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SIMON FRASER UNIVERSITY 


39345011947631 






















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2019 with funding from 
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ublic Accounts 

Volume 2, 1996—97 i 

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SIMON FRASER UNIVERSITY 

W.A.C. BENNETT LIBRARY 



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Public Accounts 


Volume 2 


Financial Statements and 
Schedules of the 
Consolidated Revenue Fund 

For the Fiscal Year Ended 
March 31, 1997 



^British 

Columbia 


Ministry of Finance and 
Corporate Relations 

Office of the Comptroller General 


Canadian Cataloguing in Publication Data 

British Columbia. Ministry of Finance and Corporate 
Relations. 

Public accounts. — 1987/88- 
Annual. 

Each issue published in 2 to 3 v. 

Each v. has also a distinctive title. 

Report year ends Mar. 31. 

Continues: British Columbia. Ministry of Finance and 
Corporate Relations. Public accounts of British Columbia. 
ISSN 0382-2001 

ISSN 1187-8657 = Public accounts—British Columbia. 
Ministry of Finance and Corporate Relations 

1. British Columbia — Appropriations and expenditures 

— Statistics — Periodicals. 2. Revenue — British Columbia 

— Statistics — Periodicals. 3. Finance, Public — British 
Columbia —Accounting — Periodicals. I. Title. 

HJ13.B74 354.71172 CP92-89013-X 



November 30, 1997 
Victoria, British Columbia 


Lieutenant Governor of the Province of British Columbia. 

MAY IT PLEASE YOUR HONOUR: 

The undersigned has the honour to present the Public Accounts of the Province of British Columbia for the 
fiscal year ended March 31,1997. 


Ministry of Finance 
and Corporate Relations 
Victoria, British Columbia 
November 30, 1997 


ANDREW PETTER 
Minister of Finance 
and Corporate Relations 


The Honourable ANDREW PETTER 

Minister of Finance and Corporate Relations 

I have the honour to submit herewith the Public Accounts of the Province of British Columbia for the fiscal 
year ended March 31,1997. 

Respectfully submitted, 


ALAN J. BARNARD 
Comptroller General 


















































Contents 


Volume 2— Section 

Financial Statements and Schedules of the Consolidated Revenue Fund 

Consolidated Revenue Fund Financial Statements. B 

Supplementary ScFiedules to the Financial Statements. C 

Detailed ScFiedules of Payments. D 

(A table of contents is provided at the beginning of each section) 


There are two other volumes of the Public Accounts, entitled: Volume 1—Annual Report and Volume 3—Other 
Government Financial Statements and Information. 

The Financial Administration Act and other statutes were revised effective April 21,1997. References throughout 
the 1996/97 Public Accounts relate to the statutes in effect at March 31,1997. 





























Public Accounts Content 


The Public Accounts are divided into three volumes as follows: 

Public Accounts Annual Report 

• Overview— provides a written commentary on the numbers reported in the Summary Financial State¬ 
ments plus additional information on the financial performance of the government. 

• Summary Financial Statements —these statements have been prepared to disclose the economic im¬ 
pact of the government's activities. They aggregate the Consolidated Revenue Fund and government 
organizations and enterprises. 

• Additional Information (Unaudited) —these schedules provide additional information on the results 
of the Health and Education Sectors adding amounts not contained within the Summary Financial 
Statements to incorporate activities of organizations that are primarily accountable to locally selected 
boards. 

Public Accounts—Volume 2 

• Consolidated Revenue Fund Financial Statements —these statements include the accounts of the 
Consolidated Revenue Fund, combining the activities of the General Fund with funds earmarked for 
specific purposes, Special Funds. 

• Supplementary Schedules to the Financial Statements —this section contains schedules which sup¬ 
port the information presented in the province's Consolidated Revenue Fund Financial Statements, 
including details of expenditures by ministerial appropriations, together with an analysis of statutory 
appropriations and Special Accounts and Special Funds transactions. 

• Detailed Schedules of Payments —this section contains detailed schedules of salaries, wages, travel 
expenses, grants and other payments. 

Public Accounts—Volume 3 

• Summary of Financial Statements of Government Organizations and Enterprises —this section con¬ 
tains summaries of the latest audited financial statements of government organizations and enter¬ 
prises. A summary of financial information for other entities subject to the Financial Information Act is 
incorporated in Section G of this volume. 

• Trust Funds Financial Statements —this section contains the latest audited financial statements of the 
pension, superannuation and long-term disability funds administered by the government. A sum¬ 
mary of financial information for trust funds is included in this section. 

• Summary of Audited Financial Statements of Public Bodies Reporting under the Financial Informa¬ 
tion Act —this section contains a summary of the financial statements of public bodies reporting un¬ 
der the Financial Information Act (S.B.C. 1985, chapter 8, Section 2) and not included elsewhere in 
this volume. 














































Consolidated Revenue Fund Financial Statements 

as at March 31, 1997 

Contents 

Page 

Auditor General's Report. 3 

Statement of Responsibility. 5 

Statement of Financial Position. 7 

Statement of Operations. 8 

Statement of Changes in Cash and Temporary Investments. 9 

Notes to Financial Statements. 10 

Supplementary Statements 

Statement of Revenue by Source—Comparison of Estimates to Actual. 31 

Statement of Comparison of Estimated Expenditure to Actual Expenditure. 33 

Statement of Guaranteed Debt. 35 

Statement of Information Required Under Section 8.1 (c) (iv), (v)and (vi)ofthe Financial Administration Act.. 37 
Supplementary Information on Public Debt. 38 




































































Report of the Auditor General 
of British Columbia 


CONSOLIDATED REVENUE FUND 
PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


To the Legislative Assembly 
of the Province of British Columbia 
Parliament Buildings 
Victoria, British Columbia 


These fund statements are prepared to compare the actual operating results of the 
Consolidated Revenue Fund with the estimates of revenue and expenditure as presented by 
the annual Estimates and Budget of the government for the 1996/97 fiscal year. As with the 
annual Estimates, these fund statements do not include many of the significant financial 
activities of the Province which occur outside the Consolidated Revenue Fund. These 
additional activities occur in organizations and enterprises for which the government is 
responsible and which are to be included, along with the Consolidated Revenue Fund, in 
the Province's Summary Financial Statements. 

To understand and assess the government's management of public financial affairs and 
resources as a whole, readers should refer to the Province's Summary Financial 
Statements. 

I have audited the statement of financial position of the Consolidated Revenue Fund of the 
Province of British Columbia as at March 31, 1997 and the statements of operations and of 
changes in cash and temporary investments for the year then ended, as presented on the 
expenditure basis of accounting described in note 1 to these statements. These fund statements 
are the responsibility of the government. My responsibility is to express an opinion on these 
fund statements based on my audit. 

I conducted my audit in accordance with generally accepted auditing standards. Those 
standards require that I plan and perform an audit to obtain reasonable assurance whether the 
financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test 
basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An audit also 
includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by 
management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. In the conduct of 
my audit, I have received all the information and explanations I have required. 


. . . 2 


Page 2 

AUDITOR GENERAL’S REPORT 
CONSOLIDATED REVENUE FUND 
PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Reservation 

The government has recorded as assets of the Consolidated Revenue Fund the amounts 
described in the statement of financial position as "loans for the purchase of assets, recoverable 
through future appropriations". These loans do not have the necessary characteristics of assets, 
and should be accounted for as an expenditure of the Consolidated Revenue Fund of the period in 
which each loan was incurred. Similarly, the debt of government organizations guaranteed by 
the Province, the repayment of which depends on future appropriations, should be accounted for 
as a direct liability of the Consolidated Revenue Fund. 

Had the above-noted loans been expensed and guaranteed debt been recorded as a direct 
liability of the Consolidated Revenue Fund, the net deficiency as at March 31, 1997 would 
increase by $6,198 million to $18,889 million (for 1996 by $5,892 million to $18,215 million), 
liabilities as at March 31, 1997 would increase by $702 million to $33,667 million (for 1996 by 
$823 million to $32,676 million), and net operating expenditure for the year ended 
March 31, 1997 would increase by $306 million to $674 million (for 1996 by $458 million to 
$827 million). 

Opinion 

I report in accordance with Section 10 of the Auditor General Act RSBC 1996 chapter 23. In 
my opinion, except for the effects of not expensing the loans and not recording the guaranteed 
debt, as referred to in the reservation paragraphs above, these fund statements present fairly the 
financial position of the Consolidated Revenue Fund as at March 31, 1997, and the results of its 
operations and the changes in its cash and temporary investments for the year then ended, in 
accordance with the stated accounting policies as set out in note 1 to these fund statements 
applied on a basis consistent with that of the preceding year. 

This opinion does not relate to the information marked “expense basis” provided for the year 
ended March 31, 1997 in these statements. As stated in note 1, the information provided on the 
expense basis is for comparison purposes. 



July 18, 1997 


OFFICE OF THE 

Auditor General 

of British Columbia 


PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


B 5 


Statement of Responsibility for the 
Consolidated Revenue Fund Financial Statements 
of the Province of British Columbia 


Responsibility for the integrity and objectivity of these financial statements of the Province of British Columbia rests with the government. 
The financial statements are prepared by the Comptroller General under the direction of the Treasury Board, pursuant to section 8.1 of the Fi¬ 
nancial Administration Act, in accordance with the government's stated accounting policies. The fiscal year of the government is from April 1 
to March 31 of the following year. 

To fulfill its accounting and reporting responsibilities, the government maintains systems of financial management and internal control 
which give due consideration to costs, benefits and risks. These systems are designed to provide reasonable assurance that transactions are 
properly authorized by the Legislative Assembly, are executed in accordance with prescribed regulations and are properly recorded. This is 
done to maintain accountability of public money and safeguard the assets and properties of the Province of British Columbia under government 
administration. The Comptroller General of British Columbia maintains the accounts of British Columbia, a centralized record of the govern¬ 
ment's financial transactions, and obtains additional information as required from ministries, agencies and Crown corporations to meet ac¬ 
counting and reporting requirements. 

The Auditor General of British Columbia provides an independent opinion on the financial statements prepared by the government. The 
duties of the Auditor General in that respect are contained in section 7 of the Auditor General Act. 

Annually, the financial statements are tabled in the Legislature as part of the Public Accounts, and are referred to the Standing Committee 
on Public Accounts of the Legislative Assembly. The Standing Committee on Public Accounts reports to the Legislative Assembly on the results 
of its examination together with any recommendations it may have with respect to the financial statements and accompanying audit opinions. 



















































































PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


B 7 


Consolidated Revenue Fund 
Statement of Financial Position 
as at March 31, 1997 


Liabilities 

Accounts payable and accrued liabilities. 

Due to other governments. 

Due to Crown corporations, agencies and funds. 

Deferred revenue. 

Unfunded pension liabilities. 

Public debt, used for Warehouse Program investments. 

Public debt, used for government operating purposes. 

Public debt, used for loans under the Fiscal Agency Loan Program 


Financial Assets 

Cash and temporary investments. 

Warehouse Program investments. 

Accounts receivable. 

Inventories. 

Due from other governments. 

Investments in and amounts due from Crown corporations and agencies 

Loans, advances and other investments. 

Mortgages receivable. 

Loans for purchase of assets, recoverable from agencies. 

Other assets. 


Net liabilities. 

Non-Financial Assets 

Loans for purchase of assets, recoverable through future appropriations 

Work-in-progress on tangible capital assets. 

Tangible capital assets. 

Net deficiency. 


Note 

In Millions 

1997 

1996 


Expense 

Basis 

$ 

Expenditure 

Basis 

$ 

Expenditure 

Basis 

$ 

3 

2,215 

2,215 

2,195 

4 

175 

175 

203 

5 

315 

315 

318 

6 

436 

436 

391 

7 

2,863 

2,863 

2,889 

8 

100 

100 

895 

9 

11,031 

11,031 

10,237 

10 

15,830 

15,830 

14,725 


32,965 

32,965 

31,853 


11 

83 

83 

61 

12 

100 

100 

895 

13 

2,336 

2,336 

2,132 

14 

41 

41 

41 

15 

534 

534 

630 

16 

885 

885 

670 

17 

270 

270 

220 

18 

17 

17 

19 

19 

10,333 

10,333 

9,654 

20 

179 

179 

139 


14,778 

14,778 

14,461 


18,187 

18,187 

17,392 


21 

5,496 

5,496 

5,069 

22 

21 



23 

173 



24 

12,497 

12,691 

12,323 


Contingencies and commitments 


25 


The accompanying notes and supplementary statements are an integral part of these financial statements. 


Prepared in accordance with the requirements of section 8.1 ofthe Financial Administration Act 



















































B 8 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Consolidated Revenue Fund 
Statement of Operations 
for the Fiscal Year Ended March 31, 1997 


In Millions 



1997 


1996 

Expense 

Expenditure 

Expenditure 

Expenditure 

Basis 

Basis 

Basis 

Basis 

Actual 

Estimated 

Actual 

Actual 


Revenue 




j> 

Taxation. 

13,244 

13,419 

13,244 

12,659 

Natural resources. 

2,671 

2,836 

2,671 

2,478 

Fees and licences. 

1,515 

1,515 

1,515 

1,459 

Investment earnings. 

133 

126 

133 

139 

British Columbia Endowment Fund. 




28 

Miscellaneous. 

215 

377 

215 

277 

Contributions from government organizations and enterprises. 

1,148 

1,112 

1,148 

968 

Contributions from the federal government. 

1,955 

1,909 

1,955 

2,394 

Cross revenue. 

20,881 

21,294 

20,881 

20,402 

Less: 





Transfers to British Columbia Transit. 

(82) 

(81) 

(82) 

(87) 

Transfers to BC Transportation Financing Authority. 

(63) 

(119) 

(63) 

(62) 

Transfers to Forest Renewal BC. 

(485) 

(435) 

(485) 

(452) 

Net revenue. 

20,251 

20,659 

20,251 

19,801 

Expense/Expenditure 





Health. 

7,081 

6,996 

7,086 

6,790 

Social services. 

3,020 

2,874 

3,025 

3,036 

Education. 

5,758 

5,806 

5,758 

5,495 

Protection of persons and property. 

1,094 

1,017 

1,102 

1,091 

Transportation. 

864 

899 

861 

856 

Natural resources and economic development. 

1,065 

1,111 

1,068 

1,174 

Other. 

513 

597 

513 

495 

General government. 

257 

271 

255 

256 

Debt servicing 1 . 

951 

1,001 

951 

977 

Total operating expense/expenditure (Note 26). 

20,603 

20,572 

20,619 

20,170 

Net Operating Revenue (Expense/Expenditure) for the Year. 

( 352 ) 

87 

( 368 ) 

( 369 ) 


Debt servicing does not include interest of $1,289 mil 
interest revenue and expenditure are offsetting. 


ion (1996: $1,299 million) on borrowings used for loans under the Fiscal Agency Loan Program as the 


The accompanying notes and supplementary statements are an integral part of these financial statements. 





















































PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


Consolidated Revenue Fund 

Statement of Changes in Cash and Temporary Investments 
for the Fiscal Year Ended March 31, 1997 


In Millions 

1997 1996 





Expense 

Expenditure 

Expenditure 




Basis 

Basis 

Basis 


Receipts 

Disbursements 

Net 

Net 

Net 

Operating Transactions 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

Net operating (expense)/(expenditure) for the year. 

Non-cash items included in net expense: 



(352) 

(368) 

(369) 

Amortization of tangible capital assets. 

Amortization of Public Debt deferred revenues and de- 



33 



ferred charges. 



23 

23 

33 

Concessionary loans adjustments (decreases). 



(2) 

(2) 

(13) 

Valuation adjustments. 



48 

47 

51 

Accounts receivable (increases). 



(236) 

(236) 

(85) 

Due from other governments decreases (increases). 



96 

96 

(70) 

Due from Crown corporations decreases (increases). 



(130) 

(130) 

71 

Accounts payable increases (decreases). 



20 

20 

(254) 

Due to other governments (decreases). 



(28) 

(28) 

(51) 

Due to Crown corporations increases (decreases) . 



(3) 

(3) 

29 

Unfunded pension liabilities (decreases). 



(26) 

(26) 

(25) 

Items applicable to future operations increases. 



18 

18 

40 

Cash (used for) operations. 



(539) 

(589) 

(643) 

Investment Transactions 

Work-in-progress on tangible capital assets (acquisitions) 


5 

(5) 



Tangible capital assets (acquisitions). 

5 

50 

(45) 



Loans, advances and other investments repayments (issues) 

19 

79 

(60) 

(60) 

437 

Mortgages receivable repayments. 

4 

2 

2 

2 

9 

(Investments in) Crown corporations. 

9 

98 

(89) 

(89) 

(2) 

Cash derived from (used for) investments. 

37 

234 

(197) 

(147) 

444 

Total financial (requirements). 



(736) 

(736) 

(199) 

Financing Transactions 1 






Public Debt increases. 

22,645 

21,601 

1,044 

1,044 

2,860 

Derived from (used for) Warehouse Program investments.. 


(795) 

795 

795 

(895) 

(Used for) Fiscal Agency Loan Program. 

(15,062) 

(13,981) 

(1,081) 

(1,081) 

(1,920) 

Cash derived from financing. 

7,583 

6,825 

758 

758 

45 

Increase (decrease) in cash and temporary investments. 



22 

22 

(154) 

Balance—beginning of year. 



61 

61 

215 

Balance—end of year. 



83 

83 

61 


'Financing transaction receipts are from debt issues and disbursements are for debt repayments. 


The accompanying notes and supplementary statements are an integral part of these financial statements. 




































































B 10 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Notes to Consolidated Revenue Fund Financial Statements 
for the Fiscal Year Ended March 31, 1997 

1. Significant Accounting Policies 

(a) Reporting Entity 

These financial statements include the transactions and balances of the General Fund and the Natural Resource Community Fund (Special 
Fund) which combined are known as the Consolidated Revenue Fund. Separate Summary Financial Statements of the government are pre¬ 
pared which include the financial activities of the Consolidated Revenue Fund and government organizations and enterprises. (See Summary 
Financial Statements in Volume 1 of the Public Accounts.) 

For purposes of these financial statements, the General Fund and any Special Funds of the government are presented as one Consolidated 
Revenue Fund, which is comprised of: 

• General Fund—includes all transactions and balances of the government not otherwise earmarked by legislative action, in¬ 
cluding those of the Queen's Printer and the Purchasing Commission, special accounts and other statutory spending authori¬ 
ties; and 

• Special Fund(s)—amounts set aside from the General Fund by special disposition of the Legislature. 

(b) Principles of Combination 

The accounts of the General Fund are combined with the Special Fund after adjusting to conform with the accounting policies described 
below. Inter-fund revenue and expense/expenditure transactions are eliminated upon combination. 

(c) Basis of Accounting and Specific Policies 

The government's Consolidated Revenue Fund Financial Statements are prepared in accordance with the accounting policies described 
below and, except as explained in Note 2, on a basis consistent with that of the preceding year. 

Basis of Accounting 

The annual Estimates and Budget of the government for fiscal 1996/97 were prepared on the expenditure basis. In order to present a full 
comparison to those documents these statements were prepared so as to present the current year and prior year actual numbers on the expendi¬ 
ture basis. For comparison purposes, the expense basis is provided for the current fiscal year only. 

The difference between expenditure and expense basis for recording costs in these statements relates solely to the treatment of tangible 
capital assets. 

On the expenditure basis, tangible capital assets are expensed as acquired and do not appear as a part of the assets on the Statement of Fi¬ 
nancial Position. Current year operating costs include only the costs of current year acquisitions of tangible capital assets. 

On the expense basis, tangible capital assets acquired are reported on the Statement of Financial Position and the cost is amortized on the 
Statement of Operations over the useful life of the assets. Current year operating costs on the expense basis, therefore, include the relevant am¬ 
ortization expense for capitalized assets held during the fiscal year. Physical assets acquired that are not part of a capitalized group of assets, are 
expensed in the year of acquisition. 

For both presentations, the accrual basis of accounting is used, which is specifically expressed as follows: 

Revenue 

All revenues are recorded on an accrual basis except when the accruals cannot be determined with a reasonable degree of certainty 
or when their estimation is impracticable. The exception is corporation income tax, which is recorded on a cash basis. Revenues from gov¬ 
ernment enterprises are recognized when cash transfers are received or when dividends are declared. Designated revenues collected for 
British Columbia Transit, BC Transportation Financing Authority and Forest Renewal BC are included in gross revenues and then deducted 
as transfers to these agencies to determine net revenue. 

Tax credits/offsets are accrued on the same basis as the associated tax revenues. 

Expenses/Expenditures 

The cost of all goods and services received during the year are recorded as expenses/expenditures of the province. 

Grants (which include forgivable loans) are recorded when disbursement of the funds has been authorized. Contributions are re¬ 
corded at the earlier of: 

(i) the date payment has been authorized or 

(ii) the date on which performance conditions are achieved by the recipient under provisions of a statute, contract or agreement. 
Authorized contributions relating to retroactive wage settlements are recorded as expenses/expenditures of the period during which 

the services were provided. 

Recoveries of expense/expenditure may be recorded as a credit to expenses/expenditures when: 

(i) they can be specifically identified with the expense/expenditure transactions and payment has actually been made from an appro¬ 
priation 

(ii) provision for them has been approved through the Estimates and 

(iii) the expenses/expenditures to which they relate were incurred in the same fiscal year. 

Tangible capital assets are expensed as acquired under the expenditure basis of reporting. 

On the expense basis, acquisitions of capitalized tangible capital assets are recorded as assets and the cost is amortized over the use¬ 
ful life of the assets. Tangible assets acquired, not a part of a capitalized group of assets, are expensed in the year of acquisition. 


PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


B 11 


Assets 

Assets are economic resources controlled by government as a result of past transactions and events from which future economic 
benefits may be obtained. 

Assets have three essential characteristics: 

(i) they embody a future benefit that involves a capacity, singly or in combination with other assets, to provide future net cash flows, 
or to provide services 

(ii) the government can control access to the benefit 

(iii) the transaction or event giving rise to the government's right to, or control of, the benefit has already occurred. 

Assets are recorded to the extent that they represent cash and claims upon outside parties; items held for resale to outside parties; a 
prepaid expense, deferred charge or, tangible capital assets acquired as a result of events and transactions prior to the year-end. 

In September 1995, Treasury Board approved a policy to proceed on the capitalization of tangible capital assets using a phased-in or 
"step-by-step" approach. The approved process is to capitalize and amortize those groups of assets for which estimated or actual values 
can be readily ascertained. The process of establishing the completeness and reasonableness of the records and proceeding with the capi¬ 
talization of additional groups of assets is ongoing. 

Gains arising from the initial valuation and capitalization of the existing tangible capital assets are accounted for as a component of 
accumulated equity, in a separate account titled: "Capital Adjustments." 

Tangible capital assets are physical assets that are acquired, constructed or developed and: 

(i) are held for use in the production or supply of goods and services 

(ii) have useful lives extending beyond an accounting period and are intended to be used on a continuing basis 

(iii) are not intended for sale in the ordinary course of operations. 

Liabilities 

All liabilities are recorded to the extent that they represent claims payable to outside parties as a result of events and transactions prior 
to the year-end, including: probable losses on loan guarantees issued by the government; contingent liabilities when it is likely a liability 
exists and the amount of the liability can be reasonably determined on an individual or portfolio basis; and, unfunded pension liabilities. 

Foreign Currency Translation 

Monetary assets and liabilities denominated in foreign currencies are translated to Canadian dollars at the exchange rate prevailing at 
the year-end. Foreign currency transactions are translated at the exchange rate prevailing at the date of the transaction unless hedged by 
forward contracts that specify the rate of exchange. Adjustments to revenue or expense transactions arising as a result of foreign currency 
translation are credited or charged to operations at the time the adjustments arise. Unrealized foreign currency gains and losses on 
long-term, fixed-term monetary assets and liabilities are reported as deferred charges and amortized over the remaining terms of the re¬ 
lated items on a straight-line basis. Non-monetary assets and liabilities are translated at historical rates of exchange. 

Derivative Financial Instruments 

The province is a party to financial instruments with off-balance sheet risk, either to hedge against the risks associated with fluctua¬ 
tions in foreign currency exchange rates or to manage risks associated with interest rate fluctuations. Foreign currency contracts are used 
to convert the liability for foreign currency borrowings and associated costs into Canadian or U.S. dollars. Interest rate contracts are used 
to vary the amounts and periods for which interest rates on borrowings are fixed or floating. 

Foreign exchange contracts include forward and future contracts, swap agreements and options. Interest rate contracts include for¬ 
ward rate agreements, future contracts, swap agreements and options on swaps, and deferred rate-setting agreements. 

Off-balance sheet position data is given in the form of nominal principal amounts outstanding. 

Concessionary Loans and Mortgages 

Loans and mortgages that are made at a rate of interest below the government's borrowing rate for an equivalent term are considered 
concessionary. Concessionary loans and mortgages are recorded at their net present value (net of grant component) less any provision re¬ 
quired for doubtful collection. Present value discounts are recorded as grant expenses\expenditures. Principal repayments of concession¬ 
ary loans and mortgages will be applied to the reduced loan or mortgage balance (net present value) and then recorded as revenue 
(recovery of a grant) when received. 

Valuation Allowances 

Valuation allowances, such as provisions for doubtful accounts and provisions for reduction in value of investments, are included as 
expenses on the Statement of Operations. Corporation income tax, personal income tax and property tax are recorded net of tax credits 
and adjustments that are based on revised assessments of actual tax revenue of previous taxation years. Tax credits and adjustments are not 
considered valuation allowances. 

Specific Policies 

Accounts Payable and Accrued Liabilities 

All amounts payable (including any trade payables to government organizations and enterprises) for work performed, goods sup¬ 
plied, services known to have been rendered or for charges incurred in accordance with the terms of a contract are recorded as part ot the 
expenses\expenditures of the fiscal year. 

Due to Other Governments 

Amounts due to other governments represent liabilities incurred due to advances and loans from other governments. 

Due to Crown Corporations, Agencies and Funds 

Amounts due to Crown corporations, agencies and funds represent liabilities incurred, other than trade payables, which are payable 
in the following year. 


B 12 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Deferred Revenue 

Deferred revenue represents amounts received or receivable prior to the year-end relating to revenue that will be earned in subse¬ 
quent fiscal years. 

Unfunded Pension Liabilities 

Unfunded pension liabilities represent the unfunded portion of pensions to be provided to public sector employees. The percentage 
of the unfunded portion of certain statutory pension plans, which are funded by the province, is included. The amount is calculated using 
the Accrued Benefit Actuarial Cost Method. Pension fund surplus balances are not included. 

Changes in the unfunded liability for pension plans which arise as a result of estimation adjustments due to experience gains and 
losses and changes in actuarial assumptions are amortized over the expected average remaining service life of the related employee 
group. Cains or losses arising as a result of plan amendments are recognized in full in the year of amendment. 

Public Debt 

Public debt represents direct debt obligations of the Province of British Columbia, including amounts used for government operating 
purposes, the Fiscal Agency Loan Program and the Warehouse Program. These obligations are recorded at principal less unamortized dis¬ 
counts and sinking fund balances where applicable. 

The Fiscal Agency Loan Program represents debt obligations incurred for the purpose of re-lending to authorized government bodies. 
The amounts will then be repaid through the operations of the agencies or through amounts advanced to the agencies by the government 
from future appropriations. 

The Warehouse Program represents debt incurred at beneficial terms to provide for anticipated future needs of government and the 
Fiscal Agency Loan Program. Proceeds are invested until funds are needed. Swaps may be transacted for hedging the debt issued, to ensure 
that funds are available at prevailing market rates of interest at the time the monies are needed. 

The Matched Book Program is designed to take advantage of arbitrage opportunities available in the market where the province may 
borrow at a given interest rate and invest proceeds at a higher interest rate, subject to profit targets and investment quality parameters. In¬ 
terest payments and interest income may be swapped to effectively lock-in the interest rate spread. 

Discounts are amortized on a true constant yield basis. Unamortized discount on bonds called and refinanced is amortized over the 
remaining life of the old debt, or the life of the new debt, whichever is shorter. 

When it has been determined that there are sufficient securities to satisfy scheduled interest and principal payments for a bond issue, 
the sinking fund assets are transferred to the province and are set aside in an irrevocable defeased trust account. The province legally as¬ 
sumes responsibility for all future interest and principal payments. The debt and the related securities used to extinguish the debt are re¬ 
moved from the province's Statement of Financial Position. The debt is considered extinguished for financial reporting purposes. 

Cash and Temporary Investments 

Cash balances are shown after deducting outstanding cheques issued prior to the year-end. 

Temporary investments include short-term investments recorded at the lower of cost or market value. Temporary investments consist 
mainly of units in the Province of British Columbia Pooled Investment Portfolio money market funds. Units are carried at the lower of cost 
of acquisition adjusted by income attributed to the units, or market value. 

Warehouse Program Investments 

Warehouse Program investments include investments hejd within the Warehouse Borrowing Program. Temporary investments 
within this program are short-term investments recorded at the lower of cost or market value. 

Accounts Receivable 

All amounts receivable (including any trade receivables from government organizations and enterprises) at the year-end for work 
performed, goods supplied and/or services rendered are recorded as revenue or recoveries of the fiscal year. Valuation allowances are 
provided where collectibility is considered doubtful. 

Inventories 

Inventories comprise items held for resale and are recorded at the lower of cost or net realizable value. Inventories of supplies are 
charged to the respective programs when the cost is incurred. 

Property consists of land which has been purchased, or for which development costs have been incurred, that is held for ultimate re¬ 
sale or lease to outside parties. It is recorded at the lower of cost or net realizable value. 

Due From Other Governments 

Amounts due from other governments include loans and advances outstanding at the year-end. 

Investments In and Amounts Due From Crown Corporations and Agencies 

Investments in and amounts due represent long-term investments and amounts due, other than trade receivables, and are recorded at 
cost unless significant prolonged impairment in value has occurred, in which case they are written down to recognize this loss in value. If, 
in periods subsequent to recognizing this impairment, the value of the investment is restored, the investment is written up to the lesser of 
restored value or original cost. 

Loans, Advances and Other Investments 

Loans and advances are recorded at cost less adjustment for any prolonged impairment in value. Other investments are recorded at 
the lower of cost of acquisition adjusted by attributed income, or market value. 

Mortgages Receivable 

Mortgages receivable are secured by real estate and are repayable over periods ranging up to thirty years. Valuation allowances are 
made when collectibility is considered doubtful. 


PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


B 13 


Fiscal Agency Loan Program 

Fiscal Agency Loan Program consists of loans made to government bodies, and cash and temporary investments set aside for the spe¬ 
cific purpose of loaning to government bodies. Loans are recorded at maturity value less unamortized discounts and sinking fund bal¬ 
ances. Discounts are amortized on a true constant yield basis. 

These loans are made for the acquisition of capital assets to be used in the delivery of commercial services or government funded pro¬ 
grams where the service life of the acquired asset is longer than the term of the loan. 

Loans recoverable from self-supporting government enterprises are recorded as financial assets. Loans recoverable from organiza¬ 
tions dependent on funds provided out of government appropriations are reported as a separate category of non-financial assets. 

Other Assets 

Other assets include prepaid program costs. Prepaid program costs represent expenditures made during the fiscal year for work to be 
performed, goods to be supplied, services to be rendered or contractual obligations to be fulfilled by outside parties in a subsequent fiscal 
year. These costs also include inventories of operating materials held in the Purchasing Commission and Queen's Printer warehouses 
pending distribution in a subsequent fiscal year. 

Also included in Other Assets are certain deferred charges. 

Work-In-Progress on Tangible Capital Assets 

Work-in-progress consists of construction in progress on tangible capital assets. Costs of projects that are abandoned or indefinitely 
postponed are written-down to their estimated net realizable value and charged to operating expense in the period the abandonment or 
indefinite postponement occurs. 

Tangible Capital Assets 

Tangible capital assets are recorded at historical cost. 

Estimated cost is used to record existing tangible capital assets when actual cost is unknown. 

Tangible capital asset costs include all costs directly attributable to the acquisition, construction, development, installation or better¬ 
ment of the tangible capital asset. 

For these statements, government tangible capital assets include computer software, but do not include tangible assets yet to be capi¬ 
talized. 

Costs incurred which lengthen the remaining life of the related asset (replacements) are charged to the asset's accumulated amortiza¬ 
tion account. 

A lease which transfers substantially all the benefits and risks incident to ownership of property to the province (capital lease) is re¬ 
corded as an acquisition of an tangible capital asset and incursion of a liability at the inception of the lease. The lesser of the present value 
of the minimum lease payments and the property's fair value at the beginning of the lease is recorded as the asset cost and liability at that 
time. 

The recorded cost, less the residual value, is amortized over the estimated useful life of the assets, on a straight-line basis. 

The estimated useful lives of the more common tangible capital assets are: 


Buildings. 40 years 

Vehicles. 5 years 

Computer hardware and software. 5-10 years. 


For fiscal year 1996/97 financial reporting purposes, capitalized tangible assets include only those assets which have an estimated 
useful life of greater than one year, and are as follows: 

(i) development or purchase of computer hardware and software computer systems with a cost of $10,000 or more 

(ii) vehicles regardless of cost 

(iii) buildings with a cost of $10,000 or more 

(iv) work-in-progress on tangible capital assets listed above. 

Tangible assets not capitalized in the current reporting year include: land, heritage assets, highways and highway infrastructure, fresh 
water ferries and landings, tugs and barges, marine railways and dry docks, heavy machinery and equipment, dams and water manage¬ 
ment systems, forestry roads, office furniture and equipment, personal computers and peripheral hardware, buildings under $10,000, 
computer systems under $ 10,000, betterments and replacements under $ 10,000 and work-in-progress with an estimated end cost of less 
than $ 10,000. 

The expenditure basis of accounting requires that all tangible capital assets be recorded as expenditures in the year of acquisition. All 
such assets were recorded at a nominal value of $ 1. Non-capitalized tangible assets are still recorded at the nominal $ 1 value for expense 
basis reporting. 

Guaranteed Debt 

Guaranteed debt represents that debt of municipalities and other local governments, private enterprises and individuals, and debt 
and minority interests of provincial Crown corporations, which has been explicitly guaranteed or indemnified by the government, under 
the authority of a statute, as to net principal or redemption provisions. Valuation allowances are made when probable losses can be rea¬ 
sonably estimated. 

A valuation allowance provision is established to provide for the probable losses on loan guarantees issued by the government. The 
amount of the provision is determined by the loss experience of the guarantee program and is sufficient to meet the expected payout of the 
guarantee to the lender. The provision is recorded as an expense in the year the guarantee is issued and is adjusted as necessary to ensure it 
equals the expected payout of the guarantee. 





B 14 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Cains and Losses on Disposal of Tangible Capital Assets 

Cains and losses from the disposal of tangible capital assets (being the difference between net disposal proceeds and the net carrying 
value) are accounted for each year as a component of net revenue. Gains and losses on disposal of tangible capital assets are reflected in 
operating results since the gain or loss is, in substance, an adjustment to amortization previously charged. 

Commitments 

Commitments represent future obligations of the government for capital contracts and extraordinary program commitments, to the 
extent of contracts and agreements in place at the year-end. 

2. 1997 Change in Accounting Policy 

(a) Explanation of Chance 

Due to concerns over the ability to implement the capitalization and amortization of tangible capital assets, Treasury Board has estab¬ 
lished a policy which extends the implementation period for the capitalization of assets and restricts the broadening of assets capitalized in the 
1996/97 fiscal year to those groups already recorded. Land, except for property held for resale, is removed until such time as all land holdings 
can be identified and historical cost determined. Reversal of land purchased in 1995/96 ($8 million) results in an increase in the expense basis 
deficit for that year to $355 million from $347 million as reported in the 1995/96 Public Accounts. As a result of this change, the reduction in 
the threshold limits for computer hardware and software and buildings, the change in the opening value of tangible capital assets for April 1, 
1995 is: 

In Millions 


Land. 

Buildings ($10,000 and over) net of amortization. 

Computer hardware and software systems ($ 10,000 and over) net of amortization 


(702) 

8 

6 


In addition, purchases within the 1996/97 fiscal year and included in the expenditure totals of the appropriations have been capitalized. 
For fiscal 1996/97, the amount was $50 million. 






PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


B 15 


Notes to Consolidated Revenue Fund Financial Statements 
for the Fiscal Year Ended March 31, 1997— Continued 


3. Accounts Payable and Accrued Liabilities 


In Millions 



1 

997 

1996 


Expense 

Expenditure 

Expenditure 


Basis 

Basis 

Basis 


$ 

$ 

$ 

Ministry trade accounts and other liabilities. 

. 1,070 

1,070 

996 

Accrued interest on public debt. 

. 622 

622 

653 

Accrued employee leave entitlements. 

. 135 

135 

133 

Other accrued estimated liabilities 1 ' 2 . 

. 388 

388 

413 


2,215 

2,215 

2,195 


1 Includes pending litigation, provision for clean up of Expo land site, provision for guaranteed debt payout and other miscellaneous accrued claims. 

2 Two adjustments were made which restate prior periods. The first is due to a court decision regarding widows' Workers' Compensation benefits which in¬ 
creases liabilities relating to prior years' activities ($12 million). The second relates to clean-up costs for contaminated gravel pits, salt storage areas and mainte¬ 
nance yards, and increases liabilities relating to prior years' activities ($24 million). 


4. Due to Other Governments 


In Millions 


1997 


1996 


Government of Canada: 

Current. 

Long term. 

Provincial governments: 

Current. 

Local governments: 1 

Current. 

Long term. 


1 Local governments are municipal units established by the provincial government, 
ships, districts, rural municipalities and villages. 


5. Due to Crown Corporations, Agencies and Funds 


BC Transportation Financing Authority. 

British Columbia Buildings Corporation. 

British Columbia Ferry Corporation. 

British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority. 

British Columbia Liquor Distribution Branch. 

British Columbia Transit. 

Forest Renewal BC. 

Health Facilities Association of British Columbia 

Legal Services Society. 

Post Secondary Educational Institutions. 

Trust Funds. 


Expense 

Basis 

$ 

Expenditure 

Basis 

$ 

Expenditure 

Basis 

$ 

43 

43 

43 



2 

6 

6 

8 

53 

53 

47 

73 

73 

103 

175 

175 

203 


They include regional and metropolitan municipalities, cities, towns, town- 


In Millions 


1997 1996 


Expense 

Expenditure 

Expenditure 

Basis 

Basis 

Basis 

$ 

$ 

$ 

4 

4 

4 



1 



2 



1 

11 

11 

10 

7 

7 

7 

192 

192 

196 

10 

10 

6 

47 

47 

43 

44 

44 

48 


315 


315 


318 

























































B 16 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Notes to Consolidated Revenue Fund Financial Statements 
for the Fiscal Year Ended March 31, 1997— Continued 


6. Deferred Revenue 


In Millions 



1997 


1996 


Expense 

Expenditure 

Expenditure 


Basis 

Basis 

Basis 


$ 

$ 

$ 

Medical Services Plan premiums. 

. 55 

55 

56 

Motor vehicle licences and permits. 

. 142 

142 

133 

Petroleum, natural gas and minerals, leases and fees. 

. 24 

24 

23 

Water rentals and recording fees. 

. 84 

84 

69 

Miscellaneous. 

. 131 

131 

110 


436 

436 

391 

7. Unfunded Pension Liabilities 1 


In Millions 



1997 


1996 


Expense 

Expenditure 

Expenditure 


Basis 

Basis 

Basis 


$ 

$ 

$ 

Public Service Pension Plan . 

. 335 

335 

363 

Members of the Legislative Assembly Superannuation Plan 2 . 

. 7 

7 

7 

Municipal Superannuation Plan 3 . 

. 742 

742 

740 

Teachers' Pension Plan 4 . 

. 1,779 

1,779 

1,779 


2,863 

2,863 

2,889 


'The audited financial statements of each pension plan listed may be found in the Trust Funds Financial Statements section of the Public Accounts. 

■ ? The initial unfunded pension liability of $445 million was based on an actuarial valuation of the Public Service Pension Plan for March 31,1990, plus an es¬ 
timated amount for Members of the Legislative Assembly Superannuation Plan. As a result of an actuarial valuation done for March 31,1993, the outstanding liabil¬ 
ity was estimated at $146 million, a decrease of $299 million. The reduction of the estimated liability resulted from pension plan gains and changes in actuarial 
assumptions. This estimation adjustment is being amortized over the expected average remaining service life of the related employee group (12 years). For the actu¬ 
arial valuation as at March 31,1996, the outstanding surplus was estimated at $209 million. As provided for under the Pension (Public Service) Act, recommended 
by the actuary, and approved by the Public Service Pension Advisory Board, the surplus will be refunded over a 15 year period to the employers. The refund amount 
will be calculated annually and refunded quarterly. The 1996/97 refund amount is $16.9 million. The unfunded liability increased by $9.9 million as at March 31, 
1997 for the Special Retirement Incentive Program. A further adjustment of $13 million is required to amortize the original unfunded liability for the Public Service 
Pension Plan of $140 million over the expected average remaining service life of the related employee group, (now 11 years). As a result of these adjustments, ex¬ 
penditures are reduced by $38 million (1996: $25 million). The unamortized portion of the estimation adjustment as at March 31,1997 is $326 million (March 31, 
1996: $224 million). 

’This amount is a prorated portion (70%) of the total Municipal Superannuation Plan liability of $1,081 million. The amount recognized by the Province of 
British Columbia represents the portion of active plan membership made up of schools, colleges and health care employees. An actuarial valuation is performed on 
the Municipal Superannuation Plan every three years. The latest valuation was made as of December 31,1994. At that valuation, net assets were $5,526 million 
(1991: $4,153 million), and liabilities for accrued pension benefits were $6,607 million (1991: $5,210 million), with a net deficiency of $1,081 million (1991: 
$1,057 million). The unamortized portion of the estimation adjustment as at December 31,1994 is $1 7 million. It is being amortized over the expected average re¬ 
maining service life of the related employee group (10.7 years). As a result of this adjustment, expenditures are increased by $1.6 million. The unamortized portion 
of the estimation adjustment as at March 31,1997 is $15.4 million. 

4 An actuarial valuation is performed on the Teachers' Pension Plan every three years. The latest valuation was made as of December 31,1993. At that valua¬ 
tion, net assets were $3,931 million, liabilities for accrued pension benefits were $5,709 million, resulting in a net deficiency of $ 1,779 million (1990: $1,937 mil¬ 
lion). 


































PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


B 17 


Notes to Consolidated Revenue Fund Financial Statements 
for the Fiscal Year Ended March 31, 1997— Continued 

8. Public Debt, Used for Warehouse Program Investments 


In Millions 

1997 1996 



Year of 
Maturity 

Canadian 

Dollar 

Debt 

$ 

Foreign 

Denominated 

Debt 

(CDN$) 

$ 

Total 

Canadian 

Dollars 

Expense 

Basis 

$ 

Total 

Canadian 

Dollars 

Expenditure 

Basis 

$ 

Weighted 

Average 

Coupon 

Rate Percent 

Total 

Canadian 

Dollar 

Expenditure 

Basis 

$ 

Weighted 
Average 
Coupon Rate 
Percent 

Notes and bonds. 

1997- 1998 

1998- 1999 

1999- 2000 

2000- 2001 

2001-2002 






795 

6.75 


2002-2007 

100 


100 

100 

9.25 

100 

9.25 

Total debt issued at face 









value. 


100 

0 

100 

100 

9.25 

895 

7.03 


The aggregate amount of payments estimated to be required in each of the next five fiscal years to meet retirement provisions is nil. Pro¬ 
ceeds from Warehouse Program issues are held as Warehouse Program assets until they are offlent. 

Subsequent to March 31,1997, debt in the amount of $100 million was offlent. 

Additional information on Public Debt can be found on page B38. 





















B 18 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Notes to Consolidated Revenue Fund Financial Statements 
for the Fiscal Year Ended March 31, 1997— Continued 

9. Public Debt, Used for Government Operating Purposes 





1997 

In Millions 


1996 




Total 

Total 


Total 




Foreign 

Canadian 

Canadian 

Weighted 

Canadian 

Weighted 


Canadian 

Denominated 

Dollars 

Dollars 

Average 

Dollars 

Average 

Year of 

Dollar 

Debt 

Expense 

Expenditure 

Coupon Rate 

Expenditure 

Coupon Rate 

Maturity 

Debt 

(CDN$) 

Basis 

Basis 

Percent 

Basis 

Percent 


$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 


$ 



Short-term promissory 








notes. 1996-1997 






84 


1997-1998 

191 

89 

280 

280 





191 

89 

280 

280 


84 


Notes, bonds and deben- 








tures. 1996-1997 






1,033 

8.87 

1997-1998 

1,368 

230 

1,598 

1,598 

7.51 

1,606 

7.57 

1998-1999 

1,929 

303 

2,232 

2,232 

7.17 

1,505 

8.00 

1999-2000 

567 

347 

914 

914 

5.69 

558 

7.30 

2000-2001 

930 

61 

991 

991 

10.49 

930 

10.98 

2001-2002 

1,133 

197 

1,330 

1,330 

7.33 

810 

9.69 

2002-2007 

1,553 

1,726 

3,279 

3,279 

6.91 

2,816 

7.97 

2007-2012 

715 


715 

715 

9.64 

715 

9.64 

2012-2017 

54 


54 

54 

9.80 

54 

9.80 

2017-2022 








2022-2027 

758 


758 

758 

8.93 

1,308 

8.62 

2027-2032 

50 


50 

50 

7.50 




9,057 

2,864 

11,921 

11,921 

7.60 

11,335 

8.53 

Total debt issued at face 








value. 

9,248 

2,953 

12,201 

12,201 


11,419 


Less: 








Sinking funds. 



(1,076) 

(1,076) 


(1,052) 





11,125 

11,125 


10,367 


Unamortized discount. 



(92) 

(92) 


(130) 





11,033 

11,033 


10,237 


Amount held in the Consolidated Revenue Fund. 


(2) 

(2) 







11,031 

11,031 


10,237 


Short-term promissory notes 









Promissory notes outstanding at March 31,1997 mature at various dates to June 9,1997 at a weighted average interest rate of 2.99%. Dur¬ 
ing the year, $4,902 million in notes were issued at interest rates which varied between 2.74% and 4.95%. 


Notes, bonds and debentures 

Special Features 

Balances include 5.40% debentures, due December 4, 2026, totalling $57 million Canadian (1996: nil). The holders have a put option 
which, if exercised, would result in the bond maturing on December 4, 2002. If the option is not exercised, the bond will be redeemed for $71 
million (1996: nil) on December 4, 2026, and the coupon rate on the bond will be 7.00% for the period December 5, 2002 to December 4, 
2026. 

Included in foreign denominated debt aredual currency bonds issued in yen, totalling 23,226 million yen (1996: nil), and repayable in US 
dollars totalling $1 88 million US (1996: nil). The bonds have been hedged to $250 million Canadian (1996: nil), and mature at dates from Sep¬ 
tember 9, 1999 to February 29, 2000. 













































PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


B 19 


Notes to Consolidated Revenue Fund Financial Statements 
for the Fiscal Year Ended March 31, 1997— Continued 


9. Public Debt, Used for Government Operating Purposes— Continued 

The aggregate amount of payments estimated to be required in each of the next five fiscal years to meet sinking fund and retirement provi¬ 
sions are: 


In Millions 
Canadian 
Funds 


1998 

1999 

2000 
2001 
2002 

Additional information on Public Debt can be found on page B38. 


$ 

1,619 

2,230 

972 

828 

1,165 


10. Public Debt, Used for Loans under the Fiscal Agency Loan Program 


Year of 
Maturity 

Short-term promissory 

notes. 1996-1997 

1997-1998 

Notes, bonds and de¬ 
bentures. 1996-1997 

1997- 1998 

1998- 1999 

1999- 2000 

2000 - 2001 
2001-2002 
2002-2007 
2007-2012 
2012-2017 
2017-2022 
2022-2027 
2027-2032 
2032-2037 

Total debt issued at face 
value. 


Less: 


Sinking funds. 


Unamortized discount 




1997 

In Millions 


1996 

Canadian 

Dollar 

Debt 

$ 

1,085 

Foreign 

Denominated 

Debt 

(CDN$) 

$ 

1,176 

Total 

Canadian 

Dollars 

Expense 

Basis 

$ 

2,261 

Total 

Canadian 

Dollars 

Expenditure 

Basis 

$ 

2,261 

Weighted 
Average 
Coupon Rate 
Percent 

Total 

Canadian 

Dollars 

Expenditure 

Basis 

$ 

2,271 

Weighted 
Average 
Coupon Rate 
Percent 

1,085 

1,176 

2,261 

2,261 


2,271 







340 

7.18 

422 

190 

612 

612 

6.78 

658 

7.57 

427 

100 

527 

527 

8.56 

542 

8.51 

352 

1,262 

1,614 

1,614 

3.95 

1,047 

5.93 

304 


304 

304 

9.67 

304 

9.67 

759 


759 

759 

9.29 

843 

9.28 

2,609 

791 

3,400 

3,400 

8.09 

3,231 

8.55 

1,880 


1,880 

1,880 

9.98 

1,942 

9.97 

2,449 


2,449 

2,449 

8.55 

2,464 

8.55 

686 


686 

686 

10.47 

670 

10.48 

1,852 

692 

2,544 

2,544 

7.79 

1,773 

7.80 


415 

415 

415 

7.25 



11,740 

3,450 

15,190 

15,190 

8.05 

13,814 

8.53 

12,825 

4,626 

17,451 

17,451 


16,085 




(1,489) 

(1,489) 


(1,230) 




15,962 

15,962 


14,855 




(132) 

(132) 


(130) 




15,830 

15,830 


14,725 



Short-term promissory notes 

Promissory notes outstanding at March 31,1997 mature at various dates to March 5, 1998 at a weighted average interest rate of 4.03%. 
During the year, $12,872 million in notes were issued at interest rates which varied between 2.55% and 5.43%. 
















































B 20 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Notes to Consolidated Revenue Fund Financial Statements 
for the Fiscal Year Ended March 31, 1997— Continued 

10. Public Debt, Used for Loans under the Fiscal Agency Loan Program— Continued 

Notes, bonds and debentures 

Debentures Issued to the Canada Pension Plan 

Balances in Canadian dollars include $2,000 million (1996: $2,000 million) at a weighted average interest rate of 10.50%. These deben¬ 
tures mature at various dates from November 10, 2003 to July 10, 201 2 with interest rates varying between 9.04% and 14.06%. These deben¬ 
tures are redeemable in whole or in part before maturity, on six months' prior notice, at the option of the Minister of Finance of Canada, subject 
to certain restrictions. During the year, no Canada Pension Plan debentures were issued. Under the Canada Pension Plan legislation, any sig¬ 
nificant amendment to benefits or contributions requires the approval of the legislature of two-thirds of the provinces. When Canada Pension 
Plan contributions exceed benefits, these excess funds are loaned to the provinces in proportion by residents of the respective provinces. 
Special Features 

Balances include 5.40% debentures, due December 4, 2026, totalling $43 million Canadian (1996: nil). The holders have a put option 
which, if exercised, would result in the bond maturing on December 4, 2002. If the option is not exercised, the bond will be redeemed for $54 
million (1996: nil) on December 4, 2026 and the coupon rate on the bond will be 7.00% for the period December 5, 2002 to December 4, 
2026. 

Balances include 9.75% debentures, due May 1 5, 2001, totalling $284 million Canadian (1996: $300 million) which are exchangeable at 
the holders' option for an equal principal amount of 9.95% debentures due May 15, 2021, during the period March 1 5 to April 1 5 of each year 
from 1997 to 1999, inclusive. 

Included in foreign denominated debt are dual currency bonds issued in yen, totalling 53,774 million yen (1996: nil), and repayable in US 
dollars totalling $442 million US (1996: nil). The bonds have been hedged to $591 million Canadian (1996: nil), and mature at dates from Sep¬ 
tember 9, 1999 to February 29, 2000. 

Defeasances 

At March 31,1997, sufficient securities had been set aside in an irrevocable trust to satisfy the scheduled interest and principal payment re¬ 
quirements of $308 million (1996: nil). The related debt is considered extinguished for financial reporting purposes. 

The aggregate amount of payments estimated to be required in each of the next five fiscal years to meet sinking fund and retirement provi¬ 
sions are: 

In Millions 
Canadian 
Funds 

$ 


1998 

1999 

2000 
2001 
2002 


762 

601 

1,803 

434 

850 


Subsequent Events 

Subsequent to March 31, 1997, a total of $41 million Canadian of 9.75% debentures, due May 15, 2001, were exchanged for an equal 
principal amount of 9.95% debentures due May 15, 2021. 

Additional information on Public Debt can be found on page B40. 








PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


B 21 


Notes to Consolidated Revenue Fund Financial Statements 
for the Fiscal Year Ended March 31, 1997— Continued 

11. Cash and Temporary Investments in Millions 



1997 

1996 

Expense 

Expenditure 

Expenditure 

Basis 

Basis 

Basis 

$ 

$ 

$ 


Cash (cheques issued in excess of funds on deposit). 

Temporary investments (units in Province of British Columbia Pooled Investment Portfolios). 

(186) 

269 

(186) 

269 

(183) 

244 


83 

83 

61 


Other than statutory requirements or administrative policies which specifically provide for the maintenance of separate bank accounts, 
such as the Fiscal Agency Loan Program and Warehouse Program amounts, the government's cash balances and temporary investments are 
held in General Fund bank and investment accounts. 


12. Warehouse Program Investments 

In Millions 

1997 

1996 


Expense 

Expenditure 

Expenditure 


Basis 

Basis 

Basis 


$ 

$ 

$ 

Temporary investments. 

. 101 

101 

914 

Deferred charges. 



6 


101 

101 

920 

Less: accrued interest payable. 

. (1) 

(1) 

(25) 


100 

100 

895 


Subsequent to March 31,1997, net assets in the amount of $100 million were transferred when the corresponding debt was transferred to 
Public Debt, used for the Fiscal Agency Loan Program. 


13. Accounts Receivable 


In Millions 



1 

997 

1996 


Expense 

Expenditure 

Expenditure 


Basis 

Basis 

Basis 


$ 

$ 

$ 

Taxes receivable. 

. 1,565 

1,565 

1,467 

Ministerial accounts receivable. 

. 603 

603 

392 

Accrued interest. 

. 326 

326 

361 

Crown corporations and agencies. 

. 109 

109 

79 


2,603 

2,603 

2,299 

Less: provision for doubtful accounts. 

. (267) 

(267) 

(167) 


2,336 

2,336 

2,132 


14. Inventories 

In Millions 

1997 

1996 


Expense 

Basis 

$ 

Expenditure 

Basis 

$ 

Expenditure 

Basis 

$ 


. 40 

40 

40 


. 1 

1 

1 


41 

41 

41 
































































B 22 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Notes to Consolidated Revenue Fund Financial Statements 
for the Fiscal Year Ended March 31, 1997— Continued 


15. Due from Other Governments 

In Millions 

1997 

1996 


Expense 

Expenditure 

Expenditure 


Basis 

Basis 

Basis 


$ 

$ 

$ 

Government of Canada: 

Current. 

. 516 

516 

618 

Long term. 

. 1 

1 


Provincial governments: 

Current. 

. 12 

12 

12 

Local governments: 1 

Current. 

. 5 

5 



534 

534 

630 


1 Local governments are municipal units established by the provincial government. They include regional and metropolitan municipalities, 
cities, towns, townships, districts, rural municipalities and villages. 


16. Investments in and Amounts Due from 
Crown Corporations and Agencies 


In Millions 

1997 1996 




Total 

Total 

Total 


Amounts 

Expense 

Expenditure 

Expenditure 

Investments 

Due 

Basis 

Basis 

Basis 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 


B.C. Community Financial Services Corporation. 

. 6 


6 

6 

6 

B.C. Pavilion Corporation. 

. 153 


153 

153 

154 

British Columbia Buildings Corporation. 


10 

10 

10 

12 

British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority. 

. 1 

279 

280 

280 

116 

British Columbia Lottery Corporation. 


15 

15 

15 

15 

British Columbia Railway Company. 

. 258 


258 

258 

258 

British Columbia Systems Corporation. 

Columbia Basin Trust. 

. 45 


45 

45 

3 

Columbia Power Corporation. 

. 102 


102 

102 

52 

Discovery Enterprises Inc. 

. 8 


8 

8 

17 

Provincial Rental Housing Corporation. 

. 1 

7 

8 

8 

37 


574 

311 

885 

885 

670 


Definitions 

The entire issued capital stock of each of the Crown corporations recorded under investments is owned by the province. A number of other 
Crown corporations and agencies exist for which the province has either no recorded investment or an investment of less than one million dol¬ 
lars. 

Amounts due represent long-term notes and debentures of Crown corporations and agencies held by the province, recoverable advances 
due to the province and declared distributions of income. 














































PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


B 23 


Notes to Consolidated Revenue Fund Financial Statements 
for the Fiscal Year Ended March 31, 1997— Continued 

17. Loans, Advances and Other Investments In Millions 



1997 

1996 


Expense 

Expenditure 

Expenditure 


Basis 

Basis 

Basis 


$ 

$ 

$ 

Financial Administration Act . 

213 

213 

182 

Industrial Development Incentive Act . 

112 

112 

99 

Insurance for Crops Act . 

13 

13 

14 

Natural Resource Community Fund Act . 

25 

25 

25 

Special Accounts Appropriation and Control Act . 

52 

52 

38 

Other under $10 million. 

45 

45 

49 


460 

460 

407 

Less: provision for doubtful accounts. 

(190) 

(190) 

(187) 


270 

270 

220 

18. Mortgages Receivable 


In Millions 



1 

997 

1996 


Expense 

Expenditure 

Expenditure 


Basis 

Basis 

Basis 


$ 

$ 

$ 

Crown land—pursuant to the Ministry of Lands, Parks and Housing Act . 

11 

11 

12 

False Creek land sale: public participation funding agreement. 

Provincial home acquisition—pursuanttothe Provincial Home Acquisition Act, Home Purchase 

10 

10 

10 

Assistance Act, and the Home Conversion and Leasehold Loan Act . 

6 

6 

10 


27 

27 

32 

Less: provision for doubtful accounts. 

(10) 

(10) 

(13) 


17 

17 

19 









































B 24 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Notes to Consolidated Revenue Fund Financial Statements 
for the Fiscal Year Ended March 31, 1997— Continued 


19. Loans for Purchase of Assets, Recoverable from Agencies In Millions 

1997 1996 


Expense 

Expenditure 

Expenditure 

Basis 

Basis 

Basis 

$ 

$ 

$ 


BC Transportation Financing Authority. 

916 

916 

590 

British Columbia Assessment Authority. 

6 

6 

7 

British Columbia Buildings Corporation. 

686 

686 

670 

British Columbia Ferry Corporation. 

650 

650 

462 

British Columbia Housing Management Commission. 

41 

41 

24 

British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority. 

6,641 

6,641 

6,287 

British Columbia Institute of Technology. 

25 

25 

12 

British Columbia Railway Company. 

375 

375 

309 

British Columbia Regional Hospital Districts Financing Authority. 

390 

390 

377 

British Columbia Systems Corporation. 

12 

12 

12 

British Columbia Transit. 

448 

448 

433 

College of New Caledonia. 

3 

3 

3 

College of the Rockies. 

3 

3 

3 

Columbia Power Corporation. 

3 

3 


Greater Vancouver Sewerage and Drainage District. 



175 

Greater Vancouver Water District. 



131 

Improvement Districts. 

3 

3 

3 

Malaspina University College. 

2 

2 

3 

Okanagan University College. 

10 

10 

11 

Pacific Racing Association. 

6 

6 

6 

Selkirk College. 

2 

2 

2 

Simon Fraser University. 

28 

28 

23 

University College of the Cariboo. 

7 

7 

7 

University of British Columbia. 

49 

49 

65 

University of Northern British Columbia. 

15 

15 

16 

University of Victoria. 

10 

10 

22 

Victoria Line Limited. 

2 

2 

1 


10,333 

10,333 

9,654 

20. Other Assets 


In Millions 



1997 

1996 


Expense 

Expenditure 

Expenditure 


Basis 

Basis 

Basis 


$ 

$ 

$ 

Prepaid program costs—ministerial prepayments. 

48 

48 

39 

Deferred charges. 

131 

131 

100 


179 

179 

139 

21. Loans for Purchase of Assets, Recoverable through Future Appropriations 


In Millions 



1997 

1996 


Expense 

Expenditure 

Expenditure 


Basis 

Basis 

Basis 


$ 

$ 

$ 

British Columbia Educational Institutions Capital Financing Authority .. 

1,215 

1,215 

1,077 

British Columbia Regional Hospital Districts Financing Authority. 

698 

698 

620 

British Columbia School Districts Capital Financing Authority . 

2,502 

2,502 

2,184 

British Columbia Transit. 

910 

910 

879 

Capital Project Certificate of Approval Program. 

171 

171 

309 


5,496 

5,496 

5,069 





































































PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


B 25 


Notes to Consolidated Revenue Fund Financial Statements 
for the Fiscal Year Ended March 31, 1997— Continued 

22. Work-In-Progress on Tangible Capital Assets 

In Millions 



1997 


1996 



Computer 





Hardware/ 



Buildings 

Vehicles 

Software 

Total 

Total 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 


Opening cost of work-in-progress. 

. 1 


16 

17 

18 

Additions during the year. 



15 

15 

13 

Valuation adjustments. 



(1) 

(1) 


Transferred to Capital Account. 

Disposals during the year. 

. (1) 


(9) 

(10) 

(14) 


0 

0 

21 

21 

17 

23. Tangible Capital Assets 


1997 

In Millions 


1996 




Computer 

Hardware/ 




Buildings 

Vehicles 

Software 

Total 

Total 


$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

Opening cost of tangible capital assets. 

. 79 

83 

132 

294 

255 

Additions during the year. 

Valuation adjustments. 

. 4 


46 

50 

39 

Disposals during the year. 



(5) 

(5) 


Closing cost of tangible capital assets. 

. 83 

83 

173 

339 

294 

Opening accumulated amortization. 

. 24 

53 

56 

133 

109 

Add: amortization expense. 

. 2 

11 

20 

33 

24 

Closing accumulated amortization. 

. 26 

64 

76 

166 

133 

Net book value of tangible capital assets. 

. 57 

19 

97 

173 

161 


24. Net Deficiency In Millions 

1997 1996 



Expense 

Expenditure 

Expense 

Expenditure 


Basis 

Basis 

Basis 

Basis 


$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

Net deficiency—beginning of year. 

. 12,145 

12,323 

11,886 

11,886 

Net expense/expenditure for the year. 

Capital adjustment account 1 . 

. 352 

368 

355 

(164) 

369 

Restatement of prior periods 2 . 



68 

68 

Net deficiency—end of year. 

. 12,497 

12,691 

12,145 

12,323 


1 1995/96 was the first year the province booked tangible capital assets. In 1996/97, the tangible capital assets' policy was changed in three ways: removal ol 
land; reduction of computer hardware and software thresholds; and, reduction of building thresholds. Land purchases of $8 million during 1995/96 result in an in¬ 
crease in the expense basis deficit for that year to $355 million from $347 million as reported in the 1995/96 Public Accounts. 

The capital adjustment account ($ 164 million) is made up of buildings ($54 million), computer hardware and software ($58 million), vehicles ($34 million) 
and work-in-progress ($18 million). 

The capital adjustment account amount disclosed in the 1995/96 Public Accounts was $852 million. The capital adjustment account amount has been re¬ 
duced to reflect the removal of land from the statements ($702 million) and increased to reflect the lower capitalization thresholds for computer hardware and soft¬ 
ware ($6 million) and buildings ($8 million). Refer to Note 2—1997 Change in Accounting Policy for further explanation. 

“The restatement of prior periods is comprised of three adjustments. The first is due to a court decision regarding widows Workers Compensation benefits 
which increases liabilities relating to prior years' activities ($ 1 2 million). The second relates to clean-up costs for contaminated gravel pits, salt storage areas and 
maintenance yards, and increases liabilities relating to prior years' activities ($24 million). The third is a reversal of the College Pension I Ian surplus, whir h in¬ 
creases the total unfunded pension liabilities ($32 million). 





















































































B 26 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Notes to Consolidated Revenue Fund Financial Statements 
for the Fiscal Year Ended March 31, 1997— Continued 


25. Contingencies and Commitments 

(a) Guaranteed Debt 

Guaranteed debt as at March 31,1997, totalled $2,004 million (1996: $2,683 million). 5ee Statement of Guaranteed Debt on B35 for details. 

(b) Contingent Liabilities 

(i) Litigation and Other Claims 

The government is a defendant in legal actions and is involved in matters such as expropriation compensation disputes and tax 
assessment appeals. These matters may give rise to future liabilities. 

These potential liabilities are accrued when it is likely that a liability exists and the amount of the liability can be reasonably esti¬ 
mated on an individual or portfolio basis (see Note 3—Other accrued estimated liabilities). 

The government has contingent liabilities in respect of the following summary of matters where the estimated or known claim is 
or exceeds $ 100,000 and is net of accrued amounts: 

• claims of $15 million in expropriation disputes 

• claims of $14 million regarding motor vehicle accidents 

• claims of $52 million regarding tax disputes 

• claims of $32 million in contract disputes 

• claims of $9 million regarding negligent design, construction or maintenance of roads 

• claims of $62 million regarding damages to persons or property and other miscellaneous matters. 

(ii) Other Contingent Liabilities 

The government also has contingent liabilities in the form of indemnities, indirect guarantees and outstanding claims. Where in¬ 
demnities are for explicit quantifiable loans, the amounts are included in the Statement of Guaranteed Debt. 

Under the Criminal Injury Compensation Act, the government is responsible for providing compensation to victims of crime in 
British Columbia, for offences described in the Act. A liability of $75 million (1996: $74 million) has been accrued based on the esti¬ 
mated cost of periodic future payments for claims. 

The government operates and indemnifies pre-funded self-insurance programs to cover claims against school districts and col¬ 
leges, hospitals and other health care agencies, and certain social service providers. A liability of $38 million (1 996: $31 million) has 
been accrued based on the estimated ultimate cost of settling any outstanding claims. 

Under current pension agreements, the government is responsible for payment of pensioners' Medical Services Plan and Ex¬ 
tended Health Care premiums, which are recorded when due. 

As at March 31,1997, the Government of British Columbia and Alcan Aluminum Ltd had not reached a settlement on the out¬ 
standing issues relating to cancellation of the Kemano Completion Project in January 1995. On April 14, 1997, Alcan filed a writ and 
a statement of claim for damages. On August 5, 1997, theprovince and Alcan signed an agreement resolving all issues in connection 
with the legal action taken against the province by Alcan. The agreement will provide Alcan with a source of electric power to replace 
in part the potential electric power generated from the Kemano Completion Project. 

(iii) Aboriginal Land Claims 

The absence of treaties in British Columbia has resulted in a number of outstanding aboriginal land claims across the province. 
Some of these claims have resulted in litigation but most are being negotiated. The province's position on these claims is that, al¬ 
though the province recognizes aboriginal rights, including the inherent right of aboriginal people to self-government, the precise lo¬ 
cation, scope, and content of these rights should be established not through litigation but by means of tripartite negotiations involving 
the federal and provincial governments and aboriginal groups. The province anticipates that these negotiations will result in mod¬ 
ern-day treaties defining the boundaries and nature of First Nations treaty settlement lands and rights and ensure a more stable envi¬ 
ronment for resource development in British Columbia. 

The British Columbia Treaty Commission monitors the progress of treaty negotiations in British Columbia under a six stage nego¬ 
tiation process. The Treaty Commission began operating in December 1993. As of March 31,1997, it had accepted 49 statements of 
intent to negotiate treaties from First Nations. Twenty-six of the 49 First Nations were in the Agreement in Principle stage of negotia¬ 
tions and 1 3 were in the Framework Agreement stage. The remaining 10 are in the Preparation stage. 

On March 22, 1996, the provincial and federal governments reached an Agreement in Principle (AIP) with the Nisga'a in north¬ 
western British Columbia. If a final agreement is negotiated which contains the same provisions as the AIP, the Nisga'a would receive 
from the province $14.4 million in settlement costs over a period of years. The Nisga'a would also receive $5.75 million from the 
province to purchase fishing vessels and licences. An estimate of third party compensation is not available at this time. Final negotia¬ 
tions to reach a settlement are now in progress. A final agreement is subject to ratification by the Nisga'a, the federal and provincial 
governments. 


PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


B 27 


Notes to Consolidated Revenue Fund Financial Statements 
for the Fiscal Year Ended March 31, 1997— Continued 

25. Contingencies and Commitments— Continued 

There are, currently, several major cases involving Aboriginal Rights before the Courts. 

The Supreme Court of Canada will hear a very significant British Columbia case involving aboriginal rights, shortly. In this case, 
Delgamuukw v. Her Majesty the Queen in Right of British Columbia and Attorney General of Canada, the B.C. Court of Appeal held 
that the Gitxsan and Wet'suwet'en First Nations hold unextinguished, non-exclusive aboriginal rights over a large area of northern 
British Columbia. The B.C. Court of Appeal however, dismissed the claim of the appellants for damages and for a declaration that they 
owned and have jurisdiction over the area in question. The appeal and cross-appeal were heard by the Supreme Court of Canada on 
)une 16 and 1 7, 1997, but no decision has yet been made. 

Currently before the Supreme Court of British Columbia is a potentially significant case in which a First Nation claims aboriginal 
rights on privately held land. This case, Burns Lake Indian Band v. Brenda Fountain, was the subject of mediation last year, and some 
settlement discussions are under way. These have not yet been concluded, and there remains potential that the matter could go to 
trial. The province is named as party in this litigation. No dates for trial have yet been set. 

There is also a significant case on the question of Treaty 8 First Nations entitlements in British Columbia. In McLeod Lake Bandv. 
Her Majesty the Queen, the McLeod Lake Band is claiming that it comes within the boundary of Treaty 8 and that the province is obli¬ 
gated to provide, to the federal government, land pursuant to the formula established in Treaty 8. 

The interpretation of the rights granted under Treaty 8 is also the subject of another case— Chief Bernie Metechaea (Halfway 
River First Nation) v. the Ministry of Forests and Canadian Forest Products Ltd. In this case, the Halfway River Indian Band is challeng¬ 
ing the issuance of a cutting permit by the Ministry of Forests of the province, on the basis that the cutting activity would bean interfer¬ 
ence with their Treaty 8 hunting and trapping rights. The case was heard in January 1 997. Decision was reserved and has not yet been 
handed down. 

(c) Commitments 

The government has ongoing operational commitments to fund a variety of programs for public welfare including health, education, social serv¬ 
ices, protection of persons and properties, and management of natural resources. In addition, the government normally contracts out construction or 
maintenance of its roads, bridges and buildings. All these ongoing operational commitments are detailed in the Estimates published yearly and are 
not repeated in this note. Any significant non-operating commitments (less than five years duration costing more than $50 million) and their comple¬ 
tion costs are detailed in this note. 

In accordance with an Agreement signed July 27,1995, the province will invest $50 million annually, for ten years, beginning the 1996/97 
fiscal year, with the Columbia Power Corporation (the Corporation) and the Columbia Basin Trust (the Trust), for equity investment in power 
projects. The disbursement of the funds is controlled by Treasury Board through approval of individual project budgets and joint venture agree¬ 
ments. The payments in the first five years will be made to the Corporation and the payments in the second five years will be made to the Trust, 
except that the Trust will also receive a payment in the fifth year equal to one-half the book value of the hydro-electric expansion rights, and the 
payment to the Corporation in the fifth year will be reduced by an equal amount. At March 31, 1997, the book value of the expansion rights was 
$102 million. 

On October 1 5, 1993, the government declared part of theTatshenshini/Alsek region a class "A" provincial park. On August 1 8, 1995, the 
government, Geddes Resources Limited (the registered and beneficial owner of claims in that area), and Royal Oak Mines Inc, signed a Heads 
of Agreement. The agreement provided for compensation for lost mineral claims of $29 million which have been paid and a conditional eco¬ 
nomic development grant (maximum $ 1 37 million over 14 years) for development of a mine at another site. The economic development com¬ 
ponent is contingent on the corporation's fulfilling requirements in the development of a mine and is recorded as a liability as the relevant 
conditions are met. At this time, $19 million has been accrued. 


B 28 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Notes to Consolidated Revenue Fund Financial Statements 
for the Fiscal Year Ended March 31, 1997— Continued 


26. Expense/Expenditure by Group Account Classification 


In Millions 


1997 


Grants and contributions 

Salaries and benefits. 

Operating costs. 

Asset acquisitions. 

Other. 

Recoveries. 


Valuation allowances of $47 million (1996: $58 million) are included in the "Other" group account classification 


27. Expense/Expenditure Due to Valuation Allowances 


Accounts receivable. 

Investments in and amounts due from Crown corporations and agencies 

Loans, advances and other investments. 

Mortgages. 


1996 


Expense 

Expenditure 

Expenditure 

Basis 

Basis 

Basis 

$ 

$ 

$ 

16,113 

16,113 

15,541 

2,159 

2,159 

2,032 

1,856 

1,856 

1,866 

461 

477 

509 

2,311 

2,311 

2,412 

(2,297) 

(2,297) 

(2,190) 

20,603 

20,619 

20,170 

account classification. 



In Millions 


1997 

1996 

Expense 

Expenditure 

Expenditure 

Basis 

Basis 

Basis 

$ 

$ 

$ 

32 

32 

24 

4 

4 

11 

11 

11 

22 



1 

47 

47 

58 


These amounts are included in expenditure and represent the write down of assets in the above categories. 


































PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


B 29 


Notes to Consolidated Revenue Fund Financial Statements 
for the Fiscal Year Ended March 31, 1997— Continued 


28. Trust Funds 

Amounts held and administered in trust by the government at the end of the fiscal year were comprised of the following: 


In Millions 

1997 1996 


Superannuation, pension and long-term disability funds 1 ' 2,3 

Expense 

Basis 

$ 

Expenditure 

Basis 

$ 

Expenditure 

Basis 

$ 

—administered by the Superannuation Commission. 

Sinking funds 1 

. 28,054 

28,054 

23,934 

—administered by the Provincial Treasury. 

Defeased trust funds 4 

. 4,547 

4,547 

5,409 

—administered by the Provincial Treasury. 

Investment funds of Crown corporations and agencies 

. 1,080 

1,080 

879 

—administered by the Provincial Treasury. 

Public Trustee and Official Administrators 

. 1,213 

1,213 

933 

—administered by government officials. 

Supreme and County Court (Suitors' Funds) 

. 573 

573 

564 

—administered by the Courts. 

. 31 

31 

24 

Workers' Compensation Board of British Columbia 1 ' . 

Other trust funds 

. 5,904 

5,904 

5,218 

—administered by various government officials. 

. 66 

41,468 

66 

41,468 

64 

37,025 


Trust funds include amounts held and administered in trust, over which the government has no power of appropriation. 
Cash and investments of the trust funds are managed or held by the Provincial Treasury. 


'See the Trust Funds Financial Statements section of the Public Accounts for the latest audited financial statements of superannuation and pension funds, the 
Workers' Compensation Board of British Columbia and most entities whose sinking funds are administered by the Provincial Treasury. 

2 This amount includes the Workers’ Compensation Board Superannuation Plan fund balance of $401 million, as at March 31,1997. The Superannuation 
Commission assumed the direct administration of this fund as of November 24, 1995. 

! The amounts for six of the superannuation and pension funds totalling $ 19,400 million (1996: $ 1 6,400 million) and for the Workers' Compensation Board of 
British Columbia (excluding the Workers' Compensation Board Superannuation Plan), have been taken from these funds' latest audited financial statements which 
have a different fiscal year-end than these financial statements. 

4 Defeased Trust Funds of $1,080 million (1996: $879 million) represent investments set aside to repay outstanding term debt and related interest payments. 
These defeased debts have been removed from the Statement of Financial Position of each government organization and enterprise and are considered extin¬ 
guished for financial reporting purposes. 






















B 30 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Consolidated Revenue Fund Supplementary Statements 
Statement of Revenue by Source Comparison of Estimates to Actual 
for the Fiscal Year Ended March 31, 1997 


Taxation Revenue 

Personal income. 

Corporation income. 

Social service. 

Fuel. 

Tobacco . 

Property—residential (school purpose) 
Property—business (school purpose)... 

Property—rural area. 

Property transfer. 

Corporation capital. 

Insurance premium. 

Hotel room. 

Horse racing. 

Total Taxation Revenue. 

Natural Resource Revenue 

Petroleum and natural gas— 

Natural gas royalties. 

Permits and fees. 

Petroleum royalties. 


Minerals. 

Forests— 

Timber sales. 

Small Business Forest Enterprise Program 

Logging tax. 

Other forests revenue. 


Other— 

Water resources. 

Wildlife Act —fees and licences 


Total Natural Resource Revenue 


Other Revenue 

Fees and licences— 

Medical Services Plan premiums. 

Motor vehicle licences and permits'. 

Ministry of Attorney General fees. 

Real estate earnings of the Crown Land Special Account 

Coquihalla Highway tolls. 

Registries agency fees. 

Vital Statistics agency fees. 

Ministry of Health fees. 


In Mi 

1997 

Expense 

Expenditure 

Basis 

Basis 

Actual 

Estimated 

$ 

$ 


5,289 

5,216 

1,347 

1,450 

3,063 

3,136 

823 

864 

488 

475 

493 

498 

702 

712 

62 

65 

313 

305 

403 

440 

169 

170 

87 

82 

5 

6 

13,244 

13,419 


173 

157 

206 

137 

74 

56 

453 

350 

47 

81 

1,496 

1,632 

348 

375 

41 

116 

9 

12 

1,894 

2,135 

264 

255 

13 

15 

277 

270 

2,671 

2,836 


853 

848 

298 

289 

95 

101 

54 

42 

38 

40 

36 

35 

9 

9 

20 

24 


lions 

1996 

Expenditure 

Expenditure 

Basis 

Basis 

Actual 

Actual 

$ 

$ 


5,289 

4,992 

1,347 

1,225 

3,063 

2,986 

823 

819 

488 

482 

493 

481 

702 

702 

62 

63 

313 

266 

403 

380 

169 

176 

87 

81 

5 

6 

13,244 

12,659 


173 

94 

206 

168 

74 

53 

453 

315 

47 

77 

1,496 

1,339 

348 

315 

41 

134 

9 

12 

1,894 

1,800 

264 

268 

13 

18 

277 

286 

2,671 

2,478 


853 

822 

298 

318 

95 

83 

54 

30 

38 

38 

36 

34 

9 

8 

20 

21 













































































PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


B 


Consolidated Revenue Fund Supplementary Statements 
Statement of Revenue by Source Comparison of Estimates to Actual 
for the Fiscal Year Ended March 31, 1997— Continued 




In Mill 

ions 




1997 


1996 


Expense 

Expenditure 

Expenditure 

Expenditure 


Basis 

Basis 

Basis 

Basis 


Actual 

Estimated 

Actual 

Actual 


$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

Provincial Treasury Operations and Insurance and Risk Management Special 





Account. 

21 

26 

21 

21 

Safety inspection fees. 

16 

17 

16 

16 

Waste management fees. 

16 

15 

16 

13 

Public gaming licence and permits. 

17 

21 

17 

15 

Fire Services Act . 

11 

10 

11 

9 

Property tax collection fees. 

6 

6 

6 

6 

Financial Institutions Commission. 

5 

7 

5 

5 

Other fees and licences. 

20 

25 

20 

20 


1,515 

1,515 

1,515 

1,459 

Investment earnings. 

133 

126 

133 

139 

British Columbia Endowment Fund. 




28 

Miscellaneous— 





Fines and penalties. 

74 

172 

74 

77 

Maintenance of children. 

13 

8 

13 

19 

Insurance claim receipts. 

22 

26 

22 

25 

Other miscellaneous. 

106 

171 

106 

156 


215 

377 

215 

277 

Total Other Revenue. 

1,863 

2,018 

1,863 

1,903 

Contributions from Government Organizations and Enterprises 





British Columbia Liquor Distribution Branch. 

588 

587 

588 

567 

British Columbia Buildings Corporation. 

10 

20 

10 

12 

British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority. 

279 

214 

279 

115 

British Columbia Lottery Corporation. 

266 

262 

266 

244 

Other. 

5 

29 

5 

30 

Total Contributions from Government Organizations and Enterprises. 

1,148 

1,112 

1,148 

968 

Contributions from the Federal Government 





Canada health and social transfer. 

1,775 

1,798 

1,775 

1,388 

Canada Assistance Plan. 

27 


27 

834 

National Training Act . 

11 


11 

20 

Education (public schools). 

72 

66 

72 

69 

Vocational Rehabilitation of Disabled Persons. 

29 

20 

29 

46 

Young Offenders Act . 

8 

8 

8 

8 

Other payments. 

33 

17 

33 

29 

Total Contributions from the Federal Government. 

1,955 

1,909 

1,955 

2,394 

Gross Consolidated Revenue Fund Revenue. 

20,881 

21,294 

20,881 

20,402 






















































































B 32 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Consolidated Revenue Fund Supplementary Statements 
Statement of Revenue by Source Comparison of Estimates to Actual 
for the Fiscal Year Ended March 31, 1997— Continued 



In Mill 

1997 

ions 

1996 

Expense 

Expenditure 

Expenditure 

Expenditure 

Basis 

Basis 

Basis 

Basis 

Actual 

Estimated 

Actual 

Actual 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 


Less: 

Transfers to British Columbia Transit. 

. (82) 

(81) 

(82) 

(87) 

Transfers to BC Transportation Financing Authority. 

. (63) 

(119) 

(63) 

(62) 

Transfers to Forest Renewal BC. 

. (485) 

(435) 

(485) 

(452) 

Net Consolidated Revenue Fund Revenue. 

. 20,251 

20,659 

20,251 

19,801 


Personal and corporation income tax revenues are recorded after adjustment for tax credits. Personal income tax was reduced by $78 mil¬ 
lion (1996: $89 million) and corporation income tax was reduced by $22 million (1996: $29 million). The types of tax credits adjusting per¬ 
sonal and corporation income tax revenues are for foreign taxes, logging taxes, venture capital, political contributions, low income rent 
reductions, low income tax rebates and royalty tax rebates. 

Personal income tax revenue is also reduced by $87 million representing that portion of the Family Bonus Program costs which are re¬ 
corded against revenue. 

Additional personal and corporation income tax refunds are issued under the International Financial Business (Tax Refund) Act. Corpora¬ 
tion income tax refunds were $3.5 million (1 996: $1.5 million) and personal income tax refunds were $0.3 million (1996: $0.3 million). 

Property-residential (school purpose) revenue is net of home owner grants of $453 million (1996: $438 million). 


'Effective November 18, 1996, ICBC assumed administration of vehicle licencing, registration and issuance of drivers' licences. Motor vehicle licences and 
permits revenue for 1997 is shown net of $ 15 million in administration fees retained by ICBC. 





















PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


B 


Consolidated Revenue Fund Supplementary Statements 
Statement of Comparison of Estimated Expenditure to Actual Expenditure 

for the Fiscal Year Ended March 31, 1997 

(In Thousands) 


-Total Appropriations- 

Other Actual Net Under 

Estimated Authorizations Total Expenditures Expenditure 


Special Offices 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

Legislation. 

24,294 

6,328 

30,622 

30,622 


Auditor General. 

7,392 


7,392 

7,073 

319 

Office of Child, Youth and Family Advocate. 

1,040 


1,040 

985 

55 

Conflict of Interest Commissioner. 

178 


178 

123 

55 

Elections B.C. 

23,967 


23,967 

18,860 

5,107 

Information and Privacy Commissioner. 

2,630 


2,630 

2,417 

213 

Ombudsman. 

4,819 


4,819 

4,815 

4 

Office of the Premier. 

2,409 


2,409 

2,408 

1 

Ministries 

Aboriginal Affairs. 

31,985 


31,985 

27,561 

4,424 

Agriculture, Fisheries and Food. 

Attorney General and Ministry Responsible for Multicultur- 

68,101 

15 

68,116 

60,993 

7,123 

ism, Human Rights and Immigration. 

905,566 

53,673 

959,239 

954,030 

5,209 

Children and Families. 


1,250,669 

1,250,669 

1,224,425 

26,244 

Education, Skills and Training. 

5,794,677 

(26,713) 

5,767,964 

5,725,057 

42,907 

Employment and Investment. 

138,721 

17,163 

155,884 

134,278 

21,606 

Environment, Lands and Parks. 

234,104 

23,504 

257,608 

244,037 

13,571 

Finance and Corporate Relations. 

130,458 

(25,921) 

104,537 

97,102 

7,435 

Forests. 

Health and Ministry Responsible for Seniors and Intergov- 

655,281 

24,832 

680,113 

611,312 

68,801 

ernmental Relations. 

6,934,620 

243,847 

7,178,467 

7,158,541 

19,926 

Human Resources. 

2,600,811 

(812,388) 

1,788,423 

1,788,407 

16 

Labour. 

36,924 


36,924 

32,815 

4,109 

Municipal Affairs and Housing. 

440,484 

3,986 

444,470 

418,616 

25,854 

Small Business, Tourism and Culture. 

429,434 

(283,176) 

146,258 

134,750 

11,508 

Transportation and Highways. 

628,055 

4,608 

632,663 

626,430 

6,233 

Women's Equality. 

237,247 

(197,223) 

40,024 

36,716 

3,308 

Other Appropriations 

Management of public funds and debt. 

1,001,000 


1,001,000 

950,660 

50,340 

Contingencies (all ministries) and new programs. 

51,000 


51,000 

48,715 

2,285 

BC Benefits. 

143,149 

101,409 

244,558 

244,558 


Corporate Accounting System. 

12,890 


12,890 

8,483 

4,407 

Environmental Assessment and Land Use Coordination. 

17,651 


17,651 

15,643 

2,008 

Environmental Boards and Forest Appeals Commission. 

2,217 


2,217 

934 

1,283 

Forest Practices Board. 

4,292 


4,292 

3,022 

1,270 

Office of the Police Complaints Commissioner. 

500 


500 

134 

366 

Public Sector Employers' Council. 

2,107 


2,107 

1,721 

386 

Public Service Employee Relations Commission. 

Office of the Transition Commissioner for Child and Youth 

12,450 

14,090 

26,540 

24,895 

1,645 

Services. 

7,200 


7,200 

989 

6,211 

Amortization of change in unfunded pension liability. 

(24,880) 

(11,127) 

(36,007) 

(36,007) 


Insurance and Risk Management Special Account. 

9,212 

2,865 

12,077 

12,077 















































B 34 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Consolidated Revenue Fund Supplementary Statements 
Statement of Comparison of Estimated Expenditure to Actual Expenditure 
for the Fiscal Year Ended March 31, 1997—Continued 

(In Thousands) 


South Moresby Implementation—Forestry Compensation 

Special Account. 

Less .’transfer from the South Moresby Implementation— 
Forestry Compensation Special Account to the Gen¬ 
eral Account. 

Total Consolidated Revenue Fund Expenditure. 

Less: tangible capital assets. 

Add: amortization expense. 

Total Consolidated Revenue Fund Expense. 


Summary of Appropriations 

Voted expenditure. 

Statutory 

Amortization of change in unfunded pension liability.... 

Special Accounts. 

Special Funds. 

Special Warrants. 

Various Acts. 

Valuation allowances. 

Less: Inter-account transfers. 

Total Expenditure by Appropriation 1997 . 

Less: tangible capital assets. 

Add: amortization expense. 

Total Expense—1996/1997. 


Estimated 

-Total Appropriations- 
Other 

Authorizations 

Total 

Actual 

Expenditures 

Net Under 
Expenditure 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

15 

1,248 

1,263 

1,263 



(166) 

(166) 

(166) 


20,572,000 

391,523 

(49,871) 

34,167 

20,963,523 

(49,871) 

34,167 

20,619,294 

(49,871) 

34,167 

344,229 

20,572,000 

375,819 

20,947,819 

20,603,590 

344,229 


20,254,065 

207,737 

20,461,802 

20,155,256 

306,546 

(24,880) 

(11,127) 

(36,007) 

(36,007) 


392,185 

266,844 

659,029 

638,006 

21,023 

96 

13,192 

13,288 

13,288 



98,930 

98,930 

82,270 

16,660 


133,731 

133,731 

133,731 



47,542 

47,542 

47,542 


(49,466) 

(365,326) 

(414,792) 

(414,792) 


20,572,000 

391,523 

20,963,523 

20,619,294 

344,229 


(49,871) 

(49,871) 

(49,871) 



34,167 

34,167 

34,167 


20,572,000 

375,819 

20,947,819 

20,603,590 

344,229 

20,194,000 

368,012 

20,562,012 

20,170,053 

391,959 


Total Expenditure by Appropriation 1995/96 













































































PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


B 35 


Consolidated Revenue Fund Supplementary Statements 
Statement of Guaranteed Debt 
as at March 31, 1997 


Guaranteed debt represents that debt of municipalities and other governments, private enterprises and individuals, and debt and minority 
interests of provincial Crown corporations, which has been explicitly guaranteed or indemnified by the government, under the authority of a 
statute, as to net principal or redemption provisions. 


Municipalities and other local governments— 

(1) Guarantees authorized pursuant to the Municipal Act, sec. 854— 

Debentures. 

Subtotal, municipalities and other local governments. 

Government services— 

(2) Guarantees authorized pursuant to the British Columbia Buildings Corporation Act, sec. 1 3 2 — 

Debentures. 

Mortgage. 

(3) Guarantees authorized pursuant to the System Act, sec. 20 2 — 

Debentures. 

Subtotal, government services. 

Health and education 3 — 

(4) Guarantees authorized pursuant to the Educational Institution Capital Finance Act, sec. 9 J — 

Debentures. 

(5) Guarantees authorized pursuant to the Financial Administration Act, sec. 56— 

Student aid loans. 

Simon Fraser University—Debentures. 

(6) Guarantees authorized pursuant to the Hospital District Finance Act, sec. 9"— 

Debentures. 

(7) Guarantees authorized pursuant to the School District Capital Finance Act, sec. 9 — 

Debentures. 

Subtotal, health and education. 

Economic development— 

(8) Guarantees authorized pursuant to the British Columbia Railway Finance Act, sec. 10 — 

Capital leases. 

(9) Guarantees authorized pursuant to the British Columbia Transit Act, sec. 22'— 

Bonds and debentures. 

Capital leases. 

(10) Guarantees authorized pursuant to the Ferry Corporation Act, sec. 18 — 

Notes. 

Capital leases. 

(11 JGuarantees authorized pursuant to the Financial Administration Act, sec. 56— 

C.M.A. Parking Association. 

District of Tumbler Ridge. 

Feeder Association's Loan Guarantee Program. 

JS McMillan Fisheries Ltd. 

PWA Corporation. 

Miscellaneous guarantees less than $1 million. 

(1 2)Guarantees authorized pursuant to the Home Mortgage Assistance Program Act, sec. 2. 

British Columbia Second Mortgage Program 4 . 

(1 3)Guarantees authorized pursuant to the Trade Development Corporation Act, sec. 3. 

Subtotal, economic development. 


In Millions 

1997 1996 

Net Net 

Outstanding' Outstanding' 


$ 

$ 

3 

4 

3 

4 

47 

47 

2 

2 

7 

9 

56 

58 


130 

163 

149 

174 


3 

285 

334 

269 

323 

833 

997 


16 

17 

28 

31 

151 

162 

5 

7 

30 

33 

7 

7 

4 

5 

2 

2 

4 

4 

5 

8 


1 

42 

58 

12 

18 

1 

5 

307 

358 















































B 36 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Consolidated Revenue Fund Supplementary Statements 
Statement of Guaranteed Debt 
as at March 31, 1997— Continued 


Utilities— 

(14)Guarantees authorized pursuant to the Hydro and Power Authority Act, sec. 44 — 
Bonds and debentures. 

Subtotal, utilities. 

Grand total, all guaranteed debt. 

Less: 

Amounts included above held by Consolidated Revenue Fund s . 

Provision for probable payout. 

Net total, all guaranteed debt 6,7 . 


In Millions 


1997 

Net 

Outstanding 1 2 * 4 

1996 

Net 

Outstanding 1 

$ 

$ 

837 

1,305 

837 

1,305 

2,036 

2,722 

(1) 

(D 

(31) 

(38) 

2,004 

2,683 


1 Net outstanding guaranteed debt includes gross principal debt less sinking fund balances, and represents the total amount of contingent liability of the gov¬ 
ernment arising from relevant guarantees. Amounts payable in foreign currency are translated into Canadian dollars at the rate of exchange prevailing at the fiscal 
year-end. 

2 See the financial statements of government organizations and enterprises for details of maturity dates, interest rates and redemption features of the outstand¬ 
ing debt of these Crown agencies and for details of derivative financial products. 

’The government is directly responsible for paying 64.1 7% to 100.00% of debt service costs for health and education debt through various grant formulas. In 
1996/97, the contributions totalled approximately $588 million (1996: $478 million) or 84.40% (1996: 83.28%) of debt service costs. 

4 The British Columbia Second Mortgage Program was sold to the Bank of Montreal in June 1989, with the condition that the province will buy back any mort¬ 
gages which may become uncollectible in future years. 

’As a result of government financing and investment policies, $415 million (1996: $844 million) of guaranteed debt is held by trust funds actively managed by 
the government. 

“The government has unconditionally guaranteed the payment of principal and interest for $2,804 million (1996: $3,028 million) of debentures issued to the 
Canada Pension Plan Investment Fund. 

' Debentures totalling $720 million (1996: $839 million) have been defeased and are considered extinguished for financial reporting purposes; of these, $625 
million (1996: $646 million) have been issued to the Canada Pension Plan Investment Fund. 





















PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


B 37 


Consolidated Revenue Fund Supplementary Statements 
Statement of Information Required Under Section 8.1 (c)(iv),(v) and (vi) 

of the Financial Administration Act 
for the Fiscal Year Ended March 31, 1997 


Ministry 



In Mill 

ions 



Assets and 




Uncollectible 

Debts and 


Money 

Debts 

Obligations 

Remissions 

Refunded 

Written-Off 

Forgiven 

Made 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 


Attorney General and Ministry Responsible for Multiculturalism, Human 

Rights and Immigration. 

Education, Skills and Training. 

Employment and Investment. 

Finance and Corporate Relations. 

Forests. 

Health and Ministry Responsible for Seniors and Intergovernmental 
Relations. 

Total 1996/97. 


Total 1995/96 


1 

1 

1 



12 

1 



1 




2 



0 

18 

1 

0 

1 

18 

2 

0 


This statement includes amounts authorized by sections 1 3,14,1 5 and 16 of the Financial Administration Act. Amounts authorized for re¬ 
fund, write-off, forgiveness or remission by other statutes are not shown separately in these financial statements. 


































B 38 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


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A variety of interest rate swaps and foreign currency swaps have been entered into by the province in order to effectively manage exposure to fluctuations in interest rates and foreign currency rates. 










































PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


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A variety of interest rate swaps and foreign currency swaps have been entered into by the province in order to effectively manage exposure to fluctuations in interest rates and foreign currency rates 


















































































Consolidated Revenue Fund 
Supplementary Information on Public Debt 
for the Fiscal Year Ended March 31, 1997—Continued 

(Currency in Millions) 


B 40 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


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Consolidated Revenue Fund 
Supplementary Information on Public Debt 
for the Fiscal Year Ended March 31, 1997—Continued 

(Currency in Millions) 


PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


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Fair Value of Hedges 

As at March 31,1997, the fair value of forward foreign currency exchange contracts is $2.5 million Canadian and the fair value of all currency and interest rate swaps is $60 million Canadian. 



























































































Supplementary Schedules to the Financial Statements 
for the Fiscal Year Ended March 31,1997 

(Unaudited) 

Contents 

Page 

Ministry Abbreviations. 3 

Consolidated Revenue Fund Schedule of Revenue by Source for the Fiscal Years Ended March 31. 4 

Consolidated Revenue Fund Schedule of Expenditure by Function for the Fiscal Years Ended March 31 . 6 

Consolidated Revenue Fund Schedule of Expenditure by Group Account Classification. 7 

Schedule of Public Debt. 8 

Tangible Capital Assets and Schedule of Amortization. 10 

Schedule of Comparison of Net Operating Results Arising from Different Capitalization Policies. 10 

Schedule of Payments Based on Contributions. 11 

Schedule of Payments Made to Honour Guarantees. 14 

Schedule of Obligations Under Capital Leases. 14 

Schedule of Investment Portfolio. 15 

Explanatory Note on Appropriations. 16 

Explanatory Notes on the Group Account Classifications. 16 

Ministerial Appropriations 

Legislation. 18 

Auditor General. 20 

Office of the Child, Youth and Family Advocate. 22 

Conflict of Interest Commissioner. 24 

Elections B.C. 26 

Information and Privacy Commissioner. 28 

Ombudsman. 30 

Office of the Premier. 32 

Ministry of Aboriginal Affairs. 34 

Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food. 36 

Ministry of Attorney General. 38 

Ministry for Children and Families. 42 

Ministry of Education, Skills and Training. 44 

Ministry of Employment and Investment. 46 

Ministry of Environment, Lands and Parks. 50 

Ministry of Finance and Corporate Relations. 52 

Ministry of Forests. 56 

Ministry of Health and Ministry Responsible for Seniors and Intergovernmental Relations. 58 

Ministry of Labour. 62 

Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing. 64 

Ministry of Small Business, Tourism and Culture. 66 

Ministry of Human Resources. 68 

Ministry of Transportation and Highways. 70 

Ministry of Women's Equality. 74 

Other Appropriations. 76 








































Supplementary Schedules to the Financial Statements 
for the Fiscal Year Ended March 31, 1997 

(Unaudited) 

Contents—Continued 

Page 

Summary of Special Accounts Account Balance. 80 

Summary of Special Accounts Operating Statement. 82 

Schedule of Reorganization of 1996/97 Revised Estimates. 84 

Descriptions of Appropriations. 87 

Natural Resource Community Fund Financial Statements and Notes. 126 

Statement of Full Time Equivalent (FTE) Employment. 129 

Statutory Spending Authorities. 1 30 

Ministry Related Financing Transactions—Summary. 1 35 











PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


C 3 


Ministry Abbreviations 

In order to reduce words in the Public Accounts, ministries referred to in this section may be shown as follows: 


Ministry Name 


May be shown as 


Legislation... 

Auditor General. 

Office of the Child, Youth and Family Advocate. 

Conflict of Interest Commissioner. 

Elections B.C. 

Information and Privacy Commissioner. 

Ombudsman. 

Office of the Premier. 

Ministry of Aboriginal Affairs. 

Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food. 

Ministry of Attorney General and Ministry Responsible for Multiculturalism, Ffuman Rights 

and Immigration. 

Ministry for Children and Families. 

Ministry of Education, Skills and Training. 

Ministry of Employment and Investment. 

Ministry of Environment, Lands and Parks. 

Ministry of Finance and Corporate Relations and Ministry Responsible for Intergovernmen¬ 
tal Relations. 

Ministry of Forests. 

Ministry of FHealth and Ministry Responsible for Seniors. 

Ministry of Labour. 

Ministry of Municipal Affairs and FHousing. 

Ministry of Small Business, Tourism and Culture. 

Ministry of Ffuman Resources. 

Ministry of Transportation and Highways. 

Ministry of Women's Equality. 

Other Appropriations. 


Legislation 
Auditor General 
Child Advocate 
Conflict of Interest 
Elections B.C. 

Information and Privacy 
Ombudsman 
Office of the Premier 
Aboriginal Affairs 
Agriculture 

Attorney General 
Children and Families 
Education 

Employment and Investment 
Environment 

Finance 

Forests 

Health 

Labour 

Municipal Affairs 
Small Business 
Human Resources 
Transportation 
Women's Equality 
Other Appropriations 





























C 4 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Consolidated Revenue Fund 
Schedule of Revenue by Source 
for the Fiscal Years Ended March 31 

(Unaudited) 



1993 

1994 

1995 

1996 

1997 

Taxation Revenue 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

Personal income. 

4,212,136,799 

4,477,162,379 

4,706,500,000 

4,992,323,254 

5,289,000,000 

Corporation income. 

545,039,233 

719,448,934 

997,802,103 

1,225,249,372 

1,347,277,988 

Social service. 

2,085,253,471 

2,653,124,544 

2,869,126,383 

2,986,289,513 

3,062,656,997 

Fuel. 

641,433,564 

731,442,876 

798,040,831 

818,493,668 

823,186,775 

Tobacco. 

483,206,914 

482,397,307 

516,371,702 

482,022,634 

487,657,050 

Property—residential (school purpose).. 

416,154,225 

441,609,553 

469,623,824 

480,526,497 

493,074,373 

Property—business (school purpose).. 

638,848,261 

685,654,816 

689,973,329 

701,635,817 

701,812,009 

Property—rural area. 

54,969,092 

57,652,099 

51,980,939 

63,314,731 

62,270,190 

Property transfer. 

353,107,524 

372,557,078 

339,159,412 

266,122,472 

313,262,144 

Corporation capital. 

320,326,581 

359,109,097 

399,586,728 

380,212,585 

402,924,895 

Insurance premium. 

131,717,197 

151,672,339 

156,653,568 

175,721,980 

168,624,542 

Hotel room. 

58,713,958 

62,703,714 

75,177,988 

80,918,358 

86,829,536 

Horse racing. 

6,032,043 

5,410,579 

6,507,682 

6,019,648 

5,010,190 

Total Taxation Revenue. 

9,946,938,862 

11,199,945,315 

12,076,504,489 

12,658,850,529 

13,243,586,689 

Natural Resource Revenue 

Petroleum and natural gas— 

Natural gas royalties. 

76,431,267 

134,161,571 

130,820,508 

94,065,060 

173,406,419 

Permits and fees. 

66,283,183 

214,013,619 

219,498,190 

168,120,352 

205,822,581 

Petroleum royalties. 

54,130,971 

44,858,817 

49,762,560 

52,702,739 

74,327,886 

Minerals. 

42,025,700 

46,446,011 

65,483,114 

77,499,247 

47,236,255 


238,871,121 

439,480,018 

465,564,372 

392,387,398 

500,793,141 

Forests— 

Timber sales. 

505,456,479 

686,356,187 

1,437,932,325 

1,338,728,231 

1,496,058,120 

Small Business Forest Enterprise 
Program. 

176,104,432 

282,502,685 

376,814,358 

314,949,593 

348,270,863 

Other forest revenue. 

39,762,198 

62,700,381 

139,056,004 

145,938,140 

48,904,337 


721,323,109 

1,031,559,253 

1,953,802,687 

1,799,615,964 

1,893,233,320 

Other— 

Water resources. 

289,373,437 

284,773,500 

261,753,194 

267,684,931 

264,100,060 

Wildlife Act —fees and licences. 

14,710,848 

15,745,382 

17,538,514 

17,869,777 

12,731,566 


304,084,285 

300,518,882 

279,291,708 

285,554,708 

276,831,626 

Total Natural Resource Revenue... 

1 , 264 , 278,515 

1 , 771 , 558,153 

2 , 698 , 658,767 

2 , 477 , 558,070 

2 , 670 , 858,087 

Other Revenue 

Fees and licences — 

Medical Services Plan premiums .... 

776,645,722 

778,703,910 

805,177,799 

822,381,689 

853,261,900 

Motor vehicle licences and permits... 

231,630,234 

268,745,417 

297,717,070 

317,819,688 

297,999,395 

Real estate earnings of the Crown 
Land Special Account. 

38,242,699 

40,527,537 

54,920,427 

30,507,534 

54,269,858 

Miscellaneous fees and licences. 

270,891,583 

294,652,703 

308,988,873 

288,517,935 

309,695,573 


1,317,410,238 

1,382,629,567 

1,466,804,169 

1,459,226,846 

1,515,226,726 

Investment earnings. 

122,581,054 

128,374,867 

63,084,958 

139,397,668 

133,675,904 

British Columbia Endowment Fund .... 

46,924,111 

70,637,275 

80,247,371 

27,668,442 

0 






















































































PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


C 5 


Consolidated Revenue Fund 
Schedule of Revenue by Source 
for the Fiscal Years Ended March 31— Continued 

(Unaudited) 



1993 

1994 

1995 

1996 

1997 

Other Revenue —Continued 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

Miscellaneous — 

Fines and penalties. 

Other miscellaneous. 

79,467,507 

91,686,005 

87,052,052 

144,487,232 

84,678,886 

181,385,415 

77,127,854 

200,041,271 

73,941,161 

140,854,865 


171,153,512 

231,539,284 

266,064,301 

277,169,125 

214,796,026 

Total Other Revenue. 

1 , 658 , 068,915 

1 , 813 , 180,993 

1 , 876 , 200,799 

1 , 903 , 462,081 

1 , 863 , 698,656 

Contributions from Government 
Organizations and Enterprises 

British Columbia Liquor Distribution 

Branch. 

British Columbia Buildings Corporation 
British Columbia Hydro and Power 

Authority. 

British Columbia Lottery Corporation.... 
Other. 

517,127,403 

16,612,540 

237,584,493 

227,025,202 

17,308,000 

554,778,174 

10,000,000 

244,744,235 

233,765,777 

5,000,000 

568,525,317 

20,000,000 

198,000,000 

235,371,688 

6,000,000 

567,050,607 

12,000,000 

114,845,592 

244,208,731 

29,500,890 

587,828,496 

10,000,000 

279,326,514 

266,166,709 

4,740,099 

Total Contributions from Govern¬ 
ment Organizations and Enter¬ 
prises . 

1 , 015 , 657,638 

1 , 048 , 288,186 

1 , 027 , 897,005 

967 , 605,820 

1 , 148 , 061,818 

Contributions from the Federal 
Government 

Canada Health and Social Transfer. 

Canada Assistance Plan. 

Other. 

1,442,608,000 

793,709,357 

179,080,330 

1,248,134,875 

842,352,059 

178,546,712 

1,375,000,000 

867,662,569 

219,798,963 

1,387,587,000 

834,549,412 

171,989,894 

1,774,999,500 

26,594,000 

153,331,589 

Total Contributions from the 
Federal Government. 

2 , 415 , 397,687 

2 , 269 , 033,646 

2 , 462 , 461,532 

2 , 394 , 126,306 

1 , 954 , 925,089 

Gross Consolidated Revenue 
Fund Revenue. 

16 , 300 , 341,617 

18 , 102 , 006,293 

20 , 141 , 722,592 

20 , 401 , 602,806 

20 , 881 , 130,339 

Less: 

Transfers to British Columbia Transit 

Authority. 

Transfers to BC Transportation Financ¬ 
ing Authority. 

Transfers to Forest Renewal BC. 

(50,363,421) 

(69,175,838) 

(30,362,921) 

(79,207,639) 

(60,394,130) 

(454,864,349) 

(86,981,184) 

(62,306,390) 

(451,679,174) 

(81,802,087) 

(62,486,591) 

(485,327,906) 

Net Consolidated Revenue Fund 
Revenue. 

16 , 249 , 978,196 

18 , 002 , 467,534 

19 , 547 , 256,474 

19 , 800 , 636,058 

20 , 251 , 513,755 
































































C 6 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Consolidated Revenue Fund Schedule of Expenditure by Function 
for the Fiscal Years Ended March 31 

(Unaudited) 



1993 

1994 

1995 

1996 

1997 

Health 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

Hospital care. 

. 2,835,029,816 

2,897,773,178 

2,954,232,533 

2,993,431,807 

3,140,352,801 

Medical care. 

1,978,024,952 

2,146,044,005 

2,221,925,000 

2,325,929,412 

2,399,818,248 

Preventive care. 

1,090,453,319 

1,166,757,805 

1,329,252,000 

1,392,312,873 

1,449,279,595 

Other health. 

99,350,831 

77,872,698 

80,973,000 

78,232,847 

95,981,401 


6,002,858,918 

6,288,447,686 

6,586,382,533 

6,789,906,939 

7,085,432,045 

Social Services 

Social assistance. 

. 1,890,210,276 

2,209,698,654 

2,307,301,325 

2,512,666,872 

2,507,686,512 

Child welfare. 

204,682,747 

192,948,614 

206,452,678 

229,244,646 

269,876,600 

Other social services. 

271,613,051 

302,065,791 

376,366,220 

294,009,417 

247,448,832 


2,366,506,074 

2,704,713,059 

2,890,120,223 

3,035,920,935 

3,025,011,944 

Education 

Elementary and secondary. 

. 3,519,065,970 

3,628,196,789 

3,782,825,563 

3,969,134,572 

4,120,914,876 

Post secondary. 

1,216,703,167 

1,288,374,810 

1,351,371,349 

1,417,042,921 

1,472,291,143 

Other education. 

68,037,572 

67,098,094 

117,639,275 

108,987,977 

165,012,836 


4,803,806,709 

4,983,669,693 

5,251,836,187 

5,495,165,470 

5,758,218,855 

Protection of Persons 
and Property 

Law enforcement. 

346,686,841 

365,047,484 

361,261,385 

375,904,426 

395,861,559 

Police protection. 

133,783,477 

129,315,556 

137,639,695 

143,710,104 

149,749,403 

Corrections. 

196,935,560 

207,180,414 

235,714,416 

243,054,165 

259,202,005 

Other protection and regulations. 

203,673,834 

285,164,367 

308,516,950 

327,762,343 

297,536,039 


881,079,712 

986,707,821 

1,043,132,446 

1,090,431,038 

1,102,349,006 

Transportation 

Road and air. 

789,423,870 

725,054,072 

626,247,960 

576,686,779 

575,411,411 

Ferries. 

47,949,287 

60,901,816 

35,954,895 

9,352,000 

4,700,000 

Railways. 

Public transit. 

13,260,000 
226,946,807 

244,048,322 

246,781,457 

270,298,353 

281,369,319 


1,077,579,964 

1,030,004,210 

908,984,312 

856,337,132 

861,480,730 

Natural Resources and 

Economic Development 

Forests (including fire suppression).... 

648,894,515 

654,031,867 

756,592,240 

688,084,867 

613,691,762 

Minerals and mines. 

65,543,316 

57,058,892 

254,395,610 

45,704,454 

26,599,264 

Environment and agriculture. 

281,355,729 

250,448,821 

271,335,466 

242,709,615 

250,466,224 

Fish and game. 

20,091,564 

26,724,913 

28,908,376 

25,872,699 

24,028,287 

Trade and industry. 

131,588,536 

151,527,809 

186,088,197 

171,798,902 

153,488,245 


1,147,473,660 

1,139,792,302 

1,497,319,889 

1,174,170,537 

1,068,273,782 

Other 

Local government. 

346,864,429 

347,568,113 

317,219,092 

302,142,367 

309,216,321 

Housing support. 

79,116,887 

85,483,934 

108,041,982 

76,342,876 

87,218,701 

Recreation and culture. 

132,721,185 

193,915,571 

176,931,009 

115,972,453 

116,520,838 


558,702,501 

626,967,618 

602,192,083 

494,457,696 

512,955,860 

General Government 

Legislature. 

25,535,099 

25,075,834 

25,464,125 

26,465,696 

30,622,180 

Administration. 

259,837,158 

211,784,1 15 

221,161,421 

229,847,883 

224,289,799 


285,372,257 

236,859,949 

246,625,546 

256,313,579 

254,911,979 

Debt Servicing—Third Parties. 

813,544,812 

915,702,863 

967,145,957 

977,349,339 

950,659,896 

Net Operating Expenditure. 

17,936,924,607 

18,912,865,201 

19,993,739,176 

20,170,052,665 

20,619,294,097 


Prior years' figures have been restated to conform with current classification. 




























































































Consolidated Revenue Fund 

Schedule of Expenditure by Group Account Classification 
for the Fiscal Year Ended March 31, 1997 

(Unaudited) 


PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


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C 8 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Schedule of Public Debt 

Pursuant to Section 54(2) of the Financial Administration Act,, 1981 
for the Fiscal Year Ended March 31, 1997 

(Unaudited) 


Public debt represents direct debt obligations for the purpose of the Province of British Columbia, fiscal agency borrowings and Warehouse Pro¬ 
gram borrowings. Fiscal agency borrowings and Warehouse Program borrowings represent borrowings made by the Minister of Finance and Corpo¬ 
rate Relations, in the capacity as fiscal agent, on behalf of government bodies in accordance with the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, 
chapter 15). 


In Millions 


Net increase (decrease) 



April 1/96 

Issues 

Offlent 

March 31/97 

1997 

1996 

Used for Warehouse Program 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

Investments 

Province of British Columbia notes and bonds. 

895 


795 

100 

(795) 

895 


Notes and 
Bonds 


$ 


Maturity value. 100 


Subsequent to March 31, 1997, debt in the amount of $100 million was offlent. 

Proceeds from Warehouse Program issues are held as Warehouse Program assets until they are offlent. 

In Millions 

Net increase (decrease) 



April 1 /96 

Issues' 

Retirements 2 

March 31 / 97 

1997 

1996 

Used for Government Operating 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

Purposes 







Short-term promissory notes. 

84 

4,902 

4,706 

280 

196 

(1) 

Province of British Columbia notes and bonds. 

11,335 

2,710 

2,124 

11,921 

586 

4 

Total. 

11,419 

7,612 

6,830 

12,201 

782 

3 





Short-term 

Promissory 

Notes and 






Notes 

Bonds 

Total 





$ 

$ 

$ 

Maturity value. 




280 

11,919 

12,199 

Assumption of obligations of David Thompson University Centre on 

wind-up . 



2 

2 





280 

11,921 

12,201 

Less: sinking fund balances. 




(83) 

(993) 

(1,076) 





197 

10,928 

11,125 

Less: unamortized discount. 




(1) 

(91) 

(92) 





196 

10,837 

11,033 

Less: amount held in the Consolidated Revenue Fund . 





(2) 

(2) 

Total. 




196 

10,835 

11,031 


'issued under and pursuant to the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chapter 15) as amended and an Order of the Lieutenant Governor in Council of the 
Province of British Columbia. Issues include amounts offloaned from the Warehouse Program. 

Retirements include debt maturities, redemptions, serial payments, calls, defeasances, buybacks and the offlending of debt to clients under the Fiscal Agency Loan 
Program. 
















































































PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


C 9 


Schedule of Public Debt 

Pursuant to Section 54(2) of the Financial Administration Act, 1981 
for the Fiscal Year Ended March 31, 1997— Continued 

(Unaudited) 


In Millions 







Net increase (decrease) 


April 1 / 96 

Issues' 

Retirements 2 

March 31/97 

1997 

1996 

Used for Loans under the Fiscal 

Agency Loan Program 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

Short-term promissory notes. 

Province of British Columbia notes, bonds and de- 

2,271 

12,873 

12,883 

2,261 

(10) 

(122) 

bentures. 

13,814 

2,341 

965 

15,190 

1,376 

2,100 

Total. 

16,085 

15,214 

13,848 

17,451 

1,366 

1,978 





Short-term 

Promissory 

Notes 

Notes and 

Bonds 

Total 





$ 

$ 

$ 

Maturity value. 

Less: sinking fund balances. 




2,261 

(360) 

15,190 

(1,129) 

17,451 

(1,489) 





1,901 

14,061 

15,962 

Less: unamortized discount. 




(19) 

(113) 

(132) 

Total. 




1,882 

13,948 

15,830 


1 Issued under and pursuant to the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chapter 15) as amended and an Order of the Lieutenant Governor in Council of the 
Province of British Columbia. Issues include amounts offloaned from the province and the Warehouse Program. 

Retirements include debt maturities, redemptions, serial payments, calls, defeasances and buybacks of debt. 

















































CIO 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Tangible Capital Assets and Schedule of Amortization 

as at March 31, 1997 

(Unaudited) 


In Thousands 



1997 


1996 



Net 

Net 

Historical 

Accumulated 

Book 

Book 


Consolidated Revenue Fund: 

Cost 

$ 

Amortization 

$ 

Value 

$ 

Value 

$ 

Land. 

. 756,046 


756,046 

702,219 

Highways and bridges 1 . 

. 8,008,222 

(3,171,536) 

4,836,686 

5,197,995 

Ferries and ferry landings 1 .. 

. 79,302 

(54,209) 

25,093 

25,618 

Machinery and equipment .. 

. 156,464 

(62,815) 

93,649 

82,236 

Office furniture 2 . 

. 94,653 

(32,321) 

62,332 

62,290 

Office equipment 2 . 

. 67,428 

(39,603) 

27,825 

27,992 

Other 3 . 

. 23,751 

(14,277) 

9,474 

10,379 


9,185,866 

(3,374,761) 

5,811,105 

6,108,729 


’Highways and bridges, ferries and ferry landings, are reported at their historical costs and are amortized on a straight-line basis over their useful lives. 
2 Machinery and equipment, office furniture and office equipment are recorded at their historical costs and are amortized on a straight-line basis over a period 
of 5 to 25 years. 

3 Other—includes land improvements and radio communication equipment. 


Schedule of Comparison of Net Operating Results 
Arising from Different Capitalization Policies 
for the Fiscal Year Ended March 31, 1997 

(Unaudited) 




In Millions 



1997 


1996 

Based on the 1996/97 Estimates—Expenditure Basis 

Estimated 

$ 

Actual 

$ 

Actual 

$ 

Net operating revenue (expenditure) for the year. 

. 87 

(368) 

(369) 

Adjustments to agree to the 1997/98 Estimates comparative numbers: 




Less: cost of capital assets except land acquired during the year. 

. 84 

50 

38 

Add: amortization provision. 

. (73) 

(34) 

(24) 

Net operating expense in accordance with the 1997/98 Estimates. 

. 98 

(352) 

(355) 

Adjustment to capitalize land: 




Less: cost of land capital assets acquired during the year. 

. (3) 

25 

8 

Net operating revenue (expense) for the year. 

