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I 




CAREER & 

TECHNOLOGY 

STUDIES 




MANUAL FOR 
ADMINISTRATORS, 
COUNSELLORS AND 
TEACHERS 



I 



LC 

1037.8 

C22 

£ 3 3 315 E1998 EDUCAT,0N 

1998 



Liberia 



gr.7-12 UPD.2000 
CURRGDHT 



ALBERTA EDUCATION CATALOGUING IN PUBLICATION DATA 

Alberta. Alberta Education. Curriculum Standards Branch. 

Career & technology studies manual for administrators, counsellors 
and teachers. 

Available on the Internet: http://ednet.edc.gov.ab.ca/cts 
ISBN 0-7785-0296-1 

1 . Career education — Alberta — Handbooks, manuals, etc. 2. Vocational 
education — Alberta — Handbooks, manuals, etc. 3. Vocational guidance — 
Alberta — Handbooks, manuals, etc. 4. Life skills — Alberta — Handbooks, 
manuals, etc. I. Title. II. Title: Manual for administrators, counsellors and 
teachers. 



LC1037.8.C2.A333 1998 



371.425 



Additional copies are available for purchase from: 

Learning Resources Distributing Centre 
12360 -142 Street 
Edmonton, Alberta 
T5L 4X9 



Questions or comments about this document are welcomed and should be directed to the Program 
Manager, Career and Technology Studies Unit, Curriculum Standards Branch. 



The primary intended audience for this document is: 



Administrators 


/ 


Counsellors 


/ 


General Audience 




Parent School Councils 




Parents 




Students 




Teachers 


/ 




Ex LIBRIS 

UNIVERSITATIS 

ALBERTENSIS 



Copyright © 1998, the Crown in Right of Alberta, as represented by the Minister of Education. Alberta 
Education, Curriculum Standards Branch, 1 1 160 Jasper Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, T5K 0L2. 

Every effort has been made to provide proper acknowledgement of original sources and to comply with 
copyright law. If cases are identified where this has not been done, please notify Alberta Education so 
appropriate corrective action can be taken. 



Permission is given by the copyright owner to reproduce this document for educational purposes and on a nonprofit basis, with 
the exception of materials cited for which Alberta Education does not own copyright. 




PREFACE 



This manual is also available for viewing and downloading from the Alberta Education web site at: 

<http://ednet.edc.gov.ab.ca> 

under "Students and Learning," then "Student Programs." 

Note: Check memory capacity on your computer before downloading CTS documents. 

In addition to reviewing draft documents and providing input during curriculum development, many of 
the 2400 (January 1995) members of the CTS Communication Network asked questions and provided 
suggestions about matters related to the implementation of CTS that affect teachers, counsellors and 
administrators. We have tried to address these within this manual. 

This manual includes information and recommendations related to: 

• understanding the CTS program 

• planning CTS programs in schools and school systems 

• implementing CTS courses in the classroom. 

Also included in this manual are charts, forms and a series of appendices that provide additional 
information and guidelines relevant to implementing CTS, and blackline masters for program 
administration. 

This manual is a useful reference for those having the responsibility for planning and implementing CTS 
at the school system, school and classroom levels. 

Note: 

• The CTS "modules" are now officially referred to as "courses" each with an individual, 
alphanumeric code. In this manual, the term "course" refers to a 1 -credit CTS course, and the term 
"cluster" refers to a multiple-credit CTS offering. 

• In accordance with the change to the terminology from "module" to "course," there is a subsequent 
change in references to the "learner expectations." In this manual, and in future Guides to Standards 
and Implementation, "module learner expectations" are referred to as "general outcomes" and 
"specific learner expectations" are referred to as "specific outcomes." 

• This manual is a support document that supplements other CTS documents, including the Career and 
Technology Studies Program of Studies and the Guide to Standards and Implementation for each 
strand. The Guide to Education: ECS to Grade 12 and the Career and Technology Studies Program 
of Studies define the legal or prescriptive components of CTS. 

• This manual may not answer all of your questions. You may wish to refer to the current issue of the 
Guide to Education: ECS to Grade 12 for further information regarding policies and guidelines. 

For additional information about CTS and specific program planning, contact: 

Career and Technology Studies Unit, Curriculum Standards Branch, Alberta Education 
Devonian Building, East Tower, 1 1 160 Jasper Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, T5K 0L2 
Telephone: 403^22-4872, Fax: 403-422-0576 
Toll Free Inside Alberta 310-0000. 

CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers Preface / 1 

©Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada ( 1 998) 



HI 

UNIVERSITY L®8M 
MNIVFRSITY DF AI.BERTA 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

©Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada 



Send Us Your Comments 

We would appreciate receiving your comments about this manual. We would especially like to 
know: 

Do you feel there are any topics requiring additional information or clarification? 



Do you feel there are any topics that should be deleted? 



Are there any questions or issues that you feel need to be addressed? 



Additional Comments 



Please return completed form to the Career and Technology Studies Unit, Curriculum Standards 
Branch, Alberta Education, Devonian Building, East Tower, 11160 Jasper Avenue, Edmonton, 
Alberta, Canada, T5K 0L2. Telephone: 403-422-4872; Fax: 403^122-0576. Toll Free Inside 
Alberta 310-0000. 

CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers / III 

©Alberta Education. Alberta. Canada (1998) 



JV / CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

( 1 998) ® Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

This manual is organized into one main introductory section accompanied by relevant charts and forms, 
and five appendices accompanied by attachments. The charts, forms and attachments are designed to be 
photocopied for use as they exist, or may be adapted to suit local circumstances. 

PREFACE i 

SEND US YOUR COMMENTS iii 

PROGRAM OVERVIEW 1 

WhatlsCTS? , 1 

Who Is Affected by CTS? 2 

How Was CTS Developed? 2 

Why Was CTS Developed? 3 

How Is CTS Maintained? 3 

CURRICULUM STRUCTURE 5 

Putting the Parts Together 5 

Designing CTS Courses 7 

KEY FEATURES OF CTS 7 

Career-related Learning 7 

Technology Integration 8 

Basic Competencies 8 

One-credit Course Structure 8 

Clearly Defined Results 9 

Broad-based Resource Support 9 

Expanded Delivery Options 9 

Enhanced Connections 9 

Continuity in Learning 10 

CURRICULUM DOCUMENTS AND OTHER MATERIALS 10 

Program of Studies 10 

Guide to Standards and Implementation 1 1 

Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 1 1 

Other Materials 11 

DEVELOPING AN LMPLEMENTATION PLAN 13 

Develop an Understanding of the CTS Program 1 3 

Prepare an Implementation Plan 13 

Select Strands/Courses 14 

Select Teachers to Deliver the Program 15 

Prepare Student Programs 15 

Identify Appropriate Learning Environments 16 

Establish Scheduling/Delivery Strategies 16 

Prepare Learning Plans 21 

CTS IN JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL 22 

Program Planning 22 

Effective Transitions 23 

CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers Table of Contents / V 

©Alberta Education, Alberta. Canada ( 1 998) 



CTS IN SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL 24 

Program Planning 24 

Effective Transitions 25 

SELECTING AND USING LEARNING RESOURCES 27 

Authorized Learning Resources 28 

Other Sources of Information and Support 29 

Establishing Resource-based Classrooms 29 

INTEGRATING CAREER-RELATED LEARNING 30 

Daily Living/Personal Interest Skills 30 

Career Planning and Preparation 31 

Workplace and Post-secondary Transitions 32 

The Role of the CTS Counsellor 34 

INTEGRATING TECHNOLOGY OUTCOMES 34 

Technology Framework: ECS to Grade 12 35 

Technology Integration in CTS 36 

STRATEGIES FOR INSTRUCTION IN CTS 37 

Learn by Doing/Active Learning 38 

Applied Learning/Making Connections 39 

Teamwork/Cooperative Learning 39 

Multi-activity Learning 40 

ASSESSING STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT 41 

Curriculum and Assessment Standards 41 

Assessment Tools 42 

Assessing Achievement in Junior High School 42 

Assessing Achievement in Senior High School 43 

FUNDING FOR CTS 44 

CHARTS 

1. CTS Strands that Replace Practical Arts Courses 47 

2. CTS Advisory and Consultation Network 49 

3. Positive Classroom Climate Checklist 51 

FORMS 

1. Evergreening CTS — Survey and Response Form 53 

2. CTS Communication Network Registration Form 59 

3. Group Member Effectiveness 61 

4. Sample Learning Contract 63 

APPENDICES 

1. Planning and Marketing CTS in Your School and Community 65 

2. Defining CTS Learning Environments — Strand and Course Parameters 91 

3. Addressing Health and Safety in CTS 225 

4. Strategies for Instruction in CTS 271 

5. Planning Ahead — CTS Transitions into Post-secondary Programs and the Workplace 299 

vi / Table of Contents CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

( 1 998) © Alberta Education. Alberta, Canada 



PROGRAM OVERVIEW 



Refer to the CTS Guide to 
Standards and 
Implementation, Section A: 
Program Rationale and 
Philosophy. 



WHAT IS CTS? 

CTS is an optional program designed for Alberta's secondary school 
students. As a program of choice, CTS helps junior and senior high 
school students to: 

• develop skills they can apply in daily living now and in the future 

• investigate career options and make effective career choices 

• use technology (processes, tools and techniques) effectively and 
efficiently 

• apply and reinforce learnings developed in other subject areas 

• prepare for entry into the workplace or further learning. 

The 1 -credit course structure of CTS enables schools to design unique 
clusters of courses that meet the needs of students and take advantage 
of community resources. Developed across levels rather than grades, 
CTS has multiple entry points and provides junior and senior high 
school students with access to a common curriculum. As a 
competency-based curriculum, CTS recognizes prior learning from 
formal schooling and personal initiatives. 

The CTS curriculum is organized into strands and courses as outlined 
in the following chart. Each strand represents a group of courses 
designed to support broad career and occupational opportunities. 
Courses are the building blocks for each strand, and defines what a 
student is expected to know and be able to do. 



CTS Strands 


Number of Courses 


Agriculture 


33 


Career Transitions 


28 


Communication Technology 


33 


Community Health 


31 


Construction Technologies 


46 


Cosmetology Studies 


58 


Design Studies 


31 


Electro-Technologies 


37 


Energy and Mines 


26 


Enterprise and Innovation 


8 


Fabrication Studies 


41 


Fashion Studies 


29 


Financial Management 


14 


Foods 


37 


Forestry 


21 


Information Processing 


48 


Legal Studies 


13 


Logistics 


12 


Management and Marketing 


19 


Mechanics 


54 


Tourism Studies 


24 


Wildlife 


17 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 
©Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada 



II 

(1998) 



WHO IS AFFECTED BY CTS? 

CTS was developed to accommodate the varied experiences and needs 
of all learners in Alberta's junior and senior high schools. Effective 
September 1997, the CTS program replaced the former practical arts 
program, including courses in business education, home economics, 
industrial arts and vocational education. A list of CTS strands and the 
former practical arts courses they replace is provided at the end of this 
section in Chart 1 : CTS Strands Replacing Practical Arts Courses. 



Refer to the Guide to 
Education: ECS to 
Grade 12. 



CTS is part of the junior and senior high school optional course 
selection, and is therefore a program of choice for junior and senior 
high school students. Junior high school students can access up to 
450 hours of instruction in CTS throughout their junior high school 
years. The CTS competencies that students develop while in junior 
high can form an important foundation for further learning at the high 
school level. Senior high school students may choose to register in 
CTS courses to meet optional course requirements for the Alberta 
High School Diploma. Based on current enrollment patterns, about 
75 per cent of Alberta's students will earn at least 30 high school 
credits in CTS. 



HOW WAS CTS DEVELOPED? 

Development of the CTS program was based on a review of all the 
former practical arts programs. Through an extensive consultation 
process, key interest groups were asked to identify elements of these 
programs that should continue as well as changes that should be made. 
Former practical arts programs were analyzed in terms of learning 
environments, enrollment patterns and delivery methods. 



Refer to: 

• A Status Report on the 
Practical Arts Programs 
Within Secondary 
Schools in Alberta, 1989 

• Trends and Issues 
Affecting Practical Arts 
in Alberta Secondary 
Schools: A Review of 
Research, 1989 

• Framework for Change: 
Career and Technology 
Studies in Secondary 
Schools in Alberta, 1990. 



In addition, research was conducted to identify: 

• trends and issues affecting specific practical arts programs and 
secondary education in general 

• promising practices that could serve as models for curriculum 
development and implementation. 

Based on the results of this consultation and research, a framework for 
the CTS program was established that included guiding principles and 
a structure for curriculum development. 

The development process included extensive consultation with key 
interest groups relevant to each strand; i.e., teachers, schools and 
school systems, post-secondary institutions, business and industry, 
other government departments. Throughout the development period, 
over 2400 Albertans were involved in developing and validating the 
22 CTS strands. The consultation process used throughout the 
development of CTS is illustrated at the end of this section in 
Chart 2: CTS Advisory and Consultation Network. 



21 

(1998) 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

©Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada 



Refer to the CTS Guide to 
Standards and 
Implementation, Section A: 
Program Rationale and 
Philosophy. 



WHY WAS CTS DEVELOPED? 

The CTS curriculum was developed to enhance the relevance and 
credibility of existing optional programs, and to expand access to 
these programs for all junior and senior high school students. 

CTS consolidates and expands upon learnings in the former practical 
arts courses, and enables educators to respond effectively to rapid 
changes in our society, including: 

• a renewed emphasis in the workplace on teamwork, creativity, 
problem solving and flexibility 

• advances in technology 

• the growing demand for multiskilled workers 

• the move toward a global economy 

• growth in trades, technical and service occupations. 

The CTS program responds to the need for students to develop 
technology-related skills and begin serious exploration of their career 
options. Program objectives were established jointly by Alberta 
Education, school system administrators and teachers, and other 
stakeholder groups, and focus attention on: 

• integrating basic competencies — employability skills — and 
technology outcomes into a results-based curriculum, thus 
enhancing transitions for students into the workplace and related 
post-secondary programs 

• establishing credible and clearly-defined standards for measuring 
student performance and achievement 

• making connections with curriculum in other core and optional 
courses 

• establishing flexible delivery strategies, including workplace 
learning and community partnerships, that make efficient use of 
in-school and community resources 

• improving linkages among educators, business and industry, 
post-secondary institutions, community agencies and Alberta 
Education. 



HOW IS CTS MAINTAINED? 

Strategies are in place for evergreening CTS. Key goals of the 
evergreening process are to: 

• maintain a relevant and credible curriculum and resource base 

• support the effective implementation of CTS programs. 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 
©Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada 



/3 

(1998) 



STRATEGY FOR "EVERGREENING CTS" 




Annual strategies for maintaining a relevant and credible curriculum 
and resource base include: 

• gathering input from key players regarding strengths and gaps in 
curriculum and resources 

• establishing priorities for change based on future gazing and the 
feedback received 

• revising curriculum and assessment standards, drafting new 
courses and identifying new resources, as required 

• validating new or revised curriculum and resources for subsequent 
approval and implementation. 

Effective implementation of CTS is supported by a number of ongoing 
initiatives that focus attention on: 

• support for teachers through curriculum and resources, key 
contacts, professional development 

• effective use of learning/teaching resources, facilities/equipment, 
learning time and other resources 

• expanded delivery options for CTS strands/courses; e.g., distance 
delivery, linkages with core, off-campus learning 

• smooth transitions for CTS students from junior to senior high and 
from senior high to post-secondary and the workplace 

• ongoing exchange of information with teachers, schools and 
school systems through the Career and Technology Studies 
Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers, CTS 
Communication Network Update, CTS web site and other 
documents. 

Ongoing input from teachers and other stakeholders across the 
province is essential to an effective evergreening process. Feedback 
regarding CTS curriculum, resources and implementation strategies 
can be provided using Form 1: Evergreening CTS — Survey and 
Response Form, which is included at the end of this section. 

4 1 CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

( 1 998) ©Alberta Education. Alberta. Canada 



CURRICULUM STRUCTURE 



Note 1: The CTS "modules" are now officially referred to as 
"courses" each with an individual, alphanumeric code. In 
this manual, the term "course" refers to a 1 -credit CTS 
course, and the term "cluster" refers to a multiple-credit CTS 
offering. 

Note 2: In accordance with the change to the terminology from 
"module" to "course," there is a subsequent change in 
references to the "learner expectations." In this manual, and 
in future Guides to Standards and Implementation, "module 
learner expectations" are referred to as "general outcomes" 
and "specific learner expectations" are referred to as 
"specific outcomes." 



Strands and Courses 

Refer to the CTS Guide to 
Standards and 
Implementation, Section B: 
Strand Rationale and 
Philosophy. 



Levels of Achievement 



PUTTING THE PARTS TOGETHER 

There are 22 strands in CTS. Each strand is comprised of a group of 
courses designed to support positive career and occupational 
opportunities for students. In general, strands relate to selected 
industry sectors, including goods-producing industries such as 
agriculture, manufacturing and construction, and service-producing 
industries such as business, health and finance. Learnings within any 
particular strand may involve similar tools and technologies, clientele, 
working environments, products and processes. 

There are 660 courses in CTS. Courses are the building blocks for 
each strand. A course defines what the student is expected to know 
and be able to do, and describes the conditions and criteria by which a 
student's performance can be judged. Although courses are designed 
to take approximately 17 to 25 hours of study, some students may 
need less or more time to complete a course. Courses are organized 
into levels, not grades. Both junior and senior high school students 
can access CTS courses. Where appropriate, prerequisites and other 
requirements for course delivery are specified. 

The CTS program is level based, not grade based, and thus can be 
started by students at different entry points. Courses in each strand 
are organized into three levels: 

• introductory level courses help students build daily living skills 
and form the basis for further learning. Introductory courses are 
for students who have no previous experience in the strand 

• intermediate level courses build on the competencies developed 
at the introductory level. They provide a broader perspective, 
helping students recognize the wide range of related career 
opportunities available within the strand 

• advanced level courses refine expertise and help prepare students 
for entry into the workplace or a related post-secondary program. 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

©Alberta Education, Alberta. Canada 



/5 

(1998) 



As junior and senior high school students progress through the levels, 
they are expected to meet higher standards and demonstrate an 
increasing degree of competence, both in the scope of learning and 
quality of performance. 

The following illustrates the relative emphasis on aspects of career 
planning at each of the levels. 




Introductory Level Intermediate Level Advanced Level 



^™ Personal Use 

BH Career Awareness/Exploration 

Preparation for the Workplace or Further Education 

Courses at each level are grouped into theme areas to provide 
additional structure and assist in career planning. By linking courses 
in themes, teachers can plan learning activities that align with student 
interests/needs and available resources. 



Curriculum and 
Assessment Standards 

Refer to the CTS Guide to 
Standards and 
Implementation, Sections D, 
E and F. 



Each CTS course clearly defines credible curriculum and assessment 
standards that are relevant to post-secondary education and the 
workplace. Students are expected to demonstrate higher degrees of 
competency and meet higher standards as they move through the 
course levels. 

Curriculum standards define what students must know and be able to 
do. In CTS, these outcomes are communicated through general 
outcomes (module learner expectations in 1997 documents), with 
further detail provided in specific outcomes (specific learner 
expectations in 1997 documents). 

Assessment standards establish the conditions and criteria for 
assessing student competency. For each course, CTS curriculum 
defines a minimum level of performance for each general outcome, 
with reference to assessment tools to ensure fairness and equity in 
judging student achievement. 



61 

(1998) 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

©Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada 



Refer to the Guide to 
Education: ECS to 
Grade 12. 



DESIGNING CTS COURSES 

Whereas the former practical arts courses were designed by Alberta 
Education, CTS is designed at the school/school system level by 
combining 1 -credit courses that best suit the needs of students, the 
school/school system and the community. 

The CTS curriculum structure allows schools and teachers to design 
courses: 

• within and across CTS strands 

• within and across CTS levels 

• with other non-CTS core and optional courses. 

Some students may successfully complete CTS courses while in junior 
high school. Competencies developed in junior high school may be 
recognized in senior high school. 

Senior high schools may choose to design CTS courses that enable 
students to meet the optional course requirements for the Alberta High 
School Diploma, and develop competencies that align with those 
expected in the workplace and/or by post-secondary institutions. 



KEY FEATURES OF CTS 



The following represents a summary of key features incorporated into 
the CTS program. 



Refer to Appendix 5: 
Planning Ahead — CTS 
Transitions into 
Post-secondary Programs 
and the Workplace. 



CAREER-RELATED LEARNING 

CTS offers students learning opportunities in a wide range of career 
contexts. Students become familiar with the many careers related to 
each strand, and are able to investigate various career options. 

In CTS, the concept of career encompasses activities in one's personal 
life as well as those related to a job or occupation. Students develop 
competencies for: 

• daily living and personal interest 

• career planning and preparation 

• entry into the workplace and post-secondary programs. 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 
©Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada 



17 

(1998) 



TECHNOLOGY INTEGRATION 



Refer to the Learner 
Outcomes in Information and 
Communication 
Technology — ECS to 
Grade 12. 



Technology outcomes are integrated as appropriate throughout all 
CTS strands, and focus on the development of competencies required 
for daily living, entry-level work and lifelong learning. 

CTS defines technology in its broadest sense to include all processes, 
tools and techniques that affect daily life, and provides opportunities 
for students to: 

• make decisions regarding which procedures best suit the task at 
hand 

• select and use available tools and resources in an appropriate 
manner 

• assess and manage the impact of technology on self, others and 
the environment. 



Refer to the CTS Guide to 
Standards and 
Implementation, Section A: 
Program Rationale and 
Philosophy. 



BASIC COMPETENCIES 

Critical skills for daily living and employability are incorporated into 
each CTS strand and course through a set of "basic competencies." 
Sequenced around four developmental stages, the basic competencies 
establish standards of performance with respect to: 

• managing learning 

• managing resources 

• problem solving and innovation 

• communicating effectively 

• working with others 

• demonstrating responsibility. 



Refer to the CTS Guide to 
Standards and 
Implementation, Section B: 
Strand Rationale and 
Philosophy. 



ONE-CREDIT COURSE STRUCTURE 

The 1 -credit course curriculum structure of CTS allows schools to 
design programs that enable students to: 

• select relevant courses and strands 

• progress at rates that are personally challenging 

• build on successes and investigate new options. 

Schools determine which strands/courses to make available to 
students, and the extent to which students are involved in planning 
their own CTS programs. 



8/ 

(1998) 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

©Alberta Education. Alberta. Canada 



Refer to the CTS Guide to 
Standards and 
Implementation, Section G: 
Assessment Tools. 



CLEARLY DEFINED RESULTS 

CTS courses emphasize competency-based learning rather than 
time-based learning. While each course is designed to take a student 
approximately 25 hours to complete, some students may need more or 
less time to obtain the competencies. The CTS curriculum defines: 

• what students must know and be able to do — the knowledge, skills 
and attitudes to be developed (curriculum standards) 

• the criteria and conditions for assessing student performance 
(assessment standards). 



Refer to the CTS Guide to 
Standards and 
Implementation, Section I: 
Learning Resource Guide. 



BROAD-BASED RESOURCE SUPPORT 

CTS supports the development of resource-based classrooms where a 
variety of appropriate, up-to-date print and nonprint resources are 
available. This approach enables students to: 

• interact with a wide range of information sources 

• assess and use information sources appropriately 

• take an active role in managing their own learning. 

CTS identifies learning resources in print, software, video and 
CDROM formats, as well as other sources of information available in 
the community and through the Internet. 



Refer to the Off-campus 
Education Guide for 
Administrators, Counsellors 
& Teachers. 



EXPANDED DELIVERY OPTIONS 

CTS supports a variety of learning opportunities and delivery 
strategies using technology and other resources available in the school 
and community. Learning can take place on- and off-campus, in 
classrooms, labs, the workplace or through distance learning. 

CTS recognizes the importance of community support and 
involvement in the delivery of career-related education programs, and 
provides flexibility to plan program delivery in ways that meet local 
needs. 



Refer to the CTS Guide to 
Standards and 
Implementation, Section H: 
Linkages/Transitions. 



ENHANCED CONNECTIONS 

CTS links theory and practice in real contexts. Students gain 
confidence and motivation as they learn to relate, extend and apply 
abstract learning in a variety of real-life and work-related situations. 

The 1 -credit course structure of CTS facilitates making connections 
among CTS strands and with core and optional subjects. Connections 
identified throughout the CTS curriculum help students transfer their 
learning effectively and prepare for future career options. 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 
©Alberta Education, Alberu. Canada 



19 

(1998) 



CONTINUITY IN LEARNING 



Refer to the CTS Guide to 
Standards and 
Implementation, Section H: 
Linkages/Transitions. 



CTS enables students to build on the competencies they have already 
achieved — prior learning from formal schooling and 
community/personal initiatives is recognized. There are no distinct 
boundaries between junior and senior high school, and numerous 
credentialling and articulation agreements at the intermediate and 
advanced levels provide effective bridging to the workplace or related 
post-secondary programs. This approach enables students to 
experience smooth transitions throughout their school careers. 




Refer to CTS at the 
Alberta Education web 
site <http://ednet.edc. 
gov. ab.ca> under 
"Students and Learning," 
then "Student 
Programs." 



Note: Check memory capacity on 
your computer before 
downloading CTS documents. 



Sources: 

• Learning Resources Distributing 
Centre (LRDC) (print and 
CDROM) 

• Alberta Education Web Site. 



CURRICULUM DOCUMENTS AND OTHER 

MATERIALS 

A number of legal and support documents and other materials are 
available to support the effective implementation of CTS programs. 

To facilitate ease of access, all curriculum documents are available in 
print and electronic formats through the sources indicated. The most 
recent versions of curriculum documents can also be viewed and 
downloaded from the Alberta Education web site. 



PROGRAM OF STUDIES 

The CTS Program of Studies, 1997 is a legal document that outlines 
mandatory requirements for CTS courses in all strands. This 
document provides information regarding: 



• program rationale and philosophy (Section A) 

• strand rationale and philosophy, and general 



outcomes 



(Section B). 



This is a required document for those planning CTS programs at 
schools and school system levels. Individuals responsible for 
delivering CTS courses on- or off-campus should also consult the 
support documents noted below for additional information regarding 
specific strands and courses. 



10/ 

(1998) 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

©Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada 



Sources: 

• LRDC (print and CDROM) 

• Alberta Education Web Site. 



GUIDE TO STANDARDS AND IMPLEMENTATION (GSI) 

There is a Guide to Standards and Implementation, 1997 to support 
each of the 22 CTS strands. The GSIs outline the mandatory course 
requirements in shaded format, and provide additional information 
useful in implementing strand-specific courses in schools and 
classrooms. Each GSI provides information regarding: 

the CTS program in general (Section A) 

strand rationale and overview (Section B) 

program planning (Section C) 

curriculum and assessment standards (Sections D, E and F) 

assessment tools (Section G) 

linkages/transitions (Section H) 

learning resources (Section I) 

sample student learning guides (Section J) 

individuals involved in strand development (Section K — print 

copy only). 

The GSIs are highly recommended to those delivering instruction and 
assessing student achievement in specific CTS strands and courses. 



Sources: 

• LRDC (print and CDROM) 

• Alberta Education Web Site. 



MANUAL FOR ADMINISTRATORS, COUNSELLORS 
AND TEACHERS (ACT MANUAL) 

This Career and Technology Studies Manual for Administrators, 
Counsellors and Teachers, 1998 is a support document available to 
facilitate the effective implementation of all CTS strands and courses. 



CTS Communication 
Network Update 

Source: 

• Alberta Education Web Site. 



OTHER MATERIALS 

The CTS Communication Network Update is a newsletter published 
twice a year. It provides current information on CTS curriculum and 
resources, key issues affecting program implementation, opportunities 
for students, professional development, and successful 
practices/initiatives in CTS. 

The newsletter is distributed to junior and senior high school 
principals, school system superintendents and all members of the CTS 
Communication Network. Individuals can join the CTS 
Communication Network by returning Form 2: CTS Communication 
Network Registration Form, which is included at the end of this 
section. 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 
©Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada 



III 

(1998) 



CTS Tracker 

Source: 
• LRDC. 



CTS Tracker (Version 3.2) is a database software program that assists 
administrators, counsellors and teachers to track CTS courses 
completed by students. The software is designed for Microsoft 
Windows (version 3.1 or later) or DOS (version 6.2 or later), and 
requires a minimum of 8 MB of RAM. Accompanied with a user 
manual, the program enables schools to: 

• import student demographic data from student record systems 

• identify courses being taken by a student 

• print over 20 different reports, including student timetables, class 
lists, program/course profiles and student achievement reports 

• assign teaching staff to specific CTS courses. 



CTS Promotional 
Materials 

Refer to Appendix 1 : 
Planning and Marketing CTS 
in Your School and 
Community. 



The following brochures for promoting CTS in the school and 
community are available as blackline masters: 



• CTS Backgrounder, 1998 

• CTS Strand Brochures, Revised 1998. 



CTS Videos 

Source: 

• ACCESS: The Education Station. 



The following videos provide an effective means of explaining CTS to 
clients and stakeholders in the school and community. 

• CTS: Building the Future, 1996 explains the philosophy, 
curriculum structure and potential benefits of the CTS program. 
Designed for viewing by adults, the video is divided into distinct 
segments and may be used for inservice and orientation sessions. 
The video is accompanied by a brochure (available in quantity) 
that describes key features of the CTS program (25 minutes). 

• Opportunities for You, 1996 profiles CTS along with related 
programs and initiatives. Designed for use with students, the 
video focuses attention on technical career opportunities, and is 
accompanied with a questionnaire to assist students in career 
planning (15 minutes). 

• On Cue, 1993 introduces teachers, administrators, parents and the 
community-at-large to the CTS program. The video is divided 
into distinct segments and may be used for inservice and 
orientation sessions (30 minutes). 

• U -Choose, 1993 describes the CTS program and the 22 CTS 
strands to students (11 minutes). 



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CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

©Alberta Education, Alberta. Canada 



DEVELOPING AN IMPLEMENTATION PLAN 



The following steps assist in planning for the effective implementation 
of CTS programs at the school and school system level. 



DEVELOP AN UNDERSTANDING OF THE CTS 
PROGRAM 

Schools and school systems are encouraged to design a 
communication plan to inform all client and stakeholder groups about 
the goals and structure of the CTS program. The communication plan 
should include an initial orientation to CTS, and ongoing strategies to 
reinforce and expand understanding of the CTS program and how it is 
evolving in the school and community. 

To assist in this task, information packages can be developed and 
modified to address the needs of different groups. As well, it is 
helpful to keep informed of implementation initiatives undertaken in 
other communities. 

When developing their communication strategies, schools and school 
systems may wish to: 

• access the promotional materials and videos on CTS 

• share ideas with neighbouring schools and school systems. 



Refer to Appendix 1: 
Planning and Marketing CTS 
in Your School and 
Community. 



PREPARE AN IMPLEMENTATION PLAN 

Successful implementation of CTS requires the coordinated effort of 
school and school system administrators, counsellors and teachers. 
While implementation plans vary according to the unique 
characteristics of individual schools and school systems, successful 
implementation of CTS involves: 

• establishing a planning team 

• drafting a plan of action 

• taking inventory of in-school and community resources 

• researching interests/needs and potential sources of support in the 
community 

• identifying potential strands/courses, appropriate for on-site 
and/or off-campus delivery 

• identifying potential barriers to implementation and possible 
solutions 

• gaining commitment, buy-in and approval for action 

• monitoring and assessing progress. 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 
©Alberta Education. Alberta, Canada 



in 

(1998) 



Refer to the CTS Guide to 
Standards and 
Implementation, Section H: 
Linkages/Transitions. 



Prior to implementing CTS programs, careful consideration should be 
given to: 

• the anticipated scope of change in school programming 

• the expected rate at which these changes will occur. 

To assist teachers in making the transition from practical arts to CTS, 
a correlation of CTS courses to the former practical arts courses they 
replace is provided for each strand. 



Refer to Appendix 2: 
Defining CTS Learning 
Environments — Strand and 
Course Parameters. 



SELECT STRANDS/COURSES 

Schools decide which CTS strands and courses to offer on the basis of 
student interests/needs and resources available in the school and 
community. Course design and selection must address 
prerequisites and other delivery requirements defined in the 
strand and course parameters. 

Individual schools may select which CTS strands they wish to offer. 
Schools and teachers design CTS programs by combining 1 -credit 
courses: 

• within and across strands 

• within and across levels — introductory, intermediate, advanced 

• with other non-CTS core and optional courses. 

When designing CTS programs, teachers need to be familiar with 
courses: 

• in strand clusters; e.g., business education, home economics, 
industrial education, natural resources. CTS programs can often 
be enhanced by including courses from two or more related 
strands 

• in "process" strands; e.g., Enterprise and Innovation, Design 
Studies, Information Processing, Management and Marketing. 
Learning in these strands can be effectively contextualized when 
their courses are combined with other strands that are more 
specialized in context 

• in the Career Transitions strand; e.g., courses from the Career 
Extensions, Career Credentials and Job Safety Skills themes. 
These courses directly reinforce employability skills and can be 
used effectively to extend learning in other CTS strands. 



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CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

©Alberta Education, Alberta. Canada 



Refer to Appendix 2: 
Defining CTS Learning 
Environments — Strand and 
Course Parameters. 



SELECT TEACHERS TO DELIVER THE PROGRAM 

A key factor in the effective delivery of CTS courses is the 
involvement of qualified and enthusiastic teachers. While many 
courses can be delivered by certified teachers having expertise and 
interests suited to providing instruction in CTS settings, some courses 
require additional instructor qualifications over and above a regular 
professional teaching certificate. These qualifications may include: 

• a specific credential granted by business, industry, government or 
a community organization; e.g., journeyman certificate, Alberta 
Best Trainer, First Aid certificate 

• evidence of successful completion of a specialized training 
program or equivalent; e.g., a workshop/course from a technical 
institute/college/university, a session at the CTS Leadership 
Seminar. 

Teacher selection processes must address the instructional 
qualifications as defined in the strand and course parameters. 

Schools may find it desirable to expand human resources available for 
the delivery of CTS programs by: 

• providing effective teacher orientation and inservice 

• encouraging collaboration and teamwork 

• involving teachers from other core/optional subject areas 

• involving instructional assistants — community partners — having 
specialized knowledge and skills 

• establishing partnerships with post-secondary institutions. 



PREPARE STUDENT PROGRAMS 

CTS is available to all secondary students having the potential to meet 
the requirements of an Alberta High School Diploma. While schools 
establish their own strategies and criteria for placing students in CTS 
courses, these practices should reflect student interests and needs. 

Some students with special needs may benefit from instruction in 
some CTS strands and courses, particularly those involving 
considerable hands-on learning with limited emphasis on theory. 
Counsellors and teachers can help students with special needs make 
the transition to CTS by making provision for: 

• supportive learning environments and differentiated instruction 

• flexible transfer points into and out of the CTS program. 

Students with special needs taking CTS courses for credit are 
expected to meet all requirements for successful course 
completion. In situations where curriculum is modified and no credit 
is granted, such changes should be recorded on the student's 
individual program plan. 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 
©Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada 



IIS 

(1998) 



Refer to: 

• Appendix 2: Defining 
CTS Learning 
Environments — Strand 
and Course Parameters 

• Appendix 3: Addressing 
Health and Safety in 
CTS. 



IDENTIFY APPROPRIATE LEARNING 
ENVIRONMENTS 

Some CTS courses can be delivered in regular classrooms, while 
others require the use of more specialized facilities. CTS encourages 
schools to use on- and off-campus learning environments in 
addressing student needs. Learning environments, whether 
on-campus or off-campus, must address the policies and 
guidelines for facilities, equipment and safety as defined in the 
strand and course parameters. 

Schools may find it desirable to expand learning environments suited 
to the delivery of CTS programs by: 

• making innovative and effective use of existing facilities and 
equipment 

• carrying out renovations to existing facilities 

• using facilities and equipment in the community 

• sharing facilities and equipment in neighbouring schools and 
school systems 

• using distance learning technologies and other alternative delivery 
strategies. 

CTS learning environments should provide opportunities for students 
to work individually or with others in a supportive atmosphere that 
reflects due attention to health and safety. When possible, work areas 
for CTS should: 

• be flexible and multipurpose, supporting hands-on learning as 
well as research, note-taking and discussion 

• enable teachers to observe, supervise and assess student 
performance readily 

• facilitate a shared and team approach to instructional delivery 

• provide easy access to learning resources, computers and other 
technology 

• provide adequate and secure storage. 



ESTABLISH SCHEDULING/DELIVERY STRATEGIES 



Refer to the CTS Guide to 
Standards and 
Implementation, Section C: 
Planning for Instruction. 



Schools and school systems are encouraged to consider the many 
methods of course delivery available to them when they plan course 
offerings in CTS. While most strands and courses can be offered 
through standard class scheduling practices, the structure of CTS, its 
focus on competency rather than time-based learning, and the use of 
off-campus delivery and enhanced distance learning tools enable 
schools to expand student access to CTS strands and courses. 



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CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

©Alberta Education, Alberta. Canada 



Refer to the Guide to 

Education: ECS to 

Grade 12, Program Planning. 



Standard Class 
Scheduling 



Schools may choose to maximize options available for delivering a 
range of CTS courses by modifying current class scheduling practices, 
and/or combining them with other methods of course delivery. 
Specific scheduling and delivery strategies will be determined by: 

• the strands and courses being offered 

• teacher background and instructional approach 

• resources available in the school and community 

• the degree of choice and self-direction provided for students. 

Regardless of particular course scheduling and delivery strategies 
adopted by schools, any method of delivering CTS courses must 
ensure that: 

• students are apprised of their registration in CTS courses, and 
their right to choose optional courses is maintained 

• the teachers who provide or supervise the instruction are 
certificated and knowledgeable about the course 

• students are provided access to a minimum of 25 hours of 
instruction per credit at the high school level, with exceptions 
as noted in the Guide to Education: ECS to Grade 12 

• the instruction, and evaluation of performance, is based on the 
learner expectations or outcomes in the CTS program of 
studies 

• there are designated times when teachers are available to the 
students 

• students know, prior to enrolling in courses, how and when 
they will be able to access the instructional expertise of 
teachers. 

Standard class scheduling involves timetabling CTS classes using the 
Carnegie Unit organizational model; i.e., a time-credit relationship. 
Such practices, usually established at the school level through various 
software programs, provide for instruction through clearly defined 
time blocks. Standard class scheduling can be effectively used to 
timetable CTS classes, assign students and teachers, and monitor 
attendance. 

Using typical timetabling practices, schools may decide to: 

• schedule a specific CTS course within an instructional time block 

• schedule multilevel courses concurrently within an instructional 
time block 

• schedule time blocks when students select from a menu of courses 

• cycle particular strands/courses over semesters or school years. 

