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BULK RATE 
U S. POSTAGE 
PAID 

CARMEL. CA 
Permit No. 149 


VOLUME 79 NO. 5 


FEBRUARY S, 1994 


Survey reveals 
public not sold 
on Sunset Center 
renovation plan 

By PAUL WOLF 

Two WEEKS before the Voice of Carmel 


Getting ^funky’ on the golf course 


survey 

results were released, The Carmel Pine Cone included 
a guest column by the Carmel Residents Association 
attacking the survey and the findings Carmelites should 
expect to come out of it. 

A 1 ^ A ¥ V/CIC' TheCRAspokesp er- 

AIx/VLjI 0115 son wrote that, in this 

survey, you can expect 
results that W^“pleasing to landlords and the agents 
of landlords.^ 

Not surprisingly, after the results were made public, 
the familiar two schools of thought were as much 


See SURVEY page 1 

St. Bernard project 
gets city’s blessing 

By PAUL WOLF 


PHOTO/COIE THOMKON 

FRED FUNK (right) and Chip Beck, eventual winner of the AAerrill Lynch ShootOut, exchange high-fives Tuesday 
afternoon on the 17th green at P^ble Beach Golf Links. Beck had just sunk a birdie putt to remain in contention 
with Funk and Jeff AAaggert. 

GWJrH 

When the dust settled 


1 he Carmel city Council Tuesday gave its 
informal blessing to the St. Bernard Project, a neigh- 
bors-helping-neighbors concept conceived by Mayor 
Ken White. 

The five-member council took no action, but of¬ 
fered strong encouragement to White and the three 
other members of his St. Bernard Committee, which 
will launch a pilot program in the coming weeks. 

“I think it’s a very exciting idea,” said Council- 
woman Barbara Brooks-. 

More details about the program surfaced at the 
council meeting, reported by committee members 
Shary Farr, Becky Hanna emd Marjorie Montelius. 

Each pair of St. Bernard volunteers would be as- 

See COUNCIL page 9 

Freeway opponents 
pin hopes on Friday 
court hearing on EIR 

By PAUL WOLF 

Skip LLOYD knov^s about such things. After all, 
he is an attorney. 

He describes a bookcase about 
eight feet-long and six-feet high 
— that is what is required to 
hold the technical reports, cor- 
respondence and minutes of pub- 
lie meetings detailing the envi- 
ron mental review for the Hatton 
Canyon freeway. 

“Ihere is no way the judge 
R read all of the administra¬ 

tive record — maybe 10 per¬ 
cent,” said Lloyd, who co-chairs 
the Hatton Canyon Coalition, which is contesting the 
environmental impact report/statement, (EIR/EIS) in 

See FREEWAY page 8 


in the sand traps mb 

Tuesday after the 8th annual Merrill Lynch Shoot- 
Out at the AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am, 
the man left with the smoking gun and the first- 

place purse of $5,000 was veteran Chip Beck. ^ 

Beck beat fellow pro Fred Funk by a few feet, with * 

a sudden-death chip shot out of the sand near the ^ ' ^ 

18th that almost hit the hole. Funk’s shot went a few ^ 

feet wide to the right. 

“It’s hard to 

$3',000 for'second 
L place.^“The far- 

The Shoot-Out, part of the preliminaries leading 

up to the start of the Pro-Am competkion today_, , 

pitted 10 professionals tackling holes 1 -5 and 15-18 photo/coie Thompson 

on the Pebble Beach Golf Links. The duel’s rules j^pp /w\GGERT blasts out of a sand trap on the 4th 
called for the highest scorer on each hole to be ^jyfjng Tuesday's AAerrill Lynch ShootOut at 

eliminated. Ties were settled with sudden death Beach, 

chip shots out of the rough, from spots chosen by a 

PGA official. , 

The event is designed so, ultimately, only two are and the 1993 Byron Nelson Classic; 1993 Canadian 
left standing heading to the 18th hole. Open winner David Frost; and Jeff Maggert, winner 

Among the shootists Beck buried on the greens ofthel993Disney/OldsmobileOpen. Fuzzy Zoeller 
Tuesday were Brett Ogle, defending champion of 

the AT&T; Scott Simpson, winner of two U.S. Opens See SHOOT OUT page 11 


SKIP LLOYD 







































BEN DELLA 


Traditional 
Northwest 
Indian Art 


Makah artist 
Ben Della 


Demonstration 
F(*l). i \ f) 


Silver Feather 


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PHOTO/SCOn MEAiTON 

KEN THURAAAN, the Carmel Police Department's full-time desk officer for the past 
year, has accepted a position with the City of San Carlos. 


Carmel Police’s desk officer 
opts for more pay in Bay Area 


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2 The Carmel Pine Cone/CV Outlook February 3, 1994 










































Freeman gives glimpse into city attorney’s role 


■ He tries to steer cities down 
the right path, though ‘they 
don’t always listen’ to advice 

By PAUL WOLF 

City attorneys tend to keep their mouths 
shut most of the time. 

But when the decision-makers tread down a treach¬ 
erous legal path, “it is our job to get them out of 
trouble,” said Don Freeman, CarmeFs city attorney 
since 1984. 

Freeman, who spoke before about 50 members of 
the Carmel Residents Association Thursday, Jan. 27, 
distinguished between valid policy choices and deci¬ 
sions that introduce legal hazards. 

“I try to get them down the right path, and yes, they 
don’t always listen,” Freeman said, smiling. 

At times, it was a mini seminar on the role of legal 
counsel. Freeman was careful to sidestep areas of 
personal opinion, although he chose not to remain a 
total mystery. 

In all, what Freeman hoped to convey Was how the 
process works, and where he fits into the scheme of 
things. 



Freeman: Short-term 
rental problem will 
soon be '^behind us’ 

By PAUL WOLF 

BEEN a time-consuming affair, fraught 
with hassles and even a trek to the U.S. Supreme 
Court. 

But in short ordo*, Carmel will be able to say 
to itself, “We’ve got this behind us.” • 

City Attorney Don Freeman was referring to 
the problems associated with its short-term rental | 
ordinance, which prohibits homeowners from | 
renting out their properties for less than 30 days. 

It has been big business in this resort town, but * 
Freeman suggested the industry will be stopped 
for good. 

In 1993, Carmel filed three lawsuits against 
individu&ls and property management agencies 
for alleged violations. 

“One has said uncle, the other is on the way, 
and the third is shortly coming to that point,” 
said a confident Freeman, before a Carmel Resi- ! 
dents Association audience. “I firmly believe that I 
once we’ve dealt with these agencies, we won’t | 
have a problem anymore.” I 

Violators, for starters, will be required to 
make up the room tax bill that would have been | 
imposed were their homes actually motels. “1 
can’t say how much this will come to, but let’s just ' 
say we will collect enough to cover the legal fees 
and then some.” , ■ 

Carmel’s short-term rental ordinance was the j 
first of its kind in the region, serving as a model | 
for similar laws. The legislation was challenged 
and went all the way to the Supreme Court. | 
Critics of the law have argued it is an affront j 
to property rights. Supporters contend neighbor- ^ 
hoods have the right to protect the sanctity of 
residential zoning. ' 

Forty-two cities joined the city in its defense of } 
the ordinance. By refusing to hear the case, the : 
high court, in 1992, upheld the law. 

Freeman said the hassle and expense con - ^ 
nected with the code violation will preclude ille¬ 
gal rentals down the road. “It’s unlikely that any 
self-respecting person will stand before a judge 
and say, T won’t do it again,’ and then come back 
and rent their property again.” 


Defining the role 

Freeman had the audience consider the role of the 
planning commission, charged with reviewing appli¬ 
cations for new homes or businesses. 

“You can’t think to yourself, ‘Oh, I’d like to help ^ 
these people. They do good work in town. You have to 
look at the bulk of the structure, the legal requirements 
of the lot. A variance is granted for a hardship that is 
tied to the land.” 

Thus, he explained, legal findings have to be made 
based on specific criteria. Among other things, the city 
attorney must keep people on track. 

Freeman provided some background on the func¬ 
tion of a city’s Genersd Plan, which he likened to the 
U.S. Constitution, the foundational document upon 
which other laws are based. 

In addition. Freeman stressed the importance^ of 
residents getting involved in city affairs, calling it “a 
duty to participate in your community.” 

Because Freeman recently began serving as interim 
city attorney for the City of Seaside, he was asked 
whether he believes there is a conflict of interest in the 
twin roles. 

He explained, for starters, he didn’t anticipate a 
conflict, and that he considers Carmel to be his “first 
client,” suggesting that fact would guide him should he 
have to remove himself from a potential conflict. 

Moreover, Freeman, who is a partner with the 


mOTO/PAUL WOIF 

DON FREEMAN spoke to the Carmel Residents Asso¬ 
ciation on a variety of topics last Thursday. 

A 

% 

Carmel-based Perry & Freeman, said he treats a city 
like any other client. 

“I basically work on a handshake,” he said. “It’s 
simple. If they say, ‘I don’t want you to come in 
tomorrow,’ I don’t.” 

Whether he intended to or not. Freeman offered a 
few opinions. 

On the Hatton Canyon freeway controversy, he 
said, “I don’t think we always need a freeway to 
transport people from point A to point B. T^ere are 
other types of roadways that can be attractive and can 
get the job done.” 

While not discussing the details of this year’s nego¬ 
tiations between the city and its employees, he did 
offer a defense of the Carmel City Council, accused by 
the employee groups of not negotiating in good faith. 

“The council is ^ways willing to talk about reason¬ 
able proposals, but it is not willing to negotiate in the 
press. From everything 1 know, this council has always 
been responsive.” 

Freeman said it’s a customary “tactic” of labor “to 
bring their grievances to the media,” while the city is 
more constrained in the process it must follow. 



got our first choice^ 


Hard work pays off 


Carmel brings home wildland rig 


By PAUL WOLF 

IS a dream come true for Carmel 
firefighters, but it didn’t happen over¬ 
night. 


Now in the Carmel Fire Department’s 
possession is a 1979 wildland fire en¬ 
gine — a compact unit that can stray 
from the roads to fight rural blazes, 
pumping and spraying water while on 



ASST. FIRE Chief John Willett (left) and Battalion Chief John Trenner stand next to 
Carmel's newly purchased wildland fire engine. 



PHOTo/PAUi wexf 







[ \ 


the move. It is this "pump-and-roir^ But it has always gone home empty- 
capability that puts the wildland rig in a handed because of bad luck in the ran- 
distinct class. dom bidding process. 


Earlier this month in Davis, Calif., 
250 agencies bid (with fixed prices) on 
a total of 14 rigs, and Carmel was fortu¬ 
nate enough to receive its first choice, 
according to Asst. Fire Chief John 
Willett,. Carmel, Willen, said was in the 
running for four vehicles. 

The wildland engine, purchased by 
Carmel for a mere $7,700, was brought 
to its new home on Monday. “When we 
got the news on Friday, the entire troop 
was ecstatic,” Willett said. 

l.ong in coming 

l ire personnel, with the help of such 
citizens as Creg Colletti and Laurie 
Schumann,'had raised Si 0,000 with the 
expressed purpose of Liuying a wildland 
fire engine. 

TTie leftover funds will go toward the 
rig’s maintenance and repair, which 
Willett characterized as minor. 

For the past two years, the fire de¬ 
partment has rented similar surplus fire 
engines at nominal costs, allowing the 
department to conduct drills with asmall 
engine. 


In addition to the wildland rig, the 
department currently maintains a fleet 
of three large engines, designed princi¬ 
pally for fighting structure fires. 

“We got our first choice, and we are 
quite happy,” Willett said. “Lady luck 
was on our side.” 

MEETINGS DIGEST^ 

■ Tuesday, Feb. 8 

• Monterey County Board of Su- 

* pervisors, Salinas Courthouse, 9:30 , 
am. 

I • Carmel Celebrates Community 
Committee, City Hall Conlerence 
Boom, 4:30 p .m 

I 

t 

j Wednesday, Feb. 9 

• Lester Rowntree Native Plant 

i Carden Committee, Sunset Center, , 
10 a m. ' 

• Carmel Planning Commission, 
Carmel City Council Chambers, 3:30 

_ J, 


f 


February 3, 1994 


The Carmel Pine Cone/CV Outlook 

























\ \ % \ 


Despite Measure H, planning permit activity rose in ’93 


■ While streamlined functions 
ea^ some staff burdens, the 
end of the water moratorium 
released ^pent*up demand/ 

By PAUL WaF 

OeSPITE the streamlining mea¬ 
sures introduced with last summer's 
commercial rezoning, permit activity at 
the Carmel Planning Department in¬ 
creased by 10 percent in 1993. 

Overall, 1,303 permits were issued 
last year, as compai^ to 1,181 in 1992, 
according to the report. The numbers 
were up in all categories — including 
building permits, new businesses, signs. 


encroachment permits, commercial uses 
and design reviews. 

The number of commercial use per¬ 
mits granted were roughly equal: 35 in 
1992, and 36 in 1993. 

**1 think 1992 was abnormal in that 
we didn’t issue that many use permits, 
perhaps because of the economy,” said 
Carmel Planning Director Brian Roseth. 

Labor-intensive 

According to the r^>ort, the permits 
issued in 1993 were more labor-inten¬ 
sive than those processed in 1992. 

‘Although the total number of per¬ 
mits rose only slightly, the increase in 
permits involving signmbant staff and/ 
or planning commission time showed 


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■ largOT increase,” the report stated. 

The biggest growth in the permit ac¬ 
tivity surrounded design reviews and 
building permits, which include the most 
labor-intensive applications, Roseth 
said. 

The streamlining features of Measure 
H — approved narrowly by voters last 
June — were a selling point for the 
rezoning effort. Measure H, for starters, 
reduced the number of cat^ories re¬ 
quiring commercial use permits from 
the planning commission. 

A^ut the slight increase of commer¬ 
cial use permits, the r^>ort stated, ‘It is 
likely that the long-term effect of Mea¬ 
sure H will be to stabilize use permit 
activity at this lower level.” 

Roseth noted it was the public, more 
than the city’s staff, that was expected to 
benefit most from Measure H. 

Clearly, there were other factors lead¬ 
ing to the increased permit activity be¬ 
sides the introduction of new commer¬ 
cial zoning. Because the peninsula-wide 
moratorium on new water connections 
was lifted at mid year, a “pent-up de¬ 
mand” has been felt everywhere. 

“We’ve already seen a slight drop¬ 
ping off from this flurry of activity,” 
Roseth said. 

The lifting of the moratorium was a 
direct factor in the near doubling of 
commercial design review permits — up 
from 28 to 52. 

I 

Shrinking staff 

The permit activity is significant in 
the context of the relatively low staffing 
level at the department, which experi¬ 
enced a 40-percent staff reduction in the 
1992-93 budget, from nine to five full¬ 
time employees. 

(An additional full-time planner is 


scheduled to be hired later this year.) 

Over the past two y^s, city officials 
have made adjustments to accommo¬ 
date the shrinking staff. 

For example, the duties of code en¬ 
forcement have been tramsferred from 
planning to the fire department. Design 
review functions have been simplified. 
The building division has reduced its 
inspections schedule. And planners 
spend less time on regional and long- 
range planning issues. 

“Some of these adjustments have re¬ 
sulted in lower service levels and a lower 
capacity to implement city goals,” the 
report stated. “In most cases, however, 
these adjustments were made in a man¬ 
ner that was ^transparent’ to the pub¬ 
lic.” 


CRA names new directors 

Five new directors have been to 
elected to three-year terms on the Carmel 
Residents Association, while Lou Rolle 
takes over as president. 

The five new directors arc Edwin 
Bayley, Roger Premier, Christine 
Musker, Constance Wright and Renate- 
Karin Wunsch. 

In addition to Rolle, the CRA’s new 
board slate has Linda Anderson and 
Howard Skidmore as vice presidents; 
Louis Ungaretti as treasurer; Wayne 
Kelley and Suzsinne Paboopan; and Beth 
Wright as immediate]past president. 

Directors who arc stepping down 
under CRA bylaws after two consecu¬ 
tive terms are Clayton Anderson, Jim 
Holliday, Jane Mayer and Ann 
Woolworth. Bruce Kibby and Judith 
Wolfe Wasco have stepp^ down from 
the board after completing one term. 



CARMEL VALLEY VILLAGE IMPROVEMENT COMMITTEE 
APPLAUDS ALL THE DONORS WHO MADE THE 

FIFTH ANNUAL "A VILLAGE AFFAIR" BETTER THAN EVER! 

OUR GENEROUS HOSTS, NOEL AND GORDON HENTSCHEL, AND... 



Acorn Hardware 

Ahoy There 

Allaire Insurance 

Lou Allaire 

Thomas Allaire, CMP 

Lindi Angermeier 

Ann-How Dressings & Sauces 

AT&T Pebble Bead) ProAm 

Dr. Steve Austin 

Batt Cassano - New York Life 

Dorothy Baumann 

Bay Laurel Farm 

Ron Bean 

BemardusWinery 

Blue Sky Lodge 

Boulder Credc Golf and CC 

Chef Wendy Brodie 

Joan Brunn 

Alice Buckham 

Web Buckham 

Carmel Bicycle 

Carmel Floral Company 

The Caimel Sun 

Carmel Valley Antiques 

Carmel Valley Business Service 

Carmel Valley Chiropractic 

Carmel Valley Ranch Resort 

Carmel Valley Realty Company 

Carmel Valley Veterinarian 

Channel Islands Hotels 

Cheppu from Himalaya 

Claire Lemer Arts 

The Club at Quail Lodge 

Peter and Sherry Coaloey 

Concepts in Carmel 

Concours Car Care 

Maurice C. Corbett. D.D.S. 

Cornucopia Natural Foods 

Country Rose 

E rossroads Cafe 
hef Katy Curry 
del VaHe Gunsmithing 
Disneyland 
pomair>e de Clardc 
Driving Sounds 
P>omas and Michele Duckett 


Debbi Effron 
Esprit de Fleurs 
F.T. Renner Company 
Farm Center Country Store 
Farm Center Framing 
First National Bank 

- Deborah Gonzalez 

- Donna McGehee 

- Mary Rhoades 

Frank Licsko Gallery 
Michelle F^e / \ 

Gardiner Tennis Ranch' 

Lou Gardner 

Chef Alex GianrHizzi 
Joanne Gimbel 
tsiussMipe’s Work Bench 
Good News Clothing Co. 
Kenneth Gregg 
Ellsworth Gregory 
The Grindstone 
GWS Galleries 
Hacienda Hay and Feed 
Susan Balcom Hammer 
Noel and Gordon Hentschel 
Sharon Hermes 
H^day Books 

Hidden Valley Musk Seminars 

Highlands Inn 

The Holman Ranch 

In and Outdoor Shop 

Inns by the Sea 

The Iron Kettle 

Joyce Jenkins 

John Schaffer Company 

Chef Michael Jones 

Kasey’s 

Cestral Press 

Cirk Gayman Tractor Service 
oseph Kovacs 
.’Auberge de Sedona 
.a Pbya Motel 

.aguna Seca Raceway SCRAMP 

^vnn Larson 

The Last Chance 

.aura Locke 

une Levora 

.ong’s Drug Store 


.inda Lord 

.os Laureles Lodge 

Craig Lovell 

M’U^ Bruhn 

lobin Mahoney 

iail Boxes, Etc 

4aison Val du Soleil 

*eter McArthur 

4cKay Business Servke 

icKibbon and Field 

ackie and Larry Menke 

'lerry Hair Due 

<obbie Meryash 

Michele Braden 

Monterey Institute of Touch 

MVM Video 

M.J. Murphy, Inc 

Nepenthe 

Thomas Nix 

OcaiT^ Cabinet and Mill 
The Orchid Garden 
Paced and Poised 
Pacific Office Products 
Paranxxjnt’s Great America 
Park Ci^ Ski Area 
Pebble Eieach Company 
Peninsuh Septk Tank Service 
Personal Fitness Clink 
Prescott Hotel, San Francisco 
Pucci’s Bakery 
Quail Comer Antiques 
iGncho Canada Country Club 
Rancho San Carlos 
Charlene Randazzo 
Rick Simms Pool/Home Repair 
Jo An Rieman 
The Ridge Restaurant 
Ringer’s General Store 
River Rock Cafe & Deli 
Roaring Camp & Big Trees R/R 
Robles del FUo Lodge 
Roth’s Gourmet Deli 
Teresa Sakasegawa 
Safeway Store at Mid-Valley 
Joseph and Carolyn Samson 
^an Clemente Rancho 
Margaret Schulz, M.T. 


Shelter Island Marina Inn 
Sheryl’s 

Sierra Mar at the Post Ranch 

The Silver Treadle 

Southwest Airlines 

Spinning Wheel Inn/Restaurant 

Laura and Bill Stahl 

Lynn Stateham 

Steve Rial Septic Systems 

Stonepine Estate Resort 

Suites Marina, La Paz 

Sycamore Farm 

Talbott Ties 

Tancredi and Morgen 

Teeleet 

Tempel’s Carmel Fbrist 
Richard Tette 
Chef Jeffrey Thompson 
Three Sisters/Rose Cottage 
Tidkie Pink Inn 
Paul Tocchet, M.D. 

Tom Ewen Woodworking 

Valley Grading and Paving 

Valley Lodge 

Valley Stucfio 

Valley Typesetters 

Van Saun Fbral Arrangements 

Joan Vandervort 

Ventana Big Sur 

Victoria Rugg Studb 

Village Cabinet 

Village Fbrist and Gifts 

The Village Garden 

Village Cabinet 

Village Pizzeria . 

Leslie Voss 
Jan Wagstaff 
Watts^allcy Glass 
Ken Wiese 
Westin St Francis 
Will’s Fargo Restaurant 
William Giles Studb 
Dodie Williams 
Roger Williams Family 
Wishixine 
Rickey Wolfe 
YourTiakre d’ Limousine 


THE RESTAURANTS: 

Bon Appetit 
Gracielb’s Casa d’ltalia 
The Iron Kettle 
Kate’s 

The King and I 
A Move^le Feast 
Los Laureles Lodge 
A Moveable Feast 
Oak Deli and Bakery & Bird of 
Paradise Catering 
Plaza Linda 
The Ridge 
Running Iron 
Stonepine Estate Resort 
Sweet Retreat Cafe and Bakery 
Taqueria del Valle 
Thau Bistro 
Vanderbilt House 
at Los Laureles Lodge 
Will’s Fargo 

THE WINERIES: 

Bemardus 
Chateau Julien 
Domaine de Clarck 
Dumey Vineyard 
Joullian 

Talbott Vineyards 
Zabala Winery 

SPARKLING WATERS: 

Safeway at Mid-Valley 

THE ENTERTAINMENT: 

Alan Drew, Auctioneer 
l^t Duval, Vocalist 
Kathleen Tarp, Vocalist 
Steve Tosh, Accompanist 


THE 'VILLAGE AFFAIR" COMMITTEE Peter Coakley (Chairman), Daniel Barduzzi, Joan Brunn, Jeff Frye, Tony Glanville, Glen Gurries, 
Randy Randazzo, Lee Rieman, Lory Swiess, Merry Trucksis, Joan Vandervort, Leslie Voss, Chuck Vout, Roger Williams and Rickey Wolfe 


The Cormel Pine Cone/CV Outlook 


February 3, 1994 








CONTEMPORARY 

WESTERN 

FASHION 


CV residents rally behind Los Laureles owners 


By SUSAN BECK 

While THE hiMoric Los Laureles 
Lodge in Carmel Valley closed Monday 
night, a group of locaJ residents have 
rallied together for the owners, Cordon 
and Noel Hentschel. 

Leslie Voss and Joan Vandervort, both 
Carmel Valley residents, have spear¬ 
headed a petition drive urging the 
Monterey County Board of Supervisors 
to rescind its decision that imposed a use 
permit for events accompanied with live 
music at the lodge. 

The board agr^ Jan. 18 to allow the 
lodge to continue its outdoor events with 
the stipulation that sound experts moni¬ 
tor the noise level of amplified music. 

The Hentschels decided to close the 
104-year-old lodge last week after the 
supervisors rejected their plea not to be 
governed by a use permit. 

More than 150 signatures were gath- 
eredMonday night, said Voss, who added 
additional copies of the petition are still 
being signed throughout the commu¬ 
nity. 

few of us just don’t want to let this 
happen,” Voss added. “Partly because 
the Hentscheb have been so gracious to 
the community and partly because of 

the anti-business attitude of the board.” loud amplitied music played at recep¬ 
tions during the past two years at the 
Shocking news lodge. 

The news that Los Laureles Lodge The Hentschels agreed with the su- 
was closing came as a shock to many pervisors’request to install a new sound 
Carmel Valley residents. However, the system to appease the neighbors, but 
impetus for closing the lodge was based they urged the board to reject the use 
on a familiar long-standing dispute be- permit requirement, 
tween the owners of the lodge and adja- Noel Young, manager for the lodge, 
cent homeowners. said the Hentschels were willing to pay 

The neighbors disapproved of the the $40,000 it would take to install the 


sound system. The only real problem, he 
argued, was the anti-business sentiment 
from the board of supervisors. 

“They (Hentschels) made an effort,” 
Young said. “They were willing to work 


with the neighbors. Biit they didn’t want 
to deal with a use permit because there 
would be no assurance the board would 
not change the conditions, which may 
See LAURELES page 8 


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PHOTO/SUSAN BECK 

NOEL YOUNG, manager of Los Laureles 
Lodge, said 'its owners, Gordon and 
Noel Hentschel, perceived the 


Noel Mentschel, perceived the county s 
decision to impose a use permit for 
events at the lodge as an anti-business 
sentiment. 


Sydney 


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Ron’s Liquors) btwn. Ocean & 7th 

624-5779 

Mon. - Sat. 11 - 5 • Sun. 11-3 


The original comfort shoe. 

i 

(Q 1993 Birkenstock is a registered trade mark 


Jl ou are cordially 
invited to a 
showing of the... 


COLLECTION 

FEB.5TH THROUGH FEB.IOTH 


The collection includes 
Dinner Suits 
Silk Coordinates 
Skirts • Trousers 
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625-5622 


Februory 3, 1994 The Carmel Pine Cone/CV Ouflook 













































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6 The Carmel Pine Cone/CV Outlook February 3, 1994 

















Cv 

Before spring bree ding season beg ins 

Animal control to begin trapping feral cats 

^ Hl^DEI^ON,Carmel’s Initially, traps will be set in the area be sent to the SPCA. Cats with collars 

animal control office, will begin a trap- bordered by Seventh and Eighth av- will be released. A complete description 
ping program nex^ Monday to curb‘^a enues, from Lincoln to Casanova, of each animal taken to the SPCA will be 
signincantincrease in^ewildcatpopu- Henderson said only humane traps - available in the event a pet cat without 
^*^^*** limits. which will not injure the animals — will a collar is trapped. 

The prog^in, according to be used. According to Henderson, the cat trw- 

Henderson, is designed to reduce the Henderson is asking cat owners to ping program is necessary not only for 
number of feral cats in the city before ensure their cats arc wearing a collar, population control, but to prevent a 
the spring breeding season begins. since only animals without collars will possible increase in diseases which could 

spread to indigenous wildlife. 

Additional information can be ob¬ 
tained by calling Henderson at the 
Carmel Police Department, 624-6403. i 



Car stereos targeted 
in auto burglaries 

Carmel police report five 

cars were burglarized within the 
city limits during the month of 
January. 

‘*ln all Hve incidents, car stereos 
were targeted,” said Caiynel Police 
Detective Sgt. PetePoitras. “In two 
of the incidents, the cars were left 
unlocked.” 

Poitras reminded residents to 
pfiu'k'in a locked garage whenever 
possible, roll up windows and lock 
vehicles, and report all suspicious 
noises or activity to police. 


PHOTO/SCOTT MEMTON 


VALORIE HENDERSON, Carmel's animal control officer, demonstrates the "Havahart" 
trap, a homane method of controlling the population of feral cats within the city limits. 

_ 

Thunderbird bookstore burglarized 

Metal cash box containing more than $1,200 removed 

Burglars struck the was made through a front louvered win- 

Thundeibird bookstore in the Carmel dow. 

Barnyard this week, escaping with a According to Capt. Roger Chatterton, 

metal cash box containing more than spokesperson for the sheriffs depart- 
$1,200. ment, the cash box was located in a 

According to a Monterey County locked room behind a heavy, bolted 
Sheriffs report, the crime occurred some door. 

time between 9 p.m. Monday and 7a.m. Nothing else in the store was dis- 
Tuesday. .j ' turbed, according to Chatterton, who 

^ ‘TTie report said entry into the store' added the investigation is in progress. 


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February 3 .-1994 


The Carmel Pine Cone/CV Outlook 7 

























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8 The Carmel Pine Cone/CV Outlook 


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February 3, 1994 


LAURELEShmpa^S 

have Ikiiited their alMUty to stay in buti- 


ness. 


Young api^aiided die efftMrts of the 
community but noted, as of Feb. 1, Los 
Laureles Lod|g6 was on the Mock to be 
sold ^J$4.7.fBinion. 

Voss said.the community of Carmel 
Valley needs to show tbs board super¬ 
visors that the brohbms between busi- 
nessM and resioeatB can be worked out 
without govirnmeot iBteiyent^ ‘‘We 
are ifaMy a Very setf-sui^cieat group,” 
she noted. "We’ lel^Jkind of town that' 
, wants to have our own destiny in our 

Michael Tancredi, who could hear the 
amplified intuic at Los Laureles Lodge 


as if it were playing in bis own Hving 
room, said he was suiprised by the 
Hentschels decision to close the lodge. 

Tancredi was a strong op^nent of 
amplified music at Los Laureles Lodge. 
He said prior to the Hentschels taking 
oyer the lodge in 1989, the musicians 
did not use amplifiers. 

”lt was never a problem before,” 
Tancredi noted. ‘^Historically, amplifi¬ 
cation wasn't part of the music.” 

•Tom Treanor, another neighb<nr who 
(directed to the lodge's outdoor music, 
said he feels sorry for the employees 
who lost their jobs. 

“1 hate to see anybody get hurt,” 
Treanor said. 

But he maintains his belief that am¬ 


plified music can be damaging to a time, can be damaging to your health,” 
person's overall weli-beins. Treanor added. “Adiustments are not 


person's overall well-being. 

“Health authcHities and law-enforce¬ 
ment agencies recognize that sustaining 
outdoor-amplified sound, for hours at a 


Ireanor added. Adjustments are not 
easy. There was only one thing the 
Hentschels needed to do — decrease the 


noise. 


Hatton EIR gets Friday hearing 


FREEWAY from page 1 
federal court Friday. 

Lloyd lives in Carmel and practices 
law in Monterey. 

“There is a lot of filtering through 
that must be done,” he said. 

Opponents of the Hatton Canyon 
freeway, who lost a key battle last 
week, hope for victory in court in San 
Jose tomorrow. 

Judge Spencer Williams will hear 
arguments on whether the California 
Department of Transportation 
(Caltrans) and the Federal Highway 
Administiation did an adequate j(^ in 
prwaring the EIR/EIS. 

Four entities—the Hatton Canyon 
Coalition, the Monterey Peninsula Re¬ 
gional Paric District, the Sierra Club 
and the City of Carmel — contend it 
did not. 

Court order 

They seek an order of the court 
requiring Caltrans to revise or supple¬ 
ment the three-inch thick EIR/EIS, 
published in October 1991. 

“The adequacy of information in 
the EIR/EIS is necessary to inform all 
decision makers of the possible conse¬ 
quences of their actions,” Lloyd said. 

The key decision-maker that free¬ 


way opponents would like to influ¬ 
ence is the U.S. Ariny Corps of Engi¬ 
neers, which will grant or deny a key 
wetlands-impact permit in the com¬ 
ing weeks. 

According to Lloyd, the plaintiffs 
charge the EIR/EIS falb short in its 
analysis of wetland impacts and 
project-induced growth, and in its 
exploration of reasonable alternatives. 

Opponents also contend the project 
seeks to attain higher traffic service 
levels service than is legally called 
for, according to Lloyd. 

Earlier battle i 

Last week, Caltrans won an im¬ 
portant batde before the Transporta¬ 
tion Agency for Monterey County. 

' TAMC voted 15-2 to support the 
freeway, thus abandoning study of 
alternatives, such as the various High¬ 
way 1 widening schemes. 

A total of $43 million has been 
earmarked for the fr^way, and the 
California Transportation Commis¬ 
sion (CTC) is expected Feb. 24 to 
assign the funds to Hatton Canyon. 
The CTC would have had to chose 
between the freeway project and a 
somewhat less expensive Highway 1 
I widening project. 


Residents hope to convince supes rifts can be mended 


i 



























































































CARMEL 


PEBBLE BEACH 


PACIFIC GROVE 


Desk officer leaves for higher-paying 

^ Thurman** position, Camid Police Detective 

he^ l^unnan*^ Sgt. Pete Poitras said^ wiM take at least two months 

ThiTOMWMh^in FArua^l^asabuilding to adequately train a new desk officer, 
inspwtor for City of Carmel s planning depart- In the meantime, an additional officer will have to 
ment. l^^ng the gi^ s bu^et crisis, his position was man the communication center with the trainee, ac- 
ehminated. According to lliurman, the city offered coiding to Poitras. 

_ m a job u a desk officer, which he accepted in , Hiurman said his new position in San Carios will 

ruary . pay him 20 to 25 percent more than whsrt he earned as 

As a drak officer, Ihurman was responsible for a building inspector for the City of Carmel, and 60 
manning the police department s communication cen- percent more than what he made as a full-tim* dmik 


RENRISSRNCE 

CONSTRUCTION 


signed to 20 to 25 households, and would serve as the 
block resource for those who need help, particularly in 
seeking the assistance of social service agencies. 

“Our goal is to be caring, not intrusive,** Faur told 
the council. 

Each volunteer would receive some disaster and 
first aid training, according to committee members. 

Councilman Bob Fischer suggested the network be 
linked with existing neighborhood watch programs, 
which focus on crime, rather than social needs. 

Tlie next St. Bernard. Committee meeting will be 
held Wednesday, Feb. 9, at city hall. 

Unsung heroes 

In other matters, the council recognized seven Carmel 
residents as 1993*s “Unsung Heroes.** ^ 

Mayor White presented certificates to Violet Beah^, 
Lyn and Paul Eastman, Bob Irvine, Margaret Parkhurst, 
Marjorie Timmins and Cecil Wahle. 

Befitting the criteria of the award, none of these 
individuals — all Carmel residents — serves on any 
city board or commission or has been formally recog¬ 
nized for his or her good deeds. 


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hardwara, oak flooring & 3 firaplacas. Two 
badrooms, 3 baths, guest suite, office & gourmet 
kitchen. Need you want more? $895,000. 

NEAR THE SEAI * 

Overlooking the Odello fields with a view of the 
ocean from the living room is this delightful, 
warm & cozy Carmel Meadows home. Vaulted- 
ceiling living room with open beams and 
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Two bedrooms, 2 baths. Just blocks to 
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On a roomy lot near MPCC is this well-cared for 
vintage Spanish-style casita. The main house, 
with its hardwood floors, is spacious with a large 
living room, formal dining, one bedroom & bath. 
Upstairs is a two-room suite with bath. The park¬ 
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PARTNERS IN EDUCATION 


FOR THE FIRST QUARTER OF 1994 
(January 1 through March 31, 1994) 
MONTEREY COUNTY BANK WILL 
DONATE TO FOCUS (Friends of Carmel 
Unified Schools) 1% OF ALL NET NEW 
DEPOSITS TO ALL NEW AND 
EXISTING DEMAND (CHECKING) 
ACCOUNTS AT ITS CARMEL BRANCH. 


th9W>nififi<siub 


Remember, you can also help our schools by 
buying SCRIP at both Monterey County Bank 
locations for your Albertsons, Del Monte 
Shopping Center, Longs and Safeway purcha.scs! 
Use SC/?/P just like gift certificates! 


STEPS TO WATERFRONT! 

Just forty-eight steps from the shoreline, the 
charming "Mermaid Cottage" sits nestled among 
English gardens & Carmel-stone walls. Near 
"Lovers Point," this romantic 1-bedroom, 2-bath 
home offers gracious ocean views from the 
upper deck & loft. River-rock fireplace & wood 
floors. $317,000. 

VICTORIAN DUPLEX! 

Built in 1888 one block from Lovers Point 
Beach, this home offers choices for the owner. 
The downstairs has a living room, dining room, 
full kitchen, 2 bedrooms, bath & storage shed. 
The upstairs presents a living room, full kitchen, 
bedroom & bath. Retain as separate, legal 
duplex or re-convert to a single-family 
residence. $375,000. 


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625-4300 


626-6963 


Member F.D.I.C 


February 3, 1994 The Carmel Pine Cone/CV Ouriook 9 


















HOME 


Residents 


say county 

planners ignored their 
concerns ^out project 

PROJECT from page 6 
the 


acknowledged any of the 


Williams said he already has made all the conces¬ 
sions he plans to. 

**We left 40 acres in farming land,” Williams ex¬ 
plained referring to the 50-acre property adjacent to 
Valley Hills Shopping Center. could have built 16 
houses there.” 

He added that the Canada Woods subdivision al¬ 
lowed for 128 homes on 500 acres, but "we chose to 
build 48 because it*s proper. It’s a very balanced 
project. I’m only using one-third of what I could.” 
iTie commercial development would include a conve¬ 
nience store, service center, offices, a sewage-treat¬ 
ment plant to service the entire project, sind recre- 
ationaJ-vehicle storage in the basement of the facility. 
The facility would consist of seven buildings designed 
to look like working bams. 

The Canada Woods project goes before the Monterey 
County Board of Supervisors in March, at which time 
Williams said he will "basically show them everything 
is the same.” ^ 

If the board approves the project, Williams said 
there are 120 conditions placed upon the project.. 

The commercial section of the project will be the 
first to be developed, Williams said, starting with the 
employee housing and sewer-treatment plant. 


CQl{K)mki'$ f thiim 




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10 The Carmel Pine Cone/CV Outlook February 3, 1994 


































Beck outlasts Funk in Shoot-Out 




SHOOT OUT from page 1 

had initially been penciled in to compete, but was a late 
scratch. 

“1 have really come to enjoy the Shoot-Out,” Beck 
said after accepting the winner’s check. Two years ago, 
he beat Corey Pavin to win here. He has been compet¬ 
ing since the Shoot-Out began at AT&T-Pebble Beach 
eight years ago. 

“When I first started 1 used to be so nervous. I really 
grew a lot through the Merrill Lynch Shoot-Outs.” 

Beck, who finished 25th on the PCA Tour money 
list last year, showed no signs of nervousness Tuesday. 
Rather, he was a model of concentration. Beck calmly . 
practiced his putting motion while his fellow pros 
bantered their way through the low-key event. He 
barely raised his head when one of the others took a 
shot or putted. 

“The greens were in as good as shape as I’ve ever 
played them here,” Beck said, giving tournament 
officials a positive scouting r^ort considering last 
week’s rain. 

The shootists were relaxed and jovial. Beck’s quiet 
intensity aside, as they joked with one another, the 
crowd and roving commentator Bob Murphy. Several 
times Ogle wired himself for sound so he could vent his 
humor more publicly. . ^ 

“What’s Pebble^ach without going to the beach ? ” 
he asked after leu^ng in the bunker on the fourth hole, 
which resulted in his elimination. Ogle took his early 
exit casually, still recovering from a cold that kept him 
out of the last two PGA tour stops in Tucson and 
Phoenix. 

“That’s pretty good considering I already played 23 
holes today,” said the lanky Australian in the straw 
cowboy hat, who won this year’s United Airlines 
Hawaiian Open. 

—i-T' Guns blazing 

7 There was some wild shooting. 

Ogle started off with both guns blazing. He birdied 
the first two holes in a hail of accurate fire that sent Jim 
Galagher, Jr. and Fulton Allem running for cover. Billy 
Andrade went down shooting wildly, blasting a bullet 
into the trees en route to the fifth hole. That ball just 
disappeared, and so did Billy the Kid. Then Ogle went 
down, and Rocco Mediate. Then Simpson. 

But the real shooting started when it was down to 
three on the 17th hole as Maggert, Funk and Beck each 
birdied to force a shootout. They wem’t exacdy the 
Good, the Bad and the Ugly, but the stage was set for 
high drama. 

All three took chip shots from behind the bunker. 
Be»k put his clo^e to the hole with the kin^^f delicacy 

See AT&i' page 23 



PHOTO/COIE THOMPSON 


FRED FUNK (left) congratulates Chip Beck moments after 
Beck was declared the winner of tne 8th annual Merrill 
Lynch ShootOut, held Tuesday at Pebble Beach. 


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ttis year’s taxes kx 15% less! 

Joseph E. Battilega, C.P.A. 

Mission & Eighth, Carmel ^ 

^ 626-9114 


ACUPUNCTURE CLINIC 


BY-TIIE-SEA 



J Acupuncture & Herbal Medidne 

Koji Okazaki, L.Ac., O.M.D. • 

State Licensed (Ca & NY) 

28 years experience in Japan, 
r m Mix U.5. A. and Europe 

Arthritis • Tension Release • Female Ailments 
Neck, Shoulder, & Lower Back Pain Problems, etc. 

HOUSE CALLS • DISCOUNT FOR SENIORS 

TREATMENT WITHOUT PAIN C^AO 

DISPOSABLE NEEDLES 

M - F: 9A.M. - 6 PM. SAT.: 9 A.M. -1 P.M. 

8th & Mission • CARMEL 


If you've always dreamed of a 
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Walk to Town • Ocean views, remodeled 3B0/ 
3BA home. Beautiful patios and gardens per¬ 
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for rental income. 



SUNUGHT & SPACE $695,000 

Beach Walk - Near Carmel Point, 3BR/2.5BA, 
2-story home with sunny open floor plan, gen¬ 
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and more. Convenient location. 



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CARMEL COMFORT $279,500 

Walk to Town - Charming 2BD/2BA Carmel 
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venient location, low maintenance. 

EASY STREET $229,000 

Convenient Condo living - Clean, private 
2BR/2.5BA unit with views, sunshine, tennis. 
Close to the Post Office and shopping. 

VALLEY & OCEAN VIEWS $895,000 
Cotswold cottage - Charming, private 4BD/ 
3.5BA. 3000 sq.ft, home just 3 houses from the 
beach on large street-to-street lot. Gorgeous 
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COME HOME TO FOX & CARSKADON 


February 3, 1994 


The Carmel Pine Cone/CV Outlook 11 










































Killer whales common in Monterey Bay 


Steep canyon provides ideal location to hunt their favorite prey - gray whales 

By SCOTT BREARTON ^ 

Nowhere are transient killer whales more . 


inni 


the bestplace to go see one to go stand out on the 
edge of Point L(»os or buy a house somewhere on 
Carmel Bay,” said Richaixl Temullo, captain of 
the Pt. Sur Clipper, a local research vessel. 

Temullo Sind Black spoke to a large crowd 
assembled at the Monterey Boatworks building of 
Hopkins Marine Station Jan. 27, for the Monterey 
Bay Chapter of the American Cetacean Society's 
monthly meetine. More than 100 people turned 
out for a fascinating slide presentation and infor¬ 
mational lecture about these mysterious, highly- 

intelligent cetaceans. A PAIR of adult killer whales are at home in AAonterey E 

According to Black, most of the information by the large dorsal fin. The other is a female, 
about kiljer whales has come from British Colum¬ 
bia and Washington State, where killer whales killer whales: to try to identify every member in th( 
occur predictably during the summer months to pod and photogre^h them if possible, and to recorr 
feed on spawning salmon. These killer whales, their calls. 

which can easily be observed from shore, are Photographic evidence is important because it en 
called the “resident” group. ables researchers to chart the movement of individua 

But the resident group of the Pacific Northwest whales. Researchers at the National Marine Mamma 
is very different than the other main type of killer Laboratory in Seattle, for example, have helped matcl 
whales, the type common to Monterey Bay — the photos of Monterey Bay killer whales with those spot 
transient group. Black said there are both genetic ted in the Pacific Northwest. 

and physical differences between the two types. Identification work also helps researchers note as 


Primary* prey “There is a linkage between almost every animal 

Killer whales in the transient group travel in we’ve identified,” Black said, noting that one particu- 
small groups of one to eight animals, according to lar male has been seen with 34 different killer whales. 
Black. Their primary prey includes young Califor- “Basically, every single killer whale we’ve identified 

nia gray whales, California sea lions, northern - over 100 whales - is somehow linked up through 
elephant seals and other marine mammals. Tran- (its) associations,” said Black. “They’re not just in 
sients are usually very quiet, except while hunting, these real stable pods. They seem to be floating around 
They tend to have more closed saddle patches and quite a bit.” 

taller, straighter and more pointed dorsal fins. According to Black, there are “core” associations, 

Interestingly, the two primary groups - resi- however, suggesting animals that have been seen 
dents and transients - rarely if ever intermix, together on three or more occasions are possibly re¬ 
according to Black. lated. 

“They really stay away from each other,” she 
said, “even though they are living in the same Each is distinct 

area.” “Each individual whale is distinct,” Black said. 

Based on evidence gathered with underwater noting each has some type of marking that distin- 
microphones called hydrophones (which record guishes the animal from others in a group, 
killer whale calls), the transient range extends “Ifwe can actually know them,” she added, “we can 

from as far north as Glacier Bay, Alaska to Monterey really get to know their individual behaviors and 
Bay. Photographic evidence indicates the range document them over time.” 

extends much further southward - to the Gulf of According to Black, more than 120 different killer 
Baja California and possibly beyond. whales have been identified off the coast of California. 

“There may be other types of killer whales in Of these, 75 were observed in Monterey Bay. Forty- 
other areas that we don’t know about,” Black four adult males have been identified. Most whales 
noted. have been spotted only once, while others have been 

Black refers to ongoing research in Monterey seen numerous times. 

Bay as “opportunistic,” because killer whales in “We can probably expect that there are many more 
this area occur so unpredictably. Researchers whales that we still have to identify in this area,” said 
generally have two goals in jnind while observing Black. 


1#^*' 


A LARGE female killer whale "spy-hops" after a successful attack on a Dali's porpoise 


12 The Carmel Pine Cone/CV Outlook February 3, 1994 


I 
























director. The Arthritis Foundation, Northern Califor- 


llUlMiUJ 


the disease may vary. ‘^It is a disease that*s pretty 
individual,** she says. 

Karol Orr, O.T.R. and director of Rehabilitation 
Services for Community Hospital of the Monterey 
Peninsula (CHOMP), supports this view and strongly 
advocates self>management. '*Arthnti<« is a chronic 
disease with medications that are s( varied and re¬ 


sponses so individual that people have to be directing 
their own programs,** she states. 


the difficulties of the disease. Focus is on pain manage¬ 
ment and improving Activities of Daily Living (ADL) 
function. This group is free. 

The self-help course offered by the Arthritis Foun¬ 
dation and the Stanford Arthritis Center is so popular 
that the next class, scheduled to start Feb. 12 at the 


Carmel Foundation was already filled at press time. 
But you may call the toll-free number now to register 
in advance for the next class in September. If there is 
enough demand, an additional course may be held 
earlier. 




How arthritis patients 

can help themselves 

/ 

It can be something as simple as a new product— 
elastic shoelaces — that permits an arthritis patient to 
put on shoes without having to re-tie the laces. Shoes 
are slipped on and off with a long-handled shoehorn. 

Little things can add up to increased comfort and 
decreased pain. An exsmnple is to change positions 
frequently while performing tasks or pursuing hob¬ 
bies. Hot and cold treatments can be helpful. Products 
are available that allow swollen fingers to open jars 
smd negotiate door handles. 

These are just a few of the means that can make life 
easier for people with arthritis. Obviously, they are not 
the whole answer, particularly for those with more 
advanced stages or Afferent forms of the disease. But 
th^ may be part of the overall treatment program. 

Treatment plans are individual, but most will in¬ 
clude some combination of medication, rest, exercise 
and joint protection. Together these methods help 
relieve pain, reduce inflammation, minimize damage 
to joints and improve joint movements. Improvement 
comes slowly, says the Arthritis Foundation, but many 
effects of arthritis can be overcome for most people. 
For some, surgery may be recommended to reduce 
pain or maintain movement. A weight loss program 
and physical or occupational ther^y are other op¬ 
tions. 

Arthritis* effects can range from minor aches and 
pains to crippling joint damage. There are more than 
100 types of the disease, the most common of which is 
osteoarthritis. Other major types are rheumatoid, lupus, 
ankylosing spondylitis and gout. In a study conducted 
by the San Mateo Arthritis Project, the average age of 
those affected was reported to be 49. One out of seven 
people has'the disease. 

In the past there has not been any treatment to stop 
or reverse the disease process, according to the Arthri¬ 
tis Foundation. But a good treatment program may 
help decrease joint pain and stiffness and improve 
movement and function. It may or may not slow down 
the disease. Recent research, however, indicates that 
in the future there may be treatment that can stop 
some forms of the disease, in particular, rheumatoid 
arthritis. 

Rather than laying their aches and pains to old age, 
people should get a speciRc diagnosis from their doc¬ 
tors, according to Kathy Downs, associate program 


Gadgets can help 

In addition to elastic shoelaces, there are a number 
of items that may be found in local pharmacies, 
medical supply firms and other stores. But many 

{ >roducts are only available through mail order cata- 
ogs.. 

They include a long-handled picker to reach high 
shd ves, rubber gripper to remove bottle tops and shoes 
and clothes with Velcro fasteners. More and more 
firms are incorporating desi^ innovations in their 
products that can make household chores, caving and 
dressing easier to accomplish. 

What*8 the question? 

The Arthritis Foundation has a toll-free number 
you may call with any and all questions and staff will 
even do research to help you find answers. The Foun¬ 
dation sponsors self-help courses, aquatic classes and 
public forums and offers a local physician referral list. 

Available are informative pamphlets on various 
forms of the disease, medications, travel tips, back 
pain and more. A list of catalogs will assist in locating 
specifiosproducts. A form will be sent you from which 
you can order up to 15 titles without charge. Phone 
(800) 464-6240. 

Self-help courses offered 
Arthritis is a condition in which the patient can 
participate very productively in the treatment pro¬ 
gram. 

Locally, CHOMP has an ongoing long-established 
arthritis program which currently includes Rtness 
classes and a support group. The exercise program 
includes individual assessment, regular exercise and 
lectures designed to maintain and/or increase range of 
motion, reduce stress and increase functional strength 
and endurance. You may bill Medicare for the fee. 
The CHOMP support group aids to help cope with 


In this class, participants are informed about joint 

E rotection, energy conservation, medications and self- 
elp behaviors designed to°decrease stress, psun and 
even d^ression which may result from the disease. 
How to work effectively with the physician and the 
latest in exercise and pain management techniques are 
also discussed. 

Individuals can play an active role in managing 
their own arthritis. Self-help and exercise programs 
are available. Any program should be undertaken in 
consultation with your physician. 

A call to the Arthritis Foundation can answer many 
of your questions. Programs and phone numbers are 
listed below. 

Classes and support groups 
Arthritis Foundation and Stanford Arthritis 
Center: Self-help course, six weeks. Materials fee is 
$15, fee waivers available. Current course is filled.- 
Phone to register in advance for September course, 
toll-free (800) 464-6240 or Steven Wilson, program 
coordinator, (415) 723-7935. i 

Community Hospital of the Monterey Penin¬ 
sula (CHOMP): Arthritis Fitness Class — Monday, 
Wednesday and Friday, 1:30 to 2:30 p.m. or 2:30 to 
3:30 p.m., eight weeks. Ongoing. $250, participants 
bill Medicare or insurance company. Arthritis Group 
Therapy — Second and fourth Thursdays, 2 to 3 p.m. 
Free. No physician referral necessary. To register 
contact Rehabilitative Services Department, Holman 
Highway, Monterey. Phone 625-4978. 

Josephine Kernes Memorial Pool: Warm-water 
arthritis exercise class. Phone 372-1240. 

Monterey Sports Centen Deep hydro-aerobics for 
patients with arthritis and other conditions. Next class 
starts Feb. 23. Additional swim programs for seniors. 
Fee. Phone Sara Collins, 646-5621. 

Pattulo Swim Center: Warm water exercise classes. 
Phone 899-6272. 


Expanded hours for residenticil parking permit sales offered 


tHE CARMEL Police Department has expanded 
the hourstii which residential parking permits can 
be purchased. 

The permits, which can still be purchased from 
8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Friday, are now 
available from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Mondays. 

Residential parking permits cost $12. In order to 


be eligible, persons must present their current ve¬ 
hicle registration and proof of residency. 

A voter registration card, PG&E billing stub or 
other documentation which shows a physical loca¬ 
tion within the city limits of Carmel-by-the-Sea will 
suffice as proof of residency. 

Additional information: 624-6403. 


What’s 

shakin’ 
around the 
Monterey 
Peninsula 
this 
week? 


Jtiiliiii 






Moselle Carlin, Retired County Clerk 
and Villa Serra Server, Tony 


FUN! FOOD! 
ENTERTAINMENT! 




Don't miss any of 
It...pick up 0 FREE 
copy every 
Wednesday! 


Ciracious Retirement Living 

U •JTC'TOW 


THE REVIEW 


S!*()\s()Ki /) MV DiiKiM ()i Movji KM \si) DoMJMc’.w Sw'iA Cri 7 Hosi’/J \i • I HO P\i)R/. Dr. • Sm.j.vvs, C.\ 93901 • 4(),s/7S4'S5 32 


my^p^nd,^^er,T€pY. He*$ im 
^ ^ ^of the reas^ I enjoy living at Vilia SeiTa^ 

- His happy petsomlity and warm smile are gi^rant^^ 
to fimke you feel Tight at home. In fact, the entire staff 
at Villa Serra pride themselves on going out thet| 
way to make you feel comfortable and jiist IBte 
cme the family. Come by or call for a free tour and 
Cc meet our dedicated staff. They play a big part In 
making Villa Serra retirement community 
- a wonderful place to call honut. 



The Carmel Pine Cone/CV Outlook 1 3 


februory 3, 1994 

















' » t 




c 


OPEN EVERY MY 

^ 624-1543 


SERVMQ OUR OOMMUNTTY FOR 35 YEARS 

• Medication & Nutritional Counseling 

• Home Health Supplies & Services 

• Accept Most Third Party Insurance 
* Aids for Independent Living ~ 

For those with impaired abiimes 


EASY PARKING • FREE DELIVERY 
Open9am-9pm • eth & Juniporo • Caimel 


.For the Time of Your Life 


Salvation Army Family ^viionment Center on the 
campus of Salvation Army’s Community Center 
Elm and Cbntra Costa« Seaside 


Daycare services for 
frail adults while . 
caregiver is away, at 
work, or taking care 
of errands... 


SOMEONE YOU 
LOVE CAN HAVE A 
BEAUTIFUL DAY! 



Monday - Friday: 8:30 - 3:45 

Call Marcia Love-Jackson 899-4911 


CRESTWOOD 


CONVALESCENT HOSPITAL 
OF MONTEREY 




OFFERING SKILLED NURSING 
AND REHABILITATION SERVICES 


Accepting Medicare, VA 
& other approved insurances 


373-2731 


Professional staff 

offering families a unique partnership 
in caring for their loved ones. 