. 95 

(327) 

(347) 












































PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


C 11 

Schedule of Payments Based on Contributions Pursuant to Section 22(1) 
of the Financial Administration Act, 7981 for the 
Fiscal Year Ended March 31, 1997 

(Unaudited) 


$ 

Ministry/Agreement Description 

Agriculture 

Canada/BC Farm Business Management Agreement. 270 746 

Western Grain Transition Payment Program. g •] 35 

278,882 

Attorney General 

Ex Gratia Payment. 42 614 

RCMP Special Events Policing. 51 723 

Extra Policing-RCMP/ICBC. 1 ,451,353 

Enhanced 911 Study. 153,961 

1,699,656 

Children and Families 

Child Care Renewal. 4,185,014 

4,185,014 

Education 

Special Opportunity Grant. 3,388,602 

Forest Worker Training and Employment. 6,127,053 

Canadian Official Languages Program. 8,276,153 

Labour Mobility. 23,303 

Royal Roads. 3,750,000 

Special Investment Fund. 1 00,000 

21,665,111 

Employment and Investment 

British Columbia Investment Fund Ltd. 98,307 

Columbia Power Corporation. 601,129 

Forest Renewal BC (FRBC)—Science Council of BC. 92,257 

BC Hydro (IPP Panel). 73,791 

Royal Oak Maps. 4,651 

Job Protection Commission (JPC). 47,008 

BC Hydro (PowerSmart Program). 1 5,81 2 

FRBC—Vancouver Accommodation. 22,989 

Canadian Society of Petroleum Geologists—Public Education. 127 

CRD Earthquake Hazard Maps. 1,500 

Request for Proposal—Victoria Line. 36,086 

FRBC/JPC—Columbia Valley. 214,500 

BC Transporation Financing Authority (BCTFA). 233,539 

Gaming Project. 305,933 

FRBC/JPC—Forest Community Business Program. 55,961 

Casino Registration. 170,000 

Fuel Choice Study. 55,000 

Crown Corporations Secretariat (CCS)—BCTFA Accommodation Costs. 25,000 

CCS—Archipelago/Ferries. 47,004 

2,100,594 

Environment 

Forest Renewal BC. 90,217,471 

Neck Point Purchase. 3,500,000 

Production of an Access Planning Document. 21,000 

Science Council of BC. 419,049 

FRBC Startup Funding. 114,373 

Yellowstone Wolf Project. 2,474 

Environmental Youth Team. 1,100,259 


95,374,626 
















































C 12 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Schedule of Payments Based on Contributions Pursuant to Section 22(1) 
of the Financial Administration Act, 1981 for the 
Fiscal Year Ended March 31, 1997—Continued 

(Unaudited) 


$ 

Ministry/Agreement Description 

Forests 

Forest Renewal BC. 153,238,341 

153,238,341 

Health 

Inter-provincial Reciprocal Agreements—Hospital Care. 28,286,964 

Inter-provincial Reciprocal Agreements—Medical Services. 14,027,600 

Heart Health. 173,626 

Native Home Nursing. 2,167 

Occupational Therapy Outreach. 15,625 

Yukon Communicable Disease Program. 75,580 

Elderly Outreach Service. 13,345 

Seniors Impact on Drug Policy. 157,452 

HIV Surveillance System Study. 48,276 

Registered Dietician. 17,172 

Tobacco Enforcement. 159,116 

Hepatitis/Asthma Sentinel Surveillance Study. 57,242 

Veterans'Beds. 587,717 

MSP/WCB Administration. 123,643 

43,745,525 

Labour 

Human Resources Development Canada-Apprenticeship Scholarship . 28,232 

28,232 

Small Business 

Longitudinal Analysis. 42,750 

Forest Sector Employment. 61,650 

Columbia Basin Power. 94,000 

One Stop Business Registration. 49,350 

North American Indigenous Games (NAIG). 298,500 

Forest Community Economic Development Program. 663,617 

Federal Map Sales. 12,025 

Residential Accommodation for Government Agents. 8,799 

Supplementary Regional Agreement Thompson/Okanagan/Forest Renewal BC. 75,000 

Evaluation, Research and Analysis Support. 6,641 

Government Agents Training by ICBC. 4,034 

Annotated Bibliography and Database. 31,000 

Forest Renewal BC, Workforce in Communities. 2,587 

BC Online—One Stop Business Registration. 100,000 

IPS Consulting (NAIG). 52,000 

1,501,953 

Transportation 

Signal Installation, Parksville. 84,426 

Signal Installation, Highway 99 at Blueberry Drive. 18,000 

Highway 20, Williams Lake, Lighting Installation. 53,836 

Occupancy Charges, Cloverdale Yardsite. 131,975 

Annacis West Channel. 162,700 

Road Reporting, 1-900 Number. 100,110 

Thetis Lake Sewer Service. 6,368 

Broadway Connector, Burnaby. 52,215 

Sharon Developments Ltd. 35,000 

Old Lakelse Road Widening. 125,200 

Paving of Dogtooth Road. 40,1 50 

Jones Road, Asphalt Recycling. 1 2,350 


















































PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


C 13 


Schedule of Payments Based on Contributions Pursuant to Section 22(1) 
of the Financial Administration Act, 1981 for the 
Fiscal Year Ended March 31, 1997—Continued 

(Unaudited) 


$ 

Ministry/Agreement Description 

T ransportation —Conti n ued 

Highway 19 at Pym Road, Serialization. 25,702 

20th Avenue (Yellowhead Highway) and Spruce Street. 38,750 

Kenney Street, Signalization. 23,000 

BC Tel, Quality Assurance Fiber Optic Cable. 39,579 

8 th and 116th, Intersection Improvements. 1 40,187 

Front and Poplar Intersection. 23,496 

Traffic Controller, Highway 1 1 . 22,551 

Highway 97, Paving. 1,021 

Route 19 at Duke Point Ferry Terminal. 17,229 

Transfer of Mount Vesuvius Queen. 4,969 

Electronic Road Weather Station. 49,737 

Snow Plowing Residential Driveways. 4,960 

Railway Crossing Upgrade. 111,295 

Canada Way Corridor. 29,284 

Motor Carrier Regulatory Reform Workshop. 4,275 

Barnett Hastings Capital Project. 6,184 

Sanitary Sewer Sleeve. 9,379 

Utility Relocations. 22,646 

Landscape Development. 20,758 

Design Omission, Spencer Road to Highland Road. 4,695 

Audible Signals, Highway 19 and St. George Street. 4,136 

CounterAttack, Television Production. 225,000 

Route 19A and Jingle Pot Road. 4,000 

Route 19A and Hammond Bay Road. 3,588 

Seymour Creek Study. 4,500 

Cranberry/Harewood Sewer. 21,416 

Highway 10 at 1 32nd Street, Left Turn Signal. 3,750 

National Safety Code. 346,900 

Traffic Signal Installations. 215,957 

Signal Upgrade, Highway 99 at Lorimer. 50,000 

MVB/ICBC Operations. 8,869,072 

MVB/ICBC Traffic Safety Initiatives. 19,254,794 

Tsable River Bridge, Insurance Claim. 31,050 

Watkiss Way Sewer Casing. 5,315 

TCH/Victoria, Supply of Gravel. 9,750 

Sign Shop Recovery. 63,898 

30,535,153 

Total: 1996/97 . 354,353,087 


Total: 1995/96. 168,784,267 


Section 22(1) of the Financial Administration Act, 1981 authorizes payments "where under an Act, agreement or undertaking: 

(a) money is payable to the government, or 

(b) money has been received by the government, for the purpose of or as a contribution towards expenditures . . . received by the 
government." 

These payments are reflected in the main statements of the province. 
















































C 14 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Schedule of Payments Made to Honour Guarantees 
Pursuant to Section 58(3) of the Financial Administration Act , 1981 
for the Fiscal Year Ended March 31, 1997 

(Unaudited) 


Description of Item 

British Columbia Student Loan Program: $ 

Various lending institutions. 1 5,554,345 

Business Start-up Program. 1,256 

Mortgage Assistance Program: 

B.C. Second Mortgages. 192,468 

Buy backs from the Bank of Montreal. 74,124 

Total: 1996/97 . 15,822,193 

Total: 1995/96 . 35,031,781 


Section 58(3) of the Financial Administration Act , 1981 authorizes payments to honour guarantees and indemnities where the govern¬ 
ment has entered into an agreement to give a guarantee in connection with the issue or sale of securities. These payments are reflected in the 
main statements of the province. 


Schedule of Obligations Under Capital Leases 
Pursuant to Section 54(3) of the Financial Administration Act f 1981 
for the Fiscal Year Ended March 31,1997 

(Unaudited) 


Total: 1996/97 
Total: 1995/96 


$ 

0 

1,305,047 


Section 54(3) of the Financial Administration Act, 1981 requires disclosure of the financial obligations of the government under a lease 
when substantially all the risks and benefits of ownership of the property have been transferred to the government. These leases are reflected in 
the Public Accounts in accordance with the province's accounting policies. 





















PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


C 15 


Schedule of Investment Portfolio 

Pursuant to Section 36.2(3) of the Financial Administration Act; 1981 

as at March 31, 1997 

(Unaudited) 


Obligations of or guaranteed by Canada. 

Obligations of or guaranteed by the U.S.A. 

Obligations of or guaranteed by a province. 

Obligations of or guaranteed by savings institutions. 

Commercial paper issued by corporations incorporated under the laws of Canada or of 

a province . 

Bonds and debentures issued by corporations incorporated under the laws of Canada 

or of a province. 

Fully paid common shares of corporations incorporated under the laws of Canada or 

of a province. 

Fully paid shares of corporations incorporated in a foreign country. 

Total. 


(In Thousands) 

1997 1996 


Total 

(amortized 
book cost) 

$ 

Total 

(market value) 

$ 

Total 

(amortized 
book cost) 

$ 

11,547,031 

11,910,803 

14,209,459 

63,645 

60,868 

181,541 

6,796,105 

7,071,077 

7,051,764 

2,417,225 

2,416,004 

3,082,734 

821,272 

821,195 

126,231 

779,331 

809,566 

480,176 

9,872,674 

12,602,682 

7,005,606 

5,767,809 

6,560,262 

4,077,280 

38,065,092 

42,252,457 

36,214,791 






















C 16 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Explanatory Note on Appropriations 


The total appropriation amount presented includes the original estimate, statutory authorizations, special warrants and re-allocations 
within voted appropriations. 

Explanatory Notes on the Group Account Classifications 


Salaries and Benefits 

• Base Salaries —includes the cost of base salaries, overtime pay and lump sum payments, for all permanent and temporary direct employ¬ 
ees of the government. 

• Supplementary Salary Costs —includes the cost of extra pay such as premiums and allowances for certain types and locations of work, as 
well as for additional qualifications or responsibilities of the job. 

• Employee Benefits —includes the cost of employer contributions to employee benefit plans, pensions and other paid benefits. Employees' 
relocation and transfer expenses are also included. 

• Legislative Salaries and Indemnities —includes the cost of the annual indemnity and supplementary salaries for Members of the Legislative 
Assembly (MLA) as authorized under Sections 2 and 3 of the Legislative Assembly Allowances and Pension Act and salaries of members of 
the Executive Council and Officers of the Legislature. The expense allowances payable under subsection 2(1) are classified under Other 
Expenditures. 

Operating Costs 

• Boards, Commissions and Courts—Fees and Expenses —includes fees paid to board and commission members, appointed by Or- 
der-in-Council or by a Minister under an Act, juries and witnesses, and related travel and out-of-pocket expenses. 

• Public Servant Travel —includes travel expenses of direct government employees and officials while on government business, including 
travel expenses of Ministers' and Ministers' Office staff. 

• Professional Services —includes fees and expenses for professional services rendered directly to government such as legal, engineering or 
management consulting services. 

• Information Systems—Operating —includes all contract fees and costs related to data, voice, image and text processing operations and 
services such as data and word processing, data communication charges, supplies, repairs, maintenance and short-term rentals of infor¬ 
mation processing equipment. 

• Office and Business Expense —includes materials, supplies and services required for the operation of offices. 

• Advertising and Publications —includes costs associated with non-statutory advertising and general publications. 

• Statutory Notices, Annual Reports and Non-Discretionary Publications —includes costs associated with special notices and publications 
required by statute and regulations. 

• Utilities, Materials, Supplies and Vehicles — Operating and Maintenance Costs —includes the cost of services such as the supply of water 
and electricity, materials and supplies required for normal operation of government services, food for institutions and the costs associated 
with the repair and maintenance of government vehicles, machinery and equipment. 

• Building Occupancy Charges —includes payments to the British Columbia Buildings Corporation (BCBC) or the private sector, for the 
rental and maintenance of buildings and office accommodation. 

Asset Acquisitions 

• Information Systems —includes the major purchase or capital lease cost of information systems equipment and related software. Also in¬ 
cludes the development cost of new information systems. 

• Office Furniture and Equipment —includes the purchase or capital lease cost of office furniture and equipment such as desks, filing cabi¬ 
nets and photocopiers. 

• Land —includes the cost of purchasing, holding and developing land other than rights-of-way acquired for highways and bridges. 

• Highways, Roads and Bridges —includes the capital costs for construction and major improvements of roads, highways, bridges and ferry 
landings. 

• Buildings and Works —includes the purchase, construction or major improvement of buildings which are not part of the BCBC inventory. 

• Machinery, Equipment and Vehicles —includes the purchase or capital lease cost of aircraft, ships, vehicles, machinery and equipment. 

Grants and Contributions 

• Grants —includes grant payments of a general nature to individuals, businesses, non-profit associations and others in accordance with es¬ 
tablished eligibility criteria, where there are no contractual requirements. 

• Contributions —includes payments made under the authority of a contract, agreement or statute, to public bodies and organizations for the 
provision of specific goods and/or services to the general public where the government has some control over how the funds are to be 
spent, what goods and/or services are to be provided and which groups are to receive these goods and/or services. 


PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


C 17 


Explanatory Notes on the Group Account Classifications— Continued 
Other Expenditures 

• Transfers Between Votes and Special Accounts and Funds —includes all transfers (payments) between a vote and a Special Account or a 
Special Fund. 

• Inventories for Resale —includes payments made for the direct purchase of items to be held for resale to other government entities, or the 
private sector, or for redistribution within government, and adjustments for year-end inventory counts. 

• Interest on the Public Debt —includes only interest payments on the direct provincial debt borrowed for government purposes. 

• Other Expenditures —includes expenditures which cannot be reasonably allocated to another standard object of expenditure, such as fi¬ 
nancing costs, valuation allowances and certain M.L.A. expenses under the Legislative Assembly Allowances and Pension Act. 

Recoveries 

• Recoveries Between Votes and Special Accounts and Funds —includes all recoveries between a vote and a Special Account or a Special 
Fund. 

• Recoveries Within Government —includes recoveries for the use of equipment or the provision of goods and services within or between 
ministries and other entities of the provincial government included in the Consolidated Revenue Fund. 

• Recoveries External to Government —includes costs and amounts recovered from government corporations, other levels of government, 
non-government organizations and the amortization of previously established liabilities. 



C 18 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Legislation— (Unaudited) 




-Total Appropriations- 




Budget 

Other 

Total 

Description 

Estimated 

Re-allocations 

Authorizations 

Appropriations 


$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

Legislation 





Members' Indemnities and Allowances. 

4,906,350 



4,906,350 

Members' Constituency Support. 

4,954,592 



4,954,592 

Legislative Committees. 

50,000 



50,000 

Inter-Parliamentary Relations. 

67,500 



67,500 

Legislative Documents. 

450,000 



450,000 

Parliamentary Dining Room (net of recoveries). 

100,000 



100,000 

Caucus Support Services. 

3,792,096 

455,294 


4,247,390 

Office of the Speaker. 

280,129 



280,129 

Clerk of the House. 

842,024 



842,024 

Legislative Accounting/Assembly Services. 

535,857 



535,857 

Human Resources. 

156,850 



156,850 

Computer Systems. 

86,015 



86,015 

Legislative Internship Program. 

115,450 



115,450 

Sergeant-at-Arms. 

1,636,819 



1,636,819 

Hansard. 

1,535,650 



1,535,650 

Legislative Library. 

2,135,890 



2,135,890 

Legislative Building Improvements. 

646,000 



646,000 

Communications and Other Centralized Expenses. 

2,002,778 

(455,294) 


1,547,484 

Statutory Appropriation. 



6,328,180 

6,328,180 

Total Expense. 

24,294,000 

0 

6,328,180 

30,622,180 

Breakdown of Other Authorizations— 





Statutory Appropriations—within vote. 

6,328,180 





6,328,180 








































PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


-Actual Expenditure by Group Account Classification 


Salaries 

Operating 

Asset 

Grants and 

Other 



and Benefits 

Costs 

Acquisitions 

Contributions 

Expenditures 

Recoveries 

Total 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

3,853,373 




1,571,994 


5 , 425,367 





6,443,772 


6 , 443,772 


60,704 



628,185 


688,889 


4,073 


24,338 

71,106 


99,517 


314,752 





314,752 

170,321 

124,797 




(119,530) 

175,588 

3,408,965 

591,447 

419,863 




4 , 420,275 

192,680 

69,071 

4,543 


28,272 


294,566 

792,547 

67,122 

19,618 


12,463 


891,750 

491,101 

101,596 

5,993 




598,690 

106,489 

8,141 

856 




115,486 

79,006 

5,642 

10,165 




94,813 

99,662 

18,062 



4,725 


122,449 

1,882,920 

298,931 





2 , 181,851 

1,085,761 

647,014 

80,309 




1 , 813,084 

1,578,776 

423,534 

17,975 




2 , 020,285 


772,862 

13,824 




786,686 


3,958,796 

175,564 




4 , 134,360 


0 


13 , 741,601 

7 , 466,544 

748,710 

24,338 

8 , 760,517 

( 119 , 530 ) 

30 , 622,180 


C 19 


Net Under (Over) 
$ 

(519,017) 

(1,489,180) 

(638,889) 

(32,017) 

135,248 

(75,588) 

(172,885) 

(14,437) 

(49,726) 

(62,833) 

41,364 

(8,798) 

(6,999) 

(545,032) 

(277,434) 

115,605 

(140,686) 

(2,586,876) 

6,328,180 

0 




























C 20 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Auditor General— (Unaudited) 


■Total Appropriations- 


Vote Budget Other 

IMo Description Estimated Re-allocations Authorizations 

$ $ $ 

2 Auditor General. 7,392,000 

Total Expense. 7,392,000 0 0 


Total 

Appropriations 

$ 

7,392,000 

7,392,000 


















PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


C 21 




-Actual Expenditure by Group Account Classification- 



Salaries 
and Benefits 
$ 

Operating 

Costs 

$ 

Asset 

Acquisitions 

$ 

Grants and 
Contributions 
$ 

Other 

Expenditures 

$ 

Recoveries 

$ 

Total 

$ 

Net Under (Over) 
$ 

5,816,347 

1,492,004 

201,246 

57,000 


(494,146) 

7,072,451 

319,549 

5,816,347 

1,492,004 

201,246 

57,000 

0 

(494,146) 

7,072,451 

319,549 




























C 22 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Office of the Child, Youth and Family Advocate— (Unaudited) 





-Total Appropriations- 


Vote 



Budget 

Other 

Total 

No. 

Description 

Estimated 

Re-allocations 

Authorizations 

Appropriations 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

3 

Office of the Child, Youth and Family Advocate. 

1,040,000 



1,040,000 


Total Expense. 

1,040,000 

0 

0 

1,040,000 


















PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


C 23 




-Actual Expenditure by Group Account Classification- 



Salaries 
and Benefits 
$ 

Operating 

Costs 

$ 

Asset 

Acquisitions 

$ 

Grants and 
Contributions 
$ 

Other 

Expenditures 

$ 

Recoveries 

$ 

Total 

$ 

Net Under (Over) 
$ 

579,855 

334,848 

38,501 

32,000 

35 


985,239 

54,761 

579,855 

334,848 

38,501 

32,000 

35 

0 

985,239 

54,761 




























C 24 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Conflict of Interest Commissioner— (Unaudited) 





-Total Appropriations- 


Vote 



Budget 

Other 

Total 

No. 

Description 

Estimated 

Re-allocations 

Authorizations 

Appropriations 



$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

4 

Conflict of Interest Commissioner. 

. 178,000 



178,000 


Total Expense. 

. 178,000 

0 

0 

178,000 


















PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


C 25 




-Actua 

il Expenditure by Gr( 

aup Account Classification-— 



Salaries 

Operating 

Asset 

Grants and 

Other 



and Benefits 

Costs 

Acquisitions 

Contributions 

Expenditures Recoveries 

Total 

Net Under (Over) 

$ 

66,453 

$ 

56,980 

$ 

$ 

$ $ 

$ 

123,433 

$ 

54,567 

66,453 

56,980 

0 

0 

0 0 

123,433 

54,567 




























C 26 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Elections B.C.— (Unaudited) 


Vote 

No. Description 

5 Office of the Chief Electoral Officer.... 
Statutory Services. 

Total Expenditure. 

Tangible Capital Assets. 

Amortization Expense. 

Total Expense. 

Breakdown of Other Authorizations— 

Tangible Capital Assets. 

Amortization Expense. 


Estimated 

$ 

3,767,000 

20,200,000 

-Total Appropriations- 

Budget Other 

Re-allocations Authorizations 

$ $ 

Total 

Appropriations 

$ 

3,767,000 

20,200,000 

23,967,000 

0 

0 

23,967,000 



(44,989) 

(44,989) 



215,469 

215,469 

23,967,000 

0 

170,480 

24,137,480 


(44,989) 

215,469 


170,480 
































PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


C 27 




-Actual Expenditure by Group Account Classification- 



Salaries 
and Benefits 
$ 

Operating 

Costs 

$ 

Asset 

Acquisitions 

$ 

Grants and 
Contributions 
$ 

Other 

Expenditures 

$ 

Recoveries 

$ 

Total 

$ 

Net Under (Over) 
$ 

2,181,935 

1,264,435 

197,562 

0 

1,955 


3,645,887 

121,113 

3,044,129 

11,815,153 

234,278 

0 

120,704 


15,214,264 

4,985,736 

5,226,064 

13,079,588 

431,840 

0 

122,659 

0 

18,860,151 

5,106,849 



(44,989) 




(44,989) 

0 



215,469 




215,469 

0 

5,226,064 

13,079,588 

602,320 

0 

122,659 

0 

19,030,631 

5,106,849 







































C 28 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Information and Privacy Commissioner—(Unaudited) 


Total Appropriations- 


Vote 



Budget 

Other 

Total 

No. 

Description 

Estimated 

Re-allocations 

Authorizations 

Appropriations 



$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

6 

Information and Privacy Commissioner.. 

. 2,630,000 



2,630,000 


Total Expense. 

. 2,630,000 

0 

0 

2,630,000 


















PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


C 29 


-Actual Expenditure by Croup Account Classification 


Salaries 

Operating 

Asset 

Grants and 

and Benefits 

Costs 

Acquisitions 

Contributions 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

1,651,994 

726,612 

35,681 


1,651,994 

726,612 

35,681 

( 


Other 

Expenditures 

Recoveries 

Total 

Net Under (Over) 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

2,836 

0 

2,417,123 

212,877 

2,836 

0 

2,417,123 

212,877 




























C 30 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Ombudsman— (Unaudited) 


-Total Appropriations- 


Vote Budget Other 

fsj 0 Description Estimated Re-allocations Authorizations 

$ $ $ 

7 Ombudsman. 4,819,000 

Total Expense. 4,819,000 0 0 


Total 

Appropriations 

$ 

4,819,000 

4,819,000 


















PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


C 31 




-Actual Expenditure by Group Account Classification- 



Salaries 
and Benefits 
$ 

Operating 

Costs 

$ 

Asset 

Acquisitions 

$ 

Grants and 
Contributions 
$ 

Other 

Expenditures Recoveries 

$ $ 

Total 

$ 

Net Under (Over) 
$ 

3,382,732 

1,180,824 

250,974 


0 

4,814,530 

4,470 

3,382,732 

1,180,824 

250,974 

0 

0 0 

4,814,530 

4,470 




























C 32 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Office of the Premier— (Unaudited) 


-Total Appropriations- 


Vote 



Budget 

Other 

Total 

No. 

Description 

Estimated 

Re-allocations 

Authorizations 

Appropriations 


$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

8 

Office of the Premier 






Office of the Premier. 

. 1,843,794 

15,000 


1,858,794 


Deputy Minister's Office. 

. 565,206 

(15,000) 


550,206 


Total Expense. 

. 2,409,000 

0 

0 

2,409,000 



















PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


C 33 


•Actual Expenditure by Croup Account Classification 


Salaries 
and Benefits 
$ 

Operating 

Costs 

$ 

Asset 

Acquisitions 

$ 

Grants and 
Contributions 
$ 

1,788,771 

61,231 

8,748 


465,930 

78,570 

5,136 


2,254,701 

139,801 

13,884 

( 


Other 

Expenditures 

$ 

Recoveries 

$ 

Total 

$ 

Net Under (Over) 
$ 



1,858,750 

44 

0 


549,636 

570 

0 

0 

2,408,386 

614 




























C 34 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Ministry of Aboriginal Affairs— (Unaudited) 





-Total Appropriations- 


Vote 

No. 

Description 

Estimated 

$ 

Budget 

Re-allocations 

$ 

Other 

Authorizations 

$ 

Total 

Appropriations 

$ 

9 

10 

Minister's Office. 

Ministry Operations 

332,000 



332,000 


Support to Treaty Negotiations and Other Initiatives (net of 

recoveries). 

Treaty Negotiations. 

19,202,440 

9,550,560 



19,202,440 

9,550,560 


Statutory— 

28,753,000 

0 

0 

28,753,000 


Special Account— 






First Citizens' Fund. 

2,900,000 



2,900,000 


Total Expense. 

31,985,000 

0 

0 

31,985,000 

























PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


C 35 




-Actual Expenditure by Group Account Classification- 



Salaries 
and Benefits 
$ 

Operating 

Costs 

$ 

Asset 

Acquisitions 

$ 

Grants and 
Contributions 
$ 

Other 

Expenditures 

$ 

Recoveries 

$ 

Total 

$ 

Net Under (Over) 
$ 

278,662 

12,494 





291,156 

40,844 

6,589,306 

3,673,007 

663,699 

4,067,064 

2,906 

(150,000) 

14,845,982 

4,356,458 

4,228,872 

1,907,117 


3,412,441 

77,345 


9,625,775 

(75,215) 

10,818,178 

5,580,124 

663,699 

7,479,505 

80,251 

(150,000) 

24,471,757 

4,281,243 


41,356 


2,756,998 



2,798,354 

101,646 

11,096,840 

5,633,974 

663,699 

10,236,503 

80,251 

(150,000) 

27,561,267 

4,423,733 





































C 36 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food— (Unaudited) 


Vote 

No. Description 

11 Minister's Office. 

12 Ministry Operations 

Administration and Support Services. 

Financial Programs (net of recoveries) 

Financial Development Programs. 

Revenue Protection Plan. 

Crop Insurance. 

Net Income Stabilization Account. 

Fisheries and Food (net of recoveries). 

Agriculture (net of recoveries). 

1 3 Provincial Agricultural Land Commission. 

14 British Columbia Marketing Board. 

15 Okanagan ValleyTree Fruit Authority. 

Statutory— 

Canada/BC Farm Business Management Agreement. 

Western Grain Transition Payment Program. 

Cattle Horn Act . 

Special Accounts— 

Grazing Enhancement Fund. 

Livestock Protection. 

Less transfer from Vote 12 to the Grazing Enhancement 
Fund Special Account. 

Total Expenditure. 

Tangible Capital Assets. 

Amortization Expense. 

Total Expense. 

Breakdown of Other Authorizations— 

Statutory Appropriations. 

Tangible Capital Assets. 

Amortization Expense.:. 


—Total Appropriations- 

Budget Other Total 


Estimated 

Re-allocations 

Authorizations 

Appropriations 

$ 

$ 


$ 

$ 

400,867 




400,867 

12,069,546 




12,069,546 

2,772,325 

1,200,000 


3,972,325 

98,249 




98,249 

4,861,197 

(1,200,000) 


3,661,197 

5,007,500 




5,007,500 

9,552,637 




9,552,637 

25,827,408 




25,827,408 

60,188,862 


0 

0 

60,188,862 

2,822,244 




2,822,244 

789,027 




789,027 

2,880,000 




2,880,000 





0 





0 




14,600 

14,600 

3,340,000 




3,340,000 

20,000 




20,000 

(2,340,000) 




(2,340,000) 

68,101,000 


0 

14,600 

68,115,600 




(194,000) 

(194,000) 




127,772 

127,772 

68,101,000 


0 

(51,628) 

68,049,372 


14,600 

(194,000) 

127,772 


(51,628) 




















































PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


C 37 


-Actual Expenditure by Group Account Classification 


Salaries 

Operating 

Asset 

Grants and 

Other 




and Benefits 

Costs 

Acquisitions 

Contributions 

Expenditures 

Recoveries 

Total 

Net Under (Over) 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

362,138 

10,873 

620 


2 


373,633 

27,234 

4,751,259 

3,350,654 

590,876 

2,004,400 

124,820 


10,822,009 

1,247,537 

470,196 

277,610 

69,000 

3,102,982 

132,633 

(1,278,174) 

2,774,247 

1,198,078 


18,300 


22,681 


(9,150) 

31,831 

66,418 

2,019,987 

1,031,264 


2,203,988 

7 

(1,800,881) 

3,454,365 

206,832 


48 


4,978,038 



4,978,086 

29,414 

4,584,276 

2,815,895 

63,244 

1,787,273 

4 


9,250,692 

301,945 

13,464,664 

6,673,014 

206,466 

1,675,412 

2,365,982 

(1,286) 

24,384,252 

1,443,156 

25,290,382 

14,166,785 

929,586 

15,774,774 

2,623,446 

(3,089,491) 

55,695,482 

4,493,380 

1,660,475 

1,074,004 

19,450 

18,300 

4 

(7,572) 

2,764,661 

57,583 

293,428 

308,006 

27,250 




628,684 

160,343 




2,880,000 



2,880,000 

0 


119,037 

5,329 

146,380 


(270,746) 

0 

0 


8,136 




(8,136) 

0 

0 




14,600 



14,600 

0 


735,590 

87,594 

144,734 



967,918 

2,372,082 


2,639 


5,776 



8,415 

11,585 





(2,340,000) 


(2,340,000) 

0 

27,606,423 

16,425,070 

1,069,829 

18,984,564 

283,452 

(3,375,945) 

60,993,393 

7,122,207 



(194,000) 




(194,000) 

0 



127,772 




127,772 

0 

27,606,423 

16,425,070 

1,003,601 

18,984,564 

283,452 

(3,375,945) 

60,927,165 

7,122,207 












































C 38 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Ministry of Attorney General— (Unaudited) 


-Total Appropriations- 


Vote 

No. Description 

16 Minister's Office. 

17 Ministry Operations 

Administration and Support Services (net of recoveries).... 
Court Services (net of recoveries) 

Management Services. 

Registry and Trial Support. 

Security and Escorts. 

Legal Services (net of recoveries). 

Criminal Justice. 

Community Justice (net of recoveries). 

Corrections (net of recoveries) 

Management Services. 

Adult Correctional Centres. 

Youth Custody Centres. 

Probation, Family and Community Services. 

Public Safety and Regulatory Services (net of recoveries) 

Police Services Division. 

Security Programs. 

Provincial Emergency Program. 

Film Classification. 

Gaming, Audit and Investigation. 

Agencies, Boards and Commissions (net of recoveries). 

Land Titles Branch. 

Coordinated Law Enforcement Unit (net of recoveries). 

Multiculturalism, Immigration and British Columbia 
Council of Human Rights (net of recoveries) 

Multiculturalism and Immigration. 

British Columbia Council of Human Rights. 

18 Statutory Services 

Criminal Injury Compensation Act . 

Crown Proceeding Act .<. 

Emergency Program Act . 

Inquiry Act . 

Valuation Allowance. 

19 Judiciary 

Superior Courts. 

Provincial Courts. 


Estimated 

$ 

Budget 

Re-allocations 

$ 

Other 

Authorizations 

$ 

Total 

Appropriations 

$ 

425,473 



425,473 

42,829,960 

1,442,282 


44,272,242 

4,991,961 

107,423 


5,099,384 

109,441,229 

(2,462,040) 


106,979,189 

24,620,922 

2,455,416 


27,076,338 

23,677,608 

478,472 


24,156,080 

59,046,844 

2,014,487 


61,061,331 

126,862,870 

(2,691,614) 


124,171,256 

8,512,649 

476,730 


8,989,379 

146,501,676 

4,647,907 

8,600,000 

159,749,583 

28,888,052 

(6,814,878) 

6,830,000 

28,903,174 

60,854,762 

(1,996,588) 

3,000,000 

61,858,174 

138,631,233 

(1,791,226) 


136,840,007 

1,633,525 

260,050 


1,893,575 

3,326,619 

427,229 


3,753,848 

909,119 

12,835 


921,954 

1,230,982 

9,018 


1,240,000 

17,154,871 

(177,705) 


16,977,166 

19,951,208 

4,929,731 


24,880,939 

5,831,454 

50,111 


5,881,565 


9,874,166 

(844,316) 


9,029,850 

5,206,596 

(533,324) 


4,673,272 

839,978,306 

0 

18,430,000 

858,408,306 

11,800,000 


14,890,591 

26,690,591 

1,740,000 


(9,650,085) 

(7,910,085) 

1,990,509 


20,721,335 

22,711,844 

100,000 


1,213,499 

1,313,499 

100,000 


3,180,562 

3,280,562 

15,730,509 

0 

30,355,902 

46,086,411 

9,066,878 



9,066,878 

27,083,874 



27,083,874 

36,150,752 

0 

0 

36,150,752 


Statutory— 

Liquor Control and Licencing. 

Ex Gratia Payment. 

RCMP Special Events Policing 
Extra Policing—RCMP/ICBC .. 

Enhanced 911 Study. 

Unclaimed Monies. 


5,014,339 


381,115 


5,014,339 

0 

0 

0 

0 

381,115 



















































PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


C 39 


•Actual Expenditure by Croup Account Classification- 


Salaries 

Operating 

Asset 

Grants and 

Other 




and Benefits 

Costs 

Acquisitions 

Contributions 

Expenditures 

Recoveries 

Total 

Net Under (Over) 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

378,310 

23,067 

12,802 


1,308 


415,487 

9,986 

22,766,350 

12,531,594 

3,497,311 

4,631,928 

756,675 

(38,334) 

44,145,524 

126,718 

2,451,308 

1,454,668 

757,219 


94,247 


4,757,442 

341,942 

41,519,437 

63,197,427 

1,990,131 


16,480 

(90,000) 

106,633,475 

345,714 

22,446,664 

4,470,053 

43,195 


1,096 


26,961,008 

115,330 

13,500,041 

10,095,114 

365,549 

6,000 

157,057 


24,123,761 

32,319 

42,955,716 

17,840,163 

456,263 

137,610 

472,971 

(723,437) 

61,139,286 

(77,955) 

10,472,391 

8,614,641 

68,767 

104,976,863 

1,059 

(116,007) 

124,017,714 

153,542 

6,064,535 

2,451,886 

81,199 

(305) 

29,721 


8,627,036 

362,343 

79,777,063 

61,809,556 

946,798 

21,306,683 

8,401 

(4,622,516) 

159,225,985 

523,598 

25,749,039 

7,759,352 

66,203 

4,949,512 

673 

(9,746,858) 

28,777,921 

125,253 

33,013,473 

8,375,751 

245,273 

20,137,281 

843 

(57,604) 

61,715,017 

143,157 

1,933,921 

2,300,167 

403,354 

132,694,655 


(599,250) 

136,732,847 

107,160 

1,648,631 

722,706 

40,283 


1,955 

(506,514) 

1,907,061 

(13,486) 

1,917,308 

1,383,554 

97,095 

558,226 

489 

(595,466) 

3,361,206 

392,642 

715,570 

158,140 

52,975 


489 


927,174 

(5,220) 

599,395 

165,160 

45,436 




809,991 

430,009 

7,762,785 

9,826,573 

198,353 

275,500 

6,717 

(100,113) 

17,969,815 

(992,649) 

8,928,850 

6,161,537 

9,601,989 


9,631 


24,702,007 

178,932 

2,950,008 

3,194,528 

237,197 


4,205 

(508,328) 

5,877,610 

3,955 


2,613,563 

1,173,929 

106,993 

4,621,354 

50,000 

(1,100) 

8,564,739 

465,111 

2,467,911 

1,240,388 

350,590 

258,800 

2,068 


4,319,757 

353,515 

332,253,959 

224,926,887 

19,652,173 

294,554,107 

1,614,777 

(17,705,527) 

855,296,376 

3,111,930 


80 


26,690,511 



26,690,591 

0 





(7,910,085) 


(7,910,085) 

0 

716,315 

15,171,208 

31,718 

6,995,533 


(202,930) 

22,711,844 

0 

90,052 

1,072,800 

150,647 




1,313,499 

0 





3,280,562 


3,280,562 

0 

806,367 

16,244,088 

182,365 

33,686,044 

(4,629,523) 

(202,930) 

46,086,411 

0 

7,686,444 

1,021,706 

337,912 


5,231 


9,051,293 

15,585 

23,703,847 

2,648,569 

481,008 

229,440 

15 


27,062,879 

20,995 

31,390,291 

3,670,275 

818,920 

229,440 

5,246 

0 

36,114,172 

36,580 


3,887,751 1,034,180 101,075 


978 (9,645) 5,014,339 0 

42,614 (42,614) 0 0 

(51,728) 0 0 

(1,451,353) 0 0 

(153,961) 0 0 

381,115 0 


153,961 


51,728 

1,451,353 


381,115 




























C 40 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Ministry of Attorney General— (Unaudited)—Continued 


Vote 

No. 


Description 


Special Accounts— 

Forfeited Crime Proceeds Fund. 

Inmate Work Program. 

Public Trustee Operating Account. 

Less transfer to the General Account from the Inmate Work 
Program Special Account. 

Total Expenditure. 

Tangible Capital Assets. 

Amortization Expense. 

Total Expense. 

Breakdown of Other Authorizations— 

Statutory Appropriation—within Vote. 

Statutory Appropriations. 

Special Warrant. 

Inter-account transfer. 

Valuation Allowance. 

Tangible Capital Assets. 

Amortization Expense. 



-Total Appropriations- 


Estimated 

$ 

Budget 

Re-allocations 

$ 

Other 

Authorizations 

$ 

Total 

Appropriations 

$ 

1,185,743 



1,185,743 

1,492,365 



1,492,365 

10,602,852 



10,602,852 



(508,531) 

(508,531) 

905,566,000 

0 

53,672,825 

959,238,825 



(10,330,829) 

(10,330,829) 



2,253,285 

2,253,285 

905,566,000 

0 

45,595,281 

951,161,281 


27,175,340 

5,395,454 

18,430,000 

(508,531) 

3,180,562 

(10,330,829) 

2,253,285 


45,595,281 







































PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


C 41 




-Actua 

1 Expenditure by Grc 

)up Account Classify 

ration--— 



Salaries 
and Benefits 
$ 

Operating 

Costs 

$ 

Asset 

Acquisitions 

$ 

Grants and 
Contributions 
$ 

Other 

Expenditures 

$ 

Recoveries 

$ 

Total 

$ 

Net Under (Over) 
$ 

5,963,408 

678,628 

3,506,924 

39,143 

250,085 

523,939 

122,865 

567,304 

(421,655) 

0 

1,364,575 

9,866,066 

1,185,743 

127,790 

736,786 





(508,531) 


(508,531) 

0 

374,680,086 

250,238,010 

21,056,563 

(10,330,829) 

2,253,285 

330,496,611 

(2,401,847) 

(20,039,413) 

954,030,010 

(10,330,829) 

2,253,285 

5,208,815 

0 

0 

374,680,086 

250,238,010 

12,979,019 

330,496,611 

(2,401,847) 

(20,039,413) 

945,952,466 

5,208,815 




































C 42 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Ministry for Children and Families— (Unaudited) 


Vote 

No. Description 

Statutory— 

Ministry Operations (Vote 21) (net of recoveries) 
Administration and Support Services (net of recoveries).. 

Student Services (net of recoveries). 

Schools Funding (net of recoveries) 

Operating Contributions, Public Schools. 

School Support Contributions. 

Operating Contributions, Independent Schools. 

Ministry Operations (Vote 40) 

Corporate Programs (net of recoveries) 

Administration and Support Services. 

Strategic Programs. 

Regional Programs (net of recoveries) 

Program Management. 

Debt Servicing and Building Occupancy. 

Provincial Programs. 

Regional Health Programs. 

Ministry Operations (Vote 52) 

Administration and Support Services. 

Child, Family and Community Services (net of recoveries) 

Program Management. 

Family and Youth Support Services. 

Child in Care Services. 

Community Support Services (net of recoveries) 

Program Management. 

Services for Children with Mental Handicaps or Spe¬ 
cial Needs. 

Services for Adults with Mental Handicaps or Multi¬ 
ple Disabilities. 

Projects to Support Communities.. 

Institutional Care. 

Health Services (net of recoveries) 

Program Management. 

Health Care and Dental Services. 

Healthy Kids. 

Ministry Operations (Vote 56) 

Ministry Support. 

Programs 

Child Care. 

Stopping the Violence. 

Child Care Renewal. 

Total Expenditure. 

Tangible Capital Assets. 

Amortization Expense. 

Total Expense. 

Breakdown of Other Authorizations- 

Tangible Capital Assets. 

Amortization Expense. 


-Total Appropriations- 


Estimated 

$ 

Budget 

Re-allocations 

$ 

Other 

Authorizations 

$ 

Total 

Appropriations 

$ 


49,000 

485,000 


49,000 

485,000 


20,300,000 

929,000 

4,950,000 


20,300,000 

929,000 

4,950,000 

0 

26,713,000 

0 

26,713,000 


1,638,900 

282,100 


1,638,900 

282,100 


5,500,000 

3,191,000 

21,785,000 

109,000,000 


5,500,000 

3,191,000 

21,785,000 

109,000,000 

0 

141,397,000 

0 

141,397,000 


37,999,076 


37,999,076 


140,989,440 

97,166,498 

152,030,522 


140,989,440 

97,166,498 

152,030,522 


32,032,262 


32,032,262 


55,498,643 


55,498,643 


329,712,699 

1 1,538,194 
14,096,628 


329,712,699 

11,538,194 

14,096,628 


846,928 

6,896,204 

6,529,331 


846,928 

6,896,204 

6,529,331 

0 

885,336,425 

0 

885,336,425 


3,518,000 


3,518,000 


191,891,000 

1,814,000 


191,891,000 

1,814,000 

0 

197,223,000 

0 

197,223,000 

0 

0 

1,250,669,425 

0 

(2,951,224) 

171,644 

1,250,669,425 

(2,951,224) 

171,644 

0 

1,250,669,425 

(2,779,580) 

1,247,889,845 


(2,951,224) 

171,644 


(2,779,580) 








































































PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


C 43 


•Actual Expenditure by Croup Account Classification 


Salaries 
and Benefits 
$ 

Operating 

Costs 

$ 

Asset 

Acquisitions 

$ 

Grants and 
Contributions 
$ 

Other 

Expenditures 

$ 

Recoveries 

$ 

Total 

$ 

Net Under (Over) 
$ 

35,151 

218,048 

11,000 
45,641 


100,200 



46,151 

363,889 

2,849 

121,111 




17,527,726 

929,000 

4,950,000 



17,527,726 

929,000 

4,950,000 

2,772,274 

0 

0 

253,199 

56,641 

0 

23,506,926 

0 

0 

23,816,766 

2,896,234 

1,532,898 

275,653 

106,002 

6,447 





1,638,900 

282,100 

0 

0 

4,472,537 

11,134,417 

24,525,993 

709,086 

3,191,000 

1,103,710 

2,298,526 

72,332 

272,772 

637,798 

4,228 

6,291,914 

81,945,560 

646,425 

178 

(516,075) 

(1,491,514) 

5,258,361 

3,191,000 

18,286,738 

108,562,788 

241,639 

0 

3,498,262 

437,212 

41,941,498 

7,414,771 

982,902 

88,241,702 

646,425 

(2,007,411) 

137,219,887 

4,177,113 

21,463,687 

14,177,392 

986,511 

139,899 

1,231,587 


37,999,076 

0 

102,757,710 

35,742,699 

2,489,031 




140,989,440 

0 


41,111 


97,125,387 



97,166,498 

0 


258,505 


157,484,952 


(5,712,935) 

152,030,522 

0 

23,219,288 

8,049,052 

468,722 

292,198 

3,002 


32,032,262 

0 


231 


55,498,412 



55,498,643 

0 

23,418 



329,816,390 


(127,109) 

329,712,699 

0 


9,654 


11,528,540 



11,538,194 

0 

10,230,279 

3,000,260 

19,854 

1,022,860 


(176,625) 

14,096,628 

0 

459,160 

387,768 





846,928 

0 




6,896,204 



6,896,204 

0 




6,529,331 



6,529,331 

0 

158,153,542 

61,666,672 

3,964,118 

666,334,173 

1,234,589 

(6,016,669) 

885,336,425 

0 

558,945 

1,999,345 

266,903 

200,000 

136,730 


3,161,923 

356,077 

7,935,205 

977,145 

78,242 

164,085,201 



173,075,793 

18,815,207 




1,814,294 



1,814,294 

(294) 

8,494,150 

2,976,490 

345,145 

166,099,495 

136,730 

0 

178,052,010 

19,170,990 

290,206 

1,474,423 


2,420,385 


(4,185,014) 

0 

0 

209,132,595 

73,588,997 

5,292,165 

946,602,681 

2,017,744 

(12,209,094) 

1,224,425,088 

26,244,337 



(2,951,224) 




(2,951,224) 

0 



171,644 




171,644 

0 

209,132,595 

73,588,997 

2,512,585 

946,602,681 

2,017,744 

(12,209,094) 

1,221,645,508 

26,244,337 



































































C 44 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Ministry of Education, Skills and Training— (Unaudited) 


Vote 

No. Description 

20 Minister's Office. 

21 Ministry Operations 

Administration and Support Services (net of recoveries).... 
Educational Programs and Accountability (net of recoveries) 

Student Services (net of recoveries). 

Schools Funding (net of recoveries) 

Program Management. 

Operating Contributions, Public Schools. 

Debt Service Contributions, Public Schools. 

School Support Contributions. 

Operating Contributions, Independent Schools. 

Post Secondary Education Programs (net of recoveries) 

Program Management. 

Educational Institutions and Organizations. 

Matching Program, Universities. 

Grants in Lieu of Property Taxes. 

Student Financial Assistance Programs. 

Capital Debt Servicing. 

Skills Development Programs. 

Statutory— 

Special Opportunity Grant. 

Forest Worker Training and Employment. 

Canadian Official Languages Program. 

Labour Mobility. 

Royal Roads. 

Special Investment Fund. 

Valuation Allowance. 

Total Expenditure. 

Amortization Expense. 

Total Expense. 

Breakdown of Other Authorizations— 

Valuation Allowance. 

Amortization Expense. 


—Total Appropriations- 

Budget Other Total 


Estimated 

Re-allocations 

Authorizations Appropriations 

$ 

$ 

$ $ 

460,000 


460,000 

29,827,777 

(49,000) 

29,778,777 

29,631,237 

(22,000) 

29,609,237 

12,202,363 

(363,000) 

11,839,363 

5,627,527 

(1,400,000) 

4,227,527 

3,480,739,357 

(4,150,000) 

3,476,589,357 

395,000,000 

(500,000) 

394,500,000 

56,657,470 

3,171,000 

59,828,470 

132,055,969 

(5,400,000) 

126,655,969 

11,121,743 

705,000 

11,826,743 

1,126,973,000 

(14,905,000) 

1,112,068,000 

6,500,000 


6,500,000 

2,200,000 


2,200,000 

99,191,000 

14,200,000 

113,391,000 

235,251,000 


235,251,000 

171,238,557 

(18,000,000) 

153,238,557 


5,794,217,000 (26,713,000) 0 5,767,504,000 


0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

375 375 

5,794,677,000 (26,713,000) 375 5,767,964,375 

202,780 202,780 

5,794,677,000 (26,713,000) 203,155 5,768,167,155 


375 

202,780 

203,155 





















































PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


C 45 


Salaries 

Operating 

-Actual Expenditure by Croup Account Classificat 

Asset Grants and Other 

ion- 



and Benefits 

Costs 

Acquisitions 

Contributions 

Expenditures 

Recoveries 

Total 

Net Under (Over) 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

337,386 

21,299 

121 




358,806 

101,194 

13,328,120 

10,534,076 

1,096,306 

919,319 

460,019 

(575,126) 

25,762,714 

4,016,063 

9,208,809 

14,016,120 

348,639 

5,876,295 


(1,772,840) 

27,677,023 

1,932,214 

1,828,282 

2,165,324 

357,664 

2,648,708 


(4,128) 

6,995,850 

4,843,513 

3,002,226 

1,200,087 

12,907 

5,000 



4,220,220 

7,307 


849 


3,476,502,007 



3,476,502,856 

86,501 




394,492,517 



394,492,517 

7,483 


154,421 


62,668,528 


(3,000,000) 

59,822,949 

5,521 




126,611,267 



126,611,267 

44,702 

7,622,760 

3,767,453 

439,214 

295 


(4,279) 

11,825,443 

1,300 




1,109,955,042 



1,109,955,042 

2,112,958 




2,470,000 



2,470,000 

4,030,000 




764,923 



764,923 

1,435,077 




105,883,465 

7,456,546 


113,340,011 

50,989 




233,935,351 



233,935,351 

1,315,649 

19,669,947 

9,448,067 

4,148,532 

97,054,983 

8 


130,321,537 

22,917,020 

54,660,144 

41,286,397 

6,403,262 

5,619,787,700 

7,916,573 

(5,356,373) 

5,724,697,703 

42,806,297 




3,388,602 


(3,388,602) 

0 

0 

107,572 

228,195 


5,791,286 


(6,127,053) 

0 

0 

637,369 

730,747 


6,908,037 


(8,276,153) 

0 

0 


23,303 




(23,303) 

0 

0 




3,750,000 


(3,750,000) 

0 

0 



100,000 



(100,000) 

0 

0 





375 


375 

0 


55,742,471 

42,289,941 

6,503,383 

202,780 

5,639,625,625 

7,916,948 

(27,021,484) 

5,725,056,884 

202,780 

42,907,491 

0 

55,742,471 

42,289,941 

6,706,163 

5,639,625,625 

7,916,948 

(27,021,484) 

5,725,259,664 

42,907,491 












































C 46 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Ministry of Employment and Investment— (Unaudited) 





-Total Appropriations- 

Vote 



Budget 

Other 

No. 

Description 

Estimated 

Re-allocations 

Authorizations 



$ 

$ 

$ 

22 

Minister's Office . 

374,615 



23 

Ministry Operations 





Administration and Support Services (net of recoveries).... 

20,364,249 

25,000 



Policy. 

8,858,672 

(2,000,000) 



BC Trade and Investment Office (net of recoveries). 

19,553,000 

8,500,000 



Science and Technology and Capital Development. 

52,189,768 

(2,000,000) 



Energy and Minerals. 

24,225,233 

(1,525,000) 



Reserves for Doubtful Accounts and Concessionary Loans. 

3,849,750 

(3,000,000) 



Contributions to the British Columbia Ferry Corporation .. 

4,700,000 





133,740,672 

0 

0 

24 

Crown Corporations Secretariat. 

10 



26 

Resource Revenue Sharing Agreements. 

810,000 




Statutory — 





Information and Technology (Vote 25) 





Information Technology Access Office (net of recover- 





ies). 


3,272,703 



BC Information and Privacy Office. 


1,058,000 



Enquiry BC (net of recoveries). 


2,062,000 



Archives and Records Services (net of recoveries). 


5,671,000 




0 

12,063,703 

0 


Information Technology Services Division (Vote 35) 





Data Services. 


45,327,666 



Network Services. 


82,441,246 



Desk Top and Office Systems. 


7,221,948 



Support Services. 


19,480,369 



Information Technology Training. 


7,000,000 



Information Technology Recoveries. 


(161,471,219) 




0 

10 

0 


Ministry Operation (Vote 43) 





British Columbia Racing Commission (net of recoveries) 


10 



British Columbia Gaming Commission (net of recover- 





ies). 1 . 


4,344,231 




0 

4,344,241 

0 


British Columbia Investment Fund Ltd. 

Columbia Power Corporation. 

Forest Renewal BC (FRBC)—Science Council of BC. 

BC Hydro (IPP Panel). 

Royal Oak Maps. 

Job Protection Commission (JPC). 

BC Hydro (PowerSmart Program). 

FRBC—Vancouver Accommodation. 

Canadian Society of Petroleum Geologists—Public Edu¬ 
cation . 

CRD Earthquake Hazard Maps. 

Request for Proposal—Victoria Line. 

FRBC/JPC—Columbia Valley. 

BC Transportation Financing Authority (BCTFA). 

Gaming Project. 

FRBC/JPC—Forest Community Business Program. 

Casino Registration. 

Fuel Choice Study. 

Crown Corporations Secretariat (CCS)—BCTFA Accom¬ 


modation Costs. 

CCS—Archipelago/Ferries. 

Interest on Revenue Refunds. 78,670 

Mine Improvement. 259 

Fort Nelson, Blueberry-Doig Indian Band Lands. 212,917 


Total 

Appropriations 

$ 

374,615 

20,389,249 

6,858,672 

28,053,000 

50,189,768 

22,700,233 

849,750 

4,700,000 

133,740,672 

10 

810,000 


3,272,703 

1,058,000 

2,062,000 

5,671,000 

12,063,703 

45,327,666 

82,441,246 

7,221,948 

19,480,369 

7,000,000 

(161,471,219) 

10 

10 

4,344,231 

4,344,241 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

78,670 

259 

212,917 





























































PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


C 47 


Salaries 

Operating 

Asset Grants and 

jup cvceuuni i^iassir 

Other 

icauon- 



and Benefits 

Costs 

Acquisitions 

Contributions 

Expenditures 

Recoveries 

Total 

Net Under (Over) 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

326,152 

9,050 





335,202 

39,413 

7,852,708 

10,037,285 

644,358 

1,030,459 

224,437 


19,789,247 

600,002 

4,894,753 

897,317 

28,123 

347,182 



6,167,375 

691,297 

4,915,673 

7,073,538 

90,137 

17,782,104 

9,695 

(1,921,021) 

27,950,126 

102,874 

2,270,909 

242,686 

10,667 

1,670,722 

45,815,163 


50,010,147 

179,621 

16,207,486 

4,893,897 

541,776 

666,618 



22,309,777 

390,456 





532,965 


532,965 

316,785 




4,700,000 



4,700,000 

0 

36,141,529 

23,144,723 

1,315,061 

26,197,085 

46,582,260 

(1,921,021) 

131,459,637 

2,281,035 

979,666 

1,043,165 

9,912 



(2,032,743) 

0 

10 




810,000 



810,000 

0 

1,920,669 

1,101,362 

7,688 

17,500 



3,047,219 

225,484 

620,678 

336,394 

3,323 




960,395 

97,605 

55,756 

1,978,217 



(3,704) 


2,030,269 

31,731 

3,020,010 

2,547,244 

66,230 

117,861 

(27,015) 

(227,517) 

5,496,813 

174,187 

5,617,113 

5,963,217 

77,241 

135,361 

(30,719) 

(227,517) 

11,534,696 

529,007 

10,391,968 

26,607,728 

1,167,316 


20 


38,167,032 

7,160,634 

9,002,674 

61,887,575 

3,271,795 


713 


74,162,757 

8,278,489 

4,243,127 

3,272,312 

1,019,160 




8,534,599 

(1,312,651) 

8,495,365 

5,515,390 

8,457,938 


546,447 

(150) 

23,014,990 

(3,534,621) 

2,707 

2,121,549 

69,932 




2,194,188 

4,805,812 


923 




(151,547,372) 

(151,546,449) 

(9,924,770) 

32,135,841 

99,405,477 

13,986,141 

0 

547,180 

(151,547,522) 

(5,472,883) 

5,472,893 

966,280 

526,579 

39,726 



(1,532,585) 

0 

10 

2,955,482 

1,053,153 

230,700 



(13,582) 

4,225,753 

118,478 

3,921,762 

1,579,732 

270,426 

0 

0 

(1,546,167) 

4,225,753 

118,488 


97,782 

525 



(98,307) 

0 

0 

535,240 

65,889 




(601,129) 

0 

0 


92,257 




(92,257) 

0 

0 


73,791 




(73,791) 

0 

0 


4,651 




(4,651) 

0 

0 


47,008 




(47,008) 

0 

0 


15,812 




(15,812) 

0 

0 


22,989 




(22,989) 

0 

0 


127 




(127) 

0 

0 


1,500 




(1,500) 

0 

0 

1,000 

35,086 




(36,086) 

0 

0 

55,218 

159,282 




(214,500) 

0 

0 

228,818 

4,721 




(233,539) 

0 

0 

71,570 

233,264 

1,099 



(305,933) 

0 

0 


55,961 




(55,961) 

0 

0 

40,000 

130,000 




(170,000) 

0 

0 


55,000 




(55,000) 

0 

0 


25,000 




(25,000) 

0 

0 


47,004 




(47,004) 

0 

0 


78,670 





78,670 

0 


259 





259 

0 


212,917 


212,917 




































C 48 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Ministry of Employment and Investment— (Unaudited)—Continued 


Vote 

No. Description 

Williston Reservoir Compensation Costs. 

Industrial Incentive Fund. 

Special Accounts— 

Build BC. 

Science and Technology Fund. 

Vancouver Island Natural Gas Pipeline Assistance. 

Special Fund— 

Natural Resource Community Fund. 

Less transfer from Vote 23 to the Build BC Special Account. 
Less transfer from Vote 23 to the Science and Technology 

Special Account. 

Less transfer from the Natural Resource Community Fund 

Special Fund to the General Account. 

Less transfer from the General Account to Industrial Incen¬ 
tive Fund Special Account. 

Total Expenditure. 

Tangible Capital Assets. 

Amortization Expense. 

Total Expense. 

Breakdown of Other Authorizations— 

Statutory Appropriations. 

Statutory Appropriations—Special Fund. 

Inter-account transfers. 

Tangible Capital Assets. 

Amortization Expense. 


Total Appropriations- 


Estimated 

$ 

Budget 

Re-allocations 

$ 

Other 

Authorizations 

$ 

Total 

Appropriations 

$ 



520,022 

100,000,000 

520,022 

100,000,000 

20,000,000 

25,815,163 

3,700,000 



20,000,000 

25,815,163 

3,700,000 

96,000 

(20,000,000) 


13,192,564 

13,288,564 

(20,000,000) 

(25,815,163) 



(25,815,163) 



(13,249,409) 

(13,249,409) 



(100,000,000) 

(100,000,000) 

138,721,297 

16,407,954 

755,023 

(9,120,953) 

2,321,969 

155,884,274 

(9,120,953) 

2,321,969 


138,721,297 16,407,954 (6,043,961) 149,085,290 


100,811,868 

13,192,564 

(113,249,409) 

(9,120,953) 

2,321,969 


(6,043,961) 









































PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


C 49 


■Actual Expenditure by Croup Account Classification 


Salaries 

Operating 

Asset 

Grants and 

Other 


and Benefits 

Costs 

Acquisitions 

Contributions 

Expenditures 

Recoveries 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 


Total Net Under (Over) 

$ $ 


20,022 


399,696 341,827 

430,478 


80,453,605 133,183,744 


80,453,605 133,183,744 


825 10,481,235 

73,245 21,407,225 

3,215,263 

39,155 


15,734,475 62,498,241 

(9,120,953) 

2,321,969 

8,935,491 62,498,241 


500,000 

100,000,000 

13,249,409 

( 20 , 000 , 000 ) 

(25,815,163) 

(13,249,409) 

( 100 , 000 , 000 ) 

1,783,558 (159,375,564) 

1,783,558 (159,375,564) 


520,022 

0 

100,000,000 

0 

11,223,583 

8,776,417 

21,910,948 

3,904,215 

3,215,263 

484,737 

13,288,564 

0 

(20,000,000) 

0 

(25,815,163) 

0 

(13,249,409) 

0 

(100,000,000) 

0 

134,278,059 

21,606,215 

(9,120,953) 

0 

2,321,969 

0 

127,479,075 

21,606,215 




































C 50 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Ministry of Environment, Lands and Parks— (Unaudited) 


Vote 

No. Description 

27 Minister's Office. 

28 Ministry Operations 

Administration and Support Services. 

Policy, Planning and Legislation (net of recoveries). 

B.C. Environment (net of recoveries) 

Fisheries, Wildlife and Habitat Protection. 

Environment Regional Operations. 

Lands and Water Management (net of recoveries) 

Land Services. 

Geographic Data BC. 

Lands Regional Operations. 

Water Management. 

B.C. Parks (net of recoveries) 

Parks Operations and Management. 

Environment Youth Team. 

Environmental Protection and Renewal. 

Statutory— 

Forest Renewal BC. 

Neck Point Purchase. 

Production of an Access Planning Document. 

Science Council of BC. 

FRBC Startup Funding. 

Yellowstone Wolf Project. 

Environmental Youth Team. 

Happy Valley Mobile Park Ltd. 

Forest Grove Service Station. 

Special Accounts— 

Crown Land. 

Habitat Conservation Fund. 

Sustainable Environment Fund. 

Less transfer to the Sustainable Environment Fund Special 

Account from Vote 28. 

Less transfer from Crown Land to the General Account. 

Non-cash transfer of Land. 

Valuation Allowance. 

Total Expenditure... 

Tangible Capital Assets. 

Amortization Expense. 

Total Expense. 

Breakdown of Other Authorizations— 

Statutory Appropriation—Special Account. 

Inter-account transfer. 

Valuation Allowance. 

Tangible Capital Assets. 

Non-cash transfer of Land. 

Amortization Expense. 


—Total Appropriations-—— 

Budget Other Total 


Estimated 

Re-allocations 

Authorizations 

Appropriations 

$ 

$ 


$ 

$ 

399,564 




399,564 

48,603,296 




48,603,296 

8,427,871 




8,427,871 

14,454,104 




14,454,104 

45,709,056 




45,709,056 

9,825,685 




9,825,685 

7,563,352 




7,563,352 

11,509,274 




11,509,274 

7,373,946 




7,373,946 

36,296,138 




36,296,138 

5,000,000 




5,000,000 

1,310,870 




1,310,870 

196,073,592 


0 

0 

196,073,592 





0 





0 





0 





0 





0 





0 





0 





0 





0 

2,955,844 



55,961,530 

58,917,374 

1,250,000 




1,250,000 

34,735,870 




34,735,870 

(1,310,870) 




(1,310,870) 




(50,226,273) 

(50,226,273) 




17,506,261 

17,506,261 




262,882 

262,882 

234,104,000 


0 

23,504,400 

257,608,400 




(4,255,158) 

(4,255,158) 




1,488,949 

1,488,949 

234,104,000 


0 

20,738,191 

254,842,191 


55,961,530 

(50,226,273) 

262,882 

(4,255,158) 

17,506,261 

1,488,949 

20,738,191 

































































PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


C 51 


-Actual Expenditure by Group Account Classification- 


Asset 

Acquisitions 

$ 


Grants and 
Contributions 
$ 


Other 

Expenditures 


Recoveries 


Salaries 
and Benefits 
$ 

361,316 

18,805,739 

5,194,962 

9,358,712 

47,997,465 

7,443,216 

5,350,294 

10,388,086 

5,080,635 

18,430,653 

433,974 


128,483,736 

2,832,677 


15,250 

101,711 


31,897 

8,833,409 


140,659,996 


140,659,996 


Operating 

Costs 

$ 

12,537 

39,529,224 

1,323,826 

3,217,541 

7,777,910 

1,719,038 

7,792,806 

345,943 

2,841,009 

13,201,046 

7,883,088 


85,631,431 

62,674,054 

21,000 

370,762 

12,662 

2,474 

1,100,259 

60,651 

2,264 

854,480 

926,741 

4,536,653 


156,205,968 


156,205,968 


2,506,734 

139,421 

243,956 

1,451,908 

297,819 
858,861 
37,178 
114,192 

1,465,684 

20,324 


7,136,077 

3,299,170 

3,500,000 

8,037 


2,062,806 

(630) 

407,624 


17,506,261 


33,919,345 

(4,255,158) 

1,488,949 

31,153,136 


327,143 

22,714 

1,337,702 

1,167,464 

9,750 

192,793 

3,057,566 

7,369,771 

25,000 

5,729,988 

242,000 

6,070,581 


22,494,906 

22,494,906 


(14,151,252) 

167,450 

38,827 

1,310,870 

(12,634,105) 

14,041,799 


50,270,100 

14,332,482 

(1,310,870) 

(50,226,273) 

262,882 

14,736,015 

14,736,015 


$ 


(450) 

(26,496) 

(580,324) 

(15,730,700) 

(65,157) 

(6,353,761) 

(1,429,641) 

(253,965) 

(3,500,000) 


(27,940,494) 

(90,217,471) 

(3,500,000) 

( 21 , 000 ) 

(419,049) 

(114,373) 

(2,474) 

(1,100,259) 

(60,651) 

(2,264) 


(600,930) 


(123,978,965) 


(123,978,965) 


Total 

$ 

373,853 

47,017,138 

6,654,427 

13,577,587 

42,664,047 

9,562,366 

7,687,027 

10,771,207 

6,615,945 

33,036,211 

4,837,386 

1,310,870 

183,734,211 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

58,917,374 

1,200,008 

33,579,819 

(1,310,870) 

(50,226,273) 

17,506,261 

262,882 

244,037,265 

(4,255,158) 

1,488,949 

241,271,056 


Net Under (Over) 
$ 

25,711 

1,586,158 

1,773,444 

876,517 

3,045,009 

263,319 

(123,675) 

738,067 

758,001 

3,259,927 

162,614 

0 

12,339,381 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

49,992 

1,156,051 

0 

0 

0 

0 

13,571,135 

0 

0 

13,571,135 













































C 52 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Ministry of Finance and Corporate Relations— (Unaudited) 


Vote 

No. Description 

29 Minister's Office. 

30 Ministry Operations 

Corporate Support Services (net of recoveries). 

Treasury Board Staff. 

BC Stats (net of recoveries). 

Office of the Comptroller General (net of recoveries). 

Revenue Operations. 

Financial Institutions Commission (net of recoveries). 

Purchasing Commission (net of recoveries). 

Cabinet Operations. 

Cabinet Policy and Communications Secretariat. 

Coordination of Appointments to Agencies, Boards and 

Commissions. 

Public Service Appeal Board. 

Provincial Capital Commission. 

Intergovernmental Relations Secretariat. 

British Columbia Racing Commission (net of recoveries).. 
British Columbia Gaming Commission (net of recoveries) 

31 Registries. 

32 Pensions Administration (net of recoveries). 

33 British Columbia Utilities Commission (net of recoveries).... 

34 Product Sales and Services 

Queen's Printer and Publishing. 

Postal and Distribution Services. 

Warehouse and Asset Investment Recovery. 

Product Distribution Centre. 

Recoveries. 

35 Information Technology Services Division 

Data Services. 

Network Services. 

Desk Top and Office Systems. 

Support Services. 

Information Technology Training. 

Information Technology Recoveries. 

25 Information and Technology (net of recoveries) 

Information Technology Access Office. 

BC Information and Privacy Office (net of recoveries). 

Enquiry BC (net of recoveries). 

Archives and Records Services. 

Statutory— 

Unclaimed Money Act . 

Interest on Revenue Refunds. 

Student Loans. 



-Total Appropriations- 



Budget 

Other 

Total 

Estimated 

Re-allocations 

Authorizations 

Appropriations 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

348,000 



348,000 

25,739,998 



25 , 739,998 

7,462,464 

(817,237) 


6 , 645,227 

1,801,529 



1 , 801,529 

8,609,598 

817,237 


9 , 426,835 

32,651,971 



32 , 651,971 

4,305,000 



4 , 305,000 

6,647,217 



6 , 647,217 

1,240,000 

(226,870) 


1 , 013,130 

6,904,054 

226,870 


7 , 130,924 

450,000 



450,000 

330,000 



330,000 

224,500 



224,500 

1,537,361 



1 , 537,361 

10 

(10) 


0 

4,344,231 

(4,344,231) 


0 

102 , 247,933 

( 4 , 344 , 241 ) 

0 

97 , 903,692 

8 , 297,129 



8 , 297,129 

10 



10 

10 



10 

40,000,010 

(4,200,000) 


35 , 800,010 

30,000,000 



30 , 000,000 

4,200,000 

1,900,000 


6 , 100,000 

18,000,000 

2,300,000 


20 , 300,000 

(92,200,000) 



( 92 , 200 , 000 ) 

10 

0 

0 

10 

45,327,666 

(45,327,666) 


0 

82,441,246 

(82,441,246) 


0 

7,221,948 

(7,221,948) 


0 

19,480,369 

(19,480,369) 


0 

7,000,000 

(7,000,000) 


0 

(161,471,219) 

161,471,219 


0 

10 

( 10 ) 

0 

0 




0 

3,272,703 

(3,272,703) 


0 

1,358,000 

(1,358,000) 


0 

1,762,000 

(1,762,000) 


0 

5,671,000 

(5,671,000) 


0 

12 , 063,703 

( 12 , 063 , 703 ) 

0 

0 



41,900 

41,900 



1 , 016,288 

1 , 016,288 



102,050 

102,050 






















































PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


C 53 


Actual Expenditure by Group Account Classification 


Salaries 

Operating 

Asset 

Grants and 

Other 




and Benefits 

Costs 

Acquisitions 

Contributions 

Expenditures 

Recoveries 

Total 

Net Under (Over) 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

302,611 

39,607 





342,218 

5,782 

13,928,397 

10,579,132 

526,613 

175,100 

1,029,161 

(1,105,864) 

25,132,539 

607,459 

5,382,500 

1,097,380 

15,090 




6,494,970 

150,257 

1,582,186 

339,885 

88,491 



(333,768) 

1,676,794 

124,735 

7,644,610 

1,787,651 

302,621 



(1,557,255) 

8,177,627 

1,249,208 

21,418,078 

9,349,513 

1,263,813 




32,031,404 

620,567 

4,509,883 

1,017,240 

130,817 



(1,670,283) 

3,987,657 

317,343 

4,733,680 

12,493,462 

153,808 



(11,542,713) 

5,838,237 

808,980 

647,958 

136,378 





784,336 

228,794 

2,891,820 

2,330,214 

23,982 




5,246,016 

1,884,908 

211,781 

43,293 

1,550 




256,624 

193,376 

203,940 

122,318 

1,611 




327,869 

2,131 







0 

224,500 

1,165,323 

92,339 





1,257,662 

279,699 







0 

0 







0 

0 

64,320,156 

39,388,805 

2,508,396 

175,100 

1,029,161 

(16,209,883) 

91,211,735 

6,691,957 

5,386,496 

2,508,503 

153,543 




8,048,542 

248,587 

12,172,806 

4,145,050 

4,498,736 


110,366 

(20,926,958) 

0 

10 

1,917,817 

925,152 

57,766 

40,764 


(2,941,499) 

0 

10 

7,417,680 

2,697,440 

1,478,878 


20,921,736 

(987) 

32,514,747 

3,285,263 

5,207,399 

23,338,204 

131,689 


346,008 

(1,779,308) 

27,243,992 

2,756,008 

1,568,952 

1,806,840 

68,119 


2,326,031 


5,769,942 

330,058 

2,840,337 

1,151,735 

157,082 


15,354,336 

774,582 

20,278,072 

21,928 






(85,806,753) 

(85,806,753) 

(6,393,247) 

17,034,368 

28,994,219 

1,835,768 

0 

38,948,111 

(86,812,466) 

0 

10 







0 

0 







0 

0 







0 

0 







0 

0 







0 

0 







0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 







0 

0 







0 

0 







0 

0 







0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 





41,900 


41,900 

0 


1,016,288 





1,016,288 

0 





102,050 


102,050 

0 




































C 54 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Ministry of Finance and Corporate Relations— (Unaudited)—Continued 


Vote 

No. 


—Total Appropriations- 


Budget Other 

Total 


Description 

Estimated 

Re-allocations 

Authorizations 

Appropriations 

Special Accounts— 

Provincial Home Acquisition. 

Provincial Treasury Operations. 

Purchasing Commission Working Capital Account. 

Less transfer from the Provincial Treasury Operations Spe¬ 
cial Account to the General Account. 

Valuation Allowance. 

$ 

182,000 

7,319,000 

$ 

$ 

(16,047,171) 

(9,522) 

5,383,778 

$ 

182,000 

7,319,000 

(16,047,171) 

(9,522) 

5,383,778 

Total Expenditure. 

Tangible Capital Assets. 

Amortization Expense. 

130,457,805 

(16,407,954) 

(9,512,677) 

(7,707,565) 

16,298,825 

104,537,174 

(7,707,565) 

16,298,825 

Total Expense. 

130,457,805 

(16,407,954) 

(921,417) 

113,128,434 


Breakdown of Other Authorizations— 


Statutory Appropriations. 1,160,238 

Statutory Appropriations—Special Account. (16,047,1 71) 

Inter-account transfer. (9,522) 

Valuation Allowance. 5,383,778 

Tangible Capital Assets. (7,707,565) 

Amortization Expense. 16,298,825 

(921,417) 






































PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


C 55 


Salaries 
and Benefits 
$ 

Operating 

Costs 

$ 

--Actua 

Asset 

Acquisitions 

$ 

1 Expenditure by Grr 

Grants and 
Contributions 
$ 

>up Account Classif 

Other 

Expenditures 

$ 

ication---—- 

Recoveries 

$ 

Total 

$ 

Net Under (Over) 
$ 

10,174,555 

4,678,979 

2,335,833 

612,975 

978,448 


73,655 

2,954,425 

(11,482,184) 

(19,361,452) 

73,655 

6,938,750 

(16,047,171) 

108,345 

380,250 

0 





5,383,778 

(9,522) 

(9,522) 

5,383,778 

0 

0 

111,308,809 

84,032,436 

10,645,632 

(7,707,565) 

16,298,825 

215,864 

48,643,446 

(157,743,964) 

97,102,223 

(7,707,565) 

16,298,825 

7,434,951 

0 

0 

111,308,809 

84,032,436 

19,236,892 

215,864 

48,643,446 

(157,743,964) 

105,693,483 

7,434,951 





































C 56 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Ministry of Forests— (Unaudited) 


■Total Appropriations- 


Vote 

No. Description 

36 Minister's Office. 

37 Ministry Operations 

Administration and Support Services (net of recoveries).... 
Forest Resources Management (net of recoveries) 

Resource Planning and Allocation. 

Resource Use. 

Monitoring, Enforcement and Audit. 

Forest Investment. 

38 Fire Suppression 

Direct Fire Fighting (net of recoveries). 

Fire Preparedness (net of recoveries). 

Statutory— 

Forest Renewal BC. 

Interest on Revenue Refunds. 

Special Accounts— 

Forest Stand Management Fund. 

Small Business Forest Enterprise 

Administration. 

Harvesting—Sales. 

Harvesting—Roads. 

Silviculture. 

Protection. 

South Moresby Implementation—Forest Replacement.. 
Less transfer from Small Business Forest Enterprise Special 

Account to the General Account. 

Valuation Allowance. 

Total Expenditure. 

Tangible Capital Assets... 

Amortization Expense. 

Total Expense. 

Breakdown of Other Authorizations— 

Statutory Appropriation—within Vote. 

Statutory Appropriations. 

Statutory Appropriation—Special Account. 

Inter-account transfer. 

Valuation Allowance. 

Tangible Capital Assets. 

Amortization Expense. 


Estimated 

$ 

Budget 

Re-allocation 

$ 

Other 

Authorizations 

$ 

Total 

Appropriations 

$ 

432,868 




432,868 

43,958,389 




43,958,389 

62,660,226 

227,423,008 

18,539,023 

91,020,489 




62,660,226 

227,423,008 

18,539,023 

91,020,489 

443,601,135 


0 

0 

443,601,135 

16,293,708 

46,912,205 



20,792,831 

37,086,539 

46,912,205 

63,205,913 


0 

20,792,831 

83,998,744 




84,126 

0 

84,126 

1,150,000 




1,150,000 

30,900,000 

23,600,000 

52,191,084 

37,800,000 

900,000 



200,120,228 

231,020,228 

23,600,000 

52,191,084 

37,800,000 

900,000 

145,391,084 

1,500,000 


0 

200,T20,228 

345,511,312 

1,500,000 

0 



(196,166,186) 

1,007 

(196,166,186) 

1,007 

655,281,000 


0 

24,832,006 

(3,350,800) 

3,327,989 

680,113,006 

(3,350,800) 

3,327,989 

655,281,000 


0 

24,809,195 

680,090,195 


20,792,831 

84,126 

200,120,228 

(196,166,186) 

1,007 

(3,350,800) 

3,327,989 

24,809,195 































































PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


C 57 


Salaries 

Operating 

Actual Expenditure by Group Account Classification 

Asset Grants and Other 


and Benefits 

Costs 

Acquisitions 

Contributions 

Expenditures 

Recoveries 

Total 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

407,224 

19,176 

295 




426,695 

27,338,941 

24,612,228 

3,923,538 

513,132 

5,000 


56,392,839 

29,897,339 

21,819,959 

1,093,406 

681,779 

(100,000) 

(2,172,169) 

51,220,314 

158,920,703 

76,288,042 

8,826,117 

50,000 


(36,867,245) 

207,217,617 

11,113,904 

4,357,043 

147,775 




15,618,722 

27,408,336 

51,786,185 

344,456 

1,950,000 


(33,756,055) 

47,732,922 

254,679,223 

178,863,457 

14,335,292 

3,194,911 

(95,000) 

(72,795,469) 

378,182,414 

11,650,346 

30,254,518 

564,826 



(5,383,151) 

37,086,539 

24,503,828 

18,452,128 

4,920,837 



(2,714,565) 

45,162,228 

36,154,174 

48,706,646 

5,485,663 

0 

0 

(8,097,716) 

82,248,767 

390,456 

147,058,496 

3,699,172 

123,162 

1,967,055 

(153,238,341) 

0 


84,126 





84,126 


472 





472 


43,750 



226,612,808 


226,656,558 


30,987,331 

139,660 




31,126,991 


46,211,984 

11,472,674 




57,684,658 


23,472,516 



6,137,088 


29,609,604 

943 

429,558 




3,000 

433,501 

943 

101,145,139 

11,612,334 

0 

232,749,896 

3,000 

345,511,312 

68,521 

955,155 





1,023,676 





(196,166,186) 


(196,166,186) 





1,007 


1,007 

291,700,541 

476,832,667 

35,132,756 

3,318,073 

38,456,772 

(234,128,526) 

611,312,283 



(3,350,800) 




(3,350,800) 



3,327,989 




3,327,989 

291,700,541 

476,832,667 

35,109,945 

3,318,073 

38,456,772 

(234,128,526) 

611,289,472 


Net Under (Over) 
$ 

6,173 

(12,434,450) 

11,439,912 

20,205,391 

2,920,301 

43,287,567 

65,418,721 

0 

1,749,977 

1,749,977 

0 

0 

1,149,528 

4,363,670 

(7,526,991) 

(5,493,574) 

8,190,396 

466,499 

0 

476,324 

0 

0 

68,800,723 

0 

0 


68,800,723 




























































C 58 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Ministry of Health and Ministry Responsible for Seniors 
and Intergovernmental Relations— (Unaudited) 


Vote 

No. Description 

39 Minister's Office. 

40 Ministry Operations 

Corporate Programs (net of recoveries) 

Administration and Support Services. 

Emergency Health Services. 

Strategic Programs. 

Regional Programs (net of recoveries) 

Program Management. 

Debt Servicing and Building Occupancy. 

Provincial Programs. 

Regional Health Programs. 

Medical Services Plan and Pharmacare (net of recoveries) 

Medical Services Plan Program Management. 

Medical Services Plan Contribution Payments . 

Pharmacare. 

Medicare Protection and Enhancement Initiative. 

Recoveries from Health Special Account. 


41 Vital Statistics. 

44 British Columbia Transit 

Operating Contributions. 

Debt Servicing Contributions. 

Statutory— 

Inter-provincial Reciprocal Agreements—Hospital Care.. 
Inter-provincial Reciprocal Agreements—Medical Services 

Heart Health. 

Native Home Nursing. 

Occupational Therapy Outreach... 

Yukon Communicable Disease Program. 

Elderly Outreach Service. 

Seniors Impact on Drug Policy. 

HIV Surveillance System Study. 

Registered Dietician. 

Tobacco Enforcement.. 

Hepatitis/Asthma Sentinel Surveillance Study. 

Veterans' Beds... 

MSPAVCB Administration. 

Collection Agency Commissions. 



-Total Appropriations- 



Budget 

Other 

Total 

Estimated 

Re-allocations 

Authorizations 

Appropriations 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

462,000 



462,000 

42,211,884 

(531,363) 


41,680,521 

116,340,620 



116,340,620 

31,671,457 

3,287,565 


34,959,022 

24,667,831 

(5,686,902) 


18,980,929 

246,999,052 

(3,335,008) 


243,664,044 

1,006,307,580 

9,010,220 


1,015,317,800 

3,319,347,174 

(140,303,604) 


3,179,043,570 

40,619,966 

(972,882) 


39,647,084 

1,653,676,000 

(4,626) 

63,393,837 

1,717,065,211 

396,324,453 

(2,860,400) 


393,464,053 

48,000,000 



48,000,000 

(115,000,000) 



(115,000,000) 

6,811,166,017 

(141,397,000) 

63,393,837 

6,733,162,854 

7,992,122 



7,992,122 


142,500,000 


142,500,000 


145,010,000 


145,010,000 


287,510,000 


287,510,000 




0 




0 




0 




0 




0 




0 




0 




0 




0 




0 




0 




0 




0 




0 



165,294 

165,294 









































PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


C 59 


■Actual Expenditure by Group Account Classification- 


Salaries 

Operating 

Asset 

Grants and 

Other 



and Benefits 

Costs 

Acquisitions 

Contributions 

Expenditures 

Recoveries 

Total 

$ 

428,341 

$ 

14,043 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

442,384 


23,238,029 

8,653,854 

77,596 

2,624,746 

1,180,806 

(25,400) 

35,749,631 

89,318,731 

29,328,465 

4,011,098 

483,107 


(199,491) 

122,941,910 

11,774,807 

10,042,388 

3,081,177 

7,020,393 


2,000 

31,920,765 

13,025,302 

3,336,012 

213,299 

769,867 


72 

17,344,552 

1,964,085 

48,186,588 

1,589,194 

173,519,002 



225,258,869 

36,803,23 7 

36,657,002 

1,962,132 

985,558,355 

73 

(3,825,345) 

1,057,155,454 

142,624,156 

17,428,889 

(359,812) 

2,977,537,159 

19 

(6,618,742) 

3,130,611,669 

21,702,914 

13,304,583 

886,980 

411,342 


(176,101) 

36,129,718 

23,225 



1,719,793,048 

5,000,000 

(11,375,164) 

1,713,441,109 

4,535,608 

7,001,126 

2,181,325 

411,127,933 



424,845,992 

4,975,605 

390,565 


33,848,655 


(115,000,000) 

39,214,825 

(115,000,000) 

349,985,699 

174,329,472 

13,642,989 

6,312,693,607 

6,180,898 

(137,218,171) 

6,719,614,494 

4,963,051 

2,738,452 

661,255 

35,423 

3 

(623,921) 

7,774,263 


142,500,000 142,500,000 

138,869,319 138,869,319 




281,369,319 


281,369,319 



28,286,964 

(28,286,964) 

0 



14,027,600 

(14,027,600) 

0 


4,246 

169,380 

(173,626) 

0 

1,698 

469 


(2,167) 

0 

14,107 

1,518 


(15,625) 

0 

34,116 

36,564 

4,900 

(75,580) 

0 

13,345 



(13,345) 

0 


157,452 


(157,452) 

0 

45,011 

3,265 


(48,276) 

0 

13,885 

3,287 


(17,172) 

0 

86,220 

26,166 

46,730 

(159,116) 

0 

48,148 

2,222 

6,872 

(57,242) 

0 



587,717 

(587,717) 

0 

25,000 

73,643 25,000 

(123,643) 

0 


165,294 


Net Under (Over) 
$ 

19,616 

5,930,890 

(6,601,290) 

3,038,257 

1,636,377 

18,405,175 

(41,837,654) 

48,431,901 

3,517,366 

3,624,102 

(31,381,939) 

8,785,175 

0 

13,548,360 

217,859 

0 

6,140,681 

6,140,681 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 


165,294 




















C 60 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Ministry of Health and Ministry Responsible for Seniors 
and Intergovernmental Relations— (Unaudited)—Continued 


Vote 

No. 




-Total Appropriations- 




Budget 

Other 

Total 

Description 

Estimated 

Re-allocations 

Authorizations 

Appropriations 

Special Accounts— 

Health Special Account. 

Medical and Health Care Services. 

Less transfer to the Medical and Health Care Services Spe¬ 
cial Account from Vote 43. 

Valuation Allowance. 

$ 

115,000,000 

$ 

$ 

22,695,965 

(5,000,000) 

16,478,860 

$ 

115,000,000 

22,695,965 

(5,000,000) 

16,478,860 

Total Expenditure. 

Tangible Capital Assets. 

Amortization Expense. 

6,934,620,139 

146,113,000 

97,733,956 

(9,519,478) 

4,509,058 

7,178,467,095 

(9,519,478) 

4,509,058 

Total Expense. 

6,934,620,139 

146,113,000 

92,723,536 

7,173,456,675 


Breakdown of Other Authorizations— 


Special Warrant No. 1 . 40,500,000 

Statutory Appropriation—within Vote. 22,893,837 

Statutory Appropriations. 165,294 

Statutory Appropriation—Special Account. 22,695,965 

Inter-account transfer. (5,000,000) 

Valuation Allowance. 16,478,860 

Tangible Capital Assets. (9,519,478) 

Amortization Expense. 4,509,058 

92,723,536 








































PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


C 61 


■Actual Expenditure by Group Account Classification 


Salaries 

Operating 

Asset 

Grants and 

Other 



and Benefits 

Costs 

Acquisitions 

Contributions 

Expenditures 

Recoveries 

Total 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 


115,000,000 115,000,000 

22,695,965 22,695,965 


(5,000,000) (5,000,000) 

16,478,860 16,478,860 


355,658,621 

177,390,799 

14,336,116 

(9,519,478) 

4,509,058 

6,659,917,605 

132,825,055 

(181,587,617) 

7,158,540,579 

(9,519,478) 

4,509,058 

355,658,621 

177,390,799 

9,325,696 

6,659,917,605 

132,825,055 

(181,587,617) 

7,153,530,159 


Net Under (Over) 
$ 

0 

0 

0 

0 

19,926,516 

0 

0 

19,926,516 




































C 62 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Ministry of Labour— (Unaudited) 





- Total Appropriations - 


Vote 

No. 

Description 

Estimated 

$ 

Budget 

Re-allocations 

$ 

Other 

Authorizations 

$ 

Total 

Appropriations 

$ 

42 

Minister's Office. 

403,000 



403,000 

43 

Ministry Operations 






Labour Programs (net of recoveries) 






Labour Relations and Labour Programs. 

15,612,692 



15,612,692 


Apprenticeship Initiatives. 

11,317,807 



11,317,807 


B.C. Labour Force Development Board. 

1,579,682 



1,579,682 


Labour Relations Board . 

Workers' Compensation Review Board and Compensa- 

8,010,568 



8,010,568 


tion Advisory Services (net of recoveries). 

10 



10 



36,520,759 

0 

0 

36,520,759 


Statutory— 

Human Resource Development Canada—Secondary 






School Apprenticeship Scholarship. 




0 


Total Expense. 

36,923,759 

0 

0 

36,923,759 




























PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


C 63 


-Actual Expenditure by Group Account Classification 


Salaries Operating Asset Grants and Other 


and Benefits 

Costs 

Acquisitions 

Contributions 

Expenditures 

Recoveries 

Total 

Net Under (Over) 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

269,542 

12,137 

1,791 




283,470 

119,530 


11,499,555 

3,043,042 

166,897 

86,880 

161,915 

(738) 

14,957,551 

655,141 

4,166,871 

931,031 

14,684 

3,495,273 



8,607,859 

2,709,948 

502,909 

430,099 

8,032 

139,179 



1,080,219 

499,463 

5,697,824 

1,763,657 

424,477 


56 


7,886,014 

124,554 

9,272,378 

2,910,661 

136,534 



(12,319,573) 

0 

10 


31,139,537 9,078,490 750,624 3,721,332 161,971 (12,320,311) 32,531,643 3,989,116 


732 27,500 (28,232) 0 0 

31,409,079 9,091,359 752,415 3,748,832 161,971 (12,348,543) 32,815,113 


4,108,646 





































C 64 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing— (Unaudited) 


Vote 

No. Description 

45 Minister's Office. 

46 Ministry Operations 

Administration and Support Services. 

Local Government and Community Services . 

Assessment Services. 

Safety and Standards (net of recoveries). 

University Endowment Lands (net of recoveries). 

Housing Programs. 

47 Local Government Grants 

Unconditional Grant Programs. 

Conditional Grant Programs. 

Canada-British Columbia Infrastructure Program (net of 
recoveries). 

Statutory— 

Home Owner Grant. 

Special Account— 

University Endowment Lands Administration. 

Total Expenditure. 

Amortization Expense. 

Total Expense. 

Breakdown of Other Authorizations— 

Statutory Appropriations. 

Amortization Expense. 


—Total Appropriations- 

Budget Other Total 


Estimated 

$ 

Re-allocations Authorizations 

$ $ 

Appropriations 

$ 

339,135 


339,135 

7,313,072 


7,313,072 

19,028,600 

(100,000) 

18,928,600 

2,245,700 


2,245,700 

21,454,827 


21,454,827 

4,241,006 

100,000 

4,341,006 

92,486,666 


92,486,666 


146,769,871 

0 

0 

146,769,871 

141,950,000 

110,160,000 

(11,000,000) 


141,950,000 

99,160,000 

38,397,000 

11,000,000 


49,397,000 

290,507,000 

0 

0 

290,507,000 



3,985,510 

3,985,510 

2,867,994 



2,867,994 

440,484,000 

0 

3,985,510 

108,000 

444,469,510 

108,000 

440,484,000 

0 

4,093,510 

444,577,510 


3,985,510 
108,000 


4,093,510 

















































PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


C 65 


■Actual Expenditure by Group Account Classification- 


Salaries 

Operating 

Asset 

Grants and 

Other 




and Benefits 

Costs 

Acquisitions 

Contributions 

Expenditures 

Recoveries 

Total 

Net Under (Over) 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

225,780 

5,821 





231,601 

107,534 

3,565,615 

2,899,005 

96,600 


19,403 


6,580,623 

732,449 

5,244,786 

738,406 

6,403 

11,129,990 



17,119,585 

1,809,015 

464,509 

1,433,490 

9,424 




1,907,423 

338,277 

15,828,419 

3,914,231 

98,454 

506,082 



20,347,186 

1,107,641 

944,083 

2,341,524 

85,729 

3,821,603 


(2,867,994) 

4,324,945 

16,061 

1,080,007 

93,431 

4,953 

85,897,997 

70,657 


87,147,045 

5,339,621 


27,127,419 

11,420,087 

301,563 

101,355,672 

90,060 

(2,867,994) 

137,426,807 

9,343,064 




141,519,582 

83,628,263 



141,519,582 

83,628,263 

430,418 

15,531,737 

350,718 

54,091 

609 

125,539,576 


(76,988,777) 

48,956,217 

440,783 

350,718 

54,091 

609 

350,687,421 

0 

(76,988,777) 

274,104,062 

16,402,938 




3,985,510 



3,985,510 

0 





2,867,994 


2,867,994 

0 

27,703,917 

11,479,999 

302,172 

108,000 

456,028,603 

2,958,054 

(79,856,771) 

418,615,974 

108,000 

25,853,536 

0 


27,703,917 11,479,999 410,172 456,028,603 2,958,054 (79,856,771) 418,723,974 


25,853,536 





















































C 66 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Ministry of Small Business, Tourism and Culture— (Unaudited) 


-Total Appropriations- 


Vote 



Budget 

Other 

Total 

No. 

Description 

Estimated 

Re-allocations 

Authorizations 

Appropriations 


$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

48 

Minister's Office. 

370,000 



370,000 

49 

Ministry Operations 






Administration and Support Services (net of recoveries).... 

12,584,000 

(418,400) 


12,165,600 


Community and Regional Development (net of recoveries) 
Culture, Recreation, Heritage and Sport (net of recoveries) 

38,570,000 



38,570,000 


Culture Programs. 

22,902,000 

27,000 


22,929,000 


Heritage Resource Programs. 

8,454,000 



8,454,000 


Community Grants. 

3,366,000 



3,366,000 


Sport Services Branch. 

11,257,000 



11,257,000 


Recreation. 

1,653,000 

36,000 


1,689,000 


British Columbia Film Commission. 

903,000 



903,000 


Royal British Columbia Museum (net of recoveries). 

11,357,000 

355,400 


11,712,400 


Reserve for Doubtful Accounts and Concessionary Loans. 

50,000 



50,000 


Contributions to the British Columbia Pavilion Corporation. 

5,500,000 



5,500,000 



116,596,000 

0 

0 

116,596,000 

50 

Tourism B.C. 

23,408,000 



23,408,000 

44 

British Columbia Transit 






Operating Contributions. 

142,500,000 

(142,500,000) 


0 


Debt Servicing Contributions. 

145,010,000 

(145,010,000) 


0 



287,510,000 

(287,510,000) 

0 

0 


Statutory— 






Longitudinal Analysis. 




0 


Forest Sector Employment. 




0 


Columbia Basin Power. 




0 


One Stop Business Registration. 




0 


North American Indigenous Games (NAIG). 




0 


Forest Community Economic Development Program. 




0 


Federal Map Sales. 




0 


Residential Accommodation for Government Agents. 

Supplementary Regional Agreement Thompson/Okana- 




0 


gan/Forest Renewal BC. 




0 


Evaluation, Research and Analysis Support. 




0 


Government Agents Training by ICBC. 




0 


Annotated Bibliography and Database. 




0 


Forest Renewal BC, Workforce in Communities. 




0 


BC Online—One Stop Business Registration. 




0 


IPS Consulting (NAIG). 

Special Account— 




0 


Physical Fitness and Amateur Sports Fund. 

1,550,000 



1,550,000 


Valuation Allowance (BC PAVCO). 



4,333,960 

4,333,960 


Total Expenditure. 

429,434,000 

(287,510,000) 

4,333,960 

146,257,960 


Amortization Expense. 



143,200 

143,200 


Total Expense. 

429,434,000 

(287,510,000) 

4,477,160 

146,401,160 


Breakdown of Other Authorizations— 

Valuation Allowance. 4,333,960 

Amortization Expense. 143,200 


4,477,160 
































































PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


C 67 


-Actual Expenditure by Croup Account Classification- 


Salaries 

Operating 

Asset 

Grants and 

Other 


and Benefits 

Costs 

Acquisitions 

Contributions 

Expenditures 

Recoveries 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

351,104 

17,324 

1,527 




5,477,981 

3,965,234 

1,869,482 

180,000 

2,052,501 

(142,046) 

19,964,105 

9,386,211 

809,325 

2,476,385 

324,261 

(523,131) 

1,027,768 

974,561 

13,700 

20,501,422 



4,396,646 

1,951,555 

1,087,034 

1,580,000 

714 

(505,026) 

490,659 

123,199 

2,847 

2,140,378 



855,040 

475,491 

16,442 

9,831,695 



417,755 

104,118 

212 

1,091,404 



504,309 

425,451 

3,328 

12,550 


(17,683) 

5,162,922 

7,900,397 

436,981 

187,100 

29,039 

(2,389,250) 





15,000 





1,708,000 



38,297,185 

25,306,217 

4,239,351 

39,708,934 

2,421,515 

(3,577,136) 

4,223,879 

11,245,721 

348,431 

7,509,553 

1,171 

(1,227,473) 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

42,302 

448 




(42,750) 

15,297 

46,353 




(61,650) 

86,376 

7,624 




(94,000) 



49,350 



(49,350) 




298,500 


(298,500) 

575,964 

87,653 




(663,617) 


6,755 



5,270 

(12,025) 


8,799 




(8,799) 

60,417 

14,583 




(75,000) 

6,325 

316 




(6,641) 


4,034 




(4,034) 

4,539 

26,461 




(31,000) 

2,352 

235 




(2,587) 


100,000 




(100,000) 


52,000 




(52,000) 




1,549,088 







4,333,960 


43,665,740 

36,924,523 

4,638,659 

49,066,075 

6,761,916 

(6,306,562) 



143,200 




43,665,740 

36,924,523 

4,781,859 

49,066,075 

6,761,916 

(6,306,562) 


Total 

$ 

369.955 

13,403,152 

32,437,156 

22,517,451 

8,510,923 

2,757,083 

11,178,668 

1,613,489 

927.955 
11,327,189 

15,000 

1,708,000 

106,396,066 

22,101,282 


0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

1,549,088 

4,333,960 

134,750,351 

143,200 

134,893,551 


Net Under (Over) 
$ 


45 

(1,237,552) 

6,132,844 

411,549 
(56,923) 
608,917 
78,332 
75,511 
(24,955) 
385,211 
35,000 
3,792,000 

10,199,934 

1,306,718 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

912 

0 

11,507,609 

0 

11,507,609 






















































C 68 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Ministry of Human Resources— (Unaudited) 


Vote 

No. Description 

51 Minister's Office. 

52 Ministry Operations 

Administration and Support Services. 

Child, Family and Community Services (net of recoveries) 

Program Management. 

Family and Youth Support Services. 

Child in Care Services. 

Community Support Services (net of recoveries) 

Program Management. 

Services for Children with Mental Handicaps or Special 

Needs. 

Services for Adults with Mental Handicaps or Multiple 

Disabilities. 

Projects to Support Communities. 

Institutional Care. 

Income Support Programs (net of recoveries) 

Program Management. 

Income Assistance. 

Income Support for Persons with Disabilities. 

Youth Works. 

Health Services (net of recoveries) 

Program Management, Health Services. 

Health Care and Dental Services. 

Healthy Kids. 

Valuation Allowance. 

Total Expenditure. 

Tangible Capital Assets. 

Amortization Expense. 

Total Expense. 

Breakdown of Other Authorizations— 

Special Warrant No. 2. 

Statutory Appropriations. 

Valuation Allowance. 

Tangible Capital Assets. 

Amortization Expense... 


—Total Appropriations- 

Budget Other Total 


Estimated 

Re-allocations 

Authorizations 

Appropriations 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

398,000 



398,000 

69,518,624 

(31,391,229) 


38,127,395 

129,392,820 

(129,392,820) 


0 

125,264,609 

(125,264,609) 


0 

153,371,188 

(153,371,188) 


0 

31,611,593 

(31,611,593) 


0 

58,973,338 

(58,973,338) 


0 

332,382,442 

(332,382,442) 


0 

13,068,000 

(9,437,419) 


3,630,581 

18,996,000 

(18,996,000) 


0 

123,069,998 

(1,500,000) 


121,569,998 

1,025,144,000 

81,128,575 

55,048,092 

1,161,320,667 

230,995,500 

(12,400,000) 


218,595,500 

202,880,500 

(32,800,000) 


170,080,500 

3,826,555 

(1,330,362) 


2,496,193 

66,217,833 

(11,914,000) 


54,303,833 

15,700,000 

(15,700,000) 


0 

2,600,413,000 

(885,336,425) 

55,048,092 

1,770,124,667 



17,900,000 

17,900,000 

2,600,811,000 

(885,336,425) 

72,948,092 

1,788,422,667 



(2,266,082) 

(2,266,082) 



466,448 

466,448 

2,600,811,000 

(885,336,425) 

71,148,458 

1,786,623,033 


40,000,000 

15,048,092 

17,900,000 

(2,266,082) 

466,448 


71,148,458 

























































PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


C 69 


-Actual Expenditure by Group Account Classification- 


Salaries 
and Benefits 
$ 

359,614 

Operating 

Costs 

$ 

23,442 

Asset 

Acquisitions 

$ 

Grants and 
Contributions 
$ 

Other 

Expenditures 

$ 

Recoveries 

$ 

Total 

$ 

383,056 

Net Under (Over) 
$ 

14,944 

20,398,444 

12,576,434 

3,767,058 

75,624 

1,309,835 


38,127,395 

0 


0 0 
0 0 
0 0 


0 0 

0 0 

0 0 

302 3,624,845 3,625,147 5,434 

0 0 


89,086,321 

31,252,187 

138 

777,794 

436,335 

1,175,466,536 

218,535,240 

169,987,035 

3,810 

3,567,533 

(17,503,239) 

121,556,447 

1,161,530,968 

218,535,240 

169,987,035 

13,551 

(210,301) 

60,260 

93,465 

1,378,342 

1,091,450 

8,481 


54,284,162 



2,469,792 

54,292,643 

0 

26,401 

11,190 

0 

110,863,107 

44,928,992 

4,544,852 

1,622,409,777 

4,881,178 

17,900,000 

(17,503,239) 

1,770,124,667 

17,900,000 

0 

0 

111,222,721 

44,952,434 

4,544,852 

(2,266,082) 

466,448 

1,622,409,777 

22,781,178 

(17,503,239) 

1,788,407,723 

(2,266,082) 

466,448 

14,944 

0 

0 


111,222,721 44,952,434 2,745,218 1,622,409,777 22,781,178 (17,503,239) 1,786,608,089 


14,944 













































C 70 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Ministry of Transportation and Highways— (Unaudited) 


Total Appropriations- 


Vote 

No. Description 

53 Minister's Office. 

54 Ministry Operations 

Administration and Support Services. 

Highway Planning and Major Projects (net of recoveries). 

Highway Operations (net of recoveries). 

Highway Maintenance (net of recoveries). 

Highway Rehabilitation (net of recoveries). 

Highway Capital Construction (net of recoveries) 

Recoverable Highway Capital Construction Projects .... 
Non-recoverable Highway Capital Construction Projects 

Motor Vehicles. 

Motor Carrier Commission. 


Estimated 

$ 

Budget 

Re-allocations 

$ 

Other 

Authorizations 

$ 

Total 

Appropriations 

$ 

432,000 



432,000 

29,931,000 



29,931,000 

9,829,000 



9,829,000 

43,586,000 

(1,590,679) 


41,995,321 

382,961,000 

4,590,629 


387,551,629 

138,552,000 

(29,640,979) 


108,911,021 

10 



10 

2,164,990 

827,247 


2,992,237 

19,909,000 

25,805,524 


45,714,524 

690,000 

8,258 


698,258 

627,623,000 

0 

0 

627,623,000 


Statutory— 

Signal Installation, Parksville. 0 

Signal Installation, Highway 99 at Blueberry Drive. 0 

Highway 20, Williams Lake, Lighting Installation. 0 

Occupancy Charges, Cloverdale Yardsite. 0 

Annacis West Channel. 0 

Road Reporting, 1-900 Number. 0 

Thetis Lake Sewer Service. 0 

Broadway Connector, Burnaby. 0 

Sharon Developments Ltd. 0 

Old Lakelse Road Widening. 0 

Paving of Dogtooth Road. 0 

Jones Road, Asphalt Recycling. 0 

Highway 19 at Pym Road, Signalization. 0 

20th Avenue (Yellowhead Highway) and Spruce Street.... 0 

Kenney Street, Signalization. 0 

BC Tel, Quality Assurance Fiber Optic Cable. 0 

8th and 11 6th, Intersection Improvements. 0 

Front and Poplar Intersection. 0 

Traffic Controller, Highway 11. 0 

Highway 97, Paving. 0 

Route 19 at Duke Point Ferry Terminal. 0 

Transfer of Mount Vesuvius Queen. 0 

Electronic Road Weather Station. 0 

Snow Plowing Residential Driveways. 0 

Railway Crossing Upgrade. 0 

Canada Way Corridor. 0 

Motor Carrier Regulatory Reform Workshop. 0 

Barnett Hastings Capital Project. 0 

Sanitary Sewer Sleeve. 0 

Utility Relocations. 0 

Landscape Development. 0 

Design Omission, Spencer Road to Highland Road. 0 

Audible Signals, Highway 19 and St. George Street. 0 

Counter Attack, Television Production. 0 

Route 19A and Jingle Pot Road. 0 

Route 19A and Hammond Bay Road. 0 

Seymour Creek Study. 0 

Cranberry/Harewood Sewer. 0 

Highway 10 at 1 32nd Street, Left Turn Signal. 0 

National Safety Code. 0 

Traffic Signal Installation. 0 

Signal Upgrade, Highway 99 at Lorimer. 0 





























































PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


C 71 


-Actual Expenditure by Group Account Classification- 


Salaries 
and Benefits 
$ 

Operating 

Costs 

$ 

Asset 

Acquisitions 

$ 

Grants and 
Contributions 
$ 

365,106 

36,751 

1,689 


16,325,516 

11,161,876 

658,405 

3,000 

3,423,616 

1,520,273 

129,795 

4,315,286 

28,116,945 

12,751,576 

1,975,467 

141,202 

54,067,139 

334,793,596 

1,544,639 

1,487,043 

13,302,895 

43,600,871 

55,017,377 

281,190 

33,945,055 

57,927,187 

257,443,408 


27,562 

180,305 

2,483,371 

300,000 

29,065,134 

15,949,202 

228,285 

44,965 

283,216 

405,746 

2,678 

5,000 

178,557,078 

478,290,632 

319,483,425 

6,577,686 

8,616 

75,810 




18,000 

53,836 

131,975 

162,700 

100,110 

6,368 



52,215 

35,000 

125,200 




40,150 

12,350 



1,048 

24,654 

38,750 

23,000 

39,579 

93,459 

23,496 

46,728 


600 

21,951 

1,021 

17,229 



4,644 

325 




49,737 




4,960 



1,140 

20,174 

89,981 

29,284 



4,275 




6,184 

9,379 

22,646 



20,758 

4,695 


137 

3,999 

225,000 



2,063 

1,937 



1,276 

2,312 




4,500 

21,416 



3,750 

249,333 

97,567 


13,959 

166,468 

35,530 



50,000 




Other 


Expenditures 

Recoveries 

Total 

Net Under (Over) 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 



403,546 

28,454 

198,283 


28,347,080 

1,583,920 

31,880 

(19,425) 

9,401,425 

427,575 

(2,869,365) 

(298,278) 

39,817,547 

2,177,774 

(354,649) 

(4,854,399) 

386,683,369 

868,260 

(1,361,658) 

(3,073,469) 

107,767,206 

1,143,815 

72,737 

(349,388,387) 

0 

10 



2,991,238 

999 

425,938 


45,713,524 

1,000 

618 


697,258 

1,000 

(3,856,216) 

(357,633,958) 

621,418,647 

6,204,353 


(84,426) 

0 

0 


(18,000) 

0 

0 


(53,836) 

0 

0 


(131,975) 

0 

0 


(162,700) 

0 

0 


(100,110) 

0 

0 


(6,368) 

0 

0 


(52,215) 

0 

0 


(35,000) 

0 

0 


(125,200) 

0 

0 


(40,150) 

0 

0 


(12,350) 

0 

0 


(25,702) 

0 

0 


(38,750) 

0 

0 


(23,000) 

0 

0 


(39,579) 

0 

0 


(140,187) 

0 

0 


(23,496) 

0 

0 


(22,551) 

0 

0 


(1,021) 

0 

0 


(17,229) 

0 

0 


(4,969) 

0 

0 


(49,737) 

0 

0 


(4,960) 

0 

0 


(111,295) 

0 

0 


(29,284) 

0 

0 


(4,275) 

0 

0 


(6,184) 

0 

0 


(9,379) 

0 

0 


(22,646) 

0 

0 


(20,758) 

0 

0 


(4,695) 

0 

0 


(4,136) 

0 

0 


(225,000) 

0 

0 


(4,000) 

0 

0 


(3,588) 

0 

0 


(4,500) 

0 

0 


(21,416) 

0 

0 


(3,750) 

0 

0 


(346,900) 

0 

0 


(215,957) 

0 

0 


(50,000) 

0 

0 












C 72 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Ministry of Transportation and Highways— (Unaudited)—Continued 


Vote 

No. Description 


MVB/ICBC Operations. 

MVB/ICBC Traffic Safety Initiatives ... 
Tsable River Bridge, Insurance Claim 

Watkiss Way Sewer Casing. 

TCH/Victoria, Supply of Gravel. 

Sign Shop Recovery. 

Commission Fees on Collection. 

Write-Offs/Bad Debts. 

Valuation Allowance. 

Total Expenditure. 

Tangible Capital Assets. 

Amortization Expense. 

Total Expense. 

Breakdown of Other Authorizations— 

Statutory Appropriation. 

Valuation Allowance. 

Tangible Capital Assets. 

Amortization Expense. 


-Total Appropriations- 

Budget Other Total 

Estimated Re-allocations Authorizations Appropriations 

$ $ $ $ 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 




4,607,029 

665 

416 

4,607,029 

665 

416 

628,055,000 

0 

4,608,110 

632,663,110 



(129,555) 

(129,555) 



2,531,649 

2,531,649 

628,055,000 

0 

7,010,204 

635,065,204 


4,607,694 

416 

(129,555) 

2,531,649 


7,010,204 








































PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


C 73 




Actual Expenditure by Group Account Classification- 



Salaries 

Operating 

Asset 

Grants and 

Other 




and Benefits 

Costs 

Acquisitions 

Contributions 

Expenditures 

Recoveries 

Total 

Net Under (Over) 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

6,841,903 

2,001,683 

4,375 


21,111 

(8,869,072) 

0 

0 

1,269,439 

7,039,552 

10,945,803 



(19,254,794) 

0 

0 



31,050 



(31,050) 

0 

0 



5,315 



(5,315) 

0 

0 



9,750 



(9,750) 

0 

0 


63,898 




(63,898) 

0 

0 





4,607,029 


4,607,029 

0 





665 


665 

0 





416 


416 

0 


187,067,009 489,336,713 330,845,001 6,577,686 773,005 (388,169,111) 626,430,303 6,232,807 


(129,555) (129,555) 0 

2,531,649 2,531,649 0 

187,067,009 489,336,713 333,247,095 6,577,686 773,005 (388,169,111) 628,832,397 


6,232,807 





































C 74 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Ministry of Women's Equality— (Unaudited) 


-Total Appropriations- 


Vote 



Budget 

Other 

Total 

No. 

Description 

Estimated 

Re-allocations 

Authorizations 

Appropriations 



$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

55 

Minister's Office. 

. 373,020 



373,020 

56 

Ministry Operations 






Ministry Support. 

. 8,093,923 

(3,518,000) 


4,575,923 


Policy, Planning and Evaluation. 

Programs 

. 1,254,148 



1,254,148 


Child Care. 

. 192,336,875 

(192,336,875) 


0 


Stopping the Violence. 

. 34,041,200 

(1,368,125) 


32,673,075 


Community Programs. 

. 1,147,834 



1,147,834 


236,873,980 

(197,223,000) 

0 

39,650,980 

237,247,000 

(197,223,000) 

0 

40,024,000 


Total Expense 

































PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


C 75 


Actual Expenditure by Group Account Classification- 


Salaries Operating Asset Grants and Other 


and Benefits 
$ 

Costs 

$ 

Acquisitions 

$ 

Contributions 

$ 

Expenditures 

$ 

Recoveries 

$ 

Total 

$ 

Net Under (Over) 
$ 

315,142 

18,902 





334,044 

38,976 

2,329,015 

754,033 

1,692,974 

32,491 

130,642 

241,600 

8,750 

16,825 


4,411,056 

795,274 

164,867 

458,874 

711,974 

944,269 

107,767 

118,791 


29,292,394 



0 

30,112,135 

1,063,060 

0 

2,560,940 

84,774 


4,739,291 1,952,023 130,642 29,542,744 16,825 

5,054,433 1,970,925 130,642 29,542,744 16,825 


0 


36,381,525 

36,715,569 


3,269,455 


0 


3,308,431 





































C 76 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Other Appropriations—(Unaudited) 


Vote 

No. Description 

57 Management of Public Funds and Debt 

Cost of Borrowing for Government Purposes (net of re¬ 
coveries) . 

Cost of Hedging Interest on Debt Guaranteed by the Prov¬ 
ince (net of recoveries). 

Cost of Borrowing for Relending to Government Bodies 

(net of recoveries). 

Provincial Treasury Revenue Program (net of recoveries).. 
Cost of Unallocated Borrowing under the Warehouse Pro¬ 
gram (net of recoveries). 

58 Contingencies (All Ministries) and New Programs. 

Ballard Power Systems. 

Ballard Bus Program Operations. 

Royal BC Museum. 

Jericho School. 

North American Indigenous Games. 

Apex Resort. 

Sechelt First Nation—Utility Corridor. 

Line Ministry Fund. 

Cabinet Policy, Communications and Operations. 

Ex Gratia Payments. 

Ministry for Children and Families, Minister's Office. 

First Nations Bands. 

Attorney General Children's Commission. 

Review Team on Automobile Insurance Reform. 

Workforce Adjustment Program. 

Human Resources Leave Liability and Systems. 

Fort Nelson/Blueberry/Doig Indian Band Lands Oil and 
Gas Activity. 

59 BC Benefits (net of recoveries). 

60 Corporate Accounting System (net of recoveries). 

61 Environmental Assessment and Land Use Coordination 

Environmental Assessment Office. 

Land Use Coordination Office. 

Corporate Resource Inventory Initiative. 

62 Environmental Boards and Forest Appeals Commission 

Environmental Appeal Board (net of recoveries). 

Environmental Assessment Board. 

Forest Appeals Commission. 

63 Forest Practices Board. 

64 Office of the Police Complaints Commissioner. 

65 Public Sector Employers' Council. 



-Total Appropriations- 


Estimated 

$ 

Budget 

Re-allocations 

$ 

Other 

Authorizations 

$ 

Total 

Appropriations 

$ 

1,000,999,960 



1,000,999,960 

10 



10 

10 



10 

10 



10 

10 



10 

1,001,000,000 

0 

0 

1,001,000,000 

51,000,000 



51,000,000 


0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 


0 


51,000,000 

143,149,000 

12,890,000 

0 

0 

101,408,548 

51,000,000 
244,557,548 
12,890,000 

3,664,000 

4,774,000 

9,213,000 



3,664,000 

4,774,000 

9,213,000 

17,651,000 

0 

0 

17,651,000 

397,000 

425,000 

1,395,000 



397,000 

425,000 

1,395,000 

2,217,000 

4,292,000 

500,000 

2,107,000 

0 

0 

2,217,000 

4,292,000 

500,000 

2,107,000 





















































PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


C 77 


Salaries 
and Benefits 
$ 


0 


20,487 

200 


52,642 

1,044,950 

172,174 


1,191,668 


2.482.121 
933,935 

2,889,211 

1,885,335 

1,862,052 

1,946,735 

5.694.122 

175,324 

329,783 

505,107 

1,033,977 


Operating 

Costs 

$ 


0 


25,312 

540,086 


527,651 

292,035 

11,511 

55,865 

100,000 

3,300,000 


4,852,460 

241,938 

3,055,377 

1,267,407 

1,781,520 

4,512,415 

7,561,342 

381,954 

24,972 

186,503 

593,429 

1,877,279 

70,358 

418,486 


Actual Expenditure by Group Account Classification 

Asset Grants and Other 



Acquisitions 

Contributions 

Expenditures 

Recoveries 

Total 

Net Under (Over) 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 



951,946,529 

(1,286,633) 

950,659,896 

50,340,064 



(10,133,889) 

10,133,889 

0 

10 



1,289,225,555 

(1,289,225,555) 

0 

10 



18,215,587 

(18,215,587) 

0 

10 



7,558,859 

(7,558,859) 

0 

10 

0 

0 

2,256,812,641 

(1,306,152,745) 

950,659,896 

50,340,104 


600,000 



600,000 

(600,000) 


2,554,591 



2,554,591 

(2,554,591) 





45,799 

(45,799) 

29,795 

251,500 



821,581 

(821,581) 


500,000 



500,000 

(500,000) 



105,423 


105,423 

(105,423) 



200,000 


200,000 

(200,000) 

63,787 




644,080 

(644,080) 





1,336,985 

(1,336,985) 



6,425 


6,425 

(6,425) 





183,685 

(183,685) 


13,118 



13,118 

(13,118) 





55,865 

(55,865) 





100,000 

(100,000) 



36,870,149 


36,870,149 

(36,870,149) 





4,491,668 

(4,491,668) 


185,293 



185,293 

(185,293) 

93,582 

4,104,502 

37,181,997 

0 

48,714,662 

2,285,338 

87,890 

246,234,172 

160,224 

(3,100,611) 

244,557,548 

0 

2,825,350 



(286,561) 

8,483,377 

4,406,623 

41,397 

149,167 



3,343,306 

320,694 

100,777 

506,873 



4,251,222 

522,778 

619,968 

968,920 



8,048,038 

1,164,962 

762,142 

1,624,960 

0 

0 

15,642,566 

2,008,434 

2,500 



(198,767) 

361,011 

35,989 





24,972 

400,028 

31,848 




548,134 

846,866 

34,348 

0 

0 

(198,767) 

934,117 

1,282,883 

110,211 




3,021,467 

1,270,533 

63,158 




133,516 

366,484 

106,547 




1,720,515 

386,485 


1,195,482 






































C 78 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Other Appropriations —(Unaudited)—Continued 


Total Appropriations- 


Vote 

No. 

66 


67 




Budget 

Other 

Total 

Description 

Estimated 

Re-allocations 

Authorizations 

Appropriations 


$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

Public Service Employee Relations Commission 





Commission Operations. 

Employee Benefits Administration, Pension Contributions, 

12,449,990 

0 


12,449,990 

and Retirement Benefits 

Provincial Pension. 

131,728,000 

406,947 

748,669 

132,883,616 

Miscellaneous Statutory Items. 

3,500,000 


2,135,910 

5,635,910 

Canada Pension. 

33,475,000 

1,009,810 


34,484,810 

Members of the Legislative Assembly Superannuation .. 

300,000 


2,160,509 

2,460,509 

Death and Retiring Benefits. 

2,340,000 

(4,461) 

3,853,091 

6,188,630 

Extended Heath and Dental Benefits. 

35,200,000 

1,378,451 

720,379 

37,298,830 

Group Insurance. 

5,500,000 

(261,954) 


5,238,046 

Medical Services Plan. 

30,900,000 

9,352 

1,519,813 

32,429,165 

Long Term Disability. 

23,500,000 

(2,525,295) 


20,974,705 

Unemployment Insurance. 

51,518,000 

1,484,024 

1,644,612 

54,646,636 

Workers' Compensation. 

6,900,000 

(505,485) 

1,307,083 

7,701,598 

Employee Assistance Program Administration. 

630,000 

(92,028) 


537,972 

Other Benefits. 

10,248,700 

37,222,608 


47,471,308 

Recoveries from Special Offices and Ministries. 

(335,739,690) 

(38,121,969) 


(373,861,659) 


12,450,000 

0 

14,090,066 

26,540,066 

Office of the Transition Commissioner for Child and Youth 





Services. 

7,200,000 



7,200,000 

Statutory— 





Special Accounts— 





Insurance and Risk Management. 

South Moresby Implementation—Forestry Compensa- 

9,212,000 


2,864,780 

12,076,780 

tion. 

Less transfer to the General Account from the South Mo- 

15,000 


1,248,416 

1,263,416 

resby Implementation—Forestry Compensation Spe¬ 
cial Account. 



(166,446) 

(166,446) 

Amortization of Change in Unfunded Pension Liability. 

(24,880,000) 


(11,127,124) 

(36,007,124) 

Total Expense. 

1,238,803,000 

0 

108,318,240 

1,347,121,240 

Breakdown of Other Authorizations— 





Statutory Appropriation—within Vote. 

115,498,614 




Statutory Appropriation—Special Account. 

4,113,196 




Inter-account transfers. 

(1 66,446) 




Amortization of Change in Unfunded Pension Liability .... 

(11,127,124) 





108,318,240 














































PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


C 79 


-Actual Expenditure by Group Account Classification 


• Salaries 

Operating 

Asset 

Grants and 

and Benefits 

Costs 

Acquisitions 

Contributions 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

9,689,416 

4,827,492 

2,025,894 

35 

151,843,179 




5,635,910 

35,065,461 




2,460,509 

6,350,783 

2,308 



47,220,379 

8,292,491 

32,819,813 

21,008,828 

55,551,373 

10,507,083 

627,000 



47,131,055 

267,622 

72,631 


433,576,280 

5,724,422 

2,098,525 

35 

456,508 

495,277 

36,358 

643 

876,808 

9,623,536 

138,869 



16,723 




Other 

Expenditures 

Recoveries 

Total 

Net Under (Over) 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

(18,100) 

(5,719,359) 

10,805,378 

1,644,612 


(18,959,573) 

132,883,606 

10 


5,635,910 

0 

(580,651) 

34,484,810 

0 


2,460,509 

0 

(164,461) 

6,188,630 

0 

(9,921,549) 

37,298,830 

0 

(3,054,445) 

5,238,046 

0 

(390,648) 

32,429,165 

0 

(34,123) 

20,974,705 

0 

(904,737) 

54,646,636 

0 

(2,805,485) 

7,701,598 

0 

(89,028) 

537,972 

0 


47,471,308 

0 

(373,861,659) 

(373,861,659) 

0 

(18,100) (416,485,718) 

24,895,444 

1,644,622 


988,786 

6,211,214 


6,870,965 

(5,433,398) 

12,076,780 

0 

1,246,693 


1,263,416 

0 


449,643,551 


(166,446) 


34,364,181 


(166,446) 

(36,007,124) (36,007,124) 

6,356,980 251,964,312 2,266,247,296 (1,731,657,800) 1,276,918,520 


0 

0 


70,202,720 






































C 80 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Summary of Special Accounts 
Account Balance as at March 31, 1997 

(Unaudited) 



Opening 

Account 

Balance 

Net 

Revenue 

(Expenditure) 

Closing 

Account 

Balance 

Spending 

Authority 

Committed 

Spending 

Authority 

Available 

Revolving Accounts 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

Agricultural Land Development. 

24,084,929 

1,568,962 

25,653,891 

7,649,573 

18,004,318 

Build BC. 

42,977,569 

9,982,099 

52,959,668 

(204,811) 

53,164,479 

Crown Land. 

156,103,159 

6,532,149 

162,635,308 

23,358,587 

139,276,721 

First Citizens' Fund 






—Unexpendable funds. 

25,000,000 


25,000,000 

25,000,000 


—Expendable funds. 

9,073,825 

412,329 

9,486,154 


9,486,154 


34,073,825 

412,329 

34,486,154 

25,000,000 

9,486,154 

Forest Stand Management Fund. 

953,588 

833,426 

1,787,014 


1,787,014 

Forfeited Crime Proceeds Fund. 

3,229,851 

258,557 

3,488,408 


3,488,408 

Grazing Enhancement Fund. 