CTS emphasizes experiential learning. It is important that students 
have opportunities to demonstrate and practice the competencies they 
develop. Class length should provide sufficient time for hands-on 
experiences as well as work set-up and clean-up. Class sequencing 
should provide frequent opportunities for students to practise the skills 
they are learning. 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 
©Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada 



117 

(1998) 



The following scenarios represent possible ways of organizing for 
instruction with standard time blocks. 



Scenario A 

Students move through courses sequentially; e.g., 

INF1020 Keyboarding 1 
INF2030 Keyboarding 2 
INF2040 Keyboarding 3 



Sept. 



Jan ./June 



Scenario B 

Students work on one course throughout the 
year/semester (e.g., 20 minutes per class or 
one class per week) and then spend the 
remainder of the class time working on other 
courses; e.g., 

COM 1010 Presentation & Communication 1 

(throughout the term) 
COM 1030 Photography 1 
COM 1050 Printing 1 



Sept. 



1 


2 


3 



Jan/June 



Scenario C 

Students work on three courses within an 
instructional time block. This strategy is often 
used when students are working on an 
integrated project, such as operating a school 
store or handling customer work; e.g., 

MAM 10 10 Management & Marketing 
Basics — one class per week 

MAM 1020 Quality Customer Service — 
first half of class 

MAM2040 Retail Operations 



Sept. 



1 


2 


3 



Jan ./June 



Scenario D 

All students work on one or more courses 
together, then are able to select from a list of 
courses that are available for individual or 
small group learning. The menu of courses 
could be from one or more strands. 



Sept. 



Jan./June 



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CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

©Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada 



Scenario E 

From a list of courses defined by the teacher, 
students select which ones they will work on 
and, in consultation with the teacher, establish 
timelines for completion and submission of 
assignments, etc. 



Sept. 

ooa 
ooa 
d □ 
d □ 
d □ 

D 

Jan./June 



□ 



Expanded Delivery 
Options 



Schools also may wish to consider other methods for expanding or 
enhancing delivery of CTS programs, keeping in mind that the quality 
of interaction between student and teacher has a profound influence 
on learning. Many of the options outlined below can be used as an 
extension to, or in combination with standard class timetabling. 

Shared Delivery 

Schools may decide to expand their delivery of CTS programs by 
making expertise and/or resources present in one school available to 
other schools. Sharing may occur among schools within the same 
school system, or through special agreements with schools in a 
neighbouring system. Shared delivery may involve the use of mobile 
labs, the sharing of teachers among schools, and/or the bussing of 
students to other schools offering complementary programs and 
facilities. 



Refer to the Off-campus 
Education Guide for 
Administrators, Counsellors 
& Teachers. 



Off-campus Delivery 

CTS courses or course components can be delivered outside the 
school classroom or lab through off-campus education. Through 
worksite learning and partnerships with local business/industry and 
post-secondary institutions, off-campus education provides access to 
instructional expertise and specialized facilities available within the 
community. Off-campus education may encompass community 
partnerships, job shadowing, job sharing, mentorships, and work 
study. 

Combining CTS and Non-CTS Courses 

The 1 -credit course structure of CTS allows flexibility in delivering 
courses by combining CTS courses with other core and optional 
courses. Such strategies are effective in helping students make 
connections in their learning across the curriculum. 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 
©Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada 



119 

(1998) 



When schools combine a CTS course with a non-CTS course the 
following shall apply: 

• the teachers who provide or supervise the instruction are 
certificated and knowledgeable about both the CTS and 
non-CTS course 

• prior to registration, schools provide information to parents 
and students about the philosophy of each of the integrated 
courses, the learner outcomes of each of the integrated courses 
and how student learning will be assessed in each of the 
integrated courses 

• information and counselling services make clear that 
registration in an integrated course is optional 

• students have access to a minimum of 25 hours of instruction 
per credit 

• teachers offer each of the integrated courses in accordance 
with the approved programs of study 

• students meet the standards specified in the 1 -credit CTS 
course for all learner outcomes within that 1-credit course in 
order for a teacher to provide a passing grade in the CTS 
component 

• the CTS course and the non-CTS course must be graded 
separately, and credits must be awarded and reported 
separately 

• if a CTS course is being integrated with a non-CTS course, 
then any prerequisite to the CTS course must be met first 

• a student who has already gained credit in the integrated 
1-credit CTS course is not eligible to earn another credit for 
the same 1-credit CTS course. 



Refer to Appendix 2: 
Defining CTS Learning 
Environments — 
Strand and Course 
Parameters. 



Distance Education Technology 

The use of information, communication and multimedia technologies 
can be another effective means of expanding and/or enhancing the 
delivery of CTS courses. Distance education technology can be used 
to: 

• help students learn difficult concepts 

• deliver instruction in new areas where there may be a lack of 
teacher expertise. 

While the potential for distance education technology to deliver a 
range of CTS courses is expanding rapidly, some courses focus on the 
development of workplace competencies and cannot be effectively 
delivered unless the student has access to hands-on learning, either in 
a lab or worksite setting. Such courses do not lend themselves to 
technological delivery unless supported by other forms of instruction 
and practice. 



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CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

©Alberta Education, Alberta. Canada 



Expanded Time Frames 



Refer to the Guide to 

Education: ECS to 

Grade 12, Program Planning. 



Offering CTS courses during the evening, on weekends and in the 
summer can be yet another means of providing flexible delivery 
options and making efficient use of school and community resources. 
The same requirements for course delivery as noted previously apply, 
with the exception that for these courses, schools must provide access 
to instruction of at least 16 hours per credit. 



PREPARE LEARNING PLANS 



Refer to the CTS Guide to 
Standards and 
Implementation: 

• Section D: Introductory 
Level 

• Section E: Intermediate 
Level 

• Section F: Advanced 
Level. 



Student Learning 
Guides 



Refer to the CTS Guide to 
Standards and 
Implementation, Section J: 
Sample Student Learning 
Guides. 



Once organizational strategies regarding where and how learning is to 
occur have been established, teachers can begin to prepare learning 
plans. Learning plans determine how the competencies defined within 
specific courses are to be developed and assessed. 

Learning plans should address both the basic competencies and 
strand-specific competencies referenced as general outcomes (module 
learner expectations in 1997 documents). Additional guidelines for 
preparing learning plans are provided through the specific outcomes 
(specific learner expectations in 1997 documents). Though not 
prescriptive, the specific outcomes provide further information 
regarding the depth and scope of learning expected for each course. 

In general, learning plans should include: 

• assignments/projects/tasks that develop the defined competencies 

• strategies to assess student performance and achievement 

• resources that support learning outcomes 

• timelines and task/laboratory schedules. 

A Student Learning Guide (SLG) provides information and direction 
to help students attain the outcomes defined in a CTS course. SLGs 
are designed to be used by students under the direction of a teacher. 
Components of an SLG include: 

• Why take this course? 

• What do you need to know before you start? 

• What will you be able to do when you finish? 

• When should your work be done? 

• How will your mark for this course be determined? 

• Which resources may you use? 

• Activities/worksheets. 

While a development template accompanied by some sample SLGs is 
provided for each CTS strand, most SLG development is being done 
by individuals and organizations across the province. Teachers are 
encouraged to share their SLGs through the CTS WebBoard. 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 
©Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada 



121 

(1998) 



Distance Learning 
Materials 

Refer to the Learning 
Technologies Branch home 
page at <http://ednet.edc.gov. 
ab.ca/ltb>. 



Teachers should note that an SLG is not a self-contained learning 
package like those produced by the Learning Technologies Branch. 

The Learning Technologies Branch is developing distance learning 
materials for courses in a number of CTS strands. Distance learning 
materials are self-contained learning packages that typically include 
the type of information provided in a Student Learning Guide and 
additional resource materials for the student. 

Teachers are advised to consult the Learning Technologies Branch 
home page for information regarding the availability of distance 
learning materials in particular strands and for future development 
schedules. 



CTS IN JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL 



PROGRAM PLANNING 

Each junior high school determines which CTS strands and courses to 
offer. Because few junior high students have made specific career 
decisions and plans, they are better able to learn about different career 
areas if they can explore several of the CTS strands along with other 
optional courses. 

Experience has demonstrated that male and female students do equally 
well in CTS programs. When possible, planning should facilitate 
co-ed classes in most CTS strands. 



Selecting 
Strands/Courses 



Junior high schools are encouraged to develop CTS programs that 
focus on personal skills for daily living and career exploration. While 
all CTS strands can be delivered at the junior high school level, some 
strands have a more specialized occupational focus and may be less 
relevant to the junior high school student. 

Introductory level courses are considered most appropriate for junior 
high school students as they focus on developing competencies that 
are useful for daily living and form a foundation for further study 
within the strand. Junior high schools may also choose to deliver 
intermediate level courses, particularly in areas where students may 
have previously developed competencies. 

When selecting CTS courses, junior high schools should take into 
account the strands/courses available to students when they enter high 
school, and design courses accordingly. 



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CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

©Alberta Education. Alberta, Canada 



Designing Courses 

Refer to the CTS Guide to 
Standards and 
Implementation, Section C: 
Planning for Instruction. 



Junior high schools may design CTS courses by combining: 

• components of courses within and across strands to enable 
students to explore a range of career options 

• complete courses within and across strands to enable students to 
acquire knowledge and skills prerequisite to further study. 

Course design in junior high school may involve sequencing the 
delivery of course components over a period of one, two or three 
years. 

Course prerequisites and recommended sequences are defined in 
the scope and sequence chart for each strand. 

Courses offered at the junior high school level can be named Career 
and Technology Studies (CTS), given specific strand names such as 
Agriculture or Design Studies, or given other names considered 
appropriate in communicating the nature of the learning. 



Elementary to 
Junior High 



Junior High to 
Senior High 



EFFECTIVE TRANSITIONS 

CTS encourages students to build upon prior learning that may have 
occurred through formal schooling and personal initiatives. Within 
this context, junior high students who have already developed 
competencies defined within a course should have opportunities to 
expand upon or enhance these competencies as they move through 
their school experience. 

Some students entering junior high school may have already 
developed CTS-related competencies in the elementary school years. 
As well, many elementary students are already accustomed to working 
in multi-activity and independent learning environments. Junior high 
schools are encouraged to consult with feeder schools to determine the 
level of expertise students bring to junior high school, and plan their 
CTS courses accordingly. 

Junior high schools should become knowledgeable of the 
strands/courses available at high school and design their courses 
accordingly. Junior and senior high school teachers and 
administrators are encouraged to share information regarding: 

• which CTS strands/courses they are delivering 

• where and how CTS courses are being delivered 

• strategies used to organize for learning; e.g., class timetabling, 
flexibility and degree of student choice 

• policies regarding the recognition of prior learning. 

Awareness of each other's programs and flexible approaches to 
program planning facilitates effective transitions from junior to senior 
high school. 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 
©Alberta Education. Alberta, Canada 



123 

(1998) 



Recognizing Prior 
Learning 

Refer to the Guide to 
Education: ECS to 
Grade 12, Courses and 
Programs. 



Some students may successfully complete CTS courses while in 
junior high school. The senior high school principal may accept a 
recommendation from the junior high school principal that a 
student has successfully completed a course and should be given 
credit. 

Junior high schools need to determine the practices adopted by local 
high schools regarding recognition of prior learning in CTS, and 
advise students and parents accordingly. 



CTS IN SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL 



Selecting 
Strands/Courses 



PROGRAM PLANNING 

While the emphasis of CTS programs in junior high school is on daily 
living skills and career exploration, CTS programs in senior high 
school focus on building transitions to the workplace or related 
post-secondary programs. 

Each senior high school determines which CTS strands and courses to 
offer. Some students entering high school may wish to expand on the 
competencies they have already developed within a particular strand. 
Other students may wish to expand their repertoire of competencies by 
working in other strands. 

Intermediate- and advanced-level courses are generally most 
appropriate for high school students, particularly those in Grade 1 1 
and Grade 12, as these courses focus more directly on technical and 
career-related competencies. Senior high schools may also deliver 
introductory-level courses, particularly in strand areas where students 
may not have developed the prerequisite knowledge and skills. 

When selecting CTS strands and courses, senior high schools should 
take into account prior learnings acquired by students in junior high 
school and through personal initiatives, and design courses 
accordingly. 



Course Delivery 



Senior high schools may deliver CTS by combining 1 -credit courses: 

• within and across strands, and 

• within and across levels (introductory, intermediate, advanced). 

While schools are encouraged to consider flexible methods of 
planning and delivering courses that best meet the needs of students, 
care is needed when planning senior high school CTS courses to 
ensure they: 



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CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

©Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada 



Refer to the Guide to 
Education: ECS to 
Grade 12, Senior High 
School Programming. 



• deliver all the general outcomes of a course (MLEs in 1997 
documents) 

• preserve the student's right to access to instruction 

• do not offer double credits for the same learning. 

Course prerequisites and recommended sequences are defined in 
the scope and sequence chart for each strand. Plans for course 
delivery must ensure that students have access to a minimum of 
25 hours of instruction per high school credit, unless otherwise 
specified in the Guide to Education: ECS to Grade 12. 

Advanced-level courses may be used by students to meet the high 
school diploma requirements. Schools need to review the course 
combinations made available to ensure that students have access to an 
adequate number of advanced-level courses to meet the 30-level credit 
requirements for the Alberta High School Diploma. 

Schools may combine courses into multiple-credit clusters for 
scheduling and instructional purposes. However, the courses are to be 
reported to Alberta Education as 1 -credit courses. At the school level, 
course names may be used that clarify learning outcomes for students 
and parents. 



Junior High to 
Senior High 



EFFECTIVE TRANSITIONS 

An important goal of the CTS program is to enhance transitions from 
junior high school to senior high school, and from senior high school 
into the workplace or related post-secondary programs. Within this 
context, senior high school students should have opportunities to: 

• expand upon or enhance competencies they may have already 
developed through formal schooling and personal initiatives 

• develop competencies that prepare them for entry into the 
workplace or related post-secondary programs. 

Senior high schools should become knowledgeable of the 
strands/courses offered to students at junior high school, and take this 
information into account as they plan their CTS programs. Junior and 
senior high school teachers and administrators are encouraged to share 
information regarding: 

• which CTS strands/courses they are delivering 

• where and how CTS courses are being delivered 

• strategies used to organize for learning; e.g., class timetabling, 
flexibility and degree of student choice 

• policies regarding the recognition of prior learning. 

Awareness of each other's programs and flexible approaches to 
program planning facilitates effective transitions from junior to senior 
high school. 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 
©Alberta Education. Alberta, Canada 



125 

(1998) 



Senior High to 
the Workplace 

Refer to the CTS Guide to 
Standards and 
Implementation, Section H: 
Linkages/Transitions. 



Many young people experience challenges upon entering the 
workplace. In preparation for this critical step, students can be 
provided with opportunities to explore options for employment 
through work study, job shadowing, mentorship and other forms of 
off-campus learning. Each CTS strand is supported with a 
comprehensive list of related occupations and career opportunities. 

A number of credentialling opportunities are available to CTS 
students through professional and community organizations, whereby 
students may earn partial or complete credentials recognized in the 
workplace. CTS courses can be designed in ways that enable students 
to obtain credentials that enhance opportunities for entry into the 
workplace. 



Senior High to 
Post-Secondary 



Refer to the CTS Guide to 
Standards and 
Implementation, Section H: 
Linkages/Transitions. 



Many CTS students upon completing particular course sequences have 
developed competencies that align with those expected in 
post-secondary programs. A summary of related post-secondary 
programs offered at the college, technical and university level, as well 
as through Apprenticeship and Industry Training, is published 
periodically in It's About Time to Start Thinking About Your Future 
by Alberta Advanced Education and Career Development, and is 
available for purchase from the LRDC. 

A number of articulation agreements have been established with 
post-secondary institutions and training programs in Alberta. These 
agreements provide preferred entrance and/or advanced standing for 
CTS students who have successfully completed designated courses. 
Advanced-level courses will be accepted in lieu of 30-level practical 
arts courses in qualifying for post-secondary entrance. 

The Alberta Heritage Scholarship Fund combines and averages the 
marks of CTS courses taken at the same level (i.e., introductory, 
intermediate) to establish 3 credits that can be considered for the 
Alexander Rutherford Scholarship. In cases where more than three 
courses have been taken at the same level, the three courses with the 
highest marks are combined and averaged. 



Recognizing Prior 
Learning 



Students should be encouraged to refine and extend competencies they 
may have developed in junior high school or through personal 
initiatives. To do this, high schools need to establish practices for 
recognizing students' prior learning. 



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Refer to the Guide to 
Education: ECS to 
Grade 12, Senior High 
School Courses and Credits 
for Junior High School 
Students. 



Courses Completed in Junior High 

Some students may successfully complete CTS courses while in junior 
high school. The senior high school principal may accept a 
recommendation from the junior high school principal that a student 
has successfully completed a course and should be given credit. This 
course then can be included when reporting student achievement 
through the normal student records system. The course(s) also will 
then be included in the student's transcript. 

Such courses are to be reported by the senior high school principal 
according to the directions provided in the Guide to Education: ECS 
to Grade 12. High school credits granted upon the 
recommendations of a junior high school principal are not eligible 
for Credit Enrollment Unit (CEU) funding. 

Local policies regarding the granting of credits for prior learning in 
CTS should be established collaboratively and communicated to all 
clients and stakeholders. These policies may include provisions for 
challenge assessment. 



Refer to the Guide to 
Education: ECS to Grade 12, 
Course Challenge. 



Course Challenge 

Course challenge may be appropriate for students who, because of 
prior learning, have demonstrated the ability to meet the assessment 
standards established for specific 1 -credit courses. Course challenge 
assessment may occur through: 

• a traditional comprehensive examination 

• teacher observation over three to four classes 

• teacher evaluation of a student's portfolio or work sample 

• a student's demonstration of skills through performance of set 
tasks. 

Successfully challenged courses are to be reported as passed courses 
according to the directions provided in the Guide to Education: ECS 
to Grade 12. 



SELECTING AND USING LEARNING 

RESOURCES 



CTS encourages teachers to establish resource-based classrooms 
where a variety of appropriate, up-to-date print and nonprint 
resources, such as print, software, video, CDROM and other 
electronic formats, are available. 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 
©Alberta Education, Alberta. Canada 



127 

(1998) 



Basic, Support and 
Teaching Resources 



AUTHORIZED LEARNING RESOURCES 

To assist teachers in identifying a variety of resources to meet their 
needs and the learning needs of students, Alberta Education has 
authorized learning and teaching resources for use in each of the CTS 
strands. While an authorized resource meets high standards and 
can contribute to the attainment of the goals of the CTS 
curriculum, authorization does not require its use in course 
delivery. Decisions regarding the selection and use of resources are a 
local matter and should take into account student skill levels, interests 
and stages of development. 

Resources authorized by Alberta Education for CTS are categorized 
as: 

• basic student learning resources — resources that address the 
majority of the learner outcomes in one or more courses 

• su pport student learning resources — resources that assist in 
addressing some of the learner outcomes of a course 

• authorized teaching resources — resources that assist teachers in 
the instructional process. 



Refer to the CTS Guide to 
Standards and 
Implementation, Section I: 
Learning Resource Guide. 



Authorized resources are identified in the CTS curriculum documents 
for each strand by title and format, and are accompanied with: 

bibliographic information 

an annotation, where appropriate 

a correlation to CTS courses 

recommendations for use in junior and/or senior high school 

distributor/vendor information. 



Although listings of authorized resources in the curriculum documents 
are maintained on a regular basis, this information is time-sensitive 
and subject to change. To obtain the most up-to-date information on 
authorized resources for each CTS strand — new resources, more 
recent editions/versions — teachers are encouraged to browse the 
database of authorized resources on Alberta Education's web site. 



Learning Resources 
Distributing Centre 

Refer to the LRDC Buyers 
Guide or web site at <http:// 
ednet.edc.gov.ab.ca/lrdo. 



Most authorized learning resources are available for purchase from the 
Learning Resources Distributing Centre (LRDC). A current listing of 
newly approved resources available through the LRDC can be 
accessed electronically through their web site. 

Authorized resources can also be obtained directly from the publisher 
or distributor. It is recommended that teachers preview all resources 
before purchasing, or purchase a single copy for their reference and 
additional copies as required. 



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OTHER SOURCES OF INFORMATION AND SUPPORT 



Other Resources 

Refer to the CTS Guide to 
Standards and 
Implementation, Section I: 
Learning Resource Guide. 



Also included in the curriculum documents for each CTS strand is a 
list of other resources . These titles have been provided as a service 
only to assist local school systems to identify resources that contain 
potentially useful ideas for teachers. Alberta Education has done a 
correlation to CTS courses. Teachers are advised, however, that 
further review will be necessary prior to their use in the learning 
process. 



Additional Sources of 
Information 

Refer to the CTS Guide to 
Standards and 
Implementation, Section I: 
Learning Resource Guide. 



Teachers are encouraged to consider opportunities for enhancing their 
delivery of CTS courses through the use of other sources of 
information readily available at local, provincial and national levels. 
Each strand provides a partial listing of additional information sources 
potentially available through the community, government, industry 
and professional organizations. Also identified as appropriate for 
each strand are sources of information available through the Internet. 



ESTABLISHING RESOURCE-BASED CLASSROOMS 

Resource-based classrooms can accommodate a variety of 
instructional strategies and teaching styles, and support individual or 
small group planning. They provide students with opportunities to 
interact with a wide range of information sources in a variety of 
learning situations. 

Schools are encouraged to establish CTS resource centres that 
include: 

• copies of various learning and teaching resources that have been 
authorized for each strand 

• copies of other resources identified in each strand 

• relevant magazines, periodicals and newsletters 

• multimedia resources, including videos and CDROMs 

• samples of student work. 

Access to a broad resource base enables students to learn to screen 
and use information appropriately, solve problems, meet specific 
learning needs, and develop competency in communication skills. 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 
©Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada 



129 

(1998) 



INTEGRATING CAREER-RELATED 

LEARNING 



A key feature of CTS is its focus on "careers" in a wide range of 
contexts. A career not only relates to a person's job or occupation, 
but also involves one's personal life — as a family member, a friend, a 
community volunteer, a citizen. Competencies developed through 
personal interest during secondary school often form the foundation 
for a future career choice. 





CAREERS 






' I Personal ] \ 


F 


N / 


V Life ) 


\ u 


o ( 




I u 


w y 


( Work ] 
V V Life / 7 


/ r 
/ e 



Career — the sum total of life's experiences 
Occupation — a cluster of similar jobs 
Job — a position of work in an organization. 

Junior and senior high schools should plan CTS programs in ways that 
enable students to explore their goals in life and work, now and in the 
future. Career-related learning should begin in junior high school and 
continue through the high school years so that by the time students 
graduate they have developed competencies for: 

• daily living and personal interest 

• career planning and preparation 

• entry into the workplace or post-secondary programs. 

DAILY LIVING/PERSONAL INTEREST SKILLS 



Refer to the CTS Guide to 
Standards and 
Implementation, Section B: 
Strand Rationale and 
Philosophy, and Scope and 
Sequence. 



Many CTS courses identify competencies that people consider 
essential for daily living, such as financial management, nutrition and 
basic meal preparation, consumer decision making, and the use of 
information and communication technology. In addition, CTS 
provides access to courses that support the pursuit of hobbies and 
other recreational interests. 

By reviewing the scope and sequence charts for the CTS strands 
offered, schools can identify courses that: 

• provide an introduction to each strand 

• develop skills for daily living and personal use 

• provide a foundation of knowledge and skills that support further 
specialization in the strand. 



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CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

©Alberta Education. Alberta, Canada 



CAREER PLANNING AND PREPARATION 

As students progress through each level of learning in CTS, they 
develop skills in career planning, explore numerous strand-related 
career options, and begin to prepare for present and future career 
options. 



Career Awareness 

Refer to relevant career web 
sites, including: 

• OCCINFO <www.aecd. 
gov.ab.ca/occinfo> 

• CAREER 
INFORMATION 
HOTLINE <www.aecd. 
gov.ab.ca/hotline> 

• HUMAN RESOURCES 
DEVELOPMENT 
CANADA <http://roe- 
ab.hrdc-drhc.gc.ca>. 

Refer to the CTS Guide to 
Standards and 
Implementation, Section H: 
Linkages/Transitions. 

Career Readiness 

Refer to the Career 
Transitions Guide to 
Standards and 
Implementation, Section B: 
Strand Rationale and 
Philosophy. 



Employability Skills 

Refer to the CTS Guide to 
Standards and 
Implementation, Section A: 
Program Rationale and 
Philosophy. 



Junior and senior high schools are encouraged to use current labour 
market information in developing career awareness within the context 
of specific strands and courses. Competencies relevant to career 
planning and awareness are defined within each CTS strand through 
learner outcomes (learner expectations in 1997 documents). 

Clearly defined assessment standards and tools provide further 
benchmarks for establishing appropriate levels of career awareness 
within specific CTS courses. 

Each CTS strand is supported with a comprehensive list of related 
occupations and career options that align with National Occupational 
Classification (NOC) descriptions. Approximately 800 linkages to the 
labour market are identified across the 22 CTS strands, each further 
described by educational and training requirements. 



The Career Transitions strand provides extensive opportunities for 
career preparation through its themes on Career Readiness, 
Leadership, Career Extensions, Career Credentials and Job Safety 
Skills. 

Of particular relevance to career planning and preparation at the high 
school level are courses in the Career Readiness theme: 

• CTR1010: Job Preparation 

• CTR2010: Job Maintenance 

• CTR3010: Preparing for Change. 

Schools can design courses that prepare students for particular careers 
by combining one or more courses from the Career Transitions strand 
with intermediate- and advanced-level courses from other strands 
having an industry focus. 

Career preparation is further enhanced through a set of basic 
competencies or employability skills integrated throughout all CTS 
strands and courses. The basic competencies align with critical skills 
for employability identified by the Conference Board of Canada, and 
are organized around four developmental stages that address the 
learning needs of junior and senior high school students. The basic 
competencies are included as appropriate in curriculum and 
assessment standards defined for each CTS course. 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

©Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada 



131 

(1998) 



WORKPLACE AND POST-SECONDARY TRANSITIONS 

The relevance and credibility of CTS within career contexts is 
enhanced through the extensive contributions to curriculum 
development by representatives of business and industry, professional 
associations and post-secondary institutions. Many students who 
complete intermediate- and advanced-level courses in one or more 
CTS strands develop competencies that align with those expected in 
the workplace and/or by post-secondary institutions. 



Credentials for the 
Workplace 



A credential provides written evidence by agencies external to the 
school of a student's qualifications with respect to particular 
competencies. CTS students may earn partial or complete credentials 
recognized in the workplace or by post-secondary institutions through 
their work in particular CTS strands and courses. 



Students can earn credentials by successfully meeting the curriculum 
and assessment standards established for: 

• specific credential-bearing courses 

• generic "practicum" courses from the Career Transitions strand 
that incorporate learnings requisite to particular credentials. 



Refer to Appendix 5: 
Planning Ahead — CTS 
Transitions into 
Post-secondary Programs 
and the Workplace. 



Each CTS strand provides information regarding relevant 
credentialling opportunities. Schools and school systems can use this 
information as a basis for further research and planning regarding 
credentials they may wish to offer through CTS. Schools should 
determine which credentials are viable in their community, and plan 
courses that incorporate these opportunities when appropriate. 



Articulation with 
Post-Secondary 

Refer to: 

• CTS Guide to Standards 
and Implementation, 
Section H: Linkages/ 
Transitions 

• CTS at the Alberta 
Education web site under 
"What's New and 
Upcoming Events?". 



A number of articulation agreements have been established with 
post-secondary institutions and training programs in Alberta. While 
the agreements vary in terms of how prior learning in CTS is 
recognized, most provide preferred entrance, advanced placement 
and/or advanced standing for CTS students who have successfully 
completed designated courses or course sequences. Schools and 
school systems are encouraged to consult local post-secondary 
institutions regarding: 

• recognition of locally offered CTS courses 

• the status of existing articulation agreements established at the 
provincial level. 



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Refer to Appendix 5: 
Planning Ahead— CTS 
Transitions into 
Post-secondary Programs 
and the Workplace. 



Off-campus Learning 

Refer to the Off-campus 
Education Guide for 
Administrators, Counsellors 
<Sc Teachers. 



Articulation with the Alberta Apprenticeship Training Program 

Articulation agreements have been established between CTS strands 
and a number of the Alberta Apprenticeship Training Programs. 
Through these agreements, students who complete required CTS 
courses and successfully challenge appropriate theory and practical 
examinations for particular trades may qualify for: 

• a portion of the trade's in-school training program, and/or 

• on-the-job time credit within the trade. 

At present, articulation agreements are in place with the Automotive 
Service Technician, Carpenter, Cook, Hairstylist and Welder trades. 

A variety of off-campus learning experiences are suggested throughout 
the CTS curriculum — work study, work experience, job shadowing, 
mentorship. Each provides valuable opportunities for students and 
schools to enhance connections with business/industry, professional 
associations, post-secondary institutions or other community groups. 



Work Experience Program 

The Work Experience program is designed to provide high school 
students with experiential learning in career-related contexts. Work 
Experience courses are delivered off-campus under the supervision of 
a community partner, and enable students to develop: 

• an understanding of expectations in the workplace 

• knowledge and skills relevant to a specific career. 

Although Work Experience and CTS are separate programs, 
CTR1010: Job Preparation is a prerequisite for all Work Experience 
courses. Schools may choose to register students concurrently in CTS 
and Work Experience courses. 



Registered Apprenticeship Program 

The Registered Apprenticeship Program (RAP) is designed for high 
school students who wish to begin a trade apprenticeship while 
completing their high school diploma. A RAP apprentice accumulates 
hours of on-the-job training as credit toward both a journeyman 
certificate and a high school diploma. RAP 15-25-35 courses are 
taught through off-campus learning under the joint supervision of a 
certified teacher and a journeyman in the workplace. 

Although RAP and CTS are separate programs, courses in each may 
complement one another. 



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© Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada 



/33 

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THE ROLE OF THE CTS COUNSELLOR 

The role of the school counsellor in CTS is one of helping students 
make effective career decisions through awareness and preparation. 
Counsellors can help students plan their junior and senior high school 
CTS programs, identifying strands and courses most appropriate to: 

• long- and short-term goals 

• interests and aptitudes 

• learning styles and abilities. 

Through effective partnerships with other school personnel, 
counsellors can assume a key role in coaching CTS students to: 

• explore a range of career and occupational opportunities 

• plan the necessary steps to meet entry-level requirements for 
particular career choices 

• negotiate effective transitions to the workplace or related 
post-secondary programs. 

Counsellors can also help CTS teachers and administrators to 
determine which strands and courses should be made available to 
students, and help them, parents and community partners to understand 
the nature and structure of the CTS program. 



INTEGRATING TECHNOLOGY OUTCOMES 

A key feature of CTS is its focus on the use of technology. In its 
broadest sense, technology includes all the processes, tools and 
techniques that affect daily life. Technology is more powerful today 
than ever, creating ways of living, working and thinking never before 
imagined. Technology outcomes in CTS reinforce, extend and 
enhance related skills developed in earlier grades and in other 
courses. 

TECHNOLOGY 




CTS programs in junior and senior high school provide opportunities 
for students to develop technology skills required for daily living, 
entry-level work and lifelong learning. These skills involve: 



34 / CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

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making effective decisions regarding which processes or 

techniques best suit a particular task 

selecting and using appropriate tools and resources in a skilled 

manner 

assessing and managing the impact of technology on self, others 

and the environment. 



Refer to Learner Outcomes in 
Information and Communication 
Technology: ECS to Grade 12. 



TECHNOLOGY FRAMEWORK: ECS TO GRADE 12 

To assist students to understand, use and apply technologies in 
effective, efficient and ethical ways, Alberta Education has conducted 
an extensive review of technology curricula around the world. Based 
on the results of this review, a framework for learner outcomes in 
information, communication and multimedia technology for ECS to 
Grade 12 students has been developed. 

The framework not only identifies outcomes already included in CTS 
and other current programs of study, but also anticipates the 
knowledge, skills and attitudes that students may need in the future as 
technology continues to change and expand. 



Framework 
Organization 



The framework organizes technology outcomes around three 
interrelated categories. 

Foundational Operations, Knowledge and Concepts 

Outcomes in this category include understanding the nature and 
impact of technology, the moral and ethical use of technology, mass 
media in a digitized context, ergonomic and safety issues, and basic 
computer, telecommunication and multimedia technology operations. 

Processes for Productivity 

These outcomes focus on the knowledge and skills required to use a 
variety of basic productivity techniques and tools. These include text 
composition, data organization, media and process integration, 
electronic communication navigation, collaboration through 
electronic means, and graphical, audio and multimedia composition 
and manipulation. 

Inquiring. Decision Making and Problem Solving 

Outcomes in this category build on the foundational operations, 
knowledge and concepts, as well as the ability to use a variety of 
processes. These outcomes include the ability to critically assess 
information, manage inquiry, solve problems and use research 
techniques. These outcomes should be addressed within the context 
of other subjects where students are expected to apply their 



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©Alberta Education, Alberta. Canada 



/35 

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Using the Framework 



knowledge and skills in practical situations. 

Outcomes within the three categories noted above are intended to be: 

• integrated into existing programs, through relevant subjects/ 
strands and at appropriate grades/levels 

• developed by all students prior to graduation, in a recommended 
progression from simple to more complex skills. 

Schools and school systems are encouraged to use the framework as 
they plan their CTS programs. The framework assists in identifying 
technology outcomes relevant to particular CTS strands and courses, 
and may also be used to plan for: 

• improvements to the technological capabilities of schools, 
including access to learning networks, the Internet, email and 
bulletin board services 

• partnerships among schools, business and the community that 
facilitate technology implementation 

• teacher inservice that focuses on technology competencies and 
their use in providing instruction 

• the acquisition of hardware, productivity software and 
multimedia resources 

• expanded program delivery through communication technology 
and multimedia courseware. 



TECHNOLOGY INTEGRATION IN CTS 

The CTS curriculum integrates technology skills required for daily 
living, entry-level work and lifelong learning. Each CTS strand 
requires students to learn about technology and learn with 
technology. 



Learning About 
Technology 



While students learn about technology in all CTS strands, the 
Information Processing, Communication Technology and Electro- 
Technologies strands provide specific focus on the development of 
knowledge and skills in information, communication and multimedia 
technology. Technology outcomes are clearly identified in each of 
these strands through learner outcomes in each course, and directly 
support competencies identified in the technology framework within 
the categories of: 

• foundational operations, knowledge and concepts 

• processes for productivity. 



Refer to the Information 
Processing Guide to 
Standards and 
Implementation. 



Information Processing 

The Information Processing strand provides opportunities for students 
to learn about electronic technologies as they apply to personal use 
and the business environment. Students develop competencies 
related to system operations, text/data input, productivity software, 



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Refer to the Communication 
Technology Guide to 
Standards and 
Implementation. 



Refer to the Electro- 
Technologies Guide to 
Standards and 
Implementation. 



applied processing, dynamic environments and programming. 
Communication Technology 

The Communication Technology strand provides students with a 
broad understanding of the impact that presentation and 
communication technology, print, photography and media design 
have on society. Students develop competencies related to 
presentation techniques, photography, print communication and the 
use of audio, video and digital technologies. 

Electro-Technologies 

The Electro-Technologies strand focuses attention on electric and 
electronic systems and the role of electronics in daily life, major 
research and scientific developments. Students develop competencies 
related to fabrication and service principles, power systems, computer 
logic systems, and robotic and control systems. 



Learning with 
Technology 



The CTS curriculum recognizes the expanding influence of 
technology in aU learning environments. CTS students use and apply 
technology in strand-specific contexts to: 

• develop an understanding of difficult concepts and relationships 

• perform tasks that are technology-based 

• access a range of current information 

• collaborate with other learners on a project. 

Learning outcomes relevant to the use of technology are embedded 
throughout the CTS curricula, and reinforce a range of competencies 
identified in the technology framework — including those within the 
category of inquiry, decision making and problem solving. Many 
CTS strands and courses require students to: 

• refine and extend their skills in the use of all levels of technology, 
from simple hand tools to sophisticated computer and 
telecommunications technologies 

• select and manage available technology to respond to challenges 

• use information, communication or multimedia technology as an 
aid to learning. 



STRATEGIES FOR INSTRUCTION IN CTS 

Instruction in CTS should use a range of strategies and methodologies 
that suit the needs of the learner and the nature of learning taking 
place. No one strategy is appropriate for all courses or learnings 
within a course, nor for all students. Key to helping students develop 
career-specific and basic employability skills within the context of any 
course are: 



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©Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada 



/37 

(1998) 



• flexible time frames for learning 

• access to a range of resources and learning activities 

• support, encouragement and opportunities for success. 

Teachers are encouraged to plan learning experiences that help 
students: 

• understand the outcomes and standards of performance required to 
succeed in each course 

• link theoretical and practical components of learning within each 
course 

• make connections between learning in a particular course, and: 

- what is learned in other CTS strands and curriculum areas 

- future plans for the workplace and/or related post-secondary 
programs 

• become self-directed lifelong learners who are able to adapt to 
change. 

Suggestions for developing a positive CTS learning environment are 
provided at the end of this section in Chart 3: Positive Classroom 
Climate Checklist. 



Metric and Nonmetric 
Measurement 



Many CTS strands and courses involve the development and use of 
measurement skills. While SI units have become the principal 
measuring system used in provincial curriculum, the present use of 
imperial and other nonmetric units in technical and trade-related 
occupations makes the application of other measurement systems 
unavoidable. Students should be given opportunities to develop 
measurement skills consistent with those required in future career 
paths. Teachers should: 

• use SI units of measurement wherever possible in activities 

• use imperial and other nonmetric units only where such 
measurement parallels its common usage in occupations. 



Refer to Appendix 4: 
Strategies for Instruction in 
CTS 



LEARN BY DOING/ACTIVE LEARNING 

Active learning occurs when students learn by doing and reflect on the 
processes used. Active learning requires that students are not just 
passive recipients of information, but develop the ability to apply what 
they are learning. 

CTS places an emphasis on learning by doing. Essentially, the 
teacher's role in this process is that of facilitator, guide and coach. 
Teachers need to: 

• recognize the different ways in which students learn, and plan 
activities that enable students to use learning processes 
appropriate to their needs 



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• plan for deliberate observation and questioning that promote 
thinking and reflection on learning tasks 

• encourage students to observe, verbalize and discuss relationships 
between theory and practice. 

APPLIED LEARNING/MAKING CONNECTIONS 

CTS courses provide career-specific contexts through which students 
can reinforce, extend and apply learning from other core and optional 
programs. As students recognize the relevance of prior learning to 
their future lives, they are motivated to develop higher levels of 
competency. Course planning should focus attention on ways to help 
students make connections between abstract concepts developed in 
other curriculum areas and their application in practical settings. 