1575 Skyline Drive • Monterey 


, S - w. 



r 







T 


.■* 








on the 






lerev 




Peninsula 


SFECALIZED SERVICES FOR SENIORS 








CARMEL CONVALESCENT 


L ’ 


Serving Carmel 63 Years 


WJifaiL 


^^6/) 

; INC 


• Ambulatory • Convalescent 
• 24-Hour Pix)fessional Care 
Physical Therapy • Occuational Therapy • Speet 
Excellent Meals •.Respitecare 


MARKET, INC. 

The Non-Supermarket 

GROCERIES - MEAT - WINES - UQUORS 
GOURMET SHOP 
, Charge Accounts Welcome 

HOTEL OR HOME DELIVERY 

624-6441 

Groceries 624-6441 Meat 624-6263 

Wine 624-9463 Cheese 624-5939 


Locally owned and operated by Floyd & Portia Harda 


Carmel Convalescent Hospital is conveniently located in a 
park-like setting on Highway One between Carpenter and 
Every patient at Carmel Convalescent Hospital has the i 
environment where dignity, self-esteem and individuality a 
through affection, consideration and re^^ect. 


P.O. Box 6177, Carmel, CA 93921 

HIGHWAY ONE & VALLEY WAY • CARMEL • (4 


HEARING FACT NO. 3 


Hearing loss is the wo^4c^f secret. 




GOLDEN POPPY CLUB CHECKING 
...Just Common Sense! 


The one secret which many people discover quicker than any other is hearing bss. 
If you try to hide your hearing loss from family, friends or business acquaintances, 
it is guaranteed your secret will be os obvious os rain on the desert. They will 
notice your inappropriate responses. Your withdrawal from meaningful 
conversations. Yes. It is frustrating. Sometimes we get angry or depressed. But, 
heoring loss is not terminal. Your Family Practice Physician con advise you what 
steps to take to solve your difficulty. You may benefit from o hearing aid. One of 
those new advanced, miniature hearing instruments that more and more people 
ore wearing. 

Call today lor a hearing evaluation and check-up. 


vcr wonder if you’re making smart 
fmancial decisions? Here’s a new 
idea in banking that’s more than just 
a wise move - it’s the Golden Poppy 
Club Oiecking Account. Pay no service 
fee with a $100 minimum balance. Every 
account receives the following benefits, 
and more: 


Accidental Death Insurance 


Emergency Cash Advance Service - 
available 24 hours a day at thousands 
of locations 


Unlimited checking privileges 
Personalized checks 
Interest on checking 


Credit Card Protection Service - if 
your credit cards are ever lost or stolen, 
one toll-free call 


Key Ring and Registration Service - 
lost keys can be dropped in any mailbox 
and returned to you at no charge 


The 

Monterey 
Hearing Center 


1077 A Cass St. • Monterey 


375-5688 



Discounts - on lodging, dining 
and recreation across the country 


Sojourns Magazine - featuring vivid, 
color photography, in-depth travel 
stories and great mscounts 


If y^ re 50 or over, the Golden Poppy Club Checking account 
makes sense for you. If you’re not yet 50,^u can still take 
advantage of special benefits for a small monthly fee. 


Michele J. Ikuta, M.A. 


Stop by today for all the details. 

3785 Via Nona Marie • Carmel Rancho • 625-4300 COUNTY 
665 Munras Avenue • Monterey • 649-4600 B4NK 

^ Metnbg F.DJ.C. SBA Preferred Lender E<{ual Houcing Lender 


1 4 The Carmel Pine Cone/CV Outlook 


February 3, 1994 

























VISrriNG NURSE 

ASSOCIATION 


Prompt Kmerj»ency Care 


CaU for rates & information rK>wl 


Serving the Carmel area since 1946 

Complete Pest Control 

Night Service Available 

624-8211 

San Carios & 7th • Carmel 


Hornet ii7Healfh Pkis 


V FULL SERVICE—NURSING/REHAB 

SOCIAL SERVICES 
PRIVATE DUTY/INFUSION 
y PERSONAUZED HI-TECH QUALITY CARE 
y RN STAFF & MANAGEMENT AVAILABLE 

AROUND THE CLOCK 
y MEDICARE CERTIFIED/STATE UCENSED 
y SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 


MEDICARE CERTIREO 
REHABILITATION AGENCY 


Physical Therapy • Speech Therapy 
Biofeeciback • Acupuncture • Massage 
No $750 yearly cap on physical therapy. 

373-1209 

917 Pacific Street • Monterey 


CALL NOW FOR FREE NURSING ASSESSMENT! 
GUARANTEED 2-HOUR 
RESPONSE TIME 

373-8442 


Caring for you at home... since 1952. 

■ Home nursing care, clinical specialists 

■ Physical, occupational or speech therapy 

^ t ■ Nutritionists . , , . ^ 

■ Medical social workers 

■ Diabetes care 

■ Personal care, light housekeeping, meal 
preparation, chore services, driving 

■ Adult day care, respite 

M MONTEREY PENINSULA 

37S9882 

SAUNAS VALLEY 

_ 75&8302 

BHHBSIffll-Hl SAN BENITO COUNTY 

637-6724 

Fully licensed, Medicare certified 


Full-Service Pharmacy 
Competitive Pricing 


lOSPITAE 


)eech Therapy 


Serving the Community Since 1910 

• Personalized Blood Pressure Testing 

• Patient Profiles 

• Ph^cian prescription call in 

• Patient counseling 

• In store charges 

• We accept Blue Cross of CA, 

Paid Prescription, A4edi-Met, PCS, 
Workers Comp 

Have your doctor call in your prescriptk) 
& we'll deliver at NO EXTRA CHARGE 

Catering to our heal senior citizens 


irdcastle 


For Information 
on VNA 
Priority Program 
call 372-6668 


in a picturesque 
and Ocean Ave. 
the right to an 
ty are maintained 


■ 624-3819 

Ocean Ave. & San Carlos St. ♦ Carmel- by-the-Sea 


FULL RESTORATIVE 
SERVICES 
FOR HEALTH, 
FUNCTION 
L. & BEAUTY 


PERSONALIZED 
CUSTOM DENTURES 

• Immediate Placement Dentures 

• Repairs and Reline Same Day 

• Implant & Attachment Dentures 

• Diificult Denture Problems 

• Lab on Premises f 

• Over 20 Years Experience | 


GENERAL & COSMETIC 
DENTISTRY 

• Prevenutive and Hygiene Care 

• Porcelain Veneers and Resin Bonding 

• Crowns and Bridges 

• Full Mouth Reconstruction 

• Dental Implants 

• SENIOR DISCOUNTS 


CompletCy Alert 24-Hour Care 


Insuramce 
Plant Accepted 

New Patients 
Welcome 


FOR SENIORS 


All Meals /Transportation /Medical AUention • Personal Service & Private Root 

DOWNTOWN CARMEL 

Siam License « 270706117 

San Carios btwn.7th & 8th • P.O.Box 1200, Carmel, CA 93921 624-8336 


^ 800 PORTOLA DRIVE, MONTEREY, CA 93940 

K (Comer of Fremont & Canyon Del Rey) 

3275 Afros RANCHO ROAD, SUITE D, AfTOS (AcroM from Ranck 


John H. Hottinger. DDS 



Carmel Inn 

\ 


For discriminating seniors since 1967 






1 r • : 




February*^3, 1994 


The Carmel Pine Cone/CV Outlook I 5 























































TTie Best Drug Store In Tbwri 


CRESTWOOD 

CONVALESCENT HOSPITAL 
OF MONTEREY 


OFFERING SKILLED NURSING 
AND REHABILITATION SERVICES 


Accepring Medicare, VA 
& other approved insurances 


Professional staff of^ng families a unique 
partnership in caring for their loved ones. 

1575 Skyline Drive • Monterey 


^^1 SERVICES FOR SENIORS 

on tke Monterey Peninsula 


Dr. Marshall Shoquist, Audiologist 


A special place... 
it's really home! 


Acupuncture & Herbal Medidne 


Koji Okazaki, L.Ac, O.M.D, 
State Licensed (CA A. NY) 

28years exmence in Japan. 
r U.aA. and Europe 

Arthritis • Tension Release • Female Ailments 
Neck, Shoulder, & Lower Back Pain Problems, etc. 

HOUSE CALLS • DISCOUNT FOR SENIORS 


Valley Heights 

SENIOR RENTAL COMMUNITY 
925 Freedom Blvd. • Watsonville, CA 95076 
(408) 722-4884 Call or write for our free brochure. 
.Ask about our complimentary overnight stay! a 


DIGITAL HEARING AID SYSTEM 

FREE HEARING AID CLINIC 
50 Day Trial Period 

Carmel Rancho Shopping Center 625-6159 


I (408) 625-5309 

8th & Mission • CARMEL 
North of Sunset Center Public Parking Lot 


OUR PHILOSOPHY IS THAT 
THE BUSINESS OF CARING 
Should be more caring than business 

At Kimberly (^ality Care, ~ 

the nation’s laigest provider of s 

home care services, our business is f ” 

caring for your neighboihood k 
health care needs. Ik 


RETAIL 

PHARMACY 


Hours: MonFiri. 
8:30 am - S:3k) pm 
Sat. Sun., HoKdays: 
Emergency on-call 


Patient Services 

• Full Prescription Service (includes compounded and sterile products) 

• Diabetes Center • Certified Diabetes Educator. RN 

• Cholesterol Screening^otal and HDL • Ostomy & Urostomy Supplies 

• Wound Supplies & Dressings • Patient Profiles 
• Patient Consultation • Drug Information 

' * FREE DELIVERY 

Financial Services F 

• Insurance Billing - coordination and 
billing of most insurance prescription 

ben^ts • Charge Accounts 
• Accept PCS, PAID, Insurx, Calif. Blue 
Cross, Medi-Cal, PCN, and others 
• Discounts to Seniors (55+) 
on Prescriptions • Competitive Pricing L 

798 CASS STREET • MONTEREY 


We provide (he following services 
24 hours a day, 7 days a week: 

' • Skilled Nurses • Theraines: Physical, Speech & Occupational 

Home Health Aides assisting with baths, meal preparation & light housekeq>ing 
Psychiatric Clinical Specialists • Inuavenous Therapy • Wound Care Specialists 

We are a Medicare Certified Agency and provide 
FREE consultations and evaluations. 


pacJfJc 


mmsmmxGuoxm 

due to ilineas, age, disability* 


KMBERiyMi 

CgMJTYCARE 


cnmcAL 
■CARE , 


Quality of Life is Our Committment 


3 PENINSULA LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU 


CARMEL - #6 The Crossroads 

Phone: 624-0195 Photo: 624-0197 Rx: 624-0148 


1229 David Avenue • Pacific Grove 

• 7 homes in a garden setting • 24-hour staffing 

• Ambulatory & non-ambulatory • Brealdast served in guests' rooms 

• Activities director • Three delicious meals daily 

• Intercom system in rooms • Personal care program 

• Cable & phones in all rooms • Supervision of medication 

• Transportation available 

- Private Rooms from $1500 - 


MONTEREY - 2170 Fremont Street 

Phone: 373-6134 Photo: 373-4040 Rx: 375-5135 


MONTEREY - 686 Lighthouse Avenue 

Phone:655-5404 Photo: 655-3115 Rx: 655-5411 


VISIT OUR NEW IN-STORE PHOTO LABS! 

1-HOUR PHOTO PROCESSING 

Available at All Three Peninsula Locational 


16 The Carmel Pine Cone/CV Outlook February 3, 1994 
























t 


* 


Can city successfully ‘sell’ Sunset Center renovation project? 


SURVEY firom page 1 
evident as in the wake of past Voice 
surveys. The difference this time was the 
debate didn't wait for the results to be 
made public. 

Hie most signiHcant question asked 
citizens — in this case, registered voters 
and property owners — whether they 
support the proposed $11 million reno¬ 
vation of Sunset Center. 

Of the 23 percent that responded, 66 
percent (807) said no, and 25 percent 
(305) said yes. 

The survey also revealed that: 

• Eighty-percent of respondents op¬ 
posed the city's establishing assessment 
districts to raise revenues. 

• Eighty-one percent opposed any 
proposal to intr^uce paid on-street 
parking. 

• Sixty percent favored seeking off- 
street parking solutions, such as a park¬ 
ing structure at the Sunset Center lot. 

For now, the undeiiying issue con¬ 
cerning Sunset Center is not how people 
respond to the survey, but what the 
results suggest about the public rela¬ 
tions task awaiting the city if it is to win 
widespread support for the renovation. 

To some, the results strengthen the 
position the city's leadership is out-of¬ 
touch with public opinion. In the past, 
VOC surveys have led to a similar im¬ 
pressions on prominent issues, as re¬ 
spondents have indicated support for 
the Hatton Canyon freeway and opposi¬ 
tion to miniparks at the price of parking. 

. “There seems to be a reluctance to 
accept these results as valid,” said VOC 
President Pat Sippel, who was upset by 
what she viewed as a premature com¬ 
mentary submitted by the CRA. 


She outlined the Voice of Carmel's 
painstaking survey method, which in¬ 
cluded not just carefully worded ques¬ 
tions and background information, but 
independent verification of results. 

“Voice of Carmel makes every effort 
to present questions and background 
information evenhandedly,” said a VOC 
statement th^t accompanied the results. 

Nevertheless, there continues to be 
critical voices. Linda Anderson, who 
chairs the Carmel Community and Cul¬ 
tural Commission, argues VOC strives 
to elicit certain responses. 

“I'm sure the results would have been 
quite different had the Voice of Carmel 
asked the Cultural Commission or the 
fund-raising group to provide back¬ 
ground and check their statements for 
accuracy,” Anderson said. 

She took issue with a number of facts 
in the survey's background, underscor¬ 
ing that, “No mention was made that 
the project is trying to upgrade a seri¬ 
ously deteriorated facility." 

Anderson said some of the informa¬ 
tion in the background was either wrong 
,or misleading. For example, the text 
states the city would contribute to capi¬ 
tal costs for disabled access and seismic 
safety, which Anderson contends is un¬ 
true. 

Carmel Mayor Ken White, who has 
been a major supporter of the renova¬ 
tion, was concerned about what was left 
out in the VOC background. “We face 
serious economic conditions if we don 'l 
do something." 

White said he “appreciates the work 
of the V oice of Carmel,” but believes the 
survey is not the final word. He would 
have been happier if the background 


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You can have your hearing tested by Mark J. Sanford, 
an audiologist who specializes in hearing problems. 

4. Call For An Exam Today 

Your initial consultation is complimentary. 



UMBRELLAS FOR 
YOUR FEET. 







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included pro and con arguments. 

Meetings on Sunset Center have re¬ 
vealed overwhelming public support for 
the renovation, which would be carried 
out entirely'with private funds, accord¬ 
ing to those active in the planning. 

So far, initial architectural plans have 
been submitted by the Portland-Ore.- 
based firm, known as BOOR/A. Last 
fall, when the team visited Carmel to 
turn in its initial drawings, it received a 
standing ovation from a big crowd at „ 
Carpenter Hall. 

To date, only a relatively moderate 
debate has surrounded the investment 
by the city of $30,000 in seed money. In 
this context, the results of the VOC sur¬ 
vey results may surprise many. 

Whether or not one puts much faith in 


its findings, “The survey shows the city 
still has to do a heck of a better ssJes job 
if it wants this project,” said Alan Wil¬ 
liams, who sits on the VOC board. 

White seemed to agree, noting, “This 
mesins we haven't had the time to de¬ 
velop a precise position statement with 
regaH to Sunset.” 

Williams offered a more elaborate 
interpretation: “There are those who 
understand the project and don't sup¬ 
port it; and there are those who don't 
understand the project, and still they 
don't suppon it.” 

The debate over validity of the survey 
may obscure a more import^t issue — 
whether the city will ne^ to do more to 
insure the citizens know enough about 
the project and support it. 



Accents 

Windows 

We’ve Changed Our Name 
& Expanded Our ServicesI 

(Jormeriy Windows Works) 

• Custom Shutters 

• Draperies, Romans & Balloons 

• Wood Blinds 

• Vertical & Pleated Shades 

• Skylights, Motorized Shades, etc. 

• Bedspreads & Accessories 


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CarmeL CA 9392) 
(408) 626-9054 

Susan Ashelford & 
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Oumers 



Fall /Winter 

CLEARANCE 

40 - 50 % OFF 


Doud Arcade • Ocean. bfwn. San Carlos & Dolores • Carmel • 625-5587 




February 3, 1994 


The Carmel Pirte Cone/CV Outlook 17 















1. Valtoy Gorctont' 408 / 436-3068 

263 HefTTKXi IM., ^otts VaNey 

2. !>• La Veaga-408 / 423-7212 

401 Upper Park Rcxid. Santa Cruz 

3. PoMlIempp - 408 / 459-9156 

18 QubhoUso f^cxsd. Santa Cruz 


17. Spygkm HW - 408 / 625-8563 

Stevenson Dr. & Spyglass Hill, PB 

18. Poppy HMs - 408 / 625-2035 

3200 Lopez on 17 MlleDriye. PB 

19. Pacific Grove • 408 / 648-3177 

77 AsMomar Blvd., Pacific Grove 


4. ApkMPcir3 - 408 / 688-5000 

2600 Mar Vista O^e, Aptos 

5. /I^Secncape-406 / 6883254 

610 Clubhouse Drive. Aptos 

6. Ca8MrlyPar3 - 408 / 724-1404 

626 Cosserty Road. Watsonville 

7. Spring HMs-406/724-1404 

31 Smith Road, WalsonvUe 

8. Oavlan-408/848-1363 

5065Sonia Tieresa Blvd.. GHroy ; 

9. Pdkia VCM^ - 408i / 724-3851 
W $C*X3S Rocta. Wdtscxivilie 

10. Sherwood Greens - 406 / 758- 

, 7333.1050 N. Main Street Sqllnas 

11;Sc*Kit GdV 8 C.C. - 408 / 449- 
1827.475 Son Jucn Grade. SdlXB 

12. The Unks at Spanish Say - 408 / ^ 

647-7500. 2700 17-Mile Drive. 

Pebble Beach 

13. Peter Hay - 4^ / 625-8518. 

1 7-Mlle Drive. Pebble Beach 29. HM Country - 406 / 779-4136 

FdothM Averxje, Morgan Hi 

30. GMoy - 408 / Not Avolable 

2696 Hecker Pass HlQ^Tway. Gilroy 

31. RIdgermk GoV 8 C.C. - 408 /637< 

3800 AlrUne Hwy., Hollister 

32. Bolado Park - 408 / 628-9995 

7777 AlrBne Hwy, 25, Tres Rnos 


20. Old Del Monte - 408 / 373-2436 

1300 Sylvan Rood, Monterey 

21. Laguna Seed - 408 / 373-3701 
105120 York Road, Monterey 

22. U3. Navy Course - 408 / 373-8118 

Mark Thomas Dr, & Garden Rd.. Mtry. 

23. Fort Ord -408 / 242-3268 
McClure Way. Fort Ord 

24. Salnas Fairways - id8 / 758-7300 

45 Skyway Blvd.. Sciihas 

25. Rancho Carickia - 408 / 624-bi 11 

Carmel Vofley Rood, Carmel 

26. GoV Club of Qual Lodge - 408 / 624-2770 

8000 Valley Greens Dr., Carmel Valley 

27. Carmel VoHey Ranch Resort - 408 / 626- 
2510. 1 Old Rarxih Ita.. Carmel Vattey 

28. Corral de Tierro C.C. - 408 / 484-1325 

81 Corral DeTlerra, SallrxK 




14. Pebble BsKich GoV Unks - 408 / 
624-661 1.17-MHe Drive, Pebble 
Beach 


15. Monterey Peninsula C.C. - 408 / 
372-6141. 3000 Club Rood. 
Pebble Beach 


^ the knicker place 

A Golf Emporium 

Villa^ Shop 

Ocean & Lincoln (In the Court of the Golden Bough) 
Carmel-by-the-Sea • 624-9072 
Also 601 Wave Street • Monterey • 375-8340 


sss Point Club - 408 / 624- 

17 MBe Drive. Pebble Beach 


These handmade shoes are 
designed around the natural 
movement of the foot .using only 
the highest quality materials. 

SIZES FOR MEN & WOMEN 


S //\ Doug Swineford's 

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Mgolf& tennis 

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The Most Complete Tennis & ; 
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Open Mon.-Sat. 9-6 • Sun. 10-5 We Ship Anywhere! ■■ 

865 Abrego Street • Monterey • (408) 372-2414 ^ 


SAN CARLOS AT 6TH • COTTAGE ROW • CARMEL 

M-SAT. 10-6, SUN. 11-4 


Golf Tips On... SAND WEDGE 

From Doug at Sweetshot Golf & Tennis 


The family of sand wedges includes the m 

‘sand wedge," ‘sand club club,‘ the #11 jl 

iron," and "niblick." In most cases the only 
differences are in the terminology. Sand 
wedges ore available in an infinite number 
of shapes and many combinations of 
specifications all of which could becorrectly 
called any on of the names mentioned 
except for the niblick. One of the main 
problems that golfers faced in the pre-1930's era was 
that sand wedges were not invented yet. Thus, the trusty 
niblick was used to many golfers' frustration because it had a 
very narrow sole width and sharp leading edge which caused 
digging. The skill level required to extract a ball from sand with 
the niblick was for greater than it was with the wider bounce 
sole type sand wedge first invented by Gene Sarazen in the 
1940's and manufactured by the Wilson Sporting Goods Co. 

Many golfers today do not have a sand wedge in their set. 
Regardless of golfing proficiency, a sand wedge will prove to 
be a valuable asset to any player. In particular, a sand wedge 
can make most sand shots much easier and particularly so if 
the golfer understands how a sand wedge works. 

Look for the definition of "how the sand wedge works" Feb. 17. 


f : y Handcrafted, CiJstom Made Golf 

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^ Personalized Fitting 

Be fitted by the craftsmen who hav^ 
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but only ORUMAR can deliver the product the finest players demand. 


When in Carmel, visit our Custom Fitting Shop 
and see how our clubs are made. 


A FAMILY TRADITION SINCE 1960 


Son Carlos btwh. 5th & 6th, next to 
the Hog’s Breath • Carmel • 625-7115 


February 3, 1994 


1 8 The Carmel Pirre C one/CV Outlook 











i>«ni 































*Aquaravan* visits River School 


urui. 


Auditor applauds CUSD 


By GARTH MERRILL dents per class, according to figures 

presented at Thursday's school board 
1 HE CARMEL Unified School Dis- meeting, 
trict received a comforting report on its Enrollment at Carmel High School 
financial position. and Carmel Valley High, as well as at 

Ray Cowles of C. Tom Nelson & As- Carmel River, Tularcitos, and Captain 
sociates, hired by the district to comply Cooper elementary schools, should re- 
with state accountability laws, offered ^ain stable enough to guarantee what is 
good news: In the 1992-93 fiscal year, considered the ideal teacher-to-student 
revenues exceeded expenditures by ratio. 

$229,024, the firm reported to the board **It is a big commitment on the 

of education Thursday, Jan. 27. district's part to maintain that class 

The district's available reserves size," Baltin noted. 
amount to $851,580, which is equal to The enrollment figures were reached 
nearly 6 percent of total expenditures in by projecting current class sizes into the 
the general fund. State law requires nex^ear. 

school districts the size of the CUSD to ‘‘Inis doesn't count for hi-migration 
maintain reserves of at least 3 percmt of or out-migration," Baldwin said. ‘*We 
general fund spending. can get a litde more sophisticated. This 


moiDVSCorr stEAiroN 

grcxjp of enthusiastic firsf 
landle a sea star. 


OUTREACH VOLUNTEER Scott Stratton showed a 
graders from Ebine Green's class how to properly 

The MONTEREY Bay Aquari um 
has gone mobile. 

Outreach volunteers from the 
Monterey Bay Aquarium's educa¬ 
tional dmartment paid a visit to 
Carmel luver Elementary School 
Monday, providing first-grade stu¬ 
dents an opportunity to learn about 
the marine environment in a hands- 
on fashion. 

Tubs filled with sea stars, hermit 
crabs, sea urchins and other marine 
organisms were brought to the school 
in the ‘'Aquaravao," a mobile 
aquarium of sorts. Students broke up 
into smaller ^ups to touch the dif¬ 
ferent animals and discuss their be¬ 
haviors and peculiarities. 

According to Merilyn Ceorgevich, 
an outreach* volunteer, the intent of 
the program goes far beyond just 


Your people were very open and 
very firienoly. That's something we don't 
usually see. What we get fiom that is 
there is a sense of pride in what they're 
doing." 


MONTEREY BAY Aquarium's 
"Aquaravan" visited Carmel River 
School on Monday. 

Ceorgevich said. “It begins with the 
ocean.” 

'Die Aquaravan visit was spon¬ 
sored by FOCUS. 


Paddington & Wehr 

Model Trains • Hobby Supplies 

Wed. - Mon. 10.30 am - 6:00 pm (Closed Tuesdays) 
SW Savanth & San Cark>$ • Carmal • 624-4157 


OPEN IN CARMEU 

Ovr2S Yr». In Downtown Montoroy 

• Custom tailored suits, coats • 
men & vvomen 

• Fabric bolts/swatches 

• Alterations - men & women 

625-5641 MON. - SAT. 10-6 I 


JOSEPH 
Dl ROCCO 


209 Crossroads Bivd., Carmel 
The CrossroadsShopping Ctr. 


I he beauty of living 
comfortably is yours 
in this lightweight 

RANGER DENIM 
COLLECTION 

Shirred trim zipper or 
cardigan jacket with 
the companion basic 
pull on pant, zip skirt 
and embroidered trim 
tee and step in tops. 
Easy shapes with 
easy care. 


SINCE 1971 


AU FORMS OF LANDSCAPE 
mSTALUnON A MANAOEMENT 

Commercial - Residential 
Comploto or Revomp 

• Sprinklers • Fencing • Drought Scope 

• Lighting • Decks • Maintenance 

Gill Powers 


\l\ i'(M)mm;ite Wiis 
(lepn’sst'd. MoivlhanltiftiliK^ 
I mean seriousK depressed. 

Sheal\va\sl(K)kedsad. 
Cried a lot. She louldn't sleep, 
eat. ordoanx (il hervuirk. 


Most of the time she 
wouldn't talk to me. I just couldn't 
reach her. 

I figured she needed to gel 
professional help, before her 
pain got worse. ^ I checked it out. 

I was amazed. Once her 
depression was diagnosed, treat¬ 
ment was efferthe and began to 
work w ithin a few weeks. 

Gotablendor 
loved one ivtio you think 
tedepres^? 

Rir llree materials, call 


\An Herbal Pharmacy! 

TEAS 


$6S 

We use only the finest 
products; Mequiar's, 
Blue Coral, Auto Magic 
& Perma Plate. 


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HFJiBAi NlflRITlON 
HOMEOPATHY 
HERBAL mCWRES 
BACH FLOWERS 
mTPOURR! 
PURE PERFUMES 
ESSEN'HAL OHS 
MASSACE OILS 
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UNUSUAL an hems 


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Soaside 

899-4038 


l.S DEPARTMEVr OF HEALTH 
A.ND HI MAN SERVTCFJi 


Al The Crossroads 
Rjo Rd & Hwy 1, Carmel 
626-HFRB iM)0-45S-HF.RR 


Carmel 


Ocean Avenue & Dolores Street 


National ImUtulnt of Health. 
NaUmal IntHHMe of MeiNal lleaWi 


February 3, 1994 The Carmel Pine Cone/CV Outlook 19 






























Emergency Service 
(WAVES) at Smith Col¬ 
lege in Massachusetts. 

She served' through 
WcM^d War 11 and was dis¬ 
charged as a lieutenant. 
Befme retiring in 1980 to 
Carmel, she pursued a 
career in advertising, pri¬ 
marily in market research 
in New York and Los An¬ 
geles. 

Miss Clements is sur¬ 
vived by a sister, Helen 
Slawson of Aptos. / 

At her request, no ser¬ 
vices were hdd. l^e Paul 
Mcntuary was in charge of 
arrangements and burial 
will be in Chicago. 

The family suggests 
any memorial contribu¬ 
tions be sent to the Hos¬ 
pice of the Centra] Coast, 
P.O. Box2480,Montcrey, 
93942; Community Hos¬ 
pital the Monterey Pen¬ 
insula, P.O. Box HH, 
Mcmtcrey 93942, <wr the 


Obituaries 


Public Notices 


«Hl property desciibed above ia 
purported to be: 8017 River PI.. 
Carmel. CA 03923 

The undersigned Trustee dis¬ 
claims any Nabiaiy lor any incorrect¬ 
ness ol the street address and oth¬ 
er common designation, il any, 
ttmum herein. 

The total amount of the unpaid 
bafance of the obligation secured 
by the property to be sold and rea¬ 
sonable estimated costs, expenses 
and advances at the time of the ini¬ 
tial pubkcation ol the Notice of sale 
iK $511,108 52 

In addition to cash, the Trustee 
nil accept a cashier's check drawn 
on f slate or nalxmal bank, a check 
tbatm by a state or federal credit 
union or a check drawn by a state 
or federal savings and loan associ- 
abort, savings association or savings 
bank specified m Section 5102 of 
die Financial Code and authorued 
lo do business in this state. In the 
event lander other than cash is ac¬ 
cepted, the Trustee may withhold 
ttte issuanre of the Trustee's Deed 
until funds become available to the 
payee or endorsee as a matter of 


NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE 
UNDER DEED OF TRUST 
T.S. No 21413 
Loan No 386395-8IS 
Other Ref. ~ 

A.P. Number 157-041-004 
YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A 
DEQ} OF TRUST DATED October 
2. 1990 UNLESS YOU TAKE AC¬ 
TION TO PROTECT YOUR PROP¬ 
ERTY. IT MAY BE SOLO AT A PUB¬ 
LIC SALE IF YOU NEED AN EX¬ 
PLANATION OF THE NATURE OF 
THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU. 
YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAW- 
YER . 

NoUce IS hereby given Ihdr* 
Coast Fed Services, a California 
Corporabon. as iiustue. or succes¬ 
sor trustee, ix substituted trustee 
pursuant lo llie Deed ol Trust ex¬ 
ecuted by Hisayushi Miyamoto and 
Michiko Miyamoto, husband and 
wile Recorded 10/15/1990 in Book 
2565 Page 1069 Inst « 60187 ol 
Official Fiords m the oltice ol the 
County Recordei ul Munteiey Cuun- 
ly. Cahlornia. and pursuant to the 
NolK:e ol Delaull and Election lo 
Sell thereunder recorded 
09/22/1993 m Book - Page - Inst 
# 65016 ol said OHicial Records, 
will Sell on 02/09/1994 at 10 00 
AM at the mam (South) enirarx^e 
lo the County Courthouse, (lacing 
the courtyard oil Church Stieet, 
240 Church Street. Salinas. CA at 
public auction, to the highest bidder 
for cash (payable at the time ol sale 
in lawlul money ol the United 
States). aH right, title, and interest, 
ciwiveyed lo and now held by it un¬ 
der Deed ol Trust in the prop¬ 
erty situated in said Chunly and 
State and described as lollows Lot 
Numbered 4 in Block Numbered 2, 
as said Lot and Block are shown on 
that certain Map entitled . Map ol 
*Tracl No 445, Carmel Valley Goll 
»nd Country CSub’, tiled in Volume 
8 ol Maps. ’Qlies arxl Towns', at 
Page 1, Monterey County Records. 

The street address and other 
common designation, it any, ol the 


' Said sale wiN be made. )iut with¬ 
out covenant or warranty, express 
or implied regarding title, posses- 
SKMi or encumbrances, lo satisfy the 
indebledness secured by said Deed, 
advances thereurrder, with mieresi 
as provided therem. and the unpaid 
principal ol the rKXe secured by 
sard deed with mieresi thereon as 
provided in saxt Note, lees, charges 
and expenses ol the trustee and of 
the trusts created by said Deed of 
Trust 

Coast Fad Services. 19900 
Plummer St , Chatsworih, CA 
01311, (818) 725-4360. By Hamel 
Moror. Assistant Secretary. Dated 
01/12/1994 
ASAPi 13960 
Dates of Pubkcatxxi: 

January 20. 27 & February 3,1994 
(PCI 15) 


ju^ 3 blocks 

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just in'time tci plan your winter 
get-iiway to San Francisco! 


■ Continental breakfast 


■ Refreshing afternoon 
tea, cookies & sherry 


David M. Dormcdy Ronald H. Siebc 

THE PAUL MORTUARY 

The Little Chapel-by-the-Sea Crematory 

OFFERING 
THE ALTERNATIVES 

Services arranged to individual preferences 


State Farm 
Annuities 


■ Valet parking reduced 
to $10 per day 
up)on request 

• Based on single/double occupancy, plus tax. 
Limited availability. Offered 1 /2/94 - 3/20/94 


Security, Safety, 
and a Guaranteed 
Income for as long 
as you live. 


.Cremation without Services 

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.... Burial without Formality 
.The Traditional Service 


THE PINE". 

THE CYPRESS 

THE OAK". 

THE MAPLE".. 




Call me. 

Barney J. Belled 

26555 Carmel Rancho Blvd 
Suite 1 • P.O. Box 221399 
Carmel, CA 93922 

624-6466 


Pre-planning is a logical part of this concept, 


CASKETS. EMBALMING & SERVICES ARE 
OPTIONAL. CALL OR WRITE FOR 
COMPARISON AND ITEMIZED PRICES. 


580 Geary Street 
San Francisco, CA 
(800) 227-4223 
(415) 441-2700 


390 LIGHTHOUSE AVE. 
PACinC GROVE. CA. 93950 

375-4191 


Like a good neighbor. State Farm is there. 


State Farm Life Insurane Company 
Home Onioe: Bloomington, llUnois 


February 3, 1994 


20 The Carmel Pine Cone/CV Outlook 



















FRIDAY, FEB. 4 
CONGREGATION 
BETH ISRAEL 
Rabbi Mendel will hold 
the Shabbat Service at 
8:15 p.Hi. Torah study on 
Satui^ay at 10 a.m. with 
Shabbat services at 11 
a.m. Also, the first Friday 
of every month, a family 
service is held addition* 
ally at 7:30 p.m. The con- 
regation is located at 
716 Carmel Valley Road, 
Carmel. 

SUNDAY, FEB. 6 
ALL SAINTS’ 
EPISCOPAL 
CHURCH 

The sermon will be' 
preached and the Eucha* 
list celebrated at the 8 
a.m., 10 a.m. and 5:30 
p.m. services. Sunday 
School for pre-school 
through eigh^ grade at 
10 a.m. Childcare pro¬ 
vided at the 10 a.m. ser¬ 
vice. The church is located 
at Ninth and Dolores, 
Carmel. 

FIRST BAPTIST 
CHURCH OF CARMEL 
Service is at 11 a.m. 
Tuesdays’ “7:01” is for 
all Junior High Youth and 
begins at 7:01 p.m., and 
High School Bible Study 
Wednesday evening at 7 


.m., both led by Youth 
astor Casey Jones. First 
Baptist Church of Carmel 
is at 8340 Carmel Valley 
Road at Schulte Road. 

CARMEL VALLEY 
COMMUNITY 
CHAPEL 

Service and Sunday 
School are at 10:30 a.m. 
The chapel is located on 
the comer of Paso Hondo 
Road and Village Drive, 
Carmel Valley. 

I 

CARMEL CHURCH 
OF RELIGIOUS 
SCIENCE 

Services are held at 11 
a.m., with a Wednesday 
evening heart to heart ser¬ 
vice at 6:30 p.m. The pub¬ 
lic is invited to attend all 
activities held at the Sanc¬ 
tuary, Carmel American 
Legion, Dolores and 
Eighth, Carmel. 

CARMEL 

PRESBYTERIAN 

CHURCH 

Services are at 8, 9:30 
and 11 a.m. Sunday 
School for all ages at 9:30 
a.m. Nursery care pro¬ 
vided. ' 

Carmel Presbyterian 
Church is located at Ocean 
and Junipero in Carmel. 


CHURCH IN 
THE FOREST 
Service is held at 9:30 
a.m. The church is located 
at Stevenson School, For¬ 
est Lake Road in Pebble 
Beach. 


CHURCH OF THE 
WAYFARER 
Service begins at 10 
a.m. Child care is pro¬ 
vided at the service. Sun¬ 
day School is at 9 a.m. 
Church of the Wayfarer is 
located on Lincoln & Sev¬ 
enth, Carmel. 

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE 
Service is held at 10 
a.m. at First Church of 
Christ, Scientist, Carmel, 
located between 5th and 
6th on Monte Verde. Sun¬ 
day School is held at the 
same hodn * Wednesday 
evening testimonial meet¬ 
ing is held at 8 p.m. Child 
care provided at‘all ser¬ 
vices. . 

COMMUNITY 

CHURCH 

OF THE MONTEREY 
PENINSULA 
Service is at 10:30 a.m. 
A coffee hour follows 
morning worship. Church 
school for children is at 
10:30 a.m. Nursery care 
is provided. Adult study, 
Thursdays, 2:30 or 7 p.m. 
The church is a mile east 
lof Hwy I on Carmel Val¬ 
ley Road . 


Business Beat 



GINGER STEINHAUER and BEtlNDA SCHUSTER 


Schuster, Steinhauer take over Profiles Hair Studio 


Belinda Schuster, from Mount 
Vernon, Wash., and Ginger Steinhauer, 
formerly of the San Francisco Bay Area, 
have purchased Profiles Hair Studio lo¬ 
cated on Lincoln between Ocean and 
Seventh within Morgan Court in Carmel- 
by-the-Sea. 

Both co-owners have had extensive 
color and chemical training as well as 
advance cutting instruction in British 


Columbia, lliey arc award-winning styl¬ 
ists and belong to an international edu¬ 
cation team, for whom they travel from 
time to time sharing their skills with 
fellow stylists. 

Profiles will be open Monday through 
Saturday and early morning and evening 
appointments are available. Walk-ins 
are welcome. Additional information is 
available by calling 625-2880. 


Wainscoals open Ilcdy’s Backerci behind General Store 


Paul and Hedy Wainscoat have 
opened Hedy’s Backerei, which features 
such specialty baked goods as 13-grain 
bread, whitecheddar sourdough, squaw 
bread, fine pastries, scones, muffins and 
cakes. 

Paul’s background stems from grow¬ 
ing up in the business. His father’s first 
bakery opened in San Francisco in the 
1950s. The staff included bakers and 


pastry chefs from France, Germany, 
Austria and Italy. 

Paul perfected his craft and recipes 
by working in the industry, including as 
a chef in this area at Spanish Bay. 

Hedy’s Backerei is open 7 a.m. to 6 
p.m. daily is and is located behind the 
General Store, on Junipero between Fifth 
and Sixth, Carmel by the Sea. For more 
information, call 626-9055. 


THE COASTLANDS 
FOURSQUARE 
(»URCH 

Service is held at 9:30 
a.m. at the YMCA, 600 
Camino El Estero in 
Monterey. Nursery care is 
provided. Home Bible 
studies are held every 
other W ednesday evening. 

HRST ASSEMBLY 
OF GOD 
(CARMEL 
CHRISTIAN 
FELLOWSHIP) 

Rev. Kevin Grimes will 
preach the Word of God 
at the 10:30 a.m. service. 
Sunday School (ages 4- 
12), following worship. 
Bible study Thursday at 7 
p.m. Nursery care pro¬ 
vided Sunday. Located on 
Mission and Eighth in 
Carmel. Visitors welcome. 

MONTEREY 
PENINSULA 
FRIENDS MEETING 
(QUAKER) 

Silent meeting for wor¬ 
ship begins at 10 a.m. at 
the O’Donnell Library, 
155 Van Buren, Monterey. 

ST. DUNSTAN’S 
EPISCOPAL CHURCH 
Services are at 8 and 9 
a.m. Sunday, with Sun¬ 
day school and adult 
classes at 9:15. Holy Com¬ 
munion or morning prayer 
begins at 10:15 a.m. The 
church is located on 
Robinson Canyon Road in 
Carmel Valley. 


The 
Golden 
Years 

By Myles Williams 

Home ownership, paid for 
over the years, can be the 
foundation for financial se¬ 
curity in the later years. The 
majority of people 75 and 
over own their homes, ac¬ 
cording to the U.S. Census 
Bureau. Although home 
ownership reduces housing 
costs, it is important to plan 
ahead to assure that there 
will be adequate income for 
living costs. Less than 15 
percent of women 75 and 
older who live alone had in¬ 
comes of more than $20,000 
in the latest year for which 
statistics are available For 
58 percent of such women, 
incomes were less than 
$10,000 

• •• 

Roger Tory Peterson cred¬ 
its a seventh-grade teacher 
with inspiring a brilliant ca¬ 
reer by suggesting that he 
try drawing birds. He won 
instant fame in 1934 when 
his field guide to birds of the 
Eastern U.S was published, 
the first such comprehen¬ 
sive, richly illustrated book. 
For 60 years he has “birded” 
worldwide, photographing and 
drawing countless species 
and publishing more guides 
At age 84, his plans included 

an 11th trip to East Africa 

• •• 


Presented as a public 
service to our senior 
citizens, and the people 
who care about them by 

CARMEL INN 

For Seniors 
P.O. BOX 1200 
Carmcl-By-Thc-Sca 
California. 93921 
(408) 624-8336 

Sial 0 Li(»nsad 24-hr Care 



ST. PHILIP’S 
LUTHERAN CHURCH 
Worship 9:30 a.m. 
with children’s sermon 
and Sunday School dur¬ 
ing the service. Attended 
nursery available. The 
Reverend Roy Blumhorst 
will preach the sermon. 
St. Philip’s is located at 
8065 Carmel Valley Road, 
four miles east of Hwy 1. 

UNITARFAN 
Sunday service is held 
at 9:30 and 11 a.m. The 
Unitarian Universalist 
Church of the Monterey 
Peninsula is located at 
Aguajito Road at the in¬ 
tersection of Highway 1 
and Hwy 68, Carmel. 

ECKANKAR 
The Monterey 

Eckankar Center con¬ 
ducts services every Sun¬ 
day at 4:30 p.m. Discus¬ 
sion classes are held sev¬ 
eral times each month. 
The Center is located at 
529 Central Avenue, Pa¬ 
cific Grove. I 


UNITY CHURCH OF 
THE MONTEREY 
PENINSULA 
The Rev. Dorothy 
Pierson will give a lesson 
at the 11 a.m. service. 
Unity Church is located 
at the comer of Madison 
Street and Hermann Drive 
in Monterey. 


KOREAN BUDDHIST 
SAMBOSA 

Services begin at 11 
a.m. Daily meditation 
classes are from 5 to 6 
p.m. The church is located 
at 28110 Robinson Cyn. 
Rd., Carmel Mid-Valley. 

PENINSULA 

PRESBYTERIAN 

CHURCH 

Service is at 10:30 a.m. 
Sunday School for all ages 
begins at 9:15 a.m. Nurs¬ 
ery care is available for all 
services. The congregation 
meets at the Pacific Grove 
Community Center, 515 
Junipero, Pacific Grove.. 

CONGREGATION 
B'NAI TORAH 

Services are held every 
Friday at 8 p.in. and Sat¬ 
urdays at 9:30 a.m. Lit¬ 
urgy class begins at 8:30 
a.m. Saturday with To¬ 
rah study at 11 a.m., after 
services. Located at 917 
Pacific Street in Monterey. 

ZEN 

The Monterey Bay Zen 
Center conducts m^ita- 
tion and services every 
Tuesday at 6:30 p.m., fol¬ 
lowed by walking medi¬ 
tation, service and a talk 
from 7:10 to 8:30 p.m. 
Meditation instruction is 
offered the second Tues¬ 
day of every month at 5:45 
p.m. The Zen Center 
meets at the Cherry Foun- 
dation, 4th and 
Guadalupe, Carmel. 




^cruicEH 


The Church of 
the Wayfarer 

(A United Methodist Church) 
Worship SufKlays at 10 am at 
Ihis historic Uniled Methodist 
Church. Adult A ^uth classes 
8:45 am. Sunday xhool 10 am 
(Nursery care pravided.) 
Youth Fellowship 5:30p.m. 
Children's choir ond weekly pre¬ 
school progroms ovoilable. 

624-3550 

All Saints' 
Episcopal Church 

Sunday Eucharists at 8 and 
10 am and 5:30 pm. 
Eucharist on Wednesdays 
' at 7 am and Thursdays 
at noon. Sunday nursery care 
at 10 am service. 

Doloras St. A 9tn Ava. 

624- 3883 

Carmel Chuixh of 
Religious Science 

Services held 1 1a.m. Sundays. 
"Heart to Heart" meetings 
held Wed. evenings 6;3o. 
The public is invited. 

Doloras St. A 8th Ava. 
Amerkan Lagion Post 

625- 5360 


Christian^ 
Science Services 

Sundays 10 am, Sunday 
School 10 am. Wednesday 
evening testimoiw meetings 
8 pm. Reading Room open 
weekdays 9-5 
(Wed. 9-7:30) 

Sun.& holidays 1:30-4:30. 

Monta Varda St. 
north of Ocean Ava. 
btwn. 5th A 6th 

Carmel Mission 
Basilica 

Sat. Mass: 5:30 pm fullfiulls 
Sunday obligation. Sun. 
Masses: 7:00, o:0<T 9:30 & 
1 1:00 am and 1 2:30 & 
5:30 pm. Confessions: Sat. 
3:30 to 5:30: days before 
First Friday and Holy Days 
4:00 to 5:00. Mass at Big 
Sur: Sundays at 10:30 am. 
Rio Road, Carmel 

First Baptist 
Church of 
Carmel Valley 

Sun. services 8:45 am 
(conterTworory) & 11 am 
(traditional). Sunday School kx 
all agm 9:45 am. Child core 
provided. Call about eve. 
group meeting schedules. 

8346 Carmel Valley 
Rd. at Schulte Rd. 
624-5551 




\\\\7//. r W/. (iV, 


February 3, 1994 


The Carmel Pine Cone/CV Outlook 2 1 































Alisal puts the clamps on Powell, Padres 

Padres slip to third pi 


MTAL; Stevenson slides down league ladder with loss to PG 


in the cards for either of the two local 
boys' prep basketball teams Tuesday night. 

TOtn Carmel High and Robert Louis Stevenson lost 
important Mission Trail Athletic League contests as 
AlisfiJ dropped the visiting Padres 44-39, and Pacific 
Grove traveled to Pebble Beach to dispose of the 
Pirates 50-42. 

Despite a 15-point effort by sophomore guard Ryan 
Sanchez, who has scored in double figures in each of 
his last three games, the Padres could not overcome a 
smothering defensive effort by the Trojans. Carmel 
senior gua^ R.J. Powell was held to only two first-half 
points by a smothering Trojan defense, as Alisal jumped 
out to a three-point halftime lead. 

Carmel did mount a comeback in the second half, 
with Sanchez hitting some big shots to close the gap to 
only two. But once again, the Alisal defense came up 
big, shutting down the Padres in the final minutes. 

Both Powell and senior forward Joey Bernhard were 
well defensed by the Trojans. Powell finished with a 
season-low 10 points, while Bernhard’s six was well 
below his double figure scoring average. 

The Padres’ loss, combined with Palma’s 53-41 win 
over King City on Tuesday, drops Carmel into third 
place in the MTAL, one and one-half games behind 
first place Alisal and one-half game in back of the 
Chieftains. 

The Padres will host Gonzales at 7 p.m. Friday. 


Pirate 


Sports Scene 


MIKE THOMPSON 


SAAAANTHA SIIVERAAAN 


Field hockey team is riding high 

H Girls hoop learn derailed by sizzling PG 

I HE ROUERT Louis Stevenson 
girls field hockey team went out last 
ITiursday and did exactly what it 
needed to do to recover from its heart¬ 
breaking loss to Santa Catalina two 
weeks ago — the Pirates beat up on 
Carmel with ease. 

MarinaCook, Lisa Banner, Justine 
Descollonges and Amy Offermann- 
Sims each scored a goal as RLS won, 

4-0. 


The Pirates remain tied with Catalina, 
both teams with 6-1 records. 

In last week’s column, we wrote that 
if RLS and Catalina remain tied at 
season’s end, a tiebreaker system would 
be invoked that would take into account 
the number of league goals scored by the 
two teams. League rules have changed 
this season, however, and the tie would 


PHOTO/KAKEN MAHASCO 

SHADD AAADSEN, one of Carmel High's top wrestlers, clearly has the upper- 
hand in this match. 


See PIRATE SPORTS 


Padre Sports Scene 


By DAN SILVER 


CHS wrestlers pin Pacific Grove 

I Girls basketball team continues rolling along 
Whenever pacific 


Grove and to improve their league record to 1 -3. 
Carmel High get together in any sport, Carmel hosts King City at 6 tonight, 
there is a definite sense that the two 

teams just don’t like each other. The ■ GIRLS BASKETBALL 
Padre wrestlers took out these aggres- Although it plays in one of the 
sions on the hapless Breakers on Thurs- toughest league’s around, the Carmel 
day, Jan. 27. High School girls’ basketball team is 

Lead by Shad Madsen, Toby making its mark on the competition 
Lauterbach, Bart Rowley and Mike 

Curry, the Padres cruised to a 50-20 win See PADRE SPORTS pace 23 


PHOrO/SUSAN BECK 

THE ACTION was fast and furious at the RoE)ert Louis Stevenson goal last Friday 
as the Carmel High field hockey team tries to notch a goal. It wasn't to be, 
however, as the Pirates blanked the Padres, 4-0. 


2 2 The Carmel Pine Cone/CV Outlook 


February 3, 1994 











I 


Carmel Commentary 


By RICK HARPER 


Condom vending machines at CHS 
would encomage casual view of sex 


As A parent who has attended 
numerous school district meetings, and 
delved into mountains of research con¬ 
cerning the school condom issue, I 
would like to share some personal 
views on the topic. / 

The students who advocate a 
condom -distribution 
program at the high j 
school cite three rea- j 
sons for their posi¬ 
tion: 1) They are too | 
embarrassed to buy | 
condoms at the drug- j 
store, 2) Some of 
them say that trans- ^ 
porting themselves to j 
a drugstore is a prob¬ 
lem, and 3) They be¬ 
lieve a condom pro¬ 
gram would save 
lives and reduce RICK 

pregnancies. 

Regarding being too embarrassed 
to buy condoms, the school is only 
open 167 days of the year. It is closed 
198 days, including multi-week breaks 
and the long summer break. Do the 
pro-condom students plan to abstain 
during those periods, or do they plan 
to risk embarrassment and buy 
condoms at the drugstore? 

Some students say that transporta¬ 
tion is the problem, but where are 
they going to have sex once the school 



RICK HARPER 


hands them the condom ? How are they 
going to transport their lover hrom the 
school to their intimate nest, and then to 
their respective homes? We would have 
to provide a bed on campus in order to 
solve the transportation problem. 

The pro-coridom advocates like to 
say, “If a condom pro- 
j gram could save just 
one life, it would be 

j ’ 

worth it. ” However, the 
students saying it most 
proudly are the very 
students that ada¬ 
mantly opposed a re¬ 
cent district drug and 
alcohol policy that had 
a significant chance of 
saving lives. 

I recognize that to 
some parents and stu- 
dents alike, the drug 
and alcohol program 
was a heated issue on many levels. But 
the student advocates in that case had 
nothing to say about the life-saving po¬ 
tential of the program; whereas with the 
condom issue, the “if-just-one-life” ap¬ 
proach is being heralded as all-impor¬ 
tant beyond all other considerations. I 
think this inconsistency sheds light upon 
some of the students' priorities. 

' I do believe that other students are 
indeed sincere in their desire to reduce 
teen pregnancies and to save lives. And, 


as a father of three children, 1 certainly 
share that concern. Would such a pro¬ 
gram accomplish that goal? If history is 
any guide — and it always is - then we 
need to study past related policies and 
their outcomes. 

Teen birth rates were bouncing along 
at a rate of about 16 per 1,000 teen girls 
in the early 1960s. When the birth- 
control pill was introduced, it was sup¬ 
posed to help lower that rate. The de¬ 
sired result was not achieved. 

As predicted by many at the time, the 
pill instead gave teens a false sense of 
security that “everybody's doing it,” 
and teen birth rates shot up. 

A decade later, in 1973, abortion was 
made nationally available, largely with 
the hope of sending the alarming teen 
birth rate back down. But the teen birth 
rates shot up again. 

Teens had gained a new dose of false 
security. This is why 1 oppose any form 
of condom distribution in the schools, 
because I am certain that the condoning 
of teen sex by our educational institu¬ 
tions will ultimately lead to a more ca¬ 
sual view of sex among teens, which 
leads to greater disease and teen preg¬ 
nancies. 

If we are interested in saving lives, 
why do we want to hand out condoms 
that fail 15 to 30 percent of the time? 
(Several studi es show this.) 

Why aren't we looking into the absti¬ 
nence-based education programs (“Teen 
Aid,” “Sex Respect,” or “Choices”) that 
claim some astounding results? Where 
are the students so interested in life¬ 
saving that they will show some real 
courage and give a serious look at those 
programs? 

Inereare also some liability concerns 
that the district needs to consider very 
carefully, especially because of the 
condom failure rates. 

Here's a hypothetical legal mess: Two 


CHS students have sex. The girl ^s 
psu^nts did not sign the school's 
condom release agreement; the boy's 
parents did. The condom given to the 
boy by the school lesJcs, and the girl 
gets pregnant or contracts a disease. 
The girl's parents now sue the school 
district. 

Sooner or later this scenario will 
play out somewhere in this country, 
and it's likely to occur in a district like 
Carmel, where parents can afford good 
lawyers. 

Which program would you like the 
school district to cut so that they can 
afford such a lawsuit? We have to 
face the liability issue. According to a 
Kaiser Foundation study, of the rela¬ 
tively few school districts that have 
condom programs, 95 percent have 
had lawsuits brought against them. 

In 1991, a survey conducted by Dr. 
Marion Howard in Atlanta asked 
1,200 teen girls what would most 
improve the sex education at their 
school. Eighty-six percent responded 
that they wanted to know how to say 
“no” to their boyfriend without losing 
him. ' 

Astounded by this response. Dr. 
Howard began an abstinence-based 
sex-education program. According to 
a Ford Foundation study, that pro¬ 
gram has reduced the teen pregnancy 
rate by one-third among students in 
participating schools. 

Does Carmel High School need 
more sex accommodation or better 
sex education? 


Rick Harper is a producer-director 
of educational and medical films. He 
holds over 150 international film- 
making awards including a recent 
Emmy award. 



i 

Defending library fees — choice was clear, courageous 


By HAROLD RAGAN 

A RECENT Carmel Commentary by 
Robert H. Evans about public library 
funding was somewhat misleading in its 
discussion of Monterey Public Library's 
non-resident library card fees. 

To set the record straight, nobody is 
charged a fee to enter the Monterey 
Library, or to get reference assistance, 
or to use the books, magazines, newspa¬ 
pers or research materials. 

Children from all parts of the com¬ 
munity continue to attend “Storytimes” 
and other programs free of charge. School 
classes continue to enjoy free library 
visits, hear book talks and receive in¬ 
struction in the use of library resources. 

Non-resident library card fees were 
not established for the exclusive pur¬ 
pose of balancing the budget, nor has 
the fee-based library card policy been a 
failure, as Mr. Evans suggests. 


