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Caledon Public Library hosted its first ever Comic Expo Saturday at the Albion-Bolton branch, attracting lots of fans and enthusiasts. 
Larissa Lammers, 7, from Bolton was working on creating her own cartoon, assisted by library volunteer Theresa Nagele. Turn to 
page A6 for more scenes of the Expo. 


Photo by Bill Rea 


Town sending $5,000 to Fort McMurray fire relief 


By Bill Rea 

The Town of Caledon is 
pitching in on the relief effort 
in light of the massive wild 
fires in Fort McMurray, Alber- 
ta. 

Town council Tuesday night 
passed a motion to donate 
$5,000 to the Red Cross, Alber- 
ta Fires Appeal. The funds will 
come from the Town’s Corpo- 
rate Accounts Grant Account. 

The preamble to the motion 
stated that the fire has forced 
all 70,000 Fort McMurray res- 
idents to leave their homes in 


Quote 
of the week 


“As we travel along the road- 


way in the future, they will be 
remembered,” 

Peel Region Chair Frank Dale, at 

the unveiling of the signs des- 

ignating Dixie Road as Veterans 

Memorial Roadway 





search of safety — the largest 
fire-related evacuation in the 
province’s history, and some 
of these people are in need of 
emergency supplies, such as 


food, clothing, 7? 












backs. 

“IT can’t imagine how diif- 
ficult it would have been for 
them,” he commented. 

Thompson 
also had praise 





shel- for the  fire- 
ter, a fighters who 
person- ss | have been 
al ser- | a battling the 
vices, Ne blaze, as well 
etc. ~ as municipal 
May- Ky oie officials who 
or Allan have been 
Thomp- sy Think! providing 
ane Isnt As}Ha Te tal aid and 
teeeaay Bolton Fam jy De ie tn 
meeting jg always accepting " antl all _—he- 
with an ac- day for an appointment eee? he 
knowledge- Call today 905 951-9 ston declared. 
ment of the Bi shor sealers pizaNova =»s- Fe. also 
situation in uw tow © i pointed 
Alberta, ob- | @ 7 eo ena cente tist.com out the 
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serving that www.Bo Town 





many of the 
residents of Fort McMur- 
ray would have been forced 
from their homes with little 
more than the clothes on their 


has been willing to help out 
during emergency situations 
elsewhere in Ontario, and has 
offered aid with refugees ar- 
riving in the area. 


Councillor Rob Mezzapel- 
li, himself a professional fire- 
fighter, put forth the motion. 

“It’s an extremely unfortu- 
nate event,” he remarked. 


Province 
looking to 
expand 
Greenbelt 


There’s good news for people 
who are fans of the Province’s 
Greenbelt. 

It’s going to get bigger, if the 
government acts on the recom- 
mendations of the panel it set up. 

The Province announced Tues- 
day it’s proposing changes to the 
four provincial plans governing 
land use in the area, including the 
Growth Plan for the Greater Gold- 
en Horseshoe, Greenbelt Plan, 
Oak Ridges Moraine Conservation 
Plan and Niagara Hecaromene | 
Plan. The proposed changes are 


See ‘Mayor’ on page A2 © 








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A2 CALEDON CITIZEN | MAY 12, 2016 


Mayor is happy to see steps to harmonize plans 


From page Al 


in response to the input received from the 
land Use Planning Review advisory pan- 
el, which was chaired by former Toronto 
David Crombie. 

The proposed changes will help protect 
clean water in the area by adding the 
lands within 21 major urban river val- 
leys to the Greenbelt, as well as setting 
up a process for additional expansion to 
the Greenbelt in the future to protect oth- 
er water resources; require zoning along 
transit corridors to provide adequate den- 
sity to support transit; establish Green- 
belt-level protection for natural heritage 
systems, such as wetlands, woodlands 
and rivers, beyond the current Greenbelt, 
with the Province taking a lead in map- 
ping those areas; support agricultural vi- 
ability and preserve farmland by setting 
strict requirements for the expansion of 
urban areas and allowing more flexibili- 
ty for agricultural use in the Greenbelt; 
and require municipalities to integrate 
climate change policies into municipal of- 
ficial plans and to conduct climate change 


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Affiliated with the Associated Gospel Churches of Canada 


vulnerability risk assessments when they 
are planning or replacing infrastructure. 

Members of the public can comment 
on these proposals by filling out a survey 
that can be found at Attp://www.mah. 
gov.on.ca/ Page14851.aspx 

They have until Sept. 30 to comment. 

Reaction to the proposals started soon 
after the announcement was made. 

“IT was happy to hear that they will be 
harmonizing the four plans,” Mayor Allan 
Thompson commented in a statement re- 
leased by his office, adding that shows the 
panel was listening. 

He also said he had some concerns with 
the intensification numbers in the report, 
observing it might slow greenfield devel- 
opment. 

“[m looking forward to reviewing it in 
more detail,” he added. 

But not all the reaction has been posi- 
tive. 

The Ontario Homebuilders’ Association 
(OHBA) fears plans to increase both in- 
tensification and density requirements in 
the Provincial Growth Plan will mean less 
housing choice and higher prices for home 
buyers. 

“This announcement means that you're 
going to see more intensification, more 
condos, less choice and higher prices,” 
said Bryan Tuckey, president and CKO 
of the Building Industry and Land Devel- 
opment Association (BILD), representing 
the largest of OHBA’s locals affected by 
the announcement. “The residential con- 
struction industry will adapt, as it has in 
the past — it 1s going to be the residents 
and new home buyers that are going to 
pay the price.” 

OHBA added that since the introduction 
of the Growth Plan in 2006, every housing 


Community Events 


A directory of what's happening 
In our community 





This column is provided as a free public service to 
non-profit organizations to announce up-coming 
events. Please contact Bill Rea at the Caledon Citi- 
zen at (905) 857-6626 or 1-888-557-6626 if you wish to 
have an announcement published. 


THURSDAY, MAY 12 

Come and join members of the Caledon Horti- 
cultural Society to learn and enhance gardening 
knowledge, starting at 7:30 p.m. at Cheltenham 
United Church, 14309 Creditview Rd. Can you 
keep a secret? Fortunately Shannon Wood from 
the Saugeen Conservation Authority will share 
her knowledge on the “Secret Lives of Plants.” 


“Has your life been affected by someone else’s 
drinking? Al-Anon Family Group is for you.” The 
Bolton group meets Thursdays at 8:30 p.m. at 
Caven Presbyterian Church (110 King W, Bolton). 
Call 416-410-3809 or http://al-anon.alateen.on.ca 


Bolton and District PROBUS Club presents Social 
Media 101, Keeping up with the Grandchildren, 
with library technical staff doing the presentation. 
It will be at Albion-Bolton Community Centre, 
starting at 9:45 a.m. All are welcome. Refresh- 
ments will be provided. 


Asmall group from the Dufferin Circle of Storytell- 
ers will be sharing their tales with the PROBUS 
Club at the Orangeville Agriculture Society Event 
Centre, starting at 10 a.m. The Dufferin Circle of 
Storytellers was formed in 1994 and is devoted 
to reviving the ancient art of storytelling by evok- 
ing the memory of storytellers of olden times who 
travelled rough roads to gather stories to tell. 
Guests are welcome at the monthly meetings. 
Call Clare at 519-939-2711 for more information. 


FRIDAY, MAY 13 

Wellness, Interaction, Social and Exercise 
(WISE) is a health promotion and social program 
for seniors (55+) happening at the Palgrave Unit- 
ed Church Friday mornings. Low impact exercise/ 
falls prevention session starts at 9:30 a.m. with 
regular programming with refreshments starting 
at 10:15. Call 905-857-7651 for more information. 


SATURDAY, MAY 14 

A welcome is extended to everyone who wants to 
stop eating compulsively and are tired of dieting. 
Come to Overeaters Anonymous Saturday morn- 
ings at 9 a.m. at Knox United Church, Caledon vil- 
lage. For more information, contact 416-705-7670. 


Palgrave United Church will be holding a plant 
and bake sale. It will be at the church, 34 Pine 
Ave., from 8 a.m. to noon. for more information, 
phone 905-880-0303 or email to palgraveunited- 
church @rogers.com 


SUNDAY, MAY 15 

Caledon Concert Band presents a live music event 
at the Caledon Community Complex, 6215 Old 
Church Rd., Caledon East at 2 p.m. Our Heroes 
from Fantasy & History is an affordable family enter- 
tainment featuring casual cafe seating, free refresh- 
ments and a Fan Costume Contest. Musical selec- 
tions will include Guardians of the Galaxy, Star Trek, 
Pirates of the Caribbean, Dr. Who, Hockey and 
Olympic Themes. Tickets are available at the door. 
Kids 12 and younger get in free with a $12 adult 
purchace. Students and seniors are $10. Proceeds 
support the Caledon Concert Band Association Mu- 
sical Education Scholarship Program and music 
development opportunities within the community. 
Interested musicians are welcome to join rehears- 
als each Wednesday 7:30 p.m. at the Caledon East 
Community Complex Hall B. For more information, 
contact Andy at 416-276-7852. 


TUESDAY, MAY 17 

Adjustments After Birth meets from 10 a.m. to 
noon. This support group is for mothers needing 
additional support following the birth or adoption 
of a child. Registration is required. Group and 
child care are offered free of charge. To register 
call Caledon Parent-Child Centre at 905-857- 
0090 or email jvanandel@cp-cc.org 


Caledon Parent-Child Centre (CPCC) is offering a 
program called Growing Together at Stationview 
Place in Bolton from 4:30 to 7 p.m. A small group of 
families and their children will meet to share a meal, 
play and learn. Staff will also be available to provide 
information and support to parents. Activities will 
include topics like healthy foods, active living and 
wellness. This program is designed for families with 
children up to the age of six who have a total house- 
hold income of less than $45,000. Growing Togeth- 
er in Peel is funded by CAP-C. Contact CPCC at 
905-857-0090 to determine if you qualify. 


Let’s Get Together: Sharing the Journey of Raising 
a Child with Special Needs is an inclusive program 
for families presented by the Caledon Parent-Child 
Centre and Brampton/Caledon Community Living, 
meeting the first and third Tuesday of the month, 


from 5:45 to 7:15 p.m. Come play and connect 
with other families to explore the various issues 
that surround parenting a child with special needs. 
Registration is required. To register call 905-857- 
0090 or email ailsa@cp-cc.org 


WEDNESDAY, MAY 18 

TOPS (Take Off Pounds Sensibly) Chapter 
#ON1381 meets every Wednesday from 6:30 to 
7:30 p.m., at the Friendship Room of Knox United 
Church in Caledon village. This non-profit weight 
loss group meets to learn about nutrition and ex- 
ercise. Call Barbara at (519) 927-5696. 


Caledon East Seniors Club #588 meets every 
Wednesday at 1:15 p.m. at the Caledon Commu- 
nity Complex, Caledon East. Everyone welcome 
for an afternoon of friendly euchre and lunch. For 
more information, call (905) 584-9933. 


TOPS (Take Off Pounds Sensibly) is a non-profit 
weight loss group that meets weekly in the Heri- 
tage Hall of Bolton United Church at 8 Nancy St. 
Weigh in is from 6:45 to 7:20 p.m. and the meet- 
ing is from 7:30 to 8:30. Everyone is welcome. For 
more information, call Marion at 905-857-5191 or 
Lorraine at 905-857-1568. 


Every Wednesday, catch up with friends over cof- 
fee at Knox United Church in Caledon village at 
10 a.m. 


THURSDAY, MAY 19 

Bolton Banter Toastmasters meet every first, third 
and fifth Thursday at the Albion-Bolton Commu- 
nity Centre at 7 p.m. Lose your fear of public 
speaking and build leadership skills. Everyone 
welcome. Email info@boltonbanter.org or visit 
www.boltonbanter.org 


“Has your life been affected by someone else’s 
drinking? Al-Anon Family Group is for you.” The 
Bolton group meets Thursdays at 8:30 p.m. at 
Caven Presbyterian Church (110 King W, Bolton). 
Call 416-410-3809 or http://al-anon.alateen.on.ca 


FRIDAY, MAY 20 

Wellness, Interaction, Social and Exercise 
(WISE) is a health promotion and social program 
for seniors (55+) happening at the Palgrave Unit- 
ed Church Friday mornings. Low impact exercise/ 
falls prevention session starts at 9:30 a.m. with 
regular programming with refreshments starting 
at 10:15. Call 905-857-7651 for more information. 


SATURDAY, MAY 21 

A welcome is extended to everyone who wants to 
stop eating compulsively and are tired of dieting. 
Come to Overeaters Anonymous Saturday morn- 
ings at 9 a.m. at Knox United Church, Caledon 
village. For more information, contact 416-705- 
7670. 


SUNDAY, MAY 22 

The Memorial Windows at St. James. During the 
11 a.m. worship service at St. James’ Anglican 
Church in Caledon East, the congregation will 
share the stories of windows including the sym- 
bolism, scriptural significance and stories about 
the people each window memorializes. Today, 
they will discuss the Judge, Evans, Blackburn, 
Holder and Noble windows. The Church is at 
6025 Old Church Rd. 


TUESDAY, MAY 24 

Adjustments After Birth meets from 10 a.m. to 
noon. This support group is for mothers needing 
additional support following the birth or adoption 
of a child. Registration is required. Group and 
child care are offered free of charge. To register 
call Caledon Parent-Child Centre at 905-857- 
0090 or email jvanandel@cp-cc.org 


Caledon Parent-Child Centre (CPCC) is offering 
a program called Growing Together at Station- 
view Place in Bolton from 4:30 to 7 p.m. A small 
group of families and their children will meet to 
share a meal, play and learn. Staff will also be 
available to provide information and support to 
parents. Activities will include topics like healthy 
foods, active living and wellness. This program is 
designed for families with children up to the age 
of six who have a total household income of less 
than $45,000. Growing Together in Peel is funded 
by CAP-C. Contact CPCC at 905-857-0090 to de- 
termine if you qualify. 


Let’s Get Together: Sharing the Journey of Rais- 
ing a Child with Special Needs is an inclusive 
program for families presented by the Caledon 
Parent-Child Centre and Brampton/Caledon 
Community Living, meeting the first and third 
Tuesday of the month, from 5:45 to 7:15 p.m. 
Come play and connect with other families to ex- 
plore the various issues that surround parenting a 
child with special needs. Registration is required. 
To register call 905-857-0090 or email ailsa@cp- 
Cc.org 


type has seen significant price increases. 

But OHBA and BILD welcomed the 
Province’s move to require zoning along 
transit corridors to provide adequate den- 
sity to support transit. This is something 
the industry associations have advocated 
for. 

“The changes we are proposing would 
promote compact, vibrant communities 
that support jobs and public transit, and 
reward us with an expanded Greenbelt,” 
commented Municipal Affairs and Hous- 
ing Minister Ted McMeekin. “Together, 
these would be major steps in boosting 
our economy, furthering smart, sustain- 
able living, protecting our environment 
and addressing climate change.” 

“People want to live in well-planned 
areas that meet their needs in a thought- 
ful way,” observed Natural Resources and 
Forestry Minister Bill Mauro. “I thank 
all who have taken part in this review for 
helping to shape the balanced changes 
we are now proposing and I look forward 
to hearing your views on the proposed 


changes to the plans.” 

“IT am happy to see the province has 
embraced the advisory panel’s recommen- 
dations to co-ordinate land use planning 
with transit planning and infrastructure 
investments,” Crombie said. “The pace 
and growth of the Greater Golden Horse- 
shoe could be sustained for decades to 
come with the adoption of the proposed 
land use plans.” 

The Ontario Greenbelt Alliance (OGA) 
was pleased with the plans to grow and 
strengthen the Greenbelt while guiding 
smart urban growth through strong 1m- 
provements to Ontario’s Growth Plan. 

“Today's announcement is great news 
for Ontarians who care about local farms, 
forests and sustainable communities,” 
said Tim Gray, executive director of Envi- 
ronment Defence. “We’re pleased that the 
province is showing leadership with new 
protections for the Greenbelt, including 
sensitive water supplies and natural her- 
itage systems, while supporting the agri- 
cultural sector and protecting farmland.” 


Public consultation tonight on 
Belfountain Conservation Area 


Credit Valley Conservation (CVC) is 
hosting a public consultation session to 
present the preferred alternative for the 
Environmental Assessment (Class EA) 
for the Belfountain Conservation Area 
dam and headpond. 

The consultation will take place tonight 
(Thursday) from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Bel- 
fountain Public School (Gymnasium) at 
17247 Shaws Creek Rd. 

The consultation session will include 
a presentation and opportunity to speak 
to CVC staff, ask questions and provide 
feedback. Registration starts at 6:45 
p.m. and the presentation begins at 7:15 
pM: 

The preferred alternative was deter- 
mined after extensive consultation and 
input from the public, CVC’s Stakehold- 
er Advisory Committee and agency part- 
ners. It has been identified as the best al- 
ternative that meets CVC’s objectives for 
the area, which include reducing risk to 
visitors, staff and downstream property; 
promoting natural stream function; con- 
serving and enhancing natural heritage 
attributes; maintaining a barrier between 
upstream brook trout and downstream 
non-native and invasive species; striving 
for long-term sustainability including 


economic viability; and maintaining or 
improving the visitor experience 

CVC acquired the Belfountain dam and 
headpond in 1959 when it purchased the 
property. A study completed in 2018 re- 
vealed various structural issues with the 
dam and concluded it did not meet Pro- 
vincial standards for safety. The head- 
pond associated with the dam has various 
environmental impacts. 

CVC reports it has been speaking with 
the Belfountain community and stake- 
holders since 2014. There are two concur- 
rent public processes underway — a Class 
EA process for the Belfountain Conserva- 
tion Area dam and headpond and a man- 
agement plan process for the Belfountain 
Complex. 

In December 2014 and September 2015, 
CVC held open houses in the communi- 
ty regarding the Class EA and the man- 
agement plan. Nearly 60 people attend- 
ed these meetings, shared opinions and 
commented as they heard presentations, 
toured displays and received information. 

Visit www.creditvalleyca.ca/bcmp for 
information on the complete process or 
contact Conservation Lands Planner Lau- 
ra Rundle at 905-670-1615, ext. 535 or 
lrundle@creditvalleyca.ca 


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Tilson wants to hear more 
about Assisted Dying bill 


By Bill Rea 

The federal government last week re- 
ceived approval in principle for it’s pro- 
posed legislation on medically assisted 
dying, but there’s still opposition to what’s 
been presented. 

Only 20 Conservative MPs were in fa- 
vour of the motion, and Dufferin-Caledon 
MP David Tilson was among them, al- 
though he called it an “awful bill.” 

He pointed out the bill is still in second 
reading in the House of Commons, and it 
still has to be looked over by the justice 
committee of the House. Tilson is anxious 
to see what amendments they propose. 

“It’s probably one of the most difficult 
issues I’ve ever come across in my politi- 
cal career,” he commented. 

This issue also hits home with Tilson. 

His father died of amyotrophic lateral 
sclerosis (ALS), which is also known as 
Lou Gehrig’s Disease. Tilson pointed out a 
person wishing to be assisted 1n dying has 
to be an adult, competent and consenting. 
By the fourth year of his illness, Tilson’s 
father couldn’t speak, so he wouldn’t have 
been able to give consent. 

He also pointed out the bill doesn’t cov- 
er dementia, which his mother, who lived 
to be 95, had. 

Tilson said when his mother was in her 
early 90s, she thought she might be losing 
control of her mind, and she didn’t want 





Tilson pointed out if the legislation 
were to fail, there would be a void in the 
issue of doctor-assisted suicide. “I believe 
we need a bill,” he declared. 

But Tilson does have problems with 
what’s been presented. 

“T believe it’s poorly drafted,” he said, 
commenting it contains no mention of 
palliative care, hospice or funding these 
programs. He was also concerned there 
are no protections include for health care 
workers. 

“We need to hear what the committee’s 
suggesting,” Tilson said, adding he wants 
to hear legal opinions on whether it com- 
plies with the Charter of Rights and Free- 
doms. 

“Tm not pleased with the bill,” he re- 
marked. “I’m still up in the air on how ’m 
going to vote on the bill.” 

He said the issues of palliative care and 
hospices might be resolved at committee. 

“If theyre not resolved, I might vote 
‘no’,” he said. 

The government was anxious to move 
on with the matter. The Supreme Court 
last year set a June 6 deadline to have a 
new law enacted. Tilson said he had sug- 
gested the government seek and exten- 
sion from the Court. “They’re not going to 
do that,” he commented. 

“We'll wait and see what the govern- 
ment does,” he commented. “I want to see 
what they're going to do.” 