Refer to Appendix 4: Teachers can enhance students' ability to make connections across the 

Strategies for Instruction in curriculum by: 

CTS. 

• increasing their sensitivity to the content of other subject areas 
and working with other teachers to design courses, lessons and 
activities that strengthen linkages 

• identifying prior learnings in other subject areas that apply in 
practical CTS contexts and being prepared to review or teach 
particular core concepts/skills prior to their use in a particular 
CTS course 

• designing projects and assignments that purposely link learnings 
from one discipline/subject to another and collaborating with 
other teachers in their delivery to help students integrate learning 
across several CTS strands or other disciplines 

• becoming familiar with the processes used for inquiry, research, 
reporting and decision making in other disciplines, and providing 
opportunities for students to use similar processes and vocabulary 
in CTS settings. 

TEAMWORK/COOPERATIVE LEARNING 

The ability to work as part of a team is essential in the workplace. 
The transition to a technology- and information-based society requires 
today's workers to pool their expertise. This trend can be expected to 
become even more pronounced in the future. 

Cooperative learning also promotes active learning and encourages 
individual and group enterprise. Group learning can help students to 
develop increasingly independent and responsible learning habits and 
to become more self-disciplined. 

CTS offers many opportunities for students to work in team settings, 
formally and informally. The teacher's role in cooperative learning 
involves: 

CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers / 39 

©Alberta Education. Alberta. Canada ( 1 998) 



Refer to Appendix 4: 
Strategies for Instruction in 
CTS 



communicating objectives, assignments and tasks 

determining the size and composition of groups 

arranging for appropriate facilities, equipment and materials 

informing the group of behavioural expectations 

acting as a resource person, coach and monitor 

evaluating the product of the group and performance of each 

group member. 



Teachers may wish to use Form 3: Group Member Effectiveness, 
included at the end of this section, to guide their observation and 
evaluation of student performance in group settings. 



MULTI-ACTIVITY LEARNING 

Multi-activity learning supports the concurrent delivery of different 
courses and/or learning tasks within a common time frame. It 
combines elements of active learning and cooperative learning. The 
process empowers students, working individually or in groups, to 
assume responsibility for completing courses or course components 
within a specified time period. 

In multi-activity learning, teacher and student share responsibility for 
managing the learning process. The process requires students to 
become self-directed learners who are able to manage their time, 
energy and resources in effective ways. As students move from 
introductory to advanced levels and become more proficient in 
managing their learning, teachers may introduce a larger number of 
course and activity choices. 



Introductory 
Level 



Intermediate 
Level 



Advanced 
Level 



Teacher 
Directed 



- : Student 
Managed 



Multi-activity learning requires much structure and planning prior to 
implementation, as well as class time spent in orienting students to 
expectations and the learning process. The role of the teacher in 
multi-activity learning is to: 

• plan and develop a range of learning activities 

• facilitate and support the learning process for individual students 
or groups of students 

• evaluate student performance and learning outcomes. 



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Teachers and students may wish to use Form 4: Sample Learning 
Contract, included at the end of this section, in establishing plans for 
multi-activity learning. 



ASSESSING STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT 



CURRICULUM AND ASSESSMENT STANDARDS 



Refer to the CTS Guide to 
Standards and 
Implementation: 

• Section D: Introductory 
Level 

• Section E: Intermediate 
Level 

• Section F: Advanced 
Level. 



As a competency-based curriculum, CTS defines curriculum 
standards — what students must know and be able to do, and 
assessment standards — the criteria and conditions for assessing 
student performance. Together, the curriculum and assessment 
standards: 

• establish an appropriate level of challenge and rigour for learning 
within each strand and course 

• define knowledge and skills relevant to preparing students for 
further learning and the workplace 

• enable students to focus their efforts on key learnings 

• ensure fairness and equity in how student's efforts are judged 

• provide a common base of understanding about the competencies 
developed in each CTS course. 

Consistent application of curriculum and assessment standards 
throughout the learning process is critical to establishing and 
maintaining the credibility of CTS programs with business, industry, 
post-secondary institutions and other community stakeholders. 

Curriculum and assessment standards are defined in each CTS course 
through: 

• general outcomes (module learner expectations in 1997 
documents) — the exit-level competencies that students are 
expected to achieve to complete a course. Each learner outcome 
defines and describes critical behaviours that can be measured and 
observed 

• criteria and conditions — the behaviours a student must 
demonstrate to achieve each exit-level competency and the 
conditions under which that competency should be judged. The 
conditions and criteria specify a minimum standard for 
performance, and include a reference to one or more assessment 
tools when appropriate 

• suggested emphases — guidelines for the relative significance of 
each general outcome. Though not prescriptive, these guidelines 
can be used to allocate instructional time and/or determine 
percentage marks for a course. 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 
©Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada 



141 

(1998) 



ASSESSMENT TOOLS 



Refer to the CTS Guide to 
Standards and 
Implementation, Section G: 
Assessment Tools. 



A range of assessment tools are provided to further assist teachers in 
assessing student performance in each CTS course. Each assessment 
tool communicates, through a five-point rating scale, a minimum 
standard for successfully completing a learning task. When used 
collectively for a particular course, the assessment tools provide a 
benchmark for assessing successful course completion in an equitable 
and consistent manner. 



Depending on the way the classroom is organized for instruction, 
assessment tools may be used with individual students upon 
completion of specific learning tasks, or with the entire class at the 
end of a learning period. 

Although the assessment tools focus on final or summative 
assessment, teachers should continue to use formative assessment 
throughout the learning process as they direct and respond to student 
efforts. As formative and summative assessment are closely linked, 
some teachers may find it beneficial to modify the assessment tools 
provided for particular courses during the instructional process. 

Teachers may develop and use alternative assessment tools 
providing these tools address standards that are consistent with 
the minimum competency defined in each course. 



Assessing 
Achievement 



Reporting 
Achievement 



ASSESSING ACHIEVEMENT IN JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL 

Assessment of student achievement in junior high school is based 
on successfully demonstrating all or part of the general outcomes 
for any given course to the minimum standard defined for each 
competency. Consistent application of curriculum and assessment 
standards is critical to maintaining the credibility of student learning 
in CTS programs. 

As in other junior high school courses, student achievement is 
reported to students and parents in accordance with local policy. 
Reporting practices should provide information to parents about: 

• what their child knows and can do in CTS courses 

• how well their child is doing in these courses. 

At the junior high school level, student achievement is not reported to 
Alberta Education. 



42/ 

(1998) 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

©Alberta Education, Alberta. Canada 



Tracking Course 
Completion 



■ 



Junior high schools need to implement tracking procedures to maintain 
appropriate records of the courses and/or general outcomes completed 
by individual students. Tracking procedures can be: 

■ quite simple, involving the use of a card for each student to record 
all completed courses and/or outcomes 

■ more complex, involving spreadsheets and databases. 

Tracking procedures at the school level should be complemented with 
student portfolios and/or other methods of profiling the work 
completed by individual students. A per cent mark for completed 
courses is required by high schools if prior learning is recognized 
through the granting of credits. 



Assessing 
Achievement 



ASSESSING ACHIEVEMENT IN SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL 

Assessment of student achievement in senior high school is based 
on successfully demonstrating all of the general outcomes for any 
given course to the standard defined for each competency. 

Consistent application of curriculum and assessment standards is 
critical to maintaining the credibility of student learning in CTS 
programs. 

When a student is able to successfully demonstrate all the general 
outcomes for any given course to the standard defined for each 
competency, the teacher designates the course as successfully 
completed and assigns a percentage grade to the course — a mark not 
less than 50%. 



Reporting 
Achievement 



Refer to Guide to Education: 
ECS to Grade 12, September 
1999, page 44. 



i 



Each high school reports student achievement in CTS courses to the 
Educational Information Exchange (EEE) on the basis of individual 
1 -credit courses, using the seven character alphanumeric codes 
provided on the scope and sequence chart for each CTS strand. 
Course reporting is done electronically using appropriate file formats, 
and includes all: 

■ successfully completed (passed) courses (i.e., courses in which the 
student has demonstrated aU the general outcomes to the 
established standard), along with a mark of 50% or greater for 
each successfully completed course 

■ unsuccessful courses (i.e., courses in which the student has not 
demonstrated aU the general outcomes to the established standard). 

The senior high school principal may accept a recommendation from 
the junior high school principal that a student has completed 
successfully all of the course outcomes and should be given credit. A 
mark of "P" for pass, or a percentage grade, may be assigned to the 
student by the senior high school principal. This course can then be 
included when reporting student achievement through the normal 
student records system and will appear on the student's transcript. 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

■Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada 



143 

(Revised 2000) 



Refer to the Funding Manual 
for School Authorities in the 
1998-1999 School Year. 



CTS courses reported as unsuccessful will need to be further identified 
regarding their eligibility for funding. For information regarding 
funding, see the Funding for CTS section below. 



Tracking Course 
Completion 

Refer to the Electronic Data 
Exchange User Guide and/or 
Manual Forms User Guide. 



For information regarding the reporting of challenged courses and 
courses completed in junior high school , see the CTS in Senior High 
School, Effective Transitions section. 

As in other senior high school courses, student achievement is reported 
to students and parents in accordance with local policy. 

Tracking systems used by senior high schools to record the completion 
of individual CTS courses should align with the system used by EIE 
for reporting student achievement. Schools may choose to supplement 
their tracking of course completion with information regarding 
achievement in junior high school. 

Course tracking and record keeping at the senior high school level 
should be complemented with student portfolios and/or other methods 
of profiling the competencies and learning experiences of individual 
students. 



FUNDING FOR CTS 



Basic Instructional 
Funding 

Refer to the Funding Manual 
for School Authorities in the 
1998-1999 School Year. 



The sources of funding described below support Alberta Education's 
shift to site-based management. Local school systems are responsible 
for assessing needs and making appropriate funding applications. 
School systems also retain responsibility for distributing funds to 
schools equitably. 

Basic instructional funding for junior high schools is independent of 
course completion. Funding is based on a per student grant, with the 
amount of the grant subject to adjustment from time to time. 

Basic instructional funding for senior high schools is based on the 
credit enrollment unit (CEU), and allocated according to the following 
criteria: 

■ full CEU funding for successfully completed (passed) courses 

■ 20% of CEU funding for successfully challenged courses. 

A 1 -credit CTS course is considered completed for funding purposes 
when a student has completed at least 50 per cent of the course 
content. These 1 -credit courses should then be reported as withdrawn 
but eligible for funding. 



441 

(Revised 2000) 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

■Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada 



CEU funding is not provided for high school credits granted upon the 
recommendations of a junior high school principal. 

Further inquiries regarding basic instructional funding should be 
directed to the School Finance Unit. 



Capital Funding 

Refer to the School Capital 
Funding Policies, 
Regulations and Guidelines 
Manual. 



Capital funds are made available each year for new construction and 
major modernization projects. This funding is provided to school 
boards for capital projects that may include the upgrading of an 
existing CTS lab, construction of new space, and associated 
equipment costs. 

Further inquires regarding capital funding should be directed to the 
School Facilities Branch. 



Technology 
Integration Funding 

Refer to Alberta Education's 
web site at <http://ednet.edc. 
gov.ab.ca/technology/> for 
funding guidelines. 



Funding for technology integration is provided to enable schools to 
replace obsolete computer systems with new systems that are at, or 
above, defined standards. Technology integration funding can be 
applied to the purchase of hardware, instructional software and 
networking components within schools. 

Further inquiries regarding technology integration funding should be 
directed to the School Technology Task Group, Alberta Education. 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 
©Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada 



I4S 

(1998) 



46 1 CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

( 1 998) ©Alberta Education. Alberta, Canada 



CHART 1: CTS STRANDS THAT REPLACE PRACTICAL ARTS COURSES 



Refer to the Guide to 
Standards and 
Implementation, Section H, 
for a correlation of CTS 
courses to former practical 
arts courses. 



CTS Strand 


Practical Arts Courses Replaced by CTS 


Agriculture 


Agriculture: Land and Life 7-8-9 
Agriculture 10-20-30 
Horticulture 12-22-32 


Career 
Transitions 


no related practical arts course 


Communication 
Technology 


Industrial Education 7-8-9 (Visual 

Communication) 
Graphic Arts 22-32 
Industrial Education 10-20-30 (Visual 

Communication) 
Visual Communication 12-22-32 


Community 
Health 


Home Economics 7-8-9 (Family) 
Health Sciences 12-22-32 
Personal Living Skills 10-20-30 


Construction 
Technologies 


Industrial Education 7-8-9 (Materials) 
Building Construction 12-22-32 
Electricity 12-22-32 

Industrial Education 10-20-30 (Materials) 
Industrial Education 10-20-30 
(Electricity/Electronics) 


Cosmetology 
Studies 


Beauty Culture 12-22-32 


Design Studies 


Drafting 10-20 
Drafting 12-22-32 


Electro- 
Technologies 


Electronics 12-22-32 
Industrial Education 10-20-30 
(Electricity/Electronics) 


Energy and 
Mines 


no related practical arts course 


Enterprise and 
Innovation 


no related practical arts course 


Fabrication 
Studies 


Industrial Education 7-8-9 (Materials) 
Industrial Education 10-20-30 (Materials) 
Machine Shop 12-22-32 
Piping 12-22-32 
Sheet Metal 12-22-32 
Welding 12-22-32 


Fashion Studies 


Home Economics 7-8-9 (Clothing) 
Clothing and Textiles 10-20-30 


Financial 
Management 


Recordkeeping 10 

Business Calculations 20 (Components) 

Accounting 10-20-30 



(continued) 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 
©Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada 



147 

(1998) 



(continued) 



CTS Strand 


Practical Arts Courses Replaced by CTS 


Foods 


Home Economics 7-8-9 (Foods) 




Food Preparation 12-22-32 




Food Studies 10-20-30 


Forestry 


no related practical arts course 


Information 


Computer Studies 7-8-9 


Processing 


Business Calculations 20 (Components) 




Business Communications 20 (Components) 




Computer Literacy 10 




Computer Processing 10-20-30 




Dicta Typing 20 




Shorthand 20-30 




Typewriting 9 




Typewriting 10-20-30 




Word Processing 


Legal Studies 


Law 20-30 


Logistics 


no related practical arts course 


Management 


Business Studies 9 


and Marketing 


Basic Business 20-30 




Marketing 20-30 




Office Procedures 20-30 (Components) 




Business Communications 20 (Components) 




Dicta Typing 20 




Business Calculations 20 (Components) 


Mechanics 


Industrial Education 7-8-9 (Power) 




Mechanics 12 




Automotives 22-32 




Related Mechanics 22-32 




Autobody 12-22-32 




Industrial Education 10-20-30 (Power 




Technology) 




Driver and Traffic Safety Education 10 


Tourism Studies 


no related practical arts course 


Wildlife 


no related practical arts course 



48/ 

(1998) 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

©Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada 



CHART 2: CTS ADVISORY AND CONSULTATION NETWORK 

(as of August 1995) 



MINISTER OF EDUCATION 

I 



EDUCATION OFFICIALS 



DIVISION COUNCIL 



I 



MANAGEMENT COUNCIL 



Intergovernmental 
Liaison 



Interbranch Liaison 



__ Interdepartmental Liaison 



Client/Stakeholder 
Consultation 



Teachers, Schools and 
School Systems 



Program and 

Assessment Advisory 

Committee 



CTS Project Team 



Career and Technology Studies 
Advisory Committee 



Agriculture 

• FG (16) 

• TF (9)* 

• C 5) 

• CN(414) 



AP(5) 
AV (N/A) 
RR (N/A) 
FR(7)* 



Fashion Studies 

• FG(10) • 

• TF(5) • 

• C (N/A) • 

• CN(591) • 



AP (N/A) 
AV (N/A) 
RR (N/A) 
FR(13) 



Career Transitions 

• FG(N/A) • AP(N/A) 

• TF(N/A) • AVfN/A) 

• C (N/A) • RR(N/A) 

• CN(663) • FR(N/A) 



Financial Management 

• FG(10) • AP(6) 

• TF(5)* • AV(N/A) 

• C (4) • RR(N/A) 

• CN(574) • FR(15)* 



Communication Technology 
FG(9) • AP(8) 

(N/ 



TF (N/A) 
C (4) 
CN (640) 



AV (N/A) 
RR (N/A) 
FR(19) 



Foods 

• FG(9) 

• TF(N/A) 

• C (5) 

• CN(690) 



AP(8) 
AV (71) 
RR(3) 
FR(21) 



Community Health 

• FG(9) • AP(N/A) 

• TF(5) • AV(N/A) 

• C (N/A) • RR (6) 

• CN(515) • FR(8) 



Electro-Technologies 

• FG(8) • AP(N/A) 

• TF(5) • AV(N/A) 

• C (4) • RR (2) 

• CN(483) • FR(15) 



Students and 
Parents 



Post-secondary 
Institutions 



Professional 
Associations 



Business and 
Industry 



Construction Technologies 

• FG(13) • AP(7) 

• TF(4)* • AV(N/A) 

• C (3) • RR(4) 

• CNf544) • FR(22> 



Energy and Mines 

• FG(16) 

• TF(N/A) 

• C (6) 

• CNG75) 



AP (N/A) 
AV (N/A) 
RR (N/A) 
FR(75)* 



Cosmetology Studies 

• FG(8) • AP(N/A) 

• TF(5) • AV(N/A) 
C (N/A) • RR (3) 

"~ (N/ 



CN (425) 



FR (N/A) 



Enterprise and Innovation 



FG(29)* 
TF (N/A) 
C (2)* 
CN (703) 



AP(5) 
AV(23) 
RR(3) 
FR(15)* 



Design Studies 

• FG(10) • 

• TF(5) < 

• C (6) 

• CN(600) ■ 



AP(6) 
AV (N/A) 
RR (N/A) 
FR(17) 



Fabrication Studies 

• FG(8) • AP(N/A) 

• TF(4) • AV(N/A) 

• C (6) • RR(5) 

• CNf497) • FR(16) 



Forestry 

• FG(16) 

• TF(7)* 

• C (4) 

• CN(425) 



AP(5) 
AV (N/A) 
RR (N/A) 
FR(6)» 



Information Processing 

• FG(10) • AP(7) 

• TF(9) • AV(N/A) 

• C (5) • RR(4) 

• CN(715) • FR(25) 



Legal Studies 

• FG(10) 

• TF(N/A) 

• C (10) 

• CN(527) 



AP(6) 
AV (N/A) 
RR (N/A) 
FR(10)» 



Management and Marketing 

• FG(8) • AP(N/A) 

• TF(N/A) • AV(N/A) 

• C (4) • RR(4) 

• CN(346) • FR(16) 



Mechanics 

• FG(8) 

• TF(5) 

• C (4) 

• CN(483) 



AP (N/A) 
AV (N/A) 
RR(2) 
FR(8) 



Tourism Studies 

• FG(24) • 

• TF(N/A) • 

• C (5) 

• CN(672) • 



AP(4) 
AV (N/A) 
RR (N/A) 
FR(9) 



Wildlife 

• FG(16) 

• TF(5)* 

• C (5) 

• CN(455) 



AP(5) 
AV (N/A) 
RR (N/A) 
FR(6)* 



Key: FG - Focus Group AP - 

TF - Task Force AV - 

C - Contractors RR - 

CN - Communication Network FR - 



Assessment Panel ( #) 
Assessment Validators 

Resource Review (N/A) - 

Field Review * _ 



Number of Committee 
Members 
Not Applicable 
Work Complete 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 
©Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada 



149 

(1998) 



5" i CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

C1998) ©Alberta Education, Alberta. Canada 



CHART 3: POSITIVE CLASSROOM CLIMATE CHECKLIST 

These classroom management strategies may be used as a basis for establishing a positive 
classroom climate. 

D Did I greet my students warmly? 

□ Are the students aware of the objective for today's activities? 
D Did I help focus the class or individuals on today's activities? 

□ Did I review the major concepts from the previous session? 

□ Did I explain the purpose of today's lesson or activity clearly and accurately? 

□ Did I ask processing questions throughout today's lesson to check for understanding? 

□ Did I take five minutes at the end of the class period to allow students to summarize 
today's learnings? 

D Did I respond to their assigned work in verbal or written form? 

D Did I model all of the classroom ground rules on my own behaviour? 

D Did I consistently enforce the ground rules? 

□ Did I consciously try to support the students by focusing on their positive qualities and 
praising their efforts? 

D Did I handle problems quickly and discreetly, treating my students with respect and 
fairness? 

D Am I creating a safe, supportive environment in which my students may grow and learn? 

□ Am I emphasizing the "specialness" of each individual student, the group as a whole, and 
the course itself? 

D Am I genuinely encouraging parent and community involvement? 



CIS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers / 51 

©Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada ( 1 998) 



52 I CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

( 1 998) ©Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada 




FORM 1: EVERGREENING CTS— SURVEY AND RESPONSE FORM 



EVERGREENING CTS 

Survey and Response Form 
(June 1998) 



The purpose of this Survey and Response Form is to gather information and ideas that will: 

• enhance initiatives proposed to support the implementation of CTS 

• maintain CTS curriculum and resources on an ongoing basis. 

Please return your response to Jan Mills, Program Manager, Career and Technology Studies, Curriculum Standards 
Branch, Alberta Education, 5* Floor East Devonian Building, 1 1 160 Jasper Avenue, Edmonton, AB, T5K 0L2; 
Telephone 403-422-3275; Fax 403-422-0576, or, email <jmills@edc.gov.ab.ca>. 



Note: The CTS "modules" are now officially referred to as "courses," each with an individual, alphanumeric code. 
In this form the term "course" refers to a 1 -credit CTS course, and the term "cluster" refers to a 
multiple-credit CTS offering. 



Please further describe the focus of this response by 
checking one of the following: 

□ Teacher: Grade 7 8 9 10 11 12 



□ 
D 
□ 



SECTION A: FOCUS OF RESPONSE 
This response represents: 

Q suggestions offered by an individual 

Q ideas offered by an individual on behalf of: 

(organization/group) 

D the collective ideas offered by: 

(organization/group) 

SECTION B: IMPLEMENTING CTS 

The following challenges and issues with respect to implementing CTS have been identified through the 
response received to earlier versions of this survey and response form. Based on your experience in 
implementing CTS programs, please provide further information regarding the strengths of existing practice 
and/or recommendations for improvement in each area. 

1 . Junior-Senior High School Transitions 

a) Feedback suggests that further policies and/or guidelines are required to support transitions for students 
from junior to senior high school. 

Comments (e.g., current strengths, challenges, recommendations): 



D Curriculum Leader/Department Head 
D School Counsellor 

School/School System Administrator 

Parent/Student 

Post-secondary Representative 
D Business/Industry Representative 
D Government Representative 
□ Other: 



b) Schools and/or jurisdictions developing promising strategies to manage junior-senior high school 
transitions will be identified and encouraged to share their practices. 

Can you identify particular schools and/or jurisdictions that have implemented effective practices? 



(continued) 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 
©Alberta Education, Alberta. Canada 



/53 

(1998) 



(continued) 

2. Post-secondary and Workplace Transitions 

a) Feedback suggests that transitions for CTS students into post-secondary institutions and the workplace 
could be enhanced through additional articulation agreements; e.g., recognition of CTS for admission to 
and/or advanced standing in post-secondary programs. 

Comments (e.g., current strengths, challenges, recommendations): 



b) Schools and/or jurisdictions developing promising strategies to manage post-secondary and workplace 
transitions will be identified and encouraged to share their practices. 

Can you identify particular schools and/or jurisdictions that have implemented effective practices? 



3. Curriculum Content and Rigour 

a) Feedback suggests that the content, with respect to time requirements, and rigour, level of difficulty, of 
some CTS courses needs to be reviewed. 

Comments (e.g., current strengths, challenges, recommendations): 



b) Can you identify particular CTS courses in which the content and/or rigour should be reviewed? 

Strand/Course: 

Rationale: 



4. Curriculum Alignment with other Strands/Disciplines 

a) Feedback suggests that the learnings defined in some CTS courses duplicate learnings that are defined in 
other strands and/or disciplines; e.g., core, complementary. 

Comments (e.g:, current strengths, challenges, recommendations): 



b) Can you identify particular CTS courses that should be reviewed for duplication of learning outcomes? 

Strand/Course: 

Rationale: 



Course Sequences/Prerequisites 

a) Feedback suggests that some course sequences/prerequisites create unnecessary roadblocks or barriers for 
students, thus reducing opportunities for obtaining advanced level credits for graduation requirements. 

Comments (e.g., current strengths, challenges, recommendations): 



b) Can you identify particular CTS strands/courses whose course sequences/prerequisites should be reviewed? 

Strand/Course: 

Rationale: 



(continued) 



54 1 CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

( 1 998) ©Alberta Education. Alberta. Canada 



(continued) 

Can you suggest other initiatives/practices that would enhance effective implementation of CTS? 



SECTION C; MAINTAINING CTS CURRICULUM AND RESOURCES 

The following chart outlines strand-specific recommendations for change to CTS curriculum that have been received 
from clients and stakeholders over the past year. Each recommendation has been prioritized according to the nature 
and extent of input received, as: 

• high priority — similar recommendations were received from a range of stakeholders; these recommendations 
were supported with a solid rationale and were deemed to require action in 1998-1999 

• medium priority — limited input was received with respect to particular courses and/or strand-related issues; 
further input and/or monitoring is required during the coming year prior to taking further action; your comments 
and input on these recommendations are requested 

• low priority — no input was received, input was of a minor editorial nature, or the input received was 
contradictory; no further actions are planned at this time. 

Please respond to recommendations for change within the strands/courses that you have experience, and 
provide a rationale for the comments you make. Your feedback on recommendations identified as Medium 
Priority is of particular importance to the evergreening process. 



Strand 


Recommendations 


Priority 


Comment/Rationale 


Agriculture 


No input/feedback received 


Low 




Career 
Transitions 


• determine if there are sufficient courses 
for skill/technique development, 
commercial production and client services 


High 




• add a three-course sequence on portfolio 
development 


Medium 




Communication 
Technology 


• COM1010: Presentation & 

Communication 1 — content duplicates 
other curriculum 


High 




• add additional courses to address career 
opportunities in the broadcasting/film 
industry 

• COM 1080: Digital Design 1 is rather 
general; needs to focus more on 
multimedia or HTML authoring 

• add a course on digital photography 


Medium 





(continued) 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

©Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada 



/55 

(1998) 



(continued) 



Strand 


Recommendations 


Priority 


Comment/Rationale 


Community 
Health 


• CMH2020: Perspectives on Marriage — 
should be advanced level course since it is 
as challenging as CMH3020: Parenting 

• add advanced level courses on: 

- control and treatment of disease 

- biomedical ethics 

- pediatrics 


Medium 




Construction 
Technologies 


No input/feedback received 


Low 




Cosmetology 
Studies 


No input/feedback received 


Low 




Design Studies 


• provide a greater focus/emphasis 
throughout scope and sequence on 
computer design 


Low 




Electro- 
Technologies 


• add an introductory level course on laser 
technology 

• reduce number of prerequisite courses 

• add some advanced level courses 


Medium 




Energy and 
Mines 


No input/feedback received 


Low 


■ 


Enterprise and 
Innovation 


No input/feedback received 


Low 




Fabrication 
Studies 


No input/feedback received 


Low 




Fashion Studies 


• add an introductory level and an 
intermediate level course on quilting 
techniques 

• add an advanced level course on flat 
pattern 


Medium 





(continued) 



56/ 

(1998) 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

©Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada 



(continued) 



Strand 


Recommendations 


Priority 


Comment/Rationale 


Financial 
Management 


• FIN 10 10: Financial Information: 

- is too difficult 

is more of a Management and 
Marketing course 

- should not be a prerequisite to all 
other Financial Management courses 


Medium 




Foods 


• FOD2080: Vegetables/Fruits/Grains— is 
too long — move grains to FOD2090: 
Creative Cold Foods 

• FOD2090: Creative Cold Foods is too 
short 


Medium 




Forestry 


• delete FOR 1040/2040: Woods Survival 1 
and Wood Survival 2; content duplicates 
WLD 1030/2030: Outdoor Experiences 1 
and Outdoor Experiences 2 


High 




• add a three-course sequence on 
ecoforestry 


Medium 




Information 
Processing 


• some courses are "too basic" and/or "can 
be delivered in too short a time"; e.g., 

5 hours rather than 25 hours: 

- INF1010: Computer Operations 

- INF 1090: Information Highway 1 

• INF1070: Hypermedia Tools — learnings 
duplicate and are more aligned to the 
Communication Technology 
strand/courses 

• INF3 160/3 170: Programming 
Application 2 and Programming 
Application 3 — too advanced in terms of 
the learner outcome for "solving problems 
in a second programming language" 


High 




• add an advanced level course on 
spreadsheets and databases 


Medium 




Legal Studies 


• LGS3080: Criminal Law — focus on 
criminal justice system, but add an 
intermediate level course to focus on 
criminal law 


Medium 




Logistics 


No input/feedback received 


Low 





(continued) 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

©Alberta Education. Alberta. Canada 



157 

(1998) 



(continued) 



Strand 


Recommendations 


Priority 


Comment/Rationale 


Management 
and Marketing 


• MAM 1010: Management & Marketing 
Basics — delete the first module learner 
expectation, as it duplicates the learnings 
inFINlOlO: Financial Information 

• MAM2020: Promotion: Advertising — 
too long; split into two, 1 -credit courses 
"Promotion — Print Advertising" and 
"Promotion — Broadcast Advertising" 


High 




• add an introductory course on business 
ethics or ethics in advertising 


Medium 




Mechanics 


• add a three-course sequence on customer 
service 

• add a 1 -credit course on bicycle repair 
and maintenance 


Medium 




Tourism 
Studies 


• combine TOU1010: The Tourism 

Industry and TOU1070: The Attractions 
Sector to eliminate overlap and provide 
some flexibility 


Low 




Wildlife 


No input/feedback received 


Low 





Other comments/recommendations for maintaining CTS curriculum and resources: 



Can we contact you for further information regarding the views you have shared? 



Your Name: 



School/Organi zation :_ 



Telephone: 
Fax: 



Are you interested in: 

• reviewing new learning resources? Yes No 

• validating new and/or revised courses on an informal basis? 
If yes, please indicate CTS strand(s) 



Yes 



No 



58/ 

(1998) 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

©Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada 



FORM 2: CTS COMMUNICATION NETWORK REGISTRATION FORM 



If you are interested in becoming a member of the CTS Communication Network, please complete and 
return this registration form. As a member of the CTS Communication Network, you will receive 
curriculum updates and newsletters, and may be asked to respond to evergreening initiatives. 

(Please Print) 



Name: 
Position: 



Date: 



School/Company/ Association: 
Address: 



Postal Code: 
Telephone: 



Subjects taught/area of responsibility: 



Email: 
Fax: 



Additional information/comments: 



Please indicate your area of interest/expertise: 





D CTS General Information 






□ 


Agriculture 


□ 


Fashion Studies 


□ 


Career Transitions 


□ 


Financial Management 


□ 


Communication Technology 


□ 


Foods 


□ 


Community Health 


□ 


Forestry 


□ 


Construction Technologies 


□ 


Information Processing 


□ 


Cosmetology Studies 


□ 


Legal Studies 


□ 


Design Studies 


□ 


Logistics 


□ 


Electro-Technologies 


□ 


Management and Marketing 


□ 


Energy and Mines 


□ 


Mechanics 


□ 


Enterprise and Innovation 


□ 


Tourism Studies 


□ 


Fabrication Studies 


□ 


Wildlife 



Please return to: Program Manager 

Career and Technology Studies 
Curriculum Standards Branch 
5th Floor East Devonian Building 
1 1 160 Jasper Avenue 
Edmonton, AB, Canada, T5K 0L2 



Fax: 403-422-0576 

Telephone: 403^22-3275 
Toll Free Inside Alberta 310-0000 
Email: <jmills@edc.gov.ab.ca> 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 
©Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada 



1 59 

(1998) 



60 I CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

( 1 998) ©Alberta Education, Alberta. Canada 



FORM 3: GROUP MEMBER EFFECTIVENESS 



Name: 



Date: 



Project: 



Group: 



Observations: 4 = Always; 3 = Frequently; 2 = Occasionally; 1 = Never 



Behaviours 


Observations 


The student: 


4 


3 


2 


1 


was on time 


□ 


□ 


□ 


D 


attended group sessions 


□ 


□ 


D 


D 


took an active part and contributed information and ideas 


□ 


□ 


□ 


□ 


had a positive, rather than negative or critical, approach 


□ 


□ 


D 


D 


listened when others spoke 


□ 


□ 


□ 


D 


respected and interacted with other members 


D 


D 


□ 


□ 


respected individual differences 


□ 


□ 


□ 


□ 


avoided prejudice and kept biases out 


□ 


D 


□ 


□ 


was open to the ideas and suggestions of others 


□ 


D 


□ 


□ 


encouraged noncontributors to take part 


D 


□ 


□ 


D 


accepted responsibility for the consequences of his or her 
behaviour 


□ 


D 


□ 


D 


was sensitive to the feelings and concerns of others 


□ 


D 


□ 


□ 


was genuine and open 


□ 


□ 


□ 


D 


supported others and helped them articulate their ideas 


□ 


D 


□ 


□ 


helped the group by summarizing, clarifying, mediating, 
praising and encouraging 


D 


D 


□ 


a 


Strategies for Improvement 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

©Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada 



161 

(1998) 



62 I CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

( 1 998) ©Alberta Education. Alberta. Canada 



FORM 4: SAMPLE LEARNING CONTRACT 



An agreement between a student and a teacher can be used to focus a student's attention on class 
expectations. This example could be altered as necessary. 



Student: 



Date: 



Cluster/Course Name: 



Teacher: 



LEARNER EXPECTATIONS (of cluster/course): 

1. 

2. 

3. 

4. 



ASSIGNMENTS TO BE SUCCESSFULLY COMPLETED (in order to finish the cluster/ 
course): 

1. 

2. 

3. 

4. . 



PERFORMANCE INDICATORS (specific behaviours necessary for successful completion of 
the cluster/course): 

1. 

2. 

3. 

4. 



I understand the requirements for cluster/course completion, and I will complete the learning as 
noted above. 



Date 



Signature of Student 



Witnessed by Parent(s) or Guardian 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 
©Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada 



163 

(1998) 



64 1 CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

( 1 998) ©Alberta Education. Alberta. Canada 




CAREER & 

TECHNOLOGY 

STUDIES 

Manual for Administrators, 
Counsellors and Teachers 



Appendix 1: 

Planning and Marketing 

CTS in Your School and 

Community 



June 1998 



The information and recommendations provided in this appendix are 
general in nature and do not in any way replace the collaboration and 
professional advice required for effective implementation at school 
and school system levels. 



66 1 Appendix 1 
(1998) 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

©Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



PURPOSE 69 

STRATEGIES FOR IMPLEMENTING CTS 69 

1. Establish a Planning Team 69 

2. Draft a Plan of Action 71 

3. Inventory Resources 72 

4. Conduct Market Research About Community Needs 72 

5. Identify Strands and Courses to Be Offered 73 

6. Identify Potential Barriers and Possible Solutions 73 

7. Gain Commitments for Action and Secure Approvals 74 

8. Check Progress 74 

MARKETING CTS IN THE SCHOOL AND COMMUNITY 74 

CTS Promotional Materials 74 

CTS Videos 75 

ATTACHMENTS 

Attachment 1: Sample Implementation Plan 77 

Attachment 2: Sample School/Community Profile 81 

Attachment 3: Sample Community Survey 85 

Attachment 4: Sample Student Interest Survey 87 

Attachment 5: Blackline Masters — CTS Promotional Materials 89 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers Appendix 1/67 

©Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada ( 1 998) 



68 / Appendix 1 CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

( 1 998) © Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada 



PURPOSE 



This appendix provides basic processes and sample support materials 
to assist school and school system administrators to implement CTS. 

Implementation of CTS differs in each school and school system. 
Effective implementation is based on a commitment from 
administrators, counsellors and teachers to consider new options in 
course design and timetabling. CTS provides schools with an 
opportunity to make connections with other optional or core courses 
and to design unique programs that meet local needs. 

Since each school and school system assumes increasing 
responsibility for establishing implementation plans in accordance 
with local needs, it is important to begin the planning process early. 

This document outlines eight steps for implementing CTS: 

1. Establish a planning team. 

2. Draft a plan of action. 

3. Inventory resources. 

4. Conduct market research about community needs. 

5. Identify strands and courses to be offered. 

6. Identify potential barriers and possible solutions. 

7. Gain commitments for action and secure approvals. 

8. Check progress. 

Each step is described in detail, often with supporting strategies and 
questionnaires provided as attachments. Schools and school systems 
are encouraged to adapt the processes and implementation strategies 
as required to address local needs and plan for effective 
implementation. 



STRATEGIES FOR IMPLEMENTING CTS 



1. ESTABLISH A PLANNING TEAM 

The planning team should involve key players from the school and 
school system including administrators, counsellors and teachers, and 
students. It may also involve representation from the community, 
including parents, business and industry, post-secondary and 
community organizations. Consider the roles and perspectives of key 
players, in the school and in the community. Some players may be 
involved only at the initial planning level, while others are responsible 
for the day-to-day implementation of the plan. 

CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers Appendix 1 / 69 

©Alberta Education. Alberta, Canada ( 1 998) 



School-based 
Members 



Some key players at the school and school system level, and their 
roles/perspectives, are listed below. 

• School and school system administrators promote students' 
opportunities to move from secondary school to productive, 
positive adult roles. Administrators help determine which CTS 
strands/courses are available to students, and are responsible for 
providing instructional expertise, facilities and resources to 
deliver selected course sequences in CTS. 

• Counsellors provide support for career and occupational guidance 
and, in many cases, strengthen the link between the goals of the 
school and those of students and parents. 

• Teachers play an essential role in the implementation plan. 
Teachers from all subject areas should be encouraged to get 
involved in the planning process. Improved linkages between 
CTS and other programs, team teaching strategies and shared 
resources can enrich the learning experience. 



Community-based 
Members 



Other community members can contribute important perspectives 
regarding program needs and expanded delivery options through their 
involvement on planning teams. 

• Parents have a vested interest in helping students to maximize 
their potential. 

• Business and industry offer workplace opportunities for students, 
now and in the future. Members of the business and industry 
community have expressed the need for highly skilled, effective 
employees who have a combination of basic competencies and 
technical and career-specific skills. Many favour an increased 
involvement in what and how students are taught, and in helping 
with the delivery of the curriculum. They are valuable assets on 
the planning team. 

• Post-secondary representatives on the planning team ensure 
coordination of programs and smoother transition between high 
school and post-secondary programs. 

• Community organizations and professional associations are also 
key players on the CTS planning team, as they can encourage 
community and professional support for CTS initiatives. 