In 1992, the library was faced with 
the withdrawal of county funding, which 
partially reimbursed the library for bor¬ 
rowing services it extended to residents 


The choice of non-resident 
library card fees was clear, 
and it was made with much 
courage by the library trust¬ 
ees, who anticipated the pos¬ 
sibility of criticism and mis¬ 
understanding. 


of the county library's service area. At 
the same time, increasing numbers of 
non-residents were making use of the 
library. ' 

It was simply unrealistic for anyone 


to expect Monterey's city library to pro¬ 
vide services to thousands of county 
residents without receiving any county 
funding. 

It made no more sense than to risk 
capsizing a lifeboat by exceeding its 
passenger load. A “residents-only” policy 
would violate every library principal 
regarding free public access to informa¬ 
tion. 

The choice of non-resident library 
card fees was clear, and it was made 
with much courage by the library trust¬ 
ees, who anticipated the possibility of 
criticism and misunderstanding. As ex¬ 
pected, the number of non-resident li¬ 
brary users has declined and, as desired, 
the quality of service, in terms of avail¬ 
ability of materials and staff assistance, 
has gone up. 

Those who protest Monterey Public 
Library's card fees are reminded that 
they can still get a free library card from 


their own library jurisdiction. 

If public library services were ad¬ 
equately funded throughout the state, 
and all libraries were able to meet their 
own constituents' needs, the problem of 
an overwhelming imbalance of non-resi¬ 
dent useof the Monterey Library, Carmel 
Library, or any other library faced with 
this situation would not exist. 

The only fair criticism of these fees is 
that they do not entirely solve the prob¬ 
lem. The real solution is for citizens and 
elected officials to work toward an equi¬ 
table partnership between state and lo¬ 
cal government which supports the edu¬ 
cation and information needs of all 
people by maintaining strong public li¬ 
braries in every California community 


Harold Ragan is chairman of 
Monterey Public Library Board ofTrust- 






Karen Carlson.General Manager 

Doug Thompson.Managing Editor 

Paul Wolf.City Editor 

Molly D. Whitehead.Arts & Entertainment Editor 

Susan Beck, Scott Brearton.Staff Writers 

John Detro, Nathalie Plotkin, 

Ly n Bronson, Garth Merrill, 

- KristinaS.Mead,J T. Mason.Contributing Writers 

MarcieNestell, Elizabeth Hinnant, 

Bill Phillips.Advertising 

Jackie Martinez.Production Manager 

Cathy Blake.Production 

Laura Hamilton.Advertising Design 

Patti Saunders.Business Manager 

Cilda Soule.Accounts Receivable Supervisor 

Katie Slobodin..Receptionist and Classified Ads 

Robert Vonessen.Circulation 

Bill Brown ..Editor & Publisher 




twr :: 


PUBLISHEDEVERY 

THURSDAY 


Vol.79No.5 
February.!, 1994 


iir 

Mambar 


f^ublishedby Brown & Wilson, Inc. 
a California Corporation 


The Carmel Pine Cone, 

established in 1915, is a legal newspaper for the City of 
Carmel-by*the-Sea, theCounty of Monterey and the State of 
Califontia, established by Superior Court Decree No. 34750. 

The Carmel Valley Outlook 
is a legal newspaper of general circulation for Monterey 
County and the State of California established Oct 6, 1961 
Superior Court Decree No. 52029 

Fourth and Mission 
Telephone (408)624-0162 

P.O. BoxC-1,Carmel-by-the-Sea,California,9.3921 
Fax(408)624-8076 

SUBSCRIITION RATES: InsidetheU.S.Third Class 
S9,5 per year; First Class $.3..50 per issue 


Februorv 3, 1W4 


The Carmel Pine Cone/CV Outlook 23 


I 


































Sports 




Shoot-Out gets ’94 AT&T tourney off to a blazing start 


AT&T from page 11 


PHOTO/CCXE THOMKON 

DEFENDING AT&T champ Brett Ogle 
reacts to being called 'a 1 -iron with ears.' 


and deadly aim that should put the pros 
on notice this week. Funk and Maggert 
followed with nearly identical in-and- 
out skidders minus backspin tl^t 
seemed to roll right over the hole. 

It came down to two veterans, both 
37 years old, as Beck and Funk blazed 
away at each other with giant drives 
and skillful approaches to set up the 
final sudden death situation. This was 
the 18th, and this hole wasn\ big enough 
or the both of them. 

There was a big silence over Pebble 
Beach as Beck and Funk lined up for the 
Hnal showdown. Somewhere in the dis¬ 
tance a baby cried, a man coughed, and 
a seal barked. Beck fired away. So did 
Funk. His shot went wide. Beck's aim 
was nearly perfect. 

He bolstered his smoking iron. Fi¬ 
nally alone there in the sunset on the 
18th hole. Beck was the best in the west. 


FHOTO/COIE THOMPSON 

FOX NETWORK'S newest millionaire, sports commentator John AAadden, was on the 
prowl at the AAerrill Lynch Shootout on Tuesday. AAadden makes his home in Carmel. 


Carmel, RLS boys’ hoop teams 
suffer crucial MTAL setbacks 


PREP HOOP from page 22 

starters to score in double figures, had 
trouble getting anyone to score. 

Strong defense by the Breakers, com¬ 
bined with poor shooting by the Pirates, 
led to a five point PC lead at halftime. 
The Pirates closed the deBcit to one to 
start the third quarter, but great passing 
by the Breakers sparked a 13-0 run, and 
the Pirates couldn’t recover despite a 
run of their own late in the game. 

Stevenson forward Sean Jackson hit 
two treys in the fourth quarter to help 
mount the comeback effort, and fin¬ 


ished with nine points^ as did senior 
guard Chris Watkins to lead all Pirate 
scorers. 

This was a critical loss for RLS, which, 
after losing to Alisal last Friday, now 
drops to 5-4 and three games behind the 
front-running Trojans. 

Stevenson will try to get back on the 
winning track Friday as it travels to 
winless King City for a 7 p.m. game. 

Alisal will be entertained by PC, 
which, at 3-5, still has an outside shot at 
the playoffs. 


CHS soccer team eyes playoffs 


PADRE SPORTS from page 22 

in the Mission Trail Athletic League. 

After convincing wins against Alisal 
on Tuesday night and Santa Catalina 
last Thursday, the Padres have upped 
their record to 6-3 in league play, just 
one game off the pace of Notre Dame, 
Pacific Grove and King City, all locked 
in a first-place tie at 7-2. 

The 59-29 rout of Alisal at the CHS 
gym was paced by Darlene Tulua, who 
scored 15 points and pulled down 10 
rebounds. Jenn Rosenthal continued her 
key contributions with 14 points and 13 
rebounds. 

Tulua and Rosenthal came up big on 
Thursday, Jan. 28 as well in the Padres’ 
44-23 over Catalina. 

Carmel won this game in the paint — 
Tulua and Rosenthal dominated the 
middle with their 14 and 11 points, 
respectively. Rosenthal continued her 
torrid scoring pace, which has her at 
16.7 points per game. Corrina Tulua 
pumped in 10 points of her own to help 
carry the Padres to victory. 


Robbie Shepner was out for academic 
reasons, and senior defenseman David 
Vienna was suffering from the flu. These 
factors went a long way to explain the 
resulting 3-1 loss. Jono Spaulding scored 
the lone goal for the Padres on a penalty 
kick. 

■ FIELD HOCKEY 
The Padres dropped a 4-0 decision to 
Robert Louis Stevenson on Friday, Jan. 
28, and then fell to York 3-1 on Tues¬ 
day. Sunshine Pinney continued her fine 
play for Carmel, now 1-5-2, by scoring 
the team’s lone goal in Tuesday’s loss. 

PREP SPORTS SLATE 

Today 

• Field hockey: RLS at North Salinas, 3 
p.m.; Carmel at Catalina, 3 p.m. 

• Wrestling: Carmel at Gonzales, 6 p.m. 

Friday 

• Boys basketball: Gonzales at Carmel, 

7 p.m.; RLS at King City, 7 p.m. 

• Girls basketball’ Carmel at Gonzales, 

7 p.m.; King City at RLS, 7 p.m. 

• Soccer: Gonzales at Carmel, 3 p.m.; 
ORLS at Palma, 3 p.m. 

Saturday 

• Lacrosse: Dunn at RLS, 10 a.m. 

Monday, Feb. 7 

• Field hockey: York at RLS, 3 p.m. 

Tuesday, Feb. 8 

• Boys basketball: Carmel at Palma, 7 
p.m. 

• Girls basketball: Notre Dame at Carmel 
7 p.m.; RLS at Santa Catalina, 7 p.m. 

• Field hockey: North Salinas at Carmel, 

3 p.m. 

Wednesday, Feb. 9 

• Soccer: Carmel at Alisal 4:30 p.m.; 

Pacific Grove at RI.S, 3:30 p.m. , 


■ SOCCER 

As the season begins to wind down, 
the Padre soccer team has found them- 
iselves in a race to make the playoffs. The 
first and second place teams will ad¬ 
vance automatically, while the rest of 
the contenders must battle it out to 
receive an at-large bid by finishing third. 

Carmel took a step forward by de¬ 
feating Palma, 2-1, on Wednesday, Jan. 
26. Robbi Shepner and Cheyenne 
Stoney-Stevens scored goals for the Pa¬ 
dres. 

A depleted Padre team was faced 
with the challenge of facing rival York 
on Friday, Jan. 28. Freshman standout 


24 The Carmel Pine Cone/CV Outlook February 3, 1994 


JV lacrosse team wins 20-0 


PIRA'TE SPORTS from page 22 

remain unless both coaches agreed to 
a pl^off game. 

“The way we fought against Carmel, 
and watching the teamwork develop,” 
said senior Myung Lee, “if we had the 
chance to play Catalina, we’d win.” 

The junior varsity squad, mean- 
i while, remained undefeated with a 4- 
J 1 victory over Carmel. 

I ■ GIRLS BASKETBALL 
I Fresh off their upset win over Notre 
Dame on Saturday, the Pacific Grove 
varsity girls remained on a high note 
Tuesday night as they rolled over RLS, 
55-34. PC has now moved into a first- 
place tie with Notre Dame and King 
City, all three teams at|7-2. 

With the loss, RLS falls back to 5- 
4 in the MTAL, still only two games off 
the pace. Rachel Maddux, who has 
been on a tear of late, led RLS with 15 
points. 

Last Friday, Stevenson turned back 
Alisal, 51-39. 

I 

■ BOYS BASKETBALL 

In another hard-fought game which 
shows nothing more than a loss in the 
Mission Trail Athletic League stand¬ 
ings, it is becoming a trend for the 
Robert Louis Stevenson boys basket¬ 
ball team to turn up on the losing end 
of close games. 

Just as they fell in overtime to Carmel 
on Jan. 21, the Pirates were defeated 
by Alisal, 57-52, in a nip-and-tuck 
affair on Friday, Jan. 28 in Pebble 
Beach. (See story, page 22, for report 
on Tuesday night’s RLS-Pacific Grove 
game.) 

Chris Watkins led RLS with 19 
points, including four three-point 
bombs. The mostTIfamatic shot in the 
game, however, left the hands of sopho¬ 
more Sean Jackson at the end of the 
third quarter. An impossible shot. Jack- 
son heaved the ball up into the air 
from behind the half-court line and 


banked it in as the buzzer sounded. 
The improbable three-pointer knot¬ 
ted up the game at 40-40 with one 
quarter remaining. 

Jackson’s 12 points and Scott 
Clinton’s 11 points aided the RLS 
effort, but the Trojans seized an early 
lead in the final eight minutes and 
then paced their scoring with the Pi¬ 
rates to deny RLS a victory. 

■ LACROSSE 

This past weekend, the Rl^ la¬ 
crosse team ventured south for a pair 
of game against second place Thacher 
and third place Midland. 

The Pirates dropped both games 
— 5-2 to Thacher in Santa Barbara 
and 10-7 to Midland in Los Olivos — 
' but recieved strong showings by midi 
Vinnie Balestreri and goalie Tony 
Lobay. Balestreri paced the team with 
four goals, while Lobay made many 
impressive saves to keep RLS in con¬ 
tention. 

While the varsity wasn’t able to 
come up with a victory last weekend, 
the RLS junior varsity recorded an 
incredible triumph Sunday against 
Midland. The Pirates, led by Gabe 
Macias’ six gods and four assists, 
buried Midland, 20-0. Other goal scor¬ 
ers were Wayan Garvey and Brent 
Hamill (3 each), Ryan Anderson (2) 
and David Dauphine, Ed Hamer,Tim 
Hentschel, Peter West, Dominic 
Boitano and Matt Mink (1 each), 
y The JVs, which lost to Thacher 6- 
2 on Saturday despite Macias’ three 
goals, are now 3-3. 

■ SOCCER 

Stevenson traveled south to King 
City on Wednesday, Jan. 26 and 
stumbled its way through a 3-0 loss. 

Then, on Friday, Jan. 28, the Pi¬ 
rates were to fall again, this time at 
home to Gonzales, 2-1. The lone Pi¬ 
rate goal came on Zack Berman’s 
makeshift bicycle kick. 


Kapp to deliver keynote speech at Hall of Fame banquet 


Former national Football 

League qusuterback Joe Kapp will de¬ 
liver the keynote speech Friday, Feb. 11 
at the Scholar-Athlete Awards Banquet 
for the National Football Foundation, 
Monterey County Chapter. 

The event, which begins at 6:30 p.m., 
will be held in the Grand Ballroom of the 


Hyatt Regency Monterey. Tickets are 
$40 person and are available by calling 
Butch Sernas at 372-4929. 

F our local students will be honored at 
the banquet — Carmel High’s Dan Sil¬ 
ver and Robert Shaffer, and Robert Louis 
Stevenson’s Josh Bonifas and David 
Dostal. 





























Opinion 


L 


etters 

to the Editor 


lelton k> •dHor or« walcom*. Vi«ws on oil 
niottors or* oocoplobi*, foMowing lh« guidolinos of 
P<^ tost*- LoNors should not exceod j 50 words in 
mtgth. Letters ore subject to editing for siyte and 
length. Eoch letter must contoin nome, oddress, 
tele^one number ond signature, and preferably be 
IvpM and double spaced. Anonymous letters, or 
mose with no phorM numbers will not be occepted. 


Only small comfort 

Dear Editor: 

The 15-2 vote by the Transportation 
Agency for Monterey County to support 
construction of the Hatton Canyon Free¬ 
way was no true victory for the support¬ 
ers of the alternate 1 -C modiHed project. 

The cost not only to Caltrans but to 
the taxpayer over these many years leads 
me to bring to the public's attention that 
those who we elect, sooner or later, 
make mistakes in judgment that are not 
in the public interest and that proves 
costly. 

1 find small comfort that after some 
40 years we may well see this parkway 
built during my lifetime. 

Contrary to my usual genial self, 1 am 
upset at the sentiments expressed by 
Monterey Councilman Dave Potter, who 
. consider^ the freeway ‘^a frivolous ex¬ 
pense.” Did he consider his council's 
$200,000 expense to save the Defense 
Language Institute a frivolous expense? 

Did Carmel Councilwoman Brooks 
also feel that she could not ‘^put her 
heart into building through the can¬ 
yon,” and that she also believed that it 
was a “frivolous” expense? 

Could she consider the $10,000 spent 
by the Carmel City Council to fight the 
freeway a “frivolous expense?” Was she 
expressing the sentiments of the council 
and the residents of Carmel? Is Pacific 
Grove Councilwoman Flo Schaefer re¬ 
ally speaking of the residents of Pacific 
Grove when she states, “Arc we so self¬ 
ish we wouldn't share it with Los Ange¬ 
les County where freeways are collapsed 
.and children and commuters are in traf¬ 
fic jams every day?” 

How could she close her eyes to the 
Carmel High students and the residents 
living along the present Highway 1 ? 

1 am particularly upset at Supervisor 
Karas who is supposed to represent the 
4th District. He stated he w^ “willing 
to compromise his position” because he 
doesn’t want to lose the $43 million.” 

Don’t try to tell me that he came to his 
decision the night before after talking to 
“someone” who had spent the previous 
day in Sacramento hearing about the 
state’s financial woes. 

I think the voters in Carmel should 
not re-elect Councilwoman Brooks, and, 
for my two cents’ worth, I would like to 
see the 5th District supervisor recalled, 
because he is not representing me and 


the majority of the voters in the 5th 
District. 

1 am glad to get this off my chest, so 
1 can return to being my congenial self. 

Joseph Noto 
Carmel 

A parental wake-up call 

Dear Editor: 

As a parent who has attended several 
Carmel school district meetings on the 
condom debate, I find that the underly¬ 
ing issue comes down to this: Are the 
parents in our community willing to get 
involved in the issue, or are they going to 
hand it off to the schools? 

On the surface, the Associated Stu¬ 
dent Body’s request to place condom¬ 
dispensing machines on campus seems 
reasonable. They say their request is 
made in an effort to “protect” those 
students who are sexually active. 

They state that “if condom distribu¬ 
tion on campus can save just one life, 
then that should be reason enough.” 
Students also cite the “fact” that no 
matter what anyone says to persuade 
them differently, they are going to “do it 
anyway.” 

Our 14- to 17-year-old high school 
students believe that they understand 
the risks associated with teen sex. Do 
they really have the experience to fully 
comprehend the lifelong emotional or 
physical impact of a teen pregnancy or 
an abortion? 

I don’t think so. Do they comprehend 
the lifelong impact of contracting a sexu¬ 
ally transmitted disease that will never 
go away and may cause sterility, cancer, 
or even death? I don’t think so. 

I believe words like “safe sex” and 
“protected sex,” which arc most com¬ 
monly used when promoting condom 
usage, are sending the wrong message to 
our children. I believe the message the 
students hear is that sex is “safe enough” 
when you use a condom. The facts show 
that even with the “proper” use of a 
condom, the risks can be reduced but 
definitely not eliminated. 

I wonder what we parents would do if 
we found out that some of the students 
were being injured by autos while play¬ 
ing touch football on Highway 1 in front 
of the school every day? 

I think we’d do everything possible to 
stop them. I wonder what our response 


would be if the students said ^ey were 
going to “do it anyway” a^ further¬ 
more, they’d like to have the school 
make football helmets available. 

We cannot give up our parental re¬ 
sponsibility to some public agency on 
this issue. 

We need to let them know that if they 
choose to be sexually active, their lives 
could be on the line. As parents, we have 
something to give our children that is 
priceless. It is called life experience — 
what we’ve learned along the way. 

The way 1 see it, the only way our sons 
and daughters will be safe is for parents 
and schools to do everything in their 
power to give our kids the skills and 
courage to say no to sex. 

It is our parental responsibility to 
provide clear guidance, no matter how 
difficult or unfashionable it may be. Our 
children’s futures depend upon it! 

Lee Underwood 
‘ Carmel Valley 


Farewell to Los Laureles 

Dear Editor: 

1 am so saddened by the turn of events 
which has led to the closure of Los 
Laureles Lodge, 1 felt compelled to write. 
The Lodge has been an “institution” in 
Carmel Valley and the Hentschels an 
integral part of this community. The 
rich history of Los Laureles Lodge rep¬ 
resents the very essence of this rural area 
in which we are so fortunate to live. 

As past director of the Carmel Valley 
Community Youth Center, and current 
director of Redwings Horse Sanctuary, 1 
have called upon the Hentschels and 
Daniel Barduzzi, general manager, on 
numerous occasions for fund raising as¬ 
sistance. Never once did they hesitate in 
their desire to support the community. 
In fact, often times, they were the first in 
this community to offer their help. We 
all realize the tremendous role they have 
played in making the Village Affair such 
a success. Over $130,000 has been raised 
for pathways in the village, thanks, in 
great part, to their generosity. 

Whether it be the school, the commu¬ 
nity, or other non-profits, the Hentschels 
and Los Laureles Lodge have always 
been there for our support, offering us 
their first-class hospitality. I think it is 
about time that the community as a 
whole says “thank you” and offer them 
our support when they need it most. 
Please, write to the board of supervisors 
today and ask them to reverse their 
decision regarding the music use permit 
for Los Laureles Lodge! Catch the spirit 
of community support and keep the 
tradition of Los Laureles Lodge alive! 

Kathleen Tarp 

Carmel Valley 


Spaces for the handicapped 

Dear Editor: 

Why do so many people have dis¬ 
abled/handicapped cards in their auto¬ 
mobiles? 

1 was under the impression that walk¬ 
ing was good for a person, so why are so 
many physicians authorizing so many 
cards? 

How often do you see a truly handi¬ 
capped or disable person leave the car 
he has parked in a disabled space? From 
my observation, not very often. 

While 1 am aware that pulmonary, 
cardiac and circulation problems qualify 
people for these permits, surely there 
aren’t that many people with these prob¬ 
lems. 

Two acquaintances of mine were given 
cards a few years ago. They admit to 
having no physical problems now. Do 
they use the handicapped spaces? Of 
course, and it is perfectly legal since 
their cards are automatically renewed 
every two years. 

The Department of Motor Vehicles 
sends out registration forms for the per¬ 
mits, and all you have to do is send a 
check for $6. No validation from a doc¬ 
tor is needed. 

1 suspect a large number of these 
card-holders have difficulty remember¬ 
ing why they received a card in the first 
place. 

Whoever devised this crazy system 
other than the Department of Motor 
Vehicles should experience the diffi¬ 
culty in getting around with permanent 
orthopedic problems. This system virtu¬ 
ally wipes out the benefits that the handi¬ 
capped have gained in the last few years. 

iPretty soon there won’t be anyone left 
who isn’t using a disabled card. A little 
more vigilance on the police’s part 
wouldn’t hurt, since 1 suspect a lot of the 
cards are being misused. 

1 understand you can buy these cards 
at flea markets for $50. 

Come on, people. Leave the spaces 
for the truly handicapped. 

Eugenie Almond 
Carmel 


Bubba-gate Blues 

Dear Editor: 

How tragic! What next after Dategate 
II? Will it be a steady downhill ^ide 
from Kennedy, Carter, and Clinton to 
Gore, or has “Bubba” already ruined the 
scene for any “good old boy” from the 
South? . 

President Clinton undoubtedly had 
no idea at the time he was “dating” 
around that the exigencies of his mob’s 
politics would throw him in with the 
razorbacked feminist housewives of 
Yankee suburbia, the backbone of his 

See LETTERS page 26 



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The Carmel Pine Cone/CV OutIcKik 25 

















Opinion 


Preservation takes hard work 

4 


By BRIAN STEEN 

The comment the Big Sur Land 

Trust gets most often is: Land 

Trust is such a great organization...tell 
me again what it is you do?** 

The Big Sur Land Trust is more than 
a local community organization. It is a 
non-proftt with over 1,200 members 
worldwide who are committed to pre¬ 
serving and protecting 
the beauty of this area. 

Its goflJ has always 
been preservation and 
conservation of open 
space in Monterey 
County. Now, it also has 
another worthwhile 
goal: doubling its mem¬ 
bership in 1994. 

Clearly, an increased 
membership will allow 
the land trust to ex¬ 
pand its crucial work. 

For 15 years, the 
land trust has worked 
to conserve the irreplaceable lands of 
Big Sur and Monterey County. To date 
more than 10,500 acres have been pro¬ 
tected through its work. These unspoiled 
scenic vistas are enjoyed by local resi¬ 
dents and over three million visitors 
annually. 

Vital role 

The land trust's vital work is made 
possible by financial support provided 
by both residents and visitors who share 
its vision to safeguard this international 
treasure. 

New supporters will join others who 
already share the commitment of pro¬ 
tecting our coastline, redwood forests 
and scenic open space. 

Membership in the Big Sur Land Trust 


will provide them the satisfaction of 
having insured this rich inheritance for 
future generations. 

Point Lobos Ranch 

In June 1993, The Big Sur Land 
Trust acquired the 1,300 acre Point 
Lobos Ranch, formerly the Hudson/Riley 
Ranch. 

This unprecedented achievement not 
only tripled the size of 
Point Lobos Preserve; 
it also prevented the 
property from being 
developed. Currently, 
it is being leased to the 
State Department of 
Parks and Recreation. 

This transaction, 
our 67th since the 
founding in 1978, 
shows the unique role 
of The Big Sur Land 
Trust as it bridges the 
gap between the pub¬ 
lic and private sectors. 
Again and again, the Land Trust has 
worked as a facilitator to bring indi¬ 
viduals, organizations, business and 
government together in order to save the 
area*5 natural resources. 

Nineteen-nighty-four will be a mile¬ 
stone year for The Big Sur Land Trust. 
In future months, the preservation of the 
Odello Artichoke Ranch will be a prior¬ 
ity. 

This historic community landmark, 
known as the gateway to Big Sur, has 
been approved for an 82-unit residen¬ 
tial development. These fields r^resent 
the last remaining artichoke ftelds be¬ 
tween Carmel and Los Angeles and have 
always been considered an irreplaceable 
local treasure. 

The Land Trust intends to secure 



BRIAN STEEN 


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funds firom the upcoming California 
Parks and Wildlife Initiative (CALPAW 
*94) as well as individual support to save 
thi^roperty from development. 

The initiative will be on the June state 
ballot, and, if passed, it would provide 
$32 million for Monterey County. Other 
projects funded by the CALPAW *94 
Initiative include preservation of the 
Monterey Bay shoreline and the Elkhom 
Slough. 

Greater outreach 

Throughout the year, the Land Trust 
will be expanding its outreach program 
and will be seeking both new members 
and volunteers who want to see its work 
continue. 

There will be spring hikes on its 1,100 


acre redwood preserve, summer envi¬ 
ronmental workshops for students, ex- 

e ansion of cultural activities at its Henry 
liller Library in Big Sur, volunteer re¬ 
cruitment and training programs. These 
programs as well as others will a ow 
members to learn about the land and 
resources they have helped protect. 

The cost of participating in the Land 
Trust is small. But the cost of not par¬ 
ticipating is great. The loss of the re¬ 
maining open space and scenic beauty 
depends on, participation by residents 
and visitors ^ike. 


Brian Steen is executive director of 
the Big Sur Land Trust. 


Letters 

from such an embarrassingly muddle- 
headed proposition. 

Even our own master of sublime 
utopianism, Sam Farr, has fallen 
strangely silent in awe of his leader's 
good humor ghoulishness about such 
contradictions. 

Bubba's mob says it makes perfectly 
good sense to require licenses and profi¬ 
ciency in gun-handling tests for Ameri¬ 
cans to exercise their right to defend 
their persons, homes and hearths 

Next he wants to hire 50,000 cops to 
“protect” us after he gets our guns. 

It's a good thing Bubbagate caught 
up with him in time. 

James D. Craig 
> Pebble Beach 

LETTERS from page 25 
party's gun-control strategy. 

Obviously, Bubba simply wasn't set 
up to become the champion of the New 
Puritanism. 

It was all going so smoothly until a 
black racist walked into a subway car in 
New York and shot everybody, thereby 
initiating Phase Two of the Democrats' 
doublespeak strategy. Specifically, to 
combat violence by the party’s black 
racist wing, tougher handgun controls 
are imposed — to protect people from 
defendiing themselves. 

I really couldn't blame President 
Clinton if he welcomed a timely exit 

How to reach local elected officials 

Carmel Mayor 

916/445-5843 

KEN WHITE 

or 

City Hall ' 

1200 Aguajito Road 

Carmel-by-the-Sea 

Monterey, CA 93940 

P.O. Box CC 

373-0773 

Carmel, CA 93921 


624-2781 

State Assemblyman 


BRUCE McPherson 

U.S. Representative 

27th District, State Assembly 

SAM FARR 

Room 3120, State Capitol 

17th Congressional District 

Sacramento, CA 95814 

1216 Lohgworth House Office Bldg 

916/445-8496 

. Washington, DC 20515 

or 1200 Aguajito Road 

202/225-2861 

Monterey, CA 93940 i 

or 380 Alvarado St. 

646-1980 i 

Monterey, CA 93940 

1 

649-3555 

County Supervisor 


SAM KARAS 

State Senator 

Monterey County Board of Supervisors 

HENRY MELLO 

5th District 

15th District, State Senate 

1200 Aguajito Road, Ste 001 

State Capitol, Room 313 

Monterey, CA 93940 

Sacramento, CA 95814 

647-7755 




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26 The Carmel Pine Cone/CV Outlook 


February 3, 1994 



















O P 


N 


O N 



Doris Day’s 
Best Friends 

By DORIS DAY 


Meatless morsels 

Burger KING is expanding its test-marketing of 
"Crillers," a non-meat burger, to 38 locations around 
the United States. Crillers are also available in super¬ 
markets under the Momingstar Farms label and lots of 
my readers have told me they absolutely love this 
product. 

Also, watch for these new v^etarian treats coming 
soon to your supermarket — a new meatless buiger 
from Green Giant foods, and Linda McCartney's Foods 
from the Heart. Paul and his wife are longtime veg¬ 
etarians and since the publication of her vegetarian 
cookbook in 1989, Linda has also introduced a line of 
vegetarian entrees in England that has been quite 
successful. 


Just a pinch will do 

Home health checks will help you become aware of 
your pet’s mental and physical well-being. It’s impor¬ 
tant to know how your pet looks and acts-when he’s 
feeling healthy so that you can recognize signs of 
distress. 

One sign of potential illness is dehydration, an 
excess loss of body fluids. This loss usually involves 
water and electrolytes (which are minerals such as 
* sodium, chloride and potassium). Fever can increase 
the loss of water and the loss may be significant if your 
pet doesn’t drink enough to offset it. Vomiting and 
diarrhea are other common causes of dehydration. 

There’s a simple test to determine if your pet is 
dehydrated. Gently pick up the skin on the back of his 
neck or along his back.,When you release, it should 
spring back into place. In dehydration, the skin stays 
up in a ridge. If this is the case, see your veterinarian. 
In mild cases without vomiting, fluids may be given by 
mouth. Otherwise, your veterinarian can administer 
fluids by injecting them under the skin. 


Required reading 

Don’t wait until your dog misbehaves to read “When 
Good Dogs Do Bad Tilings.” Authors Mordecai Siegal 
and Matthew Margolis are true animal behavior ex¬ 
perts and their book is chockfull of excellent informa¬ 
tion. Read this book as a preventative measure to gain 
valuable insight into your dog’s behavior. 

New hope for paralysis victims 

An ongoing study at Purdue University may help 
dogs with spinal injuries recover some normal abili¬ 
ties, including the ^ility to walk. 

An electrical device called an oscillating field stimu¬ 
lator was implanted near the spinal cord in a control 
group of dogs. These dogs were volunteered by their 
owners and had varying spinal cord injuries. 

The stimulator is about the size of tube of lipstick 
and it sends a weak electrical current across damaged 
nerves to stimulate their growth. 

The results showed that 85 percent of the dogs 
receiving the device showed improvement and the 
most improved dogs got their implant within two 
weeks of their injury. Researchers are encouraged that 
the results seem to be permanent, so this study may be 
of great benefit to two-leggers and four-leggers. 

That’s all for this week. See you next time. 


(Written in collaboration with Judy Ruby, director, 
Doris Day Pet Foundation, Los Angeles.) 


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Campus Life 

By JAMES GENOME 


Incurable disease spreads 
among Carmel High seniors 


LjIKE a tsunami rushing forward and destroy¬ 
ing everything in its path, a crippling disease has hit 
the Carmel High School campus, decimating the ranks 


of even the most stalwart seniors. 

Is it the black plague? Gould it be that polio vaccines 
are no longer effective? 

No, it is something far worse: Senioritis has struck 
the campus with a vengeance. 

1 first became aware of Senioritis as sophomore. I 
had a few classes with seniors and, for some mysterious 
reason, after the end of the first semester, msuiy of 
them stopped doing their woric and some even stopped 
coming to school. 

I asked one of my teachers what was going on. Have 
they all transferred? Have they all gotten very lazy? 
No, the teacher confided in me, they all have Senioritis. 

Now that I’m a senior myself, I truly understand 
what this dreaded affliction is all about. It usually 
breaks out at the end of the first semester of one’s 
senior year, about a week and a half ago to be precise. 


The time to relax 

Many factors lead to Senioritis. First off, grades 
suddenly appear less important. Colleges rarely judge 
an applicant on his or her second semester senior 
marks. So long as you pass, you are usually OK. 

Secondly, many students are, believe it or not, 
weary of the same routine they have gone through for 
the previous seven semesters. Now, many say, is the 
time to relax. Extend summer vacation by a few 


months and get that extra bit of rest before starting 
college. ^ 

Senioritis exhibits varying levels of effectiveness. 
Some seniors will allow their grades to slip just a little, 
while others experience a total collapse. Many students 
stop attending their classes, and as a result give up 
many a fun hour in detention. 

Along with Senioritis comes a propensity to become 
slightly more boisterous. Some students actually stoop 
so low as to play pranks at school, or participate in 
“ditchday” activities. 


So if you begin to notice CHS seniors 
laughing ana frolicking in the streets of 
Carmel, the lines of stress all but erased 
from their faces, don*t panic. There is 
absolutely nothingyou can do —Senioritis 
is one disease for which there never will be 
a cure. 


For some though, Senioritis isn’t a very big deal. As 
one of my friends told me: “I’ve had Senioritis since I 
was a freshman.” 

Others, who have high standards and higher energy 
..levels don’t slack off one bit in their Isist semester. 1 can^ 
think of one friend in particular who attacks her school 
work with all the ferocity of a rabid Energizer Bunny 
— yes, she just keeps going and going. 

As for myself, I have already felt the chilling grip of 
Senioritis. There have been many times, even before 
the semester ended, when 1 was ready to give up. But 
hopefully 1 can relax and still maintain all my respon¬ 
sibilities, 

So if you begin to^notice CHS seniors laughing and 
frolicking in the streets of Carmel, the lines of stress all 
but erased from their faces, don’t panic. There is 
absolutely nothing you can do —Senioritis is one 
disease for which there never will be a cure. 

I 



MARATHON 

MEN 


If you get the idea that these two ath¬ 
letic-looking men are Marathon runners, 
you're right. They are Pierre Delfausse 
on the left and Bob Mills on the right. 
They have run in various Marathons all 
over America and they are 
very good at it. 


THi: AlJXll.lARY 

Comimmity I lospilal of 
iho .\loi\(cro.\ IVniuMila 


One of the ways they stay in 
shape is by volunteering at 
Community Hospital. As 
members of the Auxiliary, 
they stay active, involved, 
and very useful. 


These two work in services 
that keep them physically 
active. However, the Auxil¬ 
iary has fifteen separate 
services that allow its mem¬ 
bers to choose the areas they 
want to work in - all are 
interesting and absorbing. 


If you would like to explore 
the many opportunities 
available to both men and 
women in the Auxiliary, plan 
to attend the Orientation Meeting 
at the Hospital, February 5 at 
10 am. Call 625-4555 to register. 


y 


February 3, 1994 


The Carmel Pine Cone/CV Outlook 27 














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February 3, 1994 


28 The Carmel Pine Cone/CV Outlook 


































































Section 

* 



Arts & 

Entertainment 


I Social Spotlight 
Real Estate ^rkeiploce 
Classified/Services Directory 


New exhibit at Cherry Center to feature 
trompe Foeil, dream imagery by 2 artists 


Artists anna Koster and Marilyn Hum Mohr 
challenge the imagination during a month-long ex¬ 
hibit of their work entitled **More Than Real/Dream 
Windows.” 

Koster admits that she sums to deceive. She paints 
in a ‘^trompe Toeil” msunner, in which objects are so 
meticulously rendered in acrylic paint that they con¬ 
fuse the eye, even close up. 

Koster places msuiy of her psuntings within settings 
of actual objects, creating the illusion of resJity. Her 
work chsJlenges the viewer to distinguish the real 
from the painted objects. A false hrame surrounds a 
real painting, an illusionsuy rock rests on a bookcase, 
or an apparent installation is actually a painting. 

Koster, whose ‘Alchemy Workshop’ is at right, 
describes her work as “an intimate look at things 
people normally don’t pay attention to.” 

The artist, who works as Public Relations Coordi¬ 
nator and Registrar at Santa Clara University’s de 
Saisset Museum, has had numerous exhibitions at 
San Jose State University, the Ssui Jose Institute of 
Contemporary Art, and many Bay Area galleries. 


I 

Marilyn Hum Mohr’s new series of woric originated 
from a coming of age gift made for her niece in a 
flimsy greeting card box. Intrigued by the small size 
and intimacy of the medium, Mohr began creating' 
■ colorful, three-dimensional images in shallow con¬ 
crete boxes. 

Tbese wall sculptures of paper, paint sind “what¬ 
ever works” are windows into the artist’s thoughts 
and feelings and are inspired by both natural and 
dream images. 

Two of Hie works were created to honor her per¬ 
sonal hmiines. New York artist Louise Bourgeois, 
and a former slave who spoke on behalf of Afncan 
Americans and women. 

Mohr, who lives in Santa Cmz, is known on the 
Central Coast through her exhibitions at the Univer¬ 
sity of California at Santa Cruz, the Santa Cmz Art 
League and Cabrillo College. 

An opening rec^don for the artists will be held 
from 2:30 to 4:30 p.m. on Saturday at the Carl Cherry 
Center for the Arts, located at the comer of Fourth 
and Cuadalupe in Carmel. 



New on the scene 

Monterey Recording Artists markets work of local performers 

By JT MASON 


Ask JOHN Dally , co-founder of 
Monterey Recording Ardsts, about 
his new business venture, and it 
isn’t long before 
the word “snow- 

Feature “ 

X caxui c the conversation. 

This'is under¬ 
standable, given 
the meteoric speed with which the 
company has t^en off. The idea for 
Monterey Recording was only con¬ 
ceived this past July. 

Dally had recently left his posi¬ 
tion as chief financial officer for the 
U. S. Headquarters of Sofdab, a 
Cerman software company owned 
by BMW. His wife, Tricia, had just 
left her job as Saab’s account super¬ 
visor for the adverdsing agency, 
Angotd, Thomas, Hedge, Inc. The 
Ddlys came to Carmel on vacation 
to visit John’s brother David, prin¬ 
cipal violinist.for the Monterey 
String Quartet. 

“David was talking about how 
hard it was for the local musicians 
to get promotion and distribution 
for their recordings,” explains John. 


“We thought that if we could bring a 
group of these ardsts together under one 
umbrella and then market them to the 
local community, we’d not only being 
doing a great service but we’d also have 
fiui instant business.” 

Tricia adds, “Instead of each indi¬ 
vidual ardst creadng their own separate 
distribution, we could create one net¬ 
work that would take care of markedng, 
sales and distribution, leaving the artists 
free to concentrate on their music.” 

The Dallys contacted a variety of lo¬ 
cal perfomiers, asking for samples of 
their work. Ten responded. Performers 
were hungry for go^ business help. In 
September the company signed their 
first artist, Mary Lee Sunseri. Their ros¬ 
ter of ardsts has rapidly grown to in¬ 
clude Kenny Stahl, Colin Farish, Mike 
Marotta and the Passionate Paisanos, 
the Jan Deneau Trio, Amy Kmpski and 
Jonathon Lee. 

In October, Sandy Sidener joined the 
business to work on promotions. She has 
been active in the local theater scene as 
an actress and has sung with various 
bands. “I don’t have the training and 
background in adverdsing and market¬ 
ing that John and Tricia have, but I am 
a long time shopaholic,” she laughingly 


admits. “I know on an insdnctual level 
what makes things sell, why people buy. 
I woik closely with the retailers.” 

Sidener has set up 50 accounts from 
Santa Cruz to Big Sur. “We’ve gotten 
great response from retailers. We’re for¬ 
tunate to live in a community that is 
very supportive of local musicians.” 

One of the many services that 
Monterey Recording provides is help in 
creating a consistent professional look. 
Mary Lee Sunseri and Nancy Stewart 
had two cassettes on the market before 
signing with Monterey Recording. 

Packaging to reflect quality 

Upon the^release of Sunseri’s latest 
recording. Whale Watchings Monterey 
Recording redesigned the cover of her 
two previous cassettes so that all three 
recordings would have a similar look. 
“We want the quality of the outside 
packaging to reflect the quality of the 
music inside,” says Tricia. “These art¬ 
ists are world class musicians with in¬ 
credible recordings. The graphic art has 
to reflect that.” 

Asked if Monterey Recording has a 
signature sound, John responds, “Over¬ 
all our recordings are targeted for the 
adult market, 30 years old and up. The 


majority of the music is jazz and 
new age instrumentkls.'Maiy Lee is 
an exception. Her music is geared 
more toward children.” 

Thanks in large part to the per¬ 
sistent efforts of Monterey Record¬ 
ing, flautist Kenny Stahl finally has 
his own recording out. Stahl has 
been a perennial favorite around 
the Monterey Bay area. He is a well 
respected studio musician who has 
played with Stevie Wonder and Lee 
Greenwood. He performs with nu¬ 
merous bands and regularly ap¬ 
pears at the Monterey Jazz Festival. 

First Stahl recording 
His tape The Kenny Stahl Band 
Live at the Portojino was recorded 
by fellow musician Colin Farish. It 
features Stahl on flute and piccolo, 
Weber Drummond on keyboards, 
Tom Bockhold on bass, Anthony 
King and Steve Robertson on drums, 
Macucho Bonilla on per<ri^sion and 
Claudia Villela on vocals. 

Tricia is proud of this release. 
“People have been after Kenny for 
years to do a recording. Colin re- 

See RECORDING page 39 



'SHADOWLANDS; PLAYING at MPC, tells the story of the love of C.S. Lewis' 
life. The bittersweet drama plays Friday through Feb. 27. 


‘Shadowlands’: Bittersweet love story 
about creator of Neimia Chronicles 


THE LOVE story of C. S. Lewis and 
Joy Davidman is portrayed in 
Shadowlands^ presented by the 
Monterey Peninsula College Drama De¬ 
partment Feb. 4 through 27 in the SRO 
Theatre. 

Nick Zanides directs the* William 
Nicholson drama, which won the 1990 
London Evening Standard Award for 
Best New Play. Lewis was a professor at 
Oxford and a prolific writer. He created 
the famed fantasy series of “Narnia 
Chronicles.” Davidman was an Ameri- 
canpoet. 

Tnc couple carried on a correspon¬ 
dence for some time before meeting. 

February 3, 1994 


Following Davidman’s divorce, the poet 
moved to Oxford to be near Lewis, who 
married her so she could stay in En¬ 
gland. 

During the bittersweet course of their 
relationship, l.,ewis, who once described 
pain as “God’s megaphone to rouse a 
deaf world,” learned first-hand about 
love and suffering. 

Shadowlands will be presented at 8 
p.m. Fridays and Saturdays, and at 2 
p.m. Sundays. Tickets are $10 for gen¬ 
eral admission; $9 for students, senior 
citizens and military personnel. Reser¬ 
vations are available by calling the MPC 
Box Office at 646-4123. 

The Carmel Pine Cone/CV Outlook 29 
















irS LATE... 
YOU’RE HUNGRY 


How about )::|zzo, solads,j^afb<ki 
appc^ers, dess ^S 
and a fileRignon $afflwich 

R$5.95 _ I 

from loBu pm - lidO am , i 


Taste Buds 


By DOUG THOMPSON 

PASTA MIA TRATTORIA 

A memorable dining experience^ indeed 

Now THAT 


it's open seven days Pasta Mia and Angolotti con Polio, 
a week, ardent lovers of Pasta Mia Our waitress set the dishes before us 
Trattoria — and there are many of and, though we had already consumed 
them out there — no longer have to quite a bit up to this point, we both 
endure the Monday night blues. were eager to taste our piping hot 

By recendy opening her doors for entrees, 
business on Monday nights. Pasta Mia The lasagne, a perennial favorite 

owner Maureen Signorella has met of mine, was delicious and light as 
the public's demand. Hie popular always. The delicate bechamel sauce 
Pacific Grove restaurant, which and homonade ricotta perfecdy en- 
opened in 1981, continues to have a hances the fresh pasta and tomato 
loyal local following as well as having sauce. 

caught the intrigue of new and r^ieat My partner's Agnolotti con Polio 

visitors to the peninsula. — half moon pasta stuffed with pesto. 

And who could blame fans of Pasta in lemon zest cream sauce with chicken 
Mia for wanting the restaurant every and sun-dried tomatoes — was an 
night of the week? When the craving i equally popular choice, 
comes for their homemade pasta or It is quite evident that Chef Tito 
any number of the other delectable Perez, who follows Maureen's recipes 
dishes on the diverse menu, the rea- to perfection, is a true culinary talent, 

sonably priced Italian restaurant is 

tops on many people's list. *A wonderful balance' 

Even a brief wait before you're ‘^Tito has brought a wonderful bal- 

seated is a highlight. ITie cozy wait- ance," Maureen said of her chef who 
ing room has been home to many new has been at Pasta Mia for three years, 
friendships between heretofore strang- “Our menu is indicative of all of Italy." 
ers, who are comforted by the tanta- Every sauce at Pasta Mia, Maureen 

lizing scents while sipping on a glass points out, is made from scratch. In 
of house red wine. fact, she said, individuals with high 

‘ cholesterol, for example, can make 

special requests that Tito and his staff 
are more than happy to meet. 

And, of course, the pasta is made 
firesh on the premises every day. Gloria 
Santos not only spearheads that task, 
is responsible for creating 
of the restaurant’s desserts. 
Even as we were already quite sa- 
we knew from experience that 
we couldn’t pass up on one of Gloria’s 
glorious desserts. We knew right away 
that decaffeinated Cafe Lates were a 
must, and requested a few more min¬ 
utes to make the right dessert selec¬ 
tion. And the choices we inevitably 
made were'heavenly: Chocolate Wal¬ 
nut Torte and Spumoni Celato. 

Though we felt as though we had 
been enjoying the tastes of Pasta Mia 
thoughtfully stopped by the table to for almost an hour straight, the great- 
recommend a 1988 Ruffino Chianti est testimony to Maureen and Tito is 
Classic. It proved to be the perfect that neither of us felt uncomfortably 
partner for our quartet of appetizers, full. It underscores the fact that Pasta 
Though it was very difficult for us Mia’s dishes accent the flavors and 
to determine if one was any more are done so very delicately, 
delicious than the other, we felt com- The best news of all for us is our 
pelled to single out the Polenta al experience took place on a Monday 

Sugo, baked Italian commeal with night. No longer did we have to worry 

tomato sauce and cheese. In one word, that Pasta Mia Trattoria would be 

it was awesome! closed off to us when the urge strikes. 

It would be inappropriate, how- And that occurs quite frequently, 
ever, to overlook the Antipasti Pasta 

Mia because it, after all, is displayed ^ # 

just as one begins the walk to their 

table. We thoroughly enjoyed our- Pasta Mia is located at 481 Light- 
selves as we sampled roasted peppers, house Ave., a block from downtown 
frittata, carrot salad, artichokes and Pacific Grove. Pasta Mia is only open 
garbonzo beans, not to mention some for dinnerfrom 5:30 to 10p.m. daily; 
roasted garlic for our bread. reservations are taken only for parties 

We moved to our next course — a of six or more and Pisa and 
spinach salad with cucumber, white MasterCard are accepted. 
beans and a very tasty dressing. At There is a small wine list and do- 
this point, we passed on the soup, mestic and imported beers. 
only so'we could save room for our And for those who may not have 
hearty entrees that were about to ar- the time to sit down for dinner at 
rive. But Pasta Mia offers two choices Pasta Mia, they can now take it 
nightly: Minestrone and Fagioli, an home with them! The restaurant has 
Italian bean soup, both of which we recently added a delicatessan on the 
have tried before and thoroughly en- premises, where fresh pastas, sauces 
joyed. and wines are Just a sampling of 

what can be purchased. 

Eagerly awaiting entrees Additional information about the 

Although the evening specials were delicatessan and/or dinner reserva- 
tempting, we both stayed with selec- tions can be obtained by calling 375- 
tions on the menu — Lasagne di 7709. 


Peninsula poets to read at T-bird 

Five MONTEREY Peninsula dation, Richard (Bud) Lamb will 
poets will read from their book, read selections brom the Adult Gon- 
Quintet in Concert, at the test Book. Admission is $5. Infor- 
Tliunderbird Bookshop at 7 p.m. mation will be available regarding 
on Friday. Also, as a guest of the the 1994 adult poetry contest spon- 
Whitney Poetry Scholarship Foun- sored by the foundation. 


Homey atmosphere 

Upon being seated, you're imme¬ 
diately impressed by the restaurant's 
homey atmosphere, a trademark of 
Pasta Mia. As if the menu isn't im¬ 
pressive enough, the wait staff is quick but she also 
to provide an update on the evening’s many 
specials, which added to the difficulty 
of narrowing down the entree choice tiated 
to one. 

But we started slowly — continu¬ 
ing to sip on a glass of house red while 
surveying the antipasti selections. Our 
table opted for four starters: 

Melanzane alia Mia, Carpaccio di 
Lorenzo, Polenta al Sugo and Anti¬ 
pasti Pasta Mia. Seeing our delightful 
spread, and noticing that we had fin¬ 
ished our glasses of wine, Maureen 


30 The Carmel Pine Cone/CV Outlook February 3, 1994 
















13Y PLEASURE’S missile trans- 
Hxed, I shall use the sail of my firee-will 
and navigate under Venus’ star.” 

Tliis is just one of the memorable 
lines hrom Sequenda’s equally memo¬ 
rable concert of mediev^ music last 
Thursday. 

Endtled Love Terror, the program 
explored many manifestations of love. 


plored many manifestations of love, 
as described in vocal and instrumental 
music of the 9th to the 15th centuries. 


Pick up the Review FREE each Wednesday at peninsula 
restaurants, shops, hotels/motcls & visitor attractions! 


Cosine express 


Boeing 737's 


*500 SUM 

*BUckjack 

^Roulette 

*Cnp8 

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*Spofts Bar 

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♦Fine Dining ' 

*GKkuilf 

*Sporu Book 


Day 

Trips from 


R€D UON INN 

& CASINO 

In CUCO, NCVADA « 

Deports 
Monterey 
February 17 

$500 in GivtftUiRVS dwi 


*Round Trip Airfare via Caaine 
Express Airlines 
^Ground Transportation 
*Fun Pak 

^Champagne in-flight 

*Free Cocktails while Gambling 


The Museum Association’s 
THIRD CHINA EXPEDITION 
29 April - 31 May 


Inclusive Cost $4,987 


INFORMATION & PREVIEW MEETINGS: 
Thursday, January 27 n 4:00 p.m. MPMA at Civic Center 
Friday, February 11 4:00 p.m. MPMA at La Mirada 
or call: 624-0541 




Casual Elegance, Delightful Delicious 
Award-IVinning Local Favorite 
Inventive Regional European Cooking 
Earty and lianauet Room Available 


CUisipie 


Fireplaces Indoor & Outdoor Dining 

LUNCH . DINNER . BRUNCH 

Reservations Suggested 40^^ / 

I UK BARNYARD, CAHMF.L 


^1Y;30^:30 . . 

fims 




DINNERMON.- 

Evming 


February 3, 1994 


The Carmel Pine Cone/CV Outlook 3 1 






















Entertaining guests from out of town, or The Dinner from Hell 


By BEVERIY BORGMAN 

My SON and his girlfiriend' came 
down from the Bay Area recently to 
^>end a few days and for the first time 
r^ly get a(^ainted with the Monterey 
Peninsula. Ineir other visits had been 
holiday hit-and>runs, but now they had 
four days to relax and enjoy themselves 
and see things theyM never seen before. 

David, a rock-and-roll musician at 
heart but a computer programmer by 
profession, was happy to let April call 
the shots. Her first request, after they^d 
checked into a motel, was for a visit to 
the SPCA animal shelter out on High¬ 
way 68. 1 guess you'd call this a clue. 


I made it clear right away that they 
had no particular obligations to us. They 
could ‘^hang out” as much as they 
wanted, operate on their own schedule, 
and if they wanted to drop by now and 
then, that was fine too. 

They took me at my word, wandering 
around to sample our many attractions; 
the aquarium, the tide pools, 17 Mile 
Drive. When David called me at 3:30 
p.m. the first day, 1 asked, “What did 
you do this morning?” 

“Mom, this is this morning. We were 
up until 3 a.m. last night.” He said they 
were going out to dinner and I invited 
them to come by later for dessert. They 
(hd, at 10 p.m., and April talked ecstati- 




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LUNCH & 
DINNER 




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™'Home Edition 

The Monterey Peninsula's 
first home and garden resource directory. 

CaU 624-3881 

Buying The Best and The Hon%e Edition are published by Carmel Publishing Co. 
Ray and Barbara March, publishers 


cally about the many deer they'd seen in 
the Del Monte Forest and the countless 
whale spouts they'd sighted offshore. 
April, if you hadn't already guessed, is 
an animal lover. ^ 

Their second day was spent in much 
the same way, and by the time they 
showed up for dessert that night, April 
was convinced that they should relocate 
here. Her big brown eyes were almost 
irresistible as she tried to persuade my 
son. His response was that there just 
isn't enough “action” down here in Para¬ 
dise. 

Incidentally, after leaving us each 
night they went to the Crazy Horse 
Saloon, where karaoke is featured. For 
those who don't know, karaqj^e is a 
system in which people in the audience 
can get up and sing their favorite songs. 
It's not lip-synching; it's recorded pop 
music with the vocal track left out, and 
the lyrics appear on a monitor. That's 
where the amateur steps in. The kids 
had'a ball, performing in front of an 
enthusiastic audience. (I'd try karaoke 
myself, but it doesn't start until my 
bedtime.) 

A homemade meal 
By the third day I Hgured that David 
and April might be ready for a home¬ 
made meal. The SigniBcant Other said 
he was in the mood to cook, and set 
about Bxing one of our favorite recipes. 

I had some misgivings, however. I 
just couldn't see myself telling April we 
were having Mexican Lamb Stew. “Let's 
call it something else,” I suggested to the 
S.O., and we came up with Sonora Stew. 

The kids arrived sibout 6 p.m., visibly 
tired from another busy day of 
sightseeing. We had a drink before din¬ 
ner, then started to serve. April’s was the 
first plate I put on the table. 

“What kind of meat is this?” she 
asked. 


The S.O. and I looked at each other in 
alarm. “It's er, ah, mutton,” I said, 
figuring that no 22-year-old had ever 
heard of mutton. But the big brown eyes 
looked right into mine, and 1 admitted, 
“It's called lamb, but it's really sheep. I 
don't want you to think in terms of some 
fuzzy little lamb.” 

“I like sheep too,” said April calmly, 
and carefully begsm moving each morsel 
of meat to the far side of her plate. 

Well, OK, I've got a daughter who's a 
dyed-in-the-wool vegetarian, and I 
should know better, but there's some¬ 
thing about sitting at a table with a non- 
meateater that msikes you feel as if blood 
is dripping from your fangs with every 
bite you take. 

I said a nervous grace and we began 
to eat. Only moments later my son ex¬ 
cused himself from the table and went to 
the bathroom. I knew the signs. The 
poor kid has suffered from esophageal 
reflux since adolescence. 

I don't pretend that this is a doctor 
column, but what happens is that the 
little door that opens from the esopha¬ 
gus into the stomach starts to swing 
wildly, allowing food to back up into the 
esophagus. The condition can be brought 
on by a number of things, among them 
too-spicy foods. Or stress. Maybe stress 
from your best girl not eating what your 
mom has put on the table. 