Sunday, being Mother’s Day, was a time for mothers and their children to do things to- 
gether, even if it just taking a stroll in Bolton. That’s what this family was doing Sunday 
afternoon. 





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Photo by Bill Rea 


633222 Highway #10 North 


CALEDON CITIZEN | MAY 12, 2016 A3 


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Our team of lawyers, paralegals and 

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Reduce the strain on muscles for National Road Safety Week 


Being a road user comes with a whole 
list of inherent risks — fast-moving ve- 
hicles, distracted drivers and inattentive 
pedestrians are only a few of the hazards 
one may encounter while in transit. But 
what about the dangers people pose to 
themselves? 

For this year’s National Road Safety 
Week (May 17 to 23), the Canada Safety 
Council wants to remind Canadians of the 
importance of proper ergonomics behind 
the wheel. Developing a musculoskeletal 
or repetitive strain injury 1s much easier 
than it would appear, and these can in 
fact leave people at a higher risk for car 
crashes. 

According to SAFE Work Manitoba, 






























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more than 50 per cent of on-the-job in- 
juries to people who drive for a living 
are musculoskeletal injuries (MSI). And 
while a significant amount of this statistic 
can be linked to heightened exposure — a 
professional driver will, out of necessity, 
have more opportunity to have their pos- 
ture negatively impact their health — it’s 
still an injury risk that can be mitigated 
by taking steps to reduce the strain on the 
body. 

A significant factor in injury 1s when a 
driver maintains a posture that causes 
them to reach forward or forces them to 
use awkward motions to control the ve- 
hicle. Additionally, in larger vehicles, the 
full-body vibration over a prolonged peri- 


od of time can heighten the risk of injury 
to the lower back and spine. 

Additionally, prolonged sessions at the 
wheel can fatigue the back muscles and 
weaken them, which makes them more 
vulnerable to injury than when they are 
not fatigued. 

Here are some steps that can be taken 
to reduce the risk of injury: 

- Maintain a proper posture while seated, 
ensuring that the knees and hips are lev- 
el and that you can reach the pedals and 
instruments without having to come away 
from the back of the seat. 

- Aim to have the seat inclined at be- 
tween 110-120 degrees, which will reduce 
the pressure on the discs in your back. 


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Carolynn Tersigni began Mandala 
Home Staging after realizing her 
Holistic Practitioner practice was 
missing an element. Having owned 
38 natural health centres in her 
career, Carolynn found that it could 
be a challenge for some to really 


= change their health and lives 
si) once they left her centre. 


With  Carolynn’s help 
clients can improve their 
health and mindset, 
but sometimes those 
improvements are not 
enough. That’s when 

Carolynn started to 

look more into their 

environments. After 

studying Feng Shui 

and how energy either 
helps or hinders us, 
she found the missing 

element. Many times if we 
have an environment that 
is considered toxic, which can 
include challenging relationships, 

a poorly designed space, geopathic 
stress lines and clutter, these issues 
will have a direct impact on our 
health success. Since moving to 
Caledon in 2014, Carolynn has now 
built her business in this area that 
includes Home Staging properties 
that reflect the home in its best 
light and are energetically ready to 
be sold. Homes hold onto the energy 
they witness and can influence 
how the space feels. Have you ever 
walked into a home and could feel 
heaviness or sadness, to later find 
out the family selling is going thru 
a divorce? Carolynn has an elegant 
and inspiring style to creating a 
home people feel connected to in a 
positive way. She believes our homes 


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- If your vehicle is equipped with a lum- 
bar support, adjust it so your back is even- 
ly supported. 

- The steering wheel should be close 
enough to you and low enough that you 
don’t have to strain your neck and upper 
back by reaching. 

- Before removing any heavy items from 
the trunk or the back of the truck, give 
your body a few minutes to adjust to being 
out of the vehicle. Perform a few stretches 
to limber up. 

- Where possible, break up your driving. 
Take small breaks every two hours or so 
— it’s better to arrive at your destination 
on time and well than to get there early, 
but 1n pain and stiff. 


CALEDON 


CHAMBER 
SF COMMERCE 











should be our sanctuary, a place to 
return to after a stressful, busy day 
that will ground and uplift our lives. 
Utilizing her skills as a professional 
designer, certified home stager, coach 
and holistic practitioner, Carolynn 
helps each family be and live their 
best. Transforming a home thru 
staging includes a complete 
19 page assessment 
of what needs to be 
done to bring a fast, 
profitable sale. With 
a beautiful collection 
of accessories, 
florals, furniture and 
crystals, Carolynn 
can transform any 
space into an inspired 


space. Whether it’s 
time to move, de- 
clutter or re-design, 


Carolynn shares all her 
knowledge to help you get 
your goals done. 


As a dedicated philanthropist and 
entrepreneur, Carolynn is always 
paying it forward. She hosts a 
monthly networking breakfast 
for entrepreneurs, hosts women’s 
fundraising luncheons, teaches 
crystal and mandala art classes, and 
does lunch and learn programs for 
companies covering topics such as 
goal success, meditation, feng shui 
for success, natural remedies for 
stress in your space and many more. 


Interested in crystals? Carolynn 
will be hosting her next Crystal 
Wonders Open House & Sale June 
17th to June 19th in Caledon. 
Please contact her for more 
details. 


Mandala Home Staging 
& Lifestyle Design 


Specializing In.... 

Home Staging, Show casing, Organizing 
Accessory & Furniture Rental 
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647-534-9252 


carolynntersigni@gmail.com 


Mortgage Broker, Lic m1001787 
Igibson@dominionlending.ca 
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CELL : 416.458.4246 


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CALEDON CITIZEN | MAY 12, 2016 A5 


Region unveils Veterans Memorial Roadway signs 


By Bill Rea 

Signs commemorating Dixie Road and 
Horseshoe Hill Road as Veterans Memo- 
rial Roadway are now prominently dis- 
played. 

Peel Region Chair Frank Dale was on 
hand last Wednesday, along with dozens 
of representatives of Regional staff and 
the Royal Canadian Legion, to help offi- 
cially unveil the first sign on Dixie, just 
south of Olde Base Line Road in Caledon. 

“This is a great occasion, out of respect 
certainly for our veterans,” Dale declared, 
commenting on the bravery and sacrifice 
they have shown through the years. “Our 
veterans are our heroes.” 

Dale also thanked the Legion members 
for their help during the process of getting 
the road designated. “You guys were abso- 
lutely great,” he said. 

“As we travel along the roadway in the 
future, they will be remembered,” he add- 
ed. 

“Tm glad you picked Caledon first,” 
Mayor Allan Thompson told Dale. 

Thompson also observed the idea was 
suggested about two years ago by then 
mayor Marolyn Morrison. Morrison has 
two sons in the military, and both of them 
did tours in Afghanistan. 





The original idea had been to designate 
Airport Road. Regional councillors, last 
fall, went along with staff recommenda- 
tions to change it to Dixie. Among the 
reasons cited was Dixie runs all the way 
south to Lake Ontario, while, Airport 
Road only goes a far south as Pearson 
International Airport. Dixie ends at Olde 
Base line, but Thompson said the neces- 
sary motions have been passed by Town 


council to allow the designation to extend 


north to Highway 9. 

The road names have not changed. 

“On behalf of District B of the Royal 
Canadian Legion Ontario Command and 
all its members, I would like to thank the 
Region of Peel and the municipal govern- 
ments involved in honouring our veterans 
with this Veterans Memorial Roadway,” 
said District B Deputy Commander Jack 
Porter. “Along with the aid of our local 
Royal Canadian Legion Branches, you 
have helped to insure that our Veter- 
ans remain in the hearts and minds of a 
erateful nation throughout the years. As 
Legion Members, we were honoured to 
have been requested to participate in this 
process and | would like to thank all that 
participated for all their input. ‘We will 
remember them.” 


The Poppy, when used as a symbol of Royal Canadian Legion and is used on the 


Remembrance in Canada, is a registered 
trademark of Dominion Command of The 


signs with the permission of Dominion 
Command. 





Chair Frank Dale, Councillor Doug Beffort and Mayor Allan Thompson were joined e 
Steve Hayward, Larry Weltz and Errol Henry of the Alton Branch of the Royal Canadian 
Legions at last Wednesday’s sign unveiling. 


This spring, the Region of Peel is of- 
fering residents a free confidential pa- 
per shredding event at each Community 
Recycling Centre (CRC) and at Conser- 
vation Day in south Mississauga. 

“When we offered a free confidential 


~| paper shredding event at two CRCs 


Meer Allan Thompson and Peel Regional Chair Frank Day Aveled this Sn Dixie 
Road last Wednesday. 


}.) 





last year, it was so popular that we’re 
pleased to be able to offer it at all of the 
CRCs this spring,” commented Dwayne 
Cromwell, acting manager of the Re- 
cion’s Waste Operations. “This provides 
a great opportunity for Peel residents to 


| protect their privacy, while also bring- 
ing unwanted items to the CRCs and 
H our annual Conservation Day.” 


Residents can take unbound paper — 
such as taxes, bills, income statements 
and personal information — to the con- 
fidential paper shredding events. They 


: | will be held May 26 at the Fewster 


CRC, 1126 Fewster Dr. in Mississauga 


| from 4 to 8 p.m.; May 28 at the Caledon 


CRC, 1795 Quarry Dr. from 8:30 a.m. to 
12:30 p.m.; June 2 at Brampton CRC, 
395 Chrysler Dr. from 4 to 8 p.m.; June 
4 at Bolton CRC, 109 Industrial Rd. in 
Bolton from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.; 


Peel offering free shredding 


June 9 at Battleford CRC, 2255 Battle- 
ford Rd. in Mississauga from 4 to 8 p.m.; 
and June 11 at Heart Lake CRC, 420 
Railside Dr. in Brampton from 8:30 a.m. 
to 12:30 p.m. 
Regular fees apply to all other items. 
Residents can also drop many items 
at Conservation Day May 14. It will be 
held in the Suncor Parking Lot at 385 
Southdown Rd. (off Lakeshore Road W.) 
in Mississauga from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. 
The items that residents can drop at 
Conservation Day are: 
- household hazardous waste (in sealed, 
labelled containers): motor oil, paint, 
chemicals, all types of batteries and pro- 
pane tanks (maximum 18 kilograms or 
40 pounds.), 
- reusable items: clothing, books and 
housewares, 
- electronics: TVs, computers and cell 
phones, 
- blue and grey boxes, and old green 
bins, and 
- confidential paper for shredding. 
There will be no cart exchanges — for 
garbage, recycling or organics carts — 
at any of these events. 


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A\6 CALEDON CITIZEN | MAY 12, 2016 






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Comic Expo attracts enthusiasts to the library 


There was lots of activity Saturday at the Albion-Bolton branch of Caledon Public Li- 
brary, as they were hosting their first ever Comic Expo. There were a host of interactive 


aw. 


activities for them to try, as well as some educational components. Cartoonist Mike 
FE Cope was running classes on the art. There were plenty of costumes, inspired by vari- 
ous cartoon figures. Maia Spatone won the class for those 12 and younger, dressed as 


CARS FROM SUVs FROM Indiana Jones. Maia was flanked by brothers Gianluca, dressed as Mario, and Alessio, 


dressed as Roblox Man. 
Photos by Bill Rea 





shampooing of INTERIOR INCLUDES: 


Mats & Seats & Seats 


Leather Cleaned & Conditioned 
Trim Leather Cleaned & 
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POWER TO SURPRISE 
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a) ake FROM ff ™ DOWNAT fF _- 60/MO" 


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The Power to Surprise 


Offerts) avaiable on select new 2006/2017 models through partianating dealers tn qualified retail customer who take delivery tram May 3 to Sl, 20lb, Dealers may sell or lease for hess, Some-conditions apply, See dealer for complete details, Vehkies shown may incude optional accesories and upgrades avelable at extra cost. All.olfers are aubseet to change wilhoul motice. All pricing and payments indude delivery and deshination fees up to $175, 15 OMVIC fee, 
tire fee, and H00 A/C change (where apparable), Excludes other tames, licensing, PPiA, registration, inawance, variable dealer administration tees, fuel-fill charges up to 100, and down payment (if applicable and unless otherwise specified). (ther jaase and financing options aiso avaiable. “0% financing on all 2016 models. Available discount is deducted from the negotiated purchase price before tames. Certain conditions apmly. See your dealer for complete details. 
Representative Financing Example: Financing offer availible on approved credit (O40), on.a new 2016 Forte Sedan LX MT (FO541G) with 2 selling price of $17,574 is based on monthly payments of $566 for 24 months at 0% with a $0 down payment and first monthly payment due at finance inception, (Ofer also indudes $4,000 discount ($3,500 loan credil and $500 competitive bonus”* or lovely bonus"). Cost.of borrowing is $0 and total obligation is $1750. Other tawes, 
registration, insurance and licensing fees are excbuced. “Cath Purchase Price for the new 2016 Forte Sedan Lt M7 (FO540G) is $12,574 and includes 3 cash discount of $5,000 (including §500 competitive bonus’* or loyalty bonus"), Dealer may sell for les. Other Lees, registration, insurance and licensing fees arp eerluded. Cash discounts vary by model and trim and are deducted from the negotiated selling price befinee tames. ““$500/4750 competitive bonus offer available 
on the retail purchase/lease of any new 2015 Forte, 2016 Sorento, DIG Sportage, 27 Sportage, 2016 Optima, 2016 Rin, 2006 Ried and 2016 Bonda/'2016 Sedona and 2016 Cintima Hybrid from participating dealer between May 3 and May 51, 2016 upon peoof of current ownershin/lease of a select competitive vehice. Competitive models incude specific VW, Toyota, Nissan, Manda, Mitsubishi, Hyundai, Honda, GM, Ford, Jeep, Poritiac, Sumuki, Satur, Chrysler, Chevrolet, 
Subaru, GW, Memedes-Benz, Lemus, Land Rover, Infiniti, Acura, Audi, Lincoln, Volvo, Buick and Jaguar vehicles. Some conditions apply, See your dealer or kia.ca for complete details. “900,/$750 loyalty bores offer available on the retail purthase/leate of any new 2006 Forie, 2006 Sorento, 2016 Sportage, 2007 Sportage, 2016 Optima, 2006 Rio, 2006 RaoS and 2006 Rondoy206 Sedona and 2016 Optima Hybrid trom participating dealers between May J and May 71, 20% upon 
peool of current ownership, registration of Mia vehicle, Some conditions apply. See your dealer of kiauca for complete details. "$60 git will be awarded in the fonm of 20,000 Kia Member Rewards Dealer Points which can be redeemed at the participating Kia dealership in Canada where Ehe customer took the test drive. $60 gift can be used towaeds the purchase of parts, services, accessories or maintenance. In order for the points to be awarded, customers must have 
a Kia Member Rewards account. The Kia Member Rewards Program is open to any licensed driver with a Canadian mailing address and enrollment in the Program is free for the purposes of this promotion, Further details about the Program and Dealer Points are avvailabte at lia.ca/member-rewards, “Four local deaber may be chosed May 15, Visit ka. ca/Tind-a-dealer for dealership hours. "No Purchase Hevessary, Enter by taking a test drive.at a participating dealer or 
online af kia.ca/drivetosurprise, Open to Canadian residents over the ape of majority. Contest begins May §, 2006 and ends June 30, 2006 at 11:99 on ET. 30 Prizes will be awarded (00 lo Queber residents, 20 to resiients. of rest of Canada), Each prine consists of winner's choice off trip expenence up bo $10,000, or $10,000 towards 2 Kia vehicle purchate/iease, Complete contest rules in dealership or at kiaca/drivetcamprise, “Representative Leasing Example; Lease offer 
avallable on approved credit (OAC), on the 26 Sorento 241. U0 FWD (SR7SAG 2006 Soul LX AT (S075) with a selling price of $29.54 9271, 74 (includes S500/$0 lease credit discount and $900)/0 compelitive bones" or loyally bonus*) is based on a total umber of 130/104 bi-weekly payments of 12/999 for 60/48 months at 1.74 /0.9%, with 40 security deposit, $2:650/ $575 down payment and fint biweekly payment due at lease inception. Total lease obligation 
§00,922/900.645 wath the option to purchase af the end of the berm for §06,727/$00,292. Lease has 16,000 kmy'yr allowance (other packages available and 0U0/lon for excess Klometres). ‘Model shown Manufacturer Suggested Retal Price for 2006 Sorento SX Turbo AWD (SATS)! 2006 Forte S00 AT (POTSSG)/2006 Soul SX Lunmary (UCTS) is $42 295,'$26,095/977.495. The Bluetooth" wordmark and logo are registered trademarks and ase-owned by Bluetooth SN, Inc. ALG is: 
the industry benchmark for redial values and deorediation data, wawuilg.tom, Govemment 5-Star Safety Ratings are part af the Matonal Highway Tralfic Safety Adeninetration’s (NHTSA's) Mew Car Assesment Program: (wire SaferCargov), infcematicn in thes advericement & believed to be accurate af the fine of panting. Aor more indanation on dur 5-year warranty cowerage, visit itia.t8 of fall un. at E72 RSS. ina eh a trademark of Kia Motors Corporation, 


CALEDON CITIZEN | MAY 12, 2016 A7 


Saturday, June 18, 2016 
2:00 p.m. to 11:00 p.m. 


ee, ee ee es a) 





National Access Awareness Week 


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May 29— June 4, 2016 


National Access Awareness Week began in 1988 to honour 
Rick Hanson. In 1985, he began a two-year 40,000 km 
journey through 34 countries in his wheelchair to raise 
awareness about the need for accessibility for people with 
disabilities. Since then, communities across Canada have 
continued Hansen's mission during the last week of May. 





Did you know? 
¢ 15% of Ontarians live with some form of a disability; 





° approximately 10% of the Caledon population has some 
form of a disability; 


¢ Individuals with disabilities are impacted daily by barriers 
to accessible information, independent access to 
facilities, to employment, transportation and accessible 
communication supports; 


e the Town of Caledon’s Accessibility Advisory Committee Is 
a citizen volunteer committee dedicated to the 
identification, removal and prevention of barriers for 
persons with disabilities; 


National access awareness week is an opportunity to celebrate 
accessibility and increase our efforts to achieve our goal of 
becoming a fully-accessible community and province. 










Xx 


Walkera 


BATTLE EVENT DETAILS: REGISTRATION DETAILS: Pub lic Bid Opportunities 


Friday May 27, 2016 All band members must be under Request For Tender # 2016-44 

Caledon Community Complex 25 years of age. Supply & Installation of HVAC System-Town Hall 

6215 Old Church Road, Caledon Contact 905.584.2272 x.4810 or Mandatory Site Meeting: May 18, 2016 @ 4:30 p.m.-—in 
7:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. email elizabeth okeefe@caledon.ca front of Council Chamber entrance, 6311 Old Church Road 
Tickets will be sold at the door. for more information or to Closing Date: June 2, 2016 @ 3:00 p.m. local time 

$3.00 - Children/Youth/55+ register your band. 


Visit www.biddingo.com/caledon for details and a listing 


$5.00 - Adult of current public bid opportunities. 





Download our App! 


Use your smart-phone to report problems, 
receive emergency messages, get news updates and more! 





TOWN GARRET v oinostr Se L 


ENE Tiree) (-melam dal ANDROID APP ON : Get it at m 
’ > »®,\ BlackBerr Dloyialley-(eminelan 
: ale store Googte play ani elale Y VVitave lee a atolatemsicola= 














FOLLOW US For real-time updates 





6311 Old Church Road To obtain this page in an we Wwvww.twitter.com/yourcaledon OFA 

Caledon, ON L7C 1J6 alternative format please f | facebook.com/yourcaledon : a 

www.caledon.ca contact x.4288 or — ; co 
TOWN OF CALEDON T. 905.584.2272 | 1.888.225.3366 | F. 905.584.4325 accessibility@caledon.ca Download our mobile app 


caledon.ca/pingstreet 


A8 CALEDON CITIZEN | MAY 12, 2016 





Lots of laughs in Always a Bridesmaid at Caledon Townhall Players 


By Bill Rea 

The idea of “friends forever” can add up 
to wonderful times, and also chaos. 

And when these friends get married 
(more than once, in some cases) and the 
friends are always asked to be in the wed- 
ding party, there can be a lot of unantici- 
pated consequences. There’s also room for 
plenty of laughs, which is the case with 
Jessie Jones’s, Nicholas Hope’s and Jamie 
Wooten’s Always a Bridesmaid, which is 
currently being presented by the Caledon 
Townhall Players. 

Four young ladies took a vow when they 
were girls to be bridemaids at each others’ 
weddings. Time goes by, and all four keep 
their pledges, over the years, with some- 
times hilarious results, not to mention 
countless pithy one-liners. 