Once a CTS planning team has been established, members should 
create a vision statement and set goals. It is important that time be 
allocated for these tasks, but it is also important that once general 
agreement is reached, the team moves on to preparing the actual 
implementation plan. 



70 / Appendix 1 
(1998) 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

©Alberta Education. Alberta, Canada 



2. DRAFT A PLAN OF ACTION 



Refer to Attachment 1: 
Sample Implementation Plan. 



Define what is to be achieved (deliverables), when it is to be achieved, 
and how (responsibilities, resource needs). 



System-level Decision 
Making 



It is important to establish early in the planning stages an 
understanding of system-level policies and guidelines that affect 
implementation plans. System level decisions need to be made 
egarding: 

the degree of flexibility to be delegated to schools 

the depth and breadth of course offerings in CTS 

funding allocations to schools 

the coordination of inservice opportunities 

transitions from junior to senior high, and from senior high to 

post-secondary and the workplace. 



School-level Decision 
Making 



School-level decisions need to be made, within the system context 
outlined above, regarding: 

• what CTS courses to offer: 

- course combinations 

- cross-strand possibilities 

- advanced level credits for diploma requirements 

- alternative delivery strategies 

• how CTS courses will be delivered, keeping in mind: 

- requirements for access to instruction 

- potential strategies for expanding access to CTS courses, in 
the school and through off-campus learning 

- policies and guidelines regarding assessment 

- a method for tracking course completion 

• the counselling structures and practices in place to assist students 
in making decisions regarding entry into post-secondary programs 
or the workplace. 

Those involved in drafting an implementation plan should take into 
account that: 

• the implementation of new course offerings or delivery strategies 
should be phased in gradually, taking one step at a time 

• expecting too much too fast may lead to problems, stress or even 
failure 

• all players need to be involved in the process and informed of 
progress on an ongoing basis. 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 
©Alberta Education, Alberta. Canada 



Appendix 1 / 71 
(1998) 



System-level 
Inventories 



3. INVENTORY RESOURCES 

Part of the implementation plan should include consideration of 
existing and potential resources. Conducting an inventory of 
resources at the system level can determine: 

• existing facilities and equipment 

• current and potential off-campus delivery sites 

• capabilities/needs with respect to delivering teacher training and 
inservice in CTS areas 

• strategies in place for scheduling classes and grading/reporting 
student achievement 

• policies for the distribution of funds to schools. 



School/Community 
Profiles 



Refer to: 

• Attachment 2: Sample 
School/Community 
Profile 

• Attachment 3: Sample 
Community Survey. 



Prepare a profile of the school and community, identifying available 
resources that can be used to meet student needs. Include current and 
potential physical and human resources available in the school and 
through off-campus learning. A well-designed school/community 
profile may be useful in identifying: 

• levels of program interest and demand — past student enrollment 
in the former practical arts courses, current student/parent interest, 
and potential support from business/industry 

• career steps taken by former graduates into the workplace or 
post-secondary programs 

• the courses that students find most useful, and the competencies 
that young adults wish they had developed while in secondary 
school 

• the competencies that teachers, administrators, parents, 
community members and business partners consider essential for 
effective career preparation. 



Refer to Attachment 4: 
Sample Student Interest 
Survey. 



4. CONDUCT MARKET RESEARCH ABOUT COMMUNITY 
NEEDS 

Survey student and parent interest in the various CTS strands. The 
survey may include reference to all the CTS strands, or only those 
strands that the school can potentially offer. A sample survey is 
provided for use with students. It can be adapted for use with parents 
and other community members. 

This is a good time to begin summarizing information obtained 
through previous inventories and surveys, and to consider the 
implications of this information for course delivery. 



72 I Appendix 1 
(1998) 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

©Alberta Education. Alberta, Canada 



Refer to Appendix 2: 
Defining CTS Learning 
Environments — Strand and 
Course Parameters. 



5. IDENTIFY STRANDS AND COURSES TO BE OFFERED 

No one school is expected to offer all the strands and all the courses in 
CTS. In order to meet the needs of most students, schools need to 
target certain strands and courses for delivery. It is useful to consider: 

• related courses formerly offered through the practical arts 

• reasons for offering the present selection of courses 

• the views of students and the community regarding the relevancy 
of current course offerings 

• the interests and needs of students and the backgrounds and 
expertise of school staff 

• new strands/courses that could be offered to students if the use of 
present and potential school- and community-based resources was 
maximized 

• the facility and equipment guidelines for proposed strands/courses 

• the instructional qualifications required for offering proposed 
strands/courses and the inservice requirements of teachers. 



6. IDENTIFY POTENTIAL BARRIERS AND POSSIBLE 
SOLUTIONS 

The barriers that may affect the implementation of CTS are unique to 
each school and school system. Barriers may include: 

• program credibility within the school and the community — 
acceptance by community/parents/students of programs that lead 
to positive career options 

• access to resources — teaching expertise, facilities, equipment and 
instructional materials. 

While most CTS courses can likely be implemented through the use of 
existing labs, program delivery can be expanded through off-campus 
learning experiences, arrangements with neighbouring schools and/or 
through distance learning technologies. The involvement of 
community members in planning course offerings can be an effective 
strategy in establishing innovative solutions to implementation 
barriers. 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

©Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada 



Appendix 1 / 73 
(1998) 



7. GAIN COMMITMENTS FOR ACTION AND SECURE 
APPROVALS 

A broad base of support among school and community members is 
critical to establishing successful implementation practices. It is 
recommended that approval and commitment for action be obtained 
from all players, particularly teachers, principals and school system 
administrators. 

Ongoing communication with key players increases local support for 
actions taken at the school and school system level to implement CTS. 



8. CHECK PROGRESS 

Take time periodically to review the original goals for implementation 
as outlined in Step 2: Plan of Action. Also review the Sample 
Implementation Plan as outlined in Attachment 1. 



MARKETING CTS IN THE SCHOOL 

AND COMMUNITY 



Schools and school systems are encouraged to design a 
communication plan to inform all client and stakeholder groups about 
the goals and structure of the CTS program. The communication plan 
should include an initial orientation to CTS and ongoing strategies to 
reinforce and expand understanding of the CTS program and how it is 
evolving in the school and community. 

To assist in communicating information about CTS, information 
packages can be developed and modified to address the needs of 
different groups. A number of materials are available for 
communicating information about CTS within the school and 
community. 



CTS PROMOTIONAL MATERIALS 



Refer to Attachment 5: 
Blackline Masters — CTS 
Promotional Materials. 



The following information brochures on the CTS program are 
provided to schools for use as blackline masters: 

• CTS Backgrounder, 1998 

• CTS Strand Brochure Series, Revised 1998. 



74 I Appendix 1 
(1998) 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

©Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada 



CTS VIDEOS 

The following videos are an effective means of explaining CTS to 
clients and stakeholders in the school and community: 

• CTS: Building the Future, 1996, explains the philosophy, 
curriculum structure and potential benefits of the CTS program. 
Designed for viewing by adults, the video is divided into distinct 

Source: ACCESS: The segments and may be used for inservice and orientation sessions. 

The video is accompanied by a brochure that describes key 
features of the CTS program (25 minutes). 

• Opportunities for You, 1996, profiles CTS along with related 
programs and initiatives. Designed for use with students, the 
video focuses attention on technical career opportunities, and is 
accompanied with a questionnaire to assist students in career 
planning (15 minutes). 

• On Cue, 1993, introduces teachers, administrators, parents and the 
community-at-large to the CTS program. The video is divided 
into distinct segments and may be used for inservice and 
orientation sessions (30 minutes). 

• U -Choose, 1993, describes the CTS program and the 22 CTS 
strands to students (11 minutes). 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers Appendix 1/75 

©Alberta Education. Alberta, Canada (1998) 



76 1 Appendix 1 CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

(1998) , ©Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada 



Attachment 1 



Sample Implementation Plan 



Objective: To ensure that all staff involved in the delivery of CTS have received 
appropriate inservice. 



ACTION 


ASSIGNED 
TO 


START 
DATE 


DATE 
DUE 


DATE 
COMPLETED 


1 . Organize a one-day workshop that 
addresses general and subject- 
specific topics. 










2. Ensure that course materials and 
other information available about 
CTS are distributed to teachers at 
every opportunity. 










3. Encourage teachers to assess and if 
necessary upgrade their technical 
skills to accommodate delivery of 
CTS courses. 










4. Encourage teachers to assess and if 
necessary expand their teaching 
strategies to accommodate delivery 
of CTS courses. 










5. Establish a network of CTS teachers 
to ensure ongoing communication on 
issues relevant to program 
implementation. 










6. Establish opportunities for ongoing 
professional development 
coordinated at the school or school 
system level, which teachers may 
access as appropriate. 










7. Ensure that professional 

development opportunities in CTS 
align with other initiatives/priorities 
established at the school or school 
system level. 










8. Arrange opportunities for teachers to 
visit other schools that demonstrate 
innovative approaches to the use of 
equipment and resources, teaching 
strategies or school organization. 











CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 
©Alberta Education, Alberta. Canada 



Appendix 1 / 77 
(1998) 



Attachment 1 (continued) 

Objective: To establish administrative procedures at the school and school system levels 
to facilitate the implementation of CTS. 



ACTION 


ASSIGNED 
TO 


START 
DATE 


DATE 
DUE 


DATE 
COMPLETED 


1 . Inservice key administrators on 
program delivery options for 
CTS. 










2. Investigate alternative models 
of scheduling. 










3. Schedule CTS courses. 










4. Establish a school-based CTS 
planning process each fall. 










5. Inventory student interest, staff 
expertise, and available 
resources and facilities. 










6. Identify CTS courses to be 
offered the following school 
year. 










7. Provide support for teachers 
who undertake the delivery of 
new CTS courses. 










8. Devise strategies to support 
cross-curricular integration 
between CTS and other subject 
areas. 










9. Ensure ongoing system 
coordination of CTS. 










10. Monitor program quality to 
ensure high standards of 
teaching/learning. 










1 1 . Market CTS to students and 
parents at both the school and 
school system levels. 











78 I Appendix 1 
(1998) 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

©Alberta Education, Alberta. Canada 



Attachment 1 (continued) 



Objective: To ensure that all necessary human and material resources are in place. 



ACTION 


ASSIGNED 
TO 


START 
DATE 


DATE 
DUE 


DATE 
COMPLETED 


1 . Assess the capital equipment 
necessary for each course 
prior to implementation. 










2. Determine what purchases 
will be necessary and budget 
for these items. 










3. Modify facilities to 

accommodate each course as 
required. 










4. Assess the need for new 
learning resources, including 
print, audio-visual, computer 
software and other 
technologies. 










5. Determine necessary 
purchases and budget for 
these items. 










6. Investigate options available 
to support student-directed 
learning. 










7. Budget appropriate dollars for 
the purchase of all necessary 
materials and supplies. 










8. Develop test banks for all 
course areas of CTS taught by 
more than one person. 










9. Maintain knowledge of 
emerging technologies to 
ensure related purchases are 
based on informed decisions. 










10. Ensure that planning for new 
facilities incorporates current 
technology and recommended 
delivery methods. 











CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

©Alberta Education, Alberta. Canada 



Appendix 1 / 79 
(1998) 



Attachment 1 (continued) 



Sample Indicators of Successful Implementation 



Indicators of Success 





1 


2 


1 . CTS implementation in the school (and 
school system) is guided by a long-range 
plan. 








2. Administrators, counsellors and teachers 
are knowledgeable about CTS and have 
incorporated CTS philosophy into the 
school program. 








3. Teachers are engaged in collaborative 
planning and support program 
integration. 








4. Teachers are enhancing their skills to 
deliver the CTS program. 








5. The school program offers students a 
choice of CTS strands and supports a 
wide range of delivery strategies. 








6. Facilities are organized for effective 
learning and instruction. 








7. Equipment and resources are available 
to support delivery of CTS modules. 








8. Technology is an integral part of the 
CTS program and is effectively used by 
teachers and students. 








9. Students are responsible learners and 
have opportunities for choice in CTS 
learning activities. 








10. Students demonstrate problem-solving 
and decision-making skills in their CTS 
learning activities. 








11. Student learning activities are 

appropriate and demonstrate a high 
standard of achievement. 








12. The community is involved as a 

meaningful partner in the CTS program. 









Rating Scale: 

No evidence of planning or actions taken at this time. 

1 Appropriate planning is underway and first steps have been taken. 

2 Effective strategies and practices are in place. 



80 I Appendix 1 
(1998) 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

©Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada 



Attachment 2 



Sample School/Community Profile 



A. Student Profile 



1. When our students leave school: 

% enter a university 

% enter a technical institute 

% enter a college 

% enter an apprenticeship program 



% enter a workplace 

% retail industry 

% tourism industry 

% agriculture 

% other: 

% other: 



2. While students attend our school: 

% have firm career plans 

% are planning to go on to post-secondary, but have not decided which area 

% are undecided about career plans 

% attend school full-time 

% work part-time and attend school 

% work full-time and attend school 

% actively participate in extracurricular school activities 

% actively participate in club activities 

% other: 

% other: 

% other: 



3. List competencies that students can gain outside of school. 

Computer Literacy: 

Technical Skills: 

Other: 



4. % of the school population assesses courses in CTS 

% of the school population assesses courses in other optional areas 

% of the school population assesses courses in Work Experience 



5. Among students enrolling in CTS courses, credit enrollments in CTS strands are as follows: 



Agriculture 

Career Transitions 

Communication Technology 

Community Health 

Construction Technologies 

Cosmetology Studies 
. Design Studies 
. Electro-Technologies 
. Energy and Mines 
. Enterprise and Innovation 

Fabrication Studies 



Fashion Studies 
Financial Management 
Foods 
Forestry 



Information Processing 

Legal Studies 

Logistics 

Management and Marketing 

Mechanics 

Tourism Studies 

Wildlife 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

©Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada 



Appendix 1 / 81 
(1998) 



Attachment 2 (continued) 



B. School Profile 

1 . Grade level of school: 

□ K-12 □ 7-12 □ 9-12 □ 7-9 □ 10-12 

2. Location of school: 

□ Rural □ Urban 

3. Size of school: 

□ Fewer than 300 students (please specify number 

□ 301-800 students 

□ 801-1200 students 

□ More than 1200 students 

4. School population by grade: 

Grade 7 

Grade 8 

Grade 9 

Grade 10 

Grade 1 1 

Grade 12 



The student population consists of: 

□ Regular students 

□ IOP students 

□ Special education students 

□ Other 



6. What clubs exist in your school? 



7. What major productions/projects are undertaken by your school? 



8. On what occasions do parents or other community members come to the school? 



82 I Appendix 1 CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

(1998) , ©Alberta Education, Alberta. Canada 



Attachment 2 (continued) 



Timetable 

1. Class length and frequency: 

Senior high: minutes per 



□ Semestered □ Nonsemestered 



Junior high: 

• core courses: minutes per 

• optional courses: minutes per _ 



2. How are students enrolled in CTS courses? 
□ School placement □ Student choice 

3. Which CTS strands do you offer? 

Agriculture Fashion Studies 

Career Transitions Financial Management 

Communication Technology Foods 

Community Health Forestry 

Construction Technologies Information Processing 

Cosmetology Studies Legal Studies 

Design Studies Logistics 

Electro-Technologies Management and Marketing 

Energy and Mines Mechanics 

Enterprise and Innovation Tourism Studies 

Fabrication Studies Wildlife 



4. How many different CTS courses does your school offer? 

Facilities/Equipment 

What facilities/equipment does your school have? 

a) Multipurpose labs: 



b) Special purpose labs:. 



c) General equipment:. 



d) Strand-specific equipment: 



e) Other:. 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers Appendix 1 / 83 

©Alberta Education. Alberta, Canada (1998) 



Attachment 2 (continued) 



Human Resources 

What CTS-related expertise does your staff have? 
a) Formal training: 



b) Hobbies/interests: 



c) Past experience: 



C. Community Profile 

Gather information from local government offices regarding future economic trends and potential 
employment opportunities. Determine which post-secondary programs are available in your area and 
gather enrollment statistics. A sample community survey is provided in Attachment 3. 

1. Does the school now have any community partnerships; e.g., Work Experience, RAP and/or other 
off -campus programs? 

□ No 

□ Yes. If so, please list them: 



2. How extensive are opportunities for community partnerships? 

□ Limited 

□ Some 

□ Extensive 

3. Are community resources and/or expertise incorporated into the school program? 

□ No 

□ Yes. If so, list them: 



84 1 Appendix 1 CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

(1998) , ©Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada 



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y(J / Appendix 1 CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

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Attachment 5 
Blackline Masters — CTS Promotional Materials 



CTS Backgrounder 

CTS Strand Brochure Series 
Agriculture 
Career Transitions 
Communication Technology 
Community Health 
Construction Technologies 
Cosmetology Studies 
Design Studies 
Electro-Technologies 
Energy and Mines 
Enterprise and Innovation 
Fabrication Studies 
Fashion Studies 
Financial Management 
Foods 
Forestry 

Information Processing 
Legal Studies 
Logistics 

Management and Marketing 
Mechanics 
Tourism Studies 
Wildlife 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers Appendix 1 / o" 

©Alberta Learning. Alberta. Canada (Revised 1999) 



88 1 Appendix 1 CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

( 1 998) ©Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada 



Attachment 4 



Sample Student Interest Survey 



You can help your school decide which CTS strands to offer by indicating your preferences in this chart 
and returning it to your teacher or principal. Your responses will enable your school to determine which 
strands are of most interest to the students, parents and community. 



CTS Strand 


Examples of Related Occupations * 


Very 
Interested 


Somewhat 
Interested 


Not 
Interested 


Agriculture 


Agriculturalist, Fieldman, Floral Designer, Greenhouse 
Operator, Writer, Scientist, Farmer, Auctioneer, Cattle Buyer, 
Landscaper, Horse Trainer, Veterinarian 








Career Transitions 


Supports other strands and supports off-campus learning 
programs and experiences 








Communication 
Technology 


Writer, Photographer, Radio/Television Personality, Sales 
Person, Printer, Desktop Publisher, Journalist, Animator 








Community 
Health 


Social Worker, Nurse, Dental Assistant, Doctor, Day Care 
Operator, Physiotherapist, Nursing Home Administrator, Lab 
Technician 








Construction 
Technologies 


Engineer, Carpenter, Contractor, Architect, Building 
Inspector, Draftsman, Instructor, Home Handyman, 
Electrician, Roofer, Plumber, Estimator, Installer, Millwright 








Cosmetology 
Studies 


Salon Owner, Hairstylist, Theatrical Makeup Artist, 
Esthetician, Sales Consultant 








Design Studies 


Architect, Designer, CADD, CAM, Photographer, Engineer, 
Estimator, Product Designer 








Electro- 
Technologies 


Engineer, Instructor, Electrician, Computer User, Robotics 
Engineer, Designer 








Energy and Mines 


Environmentalist, Engineer, Chemist, Mechanic, Technician, 
Safety Supervisor, Geologist, Service Station Leasee 








Enterprise and 
Innovation 


Entrepreneur, Fund Raiser, Event Planner, Sales Consultant, 
Manager, Business Owner, Marketer 








Fabrication 
Studies 


Millwright, Welder, Iron Worker, Engineer, Technologist, 
Designer 








Fashion Studies 


Display, Theatre or Fashion Designer, Manufacturing 
Manager, Retail/Wholesale Buyer, Dressmaker, Tailor 








Financial 
Management 


Manager, Business Owner, Bookkeeper, Credit/Loans 
Manager, Accountant 








Foods 


Chef, Dietitian/Nutritionist, Banqueting/Catering Supervisor, 
Purchasing Manager, Baker, Butcher/Meat Cutter 








Forestry 


Forest Ranger, Environmental Engineer, Biologist, Forest 
Technologist, Land Surveyor, Logging/Silviculture Worker, 
Outdoor Guide 








Information 
Processing 


Word Processor, Administrative Support, Computer 
Programmer, Office Manager, Systems Analyst 








Legal Studies 


Lawyer, Law Enforcement Officer, Legal Assistant 








Logistics 


Air Traffic Controller, Bus Driver, Letter Carrier, Messenger, 
Railway Worker, Transportation Worker 








Management and 
Marketing 


Business Owner, Advertising Consultant, Market Research 
Analyst. CEO 








Mechanics 


Engineer, Motor/Auto Body Mechanic, Aircraft Mechanic, 
Heavy Industrial Equipment Operator/Mechanic 








Tourism Studies 


Travel Consultant, Historical Interpreter, Tour Guide, Hotel 

Manager 








Wildlife 


Fish & Wildlife Officer, Park Ranger, Biologist, Environment 
Engineer, Veterinarian, Trapper/Hunter, Outdoor Guide 









• While some occupations would be entry level after high school, others may require post-secondary education and/or 
considerable work experience. 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

©Alberta Education, Alberta. Canada 



Appendix 1 / 8 7 
(1998) 



OO I Appendix 1 CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

*• ' ©Alberta Education. Alberta. Canada 



Attachment 3 



Sample Community Survey 

Name: Telephone: 

Address: 

Business: 



Check off one or more of the following to indicate how willing you would be to volunteer to help 

students from learn about your business/organization. 

name of school 

I will welcome students supervised by a teacher to visit my business/organization for a tour 

conducted by a responsible member of the business/organization. 

Note: Arrangements would be made in advance with the classroom teacher. 

I am willing to speak directly to a class on the production or process involved in my business, or 

other area of the industry with which I am familiar. Options include videos, slides, brochures, or 

other materials in presentations. 

Note: Arrangements would be made in advance with the classroom teacher. 

I am willing to provide information to a teacher by telephone or in person regarding the 

business/industry that I am involved with. 

Our company/organization would be willing to consider forming a partnership with the school or 

with a program area of the school; e.g., CTS, Humanities, Mathematics, Science, Fine Arts, 
Physical Education. 

Our company/organization would be willing to: 

provide resources 

sponsor students 

other: 

I do not want to be involved. 



1. Please identify below the areas of your expertise that you would be willing to share with students. 



2. Please provide a brief description of your business/organization along with number of employees. 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers Appendix 1 / 85 

©Alberta Education, Alberta. Canada ( 1 998) 





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CAREER & 

TECHNOLOGY 

STUDIES 

Manual for Administrators, 
Counsellors and Teachers 



Appendix 2: 

Defining CTS Learning 

Environments — Strand and 
Course Parameters 



June 1998 



The information and recommendations provided in this appendix do 
not in any way replace the collaboration and professional advice 
required for establishing effective learning environments at school and 
school system levels. 



92 I Appendix 2 
(1998) 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

©Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

PURPOSE 95 

STRAND AND COURSE PARAMETERS 95 

Facilities and Equipment 96 

Safety Considerations 96 

Instructional Qualifications 96 

Credentialling Opportunities 97 

DEVELOPING FACILHTES TO SUPPORT CTS 97 

Planning Principles 97 

Guidelines for New Construction and Modernization 98 

CTS IN STANDARD CLASSROOM SETTINGS 98 

EXPANDING STUDENT ACCESS TO CTS 99 

Use of Facilities and Equipment 99 

Use of Distance Education Technology 99 

ATTACHMENTS 

Attachment 1: Strand and Course Parameters 101 

Attachment 2: Developing a Facility Improvement Plan 219 

Attachment 3: Sample Checklist for Facility Planning 221 

Attachment 4: CTS without Labs 223 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers Appendix 21 9 J 

©Alberta Education. Alberta. Canada ( 1 998) 



94 1 Appendix 2 CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

(1998) ' ©Alberta Education, Alberta. Canada 



PURPOSE 



This appendix is designed to assist school and school system 
administrators and teachers to plan for the delivery of CTS in their 
schools and communities. It provides information regarding suitable 
learning environments for each CTS strand and course, and guidelines 
for developing CTS facilities. Schools and school systems may use 
this information to: 

• decide which strands and courses to make available to students 

• organize for learning by: 

selecting appropriate on-campus and off -campus learning sites 
scheduling facilities and equipment to maximize student 
access to courses 
- identifying program components or entire courses that may be 
effectively delivered through distance education technologies 

• plan for change through: 

upgrades to present facilities and equipment 
the design of new facilities 
the purchase of new equipment. 



Refer to Attachment 1 : 
Strand and Course 
Parameters. 



STRAND AND COURSE PARAMETERS" 

A set of strand and course parameters are defined for each of the 
following CTS strands: 



Agriculture 

Communication Technology 
Community Health 
Construction Technologies 
Cosmetology Studies 
Design Studies 
Electro-Technologies 
Energy and Mines 
Fabrication Studies 



Fashion Studies 

Foods 

Forestry 

Information Processing 

Logistics 

Management and Marketing 

Mechanics 

Wildlife 



Each set of parameters describes key features of the learning 
environment that need to be in place to support effective learning. 
The parameters provide: 

• general information regarding facilities and equipment, safety 
considerations, instructional qualifications and credentialling 
opportunities for each strand 

• specific requirements and recommendations regarding facilities, 
equipment, instructional qualifications and credentialling for each 
course. 



* Includes only those CTS strands that require specialized facilities, equipment and/or instructional qualifications. 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 
©Alberta Education. Alberta, Canada 



Appendix 2 / 95 
(1998) 



The strand and course parameters apply to courses delivered in the 
school and through off-campus learning. In general, the parameters 
identify more requirements for course delivery at the intermediate- 
and advanced-level than at the introductory-level. 



FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT 

Specialized facilities and equipment are identified for courses when 
their use is recommended for: 

• delivering one or more of the learner outcomes 

• maintaining appropriate levels of safety 

• providing credentialling opportunities or articulation with 
post-secondary training programs. 

In some instances particular facilities and equipment are 
recommended as necessary to meet the outcomes of the course , while 
in other instances they are identified as optional in providing student 
access to supportive learning environments . Where appropriate, 
facility and equipment requirements for offering commercial programs 
are also identified, as in the Foods strand. 



Refer to Appendix 3: 
Addressing Health and Safety 
inCTS. 



SAFETY CONSIDERATIONS 

General guidelines for promoting a safe learning and teaching 
environment are also provided through the strand and course 
parameters. Safety guidelines focus attention on safety awareness and 
the demonstration of safe practices, and in some instances identify 
specific elements that need to be in place to support safe learning. 

Recommendations regarding safety and risk management are 
general in nature, and do not in any way replace the expert advice 
required in specific circumstances. 



INSTRUCTIONAL QUALIFICATIONS 

Instructional qualifications over and above a professional teaching 
certificate are identified for courses that require special technical 
expertise or special safety precautions. Instructional qualifications 
required may include: 

• a specific credential granted by business, industry, government or 
a community organization; e.g., journeyman certificate, Alberta 
Best Trainer, First Aid certificate 

• evidence of successful completion of a specialized training 
program or equivalent; e.g., a workshop/course from a technical 
institute/college/university, a session at the CTS Leadership 
Seminar. 



96 1 Appendix 2 
(1998) 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

©Alberta Education. Alberta, Canada 



Refer to Appendix 5: 
Planning Ahead — CTS 
Transitions into Post- 
Secondary and the 
Workplace. 



In some instances the instructional qualifications are a requirement for 
course delivery, such as when learning involves high risk to student 
safety. In other instances they are recommended for specific 
circumstances, such as when providing customer services or in 
qualifying students to obtain a credential. 

CREDENTIALLING OPPORTUNITIES 

The course parameters also identify courses that offer students the 
opportunity to earn partial or complete credentials recognized in the 
workplace or by post-secondary institutions. Credentials provide 
written evidence by agencies external to the school of a student's 
qualifications with respect to particular competencies. 

Credentialling opportunities are not limited to those identified through 
the course parameters, and depend on resources available in local and 
neighbouring communities. Schools may choose to use this 
information as a basis for further research and for planning regarding 
credentials they wish to offer students. 



DEVELOPING FACILITIES TO SUPPORT CTS 

Developing CTS facilities is a collaborative process involving 
teachers, administrators, students and the community. Decisions 
regarding facilities and equipment are made on the basis of student 
need, knowledge of the curriculum and further education/workplace 
opportunities. 

Those involved in planning for the construction of new facilities or 
renovations to existing facilities should contact the School Facilities 
Branch for guidelines on developing facilities to support CTS. 

PLANNING PRINCIPLES 



Refer to Attachment 2: 
Developing a Facility 
Improvement Plan. 



When planning CTS facilities at the school and school system level, 
consideration should be given to: 

• the safety of students and staff and care of the environment 

• facilities and space that support the achievement of desired learner 
outcomes 

• facilities that are flexible and adaptable to accommodate change 

• facilities that accommodate a variety of learning styles and 
teaching methodologies 

• extending school programs and courses through the use of 
community partnerships and off-campus learning 

• demographic trends regarding long-term use of facilities. 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 
©Alberta Education. Alberta, Canada 



Appendix 2/97 
(1998) 



Refer to Attachment 3: 
Sample Checklist for Facility 
Planning. 



GUIDELINES FOR NEW CONSTRUCTION AND 
MODERNIZATION 

As teaching and learning in CTS is student centered and involves a 
broad base of resource support, facilities should be adapted to meet a 
range of student and community needs. Instructional spaces should 
become larger and more flexible. Larger spaces can be subdivided 
into work stations, research centres, computer centres and seminar 
rooms, thus allowing for individual and group work across a range of 
instructional areas in CTS. As schools expand their delivery of CTS, 
students may also spend more time outside the physical boundaries of 
the school, accessing resources found in the community. 

The following processes are recommended when planning for new 
construction or modernization projects at the school level: 

• identify specific educational outcomes to be achieved, ensuring 
alignment with the school/school system mission, needs of 
students and local resources 

• determine which CTS strands and courses are to be offered by or 
in the school 

• inventory existing space within the school and community that 
can be used, as it exists, to achieve educational outcomes and 
deliver CTS strands and courses 

• identify new space that may be required to achieve educational 
outcomes and deliver CTS strands and courses 

• consider the proximity of instructional spaces to one another and 
how they are likely to be used by teachers and students 

• determine millwork, furniture, equipment and services required to 
deliver the learner outcomes 

• identify ambient features important to the learning environment. 



CTS IN STANDARD CLASSROOM SETTINGS 



Refer to Attachment 4: CTS 
without Labs. 



While many CTS courses cannot be delivered effectively unless the 
student has access to hands-on learning, either in a lab or worksite 
setting, others are more theory based and can be readily delivered in 
standard classroom settings. CTS courses suitable for delivery in a 
standard classroom assume access to appropriate learning and 
teaching resources, and may also require that students: 

• gain practical experiences through participation in field trips 

• use computer simulations and other multimedia software. 



98 I Appendix 2 
(1998) 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

©Alberta Education, Alberta. Canada 



EXPANDING STUDENT ACCESS TO CTS 



Student access to the CTS program can be expanded considerably 
through the efficient use of facilities and equipment and taking 
advantage of alternative delivery strategies, on- and off -campus. The 
following questions are provided to provoke thought about how 
course delivery might be expanded. 



USE OF FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT 

What courses are presently being offered? 

When making the transition into CTS, it may be possible that a 
particular facility could support the delivery of courses from strands 
other than those currently being considered. 

Which additional courses could be offered: 

• in this facility? 

• in an adjacent facility? 

Is there adequate technical support? 

Teachers who are extensively involved in setting up, maintaining and 
repairing the technology are often unable to invest sufficient time in 
organizing for learning, working directly with students and assessing 
their competencies. 

Are there alternative facilities and equipment available: 

• in the community, from business, industry, central office, and the 
like? 

• through neighboring schools and school systems, post-secondary 
institutions, and other partners? 



USE OF DISTANCE EDUCATION TECHNOLOGY 

The use of information, communication and multimedia technologies 
can be another effective means of expanding access to a range of 
relevant CTS courses for all students. 

Could distance education technologies be used to: 



• 



help students learn difficult concepts? 

deliver instruction in new areas where there may be a lack of 

teacher expertise? 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers Appendix 2/99 

©Alberta Education. Alberta. Canada ( 1 998) 



While distance education can be a valuable alternative for expanding 
student access to some CTS courses, care is needed in selecting 
courses to be delivered by these technologies. Many CTS courses 
focus on the development of workplace competencies and require 
students to link theory with practice in real-life contexts. These 
courses cannot be effectively delivered unless the student has access 
to hands-on learning, either in a lab or worksite setting, and 
appropriate levels of technical expertise. 



100 I Appendix 2 CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

(1998) ' ©Alberta Education. Alberta. Canada 



Attachment 1 
Strand and Course Parameters - 

Agriculture 103 

Communication Technology 109 

Community Health 115 

Construction Technologies 119 

Cosmetology Studies 129 

Design Studies 141 

Electro-Technologies 145 

Energy and Mines 159 

Fabrication Studies 163 

Fashion Studies 173 

Foods 175 

Forestry 183 

Information Processing 189 

Logistics 193 

Management and Marketing 195 

Mechanics 199 

Wildlife 215 



* Includes only those CTS strands that require specialized facilities, equipment and/or instructional 
qualifications. 

CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers Appendix 2 / 101 

©Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada ( 1 998) 



102 I Appendix 2 CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

(1998) i ©Alberta Education. Alberta. Canada 



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INSTRUCTIONAL FACILITIES 
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INSTRUCTIONAL FACILITIES 
CREDENTIALLING OPPORTUNITIES 

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Laser printer and plotter 

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THEME 

INSTRUCTIONAL QUALIFICATIONS 

INSTRUCTIONAL FACILITIES 

CREDENTIALLING OPPORTUNITIES 


EQUIPMENT 

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Shaker, paint 
Shear, sguaring 
SDrav booth 


gun 
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Attachment 2 



Developing a Facility Improvement Plan 



Listed below are eight major steps with supporting actions that might be taken in developing a facility 
improvement plan for CTS. Although listed in sequential order, the steps and actions can be modified to 
accommodate local needs. 



Step 1: Identify Intended Outcome 

□ specify desired strands to be offered 

□ formalize the scope of project 

□ review external factors that need to be 
considered; e.g., political, economic 

Step 2: Organize an Advisory Team 

□ identify potential members of the team 

□ consider all stakeholders 

□ assess qualities of potential members 

□ determine staff involvement and level of 
authority 

□ establish communication plan 

Step 3: Determine Program Needs 

□ conduct needs assessment 

□ confirm strands and courses to be 
offered 

□ develop plans for changes to facilities 
and equipment 

□ gain preliminary informal support 

Step 4: Establish Project Timelines 

□ identify key dates/deadlines for the 
project 

□ establish timeline for planning and 
implementation efforts 

confirm proposed agenda with school 
personnel 

Step 5: Complete Planning Phase 

□ review existing equipment/materials 

□ finalize new equipment/material needs 



Step 5: Complete Planning Phase 

(continued) 

□ propose budget details 

□ explore sources of funding 

□ complete renovation plans 

□ confirm plans with school and school 
system administration 

□ prepare formal presentations 

Step 6: Present Plans to Authorities 

□ develop support among key 
stakeholders; e.g., advisory committee, 
principal 

□ present plan to school and school 
system administration 

□ modify plans, schedules, budget as 
required 

□ gain formal approval 

□ submit application for funding 

Step 7: Implement the Plan 

□ improve program and facility as planned 

□ monitor/evaluate implementation efforts 

□ adjust plans and make changes as 
required 

Step 8: Follow-up and Review 

□ review improvements with school 
authorities 

□ compare results to original plans 

□ formalize safety plans and maintenance 
program 

□ implement strategic plans to continue 
development 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

©Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada 



Appendix 2 1 219 
(1998) 



220 I Appendix 2 • CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

( 1 998} ©Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada 



Attachment 3 
Sample Checklist for Facility Planning 



The following checklist for facility planning can be modified as required to plan facilities that enhance 
teaching, learning and safety in CTS. 

Determining Need Yes No 

• Has a need assessment been completed? 

• Has achieving the learner outcomes been planned? 

• Can these outcomes be met within the existing school and resources? 

• Are there community resources that meet these needs? 

• Will a facility modernization within the school meet the needs? 

• Is new space required? 



Developing the Concept Yes No 

• Has there been input from the community, students, staff, business, industry, 
organizations, local government? 

• Have other districts and schools been contacted? 

• Has there been discussion with local teachers, administrators and board 

members? 

• Has the project been discussed with outside consultants? 

• Are labs/work stations similar to those found in the occupations represented? 

• Is there a need for direct outside access for customer service and delivery of 

materials? 

• Has consideration been given to the relationship of spaces in and outside the 

facility? 

• Is there a logical arrangement for instruction and lab management with 

adequate areas for both group and individualized instruction? 

• Is there space for an instructor work centre? 

• Is an instructional resource centre available/appropriate? 

• Are there sufficient number of work stations? 

• Have opportunities for curriculum integration been discussed? 

• Has consideration been given for accessibility for all students including those 

with physical disabilities? 

• Is it a safe environment overall? 



Furnishings and Equipment Yes No 

• Will modular furniture and cabinets be used? 

• Will modular units be mobile where possible? 

• Are the work surfaces and flooring appropriate for projected activities? 

• Are assembly, fabrication, preparation areas adequate/appropriate? 

• Are there sufficient white boards, bulletin boards, display boards and 

projection screens? — 

• Is there space to display three-dimensional work? — 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers Appendix 2 / 221 

©Alberta Education. Alberta, Canada ( 1 998) 



Attachment 3 (continued) 

Furnishings and Equipment (continued) Yes No 

• Is there sufficient storage space for equipment, instructional materials and 

supplies? 

• Is there locker space for all students? 

• Are there adequate utility connections for power, water, gas, etc? 

• Have make, model, accessories, space needs and power requirements of the 

equipment been identified? 

• Are there provisions for exhaust, ventilation, acoustics and illumination? 

• Are provisions made for use of multimedia; i.e., sound, light control? 

• Has a sketch been prepared to show the location of furnishings and 

equipment within the work centres (independent study or group work areas)? 

• Are equipment and supplies adequate for the tasks identified for the program? 

• Is there conformity to local, provincial and federal health and safety 

regulations? 

• Is there sufficient space between work stations and equipment for a safe 

traffic flow pattern? 

• Is it a safe environment overall? 



Ambient Features Yes No 

• Does the colour scheme enhance the mental and physical well-being of the 

students and staff? 

• Is there sufficient natural and full spectrum lighting? 

• Are walls, ceiling and floor durable, yet appealing? 

• Are there areas for small group work? 

• Are there quiet spaces for students to engage in reflective thinking? 

• Is there a visible and "customer" friendly location for the community to 

contact the school? — 



222 I Appendix 2 CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

(1998) ©Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada 



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224 /Appendix 2 ' CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

( 1 998) ® Alberta Education. Alberta. Canada Mj, 




CAREER & 

TECHNOLOGY 

STUDIES 

Manual for Administrators, 
Counsellors and Teachers 



Appendix 3: 

ADDRESSING HEALTH 
AND SAFETY IN CTS 



June 1998 



The information and recommendations provided in this appendix are 
general in nature and do not in any way replace the expert advice 
required for specific circumstances. 