At the other end of the table I saw the 
^.O.'s face close tighter than a clamshell. 
There I was, left to make conversation 
with a young woman repulsed by our 
choice of food, a young man experienc¬ 
ing pain and embarrassment, and a 
domestic partner who was thinking of 
how he'd slaved over a hot stove all 
afternoon. i 

Some might say it was just a typical 
family meal, but it felt like The Dinner 
from Hell. And no, I don't think the kids 
will be moving down here very soon. 


E' , 




•f 


-V --if' 




y-m. 


CHRISTINA OLSEN, Kelly 
Lucido and Tara Lucido dem¬ 
onstrate how to stay home 
from school in the Carmel 
Ballet Academy's production 
of How to Eat Like a Child 
(and Other Lessons in Not 
Being a Grownup). This week¬ 
end is the last chance to catch 
the show. Times are 7:30 
p.m. Friday arid Saturday and 
2:30 p.m. Sunday. Informa¬ 
tion isavailableat624-3729. 





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3 2 The Carmel Pine Cone/CV Outlook 


February 3, 1994 































DynamO brings adolescent emotions to life with magic, charai 


By LYN BRONSON ^ 

Performance carmel pre¬ 
sented another in its series of entertain¬ 
ment events last Saturday night for a 
capacity audience that contained a sig- 
nihcant number of children. 

The show was called DesequUibre — 
The ChaUengey and it was like no other 
theater, dance, acrobatic or musical event 
1 have ever eimerienced. 

DynamO Theatre, the French Cana¬ 
dian company consisting of four young, 
talented performers — Sylvette 
Boudreau, Lisa Carrier, Guillaume 
Chouinard and Yves Simard — com¬ 
bined their talents in gymnastics, acro¬ 
batics, dance and acting to present a 
short program of magic and charm. 

The ingenious creators of The Chal¬ 
lenge are writer Gilbert Dupuis and di¬ 
rector Alain Fournier. They have gener¬ 
ated an interesting and original example 
of the interdisciplinary art that they call 
acrobatic theater. 

Ensemble Monterey slates 

Ensemble monterey, the resi¬ 
dent professional chamber ensemble of 
Monterey Peninsula College, will begin 
its 1994 season by presenting “An Af¬ 
ternoon with Brahms” this Sunday. 

The concert will feature two major 
compositions by the romantic master, 
Johannes Brahms. The first of these will 
be the “Piano Quintet in F Minor, Opus 
34.” 

I Written between 1861 and 1864, the 
Piano Quintet is scored for piano and a 
string quartet, and is one of the major 
chamber works of the romantic period. 


In The ChaUengey the audience is 
presented with four young people, two 
boys and two girls, in what we suppose 
is early adolescence. They are wearing 
masks to suggest that they are still 
unformed beings on the threshold of life. 
We see them in the throes of awkward 
meetings that remind us of the painful 
encounters we all experienced as teen¬ 
agers. 

The prerecorded score is new age and 
minim^ist. It consists of electronic in¬ 
strumentation with percussion and is 
utilized effectively throughout. 

The stage is dominated by a large 
monolithic structure resembling o.papier 
mache mountain with a steely angled 
plane surface. 

This surface is used by the four ac¬ 
tors/acrobats as a playground. It is 
shrouded by a lar^ tarpaulin for almost 
half the evening* The audience begins to 
understand that underneath this cloth 
lie the mysteries of life which the teens 
only dimly perceive. 

^Afternoon with Brahms^ 

The second half of the concert will be 
devoted to a performance of the Brahms 
“Serenade Number 2 for Small Orches¬ 
tra, Op. 16 in A Major.” 

This five-movement composition, 
written between 1858 and 1859, fea¬ 
tures an orchestra of 16 instruments, 
conducted by Dr. John Anderson. 

The concert will be presented at 3 
p.m. at the MPC Music Hall. Tickets 
cost $12 for general admission, and $8 
for students and persons''aged 65 and 
older. Tickets will be availwle at the 
door, or may be reserved at 646-4205. 


Finally the tarp slips away, and with 
it some of th^rotected innocence of an 
earlier age. The monolith reveals itself 
to be a dangerous entity. Its middle 
section is hinged and swings freely, al¬ 
lowing the actors to play increasingly 
more hazardous games by balancing on 
top of the plane or darting in and out, 
barely escaping being crushed. 

And, of course, this is what DynamO 
Theatre stimulates us to think about. 
The youths are taking chances in a very 
risky world in order to become some¬ 
thing more than what they would have 
been had they stayed in their original 
environment. 

The ability of the actors to convey 
emotion is one of the strong points of 
this work. The challenge of such a pro- 

1 


duction is how to achieve enough vari¬ 
ety. Anyone who has seen PUobolus can 
remember the initial fascination of see¬ 
ing intertwined bodies assuming fasci¬ 
nating new shapes and meanings in de¬ 
licious slow motion, unfolding like pat¬ 
terns in an elaborate kaleidoscope. 

But in PUoboUuy the fascination 
tended to wear off, ultimately leaving a 
feeling of sameness. DynamO Theatre’s 
presentation suffered somewhat from 
the same problem. For an hour and 10 
minutes we saw too many of the same 
pratfalls and gestures, which tended to 
dull the senses. 

But the freshness and spontaneity of 
the actors were so appealing that the 
overall performance could not fail to 
please the audience, and it did just that. 



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» 


The Carmel Pine Cone/CV Outlook 33 


February 3, 1994 






















Jazz Tides 

ByJOHNDETRO ' 


Next Dixieland Monterey 
edition will include a tribute 
to Monterey’s jazz patriarch 

HE NEXT Dixieland Monterey bash will feature a 
tribute to Papa Jake Stock, jazz patriarch and reedman 
who has played gigs in these parts for more than half a 
century. 

And there will be very popular bands on the festival 
roster for March 4-5-6 in downtown Monterey. 

Information about the 14th annual edition is in a 
bright brochure now being sent out to all tho.'^e on 













HELLRM’S TOBACCO SHOP 

The Helam famiy has been in this same business 
since 1892. And what a fasdnoting place. Tobacco 
products and pipes from all over the vy^Drid. Rare gift 
items, joke gifts and tricks, adult party items. Lee 
Helam and hb staff take plenty of time with 
customers whie consultirig on fine tobaccos ar>d. 
for arother example, pipe core and stpplies. Stop 
by ard browse...it's a fLirvpacked stop on anyone's 
shopping trip. 423 Alvarado in downtown Monterey. 


MARCH HARE: AN AUEDA 
CONCEPT SALON 

Probably the rrost carirTg hair design center you'H 
ever e)qDerience. Another key word is ffxxjgriffri— 
as MoryAma Wagner ord her staff take time to 
irdividualize services. Hair cutting for everyone, 
festh/e occasion ord wedding styling (whole 
parties), perms, ol types hair coloring, manicure and 
pedicxre, facials, makeup. A real gift to yourself is 
the aroma therapy scalp ord hair treatment with 
nrxassoge (relaxation plus exhilaration, essential oils 
used to nourish sldn ord hair unto real health). 
MoryAma's 22 years of experierx» go into each 
sure, gentle process. A# the March Hare services 
errploy these essential oils; the bright site's this area's 
exclusive center for erTvkotTrr»entaly<xx^ious 
Aveda Products. At Rflh ord Mission in Carmel. 

Cal ahead: 624-3024. 


TOOTS LHGOON 

Fabulous place for fabrJous fol<s. Bi Oates. Ed 
Johnson...these Toots execs are happy carriers 
whose spirit penmeates. Romantic dinners? Fomly 
outings? Grotps? Here's the spx^t. Rtis. seafood, 
pasta, great steaks, salads, appetizers, desserts. 
Open for lunch ord dimer seven days psif week. Ful 
bar, tots of evening activity, a dfferent chef's special 
every night. Dolores ord Seventh. Carmel. 625-1915. 


To ask about spaceon this page 
call 624-0162. 
Surprisingly low rotes! 


Dixieland Monterey's national mailing list. 

Alorfg with spotlighting Papa Jake, the celebration 
will include a Saturday morning Jazz Parade — ^old 
cars, marching bands, riding bands, floats, flappers, 
fun.” 

Announced by the brochure are thcise performers: 
Abalone Stompers (fronted by Jake), Av^on Swing, 
Banjo Buddies, Blue Street, Chicago Six, Churchill 
Street, Creole Jazz Kings, Eddie and Sue, Frisco Synco- 
pators with George Probert, Janet Carroll Quartet, 
Midnight Rose, Mike Vax’s Great American, Natural 
Gas, Night Blooming Jazzmen, Pat Yankee and her 
Gentlemen of Jazz, Professor Plum, South Market 
Street, Spirit of *29, Wooden Nickels. 

That Sunday morning will bring forth the traditional 
jazz services. Call the Dixieland Monterey Hotline 
(443-5260) to find out about attendance badges and 
preferred seating plans. 

Outstanding freebie 

An International Jazz Party will be held from 7 until 
11 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 9, in the Hyatt Regency’s 
Monterey Grand Ballroom. The cost to you — zero. 

Featured will be the quintet of Japanese clarinet star 
Eiji Kitamura with special guest Bill Berry. Cometist 
Bill is on the Monterey Jazz Festival staff and leads a Los 
Angeles big band; Eiji has appeared at MJF many times. 

You’ll hear as well the Jackie Coon Quartet with 
flugelhomist Jackie, banjo pro Eddie Erickson, drum¬ 
mer Dottie Dodgion, Bryan McConnell on bass. AH but 
Bryan sing too. i 

The Dobson Family will showcase Smith Dobson 
(piano and vocals), wife Gail (vocals), daughter Sasha 
(vocals), son Smith Jr. (drums), John Shiflett on bass. 

This date is part of a tour put together annually by 
Bill Berry and his wife Bfetty. No-host bar service will be 
available. 

Sellfng tee shirts there will be International Disabled 
Exchange Adventures (IDEA) — a non-profit organi¬ 
zation which provides international cultural exchange 
programs and individual growth opportunities for per¬ 
sons with disabilities. Kitamura has supported IDEA 
via jazz benefits of the past. 

Disc notes 

Composer and superb baritone saxist Gerry Mulligan 
long has been known as a perfectionist. His moods and 
demands have made him some enemies over the de¬ 
cades. 

Of course, tragedy hit Mulligan when the love of his 
life — actress Judy Holliday — was killed by cancer. 
Once upon a time, Zoot Sims capped a session under 
Gerry’s leadership by saying to another musician: “He 
doesn’t have much fun, does he?” 

Lj’m happy to report that the new Mulligan CD — 

’aiso from Telarc — souilds like he had big fun 
cutting it. Here, Gerry celebrates Brazilian jazz in 
tandem with vocalist Jane Duboc of northern Brazil 
(originally) and TV and music award fame over there. 

The two combine advanced technique with pure joy 
and ever-fetching samba rhythms. Gerry’s playing is 
lyrical, sunny, sure. Duboc’s clarity and sound will win 
North American admirers immediately. 

The 11 -track package includes Duboc/Mulligan origi¬ 
nals. One of these — Bordado — is of such rare beauty 
that tears come to the eyes. I’ve been playing it quite a 
bit on my Sunset Jazz show over KRML Radio. 

Among the personnel are such strong Brazilian 
sidcmen as Emanuel Moreira, Rogerio Maio, Leo 
Traversa, Duduka DaFonseca. Fine addition to your 
library. 

Meanwhile, a new label has emerged in Palo Alto — 
Monarch Records. Founded by brothers Stephen and 
l ed Hall, the operation is described as “eclectic” with 
“jazz a major aim.” 



JAZZ VOCALIST Kilty AAargoliS, a great favorite locally, is 
drawing rave reviews with her new album. It's called 
Evolution and it features great tenorman Joe Henderson 
(AAad-Kat CD and cassette). 

The first CD — Dream IValkin* — spodights jazz 
pianist Mark Little. He studied with Bill Evans, and 
does the late master proud. The second presents Guam 
jazz pianist Patrick Palomo on Piti Village. The extraor¬ 
dinary Mary Fettig supports him with sax and flute. 
The Latin/Guam blend is called chamorro music, and 
it’s well worth hearing. 

Concord Records has released the Chromatic Palette 
session of guitar genius Tal Farlow on CD. The LP was 
issued in 1981. With Tommy Flanagan at the piano and 
Gary Mazzaroppi on bass. 

She tried 

The beautiful Frenchwoman made every attempt to 
keep her plaqe open — tasteful jazz, good food, cordial 
help. But Mermaid Bistro on Cannery Row has been 
sold through bankruptcy court to restaurant man John 
Pisto for $325,000. 

Herald columnist Joe Fitzpatrick reported the trans¬ 
action. With some digging, the paper could have told 
the larger story. 

That was where two men — the woman’s husband 
and their business partner — were arrested on charges 
of having stolen millions of dollars from their former 
employer back in France. 

'The last time we chatted, she said the men still were 
in Santa Clara County Jail and prepared to fight 
extradition in federal district court. “It’s very hard,” 
she added, “to do this (restaurant) all by oneself.” 

Also, the Yoshi’s jazz spot in North Oakland has been 
sold to Dreyer’s Ice Cream and will open again else¬ 
where. Probably in Jack London Square, says booker 
Chuck IjaPaglia. 

Short takes 

• Vocalist Pipa Pinon will appear on Friday night, 
Feb, 4, at Kuumbwa Jazz Center of Santa Cruz. Eight 
o’clock kick; $5 per at the door. The band includes 
excellent reedman Gary Regina and two guitarists — 
Bob Burnett, Bill Walker. Pipa has a new Cf) in the 
shops. 

Since the Bob Berg Band cancelled, there will be no 
concert at Kuumbwa on Monday night, Feb. 7. Coming 
up on Feb. 14 — pianist Eliane Elias with drummer 
Peter Erskinc and Marc Johnson on bass. 



/■!< 

m 


WILD MAN OF THE WOODS 


Traditional Native American 
carvings displayed at Silver 

Feather in Carmel Plaza 

\ 

Silver EEA n IER Trading Company is currently exhibit¬ 
ing northwest Indian carvings by Makah artist Ben Della. 
Carving out of ce<Iar with hand tools, Della has become known 
for remaining true to traditional Makah designs. 

His carvings arc derived from the customs and ceremonies of 
his tribe, which is located in the state of Washington at Neah Bay. 
His masks, rattles and drums, including a 25-foot totem pole, 
may be found throughout the country in both private and public 
collections, including the Smithsonian. 

Hie artist will demonstrate his carving process at the store 
Friday through Sunday. A reception will be held from 5 to8 p.m. 
Friday. Theexhibit will continue through Feb. 27. Silver Feather 
is located on the Ocean Street level in Carmel Plaza. 


34 The Carmel Pine Cone/CV Outlook 


February 3, 1994 















Altman’s ‘Short Cuts’ is affecting glimpse at suburban misery 


By CRAIG ARNOH 

KOR BETTER or worse, Robert Altman has devel¬ 
oped into a rowdy American icon. 

His films, from M*A*S*H* and Nashville in the 
1970s to last year’s The Player and newly released 
Short Cuts, all have a drowsy pace and a relatively 
seedy environment. His characters are usually de¬ 
praved or unstable yet always objectively portrayed. 

Altman’s skill lies not in his ability to direct, but to 
observe. 

His camera takes wide angles, allowing the action to 
unfold naturally. Scenes run long, and they often 
contain enough detail and insight to be memorable. 

It is therefore appropriate for Altman to choose to 
ad^t Raymond Carver’s tight, dreary short stories. 
Short Cuts is the director’s unblinking look at suburban 
misery. While frequendy difficult to watch, the film is 
largely an admirable piece of work. 

Study in chaos 

The setting is Southern California, and the film 
begins with helicopters sprang for medflies and ends i 
with a joldng earthquake. Inis set of miniature pieces 
is a metaphor for poorly contained chaos. 

Under the milky brown sky live a ragged assortment 
of people: 

A philandering motorcycle cop (Tim Robbins) is fed 
up with the family dog and decides to dqf>osit it across 
town; three fishermen (Fred Ward, Huey Lewis and 
Buck Henry) discover a naked corpse while camping 
and do nothing about it; a pool cleaner (Chris Penn) 
barely masks his distaste for his wife’s phone sex 
service, which she operates at home in front of the 
children. ^ 

These characters are just a few of the many featured 
in the film. Their stories regularly overlap and parallel, 
but Altman shows a mastery of momentum in his sturdy 
development of a loose and potentially confusing plot. 

The subject matter here is so tersely and acutely 
filmed that the job Altman has done at first appears 
unassailable. But with a closer look, its edges become 
somewhat frayed. ' 

Everyone here is either a scoundrel, a cheat, a loser 
or a victim . There is no middle ground, let alone higher 
ground. It’s as if Altman just wanted to see how far he 
could sink, saying, “I’ll show you disaffection.” 

If that’s true, fine. But then an artihcial light shines 
at the end of the film. These little redemptions are 


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★ ★ ★ 


contrived and insulting. If these characters are so true- 
to-life, would they magically reform? Is this an easy 
way out? i 

It appears that, once again, Hollywood intrudes. 
Most of the acting in Short Cuts is Bne, and some of 
it is excellent. Tom Waits and Lily Tomlin create their 
own perfectly skewed world as a pair of boozy wrecks. 


Bruce Davison is poignantly forceful as the bereaved 
newsman, and Penn is disarming as the bemused pool 
cleaner. 

Other actors stumble, however: Jack Lemmon does 
a melodramatic turn as a delinquent father, and Robert 
Downey, Jr. and Peter Gallagher, as the make-up artist 
and helicopter pilot respectively, ape instead of act. 

Graceful hand 

Altman directs with the same mellow grace he shows 
in his earlier films. He does not leap around and try to 
amaze, preferring to drift and amble, sometime^ speak¬ 
ing with closeups (the anguished face of a mother whose 
son has slipped into a coma). 

If his aim was to create a grim Circus of the Unfor¬ 
tunate, he has succeeded. All told. Short Cuts may be 
Altman’s hnest work, and if nothing else it reaffirms his 
landscape artistry. All that’s missing is a steadfast 
pessimism. 

Forget It ★ Fair ★★ Good ★★★ Excellent ★★★★ 



True story 

STEVEN SPIELBERG'S 'Schindler's List,' a real-life tale of heroism, plays at the Galaxy 6 Cinemas in Monterey. 
Shown here are Liam Neeson (right), as Oskar Schindler, and Ralph Fiennes, as a depraved SS officer. 


What’s 

shakin’ 
around the 
Monterey 
Pe^sula 
this 
week? 



FUN! FOOD! ‘ 
ENTERTAINMENT! 

Don't miss any of 
it...pick up a FREE 
copy every 
Wednesday! 

THE REVIEW 


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r 

Carmel Village Theater 625-1200 

1 

Golden Bough 624-4044 

Dolores & Seventh, Carmel 

Monte Verde & Eighth, Carmel 

TTje Piano 

Philadelphia 

Crossroads Cinema 372-4555 

Lighthouse Cinemas 372-7300 

2 Crossroads Mall, Carmel 

525 Lighthouse, Pacific Grove 

Intersection 

My Father The Hero 

Shadowlands 

I'll Do Anything 


Six Degrees of Separation 


Grumpy Old Men 

The Dream Theater 372-1331 


301 Prescott, New Monterey 


Short Cuts 

State Cinemas 372-4555 

Like Water For Chocolate 

417 Alvarado, Monterey 

The Snapper 

Ace Ventura 

The Summer House 

Cabin Boy 

The Pelican Brief 

- 

Mrs. Doubtfire 

Galaxy Cinemas 655-4617 

280 Del Monte Center, Monterey 

Pet Detective 

Schindler's List 


Iron Will 

Carmel VaUey Cinema 625-9996 

' Blink 

Mid Valley Shopping Center 

Sister Act LI 

Carmel Valley 

: Tombstone 

^ 

Closed j 


February 3, 1994 


The Carmel Pine C one/CV Outlook 3 5 





































School hosts annual art show 


Lower and 


By SCOTT BREARTON ing tempera paint, glitter and natural tures with anti-gravity 

* materials. A Native American myth was themes:‘^'Diey have to 

A. MYRIAD of media has been inte- the inspiration for another first-grade create an illusion of 
grated into an ongoing art show at Rob- art project in which students built weightlessness using 
ert Louis Stevenson Lower and Middle ‘*dr^un-catchers.” the position of wood 

School. These are designed to ‘*catch dreams and choice of colors,” 

During the show, dubbed “Festival that float by,” Moore explained. “Night- Moore said, “under- 
de Arte,” student art work will be exhib- mares become entangled in the web and standing how light 
ited in the school’s art room, dance disappear with the morning sun. Good pls^s on form.” 
studio and main office through Wednes- dreams drift through the center hole to Fifth-graders built 
day, Feb. 16. the sleeper below.” looms and are weaving 

According to Katy Moore, who teaches “Ojos de Dios” or “God’s Eye,” a small rugs using multi¬ 
art at RLS Lower and Middle School, Mexican concept, was the inspiration colored yam. Fifth- 
the exhibit is representative of nearly all for a second-grade project involving yam graders also built and 
the art projects students were assigned and sticks woven in a criss-cross pat- painted masks, 
during the first part of the school year. tern. After studying 

After studying the work of renowned ^Third-graders built masks from plas- Egyptian art history, 
artists Kandinsky and Ghagall, first-, ter of paris on gauze, which was molded sixth-graders built 
second-and third-graders createdpaint- to each student’s face to make a self- three-dimensional 
ings to illustrate their understanding of portrait. The masks were then deco- bas-relief ceramic 
arbitrary color, geometric and rated with brightly-colored acrylic and sculptures - carved 
biomorphic shapes and unusufiJ size re- tempera paints, pennies, feathers, shells replicas of authentic 
lationships. and bits of yam. lEgyptian palettes 

First-graders also created comets us- Fourth-graders designed wood sculp- painted with bright 


EIGHTH-GRADER 
Guenevere Schwien 
painted this acrylic 
work after stretching her 
own canvas. 


Guess , 

"cooking” V 

at The Whaler?! \f|P 
HEINZ FANDERL lMl _l_ 

LUNCH il:30 AM - 2:30 PM 
DINNER FROM 5:00 PM 

Sandwiches in the Bar 
Regular Lunch in the Dining Room 

OPEN FOR DINNER 7 DAYS A WEEK RESERVATIONS ADVISED 

Cocktails from 4:00 pm • Dinner from 5:00 pm 

373-1933 

635 CASS STREET, MONTEREY 


Alfresco Dining 
at its Best... 


Please be seated... 

Indcx)r and outdoor tables (with h^at lamps) 
both offering views of our award-winning gardens, 
beautiful sunsets and glimpses of the ocean 

Happy Hour 4:30- 6:30 pm Monday - Friday 
Sunday Brunch 8:00 am - 2:00 pm 


Casual attire always 
welcome. 


NOON, WEDNESDAY, 
FEBRUARY 9TH 
with the Cliiiiese Lion Dance at 


Reservations 624-4010 


olden Buddha 


Eighth & Camino Real 
in the La Playa Hotel 
Carmel-by-the-Sca 


HUNAN SZECHUAN RESTAURANT 

Banquet Room Available 

Lunch 11:30 - 2:30 • Dinner 4:30 - 10 • Sat & Sun. 12 Noon - 10pm 

3678 The Barnyard • Carmel • (408) 625-1668 


36 The Carmel Pine Cone/CV Outlook 


February 3, 1994 



L i> 

r*-ff-r" 

: ^ tJw 




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_ t 

Don Juan: Witty debate, self-discovery amidst fire and brimstone 


ByAAAnHEW FRIDAY 


eerie half-light of an underground cavern, 

unbiei 


Inthe 

a setting reminiscent of the gaslight am'Lience of a late 
19th centu^ Victorian parlor, the four principals 
from Staff Players Repertory foil and bluff, brood, 
snarl and roar through a richly dramatic reading of 
George Bernard Shawls Donjucui in Hell at the Indoor 
Forest Tlieater in Carmel. 

If the larger play, Afon andSuperman^ of which Don 
Juan in Hell is a part, offers a farcical commentary on 


Don Juan in Hell 

through Feb. 12 
8 p.m. Fridays, Saturdays 
2:30 p.m. Sunday 
Reservations: 625-1531 


the masks, manners and romantic rituals of the age*s 
gentry, then the latter strips those characters of their 
hypocrisy, pretension and deceits. Here, each plotting, 
shuttered soul wallows in the polite collusions and 
secrets of the motivations that have defined them, and 
each divulges their dependence on those traditions or 
institutions that have held them (like many of us) 
tenuously in place. 

” t , 

Fine direction 

Director Marcia Hovick has done a fine job of 
bringing out the dreamlike qualities inherent to the 
piece. From raised stools and four podiums placed 
mid-stage in a shallow liiQestone cave, sinuously pink 
and haunting charcoal-gray, the four seasoned play¬ 
ers, including Hovick herself as Dona Ana, bring 
Shaw’s complexities to life. 

While seated at their podium, each costumed actor 
is enmeshed in the interchange of sometimes passion¬ 
ate argument. Timing and intonation, always impor¬ 
tant, overcome the potential awkwardness and limita¬ 
tions of reading from a text, and the audience’s imagi¬ 
nation is led through the demands of Shaw’s script. 

Played by Keith Decker, the wry Don Juan delivers 
acerbic recriminations, ironic self-appraisals and 
smashing polemics on almost everything. Law, poli¬ 
tics, religion, marriage, family, instinct and morality, 
among'other subjects, are explored in his unflinching 
determination to uncover the truth in seething human- 
ity. 

Decker deftly captures Don Juan’s poses and nu¬ 
ances, and brings a definitive edge to Shaw’s concepts. 
At first, one wants him to show more warmth; how¬ 
ever, this would probably be artfulness on the part of 
Don Juan, who is singularly anti-romantic and ruth¬ 
lessly critical. 


_ 

• • • • • • V 



3770 The Barnyard 
Carmel • 626-5454 


/■ ■ 1184 Forest, near Prescott 
Pacific Grove • 373-5656 


Sun. Thur.11 am-9 pm • Fri. & Sat 11 am-10 pm • Closed Tues. 


DOWNTOWN STUDIOS & SUITES ON NOB HILL 

975 Bush, San Francisco, CA 94109 

MAYFLOWER HOTEL 

DAILY • WEEKLY • MONTHLY 

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(415) 673-7010 

FAX (415) 673-9590 

• 2 BLOCKS TO CABLE CARS 

• 4 BLOCKS TO UNION SQUARE — 

• CLOSE TO CHINATOWN & FINANCIAL DISTRICT 


Decker provides him with a little more charity in Act 
II, as Don Juan stn^les with the insights of will, 
desire and purposoTHe is a sorely bruised soul, a 
'^philosopher in the grip of the Life Force [and, there¬ 
fore] nature’s pilot.” An advocate who accuses the 
devil of ‘‘diverting the attention of men firom their real 
purposes... to drift with you in your want of will,” Don 
Juan is more cynical than tfie devil himself in the 
debate that continues. 

Kamer Benjamin’s Satan is a wonderfully droll and 
resonant version of the “Prince of Darkness . a 
gentleman, as everyone knows.” Handsome, occasion¬ 
ally modest, and ^ways self-assured, this is a devil 
that doesn’t need to be convinced of anything; he is 
already much on humanity’s side, and sensitively 
respects our need for company. 

He is also a goad, blowhard and thespian, a senti¬ 
mental if aging satyr — legs folded coquettishly, one 
foot caught in the crook of a bent leg cocked on a rung 
of the stool beneath him, gesturing warmly to the 
world as his witness. 

Theidevil stimulates and focuses the competitive 
dynamic through each individual’s discovery of the 
rewards or limitations of heaven and hell. One can 
leave either any time, a concept that both confuses and 
delights the newly arrived, religiously proper Dona 
An&. She is much surprised to find herself in hell and 
“[unable] to believe a kufy would be here!” 

When Dona Ana first appears on the stage, her face 
hidden by a dark veil, we perceive a peevish and 
wandering crone recendy arrived in hell. Marcia Hovick 
portrays her with screeching bewilderment, then 
guarded, aloof discomfort, and finsJly with mincing 
dignity. * 

Hovick’s Dona Ana is wily but never brazen, soon 
noting in the discussions on love, beauty, the heart and 
spirituality that “there is plenty of humbug in hell. 
Indeed, there is hardly anything else!” Yet the com¬ 
plete ruination of her values threatens with the ap¬ 
pearance of her father, the very symbol of honor and 
propriety. 

Played with a sense of everyman’s bounty and good 
humor, Steve Harris gives us the Commandatore, 


Experience 
Good Taste 




THE 


The Covey is the signature restaurant at 
Quail Lodge Resort and golf Club. The 
Resort has been the recipient of the 
coveted Mobile Travel Guide's 5-Star 
Award for 17 years. Set in a tranquil 
country environment, the restaurant 
features views of a sparkling lake, 
fountains, lush gardens and greens. Their 
extensive wine list, a consistent 
winner of The Wine Spectator's 
Award of Excellence, emphasizes 
California and Monterey County 
wines and offers an impressive 
selection of rare vinuges. Executive 
Chef Robert Williamson is known 
for his culinary diversity in 
graciously accommodating sp>ecial menu 
requests. In a community of resuurant 
legends. The Covey reigns supreme. Come 
to where the "stars" are. 

Located at Quail Lodge just 3 5 miles 
from Hwy. 1 on Carmel Valley Road. 
Cockuils from 5pm, dinner every evening 
from 6:30 pm. Reservations and jackets 
requested. (408)624-1581 


COVEY 


at QUAIL LODGE 


Dona Ana’s father, as a man unafraid of what plea^ 
him. Harris doesn’t have as many lines as the Devil or 
Don Juan, but makes great use of those he has through 
levity and plainspoken accessibility. 

A deeply satisfying production of a play that en- 

S rages an audience wiu thought-provoking content 
ong after the show’s end, Don Juan in Hell will be at 
the Indoor Forest Theater through Feb. 12. 


'Answer to last week's Crossword Pussle 


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li 



v-g:-:: 


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Santa Cruz County 
residents all of our 
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warmth, all of our 
soothing hot baths, and 
all of the spectacular 
Big Sur - all for half the 
usual roomrates. 

Come for one impetuous 
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H I (. 


s I W 


... 


February 3, 1994 


The CarrDel Pirie C one/CV Outlook 3 7 
























X 


Carmel Art Walk 


^HIS YEAR'S fint Cuinei Art 
Walk will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. 
this Friday to coincide with the AT & 
T Pro-Am Celebrity Coif Tournament. 
Hie Art Walk offers visitors the 
opportunity to attend numerous 
demonstrations and Kiecial events at 
galleries throu^out downtown 
Carmel. Tbe vulage boasts 70 art 
galleries and studios featuring diverse 
woik, from the traditional to the 
avant-garde. Below is a schedule of 
the special events planned as of press 
time. Further information is available 
by calling the Carmel Business Asso¬ 
ciation at 624-2522. 

i 

BENNETT SCULPTURE GALLERY 
6 to 9 p.m. 

Wicr Amiture 

San Carlos between 5th & 6th 
626-0470 

BLEICH GALLERY 
6 to 8 p.m. 

Oil painting demonstration by artist 
George Bleich 

Dolores between Ocean & 7th 
372-2717 I 

CARMEL LEATHERSMITH 
6 to 9 p.m. 

Leather carving demonstration by 
David Manchel 

San Carios between Ocean & 7th 

Carmel Square 

626-6555 


THE COLLECTION OF ANN 
CUNNINGHAM 
6 to 8 p.m. 

Watercolor 

Dolores between 5th & 6th 
Su Vedno Court 
622-9323 

DODCE/LaRUE GALLERY 
6 to 9 p.m. 

Oil painting by artist Jim Kelly 
Dolores be^een 5th & 6th 
625-5636 

FINE WOODWORKING OF 
CARMEL 
6 to 9 p.m. 

Video on the art of wood turning by 
Kari Pohl 

San Carlos between 5th & 6th 

The Mall 

622-WOOD 

FRIENDS OF THE ARTS 
6 to 9 p.m. 

Award-winning still life and floral 
artist St^hen Wood, Van Waldron 
6th between San Carlos & Dolores 

624-1305 

HIGHLANDS SCULPTURE 
GALLERY 

6:30 to 8:30 p.m. ^ 

Welded bronze sculpture demonstra¬ 
tion by Frank Sunseri 
Dolores between 5th & 6th 

624-0535 


r 


Artist Crispo will donate to Chiapas 
proceeds from sale of print edition 



Carmel artist Dick cnsi 

, to Latin America for the 
partment,' will be'donating a print 
edition based on numerous trips to 
Mexico, particularly San Cristobal 
de Las Casas. 

Funds raised from the sale of the 
prints will pay for medical supplies 
for the Chiapas. 

The print depicts a scene from a 
festival that Crispo attended in 1974 


at Tenejapa, one of the places 
bombed by the Mexican govern¬ 
ment in response to the recent up¬ 
rising by the Chiapas. 

The prints will be on sale during 
the opening of Crispo's show of new 
works at the Carmel Art Associa¬ 
tion. 

The opening will be held from 6 
to 8 p.m. on Saturday. The associa¬ 
tion is located on Dolores between 
Fifth and Sixth in Carmel. 


Speak out! Share your thoughts and ideas in a letter 
to the editor, 250-word limit, please. 



LISA’S STUDIO 

Equestrian painting by artist Lisa 

Bryan 

Missicm between Ocean A 7th 
Court of the Fountains. 

626-5435 

LUDWA STUDIO 
6 to 9 p.m. 

Siberisui oil painter Albino Tsibikova 
(firom Buryat Republic on Lake 
Baikal) 

Mission between 5th A 6th 

The Mall 

625-3135 

LYNN LUPETTI GALLERY 
6 to 9 p.m. 

Oil portrait sketch from life 
6th between Dolores A Lincoln 

624- 0622/626-0418 

ROBERTO LUPETTI GALLERY 
6 to 9 p.rti. 

Oil painting by artist Roberto Lupetti 
Ocean between San Carlos A Dolores 

625- 4151 

MALCOLM MORAN STUDIOS 
6:30 to 7:30 p.m. 

Wax model ' 

Mission between 5th A 6th 

626- 3300 

MARY TITUS GALLERY 
6:30 to 7:30 p.m. 

Watercolor painting demonstration by 
artist Mary Titus 
Barnyard Shopping Center 

626-8628 


NEW MASTERS GALLERY 

6 to 9 p.m. 

Video demonstration by Will Bullas, 
Cordon Mortensen and Dorothy 
Spangler 

Dolores between Ocean A 7th 

625- 1511 

I 

SKALAGARD’S SQUARE-RIGGER 
ART GALLERY 
7:30 to 8:30 p.m. 

Nautical oil painting demonstration by 
artist Hans Skalagard 
Dolores between 5th A 6th 
624-5979 

SMITH/COSBY GALLERY 

7 to 8 p.m. 

Oil paintings by artist John Cosby 
San Carios between Ocean A 7th 

626- 6563 

I 

SYBILL/DAWSON 
7 to 8 p.m. 

Sculpture demonstration by artist 

Richard MacDonald 

San Carlos between 5th A 6th 

THOMAS KINKADE GALLERY 

5 to 8 p.m. 

Luminosity display 

Ocean between Dolores A Lincoln 
626-1927 

TRAILSIDE AMERICANA 

6 to 8 p.m. 

Lincoln A 6th 
Painting demonstration 
624-5071 


Trailside Americana will auction 
pairhting to benefit quake victims 

* -i " 

Trailside AMERICANA 

Fine Art Galleries and artist 
Maurice Harvey will donate all 
proceeds from the sale of one of 
the artist’s paintings to assist 
victims of the recent earth¬ 
quake in southern California. 

Harvey and his wife Julie 
lived in the San Fernando Val¬ 
ley for 15 years. According to 
gdlery director Rob Pitzer, the 
Harveys “are indeed grateful 
to be living on the Monterey 
Peninsula now, but have not 
forgotten their fellow Califor¬ 
nians to the south and wish to 
make their contribution to the 
overwhelming need for aid in 
this major disaster.” 

The painting to be offered is 
titled, “Big Sur Spring,” and is 
valued at $2,750. The work 
will be auctioned off at Trailside 
Americana by silent bid over 
the next two weeks. 

The artist has requested a 
minimum starting bid of $750. 

The highest bid beyond this 

amount will purchase the painting. Pay- The painting is currently on display 
ment will be made directly to the Ameri- at the gallery, which is located on the 
can Red Cross. comer of Sixth A Lincoln in Carmel. 

Carmel Gallery Alliance organizes 
month-long earthquake.relief project 



'BIG SUR SPRING' 


IVIeMBERS of the Carmel Gallery 
Alliance, a standing committee of the 
Carmel Business Association, will par¬ 
ticipate in a joint effort to raise funds for 
the relief of victims of the recent earth¬ 
quake. 

Works of art in supporting galleries 
will be designated to be sold by silent 
auction throughout the month. 

A percentage of the sale price of each 
piece will go to a quake relief group 


decided by the winning bidder and the 
contributing gallery. 

The relief project was initiated by 
gallery owner CeoWe J. Bleich, who is 
chairperson of the Ara Spirit Committee 
of the alliance. 

Bleich comments, “The beauty of this 
area is matched by the beauty and com¬ 
passion of the people who live and work 
here. I am proud to be part of an art 
community that cares and shares.” 


The Carmel Pine Cone/CV Outlook 


February 3, 1994 






V 



BLIND CURVE 


A 


Scottish storyteller and harpist will 
entertain on Saturday at Art Center 


Robin Williamson wiii 

weave stories and harp music in a 
concert beginning at 8 p.m. on Sat¬ 
urday at the Pacihc Grove Art Cen¬ 
ter. 

Williamson, who was born in 
Edinburgh, plays more than 30 in¬ 
struments. He is an accomplished 
poet, author, composer, actor, story¬ 
teller, lecturer and teacher. 

The San Diego Tribune described 
Williamson as ‘^the consummate 
performer, at once captivating in 


his artistry, delightful in his wit and 
his easygoing stage manner.” 

The performer’s recent albums 
have included WuUer*$ Turnings an 
unusual selection of secular music 
> for the festive season by Vivaldi, 
Shakespeare, and Hmry Vlll; and 
Songs for Children of All Ages, a 
selection of traditional wonder songs 
in the vein of Blake and Carroll. 

Tickets to the concert cost $10 
and may be reserved by calling 373- 
7379. 


Local rock band Blind Curve to 
make live debut at Planet Gemini 


Local band Blind Curve takes 
the stage at 9 p.m. Tuesday at Planet 
Gemini for its live debut. The band 
consists of Thierry Crocquet on drums, 
Deven Finnie on guitar and vocals. Brad 
Mallory on guitar and vocals, and Fran 
Vanatta on bass guitar. 


The musicians have been playing to¬ 
gether for almost a year and have most 
recently produced a ts^ of six original 
songs. Finnie and MsJlory, who have 
been playing together for three years, 
write all the band’s original music. 

Admission to Tuesday’s jam is $3. 


Streicher Trio will perform for Mozart Society 

The MOZART Society will feature The group will also perform a Haydn 
the Streicher Trio in a concert at 8 p.m. Trio in G Major. Fortepianist Charlene 
Friday at the Church of Religious Sci- Brendler, violinist Carla Moore and cel- 
ence. The church is located at the comer list Sarah Freiberg will perform, 
of Pacific and Franklin Streets in Tickets for this performance are $10 
Monterey. per person. Seating is limited and pa- 

The pro^am, played on original in- trons should arrive early for the best 
struments, includes Mozart’s Trio in C places. The program will begin promptly 
major K. 548 and his Trio in G K. 564. at 8 p.m. j 


Entrepreneurs pursue artistic vision 


RECORDING from page 29 

corded and mastered it, and then we 
took care of the rest. In two weeks we 
were able to turn around a fully pack¬ 
aged product.” 

Their other recent release is entitled 
Best of *93, a sampler cassette featuring 
13 full-length selections from seven of 
the 16 albums that Monterey Recording 
represents. It is a taste of the incredibly 
fine musicianship this area has to offer. 

This is a scary time for small busi¬ 
nesses. More are folding than begin¬ 
ning, more are downsizing than ex¬ 
panding. In this climate, it is exciting to 
see people pursue their vision, espe¬ 
cially in the arts. 

A current catalogue ior Monterey 
Recording Artists may be obtained by 
calling 373-8462. 



COLIN PARISH is one of the growin 
number of local musicians represente 
by the newly formed AAonterey Record¬ 
ing Artists. 


A FOOD LOVER’S GUIDE TO C A R M E L - B Y - T H E - S E A RESTAURANTS 


HOMESTYLE 



Mission btwn. 5th & 6th 
Carmel • 624-1922 


c 6 n t i »1 ^ N T A 1 


‘hxm 

i&l 

R* tt a m r a m t 


Court ^the Fountains 
fission Dtwn. Ocean A 7t 
Carmel • 624-2406 


BREAKFAST 

"A CarmelBreakfast 
Tradition" 

‘Piaae 


Mission St. btwn. 
5th & 6th • Carmel 
624-0199 


CALIFORNIAN 
^I rSi v^ 



Wed. • Saik Noon - 1 njn. 
5tK 8l Junipero • Carmel 

3 624-2233 


F R E N C H 



LUNCH 11 AM • 3 PM WEEKDAYS 
SAT. • SUN. 11 AM-4 PM 
DINNER 6:00 • 9:30 PM 

Ocean Ave. btwn. Lincoln 
& Monte Verde • 625-4331 


1. CARMEL CAFE ...Let us be your home-away- 
from home in Carmel. Fami^ owned & operated. 
Open dalyforbieeMa5t&lunch 7:00amto3XX)pm 
Heavenly home cookkigl 

2. AhfTON&MCHEL... Superb oontinertal 
cuisine, attentive service, and an elegant setting 
enhanced by outdoa fountains and gardens. 
Open daily for lunch 1130-3 and dinner 5:30-9. 

3. KAT\rS PLAC&..lndoorfoufooor seating. 
Breakfast al day. Home style meals.Warm, oozy 
atmrKinhoro luTich spedafoOpen 7:00 
am. daily. BreaKfost & lundi served al day. 

GENERAL STORE..Casual mstic atmosphere, 
irxfoor arxJ outdoor dining with fireplaces and 
heaters. Ful bar, moderatly priced extensive 
menu, daly specials, fresh pastas, burgers 
and super salads! 

5. OCZOfCtTIAFLRxmetVtheCaddyshariLC^ 
(under same ownershp). krtrnate dring at Is best 
Raasoriabfo prices in aquaint atTTxsphere. Pasta, 
fresh seafood, chickan & staaks, plus spedalies. 

Ratio seating. Beer & wina Open 11 am - 930 pm 
Tues.-Sua MC,Visa 


Some of the Best 
Dining in 

tarmel-by-the-Sea 



Tl 


SANCAKlOft 



9 

D □ 

9 





i| 

2 

B 

$ 

• 


□ 


. 


7. LE COQ D’OR ...Delightful European country 
cooking in an intanate atmosphere. 

Reservatbns recommended. Dinner served 
nightly from 5:00 to 930. Beer & wine. 

9. CLAM BOX...Family operated & run since 
1961. Restaurart & cocktail lounge. Fresh 
seafood & chicken, pot roast, ham, children's 
menu. Outside dining. Full bar. Open 4:30-9:00 
p.m. Lounge open 4-10 p.m. daily. Closed Mon. 

1 0. IL BUCO RISTDRANTE JWvays casud, but 
warm & romantic. Northern Dalian country style 
cu isine - "dishes my own grandmother taught 
me to make". Dinner Tues. - Sun. 5-10 pm. 

Dine indoors or alfresco on our heated patb. 


lUNirtno 




EUROPEAN 



A European Country Restaurant 

__ E/S Mission St btwn, 

H 4th & 5m • 626-9319 



SEAFOOD 




CARMEL 

local wines • FULL BAR 
OUTSIDE DINING 

Mission btwn, 5m & 6m 
Carmel . 624-8597 



W 


Son Carlos btwn. Ocean & 
7m • Carmel • 624-5367 


Febtjjory 3 1994 


The Carmel Pine Cone/CV Outlook 39 














Social 

Spotlight 


By SUSAN CANTf ILL 


1 HE SUN is about to take a dunk at my right. 
Maggie Eastwood's driftwood estate is at my left. I sit, 
with^my little portable computer, in my car, having 
escaped the crowded media tent. Some people like to 
fraternize with their peers. 1 prefer seals and whales. 

It's the first day of the AT&T and 1 have arrived - 
a singular nerd squad - on my blue bike with my 
helmet with a mirror on the side. 

Hey, it beats walking a mile. 

My Hrst encounter with stardom is in the pro shop 
where 1 have followed Craig T. Nelson (“Coach”). “I'm 
doing fine,” he says. “I've had a fine day. I didn't die.” 
A deep answer to the thought-provoking question, 
“How did you do today?” 

A nerdy question, 1 admit... but what can you say in 
the face of this awe-inspiring hunk? 

Anyway, more star dust next week when 1 write 
about the AT&T Volunteer Night... 


KATEE LEACH, cochair of the Junior League of AAonterey 
County's cookbook committee, worked with Suzanne 

Case, chair of recipe lasting, to produce the gastronomi- photos/chus huise 

cal three-star book "Feast ol Eden." Their waists don't JAMIE KAUFAAAN, junior league president, and Jann 
look like they suffered from the tasting of some 900 AAoreland, cochair for the cookbook project, will be 
entrants. marketina the book this year. 


marketing the book this year 


I'll never forget her: reddish hair twisted into a French ^ 

roll; colorful, artistically-arranged clothing; a ruler in 

her hand, to make a point. She was ancient. Probably H ' 

in her late forties. V 

She told my mom 1 had great promise as an artist. ^ 

But like most people who are agitated by the creative ^ 

force-we just want to express ourselves. Any medium LYNN CLEMENTS, marketing chair, tal 
will do, . ^ Doherty, book committee cochair, beside 

Painting worked fm* many years. 1 did oils and soars above the Pacific at the gorgeous 
switched to acrylk^ when I foumd out how fast they 
dry. I was always the “When Will it be done?" type. 

Mom confiscated all my best paintings. I was pro¬ 
lific in high school. I had to mortgage my soul to get one 
back from her. It hangs over my piano. The piano from 
which I took lessons until age 13, when I discovered 
boys and didn't like breaking my long nails on the 
keys. 

A passion for poetry actually preceded this. My first 
poem, at age seven, read, “Roses are red, violets are 
blue. I like p-nut butter. Can you swim?” 

I've always been self-centered.’ 

So I re-discovered poetry after finding no career in 
my college major- anthropology. And that led to a love 
of journalism which has supplanted my need to paint. 

However, my appreciation for art is omnipresent. 

Thus, I thoroughly enjoyed the GuestLife Invitational 
Masters of Fine Art gathering at the Hyatt Regency 
Monterey last week. 

Practically everyone I know was there. And I was 
delighted to talk with nationsJly celebrated- Lilliana 
Braico. Her breezy, brilliant pmntings adorn the walls 
of many Carmel establishments as well as her little 
walk up studio beside The Pine Inn. 

“Lillian” (to me) and I have a special connection. 

She was best friends with my family as I grew up and 
recounted a time when I was put in a playpen with her 
son, Chris Bava. 1 hadn't seen Chris since age 
there he was. Hsundsome, mustachioed, acclaimed 
photogrwher. And beside him, his acclaimed sculptor 
brother, Mark, a clone for Harrison Ford. They for¬ 
gave my gorky remarks about childhood and how 
awesome it always was to go to their house, especially 
at Christmas. Lilliana's house was lavishly carpeted in 
white, a perfect backdrop for her gigantic abstract 
paintings. And at Christmas there weis a two-story tree 
' with thousands of uniformly decorated presents. 

I told her how, as a child, I wished to emulate her 
right down to her perfume. She has such understated 
class. 

Her painting of Maria Muldaur, a personal friend, 
was a focal point at the display. Beside it weis one with 
a $28,000 price tag on it. I nearly swooned. 

I like Eutists. I've always sought them out. And one 
of my favorite things to do, when I remember it, is to 
kick around Csumel's many gfiilleries - especially the Olympics 
Carmel Art Association. With tl 

Back to the sutisticfiJIy engineered pEuty. It was when I cl 
artisticsJly engineered with a huge ice sculpture that Rocky Po 
dripped behind a splendid display of finger foods. And two-story 

40 The Carmel Pine Cone/CV Outlook 


DIDIER DUTERTRE, of Casanova, stirs the bouillabaisse 
pot with some help from leaguer AAaria Anderson and his 


THE LODGE at Pebble Beach's Beat Giger serves his 
elegant scallops to Charlie Keeley. 


Jonathan Lee, my favorite modem day piEuiist, played was a whale-shaped pool. The only thing that re¬ 
tunes from his dozens of recorded titles. strEuned me was glEiss on the second floor and the fact 

Three Ansel AdEums photographs hung on the weJIs, that the pool wels unheated (I'd tested it with my 
including “Monolith, the Face of Half-Moon,” for a finger). 

14-Emd cool $12,000. And I marvelled at Lynn Lupetti's Theoccasionwasthechristeningof“FesistofEden,” 
magical “Lords of the Moon,” with fsury tale figures a cookbook composed by members of the Junior 
pouring out of the moon Eund into a sleeping boy’s League of Monterey County. And hundreds of guests 
room. threaded their way amongst food stations hosted by 

I left, vowing to start pEunting again... some of the Peninsula's finest restaurEuits. 

Martha (BEuton) Doherty, event co-chEur with Katee 
Leach, is a fine cook, according to her mother. She 
edited and wrote for the book. Her mom told me when 
Whales and such... they bought the '60s style house 15 years ago it had a 

OK. I confess. I swim Eiround. I’ve been doing it for green ceiling and velvet flocked wallpaper. What a 
20 yeEU-s. I cEui’t stop. The different sizes, shapes, trEmsformation to this soaring wood, stone and white 
views, temperatures (as long as they’re Eibove 80), carpeted estate. The exotic wood kitchen counter 
colors of pools are so inveigling. I’ve tried to quit but curved down the entire length of the kitchen where 

leELgue members were prepsunng tasty samples from 
during a trip their book. 

laps for about Alan and Lisa Richmond and 1, along with Nancy 
ng querulous and Jim Hixon and Ross and Laura Finney, stood 
icing for the spellbound watching the sun dissolve into the ocean 
►. while whales spout^ just offshore, 

y compulsion Committee chair Lynn Clements came by and said 
the beautiful they sorted through 900 submitted recipes to find the 


See SPOTLIGirrpage41 


February 3, 1994 































/ 


/ 










FULL BAR OPEN 7 DAYS 
Sunday Brunch Lunch Dinner 

408/372-3456 

223 17fh Street Pacific Grove 


MICHAEL JONES, of A Moveable Feast, impessed a large crowd with his demonstration showing how to prepare 
an apricot souffle. The scxjffles were served with generous portions of homemade ice cream. 


{air is the halo of the mind.'' Hair Cutting By Appt. 625-1888 


served in the casual warmth 
of a Mediterranean setting. 


i 

RICK ENOS, new ccKDwner of Compadres Old Adobe 
Grill, provided some technical assistance too Hawaiian 
priest during the blessing of his new Monterey restaurant. 


PHOTOS/COLE THOMPSON 

THE REVEREND Abraham Akaka, a Hawaiian priest, 
blessed Compadres Old Adobe Grill at a private 
ceremony last Saturday. Rick Enos, new co-owner of 
Compadres, is seen in the background. 


THINGS TO THINK ABOUT 

from Les the Barber of Carmel 


The secret of life.... 
is to enjoy what we have 
while we have it. 


CUISINES OF THE SUN... 
PASTAS PAELLA COUSCOUS 


MESQUITE GRILLED... 

RACK OF LAMB, FRESH SEAFOOD, STEAK 
DECADENT DESSERTS 


99 , 


Pops Panda says 
Don’t get trapped with 
the wrong mattress.'^ 


MoMie Rex 










FACTORY DIRECT., 
where the price is 
right to begin with! 


26362 Carmel Flancho Ln., Carmel • 625-9911 • 701 Redwood Ave., Sand City 


Social Spotlight 


SPOTLIGHT h-om page 40 

perfect 200 for the book. She admitted members 
gained some weight taste testing too. 

As for proceeds from the book sales, she said half 
will go towards a new league project. “We want to start 
a children's hands-on museum," she said. ^ 

According to Renata Seme, there with her husband, 
Ron, the league has changed its image. “It's no longer 
a white gloves and pearls image," she said. It's more a 
roll up your sleeves and pitch in to better our commu¬ 
nity, such as gardening at the Whaling Station, as she 
has done. 

It had been a spellbinding drive along the coast that 
day with balmy breezes and an ocean horizon as sharp 
as a razor^s edge. Whale's spewing steam, yellow 
mustard cropping up between the artichokes on the 
Odello ranch. I had stopped at Pt. Lobos for a hike and 
changed into my soiree duds at a Crossroads bath¬ 
room. 

While there, 1 spied two artists, Tom Davies and 
Missy Lofton, who were painting out on pelican rock. 
Their renditions of the azure blue cove and cliff sides 
were reminiscent of Cezanne, with bold primary colors 
and intense sunlight. 

...Art and water and whales and pools... I drove 
home grateful for my life and for making a living 
writing about events that raise money for this “Feast 
of Eden" place we live in. 

^ ^ ^ 

Gourmet Gala postponed... 

In case you missed the notices, the Gourmet Gala, 
scheduled for last Saturday night, was postponed. 

Barbara Buss, director of development for the South 
Bay Chapter of the March of Dimes, said this: “March 
of Dimes listens to the community and they felt it 
should be every other year, to bring all our resources 
together to create a spectacular event." 

As we know, the M of D has fallen on hard times, like 
most non-profit agencies. A year ago they closed their 
Monterey office. However, it was but an arm of the 
regional office in San Jose which is alive and well. 

Also, with major celebrities asking astronomical 
prices to appear, the gala is hard pressed to top former 
guest appearances by the likes of Brooke Shields, Tab 
Hunter, James Brolin, etc., etc., to appear. 

But, as Buss said, we have so many of our own local 
“stars" who do suit up and show up for the event, that 
there is no reason the gala can’t continue to be gala¬ 
ctic! Certainly, Ruth Bussy and Joanne Worley are 
impressive. * 

What the M of D is doing, for sure, is hosting a teaser 
this fall. 

A kind of kick-off for the ’95 Gourmet Gala. 

More about this later... 


February 3, 1994 


The Carmel Pir*e Cor»e/CV Outlook 4 1 

































Taste Buds 


Calendar 


By scon BREARTON 


LE COO D’OR 


Ws like an evening out in Europe 


Tucked away on the east side 

Missiop Street between Fourth and 
Fifth Avenue lies one of the best-kept 
secrets in Carmel. 

When my companion and I ap¬ 
proached the entrance of Le Coq D'Or, 
we had no idea we were about to 
partake of one of the Hnest meaJs we 
nad ever experienced. The building’s 
simple exterior belies the wonders 
inside. 

We knew this Europeaui country 
restaurant was different when we were 
greeted outside the door by the pro¬ 
prietor, Annelore Parsons. When 
seated, we immediately noticed the 
Europeam hospitality, a distinct sen¬ 
sation of being invited into someone’s 
home. 