2,037,934 

1,378,539 

3,416,473 

(50,361) 

3,466,834 

Habitat Conservation Fund. 

4,583,603 

(1,183,849) 

3,399,754 

(73,141) 

3,472,895 

Health Special Account. 






Inmate Work Program. 

460,264 

271,521 

731,785 

315,744 

416,041 

Insurance and Risk Management. 

16,848,275 

(2,398,077) 

14,450,198 

(37,644,128) 

52,094,326 

Livestock Protection. 

116,971 

4,675 

121,646 


121,646 

Medical and Health Care Services. 

30,435,471 

(15,486,903) 

14,948,568 


14,948,568 

Physical Fitness and Amateur Sports 






—Unexpendable funds. 

20,000,000 


20,000,000 

20,000,000 


—Expendable funds. 

1,493,992 

183,501 

1,677,493 


1,677,493 


21,493,992 

183,501 

21,677,493 

20,000,000 

1,677,493 

Provincial Home Acquisition. 

479,837,652 

1,098,395 

480,936,047 

547,488 

480,388,559 

Provincial Treasury Operations. 

17,909,850 

5,967,413 

23,877,263 

2,226,885 

21,650,378 

Provincial Treasury Revenue. 

3,941,307 

773,359 

4,714,666 


4,714,666 

Public Trustee Operating Account. 

4,273,428 

106,872 

4,380,300 

484,130 

3,896,170 

Purchasing Commission Working Capital. 

4,922,585 

16,047,171 

20,969,756 

9,560 

20,960,196 

Science and Technology Fund. 

25,026,011 

3,943,176 

28,969,187 

(28,031) 

28,997,218 

Small Business Forest Enterprise. 

135,800,000 

1,214,065 

137,014,065 

37,921,881 

99,092,184 

South Moresby Implementation 






—Forestry Compensation. 

1,883,780 

(1,883,780) 




—Forest Replacement. 

24,044,488 

(15,074) 

24,029,414 

10,937 

24,018,477 


25,928,268 

(1,898,854) 

24,029,414 

10,937 

24,018,477 

Sustainable Environment Fund. 

17,147,338 

1,863,782 

19,011,120 

(9,809,052) 

28,820,172 

University Endowment Lands Admin- 






istration. 

3,735,138 

102,627 

3,837,765 

315,771 

3,521,994 

Victim Surcharge. 


103,015 

103,015 


103,015 

Total. 

1,055,921,008 

31,677,950 

1,087,598,958 

70,031,032 

1,017,567,926 
















































































PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


C 81 

Summary of Special Accounts 
Account Balance as at March 31, 1997— Continued 

(Unaudited) 



Opening 

Increase 

Closing 

Spending 

Spending 


Account 

(Decrease) 

Account 

Authority 

Authority 


Balance 

Account Balance 

Balance 

Committed 

Available 

Non-revolving Accounts 1 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

Industrial Incentive Fund. 

61,903,336 

29,934,729 

91,838,065 


91,838,065 

Small Business Incentive Program. 

14,266,854 


14,266,854 


14,266,854 

Vancouver Island Natural Gas Pipeline.. 

9,378,333 

(3,215,263) 

6,163,070 


6,163,070 

Total. 

85,548,523 

26,719,466 

112,267,989 

0 

112,267,989 


'For non-revolving Special Accounts, cash disbursements decrease the account balance. 



























C 82 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Summary of Special Accounts 
Operating Statement 
for the Fiscal Year Ended March 31, 1997 

(Unaudited) 



Revenue 

Revenue 



Net 


from Third 

from 

Total 


Revenue 


Parties 

Appropriation 

Revenue 

(Expenditure) 

(Expenditure) 

Revolving Accounts 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

Agricultural Land Development. 

1,568,962 


1,568,962 


1,568,962 

Build BC. 

1,205,682 

20,000,000 

21,205,682 

(1 1,223,583) 

9,982,099 

Crown Land. 

First Citizens' Fund 

65,449,523 


65,449,523 

(58,917,374) 

6,532,149 

—Unexpendable funds. 

—Expendable funds. 

3,210,683 


3,210,683 

(2,798,354) 

412,329 


3,210,683 


3,210,683 

(2,798,354) 

412,329 

Forest Stand Management Fund. 

833,898 


833,898 

(472) 

833,426 

Forfeited Crime Proceeds Fund. 

258,557 


258,557 


258,557 

Crazing Enhancement Fund. 

6,457 

2,340,000 

2,346,457 

(967,918) 

1,378,539 

Habitat Conservation Fund. 

16,159 


16,159 

(1,200,008) 

(1,183,849) 

Health Special Account. 

115,000,000 


115,000,000 

(115,000,000) 


Inmate Work Program. 

1,636,096 


1,636,096 

(1,364,575) 

271,521 

Insurance and Risk Management. 

9,678,703 


9,678,703 

(12,076,780) 

(2,398,077) 

Livestock Protection. 

13,090 


13,090 

(8,415) 

4,675 

Medical and Health Care Services. 

Physical Fitness and Amateur Sports 

7,209,062 


7,209,062 

(22,695,965) 

(15,486,903) 

—Unexpendable funds. 

—Expendable funds. 

1,732,589 


1,732,589 

(1,549,088) 

183,501 


1,732,589 


1,732,589 

(1,549,088) 

183,501 

Provincial Home Acquisition. 

1,172,050 


1,172,050 

(73,655) 

1,098,395 

Provincial Treasury Operations. 

13,068,662 


13,068,662 

(7,101,249) 

5,967,413 

Provincial Treasury Revenue. 

773,359 


773,359 


773,359 

Public Trustee Operating Account. 

10,143,345 


10,143,345 

(10,036,473) 

106,872 

Purchasing Commission Working Capital. 




16,047,171 

16,047,171 

Science and Technology Fund. 

38,961 

25,815,163 

25,854,124 

(21,910,948) 

3,943,176 

Small Business Forest Enterprise. 

South Moresby Implementation 

346,725,377 


346,725,377 

(345,511,312) 

1,214,065 

—Forestry Compensation. 

(620,364) 


(620,364) 

(1,263,416) 

(1,883,780) 

—Forest Replacement. 

1,008,602 


1,008,602 

(1,023,676) 

(15,074) 


388,238 


388,238 

(2,287,092) 

(1,898,854) 

Sustainable Environment Fund. 

University Endowment Lands Admin- 

34,132,731 

1,310,870 

35,443,601 

(33,579,819) 

1,863,782 

istration. 

2,970,621 


2,970,621 

(2,867,994) 

102,627 

Victim Surcharge. 

103,015 


103,015 


103,015 

Total. 

617,335,820 

49,466,033 

666,801,853 

(635,123,903) 

31,677,950 
















































































PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


C 83 




Summary of Special Accounts 
Operating Statement 

for the Fiscal Year Ended March 31, 1997— Continued 

(Unaudited) 

Revenue Revenue 



from Third 

Parties 

from 

Appropriation 

Total 

Revenue 

Cash 

Disbursements 

Non-revolving Accounts 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

Industrial Incentive Fund. 

Small Business Incentive Program. 

Vancouver Island Natural Gas Pipeline.. 


100,000,000 

100,000,000 

(70,065,271) 

(3,215,263) 

Total. 

0 

100,000,000 

100,000,000 

(73,280,534) 


Increase 
(Decrease) 
Account Balance 

$ 

29,934,729 

(3,215,263) 

26,719,466 


























C 84 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Schedule of Reorganization of 1996/97 Revised Estimates 


(Transfer to) 

Ministry Transfer from Transfers 

$ 


Children and Families. 

Ministry Operations 

Administration and Support Services (net of recoveries) 

Administration and Support Services. 

Administration and Support Services. 

Ministry Support. 

Student Services. 

Schools Funding 

Operating Contributions, Public Schools. 

School Support Contributions. 

Operating Contributions, Independent Schools. 

Strategic Programs. 

Regional Programs (net of recoveries) 

Program Management. 

Provincial Programs. 

Regional Health Programs. 

Debt Servicing and Building Occupancy. 

Child, Family and Community Services (net of re¬ 
coveries) 

Program Management. 

Family and Youth Support Services. 

Child in Care Services. 

Community Support Services (net of recoveries) 

Program Management. 

Services for Children with Mental Handicaps or Spe¬ 
cial Needs. 

Services for Adults with Mental Handicaps or Multi¬ 
ple Disabilities. 

Projects to Support Communities. 

Institutional Care. 

Health Servicesfnet of recoveries) 

Program Management. 

Health Care and Dental Services. 

Healthy Kids. 

Programs 

Child Care. 

Stopping the Violence. 

Education, Skills and Training. 

Ministry Operations 

Administration and Support Servicesfnet of recoveries) 

Student Services. 

Schools Funding 

Operating Contributions, Public Schools. 

School Support Contributions. 

Operating Contributions, Independent Schools. 

Employment and Investment. 

Information Technology Services Division 

Data Services. 

Network Services. 

Desk Top and Office Systems. 

Support Services. 

Information Technology Training. 

Information Technology Recoveries. 


Education, Skills and Training 

49,000 

Health 

1,638,900 

Human Resources 

19,912,654 

Women's Equality 

3,518,000 

Education, Skills and Training 

485,000 

Education, Skills and Training 

20,300,000 

Education, Skills and Training 

929,000 

Education, Skills and Training 

4,950,000 

Health 

282,100 

Health 

5,500,000 

Health 

21,785,000 

Health 

109,000,000 

Health 

3,191,000 

Human Resources 

129,392,820 

Human Resources 

107,764,609 

Human Resources 

153,371,188 

Human Resources 

31,611,593 

Human Resources 

58,973,338 

Human Resources 

332,382,442 

Human Resources 

8,741,419 

Human Resources 

18,996,000 

Human Resources 

980,362 

Human Resources 

7,510,000 

Human Resources 

15,700,000 

Women's Equality 

191,891,000 

Women's Equality 

1,814,000 

(Children and Families) 

(49,000) 

(Children and Families) 

(485,000) 

(Children and Families) 

(20,300,000) 

(Children and Families) 

(929,000) 

(Children and Families) 

(4,950,000) 

Finance and Corporate Relations 

45,327,666 

Finance and Corporate Relations 

82,441,246 

Finance and Corporate Relations 

7,221,948 

Finance and Corporate Relations 

19,480,369 

Finance and Corporate Relations 

7,000,000 

Finance and Corporate Relations 

(161,471,219) 


Total by 
Ministry 

$ 

1,250,669,425 


(26,713,000) 


16,407,954 












































PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


C 85 


Schedule of Reorganization of 1996/97 Revised Estimates— Continued 


Ministry 


(Transfer to) 
Transfer from 


Transfers 


Total by 
Ministry 


S 


Information and Technology 

Information Technology Access Office. 

BC Information and Privacy Office. 

Enquiry BC. 

Archives and Records Services. 

BC Gaming Commission. 

BC Racing Commission. 

Finance and Corporate Relations. 

Information Technology Services Division 

Data Services. 

Network Services. 

Desk Top and Office Systems. 

Support Services. 

Information Technology Training. 

Information Technology Recoveries. 

Information and Technology 

Information Technology Access Office. 

BC Information and Privacy Office. 

Enquiry BC. 

Archives and Records Services. 

BC Gaming Commission. 

BC Racing Commission. 

Health. 

British Columbia Transit 

Operating Contributions. 

Debt Servicing Contributions. 

Corporate Programs(net of recoveries) 

Administration and Support Services. 

Regional Programs 

Debt Servicing and Building Occupancy . 

Regional Health Programs. 

Small Business, Tourism and Culture. 

British Columbia Transit 

Operating Contributions. 

Debt Servicing Contributions. 

Human Resources. 

Ministry Operations 

Administration and Support Services. 

Child, Family and Community Services(net of recoveries) 

Program Management. 

Family and Youth Support Services. 

Child in Care Services. 

Community Support Servicesfnet of recoveries) 

Program Management. 

Services for Children with Mental Handicaps or Spe¬ 
cial Needs. 

Services for Adults with Mental Handicaps or Multiple 

Disabilities. 

Projects to Support Communities. 

Institutional Care. 


Finance and Corporate Relations 3,272,703 

Finance and Corporate Relations 1,358,000 

Finance and Corporate Relations 1,762,000 

Finance and Corporate Relations 5,671,000 

Finance and Corporate Relations 4,344,231 

Finance and Corporate Relations 10 


(Employment and Investment) 

(45,327,666) 

(Employment and Investment) 

(82,441,246) 

(Employment and Investment) 

(7,221,948) 

(Employment and Investment) 

(19,480,369) 

(Employment and Investment) 

(7,000,000) 

(Employment and Investment) 

161,471,219 

(Employment and Investment) 

(3,272,703) 

(Employment and Investment) 

(1,358,000) 

(Employment and Investment) 

(1,762,000) 

(Employment and Investment) 

(5,671,000) 

(Employment and Investment) 

(4,344,231) 

(Employment and Investment) 

(10) 


Small Business, Tourism and Culture 
Small Business, Tourism and Culture 

142,500,000 

145,010,000 

(Children and Families) 

(1,921,000) 

(Children and Families) 

(Children and Families) 

(3,191,000) 

(136,285,000) 


(Health) 

(Health) 

(142,500,000) 

(145,010,000) 

(Children and Families) 

(27,912,654) 

(Children and Families) 

(Children and Families) 

(Children and Families) 

(129,392,820) 

(107,764,609) 

(153,371,188) 

(Children and Families) 

(31,61 1,593) 

(Children and Families) 

(58,973,338) 

(Children and Families) 

(Children and Families) 

(Children and Families) 

(332,382,442) 

(8,741,419) 

(18,996,000) 


$ 


(16,407,954) 


146,113,000 


(287,510,000) 


(885,336,425) 














































C 86 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Schedule of Reorganization of 1996/97 Revised Estimates— Continued 


Ministry 


(Transfer to) 
Transfer from 


Transfers 


Total by 
Ministry 


$ 


$ 


Health Servicesfnet of recoveries) 

Program Management. (Children 

Health Care and Dental Services. (Children 

Healthy Kids. (Children 

Women's Equality. 

Ministry Operations 

Ministry Support. (Children 

Programs 

Child Care. (Children 

Stopping the Violence. (Children 


and Families) 

(980,362) 

and Families) 

(7,510,000) 

and Families) 

(7,700,000) 


(197,223,000) 


and Families) 

(3,518,000) 

and Families) 

(191,891,000) 

and Families) 

(1,814,000) 













PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


C 87 


Descriptions of Appropriations 


Legislation 

Vote 1—Legislation 

This vote provides for the operation of the Legislative Assembly and its committees, including indemnities, allowances and salaries for 
Members of the Legislative Assembly, officials and staff, and for support services and other related costs. The funds allocated for the Offices of 
the Opposition Leaders are provided for the general operations and support functions of those offices. A grant is provided for membership in the 
Commonwealth Parliamentary Association. Operating costs of the Parliamentary Dining Room are partly recovered from ministries, organiza¬ 
tions and individuals. 


Auditor General 

Vote 2—Auditor General 

This vote provides for the operation of the Office of the Auditor General in meeting the requirements of the Auditor General Act including: 
examination of the accounts and records of the government; issuance of audit reports on the government's financial statements; submission of 
an annual report to the Legislative Assembly on the work of the Office; other reports; and auditing a number of Crown corporations and other 
public bodies. Provision is made for a grant to the Canadian Comprehensive Auditing Foundation. Costs incurred for certain audits are recov¬ 
ered. 

Office of the Child, Youth and Family Advocate 

Vote 3—Office of the Child, Youth and Family Advocate 

This vote provides for the operation of the Office of the Child, Youth and Family Advocate. The Advocate is an officer of the Legislature 
with a mandate under the Child , Youth and Family Advocacy Actio ensure that the rights and interests of children, youths and their families re¬ 
lating to designated services are protected and advanced. The Advocate assists and supports children and youths in obtaining access to desig¬ 
nated government services, ensures appropriate and effective review and appeal processes are in place, and provides information and advice 
to government and communities about designated services for children and youths and their families. As well, the Advocate supports, pro¬ 
motes and coordinates the establishment of advocacy services for children, youths and their families in their local communities. 

Conflict of Interest Commissioner 

Vote 4—Conflict of Interest Commissioner 

This vote provides for the operation of the Conflict of Interest Commissioner. The Commissioner is an officer of the Legislature with a man¬ 
date under the Members' Conflict of Interest Act to meet the requirements under the Act. 

Elections B.C. 

Vote 5—Elections B.C. 

This vote provides for expenses incurred by the Office of the Chief Electoral Officer. The Chief Electoral Officer is an officer of the Legisla¬ 
ture, and is responsible for the administration of the Election Acfand the Recall and Initiative Act. 

(a) Office of the Chief Electoral Officer 

This sub-vote provides for the ongoing operating costs of the Office of the Chief Electoral Officer. 

(b) Statutory Services 

This sub-vote provides for the administration of provincial elections, plebiscites, voter registration and list maintenance, enumerations, 
referenda, electoral boundaries, election financing, registration of political parties and constituency associations, recall petitions, initiative pe¬ 
titions and initiative votes, and other aspects of the provincial electoral process. 


Information and Privacy Commissioner 

Vote 6—Information and Privacy Commissioner 

This vote provides for the salary and expenses of the Office of the Information and Privacy Commissioner. The Commissioner is an officer 
of the Legislature under the Freedom of Information and Protection ot Privacy Act, ( FOIPPA) with a broad mandate to protect the rights given to 
the public under FOIPPA. This includes conducting reviews of access to information requests, investigating complaints, monitoring general 
compliance with the Act, and promoting freedom of information and protection of privacy principles. Provision is also made for grants to ac¬ 
cepted organizations to inform the public about the Act. Costs related to the Annual Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Confer¬ 
ence are fully recovered. 




C 88 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Ombudsman 

Vote 7—Ombudsman 

This vote provides for the operation of the Office of the Ombudsman. The Ombudsman is an independent officer of the Legislature. Under 
the authority of the Ombudsman Act, the Ombudsman may investigate, either in response to a specific complaint or upon the Ombudsman's 
own initiative, the actions and decisions of government bodies. The jurisdiction of the Ombudsman extends to ministries of the province, 
Crown corporations, provincially appointed agencies, boards and commissions, school districts, colleges, universities, hospitals, governing 
bodies of professional and occupational associations, local governments and regional districts. 


Office of the Premier 

Vote 8—Office of the Premier and Cabinet Office 

This vote provides for the Office of the Premier including: 

(a) Office of the Premier 

This sub-vote provides for salaries, benefits, allowances and operating expenses for the Premier and the executive staff of the Office. 

(b) Deputy Minister's Office 

This sub-vote provides for support for the Executive Council, including Cabinet and government administration, and management of 
cross government issues. This sub-vote also provides for salaries, benefits and operating expenses for the Deputy Minister's office. 

Aboriginal Affairs 

Vote 9—Minister's Office 

This vote provides for the Office of the Minister of Aboriginal Affairs, and includes the salaries of the minister, the minister's staff and re¬ 
lated office expenses. 

Vote 10—Ministry Operations 

This vote provides for ministry programs and activities including: 

(a) Support to Treaty Negotiations and Other Initiatives 

This sub-vote provides for: mandate and policy development; inter-ministry policy coordination; and negotiation and consultation on 
pre-treaty and claim issues with First Nations, the federal government, third party advisory groups and others. This sub-vote also provides for: 
financial and administrative, human resource and information management support; communications and public consultation; administration 
of the First Citizens' Fund Special Account and support to the First Nations' advisory committees and boards. Grants and contributions are pro¬ 
vided to various First Nations and organizations for heritage, language and cultural programs, aboriginal community development, pre-treaty 
consultation and negotiation, interim measures, and to support intergovernmental policy forums. Recoveries are received from the federal gov¬ 
ernment for costs incurred pursuant to federal/provincial agreements. 

(b) Treaty Negotiations 

This sub-vote provides for: the coordination and management of the province's participation in negotiating treaties with First Nations and 
the federal government. Provision is made for contributions to the British Columbia Treaty Commission to fund operations and various tripartite 
initiatives, and to provide support for First Nations and others in respect of their participation in the treaty process and in the settlement of 
claims. 

Statutory Account 
Special Account 

First Citizens' Fund 

This account was originally created as a fund under the Revenue Surplus Appropriation Act, 1 969, was continued under the Funds 
Control Act, 1979, and was changed to a Special Account under the Special Accounts Appropriation and Control Act, 1988. 

The account promotes the economic, social and cultural well being of members of First Nations who are residents of British Colum¬ 
bia, by providing financial assistance through loan guarantees, grants and contributions. Interest attributable to the account balance is 
credited to the account as revenue. Expenditures consist of grants and contributions in support of student bursaries, native friendship cen¬ 
tre operations and economic development programs. The account also provides funds for administrative costs of certain social and eco¬ 
nomic development programs. 

No financing transactions are provided for under this account. 

Agriculture, Fisheries and Food 

Vote 11—Minister's Office 

This vote provides for the Office of the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food, and includes the salaries of the minister, the minister's 
staff and related office expenses. 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


C 89 


Vote 12—Ministry Operations 

This vote provides for operations and programs of the ministry, including: 

(a) Administration and Support Services 

This sub-vote provides for executive direction of the ministry and administrative support services including financial planning, personnel, 
communications, information systems and program audit. This sub-vote also provides for policy development, program planning, economic 
and statistical analysis, and information programs. This sub-vote also provides for an operating grant to Columbia Basin Trust. 

(b) Financial Programs 

This sub-vote provides for financial programs to stabilize farm incomes and promote industry self sustainability and includes: 

(i) Financial Development Programs —provides for: management of federal/provincial environmental, business management and in¬ 
dustry development initiatives; cost shared industry development initiatives; and industry trusts. Contributions are made to agricul¬ 
ture, food, aquaculture and fisheries business organizations; and in support of agriculture, food, resource development and 
federal/provincial initiatives. Also provides for the administration of the Feeder Association Loan Guarantee Program under the Fi¬ 
nancial Administration Act and credit programs under the Agriculture Credit Act and the Okanagan Valley Tree Fruit Authority Act. 
Recoveries are received from the federal government for joint federal/provincial initiatives and from the Okanagan Valley Tree Fruit 
Authority for administration of credit programs on their behalf. 

(ii) Revenue Protection Plan —provides for administration of the Revenue Protection Plan for Grains and Oilseeds. Contributions are 
made to the Revenue Protection Plan for Grains and Oilseeds Trust Account. Recoveries are received from the federal government 
for a portion of the administration costs. 

(iii) Crop Insurance —provides for administration of a crop insurance program, under the Insurance for Crops Act, to protect against crop 
loss as a result of natural disasters. Contributions represent the provincial portion of program premiums. Premiums are also paid by 
the federal government and producers. Recoveries are received from the federal government for a portion of the administration costs. 

(iv) Net Income Stabilization Account —provides for contributions to the federal net income stabilization program. 

(v) Agricultural Risk Management —provided for administration costs associated with windup of the Farm Income Insurance Program 
up to the 1995/96 fiscal year. No provision is required in fiscal 1996/97. 

(c) Fisheries and Food 

This sub-vote provides for aquaculture, commercial fisheries and agri-food programs including: 

(i) Development and Extension Services —extension services to the aquaculture industry and research and development projects re¬ 
lated to shellfish, marine plants and finfish farming and funding and technical assistance for the handling, processing and marketing 
of seafood products; 

(ii) Licencing and Enforcement —the technical review of applications for tenure and licences and for the licencing and enforcement of 
regulations as required under the Fisheries Act and Fish Inspection Act; 

(iii) Administration —the administration of parts of the Fisheries Act and Fish Inspection Act; 

(iv) Resource Management —the development of policies and programs with respect to aboriginal issues, including involvement of First 
Nations in resource management. Also provides for resource use and environment impact studies; 

(v) Trade Competition and Food Industry —the operating costs of the Trade Competition and Food Industry Development programs, in¬ 
cluding development of policies and strategies to enhance the competitiveness of British Columbia food products in the provincial 
market; and 

(vi) Grants and Contributions —contributions to support aquaculture and commercial fish industries and to enhance the competitiveness 
of agri-food and fish production, processing and distribution organizations. 

(d) Agriculture 

This sub-vote provides for agricultural extension, development, specialist, regulatory and market development programs including: 

(i) Agriculture Development and Extension Services —in partnership with agriculture organizations, farm families and industry, pro¬ 
vides advice and information on marketing, production technology and research to the agri-food industry through seminars, work¬ 
shops and field days; technical information dissemination to producers; milk, soil, feed and tissue testing; water analysis; animal 
health centre services; and the provincial 4—FH, game farming, horse industry and farm management programs. Also provides for ad¬ 
ministration of the Farm Practices Protection (Right to Farm) Act. Recoveries are received from seminar, workshop and field day pro¬ 
gram participants; 

(ii) Natural Resource Management —services and programs to initiate and coordinate province-wide land and water policies regarding 
soil management, waste management and water allocation and conservation; 

(iii) Inspection —animal health, brand, dairy farm, apiary and crop inspections; 

(iv) Licencing —the licencing of sale yard operations, production and sale of veterinary drugs, fur farm operations, brand certificates, 
game farming operations and poultry processors; 

(v) Applied Research/Demonstration —research and demonstration projects related to soil, water, plants and animals; a environ¬ 
mental impact and other agriculture and food research, and technology transfer initiatives; and 

(vi) Grants and Contributions —grants and contributions to municipalities and regional districts under the Weed Control Act; grants to re¬ 
gional committees under the Grasshopper Control Act; operating grants to livestock associations, 4—H clubs and veterinary services; 
grants and contributions in support of the agriculture and aquaculture industries; and grants to universities for agriculture, aquacul¬ 
ture and food research. 

This sub-vote also provides for a transfer to the Grazing Enhancement Fund Special Account. 




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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Vote 13—Provincial Agricultural Land Commission 

This vote provides for operation of the Provincial Agricultural Land Commission. Under the Agricultural Land Commission Act, the com¬ 
mission is responsible for encouraging the establishment and maintenance of agricultural land in the province. The commission advises mu¬ 
nicipalities and regional districts on the Agricultural Land Reserve and decides on applications for the addition of land to and/or the exclusion 
of land from the reserve, and applications for subdivisions and non-farm uses within the reserve. A portion of fees for applications made under 
the Agricultural Land Commission Act and the Soil Conservation Act are paid out of this vote, as contributions, to local governments for serv¬ 
ices provided in the application process. This vote also provides for operation of the Forest Land Commission established by the Forest Land Re¬ 
serve Act. Recoveries are received from the sale of publications and application fees. 

Vote 14—British Columbia Marketing Board 

This vote provides for operation of the British Columbia Marketing Board which is responsible for supervising the operations of marketing 
boards and commissions formed under the Natural Products Marketing (BC) Act, and hearing related appeals. This vote also provides for the 
operation of the Farm Practices Board formed under the Farm Practices Protection (Right to Farm) Act, and the hearing of related appeals. 

Vote 1 5—Okanagan Valley Tree Fruit Authority 

This vote provides for a contribution to the authority for operating costs and the delivery of revitalization programs. The authority is estab¬ 
lished under the Okanagan Valley Tree Fruit Authority Actio ensure an efficient and coordinated approach to the revitalization of the Interior 
tree fruit industry. Programs include assistance for orchard renovation, marketing, research and development, education and advisory services, 
and communications and community relations. The authority will terminate as of December 31,2000. 

Statutory Accounts 

Canada/BC Farm Business Management Agreement 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 15, sec. 22(1)). This agree¬ 
ment provided funds to develop farm business management research and information and increase the knowledge and skills of producers 
in farm business management through training and development programs. No other resources in the form of staff or funds were required 
as a result of the renewal of the agreement. 

Western Grain Transition Payment Program 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 15, sec. 22(1)). This agree¬ 
ment provided funds for field inspection services to the Western Grain Transition Payment Program on an "as and if required" basis in ac¬ 
cordance with the background and scope of work as defined in the Western Crain Transition Payment Act and its regulations. 

Cattle Horn Act 

This account was established under the authority of the Cattle Florn Act (R.S.B.C. 1979, chap. 44, sec. 7) for livestock improvement. 

Special Accounts 

Agricultural Land Development 

This account was originally created as a fund by the Finance Statutes Amendment Act, 1981 which amended the Agricultural Land 
Development Act. This fund was subsequently changed to a Special Account by the Special Appropriations Act, 1982, and the Agricul¬ 
tural Land Development Actwas repealed and incorporated into the Agricultural Credit Act. This program was discontinued on March 31, 
1995. 

The purpose of the account was to make low interest loans, on a revolving basis, for purposes specified under the Agricultural Credit 
Act. Revenue represents interest received on outstanding loans and the recovery of the grant component of concessionary low interest 
loans expensed in previous years. Expenditures represented the grant component of concessionary low interest loans received up to 
March 31,1995 and disbursed during the 1995/96 fiscal year. Administration costs were funded through voted appropriations. Financing 
transaction receipts represent principal repayments on outstanding loans; disbursements represent loans issued. 

Grazing EnFiancement Fund 

This account was created by the Crazing Enhancement Fund Special Account Act, 1995 and will terminate as of March 31,2000. 
Revenue is received through a transfer from Vote 12. Expenditures provide for the maintenance and enhancement of range resources in¬ 
cluding contributions to universities and/or research agencies for research projects related to grazing enhancement. The account also pro¬ 
vides funds for costs related to the administration of the account. 

No financing transactions are provided for under this account. 

Livestock Protection 

This account was originally created as a fund by the Domestic Animal Protection Act, 1973, was continued under the Livestock Pro¬ 
tection Act, and was changed to a Special Account under the Special Appropriations Act, 1982. The purpose of the account is to provide 
compensation to an owner for livestock killed or injured by a dog that is not owned or kept by the livestock owner, and also to encourage 
good dog husbandry practices in the province. 

All fees, licences and cost assessments levied under the Livestock Protection Act are credited to the account as revenue. Expenditures 
include compensation grants and administration costs. 

No financing transactions are provided for under this account. 





PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


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Attorney General 

Vote 16—Minister's Office 

This vote provides for the Office of the Attorney General and Minister Responsible for Multiculturalism, Human Rights and Immigration, 
and includes the salaries of the Attorney General, the minister's staff and related office expenses. 

Vote 1 7—Ministry Operations 

This vote provides for ministry programs and operations including: 

(a) Administration and Support Services 

This sub-vote provides for ministry management, policy, legislation and program development, administrative support, information sys¬ 
tems, audit and communications services, investigation of matters related to the administration of the Correction Act and court services, and 
policing of aboriginal reserves. Grants and contributions are provided to agencies and societies providing services which complement ministry 
programs. Recoveries are received for cost sharing of a project to integrate justice services. 

(b) Court Services 

This sub-vote provides for judicial administration and other services, including the provision, operation and maintenance of the courts. 
This includes: 

(i) Management Services —provides for management of branch programs, including administrative and support services; 

(ii) Registry and Trial Support —provides for support to the Superior and Provincial Courts, including administrative services, translating, 
reporting and recording services, facilities, and operational systems. Recoveries are received from the Insurance Corporation of Brit¬ 
ish Columbia for the retrieval of licence plates from unlicenced or uninsured drivers; and 

(iii) Security and Escorts —provides for Sheriffs in both the Superior and Provincial Courts whose responsibility is court security, escort of 
prisoners and document services. 

(c) Legal Services 

This sub-vote provides for legal services to the province and various boards, committees and societies including legal advice, representa¬ 
tion in civil litigation, and the drafting, preparing, filing and publishing of statutes, regulations and Orders in Council. This sub-vote also pro¬ 
vides for administration of Orders in Council and appeals to the Executive Council. A grant is provided to the Uniform Law Conference of 
Canada. Recoveries are received from the Liquor Distribution Branch for legal services provided. 

(d) Criminal Justice 

This sub-vote provides for operation of Crown counsel services including prosecution of criminal code and provincial statute offenses, ad¬ 
vice to government on matters of criminal law and its enforcement, development of policies and procedures in matters pertaining to the ad¬ 
ministration of criminal law, and support services to victims of crime. 

(e) Community Justice 

This sub-vote provides for family maintenance enforcement activities, services for victims of crime, community crime prevention pro¬ 
grams, training and maintenance of auxiliary and reserve police, public legal education, regulatory services which are under the jurisdiction of 
the Attorney General, and administration of corporate and community programs. This sub-vote also provides for the administration of the Resi¬ 
dential Tenancy Act, which governs the relationship between landlords and tenants, and reviews of arbitrators' decisions rendered under the 
Residential Tenancy Act; the promotion of fairness and understanding in the marketplace through the administration and enforcement of con¬ 
sumer legislation, including the Trade Practice Act, the Consumer Protection Act, the Motor Dealer Act, the Cemeteries and Funeral Services 
Act, the Travel Agents Act, and the Sale of Goods Act; the inspection of business operations to verify compliance with legislation; the investiga¬ 
tion of violations involving consumer loss; assistance to over-committed debtors through counselling and debt-pooling arrangements; and the 
development and implementation of consumer protection policy, legislation and programs. Grants and contributions are provided to educa¬ 
tional institutions and other organizations to promote consumer education and awareness. Contributions are also provided to the Legal Serv¬ 
ices Society and to agencies and societies providing services which complement ministry programs. Costs of administering the Motor Dealer 
Customer Compensation Fund are recovered from the fund. Recoveries are received from the federal government for costs relating to the im¬ 
provement of child and spousal support enforcement under the Family Support Enforcement Fund Agreement and from other jurisdictions for 
maintenance enforcement services. 

(f) Corrections 

This sub-vote provides for incarceration of remanded and sentenced adults and youths, probation, family and community services, and 
management of the program, including: 

(i) Management Services —provides for management of correctional programs, including administrative and support services. Provi¬ 
sion is made for contributions to the private sector and non-profit societies for the development and evaluation of correctional pro¬ 
grams; 

(ii) Adult Correctional Centres —provides for incarceration of remanded and sentenced adult inmates and keeping of provincial prison¬ 
ers in police custody. Contributions are provided to the private sector and non-profit societies for correctional services related to 
health, education, training, work programs, and food services. Recoveries are received from the federal government for shareable 
costs related to the housing of federal inmates, including non-routine supplemental programs, under the Exchange of Services 
Agreement and from the Medical Services Plan for salaried and sessional medical services; 

(iii) Youth Custody Centres —provides for custody of remanded and sentenced youths. Contributions are provided to the private sector 
and non-profit societies for correctional services related to health, education, training, work programs, social and recreational pro¬ 
grams, and food services. Recoveries are received from the federal government for shareable costs for youth custody and from the 
Medical Services Plan for salaried and sessional medical services; 




C 92 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


(iv) Probation, Family and Community Services —provides for probation services for adults and youths, and for family services. Proba¬ 
tion services include pre-trial enquiries, pre-sentence and other court reports as well as the supervision of adults and youths on pro¬ 
bation, bail or conditional release from incarceration. Family services provide assistance in resolving child custody and financial 
maintenance problems through conciliation and mediation, and custody and access reports for Supreme and Provincial Courts. Pro¬ 
vision is made for contributions to the private sector and non-profit societies for diversion, attendance, community service work and 
youth bail residential programs. Recoveries are received from the Vancouver School Board for contracted education programs. 

(g) Public Safety and Regulatory Services 

This sub-vote provides for administration, policy development and operations of the Police Services Division, the Security Programs Divi¬ 
sion, the Provincial Emergency Program, the Film Classification Office, the Gaming Audit and Investigation Office, and for the administrative 
coordination of various agencies, boards, and commissions, including: 

(i) Police Services —provides for development and administration of policing policy and programs and training of municipal police offi¬ 
cers through contributions to the justice Institute of British Columbia. A grant is provided to the Canadian Association of Police 
Chiefs. This program also provides for the organization, selection, training, operations and maintenance of the provincial police 
through the contracted services of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, grants to municipalities for police services, appointment of 
special provincial constables, service of criminal documents, and protection of provincial witnesses. Recoveries are received from 
the Liquor Distribution Branch for police services provided; 

(ii) Security Programs —provides for administration of firearm control legislation including recording of acquisition certificates, licenc¬ 
ing and inspection of firearms and ammunition businesses, disposal of surplus firearms, and licencing and regulation of the private 
security industry which includes armoured car businesses, alarm services, locksmiths, security patrols, security consultants and pri¬ 
vate investigators. Also provides for administration of criminal record checks and the protection order registry. Recoveries are re¬ 
ceived from other levels of government for cost-shared programs; 

(iii) Provincial Emergency Program —provides for development and coordination of provincial emergency planning, warning, prepared¬ 
ness, response and recovery in order to prevent or mitigate the effects of natural or other disasters. Contributions are provided to local 
governments participating in emergency programs. Recoveries are received from other levels of government for cost-shared pro¬ 
grams; 

(iv) Film Classification —provides for reviews of all films that are to be exhibited publicly, and adult videos to be sold or rented through 
retail outlets. Additionally, the office licences theatres, film and video distributors, and all video retailers; and 

(v) Caming, Audit and Investigation —provides for background investigations including criminal record checks on applicants for and 
holders of gaming licences and on their employees and audits or investigations of gaming events and provincially sanctioned lottery 

schemes. 

(h) Agencies, Boards and Commissions 

This sub-vote provides for various boards and commissions under the jurisdiction of the Attorney General, including the operations of the 
Coroners Service, Commercial Appeals Commission, British Columbia Board of Review, British Columbia Parole Board, Motion Picture Ap¬ 
peal Board, British Columbia Police Commission, Law Reform Commission, Expropriation Compensation Board, Liquor Appeal Board, and 
adult guardianship legislation and other expenditures for the Office of the Public Trustee. Recoveries may be received from the Law Foundation 
for the activities of the Law Reform Commission. 

(i) Land Title Branch 

This sub-vote provides for recording and guaranteeing title to all land in British Columbia and provides a means of access to land title in¬ 
formation. 

(j) Coordinated Law Enforcement Unit 

This sub-vote provides for the identification, prevention and suppression of organized and major crime in British Columbia through inves¬ 
tigations by Police Joint Forces Operations and policy advice to government on all aspects of organized crime. Recoveries are received from 
other levels of government for cost-shared programs. 

(k) Multiculturalism, Immigration and British Columbia Council of Human Rights 

This sub-vote provides for programs including: 

(i) Multiculturalism and Immigration —provides for the development and delivery of policy and programs with respect to multicultural¬ 
ism and immigration. Grants and contributions are provided for the delivery of programs including settlement grants, programs to as¬ 
sist and coordinate multicultural initiatives in the community, and initiatives to attract and secure business immigrant investment. 
Some immigrant investor program costs are partially recovered through user fees. 

(ii) British Columbia Council of Human Rights —provides for the operation of the British Columbia Council of Human Rights, a quasi-ju¬ 
dicial tribunal established to enforce the Human Rights Act and promotion of public awareness of human rights issues. Contributions 
are provided for legal representation for human rights proceedings under the Human Rights Act. 

Vote 18—Statutory Services 

This vote provides for payments made under statutory authority and for contributions made to individuals; for preparedness, response and 
recovery costs relating to disasters; for the costs of inquiries; and for valuation allowances including: 

(a) Criminal Iniury Compensation Act 

This sub-vote provides for payment of compensation, as awarded by the Workers' Compensation Board, to a victim of crime or, if killed, 
the dependants of the victim. 






PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


C 93 


(b) Crown Proceeding Act 

This sub-vote provides for payments made under the statutory authority of the Crown Proceeding Act. 

(c) Emergency Program Act 

This sub-vote provides for preparedness, response and recovery costs relating to emergencies or disasters. 

(d) Inquiry Act 

This sub-vote provides for the costs of commissions issued and inquiries conducted under the Inquiry Act. 

(e) Valuation Allowance 

This sub-vote provides for valuation allowances, including provision for doubtful accounts. 

Vote 19—Judiciary 

This vote provides for operation of the judiciary including: 

(a) Superior Courts 

This sub-vote provides for administrative and support services for the Court of Appeal and Supreme Court located in the province. 

(b) Provincial Courts 

This sub-vote provides for operational budgets for the Provincial Court of British Columbia. A contribution is provided to the British Co¬ 
lumbia Courthouse Library Society. 

Statutory Accounts 

Liquor Control and Licencing 

This account was established under the authority of the Liquor Control and Licencing Act sec. 81 with a revolving statutory spending 
authority to fund the activities of administering the Act up to the limit of their receipts, without the need of an appropriation. 

Ex Gratia Payment 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 15, sec. 22(1)) to recover a 
portion of an ex gratia payment from the Federal Department of Justice. 

RCMP Special Events Policing 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 15, sec. 22(1)) to increase 
the perceived risk of apprehension for speeding by performing consistent high profile and visible roadside speed enforcement on Highway 
99 between District of North Vancouver and District of Whistler, British Columbia. 

Extra Policing—RCMP/lnsurance Corporation of British Columbia 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)) to recover 
from the Insurance Corporation of British Columbia extra policing expenditures by the Ministry of Attorney General. 

Enhanced 911 Study 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)) to investigate 
the provision of province-wide E911. The funding for the study will be provided by BC Tel. 

Unclaimed Money Act 

This account was established under the authority of the Unclaimed Money Act (R.S.B.C. 1979, chap. 418, sec. 4). 

Special Accounts 

Forfeited Crime Proceeds Fund 

This account was established by the Special Accounts Appropriation and Control Act, 1988 as amended by the Attorney General 
Amendment Act, 1989. The purpose of the account is to dispose of property forfeited from criminal offenses in a manner which will facili¬ 
tate the administration of criminal justice and law enforcement in the province. Revenues represent the disposition of forfeited proceeds of 
crimes. The Attorney General will determine expenditures to be made from the account; however, under the terms of a protocol agree¬ 
ment, expenditures can be made only with the approval of the Minister of Finance and Corporate Relations and from the previous year's 
revenues. 

No financing transactions are provided for under this account. 

Inmate Work Program 

This account was created by the Miscellaneous Statutes Amendment Act (No. 2), 1987. The purpose ot the account is to assist inmates 
in acquiring skills and to encourage them to develop good work habits. 

Revenue represents proceeds from the sale of goods and services produced by inmates. Expenditures are for supplies and costs directly related 
to the production and sale of goods and services within the Inmate Work Program. Administration costs are funded through voted appropriations. 
No financing transactions are provided for under this account. 



C 94 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Office of the Public Trustee 

This account was created by the Public Trustee Amendment Act, 1989. The purpose of the account is to provide services to clients of 
the Public Trustee, including those incapable of managing their own affairs, deceased estates where no other person is willing or able to 
act, minors in receipt of settlements, and missing persons. Revenue represents fees and commissions paid by clients of the Public Trustee 
for services rendered, and interest on inactive estates. Expenditures are for costs directly related to the provision of services to clients and 
for administration. 

No financing transactions are provided for under this account. 

Education, Skills and Training 

Vote 20—Minister's Office 

This vote provides for the Office of the Minister of Education, Skills and Training, and includes the salaries of the minister, the minister's 
staff and related office expenses. 

Vote 21—Ministry Operations 

This vote provides for ministry programs and operations including: 

(a) Administration and Support Services 

This sub-vote provides for executive direction for the ministry, and corporate support services to the ministry operating programs includ¬ 
ing financial, human resources, administrative services, information resources, communications services, and freedom of information and pri¬ 
vacy services; legislation, policy, planning and research activities; and for the Office of Disability Issues. In addition, this sub-vote provides 
financial, human resources, information resources, administrative services, freedom of information and privacy services and general services 
and assistance to the Ministry of Labour. This sub-vote also provides for grants and contributions for employment equity initiatives, initiatives 
that enhance the provincial educational system, and joint communications projects with partner groups. Certain costs of supporting the Work¬ 
ers' Compensation Review Board and Compensation Advisory Services are recovered from the Accident Fund established pursuant to the 
Workers' Compensation Act. Recoveries are also received for participation in, and administration of, federal/provincial/agency agreements 
and activities. The cost of information systems is partially recovered from other ministries. 


(b) Education Programs and Accountability 

This sub-vote provides for: the development of the provincial school curriculum; evaluation and provision of textbooks and media materi¬ 
als for the education system; and support for projects relating to computer technology acquisition and implementation in the school system. 
The sub-vote also provides for: the research, assessment, evaluation, and accountability related to provincial educational programs; develop¬ 
ment and administration of the provincial examination system and the general educational development program; the development of stan¬ 
dards related to the assessment, examination and reporting of student progress; and community and partner relations. Grants and contributions 
are provided for education development and implementation activities at the provincial, district, and school levels including the educational 
use of information technologies. This sub-vote also provides grants and contributions for textbooks, media material, course materials, and pro¬ 
vincial assessment and examination activities, and grants for the ministry's share of the operating expenses of the Council of Ministers of Educa¬ 
tion (Canada) and the Canadian Education Association. Recoveries are received from the sale of supplementary textbooks, course materials, 
general educational development test fees and other miscellaneous sources. 




(c) Student Services 

This sub-vote provides for: the development, implementation and evaluation of student service programs including special education 
programs; Kids at Risk initiatives; aboriginal language and culture initiatives; governance initiatives; and international education initiatives. 
Grants and contributions are provided to support aboriginal language and culture initiatives, special education initiatives, Kids at Risk initia¬ 
tive, governance initiatives and the international education initiatives. Recoveries are received from students and teachers participating in in¬ 
ternational education initiatives, the student selection offices for student testing fees, federal government support for the Federal French , 
Program, and other miscellaneous sources. 


(d) Schools Funding 

This sub-vote provides for: 

(i) Program Management —provides for management of the provincial funding programs for the provincial education system, regional 
correspondence centres, and provincial resource programs. This sub-vote also provides for international education; budgeting and 
accountability initiatives related to public school finance and facilities; and information services which include student and teacher 
data collection systems. Grants and contributions are provided to support initiatives related to public school finance and interna¬ 
tional education; 

(ii) Operating Contributions, Public Schools —provides for provincial block contributions and special grants, including technol¬ 
ogy/skills, accreditation, enrolment growth during the school year, pay equity programs, special needs integration, English as a Sec¬ 
ond Language initiatives, Kids at Risk initiatives, public school finance initiatives; and support for collective bargaining in the public 

school system; 

(iii) Debt Service Contributions, Public Schools —provides for contributions to school districts for the payment of short and long term in¬ 
terest costs and sinking fund payment charges for approved capital construction projects, bus and equipment purchases, and interest 
payments on school district operating borrowings; 

(iv) Schools Support Contributions —provides for contributions for the operation of regional correspondence centres, provincial re¬ 
source programs, Francophone Education Authority, and special needs equipment. Grants are provided for the forgivable loan pro- 








PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


C 95 


gram and initiatives that enhance student performance. Recoveries are received from the federal government for support of 
francophone education; and 

(v) Operating Contributions, Independent Schools —provides for contributions to eligible independent schools for operating expendi¬ 
tures and contributions to support special education programs provided by eligible independent schools. 

(e) Post Secondary Education Programs 
This sub-vote provides for: 

(i) Program Management —provides for management and program support for universities, colleges, institutes, open learning organiza¬ 
tions, international education, and other educational partnerships. This sub-vote also provides management support for student fi¬ 
nancial assistance programs. Recoveries are received for participation in, and administration of, federal/provincial/agency 
agreements and activities; 

(ii) Educational Institutions and Organizations —provides for contributions toward the operating expenses of the provincial universities, 
colleges and institutes, educational agencies, and other educational partnership organizations. Expenditures are for instruction, re¬ 
search, support services, student services, apprenticeship training, matching contributions to encourage donations for scholarships, 
bursaries and capital projects in the colleges, institutes and educational agencies. Contributions are also provided for the Common¬ 
wealth of Learning and educational activities targeted to international trading partners; 

(iii) Matching Program, Universities —provides for matching financial contributions to encourage and supplement approved private sec¬ 
tor cash or gift-in-kind donations to establish student awards, endowments, research initiatives and capital projects; 

(iv) Grants in Lieu of Property Taxes —provides funding to post-secondary institutions to offset costs relating to the payment of grants in 
lieu of property taxes to municipalities; 

(v) Student Financial Assistance Programs —provides for financial/income and other assistance to students in post-secondary educa¬ 
tion, interest on student loans issued by financial institutions under these programs; provisions for future liabilities on student loans; 
payments to financial institutions in lieu of loan guarantees; grants to students; and partial loan repayments to students who success¬ 
fully complete their studies; 

(vi) Capital Debt Servicing —provides for payment of interest and sinking fund provisions related to the capital costs of new buildings, 
renovations and improvements to existing university, college, institute and agency facilities, and debt servicing costs of short term 
borrowing requirements of universities, colleges, institutes and agencies. 

(f) Skills Development Programs 

This sub-vote provides for program management, consultations with, and contributions and grants to, businesses, industry, individuals, 
institutions and agencies for planning and implementing vocational rehabilitation initiatives, and human resource development strategies and 
the provision of workplace, classroom and community based training opportunities for individuals in receipt of income support and other Brit¬ 
ish Columbians. This sub-vote also provides for pre-employment, employment and training services for the Youth Works and Welfare to Work 
programs under the BC Benefits initiative, including program management costs of BC Benefits programs. This sub-vote also provides for ad¬ 
justment programs, sectoral and small business partnerships, assistance for persons with disabilities and older workers, employment programs 
for students and support to the Private Post-Secondary Education Commission. 

Statutory Account 

Special Opportunity Grant 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 15, sec. 22(1)) for the pur¬ 
pose of receiving funds from the federal government to deliver Special Opportunity Grants for Students in British Columbia. These grants 
target three special needs groups including Students with Permanent Disabilities, Women in Doctoral Studies, and High-Need Part-Time 
Students. 

Forest Worker Training and Employment Program 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Acf (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)). The program 
addresses training and employment requirements of displaced and at-risk workers in the British Columbia forest industry. 

Canadian Official Languages Program 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Acf (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 15, sec. 22(1)). These funds 
are contributed by the federal government in accordance with the Canada-British Columbia Agreement on the Official Languages in Edu¬ 
cation to support the maintenance and development of minority language in education. 

Labour Mobility Chapter 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)) to recover 
costs for developing and implementing a communications strategy for the Labour Mobility Chapter of the Agreement on Internal Trade. 

Royal Roads 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)) for the pur¬ 
pose of receiving and disbursing funds from the federal government to provide the 1 996/97 operating budget for Royal Roads University. 

Special Investment Fund 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)) to recover 
costs for the development of a communications system to improve client service and audit requirements for the British Columbia Student 
Assistance Program. 




C 96 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Valuation Allowance 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 14(1)). 


Employment and Investment 

Vote 22—Minister's Office 

This vote provides for the Office of the Minister of Employment and Investment, and includes the salaries of the minister, the minister's staff 
and related office expenses. 

Vote 23—Ministry Operations 

This vote provides for executive direction, administrative services and operating programs of the ministry, including: 

(a) Administration and Support Services 

This sub-vote provides for resource revenue administration and ministry executive support, including: 

(i) Revenue Administration —provides for the collection and audit of mineral, petroleum and natural gas taxes and royalties, and the 
collection of the levy under the Natural Gas Price Act and Mine Safety Inspection Fee. 

(ii) Management Services —provides for the deputy minister's office, corporate relations, financial, human resources, legislation, and 
administrative services; records management and information systems and resources; library and research services; communication 
services and public affairs; the office of the Special Advisor to the Premier on Science and Technology; the Community Development 
Unit; the Agent General in British Columbia House, London and the BC Trade and Investment Office in Ottawa; and payment of 
travel expenses outside of Canada, including prescribed allowances to members of the Executive Council, Parliamentary Secretaries 
and related staff. Grants and contributions are provided for the Vancouver Island Natural Gas Pipeline agreements and for initiatives 
that enhance employment and investment opportunities. 

(b) Policy 

This sub-vote provides for the development, analysis and preparation of provincial employment, non-highway transportation and eco¬ 
nomic development policies, strategies and plans including: 

(i) Trade and Industry Policy —provides for: participation in the Environmental Assessment Process; ministry policy coordination; advi¬ 
sory and support services related to trade policy, internal trade agreements, trade negotiations, trade disputes and related issues; 
analysis of international economic trends; coordination of economic development agreements, intergovernmental strategies, and re¬ 
lated economic development programs; and socio-economic impact analysis. 

(ii) Energy Policy —provides for the formulation and implementation of provincial energy policies including energy efficiency, energy 
project assessments, energy forecasts, strategic energy studies, domestic gas and electricity policies, and the regulation of gas and 
electricity exports; the management and conservation of energy resources; the management of oil and gas lands in relation to other 
land uses and planning processes; and the administration of the province's participation in the Vancouver Island Natural Gas Pipe¬ 
line project. 

(iii) Mineral Policy —provides for the formulation , advancement and administration of policies for the discovery, orderly development, 
management and conservation of mineral resources; assessment and management of mineral lands in relation to competing land 
uses; and encouragement of research and technical innovation in related fields. Provision is made for grants and contributions to in¬ 
dividuals and organizations to support special projects and activities, including participant assistance in the development of policy, 
related studies and special projects. 

(c) BC Trade and Investment Office 

This sub-vote provides for the administration, operation and delivery of programs intended to stimulate provincial economic develop¬ 
ment, including: 

(i) Foreign Investment —provides for: the promotion of British Columbia as an investment location; financial analysis of, and facilitation 
for, key private sector projects in the province; and assistance to investors seeking investment opportunities, alliances and other in¬ 
vestment objectives, to ensure that regulatory requirements are understood and complied with. 

(ii) Business Development —provides for industry and investment activities including: developing, delivering and evaluating programs, 
policies and services which promote development and expansion of emerging industry sectors; maintaining the competitiveness of 
the resource sector and encouraging value-added activities; enhancing the availability of risk capital; identifying , researching and 
promoting business opportunities; providing financial analysis services for other divisions in the ministry; encouraging business de¬ 
velopment in the province; and funding economic development initiatives such as the )ob Protection Commission. 

(iii) Trade Development —provides for: intergovernmental and business/government development initiatives; funding for long term 
trade development initiatives, including the International Financial Centre, the International Maritime Centre and the International 
Centre for Environmental Business; trade development services and initiatives, including trade intelligence; export promotion assis¬ 
tance; export loan guarantees for working capital; performance bonds or bid bonds for export orders; equity investment through the 
BC Export Investment Fund; strategic partnering advice; support for international offices; organization of international trade mis¬ 
sions; and planning activities for the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation Summit. Costs are partially recovered from clients, and fees 
are generated from loans and guarantees. 

(iv) Industrial Development —provides for administration of the Natural Resource Community Fund; loans, investments and loan guar¬ 
antees to encourage investment and industrial development in the province; and coordination of the provincial government's re¬ 
sponse to federal airport devolution. Grants and contributions are provided for consultations, studies and issue resolution for specific 
advanceable projects. 







PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


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(d) Science and T echnolocy and Capital Development 

This sub-vote provides for science and technology programs and capital development activities, including: 

(i) Science and Technology —provides for the development of policies and programs to support science and technology initiatives, and 
for the administration of and transfer of funds to the Science and Technology Fund Special Account. Contributions are provided to 
employers in the science and technology sector to provide for first time employment opportunities for recent graduates in fields re¬ 
lated to science and technology. 

(ii) Capital Development —provides for: the formulation of capital development policy and program proposals to facilitate the expan¬ 
sion and diversification of British Columbia's economy; the coordination of provincial social, transportation and Crown corporation 
capital expenditures to advance the government's job creation and investment priorities, including, in conjunction with Treasury 
Board Staff, the development of government-wide capital asset management policy and the preparation of the government's Con¬ 
solidated Capital Plan; the review of alternative financing options; the development, evaluation, implementation and coordination 
of public-private partnership projects, and specific program and project initiatives, with other ministries and Crown corporations, 
aimed at facilitating economic, regional and sector development; the administration and management of the federal/provincial/mu¬ 
nicipal infrastructure program, in conjunction with the Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing; and for the transfer of funds to the 
Build BC Special Account. 

(e) Energy and Minerals 

This sub-vote provides for the administration, regulation and inspection of the mineral, coal, oil and natural gas industries, including: 

(i) Resource Management —provides for the administration and disposition of petroleum, natural gas and geothermal resource rights; 
the administration of title to the mineral and coal resources of the province; the determination of mineral, coal, oil and natural gas re¬ 
serves in British Columbia; the maintenance of data bases, maps, surveys and prospecting reports on the geology of British Columbia, 
including the storage of well cores, logs and records; and the preparation of industry reports, and the provision of information and 
support services to industry. Grants and contributions are provided for resource related studies and projects. 

(ii) Regulation and Enforcement —provides for the administration and enforcement of provincial legislation and regulations relating to 
minerals, coal, oil and natural gas to ensure safe operation, environmental responsibility and prudent resource management and 
conservation. 

(iii) Exploration —provides training support and grants to prospectors to increase mineral exploration activity. 

(f) Reserves for Doubtful Accounts and Concessionary Loans 

This sub-vote provides for reserves for doubtful loans, write-downs of investments, and the interest subsidy expense for concessionary 
loans made under the Industrial Development Incentive Act. This sub-vote also provides for reserves for potential payments pertaining to loan 
guarantees made under ministry programs and the Financial Administration Act. 

(g) Contributions to the British Columbia Ferry Corporation 

This sub-vote provides for contributions to compensate the corporation for operating losses incurred in providing ferry services in British 
Columbia's coastal waters. 

Vote 24—Crown Corporations Secretariat 

This vote provides for analysis and advice to the government on issues relating to Crown corporations, including: financial, service and 
other policy issues; monitoring of strategic plans, special initiatives, operating budgets and capital projects; assessment of specific programs for 
effectiveness, efficiency and relevance; integration and coordination of broad initiatives across Crown corporations; and liaison with Crown 
corporations regarding strategic government matters. Costs are recovered from Crown corporations. 

Vote 26—Resource Revenue Sharing Agreements 

This vote provides for agreements reached with First Nations to share revenue received from the petroleum, natural gas and minerals ex¬ 
traction. Provision is made for payments made in accordance with the federal/provincial agreement, as specified under the Fort Nelson Indian 
Reserve Minerals Revenue Sharing Act, and agreements with other First Nations. 

Statutory Accounts 

British Columbia Investment Fund Ltd 

This account was established under the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)) to provide for the recovery of 
expenses associated with the creation and promotion of the British Columbia Investment Fund Ltd. 

Columbia Power Corporation 

This account was established under the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 15, sec. 22(1)) to provide for the recovery of 
staff, travel and professional services contract costs and other related costs and expenses from the Columbia Power Corporation. 

Forest Renewal BC 

This account was established under the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 15, sec. 22(1)) to provide for the recovery of 
costs from Forest Renewal BC, through the Science Council of BC, for administering a contract. 

BC FHydro (Independent Power Producers Review Panel) 

This account was established under the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C.1 981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)) to recover costs of two con¬ 
tracts from BC Hydro. Both contracts are for members of the Independent Power Producers Review Panel; one to review electricity trans¬ 
mission and distribution matters and the other to review social costing. 




98 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Royal Oak Maps 

This account was established under the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C.1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)). The ministry will buy maps 
for Royal Oak's consultant to use to design the Kemess powerline. Royal Oak's contribution will cover ministry's cost of the maps from 
Maps BC. Upon project completion the maps are to be returned for ministry use. 

Job Protection Commission 

This account was established under the Financial Administration Acf (S.B.C.1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)). As part of its mandate, the Job 
Protection Commission engages third parties to provide consulting services. Whenever possible the Job Protection Commission cost 
shares such services with interested parties, under terms negotiated on a case by case basis. 

BC Hydro (PowerSmart Program) 

This account was established under the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C.1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)) to provide for the recovery of i 
travel costs incurred by ministry staff on behalf of the BC 21 PowerSmart Program. Costs are recovered from BC Hydro. 

Forest Renewal BC, Vancouver Accommodation 

This account was established under the Financial Administration Acf (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)) to provide for the recovery of ; 
accommodation costs from Forest Renewal BC for space occupied in Vancouver. 

Canadian Society of Petroleum Geologists (CSPG), Public Education 

This account was established under the Financial Administration Acf (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)) for a donation received from 
the CSPG by the Petroleum Geology Branch for the purpose of providing public education. 

Capital Regional District, Earthquake Hazard Maps 

This account was established under the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)) to provide a contribution 
from the Capital Regional District, on behalf of member municipalities, towards preparation by the ministry of earthquake hazard maps. 

Request for Proposal, Victoria Line 

This account was established under the Financial Administration Acf (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)) to recover ministry costs as¬ 
sociated with organizing and preparing a Request for Proposal to continue operations of the Victoria Line between Victoria and Seattle. j 
Upon completion of the project, Victoria Line will be invoiced for these expenditures. 

Forest Renewal BC/Job Protection Commission, Columbia Valley 

This account was established under the Financial Administration Acf (S.B.C.1 981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)). Forest Renewal BC has en¬ 
tered into an agreement with the Job Protection Commission of this ministry to pay the Commission for providing business assistance to 
small and independent firms in the Columbia Valley that have been affected by the Evans Forest Products Ltd closure/shutdown. 

BC Transportation Financing Authority (BCTFA) 

This account was established under the Financial Administration Acf (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 15, sec. 22(1)) to recover costs from the BC 
Transportation Financing Authority for the salary and benefits for one employee from April 1 to October 23, 1 996. Also recovered are ' 
some travel expenses associated with work being performed on behalf of the BC Transportation Financing Authority. 

Gaming Project 

This account was established under the Financial Administration Acf (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)) to provide for the government 
review of gaming expansion options in the province, with recoveries being proposed from gaming revenue. 

Forest Renewal BC/Job Protection Commission, Forest Community Business Program 

This account was established under the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)) for the recovery of costs from 
Forest Renewal BC by the Job Protection Commission for companies involved in the Forest Community Business Program for value-added 
products. 

Casino Registration 

This account was established under the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)) to recover costs from casino 
management companies for operating expenses incurred by the British Columbia Gaming Commission. 

Fuel Choice Study 

This account was established under the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)) to recover costs being ex¬ 
pended on behalf of British Columbia Transit and the Department of Natural Resources, Federal Government. 

Crown Corporations Secretariat/BC Transportation Financing Authority Accommodation Costs 

This account was established under the Financial Administration Acf (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)) to recover costs from the BC 
Transportation Financing Authority for office space. 

Crown Corporations Secretariat, Archipelago/Ferries 

This account was established under the Financial Administration Acf (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)) to recover costs for adminis¬ 
tering a contract between British Columbia Ferries, Catamaran Ferries International Inc. and Archipelago Planning Inc. 






PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


C 99 


Interest on Revenue Refunds 

This account was established under the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1 981, chap. 1 5, sec. 24(1)). 

Mine Improvement 

This account was established under the authority of the Mines Act (S.B.C. 1 980, chap. 28, sec. 1 7(2)). 

Fort Nelson, Blueberry Doig Indian Band Lands 

This account was established under the authority of the Fort Nelson Indian Reserve Minerals Revenue Sharing Act (S.B.C. 1980, chap. 
16, sec. 7). 

Williston Reservoir Compensation Costs 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 58(1)) for the pur¬ 
pose of sharing mitigation costs associated with deep water drawdowns by BC Hydro at Williston Reservoir. 

Industrial Incentive Fund 

This account was established under the authority of the Budget Measures Implementation Act sec. 3, to amend the Industrial Devel¬ 
opment Incentive Act (S.B.C. 1985, chap. 43, sec. 6(2)c). 

Special Accounts 

Build BC 

This Special Account was established in 1993 by the Build BCAct. The purpose of the account is to provide for projects and initiatives 
to facilitate the expansion and diversification of the British Columbia economy in a manner consistent with the Act. Revenue is received 
through a transfer from Vote 23. Expenditures are for development and implementation of Build BC projects and initiatives; administration 
of the Special Account; and communications activities consistent with the Act. 

No financing transactions are provided for under this account. 

Science and TecFinology Fund 

This account was created in 1990 by the Science and Technology Fund Act. The purpose of the account is to support activities which 
promote new technologies in traditional industries; the creation of new knowledge-based export industries; and the promotion and timely 
application and transfer of new technologies. Contributions are provided to support research and development and related infrastructure 
facilities; increase public awareness and understanding of science and technology issues; improve science and technology related educa¬ 
tion and training; and support strategic long term science and technology related partnerships including federal/provincial initiatives. 
Revenue is received through a transfer from Vote 23 and from activities funded under the Science and Technology Fund. 

No financing transactions are provided for under this account. 

Vancouver Island Natural Gas Pipeline Assistance 

This account was created by authority of the Vancouver Island Natural Cas Pipeline Act. Of the original $80,000,000 authorized for 
this account, $25,000,000 was disbursed as loans in 1990/91 and 1991/92 for capital construction ofthe pipeline to Vancouver Island. No 
loan repayments are expected in 1996/97. The balance ofthe account is for the provision of financial assistance for the conversion of oil, 
propane and other fuel fired appliances to the use of natural gas. 

Expenditures consist of grants to persons and businesses that have applied and qualified for financial assistance. No interest or other 
revenue is credited to the account. Administration costs are funded through Vote 23. 

No financing transactions are provided for under this account. 

Industrial Incentive Fund 

This account was established in 1985 by the Industrial Development Incentive Act. The purpose of the account is to provide loans and 
make investments to assist in the establishment or expansion of industry and the introduction of new technology to existing industry, and 
to otherwise encourage regional and economic development in the province. Loans and investments may also be provided from the ac¬ 
count to support economic plans of the )ob Protection Commission. 

The account has no operating revenues or expenditures since interest and other amounts received relating to outstanding loans are 
credited to the General Fund. All administration costs, concessionary expenditures and reserves for doubtful accounts are funded through 
Vote 23. Receipts represent loan repayments which are credited to the General Fund, and do not increase the account balance. Disburse¬ 
ments represent new loans and investments. The account balance is increased by $ 100,000,000 for 1996/97 through an amendment to 
the Act. 

Special Fund 

Natural Resource Community Fund 

This Special Fund was created in 1992 by the Natural Resource Community Fund Act. Administered by the Ministry of Employment 
and Investment, the purpose of the fund is to assist single resource industry communities to adjust to severe economic dislocations arising 
from industry closures. 

Fund revenue represents 0.5 per cent of annual petroleum, natural gas, mineral and forest revenues, and interest earned on fund in¬ 
vestments. 

Expenditures are for training and skill development, worker relocation, job creation and maintenance, local government operating 
costs and other costs which may be deemed necessary. Administration costs are funded through Vote 23. 



C 100 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


The fund balance is capped at $25 million, and surpluses in excess of $25 million will be transferred to the General Fund. 

Valuation Allowance 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act ( S.B.C. 1981, chap. 15, sec. 14(1)). 


Environment, Lands and Parks 

Vote 27—Minister's Office 

This vote provides for the Office of the Minister of Environment, Lands and Parks, and includes the salaries of the minister, the minister's 
staff and related office expenses. 

Vote 28—Ministry Operations 

This vote provides for the ministry's resource planning, environmental, conservation and recreational programs, including support for sus¬ 
tainable land use planning and cooperative relationships with First Nations. This vote also provides for management, finance and administra¬ 
tion services. Functions related to these programs and initiatives include: 

(a) Administration and Support Services 

This sub-vote provides for executive direction, communications, personnel, finance, systems, vehicles and accommodation. Grants and 
contributions are provided for activities concerned with use, protection and management of the environment, Crown land, provincial parks 
and ecological reserves. 

(b) Policy, Planning and Legislation 

This sub-vote provides for: coordination for development of corporate policy, legislation and reporting; ministry strategic planning; ad¬ 
dressing intergovernmental and aboriginal issues; provincial environmental review processes; administering the delivery of environmental en¬ 
forcement and emergency programs; and economic analysis and program evaluation. Contributions are provided to organizations for program 
related work. Funds expended may be recovered from other organizations. 

(c) B.C. Environment 

This sub-vote provides for fisheries, wildlife and habitat protection and regional delivery of these programs as well as environmental pro¬ 
tection, enforcement and water management programs. This includes: 

(i) Fisheries, Wildlife and Flabitat Protection —provides support for, management, protection, and enhancement of fauna resources and 
habitat, protection of biodiversity, and securementof key wildlife habitat through administration of the Fisheries Act (Canada), Wild¬ 
life Act, Migratory Birds Convention Act, Firearms Act, Wild Animal and Plant Protection Act (Canada) and Game Export Act (Can¬ 
ada), and integrated management of water, soils and natural ecosystems. Contributions are provided to organizations concerned 
with the protection, management, and use of fish and wildlife resources and habitat. Funds expended on some programs and publi¬ 
cations are partly or wholly recovered from other governments, other provincial ministries, the Sustainable Environment Fund Spe¬ 
cial Account, the British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority and other Crown corporations, the Skagit Environmental Endowment 
Commission, local government, and other organizations and individuals; and 

(ii) Environment Regional Operations —provides for the administration and delivery of programs in regional, sub-regional and district 
offices throughout the province. Contributions are provided to organizations concerned with protection, management and use of the 
environment, and to local governments to share costs of aquatic weed control. Funds expended on some programs and publications 
are partly or wholly recovered from other governments, other provincial ministries, the Sustainable Environment Fund Special 
Account, the British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority and other Crown corporations, the Skagit Environmental Endowment 
Commission, local government, and other organizations and individuals. 

(d) Lands and Water Management 

This sub-vote provides for management of the province's land and water resources. This includes: 

(i) Land Services —provides for management of Crown land through administration of the Land Act, Land Titles Act, Land Survey Act, 
and Land Surveyors Act; appraisal, acquisition, exchange and valuation services; the provincial cadastral survey system; the issu¬ 
ance of Crown grants; maintaining the Crown land registry; support to treaty and pre-treaty negotiations with First Nations; and sys¬ 
tems services and support. Funds expended on some programs are partly or wholly recovered from other levels of government and 
the private sector from the sale of digital, map and survey information; 

(ii) Geographic Data BC —provides for the management of land related information through LandData BC, including the Terrain Re¬ 
sources Information Management Program, and distribution of map and air photos. Recoveries are received from cost sharing agree¬ 
ments and map, air photo and digital information sales to other governments, ministries and the private sector; 

(iii) Lands Regional Operations —provides for the administration and delivery of programs from eight regional offices, including manag¬ 
ing, allocating and tenuring, marketing and developing, and reserving of Crown land for specific purposes. Recoveries are received 
for costs attributable to Crown Land projects and programs; and 

(iv) Water Management —provides for management of water, including the occurrence of surface and groundwater resources, allocation 
of surface water, regulation of privately owned water utilities, river flow forecasting and floodplain mapping through administration 
of the Water Act, Water Utility Act, Dyke Maintenance Act, and Drainage, Ditch and Dyke Act. In addition, the ministry has approval 
responsibilities under the Utilities Commission Act, Land Title Act, Condominium Act regulations and Municipal Act. Water related 
recoveries are received from the federal government and Crown corporations, B.C. Hydro and Power Authority, other ministries, or¬ 
ganizations and individuals. 


PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


C 101 


(e) B.C. Parks 

This sub-vote provides parks programs including: 

(i) Parks Operations and Management —provides for management operation and development of the provincial park and ecological re¬ 
serve systems and coordination of outdoor recreation opportunities including the Canadian and Provincial Heritage Rivers Program 
through administration of the Park Act, Ecological Reserve Act, Park (Regional) Act and Commercial River Rafting Safety Act. Contri¬ 
butions are provided to non-profit organizations for outdoor recreation, education and safety programs. Funds generated from parks 
producing net revenue are used to partially fund the operating costs of other parks. Funds expended on some programs are partly or 
wholly recovered from the British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority, the Skagit Environmental Endowment Commission, other 
ministries, organizations and individuals; and 

(ii) Environment Youth Team —provides for the administration and delivery of the internship, eco-education and work crew programs 
focused on improving the environment and employment and training experiences. Contributions are provided to the private sector, 
all levels of government and non-profit organizations for program related work. Funds expended on some programs are partly or 
wholly recovered from other organizations. 

(f) Environmental Protection and Renewal 

This sub-vote provides for transfers of funds to the Sustainable Environment Fund Special Account for pollution prevention and waste 
minimization. 

Statutory Accounts 
Forest Renewal BC 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S. B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)) to allow funds 
to be expended and received and to initiate contracts on behalf of Forest Renewal BC, the Forest Renewal Plan initiative for Watershed 
Restoration, Enhanced Forestry, Forest Recreation and Inventory. 

Neck Point Purchase 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)) to recover 
costs for the purchase of Neck Point lands. 

Production of an Access Planning Document 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)) to recover 
costs for the publication of a document which focuses on managing human access to environmentally sensitive areas. 

Science Council of BC 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)) to recover 
costs related to the implementation of a program to enhance the productivity and environmental values of forest lands, to create jobs, pro¬ 
vide training for forest workers and strengthen communities. 

Forest Renewal BC Startup Funding 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)) to recover 
costs for the relocation and hiring of staff for Forest Renewal BC. 

Yellowstone Wolf Project 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)) to receive 
funds from the United States Fish and Wildlife Service for the transfer of wolves from Northern British Columbia to the Yellowstone Na¬ 
tional Park, Wyoming, United States. 

Environmental Youth) Team 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)) to recover 
costs for the initiation of contracts on behalf of the Forest Renewal Plan initiative for Forest Recreation. 

Happy Valley Mobile Home Park Ltd 

This account was established under the authority of the Environment Management Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 14, sec. 6(1)) for the envi¬ 
ronmental emergency costs associated with the Happy Valley Mobile Home Park Ltd. 

Forest Grove Service Station 

This account was established under the authority of the Environment Management Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 14, sec 6(1)) for the pur¬ 
pose of controlling the hazard created by gasoline contamination at the Forest Grove Service Station site in Enderby. 

Special Accounts 
Crown Land 

This account was originally created as a fund by authority of section 7 of the Department of Housing Act, 1973, was replaced by the 
Crown Land Fund effective July 31, 1979 pursuant to the Ministry of Lands, Parks and Housing Act, and was changed to a Special Account 
under the Special Appropriations Act, 1982. 



C 102 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Revenue sources (net of direct costs) include land sales, land tenures, interest income, and fees. Expenditures include non-recover- 
able disbursements associated with program related costs such as reporting, clean-up, servicing, development and disposition of Crown 
land; the sale or disposal of assets on Crown land; acquisitions for parkland, ecological reserves and critical fish and wildlife conservation 
projects; the write-down of uncollectible loans; and the write-down of land inventory values to the lower of cost or net realizable value. 
Contributions are provided to other levels of government or organizations for the acquisition of lands for environmental, conservation, 
recreational or sustainable land use purposes. 

Receipts represent repayment of outstanding loans and deposits made on pending sales. Disbursements reflect recoverable disburse¬ 
ments associated with the acquisition, servicing, development and disposition of Crown land. 

Habitat Conservation Fund 

This account was originally created by the Miscellaneous Statutes Amendment Act (No. 2), 1 981 which amended the Wildlife Act to 
establish a fund for the enhancement of fish and wildlife and their habitat. The fund was changed to a Special Account by the Special Ac¬ 
counts Appropriation and Control Act, 1 988. 

Amendments to the Wildlife Act in 1996 created the Habitat Conservation Trust Fund. Revenue which was previously credited to the 
Habitat Conservation Fund is now credited to the Habitat Conservation Trust Fund. Expenditures previously made from the Habitat Con¬ 
servation Fund are now made from the Habitat Conservation Trust Fund and consist of projects to enhance fish and wildlife populations, 
habitat acquisitions, promotional and educational projects and other expenses. Contributions provided to organizations concerned with 
protection, management and use of the environment by the Habitat Conservation Fund are now made from the Habitat Conservation Trust 
Fund. During 1 996/97, expenditures and contributions are made from both funds to allow for transition of projects to the Habitat Conser¬ 
vation Trust Fund, and allow for habitat acquisition. 

No financing transactions are provided for under this account. 

Sustainable Environment Fund 

This account was created by the Sustainable Environment Fund Act, 1990, and subsequent amendments. It provides for the protec¬ 
tion of the air, land and water and for environmental renewal by preventing pollution, controlling pollutants and undertaking remediation 
activities through administration of the Waste Management Act, the Litter Act, Pesticide Control Act, the Environment Management Act, 
and related regulations. 

Revenue is derived from environmental levies, fees, licences, transfers from Ministry Operations (Vote 28), and contributions from 
the federal government and other organizations and individuals. 

Expenditures provide for the development of policies, legislation and regulations, and standards and criteria for discharges and emis¬ 
sions. Expenditures also provide for monitoring and understanding the receiving environment, education, and encouragement of activi¬ 
ties to prevent pollution. Funds are provided for waste reduction, air and water quality, the clean-up of contaminated sites, special waste 
management, and soil and water remediation projects. Contributions are provided to local governments and other organizations to assist 
in waste management, clean-up of contaminated sites and to support various environmental protection initiatives. 

Recoveries are received for environmental monitoring, laboratory services, sale of documents, publications and forms, and environ¬ 
mental emergency responses. Funds expended on some programs are partly or wholly recovered from the federal government and other 
organizations. 

No financing transactions are provided for under this account. 

Non-cash Transfer of Land 

This account was established to record non-cash transfers of land. 

Valuation Allowance 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 14(1)). 


Finance and Corporate Relations 

Vote 29—Minister's Office 

This vote provides for the Office of the Minister of Finance and Corporate Relations, and includes the salaries of the minister, the minister's 

staff and related office expenses. 

Vote 30—Ministry Operations 

This vote provides for operations and programs of the ministry, including: 

(a) Corporate Support Services 

This sub-vote provides for: 

(i) policy, research, analysis and advice on intergovernmental fiscal relations, financial sector issues, corporate sector issues, and legis¬ 
lation; 

(ii) executive, financial, administrative, personnel, information systems, and communications support to ministry operations and pro¬ 
grams, and to the Public Sector Employers' Council and the Public Service Employee Relations Commission, the Corporate Account¬ 
ing System, the Information Technology Services Division, and the Insurance and Risk Management Special Account. Financial, 
human resources, information resources, administrative services, freedom of information and privacy services, and general services 
and assistance to the Ministry of Labour. The cost of information systems, personnel and other services is partially recovered from 
other divisions of the ministry, other ministries, special offices, organizations and agencies; 





PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


C 103 


(iii) certain expenses incurred by the Legislature and the Office of the Premier; operation and maintenance costs of the Legislative Build¬ 
ings; occupancy and related costs in Vancouver for the Executive Council; reimbursement of certain expenses to members of the 
Legislative Assembly under section 6 of the Legislative Allowances and Pensions Act; and Cabinet committee expenses and travel 
expenses within Canada for members of the Executive Council, Parliamentary Secretaries, and related staff, as well as a grant to the 
Intergovernmental Conference Secretariat; 

(iv) Government House —the operation and maintenance costs of Government House as the official residenceand officesofthe Lieuten¬ 
ant-Governor, official functions including support for government-sponsored events; and ceremonial, diplomatic, hospitality and 
other activities of the Vice-Regal Office; and 

(v) Protocol and Events —costs of official ceremonies, programs for visiting dignitaries, government-hosted functions, government hon¬ 
ours and awards, Parliament Buildings tours, the carillon tower, and grants for the Queen Elizabeth II British Columbia Centennial 
Scholarships. 

(b) Treasury Board Staff 

This sub-vote provides for: 

(i) analysis and advice on fiscal, budgetary, administrative, economic and taxation policy issues; 

(ii) monitoring, analyzing and forecasting of economic activity and the government's fiscal position; 

(iii) production of various financial and economic documents, including the Estimates and Budget; 

(iv) program reviews of specific programs, to assess effectiveness, efficiency and relevance; 

(v) analysis and advice on improving government performance and accountability; and 

(vi) operation and maintenance of financial and economic models to support decision-making within government. 

(c) BC Stats 

This sub-vote provides for the production of statistical information, data dissemination, and analytical services to government under the 
Statistics Act. Costs incurred for statistical services to ministries and other parties are partially recovered, as are the costs of publications and re¬ 
leases to external users. 

(d) Office of the Comptroller General 

This sub-vote provides for payment, recording, reporting and auditing of government accounts and trust funds; development and implementation 
of financial administration policies and procedures; and evaluation of accounting and financial management systems throughout government. 

Recoveries are received from ministries and Crown corporations for internal audit services. 

(e) Revenue Operations 

This sub-vote provides for administration of activities including: 

(i) taxation statutes which are the responsibility of the Ministry of Finance and Corporate Relations; 

(ii) ministry responsibilities under the School Act regarding residential and non-residential school property taxes collected by munici¬ 
palities on behalf of the province; 

(iii) advances to local governments in respect of property taxes collected on their behalf; 

(iv) the Land Tax Deferment Act and related costs; 

(v) the Home Owner Grant Act as it relates to the non-municipal areas of the province. 

(vi) BC Benefits which are the responsibility of the Ministry of Finance and Corporate Relations; and 

(vii) payment of interest or refunds of taxation revenues under statutes administered by the Ministry of Finance and Corporate Relations. 

(f) Financial Institutions Commission 

This sub-vote provides for: 

(i) operation of the Financial Institutions Commission and the Credit Union Deposit Insurance Corporation underthe Financial Institu¬ 
tions Act; 

(ii) administrative costs of regulating credit unions, trust companies, and insurance companies; 

(iii) administration of international financial business legislation, captive insurance legislation, the Real Estate Act, the Mortgage Brokers 
Act and the Condominium Act; and 

(iv) administrative costs of credit union stabilization, the Credit Union Deposit Insurance Fund, and related activities. These costs are 
fully recovered from the Credit Union Deposit Insurance Corporation. 

Recoveries are also received from self-regulatory organizations for electronic information services. 

(g) Purchasing Commission 

This sub-vote provides for executive direction and procurement services related to the acquisition of commodities and services for special 
offices, ministries and public sector agencies, and development and administration of public sector purchasing policy to stimulate economic 
activity in the province as follows: 

(i) Aviation Quality Assurance —provides for contract management services to ministries using private sector aviation companies and 
performs aviation safety standard compliance audits; 

(ii) Purchasing Services Branch —provides for a purchasing service, including an electronic bidding system linking government buyers 
and suppliers; planning, evaluation and consultation to ministries and public sector agencies, and assisting British Columbia busi¬ 
nesses in obtaining a larger share of the public sector market. In addition, travel industry alternatives are investigated and travel infor¬ 
mation is published in a guide. A portion of the costs is recovered from special offices, ministries and participating public bodies; and 

(iii) Vehicle Management Services —provides management and policy direction on matters pertaining to the government's light vehicle 
fleet and assistance to ministries and public sector agencies in the acquisition of vehicles. A portion of the costs is recovered from 
ministries and public sector agencies. 

Costs related to the provision of direct procurement services for participating public sector agencies are fully recovered. 



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(h) Cabinet Operations 

This sub-vote provides for salaries and other expenses incurred in providing policy, planning and operational support to Cabinet and its 
committees. 

(i) Cabinet Policy and Communications Secretariat 
This sub-vote provides for: 

(i) coordination of strategic policy initiatives and public consultation activities for the Premier and Cabinet; coordination and manage¬ 
ment of key corporate initiatives; and 

(ii) planning, coordination and implementation of communications programs and policies, advertising and information services for 
ministries, special offices and certain bodies, and for the public liaison function of government. 

(j) Coordination of Appointments to Agencies, Boards and Commissions 

This sub-vote provides for the coordination of appointments to government agencies, boards and commissions. 

(k) Public Service Appeal Board 

This sub-vote provides for fees and salaries of the board members and staff, and expenses of the board in the processing and hearing of ap¬ 
peals under the Public Service Act. 

(l) Intergovernmental Relations Secretariat 

This sub-vote provides for salaries, benefits, allowances, grants and operating expenses incurred in providing support for the Executive 
Council in development and coordination of advice, policy, negotiations, issues management and public consultation relating to federal, inter¬ 
provincial, and international relations, including administration of British Columbia House, Ottawa, and support for the Premier and Cabinet 
in participation in First Ministers' Conferences, Premiers' Conferences, Ministerial Conferences, and international conferences and travel. 

(m) Provincial Capital Commission 

This sub-vote provides for contributions to the Provincial Capital Commission to protect and enhance the amenities of the Greater Victo¬ 
ria area and its approaches. 

(n) British Columbia Racing Commission 

This sub-vote provides for operation of the commission, and the regulation of horse racing in British Columbia, through the Horse Racing 
Act and regulations, to promote a high standard of harness and thoroughbred racing. Contributions are provided to the Horse Racing Improve¬ 
ment Fund. Costs associated with the British Columbia Racing Commission are fully recovered from wagering under the authority of the Horse 
Racing Tax Act. 

(o) British Columbia Gaming Commission 

This sub-vote provides for licencing, developing policy and setting gaming standards for charitable organizations; establishing terms and 
conditions, standard operating procedures and processing of all applications for gaming licences including recommendations to the Licencing 
Authority; regulating the operation of gaming events and management companies; conducting hearings for licence denials, suspensions and 
revocations; and site selection of all bingo and casino sites. Recoveries are received for registration fees. 

Financial, human resources, information resources, administrative services, freedom of information and privacy services, and general 
services and assistance are provided by other ministries. 

Vote 31—Registries (Special Operating Agency) 

This vote provides for expenditures of the Special Operating Agency responsible for: creation and registration of all business entities, 
non-profits and cooperatives operating in British Columbia; registration of security interests in personal property in British Columbia; registra¬ 
tion of ownership and location of manufactured homes in British Columbia; and the operation of the Auditor Certification Board under the 
Company Act. Revenue represents fees and licences charged by Registries forthe provision of its service and is credited to the General Fund. 

Vote 32—Pensions Administration 

This vote provides for administrative costs incurred by the Superannuation Commission in the administration of nine pension plans, as 
authorized by the following authorities: 

Pension (Public Service) Act; 

Pension (Municipal) Act; 

Pension (Teachers) Act; 

Pension (College) Act; 

Legislative Assembly Allowances and Pension Act; 

BC Rail Ltd. Pension Plan rules; 

British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority Pension Plan regulations; 

Westel Communications Ltd. Pension Plan rules; and 
Workers' Compensation Board Superannuation Plan regulations. 

Costs are fully recovered from the pension funds. 

Vote 33—British Columbia Utilities Commission 

This vote provides for the operation of the commission, as authorized under the Utilities Commission Act. The commission is responsible 
forthe regulation of all utilities in the province including conducting public hearings into major energy projects and energy use proposals. Pro¬ 
vision is made for contributions to reimburse participants for costs related to public hearings. This vote also provides for recovery of costs from 
hearing and project proponents, regulated utilities and others. 




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Vote 34—Product Sales and Services 

This vote provides for acquisitions for and services to special offices, ministries, the federal government and participating public sector 
bodies, administration of the Queen's Printer Act, mail services, and purchases, disposals and storage under the Purchasing Commission Act. 
Major activities include: 

(a) Queen's Printer and Publishing 

This sub-vote provides for government printing which includes publishing the British Columbia Gazette Parts I and II and other publica¬ 
tions, administration of the government's copyright, distribution of information, and the acquisition and distribution of stationery, office prod¬ 
ucts, forms, and protocol giftware. 

(b) Postal and Distribution Services 

This sub-vote provides for province-wide mail processing, courier, mail preparation, mail list services, employee relocation services, and 
production and distribution of driver licences and other identification cards. 

(c) Warehouse and Asset Investment Recovery 

This sub-vote provides for disposal of surplus assets and materiel, establishment and operation of warehouses for storage of inventory, and 
administration of the intellectual property program. 

(d) Product Distribution Centre 

This sub-vote provides for the acquisition of inventory and distribution of health, medical, safety-related and general goods for resale to 
ministries and public sector agencies. 

(e) Recoveries 

This sub-vote provides for full recovery, from all special offices, ministries, the federal government, and public sector bodies, of the costs 
of product sales and services. 

Vote 35—Information Technology Services Division 

This vote provides for the delivery of information technology services, infrastructure, and payments to British Columbia Systems Corpora¬ 
tion, including: 

(a) Data Services 

This sub-vote provides for data facilities and processing infrastructure to special offices and ministries. 

(b) Network Services 

This sub-vote provides for data, voice and video conferencing services, network infrastructure and security services to special offices and 
ministries. 

(c) Desk Top and Office Systems 

This sub-vote provides for the management of desktop and office systems infrastructure to special offices and ministries. 

(d) Support Services 

This sub-vote provides for access to electronic commerce services, and for management and support of government computer systems. 

(e) Information Technology Training 

This sub-vote provides for design, development and delivery of information technology training. 

(f) Information Technology Recoveries 

This sub-vote provides for full recovery from special offices, ministries, Crown corporations, public sector and private sector of the costs of 
information technology services and training. 

In 1995/96, these services were provided by British Columbia Systems Corporation. Responsibility is transferred to the Ministry of Finance 
and Corporate Relations in 1996/97. 1996/97 FTEs for the Ministry of Finance and Corporate Relations include 624 FTEs transferred from Brit¬ 
ish Columbia Systems Corporation for the Information Technology Services Division. 

Vote 25—Information and Technology 

This vote provides for information services, standards and policy to the Legislature, Executive Council, special offices, ministries and par¬ 
ticipating public bodies, and for administration of the Freedom of Information and Protection ot Privacy Act. 

(a) Information Technology Access Office 

This sub-vote provides for developing, communicating, monitoring and enforcing government-wide policy, architecture and standards 
relating to information technology and information management, to ensure that government makes efficient and effective use of information 
technology. 

(b) BC Information and Privacy Office 

This sub-vote provides for support to other ministries on matters relating to the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act in¬ 
cluding: the development of policies and procedures and the implementation of improved public access to government information; review of 
legislation for privacy and access considerations; coordination of government-wide responses to specific requests; the protection of personal 
information held by government; and the administration of the Freedom ot Information and Protection of Privacy Act. 



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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


(c) Enquiry BC 

This sub-vote provides for toll-free telephone access and referral service on government programs for residents of British Columbia, and 
the undertaking of special projects for government agencies on a cost recovery basis. 

(d) Archives and Records Services 

This sub-vote provides for the acquisition and preservation of government and private documents, printed materials and other records 
such as photographs, paintings, prints and audio-visual recordings deemed to be of historical significance to the province; the storage, retrieval 
and disposal of records on behalf of government, Crown agencies and external organizations; and the administration of the Document Dis¬ 
posal Act. Contributions are provided to the provincial Archival Association and individual and community archives for training of community 
archivists preservation of heritage documents, and for making archival collection accessible to the public. Costs are partially recovered from 
ministries, Crown agencies and external organizations. 

Statutory Accounts 

Unclaimed Money Act 

This account was established under the authority of the Unclaimed Money Act ( R.S.B.C. 1 979, chap. 418, sec. 4). 

Interest on Revenue Refunds 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act, (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 24(1 )(c)). 

Student Loans 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act, (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 11 (2)) for the pur¬ 
pose of covering costs associated with collecting out-of-province student loans. 

Special Accounts 

Provincial Home Acquisition 

This account was created as a fund by the Provincial Flome Acquisition Act, 1967, and was changed to a Special Account under the 
Special Appropriations Act, 1 982. The purpose of the account was to pay grants to qualified British Columbia residents constructing or 
purchasing a home, and to make loans secured by second mortgages. Currently, mortgage financing is provided from this account to 
qualified British Columbia residents for the conversion of existing housing into rental suites under the Home Conversion and Leasehold 
Loan Act, 1979. 

Most of the B.C. Second Mortgage program portfolio has been sold to private sector lenders. The province re-purchases mortgage ac¬ 
counts which become more than 90 days in arrears. 

Revenue consists of interest on outstanding mortgage principal. Expenditure includes statutory rebates and other miscellaneous pro¬ 
gram costs. 

Receipts represent repayment of outstanding mortgage loan principal. Disbursements represent new conversion mortgages, repur¬ 
chased mortgage accounts and guarantee claims paid under the mortgage assistance program. 

Provincial Treasury Operations 

This account was established in 1990 by amendments to the Financial Administration Act, and provides for the operations of the Pro¬ 
vincial Treasury. Provincial Treasury provides investment, debt management, banking and cash management, and loan administration 
services on a cost recovery basis to its clients, including Crown corporations and the government. 

Revenue is derived from the fees charged by the Provincial Treasury for its services provided to government entities not included in 
the Consolidated Revenue Fund. Expenditure represents the cost of operating Provincial Treasury. Recoveries are received for the cost of 
services provided to ministries and are netted against expenditures. 

No financing transactions are provided for under this account. 

Purchasing Commission Working Capital Account 

This account was established by authority of the Purchasing Commission Act. The account provides the Purchasing Commission with 
working capital to finance the acquisition of the government's light vehicle fleet for use by special offices and ministries. 

All expenditures are recoverable. Expenditures may exceed revenue in any year by the amount of the statutory spending authority 
shown in the Estimates and provided for by the Supply Act, minus the net deficiency from operations carried forward from previous years. 

All purchases are fully expensed when they are made. The expenditure of the account, net of revenue, is included in the total expendi¬ 
ture of the ministry. 

No financing transactions are provided for under this account. 

Special Fund 

British Columbia Endowment Fund 

This fund was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act, to hold the assets of the Special Fund in perpetuity, 
and keep them invested to produce revenue and economic benefit for British Columbia. 

On |une 30, 1995, the remaining assets of the Fund, along with related commitments, were transferred to the General Fund of the 
Consolidated Revenue Fund. 





PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


C 107 


Valuation Allowance 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 15, sec. 14(1)). 

Forests 

Vote 36—Minister's Office 

This vote provides for the Office of the Minister of Forests, and includes the salaries of the minister, the minister's staff and related office ex¬ 
penses. 

Vote 37—Ministry Operations 

This vote provides for forest and range management programs of the ministry and for management, finance and administration services. 
Functions related to these programs and services are performed at provincial, regional and district levels and include: 

(a) Administration and Support Services 

This sub-vote provides for senior executive direction and coordination of central ministry services including personnel, finance, audit, 
systems, accommodation, communications, technical services and public information for all other ministry initiatives. Grants and contribu¬ 
tions are provided for activities which promote prudent forest management. Costs related to the provision of certain services are recovered from 
other ministries. 

(b) Forest Resources Management 

This sub-vote provides for the management of the provincial forest and range land base at provincial, regional and district levels. Grants 
and contributions are provided for the promotion of integrated management of the forest and range land base. Costs related to the Small Busi¬ 
ness Forest Enterprise Program are recovered from the Small Business Forest Enterprise Special Account. Costs related to the provision of sup¬ 
plies and services are recovered from other ministries, agencies and levels of government. This sub-vote is comprised of the following 
activities: 

(i) Resource Planning and Allocation —provides for land use planning; compiling and maintaining information about forest and range 
lands; compiling and maintaining information about aboriginal rights over forest and range lands; and research and development as¬ 
sociated with resource utilization; 

(ii) Resource Use —provides for forest tenure administration and other ongoing forest and range land administrative activities; opera¬ 
tions administrative support; the development, maintenance, deactivation and rehabilitation of roads, trails and bridges; the activi¬ 
ties associated with reforesting lands destroyed by fire, insects or disease since 1987; and the operation of tree nurseries and the seed 
centre; and 

(iii) Monitoring, Enforcement and Audit —provides for the monitoring, enforcement and audit of forest practices and revenue administra¬ 
tion and the audit of industry performance. 

(c) Forest Investment 

This sub-vote provides for activities which enhance forest resources to increase and improve wood supply, range lands, recreation oppor¬ 
tunity and habitat. These activities include stand tending, silviculture activities and reforestation of lands denuded by pests and fire prior to 
1987; range and recreation land enhancement; research and development associated with forest enhancement; land information; seed or¬ 
chards and forest health activity. Grants are provided to agencies or groups involved in cooperative forestry research. 

Vote 38—Fire Suppression 

This vote provides for the direct fire fighting and fire preparedness programs of the ministry. Functions related to these programs and serv¬ 
ices are performed at provincial, regional and district levels, and include: 

(a) Direct Fire Fighting 

This sub-vote provides for fighting and extinguishing forest and range fires as required by the Forest Act, including ex gratia payments re¬ 
lated to this program's activities. Recoveries are received for the provision of these services to other provinces and countries. 

(b) Fire Preparedness 

This sub-vote provides for administration, policies, procedures and research pertaining to fire management and for maintaining the minis¬ 
try's fire fighting resources in a state of readiness. Grants and contributions are provided to promote fire safety and awareness. Recoveries are 
also received for the provision of fire suppression products and services to other agencies, provinces and countries. 

Statutory Accounts 
Forest Renewal BC 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)). 

Interest on Revenue Refunds 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 15, sec. 24(1 )(c)). 



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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Special Accounts 

Forest Stand Management Fund 

This account was originally established as a fund by the Forest Stand Management Fund Act, 1986, and was changed to a Special Ac¬ 
count under the Special Accounts Appropriation and Control Act, 1988. Revenue is provided by contributions from municipalities, the 
forest industry, forest sector unions and others and through money collected under section 70.1 of the Forest Practices Code of British Co¬ 
lumbia Act. Expenditures provide for enhanced management of British Columbia's forest and range lands and for silviculture work per¬ 
formed under section 70.1 of the Forest Practices Code of British Columbia Act. 

No financing transactions are provided for under this account. 

Small Business Forest Enterprise 

This account was established in 1988 through an amendment to section 87.1 of the Forest Act. The purpose of the account is to iden¬ 
tify all revenues incidental to the operation of the Small Business Forest Enterprise program and to provide an ongoing source of funds to 
defray the costs of the program. 

Revenue is collected from the following sources: upset stumpage; bonus stumpage; annual fees and billings (annual rent, trespass 
charges, scaling fees, and registration fees) incidental to the operation of the program; and sales of logs. 

Expenditure is for program administration; construction and maintenance of logging roads and bridges; costs of selling timber and 
logs; basic silviculture to restock logged lands; and other activities incidental to the operation of the program. 

Revenue in excess of current expenditures and future basic silviculture requirements is transferred to the General Fund. 

No financing transactions are provided for under this account. 

South Moresby Implementation—Forest Replacement 

This account was established by the South Moresby Implementation Account Act in 1 988. The purpose of the account is to offset the 
decrease in forest land available for harvest due to the creation of South Moresby National Park by funding incremental silviculture activi¬ 
ties on coastal forest lands. 

The account can be credited with contributions from the General Fund, the federal government and accrued interest. 

No financing transactions are provided for under this account. 

Valuation Allowance 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 14(1)). 

Health and Ministry Responsible for Seniors and Intergovernmental Relations 

Vote 39—Minister's Office 

This vote provides for the Office of the Minister of Health and Minister Responsible for Seniors and Intergovernmental Relations, and in¬ 
cludes the salaries of the minister, the minister's staff and related office expenses. 

Vote 40—Ministry Operations 

This vote provides for the planning, administration, operation and delivery of health care, preventive measures, health promotion and 
educational services, including: 

(a) Corporate Programs 
This sub-vote provides for: 

(i) Administration and Support Services —provides for the central financial and operational management services of the ministry, in¬ 
cluding financial and management services; communications and public affairs; human resources, staff training and safety pro¬ 
grams; freedom of information and protection of privacy; and grants and contributions to the British Columbia Health Research 
Foundation. Recoveries are received from the British Columbia Health Research Foundation for services provided to them by the 
ministry; and 

(ii) Emergency Health Services —provides for program management, training, and delivery of ambulance services and for the Emer¬ 
gency Medical Assistants licencing Board which examines and licences emergency medical personnel. Contributions are provided 
to agencies which provide ambulance services for the Emergency Health Service Commission. Recoveries are received from the fed¬ 
eral government for emergency health services provided to Status Indians. 

(b) Strategic Programs 

This sub-vote provides for overall strategic support for the ministry's programs, including: computer systems support; policy planning and 
economics; program standards and information management; health systems performance and evaluation measurement; management and 
medical consultation; legislation and professional regulation, including costs associated with the Mental Health Review Panels and the Medi¬ 
cal and Health Care Services Appeal Board; the Office for Seniors; the Office of the Provincial Nurse Advisor; the Provincial Health Officer; and 
the Women's Health Bureau. Grants and contributions are provided to individuals, agencies, or organizations which provide services related 
to Aboriginal health, research and related services on health related issues, the Health Professions Council and federal/provincial/territorial 
agreements. 






PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


C 109 


(c) Regional Programs 

This sub-vote provides for the program management, operation and delivery of all community and institutional based health care pro¬ 
grams, including the provision of grants and contributions to, or on behalf of, Regional Health Boards and Community Health Councils, as fol¬ 
lows: 

(i) Program Management —provides for regional coordination, development and implementation of the New Directions strategy, stra¬ 
tegic labour services, and general administration, including the establishment of policies and standards, of the programs identified 
below; 

(ii) Debt Servicing and Building Occupancy —provides for contributions for the provincial government's share of debt servicing costs for 
health facilities, the ministry's building occupancy costs, as well as space planning, design and construction services; 

(iii) Provincial Programs —provides for operating and equipment contributions to provincial/tertiary hospitals, out of province hospital 
contributions, forensic psychiatric services, kidney dialysis and medical supplies, health protection and safety services, the head in¬ 
jury program and health services for community living, as well as grants and contributions to various individuals and organizations 
such as the Hospital Employers Association of BC, the Canadian Blood Agency, the Red Cross, and the Healthcare Labour Adjust¬ 
ment Agency. Recoveries are received from the Medical Services Plan for medical services provided on a salaried or sessional basis, 
from the private sector for Canuck Place Hospice, and from the federal government for health services provided to Status Indians; and 

(iv) Regional Health Programs —provides for operating and equipment funding for acute care hospitals and extended care units attached 
to those hospitals, as well as continuing care services, mental health services, public health services, alcohol and drug services, and 
community health services. Grants and contributions are provided to, or on behalf of, individuals, corporations, community groups, 
hospitals, municipalities, and other organizations. Recoveries are received from the Medical Services Plan for medical services pro¬ 
vided on a salaried or sessional basis, from the general public for certain fees and licences, and from the federal government for 
health services provided to Status Indians. 

(d) Medical Services Plan and Pharmacare 

This sub-vote provides for the management and operations of the Medical Services Plan and Pharmacare, including: 

(i) Medical Services Plan Program Management —provides for the administration of the plan, including: enrollment of beneficiaries and 
practitioners; billing and processing of premiums; processing of claims for contribution payments; auditing of claims; review of utili¬ 
zation; education of beneficiaries and practitioners; licencing and inspection of diagnostic facilities; negotiation of contracts; and 
costs associated with the Medical Services Commission, special committees and advisory committees. Recoveries are received for 
certain processing services provided to practitioners and organizations; 

(ii) Medical Services Plan Contribution Payments —provides for contributions in respect of eligible services provided by medical practi¬ 
tioners, health care practitioners and diagnostic facilities, on a fee-for-service basis or alternative contractual payment, and also pro¬ 
vides for other types of payments required under the Medicare Protection Act and various agreements concerning medical 
practitioners, health care practitioners and diagnostic facilities, including payments to the Medical and Health Care Services Special 
Account. Recoveries are received for payments made by the Medical Services Plan which are the responsibility of the Insurance Cor¬ 
poration of British Columbia and other third parties, and from the federal government for health services provided to Status Indians; 
and 

(iii) Pharmacare —provides for program management and delivery of Pharmacare programs. Program management includes the estab¬ 
lishment of policies and systems for the reimbursement of benefits paid under the various Pharmacare programs, negotiation and 
monitoring of participation agreements, verification and processing of claims for benefits, and monitoring of drug utilization. Phar¬ 
macare program expenditures include contributions and other payments for the full or partial cost of designated prescription drugs, 
dispensing fees, ostomy supplies, home oxygen, prosthetic appliances and other approved items. 

(e) Medicare Protection and Enhancement Initiative 

This sub-vote provides for support for the protection and enhancement of the British Columbia health care system. 

(f) Recoveries from Health Special Account 

This sub-vote provides for recoveries from the Health Special Account in order to fund expenditures as provided by the Health Special Ac¬ 
count Act, including: Closer to Home Fund; public health inspection; kidney dialysis; child and youth mental health; AIDS/HIV prevention and 
education activities; hospital equipment; Mental Health Residential Program; Aboriginal initiatives; public health nursing; school health; Con¬ 
tinuing Care Services for Community Living; Child Development Centre; community health special care grants. 

Vote 41—Vital Statistics (Special Operating Agency) 

This vote provides for expenditures of the Special Operating Agency responsible for program management and the registration, certifica¬ 
tion, statistical analysis and reporting of the vital events of birth, marriage, and death and management of the Health Status Registry, Wills Reg¬ 
istry, Client Registry and change of name process. Grants and contributions are provided to various individuals, groups, and agencies which 
provide services on behalf of the Vital Statistics Agency. Recoveries are received as a result of the provision of services to programs within the 
ministry, to other ministries, to agencies, to other levels of government, and to the public. Revenue represents fees and licences charged by Vi¬ 
tal Statistics for the provision of its service. 

Statutory Accounts 

Inter-provincial Reciprocal Agreements—Hospital Care 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)). Effective Oc¬ 
tober, 1981, all the provinces in Canada agreed to fund the hospitals in their jurisdiction for eligible services provided to insured residents 

of another province. The province providing the service recovers the cost from the patients' home province. 



c no 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Inter-Provincial Reciprocal Agreements—Medical Services 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)). Effective 
April, 1 999, all provinces in Canada, except Quebec, agreed that residents of other provinces would be eligible for the same insured phy¬ 
sician services as those provided to residents in the host province. The host province reimburses the physician for the service, and then re¬ 
covers the cost from the patients' home province. 

Heart Health 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)) to facilitate 
accounting for recoverable expenditures under a five year cost sharing agreement with the federal government to develop a community 
based approach to preventing and reducing heart disease. 

Native Home Nursing 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)) for the pur¬ 
pose of providing home nursing care services by the Upper Island Health Unit to the Gwa'Sala-Nakwaxda'Xw Band and the Kwakiuti 
Band. 

Occupational Therapy Outreach 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)) for the pur¬ 
pose of providing occupational therapy services to First Nations people living in the Mount Washington region. Associated costs are re¬ 
coverable from the federal government. 

Yukon Communicable Disease Program 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)) for the pur¬ 
pose of contracting with the B.C. Centre for Disease Control to assist with communicable disease (TB) control. There are no Medical 
Health Officers in the Yukon. 

Elderly Outreach Service 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)). This project 
will be provided by Mental Health Services and funded by the University of Victoria. 

Seniors Impact on Drug Policy 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)) for the pur¬ 
pose of completing a five-year research project relating to the making of drug policy and its impact on seniors. 

HIV Surveillance System Study 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 15, sec. 22(1)) for the pur¬ 
pose of conducting a study to enhance the HIV surveillance system in British Columbia. 

Registered Dietician 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)) for the pur¬ 
pose of providing the services of a part-time Registered Dietician Nutritionist for School District No. 23. 

Tobacco Enforcement 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 15, sec. 22(1)) for the recov¬ 
ery and expenditure of the federal government contributions associated with the Joint Tobacco Enforcement Program. The program facili¬ 
tates cooperation and reduces duplication between the federal and provincial governments regarding enforcement of health related 
tobacco legislation. 

Hepatitis/Asthma Sentinel Surveillance Study 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 15, sec. 22(1)) for the pur¬ 
pose of investigating the risk factors associated with all forms of viral hepatitis on a cost sharing basis with the federal government. 

Veterans' Beds 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)) for the pur¬ 
pose of providing 2/3 of the capital costs of extended and multi-level care beds for which veterans will have priority access. 

Medical Services Commission/Workers' Compensation Board Administration 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 11 (2)) so that Work¬ 
ers' Compensation Board (WCB) may make payments to injured workers at a rate or scale of fees determined by WCB to the Commission 
for the services provided by practitioners for work-related injuries. 

Collection Agency Commissions 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 11 (2)) for the pur¬ 
pose of recording commissions paid to collection agencies for the successful collection of outstanding accounts owed to the ministry. 


PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


cm 




Special Accounts 

Health Special Account 

This account was established by the Health Special Account Act, 1992. Administered by the Ministry of Health and Ministry Respon¬ 
sible for Seniors and Intergovernmental Relations, the account provides for the allocation of a portion of Lottery Corporation revenues to 
fund the administration, operation, and delivery of health care, health research, health promotion and health education services. Expendi¬ 
tures out of the Special Account represent transfers to the Ministry Operations vote. 

No financing transactions are provided for under this account. 

Medical and Health Care Services 

This account was established by the Medical and Health Care Services Special Account Act, 1994 and is administered by the Ministry 
of Health and Ministry Responsible for Seniors and Intergovernmental Relations. The purpose of the account is to facilitate arrangements 
to manage year to year fluctuations in payments by the Medical Services Plan to members of various health care professions. These ar¬ 
rangements are established by regulation or are contained in agreements between the government and the professions under the authority 
of the Medical and Health Care Services Act. 

Revenue is provided from unused portions of the available amount for each profession and from any amount specified by an agreement. 
Expenditures may be made where savings from underutilization in prior years are applied to offset overutilization in a subsequent 

year. 

No financing transactions are provided for under this account. 

Valuation Allowance 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 14(1)). 


Labour 

Vote 42—Minister's Office 

This vote provides for the Office of the Minister of Labour and includes the salaries of the minister, the minister's staff and related office ex¬ 
penses. 

Vote 43—Ministry Operations 

This vote provides for ministry programs and activities including: 

(a) Labour Programs 

This sub-vote provides for: 

(i) Labour Relations and Labour Programs —provides for the executive direction of the ministry including the deputy minister's office; 
services promoting harmonious labour and employment relations, including administration of the Pension Standards Act, Employ¬ 
ment Standards Act, Skills Development and Fair Wage Act, and parts of the Labour Relations Code relating to arbitration; support 
services to the Labour Relations Board; related policy and statistical services; support to the Employment Standards Tribunal; and 
grants and contributions to individuals, agencies and other organizations to assist in the resolution of labour/management conflicts 
and the promotion of good employment relationships. Recoveries are received for the costs of client education seminars sponsored 
by the Employment Standards Branch; 

(ii) Apprenticeship Initiatives —provides for the planning, development and implementation of provincial apprenticeship training poli¬ 
cies, programs and services, as well as the management and operations of the provincial apprenticeship system, including the Pro¬ 
vincial Apprenticeship Board. Contributions are provided to various organizations for apprenticeship training initiatives and 
curriculum development; and 

(iii) B.C. Labour Force Development Board —provides for operation of the B.C. Labour Force Development Board. Contributions are 
made to organizations in support of workforce development activities in the private and public sectors. 

(b) Labour Relations Board 

This sub-vote provides for operation of the Labour Relations Board, an agency established under the Labour Relations Code. 

(c) Workers' Compensation Review Board and Compensation Advisory Services 

This sub-vote provides for operation of the Workers' Compensation Review Board, an agency established under the Workers' Compensa¬ 
tion Actio review decisions made by the Workers' Compensation Board. Compensation Advisory Services provides advice to employers and 
workers respecting decisions made by the Workers' Compensation Board. This sub-vote also provides a statutory appeal mechanism for vic¬ 
tims of crime who are not satisfied with decisions of the Criminal Injuries Compensation Branch. Costs associated with the Workers' Compen¬ 
sation Review Board and Compensation Advisory Services are fully recovered from the Accident Fund established pursuant to the Workers' 
Compensation Act, and from course fees, proceeds from the sale of manuals and disposal of assets, and other sources. 

Statutory Accounts 

Human Resource Development Canada—Secondary School Apprenticeship Scholarships 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)) to recover 

50% of the cost for secondary school apprenticeship scholarships under the Apprenticeship Scholarship Strategic Initiative. 




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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Municipal Affairs and Housing 

Vote 45—Minister's Office 

This vote provides for the Office of the Minister of Municipal Affairs and Housing and includes the salaries of the minister, the minister's 
staff and related office expenses. 

Vote 46—Ministry Operations 

This vote provides for executive direction and management of the ministry and delivery of operating and statutory grant programs including: 

(a) Administration and Support Services 

This sub-vote provides for executive direction and administrative services to the operating programs of the ministry, including: financial 
administration and budget coordination; information and privacy; records management; personnel administration and support; office man¬ 
agement and accommodation; public affairs; information systems; and administration of the Home Owner Grant Act. 

(b) Local Government and Community Services 
T his sub-vote provides for: 

(i) administration of the Municipal Act, Local Government Grants Act and Growth Strategies Act; review and monitoring of local gov¬ 
ernment administrative and financial practices and procedures; support services to local governments including collection and as¬ 
sessment of statistics and information, analysis of water and sewerage construction projects to support allocation of capital grants, 
investigations into local government issues, and community and regional planning; and 

(ii) policy research and development on local government and aboriginal issues; legislative review; administration of the Downtown 
Revitalization Program and the Library Act; and implementation of policies and programs related to community library services. 

Grants are made for local services as provided under the Municipal Aid Act. Grants are also paid to local authorities to assist in financing 
various projects and services, and to various organizations to support library services and projects. 

(c) Assessment Services 

This sub-vote provides for the operating costs of, including the fees and expenses of appointees to, the Courts of Revision and Assessment 
Appeal Board. 

(d) Safety and Standards 

This sub-vote provides for: public safety programs including the Office of the Fire Commissioner; the establishment of building construc¬ 
tion and safety standards; inspection services for electricity, natural gas, propane, boiler and pressure vessels, elevating devices, amusement 
rides, refrigeration systems, ski lifts, and railways; fire and accident investigations; and the licencing of technical personnel. Contributions are 
made to the Fire Academy in support of fire fighter training. Some recoveries are made for inspection services. 

(e) University Endowment Lands 

This sub-vote provides for the management and operation of the University Endowment Lands. Contributions are made to the City of Van¬ 
couver for the provision of fire protection services. Recoveries represent the transfer of costs associated with services to ratepayers from the 
University Endowment Lands Administration Account. 

(f) Housing Programs 

This sub-vote provides for the planning and development of housing policy and the administration of program initiatives, including: 

(i) Shelter Aid for Elderly Renters —provides for grants to eligible seniors for assistance with shelter costs; and 

(ii) British Columbia Housing Management Commission (BCHMC) —provides for a contribution to the BCHMC for the protection and 
enhancement of the supply of adequate and affordable housing. 

Vote 47—Local Government Grants 

This vote provides for conditional and unconditional grants to local governments and related organizations in British Columbia. This vote 
also provides for administration costs associated with the programs. Major activities include: 

(a) Unconditional Grant Programs 

This sub-vote provides for grants under the Local Government Grants Actto supplement the local revenue base, thereby reducing de¬ 
pendence on property taxation for the provision of local services. 

(b) Conditional Grant Programs 

This sub-vote provides grants under the Local Government Grants Act for infrastructure development including: water and sewerage fa¬ 
cilities and local roads; sewer and water studies; and planning. A grant is also provided in respect of interest costs associated with projects com¬ 
pleted as part of the pre-1983 sewer and water program. In addition, grants are provided to facilitate institutional change within the local 
government system. 

(c) Canada-British Columbia Infrastructure Program 

This sub-vote provides grants for water and sewerage facilities, municipal road construction and other infrastructure projects under the 
Canada-British Columbia Infrastructure Program Agreement. Recoveries are received from the federal government in respect of its share of 
project costs approved under the program. 


i 


PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


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Statutory Accounts 
Home Owner Grant 

This account was established under the authority of the Home Owner Grant Act ( S.B.C. 1980, chap. 18, sec. 9(3) and 10(2)) to reim¬ 
burse municipalities and property owners for retroactive grant claims. 

Special Account 

University Endowment Lands Administration 

This account was established as a Miscellaneous Statutory Account by authority of the University Endowment Lands Administration 
Act, was continued under the University Endowment Land Act, 1979, and became a Special Account under the Special Appropriations 
Act, 1982. The account provides for services to residents within the University Endowment Lands. 

Revenue is derived from University Endowment Lands resident ratepayer contributions, including fees, licences and property taxes. 
Expenditures represent the transfer to Vote 46, Ministry Operations of the ratepayers' portion of the costs of providing services. 

No financing transactions are provided for under this account. 

Valuation Allowance 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 15, sec. 14(1)). 

Small Business, Tourism and Culture 

Vote 48—Minister's Office 

This vote provides for the Office of the Minister of Small Business, Tourism and Culture, and includes the salaries of the minister, the minis¬ 
ter's staff and related office expenses. 

Vote 49—Ministry Operations 

This vote provides for executive direction, administrative services and delivery of ministry programs, including: 

(a) Administration and Support Services 

This sub-vote provides for executive direction and central ministry services including accommodation and telecommunications, audit, 
corporate planning and policy, finance and administration, information systems, personnel and public affairs. Grants and contributions are 
provided to organizations to support special projects and activities which complement ministry programs. Costs are partially recovered from 
organizations working in partnership with the ministry. 

(b) Community and Regional Development 

This sub-vote provides for development, delivery and administration of programs and services in community and aboriginal economic 
development, economic transition, women in business, and small business (including small business equity financing, training, and access to 
business information) programs. This sub-vote also provides for the operation of Government Agent offices throughout the province to make 
government programs, services and information available to the public, including: Gold Commissioner; Registrar of Voters; Registrar of Births, 
Deaths and Marriages; driver licence services; and revenue collection. In addition, this sub-vote provides for the coordination of govern¬ 
ment-wide activities regarding cooperatives, and includes contributions to various organizations to support cooperative initiatives. Contribu¬ 
tions are provided to Business Information Centres and local economic development commissions and other entities to encourage the 
development of economic opportunities in British Columbia. A portion of operating costs is recovered from ministries, participating public 
bodies and the public. 

(c) Culture, Recreation, Heritage and Sport 

This sub-vote provides for support of cultural and heritage resource activities, and administration and delivery of government programs 
under the Arts Council Act, the Heritage Conservation Act, the Cultural Foundation Act and the Klondike National Historic Park Act, and in¬ 
cludes: 

(i) Culture Programs —provides for: support services, advice and grants to the performing arts, including management of the British Co¬ 
lumbia art collection; program support for, and coordination of, development of the motion picture industry; and grants and contri¬ 
butions to the BC Festival of the Arts Society and the Film Development Society of British Columbia and other organziations and 
individuals. 

(ii) Heritage Resource Programs —provides for: protection, preservation and management of the province's heritage resources including 
archaeological sites, heritage buildings and administration of the British Columbia Heritage Trust as required by the Heritage Con¬ 
servation Act; management and promotion of historic sites including Barkerville, Keremeos Crist Mill and Fort Steele; and grants and 
contributions to the Heritage Trust and other organizations and individuals for heritage related initiatives. Program costs are partially 
recovered from program revenues, and from other organizations for certain programs. 

(iii) Community Grants —provides for grants in support of a broad range of community initiatives, and for the administration of commu¬ 
nity grant programs including those funded by the Ministry of Employment and Investment. 

(iv) Sport Services Branch —provides for administration of the Physical Fitness and Amateur Sports Fund Special Account and implemen¬ 
tation and support of policies and programs in the areas of amateur sports. Grants and contributions are provided to amateur sports 
groups and associations. 



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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


(v) Recreation _provides for equitable access to recreation opportunities through the planning, development and administration of rec- ! 

reation policy and programs. Grants and contributions are provided to various organizations to support recreation services and proj- i 
ects. 

(vi) British Columbia Film Commission —provides for the promotion of British Columbia's varied locations, skilled professionals and film 
industry infrastructure, for use by the world's film, television and commercial producers. Grants are provided to various organiza¬ 
tions to promote the film and television industries. Program costs are partially recovered from other organizations and individuals for 
certain activities. 

(d) Royal British Columbia Museum 

Pursuant to the Museum Act this sub-vote provides for: the security preservation and interpretation of specimens and other objects which 
illustrate the natural and human history of the province through research, exhibits, public programs, publications, and other means; and it also 
provides public programs and objective information about the cultural and natural environments of British Columbia, past and present. Contri¬ 
butions are provided to assist in research and public programs. Program costs are partially recovered from program revenues and other organi¬ 
zations, including the federal government, for certain programs. 

(e) Reserve for Doubtful Accounts and Concessionary Loans 

This sub-vote provides for reserves for doubtful loans, and the interest subsidy expense for concessionary loans made under the Industrial 
Development Incentive Act. This sub-vote also provides for reserves for potential payments pertaining to loan guarantees made under ministry 
programs and the Financial Administration Act. 

(f) Contributions to British Columbia Pavilion Corporation 

This sub-vote provides for contributions towards the operating costs and facilities maintenance costs of the corporation. 

Vote 50—Tourism B.C. (Special Operating Agency) 

This sub-vote provides for expenditures of the Special Operating Agency responsible for: administering the planning, development and 
marketing of tourism including: development and implementation of provincial and regional strategies, and industry research; administering 
the provincial information and reservation system; operating provincial tourist information centres; promoting cooperative ventures between 
government and the travel industry; assessing and promoting the optimum capacity and quality of tourism products and infrastructure; and ad¬ 
ministering tourism employment programs and regional, national and international marketing of British Columbia as a tourist destination in¬ 
cluding planning, coordinating and implementing tourism advertising, market research, project evaluation, tourism promotions and 
cooperative marketing programs. Grants and contributions are provided to the Pacific Rim Institute of Tourism, regional tourism associations 
and other organizations to support tourism related projects and activities. Costs are partially recovered from program revenues and other or¬ 
ganizations working in partnership with the Special Operating Agency. Expenditures of the Special Operating Agency are linked to perform¬ 
ance requirements. 