They are there for Monette (played by 
Cathy Montgomery), who is tying the 
knot for the third time, her first marriage 
coming right out of high school. 

“Those were the best six weeks of my 
entire life,” she says. 

They are there for Charlie (Melinda Bri- 
el), who’s going to the altar for the first 


time and is having second thoughts. 

“Can I really marry into a family that 
thinks gravy is a beverage?” she asks. 

They’re there for Deedra (Joanne Hop- 
kinson) at her second wedding. Her ex 
crashes the ceremony and a brawl ensues. 

“One of my greatest strengths is giving 
advice that I would never follow,” she re- 
flects. 

And they are there for Libby Ruth (Mar- 
garet Brady), who observes “marriage can 
be fun, if you enjoy it like the adventure it 
is, as her daughter Kari (played by Hop- 
kinson’s daughter Sara) heads down the 
isle. 

Each scene is preceded by Kari, decked 
out in a beautiful wedding gown, offering 
segments of the address at her own wed- 
ding, sipping champagne in the process. 

“Throwing the perfect wedding .. 
really easy until you try it,” she says. 


The play, directed by Mark Tiller and fF 
produced by Judy Lewis, is set in the | 


waiting room of a wedding facility in the 
American south. It sees various changes 
over the years and between scenes. The 
place is run by Sedalia (Kim Blacklock), 


Have high tea at Rising 
Angels fundraiser 


The second annual Rising Angels fund- 
raiser will feature high tea being served 
at Inglewood Community Centre. 

It will be May 14 with seatings at noon 
and 3:30 p.m., and May 15 at 12:30 and 
3:30 p.m. 

The cost will be $30 for the high tea ex- 


GALA CONCERT 


Monday, May 16, 2016 at 7:00 pm 


Westminster United Church 
247 Broadway, Orangeville 
Tickets at the Door: 

Adults: $8 Children 12 and under: $5 
Highlights of the Adjudications 
Scholarships and 
Most Promising Musician Award 





perience, which will include sandwiches, 
squares, scones with jam and premium 
teas. Each cup brings hope to the survi- 
vors that Rising Angels serves. 

Seating is limited, and tickets are be- 
ing sold in advance only. Order tickets by 
email to sheila.howlett@sympatico.ca or 
call 905-838-4351. 

Rising Angels Awareness and Restor- 
ative Care exists to bring sex trade educa- 
tion to professionals and the public, and 
to provide supportive services and safe 
environments to women exploited by the 
sex trade, allowing them to experience 
physical, mental, social and spiritual res- 
toration in their lives. The founder, Kata- 
rina MacLeod, is a survivor of 15 years in 
prostitution and looks forward to welcom- 
ing everyone and sharing her inspiration- 
al story. 

To learn more about the organization, 
vo to www.risingangels.net 


. looks 


who can take charge when she needs to, 
sometimes literally brandishing an axe. 

“Let’s slam this turkey in the oven,” she 
shouts as she lines the ladies up for one of 
the nuptials. 

It’s an all-women cast, and with just 
six parts, there’s plenty of opportunity for 
everyone to get their own scene-stealing 
moments, from Deedra and Charlie deal- 
ing with hangovers, to Monette’s wedding 
night advice — “Never do anything you'd 
be embarrassed to explain to the para- 
medics.” 

Considerable effort went into the cos- 
tumes, of which Pam Niesiobedzski was 
in charge. One of the women decides on 
a French theme for her wedding, and the 


three bridesmaids liberally apply their 
own interpretations, meaning one shows 
up dressed as a can-can dancer, another 
as a French maid and the third as Marie 
Antoinette. 

“Let them eat wedding cake,” 
claims at one point. 

Sherry’s Bridal Boutique in Caledon vil- 
lage received thanks for helping with the 
production. 

This fast-moving play will be performed 
tomorrow (Friday) and Saturday nights 
at the Townhall theatre in Caledon vil- 
lage. Curtain is at 8:15 p.m. with a 2:15 
matinee Saturday. 

Call the Box Office at 519-927-5460 for 
ticket reservations. 


she ex- 





The cast of Always a Bridesmaid consists ai Cathy Montgomery, Margaret Brady, Sara 
Hopkinson, Kim Blacklock, Joanne Hopkinson and Melinda Briell. 


Photo by Bill Rea 


Local actors return to Orangeville 
in closing production of season 


Playwright Mark Crawford makes his 
Theatre Orangeville debut with the hilar- 
10us comedy Stag and Doe. 

Bonnie and Brad are having a stag 
and doe in a small town community hall 
kitchen. Dee, their maid of honour, 1s still 
getting over being left at the altar. Man- 
dy and Rob are getting married that very 
day and their caterer Jay just found out 
his entire staff is in jail. Stag and Doe is 


’ a hilarious look at a southern Ontario tra- 


DRIVERS WANTED! 


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Tickets are available from PALGRAVE BOLTON CALEDON EAST 
any Palgrave Rotarian Migrations Travel Scotiabank Howard the Butcher 
or these locations: Palgrave Café Naked Vine ORANGEVILLE (Ey Rotary 
All proceeds directed towards Forsters Book Garden ¢-atiahank (First St) 6 
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Hwy’s 27 & 9, Schomberg 
For more information call , 

Mark at 905-939-4644 
Register on line at www.schombergfair.com 


Don’t muss 
Wines of ¥ 
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Includes wine, cider and beer 
tasting with food pairing 
To purchase tickets online visit 


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dition. Directed by Theatre Orangeville 
Artistic Director David Nairn, this show 
stars Jesse Griffiths, Jeff Hanson, Karen 
Knox, Heidi Lynch, David Reale and Car- 
oline Toal. 

Three of the stars, Knox, Reale and 
Toal, are homegrown talents. Local girls 
Knox and Toal grew up performing in 


Theatre Orangeville’s Young Company. 
In fact, the two shared the role of Viola 
in the 2005 production of Twelfth Night. 
Reale grew up in Caledon and made his 
professional debut at the age of 12 in Ja- 
cob Two-Two Meets The Hooded Fang on 
the Theatre Orangeville stage. 

Griffiths and Lynch are also no strang- 
ers to Theatre Orangeville. These two 
talented actors last graced the stage in 
Norman Bray In The Performance Of His 
Life during the 2014-15 season. Windsor 
native Hanson makes his Theatre Oran- 
geville debut in Stag and Doe. 

Stag and Doe opens May 5 and runs un- 
til May 22. 

Tickets can be purchased online at the- 
atreorangeville.ca or by calling our box 
office at 519-942-3423 or 1-800-424-1295. 


194 McEwan Dr. East, Bolton 


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CALEDON CITIZEN | MAY 12, 2016 AQ 


Bev Nicolas talks about his six decades In theatre 


By Constance Scrafield 

In May, Shelburne’s Tipling Stage 
Company presents its production of the 
1950 play Murder Mistaken by British 
playwright Janet Green. 

We contacted Director Bev Nicolas to 
chat about the business of running a 
play for community theatre as opposed 
to professional theatre. 

“l’m in my seventh decade of theatre,” 
he admitted, adding coyly, “of course, I 
started very early. My wife and I were 
both professional theatre actors on both 
sides of the Pond. I was also somewhat 
involved with radio and television in 
Britain.” 

Mr. and Mrs. Nicolas both acted in Ag- 
atha Christie’s Mousetrap in Toronto, 





where it had an extremely long run of 
more than 25 years here as it did in Lon- 
don, England: the longest running play 
in history. In Toronto, it was staged ina 
converted church for all that time. 

“People still sat in the pews,” Nicolas 
told us, “but, of course, they had cush- 
ions by then.” 

During his long life in the theatre, on 
both sides of the money, as it were, that 
is, as a professional or a volunteer, he has 
acted and directed a great many shows. 

“Funny thing is, I learn something ev- 
ery time,” he commented. “When I stop 
learning, Pll quit.” 

To begin, we had a chat about the up- 
coming play with the Tipling Stage Com- 
pany. 


Jean Jardine Miller as Monica, Josh Oatman as Edward and Chris Wright as Phip in 
Murder Mistaken, which is being presented by the Tipling Stage Company of Shelburne. 


There’s Murder Mistaken in Shelburne 


Edward Bare, an attractive, charm- 
ing and likeable, but ruthlessly ambi- 
tious young man married to a rich, dot- 
ing wife many years his senior, thinks 
she is about to change her will and 
decides he must hasten her end. Un- 
fortunately, he finds himself with less 
than he had when she was alive, but 
quickly finds himself a wealthy widow. 
She’s wise enough, however, to keep a 
tight hold on the purse strings to his 
increasing frustration. Then, another 
rich woman arrives on the scene. 

This is what goes on in Murder Mis- 
taken, which is being presented by the 
Tipling Stage Company of Shelburne. 

Directed by Bev Nicholas, Murder 
Mistaken opened to an enthusiastic 
audience Friday and will continue its 
run this weekend. 

Tickets are $15 for May 138 and 14 
at 8 p.m. and are available online at 





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For a brief synopsis, Nicolas told 
us, “It’s was written by Janet Green 
in 1950. In her notes, ‘This is a very 
straight forward play,’ she says. “Play it 
straight.’ So, that’s what we're going to 
do. It needs to be kept in 1950. It can’t 
be brought up to modern times. There 
were no computers then and the refer- 
ences are different.” 

He added, “As long as the diction is 
good and people don’t bump into each 
other, it'll be fine.” 

For the story, a young man charms a 
much older woman into marrying him 
with a view to inheriting her wealth. 
Unknown to him, she changes her will, 
leaving everything to her sister. When 
he murders her, he winds up with noth- 
ing, hence the title. The rest of the play 
is taken with his next intended older 
wife and whether he can get away with 
the first murder. 

There are six roles to fill: four la- 
dies and two men. Although the part of 
Monica is short as she dies in the first 
scene, it 1s a very good part, Nicolas 
assured us. Otherwise, there are the 
scheming, murderous young man, an 
elderly housekeeper, a Canadian law- 
yer, Monica’s sister and the second wife 
— but will she outsmart her young hus- 
band? 

It seems the biggest difference be- 
tween professional and amateur actors 
1s movement. The trained actor un- 
derstands moving naturally, using his 
hands as one does and speaking while 
in motion as opposed to moving to a spot 
and then delivering the line. 

“Pros know exactly what they’re do- 
ing,” Nicolas said. “I was directing Ag- 
atha Christie’s Witness for the Prosecu- 
tion and two of the character have met 
and will meet again. I asked the two who 
were auditioning to make up what they 
thought would happen. They weren't 
saying the lines but it was very interest- 
ing and I used some of their ideas when 
I was directing it later. Those two got 
the parts too.” 

When directing a community theatre 
play, “I make people move on stage. 
Some people are stiff but only because 
they feel nervous. What I’m looking for 


1s why they move — because I told them 
or because they feel they should. Lots of 
actors don’t have too much idea of mov- 
ing.” 

About saying their lines, he comment- 
ed, “I have never given people a line 
reader because I think they should read 
as they feel. I learnt this when I was a 
young man. Directing — I want you to 
make your own way down here.” 

Connection to the audience 1s import- 
ant, even when not breaking the “fourth 
wall.” Nicolas quoted Noel Coward as 
saying, “You never immerse yourself 
totally into the character — just 75 per 
cent, because the other 25 per cent is 
listening to the audience reaction.” Es- 
pecially for comedy. 

One of the things that thrills Nico- 
las about amateur theatre, as he put it, 
“Some are coming out on stage for the 
first time — it’s wonderful to see. The 
play the company is doing now (Norm 
Foster’s The Great Kooshog Lake Hollis 
McCauley Fishing Derby) — one of the 
ladies is acting for the first time and she 
is doing a great job. Jean (Jardine Mill- 
er) has done a good job of directing.” 

“A lot of community theatres in To- 
ronto benefit from the participation of 
what we call ‘rusting’ professional ac- 
tors,” Nicolas laughed. 

He confessed that he and his wife Jo 
are old movie fans. “I have to strain to 
hear the dialogue in new movies,” he 
complained. 

Speaking of sound, he said, “A lot of 
community theatres use sound systems. 
There’s no need. You have a diaphragm,” 
he declared, “Use your diaphragm.” 


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You are invited to attend the 


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Featuring guest speaker Helen Mason 
of Heritage Caledon with her 
presentation, “The Secret to My House” 


CALEDON PUBLIC LIBRARY 


25. Food-related 
allergic reaction (abbr.) 
Review Board 26. Car mechanics 

4. Not worried group 

8. Rowan Atkinson 27. Exceed in weight 
played him 34. Deserved 

10. Stars 35. Singer Thicke 

11. Indian city 36. Clemencies 

12. North American 38. Critique 

nation 39. Resented 

13. He partnered with 40. Type of tissue 
Garfunkel 41. Passages 

15. Understood 42. It comes in a can 
16. Foe 43. His heart is in San 
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18. 2015 postseason 44. Retirement account 
hero 

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dictionary (abbr.) 


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healing 

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24. Actor McKellen 


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American Southwest 36. 
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14. The Science Guy 


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Turf 

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Puzzle No. 5210 
Solution on page: B2 
















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A10 CALEDON ciTizEN | MAY 12, 2016 


Extended seasonal hours begin at four of Peel’s CRCs 


Extended seasonal hours of operation Untill Oct. 27, the hours for the Bramp- and Friday to Sunday from 8:30 a.m. to reuse, safely dispose of household hazard- 
start at four of Peel Region’s six Com- ton CRC and Battleford CRC in Missis- 4:30 p.m. ous waste, recycle acceptable materials 
munity Recycling Centres (CRCs) this sauga will be Monday to Thursday from Ata CRC, Peel residents can drop off (at and dispose of any excess garbage after 
week. 8:30 a.m. to 8 p.m. and Friday to Sunday Heart Lake and Bolton CRCs only) gently they have reduced and recycled what they 

Extended hours run from early May from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The hours at used items in good working condition for can. 
to late October in all four Brampton and the Heart Lake CRC in Brampton and 
Mississauga CRCs. Fewster CRC in Mississauga will be Mon- 

The hours of operation remain un- day to Wednesday from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 
changed at the Caledon and Bolton CRCs. p.m., Thursday from 8:30 a.m. to 8 p.m. 


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GREAT PLACE FOR DOGS AT CANINE COMFORT 
Everybody likes to be pampered, and that goes for dogs too. Canine Comforts opened 
last week in Bolton. Operated by Jennifer Minister, the services offered include doggy 
daycare, dog grooming and canine massage. There are also agility areas, as well as a 
place for outdoor play, weather permitting. “I could tell there was a need,” she said, adding 
she’s also a big dog lover. “I always wanted something like this.” Minister has 12 years ex- 
perience as a dog handler and trainer. She’s also a puppy raiser for COPE Service Dogs. 
Photo by Bill Rea 


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jack.org/ride 


On Saturday May 28th Jack.org will be hosting Jack Ride 
2016, Canada’s ride for youth mental health, with four 
routes passing through the Town of Caledon. 





Riders will depart from Caledon Ski Club between 8:00-9:30am, and cyclists will 
responsibly share the road with drivers along several major and minor roads, until 
event completion at approximately 1-2pm. Main roads include: Mississauga Rd. 
(sections between King St.. and Queen St.); Main St. (from Queen St. to Oran- 
geville-Caledon Town Line); Winston Churchill Blvd. (sections between Oran- 
geville-Caledon Town Line and Mayfield Rd.); Heritage Rd. (from Mayfield Rd. to 
King St.); and Old Baseline Rd. (from McLaughlin Rd. to Winston Churchill Blvd.). 


Interested in volunteering tor Jack Ride or just cheering the riders along? We 
would love to have you join us! For general information, volunteer information, or 
full maps of the route, please visit jack.org/ride. 


Jack.org wishes to thank the Caledon community for the opportunity to host this 
important Ride. We consider It a privilege to be able to share your roads. For 
more information about us, please visit, jack.org. 








CALEDON CITIZEN | MAY 12, 2016 A11 


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payment (or equivalent trade-in) of $2,195/51,195/$895/$895. As shown, Offered Pricing for new 2016 MX-5 GT (L2TK66AA00)/2016 CX-3 GT (HXTKB6AA00)/2016 Mazda3 GT (D4TLEGAA00)/2016 CX-5 GT (NXTLEGAAQD) with a lease APR of 4.9996/3,4990/1,4990/1.69% and 130/130/104/130 bi-weekly payments of $251/S176/$157/$199 for 60/60/48/60 months, 
the total lease obligation is $34,838/$24,046/517,223/$26,729, including down payment (or equivalent trade-in) of $2,195/51,195/$895/$895. Lease payments include freight and PDE. of $1,795/$1,895/51,695/$1,895, $10 OMVIC fee (all models), $23.75 Tire Stewardship Fee (all models), and $100 Air Conditioning charge (where applicable). PPSA of 
$90.95/590.95/575.28/590.95 and first monthly payment are due al lease inception, 20,000 km per year mileage allowance applies; if exceeded, additional 8¢ per km applies (12¢ per km for CX-9 models), Offers exclude HST. Offered leasing available to retail customers only, “To learn more about the Mazda Unlimited Warranty, go to mazdaunlimited. 
ca. 70% APR Purchase Financing is available on select new 2015 and 2016 Mazda models. NOTE: 0% Purchase Financing not available on 2016 CX-3, 2016 MazdaS and 2016 MX-5 models. Terms vary by model, Based on a representative agreement using an offered pricing of $24,600 for the new 2016 CX-5 GX (NVXK66AA00) with a financed amount of 
$25,000, the cost of borrowing for a 48-month term is $0, monthly payment is $520.83, total finance obligation is $25,000. Offer includes freight and P.D.E. of $1,895, S10 OMVIC fee, $23.75 Tire Stewardship Fee, $75.28 PPSA and $100 Air Conditioning charge. Offer excludes HST. Licence, insurance, taxes and down payment (where applicable) are extra 
and may be required at the time of purchase. Dealer may sell/lease for less. Dealer order/trade may be necessary on certain vehicles. Offers valid May 3 - 31, 2016, while supplies last. Lease and finance on approved credit for qualified customers only. Offers subject to change without notice. Visit mazda.ca or see your dealer for complete details. 


A12 CALEDON CITIZEN | MAY 12, 2016 


Lots of contributions for McHappy Day 





Last Wednesday was McHappy Day at McDonalds outlets, and several Town officials 
were out helping generate donations to the cause. Money collected will be going to Ron- 
ald Mcdonald House and the united Way of Peel Region. Councillor Annette Groves was 
joined by Caledon OPP Constables Alvin Paliuanan and Chris Nguyeu at the Bolton Mc- 
Donalds, along with manager Ashlee Chant, all wearing these smiles as part of McHappy 
Day. 





Councillor Jennifer Innis and Fire Chief David Forfar were collecting contributions at the 
Caledon village McDonalds from people like Inglewood area resident Joe Metcalfs. 
Photos by Bill Rea 


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Caledon resident Amedeo Marrocco gave a contribution to Bolton McDonalds employee 
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CALEDON CITIZEN | MAY 12, 2016 A13 





ALL-IN LEASE | 2016 COROLLA cE 


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(Model JFSC7MA) with an all-in price of $17,624/$26,484/$27,139/$24,219 equals a bi-weekly payment of $69/$105/$109/$105 for 130/130/130/130 payments with a $1 ,000/$2,350/$2,600/$2,100 down payment or trade equivalent, when you apply the $1,500/$1,000/$1,000/$1,500 
Customer Incentive. First bi-weekly payment due at lease inception. Total lease obligation is $9,945/$15,955/$16,755/$15,726. All-in lease includes freight and fees (PDE, EHF, OMVIC fee and air condition tax, where applicable). HST, licensing, registration and insurance are 
extra. Dealer may lease for less. Based on a maximum of 100,000KM/100,000KM/100,000KM/100,000KM. Additional KM charge of $0.07/$0.10/$0.10/$0.07 for excess kilometres, if applicable. 6$1,500/$1 ,000/$1 ,000/$1 ,500 Customer Incentive is available on a 2016 Corolla 
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and will apply after taxes have been charged on the full amount of the negotiated price. Vehicles receiving Customer Incentives must be leased, registered and delivered between May 3 and May 31, 2016. tAeroplan offers specific to vehicle purchase offers valid from 
March 1, 2016 to May 31, 2016, are not retroactive and apply to Toyota and Scion vehicles only. Test Drive: New Toyota and Scion vehicles only. Maximum 1 test drive/30 days, 3 test drives/calendar year per Aeroplan Member. Purchase: New Toyota or Scion vehicle retail 
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A\14 CALEDON CITIZEN | MAY 12, 2016 


Jones charges cutting IBI therapy forces families out 


Dufferin-Caledon MPP Sylvia Jones 
and her Progressive Conservative col- 
leagues are not pleased with the govern- 
ment’s decision to cut autistic children 
older than five off from IBI therapy. 