226 I Appendix 3 
(1998) 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

©Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



PURPOSE 229 

HEALTH AND SAFETY IN THE CTS CURRICULUM 230 

Health and Safety as a Basic Competency 230 

Health and Safety as Learner Outcomes 231 

Safety as a Course Parameter 231 

HEALTH AND SAFETY IN THE CTS LEARNING ENVIRONMENT 232 

Pre-contact: Avoiding Accidents/Ensuring Health 232 

Risk Management 232 

Emergency Preparedness 236 

Contact: Emergency Response to an Accident 238 

Response to Injury 238 

Response to Hazardous Materials Spills 239 

Response to Fire 239 

Response to Natural Gas or Propane Leak 239 

Post-contact: Accident Investigation and Reporting 239 

SOURCES OF SUPPORT: REGULATORY, MONITORING, CONSULTING 240 

Legislation and Regulations 240 

Key Players: Roles and Responsibilities 240 

Due Diligence 242 

ATTACHMENTS 

Attachment 1 : Components of a Health and Safety Program 243 

Attachment 2: Health and Safety Hazard Risks in CTS Strands 245 

Attachment 3: Sample Health and Safety Checklist 247 

Attachment 4: Engineering Controls 255 

Attachment 5: Personal Protective Equipment 257 

Attachment 6: Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System 261 

Attachment 7: Transportation of Dangerous Goods 265 

Attachment 8: Overview of Legislation and Key Players Related to 

Health and Safety in CTS Program 267 

Attachment 9: Due Diligence in the CTS Classroom: Provision of a Safe Work Environment 269 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

©Albert Education, Alberta, Canada 



Appendix 3 I 227 
(1998) 



I 
I 
I 
I 

■ 
I 
■ 
■ 



228 / Appendix 3 
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CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

©Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada 



PURPOSE 



This appendix serves as a reference for identifying key issues and 
legislation related to health and safety in CTS learning environments. It 
is designed to assist teachers and school system administrators to: 

• understand how safety is addressed in the CTS curriculum 

• review present safety practices within CTS learning environments, 
on- and off-campus 

• develop and maintain effective health and safety programs 

• plan for the design and/or upgrading of CTS learning environments 

• plan professional development and inservice activities related to 
health and safety. 

Refer to Attachment 1: The information included in this appendix focuses on the major 

l^dTafe 6 " Pro f ram 631 * components of an effective health and safety program: 

• pre-contact — what is done to prevent or reduce accidents: safety 
program, safe facilities, ensuring safe practices 

• contact — what is done when an accident occurs to reduce injury to 
those affected 

• post-contact — what is done to investigate the accident and determine 
corrective action. 

Safety programs and practices in place within schools support the 
implementation of CTS, as well as other school programs, such as science 
and physical education. As students learn to manage themselves and the 
tools they work with, they develop an attitude toward personal safety and 
the safety of others that transfers to their personal and work life as they 
move into adult roles. Safety awareness and practice are developed 
through formal instruction and by integrating safety into daily learning 
experiences. A successful health and safety program requires the 
cooperation of students and the active understanding and leadership of 
teachers, administrators and school boards. 

As employers, school boards provide their employees and those in their 
care with a place to work and learn that complies with all applicable 
federal, provincial and municipal health and safety and environmental 
regulations. In addition, school boards ensure that their employees are: 

• aware of their responsibilities 

• aware of the hazards associated with their work 

• able to carry out their work safely 

• trained in measures for their own safety. 

Establishing effective health and safety policies and programs requires 
that attention be given to facilities and equipment , instructional planning , 
classroom management and due diligence , and that each be considered 
from personal, professional and economic perspectives. 

CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers Appendix 3 / 229 

©Albert Education. Albcna. Canada ( 1 998) 



Personal 

• Opportunity — development of an individual's confidence in 
understanding how to act in a way to reduce accidents, how to 
respond efficiently and effectively if an accident should occur, and to 
understand rights and responsibilities related to ensuring the safety of 
self and others. 

• Challenge — the adjustment to an individual's physical, psychological 
and social well-being, present and future, required when an accident 
occurs. 

Professional 

• Opportunity — development of a team that is committed to ensuring 
the health and safety of themselves and others. 

• Challenge — the challenge for teachers to manage many variables: 
what students know, the tools they need to learn to use, and their 
interaction with others. 

Economic 

• Opportunity — more productive working and living environments, 
opportunity to reallocate resources from damage control to new 
initiatives that can stimulate greater economic growth. 

• Challenge — the direct costs to the individual and the workplace in 
accident costs as well as indirect, long-term costs to the individual, 
family and society in reduced potential and opportunity. 



HEALTH AND SAFETY IN THE CTS 

CURRICULUM 

The CTS curriculum addresses safety and risk management through the 
identification of specific elements that need to be in place to support safe 
learning, and through learning outcomes that require safety awareness 
and the demonstration of safe practices. 



HEALTH AND SAFETY AS A BASIC COMPETENCY 



Refer to the CTS Guides 
to Standards and 
Implementation , 
Section A: Program 
Rationale and 
Philosophy. 



Students are expected to improve their ability to demonstrate basic 
competencies within each strand and course. Through the task area of 
"managing responsibility" defined in the Basic Competencies Reference 
Guide, students are expected to identify and promote safety practices, for 
themselves and others. Teachers are expected to monitor and assess these 
behaviours in all CTS courses. 



Students' performance and growth in self-management and working with 
others in safe environments can be assessed through observations 
involving the student, teacher, peers and others as they complete the 
requirements for a course. 



230 I Appendix 3 
(1998) 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

©Alberta Education. Alberta, Canada 



Refer to the CTS Guides 
to Standards and 
Implementation. 

Refer to the Career 
Transitions Guide to 
Standards and 
Implementation. 



Refer to the Community 
Health Guide to 
Standards and 
Implementation. 



HEALTH AND SAFETY AS LEARNER OUTCOMES 

Learner outcomes (learner expectations in 1997 documents) related to 
health and safety are integrated throughout the CTS curriculum. 

In addition, the following courses in the Career Transitions strand focus 
specifically on developing students' competency in workplace safety 
procedures: 

• CTR1210: Personal Safety (Management) 

• CTR2210: Workplace Safety (Practices) 

• CTR3210: Safety Management Systems. 

Credentialling opportunities in first aid procedures are provided through 
courses in the Community Health strand: 

• CMH2120: First Aid/CPR 

• CMH2 130: Sports First Aid 1 

• CMH3120: First Aid/CPR for Children. 



Refer to Appendix 2: 
Defining CTS Learning 
En v ironments — S trand 
and Course Parameters. 



SAFETY AS A COURSE PARAMETER 

Course parameters describe the elements that need to be in place to 
support effective learning in a course, including facilities and equipment 
and instructional qualifications. 

In some courses, the competencies students are developing may involve a 
higher risk factor, possibly because of the type of equipment or the kind 
of performance; e.g., doing customer work. In this event, those involved 
in delivering the program may require additional training in safety 
procedures. 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 
©Albert Education, Alberta, Canada 



Appendix 3 / 231 
(1998) 



Risk Management 



HEALTH AND SAFETY IN THE CTS LEARNING 

ENVIRONMENT 

PRE-CONTACT: AVOIDING ACCIDENTS/ENSURING HEALTH 

Risk management involves the recognition, evaluation and control of 
health and safety hazards. Under provincial legislation, administration 
and teachers are required to take steps to recognize hazards and reduce 
them to a minimum. 



Hazard Recognition 

A health and safety hazard can be any condition or practice that has the 
potential to cause an illness, personal injury or damage to property. 
Common types of health and safety hazards found in CTS classrooms are 
illustrated in the following chart. 



Type of Hazard 



Generally caused by: 



Biological: 

• bacteria 

• moulds 

• viruses 

• parasites 



poor sanitation and housekeeping practices; 
contact with body fluids; inadequately 
maintained air conditioning and heating systems 



Chemical: 

• flammable 

• toxic 

• reactive 

• corrosive 



a chemical in the form of a solid, liquid, vapour, 
mist or fume that can cause harm to a body organ 
through ingestion, absorption, inhalation or 
injection 



Ergonomic: 

• excessive force 

• excessive 
repetition 

• improper posture 

• incorrect lighting 



muscle strains/sprains; inadequate lighting; poor 
work station design 



Physical: 

• cuts/bruises 

• fractures 

• burns/frost bite 

• electric shock 

• hearing loss 



excessive energy related to falling/flying objects 
and extreme pressure, temperatures, electrical 
current, radiation, noise 



Other 



work-related stress and personal issues 



232 I Appendix 3 
(1998) 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

©Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada 



The following chart identifies the CTS strands that can involve higher 
risk. 



Refer to Attachment 2: 
Health and Safety 
Hazard Risk in CTS 
Strands. 



CTS Strand 


'So 
PQ 


73 
5 

1 


i 

o 
e 
o 
ex 

u 

H 


"3 

a. 


u 

o 


Agriculture 


X 


X 


X 


X 




* Career Transitions 












Communication Technology 




X 


X 






Community Health 


X 








X 


Construction Technologies 




X 


X 


X 




Cosmetology Studies 




X 


X 






• Design Studies 






X 






Electro-Technologies 




X 


X 


X 




Energy and Mines 


X 


X 


X 


X 




* Enterprise and Innovation 












Fabrication Studies 




X 


X 


X 




Fashion Studies 






X 


X 




Foods 




X 


X 


X 




Forestry 


X 


X 


X 


X 




Information Processing 






X 




X 


Logistics 






X 


X 




Management and Marketing 








X 




Mechanics 




X 


X 


X 




• Tourism Studies 












• Wildlife 













* Varies according to type of program and off-campus experience. 



Refer to Attachment 3: 
Sample Health and 
Safety Checklist. 



Hazards can be identified through: 

• formal and informal lab inspections 

• analysis of accidents or near-misses 

• task analysis 

• product labels and information sheets 

• equipment and tool manufacturers' recommendations 

• concern expressed by students when involved in a specific task. 

As a matter of policy, every student should be taught to recognize and 
report hazards associated with his or her work and take the necessary 
precautions to prevent an accident from occurring. 

One of the most effective ways of identifying unsafe conditions is 
through regular classroom/lab inspections. These inspections help to 
identify: 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

©Albert Education, Alberta, Canada 



Appendix 3 / 233 
(1998) 



• housekeeping concerns 

• equipment problems 

• issues related to lighting, heating and ventilation 

• changes in procedures that may have a negative impact on health and 
safety 

• corrections that should have already been made. 

Accidents are by their very nature disruptive and may or may not cause 
injury or damage to property. Students may not report incidents where no 
injury or damage to property occurs. However, these near-misses are 
potential future accidents and therefore should be monitored and 
corrected on an ongoing basis. 

The analysis of lab procedures is a process that examines the interaction 
between the students, the environment in which they work, and the 
equipment and materials they use. The results of this assessment enable 
teachers to: 

• determine the level of knowledge and skills that a student requires to 
complete a given task, process or operation safely 

• identify substandard acts and conditions and determine effective 
control measures to: 

- modify student behaviour 

- modify lab/shop conditions or procedures. 

Hazard Evaluation 

Hazard evaluation is the process used to prioritize an identified hazard to 
ensure that appropriate action will be taken. Hazards deemed most 
dangerous should be dealt with first. Consideration should be given to: 

• the short- and long-term effects on teachers and students 

• ways to remove the hazard 

• methods to protect persons from harm 

• reducing or eliminating a person's exposure time. 

Hazard Control 

Besides being able to recognize and evaluate hazards, risks can be further 
minimized through hazard control. Hazard control can be accomplished 
in the classroom through effective: 

• administrative controls — controls that deal primarily with policies 
and regulations, classroom supervision and instruction. In a 
well-managed classroom, the teacher's efforts are directed toward: 

- providing adequate instruction on lab routines, job procedures 
and equipment operation 

- identifying and establishing sanitary practices 

- planning safe event sequences 

- scheduling work to avoid overcrowding 

- identifying and securing materials that are less toxic and harmful 
to the student and environment 



234 I Appendix 3 CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

( 1 998) ©Alberta Education, Alberta. Canada 



Refer to Attachment 4: 
Engineering Controls. 



Refer to Attachment 5: 
Personal Protective 
Equipment. 



- locating and ordering equipment that meets or exceeds accepted 
standards of safety 

engineering controls — controls that focus on systems that physically 
remove hazardous materials or provide protection from a known 
hazard. These controls address practices that may involve the use of 
ventilation systems, dust and fume extraction equipment and machine 
guards 

personal protective equipment — clothing and equipment worn to 
minimize the risk of illness or injury through protection of the 
eye/face, hearing, head/hair, foot, hand and/or respiratory system. 
Points to consider when selecting and using personal protective 
equipment include: 

- matching the type and design features of the equipment with the 
type and extent of the hazard 

- identifying equipment that does not interfere with the student's 
performance 

- using equipment that is approved and easily maintained. 



Personal protective equipment should not take the place of control 
techniques, such as substituting a less hazardous product for a more 
hazardous one, exhausting dangerous fumes, extracting dust particles 
and guarding equipment. 



Refer to Attachment 6: 
Workplace Hazardous 
Materials Information 
System. 



Strategies for hazard control in the school also need to address chemical 
management. The Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System 
(WHMIS) is a system to ensure that workers are provided with complete 
and accurate information regarding hazardous products they use, and to 
ensure that the information is used to provide safe working conditions. 
As all workers in the school environment are responsible for WHMIS 
equirements, related policy and information are pertinent to: 

school administrators 
teachers, especially in science, CTS and art 
aides and assistants in those subject areas 
cleaning and facility operations staff 
secretarial and clerical staff. 



Although students are not considered workers in the school environment, 
it is important they become knowledgeable and follow WHMIS 
provisions. 



Refer to Attachment 7: 
Transportation of 
Dangerous Goods. 



Of further significance when planning for hazard control is the 
Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act, legislated to promote public 
safety when dangerous goods are handled, offered for transport, or 
transported in Canada. All persons who handle, offer for transport or 
transport dangerous goods must meet the TDG Regulation requirements. 



The dangerous goods most likely to be transported by school system 
vehicles and personnel include chemical materials for instructional 
purposes, cleaners and other janitorial products, solvents and petroleum 
products, paints, and assorted chemical wastes. The following 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

©Albert Education, Alberta, Canada 



Appendix 3 / 235 
(1998) 



school-based personnel should be knowledgeable regarding TDG 
Regulations: 

• school administrators 

• teachers responsible for technical areas 

• lab technicians 

• facility operators. 

Emergency The impact of an accident can be greatly reduced through effective 

Preparedness planning. In addition, planning also ensures that the resources required to 

deal with an unexpected situation are available. 

Students and teachers in CTS programs must be prepared to respond to an 
emergency. An effective emergency response plan should include: 

a clearly defined and understood set of procedures 

prominently posted local emergency telephone numbers 

identification and location of external assistance procedures 

an evacuation plan in the event of a fire, chemical spill or gas leak 

easily accessed first-aid supplies 

knowledge and practice in applying first-aid techniques. 

First-Aid Response Plan 

In accordance with School Board Policy, each school should develop a 
First-Aid Response Plan appropriate to the acute illnesses or injuries that 
may occur on school property. This plan should enable CTS teachers to: 

• identify those acute injuries or illnesses that may occur in specific 
areas of responsibility. 

This information will be based on the type of work being done in the area, 
and on types and frequencies of previous injuries or illnesses. 

• understand their roles and responsibilities for addressing safety 
issues. 

Everyone in the school needs to know his or her role in putting the 
First-Aid Response Plan into practice. 

• identify training opportunities appropriate to the acute injuries or 
illnesses that may occur. At minimum, this training should result in 
the instructor having readily available access to competent first-aid 
help. 

The training needed varies with the needs of the particular CTS area. 
Schools located far from other emergency services need to have 
people with the extra skills necessary to stabilize an injured person 
for travel to an acute care hospital. 

• provide their areas with first-aid response equipment appropriate to 
the acute injuries or illnesses that may occur, and the proximity to 
other emergency services. As a minimum, a basic first-aid kit, 
containing the equipment specified by the First-Aid Training and 
Standards Agency, would be required. 

First-aid response equipment varies considerably according to the 
needs of a particular CTS function. A minimum expectation would be 
that all work sites have some type of basic first-aid kit. In areas 
remote from services, the expectation would be on the school to 



236 / Appendix 3 
(1998) 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

©Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada 



provide the equipment needed to respond to first-aid emergencies. 

• become familiar with the location and content of the school's 
First-Aid Response Plan, especially with regard to the specific 
procedures on how to respond to those acute illnesses or injuries that 
may occur. 

First-aid response procedures detail the action steps required to deal 
with the immediate emergency. Schools can contact their local 
Health Authority for assistance. 

• keep written records of acute injuries or illnesses that occur in their 
areas of responsibility. At minimum, the records should include 
name of person, name and qualifications of person giving first aid, 
time of injury, description of injury, location and description of 
injury cause, and actions taken to prevent recurrence. Records 
should be kept for three years. 

Records are necessary to provide data for program review. 

• review their CTS first-aid response capabilities every three years, or 
whenever there are significant changes in the operating conditions in 
the CTS work area. 

First-aid response capabilities in CTS need to be reviewed to ensure 
their effectiveness and to identify opportunities for improvement. The 
intent here would be to allow some flexibility in how the CTS 
instructor accomplishes this task, but at the same time ensure that 
some type of review is carried out. 

Fire Prevention and Suppression 

There is a higher risk of a fire starting in a CTS facility than in other 
program areas because of the nature of many CTS activities. Fuels such 
as paper, plastic, wood, paint, oily rags, cleaning solvents and oxidizing 
agents that support combustion are often found in CTS labs. Conditions 
that can cause ignition, including electrical equipment, heating devices, 
open flames and sparks are also present in many CTS programs. 

Fires can be prevented by eliminating the fuel source and sources of 
ignition through good housekeeping, proper storage of materials and 
appropriate use of equipment. 

Not all fires have the same characteristics; therefore it is important to 
know the class of fire and the recommended type of fire extinguisher. 

• Class A fires are associated with common materials such as wood, 
paper, rubber and most plastics. This class of fire can be 
extinguished by bringing the temperature of the burning materials 
below the ignition point using water or by the blanketing and 
smothering effects of a dry chemical or carbon dioxide extinguisher. 

• Class B fires are associated with a flammable liquid, gas and grease. 
This class of fire is best extinguished by limiting the air that supports 
the fire. Dry chemicals, carbon dioxide and foam agents are 
recommended for this class of fire. Water, unless it is a form of mist, 
is not recommended because it tends to spread the fire. 

CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers Appendix 3 / 237 

©Albert Education, Alberta, Canada ( 1 998) 



• Class C fires are mainly caused by the misuse of electrical equipment 
and/or electrical failures. The first step in extinguishing this type of 
fire is to shut off the electrical supply. Only extinguishers with a 
class C rating are recommended to be used with this type of fire. 

• Class D fires occur when combustible metals such as magnesium, 
powdered aluminum and zinc are ignited. Dry sand or a class D 
extinguisher can be used to exclude air. 

Release of Hazardous Materials 

Owing to possible damage to the environment and risk of danger to the 
health and safety of others, a plan should be in place to deal with the 
release of hazardous materials. 

If a large spill occurs off-campus, those involved are required to 
immediately report the accident to proper authority, generally by 
contacting the Pollution Emergency Response Team at 1-800-222-6514 
or by calling 911. 



Smaller spills that may occur in a lab or shop should be confined and 
cleaned up as soon as possible. To do this, a conveniently located 
clean-up kit is recommended. A kit of this nature should include the 
following material and equipment: 

bag of granular absorbent 

damming materials 

neutralizing agents 

garbage bags 

plastic garbage cans 

goggles and respirator 

latex gloves, coveralls and rubber boots 

broom and dustpan. 



Response to 
Injury 



CONTACT: EMERGENCY RESPONSE TO AN ACCIDENT 

In the event of an accident, it is important to act quickly yet take time to 
evaluate the extent of the injury /accident and the potential for further 
damage to personnel or property. When an accident occurs: 

• take control of the situation through effective management techniques 

• ensure that any injured person(s) is cared for 

• ensure that no further injury or damage occurs 

• proceed to get help. 



238 I Appendix 3 
(1998) 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

©Alberta Education, Alberta. Canada 



Response to 
Hazardous 
Materials Spills 



Response to Fire 



Response to 
Natural Gas or 
Propane Leak 



In the event of a serious spill, alert others, get away from the area and 
report the accident to the proper authorities by calling 911 or the fire 
department. 



For smaller spills: 

secure the area 

keep others away from the spill 

get assistance 

contain the spill 

clean up the spill. 



Before attempting a clean up, check the Material Safety Data Sheet for 
recommended procedures. It should be noted that all cleaned up 
materials, contaminated absorbent and clothing should be treated the 
same way as the spilt material and disposed of similarly in a clearly 
marked container. 

A typical response to a fire would include: 

• if visible fire or smoke is detected, evacuate the area and isolate the 
fire by closing the doors 

• have someone notify the teacher or administration 

• pull the nearest fire alarm 

• if the fire is small and contained, attempt to extinguish it using the 
appropriate fire extinguisher. 

Because propane is heavier than air a leak may spread into a ventilation 
or sewer system. If the gas should ignite, the fire could spread rapidly 
and cause an explosion in a confined space. When a leak is detected: 

• evacuate the area 

• locate and stop the leak if possible 

• do not operate any electrical equipment 

• notify the appropriate staff person 

• remove any victims to fresh air and apply CPR if necessary. 



POST-CONTACT: ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION AND 
REPORTING 

The major purpose of an investigation is not to attach blame but to 
identify the causes of an accident or potentially hazardous event so that 
corrective measures can be taken to prevent similar events in the future. 

When investigating an accident, the investigator needs to: 

• get an overall view of what happened 

• identify the circumstances that contributed to the accident 

• examine physical evidence, such as equipment and material 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 
©Albert Education, Alberta, Canada 



Appendix 3 / 239 
(1998) 



take photographs and/or collect and safeguard any physical evidence, 

if warranted 

talk to people directly involved and/or witnesses. Obtain written 

statements, if appropriate 

identify causes, and determine corrective action 

maintain records of incidents and corrective measures in keeping 

with board/school policy. 



SOURCES OF SUPPORT: REGULATORY, 
MONITORING, CONSULTING 



Refer to Attachment 8: 
Overview of Legislation 
and Key Players 
Related to Health and 
Safety in CTS 
Programs. 



LEGISLATION AND REGULATIONS 

The health and safety of individuals and the environment is protected by 
law. All workers have the right to know about the hazardous materials 
they may come in contact with, to be protected from injury and to receive 
proper care and attention if they do become involved in an accident. 



KEY PLAYERS: ROLES AND RESPONSD3ILITDZS 

To ensure that there is an effective health and safety program in place 
requires the cooperation and support of all those responsible for the 
learning environment, development of curriculum and delivery of 
instruction. This involves the education community as well as various 
government departments and agencies who have responsibility for 
various aspects of health and safety. 

Alberta Education : 

• works cooperatively with school boards in the development of school 
safety policies and guidelines 

• creates legislation as required and provides information explaining 
relevancy of legislation to the school 

• identifies activities within the curriculum that may be hazardous. 



240 I Appendix 3 
(1998) 



School Boards : 

• formulate safety policies in conjunction with the appropriate 
education professionals 

• adopt safety policy statements consistent with regulations and codes 

• facilitate the implementation of safety policies 

• request and/or direct safety and health investigations 

• provide for, and administer, adequate funding for the provision of a 
healthy and safe environment 

• ensure that the requirements of various agencies such as 
Occupational Health and Safety Division, Fire Commissioner and 
Building Standards, are carried out in schools and other work sites 
under their jurisdiction 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

©Alberta Education, Alberta. Canada 



formulate and implement school board policies 

communicate School Board policies, especially the minimum 

standards, to staff, students, parents and the public 

establish a system to monitor the effectiveness of safety policies and 

practices in the schools 

initiate corrective action as required 

implement an appeal system that extends beyond the local 

environment to governmental agencies that may result in local or 

government intervention 

ensure that in each school there is one certified teacher and one 

support staff trained in first aid and emergency care. 

School Administrations: 



provide appropriate materials and equipment to maintain adequate 
standards of health and safety 

establish procedures to monitor safety policies and direct 
investigations as required. 

uperintendents : 



provide for educational programs and resources that assist in the 

development of good safety practices and attitudes 

appoint one person to be responsible for the coordination of health 

and safety programs and resources in the school 

maintain accurate records of accidents at school and the treatment 

provided 

provide direction and support to teachers regarding student safety 

supervision and/or violations 

identify potentially hazardous conditions and ensure that safe 

practices and procedures are in place to correct them 

ensure school representation on safety committees, who would be 

involved in safety inspections 

conduct and/or facilitate regular safety inspections 

ensure that teachers provide safety instruction as required in the 

courses they teach 

report accidents to the school board and the Workers' Compensation 

Board, as required. 

Instructional Staff: 



assume responsibility for protecting their own health and safety and 

that of the students under their charge 

model safe behaviour in teaching practices and procedures 

accept as a professional obligation responsibility for providing and 

emphasizing safety education in the classroom 

implement safety education programs in accordance with school 

board policies and the regulations and standards of other regulating 

bodies 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 
©Albert Education, Alberta, Canada 



Appendix 3 / 241 
(1998) 



• evaluate safety education efforts, monitor student behaviour, and 
initiate corrective action as required 

• identify unsafe environment conditions and correct or report these in 
writing. 

Students : 

• are knowledgeable in both environment safety factors and safe 
behavioural practices 

• should conduct themselves in accordance with established safety 
practices and rules, such as appropriate dress and protective clothing 

• should identify unsafe practices or environmental conditions and 
report these to the school staff 

• should inform school staff of the possible health concerns relevant to 
their personal safety and protection. 

Parents : 

• should inform the school about relevant student medical problems 

• should inform the school if they wish their child to be excluded from 
particular course activities that may be potentially hazardous. 



DUE DILIGENCE 



Refer to Attachment 9: 
Due Diligence in the 
CTS Classroom. 



Due diligence implies that everything reasonably possible is being done 
to ensure the health and safety of students, teachers and the environment. 
Essentially, due diligence is achieved through constant monitoring and 
compliance with local policies and government regulations. 

Elements of a safety program include: 

• establishing clearly defined policies, practices and procedures 

• monitoring procedures to ensure that safe policies, practices and 
procedures are being followed 

• communicating information on issues related to health and safety 

• auditing/inspecting the learning environment 

• training in issues related to health and safety 

• investigation and reporting of accidents. 



242 I Appendix 3 
(1998) 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

©Alberta Education, Alberta. Canada 



Attachment 1 



Components of a Health and Safety Program 



PRE-CONTACT: Avoiding Accidents/ 
Ensuring Health 

What is done to prevent or reduce accidents: 

• ensuring a safe environment 

• ensuring safe practices and procedures 

• providing training. 



CONTACT: Emergency Response 
to an Accident 

What is done when an accident or incident occurs; 
includes emergency response to: 

• injury 

• chemical spill 

• fire 

• gas leaks. 



POST-CONTACT: Accident 
Investigation and Reporting 

What is done to investigate an accident/incident and 
determine corrective action: 

investigation 

observation 

documentation 

reporting 

identification of corrective action. 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

©Albert Education, Alberta, Canada 



Appendix 3 / 243 
(1998) 



II 

■ 
■ 



244 1 Appendix 3 
(1998) 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

©Alberta Education. Alberta, Canada 



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246 1 Appendix 3 CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

(1998) ©Alberta Education. Alberta, Canada 



1 d& I a nnendix 3 CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

Z«0 I Appendix J Education. Alberta, Canada 

(1998) 



Attachment 3 



Sample Health and Safety Checklist 



School: 



Program: 



Inspection made by: 
Signature: 



Please Print Name 



General Questions: 

1 . Who is responsible for the health 
and safety program in this facility? 

2. Has a previous written safety 
inspection been made of this 
facility: 

3. If Yes, by whom? 

4. Date of that inspection. 

5. Have the recommendations of that 
inspection been carried out? If 
not, indicate the status of those 
exceptions below: 



Yes 



All 



Facility: 



Position 



Date: 



Administrator 



Teacherts) 



No 



Some 



None 



Date Identified 



Concemfs) 



Corrective Actionfs) and 
Anticipated Completion Date 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

©Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada 



Appendix ll 247 
(1998) 



Attachment 3 (continued) 



Hazard Identification and Control 



To identify the health and safety hazards in the learning environment is one of the most important 
components of a health and safety program. The individual or team that carries out this inspection 
should carefully evaluate the condition and appropriateness of all facilities, work areas, equipment and 
instructional procedures. Each unsafe act or condition should be noted and a recommendation to correct 
or remove the hazard be provided. Since the learning environment is not static, it is essential that 
ongoing vigilance and control of health and safety hazards continue. 

Checking Procedure 

Draw a () around the appropriate number using the following rating scale: 

Satisfactory Unsatisfactory 

N/A 



Satisfactory 
4 3 



Unsatisfactory 
2 1 



Action required should be identified in all instances where a number of 2 or less is circled. Space is 
provided at the end of each topic for such comments. 

Section I: Facilities 

A. Housekeeping 

Evaluate the condition of: 

1 . walls, windows and ceiling; e.g., clean, free of chips 
and cracks 

2. floors, aisles and stairs; e.g., clean and free of 
obstructions 

3. student work stations; e.g., benches, tables and desks 

4. shelves, tool and material storage areas 

5. bulletin boards and display cases 

6. washing and changing facilities 

7. waste disposal areas and containers (incompatible 
materials should not be allowed to come in contact with 
each other) 

8. power panel and gas meter areas; e.g., free of 
obstructions and combustible materials 

9. other: 



Satisfactory 




Unsatisfactory 


4 


3 


2 


1 


N/A 


4 


3 


2 


1 


N/A 


4 


3 


2 


1 


N/A 


4 


3 


2 


1 


N/A 


4 


3 


2 


1 


N/A 


4 


3 


2 


1 


N/A 


4 


3 


2 


1 


N/A 



N/A 



N/A 



Comments (concerns, required actions, recommendations): 



248 / Appendix 3 
(1998) 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

©Alberta Education, Alberta. Canada 



Attachment 3 (continued) 



B. General Conditions 

Evaluate the provision for/condition of: 

1. clearly marked and accessible exits 

2. emergency lighting 

3. safety treads and railings on stairs 

4. safety zone markers around hazardous equipment 

5. non-skid floor surfaces in front of machines 

6. air quality (general ventilation, fume extraction and 
dust control systems) 

7. lighting direction and levels 

8. noise levels 

9. other: 

Comments (concerns, required actions, recommendations): 



atisf; 
4 


ictory 
3 


\ 

2 1 


Jnsatisfac 




tory 
N/A 


4 


3 


2 1 





N/A 


4 


3 


2 1 


i 


N/A 


4 


3 


2 1 


[ 


N/A 


4 


3 


2 1 


I 


N/A 


4 


3 


2 1 


I 


N/A 


4 


3 


2 


I 


N/A 


4 


3 


2 


I 


N/A 


4 


3 


2 


I 


N/A 



C. Electrical Supply 

Evaluate provision for/condition of: 

1 . electrical outlets (outlets should not be overloaded) 

2. power panel breakers and circuit identification 

3. master control and emergency shut-off switches 

4. electrical conduit, cables, connections and extension 
cords 

5. high voltage signage 

6. explosion proof switches and fixtures; e.g., paint room 

7. other: 

Comments (concerns, required actions, recommendations): 



Satisfactory 


u 


nsatisfacti 


Dry 


4 


3 


2 1 





N/A 


4 


3 


2 1 





N/A 


4 


3 


2 1 





N/A 


4 


3 


2 1 


1 


N/A 


4 


3 


2 1 


I 


N/A 


4 


3 


2 


I 


N/A 


4 


3 


2 


I 


N/A 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 
©Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada 



Appendix 3 / 249 
(1998) 



Attachment 3 (continued) 



D. Gas Supply 

Evaluate the provisions for/condition of: 

1. gas lines, valves, regulators and colour coding 

2. lighting instructions for gas-fired equipment and 
appliances 

3. pilot lights and/or electronic ignition systems 

4. fire guards between gas appliance and equipment and 
adjacent walls, benches and other combustible 
materials 

5. combustion air supply 

6. other: 

Comments (concerns, required actions, recommendations): 



Satisfactory 




Unsatisfactory 


4 3 


2 


1 


N/A 


4 3 


2 


1 


N/A 


4 3 


2 


1 


N/A 


4 3 


2 


1 


N/A 


4 3 


2 


1 


N/A 


4 3 


2 


1 


N/A 



Section II: Furniture and Equipment 
A. Lab Furniture and Equipment 

The furniture/equipment is: 

1 . arranged to provide maximum safety to the operator 
and other students 

2. properly adjusted and secured to floor, bench or cart 

3. guarded at all exposed points of operation 

4. controlled easily (switches and levers accessible) 

5. provided with dust extraction or ventilation where 
required 

6. provided with working surfaces appropriate to the tasks 
performed; e.g., electrical work should not take place 
on a metal surface 

7. serviced and maintained on a regular basis 

8. provided with electromagnetic switches where 
required; e.g., drill press, table saw, wood and metal 
lathes 

9. CSA approved (applies to all electrical equipment) 

10. properly grounded or double insulated 

11. other: 

Comments (concerns, required actions, recommendations): 



Satisfactory 




Unsatisfactory 




4 3 


2 


1 


N/A 


4 3 


2 


1 


N/A 


4 3 


2 


1 


N/A 


4 3 


2 


1 


N/A 


4 3 


2 


1 


N/A 



4 
4 

4 
4 
4 



3 
3 

3 
3 

3 



2 
2 

2 
2 
2 



N/A 






N/A 





N/A 





N/A 





N/A 





N/A 



250 I Appendix 3 
(1998) 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

©Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada 



Attachment 3 (continued) 



B. Fire Protection 

Evaluate: 



Satisfactory 



1 . emergency exit routes and signage 

2. proper type, location and service records of fire 
extinguishers 

3. provision and use of fireproof pads under electric irons, 
hot plates and other portable heating devices 

4. type of storage of chemicals and flammable materials 

5. storage of oily rags and other combustible materials 

6. placement and condition of smoke detectors and/or heat 
sensors 

7. condition and use of heat fuses (used in conjunction 
with extinguishing system and parts washer lids) 

8. other: 

Comments (concerns, required actions, recommendations): 



Unsatisfactory 






4 


3 


2 1 


I 


N/A 


4 


3 


2 1 


I 


N/A 


4 


3 


2 


I 


N/A 


4 


3 


2 


I 


N/A 


4 


3 


2 


1 


N/A 



N/A 
N/A 



N/A 



C: Personal Protective Equipment 

Evaluate provision for/condition of: 

1. appropriate eye protection; e.g., face shields, goggles 
and safety glasses 

2. hand protection; e.g., rubber gloves, leather gauntlets 
and heat-resistant gloves 

3. foot protection; e.g., safety shoes and toe caps 

4. head covering/protection; e.g., hats, hair nets, hard hats 4 
and bump caps 

5. respiratory protection; e.g., dust, paint and spray masks ^ 

6. protective clothing; e.g., aprons, gowns, smocks and 
leggings 

7. hearing protection; e.g., ear plugs and muffs 

8. other: 

Comments (concerns, required actions, recommendations): 



Satisfactory 




Unsatisfactory 


4 


3 


2 


1 


N/A 


4 


3 


2 


i o 


N/A 


4 


3 


2 


1 


N/A 


4 


3 


2 


1 


N/A 


4 


3 


2 


1 


N/A 


4 


3 


2 


1 


N/A 


4 


3 


2 


1 


N/A 


4 


3 


2 


1 


N/A 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

©Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada 



Appendix 3 / 257 
(1998) 



Attachment 3 (continued) 



D. First-Aid Equipment 

Evaluate availability/condition of: 

1. first-aid kit 

2. eye wash station 

3. emergency shower 

4. first-aid information 

5. fire blanket 

6. other: 



Comments (concerns, required actions, recommendations): 



Satisfactory 




Unsatisfactory 


4 3 


2 


1 


N/A 


4 3 


2 


1 


N/A 


4 3 


2 


1 


N/A 


4 3 


2 


1 


N/A 


4 3 


2 


1 


N/A 


4 3 


2 


1 


N/A 



Section III: Instructional Program 

A. Posted Information 

Evaluate: 



Satisfactory Unsatisfactory 



4 3 2 



1 . use of bulletin boards, health and safety posters and 
student reports 

2. suitability and type of safety instruction posted at each 4 3 2 
machine 



3. emergency response procedures and postings 



4 3 2 



4. availability of important telephone numbers and contact 4 3 2 
people to be used in the event of an accident or injury 

5. other: 4 3 2 

Comments (concerns, required actions, recommendations): 



1 


N/A 


1 


N/A 


1 


N/A 


1 


N/A 


1 


N/A 



252 I Appendix 3 
(1998) 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

©Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada 



Attachment 3 (continued) 



B. Handling Materials/Goods 



Evaluate: 


Satisfactory 


Uns 


atisfactor 


y 


1. 


instruction on the use of hazardous materials (WHMIS) 


4 


3 


2 1 





N/A 


2. 


availability and maintenance of Material Safety Data 
Sheets 


4 


3 


2 1 





N/A 


3. 


labels on controlled product containers 


4 


3 


2 1 





N/A 


4. 


methods used to dispose of hazardous materials 


4 


3 


2 1 





N/A 


5. 


material lifting and handling instructions and 
procedures 


4 


3 


2 1 





N/A 

1 


6. 


procedures used to transport dangerous goods 


4 


3 


2 1 





N/A 


7. 


personal hygiene related to customer service; e.g., hair 
nets, plastic gloves and hand washing 


4 


3 


2 1 





N/A 


8. 


other: 


4 


3 


2 1 





N/A 


Comments (concerns, required actions, recommendations): 












C. Record Keeping 

Evaluate: 


Satisfactory 


Unsatisfactory 


1. 


documentation of safety lesson plans and presentations 


4 


3 


2 


1 


N/A 


2. 


records of student attendance. 


4 


3 


2 


I 


N/A 


3. 


records of student safety tests and results 


4 


3 


2 


1 


N/A 


4. 


reporting mechanisms for accidents and injuries 


4 


3 


2 


1 


N/A 


5. 


records of follow-up measures 


4 


3 


2 


1 


N/A 


6. 


records of facility and program inspection 


4 


3 


2 


1 


N/A 


7. 


records of requests for facility/equipment 
improvements 


4 


3 


2 


1 


N/A 


8. 


other: 


4 


3 


2 


1 


N/A 


Comments (concerns, required actions, recommendations): 










1 


CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 








Appendix 3 / 253 


©Alberta Education. Alberta, Canada 










(1998) 



Attachment 3 (continued) 



Summary of Recommendations 

Identify and rank concerns that may place students and teachers in immediate danger. 