Our waitress spoke with a wonder¬ 
ful German accent, adding to the cozy 
ambiauice of this small dining room. 
Wamm peach tones helped highlight 
the warmth of a close, intimate dining 
experience. 

f We started with a glass of white 
wine to go with the wonderful toasted 
herb and gairlic-topped croutons with 
a delectable chicken liver pate. 
Annelore informed us that the aJ- 
ready extensive wine list wais only 
pairtiad, that her complete selection of 
fine domestic and imported Euro¬ 
pean! wines was being compiled, yet to 
be printed. 

White wines include such labels ats 
Miraisspu, Estancia, Chateau St. Jeam 
I lemd William Hill. For red wine lovers, 
'Annelore recommends George 
Duboeuf Chateau Neuf du Pape, a 
Hne French selection. 

''We also have a good selection of 
CaJifomiaMerlots and Chaurdonnays,” 
she added. 

Long history in Carmel 

Annelore informed us that Le Coq 
D’Or had a long history in Carmel, 
dating back to the 1960s when a 
Swiss couple operated it. She amd her 
30-year-old daughter, Lorie, the chef, 
aure excited about having brought the 
restaurant back to Carmel, making it 
even better than before. 

Spending long hours training in 
Europe, Chef Lorie knows that work 
caul pay off. 

“Lorie had always been interested 
in the culinau^ arts, being that she 
grew up in the restaurant business 
with me,” Annelore saud. Opting for a 
full three-yeau- apprenticeship rather 
than spending just one year training 
in a German restaurant, Lorie spent 
one and a half years in DusseldoiT (in 
the Rhineland) and two years in 
Garmisch-Partenkirchen, in upper 
Bavaria neau* Munich. She started at 
the bottom, scrubbing pots and pans. 


When aisked to characterize the 
menu, Annelore responded, “Euro¬ 
pean! country cuisine, a mix of French, 
German and ItaJian.” 

Our mimosa salads came next; a 
simple mix of butter lettuce topped 
with crumbled egg, parsley and firesh 
ground black pepper on a chilled plate. 
The house vinaugrette boasts a hint of 
Dijon mustard, one of many extra 
touches that makes Le Coq D’Or stand 
out aunong the rest. 

Though not rushed, shortly adter 
we set our salad forks down, two 
steauning entrees were headed in our 
direction. We noticed the attention to 
detail in presentation — clean, hot 
plates gaunished with a sprig of fresh 
dill amd lemon wedge.-The service' 
wais friendly and personal. 

Mine, Sealless ‘*LeCoq D’Or,” sau¬ 
teed in a tangy lemon and Chablis 
sauce amd nestl^ in a light puff pastry, 
was enough to make even the most 
criticad seafood .connoisseur shiver 
with delight. 

Likewise, the Chicken Cordon Bleu 
was more than my companion could 
finish. Breast of chicken stuffed with 
Gruyere cheese and Black Forest Ham, 
breaded and sauteed with a buerre 
blame, gave a whole new meaning to 
the word rich. 

'Other popular entrees at Le Coq 
D’Or include scaunpi, filet of] beef, 
broiled pork tenderloin amd Kase 
Spaetzle, a German paista with melted 
cheese amd resisted onions. The sauces 
make the difference. 

Oh, and let us not forget the 
Pommes Au Gratin, served piping hot 
in a casserole dish, one of Lorie’s 
specialties. These were the most 
creamy, cheesy and delectable scad- 
loped potatoes I’ve ever encountered, 
and yes, aure included in the price of 
the entree. 

Annelore boaists of the restaurant’s 
new "Alsation Onion Tart”—"we’re 
the only restauramt in town with our 


own. 


Though we had no room for des¬ 
sert, the selection was sinful. Home¬ 
made cheesecake, lemon bars with 
vanilla ice cream and chocolate 
mousse are but a few of the choices. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Le Coq D*Or is located on the east 
side of Mission Street between Fourth 
and Fifth avenues in downtown 
CarmeL Lunches are served Tuesday 
through Saturday beginning at 11:30 
a.m. Dinner is served nightly starting 
at 5:30. 

Reservations are appreciated, and 
can be obtained by calling Le Coq 
D’or at 626-9319. 



Thursday/3 

La Mirada tours: The tours are Thurs¬ 
day though Sunday, 720 Via Mirada, 
Monterey, 2 amd 3 p.m., Monterey Penin¬ 
sula Museum of Art members free, $5 
general, $3 full-time students, military, 
under 12 free, first Sunday of month free. 
Phoae 372-3689. 

La Mirada galleries tour: The tours 
are Saturday and Sundays, 720 Via 
Mirada, Monterey, 1 p.m., Monterey Pen¬ 
insula Museum of Art members free, $5 
general, $3 full-time students, militauy, 
under 12 free, first Sunday of month free. 
Phone 372-3689. 

Maritime Museum Gallery: “Ships in 
Shadow Boxes” will be on display at the 
museum, Stanton Center, 5 Custom House 
Plaza, Monterey, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m., $5. 
Phone 373-2469. 

Farmers* Market: Local farmers’ fresh 
fruits and vegetables, nursery sto^, eggs, 
flowers,, honey and other items, weekly, 
Monterey Peninsula College parking lot, 
980 Fremont St., Monterey, 2:30-6 p.m. 

Chinese New Year celebration: The 
event will be held at The Barnyard, Carmel 
Rancho Lane, Carmel, noon to 1 p.m. 
Phone 625-1668. 

Circle of Light lecture: Keith Luke 
will discuss ^iritual and intellectual ex¬ 
pansion at The Barnyard, Community 
Room, Carmel Rancho Lane, Carmel, 7-9 
p.m., $6. Phone 647-9516. 

Genealogy Society meeting: The 
meeting will be held at the Family History 
Center, Noche Buena and Plumas, Sea¬ 
side, 6 p.m., public invited. Phone 484- 
1679. 

Creative arts seminar: Sponsored by 
The Creative Edge: The Way of the Arts, 

8 Stratford Place, Monterey, 9 a.m. to 
noon, $15/35. Phone 373-7809. 

Artist’s exhibit: Delanie Engle Horton 
will have her work on display at the Carmel 
Valley Manor Hallway Gallery, 8545 
Carmel Valley Road, Carmel Valley. Phone 
626-4806. 

Women’s Center Open House: The 
Women’s Re-entry/Multicultural Resource 
Center is open to new students and com¬ 
munity members, SS-204, Monterey Pen- 
ir!sulaCollege, 980 Fremont St., Monterey, 

9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Phone 646-4276. 

Theater performance: "Don Juan in 
Heirwill be performed at the Indoor For¬ 
est Theater, Santa Rita Ave., Carmel, 8 
p.m. Phone 624-1534. 


2-4 p.m., free. Phone 372-2608. 

Maritiipe Museum Gallery: “Ships in 
Shadow Boxes” will be on display at the 
museum, Stanton Center, 5 Custom House 
Plaza, Monterey, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m., $5. 
Phone 373-2469. 

Senior Outreach luncheon: Alfred 
Beerbaum, Ph.D. will conclude a slide 
show of Southern France, Pacific Grove 
Community Center, 515 Junipero Ave., 
Pacific Grove, 11:45 a.m., $2.50. Phone 
646-4636. 

Friends of C. G. Jung: A poduck re- 
cepdon will be held at All Saints’ Church, 
Dolores and Ninth streets, Carmel, 6:30 
p.m., donation requested. Phone 649- 
4018. 


Carmel Art Walk: Explore Carmel’s 
70 art galleries and studios representing 
artists both past and present, 6-9 p.m. 
Phone 624-2522. 


Artist’s reception: Makah Indian Ben 
Della will have hb work on display at the 
Silver Feather Trading Co., Carmel Plaza, 
Ocean Avenue, Carmel, 5-8 p.m. Phone 
624-3622. 


Friday/4 


LE COQ D'OR impresses with its food, portions and service 


La Mirada tours: The tours are Thurs¬ 
day though Sunday, 720 Via Mirada, 
Monterey, 2 and 3 p.m., Monterey Penin¬ 
sula Museum of Art members free, $5 
general, $3 full-time students, military, 
under 12 free, first Sunday of month free. 
Phone 372-3689. 

La Mirada galleries tour: The tours 
are Saturday and Sundays, 720 Via 
Mirada, Monterey, 1 p.m., Monterey Pen¬ 
insula Museum of Art members free, $5 
general, $3 full-time students, military, 
under 12 free, first Sunday of month free. 
Phone 372-3689. 

Public tours of Tor House: Docent- 
led tours of Tor House, Hawk Tower. Poet 
Robinson Jeffers old world gardens, 26304 
Ocean View Ave., Carmel, Friday and 
Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., $5 adults, 
$3.50 college studenCs, $1.50 high school 
students, under 12 not permitted, reserva¬ 
tions required. Phone 624-1813 Sun-Th, 
624-1840 Fri-Sat. 

Don Florencio Serrano loun Docent 
tours of the 1845 home of Don Florencio 
Serrano, the second alcalde of Monterey 
will be held at 412 Pacific St., Monterey, 


Hieater performance: A performanpe 
of “Shadowlands” will be held at the 
Monterey Peninsula College SRO Theater, 
980 Fremont St., Monterey, 8 p.m., $10 
general, $9 students, seniors, military. 
Phone 646-4123. 

Mozart Society performance: The 
Streicher Trio will perform at the Church 
of Religious Science, Pacific And Franklin’ 
streets, Monterey, 8 p.m., $10. Phone 
646-1203. 

Carmel Ballet performance: “How 
to Eat Like A Child** will be performed at 
the academy. Mission and Eighth streets, 
Carmel, 7:30 p.m., $8 adults, $6 senior, 
children. Phone 624-3729. 

Professional boxingnight: Fb^e bouts 
will be held at the Doubletree Hotel, De 
Anza Ballroom, Two Portola Plaza, 
Monterey, 8 p.m., $20/50. Phone 649- 
4511. 

Theater performance: "Don Juan in 
Heirwill be performed at the Indoor For¬ 
est Theater, Santa Rita Ave., Carmel, 8 
p.m. Phone 624-1534. 


Saturday/5 

La Mirada tours: The tours are Thurs¬ 
day though Sunday, 720 Via Mirada, 
Monterey, 2 and 3 p.m., Monterey Penin¬ 
sula Museum of Art members free, $5 
general, $3 full-time students, military, 
under 12 free, first Sunday of month free. 
Phone,372-3689. 

La Mirada galleries tour: The tours 
are Saturday and Sundays, 720 Via 
Mirada, Monterey, 1 p.m., Monterey Pen¬ 
insula Museum of Art members free, $5 
general, $3 full-time students, military, 
under 12 free, first Sunday of month free. 
Phone 372-3689. 

Casa Amesti tours: Docent tours of 
the historic home and former residence of 
decorator Frances Elkins, currently the 
home of the Old Capitol Club, 516 Polk 
St., Monterey, 2-4 p.m., $2. Phone 372- 
2608. 

Don Florencio Serrano tour: Docent 
tours of the 1845 home of Don Florencio 
Serrano, the second alcalde of Monterey 
will be held at 412 Pacific St., Monterey, 
2-4 p.m., free. Phone 375-3338. 

Art tours: The Monterey Peninsula 
Museum of Art offers docent-led tours 
weekly, 559 Pacific St., Monterey, 2 p.m. 
Phone 372-7591. 

Live entertainment: “Wild Hearts” 
will perform at the River Rock Cafe, 
Carmel Valley Road, Carmel Valley Vil¬ 
lage, 8-10 p.m., free. Phone 659-5052. 

Hike Cone Peak: A dawn to dark 13- 


4 2 The Carmel Pine Cone/CV Outlook 


February 3, 1994 



















Cher^ Center for the Arts, Guadalupe McMullen, SND,MA, Monterey, 10 a.in., 
and Fourth streets, Carmel, 2:30-4:o0 $10. Phone 373-4077. * 

p.m. Phone 624-7491. • A ■ i* 

Portoflno preaenta: Scotland s mas- 

Artiat'a reception: Dick Crispo will ter storyteller Robin Williamson will per- 
havehisworkondisplay at the Carmel Art form at the Pacific Grove Art Center, 
Association, Dolores and Fifth streets, LiffhthouseAvenue,PacificCrove,8p.m., 
Carmel, 6-8 p.m. $10. Phone 373-7379. 

'Dieaterperfumance: A performance Carmel Ballet performance: ‘^How 

of '*Shadowlands’*wUl be neld at the to Eat Like A Child will be performed at 
Monter<^ Peninsula College SRO The- the academy. Mission and Eighth streets, 
ater, 980 Fremont St., Monterey, 8 p.m., Carmel, 7:30 p.m., $8 adults, $6 senior, 
$10 general, $9 students, seniors, mili- children. Phone 624-3729. 
tary. Phone 646-4123. 

Yosemite multimedia lecture: Ron 
Book diacussion group: “A Guide for Alan Pierce will present “A Foul’s Jour- 
Culdvating Depth and Sacredness in Ev- j 

eryday Lim" will be discussed with Kay Continued on page 44 


Rcnnous BUSINESS NAME 
STATEMENT 
RI»Ne.Ft401M 

The foUowing (wraons are doing 
businMS as HAPJ ASSOCIATES. 
264M Cannal Rancho Rv, Sla. 1, 
Cannal, Ca. 9S92S. 

Hwold R. Apgar. 110 Marion Trail 
— Law, Chaster, Ca. 06020. 

Kalhiyn Apgar, 110 Mario Trail — 
Law, Chaelsr, Ca. 06020. 

Harkmoon Paik, 10 Wyndamara 
Risa, Montsray, Ca. 03040. I 

Talhi M. Paik. 10 Wyndamara 
Risa, Monisray, Ca. 03040. 

Ward L. Jannings, 2S685 Tiarra 
Granda Dr., Carmal, Ca. 03023. 

Jo Maria Jannings, 25685 Tiarra 
Granda Or., Carmal, CA. 03023. 

TNs businass is oonductad by a 
ganaral partnarship. 

Raoistrant commancad to 
transact businass undar tha 
fictitious businass nama listad 
above on Sapt. 13,1074. 

(s) Ward L. Jennings 

This staiament was Mad with the 
County Clark of Monterey County 
on Jan. 24,1004. 

Publication dates: Feb. 3, 10,17, 
24, 1004. 

(PC203) 


Rcrmous business name 

STATEMENT 
nia No. F040128 
The following person is doing 
business as AT HOME — IN 
CARMEUVIKINO SAILS, 5lh 
between Doloras A San Carloa, 
Carmal, Ca. 03021. 

Kathleen Virginia Ritter, 3535 
Mesa Court, Carmel, CA. 93921. 

This business is conducted by an 
irtdividual. 

Registrant commenced to 
transact business under the 
fictitious business name listed 
above on March 1,1994. 

(s) Kathleen V. Ritter 
This statement was filed with the 
County Clerk of Monterey County 
on Jan. 18,1994. 

Publication dates: Feb. 3. 10, 17, 
24,1994. 

(PC201) 


FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME 
STATEMENT 
Hla No. F940209 
The following persons are doing 
business as TNE GRILL ON 
OCEAN AVENUE, north side of 
Ocean between Dolores and 
Lincoln, Carmal-by-tha-Saa, Ca. 
93921. 

Old Carmel Restaurants, Inc., a 
Calif, corporation, 100 Dolores St. 
No. 300, Carmel, Ca. 93921. 

This business is conducted by a 
corporation. 

Registrant commenced to 
transact business under the 
fictitious business name listed 
above on Jan. 15, 1994. 

(s) Anthony Salameh, President 
This statement was filed with the 
County Clerk of Monterey County 
on Jan. 27, 1994. 

Publication dates: Feb. 3, 10, 17, 
24,1994 
(PC 2-04) 

Rcrmous business name 

STATEMENT 
File No. F940208 
The following person is doing 
business as HEIRLOOM 
ANTIOUES/BIO SUR BIRO CO.. 
24002 Robinson Canyon Rd., 
Carmel, Ca. 93923. 

John Lawrence Gormley. 
Greenridge Rd.k^armel, Ca 
93923 

This business is corKlucted by an 
individual. 

Registrant commenced to 
transact business under the 
fictitious business name listed 
above on Jan. 30, 1994. 

(s) John L. Gormley 
This statement was filed with the 
County Clerk of Monterey County 
on Jan.27, 1994 

Publication dates: Feb. 3, 10, 17, 
24,1994. 

(PC 2-08) 


Now You Have 
More Time To Pay 
Your Winter 
EnergyBills. 


., , .l.- 


There's no way around it. You use more enei^ in 
the winter. It gets cold. You turn up the heat. You stay a 
little longer under the shower. So your winter energy bills 
shoot up. Which hits hard if you're not ready for it. And 
in today's economy, a lot of people aren't ready for it. 

PG&E'S WINTER STRETCH PROGRAM MAKES 
IT EASIER FOR YOU TO PAY WINTER BILLS. PG&E 
has a package of services called Winter Stretch that 
gives people more ways to manage their energy bills. 
Right now, you can stretch out your current winter bill, 
including any past due balance, over an entire year. 

You can average your future monthly payments, toti. 
Which means you pay almost the same amount every 
month. No highs. No lows. No finance charges. Your 
home must be individually metered to qualify. 

OTHER WINTER STRETCH PROGRAMS CAN 
ALSO HELP. 

• SPECIAL PAYMENT ARRANGEMENTS. We'll give 
customers more time to pay their bill, based on individ¬ 
ual needs. 

• REACH (Relief for Energy Assistance WM 

through Community Help). This pmgram is 
administered by the Salvation Army and 

covers a one-time payment for low-income | ^ 


i! 


' In 1994, PG&E is increasing its contribution to this pro¬ 
gram by^l million, bringing PG&E's total REACH con¬ 
tribution to $3 million. Customer and employee contri¬ 
butions, totalling $2.4 million last year, are also expect¬ 
ed to increase in 1994. 

• ECIP (Energy Crisis Intervention Program). For 
low-income households who are experiencing energy- 
related emergencies, this federally funded program 
provides assistance. 

• LIRA (Low Income Ratepayer Assistance). PG&E 
provides a 15% discount on monthly energy bills for 
qualifying low-income households. 

• HEAP (Home Energy Assistance Program). This 
federally funded program gives help to low-income 
households that fall within 130% of federal poverty 
guidelines. 

• MEDICAL BASELINE. For customers with medical 
needs, rc&E provides additional gas and electricity at 
the lowest rates. 

• RATE OPTIONS AND RATE ALTERNATIVES. There 
may be lower rates for customers who are large energy users 

or who can switch their use to off-peak hours. 

E This winter, take the chill out of your 

energy bills and sign up for any of the Winter 
Stretch pmgrams. Call your kx:al PG&E office 
about them or Icxik for the enrollment infor- 


households experiencing financial hardship. At your service. mation in your next Ki&E bill. 


Calendar 


mile excursion to Cone Peak, White Red¬ 
wood and Pfeiffer Falls. Phone624-4688. 

Creative arta group meetsc Sponsored 
by The Creative Edge: The Way of the 
Arts, 8 Stratford Place, Monterey, 9 a.m. 
to noon. Phone 373-7809. 

Sons of Italy dinner: The 44th annual 
dinner dance will be held at Rancho 
Canada, Carmel Valley Road, Carmel 
Valley, 6 p.m.. Phone 372-9118. 


Genealogical seminar: Jimmy B. 
Parker, chief of staff from the Family 
History Libraiv in Salt Lake Ciw will 
speak at the loth annual event. Family 
History Center, Noche Buena and Plumas 
streets. Seaside, 11:45 a.m., $15, with 
lunch$20. Phone 624-0571 or394-1124. 

Artist’s reception: Marilyn Hum Mohr 
and Anna Koster will have their exhibit 
'*Dream Windows’* on display at the Carl 


February 3, 1994 


The Carmel Pine Cone/CV Outlook 4 3 





Calendar 


Continued from page 43 

ney* about being along on skis across the 
Sierras, The Barnyard, Community Room, 
Carmel Ranch Lwe, Carmel, 7:30 p.m., 
$5. Phbne 625-0870. 

Celebrate Beatles* arrival: Peter 
Blackwell presents '^The British Invasion” 
at The Rose and Crown, 479 Alvarado St., 
Monterey, 12:30 p.m. Phone 655-9502. 

Hieater performance: "Don Juan in 
Hell "will be performed at the Indoor For¬ 
est Theater, Santa Rita Ave., Carmel, 8 
p.m. Phone 624-1534. 


'Hieater performance: A performance 
of ‘^Shadowlands”will beheld at the 
Monterey Peninsula College SRO 'The¬ 
ater, 980 Fremont St., Monterey, 2 p.m., 
$10 general, $9 students, seniors, mili¬ 
tary. Phone 646-4123. 

Carmel Ballet performance: ‘^How 
to Eat Like A Child” will be performed at 
the academy. Mission and Eighth streets, 
Carmel, 2:30 p.m., $8 adults, $6 senior, 
children. Phone 624-3729. 

Ensemble performance: “An After¬ 
noon with Brahms” will be performed at 
Monterey Peninsula College, Music hall, 
980 Fremont St., Monterey, 3 p.m., $12 
general, $8 students, seniors. Phone 646- 
4205. 

'Hieater performance: "Don Juan in 
Hell"will be performed at the Indoor For¬ 
est 'Theater, Santa Rita Ave., Carmel, 8 
p.m. Phone 624-1534. 


Sunday/6 


La Mirada galleries tour: The tours 
are Saturday and Sundays, 720 Via 
Mirada, Monterey, 1 p.m., Monterey Pen¬ 
insula Museum of Art members free, $5 
general, $3 full-time students, military, 
under 12 free, first Sunday of month free. 
Phone 372-3689. i 

Casa Amesti tours: Docent tours of 
the historic home and former residence of 
decorator Frances Elkins, currently the 
home of the Old Capitol Club, 516 Polk 
St., Monterey, 2-4 p.m., $2. Phone 372- 
2608. 

Hike Carapata/Mal Paso Creek: A 
strenuous hike up steep hills and wild 
cross country descent, meet at Brintons', 
Carmel Rancho Boulevard, Carmel Val¬ 
ley, noon, bring water, snack, flashlight, 
cameras, study shoes. Phone 649-0265. 

Friends of the Library meet: Poet Ric 
Masten will speak at the annual meeting 
of the Friends of the Harrison Memoricd 
Library, Church of the Wayfarer, Carden 
Room, Lincoln and Seventh streets, 
Carmel, 3 p.m. Phone 624-0684. 


Monday/7 


Whole Life Center lecture: Orpheus 
Phylos, oracle for the Archangel Michael, 
Prince of Heaven, offers an evening of 
warmth, insight and humor, Thunderbird 
Bookstore, The Barnyard, Carmel Rancho 
Lane, Carmel, 7 p.m., $5. Phone 624- 
1308. 

I 

Carmel Woman’s Club sale: A Chi¬ 
nese New Year white elephant sale and 
bridge luncheon will be held at the club, 
Sarv Carlos and Ninth streets, Csirmel, 
11:45 a.m., $15. Phone 625-6253. 

Single parent support group: Jeanne 
Costello will conduct the meeting at the 
Woman’s Center at Monterey Peninsula 
College, SS-204, 980 Fremont St., 
Monterey, noon, free. Phone 646-4276. 


Peninsula Quitters guild meets: Rod 
Kirakofe will discuss his new book “The 
American Quilt” at St. Mary’s Church, 
Central and 12th streets. Pacific Grove, 
7:30 p.m. Phone 484-1461. 

/ 

Food Bank volunteer session: The 
Food Bank for Monterey County needs 
volunteers for its hunger relief efforts, 815 
West Market St., Salinas, noon. Phone 
372-7843. 


Tuesday/8 


Old Monterey Farmers’ Market: The 
weekly, year-round market features fresh 
produce, prepared foods, live entertain¬ 
ment and crafts, Alvarado Street, 
Monterey, 4-7 p.m. Phone 655-8071. 

Whole Life Center lecture: Monterey 
Peninsula poets. Quintet in Concert, will 
perform at 'Thunderbird Bookstore, The 
oamyard, Carmel Rancho Lane, Carmel, 
7 p.m., $5. Phone 624-1308. 

Singles book stu^ groim: “ Conscious 
Loving: The Journey 'To Co-Commitment” 
by Cay and Kathleen Hendricks wiU be 
discussed at the Monterey Coffee house 
Bookshop, 472 Alvarado St., Monterey, 
7:30-9 p.m., free. Phone 373-3031. 

Lawyers on Duty lecture: Answers to 
basic legal questions will be discussed at 
60 Bofiifacio Place, Monterey, 7 p.m., 
free. Phone 375-1747. 

An evening of poetry: 'The Oriental 
Art Society is sponsoring Kiyoko Tokutomi 
to discuss how the forms of Haiku and 
Tanka are developing in English, The 
Crossroads Shopping Center, Community 
Room, Rio Road, Carmel, 7:30 p.m. Phone 
624-7126. 

Live entertainment: “Blind Curve” 
will perform at Planet Gemini, 625 Can¬ 
nery Row, Monterey, 9 a.m., $3. Phone 
373-1449. ‘ 

Poetry reading: Local poets will read 


“Quintet in Concert” at the Thunderbird 
B^kstore, 'The Barnyard, Carmel Rancho 
Lane, Carmel, 7 p.m., $5. Phone 372- 
5473. 

Gentrain Society short course: Nancv 
Johnson w ill discuss “The Frencn 
Lieutenant’s Woman” at the Monterey 
Peninsula College, LF 102, 980 Fremont 
St., Monterey, 1-3 p.m., registration re¬ 
quired, moderate fee. Phone 646-4224. 

Camerata auditicm: 'The Camerata 
Singers of Monterey County have open¬ 
ings for two tenors and two basses, 7 p.m., 
audition appointment required. Pnone 
484-1217. 


Wednesday/9 

Carmel Bridge Club meets: Bridge 
players are invited to join in the fun at All 
Saints Episcopal Church, Dolores and 
Ninth streets, Carmel, singles welcome, 1 
p.m., $4. Phone 625-4307. 

International Jazz Party: 'The “Eiji 
Kitamura Quintet” will peiform at the 
Hyatt Regency Monterey, Monterey Grand 
Ballroom, 1 Old Golf Course Road, 
Monterey, 7-11 p.m. Phone 372-1234. 

Chinese Lunar New Year dance: A 
Chinese Lion Dance will be performed at 
the Golden Buddha Restaurant, 'The Barn¬ 
yard, Carmel Rancho Lane, Carmel, noon. 

Writers Reading session: 'The Na¬ 
tional Writers Union Local 7 Reading 
Series presents Jack Foley and Lou 
Harrison at Bay Books, 316 Alvarado St., 
Monterey, 7:30 p.m., $5. Phone 883-0406 
or 684-0854. 


CASA meeting: The Community 
Against Substance Abuse will meet at the 
Carmel Youth Center, Junipero and Fourth 
streets, Carmel, 9-11 a.m. Phone 648- 
3819. 


THE NEW YORK TIMES MAGAZINE CROSSWORD PUZZLE 


No. 0130 


CROCKED POLITICS 

By Alex K. Justin/Edited by Will Shortz 


11 13 4 Ts T« p It lie II II II II III III fit It 


ACROSS 54 

I Mo/.in’s 
alleged poisoner 55 

8 In jcop.irdy 

15 Itsy-bitsy hits 

20 P.trt-tinie 56 

reporter 

21 Stimul.tie 60 

22 Text for public 

reading 63 

23 f'lection pledges? 

25 “Mefisiofele" 64 

composer 

26 Noted 65 

W.ishin^ton 66 

couple 

27 Oilstone 68 

28 1982 World 69 

Cup site 

29 Place for props? 

30 Talked into 

31 Lapwings 74 

33 Joseph Smith’s 78 

K^p 

34 Tittle 79 

35 C'.omeback 

victor of 1974 80 

36 Oalfy Duck’s 

voice 81 

37 Reason for 83 

sudden death 84 

39 "l eCoq-" 

40 The Wild Man 86 

of Africa 93 

41 1 ermite’s 94 

medium 

45 I'lectuin victory 95 
celebration? 

49 Last place? 96 

50 Rm kefeller and 97 

others 

52 Not playing 99 

around 

53 I ndol- 101 


Answer to last week's 
pilule on patfe ,37 


l ormer I'rench 109 

Sudan 110 

Subject of the il2 

movie “Sweet 
Dreams" 113 

Mussolini’s 
son-in-law 114 

Political .116 

therapists? 118 

Mubble 122 

component 124 

Winston Cup 126 

sponsor 127 

Gold source 
Lawyer 128 

Dershowiiz 
Highest degrees 129 
With 

74-Across, 
devious skill in 132 

politics? 

See69-Across 133 

l-ord’s press 134 

secretary 135 

Lane-I,erner’s 136 

“On-D.ay" 137 

Words from 
C.aesar 

Informality * 

Rear hugs ^ 

Louise or ^ 

Victoria ^ 

House whips? ^ 

Pan-fry 5 

Warlord in the _ 

news 

-off (beside ^ 

oneself) 

Actor Delon ./» 

Triathlon 

athletes U 

Knglish 

composer 12 

Lxeite 13 

Prosperous |4 

political outing? 15 

Gut response |6 

“Give it-!" 

StH'ial hanger-on 


Arctic explorer I 
Largo, e.g. 1 

Gulager «)f “The 
Virginian" I 

Comment from ^ 
the byre ^ 

Society event 
Post-office pane ^ 
Meanders \ 

Add, as a rider ; 
Set on fire ■ 

-da capo ■ 

“The Frog and 
the Ox" writer , 
J.aleel White TV ' 
role 

Bowing to a 
Presidential ‘ 
veto? ^ 

Contract ^ 

negotiator 
Leader of France?^ 
Diving gear 
Resulted in ^ 

Mrs. Bob Hope < 
Yea votes 

DOWN ' 

Filibuster < 

Type of conflict < 
Runy items 

-sense | 

Highbrow | 

Celebrity 
Pacific I 

Air traffic 
controllers’ sys. | 
Relative of Will. ; 
or Robt. 

“Home Sweet 1 
Home" site , ; 

Three-note i 
chord 

Point in orbit ( 
Poignant 

Annapolis grad. I 
( 

“Tummy ( 

Trouble" 

character 


Paperwork? 
Mary of “F!qual 
Time" 

Br.icing 
“Off you go!" 
I.R.A. 

investments 
Dearie 
Mob 
(iraph 
Maneuver 
“(jo and Catch 
a Falling Star" 
poet 

Maverick Idaho 
Senator 

Evaders’ enemy 
Sews up 
See 48-Down 
Dead he.at 
Hebrew name 
meaning “jov" 
W.W. I battle 
site 

Prtimise 
Flshkol’s 
successor 
Soviet dissident 
Bonner 
Get ahead 
Floudini et al., 
with 40-Down 
Well-founded 
Nicholas Ciage 
book 

Clarke of “The 
Public Fmemy" 
Button one’s lip 

Handel’s “- 

and Galatea" 

Big shot 
Algerian port 
Middle of a 
famous trio 
Saved, with 

44 94 

away 

-taxes 

Stock holding 
Pouches 
Jtihn Wooden’s 
school 


32 ^^33 


fMl 157 |M h« 




|70 |7I 172 173 


T4 75 


75 77 ^■71 


•1 M 


l*r M 


rniTTwi 


125 


71 Blue in Berlin 

72 Appear before a 
House 
committee 

73 Duk.i.s' ballet 

75 -duck 

76 Harvest 
goddess 

77 Director of 
“Breaking Away 

82 A Chaplin 

84 Brink 

85 -of thieves 

87 “Take 

from me" 


88 Oprah’s 
production 
company 

89 Jesus, for one 

90 Net lining in a 
woman’s nat 

91 Philematolo- 
gisi’s study 

, 92 (3ld kmie 

94 l llerbee’s “- 

It Cioes" 

98 Salad bulb 

99 Car-lroni cover 
100 “Fairy talev" 


M It M 51 52 


lit 115 120 121 


101 Music 
enhancers 

102 Sure-enough 

103 Loose 

104 Hauled 

105 John Deere 
product 

106 Repercussions 

110 Pacific battle 
site of f94.3 

111 Her/ogand 
/ola 

113 -allegro 

(very quickly) 

114 Pitched 

115 One of nine 


117 Randy’s skating 
partner 

118 Understand 

119 Small helpers 

120 John and Jane 

121 Rudolf Abel, 

123 Artist Rockwell 

124 “A-’cl.Kk 

scholar" 

125 P.itchsite 

127 Give-lor 

one’s money 

129 Triste 

130 Litin thing 

131 Deal with 


44 The Carmel Pine Cone/CV Outlook 


February 3, 1994 















LJJ 

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Designer Lines 

By MEREDITH CROWELL 


Winter furniture market 
proves to be stimulating 

It certainly seems appropriate that my first 
column follows on the heels of the 1994 Winter Furni¬ 
ture market held in San Francisco, Jan. 22 to 25. (The 
market is also held in the summer.) 

During the market, vendors and manufacturers 
who do not have permanent representation in the 
Design Center, Gift Mart or the downtown Merchan¬ 
dise Mart come to show their new designs and wares. 

It is also a time of education. Seminars are given on 
many subjects, such as learning current developments 
in the printing and dyeing processes of fabrics and 
carpets, watching a slide show of how a certain fabric 
designer gets inspiration or how to recognize certain 
styles of Oriental rugs. 

For me, and countless other interior designrs, store 
owners and other people in the home furnishings Held, 
find the market very stimulating. It is an opportunity 
to leam of new suppliers, see new products, talk with 
the movers and groovers of the corporations owning 
and/or running the permanent showrooms, see and 
network with our peers and try to absorb all the new 
stimulus. 

The designer or owner can then bring this inspira¬ 
tion back to the jobs in progress or file the information 
for a future time. ^ 

The most important information I get is the color 
forecast for the home furnishing industry, which is set 
world-wide, mostly by the fashion industry. The Col¬ 


oring Marketing Group surveys all the known trends in 
colors for the past six months and identiRes the most 
visible, records them and publishes a very extensive 
smd expensive report. 

The colorists for the various levels of fabric design 
select from those colors to color the fabrics, which will 
be presented in the next 12 months. Home furnishings 
follow behind fashion; the pallet is often softer and not 
quite as varied. What we see when we get to market in 
January 1994 is next year’s forecast. 

Why? ... Well, the fabric designs, which are just 
being introduced, have been on the boards and at the 
colorists for up to two years before they are actually 
introduced to the interior design and home fashions 
communities. The floor and carpet industries delay 
their entry into the color presentations until after there 
is a prevailing color direction. 

Tbis is true for all introductions where there are no 
opportunities to customize the color or pattern selec¬ 
tions. Most of you will make selections from those 
patterns with these color combinations. 

A look at the *95 color pallet 

Listen to the 1995 color pallet: New Mood Mauve; 
Opulent Opal; Coral Cocktail; Watersilk; Parisian 
Pink; Twenties Teal; Charlestorl Charcoal; Tango; 
Glitzy Green; Tequila; Gold Lame; Ritzy Red; Daring 
Damson; Vivid Violet; Racing Green; Brilliantine Blue; 
Fabulous Fuchsia; French Navy; Smoke Haze; Plati¬ 
num Blonde; Foxy Blue; Champagne Fizz; Luxurious' 
Lime; Tantalizing Turquoise. 

I love the contemporary show where 1 can see the 
newest, the most daring, the repeats from the year 
before. Here also are vendore, who are importers 
whose styles may not be considered avant garde but 
who are introducing their lines to the buyers. 

I saw whimsical beanbags looking like fruits, veg¬ 
etables, the **8” Ball and good ol’ denim jeans. I noticed 
that the Southwest look and colors are fading fast and 
in its place is being introduced a **western’’ look with 
deeper colors and lots of leather. 

I Painted furniture continues to hold its place, with 


'fi 




I IP 


PEBBLE BEACH 

$295,000 Ocean and Panoramic Mountain Viewg 
from Fremont Peak to Mt. Toro. This original 1950' 
era home with its spacious living room and formal 
dining room lends itself to entertaining. 3 
Bedroom/2.5 Bath. 

CARMEL VALLEY 

$399,000 Golf and Valley Views Just a Drive to 
Nearby Courses. This immaculate home has open 
beam ceilings in the living room and bedrooms, Relax 
in the patio amidst spreading oaks and enjoy the 
beauty of Carmel Valley. Private setting. 3 
Bedroom/2 Bath. By appt. 

PACIFIC GROVE 

$239,000 Cozy Weekender in immaculate 
condition. This home is situated on a quiet street 
and features oak floors, a'fireplace with a gas starter 
and a low maintenance yard. 2 Bed/1 Bth. Open 
Friday 11-1; Sat. 1-5. 

Marilyn Vassallo 
(408) 372-8634/(408) 655-7940 

Ben Heinrich Real Estate 
26335 Carmel Rancho, Carmel 650 Lighthouse, Paciric Grove 


m 





LOW START RATE - LOW MARGIN ADJUSTABLE LOAN! 
30 YEAR ADJUSTABLE (First Trust Deed) TO $20},l$0 

A HA/ m AHA#a mmi 


3.5%?.‘!?D.Ny70'€‘«l VB ,rs:, 

•APR IS BASED ON A $203.ISO LOAN AMOUNT ■ I ’h MARGIN OVER 6 MO LIBOR - 9 5% LIFE CAP 


5 b 49 %'€‘« 1 % 


30 YEAR FIXED (First Trust Deed) TO $203,150 

W VHA/ W AAA/ Bt 


6.75%"sr 




W 9 m V / V Rxn m 9 wm 

•APR IS BASED ON A $203,150 LOAN AAM3UNT 


30 YEAR ADJUSTABLE (First Trust Deed) TO $500,000 

3i875% 6 b 59% 0 pou 

•APR IS BASED ON A SSMOOO LOAN AMOUNT 


POINH! 


■|’li c:: 

('108) 372-8900 

»I I l#i r ( I I j; I . Mc>»» I r V , c:/» . *> I '1 t) 

■••nl runlr htnh*-*, «». t..»f •*»••*! olllnnlKr«l at »• 


vS&L 


icrvii, i.cv\NS 







R/SALi SCST'^'PE: 

El Pasco Bldg., Dolores at Seventh 
P.O. Box 3777 • Carmel-by-the-Sea 

624-0136 


IN THE SUNBELT OF PEBBLE BEACH 


irri 


^ A 






A STUNNING home on a quid cul-dc-sac in upper 
Pebble Beach, on a 1.4 acre parcel with lovely ocean 
vicw.s. ArchiicciurcHy designed and custom built for 
thc.se owners seventeen years ago, this home is ever so 
gracious and beautifully decorated. An interesting floor 
plan allows for comfortable living and entertaining on 
many different levels. Gorgeous hardwood floors and 
hand-made Mexican tile floors throughout the house. 
Altogether there's about 3200 square feet of living 
space, plus a two car garage. 

$995,000 

Call for an appoiftffnent! 


the old ranch or ranchero used look still very hot. 
(Frequently those '*used” patinas are the most labor 
intensive and therefore the most expensive.) Country 
French and Country English are still holding their 
own. Country antiques from Mexico, Brazil and the 
European continent continue to be placed in all set¬ 
tings. 

Iron is everywhere 

And iron ... iron is everywhere. It is rusted, it is 
burnished, it is painted, it is patina-ed. It is the 
cambriole legs of a contemporary wood table; it is an 
insert in an armoir; it is the frame around two-inch 
thick glass cigarette tables; it is lamps, shades and 
bases. 

Elegance has not been left out either. Tliere has 
been such a resurgence of ropes and braids, tassels and 
rosettes. New suppliers continue to fill the market¬ 
place with exciting products enhanced with these Hnal 
details. Most^ trendy is the relaxed, washed elegant 
slipcover, over-sized. Down/feather cushions and pil¬ 
lows are required for the upper-end market. 

For those with allergies or a tighter budget, the 
upholstery companies have developed a means of 
making foam and Dacron feel like down. The idea is to 
appear that you have been living this elegant way for 
just years and years. 

New designers, new products 

I love talking to the new designers about their 
products. They are truly the bravest of all those at 
market. For individual furniture ateliers and small 

See DESIGNER LINES page 46 

Meredith Crowell is a Certified Interior Designer 
who owns her own business in Carmel Valley^ Meredith 
Design Co. She can be reached at 624-3637. 


BUSINESSES & RESTAURANTS AVAILABLE 

CARMEL BUSINESS SALES. INC. otters the Monterey 
Peninsula's largest list ot available businesses, 
restaurants, motels and commercial property. Call, 
write or FAX tor out tree list 


CARMEL BUSINESS SALES, INC. 

Don Bowen & Associates 
SW Corner Lincoln & 7th • Carmel-by-the-Sea 
625-5581, FAX 625-2057 


Fore! 



DON'T Be Hit 

by rising rents, when 
you can be experiencing the thrill of home 
ownership. You can use your V.A., with no 
down payment, to get into this Marina 
townhouse, with 2 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, inside 
laundry & single-car garage. It's close to the 
beach, a new shopping center & community 
tennis courts! $137,000. 

Home Town Realtor Serving the 
Peninsula Since 1046 

Touratt-Simmons 


REAL ESTATE 

Court of the Golden Bough 
Ocean Ave. betwn. Lincoln 
& Monte Verde • Carmel 

^624-3829 



February 3, 1994 


V 


The Carmel Pine Cone/CV Outlook 45 



























UJ 

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E 


Interior design, decorating business one of constants, change 


LOS LAURELES LODGE 

CARMEL VALLEY 

30 Rooms, 3 BR, 2 BA, Guest House, 150 
seat Restaurant, Bar, Pool. On 10 acres. 
$2.0 Million spent on Total Renovation. 


CARMEL BUSINESS SALES, 

INC. 

Don Bowen & Associates 
SW Comer Lincoln & 7lh • Carmel-by-the-Sea 

(408) 625-5581, FAX (408) 625-2057 


m Mid Coast 626-0145 

MO Investments 624-3675 

Bill Probasco Broker 

WHAT IS A DREAM HOME? 


Big Sur at Rocky Point 

(10 miles south of Carmel, on Hwy. 1) 

OPEN HOUSES: Sat. & Sun. 12-4 p.m. 



A furnished new home on 5 oceanfront acres, 
only 10 miles from Carmel. Watch whales 
and otters, experience breathtaking sunsets, 
smell and feel the ocean spray. $3,S(X),000. 


Five acres' in Big Sur with white water and 
mountain views. A furnished new home, 
spacious and comfortable, is surrounded by 
nature. Serenity will be yours. $1,600,000. 


CARMEL 

HIGHLANDS 

• 40 acres on Lobos Ridge, 
good for horses. $595,000. 

• LOT Sonoma Lane with 
plans, permits and water for a 
3 BR, 2-1/2 BA home. 
$325,000. 

• 85 Acres with water. Views! 
Views! $410,000. 


CARMEL 

• Laree lot with app 


• Large lot with approvals, 
11th St. & Mission Trail Park. 
1% down. $169,000. 

• Carmel Charmer, 3 BR, 2 
BA, plus studio. Furnished. 
Owner may carry with 10% 
down. $595,000, 


^ BIG SUR 

Two ridge top homes 
Garrapata Ridge 

• 35 acres $1,150,000 

• 15 acres $625,000 

• 650 aers overlooking Bixby 
Bridge. Plans for 5 homes. 
May TO purchased in 40 to 113 
acre parcels. 


DESIGN LINES from page 45 
manufacturers who are most often on 
the leading edge of style, this show is 
hnequendy their only opportunity to meet 
the interior designers, furniture store 
buyers and specifies. 

It is quite expensive to rent the spaces 
for those few days. The risk for these 
small entrepreneurs and artists is that 
larger, better funded factories have their 
stylists out ready to snap up a good idea, 
incorporate it into their line, probably 
using less costly raw materials and 
manufacturing methods. It is very un¬ 
usual that the designer of the pToduct 


gets paid for his design by the unscrupu¬ 
lous factory. In the industry this is known 
as ‘^knocking it off.” 

The interior design and decorating 
business is one of constants and of 
change. Time-honored furniture and 
fabric designs continue to be recolored 
and reissued. As always, it takes many 
years for today’s contemporary styles to 
find,their way into the reproduction 
market as we now find, for example, the 
’50s fashions. 

A few years ago, we had a sharp 
interest in the elegant sleek look of the 
’30s. What will be the ’90s look? 




Old World Craftsmanship 

5 Bedrooms •71/2 Baths • Gourmet IGtchen • Family 
Room • Library • Came Room • Conservatory • 3 Car 
Garage • Servant's Quarters 
Delightful Details: Solid Oak & Etched Glass Front Doors, 
Italian Marble Entrance, Royal Circular Stairway, 
Hardwood Oak Floors 

Estate Extras: Video Security, Elevator, 5 Fireplaces, 4 Wet 
Bars, Whirlpool, Steam Room, Central Vacuum, 
Computerized Heat!Air 
S,700 Sq.Ft. on 10 Golden Acres! 

Minutes to Shopping, Freeway, Local Air Strip, 
Commuter Train. One hour dri^^ north to S.F. 

One hour drive south to Pebble Beach. 


ici ysttj y iw t»jci > 


Well-established French restaurant located in the 
Court of the Golden Bough. Seats 39 inside, plus patio 
seating. Asking $89,500. 


MARINA 

3 bedroom, 2 bath 1140 sq.ft, home has a fireplace, 
fenced yards and patio. Can be shown anytime. 

Call for appt. $169,000 

SEASIDE 

This cute 2 bedroom, 1 bath home is in a sunny 
neighborhood. It has a tiled p>atio, secluded backyard 
for privacy, fruit trees in front & back. Immaculate & 
ready to move into! $125,(XX) 

A large 4 bedroom, 2 bath home in a lovely Seaside 
neighborhood has a spacious living room, dining room 
with deck and well-landscaped front & back yards. 

Must see! $150,0(X) 

Robert M. Banks, Realtor 

1-800-445-6173/408-372-7888. 


ForuptotvwansiMnto 
IblvDoikQM^CironMinl 

Can 1-90CM20-5656 

llMalauaMotiaptafa 7Baan*ia«*wla. 


Avoid capital 
gains tax. 
Support the 
American Heart 
Association. ~ 


ally pushes Dow 6.47 highe 



By supporting the 
American Heart Association 
you may: 

• avoid capital gams tax on 
appreciated securities or 
other property 

• reduce current and future 
income taxes 

• provide a lifetime income 
for yourself or beneficiaries 

• avoid probate and publicity 

• maximize estate tax 
savings 

It may pay you to inquire 
about the American Heart 
Association's Planned Giv¬ 
ing Program by contacting 
your local American Heart 
Association. 

Sometimes, it can be bet¬ 
ter to give than to receive 

American Heart 
Association 


This space provided as a public service 


12 ACRE C.V. COUNTRY ESTATE 

SPACIOUS ENGLISH RESIDENCE & solar pool on 
spectacular, useable, view acres. Sunny meadows, woods, 
yearns. Private gated entry road, bridm & well. Massive 
fireplace in beamed great haN. Modem Euro eat-in kitchen, 
3 exec BR suites wmrivate sundecks. Your own private 
world near village & million dollar homes & ranches. 
Stable, tennis sites. Suitable for spa, BAB. A one of a kind 
EXECUTIVE RETREAT reduced far below market valuel 
Owner FInancingl 

REDUCED TO $750,000 from $1.2 million. 

OWNER - 659-3100 


Personal Professional fisslstonce 
to buyers ond sellers for 17 years. 

— Ulolsen fteprasoAks Vou — 

‘'Shcriock would bo proud” 

Resldentiol Gi Investment properties 

Monterey County Regional MLS 


Watson Realty, Inc. 


3785 Vio Mono Marie, Suite 315* Cormel, Cfl 93923 

CALL RKH lUflTSON AT 625-5171 


French 

Country Estate 

Main house plus detached guest suite on 
10 acres. Ocean view! $950,000. 

Call today I 625-5965. 


Hied Assoc., In 



BURCHELL HOUSE 

PROPERTIES 

CARMEL. Quality, convenience and lake tide location. This 2 bed, 
2-1/2 bath condo has appeal, tennis, swimming A quiet life-style. 
$279,000. 

BAY RIDGE. Lovely 4 bod, 4 full ba and 2 half-ba, Fiench Chateau 
situated on 3.75 acres overlooking ocean, rolling hills and city lights. 
Grand and sutely. $1,450,000. 

CARMEL. Fantastic value in great location. 3 bed, 2 bath home in 
good condition on quiet street. Only $299,5001 

CARMEL VALLEY. Country living at its betti Ranch style, pool, 
2 bed, 1-1/2 ba -f den in main house; and 3 rooms 4- 1 ba in guest 
quartera. Large comer lot with views. $385,000. 

(X:EAN AT IXM-CTRES, CARMEL BY-THE SEA 

624.6461 


HOMES • LAND • RANCHES 
HORSE PROPERTIES 
in Carmel Valley 




SMALL COZY HOME 

15 min. to Village in beautiful Sky 
Ranch Estates. Large deck with views. 
Also, a cozy home for up to 4 horses. 
Easy to see. Several 200 year old trees. 
$279,000 

COLTON REALTY 

Call 659-5535 or 659-5587 

12 Delfino PI. Carmel Valley, CA. 93924 


BAYVIEW TOWNHOUSE 

PANORAMIC VIEWS of Monterey Bay 
by day, twinkling city lights by night — 
all yours to enjoy in this well-kept 
2 bdrm, 2 bath condo in Monterey. Each 
bedrm. has private balcony, private deck 
surrounds unit. No common walls. Walk 
to town & waterfront. 

Perfect vacation home! 

$ 190,000 

Beth Hightow^er/Betty Matterson 

Greg Shankle Real Estate 

646-1401 


The Carmel Pine Corte/CV Outlook 


February 3, 1994 











































Real E state 


So just when is the best tune to close? 


T HE SETTLEMEINT of a home sale often is sched¬ 
uled at the end of the month. Many buyers insist on this 
target, because they feel they are saving money by 
cutting back the number of ownership days for which 
they must make interest payments on their mortgage 
Hnancing. 

But the Carmel ^sociation of Realtors reminds 
buyers that whether a closing occurs at the first, 
middle or end of the month has no bearing on the 
amount of interest owed. Generally, a lender collects 
interest, starting with closing, for as long as the buyer 
has a mortgage on the home. 

**As the month’s end draws near, the workload 
builds for real estate professionals and mortgage lend¬ 
ers as all parties under pressure by home buyers trying 
to close on time,” ssJd Rhenda Miller, president of the 
Carmel Association of Realtors. 

“The money saved by closing at the end of the 
month are funds included in the prepaids, part of the 
expenses paid up front by the buyer at setdement. 
Except in states where regulations prohibit the prac¬ 
tice, prepaids include interest that accrues on the 
mortgage from the closing day to the first day of the 
next month.” 


Mortgage interest is always collected in arrears to 
cover the previous month’s ownership. The first 
monthly mortgage payment made after closing applies 
to the first full month of ownership that comes between 
the setdement date and when the first payment is due. 

Closing scenario unfolds 
For example, if a closing occurs on Jan. 31, the 
borrower pays prepaid interest for one day’s owner¬ 
ship in that month. If loan payments are collected once 
a month, the first mortgage payment likely will be due 
March 1. However, if the borrower’s closing is on Feb. 
1, he or she will pay prepaid interest for 29 days of 
ownership for that month. 

But the first mortgage payment is not then due until 
April 1. During virtually the same amount of timo— 
from Jan. 31 to April 1, or from Feb. 1 to April 1 —the 
borrower pays close to the same amount of money. 

“Some buyers who find themselves short on cash 
needed to cover all closing costs might prefer an end- 
of-the-month settlement because they lack the money 
needed to make a prepaid interest payment for all or 
most of one month’s occupancy,” Miller said. 





Monterey Peninsula 



PAULETTE KENNEDY 
Broker Associate 


I 




"PAULETTE KENNEDY 
SELLS HOMES" 

Please caU PAULETTE today: 

626-4982 or 
eves. 626-4655 


Each office independently owned aftd operated 




QUAIL LODGE REALTY 


(408) 624-1581 

QUAIL LODGE RESORT 

$595,000—^3 bedroom/2 bath, river and golf 
course views, patio. 

$625,000—4 bedroom/3 bath, family room, pool, 
2 fireplaces. 

$675,000—2 bedroom/2 bath, solarium, family 
room, 2 fireplaces, patio. 



OCEANAVEISUE 
REALTY 

Ocean & San Carlos. Carmel 

625-1343 

PEBBLE BEACH 

3120 Stevenson Dr. 

Lovely three bedrooms, two baths, 
recently remodeled baths & kitchen, 
new roof. Great opportunity 
to own your home. 

Asking $448,000 
OPEN FRIDAY 2-4 p.m. 

Hosteu Carla Ramsey 

SALES • RENTALS • PROPERTY 
MANAGEMENT 


f Wiramar" 

336317 Mile Drive 

Pebble Beach, California 

OPEN 12-5 DAILY 


Recently transformed and completely 
updated by Michael Bolton beyond its original 
grandeur when Pebble Beach was most 
exquisite. Wonderful views of Pt. Lobos, 
Stillwater Cove and the 14th and 15th holes 
of the Pebble Beach Golf Links enhance the 
pleasure of living on this over one-acre estate 
adjacent to a permanent greenbelt. Lush 
landscaping, artistic and meticulous design of 
the home, cottage and furniture (which is 
included in the selling price) has made this 
property an incomparable value at the 

reduced price of - 

$1,650,000. 

(3% Broker's Commission Offered) 

(408) 655-7600 

(408) 659-2992 
. Evenings 






J 


DEL MESA 

.$325,000—2 bedroom/2 bath, remodeled kitchen. 
$315,000 walk-in closet, views. 

MONTEREY 

$695,000—4/5 bedroom/4 bath, family room, 
soliarum, 2 fireplaces, private. 

QUML ' 

tfnuM 1 614 acres adjacent to Quail Lodge with only 56 

Umm S(l6S I liotne sites-all parcels have water entitlements. All 
> utilities are underground with the roads and 
gatehouse complete. (4()g)g26-2475 


QUAIL LODGE 

RESORT&COIF CLUB 

PRESENTS 

QUAIL 

MEADOWS 

CARMEL, CALIFORNIA 

★ 614 ACRES-(one-half of which has been donated to 
permanent open space) with only 56 Home Sites 
ranging from 2 1/2 to 21 acres. 

★ LOCATION-adjacent to the Quail lx)dge Resort & 
Golf Club, Quail Meadows is just minutes to 
downtown Carmel. 

★ BUILDING PERMITS-by agreement with the 
County and the Water District, Building Permits arc 
available to all Quail Meadows parcels. 

For the first time ever, estate size home sites arc for sale 
at Quail Meadows. This property is totally privatc-is 
gated and sccure-and the 56 home sites all have 
beautiful views and magnificent oak trees. A rare 
opportunity to enjoy a mild and sunny climate in 
California's most desirable location. Quail Meadows is 
brought to you by the same independent and locally- 
owned company that created Quail Lodge 30 years ago. 

CALL LAWSON LITTLE 

today for information, color brochure, or a private 
showing-or address inquiries to Quail Lodge Realty, 
8000 Valley Greens Drive, Ormcl, CA 93923. 

(408) 626-2475 

Fax (4t8) 626-2490 




ULTIMATE QUALITY ON 
CARMEL POINT 

Brand new home by premier builder Chris 
Tescher featurings super views of Carmel's 
white, sandy beach and the bay beyond. 3 
bdrms, 3.5 baths with open floor plan, 2 
fireplaces, dream kitchen, French doors, slate 
roof & French limestone floors. Custom quality & 
mastercraftsmanship throughout. • A 
connoisseur's wine cellar & 2-car garage. 
$1.695.000. _ 

CARMEL NEAR TOWN 

Older 2-bdrm, 2-bath charmer. Plus 1-bdrm, 1-bath. 
Guest qtrs. Large lot. Steps to town. Offers excellent 
potential. $350,000. 