That was the main issue raised by Tory 
caucus members last Thursday during 
Question Period in the legislature. 


Help 


It’s almost time for the community to 
help pull garlic mustard from the ground. 

The fifth annual Belfountain Garlic 
Mustard Pull and Barbecue is planned for 
May 28, from 9 a.m to 1 p.m. 

Join Credit Valley Conservation (CVC), 
Belfountain Public School and the Bel- 
fountain Community Organization at Bel- 
fountain Conservation Area. Help remove 
the invasive garlic mustard plant and cre- 
ate space for native species. 


IF Region of Peel 


Working for you 


Jones highlighted that families are be- 
ing forced to consider leaving the prov- 
ince to receive support for their children, 
as a result of the Premier’s decision. 

“A family in my riding is considering 
leaving the province entirely to get the 
support their daughter needs,” Jones 
said in her question, according to Han- 


pull garlic mustard in Belfountain 


Volunteers will be ferried a short dis- 
tance on a bus to pull garlic mustard in 
the morning. Following the pull, there 
will be a free barbecue to celebrate all the 
work that was accomplished. 

Those younger than 18 are advised they 
might need to bring a waiver signed by a 
parent or guardian to participate. 

For more information, contact Adam 
Wilford at 905-670-1615, ext. 441 or awil- 
ford@creditvalleyca.ca 


muleliiem \Celdras 


TRAFFIC CALMING SPEED CUSHIONS 


OLD MAIN ST BETWEEN CALEDON MOUNTAIN DR AND BUSH ST 


The Regional Municipality of Peel is proposing the installation of 


traffic calming Speed 
Cushions on Old Main Street 
between Caledon Mountain 
Drive and Bush Street. 


Please join us at a Public 
Open House to discuss the 
proposed installation of the 
speed cushions. 


Public Open House 
Wednesday, May 18, 
2016 
Belfountain Public School 
17247 Shaws Creek Road, 
Caledon, L7K 0E8 
6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m 


sard. 

“These parents only want the best for 
their children and will do anything for 
them,” she added. 

Jones’s question was addressed to Pre- 
mier Kathleen Wynne, but she passed it 
on to Children and Youth Services Min- 
ister Tracy MacCharles. 

“IT think we’re in agreement,” Mac- 
Charles replied. “I would say to the 
critic from the opposition (Jones), that 
we want the best for these children. We 
want these children to reach their full 
potential.” 

“That is something I hear from par- 
ents all the time,” she added. “I’m meet- 
ing with parents on a continuous basis. 
Many of them have told us what this new 
program should look like. That feedback 
has been incorporated, but there are ad- 
ditional opportunities to hear parents’ 
voices, and to hear children’s voices, 





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~ AGROCROP BREAKS 


too, as this program transitions over the 
next couple of years.” 

“Families are deeply upset by the gov- 
ernment’s decision,” Jones said later, 
observing a rally was held at Queen’s 
Park last Thursday calling on the gov- 
ernment to reverse its decision. “Offi- 
cials from both opposition parties as well 
as leaders from CUPE, OSSTF, ETFO, 
OFL and OPSEU were in attendance to 
show their support for the thousands of 
families impacted by the government’s 
decision.” 

“Ontario PC Leader Patrick Brown 
also spoke and assured families that a 
PC government would fund IBI therapy 
after the age of five,” Jones added. 

“It’s never too late do the right thing,” 
she observed. “Ihe Premier and the 
Minister should show leadership and 
reverse their decision and restore IBI 
therapy for children over five.” 


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GROUND IN BOLTON 





To learn more about Speed Cushions visit us online at: 
http://www.peelregion.ca/pw/transportation/residents/traffic-calming.htm 


Or call Joe Avsec, Manager, Traffic Engineering at 905-791-7800 extension 7910 


The Region of Peel is committed to ensure that all Regional services, programs and facilities are inclusive 
and accessible for persons with disabilities. Please contact the project manager if you need any disability 


The Town of Caledon is excited to welcome Agrocrop Exports Ltd. to the community, 
adding to the growth of the local food processing cluster. Mayor Allan Thompson and 
MPP Sylvia Jones joined Yash Karia, president and CEO, for the official sod-turning cere- 
mony April 29. Agrocrop is building a 171,000-square-foot state of the art processing and 
packaging facility. Agrocrop Exports Ltd. has successfully grown to become the largest 
private label processor of pulses (beans, lentils and peas) in the western hemisphere. 


accommodations to participate in the public meeting. 





Photo by Mark Pavilons 


Funding to our health care 
system will increase 
by over $1 billion this year. 











Investing in new and better ways for all Ontarians to get the care they need means: 


700 new doctors and specialists 

35 hospitals currently being renewed, modernized or expanded 
$250 million invested in home and community care 

$345 million invested to improve wait times and access to care 


These investments ensure a strong health care system for both today and tomorrow. 


ontario.ca/bettercare 


i 
an Ontario 


Paid for by the Government of Ontario 





CALEDON CITIZEN | may 12, 2016 A15 


Plant trees Saturday in Inglewood to help cool the Credit River 


Do you want to help make a difference 
in your community? 

Join Credit Valley Conservation 
(CVC), Ontario Streams and the Halton 
Peel Woodlands and Wildlife Group for 
a community tree planting in Inglewood. 

The event will take place this Sat- 
urday (May 14) from 9 a.m. to noon at 
Lloyd Wilson Centennial Park in Ingle- 
wood. 

“We are excited to host this important 
event in Inglewood,” said CVC’s Deputy 
CAO and Director of Watershed Trans- 
formation Mike Puddister. “The goal of 
this tree planting is to expand an exist- 
ing wooded area to create more natural 
space along the banks of the Credit Riv- 
er. This is particularly important to cool 
the river’s temperature to help trout 
populations. It will also provide many 
other benefits for the environment, but 
river temperature here is critical.” 

The Credit River is an important cold 
water fishery in Southern Ontario. The 
Credit River watershed is home to 79 


species of fish, including brook trout, 
brown trout and rainbow trout. Differ- 
ent fish species prefer different habitats. 
Trout rely on cold water for survival. 
Tree plantings are one way to increase 
the natural area, or buffer, along the 
river to help cool the water. 

“In an area like Inglewood, where 
trout are thriving, you would expect to 
find river banks with up to 80 feet of nat- 
ural growth on both sides of the river. 
This helps prevent erosion and provide 
shade for cool water temperatures,” con- 
tinued Puddister. “Unfortunately, many 
streams and rivers don’t have enough 
coverage. Community tree plantings 
help us reach this goal.” 

CVC and its partners host a number 
of tree plantings annually in the wa- 
tershed to support local environments. 
Trees are important to help fight cli- 
mate change. Volunteers are essential 
to help maintain a healthy watershed. 
In 2015, CVC’s 6,000 volunteers gave 
30,000 hours of personal time to plant 


Electrofishing Volunteer Day May 27 


Credit Valley Conservation (CVC) is 
looking for volunteers to assist with 
Electrofishing Volunteer Day May 27. 

It will be where the Credit River 
Crosses Highway 10, north of High- 
point Sideroad from 9 a.m. to noon. 

This monitoring technique is used to 
inventory fish species and populations. 
CVC depends on volunteers to help car- 
ry out this type of monitoring. 









Those younger than 18 are advised 
they might need to bring a waiver 
signed by a parent or guardian to par- 
ticipate. 

For more information, contact the 
crew at 416-989-6602. 

Be sure to wear comfortable pants (no 
jeans) with socks, a hat, sunscreen and 
bring water and snacks/lunch. All re- 
quired equipment will be provided. 


16,000 native trees and shrubs. 

No experience is needed and CVC 
staff give tree planting demonstrations. 
Students can participate and earn their 
community volunteer hours. 

Participants should dress for the 


The Homeowner Renovations Program 
helps seniors and other low to moderate 
income homeowners with the cost of home 
repairs and/or accessibility concerns. 


The Homeowner Renovations Program 
will be accepting applications from 
May 9 - 27, 2016. 


weather, and wear long pants and boots 
if possible. Shovels and gloves are pro- 
vided but extras would be helpful. 

For more information and to register, 
visit http://www.creditvalleyca.ca/event/ 
inglewood-community-tree-planting/ 


Second Units 


The Second Units Renovation 
Assistance Program helps homeowners 
cover the cost of renovations to an existing 
second unit to improve health and safety, 
increase accessibility and obtain a Second 
Unit Registration. 


To find out if you qualify for either program, or to 


apply, please visit peelregion.ca/peelrenovates 


or call 905-793-9200. 


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of twelve (12) monthly payments divided by 26 periods gives payee a bi-weekly payment of $145), total lease obligation ls $20,595, interest cost of leasing is $993 or 0.99% APR. Offers include freight, air tax, and PPSA but exclude administration and registration fees of up to $799, fuel fill charge of 
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A\16 CALEDON CITIZEN | MAY 12, 2016 


Caledon 
* = 
Citizen 
Covering all of 
Caledon 
Distributed throughout the 
Town of Caledon, 
the Citizen 
is published Thursdays 
by Caledon Publishing Ltd. 
Copyright Caledon Citizen 
2015 
30 Martha Street, 
Suite #205, Bolton 
L7E 5V1 


Phone: 905-857-6626 
Toll Free: 1-888-557-6626 
Fax: 905-857-6363 
www .caledonciizen.com 
www. facebook.com/ 





caledoncitizen 


Editorial 
Managing Editor 
Bill Rea 
editor@caledoncitizen.com 
Sports 
Jake Courtepatte 
jakecourtepatte 
@gmail.com 


Advertising 
Erin Luckett 
erin@ Ipcemedia.ca 
Motoring 
Heather Erwin 
heather@ caledoncitizen.com 
Resale Homes 
Erin Luckett 


erin@ Ipemedia.ca 


Business 
Office 
Administrator 
Mary Speck 


admin@ caledoncitven.com 


Composing 
Lisa Clendening 
John Speziali 
Judy Lea 
Steve LeBlanc 


Subscriptions: 


$39.00 + G.S.T 
within 65 km 
$67.00 + G.5.T 
beyond 65 km 
and in towns 
with letter carriers 


ADVERTISING 
140) Oe 


agrees that the publisher 


The advertiser 


shall not be liable for dam 
ages arising out of errors 
in advertisements beyond 
the amount paid for the 
space actually occupied by 
the portion of the adver- 
tisement in which the error 
occurred, whether such 
error 1s due to the negli 
gence of its servants or 
otherwise, and there shall 
be no liability for non-in- 
adver- 


sertions of any 


tisement beyond the 
amount paid for such ad 
vertisement. All advertis 
ers are asked to check ther 
advertisements after first 
insertion. We accept re- 
sponsibility for only one 
incorrect insertion unless 
notified immediately after 


publication. Errors which 


do not lessen the value of 


the advertisement are not 
eligible for corrections by 
a make-good advertise- 


ment. We reserve the right 


to edit. revise, classify or 


reject any advertisement 


DEADLINES: Untfor- 
tunately deadlines do 
not allow us to take ads 
the 


alter following 


specified times: 


DISPLAY ADS and 
CLASSIFIED 
ADS: Tuesday 

2 p.m. 

All word ads must be paid 

in advance by deadline or 


the ad will not run. 


WE ACCEPT VISA, 
MASTERCARD & AMEX 
PAYMENTS OVER THE 
PHONE. 


The CALEDON CITI- 
FAD Be Willetts mem tile 
Ontario Press Council, 


an independent body set 


up by the newspapers of 


the province to uphold 
freedom of expression 
and aie 
plaints from 


deal com- 
readers. 
The Press Council en 
courages complainants 
to first give the newspa- 
per an opportunity to re- 


dress their grievances. Ii 
not satisfied, they may 
then write to the Coun- 


cil, enclosing a copy of 


material that is the sub- 
ject of the complaint, at 
80 Gould St.. Suite 206. 
Toronto, ON M5A4L8. 





Editorial 


Are you prepared? 


It’s ironic that Emergency Preparedness Week took place ear- 
her this month. 

Had it fallen in June instead, we suspect a lot of people would 
have paid more heed to the message; namely of making sure you 
and your family are ready for an emergency. 

Statistics Canada released the results of a survey in 2014 that 
revealed that only about 47 per cent of Canadians possess an 
emergency survival kit. We have to wonder how many in the re- 
maining 53 per cent live in Fort McMurray, Alberta. 

True, a disaster of that nature is not likely to his this area, but 
we have seen enough evidence in the last couple of years, through 
floods and ice storms, that we in Caledon are not immune from 
Nature’s wrath. 

We should all devote some time to figuring out a plan to deal 
with such emergencies here, if they should arise. 

Because we all know they can happen. 


Our Readers Write 


My first Mother’s Day 


I found out I was pregnant while I was at my annual physical. 

My doctor wanted to run some tests and asked if I was preg- 
nant. I gave the old response “maybe, who knows’ with a laugh; 
after all, my husband and I were trying for a baby, but it had only 
been a month. When she told me it was positive, I was 1n shock. 
I was so happy and I didn’t have my husband Jonathan there to 
celebrate with. My doctor laughed at me as I stood up and sat 
down in my seat, unsure of what to do, and opened her arms for 
a hug. On the ride home, I stopped off at the store and bought a 
onesie, sized three months, because after one look at my athletic 
hubby, I knew our baby would be big! 

Six weeks later, the doctors told me there was something wrong 
with my baby. There were developmental problems in the brain. 
They didn’t know how bad it was. A week later, they told me 
there was a problem with the heart too. My heart broke as they 
told me I would likely lose my baby, our little girl. They gave her 
a one per cent chance of being born alive, they were confident 
that I would miscarry. When that didn’t happen, they were con- 
fident I would have a stillbirth. When that didn’t happen, they 
were confident that she wouldn’t survive the birth. When I was 
in labour at the hospital, we turned the monitors off and prayed. 

Sarah lived! Jonathan I spent seven glorious days with her. 
She was absolute perfection from her full head of hair, to her soft 
lips, to her long legs. We would have been twins, she was my dou- 
ble in every way. Except her eyes, she had her father’s eyes. She 
never got to wear the onesie I bought her. She never got to see the 
room that would have been hers. We got to take her outside once, 
we sat on the hospital bench with the sun streaming down and it 
was one of the happiest moments of my life. 

This was my first Mother’s Day Sunday. I didn’t know what I 
would do on Sunday. I knew Jonathan planned something, a gift 
from Sarah to me. 

I protected my little lady as best as I could. I fought for her. I 
argued with doctors and nurses and demanded the best treat- 
ment I could get. And I am privileged to live in Canada, a country 
where I have access to the best health care for free. 

The best gift I could give to honour my sweet Sarah this year 
was to help another mother protect her child. That is why I made 
a donation to effect:hope’s Protect a Child fund. It provides treat- 
ment and vitamin A supplements to kids and pregnant women in 
Kenya for hookworm, roundworm and whipworm. Plus, all dona- 
tions are matched three times by the government of Canada, so 
for every $1 I give, $4 goes to the fund. 

I hope others joined me in giving mothers in Kenya a truly 
Happy Mother’s Day. 

From one mother to another, Happy Mothers Day. 

Andrea Onley, 
Formerly of Caledon 


Rotary Club of Palgrave’s 
Weekly Rotary Minute 


By lan Kittle 

I had the privilege to volunteer as a chaperone at Camp En- 
terprise, Bethell Hospice hike continues 1n Bolton located at Ce- 
dar Glen YMCA Camp May 6. 

This is a business, entrepreneur’s camp running from May 
5 to 8, involving 43 Grade 11 and 12 students from numerous 
high schools in the two Rotary Districts — 7080 and 7070. 

The program consisted of varied guest speakers who lectured, 
challenged and involved the students in subjects ranging from 
Habit Hacks and Top Performers, Portrait of an Entrepreneur, 
Creating a Small Business, Presenting Business Plans, La- 
bour-Management Negotiation, Personal Finances and a Busi- 
ness Game. 

The students also took part in fun ice-breakers, outdoor activ- 
ities with the YMCA staff and a dance, movie and pizza night. 

My day was spent observing these amazing students work- 
ing in small groups, devising a business plan for their newly 
thought up business. Their sheer enthusiasm, co-operation, 
brainstorming of ideas and respect for each other was a joy to 
witness. These are intelligent teens who no doubt will be our 
leaders of tomorrow. 

This Rotary camp is available each spring through your local 
Rotary Club and high school. 

For more information on all that we do, please visit www.ro- 
taryclubofpalgrave.com 


It happened today 


He was well known for his skills as a baseball player, as well as his 
curious mastery of the English language. 

He is remembered for certain phrases, such as “It ain't over till 
it’s over, or “It’s déja vu all over again,” or “I really didn’t say ev- 
erything I said.” 

Famed New York Yankee catcher Yogi Berra was born this day, 
May 12, 1925. 


THIS WEEK’S 
QUESTION 


In light of the massive 
wild fire in Fort 
McMurray, Alberta, 
have you made, or are 
you planning to make 
a financial 
contribution to the 
relief effort? 


Caledon Citizen WEBPOL 


www.caledoncitizen.com 


Results from last week’s poll: 


Are Canadians well served 
by having a Senate? 


= «14% 
| 86% 


The results of this poll are in no way considered to be valid or infallible. 


a) YES 


a) Yes 


b) NO b) No 


So go to the website 
& cast a vote! 





My first mint julep 


“‘T loved covering the Kentucky Der- 
by and the Preakness. These are great 
events and thoroughbred racing people 
are great people.” 

Howard Cosell 

Most of us have things we plan to do, 
but alas never get around to them. 

One of the items on my to-do list was 
watching the Kentucky Derby while 
working on a mint julep. I did it Saturday. 
Granted, I didn’t see the race live. My 
wife and I had to attend a family birthday 
party (our nephew Jacob is now officially 
a teenager, and I’m officially 
feeling old as a result). But 
Beth recorded the whole 
thing, including the all-im- 
portant pre-race show, and 
we watched the spectacle 
late at night, while sipping 
my first attempts at a mint 
julep. 

It is a fact, confirmed by 
the T'V coverage I eventually 
was able to watch, that mint 
juleps are as much a part 
of The Run for the Roses as 
the hats the ladies wear and 
the horses that compete. 
Every year, we watch ladies 
wearing hats I can’t begin picturing Beth 
wearing sipping on their glasses filled 
with tradition. According to the TV cov- 
erage, some 120,000 of these drinks are 
sold at the track over the weekend. Makes 
sense, since they said more than 170,000 
were on hand to take it all in. 

I resolved this year to try my skill with 
making them. It wasn’t easy, as some 
simple googling provided me with a myr- 
iad of different mint julep recipes. Indeed 
the early TV coverage, which I was able to 
watch about an hour of before I had to go 
to the birthday party, obligingly provid- 
ed a classic recipe for the julep, priced at 
$2,500. This one required three-quarters of 
an ounce of pecan syrup. I knew we didn’t 
have any of that in the house, and Beth as- 
sured me we had no syrup of any kind. 

Thus I googled until I found a recipe 
with ingredients that were available (I 
had already acquired the mint and bour- 
bon, even finding a bottle of Kentucky 
bourbon at LCBO). 

What it all proves, I think, is one need 
not travel to Kentucky to get into the spir- 
it of the event. On the other hand, I think 
I might like to take in the Derby one of 
these years, simply for the experience and 
ambiance, from the fashions, to the drinks 
to the playing of that beautiful song My 
Old Kentucky Home. 

I am no expert on what is sometimes 
known as The Sport of Kings. My expo- 
sure to horse racing has been limited. I 
have been to the track maybe five times 
in my life, and every time it was to har- 
ness racing. The last time was more than 
30 years ago, when a group of us spent a 
Sunday afternoon at the track. 

I put $2 down on every race, meaning I 
had gone to the track fully prepared to lose 
$18 ($18 went a lot farther in those days). 
My winnings amounted to about $10. Like 
a chicken, I picked what I thought was 
the most likely horse to win, and then bet 
it to show. I know I will never get rich on 
the ponies. 

Actually, I had known that for many 
years. There were a couple of times when 
I was kid that my family spent the eve- 
ning at the track. Dad would bankroll the 
betting, but as my brother Michael and I 
got older, he let us do the picking. If mem- 
ory serves, he went along with our rec- 
ommendations, but he insisted he bet the 
horse to place. My old man evidently had 
somewhat more guts than I. 