Efforts should first be directed toward correcting those problems that have the most serious consequence 
and highest probability of occurrence, followed by those that are less hazardous. 



Item No. 


Concerns 


Required Actions 





















































































































Signature: 
Date: 



254 1 Appendix 3 
(1998) 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

©Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada 



Attachment 4 



Engineering Controls 



Ventilation 



Dust and Fume 
Extraction 

Dust and fume 
extraction equipment 
should be engineered to 
operate with the least 
amount of noise and 
vibration. 



Machine Guards 

Well-engineered guards 
should not interfere 
with the safe operation 
of the equipment. 



In accordance with government regulations, where there exists a 
reasonable possibility that a health or safety hazard exists from the 
production or dissemination of an airborne contaminant, ventilation is to 
be in place such that these hazards are controlled. 

In determining whether a ventilation system is needed, the following 
points should be considered: 

• concentrations of the airborne contaminants in comparison with the 
maximum allowable limits set by Alberta Labour, Occupational 
Health and Safety (Chemical Hazards Regulation) 
physical, chemical and toxicological properties of the contaminants 
flammability and explosivity of the contaminants 
location of the students or staff in relation to the sources 
oxygen content of the air 
duration of the exposure of the workers 
sources and concentrations of the contaminants; e.g., dust and fumes. 

Dust and fume extraction should take place as close to the source as is 
possible to avoid spreading the contaminates or fumes throughout the 
work environment. Processes that typically require dust/fume extraction 
include: 

• cooking 

• foundry 

• welding and soldering 

• woodworking. 

Guards are installed on equipment to protect the operator from rotating 
parts, flying chips, sparks, high temperatures and operating points. At no 
time should fixed guards be removed or mechanisms locked out. Types 
of guards and guarding mechanisms include: 

complete enclosures around belts and pulleys 

movable guards as found on table saw or jointer 

fixed guard around a grindstone 

covers in place at the point of operation 

interlocking devices requiring both hands to be used as in the 

operation of a paper cutter 

automatic shut off used in connection with a washer/dryer lid or door 

and computer numerical control (CNC) lathe/mill cover. 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

©Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada 



Appendix 3 / 255 
(1998) 



256 1 Appendix 3 CT S Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

(1998} ©Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada 



Attachment 5 



Personal Protective Equipment 



Often the only practical way to minimize the risk of illnesses or injury is to use Personal Protective 
Equipment (PPE). 



Clothing 



Eye/Face Protection 

For more information, refer to 
Alberta Labour "Eye Injury 
Prevention in Industry," 1994. 



Hearing Protection 

For more information, refer to 
CSA Standards "Hearing 
Protection," Z94.2-94. 



Clothing may provide a defence against injury. Many lab processes 
require students to wear aprons, smocks or coveralls over their regular 
clothing. Where there is the possibility of becoming caught in moving 
parts or exposure to fire, students should not be permitted to wear: 

• loose fitting or torn clothing 

• garments made from flammable materials 

• exposed jewelry 

• long, loose hair. 

Any operation that presents a risk of injury to the eyes or face requires 
the use of approved eye/face protection equipment. This PPE is designed 
to protect individuals against: 

• flying objects, sparks and particles 

• splashing liquids and molten metal 

• intense heat 

• ultraviolet, infrared and visible radiation. 

A variety of eye and face protection devices are available. They include: 

• safety glasses equipped with side shields to offer protection from 
impact 

• goggles that are vented to protect the eyes and a portion of the face 

• goggles that are nonvented to protect against impact and chemical 
splashes 

• welding goggles to protect against radiation and impact 

• welding helmets to protect the eyes and face from radiation and 
impact 

• face shields to protect the whole face; these should also be 
supplemented with safety glasses. 

Noise from some operations may cause hearing loss. 

Students and teachers should not be exposed to a sound level that exceeds 
85 dB on average for an eight-hour day unless some form of hearing 
protection is used. It is at decibel levels 85 and above that the chances of 
noise-induced hearing loss begins to increase. Examples of noise levels 
produced by common tools and the occupation exposure limits are 
outlined in the following chart. 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

©Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada 



Appendix 3 / 257 
(1998) 



Attachment 5 (continued) 



Head Protection 

For more information, refer to 
CSA Standards "Industrial 
Protective Headwear," 
Z94.1-92. 



Foot Protection 





Noise Levels * 






Machine 


Decibel Level 


Max 


Hours/Days 






of 


Exposure 


Bandsaw 


95 




2 


Chain saw 


100 




1 


Circular saw 


105 




1/2 


Dust collector 


95 




2 


Jointer 


90 




4 


Lawn mower 


95 




2 


Metal lathe 


80 




16 


Router 


105 




1/2 


Thickness planer 


105 




1/2 



* Actual levels vary according to the design of the equipment. For example, belt driven 
equipment tends to be less noisy than gear driven. 

To reduce or eliminate the risk of injury owing to sudden or continuous 
noise levels, the appropriate precautions should be taken, by using 
hearing protection and/or limiting exposure time. The most common 
types of hearing protection used in CTS programs are earplugs and 
earmuffs. 

On many job sites and activities, safety headwear is required to protect 
the head from falling objects, bumps, splashes or energized objects. 
Headwear must meet CSA requirements and job site recommendations. It 
should be noted that bump caps are not considered to be helmets and can 
only be used where there is little risk from falling objects. 

Safety footwear is designed to protect against impact, compression and 
puncture injuries. Safety footwear can be purchased in a variety of styles 
and grades indicated by coloured tags and symbols. The colour of the tag 
indicates the amount of resistance the toe will support against different 
weights dropped from varying heights. In construction, a green triangle 
is recommended in conjunction with a high cut boot that gives ankle 
support. 



258 I Appendix 3 
(1998) 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

©Alberta Education. Alberta. Canada 



Attachment 5 (continued) 



Hand Protection 

Consult the Material Safety Data 
Sheet for recommended 
protection when handling 
hazardous materials. 



Respiratory Protection 



Remember, APR is only as 
good as its seal and its ability 
to filter out the contaminates 
for which it was designed. 



Hands often need to be protected from heat/cold, abrasion, chemicals and 
electrical shocks. PPE is available for each of these hazards, including: 

• finger guards 

• thimbles 

• hand pads 

• mitts 

• gloves. 

If gloves or other devices are necessary, they should fit properly and do 
the job required. Note, in some instances, that gloves or other forms of 
hand protection are not recommended particularly around moving 
machinery since the glove can get caught and pull the worker into the 
moving parts. 

There are two major categories of respirators. The most common type to 
be found in a CTS classroom is the Air Purifying Respirator (APR) that is 
designed to remove dust, fume and mist particles. APRs are further 
divided into disposable and reusable types. The second, more specialized 
category is the atmosphere supply respirator, which includes 
Self-contained Breathing Apparatus (SCBA) used, for example, in auto 
body painting. 

The choice of respirator depends on the type of hazard and the degree of 
use. For example: 

• disposable fiber respirators are simple types of air purifiers that cover 
the nose and mouth. They can be used in conjunction with low levels 
of dust, mist and fumes. Once the paper fibers have become loaded 
the filter must be disposed of safely 

• reusable half and full face respirators are usually made of rubber and 
protect against certain dust, mists, gases and vapours using 
disposable or rechargeable cartridges. 

In all cases, it is important to maintain the equipment and ensure a proper 
seal around the face when in use. 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 
©Albcru Education. Alberta, Canada 



Appendix 3 / 259 
(1998) 



260 1 Appendix 3 CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

( 1 9981 ©Alberta Education, Alberta. Canada 



Attachment 6 



Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System 



The following is a brief overview of Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System (WHMIS) and 
how it applies to schools. It is not meant to be a comprehensive description of WHMIS. Questions 
pertaining to specific details regarding WHMIS should be directed to the school board's occupational 
Health and Safety Department, or to Alberta Labour. 

WHMIS is a system to ensure that workers are provided with complete and accurate information 
regarding hazardous products that they use, and to ensure that the information is used to provide safe 
working conditions. It is a Canada-wide system that regulates suppliers, employers and workers. 

Suppliers must inform purchasers of the properties, hazards and procedures for safe use of the hazardous 
materials they are buying. 

Employers and workers must become knowledgeable about this hazard information and must use the 
information to ensure safe use of the materials, under normal and emergency conditions. 



Why WHMIS? 



Legal Status of WHMIS 



Elements of WHMIS 



WHMIS is intended to solve several problems that currently exist at some 
work sites, including schools. These problems include: 

• unlabelled or inadequately labelled substances 

• inadequate information on hazards and precautions relating to 
hazardous materials 

• lack of awareness by employers and workers about the materials they 
use 

• improper use of hazardous materials. 

These problems are resulting in an unacceptable incidence of injuries, 
illnesses, and allergies resulting from exposure to hazardous substances, 
and the associated loss of work time, money and quality of life. 

WHMIS is a federal law supplemented by provincial laws. Therefore, the 
requirements of WHMIS must be followed. 

School administrators and teachers, as well as other paid workers in the 
school, are "designated occupations" under the legislation. Therefore, 
literally all workers in the school are responsible for WHMIS requirements 
in their work. Although "student" is not a designated occupation in 
legislation, it is important that students become knowledgeable and follow 
WHMIS provisions. 

WHMIS is composed of three key elements: 

• Labels 

• Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) 

• Worker Education. 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 
©Alberta Education, Alberta. Canada 



Appendix z/ 261 
(1998) 



Attachment 6 (continued) 



Labels 



Consumer Products 



Material Safety Data 
Sheets 



There are two different types of WHMIS labels that can be attached to a 
controlled product: the Supplier Label and the Workplace Label. 

The Supplier Label contains information regarding the product's name, 
health risks, safe handling procedures, first-aid measures and the 
manufacturer or supplier identity. The Supplier Label also must display the 
applicable WHMIS symbols and must make reference to the product's 
Material Safety Data Sheet. All original containers of controlled products 
from manufacturers or suppliers must have this information. 

Many of the products used in a school are "Consumer Products" and are 
partially exempt from WHMIS requirements. As a result, these products 
do not require Workplace Labels provided their original labels are legible, 
and they are stored and used in their original containers. However, once 
they have been decanted or their original labels have been replaced with 
workplace labels, they become WHMIS-controlled and must meet all 
labelling and Material Safety Data Sheet requirements. 

A Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) for each controlled product that is 
used or available for use must be readily accessible at the work site. 

The MSDS contains nine sections of important information: 

Product Identification and Use 
Hazardous Ingredients 
Physical Data 
Fire and Explosion Data 
Reactivity Data 
Toxicological Data 
Preventive Measures 
First-aid Measures 
Preparation Date. 

The MSDS is NOT: 

• all the information needed for safe use of a product in every situation 

• a document only to be read and filed away. 

A binder of MSDSs should be maintained and located in the area where the 
products are used. MSDSs should be reviewed before using a product or 
instructing anyone else in its use. An MSDS cannot be more than three 
years old (from indicated preparation date on MSDS). Any MSDS older 
than this is invalid and must be replaced as soon as possible with an 
updated version. Updated MSDSs are usually readily available from the 
supplier. A WHMIS-controlled product should not be used if there is no 
MSDS on-site. 



262 I Appendix 3 
(1998) 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

©Alberta Education, Alberta. Canada 



Attachment 6 (continued) 



Worker Education 



The employer must ensure that each worker is provided, or has whatever 
amount of education and training is necessary, to ensure safe use of each 
controlled product under normal and emergency conditions. Thus, 
personnel who use or come into contact with WHMIS-controlled products 
and Transportation of Dangerous Goods must be identified and their 
training needs determined (see Attachment 7). Initial and regular refresher 
training must be provided. The training given should also be regularly 
evaluated for relevance and effectiveness. 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

©Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada 



Appendix 3/ 263 
(1998) 



264 1 Appendix 3 CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

(1998") ©Alberta Education. Alberta. Canada 



Attachment 7 



Transportation of Dangerous Goods 



"Dangerous goods" are defined here as potentially hazardous materials that are explosive, flammable, 
poisonous, infectious, radioactive or corrosive. The Transportation of Dangerous Goods (TDG) Act 
exists to protect people, the environment, or property when these goods are being transported by road, 
rail, sea or air. TDG applies to transport only. It does not apply within the workplace — only WHMIS 
does. Shippers, carriers and receivers are all responsible for ensuring that shipments of dangerous 
goods comply with federal and provincial regulations as well as municipal bylaws. 



TDG Regulations 



Legal Status of TDG 



Who Is Involved? 



Training 



The Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act and Regulations were 
enacted to promote public safety when dangerous goods are handled, 
offered for transport, or transported in Canada. The regulations prescribe 
safety standards and requirements, and provide a mechanism for 
communicating the relative degree and nature of the hazard. 

The transport of dangerous goods by road is regulated under provincial 
regulations, which parallel the Federal Transportation of Dangerous 
Goods Act. Compliance is ensured in Alberta by Alberta Transportation 
and Utilities. Inspectors may issue tickets on the road, for infractions. 
Typically, most infractions relate to deficiencies in training, shipping 
documentation or labelling. 

All persons who handle, transport or offer for transport dangerous goods 
must meet the TDG Regulation requirements. The dangerous goods most 
likely to be transported by school system vehicles and personnel include 
chemical materials for instructional purposes, cleaners and other 
janitorial products, solvents and petroleum products, paints, and assorted 
chemical wastes. As a result, within a school, the following personnel 
should be knowledgeable regarding TDG Regulations: 

• school administrators 

• teachers responsible for technical areas 

• lab technicians 

• facility operators. 

TDG Regulations are composed of three keys elements: 

• training 

• shipping documents 

• labelling. 

No person can handle, offer for transport, or transport dangerous goods 
unless that person is properly trained or under the direct supervision of a 
properly trained person. A person cannot direct another person unless 
they also have received appropriate training. The school board must 
ensure that training has been received by all personnel who handle, offer 
for transport, or transport dangerous goods and must see that Certificates 
of Training (valid for three years) have been issued and are still valid. 
This applies to the generators of dangerous goods, schools, and carriers 
of dangerous goods, school board shipping department. 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

©Alberta Education. Alberta, Canada 



Appendix 3 / 265 
(1998) 



Attachment 7 (continued) 



Shipping Documents 



Labels 



All shipments of dangerous goods must be accompanied by a shipping 
document containing information identifying the goods, shipper, carrier 
and receiver as well as quantities, safe handling and emergency 
procedures. The shipper, carrier and receiver must retain a copy of the 
dangerous goods shipping document and any additionally pertinent 
documents, following delivery of the consignment. These documents 
must be made available to a government inspector within 15 days of a 
written request and must be retained for two years by all three parties. 

Placards on transporting vehicles are not needed for most materials 
carried in the school system because of the small quantities involved. 
There are, however, some exceptions. Boxes containing separate classes 
of dangerous goods must be labelled with the primary classification, 
orientation sticker if liquid, and any other pertinent safe handling 
information. Individual containers of dangerous goods, if shipped 
separately, must have a TDG label attached indicating proper shipping 
name, PEN number, primary and secondary classifications, an orientation 
sticker if liquid and any other pertinent handling information. 



266 /Appendix 3 
(1998) 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

©Alberta Education. Alberta, Canada 



Attachment 8 



Overview of Legislation and Key Players Related to 
Health and Safety in CTS Program 



Alberta Education 

School Act 

Defines the responsibilities of 

ensuring a safe learning 

environment. 



SCHOOL 
BOARD 



SCHOOL 
ADMINISTRATION 



CTS PROGRAM 



Alberta Health 
Public Health Act 



Alberta Workers' 
Compensation Board 

Provides assistance to 
injured workers. 



Alberta Transportation 
and Utilities 

Transport of Dangerous 
Goods Act 



Alberta 
Environmental Protection 

Environmental Protection and 
Enhancement Act 



Alberta Labour 



Workplace Health, Safety and 
Strategic Services 

Occupational Health and Safety Act 

Regulates general safety, first aid, 
chemical hazards, noise, ventilation, 
radiation and explosion. 



Technical and Safety 
Services 

Defines building and fire codes. 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

©Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada 



Appendix 3 / 267 
(1998) 



268 I Appendix 3 CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

(1998) ©Alberta Education, Alberta. Canada 



Attachment 9 t 

Due Diligence in the CTS Classroom: Provision of a Safe Work Environment | 

A. Physical Environment | 

• Maintain a clean and orderly work environment. 

• Ensure that all tools, machines, safety, and other equipment, are maintained, safe and in good ] 
working condition. 

• Be able to use competently and safely all tools, machines, safety and other equipment. - 

• Know what safety devices are necessary, and be familiar with and able to use all safety devices ] 
for your tools, machines and equipment. 

• Know the locations of and be able to use fire extinguishers. 

• Be sure that fire extinguishers are maintained. 

• Ensure proper storage of all materials and supplies. 

• Be able to operate the electrical safety control system in the teaching environment. 

• Check that lighting, heating/cooling, plumbing and ventilation are functioning and adequate. 
Report inadequacies to your administrator. 

B. Program 

• Provide an exemplary model of how to operate safely in the work environment. 

• Provide a safety training program for your students with respect to all tools, machines, safety and 
other equipment, that contains the following elements: 

— demonstration and explanation 

— guidance and observation until competence is achieved 

— inform the student when competence is achieved 

— formal recognition of competence 

— ongoing monitoring of performance. 

• Ensure that all students know and can perform the emergency procedures established as part of 
the safety program. 

• Ensure that students report all accidents/incidents/near-misses. 

• Ensure that all students use appropriate safety gear when necessary. 

• Maintain a high level of order and discipline. 

• Do not accept any unsafe behaviour. Remove any student who is acting in an unsafe manner, and 
ensure that he or she can operate safely before re-admittance. 

• Ensure that all students handle all materials and supplies in a safe manner. 

• Ensure that students are dressed safely. 

• Continually monitor the student's learning environment. 

C. Emergency Response Skills 

• Know the school's emergency response plan. 

• Know your role in the school emergency response plan. 

• Become an emergency response team member. 

• Respond appropriately to emergencies. 

• Be able to use first-aid kit equipment. 

• Become first-aid certified — Emergency LeveUCPR. 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers Appendix 3 / 26" 

©Alberta Education. Alberta, Canada (1998) 



Attachment 9 (continued) 



D. Accident/Incident Investigation Skills 



Know the accident/incident reporting procedure. 

Know what accidents/incidents are to be reported. 

Be able to prepare full and accurate reports. 

Know to whom reports must be given. 

Treat near-miss information appropriately. 

Use accident/incident/near-miss information in the continual upgrading and provision of a safer 

work environment. 



270 I Appendix 3 CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

(1998) ©Alberta Education, Alberta. Canada 




CAREER & 

TECHNOLOGY 

STUDIES 

Manual for Administrators, 
Counsellors and Teachers 



Appendix 4: 

Strategies for Instruction 

inCTS 



June 1998 



The information provided in this appendix can be used to provide a basis 
for further collaboration and discussion at the local level in planning 
effective instruction in CTS. 



272 /Appendix 4 
(1998) 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

© Alberta Education. Alberta, Canada 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

PURPOSE 275 

LEARN BY DOING/ACTIVE LEARNING 275 

APPLIED LEARNING/MAKING CONNECTIONS 277 

Making Connections within CTS 278 

Making Connections Across the Curriculum 278 

TEAMWORK/COOPERATIVE LEARNING 280 

Establishing Learning Teams 281 

Facilitating Cooperative Learning 281 

IOP-CTS TRANSITIONS 283 

Managing Concurrent Program Delivery 283 

Planning Successful Transitions 284 

ATTACHMENTS 

Attachment 1: Opportunities for Making Connections within CTS 285 

Attachment 2: Integrating Concepts in CTS 287 

Attachment 3: Opportunities for Making Connections Across the Curriculum 289 

Attachment 4: Characteristics of Effective Group Members 291 

Attachment 5: Comparing the IOP and CTS Programs 293 

Attachment 6: Connections Between IOP and CTS 295 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers Appendix 4/273 

© Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada ( 1 998) 



274 1 Appendix 4 CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

n 998) ® Albcrta Education, Alberta, Canada 



PURPOSE 



This appendix provides a range of instructional strategies teachers 
may wish to consider as they plan delivery of CTS courses. Teachers 
may use this information to: 

• plan for experiential and active learning while assuming roles of 
facilitator and coach in the learning process 

• identify opportunities for making connections in learning 

- among the 22 CTS strands 

- with other areas of the curriculum 

• facilitate individual and group enterprise through teamwork and 
cooperative learning 

• manage program delivery and student placement in special 
circumstances where: 

- CTS courses and Integrated Occupational Program (IOP) 
courses are delivered concurrently 

- students wish to make transitions from IOP courses into CTS 
courses. 



LEARN BY DOING/ACTIVE LEARNING 



Refer to Chart 3: Positive 
Classroom Climate Checklist. 



Active learning occurs when students learn by doing and reflect on the 
processes used. Active learning requires that students are not just 
passive recipients of information, but develop ability to apply what 
they are learning. 

CTS places an emphasis on learning by doing. Essentially, the 
teacher's role in this process is that of facilitator, guide and coach. It 
takes time to develop a learning atmosphere conducive to active 
learning. The classroom climate should be friendly and 
nonthreatening, with appropriate levels of trust, flexibility and mutual 
respect. The following strategies may be effective in facilitating an 
active learning approach in CTS. 



Agendas 



Action Planning 



Encourage students to prepare an agenda of tasks to be completed. 
Ideally, the agenda is cooperatively developed and forms a meaningful 
basis for subsequent activity. 

As more effective results are generally achieved through purposeful 
pursuit than by chance, students benefit by developing a plan of 
individual steps that need to be taken to accomplish each task. Action 
plans can be developed through small group planning sessions, and 
can be guided through appropriate questioning: 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 
© Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada 



Appendix 4/275 
(1998) 



Motivating 



Active Listening 



Discussing 



Negotiating 



Networking 



• What do we wish to accomplish? 

• How will we achieve results? 

• When will the task be completed? 

• What resources do we need? 

Active learning relies on students wanting to become involved. 
Students may choose to participate because of idea ownership, 
opportunities for choice, team spirit, group loyalty and interest. 
Motivation involves developing interests, facilitating involvement, 
and encouraging individual ownership and responsibility for learning. 

Teachers and students are encouraged to engage in active listening. It 
demands high levels of concentration, devoting attention to the 
speaker, avoiding interrupting, being receptive, listening rather than 
just hearing, asking for clarification, elaboration and specific 
examples, and reserving judgement. 

Opportunity for discussion is an important part of active learning. It 
can be spontaneous and associated with the task, or more structured in 
becoming the task in itself. Ideally, discussion should involve 
everyone, with no one person being allowed to dominate the exchange 
of ideas. 

An effective facilitator may use "icebreaker" activities to help 
members of a new group get to know each other, and encourage 
participants to stay on task. 

The facilitator should be alert to the needs of the group and respond as 
appropriate without being dominant or dictatorial. By asking 
questions, such as "What if you tried ...?", teachers can help students 
understand the essence of a problem and encourage promising ideas. 

Negotiation involves reaching mutually acceptable agreements on 
what to do next, how to do it, how much time to take and what 
constitutes a successful outcome. Negotiation occurs between 
teachers and students and among the students themselves. Skills in 
negotiation improve with practice. 

Networking involves the clustering of individuals who share a 
common interest or need. Networking can support learning, with 
members communicating openly and freely to share knowledge and 
expertise. Teachers are encouraged to establish support networks to 
help meet the needs of students. These may include: 

• in-school support networks among school administrators, 
counsellors, teacher-librarians, other teachers, office managers 

• community-based support networks among parents, local business 
and industry, community representatives. 



2 76 1 Appendix 4 
(1998) 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

© Alberta Education. Alberta, Canada 



Reflecting 



Reflection involves looking back over a recently completed activity to 
summarize, reinforce and assess learning that has occurred. 
Reflection can occur on an independent or group basis, and be 
structured or unstructured. The following phrases may be used to 
initiate reflection on tasks completed. 

Before I began this course . . . 

Some discoveries that I made were ... 

My work in this course was made easier because ... 

In this course I had difficulty with ... because ... 

One thing I would do differently next time is ... 

The part of this course that was most worthwhile was ... 

I would like to learn more about . . . 

Now that I can ... I will be able to 



APPLIED LEARNING/MAKING CONNECTIONS 

CTS courses provide career-specific contexts through which students 
can reinforce, extend and apply learning from other core and optional 
programs. As students recognize the relevance of prior learning to 
their future lives, they are motivated to develop higher levels of 
competency. 

Course planning should focus attention on ways to help students make 
connections between abstract concepts developed in other curriculum 
areas and their application in practical settings. Teachers can enhance 
students' ability to make connections across the curriculum by: 

• increasing their sensitivity to the content of other subject 
areas — and working with other teachers to design courses, lessons 
and activities that strengthen linkages 

• identifying prior learnings in other subject areas that apply in 
practical CTS contexts — and being prepared to review and/or 
teach particular core concepts/skills prior to their use in a 
particular CTS course 

• designing projects and assignments that purposely link learnings 
from one discipline/subject to another — and collaborating with 
other teachers in their delivery to help students integrate learning 
across several CTS strands and/or other disciplines 

• becoming familiar with the processes used for inquiry, research, 
reporting and decision making in other disciplines — and providing 
opportunities for students to use similar processes and vocabulary 
in CTS settings. 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 
© Alberu Education. Alberta. Canada 



Appendix 4/277 
(1998) 



MAKING CONNECTIONS WITHIN CTS 



Refer to Attachment 1: 
Opportunities for Making 
Connections within CTS. 



Strand Clusters 

Refer to the CTS Guide to 
Standards and 
Implementation, Section H: 
Linkages/Transitions. 

Process Strands 



Each CTS strand provides opportunities for students to develop 
competencies that link with, or enhance what they learn in other 
strands. The following strategies are suggested for enhancing 
connections among the 22 CTS strands. 

Teachers may wish to develop familiarity with courses across various 
strand "clusters" in CTS; e.g., business education, home economics, 
industrial education, natural resources. Subsequent course delivery 
may involve combining courses from two or more strands and/or 
working with other teachers to share the delivery of the courses. 

Familiarity with the scope and intent of the process strands (e.g., 
Enterprise and Innovation, Design Studies, Information Processing, 
Management and Marketing) can also enhance connections. Learning 
in these strands can be effectively contextualized when relevant 
courses are combined with other strands that are more specialized in 
context. 



Assessment Practices 

Refer to the CTS Guide to 
Standards and 
Implementation, Section G: 
Assessment Tools. 



Integrating Concepts 



A number of generic and strand-specific assessment tools have been 
developed to help teachers assess learning outcomes within each CTS 
strand. Assessment tools establish benchmarks for student 
performance, and help assess student achievement fairly and 
equitably. As students become familiar with the criteria for 
assessment as defined through each tool, they begin to understand 
how the skills they develop in one course transfer to other areas of 
learning. 

A number of integrating concepts are developed in and reinforced 
across the CTS strands. These concepts include: 



Refer to Attachment 2: 
Integrating Concepts in CTS. 



career 

technology 

design 

enterprise 

environment 



• family 

• legislation 

• safety 



service. 



Focusing attention on these concepts as appropriate in course delivery 
heightens awareness of their significance in a variety of personal and 
work-related situations. 



Refer to Attachment 3: 
Opportunities for Making 
Connections Across the 
Curriculum. 



MAKING CONNECTIONS ACROSS THE CURRICULUM 

CTS courses provide career-specific contexts through which students 
can reinforce, extend and apply knowledge and skills developed in 
other core and optional programs. Course planning may well involve 
helping students to make connections between abstract concepts 



2 78 /Appendix 4 
(1998) 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

© Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada 



Concept Mapping 

Refer to the CTS Guide to 
Standards and 
Implementation, Section H: 
Linkages/Transitions. 



Application of Process 

Refer to the CTS Guide to 
Standards and 
Implementation, Section G: 
Assessment Tools. 



Vertical Integration 



developed in other disciplines and their application in practical 
settings. The following strategies are suggested for enhancing 
connections in learning across the curriculum. 

Science and mathematics are two core program areas where an 
understanding of core concepts and skills are often required prior to 
their application in practical CTS contexts. Teachers are encouraged 
to become familiar with the content and processes developed in other 
core and optional program areas so as to: 

• maintain consistency in expectations and demands placed on 
students 

• identify prior learnings, prerequisites and corequisites necessary 
for success in CTS courses 

• avoid instances of overlap or repetition between CTS and other 
core/optional courses. 

CTS students are also required to use many of the process skills 
developed in core courses. To support the application of process in 
CTS, developmental frameworks are provided for laboratory 
investigation, research, reports/presentations, issue analysis, and 
negotiation/debate. Each framework is consistent with the use of 
related processes in other disciplines — science, language arts, social 
studies — and can be used to guide students in their application of 
process in career-specific settings. 

Vertical integration implies the sequencing of instruction across 
subject areas so that particular concepts and skills are developed prior 
to their application in practical CTS settings. Teachers are 
encouraged to use appropriate references to: 

• identify relevant concepts/skills developed in core disciplines; 
e.g., mathematics, science, and the possible need to review these 
concepts/skills prior to their use in CTS courses 

• identify prior learnings necessary for success in CTS courses, and 
the possible need to teach core concepts/skills if they are used in a 
CTS course prior to their development in a core discipline. 



Combining CTS and 
Non-CTS Courses 



The 1 -credit course structure of CTS allows flexibility in combining 
CTS courses with non-CTS core and optional courses. Such strategies 
are effective in helping students to make connections across the 
curriculum. 



Refer to the Guide to 

Education: ECS to 

Grade 12, Program Planning. 



Combined courses must 
delivery, and ensure that: 



meet all requirements for course 



a written description of the combined course is provided for 
students/parents, and students are given the option to take the 
non-CTS course with or without the combined CTS course 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 
© Alberta Education. Alberta. Canada 



Appendix 4 / 279 
(1998) 



appropriate learning environments (including facilities and 
equipment), learning resources and instructional expertise are 
available to support the delivery of the combined course 
students are provided access to a minimum of 25 hours of 
instruction per credit at the high school level, with exceptions 
as noted in the Guide to Education: ECS to Grade 12 
students know precisely when and where they can regularly 
access the instruction they need 

the integrity and intent of curriculum and assessment 
standards as defined for each CTS course are maintained 
instruction addresses the evaluation criteria established for 
both the CTS course(s) and non-CTS course, and that each is 
graded and reported separately. 



TEAMWORK/COOPERATIVE LEARNING 

The ability to work as part of a team is essential in the workplace. 
The transition to a technology- and information-based society requires 
today's workers to pool their expertise. This trend can be expected to 
become even more pronounced in the future. 



Refer to Attachment 4: 
Characteristics of Effective 
Group Members. 



Cooperative learning also promotes active learning and encourages 
individual and group enterprise. Group learning can help students to 
develop increasingly independent and responsible learning habits and 
to become self-disciplined. 



Refer to Form 3: Group 
Member Effectiveness. 



CTS offers many opportunities for students to work in team settings, 
formally and informally. The teacher's role in cooperative learning 
involves: 

• communicating objectives, assignments and tasks 

• determining the size and composition of groups 

• arranging for appropriate facilities, equipment and materials 

• informing the group of behavioural expectations 

• informing both team leaders and members of their roles, and 
clarifying learning tasks with all 

• acting as a resource person, coach and monitor 

• evaluating the product of the group and performance of each 
group member. 



280 I Appendix 4 
(1998) 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

© Alberta Education. Alberta. Canada 



ESTABLISHING LEARNING TEAMS 

Students are often motivated through their involvement with other 
members of a team, and may develop a greater commitment to 
learning. Effective teamwork requires the establishment of learning 
groups whose size and nature are appropriate to the nature of the 
learning task. 

• Discussion groups encourage students to become involved with 
their peers, and provide opportunities for students to explore 
classroom, community or national issues when given background 
information and an understanding of objectives. 

• Brainstorming groups encourage creative thinking and problem 
solving, and require students to identify as many ideas or 
suggestions as possible within a given time frame. A quantity of 
ideas is desired, "hitchhiking" on the ideas of others is permitted, 
judgement is deferred until the end of the activity, and criticism is 
not allowed. 

• Buzz groups involve small clusters of students who, for a short 
period of time, seek the solution to an issue or problem. A variety 
of solutions to the issue are sought, the pros and cons of each 
proposal considered, consensus developed and an appropriate 
alternative selected. 

• Laboratory groups can be established to complete a project, 
conduct an investigation, or practice a skill demonstrated by the 
teacher. Assigned questions or research can become a part of the 
group activities. 

• Tutorial groups can be established to assist students who need 
extra help or additional practice, or for students who would 
benefit from enrichment. Tutorial groups are led by a teacher or 
student, and focus on meeting individual needs. 

• Role-playing groups help students understand the perspectives 
and feelings of others regarding a controversial topic. Each group 
member is given a role to assume and defend, regardless of their 
actual beliefs. 



FACILITATING COOPERATIVE LEARNING 

The following guidelines may be effective in facilitating teamwork 
and cooperative learning in CTS. 

Establish Ground rules represent an explicit, negotiated and accepted code of 

Ground Rules expectations. Ideally, they are enforced through peer group pressure. 

Specific ground rules can be negotiated, but also include some 
givens — safety, attendance, respect for others. 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers Appendix 4/ 281 

© Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada (1998) 



Observe 
Team Process 



Manage 

Group Dynamics 



Resolve 
Conflict 



Plan for 
Debriefing 



Team activities are accomplished through interaction between 
individuals. This interaction should be observed by the teacher, who 
focuses on the nature of the interaction and its consequences. 
Observation of team process permits the identification of methods by 
which the team achieves its goals. Feedback on process allows the 
team to examine the way it works and explore ways of improving its 
effectiveness. The following questions suggest a possible approach to 
observing team process: 

• How did the group begin the task? 

• Was a leader appointed? If so, by whom? 

• What method of appointment was used? Did a leader naturally 
emerge? 

• How were decisions reached? If no decisions were reached, why 
not? 

• Was there negotiation, confrontation, and/or cooperation? 

• How was consensus established? Did the majority rule? 

• Who spoke the most? The least? 

• Were any members ignored? If so, why? 

Interaction between team members can often be anticipated and 
directed. Management of group dynamics involves adjusting the 
number and composition of work groups in effective ways. 

Conflict may arise among team members during an activity. 
Resolution of the conflict should, when possible, be a responsibility of 
team members. Conflict provides opportunities for students to 
develop critical skills in negotiation and mediation. 

Students and teacher can expect to compromise, not only through 
negotiation and mediation, but also because of organizational 
constraints. For certain principles, however, there can be no 
compromise (see "Establish Ground Rules"). 

Effective debriefing summarizes, reinforces and assesses learning. 
The process should allow sufficient time to reflect on what has 
happened and what students have learned. Debriefing can occur 
within learning teams, and be prompted with key questions. Teachers 
can facilitate debriefing by: 

• including time for debriefing in their long-range plans 

• organizing students into smaller groups to give everyone an 
opportunity to share their feelings 

• asking open-ended questions 

• summarizing team accomplishments, the knowledge/skills 
developed, and team processes observed. 



282 I Appendix 4 
(1998) 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

© Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada 



IOP-CTS TRANSITIONS 



Refer to Attachment 5: 
Comparing the IOP and CTS 
Programs. 



The Integrated Occupational Program (IOP) is designed for selected 
students who need special learning support systems, including 
hands-on learning and remediation in mathematics, science, social 
studies and language arts. In general, IOP courses and learning 
environments are characterized by: 

• more hands-on learning with minimal reference to occupation- 
related theory 

• greater emphasis on generic self-management skills than on 
career-specific competencies 

• smaller class sizes, thus providing for more individual assistance 
in developing course-specific competencies. 

Although many of the CTS strands/courses may extend competencies 
that IOP students have initially developed in 16-26-36 occupational 
courses, these connections do not represent course equivalencies . 
Curriculum and assessment standards defined for CTS courses are 
different from those defined for IOP occupational courses. 



Refer to Attachment 6: 
Connections Between IOP 
and CTS. 



MANAGING CONCURRENT PROGRAM DELIVERY 

Some schools may schedule IOP students and CTS students in the 
same time block/facility. Teachers may choose to manage the 
concurrent delivery of CTS and IOP courses by: 

• using connections between courses in CTS and the content of IOP 
occupational courses and student workbooks 

• clarifying performance expectations for CTS and IOP students 

• using a combination of IOP and CTS instructional materials to 
deliver the required IOP generic learnings 

• providing support for IOP students to develop and apply academic 
competencies; e.g., mathematics, language arts 

• developing a "buddy system" among IOP and CTS students 

• providing IOP students with as much practice time as possible. 

IOP students who wish to receive credit in CTS courses must meet 
all of the learner outcomes (learner expectations in 1997 
document) to the standard established for each CTS course. 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 
© Alberta Education. Alberta. Canada 



Appendix 4 / 283 
(1998) 



Refer to Attachment 6: 
Connections Between IOP 
andCTS. 



PLANNING SUCCESSFUL TRANSITIONS 

After completing Grade 1 1 or Grade 12 IOP programs, some students 
may be able to successfully transfer from IOP occupational courses 
into related CTS strands/courses. Students who demonstrate high 
levels of success in the IOP mathematics, science, language arts and 
social studies curriculum — 16-26-36 courses — are more likely to be 
able to: 

• handle the increased requirements to read, write, make 
calculations and take measurements in the CTS program 

• understand and apply theory that is fundamental to technical 
processes. 

Assessment of prior learning assists in identifying previously 
developed IOP competencies and their relationships to the learner 
outcomes of particular CTS courses. When choosing appropriate CTS 
strands/courses for IOP students, care should be taken to select from 
those that: 

• link with and extend concepts/skills already introduced in related 
IOP occupational courses and student workbooks 

• involve considerable hands-on learning with limited emphasis on 
theory 

• support workplace entry. 

A list of courses that may be suitable for IOP students transferring 
into CTS courses is provided in Attachment 6: Connections Between 
IOP and CTS. 



2 84 1 Appendix 4 
(1998) 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

© Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada 



Attachment 1 



Opportunities for Making Connections within CTS 



CTS Strands 



Agriculture 



Career Transitions 



Communication Technology 



Community Health 



Construction Technologies 



Cosmetology Studies 



Design Studies 



Electro-Technologies 



Energy and Mines 



Enterprise and Innovation 



Fabrication Studies 



Fashion Studies 



Financial Management 



Foods 



Forestry 



Information Processing 



Legal Studies 



Logistics 



Management and Marketing 
Mechanics 



Tourism Studies 



Wildlife 




Provides many direct links with competencies in this strand. Students reinforce, extend and 
apply a substantial number of knowledge and/or skill components in practical contexts. 

Provides some links with competencies developed in this strand, usually through the 
application of related technologies and/or processes. 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 
© Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada 



Appendix 4 / 285 
(1998) 



286 1 Appendix 4 CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

( 1 99g) © Alberta Education, Alberta. Canada 



Attachment 2 



Integrating Concepts in CTS 























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Career: provides opportunities for students to identify and assess a wide range of career 

options, in their personal life and work life; students learn about career and 
occupational expectations and opportunities. 