SPECTACULAR OCEAN VIEWS 

A ranch-style home steps away from the ocean's 
edge. 2 bdrms. 2 baths, den, dining room, large 
living room with fireplace & open beam ceiling, 
country kitchen, & separate guest quarters with 
bdrm. &' bath. $699,000. 

"CYPRESS HEDGE" 

A 3-bdrm, 2-bath cottage with the beach at your 
doorstep. Ocean & R. Lobos views. $1,100,000. 


A superb blend of old world charm & casual 
elegance. Enjoy beautiful ocean views. Dramatic 
living room with garden windows. A spacious 
home surrounded by'^decks. 4 Bdrms, 3 baths, 3- 
car garage. $1,200,000. 


MONTEREY MEDITERRANEAN 

Views of the bay. Cozy, comfortable, 2 bdrm, 2 bath 
with fireplace. $215,000. 

COUNTRY LIVING 

This lovely ranch-style home situated on over an 
acre in sunny Corral de Tierra features 3 bdrms, 2 
baths, a new kitchen & master bath, & a large deck 
overlooking a year-round stream. $295,000. 

HATTON FIELDS HOME 

A ranch-style home with 2 bdrms, 2 baths, family 
room, dining room, den. Beam-ceiling living room 
with oak floors & Carmel stone fireplace. Lovely 
mountain views. $415,000. 

CARMEL PT. CONTEMPORARY 

Serene ocean & mountain views. Just 2-blocks to 
Carmel's white sandy beach. A light, bright & airy 
home. Move-in condition. 2 Bdrms, family room, 2.5 
baths. $725,000. 

ON THE 8TH GREEN, CVG&CC 

Near Quail Lodge. "When only the best will do." An 
elegant & spacious home. 3 Bedrooms, 3.5 baths, 
3-car garage. $975,000. 

PT. LOBOS STONE HOUSE 

Breathtaking views of Carmel Bay. A landmark 
stone house near Point Lobos Park. On 5-»- level 
acres. 6 Bdrms, 3 baths. 2-bdrm. guest house & 
large barn/stables. $1,975,000. 


m 


IXTGPfMlf' 



Sales, Rentals. Property Management 
Dolores, South of Seventh 
P.O. Drawer C., Carmel 93921 

PHONE 624-6482 ANYTIME 



February 3, 1994 


The Carmel Pine Cone/CV Outlook 47 






















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’ H'T •'»•■ t ■'■iif ■ r.. 


CutMa 


83 Hiffh Meadow $335,000 

Sun, T-4 Del Monte Realty 

Santa Rita & Ist $387,500 


Santa Rita & Ist 

Sat & Sun,1-4 
CENTURA 21 Allied 


2865 Ribera $395,000 

Sat, 12-3 Coldwell Banker 

Mission & 4th $399,500 

25383 Handers $424,900 

Sat, 1 -4 CENTURY 21 Allied 

26035 Dougherty P). $435,000 

Sun, 1-4 F'ouratt-Simmons 


24780 Pescadero 
Sun, 2-4 

2825 Ribera Rd. 
Sat, 2-4 

26370 Carmelo 
Sat, 2-4 

24716 Dolores 
Sat, 12-2 


$439,500 
Del Monte Realty 

$450,000 
Del Monte Realty 

$510,000 
Del Monte Realty 

$545,000 
Del Monte Realty 


24728 San Carlos $560,000 

Sun, 1-4 The Mitchell Group 

25193 Hatton Rd. $565,000 

Sun, 1-4 CENTURY 21 Allied 

24752 Pescadero $579,500 

Sun, 11-1 .Foaratt-Simmons 

San Carlos, 4 NW/lst $589,000 
Sat, 2-4 Del Monte Realty 

24507 San Mateo $595,000 

Th.,11-7 Fox & Carskadon 

26207 Valley View $595,000 
Sun, 2-4 Fouratt-Simmons 


Castro Ln. 
Sun, 2-4:30' 


$597,000 
Fox & Carskadon 


San Carlos, 2 NE/Vista 
$615,000 Fri, 3:30-5 

Fox & Carskadon 

Dolores & 10th $639,000 

Fri & Sat, 3:30-5:30 
Performance Realty 

San Carlos & 9th $649,000 

Sun, 1-4 The Mitchell Croup 

Casanova, 3 NE/3rd $659,000 

Sun, 1-4 Fox Sc Carskadon 


Sat, 2-4 


San Antonio, 3 NE/9th 

$749 000 

Del Monte Realty 


Casanova, 2 NFVl 2th $835,000 
Sat, 2-4 Del Monte Realty 


Carmelo, 2 NW/4th 
Fri, Sat Sc Sun. 1-4 
Fox Sc Carskadon 

San Antonio St 2nd 
Fri St Sun, 3:30-5:30 
Performance Realty 


$895,000 


$995,000 


Cajumci. 

116 Yankee Beach. 

$1,600^)00 

Sun, l:o0-4:30 John Saar/Remax 

2321 Bayview . $2,295,000 

Sat, 2-4:30/Sun, 1:30-4:30 
Coldwell Banker 


‘Cmim HiSmANS>s 


199 Van Ess 
Sat, 1-3 

166 Spindrift 

Th, 9:30-12:31 


$795,000 
Del Monte Realty 

$2,900,000 
Del Monte Realty 


CAKMeL So. 


Rocky Pt/Hwy. 1 
Sat Sc Sun, 12-4 
Bill Probasco/MCI 

Rocky Pt/Hwy. 1 
Sat & Sun., 12-4 
Bill Probasco/MCI 


$1,600,000 


$3,500,000 


Carmel Valley 

23 Callc de Este $39^000 

Sun, 2-5 Del Monte Realty 


60 Middle Cyn. 
Sat, 2-4 


$399,000 
Coldwell Banker 


25505 Tierra Grande $449,500 

Sat, 2-4 Del Monte Realty 

8062 Lake PI. $559,000 

Sat Sc Sun, 1-3 Del Monte Realty 


24690 Outlook 
Sun,1-4 


$595,000 
Fox Sc Carskadon 


127 Montecitq. #7 
Sat, 11:30-1:30 Del 

400 Mar Vista, #13 
Sat, 1-4 Fox 

249 Forest Ridge 
Sat St Sun, 4-6 
Calandra Real Estate 

1199 Harrison St. 
Sat, 1-4 Del 

7 Abinantc Way 
Sun, 2-4 Del 


$154,700 
Monte Realty 

$289,500 
St Carskadon 

$345,000 


$349,000 
Monte Realty 

$379,000 
Monte Realty 


Hwr.68 


25200 Baronet $395,000 

Sun, 1-4 f'fcg Shankie R.E. 

13000 Paseo Barranco 
$425^00 Sun, 1-4 

Greg Shankie Real Estate 

40 Calera Cyn. Rd. $460,000 

Sun, 1-3:30 Fouratt-Simmons 

24965 Corte Poco $595,000 
Sun, 1-4 Creg Shankie R.E. 

11826 Saddle Rd. $750,000 

Sat, 2-4 Coldwell Banker 

11466 Saddle Rd. $995,000 

Sat, 11-4 Coldwell Banker 


pacific GIBve 


239 Lobos Ave. 
Sat, 2:15-4:15 

516 8th St. 

Sun,1-3 

214 Park St. 

Sat, 12-2 

2911 Ronsford 
Sun, 2-4 


$249,000 
Del Monte Realty 

$257,000 
Del Monte Realty 

$259,500 
Del Monte Realty 

$300,000 
Fox St Carskadon 


Pebble Beach 


Ocean Pines Ln., #56 $289,000 

Sat & Sun, 1-5 Fouratt-Simmons 

4083 Sunset Ln. $445,000 

Fri & Sun, 1-4 Fox St Carskadon 

4035 Costado Ln. $445,000 

Sat, 1-4 Coldwell Banker 

2857 Congress $575,000 

Sun, 2-4 Del Monte Realty 

3048 Valdez $619,000 

Sat Sc Sun, 1-4 Mitchell Croup 

1403 Cantera Court $625,000 
( Sun, 12:30-3:30 Coldwell Banker 

1048 Paradise Park $765,000 
Fri, 1-4/Sat, 12-3 Fox St Carskadon 


2817Sloat Rd. 
Sun,1-4 


$795,000 
Coldwell Banker 


2700 17 Mile Dr. $995,000 

Sat St Sun, 11-4 Del Monte Realty 

18 Spanish Bay $1,499,999 

I’hur-Sun, 1-4 Fox St Carskadon 

.3151 Spruance $1,955,000 

Sat, l:.'v0-4:30/Sun, 1- 4:30 
Coldwell Ranker 


Briefly Speaking 

New graphics company to produce 
magazine with focus on ‘affordability’ 

Homes & land magazine has announced that its 
new pre-press division, Carmel Color Graphics, will 
begin production of “Affordable Living — Property 
for Sale and Rent in Monterey County.” 

According to its publisher Gregg Wells, the maga¬ 
zine will strive to fill the need for affordable advertis¬ 
ing featuring low- to middle-end properties. 

The magazine will be published monthly and will 
feature a color cover. Like Homes & Land magazine, 
it will be free to the public. 

Realtors to sponsor Youth Baseball team 

The CARMEL Association of Realtors, at its Jan. 
13 meeting, pa.ssed a motion to sponsor a team during 
the 1994 Carmel Youth Baseball league season. 

The season gets underway in March. 


Enchanted Oaks 

Vintage building, downtown Carmel. Great 
street appeal, good foot trafUc. TWo separate 
structures, small private courtyard. "Central 
Commercial" zone. All four units have full 
kitchens and baths. Call for further information. 

SSXSfOOO 

SandraCAsliby-408-fi4<1200 



PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 
VACATION & LONG-TERM RENTALS 

Wc are currently seeking vacation homes and long term 
rentals for our property management department. We 
have numerous clients waiting for vacation homes this 
summer. We also have need ofyearround vacation rentals. 
Why not let^our home wc^k for you when you are not 
using it? We treat your home as if it was ours. We offer 
peace of mind for our owners, furnish'conyjuter itemized 
statements, and maintain higher occupancy percentages. 
San Carlos Agency has been doing property management 
on the peninsula for over 40 years. Call us for more 
information.. 


SAN CARLOS AGENCY 

I Real Estate and Propety Management 

26358 CARMEL RANCHO LANE 

(at the entraoe to The Barnyard) 

624-3846 or 659-3731 after 5 p.m. 


"Buy With Confidence...Sell With Security" 

SINCE 1910 

Rose D. Ulman 

REA L ESTATE BRO KER 

BEST PRICED LOT 
In the Highlands 

In authentic Carmel Highlands; with Whitewater 
ocean views. Priced to sell at $150,000. Call 
now for more information and 
its great location! 

We List All Carmel Highlands Properties Except Those 
That Are Over-Priced. 

Contact: Bill Ostradick 625-2865 or 624-7722 

FERN CANYON ROAD (Adjjoining North of Highlands Inn) 


CARMEL VALLEY 

Lovely maintained home on 
useable acre, 3 BR-2 BA, floor 
to ceiling used brick fireplace, 
wrap around decks overlook 
gracious oaks, <& ponds for 
relaxed living. $ 349 , 000 . 

Call Marlene 

Greg Shankie Real Estate 
646-1401 or 646-0253 


48 The Carmel Pine Cone/CV OuHook 


February 3, 1994 




















Classified A dvertising 


^ ^ -vi * 


.. v"'y'yvv,'X'>iv' 








Art & Antiques For Rent Houses For Rent Houses 


THOMAS KINKAOE print; ‘Main 
Svaat at Dusk. Plaoervilla. 1016.* 
«896/950, signed by artist- $1,950. 
(916) 644-4312 2/3 

WANTED: Old colna, currency, large 
size A National banknotes, gold ft 
silver items. Jewelry scrap, dental, 
etc. Also, old Indian items; baskets, 
beadwork, etc. Old Monterey Coins, 
527 Hartnell, Monterey, CA 93940. 
372-1225 2/3 (TF) 


Property 

Management 


Property 

Management 


Services 


Business 

Opportunities 


Solvang's Most 
Prestigious Locs^on 


JhfRfnmissance Buildup 

High-profile, free¬ 
standing showroom 
with extraordina^ old- 
world carved millwork 
and architectural detail 
inside and out. 

This is an exceptional 
leasing opportunity for 
a high-quality retailer or 
fine restaurant. 

Call Ron Palladino 
at (805)688-6222. 


WANT TO BUY small Bed ft Break 
fast in Carmel area. (209) 763-5619 
2/3 


For Rent 


r Property Management 

PEBBLE BEACH—Furnished Home 
$2000—3 M, 2 bs, beautifully furnished. Avail. 12/1 
CARMEL VALLEY—Retirement Community & Homes 
$1350—2bd.,2ba. condo, fumished.nr. laundry,inc. util. 
$1500—Hidden Hills, great neighborhood 3 bd, 2 ba, garage 
$2000—White Oaks condo, fum., 2bd, 2- l/2ba, very nice 
CARMEL—Front Duplex Unit, Home 
$1500—4 bd, 2.S ba, garage, walk to town. 

PACIFIC GROVE—Large Wooded Lot, Remodeled Home 
k $1600—Exceptionalremodeled2bd,2ba,den,fabulous kit ^ 

j^V acofion Homes Available Throughout The Peninsula. 
26613 Carmel Center Place, Suite 202 
Carmel, C A 93923 

PROPERTY MANAGEMENT IS OUR 
ONLY BUSINESS...THAT'S THE DIFFERENCE 


‘All real estate advertised in this news¬ 
paper is subject to the Federal Fair 
Housing Act of 1966, which makes it 
illegal to advertise any preference, 
limitation or discrimination based on 
race, color, religion, or national dis¬ 
crimination. Brown ft Wilson Inc will 
not krxtwingly accept any advertise¬ 
ment for real estate which is in viola- 
tionofthelaw. Our readers are hereby 
intormed that all dwellirtgs advertised 
in tNs newspaper are available on an 
equal opportunity basis' 


CARMEL MEADOWS. Lovely, peace¬ 
ful 2 bedrm, 2 bath, fuHy furnished, 
walk toquietbeach,near shops. From 
March 1. 373-0100 2/3 

PRUNEDALE. 3-5 Bedroom Home, 1 
1/2 acres, can be office or sub-rental, 
quiet area. $1500. 394-5136 2/3 


BIG SUR CUSTOM HOME: 3 bedrm, 
2 bath, near Ventana. ocean view- 
$ 1 500/mo. 667-0325 2/17 


For Sale 


For Sale 


$250 OFF 

First month's rent! 

1 & 2 bdrm. apts. at $555- 
$635. Water & trash paid. 
Enclosed garage/storage. 
Clean & quiet. Like new. 

No pets. 

MARINA MEADOWS 

3350 Del Monte Bl. 
Marina* 883-2310 

CARMEL. 3-room cottage, recently 
remodeled. Spacious decks, 2 blocks 
from Ocean Ave. $650/mo., 1 st, last ♦ 
secunty. Call 372-8475, 9-5 or 624- 
1445, after 6pm. 2/10 

APT. FOR LEASE; downtown Carmel, 
upstairs studto- $62S/mo. No smok¬ 
ing, 624-8535, 8-12 am. 2/3 

CARMEL VALLEY. Furnished short 
term rooms ft apts. Weekly or monthly. 
Blue Sky Lodge, 659-2256. 2/24 

(TF) 

For Rent 
Commercial 


400 SQ.FT. RETAIL. High traffic, 
Carmel-by-the-Sea. Gabrielle, BT- 
broker. 375 8000/626-6565 2/24 

COMMERaAL, RETAIL or OFHCE 
SPACE in central Carmel, ground 
level, across from Rod Lion (between 
5th ft 6th). 350 to 750 sq.ft. 757-2647 
or 625-5090. 2/3 (TF) 

For Rent Houses 


CARMEL. 3 room cottage, recently 
remodeled. Spacious decks, 2 biks. 
from Ocean Ave. $650/mo, 1 st ft last 
+ security. Call 372-8475,9am-5pm 
or 624-1445 after 6pm. 2/3 


Y/AiHED 


Fine J 

lewel 

rv, Silver and 

Antiques 

for purcl 

hase 


(ppcfi ill hcanliful Cannvl 

Erickson & Erickson 

San Carlos btwn. 5th & 6th 

(3 doors Icfl of Hogs Breath Inn) 

626-3048 


SHARE EXCLUSIVE San Francisco 
Russian Hill Condo. Own 1/8th inter¬ 
est! (Not a time-share.) Great loca¬ 
tion, walk to Fisherman’s Wharf, Info: 
(408)688-1147. 2/3 

Help Wanted 


EDUCATION PROGRAM CO¬ 
ORDINATOR. Exciting summer posi¬ 
tion working with foreign exchange 
student organization. Plan program & 
recruit host families for 4 weeks this 
summer. Must be organized, know 
your community ft go a mile a minute! 
$2500-$3500 (408) 977-3460 2/3 

WILDUFEAXmSERVATION JOBS 
Game wardens, secunty, mainte¬ 
nance, etc. No exp. necessary. Now 
hiring. For info call (219) 794-0010, 
ext. 7204,6am to 7pm. 7 days. 2/3 

MODELS, HOSTESSES and Sales 
Reps for Cameo Home Party Ran 
372-6339 2/17 

Homes For Sale 


NEW - 3 bedrm. 2 1/2 bath, 2200 
sq.ft, in the “ViMage." 10 ft. ceilings, 
marble bath, $289,000. NEW - 3 
bedrm, 2 bath. 2000 sq.ft., golf course, 
patio home with pool, $200,000. NEW 
— 2 bedrm. 2 1/2 bath, 2300 sq.ft, 
ocean front condo with white water 
views, $275,000. Vero Beach Florida, 
Chris or Lois. 800-533-2769. 2/17 


Pets 


Going Away FOR 
THE DAY, WEEK OR 
MONTH/ 

ijf What about 


Lei Puppy Hugs keep 
your best friend 
company. 

Puppy Hugs Pet 
Sitting ¥ 

Loving cart for your p^ts, pUmtt 
mnd bom* 

373-5376 • Monterey 

Bona*^ I kMif ifvuiwa. MM Ntp*, 
i Omfiuwr of ComifiMpae A Btan 


Services 


Property Management 

Long Term Leases & Vacation Rentals 
Barbara Wermuth or Judy Ivey 

Established 1913 


Dolores, South of Seventh, Carmel 
624-6484 ^ 


r Property Mooogement 

■VACATION HOMES 

■RESIDENTIALHOMES ICONDOMINIUMS 
^ LONGTERMLEASES SHORT TERM LEASES 

^ PROPERTY MANAGEMENT IS OUR 

W^ ^jPNLY BUSINESS...THArS THE DIFFERENCE 

S^gfej^ROFESSIONALCARE ■ PERSONAL ATTENTION 

626-8163 

26613 CARMELCENTER PLACE ■ SUITE 202B CARMEL 


PROPERTY 

MANAGEMENT 

Short term or long term, 
furnished or unfurnished. 
More than 30 years of 
managing property on the 
Monterey Peninsula. We 
treat your home as if it 
were our Own. 

SAN CARLOS 
AGENCY 
( 408 ) 624-3846 

Real Estate & 
Property Managemerit 

or 659-3731 

(after 5 p.m.) 


• Carmel • 

• Pebble Beach < 

• Ca^el Valley 


Services 


• Reclaim the value of your view! Call 
ROYALTY WINDOW CLEANING in 
Carmel tor a free estimate. 626-4367 
TF 

BACKHOE jobs: Digging, leveling, 
trenching. cleari ng. Professional work. 
Reasonable rates. Quick service 
References Cal I John. 899-2397 TF 


PATHOS 

PAINIlfG 

SYSIMS 


l*AI I{ICK KeNLY 

Interior & Kxterior F’ainting 

I’REE FSEIMAI’ES 

References 
15 Years Experience 

Lie. 11646493 

(408) 384-2062 


WATTS PLASTERING. Repair work 
a speaalty. Lie #537996. Bonded. 
883 4800 2/3 

“COMPUTER DOCTOR" Consult- 
ing, set-up, instruction, troubleshoot, 
updates, technical support, sales ft 
service. Call Alex, 625-9356 2/ 

24(TF) 


Let me build 
it for you! 

Solid Hardwood 
Furniture 
Custom Cabinets 
Antique Repair & 
Restoration 

Firm Estimate with 
\ No CXiligation 

CaU Larry Busick 
659-5038 

QualUy to your 
S my satisfaction 




Our 24-hour 
Telecopier number 

(408)62^8076 

The Review 
The Carmel Pine Cone 



Mark Watson 

SuMiw g & h«>o»o<o« i 
licMM 403774 
Hom londJiig i lipain 
Ddm by hetHMondi 

647-6747 


Squccky Clean 

windows 

Residential /CommsrcM 
Work Guaranteed 
IS Years Experience 

John Laurence 
FREE ^TIMATE 

646-1018 

RainOtecks on Rainy Days 

Situations Wanted 


WONDERFUL WOMAN4>ROFES- 
SIONAL • art/publishing busioMS - 
looking Ibr lov^ housesilling situa- 
tiorvstudio rental (sunny, well-main¬ 
tained). Long-time resident; excellent 
references. (408)659-9111 2/3 

MATURE WOMAN with 9 yr. old son. 
seeks kve-in position. Will cook, dean 
and has own transportation tor er¬ 
rands ft appts. Refererwes. Over 15 
yrs.exp. 6^ 1164or659-3952 (TF) 


Vintage 

Property 

Management 

Rosemarie Carter 

624-2930 

San Carlos near 8th 
Carmel 

Services 


JACK OF ALL TRADES - MASTER 
OF MANY Hauling/Landscape/ 
Plumbing/Carpeniry/General Mainte¬ 
nance/Painting Call Joe at 659-5102 
TF 


Special 

Notices 


BAHAMA CRUISE. 5 days/4 nightt 

UrKlerbooksd! Mustseill $279/oouple. 

Limited tickets. (407) 767-8100, ext. 

3230, Mon-Sat, 6am-7pm PST 1/27 
0 

Vacation Rentals 


Vacation at (Juall^ 
Lodge or CV. Ranch 

...in the sunshine of 
beautiful Carmel Valley 

CaU Steven Lawry 
Quail Lodge Realty . 
V (408) 624-1581 ^ 

CARMEL. Oceanfront, spectacular 
views, wonderful home, dean, garage 
(510) 935-5950 7/7 

CAPTIVATING COTTAGE. Carmel, 
near beach. 2-bedrm, 2-ba. Beamed 
ceiling. Fireplace. Furn. (805) 569- 
1855 1/27 

CARMEL COTTAGE. 1 bedrm. fully 
furnished, fireplace, patio- $1500/mo 
No pets. 624-1136 (TF) 

CARMEL HOUSE, walk to beach & 
town. 2 bdrm 2 bath. 624-4385 
(TT)_^_ 

MAUI. Ocean view deluxe condo for 
2. $455/wk Avail. 3/12 — 4/9. Owner, 
(916)885-7252/(916)885-1012 2/ 

10 


Ficrmous business name 

STATEMENT 
Fila No. F940173 
The following persons are doing 
business as GROSVENOR'S 
GARDEN INN, Carpenter ft 
Valley Way, P.O. Box 2623, 
Carmel, Ce. M921. 

Maguy Mignon, 4 Rue Oes 
Arsilliers, 4890 Maldedy, Belgium 
Philippe Mignon, 4 Rue Des 
Arsilliers. 4890 Maldedy. Belgium 
Michel Mignon, P.O. Box 95, 
Carmel, Ca. 93921; 3081 Serra 
Ave., Carmel, CiT. 93923. 

This business is conducted by a 
general partnership 
Registrant commenced to 
transact business under the 
fictitious business name listed 
above in March 1978. 

(s) Michel Mignon 
This statement was filed with the 
County Clerk of Monterey County 
on Jan. 25, 1994 
Publication dates: Feb. 3, 10, 17, 
,24.1994. 

(PC 2-05) 


Februaiy'jT'TP^ The Carmel Pine Cone/CV Ouflook 49 
















PET SITTING 


ADDITIONS & REMODELS 


TOP NOTCH CRAFTSMANSHIP 
and oiMlofner service. Budget analysis & free 
estfmales. No hidden costs. Licensed, bonded, 
insured. Tony Watson. 37S-9684. TF 


ART INSTRUCTION 


ART 

Instruction in drawing, painting, history, philoso¬ 
phy, acquisitions/investments. Specializing in 20th 
century and contemporary. Billy Evans, Carmel 
625-6113. 2/10 


ATTORNEYS 


LAW OFFICES OF 
THOMAS V. NASH 

Clear and simple explanations and solutions to 
your legal problems. Emphasis on acddentdaims, 
business law. real estate. Initial consultation free. 
SW Mission at 4th. 624-5000. TF 


CABINETRY 


FINE WOOD-WORKING 

Furniture, entertainment centers, cabinets. 28yrs. 
experience. Catering to the discriminating 
homeowner. Exceptmasl attention to detail. Call 
1-761-1766 for free estimate and design consul¬ 
tation or (600) 233-7309. 2/3 


CARPENTRY A CONSTRUCTION 

DECKS a FENCES 

Build new or repair existing. No job too big or 
small. Lie. #617615 Tony Watson, 375-9684. 

TF 

BLACK BEAR CARPENTRY 

Professional interior remodeling. Kitchens and 
baths our specialty. Complete plumbing services 
plus custom decK/fence/dry-rot work. References. 
Oavid at 658-3036. - TF 

GENERAL BUILDING CONTRACTOR 

Finish-work, Book shelves. Storage closets. Cabi¬ 
nets for garages. Fences, Decks, RenKxlel Baths 
and Kitchens, Dryrot and Termite work. Irrigation 
Installations and repair. Also do commercial work/ 
maintenance ar>d repair for offices. No job too big 
or small. I do it all. Free estimates. Bonded. Cal 
Lie. #612226. Eric 622-9150. TF 

DRY ROT & TERMITE REPAIR 

Very experierreed. Top quality work. Licensed, 
bonded, fnsured. Tony, 375-9684. TF 

SCOTTS CUSTOM CARPENTRY 

All remodels ar>d repair. Doors, windows, stair¬ 
ways, decks, ferrees. Designs drawn. Free esti¬ 
mates. 375-5918. 

20 YEARS IN CARMEL 

Full service contractor. #189188. Insured. Resi¬ 
dential, commercial Reasonable rates No job 
too small. 625-0102. 2/3 


CHAUFFEURS 


WEDRIVEU, INC. 

Private chauffeurs drive custome's car. Fully in¬ 
sured and bonded since 1988. Chauffeured rent¬ 
als available. 1-800-773-7483. 


FIREWOOD 


BUY NOW! SUMMER RATES! 

Professionally prepared quality seasoned oak, 
sycamore, eucalyptus, acacia, cypress, pine & 
cedar. Green oak & stacking avail. 
John, 646-4540 TF 


FITNESS TRAINING 


PERSONAL FITNESS TRAINING 

by Ken Green in private fitness 'Studio One-On- 
One * Private or pairs. 372-0221 or 625-1173. 

TF 


_ / FLOORS _ 

HARDWOOD FLOORS 

For beautiful new looking floors call Ken Rob¬ 
erts — 40 years experience. Sand and refinish¬ 
ing. 624-7175 or 624-1025 TF 


GARDEN LANDSCAPE 
& IRRK$ATION 


LANDSCAPE GARDENING 
FOR ALL SEASONS. 

Residential garden maintenance. Dependable, 
competentcareforyourproperty. Call Ron 626- 
3739. TF 

PROFESSIONAL GARDENING 

Clean-up« and landscaping. Sprinkler repair. 
Contract #652483. Call 659-9244. 2/3 

EXPERT LANDSCAPE GARDENER 
Drip systems & low maintenance gardens a spe¬ 
cialty. Monthly rates available. Chris 655-8499. 
2/10 


GLASS a MIRRORS 


FAST GLASS 

Residential/oommercial. Broken glass replaced 
fast. Mirrors, shower doors. AUTO/TRUCK glass, 
mobile service if needed. Same day service in 
most cases. Free pick-up and delivery available. 
394-9344 SAVE THIS NUMBER. TF 


HAIR REPLACEMENT 


PRINCETONIAN 

Male pattern baldness and dtemo-radiation spe¬ 
cialist. Mission St. near 5th Carmel. 624-8141. 
_ TF 

HANDYMAN 


JACK OF ALL TRADES - 
MASTER OF MANY 

Hauling / Landscape / Plumbing / Carpentry / 
Painting / General Maintenance. Call Joe 
at 659-5102 TF 


HOME REPAIRS 


MASTER CRAFTSMAN 

Electric wiring and plumbing is my specialty, but I 
can do almost anything in home repairs. Ftefer- 
ences, call Wayne Herring.375-2980 TF 

ROOF-RAIN GUTTER CLEANING 

License, roof broom swept, unplug downspouts, 
wash skylights. Senior discount. Local references. 
Best jobi Best price! Free estimates. 
Fletch, 626-6326. TF 

DAVE'S CARPENTRY & 

HANDYMAN SERVICES 

Low rates, local references. Work guaranteed. 
375-0929. 


HOUSECLEANING 


"TWO GIRLS FROM CARMEL" 

Specialists in housecleaning since 1979. Weekly, 
bi-weekly monthly—we‘11 tailor our services to 
meet your needs. Bonded, free estimates. 

626-4426. TF 


HOUSE PAINTING 


BRENT BAYSINGER PAINTER 

Interior-Exterior. Old fashioned quality. Free esti¬ 
mates. Excellent Carmel, Pebble Beach and 
Carmel Valley references Lie. #663828 Insured. 
625-0679. TF 

PAINTING & RESTORING 

Always correct surface preparation. Exact color 
matching. Great restoration. Interior-exterior. In¬ 
sured, License #436767. Call Will at 
625-3307, 20 year references. TF 

PAULDI MAURO PAINTING 

Serving Carmel's painting needs since 1978. Pro¬ 
fessional quality work. Inside and out. Lie. 
No.476690. Fully insured. 624-8218 TF 

JIMMY DOMINGO PAINTING 

Interior/Exterior, quality, efficiency, dependabil¬ 
ity, competitive rates, free estimates, excellent 
references Lie #604568 insured 

624-0859. TF 

"FRESH COATS" 

Interior/Exterior, over 11 years of experience in 
the Monterey/Carmel area Free estimates. Li¬ 
cense #534866 Call David at 372-1414. 3/3 


HOUSEPAINTING 
OUALRY PAINTER- 

Master painter—35 years experience. Very neat. 
cte#n. Kitchen cabinets, restoration expert. Rea¬ 
sonable prices. References. Call Frank624-1197. 
2/24 


INSTRUCTION 


PROFESSIONAL TENNIS PRO 

Now offering group and induvidual lessons. 
375-3464. ' TF 

AUTHOR'S CONSULTANT & 

COACH IN CARMEL 

Stuart Miller offers assistance to first-time book 
writers. All aspects: from planning, hartd-holding, 
and writing to publishing and public relatiosn. 
Clients in thirty-nine states & six countries. Phone: 
626-9477. 4/7 


INSURANCE 


BARNEY BELLECI 
STATE FARM INSURANCE 

We specialize in Auto-Home-Health-Life annu¬ 
ities and Business insurance. Please call us for an 
appointment to review any of your insurance poli¬ 
cies. 624-6466. TF 


LANGUAGE INSTRUCTION 


TEACH RUSSIAN LANGUAGE ' 
AND CULTURE 

Teach not only Russian Language, but also people 
and culture. 655-3686. 


MEDICAL SERVICES 


JAMES W. MICHEL 
M.D.-PHYSICIAN 

Located on Lincoln St. at 6th Avenue, next to 
Homestead Inn. With a full family practice empha¬ 
sizing women's health and geriatrics, ar>d with 16 
years experience attending individual personal 
health needs, I am board certified arxf on staff at 
Community Hospital of the Monterey Peninsula. 
You are welcome 8:30-5:00 p.m., and earlier or 
later by appointment. 624-2431. TF 

EXPERIENCED MEDICAL 
ASSISTANT 

Available for private care, including driving to 
appointments and running errands. Dependable • 
Excellent references. Elia, 384-3436. Pager, 645- 
4551. 


MOVING & HAUUNG 


STUDENTS HAULING 

New, larger trucks, 2 men. Reliable service — 
reasonable rates. Call Vic., 373-0439; 
pager, 646-7689. TF 

TRASH IT 

Hauling is my calling. Call John for hauling and 
trash removal. TRASH IT. 659-5847 TF 

PENINSULA HAULING 

Construction, yard dean-up tree work, trips to the 
dump. Two trucks — 3ton& 10 ton. Responsible 
Presentable Most reasonable rates 
648-3810. TF 


NURSING 


CNA 

CNA Work out of home. 11 p m.-7 a m. 5 yrs. 
experience. 899-3634. 


_ PAVING _ 

STATE WIDE PAVING 

All types of asphalt paving. Spedalizing in drive¬ 
ways, root removal and repairs. Lic.#593-953. 
4(408)671-9255 #(408)758-7604 TF 


PACKING & SHIPPING 


MAILBOXES...ETC. 

•UPS AUTHORIZED SHIPPING OUTLET' Pack¬ 
age delivery via UPS, Fed X, U S. Post Office 
Other services: FAX sending and receiving, ship¬ 
ping and packing supplies, NOTARY, WesUnion, 
personal and business stationery, PRIVATE MAIL¬ 
BOX RENTAL, etc 225 Crossroads Shopping 
Ctr , Carmel — 625-2800; Forest Hill Ctr 
(Forest & Prescott), P G 372-4849. TF 


CREATURE COMFORT 

A bonded CAT sitting service providing loving 
care in Monterey Peninsula homes since 1986. 
Please caH for literature and references. 
626-1116 TF 

PAM'S PET CARE 

I will visit your home daily to pamper your pets 
while you're away-large or small. 624-6977 TF 


PLUMBING 


HARDISTY PLUMBING 

STATE Lie. #C-36 631213. Expert: Sales-instal- 
lation or development of all your plumbing and 
construction requirements. Phone/Fax (408) 659- 
4378, Carmel Valley. Member Better Business 
Bureau. 1/95 TF 


POWER EQUIPMENT 
REPAIR 


CURTS SMALL EQUIPMENT REPAIR 

Specializing in mowers, blowers, chainsaws, etc. 
Pickup/Delivery Available. 659-4239 4/25 


ROOF REPAIR 


RAINS COMING! 

Roof and gutter deaning, and repairs. Also plumb¬ 
ing and painting. Very reasonable rates. 
FREE ESTIMATES. Eric, 899-2225. TF 


TREE SERVICE 


BLUE SKY TREE SERVICE 

Complete service offered by native Carmelite. 
FULL INSUREDS1,000,000coverage. Calif. State 
Cont. No. 547701. Free estimates. 626-1162. 

TF 

i' 

SPENCER’S TREE SERVICE 

Professional tree care. Stump removal, trimming, 
topping; removal, lot dearing. Insured. Free esti¬ 
mates. 624-0187. TF 

» 1 

JERRY GATES TREE SERVICE 

Tree and stump removal. Trimming & topping. 
View enhartcement. Fully insured. PL & PD plus 
workmans comp. State Lie. 641098. 646-8199. 
State Lie. #67370 TF 

IVERSON'S TREE SERVICE 
& STUMP REMOVAL 

Removal, trimming, lot dearing, brush chipping, 
and tractor work. Fully insured. Free estimates. 
Uc. #677370. 625-5743. ' TF 


WINDOW CLEANING 


MONTEREY BAY WINDOW 
CLEANING CO. 

Free estimates. Our uniformed staff will profes¬ 
sionally service your window cleaning needs 
Regular maintanence discounts. One million 
dollar liability insurance. 624-6507. TF 

PENINSULA WINDOW 
CLEANING 

No need to see through a glass darkly...Call 
Richard today for a free estimate.624-3712 TF 


WINDOW & FLOOR 
COVERINGS 


ROD WOODARD 

Featuring custom draperies, shutters, blinds, ver¬ 
ticals, pleated & roller shades Carpet, vinyl & 
hardwood floors. Calif. Contractor's #C 15 541199 
For free estimates call 625-5339 
TF 


THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA 
CONTRACTOR'S LICENSE LAW 
requires contractors include their license 
number in their advertising. An unlicensed 
contractor can perform work if the con¬ 
tract price is less than $300. for more 
information, call: 

THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA 
CONTRACTOR'S LICENSING BOARD, 
(408) 277-1244. 


50 The Carmel Pine Cone/CV Outlook 


February 3, 1994 








» t 


Public notices 



(TS No. SM1S686C) 

Noncf OF TNUSTEF* SALE 
Loon No. EWMESIOtS 

JAMES P. MUaiQAN. n duly appolniod Truotoo undar Iho following 
Dood of Trust WILL SELL AT PUSUC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST 
SEXIER FOR CASH ANQOR THE CA8MERS OR CERTIREO CHECKS 
SPEOREO M CIVIL CODE SECTION 2t2«h (payabis w ihs lims of sNs in 
la«M monay of iha Undad Staiaa) al right #<0 arKf imsrast oonvoyad 10 wid 
now hold by him undar said Oaad of Trust in tha proparty harainaftar 


TRUSTOR: UndaS. Smith 
■ENERCIARY: First Frwddin FinwicW Corp. 

Raoordad January 23. igso as Inabumam No. 04468 in Book 2462 pi«s 
1066, Ra-fooordad on . aa tnatumant No.. Book. Paga of OUgM Racords 
In Iha olloa of ttta Raoordar of Montaray County, CaMomia. daaoribing tha 


PARCEL 1: 

A PART OF THE RANCHO SAN JOSE Y SUR CHKXJITO, BEGMNMG 
AT STATION Yit, WHICH STATION IS SHOWN ON 'LICENSED 
SURVEYORS MAP OF TOMPKINS’ PROPERTY AT CARMEL HIGHLAND. 
CALIFORNIA’ FLED IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF 
THE COUNTY OF MONTEREY, STATE OF CAUFORNIA. M MAP BOOK 3 
OF SURVEYS. AT PAGE 118 THEREM. AND RUNNING THENCE N. 35* 
00 W.. 46.54 FEET: THENCE N. 3* Off W.. 36.76 FEET TO STATION Y13; 
THENCE N. 45* Of W.. 36 JO FEET TO STATION Yl4: THENCE S. 85* 44’ 
W.. 133.79 FEET; THENCE S. 21* Sff E.. 7460 FEET; THENCE S. 40* 55’ 
W., 75.23 FEET; THENCE S. 78* 5ff E.. 148.96 FEET; THENCE N. 45* 
11’E.. 90.42 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; AND BEING A 
PORTION OF THE CARMEL HIGHLANDS TRACT M SAK> RANCHO SAN 
JOSE Y SUR CHIQUITO. 

SAVINGS AND EXCEPTING THEREFROM THAT PORTION 
AC coi I ouic* 

BEGINNMO AT A POINT LYING SOUTH 85* 44’ WEST. 90.52 FEET 
FROM STATION Y14, AS SAID STATION IS SHOWN ON THE ABOVE 
MENTIONED MAP; AND RUNNING THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF* 
BEGMNMG. 

(1) SOUTH 85* 44’ WEST. 43.27 FEET; THENCE (2) SOUTH 21* 38’ 
EAST, 74.50 FEET; THENCE (3) SOUTH 40* 55’ WEST. 45.2 FEET; 
THENCE (4) SOUTH 78* 58’ EAST. 20.00 FEET; THENCE (5) NORTH 56* 
48’ EAST. 41.88 FEET; THENCE (6) NORTH 21* 42 EAST, 25.00 FEET; 
THENCE (7) NORTH 18* 08’ WEST. 66.94 FEET TO THE POINT OF 
BEGINNING. AND BEING A PORTION OF THE CARMEL HIGHLANDS 
TRACT M SAID RANCHO SAN JOSE Y SUR CHIQUITO. 

PARCEL N: 

BEGMNMG AT STATION Y11, WHK>f STATION IS SHOWN ON THE 
TICENSEO SURVEYOR’S MAP OF TOMPKMS’ PROPERTY OF CARMEL 
HX5HLANOS. CALIFORNIA', FILED IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY 
RECORDER OF THE COUNTY OF MONTEREY. STATE OF CALIFORNIA. 
IN MAP BOOK 3 OF SURVEYS. AT PAGE 118 THEREM; AND RUNNING 
THENCE S. 45* 11’ W.. 90.42 FEET TO A 2" X 2" S^E. THENCE S. 51* 
Iff E.. 27.81 FEET; THENCE N. 45* 11’ E.. 75.71 FEET; THENCE N. 21* 
58' W.. 30.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, BEING A PORTION 
OF THE CARMEL HIGHUNDS PROPERTY IN RANCHO SAN JOSE Y 
SUR CHIQUITO. 

A/K/A; 2 Mount Devon Road 
Carmel Highlands, CA 93923 
APN •: 241-155-002 

YOU ARE M DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED January 3. 
1990. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT 
MAY BE SOLO AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION 
OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEOINQ AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD' 
CONTACT A LAWYER. 

'(If a street address or common designation of property is shown above, 
no warranty is given as to its completeness or correctness).' The beneficiary 
under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the 
undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a 
written Notice of Default arxl Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said 
Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the 
real property is located. 

Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, express or 
implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the unpaid 
balance of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest as in said 
provided, advances, if any under the terms of said Deed of Trust, fees, 
charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts aeated by said Deed 
of Trust. Said sale will be held on; 

FEBRUARY 28, 1994 AT 1:45 P.M. AT THE ENTRANCE STEPS 
(FACING GABILAN STREET) TO THE COUNTY COURTHOUSE. 240 
CHURCH STREET. SALINAS. CA. 

At the time of the initial publication of this notioe, the total amount of the 
unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the above described deed of 
trust and estimated costs, expenses and advances is $546,639.33. 

Date: 1-19-94 
/s/James P. Mulligan 
as said Trustee 

600 North Broadway — Suite 400 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53202-5099 
(414) 224-1236 or (414) 224-1235 
Publication dates: Feb. 3,10,17,1994 
(PC 2-07) 


NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER 

YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED SEPTEMBER 
11.1990. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY. 
IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION 
0F*THE nature of the PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU. YOU SHOULD 
CONTACT A LAWYER. 

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE SALE 

On Wednesday, the 23th day of February, 1994 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock 
A.M., of said day at the main (South) entrance to the County Courthouse, 
(facing the Courtyard off Church St.), 240 Church Sti]pet, Salinas, Monterey 
County, California, Eureka Service Corporation, as Tmstee, will sell at public 
auction, to the highest bidder, for cash, in lawful money of the United States, 
all payable at the lime of sale, the following described real property, situated 
in the Monterey Judicial District, Monterey County, California, and described 
as follows; 

EXHIBIT ’’A’’ 

PARCEL 1: 

That portion of Lot 13B, of the James Meadows Tract, in the County of 
Monterey, State of California, as shown on Map filed January 29, 1947, in 
Volume 4, Page 36, of Surveys, in the office of the County Recorder of said 
county, describes as loHows: 

Beginning at the Northwest comer of the Carmel School Lot as shown on 
the partition Map of the James Meadows Tract, filed June 10, 1905, in 
Volume 1, Page 67. of Surveys, records of said County, therice, 

(1) North 17 Deg 03 Min. 30 Sec. East, 239.49 feet to a 1 1/2 iron pipe 
'TT9'; thence 

(2) South 79 Deg 08 Mm 30 Sec. East, 212.38 feet, more of less, to the 

Southeasterly line of the land described in the Deed to Louis S. Navaez, et 
ux, recorded October 22. 1931, in Volume^l2. Page 335, Offiaal Records; 
thertce, ' 

(3) South 17 Deg. 37 Min West. 264.48 feel to the Northeast corner of said 
school lot; thence, 

(4) North 72 Deg. 23 Min. West. 206.56 feet to the point of beginning 


PARCEL 2: 

A norvexckisive righl of way. 20 leal in width, lying 10 Mat on each side of 
the following deaortwd oemertine: 

Beginning at a poini«i4iich bears North 85 Deg. i4lAn. East 60.46 faet and 
NorVi 4 Deg. 48 fin. WesL 25.0 feet from the Southwest comer of Lot 13-^. 
as shown on 9ie map of the James Meadows Tract, filed in Volume 1, Pa^ 
07. of Surveys, records of said County; thence 

(1) North 9 Dag. 25 Mki. West, 6767IM; thence 

(2) Along a curve to the left. hsMng a radius of 250 leeL an arc distance of 
130.63 feet; thertce 

(3) North 41 Deg. 25 Min. WesL 68.11 feet; thence 

(4) North 28 Deg. 35 Mkt. East 10.64 feet; thence 

(5) North 20 Deg. 48 in. East, 52.60 IseL thence 

(0) North 5 Dog. 58 Min. West, 394.0 feet to a point srhich bears Northerly, 
at right angles. 10 feet from the Southerly line of the land described in the 
Deed to Paul E. Trotter, et ux. recorded March 23, 1931, in Volume 284, 
Page 386, Official Records of said County; thence, parallel to and 10 feet at 
right artgioe from the Southerly line of said land. 

(7) South 79 Deg. 06 Min. 30 Sec. East, 594.48 feet more of less, to the 
Easterly boundary of the land described in the Deed to Louis S. Navaez, et 
ux. recorded Ocl^r 23,1931, in Volume 312, Page 335, Official Records. 
Except the Easterly 160 feet thereof. 

Assessor's Parcel No(s). 169-041-04 

Commonly known as: 27185 Los Arboies, Carmel, Caiifomia 93923 
Said sale will be made without covenant or warranty regarding title, 
possession or encumbrances to satisfiy the obligation secur^ by and 
pursuant to the power of sale confsrred in a certain deed of trust executed 
by JAMES H. JOHNSTON and OAYNE V. JOHNSTON, as trustors, for the 
benefit and security of EUREKABANK, a Federal Savings Bank, dated 
September 11, 1990, and recorded on September 21, 1990 in the office of 
the Montsrey County Recorder, California, as Instrument No. 55914, in Reel 
2558, at Page 162, of Official Records. Eureka Service Corporation is 
trustee or substitute trustee under said deed trust. Said real property is being 
sold in an 'as »' oorKfition. 

DATED: Jwiuwy 12.1994 
TRUSTEE SALE NO. 6299 

Unpaid balance and estimated costs, expenses and advances are 
$572,431.53. 

Eureka Service Corporation 
950 Tower Lane, Suite 600 
Foster City, CA 94404 
(415) 358-6100 • Foreclosure Department 
BY (8) Sonia HaUera, Assistant Secretary 
Publk^on Dates: January 20,27 and February 3.1994. 

(PC114) 


NOTICE OF PETmON TO ADMINISTER ESTATE 
OF MYRTLE B. MANIGO 
CASE8MP12703 

1. To all hairs, beneficiaries, aeditors, contingent creditors, and persons 
who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of MYRTLE B. 
MANIGO. 

2. A PErmON has been filed by CAROLYN ROSE in the Superior Court 
of California. County of Monterey. 

3. THE PETITION requests that CAROLYN ROSE be appointed as 
personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. 

4. THE PETITION requests the decedents WILL and codicils, if any, be 
admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in 
the Me kept by the court. 

5. -THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the 
Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the 
personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court 
approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal 
representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless 
they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The 
independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested 
person fifes an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court 
should not grant the authority. 

7. A HEARING on the petition will be held on 2/18/94 at 9:30 a.m. located 
at 1200 Aguajito Road, K^terey, CA. 

8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the 
hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court 
before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your anorney. 

9. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the deceased, 
you must file you claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal 
representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first 
issuance of letters as provided in section 9100 of the California Probate 
Code. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the 
hearing date noticed above. 

10. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person 
interested in the estate, you may file with the court a formal Request, for 
Special Notice of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or 
of any petition or account as provided in section 1250 of the California 
Probate Code. A Request for Speoal Notice form is available from the court 
clerk. 

11. Attorney for petitioner: 

Thomas P. McCann 

33 Soladad Drive 

Monterey, CA 93940 

/s/ Thomas P. McCann 

This notice was filed with the Clerk of Monterey Jan 24.,1994 

Publication dates: Jan. 27, Feb 3, 10, 1994 

(PC119) 

Title Order No. 556422 
Trustee Sele No. 93-09-45K 
Reference No. 4483-5008376 
NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE 

YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 08/30/90. 
UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY,TT MAY 
BE SOLO AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE 
NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD 
CONTACT A LAWYER. 

On 02/23/94 at 10:00 A M., W.T. SERVICE CORPORATION. A 
CALIFORNIA CORPORATION as the duly appointed Trustee under and 
pursuant to Dood of TrusL Recorded on 09/04/90 as Document No. 52135 
Book 2551 Pago 267 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of 
MONTEREY County. Calikxnia, executed by; RONALD J. ANTUZZI AND 
KAREN ANTUZZI. HUSBAND AND WIFE. WILL SELL AT PUBLIC 
AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, (payable at time of sale 
in lawful money of the United States) at: THE MAIN (SOUTH) ENTRANCE 
TO THE COUNTY COURTHOUSE, (FACING THE COURTYARD OFF 
CHURCH STREET). 240 CHURCH STREET. SALINAS. CA all right, title 
and interest conveyed to and now held by it urtder said Deed of Trust in the 
property situated in said County, California desaibed as; 

EXHIBIT "A" 

PARCEL I: 

Lot Numbered 11, as said Lot is shown and so designated on that certain 
map entitled. 'Tract No. 858, Sleepy Hollow', etc., filed in Volume 13 of 
Maps. 'Cities and Towns', at l^e 112, Monterey County Records. 

PARCEL II: 

An easement for dnveway purposes across that certain parcel of land 
connecting the Easterly terminus of San Clemente Drive in Lot Numbered 12 
with the Carmel Valley Road, and more particularty described in that certain 


Deed recorded in Volume 1157 of Official Records of Montaray CourMy at 
Page 270, shown as TC on said map of ' S toapy Hoiow”. 

PARCEL M: 

A non-exduaive easement lor pnvaiM road purposes over the folawing as 
shown on said map; 

a) San demenie Drive, a privaia roadOff wide 

b) Sleepy HoMow Drive, a privaia road 6ff wide and 3ff wide 

c) Private Road Easements D, E, F, G, H and I. 

APN Number: 197-191-011 

The total amount of the unpaid balanoe of the obligation secured by the 
property to be sold arxf reiMonably estimated coats, expenses and advances 
at the time of the initial publication of the Notioe of Sale is $586,365.00. 
Payment must be by cash, a cashier's check drawn on a state or national 
ba^ a check drawn by a stale or tederai credk union, or a check dr a w n by a 
stats or federal savings and loan association, savings associa t ion, or savirigs 
bank specified in section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do 
business in this slate. 

The street address and other common designation, if any. of the real 
property described above is purported to be: 11 SAN CLEMENTE DRIVE, 
CARMEL VALLEY, CA 93923. 

The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability or incorrectness of the 
street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. 

Beneficiary: FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION. CREDTT 
SUPPORT UNIT - 1. ATTN: DANNY J. PETERSON. 2870 ZANKER ROAD, 
SAN JOSE. CA 95134. 

Telephone No.: (408) 434-0640 ExL 557 

Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or 
implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, for the purpose of 
satisfying the indebtedness secured by said Deed of Tmst including the fees, 
charges and expenses of the Trustee. The in^tse under said Deed of Trust 
caused a Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county 
where the real property is located and more than three months have elapsed 
since such recordation. I 

DATE: 01/31/94 

W.T. SERVICE CORPORATION, as Trustee 1111 HOWE AVENUE, 
SUITE 450A. SACRAMENTO. CA 95825; Telephone Number: (916) 567- 
3080 

/S/ By: DEBBIE LESEUR, ASSISTANT SECRETARY 

Publication dates; Feb. 3,10,17. 

(PC207) 


FICTmOUS BUSINESS NAME 
STATEMENT 
RIs No. F940019 
The following person is doing 
business as ACCESS 
MARKETING, 969 Pacific St.. 
Monterey, Ca. 93940. 

Stephen G. Thomas, 72 La 
Rancheria, Carmel Valley, Ca. 
93924. 

This business is conducted by an 
individual. 

(s) Stephen G. Thomas 
This statement was filed with the 
County Clerk of Monterey County 
on 1-14-94. 

Publication dates: Jan. 13, 20, 
27, Feb. 3. 1994. 

(PC 1 O 8 ) 

Rcrmous business name 

STATEMENT 
RIe No. F940023 
The following person is doing 
business as PRINT STRATEGIES, 
716 C Lighthouse Ava., Pacific 
Grovs, Ca. 93950. 

Brian Douglas George. 238 
Wood St., Pacific Grove, Ca. 
93950 

This business is conducted by an 
individual. 

Registrant commenced to 
transact business under the 
fictitious business name listed 
above on Jan. 3,1994. 

(^riari Douglas George 
^This statement was filed with the 
County Clerk of Monterey County 
on Jan. 4,1994. 

Publication dates: Jan. 20, 27, 
Feb. 3,10.1994. 

(PC113) 

FICTmOUS BUSINESS NAME 
STATEMENT 
RIs No. F940075 
The following persons are doing 
business aa FLORAL CLASSICS, 
25990 Doughtsry PI.. Carmsl. Ca. 
93923. 

Karen Lynn Lindsey, 25990 
Dougherty R, Carmel, Ca. 93923. 

John Cunningham Lindsey, 
25990 Doughterty R.. Carmel, Ca. 
93923. 

Paul Donahue, 4018 Bending 
Oak , Moor Park. Ca 93021. 

Linda Donahue, 4018 Bending 
Oak. Moor Park. Ca. 939021. 

TNs business is conducted by a 
general partnership. 

Registrant commenced to 
transact business under the 
fictitious business name listed 
above on 4/27/94. 

(s) Karen Lynn Lindsey 
This statement was filed with the 
County Clerk of Monterey County 
on Jan. 11 ,1994. 

Publication dates: Jan. 20, 27, 
Feb. 3.10. 1994. 

(PC 111 ) 

RCTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME 
STATEMENT 
RIe No. F940083 
The following person is doing 
business as REDFIELD 
ENTERPRISES. Box 2059, SE 
Cor. Guadalupe, Carmel, Ca. 
93921. 


Judd Hamilton Redfield III, SE 
Cor. Guadalupe ft 4th Ave., 93^1. 

This business is conducted by an 
individual. 

Registrant commenced to 
transact business under the 
fictitious business name listed 
above on Jan. 12,1994. 

(s)Judd H. Redfield III 
This statement was filed with the 
County Clerk of Monterey County 
on Jan. 12,1994. 

Publication dates: Jan. 20, 27, 
Feb.3.10.1994. 

(PC110) ' 


RCTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME 
STATEMENT 
RIe No. F940076 
The following person is doing 
business as HARRIET DUNCAN, 
6th Avenue and Lincoln, Carmel, 
Ca. 

Pernie McMahon, 6th Avenue 
and Lincoln, Carmel, Ca 
This business is conducted by an 
individual. 

Registrant commenced to 
transact business under the 
fictitious business name listed 
above on 10/30/93.. 