The debating sometimes got a bit heat- 
ed. Michael tended to concentrate on the 
odds, while I focused more on the track 





Bill Rea 


records, and what success individual 
horses had had with others in the field. 
Mom tried, without much success, to 
hide the feeling of terror she felt as she 
reflected that the family finances would 
one day fall into the hands of these two 
characters (meaning Michael and I). Dad 
was uncharacteristically laid back. He 
got a good chuckle watching the scene. In 
strict economic terms, the entertainment 
he was receiving was probably worth the 
money coming from his pocket. While I 
don’t think he was ever much of a follow- 
er of the ponies, he offered 
some of his paternal wisdom 
to his offspring. He admon- 
ished Michael about getting 
too enamoured of the favou- 
rite, pointing out we weren't 
taking in the upper echelons 
of the sport. 

“At this level of racing, 
the favourite is liable to stop 
for a (call of nature) in the 
back stretch,” he remarked, 
much to my big brother’s 
amusement. 

The main point is I really 
know next to nothing when 
it comes to picking winners 
in a horse race. On the other hand, how 
many of you are much better? 

So 1t all boiled down to who I would have 
bet on, had I been at Churchill Downs 
with money in my pocket (accepting the 
fact that the TV coverage also told me it 
would have cost $120 to get Beth and I 
into the cheap seats). 

Nyquist was the favourite, having never 
been defeated. The words “too good to be 
true” filled my head. I remember Dad ad- 
monishing us to be careful when it came 
to betting on favourites, although it is a 
fact my old man made most of his money 
away from the track. His odds at the start 
were 2-1. 

Mor Spirit was trained by Bob Baffert, 
who’s known a lot of success. He trained 
American Pharoah, who won the Triple 
Crown last year. He couldn’t be counted 
out. The odds were 12-1 at the start. 

For reasons I can’t explain, Sudden- 
breakingnews caught my attention. He 
went off at 24-1 

Laniis a Japanese horse. My mind went 
back to the 1971 Derby, when Canonero II 
from Venezuela took the roses, then won 
the Preakness a couple of weeks later. We 
watched it at home. 

“What a horse!” Michael said almost 
under his breath as the pony crossed the 
finish line. 

Dad worked Saturdays in those days, 
and I remember my mother grabbing the 
phone to call him at his office to tell him 
the news. 

Lani was also the only horse in the field 
who had raced the Derby distance. He 
went off at 29-1 

I haven’t addressed the jockeys yet. 

I opened this column with a quote from 
the late Howard Cosell. Here’s another 
one. 

“T have long been on the record as feeling 
that jockeys are the best athletes, pound 
for pound, in the world. It takes uncom- 
mon strength to handle a 1,200-pound an- 
imal and it’s extremely dangerous.” 

When it came to the crunch, I picked 
Mor Spirit to win. 

Now you know why I never expect to get 
rich on the ponies. 

Oh yeah! About the mint julep! I was 
frankly a little disappointed at my effort, 
but I was also mindful that it was the first 
attempt of a confessed amateur. I had to 
give it a try, and I did. 

Another good reason to fork up that 
$120, so Beth and I can have mint ju- 
leps prepared for us by pros at Churchill 
Downs. 


CALEDON CITIZEN | MAY 12, 2016 A117 


Government doesn’t look good after its ‘six-month reality check’ 


Last week, the Liberals celebrated six 
months since being sworn into office. 

But while Liberals are cheering and pat- 
ting each other on the back, they continue to 
deny their own failures and broken promis- 
es. Whether managing Canada’s economy, 
governing ethically, supporting Canada’s 
military or representing Canada on the in- 
ternational stage, the Liberal record of fail- 
ures and broken promises speaks for itself. 

On the Canadian economy, the Liberals 
have broken their promise to keep deficit 
spending under $10 billion annually; and 
broken their promise to keep taxes low for 
middle-class Canadians. In fact, the Lib- 
erals are raising taxes on Canadian fam- 
ilies and small businesses by ending tax 
credits for children’s arts and sports ac- 
tivities and cancelling a scheduled small 
businesses tax cut which will cost small 
business owners more than $2 billion dol- 
lars in extra taxes. They have also misled 





= | OTTAWA JOURNAL 


David Tilson 


As MP Dufferin-Caledon 





Canadians by denying that the Conserva- 
tives left Finance Minister Bill Morneau 
with a surplus, despite confirmation from 
the Minister’s own officials and the Par- 
hamentary Budget Officer. 

On the question of governing ethically, 
the Liberals allowed the Justice Minister 
to attend a high-priced pay-to-play fund- 
raiser in Toronto with Bay Street law- 
yers; defended the Trade Minister after 


she spent almost $20,000 of taxpayers’ 
money on an all-inclusive vanity trip to 
Hollywood; and appointed a Justice Min- 
ister who has a significant interest in her 
husband’s lobbying firm. 

With respect to supporting Canada’s 
military, the Liberals cut $38.7 billion from 
the military procurement budget; failed to 
stand with our allies in the fight against 
ISIS by ending our combat mission and 


withdrawing our CF-18s; and plunged the 
Canadian Armed Forces into uncertainty 
with a “defence review” that will focus on 
a “leaner” military, which will inevitably 
mean further cuts. 

In terms of representing Canada on the 
international stage, the Liberals have 
failed to stand with our ally Israel with 
their move to normalize relations with 
Iran, a state sponsor of terror that has ex- 
plicitly called for Israel to be wiped off the 
map; failed to stand with Ukraine in the 
face of unwarranted and illegal Russian 
military aggression by moving to normal- 
ize and improve relations with Vladimir 
Putin; and failed to stand with the mil- 
lions of people around the world who are 
persecuted because of their faith by clos- 
ing the Office of Religious Freedom. 

So in terms of a six-month reality check, 
the new government seems to be leaving a 
lot to be desired. 


A surplus by any other name 


I had the opportunity May 1 to attend 
the 17th annual Ceremony of Remem- 
brance at Queen’s Park, alongside my 
Leader, MPP Patrick Brown, and my 
colleague MPP Rick Nicholls, who is 
the critic for Community Safety and 
Correctional Services for the Progres- 
sive Conservative Caucus. 

Every year on the first Sunday of 
May, the Ontario Police Memorial 
Foundation holds their annual Cere- 
mony of Remembrance to pay tribute to 
the brave men and women who made 
the ultimate sacrifice in service to their 
communities. 

Hundreds of police officers gathered 
from across the province to attend the 
ceremony to pay their respects to the 
police officers who have lost their lives 


FROM WUEEN’S PARK 


Sylvia Jones 


MPP Dufferin-Caledon 


in the line of duty. This year’s ceremony 
went back in history to honour the lives 
of three Ontario police officers, Coun- 
ty Constable Samuel James Vanstone 
of Ontario County, who was killed Oct. 
12, 1928; County Constable John Mor- 
rison of Russell County, who was killed 
June 27, 1880; and County Constable 


Great War Flying Museum to reopen 


After more than a year of planning, struc- 
tural work and major exhibit renovations, 
the Great War Flying Museum (GWFM) 
will re-open to the public May 21 at 1 p.m. 

Mayor Allan Thompson will officially cut 
the ribbon to help celebrate this significant 
milestone in the Museum’s 46-year histo- 
ry. 

GWFM was created through the efforts 
of the Ontario Aviation Historical Society, 
founded in 1970 by a group of members at 
the Brampton Flying Club. With a vision to 
inspire a passion and appreciation for First 
World War aviation history, it 1s dedicated 
to all those who served in the world’s first 
air war. 

This beautifully restored museum now 
houses a renewed collection of original 


uniforms, artifacts, documents and art 
through stunning new displays of aircraft 
models, rare treasures and aviation-relat- 
ed dioramas. 

GWFM is also unique. It is the only or- 
ganization in Canada that builds and flies 
full-sized reproduction First World War 
aircraft for education, entertainment and 
for the benefit of members and the visiting 
public. 

In the hangar adjacent to the newly ren- 
ovated Museum, visitors are welcome to 
meet dedicated volunteers and see up-close 
the aircraft that filled the skies during 
those early days of aviation. 

The Museum is at Brampton Flight Cen- 
tre, 13691 McLaughlin Rd., just south of 
King Street. 


A matter of sheer jealousy 





: | NATIONAL AFFAIRS 





i Claire Hoy 
i, Se | 5 


1 YY S 


Jealousy 1s among the least attractive 
yet most common human traits. It adds 
nothing to the target but subtracts from 
the jealous person. 

It is hard to say exactly when this cur- 
rent fad began which sees success as a bad 
thing, as something that detracts from the 
rest of us rather than applauds the suc- 
cessful. 

Yes, there have always been some who 
hold this view, those who believe that if one 
person is successful he or she must be doing 
it at the expense of somebody else. They seem 
to believe there is a set amount of success al- 
lowed in the world and if you get more than 
your share well then, that means everybody 
else 1s getting less than they deserve. 

But it hasn’t been until recent times 
when this unwholesome view has become 
widespread. Just look at all those protest- 
ers in the U.S. who go on about the dread- 
ed one per cent, the idea apparently being 
that if they didn’t have as much money as 
they have then you, the protester, would 
clearly have more. 

Not that you're prepared to go out and 
work for it, mind you. It’s the feeling that 
you are entitled to it, but they, those horr1- 
ble successful people, are not. 

Let us, for example, look closely the re- 
cent release of the so-called Panama Pa- 
pers, the private financial records of some 
of the world’s wealthiest individuals. An 
international consortium of journalists and 
others has discovered the secret identities 
of some 200,000 anonymous offshore enti- 
ties — thanks to somebody hacking into 
the private files of the Panamanian law 
firm Mossack Fonseca — and are about to 
make those names public. 

Why? Out of sheer jealousy actually. 
Oh sure, they make it sound much more 
high-minded than that, telling readers and 
viewers that these “tax dodgers” are up to 
no good. Or, as the page 2 headline in the 
Sunday Star said: “New Panama Papers 
data could reveal crimes.” 

Then again, they may not reveal crimes. 
But do you think the so-called investigative 
journalists promoting this story will differ- 
entiate? Do you think they will investigate 


every name to discover if in fact there was 
something criminal involved in the invest- 
ments before publishing the names? Of 
course they won't. They'll publish them all 
and hope that crimes are revealed so they 
can get even more stories. 

Same thing with the push from Ottawa 
to reveal the names of employees and 27 
clients who took advantage of a service 
once offered by KPMG to set up tax shel- 
ters in the Isle of Man. Never mind that at 
the time of these investments it was per- 
fectly legal and like all Canadians — and 
yes, that includes you — these wealthy 
people took advantage of a scheme to cut 
back on their tax bills. 

Who among us doesn’t take advantage of 
everything governments offer to cut back on 
taxes? And why not? It’s your money, not 
the government’s money. It’s one thing if 
youre breaking the law to evade taxes — 
that’s a criminal matter — but quite anoth- 
er if you're using the system to avoid paying 
more taxes than you absolutely have to pay. 

Yet, these investors are painted as “tax 
dodgers” of the worst kind. Indeed, I’ve 
even seen them labeled as “tax evaders,” 
apparently from people who don’t know or 
don’t care about the difference between le- 
gal and illegal accounting practices. 

And no — if that’s what you're thinking 
— Ido not have any offshore investments 
of any kind, so ’m not concerned about 
protecting my own butt here. 

What concerns me a lot, however, is this 
popular, jealousy-inspired notion that suc- 
cessful people deserve to be shamed and 
brought to heel for the apparent social 
crime of being successful. 

We used to admire people who succeeded 
in whatever it is they were doing. Success 
was not considered a four-letter word, wor- 
thy of being held up to ridicule and shame 
by those who no doubt wish in their hearts 
that they, too, were successful. But since 
they aren't, well then, the next best thing 
is to smear those who are. 

Sure, it may be bad optics for a politician 
to stand up for the rich people — who, de- 
spite the cheap partisan rhetoric to the op- 
posite, already do pay far more than their 
fair share of taxes than the rest of us pay. 

But sometimes the right thing to do is 
the toughest thing to do. And if nothing 
else, we should stop this nasty business of 
trying to drag successful people down to 
the lowest common denominator. 





William Lorenzo Pickard of Kent Coun- 
ty, who was killed April 17, 1922. As 
part of the ceremony, their names are 
added to the Wall of Honour as part of 
the Ontario Police Memorial at Queen’s 
Park. 

The Ontario Police Memorial was un- 
veiled May 7, 2000 to honour our prov- 
ince’s police officers that lost their lives 
in the line of duty. The Memorial con- 
sists of two bronze statues depicting a 


male officer in duty dress and a female 
officer in modern duty dress, in addition 
to eight walls that contain the names 
of Ontario’s fallen police officers. It is 
one of many ways we show our support 
and recognition to the courageous men 
and women that sacrificed their lives to 
keep our communities safe. 

Attending the Ceremony of Remem- 
brance, listening to the stories of how 
these three police officers died so many 
years ago while serving their commu- 
nities, reminds us all of the import- 
ant role our police offices have in our 
community. It is a role that few of us 
choose, and yet is so critically import- 
ant for us to operate in a safe and dem- 
ocratic society. While the weapons have 
changed since the early 1900's, clearly 
the need for our police offices to be will- 
ing and prepared to defend our safety is 
no less important today. Heroes in Life. 


Boosting food processing will 
benefit farmers, says Wynne 


By Brock Weir 

As Ontario looks to expand the Green- 
belt, farmers “are very much a part of the 
discussion,’ according to Premier Kathleen 
Wynne. 

Also part of the discussion? Making sure 
Ontario’s produce makes the market it de- 
serves. 

Wynne was in Newmarket recently to 
speak to local students about the Province’s 
Ontario Student Grant. Announced in the 
2016 Budget, the program will overhaul 
several existing Provincial grant programs 
by the 2017-2018 school year to make 
post-secondary education free for eligible 
students in families with an annual income 
of $83,300 or less. 

The students presented Wynne with a 
number of hard-hitting questions about 
how this will affect them, impact students 
preparing to go to university for the 2016- 
2017 school year, as well as pressing her for 
support for young adults grappling with the 
suicide epidemic in First Nations, particu- 
larly Attawapiskat. 

“Students always ask the best questions,” 
Wynne said, sitting down with local media 
following the roundtable for a wide-ranging 
interview. “My experience going to debates 
during election campaigns or discussions 
with students is they cut right to the chase. 
They are just fantastic.” 

Cutting to the chase, the discussion shift- 
ed to issues immediately before the com- 
munity, including issues surrounding the 
Province’s Greenbelt and its impact on local 
businesses. 

“Our local food movement and the fund- 
ing we have put into local food has been 
very, very important in terms of that won- 
derful produce that is created in Ontario 
being prominently displayed and prom- 
inently focused on, (but) the other part of 
this is food processing,” Wynne commented. 
“T think we have much more of a capacity to 
do food processing in Ontario than we have 
taken advantage of. 

“There would be a greater market for 
Ontario produce in those food processing 
plants and that is why we have, as part of 
our Jobs and Prosperity Fund, carved out 
for food processing and investment and food 
processing,” she added. 

The recent ketchup wars, which has re- 
sulted in French’s carving out a unique 
share of the Heinz dominated market, 
is Just one example of that. Wynne cited 
French’s investment 1n processing tomatoes 
in Leamington. This highlights the impor- 
tance of food processing in every corner of 
Ontario, she contended. 

“When I was Minister of Agriculture 
and Food, I challenged the sectors to cre- 
ate 120,000 new jobs by 2020, putting fruit 
wine in farmers’ markets, for example, al- 
lowing farmers’ markets on the En Routes 
along the 401,” she said. “We are doing a 
lot to support farmers, on top of things like 
risk management funds, so there is recogni- 
tion that farmers need support depending 
on what the weather does. They do not have 
control over all of the factors that have an 


impact on their crops.” 

Wynne highlighted farmers on the nearby 
Holland Marsh, with a particular mention 
of King Township Councillor Avia Eek, as 
“some of the greatest advocates for the local 
food movement” and have pushed Ontario 
to take action on food processing “so there 
is a place for our Ontario produce to grow.” 

“It is about $34 billion in our GDP, so it is 
very, very important,” she said. 

But, it is also important that there is land 
enough to grow food to be processed, par- 
ticularly as the rural-urban divide with To- 
ronto narrows. 

Next month, municipal politicians from 
across Ontario will be meeting in Markham 
for a summit on reforms that should be 
made at the Ontario Municipal Board 
(OMB). Spurred by two councillors from 
Aurora over the issue of an in-fill develop- 
ment of a community golf course surround- 
ed by a long-established community, this 
1s an issue that Wynne said is cropping up 
all over Ontario, but it is up to municipali- 
ties to strike that all-important balance be- 
tween development and open space. 

The Liberal government, she said, has al- 
ready made “significant changes” as to what 
can be heard at the OMB, including time- 
lines, there is “a need for another round of 
review and we are going to undertake that.” 

“My concern is we have the decisions 
made around land use planning at the right 
level of government and in the right places,” 
Wynne added. “We want city councils to be 
empowered and make good planning deci- 
sions and to be able to control the things 
they should be controlling. For example, 
there is a large percentage of minor vari- 
ances that still go to the OMB and I don't 
think that should happen.” 

“T think we should find a way to have 
those very local decisions, when they are 
very local decisions, made at the council lev- 
el,” she remarked. “When there are broad- 
er, more systemic issues where there is a 
Provincial interest, then I think those are 
the things that should go to the OMB and 
we haven't quite got that balance yet and 
that is what we'll be looking for.” 

She is not in favour, she added, of abolish- 
ing the OMB and that is an option that is off 
the table as far as the government is con- 
cerned, but there is room for improvement. 

“T think we need to define better the deci- 
sions that should be made at the local lev- 
el and the decisions that should go to the 
OMB,” Wynne observed. “For that, we need 
councils to really take responsibility for 
planning decisions. What I think shouldn't 
happen is decisions (being) referred to the 
OMB because councils don’t want to make 
those decisions. That is the worst kind of 
planning process, from my _ perspective. 
Since before I got into government, and I 
was elected in 2003, before that I was al- 
ready working in my community with ad- 
vocates and folks who want to make sure 
the OMB was making decisions that were 
good for neighbourhoods, but that presup- 
poses that city councils take responsibility 
for planning decisions.” 


A118 CALEDON cITIZEN | MAY 12, 2016 


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Junior C Bandits open OJCLL season with pair of losses 


By Jake Courtepatte 

The Caledon Bandits junior C lacrosse 
club is looking to find its feet still after 
back-to-back losses to open the Ontario 
Junior C Lacrosse League season. 

Close to 100 fans filled the seats at the 
Mayfield Recreation Complex last Tues- 
day for the Bandits’ season opener, host- 
ing a newly-minted Brantford Warriors 
team. The Warriors wasted no time mak- 
ing their presence felt in the league, giv- 
ing the Bandits a five-on-three opportuni- 
ty in the first minute of the game. 

Caledon failed to convert, and it was 
Brantford that opened the scoring on 
goalkeeper Jeremy Outopoulos midway 
through the first frame. 

A four-Bethell Hospice hike continues 
in Boltonminute five-on-three power play 
closed out the first period for the Bandits, 
but despite a frenzy of opportunities in 
front of the Brantford crease, the score re- 
mained 1-0 at intermission. 

Brantford potted four more goals ear- 
ly in the second before the Bandits could 
capitalize, with Colin Sinclair scoring 
Caledon’s first goal of the year after some 
sustained pressure. Sinclair added an- 
other in the period, as well as last year’s 
leading point scorer Austin Heughan, but 
the Warriors took a 7-3 lead into the third 
period. 

Three more quick goals by the Warriors 
early in the third made the score 10-3, 
and chased Outopoulos from the net in fa- 
vour of Adam Brennan. The change was 
followed by a resurgence by the Bandits, 





The deficit was too much to overcome, 
however, and Brantford added a final 
marker in the last second of the game, 
much to the displeasure of the Caledon 
bench. Final score was 11-6. 

The team travelled to Fergus Friday 
night to face the Thistles, where again 
they were forced to deal with a large defi- 
cit. They crawled back from a 4-0 score 
to tie the game at fives midway through 
the second period, off goals from Sinclair, 
Mclsaac, Alex Freethy, Jarett Petrie, and 
Brandon Marion. 





Fergus then exploded for six straight 
goals to end the second, making the score 
11-5. Petrie added another marker in the 
third, with the Bandits eventually falling 
15-6. 

After falling out of the first round of the 
playoffs to the Fergus Thistles in a pair of 
hard fought games in 2014, it was a bad 
case of déja vu last July. They once again 
drew the Thistles in the first round, and 
were promptly swept in two games. 

Summer of 2015 was hard on the Ban- 
dits, as they compiled a 4-12-0 regular 


= 


with Mike Paschals and Josh MclIsaac Scott Edwards brushes past a Warriors defenseman in the Caledon Bandits’ 11-6 loss to 
getting on the board, as well as Sinclair Brantford at Mayfield Recreation Complex last Tuesday. 


completing the hat trick. 