Technology: focuses on the use of all levels of technology, from simple hand tools to 

sophisticated computer and telecommunications technologies; students learn to 
select and manage available technology to respond to challenges. 

Design: presents the concept of design as a generic strategy that can be used across the 

CTS strands for resolving problems; resolution may be in two- or 
three-dimensions and involve plans, systems, materials, etc. 

Enterprise: develops students' ability to identify and respond to challenges and 

opportunities in creative ways, and to respond to change efficiently and 
effectively. 

Environment: addresses a variety of relevant environmental issues; focuses attention on 
citizen/worker empowerment; develops strategies for problem solving through 
goal setting, planning, negotiation and consensus building. 

Family: applies related concepts in contexts related to the individual's role in the family 

and the changing nature of the family as a support system and economic unit. 

Legislation: develops understanding of the processes used in establishing and changing 

laws; makes specific reference to laws and/or statutes and general reference to 
regulations, policies and standards that imply legislation. 

Safety: establishes expectations regarding safe and responsible behaviour in situations 

that involve the use of tools, equipment, materials and facilities. 

Service: focuses attention on strategies for identifying and responding to client/customer 

needs in a proactive manner; addresses career options within the service sector. 



CTS Manual for Administratprs, Counsellors and Teachers 

© Alberta Education, Alberta. Canada 



Appendix 4/287 
(1998) 



288 1 Appendix 4 CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

( 1 998) © Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada 



Attachment 3 



Opportunities for Making Connections Across the Curriculum 





Junior High 


Senior High 


CTS Strands 


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Provides many direct links with course content; students reinforce, extend and 
apply a substantial number of knowledge/skill components in practical contexts. 

Provides some links with course content, usually through the application of 
related technologies and/or processes. 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

© Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada 



Appendix 4/289 
(1998) 



290 1 Appendix 4 CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

( 1 998) © Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada 



Attachment 4 



Characteristics of Effective Group Members 



Team members should: 

□ be on time and attend all group sessions 

□ take an active part, and contribute 
information, ideas and experience 

□ display a positive, rather than negative or 
critical approach 

□ show respect for the ideas and opinions of 
others 

□ listen when others speak, be empathetic and 
hear others out 

□ respect and interact with other members 

□ respect individual differences 

□ avoid prejudice and bias 

□ seek, and be open to, the ideas and 
suggestions of others 

□ encourage noncontributors to take part 

□ accept responsibility for the consequences 
of their own behaviour 

□ be sensitive to the feelings and concerns of 
others 

□ avoid self-serving, judgemental, blaming, 
grandstanding or storytelling behaviour 

□ stay on topic 

□ be genuine and open 

□ support others, and help them articulate 
their ideas 

□ help phrase ideas and statements 

□ help the group by clarifying, mediating, 
praising and encouraging 

□ help make summaries and reach 
conclusions 

□ avoid distracting the group 

□ use problem solving, decision making and 
conflict resolution frames of reference 



□ confine the argument to ideas and not 
engage in personal attacks 

□ act as group leader, recorder, discussion 
evaluator or group effectiveness monitor, as 
appropriate. 

Group leaders should: 

D clarify the problem or issue 

D initiate discussion 

D keep discussion moving 

□ see that all phases of the problem are 
discussed 

□ attempt to keep discussion on topic 

□ encourage the participation of all members 
□ 
□ 



be objective 

rephrase and clarify statements, or have 
others do this 



□ ensure that summaries or conclusions are 
made 

□ ensure that all members are treated with 
respect 

□ respect the confidence of the group 

□ summarize the thoughts of the group in an 
accurate manner. 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

© Alberta Education. Alberta, Canada 



Appendix a/ 291 
(1998) 



292 I Appendix 4 CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

(1 g9g) © Alberta Education. Alberta, Canada 



Attachment 5 



Comparing the IOP and CTS Programs 



Student Placement 





IOP 


CTS 


Target Group 


At-risk students (12.5 to 19 years of age). 


All junior and senior high school students. 


Grade Levels 


Specific curriculum designed for Grades 8, 
9, 10,11, 12. 


Designed around levels, not grades — 
introductory, intermediate, advanced 
(Grades 7-12). 


Proportion of 
Student Population 


IOP students represent 4—8% of the 
junior/senior high school population. (In 
1994-95, there were approximately 5,000 
students in 180 schools.) 


Most junior/senior high school students 
receive 3 or more credits in CTS. 


Learning Styles 


Concrete learning experience. 


Concrete to abstract. 


Expectations for 

Student 

Performance 


Students are expected to demonstrate 
generic skills within an occupational 
context with limited emphasis on theory. 
Grading merges student ability and effort. 


Students must demonstrate a set of 
competencies to a specified standard, based 
on workplace and post-secondary 
expectations. Grading only occurs after the 
minimum competencies have been met. 


Credentialling 
Opportunities 


A Certificate of Achievement is awarded to 
students who have completed 80 credits — a 
minimum of 27 credits in academic courses, 
13 credits in optional courses and 40 credits 
in IOP occupational courses. 


A High School Diploma is awarded to 
students who have completed 100 credits 
and meet the requirements specified for the 
diploma. 

External credentialling opportunities have 
been identified for specific CTS courses. 



Program Delivery 



1 


IOP 


CTS 


On-campus 

Learning 

Experiences 


On-campus learning (classroom/lab) is 
primarily used for core program and 
selected sections of occupational courses. 


Most programs are delivered on-campus, 
depending on student interest, school 
facilities and instructional expertise. 


Off -campus 

Learning 

Experiences 


Community partnerships is a required 
component for delivery of occupational 
courses. This may include off-campus 
learning, job shadowing and mentoring. 


Off-campus learning can be used to deliver 
competencies outlined in courses. Student 
achievement is reported using CTS courses 
assessment tools. 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

© Alberta Education, Alberta. Canada 



Appendix 4/293 
(1998) 



294 1 Appendix 4 CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

(1998) ® Albcrta Education, Alberta, Canada 



Attachment 6 



Connections Between IOP and CTS 



This chart identifies connections between CTS strands and IOP 16-26-36 occupational courses. The 
connections do not indicate course equivalencies. IOP students wishing to receive credit in CTS courses 
must meet all of the learner outcomes (learner expectations in 1997 document) to the standard set for 
each CTS course. 





Jr. High 

Occupational 
Themes 


Senior High School 
IOP Occupational Course Sequence 


CTS STRANDS 


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Design Studies 






































Electro-Technologies 






































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Connections exist between some courses in this CTS strand and content of the IOP student 
workbook. 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 
© Alberta Education. Alberta, Canada 



Appendix 4/295 
(1998) 



Attachment 6 (continued) 



The following courses may be suitable for IOP students transferring into CTS courses because they: 

• link with and extend concepts/skills previously introduced in related IOP occupational courses and 
student workbooks 

• involve considerable hands-on learning with limited emphasis on theory 

• support workplace learning. 



Agriculture 

• AGR1010: Agriculture: The Big Picture 

• AGR1030: Production Basics 

• AGR1060: Consumer Products & Services 

• AGR1070: Basic Landscape/Turf Care 

• AGR1080: Basic Floral Design 

Career Transitions 

• CTR1010: Job Preparation 

• CTR1210: Personal Safety (Management) 

Communication Technology 

• COM 1020: Media & You 

• COM 1030: Photography 1 

• COM 1050: Printing 1 

Community Health 

• CMH1040: Caring for Children 

• CMH1050: Child Development 

• CMH1060: Home Care 1 



Design Studies 

• DES1010: Sketch, Draw & Model 

• DES1020: The Design Process 

• DES1030: 2-D Design Fundamentals 

Electro-Technologies 

• ELT1010: Electro-assembly 1 

Energy and Mines 

• ENM1010: Overview of Alberta Geology 

• ENM1020: Nonrenewable Resources 

Fabrication Studies 

• FAB 1040: Oxyacetylene Welding 

• FAB 1050: Basic Electric Welding 

• FAB 1100: Fabrication Principles 

Fashion Studies 

• FAS 1050: Repair & Recycle 

• FAS 1070: Creative Yarns/Textiles 



Construction Technologies 

• CON1010: Basic Tools & Materials 

• CON1070: Building Construction 

• CON 1120: Project Management 

• CON 11 30: Solid Stock Construction 

• CON 1160: Manufactured Materials 

Cosmetology Studies 

• COS 1010: Personal Images 

• COS 1020: Hair Graphics 1 

• COS 1030: Hair & Scalp Care 1 

• COS 1040: Forming & Finishing 1 

• COS 1050: Permanent Waving 1 
(The Physical Process) 

• COS 1060: Skin Care 1 (Basic Principles) 

• COS 1070: Manicuring 1 

• COS 1080: Theatrical Makeup 1 
(Basic Principles) 



Foods 

• FOD1010: Food Basics 

• FOD1020: Baking Basics 

• FOD 1050: Fast & Convenience Foods 



Forestry 

• FOR1010: Why Forestry? 

• FOR 1020: Forest Regions of Canada 

• FOR1050: Mapping & Aerial Photos 

• FOR1060: Measuring the Forest 1 

Information Processing 

• INF1010: Computer Operations 

• INF 1020: Keyboarding 1 

• INF1030: Word Processing 1 



296 I Appendix 4 
(1998) 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

© Alberta Education. Alberta. Canada 



Attachment 6 (continued) 



Logistics 

• LOG 10 10: Logistics 

• LOG 1020: Warehouse & Distribute 1 

Management and Marketing 

• MAM 1010: Management & Marketing Basics 

• MAM 1020: Quality Customer Service 

• MAM 1030: Communication Strategies 1 

Mechanics 

• MEC1010: Modes & Mechanisms 

• MEC1020: Vehicle Service & Care 

• MEC1040: Engine Fundamentals 

• MEC1090: Electrical Fundamentals 

• MEC1110: Pneumatics & Hydraulics 

• MEC1150: Ride & Control Systems 

• MEC1160: Structures & Materials 

• MEC1170: Metal Forming & Finishing 

• MEC1190: Surface Preparation 1 

Tourism Studies 

• TOU1030: Quality Guest Service 

• TOU1040: The Food Sector 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

© Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada 



Appendix 4 1 297 
(1998) 




CAREER & 

TECHNOLOGY 

STUDIES 

Manual for Administrators, 
Counsellors and Teachers 



Appendix 5: 

Planning Ahead — 

CTS Transitions into 

Post-secondary Programs 

and the Workplace 



June 1998 



■ 

■ 
■ 
■ 



I 



2 QQ I Aouendix 4 CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

47 O I W Alberta Education. Alberta, Canada 1 

(1998) 1 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

PURPOSE 303 

CAREER PLANNING AND PREPARATION 303 

National Occupational Classification 304 

Career Transitions 304 

Employability Skills 304 

PATHWAYS INTO POST-SECONDARY 305 

Recognition of Prior Learning 305 

Apprenticeship Articulation Agreements 306 

CREDENTIALLING FOR THE WORKPLACE 307 

OFF-CAMPUS LEARNING 307 

Work Experience Program 307 

Registered Apprenticeship Program 308 

ATTACHMENTS 

Attachment 1: Overview of the National Occupational Classification 309 

Attachment 2: Apprenticeship Articulation Agreements (Revised 1999) 311 

Attachment 3: Credentialling Opportunities in CTS Strands (Revised 1999) 319 

Attachment 4: Directory of Apprenticeship and Credentialling Contacts (Revised 1999) 327 



CTS Manual for Administrators. Counsellors and Teachers Appendix 5 / Jul 

© Alberta Learning. Alberta. Canada (Revised 1999) 



a 

■ 

■ 
■ 
i 
I 
I 
l 
I 
l 
i 
I 
P 
l 

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302 I Appendix 5 CTS Manual lor Administrators. Counsellors and Teachers 

(Revised 1999) © Alberta Learning. Alberta. Canada 



I 
I 



I 



302 I Appendix 5 CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

(1 998) ® Albcrta Education, Alberta, Canada 



PURPOSE 

This appendix serves as a reference in planning effective transitions 
for CTS students into post-secondary programs and the workplace. It 
provides information regarding: 

• career options that align with each of the 22 CTS strands 

• strand-related post-secondary education and training programs 
offered at college, technical and university levels 

• recognition of prior learning in CTS at post-secondary levels, and 
articulation agreements with Alberta's apprenticeship trades 

• workplace credentials that can be delivered through partnerships 
with business, community and government organizations 

• off-campus education programs that extend learning opportunities 
beyond the boundaries of the school. 



CAREER PLANNING AND PREPARATION 



Refer to relevant career web 
sites, including: 

• OCCINFO <www.aecd. 
gov.ab.ca/occinfo> 

• CAREER 
INFORMATION 
HOTLINE 
<www.aecd.gov. 
ab.ca/hotlino 

• HUMAN RESOURCES 
DEVELOPMENT 
CANADA <http://roe- 
ab.hrdc-drhc.gc.ca>. 



CTS is designed to assist all students — those who plan to attend 
university, college or technical school, as well as those who move 
from high school directly into the work force — to experience smooth 
career transitions. As students progress from introductory- to 
advanced-level courses, they should develop skills in career planning, 
explore numerous strand-related career options, and begin to prepare 
for present and future career options. 

Junior and senior high schools are encouraged to use current labour 
market information in developing career awareness within the context 
of specific strands and courses. Competencies relevant to career 
planning and awareness are defined within each CTS strand through 
learner outcomes (learner expectations in 1997 documents). 

Assessment standards and tools provide further benchmarks for 
establishing appropriate levels of career awareness within specific 
CTS courses. 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 
© Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada 



Appendix 5/303 
(1998) 



Refer to Attachment 1: 
Overview of the National 
Occupational Classification. 



NATIONAL OCCUPATIONAL CLASSIFICATION 

Each CTS strand is supported with a comprehensive list of related 
occupations and career options that align with National Occupational 
Classification (NOC) descriptions. Approximately 800 linkages to the 
labour market are identified across the 22 CTS strands, each further 
described by educational and training requirements. 



Refer to the Career 
Transitions Guide to 
Standards and 
Implementation, Section B: 
Strand Rationale and 
Philosophy. 



CAREER TRANSITIONS 

The Career Transitions strand provides extensive opportunities for 
career preparation through its themes on Career Readiness, 
Leadership, Career Extensions, Career Credentials and Job Safety 
Skills. 

Of particular relevance to career planning and preparation at the high 
school level are the following courses in the Career Readiness theme: 

• CTR1010: Job Preparation 

• CTR2010: Job Maintenance 

• CTR3010: Preparing for Change. 

Courses can be designed that prepare students for particular career 
fields by combining one or more courses from the Career Transitions 
strand with intermediate- and advanced-level courses from other 
strands having a business/industry focus. 



Refer to the CTS Guide to 
Standards and 
Implementation, Section A: 
Program Rationale and 
Philosophy. 



EMPLOY ABILITY SKILLS 

Career preparation is further enhanced through a set of basic 
competencies or employability skills integrated throughout all CTS 
strands and courses. The basic competencies align with critical skills 
for employability identified by the Conference Board of Canada, and 
establish standards of performance for: 

• managing learning 

• managing resources 

• problem solving and innovation 

• communicating effectively 

• working with others 

• demonstrating responsibility. 

Organized around four developmental stages that address the learning 
needs of both junior and senior high school students, the basic 
competencies are included as appropriate in curriculum and 
assessment standards defined for each CTS course. 



304 /Appendix 5 
(1998) 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

© Alberta Education, Alberta. Canada 



■ 

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PATHWAYS INTO POST-SECONDARY 



Refer to the CTS Guides to 
Standards and 
Implementation. Section H: 
Linkages/Transitions. 



Involvement of business/industry, professional associations and post- 
secondary programs in the development of CTS curriculum has 
enhanced its relevance and credibility in career contexts. Many 
students who complete intermediate- and advanced-level courses in 
one or more CTS strands develop competencies that align with those 
expected by post-secondary institutions. 

A summary of post-secondary programs offered at the college, 
technical and university level, as well as through Apprenticeship and 
Industry Training, is published periodically in It's About Time to Start 
Thinking About Your Future by Alberta Learning and is available for 
purchase from the LRDC. This information is summarized for each 
CTS strand through a list of strand-related post-secondary programs. 



Refer to: 

• CTS Guide to Standards 
and Implementation. 
Section II: Linkages/ 
Transitions 

• CTS weh site ("'What's 
New and Upcoming 
Events'.'"). 



RECOGNITION OF PRIOR LEARNING 

Prior learning in CTS may be recognized at the post-secondary level in 
a variety of ways, including: 

recommended learning 
preferred entrance 
prerequisite to entry 
time credit 
partial credit 
advanced placement. 

While agreements with post-secondary institutions vary in terms of 
how prior learning in CTS is recognized, most provide preferred 
entrance, advanced placement and/or advanced standing for CTS 
students who have successfully completed designated courses or 
course sequences. Schools and school systems are encouraged to 
contact local post-secondary institutions regarding: 

• the status of existing articulation agreements established at the 
provincial level 

• other ways of having locally designed CTS courses recognized by 
post-secondary institutions. 

Schools and teachers may decide to work with local post-secondary 
institutions in establishing a basis for recognizing prior learning in 
locally designed CTS courses. 

Advanced level courses arc accepted in lieu of 30-level practical arts 
courses in qualifying for post-secondary entrance. 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 
&") Alberta Learning. Alberta. Canada 



Appendix 5 / 305 
(Revised 1999) 



■ 



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APPRENTICESHIP ARTICULATION AGREEMENTS 

Articulation agreements have been established between CTS strands 
and a number of the Alberta Apprenticeship Training Programs. 
Through these agreements, students who complete required CTS 
courses and successfully challenge appropriate theory and practical 
examinations tor particular trades may qualify for: 

• a portion of the trade's in-school training program, and/or 

• on-the-job time credit within the trade. 

The following chart summarizes apprenticeship articulation 
agreements currently in place. 



Apprenticeship 
Trade 


Length 

of 

Program 


Number of 

Required CTS 

I -Credit 

Courses 


Credit for 
Formal 
Training 


On-the-job 
Time 
Credit 


Automotive Service 
Technician 


4 yrs 


25 
35 


I s1 Period 
l s '&2' Kl Period 


Nil 
525 hrs 


Cabinetmaker 


4 yrs 


30 


Nil 


408 hrs 


Carpenter 


4 yrs 


25 


I s ' Period 


Nil 


Cook 


3 yrs 


17 
30 


I s ' Period 
T& 2'"' Period 


NU 
450 hrs 


Electrician 


4 yrs 


25 


1 st Period 


Nil 


Electronic- 
Technician 


4 yrs 


25 


1 " Period 


Nil 


Hairstylist 


2 yrs 


35 
55 


I M Period 
I s ' & 2 ,H| Period 


525 hrs 
700 hrs 


Welder 


3 yrs 


25 


I ''Period 


Nil 



Refer to Attachment 2: 
Apprenticeship Articulation 
Agreements. 



Further details regarding each articulation agreement — including 
correlations to CTS strands and courses — are provided as an 
attachment to this document. 



Refer to Attachment 4: 
Directory of Apprenticeship 
and Credentialling Contacts. 



Additional information can be obtained by contacting the 
Apprenticeship and Industry Training Division. A list of local Career 
Development Centres throughout Alberta is also provided as an 
attachment. 



Current information regarding the status of articulation agreements 
with Alberta's apprenticeship trades is available on the CTS web site 
at <http://cdnct.cdc.gov.ab.ca/cts>. 



306 /Appendix 5 
(Revised 1999) 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

CO Alberta Learning. Alberta. Canada 



p 
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p 



I 
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CREDENTIALLING FOR THE WORKPLACE 



CTS students may earn partial or complete credentials recognized in 
the workplace and/or by post-secondary institutions through their 
work in particular CTS strands and courses. Credentials enhance the 
credibility of learning by providing written evidence of a student's 
qualifications with respect to competencies established by agencies 
external to the school. 



Refer to Attachment 3: 
Crcdentialling Opportunities 
in CTS Strands. 



Refer to the CTS Guide to 
Standards and 
Implementation, Section H: 
Linkages/Transitions. 



Students can earn credentials by successfully meeting the curriculum 
and assessment standards established for: 

• specific credential-bearing courses 

• generic "practicum" courses from the Career Transitions strand 
that incorporate learnings requisite to particular credentials. 

Each CTS strand provides information regarding relevant 
credentialling opportunities. Schools can use this information as a 
basis for further research and planning regarding credentials that may 
be viable in their community. Teachers are encouraged to plan 
courses that incorporate these learning opportunities when 
appropriate. 



OFF-CAMPUS LEARNING 



A variety of off-campus learning experiences are suggested 
throughout the CTS curriculum — work study, work experience, job 
shadowing, mentorship. Each provides valuable opportunities for 
both students and schools to enhance connections with 
business/industry, professional associations, post-secondary 
institutions and/or other community groups. 



WORK EXPERIENCE PROGRAM 



Refer to: 

• Off- campus Education 
Policy. 1997 

• Off-campus Education 
Guide for Administrators, 
Counsellors & Teachers, 
1995. 



The Work Experience program is designed to extend the boundaries of 
learning beyond the school into the community through 
education-business partnerships. Work Experience courses are 
delivered off-campus under the supervision of a community partner, 
and enable students to develop: 

• an understanding of expectations in the workplace 

• knowledge and skills relevant to a specific career. 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 
© Alberta Education. Alberta. Canada 



Appendix 5/307 
(1998) 



p 
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Students can spend from 75 to 250 hours in Work Experience courses 
in each of Grades 10, 1 1 and 12. Although Work Experience and CTS 
are different programs, CTR1010: Job Preparation is a prerequisite 
for all Work Experience courses. 

Schools may choose to register students concurrently in both CTS and 
Work Experience courses. 



Refer to the Registered 
Apprenticeship Program 
Information Booklet, April 
1997. 



REGISTERED APPRENTICESHIP PROGRAM 

The Registered Apprenticeship Program (RAP) is designed for high 
school students who wish to begin a trade apprenticeship while 
completing their high school diploma. A RAP apprentice accumulates 
hours of on-the-job training as credit toward both a journeyman 
certificate and a high school diploma. After graduating from high 
school a RAP apprentice can become a full-time apprentice. 

RAP 15-25-35 courses are taught through off-campus learning under 
the joint supervision of a certified teacher and a journeyman in the 
workplace. The hours of work are flexible, determined by the 
employer, the student and the school. Some options are: 

• working as a RAP apprentice for one school semester, and going 
to school during the other semester 

• working as a RAP apprentice for a half day, and attending school 
for the other half day 

• working as a RAP apprentice during the summer months, holidays 
and weekends, and attending school during the regular school 
term 

• working as a RAP apprentice one or two days a week, and 
attending school on the other days. 

Although RAP and CTS are separate programs, courses in each may 
complement one another. Students can enroll in both RAP courses 
and trade-related CTS courses in the same school year providing the 
RAP learning plan identifies new learnings substantially different 
from those included in the CTS courses that require access to 125 
hours of on-the-job training. 



308 I Appendix 5 
(1998) 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

© Alberta Education. Alberta, Canada 



Attachment 1 



Overview of the National Occupational Classification 



The National Occupational Classification (NOC): Occupational Descriptions, Employment and 
Immigration Canada, Minister of Supply and Service Canada, 1993, provides a systematic taxonomy of 
occupations in the Canadian labour market. The NOC system is based on skill level and skill type 
criteria. 



SKILL LEVEL CRITERIA 


SKILL LEVEL 


EDUCATION/TRAINING 


OTHER 


SKILL LEVEL A 


• University degree (bachelor's, 
master's, or post-graduate 




SKILL LEVEL B 


• Two to three years of post-secondary 
education at community college , 
institute of technology or CEGEP or 

• Two to four years of apprenticeship 
training or 

• Three to four years of secondary 
school and more than two years of 
on-the-job training courses or specific 
work experience 


• Occupations with supervisory 
responsibilities are assigned to skill 
level B 

• Occupations with significant health 
and safety responsibilities (e.g., fire 
fighters, police officers and registered 
nursing assistants) are assigned to 
skill level B 


SKILL LEVEL C 


• One to four years of secondary school 
education 

• Up to two years of on-the-job training 
courses or specific work experience 




SKILL LEVEL D 


• Up to two years of secondary school 
and short work demonstration or 
on-the-job training 





SKILL TYPE CRITERIA 


Skill type defines the type of work performed and is represented in NOC by the first number in each of 


the occupational area's classification. 


= Management Occupations 


5 = Occupations in An, Culture, Recreation and Sport 


1 = Business, Finance and Administration 


6 = Sales and Service 


2 = National and Applied Sciences and Related 


7 = Trades, Transport and Equipment Operators and 


Occupations 


Related Occupations 


3 = Health Occupations 


8 = Occupations Unique to Primary Industry 


4 = Occupations in Social Sciences, Education, 


9 = Occupations Unique to Processing, Manufacturing and 


Government Service and Religion 


Utilities. 



Refer to the Guide to Standards and Implementation, Section H: Linkages/Transitions for a list of 
occupations in the Canadian labour market related to each CTS strand. 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

© Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada 



Appendix 5 / 309 
(1998) 



310 1 Appendix 5 CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

( 1 998) © Alberta Education, Alberta, Canada 



I 



Attachment 2 



Apprenticeship Articulation Agreement: 
Automotive Service Technician Trade 
Student Information and Sign-off Form 



Based on an articulation agreement established with 
the Apprenticeship and Industry Training Division: 

• students who successfully complete 25 required 
CTS courses related to the Automotive Service 
Technician trade may be credited, upon 
successfully challenging the appropriate theory 
examinations, with the first period of formal 
instruction . Logged hours earned wiUiin the 
industry toward the trade may also be credited 
upon the recommendation of the employer 

• students who successfully complete 35 required 
CTS courses related to the Automotive Service 
Technician trade may be credited, upon 
successfully challenging the appropriate theory 
examinations, with the first and second periods of 
formal instruction and 525 hours of on-the-job 
training (375 hours for the first period and 150 
hours for the second period). Additional logged 
hours earned within the industry toward the trade 
may also be credited upon the recommendation of 
the employer. 

Additional terms of the agreement require that: 

• required CTS courses identified with a ■ must be 
delivered and assessed by a journeyman 
automotive service technician 

• following the completion of each semester/school 
term, marks consistent with those reported to 
Alberta Learning be entered on this form for those 
courses identified to the right that were 
successfully completed by the student 

• upon successful completion of an accredited CTS 
automotive service technician program. Part B of 
this form be completed by the supervising teacher, 
journeyman and principal, verifying successful 
completion of all required courses. 

Advanced standing in the apprenticeship program 
tor Automotive Service Technician will not be 
granted unless all requirements for program 
delivery, reporting of achievement and 
verification/sign-off as outlined in this agreement 
have been met. Students eligible for advanced 
standing through the terms of this agreement will 
be required to produce this form at the time of 
making application to enter an apprenticeship 
contract. 



Part A: Student and School Information 

Student: 

School: 



Required CTS Courses in Mechanics 

and Related Strands* 



Course 
Code 


Course Name 


Course 
Mark 


FIRST PERIOD 


VIIiCI020 


Vehicle Service & Care 




MET 104(1 


Engine Fundamentals 




MliCKWO 


Electrical Fundamentals 




\ir.ci IK) 


Pneumatics & Hydraulics 




Minno 


Mechanical Systems 




MECII50 


Ride it Control Systems 




MECIIM) 


Structures & Materials 




l : ABI04(> 


Oxyacelylene Welding 




i-ABmo 


Principles of Machining 




MEC2020 


Vehicle Maintenance" 




MEC2030 


Lubrication & Cooling" 




MIIC2060 


Ignition Systems" 




MI-C20W) 


Electrical Components" 




MEC2I00 


Power Assist Accessories" 




MILC2IH) 


Braking Systems" 




MEC2I20 


Hydraulic Accessories" 




(TR2I II) 


Project A (Brake Project)" 




MEC2I30 


Drive Trains" 




(TR2I20 


Projecl 2B (Electrical Project)" 




MEC2I50 


Suspension Systems" 




MEC2I60 


Steering Systems" 




MEC3O40 


Engine Tune-up" 




MEC3I0U 


Safety Systems" 




MECHM) 


Wheel Alignment" 




CTR3I20 


Project 3B (Wheel Alignment Project)" 




SECOND 1'ERIOD 


MEC2040 


Fuel & Exhaust Systems" 




MEC2050 


Alternative Fuel Engines" 




MEC2070 


Emission Controls" 




MEC3030 


Engine Diagnosis" 




MEC3050 


Engine Replacement" 




MIX MOM) 


Engine Reconditioning I" 




MEC3070 


Engine Reconditioning 2" 




(Tiono 


Project 3C (Engine Components Project)" 




MEC3I40 


Drive Train Repair" 




CTR3140 


Rear Axle and Differential Project" 





Courses 
automot 



that must he delivered and assessed by a journeyman 
ve service technician. 



Part B: Verification and Sign-off 

Number of Courses Successfully Completed: 
Dale Issued: 



School Telephone: 

Supervising Teacher: 
Journeyman Instructor: 



Journeyman Instructor's Signature: 

Journeyman Certificate No.: 

Supervising Teacher's Signature: _ 
Principal's Signature: 



*For a detailed description of CTS courses, see the appropriate Guide to Standards and Implementation available for 
purchase from the Learning Resources Distributing Centre, or for viewing and downloading from the CTS web site. 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

M Alberta Learning. Alberta. Canada 



Appendix 5/ 311 
(Revised 1999) 



I 



I 



Attachment 2 (continued) 



Apprenticeship Articulation Agreement: 

Cabinetmaker Trade 
Student Information and Sign-off Form 



Based on an articulation agreement established with 
the Apprenticeship and Industry Training Division: 

• students who in each year of high school 
successfully complete 10 or more required CTS 
courses related to the Cabinetmaker trade may be 
granted upon completion of each year of high 
school with 136 hours of on-the-job training 
credits (to a total of 408 hours) toward their 
apprenticeship. Additional logged hours earned 
within the industry toward the trade may also be 
credited upon the recommendation of the 
employer. 

Additional terms of the agreement require that: 

• required CTS courses identified with a ■ must be 
delivered and assessed by a journeyman 
cabinetmaker 

• students must obtain a final grade of 70% or more 
in each CTS course 

• following the completion of each semester/school 
term, marks consistent with those reported to 
Alberta Learning be entered on this form for those 
courses identified to the right that were 
successfully completed by the student 

• upon successful completion of an accredited CTS 
cabinetmaker program. Part B of this form be 
completed by the supervising teacher, journeyman 
and principal, verifying successful completion of 
all required courses. 

Advanced standing in the apprenticeship program 
for Cabinetmaker will not be granted unless all 
requirements for program delivery, reporting of 
achievement and verification/sign-off as outlined in 
this agreement have been met. Students eligible for 
advanced standing through the terms of this 
agreement will be required to produce this form at 
the time of making application to enter an 
apprenticeship contract. 



Part A: Student and School Information 

Student: 

School: 



Required CTS Courses in Construction 
Technologies and Related Strands* 



Course 
Code 


Course Name 


Course 
Mark 


FIRST PERIOD 


CONIOIl) 


Basic Tools & Materials 




DF.SIOIO 


Sketch. Draw and Model 




COM 120 


Project Management 




COM 130 


Solid Slock Construction 




FAB 1 (WO 


Sheet Fabrication 1 (Hand Processes) 




CTR12I0 


Personal Safety (Management) 




FOR2070 


Harvesting Practices (Harvest/Processing) 




COM 160 


Manufactured Materials 




CON2I20 


Multiple Materials 




l : AB2()2() 


Print Reading 




CON 2 IK) 


Furniture Making 1 (Box Construction)" 




CON2I40 


Furniture Making 2 (Frame and Panel)" 




CON2IM) 


Cabineimaking 1 (Web & Face Frame)" 




CON2I70 


Cabinetmaking 2 (Door& Drawer)" 




CTR2I.K) 


Project 2C (Practical Skill Development)" 




(TR2I40 


Project 2D (Practical Skill Development)" 




(TR2I50 


Project 21: (Practical Skill Development)" 




CON2IM0 


Manufacturing Systems* 




CON2200 


Pnxluct Development" 




CONJIWJ 


Production Planning" 




COM200 


Production Management" 




CON3I20 


Tool Maintenance" 




CTR3I30 


Project 3C (Practical Skill Development)" 




(TR3I40 


Project 3D (Practical Skill Development)" 




CTR3IU0 


Praciicum A (Explosive Actuated Tools)" 




SFCOND PERIOD 


COM 140 


Turning Operations 




CON 2 150 


Wood Forming" 




CON2I60 


Finishing & Refinishing" 




DES2050 


Technical Drawing Applications" 




CON30M) 


Doors it Trim" 




COM 130 


Furniture Making 3 (Leg & Rail)" 




COM 140 


Furniture Making 4 (Surface 
Enhancement)" 




CON3IM) 


Cabineimaking 3 (Counter/Cabinet Tops) " 




COM 150 


Furniture Repair" 




CTR3I50 


Project 3E (Practical Skill Development)" 





Courses that must be delivered and assessed by a journeyman 
cabinetmaker. 



Part B: Verification and Sign-off 

Number of Courses Successfully Completed: 
Dale Issued: 



School Telephone: 

Supervising Teacher: 
Journeyman Instructor: 



Journeyman Instructor's Signature: 

Journeyman Certificate No.: 

Supervising Teacher's Signature: 
Principal's Signature: 



♦ For a detailed description of CTS courses, see the appropriate Guide to Standards and Implementation available for 
purchase from the Learning Resources Distributing Centre, or for viewing and downloading from the CTS web site. 



312 /Appendix 5 
(Revised 1999) 



CTS Manual lor Administrators. Counsellors and Teachers 

i") Alberta Learning. Alberta. Canada 



Attachment 2 (continued) 



Apprenticeship Articulation Agreement: 

Carpenter Trade 
Student Information and Sign-off Form 



Based on an articulation agreement established with 
the Apprenticeship and Industry Training Division: 

• students who successfully complete 25 required 
CTS courses related to the Carpenter trade may be 
credited, upon successfully challenging the 
appropriate theory and practical examinations, with 
the first period of formal instruction . Logged hours 
earned within the industry toward the trade may 
also be credited upon the recommendation of the 
employer. 

Additional terms of the agreement require that: 

• required CTS courses identified with a ■ must be 
delivered and assessed by a journeyman carpenter 

• following the completion of each semester/school 
term, marks consistent widi those reported to 
Albena Learning be entered on this form for those 
courses identified to the right that were 
successfully completed by the student 

• upon successful completion of an accredited CTS 
carpenter program. Part B of this form be 
completed by the supervising teacher, journeyman 
and principal, verifying successful completion of 
all required courses. 

Advanced standing in the apprenticeship program 
for Carpenter will not be granted unless all 
requirements for program delivery, reporting of 
achievement and verification/sign-off as outlined in 
this agreement have been met. Students eligible for 
advanced standing through the terms of this 
agreement will be required to produce this form at 
the time of making application to enter an 
apprenticeship contract. 



Required CTS Courses in Construction 
Technologies and Related Strands* 



Course 
Code 


Course Name 


Course 
Mark 


HKST PERIOD 


CONI0I0 


Basic Tools it Materials 




CON 1070 


Building Consiruclion 




df.sioio 


Sketch. Draw & Model 




COM 120 


Project Management 




COM 1.11) 


Solid Stock Construction 




COM IN) 


Manufactured Materials 




con: i;o 


Multiple Materials 




CON 2 1.K) 


Furniture Making 1 (Box Construction)" 




con: in) 


Cabinet making 1 (Web it Face Frame)" 




con:i7o 


Cabineimaking 2 (Door it Drawer)" 




iab2oio 


Structural F.ngineering 




i au:o:o 


Print Reading 




con:oio 


Site Preparation" 




CON 2020 


Concrete Forming" 




CTK2II0 


Project 2A (Concrete Forming and 
Placing)" 




CON 2040 


Framing Systems 1 (Floor & Wall)" 




CON2050 


Rix)l Structures 1 (Framing & Finishing)" 




CON. 10X0 


Ijiergy-ell'icient Housing" 




CONMOIO 


Concrete Work (Structures & Finishes)" 




CONMI00 


Commercial Structures" 




CON.1I 10 


Site Management" 




CON 11 20 


Tcx)l Maintenance" 




CTR2I20 


Project 2B (Practical Work)" 




CTK.HIO 


Project 1A (Practical Work)" 




CTk.HUO 


Praciicum A (lixplosive Actuated Tools)" 





Courses that must be delivered and assessed by a journeyman 
carpenter. 



Part A: Student and School Information 

Student: 

School: 



School Telephone: 

Supervising Teacher: _ 
Journeyman Instructor: 



Part B: Verification and Sign-off 

Number of Courses Successfully Completed: 
Date Issued: 



Journeyman Instructor's Signature: 

Journeyman Certificate No.: 

Supervising Teacher's Signature: _ 
Principal's Signature: 



*For a detailed description of CTS courses, see the appropriate Guide tn Standards and Implementation available for 
purchase from the Learning Resources Distributing Centre, or for viewing and downloading from the CTS web 

site. 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 
© Alberta Learning. Alberta. Canada 



Appendix 5 / 31 J 
(Revised 1999) 



Attachment 2 (continued) 



Apprenticeship Articulation Agreement: 

Cook Trade 
Student Information and Sign-off Form 



Based on an articulation agreement established with 
the Apprenticeship and Industry Training Division: 

• students who successfully complete 17 required 
CTS courses related to the Cook trade may be 
credited, upon successfully challenging the 
appropriate theory examinations, with the first 
period of formal instruction . Paid hours earned 
within the industry toward the trade may also be 
credited upon the recommendation of the employer 

• students who successfully complete 30 required 
CTS courses related to the Cook trade may be 
credited, upon successfully challenging the 
appropriate theory examinations, with the first and 
second periods of formal instruction and 450 hours 
of on-the-job training . Additional logged hours 
earned within the industry toward the trade may 
also be credited upon the recommendation of the 
employer. 

Additional terms of the agreement require that: 

• all required CTS courses must be delivered and 
assessed by a journeyman cook 

• in order to challenge the first period examination, 
candidates must possess a Food Safe Provincial 
Certificate 

• following the completion of each semester/school 
term, marks consistent with those reported to 
Alberta Learning be entered on this form for those 
courses identified to the right that were 
successfully completed by the student 

• upon successful completion of an accredited CTS 
cook program. Part B of this form be completed by 
the supervising teacher, journeyman and principal, 
verifying successful completion of all required 
courses. 

Advanced standing in the apprenticeship program 
lor Cook will not be granted unless all requirements 
for program delivery, reporting of achievement and 
veriiication/sign-off as outlined in this agreement 
have been met. Students eligible for advanced 
standing through the terms of this agreement will 
be required to produce this form at the time of 
making application to enter an apprenticeship 
contract. 