Vote 44—British Columbia Transit 

This vote provides for the annual contribution to British Columbia Transit including: 

(a) Operating Contributions 

This sub-vote provides for contributions towards the operating costs of public passenger and transportation services and transportation 
services for the disabled in various communities throughout the province. 

(b) Debt Servicing Contributions 

This sub-vote provides for contributions towards the interest and principal repayment of debt related to the capital expenditures for the 
public passenger transit services including transportation services for the disabled in communities throughout the province. 

Statutory Accounts 

Longitudinal Analysis 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)) to recover 
costs for the longitudinal analysis of small businesses in British Columbia's forest sector. 

Forest Sector Employment 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)) to recover 
costs for a forest sector employment forecast model. 

Columbia Basin Power Projects 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Acf (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)) to recover sal- • 
ary and travel expenses for Mr. Penner. The project assigned to Mr. Penner is to assist in the contract work awarded to BC Hydro to evalu¬ 
ate and co-develop certain Columbia Basin Power Projects. 

One Stop Business Registration 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)) to enter into a 
cost-share partnership agreement with the Government of Canada. A new application, One Stop Business Registration, allows small busi¬ 
ness entrepreneurs to register their business with multiple agencies. 






PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


C 115 




North American Indigenous Games 

This account was established under the Financial Administration Act( S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)) to recover salary costs of em¬ 
ployees seconded to the North American Indigenous Games. 

Forest Community Economic Development Program 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 15, sec. 22(1)) to administer 
the Forest Community Economic Development Program funded by Forest Renewal BC. 

Federal Map Sales 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)) to recover 
costs for the purchase and sale of federal topographical maps through Government Agent offices. 

Residential Accommodation for Government Agents 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1 981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)) to recover 
costs for the provision of residential accommodation to Government Agents in the communities of Atlin, Dease Lake and Stewart. 

Supplementary Regional Agreement Thompson-Okanagan/Forest Renewal BC 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)) to recover 
costs for the provision of services to the Thompson-Okanagan office of Forest Renewal BC outside the scope of the Regional Partnership 
Agreement. 

Evaluation, Research and Analysis Support 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)) to recover 
costs for evaluation, research and analysis support as required on behalf of Forest Renewal BC. 

Government Agents Training by the Insurance Corporation of British Columbia (ICBC) 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)) to recover 
costs incurred by Government Agents staff attending ICBC training in North Vancouver. 

Annotated Bibliography and Database 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1 981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)) to recover 
costs for managing the development of an Annotated Bibliography and Database of Community and Economic Development research re¬ 
lated to British Columbia's forest sector on behalf of Forest Renewal BC. 

Forest Renewal BC/Workforce in Communities 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)) to recover 
costs for undertaking the review, revision and development of new research priorities for Forest Renewal BC in the workforce and commu¬ 
nities activities. 

BC Online—One Stop Business Registration 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)) to enter into a 
cost-share partnership agreement with the Government of Canada. A new application, One Stop Business Registration, allows small busi¬ 
ness entrepreneurs to register their business with multiple agencies. 

IPS Consulting for the North American Indigenous Games 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 15, sec. 22(1)) to recover 
costs for a contract with IPS Consulting Ltd with respect to the 1997 North American Indigenous Games. 

special Account 

Physical Fitness and Amateur Sports Fund 

This account was originally created as a fund under the Revenue Surplus Appropriation Act, 1969, was continued under the Funds 
Control Act, 1 979, and was changed to a Special Account under the Special Accounts Appropriation and Control Act, 1 988. 

The account promotes the physical fitness of residents of the province and their participation in amateur sport. Interest earned on the 
account balance is credited to the account as revenue. Expenditures consist of grants to physical fitness and amateur sport projects, groups 
and organizations, and awards to individuals. Administration costs are provided through Vote 49. 

No financing transactions are provided for under this account. 

/aluation Allowance 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 14(1)). 




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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Human Resources 

Vote 51—Minister's Office 

This vote provides for the Office of the Minister of Human Resources, and includes the salaries of the minister, the minister's staff and re- j 
lated office expenses. 

Vote 52—Ministry Operations 

This vote provides for protecting children and supporting families with children at risk of abuse or neglect, supporting people with disabili¬ 
ties so that they are able to live in their communities, income support, and health care and dental services to those in need, as follows: 

(a) Administration and Support Services 

This sub-vote provides for overall direction, development and support of ministry programs. This includes ministry executive, communi¬ 
cations, policy planning and research, human resource and staff training, financial operations, operational review, audit services and monitor¬ 
ing, systems support services, facilities support, and records management. This sub-vote also provides for emergency social services 
coordination and delivery, ministry requirements for postal services and office furniture and equipment, and banking services. Grants and con¬ 
tributions are provided in support of these activities. 

(b) Child, Family and Community Services 

This sub-vote provides for: 

(i) Program Management —provides for the direct operating costs of delivering child welfare services under the Child, Family and Com- : 
munity Service Act, the Adoption Act, and other initiatives to support families and youth; 

(ii) Family and Youth Support Services —provides for community based support services to families with non-handicapped children at 
risk of abuse or neglect, youth at risk of abuse or neglect and individuals who are victims of abuse. Also provides for adoption services 
and other initiatives consistent with the ministry mandate to support families and youth; and 

(iii) Child in Care Services —provides for community based care and support to non-handicapped children in care of the province by * 
agreement or court order. 

Grants and contributions are paid to or on behalf of children in care, eligible families and youth, and to care givers and agencies providing 
these services. Recoveries are received from the federal government for the Children's Special Allowance, for repayable benefits and overpay¬ 
ments, and from parents and agencies contributing to or sharing in the cost of sponsored services. 

(c) Community Support Services 

This sub-vote provides for: 

(i) Program Management —provides for the direct operating costs of delivering services for children with mental handicaps or special 
needs, services for adults with mental handicaps or multiple disabilities, and projects which support communities. This includes 
services mandated under the Child, Family and Community Service Act, the Guaranteed Available Income for Need Act, and other 
ministry approved services; 

(ii) Services for Children with Mental Handicaps or Special Needs —provides for community based support services to families with 
children who have mental handicaps or special needs, and children in care of the province; 

(iii) Services for Adults with Mental Handicaps or Multiple Disabilities —provides for community based residential care for adults with 
mental handicaps or multiple disabilities, and training and support services to promote independence and personal development; 

(iv) Projects to Support Communities —provides for community based services which complement and support ministry programs, in¬ 
cluding seniors counselling; and 

(v) Institutional Care —provides for the direct operating costs of Woodlands and Glendale Lodge. 

Grants and contributions are paid to or on behalf of clients, and to care givers and agencies providing these services. Recoveries are re¬ 
ceived from the Medical Services Plan for salaried and sessional medical services, for repayable benefits and overpayments, and from parents 
and agencies contributing to or sharing in the cost of sponsored services. 

(d) Income Support Programs 

This sub-vote provides for: 

(i) Program Management —provides for the direct operating costs of delivering income support programs to eligible individuals and 
families in need. This includes administration of benefits and services authorized under the Guaranteed Available Income for Need 
Act, and other ministry approved services; 

(ii) Income Assistance —provides for income support to persons eligible under the Guaranteed Available Income for Need Act, who do 
not qualify under Income Support for Persons with Disabilities, or Youth Works. Also includes support for individuals participating in 
job search and job search training under the Welfare to Work Program; 

(iii) Income Support for Persons with Disabilities —provides for income support to eligible individuals designated under the Disabilities 
Benefits program; and 

(iv) Youth Works —provides for income support to eligible individuals participating in job search and job search training under the Youth 
Works Program. 

Direct income support benefits are paid as grants to eligible recipients. Grants and contributions are also paid for the provision of other in¬ 
come support programs and services such as hostels and emergency shelters, user fees for continuing care and alcohol and drug rehabilitation, 
and other support services. Recoveries are received from assignments of repayable benefits and overpayments, and from agencies contributing 
to or sharing in the cost of sponsored services. 







PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


C 117 


(e) Health Services 

This sub-vote provides for: 

(i) Program Management —provides for the direct operating costs of delivering health services to eligible recipients under the Guaran¬ 
teed Available Income for Need Act, and the Child, Family and Community Service Act, and for other ministry approved health serv¬ 
ices; 

(ii) Health Care and Dental Services —provides for medical goods and services, medical transportation, dental and optical services for 
eligible individuals and families qualifying for benefits under Income Support Programs, children in care of the province, and chil¬ 
dren under the At Home program; and 

(iii) Healthy Kids —provides for dental and optical care for children in low income families eligible for premium assistance under the 
Medical Services Plan and not covered under other insurance plans. 

Benefits are paid as grants and contributions to service providers, or as direct grants to eligible individuals as appropriate. Recoveries are 
received for repayable benefits or overpayments. 


Transportation and Highways 

Vote 53—Minister's Office 

This vote provides for the Office of the Minister of Transportation and Highways, and includes the salaries of the minister, the minister's 
staff and related office expenses. 

Vote 54—Ministry Operations 

This vote provides for administration, operation, and delivery of ministry programs including: 

(a) Administration and Support Services 

This sub-vote provides for the office of the Deputy Minister and executive direction for the Administrative Services Department which in¬ 
cludes financial, administrative, human resources, information systems, internal audit, strategic planning, freedom of information, and public 
affairs functions. 

(b) Highway Planning and Maior Projects 

This sub-vote provides for executive direction for the Highway Planning and Major Projects Department, for highway planning, policy, 
properties, programming, and quality management activities, and for contributions to municipalities in support of local road systems. This 
sub-vote also provides for the management of major highway projects. Recoveries are received from the federal government for work carried 
out as part of the Strategic Highway Improvement Program. 

(c) Highway Operations 

This sub-vote provides for executive direction for the Highway Operations Department and for regional and headquarters services in sup¬ 
port of ministry programs throughout the province. This sub-vote also provides for contributions to various transportation organizations. Re¬ 
coveries are received from the federal government for work carried out as part of the Canadian Heavy Vehicle Electronic licence Plate Project. 

(d) Highway Maintenance 

This sub-vote provides for maintenance and operation of highways and roads, bridge structures, ferry routes, ferry landings, tunnels, and 
for winter maintenance involving snow and ice removal. This sub-vote also provides for district operations, regional maintenance activities 
and protection of the road and bridge infrastructure. Contributions are provided to various organizations in support of transportation related ac¬ 
tivities. Recoveries are received from parties external to government for the use of ministry equipment and materials and for leased premises. 

(e) Highway Rehabilitation 

This sub-vote provides for restoration of the existing highway system including roads, bridges, ferries and ferry landings, in order to protect 
the investment in infrastructure, provide economy of maintenance and enhance safety; and also provides for minor rehabilitation of roads and 
bridges to prevent deterioration or enhance the life cycle of the infrastructure. Recoveries are received from government corporations and other 
levels of government for rehabilitation activities carried out on their behalf. 

(f) Highway Capital Construction 
This sub-vote provides for: 

(i) Recoverable Highway Capital Construction Projects —provides for planning, engineering, design, survey, construction, reconstruc¬ 
tion, paving, legal services, right-of-way acquisitions and property purchases for provincial highways, roads, bridges, ferries, ferry 
landings and tunnels. Recoveries are received from the BC Transportation Financing Authority for projects carried out on behalf of 
the authority to upgrade the existing highway system and develop new routes to improve safety, capacity, accessibility and service 
levels. Recoveries are also received from the federal government for work carried out as part of the Strategic Highway Improvement 
Program and municipalities for urban renewal projects; and 

(ii) Non-Recoverable Highway Capital Construction Projects —provides for expropriation and construction claims related to projects 
completed prior to the formation of the BC Transportation Financing Authority. 

(g) Motor Vehicles 

This sub-vote provides for: 

(i) administration of the legislation, regulations and policies governing the operation of motor vehicles and the fitness of drivers in ac¬ 
cordance with provisions of the Motor Vehicle Act, Commercial Transport Act, Motor Vehicle (All Terrain) Act, Motor Carrier Act, 
Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act, and accompanying regulations; 



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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


(ii) the office of the Superintendent of Motor Vehicles, general administration, planning, development of examination standards, coordi¬ 
nation and development of provincial traffic safety initiatives and driver improvement programs, determination and administration 
of traffic fines and penalties, and revenue administration; and 

(iii) the licencing and testing of drivers operating on public highways and roads, monitoring driving records, monitoring commercial ve¬ 
hicle size, weight, load security and the transport of dangerous goods, issuing permits, enforcing compliance with regulations, in¬ 
specting vehicles, administering the provincial emissions control and maintenance program, developing policies relating to the 
National Safety Code, examining rates and time schedules of carriers, and liaising with the Motor Carrier Commission. Provision is 
made for contributions to organizations in support of traffic and road safety. 

(h) Motor Carrier Commission 

This sub-vote provides for an independent body which regulates the province's for-hire motor carrier industry (trucks, buses and taxis) 
pursuant to the Motor Carrier Act. The Commission, by delegation pursuant to the Motor Vehicle Transport Act (Canada) also issues licences for 
the inter-provincial and international road transport of freight and passengers. This sub-vote also provides for the Reconsideration Panel which 
hears appeals of Commission decisions. 

Statutory Accounts 

Signal Installation, Parksville 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)) to recover 
costs from the City of Parksville for lighting installation on Route 19 at McVickers Avenue. 

Signal Installation, Highway 99 at Blueberry Drive 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)) to recover 
costs from the Resort Municipality of Whistler for traffic signal installation at the intersection of Highway 99 at Blueberry Drive. 

Highway 20, Williams Lake, Light Installation 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)) to recover 
costs from the City of Williams Lake for lighting installation on Route 20 at MacKenzie Avenue to Westridge Drive, Phase 1. 

Occupancy Charges, Cloverdale Yardsite 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 15, sec. 22(1)) to recover 
costs from Mainroad Contracting Ltd for the rental of their portion of the ministry yard at 1 7435-56th Avenue, Surrey. 

Annacis West Channel 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)) to recover 
costs from H.A. Simons Ltd. Due to a faulty design, the structure developed fatigue cracks which have to be repaired. The designer has 
agreed to accept liability and has agreed to reimburse the ministry for these costs. 

Road Reporting, 1-900 Number 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)) to recover 
costs from BC Telephone for 1 -900 number telephone revenues. The 1994/95 Highways Operations Program for the South Coast Region 
was reduced by $420,000 in anticipation of adopting user pay approach to providing road information. This reduction has been continued 
in subsequent fiscal years. Implicit was the understanding that this reduction could be recovered from 1 -900 revenues. 

Thetis Lake Sewer Service 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)) to recover 
costs from the Capital Regional District (CRD) Parks for the installation of a sanitary sewer service in Thetis Lake Regional Park. The CRD 
Park agrees to reimburse the ministry for the actual cost. This work is beyond the scope of the project and was not known at the time of the 
annual estimate preparation. 

Broadway Connector, Burnaby 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)) to recover 
costs from BC Telephone to relocate aerial cables to underground on North Road. BC Telephone will benefit by pre-building for future 
needs without requiring the traffic disruption and road reconstruction necessary with overhead relocation or upgrading. 

Sharon Developments Ltd 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)). Sharon De¬ 
velopments Ltd is required under subdivision approval to supply a hard surface road to a development in Dease Lake. The ministry has re¬ 
tained a Letter of Credit for the estimated cost of $35,000. The ministry's sealcoat crew is in Dease Lake and are able to do the work. The 
developer has agreed to pay the ministry for the work to be done. 




PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


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Old Lakelse Road Widening 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)) to recover 
costs from the Regional District of Kitimat-Stikine. The District has agreed to pay for the widening of Old Lakelse Road in order to better ac¬ 
commodate bicycle, vehicle and foot passenger movement on this road. 

Paving of Dogtooth Road 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act(S.B.C. 1981, chap. 15, sec. 22(1)). The cost of 
paving Dogtooth Road will be provided by the Town of Golden for a 1.7 km section and Golden Golf and Country Club for the remaining 
.5 km section. This is being completed as part of a $1,238,095 contract that the ministry has let for paving Dogtooth Road. 

jones Road, Asphalt Recycling 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 15, sec. 22(1)). The Town of 
Qualicum Beach has agreed to contribute $12,350 as their share of the asphalt recycling on Jones Road. The ministry's contribution will 
be $10,000, which is provided for in the Highway Rehabilitation funding. 

Highway 19 at Pym Road, Signalization 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)) to recover 
costs from the City of Parksville for the controller and electrical works for the project. 

20th Avenue (Yellowhead Highway) and Spruce Street, Traffic Signal Installation 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)). The City of 
Prince George has agreed to contribute 50% of the total project cost of traffic signal installation at the 20th Avenue and Spruce Street inter¬ 
section. The present traffic and pedestrian volumes warrant protected pedestrian crossing and proposed developments warrant full actu¬ 
ated two phase traffic signals. The ministry portion will be covered through the Highway Rehabilitation funding. 

Kenney Street Signalization 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)). The City of 
Terrace has agreed to contribute 32.857% of the total project cost of traffic signal installation at Highway 1 6 and Kenney Street intersec¬ 
tion. The ministry's portion is included in the Highway Rehabilitation vote. 

BC Tel, Quality Assurance Fiber Optic Cable 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1 981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)). BC Tele¬ 
phone has agreed to contribute 100% of the total project cost of restoring the shoulders of the highway to ministry standards on Highway 
1 6. This work is required due to BC Telephone completing the East West leg of their new Fiber Optic communications cable within the 
highway right-of-way. 

8th and 116th, Intersection Improvements 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)). The intersec¬ 
tion of 8th and 11 6th in the City of Dawson Creek was identified as an intersection with a relatively high collision risk. A comprehensive 
traffic operations review was initiated with the goal of reducing the collision risk at the intersection. The review recommended safety inter¬ 
section improvements that were to be cost shared between the ministry, the Insurance Corporation of British Columbia (ICBC) and the City 
of Dawson Creek. 

Front and Poplar Intersection 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 15, sec. 22(1)) to provide ac¬ 
cess to the Chako Mika Mall parking lot at its east end, where there are strong traffic movements. Due to the number of vehicles turning 
(230 vehicles per hour) this intersection warrants the installation of a traffic signal. The City of Nelson has agreed to pay 33.33%, the minis¬ 
try's portion is being provided through the Highway Rehabilitation funding. 

Traffic Controller, Highway 11 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)). Chard Retail 
Development Ltd has agreed to pay for the installation of a traffic controller at the new intersection on Highway 11, south of Marshall 
Creek in the City of Abbotsford, as part of the highway upgrade required for a commercial development adjacent to the highway. 

Highway 97, Paving 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)). At the re¬ 
quest of BC Telephone, the ministry milled and repaved a trench across Highway 97 to allow for the installation of new telephone ducting. 
BC Telephone has agreed to pay for this work. 

Route 19 at Duke Point Ferry Terminal and Public Access to Doman Industries, Nanaimo 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 15, sec. 22(1)) to recover 
costs from the British Columbia Ferry Corporation for the costs associated with the purchase of traffic signal equipment for this intersec¬ 
tion, which they are constructing. 



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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Transfer of the MV Vesuvius Queen 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)). At the re¬ 
quest of the British Columbia Ferry Corporation, the ministry's Marine Branch staffed the MV Vesuvius Queen when it was transferred 
from Albion to Deas Dock and Swartz Bay, and when it was transferred back to Albion. The Corporation agreed to reimburse the ministry 
100% of the salary and travel costs associated with transferring the vessel. 

Electronic Road Weather Station 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 15, sec. 22(1)) for one Elec¬ 
tronic Road Weather Station to be developed and installed for the delivery of data from the Snow Avalanche Program's weather network 
for the duration of Emcon Services Inc's contract for the Okanagan Shuswap Road and Bridge Maintenance area and for the Kootenay 
Boundary Road and Bridge Maintenance area. Emcon Services Inc has agreed to contribute 100% of the total electronic component costs 
to develop and install the Road Weatherstation and for the annual road temperature and condition forecasts. The ministry will manage the 
project and provide technical expertise and maintenance support. 

Snow Plowing Residential Driveways 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 15, sec. 22(1)). The ministry 
is providing a snow plowing service to the residents in various areas by having the Maintenance Contractors plow their driveways. The 
ministry will phase this service out over a three year period. This fiscal year the ministry will charge $10.00 per residence per plowing and 
wishes to recover these funds to vote. The change in service level is comparable to the municipalities; that is, all private residents are re¬ 
sponsible for their own driveway snow clearing. 

Railway Crossing Upgrade 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1 981, chap. 15, sec. 22(1)). The City of 
Surrey has agreed to cost-share the upgrade of the railway crossing at Highway 10 and 168th Street. The ministry's portion will be pro¬ 
vided by the Highway Rehabilitation funding. 

Canada Way Corridor 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 15, sec. 22(1)). The City of 
Burnaby has agreed to cost share the cost of traffic improvements along Canada Way Corridor at the Edmonds and Imperial intersections. 
These improvements will improve traffic flow and reduce congestion, providing better safety for pedestrians and vehicles. The ministry's 
portion is provided for in the Capital Construction Program funding. 

Motor Carrier Regulatory Reform Workshop 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 15, sec. 22(1)). The Motor 
Carrier Regulatory Reform Workshop held in Richmond, covered the meal expenses for the participants, who have reimbursed the minis¬ 
try for those meals. The ministry needs to recover these costs as they were not included in the budget for the workshop. 

Barnett Hastings Capital Project 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 15, sec. 22(1)). The City of 
Burnaby has agreed to reimburse $ 142,000 for the work completed by the ministry as part of the Barnett Hastings Capital Project. At the 
same time the City of Burnaby completed $135,81 6 of work on behalf of the ministry as part of the same project. The net difference of 
$6,1 84 is to be recovered from the City of Burnaby. The ministry's portion of the costs is provided for in the Highway Capital Program fund¬ 
ing. 

Sanitary Sewer Sleeve 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 15, sec. 22(1)). The District 
of Langford has agreed to pay costs for the work the ministry did for a sanitary sewer sleeve at the Millstream Interchange on the Trans Can¬ 
ada Highway on the Vancouver Island Highway Project. 

Utility Relocations 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 15, sec. 22(1)). Tom Harris 
Chevrolet has agreed to reimburse the ministry for the installation of servicing pipes to their property. This work was undertaken by the 
contractor, North Pacific Roadbuilders, as part of the Nanaimo Parkway Project. 

Landscape Development 

Phis account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act( S.B.C. 1981, chap. 15, sec. 22(1)). The City of 
Kamloops has agreed to cost share the landscape development at Columbia Street and Notre Dame Drive. 

Design Omission, Spencer Road to Highland Road 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)). Due to a de¬ 
sign error, the consultant, Reid Crowther, has admitted liability and has agreed to pay all additional costs resulting from the oversight. 

Audible Signals, Highway 19 and St. George Street 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)). The City of 
Nanaimo has agreed to pay the costs of the audible signals and installation at Highway 19 and St. George Street. 







PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


C 121 


CounterAttack, Television Production 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)). The Insur¬ 
ance Corporation of British Columbia has agreed to contribute a portion of the total project cost as a partner in the Enhanced CounterAt¬ 
tack Roadcheck Enforcement Campaign, and to ensure the successful introduction of two Traffic Safety Initiatives Programs, 
Administrative Driving Prohibition and Vehicle Impoundment. The ministry's portion is included in the Motor Vehicle Branch sub-vote. 

Route 1 9A and Jingle Pot Road 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)) to recover 
costs of the installation of fire pre-emption equipment. 

Route 19A and Hammond Bay Road 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 15, sec. 22(1)) to recover 
costs of the installation of fire pre-emption equipment. 

Seymour Creek Study 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)) to recover 
costs of the Seymour Creek traffic study from the Squamish Nation. Ministry's portion is included in Highway Operations sub-vote. 

Cranberry/Harewood Sewer 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1 981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)) to recover 
costs for a sanitary sewer crossing of the Nanaimo Parkway from the City of Nanaimo and Country View Estates. Ministry's portion is in¬ 
cluded in Recoverable Highway Capital Program. 

Highway 10 at 1 32nd Street, Left Turn Signal 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)) to recover 
costs for the installation of a traffic signal on Highway 10 at 1 32 nd Street from the City of Surrey. Ministry's portion is included in Highway 
Rehabilitation Program. 

National Safety Code 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)) to recover 
costs incurred in the development and monitoring of commercial carrier safety code standards from the federal government. 

Traffic Signal Installations 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1 981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)) to recover 
costs for the installation of traffic signals for the City of Surrey, City of Coquitlam, Township of Langley and the Corporation of Delta and 
the City of Burnaby. Ministry's portion is included in Highway Rehabilitation Program. 

Signal Upgrade, Highway 99 at Lorimer 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)) to recover 
costs for the signal upgrade and other improvements at the Highway 99 and Lorimer intersection from the Resort Municipality of Whistler. 
Ministry's portion is included in Highway Rehabilitation Program. 

Motor Vehicle Branch/Insurance Corporation of British Columbia Operations 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)) to recover 
costs of operational expenditures for the Motor Vehicle Branch from November 1 8, 1996 (the date of the merger of certain Motor Vehicle 
Branch functions with ICBC) to March 31,1997 from ICBC. 

MVB/ICBC, Traffic Safety Initiatives 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)) to recover 
costs of the development and operational expenditures for the group of traffic safety projects known collectively as the "Traffic Safety Ini¬ 
tiatives" from ICBC. 

Tsable River Bridge, Insurance Claim 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1 981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)) to recover 
costs of remedial work performed by a contractor to correct a design error made by the consultant. 

Watkiss Way Sewer Casing 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)) to recover 
costs of the installation of a sewer casing under Watkiss Way from the Greater Victoria School District #61. Ministry's portion included in 
Recoverable Highway Capital Contruction Program. 

Trans Canada Highway, Supply of Gravel 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)) to recover 
costs for the provision of gravel to the Greater Victoria Water District for parking lot construction. 



C 122 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Sign Shop Recovery 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 22(1)) to allow 
Highways Sign Shop to recover monies from third parties. 

Commission Fees on Collection 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Acf (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 11 (2)) to provide for 
commission expenses paid to collection agencies for collecting outstanding accounts receivable. 

Write-Off of Bad Debts 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 15, sec. 14(1)). 

Valuation Allowance 

This account was established under the authority of the Financial Administration Act (S.B.C. 1981, chap. 1 5, sec. 14(1)). 

Women's Equality 

Vote 55—Minister's Office 

This vote provides for the Office of the Minister of Women's Equality, and includes the salaries of the minister, the minister's staff and re¬ 
lated office expenses. 

Vote 56—Ministry Operations 

This vote provides for ministry programs and activities, including: 

(a) Ministry Support 

This sub-vote provides for executive direction for the ministry, and for financial, personnel, training, information, administration, commu¬ 
nications and public education services. 

(b) Policy, Planning and Evaluation 

This sub-vote provides for: the review and research of issues affecting women; the coordination and development of policy and legislation 
related to women's equality programs and initiatives, including participation in federal/provincial discussions and initiatives; the review of 
government-wide policy proposals and their impact on women; advice to ministries in their review and analysis of existing and proposed poli¬ 
cies, legislation and programs; and the evaluation of related programs and initiatives. 

(c) Program 

This sub-vote provides for: 

(i) Child Care —provides for programs development, management and support; grants and contributions for programs to stabilize, sup¬ 
port and expand the child care system; program support for children with special needs; and day care subsidies to low income fami¬ 
lies to assit in meeting their child care costs. 

(ii) Stopping the Violence —provides for policy and program development including violence prevention and advice to other ministries 
on violence issues; Transition House shelter and counselling programs, including contributions to the Provincial Rental Housing 
Corporation to assist in establishing Transition Houses; and contributions to promote equality for women, access to local services 
and other community-based equity initiatives. 

(iii) Community Programs —provides for ministry regional operations linking women in the community with ministry programs and other 
government initiatives. 

Other Appropriations 

Vote 57—Management of Public Funds and Debt (Minister of Finance and Corporate Relations) 

This vote provides for the cost of managing public funds and debt, and includes the following: 

(a) Cost of Borrowing for Government Purposes 

This sub-vote provides for the cost of interest on the direct debt of the province incurred for government purposes, and for associated costs 
and fees charged for the borrowing and management of government funds and debt instruments. Recoveries from the use of financial instru¬ 
ments such as interest rate swaps and forward rate agreements and interest revenue earned from prefunding operations are offset against the re¬ 
lated interest expenditure. 

(b) Cost of Hedging Interest on Debt Guaranteed by the Province 

This sub-vote provides for the cost of financial instruments used to hedge interest on debt of government bodies guaranteed by the prov¬ 
ince, and all associated costs. These costs are fully recovered from the government bodies. Recoveries from the use of financial instruments 
such as interest rate swaps and forward rate agreements are offset against the related interest expenditure. 






PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


C 123 


(c) Cost of Borrowing for Relending to Government Bodies 

This sub-vote provides for the cost of interest on borrowings under the fiscal agency program, and all associated costs. These costs are fully 
recovered from government bodies. Recoveries from the use of financial instruments such as interest rate swaps and forward rate agreements 
are offset against the related interest expenditure. 

(d) Provincial Treasury Revenue Program 

This sub-vote provides for costs associated with special revenue programs. The programs are structured so that interest (and other earn¬ 
ings) on program assets exceed interest (and other payments) on program liabilities. Any profit or loss is transferred to the Provincial Treasury 
Revenue Special Account. Recoveries may be made from investment earnings of the Consolidated Revenue Fund. Recoveries from the use of fi¬ 
nancial instruments such as interest rate swaps and forward rate agreements are offset against the related interest expenditure. 

(e) Cost of Unallocated Borrowing Under the Warehouse Program 

This sub-vote provides for costs associated with debt issued in advance of requirements. At the time of borrowing, the debt has not been al¬ 
located to the province or any government body. The program is structured so that interest (and other earnings) on program assets offset interest 
(and other payments) on program liabilities. Recoveries from the use of financial instruments such as interest rate swaps and forward rate agree¬ 
ments are offset against the related interest expenditure. When debt is assumed by the government or a government body, the borrower as¬ 
sumes all liabilities and receives all assets associated with an issue. There is no profit or loss associated with the program. 

Vote 58—Contingencies (All Ministries) and New Programs (Minister of Finance and Corporate Relations) 

This vote provides additional funding for items budgeted in other votes to accommodate the financial consequences of unanticipated and 
contingent events. Unanticipated events include developments during the year that could not be reasonably anticipated when the budget is 
prepared. Contingent events include developments that could be anticipated but not with enough certainty to make a reasonable estimate of 
budget costs, or where final costs are dependent on a pending decision by government or another party. 

This vote also provides for unanticipated events not budgeted in other votes, but which are consistent with the general purposes of those 
votes. This includes natural disasters, emergency relief and assistance for those in need. Ex gratia payments are also provided for. 

In addition, this vote provides for funding of new government programs, and for salary and benefits funding for program initiatives. 

Vote 59—BC Benefits (Minister of Finance and Corporate Relations) 

This vote provides for: administrative costs of BC Benefits; grant and contribution funding for an additional monthly payment to the most 
needy seniors who receive the federal Guaranteed Income Supplement or Spouse's Allowance; and for subsidized bus passes for senior citi¬ 
zens and handicapped persons who qualify for income assistance benefits or the federal Guaranteed Income Supplement, or are sponsored by 
Indian and Northern Affairs Canada. This vote also provides funding for BC Family Bonus payments to low income families with children. Re¬ 
coveries are received from the sale of bus passes to eligible persons. 

Vote 60—Corporate Accounting System (Minister of Finance and Corporate Relations) 

This vote provides for the development, implementation, operation and maintenance of a corporate accounting system for government 
and for associated administration costs.Recoveries are received from ministries and Crown corporations for accounting system services. 

Vote 61—Environmental Assessment and Land Use Coordination 

This vote provides for a process for the environmental assessment of major projects, as outlined in the Environmental Assessment Act, for 
coordination of corporate land use strategies, planning and projects, and for corporate resource inventory initiatives. Functions related to these 
activities include: 

(a) Environmental Assessment Office 

This sub-vote provides for the overall administration of a neutral and publicly open process for the assessment of the environmental, eco¬ 
nomic, social, cultural, heritage and health effects of major project proposals. Contributions are made to participants in project assessments 
who would be unable to participate without financial assistance. 

(b) Land Use Coordination Office 

This sub-vote provides for interministry program coordination of corporate land use strategies, planning and projects including the pro¬ 
tected areas strategy. Contributions are made to participants in planning processes who would be unable to participate without financial assis¬ 
tance. 

(c) Corporate Resource Inventory Initiative 

This sub-vote provides for the collection, analysis and management of biophysical, cultural, archaeological, social and economic infor¬ 
mation in support of land use planning and resource management activities including negotiations with First Nations. Contributions are pro¬ 
vided to First Nations for program-related work. 

Vote 62—Environmental Boards and Forest Appeals Commission 
(Minister of Environment, Lands and Parks; Minister of Forests) 

This vote provides for: 

(a) Environmental Appeal Board 

This sub-vote provides for operation of the Environmental Appeal Board, which hears appeals to decisions made under environmental 
legislation. Costs related to some appeals are recovered from the Ministry of Health. 




C 124 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


(b) Environmental Assessment Board 

This sub-vote provides for independent public hearings on project proposals under the Environmental Assessment Act, for reviews of mat¬ 
ters referred by the Minister of Environment, Lands and Parks and for reviews of activities under other enactments. Contributions are provided 
to participants in public hearings who would be unable to participate without financial assistance. 

(c) Forest Appeals Commission 

This sub-vote provides for operation of the Forest Appeals Commission in meeting the requirements of Part 9 of the Forest Practices Code 
of British Columbia Act, including hearing appeals under the Act, evaluating how the Act, regulations and standards are functioning, and rec¬ 
ommending amendments. 

Vote 63—Forest Practices Board (Minister of Forests; Minister of Environment, Lands and Parks) 

This vote provides for the operation of the Forest Practices Board in meeting the requirements of Part 8 of the Forest Practices Code of Brit¬ 
ish Columbia Act, including independent audits and special investigations of forest practices, investigations of public complaints, and reviews 
of administrative decisions. 

Vote 64—Office of the Police Complaints Commissioner (Minister of Attorney General and Minister Responsi¬ 
ble for Multiculturalism, Human Rights and Immigration) 

This vote provides for the salaries of the Police Complaints Commissioner and staff and the costs incurred by the office of the Police Com¬ 
plaints Commissioner in dealing with complaints against municipal police. 

Vote 65—Public Sector Employers' Council (Minister of Finance and Corporate Relations) 

This vote provides for operation of the Public Sector Employers' Council and the Council Secretariat, as established under the Public Sec¬ 
tor Employers Act, 1993, and includes salaries and remuneration of the secretariat staff and related expenses. The council sets and coordinates 
strategic directions in human resource management and labour relations, and advises government with respect to human resource issues in the 
public sector. 

Vote 66—Public Service Employee Relations Commission (Minister of Finance and Corporate Relations) 

This vote provides for the activities of the Commission related to human resource management, labour relations, collective bargaining, 
and employee benefits administration and contributions. 

(a) Commission Operations 

This sub-vote provides for strategic human resource management, labour relations and collective bargaining, which include: 

(i) negotiation and administration of collective agreements on behalf of government, settlement payments for grievances, other person¬ 
nel-related settlements, and payment for legal and arbitration services; 

(ii) development, implementation and monitoring of human resource policies and programs, government-wide training and develop¬ 
ment programs, staffing including workforce adjustment, employment equity strategies and programs within the public service, 
compensation, job evaluation and organization, corporate human resource information and payroll services, career planning and 
career transition services, and organizational change initiatives; and 

(iii) grants provided to government employees under the employee recognition programs. 

Recoveries are received from ministries, special offices and Crown corporations for training and development costs, costs associated with 
career planning and career transition services and the Corporate Human Resource Payroll System. 

(b) Employee Benefits Management and Administration, Pension Contributions and Retirement Benefits 

This sub-vote provides for the management and administration of employee benefit plans and employer contributions, including: 

(i) Provincial Pensions —provides for employer contributions as required under the Pension (Public Service) Act and retirement bene¬ 
fits; 

(ii) Miscellaneous Statutory Items —provides for the employer's minor statutory requirements under the Pension (Public Service) Act 
such as payments for purchase or reinstatement of service; 

(iii) Canada Pension —provides for employer contributions to the Canada Pension Plan; 

(iv) Members of the Legislative Assembly Superannuation —provides for government contributions as required by the Legislative Assem¬ 
bly Allowances and Pension Act; 

(v) Death and Retiring Benefits —provides for death benefits to nominated beneficiaries of participating pensioners and retirement al¬ 
lowances granted to eligible employees; 

(vi) Extended Health and Dental Benefits —provides for employer costs for the extended health and dental plan; 

(vii) Croup Insurance —provides for employer costs for the group life insurance plan; 

(viii) Medical Services Plan —provides for full payment by the employer of employees' and pensioners' medical services plan premiums; 

(ix) Long Term Disability —provides for employer contributions to the British Columbia Public Service Long Term Disability Fund; 

(x) Unemployment Insurance —provides for employer costs for unemployment insurance premiums; 

(xi) Workers' Compensation —provides for employer costs of benefits paid to eligible employees by the Workers' Compensation Board; 

(xii) Employee Assistance Program Administration —provides for counselling services to government employees; and 

(xiii) Other Benefits —provides for severance settlements and other miscellaneous benefits and related payments, and benefits manage¬ 
ment and administration. 

Recoveries are received from those public bodies which participate in the above plans and, in certain circumstances, from employ¬ 
ees. As well, recoveries are received from participating public bodies for employer contributions made on their behalf by govern- 







PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


C 125 


ment's central pay office. Recoveries are also received from special offices and ministries for pension contributions and retirement 
benefits, and employee health, insurance and other benefits of employees covered by these plans and receiving these benefits. 

Vote 67—Office of the Transition Commissioner for Child and Youth Services (Minister of Human Resources) 

This vote provides for the operation of the Office of the Transition Commissioner for Child and Youth Services. 

The Commissioner reports to the Premier and is mandated by an Order in Council under the Public Service Act to design, recommend and 
implement a new child and youth services system. 

Special Accounts 

Insurance and Risk Management 

This account was established by the Financial Administration Amendment Act, 1989, and provides insurance and/or risk manage¬ 
ment services to government bodies, ministries, public authorities, and classes of persons and public authorities designated by regulation. 
The account is administered by the Ministry of Finance and Corporate Relations. 

Revenues and recoveries represent amounts paid into the account by or in respect of participants under agreements, earnings of the 
account, the cost of services provided to or on behalf of participants, amounts required to be paid under regulation or amounts appropri¬ 
ated for that purpose. Revenues are received from government entities not included in the Consolidated Revenue Fund. Expenditures are 
for administrative costs associated with risk management services; and costs related to agreements or arrangements for risk management 
services, purchases of insurance, and/or self-insurance services provided to government bodies, ministries, public authorities, persons, 
hospitals, regional health boards, community health councils, schools, colleges, and universities for investigation and settlement of 
claims. Recoveries are received from government entities included in the Consolidated Revenue Fund, and are netted against expendi¬ 
tures. 

No financing transactions are provided for under this account. 

South Moresby Implementation—Forestry Compensation 

This account was established by the South Moresby Implementation Account Act, 1988 and is administered by the Ministry of For¬ 
ests. The purpose of the account is to provide for acquisition of third party forest interests associated with the proposed national park on 
South Moresby Island. 

The account may be credited with contributions from the General Fund, the federal government and accrued interest. Expenditures 
may be made for acquisition of third party forest interests associated with the proposed national park on South Moresby Island and to cover 
costs associated with making such acquisitions. 

No financing transactions are provided for under this account. 




C 126 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Natural Resource Community Fund 
Balance Sheet 
as at March 31, 1997 

(Unaudited) 


Assets 

Investment portfolio (Note 4) 


Net Equity 

Net equity (Note 2) 


In Millions 

1997 

1996 

Expense 

Expenditure 

Expenditure 

Basis 

Basis 

Basis 

$ 

$ 

$ 

25 

25 

25 

25 

25 

25 


25 

25 

25 

25 

25 

25 


The accompanying notes and supplementary statement are an integral part of these financial statements. 


























PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


C 127 


Natural Resource Community Fund Statement of Operations 
for the Fiscal Year Ended March 31, 1997 

(Unaudited) 


Revenue 

Income from investments 
Other revenues (Note 5). 

Total Revenue. 


Expense/Expenditure 

Community Assistance (Note 6). 

Transfer to General Fund (Note 7). 

Total Expenditure. 

Net Operating Revenue for the Year 


In Millions 

1997 

1996 

Expense 

Expenditure 

Expenditure 

Basis 

Basis 

Basis 

$ 

$ 

$ 

1 

1 

2 

12 

12 

9 

13 

13 

11 


13 

13 

11 

13 

13 

11 

0 

0 

0 


The accompanying notes and supplementary statement are an integral part of these financial statements. 

































C 128 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Notes to Natural Resource Community Fund Financial Statements 
for the Fiscal Year Ended March 31, 1997 
(Unaudited) 


1. Significant Accounting Policies 

(a) Reporting Entity 

The Natural Resource Community Fund is a special fund, for purposes of the Financial Administration Act, established pursuant to the 
Natural Resource Community Fund Act. Its purpose is to assist communities that are largely dependent on a single resource industry to adjust to 
severe economic dislocation arising or that may arise as a result of business closures or industry workforce reductions. 

(b) Basis of Accounting and Specific Policies 

The basis of accounting and specific policies are as stated in the Significant Accounting Policies note in the Consolidated Revenue Fund Fi¬ 
nancial Statements. 


In Millions 

1997 1996 


2. Net Equity 

Expense 

Expenditure 

Expenditure 

Basis 

Basis 

Basis 


$ 

$ 

$ 

Net equity at beginning of the year. 

Net operating revenue for the year. 

. 25 

25 

25 

Net equity at end of the year. 

. 25 

25 

25 


3. Commencement of Fund 

Effective April 1, 1992, the Natural Resource Community Fund came into force. Subsequently $1 5 million was transferred from the British 
Columbia Endowment Fund into the fund. 


4. Investment Portfolio 

The investment portfolio consists of units of the Province of British Columbia Pooled Investment Portfolios. 


5. Other Revenues 

Other Revenues equate to 0.5% of all revenues, other than fines, under all the following Acts: Coal Act; Geothermal Resources Act; Log¬ 
ging Tax Act; Mineral Tax Act; Mineral Land Tax Act; Mineral Tenure Act; Mines Act; Mining Tax Act; Petroleum and Natural Gas Act; and, 
Range Act. 


6. Community Assistance 

During 1996/97 assistance was provided to the following community: 


Port Hardy 


1996/97 

$ 

39,155 


7. Transfer to the General Fund 

Under the Natural Resource Community Fund Act, section 6, at the end of the fiscal year any balance in the special fund in excess of $25 
million is transferred to and becomes part of the General Fund. 






















PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


C 129 


Consolidated Revenue Fund 
Statement of Full Time Equivalent (FTE) Employment 
for the Fiscal Year Ended March 31, 1997^ 

(Unaudited) 


Legislation. 

Auditor General. 

Child Advocate. 

Elections B.C. 

Information and Privacy. 

Ombudsman. 

Office of the Premier. 

Aboriginal Affairs. 

Agriculture. 

Attorney General. 

Education. 

Employment and Investment. 

Environment. 

Finance. 

Forests. 

Health. 

Labour. 

Municipal Affairs. 

Small Business. 

Human Resources (Social Services) .... 

Transportation. 

Women's Equality. 

Other Appropriations. 

Across government students and other 


Estimated 

Actual 

Under(Over) 

33 

32 

1 

89 

88 

1 

7 

6 

1 

48 

45 

3 

25 

23 

2 

50 

47 

3 

38 

37 

1 

175 

160 

15 

471 

454 

17 

6,363 

6,402 

(39) 

1,083 

1,001 

82 

655 

596 

59 

2,325 

2,415 

(90) 

2,759 

2,609 

150 

4,660 

4,997 

(337) 

4,720 

5,795 

(1,075) 

261 

254 

7 

493 

473 

20 

832 

800 

32 

5,297 

5,331 

(34) 

3,071 

3,295 

(224) 

295 

276 

19 

399 

358 

41 

512 

503 

9 

34,661 

35,997 

( 1 , 336 ) 


'This statement was prepared using information provided by the Public Service Employee Relations Commission and does not include the government reor¬ 
ganization. The FTE staff utilization is prepared on the basis of all employees appointed under the Public Service Act. 








































Statutory Spending Authorities 
as at March 31, 1997 

(Unaudited) 


C 130 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 





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C 131 


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C 134 


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PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


C 135 


1 

Ministry Related Financing Transactions —Summary 
for the Fiscal Year Ended March 31, 1997 

(Unaudited) 


Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food 

Agricultural Land Development (Special Account). 

This program, provided under the Agricultural Credit Act is 
terminated for 1996/97. No new loans will be issued, there¬ 
fore, no disbursements are required. Receipts represent esti¬ 
mated repayments of outstanding loan principal. Outstanding 
loans totalling $15.0 million will be continued. 

Columbia Basin Trust. 

Advances (disbursements), authorized by Section 21 of the Fi¬ 
nancial Administration Act, are provided to the Columbia Ba¬ 
sin Trust, for economic, social and environmental 
investments in theColumbia-Kootenay region in accordance 
with the Columbia Basin Trust Act. 

Crop Insurance Stabilization. 

Advances (disbursements) are provided to cover deficits in 
the Crop Insurance Trust Account that may arise due to 
payment of indemnity claims in excess of premiums and 
other revenue in the Trust Account. These advances are to 
be fully recovered from Crop Insurance Program premium 
revenue in subsequent years (receipts). 


-Actual— 

Receipts Disbursements 

~$ r~ 


2,425,621 


45,000,000 


Ministry of Attorney General and Ministry Responsible for 
Multiculturalism, Human Rights and Immigration 

Interest on Trusts and Deposits. 914,550 914,550 

Interest (disbursements) is credited to certain trust funds 
and deposits belonging to third parties, which are held by 
and are under the general administration or trusteeship of 
the province, on the basis of earnings received (receipts) 
from the investment of these funds or as specified by pro¬ 
vincial statutes. Administration costs are funded through 
the ministry's voted appropriations. 

Ministry of Employment and Investment 

Industrial Incentive Fund (Special Account). 5,336,923 70,065,271 

Loans and investments (disbursements) are provided to stimu¬ 
late private sector investment and development for key sec¬ 
tors and projects under the Industrial Development Incentive 
Act. Loans and investments may also be provided from the ac¬ 
count to support economic plans of the Job Protection Com¬ 
mission. Receipts represent loan repayments. 


Ministry of Environment, Lands and Parks 

Crown Land (Special Account). 819,496 202,480 

Disbursements reflect recoverable disbursements associated 
with land acquisition, servicing and development. Receipts 
represent repayment of loan principal and deposits made on 
pending sales. 


Source 

(Requirement) 

$ 

2,425,621 

(45,000,000) 


(64,728,348) 


617,016 














C 136 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


■t 

Ministry Related Financing Transactions —Summary 
for the Fiscal Year Ended March 31, 1997— Continued 

(Unaudited) 


--Actu a I-- 

Receipts 2 Disbursements 


Ministry of Finance and Corporate Relations 

Provincial Home Acquisition (Special Account). 1,781,636 292,719 

Disbursements represent new conversion mortgages, repur¬ 
chased mortgage accounts and guarantee claims paid under 
the Mortgage Assistance Program. Receipts represent repay¬ 
ment of outstanding mortgage loan principal. 

International Fuel Tax Agreement. 4,086,133 4,086,133 

Advances (disbursements) are provided by the province to 
other International Fuel Tax Agreement jurisdictions in re¬ 
spect of the monies (receipts) collected on their behalf by 
the Ministry of Finance and Corporate Relations. Admin¬ 
istration costs are funded through the ministry's voted ap¬ 
propriations. 

Land Tax Deferment Act . 17,276,884 17,276,884 

Disbursements represent reimbursements to local gov¬ 
ernments by the province for property taxes, of those 
over 60 years of age and other qualified property owners, 
that are deferred under this Act. The property owner or 
the estate is required to repay to the province all deferred 
taxes together with interest on the termination of the 
agreement. Receipts represent repayments of outstand¬ 
ing principal (taxes deferred exclusive of interest). Inter¬ 
est is credited to the Consolidated Revenue Fund as 
revenue, and administration costs are funded through 
the ministry's voted appropriations. 

Low Interest Loan Assistance. 

Disbursements represent capitalized administrative costs 
relating to loans that were made under the Low Interest 
Loan Assistance Program. Most of the loan portfolio was 
sold to private sector lenders in 1989/90. Receipts repre¬ 
sent principal payments on retained loans. No new loan 
authorizations are being made. 

Rural Area Property Taxes. 135,214,201 135,214,201 

Advances (disbursements) are provided by the province to 
local governments and entities in rural areas in respect of 
local taxes and levies (receipts) collected on their behalf by 
the Ministry of Finance and Corporate Relations. Admin¬ 
istration costs are funded through voted appropriations. 


Ministry of Health and Ministry Responsible for Seniors 

Health Innovation Incentive Program. 7,392,029 6,909,201 

Loans (disbursements) are provided to stimulate investment 
in innovation by British Columbia hospitals and other 
health agencies. Receipts represent repayment of the loans 
through efficiency savings. Administrative costs are funded 
through the ministry's voted appropriations. 


Source 

(Requirement) 

$ 


1,488,917 


482,828 















V 

•• 


PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


C 137 


Ministry Related Financing Transactions 1 —Summary 
for the Fiscal Year Ended March 31, 1997— Continued 

(Unaudited) 


Ministry of Human Resources 

Social Services Agencies Restructure Program. 

Loans (disbursements) are provided to stimulate invest¬ 
ment in efficiencies and innovation by British Columbia 
community social service agencies. Receipts represent re¬ 
payment of the loans through efficiency savings. Admin¬ 
istration costs are funded through the ministry's voted 
appropriations. 


Receipts 2 


Actual 


Disbursements 

~~v~ 


Source 

(Requirement) 

$ 


Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing 

Social Housing. 

Advances (disbursements) are provided by the Provincial 
Rental Housing Corporation to acquire sites, on behalf of 
the province, for social housing projects. Receipts repre¬ 
sent funds received through prepaid leases from non-profit 
organizations. 


Ministry of Small Business, Tourism and Culture 

Small Business Incentive Program (Special Account). 1,245,195 1,245,195 

Loans (disbursements) are provided to assist small business in¬ 
vestment in aquaculture and industrial production facilities 
and equipment under the Small Business Incentives Subsidi¬ 
ary Agreement and other programs. Loans may also be pro¬ 
vided to support the economic plans of the Job Protection 
Commission. 

Total Financing Transactions. 176,492,668 279,961,439 (103,468,771) 


^he purpose of this table is to show the receipts and disbursements for major financing transactions related to ministry programs, or administered by minis¬ 
tries, in order to fully disclose the government's financial transactions and provide documentation for the Supply Act which authorizes these transactions. Financ¬ 
ing transactions do not affect operating revenue or expenditure or change the net equity of the province. The exception would be concessionary loans. 
Concessionary loans are those granted at an interest rate less than market rate. The present value of the difference is considered as a grant and an expense of the pe¬ 
riod. They do, however, change the composition of the province's assets between cash and loans and other investments. As a result, they either increase or decrease 
the government's cash or borrowing requirements. Though listed as financing transactions, financial transfers to BC Transit, BC Transportation Financing Authority 
and Forest Renewal BC are not included in this schedule. These transactions are reported in the revenue portion of the Statement of Operations as transfers from 
revenue. 

Receipts represent only the recovery of the original advance, investment or loan principal (disbursements). Interest earned on outstanding advances, invest¬ 
ments or loans is credited to the appropriate Special Account or to the main operating account revenue. 




































Detailed Schedules of Payments 
for the Fiscal Year Ended March 31, 1997 

(Unaudited) 

Contents 

Page 

Ministry Abbreviations. 3 

Summary of Payments. 4 

Members of the Legislative Assembly Schedule of Indemnities and Allowances. 5 

Schedules of Salary and Travel Expenses for: 

Ministers. 8 

Deputy Ministers and Associate Deputy Ministers. 8 

Order-In-Council, Other Appointees and Employees not Appointed under the Public Service Act . 9 

Other Employees. 15 

Grants and Contributions. 55 

Other Suppliers.215 






























PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


D 3 


Ministry Abbreviations 

In order to reduce words in the Public Accounts, ministries referred to in this section may be shown as follows: 


Ministry Name 


May be shown as 


Legislation. 

Auditor General. 

Office of the Child, Youth and Family Advocate. 

Conflict of Interest Commissioner. 

Elections B.C. 

Information and Privacy Commissioner. 

Ombudsman. 

Office of the Premier. 

Ministry of Aboriginal Affairs. 

Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food. 

Ministry of Attorney General and Ministry Responsible for Multiculturalism, Fluman Rights 

and Immigration. 

Ministry for Children and Families. 

Ministry of Education, Skills and Training. 

Ministry of Employment and Investment. 

Ministry of Environment, Lands and Parks. 

Ministry of Finance and Corporate Relations and Ministry Responsible for Intergovernmen¬ 
tal Relations. 

Ministry of Forests. 

Ministry of Health and Ministry Responsible for Seniors. 

Ministry of Labour. 

Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing. 

Ministry of Small Business, Tourism and Culture. 

Ministry of Human Resources. 

Ministry of Transportation and Highways. 

Ministry of Women's Equality. 

Other Appropriations. 


Legislation 
Auditor General 
Child Advocate 
Conflict of Interest 
Elections B.C. 

Information and Privacy 
Ombudsman 
Office of the Premier 
Aboriginal Affairs 
Agriculture 

Attorney General 
Children and Families 
Education 

Employment and Investment 
Environment 

Finance 

Forests 

Health 

Labour 

Municipal Affairs 
Small Business 
Human Resources 
Transportation 
Women's Equality 
Other Appropriations 






























D 4 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Consolidated Revenue Fund 
Summary of Payments 
for the Fiscal Year Ended March 31, 1997 

(Unaudited) 


$ 

Salary 1 

Members of the Legislative Assembly Indemnities and Allowances. 4,314,002 

Ministers. 565,598 

Deputy Ministers and Associate Deputy Ministers. 3,377,050 

Order-in-Council, other appointees and employees not appointed under the Public Service Act.... 57,234,382 

Other employees—gross salary of $50,000 or more. 578,853,91 3 

Other employees—gross salary of less than $50,000. 1,099,767,526 

Benefits. 415,453,886 


$ 


2,159,566,357 


Travel 

Ministers. 352,421 

Deputy Ministers and Associate Deputy Ministers. 457,655 

Order-in-Council, other appointees and employees not appointed under the Public Service Act.... 3,061,056 

Other employees—gross salary of $50,000 or more. 28,725,297 

Other employees—gross salary of less than $50,000. 25,553,588 


58,150,017 


Grants and Contributions 

Recipients of $ 10,000 or more. 

Recipients of less than $ 10,000. 

Grants and contributions recoveries 


16,092,277,071 

50,131,194 

(29,739,108) 

16,112,669,157 


Other Suppliers 


Suppliers which received $10,000 or more. 3,903,622,814 

Suppliers which received less than $10,000. 207,451,682 

Transfer of benefits to salary listing. (41 5,453,886) 

Advances to local governments in rural areas recovered from property taxes collected by the prov¬ 
ince. (134,656,795) 

Other supplier recoveries. (1,272,055,249) 


2,288,908,566 

20,619,294,097 


'includes $2,159,105,567 of "Salaries and Benefits" and 


$460,790 of "Other Expenditures" (see Expenditure by Group Account Classification, page C7). 

































PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1 996/97 


D 5 


Members of the Legislative Assembly 
Indemnities and Allowances 
for the Fiscal Year Ended March 31,1997 


Member 


Constituency 


Abbott, C. 

Anderson, V. 

Allowance as Official Opposition Caucus Chairperson 

Barisoff, B. 

Barlee, Hon. B. 

Barnes, E. 

Allowance as Speaker. 

Beattie,). 

Blencoe, R. 

Boone, Hon. L. 

Bowbrick, G. 

Brewin, G. 

Allowance as Deputy Chair Committee of the Whole .. 

Allowance as Deputy Speaker. 

Calendino, P. 

Campbell, G. 

Allowance as Official Opposition Leader. 

Cashore, Hon.). 

Charbonneau, A. 

Chisholm, R. 

Chong, I. 

Clark, C. 

Clark, Hon. G. 

Coell, M. 

Coleman, R. 

Allowance as Official Opposition Caucus Chairperson 

Conroy, E. 

Allowance as Government Caucus Chairperson. 

Copping, B. 

Cull, Hon. E. 

Dalton, J. 

De long, M. 

Dosanjh, Hon. U. 

Doyle, I. 

Allowance as Parliamentary Secretary. 

Edwards, A. 

Evans, Hon. C. 

Farnworth, Hon. M. 

Allowance as Parliamentary Secretary. 

Farrell—Collins, G. 

Allowance as Official Opposition House Leader. 

Fox, L. 

Allowance as Third Party Caucus Chairperson. 

Gabelmann, C. 

Garden, F. 

Allowance as Parliamentary Secretary. 

Giesbrecht, H. 

Allowance as Parliamentary Secretary. 

Gillespie, E. 

G ingel I, F. 

Goodacre, B. 

Hagen, A. 

Hammell, Hon. S. 

Hansen, C. 

Hanson, L. 

Allowance as Third Party House Leader. 

Harcourt, M. 


Shuswap. 

Vancouver—Langara 


Okanagan—Boundary 
Okanagan—Boundary 
Vancouver—Burrard... 


Okanagan—Penticton. 

Victoria—Hillside. 

Prince George—Mount Robson 

New Westminster. 

Victoria—Beacon Hill. 


Burnaby North. 

Vancouver—Point Grey 


Coquitlam—Mai I lardvi I le. 

Kamloops. 

Chilliwack. 

Oak Bay—Gordon Head. 

Port Moody—Burnaby Mountain 

Vancouver—Kingsway. 

Saanich North and the Islands. 

Fort Langley—Aldergrove. 


Rossland—Trail 


Port Moody—Burnaby Mountain 

Oak Bay—Gordon Head. 

West Vancouver—Capilano. 

Matsqui. 

Vancouver—Kensington. 

Columbia River—Revelstoke. 


Kootenay. 

Nelson—Creston 
Port Coquitlam ... 


Vancouver—Little Mountain 


Prince George—Omineca 


North Island ... 
Cariboo North 


Skeena 


Comox Valley. 

Delta South. 

Bulkley Valley—Stikine 

New Westminster. 

Surrey—Green Timbers 
Vancouver—Quilchena 
Okanagan—Vernon. 


Vancouver—Mount Pleasant 


Sessional 

Indemnity 1 

$ 

47,332 

54.572 
1,223 

46,932 

8,340 

8,340 

4,405 

8,340 

8,010 

54.772 
47,532 
51,567 

477 
16,606 
47,732 
56,072 
34,411 

53.772 
8,640 
8,340 

45,177 

46,932 

53,372 

43,887 

47,632 

4,290 

55,672 

4,619 

8,440 

8,010 

55,252 

55.572 

53.872 
57,072 

5,195 

9,040 

57,272 

55,972 

3,337 

56.772 
5,777 
8,440 

472 

8,840 

8,340 

575 

56,472 

4,734 

47,532 

55,172 

47,832 

8,340 

55.872 
47,132 

8,740 

357 

9,040 










































































































D 6 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Members of the Legislative Assembly 
Indemnities and Allowances 
for the Fiscal Year Ended March 31, 1997— Continued 


Member 


Constituency 


Hartley, B. 

Allowance as Deputy Chair Committee of the Whole 

Hawkins, C. 

Hurd, W. 

Allowance as Official Opposition Whip. 

lackson, F. 

Janssen, G. 

Allowance as Government Whip. 

Jarvis, D. 

Jones, B. 

Jones, K. 

Kasper, R. 

Allowance as Parliamentary Secretary. 

Krog, L. 

Allowance as Government Caucus Chairperson. 

Krueger, K. 

Kwan, J. 

Allowance as Deputy Government Whip. 

Lali, H. 

Allowance as Parliamentary Secretary. 

Lord, M. 

Lortie, N. 

Lovick, D. 

Allowance as Deputy Speaker. 

Allowance as Speaker. 

MacPhail, Hon. J. 

Marzari, D. 

Masi, R. 

McGregor, Hon. C. 

McKinnon, B. 

Miller, Hon. D. 

Nebbeling, T. 

Nettleton, P. 

Neufeld, R. 

Allowance as Third Party Whip. 

O'Neill, S. 

Allowance as Deputy Government Whip. 

Orcherton, S. 

Pement, P. 

Penner, B. 

Perry, T. 

Petter, Hon. A. 

Plant, G. 

Allowance as Official Opposition Whip. 

Priddy, Hon. P. 

Pullinger, Hon. J. 

Allowance as Parliamentary Secretary. 

Ramsey, Hon. P. 

Randall, F. 

Allowance as Parliamentary Secretary. 

Reid, L. 

Reitsma, P. 

Robertson, G. 

Sanders, A. 

Sawicki,). 

Allowance as Parliamentary Secretary. 

Schreck, D. 

Allowance as Parliamentary Secretary. 


Maple Ridge—Pitt Meadows 


Okanagan West. 

Surrey—White Rock 


Kamloops—North Thompson 
Alberni. 


North Vancouver—Seymour 

Burnaby North. 

Surrey—Cloverdale. 

Malahat—Juan de Fuca. 


Parksville—Qualicum 


Kamloops—North Thompson 
Vancouver—Mount Pleasant 


Yale—Lillooet 


Comox Valley 
Delta North ... 
Nanaimo. 


Vancouver—Hastings. 

Vancouver—Point Grey. 

Delta North. 

Kamloops. 

Surrey—Cloverdale. 

North Coast. 

West Vancouver—Garibaldi 
Prince George—Omineca ... 
Peace River North. 


Shuswap 


Victoria—Hillside. 

Bulkley Valley—Stikine. 

Chilliwack. 

Vancouver—Little Mountain 

Saanich South. 

Richmond—Steveston. 


Surrey—Newton. 

Cowichan—Ladysmith 


Prince George North 
Burnaby—Edmonds. 


Richmond East. 

Parksville—Qualicum 

North Island. 

Okanagan—Vernon... 
Burnaby—Willingdon 


North Vancouver—Lonsdale 


Sessional 

Indemnity 1 

$ 

55,972 

2,301 

46.832 

55.972 
4,790 
8,340 

55,772 

6,007 

55,717 

8,340 

8,340 

57,672 

5,310 

8,340 

944 

48,032 

45.832 
2,315 

57.972 
4,734 
8,340 
8,340 

55.772 
4,541 

28,379 

53.772 
8,440 

47,632 

46.932 
47,632 
57,672 
47,332 

47.832 

55.772 
472 

8,640 

472 

45,317 

8,840 

47,032 

8,540 

51,487 

46.832 
1,299 

53.772 
54,072 

2,178 

53,772 

55,872 

3,140 

56,072 

47,432 

47.932 
47,532 
55,072 

5,310 

8,340 

575 












































































































PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


D 7 


Members of the Legislative Assembly 
Indemnities and Allowances 
for the Fiscal Year Ended March 31, 1997— Continued 


Member 


Constituency 


Serwa, C. 

Sihota, Hon. M. 

Simpson, B. 

Smallwood, J. 

Allowance as Parliamentary Secretary 

Stephens, L. 

Stevenson, T. 

Streifel, Hon. D. 

Symons, D. 

Tanner, C. 

Thorpe, R. 

Tyabji,). 

van Dongen, J. 

Waddell, I. 

Walsh, E. 

Warnke, A. 

Weisbeck, J. 

Weisgerber, J. 

Allowance as Third Party Leader. 

Whittred, K. 

Wilson, C. 

Wilson, J. 

Zirnhelt, Hon. D. 


Okanagan West. 

Esquimalt—Metchosin.. 
Vancouver—Fraserview 
Surrey—Whalley. 


Langley. 

Vancouver—Burra rd. 

Mission—Kent. 

Richmond Centre. 

Saanich North and the Islands 

Okanagan—Penticton. 

Okanagan East. 

Abbotsford. 

Vancouver—Fraserview. 

Kootenay. 

Richmond—Steveston. 

Okanagan East. 

Peace River South. 


North Vancouver—Lonsdale .. 
Powell River—Sunshine Coast 

Cariboo North. 

Cariboo South. 


Sessional 

Indemnity 1 

$ 


8,440 

52,197 

8,340 

55,972 

4,734 

56,172 

47,632 

54.372 
55,962 

8,110 

47,732 

8,340 

56,172 

46,832 

47,232 

8,340 

47,532 

55,772 

1,573 

47,377 

57.372 
47,532 
53,872 

4,314,002 


'"Sessional Indemnity" includes annual indemnity, expense allowance, capital city allowance and salary authorized by Section 2, 3 and 5 of the Legisla¬ 
tive Assembly Allowance and Pension Act. Additional salaries paid to the Premier and Ministers are included in the Schedule of Salary and Travel Expenses for 
Ministers, Deputy Ministers and Associate Deputy Ministers. 
























































D 8 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Ministers, Deputy Ministers and Associate Deputy Ministers 

Salary and Travel 

for the Fiscal Year Ended March 31,1997 

Deferred 



Salary 

T ravel 

Deputy Ministers and 

Salary 

Compensation 1 

Travel 

Ministers 

$ 

$ 

Associate Deputy Ministers 

$ 

$ 

$ 

Clark, Hon. G, Premier. 

42,750 

50,777 

Allan, I. 

107,938 


17,993 

Barlee, Hon. N L. 

7,811 

4,045 

Allen, D E. 

39,849 


6,476t 

Boone, Hon. L. 

37,050 

16,240 

Armstrong, G R. 

112,952 


26,925 j 

Cashore, Hon. J. 

37,050 

11,739 

Arthur, M M. 

102,917 


3,005 

Cull, Hon. E. 

7,811 

924 

Avison, D. 

11,198 


2,850 

Dosanjh, Hon. U. 

37,050 

28,258 

Collins, M V. 

48,604 


524 

Evans, Hon. C. 

37,050 

23,102 

Costello, M. 

80,062 

17,774 


Farnworth, Hon. M. 

8,662 

9,679 

Doyle, C. 

107,053 

i nn r\A i 


15,315 

Hammell, Hon. S. 

37,050 

13,992 

Eaton, B. 

95,797 


Z4,7JO 

3,173 

MacPhail, Hon. ) K. 

37,050 

22,071 

Ebbels, J. 

101,735 


16,537 

McGregor, Hon. C. 

8,663 

3,571 

Ford, G. 

116,367 


6,170 

Miller, Hon. D. 

37,050 

19,773 

Fyke, K. 

34,487 



Petter, Hon. A. 

37,050 

21,576 

Gunton, T. 

114,198 


8,379 

Priddy, Hon. P. 

37,050 

9,835 

Halkett, P. 

112,730 

4,328 

12,278 

Pullinger, Hon. J M. 

19,313 

10,318 

Hey wood, C G. 

39,519 


3,983 

Ramsey, Hon. P W. 

37,050 

40,958 

Kang, C. 

50,983 


4,213 

Sihota, Hon. M. 

25,988 

15,531 

Kelly, D. 

106,964 


21,481 

Streifel, Hon. D. 

37,050 

12,328 

Maloney, M. 

112,406 


20,684 

Zirnhelt, Hon. D G. 

37,050 

37,704 

Manson Singer, S. 

17,915 


4,480 




McArthur, D F . 

117,758 


41,568 

Total. 

565,598 

352,421 

McFarlane, L. 

114,653 


3,407 




Mitchell, V. 

52,752 


5,516 




Mochrie, J A. 

106,943 


1,330 




Owen, S D. 

136,694 


16,483 




Plecas, R S. 

59,767 


15,605 




Quantz, E ). 

100,041 


8,395. 




Read,C . 

98,929 


13,647 




Redlin, B. 

49,440 


10,903 




Seitz, L. 

107,054 


19,283 




Spitzer, E. 

67,324 


7,347 




Tait, L. 

96,749 


14,268 




Vakil, T F. 

100,041 


15,270 




Veit, S. 

108,761 


10,180 




Walsh, |. 

93,646 


8,656 




Wouters, G. 

95,976 

10,254 

17,678 




Wright, D ). 

103,915 

1,670 

30,894 




Wynn, SC. 

112,406 

6,460 

17,821 




Total. 

3 , 336,564 

40,486 

457,655 


'Deferred compensation is amounts earned in previous years and received in the current year. Th 
would include, for example, vacation time not taken, or other lump sum payments. Up to October 1,198^ 
Deputy Ministers were able to defer up to 1 5% of annual compensation. Amounts received in the currei 
year appear as deferred compensation. This does not include employee benefits. 

















































































PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


D 9 

Order-ln-Council, Other Appointees and 
Employees not Appointed under the Public Service Act 

Salary 1 and Travel 

for the Fiscal Year Ended March 31,1997 


Salary 

Travel 


Salary 

Travel 


Salary 

Travel 

$ 

$ 


$ 

$ 


$ 

$ 

66,613 

5,155 

Biccum, T A. 

32,269 


Caron, M A. 

10,986 


19,816 

59 

Bill, K 1 . 

1,095 


Carr, H E. 

43,233 

1,248 

83,586 

11,084 

Bisanz, M S. 

1,500 


Carroll, P. 

38,402 

607 

53,862 


Bishop, M R. 

118,451 

8,098 

Cartwright, | P. 

118,451 

3,520 

1,353 


Bjarnason, H K. 

37,904 


Carver, CM. 

46,071 


53,010 

230 

Black, D. 

31,648 


Carver, E). 

1,092 


683 


Black, M C. 

5,111 


Caulfield,). 

9,708 

888 

31,648 


Blackwell, D L. 

28,950 


Cavanagh, | A. 

82,163 

3,003 

118,451 

4,076 

Blair, S D. 

45,879 


Chalmers, N M. 

1,196 


18,807 


Blair, W A. 

118,451 

8,955 

Chalmers, R T. 

16,503 

628 

81 


Blais, M. 

4,081 


Chamberlain, R J. 

1 7,600 


25,319 

2,019 

Blakely, J. 

58,700 

2,632 

Chamberlist, E G. 

118,451 

23,210 

72 


Blunt, WR. 

48,130 


Chan, K. 

34,981 


66,613 

3,818 

Blyth, D L. 

35,570 


Chandler, P. 

42,951 

463 

9,957 

565 

Boalch, R B. 

44,515 

36 

Chaperon, L F. 

118,451 

2,762 

41,522 


Bohlin, R H. 

74,375 

13,580 

Chappel, S. 

3,251 


62,209 

707 

Boldt, L. 

39,418 

644 

Chilton, C R. 

110,954 

4,096 

30,586 


Bolton, A N. 

118,451 

11,539 

Cho, L G. 

12,180 


56,570 


Bondurant, F. 

59,778 


Choquette, C M L. 

21,626 


77,474 

6,134 

Bonner, S E. 

42,953 

1,044 

Chow, Y H. 

6,406 


48,167 

397 

Borowicz, M C. 

118,451 

1,585 

Christensen, S. 

82,359 

490 

41,706 


Bosscha, A. 

1,909 

194 

Chung, K. 

7,308 


118,451 

1,512 

Bourne, R M. 

38,030 


Chung, L. 

44,409 


83,859 

6,880 

Bowell, A. 

31,745 


Clare, L P. 

118,451 

3,071 

24,710 


Bowen, W F. 

42,972 


Clark, G L. 

19,042 


32,013 


Bowman, J E. 

7,323 


Clark, J. 

58,412 

6,008 

31,956 


Boychuk, R. 

22,890 

69 

Clark, J A. 

3,920 


52,098 


Bracken, J K. 

118,451 

10,428 

Clark, K M. 

3,345 


118,451 

238 

Braddick, S. 

40,660 

4,869 

Clark, MW. 

78,014 

230 

39,265 


Bra id—Skolski, A S. 

40,138 

1,455 

Clark, P H. 

91,231 

17,819 

51,979 

189 

Braman,). 

1,554 


Clark, SG. 

118,451 

6,525 

13,571 


Brandreth-Gibbs, S R.... 

118,451 

879 

Clark. SS. 

38,149 


3,959 

800 

Braun,) D. 

3,433 


Clarke, H R. 

40,483 

439 

16,130 


Brazier, J S. 

19,624 

2,229 

Cleaveley, C. 

118,451 

18,327 

83,859 

17,562 

Breckenridge, J S. 

83,859 

6,169 

Cline, 11 |. 

34,195 


1,322 


Brecknell, E R. 

118,451 

12,864 

Close, A. 

91,231 

2,128 

38,986 


Brecknock, D T. 

2,742 

930 

Coates, C. 

45,894 

543 

64,301 

975 

Brett, ). 

4,412 


Cochrane, W R. 

32,881 


79,477 


Bright, H A. 

35,612 


Code, M. 

42,156 

2,165 

7,398 


Brooks, M S. 

19,473 

3,125 

Coey,) R. 

44,663 


690 


Brown, C. 

8,204 


Cohen, A. 

39,815 

1,766 

118,451 

3,879 

Brown, DM. 

25,800 

3,042 

Coleman, A L. 

9,197 

3,142 

38,131 


Brown, G. 

50,050 


Collicott, L. 

52,519 

657 

42,101 


Brown, H ). 

66,279 


Collings, P D. 

21,330 

732 

118,451 

1,024 

Brown, ) M. 

36,603 


Collingwood, N C M. 

1 18,451 

17,000 

118,451 

2,122 

Brown, L M. 

46,071 


Collins, D W. 

9,904 


118,451 

861 

Brown, M. 

95,574 

3,903 

Collins, I E. 

31,700 


69,143 

1,477 

Brownell, R N. 

66,613 

1,574 

Cook, | W. 

101,875 

9,566 

20,424 


Brynen, S D. 

43,326 


Cook, K. 

10 


33,324 

2,680 

Buckingham, R W. 

83,853 

4,101 

Coombes, V L. 

47,306 


47,745 


Bugera, P. 

10,400 


Coonce, T M. 

1,500 


28,116 


Buller Bennett, M R. 

118,451 

2,272 

Cormack, A H C. 

40,552 

22 

118,451 

7,131 

Burbury, P T. 

5,528 


Corns, P. 

53,038 

4,023 

23,111 


Burdett, E J. 

18,879 


Costello, S ). 

25,180 


106,651 

10,536 

Burdett, E M. 

1 18,451 

3,555 

Cott, D W. 

95,576 

19,968 

84,931 

3,309 

Burgis, | A. 

27,077 


Coughlin, D. 

33,207 


63,621 

2,473 

Burke, E M. 

96,587 


Cowling, J D. 

1 18,451 

3,206 

21,782 

45 

Burke, K. 

33,632 


Cox, DA. 

62,167 

13,494 

118,451 

486 

Burnett, MW. 

6,797 


Craig, W G. 

118,451 


51,959 


Burrell, EJ. 

62,150 

2,115 

Crawford, M. 

25,003 

2,609 

21,489 


Burton, P R. 

83,605 

18,553 

Creba, D. 

19,823 

664 

25,343 


Butcher, WE. 

42,663 


Crone,) A. 

91,231 


29,904 


Cain, J V. 

91,231 

6,303 

Cronin, E). 

118,451 

427 

31,979 


Caldwell, FI A. 

1,500 


Cross, K. 

62,248 


32,788 


Cameron, D. 

52,903 

10,046 

Cruz, NS. 

31,327 


1,437 


Cameron, PS. 

70,740 

9,985 

Cubberley, D. 

61,160 

1,149 

46,108 


Campbell, L W. 

73,971 

5,648 

Cummings, D L. 

52,599 

2,473 

118,451 

1,001 

Campbell, R). 

12,868 


Cundliffe,). 

1,500 


37,188 


Campbell, S. 

34,687 


Cunning, J A. 

3,920 


9,440 


Cantelon, K. 

22,460 

1,331 

Cunningham, T D. 

40,226 


475 


Carbert,). 

40,827 


Curry, N. 

13,736 

3,882 

41,446 


Cardiff, W E. 

28,063 


Dang, L V. 

135 


45,789 

9,175 

Carey-Gilgunn, C. 

32,788 


Daoust, L L. 

7,864 


33,096 

2,766 

Carlgren, DC. 

118,451 

10,468 

Darling, M. 

35,106 

582 

43,470 


Carlsen, P). 

37,818 


Dauphinee, L A. 

27,593 

250 







































































































































































































































DIO 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


OIC and Other Appointees —Continued 



Salary 

Travel 


Salary 

Travel 


Salary 

Travel 


$ 

$ 


$ 

$ 


$ 

$ 

Davies, M T. 

7,666 


Foote, C W. 

74,304 

3,022 

Grewal, R. 

32,372 

4,680 

Davis, B. 

118,451 

3,785 

Forsyth, LA. 

19,640 


Gripich,) A. 

8,003 


Davis, L W. 

3,692 


Forward, R B. 

9,028 


Grist, W G E. 

34,038 

554 

Davis, MEA. 

34,827 


Fox,). 

60,795 

5,051 

Groberman, I. 

.. 118,451 


Davy,). 

14,678 


Frank, D L. 

34,827 


Grobman, M T. 

16,810 


de Lange, L D. 

62,090 


Fraser, E D. 

10,719 


Gronert, P H. 

71,682 

433 

De Villiers, J. 

118,451 

15,181 

Fraser,). 

43,121 

4,365 

Gropp, H. 

6,370 


De Walle, E F. 

118,451 

9,935 

Fraser, J W. 

65,924 

816 

Grosvenor, W A. 

9,246 


De Wit, A. 

43,002 


Fraser, R. 

350 


Gunn, P M. 

38,108 


Debei, E A. 

8,178 


Fraser-Mol, A. 

44,580 


Gusso, N. 

1,737 


Decaria, R E. 

17,747 


Fratkin, R . 

.... 118,451 

607 

Haave, S M. 

19,064 


Decker, K E. 

30,922 


Freeman, B W. 

17,304 


Hackett, BA. 

.. 107,053 



54,376 

2,100 

French, F K. 

49,300 


Hague, J1. 

65,448 

305 

Delaunay-Belleville, KA 

6,133 

Friesen, B M. 

35,678 


Haima, B. 

30,885 


Demers, D J. 

97,833 

6,049 

Fryer, B C. 

48,856 

10,573 

Hall, DC. 

32,171 


Denis, C. 

8,920 


Furst, D. 

1,500 


Hall, D E. 

53,088 

15,441 

Denney, N J. 

62,269 

3,284 

Gaffney, H. 

66,613 

4,891 

Hall, I PL. 

1,500 


Derkson, K L. 

26,632 


Gainor, C. 

22,078 

1,103 

Halvorson, E A. 

1,500 

422 

Devitt, T D. 

118,451 

4,068 

Gale, S E. 

1,500 


Hamer, M. 

56,305 

3,511 

Devlin, D A. 

3,001 


Gall, D W. 

46,185 


Hamilton, W T. 

47,987 

26 

Dickie, P H. 

17,211 


Gallagher, R M. 

.... 118,451 

3,435 

Handley, L W. 

32,487 


Dickinson, C M. 

1,500 


Gandhi,) K. 

32,963 


Hansen, D R. 

4,561 


Dickinson, J. 

597 


Garcia, T 1. 

5,332 

1,138 

Harlow, R B. 

37,798 


Diebolt, W. 

118,451 

6,575 

Gardener, J F. 

49,022 

1,264 

Harvey, 1. 

118,451 

4,909 

Dilalla, A M G. 

3,001 


Garland, PA. 

64,960 

294 

Harvey, S R. 

95,576 

11,019 

Diraddo, S. 

37,066 


Garrett, BA. 

37,343 


Haslam,) H. 

1,500 


Djurkovic, | Y. 

14,858 

364 

Garrison, R. 

51,731 

2,563 

Hastings, D C. 

317 


Dobson, | D. 

34,346 


Garrod, A. 

66,613 

1,268 

Hatcher, E R. 

33,142 


Dohan, G G. 

43,784 


Garrow, V S. 

30,636 


Hatlen, E. 

13,453 


Doherty, PM. 

118,451 

12,490 

Gee, D E. 

2,909 

46 

Hawrysh, B. 

62,269 

5,743 

Dollis, B L. 

118,451 

9,890 

Gelfand, M). 

29,497 


Hayes, G A. 

38,284 

348 

Donaldson, A W. 

139,327 

4,627 

Gendron, Y J J P. 

33,068 


Hayman, M. 

6,435 


Doney, R L. 

123,459 

12,072 

Geoghegan, M. 

14,553 

846 

Head, M R. 

32,858 

236 

Donn, M E. 

50,684 

284 

George, G A. 

16,582 

103 

Heaney, S M. 

50,684 


Doolan, K ]. 

118,451 

2,455 

George, N. 

5,381 


Heath, R E. 

1,179 


Doricic, S M. 

31,901 


Germaine, A. 

883 


Heerspink, R C. 

45,166 


Doroshuk, C J. 

1,122 


Ghosh, M. 

30,933 


Heidorn, K. 

4,728 


Dorsey, I. 

20,729 


Gibbons, S E. 

32,198 


Heighes, K. 

34,827 


Dowding, M A. 

1,713 


Gibson, C A. 

32,271 


Heighton, R A. 

67,179 


Downie, G W. 

56,623 

10,400 

Gibson, D E. 

13,273 

275 

Helweg, J A. 

1,333 

47 

Driscoll, P T. 

67,135 

24 

Gibson,) E M. 

1,959 


Hesketh, J. 

81,544 


Driscoll, T. 

32,052 


Giesbrecht, S R. 

15,987 


Hesseln, C 1 R. 

41,932 


Ducharme, C M. 

21,127 


Gill, C. 

.... 118,451 

5,207 

Hickey, M. 

31,648 


Dunn, P. 

4,785 


Gill, RG. 

8,838 


Higgins, G W. 

3,920 


Durrant, R B. 

10,480 


Gillis, CD..,. 

28,697 


Higgins, S M. 

1,500 

497 

Dzuris, L. 

1,368 


Gillis, G. 

.... 118,451 

1,193 

Hight, |. 

61,084 


Eastman, L. 

34,015 


Gilmore, D M. 

38,122 


Higinbotham, R A. 

118,451 

6,554 

Eastwood, | D. 

61,920 

8,880 

Gilroy, KC. 

7,861 

467 

Hill, M. 

7,910 


Edgell, F. 

95,576 

10,398 

Giroday, S. 

.... 118,451 

13,008 

Hill,MS. 

74,375 

6,427 

Edwards, BA. 

6,121 

86 

Giuliano, L A. 

30,932 


Hill, T W. 

66,485 


Edwards, 1 R. 

54,008 


Giuliano, M E. 

38,149 

1,019 

Hinde, BC. 

1,667 


Eely, P. 

38,874 


Godfrey, J. 

.... 119,946 

2,720 

Hira, L. 

27,194 


Egan, R B. 

84,240 

8,292 

Golab, T. 

7,482 


Hnatiuk, K M. 

4,608 


Ehrcke, A. 

118,451 

3,999 

Gordon, C. 

43,589 


Ho, 1 S. 

55,145 


Elford, L W. 

47,062 


Gordon, F. 

92,297 

2,607 

Hodkinson, C M. 

25,754 

2,073 

Ernes, D W. 

71,682 

1,325 

Gordon, J. 

.... 118,451 

10,670 

Hogan, P. 

... 118,451 

10,918 

Enderton, S. 

79,421 

9,129 

Gordon, J M. 

50,205 


Holden, 1 L. 

85,699 

8,201 

Engstad, P. 

83,267 

7,944 

Gordon, J M. 

11,901 

539 

Hollett, S R. 

... 100,355 

8,591 

Erickson, R. 

45,995 

37 

Gosney, V E. 

56,477 


Holman, N. 

14,244 

54 

Evans, D L. 

45,573 


Gotto, G. 

30,932 


Holmes, D. 

... 118,451 

1,913 

Evans, R F. 

5,553 


Gould, R. 

.... 118,451 

4,674 

Holt, L P. 

36,818 


Eve, C). 

36,918 


Gove, T. 

.... 118,451 

1,261 

Horgan, J. 

70,810 

2,474 

F-abbri. A H. 

13,360 


Gowe, G T. 

5,332 

1,895 

Horn, | W. 

... 118,451 

8,168 

Fabbrc, R. 

118,451 

6,414 

Gower, M B. 

6,172 


Horricks, B. 

10,280 


Farrally, V. 

102,538 

22,860 

Graham, H. 

22,245 


Houston, S L. 

22,665 


Fast, D A. 

86,421 

17,375 

Graham, L K. 

2,437 


Howard, F E. 

... 118,451 

3,623 

Fedje, G. 

43,929 

49 

Graham, R J. 

66,613 

4,693 

Howitt, C W. 

5,573 


Fedje, L. 

1,089 


Grandison, R. 

.... 118,451 

3,783 

Hoy, B G. 

... 118,451 

7,717 

Fedosenko, K A. 

1,500 

2,566 

Grannary, B J. 

.... 118,451 

13,880 

Hrick, WA. 

59,859 


Ferguson, H ). 

11,120 


Grant, D E. 

32,151 


Hubbard, M. 

118,451 

13,950 

Fern,1. 

37,360 


Grant, E. 

32,310 


Hughes, A M G. 

32,958 

138 

Field, H H. 

73,067 

4,427 

Grant, W). 

91,231 

7,194 

Hughes, E N. 

15,995 


Fielder, C A. 

1,932 


Grantham, R G. 

16,042 


Hughes, | E. 

38,284 

12,738 

Fika, S M. 

44,033 


Grasby, R. 

48,167 

268 

Huls, D. 

62,150 


Filmer, A. 

118,451 

3,457 

Graupe, G A. 

1,345 


Hume, S. 

50,155 


Fisher, J. 

29,748 

340 

Graydon, M. 

39,492 


Humphrey, B A. 

12,229 


Flaherty, D. 

128,455 

19,039 

Graydon, T W. 

9,547 


Humphreys, A A. 

62,269 


Fleming, M A. 

4,028 

5 

Green, A. 

31,907 


Humphreys, B G. 

76,789 

4,580 

Florendo, B E. 

39,072 


Green, R A. 

49,029 


Hundal, 1. 

62,269 

8,653 

Foley, B. 

121,971 

4,791 

Green, S A. 

36,458 


Hunter, R M. 

91,231 

2,071 

Food, R A. 

67,786 


Gregg, L M. 

89,537 

3,443 

Hurtig, J. 

20,877 

782 






















































































































































































































































PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 Dll 



Salary 

Travel 


Salary 

Travel 


Salary 

Travel 


$ 

$ 


$ 

$ 


$ 

S 

Husband, K. 

118,451 

3,145 

Kowal, D. 

42,713 


MacArthur, D H. 

74,236 

11,754 

Hussain, S. 

11,506 

959 

Koyl, G R. 

91,231 

1,112 

MacDiarmid, W). 

24,212 


Hutton, J. 

18,628 

269 

Kozyniak, S L. 

56,810 

1,120 

MacDonald, 1 K..., 

29,881 


Hvde, P. 

118,451 

7,151 

Krantz, A. 

118,451 

11,107 

MacDonald, 1 M H. 

74,375 

15,153 

Ingenhorst, R ). 

3,710 


Krishan, A. 

4,441 


MacDonald, W. 

118,451 

5,270 

Inglis, D. 

24,102 


Krismer, P. 

11,617 

2,589 

MacFarlane, R B. 

118,451 

6,838 

Ingram, P. 

39,238 


Kristianson, E I. 

57,259 

3,981 

MacGregor, S K. 

44,930 

723 

Irving, R C. 

50,591 

147 

Kristjanson, MY. 

39,659 

2,014 

Maclsaac, R I. 

3,711 


Irwin, K. 

6,747 


Kroeker, H P. 

3,602 


MacKay, D E. 

32,852 


Ishkanian, V A. 

72,191 

2,309 

Kumi, I. 

95,576 

13,971 

Mackenzie A. . 

31 088 

1 147 

Ivens, L. 

66,705 

384 

Kurian, |. 

32,062 

Mackenzie, B D.. 

118 451 

9,626 

Iverson, EL. 

118,451 

9,813 

Kwiatkowska, K. 

36,209 


MacKinnon, R E. 

44,037 

1,953 

Ives, R L. 

31,595 


Lam, M. 

588 


MacMinn, E G. 

154,032 


Izard, 1 D. 

91,193 


Lam, S. 

2,437 


MacPhail, A. 

89,841 

12,392 

laccard, M K. 

107,232 

3,787 

Lamb, J E. 

26,816 

4,348 

MacPhee, N D. 

67,030 

4,097 

lackson, J. 

7,219 

818 

Lambert, B D L. 

38,284 

4,188 

MacPherson, R 1. 

50,230 


jacob, M. 

13,160 

268 

Lang, C G. 

23,288 


MacTavish, J A. 

28,587 


laffer, G M. 

39,091 


Langford, E. 

7,101 


Mahil, H P. 

91,231 

13,046 

lames, C H. 

75,801 

27,234 

Lanyon, S N. 

36,720 


Makhdoom, Z H. 

38,284 

3,790 

lames, F S. 

62,293 

1,862 

Lapointe, L). 

54,218 

869 

Maloff, N. 

141 


lansen, A. 

39,166 


Larsen, A E. 

46,071 


Maltby, C G. 

118,451 

3,264 

larvis, D. 

32,082 


Larson, C. 

4,065 


Manton, M. 

12,347 


lawandha, H. 

6,133 


Larusson, L M. 

14,857 


March, A. 

11,552 


lefcoat, P |. 

7,383 

2,126 

Lau, E H L. 

31,524 


Marley, C I. 

29,493 

149 

Jenkyns, I M. 

13,440 


Lawrence, P. 

118,451 

9,798 

Martin, C. 

89,407 

2,001 

lensen, M L. 

42,156 

919 

Layne, S S. 

39,072 


Martin, G. 

99,237 

4,305 

Jesshope, B. 

39,387 


Lazar, C. 

118,451 

7,184 

Martinson, D ). 

118,451 

2,674 

lessop, 1. 

25,372 

3,531 

Leach,). 

78,755 

5,701 

Mason, A W. 

48,590 


lessop, V L. 

45,317 


Leamy, A). 

54,908 

5,503 

Masse, D. 

19,975 


jewel 1. K E. 

69,730 

826 

Leamy, M T. 

44,154 

1,953 

Masselink, D. 

45,087 

4,993 

loe, 11 D. 

118,451 

6,528 

Lebus, N. 

8,425 


Matharu, D. 

23,051 


lohal, N. 

177 


Lebus, O P. 

12,220 


Matheson, B J. 

66,613 

368 

lohannessen, D 1. 

42,930 

10,622 

Leche, D M. 

31,770 


Matthews, B L. 

36,903 


lohannson, T. 

5,299 


Lee, B. 

55,384 

51 

Maughan, P L. 

118,451 

545 

Johima, H F. 

16,190 


Lee, I B. 

770 


Maurer, R. 

35,501 

9,825 

Johnson, J H. 

50,156 


Lee, R S. 

11,285 

1,508 

Maw, S. 

27,428 


lohnson, K G. 

62,269 

5,036 

Leekha, M. 

7,379 

108 

McAlary, ) H. 

16,814 


lohnston, P. 

95,574 

2,931 

Lefeaux-Valentine, W.... 

100,605 

27,483 

McArthur, G D. 

90,993 

15,007 

lohnstone, B. 

19,198 


Leibel, N. 

66,613 

407 

McArthur, S A. 

7,075 


lolly, C D. 

66,613 

9,122 

Leigh, P. 

23,859 


McAuley, A. 

3,539 


lolson, L. 

91,489 

14,279 

Lemiski, R. 

118,451 

4,809 

McAvity, | PM. 

95,576 

8,180 

lones, C. 

5,124 


Lenaghan,) |. 

118,451 

4,329 

McCabe, M J... 

291 


lones, C) C .. 

62,269 

1,627 

Lennox,) 1. 

4,514 

McCague, SR... 

18,237 


lones, G R. 

45,038 

Lesueur, K. 

62,269 

6,759 

McCallum, J M. 

43,762 

830 

loyce, B M. 

118,451 

6,290 

Leung, A C. 

35,319 


McCallum, S D. 

128,455 

14,506 

lunker, B j. 

95,574 

2,120 

Levasseur, T M. 

51,398 


McCallum, W C. 

118,451 

2,504 

Kailan, L. 

44,270 

377 

Levis, DM. 

118,451 

17,394 

McCandless, R C. 

94,727 

1,047 

<alista, D M. 

32,582 


Lewis, B. 

30,553 


McCannell, S. 

12,863 

3,416 

<aminski, G A. 

31,969 


Lewis, R. 

31,648 


McCarthy,). 

118,451 

182 

<arpoff, K. 

12,874 


Lewis, W S. 

44,864 


McCluskie, C. 

19,010 


<astelen, KB. 

26,927 


Libby, K. 

118,451 

1,858 

McCoy, C A. 

38,808 


<ay, IN. 

118,451 

3,242 

Lightburn, G. 

33,081 


McCulloch,). 

31,647 


<eehn, G). 

23,676 


Liivam, J M. 

1,500 


McDermott, M M. 

34,827 


<eithly, NS. 

74,375 

1,819 

Lim, P. 

66,613 

3,422 

McDonald, L M. 

38,668 

905 

<elliher, H. 

10,875 

208 

Lim, S. 

93,664 

45,436 

McDonald, M. 

31,098 

390 

(elly, | C. 

83,859 

12,193 

Limongelli, P. 

4,800 


McDonnell, N. 

68,477 

1,413 

(ernper, M D. 

34,466 

5,331 

Lindgren, S V. 

38,964 


McDowall, A W. 

62,269 

8,607 

(ennedy, DM. 

36,818 


Lindner, G K. 

14,089 


McGee, T. 

118,451 

932 

<ennedy-Mageau, M.... 

31,491 


Lindroos, R. 

45,422 


McGivern, J. 

118,451 

888 

Senning, A V. 

59,031 


Lindsay, L M. 

1,500 


McGregor, V A. 

10,274 


Cern, M). 

54,504 

1,243 

Lisun, L. 

12,457 

250 

Mclnnis, J R L. 

80,948 

8,188 

(err, V B. 

2,437 


Lloyd, E S. 

92,183 

1,398 

Mclver, B P. 

46,046 

11,721 

(eto, D K. 

5,126 


Logan, H D. 

1,333 


McKay, M A. 

68 


\idd. L. 

15,069 

2,563 

Lomas, | C. 

38,814 


McKenzie, G G. 

1,500 


(imberley,). 

30,622 

5,667 

Longpre, R S. 

18,630 

3,023 

McKichan, 1 D. 

56,477 

1,483 

Sing, D L. 

11,325 


Loomer, A. 

5,124 


Mi Kim. C I. 

33,061 


9ng, T. 

31,893 


Loughran, E. 

50,598 

8,413 

McKinlay, B R. 

71,682 

3,811 

Sipp, J D. 

1,500 


Low, R R. 

75,336 

10,616 

McLaren, C. 

46,071 

65 

Sirk, J. 

31,902 

3,777 

Lowe, C. 

22,267 

1,104 

McLaren, K. 

50,388 

16,391 

lirker, G. 

11,819 


Lowing, C. 

3,927 


McLaren, R |. 

59,314 

1,428 

Citchen, W. 

118,451 

668 

Lowrie, M). 

31,557 


McLean, M). 

14,821 

1,846 

Haver, B R. 

118,451 

7,379 

Lum, G. 

668 


McLellan, B A. 

68,830 

9,640 

Hinger, W. 

118,451 

32,174 

Lumholst-Smith, B A. 

68,843 

1,188 

McLeod, D |. 

6,771 


Sobiljski, M. 

63,040 

577 

Lusztig, C B. 

2,555 


McMillan, R D. 

62,269 

12,873 

lolson, H W. 

32,831 


Lynch, B R. 

4,022 

461 

McNamara-Smith, DA.. 

21,336 


lonrad, J. 

40,202 


Lynn, S. 

26,659 

722 

McPhee, L 1. 

41,457 


lorman, A. 

62,269 

7,697 

Lytle, C B. 

71,079 


McPhee, W. 

45,348 

227 

lorman, S R. 

43,641 

5,099 

Lytwyn,) R. 

118,451 

5,745 

McPherson, G. 

60,361 

8,007 

lotler, L. 

23,317 


MacAlpine, M 1. 

118,451 

4,159 

McRae, G B. 

81,741 

14,901 

lottmeier, C. 

31,625 

893 

MacAlpine, W. 

9,549 


McRae, P 1. 

42,593 

1,418 

louwenhoven, Y. 

34,827 


MacArthur, C. 

118,451 

4,116 

McWhirter, R D. 

1,500 

























































































































































































































































D 12 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


OIC and Other Appointees —Continued 



Salary 

Travel 


Salary 

Travel 


Salary 

Travel 


$ 

$ 


$ 

$ 


$ 

$ 

Mears, |. 

895 


Norgaard, A V. 

48,718 


Prelypchan, N ). 

... 118,451 

26,802 

Meggs, G. 

58,234 

12,869 

Northcott, P. 

2,317 


Premack, L L. 

56,261 


Memory, C S. 

76,513 

4,912 

Norton, D R. 

45,038 


Prescott, S L. 

79,758 

7,528 

Menzies, B C. 

22,905 

21 

Notar, B. 

93,012 

9,475 

Prestash, G. 

59,592 

2,795 


hi 0?4 

568 

Notley, R A ... 

29,379 

2,511 

Preston, ]. 

128,455 

18,502 

Merner, M L. 

65,952 

356 

Nyberg, D K. 

46,071 

Preston, R. 

50,648 

Messenger, A F. 

85,222 

6,927 

O'Brien, P M. 

94,163 

2,393 

Price, J L. 

37,500 


Metzger, R. 

... 128,455 

31,499 

O'Connor, K D. 

61,898 


Price, N Y. 

32,778 


Michelsen, S M. 

66,613 

5,348 

O'Donoghue, M. 

63,719 

3,168 

Prior, L M. 

42,282 


Middlestead, L P. 

1,587 


O'Gorman, A ]. 

45,432 


Proctor, C. 

59,289 

1,521 

Miller, A D. 

13,832 


O'Gorman, D K. 

95,576 

10,268 

Proverbs, T B. 

93,852 

28,793 

Miller, G. 

8,814 


O'Mahony,). 

25,850 


Prox, R G. 

2,155 



91 231 

1 2,884 

O'Riordan, I. 

95,576 

15,250 

Proznick, R G. 

45,038 


Miller, R D. 

... 118,451 

8,675 

Obara, M G. 

20,512 

Psefteas, G. 

20,657 

6,248 

Mills, B ). 

1,460 


Offerman, K. 

24,335 

2,517 

Puchlik, 1. 

6,203 


Mitchell, D |. 

1,641 


Ofner, j H. 

11,478 


Puhach, M S. 

... 118,451 

1,793 

Mitchell, K. 

26,036 


Oleksiuk, K. 

. 108,928 

1,246 

Pultr, L. 

7,535 


Mitchell, L L. 

26,379 


Oliver, T. 

50,940 

5,025 

Purdon, M. 

35,590 


Mitchell, M F. 

80,983 

8,375 

Olson, D. 

66,613 

3,639 

Purgavie, R. 

3,833 

456 

Mitchell, W. 

31,648 


Olson, M A. 

50,140 

3,882 

Pylypchuk, W. 

95,574 

5,038 

Modha, P. 

50,796 

9,931 

Olynyk, T D. 

13,395 

1,045 

Quay, | H L. 

50,920 


Molland, P C. 

1,500 

395 

Opheim, A G. 

2,257 


Quigley, S. 

23,383 

1,541 

Molsberry,) L. 

25,876 

316 

Ordeman, M. 

31,919 

639 

Rae, M. 

... 118,451 

1,496 

Mondin, M. 

... 118,451 

5,015 

Ormiston, D. 

1,897 


Rai, F M. 

48,657 

248 

Mood ley, R. 

23,931 


Orton, A. 

43,441 


Rainey, F M. 

18,611 


Moody, J. 

43,914 

711 

Osborn, E L. 

17,659 


Raketti, A F. 

45,839 


Moore, G B. 

42,613 


Ostergaard, P. 

95,576 

8,786 

Ralph, K. 

30,916 


Moore, K. 

... 111,750 

12,180 

Otter, 1 A. 

74,375 

2,663 

Ramsay, D W. 

... 118,451 

11,676 

Moorhead, K. 

6,973 

2,114 

Ovens, 11. 

32,740 


Ramsbotham, D J. 

5,124 


Moran, R. 

56,782 

4,201 

Overend, D. 

118,451 

9,295 

Randle, ] T. 

1,500 

102 

Morel, I M. 

3,070 

1,136 

Owen, S D. 

32,328 


Ranger, G. 

8,034 

671 

Morfitt, G L. 

... 128,455 

6,125 

Paddon, H M. 

44,317 


Rankin, E. 

43,470 


Morgenthaler, P T. 

3,301 

450 

Page, K. 

118,451 

8,775 

Rasmussen, B 1. 

56,477 

3,678 

Morris, A. 

5,402 


Pallan, P. 

96,125 

25,477 

Rasode, B. 

29,545 

442 

Morris, L. 

34,827 


Palmer, A ). 

. 118,451 

9,183 

Ratvay, T L. 

1,100 


Morrison, B C. 

32,867 


Pandher, A. 

5,124 


Rauscher, G ). 

25,652 


Morrison, K. 

34,353 

1,543 

Paonessa, M C. 

56,515 

4,639 

Raven, R. 

... 104,836 

2,102 

Morrison, R T. 

25,565 


Pape, L. 

5,124 


Rayfuse, L. 

31,648 


Morrow, J. 

24,051 


Paradis,). 

. 118,451 

4,918 

Rayner, T. 

49,032 


Morton, C. 

... 114,699 

20,002 

Parker, B. 

2,341 


Rea, M A. 

29,805 


Morven, FH B. 

1,500 


Parkinson, L. 

83,245 

166 

Read, AW. 

62,269 

13,716 

Morven, S V. 

39,072 


Parmar, S. 

13,041 


Reichert, K. 

31,098 

8,697 

Moss, D E. 

... 118,451 

6,266 

Patch, T W. 

78,895 

2,274 

Reid, D. 

74,375 

12,831 

Moy, | L. 

6,986 


Patterson, AN. 

118,451 

4,972 

Reid, 1. 

47,212 


Mueller, B A. 

37,707 


Patterson, R...i. 

. 128,455 

18,838 

Reid, 1 D. 

70,038 

3,305 

Mulder, S. 

8,817 


Paul, C. 

29,516 


Reid, L ]. 

13,044 


Mullin, B G. 

95,574 


Paul, E J. 

719 


Reid, P. 

16,836 


Mullins, W ]. 

67,112 

1,986 

Paul, E W. 

9,118 


Reimer, N S. 

41,189 

4,840 

Munro, N E. 

9,084 

4,285 

Paxton, A E. 

30,933 


Reine, K 1. 

21,339 


Munro, S E. 

12,191 

149 

Pearson, B. 

27,066 


Rempel, M. 

48,718 


Murphy, J E A. 

37,005 

830 

Peart, R W. 

58,690 

11,803 

Renwick, R ). 

74,375 

7,073 

Murphy, S L. 

47,756 


Peden, M A. 

33,676 


Rerie, R W. 

60,841 

2,189 

Musclow, A F. 

44,674 


Pedersen, E B. 

34,140 


Rich, S P. 

1,500 


Myers, DR. 

32,788 


Pekeles, R. 

95,574 

604 

Richards, A. 

36,724 

542 

Myers, T. 

1,095 


Pellatt, R I. 

71,682 


Richards, T C. 

20,395 


Nakoneshny, P W. 

62,269 

2,728 

Pendleton, D. 

118,451 

3,180 

Richardson, D. 

91,231 

5,878 

Nardi, R A M. 

47,147 


Perri, S. 

24,379 

157 

Richardson, M. 

4,579 


Neal, B. 

... 118,451 

8,965 

Perry, DA. 

60,155 

12,560 

Richardson, R W. 

1,500 


Nedzelski, E M. 

18,330 


Perry, SC. 

24,027 

359 

Riedel, D E. 

33,297 


Neesham, M K. 

4,448 


Petras, T L. 

74,375 

8,728 

Riehl,) M. 

2,979 


Nelson, C D. 

95,576 

34,134 

Petrie, S L. 

8,274 


Rignault, E. 

6,026 


Nemec, SR. 

30,704 


Pettersson, N J. 

29,888 


Rinfret, S. 

83,859 

16,904 

Neoh, FI. 

21,533 


Phillips, DA. 

75,801 

5,690 

Riva, A M. 

44,409 


Nera, L A. 

40,931 


Phung, B. 

133 


Robbie, D P. 

36,417 


Ness, M ). 

1,500 


Pierce, W E. 

259 

40 

Robbins, P R. 

57,450 

819 

Neufeld, L E. 

34,524 


Piercy, G N. 

41,403 


Roberts, J M. 

66,613 


Neufeld, R P. 

28,127 


Pifer, | E. 

26,921 


Robertson,) L. 

7,031 

30 

Newell, M M. 

35,699 


Pilley, S F |. 

54,504 

103 

Robinson, G. 

19,089 


Newell, TEC. 

62,269 

2,168 

Pivetta, M M. 

7,727 


Robinson, ) M. 

58,338 


Newhouse, T. 

36,540 


Plamondon, W. 

53,010 

260 

Robson, S. 

30,662 


Newman, R D. 

69,695 


Poirier, J A. 

42,692 


Rodgers, W). 

... 118,451 

4,453 

Newnham, L. 

18,119 


Poitras, M. 

31,786 


Rohrmoser, H R. 

118,451 

7,500 

Newton, L D. 

75,800 

7,896 

Pollard,). 

71,537 

2,325 

Rontu, P J. 

19,408 


Nichol, R. 

19,224 


Pollard, M |. 

18,833 

5,193 

Roosa, S. 

30,384 


Nicholls, M. 

... 113,678 

308 

Pollock, S R. 

46,373 


Rose, D)G. 

53,529 


Nicholson, R |. 

7,824 


Polsky Shamash, S L. 

74,375 

1,632 

Ross, T C. 

31,648 

50 

Nicol, J1. 

35,644 

664 

Polvi, D D. 

20,680 

484 

Rothwell, C. 

606 


Nieman, C. 

6,037 


Porter, R. 

22,660 


Rounthwaite, A E. 

118,451 

4,684 

Nightingale, E W. 

43,166 


Powers, RE. 

118,451 

13,732 

Rounthwaite, C |. 

75,336 

2,530 

Nimsick, L A T. 

... 118,451 

5,052 

Pratt, R E. 

65,756 

6,456 

Rowan, C. 

6,618 


Nitikman, R C. 

25,415 


Preddy, H W. 

1,720 

876 

Royer, T. 

31,799 

214 























































































































































































































































PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


Rutkowski, I A. 

Ruttan, C A. 

Sahota, P. 

Sail, C . 

Salmon, B. 

Salmon, K D. 

Sampson, J. 

Samson, P L. 

Saunderson, B H ... 

Scarcella, j. 

Scarlett, E. 

Scattolin, C A. 

Scherling, K I. 

Schmidt, E. 

Schofield,). 

Schulz, N G. 

Schuss, D K. 

Scott, C. 

Scott, G. 

Seager, S. 

Searle, R. 

Sears, W. 

Sharp, BA. 

Sheardown,) L. 

Shepheard, G. 

Shepherd, T A. 

Sheppard, A. 

Shewchuk, K. 

Shkuratoff, H. 

Shorthouse, R W C 

Shortt, C. 

Shum, E. 

Shupe, T. 

Shwetz, AM. 

Sidhu, S K. 

Siegel, M R. 

Sievewright, H. 

Sihota, P. 

Siklenka, B I. 

Silver, | R. 

Simm, E A. 

Simonds, R). 

Sinclair, G. 

Sine, K D. 

Sine, N M. 

Singh, H. 

Skrepetz, C. 

Sloan, N. 

Smallwood, N. 

Smigel, I. 

Smith, C. 

Smith, D. 

Smith, K. 

Smith, L B. 

Smith, N C ). 

Smith, R R. 

Smith, T. 

>mith, W. 

Smithson, V D. 

Smyth, D. 

■nyder, D. 

>oon, F. 

■parks, E W |. 

■pence, A. 

■perry, D. 

■pooner, PA. 

t Clair, F. 

t Dennis, J. 

t-Pierre, CC. 

tack, C. 

tack, ML. 

tackhouse, SR. 

tandish, C P. 

tansfield, H C. 

teele, KB. 

teele, PM. 

teenkamp, P J. 

tegar, G. 

teinberg, D. 

tevens, A F. 

tevens, C. 


Salary 

Travel 

$ 

$ 

47,936 

6,401 

32,788 


16,681 

145 

39,166 


17,098 

1,242 

45,335 


33,251 


17,617 

7,397 

118,451 

8,385 

36,447 


118,451 

3,511 

86,590 

1,212 

118,451 

2,543 

124,453 

12,228 

15,069 


12,776 

25 

46,108 


12,911 

2,935 

62,374 

1,740 

45,365 


776 


32,487 


83,859 

14,967 

19,213 

69 

730 


40,700 


23,916 


11,123 

295 

35,841 


102,137 

4,316 

38,264 


24,107 

10 

118,451 

7,695 

32,165 


37,786 

189 

36,840 


31,712 

1,367 

48,521 

11,750 

61,439 

474 

7,956 


52,726 

10,400 

43,810 

591 

118,451 

11,458 

26,545 


29,643 


91,575 

3,163 

22,053 

2,036 

7,219 

1,439 

1,396 


66,613 

9,859 

42,544 


79,188 

988 

118,451 


46,203 


65,914 


47,199 

3,245 

118,451 

11,939 

118,451 

6,076 

4,058 


118,451 

4,050 

43,421 

10,922 

67,955 


1,500 


118,451 

2,920 

118,451 

21,182 

30,814 


79,996 

3,784 

18,067 


38,001 


22,475 


1,050 

256 

91,231 

10,019 

58,659 


118,451 

13,597 

62,269 

8,947 

74,375 

1,585 

72,794 

34,648 

34,956 

605 

118,451 

7,013 

62,269 

3,892 

175 




Salary 

Travel 


Salary 


$ 

$ 


$ 

Stevens, R C. 

4,747 


Vandermoor, L E. 

42,691 

Stevenson, M. 

95,576 

43,256 

Varcoe, M. 

6,618 

Stevenson, R E. 

66,613 

2,661 

Vardy, DC. 

670 

Stewart, C A. 

3,802 


Varette, DA. 

13,681 

Stewart, | G. 

50,556 

934 

Vasilev, S E. 

34,641 

Stewart, M. 

58 


Vessey, M C. 

37,433 

Stewart, T. 

45,925 

998 

Vickers, C. 

1,500 

Stewart, W F. 

... 118,451 

4,289 

Vickers, P. 

59,952 

Stieda, R FI E. 

73,759 

1,157 

Vigod, T E. 

95,575 

Stockton, P. 

87,582 

8,084 

Virk, B. 

1,092 

Stone, D. 

118,451 

4,610 

Vowles, D A. 

62,269 

Stone, G D. 

49,044 

292 

Vyas, R. 

1,134 

Stone, T G. 

27,343 

2,973 

Wagner, E. 

29,351 

Storms, L). 

36,712 


Waldman, K P. 

68,949 

Strongitharm, G D. 

81,810 

2,542 

Walker, C 1. 

.. 118,451 

Sturrock, R. 

42,128 

392 

Walker, F. 

31,057 

Sundhu, B W. 

.. 103,928 

4,903 

Walker, | H C. 

91,231 

Surich, I. 

68,536 

14,648 

Walker, VL. 

16,699 

Sutherland, R C. 

14,222 


Wall, AS. 

71,682 

Sutherland, S. 

70,101 

2,008 

Wallace, G. 

97,480 

Swan, L. 

62,180 

2,454 

Walls, K. 

44,409 

Swanson, T. 

33,802 

155 

Walmsley. R C. 

43,150 

Sweeney, N E. 

46,115 


Walsh. I. 

2,034 

Swetlikoff, M. 

61,911 

10,092 

Walter, B. 

101,068 

Syer, T. 

8,732 

1,229 

Walton, D M. 

44,059 

Sylvan, A. 

30,932 


Warner, BA. 

6,906 

Sze, A. 

3,132 


Warner, R. 

20,315 

Takahashi, M G. 

43,568 

5,998 

Wasney, R). 

32,680 

Tayler, T. 

49,713 

331 

Watchuk,). 

118,451 

Taylor, C E. 

44,409 


Waters, R. 

66,613 

Taylor, J E. 

12,687 

30 

Watson, M. 

10,480 

Taylor,) G. 

43,452 


Waurynchuk, D M. 

.. 118,451 

Taylor, K. 

33,066 


Wauthier, V. 

16,082 

Taylor, L J. 

66,613 

12,408 

Wearmouth, I A. 

2,473 

Taylor, M G. 

83,267 

10,416 

Webb, P. 

70,107 

Teslyk,) A. 

2,437 


Webster, B D. 

44,586 

Tesolin, L. 

32,358 


Webster, K. 

4,125 

Tessier, A. 

12,529 


Webster, S E. 

24,281 

Tessmann, B A. 

4,453 


Weddell, B C. 

118,451 

Testa, I H. 

34,553 


Weitzel, FH F. 

.. 118,451 

Thiessen, M. 

1,550 


Welch, A M. 

25,894 

Thomas, J H. 

35,570 


Wellburn, K M. 

79,758 

Thomas, M H. 

118,451 

5,561 

Wellington, K. 

64,491 

Thompson, D L. 

18,423 


Welter, L M. 

62,269 

Thompson, N. 

61,086 


Wenaas, S A. 

41,893 

Thompson, R T. 

42,437 


Wenzel, K | B. 

36,732 

Thomson, L. 

8,817 

11 

Werier,). 

.. 118,451 

Thornhill, D M. 

9,197 

6,087 

Westerlund, D R. 

4,202 

Threlfall, J J. 

118,451 

3,817 

Weston, D. 

64,772 

Threlkeld, P). 

17,204 

Wharf, S. 

62,269 

Tieleman, B. 

16,956 

5,283 

Wheeler, M |. 

1,500 

Tokarek, D W. 

.. 118,451 

2,238 

Whelan, M K. 

61,120 

Townsend, R J. 

38,381 


Whincup, G A. 

11,067 

Tran, J. 

71 


White, H A. 

.. 118,451 

Trueman, C J. 

.. 118,451 

5,438 

Whitfield, 1. 

51,556 

Truong, S. 

46,285 


Wickstrom, N. 

42,834 

Tsang, P C P. 

55,264 


Wickstrom, R W. 

78,252 

Tsao, M F. 

14,436 

319 

Wiebe, A. 

12,154 

Tucker, D. 

33,074 


Wilcox, G P. 

1,500 

Tucker, G. 

4,097 


Wild, S. 

7,631 

Turko, B A. 

6,976 


Wilfert, L M. 

56,305 

Turley, E. 

35,731 

2,928 

Wilimovsky, C S. 

83,267 

Turnbull, E. 

37,139 


Williams, G O. 

71,681 

Turner, C. 

15,359 


Williams, S. 

29,651 

Turner, F3 A. 

49,018 


Williams, T A. 

52,181 

Tuson, N C. 

28,237 


Williamson,) A. 

30,772 

Tut, K. 

43,706 


Willing, B N. 

46,071 

Tweedale, A R. 

.. 118,451 

903 

Williston, | B. 

63,545 

Twomey, W. 

42,540 

1,190 

Wilms, S. 

36,382 

Tyakoff, A. 

45,681 

437 

Wilson, B. 

27,435 

Tyler, PA. 

40,716 

26 

Wilson, D S. 

36,929 

Umlas, R. 

31,254 

613 

Wilson, E |. 

1,500 

Unrau, L W. 

45,641 


Wilson, | N. 

19,080 

Uppal,) K. 

33,237 

5,585 

Wilson, RE. 

1,500 

Urquhart, K G. 

13,033 

166 

Wilson, S E. 

57,498 

Vaive, R. 

.. 105,043 

949 

Wiltjer,). 

1,016 

Valecourt, | K. 

8,897 


Winnig, S E. 

724 

Valentine, R D. 

63,949 

12,062 

Wolfe, M. 

1,529 

Vamplew, D. 

49,922 

835 

Wong, S S. 

71,682 

Van Der Kamp, E. 

5,124 


Wood, AC. 

12,309 

Vanagas, S A. 

51,591 

590 

Wood, E. 

73,861 


D 13 


Travel 

$ 


40 


5,098 

13,206 

7,988 

171 

9,231 

4,517 

10,896 

8,276 

2,057 

48 


11,235 

2,130 


4,100 

310 

17,783 


13,465 


4,972 

907 


5,810 

9,460 

767 

2,495 

561 

6,513 

951 

2,840 

5,307 

5,236 

7,709 

104 


7,408 

2,743 

7,579 


2,256 

2,081 

6,968 


397 

2,096 

53 

501 

8,599 


























































































































































































































































D 14 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


OIC and Other Appointees —Continued 



Salary 

Travel 


Salary 

Travel 


Salary 

Travel 


$ 

$ 


$ 

$ 


$ 

$ 

Woods, C E. 

12,261 


Yan, WH. 

7,540 


Zammit, N. 

4,981 


Woosnam, T L. 

1,095 


Yeomans, C. 

35,971 


Zhao, Y. 

9,634 


Wright, |. 

40,286 


Yip, L. 

46,319 

1,283 

Zhu, C X. 

7,636 


Wylie, KS. 

30,932 


Young, E. 

7,130 


Ziebart, L. 

5,124 


Yaholkoski, S |. 

56,477 

2,067 

Young, I. 

37,915 


Zimmerman, A R. 

15,859 


Yamamoto, K. 

66,613 

3,174 

Young, K P. 

62,068 

1,335 




Yan, RMT. 

48,167 

1,900 

Young, W A. 

97,311 

3,520 





'Salary includes regular base pay, overtime and lump-sum payments but does not include employee benefits. 
The totals for this section are located on Page D4. 
























PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 D15 

Other Employees 
Salary 1 and Travel 

for the Fiscal Year Ended March 31,1997 

(Details of employees with a gross salary of $50,000 or more) 



Salary 

Travel 


Salary 

Travel 


Salary 

Travel 


$ 

$ 


$ 

$ 


$ 

$ 

Aaron, 1 H. 

60,499 

1,470 

Alger, D. 

50,478 

1,133 

Anderson, W K. 

66,613 

1,426 

Abbey, T L. 

55,308 

10,665 

Allan, B. 

61,400 


Anderssen, H. 

56,105 

2,315 

Abbott, L M. 

50,684 

3,840 

Allan, D H. 

75,050 


Andison, A. 

75,627 

2,387 


51,233 

749 

Allan, |. 

50,478 

4,944 

4,566 

Andison F S 

82 948 

4,045 

1,784 

Abel,)) L. 

71,909 

2,872 

Alldrick, D |. 

63,646 

Andres,) R. 

58,826 

Abels, E. 

51,749 

484 

Allegretto, T D. 

52,364 

3,751 

Andrews, ST. 

66,613 

3,824 

Abels, S. 

52,280 

847 

Allen, D E. 

. 65,567 

4,746 

Andrews, T. 

50,047 


Abercrombie, S). 

54,921 

969 

Allen, G. 

56,477 

1,075 

Andriash, N. 

53,252 


Abiola, P. 

59,022 

4,052 

Allen, G R. 

61,132 

16,170 

Androsoff, W. 

65,684 

2,399 

Abrahamson, K. 

53,555 

2,872 

Allen, 1. 

55,438 

2,538 

Andrusak, H. 

75,925 

10,201 

Achadinha, M. 

78,271 

5,548 

Allen, L R. 

62,269 

2,331 

Angel, L E. 

71,450 

15,646 

Acheson, M. 

59,758 

1,901 

Allen, R. 

71,689 


Angus, G. 

50,182 


Ackerman, A A. 

68,814 

7,601 

Allen, RG. 

55,750 

3,026 

Angus, G A. 

68,814 

2,242 

Acton, R I. 

53,771 


Alley, A G. 

71,682 

6,744 

Annesty, PM. 

56,477 

1,624 

Adam, H. 

60,401 

86 

Alley, J A. 