Photo by Jake Courtepatte 





season record, the franchise’s second sub- 
.500 record in a decade. Two of their wins 
came as defaults due to ineligible players 
used on the Six Nations team. 

The Bandits enter this year’s season 
with hopes of returning to the glory days 
of Caledon lacrosse. Their last OJCLL 
championship came back in 2009. 

They will be looking to rebound on Sat- 
urday when they visit the Mimico Moun- 
taineers. 

They will be at home every Tuesday, 
next week hosting the Shelburne Vets, 
who are also searching for their first win 
of the season, at the Mayfield Rec Com- 
plex. Opening draw is at 8 p.m. 

For stats, schedules, and more informa- 
tion, visit www.banditslacrosse.com/jrc 


Annual General Meeting 





Tuesday June 14th, 2016 
f:00 p.m, — 9:00 p.m. 
Caledon Community Complex 
6215 Old Church Road, Caledon East 


Notice of Motion/Constitutional Change form is available 
online at www.caledonminorhockey.ca 
Deadline for submission of form is May 1/th, 2016. 


send completed forms to: 
Mail: PO Box 14/7, Caledon East, ON L/C 3L8 
Fax: 905-584-4316 Email: ttmha@bellnet.ca 


Volunteer Executive Position Openings (2 year term): 

e Secretary 

« Vice-President - Administration 

e Vice-President — House League 

e Vice-President — Risk Management 

e Vice-President — Rep (1 year term) 

** Register for the 2016/17 hockey season by 
May 31st to save! ** 


BOLTONHYUMNDAIZ~ 


N'S ATHLETES 





Puck drops on annual 





Bill Whitbread Tournament 
|) Mi 





Tyler McGregor and women’s national team 
member Natalie Spooner were on hand 

at the tournament, offering some 

tips to the participants. 





By Jake Courtepatte 

Caledon house league hockey’s staple 
tournament was back for its_ third 
installment recently, in its second year 
under a new name. 

Close to 40 teams from. across 
Southern Ontario converged on Caledon 
East for the Bill Whitbread Memorial 
Tournament, including 14 teams from 
the hosting organization, Caledon Minor 
Hockey Association. 

The annual tournament was renamed 
from the Master’s Tournament to the 
Whitbread Memorial two years ago, with 
the CMIHA stating they wished to “do their 
part to keep Bill’s legacy vital.” 

Mr. Whitbread got his start with the 
Caledon Enterprise (then known as the 
Bolton Enterprise) while he was in high 
school, earning the title of Sports Editor 
in 1963. 

He passed away at the Enterprise offices 
about two years ago. 

In terms of results, the home team was 
represented by the Caledon Hammerheads 


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in the final of the atom division, but was 
shutout by the Meadowvale Hawks. In 
tyke, the Oakridges Kings took home 
the gold over the Kitchener Sharks, the 
Ancaster Flyers won the novice division 
over Bradford House League, and peewee 
Halton Hills Minor Hockey defeated the 
peewee Meadowvale Hawks. 

In the bantam division, two teams from 
the Port Credit Storm organization met in 
the final, with the Storm Red taking down 
Storm White 1 - O. 

The players got a special surprise 
Friday afternoon, when Canadian sledge 
hockey team member Tyler McGregor and 
women’s national team member Natalie 
Spooner dropped by the arena to give 
some tips of their own. The initiative was 
part of Chevrolet’s Team Canada 2023 
project, designed to help young hockey 
players improve on and off the Ice. 

Registration for the 2016-17 season 
has already begun, with the full schedule 
for rep tryouts available at www. 
caledonminorhockey.ca 








The Caledon Yellow Jackets and Caledon 
Penguins battle it out in the Bill Whitbread 
Memorial Tournament at Caledon 

East. 





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B2 CALEDON CITIZEN | MAY 12, 2016 


Hot action in recent Inglewood Ball Hockey League play 


The fourth week of action in the Inglewood 
Ball Hockey League included an upset. 

The loop-leading 360 Tired Service suf- 
fered their first loss of the campaign, being 
blanked 4-0 by Mr. Handyman. Those two 
clubs ended the evening tied for the lead in 
the standings with six points. 

George’s Arena Sports 7, 
Caledon Hills Cycling 3 




















PUZZLE SOLUTION 


With the first and third periods being 
tight, George’s took full advantage in the 
middle frame to pull ahead and get the win, 
holding their grip on third place with five 
points. 

Notching points for George’s were 
Jody Spagnol (two goals and three as- 
sists), Gus Kourousis (three assists), 
Jordan Bokla (one goal), Liam Winslow 
(one goal), Sal Iozzo (one assist), Jake 
Stronach (one assist), Zach Lyons (two 
goals and two assists), Tony Sousa (one 
assist) and Chris Bernardi (a goal and 
an assist). The Cycling guys’ pedal pow- 
er came from Dave Phillips from Kyle 
Dalcin and Travis Cassar, Terry Masters 
from Dalcin, and Masters from Ian Dunn 
and Phil Anselm. 

Carney Plumbing 2, We Are Creative 1 

It was a nail-biter, that saw Carney take 
the win with less than a minute to go 1n the 
third frame. 

Carney net nabbers were Ryan Zimmer- 
man from Brandon Sinclair and Scott Chur- 
ly, and Sinclair from Jesse Rooyakkers. We 
Are Creative got on the board with Mark 


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Hammett from Joshua D’Eri and Richard 
Podzorski. 
Mr. Handyman 4, 360 Tire Service O 

Stand in goalie Jonathan Gargaro stood 
tall and turned away all, earning a goose- 
egg for Mr. Handyman. 

Handyman hammers were dropped by 
Joseph Lupo from Caitlin VanNoort and 
Kent Johnstone, Daniel Leone from Ryan 
Hartman and JT Gore, Nathan Irvine from 
Will Pitsadiontis and Lupo, and VanNoort 
from Melissa Gargaro and Leone. 

April 28 

Coming out of the third night of action, 
360 Tire was shaping up to be the team to 
beat in the Inglewood Ball Hockey League. 

They posted their third win with a 4-0 
shut out of Carney . 

360 Tire 4, Carney O 

In the first shut out of the season, Dylan 
Berry backstopped the Tire Service to the 
win. 

Net nabbers for 360 were Kelvin Young 
from Mike Vutcher and Kyle Jones, Vutch- 
er from Kyle Young, Jeff Ferguson from 
Young and Tyson Dennings, and Jones 
from Marco Franza and Kyle Young. 

George’s 4, Mr. Handyman 2 

In a close one, the guys from George’s 
were able to hobble the Handymen and get 
the win. 

George’s gate crashers were Matt Cam- 
panella (unassisted), Campanella from 
Zach Lyons and Winslow, Bokla from Dar- 
ryl Miles, and Iozzo from Lyons. Handyman 
heroes were Irvine from Pitsadiontis and 
Kristian McMillan, and Leone from Chris 
Capobianco and Gore. 

Caledon Hills 3, We Are Creative O 
In the final game, substitute keeper 


Brandon Sinclair earned the goose-egg for 
the Cycling crew. 

Cycling scorers were Cassar from Dave 
Philips and Dalcin, Matt White (unassist- 
ed), and Cassar from Philips and Albert 
Bettridge. 

April 26 

Last Tuesday saw the first tie of the sea- 
son and George’s and The Creative crew 
battled to a draw. 

We Are Creative 2, 
George’s 2 

In an evenly matched game, neither team 
was able to best the other this night. 

George’s go-to guys were Campanella 
from Zach Lyons, and Winslow from Lyons. 
We Are got Creative from D’Eri with both 
markers and Anthony Mellace with the 
lone helper. 

360 Tire 7, Caledon Hills 1 

The 360 Tire guys took no chances after 
falling behind in the first and rolled over 
the Cyclers. 

Tire troopers were Franza (four goals and 
two assists), Dean Campbell (a goal and an 
assist), Chris McCron (a goal and an as- 
sist), Simon Nicholson (three assists), Kyle 
Young (one goal), Graham Taylor (one as- 
sist) and Kelvin Young (one assist). Caledon 
Hills lone sniper was Dalcin from Cassar 
and Geoff Lyons. 

Mr. Handyman 3, Carney 1 

In a close one, Mr. Handyman dropped 
the hammer and took the win from the 
Plumbers. 

Handyman howlers were Robert Keszeg 
from Gore and Hartman, Keszeg from Mc- 
Millan and Alex Tenaglia, and Capobianco 
from Johnstone and Irvine. Carney’s lone 
lamp lighter was Churly from Pete Davis. 


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This Grade 11 student is a full back 
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currently has a 2-2 record, with a chance 
foe [=1t(lalemi acon tat=m e)t-\ Ve) licwam (eM) cctoeelsvenr=! 
aU] alalialem ey= (ei; @ie)mial-ms\-1a](e)mcelelier-\imcsy-lan 
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oloi ator) b 
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The Grade 10 student is currently 
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o)FeXexsre mm (alice mula mm (ai)|qmutcksjam coll |aat-laat-lalm 
She also played on the senior girls’ 
volleyball team, and used to play flag 
football. Away from school, she helps 
out as a Skating instructor in Brampton 
and plays midget AAhockey in the 
=) ¢-100)0)(0)a lum Or-lal-le(1i(<tsmmme)gel-lalPZ-lile) ae 
The 15-year-old lives in Bolton. 


THE WEEK 


Name: 
TOMMY DOYLE 


| School: 
> WeaNe=s a0 ae 
CATHOLIC 
SECONDARY SCHOOL 


This 17-year-old iS currently 
(ofo)aTex=ahig-ltlale Mmmm e)a Mmmm; (0), @ummr-|a (0 MN I>) (0p 
SJolsveit=\|74)alemlamsatsmea|@)(om10)a0] em-lalem ele) (-) 
VZ= 10] | mrs laren alo Wr=lksve exer; (ovals om ie-tan) ele) il aloe 
He will be taking a year off school 
next year to train in free-style skiing 
in Quebec. He’s hoping to make the 
National Team, and maybe compete 
alm ial>m@)\V/00)e)(exseam Mal-Mele-\e (om Wears} (U(o(-ya) 
IWZetoml alm lave} (oa eleye B 


Name: 
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School: 
HUMBERVIEW 


‘| SECONDARY SCHOOL 


This 17-year-old is a flanker with the 
senior girls’ rugby team, which is in 
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a flanker on the flag football team in 
the fall and is a nordic skier, having 
aatc\e (oan @) mteyAVe Wan |ammcal-mece)anlanlelalina 
she plays house league soccer in the 
Bolton Wanderers’ organization. The 
Grade 12 student lives in Bolton. 


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Compleat Paving § Service - 
- | Asphalt Sealing 
| Asphalt Paving 
Free Estimates 
eig-lellale mom cer NVEli ale 
Interlock 
1 Snow Removal 


| Locally Owned 
& Operated 


~ Duane Breese 
Fax (519) 943-1025 


319-941-4246 





B4 CALEDON CITIZEN | MAY 12, 2016 





PROPERTY MAINTENANCE 


SCHOMBERG COMMUNITY 


TREE SERVICES Servicing the surrounding areas: 
- from one branch to entire tree 
<a me - complete removal - stump grinding - Best Rates 
- Multiple tree removal - high risk 
- diseased trees - storm damaged tree removal 
Simply the best! 

Will beat any written quotation. 

FULLY INSURED - CONSUMERS’ FIRST CHOICE 
Call Tony for a free estimate: 

(647) 889-2852 or (905) 939-7278 


On Site 
Repair and 
Maintenance 
Specializing in 
Lawn Maintenance 
Equipment & 

Golf Course Equipment 
Able to sharpen push reel mowers 


www.facebook.com/reelsharp 


LAWN EQUIPMENT 
ane wor 


Jason Sharples 
www.reelsharp.ca 
C: (519) 940-6279 


DISPOSAL 


BIN RENTALS ‘N'> 


"4 
JUNK REMOVAL © rr SG 


5-20YRDBINS “& ry ty VN 


416-248-5543 - 1-844-DNT-T0SS wae. 


www.dropntoss.ca 


A Division of Metro Jet Wash 


RV SALES & SERVICE 


KO! RZ ey 


TRAVEL, 


@ HEPBURN 
TRAILER SALES 


5200 Hwy 9, Schomberg 
905-939-2279 it 
www.hepburnsales.com 7» ® 
Call Ed - forall your hitch, (i 
tires, RV & trailer parts needs. 


Alltree & Services 
FOR ALL YOUR TREE NEEDS 
Deep Root Fertilizing 
eInsect Diagnoses/Control 
eTree Sales and Planting 


¢Pruning and Removal 
eStump Grinding 
¢Certified Arborists 


wells 519.942.6781 
cspaat www.alltrees.ca ISA 


Wi AMT ° Tree Removal 
BL ya ° Trimming 

MANA GS R ° Stump Grinding 
° Land Clearing 


° Storm Damage 
© 24 hr Emergency Services 


fe ee 
/19- 938- 6996 branchmanagertreecare@gmail.com 


Tree Removal « Stump Removal 
Pruning * Trimming * Firewood Orders 


FREE ESTIMATES - FULLY INSURED 


416-427-9992 
axemantreeservices@gmail.com 


Charles Emerson 
Tree Service 


ISA Certified Arborist 
Residential & Commercial 
Locally Owned & Operated. 
Licensed, Insured & Bonded 
* Complete Bathroom Renovations 
* Plumbing Rough-Ins « Pumps 
* Flooring * Toilets & Faucets 
* Service & Repairs 
* UV Lights & Filters 
* Sewer Cameras & Drain Cleaning 


« Hot Water Tanks, Pressure Tanks, 
Water Softeners 


647-228-1999 
1-866-652-1999 
www.theplumbingguy.ca 


NO JOB TOO BIG OR SMALL 
GUARANTEED BEST PRICE! 


Free Consultation 
Tree Removal & Pruning 
Bucket Truck Service 
Cabling & Bracing 
Stump Removal 
Emergency Work 
Property Management | 
Arborist Reports 
Year Round Service | 
Fully Insured 


905-801-5891 


www. charlesemersontreeservice.com 
charlesem ercontreaservice@hotmall.com | 


™™" Rental, Sales, Service, Parts & Storage 


[Modern Recen ii ' "7 " oil IS NEVER TOO LATE 


RENOVATION 
FLOORING SPECIALIST 


Hardwood, Refinishing Hardwood, 
Stairs, Laminate, Carpet, Tiles, Granite. 
Sales, Installation, Repairs. 


416-677-7555 


www.pearlknstructions.com 


M&M 


Quality Homes 


SEWING 


y te 


Your One Stop Sewing Shop 
+ Sewing Workshops 
« Embroidery designs & Supplies 
* 100% Cotton Quilt Fabrics 


Service to all makes 
Vernon & Minerva Knorr 


519-323-2693 


and sew much more 


a 
. a cf 


nani ER into ering e interlock/pavers 
e decks/fences 

¢ retaining walls 
e natural stone 

e flagstone 


e bobcat services 


Peter 


www.MandMQualityHomes.com 519-216-5806 





COMPLETE BATHROOM 
_ REMODELING. SPECIALIZING 


~ SIN CURB-FREE, WALK-IN : : 
- SHOWERS. OFFICE: 905-859-1046 CELL:416-676-6641 


~ . HANDS ON FAMILY BUSINESS WWW.MFCLANDSCAPING.COM 
_“ — FOR OVER 35 YEARS. 


BRIAN STEVENSON 


LANDSCAPE 
DESIGN / BUILD 


www.albanycontracting.com 


We Specialize in NATURAL STONE LANDSCAPES 
Featuring: 
e Granite Steps ¢ Flagstone Walkways ¢ Patios 
e Armor Stone Retaining Walls 
As well as: A complete range of Interlocking Installations 
¢ Pool Landscaping ¢ Water Features ¢ Tree Planting * Sodding 


Caledon Renovations 
CALEDON & Contracting 


RENOVATIONS 


CONTRACTING CO. 


ESTABLISHED 1950 


WOOD RESTORATION SPECIALIST 
DECKS - FENCES - ~~ OUTDOOR FURNITURE 


FULLY INSURED * ALL WorK GUARANTEED 


1-800-387-3304 
“Proudly serving York Region since 1975!” 


Landscapes 
Visit us at our new location: 
906195 Hwy 89, Unit 2, Mulmur, ON_ 


design - build REAT YOUR WOOD RIGHT. L 


905- 790-2101 - www. modernaccent.ca 


Inground Pools 
Landscape Construction 
Home Renovations 
New Home Construction 
OVER 30 YRS EXPERIENCE 








= ate 
meyer: cate 
ats wih ice aa? aa ks 


Yolo) =a LANDSCAPING ~ 
519.217.1593 416.936.6469 705.279.SWIM 


ORANGEVILLE Cay VAL@) 5 (@)\ Ee) COLLINGWOOD 


geminipools.ca ¢ geminilandscapes.ca 


mele) INIC 


1.844.732.7575 
8575 Keele St. #5-6, Concord, ON LAK 3P4 
info@pearlknstructions.com * www.pearlknstructions.com 


GoodLife Contracting 


Bathrooms 
DECKS - Professional Carpenter 
Kitchens 


Call/Text 416-655-6065 
goodlifecontracting@gmail.com * goodlifecontracting.weebly.com 


GRAPHIC/WEB DESIGN 


Pixel Sird 


Design 
custom designs for small businesses 


web design a _ print design a logo design 
inquire about a free consultation 
info@pixelbirddesign.com 


416 807 6619 


pixelbirddesign.com 


GLASS & MIRRORS 


> Ye; 4rs in the Indust™ 


ry a we wes /- & eS 
PALGRAVE GLASS & MIRROR 


Designs and Creations to fit your Personal needs 
— CUSTOM DESIGNED — 
Shower Enclosures, Glass Railings, Mirror Walls & Ceilings 





teal Skylights replaced? IZ 
No mess in your home ~ 


| Leak-proof - Guaranteed! AW 
S - Licensed & Insured BRIGHT 


- 10 year Guarantee SKYLIGHTS 
Call Joe at any time 416-705-8635 / 905-898-9185 INC. 


www.PalgraveGlassAndMirror.com 
Dave Haney: 416.258.2980 or davehaney@live.ca 


VET SERVICES 


mm lelet-t-Mer-||(-m (eo) matcel0l mi el=)i-me)' 
FTelelo)iaisaat=|sime)m-iaa(-1 ge [-1a le.) Aum 


Over 40 years experlence in 
the auction industry 


> ON SITE / FOR HIRE 
> COM PLETE ESTATE 
GLEAR OUT 


Craig Kimberley, 
AUCTIONEER 


519.216.0951 
craig@kcauctions.ca 


VETERINARY SERVICES 
mache hiavary@ (wders: com 
www.averymobilevetservices.com 


Call (519) 941-2230 
or (905) 857-6626 


CALEDON CITIZEN | MAY 12, 2016 B5 


Who Does | vl 


In Our Community... 


CLEANING SERVICES 


Lawyers 
e Crimal Offences 
e Family Law/Divorce 
e Real Estate ¢ Wills & Probate 
e Litigations 
Paralegals 
e Small Claims e Traffic Offences 
e Landlord/Tenant 


. 2 Nieg ladi¢s 


WILL CLEAN YOUR HOUSE, 
APARTMENT OR OFFICE. 