(s) Pernie McMahon 
This statement was filed with the 
County Clerk of Monterey County 
on Jan. 11,1994. 

Publication dates: Jan. 27, Feb 
3.10.17.1994 
(PC116) 


RCTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME 
STATEMENT 
RIe No. F940025 

The following person is doing 
business as TWIGGS, 3774 Tha 
Barnyard, Carmal, CA 93923. 

Camidge C. Watkins. 94 San 
Benancio Road, Salinas, CA 
93906 

This business is conducted by an 
individual. 

Registrant commenced to 
transact business under the 
fictitious business name listed 
above on Feb. 1,1994. 

(s) Camidge C. Watkins 

This statement was filed with the 
County Clerk of Monterey County 
on Jan. 5, 1994. 

Publication dates; Jan. 27.^eb. 
3.10. 17,1994. 

(PC118) 


NOTICE OF APPLICATION 
TO SELL ALCOHOLIC 
BEVERAGES 

To Whome It May Conern: 
GRUPE, Frank J. ft Lois G. are 
applying to the Department of 
Ala>holic Beverage Control to sell 
alcoholic beverages at E/S Lincoln 
Between Ocean ft 7th Carmel with 
On Sale General Public Premises 
license. 

Publication dates: Feb. 3,1994 

(PC202) 


February 3, 1994 


The Carmel Pine Cone/CV Outlook 5 


C 








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■rnsmmmmwwnmmw 


eetyou with §^le irwMemM^mn $€fviee 0^p(isu 


SunsKOmt 


GoKOatm 


■4 f <w'^ 


RH/En 


.-i?»Kt», 


Customer appreciation sale 

10% OFF anlfe* invanlory 

During Hbnttiy 

GREAT VALENTINE CIETS! 


'qROl/E 


Fashions AND Gi^s ' 

Alex Sportswear ^ 

553 Lighthouse Ave. • Pacific Grove 

^ (408) 372-5563 


Wefts JeweCers 

Jim JezueCry Since 1936 


Jewelry • Crystals 
Supplies 


Ask about our classes! 


(408)375-352$ 


Reference Material M 
Restringing • 

Hours: Mon.-Sat. 10 to 6 

^ 213 Grand Avenue 

(6) Pacific Grove • (408) 647-9323 


[:r-i^"v"aK:i:4"J3rr4'*r,r..: : 

I 4 ■/ > 

V I ’ k-AjK,*' . , • \ 


ritiFii HUE 

Great espresso drink, pastries 
& light lunches. 
Excellent service from coffee 
specialists. Accesories, gift 
baskets, shipping anywhere. 

n n II n I II V '1*^ a pound of the 
I y M r 1 B 1 KoastoftheToum.- 

510 Lighthouse Avenue • Pacific Grove 

0 655-5633 


505 Lighthouse Avenue, 
Suite 103, Pacific Grove, 
Colifornio 93950 

(408) 649-6057 


® Speciafizinff In Jfu Jimr 'ETcampCes of 
IStfi & 19tfi Century J4ntiques. 

ALONG WITH THE LARGEST COUECTKDN OF GLASS ART 
OF THE WEST COAST 

SMOU ITEMS OR 
ESTATES PURCHASED 

Visit our 
Antique Annex 

223 FOREST AVE. 


J 7 J.JS 0 S 


6 m 






jiiA 






mm 




170-A GRAND AVENUE • PACIFIC GROVE • 372-061S 
OPEN 10:30-5:00 TUES.-SAT. 


THE LARGEST SELECTION OF CHARMS ON THE 
MONTEREY PENINSULA 

STERUNC SILVER • I4K COLO MARCASITE • MINIATURE BOXES • 

RUSSIAN LACQUER BOXES • VENETIAN CLASS lEWORY • NATIVE 
AMERICAN MADE lEWELRY • CRYSTALS • 
COiUCTABLES • FRAMES 6 MUCHMOKC 


A Gift & Home Decor Shop of 
Timeless Tradition 

You'll always find the perfect treasure at 

THE WCXDDENICKEL 

Mon.-Sat. 10-5:30 • Sun. 12-5 
529 Central at Fountain in Pacific Grove 
645-8050 


‘ Rginearna JjjQn 


Fine Vintage Clothing 
1890 ’s- 1950 's 

• Jewelry & Accessories 

• Exotic Clothing from Bali 

• Men's Department Also 


214 17th Street. • PG • 649-0689 


5491/2 Lydifiotise lAvt, 
(Pacific Qrove, Co.. 93950 




PENINSULA POTTERS 


Handmade Pottery 
at Reasonable Prices 


Hours: 
Open 10-4 
Daily 


2078 SUNSET DR. (RUSSEL SERVICE CENTER) 
PACIFIC GROVE, 372-8867 


5 2 The Carmel Pine C one/CV OutlooL 


February 3, 1994 































A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT 

to the 

Carmel Pine Cone 
and 

Monterey Peninsula 
Visitors Review, 
published by 
Brown & Wilson, Inc. 
Fourth & Mission ‘ 
P.O.Box G*1 

Carmel-by-the-Sea, CA 93921 


Remember 
him from 

the Pine Inn? ( . j 

HEINZ FANDERL / 

...invites AT&T players & gallery to enjoy 
the same excellence in dining...now in a new location! 


The Whaler is a favorite with the local community offering 
informal dining in a casual, relaxed atmosphere. 


Telephone (408) 624-0162 
FAX (408) 624-8076 


JCm, Peninsula tradition... 
serving Monterey and the 
classic Pebble Beacb 


A SPECIAL THANK YOU TO: 

Diane Stracuzzi, Scott Fenton of The Pebble Beach Co 
' Cathy Scherzer, tournament marketing for the AT&T 
Pebble Beach National Pro-Am 


ON THE COVER: ^ 

Jack Nicklaus is a three-time winner at this tournament 
1967,1972 and 1973. {Don Smith photo) 


General Manager 
. Managing Editor 


Karen Carlson. 

Doug Thompson. 

Paul Wolf, Susan Beck, 
Scott Brearton, Garth Merrill 

Anne Papineau. 

Laura Hamilton. 

Jackie Martinez. 

Cathy Blake . 

Elizabeth Hinnant 

Marcie Nestell 

Bill Phillips. 


LUNCH 11:30 AM - 2:30 PM 
DINNER FROM 5:00 PM 

Sandwiches in the Bar 
Regular Lunch in the Dining Room 

OPEN FOR DINNER 7 DAYS A WEEK RESERVATIONS ADVISED 

■t Cocktails from 4:00 pm • Dinner from 5:00 pm 

373-1933 

635 CASS STREET, MONTEREY 


.Writers 

....Editorial Assistant 

.Design 

Production Manager 
.Production 


Advertising 


Blueprint For, 

Refinishing and/or 
Restrapping Patio Furniture 


iff 

Men’s 

Clothing 

• Corbin 

• Nautica 

• Burberry 

• Ruff Hewn 

Shirts • Sweaters 
Jackets • Trousers 

Expert Tailoring 


(1) REMOVE OLD PAINT 

Sandblast frame to remove old 
paint and prepare 
frame for painting 

(2) INSPECT FRAME- 

Inspect frame for level and for 
cracks or breaks and repair w/ 
special heliarc equipment J 


(4) NEW VINYL STRAP 

Only virgin vinyls with 
mildew inhibitors and ultra¬ 
violet stabilizers are used 
in the restrapping of 
[>d your furniture 


) NEW GLIDES 

istall nylon glides 
protect frame and 
rovide even wear 


(3) RE-PAINT-- 

Powder coat paint electrostatically 
applied and baked on at 400' F, 

3 times thicker than conventional liquid paint 


lANTY - 

B by Patio 
rd by a five 
warranty 


PICK-UP AND DELIVERY AVAILABLE 

limited Areos 


Take Hwy 1 So. to Carmel Valley Rd 
Right on Carmel Rancho Boulevard, 
then right on Carmel Rancho Lane. 


SINCE 1978 


2 


AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am 


February 3, 1994 

























































1994 AT&T Pebble Beach 
National Pro-Am 

Daily Schedule 


WEDNESDAY —$15 

• Practice rounds - All courses. ' 

• 3M Celebrity Challenge 11 a.m., Pebble Beach Golf Links. 

• Six celebrity amateurs play holes number 1, 2, 3, 17, 18. Prize 
money donated to player’s favorite charity. 

• Coca-Cola Classic Youth Clinic - 3:30 p.m. Pebble Beach Driving 

Range. i ^ 

THURSDAY —$25 

• First round Pro-Am - All courses. 

FRIDAY —$25 

• Second round Pro-Am - All courses. 

I 

SATURDAY — $25 

• Third round Pro-Am - All courses. 

SUNDAY — $25 

• Final round - Pebble Beach Golf Links. 

• Low teams and professionals in the money, 

Awards Ceremony: The Waterford Crystal trophy will be presented 
tbv^e winner following play on the 18th green. 


Treasures 







SCULPTURE & DRAWINGS 







K 




Ridtard MacDonald 
Will Be 

In The Gallery On 
Friday, February 4th, 
At 7PM To Present 
A Special 
Demonstration 
Of His Sculpture. 


I' -- ■ 






riir rRinvtri ri r pros/i ir xik x7 







M/K/wi M'Ri yRi rnmo\ prom/i iR x:'xn 


Si/bill/Dawson Fine Art Proudly Represents: joe Bowler, Dario Campanile, Chase, Robert Heindel, 
Malcolm Liepke, Richard MacDonald, Frederick Phillips, Early Californian Impressionists And Bella Epoque. 


S V B I 1. 

SANCAKI.O.S lil'. I W l-.l-N I II 


1. / 1) A W S () N FINE A R T 

AND.SIX I ll.l’O »()\ LS'l(,.('AKMI I..CAI,ll ()RNIA‘*,w:i,lim'R,S:inTOhDAII,'i •PII0Ni::4(W/(04-s:(l() 


February 3, 1994 


AT&1' Pebble Beach National Pro-Am 


Persia India Afghanistan Nepal Africa China Indonesia 























) 



Take a break from the 
AT& T.Mt the Hullv! 

FROM THE PL H... 

11:Ml am - 1(1:1111 pm Sun. - / hm 11:.U( am - ( lasing ! n. A Sal. 
I.ach fn/nc incliah s chain’ aj Soup ai Salad. I n nch / ru \ ac I n \h I i j^t iahli 

I isli \ < hips.7.50 

lU-ir Kihs.').‘>5 

Dtt p I rifd ( ;il;iin;ii i..7.25 

Dct-p I rifd .Scallops.S.05 

I criuiki Chicken Hrcasl.7.50 

Crispc I-l ied Chickc-n.7.50 

SPECIALS DAILY 

( IkT'sS|K vi;ilsiiifliKk' Lain!) .Shanks, Meal l.oal, 

( hickoi rrii'd Steak, or ()\en Koasled ( liickc n 
...each with real Mashed Potatoes (ha\> 5.05 - 0.05 
....\n(/ imicli, much nnm !! 


I ROM THE I)IMN(; ROOM 


S:(HI pm - pm Sun. - Ihurs., S:H() pm - lll:<lll pm In. 

alians Xcccpicd 

I.ach cnin c include'^ Soup at Salad, I rc\h \ i ip lahh 
Rice af the Day, and / n'\h linked litcad. 

Roast Prime lOh ot Reet ( trom N - .M( »i/.). 11.‘15 

New ^ oi k Steak (12 o/.». 

Rih l.\e Steak (trom S • 12 <»/.!. 12.05 

I resh ( ate h. 

Prime Rih «.N l.ohster. 

lerixaki ( hie ken Rreast. 

...And inuch, inuch mitre!.' 


VigilfiSm 


TEDDURElN.FOmDEB 

Comniitment to community fueled desire to bring the Crosby here 


responsible for covering sporting 
events. 

After World War 11, a group of local 
businessmen approached him about 
an idea to boost Monterey's economy. 
Monterey was the third largest fishing 
port in the world, Durein said, but it 
was just a little country village. 

During the war, he added, Monterey's 
economy declined sharply with the 
loss of sardines. 

**A11 of us at the paper were deeply 
involved with the 

_ community,” 

r Durein recalled. 

mat 1 was «rp. ,, , , 

1 iiat s why 1 was 
ng" the Sta^C asked to see what 1 
face of a could do.” 

villase. ’ remembered 

® ^ that Bing Crosby 

Ted Durein held a golf tourna- 
mmmammmmmmmm ment in Rancho 

Santa Fe, Calif., 
which Crosby started in 1937. 

Durein wrote a letter to Crosby 
asking him if he would consider 
bringing his tournament to the 
I Monterey Peninsula. The letter went 
something like “You don't know me 
but...,” said Durein. 

Six months later, he received a 
letter from Crosby’s brother, Larry, 
telling him, he recalled, “Bing is 
interested. What do you have to 
offer?” 

Durein went to see Samuel F. B. 
Morse, who owned Del Monte Forest, 


By SUSAN BECK 

HEN TED Durein started 
working on his new assignment in the 
spring of 1946, he never imagined the 
endeavor would become a key factor 
in the transformation of the Monterey 
Peninsula hrom a quiet fishing village 
into one of the most renowned tourist 
spots in the woHd. 

, Durein, 85, is the founder of the 
Bing Crosby Pro-Am Golf Tourna¬ 
ment, now ' 

known as the _ 

AT&T Pebble <r „ /• 

Beach National {f 

Pro-Am. doing. I wos sei 

It started out for changing th 

innocently sleepy little fish 

enough. Durein ^ 

was just doing — 

his job. He was 

one of four 

reporters for The Monterey Peninsula 
Herald, having started with the 
newsp^er in 1935 for $10 a week. 

“It's the greatest business in the 
world,” Durein said. “But not for 
money.” > - 

Before becoming a reporter, he 
attended law school near his home¬ 
town in Alameda but soon realized it 
wasn’t what he wanted to do. 

An uncle living in Monterey knew 
Allen Griffin, the editor of The Her¬ 
ald, and introduced Durein to his 
future boss. 

Over the years, Durein wrote a 
variety of stories but was primarily 


PHOTO/COUKTESY Of TED DUKEIN 

1 

TED DUREIN shared many memorable moments with Bing Crosby, none more so 
appropriate than when they were on the golf course together. 


See DUREIN 


While you're here breathing 

our fresh air^ 
do something 
else nice for 


When you purchase the 
American Lung Association's 
Golf Privilege Card*, you or 
your favorite golfer v^l be 
1 able to choose from many 
I of your favorite courses and 
I save money with a year's 
I worth of free or reduced 
I greens fees. 


L 


at‘ON 


More importantly, by 
purchasing the Card from 
your Lung Association, 
you'll be fighting the #1 

i killer of children under 
one year of age and the 
#3 killer in America: 
lung disease. 


Located in the Adobe inn 
8th Sl Dolores. Carmel 
,625-1750 


AMERICAN 

LUNG 

ASSOCIATION 

of the Central Coast 


200 East Franklin Street #220 
Monterey, CA 93940 

(408) 373-7306 


4 AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am 


February 3, 1994 










































BELL 


CHRISTOPHERS 


fv''! I PV’ION 




Contemporary 
West Coast Art 


200 Alvarado Mall, Monterey, CA 93940 
(408) 649-0214 


At The Doubletree 


Ted Durein — 

/ 

DUREIN from page 4 

site of the Pebble Beach Coif Links, 
and told him about his idea t<y bring a 
major golf tournament to the area. 

“He jumped at it like a fly on a 
hook,” Durein remembered. 

Durein went to Hollywood (still on 
his $10-a-week salary) to talk with 
Crosby about Pebble Beach. Crosby 
brought up the idea of playing the 
tournament on three different golf 
courses, Durein said. 

“So, I called the head of the Profes- ~ 
sional Coif Association (PCA),” he 
said. “I didn’t realize what I was 
doing. I was setting the stage for 
changing the face of a sleepy little 
Bshing village. 

“I always tell people, ‘If you’re not 
happy about the way things are going 
on the Monterey Peninsula, you can 
always blame me.’ ” 

The PCA told Durein no tourna¬ 
ment had ever been held on more than 
one golf course. However, he was told 
to go ahead with the project. 

In 1947, the Crosby became the 
Hrst-ever PCA tournament to include 
celebrities, and the first to be played 
on different courses — Pebble Beach, 
Cypress Point and the Monterey 
Peninsula Country Club. 

There was, however, a slight snag, 
he recalled. The PCAi informed him 
the association had upped the ante for 
a golf tournament’s purse from 
$5,000 to $10,000. 

“Bing agreed to pay the $10,000,” 
Durein said. “He paid for the 
tournament’s purse for the next 10 
years plus all of the expenses. 1 found 
him to be a very nice man, who 


he’s why Bing moved Crosby Pro-Am here 


ment in the world being played 
today.” 


TRAILSIDE 

AMERICANA 


JACKSON, WY CARMEL scoitsdale, az 

LINCOLN & SIXTH 
(408) 624-5071 


Formidable weather 

The first few years were difficult, 
but finally the tournament broke even, 
Durein said. And despite the harsh 
winter weather that always seemed to 
accompany the January event, he 
added, there never was a problem 
attracting customers. 

Crosby decided to have his tourna¬ 
ment in January because golfers 
barely made enough to survive on 
during the winter months, Durein 
noted. 

“Crosby did it so that the golfer’s 
could have what he called, ‘walking- 
around money during the bleak 
months,’” Durein said, adding, it also 
was a perfect time to boost the 
peninsula’s economy. 

Durein remembers writing a piece 
for The Herald stating, “In January on 
the Monterey Peninsula, one could 
shoot a cannon through any hotel 
lobby and not hit a soul.” Now, he 
noted, “you can’t get a room.” 

One (Crosby incident that has 
always stayed with Durein was the 

See DUREIN page 19 


Blair Buswell 


Curt Walters 


TURBULANCE ALONG 17 MILE DRIVE 28X28 


A GENTLEMAN’S GAME BRONZE EDITION OF 50 


fHOTO/COlMTESY Of TED DUtlEiN 

BING CROSBY and Ted Durein — the two men vyho were mosi responsible for 
bringing the popular proom golf tournament to the AAonterey Peninsula. 


always had an eye out for fellow 
golfers and actors.” 

The next step for Durein was to 
inform the public about the golf event. 
He made himself the publicity direc¬ 
tor, the position he held for almost 
five decades. 

Starting from scratch, he contacted 
the top sportswriters in the nation. 
Durein said he made it very attractive 
for them to come to Monterey by 
offering all of the writers a place to 
stay during the tournament. 

The reporter who put the Crosby 
Pro-Am on the map, Durein recalled. 


was Crwtland Rice, the famed sports 
editor of the Chicago Tribune. Rice 
wrote that, “the Bing Crosby golf 
tournament is the greatest golf touma- 


February 3, 1994 


AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am 


5 














/ 





Wake Up To a Hearty Breakfast! 

Seiveasto il:30am Ef^oy a uafiety 

Sgs Benedicts • Savoiy Chneletts • WafiOes & faiicaki 
Deiidous Specials • Awaixl-Winiiiiig Bhid^eriy 
• Cappuccino/JEspresso Bar 


Coffee and tee. 

is no way to start the day! 

For a t>reak£Eist 
that will last for 18 holes, 

Come home to.. 


AT&T Visitors! 

B A Delicious Way 

to Begin or 
^ End Your Day... 

> SCAND1A 

EUROrEAN COUNTRY CUISINE 
A sampling from o\xr Breakfast^ Lunch & Dinner menus: 


LUNCH 

featuring Fresh Salads, 
Delicious Sandwiches, 
Burgers, Homemade 
Soups, and, of course, 
our entire selection of 
breakfast foods are 
served all day. Beer, 
Wine & Champagne. 


BREAKFAST 

featuring nine types of 
Eggs Benedict, Pancakes, 
Waffles, a selection of 
Fresh Berries and 
Blintzes, Omelettes, 
Huevos Rancheros, 
Breakfast Burrito, Hash 
& Eggs & other speciality 
breakfast dishes. 


A Local Favorite for 

Lunch! 

The easuat eUgamce MSctmdta 
€xmtdm*t be more VtHt MMt 

relax, mad emfoy m uxmdtnfat 
bioebudib/Hbndfy eervime. 

• RoaatedGarllc 

• Monterey Fried Calaimri 

^GreekSalad 

• Stuffed Fresh Castroville 

Articlioke 

• Chlckeit DQonnaise 

* Midil*Malti Santa Cru 2 

* Sphdidi Fettuocine 
with <kil]ed Chicken 

• Delicious Homemade 

Desserts 

Served if:30am-4pm 


A Sampling of Our Dinner 
Menu...Served 4 • 10 pm 

Olnnei* Entrees 

Fii/oy a camUeBgti dhmer 
on Ocean Ape. - in a Buropeam 
country setting.^ 

• Grilkd Eg^>lant 
• Fresh Monterey Bay Snapper 

• Chicken Moutude 

« Manicotti 

• Boast Leg of lamb 

• Fettnocme wAiMiy shrinip 
orScallops 

• Calamarl aQa Giaeomo 

• Danish Meatballs 

• TorteOlne 


'? Monstrous portUms are ust 


Serving Breal^fast 8-11:30 • Lunch 11:30-4 •Dinner 4-10 

Ocean Ave. btwn. Lincoln & Monte Verde • Carmel • 624-5659 


"CarmeVs Breakfast Tradition” 

Serving Carmel’s Largest Breakfast Menu 

...All Day! 

Outdoor seating under the redwood trees available. 

OPEN DAILY 7:00 AM. 

MISSION BTWN. 5TH & 6TH • CARMEL • 624-0199 


’95 AT&T results 

Brett Ogle 68-68-69-71—276 $225,000.00 
Billy Ray Brown 70-68-69-72—279 135,000.00 
Trevor Dodds 70-68-70-72—280 65,000.00 
Joey Sindelar 69-72-70-69—280 65,000.00 
Creg Twiggs 69-72-70-69—280 65,000.00 
Leejanzen 71-67-72-71—281 45,000.00 

Chip Beck 72-71-69-70—282 40,312.50 
Grant Waite 71 -70-72-69—282 40,312.50 
Billy Andrade 70-74-68-71—283 27,%8.75 
B.Chamblee 72-73-68-70—283 27,968.75 

Bobby Clampett 73-72-68-70—283 27,968.75 
Steve Elkington 68-71-74-70—283 27,968.75 


John Flannery 

70-69-70-74—283 

27,968.75 

Dan Forsman 

73-71-64-75—283 

27,968.75 

Cil Morgan 

69-70-69-75—283 

27,968.75 

Payne Stewart 

72-70-71-70—283 

27,968.75 ' 

Emlyn Aubrey 

75-70-68-71- 

-284 

18,125.00 

Mark Carnevale 

75-70-68-71- 

-284 

18,125.00 

David Frost 

66-72-71-75—284 

18,125.00 

Tom Watson 

71-75-71-67- 

-284 

18,125.00 

Brad Bryant 

70-72-71-72- 

-285 

12,089.29 

John Inman 

71-74-69-71- 

-285 

12,089.29 

Tom Purtzer 

71-73-72-69- 

-285 

12,089.29 

Fuzzy Zoeller 

69-72-73-71- 

-285 

12,089.29 

Mark Brooks 

67-70-73-75—285 

12,089.28 

Fred Funk 

69-69-72-75—285 

12,089.28 

Ken Green 

70-74-69-72- 

-285 

12,089.28 

R.Beiersdorf 

70-73-70-73- 

-286 

7,961.25 

Lennie Clements 

70-67-75-74- 

-286 

7,961.25 

Tom Kite 

72-74-69-71- 

-286 

7,961.25 

Tom Lehman 

73-74-68-71- 

-286 

7,961.25 

Davis Love III 

68-78-71-69- 

-286 

7,961.25 

Rocco Mediate 
Dillard Pruitt 

71-74-69-72- 

-286 

7,961.25 

71-72-73-70—286 

7,961.25 

Kirk Triplett 

71-70-73-72- 

-286 

7,961.25 

Bob Gilder 

71-77-66-73- 

-287 

5,507.50 

Jay Haas 

72-72-69-74- 

-287 

5,507.50 

BrianKanun 

72-72-70-73- 

-287 

5,507.50 

Mark O’Meara 

71-76-69-71- 

-287 

5,507.50 

Larry Rinker 

71-71-74-71- 

-287 

5,507.50 

Scott Simpson 

75-73-68-71- 

-287 

5,507.50 

Stan Utley 

68-71-72-76—287 

5,507.50 

Jeff Wilson 

71-71-73-72- 

-287 

5,507.50 


Ogle will be back to defend crown 


■ AT&T ’93 winner edready 
has win under his belt in ’94 

Australian BRETT Ogle forever etched his 
name in the history of the AT&T Pdt>ble Beach 
National Pro*Am when the man from down under 
came out on top to win the 1993 tournament here. 

Ogle’s four-round total of 276 topped Billy Ray 
Brown by three strokes. Ogle sparkled on the Pro- 
Am side as he and his partner, Pet^ Pocklington, 
finished in a tie for sixth place. 

After his victory was sealed on the 18th green 
on Sunday’s final day, the winning pro dropped to 
his knees and kissed the ground — a fitting ending 
to a tournament that years from now will be 
remembered as Brett Ogle’s coming-out party on 
the tour. 

To show the 29-year-old’s win at Pebble Beach 
was no fluke. Ogle c^tured the 1994 PGA Tour’s 
second event, the Hawaiian Open in Honolulu, 
played Jan. 13-16. 


The Brett Ogle file 

■ Turned pro: 1985 

■ Qualifying school: 1992 

■ Exempt status: 1993 tournament winner 

■ Career earnings: $337,374 (through 
1993) 

■ Tour victories: 1993 AT&T Pebble Beach 
National Pro-Am; 1994 United Airlines 
Hawaiian Open. 

■ Birthdate: July 14,1964 

■ Birthplace: Paddington, Australia 

■ Residence: London, England ^ 

■ Family: Wife, Maggie, and son Christopher 

■ Special interests: Snooker, tennis 


N 

February 3, 1994 


PHOTO/ATST PEtBlE BEACH NAR PBOAM 

BRETT OGLE proudly holds the Waterford crystal trophy, 
presented annually to the winner of the AT&T Peoble 
Beach National Pro-Am. 

Ogle OK after Tucson Open withdrawal 

Brett ogle, who was forced to withdraw 
firom the final round of the Tucson, Ariz.-based 
Northern Telecom Open due to the flu, has since 
recovered and will defend his title at the AT&T. 

Ogle did not play at last week’s Phoenix Open. 


AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am 


EARLY BIRD Dl.WI R SPEC IMS ERO.M ^ PM S/OAJ5 






































/ 


Past winners of the Crosby/AT&T Will O’Meara grab 5th win? 




1937.1938.1941---™S«nSnwd 

1939 ---Qyjgj, Harrison 

1940 -- Ollvar 

1942-Lloyd MangrunVLaiand Gibson 

54 Holst 

1947-(tio) Ed FurgolGsorgs Fazio • 213 

1948.1953 -Lloyd Mangrum • 205,204 

1949 ...„^Bsn Hogan • 208 

1950 -(tis) Smiley Quick/Jack Burks Jr7Sam SneadyDavs Douglas • 214 

1®®1 Byron Nelson * 209 

1952 —......B. Jimmy Demaret • 145 (36 holes) 

1954-----EbJb Dutch Harrison • 210 

1955*1956 ••bbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbb Cary kBddleCOlf * 209, 202 

1957--------Jay Hebert - 213 

72 Holes 

1958, 1963 BBB BBBBBBBB Bill ■■■■« — B——BBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBB B11 ty CaSpST * 277, 285 

1959 _____Art Wall Jr.-279 

1960 ------Ken Venturi - 286 

1961 BB.BBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBSSBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBSBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBSBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBB Bob ROSbUTg * 282 

1962 --Doug Ford-286 

1964 - - — -----Tony Lema • 284 

1965 —-.Bruce Crampton • 284 

1966 —Tb ------Don Massengale • 283 

1967,1972,1973___Jack Nicklaus • 284,284,282 

1968 ---Johnny Pott - 285 

1969 ---George Archer - 283 

1970 _Bert Yancey-278 

1971 -Tom Shaw - 278 

1974,1987_Johnny Miller • 208 (54 holes), 278 

1975 _Gene Littler-280 

1976 _Ben Crenshaw ■ 281 

1977,1978_Tom Watson - 273,280 

1979 _Lon Hinkle - 284 

1980 _—..—_...._George Burns • 280 

1981 _ _^-,- 1 -, _John Cook • 209 (54 holes) 

1982 __:__Jim Simons • 274 

1983 _Tom Kite-276 

1984 ___Hale Irwin - 278 

1985,1989,1990,1992__Mark O' Meara • 283,277,281,275 

1988_ - _Fuzzy Zoeiler • 205 (54 holes) 

1988_..........._ — _Steve Jones - 280 

1991 _......_Paul Azinger -274 

1993........~.~~.~.-.—-~~.............Brett Ogle - 276 



mOTO/ATAT PfBBlE BEACH NATl KOAM 


MARK O'MEARA, leaping into the arms of his caddy after winning the 1992 AT&T 
Pebble Beach National Pro-Am, is looking for his fifth victory here this year. In addition 
to 1992, O'Meara recorded triumphs in the 1985, 1989 and 1990 tournaments. 
He is the lone four-time winner; Jack Nicklaus and Sam Snead are three-time winners. 


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fHOTO/COUmSY Of ATAT fEMlE B£ACH NATIONAl PtOAM 

ARTHUR ASHE had a sweet swing — whether he was on a tennis court or on a golf 
course, as he was when pictured here at the AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am. 

V_ > __ 


WHO LOVES ya, baby? There were many pros, celebrities and spectators who 
loved Telly Savalas during his frequent appearances at the Pebble Beach Pro-Am. 

___ y 


' 8 AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am February 3, 1994 

_ 


TELLY SAVALAS 


ARTHUR ASHE 


PHOTO/COUSTE5Y OF AT&T PEBBLE BEACH NATIONAL PTtOAM 


A sampKng from our menu; 

APPETIZER 

Ciabatta Bread with Roasted Garlic. Whjfe Bean 
Salad. Sicilian Olives & Gorgonzola Cheese $4.25 

SOUP ft SALAD 

Chicken & Potato with Fall Vegetables $2.60 
Hearts of Romalne with Caesar or 
Creamy Blue Cheese Dressing $4.50 

SANDWICHES 

Grilled Chicken Breast with Gruyere. 
Avocado & Tangy Mustard Sauce $7.00 

MAIN COURSES 

Herb Markxated Rot-Iron Steak served 
with Greens. Fries ft Aloll $9.00 
V4^te Bean Chicken Cassoulet with Salad 
of Escarole ft Dijon Garlic Dresslr>g $8.50 


Pebble Beach Pro-Am loses two of its dear friends 


While Arthur Ashe and Xeiiy 

Savalas won^t be playing in this year's 
tournament, as they had in past years, 
they will be sinything but forgotten. 

It may be hard to think of Ashe and 
Savalas in the same sentence because 
they were such different men — but 
both were giants in their own way. 

Ashe, who lost his battle with AIDS 
in 1993 at the age of 49, was a' 
Wimbledon tennis champion and 
humanitarian. **He was an intellec¬ 
tual, but he sJways wanted to have the 
common touch with people," said his 


U 

• 

ffiend and attorney Donald Dell. 

“So he hid the intelligent side a 
little bit. He always wanted to put 
people at ease around him." 

Savalas died Saturday, Jan. 22 at 
age 70 of prostate cancer. Perhaps 
best known as television detective 
“Kojak," Savalas charmed many, 
including his friend, comedian Don 
Rickies. 

“He used to say, ‘Hang out with 
me and you get a touch of Telly,* 
Rickies said. “He always had a 
laugh.” 



( ' - s 


vx-x.-;-)!:-:-;-'’;-:' 







SiSS-ijiSi-V 



























•Paul Azinger will miss ’94 AT&T 

I But ’91 victor is quietly winning his battle against cancer 

'■ r- 

Paul azinger, who won the 1991 AT&T the PGA Tour, is at his Bradenton. Fla., home 


Pebble Beach National Pro-Am, will not be playing 
in this year's event. 

Azinger, who enjoyed a banner 1993 season on 


/ 



PAUL AZINGER is suffering from lymphoma and will not 
play in the 1994 AT&T tournament. 


battling lymphoma, a form of cancer that is consid¬ 
ered by doctors to be 90 percent curable. 

Azinger had been bothered by shoulder problems, 
and in early December cancer was detected in a 
small portion of his right shoulder blade. 

‘^Every morning I wake up and don't feel like 
throwing up, I feel fortunate," Azinger told the St. 
Petersburg Times in early January. “There is a lot to 
feel fortunate for. I don't take things like that for 
granted anymore." 

1 

‘Afy mind is good. Pm positive. Pm bald. 

/ don’t have any hair, but if you were 
around me, except for the bandana, 
you would not be able to tell the differ¬ 
ence. Pm the same. ’ • 

— Paul Azinger . 

But Azinger’s outlook is buoyed by the fact he 
has a very curable cancer even though he must 
undergo chemotherapy treatments. 

“My mind is good,” Azinger said in his interview 
with the Times. “I’m positive. I’m bald. I don’t have 
any hair, but if you were around me, except for the 
bandana, you would not be able to tell the differ¬ 
ence. I’m the same.” 

Azinger surrounded three rounds of 67 around a 
73 at Poppy Hills to win the 1991 AT&T. He 
defeated Brian Claar and Corey Pavin by four 
strokes and captured the top purse of $198,000. 

Azinger followed up with a third-place finish in 
the 1992 AT&T, narrowly missing a playoff with 
Jeff Sluman and eventual winner Mark O’Meara^ 

I 


Courtesy notes 
fortheATScT 

A CLICK of a camera or a fan's barely 
audible whispered comment to a friend 
could cost a golfer thousands of dollars. 
Because golf is a game of concentration, any 
distraction could cause the player to mis- 
stroke. One lost swing could mean the 
difference between the crown and second 
place. 

AT&T Pdable Beach National Pro-Am 
officials are especially wary of golf courtesy 
because the average spectator is usually not 
accustomed to the game. To help the 
players, tournament marshals ask spectators 
to follow a few simple rules of courtesy: 

• An admission ticket or official badge 
must be worn where it can be easily visible. 

• Always stay behind the ropes and obey 
the requests of tournament marshals. 

• Keep off the fairways, greens and sand 
traps when walking from hole to hole. 

• As tempting as it may be, please do not 
ask for autographs during play. Wait until 
after the player has putted out on the 18th 
and signed his scorecard. 

• Do not “help” a golfer if his ball drops 
out of bounds at your feet. Never touch the 
ball. The player will hit it from the lie or 
take a penalty stroke. 

• Never take photos of a player in the 
midst of a swing or putt. Take the picture as 
the shot is being lined up or just after the 
golfer has hit the ball. 

• Never talk when a player is swinging. 
Save comments and applause for after the 
shot. 



415 -; ■ m 

v> . ■ 




Good news!... to locals and visitors alike! We are fortunate indeed to welcome the opening 
of a true concept Mephisto store here in Carmel - one of just a handfull in the United States. 
We should mention that Renne Agee and her son, Gregory, have been successfully selling the 
Me[^isto footwear for over four years in Carmel - at Rerme’s Birkenstock Footprint shop. 

They find great pleasure in selling someone their first pair of Mephistos. "It’s like making a 
friend for life." Mephisto’s durability is legendary. Make sure to choose a style you like, for 
you can plan on wearing it for many years to come. Countless Mephisto owners have reported 
to us that they are still wearing the same shoes 15 or more ye^u^ after their purchase. All the 
shoes are re-solable, so they deal with customers all over the country and many in Canada. 

Mephisto is quite simply the finest walking shoe on earth. Its comfort, support and 
durability are recognized wherever people take walking seriously. In fact, Mephisto has 
become the most popular walking shoe in virtually every country in which it’s been 
introduced - selling more than 2 million pairs annually in Europe alone. 

Throughout our nearly three decades of existence, Mephisto has been in the forefront of 
innovation in walking shoe design and construction. They have been responsible for such 
revolutionary features as speed laces and air-circulation insoles. What’s more, while other 
walking shoes are often 100% synthetic, rarely seeing a human hand in their manufacture, 
Mep)histo remains a natural product (soft leather, latex, cork and rubber) arKi continues to be 
hand made one shoe at a time in the matchless European tradition. In short, they’ve remained 
impervious to the elements and to the temptation to turn to cheaper, manmade materials. 

Seek out this unique shop and treat yourself to your first pair of teal walking shoes. 

For men and women - sandals from $98 - $150; .shoes finom $198 - $290. 

SPECIAL AT&T HOURS: THURSDAY - SATURDAY 10 - 9 


February 3, 1994 AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am 9 


( 

















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The grand patio includes a Japanese 
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yU.S. Open in year 2000 to 
be played at Pebble Beach 


By PAU wolf 

With the 1992 u.s. Open not 

too distant of a memory. Pebble Beach 
officials are already thinking about 
the year 2000 — now that they’ve 
learned they will host the 100th 



JACK NICKLAUS ... 1972 winner 

national championship. 

The United States Coif Association 
determined the Pebble Beach Golf 
Links would be “an ideal site” for the 
100th playing, and the USGA execu¬ 
tive committee approved the site and 
made an announcement in mid-June 
last year. 

“The event was so successful in 
.1992 that they (USGA officials) were 
eager to come back ahead of the 10- 
year cycle,” said Paul Spengler, 

Pebble Beach Co, vice president of 
golf, “This is a wonderful compliment 
to this community,” 

While the championship was played 
in Pebble Beach in 1972, 1982 and 
1992, the USGA’s schedule was never 


tied to 2002, The association an¬ 
nounced the championship would be 
played June 15-18, 2000, 

The USGA and the company also 
announced the course will be the site 
of the U,S. Amateur, Aug, 16-21, 
1999, 

“Having both the 1999 U,S, ^ 
Amateur and the 2000 U,S, Open at 
Pebble Beach will allow the two events 
to complement each other, and it 
underscores the high regard the USGA 
has for Pebble Beach,” said USGA 
President Stuart Bloch, 

Tire first U,S Open was held in 
1895 on a nine-hole course in New¬ 
port, R,I,, The championship has been 
staged annually with two breaks. 



TOM KITE ,., 1992 winner 

I 


during each'of the world wars. 

The winners of the three U,S, 
Opens played at Pebble Beach were: 

• 1972 — Jack Nicklaus 

• 1982 — Tom Watson 

• 1992 — Tom Kite 




"Where's I he IIo*^’s Breath?" 

The most-asked question 
around town ends here! 

At the Eastwood Building,,,Located on the west 
side of San Carlos Street between 5th & 6th 
in charming, downtown Carmel-by-the-Sea 


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10 / AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am February 3, 1994 

























































Spyglass Hill, Poppy Hills: 

Not just the ‘other’ two courses 


By GARTH AAERRIU 

The **OTHER TWO” courses in 
the AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro- 
Am might not receive the media focus 
or fan recognition enjoyed by the 
justifiably honored Pebble B^ch 
course, but the professionals know to 
give both Spyglass Hill and Poppy 
Hills their undivided attention. 

But do they deserve their nasty 
reputations? 

**Spyglass is consistently the most 
difficult of the three courses,” said 
Spyglass Hill pro Laird SmsJl. “For a 
go^ player, it’s a challenge. The 
professionals who play here resJly 
respect the golf course.” 

“Poppy Hills is a golf course that 
takes a lot of patience and a lot of 
skill,” explained Poppy Hills instruc¬ 
tor Bob Pegis. “They are both ex¬ 
tremely tough golf courses.” 

Jim Murray, famed sports colum¬ 
nist of the Los Angeles Times, once 
described Spyglass as “a 300-acre 
unplayable lie” that plunders golfers. 

When Poppy Hills opened for play 
in 1986, it was quickly recognized as 
an equally sporting challenge. It was 
designed to be so. With its many 
doglegs and contoured, undulating 
greens some found it downright 
difficult. When it r^laced the trea¬ 
sured Cypress Point in the course 
rotation at the 1991 AT&T Pebble 
Beach it met with criticism by some 
pros. 

“It definitely has the attention of 
the players,” pro Mike Hulbert said 


Spyglass Hill 

Par and Yardage 


HOLE 

PAR 

YARDAGE 

1 

5 

600 

2 

4 

351 

3 / 

3. 

152 

4 

4 

370 

5 

3 

186 

6 

4 

412 

7 

5 

529 

8 

4 

396 

9 

4 

430 

Out 

36 

3,426 

10 

4 

408 

11 

5 

528 

12 

3 

178 

13 

4 

441 

14 

5 

560 

15 

3 

121 

16 

4 

468 

17 

4 

322 

18 

4 

407 

In 

36 

3,433 

Total 

72 

6,859 


back then. “I don’t know if you can 
shoot a good rounds there and win the 
tournament, but you sure could lose it 
there.” 

The eventual 1991 winner, Paul 
Azinger, almost did just that when he 
See COURSES page 20 



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February 3, 1994 


AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am 
























































































KNBR’s Frank Dill—newest ‘Ambassador of Golf 


By DOUG THOMPSON 

In his three decades as a well-known radio 
personality in the San Francisco Bay Area, Frank 
Dill has likely been called a lot of things by a lot of 
people. But he*s never been called the ** Ambassador 
of Golf.” Until now, that is. ^ 

Dill, who is celebrating his 30th anniversary at 
KNBR radio, was honored as the 1994 “Ambassa¬ 
dor of Coif” by the California Coif Writers Associa¬ 
tion (CCWA) at its annual dinner banquet on 
Tuesday night in Pebble Beach. 

“lt*s a great honor,” Dill, 62, told us prior to the 
banquet from his home in San Rafael. “1 am very 
flattered.” 

Dill is particularly proud of the company he 
keeps. Other “ambassadors” singled out in previous 
years by the CCWA include Clint Eastwood, Chi 
Chi Rodriguez, Fuzzy Zoeller and Jack Lemmon. 

Dill says he and Lemmon share another distinc¬ 
tion, dubious as it may be. Neither simateur golfer 
has made the cut at the AT&T Pebble Beach Na¬ 
tional Pro-Am after msqiy years of trying. 

But Dill has come close, so close in fact, that one 
year he joined his wife and friends for a celebration 
party after frnishing Saturday’s third round with his 
pro partner Jim Thorpe. 

' “We were 16-under-par,” Dill recalled. “Nor¬ 
mally that’s good enough to make the cut. After the 
round, we had come back to the hotel and 1 just felt 
terrific. We were all celebrating, having a few drinks 
and 1 was just waiting to make the phone call at 5 
p.m....” 

Unfortunately for Dill, that late afternoon phone 
call was to tournament headquarters to ascertain 
Sunday’s starting time for the Thorpe-Dill team. 

Dill remembers he was somewhat thunderstruck as 
he hung up the phone. 

“It was the year 17-under-par was the cut. We 
didn’t make the cut after all. I had to go back and 
tell everybody that it wasn’t to be.” 

See DlLL.page 13 



PHOTO/COU8TESY Of KNBK RADIO 

FRANK DILL (left} and Mike Cleary again will be doing their radio show on site from the AT&T Pebble Beach National 
Pro-Am. The 'Frank and Mike Show' can be heard weekday mornings on KNBR from 5:30 to 9 a.m. 






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12 AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am 


February 3, 1994 

































Dill’s first-ever Crosby was most memorable 


DILL from page 12 

Dill has nothing but fond memories, 
though, from his experiences at the 
Crosby/AT&T. It never got any better 
than his very first year, 1977, when he 
was teamed with Pete Donnelly, a 
little-known club professional from 

7 suggested we celebrate. / 
knew we would probably 
never lead the tournament 
again. So we went out and 
celebrated, really celebrated. ’ 

— Frank Dill 

who, along with his pro partner 
Pete Donnelly, led the ’77 Crosby 
Pro-Am after the first round. 


Miami and a friend of Nathaniel 
Crosby. After Donnelly and Dill 
played their first round at Pebble 
Beach, the sight of the Pro-Am leader 
board was something Dill will never 
be able to erase from his memory. 

“We were leading!,” Dill exclaimed. 
“We led the Pro-Am at 9-under-par. 
My first-ever round in the Crosby and 
my team was atop the leader board!” 

While Donnelly suggested the duo 
get back to the hotel and climb into 
bed early in preparation for the next 
day’s round, Dill said he took on a 
more realistic approach. 

“I suggested we celebrate,” he 
remembers. “I l&new we would prob¬ 
ably never lead the tournament again. 
So we went out and celebrated, really 
celebrated.” 






PHOTO/ATAT PEBBLE BEACH NATL PKOAM 

FRANK DILL loves playing of the AT&T. 

Dill knew all too well there have 
been countless one-round wonders in 
the world of golf and, as he suspected, 
he and Donnelly were just one more 
example. 

A little TV time 
More highlights were ahead, 
however. Paired one year with Blaine 
McCallister, Dill and his pro were 
sailing along so smoothly early in the 
tournament that USA network’s TV 
coverage listed them among the top 


five teams in the Pro-Am competition. 

“But we never put it all together to 
make the cut,” Dill said. 

Dill currendy plays to a 15 handi¬ 
cap and says he believes he’s destined 
to stay there. 

“I’ve struggled through the years 
and have finally reached a plateau,” 
he says. 

Dill says he absolutely loves the 
game of golf, and particularly enjoys 
making the annual trek to the 
Monterey Peninsula to play in the 
AT&T. Though three courses may be 
involved, there is no doubt in Dill’s 

' I 

mind which one he prefers. 

“Oh, Pebble Beach is my absolute 
favorite,” he«ays. “The other two 
courses are great, but Pebble is in a 
class by itself.” 

A radio show, too 

When Dill is town, he isn’t just here 
to play golf. For the past six years, 

Dill and his partner of 15 years, Mike 
Cleary, broadcast the “Frank and 
Mike Show” each morning at 5:30 
during the tournament inside the 
Lodge at Pebble Beach. 

“All the celebrities and pros drop 
by,” Dill says. “We have a lot of fun. 
Plus, the listeners really enjoy the 
shows we do every year from here.” 

For Frank Dill, life at the AT&T 
Pebble Beach National Pro-Am 
doesn’t get any better. He goes from 
doing his beloved radio show in the 
morning to playing a sport he cher¬ 
ishes on one of the three most beauti¬ 
ful courses in the world. 

All in a week’s work for the new 
“Ambassador of Golf.” 


Writers honor 11 

FRANK DILL, lon^ime San 
Francisco Bay Area KNBR radio 
personality, was honored as this 
year’s “Ambassador of Golf” by 
The California Coif Writers 
Association (CGWA) at its annual 
dinner banquet on Tuesday. 

In addition to Dill, the other 
individuals honored were: 

• Nick Price, PGA Tour 
Player of the Year, who collected 
more than $1.475 million. 

• Scott Simpson, who was 
given the Caddy Shack Award, 
for asking to be paired with Bill 
Murray last year; 

• Jim Gallagher, Jr., who 
earned a special merit honor for 
his exertional season on the 
PGA Tour last year; 

• Dave Stockton, PGA Senior 
Tour player of the year; 

• Randy Haag, amateur of the 
year; 

• Ed Hester, NorCal PGA 
professional of the year; 

• Bill Paulson, Northern 
California Golf Association 
executive director, who was 
presented the John Swanson 
Good Guy Award; 

• Gordon Scott, former NCGA 
president; 

• Art Spander, San Francisco 
Examiner columnist, who was 
presented the Hayward Newland 
Award; and 

• Mickey Wright, CGWA Hall 
of Fame inductee. On the LPGA 
Tour, Wright amassed 82 total 
victories, and averaged 7.9 wins 
per year from 1959 to 1968. 




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A r& r Pebble Beach National Pro-Arn 


13 











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Jim CaUaghtr, Jr. and Tony Caoign (12) 

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Cary Nicklaut and LyU Andaraon (10) 

Neal Lancaster and Leslie Nielsen 
Joel Edwards and Jimmy Connon (11) 

Fulton AUem end Clint Eastwood (19) 

Billy Andrade and Joe Pesci (20) 

Hale Irwin and George Busk (20) 

Tom Kite and Rudy Gatlin (6) 

Tom Lehman and J. B. McIntosh (12)- 
Curt Byrum and Fran Terken^n (12) 

Larry Mite and Bill Bentley (4) 

Mark Brooks and Howard Lester (IS) 

David Edwards and Mark Grace (13) 

Bill Britton and George Stevens, Jr. (12) 

Olin Browne and Pandel Sevic (10) 

Bill Classon and David Kirkland (S) 

Guy Boros and Harold McCraw, ID (14) 

Mike Heineo and Wally Huffman (IS) 

Kenny Kno* and Andy Nottankamper (5) 

Jim Furyk and Jeff (^ale (11) 

Andy Bean and Walter V. Shipley (18) 

Yoshi Misumaki and Masashi Yamada (12) 

Bob Bums and Robert Hoag (10) 

Steve Rintoui and Robert Moore (10) 

Robin Freeman and William Edwin Swing (12) 
Clarenoe Rote and Bud Beeler (7) 

Pbil Tataurangi and Bert Morris (16) 

Bob May and Jon Linen (13) 


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David Toms and David Clark (9) 

Craig Stadler and George Cillett, Jr. (7) 

Bren Ogle and Peter H. Pocklington (IS) 

Jack Nicklaus and Steve Nicklaus (12) 
CregTsriggs and Craig T. Nelson (10) 

Mike McCullough and Glen Campbell (13) 
Peter Jacobsen and Jack Lemmon (20) 

Billy Ray Brown and Tom Glavine (13) 
Arnold Palmer and Russ Meyer (10) 

Grant Waiu and Frank Herringer (13) 

Fuuy Zoeller and Dan Quayle (6) 

Kenny Parry and John Denver (12) 

Payne Stewart and Jim Morris (S) 

Mark Camevale and Mike Corrigan (11) 

Scoa Simpson and Bill Murray (16) / 

Bobby Clampen and Bob McCollum (9) 
JiMkie Nicklaus and Ken Bowden (7) 

Jim McGovern and Nelson Doubleday (11) 
Larry Silveira and Herbert Kohler, Jr. (18) 
Jim Kane and Tom Wagner (12) 

Ed Sneed and Don Ingerman (11) 

Brian Henninger and Rudy Staedler (6) 

Mark Hayes and Jim Chapman (17) 

Kiyoshi Murota and Remy Yamada (5) . 
Glen Day and Steve John (4) 

Jim Woodward aod Paul Pugh (9) 

Joey Rassett and Frank Dill (14) 

Steve Strieker and Dr. £. Patrick Calvin (18) 
Rocky Walcber and Cary C. Michael (18) 
Dennis Paulson and Ken Derr (15) 


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Marco Dawson and Jim Williaou (18) 

Cary Hallberg and George Peper (9) 

Michael Allen and Rick Kauenbach (14) 
Todd Barranger and Don Nickles (9) 
Thomas Levet and John F. Kluge (8) 

Dick Matt and Bob Murphy (9) 

Brad Faxon and Bradford Faxon, Sr. (8) 

Rob Boldt and Lou Herwaldt (9) 

Tom Gamer and Michael Hexner (8) 

Tommy Masters and David Ferm (9) 

Barry Jaeckel and Stu Francis (3) 

Ed Dougherty and Bill Taylor (8) 

Trevor Dodds and Robert Selleck (20) 

Mark Cato and Casey Boyns (2) 

Ted and Rick Bishop (14) 

Mike ffeid and Charles Schulx (14) 

John Cook and Orel Hershiser (5) 

Mike Hulbert and Boyd Jefferies (13) 

Dave Stockton, Jr. and Darryl-Roberson (3) 
Raymond Floydjsnd Raymond Floyd, Jr. (4) 
Ted Schult and B. J. Thomas (12) 

Morris Hatalsky and Steve Cadin (5) 
Howard Clark aod Harry Crosby (6) 

Tony Jacklin and Jim Mahoney (8) 

Sean Murphy and Tommy Smothers (18) 
Corey Pavin and Fletcher Pavin (4) 

Andy Dillard and Stan Smith (6) 

John Rannery and John B. McCoy (11) 

Jeff Sluman and Bobby Rahal (10) 

Chip Beck and Robert Coletta (18) 


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Lon Hinkle and Creg Penske (8) 

John Inman and Frederick Gruber (8) 
Jerry Pate and Pard Erdman (10) 

Paul Coydos aod Frank A. Olson (13) 
Esteban Toledo and Richad Canady (7) 
Larry Nelson and John Alden (11) 

Dan Forsman and Dave Forsman (18) 
Mike Brisky and Sonny Brown (20) 

Chris Kite and John Nakamura (9) 
Dickey Pride and Peter Cerosa (18) 
Robert Wrenn and Whit Staples (3) 

DA. Weibriog and W.R. Howell (11) 
Rick Rhoads and Dr. Roben Albo (16) 
Terrence Miskell and Joe Cardioale (14) 
Don Reese and John Campbell (12) 
Howard Twitty and John W. Teeu (17) 
Mark O'Meara and John F. Welch (8) 
Davis Love, HI and H. James Griggs (17) 
Dave Stockton, Sr. and Ron Stockton (4) 
Dudley Hart and Robert Floyd, Jr. (2) 
Kirk Triplett aod Michael Tucker (14) 
Roger Maltbie and Maury Povich (4) 
Nolan Henke and Huey Leads (15) 

Bin Kratzen and Robert E. Barrett (12) 
Mark Shermsui and Alan Shepard (18) 
Vijay Singh and Ted Forstmarui (9) 
Willie Wood and John ZoUer (S) 

Andrew Magee and Rich Lehmann (11) 
Mike Standly and Clay Larson (10) 

Tom Watson and Sandy Tatum (7) 


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John Adams and Bob Lurie (10) 

Bob Lohr and Cary Vandeweghe (6) 

Keith Clearwater and Ceorge Roberts (10) 
Charles Raulerson and Lew Rudin (15) 
Brandel Chamblee and James Rheim (5) 

Bob Cilder and William Kimpton (12) 
Ceorge Bums and William Flaherty (14) 
Mike Donald and Robert L. Scott, III (14) 
Steve Brodie and Pat Cowell (4) 

Dennis Trixler and Dave Normoyle (6) 

Ken Craen and John Smoltz (6) 

Brian Claar and Ted Simpkins (11) 

Lee Janien and Louis V. Cerstner, Jr. (18) 
David Frost and Johan Rupert (14) 

Buddy Gardner and Dennis Quaid (10) 
Lennie Clemenu and Bob Rockey (11) 

Jay Haas and John W. Harris (5) 

Shaun Micheel and Andrew Scheinman (5) 
Steve Cotsche arsd Jeff Beresford-Wood (18) 
Chris Dimarco and Kent B. Foster (17) 

Brad Bryant and Jay M. Swaiuon (9) 

Steve Lamont^gne and Howard L. Clark (9) 
Brian Kamm and Hartley Craveru (14) 

Ty Armstrong and Chuck Weil (4) 

D.A Russell and Mike Jordan (17) 

Michael Bradley and Pat Foley (13) 

Blaine McCallister and Peter Ueberroth (11) 
David Duval and Hughes Norton (9) 

Ed Kirby and Darryl Hartley-Leonard (14) 
Kyle Copeland and Cerry Donnelly (14) 


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Ed Humenik and Tom L. Crow (8) 

Dillard Pruitt and Peter Fluor (7) 

Mark Wiebe and Henry R Kravis (9) 

Paul Stankowski and Harry Carsh (18) 
Clark Dennis and Joe Morgan (6) 

Cil Morgan and Michael Franz (14) 

Jay Delsing and James Dowling (9) 

Jim Nelford and Roben 1. MacDonnell (13) 
Ted Coin and Cary Morton (6) 

Maurie Verbrugge and Nathaniel Crosby (3) 
Rocco Mediate and Merv Adelson (15) 
TedTryba and Don Ohimeyer (12) 

Larry Rinker and Richard L. Celb (16) 

Jeff Maggen and Charles R. Schwab (10) 
Stan Utley and Thomas Warde (11) 

Duffy Waldorf and William T. Dillard (6) 
Richard Zokol and Richard Ferris (8) 

Mark Wurtz and Ceorge Hutchings (9) 

Pat Could and John Coghlan (15) 

Peter Jordan and Bill Marx (7) 

Steve Elkington and Donald L. Lucas (13) 
Denis Watson and Finis Conner (9) 

David Ogrin aod Donald J. Barr (9) 

Jeff Woodland and Cwin Montgomery (5) 
John Wilson and David E. McDowell (17) 
Creg Kraft and Leo Levine (10) 

Tom Purtzer and James Nordstrom (9) 
Jasper Paraevik and Bob Arnett (12) 

John Morse and Terrence F. McCuirk (7) 
Rick Leiboviu and Brendan Davis (5) 


AT&I' Pebble Beach National Pro-Arn 


February 3, 1994 









































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15 



























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-- WITH THE HELP OF CARMFJ. BUSINESSMEN -- 

Michael Jordan launches his own golf company 


Former basketball superstar Michael 

Jordan, who is now seriously contemplating a 
professional baseball career, has launched his 
own golf company and is doing so under the 
direction of two Carmel businessmen. 