58,180 

4,876 

Annett, R K. 

62,269 

636 

Adam, R B L. 

60,526 

3,705 

Alley,) B. 

67,384 

3,714 

Annunziello, J A. 

60,497 

1,587 

Adam, V K. 

50,115 


Allgaier, L D. 

63,427 

17,664 

Ansell, D B. 

60,382 

236 

Adamack, R. 

64,534 

54 

Allison, M |. 

50,478 

528 

Ansel mo, F. 

50,498 

3,612 

Adamic, A. 

66,471 

1,937 

Allison, R M. 

66,199 

741 

Anselmo, S. 

53,957 

299 

Adamick, ]). 

72,407 

6,460 

Allman, I A. 

53,730 

3,808 

4,063 

Anshelm, E W... 

52,673 

243 

Adams, DA. 

53,771 

Alman, M ]. 

51,959 

Anthony, M W. 

61,175 

381 

Adams, D T. 

56,456 

17,902 

Almond, B. 

52,231 


Antonishak, D E. 

58,789 

4,332 

Adams, J. 

56,567 

6,406 

Alvarez, J C. 

60,497 

11,059 

Antoniuk, S D. 

50,478 

4,013 

Adams, J D. 

64,615 

3,713 

Ames, D N. 

50,478 

8,475 

Anweiler, D. 

53,993 

845 

Adams,) M. 

65,327 


Ames, L M. 

76,132 


Apland, B C. 

71,682 

3,118 

Adams, M. 

52,849 

345 

Ames, N G. 

.... 103,489 

5,998 

Apperloo, G. 

67,487 

9,829 

Adams, N E. 

52,171 


Ames, P. 

56,477 

8,967 

Applegate, K. 

53,369 

31 

Adams, R E. 

66,269 


Amo,) F. 

55,222 

2,543 

Appleton, W G. 

54,871 

1,042 

Adams, R J. 

95,576 

443 

Amos, F E. 

64,854 

2,024 

Apsassin, S. 

55,167 

3,549 

Adams, R S. 

56,553 

1,202 

Amos, M. 

57,375 

224 

Aquiline, T. 

50,832 

88 

Adams, S. 

82,913 

768 

Amren, R W B. 

62,269 

480 

Aquino, F D. 

53,187 

54 

Adams, T. 

55,326 

3,546 

Amy, G. 

67,634 

3,855 

Arber, C. 

52,273 

548 

Adams, VC. 

50,684 


Anaka, D G. 

62,269 

4,427 

Arbic, DA. 

55,828 


Adamson, D G. 

59,743 

15,720 

Ananichuk, A. 

53,190 

756 

Archbold, G D. 

62,269 

87 

Adamson, R D. 

96,103 

1,557 

Anchor, T. 

56,409 

4,401 

Archdekin, G C. 

70,248 

3,792 

Adderley, D E. 

56,477 

3,704 

Anders, K T. 

54,452 

2,674 

Archer, B. 

53,088 

2,189 

Addison, R B. 

83,267 

1,466 

Andersen, D. 

62,812 

1,902 

Archer, B A. 

63,454 

1,341 

Adelman,) A. 

63,553 

1,584 

Andersen, G. 

64,859 


Archibald, D A. 

51,959 

1,159 

Adelson, L. 

71,682 

4,478 

Andersen, L E. 

60,624 

1,534 

Archibald, E G. 

56,477 


Aderichin, A. 

56,391 


Andersen, S. 

52,098 

17 

Archibald, P L. 

50,860 

3,541 

Adie, M|. 

77,474 

5,523 

Anderson, A. 

52,348 

273 

Archibald, W R. 

71,682 

11,679 

Adkins, B. 

54,449 

1,505 

Anderson, A. 

69,708 

446 

Arduini, J L. 

74,727 

169 

Adlem, A R. 

76,156 


Anderson, A H. 

77,474 

8,684 

Argali, E. 

76,156 

4,599 

Adlersparre, W. 

66,819 


Anderson, B. 

72,784 

2,113 

Arlidge, V L. 

50,267 

7 

Adlkirchner, AG. 

63,377 

232 

Anderson, B. 

51,357 


Armes, C. 

51,426 


Adolph, G E. 

78,489 

4,324 

Anderson, B D. 

84,289 

3,852 

Armitage,) S. 

50,384 

453 

Adzijaj, S. 

52,539 


Anderson, B L. 

68,856 


Armleder, FI M. 

64,770 

619 

Afshari, 1. 

50,684 

3,069 

Anderson, C B. 

60,327 

153 

Armour, K. 

72,370 

23,094 

Ages, D S. 

62,269 

550 

Anderson, D. 

63,313 

5,927 

Armstrong, B B. 

51,561 

1,230 

Agnew, R P. 

60,497 

197 

Anderson, D). 

53,771 

4,532 

Armstrong, D. 

50,788 

3,137 

Aharonian, D A. 

52,572 

6,232 

Anderson, D L. 

61,044 

1,809 

Armstrong, G. 

74,727 

1,237 

Ahmadi, K. 

82,737 

3,742 

Anderson, D V. 

62,269 

5,467 

Armstrong,) M. 

53,771 

481 

Ahmed, S. 

60,313 

288 

Anderson, D W. 

56,891 

1,215 

Armstrong, M. 

50,883 


Ainsworth, D M. 

70,926 

1,097 

Anderson, FA. 

50,478 

14,700 

Armstrong, M 1. 

68,547 


Aitken, R. 

61,375 

2,750 

Anderson, G. 

50,533 

2,554 

Armstrong, M R. 

61,245 


Aitken, S A C. 

50,684 


Anderson, G C. 

62,269 

2,189 

Arndt, H. 

58,256 

1,452 

Aiyadurai, M. 

57,289 

141 

Anderson, H D. 

59,660 

1,587 

Arndt, J. 

54,869 

752 

Akehurst, BCE. 

50,508 

7,093 

Anderson,) D. 

77,474 

7,842 

Arnett, K E. 

77,474 

2,434 

Alam, M. 

50,929 

933 

Anderson, K W. 

52,039 

1,230 

Arnold, J D. 

72,775 


Alberti, M. 

56,620 

763 

Anderson, L M. 

59,136 

1,777 

Arnold, W. 

63,080 

359 

Albricht, G M. 

76,150 

2,817 

Anderson, M. 

50,393 


Arnott, C L. 

50,684 


Albright,). 

59,290 

4,342 

Anderson, M E. 

62,269 

1,113 

Arnott, D K. 

59,468 


Alcock, R J. 

62,269 

5,187 

Anderson, M G. 

71,149 

14,981 

Arola, F S. 

54,218 

826 

Alcock, T A. 

50,495 


Anderson, P. 

62,269 

724 

Arsenault, G R. 

67,119 

12,661 

Alderson, N R. 

51,968 

566 

Anderson, R E. 

77,474 

4,660 

Arthur, W. 

53,771 

3,456 

Alexander, B D. 

62,269 


Anderson, R G. 

83,267 

7,518 

Arthur-Wilson, L. 

83,800 

1,636 

Alexander, B V. 

59,607 

2,422 

Anderson, S). 

51,760 


Arthurs, R L. 

52,098 

5,142 

Alexander, D. 

51,244 

1,424 

Anderson, S W. 

66,613 

9,441 

Ash, C H. 

60,527 

4,852 

Alexander, D. 

54,510 

9,230 

Anderson, T. 

51,406 

569 

Ashbourne, I L. 

58,133 


Alexander, L. 

54,392 

1,695 

Anderson, T. 

61,260 


Ashby, Y T. 

66,613 

561 

Alexander, R. 

79,361 


Anderson, T A. 

61,424 

247 

Ashcroft, J A. 

50,768 

128 

Alexiou, M S. 

50,220 


Anderson, T A. 

56,393 

2,439 

Ashcroft, R. 

55,809 


Alexis, C. 

50,429 

1,898 

Anderson, T R. 

50,478 

4,126 

Ashdown, j. 

67,424 


Alexis,) L. 

53,771 

178 

Anderson, W. 

50,587 

753 

Asher, D B. 

61,685 

1,006 

Alexis, P D... 

56,149 

8,367 

Anderson, W J. 

65,082 

15,245 

Asher, K. 

58,641 







































































































































































































































D 16 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Other Employees —Continued 



Salary 

Travel 


Salary 

Travel 


Salary 

Travel 


$ 

$ 


$ 

$ 


$ 

$ 

Ashir, M. 

51,332 


Bain, N A. 

62,269 

176 

Barnes, G R. 

64,878 

3,293 

Ashley, K 1. 

59,871 

13,999 

Bain, P R. 

50,328 

120 

Barnes, L V. 

54,692 

4,734 

Ashman, W W. 

57,504 

197 

Bain, R A. 

50,677 


Barnes, S A. 

50,478 

673 1 


58 41 2 

5 399 

Bains, J. 

50,877 

11,484 

Barnes, T G. 

54,098 

344 

Askew, R G. 

57^603 

86 

Bains, M. 

61,421 

1,670 

Barnett, D R. 

57,290 


Assonitis, G C. 

63,350 

2,416 

Baird, G M. 

62,269 

1,486 

Barnett,). 

51,818 

316 

Ast 1 

51,060 

1,219 

Baird, R. 

73,949 

53 

Barnett, R T. 

75,925 

1,093 • 

Atagi, D. 

51,449 

6,743 

Baja, E A. 

68,955 


Barnewall, B. 

56,553 

Atchison, C. 

55,086 

1,367 

Baker, B A. 

59,666 


Barr, F. 

95,576 

3,969 . 

Aten, W ]. 

53,771 


Baker, G A J. 

55,347 

227 

Barr, L). 

56,553 

4,503 

Atherton, B C. 

58,790 

443 

Baker, K. 

66,613 

1,742 

Barr, S W. 

55,620 

25 1 

Atherton, 1 1. 

53,771 

185 

Baker, K. 

58,033 

367 

Barr-Humphries, V A. 

69,957 

2,448 . 

Atherton, M V. 

62,037 

18,951 

Baker, K H. 

87,448 

5,963 

Barradell, K. 

61,021 

917 

Atkins, A R. 

. 115,596 


Baker, K W. 

77,474 

14,684 

Barratt, B L. 

65,172 

12,399 1 

Atkins, L. 

68,531 


Baker, R. 

56,477 

1,550 

Barrell, I. 

50,478 

1,379 i 

Atkinson, H F. 

87,022 

2,238 

Baker, R G. 

66,613 

3,286 

Barrett, I R. 

53,771 

6,037 

Atkinson, R. 

55,207 


Baker, R W. 

50,877 

1,044 

Barrette, P A. 

61,411 

557 j 

Atkinson, R. 

66,922 

533 

Baker, T E. 

83,267 

4,615 

Barrie, 1. 

51,664 

1,352 

Atkinson, R L. 

62,822 

1,412 

Bakowski, S. 

50,036 

10 

Barron, D W. 

50,478 

223 

Attard, M. 

63,950 

5,749 

Bakuska, L. 

50,429 

490 

Barron, L. 

56,400 


Attariwala, PS. 

67,670 


Balachandran, G. 

56,553 

8,744 

Barron, W D. 

60,482 

410 

Au, T W D. 

56,216 

128 

Balash,). 

54,273 

12 

Barrow, G. 

99,511 

8,872 

Aubie, M. 

59,860 


Balaski, A K. 

71,682 

7,181 

Barrows, R A. 

62,746 

51 

Audley, M. 

62,269 

3,605 

Balcaen, M. 

66,077 

2,530 

Barry, A. 

58,807 

18,415 

Augustin, R W. 

62,269 

2,985 

Baldwin, D M. 

52,271 

497 

Barry, | M. 

68,369 

659 

Aujla, A S. 

51,880 

1,149 

Baldwin, M A. 

67,398 

2,690 

Barry, T D. 

55,179 

3,577 ! 

Aull, I. 

72,032 


Baldwin, M J. 

53,987 

2,391 

Bartel, H. 

53,775 

1,330 

Aura, K K. 

50,287 

5,512 

Baldwin, T N. 

50,478 

402 

Bartel, PA. 

50,184 

1,632 

Auringer, D R. 

50,837 

498 

Baldwinson, C S. 

51,852 

513 

Barten, R). 

50,478 

2,109 

Ausman, D. 

59,312 


Bales, D C. 

64,010 

1,699 

Barter, LB. 

71,682 

17,575 

Ausman, S A. 

74,428 

182 

Balfour, A D. 

54,151 

4,740 

Bartesko, K. 

55,245 

3,879 

Aussenegg, T. 

58,191 


Balfour,) K. 

53,708 

1,933 

Barthropp, M. 

62,269 


Austin, B. 

76,469 

65 

Balicki, S. 

54,344 


Bartle, H T. 

56,553 

4,647 

Austin, T A. 

83,522 

14,878 

Ball, R W. 

50,876 

1,528 

Barton, D C. 

62,269 

388 

Avery, L. 

59,073 


Ballam, P. 

57,165 

10,601 

Barton, J A. 

71,682 

2,632 

Avila, L A. 

53,574 

312 

Ballantyne, 1 A M. 

62,269 

4,950 

Barton, S J. 

59,136 

1,330 

Aviss, K A. 

50,063 


Ballantyne, W. 

60,216 


Bartram, V C. 

58,175 

677 

Avril, S. 

51,695 

4,821 

Ballard, D L. 

50,357 

5,167 

Bartz, J. 

51,776 


Awmack, K J. 

53,839 

1,160 

Ballard, L B. 

50,429 

15,085 

Barwish, F. 

52,018 


Axford, I. 

76,584 

13,830 

Balogh, A. 

66,358 

3,808 

Basi, H S. 

53,771 

1,092 

Aykroyd, C D. 

62,436 

2,571 

Balogh, J D. 

65,199 

16,703 

Baskerville, F M. 

66,366 

916 

Aylward,). 

65,664 

259 

Balser, R W. 

66,613 

10,355 

Baskin, K. 

58,199 

6,458 

Aziz, KJ. 

58,186 

21,855 

Baltes, J C. 

66,613 

777 

Basset, A. 

73,340 

4,065 

Azyan, K. 

61,000 

684 

Baltzer Turje, R C. 

58,994 

593 

Bassett, R. 

90,880 

1,133 

Babcock, R. 

52,856 


Banera, N G .. 

66,613 

1,591 

Bastock, B E. 

50,478 

1,022 

Baber, G C. 

71,682 

4,771 

Banerjee, S N. 

52,535 

2,977 

Batchelor,) V. 

62,304 

232 

Babiuk, D W. 

83,267 

17,229 

Banford, B |. 

64,067 

5,260 

Bateman, B. 

51,61 1 

7,743 

Bacala, D N. 

59,042 

438 

Bangert, W. 

51,391 

1,651 

Bates, CSA. 

59,801 

805 ’ 

Bach, GT. 

61,216 

4,498 

Banham, D C. 

51,113 


Bates, D. 

50,065 


Bacharach, D. 

68,183 


Banks, S. 

65,613 


Bates, D L. 

56,553 

569 

Bachiu, L. 

64,446 


Banman, A W. 

62,269 

27 

Bates, F. 

62,246 

1,298 

Bachman, C. 

51,868 

3,452 

Banner, A. 

61,936 

5,241 

Bates, G. 

54,745 

575 

Bachop, S |. 

54,733 

7,197 

Bannerman, B A. 

56,477 

5,821 

Bates,). 

54,361 

640 

Back, G A. 

67,443 

2,698 

Bannon, F J. 

71,682 

8,559 

Bates, L. 

51,490 

868 

Back, 1 H. 

57,171 

281 

Baques, A. 

53,461 

60 

Bates, ME. 

60,414 

3,779 

Backer, D 1. 

51,387 

1,370 

Baragar, C G. 

54,000 

1,365 

Bates, PA. 

55,705 


Backer, R. 

56,521 

324 

Barber, B T. 

57,445 

9,414 

Batey, 1. 

77,474 

4,020 

Backmeyer, R J. 

51,606 

1,265 

Barber, F ). 

58,171 

8,658 

Bath, A L. 

55,915 

276 

Bactawar, B. 

57,210 

3,477 

Barcham, D W. 

66,827 

3,452 

Bath, R. 

60,025 


Badall, R. 

54,325 

148 

Barclay, B S. 

52,380 

439 

Batke, S. 

51,862 

4,234 

Badger, G M. 

50,155 

11,235 

Barclay, D A. 

59,131 

515 

Batten, J. 

62,547 

1,072 

Badger, W L. 

54,976 

2,482 

Bard, A S. 

50,478 

327 

Battles, R A. 

77,474 


Badminton, D. 

52,214 


Barger, W). 

50,478 

2,355 

Battles, R W. 

57,331 


Badowski, L J. 

60,527 

6,391 

Barker, B. 

56,080 

2,033 

Bauditz, C. 

53,985 

2,718 

Bady, B L. 

52,098 

1,453 

Barker, E. 

52,469 

13 

Bauer, H F. 

56,477 

2,463 

Baehr, B E. 

71,682 

15,059 

Barker, L). 

61,091 

4,280 

Bauer, J. 

53,512 

2,856 

Baerg, D M. 

55,282 

10 

Barker, R A. 

56,553 

2,150 

Bauer, P). 

56,660 

1,118 

Bagan, L. 

51,362 

206 

Barker, S E. 

59,136 

3,434 

Bauerle, H J. 

53,771 


Baggott, G. 

50,673 


Barkley, G. 

50,691 


Baumbach, R D. 

62,910 

1,036 

Bagnall, B V. 

65,518 

1,186 

Barkley, T D. 

68,089 

4,145 

Bawtinheimer, M A. 

57,901 

2,732 

Bahr, D M. 

96,474 

3,172 

Barkley, W D. 

90,560 

3,998 

Baxter, FA. 

88,053 

13,439 

Bailey, E M. 

57,775 

344 

Barkwell j J 

76 156 

16 335 

Bayley R 

59 681 


Bailey, 1. 

66,743 

601 

Barlee, V K. 

58,052 

1,058 

Bayliff, E L. 

76,156 

22,495 

Bailey, L D. 

66,277 

1,850 

Barley, A B. 

70,580 


Bay lift', ] L. 

60,059 

506 

Bailey, L M K. 

74,375 

3,314 

Barmby, B A. 

51,796 

536 

Bayne, L. 

82,023 

6,333 

Bailey, R A. 

62,576 


Barnard, A. 

50,005 

184 

Bayntun, T C. 

65,381 


Bailey, S. 

60,460 


Barnard, A J. 

.. 100,041 

3,297 

Bayrak, W M. 

50,478 

1,970 

Bailey, S). 

68,496 

1,044 

Barnard, B E. 

82,266 

5,845 

Beach, W I. 

50,478 


Bailey, W. 

62,662 


Barnard, D K. 

62,269 

2,372 

Beadle, E I. 

62,161 


Baillie, C. 

77,673 

27 

Barnard, K. 

88,295 

8,349 

Beairsto,) C. 

50,613 

332 

Bain, B E. 

61,052 


Barnard, R D. 

53,904 

870 

Beale, D. 

60,215 

























































































































































































































































PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


D 17 


Beale,) D. 

Salary 

$ 

61,434 

Travel 

$ 

6,864 

Bell. S W I. 

Salary 

$ 

98,155 

Travel 

$ 

2,682 

Betuzzi, C C. 

Salary 

$ 

58,446 

Travel 

$ 

1,946 

Beals, R A. 

60,527 

40 

Bell, WG. 

77,474 

6,245 

Betuzzi, S. 

50,762 

270 

Beard, W H. 

60,440 

658 

Bell, W H. 

98,222 

261 

Beugeling, R F. 

73,361 

4,434 

Bearpark, R. 

53,395 

983 

Bell, WJ. 

53,771 


Bevan, B |. 

51,003 

1,955 

Beasley, R 1. 

68,735 

6,089 

Bellamore, M E. 

63,870 

1,325 

Bevans, R E. 

65,472 


Beasley, T. 

76,156 

4,662 

Belli, S M. 

51,006 

120 

Bevans, R W. 

58,565 


Beaton, C. 

51,184 

154 

Belliveau, P. 

53,771 

1,035 

Bewick, D A. 

55,697 

1,622 

Beattie, B C. 

51,094 

11,440 

Bellman, L R. 

62,269 


Beyer, P G. 

55,340 

12,179 

Beatty Spence, I M. 

61,005 

2,784 

Bellows, ). 

99,511 

32 

Bhagwanani, B.... 

50,478 


Beatty, D W. 

84,365 

Belluz, T R. 

55,229 

3,200 

Bialobzyski, D. 

51,892 

2,097 

Beatty, C E. 

62,209 

4,512 

Beltrano, L. 

58,444 

3,343 

Bianchini, R. 

50,432 

2,807 

Beaty, RE. 

60,604 

946 

Belvedere, E M. 

67,706 

4,519 

Bibby, D E. 

54,301 

2,330 

Beauchemin, S. 

56,477 

1,673 

Belway, D. 

51,830 


Biccum, L T. 

56,700 

2,377 

Beaudette, R I. 

Beaudin, M. 

66,706 

50,429 

3,736 

Benbow, W A. 

Bender, R E. 

52,840 

56,477 

5,377 

537 

Bickel, N. 

Bicknell, E M. 

65,055 

52,712 

3,185 

Beaudin, R. 

60,293 


Bendtsen, H. 

76,156 

3,627 

Biddle, M. 

89,227 

280 

Beaudry, GW. 

57,169 

2,726 

Benedict, F A V. 

50,675 


Bieller, B. 

62,031 

330 

Beaudry, P G. 

57,567 

5,201 

Benham, W. 

59,063 

486 

Big, W. 

55,634 


Beaulac, L E. 

56,477 


Bennallack, A. 

55,787 

4,904 

Bigalke, R. 

53,880 

15,663 

Beaulieu, B E. 

52,771 

741 

Bennett, A N. 

61,895 

3,403 

Bigelow, D A. 

76,702 

6,894 

Beaulieu, S D. 

62,730 

557 

Bennett, E A. 

68,247 

2,645 

Biggs, D T. 

55,243 

7,111 

Beaumont, D R. 

54,640 

6,499 

Bennett, G B. 

60,665 


Biggs, G W. 

71,682 

9,202 

Beausoleil, P. 

80,612 

1,526 

Bennett, L A. 

56,477 

7,859 

Bigler, C L. 

50,906 


Beazley, R J. 

59,949 


Bennett, M M. 

50,684 

498 

Bigras, BAR. 

68,814 

5,932 

Becelaere, DM... 

59,446 

1,782 

1,401 

Bennett, N R. 

58,262 

2,902 

4,781 

Bilinski, 

55,608 


Beck, A. 

51,044 

Bennett, R. 

51,480 

Biller, R D. 

58,193 

3,463 

Beck,) A. 

56,266 

8,404 

Bennett, R C. 

59,136 

2,450 

Billing, D W. 

58,641 

4 

Beck, R W. 

62,706 

3,232 

Bennett, R E. 

73,189 

4,598 

Billingham, M. 

59,338 


Becker, A E. 

64,831 

671 

Bennett, T R. 

65,281 

1,434 

Billings, R R. 

53,843 

1,424 

Beckett, AC. 

66,613 

7,612 

Bennett, W R. 

50,684 

4,147 

Bilodeau, E ). 

68,183 

2,571 

3eckett, D. 

56,085 

5,505 

Bennetto,) D. 

66,613 

6,820 

Bilodeau, N G. 

60,287 

5,614 

Beckett, D K. 

53,733 

3,470 

Benskin, El |. 

83,267 

5,874 

Binder, W D. 

59,136 

2,188 

Becklake, P G. 

65,558 

8,739 

Benson, D W. 

62,269 

1,634 

Bindra, K S. 

56,553 


Bedard, B N. 

54,965 

1,224 

Benson, R A. 

66,623 

3,471 

Binks, L. 

71,964 


Bedard, M. 

Bedard, O E. 

56,078 

62,619 

1,144 

Benson, W. 

Bentley, B H. 

60,314 

58,976 

172 

1,684 

Binns, M. 

Bintner, B. 

54,130 

67,289 

3,459 

Beddoes, I R. 

56,592 

820 

Bentley, R. 

50,478 

11,954 

Birch, 1 W. 

71,682 

777 

Bedell, )G. 

57,592 

1,024 

Benton, D S. 

79,056 

18,624 

Birch, J M. 

71,682 

6,217 

Bedford, 1 G. 

Bedford, L R. 

51,898 

66,960 

17,402 

Bentzon, K. 

Berch, S M. 

51,130 

64,863 

5,340 

Birch, P. 

Birch, R A. 

56,013 

53,771 

3,058 

1,908 

Bedford, W C. 

77,474 

2,236 

Berdusco, R). 

60,279 

4,566 

Bircher, N E. 

74,969 

8,178 

Bednard, G. 

Beebe, J G. 

51,063 

76,762 

2,489 

1,510 

Berekoff, F. 

Beresford, C D. 

51,051 

62,269 

1,142 

Bird, C. 

Bird, G R. 

51,779 

53,518 

14,127 

Beech, IB. 

59,136 

3,815 

Beresford, E W. 

60,725 

3,666 

Bird, I. 

50,456 

2,928 

Beeching, L. 

51,991 

2,265 

Berg, G. 

50,966 

813 

Bird, R. 

51,936 


ieedle, B M. 

88,435 

15,826 

Berg, S. 

62,360 

2,991 

Birney, W. 

61,792 

391 

ieedle, R G. 

56,280 

1,670 

Bergen, A). 

51,645 

365 

Birnie, I R. 

65,000 

1,059 

Beets, ML. 

71,682 

2,253 

Bergen, R. 

50,575 

284 

Birrell, G T. 

59,136 

586 

! egg, D G. 

51,775 

489 

Bergen, W G. 

72,970 

8,389 

Birtwistle, R W. 

63,649 

284 

> e gg, K L. 

71,297 

14,734 

Bergman, LA. 

56,553 

3,920 

Birzins, P. 

60,069 

1,967 

Begin, E J. 

50,478 

1,446 

Bergstrom, BA. 

56,917 


Bischoff, J M. 

71,682 

1,790 

ehm, D. 

55,168 

9,796 

Bergstrom, K R. 

50,478 

2,459 

Bishoff, K. 

53,166 

152 

ein, P. 

einhauer, F W. 

53,636 

64,530 

177 

Berkes, CL. 

Berkey, S E. 

50,333 

57,297 


Bishop, A M. 

Bishop, D A. 

53,050 

51,030 

4,222 

3,383 

ekker, P J. 

66,486 

9,493 

Berland, |Q. 

72,949 

17,787 

Bishop, M C. 

62,269 

7,571 

elanger, MG. 

51,539 

2,991 

Bernard, L. 

95,295 

11,988 

Bishop, M D. 

55,271 

6,152 

elcher, A R. 

62,269 

8,078 

Bernardo, | A. 

61,679 

159 

Bishop, P I. 

58,685 

6,402 

elcher, B A. 

51,740 

1,128 

Bernauer, M A. 

54,093 

6,486 

Bishop, V D. 

58,208 

6,092 

eldi, S M. 

51,632 

333 

Bernklau, R. 

56,255 

270 

Bisset, KB. 

60,162 

8,827 

eleski, E F. 

50,478 

321 

Berry, D. 

52,749 


Bist, H D. 

51,196 

392 

elik, K W. 

77,474 

6,242 

Berry, D W. 

55,718 

1,220 

Bittner, B B. 

56,477 

336 

eliveau, C D. 

60,497 

341 

Berry, E. 

57,614 

6,433 

Black, D. 

61,764 

2,599 

eljanski, M. 

51,561 


Berry, J L. 

70,435 

4,328 

Black, E A. 

53,771 

2,254 

ell, A. 

107,695 

1,765 

Berry, M. 

56,712 


Black, M. 

54,170 

1,695 

ell, C. 

50,478 

1,767 

Berry, S P. 

64,773 

486 

Black, M. 

69,485 

1,700 

ell, D. 

51,634 


Berry, V. 

73,206 

25,830 

Black, M R. 

50,684 

59 

ell, D E. 

71,682 

12,667 

Berthin, H. 

51,146 


Black, R 1. 

57,810 

1,087 

ell, D L. 

62,269 

3,757 

Bertholf, C F. 

50,308 

4,378 

Black, W. 

53,204 


ell, EL. 

59,983 

1,602 

Berton, R P. 

50,381 

4,424 

Blackburn, D. 

58,244 

15,519 

-II, G J. 

65,652 

6,030 

Bertram, K D. 

53,741 

1,268 

Blackburn, G M. 

54,213 

3,817 

ell, J A. 

53,771 

943 

Bertrand, B T. 

74,297 


Blackburn, 1 R. 

56,903 

2,760 

ell,) B. 

56,917 


Bertrand, R A. 

71,682 

6,363 

Blackett, R. 

53,668 

2,009 

ell, LO. 

51,721 

120 

Berukoff, P P. 

50,478 

3,061 

Blackey, G ). 

51,641 


ell, M E |. 

52,369 

5,376 

Besharah, N. 

56,253 

24,767 

Blackhall, D. 

52,957 

10,713 

ell, PM. 

59,186 

2,284 

Besko, EM. 

50,478 

2,653 

Blacklock, R). 

53,771 

346 

ell, R. 

76,156 

992 

Bespflug, K E. 

83,267 

12,405 

Blackman, I C. 

76,156 

241 

ell, RC. 

50,837 

7,344 

Bessey, D. 

55,760 

133 

Blackmore, I L. 

54,900 

622 

ell, RJ. 

68,061 

6,259 

Best, F. 

60,593 

29,588 

Blackstone, 1. 

56,477 

1,616 

ell, R ). 

65,629 

1,012 

Best, L. 

63,927 

3,614 

Blackwell, G. 

66,879 

8,862 

ell, S. 

62,269 

1,257 

Beswick, | E. 

65,614 

13,597 

Blackwood, A I. 

63,094 

2,330 

i ell, SC. 

50,279 


Betts, M F. 

56,553 

2,947 

Blady, S M. 

57,274 





























































































































































































































































D 18 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Other Employees —Continued 



Salary 

Travel 


Salary 

Travel 


Salary 

Travel 


$ 

$ 


$ 

$ 


$ 

$ 

Blain, W. 

55,928 


Boomer, I. 

71,561 

2,521 

Bradley, R ). 

50,643 

1,600 

Blair, L. 

68,814 

5,225 

Boomer, W G. 

78,221 

1,223 

Brady, C R. 

57,365 

890 

Blair, LA. 

63,643 

8,202 

Boon, L N. 

73,835 

3,199 

Brady, D M. 

59,682 

1,463 

Blake, D F J. 

53,771 

1,923 

Boone, W. 

51,769 

100 

Brady, G W. 

77,474 


Blake, J. 

53,228 

433 

Boorman, R. 

54,883 


Brahniuk, K G. 

62,269 


Blake, M P. 

58,208 

1,151 

Booth, C. 

53,173 


Braidwood, B R. 

53,540 

15,855 

Blake, P. 

89,028 


Booth, M. 

66,334 


Braidwood, J. 

56,956 


Blakely, D. 

51,654 


Booth, R. 

67,661 

10,209 

Braithwaite, G. 

57,054 


Blakely, K G. 

53,771 

6,914 

Boothman, T A. 

64,450 

3,068 

Braithwaite, K S. 

73,087 

6,454 

Blakemore, K M. 

62,048 

53 

Boran, L S. 

53,597 

664 

Brake, D. 

51,276 


Blank, M. 

51,946 

2,041 

Borden, A. 

56,527 

454 

Brambell, C. 

50,684 

7,907 

Blaschuk, C M. 

51,334 

348 

Borkowski,) A. 

57,289 

3,242 

Branch, K ) F. 

50,530 

993 

Blasetti, F. 

83,267 

4,660 

Borman, G E. 

53,625 


Brand, D R. 

64,845 

7,346 

Blaskovits, R R. 

82,296 

13,828 

Borradaile, L). 

59,610 


Brand, S). 

66,646 

5,176 

Blatchford, D R. 

56,477 

889 

Borth, DA. 

60,401 

1,163 

Brander, B.•.. 

50,478 

326 

Blaus, 1)1 K. 

59,229 

20,512 

Borysowich, 1 A. 

50,996 

424 

Brannigan, J. 

50,025 


Blayney, L M. 

51,336 

2,953 

Bosa, S. 

50,581 

195 

Brant, R. 

95,578 

29,915 

Blazkow, P P. 

56,477 


Bose, R N. 

66,61 3 

1,965 

Brar, D S. 

61,646 

1,955 

Blechingberg, S D. 

90,880 

15,434 

Boteju, K 1. 

60,604 

2,364 

Brar, M. 

62,627 

1,571 

Blecic, B. 

50,478 

999 

Botham, P. 

53,931 

5,599 

Brash, W R. 

80,867 

14,440 

Blenner-Flassett, M. 

57,255 

1,282 

Botje, A. 

56,477 

285 

Brassington, J A. 

62,269 

2,884 

Blevings, G J. 

59,103 

1,335 

Botrakoff, G. 

61,484 


Braumandl, T F. 

57,906 

3,109 

Blight, RJ. 

50,478 


Botten, DA. 

51,336 

1,162 

Braun, M. 

76,156 

1,348 

Bliss, G C. 

50,478 

160 

Botterell, R H. 

51,586 

11,168 

Braun, R A. 

85,146 

7,636 

Blixrud, R G. 

54,973 

6,998 

Botz, U. 

57,839 

397 

Bray, J. 

50,478 

21,503 

Blizard, W WC. 

58,519 


Bouchard, I. 

53,578 

49 

Bray, P D. 

66,613 

732 

Block, FI | F 1. 

69,166 

2,033 

Boudreau, L H. 

50,574 

2,569 

Braz, J. 

60,497 

1,251 

Blocka, K S. 

57,839 

5,893 

Boudreau, P. 

55,983 

5,891 

Brazier, A L. 

80,432 

11,184 

Blois, J 

62,269 

30 

Boule, L. 

54,594 

593 

Brazier, B M. 

56,477 

2,357 

Blokland, W. 

57,561 

1,943 

Boulger, P. 

58,587 

562 

Brazier, H. 

65,041 

207 

Blom, F W. 

66,613 

4,047 

Boulier, A. 

56,735 


Breen, A. 

68,183 


Blom, K. 

62,269 

173 

Boulsbee, C D. 

84,162 

2,944 

Breiter, T. 

62,031 

923 

Blom, K. 

62,269 

440 

Boulton, D. 

56,477 

569 

Breitkreutz, A R. 

66,613 

5,380 

Blom, T. 

62,613 


Boulton, W. 

74,896 


Breitkreuz, E. 

61,434 

4,306 

Blomgren, H. 

53,058 


Bourcet, L E. 

53,483 

1,859 

Brennan, D T M. 

77,015 

16,233 

Blomster, G. 

51,844 


Bourdon, G P. 

52,683 

5,371 

Brennan, J. 

51,870 

2,564 

Blonarowitz, C J. 

52,768 

6,954 

Bourhill, T. 

55,454 

7,739 

Brennan, W P. 

57,586 

302 

Bloomfield, R. 

51,962 

1,912 

Bourne, P R. 

57,291 

639 

Brenner, E F. 

51,066 

554 

Blower, D. 

61,455 

5,826 

Bousquet, J A. 

50,749 

2,540 

Brereton, M K. 

65,562 

2,346 

Bloxom, G L. 

56,729 

296 

Bouzane, D G. 

55,729 

753 

Bresser, W P. 

63,949 

7,252 

Blue. V 1. 

62,269 

503 

Bovey,). 

77,252 

470 

Brethour, 1. 

66,358 

2,774 

Blumenauer, D R. 

58,256 

2,314 

Bowcott, M A. 

50,332 

1,998 

Breton, N ]. 

52^661 

4,644 

Blumer, D). 

55,014 

160 

Bowden, G. 

61,770 

300 

Brett, P FI. 

81,927 

9,682 

Blundell, G L. 

50,343 


Bowden, J M. 

60,948 

3,410 

Brewer, G P. 

64,845 

2,201 

Bobenic, M W. 

50,013 

138 

Bowden, R F..'.. 

57,509 

1,837 

Brewer, K N. 

55,153 

3,641 

Bobroske, W A. 

53,771 

7,921 

Bowden, W S. 

62,269 

900 

Brewin, R L. 

57,289 


Bobrowsky, P T. 

66,153 

4,783 

Bowden-Green, R E C.... 

56,477 

2,195 

Brewster, K J. 

53,600 

2,944 

Bodak, D. 

54,760 

2,816 

Bowdige, L. 

58,062 

8,200 

Brick, R A. 

60,440 

447 

Bodnarchuk, A J. 

57,794 

6,069 

Bowe, A. 

50,768 

269 

Brickett, 1. 

64,359 


Bodnarchuk, J. 

69,006 

29,842 

Bowen, D G. 

64,562 

19,689 

Brickman, E. 

52,000 

276 

Boettger, B W. 

50,478 

1,175 

Bowen, K R. 

50,478 

367 

Brickwood, K A. 

52,038 

1,604 

Bogdan, F. 

50,478 

5,919 

Bower, K. 

53,668 

2,292 

Bridger, S. 

62,758 


Bogle, T. 

54,121 

3,040 

Bowering, D. 

78,094 

4,261 

Bridges,). 

65,713 


Boissonneault, ML. 

51,673 

7,942 

Bowes, K. 

54,899 


Briere, L. 

59,231 

39 

Boivin, A. 

50,478 


Bowes, V A. 

60,604 

714 

Brierley, T H. 

50,478 


Boland, B. 

61,095 


Bowie, W S. 

60,401 

1,343 

Bright, B. 

60,425 


Boland,) R W. 

54,650 

488 

Bowlby, V A. 

62,813 

33 

Brinkac,). 

55,608 


Bollans, R A. 

60,604 

1,183 

Bowler, PR. 

50,478 


Brinkhaus, D M. 

67,041 

42,650 

Bolton, C V. 

56,477 

5,573 

Bowles, A. 

53,771 

6,776 

Brinley, D G. 

62,269 

542 

Bolton, D B. 

57,289 


Bowman, V. 

57,535 


Brinnen, W I. 

78,411 

13,336 

Bomford,). 

60,604 

4,826 

Box, D. 

60,615 

10 

Briskham, C R. 

51,118 

112 

Bomford, L E. 

62,430 

1,341 

Boyd, A. 

66,613 


Britneff, A A. 

64,668 


Bond, A FI. 

69,688 

14,775 

Boyd, C A. 

50,079 

1,780 

Britton, | M. 

53,771 

3,587 

Bond, A K. 

74,360 

2,504 

Boyden, H R. 

51,935 

3,848 

Britton, L F. 

53,153 


Bond, D L. 

60,604 

530 

Boyer, A L. 

56,736 

4,311 

Broadbent, L. 

61,904 


Bond, S. 

50,954 

736 

Boyer, DC. 

60,604 

4,231 

Broadbent, P. 

82,913 


Bondaroff, G F. 

52,610 

39 

Boyes, D K. 

62,115 

1,994 

Broadfoot, S. 

61,284 

1,014 

Bondaroff, H. 

50,684 

1,824 

Boyes, DR. 

52,124 

29 

Broadhead, G D. 

52,072 

3,170 

Bondi, K. 

64,005 

2,497 

Boyes, H E. 

50,008 

707 

Brochu, R F. 

50,478 

3,518 

Bone, E. 

62,246 

1,097 

Boyes, K R. 

54,248 

1,929 

Brockley, R P. 

64,482 

5,197 

Bone, R. 

61,213 

3,775 

Bozoian, A. 

83,267 

279 

Broderick, J R. 

77,519 

7,841 

Bonell, K. 

50,354 

142 

Bozzer, R. 

71,682 

11,516 

Brodie, D. 

82,913 


Bones, J G. 

81,927 

18,070 

Braacx, A. 

52,844 

17 

Brodie, J R. 

55,241 

1,074 

Bonfonti, ] A. 

60,401 


Braam, R C. 

57,412 


Brodie, P. 

76,156 

993 

Bonham, E W D. 

75,052 

7,285 

Braasch, T J. 

53,617 

1,643 

Brodie, R. 

60,604 

1,308 

Bonin, D. 

54,372 


Brad beer, ] E. 

91,242 

4,033 

Broemeling, D). 

71,682 

7,751 

Bonneau, P J. 

51,818 


Braden, M). 

51,141 

5,397 

Brohman, B. 

69,073 

693 

Bonner, K R. 

62,269 

7,525 

Bradford, P A. 

58,930 

5,186 

Broman, B M. 

50,651 

551 

Bonner, R Y. 

63,342 

1,659 

Bradley, A. 

57,809 

6,646 

Bronson, L M. 

50,207 

124 

Bonnyman, S. 

59,052 

24,830 

Bradley, A W. 

77,474 

1,129 

Broocke, J M. 

62,412 

1,741 

Bonwick, GW. 

52,003 

7,049 

Bradley, K. 

58,724 

2,306 

Brooke, D F. 

59,245 

1,680 






















































































































































































































































PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


D 19 



Salary 

Travel 


Salary 

Travel 


Salary 

Travel 


$ 

$ 


$ 

$ 


$ 

$ 

Brooks, D W. 

70,074 


Bryden, EM. 

50,684 

3,174 

Busby, P N W. 

50,478 

4,045 

Brooks, M J. 

54,250 

4,126 

Bryden, G BW. 

60,604 

831 

Busby, S L. 

50,499 

29 

Brooks, R A. 

56,477 

550 

Bryden, J A. 

50,591 

4,090 

Busch, R ]. 

50,308 

3,117 

Broom, J. 

53,695 

765 

Brydon, S. 

62,269 

5,514 

Busch, T. 

57,297 

1,025 

Brophy, A. 

51,818 

2,244 

Bubber, C. 

58,124 


Buschert, L. 

50,209 


Brosseau, G. 

55,579 

6,045 

Bubela, B J. 

50,276 

2,282 

Bush, GW. 

62,269 

11,288 

Broster, C. 

50,357 

2,080 

Buble, G J. 

58,256 

2,720 

Bush, 1. 

53,180 

4,982 

Brot, CM. 

55,523 

1,332 

Buchan, DM. 

57,289 

1,415 

Bush, K. 

55,112 

640 

Brouwer, J G. 

64,530 

1,258 

Buchanan, M K. 

51,818 

77 

Bush, K R. 

53,913 


Brouwer, S J M. 

59,979 

383 

Buchanan, N V. 

50,429 

23,257 

Bush, L E. 

51,336 

6,302 

Brouwers, A. 

60,778 

1,016 

Buchanan, R G. 

56,553 

9,345 

Buss, D W. 

76,156 

442 

Brow, R F. 

50,478 

8,526 

Buchanan, S M. 

60,398 

2,022 

Buss, K. 

74,791 

152 

Brown, A A. 

87,183 

8,370 

Buchholz, S. 

56,730 

7,307 

Bussanich, W S. 

64,537 


Brown, A C. 

66,613 

3,947 

Buchholz, S. 

53,058 


Butchart, D G. 

56,553 

2,809 

Brown, AER. 

59,136 

2,069 

Buchmueller, E S. 

52,390 


Butcher, G. 

56,261 

1,360 

Brown, A R. 

64,480 

206 

Bucholtz, P. 

60,794 


Butcher, G. 

51,431 


Brown, B. 

65,848 

1,163 

Buchwald, D. 

57,535 

2,243 

Butcher, G O. 

53,578 


Brown, C. 

51,627 


Buckham, T H. 

55,192 

1,966 

Butcher, R G. 

56,477 

1,818 

Brown, C H. 

77,724 

13,807 

Buckingham, A. 

65,326 

14,939 

Butler, B L. 

64,900 

8,362 

Brown, CL. 

62,090 

3,800 

Buckland, D. 

56,893 

2,689 

Butler, D. 

56,367 

2,716 

Brown, C M. 

75,135 

6,701 

Buckland, DA. 

55,044 


Butler, D. 

55,633 

1,260 

Brown, C R. 

69,421 


Buckle, J L S. 

83,267 

19,382 

Butler, D M. 

50,397 

4,724 

Brown, D. 

53,970 


Buckley, A J. 

72,540 

4,482 

Butler, F. 

56,908 

513 

Brown, DA. 

60,488 

2,524 

Buckley, D T. 

59,136 

1,101 

Butler,) M. 

83,267 

28,074 

Brown, D F. 

66,613 

6,856 

Buckley, M. 

65,848 

567 

Butler, M. 

56,796 

954 

Brown, D J. 

57,707 

825 

Buckley, M C. 

56,477 

140 

Butler, R R. 

69,357 

3,471 

Brown, D L. 

50,731 

4,722 

Budlovsky, A G. 

90,880 

2,890 

Butler, R W. 

66,613 

2,433 

Brown, D W. 

58,700 

4,552 

Buemann, S. 

56,477 

5,492 

Butler, S. 

62,269 

764 

Brown, G F. 

54,057 

4,425 

Buettner, R H. 

... 108,853 

18,633 

Butler, S 1. 

51,959 

5,312 

Brown, G R. 

56,477 

20,794 

Bugg, D. 

57,729 

250 

Butterfield, G. 

62,594 

532 

Brown, 1 A. 

55,401 

6,030 

Bugslag, R |. 

75,815 

4,089 

Butterfield, O T. 

86,388 

2,562 

Brown, 1 C. 

71,682 

2,245 

Buhr, G. 

52,280 

2,712 

Butterfield, R. 

60,656 

221 

Brown, J D. 

50,478 

477 

Buirs, M | C. 

59,330 

1,008 

Button, E. 

72,486 

1,518 

Brown,) L. 

50,218 

876 

Bulford, D. 

56,477 

4,875 

Button, J. 

60,899 

428 

Brown, J R. 

53,566 

3,962 

Bull, CJ. 

59,136 

4,206 

Butz, S). 

62,269 

325 

Brown, K R. 

50,150 

2,944 

Bull, H. 

78,738 


Buyar, D. 

50,146 

4,415 

Brown, LG. 

50,478 

3,621 

Bull, WG. 

62,269 

729 

Buydens, G F. 

50,478 

631 

Brown, M. 

50,478 

1,480 

Bulled, PC. 

74,728 

815 

Byers, B M. 

50,478 

258 

Brown, M J. 

63,476 


Bullivant, L G. 

55,998 


Byers, D L. 

71,682 

12,334 

Brown, N B. 

66,613 

2,879 

Bulmer, C E. 

53,578 

6,892 

Byers, J. 

66,613 


Brown, P. 

50,478 

6,827 

Bulmer, E. 

55,991 

8,247 

Byford, P. 

59,785 

373 

Brown, P. 

69,357 

501 

Bulmer, L |. 

77,474 

310 

Byford, S G. 

64,362 

474 

Brown, P A. 

62,770 


Bulmer, M. 

59,136 

2,879 

Byleveld, L. 

50,249 

3,290 

Brown, P A. 

53,653 

6,301 

Bulpitt, E. 

54,497 


Byng, D. 

67,550 

10,597 

Brown, R. 

60,685 

1,924 

Bunce, Ft M. 

50,478 

1,679 

Byrne, J. 

61,679 

391 

Brown, R. 

50,769 


Bunda, L). 

56,001 

183 

Byrne, S. 

59,878 


Brown, R. 

56,323 


Burch, C A. 

66,613 

9,784 

Cable, S H. 

52,949 

176 

Brown, R E. 

66,613 

511 

Burd, M G. 

57,289 

2,623 

Cadden, D |. 

59,136 

7,090 

Brown, R G. 

68,955 

20,618 

Burger, FI. 

54,505 

1,893 

Cade, L F. 

61,429 

11,300 

Brown, S. 

73,180 


Burgers, W H. 

62,269 

435 

Cadger, P. 

65,552 

22 

Brown, S. 

56,396 

1,601 

Burgess, D J. 

52,459 

49 

Cadieux, D G. 

57,710 

6,962 

Brown, S. 

53,565 

595 

Burgess, E A. 

95,022 

5,918 

Cadieux, T R. 

62,269 

271 

Brown, S M. 

55,820 

1,808 

Burgess, G A. 

50,505 


Cadman, F. 

55,347 

2,808 

Brown, W B. 

61,076 

579 

Burgess, J T. 

51,521 

2,918 

Cadogan, G. 

75,000 

4,875 

Browne, G FI. 

58,525 

1,027 

Burgess, T E. 

59,136 

776 

Caesar, R. 

52,092 


Browning, E. 

53,032 

260 

Burgis, W R. 

52,928 

723 

Caffaro, B P. 

55,015 

14,035 

Browning, W S. 

72,206 

3,155 

Burgoyne, S F. 

50,103 

782 

Cahill, C D. 

71,550 

10,967 

Brownlee, G. 

52,759 


Burk, P K. 

67,506 

1,285 

Cail, M ). 

53,150 

2,237 

Brownlee, G. 

50,478 

4,569 

Burka, M. 

71,133 

2,153 

Cail, R. 

50,387 


Brownlow, A. 

52,435 


Burkhardt, A E. 

62,269 


Cain, J. 

65,150 

3,080 

Brownlow, G W. 

50,684 

638 

Burkhardt, V L A. 

83,267 

1,484 

Caine, G D. 

59,136 

5,642 

Brownsey, G R. 

71,682 

8,138 

Burkin, B. 

53,276 


Caird,). 

57,335 

2,005 

Broznitsky, B. 

51,616 

3,705 

Burkinshaw, B G. 

54,251 

880 

Cairns, J H. 

62,269 

2,450 

Bruce, P... 

51,983 


Burkinshaw, W D. 

53,641 

1,186 

Cairns, R G. 

59,136 

1,106 

Bruce, R C. 

52,981 


Burman, C L. 

56,477 

450 

Cairns, R W. 

99,511 

141 

Brueckl, K. 

52,086 


Burnes, 1J. 

71,682 

2,073 

Caisley, M. 

62,269 

7,600 

Brugger, M W. 

57,102 

1,775 

Burnet, A. 

86,310 

7,927 

Calder, D. 

60,034 

604 

Brulotte, A. 

62,269 

2,426 

Burnett, D G. 

56,477 


Calder, DA. 

68,241 

337 

Bruneau, J. 

56,477 

1,594 

Burnett, S. 

54,702 

1,686 

Caldwell,) N. 

50,537 

2,631 

Brunn, M. 

50,478 

1,368 

Burns, M. 

67,204 

726 

Calich, S S. 

60,357 


Brunsgaard,). 

51,670 

905 

Burns, T E. 

82,296 

1,308 

Callaghan, K. 

51,328 

6,072 

Brunton, A P. 

50,478 

480 

Burns-Clark, T. 

66,326 

997 

Callaghan, M T. 

58,262 

11,213 

Bruun, K ... 

67,173 


Burr, M. 

53,642 

7,085 

Calland, N B. 

50,478 

407 

Bryan, B B... 

57,289 


Burr, R. 

60,030 


Callander, G R. 

66,613 

6,470 

Bryan, J E ... 

53,771 

1,181 

Burrell, R W. 

62,269 

619 

Callander, K W. 

58,948 

21,404 

iryant. D L. 

62,269 

634 

Burri, D. 

51,196 

2,455 

Callbeck, D G. 

77,646 

718 

Bryant, G J.... 

53,771 

3,242 

Burris, R F. 

65,947 

2,221 

Calver, L M. 

52,593 


Bryant, J. 

50,133 

1,082 

Burrows, B. 

52,003 


Camden, W. 

56,477 

5,469 

Bryant, P). 

62,269 

2,623 

Burrows, | A. 

60,527 

2,497 

Camenzind, B G. 

53,214 

259 

Bryce, HHS. 

56,553 


Burrows, W. 

76,156 

1,190 

Cameron, A M C. 

62,935 

2,306 

Bryce, K R. 

71,682 


Burton, K R. 

66,613 

6,957 

Cameron, B. 

62,988 


























































































































































































































































D 20 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Other Employees —Continued 



Salary 

Travel 


Salary 

Travel 


Salary 

Travel 


$ 

$ 


$ 

$ 


$ 

$ 

Cameron, D. 

56,477 


Carriere, G H. 

62,297 

2,053 

Chang, W. 

55,849 

1,637 

Cameron, D. 

63,942 


Carroll, K. 

54,044 

54 

Channell, R. 

57,155 


Cameron, 1 R. 

58,714 

1,671 

Carrow, A. 

65,332 

1,230 

Chantler, K E. 

51,021 

518 

Cameron, J. 

68,205 

3,933 

Carruthers, B D. 

51,141 

3,959 

Chantler, T. 

56,477 

984 

Cameron, L L. 

57,408 


Carruthers, M K. 

50,478 

1,697 

Chapin, G H. 

54,501 

557 

Cameron, MM. 

55,666 

5,560 

Carson, D. 

90,880 

2,961 

Chapin, M E. 

51,444 


Cameron, R. 

60,475 


Carson, D W. 

56,477 

1,172 

Chapman, B. 

61,612 

931 

Cameron, R C. 

55,807 


Carson, E. 

52,943 

3,803 

Chapman, B J. 

88,649 


Cameron, R H. 

56,553 

3,844 

Carson, G. 

66,342 

326 

Chapman, C A. 

50,684 

1,065 

Cameron, V Z. 

54,989 

1,481 

Carson, K R. 

52,108 

571 

Chapman, G W. 

61,613 


Campbell, A C. 

76,897 

15,762 

Carson, S. 

54,452 


Chapman, K M. 

71,682 

174 

Campbell, C. 

59,778 

3,457 

Carstairs, M). 

99,511 

808 

Chapman, R C. 

50,429 

125 

Campbell, C K. 

74,375 

8,935 

Carter, L R. 

62,269 

1,275 

Chapman, R L. 

83,711 

24,079 

Campbell, C R. 

68,996 


Carter, N. 

74,011 


Charboneau, S. 

62,269 

1,535 

Campbell, D. 

72,486 

3,000 

Carter, T G. 

68,955 

6,742 

Charbonneau, K. 

50,478 

909 

Campbell, D. 

62,269 

1,547 

Carter, W L. 

71,682 

6,365 

Chard, G L. 

62,269 

704 

Campbell, D. 

61,302 


Cartwright, C V. 

54,452 

9,614 

Charles, R |. 

64,348 

2,908 

Campbell, D A. 

50,478 

1,587 

Carver, A B. 

83,187 


Charlesworth, ]. 

74,482 

4,283 

Campbell, D A H. 

56,553 

865 

Carver, C A. 

65,784 

6,695 

Charlton, J. 

50,628 


Campbell, D J. 

76,156 

1,285 

Carver, PI. 

59,832 

493 

Charpentier, P J. 

50,564 

2,761 

Campbell, D R. 

56,477 

17,307 

Caryer, R. 

90,880 

3,999 

Charron, P. 

62,919 

1,874 

Campbell, D W. 

67,439 

7,345 

Case, B D A. 

59,131 

6,219 

Chartier, M G. 

50,478 

705 

Campbell, E B. 

55,596 

197 

Case, G R. 

51,463 

412 

Chartrand, R B. 

71,739 

1,002 

Campbell, F F. 

50,684 

165 

Case, V. 

51,102 

2,465 

Chase Wilde, L. 

62,269 

11,892 

Campbell, C R. 

50,616 

844 

Casey, A P. 

62,269 

1,317 

Chaster, S E ). 

63,142 

690 

Campbell, H M. 

62,269 

8,301 

Casey, R P. 

72,056 

12,574 

Chater, D. 

66,613 

7,954 


58 655 

6,245 

Caskey, PM. 

50,478 

589 

Chattel 1, D M. 

77,688 

1,069 

Campbell, I E. 

52,939 

797 

Casler, S. 

60,401 


Chatton, M. 

55,641 

2,283 

Campbell, I R. 

56,169 


Castledine, A). 

63,414 

5,674 

Chatton, T C. 

61,941 

1,914 

Campbell, L. 

60,486 

3,391 

Castro, CM. 

52,099 

477 

Chatwin, S C. 

63,582 

3,370 

Campbell, L A. 

56,477 

1,572 

Castrucow, M A. 

58,477 


Chaudhry, M A. 

50,478 

2,988 

Campbell, L R. 

52,728 

4,163 

Catherall, M T. 

54,036 

7,042 

Chauvin, D A. 

50,684 

770 

Campbell, M. 

68,053 

250 

Cathro, M S. 

59,746 

2,339 

Chay, DP. 

51,108 

2,016 

Campbell, O. 

62,950 


Catney, L. 

50,684 

2,206 

Chazottes,) P. 

61,522 


Campbell, R A. 

60,770 

1,752 

Caton, H. 

56,045 

66 

Cheesman, G E. 

54,006 


Campbell, R W. 

53,771 

4,654 

Cator, B R. 

50,809 


Cheetham, R H. 

53,771 

7,619 

Campbell, R W. 

50,103 

3,837 

Cattanach, M W. 

51,997 

1,387 

Chen, A. 

52,098 


Campbell, V. 

54,468 

518 

Catto, R B. 

50,478 

567 

Chen, G G. 

50,850 

1,507 

Campbell, WDM. 

50,311 


Caul, D. 

65,100 

14,189 

Chen, ) L. 

55,156 

514 

Campese, S V. 

62,269 

1,686 

Caumartin, A. 

57,590 


Chen-Mack, B 1. 

50,678 

4,063 

Campos, K |. 

50,502 

1,345 

Caverly, A R. 

50,478 

2,481 

Cheng,) R. 

50,181 

1,049 

Canitz, S ... 

60,530 

228 

Cawley, C A. 

56,477 

3,741 

Cheng, P. 

50,541 

422 

Cannings, R A. 

63,434 

1,748 

Cawston, G A. 

50,478 

533 

Cheng, RC K. 

56,553 

7,563 

Cannings, R M. 

71,677 

5,234 

Cech, P. 

55,127 

2,909 

Cheong, A. 

52,449 

10,404 

Caple, C N. 

66,613 

2,725 

Celle, P D.•. 

90,880 


Chepil, DGC. 

56,509 

187 

Capon, I... 

57,383 

106 

Cerenzia, R E. 

50,478 

1,817 

Chequer, S. 

50,937 

153 

Capron, J. 

50,283 

1,198 

Cervenko, C. 

59,527 

223 

Chequer, S E. 

62,269 

759 

Car, ]. ... 

57,846 

172 

Cervo, L D. 

74,644 


Cherkas, D. 

51,331 

1,527 

Caravan, H. 

51,050 

3,575 

Chadwick, M 1. 

74,728 

2,583 

Chernoff, L. 

55,249 

Caravetta, J. 

53,353 

1,689 

Chadwick, R. 

61,877 

27,088 

Cherrington, B I. 

56,477 

4,018 

Carbol, B C. 

80,428 

21,523 

Chalifour, A P. 

52,122 

328 

Cherrington, J D. 

.. 129,718 

306 

Card, | R. 

60,604 

718 

Challand, R M. 

59,392 


Cherry, D. 

63,901 


Card, S. 

50,543 

95 

Challenger, D A. 

58,671 

5,463 

Chester, T. 

51,519 

224 

Cardinal, J. 

51,159 

2,352 

Challenger, R |. 

50,861 

3,989 

Chesterman, M Z... 

59,168 

1,618 

Carelius, N. 

54,760 

8,941 

Chamberlain, H L. 

63,104 

7^403 

Chetty, G. 

81,796 

11 ’ 132 

Carey, M N. 

50,478 

1,852 

Chamberlain, R. 

81,581 

1,007 

Cheung, E. 

53,998 

244 

Cargo, J. 

67,246 

38,511 

Chamberlin, T W. 

94,332 

23,837 

Cheung,) C K. 

71,682 

3,260 

Carleton, M C. 

62,269 

3,638 

Chambers, A B. 

62,150 


Cheveldeaw, W. 

77,353 

321 

Carlson, D M. 

56,477 

2,016 

Chambers,). 

62,946 


Chew, B K W. 

50,501 


Carlson, C A. 

59,136 

670 

Champion, D. 

56,477 

577 

Chew, M. 

56,477 

9,500 

Carlson, ] M. 

50,684 

7,064 

Champion, | H. 

62,101 

1,621 

Chiang, A. 

62,269 

686 

Carlson, | M E. 

88,080 

5,491 

Champoux, K B. 

60,341 


Chiddell, D J. 

52,098 


Carlson, L. 

62,269 

1,644 

Chan, A Y. 

56,553 

403 

Childerhose, H. 

50,429 

1,666 

Carlson, M A. 

70,401 


Chan, D. 

66,613 

16,727 

Childerhose, R W. 

71,782 

18,598 

Carlson, M A. 

83,267 

11,663 

Chan, D. 

55,775 

1,725 

Chin, RSK. 

50,486 

47 

Carlson, M E. 

61,302 

1,958 

Chan, E. 

65,465 

2,083 

Chiong, P. 

50,478 

2,481 

Carlson, MR. 

61,510 

6,634 

Chan, ESW. 

57,315 


Chisholm, 1 C. 

74,727 


Carlson, S M. 

51,027 

2,528 

Chan, 1. 

54 580 

326 


68 742 


Carlson, V 1. 

53,919 

3,532 

Chan, i. 

57,457 

Chislett, G R. 

67,292 

2,993 

Carlson, W C. 

63,526 

38 

Chan,) K. 

58,942 


Chiu, L. 

59,364 

804 

Carman, B W. 

59,136 

8,021 

Chan, KC. 

58,895 

3,435 

Chiu, PK. 

64,194 

181 

Carman, C |. 

77,474 

1,127 

Chan, K H. 

54,043 

3,818 

Cho, D S. 

56,216 

1,205 

Carmichael, D G. 

71,058 


Chan, R. 

77,474 

8,222 

Chodeck, C O. 

51,193 


Carmichael, N A. 

66,613 

7,333 

Chan, S. 

64,773 


Choo, B. 

72,411 


Carmichael, W |. 

59,945 


Chan, S. 

59,778 

78 

Chooi, J. 

65,184 


Carpenter, D B. 

60,527 

3,635 

Chan, SC. 

59,136 

2,671 

Chopik, K S. 

62,202 

3,196 

Carpenter, K. 

62,269 

1,928 

Chan, S H. 

56,477 

791 

Chor, A K. 

56,553 

19 

Carr, E W. 

83,267 

1,999 

Chance, K. 

58,691 

1,823 

Chou, C. 

59,010 

4,263 

Carr, SI. 

62,269 

10,603 

Chandler, D. 

53,985 

964 

Chouinard, B E. 

56,158 

3,742 

Carragher, W E. 

69,166 

3,576 

Chandler, J R. 

53,617 

1,864 

Chow, B W. 

59,433 

7,501 

Carrier, R C. 

54,595 

5,211 

Chang,) Y. 

56,879 

545 

Chow, H B L. 

50,478 

4,961 



























































































































































































































































.M.MhM/wS i fflTT 


I 


PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


Salary Travel 

$ $ 


Salary Travel 

$ $ 


Salary 

$ 


ChQw, L. 

Chow, P. 

Chow, S H. 

Choy, H. 

Choy, J C. 

Chrisgian, O. 

Christensen, F H... 
Christensen, LA... 
Christensen, T C... 

Christiaens, S. 

Christian, K L. 

Christian, M. 

Christians, L. 

Christiansen, L M . 

Christie, P. 

Christie, S M. 

Christie, W C. 

Christman, J). 

Chrysler, D. 

Chu, H. 

Chu, W. 

Chuly, P. 

Church, B N. 

hurchilI, B P. 

hurchill, J M. 

hurlish, S). 

hutskoff, K. 

hutter, M|. 

iapponi, V. 

iccone, DM. 

iceri, R A. 


icero,J. 

ichowski, D. 

ienciala, E H.... 
innamon, AD.. 

ancy,) F. 

apham, B. 

apperton, D R. 

are, D. 

aridge, M. 

ark, B. 

ark, B). 

ark, B W. 

ark, DAM. 

ark, D B. 

ark, D L . 

ark, DM. 

ark, C. 

ark, CL. 

ark,J E . 

ark,J P. 

ark, K A. 

ark, KJ. 

ark, L. 

ark, M F. 

ark, MJ R. 

ark, N L . 

ark, P T. 

ark, R A. 

ark, R C. 

ark, S. 

ark, SC. 

lark, T A. 

'ark, V A. 

ark, V I. 

ark, W A. 

ark, W K. 

arke, A L. 

arke, ARP. 

arke, B D. 

arke, B F . 

arke,C. 

arke, E A. 

arke, C. 

arke, G T. 

arke,J. 

arke, L . 

arke, P W. 

arke, S. 

arke, W. 

arkson, D G.... 


80,887 

78 

60,401 

26 

60,169 

197 

62,269 

528 

72,568 


64,553 

4,216 

87,567 

3,304 

52,626 

1,031 

54,217 

5,698 

50,478 

2,261 

59,802 

2,848 

77,474 

11,146 

52,936 

5,230 

59,485 

6,735 

66,613 

2,649 

66,613 

8,037 

62,269 

5,408 

51,013 

655 

65,943 


64,242 

2,830 

52,439 


66,613 

5,495 

64,863 

1,118 

63,031 

8,768 

56,477 


77,474 

6,319 

69,357 

742 

53,936 

1,824 

66,674 

7,210 

51,492 

3,206 

89,527 

21,236 

54,153 


51,215 

8,979 

54,169 

2,814 

63,213 

2,450 

78,252 

2,047 

58,641 


60,081 

235 

52,759 


82,296 

2,585 

50,478 

46 

73,792 

6,420 

52,281 


51,276 

847 

71,351 

35 

62,355 

2,310 

53,771 

450 

54,640 

458 

61,198 

1,087 

65,082 

5,133 

56,553 

1,717 

54,420 


54,452 

1,171 

55,089 


83,115 

18,807 

59,136 

1,751 

50,684 

268 

62,269 


62,269 

152 

77,474 

5,681 

87,431 

24,907 

62,269 

5,124 

52,051 

16,905 

50,636 

243 

66,613 

656 

71,682 

161 

88,649 


54,166 

5,367 

50,616 

257 

68,814 

4,801 

54,218 

715 

53,617 

5,633 

56,477 

3,351 

56,477 

5,179 

68,344 


56,430 

2,630 

55,588 

3,628 

64,841 

1,617 

52,911 


53,272 

2,369 

55,942 

4,753 


Clarkson, 1. 

62,236 

3,202 

Collison-Baker, J1_ 

51,336 

Clarkson, L J. 

50,478 

1,388 

Collisson, W D. 

77,474 

Clarkson, M E. 

60,966 

2,256 

Colman, I L. 

66,683 

Clarkson, N D. 

59,398 

3,785 

Colmer, R. 

55,091 

Clarotto, A. 

59,408 

5,136 

Colombo, A F. 

62,537 

Clavora, M. 

62,168 


Colquhoun, R. 

53,002 

Clay, M M. 

55,900 

4,224 

Colussi, D L. 

66,818 

Clease, K A. 

54,345 

783 

Colvey, R P. 

59,791 

Cleaver, M C. 

76,737 

3,597 

Colwell, C. 

56,001 

Cleland, F E. 

56,477 

2,465 

Colwell, DC. 

54,736 

Clements, G W. 

90,880 

8,169 

Combs, S W. 

54,452 

Clements, R J. 

53,771 

2,096 

Comeau, P C. 

62,178 

Clements, S. 

53,432 


Common, A R. 

52,398 

Clements-Currier, C M... 

50,478 

878 

Common, S H. 

58,759 

Clemmons, E L. 

54,361 

1,011 

Condotta, S. 

59,079 

Clermont, G M. 

55,909 


Congdon,B E. 

51,063 

Clevette, R E. 

66,613 

10,394 

Conlin, B M. 

57,906 

Clews, SC. 

66,348 

325 

Conlin, D. 

58,513 

Cliffe, L M. 

53,419 

1,363 

Conlin, L. 

55,737 

Clifford, T. 

62,709 

3,216 

Conlin, T. 

53,771 

Clifford, WD. 

50,422 

849 

Connal, L G. 

67,632 

Clifton, C. 

64,350 


Connaty, C L. 

82,023 

Climie, R I. 

64,156 

4,669 

Connell, J. 

63,308 

Cline, B. 

52,164 

9,129 

Conner, G I. 

62,269 

Clough, P J. 

62,269 

410 

Connolly, J. 

62,521 

Cloutier, A. 

53,047 

237 

Connolly, P. 

59,789 

Clow, S M. 

52,343 

246 

Connolly, R L. 

77,474 

Clowers, R. 

57,474 

100 

Connoly, R A. 

57,798 

Clugston, P H. 

58,722 

8,741 

Connor, J. 

62,072 

Clugston, R E. 

60,604 


Connor, K). 

88,649 

Co, ] G C. 

53,468 

202 

Connor, M J. 

64,863 

Coady, W L. 

60,169 

345 

Connor, R. 

62,754 

Coates, 1 R. 

66,613 

368 

Connors,) R. 

63,676 

Coates, J W. 

64,863 

996 

Conquist, I. 

60,604 

Coates, K D. 

57,524 

3,622 

Conrad, C. 

89,535 

Coates, R D. 

64,428 

1,662 

Conrad, R A. 

51,558 

Cober, W A. 

50,783 

4,671 

Conroy, C M. 

51,621 

Cochrane, A. 

51,449 

202 

Conroy, 1. 

60,401 

Cochrane, R N. 

51,020 

4,424 

Conroy, K A. 

50,477 

Cockburn, T C. 

53,771 

10 

Constantine, I. 

61,529 

Cocke, T R. 

63,832 

3,106 

Conte, R J. 

62,269 

Cocking, J. 

59,136 

2,651 

Contorines, ]. 

59,136 

Cockrell, L C. 

51,209 

642 

Conway, K. 

62,269 

Coe, D K. 

59,136 

1,469 

Cook, D. 

59,136 

Coe, J. 

53,771 

4,874 

Cook, J C. 

52,461 

Coelho, S. 

59,655 

3,106 

Cook, | R. 

64,757 

Cogan, M. 

56,477 

4,256 

Cook, 1 . 

57,234 

Coghill, R. 

57,497 


Cook, M. 

66,974 

Cohen, S. 

82,296 


Cook, PH. 

62,365 

Cohene, L S. 

67,706 

1,522 

Cook, R. 

59,721 

Colclough, M |. 

55,889 

8,945 

Cook, R J. 

50,478 

Coldwell, K. 

50,478 


Cook, S ). 

58,610 

Cole, B. 

62,269 

8,545 

Cook, W R. 

57,652 

Cole, G. 

67,706 

136 

Cooke, C. 

53,771 

Cole, J V. 

50,835 

1,041 

Cooke, L. 

50,451 

Cole, PR. 

66,478 


Cooke, M B. 

71,682 

Cole, S. 

53,402 

1,259 

Cooke, S. 

82,296 

Coleman, B. 

50,678 


Cookson, B W. 

59,255 

Coleman, B L. 

68,208 

16,397 

Cookson, C. 

55,179 

Coleman, DA. 

60,604 

2,329 

Cooley, S. 

57,149 

Colgan, J A. 

63,888 

2,589 

Coombe, DC. 

59,136 

Coligado, M. 

53,771 


Coombe, J M. 

59,549 

Collard, A. 

58,006 


Coomber, H G. 

70,992 

Collev, W. 

71,323 

10 

Coombs, C A. 

63,038 

Collier, AT. 

83,267 

9,251 

Coombs, J. 

63,922 

Collier, B. 

54,062 


Coombs, R M. 

53,771 

Collier, R. 

63,009 


Coon, L M. 

72,051 

Collinge, D). 

58,504 

415 

Cooney, GW. 

64,530 

Collinge, M D. 

54,452 

412 

Cooper, K R. 

50,478 

Collingwood, K A. 

83,267 

16,852 

Cooper, MW. 

56,547 

Collins, A E. 

60,271 

403 

Cooper, R. 

50,681 

Collins, B J. 

66,613 

1,269 

Cooper, T J. 

66,613 

Collins, D. 

53,943 

364 

Cooper, W H. 

59,032 

Collins, M. 

66,663 

1,714 

Coopersmith, D J. 

60,135 

Collins, M J. 

50,857 

1,326 

Copeland, D M. 

60,330 

Collins, V. 

52,357 

12,575 

Copeland, K R. 

65,609 

Collins, WJ. 

50,488 

289 

Copeland, L D. 

66,613 

Col Ms, K C. 

53,771 


Copley, G. 

90,880 

Collis, M. 

60,679 

34 

Copley,) C. 

54,176 

Collison, M. 

66,629 

2,188 

Copley, R O. 

51,336 

Collison, M D. 

51,950 


Corak, R M. 

51,247 


D 21 


Travel 

$ 

2,880 

19,091 

2,981 

4,160 

2,053 

5,363 

1,457 

1,937 
4,577 
8,768 
526 
1,857 
9,873 
872 
161 
6,310 
2,511 
7,656 
382 
7,688 

230 


18,810 


2,946 

403 

4,608 

261 

9,649 

168 

1,195 

4,751 

2,457 

1,689 

1,075 

137 

136 

5,161 

1,031 

957 

1,915 

7,255 

384 

5,632 

3,464 

8,009 

1,060 

2,187 

6,207 

172 

703 

2,412 

288 

4,286 

434 

4,317 

12,832 

4,363 

1,929 


9,126 

1,820 

6,931 

1,211 
6,890 
12,389 

832 

9,325 




























































































































































































































































D 22 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Other Employees —Continued 



Salary 

Travel 


Salary 

Travel 


Salary 

Travel 


$ 

$ 


$ 

$ 


$ 

$ 

Corbeil, M. 

87,148 

12,995 

Cramer, G. 

81,991 

8,572 

Currie, V A. 

56,300 

5,821 

Corbett, I N. 

52,778 

3,362 

Crampton, G. 

85,221 

7,164 

Curry, B. 

56,477 

1,825 

Corbin, W. 

52,949 


Cran, G J. 

62,269 

14,967 

Curry, B. 

77,992 


Corbin-Charman, E M.... 

56,477 

14,702 

Crane, AH. 

50,478 

470 

Curtis, G W. 

83,267 

2,493 

Corder, R |. 

66,61 3 

14,298 

Crane, G. 

58,892 


Curtis, |. 

69,048 


Corey, R E. 

58,732 

1,197 

Crane, W. 

52,098 


Curtis, R. 

70,462 

15,167 

Cormack, C. 

50,684 


Cranston, R S. 

60,527 

3,301 

Cusack, B. 

56,590 


Cormack, L J. 

56,477 


Craven, D. 

56,247 

6,309 

Cutbill, T ) E. 

53,352 

2,701 

Cormier, R M. 

51,666 

539 

Crawford, K 1 R. 

52,597 

1,782 

Cutcher, M C P. 

53,617 


Cornelis, B V. 

50,888 

6,453 

Crawford, R. 

51,759 


Cuthbert, B. 

51,564 

3,092 

Cornfield, C I. 

51,467 

826 

Crawford, R C. 

71,682 

5,556 

Cuthbert, B S. 

63,150 


Cornick,) D. 

56,477 

583 

Crawford, S G. 

57,728 

1,829 

Cuthbert, | T. 

52,908 

1,842 

Corrado, M. 

58,146 

22,675 

Crawley, K J. 

61,740 


Cuthbert, T B. 

74,727 


Corraini, K D. 

66,61 3 

10,077 

Crawshaw, A. 

74,727 


Cuthbert, V. 

53,013 

2,605 

Corrigal, D C. 

59,051 

3,745 

Creber, R I. 

70,846 

6,206 

Cutler, A. 

63,854 

2,078 

Corrigal, R B. 

62,269 

2,138 

Creed, N A. 

56,429 


Cutler, R F. 

51,354 

1,507 

Corrigan, K J H. 

56,477 

3,478 

Creighton, C C. 

71,682 

256 

Cutler, W. 

57,331 


Corsbie, ] B. 

83,267 

2,003 

Creighton, M A. 

66,613 

1,353 

Cyr, B S. 

54,591 

711 

Cosens, AC. 

50,478 

5,391 

Cresswell, M E. 

62,269 

1,109 

Cyr, DS. 

52,753 

1,109 

Cosgrove, D ). 

61,589 

10 

Creyke, T. 

50,592 


Cyrenne, H. 

55,554 

1,590 

Cosgrove, I A. 

59,172 

807 

Crichton, W H. 

61,559 


Czech, N A. 

70,996 


Costello, K. 

62,317 

10,314 

Crickmore, M J. 

54,648 

1,004 

Czernick, G G. 

50,566 

8,895 

Costello, R A. 

60,527 

2,898 

Crider, I R. 

60,835 

1,450 

Czillinger-Horvath, E. 

60,527 

1,306 

Costerton, R W. 

50,877 

747 

Crinkley, B. 

65,663 

458 

D'Altroy, D G. 

56,477 

367 

Cotter, A. 

51,076 


Crisp, N. 

51,462 

3,809 

D'Argis, F. 

65,950 


Cotton, R E. 

59,088 


Crispin, D J. 

50,954 


D-Easum, S. 

50,828 


Cottrell, L. 

71,922 

4,012 

Crocker, P. 

50,684 


Dacho, F H. 

62,269 

7,177 

Cottrell, T B. 

54,839 

521 

Crompton, P J. 

71,682 


Daenckaert, B R. 

55,702 

5,225 

Cottyn, C M. 

55,858 

281 

Cronin, R F. 

99,767 

3,218 

Dafoe, I. 

60,895 

2,187 

Couch, D P. 

72,792 


Cronkhite, A. 

50,273 

133 

Dagdick, B. 

77,474 

591 

Coughlin, C. 

68,183 

581 

Crook, R L. 

83,267 

15,149 

Dagg, M T. 

86,462 

324 

Coulis, C A. 

62,078 

3,236 

Crooks, | D. 

50,920 

749 

Dahl, B. 

51,919 

1,313 

Coulson, C H. 

84,720 

331 

Crosby, 1 G. 

51,401 

2,405 

Dahl, R K. 

51,208 

1,843 

Coulson, P F. 

70,714 


Crosby, R J B. 

63,667 

85 

Dahl, V. 

53,421 

2,979 

Coulter, D R. 

50,478 

803 

Cross, A N. 

50,671 

67 

Dahli, E. 

62,269 

5,439 

Coulter, FA. 

53,706 


Cross, CW. 

53,771 

6,490 

Dahlie, M. 

74,379 

5,588 

Coupland, M. 

57,442 


Cross, S E. 

56,877 

138 

Dahlin, S. 

66,613 

6,768 

Courchene, M. 

67,277 

1,102 

Croston, B. 

55,644 

57 

Daigle, P W. 

56,915 

4,984 

Couroux, R |. 

56,477 

812 

Crottey, R. 

53,657 

538 

Daines, D M. 

53,830 

592 

Courson, D E. 

69,406 

3,077 

Crowther, D B. 

53,381 

824 

Daintith, N M. 

55,004 

2,163 

Courtin, P). 

60,527 

5,387 

Crowther, M G. 

90,445 


Dalby, RSG. 

56,477 

275 

Cousens, G C. 

50,478 

1,428 

Crozier, B M. 

50,284 

971 

Dailey, WC. 

60,838 

363 

Cousins, B M. 

60,526 

1,750 

Crazier, R. 

50,498 

132 

Dallin, L L. 

64,994 

4,564 

Coutanche, B D. 

67,379 

5,686 

Crozier, R J. 

71,682 

3,640 

Daloise, R E. 

66,613 

7,133 

Covay, JR. 

53,771 

2,429 

Cruickshank, D. 

60,164 

156 

Dalpre, R R. 

63,521 

17,862 

Covington, J. 

51,103 


Cruickshank, J G. 

50,877 

1,220 

Dalrymple, R J. 

60,604 

762 

Cowan, C. 

56,689 


Cruickshank, M A P. 

54,272 

2,211 

Dalton, E L. 

50,429 

3,780 

Cowan, L. 

72,019 

539 

Cruickshank, P. 

67,423 

452 

Dalziel, R R. 

77,474 

22,428 

Coward, R N. 

51,647 

6,414 

Cruickshanks, P. 

60,876 


Dance, P. 

60,227 


Cowderoy, J. 

54,207 

1,976 

Cruise, K R. 

50,478 

1,689 

Danchuk, K D. 

54,248 

2,202 

Cowell, CE. 

54,995 

1,070 

Cuddihey, B. 

53,378 

494 

Danderfer, R ). 

77,474 

3,620 

Cowell, 1. 

79,272 

13,325 

Culbertson, S F. 

94,727 

21,907 

Daniel, G D. 

66,983 


Cowell, J. 

69,248 

33,055 

Culham, J M. 

62,269 


Daniel, M. 

66,286 

3,207 

Cowen, J S. 

74,945 


Culhane, V F. 

51,531 

765 

Danielson, K. 

50,844 

5,167 

Cowie,). 

50,478 

7,468 

Cullen, A F. 

99,511 

1,808 

Danjou, B N. 

59,426 

2,639 

Cowland, C R. 

58,651 

4,283 

Cullen, K 1. 

76,221 

9,422 

Daradics, DA. 

54,859 

50 

Cowland, U E C. 

66,641 

2,706 

Cullinane, PM. 

70,893 

4,264 

Dare, D. 

61,024 

5,122 

Cowley, MM. 

62,269 

9,554 

Culm, R J. 

51,696 

486 

Darling, M T. 

74,043 


Cox, B F. 

62,269 

233 

Culos, D. 

66,151 


Darling, S D. 

57,472 

5,311 

Cox, B N. 

71,682 

2,146 

Cumming, D W. 

53,771 

196 

Dary, C G. 

66,613 

9,389 

Cox, R K. 

72,745 

24,815 

Cumming, H W. 

56,664 


Darychuk, G M. 

62,908 

2,624 

Cox, R K. 

59,334 

4,866 

Cummings, J. 

71,233 

4,135 

Dash, E K. 

50,268 

6,777 

Cox, S F P. 

53,277 


Cunningham, C M. 

76,156 

603 

Dasnieres, P V. 

86,441 


Cox, T. 

74,727 


Cunningham, D B. 

50,478 

1,735 

Datoff, S M. 

50,877 

454 

Cox, T W. 

62,209 

831 

Cunningham, D C. 

71,682 

637 

Daubner, M L. 

50,478 

707 

Cox, W V. 

50,937 

3,733 

Cunningham, H J. 

50,478 

6,601 

Davey, DA. 

50,962 

639 

Coyle, R L. 

51,107 

2,344 

Cunningham, ). 

53,262 


Davey, R J. 

50,823 

751 

Coyne, AC. 

56,995 

227 

Cunningham, K G. 

62,269 

5,274 

David, J E. 

58,694 

1,980 

Coyne, 1 P. 

56,553 

2,034 

Cunningham, P. 

76,318 

8,877 

Davidson, A. 

71,682 

3,044 

Cozens, R D. 

61,933 

6,341 

Cunningham, S. 

52,346 

6,029 

Davidson, G W. 

50,478 

3,967 

Crabtree, R J. 

60,401 


Cunningham, S A. 

56,068 

612 

Davidson, G W. 

60,604 

4,738 

Craft, PS. 

51,615 


Curnow, R L. 

64,220 


Davidson, H. 

50,517 

654 

Cragg, D. 

61,624 

103 

Curran, M P. 

58,525 

8,113 

Davidson, K J. 

91,231 

11,352 

Cragg, R. 

53,691 


Currie, A. 

62,374 

3,914 

Davidson, W F. 

57,741 

1,508 

Craig, F E. 

77,474 

893 

Currie, B J. 

55,347 


Davies, D. 

53,357 

1,916 

Craig, G. 

71,333 

42 

Currie, D A. 

57,261 

312 

Davies, D. 

50,939 

247 

Craig, K. 

51,503 

3,791 

Currie, D S. 

50,478 

803 

Davies, D G. 

74,845 

1,112 

Craig, L. 

50,245 


Currie, G D N. 

63,307 

10 

Davies, E O. 

66,613 

150 

Craig, R ! . 

59,136 

4,125 

Currie, J S. 

50,478 

1,854 

Davies, G. 

61,316 

3,276 

Craig, S M. 

56,553 

4,031 

Currie, L M. 

66,613 

8,247 

Davies, 1C. 

65,313 

1,384 

Cramer, W J. 

52,168 


Currie, S. 

67,756 

2,486 

Davies,) C. 

57,335 

6,387 
























































































































































































































































PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


D 23 



Salary 

Travel 


Salary 

Travel 


Salary 

Travel 


$ 

$ 


$ 

$ 


$ 

$ 

avies, K. 

61,521 

1,111 

DeBock, D W. 

52,787 

10,096 

Dickson, C B. 

62,269 

5,657 

avies, L F. 

58,615 

4,470 

Deboer, P P. 

50,877 

3,187 

Dickson, D L. 

51,699 

652 

avies, M. 

76,156 

8,663 

Deboer, R. 

57,839 

6,124 

Dickson, G S. 

74,375 

4,588 

avies, PE. 

61,772 

1,567 

Deboice, R |. 

77,474 

1,942 

Dickson, H J. 

83,267 

1,766 

avies, R). 

77,949 

1,825 

Deboo, R F. 

64,863 

659 

Dickson, J. 

57,289 

3,166 

avies, R). 

69,889 


Debourcier, O). 

56,979 

1,617 

Dickson, K E. 

60,401 


avies, T. 

68,350 

101 

Decosse, S S. 

74,234 

2,487 

Dickson, S D. 

54,473 


avis, A. 

77,548 

678 

Decoste, A V. 

66,205 


Diehl, D. 

51,251 

7,763 

avis, B L. 

62,269 

1,361 

Decouto, P. 

90,880 

335 

Dielissen, T J. 

60,604 

227 

avis, D. 

77,474 

6,322 

Deedman, G C. 

76,156 


Diemer, C. 

52,530 

1,139 

avis, D W. 

65,848 

606 

Deevy, T. 

54,392 

9,010 

Diemer, H L. 

83,267 

13,315 

avis, C A. 

50,193 

133 

Degerness, MS. 

50,647 


Dignan, L R. 

54,510 

115 

avis, G W. 

72,593 

1,381 

Degner,) S. 

54,997 


Diiorio Dunn, M. 

54,966 

2,051 

avis, ] G. 

56,477 

458 

DeGraff, AH. 

64,863 

2,063 

Dill, N. 

86,075 

5 

avis,) G. 

71,753 

2,704 

Degroot, T G. 

71,626 


Dinnell, T. 

62,269 

991 

avis,) M. 

51,120 

1,736 

Dehart, j. 

50,478 

12,788 

Dinsley, K G. 

57,214 


avis, K C. 

55,286 

1,930 

Deinstadt, B. 

61,746 

4,445 

Dinsmore, D. 

50,946 

497 

avis, K R. 

57,804 

2,208 

Del Rosario, A A. 

58,802 

1,502 

Dinsmore, G. 

54,318 


avis, L. 

62,031 


Delay, I P. 

51,168 

1,364 

Dinter, C D. 

70,120 

4,305 

avis, LG. 

52,078 

9,897 

Deleur, P C. 

56,801 

8,260 

Dinwoodie, R. 

54,614 


avis, N. 

61,959 

13,278 

Delimari, G. 

68,034 

20,401 

Dirks, W. 

66,613 

1,860 

avis, PA. 

56,477 

332 

Delisle, A. 

61,424 

7,271 

Dirom, I... 

51,052 


avis, P B. 

60,440 

2,892 

Dell, I. 

60,248 

Distasio, M M M. 

62,440 

1,280 

avis, PC. 

52,589 

20 

Della Mattia, L. 

74,728 

1,017 

Dittaro, M F. 

62,046 

1,754 

avis, R. 

50,950 


Dellert, KR. 

71,682 

1,778 

Dix, A. 

84,546 

14,163 

avis, R L. 

66,613 

5,433 

Delmark, R. 

55,470 

1,237 

Dix, J S. 

72,092 

495 

avis, R L. 

66,024 

8,868 

Delong, SC. 

53,771 

3,870 

Dixon, LA. 

80,803 

6,734 

avis, S. 

55,065 

5,712 

Delves, I. 

50,240 


Dixon, R H. 

64,428 

1,723 

avis, T. 

51,066 

22 

Demarchi, D A. 

60,604 

8,722 

Dixon, T. 

50,395 


avis, T L. 

60,344 

1,529 

Demarchi, R A. 

69,331 

8,540 

Doane, W. 

66,066 

3,903 

avis, W. 

52,019 


DeMarco, C. 

53,153 

1,754 

Dobb, J L. 

91,460 

12,522 

awes,) S. 

68,184 

3,970 

Demelt, S C. 

52,371 

1,860 

Dobb, K. 

50,106 

3,413 

awes, L. 

59,779 

885 

Demers, M A. 

50,478 

1,465 

Dobbie, G. 

60,632 


awshka, R. 

66,819 


Demetzer, H. 

77,474 

19,244 

Dobell, M. 

73,654 

764 

awson, C R. 

54,062 


Dempster, M J. 

61,382 


Dobson, T. 

65,760 


awson, E M J. 

63,985 

1,091 

Dempster, W C. 

82,841 

522 

Docolas, G. 

52,606 


awson, G G W. 

62,508 

12 

Dendoff, RE. 

50,478 

2,036 

Dodd, D L. 

62,135 

321 

awson, GW. 

95,576 

1,005 

Dennill, W. 

59,614 


Dodd, D W. 

60,290 


awson,) C. 

69,984 

7,616 

Denning, T. 

63,698 

32 

Dodd, F J. 

54,401 

2,352 

awson, R. 

71,270 

5,249 

Dennis, D. 

63,922 

8,620 

Dodd, J. 

50,684 

376 

awson, R ). 

52,930 

2^593 

Dennis, W H. 

68,234 

2,015 

Dodd, R R. 

61,147 


awson, W. 

88,649 

850 

Dennison, S G. 

62,269 

461 

Dodd, R W. 

60,977 

157 

ay, B D L. 

58,327 

1,744 

Denoon,S. 

56,477 

3,999 

Doddridge, P E. 

54,346 

11,059 

ay, G S. 

69,127 

231 

Dent-Wilson, L. 

50,730 

130 

Dodds, E N. 

53,456 

13,861 

ay, 1 B. 

50,414 

208 

Denton, H L. 

56,944 

3,369 

Dodds, J D. 

62,269 

5,411 

ay, KJ. 

63,068 

1,947 

Denys, R G. 

62,269 

1,022 

Dodds, RE. 

55,451 

8,501 

ay, M R. 

72,527 

405 

Der, G N. 

53,100 


Dodds, S. 

66,613 

1,550 

ay, P. 

52,291 


Derhousoff, S. 

56,129 

3,280 

Dodds, T L. 

63,986 

3,301 

ay, R H. 

51,775 

5,813 

Derick, N. 

50,684 

428 

Dodge, M R. 

61,105 

7,398 

ay, V. 

62,687 

1,282 

Derksen, L G. 

55,119 

10,940 

Dodge, S 1. 

50,478 

914 

aynard, H. 

66,879 

3,567 

Derrick, P. 

71,545 


Dodsworth, A. 

60,384 


Bucy, A L. 

52,957 

1,788 

Des Harnais, A. 

53,856 

15,421 

Dodsworth, D F. 

66,613 

4,443 

Faye, R C. 

93,708 

513 

Desai Manhas, S. 

51,119 


Doe, S. 

51,127 

1,391 

e Groot, P. 

68,814 

8,526 

Desai, S. 

51,028 

175 

Doerksen, B L. 

51,914 

800 

e Jong, R J. 

53,950 

1,288 

Deshaw, W E. 

50,478 


Dohan, C. 

65,378 

196 

e Leeuw, AD. 

53,462 

6,172 

Desjardins, P. 

53,363 

1,596 

Dohm, P M. 

61,679 

1,317 

Montigny, L. 

54,066 

2,802 

Desjardins, W. 

71,045 


Doidge, D F. 

56,182 

903 

e Roche, P J. 

51,873 


Desnoyers, E A. 

59,464 

659 

Doig, 1. 

66,613 

17,417 

e Sousa, AMC. 

63,987 


Destromp, J A. 

52,244 


Dolhai, E. 

83,267 

1,631 

e Visser, D L. 

57,279 

391 

Deutsch, |. 

58,770 


Doll, K L. 

64,570 


' Vos, R. 

66,613 

6,589 

Dever, T J. 

75,084 

22,548 

Dolynchuk, G. 

57,288 

6,265 

5 Weever, H. 

50,877 

6,308 

Devicq, D. 

50,684 


Dominy, R S. 

51,806 

725 

a Wet, L. 

66,613 

3,216 

Devito, P. 

50,707 


Domney, B. 

65,154 

16,755 

?~Vries, HA. 

62,269 

3,541 

Devlin, L M. 

65,165 

490 

Donahoe, G W. 

50,063 


■aeon, T A. 

51,241 

8,718 

Devos, H H. 

55,775 

210 

Donahue, S E. 

58,851 


Jacon-Rogers, L). 

52,723 

1,227 

Dewald, J. 

56,537 

8,531 

Donald, P I. 

99,511 

194 

aadman, T E. 

51,414 

1,362 

Dewdney, S. 

50,227 

105 

Donaldson, D W. 

77,474 

4,557 

?an, A E W. 

55,718 

10 

Dewhurst, I. 

60,283 

520 

Donaldson, 1 R. 

53,998 

429 

?an, B. 

50,522 

2,166 

Dewick, L. 

55,239 

5,734 

Dong, H. 

54,774 

7,578 

?an, B. 

51,412 

174 

Dewynter, N D. 

64,711 

768 

Donkers, P. 

56,409 

14,080 

pan, C. 

55,137 


Dexter, W R. 

62,269 

6,382 

Donnachie, P. 

54,000 

2,074 

ban, PJ. 

51,472 

21,050 

Deyaeger, A. 

65,959 

8,652 

Donnelly, C. 

55,547 

3,172 

pan, R A. 

88,053 

499 

Dhaliwal, H. 

55,885 


Donnelly, C. 

62,765 

3,174 

ban, RJ. 

61,934 


Dhillon, H. 

59,041 

1,226 

Donnelly, j E. 

57,699 

7,569 

bane, S A. 

50,684 

184 

Di Lucca, M. 

56,553 

1,671 

Donnelly, J W T. 

52,764 

497 

parborn, K. 

65,393 


Diakow, L J. 

56,666 

6,387 

Donoghue, G W. 

51,499 


parborn, R E. 

68,183 

525 

Dibley, A. 

56,477 

2,972 

Donohue, M J. 

62,269 

13 

taring, J C. 

81,498 

1,161 

Dicastri, S W. 

85,175 

690 

Donovan, 1 C. 

77,585 

22,212 

tbeck, B. 

56,477 

1,996 

Dice, R W. 

50,478 

1,072 

Dooley, M. 

50,808 

4,633 

[■Beck, E P... 

59,994 

13,896 

Dickenson, K M. 

56,553 

407 

Dore, B M. 

57,839 


[■Beck, H. 

60,620 

10,630 

Dicks, B J. 

59,303 

9,928 

Dorken, T R. 

74,289 
























































































































































































































































D 24 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Other Employees —Continued 


Dorval, M E. 

Salary 

$ 

60,132 

Travel 

$ 

1,587 

Duffy, C D. 

Salary 

$ 

61,076 

Travel 

$ 

8,860 

Eastick, E G. 

Salary 

$ 

62,905 

Travel 

$ 

6,089 

Dosange, A. 

Doubinin, S 1. 

71,965 

50,816 

444 

Dufour, G A. 

Dufour, N M. 

57,289 

56,023 

459 

Eastman, BWR. 

Eastman, D I. 

71,682 

62,269 

6,01 i 
1,61 #1 

Doucette, W W. 

51,544 

20,211 

Duggan, A F. 

69,606 


Eastman, D S. 

66,613 

3,984 

Dougan, K A. 

54,563 


Duggan, H L. 

51,855 

898 

Easton,) E. 

77,474 

6,42ft 

Douglas, D A. 

60,604 

409 

Duggan, I S. 

55,603 

1,616 

Easton, R. 

52,435 

55C 

Douglas, C W. 

76,360 

20,611 

Duggan, R R. 

74,727 


Eastwood, J M. 

51,491 

46; 


52 524 

246 

Duke, D. 

57,331 

52,018 

76 

Eaton, D. 

52,563 



50,573 

Duke, J L. 

139 

Eaton, T M. 

64,250 

11,124 
6,OOF; 

Douglas, K J. 

Douglas, M |. 

73,842 

65,848 

237 

Duke, K. 

Dumala, R. 

57,787 

83,267 

9,101 

Eaves, D. 

Ebanks, M. 

53,718 

57,459 

Douglas, P A. 

62,269 

826 

Dumont,) A. 

60,446 

586 

Ebata, T M. 

60,497 

9,166 

Douglas, R T. 

55,718 

14 

Dumont, J C. 

52,244 

1,716 

Eby, W F. 

68,474 

146 

Douglas, W. 

81,913 

15,001 

Dumont, R. 

62,269 

4,500 

Eccles, B M. 

51,583 

6,634 

Doull, K. 

50,450 

3,348 

Dumont, R D. 

51,404 

4,289 

Eckenfelder, M. 

58,995 

68° 

Dove, VS. 

60,841 

4,133 

Dunbar,) P. 

50,741 

212 

Eckstein, N A. 

60,604 

46'- 

Dow, G G. 

54,452 

5,030 

Dunbar, L. 

50,684 


Edelman, N. 

71,682 

1,733 

Dow, | W. 

Dowdle, M L. 

50,478 

50,806 

3,506 

3,883 

Dunbar, W. 

Duncan, A B. 

50,478 

67,217 


Eden, D W. 

Edgar, A A S. 

70,317 

55,347 

2,4761 

Dowie, V. 

63,268 

18,342 

Duncan, B C E. 

112,359 

2,752 

Edgar, D D. 

51,957 

8,27? 

Dowler, J A. 

71,682 

1,173 

Duncan, D. 

56,539 

1,045 

Edgecumbe, N. 

78,335 


Down, N E. 

65,281 

12,623 

Duncan,) E. 

53,093 

5,320 

Edquist, K. 

55,877 

1 7,845 

Downer, F S. 

60,728 

5,170 

Duncan, L. 

68,472 

4,211 

Eduljee, K E. 

55,511 

3,571 

Downie, B D. 

81,927 

2,323 

Duncan, R W. 

53,771 

2,574 

Edwards, B. 

61,679 

4,194 

Downie, W J. 

58,485 

12,091 

Dundas, A D. 

53,262 

897 

Edwards, C A. 

60,268 

101 

Downing, K. 

82,296 

2,140 

Dundas, G. 

60,551 

727 

Edwards, D. 

62,758 

3,40' 

Downing, R. 

59,728 

4,512 

Dundee, D. 

53,240 

299 

Edwards, DM. 

60,604 

32,923 

Downing, R G. 

76,573 


Dunderdale, M. 

51,219 

564 

Edwards, G A. 

56,477 

906 

Downs, M. 

Downs, N. 

68,707 

53,417 

15,388 

4,021 

Dungey, R. 

Dunham, D W. 

62,269 

50,588 

6,434 

Edwards,). 

Edwards,) R. 

56,477 

53,110 


Downs, P H. 

60,838 


Dunk, D W. 

52,401 

565 

Edwards, N. 

58,430 

3,236 

Dows, R N. 

51,826 

1,155 

Dunkley,). 

54,634 

1,040 

Edwards, R A. 

86,433 

56j 

Dowswell, B. 

59,136 

181 

Dunleavey, M ). 

66,656 

6,228 

Edwards, S. 

51,430 


Doyle, D. 

86,310 

9,202 

Dunlop,) P. 

90,286 

10,771 

Edwards, S J. 

63,132 

i,i3q 

Doyle, I M. 

65,518 

2,233 

Dunn, A. 

59,470 

12,229 

Edwards, T D. 

51,781 

63 

Doyle, P F. 

60,604 

1,550 

Dunn, j M. 

50,375 

317 

Edwards, W B. 

72,859 

1,077, 

Doyle, R. 

68,707 

2,405 

Dunn, M E. 

89,352 

411 

Effa, C J. 

63,085 

4,81.9 

Doyle, S M. 

73,487 

2,046 

Dunn, S. 

51,274 

856 

Effa, R W. 

67,496 


Doyle, T M. 

50,917 

239 

Dunn, S C. 

51,250 

3,436 

Eftodie, P A. 

50,346 

4,967] 

Doyle, V M. 

66,613 

3,265 

Dunne, ] R. 

62,269 

1,481 

Egan,) T. 

71,303 

31] 

Drachinski, A. 

53,210 


Dunne, J W. 

51,161 

584 

Egan, L. 

62,225 

1,985 

Dragan, G J. 

66,422 

889 

Dunsdon, D). 

70,169 

7,492 

Egan, 1 1 . 

62,269 

2,926 

Drage, G M. 

62,247 

3,190 

Dunsmoor-Farley, D 1_ 

51,034 

19,441 

Egeland, D A. 

62,269 

515 

Drage, H W. 

74,589 

2,086 

Dunsmore, B. 

50,478 

780 

Eggen, F. 

54,566 


DragusFian, G N G. 

56,628 

529 

Dunsworth,' K R. 

51,115 

3,477 

Eggie, PE B. 

51,713 

3,30' 

2,6211 

DragusFian, J. 

63,637 

8,118 

11,682 

Dupas, I. 

52,680 

54,543 

1,785 

Eeeleton, G 1. 

77,474 

Draper, B C. 

62,645 

Duperon,)).... 

Egilson, M H. 

61,473 







Draper, D A. 

71,682 

7,551 

Durban, D A. 

53,771 

948 

1 file, D. 

74,131 

2,206* 

Draper, R). 

50,478 

7,995 

Durham,). 

66,027 

605 

Ehmann, W J. 

61,024 

35^1 

Dreger, R. 

54,113 

636 

Durie, R. 

59,971 

68 

Ehrcke, W F. 

99,511 

io,i8: 

DreFier, W FI. 

71,682 

9,429 

Durrant, P W. 

79,522 

2,827 

Eimer, J A. 

56,477 

7,981 

Drew, S. 

58,390 

3,422 

Dwyer, C D. 

57,969 

653 

Eisbrenner, W W. 

66,613 

14,206 

Drewry, J M L. 

77,474 

497 

Dwyer, C F. 

50,565 

1,440 

Ek, E. 

54,246 


Driedger, R I. 

77,696 

9,655 

Dwyer, D D. 

51,666 

2,299 

Ek, L. 

57,960 

18' 

Drier, M M. 

62,269 

6 

Dwyer, M. 

54,685 

2,323 

Ekeli, PC. 

50,436 

226, 

Dring, D H. 

55,350 

428 

Dwyer, N M. 

55,807 

5,239 

Ekman, L. 

50,327 


Drinkwater, R S. 

61,386 

2,665 

Dwyer, P J. 

50,684 


Eland, S L. 

65,159 

3,876 

Drinnan, S C. 

56,477 

3,581 

Dyble, D. 

53,210 

979 

Elchuk, K G. 

62,269 

339 

Drislane, D A. 

83,244 

1,407 

Dyck, D. 

60,138 


Elchuk, L R. 

50,478 

87/ 

Drummond, R W. 

56,553 

2,231 

Dyck, H. 

57,414 

10,878 

Elder,) D. 

61,911 


DryburgFi,) C. 

56,257 

832 

Dyck, J H. 

71,682 

9,741 

Elewonibi, M E. 

66,613 

4,023 

Dryburgh, | G. 

78,239 

7,259 

Dye, K |. 

54,395 


Elliot, B A. 

50,684 

391 

Dryden, D W. 

77,474 

5,248 

Dyer, L O. 

50,318 

1,515 

Elliot, G B. 

50,533 

117 

Drysdaie, K. 

62,059 


Dyer, T A. 

79,849 

3,603 

Elliott, A V. 

60,505 

1,346 

Du Temple, T Y. 

66,448 

1,547 

Dykes, CM. 

86,310 


Elliott, C. 

56,149 

10,186 

Dubenski, F A. 

62,537 

9,477 

Dykes, R. 

65,591 

809 

Elliott, CC. 

62,269 

4,321| 

Dubensky, W A. 

53,771 

3,094 

Dykshoorn, M. 

52,434 


Elliott, D |. 

55,393 

2,167 

Dubois, N L. 

50,877 

2,093 

Dyment, D). 

65,518 

4,579 

Elliott, F | R. 

50,478 


Dubois, P. 

58,789 

1,270 

Dyrland,) L. 

51,294 

3,343 

Elliott, H F. 

70,971 

13,323 

Duczak, O. 

58,239 


Eadie, W H. 

50,478 

979 

Elliott, IP. 

59,136 

2,651 

Duddridge, | G. 

59,136 

9,747 

Eagles, B. 

56,886 

496 

Elliott, M. 

51,427 


Dudley, i L. 

59,382 

1,125 

Eales, B I. 

62,269 

10,393 

Filip. M R. 

61,502 

36 

Dueck, L A. 

63,486 

1,418 

Earner, C E. 

66,613 

9,046 

Ellis, A. 

56,275 

1,501 

Dueck, M. 

50,505 

1,937 

Earner, W J. 

71,682 

13,137 

Ellis, | D. 

82,913 

2,277 

Duerden, J D. 

66,613 

1,865 

Eamor, G. 

58,429 


Ellis, N W. 

56,025 

2,171 

Duff, E. 

52,108 

3,501 

Earis, W A. 

67,868 


Ellis, RG. 

81,812 

6,286 

Duff, ). 

56,477 

3,079 

Earle, C T. 

53,720 

68 

Ellis, W]. 

50,827 


Duff, J. 

53,771 

939 

Earnshaw, R. 

62,793 

238 

1II say, R L. 

50,479 

1,265 

Duff, R C. 

57,234 

317 

Eason, F W. 

50,478 

5,383 

Ellwood, T G. 

89,858 


Duffel 1, R. 

59,136 

148 

Eastaugh,) G M. 

57,829 

2,920 

Elmhirst, I. 

59,276 

791 

Duffin, R 11. 

55,318 

42 

Easthope, C A. 

60,778 

486 

Elo, ) M. 

63,024 

6,23c 

























































































































































































































































PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 



Salary 

Travel 


$ 

$ 

Elwell, L D. 

56,477 

4,733 

: lwood, R K. 

.. 108,793 

2,666 

: mbacher, S. 

58,890 

3,013 

Embury, D E. 

55,470 

770 

: merson, B P. 

.. 104,577 

4,059 

: mperingham, R A. 

72,302 

22,055 

: msland, R W. 

53,955 

8,026 

Emsl ie, FI G. 

65,629 

3,102 

ndacott. N D. 

65,721 

6,634 

Enemark, P G. 

68,479 

15,137 

Enfield, R P. 

61,691 

2,225 

Eng, D. 

57,331 


Eng, E S Y. 

60,518 


Eng, M. 

53,771 

2,109 

Eng, P). 

53,269 

753 

English, A M. 

52,933 


nglish, P M. 

77,537 

13,574 

English, R W. 

59,828 

7,378 

English, W B. 

.. 106,324 

16,131 

Engwer, L. 

68,241 

28,568 

nns, H B. 

50,104 

2,604 

nomoto, R K. 

56,477 

2,105 

nsing, G W J. 

71,682 

10,590 

nsworth, C. 

54,011 

996 

ntzminger, L. 

53,171 

1,882 

nwright, R J C. 

67,451 

6,610 

PP, D. 

50,120 


PP, PF. 

56,553 

4,657 

rasmus, J. 

69,357 

483 

raut, C B. 

69,183 

6,796 

redics, 1 K. 

62,269 

6,808 

rickson, C. 

62,521 

388 

rickson, CM. 

63,089 

1,494 

rickson, D W. 

50,478 

719 

rickson, FI A. 

52,397 

1,553 

rickson, L J. 

59,136 

1,119 

rickson, P W. 

61,650 


rickson, W R. 

56,553 

33 

rikson, H B. 

50,877 

495 

rikson, L. 

52,053 

2,267 

rlendson, R L. 

50,682 


rler, F. 

50,478 

1,248 

rnst, H M. 

51,749 

2,321 

•rico, D. 

60,604 

5,530 

rrington,) C. 

64,428 

5,327 

soy. 1. 

65,630 

4,752 

smail, K. 

58,829 

8,036 

•penhain, A L. 

51,307 

10,770 

-penhain. B. 

62,876 


;penhain, T. 

58,813 


>plen, V D. 

56,477 

230 

heridge, B D. 

82,296 

1,199 

■ ans. D. 

74,727 

584 

/ans, D. 

83,128 

10 

/ans, D T. 

71,682 

9,713 

/ans, E. 

53,849 

38 

/ans, J. 

56,477 


/ans, J T. 

50,516 

1,120 

/ans, LA. 

50,682 

2,440 

/ans, L R. 

77,015 

259 

/ans, M. 

52,996 


/ans, M L P. 

52,303 

5,026 

/ans, N. 

62,269 

822 

/ans, R). 

50,421 

2,171 

'ans, S L. 

56,477 

4,155 

'ans, T J. 

50,442 

3,326 

e, D K. 

54,354 

1,765 

'enchick, A. 

54,183 

2,191 

'ensen, H 1. 

57,018 

3,276 

erett, R. 

61,332 

1,405 

eritt, W M. 

50,604 

295 

erton, J F. 

53,098 

10,675 

ison, C. 

65,575 


jen, G F. 

52,744 

2,672 

l /an, G. 

53,163 

785 

zanchuk, M H. 

52,098 


/art, T A. 

65,250 

6,690 

/asiuk, R. 

52,675 


/ert, P W... 

99,511 

9,961 

/ing, L. 

61,044 

1,414 

’ ber, S. 

50,478 

1,828 





Salary 

Travel 


$ 

$ 

Faddis, G. 

76,816 


Fagan, F E. 

62,269 

3,334 

Fahlman, R A. 

57,159 

5,234 

Fahlman, R W. 

54,242 

1,021 

Fairbarns, M. 

61,046 

14,988 

Fairbotham, D ). 

75,537 

2,522 

Fairbrother, | E. 

66,613 


Fairburn, R. 

57,288 


Fairley, B D. 

56,477 

8,226 

Fairservice, R A. 

60,604 

3,054 

Faith, J M. 

62,602 

1,791 

Falconer, M. 

63,949 

3,217 

Faliszewski, M. 

61,345 

2,695 

Falk, GW. 

63,646 

12,000 

Falkiner, M P. 

71,682 

7,939 

Falkoski, J. 

51,850 


Fallavollita, J. 

62,400 

2,027 

Falloon, L. 

54,000 

158 

Faltinson, B. 

58,053 

2,085 

Fanta, T. 

64,884 

400 

Faoro, R V. 

62,269 

346 

Fardoe, B. 

54,213 

800 

Farenholtz, G D. 

54,044 

7,388 

Farley, J. 

86,146 


Farley, M. 

74,149 

13,159 

Farley, R V. 

86,310 


Farnden, G. 

56,553 

949 

Farquhar, M. 

72,752 

2,464 

Farquhar, R M. 

56,477 

1,005 

Farr, A K. 

62,269 


Farrell, G. 

56,514 


Farrell,) E. 

77,474 

14,523 

Farrell, S W. 

50,642 


Farwell, B R. 

56,180 

1,038 

Farynuk, M S. 

55,441 

103 

Fatin, N. 

... 104,210 

13,715 

Faust, J A. 

55,882 

2,494 

Favell, P M. 

76,156 

3,857 

Fawcett, L J. 

53,719 

2,685 

Fayad, DA. 

59,952 


Fazan, L B. 

57,434 

11,622 

Fearon, N |. 

50,424 

2,193 

Feary, B. 

68,183 

1,579 

Fedder, C. 

65,518 


Fedorak, C I. 

61,868 

210 

Fedorchuk, K M. 

74,803 

2,538 

Fee, A R. 

55,327 

3,272 

Fee, G. 

65,029 


Fee, 1. 

53,924 

287 

Fee, W A. 

52,657 

124 

Feesey, T. 

52,155 

3,798 

Fehner, L. 

52,275 


Fehr, 1 . 

50,684 


Fehr, R G. 

50,478 

5,379 

Fehr, TS. 

50,955 


Feldes, L. 

54,270 

564 

Felgenhauer, C U. 

50,133 

86 

Felker, B S. 

50,861 

2,237 

Fell, R. 

69,626 

5,486 

Fell, R. 

54,008 


Fell, S. 

81,760 


Fellinger, G A. 

54,095 


Fellman, D V. 

50,478 

639 

Fellman, Y. 

56,553 

786 

Felsing, H. 

53,771 

942 

Fencott, P. 

67,753 

1,158 

Fenger, M A. 

62,343 

5,301 

Fenn, D. 

51,570 

769 

Fennell, C D. 

60,693 

726 

Fennell, R M. 

50,969 

427 

Fenny, 1 >. 

76,156 

9,454 

Fenton, N E. 

51,804 

3,066 

Ferdinands, A. 

53,361 


Ferguson, D. 

56,553 

5,240 

Ferguson, D H. 

69,837 

16,394 

Ferguson, D). 

50,758 

633 

Ferguson, K B. 

66,565 

1,865 

Ferguson, L. 

68,184 

4,438 

Ferguson, R. 

53,388 


Ferguson, R H. 

60,604 


Fernandez, DA. 

63,260 

202 


Salary 

$ 

Fernets, D. 61,910 

Ferri, F. 62,978 

Ferrier, CA. 53,088 

Fiddis, RW. 70,339 

Fiddler, N L. 56,856 

Fiddy, K D. 56,982 

Fidgeon, M. 51,624 

Fiedorowicz, S H. 50,576 

Field, PW. 63,949 

Fierro, LL. 50,157 

Filan, B. 76,156 

Filipchuk, LE. 60,384 

Fillion, A A. 52,506 

Finall, D. 90,880 

Finamore, R. 53,771 

Finch, B B. 52,098 

Finck, KE. 55,984 

Finding, C. 62,269 

Findlay, R B. 62,269 

Findlay, W. 53,149 

Finger, U. 60,604 

Finlay, DR. 55,863 

Finlay, MC. 62,269 

Finlayson, DW. 55,693 

Finlayson, H N. 50,781 

Finnie, D L. 56,477 

Finnie, jO. 60,604 

Finnie, K. 61,483 

Finvers, MA. 55,957 

Firbank, JA. 50,478 

Firby, BE. 61,526 

Fish, L E. 60,382 

Fish, M. 50,478 

Fisher, EW. 64,904 

Fisher, I R. 61,395 

Fisher, K. 61,587 

Fisher, L. 69,938 

Fisher, L S. 82,296 

Fisher, MJ. 50,684 

Fisher, SL. 63,819 

Fisk, BG. 50,050 

Fisk, R. 104,569 

Fiske, J. 59,344 

Fissel, J R. 87,802 

Fitch, GJ. 73,180 

Fitchett, DR. 50,478 

Fitger, D. 54,331 

Fitzgerald, S. 58,454 

Fitzgibbon,). 66,350 

Fitzsimmons, D L. 73,180 

Fitzsimmons, J. 59,499 

Fitzsimmons, M J P. 50,941 

Flack, AD. 72,791 

Flanagan, J PR. 54,255 

Flanagan, P R. 62,269 

Flann, W. 50,919 

Flannigan, J. 54,627 

Flanz, A R. 86,310 

Flavelle, L. 51,855 

Fleet, E. 50,684 

Fleetham, C E. 50,478 

Flegel, D. 50,004 

Fleming, C. 60,401 

Fleming, GG. 51,126 

Fleming, MG. 74,727 

Fletcher, C J. 63,620 

Fletcher, EF. 61,744 

Fletcher, G. 51,570 

Fletcher, GM. 65,596 

Fletcher, H. 73,981 

Fletcher, N B. 52,842 

Fletcher, S. 57,131 

Fletcher, V E. 60,527 

Fletcher, W A. 83,267 

Flett, S j. 50,478 

Flewin, H. 54,786 

Fliczuk, | G. 71,682 

Flight, C. 60,436 

Flindell, RF. 66,468 

Flintoft, DG. 77,474 

Flowers,). 57,026 


D 25 


Travel 

$ 


998 

380 

21,817 

832 

6,646 

11,111 

1,909 

3,192 


5,054 

2,995 


270 

320 

1,299 

6,342 

1,921 

2,055 

1,591 

1,312 

3,662 

405 

245 

147 

4,373 

1,185 

4,539 


111 

1,182 

224 

1,807 

3,525 

241 

9,119 

1,341 

749 

469 

5,143 

1,539 

15,538 

501 

239 

3,963 

3,669 


5,867 

1,283 

4,190 

691 

273 

2,963 

1,439 

5,435 

3,321 

12,822 

11,523 

145 

1,551 

589 


3,988 

11,750 



























































































































































































































































D 26 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Other Employees —Continued 



Salary 

Travel 


Salary 

Travel 


Salary 

Travel 1 


$ 

$ 


$ 

$ 


$ 

$ 

Flynn, B G. 

50,478 

19,187 

France, R T. 

60,527 

6,489 

Fuccenecco, M. 

51,155 

43 J 

Flynn, D W. 

64,977 

17,092 

Francis, C. 

59,144 

2,450 

Fudge, D C. 

53,371 

1 ,948; 

Fofonoff, P. 

60,527 

4,193 

Francis, D G. 

63,284 

1,395 

Fudge, S K. 

69,357 

83 

Fogtmann, K A. 

50,397 

800 

Francis, M. 

53,166 

2,323 

Fuglem, P L. 

64,863 

11,76' 


56,477 

919 

Francis, R P. 

77,212 

4,962 

Fukumoto,)). 

66,230 

3,228 

796 1 

Foley, C). 

53,467 

3,598 

Francis, S. 

54,027 

3,118 

Fukushima, E. 

51,621 

Folkema, M P. 

59,697 

1,390 

Frank, F. 

68,558 

25,826 

Fuller, E A. 

52,350 

2,551 

Folkestad, D L. 

50,684 


Franklin, L W. 

62,269 

3,763 

Fuller,) W. 

62,269 

228j 

Follett, C. 

50,628 

5,616 

Franklin, S R. 

60,498 

3,305 

Fuller, R D. 

62,269 

678 

Fong, D L. 

50,997 


Frantzen, M. 

62,269 


Fullerton, W. 

59,136 

8,173f 

Fong, E W. 

60,497 

2,720 

Franzmann, B. 

55,342 


Fulmer, M. 

91,895 

16,504 

Fong, M. 

57,078 


Fraser, B. 

52,066 

483 

Fulton, B. 

50,802 

2,034 

Fong, R. 

50,380 

102 

Fraser, B. 

51,205 


Fulton, T D. 

60,215 


Fong, S. 

50,684 


Fraser, B A. 

64,847 

4,169 

Fumalle, M J. 

59,079 

7,981J 

Foofat, S R. 

63,354 

709 

Fraser, BW H. 

59,778 


Fung, C. 

53,771 


Foote, B D. 

62,269 

1,284 

Fraser, D A. 

60,604 

8,694 

Fung-Sunter, C C. 

62,269 

131 

Forbes, D G. 

52,225 

1,285 

Fraser, G A. 

71,869 

1,604 

Funk, C). 

62,772 

Forbes, E. 

56,612 

801 

Fraser, J. 

73,330 


Furney, J F. 

53,771 

2,01 C 

Forbes, I E. 

56,145 

2,914 

Fraser, j. 

60,676 

1,711 

Furnival, 1. 

66,613 

1,76C 

Forbes, | N. 

53,771 

370 

Fraser, K). 

62,969 

2,147 

Fyfe, R. 

82,296 

9,124 

Forbes, R D. 

54,580 

6,349 

Fraser, L. 

81,851 

600 

Gabel, G F. 

84,601 


Forbister, (A. 

51,802 

834 

Fraser, R. 

50,653 


Gabelmann, E. 

53,771 

576 

Ford, DA. 

66,613 

1,864 

Fraser, R A. 

71,682 


Gaber, D. 

77,029 

7,938 

Ford, E A. 

.... 107,052 


Fraser, R B. 

54,739 

12,701 

Gabler, R D. 

53,151 

7,129 

Ford,G . 

56,553 

1,272 

Fraser, R D. 

55,476 

1,946 

Gaboury, M. 

51,087 

8,673 

Ford,1. 

63,032 


Fraser, W S. 

53,908 

11,752 

Gabriel, L S. 

50,513 

9,469 

Ford, I F. 

56,477 

12,474 

Frazer, G. 

57,289 

1,899 

Gage, G P. 

55,705 

512 

Ford, K L. 

76,156 

429 

Frechette, T D. 

56,477 

276 

Gage, R. 

63,462 

3,962 

Ford, 1 1). 

50,928 


Fredell, R A. 

56,553 


Gagne, L. 

60,458 

3,651 

Ford, L M. 

57,839 

647 

Frederick, G S. 

62,269 

1,473 

Gagne, S D. 

59,843 

1,661 

Ford, M. 

59,709 


Frederick, N. 

54,385 

2,151 

Gagne, T. 

65,024 


Ford, M B. 

75,718 

1,683 

Frederiksen, M A. 

62,436 

13,192 

Galambos, A R. 

59,551 

204 

Ford, R. 

79,242 


Fredrickson, R A. 

67,472 

7,587 

Galbraith, D. 

52,829 


Forget, D. 