_ REFERENCES AVAILABLE +» FREE ESTIMATES 


United - 


Van Lines Wi CANADA 


MOVING STORE, Boxes, Packing Supplies, 

Self Storage UCAN Mobile Storage Units 

93 Healey Rd., Bolton 905-857-4011 
M-F 7am-4:30pm 


Katherine “Kat” Mueller 
Paralegal Licensed by the 
Law Society of Upper Canada 


e Crimal Pardons 
e Commissioner for Taking Oaths 


www.thelegalguild.com | 519.925.1500 


Free consultations & After hours Appointments Available 


LASER TREATMENTS 


AMBER LASER _\— a 
| Cosmetic Laser Treatment Jit ive — 


e Permanent Hair Removal Cag a “ 
age free, Toca free ° 8 muzzle free % 
e Skin Rejuvenation (fade age spots, pigmented lesions, discolouration, g we 


freckles, skin tags, warts) satine the e 
CAVETSeUcLar-Veye)itorcta(oyntsm (clu ceverexctsyiUII\VmUCst<l Milflem Ces USI ISM OST INTISILES = ee ee te ee eae 
spider veins on legs, cherry angioma/little red dots) ea 


e Cellulite and Body Contouring Treatment 
DACE ROZENBERGA 647.400.9954°905.857.0644 905-857- (5683) | 
|62 Queen st. South Unit B, Bolton, ON L7E 1B2“@y 


> CLS (CERTIFIED LASER SPECIALIST) Www.amberlaserclinic.com , 


ORANGEVILLE 


MINI STORAGE 


N=) QUEM ao VM rome (=) 1 
your FREE month! 


eo PS Se 


519-939-7070 
se9 94123352) 


HOLLAND 


2 ° Math. Reading. Confidence. 
OVER 


@ Elaine Kehoe t ms lis’ Zo _25YEARS 
% 3 ci }'2\es> = EXPERIENCE 








REAL ESTATE TUTORING 


et AS ay, 


FULLY 
LICENCED 
& INSURED 


’ Dam with you every step of the way. 


ekehoed@symnpatico.ca 


t 519.940.9995 | con 416.278.06¢ 


. 1 905-460-5596 


167006 Mono Centre Road Mono, Ontario LOW 6X5 


IRWIN EXCAVATING SERVICES ING. 
Specializing in Country Property 
Septic System Design, Installation and Replacement of Septic Tanks 
Construction & Repair of Driveways 
Installation and Repair of Water/Hydro Lines 
Solve Drainage Problems 
Dig Foundations 
Ponds 


CALL PAUL AT 519-941-3326 


Award Winning Carpet and 
Upholstery Cleaning System 


ALUDIO.VWISUAL. paw = inc. 
e Audio/Video Sales & Installations « 24/7 Service Calls 
¢ Office Sound Masking ¢ Camera systems 


1.877.870.7538 © info@massiveav.ca 
WWwW.massiveav.ca 


519-927-7799 < 1-877-318-2378 
dan@heavensbestorangeville.com 


Networks 


DRIVERS WANTED 


eee —ooo SSS > 3903095900095 SS eel —————————_—e 
SSS HO 






$$ CONSOLIDATE 
YOUR DEBT $$ 


|=)-smn-1-1@)-sn(e). 
ADVENTURE 


aT. LAWRENCE RIVER 


MORTGAGE 





SE es CRUISING 
..Qurt people moke it happen — Mm WwioitN & 
WE ARE URGENTLY LOOKING FOR HOME EQUITY LOANS ee LOWER YOUR MONTHLY PAYMENTS een ee 
THE FOLLOWING AZ DRIVERS: FOR ANY PURPOSE!! SAVE 30% CLOSE TO HOME! 
Bank turn downs, Tax or Mortgage Orour AND The hassle free way to travel 


OWNER OPERATORS 
Competitive Pay Package 


CROSS BORDER COMPANY 


arrears, Self Employed, Bad Credit, 
Bankruptcy. 
Creative Mortgage Specialists! 
No proof of income 





Heart of the Arctic adventure 


June 29th — July Sth 
QUEBEC CITY TO KINGSTON 


CONSOLIDATE YOUR DEBT NOW!!! 


Visit Inuit communities in 4st, 2nd. 3rd MORTGAGES 





HIGHWAY DRIVERS Greenland and Nunavut | lidati BOOK NOW & 
$.514 Cents Per Mile 'st, ee ie : Aboard the comfortable Selnatca: tem one SAVE $200 pp 
. se JP 10 Go'% 198-passenger Ocean Endeavour Tax Arrears. No CMHC Fees pee 
recruiting@rosedale.ca Borrow: Pay Monthly: GALL FOR DETAILS! $50K YOU PAY: SEA Ea vero 
$25,000 $105.40 | $208.33 / MONTH He agin 

F ii ; 1-800-363-7566 ee | * NIGHTLY ENTERTAINMENT 
aameremanes $50,000 $237.11 (OAC) AND MUCH MORE... 
4-855-721-3962 $100,000 $474.21 www.adventurecanada.com 


No Income, Bad Credit www.StLawrenceCruiseLines.com 


For More Details 


LARGER AMOUNTS AND 14 Front St. S. Mississauga Power of Sale Stopped! x ‘en Bee: 
JOIN THE FAMILY COMMERCIAL FUNDS AVAILABLE (TICO # 04001400) BETTER OPTION MORTGAGE wi = iil 
DRIVE THE BUSINESS ~ Decrease monthly payments _ Pe | 253 Ontario Street, Kingston, Ontario 
ubecrease moninly Paymens- : : TICO # 2168740) 
www.rosedale.ca/dri up to 75%! REE FOR MORE INFORMATION ( 
Sen ane Based on 3% APR. OAC ADVERTISING CALL TODAY TOLL-FREE: 
-88: Z 1-800-282-1169 TARGET TOURS Group escorted 
FOR SALE aiicimeiiniaia vacations to Italy and Eastern 
SAWMILLS from only $4,397 - MAKE ONTARIO-WIDE FINANCIAL wwwimnortgageontaric.com = Mediterranean Cruise from 97080 
MONEY & SAVE MONEY with your 1801347inc es Seon Noes Seka Se 
own bandmill - Cut lumber any FSCO Licence #12456 (Lanes: 10989) $2789 departing from Toronto. CALL 
dimension. In stock ready to www.ontario-widefinancial.com Li cee et Lee ey, GF Viaik 
ship. FREE Info & DVD: LET US HELP !! "Ontario Community —— | | en aa ee 
www.NorwoodSawmills.com/4000T _Newspapers Assoctation MrApprovZ.com MORTGAGE | : , 
1-800-566-6899 Ext:4000T. APPROVAL - ist & 2nd MORTGAG- EMPLOYMENT OPPS. 
; aaa ES, Purchases, Refinances, Commer-  enical TRANSCRIPTIONI In- 
REFORESTATION NURSERY SEED- WANTED REACH MILLIONS OF CUSTOMERS _ cial Loans to $10 MILLION, Farmand 4. Sai ) , 


LINGS of hardy trees, shrubs, & ber- 
ries for shelterbelts or landscaping. 
Spruce & Pine from $0.99/tree. Free 
eripping. Replacement guarantee. 
1-866-873-3846 or www.treetime.ca. 


CAREER TRAINING 


MEDICAL TRANSCRIPTION, 
HEALTHCARE DOCUMENTATION, 
Medical Terminology online courses. 
Train with CanScribe, the accredited 
and top-rated online Canadian 
school. Work-from-home careers! 
1-866-305-1165. www.canscribe.com 
Info@canscribe.com. 


FIREARMS WANTED FOR JUNE 
2oth, 2016 AUCTION: Rifles, Shot- 
guns, Handguns. As Estate Special- 
ists WE manage sale of registered / 
unregistered firearms. Contact Paul, 
Switzer’s Auction: Toll-Free 1-800- 
694-2609, info@switzersauction.com 
or www.switzersauction.com. 


WANTED: OLD TUBE AUDIO 
EQUIPMENT, 40 years or older. 
Amplifiers, Stereo, Recording and 
Theatre Sound Equipment. Hammond 
oes any condition. CALL Toll-Free 
1-800-947-0393 / 519-853-2157. 


IN ONTARIO WITH ONE EASY 
CALL! 


Your Classified Ad or Display Ad 
would appear in weekly newspapers 
each week across Ontario in urban, 

suburban and rural areas. 


For more information Call Today 
647-350-2558, 
Email: kmagill@rogers.com or visit: 
www.OntarioClassifiedAds.com. 


Farmland Mortgages, Bruised Credit - 
No Problem! CALL TOLL-FREE 
1-844-277-7689. Online Application 
@ www.MrApprovZ.com Money Solu- 
tions Inc. LIC# 10731). 


ist & 2nd MORTGAGES from 2.35% 
» year VRM and 2.64% 5 year FIXED. 
All Credit Types Considered. Let us 
help you SAVE thousands on the right 
mortgage! Purchasing, Re-financing, 
Debt Consolidation, Construction, 
Home Renovations...CALL 1-800- 
225-1777, www.homeguardfunding.ca 
(LIC #10409). 


demand career! Employers have 
work-at-home positions available. Get 
online training you need from an 
employer-trusted program. Visit: 
CareerStep.ca/MT or 1-855-768-3362 
to start training for your work-at-home 
career today! 


HEALTH 


CANADA BENEFIT GROUP - Do 
you or someone you know suffer 
from a disability? Get up to $40,000 
from the Canadian Government. Toll- 
free 1-888-511-2250 or www.canada 
benefit.ca/free-assessment 


else mits mOlaie-lar-lat tem qc-aremiolelmollriinl-.s-Me-r-lantMuananaal-aliels Cat-ctiis-lemelge 





B6 CALEDON CITIZEN | MAY 12, 2016 


Mon. to Sat. & Holiday Mondays 
473051 County Rd. 11, Orangeville 
519-943-0101 





NOW ACCEPTING EWASTE AT NO 
CHARGE WE BUYSCRAP METAL 


HELP HELP HELP HELP 
USED VEHICLES USED VEHICLES USED VEHICLES GARAGE SALE WANTED WANTED WANTED WANTED 



















BUSINESS 


FLITE 


¢ Sales/Service/Parts Discounts 
¢ Work-Ready Loaner Vehicles 
¢ 24 Hour Roadside Assistance 
¢ On-Site Pickup & Delivery 
¢ Extended Priority Hours 
¢ Dedicated Account Representative 
¢ Courtesy Transportation 
























Contact Jeff Hall, 
Commercial Truck 


Manager for Details 









Fa Ausiness 


HOICE 





www.macmastergm.com 
519.941.1360 












HOMESELLERS 


Find out what homes down 
the street sold for! 
Free computerized list 
w/pics of area home sales 
and current listings. 










Free recorded message 
1-800-279-0623 
ID# 8065 


ro Reatty Lid 


APARTMENTS FOR 
RENT 


RECENTLY RENOVATED 
SPACIOUS 2 BEDROOM 
APARTMENT overlooking 
downtown Orangeville. Both 
bedrooms (6'x8’ & 12°x12’), 
kitchen (9’x18’) and living 
room (15’x15') all have 
large windows. No smok- 
ing, no pets. $1200/month. 
Available mid-March. Call 
416-518-9112. 


RENOVATED 1. BED- 
ROOM APT in quiet build- 
ing in Grand Valley. $575 & 
$675/month + utilities. No 
pets, first and last, refer- 
ences required. Suitable for 
adults. Call 519-942-0772. 


1 BEDROOM BASEMENT 
APT — walkout to backyard 
(full use), gas fireplace, 
shared laundry, south end of 
Orangeville. $1250/month 
utilities included. First & 
last required. Call Derek 
519-939-3779. 


BOLTON SOUTH HILL: 1 
bedroom basement apt. Pri- 
vate entrance. Parking for 
small car. Single person. 
No smoking, no pets. $850/ 
mth. Call 905-951-3135 


HOUSES FOR 
RENT 


FARMHOUSE for RENT 
near DUNDALK. 3 bed- 
rooms, gas heat, bedroom 
upstairs. $900/month + util- 
ities. 519-848-6904. 


ROOMS 





FOR RENT 





LOVELY FURNISHED 
ROOM for rent — walk to 
downtown No pets, no 
smoking. Available imme- 
diately. 519-415-5577 or 
416-550-8725. 


1 BEDROOM FOR rent in 
Bolton. Mature responsible 
working person. No smok- 
ing, no pets. References 
required. Includes parking. 
Call 905-857-2144 


CHILD CARE 


AVAILABLE 


IN HOME DAYCARE - Lo- 
cation: Nobleton. Safe des- 
ignated play environment, 
educational activities, nu- 
tritious snacks, hot meals, 
smoke free environment, 
Public/Catholic designated 
bus stop. Available for full 
time, part time and before 
and after school. Patient 
and experienced profes- 
sional in a loving environ- 
ment. Weekend services 
available. Call Patricia at 
416-949-5585 





|! AM LOOKING for a 
SEMI-RETIRED MECHAN- 
IC to work part-time on vin- 
tage British cars (pre-com- 
puter). Please call: Ken 
519-942-1722. 


GENERAL LABOURER 
NEEDED Must have own 
transportation, work boots, 
safety shirt. Must arrive by 
7:30 am. Lunch, break and 
water supplied. Call King’s 
Tree Removal at 519-925- 
6116. 


LOOKING for CARPEN- 
TERS and General La- 
bourers for Construction 
Company. Wages based on 
experience. Send resume 
to: greg@gp-carpentry.com. 


EXPERIENCED MEAT 
CUTTERS and LABOUR- 
ERS wanted. Cutting and 
deboning poultry products 
an asset. Labourers, $11- 
$14/hr. Butchers with mini- 
mum two years experience 
- $16/hr. Apply to Abate 
Packers Ltd by email at: 
jobs @abatepackers.com 
or by fax: 519-848-2793. 


DONALDSON'_ =TRANS- 
PORT INC. We are now 
accepting resumes A-Z 
Drivers, must have min- 
imum of 3 years driving 
experience and 3 years 
insurance. Clean CVOR 
and driver extract Start 
immediately. Contact Greg 
519-215-3335. g.donald- 
sontransport @ gmail.com 
for further info. 


FULL TIME DELIVERY 
DRIVERS & part-time on 
call delivery drivers needed 
for Orangeville & surround- 
ing area. Vehicle supplied. 
Must be 25, and have clean 
driver's abstract. Call 519- 
941-4777. 


FRAMING CARPENTER 
NEEDED minimum 2 years 
experience. Alliston area. 
705-220-2723. 


eBAY: Do you use eBAY? 
Assistance required for 
posting items for sale. 
Please contact 416-471- 
8486 for details. Caledon 
Village area. Non smoker 
please. Serious inquires 
only. 


STUDENT HELP WANTED 
to work on agrain farm. Du- 
ties to include washing ma- 
chinery, lawn maintenance 
and small paint jobs. Please 
forward your resume to 
humberviewfarms@ gmail. 
com or contact 905-880- 


0369 





DOMESTIC HELP 


Home & office 


CLEANING 
Call for FREE estimate 
416-371-4995 


CITIZEN 





| have 1000’s 
of yards of new 
100% nylon carpet. 
Will install livingroom 
& hall for as little as 
$389.00 
(includes carpet, pad & install) 
Call Steve 
905-890-5552 
carpetdeals.ca 










HUGE MOVING SALE - 
Friday May 13th & Sat. May 
14th, 9am — 4pm. 585221 
Country Rd 17, Melanc- 
thon. Household items, 
furniture, pictures, garden 
chairs & stuff. Power tools, 
compressor, bikes, camping 
equipment and lots more! 


LOST 


AND FOUND 





REWARD FOR SAFE RE- 
TURN of YAMAHA ATV. 
Missing from Conserva- 
tion Area behind Eastview 
Cres. Grey with light blue 
trim. Leave at Back Street 
Garage on Armstrong Ave, 
Orangeville. No questions 
asked or contact them for 
reward if other information 
is provided. 


FUNERAL 
SERVICES 


ON SALE FOR MAY 2016 
-ANY IN STOCK COLOUR 
SERP 36X24” on a 42” 
base, JUST $2,500.00. 
Includes a GREY Gran- 
ite Base Price, Including 
lettering & delivery any- 
where in South Western 
Ontario. HST, Cemetery 
Fees and Foundation EX- 
TRA. ALLISTON MON- 
UMENT WORKS, 169 
Dufferin St, South - Unit 8 
705.435.7951. www.monu- 
mentmaker.ca. 


FIREWOOD 


QUALITY 
FOR SALE: 


Seasoned firewood 
$370/bush cord. 
Fresh cut $245/bush cord. 


Call 905-729-2303 


FIREWOOD for SALE. 
Call David Teixeira 519-942- 
1421. Country Gardens & 
Landscapes. 


ARTICLES 
FOR SALE 


CUSTOM 


KILL 


Is now available at 


Previously known as Dundalk Poultry 
Chickens, Ducks, Turkeys, 
Guinea Hen, Pheasants 


call 519 923 2001 


Or email 
consciouslivingcuisineoffice@gmail.com 


KENTUCKY DERBY & 
QUEEN'S PLATE GLASS- 
ES. Also Blue Jays memo- 
rabilia. Contact drfager@ ip- 
rimus.ca or 905-838-1374. 


25 TON WOOD SPLIT- 
TER by Forest King with 
log holding rack and other 
upgrades. $1000.00. Call 
519-925-9197 or text 416- 
209-7444. 


REID FARM MARKET 
OPEN EVERY DAY! Let- 
tuce, Garden Plants, Seed 
Potatoes, Lawn Seed, Veg- 
gies & More! 4th line Mono, 
north of Highway #9. www. 
reidspotatoes.com. 


CONTRACTOR REPAIRS, 
RESTORES, jacks up, 
dismanties farm buildings, 
homes, cottages, roofing, 
siding, doors, windows, 
beams, post, piers, foun- 
dations, concrete work. 
Eavestroughing, decks, 
docks, sheds. Fencing in- 
stalled, replaced or fixed. 
Call Brian McCurdy 519- 
986-1781. 


CLOSING SALE! - 
WHOLESALE Perennial 
Business. Many varieties 
available including native 
wildflowers and common 
perennials. Great cost-ef- 
fective opportunity for 
homes/estates/commercial 
mass plantings at less than 
wholesale cost. Negotiable 
pricing — buy in bulk and 
save even more. Please 
e-mail aschenk @bell.net for 
availability list or call Anita 
519-941-7371. 


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Facebook 


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SERVICES 


SAID 


LAWN ¢ GARDEN 


MAINTENANCE & 
RESIDENTIAL LANDSCAPE 
‘cleanups pruning 
-lawn rolling = rototilling 
‘fertilizing + aerating 
* dethatching 


30 years in the area 
A lifetime of 
experience 


Call Mike 
519-923-3417 
or Patrick 
VEL AVE Way. 


www.nindyardworks.com 


FINALLY A SERVICE 
THAT CARES! Personal 
touch services are back. 24 
hour personal care for your 
loved one. Respite care, 
house cleaning and much 
more. Call Wendy for all 
your needs. 705-435-2821. 


TOPS (TAKE OFF 
POUNDS SENSIBLY) 
meets at 6:15 pm every 
Wednesday night at the 
Avalon Retirement Centre, 
355 Broadway. For more in- 
formation call Trudy Rockel 
519-941-6146. 


DRUG PROBLEM? We've 
been there, we can help! 
Narcotics Anonymous meets 
every Friday & Sunday at 
7:30 pm, Westminster Unit- 
ed Church, 247 Broadway, 
Orangeville, or every Thurs- 
day 8:00 pm at St. Paul’s 
Anglican Church, 312 Owen 
Sound St., Shelburne, or call 
1-888-811-3887. 

















<li) ORANGEVILLE 
Js leigata 


We are currently seeking an 


to help oversee our seasonal and housewares department. 


Responsibilities include: 


¢ Customer Service within the department, as well as 


the rest of the store 


e Assist supervisor with supervision and directing of 


department staff 


¢ Product procurement and stocking shelves 


e Sales 


Qualifications: 


e Excellent customer service and communication skills 
¢ Leadership & teambuilding skills 
¢ Professional appearance with a great attitude 


¢ Related Experience 


¢ We offer a competitive salary and benefit package 
with great growth potential. 


lf you are an energetic team player, looking to work in 
a great environment, please forward your resume to: 


m.crowe@ohhbc.ocm. 


now hiring for all positions. 
FT/PT, summer. 
lf you are hard-working, energetic, and 
have a positive attitude, then drop off 
your resume or email to 
paul@superburger.ca 


NEW HOME 
CONSTRUCTION WORKERS 


Quality Homes has openings in all construction areas 
both in our plant and on the site. If you have experience 
in framing, electrical, drywall, plumbing, roofing, trim, 
paint or any other aspects of home construction we 





would like to hear from you. 


WE OFFER: 





¢ 42 - 44 hour rain or shine work weeks 
* competitive rates of pay with paid overtime & 


paid holidays 
* benefit plan 


* opportunity for advancement in a successful 


and growing company 


* tools supplied 


Please apply in person or fax/email your resume to: 


Quality Engineered Homes Ltd. 
c/o Human Resources 

RR #2 Kenilworth, Ontario NOG 2E0 
Fax: (519) 323-3897 


QUALITY HOMES: 


Email: hr@qualityhomes.on.ca 
Website: www.qualityhomes.ca 


NEEDED IMMEDIATELY 


GENERAL LABOURERS 
SHIPPER RECEIVERS 
MILLWRIGHTS 


Please contact: 
JMR Personnel Services Ltd 
Office 905-671-0480 
Fax 905-671-4978 


imr.personnel@bellnet.ca 


Freelance Reporter 
for Local Community Newspaper 


Come join a dynamic, fast paced, growing entrepreneurial 
company looking for an energetic Reporter 
with a passion for community news. 
The ideal candidate will have a distinct willingness 
to cover local community events and issues. 


DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES: 


* Produce stories and bylines each week 


® Generate story ideas and follow up on news tips 


© Take photographs 


© Work some evenings and weekends, as required 


QUALIFICATIONS: 


© Diploma in journalism preferred 


* Candidates should have experience working on 
the editorial side of the newspaper industry 


© Excellent writing, editing and photography skills 


© Valid driver's license and a reliable vehicle 


® Reporting experience an asset 


© An interest in local issues is a necessity, 
as the majority of the writing tor this rote will be local 


LONDON 
PUBLISHING 





SERVICES 


IF YOU WANT to keep 
drinking, that’s your busi- 
ness. IF YOU WANT to 
stop drinking, that’s our 
business. Call Alcohol- 
ics Anonymous Hot Line, 
1-866-715-0005. www. 
aanorthhaltonerin.org. 


ALZHEIMER SUPPORT 
GROUPS meet monthly for 
spousal & family support. 
Call (519) 941-1221. 


Interested and qualified 
candidates should forward 
their cover letter and resume to 
brock@auroran.com 


SERVICES 


ARE YOU A WOMAN liv- 
ing with abuse? For safety, 
emergency shelter, and 
counselling call Family 
Transition Place, (519)941- 
HELP or 1-800-265-9178. 


FOR INFORMATION 
regarding HEART and 
STROKE, call Dori Ebel 
(519) 941-1865 or 1-800- 
360-1557. 





DATA COMMUNICATIONS 


Providing Internet service and 
support since 1994. 


Get Connected. Contact us: 
www.sentex.ca 888-4-SENTEX 





FULL TIME POSITIONS 

Metal Fab Shop Requires: 

¢ Shop Supervisor, Afternoon shift 

* Service Coordinator, $50K, 
Acton, ON 

¢ Estimator S60K 

¢ Project Manager $50K 

¢ “D” class driver, Small Flatbed, 
Skilled with Strapping loads 

¢ Welders ... All position MIG, Days 
and Afternoon shifts, $17-18 / hr 

* Heavy Labour, Bolton, $14-18 / hr. 


Other Positions: 

¢ Boom Truck Operator, 23 Ton, 
140’ Boom, $30 / hr. 

¢ Walkie Operator, $14.50 / hr. 

¢ Batcher, Paint Mfg., Days, 
$17.00/hr. 

* CNC Operators, Full Time, 
Bolton—A & N shifts, $17 / hr. 

¢ Certified Forklift Operators, $14-16 
/ hr. 

¢ Millwrights. Brampton and Acton, 
$26-28 / hr. 

¢ Conveyor Assembly, New Whse., 
Brampton, 3 month Assignment, 
$16/ hr. 

¢ HVAC Technician G2, ODP, 313D 
req d. 


« Resumes only, no phone calls 
* Only qualified persons will be contacted 


DaveG @ motivatedstaffing.com 
905-951-6330 Fax 
905-951-6300 Phone 
866-274-7231 Toll Free 


MOTIVATED STAPFING ING 


“Our Business ts People” 


COUNTRY GARDENS AND 
LANDSCAPES 
CREW CHIEF: 


Do you love the outdoors and gardening? 
Are you punctual, professional, have a clean driving 
record, reliable transportation, 
and preferrably certified in First Aid? 
GARDENERS: 
Do you enjoy outdoors and want to learn about plant 
material and their care? 


WE ARE LOOKING FOR YOU! 
Please forward your resume to: 
visitcgl@sympatico.ca or call us at 519-942-1421. 


VEHICLES WANTED VEHICLES WANTED 


A-1 CASH 
$200 AND UP...... 


FREE TOWING, FLATBED SERVICE 





CARS, TRUCKS, 
TRAILERS AND OLD 
TIRES WANTED 






S$ SCRAP - IT S 
S$ FOR-CASH §$ 


CARS and TRUCKS. 
Any year any Condition. 


TOP PRICE PAID 





PICKED UP FREE 


Same day service - 7 days a week 
25 years in service 


Call 519-833-1010 * Cell 905 703 5010 








9572 Sideroad 17 & 
Erin. oNNoB 170 @I 
Ph: 519-833 9775 Oa to 
Toll Free 888 270-0133 l 
www.erinauto.com rec Cc ers 


working logether @ for a cleaner cormmuntly 


GET PAID TO DO SOMETHING GOOD 
FOR THE ENVIRONMENT 


We will pay you cash for your vehicle and 
Recycle it in an Environmentally Friendly Manner. 
We are a Certified Electronic Waste Collection 
Site Drop off used Electronics “ Free of Charge” 
“ We sell Quality Used Parts & Tires” 


Serving: Wellington, Dufferin, Caledon, Halton & Peel 
Mon- Fri: 8:30am — 5:00pm + Saturday: 8:30-1:00pm 








SERVICES 


LA LECHE LEAGUE Oran- 
geville offers breastfeeding 
support. For more info call 
Erin at 519-943-0703. 


CALEDON CITIZEN | MAY 12, 2016 B7 


HELP HELP | HELP HELP HELP HELP HELP HELP 
WANTED WANTED WANTED WANTED WANTED WANTED WANTED WANTED 


THE CORPORATION OF THE TOWN OF MONO 


REQUIRES 
FULL-TIME PERMANENT PUBLIC WORK 
OPERATION EMPLOYEES 










Reporting directly to the Operations Foreman/Manager, this position requires the directed implementation of the Town's 
capital and maintenance programs as set by Council for the Town's road network and managed properties. It requires 
working nights, afternoons, weekends, statutory holidays and being on a rotating on-call schedule. 


ESSENTIAL QUALIFICATIONS: 


- Experience operating a variety of heavy equipment (loader, grader, backhoe, excavator, truck) in extreme weather and 
snow conditions is considered an asset 

- Experience with Urban Civil Infrastructure and excavation and maintenance around utilities etc. 

+ Heavy Equipment License, or willing to work towards same 

- Candidates who have education, training and/or experience equivalent to the above qualifications listed will be equally 
considered 

* Experience with road, bridge maintenance and construction is considered an asset 

- Knowledge of Minimum Maintenance Standards and Occupational Health and Safety Act 

« Knowledge of Ontario Traffic Manual and Book 7, Temporary Conditions 

- DZ or AZ license, or willing to work towards same within 6 months of hire 


DESIRED KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS AND SUITABILITY: 


The Orangeville Citizen is currently seeking newspaper 
carriers to deliver once a week. 
Route OH42 Route OE25 


65-139 Townline, Bythia St Faulkner St (Elizabeth to Fead), 
(Townline south to Dufferin St) 70 Papers Matthew St, McCarthy St (Furst St to Clra), 


Route OHS1 Fead St up to 66 
Quarry Dr. 59 papers Route OH1 14 


3 Townline (Alexander to Orange), 
Route OA90 Orange St, Orange Cres - 57 papers 
Bythia St (from Broadway to Church St), 
Church St. (John to Centre), Hewitt St 
71 papers 


- Excellent record keeping abilities and the ability to work as a team player 

- Ability to receive and follow directions with great care to detail 

« Ability to perform heavy lifting and deal professionally/effectively with Town residents 
+ Adaptability to change, sound judgment 


* Ability to work in an environment that promotes respect, dependability and reliability 

A full job description can be viewed on line at www.townofmono.com 

This challenging position suits a candidate with a can do attitude, self-motivated, great communication skills, has an eye 
for detail, well organized, willingness to learn, and professional approach with the sole goal of providing the residents of 


Mono the highest quality of service. This position also offers a competitive wage, comprehensive benefit package and a 
continuous training and recertification program. 


The Caledon Citizen is currently seeking newspaper 
carriers to deliver once a week. 


Please submit a complete resumé and cover letter to the attention of Mr. Matt Noble, Operations Foreman by Tuesday, 
May 31, 2016, at 3:00 p.m. to: 
TOWN OF MONO 
Administration, Public Works Department, 347209 Mono Centre Road, MONO, ON LSW 683 


Route BF2 


Harvestmoon Drive to Cedargrove, Iron 
Horse Crescent 165 houses 


Route BD10 
Country Stroll Cres., Wakley Blvd., 
Pineview Cres - 85 houses 


Call Cephise 416-505-2770 or 
email:cc@ cephisecuming.com 


SHELBURNE 
Jelly StS, Centre St, James St S$, Owen Sound St, 
For Shelburne route inquiries, please call Deb at 519-925-2832/519-216-1021 


Or e-mail to: publicworks @townofmono.com 


NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE 
We thank all applicants however, only those to be interviewed will be contacted. Personal information collected will be used in 
accordance with the Municipal Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act for the purpose of candidate selection only. 


Route BF1 


Frank Johnson Rd. - 115 house 
Route BF3 


Lismer Crescent - 60 houses 








Increase Traffic & 
Exposure by Targeting 
a Geographic Audience 


>» Home Based Business 
> Contractors 

>» Store Locations 

>» Business Off The Beaten Path 


GAIN REPEAT EXPOSURE 


DEXTER, Joyce ‘Joy’ Marion 

Peacefully at Wellington Terrace, Fergus, on 
Sunday, May 8, 2016, Joy Dexter, in her 81st year, 
beloved wife of Robert Dexter. Loving mother of 


JUDGE, Noreen (nee Wilson) 

Peacefully at Brampton Civic Hospital on 
Saturday, May 7, 2016, Noreen Judge, in 
her 78th year, beloved wife of Jack Judge. 


e Branding 

e Name Recognition 

e Top-Of-Mind Awareness 
e Directional Arrow 


Mojite(ola 
Billboard 
Corp. 





— 


rs 


=a Y 


anon ae a 


FULL TIME DETAILER 


needed for busy Chrysler dealership. 


Previous detailing experience required. 


Valid Driver’s License required. 
We offer competitive rates & benefits. 


Please apply in confidence by email to 


lynn.gauthier@caledonchrysler.com 
or drop in with resume. 
12435 Highway 50 S, Bolton, ON L7E 1M3 
905-857-7888 


HEALTH AND 
FITNESS 


SERENITY HEALTH. Colon 
Hydrotherapy. Effectively 
removes toxins. Increases 
energy. Helps with weight 
loss, constipation, digestion, 
bloating, irritable bowel. 
905-857-1499 (Bolton) 


CLEANING 
SERVICES 


NEED YOUR HOME 
CLEANED regularly or a 





CALL DEB OR MICHELLE FOR MORE INFORMATION 


919-925-2832 


debbie@simcoeyorkprinting.com * michelleausten@rogers.com 


Skilled Carpenter 
Wanted 


by local construction company. 
Own transportation and tools preferred. 
Apply to Box 43 
c/o Orangeville Citizen 
10 First Street, 
Orangeville LAW 2C4 


NOW BOOKING 


Kevin Scott 
McArthur - Bessey 
Auctions 


Farm, Livestock, Estate, Home & Business 
Auctions with experience & consideration 
Please contact us at 
Kevin 519-942-0264 « Scott 519-843-5083 
diane.griffith@sympatico.ca 
www.theauctionadvertiser.com/KMcArthur 


AUCTION SALE 


Cheryll and her husband Jeff Collins, John David 
and his wife Joti Dexter. Cherished grandmother 
of Cougar Dexter Collins, Indigo Key Collins, 
Shawna Kira Dexter, and Andrew David Dexter. 
Dear sister of Ginny Dibble. 

The family will receive their friends at the 
Egan Funeral Home Baxter & Giles Chapel, 
273 Broadway, Orangeville (519-941-2630) 
Thursday afternoon from 4 to 7 o'clock. 
Funeral service will be held in the chapel on 
Friday, May 13 at 1:30 o’clock. Interment 
Greenwood Cemetery. If desired, memorial 
donations may be made to the Heart & Stroke 
Foundation, 204 - 21 Surrey St. W., Guelph NIH 
3R3. 

Condolences for the family may be made at 
www.EganFuneralHome.com 


FINNERTY, John Joseph 

Suddenly on Saturday, April 

23, 2016, John, in his 59th ™ 

year. Beloved father of 

Sandra. Dear son of the late 

Jack and Kathrine Finnerty. 

Nephew of the late Frank § 

Finnerty. Loving brother of 

Margaret and Nick Colapin- ' 

to, Mary and Victor Horan, , 

Theresa Jackson and John ‘ 

Moore, Jim and Judi Finnerty, Barb and Dean 

Mason, and Pat Finnerty (deceased). Admired 

uncle of Darrell, Kimberly, Michael, Cynthia, 

Nicole, Lori, Kelly, Becky, Megan, Connor, and 

Jacklyn. Cherished great-uncle of Cameryn, 

Cole, Annalisa, Michael, Jocelyn, Nicholas, 

Jack, and Declan. The family will receive their 

friends for a Celebration of Life at Woodington 

Lake Golf Club, 7110 4th Line, Tottenham, on 

Saturday, May 14 from 2:30 - 

desired, memorial donations may be made to the 

Heart & Stroke Foundation of Canada or charity 

of your choice. 

Condolences for the family may be offered at 
www.EganFuneralHome.com 
“The important thing 1s not the miles 
you've driven, 
but what you’ve driven into your head with 
those miles” 


HADLEY, Esther Ann 


It 1s with a heavy heart the | 

family of Esther Hadley 

announce her passing at 

Headwaters Health Care 

Centre, Orangeville on 

Sunday, May 8, 2016, in 

her 93rd year, beloved gf, 

wife of the late Valentine 

Hadley. Dear mother of 

Keith and Judy Hadley, 

Michael Hadley, Denise and Sterling Steeves. 
Loving grandmother of Clayton and Elisa, 
Ashley, Trevor and Michelle, Erin and 


5:30 p.m. If 















Loving mother of Kevin and his wife Cheryl, 
Kent and his wile Connie, Kelly and his wife 
Beverley. Proud Grandma of Kristin, Ryan, Jenny, 
Katie, Millie, Charlotte, Sadie, Ella, Pearl, and 
Henry. GG of Emma, Jack, Hannah, William, 
Kelly, and Parker. Survived by her loved sister 
Jean Armstrong. The family received their friends 
at the Egan Funeral Home, 203 Queen Street S.., 
Bolton, Tuesday afternoon 2 - 4 and evening 7 - 9 
o'clock. Memorial service was held 1n the chapel 
on Wednesday morning, May [1 at 11 o’clock, If 
desired, memorial donations may be made to the 
charity of your choice. 
Condolences for the family may be offered at 
www.EganFuneralHome.com 


| SPEERS, Mary Aileen (nee Manning) 


Peacefully at Bethell Hospice on Saturday, May 
7, 2016 at the age of 90. Beloved wife of the 
late Clarence Speers (2000), Dear mother of 
Wendell (2005) (Kathy), Brien (Frances) and 
Randy (Heather). Cherished grandmother of 
Enka (Glenn), Kris (Lisa), David (Shelley), 
Michael (Jennifer). Great-grandmother of 
Hannah, Sophie, Chloe, Jorja, Vivian, Piper, 
Margaret and Henry. Remembered by her brother 
Donald Manning. Aileen will be greatly missed 
by other relatives and many friends. 
Private Family Service and Burial entrusted 
to Dads & WtcHan Funeral Home & Chapel 
Orangeville. 
Memorial donations to Bethell Hospice 
Foundation would be appreciated by the family. 
A tree will be planted in memory of Aileen in 
the Dods & McNair Memorial Forest at the 
Island Lake Conservation Area, Orangeville. A 
dedication service will be held on Sunday, 
September 11, 2016 at 2:30 p.m. 

Condolences may be offered to the family at 

www.dodsandmenair.com 


WILSON, Norman Andrew 

Peacefully at Bethell Hospice on Sunday, May 
8, 2016 at the age of 86. Beloved husband of 
Doreen Wilson. Dear father of Larry Wilson 
and his wife Anne. Cherished grandfather of 
Becky Wilson-Whitten (Shawn) and Nicky 
Fifield (Blake). Cherished great-grandfather of 
Tarah, Keeghan and Braelynn. Remembered by 
his sisters Helen and Audrey. Predeceased by his 
brothers Jack, Joe and Bill. Norm will be greatly 
missed by other relatives and many friends. 
Memorial Visitation will be held at the Zed & 
WeNan Funeral Fome, Chapel & Reception 
@entre, 2\ First Street Orangeville on Sunday, 
May 15, 2016 from 2:00-4:00 pm. Memorial 
donations to Bethell Hospice Foundation would 
be appreciated by the family. 

A tree will be planted in memory of Norm in 
the Dods & McNair Memorial Forest at the 
Island Lake Conservation Area, Orangeville. A 
dedication service will be held on Sunday, 
September 11, 2016 at 2:30 p.m. 


anor NOREN Brandon, Kevin, Carrie Ann and J.P., and Laney. 
= FOR MARG PEACOCK & gi Remembered by 8 great-grandchildren. The 
THE ESTATE OF THE LATE WILFRED PEACOCK family received their friends at the Egan 
EM.#7634 — 1OTH LINE ESSA TWP. SIMCOE CTY. Funeral Home, 203 Queen Street S., Bolton, 
Directions: 2 km north of Thornton on Cty Rd 27 to Essa S.R. 20 tum west for 2 km to Line 10 turn Wednesday afternoon 2-4andevening 7-90 ‘clock. 
north past the Fairgrounds to sale west side. Funeral service was held in St. James Anglican 
SAT. MAY 21 ST AT 10 AM Church, 6025 Old Church Road, Caledon Fast on 
Tractors: Allis Chalmers 7030 w/eab 20.8.38 rears good (new motor work); M.H. 44; a i Laurel “Hill Cemetery - as —_ 
pee 22 parts; Ford 8N; Case VA — 5153926; Case S:; Ford w/Sherman fork lift: tractor desired. aeinanal donations may ra raarte ta the 
duals; = eae e i Rie 
Vehicles: 1931 Ford A — 4 door (excellent cond.); 1984 Cadillac Biarntz convertible aa A Se i fl mav be offered at 
loaded leather etc., 58,000 miles show; (Note Ford & Caddy subject to owners approval); wiew E gan Funera i] cies om : 
1989 GMC SLE — 8’ box, 189.000 km.: = | 
Lawn & Garden: John Deere LA175 mower w/54" deck: Cub Cadet 105 mower: J.D. 
524 rototiller; Gravely PM 318 — 60” front deck mower & one for parts; Honda 4 wheel 
dirt bike: Herd broadcaster; 
Shop: Hydra Lift 28 floor hoist (2 pole); Craig air compressor; Miller — Welder/generator; 
Porter cable 175 PS1 compressor; drill press: lge. anvil; leg vises; hydro poles; propane 
tanks: 
Machinery: 3 flat rack wagons; 2 Hesston PT 7 haybines; N.H. 273 sq. baler; Hesston 
2000 — 150 harvester; NL. sone elevator, 7” auger w/gas drive motor, Tumco grain 
wagon; H.D. running gear; 2 wood H_D. forage wagons; Int. 1150 ptomixmill; A.C. 5F 
SM plow; AC 1200 — 22° wing cult; S tang 9” cult; JD 205 — 5° bush hog; Befco 376 — 6 
6° rototiller; NH. 56 — 5 bar rake; harrows; White 252 — 32° wing disc.; Brillion 14° 
packer; 9° chain harrows; Bervac 987 — 9° SA snow blower; McKee 620 — 6° snow blower; 
for parts MF 36 swather; calsa sprayer, White 5400 planter, sm. disc; packers; plus ant. 
machinery; grain handling; ant. furniture: 
Terms: conditions & photos at www.auc 


one time deal! | have 20 
years experience and am 
very reliable. Please text 
me at: 416-471-1858 or 
email: cleaningladyip@ 
gmail.com. 


Condolences may be offered to the family at 
www.dodsandmenair.com 


COMING EVENTS 


ANNUAL IODE GERANI- 
UM SALE — Red, Salmon. 
Pink, White — sold in flats, 
10 plants $35.00. On sale 
until May 20th, pick up dates 
May 25-30th at 12 Leader 
Dr. Contact: Dori 519-941- 
1865, Faye 519-941-6935, 
Barb 519-940-1180. 


GLAND APS WORK A 





PROFESSIONAL 


SERVICES 





MY INSURANCE BROKER 
CORP - Good record or 
high risk driver. Auto Insur- 
ance, home, commercial, 
life. 416-240-8888. Email: 
Insureme100@qmail.com. 


The kiss of the sun for pardon. 
The song of the birds for mirth. 
One is nearer God’s heart in a garden. 
Than anywhere else on earth. 
“Just a whisper away” 


COMPANIONS 








FIT & HEALTHY SENIOR 
seeking a petite lady com- 
panion. | have a lovely home 
in Orangeville which | share 
with avery affectionate cat. 
Please call 519-942-2430 if 
you would like to meet. 


Find Buried Treasure in | 


CITIZEN 


pasos, indepeodnet Perspective 





Classifieds 


(Al 
S1O-HEL-2250 G05-S57-0620 


Bob Severn Ai 
Shelburne ¢ 519-925-2091 * www.auctionsfind.com/severn 








New Look. 


Same classic taste. 


— Coming Soon ——