Part A: Student and School Information 

Student: 

School: 

School Telephone: 

Supervising Teacher: 

Journeyman Instructor: 



Required CTS Courses in Foods 
and Related Strands* 



Course 
Code 


Course Name 


Course 
Mark 


FIRST PERIOD 


roDioio 


l : ood Basics 




r()DI()2l) 


Baking Basics 




l()OH)5() 


l : asi «t Convenience Foods 




lODIOol) 


Canadian Heritage Foods 




101)2010 


Food it Nutrition Basics 




FOD2040 


Cake &. Pastry 




FOD2050 


Yeasi Breads &. Rolls 




1002060 


Milk Products & Eggs 




IOD2070 


Slocks. Soups & Sauces 




IOI)20S0 


Vegeiahles/Fruiis/Ci rains 




IOD2IW0 


Creative Cold Foods 




IOD2I00 


Basic Meal Cookery 




IOD2I II) 


lish & Poultry 




101)21.10 


Vegetarian Cuisine 




101)2150 


Food Safely &. Sanitation ♦ 




IOD2I70 


International Cuisine 1 




IOD.10W 


Basic Meal Cutting 




SFXONI) PERIOD 


(TK2II0 


Project 2A (Canadian Heritage Foods) 




(TR2I20 


Project 2B (Food &. Nutrition Basics) 




CTR3II0 


Project 3A (Vegetables/Fruits/Grains) 




CTR.1I20 


Project IB (Pish & Poultry) 




101)30.11) 


Creative Baking 




101)3040 


Advanced Yeasl Products 




101)3050 


Advanced Soups & Sauces 




FOD3060 


Food Presentation 




101)3070 


Short Order Cooking 




FOD3080 


Advanced Meat Cookery 




1=01)31 (XI 


Entertaining wiih Food 




101)3110 


Pood Processing 




FOD3I40 


International Cuisine 2 





♦ Certification requirement. 



Part B: Verification and Sian-otT 

Number of Courses Successfully Completed: 
Date Issued: ^^______ 



Journeyman Instructor's Signature: 

Journeyman Certificate No.: 

Supervising Teacher's Signature: 
Principal's Signature: 



* For a detailed description of CTS courses, see the appropriate Guide to Standards and Implementation available for 
purchase from the Learning Resources Distributing Centre, or for viewing and downloading from the CTS web site. 



314 /Appendix 5 
(Revised 1999) 



CTS Manual for Administrators. Counsellors and Teachers 

S) Alherta Learning. Alberta. Canada 



Attachment 2 (continued) 



I 



Apprenticeship Articulation Agreement: 

Electrician Trade 
Student Information and Sign-off Form 



Based on an articulation agreement established 
with the Apprenticeship and Industry Training 
Division: 

• students who successfully complete the 25 
required CTS courses identified to the right may 
be credited, upon successfully challenging the 
appropriate theory and practical examinations, 
with the first period of formal instruction in the 
apprenticeship program for Electrician. Logged 
hours earned within the industry toward the 
electrician trade may also be credited upon the 
recommendation of the employer. 

Additional terms of the agreement require that: 

• required CTS courses identified with a ■ must be 
delivered and assessed by a journeyman 
electrician 

• following the completion of each 
semester/school term, marks consistent with 
those reported to AJberta Learning be entered on 
this form for those courses identified to the right 
that were successfully completed by the student 

• upon successful completion of an accredited 
CTS electrician program. Part B of this form be 
completed by the supervising teacher, 
journeyman and principal, verifying successful 
completion of all required courses. 

Advanced standing in the apprenticeship program 
tor Electrician will not be granted unless all 
requirements for program delivery, reporting of 
achievement and verification/sign-ofT as outlined 
in this agreement have been met. Students eligible 
for advanced standing through the terms of this 
agreement will be required to produce this form 
at the time of making application to enter an 
apprenticeship contract. 



Required CTS Courses in Electro-Technologies 
and Related Strands* 



Course 
Lode 


Course Name 


Course 
Mark 


FIRST PERIOD 


MP.CUWII 


lllccirical Fundamentals 




1:1X1010 


PJectro-asscmbly 1 




ra.Tio.iH 


Conversion &. Distribution 




ra.Tiottn 


Control Systems 1 




ra.Tiiin 


Security Systems 1 




(TRIIIO 


Project 1 A (Practical Work/Skill Development) 




l : AB2H2H 


Print Reading 




CON 21)71) 


lllccirical Systems " 




1:1.1*2010 


r.leclro-assemhly 2 




1:1.1*2021) 


lllcclrical Servicing " 




1:1.1*20.10 


Branch Circuit Wiring " 




DI-S2O50 


Technical Drawing Applications " 




1:1.1*20X0 


Control Systems 2 * 




M1-C2IKM) 


lllccirical Components " 




l:I.T2ll(l 


Security Systems 2 " 




1:1X2120 


lilcctro-optics " 




1:1X21. VI 


Magnetic Control Devices 




(TR2II0 


Project 2A (Practical Work/Skill Development) " 




1:1X1030 


Power Systems it Services " 




l-l.T.ltUH 


( icncrai ion/Transformation 




l:IXH40 


Motors " 




1:1X1 IM) 


Control Applications " 




CTR.1H40 


Practicum A (Explosive Actuated Tools) " 




(TR.1IIU 


Project .1A (Practical Work/Skill Development) " 




(TR.1I20 


Project .IB (Practical Work/Skill Development) " 





" Courses that must he delivered and assessed by a journeyman 
electrician. 



Part A: Student and School Information 

Student: 

School: 



School Telephone: 

Supervising Teacher: 
Journeyman Instructor: 



Part B: Verification and Sign-off 
Number of Courses Successfully Completed: 
Date Issued: 



Journeyman Instructor's Signature: 

Journeyman Certificate No.: 

Supervising Teacher's Signature: _ 
Principal's Signature: 



*For a detailed description of CTS courses, see the appropriate Guide to Standards and Implementation available for 
purchase from the Learning Resources Distributing Centre, or for viewing and downloading from die CTS web site. 



CTS Manual for Administrators. Counsellors and Teachers 

& Alberta Learning. Alberta. Canada 



Appendix 5/315 
(Revised 1999) 



Attachment 2 (continued) 
Apprenticeship Articulation Agreement: Electronic Technician Trade 
Student Information and Sign-off Form 



Based on an articulation agreement established with 
the Apprenticeship and Industry Training Division: 

• students who successfully complete the 25 required CTS 
courses identified to the right and earn a minimum of three- 
credits in Work Experience or RAP courses in the 
electronic technician trade may be credited, upon 
successfully challenging the appropriate theory and 
practical examinations, with the first period of formal 
instruction and at least 75 hours of on-the-ioh training : i.e.. 
25 hours for each Work Experience credit earned. 
Additional logged hours earned within the industry may he- 
credited upon the recommendation of the employer. 

Additional terms of the agreement state that: 

• required CTS courses identified with a ■ must be delivered 
and assessed by a journeyman electronic technician or 
certified electronic engineering technologist 

• required CTS courses identified with a ♦ must be 
delivered and assessed by a journeyman electronic 
technician in a real or simulated workplace environment 

• Registered Apprenticeship Program (RAP) hours worked 
are automatically credited toward an apprenticeship and 
will not be credited twice 

• following the completion of each semester/school term, 
marks consistent with those reported to Alberta Learning 
be entered on this form for those courses identified to the 
right that were successfully completed by the student 

• upon successful completion of an accredited CTS 
electronic technician program. Part B of this form be 
completed by the supervising teacher, journeyman and 
principal, verifying successful completion of all required 
courses. 

Advanced standing in the apprenticeship program 
for Electronic Technician will not be granted unless 
all requirements for program delivery, reporting of 
achievement and verification/sign-off as outlined in 
this agreement have been met. Students eligible for 
advanced standing through the terms of this 
agreement will be required to produce this form at 
the time of making application to enter an 
apprenticeship contract. 

Part A: Student and School Information 

Student: 

School: 

School Telephone: 

Supervising Teacher: 

Journeyman Instructor: 



Required CTS Courses in Electro-Technologies 
and Related Strands* 



Course 
Code 


Course Name 


Course 
Mark 


HRST PERIOD 


MECMWO 


ILIcctncal fundamentals 




r.i.Tioii) 


Electro-assembly 1 




ELTI030 


Conversion &. Dislribuiion 




ELTI05C) 


Electronic Power Supply 1 " 




ei.tioso 


Control Systems 1 " 




EI.TKWO 


Analog Communication 1 " 




r.i.Tiioo 


Electronic Communication " 




ULTIMO 


Security Systems 1 " 




I-LT2OI0 


Kleclro-assemhly 2 " 




ELT2020 


lilcctrical Servicing * 




I-I.T2050 


Electronic Power Supply 2 " 




l:LT20XD 


Control Systems 2 " 




i;lt:()'jo 


Analog Communication 2 " 




ELT2IUO 


Radio Communication " 




(TR2II0 


Project 2A (Basic Electronics Lab) " 




(TR2I20 


Project 2B (Basic Electronics Lab) " 




CTR2I30 


Project 2C (Basic Electronics Lab) " 




ELT30IU 


Electr<vassembly 3 * 




r.i/n<>2(> 


Electronic Servicing * 




r.miuo 


Analog Communication 3 " 




lil.T.1110 


Amplifiers " 




ELT3I4U 


Motors " 




CTR3II0 


Project 3 A (Basic Electronics Lab) " 




CTR3I20 


Project 3B (Basic Electronics Lab) " 




(Tim no 


Project 3C (Basic Electronics Lab) " 





" Courses that must be delivered and assessed by a journeyman 
electronic technician or certified electronic engineering technologist. 

* Courses th;u must be delivered and assessed by a journeyman 
electronic technician in a real or simulated workplace environment. 



Part B: Verification and Sign-off 

Number of Courses Successfully Completed: 
Date Issued: 



Journeyman Instructor's Signature: 

Journeyman Certificate No.: 

Supervising Teacher's Signature: 
Principal's Signature: 



Ar For a detailed description of CTS courses, see the appropriate Guide to Standards and Implementation available for 
purchase from the Learning Resources Distributing Centre, or for viewing and downloading from the CTS web site. 



316 /Appendix 5 
(Revised 1999) 



CTS Manual for Administrators. Counsellors and Teachers 

CO Alberta Learning. Alberta. Canada 



Attachment 2 (continued) 
Apprenticeship Articulation Agreement: Hairstylist Trade 
Student Information and Sign-off Form 



Based on an articulation agreement established with 
the Apprenticeship and Industry Training Division: 

• students who successfully complete 35 required CTS 
courses related to the Hairstylist trade may be 
credited. upon successfully challenging the 
appropriate theory examinations, widi the first period 
of formal instruction and 525 hours of on-the-job 
training credits toward die first period of 
apprenticeship 

• students who successfully complete 55 required CTS 
courses related to the Hairstylist trade may be 
credited. upon successfully challenging the 
appropriate theory and practical examinations, with 
the first and second periods of formal instruction and 
700 hours of on-the-job training credits toward the 
first period of apprenticeship. 

Additional terms of the agreement require that: 

• instruction be provided in accordance with the 
journeyman certification requirements defined for 
each course in the course parameters section of the 
appropriate CTS Guide to Standards and 
Implementation 

• following the completion of each semester/school 
term, marks consistent with those reported to Alberta 
Learning be entered on this form for those courses 
identified to the right that were successfully 
completed by the student 

• upon successful completion of an accredited CTS 
hairstylist program. Part B of this form be completed 
by the supervising teacher, journeyman and 
principal, verifying successful completion of all 
required courses. 

Advanced standing in the apprenticeship program for 
Hairstylist will not be granted unless all requirements 
for program delivery, reporting of achievement and 
verification/sign-off as outlined in this agreement have 
been met. Students eligible for advanced standing 
through the terms of this agreement will be required 
to produce this form at the time of making application 
to enter an apprenticeship contract. 

Part A: Student and School Information 

Student: 

School: 

School Telephone: 

Supervising Teacher: 

Journeyman Instructor: 



Part B: Verification and Sign-off 

Number of Courses Successfully Completed: 
Dale Issued: 



Journeyman Instructor's Signature: 

Journeyman Certificate No.: 

Supervising Teacher's Signature: 
Principal's Signature: 



Required CTS Courses in Cosmetology Studies and 
Related Strands* 



Course 
Code 


Course Name 


Course 
Mark 


("osmio 


Personal Images* 




COS 1020 


Hair Graphics 1 * 




cos mho 


Hair * Scaln Care 1* 




("OS 104(1 


Forming it Finishing 1* 




COS 1051) 


Permanent Waving 1 (The Physical Process)* 




COSlOoO 


Skin Care 1 (Basic Practices)* 




COS 1070 


Manicuring 1 * 




COS20I0 


Hair Graphics 2* 




COS 20211 


Hair .si Scalp Care 2* 




COS20.UI 


Forming it Finishing 2* 




COS2IU0 


Haircutiine 1 * 




COS 2050 


Hair Care it Cutting 1 (Client Services)* 




COS2IK.0 


Permanent Wavine 2 (Cold Wavine)* 




COS2070 


Permanent Waving .1 (Heat-assisted)* 




COS20S0 


Permanent Wavine 4 (Client Services)* 




COS 2090 


Colouring 1 * 




COS2I00 


Colour Removal 1 




COS2I 10 


Colouring it Removal 1 (Client Services) 




COS 2 120 


Facials it Makeup 1* 




COS2I.M) 


Facials <t Makeup 2 (Client Services)* 




COS2M0 


Skin Care 2 (Client Services) 




COS2I50 


Manicuring 2* 




COS2I70 


Manicuring .1 (Client Services)* 




COS2IS0 


Hairpieces it F.xtensions* 




COS22IO 


Sales ,t Service 1 (Principles <t Practices)* 




DI.SI02D 


The Design Process* 




cos win 


Proles sional Practices* 




COS.1020 


Long Hair Graphics* 




COS 'OKI 


Hair .t Scalp Care .1* 




COS.1040 


Hair it Scalp Care 4 (Client Services) * 




COS.1050 


Haircut! injg 2* 




COS.1060 


H.urculling .1 (Client Services)* 




COSJ070 


Hair Care it Culling 2 (Client Services)* 




COS.MISO 


Permanent Waving 5 (Designer) 




COS JIM) 


Relax/Straighten Hair* 




COS .1100 


Wave. Relax it Straighten Hair (Client Services)* 




COS .11 10 


Colouring 2 (Permanent) * 




COS 11 20 


Colour Removal 2 




COS .11.10 


Colouring it Removal 2 (Client Services) 




COS 11 41) 


l?iul\ Therap\ 




cos.ii so 


H.iir Removal 




COS.HM) 


Skin Care .1 (Client Services) 




COS.H70 


Male Facial Cirooming 1* 




cos.nxo 


Male Facial Grooming 2 (Client Services) 




COS.1l l >0 


Nail Technology 




COS 1200 


Pedicuring 




COS.1220 


Wigs it Toupees 




COS.12.1II 


Hair Goods (Client Services) 




COS12MI 


Facial it Body Adornment 




COS 1270 


Creative Cosmetology 




I.NTIOIO 


Challenge it Opportunity* 




I.NTI020 


Planning a Venture 




I-NT20I0 


Analv/ing Ventures 




FNT2O40 


Implementing the Venture 




I.NTIOIO 


Managing the Venture 





♦ Indicates the .15 required courses lor credit toward first period 
training, all ol the 55 requi red courses identified above must be 
completed lor credit toward first and second period training. 



*l or a detailed description ol CTS courses, see the appropriate Guide 
in Simiiliirih imil liimlcmciiiuiiaii available tor purchase from the 
Learning Resources Distributing Centre, or lor viewing and 
downloading I mm the CTS web site. 



CTS Manual for Administrators. Counsellors and Teachers 

&) Alberta Learning. Alberta. Canada 



Appendix 5 / 31 7 
(Revised 1999) 



Attachment 2 (continued) 



Apprenticeship Articulation Agreement: 

Welder Trade 
Student Information and Sign-off Form 



Based on an articulation agreement established with 
the Apprenticeship and Industry Training Division: 

• students who successfully complete 25 required 
CTS courses related to the Welder trade may be 
credited, upon successfully challenging the 
appropriate theory and practical examinations, 
with the first period of formal instruction . Logged 
hours earned within the industry toward the trade 
may also be credited upon the recommendation of 
the employer. 

Additional terms of the agreement require that: 

• required CTS courses identified with a ■ must be 
delivered and assessed by a journeyman welder 

• following the completion of each semester/school 
term, marks consistent with those reported to 
Alberta Learning be entered on this form for those 
courses identified to the right that were 
successfully completed by the student 

• upon successful completion of an accredited CTS 
welder program. Part B of this form be completed 
by the supervising teacher, journeyman and 
principal, verifying successful completion of all 
required courses. 

Advanced standing in the apprenticeship program 
for Welder will not be granted unless all 
requirements for program delivery, reporting of 
achievement and verification/sign-off as outlined in 
this agreement have been met. Students eligible for 
advanced standing through the terms of this 
agreement will be required to produce this form at 
the time of making application to enter an 
apprenticeship contract. 



Required CTS Courses in Fabrication Studies and 
Related Strands* 



Course 
Code 


Course Name 


Course 
Mark 


FIRST I'KKIOI) 


CON 1010 


Basic Tools »t Materials 




FABHUO 


Oxyacetylene Welding 




TAB 1050 


Basic Flectric Welding 




FAB II 10 


Bar <t Tubular Fabrication 




l-'AIll KM) 


Fabrication Principles 




FAB2020 


Print Reading 




FAB 20.10 


Oxyluel Welding" 




FAB 2040 


Thermal Culling 




FAB2050 


Arc Welding 1 




FAB20M) 


Arc Welding 2 




FAB 2070 


Gas Metal Arc Welding 1* 




l : AB2l«J 


Custom Fabrication 




CTK2II0 


Project 2 A (Practical Work)* 




CTR2I20 


Project 2B (Practical Work)* 




FAB. 1020 


Metallurgy Fundamentals 




FAB.1050 


Arc Welding .1 




FAB. ION) 


Arc Welding 4* 




FAB.H70 


Gas Metal Are Welding 2 




FAB.1070 


Pipe & Tubular Welding 




FAB. 1040 


Specialized Welding 




FAB H60 


Prefabricalion Principles 




CTR.HIO 


Project 1A (Practical Work) 




CTR.1I20 


Project IB (Practical Work)* 




DFSIOIO 


Sketch. Draw & Model 




DI:S2(U() 


Drafting/Design Applications 





Course 
welder. 



thai musi be delivered and assessed by a journeyman 



Part A: Student and School Information 

Student: 

School: 



School Telephone: 

Supervising Teacher: _ 
Journeyman Instructor: 



Part B: Verification and Sign-off 
Number of Courses Successfully Completed: 
Dale Issued: 



Journeyman Instructor's Signature: 

Journeyman Certificate No.: 

Supervising Teacher's Signature: _ 
Principal's Signature: 



*For a detailed description of CTS courses, see the appropriate Guide t<> Standards and Implementation available tor 
purchase from the Learning Resources Distributing Centre, or for viewing and downloading from the CTS web site. 



318 /Appendix 5 
(Revised 1999) 



CTS Manual for Administrators. Counsellors and Teachers 

i) Alberta Learning. Alberta. Canada 



Credentialling Opportunities in CTS Strands 



Attachment 3 



I 

I 









CTS Strand 








Credential 


CD 

C 
3 

3 
o 

'C 

< 


co 

c 
o 

CO 

c 
2 

I— 
<D 
Q) 
\— 
CO 

o 


"cO 
CD 

X 
>. 

'c 

3 

E 
E 
o 
O 


CD 
Ol 

o 

o 

c 

o 

CD 

I- 
c 
g 

o 

3 
k_ 

W 

c 
o 
O 


co 

CD 

c 

TD 

C 

CO 

CD 

c 
UJ 


en 
■D 
O 
O 

Li_ 


w 

CD 

w 

O 

LL 


CO 

CD 

3 
W 

E 

CO 

*c 

3 

o 

t- 


■B 


Alberta Conservation and Hunter Education Program 


















X 


Alberta Fishing Education Program 


















X 


Alberta Tourism Industry Standards: Outdoor Guide 


















X 


Athletic First Ad 






X 














Babysitting 






X 














Canadian Firearms Safety Course 




X 
















CPR Level C 




X 


X 














Child Care First Ad 






X 














Day Care Level 1 






X 














Emergency Child Care 






X 














Explosive Actuated Tods 








X 












Family Health Care 






X 














Farm Pesticide Certificate Program 




X 
















First-Ad Certification: Advanced First Ad Level II 




X 






X 










First-Ad Certification: Child Care 






X 














First-Ad Certification: Emergency First Ad 




X 
















First-Ad Certification: Standard First Ad 






X 














First-Ad Certification: First-Ad in the Wilderness 




X 
















Green Certificate Training Program 


X 


















Job Safety Skills 




X 
















Lawn and Garden Domestic Pesticide Dspenser Course 




X 
















Oxygen Administration 




X 


X 














Pesticide Applicator Certificate 




X 
















Petroleum Industry Training Program 










X 










Power Engineering Technology 




X 
















Safe Food Handler 












X 








Tourism: AbertaBest 
















X 




Transportation of Dangerous Goods (TDG) 




X 
















Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System (WHMIS) 




X 

















CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 
© Alberta Learning. Alberta. Canada 



Appendix 5/31 7 
(Revised 1999) 



Attachment 3 (continued) 



AGRICULTURE 



Certificate 


Agency 


Courses 


Instructor 
Qualifications 


Comments 


Farmer Pesticide 


Extension 


CTR Practicum 


Yes— with Olds 




Certificate Program 


Services. Olds 
College 


Modules A-E 
(CTR3040-3080) 


College 




Green Certificate 


Alberta 


Field Crops 1 


None' — 


The CTS courses may provide 


Training Program 


Agriculture. Food 


(Materials & 


final evaluation 


students with an introduction to 


• Cow-Calf Beef 


and Rural 


Processes) 


hy Green 


one or more Green Certificate 


Production 


Development 


(AGR2030) 


Certificate 


specializations. Students 


• Dairy Production 

• Feedlot Beef 




Field Oops 2 
(Management 


personnel. Alberta 
Agriculture. Food 


wishing to earn a Green 
Certificate credential may enroll 


Production 




Techniques) 
(AGR3030) 


and Rural 


in newly developed Green 


• Field Crop 




Development 


Certificate courses. 


Production 










• Irrigated Field Crop 
Production 




Livestock/Poultry 1 
(Materials & 






• Sheep Production 




Processes) 








(AGR2040) 






• Swine Production 




Livestock/Poultry 2 
(Management 
Techniques) 
(AGR3040) 






Lawn and Garden 


Extension 


CTR Practicum 


Yes — with 




Domestic Pesticide 


Services. Olds 


Modules A-E 


Olds College 




Dispenser Course 


College 


(CTR3()40-3()80) 






Pesticide Applicator 


Continuing 


CTR Practicum 


None 


Certification available upon 


Certificate 


Education. 


Modules A-E 




successful completion of 


• Agriculture 


Lakeland College 


(CTR3040-3080) 




extension course and final 


• Landscape 








examination 


• Industrial 











CAREER TRANS! 


[TIONS 








Certificate 


Agency 


Courses 


Instructor 
Qualifications 


Comments 


Job Safety Skills 


Job Safety Skills 


Personal Safety 


Variable (e.g.. 






Society 


(Management) 
(CTR 1210) 

Workplace Safety 

(Practices) 

(CTR22IO) 

Safety 

Management 

Systems 


First-Aid. 
WI1M1S) 






- 


(CTR32IO) 






Emergency First-Aid 


St. John 


Personal Safety 


Certified First- 


See Community Health 




Ambulance 


(Management) 


Aid/CPR 






The Canadian Red 


(CTR 12 10) 


Instructor 






Cross Society 









320 I Appendix 5 
(Revised 1999) 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

© Alberta Learning. Alberta. Canada 



I 
I 



I 

I 
I 
1 



Attachment 3 (continued) 



COMMUNITY HEALTH 








Certificate 


Agency 


Courses 


Instructor 
Qualifications 


Comments 


Babysitting 


St. John 


Caring tor Children 


None — 


Includes artificial respiration. 




Ambulance 


(CM Ml 040) 


but Standard 


treatment for burns, poisoning. 




The Canadian Red 
Cross Society 




First-Aid 
Certificate is 
recommended 


wounds, bleeding and baby care 
techniques 


Emergency Child Care 


St. John 


First Aid/CPR for 


Certified First- 


Three-year nationally 


First- Aid in Child Care 


Ambulance 


Children 
(CMH3I20) 


Aid/CPR 
Instructor with a 


recognized certificate designed 
for child care workers; 


Child Care First Aid 


The Canadian Red 




Child Care 


recognized by Alberta Family 




Cross Society 




Instructor 
designation 


and Social Services 


Emergency First-Aid 


St. John 


Personal Safety 


Certified First- 


Three-year nationally 




Ambulance 


(Management) 


Aid/ CPR 


recognized certificate; includes 




The Canadian Red 
Cross Society 


(CTRI210) 


Instructor 


artificial respiration, treatment 
for choking, bleeding, shock and 
one rescuer CPR 


Standard 


St. John 


First Aid/CPR 


Certified First- 


Three-year nationally 


First- Aid 


Ambulance 


(CMII2I20) 


Aid/ CPR 


recognized certificate; includes 




The Canadian Red 
Cross Society 




Instructor 


Emergency First Aid. plus 
treatment of bone and joint 
injuries, heat, cold emergencies, 
medical conditions 


Family Health Care 


St. John 
Ambulance 


Home Care 1 
(CM 1 11060) 
Home Care 2 
(Personal Care 
Services) 
(CM 112060) 
Home Care 3 
(Special 
Conditions) 
(CM 1 13060) 


None 


Under revisions 


Day Care 


Alberta Family 


Day Care 1 and 2 


None 


The minimum qualification 


Level I 


and Social 


(CM 112050.3050) 




required by day care workers in 




Services 


plus 2 CTR 
practicum modules 




Alberta; recognized by Alberta 
Family and Social Services; 
must be 16 years of age 


Athletic 


Alberta Sports 


Sports First Aid 1 


None 


Emphasis on prevention of 


First-Aid 


Medicine Council 


(CM 1 12 130) 




sports injuries; includes caring 
for sports injuries and basic 
taping techniques 


Advanced 


St. John 


CTR Practicum 


Certified First- 


Includes oxygen administration. 


First-Aid 


Ambulance 


Modules A-E 


Aid Instructor 


extended first aid and accident 


Level II 




(CTR3040-3080) 


Advanced II 


scene management 


(100 hours) 











(continued) 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 
© Alberta Learning. Alberta. Canada 



Appendix 5/ 321 
(Revised 1999) 



I 

I 



Attachment 3 (continued) 



COMMUNITY HEALTH (continued) 






Certificate 


Agency 


Courses 


Instructor 
Qualifications 


Comments 


Oxygen 
Administration 
(10 hours) 


St. John 
Ambulance 


CTR Practician 
Modules A-E 
(CTR3040-3080) 


Certified Oxygen 

Administration 

Instructor 


Includes supplemental oxygen in 
emergencies, treatment of 
hypoxia and safety measures in 
handling oxygen 


CPR 

Level C 
( 1 2 hours) 


The Canadian Red 
Cross Society 

St. John 
Ambulance 


CTR Practicum 

Modules A-E 
(CTR3040-3080) 


CPR Instructors 


Nationally recognized 
certification; includes airway 
management and CPR for 
adults, child, infants and 
2-rescuer adult CPR 



CONSTRUCTION 


TECHNOLOGIES 






Certificate 


Agency 


Courses 


Instructor 
Qualifications 


Comments 


Explosive Actuated 
Tools 


Technical Institute 
or College 
(post-secondary) 


Concrete Work 
(Structures & 
Finishes) 
(CON 30 10) 


EAT certificate 


Required by Occupational 
Health and Safety for all 
operators to be certified; 
informal credentialling can be 
arranged through local 
post-secondary 



ENERGY AND Ml 


[NES 








Certificate 


Agency 


Courses 


Instructor 
Qualifications 


Comments 


First-Aid Certification 


St. John 


First Aid/CPR 


Yes- 




• Emergency 


Ambulance 


(CM 112 120) 


see Community 




First-Aid 


The Canadian Red 
Cross Society 




Health 




First-Aid Certification 


St. John 


First Aid/CPR 


Yes- 


Three-year certificates 


• Standard 


Ambulance 


(CMII2I20) 


see Community 


recognized by Occupational 


First-Aid 
• Advanced 
First-Aid 


The Canadian Red 
Cross Society 




Health 


Health and Safety; see 
Community Health strand for 
details 


Petroleum Industry 


Petroleum 


Conventional Oil/ 


Yes- 


Representative training 


Training Programs 


Industry Training 


Gas 1 (Resource 


certified 


programs that address standards 


• Petroleum 


Service (PITS) 


Exploration) 


instructors from 


accepted by industry and 


Fundamentals 




(ENM2020) 


industry 


relevant regulatory agencies 


• Hydrogen Sulphide 
Alive 

• Blowout Prevention 




Conventional Oil/ 
Gas 2 (Recovery & 
Production) 






• Floorman Training 

• Oilfield 




( EN M 3020) 






Maintenance 




Supply & 

Distribution 

(ENM2080) 

Environmental 
Safety (ENM2 100) 







(continued) 



322 /Appendix 5 
(Revised 1999) 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

CO Alberta Learning. Alberta. Canada 



4 



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Attachment 3 (continued) 



ENERGY AND Ml 


[NES (continued) 








Certificate 


Agency 


Courses 


Instructor 

Qualifications 


Comments 


Workplace Hazardous 
Materials Information 
System ( WHMIS) 


Occupational 
Health and Safety 


Personal Safety 

(Management) 

(CTRI2I0) 


Yes — see Career 
Transitions 


Addresses skills required to 
work safely around hazardous 
materials 


Transportation of 
Dangerous Goods 
(TDG) 


Occupational 
Health and Safety 


Workplace Safety 

(Practices) 

(CTR22IO) 


Yes — see Career 
Transitions 


Addresses skills required for the 
transportation and handling of 
dangerous goods 


Power Engineering 
Technology 


Power 
Engineering 
Department. SAIT 


CTR Practicum 
Modules A-E 
(CTR3040-3080) 


Yes — certified 
instructor from 
industry 


Links with Third Class Power 
Engineering 



FOODS 










Certificate 


Agency 


Courses 


Instructor 
Qualifications' 


Comments 


Food Sanitation and 
Hygiene 


Alberta Health. 
Environmental 
Health Services 


Food Safety & 

Sanitation 

(FOD2150) 







FORESTRY 










Certificate 


Agency 


Courses 


Instructor 
Qualifications 


Comments 


Alberta Conservation 


Alberta 


Hunting & Game 


Yes — with 




and Hunter Education 


Environmental 


Management 1 


Alberta 




Program 


Protection. Fish 


(Ethics/Game 


Environmental 






and Wildlife 


Identification) 


Protection 






Services 


(WLDI070) 

Hunting & Game 
Management 2 
(Field Techniques/ 
Regulations) 
(WLD2070) 




Contact Alberta Environmental 
Protection. Fish and Wildlife 
Services for information 
regarding instructor and student 
certification 


Alberta Fishing 
Education Program 


Alberta 
Environmental 


Angling & Fish 
Management 


Yes — with 
Alberta 




Protection. Fish 


(WLDI080) 


Environmental 






and Wildlife 




Protection 






Services 








Alberta Tourism 


Alberta Tourism 


Outdoor 


None 


Industry standards currently 


Industry Standards — 
Outdoor Guide 


Education Council 
(ATEC) 


Experiences 1 
(Survival Skills) 
(WI.DI030) 

Outdoor 
Experiences 2 
(Wilderness 
Excursion) 
(WLD2030) 




available — certification under 
development. Evaluation by 
industry peer-based or written 
examination and demonstration 
of practical skills 



(continued) 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

© Alberta Learning. Alberta. Canada 



Appendix 5 / SZ5 
(Revised 1999) 



1 



Attachment 3 (continued) 



FORESTRY (continued) 








Certificate 


Agency 


Courses 


Instructor 
Qualifications 


Comments 


Canadian Firearms 
Safety Course 


Alberta Justice. 
Chief Provincial 
Firearms Office 


CTR Practicum 
Modules A-E 
(CTR3040-3080) 


Yes — with 
Alberta Justice 


Contact Alberta Justice for 
information regarding instructor 
and student certification 


Emergency First-Aid 


St. John 
Ambulance 

The Canadian Red 
Cross Society 


Personal Safety 
(Management) 
(CTR 1210) 


Yes 


See Community Health 
and/or Career Transitions 


Standard First-Aid 


St. John 
Ambulance 

The Canadian Red 
Cross Society 


First Aid/CPR 
(CM 112 120) 


Yes 


First Aid in the 
Wilderness 


St. John 
Ambulance 


CTR Practicum 
Modules A-E 
(CTR3040-3080) 


Yes — with St. 
John Ambulance 


Evaluation done by instructor 
certified with St. John 
Ambulance 



TOURISM STUDIES 



Certificate 


Agency 


Courses 


Instructor 
Qualifications 


Comments 


Tourism: Alberta Best 


Alberta Tourism 
Education Council 


Quality Guest 
Service (TOU 1030) 


Alberta Best 
Trainers 


No renewal time frame 



324 /Appendix 5 
(Revised 1999) 



CTS Manual lor Administrators. Counsellors and Teachers 

Co Alberta Learning. Alberta. Canada 



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Attachment 3 (continued) 



WILDLIFE 



Certificate 


Agency 


Courses 


Instructor 
Qualifications 


Comments 


Alberta Conservation 
and Hunter Education 
Program 


Alberta 
Environmental 
Protection. Fish 
and Wildlife 
Services 


Hunting & Game 
Management 1 
(Ethics/Game 
Identification) 
(WLD1070) 

Hunting & Game 
Management 2 
(Field Techniques/ 
Regulations) 
(WLD2070) 


Yes— with 
Alberta 
Environmental 
Protection 


Contact Alberta Environmental 
Protection. Fish and Wildlife 
Services, for information 
regarding instructor and student 
certifications 


Alberta Fishing 
Education Program 


Alberta 
Environmental 
Protection. Fish 
and Wildlife 
Services 


Angling & Fish 

Management 

(WLDI080) 


Yes — Alberta 
with 

Environmental 
Protection 


Alberta Tourism 
Industry Standards — 
Outdoor Guide 


Alberta Tourism 
Education Council 
(ATEC) 


Outdoor 
Experiences 1 
(Survival Skills) 
(WLDI030) 

Outdoor 
Experiences 2 
(Wilderness 
Excursion) 
(WLD2030) 


None 


Industry standards currently 
available — certification under 
development. Evaluation by 
industry peer-based or written 
examination and demonstration 
of practical skills 


Canadian Firearms 
Safety Course 


Alberta Justice. 
Chief Provincial 
Firearms Office 


CTR Practicum 
Modules A-E 
(CTR3040-3080) 


Yes — with 
Alberta Justice 


Contact Alberta Justice for 
information regarding instructor 
and student certification 


Emergency First-Aid 


St. John 
Ambulance 

The Canadian Red 
Cross Society 


Personal Safety 
(Management) 
(CTR 12 10) 


Yes 


See Community Health 
and/or Career Transitions 


Standard First-Aid 


St. John 
Ambulance 

The Canadian Red 
Cross Society 


First Aid/CPR 
(CMII2I20) 


Yes 


First Aid in the 
Wilderness 


St. John 
Ambulance 


CTR Practicum 
Modules A-E 
(CTR3040-3080) 


Yes— with St. 
John Ambulance 


Evaluation done by instructor 
certified with St. John 
Ambulance 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teacher: 

© Alberta Learning. Alberta. Canada 



Appendix 5/ 325 
(Revised 1999) 



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326 / Appendix 5 CTS Manual lor Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

(Revised 1999) © Alberta Learning. Alberta. Canada 



Attachment 4 

Directory of Apprenticeship 
and Credentialling Contacts 

Apprenticeship Contacts (Alberta Career Development Centres): 

Bonnyville Career Development Centre 780-826-4175 

Fax 780-826-1904 

Calgary Career Development Centre 403-297-5336 

Fax 403-297^1492 

Calgary Canada/Alberta Service Centre 403-258-4822 

Fax 403-258-^719 

Edmonton Career Development Centre 780-427-8517 

Fax 780-422-3734 

Edmonton Canada/Alberta Service Centre 780-438-8111 

Fax 780-438-8123 

Fort McMurray Career Development Centre 780-743-7192 

Fax 780-743-7492 

Grande Prairie Career Development Centre 780-538-5240 

Fax 780-538-5237 

Hinton Career Development Centre 780-865-8293 

Fax 780-865-8269 

Lethbridge/Alberta Service Centre 403-381-5380 

Fax 403-381-5795 

Medicine Hat Career Development Centre 403-529-3580 

Fax 403-529-3564 

Peace River Career Development Centre 780-624—6529 

Fax 780-624-6476 

Red Deer Career Development Centre 403-340-5151 

Fax 403-340-7086 

Slave Lake Career Development Centre 780-849-7290 

Fax 780-849-7356 

Vermillion Career Development Centre 780-853-8150 

Fax 780-853-8203 



CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers Appendix 5/ 327 

© Alberta Learning. Albert a. Canada (Revised 1999) 



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Attachment 4 (continued) 



Credentialling Contacts (community, government and post-secondary organizations): 

Alberta Agriculture 

Food and Rural Development 780-427-2137 

Alberta Environmental Protection 

Fish and Wildlife Services 780-944-0313 

Alberta Family and Social Services 780-427-3734 

Alberta Health, Environmental Health Services 780-427-2643 

Area Services Division Fax 780-422-6663 

Alberta Justice 

Chief Provincial Firearms Office 780-412-6900 

Alberta Sports Medicine Council 780-453-8636 

Alberta Tourism Education Council (ATEC) 1-800-265-1283 

Canadian Red Cross 1-888-307-7997 

Olds College 

Extension Services 403-556-8344 

Job Safety Skills Society 403-413-6876 

Lakeland College 

Continuing Education 780-853-8444 

Occupational Health and Safety 780-427-8848 

Petroleum Industry Training Services (PITS) Calgary 403-250-9606 

Nisku 780-955-7770 

SA1T, Power Engineering Department 

Energy and Natural Resources Department 403-284-8284 

SA1T 

Energy and Natural Resources Department 403-284-8284 

St. John Ambulance 1-800-665-7114 

Note: Alberta Government Offices can be reached toll free throughout Alberta by dialing the Alberta 
Government RITE system at 310-0000 and asking the operator for the department telephone 
number. 



328 /Appendix 5 CTS Manual for Administrators, Counsellors and Teachers 

(Revised 1999) © Alberta Learning. Alberta. Canada 



APR 5 ZOOft 



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