57,100 

6,025 

Freeborn, L W. 

50,746 

876 

Galbraith, D. 

51,595 

332 

Forman, 1 K. 

71,682 


Freed, D E. 

... 103,943 

4,069 

Galbraith, D M. 

66,377 

15,574 

Forrest, L M. 

50,424 

1,471 

Freed, K C. 

57,998 

386 

Galbraith, W. 

57,065 


Forrester, S D. 

66,593 

1,163 

Freeman, H I B. 

73,087 

6,521 

Galdert, P. 

75,053 

147 

Forsey,). 

53,600 

2,401 

Freeman, M E. 

60,732 

4,305 

Gale, C. 

54,124 

3,890 

Forster, R M. 

59,904 


Freeman, P. 

54,079 


Gale, S. 

52,398 

12 

Forsyth, C. 

83,311 

2,739 

Freeman, P F. 

50,478 

4,417 

Galimberti, T). 

61,886 

6,800 

Forsythe, B. 

51,728 

8,585 

Freer, G L. 

67,973 

16,332 

Gall, M). 

50,478 

1,878 

Forsythe, G E. 

51,564 


French, E. 

59,200 


Gallagher,). 

57,280 


Forth, A B. 

62,269 

400 

French, L). 

53,117 

39 

Gallagher, J H. 

61,689 


Forty, T R. 

60,604 

621 

Freseman, L F. 

50,684 


Gallagher, K L. 

57,125 


Fosdick, WAG. 

61,887 

4,338 

Freter, G. 

59,675 


Gallagher, M A. 

69,244 

35,647 

Foster, A E. 

50,805 

312 

Frew, M V. 

56,679 

5,404 

Gallagher, S. 

69,357 

9,155 

Foster, D. 

66,659 

345 

Frew, P K. 

50,975 


Gallagher, T P. 

60,766 

370 

Foster, D B. 

50,908 

336 

Frey, M. 

76,156 

13,591 

Gallaher, R. 

59,062 

8,463 

Foster, D M. 

71,682 

4,947 

Frey, P R. 

62,269 

4,482 

Gallant, A. 

52,401 

5,307 

Foster, J C. 

51,699 

4,801 

Fricot, G. 

50,478 


Gallard, A M. 

51,534 


Foster,) G. 

53,988 


Fried, G. 

52,263 

2,232 

Gallimore,) A. 

58,423 

2,218 

Foster, L E. 

50,684 

648 

Friend,) F. 

52,823 

1,796 

Galloway, G. 

63,803 

411 

Foster, L T. 

95,576 

1,208 

Fries, R J. 

52,671 

647 

Galloway,) 1. 

81,324 

4,940 

Foster, R. 

65,413 

Friesen, C G. 

62,533 

2,234 

Galloway, R A. 

... 114,588 

Foster, R. 

67,616 

259 

Friesen, C M. 

56,477 

425 

Galloway, W. 

71,682 

11,778 

Foster, W F. 

64,472 

718 

Friesen, D. 

56,946 


Gallpen, B G. 

53,265 

165} 

Foubister, L |. 

69,150 

277 

Friesen, D A. 

56,483 

28 

Galpin, G T. 

51,061 

280 

Fougere, W B. 

51,264 

1,734 

Friesen, G L. 

59,451 

1,079 

Ganderski, E. 

56,553 

280 

Foulis, B C. 

68,814 

3,282 

Friesen, K R. 

62,245 

536 

Ganie, B. 

53,771 

798 

Foulis, R ] P. 

57,380 

2,324 

Friesen, P G. 

52,098 


Ganie, S L. 

53,584 


Fowler, P G. 

63,964 

453 

Friesen, R S. 

89,406 

23,761 

Gann, C S. 

50,684 

1,536 

Fowler, R. 

50,523 


Friesen, R W. 

67,848 

244 

Gann, S). 

59,136 

170 

Fowler, R). 

51,813 

896 

Friesen, V. 

63,381 

2,864 

Gannon, V. 

50,684 

1,151 

Fowler, R R. 

50,729 

5,678 

Friis, L K. 

53,771 

647 

Gardiner, G G. 

61,149 


Fowler, V E. 

52,136 

1,696 

Frisby, E. 

56,156 

745 

Gardiner,). 

59,779 

3,131 

Fowles, )S. 

76,156 

3,659 

Frisk,) A. 

66,613 

8,661 

Gardner, G. 

52,197 

5,803 

Fowlie, BEE. 

53,771 

7,752 

Frith,). 

59,824 


Gardner, LA. 

51,628 

10,388 

Fowlie, F G K. 

58,967 

4,313 

Fritz, D A. 

62,819 

2,233 

Gardner, M D. 

54,979 

971 

Fownes, R A. 

56,001 


Frketich, C L. 

56,042 

1,108 

Gardner, R V. 

86,310 

66 

Fox, G L. 

50,684 

389 

Froehlich, K H W. 

58,324 

1,765 

Garduno, B. 

68,925 


Fox, G R. 

53,771 

4,298 

Frolick, V M. 

86,310 

3,038 

Gareau, M L. 

50,175 


Fox, G R. 

59,136 

6,958 

Froment, P P. 

56,477 

7,853 

Garland, D. 

55,525 


Fox, K W. 

74,192 


Froom, D. 

62,808 


Garman, R). 

60,425 


Fox, L H. 

66,545 

687 

Frost, G. 

59,599 


Garner, D. 

56,971 

1,865 

Foxgord, D. 

77,474 

21,680 

Frost, J C. 

56,477 

1,458 

Garner, ML. 

66,613 

26,024 

Foy, M F. 

54,433 

4,038 

Fry Sutherland, ). 

66,613 

2,081 

Garner, V. 

54,078 

3,589 

Foy, S. 

71,229 

8,494 

Fry, A D. 

58,593 

5,546 

Garoupa, U. 

53,162 

1,097 

Fralick, | E. 

71,682 

11,119 

Fry, C). 

55,272 

2,046 

Garrow, T. 

61,173 


Frame, R V. 

50,252 

2,352 

Fry, W A. 

56,348 

1,078 

Garton, G A. 

66,832 


Frampton, H N. 

62,864 

8,292 

Fu, K M. 

60,890 

746 

Gaskill,). 

62,269 

16,356 

Frampton, S. 

68,241 

2,066 

Fu, S N. 

54,800 

1,433 

Gatenby, S M. 

60,518 

68 

























































































































































































































































PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


D 27 



Salary 

Travel 


Salary 

Travel 


Salary 

Travel 


$ 

$ 


$ 

$ 


$ 

$ 

Cates, B R. 

59,475 

1,606 

Gilbert, E A. 

50,478 

4,741 

Goguen, N. 

50,884 


Cates, D P. 

74,713 


Gilbert, K. 

50,684 


Goheen, I P. 

55,513 

809 

Gates, S. 

51,970 

99 

Gilbert, M A. 

51,950 


Golar, F. 

55,777 

1,326 

Gatrell, S. 

50,505 

405 

Gilchrist, 1. 

56,477 

418 

Gold, S R. 

55,072 


Gaucher, C E. 

62,269 


Gilchrist, J. 

60,838 

172 

Goldade, AM. 

62,269 


Gaudet, E. 

58,289 

33 

Gilchrist, P E. 

71,682 


Goldes, S A. 

53,771 

1,573 

Gaudry, D G. 

85,803 

10,573 

Giles, HWL. 

62,734 

2,731 

Goldie, N D. 

53,771 

1,943 

Gaul, G R. 

65,518 

22,472 

Giles, T R. 

55,192 

4,057 

Goldsbury, E A. 

52,933 

3,900 

Gauley, R A. 

63,832 

645 

Gilhooly, W A. 

61,644 

1,290 

Goldstone, G. 

53,890 

959 

Gaunt, BE. 

59,136 

1,985 

Gilkeson, L A. 

53,771 

1,195 

Golin, G B. 

60,731 


Gaunt, DC. 

57,331 


Gill, A P. 

60,392 

1,404 

Golley, W G. 

51,892 

946 

Gauthier, ] L. 

57,289 

324 

Gill, G. 

54,373 


Golumbia, T. 

52,584 

8,553 

Gaye, M. 

56,546 

1,662 

Gill, 1 S. 

50,591 

2,038 

Good, A H. 

53,013 

1,541 

Gayowski, T W. 

63,661 

2,383 

Gill, P. 

57,839 

3,326 

Good, B ! 1. 

62,071 

15,597 

Gayton, D. 

56,553 

4,845 

Gill, R. 

54,507 

267 

Goodall, ] M. 

54,040 

1,246 

Geach, P) S. 

62,269 

394 

Gill, S. 

54,196 

3,281 

Goode, D. 

51,194 

3,606 

Geary, K. 

60,527 

828 

Gill, S. 

50,684 

98 

Goodfellow, G B. 

86,310 

880 

Geddes, G S. 

54,526 

6,945 

Gillen, B WG. 

99,511 

6,694 

Goodman, D G. 

50,610 


Gedye, W. 

61,971 

32 

Gillese, K. 

61,178 

5,394 

Goodman, E 1. 

57,019 

79 

Gee, B C. 

66,896 

5,344 

Gillespie, B 1. 

56,672 

4,913 

Goodman, G D. 

62,076 

20,454 

Gee, D. 

54,008 

4,536 

Gillespie, D G. 

56,553 

1,329 

Goodrich, C. 

50,684 


Gee, L C. 

53,243 

558 

Gillespie, L. 

58,322 


Goodwin, D. 

65,281 

283 

Gee, S. 

59,952 

2,115 

Gillespie, M A. 

53,829 

843 

Goodwin, G M. 

77,474 

25,282 

Geerdink, N A. 

62,269 


Gillett, D W. 

66,613 

5,963 

Goodwin, W R. 

65,662 

569 

Geertsema, M. 

57,007 

2,873 

Gilliam,) M. 

50,972 

1,520 

Goozh, C ) E. 

54,034 

405 

Geisler, M. 

66,613 

9,506 

Gilliard, G EE. 

51,290 

3,768 

Gorbahn, El W. 

71,638 

1,019 

Geldart, EH G. 

59,846 

3,914 

Gillich, L P. 

50,864 

685 

Gordon, A. 

56,019 


Gelette, V L. 

59,028 


Gillies, E A. 

54,078 

1,281 

Gordon, H W. 

86,310 

11,411 

Gentleman, R W... 

66,613 

1,045 

Gillies, I. 

66,613 

133 

Gordon, J A. 

66,613 

2,081 

Gentles, D D. 

86,600 

338 

Gilliland, E S. 

75,693 

8,218 

Gordon, | M. 

88,649 

2,562 

George, DM. 

89,462 

7,840 

Gillings, I. 

50,478 


Gordon, K G. 

61,533 

1,964 

George, D P. 

66,613 

1,161 

Gillis, GCD. 

57,331 

4,017 

Gordon, K R. 

50,459 

416 

George, F. 

50,259 

16 

Gillis, M. 

60,497 

14,529 

Gordon, R C. 

58,780 

661 

George, G A. 

50,028 

2,117 

Gillis, M. 

66,671 

3,062 

Gore, D. 

59,856 


George, G M. 

56,151 

1,840 

Gilmour, D. 

54,888 


Gorgevik, S. 

58,283 


George, P. 

54,952 

3,209 

Gilmour, L. 

50,684 

380 

Gorley, R A. 

83,420 

36,957 

Gerber, H S. 

63,944 

724 

Gilmour, S. 

56,672 

99 

Gorman, M S. 

57,663 

3,837 

Gerbrandt,) D. 

60,604 

792 

Ginther, D. 

68,783 

7,690 

Gornall, D W. 

62,269 

1,354 

Gerick, B. 

51,109 

554 

Ginther, D M. 

59,136 

152 

Gornall, E B. 

72,181 


Gerlinsky, L. 

52,015 


Girard, M. 

60,790 

2,828 

Gorrie, E D. 

59,136 

1,112 

Germain, A. 

60,513 

797 

Girard, R P. 

56,477 

1,926 

Gorsline, K R. 

67,786 

4,096 

German, G R. 

77,474 

2,944 

Girard, R W. 

71,682 

5,627 

Gorsline, M T. 

50,684 

4,173 

Gerraghty, D E. 

60,273 

7,296 

Girvin, R A. 

56,477 


Gorsuch, D R. 

59,531 

219 

Gerrard, D. 

56,002 


Gjesdal, D. 

53,939 

10,630 

Gosh, P D. 

62,269 

299 

Certzen, D L. 

50,877 

3,670 

Gladiuk, R P. 

53,650 

1,697 

Gosnell, D A. 

62,806 

7,856 

Gerula, G. 

53,823 

2,301 

Glasier, H. 

60,438 

5,591 

Gosse, C. 

72,937 


Getz, R). 

71,682 


Glass, N |. 

56,477 

4,571 

Gosse, MG. 

71,682 

9,227 

Getzlaf, R M. 

57,544 

620 

Glassford, D W. 

54,596 

536 

Gotto, P. 

77,177 

2,222 

Gevatkoff, P. 

62,270 

4,131 

Glassford, R. 

51,505 

2,730 

Goudie,) W. 

64,471 

4,708 

Ghosh, R K. 

53,771 

694 

Glassman, M. 

83,267 

18,629 

Gough, C|. 

55,438 


biacomelli, P F. 

60,111 

548 

Gleave, D R. 

64,685 

4,730 

Gough, D G. 

66,613 

11,911 

tiannace, D. 

54,505 

7,590 

Gleeson, E G. 

57,624 

1,597 

Gough, R. 

62,269 

6,771 

bibb, J E. 

53,909 

2,551 

Gleeson, M. 

52,365 

261 

Gould, J R. 

62,269 

1,808 

pibbard, DA. 

56,553 

2,592 

Clegg, A EC. 

54,218 

2,442 

Gould, R. 

50,343 


Gibbon, G G. 

53,143 


Glemnitz, P F. 

62,269 

1,953 

Gould, R D. 

70,517 

9,465 

tibbons, T A. 

61,510 

1,055 

Glen,) L. 

60,401 


Goulet, G. 

52,178 

8,537 

fcibbs, D. 

66,773 

14,930 

Glennen, D. 

59,669 


Goulet, LA. 

67,062 

3,468 

fcibbs M B. 

50,547 


Glessing, C. 

52,615 

1,263 

Goulet, T. 

50,768 

795 

tibson, B M. 

52,098 

28 

Glow, H 1). 

50,284 

444 

Gour, A L. 

62,269 

1,676 

tibson, C. 

53,692 

1,284 

Glew, W H. 

50,478 

356 

Gourley, D. 

65,024 

61 

libson, D. 

56,639 


Glinsbockel, C. 

69,446 

430 

Gover, D. 

57,331 


libson, D. 

66,102 


Glinz, G K. 

51,336 

7,362 

Gow, F. 

50,803 


libson, G E. 

57,738 


Glockzin, D). 

54,962 

2,593 

Gow, LA. 

66,613 

3,395 

libson, 1. 

59,136 


Glover, A). 

66,613 

6,140 

Gow, M C. 

59,136 

20 

libson,). 

54,156 


Glover, J. 

53,643 

821 

Gower, E El. 

63,284 

428 

libson, | L. 

90,880 

975 

Gludo, I. 

59,093 

390 

Gower, K J. 

75,801 

1,933 

libson,) L. 

51,790 

133 

Gluns, D R. 

60,066 

5,048 

Gowriluk, J. 

71,226 

6,581 

libson, K. 

60,497 

718 

Gnissios, P A. 

51,514 

234 

Goy, R W. 

57,415 

5,328 

libson, M M. 

54,444 

811 

Gobi 1 lot, R. 

62,269 


Grace, I A. 

60,506 

3,418 

libson, P E. 

51,818 

816 

Goburdhun, C. 

51,605 


Grace, R D. 

71,682 

1,522 

libson, R. 

50,540 


Goburdhun, R S P. 

51,889 


Gracey, D. 

58,784 

20 

libson, R... 

60,890 

1,880 

Goddard, BA. 

76,156 

1,560 

Gracey, G D. 

56,477 


libson, W G.... 

76,156 

2,600 

Goddard, K. 

50,518 

412 

Gradwell, B L. 

52,624 

16,213 

Jiesbrecht, T. 

59,990 

8 

Godfrey, C G. 

62,269 

604 

Grady, C B. 

62,269 

700 

liesbrecht, W). 

51,955 


Godfrey, 1. 

53,771 

3,230 

Grady, M F. 

62,384 

3,026 

liesen, P. 

53,287 


Godfrey,). 

53,771 

2,757 

Graeme, 1. 

61,207 

852 

lifford, B T. 

62,269 

307 

Godin, I A. 

50,478 

5,021 

Graft, B. 

64,017 

5,748 

lilbart, E L. 

63,111 


Godler, C. 

60,110 

1,295 

Graff, PM. 

60,321 

723 

lilberstad, N. 

52,098 

3,077 

Godlonton, R ). 

51,678 

785 

Graham, C. 

54,742 

1,955 

lilbert, D .. 

72,041 

4,075 

Godo, M. 

63,283 

7,205 

Graham, D R. 

53,248 

82 

llbert, D E... 

77,474 

12,465 

Goerz, B. 

57,586 


Graham,). 

50,481 


























































































































































































































































D 28 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Other Employees —Continued 



Salary 

Travel 


Salary 

Travel 


Salary 

Travel 


$ 

$ 


$ 

$ 


$ 

$ 

Graham, J L. 

70,781 

4,436 

Greer, R N. 

82,678 


Gustafson, L. 

86,191 

4,348 

Graham, L. 

61,308 

298 

Gregg, 1 W. 

56,553 

3,126 

Gutensohn, G P. 

56,282 

1,833 

Graham, R D. 

91,532 

1,499 

Gregory,) P. 

95,576 

5,089 

Guyton, T E. 

59,136 

6,893 

Graham, R D. 

75,151 

25,665 

Gregory, R. 

70,771 


Gwilt, G. 

53,846 

219 

Graham, W M. 

53,944 

7,593 

Gregory, T. 

66,613 

6,963 

Gwynne, R. 

51,199 

43 

Grahame, P S. 

76,156 


Grehan, D. 

51,326 

2,043 

Gysbers, 1. 

60,951 


Grainger, W M. 

60,406 

1,256 

Greig, L V. 

56,477 

1,134 

Gysbers, L. 

53,592 

2,903 

Grandage, WE. 

67,537 

1,898 

Greig, R A. 

50,696 


Haabniit, E. 

50,519 

2,155 

Graner, D U. 

60,722 

914 

Greinacher, N. 

55,600 

1,008 

Haaksma,) A. 

53,984 


Grange, T. 

53,367 


Greiner, D L. 

50,739 

1,190 

Haas,) R. 

68,262 

1,419 

Granger, S. 

56,602 

525 

Greschner, J |. 

95,576 

1,617 

Haas, R C. 

62,269 

1,438 

Grant, B D. 

56,553 

1,657 

Greschner, R. 

54,452 

187 

Hackett, S. 

57,990 

250 

Grant, C. 

70,854 

196 

Grewal, H S. 

58,679 

18,439 

Haddock, B O. 

61,384 

17,121 

Grant, D. 

50,987 


Grewar, E E. 

62,260 

97 

Haddow, C. 

60,377 

4,894 

Grant, D. 

50,014 


Grewar, P J. 

77,474 

2,759 

Haddow, W D. 

54,154 

1,450 

Grant, D B. 

60,415 

998 

Grewsmuehl, C. 

51,784 


Haden, M. 

53,359 

139 

Grant, D 1. 

50,296 


Grexton, G. 

59,976 


Hadway, S L. 

56,665 

8,064 

Grant, F R. 

50,478 


Greyeyes, J. 

62,269 

18,524 

Haere, P K. 

50,007 


Grant, G. 

78,879 

4,905 

Gribling, D. 

53,724 

12,218 

Hagel, K W. 

52,287 

5,646 


60,454 

120 

Grieve, DA. 

53,771 

2,393 

Hagen, D. 

61,846 

34 

Grant, J A. 

61,903 

6,336 

Grieve, R FI. 

63,633 

584 

Hagen, D W. 

51,167 

72 

Grant, K L. 

58,988 

11,671 

Griffin, D P. 

82,435 

9,295 

Hagen,). 

77,411 

6,070 

Grant, N T. 

50,478 

4,363 

Griffin, G. 

60,460 

2,669 

Haggstrom, R. 

56,011 


Grant, P N L. 

77,474 

5,110 

Griffin, | R S. 

71,006 

4,060 

Hague, D C. 

51,220 

3,601 


52 743 

1,221 

Griffin, R B. 

54,507 

1,658 

Hahn,). 

83,526 


Granton, B. 

60,425 


Griffioen, G. 

53,771 

932 

Hahn, RJ. 

51,723 

1,819 

Graves, K. 

59,136 

3,375 

Griffith, L. 

50,684 

1,525 

Haigh, S. 

56,218 


Graves, R. 

51,410 

2,029 

Griffith, L D. 

56,496 

487 

Haight, D M. 

51,002 


Gray, A ... 

51,931 

301 

Griffiths, J). 

54,563 

2,658 

Hailes, N T ). 

55,490 

690 

Gray, B. 

83,267 

1,568 

Griffiths, R P. 

52,994 

5,707 

Hails, D. 

62,627 

5,203 

Gray, D R. 

67,922 


Grilz, P L. 

55,112 

7,166 

Haines, R I. 

60,401 

1,499 

Gray, D R. 

53,912 

912 

Grimaldi, S K. 

60,052 

9,823 

Hakanson, W R. 

56,477 

1,877 

Gray,) B. 

82,468 

5,212 

Grimmer, D M. 

71,682 

2,351 

Hakkarainen, K. 

52,052 

166 

Gray, J E. 

71,682 

6,724 

Grimsdell, R S. 

60,411 

3,293 

Halabourda, S M. 

50,431 


Gray, J T A. 

62,269 

10,829 

Gris, I L. 

50,705 

7,210 

Haldin, C). 

55,820 

302 

Gray, M E. 

61,237 

3,051 

Grist, C M. 

75,546 

1,233 

Hale, L. 

60,165 


Gray, M Ft. 

58,469 

1,003 

Griswold, M L. 

60,751 

120 

Hale, M G. 

62,269 

83 

Gray, R B. 

52,212 

1,547 

Groberman, H. 

74,740 

4,118 

Hales, G. 

76,156 


Gray, R R. 

60,985 

4,459 

Grobowsky, L. 

50,684 

1,972 

Haley, B L L. 

62,269 


Gray, S. 

... 104,510 

7,471 

Grof, 1. 

60,604 

3,630 

Haley, D. 

51,885 


Gray-Wiksten, B. 

65,305 

11,171 

Gronsdahl, D. 

62,269 

435 

Haley, D K. 

55,611 

6,410 

Grayston, R. 

61,888 

1,210 

Groom,) W. 

68,323 

4,869 

Haley, PF. 

62,269 

50 

Green, A. 

53,488 


Groulx, S. 

63,181 

2,652 

Hall, A A. 

59,653 

1,361 

Green, B). 

63,684 

3,453 

Grove, M C. 

56,477 

449 

Hall, CT. 

52,131 

213 

Green, B ) C. 

50,806 

356 

Grove-White,.G R. 

66,613 

1,989 

Hall, D W. 

62,663 

5,785 

Green, C N. 

53,771 

9,845 

Grover, B. 

53,736 

299 

Hall, E]. 

65,927 

11,563 

Green, D. 

57,057 

1,936 

Grozier, K B. 

62,269 

1,302 

Hall,) H. 

51,933 

1,320 

Green, D A. 

62,269 

2,174 

Grunau, G C. 

53,197 

3,267 

Hall, I R. 

58,210 


Green, D L. 

61,316 

2,157 

G run berg, F C. 

71,682 

17,801 

Hall,) R. 

99,511 

2,843 

Green, G L. 

77,127 


Grunerud, G D. 

59,749 

497 

Hall, IT. 

91,231 

8,712 

Green, J. 

67,307 

5,075 

Grunewald, B W. 

51,336 

30 

Hall, KM. 

51,076 

2,023 

Green,) R. 

61,535 

860 

Grymaloski, R E. 

53,025 

8,014 

Hall, L. 

50,478 

1,259 

Green, K P. 

62,269 

4,969 

Grzybowski, j. 

60,168 

1,250 

Hall, LFJ. 

50,478 

10,988 

Green, M. 

50,224 

709 

Guasparini, R. 

105,102 

3,679 

Hall, L]. 

66,591 

4,409 

Green, S. 

53,771 

319 

Gubbels, P M. 

77,709 

49 

Hall, P. 

62,269 

974 

Green, S D. 

56,477 

4,113 

Gubbins, A G. 

51,844 

830 

Hall, PM. 

55,501 

10,126 

Green, T D. 

65,543 

626 

Gudgeon, G S. 

63,395 


Hall, PR. 

50,478 

5,219 

Green, T K. 

62,269 

1,070 

Guenard, S |. 

58,265 

1,784 

Hall, R A. 

52,501 

985 

Green-Seed, B. 

57,420 

1,318 

Guenther, R W. 

55,790 

3,370 

Hall, R E. 

50,684 

531 

Greenall, T M. 

50,478 

274 

Guido, J P. 

63,206 

3,056 

Hall, R M. 

51,030 

867 

Greenberg, D. 

62,239 

1,428 

Guidon, R B. 

53,948 

7,494 

Hall, S. 

57,029 

4,503 

Greene, D. 

52,534 


Guilbault, A B. 

81,254 

250 

Hall, T H. 

71,682 

4,356 

Greene, L L. 

56,290 

4,080 

Guilbeault, W. 

52,754 


Hall, V R. 

63,456 


Greene, M. 

69,009 

964 

Guillet, M G. 

50,871 


Hall, W H. 

60,913 

4,732 

Greene, T L. 

75,405 

764 

Guinchard, F V. 

52,942 

573 

Halladay, D R. 

86,137 

10,849 

Greenfield, J V W. 

60,604 


Guinchard, P. 

51,284 

797 

Hallam, 1 W. 

50,684 

589 

Greenfield, R R. 

52,086 


Guinn, D R. 

57,797 

1,109 

Hallam, M A. 

56,477 

648 

Greenhalgh, KB. 

57,113 

11,352 

Guise, PC. 

60,510 

316 

Hallas, B. 

67,082 

558 

Greenhalgh, W. 

50,478 

3,035 

Gulbransen, P D. 

90,880 

674 

Hallaway, R. 

... 122,275 

880 

Greenhill, G. 

54,493 


Gulliford, V. 

62,741 


Hallin, L. 

61,116 

96 

Greeniaus, B. 

71,682 

9,408 

Gundersen-Bryden, B .... 

53,391 

3,450 

Halliwell,) D. 

66,613 

415 

Greening, D. 

64,863 

413 

Gunderson, E L. 

58,727 

3,077 

Hallman, R D. 

56,553 

7,537 

Greening, S R A. 

56,477 

2,453 

Gunn, B. 

53,545 

4,800 

Halpenny, B. 

55,609 

8,721 

Greenlaw, B A. 

62,269 

3,408 

Gunn, C R. 

59,101 

8,615 

Halsall, J .. 

51 703 

3,384 

Greenley, D W. 

63,518 

480 

Gunnarsen, D E. 

56,477 


Halsey, T G. 

72,826 

Greenman, M. 

62,269 

4,602 

Gunnarson, A R. 

53,771 

562 

Halyk, SI. 

57,611 


Greensides, | V. 

54,580 

22,486 

Gupta, P K. 

63,260 

40 

Hamade, G E A. 

62,269 

2,309 

Greenway, K T. 

69,357 

14,363 

Gurney, C A. 

51,102 

850 

Hamann, 1 R. 

62,269 

3,933 

Greenwood, G E. 

56,330 


Gurski, B. 

50,367 


Hamber, C. 

70,212 

80 

Greer, B H. 

99,511 

144 

Gust, S. 

52,556 

3,290 

Hamdi, B I. 

60,199 

759 

Greer, G. 

56,118 

4,270 

Gustafson, C O. 

75,295 

3,379 

Hamdi, L. 

66,613 
























































































































































































































































PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


D 29 


Hamdi, R D. 

Salary 

$ 

57,289 

Travel 

$ 

Hargreaves, DR. 

Salary 

$ 

.... 100,788 

Travel 

$ 

639 

Havelock,) L. 

Salary 

$ 

51,550 

Travel 

$ 

1,039 

Hamer, WE. 

51,411 

9,944 

Hargrove, A A. 

76,156 

967 

Hawboldt, D. 

51,190 


Hames, D ]. 

69,855 

2,234 

Hargrove, S. 

52,514 


Hawe, D T. 

62,269 

2,708 

Hamey, J L. 

59,193 

7,642 

Hark, H H. 

50,478 

3,172 

Hawes, C. 

68,069 

730 

Hamilton, A N. 

53,771 

18,592 

Harkema, J A. 

55,261 

8,299 

Hawes,) G. 

51,336 

5,426 

Hamilton, C. 

52,117 

11,921 

Harker, G R. 

51,375 

1,170 

Hawes, R S. 

59,721 

3,562 

Hamilton, D. 

54,049 


Harkness, G C. 

91,231 

11,478 

Hawkes, MS. 

52,098 

3,005 

Hamilton, D). 

53,597 

1,069 

Harkness, T P. 

56,495 

2,319 

Hawkes, R B. 

52,098 


Hamilton, E H. 

59,136 

3,524 

Harley, A W. 

67,672 


Hawkes, R C. 

62,269 

264 

Hamilton, 1 R. 

58,427 

6,084 

Harman, L. 

73,569 


Hawkins, B A. 

51,310 

2,437 

Hamilton, K C. 

51,603 

1,077 

Harms, D B V. 

56,362 


Hawkins, C D B. 

62,825 

2,454 

Hamilton, K W. 

52,588 

1,977 

Harms, W N |. 

55,087 

370 

Hawkins, D A. 

70,943 

10,542 

Hamilton, M. 

55,573 

602 

Harper, B M. 

50,877 

536 

Hawkins, D B. 

56,477 

108 

Hamilton, N A. 

50,345 

1,707 

Harper, C. 

50,478 

60 

Hawkins, G. 

64,728 

5,221 

Hamilton, R. 

52,048 

3,973 

Harper, EWS. 

64,233 

669 

Hawkins, L). 

60,440 

4,511 

Hamilton, R G. 

56,264 

597 

Harper, F. 

59,136 

2,195 

Hawkins, R H. 

82,296 

3,300 

Hamilton, S. 

62,459 

12,531 

Harper, G. 

54,359 

6,077 

Hawkins, S O. 

58,700 

3,930 

Hamilton, T. 

51,954 

56 

Harper, 1. 

62,269 

1,045 

Hawksworth, C D. 

71,682 

1,302 

Hamilton, T G. 

57,892 

3,519 

Harper,) G. 

63,141 

12,722 

Hawksworth, D B. 

61,240 


Hamilton, T N. 

58,293 

3,419 

Harper, P). 

50,478 

257 

Hawrys, BA. 

62,269 

3,482 

Hamlet, D). 

66,613 

4,410 

Harper, W L. 

53,771 

7,454 

Hawthorn, R S. 

54,141 

3,206 

Hamlin, I F. 

50,478 

357 

Harrhy, D. 

50,053 

402 

Hay, C. 

53,195 


Hamm, M W. 

59,400 

4,524 

Harrington, S A. 

50,478 

826 

Hay, |D. 

62,269 

4,661 

Hamm, V E. 

66,613 

1,680 

Harris, B ) R. 

50,453 

1,318 

Hay, M. 

57,174 

2,192 

Hammell, M F. 

56,477 

109 

Harris, B M. 

62,882 

1,088 

Hayashi, W S. 

55,082 

1,287 

Hammerback, B A. 

51,414 

1,442 

Harris, B S. 

50,478 

3,017 

Hayden, C. 

63,975 


Hammerl, S D. 

50,478 

921 

Harris, D N S. 

62,269 

1,857 

Hayden, F B. 

56,553 

361 

Hammett, D. 

66,613 

2,714 

Harris, DP. 

59,005 

984 

Hayden, M A. 

50,505 

3,275 

Hammon, J. 

Hammond, R). 

50,478 

59,136 

1,011 
12,795 

Harris, D P D. 

Harris, G. 

68,039 

50,492 

1,263 

Hayek, L. 

Hayes, DR. 

63,599 

66,392 

13,767 

Hamre, W F. 

Hancock, K D. 

62,269 

50,820 

1,606 

2,028 

Harris, G. 

Harris,). 

59,106 

51,001 

6,521 

Hayes, G M. 

Hayes,). 

61,563 

75,277 

12,963 

Hancock, L G. 

Handley, D P. 

52,171 

67,933 

8,388 

Harris, K G. 

Harris, K N. 

50,751 

56,477 

6,414 

Hayes, J G. 

Hayes, J M. 

100,368 

50,478 

1,866 

Handrahan, K D. 

56,477 

2,077 

Harris, L A. 

52,420 


Hayes, K L. 

67,502 

260 

Haney, D M. 

66,613 

864 

Harris, L E. 

56,658 

280 

Hayes, M C. 

55,037 

536 

Hanika, T. 

53,027 


Harris, M L. 

55,481 

1,029 

Hayes, P). 

62,881 

779 

Hanlon, L M. 

56,132 

3,486 

Harris, R B. 

53,842 

14,962 

Hayes-Newington, L M.. 

53,771 

1,665 

Hanna, K. 

54,850 

4,168 

Harris, R). 

91,231 

18,142 

Hayes-Van Vliet, W 1_ 

58,146 

1,091 

Hanna, P V. 

57,188 

2,436 

Harrison, K L. 

51,268 

512 

Hayhurst, C H. 

62,269 

2,912 

Hanna, S A. 

50,385 


Harrison, N j. 

60,111 

776 

Haymond, R. 

63,260 

543 

HannaFi, L E. 

64,683 

3,259 

Harrison, P J. 

66,613 

21,213 

Haynes, C R. 

100,041 

17,238 

HannaFi, ML. 

66,149 

4,929 

Harrison, S R. 

89,511 

2,674 

Haynes, K). 

50,478 

1,693 

Hanratty, J J. 

51,217 

2,401 

Harrison, S W. 

66,047 

4,008 

Hays-Byl, W J. 

54,546 

1,339 






Hanry, M R. 

53,771 

1,080 

Harrison, Y M A. 

55,820 

4,174 

Hayward, D. 

53,557 


Hansen, B. 

71,682 


Harrower, 1J. 

56,653 

5,959 

13,261 

Hayward, T. 

50,478 

54,369 

967 

Hansen, G. 

59,136 

1,705 

Harrower, M. 

71,682 

Haywood, DA. 

Hansen, L. 

57,409 

4,865 

Hart, BT. 

55,642 

8,538 

Hazlewood, A G. 

85,357 

16,161 

Hansen, L W. 

50,914 


Hart, R N. 

59,039 

495 

Head, K. 

53,821 

4,497 

Hansen, M A. 

66,613 

5,150 

Hart, SG. 

53,669 

2,297 

Headley, G S. 

59,995 

9,940 

Hansen, ME. 

54,306 

3,290 

Hartley, B G. 

54,424 

75 

Heagy, MR. 

51,414 

1,639 

Hansen, P H. 

Hansen, R. 

74,578 

51,763 

2,365 

Hartman, D M. 

Hartmann, H F. 

66,613 

50,478 

325 

Heap, P C. 

Heard, D C. 

91,231 

59,136 

7,763 

2,716 

Hansen, R. 

50,923 


Hartmann,). 

60,790 

2,234 

Heard, FT. 

67,078 

5,524 

Hansen, T. 

Hanson, C W. 

68,076 

62,269 

11,465 

Hartnell, B. 

Hartnell, C T. 

50,064 

58,275 

754 

Hearn, R S. 

Heath, R H. 

54,202 

56,553 

5,194 

Hanson, D J. 

54,518 

7,019 

Hartwig, G A. 

59,492 

2,801 

Heather, S A. 

55,162 

568 

Hanson, J. 

50,542 

1,184 

Harvey,) P. 

50,684 

409 

Heatherington, R P. 

51,417 

324 

Hanson, ]. 

62,963 


Harvey, M R. 

50,877 

331 

Heathman, R L. 

66,613 

10,326 

Hanson, R L H. 

62,269 

548 

Harvey, R. 

57,277 

3,131 

Heavener, C R. 

53,865 

2,203 

Hanson, V. 

68,183 

1,208 

Harvey, R D. 

63,017 

342 

Heavener,). 

62,246 

1,363 

Hanson, W. 

59,993 

161 

Harvey, S D. 

74,164 

4,558 

Hebda, R J. 

64,130 

1,840 

Happy, G W. 

Haraga, S M. 

58,538 

66,675 

4,263 

Haslett, R L. 

Hassard, S A. 

53,441 

55,837 

2,441 

Hecher, P. 

Hecker,) B D. 

55,181 

64,808 

87 

10,862 

Harbicht, D H. 

51,431 

3,245 

Hastings, N J. 

50,478 

694 

Hedges, D. 

71,623 

8,650 

Harbicht, T N. 

56,491 

2,728 

Hastings, S M. 

54,514 


Hedges, S. 

61,542 

817 

Harcombe, A P. 

56,553 

4,305 

Hastman, R. 

55,491 


Hedin, T A. 

63,287 

2,743 

Harden, D. 

62,269 

2,339 

Hatcher, P]. 

56,384 

10 

Heemskerk, A j. 

77,326 

4,261 

Harder, L. 

63,371 

7,046 

Hatfield,) G. 

55,611 

3,627 

Hegadoren, D B. 

53,455 

7,517 

Harding, D. 

54,302 

2,135 

Hatten, R A. 

62,269 


Heidecke, R. 

50,478 

246 

Hardman, M. 

84,269 

4,186 

Hatter, 1 W. 

53,771 

8,569 

Heistad, R H. 

53,771 

10,483 

Hardy, B J. 

61,728 


Haubert, V. 

56,553 

4,064 

Helewa, N T. 

56,062 

7,021 

Hardy, K. 

57,554 

10,411 

Hauff, C. 

54,150 

403 

Helmersen, A). 

71,758 

7,163 

Hardy, N E... 

66,307 

4,537 

Haugan, E M. 

56,301 

681 

Helvoigt, H. 

50,478 

8,092 

Hardy, R L. 

56,027 

279 

Haugen, S V. 

71,325 

1,982 

Hemani, A M. 

59,237 

1,187 

Hardy, R W. 

52,842 

1,137 

Haughton, E R. 

64,761 

5,944 

Hembrough, R A. 

54,546 

98 

Hardy, T B. 

50,532 

2,966 

Haugo, GO. 

54,519 


Hemming, J E. 

66,878 

1,805 

Hardy, W R. 

50,699 

732 

Hauk, CG. 

63,646 

4,481 

Hemminger, A. 

52,419 


Hare, AS. 

53,771 

1,772 

Haukaas, K R. 

55,190 

4,563 

Hemphill, G. 

77,474 

8,188 

Hare, S D. 

62,269 

1,177 

Haupt, E A. 

63,355 

462 

Hemsted, BA. 

50,877 

2,871 

Harford, B. 

64,089 


Havelka, M. 

59,401 

5,145 

Henders, K C. 

66,613 

750 























































































































































































































































D 30 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Other Employees —Continued 



Salary 

Travel 


Salary 

Travel 


Salary 

Travel 


$ 

$ 


$ 

$ 


$ 

$ 

Henderson, DM. 

71,682 


Hill, DA. 

51,946 

1,689 

Holland, G L. 

50,478 

59 

Henderson, C 1. 

78,083 

6,367 

Hill, D W. 

56,999 

714 

Holland, P. 

55,959 

1,557 

Henderson, H H. 

56,302 

727 

Hill, G. 

75,033 

2,290 

Holland, W J. 

60,015 

946 

Henderson,) A. 

56,477 

7,094 

Hill, G C. 

66,582 

8 

Hollander, M |. 

71,682 


Henderson, P. 

53,783 

5,060 

Hill, G E. 

58,252 

3,367 

Holley, U. 

51,917 



62 479 

3,202 

Hill, |. 

72,847 

7,944 

Holliday, B. 

50,284 

431 

Henderson, R D. 

56,106 

Hill, I. 

57,839 

1,604 

Hollingshead, A. 

7U682 

826 

Henderson, R F. 

50,216 

74 

Hill, K. 

52,300 

523 

Hollingshead, C. 

50,558 


Henderson, R C. 

67,351 

27 

Hill,LA. 

52,689 

5,158 

Hollingshead, E. 

50,478 

4,637 

Henderson, S. 

51,771 


Hill, M E. 

53,319 

3,333 

Hollins, L. 

87,390 

13,391 

Hendren, D F. 

57,259 

170 

Hill, S. 

52,185 


Holloway, R. 

63,537 

31 

Hendricks, P. 

50,877 

353 

Hillaby, L. 

76,156 

2,645 

Holloway, R P. 

73,014 


Hendry, R |. 

51,051 

1,449 

Hillary, F J E. 

92,264 

8,023 

Hollstedt, D. 

51,236 

4,092 

Henigman,) F. 

60,527 

11,252 

Hillbom, C. 

53,219 

1,143 

Holman, P). 

50,478 

490 

Henley, A R. 

54,000 

105 

Hillman, K R. 

94,939 

319 

Holmes, A M. 

50,469 

44,978 

Hennigar, M. 

61,023 

247 

Hillsden, R A. 

66,613 

1,588 

Holmes, B. 

53,915 

1,391 

Henning, A. 

77,363 

11,038 

Hilton, H. 

73,421 

322 

Holmes, D. 

50,920 


Henry, B. 

55,069 

5,184 

Hilton,). 

52,757 

4,218 

Holmes, D. 

62,089 


Henry, D L. 

50,684 


Hilton,) E. 

64,133 

1,055 

Holmes, D G. 

59,334 


Henry, E A. 

56,461 

688 

Himech, J. 

54,492 

5,350 

Holmes, D W. 

63,808 

2,593 

Henry, F G. 

52,286 

158 

Hincks, A. 

76,156 

2,872 

Holmes, G. 

62,246 

7,860 

Henry, G M. 

56,477 

4,884 

Hinkley, R M. 

53,666 

983 

Holmes, H J. 

76,156 

216 

Henry, L F. 

50,892 


Hinnen, M R. 

58,259 


Holmes, M A. 

57,195 

58 

Henry, M. 

73,392 

17,589 

Hinshaw, R A. 

62,269 

9,931 

Holmes, P R. 

50,822 

128 

Henry, R J. 

56,941 

1,549 

Hinton, G M. 

70,638 

8,962 

Holoboff, W. 

51,917 

741 

HenscFike, N M. 

55,097 

3,009 

Hiob, E. 

54,512 

1,767 

Holowachuk, L. 

74,913 

24,766 

Henuset, B. 

72,486 


Hitchman, H. 

62,269 

300 

Holt, C. 

86,847 

5,862 

Heppner, D G. 

56,612 

6,258 

Hitkari, R. 

68,184 


Holt, E. 

62,269 

157 

Herath, R B. 

50,877 

571 

Hjorth, D. 

56,553 

24,939 

Holter, M. 

53,288 

3,320 

Herbert,) D. 

83,267 

2,030 

Hlasny, B S. 

56,553 

3,343 

Holub, V. 

68,118 

152 

Herberts, G E. 

65,091 

9,048 

Hlatky, R M. 

56,553 

6,660 

Holz, R F. 

53,435 

9 

Herchmer, D H. 

60,250 

2,939 

Ho, D. 

77,474 

1,275 

Holzl, N E. 

58,609 


Herlinveaux, L A. 

65,370 


Ho, D Y N. 

99,385 

365 

Flomer, K. 

68,183 


Hermann, F W. 

80,384 

16,490 

Ho, J. 

52,679 

4,534 

Homer, M. 

50,706 

2,293 

Hermann, M L. 

58,977 

250 

Ho, K W. 

64,428 

765 

Honeyman, B. 

62,525 

377 

Hem, A R. 

53,742 

292 

Ho, S. 

65,124 


Hong, D. 

50,412 


Herndier, J M. 

54,505 


Hoadley, D B. 

59,778 


Hood,). 

51,002 


Heron, B. 

69,461 

39 

Hobart, R. 

.. 100,041 

2,609 

Hood, 1 . 

50,297 

557 

Heron, R. 

72,486 


Hocking, G. 

57,749 


Hook, WD. 

62,269 

9,194 

Herrera, C G. 

53,600 

10,666 

Hocking, J. 

57,839 

7,330 

Hooper, AC. 

50,975 


Herrera, C M. 

71,949 

11,033 

Hocking, J M. 

50,015 

4,140 

Hooper, P. 

52,645 


Herrick, C. 

55,115 

264 

Hockley, T. 

62,269 

43 

Hooson, A E. 

65,344 

3,183 

Herring, L). 

56,818 

7,723 

Hodge, L V. 

56,477 

1,449 

Hooton, R S. 

65,638 

7,916 

Herrington, C. 

53,771 

1,104 

Hodge, P. 

51,237 


Hoover, A L. 

59,778 

1,261 

Herron, J. 

59,241 


Hodge, W S. 

50,877 

2,986 

Hope, G D. 

56,569 

3,638 

Herzog, K. 

54,624 

1,665 

Hodges, K. 

54,386 

1,766 

Hope, N. 

83,267 

10,611 

Hesketh, A. 

51,256 


Hodgetts, 1. 

54,655 

2,702 

Hopewell, j. 

68,672 


Hess, H. 

66,613 

4,188 

Hodgins, D M. 

50,684 

1,708 

Hopkins, J B. 

51,093 

3,702 

Hess, SC. 

52,829 

2,767 

Hodgkinson, G D. 

82,893 


Hopkins, J W. 

66,749 

5,749 

Hesse,) W. 

50,874 

181 

Hodgkinson, R S. 

60,527 

7,339 

Hopkins, K L. 

64,691 

969 

Hester, J. 

67,187 

2,534 

Hodgson, C. 

67,515 

1,299 

Hopson, R E. 

51,707 

12,985 

Hetherington, A E. 

51,336 

6,240 

Hodgson, C. 

52,901 


Hora, Z. 

64,863 

7,453 

Hetherington, H T. 

54,544 

856 

Hodgson, R S. 

51,524 

628 

Horan, A. 

62,458 

18,315 

Hetherington, R. 

52,421 

14 

Hodgson, W. 

69,166 

809 

Horan, G J S. 

66,613 


Hetsler, L. 

57,339 

800 

Hodson, R. 

59,210 

961 

Hori, K K. 

52,644 

4,398 

Hewitt, J R. 

53,320 

3,244 

Hoebel, M. 

76,329 

1,320 

Horley, G R. 

50,422 


Hewitt, M P. 

77,474 

3,713 

Hoefer, | G. 

50,684 

269 

Horn, C. 

62,120 

12,937 

Hewko, R A. 

66,613 

151 

Hoehne, G E R. 

60,532 

458 

Horncastle,) R. 

62,269 

2,496 

Hewson, C A. 

54,321 

2,662 

Hoenhous, R. 

51,644 


Horne, DA. 

60,032 

6,017 

Heyes, G E. 

60,448 

58 

Hoenisch, F. 

51,551 


Horne, G). 

66,613 


Heyland, R. 

82,465 


Hoff, L M. 

53,771 


Horsfield,). 

58,993 

14 

Heywood, S. 

51,747 


Hoffman, A. 

67,407 

11,547 

Horsman, S C. 

50,371 

4,816 

Hibbins, B |. 

75,319 

377 

Hoffman, D. 

51,500 


Horton, D R. 

54,616 

3,878 

Hibbins, D A. 

95,576 


Hoffman, G S. 

56,096 

10,903 

Horton, ] L. 

71,682 

14,935 

Hicke, J B. 

73,780 

230 

Hoffman, T. 

57,271 

55 

Horton, PR. 

58,798 

2,069 

Hicke, KF. 

60,604 

1,177 

Hoffmann, E R J. 

60,046 

1,239 

Horvath, S. 

57,111 

872 

Hickey, R). 

66,726 

4,244 

Hoffmann,) C. 

53,232 

6,379 

Horvath, S. 

53,771 

998 

Hickman, T. 

63,430 

88 

Hoffmann, S T. 

52,973 


Horvath, S M. 

61,554 

311 

Hicks, D. 

59,010 

703 

Hoffos, A R. 

54,264 

1,243 

Hosick, G. 

50,723 


Hicks, G. 

67,913 

221 

Hofmeyr, H. 

53,940 

5,142 

Hosick, J B. 

70,442 

856 

Hicks, M B. 

90,880 

500 

Hofweber,) E. 

61,463 

2,573 

Hosie,). 

52,296 


Hicks, S M. 

50,674 

196 

Hogan, D L. 

60,480 

5,458 

Hoskin, D A. 

62,682 

3,351 

Higenbottam, D M. 

62,269 

9,689 

Hogg, G J. 

75,801 

646 

Hoskins, W G. 

62,269 

6,503 

Higgins, G. 

54,282 

5,227 

Hogg,) W. 

92,621 


Houg, M D. 

50,479 

1,725 

High, G. 

70,509 


Hohenacker, L. 

52,398 

4,982 

Hough, R D. 

66,613 

2,230 

High, |. 

75,023 


Hoium, T L. 

51,710 


Hough, S). 

51,141 


Highsted, J W. 

55,094 

2,359 

Holack, K. 

62,913 

6,546 

Houlind, W DM. 

58,101 

4,793 

Hilborn, B. 

58,155 


Holden, B. 

56,553 

2,944 

Hoult, C M. 

57,694 

3,697 

Hilborn, TE. 

50,877 

1,101 

Holland, B. 

77,326 

2,114 

House, D. 

76,156 

3,968 

Hilderman, W |. 

82,296 

10,929 

Holland, D. 

53,771 

577 

House, G. 

53,133 


Hill, B. 

85,155 


Holland, G B. 

51,678 


Houston, G. 

90,880 

1,558 
























































































































































































































































PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


D 31 


Houston, C B. 

Houston, K A. 

Houston, M. 

Houston, R. 

Hovde, M J. 

Howard, D). 

Howard, E J. 

Howard,). 

Howard, SC. 

Howard, W G. 

Howat, R). 

Howbold, M. 

Howden, B J. 

Howe, M T. 

Howell, S D. 

Howell-Jones, C. 

Howes, D E. 

Howes, S. 

Howie,) C S. 

Howie, KRG. 

Howie, R R. 

Howsam, K. 

Hoy, C J. 

Hoy, T. 

Hoyle, W R. 

Hoyles, S E. 

Hoyrup,) D. 

Hrycun, D J. 

Hryhoruk, G. 

Hsieh, M. 

Hubbard, D. 

Hubbard, L T. 

Hubbard, R. 

Hubbard, W F. 

Huber, R F. 

Hubert, M. 

Hubner, T B. 

Huculak, B L. 

Hudock, M J. 

Hudson, D. 

Hudson, DA. 

Hudson, F. 

Hudson, G. 

Hudson, R. 

Hudson, R. 

Hudson, R. 

Hudson, W. 

Huettmeyer, K. 

Huffman, C. 

Hugel, H E. 

Huggan, JR. 

Hughes, A J. 

Hughes, B. 

Hughes, D. 

Hughes, F C. 

Hughes, GW. 

Hughes, LA. 

Hughes, M J. 

Hughes, N. 

Hughes, P A J. 

Hughes, P D. 

Hughes, R. 

Hughes, R. 

Hughes, R H. 

Hughes, T G. 

Hughes, T M. 

Hughes-Adams, G... 
Hughes-Games, G A 

Hughson, H. 

Huhtala, M. 

Hulme, S. 

Humar, F I. 

Hume, A. 

Hume, S. 

Humphrey, D. 

Humphreys, T. 

Humphries, D H. 

Humphries, G. 

Hunchak, L. 

! Hundal, P A. 

Hundleby, WC. 


Salary 

Travel 

$ 

$ 

56,992 


51,754 

354 

66,264 


54,241 


51,003 

9,000 

50,370 

1,020 

71,782 

12,930 

62,349 

268 

50,539 

5,476 

83,267 

8,714 

57,965 

10,773 

57,289 

3,481 

67,672 

1,664 

52,959 

4,353 

62,269 

712 

85,451 

293 

78,231 

3,902 

62,296 

3,347 

66,613 

7,613 

55,955 

419 

50,478 

356 

70,287 


50,478 

425 

64,304 

5,134 

52,085 


56,553 

4,697 

63,974 

635 

59,136 

323 

58,647 


59,136 

395 

57,331 

726 

77,474 

5,205 

64,382 

680 

50,877 

193 

56,355 

7,405 

54,343 

5,197 

53,254 

9,655 

50,409 

1,993 

54,784 

1,621 

51,285 

6,431 

61,083 

630 

66,420 

1,642 

52,617 

523 

123,939 

11,410 

56,103 

6,142 

54,510 


75,928 


62,508 

1,332 

56,499 

10,909 

62,186 

7,240 

54,023 

2,226 

59,365 


62,269 

1,160 

54,062 

3,330 

60,401 

24,737 

71,682 

6,133 

70,442 

3,331 

66,613 

647 

62,269 

632 

53,556 


50,239 

397 

59,778 

1,352 

57,331 


57,564 

1,022 

50,478 

318 

62,412 

731 

50,345 


56,926 

2,352 

50,889 

4,541 

57,331 

191 

54,000 

393 

53,503 

5,086 

83,267 


59,135 

5,587 

52,440 

13,847 

50,381 

10,311 

66,613 

5,926 

52,014 


50,691 


50,620 

2,066 

53,919 

250 


Hundt, R. 

Hunks, B. 

Hunsberger, S J. 

Hunt, C. 

Hunt, C B. 

Hunt, C R. 

Hunt, D R. 

Hunt, ED. 

Hunt, F M. 

Hunt, R L. 

Hunter, B D. 

Hunter, C. 

Hunter, C. 

Hunter, D. 

Hunter, D. 

Hunter, H R. 

Hunter, J S. 

Hunter, J S. 

Hunter, R A. 

Hunter, R G. 

Hunter, R). 

Hunter, S J. 

Hunter-Oglow, S M 

Huot, WJ. 

Hupman, C B. 

Hurd, E. 

Hurd, E K. 

Hurd, L E. 

Hurly, R. 

Hurst, R A. 

Husband, G S. 

Huscroft, M. 

Huska, P. 

Hussey, P. 

Hutcheon, M. 

Hutcheson, D W. 

Hutcheson, G R. 

Hutchinson, B W .... 

Hutchinson, C M. 

Hutchinson, D C. 

Hutchinson, J O. 

Hutton, B L. 

Hutton, J A. 

Hutton, J P. 

Huxley, W. 

Hyatt, D W. 

Hyatt, P. 

Hyatt, S L. 

Hyde, D B. 

Hyde, R E. 

Hyldig, L M. 

Hynd, S G. 

Hyslop, D. 

Hyslop, R. 

Ibraheem, S M. 

Ife, J. 

Illington, J K. 

Illingworth, R C. 

Inglis, R I. 

Ingram,). 

Ingram, J D. 

Ingram, T L. 

Inkster, M. 

Innes, T. 

Innis, A J. 

Insley, P. 

Ip, F. 

IP, I. 

Ireland, D B. 

Ireland,) A. 

Ireson, K. 

Ironmonger, W G.... 

Irvine, G M. 

Irvine, R J. 

Irwin, J. 

Irwin, J. 

Irwin, M A. 

Irwin, T W. 

Irwin, W M. 

Isaac, G E. 

Isaac, M M. 


Salary 

T ravel 

$ 

$ 

56,739 


53,657 

3,467 

50,478 

1,266 

67,437 

264 

60,401 

424 

57,331 

156 

52,716 

1,551 

60,276 

713 

73,476 

3,131 

64,774 


67,539 

9,131 

57,761 

21 

54,879 

2,438 

50,381 

9,670 

60,115 

3,920 

53,503 

1,564 

63,738 

13,467 

57,857 


72,933 

395 

50,478 

4,489 

52,852 

836 

53,771 

21,060 

62,887 

2,124 

54,654 

1,308 

50,478 

2,619 

56,340 

915 

54,341 

6,364 

60,527 

2,292 

50,623 


51,670 

1,398 

52,619 

11,490 

76,156 

826 

53,771 

3,466 

54,135 

99 

66,477 

232 

77,414 

8,256 

50,852 

346 

75,045 

6,389 

56,553 

1,506 

59,533 


53,472 

23 

50,684 

279 

50,478 

2,494 

53,547 

12,546 

54,956 

3,265 

62,097 

13,433 

65,050 

447 

62,269 

617 

63,778 

290 

50,975 

241 

50,091 

3,020 

61,463 

1,689 

59,136 

2,840 

62,269 

1,464 

52,859 

406 

67,228 


78,980 

6,056 

51,892 

243 

72,885 

22,704 

50,478 

554 

59,959 

811 

60,190 


63,431 

3,387 

51,867 

614 

69,984 

27,617 

86,310 

2,455 

56,705 


62,269 


60,901 

4,879 

68,241 

5,988 

52,881 

153 

79,272 

18,128 

56,589 

5,215 

66,613 

5,983 

59,704 

5,659 

55,221 


70,539 

9,610 

60,546 

1,391 

77,474 

24,377 

50,478 


57,289 

374 


Isaac, R. 

Isaksson, K N. 

Isbister, A. 

Isenor, DM. 

Ishikawa, D R. 

Isitt, JAF. 

Isley, W G. 

Ismay, M G. 

Ivancic, E. 

Ivanco, B G. 

Ivanisko, G J. 

Ivanoff, A. 

Iverson, C. 

Ives, H B. 

Iwanson, J R D. 

Iwasaki, C. 

Iwaskow, G. 

Izard, E A. 

Jablanczy, S B P. 

Jack, D G. 

Jack, S. 

Jackisch, C. 

Jackson, A. 

Jackson, B E. 

Jackson, B J. 

Jackson, B L. 

Jackson, D. 

Jackson, G C. 

Jackson, J B. 

Jackson, L K. 

Jackson, P M. 

Jackson, R. 

Jackson, R T. 

Jackson, R V. 

Jackson, S. 

Jackson, W F M. 

Jacobi, LA. 

Jacobs, M. 

Jacques, K. 

Jacques, L. 

Jago, R C. 

Jagpal, D. 

Jahn, C R. 

Jai, R. 

Jakobsen, D E. 

Jamal, N J. 

Jamal, Z. 

James, B E. 

James, HA. 

James, I. 

James, R K. 

Jameson, R E. 

Jamieson, B W. 

Jamieson, M L. 

Jang, J G H. 

Jang, M. 

Jani, A. 

Janning-Stewart, D A 

Janowsky, R K. 

Jansen, E. 

Janusauskas, A. 

Januska, V. 

Janusson, W B. 

Janz, D W. 

Janzen, J W E. 

Janzen, P V. 

Janzen, R. 

Jaquish, B C. 

Jardine, D . 

Jardine, D A. 

Jarman, P. 

Jarman, P W. 

Jarvie, T L. 

Jarvin, R N. 

Jasinski, I. 

Jaskela, R. 

Jasperse, R J. 

Jasperse, S M. 

Jassal, B S. 

Jaunich, K. 

Jaworski, A. 


Salary 

Travel 

$ 

$ 

90,880 

737 

74,227 

1,545 

62,269 

6,962 

58,261 


50,241 

78 

63,758 

1,390 

58,931 

704 

60,401 

1,820 

67,355 

7,333 

59,390 

967 

76,156 


52,869 

2,094 

61,076 


58,436 

16,184 

50,963 

3,145 

76,156 

836 

54,441 

4,982 

57,221 

1,540 

60,192 

218 

59,362 

2,007 

50,478 

14,897 

54,486 

9,443 

57,172 


54,095 

1,370 

64,090 

1,613 

66,238 

984 

66,613 

5,600 

54,743 


51,079 

11,906 

75,197 

16,426 

63,035 


53,720 

3,974 

63,883 

3,053 

52,518 

3,815 

55,990 

2,552 

82,296 

3,584 

66,613 

1,043 

68,961 


74,375 

4,473 

53,280 

620 

71,682 

7,081 

50,100 


51,915 

275 

51,780 


54,452 

2,185 

66,613 

3,174 

61,744 

176 

50,533 

8,335 

65,518 


66,935 

9,606 

59,505 

7,380 

74,879 

9,838 

51,161 

1,015 

53,502 

2,299 

60,179 

641 

56,432 

19 

65,876 


63,206 

21 

60,085 

2,217 

62,269 

1,977 

55,997 

200 

50,684 

431 

64,615 

1,198 

59,136 

1,317 

64,530 

30 

50,478 

3,474 

61,349 


64,849 

4,445 

54,813 

1,208 

76,156 

449 

93,591 

6,172 

60,604 

2,835 

54,325 


77,474 

9,662 

53,493 

932 

61,849 

3,830 

66,613 

523 

54,760 

323 

75,273 


58,656 


54,218 

2,128 


























































































































































































































































D 32 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Other Employees —Continued 



Salary 

Travel 


Salary 

Travel 


Salary 

Travel 


$ 

$ 


$ 

$ 


$ 

$ 

Jay, 1 D. 

52,577 

8,160 

Johnson, S L. 

52,228 

12,768 

Jordheim, K. 

57,276 

36 

Jefferies, K E. 

56,477 

605 

Johnson, S L. 

50,684 


Jorgensen, C. 

59,136 

971 

Jeffery, C A. 

73,589 


Johnson, V. 

50,478 

5,340 

lorgenson, C. 

55,472 

17 

Jeffery, M H. 

66,613 


Johnson, W A. 

52,072 


Joseph, E. 

53,942 


Jeffries, F. 

92,571 

5,980 

Johnsrude, M. 

63,701 

552 

Joseph, KM. 

59,180 

205 

Jekel—Sadleir, S E. 

51,780 

209 

Johnston, B H. 

62,269 

7,630 

Joseph, R. 

51,492 

4,047 

Jeklin, C L. 

61,679 


Johnston, B K. 

73,970 

360 

Jothen, K A. 

83,605 

10,085 

Jenkins, B. 

58,237 

63 

Johnston, D. 

54,201 

10,343 

Jovic, N. 

59,039 

6,923 

Jenkins, C J. 

56,553 

1,190 

Johnston, D G. 

51,373 

685 

Joy, K R. 

53,771 

2,075 

Jenkins, F J. 

59,930 

1,562 

Johnston, D L. 

90,183 

9,834 

Joyce, R. 

60,570 

2,424 

Jenkins, J B. 

63,646 

949 

Johnston, D R. 

79,921 

7,232 

Joyce, S. 

52,907 

2,433 

Jenkins, P. 

56,631 

3,650 

Johnston, 1 A. 

52,806 

123 

Joynt, H W. 

60,527 

5,334 

Jennejohn, R G. 

65,270 

1,622 

Johnston, J. 

53,706 

159 

Jubb, R G. 

62,971 

2,294 

Jennings, J. 

62,269 


Johnston, J B. 

50,684 

1,341 

Julian, M. 

53,771 

9,369 

Jennings, P. 

61,700 

1,365 

Johnston, K. 

76,156 

3,103 

Jull. M |. 

60,527 

3,719 

Jennings, S R. 

64,184 

1,817 

Johnston, K. 

78,123 

3,422 

Jung, DJ. 

56,477 

5,514 

Jensen, J A. 

59,788 

1,217 

Johnston, K A. 

54,911 

491 

Jung, F. 

53,855 

3,137 

Jensen, J C. 

85,722 

17,323 

Johnston, K C. 

54,831 


Jung, N G. 

54,224 

13,364 

Jensen, J C. 

51,234 

100 

Johnston, M. 

58,806 

9,440 

Jungen, J R. 

56,553 


Jensen, K K. 

57,413 


Johnston, N T. 

53,771 

6,845 

Junger, R. 

70,100 

5,373 

Jensen, N B. 

79,560 

6,090 

Johnston, R H. 

56,558 

2,041 

Jupp, P. 

53,940 


Jensen, T. 

75,123 

384 

Johnston, S W. 

74,240 

4,749 

Justason, M E. 

56,477 

1,606 

Jensen, T R. 

63,486 

4,899 

Johnston, T R. 

59,370 

3,613 

Justice, R W. 

51,177 

2,680 

Jenson, E A. 

62,078 

226 

Johnston, W. 

55,127 

642 

Juszko, P. 

50,988 


Jenstad, E N. 

83,339 

5,123 

lohnston, W. 

56,613 


Juteau, L M. 

73,185 

11,346 

Jentsch, W J. 

55,295 

193 

Johnstone, B H. 

90,880 

5,302 

Kabatoff, K. 

61,211 

232 

Jenvey, J K. 

50,684 

1,509 

Johnstone, C J. 

50,684 


Kabzems, R. 

58,223 

7,945 

Jesperson, G D. 

58,256 

2,910 

Johnstone, D S. 

77,474 


Kadonaga, K. 

63,949 

970 

Jesson, D A. 

50,255 

3,093 

Johnstone,) B. 

54,455 


Kaehn, C A. 

50,877 

328 

Jessup, T. 

50,231 


Johnstone, P. 

52,624 

7,835 

Kagis, P. 

66,613 

2,519 

Jesudas, D S. 

59,136 

1,189 

Johnstone, P L. 

86,310 

795 

Kain, F B. 

51,653 

998 

Jewula, R L. 

82,913 

1,567 

Johnstone, W D. 

68,955 

1,568 

Kaivanto, L J. 

52,098 

2,247 

Jeyes, J C. 

50,463 

1,156 

Joli, 1 . 

84,591 

942 

Kaiway, B D. 

70,442 


Jickling, G. 

62,627 

844 

Jolivet, J A. 

66,613 

1,518 

Kaleka, R W. 

51,815 

5,862 

Jillings, D. 

60,709 

3,545 

Jolley, K. 

51,921 


Kalina, P EH. 

51,391 

6,276 

Jobe, J. 

59,512 

4,107 

Jolley, WRF. 

58,118 

6,741 

Kammerer, D. 

50,564 


Jobke, ME. 

53,718 

2,078 

Jonas, R G. 

51,362 

751 

Kan, P L F. 

69,859 

3,557 

Jobling, M J. 

56,032 

7,343 

Jonasen, F K. 

71,682 

10,723 

Kane, P W. 

51,818 

295 

Jodouin, L. 

62,802 

3,331 

Jondahl, J EH. 

52,226 


Kane, S R. 

55,820 

1,825 

Johal, M K. 

53,123 

1,388 

Jones, A. 

56,801 


Kang, B. 

60,748 


Johannson, D. 

61,564 


Jones, A R. 

60,454 

10,285 

Kangasniemi, B J. 

55,102 

613 

Johansen, A P. 

50,667 

287 

Jones, B D. 

54,557 

1,198 

Kanigan, F EH. 

50,478 

40 

Johansen, E P. 

62,805 

419 

Jones, B M. 

56,533 

1,188 

Kanya, G S. 

53,380 

448 

Johansen, L M. 

50,977 


Jones, B R. 

62,269 


Kao-Lin, B. 

59,136 

594 

Johansen, M. 

52,596 

1,503 

Jones, DA. 

50,937 

2,040 

Kaplun, B A. 

54,844 

1,899 

Johansen, R. 

55,125 

1,630 

Jones, D E. 

66,613 


Kappus, M. 

50,478 

2,870 

Johansson, L W J. 

56,708 

3,698 

Jones, D L. 

59,136 

2,049 

Kapralik, W J. 

57,331 


John, DM. 

66,311 

2,646 

Jones, D R. 

71,682 

4,204 

Karabilgin, E M. 

50,478 


Johns, A. 

54,691 

3,091 

Jones, E J. 

62,269 

1,587 

Karlsen, E. 

71,682 

7,034 

Johns, D H. 

79,827 

723 

Jones, E P K H. 

56,477 

1,739 

Karr, T. 

66,164 

2,001 

Johns, G A. 

59,849 

6,046 

Jones, F. 

51,810 


Kasianchuk, D A. 

83,119 

3,895 

Johns, H C. 

64,917 


Jones, G A. 

50,612 

825 

Kasprow, T. 

52,016 


Johns, K. 

74,203 


Jones, G C. 

50,173 

91 

Kaspryk, J. 

50,956 


Johnson, A D. 

50,684 

1,040 

Jones, G EH. 

66,613 

2,868 

Kassam, A. 

60,604 

6,461 

Johnson, A D. 

59,659 

5,087 

Jones, GW. 

71,302 

3,321 

Kassian, R P. 

64,128 

576 

Johnson, B D. 

56,553 

4,749 

Jones, H D. 

87,305 


Kastak, D J. 

59,983 


Johnson, B V. 

56,477 

250 

Jones, 1. 

50,657 


Kastelan, C J. 

50,074 

2,245 

Johnson, C. 

59,764 

5,673 

Jones, 1. 

57,492 

3,379 

Kasten, G P. 

57,635 

647 

Johnson, C A. 

60,604 

2,634 

Jones, J H. 

56,183 

1,511 

Katz, S V. 

60,604 

2,266 

Johnson, DA. 

68,183 

1,089 

Jones, JR. 

76,726 

2,872 

Katzer, R I. 

57,531 


Johnson, D D. 

57,262 

3,229 

Jones, K A. 

51,200 

760 

Kavanagh, W K. 

65,518 

5,074 

Johnson, D G. 

50,333 

639 

Jones, L. 

61,759 

9,762 

Kay, G. 

57,482 

2,961 

Johnson, D L. 

... 142,371 

662 

Jones, L D. 

60,527 

423 

Kay, M. 

72,682 


Johnson, D W. 

74,113 

15,800 

Jones, L E. 

53,771 

4,489 

Kay, S. 

69,752 


Johnson, D W. 

63,949 

2,740 

Jones, L K. 

64,698 

3,444 

Kay, S. 

62,043 

157 

Johnson, E B. 

66,613 

2,445 

Jones, M. 

50,032 

935 

Kay, S M. 

62,246 

480 

Johnson, G P. 

50,684 

8,375 

Jones, P K. 

53,771 

1,525 

Kayler, K. 

50,478 

8,101 

Johnson, H. 

51,782 

36 

Jones, R. 

64,836 

6,589 

Kazakoff, K L. 

67,815 


Johnson, EH. 

52,398 

250 

Jones, R A. 

81,653 

4,958 

Kearns, T F. 

56,477 

782 

Johnson, J A. 

56,553 

452 

Jones, R E. 

73,374 

1,521 

Keating, M. 

50,102 

9,745 

Johnson, J H. 

67,938 

756 

Jones, R 1. 

50,478 

415 

Keay, G R. 

60,527 

1,571 

Johnson, J T. 

56,477 


Jones, S A. 

51,818 

1,668 

Kedge, EC. 

59,392 

167 

Johnson, L. 

66,613 

3,029 

Jones, T. 

72,086 

67 

Keefer, R. 

76,156 


Johnson, L. 

51,538 

1,053 

Joneson, B. 

56,462 


Keehn, T W. 

50,478 

1,969 

Johnson, L C. 

52,596 

2,568 

Jongbloed, C W. 

65,406 

1,402 

Keen, J P. 

54,219 

1,548 

Johnson, L M. 

50,678 

3,396 

Jordan, J. 

83,267 

192 

Keetley, R. 

68,766 


Johnson, M A. 

56,477 

4,203 

Jordan, J. 

56,261 

6,273 

Kehler, D B. 

50,478 

1,659 

Johnson, N. 

52,849 

3,220 

Jordan, J D E. 

67,603 

523 

Kehler, G. 

79,311 

1,795 

Johnson, R. 

64,162 

6,009 

Jordan, R. 

61,350 


Keillor, D B. 

53,771 

41 

Johnson, R L. 

59,049 

2,182 

Jordan, R P. 

57,297 

5,013 

Keir, C J. 

54,929 

11,078 

Johnson, S A. 

53,410 


Jordens, R C. 

60,527 

6,242 

Keiser, W S. 

64,340 

10,123 























































































































































































































































PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


D 33 



Salary 

Travel 



$ 

$ 


Keith,) M. 

53,391 


Kidd, D K. 

Keith, L M. 

66,613 

3,224 

Kidd, K. 

Kekula, J L. 

57,568 

514 

Kidds, K. 

Kekula, N M. 

51,646 

657 

Kielo, )WD. 

Kelleher, A. 

53,628 

6,727 

Kierszenblat, M. 

Keller, D. 

63,040 

2,367 

Kilbride, L J. 

Keller, D. 

79,403 


Kilby, B W. 

Keller,) M. 

53,426 

22,954 

Kilby, WE. 

Keller, J P. 

71,496 

3,181 

Kilian, G A. 

Keller, L E. 

50,381 

6,094 

Killam, J S. 

Kelley, T M. 

58,868 

5,445 

Kilpatrick, K. 

Kelly, B. 

63,349 

1,615 

Kilshaw, D G. 

Kelly, B D. 

66,053 

2,596 

Kilshaw, M F. 

Kelly, DR. 

54,763 


Kilt, P. 

Kelly I. 

50,575 


Kim,) S... 

Kelly, j D. 

63,949 

6,186 

Kim, K. 

Kelly, K. 

50,900 


Kimble, B. 

Kelly, KK. 

54,394 

10,542 

Kimmerly, R K. 

Kelly, L M. 

58,775 

4,435 

Kimmitt, A H. 

Kelly, NC. 

50,840 


Kimmitt, P). 

Kelly, R ]. 

54,699 

5,802 

Kimpton, M. 

Kelly, S. 

62,407 

12,280 

Kinash, K. 

Kelsey, B W. 

95,576 


Kiner, L H. 

Kelso, D H. 

66,613 

1,302 

King, A S. 

Kelt, C S. 

99,511 

2,273 

King, D G. 

Keltie, R). 

60,527 

1,228 

King, E. 

Kernel, S. 

64,530 

294 

King, J G. 

Kemper, LG. 

50,401 

547 

King, J L. 

Kempf, J B. 

61,568 

1,123 

King, J N . 

Kendall, J. 

59,952 

5,861 

King, J P. 

Kenis, M P. 

82,296 


King, R. 

Kenk, E. 

60,604 

1,165 

King, R S. 

Kennah, G L. 

77,341 

3,666 

King, S ). 

Kennard, LA. 

55,586 

2,923 

King, T. 

Kennedy, B. 

67,811 

9,774 

King, V. 

Kennedy, B. 

63,347 


King, W R. 

Kennedy, C. 

58,372 

3,809 

Kinloch, PR. 

Kennedy, D. 

71,682 

9,097 

Kinnear, D W. 

Kennedy, G P. 

62,269 

2,034 

Kinnee, E M. 

Kennedy, J S. 

66,613 


Kinrade, T. 

Kennedy,) W. 

67,654 


Kipper, D. 

Kennedy, K. 

50,900 

52 

Kirby, A G. 

Kennedy, L. 

71,579 

4,810 

Kirby, | A. 

Kennedy, L. 

60,331 


Kirby, | E. 

Kennedy, M J. 

66,613 

33,015 

Kirchgesner, E G. 

Kennedy, P R. 

60,527 

506 

Kirk, CS. 

Kennedy, R. 

61,880 


Kirk, DS. 

Kennedy, R G. 

66,613 

7,589 

Kirk, OP. 

Kennedy, S. 

52,265 

4,438 

Kirkaldy, A D. 

Kennedy, S L. 

50,827 

5,080 

Kirkby, LT. 

Ken nett, K D. 

56,567 

15,736 

Kirkby, W M. 

Kenney, J L. 

59,778 

613 

Kirkham, H R. 

Kenney, M. 

62,269 

12,570 

Kirkland, B M. 

Kenning, M. 

57,331 


Kirstein, L. 

Kenning, P. 

64,569 

561 

Kirstein, P M. 

Kenny, R A. 

53,771 

4 

Kishimoto, M. 

Kent, M J. 

85,771 

13,435 

Kishiyama, A L. 

Kenyon, C E. 

60,527 

11,865 

Kislock, L. 

Kenzie, J. 

56,617 


Kiss, G K. 

Keogh, R. 

53,195 

4,869 

Kissinger, C J. 

Kerin, T A. 

72,139 

6,969 

Kitamura, F T. 

Kermer, R. 

64,720 

2,065 

Kitasaka, K S. 

Kern, C B . 

60,604 

58 

Kittle, C. 

Kerr, AW. 

55,003 

4,095 

Kittredge, M A. 

Kerr, B. 

54,506 

2,149 

Kivari, A E. 

Kerr,). 

59,187 


Kizuk, J D. 

Kerr, R C. 

53,771 

13,828 

Klaiber, C. 

Kerr, S P. 

66,613 


Klak, S M. 

Kershaw, B. 

61,285 


Klasen, C B. 

Kerstiens, H M. 

59,577 

465 

Klassen, E H. 

<eshvani, K A J. 

64,629 

558 

Klassen, M G. 

<ester, M. 

64,074 


Klaver, H H. 

<ettner, R R. 

59,420 

6,512 

Kleibl, D. 

Kettyls, K. 

66,562 

9,817 

Kleibl, R. 

<hadikin, L. 

52,927 

182 

Klein, C A. 

<han, 1 A... 

67,812 

11,505 

Klein, D. 

<haraghani, G A. 

56,512 


Klein, 1 . 

<hare, P... 

73,790 

6,297 

Klein, L G. 

<hoo, E.. 

50,684 

9,200 

Kleine-Deters, G. 

<idd, C. 

58,329 

1,791 

Klenner, W E. 

<idd, D A 

73,180 

4,186 

Klick, JP. 


Salary 

Travel 


Salary 

Travel 

$ 

$ 


$ 

$ 

62,976 

9,999 

Klima, J K. 

61,615 

99 

51,914 


Kline, C. 

81,745 

12,199 

59,212 


Kline, G A. 

53,771 


64,582 

3,152 

Kline, RO. 

59,392 

9,136 

50,870 

1,865 

Klingspohn, D M. 

53,968 

2,693 

81,805 

9,092 

Klopp, W S. 

60,186 

1,011 

62,670 

128 

Kloubek, V. 

55,806 

437 

68,920 

2,739 

Kluge, T. 

64,130 

3,911 

57,944 


Kluytmans, F. 

71,857 


58,130 

13,262 

Knapik, | M. 

55,473 

643 

54,530 

22,092 

Knapik, M. 

50,108 

1,644 

60,280 

7,152 

Kneeland, A R. 

64,292 

3,441 

108,486 

21,474 

Knezevich, H. 

51,376 

1,052 

51,722 

5,805 

Knezevich,) F. 

55,611 

3,050 

53,771 


Knight, C R. 

61,395 

1,481 

58,297 


Knight, T. 

67,831 

50 

64,358 


Knighton, A. 

64,914 

10,059 

65,569 

4,928 

Knights, J. 

54,770 


62,269 

1,639 

Knittelfelder, S. 

55,075 

2,651 

67,507 


Knotts, C ). 

57,331 

15 

62,269 


Knowles,) R. 

62,765 


82,296 

1,137 

Knowles, L. 

55,820 

295 

90,880 

1,024 

Knowles, PS. 

62,269 

1,833 

108,498 

2,939 

Knowles, R C. 

51,030 


59,136 

2,064 

Knox, B J. 

58,421 

1,138 

90,880 

287 

Knox, D. 

59,110 

2,021 

60,604 


Knudsgaard, FI B. 

59,002 

14,157 

57,436 

20 

Knudson, S. 

53,771 

18,108 

64,863 

7,523 

Knutson, R G. 

54,896 


57,258 

2,188 

Ko, S. 

50,932 

2,749 

52,851 


Kobenter, R. 

61,699 


54,402 

370 

Koberstein, W D. 

50,515 

834 

51,456 

3,497 

Kobylnyk, R W. 

73,055 

525 

63,876 


Koch, C. 

56,103 

1,584 

62,534 


Koch, J B. 

62,694 

2,202 

58,852 

18,600 

Kockx, G. 

54,057 

3,154 

60,322 


Kockx, R F. 

76,156 

508 

62,269 

1,381 

Kocurek, B. 

62,527 

14,874 

60,048 

2,609 

Koe, R. 

52,035 

643 

51,168 

839 

Koehn, J E. 

56,477 

265 

55,820 

672 

Koett, G H. 

64,583 

3,711 

50,829 

2,512 

Kohut, A K. 

52,674 


73,382 

944 

Kohut, A P. 

64,428 

1,462 

60,345 

4,225 

Koinoff, S). 

61,203 

2,774 

66,613 

13,971 

Kolarich, J. 

50,455 

951 

66,613 

555 

Kolesnikoff, M. 

55,264 

1,685 

66,613 

4,496 

Kolodinski, E. 

50,478 

1,349 

65,518 

1,573 

Kolotelo, D. 

51,108 

710 

86,024 

717 

Koncohrada, K. 

71,682 

4,204 

62,269 

974 

Kondla, N G. 

68,083 

2,785 

51,862 

1,313 

Kondor, T. 

51,685 

3,634 

50,741 

554 

Kong, L C. 

51,852 

5,298 

71,875 


Konkin, D W. 

77,474 

3,951 

57,331 

3,009 

Konkin, P. 

59,136 

2,028 

57,910 

449 

Konkle, R W. 

62,269 

714 

56,477 

5,126 

Konopelski, T. 

54,753 


50,321 

3,988 

Konowalchuk, ). 

64,851 


60,628 

1,090 

Konowalyk, L. 

52,122 

1,017 

95,587 

1,268 

Kooistra, CM. 

58,103 

5,612 

50,478 

4,593 

Kool, R. 

50,478 

4,950 

52,098 

71 

Kopp, C. 

67,771 


64,640 

5,187 

Kopp, R. 

67,302 


76,156 

600 

Kopperson, R. 

67,501 


66,613 


Kopriva, O. 

53,771 

4,733 

60,497 

957 

Kors, D. 

53,845 

634 

55,614 

1,722 

Kortegaard, S. 

58,766 

6,451 

60,119 


Korteweg, W. 

53,259 


55,878 


Korven, P L. 

50,139 

5,297 

60,518 

461 

Koskimaki, D J. 

62,269 

569 

55,649 

66 

Kosovic, T D. 

90,652 


54,452 

1,081 

Kossinn, R M. 

54,661 

68 

51,207 

1,063 

Kostman, D F. 

55,749 

311 

53,739 

5,653 

Kot,). 

52,349 

197 

74,164 


Kot, RJ. 

50,877 

2,166 

55,389 

2,501 

Kovacs, H 1. 

51,149 

1,858 

56,021 


Kovaltsenko, R M. 

78,881 

217 

57,803 


Kowalsky, K. 

52,406 


51,593 

11,226 

Koyl, M C. 

77,474 

8,832 

53,331 


Kozak, D. 

64,621 


53,771 

9,553 

Kozak, K. 

50,521 


51,399 

1,327 

Kozina, J L. 

57,259 


























































































































































































































































D 34 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Other Employees —Continued 


Kozsan, R. 

Kraft, C A. 

Krahn, R A. 

Kramer, C D. 

Kramer-Hoy, C M... 

Kranabetter, J M. 

Krancevic, M. 

Krasnick, J S. 

Krasowski, M. 

Krause, R. 

Krayenhoff, C R. 

Krayenhoff, L. 

Krebs, M D. 

Kreiger, R S. 

Krell, R D. 

Krestinsky, G D. 

Krezanoski, D E. 

Krieger, B. 

Kriese, K D. 

Krischanowsky, N P 

Krishna, R. 

Kristiansen, DA. 

Krivel, L M. 

Kriwoken, L A. 

Kroeker-Hall, J. 

Krogfoss, PR. 

Kroll, A. 

Kronlachner, R. 

Kropp, PR. 

Krotz, G G. 

Krueger, J. 

Krull, A. 

Krygier, M. 

Krzywonos, E A. 

Kubasiewicz, M. 

Kuchar, R J. 

Kucherka, R A. 

Kuhn, D. 

Kuhn, W J. 

Kuhnert, L H. 

Kula, J A. 

Kulch, C. 

Kulyk, DG. 

Kumar, R. 

Kumka, G W. 

Kupka, S J. 

Kurbatoff, G N. 

Kurjata, P. 

Kurl, S. 

Kuropatwa, R. 

Kurtz,) A. 

Kusisto,) C. 

Kusnick, E. 

Kuster, L P. 

Kutyn, G. 

Kutzley, D. 

Kuzma, O S. 

Kvist, K E. 

Kwan, T. 

Kwas, D. 

Kyler, J H M. 

L'Hirondelle, S). 

L-Heureux, R. 

La Roy, R W. 

La Vertu, CL. 

Labonte,). 

Labossiere, J. 

Lacasse, J. 

Lacelle, L. 

Lacerte, P. 

Lacey, T E. 

Lachance, R. 

Lachmuth, G A. 

Lackey, J. 

Lackman,) E. 

Ladd, M H. 

Ladds, J W. 

Lafontaine, C D. 

Laforest, C. 

Lafrance, L W. 

Lagore, DA. 


Salary 

Travel 

$ 

$ 

55,915 


51,794 

1,718 

51,335 

3,079 

55,820 

374 

72,941 

2,680 

58,715 

4,954 

50,077 


56,354 


53,771 

3,218 

50,548 

613 

56,477 

1,145 

61,810 

3,270 

55,820 

2,556 

50,478 

1,019 

62,269 

6,517 

51,129 

135 

64,863 


56,477 

8,363 

66,027 

10,329 

66,613 

2,709 

51,791 

1,306 

59,385 

467 

57,839 


70,453 

2,549 

51,045 

655 

63,137 

5,397 

79,870 


50,775 

945 

65,781 

1,551 

53,468 

1,822 

51,380 

580 

64,507 


50,260 

2,641 

57,331 


52,109 

517 

51,803 


50,591 

1,858 

51,593 


52,398 


50,624 

289 

65,281 


60,074 


66,796 


56,120 

7,787 

59,136 

1,630 

59,029 

486 

57,512 

507 

69,821 

1,359 

56,152 

2,422 

63,521 

6,131 

50,684 


56,477 

2,258 

50,837 

10,873 

77,474 

3,091 

51,365 


50,462 

3,277 

99,511 

10,737 

50,982 

615 

51,641 


51,898 

1,277 

53,844 

3,488 

53,771 

803 

75,953 

145 

57,512 

1,191 

52,685 

280 

52,551 


57,839 

1,357 

54,848 

3,666 

60,604 

5,923 

62,269 


70,530 

12,975 

56,503 

839 

66,613 

5,511 

74,727 

2,574 

51,818 

2,164 

50,284 

1,142 

51,492 

2,676 

58,269 


68,814 

1,701 

50,410 

4,503 

51,417 

934 


Lah, N. 

Lai, HE. 

Laidlaw, D G. 

Lainchbury, H W 

Laing, J B. 

Lake, I. 

Laker, J. 

Lakey, W. 

Lalani, A. 

La 11 i, K. 

Lalonde, L B. 

Lam, D. 

Lam, J C. 

Lam, K. 

Lam, P C C. 

Lam, PC H. 

Lam, S. 

Lam, S. 

Lamb, L K. 

Lambert, E. 

Lambert, M L. 

Lambert, P. 

Laminski,) N. 

Lamont, J. 

Lamont, W). 

Lampard, R). 

Land,). 

Land, R W. 

Landers, D. 

Landers, S. 

Landles, P E. 

Landry, D. 

Landry, E). 

Lane, D A. 

Lane, j A. 

Lane, K C. 

Lane, M. 

Lane, R A. 

Lane, T I. 

Lang, M H. 

Lang, R A. 

Lang, R N. 

Langdon, P. 

Lange, H L. 

Lange, J H . 

Langereis, K. 

Langford, A L. 

Langford, L K. 

Langin, H D. 

Langlois, J W. 

Langran, AD. 

Langridge, D W.. 

Langridge,) E. 

Langridge, RE. 

Lanyon, S E. 

Laporte, A J. 

Lapper, R. 

Laprairie, A. 

Larade, D. 

Larkin, N M. 

Larsen, L M. 

Larsen, P. 

Larsen, TG. 

Larsen, V. 

Larson, D P. 

Larson, H. 

Larson, M. 

Larson, N P. 

Larsson, S A. 

Larusson, D L. 

Lashkevich, ]. 

Latin, S L. 

LaTorre, R A. 

Latreille, R L. 

Latta, ] C. 

Lau, D K. 

Lau, E. 

Lau, JS. 

Lauder, N. 

Laughton, D. 

Laurie, J. 


Salary 

Travel 

$ 

$ 

66,819 

2,655 

56,553 

391 

50,684 

8,658 

57,328 


58,963 

36 

54,034 

61 

90,880 

324 

103,465 

8,232 

52,599 

956 

62,908 


57,288 

661 

50,536 


53,656 


52,664 


52,302 


52,098 

453 

50,733 

2,665 

60,604 

1,262 

53,771 

68 

56,477 


50,043 

2,523 

55,975 

1,102 

62,269 

10,541 

55,385 


85,540 

699 

66,613 

12,402 

53,771 

139 

50,478 

2,987 

88,165 


54,546 

9,100 

53,140 

2,121 

60,604 

655 

50,388 

2,482 

82,913 

1,613 

62,269 

2,971 

66,613 

1,851 

50,490 


58,177 

6,111 

50,429 

264 

88,392 

1,003 

57,289 


89,121 

670 

56,477 


56,553 

2,621 

55,606 

732 

60,439 

14,068 

89,981 

5,788 

76,156 

1,458 

65,041 

6,341 

75,562 

10,898 

50,253 

499 

62,583 

6,156 

80,307 

10,414 

62,497 

1,725 

51,122 

1,026 

57,331 

11 

82,296 

31,015 

50,270 

887 

50,937 

9,311 

55,660 

430 

50,478 

1,335 

50,643 

1,648 

69,130 

7,312 

55,096 


53,978 

701 

54,926 

1,588 

88,945 

890 

59,159 

1,120 

53,771 

5,631 

57,910 

1,658 

50,478 


52,918 

474 

67,615 

131 

58,574 

3,312 

77,835 

7,621 

66,613 

4,325 

52,140 


51,012 

2,500 

88,649 

4,330 

76,156 

3,541 

54,518 

1,136 


Lauzon, M A. 

Lavelle, K. 

Lavertu, M C. 

Lavery, P G. 

Lavigne, R. 

Law, G. 

Law, K R. 

Law, L. 

Law, N J. 

Law, S A. 

Lawless, DC. 

Lawley, P. 

Lawrance, G).... 
Lawrence, D S... 
Lawrence, G N L 
Lawrence, J H ... 
Lawrence, W G . 

Laws, D R. 

Lawson, D. 

Lawson, D. 

Lawson, K E. 

Lawson, M. 

Lawson, R J. 

Laxton, K E. 

Layton, C W. 

Lazar, R. 

Lazarz, DA. 

Le Fevre, A G. 

I e, III . 

Lea, E C. 

Leach, D A. 

Leach, R. 

Leadem, C L. 

Leadem, T P. 

Leahy, C. 

Leahy, J K. 

Lean, TP. 

Leard, F . 

Leard, H M. 

Learmonth, L. 

Leason, M A. 

Leatherdale, G K 

Leavy, M). 

LeBlanc, C. 

Leblanc, G. 

Leblanc, JI. 

Leblanc, L. 

LeBlond, C B. 

Lebrun, L J. 

Lecuyer, R G. 

Ledgerwood, D.. 

Leduc, H O. 

Leduc, J E. 

Leduc, R H A. 

Lee, A. 

Lee, A V. 

Lee, BA. 

Lee, B T. 

Lee, CM. 

Lee, D. 

Lee, D F L. 

Lee, D W. 

Lee, E. 

Lee, F H. 

Lee, G. 

Lee, G D. 

Lee, H. 

Lee, J D. 

Lee, JH. 

Lee, J S H. 

Lee,) W ). 

Lee, K. 

Lee, K. 

Lee, L. 

Lee, L. 

Lee, M |. 

Lee, N. 

Lee, P. 

Lee, P W ). 

Lee, R. 

Lee, VKW. 


Salary 

Travel 

$ 

$ 

55,270 


57,209 

405 

56,925 

3,847 

53,957 

103 

63,042 

10,552 

52,638 


70,992 

3,126 

55,444 


57,617 

4,981 

50,931 

4,146 

71,682 

969 

50,163 


57,147 

1,925 

53,215 

4,930 

56,553 

222 

56,477 

1,441 

54,218 

4,637 

63,528 

2,741 

77,474 

8,328 

70,965 

1,837 

52,377 

5,993 

59,136 

1,134 

66,613 

394 

53,909 

4,077 

50,324 

2,706 

52,098 

1,298 

64,595 

42 

66,190 

2,380 

51,735 


60,651 

7,433 

59,712 

3,544 

53,771 

3,549 

59,136 

1,363 

88,649 

6,906 

65,919 

1,249 

53,477 

997 

56,743 


53,301 


56,189 

207 

50,478 

4,995 

52,578 

246 

62,269 

1,308 

68,241 


50,449 

301 

90,824 

2,066 

64,655 

2,168 

78,314 

107 

54,470 

5,814 

56,247 

1,112 

50,684 

3,914 

52,691 


50,688 

379 

75,801 

1,242 

60,527 

2,189 

57,652 

1,349 

61,679 


56,477 


56,642 

16,579 

51,591 

1,222 

51,248 


60,865 

1,051 

51,704 

6,719 

57,194 

674 

61,915 

793 

53,875 

3,146 

62,751 

658 

66,613 

4,839 

56,729 

1,086 

56,553 

1,100 

54,802 

955 

68,184 


53,427 

55 

64,911 


50,069 

1,301 

58,872 

20,776 

55,806 

1,992 

60,141 

802 

76,302 

5,632 

56,477 

3,396 

61,365 


50,684 
























































































































































































































































Lees, J W. 

Lees, R. 

Lefebure, D. 

Lefrancois, M A. 

Lefsrud,). 

Legault, C H M. 

Legebokow, C S. 

Legge, S. 

Leggett, J W. 

Leggett, W J. 

Legun, A. 

Lehman, T. 

Lehrke, H F W. 

Leins, J. 

Leinweber, L R. 

Leitch, B D. 

Leitz, PA. 

Leladhar Singh, M J 

Leland, W. 

Lemke, B I. 

Lemky, B. 

Lemon, DA. 

Lemon, R H. 

Lenaghan, PA. 

Lenardt, B L. 

Lennox, D. 

Lenoury, R I. 

Lenz, S M. 

Leonard, I. 

Leonard, S. 

LePage, P. 

Leppanen, P E O .... 

Lepsenyi, G J. 

Lereverend, K. 

Lerner, J M. 

Lerner, K ]. 

Leroux, L. 

Leroy, J T. 

Lesergent, G J. 

Leskun, R M. 

Leslie, BA. 

Leslie, P. 

Lester, R D. 

Lester, T. 

Letain, AC. 

Letay, S. 

Letcher, G. 

Letchford, D). 

Letendre, DR. 

Letham, R N. 

Lett, R E W. 

Letts, S. 

Letts, S. 

Letvak, D B. 

Leu, G. 

Leuenberger, HD.. 

Leung, D W. 

Leung,). 

Leung, J Y C. 

Leung, S. 

Leuschen, AC. 

.everett, W. 

Levesque, D H. 

Levin, B. 

Levin, M H. 

Levine, G J. 

[evson, V M. 

Lew, E. 

lew, H. 

Lewendon, G. 

lewis, CP. 

Lewis, G. 

lewis, H V. 

lewis, J E. 

lewis, K. 

lewis, M. 

lewis, P J. 

lewis, R). 

lewis, R V. 

lewis, S. 

lewis, TG. 


PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


D 35 


Salary 

Travel 


Salary 

$ 

$ 


$ 

75,317 


Lewkowich,). 

62,269 

65,655 

2,541 

Lewthwaite, N. 

50,182 

71,682 

7,899 

Lewynsky, A. 

50,301 

50,760 

726 

Li Foa Wing, P. 

62,269 

54,541 

1,331 

Li, 1. 

58,711 

66,613 

1,618 

Libbrecht, M. 

71,270 

50,478 

3,345 

Libsekal, G. 

51,109 

50,758 

773 

Liddicoat, R. 

51,744 

59,136 

6,332 

Lidgren, R A. 

66,613 

54,396 

1,065 

Lidster, W). 

54,366 

56,553 

1,724 

Lidstone, A. 

65,775 

57,812 


Lieutard, D. 

79,936 

52,066 

6,375 

Liew, B. 

61,024 

92,065 

3,702 

Lillico, S. 

52,622 

50,478 

1,578 

Lilly, E A. 

66,613 

71,682 

3,518 

Lim, TT H. 

56,477 

66,158 

5,858 

Lim, T W. 

66,613 

51,860 


Lincoln, P). 

50,478 

54,263 


Lincoln, R C. 

59,136 

88,818 

4,362 

Lind, A H. 

50,478 

70,494 


Lindberg, M T. 

65,132 

58,574 


Lindquist, P A. 

51,927 

77,474 

16,748 

Lindsay, A. 

63,322 

54,807 

7,572 

Lindsay, A G. 

76,156 

58,800 

148 

Lindsay, E R. 

51,125 

57,935 


Lindsay, IBM. 

55,045 

60,345 

336 

Lindsay, T M. 

50,248 

51,640 


Lindsey, S. 

60,374 

50,730 

695 

Lines, D A. 

50,684 

56,477 

3,118 

Lines, R F. 

52,361 

61,355 

682 

Linford,A. 

54,827 

56,373 

2,192 

Linke, R R. 

50,963 

67,254 

934 

Linton, R J. 

50,273 

68,206 

5,993 

Lipsack, P. 

55,517 

55,179 

11,769 

Lipton, R. 

56,926 

59,136 

614 

Lishman, P R. 

63,576 

59,929 

3,758 

Listar, 1. 

57,689 

50,903 

251 

Lister, C W M. 

62,269 

50,664 

1,857 

Lister, D A. 

76,156 

75,315 

59 

Lister, D R. 

60,604 

65,281 


Lister,) R. 

51,852 

60,857 


Little, A A. 

62,269 

74,727 

1,372 

Little, C L. 

64,414 

75,801 

1,388 

Little, I. 

65,281 

50,478 

1,434 

Little, J A. 

51,413 

50,478 

790 

Little,) D. 

50,478 

56,719 


Littledale, C R. 

66,594 

76,708 

6,682 

Littler, B. 

65,998 

76,724 

828 

Litzen, L. 

51,050 

57,392 

1,142 

Liu, VK. 

53,026 

59,959 

2,184 

Livolsi, P C. 

60,892 

51,697 

114 

Lizna, V W. 

51,270 

77,474 

6,200 

Lloyd, AG. 

50,478 

74,871 

3,840 

Lloyd, C. 

94,959 

56,553 

3,006 

Lloyd, D A. 

56,553 

52,787 

1,992 

Lloyd, G D. 

60,873 

51,053 

1,559 

Lloyd, M S. 

63,518 

50,450 

700 

Lloyd, R. 

50,684 

63,314 


Lloyd-Smith,). 

62,360 

56,555 

3,550 

Lo, 1 K F. 

74,727 

50,877 

246 

Loat, GW. 

71,682 

80,528 

141 

Loch, K). 

60,291 

59,146 


Lock, G E. 

60,646 

50,765 


Locke, M E. 

50,006 

62,174 

971 

Locke, PS. 

60,954 

60,980 

2,551 

Locken, K |. 

50,319 

64,316 

8,968 

Lockhart, E. 

65,947 

51,063 

512 

Lockhart, E B. 

57,839 

56,553 

2,220 

Lockhart, K. 

56,477 

69,835 

220 

Lockhart, K C. 

69,972 

66,845 

5,169 

Lockyer,) D. 

56,477 

63,386 

14,892 

Lodin, M. 

60,189 

89,415 

17,858 

Loeb, G R. 

53,861 

54,409 

910 

Loeck, G. 

51,027 

54,654 

3,912 

Loewen, G J. 

57,840 

62,269 

15,225 

Loewen, R J. 

53,371 

59,121 

1,553 

Lofroth, EC. 

53,883 

67,661 

450 

Lofthouse, M ). 

83,267 

50,684 

4,534 

Lofthouse, P. 

57,124 

65,858 

4,068 

Lofting,). 

58,421 

60,801 

788 

Logan, C. 

50,714 


Travel 


Salary 

Travel 

$ 


$ 

$ 

1,926 

Logan, C. 

66,071 

282 

1,954 

Logan, D A. 

54,299 


1,900 

Logan,) M. 

60,527 

1,635 

553 

Logan, L D. 

54,486 

533 

1,534 

Logan, W A. 

66,613 

27,405 

17,056 

Lohr, G W. 

55,047 

494 

440 

Lohr, LB. 

50,815 

1,666 

438 

Loire-Maillard, 1. 

54,734 

12,513 

21,830 

Loisel, L. 

80,450 

1,733 

890 

Lomas, C M. 

51,033 

3,423 

8,844 

Lomas, E W. 

50,684 

3,347 

3,861 

Lomas, G. 

54,007 

3,121 

3,204 

Lomas, LA. 

62,269 

80 

6,856 

Lomas, M. 

62,622 

2,064 

950 

London, L). 

50,478 



London, V K. 

65,031 

5,838 

928 

Long,) P. 

62,150 

7,637 

7,373 

Long, K E. 

56,028 

3,743 

1,340 

Long, L L. 

56,477 


7,462 

Longeway, B. 

62,227 



Longman, C J. 

50,566 

977 

3,486 

Longman, D. 

71,682 

4,526 

4,448 

Looker, W B. 

52,102 

11,684 


Looman, L. 

52,449 

8,652 

17,583 

Looney, R J. 

62,269 

3,278 


Looyen, L M. 

53,013 

1,107 

9,942 

Lopatka, G D. 

53,491 

2,533 

2,102 

Lord, S. 

54,355 


682 

Lorentsen, K M. 

66,613 

12,253 

13,701 

Lorette, R M. 

57,657 

3,216 

16 

Lorimer, G B. 

50,478 

487 

914 

Lorinczi, J. 

55,828 

10,723 

2,114 

Loudon, P N. 

53,852 


1,958 

Lougheed, W C. 

51,104 

742 

2,522 

Loughran, A D. 

50,386 

262 

506 

Louie, E. 

52,098 

2,437 

1,812 

Louie,) W H. 

60,687 

7,379 

859 

Louie, T. 

61,014 


568 

Lovdahl, D B. 

56,523 

3,037 

6,343 

Love, DKG. 

50,877 


367 

Love, J. 

62,765 

218 

2,727 

Love, M. 

51,336 

682 

1,199 

Love, R A. 

63,052 

6,782 

2,177 

Lovelace, M. 

50,224 

2,136 

5,702 

Lovestrom, R D. 

71,842 

15 

11 

Lovett, D. 

68,241 

3,183 

1,510 

Lovett, K. 

58,781 


8,102 

Lovset, A B. 

60,848 



Low, C. 

56,276 


379 

Low, D. 

54,115 


25,076 

Low, D C. 

56,553 

1,831 

1,458 

Low, T C. 

66,613 

12,206 

4,527 

Lowden, B A. 

50,589 

1,233 


Lowdon, R J. 

66,613 

15,739 

4,367 

Lowe, A R. 

50,478 

1,999 

35 

Lowe, B. 

64,556 


732 

Lowe, B E. 

50,684 


274 

Lowe,). 

58,058 

5,070 

3,271 

Lowell, L. 

57,329 

130 

260 

Lowenberg, W. 

63,054 


355 

Lowes, M. 

57,234 

11,480 

6,671 

Lowrey, S D. 

62,638 

2,175 


Lowther, D. 

52,936 

1,821 

1,754 

Lowther, R. 

56,890 

4,077 

1,873 

Loyst, AM. 

65,518 


6,328 

Lu, ] D. 

.... 104,348 

4,153 

10,658 

Lucas, C). 

67,160 

16 


Lucas,) M. 

59,779 


588 

Luchenko, M R. 

90,880 


9,797 

Luchin, L V. 

54,183 

831 

466 

Ludwig, A H. 

65,242 

4,362 

10,571 

Ludwig, B W. 

60,282 

9,580 

2,559 

Lugsdin, J. 

.... 103,988 

10,481 


Lukaitis, CM. 

79,715 



Lukawesky, K W. 

50,547 

2,136 


Luke, A M. 

53,884 

447 

12,725 

Luke, C A. 

54,040 

1,928 

20,575 

Lum Min, S P. 

91,734 


365 

Lum, K D. 

67,611 

1,163 

1,240 

Lumb, C. 

56,330 

6,633 


Lund, L K. 

55,375 

566 























































































































































































































































D 36 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Other Employees —Continued 



Salary 

Travel 


Salary 

Travel 


Salary 

Travel 


$ 

$ 


$ 

$ 


$ 

$ 

Lunde, C. 

50,334 

3,122 

Mack, J W. 

64,295 


Madden, G. 

55,215 


Lundquist, A N. 

58,151 

10,273 

Mackaay, Y. 

52,209 


Maddison, B. 

57,139 


Lungal, C. 

54,388 


MacKay, B F. 

66,613 

8,038 

Madeley, P 1. 

61,799 

1,695 

Lungul, B. 

52,824 

97 

MacKay, D G. 

51,240 


Mader, B M. 

75,353 

1,111 

Lupton, C. 

66,613 

4,832 

MacKay, G L. 

66,613 

7,974 

Mader, J G. 

50,637 

799 

Lupton, L W. 

62,430 


MacKay, J H. 

67,446 


Madhok, B M. 

71,682 

4,764 

Lussenburg, H. 

55,616 

19 

MacKay, J L. 

51,997 

2,601 

Madigan, K D. 

50,212 

962 

Lussier, L M. 

69,356 

3,118 

MacKay, W S. 

52,113 

2,620 

Madigan, S. 

99,511 


Luton, JR. 

57,575 

734 

MacKean, J P. 

60,128 


Madill, H. 

61,625 

6,043 

Luttmer, P J. 

64,655 

1,101 

MacKenzie, A. 

51,923 


Madill, J P. 

67,415 

3,781 

Lyall. W R. 

71,092 

1,890 

Mackenzie, B. 

70,677 

1,413 

Madill, M. 

59,478 

3,789 

Lybbert, L. 

50,147 

861 

MacKenzie, B G. 

55,456 

612 

Madill, M. 

52,412 


Lye, D E. 

51,441 

3,420 

MacKenzie, D. 

71,788 

2,101 

Madsen, K. 

58,591 

1,071 

Lyle, M E. 

62,269 

4,654 

MacKenzie, 1 W. 

60,891 

12,136 

Madsen, K D. 

61,679 


Lynch, L H. 

50,684 

4,848 

MacKenzie,) D. 

62,269 

701 

Madsen, K E D. 

60,302 

18,823 

Lynch, L N. 

58,914 

7,233 

MacKenzie, K E. 

51,470 

5,475 

Madsen, P. 

51,597 

1,069 

Lynum, D. 

52,975 

1,490 

MacKenzie, L A. 

61,679 


Maedel, D. 

66,390 


Lyons, MR. 

56,789 


MacKenzie, M. 

53,771 


Maftechuk, T. 

52,535 

315 

Lytton, M. 

53,632 

2,204 

Mackey, W. 

69,148 

721 

Magee, Cl. 

62,269 

1,896 

Maartman, B. 

60,462 


MacKian, T P. 

83,267 

4,111 

Magee, VC. 

50,684 

1,650 

Maartman, E. 

50,348 


Mackie, AG. 

77,336 

1,302 

Maglio, M J. 

62,269 


Maas, A J. 

50,684 

740 

MacKie, R. 

56,261 

4,168 

Magnusson, JO. 

56,553 

367 

MacAllum, B. 

62,666 

29,396 

Mackie, W H. 

50,684 

3,217 

Magnusson, R M. 

50,579 

626 

MacAree, D J. 

70,622 

22,731 

MacKillop, C). 

77,474 


Mah Wren, AM. 

62,268 

7,123 

Macatee, C A. 

84,174 

18,377 

MacKinnon, A K. 

55,944 

1,234 

Mah, D. 

66,318 


Macaulay, D. 

66,613 

3,130 

MacKinnon, C. 

60,920 

2,628 

Mah, F. 

50,974 


MacAulay, |. 

76,156 

2,543 

MacKinnon, D. 

62,269 

2,682 

Mah, R. 

61,441 


MacAulay, j A. 

62,269 

282 

MacKinnon, D R. 

56,629 


Mahoney, G. 

62,565 

554 

MacAuley, L. 

59,768 

5,968 

MacKinnon, G 1. 

52,135 

895 

Mahoney, K. 

51,380 

9,470 

MacCallum, R G. 

59,115 

1,158 

MacKinnon, J A. 

64,831 

7,556 

Maihara, D. 

50,684 


MacCarthy, S P. 

66,613 

5,903 

MacKinnon, M R. 

60,089 

1,927 

Maiko, L. 

79,381 

1,602 

MacConnachie, J. 

57,676 

1,246 

MacKinnon, W A I. 

56,405 

2,578 

Mailhot, F. 

77,474 

2,154 

MacDermid, E F. 

58,419 

1,235 

Mackintosh,) A. 

71,682 

246 

Maillot, S E. 

50,937 

1,993 

Macdonald, A J. 

77,474 

6,380 

MacKlin, V M. 

50,684 

4 

Main, B. 

50,691 

2,247 

MacDonald, C E. 

70,886 

13,845 

MacLachlan, T. 

86,310 

9,151 

Main, G G. 

61,332 

2,310 

MacDonald, D. 

62,640 


MacLaren, D. 

61,247 


Mainer, D S. 

50,478 


MacDonald, G A. 

53,771 

7,025 

MacLaren, J. 

60,595 

2,267 

Maisonville, M A. 

54,246 

303 

MacDonald, G R. 

52,098 


MacLaren, L M. 

57,171 

8,278 

Majcher, J. 

52,225 


MacDonald, G S. 

86,434 

10,588 

MacLauchlan, K. 

51,669 

5,318 

Majedi, M. 

55,164 

2,730 

MacDonald, J. 

58,796 

1,912 

Maclauchlan, L E. 

60,497 

10,687 

Makar, M. 

50,911 

6,038 

MacDonald, J R. 

54,936 

4,552 

MacLean, B. 

69,357 


Maki, K P. 

54,000 

161 

MacDonald, K F. 

52,098 


MacLean, D H. 

50,071 

1,285 

Makitalo, A. 

52,945 

1,667 

MacDonald, K J. 

95,576 

5,793 

MacLean, E D. 

57,122 

184 

Makowski, R. 

52,885 

87 

MacDonald, L S. 

57,543 

942 

MacLean, G W. 

74,593 

243 

Malashenko, O. 

50,353 

3,399 

MacDonald, P. 

84,609 

226 

MacLean, F4. 

59,792 

1,372 

Malayko, A. 

50,667 


MacDonald, R E. 

57,289 


Maclean, J. 

59,504 

14,786 

Malcolm K W 

56 477 


MacDonald, R F. 

60’094 

1,096 

MacLean, K J. 

62^269 

Maley, T R. 

73U80 

15 

Macdonald, R G. 

57,225 

2,831 

MacLean, L F. 

50,478 


Malfair, G B. 

57,245 

76 

MacDonald, R J. 

76,658 

5,432 

MacLean, N R. 

51,417 

12,262 

Maligaspe, K N. 

59,136 

2,136 

MacDonald, S. 

58,131 

3,406 

MacLean, R. 

50,450 


Malin, B C. 

53,771 

151 

MacDonald, S A. 

53,594 

1,110 

MacLean, R R. 

50,478 

19,967 

Mallard, S. 

51,273 

32,356 

MacDonald, S 1. 

76,156 

2,637 

MacLean, S F. 

50,625 

468 

Mallen, R. 

52,398 


MacDonald, S J. 

59,136 

1,724 

MacLean, S J. 

51,205 


Mallett, | C. 

67,239 

2,787 

MacDonald, T A. 

53,771 

1,922 

MacLellan, S C. 

63,309 

2,043 

Mallett, L P. 

62,269 


MacDonald, W. 

85,497 


MacLennan, K N. 

55,718 

418 

Malmberg, M ). 

56,553 

3,593 

MacDonald, W. 

50,920 

392 

MacLeod, A D. 

90,086 


Malone, C. 

56,477 

5,161 

MacDonald-Date, K E. .. 

56,553 

1,374 

MacLeod, B R. 

53,771 

2,968 

Malone, P J. 

51,501 

54 

MacDonell, M D. 

51,699 

327 

MacLeod, F. 

51,087 


Maloney, C. 

56,477 

272 

MacDonell, W J. 

54,503 


MacLeod, G. 

50,823 


Maloney, N E. 

67,672 

1,635 

MacDougall, D M. 

54,062 

2,703 

MacLeod, J B. 

50,877 

169 

Malott, M L. 

54,527 

3,887 

MacDougall, J. 

52,120 

7,257 

MacLeod, K J. 

102,743 

15,680 

Maltby, R. 

58,726 

893 

MacDougall, K A. 

55,593 

388 

MacLure, M. 

52,098 

2,405 

Mana, M R. 

62,482 

3,355 

MacDougall, M. 

73,236 

1,585 

MacLure, M. 

73,289 

483 

Mandell, A M. 

76,156 

640 

MacDougall, M R. 

62,269 

6,755 

MacMath, D S. 

62,269 

2,596 

Manduca, N D. 

79,017 

10,196 

MacDougall, R D. 

57,215 


MacMillan, C. 

62,269 

10,707 

Manhas, S K. 

54,508 


MacEachern, J H. 

60,185 


MacMillan, E. 

53,345 

101 

Manifold, R. 

56,477 

1,857 

Macesic, N N M. 

55,186 


MacMillan, J. 

54,480 

11,936 

Manj, J. 

50,478 

4,336 

MacFadden, LA. 

74,373 

10,401 

MacMillan, J M. 

56,292 

6,022 

Manji, A. 

54,308 

49 

MacFarlane, J B. 

57,839 

143 

MacMillan, W. 

51,375 


Mankey, N. 

51,920 

9,405 

Macfarlane, J DO. 

71,682 

6,232 

MacNab, D W. 

63,993 

5,298 

Manley, J A. 

59,136 

448 

MacFarlane, MW. 

53,771 

2,768 

Macnair, PL. 

61,620 

7,889 

Mann, B. 

75,266 


MacGillivray, A. 

50,322 

2,732 

MacNeill, C 1. 

62,269 

1,428 

Mann, C. 

62,799 

9,869 

MacGillivray, L. 

66,613 

1,787 

MacNeill, FH A. 

51,907 

1,941 

Mann, D W. 

82,296 

455 

MacGregor, G. 

52,532 

824 

MacPhail,). 

61,539 


Mann, M. 

66,613 

451 

MacGregor-Greer, D. 

56,477 

339 

MacPhail, S M. 

50,478 

341 

Mann, R D. 

68,591 

1,140 

Machowski, R S. 

62,330 

992 

MacPherson, B A. 

50,628 


Manning, K. 

67,806 


Maclnnes, E H. 

63,429 

4,469 

MacPherson, D F C. 

66,613 

3,776 

Manning, P. 

66,613 

1,371 

Maclnnes, J N. 

51,120 

440 

MacQueen, B W. 

52,162 


Manning, P. 

80,858 

32 

Maclnnis, S H F. 

66,613 

8,277 

MacRae, C A. 

51,675 

1,578 

Manning, S. 

75,974 

2,558 

Macintosh, J H. 

62,269 


MacRae, D. 

78,795 

1 3,000 

Manning, S. 

53,164 


MacIntyre, D G. 

62,174 

7,774 

MacTaggart, A A. 

64,428 

2,676 

Manning, S C. 

50,774 

5,189 
























































































































































































































































PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1 996/97 


D 37 


Mannix, L W. 

Salary 

$ 

56,259 

57,514 

Travel 

$ 

8,043 

576 

Martinez,). 

Salary 

$ 

65,162 

Travel 

$ 

863 

Mazuch, L. 

Salary 

$ 

59,739 

Travel 

$ 

7,972 

6,407 

Marinix, M. 

Martinez, J M. 

76,113 

6,296 

Mazur, S L. 

77,474 

Mansell, D C. 

56,477 

192 

Martiniuk, P. 

64,251 

3,463 

Mazure,). 

62,269 

269 

Mansfield, J. 

56,335 

3,060 

Martins, C C. 

52,571 

10,299 

Mazuruk, M. 

51,655 

2,598 

Manton, I D. 

54,218 

1,817 

Martiquet, P. 

... 105,604 

9,978 

Mazzocchi, R A. 

54,843 

363 

Manuel, C. 

54,079 

2,496 

Maruca, N D. 

56,171 


Me Connell, C T. 

50,478 

3,051 

Manuel, R. 

70,352 

60,665 

468 

Marus, 1. 

77,474 

7,605 

McAdams, L P . 

82 737 

3 215 

Manwaring, R. 

923 

Marven, R F. 

57,402 

McAfee, K P. 

51,168 

331 

Manz, T. 

74,266 

982 

Marx, R. 

63,079 

983 

McAllister, F D. 

56,553 

1,528 

Manzano, S E. 

56,814 

2,661 

Maskell, K. 

50,684 

1,727 

McAllister, | M. 

54,419 

7,860 

Maranda, P. 

81,040 

17,616 

Maslany, O. 

67,763 

2,253 

McAllister, K M. 

51,818 

626 

Marazzi, S. 

53,627 

768 

Mason, B. 

66,613 

17,583 

McAmmond, L. 

62,675 


Marc, 1. 

56,685 

8,018 

Mason, B. 

77,474 

3,810 

McAra, P K. 

58,636 

3,733 

Marchand, GW. 

Marchenski, M. 

50,684 

74,267 


Mason, D B. 

Mason, M D. 

53,771 

52,174 

570 

McArthur, D C. 

McArthur, | G. 

50,478 

71,291 

893 

6,903 

Marcoux, G V. 

Marcy, N. 

51,804 

70,979 

380 

6,972 

Mason, S. 

Mason, W. 

73,880 

57,689 

1,481 

McArthur, M. 

McArthur, R. 

63,620 

50,478 

85 

Marek, D S. 

58,310 

8,594 

Mass, 1. 

76,894 

13,005 

Mi Ask ill, B. 

52,098 

4,576 

Marian, N. 

54,165 

348 

Masselink,) N. 

95,576 

7,416 

McAuley, A. 

50,776 


Marion, S. 

56,112 

5,173 

Massey, J E. 

50,478 

2,810 

McAuley, M E. 

52,098 

1,678 

Mark, B. 

59,902 

2,014 

Massey, NW D. 

61,743 

216 

McBratney, T. 

60,244 

332 

Mark, K. 

71,302 


Massey, SR. 

52,089 

3,011 

McBride, A K. 

66,613 

6,386 

Markham, R. 

62,269 

1,533 

Matei, G G. 

73,180 

224 

McBride, B L. 

56,971 

6,425 

Markides, H j. 

67,472 

35,941 

Mateyko, R. 

74,727 

606 

McBride, J. 

76,730 

2,102 

Markila,) A. 

56,468 

2,265 

Mathers, FH. 

56,553 

4,245 

McBride, M. 

66,304 

3,144 

Marklund, D. 

56,869 


Matheson, A H. 

60,411 

2,308 

McBride, S A. 

77,474 

14,242 

Marks, K J. 

57,839 

1,183 

Matheson, B A. 

56,477 

681 

McCagherty, G. 

60,432 

40 

Marks, R. 

52,398 


Matheson, D W. 

69,446 

2,906 

McCaghey, W D. 

58,533 

2,866 

Markstrom, J B. 

50,478 

5,056 

Matheson, E. 

64,699 


McCaig, K L. 

50,020 

4,505 

Markwart, A E. 

64,433 

6,452 

Matheson, N. 

58,104 

684 

McCaig, V A. 

64,843 

323 

Marlatt, D E. 

66,613 

192 

Matheson, N M. 

51,502 


McCall, W. 

57,928 

4,064 

Marleau, G. 

51,336 


Matheson, S. 

58,428 

19 

McCallum, S. 

54,408 

528 

Marlow, T. 

50,361 

603 

Mathew, J. 

62,950 

274 

McCammon, A W. 

54,464 

86 

Marochi, P. 

65,528 

102 

Mathias, H C. 

75,801 

7,342 

McCammon, M J. 

55,718 

992 

Marolla, F. 

58,533 

2,025 

Mathiasen, D L. 

50,778 


McCannell,) A. 

64,276 

32 

Marotz, N A. 

66,613 


Mathieson, G G. 

51,077 

621 

McCarthy, E. 

53,771 

1,191 

Marquis, J P. 

52,816 

4,603 

Mathieson, J D. 

71,682 

538 

McCartney, K. 

59,995 

33,525 

Marr, J L. 

51,618 

179 

Mathieson, R W. 

60,604 

10,539 

McCartney, R. 

64,317 

802 

Marr-Paine, A. 

61,193 


Matiation, D. 

59,136 

3,874 

McCarvill, F W. 

53,528 

16,222 

Marriott, M. 

68,000 

3,170 

Matonovich, D A. 

66,025 


McCaughey, B. 

66,804 

2,266 

Marriott, M A. 

83,267 

4,018 

Matsuda, S Y. 

62,229 

151 

McCausland, M. 

71,682 

1,243 

Marsh, B ). 

50,167 

494 

Matters, 1. 

65,848 

3,782 

McClanaghan, K. 

50,719 

151 

Marsh, L N. 

58,190 

809 

Matthews, D. 

50,937 

1,796 

McClarnon,) P. 

60,464 

12,581 

Marsh, PG. 

64,910 

31 

Matthews, G E. 

62,269 

10,773 

McClary, J D. 

56,864 

2,531 

Marsh, R D. 

59,136 

1,253 

Matthews, ) K. 

71,682 

14,535 

McClean, E. 

51,885 


Marsh, R O. 

66,613 

1,003 

Matthews, K L. 

70,442 

8,586 

McClelland, G |. 

58,807 

2,738 

Marshall Aikman, H. 

65,545 

975 

Matthews, R E. 

58,462 

28 

McClure, D. 

66,642 


Marshall, D S S. 

55,727 

387 

Matthews, R L. 

61,571 

8,253 

McClure, S B. 

66,583 

5,366 

Marshall,) D. 

Marshall, K A. 

62,269 

59,136 

2,061 

Matthias, K W. 

Mattison, J S. 

78,545 

71,682 

2,998 

McColl, B L. 

McColl, ] H. 

55,423 

61,044 


Marshall, N K. 

58,931 

3,766 

Mattoo, AS. 

60,890 

1,765 

McComb, N ). 

53,694 

1,799 

Marshall, R F. 

57,047 

10,367 

Mattson, M N. 

70,866 

8,868 

McConechy, B. 

59,748 

177 

Marshall, R S. 

55,293 

1,222 

Mattson, R. 

62,269 


McConkey, R G. 

58,607 

9,793 

Marshall, W). 

68,927 

3,218 

Matviw, D M. 

83,267 

9,849 

McConnachie, A H. 

67,953 

1,981 

Marshall-Moor, C. 

51,489 

3,784 

Matzen, T W. 

66,037 

2,839 

McConnell, M. 

50,877 

593 

Marson, D J. 

55,268 

4,925 

Mau, R L. 

51,288 

287 

McConvey,) L. 

62,269 

16,883 

Marson, D W. 

51,506 

17,359 

Maure, J. 

58,803 

7,886 

McCooeye, E. 

56,069 

902 

Marson, M J. 

57,259 

28 

Maurer, W B. 

66,613 

1,924 

McCormick, M. 

50,760 

9,364 

Martel, C. 

53,889 

8,334 

Mawer, P. 

59,532 

50 

McCormick, W. 

50,478 

1,105 

kartell, L. 

62,032 

179 

Mawle,) L. 

60,914 

103 

McCracken, J W. 

83,267 

3,252 

Marten, S P. 

56,129 

349 

Maximchuk, F W. 

57,492 

1,280 

McCreedy, B. 

64,146 


Martens, M. 

50,540 

178 

Maxnuk, M D. 

53,771 

703 

McCrimmon, N A. 

66,613 


Martin, AD. 

70,248 

9,508 

Maxwell, D. 

58,916 

10,107 

McCrimmon, S. 

62,172 

13,339 

Martin, D. 

Martin, D. 

51,171 

72,954 

116 

Maxwell, H G. 

Maxwell, J A. 

60,604 

70,847 

456 

6,895 

McCrodan, P. 

McCulloch, B W. 

50,145 

77,474 

1,694 

Martin, D L. 

56,477 

1,127 

Maxwell, N T. 

57,335 

292 

McCulloch, J G. 

54,691 


Martin, D W. 

60,097 

168 

Maxwell, R E. 

56,553 

2,658 

McCullough, | C. 

57,657 

158 

Martin, E ) N. 

53,714 

77 

May, B G. 

50,478 

2,023 

McCunn, | B. 

50,564 

875 

Martin, J D. 

53,771 

2,381 

May, D K. 

56,028 

302 

McCurdy, G. 

76,156 

1,016 

Martin, L A. 

52,553 


May,). 

55,562 

938 

McDermid, D. 

65,432 

227 

Martin, L 1. 

69,637 

2,836 

May, N P. 

66,613 

3,196 

McDiarmid, R S. 

52,497 

972 

Martin, M. 

59,136 

4,683 

May, R C. 

53,771 


McDicken, | D. 

71,682 

3,754 

Martin, M. 

Martin, P J. 

51,239 

58,175 

11,168 

Mayer, F. 

Mayhew, C. 

53,886 

65,526 


McDonald, A E. 

McDonald, D G. 

55,425 

83,267 

7,989 

11,272 

Martin, PT. 

71,682 

94 

Mayhew, R L. 

50,684 


McDonald, D M. 

60,527 

1,539 

Martin, R J. 

50,009 

771 

Maynard, D. 

51,430 

6,150 

McDonald, 1 M. 

50,511 


Martin, S. 

66,787 


Maynard, E L. 

55,718 

1,674 

McDonald,). 

62,532 

1,275 

Martin, SC. 

50,712 

2,633 

Maynard, F ) T. 

50,684 

8,247 

McDonald, I. 

50,392 


Martin, S D. 

50,478 

2,297 

Maynes, S S. 

56,553 


McDonald,). 

77,474 

9,308 

Martin, W L. 

63,206 

981 

Mayser, R E. 

60,969 

1,539 

McDonald,) C D. 

52,025 

547 

Martin, Y. 

61,044 

150 

Mazuch, 1. 

58,552 

1,005 

McDonald, K. 

50,824 


























































































































































































































































D 38 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Other Employees —Continued 



Salary 

Travel 


Salary 

Travel 


Salary 

Travel 


$ 

$ 


$ 

$ 


$ 

$ 

McDonald, P. 

61,958 


McKay, D C. 

62,635 

4,578 

McMaster, H. 

52,048 

5,612 

McDonald, R A. 

61,358 

469 

McKay, E. 

66,920 

7,004 

McMillan, D G. 

63,128 

7,821 

McDonald, R G. 

83,267 

444 

McKay, G J. 

53,771 


McMillan, H A. 

59,645 

60 

McDonald, R ). 

66,613 

832 

McKay, J. 

59,184 


McMillan, I. 

56,299 


McDonald, T D. 

56,185 

509 

McKay, J V. 

56,477 

9,545 

McMillan, L A. 

56,477 

1,689 

McDonnell, A W. 

64,863 

5,515 

McKay, R G. 

51,887 

1,674 

McMillan, S. 

52,513 

153 

McDonnell, I. 

50,478 

5,697 

McKay, R L. 

71,900 

6,601 

McMillan, W G. 

53,757 

2,359 

McDonnell,). 

57,967 

1,892 

McKay, T R. 

50,289 


McMillan, W J. 

71,682 

3,568 

McDonough, K. 

55,930 

8,047 

McKay, W B. 

54,554 

70 

McMillan, W J. 

57,289 


McDonough, P. 

62,269 

3,773 

McKean, C ) P. 

57,355 

1,261 

McMorran, K 1. 

56,477 

4,173 

McDougall, 1 A. 

53,771 

2,680 

McKechnie, R. 

59,378 

1,481 

McMullan, E. 

71,819 

149 

McDougall, K A. 

59,740 

14,103 

McKechnie, W M. 

52,401 

1,152 

McMullan, W L. 

61,542 

1,204 

McDougall, R A. 

65,281 

211 

McKee, D 1. 

56,662 

2,992 

McMullen, B R W. 

56,837 

1,468 

McDowell, D M. 

57,897 

15,499 

McKee, G D. 

59,370 

7,100 

McMullen, D C. 

50,261 

2,828 

McDuffe, N B. 

62,269 

8,383 

McKee, K. 

61,868 


McMullen, P. 

68,889 


McEachern, H H. 

53,303 

1,929 

McKeen, K |. 

74,076 

2,089 

McNabb, A E. 

55,698 

2,553 

McEachern, R E. 

91,231 

13,900 

McKellar, E. 

62,269 

349 

McNabb,) A. 

55,767 

1,605 

McEvoy, C A. 

56,477 

222 

McKenna, P F. 

62,269 

1,030 

McNabb, L A. 

83,267 

1,231 

McEwan, S E. 

67,157 

2,244 

McKenna, R. 

61,621 


McNaughton, R B. 

82,114 

1,239 

McEwen, R. 

62,269 


McKenzie, B D. 

50,684 


McNay, R S. 

56,553 

5,839 

McFadden, G. 

53,653 

2,317 

McKenzie, F B. 

57,412 

4,703 

McNeary, E. 

51,777 

395 

McFadden, K. 

52,187 


McKenzie, 1 D. 

74,215 


McNee, J A. 

51,409 

484 

McFarland, M E. 

62,269 

1,137 

McKenzie, I G. 

50,391 

11,659 

McNee,) M. 

59,115 

6,127 

McFarland, P. 

67,576 

735 

McKenzie, N W. 

62,567 


McNeely, M. 

66,032 

4,240 

McFarland, P. 

62,269 

385 

McKenzie, P. 

60,417 


McNeil, D R. 

50,478 

3,557 

McFarlane, A. 

91,013 

7,883 

McKenzie, R. 

52,373 


McNeil, M. 

72,569 

6,682 

McFarlane, I D. 

56,047 

792 

McKenzie, W A. 

54,618 

2,888 

McNeil, M D. 

62,269 

14,094 

McFarlane, P A. 

69,412 

15,256 

McKenzie, W G. 

60,284 


McNeil, R Y. 

56,553 

1,384 

McFaul, J. 

56,729 

3,487 

McKenzie, W T. 

71,943 


McNeill, S B. 

53,920 

11,924 

McFee, B R. 

50,478 

2,033 

McKeown, B R. 

95,576 

9,868 

McNevin, D L. 

57,117 

1,220 

McGavin, D A. 

64,678 

3,669 

McKerricher, B D. 

60,527 

601 

McNichol, C D. 

75,920 

12,900 

McGhie, M. 

66,613 

942 

McKibben, P B. 

54,902 

5,338 

McNulty, D C. 

51,852 

1,757 

McGillivray, D L. 

51,947 

2,963 

McKillop, D W. 

52,013 


McNulty, S. 

50,347 


McGinn, B S. 

75,722 


McKillop, G R. 

71,682 

5,093 

McNulty, W E. 

50,168 

2,272 

McGinn, |. 

50,098 

329 

McKim, D H. 

59,136 

40 

McNutt, G E. 

59,477 

8,318 

McGinnis, D |. 

54,019 

140 

McKim, R W. 

50,296 

547 

McParland, B E. 

53,771 

2,440 

McGinnis, N C. 

51,977 


McKinlay, A R. 

66,613 

1,859 

McPhail, D G. 

60,811 

2,085 

McGivern, M. 

50,243 


McKinlay,). 

70,829 

516 

McPhail, M N. 

50,877 

402 

McGivern, M. 

76,156 

271 

McKinley, P S. 

50,718 

3,226 

McQueen, N B. 

53,293 

230 

McGlashan, M. 

60,800 

282 

McKinnon, D. 

53,729 

54 

McRae, D G. 

74,375 

352 

McGloin, P. 

57,689 

10 

McKinnon, G. 

59,079 

5,184 

McRae, G. 

54,867 

17,446 

McGlynn, J B. 

55,820 

19 

McKinnon,) B. 

60,925 

2,629 

McRae, T B. 

55,436 

2,324 

McGonigal, I B. 

54,630 

1,737 

McKinnon, R D. 

50,118 

59 

McRoberts, W). 

53,993 

2,971 

McGorman, B W. 

56,553 

5,628 

McKinnon, S. 

52,582 


McRory, R D. 

52,974 

614 

McGowan, G. 

56,103 

90 

McKinstry, J. 

63,298 

5,904 

McRuer, I A. 

52,849 


McGrath, K. 

54,707 


McKitrick, N. 

53,103 


McSheffrey, H. 

56,023 

1,417 

McGrath, R L C. 

53,162 

489 

McKittrick, P R. 

81,254 

555 

McStravick, M T. 

52,455 

3,301 

McGregor, A). 

50,478 

5,466 

McKittrick, W. 

60,248 


McWilliams, S W G. 

60,059 

1,800 

McGregor, 1 A. 

59,136 

2,963 

McKnight, A B. 

50,684 

1,031 

Meade, S W. 

66,613 

4,356 

McGregor,). 

84,017 

7,648 

McKnight, C. 

66,617 

874 

Mead more, R B. 

53,387 


McGregor,). 

77,474 

12,156 

McKnight. E. 

55,448 


Mecham, J V. 

51,819 

273 

McGregor,) T. 

66,114 

6,970 

McLachlan, 1... 

61 596 

424 

Mecredy, M T . 

50 429 

639 

McGregor, M. 

63,481 

McLachlan, M. 

57,106 


Medd, L. 

104,955 

6,845 

McGregor, M D. 

67,672 


McLaren, D A. 

50,478 

1,538 

Medgyesi, MS. 

77,474 

5,301 

McGrenere, M F. 

62,125 

290 

McLaren, G P. 

65,514 

2,491 

Medlar, B W. 

59,136 

5,545 

McGuire, C. 

69,691 


McLaren, K. 

... 115,701 


Medynski, A. 

68,912 

1,381 

McGuire, | R K. 

92,761 

24,771 

McLash,) M. 

59,778 

304 

Meekison, W G. 

104,510 

4,011 

McGuire, L B. 

66,613 

5,558 

McLatchie, H D. 

50,666 

1,482 

Meeson, J H. 

53,771 

6,230 

McGunigle, B. 

62,724 

344 

McLauchlan, P. 

69,495 


Megannety, P. 

64,814 

326 

McGunigle, T B. 

54,871 

2,981 

McLaughlin, D). 

57,839 

5,622 

Mehain, ) F. 

54,445 

3,194 

McHaffie, D S. 

56,477 

2,152 

McLaughlin,) A. 

51,721 

10,544 

Mehr, E F. 

64,863 

3,573 

McHale, DR. 

50,935 

38 

McLaughlin, M L. 

78,743 


Meidinger, D V. 

66,070 

6,129 

McHale, ). 

85,502 

8,577 

McLaughlin, R S. 

61,044 

8,809 

Meidinger, J F. 

73,742 

4,456 

McHale, W D. 

57,305 


McLean, AM. 

59,531 

2,097 

Meier, D. 

74,727 


McHardy,) M. 

53,258 


McLean, D B. 

56,477 


Meijer, G S. 

54,527 

308 

McHugh, B L. 

50,236 

2,438 

McLean, DC. 

56,553 


Meikle, M. 

62,269 

4,466 

Mcllhargey, A. 

77,063 


McLean, D M J. 

52,409 

5,940 

Meise, D H. 

69,551 

978 

Mcllwain, S. 

54,619 

7,730 

McLean, R W. 

54,998 

10,197 

Meise, K B. 

55,366 


Mclnnis, P. 

52,119 

439 

McLean, W E. 

54,367 

2,783 

Melanson, D. 

72,225 

1,203 

McIntosh, B. 

62,348 

5,314 

McLeish, K. 

52,053 


Melderis, M W. 

50,478 

6,080 

McIntosh, C. 

51,611 


McLellan, B. 

60,604 

4,045 

Meldrum, S A. 

74,038 

10,163 

McIntosh, D |. 

50,478 

640 

McLellan, B H. 

56,729 

812 

Melhuish, P. 

60,994 

9,903 

McIntosh, D K. 

59,136 

1,914 

McLellan, W. 

55,122 


Melliship, K S. 

68,819 

7,276 

McIntosh, D W. 

60,604 


McLelland, D. 

65,243 

6,813 

Mellor, 1 K. 

66,550 

130 

McIntosh, L D. 

56,439 

2,653 

McLelland, D G. 

62,269 

2,215 

Mellor, L E. 

55,785 

5,755 

McIntosh, R D. 

76,156 

3,114 

McLenehan, R E. 

60,604 

9,518 

Mellors, W G. 

50,203 

6,000 

McIntyre, D F. 

51,298 


McLeod, C S. 

58,373 


Melnick, G L. 

56,477 

227 

McIntyre, 1 M. 

51,898 

3,482 

McLeod, H C. 

62,269 

501 

Melnychuk, D. 

59,959 

1,196 

McIntyre, R. 

50,821 

11,661 

McLeod, H M. 

55,326 

194 

Menchions, S. 

61,259 


Mclsaac, C E. 

65,389 


McLeod, R. 

54,880 

421 

Mendez, S. 

54,259 


McKay, A. 

81,602 

2,947 

McManus, T. 

50,359 


Meneguzzi, P. 

54,632 

2,334 


























































































































































































































































PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


Menes, R. 

Menu, F|. 

Menzel, M. 

Menzies, B C. 

Menzies, R. 

Mercer, C A. 

Mercer, W G. 

Merchant, B I. 

Merchoff, D). 

Meredith, AM. 

Meredith, R. 

Meret, L. 

Merke, N H. 

Merkel, L. 

[Merkel, R A. 

terler, H. 

terluk, T N. 

lerner, G B. 

lerner, R R. 

lero, A. 

lerrell, R). 

lerry, G R. 

terry, K J. 

terryweather,) C... 

terston, N H. 

terta, RE. 

tertton, J G. 

terz, AW. 

teskas,) D. 

tessenger, A B. 

tessenger, M. 

tessenger, S. 

tesser, D. 

tessmer, M J. 

tetcalf, EE. 

tetcalfe, E. 

tetcalfe, J W R. 

leunier, C P. 

teunier, M. 

teyer Zu Erpen, W ] 

teyer, E. 

teyer, R J. 

teyer, TV. 

teyers, R. 

teyers, RE. 

ichaels, A. 

ichaels, L. 

ichaelsen, L. 

ichalchuk, G A. 

ichalko, M. 

ichaux, C. 

ichell, R. 

ichiel, D. 

ichielin, P. 

ickel, R. 

iddleton, C. 

iddleton, J E. 

iddleton, L N. 

iddleton, R. 

iddleton, R M. 

idnight, A E. 

ieras, J E. 

ignault, G. 

iguez, D. 

ihalynuk, M. 

kasko, D D. 

kkelsen, B F. 

klas, F J. 

ikolash, R. 

|kulec,) B. 

ilburn, P R. 

les, KH. 

ill, J W. 

[liar, DC. 

liar, J A. 

Har, )S. 

Hard, C. 

Hard,T. 

Hen, D. 

Her, A. 

Her, A. 


Salary 

Travel 


Salary 

Travel 

$ 

$ 


$ 

$ 

66,613 

2,141 

Miller, A S. 

88,649 

6,436 

58,687 

4,004 

Miller, B. 

57,578 

350 

54,873 

73 

Miller. B I. 

60,527 

741 

50,631 

3,439 

Miller, C. 

52,098 


52,869 


Miller, C R. 

50,920 

6,476 

50,800 

1,681 

Miller, D. 

60,891 

6,640 

71,682 

2,125 

Miller, D. 

50,937 

1,316 

62,269 

3,412 

Miller. D. 

54,182 


81,992 


Miller, D ). 

66,102 


68,687 

6,361 

Miller, D L. 

55,820 

2,537 

53,560 

28 

Miller, D M. 

62,269 

827 

86,310 

1,733 

Miller, DR. 

56,553 

1,561 

57,813 

1,619 

Miller, D W. 

60,527 

8,379 

66,787 

5,886 

Miller, F G. 

56,477 

1,583 

53,147 

8,306 

Miller, G D. 

51,266 

1,771 

60,510 

20,664 

Miller, G E. 

71,682 

7,677 

55,038 


Miller, G W. 

62,269 

2,100 

69,097 

458 

Miller, 1 C. 

63,701 

980 

57,289 


Miller, K. 

71,016 

6,320 

66,837 

47,519 

Miller, K N. 

85,261 

12,732 

56,477 

401 

Miller, M D. 

51,696 


62,269 

4,539 

Miller, M G. 

56,721 

1,906 

50,478 

154 

Miller, N. 

57,024 

2,645 

62,269 

6,070 

Miller, P. 

56,828 


67,932 

799 

Miller, P D. 

52,374 

4,308 

57,292 

540 

Miller, R C. 

70,379 

1,420 

55,935 

797 

Miller, R G. 

77,474 

710 

57,247 

2,298 

Miller, S. 

66,613 

837 

56,879 

364 

Miller, S C. 

83,267 

4,489 

50,937 


Milligan, A. 

50,291 

2,662 

52,962 

975 

Milligan, G E. 

54,602 

7,924 

56,477 

2,703 

Milliken,). 

70,686 

1,040 

51,131 


Milliken, S H. 

53,501 

58 

50,519 

15,828 

Mills, E A. 

57,362 


50,469 

72 

Mills, F. 

58,611 


59,314 

55 

Mills, )F. 

66,792 

2,260 

71,682 

7,437 

Mills, T I. 

51,566 

7,027 

67,315 

6,360 

Millward, W S. 

64,863 

2,076 

68,053 

504 

Milne, |. 

57,731 

754 

53,813 

2,019 

Milne, K. 

61,290 

1,605 

52,664 

3,441 

Milne, L D. 

54,309 

1,527 

76,156 

27,631 

Milne, T). 

50,478 

5,474 

52,191 

1,937 

Milner, D E. 

63,717 

4,201 

50,324 

674 

Milowsky, F. 

86,377 

5,716 

65,614 

13,413 

Miltenberger, G W. 

78,945 

7,698 

62,619 

15,538 

Milton, R. 

57,822 


59,009 

2,257 

Milum, M R. 

66,895 

12,309 

52,409 

470 

Minifie, T B. 

57,742 

14,892 

56,305 

597 

Minnion, P G. 

61,608 

1,431 

56,600 

607 

Minshall, R C. 

58,517 

3,526 

63,258 

3,542 

Mintak, D. 

62,984 


57,128 


Minty, D M. 

63,046 


53,691 

7,326 

Mirza, M Y. 

71,682 

3,611 

59,778 


Miska, E. 

54,234 

5,043 

51,034 

3,087 

Mist, L. 

68,702 

5,614 

51,657 

309 

Mistiades, C. 

50,607 


51,624 

2,401 

Mitchell, A S. 

60,497 

465 

53,344 


Mitchell, C. 

51,374 

4 

65,619 


Mitchell, D. 

53,365 

13,093 

61,716 

5,283 

Mitchell, D A. 

65,114 

7,532 

52,239 

6,903 

Mitchell, D M. 

55,984 

862 

51,776 

104 

Mitchell, E. 

50,684 

591 

66,838 

2,848 

Mitchell, E F ). 

59,778 

221 

66,613 

2,363 

Mitchell, G A. 

66,550 


64,677 

2,088 

Mitchell, 1) D. 

56,553 

1,470 

77,474 

176 

Mitchell, ). 

53,389 

640 

50,478 

1,463 

Mitchell,) H. 

59,219 

460 

64,648 

2,188 

Mitchell, J V. 

53,657 

405 

55,008 

873 

Mitchell, K |. 

68,920 

10,446 

50,559 

562 

Mitchell, K M. 

50,478 

6,756 

75,286 

8,590 

Mitchell, L |. 

61,172 

8,174 

66,613 

1,596 

Mitchell, L P. 

56,867 

737 

51,402 

4,174 

Mitchell, P. 

56,521 

16,116 

77,474 

28,793 

Mitchell, R. 

55,779 

1,521 

50,478 

4,693 

Mitchell, R A. 

50,993 


108,861 

22,841 

Mitchell, R D. 

63,342 

1,374 

63,949 

1,206 

Mitchell, R ). 

58,657 

1,083 

54,005 

5,414 

Mitchell, S C. 

56,473 

1,057 

62,269 

298 

Mitchell, S P. 

65,982 

2,370 

50,505 

309 

Mitchell, W K. 

77,474 

30,114 

62,250 

5,151 

Mitchell-Banks, B. 

61,924 

976 


D 39 


Mitchell-Banks, T R 

Mitchinson, R. 

Mithani, R. 

Mitic, W R. 

Mitten, C J L. 

Miyahara, L K. 

Mjolsness, R L. 

Moadebi, S M. 

Moe, | W. 

Moehler, A. 

Moen, B. 

Moen, B W. 

Moen, S. 

Moffat, B. 

Moffat, G. 

Moffat, G A. 

Moffat, L. 

Moffat, R. 

Moffat, S. 

Moffat, W B. 

Moffatt, H D. 

Moffatt, L W. 

Mogensen, E. 

Mogensen, E. 

Mogensen, N. 

Mohr, R. 

Mohrmann, R H. 

Moi, A C. 

Moi, A W. 

Moi, W. 

Moilliet, D. 

Moir, A. 

Molnar, K. 

Molnar, L N. 

Molnar, P. 

Molsberry, C R. 

Monahan, PA. 

Monchak, D K. 

Moncur, W W. 

Monette, AG. 

Money, L M. 

Monier, P. 

Monita, D. 

Monkman, M H. 

Monks, M J. 

Monnette, HA. 

Monnon, C. 

Monro, F ). 

Monroe, K R. 

Montague, B E. 

Monterey, D. 

Montgomery, A. 

Montgomery, D. 

Montgomery, R H ... 

Moody, DM. 

Moody, R. 

Moon, D E. 

Moon, DR. 

Moon, P T. 

Mooney, K. 

Moore, AD. 

Moore, B. 

Moore, B L. 

Moore, CM. 

Moore, D N. 

Moore, E L. 

Moore, G A. 

Moore, G D. 

Moore, G IA. 

Moore, G R. 

Moore,) D. 

Moore, JR. 

Moore, KG. 

Moore, KM. 

Moore, L. 

Moore, M. 

Moore, R. 

Moore, R G. 

Moore, R J. 

Moore, T. 

Moorehead, W P. 


Salary 

Travel 

$ 

$ 

76,156 


62,396 

1,556 

55,957 

29 

66,613 

2,165 

62,269 

4,293 

53,099 

587 

62,269 

6,633 

54,135 

13 

51,283 

514 

69,446 


55,512 


52,166 

446 

61,332 

739 

55,710 


56,261 

859 

55,007 

3,264 

59,791 

3,282 

52,412 


50,045 

23 

54,101 


69,558 

12,919 

69,593 

20 

54,707 


60,401 

3,718 

74,375 

620 

54,201 

36 

62,703 

4,129 

62,269 

2,751 

51,760 


55,976 

167 

62,269 


66,613 

1,957 

60,823 

3,092 

50,478 

2,409 

54,199 

1,778 

68,615 

294 

56,460 

1,332 

56,912 

890 

56,477 

4,430 

64,542 

4,525 

53,874 

2,116 

62,269 

559 

51,251 

703 

52,098 

1,140 

70,090 


65,629 

9,658 

54,790 

710 

56,150 

2,381 

62,269 

438 

56,042 


62,246 

640 

82,913 

1,024 

51,473 

564 

55,179 


62,996 

607 

62,269 


76,156 

1,591 

54,154 

63 

51,828 

3,351 

56,779 


50,708 

480 

50,284 


50,850 

8,159 

64,776 

5,263 

62,746 

3,884 

50,877 

2,263 

56,011 


50,476 

3,046 

62,269 

1,114 

60,401 

274 

57,997 

1,120 

51,072 

3,135 

50,478 

3,183 

54,156 

9,985 

66,613 

12,361 

55,369 


71,047 


53,041 

1,331 

52,103 

1,877 

77,548 


108,734 

3,917 



























































































































































































































































D 40 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Other Employees —Continued 


Moragne, R P. 

Salary 

$ 

50,478 

Travel 

$ 

3,836 

Mould, R N. 

Moran, D. 

56,507 

11,992 

Mountenay, S L. 

Moran, D. 

66,613 

280 

Mowatt, G M. 

Moran, J R. 

56,553 


Mowrey, B L. 

Moran, K P. 

63,862 

647 

Moxon, A L. 

Mordan, A M. 

51,699 

1,460 

Moy, W W. 

More, S. 

71,187 

21,823 

Moyes, E A. 

Moreau, M E. 

62,638 

2,942 

Moyse, G. 

Morel, D. 

61,823 


Mrozinski, L. 

Morel, D P. 

70,248 

6,425 

Mucha, D J. 

Morello, R. 

55,529 

3,145 

Mueller, E. 

Moreshead, J A. 

50,478 


Mugford, M. 

Morgan, A B. 

53,136 

1,333 

Muir, A S. 


58,083 


Muir, 1. 





Morgan, B C. 

53,771 

1,794 

Muir, | A. 

Morgan, D G. 

50,034 

10,903 

Muir, R ). 

Morgan, I. 

82,470 

3,819 

Muirhead, C ]. 

Morgan,). 

68,008 


Muirhead, G. 

Morgan,). 

57,655 


Mulcahy, D C. 

Morgan, K H. 

57,069 

7,402 

Muldrew, S D. 

Morgan, R N. 

59,591 

1,660 

Mulholland, E B. 

Morgan, W B. 

67,114 

7,933 

Mullan, R P. 

Morhart, D. 

64,866 

1,345 

Mullane, ] F. 

Moricz, MMEB. 

56,656 

270 

Mullen,) R. 

Morie, 1. 

61,817 


Mullen, S. 

Morin, B W. 

71,682 

11,827 

Mullen-Dalmer, D. 

Morison, N |. 

56,553 

2,543 

Muller, G F. 

Morita, F K. 

62,269 

8,079 

Muller, R. 

Morley, D. 

50,478 


Mullett, D F. 

Morley, D R. 

50,943 

3,820 

Mullett,). 

Morley, J H. 

68,732 

5,596 

Mulligan, D J. 

Morley, R L. 

71,682 

9,610 

Mulligan, R. 

Morris, C |. 

59,539 

18,801 

Mulvihill, C. 

Morris, D. 

82,296 

1,650 

Munkley, D. 

Morris, D G. 

77,474 

12,092 

Munkley, M E. 

Morris,) R. 

56,303 

3,441 

Munn, B. 

Morris, P. 

64,872 

748 

Munn, D J. 

Morris, R A. 

63,777 

42 

Munn, P L. 

Morris, R L. 

53,262 

1,247 

Munn, W D. 

Morris, S. 

60,447 


Munro, A. 

Morris, T. 

53,771 

8,163 

Munro, E L. 

Morris, U M. 

55,638 

375 

Munro, G D. 

Morrison, A L. 

60,257 

9,785 

Munro, G I. 

Morrison, B. 

71,682 

9,576 

Munro, 1. 

Morrison, B. 

66,181 

4,338 

Munro, M S. 

Morrison, B D. 

90,880 

1,298 

Munro, S. 

Morrison, B ). 

56,477 

486 

Munro, W T. 

Morrison, D. 

86,720 

159 

Munton, D. 

Morrison, D. 

54,803 


Munton,).... 

Morrison, D C. 

59,136 

2,170 

Munzer, R M. 

Morrison, D E. 

58,777 

9,878 

Murchie, D K. 

Morrison, H. 

65,697 

1,444 

Murdock, G R. 

Morrison, K. 

64,444 

3,922 

Murdock,). 

Morrison, L W. 

54,569 

18,005 

Murgatroyd, M K. 

Morrison, M ). 

50,227 


Murphy, A M. 

Morrison, N B. 

50,478 

2,431 

Murphy, B. 

Morrison, P. 

62,269 

4,353 

Murphy, B C. 

Morrison, R. 

62,269 

3,651 

Murphy, B ). 

Morrison, W. 

51,463 


Murphy, 1. 

Morrison, W F. 

50,167 


Murphy, K. 

Morrow, D J. 

64,935 

1,599 

Murphy, K. 

Morrow, M. 

56,494 

1,043 

Murphy, K ) D. 

Mortimer, D R. 

75,834 


Murphy, M. 

Mortimer, N R. 

55,050 

29 

Murphy, P. 

Morton, BA. 

55,863 


Murphy, S L. 

Morton, D L. 

56,553 


Murphy, T. 

Morton, G. 

71,682 

11,246 

Murphy, T V. 

Morton, G A. 

56,477 

1,339 

Murphy, W. 

Mosby, G E. 

53,200 

3,064 

Murray, A. 

Mosher, C. 

54,400 


Murray, D. 

Mosher, C). 

56,477 

5,325 

Murray, D J. 

Moss, J. 

59,165 


Murray, D R. 

Moss, R A. 

55,395 

3,774 

Murray, E E. 

Moss, R K. 

62,405 


Murray,). 

Mossey, J E. 

73,085 


Murray, N. 

Mossington, D. 

65,211 

672 

Murray, P. 

Mothus, E. 

62,335 


Murray, R A. 

Mottershead, W R. 

59,778 

6,423 

Murray, R S. 

Mottishaw, J E. 

70,916 

3,141 

Murray, S E. 

Mottram, W. 

50,478 

1,591 

Murray, T. 

Mouat, D. 

54,307 

1,760 

Murray, W. 


Salary 

Travel 


Salary 

Travel 


$ 

$ 


$ 

$ 


63,284 

265 

Murrell, M. 

55,853 

1,5311 


54,161 

503 

Murtha, M F. 

59,136 

20,5571 

• 

56,737 


Murthi, J N. 

65,494 



63,949 

4,959 

Musgrave, R. 

63,115 

4,736 


51,810 

298 

Mussio,)). 

80,428 

18,6941 


61,215 

711 

Musto, R. 

69,357 

6,788* 


71,682 

278 

Mutch, M E. 

73,895 

18 


61,679 

416 

Muth, N D. 

83,378 

6,701 


57,839 

8,203 

Myers, E R. 

50,755 

1,851 


51,811 

70 

Myers, F W. 

51,336 

1,044 


66,613 

286 

Myers, H E. 

53,901 

4,957 


51,818 

363 

Myers, L. 

50,333 

994 


72,121 


Myers, M. 

56,477 



55,616 


Myers, R). 

78,852 

2,940 


64,831 

4,130 

Myers, T. 

61,520 

255 


58,647 

123 

Myhal, W. 

50,365 



54,696 

625 

Nadarajan, V. 

53,771 



71,682 


Nadeau, E F. 

62,269 

179 


51,818 

672 

Nagai, W. 

51,488 

8,902 


70,352 


Nagasaka, H H. 

55,080 



50,478 

121 

Nagati, P. 

60,420 

1,379 


71,682 

815 

Nagpal, N. 

56,553 

1,212 


60,401 

28 

Nagy, A L. 

50,877 



57,031 

129 

Nakamura, j N. 

62,269 

8,460 


62,165 

2,052 

Nakashoji, D K. 

51,746 

20 


71,682 

9,394 

Nakatsu, D T. 

64,115 

4,692 


53,552 

184 

Nakazawa, T. 

58,454 

10 


59,564 

306 

Nakken, P. 

52,098 

2,819 


63,038 

6,370 

Nalleweg, N D. 

53,710 

10,654 


55,581 

2,268 

Nance, R G. 

52,209 

127 


76,156 

4,968 

Nanton, M R. 

56,553 

1,824 


99,511 

12,266 

Nascou,) B. 

54,000 



56,145 

9,062 

Nash, A. 

57,295 

328 


71,518 


Nash, E. 

66,613 

14,0991 


61,679 

107 

Nash, G L. 

56,841 

598 


50,478 

2,455 

Nash,) T. 

57,253 

5,935! 


77,177 

6,318 

Nash, L. 

60,480 

12,12F 


65,419 


Nash, O. 

50,684 



64,586 

516 

Nash, P. 

50,478 

2,068 


57,602 

2,523 

Natsuhara, R K. 

60,510 



95,576 

125 

Navratil, R. 

63,344 

975 


59,065 

7,417 

Naylor, P. 

50,339 

5,979* 


74,225 

4,195 

Neal, T. 

57,903 

181 


50,684 

316 

Neave, M V. 

50,039 

753 


77,474 

21,039 

Nedokus, E. 

59,250 

1,227 


68,814 

4,584 

Neer, K H. 

58,223 



71,682 

5,456 

Negraeff, J. 

71,682 

4,2771 


54,586 

16,500 

Negrin, G M. 

67,509 



58,040 

280 

Negrin, R G. 

64,416 

165 


62,269 

129 

Neighbor, H W. 

50,478 

1,864 


63,009 

5,013 

Neil, R G. 

54,581 

3,764 


51,113 

242 

Neil, TO. 

54,105 



50,332 

11,540 

Neilsen, LAW. 

75,527 

1,402 


63,472 


Neily, J A. 

62,269 



73,180 

1,213 

Nelson, C A. 

66,613 

10,335 


60,666 

3,564 

Nelson, D. 

51,852 

8,399. J 

56,477 

259 

Nelson, D. 

62,376 

3,173 ! 

66,878 

5,157 

Nelson, G 1. 

52,413 

334 

63,680 

8,447 

Nelson, 1 B. 

63,196 

5,066 

54,000 

2,089 

Nelson, J. 

66,613 

15,192 

62,246 

8,323 

Nelson,) L. 

64,863 

4,599) 

59,955 

1,546 

Nelson, K A. 

50,478 

2 ( 934| 

57,399 

2,271 

Nelson, L W. 

74,774 


50,684 

6,838 

Nelson, R S. 

55,307 


57,853 

6,441 

Nemec, D. 

55,397 


53,859 

12,057 

Nesbit, B F. 

50,322 

5,279 

58,512 

13,029 

Nesbit, D P. 

57,968 

2,834 

56,445 

509 

Nesdoly, T A. 

52,098 

73 

68,326 

3,946 

Nesting, N T. 

55,204 

10,402 

51,135 


Neudorf, J. 

51,697 

898 

67,354 

14,473 

Neufeld, A E. 

91,231 

2,561 

54,218 


Neufeld, D R. 

51,648 

779 

79,272 

13,270 

Neufield, G. 

64,844 


58,727 


Neuman, R H. 

56,872 

4,812 

50,636 


Nevile, |. 

58,641 


53,888 

32 

Neville, L M. 

64,655 

3,344 

73,762 

5,407 

Neville, R W. 

54,140 

364 

50,538 

2,020 

Newall, D R. 

62,269 

1,058 

54,306 

5,424 

Newall, M E. 

51,774 

345 

62,264 

219 

Newburg, W C. 

56,477 

459 

87,801 


Newcomb, A j. 

56,477 

1,153 


























































































































































































































































PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


D 41 



Salary 

Travel 



$ 

$ 


Newhouse, J R. 

67,283 

26,874 

Nowotniak, E. 

Newman, K). 

55,950 

2,030 

Nunez, J. 

Newman, R. 

57,936 

332 

Nussbaum, A F. 

Newman, RE. 

58,968 


Nusum, C A. 

Newman, W E ). 

50,802 

10 

Nuszdorfer, F C. 

Newman, W H. 

51,621 

1,301 

Nuttall, G. 

Newroth, P R. 

65,444 

421 

Nuttall, P. 

Newsome, G A. 

56,609 

2,959 

Nyberg, D A. 

Newsome, T. 

56,553 

1,003 

Nyberg,) B. 

Newton, D J. 

53,771 

376 

Nye, LG. 

Newton, M. 

74,402 

28,313 

Nygaard, K. 

Newton, R M. 

59,548 

15,313 

Nyland, D. 

Newton, S. 

59,554 

3,922 

Nymark, W. 

Newton, SR. 

57,772 

719 

Nyst, H. 

Newton, T E. 

53,591 

1,058 

O'Brian, P. 

Sg,P. 

50,478 


O'Brien, R F. 

Mg, 1 L T. 

60,499 

1,032 

O'Bryan, A L. 

Ng, W. 

60,295 

980 

O'Bryan,) P. 

Ngai,) W. 

65,108 


O'Byrne,) R. 

Ngo, S W K. 

51,294 

3,826 

O'Byrne, M ). 

Nias,). 

57,849 


O'Dette, LE|. 

Nicholl, D. 

66,574 


O'Donoghue, P G. 

Nicholls, D R. 

50,478 

1,174 

O'Hara, B K. 

Nicholls, E. 

61,021 

304 

O'Hare, I. 

Nicholls, G M. 

60,114 

8,824 

O'Henly, A. 

Nichols, J W. 

61,825 

1,761 

O'Keeffe, D). 

Nichols, R W. 

56,553 

1,629 

O'Neil, DS. 

Nicholson, D C. 

54,716 

306 

O'Neill, D. 

Nicholson, E A... 

60,050 

4,831 

O'Neill, J. 

Nicholson, G A. 

60,951 

O'Neill, N D. 

Nicholson, J D. 

59,216 

873 

O'Rourke, P. 

Nicholson, J N. 

68,183 

543 

O-Toole, S D. 

Nicholson, S. 

53,261 

1,289 

Oakley, B T). 

Nickel, D F. 

50,916 


Oates, M L. 

Nickel, K P. 

60,510 

4,235 

Oba-Underwood, M. 

Nickel, R A. 

71,682 

731 

Obedkoff, W. 

Nickel, S G. 

56,477 

2,075 

Oberik, T M. 

Jicol, B. 

53,410 


Obirek, J. 

Nicol, D R. 

55,017 

3,649 

Obrknezev, B. 

Nicoletti, C K F. 

54,896 

2,722 

Odermatt, W). 

Jield, J. 

52,098 


Offerhaus, R M. 

Nielsen, G P. 

54,452 

225 

Offizier, H. 

Niemann, T. 

71,682 


Ogasawara, S K. 

Jiezen, AH. 

56,553 

2,129 

Ogilvie, D M. 

Nigh, G. 

60,527 

6,320 

Oh, J Y. 

Jikolejsin, D J. 

78,767 

1,718 

Ohlemann, K P. 

Nilsen, D L. 

66,613 

2,999 

Ohlhausen, L B. 

Jipp, R. 

50,684 


Ohlmann, L J. 

lirwan, P. 

51,509 

399 

Okrainetz, G. 

lix, BC. 

50,880 


Olafsen, R W. 

lixon, D. 

62,329 

5,152 

Olafson, J W. 

lixon, G T. 

64,801 

861 

Olason, B. 

loble, C R. 

55,869 

3,191 

Oldfield, M. 

loble, R. 

71,698 


Oldham, G E. 

loble, W B. 

65,878 

3,644 

Oldridge, R. 

lock, M. 

76,392 

3,410 

Oleszko, P. 

loel, S. 

62,269 

2,679 

Oliemans, F. 

loonan, H F L. 

52,211 

411 

Oliver, A L. 

loort, T. 

72,162 


Oliver, D W. 

lordin, R N. 

53,771 

2,756 

Oliver, H G. 

lordstrom, W N. 

58,024 

10,363 

Oliver, M F. 

orgren, R. 

58,262 


Olivotto, G. 

orman, B. 

54,842 


Oliynyk, RT. 

orman, C. 

66,613 

1,054 

Ollenberger, L). 

orman, P. 

50,201 

1,920 

Olsen,) B. 

orman, P. 

66,613 

4,840 

Olsen, R R. 

orman, R. 

50,819 


Olson, D. 

orman, V J. 

59,136 

11,526 

Olson, L J. 

orman, W 1. 

50,478 

7,131 

Olson, M D. 

orquay, A R. 

50,478 


Olson, T K. 

orris, B D. 

50,776 

2,483 

Olynyk,). 

orris, D). 

58,833 

4,599 

Olynyk,). 

orrish, R W. 

54,530 

2,478 

Olynyk, J. 

orsworthy, T J. 

50,575 

5,991 

Omidi, T. 

orth, B... 

59,362 

1,469 

Omstead, G I. 

orthcott, HJ. 

52,693 

243 

Omule, A. 

orthup, J A. 

62,090 


Onishko, P). 

orton, K. 

59,779 

7,393 

Opal, E S. 

orton, SC. 

68,183 

1,120 

Ord, R. 

orton, W E... 

77,474 

5,725 

Ormrod, D). 

ours, E. 

50,220 


Orom, H. 


Salary 

Travel 


Salary 

Travel 

$ 

$ 


$ 

$ 

53,771 

1,429 

Orosz, D. 

69,694 

1,846 

66,613 

3,344 

Orr, B . 

53,771 

363 

60,446 

10,992 

Orr, J. 

66,613 

3,196 

50,426 

3,028 

Orr, R. 

53,418 

826 

64,471 

7,684 

Orr, T P Dr. 

.. 127,039 

10,455 

76,026 

2,125 

Orrey, M. 

50,478 

9,696 

51,915 

7,806 

Orrick, L. 

51,988 

34 

59,779 

5,973 

Ortiz. |C. 

56,573 


67,568 

3,756 

Ortiz, L. 

57,985 

7,677 

66,767 

5,008 

Orton, M A. 

55,314 

667 

62,269 

3,491 

Orydzuk, C. 

60,653 

250 

71,682 

15,585 

Osachoff, L M. 

73,085 

676 

76,156 


Osberg, PM. 

69,089 

7,174 

71,807 

2,122 

Osborn, S. 

57,412 

1,611 

56,914 

1,256 

Osborne, A. 

66,613 

510 

50,478 

186 

Osborne, C R. 

53,771 

509 

50,478 

11,086 

Osborne, M. 

50,636 

146 

51,349 

11,757 

Osborne, T ). 

56,477 

6,129 

71,066 

5,184 

Osland, R E. 

64,863 

1,988 

62,269 

1,528 

Osoko, M D. 

51,480 

2,249 

51,334 

1,182 

Ostapovich, D E. 

52,098 


53,845 

7,881 

Ostashek, G. 

66,613 

479 

55,705 


Oster, L. 

51,912 

1,410 

66,613 

528 

Oster, MS. 

55,584 

8,379 

52,044 

4,138 

Ostry, LA. 

62,651 

325 

66,563 

7,297 

Oswald, D L. 

71,682 

2,820 

57,289 

27 

Otchere-Boateng, |. 

60,497 

10,660 

50,684 


Ottewell, R P. 

74,318 

2,940 

51,432 

3,598 

Ouellet, A G. 

51,289 

2,907 

69,756 

13,305 

Ouellet, F. 

50,079 

4,823 

75,920 

20,582 

Ouellette, M. 

56,477 


54,619 

3,025 

Ouellette, T). 

56,435 

8,148 

62,269 

973 

Ouimet, R. 

68,224 

18,853 

58,540 

80 

Oulton, E M. 

66,613 

207 

56,421 


Ouston, E. 

60,663 


56,553 

473 

Ovanin, T K. 

50,922 

594 

54,295 

1,452 

Owen, D 1. 

65,229 

2,257 

53,494 


Owen, L). 

58,256 

1,645 

65,938 

2,634 

Owen, P H. 

83,267 

10,115 

58,256 

1,807 

Owen, T. 

50,263 

260 

53,771 

15,609 

Owens, L E. 

50,684 

8,555 

50,514 

1,100 

Owsiacki, G. 

54,452 

127 

58,937 

2,121 

Owsianski, E. 

77,474 

1,224 

50,538 

616 

Ozawa, Y. 

60,246 

971 

57,453 

7,036 

Ozeer, S H. 

51,818 

1,170 

56,477 

912 

Ozeroff, C W. 

50,478 

2,861 

56,477 

6,830 

Pace, E L. 

51,719 

3,572 

70,944 

14,286 

Pack, L. 

60,951 

5,036 

61,356 

10,113 

Packham, R M. 

53,771 

4,102 

55,791 

5,496 

Padalec, G R. 

50,188 

1,422 

50,434 

1,646 

Paddon, G L. 

52,072 

8,379 

51,188 


Paetz, R. 

56,477 

588 

54,770 


Page, D B. 

54,144 

865 

71,682 

3,218 

Page, G A. 

52,467 


56,477 

9,192 

Page, J L. 

50,583 

380 

64,777 


Page, M T. 

57,896 


59,356 

185 

Page, P. 

52,773 

277 

60,527 

3,781 

Page, RE. 

51,601 

2,029 

62,269 

2,390 

Paget, G D. 

77,326 

5,784 

50,654 

109 

Paige, R I. 

56,897 

42 

73,738 

6,821 

Painter, R. 

71,682 

5,072 

62,715 

2,059 

Pakrastins, A. 

59,934 


50,427 

907 

Pal, S. 

57,289 

1,142 

62,054 

2,622 

Palesch, D). 

56,503 


60,518 

602 

Pallai, A. 

66,861 


53,245 

2,040 

Paller, A]. 

50,836 

540 

66,292 


Palm, PE. 

60,871 

2,373 

53,141 

5,760 

Palmer, F G. 

56,048 

12,745 

66,613 

3,175 

Palmer,) F. 

69,357 


51,414 

2,963 

Palmer, L M. 

52,398 


50,048 

2,936 

Palmer, M. 

53,897 

163 

59,778 

382 

Palmer, M A. 

59,136 

538 

62,450 

1,179 

Palmer, M W. 

65,551 


62,269 

317 

Paloposki, G W. 

56,967 

77 

62,269 

3,138 

Palser, V E. 

50,819 

1,136 

68,149 

4,626 

Pamplin, G B. 

60,506 

2,087 

50,478 

224 

Panagabko, N J. 

60,396 

9,421 

67,471 

3,215 

Pang, P S B. 

50,079 

1,844 

56,433 

4,246 

Pang, S. 

55,949 

3,604 

60,527 

2,725 

Panteleyev, A. 

64,428 

5,131 

57,331 

382 

Pantella, D F. 

66,613 

1,056 

























































































































































































































































D 42 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Other Employees —Continued 


Panter, C C. 

Salary 

$ 

77,175 

Travel 

$ 

19,888 

Pattie, 1 R. 

Salary 

$ 

58,277 

Travel 

$ 

105 

Pentland, B. 

Salary 

$ 

50,053 

Travel 

$ 

422 

Panter, R. 

Pape, A. 

62,269 

62,239 


Pattman, B. 

Patton, D M. 

59,397 

52,779 

465 

Pepper, 1C. 

Pepper, R. 

50,478 

66,613 

3,520 

2,496 

Paquette, D W. 

50,484 

1,796 

Patton, M. 

66,080 


Peppier, | C. 

62,269 

1,022 

Paranjpe, M A. 

59,136 

1,645 

Paul, BA. 

50,478 

763 

Perchie, R W. 

62,078 

3,985 

Pardais, A R. 

51,683 


Paul, N J. 

79,383 

3,540 

Percival, L R. 

71,323 

5,731 

Pardy,) W. 

53,771 

11,052 

Pauloski, L I. 

50,478 

2,390 

Percy, J M. 

51,389 

6,296 

Parent, E. 

68,184 

2,063 

Paulson, S G. 

60,527 

2,012 

Pereira, C. 

56,477 

2,612 

Parent, R G. 

68,183 

1,550 

Pauze, C). 

73,504 


Pereverzoff, S A. 

77,474 

1,472 

Parenteau, SR. 

59,277 

9,101 

Pavan, F H. 

67,598 

3,360 

Perkin, S E. 

50,663 

3,337 

Parfett, A A. 

61,343 

2,590 

Pavan, M M. 

74,727 


Perkins, L S. 

57,331 

551 

Parfitt, D B. 

. 100,041 

11,196 

Pawson, R M. 

53,771 

2,231 

Perkins, M A. 

50,194 

1,445 

Parish, R. 

58,935 

2,766 

Paxton-Mann, A. 

77,474 

1,966 

Perkins, R G. 

64,609 



52 119 

979 

Payie, G). 

54,426 

71,682 

2,517 

224 

Perras, J j. 

61,585 

50,683 

226 

Parke, B. 

67,294 

1,288 

Payne, R. 

Perreault, T. 

2,201 

Parker, A. 

50,478 

8,290 

Payne, R S. 

74,727 

932 

Perrin, M E. 

58,101 


Parker, A M. 

60,505 


Paynter, J P. 

51,214 

2,799 

Perron, R A. 

66,231 

5,628 

Parker, C A. 

57,302 

1,664 

Payton, S F. 

62,269 

2,012 

Perry, A. 

56,452 


Parker, G 1. 

62,768 

9,689 

Peace, T. 

54,470 

8,237 

Perry, B H. 

50,478 

5,984 

Parker, J G. 

50,247 

586 

Peake, KM. 

66,917 

333 

Perry, B M. 

54,871 

3,873 

Parker, R A. 

Parker, R). 

95,310 

74,034 

4,680 

9,446 

Peaker, R. 

Pearce, B W. 

52,570 

52,308 

6,024 

Perry, C. 

Perry, J L. 

50,047 

50,269 

199 

Parker, W G. 

54,267 

2,570 

Pearce, D G. 

95,576 

23,675 

Perry, K D. 

65,919 

812 

Parkes, N E. 

50,877 

14,763 

Pearce, L. 

52,402 

867 

Perry, R. 

54,912 


Parkin, M. 

51,689 

3,420 

Pearce, W. 

90,880 

14,687 

Perry, R F. 

50,478 

20 

Parkinson, C C. 

Parkinson, E A. 

60,872 

59,136 

2,991 

3,816 

Pearcy, B. 

Pearcy, VS. 

66,598 

59,052 

1,809 

Perry, W J. 

Peschke, B. 

55,820 

65,281 

5,742 

Parkinson, M E. 

57,178 

3,839 

Pearson, G A. 

98,006 

217 

Pesowsky, B. 

66,613 


Parkinson, P A. 

62,269 

562 

Pearson, KM. 

50,395 

1,527 

Petch, L M. 

59,136 

1,125 

Parkinson, W L. 

63,789 

8,885 

Pearson, R A. 

53,613 

8,745 

Peter, T H. 

71,682 

3,553 

Parkinson, Y M. 

54,220 

526 

Pearson, R L. 

58,413 

13,299 

Peters, G A. 

55,475 

2,474 

Parks, K. 

51,183 

1,696 

Pearson, T. 

58,884 

150 

Peters, H. 

54,795 

207 

Parks, K. 

63,055 

1,021 

Pearson, W S. 

63,284 

5,399 

Peters, M. 

53,410 


Parks, R E. 

66,613 

5,828 

Peatt, AD. 

53,771 

1,519 

Peters, N A. 

51,283 


Parkyn,) H. 

62,543 

2,397 

Pechnik, W E. 

58,900 

8,411 

Peters, N J. 

71,682 

563 

Parmar,). 

65,315 


Peck, D N. 

72,193 

1,620 

Peters, T K. 

60,962 

90 

Parmar, R S. 

52,536 

15,300 

Peck, S. 

108,544 

10,517 

Peters, W G. 

56,477 

165 

Parminter,) V. 

60,527 

1,602 

Peden, A E. 

53,889 

1,782 

Peters, W S. 

78,215 

918 

Parnell, G G. 

71,682 

16,008 

Pedersen, D. 

57,315 


Petersen, G. 

56,979 

18 

Parrish, R. 

56,477 

241 

Pedersen, E A. 

64,538 

920 

Petersen, J H. 

50,587 

1,540 

Parrott, B ) N. 

80,396 

6,037 

Pedersen, L P. 

95,576 

12,880 

Petersen, K L. 

53,332 


Parrott, G. 

70,202 

2,915 

Pedersen, M C. 

60,452 

3,309 

Petersen, O J L. 

74,156 

5,008 

Parry, N H. 

62,253 

6,550 

Pedersen, R A. 

55,802 

147 

Petersen, P. 

57,190 


Parsons, DR. 

75,566 

4,208 

Pedersen-Handrahan, K. 

57,288 

494 

Peterson, C. 

50,937 

21 

Parsons, J E. 

56,553 

1,739 

Pederson, S. 

73,530 

2,278 

Peterson, C. 

56,477 

1,067 

Parsons, M A. 

56,477 


Pedneault, H. 

77,474 

795 

Peterson, D G. 

66,613 

6,666 

Parsons, P A. 

50,091 

1,028 

Pedosuk, L D. 

55,546 

9,475 

Peterson, D H. 

60,497 

3,889 

Parsons, R S. 

57,839 

351 

Peebles, J A. 

75,037 

2,236 

Peterson, D L. 

55,131 

4,580 

Partington, N C. 

50,478 

4,894 

Peet, D H. 

58,357 

5,939 

Peterson, E. 

56,477 

361 

Partridge, E J. 

61,024 

914 

Peet, H. 

76,888 


Peterson, KG. 

50,937 

442 

Paruk, M E. 

82,296 

78 

Peeters, JAW. 

58,218 


Peterson, K L. 

51,087 

555 

Pascoe, M. 

50,019 


Peitzsche, L A. 

62,269 

1,498 

Peterson, RE. 

66,613 

11,831 

Pascuzzo, K. 

56,051 


Pelchat, M K. 

59,919 

2,828 

Peterson, R J T. 

65,781 

832 

Pashnik, P A. 

77,474 

5,944 

Pelensky, R L. 

50,450 

2,676 

Peterson, T N. 

71,682 

14,602 

Pasicnyk, V. 

64,305 

4,443 

Peligal, M. 

51,435 

8,473 

Petho, B L L. 

51,178 

13,029 

Pastor, R A. 

60,748 

11,841 

Pellerin, G. 

74,004 

1,243 

Pethybridge, J L. 

54,452 

284 

Pastorek,) L. 

62,269 

1,199 

Pelletier, D J. 

62,031 

2,286 

Petit, C. 

59,689 


Patch, S. 

56,070 

8,464 

Pel left, K A. 

53,771 

8,058 

Petkovic, AMO. 

66,071 

1,485 

Patenaude, D. 

52,631 

5,340 

Pelster, G. 

51,670 

1,941 

Petrie, M A. 

77,474 

272 

Paterson, G A. 

50,478 

229 

Pelto, E L. 

50,684 

1,345 

Petrie, M S. 

82,296 

1,246 

Paterson,). 

56,639 

282 

Pemble, D W. 

50,549 

2,131 

Petrie, R I. 

50,533 

651 

Paterson, j. 

62,269 

5,185 

Pendergast, BA. 

66,613 

1,369 

Petryshen, D. 

55,553 

276 

Paterson, K 1. 

50,478 

515 

Pendergast, L J. 

55,625 

404 

Pettifer, G. 

50,706 


Paterson, R W. 

54,502 

294 

Pendharkar, M. 

52,098 

7,689 

Pettigrew, KB. 

50,684 

535 

Paterson, SB. 

73,180 

1,698 

Penhale, R. 

55,167 


Pettit, D. 

107,021 

4,699 

Patola, S. 

54,000 

26 

Penman, W D. 

50,478 

1,179 

Petty, A J. 

67,925 

18,560 

Paton, A D. 

62,269 

274 

Penner, B P. 

74,974 


Pew, D R. 

51,818 

1,795 

Patrick, DM. 

. 105,793 

1,799 

Penner, GW. 

62,269 

1,007 

Pew, J G. 

56,553 

2,088 

Patrick, M. 

61,622 


Penner, H. 

54,068 

10,368 

Pfannenschmidt, H W R. 

71,324 

1,182 

Patriquin, B. 

67,394 

660 

Penner, J. 

53,528 


Pfeifer, MB. 

73,404 

63 

Pattee, R. 

90,882 

6,850 

Penner, J A. 

51,204 

4,569 

Pfeifle, E. 

66,156 

26 

Patten, B K. 

72,471 

831 

Penner, K R. 

56,477 

13,106 

Pflanz, O H. 

63,674 

4,810 

Patterson, C. 

Patterson, D. 

60,050 

59,700 


Penner, L P. 

Penner, R. 

51,522 

55,896 

9,619 

Pflug, M J. 

Phalen, R D. 

56,553 

64,913 

8,338 

533 

Patterson, G. 

68,411 

352 

Penner, R D. 

51,704 

5,201 

Phalen, W A. 

64,523 

946 

Patterson, G P. 

51,417 

133 

Penner, R J. 

64,428 

4,436 

Phare, CL. 

58,483 


Patterson,). 

Patterson, L T. 

59,137 

66,613 

13,407 

Penner, R K. 

Penner, W C. 

50,478 

71,682 

9,099 

Phelan, W E. 

Phelps, K. 

62,269 

50,373 

4,551 

187 

Patterson, P. 

Patterson, R. 

50,684 

60,425 


Penney, M J T. 

Pennington, J R. 

50,478 

76,156 

3,268 

Phelps, L. 

Philcox, M J. 

54,741 

62,693 

3,813 

Pattie, L G. 

55,708 

3,968 

Penny, B. 

56,791 

245 

Philip, H G. 

60,527 

3,435 



























































































































































































































































PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 



Salary 

Travel 


$ 

$ 

Philley, T. 

59,670 

48 

Phillips, AC. 

71,634 

2,276 

Phillips, B. 

66,613 

5,674 

Phillips, B. 

68,098 

4,317 

Phillips, D. 

62,269 

1,502 

Phillips, G. 

51,998 

1,654 

Phillips, J. 

77,474 

593 

Phillips, K W. 

66,455 

7,199 

Phillips, L T. 

56,553 


Phillips, N. 

50,478 

477 

Phillips, N. 

65,518 

1,867 

Phillips, N. 

64,647 

1,599 

Phillips, N A. 

51,576 

8,537 

Phillips, S. 

59,489 


Phillips, WKF. 

50,478 

785 

Phipps, A O. 

71,682 

723 

Phipps. R. 

50,974 

4,092 

Picard, A. 

63,657 

7,207 

Picha, R M. 

65,518 


Pickerel 1, R C. 

50,768 

3,073 

Pickering, K A. 

50,478 

6,441 

Pielak, K L. 

55,713 

943 

Pierce, T. 

57,288 

1,407 

Pierlot, B. 

59,178 

371 

Pietila, J J . 

60,811 

2,082 

Pigeau, L. 

58,160 

2,649 

Pigeau, W P. 

57,360 

103 

Piggin, DJ. 

53,504 

781 

Pike, D D J. 

50,478 

1,021 

Pike, S J. 

53,191 

1,261 

Pike, W D. 

82,296 

371 

Pilato, S. 

50,478 


Pilkington, 1 J . 

51,272 

1,060 

Pillay, 1. 

53,771 

373 

Pilling, G A. 

54,377 

18,536 

Pillipow, D J. 

50,684 

968 

Pinese, S. 

59,418 


Pinkerton, G E. 

57,412 

5,851 

Pinsent, R H. 

63,038 

4,320 

Pipes, M. 

83,609 

2,041 

Pires, B). 

56,932 

150 

Pirnke, M. 

52,301 


Pishalski, F. 

50,058 

1,318 

Pitcairn, J. 

53,771 

2,105 

Pitkin, E. 

74,727 

160 

Pitt, W F. 

50,478 

784 

Pitters, G. 

52,922 


Pittman, E. 

50,400 

5,261 

Pittman, T ] M. 

54,549 

4,656 

Pitzel, | P. 

74,363 

3,605 

Place,) H. 

53,718 

2,818 

Planiden, A D. 

58,367 

10,176 

Plant, A. 

69,834 

168 

Plant, J E. 

53,720 

5,842 

Plater, S A. 

61,820 

1,228 

’last. G H. 

.... 103,465 

4,521 

3 latt, N C. 

55,243 


■’latteel, F. 

71,623 

6,396 

Peasants, D V. 

50,518 

6,430 

•"leasants, j. 

54,183 

2,640 

Peasants, L W. 

51,032 


•’lecas, B. 

55,525 

4,776 

3 letz, J A G. 

56,477 

3,709 

^lewes, R K. 

57,053 

306 

’lotnikoff, J P. 

66,613 

8,357 

’lottel, M). 

59,050 

4,994 

’lunkett, PA. 

71,682 

1,933 

’obran, T T. 

53,771 

4,463 

‘odgorenko, L. 

56,477 

150 

’oeschek, G L. 

50,478 

2,034 

’oets, R F. 

61,115 

882 

’offenroth, G G. 

55,854 

2,745 

’ogson, W). 

75,801 

3,240 

’ohl, N W. 

56,497 

93 

’oirier, G. 

50,952 

1,020 

'oirier, L J. 

51,277 

1,708 

'oirier, M. 

60,588 

10,314 

'oitras, J . 

50,306 


ojar, J J. 

69,813 

4,090 

oje, DA. 

62,369 

325 

oland, P T. 

54,452 




Salary 

Travel 


Salary 


$ 

$ 


$ 

Polanska, B. 

53,691 

2,017 

Preston, D. 

53,771 

Polden, A C. 

53,322 


Preston, G S. 

52,478 

Poliquin, R D. 

67,910 

8,159 

Preston, L. 

51,937 

Polischuk, D. 

55,553 


Preston, T H. 

50,478 

Pollack,) C. 

60,604 

4,095 

Preston, T W. 

56,151 

Poliak, SC. 

56,553 

7,604 

Preto, VAG. 

71,682 

Pollard, A R. 

60,497 

2,032 

Prevett, D. 

88,649 

Pollard, D. 

51,998 

6,613 

Preyde, AM. 

66,613 

Pollard, J T. 

91,425 

9,485 

Price, B. 

66,052 

Pollard, J V. 

50,953 

1,921 

Price, C A. 

63,617 

Pollard, R. 

68,604 

1,475 

Price, C B. 

59,010 

Pollard, S M. 

54,233 


Price, C L. 

53,747 

Pollen, W. 

57,632 


Price, E S. 

83,267 

Pol 1 itt, K]. 

55,815 


Price, G D. 

75,801 

Pollock, B L. 

66,613 

8,938 

Price, G R. 

52,596 

Pollock, T. 

66,613 

14,915 

Price, I B. 

92,964 

Polowek, K. 

53,938 

295 

Price, J E. 

59,499 

Polysou, N C. 

66,613 

8,480 

Price, K. 

61,500 

Pomajzl, V. 

56,553 

1,281 

Price, L D. 

60,527 

Pomerleau, R. 

62,269 

1,020 

Price, M A. 

51,317 

Pommen, L W. 

56,553 

720 

Price, MS. 

59,496 

Pond, L. 

67,609 

2,703 

Price, R F B. 

53,771 

Poohachoff, W B. 

65,532 

6,511 

Price, W. 

50,519 

Pool, P D. 

69,357 

5,277 

Price, W. 

56,477 

Poole, K E. 

50,521 

2,141 

Price, W A. 

60,078 

Poole, S |. 

51,693 

66 

Priebatsch, P E. 

53,772 

Poole, V N. 

82,192 

6,429 

Prill, R A. 

54,408 

Poon, S. 

56,477 

111 

Prime, L A. 

53,037 

Pope, D. 

60,604 

995 

Pringle, A R. 

73,080 

Pope, D). 

69,357 

1,794 

Pringle,).. 

73,673 

Pope, W C. 

50,157 

1,419 

Pringle, T L. 

91,231 

Popham, R A. 

54,479 

151 

Prins, R J. 

56,309 

Porcher, J. 

50,275 

1,837 

Prinsze, M W. 

62,230 

Porcheron, R M. 

56,926 

6,709 

Pritchard, M B. 

53,372 

Porcina, R A. 

63,627 

5,013 

Pritchard, R. 

50,091 

Porritt, B. 

62,246 

1,119 

Profili, W. 

56,272 

Porteous, L A. 

76,156 

981 

Prokop, R G. 

65,845 

Porter, B J. 

53,771 


Pronk, M B. 

51,362 

Porter, C. 

.56,477 

2,580 

Pronker, V. 

56,564 

Porter, D D. 

51,882 

1,436 

Prosser, B. 

56,126 

Portree,) D. 

58,824 

4,186 

Prosser, K A. 

53,127 

Posgate, L. 

67,801 

6,331 

Proudfoot, M A. 

66,613 

Post, R. 

65,132 

4,384 

Proudfoot, MM. 

53,750 

Postl, W. 

52,098 

546 

Proulx, G C G. 

65,461 

Potoma, F S. 

50,478 

2,900 

Prouten, ) D. 

51,617 

Potter, N L. 

50,739 

2,837 

Prowse, DC. 

76,156 

Potter, RE. 

66,613 

1,980 

Proznick, N. 

58,147 

Pottinger, J. 

76,156 

2,772 

Prue, K. 

67,084 

Poulos, G). 

53,771 

354 

Pryce, C J. 

56,553 

Poulsen, E M. 

50,511 

2,570 

Prysiazny, D. 

58,478 

Poulton, M). 

82,173 

5,555 

Prysiazny, L. 

57,521 

Pousette, J G. 

58,973 

1,322 

Puetz, R W. 

51,804 

Poutney, R G. 

66,613 

5,790 

Puggioni, G. 

50,373 

Pow, D J. 

64,863 

5,703 

Puhallo, W P. 

68,043 

Powel, B E. 

65,329 

675 

Puls, R. 

53,771 

Powell, B. 

54,341 

162 

Punshon, J A. 

50,806 

Powell, C. 

50,710 


Purdy, D G. 

54,452 

Powell, C T. 

50,478 

4,422 

Purssell, N. 

56,366 

Powell, D F. 

63,574 

1,785 

Purvis, M D. 

58,596 

Powell, G W. 

61,826 

2,071 

Puskaric, J. 

67,433 

Powell, H G. 

94,580 

246 

Puttonen, P K. 

64,863 

Powell, J A. 

59,118 

134 

Pye, 1. 

50,616 

Powell,) S. 

83,267 

6,171 

Pyper,). 

66,275 

Powell, N J. 

60,200 

42 

Pysden, R B. 

61,024 

Power, C B. 

53,749 

9,223 

Quackenbush, P A. 

50,478 

Power, C G. 

53,771 

779 

Quackenbush, W. 

52,038 

Power, F). 

52,405 

318 

Quan, K F. 

55,023 

Power, J. 

52,734 

2,645 

Quan, S. 

54,177 

Powley, W. 

50,425 

1,838 

Quarless, G. 

63,289 

Poznikoff, F F. 

58,394 

5,396 

Quaroni, V. 

66,613 

Prasad,A . 

56,966 

5,050 

Quartermain, M C. 

75,401 

Prasad, M. 

50,684 


Quesnel, A A. 

54,773 

Pratt, B. 

53,272 

388 

Quian, G G. 

54,859 

Pratt, H. 

50,478 

1,891 

Quibell, R A. 

66,613 

Pratt, LAS. 

60,265 

4,528 

Quilter, R L. 

50,478 

Pratt, MC. 

67,501 

5,768 

Quinn, M|. 

65,562 

Pratt, R. 

50,877 

3,763 

Quinn, M ). 

50,478 

Pratt, W A. 

59,294 


Quinn, N. 

62,269 

Preddy, K P. 

50,048 

986 

Quinn, W A. 

52,800 

Prelusky, A G. 

66,613 

3,046 

Quinn, W E. 

61,038 

Prentice, W. 

56,477 

1,569 

Raappana, T. 

51,685 


D 43 


Travel 

$ 

310 

754 

1,740 

5,826 

608 

4,599 

8,275 

313 

1,355 

375 

1,191 

10,096 

1,942 

6,756 

9,397 

334 

6,906 

4,088 

492 

2,272 

1,916 

555 

13,216 

3,093 

49 

9,393 
1,132 
15,142 
711 
4,364 
3,125 
77 
2,969 
5,327 

2,765 


2,908 

2,469 

90 

2,400 

1,112 

2,482 

919 

1,818 

2,187 

6,118 

36 

1,884 

2.850 

5,144 

9,768 

4,354 

28,450 

1,424 

5,575 

130 

2,547 

177 

4,941 

3,148 

1.851 
2,695 
8,766 
3,461 
5,365 
2,346 

5,580 

4,021 




























































































































































































































































D 44 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Other Employees —Continued 



Salary 

Travel 


Salary 

Travel 


Salary 

Travel 


$ 

$ 


$ 

$ 


$ 

$ 

Raatz, R D. 

52,881 


Redburn,) W. 

52,836 

275 

Reynolds, S G. 

55,187 

3,144 

Raby, S. 

50,684 


Reddin,) L. 

58,525 

12,802 

Reznechenko, C 1. 

54,218 

7,579 

Rachwalski, M. 

54,842 

4,541 

Redding, G. 

56,477 

84 

Rhebergen, G F. 

61,463 

1,236 

Racine, R M. 

68,575 

5,333 

Redding, M E. 

68,814 

6,143 

Rhodes, J W. 

56,523 

137 

Radchenko, G J. 

50,685 

108 

Redecopp, M L. 

52,242 

9,735 

Rhodes, S N. 

56,477 

3,136 

Radford, E. 

56,175 

12,293 

Redekopp, E W. 

77,100 


Rhymer, D W. 

53,860 

2,178 

Radloff, B). 

60,024 

3,000 

Redenbach, F G. 

57,570 


Rice, G A. 

51,141 

2,456 

Rae, L C. 

50,809 

639 

Redford, D ). 

77,377 

2,457 

Rice,) M. 

50,478 

3,583 

Rae, LI. 

62,269 

6,103 

Redford, J W. 

71,682 

2,766 

Rice, S D. 

57,757 

2,247 

Raffan, A I. 

50,295 

2,268 

Redivo, M. 

73,867 

1,821 

Rich, D). 

50,560 

4,523 

Rafferty, P. 

71,682 

2,196 

Redman, D. 

50,721 


Richard, G. 

50,825 

150 

Ragan, L. 

53,668 

86 

Redman, E C. 

66,613 

2,518 

Richard, L S. 

52,075 


Ragsdale, R. 

52,461 

7,793 

Redmond, R J. 

54,060 


Richards, C E. 

59,051 

2,101 

Rail, S. 

61,679 

1,117 

Redwood, M R. 

56,477 

4,573 

Richards, G A. 

56,477 

35 

Raine, R I. 

62,078 

10,972 

Reed, G E. 

60,666 

5,108 

Richards,). 

55,701 

404 

Rainer, D. 

59,599 


Reed, G G. 

60,917 

6,577 

Richards,). 

69,177 


Rak, B]. 

50,478 


Rees, A). 

62,269 

2,067 

Richards, N. 

50,835 


Ralph, EG. 

50,478 

7,433 

Reese, J. 

53,540 


Richards, R. 

74,007 

511 

Ralph, G. 

51,285 


Regier, B V. 

53,961 

1,341 

Richards, R G. 

60,527 

1,258 

Ralph, R R. 

50,478 

4,804 

Regimbald, D. 

54,706 

221 

Richards, R P. 

56,553 

3,242 

Ralston, D E. 

62,209 

312 

Regnerus, R. 

54,045 

291 

Richards, S J. 

69,357 

79 

Ralston, R S. 

52,074 

3,449 

Rehsler, P R. 

59,657 

13,986 

Richardson, C. 

71,119 

107 

Ram, S. 

94,184 


Rei, J. 

50,478 

1,934 

Richardson, D W. 

64,773 

968 

Ramer, D. 

63,260 

522 

Reich, C D G. 

63,620 

9,254 

Richardson, |. 

52,970 

4,207 

Ramer, D. 

68,183 


Reich, R W. 

60,353 

2,654 

Richardson,) A. 

55,922 

10,815 

Ramin, | E. 

55,694 

155 

Reichenback, G H. 

60,523 

1,102 

Richardson, J A G. 

71,682 

4,550 

Ramsay, C). 

57,259 

52 

Reicker, T E. 

56,502 

1,921 

Richardson, K S. 

60,497 

6,523 

Ramsay, DM. 

51,951 

1,106 

Reicker-Tice, B. 

50,478 

4,658 

Richardson, R B. 

67,228 

1,920 

Ramsay, G. 

53,771 

401 

Reid, B ]. 

53,771 

957 

Richardson, S. 

53,470 

1,522 

Ramsay, G. 

58,116 

240 

Reid, C. 

50,234 

133 

Riches, R. 

62,269 

1,984 

Ramsden, E E. 

50,684 

657 

Reid, C N. 

50,732 


Richet, S. 

56,477 


Ramsey, D J. 

58,575 


Reid, D. 

64,863 

2,706 

Richkum, R W. 

60,381 

419 

Rana, P S. 

57,289 

1,185 

Reid, DJ. 

51,218 

19 

Richmond, A. 

60,927 

2,308 

Rand, D. 

56,477 


Reid, DS. 

53,950 

2,025 

Richmond, A C. 

71,793 

6,112 

Randall, A D. 

64,863 

2,700 

Reid, G E. 

59,136 

2,767 

Richmond, B. 

56,408 

175 

Randall, I ]. 

56,282 

60 

Reid, ] A. 

54,699 

1,927 

Richmond, J. 

71,621 

310 

Randall, W. 

53,600 


Reid, L J. 

50,478 

139 

Richter, E R. 

63,819 

268 

Rankin, L. 

56,891 

2,475 

Reid, N. 

50,355 

1,824 

Richter, K J. 

54,793 

14,268 

Rankin, M W. 

57,839 

218 

Reid, P D. 

50,961 

1,962 

Richter, MS. 

54,106 

295 

Ransford, W W. 

56,477 


Reid, R. 

50,478 

475 

Ricketts, G A. 

66,203 

569 

Ransom, L. 

52,397 

250 

Reid, R. 

55,283 


Riddoch, E |. 

65,727 

107 

Ranson, D N. 

57,398 

2,089 

Reid, R A. 

50,699 

4,221 

Ridings, T). 

60,568 


Ranson, H R. 

61,826 

180 

Reid, RT. 

57,289 

4,782 

Rieberger, D. 

51,661 


Ranson,) A. 

50,684 


Reid, RT. 

55,078 

1,889 

Riedler, H M. 

69,053 

365 

Ranson, P. 

68,373 

1,152 

Reid, S. 

54,924 

645 

Rieger, G. 

67,900 


Ranta, D D. 

69,210 

36 

Reid, S P. 

50,901 

550 

Riendeau, D W. 

56,205 

2,462 

Raper, B 1. 

50,684 

1,431 

Reid, T. 

71,623 

2,305 

Riesterer, J. 

58,977 


Raper, W G. 

62,315 

1,240 

Reilly, K. 

61,679 

236 

Rigler, A K. 

50,004 


Raphael, K. 

54,303 

1,039 

Reilly, M. 

90,880 

577 

Rikley, B V. 

60,790 

18,036 

Rasi, A. 

65,987 


Reimche, R W. 

56,477 

11,879 

Riley, R E. 

60,701 


Rasmussen, A G. 

55,051 

128 

Reimer, D L. 

54,371 


Riley, T D. 

57,459 


Rasmussen, R. 

51,779 

8,919 

Reimer, E H. 

58,482 

1,556 

Rimer, M. 

70,397 

4,874 

Ratcliff, D P. 

57,289 

940 

Reimer, G A. 

83,267 

12,141 

Ringrose, J H. 

50,424 

4,465 

Ratclit'fe, J V. 

66,613 

417 

Reimer, J. 

59,999 


Ringstad, N R. 

86,601 

26,511 

Ratcliffe-Hood, H. 

54,575 

7,111 

Reimer, L L. 

51,507 

7,911 

Riou, A E. 

62,269 

351 

Ratel, A. 

71,682 

381 

Reimer, M O. 

79,947 

12,318 

Riplinger, W. 

54,526 


Ratel, J W. 

61,679 


Reimer, R J. 

82,739 

573 

Rippon, R A. 

69,288 

8,953 

Ratel, P. 

51,876 

551 

Reiner, H J R. 

68,595 

2,462 

Risby, S O. 

56,477 

2,383 

Rathbone, G C. 

62,913 

1,028 

Reinheimer, D C. 

66,609 

859 

Riseborough, W M. 

63,051 

18,382 

Rathbone, R. 

64,352 

39 

Reinstein, M. 

61,110 


Rissling,) P. 

53,710 

1,263 

Rattan, A. 

66,613 


Rejminiak, D. 

58,724 

250 

Ritchie, D. 

68,458 

876 

Rattray, R. 

52,636 

11,397 

Rekart, M L. 

.. 108,508 

448 

Ritchie, D C. 

53,771 

2,471 

Raven, D |. 

83,322 

2,111 

Reksten, D E. 

64,137 

37 

Rivard,J. 

50,937 

1,180 

Ravenstein, K. 

51,707 

4,766 

Relkov, W G. 

54,995 

6,457 

Rivard, M. 

54,909 


Rawling, G. 

62,038 

1,009 

Remedios, 11 A. 

54,532 


Rivard, R. 

57,345 

70 

Rawluk, S. 

50,465 

502 

Rempel, T. 

54,240 


Roach, D. 

50,478 

5,933 

Rawlyk, T. 

51,969 


Rendell, B. 

88,649 

5,074 

Roadhouse, B C. 

60,505 

1,118 

Ray, G E. 

63,019 

3,601 

Rendle, G A. 

64,521 


Roark, T D. 

59,136 

1,967 

Ray, H V. 

59,723 

270 

Renholm, M Y. 

54,684 


Robb, DA. 

66,613 

8,089 

Ray, PC. 

50,976 

910 

Rennie, E M. 

61,679 

2,422 

Robb, R H. 

60,604 

860 

Raymer, B H. 

53,289 

9,131 

Rennie, P G. 

60,144 

1,603 

Robbins, C. 

56,477 

3,294 

Raymond, A M. 

66,613 

4,949 

Rensby, D F. 

51,939 

1,307 

Robbins, G. 

58,374 


Rayner, B. 

60,659 


Renshaw, L. 

50,451 

1,399 

Robbins, H S. 

50,684 


Rayner, R. 

50,660 

89 

Resh, L W. 

64,863 

524 

Robbins, M A. 

56,553 

1,614 

Read, BA. 

79,123 

7,180 

Restall, L L. 

62,269 

1,394 

Robbins, R L. 

50,429 

3,062 

Read, DVP. 

55,820 

1,348 

Restall, S B. 

52,134 


Robbins, S L. 

69,447 

988 

Reader, N G. 

51,102 


Reuther, B. 

62,269 

150 

Robek, D. 

55,489 

4,625 

Reader, R. 

67,963 

6,197 

Revak, S T. 

54,470 

4,571 

Roberge, L R. 

57,689 

4,636 

Reading, R. 

52,369 

867 

Reveley, H C. 

66,055 

5,478 

Roberge, R F. 

52,098 

1,065 

Reay, K. 

51,428 

2,916 

Reykdal, | A. 

62,269 

8,158 

Roberts, B. 

56,477 

2,525 

Rebagliati, DA. 

56,000 

4,018 

Reynolds, R G. 

70,882 

765 

Roberts, DA. 

56,020 

























































































































































































































































PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


D 45 



Salary 

Travel 


Salary 

Travel 


Salary 

Travel 


$ 

$ 


$ 

$ 


$ 

$ 

Roberts, DC. 

66,613 

11,340 

Romanko, CM. 

73,180 


Rush, E. 

54,783 

2,908 

Roberts, G A. 

83,267 

5,221 

Romano, R R. 

82,296 


Rushworth, D M. 

64,831 

6,642 

Roberts, H W. 

56,816 

1,631 

Romanow, M L. 

73,398 

15,853 

Rusman, F R. 

74,727 

590 

Roberts, I. 

50,726 


Romer, D. 

53,280 


Russell, B W. 

54,147 

2,338 

Roberts, M. 

59,136 

1,389 

Romine, S. 

51,965 


Russell, C. 

51,055 


Roberts, R H. 

77,474 

2,865 

Ronayne, F B. 

62,269 

54 

Russell, D L. 

58,124 

4,475 

Roberts, S ]. 

61,654 

865 

Rondeau, R. 

77,474 

1,977 

Russell, D V. 

54,644 

1,667 

Roberts, S ). 

61,896 

968 

Ronnenberg, B E. 

62,725 


Russell, D W. 

63,653 

3,183 

Roberts, T. 

72,507 

4,678 

Ronneseth, L T. 

66,613 

71 

Russell, J E. 

67,922 

2,274 

Roberts, W. 

51,667 

87 

Ronse, E ). 

62,412 

993 

Russell, J H. 

64,863 

4,959 

Robertsen, CM. 

55,970 

16,919 

Rooke, H A. 

50,879 

294 

Russell, P G. 

62,269 

311 

Robertson, A. 

95,497 

9,107 

Rooney, E K. 

70,473 

2,585 

Russell, R. 

60,579 


Robertson, B. 

63,949 

500 

Roper, C C. 

51,650 

3,508 

Russell, R J. 

53,771 


Robertson, B W. 

50,478 

183 

Rosby, J A. 

51,626 


Russell, S A. 

70,723 

1,995 

Robertson, D. 

50,421 


Rose, A A. 

55,274 

287 

Russell, S G. 

53,507 

6,956 

Robertson, D. 

57,008 


Rose, R D. 

76,037 


Russell, T. 

77,474 

1,459 

Robertson, D N. 

62,269 

883 

Rose, W D. 

55,759 

14,104 

Rustad, K. 

65,488 


Robertson, D S. 

50,478 

1,050 

Roseboom, MW. 

50,568 

4,786 

Rutherford, A. 

50,478 

421 

Robertson, C R. 

61,642 

12 

Rosenau, M L. 

52,389 

6,984 

Rutherford, M H. 

50,276 


Robertson, 1. 

63,949 

478 

Rosher, D. 

51,818 

3,771 

Rutkauskas, LA. 

56,477 

3,396 

Robertson, j. 

52,866 

946 

Rosin, H F. 

51,098 

195 

Rutledge, G C. 

52,129 

2,642 

Robertson,). 

50,260 

47 

Ross, AC. 

76,863 

757 

Rutledge, R. 

64,177 

3,959 

Robertson,) D. 

55,081 

10,891 

Ross, A F. 

... 106,175 

6,646 

Rutley, L. 

61,822 

907 

Robertson, I P. 

66,613 

5,676 

Ross, A R. 

52,421 

1,494 

Ruttan, R G. 

65,927 


Robertson, IS. 

71,682 

7,603 

Ross, BA. 

60,527 

2,399 

Ryan, B D. 

64,863 

4,066 

Robertson, K. 

52,044 

6,213 

Ross, B C. 

53,771 

2,005 

Ryan, E J. 

80,409 

21,092 

Robertson, L M. 

56,179 

5,620 

Ross, D. 

69,351 


Ryan, G. 

63,401 

7,083 

Robertson, L R. 

62,117 

3,955 

Ross, J A. 

53,507 


Ryan, HA. 

62,269 

4,490 

Robertson, M F. 

50,128 

1,923 

Ross, J J. 

57,762 


Ryder, S. 

57,072 


Robertson, R. 

64,530 

293 

Ross,) P. 

51,032 

3,076 

Rye, B E. 

70,384 

30 

Robertson, S. 

74,449 

1,821 

Ross, K. 

67,853 


Rye, M. 

70,449 


Robertson, S. 

51,776 


Ross, M A. 

61,690 

657 

Ryneveld, D. 

.... 162,009 

5,555 

Robertson, S J M. 

50,729 

527 

Ross, M E I. 

65,041 

224 

Saari, D E. 

51,434 

3,560 

Robertson, T. 

55,976 


Ross, M ) E. 

64,615 

2,276 

Sabourin, W. 

52,398 

459 

Robertson, T H. 

50,470 

2,032 

Ross, R N. 

50,971 

767 

Sabyan, R J. 

57,234 

141 

Robins, S A. 

78,150 

2,128 

Ross, S E. 

62,269 

1,017 

Sadler, BA. 

74,939 

1,414 

Robinson, A M. 

70,187 

3,619 

Ross-Smith, D G. 

62,269 

3,130 

Sadler, B M. 

51,746 


Robinson, B T H. 

57,132 

1,147 

Rossander, A. 

74,728 

170 

Sadler, E A. 

60,604 

8,618 

Robinson, C. 

55,334 

6,296 

Rossell, C. 

53,771 

3,125 

Sadler, F M. 

59,978 

807 

Robinson, J D. 

58,426 


Rossley, j L. 

71,682 

8,651 

Sadowski, R. 

72,402 


Robinson,) C. 

63,598 


Rossmo, M R. 

53,771 


Sage, G D. 

59,136 

923 

Robinson, J H. 

60,604 

791 

Roter, L. 

53,714 

20 

Sager, 1). 

71,982 

322 

Robinson, M). 

52,498 

7,050 

Rothenberg, R G. 

56,120 

2,229 

Sager, ]. 

58,804 

218 

Robinson, P P. 

59,406 

898 

Rothwell, E S. 

82,413 

8,218 

Sahota, G S. 

50,290 

4,202 

Robinson, T R. 

66,895 

9,690 

Roueche, K L. 

62,269 

6,958 

Sahota, S S. 

58,112 

20 

Robinson, W. 

69,737 

229 

Rounds, R 1. 

53,772 

4,479 

Said, F B. 

55,043 

1,905 

Robson, A. 

51,579 

3,868 

Rourke, C. 

55,487 


Sailes, P. 

59,022 

1,198 

Rocchini, R). 

59,443 


Roussinos, L. 

63,318 

15,205 

Saito, C. 

50,051 


Roch, C. 

62,150 

9,391 

Roussy, J. 

50,136 


Sajko, M. 

52,417 

1,299 

Roche,) S. 

82,984 

2,382 

Routledge, R W. 

50,478 

1,431 

Sajko, S. 

62,694 

2,270 

Rockerbie, K. 

56,477 

558 

Rowan, C. 

61,975 

9,082 

Sajoo, Z. 

53,875 


Rockett, F R. 

50,424 


Rowan, F M. 

76,156 

231 

Sakalauskas, A. 

95,576 

10,103 

Rockwell, F S. 

.... 101,346 

1,984 

Rowbottom, B A. 

56,261 


Sakiyama, S. 

56,553 

1,898 

Rockwell, 1 L. 

53,771 

2,735 

Rowe, G A. 

62,269 

1,078 

Saklikar, R. 

65,593 

9,890 

Rockwell, R J. 

50,505 

1,137 

Rowe, G D. 

50,478 

2,710 

Salem, M 1. 

62,269 

2,440 

Rodenburgh, H. 

74,791 

123 

Rowe, K A. 

57,646 

1,251 

Salem, R. 

56,130 

7,588 

Rodgers, BRA. 

50,646 


Rowe, K R. 

63,490 

2,233 

Sales, A. 

53,974 

160 

Rodgers, D W. 

52,152 


Rowe, S. 

52,973 

405 

Salewski, W. 

54,172 

950 

Rodier, P. 

53,022 


Rowe, S M. 

50,844 

3,230 

Salkeld, S. 

62,797 

535 

Rodine, A. 

51,659 

1,099 

Rowe, T. 

62,269 

2,823 

Salkeld, T H. 

65,886 

7,391 

Rodrigue, R. 

57,349 

3,176 

Rowley, A. 

76,156 

390 

Salmon, C. 

66,613 

2,537 

Rodrigues, M. 

53,771 


Rowling, 1 W. 

64,562 


Salzl, M R. 

55,454 

1,557 

Roemer, H L. 

53,771 

4,577 

Roy, P. 

67,451 

23,268 

Sam 1 |r. 

56,591 

215 

Roest, B M. 

65,132 


Roy, T. 

70,991 

5,322 

Samija, D. 

58,535 

1,228 

Rogers, C). 

61,679 

2,110 

Royer, C. 

51,445 

694 

Sample, D J. 

56,354 

553 

Rogers,) A. 

60,974 

4,319 

Ruault, A. 

76,382 

2,487 

Sampson, W B. 

82,842 

15,585 

Rogers,) A. 

59,895 

946 

Rubidge, N. 

83,267 


Samson, D. 

56,452 

596 

Rogers,) P 1. 

66,613 

5,029 

Rucker, P J. 

51,683 

803 

Samson, N W. 

62,508 

1,322 

Rogers, R. 

50,333 

2,156 

Rucki,). 

56,850 


Sanatani, R. 

59,336 

1,502 

Rogers, R. 

62,250 

4,097 

Rudson, A. 

57,157 

1,660 

Sanborn, P T. 

60,527 

4,668 

Rogers, R C. 

52,550 

1,523 

Rueger, P W. 

51,033 

69 

Sanchez, E. 

53,780 

3,159 

Rogers, WE. 

59,136 

1,713 

Ruhl, D. 

64,845 

5,241 

Sandborn, C. 

54,993 

972 

Roggeveen, L M . 

61,458 


Ruisaard, D A. 

57,289 


Sanders, E B. 

53,326 

14,056 

Rohan, H). 

51,769 

1,348 

Ruiter, PH. 

55,660 

1,336 

Sanders, M). 

56,553 

2,017 

Rolf, C A. 

81,417 

10,630 

Rullens, D). 

59,136 


Sanders, P L. 

50,490 


Rollerson, T P. 

62,887 

5,500 

Rumsey, SC. 

... 100,458 

1,204 

Sanderson, A. 

83,267 

12,837 

Rollin, R P. 

53,038 

7,098 

Rundle, G R. 

57,335 

408 

Sanderson, C. 

50,995 

921 

Rollins, D. 

63,521 

207 

Rupert, W. 

53,669 

396 

Sanderson, G L. 

66,613 

3,383 

Rolph, G. 

55,465 


Rupp, S. 

55,931 


Sanderson, R. 

51,315 


Romanaki, B L. 

56,455 

359 

Ruse, DM. 

57,839 

316 

Sanderson, S K. 

56,477 

639 

Romaniw, A. 

59,136 

3,048 

Rush, B. 

62,660 


Sandever, | R. 

71,682 

5,587 

























































































































































































































































D 46 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Other Employees —Continued 



Salary 

Travel 


Salary 

Travel 


Salary 

Travel 


$ 

$ 


$ 

$ 


$ 

$ 

Sandhu, B S. 

59,952 

8,432 

Schmidt,) S. 

73,945 

6,576 

Seip, D R. 

59,136 

6,913 

Sandhu,) C. 

61,715 

60 

Schmidt, P G. 

57,289 


Seivewright, S G. 

61,441 

398 

Sandhu, M. 

65,612 

2,659 

Schmidt, R ). 

56,315 

2,640 

Sekhon, P. 

65,281 

8,203 

Sandhu, M K. 

50,684 


Schmidt, W. 

62,269 

5,543 

Seline, P. 

61,677 


Sandhu, N K. 

60,605 

2,148 

Schmitt, H R. 

60,178 

2,116 

Seller, L A. 

64,400 

12,313 

Sandhu, S. 

50,333 

555 

Schmitz, W M. 

66,613 

1,250 

Sellgren, T A. 

74,727 

1,764 

Sandquist, C H. 

67,015 

3,805 

Schmor, C. 

51,735 


Sellwood, R J. 

50,379 


Sands, D I. 

56,553 

3,756 

Schmor, G. 

55,423 


Semenoff, J. 

66,613 

3,390 

Sanford, D. 

54,563 

1,257 

Schneider, | W. 

65,825 


Semenoff, P. 

50,478 

3,017 

Sang, R. 

52,036 


Schofield, D. 

76,569 

1,979 

Semere, B. 

60,346 

4,316 

Santano, L. 

52,285 

1,721 

Schofield, S A. 

50,837 


Senger, J. 

51,213 


Santosham, T V. 

59,530 

250 

Schoof, R W. 

56,553 

324 

Sentes,). 

65,618 


Sanzovo, M L. 

58,044 

4,684 

Schop, I. 

51,149 

1,387 

Senum, S A. 

56,884 

4,165 

Sapergia, M K. 

51,214 

2,394 

Schorn, G F G. 

57,839 

5,999 

Sept, EL. 

60,510 

1,550 

Sapinsky, L L. 

50,478 

298 

Schornagel, D B. 

50,478 

3,513 

Sepulveda, M. 

62,269 

1,305 

Saretsky, ] M. 

50,393 


Schramm, T R. 

66,940 

4,166 

Sera, R A. 

62,269 

3,142 

Sargent, S H. 

61,792 

494 

Schroeder, D). 

50,438 

2,585 

Sereda, J A. 

61,024 

657 

Sarsiat, D C. 

53,694 

6,928 

Schroeter, G. 

65,510 


Seredynski, G. 

58,286 


Sartisohn, W C. 

50,478 

3,009 

Schroeter, T G. 

64,863 

8,461 

Serr, B. 

50,684 

58 

Sasaki, H W. 

71,682 

10,359 

Schubert, C. 

78,715 


Serraglio, W. 

50,827 

1,284 

Sasaki, R K. 

56,831 

900 

Schuckel, V M. 

50,667 

1,831 

Service, C. 

60,509 


Sather, L. 

55,362 

762 

Schulte, D A. 

50,533 

1,888 

Serviss, D. 

57,221 


Saunders, ED. 

53,459 

1,881 

Schultes, T. 

80,547 


Seto, D. 

60,881 

6,619 

Saunders, EL. 

56,477 

1,924 

Schultz, B. 

59,293 


Seto, J. 

56,232 

29 

Saunders, C. 

52,660 


Schultz, B S. 

50,478 

1,800 

Setzer, L. 

56,477 

1,051 

Saunders, M. 

54,682 


Schultz, E W. 

62,269 

2,304 

Severinsen, B. 

68,183 

866 

Saunders, N. 

50,720 


Schultz, F. 

66,613 

7,406 

Severyn, B ). 

56,477 

4,559 

Saunders, R H. 

50,712 

6 

Schultz, R D. 

66,613 

201 

Seward, P. 

62,934 


Saunders, S. 

61,435 

971 

Schultz, R L. 

77,967 

5,165 

Seward, T L. 

60,995 

1,024 

Saunders, V. 

55,158 


Schulz, E. 

50,478 

645 

Sewell, P A. 

51,308 

2,037 

Sauve, M A. 

51,013 

653 

Schuring, R j. 

56,477 

31 

Seyfort, B M. 

62,530 

2,860 

Savage, B R. 

56,619 


Schwab,) W. 

64,978 

3,868 

Seymour, M). 

50,726 


Savage, C. 

59,136 

3,831 

Schwantje, H M. 

60,666 

12,063 

Shah, H N. 

66,613 

874 

Savage, R A. 

55,056 

1,642 

Schwartz, E. 

50,478 

102 

Shalkowsky,)). 

74,185 

1,232 

Saville,). 

59,136 

1,499 

Schwartz, H. 

64,530 


Shames, P L. 

50,478 

799 

Saville, R P M. 

57,919 

5,671 

Schwartz, P. 

56,941 

560 

Shamtanis, N. 

53,181 

808 

Savoy, T. 

51,743 


Schwarz, E. 

72,486 

1,103 

Shantz, C. 

77,474 

5,020 

Savoy, V A. 

57,331 


Schwarz, H W. 

82,668 

292 

Sharda, R K. 

56,683 

3,086 

Sawatzky, D S. 

51,775 

20,417 

Schwarz, M. 

74,562 


Sharkey, W). 

62,269 

1,830 

Sawatzky, R F. 

58,246 


Schweitzer, D G. 

55,055 

451 

Sharlow, S. 

58,217 


Sawayama, C T. 

77,474 

2,872 

Schwermer, J. 

50,201 


Sharma, N. 

57,751 

5,418 

Sawchuk, T A. 

51,738 

3,573 

Scigliano, B. 

69,166 

4,001 

Sharpe, D G. 

52,136 

1,183 

Sawich,) A. 

57,611 

38 

Scobie, G. 

71,682 

4,377 

Sharpe, 1 D. 

53,791 

2,413 

Sawoniak, J1. 

50,478 

4,901 

Scofield, B T. 

56,477 

3,792 

Sharpe, J F. 

50,684 


Sawyer, R G. 

60,498 

10,802 

Scofield, K). 

70,782 

2,243 

Sharpe, R M. 

50,684 

538 

Saxby, K D. 

66,806 

11,302 

Scott, AM. 

50,425 


Sharpe, ST. 

59,994 

11,527 

Saxena, K M S. 

61,044 

783 

Scott, B W. 

54,345 

1,271 

Shavalier, D N. 

50,478 

3,095 

Say, DM. 

51,991 

1,221 

Scott, C. 

53,432 


Shaw, A P. 

55,969 

501 

Sayle,) A. 

65,569 

2,557 

Scott, C. 

64,475 


Shaw, B. 

52,502 

111 

Sayson, W. 

65,518 

490 

Scott, D). 

52,028 

3,410 

Shaw, BA. 

73,180 


Scale, W M. 

83,267 

1,508 

Scott, E. 

58,208 


Shaw, C E. 

53,771 


Scaletta, G. 

59,136 

2,495 

Scott, G A. 

54,571 


Shaw, DA. 

66,613 

1,281 

Scarth, S. 

76,156 

639 

Scott, G R. 

59,136 

1,837 

Shaw, D L. 

66,613 

16,243 

Schacke, S. 

53,068 

7,755 

Scott,) R. 

56,477 

5,240 

Shaw, D L. 

65,455 


Schacter, N D. 

77,569 

10,735 

Scott, M. 

59,644 

1,922 

Shaw, E A. 

53,061 

2,646 

Schaefer,). 

54,294 


Scott, M E E. 

60,497 

7,861 

Shaw, |. 

54,664 

1,920 

Schaffner, D. 

72,826 

381 

Scott, MG. 

62,269 


Shaw, K D. 

50,478 

207 

Schafthuizen, R). 

59,833 

2,921 

Scott, PM. 

50,616 

149 

Shaw, M. 

62,269 

2,565 

Scharien, T. 

74,720 


Scott, R. 

57,300 

286 

Shaw, M A. 

51,352 

2,617 

Schaufele, L G. 

50,684 

146 

Scott, R L. 

56,553 

4,432 

Shaw, P. 

51,234 


Scheer, R D. 

50,478 

2,521 

Scott, W R. 

56,062 

465 

Shaw, P. 

65,814 


Scheiber, A. 

56,152 

13,515 

Scott-Miller, C. 

51,533 


Shaw, W C. 

50,478 

1,209 

Scheideman, C E. 

59,788 


Scribilo, D. 

62,269 

6,129 

Shea, CP. 

53,978 

2,186 

Schellenberg, C. 

54,766 

16,078 

Scuka, A V. 

53,457 

1,665 

Shea, J. 

76,027 

167 

Schellenberg, G H. 

73,018 

1,405 

Seagram, N P. 

59,255 

908 

Sheard, WG. 

76,156 

2,175 

Scherzer, M A. 

52,172 


Seal-)ones, G. 

53,771 

18,555 

Shearer, C A. 

71,561 

20,133 

Schiarizza, A P. 

60,527 

3,961 

Seale, T M. 

52,098 

545 

Shearer, C J. 

57,372 


Schick, G E. 

62,269 

2,450 

Sealey, B. 

55,701 

819 

Shearing, C G. 

60,604 

5,694 

Schick, P L. 

51,808 

801 

Sebastian, R. 

51,580 


Sheffield, H. 

62,054 

948 

Schick, RE. 

51,956 

2,680 

Sebellin, P F. 

50,771 

385 

Sheldan, T R. 

71,682 

9,492 

Schien, N W. 

50,999 

3,563 

Sedlack, J P. 

95,669 

2,511 

Sheldon, T. 

73,226 

838 

Schifferns, R. 

60,021 

2,658 

Seefeldt, R L. 

53,221 

2,379 

Sheldon, T W. 

52,098 

739 

Schildroth, J W. 

70,248 

8,809 

Seefried, R D. 

58,726 

1,947 

Sheldrake, C. 

54,715 


Schinbein, |. 

71 407 

4,373 

Seehagel, D B. 

56,493 

247 

Shellborn, R. 

67,674 


Schleppe, D. 



51,193 

307 

Seelig, P. 

52,348 

2,000 

Shelton, D C. 

67,890 


Schleppe, D T. 

50,643 

1,763 

Segate,) M. 

50,304 

1,381 

Shelton, PE. 

67,132 

771 

Schlosser, J W. 

50,771 

467 

Seguin, | H P. 

50,478 

2,632 

Shenkenfelder, R L. 

56,477 


Schmid, C. 

50,315 

1,311 

Sehmi, H. 

56,477 

849 

Shenton,). 

68,701 

250 

Schmidt, E. 

62,269 

1,036 

Seier, F. 

69,128 

24,386 

Shepherd, B G. 

50,972 

780 

Schmidt, F N. 

79,092 

2,338 

Seigers, F. 

64,402 


Shepherd, D W. 

62,269 

6,894 

Schmidt, G W. 

56,477 

1,601 

Seilis, M E. 

57,418 

1,395 

Shepherd, M. 

82,296 



























































































































































































































































PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


D 47 



Salary 

Travel 


Salary 

Travel 


Salary 

Travel 


$ 

$ 


$ 

$ 


$ 

$ 

Shepherd, PM. 

52,769 

357 

Simpson, L M. 

52,180 

1,524 

Smith, B G. 

59,778 

124 

Sheppard, ] A. 

62,269 

5,625 

Simpson, M. 

66,682 

10,307 

Smith, B EH. 

53,175 

474 

Shera, D M. 

88,180 

5,031 

Simpson, R E. 

65,005 

2,231 

Smith, B ). 

51,414 

39 

Shera, R M. 

51,731 


Sims, J. 

59,704 


Smith, B T. 

65,281 

2,355 

Shera, WP. 

^3,801 

7,719 

Sims, R. 

54,677 


Smith, C. 

54,118 


Sheremeta, J M. 

63,139 


Sims, R. 

79,979 


Smith, C. 

61,024 

543 

Sherman, I. 

55,896 

86 

Simson, R C. 

91,231 

1,830 

Smith, C D. 

53,932 

4,073 

Shewchuk, J A. 

68,880 


Simundic, B J. 

50,478 

10,332 

Smith, C E. 

61,101 


Shewchuk, L. 

66,075 

27 

Sinats, K. 

68,183 

773 

Smith, C L. 

54,283 


Shewchuk, N D. 

54,752 

553 

Sinclair, C R. 

53,771 


Smith, D. 

71,682 

1,902 

Shewchuk, S. 

53,642 

3,756 

Sinclair, E G. 

50,920 

4,598 

Smith, D. 

71,112 


Shewchuk, W. 

59,952 

7,250 

Sinclair,) A. 

76,156 

1,588 

Smith, D A. 

56,659 

6,309 

Shiach, R S. 

52,908 


Sinclair, K. 

53,436 

67 

Smith, D D. 

56,073 

230 

Shieh, KWM. 

51,035 

320 

Sinclair, P M. 

62,269 

15,061 

Smith, D G. 

59,764 

1,904 

Shier, DR. 

50,478 

8,735 

Sinclair, S. 

68,564 

8,300 

Smith, D 1. 

62,785 

656 

Shill, BK. 

62,269 

5,722 

Singer, D C. 

60,035 

245 

Smith, D J. 

62,269 


Shillingford, C E. 

53,772 


Singer,) G. 

83,267 

2,146 

Smith, D R. 

52,857 

105 

Shillington, M. 

59,582 


Singer, R. 

87,099 

307 

Smith, D W. 

51,134 


Shilvock, W T. 

60,650 

17,189 

Singh, G. 

54,643 


Smith, D W. 

64,111 

12,674 

Shimizu, R M. 

68,582 


Singh, S. 

63,033 

798 

Smith, E M. 

66,673 

2,911 

Shimmin, R L. 

63,949 

4,905 

Singhera, B. 

57,114 

2,554 

Smith, G. 

58,429 

200 

Shinto, M M. 

66,613 

902 

Sinkwich, | D. 

61,277 

941 

Smith, G. 

55,719 

3,913 

Shipclark, 1. 

61,935 

982 

Sinnen, K L. 

56,421 

1,162 

Smith, G. 

50,478 

665 

Shivji, S. 

61,556 

2,775 

Sirett, B. 

68,232 

572 

Smith, G O. 

63,284 

3,021 

Shobe, M. 

75,244 


Sissons, A. 

53,320 

1,260 

Smith, G R. 

66,613 

6,706 

Shoop, M C. 

77,599 

2,467 

Siu, L Y. 

55,806 

104 

Smith, H. 

51,604 


Shortreed, W. 

65,599 


Skaalid, V M. 

62,269 

2,292 

Smith, 1. 

74,375 

3,807 

Shortt, J C. 

51,796 

3,469 

Skaalrud, C A. 

50,478 

1,913 

Smith, 1 K. 

50,478 


Shovar, W). 

71,383 

9,713 

Skaarup, V A. 

72,207 

707 

Smith, ). 

68,285 

1,934 

Shul, P W. 

73,598 

237 

Skakun, AM. 

60,497 

840 

Smith, J. 

62,848 

366 

Shulhan, S. 

65,734 


Skakun, E C. 

56,477 

385 

Smith, J C. 

61,238 


Shum, B K S. 

... 100,451 


Skands, MW. 

63,680 

4,527 

Smith, J L. 

51,982 

1,733 

Shum, S. 

62,269 

4,889 

Skehor, E P. 

60,606 

5,898 

Smith, K. 

52,671 


Shutter, SB. 

53,038 

848 

Skelly,). 

67,739 

2,226 

Smith, K A. 

58,429 

5,922 

Shypitka, J. 

60,401 

1,739 

Skelton, D. 

62,357 


Smith, L. 

52,038 

3,967 

Sibbick, S. 

61,498 

6,281 

Skene, R E. 

51,963 

926 

Smith, L. 

53,950 


Sibilleau, 1. 

61,048 


Sketchley, D. 

51,077 


Smith, L). 

52,027 

2,309 

Sibley, B R. 

68,814 

673 

Sketchley, D G. 

73,864 

3,824 

Smith, M. 

51,686 

8,151 

Sidaway-Wolf, D. 

57,663 

2,797 

Sketchley, R T. 

59,484 

705 

Smith, M. 

68,005 

2,183 

Sidhu, M. 

71,682 

4,795 

Skinner, M T. 

62,269 

171 

Smith, M. 

50,872 

2,752 

Sieben, B. 

76,308 


Sklapsky, R L. 

52,080 

484 

Smith, M. 

57,424 

1,063 

Sieben, M K. 

53,988 

19,405 

Skolik, M. 

52,098 


Smith, M E. 

66,613 

153 

Siebold, M L. 

72,341 

3,983 

Skolrood, R W. 

76,156 

244 

Smith, M). 

50,478 

1,107 

Siedlaczek, R. 

50,478 

1,522 

Skoropada, G P. 

56,038 


Smith, M). 

55,767 

36 

Sieffert, B T. 

61,577 

2,160 

Skowronski, DM. 

71,748 


Smith, M M. 

57,633 


Siemens, E. 

51,843 


Skulmoski, A L. 

66,613 

15,129 

Smith, P. 

54,755 

2,128 

Siemens, K J. 

59,615 

10,279 

Sky, K O. 

51,445 

646 

Smith, P H. 

59,136 

3,620 

Siemens, LA. 

53,771 

707 

Slack, G C. 

61,702 

650 

Smith, P). 

56,042 

662 

Siemens, R M. 

54,340 

804 

Slack, R. 

56,261 

946 

Smith, P J C. 

59,793 

1,153 

Siemens, S. 

50,684 

4,418 

Slaco, D P. 

71,682 

16,731 

Smith, R. 

51,058 

1,280 

Siempelkamp, R. 

58,647 

8,124 

Slade, C D. 

... 103,779 


Smith, R. 

52,098 


Sigurdson, j. 

55,347 

347 

Slaney, P A. 

71,666 

12,646 

Smith, R. 

50,478 

1,866 

Sigurdson, L C. 

60,046 

3,695 

Slater, J 1. 

91,171 

306 

Smith, R. 

61,161 


Sihota, H. 

61,076 

21 

Slater, T. 

65,101 


Smith, R A. 

62,269 

1,543 

Sihota, P. 

52,300 

7,094 

Slavens, R D. 

63,451 

3,609 

Smith, R B. 

60,604 

30 

Sihota, R S. 

54,076 

65 

Slavik, O. 

55,328 

1,217 

Smith, R C. 

66,613 

1,084 

Silbernagel, M P. 

51,563 

724 

Sloan, C. 

76,267 


Smith, R G. 

63,008 

2,884 

Sillito, D M. 

62,269 

882 

Sloan, R. 

61,943 

619 

Smith, R R. 

52,769 


Sills, EG. 

66,221 

304 

Sloat, D. 

58,688 

9,690 

Smith, S. 

65,518 

371 

Sills, GM. 

60,604 

1,304 

Sluggett, DR. 

77,474 

5,075 

Smith, S. 

57,395 

1,681 

Silver, R S. 

62,269 

3,525 

Sluggett, L |. 

60,527 

1,381 

Smith, S. 

61,679 

295 

Silvester, D. 

50,387 


Sluys, M C. 

58,868 

874 

Smith, S. 

59,520 


Silvester,) E. 

56,393 


Smaill, G E. 

55,718 

1,617 

Smith, S. 

65,887 

1,013 

Silvestrini, G). 

64,245 

8,697 

Smale, G. 

50,684 

1,387 

Smith, S A. 

51,699 

934 

Simandl, G J. 

60,527 

6,967 

Small, W). 

59,778 


Smith, S A. 

50,478 

2,168 

Simard, S W. 

58,489 

5,494 

Smallwood, L. 

64,905 

75 

Smith, S A. 

57,331 


Simister, S. 

53,113 

630 

Smart, El. 

51,056 


Smith, S R. 

62,269 

108 

Simkin, P. 

51,439 


Smedstad, E. 

50,684 


Smith, T. 

59,943 

52 

Simmonds, A. 

57,017 

704 

Smeele, C A. 

51,966 

6,767 

Smith, W C. 

57,163 

55 

Simmons, G. 

60,276 

3,936 

Smillie,). 

51,238 

3,157 

Smith, W F. 

57,268 

7,630 

Simmons, R K. 

50,478 

3,594 

Smirl, R). 

51,719 

1,006 

Smith, W J. 

50,478 

1,165 

Simon, D J. 

50,478 


Smith, A. 

53,263 

3,521 

Smith, W N. 

53,070 

13,199 

Simon, J. 

51,659 

2,388 

Smith, A. 

52,244 


Smith, W V. 

58,401 

12,293 

Simon, R. 

6U083 

Smith, A F. 

74,727 

617 

Smith, W W. 

50’478 

4,364 

Simpson, B. 

77,478 

10,114 

Smith, AM. 

55,371 


Smyth, J. 

62,856 

493 

Simpson, C. 

50,808 


Smith, B. 

56,477 

2,967 

Smyth, W R. 

83,267 

9,629 

Simpson, D G. 

59,136 

5,879 

Smith, B. 

50,069 


Smythe, 1 M. 

61,463 

1,346 

>impson, G. 

51,615 

432 

Smith, BA. 

57,512 

1,142 

Snetsinger,) G. 

83,156 

18,414 

Simpson, G C. 

59,632 


Smith, B A. 

68,490 

10,500 

Snider, L M. 

54,013 


’impson, J E. 

62,269 

3,047 

Smith, B E. 

53,771 

3,602 

Snow, R. 

68,241 

591 

Simpson, K. 

50,859 


Smith, B G. 

63,128 


Snyder, C. 

65,443 




























































































































































































































































D 48 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Other Employees —Continued 



Salary 

Travel 


Salary 

Travel 


Salary 

Travel 


$ 

$ 


$ 

$ 


$ 

$ 

Snyder, JR. 

51,141 

5,051 

Stagg, G H. 

62,269 

2,722 

Stewart, D 1. 

66,613 

3,180 

Snyder, R. 

58,417 

4,639 

Stahl, G. 

80,885 

4,157 

Stewart, E J. 

61,646 

5,698 

Sobchuk, K. 

61,072 


Stairs, N . 

59,662 

504 

Stewart, GAM. 

50,478 

2,682 

Sobrino, M T. 

53,088 

643 

Stajduhar, G J. 

81,497 

7,613 

Stewart, G G. 

57,537 

774 

Soehl, T. 

60,734 

5,041 

Stalinski, C J. 

50,478 

4,144 

Stewart, J. 

62,584 


Soellner, G G. 

50,478 

2,175 

Stalker, W J. 

50,864 

982 

Stewart, L. 

50,945 

25,683 

Soglo, W. 

56,477 

13,349 

Stall, R. 

53,617 

1,522 

Stewart, L. 

78,570 

7,477 

Solberg, W D. 

56,136 


Stancil, D E. 

81,780 

6,106 

Stewart, L J. 

50,109 


Soles, D J. 

63,998 

818 

Standen, W. 

50,010 


Stewart, L L. 

56,477 

4,591 


81,247 

2,987 

Standeven, |. 

64,722 

2,982 

Stewart, M F. 

66,613 

63 

Soliven, R. 

51,110 

Standeven, W. 

52,044 

1,906 

Stewart, MG. 

69,258 

332 

Solomon, J. 

53,006 

371 

Stang, M A. 

54,751 

583 

Stewart, M N. 

53,977 

1,433 

Solomon, T. 

53,469 


Stangeland, D N. 

76,702 


Stewart, R. 

58,293 

16,139 

Soloway, L J. 

54,000 

58 

Stanker, V G. 

50,958 

1,593 

Stewart, R D. 

58,170 

212 

Solven, S M. 

61,472 

894 

Stanlake, E A. 

54,330 

708 

Stewart, R W. 

53,099 

6,400 

Somerton, A W. 

76,722 


Stanley, S. 

55,668 

4,320 

Stewart, S F. 

56,477 

2,794 

Sommer, U. 

57,711 


Stanton, P D. 

62,651 

1,463 

Stewart, W A. 

63,425 

4,055 

Sommers, C D. 

50,478 

802 

Staples, D L. 

59,773 

2,118 

Stigant, C N. 

71,552 

7,456 

Sommerville, D C. 

51,640 

827 

Staples, S. 

52,760 

2,722 

Stiles, J K. 

62,269 

580 

Sondheim, M W. 

60,604 

1,389 

Starchuck, K. 

51,855 

1,918 

Stiles, T. 

66,988 

15,824 

Soneff, K W. 

66,341 

1,367 

Stark, PA. 

83,267 


Still, G. 

71,682 

3,362 

Soobotin, A. 

59,136 

1,577 

Statham, F. 

90,880 

3,481 

Still, R. 

63,260 

3,831 

Soon, B. 

59,597 

1,188 

Statland, C B. 

60,507 

5,077 

Stilwell, I. 

53,319 

3,754 

Soong, E A. 

52,141 

8,270 

Statton, W H. 

53,932 

1,422 

Stipanovich, T. 

66,285 


Sopel, J. 

54,755 

145 

Stea, R. 

65,848 

1,602 

Stipdonk, B. 

55,200 

4,003 

Sorel, E). 

62,269 

21,730 

Stead, D P. 

71,682 

7,406 

Stirling, M A. 

53,854 

6,363 

Sorensen, M. 

71,305 

3,615 

Stearns, G M. 

59,778 

5,725 

Stirling, S. 

82,296 

2,710 

Sorensen, M. 

53,189 

273 

Stearns-Smith, S C. 

59,729 

4,272 

Stitt, D L. 

55,139 

281 

Sorensen, R H. 

62,328 

1,065 

Stebner, 1 A. 

62,269 

930 

Stobbe, B G. 

83,267 

16,713 

Sorley, B K. 

58,082 

5,334 

Stech, M D. 

62,269 

356 

Stock, A. 

56,553 

3,744 

Sorsdahl, G E. 

58,739 

1,312 

Steele, D J. 

57,740 

2,123 

Stockdale, W M. 

53,863 

1,540 

Sosnoski, AM. 

62,420 

150 

Steele, PM. 

50,184 


Stockerl, E C. 

57,320 

1,044 

Sound, F G. 

67,974 


Steele, R WS. 

59,778 

1,226 

Stockford, DR. 

67,095 

227 

South, N M. 

57,230 

1,901 

Steele, S M. 

54,218 

433 

Stoddart, R. 

56,477 

2,220 

Spaans, R. 

57,813 

4,585 

Steen, O A. 

53,771 

905 

Stodola, G M. 

55,653 

365 

Spackman, N M J. 

66,613 

10,268 

Stefanson, L M G. 

51,451 

56 

Stoehr, M U. 

64,863 

3,123 

Spackman, P. 

65,833 

5,482 

Stefanson, M. 

77,474 

9,866 

Stoker, P L. 

53,919 

4,232 

Spahan, H. 

55,488 

537 

Steffy, D. 

74,674 


Stokes,) A. 

66,613 

1,798 

Spalding, J E. 

51,621 

1,370 

Stefura, E. 

52,278 

2,387 

Stokes, R. 

52,898 


Spalding, P. 

56,797 

3,870 

Stein, L G. 

65,950 

4,741 

Stone, AG. 

62,758 


Spangler, C. 

57,503 


Stein, R. 

50,478 

401 

Stone, B. 

77,474 

26,914 

Spear, P B. 

70,409 

83 

Steinhauer, R O. 

67,965 


Stone, G. 

66,613 

1,045 

Spearing, J C. 

56,477 


Steinke, V E. 

50,478 


Stone, J M. 

52,223 


Spearing, R L. 

50,665 

250 

Stelck, R J. 

56,477 


Stone, J N. 

60,574 

2,311 

Spearman, P J. 

52,098 


Stelmack, D M. 

50,478 

817 

Stone, MS. 

59,323 

3,729 

Spears, F S. 

50,643 

919 

Stelmaschuk, J B. 

65,791 

7,227 

Stone, P. 

57,064 


Speers, P D. 

52,234 

18,142 

Stenning, BA. 

71,682 

2,013 

Stopper, H. 

54,408 


Spelay, E J. 

56,905 

14,227 

Stensaker, G G. 

67,856 

7,799 

Storey, B D. 

66,905 

714 

Speller, D. 

55,104 

537 

Stent, P G. 

50,478 

1,966 

Storey, F. 

62,269 

15,481 

Speller, M. 

60,556 

35 

Stenton, K A. 

52,929 


Storey, R G. 

59,693 


Spence, FI A. 

62,269 

732 

Stephen, J A. 

51,030 

1,496 

Storms, M. 

79,945 

14,922 

Spence, MM. 

55,211 

9,228 

Stephen, J G. 

60,527 

8,091 

Stott, C. 

50,478 


Spence, ST. 

51,375 

1,028 

Stephen, R D. 

61,024 

1,741 

Stovold, D. 

53,236 

507 

Spicer, K E. 

57,623 

3,344 

Stephen, R R. 

50,368 

743 

Strachan, G A. 

60,527 

1,925 

Spielman, D R. 

50,446 


Stephen, S M. 

84,477 

6,389 

Straight, R. 

62,052 


Spilsbury, R j. 

54,302 

796 

Stephen, W M. 

76,156 

759 

Strain, G A. 

62,269 


Spittlehouse, D L. 

64,831 

10,102 

Stephens, K. 

57,289 

1,677 

Strain, V M. 

72,540 

1,712 

Spouler, DA. 

50,684 


Stephenson, C J. 

69,951 

3,530 

Straiton, D E. 

50,684 

138 

Spragg, R D. 

61,461 

1,480 

Stephenson, DA. 

51,850 


Straka, A V. 

50,766 

161 

Spring, J W. 

66,613 

3,875 

Stephenson, FI W. 

52,706 

4,294 

Strandberg, C. 

68,408 

3,187 

Spring, L M. 

75,725 

1,810 

Stetski, W 1 . 

66,550 

6,161 

Strandlund, T M. 

62,815 


Spring, R A. 

53,771 


Stevely, R D. 

50,478 

3,124 

Strathearn, F. 

54,835 

10 

Sproul, J. 

66,613 

415 

Stevens, B. 

50,478 

354 

Stratton, F R. 

57,044 


Sproull. H R. 

55,662 

7,748 

Stevens, D. 

57,331 


Stremlaw-Taylor, E. 

83,267 

2,613 

Spruce, J H. 

70,671 

1,744 

Stevens, D. 

61,721 


Strickland, A. 

56,477 


Spyksma, R J. 

52,411 

901 

Stevens, F G. 

90,907 


Strickland, C. 

62,269 

25,704 

St Denis, R. 

73,981 


Stevens, K. 

83,267 

1,304 

Strike, L A. 

91,652 

5,876 

St Jean, R A. 

60,510 

5,515 

Stevens, R J. 

66,613 

5,142 

Strilaiff, D. 

50,896 


St Paul-Butler, A. 

71,682 

6,741 

Stevens, T. 

60,421 


Stringer, L J. 

71,682 

3,253 

St Thomas, D J. 

55,375 

2,335 

Stevens, WE. 

54,157 


Stringer, M. 

55,820 

1,617 

St-Germain, D E. 

62,269 

967 

Stevenson, D G. 

58,759 

489 

Stringer, W FI. 

56,098 

2,384 

Stabler, P. 

76,156 

2,845 

Stevenson, J H. 

69,897 

1,126 

Strobl, K J. 

66,613 

2,051 

Stack, A M. 

52,098 

241 

Stevenson, L. 

88,120 

16,404 

Strobl, L B. 

53,102 

603 

Stackhouse, N R. 

56,731 

23 

Steventon, J D. 

54,630 

1,044 

Strohmaier, J. 

51,545 


Stad, L. 

52,980 

1,718 

Steves, J. 

56,817 

1,183 

Strohmaier, R M. 

50,238 

290 

Stadey, W. 

55,196 

2,270 

Steward, L. 

50,478 

3,499 

Strom, G B. 

53,018 

2,091 

Stadler, L J. 

53,771 

49 

Stewart, A C. 

53,782 

46 

Stromberg-Jones, N V..,. 

57,724 

222 

Stafford, A. 

50,374 


Stewart, B. 

66,171 

564 

Strong, R A. 

54,435 

1,682 

Stafford, C E. 

69,404 

391 

Stewart, B. 

57,131 

3,912 

Strong, RWK. 

62,198 

386 

Stafford, E J. 

54,000 


Stewart, C J. 

57,360 

2,951 

Stroppa, N A. 

61,602 


Stafford, G G. 

51,024 


Stewart, D. 

55,833 

4,483 

Stroppa, R. 

62,715 























































































































































































































































PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


D 49 



Salary 

Travel 


Salary 

Travel 


Salary 

Travel 


$ 

$ 


$ 

$ 


$ 

$ 

Strosher, MM. 

56,646 

442 

Swetlikoff, N. 

59,317 


Taylor, M. 

52,202 


Stroup, D. 

57,710 

318 

Swetlishoff, D I. 

50,090 

7,536 

Taylor, M C. 

66,613 

483 

Struck, L F. 

55,310 

225 

Swiatkiewicz, V J. 

59,136 

1,051 

Taylor, M H. 

66,613 


Stuart, C R. 

71,271 


Swiatlowski, A. 

53,034 

396 

Taylor, M J. 

65,828 

1,569 

Stuart, 1. 

50,684 

2,990 

Swib, L. 

67,468 

10,497 

Taylor, N. 

57,704 

11,918 

Stuart, KM. 

50,478 

2,205 

Swift, G). 

56,477 

1,972 

Taylor, O S. 

61,102 

222 

Stubbs, S P. 

66,995 

21,844 

Swift, M. 

55,216 

684 

Taylor, P G. 

62,473 

5,651 

Stucklberger, E W. 

71,384 

5,258 

Swift, RKG. 

69,965 

4,050 

Taylor, P J. 

59,723 


Stuempel, J. 

56,477 

1,012 

Swinney, R E. 

51,024 


Taylor, R W. 

50,478 

590 

Sturby, F. 

50,730 


Syed,S H . 

52,315 

368 

Taylor, S. 

66,613 


Sturko, D. 

75,266 

13,378 

Sylvester, R R. 

56,075 


Taylor, S. 

53,314 

897 

Sturmanis, K. 

57,032 

30,156 

Syme, R. 

82,036 

12,857 

Taylor, S P. 

61,994 

6,457 

Sturney, H R. 

59,347 

2,870 

Symes, EC. 

62,269 

656 

Taylor, T S. 

52,805 


Sturrock, 1 F. 

56,553 

2,782 

Symington, J. 

52,419 


Taylor, W E. 

62,436 

15,287 

Stusek, G E. 

62,269 

700 

Symington, P). 

63,837 

3,685 

Tearoe, J F. 

51,656 


Suderman, D. 

69,539 


Symmers, S. 

68,241 


Tearoe, J P. 

60,527 

644 

Suen, K . 

60,425 


Symonds, B J. 

60,540 

1,531 

Teasdale, A. 

70,075 

2,350 

Sullivan, C T. 

63,781 

72 

Symons, M. 

58,496 


Tedder, S. 

56,087 

7,526 

Sullivan, | B. 

52,066 

15,209 

Symons, ME. 

50,478 

9,464 

Teeple, A C. 

56,211 

403 

Sullivan, K. 

58,087 


Symons, P J W. 

56,280 

8 

Tegart, R M. 

62,449 

16,092 

Sullivan, S A. 

70,664 

15,504 

Syssoloff, LI. 

55,347 

2,472 

Tehara, S S. 

60,241 

3,486 

Sullivan, S K. 

62,269 

3,023 

Syverson, L L. 

60,332 

7,364 

Teigland, R). 

52,144 


Sultan, A. 

63,837 

10,347 

Szabella, S. 

59,236 

11,581 

Tekano, W M. 

75,416 

5,515 

Summers, D W. 

59,143 

1,112 

Szalai, S. 

64,287 


Telford, J M. 

60,277 

9,975 

Summers,) M. 

75,937 

8 

Szalay, M D. 

66,613 

11,140 

Temple, E P. 

52,084 

1,166 

Summers, T G. 

50,478 

128 

Szaniszlo, A R. 

53,485 

159 

Temple, J S. 

76,156 

4,862 

Summersgill, W M. 

62,269 

2,597 

Szczawinski, A. 

54,438 

812 

Templeman, R F. 

58,802 

2,542 

Sumner, B K. 

54,101 

1,851 

Szczesniak, W. 

56,625 

614 

Templeton, D J. 

72,667 

2,691 

Sumpton, S L. 

50,981 

1,658 

Szeto, NYS. 

51,605 


Templeton,). 

67,457 


Sun, C. 

.. 107,898 

2,866 

Szto, W W. 

60,604 

1,500 

Tenove, M L. 

53,430 

5,602 

Sunde, J L. 

51,898 

2,426 

Tadsen, G A. 

62,180 

940 

Teo, H B. 

57,289 


Sunderwood, W ]. 

64,444 

840 

Taekema,) R. 

65,456 


Tepoorten, j. 

61,597 

958 

Sundher, A S. 

60,041 


Taekema, K W. 

58,432 

239 

Tepoorten,). 

66,137 

1,649 

Sundhu, S R. 

50,632 

4,342 

Taekema, W G. 

50,519 

732 

Tepper, H. 

50,030 

9,103 

Sundquist, H. 

62,059 

133 

Taggart, 1. 

62,884 

5,974 

Teppin, B E. 

52,274 


Sundstrom, V A. 

60,497 

14,066 

Tait, M M. 

87,398 

559 

Ter Kuile, KJ. 

52,454 


Suomi, R W. 

53,283 

5,842 

Tait, T. 

53,864 

913 

Terkelsen, B. 

62,269 

3,690 

Superle, M. 

62,269 

2,808 

Talarico, S. 

50,478 

2,009 

Terry, S. 

52,188 

11,555 

Sures, D G. 

62,150 

1,811 

Talbot, D E. 

50,684 


Tessaro, A M. 

57,124 

77 

Surkes, S. 

67,672 

28 

Talbot, K M. 

50,684 

2,497 

Tessier, T. 

53,487 

9,865 

Surridge,) R. 

71,407 

1,308 

Talmey, L S. 

56,477 

166 

Teti, P. 

56,472 

2,425 

Sutherland, AG. 

52,098 

2,187 

Talmey, M. 

58,913 


Tetrault, R. 

52,018 


Sutherland, A M. 

74,600 

12,741 

Tamblin, A J. 

77,474 

4,946 

Tettamanti, J. 

52,658 


Sutherland, C. 

71,325 

2,554 

Tams, G. 

52,069 

5,208 

Thambirajah, P A. 

60,604 

9,586 

Sutherland, D. 

57,300 

1,723 

Ian, PPT. 

53,140 


Thaver, S G. 

57,840 


Sutherland, D J. 

59,136 

3,047 

Tanche, J. 

62,279 

1,355 

Theurer, P H. 

61,188 

1,565 

Sutherland, E T. 

51,960 

956 

Tang, G S. 

57,331 


Thibadeau, R. 

74,727 

500 

Sutherland, G J. 

83,267 

44,259 

Tannas, D A. 

58,928 

1,652 

Thibodeau, C. 

55,691 


Sutherland, G W. 

64,863 

9,027 

Tanner, D S. 

53,580 

425 

Thicke, B R. 

56,535 

1,203 

Sutherland, J A. 

51,583 

1,308 

Tanner, L. 

51,235 

461 

Thiel, R H. 

50,643 

645 

Sutherland, J D. 

72,592 

7,490 

Tanner, M A. 

52,281 

838 

Thiele, G R. 

53,771 


Sutherland,) E. 

56,553 

1,218 

Tanner, M R. 

62,269 

1,931 

Thielmann, G H. 

51,079 


Sutherland, L. 

52,119 

1,400 

Tanner, R J. 

50,146 

5,047 

Thiessen, D. 

50,726 

624 

Sutherland, L. 

65,099 


Tannhauser, R R. 

66,613 

86 

Thiessen, F N. 

56,553 

3,462 

Sutherland, P. 

51,857 

762 

Tao, S L. 

60,604 

3,278 

Thiessen, H. 

62,317 

2,474 

Sutherland, R. 

54,671 


Tapp, S. 

58,172 


Thiessen, L. 

58,085 

3,503 

Sutton. |. 

76,156 

2,922 

Tarasoff, DWL. 

57,548 

2,510 

Thiessen, L. 

62,892 

909 

Suzuki, B M. 

52,460 


Tardell, 1. 

62,269 

63 

Thiessen, M. 

50,579 

6,792 

Suzuki, N. 

50,862 

287 

Tarras, L. 

65,281 

2,591 

Thio, K. 

63,566 

495 

Suzukovich, R W. 

50,004 

44 

Tarter, J. 

52,497 

247 

Thom, A D. 

77,474 


Svorinic, 1. 

57,193 

3,620 

Tassell, M. 

61,238 

1,218 

Thom, J C. 

52,832 

6,783 

Swain, L G. 

60,604 

6,957 

Tataryn, W P. 

60,722 

217 

Thom, S. 

65,315 


Swain, P. 

57,792 


Tatchell, M G. 

72,127 

8,365 

Thoma, M A. 

54,032 


Swales, D L. 

50,936 

724 

Tate, R B. 

69,098 


Thomae, O G. 

64,893 

851 

Swales, J. 

76,156 

9,067 

Taudin-Chabot, P R. 

63,474 

7,267 

Thomas, A. 

58,824 

3,964 

Swallow, D. 

59,695 

14,547 

Taulu, M. 

58,951 


Thomas, C S. 

66,194 

2,754 

Swan, A. 

56,450 

3,664 

Tautz, A F. 

66,613 

19,085 

Thomas, D. 

55,113 


Swan, E. 

50,521 


Taylor, A G. 

98,136 

2,964 

Thomas, G L. 

77,844 

7,238 

Swan, G B. 

56,477 

3,437 

Taylor, B. 

66,920 

1,988 

Thomas, FH. 

80,570 

1,405 

Swan, L. 

51,224 

785 

Taylor, B L. 

55,691 

1,633 

Thomas,). 

60,425 


Swan, M. 

60,527 

4,064 

Taylor, B N. 

56,477 

762 

Thomas, K. 

56,477 

4,694 

Swanson, C B. 

78,370 

8,601 

Taylor, C M. 

62,269 

1,101 

Thomas, L E. 

52,634 

1,236 

Swanson,) A. 

82,296 

1,090 

Taylor, D E. 

60,420 


Thomas, M A. 

63,949 

2,783 

Swanson,) K. 

50,984 

35 

Taylor, F. 

68,089 

6,814 

Thomas, M E. 

62,269 

3,687 

Swanson, P S. 

50,458 

847 

Taylor, F. 

52,665 

75 

Thomas, P. 

56,477 

777 

Swanson, V J. 

62,524 

5,067 

Taylor, G. 

51,794 


Thomas, R. 

62,969 


Sweeney, C. 

102,847 

103 

Taylor, G D. 

66,613 

3,103 

Thompson, B G. 

50,478 

5,480 

Sweeney, ME. 

60,527 

112 

Taylor, H. 

65,823 


Thompson, C F. 

62,211 

2,166 

Sweet, B K. 

58,804 


Taylor, H ). 

60,331 

1,919 

Thompson, D. 

68,242 

4,097 

Sweeten, | R. 

50,135 

1,895 

Taylor, J C. 

56,477 

2,386 

Thompson, D. 

95,576 

21,415 

Swerdfeger, E. 

50,425 


Taylor,) E. 

58,762 


Thompson, DR. 

52,159 

1,777 


























































































































































































































































D 50 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Other Employees —Continued 



Salary 

Travel 


$ 

$ 

Thompson, E. 

90,541 

1,192 

Thompson, E R. 

50,471 

5,644 

Thompson, F J. 

66,613 


Thompson, F M. 

54,313 

145 

Thompson, G E. 

77,474 

9,479 

Thompson, H G. 

62,269 

6,556 

Thompson,). 

79,827 

13,577 

Thompson,). 

50,429 

1,600 

Thompson, I B. 

66,613 


Thompson, J S. 

52,118 

1,932 

Thompson, J W. 

63,820 


Thompson, K. 

51,655 

20,170 

Thompson, L. 

52,098 

1,724 

Thompson, R. 

52,573 

1,278 

Thompson, R ). 

58,839 

3,841 

Thompson, R L. 

57,331 

51 

Thompson, R R. 

53,771 

3,663 

Thompson, R W. 

67,381 

23,903 

Thompson, W L. 

50,789 

490 

Thomson, AD. 

56,372 

357 

Thomson, AD. 

... 103,465 

6,183 

Thomson, AM. 

66,762 

3,431 

Thomson, B. 

56,553 

2,643 

Thomson, B L. 

51,695 

580 

Thomson, B M. 

52,407 

1,302 

Thomson, C. 

50,478 


Thomson, D B. 

60,604 

812 

Thomson, G. 

52,770 

94 

Thomson, M E. 

52,073 


Thomson, M L. 

50,241 

1,873 

Thomson, M W. 

50,588 

110 

Thomson, N E. 

52,182 

3,523 

Thomson, R D. 

55,638 

2,334 

Thomson, R N. 

54,595 

6,336 

Thomson, R T. 

56,779 

3,099 

Thomson, SB. 

51,883 


Thony, L J. 

55,009 

11,551 

Thorgrimson, S E. 

54,844 

64 

Thorimbert,). 

50,904 

613 

Thorne, G. 

69,957 

20,152 

Thorneloe, B P. 

50,275 

2,310 

Thorner, E D. 

61,397 


Thornton, j L. 

74,349 


Thornton, M. 

56,477 

47 

Thorp, M H. 

64,118 

5,674 

Thorp, V. 

59,136 

2,072 

Thorpe, D D C. 

62,684 

330 

Thorstenson, K D. 

53,772 

963 

Thorvaldson, D. 

64,877 

479 

Threadkell, SC. 

61,611 

708 

Threinen, R H. 

62,198 

2,668 

Thurmeier, ]. 

76,156 

729 

Thurston, A. 

50,976 

2,024 

Thurtell, M J. 

52,595 

230 

Thuveson, A. 

54,615 

1,875 

Thuveson, G. 

72,043 


Tickner, B H. 

70,412 


Tidmarsh, M W. 

61,857 


Tiedemann, G L. 

61,806 

28 

Tierney, M. 

53,909 

3,718 

Tierney, R B. 

50,782 

4,475 

Tigchelaar, | E. 

73,087 

5,883 

Tilby, P|. 

65,151 

1,734 

Tilt, P W. 

58,796 

627 

Timberlake, A. 

59,136 

2,649 

Timbers, G FI. 

50,286 

1,517 

Timbers, R L. 

50,657 

706 

Timewell, L J. 

56,593 


Timms, A A. 

66,613 

5,012 

Timms, R L. 

56,410 

41 

Tin Tun, U. 

60,527 

11,279 

Tinant, M E. 

63,890 


Tindall, D A. 

66,613 

2,903 

Tingle,) N. 

60,525 

4,650 

Tipper, G K. 

50,322 

2,620 

Tischler, F G. 

76,156 

147 

Tisdale,) A. 

50,453 

1,708 

Titus, L A. 

60,527 

778 

Tjernstrom, T M. 

51,293 

5,072 

Tjoei, S. 

61,309 

59 

Tkachuk, J A. 

76,953 




Salary 

Travel 


$ 

$ 

Tobacco, D. 

52,427 


Tocher, R T. 

57,226 

3,015 

Todd, MR. 

51,742 

7,749 

Todd, R M. 

53,127 


Toews, D A A. 

60,082 

3,606 

Toews, D L. 

74,386 


Tokgoz, K. 

64,749 

3,683 

Tole, B I. 

57,726 

1,038 

Tomasson, P). 

69,357 


Tomko, L P. 

54,242 

1,356 

Tomlin, B C. 

66,613 

3,298 

Tomlin, G B. 

65,518 

2,047 

Tomlinson, C ). 

50,478 

765 

Tomljenovic, J R. 

52,098 

3,562 

Tomljenovich, D A. 

56,108 

13,215 

Tommasini, L K. 

59,734 


Tompkins, K. 

55,080 

20 

Toms, L). 

76,156 

1,315 

Tones, J A. 

51,197 

575 

Toney, N C. 

77,479 

2,013 

Toombs, M. 

66,340 

679 

Toop, S O. 

55,741 


Toope, L D W. 

58,591 

1,252 

Topalian, P M. 

71,718 

9,373 

Torhjelm, K W. 

51,611 

1,531 

Tornack, R. 

62,269 

9,316 

Torrance, J W ). 

62,269 

411 

Torrans, W S. 

50,478 

1,307 

Tosh, D G. 

71,636 

50 

Toth, W. 

52,098 

12,125 

Totten, K H. 

53,545 

10 

Townend, R E. 

66,613 

4,411 

Townsend, G M. 

75,361 

6,836 

Townsend, G S. 

62,269 

1,508 

Townsend,) E. 

55,690 

5,048 

Townsend, M K. 

52,170 

109 

Townsend, N. 

58,537 


Tozer, R R. 

83,267 

12,215 

Tozer, T). 

57,839 

2,852 

Tozer, TWR. 

63,997 

93 

Track, M. 

66,613 

2,288 

Tradewell, E. 

50,478 

102 

Traer, K E T. 

54,416 

272 

Traviss, FI R. 

62,240 


Traviss, M. . 

55,117 

423 

Tray nor, G. 

57,038 


Treby, R. 

62,248 

529 

Tredger, C D. 

53,977 

6,681 

Treherne,) D. 

50,478 

3,558 

Tremblay, M M. 

58,375 

3,683 

Tremblett, E. 

63,596 


Tremere, R L. 

50,894 


Trenaman, N. 

59,965 

779 

Trenholm, B L. 

64,762 

3,355 

Trenholm, M G. 

56,477 

861 

Tresierra, R L. 

56,045 


Tressel, L. 

53,966 


Trickey, M. 

61,042 

7,155 

Trigg, D. 

62,266 

1,605 

Trimmer, DR. 

66,613 

5,580 

Trippell, P A. 

53,409 

10,194 

Trisko, LA. 

79,022 

4,032 

Trist, O C. 

64,720 

696 

Trodd, D V. 

71,603 

7,812 

Trombley, R A. 

62,209 

3,672 

Tromp, L K. 

61,377 

6,808 

Tronsgard, K. 

50,369 

1,697 

Trott, R L. 

80,036 


Trott, W R. 

62,198 

3,420 

Trotter, M. 

57,331 


Trotter, R W. 

52,098 

5,177 

Trottier, M). 

56,477 

1,506 

Troughton, A J. 

59,494 

1,851 

Trozzo, V. 

62,413 

15,013 

Truant, L. 

66,613 

1,051 

Trudeau, C. 

50,564 

3,565 

Trudeau, D. 

52,288 

1,101 

Trudeau, D M. 

50,478 

3,232 

True,G . 

52,545 


Trumpy, C M. 

97,480 

8,808 

Truscott, L. 

50,346 

1,694 


Salary 

$ 


Truscott, S). 53,661 

Tschaplinski, P). 53,771 

Iso, I. 61,811 

Tsoukalas, L C. 56,693 

Tsukijima, J E. 57,559 

Tsumura, K. 53,771 

Tuck,) M. 55,439 

Tuck, WJ. 51,347 

Tucker, DW. 55,954 

Tucker, ES. 71,682 

Tucker, R. 58,805 

Tucker, R. 66,613 

Tudor, K. 59,275 

Tufts, N A. 50,156 

Tugwood, L. 56,001 

Tuokko, HA. 56,363 

Tuomi, R A. 50,81 7 

Tuominen, C M. 50,900 

Turanski,M. 50,429 

Turick, DV. 56,477 

Turley, R. 55,043 

Turley, RE. 60,737 

Turmel, B. 67,215 

Turnbull, C. 73,233 

Turner, AC. 52,684 

Turner, B. 53,772 

Turner, BJ. 71,682 

Turner, C. 59,135 

Turner, CJ. 51,206 

Turner, D. 50,972 

Turner, D V. 66,613 

Turner, E. 52,153 

Turner, H K. 50,478 

Turner,) A. 51,963 

Turner, JV. 74,755 

Turner, K. 53,771 

Turner, K. 54,159 

Turner, KP. 53,984 

Turner, MH. 65,690 

Turner, MO. 98,240 

Turner, R D. 54,211 

Turner, RG. 56,477 

Turner, S. 52,046 

Turner, S W. 51,019 

Turner, W A. 62,209 

Turnley, C D. 50,440 

Turta, LM. 51,634 

Tuttle, RM. 53,953 

Twaddle, C. 50,478 

Twaites, B. 53,030 

Tweedhope, DJ. 64,218 

Tweedy, JW. 52,341 

Twohig, K. 73,838 

Ty, AL. 51,478 

Tyler, D. 61,238 

Tyler, LJ. 51,931 

Tymchuk, CA. 53,344 

Typusiak, W R. 50,478 

Tyzuk, B W. 82,296 

Uh, SH. 62,269 

Ullmann, F G. 63,182 

Ulrich, C. 60,481 

Underhill, KB. 62,269 

Underwood, LG. 77,474 

Underwood, R D. 61,372 

Unger, H. 56,246 

Urban, DL. 99,511 

Urbanova, H. 50,104 

Uretsky, JL. 56,221 

Urlacher, M F. 65,629 

Ursel, G R. 56,477 

Urton, K. 54,873 

Usborne, B B. 59,136 

Usher, L. 56,050 

Usher, TH. 71,160 

Utendale, DG. 55,196 

Uyesugi, SA. 51,336 

Vachon, BL. 56,805 

Valbonesi, PG. 63,992 

Valcourt, N D. 57,350 

Valentinuzzi,) A. 66,613 


Travel 

$ 

4,088 

6,688 

159 

1,824 

6,537 

690 

636 

2,962 

464 

1,720 

1,195 

10,075 

393 

1,278 

8,235 

2,329 

23,023 

5,319 

3,390 

2,040 

7,802 

1,737 

413 

517 

810 

4,596 

1,248 

8,182 

2.114 
291 

1,858 

10,299 

962 

778 

9,197 

134 

1,906 

768 

147 

11,303 

1.114 

2,583 

659 

5,484 

531 

411 

2,426 

1,150 

19,038 

1,049 

3,360 

4,620 

2,609 

3,528 

13 

5,601 

1,994 

890 

2,064 

2,698 

943 

10,215 

4,368 

7,663 

1,744 

15,327 

4,400 























































































































































































































































PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


D 51 



Salary 

Travel 


Salary 

Travel 


Salary 

Travel 


$ 

$ 


$ 

$ 


$ 

$ 

Valk, P C 1. 

64,411 

3,376 

Vermiere, L W. 

56,405 

267 

Walkden, H T. 

57,053 

2,843 

Vallance, A M E. 

57,017 


Vernon,) M. 

69,790 

8,638 

Walker, D. 

57,439 

331 

Vallance, S. 

51,282 

656 

Vernon, W. 

59,263 

138 

Walker, D. 

58,704 


Vallance, S. 

56,686 

940 

Verrier, G. 

52,098 

6,583 

Walker, D E. 

50,101 

111 

Valpy, C. 

53,943 


Verrier,) M. 

57,839 

309 

Walker, DG. 

50,864 

1,669 

Van Alstine, S S. 

82,735 

5,477 

Verspoor, F. 

59,136 

353 

Walker, D L. 

56,159 

4,487 

Van Barneveld,) W. 

60,604 

7,211 

Vertone, C. 

64,735 

250 

Walker, D M. 

50,643 

5,090 

Van Bruggen, K L. 

57,234 

2,121 

Verwoord,) M. 

62,396 


Walker, E. 

62,864 


Van Dalfsen, K B. 

56,553 

2,315 

Verwoord, W F. 

52,261 

5,052 

Walker, HA. 

81,125 

1,864 

Van Den Broek, R L. 

61,332 

1,603 

Vesey, B M. 

53,276 

1,606 

Walker, 1 B. 

57,331 


Van Der Burch, C. 

50,684 

1,822 

Vestrup, N. 

67,672 

2,629 

Walker, 1 S. 

54,533 

5,609 

Van Der Eyk, L. 

66,845 


Vey, F. 

79,229 

9,508 

Walker, ) H. 

84,224 

9,584 

Van Der Gulik, T W. 

64,863 

4,763 

Viala,C. 

54,081 


Walker, KG. 

50,383 

86 

Van Der Leer, GW. 

53,771 

17,314 

Vick, G. 

51,558 


Walker, K V. 

53,756 


Van Der Mark, L. 

53,374 

3,785 

Vickers, D N. 

72,014 


Walker, M ). 

74,728 

5,668 

Van Der Merwe, S. 

53,701 

965 

Vickery, R B. 

52,098 

4,904 

Walker, N R. 

53,474 

766 

Van Der Zwan, R. 

57,994 

2,891 

Vida, R. 

52,098 


Walker, P L. 

56,477 

1,249 

Van Driesum, R. 

69,444 

3,468 

Vielvoye, |. 

60,527 

4,946 

Walker, R ]. 

50,478 

3,773 

Van Egmond, E. 

50,198 

3,467 

Viereck, L. 

83,071 

4,659 

Walker, R |. 

53,739 


Van Haastregt,) C. 

50,478 

2,068 

Vieweg, M. 

58,017 

817 

Walker, S. 

50,156 

6,124 

Van Heeswijk, G E. 

52,043 

23 

Vilkos, VV B. 

50,478 


Walker, T H. 

51,565 


van Hemmen, C. 

61,496 

2,246 

Villa-Arce, J. 

66,613 

9,254 

Walkley, V. 

50,139 


Van Hoorn,) C W. 

60,901 


Vincent, L L. 

71,302 

2,964 

Walkley, W. 

50,801 

2,154 

Van Hove,). 

53,771 

1,471 

Vincent, N. 

66,613 

9,562 

Wall, DA. 

74,530 

4,631 

Van lersel, A R. 

87,234 

1,088 

Vincent, T E. 

81,602 


Wall, E P. 

62,269 

17,381 

Van Klaveren, M. 

73,180 

652 

Vining, B T J. 

71,682 


Wall, T. 

50,660 

210 

Van Kleeck, R J. 

59,077 

417 

Virani, R. 

59,913 

1,125 

Wall, W A. 

50,541 

713 

Van Mol, P F C. 

71,682 

2,274 

Viszlai, | G. 

51,781 

1,005 

Wallace, A K. 

51,269 

1,762 

Van Oort, B. 

74,375 

4,710 

Viszlai-Beale, M E. 

52,085 

11,496 

Wallace, B. 

55,464 

9,865 

Van Raamsdonk, R ). 

68,302 


Vivian,) E. 

64,831 

5,479 

Wallace, D. 

50,706 

4 

Van Reekum, A E. 

57,729 

21,077 

Vivian, L E. 

54,348 

59 

Wallace,). 

50,864 

460 

Van Rheenen, P B. 

83,489 

16,480 

Vogel, A. 

50,478 

5,752 

Wallace, L S. 

56,790 

836 

Van Staalduinen, G G .... 

53,264 


Vogel, L. 

57,492 

8,874 

Wallace, M E. 

63,462 

1,532 

Van Steenis, E. 

54,299 

1,864 

Vogt, H j. 

66,613 

9,291 

Wallace, M L. 

65,588 

730 

Van Swieten, DA. 

56,477 


Vogt, V W. 

54,005 

4,594 

Wallace, P I. 

58,293 

725 

Van Tongeren, W H. 

74,405 

1,841 

Vohradsky, W V. 

62,078 

179 

Wallace, R A. 

55,333 

3,956 

Van Velzen, W. 

52,159 

2,003 

Voigt, R. 

51,483 


Wallace, Y. 

52,048 

19,423 

Van Vugt, M. 

50,429 

2,108 

Vokes,) B. 

65,762 

9,447 

Wallach, A A. 

50,644 

1,733 

Van Westendorp, P. 

63,335 

3,228 

Void, T. 

64,863 

6,111 

Walle, EM. 

74,727 

2,139 

Van Woerden, H. 

50,478 

2,202 

Volk, HA. 

57,354 

445 

Wallensteen, R C. 

59,796 

8,559 

Van Zandwijk, F H. 

62,269 

9,057 

Volk, 1. 

82,913 

28 

Wallin, A S. 

50,116 

9,252 

Van, B. 

68,610 


Volkers, T E. 

58,732 

1,572 

Wallin, S. 

61,570 

1,527 

Van, D. 

62,111 


Volpatti, D. 

53,602 

2,879 

Wallinger, K N. 

56,415 

2,471 

Van-Der Horst, W D. 

70,309 

2,547 

Von Der Gonna, M. 

60,829 

2,779 

Wallis, C H. 

66,613 

1,927 

Van-Staalduinen, H F .... 

50,305 


Von Hagen, C A. 

58,265 

131 

Wallis, G A. 

51,492 

953 

Vance, B F. 

115,465 

919 

Von Schuckmann, S M... 

60,589 

4,209 

Wallis, P. 

52,555 

618 

Vance, H . 

62,269 

2,035 

Vos, M H. 

52,377 

11,046 

Walsh, B M E. 

66,613 

5,244 

Vance,). 

72,321 

4,969 

Vossler, L L. 

54,452 


Walsh, G. 

61,576 


Vancise, DM. 

53,560 

5,350 

Voth, B B. 

50,478 

3,560 

Walsh, N ). 

72,849 

2,934 

Vanden-Driessche, R. 

78,283 

1,052 

Voyer, R J. 

60,604 

2,458 

Walsh, TC. 

56,477 

1,022 

Vandenberg,) A. 

53,438 

13,308 

Vulliamy, A. 

65,295 


Walter, B D. 

57,285 

1,251 

Vandenbergh,). 

51,152 

352 

Vyse, AH. 

64,545 

4,205 

Walter, G F. 

62,020 

4,350 

Vanderburgh, K R. 

64,868 

1,619 

Wacker, R. 

56,852 

2,307 

Walter,) M. 

50,020 

141 

Vanderbyl, B. 

52,920 


Waddell, D A. 

56,553 

1,575 

Walters,) M. 

62,974 

1,473 

Vanderheyden, G ) J. 

51,364 

1,134 

Waddell, S. 

77,474 

4,188 

Walters, P D. 

56,477 

639 

Vanderhoop, D. 

55,437 


Wadds, M E. 

71,682 

1,191 

Walters, W. 

66,113 

6,011 

Vanderhorst, J. 

50,261 


Wade, A. 

61,322 

577 

Walton, D G. 

53,771 

3,086 

Vanderkwaak, G H. 

52,588 

2,025 

Wade, N. 

53,208 

2,715 

Walton, J. 

62,269 

2,651 

Vanderlinde, B N. 

68,176 

8,135 

Wadey, P J. 

50,877 

122 

Walton, TG. 

54,363 

2,483 

Vanderpol, H. 

67,660 

4,612 

Wadham, G. 

50,544 

7,154 

Walton, TW. 

57,163 

3,453 

Vandrishe, P D. 

52,856 


Wagar, K. 

51,253 

3,128 

Wan, B. 

50,478 

6,068 

Vandyke, P. 

68,187 

218 

Wagar, 1 . 

52,983 

1,769 

Wan, H S. 

66,690 

11,306 

Vanlerberg, R D. 

60,482 

17,213 

Wagar, L M. 

71,488 

10,437 

Wan, L. 

63,755 


Vanstone,). 

71,956 

6,835 

Waghorn, S J. 

50,870 

1,023 

Wan, P YS. 

59,871 


Varner, D F. 

50,478 

1,500 

Wagner, G. 

62,435 

123 

Wanamaker, L M. 

79,062 


Vatamaniuck, S D. 

53,348 


Wagner, G H. 

56,553 

4,214 

Wand, R. 

51,636 


Vath, B D. 

59,129 

3,013 

Wai, H. 

55,932 

1,095 

Wand, R. 

77,544 

1,932 

Vaughan,) ]. 

56,423 

373 

Wai, ]. 

60,527 

2,328 

Wang, C. 

59,095 

548 

Vaughan, LA. 

51,574 

3,517 

Wai, W. 

57,289 


Wang, R. 

58,957 


Venables, R C. 

50,478 

376 

Wainman, G. 

59,061 


Warburton, W P. 

61,146 

7,786 

Venables, S G. 

56,477 

92 

Wainwright, E S. 

53,463 

98 

Ward, B C. 

51,576 

7,443 

Vennema, A. 

104,210 

2,453 

Wainwright,) R. 

50,429 

802 

Ward, B R. 

53,771 

7,173 

Venos, GEA. 

60,683 

1,637 

Waite, KG. 

65,848 

1,294 

Ward, D. 

53,516 


Venturini, A. 

65,518 

1,107 

Wakaruk, O. 

50,684 

3,071 

Ward,) E H. 

66,613 

4,927 

Verbeurgt, K T. 

53,771 

956 

Wakelin, J G. 

64,831 

6,353 

Ward,) M. 

53,771 

394 

Verboven, B 1. 

57,018 

726 

Wakelin, T J. 

56,848 

1,300 

Ward,) M. 

67,131 

6,274 

Verde, J. 

50,790 


Walden, K. 

51,244 

1,428 

Ward, R. 

55,858 


Vere, P.... 

50,937 

3,156 

Waldron, S. 

53,771 

2,116 

Ward, S A. 

51,973 

2,928 

Verge, D. 

57,514 

584 

Wales, D. 

68,183 


Wardell, MC. 

52,098 


Verhulst,) H. 

82,650 


Waleski, D. 

63,750 


Warden, G. 

61,888 


Verhulst, L. 

108,146 

8,438 

Walisser, BE. 

77,474 

2,296 

Warden, R W. 

59,672 























































































































































































































































D 52 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Other Employees —Continued 


Salary Travel 

$ $ 


Wardlaw, A M. 

53,716 

1,364 

Wardrop, ) R. 

62,269 

1,839 

Wardrop, T). 

62,269 

968 

Wardrope, C. 

61,823 


Wardy, D E. 

51,997 


Ware, D S. 

57,949 

9,768 

Wargo, ML. 

56,477 


Wargo, R. 

68,593 

1,193 

Waring, M A. 

56,553 

923 

Wark, D W. 

53,337 

2,922 

WarkJ R. 

75,209 


Warmald, R W. 

57,260 

276 

Warmenhoven,). 

50,152 


Warneboldt, D. 

50,429 

1,658 

Warner, B. 

60,527 

7,941 

Warner, D. 

62,269 

3,081 

Warner, J A. 

55,705 

1,427 

Warner, R A. 

50,367 

3,662 

Warner, T L. 

56,443 

8,167 

Warner, W J. 

79,638 

538 

Warnock, E P. 

83,267 

2,918 

Warren, K B. 

50,684 


Warren, M R. 

54,184 

4,537 

Warren, W. 

53,308 


Warrington, P D. 

53,771 


Wassink, C. 

66,443 

966 

Waterer, F. 

51,072 


Waterhouse, M J. 

50,408 


Waterman, P F. 

53,657 

2,371 

Waters, A J. 

62,848 

21,145 

Waters, D. 

79,733 

2,138 

Waters,). 

66,613 

7,594 

Watkins, M S. 

50,478 

3,089 

Watkins, N. 

54,008 

5,018 

Watkins, P D. 

65,456 

2,201 

Watkins, S. 

53,486 

2,241 

Watson, A F. 

58,593 

353 

Watson, C B. 

57,950 


Watson, D. 

66,368 

12,691 

Watson, D C. 

53,057 

964 

Watson, E. 

56,641 

1,973 

Watson,). 

51,587 

724 

Watson, K L. 

54,000 

73 

Watson, M. 

56,431 

118 

Watson, R. 

71,540 


Watson, R G. 

52,175 


Watson, R I. 

53,771 

46 

Watson, S J. 

88,649 

813 

Watson, S L. 

50,684 

2,667 

Watson, S P. 

69,072 

3,401 

Watson, T J. 

67,334 

1,058 

Watson, T K. 

65,965 

1,166 

Watt, GC. 

73,363 

3,728 

Watts, C. 

65,825 

6,069 

Watts, C D. 

62,269 

3,742 

Watts, J. 

67,617 


Watts, R E. 

66,613 

17,302 

Watts, R J. 

53,615 

37,196 

Watts, W). 

62,269 

1,698 

Way, D. 

61,376 

2,713 

Waygood, G. 

58,899 


Wayte, j. 

81,741 

1,756 

Wearing, J R. 

60,527 

965 

Weaver, D. 

54,283 

9,116 

Weaver, K W. 

62,269 

1,092 

Webb, G. 

50,684 

251 

Webb,) R. 

57,298 

6,635 

Webb, M. 

58,492 

2,820 

Webb, M L. 

.... 104,688 

8,308 

Webb, R. 

50,771 

5,152 

Webb, R D. 

51,726 

1,521 

Webb, RE. 

58,366 

1,545 

Webber, C H. 

54,134 

9,818 

Webber,) E. 

68,654 

3,222 

Webber, L. 

51,555 


Webber, R A. 

60,895 

461 

Webber, R C J. 

62,269 

951 

Webber, T C. 

64,841 


Weber, G. 

90,880 


Weber, S. 

51,693 

500 

Webster, E A. 

52,098 




Salary 

Travel 


$ 

$ 

Webster, 1 C L. 

55,320 

4,799 

Webster, N. 

58,918 


Webster, R M. 

71,682 

13,608 

Webster, W A. 

51,648 


Webster-Evans, B. 

73,110 

945 

Weekes, H. 

62,572 


Weeks, C. 

82,913 


Weeks, D. 

51,466 


Weeks, R A. 

51,507 

1,451 

Wegelin, D C. 

62,269 

2,942 

Wegener, R C. 

84,869 


Weger, E. 

77,474 

1,846 

Wei, M. 

56,364 

1,953 

Weicker, D J ]. 

67,668 

16,648 

Weir, D. 

67,470 


Weir, J H. 

69,115 


Weir, M A. 

52,682 

865 

Weis, D. 

50,025 


Weisgerber, M. 

62,627 

4,488 

Weismiller, F. 

60,752 

48 

Weismiller, P. 

51,338 

90 

Weismiller, W S. 

53,423 

467 

Weistra, M). 

50,443 


Welbanks, D P. 

56,477 

3,036 

Welch, C. 

50,160 

4,300 

Welch, F. 

58,694 


Welch, L. 

56,162 

1,786 

Welcome, A A. 

50,272 

5 

Wells, C. 

54,006 

147 

Wells, GT. 

50,369 

2,711 

Wells, YC. 

77,363 

15,183 

Welock, P S. 

56,477 

739 

Welsh, B E. 

62,269 

3,702 

Wenezenki, L B. 

60,627 

2,796 

Wenger, D. 

60,318 

6,120 

Wenger, J H. 

80,332 

5,842 

Wenger, R W. 

58,533 

1,489 

Wenham, D C. 

56,477 

1,826 

Wenn, B P. 

50,546 

172 

Werle, 1). 

63,781 

4,468 

Wesley, L D. 

66,837 

4,915 

Wesleyson, B. 

60,793 

34 

West, A. 

51,194 


West, HP. 

62,269 


West, MS. 

51,243 

3,607 

West, R. 

52,098 

3,730 

West, R A. 

50,478 


Westall, G. 

51,066 

6,668 

Westby, M. 

53,771 


Westby, S F. 

64,555 

9,583 

Westergaard, K E. 

55,800 

752 

Western, C. 

63,390 

12,039 

Western, M N. 

53,653 

2,206 

Westfall, G F. 

54,124 

795 

Westfall, K G. 

69,566 

3,282 

Westhoff, R. 

57,180 

3,290 

Westmacott, A. 

58,576 

4,965 

Weston, R D. 

59,136 

4,014 

Weston, W. 

61,544 

204 

Weston, W W. 

76,956 

18,049 

Westwood, H. 

71,682 

609 

Wetter, R D. 

60,430 

2,038 

Wettlaufer, L. 

83,267 

13,001 

Wetton, D. 

51,867 

5,227 

Wetzstein, M A. 

57,562 

5,266 

Weys, C. 

55,667 

97 

Whale, A M. 

65,614 

11,085 

Whalen, D. 

57,468 

681 

Whalen, DM. 

56,553 


Whalley,). 

58,926 


Wharf, 1) E. 

62,150 

8,728 

Wharton, A H. 

62,558 

308 

Whately, M R. 

71,682 

1,737 

Wheatley, A. 

64,149 

4,127 

Wheatley, M. 

50,106 


Wheeler, A. 

62,908 

4,516 

Wheeler,). 

51,002 

66 

Wheeler,) S. 

51,067 


Whelan, O T. 

62,269 

582 

Whelan, P. 

66,613 


Wheler, F. 

56,503 

14,054 



Salary 

Travel 


$ 

$ 

Whelon, TG. 

62,269 

2,120 

Whipple, B M. 

66,613 

475 

White, C. 

56,477 


White, D. 

62,269 

2,563 

White, D E. 

50,877 

462 

White, D W. 

53,130 

617 

White,) E. 

56,477 

5,256 

White,) R. 

60,284 

282 

White, K G. 

62,269 

172 

White, K P. 

55,671 

472 

White, L. 

69,630 

1,453 

White, M A. 

62,269 

5,223 

White, M P ). 

50,478 


White, P. 

57,315 


White, PS. 

56,086 


White, R. 

50,766 


White, R. 

51,272 


White, R D. 

70,529 

5,081 

White, R G. 

59,136 

3,133 

White, S. 

62,090 


White, W. 

76,429 

5,254 

Whitehead, P. 

58,533 

1,378 

Whitehead, P F. 

51,895 

1,301 

Whitely, S E. 

63,348 

3,612 

Whitfield, P R. 

66,613 

4,656 

Whiting, D G. 

55,718 

4,910 

Whittaker, A J. 

81,020 


Whittaker, R. 

66,794 

1,570 

Whitters, J. 

58,738 


Whittla, A G. 

53,587 

6,637 

Whittla, EAR. 

56,276 


Whitton, R. 

62,065 

265 

Whitworth, 1 D. 

58,072 

1,592 

Whybrow,) A. 

57,289 

37 

Whybrow, M W. 

71,682 

600 

Whyte, D B. 

50,405 

4,163 

Whyte, DR. 

62,269 

802 

Whyte, R A. 

63,617 

2,403 

Wickens, E P. 

50,684 

4,185 

Wickens, W E A. 

71,682 

7,646 

Wickheim, A. 

60,206 


Wickson, E. 

67,535 


Wickstrom, T. 

50,453 

505 

Wideski, T W. 

77,158 

4,082 

Widmer, F. 

52,098 

409 

Wiebe, B. 

68,376 


Wiebe, W W D. 

... 132,765 

3,581 

Wiedemann, DM. 

69,357 

1,632 

Wiegers, L W. 

54,000 

1,035 

Wieler, F. 

59,929 


Wiens, S L. 

51,570 

18,761 

Wieringa, P R. 

57,951 

3,256 

Wiertz, P. 

53,337 

1,873 

Wiese, R. 

52,130 

1,530 

Wieser, C W. 

50,990 

712 

Wiffen, R J. 

51,030 

10 

Wiggill, G W. 

51,776 

765 

Wiggins, G G. 

57,251 

2,074 

Wight, J E F. 

59,352 

275 

Wight, T C. 

50,764 

196 

Wightman, J C. 

53,771 

3,912 

Wightman, P M. 

66,613 

1,153 

Wighton, D. 

52,098 

4,245 

Wijeratne, D D. 

50,897 

13 

Wikeem, B M. 

58,062 

3,095 

Wikstrom, A L. 

59,774 

1,030 

Wilcott, L A. 

57,455 

6,847 

Wilcox, A F. 

54,452 

355 

Wilcox, W R. 

63,427 

714 

Wild, R. 

56,639 

34 

Wilde, TR. 

61,454 

1,968 

Wilfert, J D. 

51,058 


Wilford, D J. 

57,561 

1,645 

Wilhelm, A. 

64,530 


Wilk, JS. 

50,684 


Wilk, KM. 

62,269 

27 

Wilkin, N L. 

68,814 

11,631 

Wilkins, C L. 

62,996 

3,864 

Wilkins,). 

51,595 

2,005 

Wilkins, S. 

56,876 

3,773 

Wilkinson, A. 

53,000 



























































































































































































































































PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 



Salary 

Travel 


Salary 

Travel 


$ 

$ 


$ 

$ 

Wilkinson, D. 

53,475 


Wilson, K B. 

57,331 


Wilkinson, G R. 

51,012 

3,464 

Wilson, K W. 

81,224 

1,139 

Wilkinson,). 

50,882 


Wilson, L C. 

56,477 

2,500 

Wilks, D M. 

50,478 

1,032 

Wilson, L D. 

67,699 

10,511 

Will,]. 

50,284 

5,268 

Wilson, L E. 

60,497 

5,389 

Willcox,). 

66,432 

33 

Wilson, M. 

51,340 

4,082 

Willems, R M. 

77,474 

9,612 

Wilson, P. 

50,017 

427 

Willett, G A. 

50,478 

2,572 

Wilson, PJ. 

65,814 

5,165 

Willett, S V. 

71,682 

4,457 

Wilson, P M. 

66,597 

1,396 

Williams, A 1. 

56,477 

439 

Wilson, R. 

50,621 


Williams, B H. 

71,682 

12,568 

Wilson, R ). 

59,131 

3,235 

Williams, B). 

59,022 

818 

Wilson, R L. 

54,524 

12,950 

Williams, B L G. 

66,613 

7,385 

Wilson, R S. 

... 123,050 

1,946 

Williams, C. 

66,613 

12,597 

Wilson, R W. 

56,088 

6,155 

Williams, D. 

53,415 

3,726 

Wilton, B T. 

77,474 

8,381 

Williams, D. 

62,032 


Wilton, D N. 

52,496 

2,337 

Williams, D). 

76,424 

10,139 

Wilton, H P. 

61,190 

2,949 

Williams, D P. 

66,613 

11,955 

Wilton, L D. 

50,736 


Williams, D R. 

50,519 

3,798 

Wilts, E. 

70,541 


Williams, E J R. 

53,674 

2,326 

Wiltse, | P. 

50,478 

289 

Williams, F M. 

54,919 

2,608 

Wilzewski, H F. 

66,61 3 

1,970 

Williams, G. 

60,643 

511 

Winchester, | G. 

66,486 

9,327 

Williams, G D. 

50,478 

859 

Winder, M C. 

55,926 

9,552 

Williams, G M. 

58,873 

54 

Windross, D D. 

53,771 

7,499 

Williams, H A. 

51,818 

471 

Windwick, G L. 

53,015 


Williams, 1 C. 

80,085 

271 

Wing, D. 

66,613 

11,679 

Williams I. 

50,424 

4,812 

Wingert, C. 

50,205 


Williams, K D. 

61,504 

6,844 

Wingerter, DM. 

62,164 

24 

Williams, K D. 

54,610 

2,897 

Winkelmans, P T. 

62,269 

13,260 

Williams, L E. 

65,656 


Winkler, D. 

99,511 

14,054 

Williams, N R. 

57,304 

536 

Winkler, E A. 

60,594 

3,307 

Williams, R. 

67,950 

507 

Winkler, K. 

57,684 

8,647 

Williams, R F. 

71,682 

601 

Winkler, R D. 

60,436 

2,631 

Williams, R G. 

58,852 

6,942 

Winnig, R A. 

50,643 

4,420 

Williams, R J. 

60,719 

872 

Winter, R. 

65,783 

8,077 

Williams, R L. 

50,505 

2,295 

Winter, V. 

53,391 

13,753 

Williams, S A. 

57,910 

1,070 

Wipfli, E. 

57,994 

2,579 

Williams, S M. 

56,748 

966 

Wisdahl, S. 

50,009 

1,382 

Williams, T B. 

... 100,631 

632 

Wiseman, i. 

52,129 

242 

Williams, W C. 

50,478 

266 

Wishlow, W). 

58,024 

18,325 

Williamsen, E B. 

51,818 


Withers, R. 

72,486 

6,180 

Williamson, C K. 

63,589 

213 

Withler, C E. 

54,415 

1,189 

Williamson, K D. 

58,336 

389 

Wittenberg, K R. 

66,613 

2,319 

Williamson, M F. 

... 108,334 

7,656 

Witthoeft, F V. 

56,553 

54 

Williamson, R M. 

54,082 

331 

Wittneben, U. 

56,553 


Williamson, S. 

57,464 

236 

Witzer, P R. 

54,097 


Williamson, W B. 

51,812 

890 

Wodtke, FA. 

50,478 

497 

Willie,) P. 

51,071 

30 

Wohlgemuth, D. 

72,376 


Willie, P. 

60,571 


Wojdak, P J. 

65,721 

5,494 

Willingdon, A W. 

59,723 

1,103 

Wolczuk, D. 

64,096 


Willis, H. 

64,863 

3,174 

Wolfe, F. 

52,316 

3,839 

Willis, S M. 

57,385 

6,520 

Wolfe, G L. 

51,336 

959 

Willmot, M C. 

53,249 


Wolfe, PS. 

62,269 

1,950 

Willoughby, B A. 

71,913 

4,386 

Wolfe-Milner, L. 

62,269 

315 

Willow, J C. 

64,165 

6,079 

Wolfram, E A. 

65,837 

39 

Willows, F. 

54,984 

250 

Wolkosky, G K. 

63,006 

12,193 

Willows, W L. 

53,771 

4,483 

Woloshyn, D. 

50,684 

151 

Wills, G. 

61,761 

950 

Wolter, M. 

55,097 


Willson, D C. 

51,384 

509 

Wolverton, J E. 

57,718 

1,512 

Wilmer, F D. 

62,269 

1,645 

Wong, B. 

56,421 

3,386 

Vilmot. R. 

67,369 

4,220 

Wong, C. 

54,648 

9,125 

Wilson, A. 

73,180 

552 

Wong, D. 

65,816 

133 

Wilson, A L. 

50,637 


Wong, D. 

52,729 

250 

Wilson, B). 

55,128 

1,118 

Wong, E. 

51,712 


Wilson, B M. 

50,202 

4,481 

Wong, E K F. 

51,978 


Wilson, CD. 

60,271 

232 

Wong, G B. 

76,156 


Wilson, D. 

73,008 


Wong, H Y. 

... 101,618 

2,582 

Wilson, D A. 

51,730 

1,474 

Wong, K K. 

52,450 

1,427 

Wilson, D B. 

50,828 

139 

Wong, M. 

55,898 

4,324 

Wilson, D E D... 

51,430 

3,652 

Wong, M P. 

57,839 

3,651 

Wilson, D G. 

86,310 

1,927 

Wong, R. 

57,764 

1,640 

Wilson, D). 

50,121 

27 

Wong, R. 

55,697 

20,875 

Wilson, D ) ... 

54,177 


Wong, S. 

59,540 


Wilson, DR .. 

64,655 

1,505 

Wong, WDF. 

56,477 

627 

Wilson, E A. 

65,439 

2,196 

Woo, D F. 

52,631 

1,577 

Wilson, G 1 ... 

53,771 

1,329 

Wood, A. 

69,935 


Wilson,). 

50,664 

5 

Wood, B. 

53,714 

492 

Wilson, | D ... 

68,183 


Wood, B. 

54,529 

921 

Wilson, ) M. 

50,709 

1,052 

Wood, B. 

66,908 

1,503 

Wilson, ] R. 

50,684 

29,998 

Wood, B J. 

51,604 

131 

Wilson, J R. 

50,561 

1,727 

Wood, B R. 

60,604 

2,375 


Salary 

$ 

Wood, C E S. 53,565 

Wood, G I . 75,801 

Wood, ). 65,955 

Wood,) M. 50,478 

Wood, J S. 50,735 

Wood, M L. 50,829 

Wood, RL. 62,031 

Wood, SF. 55,655 

Wood, S M. 52,11 6 

Wood, W |. 59,723 

Woodbine, S B. 50,485 

Woodbridge, S D H. 57,247 

Woodcock,) M. 50,478 

Woodcock, M I. 51,392 

Woodcock, M S. 81,303 

Woode, S. 50,816 

Woodgate, D N. 60,514 

Woodhouse, S. 54,443 

WoodFiouse, W R. 50,671 

Wooding, |. 53,872 

Woodland, L ). 61,903 

Woodrow, DJ. 59,778 

Woodrow, J D. 71,434 

Woods, A ). 54,864 

Woods, C. 63,224 

Woods,) FH. 64,863 

Woods, P ). 64,428 

Woods, RB. 62,202 

Woods, RE. 60,271 

Woods, R). 57,476 

Woods, SW. 55,222 

Woodske, DVC. 51,500 

Woodward, C W R. 54,622 

Woodward, D K. 66,403 

Woodward, H. 59,952 

Woodward, K M. 50,981 

Woollacott, C C. 52,484 

Woolley, R. 56,750 

Woollven, MA. 50,684 

Wootton, M). 57,321 

Workhoven, E. 66,629 

Workman, R A. 51,499 

Workman, T. 73,264 

Worobets, W A. 63,066 

Worrall, B. 54,164 

Worsfold, A. 57,906 

Worsfold,) B. 50,478 

Worsfold, R. 58,288 

Wortman,) A. 101,413 

Wortmann, A. 55,279 

Worton, )F. 65,509 

Woytack, | E. 95,576 

Wrean, D L. 66,61 3 

Wren, D. 55,468 

Wright, A. 54,566 

Wright, AM C. 59,708 

Wright, A T. 50,684 

Wright, D. 50,329 

Wright, D A. 51,748 

Wright, DE. 50,478 

Wright, DC. 55,788 

Wright, EF. 50,897 

Wright, G. 50,719 

Wright, |D. 52,990 

Wright, |E. 58,501 

Wright, K. 54,271 

Wright, M|. 53,238 

Wright, P. 51,821 

Wright, R H. 66,341 

Wright, V A. 60,465 

Wright, WG. 71,682 

Wu, M. 56,477 

Wuschke, S E. 61,812 

Wyenberg, A E. 65,752 

Wyeth, M H. 78,501 

Wylie, JE. 50,175 

Wylie, R NT. 53,591 

Wylynko, B D. 50,478 

Wynne, E I. 50,657 

Xie, C Y. 60,527 

Yacowar, H. 100,041 


D 53 


Travel 

$ 

406 

12,390 

796 

409 

130 

894 

4,369 

348 

2,836 

977 

313 

9,954 

13,294 

2,787 

1,020 

4,094 

756 

426 

3,222 

2,615 

3,637 

4,867 

3,637 

2,642 

916 

4,524 

434 

2,498 

1,109 

6,277 

2,478 

6,996 


2,826 

3,339 

3 


2,146 

585 

1,340 

11,789 

1,327 

2,992 

269 


510 

5,670 

327 

440 

1,068 

249 

4,229 

3,506 

5,412 

1,764 

1,988 

567 

2,664 

44 

7,454 

3,535 

10,184 

2,838 

5 

7,250 
586 
2,113 
2,311 



























































































































































































































































D 54 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Other Employees —Continued 



Salary 

Travel 


Salary 

Travel 


Salary 

Travel 


$ 

$ 


$ 

$ 


$ 

$ 

Yager, M. 

62,025 

449 

Young, M. 

52,098 

1,283 

Zeleny, K L. 

50,090 

1,973 

Yamaoka, R M. 

52,099 

216 

Young, M C. 

50,861 

1,790 

Zembal, D. 

51,052 

4,453 

Yan, P. 

60,056 


Young, M ). 

51,521 

1,361 

Zen, E. 

50,478 

.0,253 

Yanchuk, A D. 

64,863 

9,628 

Young, P L. 

71,682 

1,060 

Zerr, R P. 

66,613 

17,741 

Yano, H. 

64,845 

696 

Young, P N. 

62,600 

10,157 

Zetaruk, W A. 

56,365 

2,724 

Yardley,) R. 

84,125 

12,216 

Young, S R. 

75,878 

4,319 

Zhou, W. 

64,428 

11,932 

Yates, DR. 

53,885 

52 

Young, W A. 

78,040 

3,105 

Zibin, S N. 

51,622 

2,504 

Yates, H. 

53,989 

6 

Young, W M. 

65,849 


Ziebart, K). 

50,417 

2,299 

Yates, N E. 

76,156 

13,014 

Younie, S E. 

76,156 

256 

Ziebart, R. 

50,478 

2,376 

Yazdani, R. 

56,553 

7,218 

Youwe, D. 

56,553 

285 

Ziebart, T G. 

57,527 

6,830 

Yelovatz, M. 

50,657 

276 

Youwe, PL. 

56,553 

971 

Zigay, MR. 

54,079 


Yeomans, B H. 

50,775 


Yu, A H K. 

57,457 


Zilkie, B W. 

74,727 


Yeung, P K. 

68,814 


Yu, V 1. 

52,484 


Zimmer, G M. 

57,234 

562 

Yewchin, D. 

52,542 


Yuan, X. 

62,905 

4,679 

Zimmerman, |. 

66,613 

127 

Ying, CC. 

68,955 

6,043 

Yuckin, W P. 

63,664 


Zimmerman, R D. 

56,553 


Yochim, P V. 

59,136 

69 

Yuen, C. 

60,624 

501 

Zimmerman, S. 

59,079 

329 

Yolland, P. 

50,478 

2,912 

Yuen, S W S. 

59,624 

4,604 

Zimmerman, S D. 

50,684 


Youds,). 

55,865 

1,563 

Yule, D A. 

62,269 

273 

Zimmermann, R. 

53,031 


Youmans, J. 

59,926 

1,232 

Yunker, D. 

58,414 


Zipp, D. 

69,234 


Young, B. 

65,068 

415 

Yusko, G. 

59,079 

3,157 

Zirnhelt, N A. 

59,136 

1,372 

Young, B. 

62,882 

3,721 

Zacharatos, T P. 

69,210 

3,577 

Zirul, D L. 

71,682 

6,254 

Young, B M. 

63,770 

3,019 

Zackodnick, A. 

71,682 

5,948 

Zitka, E. 

59,720 

147 

Young, D. 

72,527 

13,343 

Zadravec, DA. 

70,061 

4,935 

Zolpys,). 

62,269 

1,105 

Young, E |. 

71,745 

10 

Zak, M C. 

60,450 

2,902 

Zorn, G O. 

52,502 

1,038 

Young, G. 

50,187 


Zakouras, T. 

59,614 

100 

Zsombor, G. 

53,838 

9,625 

Young, H W. 

50,478 

4,600 

Zandbergen, C. 

55,780 


Zuber, B S. 

69,443 

13,387 

Young, 1. 

68,381 

3,227 

Zannella, T. 

57,712 

3,594 

Zumrawi, A. 

52,794 

3,002 

Young, |. 

53,430 

950 

Zanotto, T. 

53,430 

527 

Zutter, AT. 

50,478 

841 

Young, |. 

52,435 

21,534 

Zapp, R O. 

83,267 

6,742 

Zweck Von Zweckenbur, E 

55,336 

5,726 

Young, |. 

50,684 

126 

Zdansky, B. 

62,269 

4,419 

Zwicker, V. 

50,937 

1,191 

Young, J M. 

57,839 

17,831 

Zeglen, S. 

61,976 

4,718 





'Salary includes regular base pay, overtime and lump-sum payments but does not include employee benefits. 
The totals for this section are located on Page D4. 

































































































PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


D 55 


Grants and C 
for the Fiscal Year Er 

(Details of payees rece 



Ministry 

Total 


$ 

$ 

100 Mile District Hospital Society. 

Health. 

100 Mile House & District Women's 

3,824,660 

3,824,660 

Centre Society. 

Women's Equality. 

145,639 

145,639 

16-37 Community Futures Development 



Corp. 


80,000 

Health. 

1997 Canada Games. 

80,000 

10,278 

Children and Families. 

249937 B C Ltd. 

10,278 

228,125 

Children and Families. 

132,831 


Human Resources. 

64,249 


Women's Equality. 

330696 B C Ltd. 

31,045 

39,932 

Women's Equality. 

334434 BC Ltd. 

39,932 

20,849 

Women's Equality. 

364433 B C Ltd. 

20,849 

26,848 

Women's Equality. 

866493 Alberta Ltd. 

26,848 

10,040 

Attorney General. 

77860 B C Ltd. 

10,040 

51,931 

Women's Equality. 

8H Craftworks Society. 

51,931 

59,302 

Health. 

fS Fitness Group Ltd. 

59,302 

17,340 

Health. 

hi322 B C Ltd. 

17,340 

19,431 

Women's Equality. 

[l 7809 BC ltd. 

19,431 

26,879 

Women's Equality. 

[44500 B C Ltd. 

26,879 

10,219 

Women's Equality. 

[46203 B C Ltd. 

10,219 

147,663 

Education. 

[84017 B C Ltd. 

147,663 

276,720 

1 Children and Families. 

57,456 


| Health. 

198,884 


1 Human Resources. 

1th World Chinese Entrepreneurs Con- 

20,380 


1 vention, The. 


150,000 

I Employment and Investment. 

1 & D (Re) Habilitation Service. 

150,000 

181,965 

1 Children and Families. 

i & K Community Options. 

181,965 

277,545 

1 Children and Families. 

1 B C Infant Care. 

277,545 

52,361 

1 Women's Equality. 

1 B C Preschool-Port Alberni. 

52,361 

15,952 

I Children and Families. 

6,712 


1 Human Resources. 

1,771 


I Women's Equality. 

1C T S S Community Services. 

7,469 

30,238 

1 Children and Families. 

22,528 


1 Human Resources. 

1 Nice Place To Be Child Care Center... 

7,710 

42,452 

1 Women's Equality. 

1 P A S E Association for the Promo- 

42,452 


1 tion & Advancement of Science 

1 Education. 

1 Employment and Investment. 

2,000 

18,875 

1 Finance. 

IS T C Science World Society. 

16,875 

313,060 

B Employment and Investment. 

238,060 


1 Finance. 

75,000 


1-1 Wheelchairs Unlimited. 

1 Children and Families. 

218,996 

331,454 

I Human Resources. 

laron Place. 

112,458 

64,413 


'Some payments made under such programs as CAIN or Pharmacare are 
lent. 


ontributions 1 
ided March 31,1997 

ving $10,000 or more) 



Ministry 

Total 


$ 

$ 

Children and Families. 

13,436 


Health. 

46,573 


Human Resources. 

4,404 


Aatelma Consulting. 


39,861 

Children and Families. 

39,861 


Abbass Ltd, Allan, Dr. 


13,522 

Health. 

13,522 


Abbey Medical Supplies Ltd. 


20,387 

Children and Families. 

15,083 


Human Resources. 

5,304 


Abbey, Doug. 


31,334 

Health. 

31,334 


Abbotsford Area Out of School Care. 


37,109 

Children and Families. 

28,300 


Women's Equality. 

8,809 


Abbotsford Area Out of School Society.. 


36,158 

Children and Families. 

7,157 


Human Resources. 

17,399 


Women's Equality. 

11,602 


Abbotsford Chamber of Commerce. 


15,000 

Agriculture. 

12,000 


Small Business. 

3,000 


Abbotsford Child Care Centre. 


17,830 

Women's Equality. 

17,830 


Abbotsford Christian School Society. 


3,281,769 

Education. 

3,281,769 


Abbotsford Community Services. 


4,511,673 

Attorney General. 

475,397 


Children and Families. 

2,916,195 


Education. 

47,552 


Health. 

701,364 


Human Resources. 

67,512 


Women's Equality. 

303,653 


Abbotsford Ravine Park Salmon 

E n hancement Society. 


11,417 

Small Business. 

11,417 


Abbotsford Taxi Ltd. 


16,463 

Children and Families. 

15,317 


Human Resources. 

1,146 


Abbotsford-Matsqui Arts Council. 


15,710 

Small Business. 

15,710 


Abbott, Gary. 


50,005 

Health. 

50,005 


Abbott, Lisa. 


26,668 

Children and Families. 

19,880 


Human Resources. 

6,788 


Abbott, Valerie. 


34,070 

Children and Families. 

34,070 


ABC Erosion Control Products Inc. 


10,800 

Employment and Investment. 

3,392 


Finance. 

7,408 


ABC Kinder Garden. 


18,017 

Women's Equality. 

18,017 


Abdelkader, Mahmoud. 


34,253 

Health. 

34,253 


Abear, Robert P. 


23,050 

Children and Families. 

6,664 


Health. 

14,184 


Human Resources. 

2,202 


Abel, 1. 


32,483 

Attorney General. 

32,483 


Able Nannies. 


11,059 

Children and Families. 

11,059 


Abogado, Marilou. 


15,035 

Children and Families. 

15,035 


Aboriginal Affairs Initiative Fund. 


98,610 

Aboriginal Affairs. 

98,610 


Aboriginal Sport & Recreation Association 

of BC. 


959,980 

Small Business. 

959,980 



under the name of the recipient of the funds (third party) rather than by program or 










































































































































D 56 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Grants and Contributions —Continued 



Ministry 

Total 


$ 

$ 

Abraham's Lodge & Care Society. 


46,662 

Attorney General. 

12,000 


Health. 

34,662 


ABRI Special Services tor Children. 


493,142 

Children and Families. 

493,142 


Acacia Ty Mawr Holdings Ltd. 


1,335,725 

Health. 

1,335,725 


Acadia House Association. 


18,537 

Children and Families. 

18,537 


Access Community Therapists Ltd. 


457,367 

Children and Families. 

307,232 


Health. 

150,135 


Access Employment Services. 


241,002 

Education. 

241,002 


Access Resources. 


344,754 

Children and Families. 

344,754 


Ace & Roy Ace, Margaret. 


33,024 

Children and Families. 

33,024 


Ace, Roy M. 


156,200 

Children and Families. 

156,200 


Achievement Centres Travel. 


657,091 

Children and Families. 

430,583 


Human Resources. 

226,508 


Acorn 8 Oaks Day Care Society. 


27,465 

Children and Families. 

18,709 


Human Resources. 

8,756 


Acorn Day Care Society. 


10,424 

Women's Equality. 

10,424 


Acropolis Manor. 


1,380,011 

Health. 

1,380,011 


Act II Child & Family Services Society.... 


1,239,238 

Children and Families. 

715,084 


Health. 

170,503 


Women's Equality. 

353,651 


Action Alcohol & Drug Counselling 

Society. 


259,404 

Attorney General. 

66,226 


Health. 

193,178 


Action Committee of People With 

Disabilities Society. 


225,525 

Children and Families. 

62,687 


Health. 

157,697 


Human Resources. 

5,141 


Action Rehab Medical Inc. 


201,092 

Children and Families. 

188,732 


Human Resources. 

12,360 


Activ Community Living. 


366,454 

Children and Families. 

366,454 


Active Support Against Poverty Society.. 


19,474 

Children and Families. 

19,474 


Adam, Lynn. 


25,652 

Children and Families. 

25,652 


Adamer, Lei L. 


13,834 

Health. 

13,834 


Adams & Antonietta Adams, Shaun. 


50,543 

Children and Families. 

50,543 


Adams & Associates Inc, D R. 


58,341 

Health. 

58,341 


Adams Lake Indian Band. 


57,129 

Children and Families. 

2,105 

Human Resources. 

7,550 


Transportation. 

37,216 


Women's Equality. 

10,258 


Adams, S L. 


48,036 

Children and Families. 

48,036 


Adcock, Joyce Mary. 


31,836 

Children and Families. 

31,836 


Addison-Wesley Publishers Ltd. 

15,690 

Education. 

15,690 

Adilman, Philip H, Dr. 

97,768 

Health. 

97,768 

Adilman, Stephen M, Dr. 


10,480 

Attorney General. 

10,211 


Health. 

269 


Adlam, Donna. 


77,714 

Children and Families. 

62,456 

Human Resources. 

15,258 


Adoptive Parents Association of B C. 


186,053 

Children and Families. 

186,053 



Ministry 

Total ' 


$ 

$ 

Adrian, Alfred D, Dr. 


145,684 

Health. 

145,684 


Adrian, Eliesabeth. 


57,525 : 

Children and Families. 

57,525 


Adshead, Gordon. 


31,334 

Health. 

31,334 


Adult Basic Education. 


6,082,214 

Education. 

6,082,214 


Adult Learning Disabilities Association.. 


29,750 

Education. 

29,750 

| 

Advanced Education Council of B C. 


323,326 

Education. 

323,326 


Advanced Mobility Products Ltd. 


109,322 

Children and Families. 

94,448 


Education. 

0 


Health. 

590 


Human Resources. 

14,284 


Advocacy Centre, The. 


43,832 

Attorney General. 

43,832 


Aegis Psychological Services Inc. 


16,473 , 

Children and Families. 

4,763 


Health. 

11,710 


Affiliation of Multicultural Societies & 

Service Agencies of B C. 


183,833 

Attorney General. 

125,000 


Women's Equality. 

58,833 


Agape Fellowship Society. 


32,523- 

Children and Families. 

32,523 


Agapeland Christian Nursery School 

Society. 


11,133 

Children and Families. 

1,877 


Human Resources. 

1,568 


Women's Equality. 

7,688 


Agassiz Christian School Society. 


278,387: 

Education. 

278,387 


Agassiz-Harrison Community Services.. 


25,263 

Attorney General. 

25,263 


Agassiz-Harrison Community Services 

Society. 


264,573: 

Children and Families. 

195,255 


Health. 

69,318 


Agassiz-Harrison Daycare Society. 


61,293 

Children and Families. 

34,479 


Human Resources. 

6,804 


Women's Equality. 

20,010 


Agbayewa Medical Services Inc, M O, Dr 


91,503 

Health. 

91,503 


Agbemenu, Theresa. 


23,048 

Children and Families. 

23,048 


Aglugub, Norberta. 


43,103 

Children and Families. 

43,103 


Agra Earth & Environmental Ltd. 


12,300 

Employment and Investment. 

2,701 


Finance. 

9,599 


Agriculture in the Classroom Foundation 


80,000. 

Agriculture. 

80,000 


Ah Joos Da Dans Day Care Ltd. 


61,976 

Children and Families. 

36,467 


Women's Equality. 

25,509 


Ahad, Sherry. 


27,731 

Children and Families. 

27,731 


AHC Aboriginal Health Association of 

B C. 


191,182 

Health. 

191,182 


Ahern & Paul Ahern, Wendy. 


30,043 

Children and Families. 

30,043 


Ahkami, Atefeh. 


34,236 

Children and Families. 

16,543 


Human Resources. 

17,693 


Ahmad, Hamida. 


21,837 

Children and Families. 

16,091 


Human Resources. 

5,746 


Ahousat Holistic Society. 


33,317 

Attorney General. 

33,317 


AIC Asia International Services Corp. 


11,423 

Employment and Investment. 

2,591 


Finance. 

8,832 


Aids Consultation & Education Services. 


219,715 

Health. 

219,715 





















































































































































PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


Aids Prince Rupert. 

Ministry 

$ 

Total 

$ 

42,322 

Women's Equality. 

Mini 

$ 

16,825 

Health. 

Aids Vancouver Society. 

42,322 

1,023,011 

Alderman, Elizabeth. 

Children and Families. 

65,453 

Health. 

Aimar, Karen. 

1,023,011 

17,553 

Aldrich & )im Aldrich, Mary. 

Children and Families. 

21,347 

Children and Families. 

Aimhi Prince George Association for 

Community Living. 

Children and Families. 

17,553 

7,332,169 

7,357,241 

Aleman & Barbara Aleman, Daniel. 

Children and Families. 

Alexander, C. 

Children and Families. 

40,315 

106,890 

Human Resources. 

Women's Equality. 

23,195 

1,877 


Alexander, Candas. 

Children and Families. 

53,686 

Ainscough, Charlena. 

Children and Families. 

27,849 

27,849 

Alexander, Deborah May. 

Children and Families. 

10,000 

Ainsworth, G, Dr. 

Children and Families. 

9,864 

27,488 

Alexander, Dorothy Ann. 

Children and Families. 

523,844 

Health. 

Aird, Rhonda ]. 

17,624 

13,582 

Alexander, Ivy. 

Children and Families. 

77,764 

Children and Families. 

Human Resources. 

11,182 

2,400 


Alexander, Karen. 

Children and Families. 

51,251 

Airgas Canada Inc. 

Children and Families. 

37,033 

154,169 

Alexis Creek Indian Band. 

Children and Families. 

38,025 

Human Resources. 

117,136 


Environment. 

20,000 

Airshow Canada. 

Employment and Investment. 

1 50,000 

150,000 

ALI Client Care Support Group Society .. 
Health. 

15,667 

Aitken, Lorraine. 

Children and Families. 

295,899 

295,899 

Ali, Naved, Dr. 

Health. 

19,870 

Akbar & S Akbar, Z. 

Children and Families. 

29,895 

29,895 

Aliakbarzadeh, Azra Mina. 

Children and Families. 

18,012 

Alalayan, Renida. 


28,625 

Human Resources. 

4,731 

Children and Families. 

28,625 


Women's Equality. 

2,286 

Alaric & Sandra Alaric, Gordon. 

Children and Families. 

36,067 

36,067 

Alilmen, Jeo Linda. 

Children and Families. 

4,998 

Alaric, Sandra P. 


25,186 

Human Resources. 

4,647 

Children and Families. 

25,186 


Women's Equality. 

1,389 

Alberni District Fall Fair. 

Agriculture. 

11,132 

11,132 

Alkali Lake Day Care Committee. 

Children and Families. 

11,059 

Alberni Health Outreach for Parents & 
Infants Association. 


75,943 

Alkali Lake Indian Band. 

Children and Families. 

39,181 

Health. 

75,943 


Women's Equality. 

11,278 

Alberni Lodge Ltd. 

Health. 

571,315 

571,315 

All Nations Trust Co. 

Aboriginal Affairs. 

60,691 

Alberni Valley Chamber of Commerce .. 
Small Business. 

18,620 

18,620 

All-Ways Travel. 

Children and Families. 

7,379 

Alberni Valley Citizen Advocacy 

Society. 

Children and Families. 

29,064 

29,064 

Human Resources. 

Allaway, Sandra. 

Children and Families. 

3,597 

62,820 

Alberni Valley Day Care Society. 

Children and Families. 

78,317 

144,991 

Allen & Rodney Allen, Chris. 

Children and Families. 

25,073 

Human Resources. 

Women's Equality. 

31,460 

35,214 


Allen, Hazel. 

Children and Families. 

50,134 

Alberni Valley Museum. 

Small Business. 

50,000 

50,000 

Allen, Pamela. 

Children and Families. 

47,723 

Alberni-Clayoquot Community Con¬ 
nections Society. 


77,262 

Allen, S. 

Children and Families. 

63,586 

Attorney General. 

Alberni-Clayoquot Community Skills 

Centre Society. 

Education. 

77,262 

122,128 

122,128 

Allen-Reid, Timlen. 

Children and Families. 

Alliance for Health & Fitness Society. 

Small Business. 

33,413 

1 7,000 

Alberni-Clayoquot Continuing Care 
Society. 


540,000 

Alliance Friendship Place. 

Children and Families. 

33,909 

Health:. 

540,000 


Human Resources. 

15,247 

Alberni-Clayoquot Economic Develop¬ 
ment Commission. 

Small Business. 

38,500 

38,500 

Alliance of Manufacturers & Exporters 

Canada, The. 

Education. 

155,000 

Alberni-Clayoquot Regional Hospital.... 
Health. 

14,279 

14,279 

Allingham, Carol. 

Children and Families. 

7,317 

Alberta Health Care Insurance Plan. 


8,259,708 

Human Resources.. 

2,975 

Health. 

Albrecht, Lee. 

8,259,708 

18,025 

Allison Andres-Joslin Associates Ltd. 

Children and Families. 

56,083 

Children and Families. 

Alcock, Diana. 

18,025 

48,879 

Alliston, Ted. 

Health. 

26,563 

Children and Families. 

Alcohol-Drug Education Service. 

48,879 

326,801 

Ally, R. 

Children and Families. 

17,750 

Education. 

23,000 


Health. 

68,491 

Health. 

303,801 


Human Resources. 

8,875 

Aldergrove Neighbourhood Services 
Society. 


208,388 

Alma Mater Society of U B C. 

Education. 

12,500 

Children and Families. 

Human Resources. 

173,293 

18,270 


Almero, Guadalupe. 

Children and Families. 

24,488 


D 57 

Total 

$ 

65,453 

21,347 

40,315 

106,890 

53,686 

10,000 

523,844 

77,764 

51,251 

58,025 

15,667 

19,870 

25,029 

11,034 

11,059 
50,459 

60,691 

10,976 

62,820 
25,073 
50,134 
47,723 
63,586 
33,413 
1 7,000 
49,156 

155,000 

10,292 

56,083 
26,563 
95,116 

12,500 

24,488 






















































































































































D 58 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Grants and Contributions —Continued 



Ministry 

Total 


$ 

$ 

Almost Home Daycare Centre. 


12,209 

Women's Equality. 

12,209 


Alouette River Management Society. 


29,980 

Environment. 

29,980 


Alouette Substance Abuse Program 

Society. 


493,254 

Health. 

493,254 


Alpha Home Care Services Ltd. 


2,509,347 

Children and Families. 

118,825 


Health. 

2,365,535 


Human Resources. 

24,987 


Alternate Day Care. 


88,177 

Children and Families. 

49,825 


Human Resources. 

38,352 


Alternate Shelter Society. 


1,466,766 

Children and Families. 

1,466,766 


Alternative Communication Consultants 

Inc. 


73,832 

Children and Families. 

73,832 


Altona, Marcia. 


19,931 

Children and Families. 

12,806 


Human Resources. 

6,054 


Women's Equality. 

1,071 


Alyward, Tina. 


110,829 

Children and Families. 

81,859 


Human Resources. 

28,970 


Alzheimer Society of B C. 


127,162 

Health. 

109,416 


Small Business. 

17,746 


Amalgamated Construction Association 

of BC. 


20,000 

Education. 

20,000 


Amanick, Jacqueline. 


71,116 

Children and Families. 

71,116 


Amata Transition House Society. 


367,430 

Women's Equality. 

367,430 


Amherst Private Hospital. 


2,600,795 

Children and Families. 

5,411 


Health. 

2,593,182 


Human Resources. 

2,202 


Amma Management Inc. 


26,197 

Children and Families. 

16,840 


Human Resources. 

9,357 


Amoranto, Gloria. 


71,192 

Children and Families. 

50,441 


Human Resources. 

20,751 


Amos, Briton J. 


13,492 

Health. 

13,492 


AMS Consulting Ltd. 


53,442 

Education. 

53,442 


AMSSA Community Education Society 

of BC. 


14,300 

Attorney General. 

14,300 


Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Society of 

BC. 


20,802 

Health. 

20,802 


An Association Advocating for Women 

& Children. 


52,661 

Children and Families. 

39,180 


Human Resources. 

13,481 


Anaham Indian Band. 


19,928 

Children and Families. 

19,928 


Anamed Medical Supply. 


1,981,065 

Children and Families. 

249,004 


Health. 

1,679,610 


Human Resources. 

52,451 


Anctil, Catherine M. 


72,509 

Children and Families. 

72,509 

Andersen, Joan. 

76,115 

Children and Families. 

76,115 


Andersen, Nancy. 


50,039 

Children and Families. 

28,617 


Human Resources. 

10,809 


Women's Equality. 

10,613 


Andersen, Shellie. 


10,586 

Children and Families. 

8,908 

Human Resources. 

1,678 


Anderson & Christopher Anderson, Linda 

27,839 

Children and Families. 

27,839 




Ministry 

Total 


$ 

$ 

Anderson & Terri Anderson, Michael. 


40,76 7j j 

Children and Families. 

Anderson, C. 

40,767 

70,347*! 

Children and Families. 

Anderson, Carol. 

70,347 

63,9111J 

Children and Families. 

Anderson, Catherine. 

63,911 

173,34b ( 

Children and Families. 

Anderson, D. 

173,341 

25,238' ■ 

Children and Families. 

Anderson, David C. 

25,238 

25,186] | 

Children and Families. 

Anderson, J. 

25,186 

20,095 

Children and Families. 

Anderson, Jane-Anne. 

20,095 

16,8221 j 

Children and Families. 

14,443 


Human Resources. 

Anderson, Karen L. 

2,379 

14,328; i 

Children and Families. 

10,487 


Human Resources. 

2,758 


Women's Equality. 

Anderson, L. 

1,083 

33,250: 

Attorney General. 

32,740 


Forests. 

Anderson, Linda. 

510 

34,6551 ] 

Children and Families. 

Anderson, M. 

34,655 

30,0171 

Children and Families. 

Anderson, Mary. 

30,017 

23,0951 

Health. 

Anderson, Maxine. 

23,095 

27,204 

Children and Families. 

Anderson, R 1 D, Dr. 

27,204 

32,3221 

Health. 

Anderton, Evelyn. 

32,322 

71,657 j 

Children and Families. 

Anderton, Loretta A. 

71,657 

21,030. 

Children and Families. 

14,409 


Human Resources. 

5,712 


Women's Equality. 

Andrew & W Andrew, B. 

909 

13,164 

Children and Families. 

Andrew, Patricia 1. 

13,164 

14,748 

Children and Families. 

10,194 


Human Resources. 

Andrews Holdings—Clover Lodge, 

4,554 


Yvonne. 

Health. 

191,745 

191,745 

Andrews Holdings—English Manor, 



Yvonne. 

Health. 

246,197 

246,197 

Angel Nannies & Domestics Inc. 


19,710 

Children and Families. 

Angel, Cathy. 

19,710 

216,802 

Children and Families. 

Angie's Kare Society. 

216,802 

31,372 

Children and Families. 

Angiogenesis Technologies Inc. 

31,372 

12,277 

Finance. 

Angus Inc, Monica, Dr. 

12,277 

17,019 

Children and Families. 

Angus, R J, Dr. 

17,019 

19,580 

Health. 

Annets, D. 

19,580 

38,301 

Children and Families. 

Anonuevo, Emma. 

38,301 

74,091 

Children and Families. 

Anquist, K Warren, Dr. 

74,091 

10,025 

Health. 

Ansell, William. 

10,025 

15,321 

Children and Families. 

Anthony & Brenda Anthony, John. 

15,321 

17,922 

Children and Families. 

Anthony, Bonnie J D. 

17,922 

39,176 

Children and Families. 

Anthony, Carla. 

39,176 

13,383 

Children and Families. 

7,595 


Human Resources. 

3,526 


Women's Equality. 

2,262 


























































































































































PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


D 59 




Antonio Inc, C L. 

Children and Families. 

Health. 

Human Resources. 

Antonio, Mario. 

Children and Families. 

Antonio, Veneracion. 

Children and Families. 

Antonopoulos, Karen. 

Children and Families. 

Apehtaw Kosisan Metis Child & Family 

Support Society. 

Children and Families. 

Applied Psychology Croup Inc. 

Children and Families. 

Appropriate Living for Physically Handi¬ 
capped Adults Society. 

Health. 

Apps, Mary Louise. 

Children and Families. 

Aqua Pure Ventures Inc. 

Employment and Investment. 

Finance. 

Araya, Virginia Westphal. 

Children and Families. 

Human Resources. 

Women's Equality. 

Arbitrators Croup. 

Labour. 

Arbutus Housing Cooperative. 

Women's Equality. 

Arbutus Shaughnessy Kerrisdale Friend¬ 
ship Society for Seniors. 

Small Business. 

Arbutus Vocational Society. 

Education. 

ARC Arts Council. 

Small Business. 

ARC Programs Ltd. 

Attorney General. 

Children and Families. 

Health. 

Arcand, Paul. 

Children and Families. 

Archbold & Donna Archbold, Phil. 

Children and Families. 

Archer, Carl. 

Children and Families. 

Health. 

Archer, Karen. 

Children and Families. 

Human Resources. 

Women's Equality. 

Archibald, Darlene. 

Children and Families. 

Archives Association of B C. 

Finance. 

Arcus Community Resource Ltd. 

Children and Families. 

Health. 

5rdakani & Masoumeh Lofti, Ahmad. 

Attorney General. 

Arenaria Research & Interpretation. 

Employment and Investment. 

Finance. 

Argieri, Tony. 

Health. 

Argyll Lodge Ltd. 

Children and Families. 

Human Resources. 

Aria Consulting. 

Children and Families. 

5RIO Canada Inc. 

Children and Families. 

5rkesteyn-Vogler, Whilhel. 

Children and Families. 

Armstrong & Russell Armstrong, 

Heather. 

Children and Families. 


Ministry 

Total 


Ministry 

Total 

$ 

$ 


$ 

$ 


332,455 

Armstrong Enderby & Spallumcheen 



42,446 


Community Health Council. 


5,669,118 

276,798 


Health. 

5,669,118 


13,211 


Armstrong Enderby & Spallumcheen 




49,920 

Community Health Council—Pleasant 



49,920 


Valley. 


608,146 


31,351 

Health. 

608,146 


31,351 


Armstrong Enderby & Spallumcheen 




16,058 

Community Health Council—Parkview 


753,061 

16,058 


Health. 

753,061 




Armstrong Enderby & Spallumcheen 




76,000 

Community Health Council—Home 



76,000 


Support. 


440,112 


656,055 

Health. 

440,112 


656,055 


Armstrong Enderby & Spallumcheen 





Community Health Society. 


117,928 


402,392 

Health. 

96,826 


402,392 


Women's Equality. 

21,102 



18,077 

Armstrong Spallumcheen Home Support 



18,077 


Services. 


17,774 


13,200 

Children and Families. 

7,718 


3,128 


Health. 

10,056 


10,072 


Armstrong, Evelyne. 


10,873 


11,405 

Children and Families. 

4,547 


7,820 


Human Resources. 

4,553 


1,584 


Women's Equality. 

1,773 


2,001 


Armstrong, Cordon. 


282,194 


10,977 

Children and Families. 

241,245 


10,977 


Health. 

35,032 



14,825 

Human Resources. 

5,917 


14,825 


Armstrong-Spallumcheen Community 





Service Centre Association. 


233,091 


27,311 

Children and Families. 

233,091 


27,311 


Armstrong-Spallumcheen Parks & 




24,225 

Recreation Commission. 


20,000 

24,225 


Small Business. 

20,000 



22,580 

Army & Navy Department Store Ltd. 


30,410 

22,580 


Attorney General. 

12,716 



1,074,642 

Children and Families. 

13,807 


206,464 


Education. 

68 


685,919 


Human Resources. 

3,819 


182,259 


Arnaud, J. 


10,222 


28,488 

Employment and Investment. 

3,578 


28,488 


Finance. 

6,644 



32,174 

Arnett, Donna Wendy. 


22,728 

32,174 


Children and Families. 

22,728 



169,896 

Arnold, Terry. 


23,293 

145,729 


Children and Families. 

23,293 


24,167 


Arnold, Thelma. 


20,335 


16,889 

Children and Families. 

14,600 


8,655 


Human Resources. 

3,386 


6,233 


Women's Equality. 

2,349 


2,001 


Arranglen Lodge. 


30,984 


21,645 

Health. 

30,984 


21,645 


Arranglen Lodge Ltd. 


2,422,280 


82,969 

Health. 

2,422,280 


82,969 


Arrow Lakes Hospital. 


261,927 


3,885,536 

Children and Families. 

8 


3,842,413 


Health. 

261,919 


43,123 


Arrow Lakes Hospital Society. 


2,494,771 


57,091 

Health. 

2,494,771 


57,091 


Arrowsmith Lodge. 


1,695,131 


13,533 

Children and Families. 

5,151 


4,928 


Health. 

1,684,853 


8,605 


Human Resources. 

5,127 



27,514 

Arsenal Pulp Press Book Publishers Ltd .. 


24,957 

27,514 


Small Business. 

24,957 



178,275 

Art Gallery of Greater Victoria. 


289,883 

118,923 


Small Business. 

289,883 


59,352 


Art Gallery of the South Okanagan. 


48,333 


23,667 

Small Business. 

48,333 


23,667 


Art Starts in Schools. 


167,000 


20,251 

Small Business. 

1 67,000 


20,251 


Arthritis Society, The. 


4,269,181 


57,579 

Children and Families. 

7,841 


57,579 


Health. 

4,256,475 




Human Resources. 

4,865 



53,968 

Artificial Reef Society of BC. 


41,668 

53,968 


Small Business. 

41,668 





















































































































































D 60 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Grants and Contributions —Continued 



Ministry 

Total 


$ 

$ 

Arts Club of Vancouver Theatre Society. 


288,750 

Small Business. 

288,750 


Arts Council of Surrey & District. 


26,870 

Small Business. 

26,870 


Artspeak Gallery. 


24,000 

Small Business. 

24,000 


Arvancl Investment Corp. 


1,377,691 

Children and Families. 

63,917 


Health. 

1,293,505 


Human Resources. 

20,269 


Asante, Kwadwo Ohene, Dr. 


10,628 

Children and Families. 

10,578 


Human Resources. 

50 


Ash, Terri-Lynn. 


12,082 

Children and Families. 

10,351 


Human Resources. 

1,731 


Ash, Tina. 


11,586 

Children and Families. 

11,586 


Asham & John Asham, Deborah. 


78,542 

Children and Families. 

78,542 


Ashcroft & District General Hospital. 


2,797,207 

Health. 

2,797,207 


Ashcroft & District Home Support Society 


377,724 

Children and Families. 

26,221 


Health. 

346,600 


Human Resources. 

4,903 


Ashford & Timon Anderson, Donna. 


81,354 

Children and Families. 

81,354 


Ashland Training Concepts Ltd. 


54,134 

Education. 

54,134 


Ashley, Susan E. 


11,957 

Children and Families. 

11,957 


Ashwin Consulting Ltd. 


55,337 

Education. 

55,337 


Asia Pacific Foundation of Canada. 


200,000 

Employment and Investment. 

200,000 


Asian Society for the Intervention of 

Aids. 


78,405 

Health. 

78,405 


Ask Seniors Project. 


299,852 

Health. 

299,852 


Askew's Food Services Ltd. 


25,449 

Attorney General. 

144 


Children and Families. 

15,590 


Human Resources. 

9,715 


Askew, S L. 


11,342 

Attorney General. 

11,342 


Aspen, Diana. 


109,527 

Children and Families. 

106,569 


Human Resources. 

2,958 


Asselin, Gail. 


41,168 

Children and Families. 

13,328 


Health. 

23,436 


Human Resources. 

4,404 


Assembly of B C Arts Councils. 


150,438 

Small Business. 

150,438 


Assion, Rita. 


20,059 

Children and Families. 

20,059 


Assistance Program for Students with 

Severe Disabilities. 


92,735 

Education. 

92,735 

Assmans Funeral Chapel Ltd. 


13,451 

Children and Families. 

9,160 

Human Resources. 

4,291 


Associated Boards of Health of B C. 

207,000 

Health. 

207,000 

Associated Travel. 


11,101 

Children and Families. 

11,101 

Association Canadienne D Education de 

Language Francaise. 


15,500 

Education. 

15,500 

Association des Parents Francophone de 

la Colombie-Britannique. 


387,000 

Education. 

387,000 

Association for Christian Education of 

Prince George. 


789,608 

Children and Families. 

161 

Education. 

789,319 


Human Resources. 

128 




Ministry 

Total 


$ 

$ 

Association for Christian High Schools in 

BC. 


1,032,707 

Education. 

1,032,707 


Association Francophone de Kamloops. 


27,905 

Children and Families. 

8,283 


Human Resources. 

7,539 


Women's Equality. 

12,083 


Association of B C Professional Foresters. 


17,000 

Environment. 

1 7,000 


Association of Book Publishers of B C.... 


56,000 

Small Business. 

56,000 


Association of Consumer Empowerment 


81,277 

Health. 

81,277 


Association of First Nations Women. 


26,100 

Women's Equality. 

26,100 


Association of Neighbourhood Houses 

of Greater Vancouver. 


4,082,238 

Children and Families. 

949,112 


Health. 

2,849,394 


Human Resources. 

108,642 


Small Business. 

42,570 


Women's Equality. 

132,520 


Association of Service Providers of Em- 

ployment & Career Training. 


4,019,640 

Education. 

4,019,640 


Association of Tourism Professionals. 


44,388 

Education. 

44,388 


Association of Vancouver Island Munici- 

palities. 


82,900 

Aboriginal Affairs. 

82,900 


Association Provincial des Professeurs 

de L'lmmersion. 


1 8,000 

Education. 

1 8,000 


Astep for Youth Society. 


74,664 

Children and Families. 

54,000 


Education. 

20,664 


At Ease Electrolysis Clinic. 


11,606 

Children and Families. 

11,606 


Atira Transition House Society. 


517,206 

Women's Equality. 

517,206 


Atkinson, Brian R, Dr. 


37,515 

Children and Families. 

37,215 


Human Resources. 

300 


Atlin Historical Society. 


100,000 

Small Business. 

100,000 


Aube Inc, Nicole, Dr. 


89,879 

Health. 

89,879 


Augustine & Ed Augustine, Dawn. 


26,165 

Children and Families. 

26,165 


Aumar Ventures Ltd. 


46,835 

Children and Families. 

34,429 


Human Resources. 

12,406 


Aunt Leah's Independent Lifeskills Society 


899,210 

Children and Families. 

885,039 


Education. 

14,171 


Aussem, Edwin. 


18,259 

Children and Families. 

18,259 


Austad, Julie A. 


16,516 

Children and Families. 

11,182 


Human Resources. 

5,334 


Austen & L Austen, D. 


35,441 

Children and Families. 

35,441 


Austen, Lauri. 


35,522 

Children and Families. 

35,522 


Austin, Anne. 


25,152 

Children and Families. 

18,104 


Human Resources. 

7,048 


Austin, Paul. 


48,316 

Children and Families. 

48,316 


Autism Society of B C Citizens. 


334,523 

Children and Families. 

334,523 


Avonlea House. 


440,239 

Children and Families. 

16,025 


Health. 

418,931 


Human Resources. 

5,283 


Avulis, Cheryl. 


49,112 

Children and Families. 

49,112 


Aware Society. 


44,079 

Education. 

44,079 

















































































































































PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


D 61 



Ministry 

Total 


$ 

$ 

Awasis, Ken. 


101,907 

Children and Families. 

Axis Mime Theatre Society. 

101,907 

56,375 

Attorney General. 

10,000 


Small Business. 

Ayles, Leeanne. 

46,375 

62,925 

Children and Families. 

Ayotte Medical Services Inc. 

62,925 

43,512 

Health. 

Ayotte, 1 . 

43,512 

31,510 

Children and Families. 

B C & Yukon Chamber of Mines. 

31,510 

18,577 

Employment and Investment. 

B C 4-H Provincial Council. 

18,577 

73,000 

Agriculture. 

B C A A Travel Agency. 

73,000 

12,754 

Children and Families. 

B C Aboriginal Fisheries Commission .... 

12,754 

52,705 

Finance. 

52,705 


B C Aboriginal Network on Disability 



Society. 

Health. 

11,550 

11,550 

B C Advanced Systems Foundation. 


2,420,000 

Employment and Investment. 

1,610,000 


Finance. 

B C Agent General japan. 

810,000 

12,691 

Small Business. 

B C Agent General London. 

12,691 

12,755 

Small Business. 

12,755 


B C Agricultural Labour Pool. 

Agriculture. 

B C Agricultural Research & Development 

21,120 

21,120 

Corporation. 

Agriculture. 

363,239 

363,239 

Education. 

B C Amateur Athletics Association. 

0 

339,062 

Small Business. 

B C Amateur Baseball Association. 

339,062 

170,755 

Small Business. 

B C Amateur Boxing Association. 

170,755 

18,186 

Small Business. 

B C Amateur Football Association. 

18,186 

42,015 

Small Business. 

B C Amateur Golf Association. 

42,015 

48,072 

Small Business. 

B C Amateur Hockey Association. 

48,072 

235,516 

Small Business. 

B C Amateur Softball Association. 

235,516 

153,731 

Small Business. 

B C Amateur Synchronized Swimming 

153,731 


Association. 

Small Business. 

136,605 

136,605 

B C Archery Association. 


69,853 

Small Business. 

B C Association for Community Living... 

69,853 

106,408 

Children and Families. 

104,676 


Women's Equality. 

B C Association of Agricultural Fairs & 

1,732 


Exhibition. 

Agriculture. 

53,492 

53,492 

B C Association of Child Care Service.... 

Women's Equality. 

B C Association of Indian Friendship 

50,196 

50,196 

Centres. 

Aboriginal Affairs. 

11 2,000 

11 2,000 

B C Association of Podiatrists. 

Health. 

B C Association of Police Affiliated Vic- 

20,000 

20,000 

tim/Witness Services. 

Attorney General. 

36,118 

37,783 

Women's Equality. 

B C Association of Specialized Victim 

1,665 


Assistance & Counselling Programs... 
Attorney General. 

41,462 

63,594 

Women's Equality. 

B C Badminton Association. 

22,132 

182,475 

Small Business. 

B C Beam Trawlers Association. 

182,475 

24,400 

Finance. 

24,400 




Ministry 

Total 


$ 

$ 

B C Biotechnology Alliance Society. 


235,000 

Employment and Investment. 

178,750 


Finance. 

56,250 


B C Blind Sports & Recreation Association 


79,901 

Employment and Investment. 

9,030 


Finance. 

7,420 


Small Business. 

63,451 


B C Block Parent Program. 


30,000 

Attorney General. 

30,000 


B C Borstal Association. 


169,700 

Attorney General. 

169,700 


B C Cancer Agency. 


1 15,623,963 

Children and Families. 

67 


Employment and Investment. 

261,000 


Health. 

115,362,800 


Human Resources. 

96 


B C Cattlemens Association. 


149,200 

Agriculture. 

149,200 


B C Centre for Excellence in HIV-Aids... 


250,000 

Health. 

250,000 


B C Children's Hospital. 


117,509,752 

Children and Families. 

393,619 


Employment and Investment. 

3,692 


Finance. 

7,266 


Health. 

117,088,948 


Human Resources. 

16,227 


B C Children's Hospitals Miracle Network 

Telethon. 


87,500 

Small Business. 

87,500 


B C Choral Federation. 


14,625 

Small Business. 

14,625 


B C Christian Academy Society. 


269,740 

Education. 

269,740 


B C Coalition of People with Disabilities 


625,149 

Children and Families. 

201,701 


Health. 

423,448 


B C Coalition to Eliminate Abuse of 

Seniors. 


50,750 

Attorney General. 

22,000 


Health. 

28,750 


B C Confederation of Parent Advisory 

Councils. 


352,000 

Education. 

352,000 


B C Conservation Foundation. 


2,427,707 

Environment. 

2,427,707 


B C Construction & General Labourers 

Training Society. 


72,000 

Labour. 

72,000 


B C Construction Industry Health & 

Safety Council. 


50,000 

Education. 

50,000 


B C Construction Industry Skills Improve- 

ment Council. 


265,262 

Education. 

15,000 


Employment and Investment. 

250,262 


B C Council for the Family. 


775,896 

Children and Families. 

189,800 


Health. 

586,096 


B C Council of Administrators of Special 

Education. 


121,000 

Education. 

121,000 


B C Council of Marine Industries. 


30,000 

Education. 

30,000 


B C Courthouse Library Society. 


179,400 

Attorney General. 

179,400 


B C Cricket Association, The. 


23,074 

Small Business. 

23,074 


B C Crime Prevention Association 

Symposium. 


126,680 

Attorney General. 

126,000 


Small Business. 

680 


B C Crime Prevention Association. 


265,000 

Attorney General. 

265,000 


B C Crimestoppers Convention Committee 


20,000 

Attorney General. 

20,000 


B C Dairy Foundation. 


20,475 

Agriculture. 

20,475 


B C Deaf Sports Federation. 


15,383 

Small Business. 

15,383 













































































































































D 62 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Grants and Contributions —Continued 



Ministry 

Total 


$ 

$ 

B C Debris Control Board. 


180,000 

Forests. 

180,000 


B C Doctors' Stop Smoking Program. 


80,000 

Health. 

80,000 


B C Egg Marketing Board. 


99,194 

Agriculture. 

99,194 


B C Family Hearing Resource Society .... 


619,757 

Children and Families. 

66,909 


Health. 

552,848 


B C Federation of Agriculture. 


82,230 

Agriculture. 

82,230 


B C Federation of Fly Fishers. 


10,000 

Environment. 

10,000 


B C Federation of Foster Parents Asso- 

ciation—Headquarters. 


1,694,111 

Children and Families. 

1,694,111 


B C Federation of Labour. 


104,880 

Education. 

100,000 


Finance. 

1,880 


Women's Equality. 

3,000 


B C Fencing Association. 


51,692 

Small Business. 

51,692 


B C Ferry Corp. 


4,701,608 

Children and Families. 

1,523 


Employment and Investment. 

4,700,000 


Health. 

78 


Human Resources. 

7 


B C Festival of Forestry Society. 


10,000 

Forests. 

10,000 


B C Festival of the Arts Society. 


882,000 

Attorney General. 

7,000 


Small Business. 

875,000 


B C Film. 


5,071,000 

Small Business. 

5,071,000 


B C Fishing Resorts & Outfitters Association 


75,000 

Aboriginal Affairs. 

35,000 


Small Business. 

40,000 


B C Forest Museum. 


340,000 

Forests. 

30,000 


Small Business. 

310,000 


B C Freestyle Ski Association. 


22,418 

Small Business. 

22,418 


B C Funeral Association. 


72,117 

Labour. 

72,117 


B C Games Society. 


2,240,000 

Small Business. 

2,240,000 


B C Greenhouse Vegetable Research 

Council. 


17,100 

Agriculture. 

17,100 


B C Ground Water Association. 


12,000 

Environment. 

12,000 


B C Guest Ranchers Association. 


10,000 

Small Business. 

10,000 


B C Gymnastic Association. 


212,894 

Small Business. 

212,894 


B C Head Injury Association. 


10,000 

Health. 

10,000 

B C Health Association. 


33,981 

Health. 

33,981 

B C Health Care Risk Management 

Society. 


6,950,000 

Health. 

6,950,000 

B C Health Research Foundation. 


4,650,000 

Health. 

4,650,000 

B C Healthly Communities Network. 


70,750 

Health. 

70,750 

B C Heritage Languages Association. 


75,050 

Attorney General. 

55,050 

Education. 

20,000 


B C Heritage Trust. 


1,500,000 

Small Business. 

1,500,000 

B C Hog Marketing Commission. 

57,494 

Agriculture. 

57,494 

B C Horticultural Coalition. 

24,200 

Agriculture. 

24,200 

B C Horticultural Council. 


66,902 

Agriculture. 

30,000 

Education. 

36,902 


B C Hot House Foods Inc. 

72,040 



Ministry 

Total 


$ 

$ 

Agriculture. 

72,040 


B C Housing Management Commission. 


72,723,530 

Children and Families. 

3,940,049 


Health. 

2,090,344 


Human Resources. 

44,452 


Municipal Affairs. 

66,087,800 


Small Business. 

300 


Women's Equality. 

560,585 


B C Human Rights Coalition. 


10,282 

Attorney General. 

10,282 

i 

B C 1 T Child Care Centre. 


43,536 

Children and Families. 

31,116 


Human Resources. 

12,420 


B C Institute for Studies in International 

Trade. 


25,000 

Employment and Investment. 

25,000 


B C Institute of Technology. 


104,213,983 

Agriculture. 

4,216 


Children and Families. 

802 


Education. 

103,894,796 


Employment and Investment. 

16,911 


Environment. 

30,000 


Finance. 

7,717 


Health. 

237,847 


Labour. 

3,885 


Small Business. 

16,809 


Women's Equality. 

1,000 


B C Institute on Family Violence Society 


282,093 

Attorney General. 

5,000 


Health. 

277,093 


B C Interior Independent Living Resource 

Centre. 


15,570 

Education. 

15,070 


Women's Equality. 

500 


B C International Commercial Arbitration 

Centre. 


68,849 

Attorney General. 

68,849 


B C judo Association. 


68,294 

Small Business. 

68,294 


B C Lacrosse Association. 


90,086 

Small Business. 

90,086 


B C Lawn Bowling Association. 


17,786 

Small Business. 

17,786 


B C Library Association. 


1,094,500 

Employment and Investment. 

865,000 


Municipal Affairs. 

226,500 


Women's Equality. 

3,000 


B C Library Trustees Association. 


36,500 

Municipal Affairs. 

36,500 


B C Lions Society for Children with 

Disabilities. 


75,000 

Small Business. 

75,000 


B C Luge Association. 


29,401 

Small Business. 

29,401 


B C Lung Association. 


182,122 

Health. 

182,122 


B C Medical Association. 


49,668,101 

Health. 

49,668,101 


B C Medical Services of the United 

Church of Canada. 


2,441,970 

Health. 

2,441,970 


B C Mental Health Society. 


100,683,293 

Children and Families. 

217,632 


Health. 

100,338,730 


Human Resources. 

126,931 


B C Mobility Opportunities Society. 


13,000 

Small Business. 

13,000 


B C Motion Picture Association. 


42,300 

Small Business. 

42,300 


B C Museums Association. 


174,531 

Small Business. 

174,531 


B C Muslim Association. 


900,949 

Education. 

900,949 


B C Netball Association. 


38,457 

Small Business. 

38,457 


B C Neurological Group Home Society . 


209,985 

Health. 

209,985 


B C Nursery Trades Association. 


37,500 

Agriculture. 

37,500 

























































































































































PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


D 63 



Ministry 

Total 


$ 

$ 

B C P V P A Connections 96. 


28,600 

■Education. 

28,600 


B C Packers Ltd. 


55,910 

Agriculture. 

55,910 


B C Paraplegic Association. 


20,740 

Health. 

18,240 


Women's Equality. 

2,500 


B C Parents in Crisis Society. 


210,696 

Children and Families. 

209,049 


Women's Equality. 

1,647 


B C Pathfinder Users Consortium. 


75,000 

Education. 

75,000 


B C Pavilion Corp. 


2,191,447 

Employment and Investment. 

483,447 


Small Business. 

1,708,000 


B C Pharmacy Association. 


260,000 

Health. 

260,000 


B C Photography & Media Arts Society .. 


47,000 

Small Business. 

47,000 


B C Pork Producers Association. 


19,000 

Agriculture. 

19,000 


B C Principals/Vice Principals Association 


161,786 

Attorney General. 

10,000 


Education. 

70,036 


Health. 

81,750 


B C Prosthetic & Orthotics Services. 


28,858 

Children and Families. 

20,418 


Human Resources. 

8,440 


B C Public Health Association. 


439,942 

Health. 

439,942 


BC Public Schools Employers Association 


1,970,773 

Education. 

1,970,773 


B C Racquetball Association. 


17,786 

Small Business. 

17,786 


B C Recreation & Parks Association. 


212,000 

Small Business. 

212,000 


B C Recreation & Parks Association— 

Woman's Committee. 


13,000 

Small Business. 

13,000 


BC Regional Hospital Districts Financing 

Authority. 


155,575,008 

Health. 

155,575,008 


B C Rehabilitation & Recovery Centre ... 


19,614 

Children and Families. 

634 


Health. 

18,980 


B C Rehabilitation Society. 


40,017,050 

Children and Families. 

258,422 


Health. 

39,721,857 


Human Resources. 

12,626 


Women's Equality. 

24,145 


B C Rehabilitation Society—G F Strong 

Centre. 


42,155 

Education. 

13,125 


Health. 

29,030 


B C Rehabilitation Society—Pearson 

Centre. 


994,121 

Children and Families. 

454,151 


Health. 

252,462 


Human Resources. 

287,508 


B C Rhythmic Sportive Gymnastic 

Federation. 


56,132 

Small Business. 

56,132 


B C Ringette Association. 


52,943 

Small Business. 

52,943 


B C Rugby Union. 


156,842 

Small Business. 

156,842 


B C Sailing Association. 


148,826 

Small Business. 

148,826 


B C Salmon Farmers Association. 


80,301 

Agriculture. 

80,301 


B C Salmon Marketing Council. 


35,775 

Agriculture. 

35,775 


B C Schizophrenia Society. 


732,249 

Health. 

732,249 


B C Schizophrenia Society—Courtenay. 


61,081 

Health. 

61,081 


B C Schizophrenia Society—Victoria. 


277,501 

Health. 

275,957 


Women's Equality. 

1,544 




Ministry 

Total 


$ 

$ 

B C School of Art Therapy. 


44,396 

Health. 

44,396 


B C School Sports. 


103,000 

Small Business. 

103,000 


B C School Superintendents Association 


100,600 

Education. 

100,600 


B C School Trustees Association. 


349,245 

Education. 

349,245 


B C Seniors Games Society. 


79,000 

Small Business. 

79,000 


B C Settlement & Integration Worker's 

Association. 


36,102 

Attorney General. 

36,102 


B C Shellfish Growers Association. 


37,700 

Agriculture. 

37,700 


B C Soccer Association. 


222,570 

Small Business. 

222,570 


B C Society for the Prevention of Cruelty 

to Animals. 


121,550 

Agriculture. 

71,550 


Small Business. 

50,000 


B C Special Olympics Society. 


74,992 

Small Business. 

74,992 


B C Speedskating Association. 


80,087 

Small Business. 

80,087 


B C Sport & Fitness Council for the Disabled 


82,000 

Small Business. 

82,000 


B C Squash Racquets Association. 


84,798 

Small Business. 

84,798 


B C Student Loans. 


30,767,086 

Education. 

30,767,086 


B C Systems Corp. 


20,593 

Women's Equality. 

20,593 


B C Table Tennis Association. 


44,354 

Small Business. 

44,354 


B C Target Sports Association. 


12,980 

Small Business. 

12,980 


B C Teachers Federation. 


995,196 

Attorney General. 

10,000 


Education. 

985,196 


B C Tenpin Federation. 


16,825 

Small Business. 

16,825 


B C Touring Council. 


56,000 

Small Business. 

56,000 


B C Trade Development Corp. 


414,805 

Employment and Investment. 

414,805 


B C Transit. 


294,487,989 

Children and Families. 

55,408 


Education. 

62,830 


Finance. 

13,000,000 


Health. 

281,369,704 


Human Resources. 

47 


B C Transplant Society. 


17,173,877 

Health. 

17,173,877 


B C Treaty Commission. 


2,760,101 

Aboriginal Affairs. 

2,760,101 


B C Triathlon Association, The. 


16,298 

Small Business. 

16,298 


B C Turkey Marketing Board. 


50,178 

Agriculture. 

50,178 


B C Vegetable Marketing Commission ... 


91,946 

Agriculture. 

91,946 


B C Volleyball Association. 


231,836 

Small Business. 

231,836 


B C Water Polo Association. 


106,505 

Small Business. 

106,505 


B C Water Ski Association. 


30,396 

Small Business. 

30,396 


B C Wine Information Society. 


34,000 

Agriculture. 

34,000 


B C Wine Institute. 


439,026 

Agriculture. 

439,026 


B C Womens Hospital & Health Centre 

Society. 


52,782,450 

Children and Families. 

108,794 


Health. 

52,646,080 


Human Resources. 

27,576 


B C Womens Institute. 


25,000 

Agriculture. 

25,000 



















































































































































D 64 


PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Grants and Contributions —Continued 


Ministry Total Ministry 

$ $ $ 


B C Wood Products Education Society... 


10,000 

Women's Equality. 

1,893 

Education. 

B C Wood Specialties Group. 

10,000 

749,912 

Baker, M. 

Children and Families. 

177,953 

Employment and Investment. 

B C Wrestling Association. 

749,912 

212,661 

Baker, Mary. 

Children and Families. 

26,165 

Small Business. 

B C/Yukon Society of Transition Houses 

212,661 

351,816 

Baker, S. 

Children and Families. 

10,967 

Women's Equality. 

351,816 


Human Resources. 

165 

B J V Enterprises Ltd. 

Children and Families. 

13,617 

546,238 

Baker, Susan Mabel. 

Children and Families. 

13,564 

Health. 

B R Community Concepts. 

532,621 

24,601 

Baker, V, Dr. 

Health. 

143,893 

Children and Families. 

B V P Enterprises Ltd. 

24,601 

60,093 

Balaam, Vaughan. 

Children and Families. 

98,636 

Children and Families. 

Human Resources. 

47,362 

12,731 


Balcaen, Marilyn. 

Children and Families. 

10,912 

Bach, Betty. 


34,003 

Health. 

25,904 

Children and Families. 

34,003 


Human Resources. 

1,787 

Bach, Carolyn. 

Children and Families. 

36,026 

36,026 

Baldwin, Pat D. 

Children and Families. 

33,780 

Bach, Heather. 

Attorney General. 

11,430 

11,430 

Balfour House Inc. 

Children and Families. 

17,723 

Bader, Soraya. 


10,041 

Health. 

418,742 

Children and Families. 

6,822 


Human Resources. 

6,606 

Human Resources. 

Women's Equality. 

2,124 

1,095 


Ball & Michael Ball, Patricia. 

Children and Families. 

11,955 

Badertscher, Marie. 

Children and Families. 

10,117 

10,117 

Ball, Graeme. 

Small Business. 

10,000 

Badger, Jeanette. 

Children and Families. 

12,000 

12,000 

Ball, Marilyn. 

Children and Families. 

7,798 

Badry, Corinne. 


24,340 

Human Resources. 

2,629 

Health. 

24,340 


Women's Equality. 

1,281 

Baert, Louise.. 

Children and Families. 

150,058 

150,058 

Balia, Gina M. 

Children and Families. 

53,700 

Bafaro, Francine. 

Children and Families. 

31,960 

44,060 

Ballantyne, Dominique. 

Children and Families. 

33,722 

Human Resources. 

Bagan, Elaine. 

12,100 

53,274 

Ballantyne, Don. 

Children and Families. 

23,086 

Children and Families. 

Bagshaw Society, Elizabeth. 

53,274 

709,627 

Ballard Power Systems Inc. 

Employment and Investment. 

2,556,541 

Health. 

709,627 


Environment. 

600,000 

Bahrey, Karen. 

Children and Families. 

4,413 

12,896 

Bambi Enterprises Ltd. 

Children and Families. 

20,066 

Human Resources. 

6,173 


Human Resources. 

6,835 

Women's Equality. 

2,310 


Women's Equality. 

7,866 

Baier, Richard. 

Children and Families. 

66,562 

66,562 

Banae, Soraya. 

Children and Families. 

16,911 

Bailey, Kathy. 


10,110 

Human Resources. 

2,550 

Children and Families. 

Human Resources. 

7,213 

1,505 


Banania, Eugenia. 

Children and Families. 

7,474 

Women's Equality. 

1,392 


Health. 

21,233 

Bailey, Patricia. 


35,921 

Human Resources. 

2,958 

Health. 

Bailey, W. 

35,921 

26,158 

Bancud & Marilou Bancud, Roger. 

Children and Families. 

18,632 

Children and Families. 

Bailey, William J T. 

26,158 

36,007 

Banhaw, Wilmore A. 

Children and Families. 

17,658 

Children and Families. 

Bain, Donna. 

36,007 

13,253 

Bank, Angeline. 

Children and Families. 

24,065 

Children and Families. 

13,253 


Human Resources. 

7,786 

Baird, Janice E. 

Children and Families. 

8,322 

14,399 

Bankhead & Samuel Bankhead, Ruth. 

Children and Families. 

10,236 

Human Resources. 

Women's Equality. 

3,924 

2,153 


Banton, Susan. 

Children and Families. 

50,361 

Bajkov, Kim. 

Children and Families. 

9,883 

1 3,004 

Baptist Housing Administration Society . 
Health. 

167,064 

Human Resources. 

Bakalos, Dionne. 

3,121 

16,985 

Barber-Cross, Rebecca. 

Attorney General. 

26,438 

Children and Families. 

Human Resources. 

8,395 

6,928 


Barclay Lodge. 

Health. 

113,940 

Women's Equality. 

Baker Memorial Hospital Society, G R... 

1,662 

10,670,420 

Barclay, lanice. 

Attorney General. 

30,516 

Health. 

Baker Memorial Hospital, G R. 

10,670,420 

162,348 

Barclay, R. 

Children and Families. 

14,401 

Children and Families. 

Health. 

17,005 

135,673 

Barclay, Roger N. 

Children and Families. 

20,632 

Human Resources. 

Baker, Debra. 

9,670 

10,029 

Bard on the Beach Theatre Society. 

Small Business. 

11,700 

Children and Families. 

Human Resources. 

7,449 

687 


Barker, Mary C. 

Children and Families. 

57,052 


Total 

$ 

177,953 

26,165 

11,132 

13,564 

143,893 

98,636 

38,603 

33,780 

443,071 

11,955 
10,000 
11,708 

53.700 
33,722 
23,086 

3,156,541 

34,767 

19,461 

31,665 

18.632 
17,658 ' 
31,851 

10,236 
50,361 
167,064 
26,438 
113,940 
30,516 
14,401 

20.632 

11.700 
57,052 





























































































































































PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 1996/97 


D 65 



Ministry 

Total 


$ 

$ 

Barker, Patricia Anne. 


10,000 

Small Business. 

10,000 


Barlees Restaurant. 


18,501 

Children and Families. 

18,501 


Barnard, Frans. 


44,478 

Children and Families. 

44,478 


Barnes, B. 


27,645 

Children and Families. 

27,645 


Barnes, Barbara. 


22,217 

Children and Families. 

22,217 


Barnes, David S, Dr. 


96,441 

Health. 

96,441 


Barnes, Cudrun. 


13,373 

Children and Families. 

13,373 


Barnetson & Associates,) M. 


73,075 

Education. 

73,075 


Barnett, Yvonne. 


110,182 

Childr