Based in Chicago, the ambitious plan calls for 
comprehensive training and recreational golf 
centers to be built nationwide. Simply enough, it 
is named the Michael Jordan Golf Company. 

The first Michael Jordan Coif Co. will be 
built this year in Chicago. 

The Jordan centers will consist of: 

• 80-tee practice ranges (both grass and 
artificial tees) with water hazards, bunkers and 
target greens in the landing area; 

• putting greens and chipping greens com¬ 
plete with bunkers; 

• classrooms with state-of-the-art teaching 
equipment for teaching; 

• PGA-certified golf instrdctors; 

• miniature golf courses featuring a Michael 
Jordan theme; 

• pro shops and refreshment facilities. 

“They will be unsurpassed practice and 

recreational centers for everyone who loves the 
game, just like I do,” Jordan said, “and it won’t 
matter whether they are beginners or pros.” 

The Jordan Golf Centers’ local link is signifi¬ 
cant as Charles W. Reeves, president of Carmel- 
based TCR Golf Enterprises, Inc., will serve as 
president and GEO of the Jordan Golf Co. 

Of Reeves, Jordan told the Chicago Tribune, 
“A lot of my decisions will be away from the 
business aspect, because I’m relying on Chuck 
[Reeves] and his staff. My input will be on the 
social side, because I don’t know how to run a 


PHOTO/COURTESY OF TCR GOLF ENTERPRISES, INC 


AT THE press conference announcing the formation of the Michael Jordan Golf Co. is the man himself and 
Charles Reevps, president of Carmel^x^sed TCR Golf Enterprises, Inc. Jordarn says 'a lot of my decisions will 
See JORDAN page 17 be away from the business aspect, because I'm relying on Chuck [Reeves] and his staff.' 


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16 AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am 


February 3, 1994 































/ 



Carmel firm will 
guide Jordan’s 
new golf center 

JORDAN from page 16 
golf business.” 

Reeves said his company will plan 
ot “design, build and maintain our 
facility better than any other. We also 
plan to provide recreation and enter¬ 
tainment for the whole family.” 

'' Steve McLennan, former director of 
golf for all five courses owned by the 
Pebble Beach Company, will serve sis 
its vice president of operations. 
McLennan is executive director of golf 
operations for TCR Coif Enterprises. 


) 



HERE'S A look of a proposed 
Michael Jordon Golf Center. The 
first center is expected to open in 
the Chicago area in the spring of 
1995. Carmel businessmen 
Charles Reeves and Steve 
McLennan, with TCR Golf Enter¬ 
prises, Inc., are spearheading 
the operation. 



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Former PGA Tour Pro 


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February 3, 1994 


A F&r Pebble Beach National Pro-Am 


17 












GEORGE BUSH 
GLEN CAMPBELL 
JIMMY CONNORS 
NATHANIEL CROSBY 
JOHN DENVER 
CLINT EASTWOOD 
RUDY GATLIN 
STEVE GATLIN 
TOM GLAVINE 
MARK GRACE 
GENE HACKMAN 
OREL HERSHISER 
DON JOHNSON 
JACK LEMMON 
HUEY LEWIS 
JOE MONTANA 


JOE MORGAN 
BILL MURRAY 
JOE PESCI 
MAURY POVICH 
DENNIS QUAID 
DAN QUAYLE 
BOBBY RAHAL 
CHARLES SCHULZ 
JOHN SMOLTZ 
TOMMY SMOTHERS 
DANNY SULLIVAN 
FRAN TARKENTON 
B.J. THOMAS 
DONALD TRUMP 
MICHAEL TUCKER 
PETER UEBERROTH 



PHOTOS/ATAT P€Ml£ BEACH NATl PtOAM 

GLEN CAMPBELL and Jack Lemmon are two perennial favorites of the AT&T Pebble Beach Pro-Am gallery. 



THE GATLIN brothers always bring a colorful touch. JOHN DENVER won the '93 '3M Celebrity Challenge. JOE MONTANA won't need late heroics in this game. 


/ 


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18 AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am 


February 3, 1994 

































Founder Ted Durein says knowing 
Bing was greatest pleasure of alV 


DUREIN from page 5 
time Johnny Weissmuller, an actor 
known for his portrayal of Tarzan, 
attended the tournament in 1952. - 

Durein remembers that Peter Hay, 
the pro at Pebble Beach Coif Course, 
watched as Weissmuller walked off 
the Hrst tee drenched by a torrent of 
rain. 

Hay asked Weissmuller what he 
was doing, and according to Durein, 
he responded, ‘^Fm going to quit. I 
csui’t tee up the ball.” Hay said, 
“Where in the rule book does it say 
you have to tee up the ball?” 
Weissmuller obliged to keep playing. 

When people ask Durein the 
difference between the tournament’s 
early years and today, he replies, it’s 
the money — the overall purse is now 
$1.25 million. And, too,^ he said, in 
those early years, many of the fans 
were friends of Crosby’s and the other 
players, who established a party-type 
atmosphere about the tournament. 

When the golfers were playing for a 
few thousand dollars, Durein said, 
they were more inclined to relax and 
have a good time. Now with the 
players vying for a $225,000 top 
prize, they approach the game as a 
business. 

Durein considers Ben Hogan and 
Jack Nicklaus as the game’s greatest 
players. During one tourney, Durein 
recalled, Crosby and Hogan played 
together not long after Hogan recov¬ 
ered from a serious auto accident. 

Durein, who was along with Crosby 
and Hogan, remembers, “When we 
got to Bing’s home on the 13th fair¬ 
way he asked Hogan if he wanted to 


stop playing. Bing knew Hogan was 
cold and aching. Hogan said, ‘No, let’s 
finish it out.’” 

Durein remarked, “I’ve always 
thought Hogan’s response exemplified 
professionalism and what the game is 
all about.” 

In 1975, Durein retired firom The 
Herald as an editor. And even though 
he had extra time on his hands, he 
didn’t take up the game of golf. He 
said he never played when he was 
younger because he didn’t have time, 
and then when he retired, he felt it 
was too late. 

About four years ago, Durein’s 
publicity responsibilities were shifted 
to that of historian, which he isn’t sure 
reflects a promotion. However, he still 
makes a tour through the 
tournament’s press tent, which now 
houses hundreds of sports writers 
from all over the world. 

“I go out and greet everyone,” he 
said, “and lend them the aura of my 
presence.” 

Durein, who lives in Carmel with 
his wife, Elizabeth “Lib,” plans, as 
usual, to attend this year’s event. He is 
especially pleased with the 
tournament’s tradition of donating all 
of the proceeds to local organizations 
such as the various city youth centers. 

In the past, Durein, along with 
Crosby’s brother Larry, and some¬ 
times Crosby himself, would visit the 
different youth halls. ' 

“We raised $1 million last year,” he 
said. “That makes me feel good. It’s 
been a lot of fun getting to know all 
the golfers. But knowing Bing was the 
greatest pleasure of all.” 


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February 3, 1994 


AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am 









































Poppy, Spyglass can make or break week 


COURSES from page 11 
shot a 73 at Poppy HilU, bunched 
around three rounds of 67. ^^The best 
hole on that course,** Azinger said of 
Poppy Hills, “is the 19th.’’ 

The PCA tour players had learned 
to accept the difficulty of Spyglass 
Hill, and its rugged borders of ocean, 
sand and ice plant. It was natursJly 
tough. But Poppy Hills was deliber- 


Poppy Hills 

Par and Yardage 


HOLE 

PAR 

YARDAGE 

1 

4 

413 

2 

3 

162 

3 

4 

406 

.•.. 

4 

5 

560 

5 

4 

426 

6 

3 

181 

7 

4 

388 

8 

4 . 

* 390 

9 

5 

557 

Out 

36 

3,483 

10 

5 

515 

11 

3 

214 

12 

5 

531 

13 

4 

1 393 

14 

4 

417 

15 

3 

210 

16 

4 

439 

17 

3 

' 163 

18 

5 

500 

In 

36 

3,382 

Total 

72 

6,865 


ately made that way. It almost 
seemed unfair. 

Criticism has quieted down re¬ 
cently, though each course remains a 
stiff challenge. Last year’s AT&T 
winner, Brett Ogle, found himself in 
trouble at Poppy where he four-putted 
the eighth hole before going on to 
victory. 

At Spyglass, Small said, “A lot of 
good rounds have been lost on the first 
five holes. It’s tough to dig your way 
out.” 

The challenge of the two courses is 
to be patient and methodical. 

“Pebble Beach has a lot of easy 
holes early,” Pegis said, “so you can 
string together four or five birdies and 
head into the difhcult part of the 
course under par.” 

Poppy Hills and Spyglass are 
different, however. Moving from 
Pebble one day to either Spyglass or 
Poppy Hills mandates a change of 
focus from the players. 

“I think it requires a change of 
approach,” Pegis said. “They have to 
shift up a little bit.” 

But Poppy Hills is not quite the big 
green monster it was made out to be 
in the early years — any more than is 
Spyglass. Now revered as much as it is 
feared, Spyglass also had a tough 
reputation and was met with profes¬ 
sional criticism in its debut in the 
1967 Crosby Pro-Am, i 

“I think Poppy Hills right now is 
sort of going through some of the 
same growing pains that Spyglass did 
in the first couple of years after it 
opened,” observed Pegis. But, like 
Spyglass, it i^ slowly earning its own 


respect. / 

“You’re getting the best players in 
the world,” Pegis said. “They should 
live up to that billing and play the 
toughest courses in the world. ” 

< Over at Spyglass, Small ^hoed 
those sentiments. 

“This is a real test of golf,” he said. 
“It brings out the best in a golfer,” 


Pebble Beach 

Par and Yardage 


HOLE 

PAR 

YARDAGE 

1 

4 

373' 

2 

5 

502 

3 

4 

388 

4 

4 

327 

5 

3 

166 

6 

5 

516 

7 

3 

107 

8 ( 

4 

431 

9 

4 

464 

Out 

36 

3,274 

10 

4 

426 

11 

' 4 

384 

12 

3 

202 

13 

4 

392 

14 

5 

565 

15 

4 

397 

16 

4 

402 

17 

3 

209 

18 

5 

548 

In 

36 

3,525 

Total 

72 

6,799 


Free shuttle service 
ofTered to courses by 
Carmel innkeepers 

The CARMEL Innkeepers 
Association will be sponsoring a 
shuttle service from the various 
properties to the three golf 
courses during the 1994 AT&T 
Pebble Beach National Pro-Am. 

The shutdes will operate every 
hour between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. 
This is the first time this service 
has ever been offered by the 
Carmel Innkeepers Association 
and will be free to the guests of 
the properties. 

The following Carmel inns are 
involved: Adobe Inn, Candlelight 
Inn, Carmel Carden Court, 
Carmel Oaks Inn, Carmel Sands 
Inn, Carmel Studio Lodge, 

Carmel Comfort Inn, Carmel 
Tradewinds Inn, Carriage House, 
Coachman’s Inn, Colonial House 
Inn, Cypress Inn, Dolores Lodge, 
Dolphin Inn, Edgemere Cottages, 
Forest Lodge, Grosvenor’s Inn, 
Hofsas House, Lobos Lodge, 
Happy Landing Inn and Horizon 
Inn. 

Also, Ocean View Lodge, La 
Playa Hotel, Monte Verde Inn, 
Pine Inn, San Antonio House, 
Sandpiper Inn, Sea View Inn, 
Spinning Wheel Inn, Stonehouse 
Lodge, Sundial Lodge, Sunset 
House, Svensgaards Inn, Tally Ho 
Inn, The Homestead, Vagabond 
House and Wayside Inn. 

Additional information is 
available by calling 624-5327. 



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. . .would like to thank all 
the AT&T volunteers and 
spectators. Come by Bings 
at Carmel Plaza and receive 


15%OFF 

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10%OFF 

CLOTHING 


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Proceeds from this discount 
will go to sponsor the AT&T 
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* Proof of volunteer or AT&T ticket 
needed to receive discount. 

* * Not opplicoble on sale items. 



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20 AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am 


February 3, 1994 

























































Former LPGA star gives tips 
on how to learn from watchb 


OCEAN AVEPfUE 


(EdUor*t Note: Janet ColeSf who toured 
14 seasons on the IxuMes Professional Golf 
Tour where she won four events^ is a 
regular columnist to The Carmel Pine Cone. 
She currently teaches golf locally,) 

By JANET CaES ^ ; 

' The AT&T Pebble Beach Na- 
tional Pro-Am Coif Tournament is a 
perfect opportunity to watch both 
your favorite player as well as your 
favorite star. 

This particular tournament format 
allows the spectator to easily observe 
the amateur and professional simulta¬ 
neously. 

1 suggest picking your favorite 
professional and follow him for nine 
holes. Observe and compare your shot 
selection around the greens, club 
selection on recovery shots and your 
ability to judge speed on long puts. 

With the shghtest improvement in 
these three areas, your golf scores will 
lower immediately. These are the 
stroke savers. The professionals 
consistently shoot the low scores, not 
because they hit great golf shots, one 
after the other. It’s because of their 
superb ability to get up and down 
around the greens, eliminate three 
putts and quickly recover from any 
disaster. 

Now, watch your favorite star play 
nine holes. Take notes on his golf 
shots and compare your decisions with 
his. Watch his ability around the 
green, his strategy to recover from 
disaster and his skill on long putts. 

Observe the good shots as well as 


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PHOTO/SUSAN BECK 

JANET COLES says you can learn from 
the professionals during the AT&T week. 

the mistakes and refer to your own 
golf game. Do you make similar 
mistakes? For example, are putts 
common, do you get “up and down” 
the majority of the time, can you go 
from trouble to safe ball position in 
one shot? 

Learn from the professionals by 
watching them in competition this 
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AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am 


February 3, 1994 

























Security will take care of itself, but about that parking 

■ Bush, Quayle will have the Secret 
Service, so tournament directors 
focus their attention on that ever- 
present snarling traffic monster. 


By GARTH AAERRIU ^ 

The number one nemesis of security forces 
at the AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am will 
not be terrorists pursuing former president George 
Bush or former vice president Dan Quayle, or crazed 
fans chasing after celebrities like Bill Murray. No, 
the top priority is always trafRc. 

When it comes to protecting the former president 
and vice president, no problem — the Secret Service 
will be on hand to deal with that. 

“They don’t deal with anybody,” Lou Russo, 
AT&T tournament executive director, said of the 
Secret Service. “They do their own thing. .They just 
want credentials to get them where they want to go. 
Basically, they want to be left alone.” 

As for characters like Murray, who has a pen¬ 
chant for roaming the fairways and flirting with the 
gallery, Russo said that’s fine. 

“As long as he’s not inteirupting play we don’t 
mind,” Russo said. “The only reason we’re worried 
is that somebody in the crowd mi^ht get hurt in a 
rush for autographs.” 

To that end, Russo said he will try to arrange 
autograph sessions later in the day fori the most 
popular celebrities. For protection on the course, 
there will be four teams of marshals on patrol flrom 
the Pebble Beach Co. 

Russo said he is not too concerned with the 
thought of a rabid fan lunging from the crowd and 
endangering one of the players. 

“Golf is a gendemanly game,” he said. “This isn’t 
football... Usually you get a more reflned gallery.” 

But that reflned gallery can turn into mad 
motorists when the tournament average of 7,000 
cars per day starts snaking along 17 Mile Drive. 


PHOTO/COUKTESY Of AUT PEBBLE BEACH NATL PKOAM 

DAN QUAYLE {above) and former president George 
Bush will gain their protection from the Secret Service, 
which likes to do its 'own thing' when they're here. 


PHOTO /COUKTE5Y Of ATATPEBBLE BEACH NATL PBOAM 

BILL MURRAY likes to frolic amidst the gallery and, 'as' 
long as he's not interrupting play,' the AT&T directors 
don't mind. 


And that congestion can cause big headaches for 
Pebble Beach locals. 

“Our primary concern is moving tournament 
traffic in and out of Pebble Beach with minimal 
impact on the residents,” said Mark Verbonich, 
Pebble Beach Co. vice president of community 
affairs and head of the golf tournament’s parking 
and security committee. 


Verbonich said his main focus is an “elaborate 
program of traffic management and control.” 

That program includes coordination with Carmel 
and Pacific Grove police departments, Galifomia 
Highway Patrol and the Monterey County Sheriffs 
Department. In addition, some 200 Explorer Scouts 

See PARKING page 25 


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22 AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am 


February 3, 1994 



































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February 3, 1994 


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Carmel volunteer Paul Hazdovac joins ‘40-Year Club’ 


By SUSAN BECK 

PAUL HAZDOVAC is a man of 
his word. 

In the mid-1940s, Hazdovac was a 
member of the Monterey Elks Lodge, 
which agreed to be the local backer 
for Bing Crosby's golf tournament 
previously held in Southern Califor¬ 
nia. ^ --— 

‘*1 voted to back it," said Hazdovac. 
“I’ve k^t my commitment." 
Hazdovac, a retired plumber and 53- 
year resident of Carmel, received the 
“Spirit of Volunteerism" award in 
August from the AT&T Pebble Beach 
National Pro-Am organization, for 40 
years of volunteer service. 

“The success of the volunteerism is 
because of Lou Russo," Hazdovac said 
of the executive director of the Pro- 
Am. “He keeps the event on an even 
keel. He keeps everyone h^py." 

Reflecting back to the night the 
Elks Lodge members voted to support 



MOTO/ATAT KBtlE KACH NATl PiOAM 

PAUL HAZDOVAC (right) receives plaque 
from Peter Ueberroth. 


Crosby’s tournament Hazdovac said, 
“No one on that night ever dreamed 
the Pro-Am toumsunent would be for 
golf what the Rose Bowl is to foot¬ 
ball." — 

In 1947, he sold his first Crosby 
Pro-Am golf tournament program on 
the 14th fairway of Pebble Beach to 
Clyde Klaumann, former chief of 
police for Carmel. 

When AT&T took over the tourna¬ 
ment, Hazdovac was assigned to the 
communications division with Dick 
Searle. He was responsible for setting 
up and taking down the Professional 
Coif Association’s official scoreboard, 
which he has done for the past 15 
years. 

Hie entire job of getting the 
scoreboard ready for the tournament 
takes about two weeks if the weather 
is right, said Hazdovac. 

During the tournament, he takes 

See HAZDOVAC page 25 



PHOTO/SUSAN BECK 


The ‘40-Year Club’ keeps growing — now 14 members 


Paul hazdovac of Carmel 

became a member of the AT&T Pebble 
Beach National Pro-Am “Forty-Year 
Club” in August, honoring 40 years of 
volunteer service to the tournament. 

Allen Foulkes of Pacific Grove and 
Bud Houser of Pebble Beach also were 
inducted into the Forty-Year Club at 
the AT&T Pebble Beach Golf Founda¬ 
tion Charity Luncheon last summer. 

Foulkes started working for the 
admissions committee at the 


tournament’s Carmel gate in 1953. He 
transferred to the Pacific Grove gate 
five years later, becoming the gate 
captain in 1965. Last year, Foulkes 
retired from his volunteer work with 
the tournament. 

Also in 1953, Houser began work¬ 
ing on the communications committee. 
He worked at Cypress Point until 
1958, then transferred to the 18th 
hole at Pebble Beach. 

Other members of the Forty-Year 


Club are: 

■ ART BERG 

■ GEORGE DOVOLIS 

■ TED DUREIN 

■ LEON EDNER 

■ WARNER KEELEY 

■ KEI NAKAMURA 

■ DICK SEARLE 

■ MAL SILVEIRA 

■ DON CORONA 

■ FRED GALLAGHER 

■ JACK SLOAN 


*7 saw a man driving toward 
us in a big, white, Rolls 
Royee, He was smoking a 
pipe. The kid yells, ^You can’t 
park here. Not even the Sav~ 
iour can park here. ’ I had to 
tell him it was okay to let 
Bing Crosby in. Bing laughed 
so hard he almost fell out of 
his car. ” 

— Paul Hazdovac 




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24 AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am 


February 3^ 1994 














As volunteer, Paul Hazdovac has 
a treasure chest full of memories 


f AZDOVAC horn page 24 
lunches to other volunteers and keeps 
the starting tents supplied with candy 
and drinks. He observed, ‘^This is a 
polite way of putting an old goat out 
to pasture.** 

Over the years, Hazdovac has 
witnessed a lot as a golf tournament 
volunteer. 

One time he was standing next to a 
young security guard who was told, 
“Even if the Saviour should come in 
his car — he can*t park here.** Shortly 
thereafter, Hazdovac said, “1 saw a 
man driving toward us in a big, white. 
Rolls Royce. He was smoking a pipe. 
The kid yells, ‘You can*t park here. 
Not even the Saviour can park here.* 1 
had to tell him it was okay to let Bing 
Crosby in. Bitig laughed so hard he^ 
almost fell out of his car. 

Hazdovac said it*s almost a sin he 
participates in a golf tournament that 


is played on three of the worlds most 
beautiful golf courses because he 
doesn*t play golf. 

“Sometimes 1 don*t even know who 
the guys are who are playing,** he 
noted. But, of course, he has gotten to 
know a few regulars during 40 years 
on the courses. One of them is Clint 
Eastwood. 

“It*s a family,** said Hazdovac. 

“l*ve know Clint for years.** 

Raising two daughters, running a 
business, being a singing bartendor for 
35 years at the First Theater and 
volunteering every year for three 
weeks could only happen with the 
undaunted support of his wife, Lillian, 
Hazdovac admitted. 

“Because of an understanding 
family, who were willing to sacrifice 
many weekends over the years,** he 
said, “it was possible for me to do 
this.** 


Shuttle buses to operate from Fort Ord 


PARKING from page 22 

will conduct trafRc under supervision 

of sheriffs deputies. 

This year, there also will be 20 
shuttle buses operating continuously 
from parking lots at Fort Ord, with an 
expected turnaround time of about 45 
minutes. 

“We hope a lot of people driving 
down from the Bay Area will take 
advantage of it,” Russo said. “They 
will get into the Forest and onto the 
golf courses much faster.” I 

Additional shuttles will operate 


within the Forest, from the Equestrian 
Center and other parking lots to the 
golf courses. 

“We feel that for the number of 
people that attend,” Verbonich said, 
“this tournament moves quite 
smoothly.” 

Verbonich said that is a credit to 
many of those in the Pebble Beach Co. 
who have a long history with the 
AT&T and other major productions. 

“Many things get done automati¬ 
cally,” he said. “It’s kind of part of 
our routine to handle big events.” 



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AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am 



































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26 AT&iT Pebble Beach National Pro-Am February 3, 1994 


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‘fVhenyou spend a week with the 
pros you get a very good appreciation 
of how difficult it is. ’ 


— Clay Larson 
Monterey bank executive 


ago, Standly held sole possession of the tourna¬ 
ment lead after one round when he shot a 65 at 
Pebble Beach Golf Links. As Standly basked in 
the national spotlight, Larson was right there at 
his side. l 

“When you spend a week with the pros you get 
a very good appreciation of how difficult it is,” 
Larson said. 

Proof of that fact is Standly’s 40th place in 
1991 after holding the early lead. Standly went 


PHOTO/COUKTESY OF MM SHEIM 

DR. JIM RHEIM (cenler) prepares to shake the hand of his pro partner, Steve Jones, after putting out on the 18th 
green at Pebble Beach during the final round of the 1988 AT&T Pro-Am. Jones left the green and went on to 
record hisifirst-ever PGA Tour victory in a sudden death playoff with Bob Tway. Bernhard Langer is at left. 


■ Banker, doctor primed for 7th Pro-Am appearances 


winner on the tour. At least Jones was a non- 
winner until he was paired with Rheim, who 
plays with a four handicap. 

Buoyed by a second-round 64 at Cypress 
Point, Jones staggered through a final round 74 
and sank an 18-foot birdie putt at the 17th hole 

See AMATEURS page 27 


By GARTH AAERRILL 

CtLAY LARSON of Pebble Beach and Dr. Jim 
Rheim of Carmel Valley each will be playing in 
their seventh AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro- 
Am tournaments this year. 

As amateurs paired with professionals, both 
Larson and Rheim have enjoyed a taste of 
success in this major sporting event before the 
glare of the national media. Each man has his 
own way of dealing with the stress. 

*^YouVe trying to play the best golf youVe ever 
played,” Larson said. “There is a great deal of 
pressure involved.” 

Larson, executive vice president of First 
National Bank of Central California in Monterey, 
has for the last five years has been paired with 
pro Mike Standly of Houston, Texas. Two years 


78-73-72 over the final three rounds for a 288 totsJ. 

When it comes to Rheim, a Monterey dermatolo¬ 
gist, his debut at the AT&T could best be described 
as, well, a dream. 

Rheim’s first-ever appearance at the AT&T was 
in 1988 and his pro partner was Steve Jones, a non- 


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V 

Local doctor, banker have basked in AT&T spotlight 


AMATEURS from page 26 

in a sudden death playoff with Bob Tway to notch 
his first-ever tour victory — all with Rheim as his 
amateur partner. 

How could Rheim's experience ever be topped? 
Try the next year when Jones and Rheim captured 
the Pro-Am portion of the tournament when 
Rheim cooly sank a putt on the 18th green at 
Pebble Beach in Sunday’s final round for a 
stirring one-stroke victory. 

“It was rather dramatic,” Rheim admits. 

That year, Jones finished sixth overall so it 
could be said Rheim was a good luck charm for 
the pro. But even with all the pressure that goes 


7 try not to get too intense. If 
anything it takes the pressure off If 
you make a bad shot, there is a pretty 
good chance your pro can make it up 
for you. It’s comforting to know how 
good they are. ’ i 


— Dr. Jim Rheim 

Monterey doctor 


with the tournament — particularly when your 
team is atop the leader board — Rheim does his 
best to stay calm. / 

“I try not to get too intense,” Rheim said. “If 
anything it takes the pressure off. If you make a 
bad shot, there is a pretty good-chance your pro 
can make it up for you. It’s comforting to know 
how good they are.” I 

Rheim has played in tournaments most of his 
life. He began as a junior golfer in his native San 
Diego, and he was the No. 1 player while on the 
squad at Stanford University. He received his first 


invitation to the AT&T Pebble Beach in 1988, after 
winning the championship at Monterey Peninsula 
Country Club. 

‘Totally different’ 

Competitive golf is nothing new to Rheim, but 
even his years of experience could hardly have 
prepared him for a spectacle such as the AT&T. 

“It is totally different from anything I’ve ever 
experienced,” he said. 



PHOTO/ATST PEBBIE BEACH NATl PgOAM 


CLAY LARSON, a local banker, will again be teeing off 
at the AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am. 


“When you get the invitation in the mail it’s 
quite a rush,” Larson agreed. “Then, when you 
get out there and you’re playing with a golf pro 
and thinking about how that is how he makes his 
living... it’s a thrill.” 

Participation in the event also has given each 
man the opportunity to meet and mingle with 
some of the legends of the game. One year, 
Larson had the chance to play a practice round 
with “Gentle” Ben Crenshaw. 

“Everything they say about him being a 
gentleman are true,” noted Larson, who plays 
with a 10 handicap. “He made it feel like it was 
his thrill to play with me.” 

“I grew up in Pennsylvania, and I can remem¬ 
ber watching (the Crosby) on TV and seeing all 
the greats out here in the sunny weather while it 
was so cold back there,” Larson recalled. “Now 


Meeting Nicklaus 

Last year, Rheim introduced himself to Jack 
Nicklaus. “1 walked up to him and said ‘Hi, jack. 
My name is Jim Rheim.’ And we talked for about 
five minutes.” 

Rheim said Nicklaus would be his idea of a 
“dream partner” in the pro-am because he is “the 
all-time greatest golfer.” 

This year the Golden Bear is teamed with his 
son, so Rheim is out of the running for that 
honor. If such a pairing seems like pure fantasy, 
well, it is. 

But for those fortunate enough to take part in 
the AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am, most 
anything is a possibility. And nobody understands 
that better than Larson and Rheim. 

“Jim had the ultimate,” Larson said, reflecting 
on Rheim’s 1989 pressure putt for the team win, 
in front of a packed gallery, hundreds of friends 
and millions watching on television. “That’s the 
dream of the amateur.” 


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AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am 


February 3, 1994 
















































1994 AT&T PEBBLE BEACH PRO-AM — SECTION 2 


’s the ‘ticket 


■ Grounds and Grandstand Badge: $100 — in 
addition to Season Badge privileges, this badge 
entitles holder to a^andstand seat at the 17th and 
18th greens at Pebble Beach. 

H Season Badge: $85 — entitles holder to entrance 
to grounds for seven full days of practice and 
tournament rounds at all three courses. 

H Teen Ticket: $10 — good Monday through 
Sunday for spectators ages 13-19. Children 12-and 
under admitted bree if accompanied by an adult. 

■ Daily 'Hckets (available at all gates): 

— Wecbiesday^ $15. 

— Thursday through Sunday, $25. 


Crosby Cleimbake memorabilia 
to be isplayed in PC gallery 

The 


' mOTO/COlE THOMPSON 

PETER JACOBSEN (right) fields questions during last year's Coca-Cola Cbssic Youth Clinic where he and joe 
A/V^nfana (left) served as hosts. TTiis year, defending AT&T champion Brett Ogle will head the clinic. 

Special events lined up for V4 AT&T 

There ARE two more special events tied in 
with the 1994 AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro 
Am. They are the: ' 


SEARLE Brown Collection, a new art 
gallery in Pacific Grove, will give golf fans this week 
a look at memorabilia from the former years of the 
Itoumament — affectionately known then as the 
Bing Crosby Clambake. 

Marshia Searle Brown, artist and owner of the 
gallery, was the executive secretary of the Bing 
Crosby National Pro-Am Tournament for 18 years. 
Her late husband, Dan Searle, was tournament 
director from 1947 — the Crosby’s first year on the 
Monterey Peninsula — until 1980. 

During that time, the gallery owner reports she 
collected many rare Clambake souvenirs, including, 
programs, posters and a bottle collection of decant¬ 
ers. 

The Searle Brown Collection is located at 207 / 
St. in Pacific Grove (adjacent to the parking lot for 
Fandango’s Restaurant). It is open from 10 a.m. to 
5 p.m. with extended evening hours on weekends 
and by appointment. The gallery is closed Tues¬ 
days. Call 649-5014 for more information. 


Last year’s winner: John Denver ($4,000 to 
Windstar Foundation). ' 


■ COCA-COLA CLASSIC YOUTH CLINIC 
Who: Brett Ogle, defending champion, and 
others. 

What: Clinic features touring professionals and 
celebrity amateurs giving golf tips to junior 
golfers. Co-sponsored by the AT&T Pebble Beach 
Junior Golf Association. 

When: 3:30 p.m., Wednesday. 

Where: Tournament practice driving range. 

Last year: Joe Montana and Peter Jacobsen 
served as hosts, while Jack Lemmon and his son, 
Chris, made surprise appearances. 


■ 3M CELEBRITY CHALLENGE 
Who: Six celebrities play five holes with one 
player eliminated on each hole. Prize money goes 
to charity of celebrity’s choice. 

Field includes John Denver, Clint Eastwood, Don 
Johnson, Jack Lemmon, Bill Murray and Tommy 
Smothers. 

When: 11 a.m., Wednesday. 

Where: Pebble Beach Golf Links, holes 1-3, 17- 
18 

How (much): $18,000. 


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Area artist emphasizes ‘rhythm of the body’ in paintings 

H CarmeVs Elizabeth Palmer^s golf art graced cover of ^93 Pebble Bedch Invitational program 


of grass. This was dancing and 
movement.” 

Many years later, the effects of light 
and movement still fascinate PsJmer, 
who has made a career out of record¬ 
ing them. Although she paints a wide 
variety of subjects, including horses, 
Hgure studies and musicians, Psilmer 
is especially well known for her sports 


By MaiY D. WHITEHEAD 

Elizabeth palmer was three 

years old when her mother took her to 
a cove in Gloucester, Mass, and told 
her to put her head under the water 
and <^en her eyes. Palmer, a painter 
and longtime resident of Carmel, 
remembers that moment vividly. 

"It was absolutely ethereal. Sun¬ 
light filtered through the water, the Two of her portraits of golfers 

softness of the waves made a pattern graced the cover of the official pro¬ 
in the sand, here and there were tufts gram for the 22nd Annual Pebble 

Beach Invitational, held Nov. 18-21 
^^^3, and 


a selection of her acrylic 
paintings on canvas is currently 
displayed at Hanson Gallery on Ocean 
and San Carlos in Carmel. 

Of her sports paintings. Palmer 
comments, "I feel the rhythm of the 
body.” Her goal in all of her art is “to 
tap into a memory, to draw the viewer 
into the canvas, evoking a personal 
experience.” 

No qualms about color 

The most striking aspect of 
Palmer's creations, besides a sense of 
sweeping motion, is their bold, 
vibrant use of color. The artist re¬ 
marks, “A lot of times, people work in 
middle values, afraid to go too light or 
too dark.” Palmer herself has no 
qualms about reflecting what she sees 
in joyous hues. 

When beginning a work. Palmer 
prepares preliminary sketches, but is 
careful not to over-plan. “If I knew 
where I was going to end up in my 
work before I started, I’d be so bored. 


ROUGH GOING' by Elizabeth Palmer 


It would be like knowing the end of a 
movie.” 

Indeed, once she becomes involved 
in a painting. Palmer often ftnds that 
her subjects seem to take on a will of 
their own. Gesturing toward a large 
mural deleting a group of horses. 
Palmer notes, “I wanted their heads to 
turn in a certain direction, but they 
wouldn’t. They have their own per¬ 
sonalities.” 


Applied Arts, Palmer studied theater 
design at Yale University, where she 
earned a Master of Fine Arts. Palmer 
also studied at Columbia University 
and the San Francisco Art Institute. 

Although the field of sports art, like 
that of sports, is perceiv^ as a male 
domain. Palmer is used to being a 
trailblazer. As one of the very first 
women to receive graduate training at 
Yale, she remembers, “the men lived 
in beautiful buildings with elaborate 
stonework, while we women slept in 
army cots in rooms that looked like 
barracks.” 

Palmer’s adventuresome spirit 
continued to make itself felt. When 


Rigorous training 
Despite her flexibility in creating 
her art, Palmer’s work is the product 
of rigorous and interdisciplinary 
academic training. After receiving a 
bachelor of science degree from the 
University of Cincinnati College of 


ELIZABETH PALMER 


See PALMER 


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THE SIGN OF RESPECT 


30 AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am 


February 3, 1994 
































^mnHmmBomooo 

Rltt^ERVICE DRUO & UCRIOR STORE 


vinaanmm 


November 18-2t 


ELIZABETH PALMER'S pcxtraits were featured on the cover of the 22nd Annual Peb 
Beach Invitational, held Nov. 18-21, 1993, on the Monterey Peninsula. 

Artist Palmer is a trailblazer in 

! 

male-dominated field of sports 

PALMER from page 30 


1 he magic that is Pebble Beach ^ the 
beauty, the serenity, the elegance — can be 
yours for more than just a weekend. 


Take time to truly enjoy the things that 
make living in Pebble Beach one of the 
world^s great pleasures. 


Her job was to translate the news, 
which came from Paris, into English. 
While translating. Palmer quietly 
deleted much of the anti-American 
propaganda packaged with the news. 
Eventually, her creative editing got 
her fired. 

After returning from Morocco to 
San Francisco in the early 1970s, 
Palmer found that city changed for 
the worse. The apartment building 
that she had shared with other artists 
and writers was sold. 

It was then that Palmer moved to 
Carmel. Twenty years later, she says, 
“I love the sea. it cleanses the cobwebs 
from the mind.” 


she was planning a trip to Europe, 
Palmer was asked by her travel agent 
whether she wanted to stop off in 
North Africa on her way to Madrid. 

“I said, ‘Why not?’ I went to 
Morocco for 10 days and stayed for 
two years.” There, she painted and 
traveled extensively. She also directed 
and staged a play for local university 
students and narrated two short 
documentary films which were 
presented by King Hassan to Presi¬ 
dent Johnson. 

At one point, Palmer worked as a 
news announcer at a radio station. 


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AT&r Pebble Beach National Pro-Am 


February 3, 1994 






































he noted and added that he hopes to expand the 
Jordan Tour in 1995 to include the western states. 

Although tournament play doesn’t begin until 
this spring, Jordsin ssud his tour already has a full 
membership of 225. 

'^We’re turning people away already and our 
tournaments aren’t bc^nning for three months,” 
Jordan ssud. 

And, according to Jordsui, prize money on his 
tour is distributed more evenly than on the PCA, 
ensuring that players can continue to compete. He 
ssud the winner of each Jordsui Tour event receives 
16 percent of the totsJ purse, suid every player who 
makes the 36-hole cut receives a check. 

*^Everybody has known there was a need for 
another tour,” Jordan ssud. ‘^I’ve been willing to do 
what everybody else has dreamed about.” 

Inspires advancement 

The Jordan Tour inspires player advancement. In' 
fact, to support its members’ goals of playing on the 
PCA Tour, the Jordan Tour hsis sponsored several of 
its players in PGA Qualifying School. 

Jordan said 1992 PGA chsunpion John DsJy, 

1993 U.S. Open titlist Lee Jsmzen, Mike Stsuidly, 
Peter Persons and Bob Walcott are among the PGA 
pros who got their start on the T.C. Jordan Profes¬ 
sional Golf Tour. 

Janzen, who surprised a lot of golf experts with 
his win at last year’s U.S. Open, was the Jordan 
Tour’s top money winner in 1989. 

“1 would say 45 of the 125 (PGA) cards have 
probably had experience with us,” Jordan said. 

While Jordan, a 54-year-old entrepreneur from 
Hawaii, is currently losing money at the rate of 
$300,000 per year to keep the tour going, he is 
confident the tour will be profitable in the long run 
and is passionate about its role in the world of' 
professional golf. 

“It’s already worked,” Jordan exclaimed. “I’m 

See JORDAN page 33 


1OU MIGHT call the T.C. Jordan Tour the AAA 
league of professional golf. 

Created in 1988, the T.C. Jordan Professional 
Coif Tour provides opportunities for talented 
players of all ages to make a living as professional 
golfers and earn the recognition they deserve. 

“We’re in the perfect place at the perfect time,” 
observed lliomas Garrick “Rick” Joi^an, who 
finances the tour, which at this point encompasses 
eight states in the south. “There are too many good 
golfers out there with not enough quality places to 


Jordan, who has 
business interests in 
^Carmel, calls his tour 
^ feeder system to the 

PGA.” With a com- 
bined membership of 
WBL *■ ^ only 350 on the PGA 

Tour, Jordan says a 
talented pool of golfers 
\ ^ko want to play 

^ professional golf now 

have an opportunity to 
see their dreams 

PHOrO/SCOn MEMTON , 

become reality. 

RICK JORDAN u-OUj ^ 

prime example of clean-cut, young men fulfilling 
the American dream,” Jordan said. “These players He said that before the Jordan Tour was created, 

are traveling every week, often with their families, many promising players had to compete intema- 

making a sacrifice for a goal they believe in.” tionally to be able to vie for higher purses. 

According to Jordan, players have responded Like the PGA tour, the Jordan Tour offers 72- 

favorably to the Jordan Tour and have placed it hole tournaments and guaranteed prize money, 

“above all other non-PGA tours in every respect.” From 1989 to 1992, the Jordan Tour sanctioned 66 

While Jordan said “mini-tours” are in existence tournaments in 14 states with guaranteed purses 

throughout the U.S., the average purse for these 36- totaling nearly $5 million. This year, Jordan said, 
hole'tournaments “is not even enough to pay the his tour is sponsoring 20 events with $2 million in 
expenses of the average tour player, much less allow guaranteed prize money. 

him to earn a profit.” “We’re raising our purses to $100,000 this year,’ 


PHOTO/COUkTESY Of ATAT PEBBLE BEACH NATl PRO-AM 

JOHN DALY, 1992 PGA Champion, was one player 
who gof his star! on the T.C. Jordan Professional Golf 
Tour. Others include 1993 U.S. Open champion Lee 
Janzen and Mike Standly. 


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32 AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am 


February 3, 1994 

















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JACK NICKLAUS ponders his next shot during the '93 AT&T at Spygbss Hill. 

Jordan giving golfers the ch^ce 
they may never have had before 

JORDAN from page 32 Jordan, 

the only guy in America who can 
phone up 156 pros and get them in 
one place, with the exception of the 
PGA.” 

“It’s what I live for,” Jordan added. 

“People used to go out and take 
chances. Everybody’s lost that spirit 
now. Everybody goes out and buys a 
lottery ticket and thinks they can get 
it for nothing.” 

While Jordan wouldn’t speculate on 
this year’s winner of the AT&T Pebble 
Beach National Pro-Am because 
“there are too many good golfers,” he 
said he has a keen interest in the 
outcome because many of competitors 
got their start on the Jordan Tour. 

And finding out whether you’re 
good enough for the PGA Tour is part 
of what the T.G. Jordan Professional 
Golf Tour is all about, according to 


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A r& r Pebble Beach National Pro-Am 









































SPECIAL INCLUDES: 

2 Cireen Fees • 1 Power Golf C^art 


Juniors get hooked on golf through local organization 

/ • 

By GARTH MERRiu AT&T^Pp.hhlp. Rp.nr.h Jiininr Onlf Axxnrintinn 

Students 


WHO want to learn 
the links can study local courses 
throughout the year, courtesy of the 
AT&T Pebble Beach Junior Coif 
Association. The goal of the local non¬ 
profit organization is to provide 
county youths with continuous oppor- 
tutiities to experience golf. 

‘^We run quality programs, and 
parents like to have their kids in¬ 
volved in those sorts of things,” said 
R.J. Harper, association president. 
“We are very organized.” 

Harper, director of golf for Pebble 
Beach Resorts, is part the association’s 
18-member board that oversees its 
administration. i 

“1 love when I see kids’ faces and 
the faces of their parents when they 
see these kids are involved and 
enthralled by what they are doing. 

The whole board feels that way,” 
Harper said. 


to getting clubs into kids’ hands. They 
do so by slating a full calendar of 
annual tournaments and clinics, and 
with programs designed to make the 
game more accessible. 

The JGA “Summer Series” of 
tournaments is held on some of the 
top golf courses on the Monterey 
Peninsula, which are donated for the 
occasions by the host clubs. 

Last summer’s final was hosted at 
the Fort Ord Black horse course, and 
the services of its head pro and his 
staff were on hand for the young 
golfers. Similarly, the junior champi¬ 
onships were held at Spyglass Hill and 
Carmel Valley Ranch Resort. 

Harper said the use of staff and 


facilities of those and a dozen other 
hosts — including Quail Lodge, 
Rancho Canada and Monterey Penin¬ 
sula Country Club — illustrates how 
“the community has embraced the 
association.” 

“When they donate a golfing 
facility for a day for kids ... that’s a 
real strong statement of support and a 
belief in the game for kids.” 

Coif Outreach and Clubs for Kids 
are two missionary methods of making 
golf more available to those who 
otherwise might not get exposure to 
the game. 

The Outreach program sends local 
golf pros into physical education 
classes at schools such as Martin 


PHOTO/PINE CONE fUE 

R.J. HARPER, association president. 

Luther King, Jr. Junior High in 
Seaside. ' 

“We needed to reach those kids in 
the community that didn’t have access 
to country clubs,” Harper said. He 
added that part of that job also was to 
make those kids aware of golfs 
availability. 

“There are more municipal golf 
courses now, like Pacific Grove and 
Del Monte. They have low rates. And 
you can go play in shorts or jeans and 
sneakers and eo have fun.” 


Ideal character builder 
Harper said golf is an ideal charac¬ 
ter building experience for young 
people. 

“The game of golf is an intriguing 
sport, but it’s a lesson in life, too. It’s 
one of the only games that you play by 
a set of rules with no official. You’re 
the official. So you learn values about 


Clubs for free 

The JGA’s Clubs for Kids program 
provides golf clubs free of charge to 
those who don’t have them. The clubs 
are exchanged for others as the golfer 
grows in the program, then refinished 
for the next student of the game. 


Begun in 19oo, the association 
currendy boasts about mem- 

bers, including more than 1,200 

junior golfers between the ages of 7 PHoro/GAam aaepriu 

and 18. COURTNEY CLARK (left) and Veronica Gamez, both nine years old, are just two 

The others are volunteers dedicated Monterey Peninsula youths who are experiencing the game of golf at a young age. 


See JUNIORS, page 35 


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Annual junior tourney raises more than $50,000 


The second Annual AT&T 


Pebble Beach Junior Coif Association 
Invitational Tournament, held on Dec. 
18, 1993, featured 155 participants 
and raised more than $50,000 for the 
association’s programs. 

Johnny Miller, former tour great 
and now an NBC color analyst, 
provided a short clinic prior to the 
tournament and gave the keynote 
speech at the event’s luncheon. 

At the luncheon, more than 
$25,000 was presented in scholarships 
to these talented prep golfers: 


■ Steven Crier, North Salinas High — 
the Jacqueline Clampett Jones Scholarship 
($1,000) and Kenny Stout Memorial 
Scholarship ($4,000). 

■ Jaaon Ling, Seaside High; Ryan 
Murphy, Aptos High; and Oliver Pappas, 
Carmel High — AT&T Pebble Beach Junior 
Coif Association Scholarship ($4,000/each). 

■ Matt Miller, Robert Louis Stevenson 
School — AT&T Pebble Beach Junior Coif 
Association Jim Langley Scholarship 
($4,000). 

■ Brandon Roberts, Carmel High — 
Marcy and Seymour Hyman Scholarship 
($4,000). 


PHOTO/ATAT PESStf SfACH NATl PfOAM 


JOHNNY MILLER gave a clinic at the 1993 Junior Golf Association annual luncheon. 


EXERCISE. 


JUNIOR COLF: An 
investment in future 

JUNIORS from page 34 

The PBJCA has invested in the 
future with its efforts, and it is 
already beginning to see pay back 
on its courses. 

“Some of the kids in our 
program are very, very talented 
players, and at very young ages 
they have very high aspirations,” 
Harper said. “So we’re not only 
introducing the game, we’re 
seeing kids grow up to become 
real stars.” 

Several of the area’s top young 
players have come up through its 
ranks, including Scott Wang of 
Robert Louis Stevenson School. 

I A junior on the Pirates’ Central 
Coast Section Championship golf 
team, Wang finished second last 
summer at the California Junior 
Amateur Coif Championships. 

“I’ve had a number of players 
who have participated in the 
program,” said RLS coach John 
Powers. He said the experience of 
junior players shows when he 
takes his team to big competi¬ 
tions. 

“Most of all they have tourna¬ 
ment experience and on-course 
etiquette and skill, which a lot of 
kids that age don’t have,” Powers 
said. “They’re over the butter¬ 
flies.” 

The PBJCA encompasses all of 
Monterey County, and its allure 
of prime peninsula greens and 
professional support has drawn 
members from Santa Cruz, Los 
Catos, San Francisco and Fresno. 


February 3, 1994 


A I’ Pebble Beach National Pro-Am 


35 







































Errant golf balls keep tourney doctor, gallery hopping 


■ For 30 years, Gerald Martin 
and first aid committee have 
treated the sick, accident-prone 
at the AT&T tournament. 


By PAUL WOLF 

A DECADE ago. Dr. Gerald 
Martin penned a column focusing on 
spectator safety for the AT&T Pd^ble 
Beach NationsJ Pro-Am, in which he 
cautioned: '^Beware of former United 
States presidents wielding 1-irons.^ 

His words proved pn^hedc. 

Gerald Ford, the first-ever presi¬ 
dent to play here, managed to send a 
ball flying in the direction of a human 
target. A woman in the crowd was 
struck, and the laceradon she suffered 
required Mardn's attendon. 

It may be academic now, but 
Martin, who chairs the AT&T First 
Aid Committee, doesn’t believe the 
offending instrument was indeed a 1- 
iron. 

There have been many such inci¬ 
dents over the years. 

“President Ford has hit a few 
people, and let’s just say that..Well, 
Jack Lemmon is not known for his 
accuracy,” observes Martin, a retired 
surgeon. 

To some, such a presidential bruise 
could be a badge of honor, much like 
retumingifrom the ballpark with a 
Barry Bonds home run'— or foul ball, 
as the case may be. 

You could just imagine someone 
walking around with a T-shirt — “I 
got hit by Chi Chi.” 


Serious business 
But this is no brigade of groupies, 
and there is rarely anything glamorous 
about the various ailments that show 
up at the AT&T: mysterious abdomi¬ 
nal pains'plaguing four-time winner 
Mark O’Meara — just bad digestion; 
Jack Nicklaus’ earache — nothing 
commanding immediate attendon. 

“Many of these players,” Martin 
says, “may have already seen their 
doctors before they arrived at the 
tournament, and they need someone 
to follow up with when they are here. 
“These are basically pretty nice 


PHOTO/COUKTESY Of M. GEKAlD MARTIN 

DR. GERALD MARTIN (center), who chairs the AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am's 
First Aid Committee, last year prescribed antibiotics to this famous couple — Don 
Johnson and Melanie Griffith. 


these injuries are not particularly 
serious, and the victims can be treated 
without being sent to Community 
Hospital of the Monterey Peninsula 
(CHOMP). 


However, to Martin, errant golf 
balls constitute an ongoing and very 
real hazard. They cause some 10 to 12 
injuries at each year’s event. 

It should be noted that most of 


See DR. MARTIN page 37 


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36 AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am 


February 3, 1994 















Helpful tips for AT&:T spectators 

■ WmX DO I ^AR? Weather on the Monterey Peninsula is unpredict¬ 
able, with many daily temperature variations. It is best to wear several layers of 
clothing and comfortable walking shoes. 

■ HOW WILL I KNOW WHERE TO FIND MY FAVORITE PLAYERS? 
Players make their own tee times for practice rounds, Monday-Wednesday. 
Touniament pairings are not confirmed until the last minute, but free daily 
pairing sheets are available at each course, beginning on Thursday. 

I WHAT TIME DOES PLAY BEGIN? Play starts around 8 a.m., and 
generally concludes by 4 p.m 

■ HOW DO I GET FROM ONE COURSE TO ANOTHER? Beginning on 
Thursday, there are courtesy shuttle buses between the courses. Your ticket 
entitles you to go to all three courses. 

H WHERE CAN I PARK FOR FREE? You can park for free at Fort Ord on 
Friday, Feb. 4 and Saturday, Feb 5, only. Free shuttle buses to the tournament 
will run continuously those days. Take the Fort Ord Main Gate entrance off 
Highway 1. 

H WHAT ABOUT AUTOGRAPHS? While our tournament is more relaxed 
that most, please remember that the pros are competing for high stakes. Wait 
until play has concluded to seek autographs. 

■ WHERE DOES THE MONEY GO? All net proceeds from the AT&T 
Pebble Beach Pro-Am go to support a variety of charitable organizations. 

Tournament doctor keeps ‘healthy’ outlook 

DR. MARTIN from page 36 together for any length of time, 

people who simply appreciate having ailments and injuries become part of 
us around. None of us bothers anyone the landscape.* 

for autographs or anything like that.” “We’ve had heat stroke and cardiac 

After two-time winner Tom Watson arrests on the golf course — senior 
received care from Martin for “a touch citizens just watching the game,” 
of the flu,” he sent the doctor a dozen Martin reports. “I think we’ve even 

Ram golf balls as a thank you gesture. had a couple of deaths.” 

Martin, in turn, gave Watson the For every sublime moment on the 

best tribute he could possibly carry green, there is something ridiculous 
out — the good doctor put down his happening out of most people’s sight: 
surgical gear, grabbed his golf clubs A spectator falling out of a tree, or a 
and proceeded to lose all the balls on golf cart running over someone’s foot, 
the course. When the history of the AT&T is 

In the end, it is usually the fans written, however, these events won’t 

who benefit most from the close claim even a footnote. Fortunately for 

proximity of the volunteer medical Martin and his committee, there is 

staff. According to Martin, any time always enough time left over to watch 

you assemble thousands of people what everyone else has come for. 



Tuck (t«k), sb ‘Form: 6.-tuck. (^Tuck v.' in 
various senses.] 

6. slang. Usually tuck-outiiiso tuck-in)-. A hearty 
meal; csp. in school use, a feast of delicacies, a 
'blow-out'. 

1823 in Spirit Pub. Jmls. 232 He being inclined for 
a tuck out, repaired where he was likely to meet 
^ with oysters. 1836 E. Ht)WARD R. Reefer xxxvii, Tell 
my steward to gve them a good tuck-out and a glass 
of grog. 1856 F. E. Page t Owlet Owlst. i72, 1 was 
at the dessen; and a jolly good tuck 1 had, besides. 
1886 T. Harpy Mayor (iasterbr. ix. We wll have a 
solid, staunch tuck-in. 

b. Food, eatables; esp. delicacies, as sweet-stuff, 
pastry, jam, etc. {schoolslan^. Cf. Tut;KER sb. 6. 
ss^; 1857 Hughes 7’owfirow/«ii.v,7'he Slogger looks 
^ rather sodden, as if he didn't take uch exercise and 
ate too uch tuck, i860 Tayior AnahnacviW. (i86l) 
210 Ten or twelve of these little bowls on the table, 
each wth a different kind of'tuck' in it. 


Shop? 


a scon^ 
sVwJ othef 
comestlblesm 

f OMr m ■ 
Tea Room 


Tuck (twk) V. 1 

10. slang, a. trans. To consume, swallow (food or 
drink): to 'put away', 'put out of sight'. 

1784 R.Ba(,e Barham Downs. I. I9i We will dine 
together: tuck up a bottle or two of claret. 1833 
Marryat P. Simple \\. Now that I've cured you, 
you'll be tucking all that into your own little 
breadbasket.,a. 1845 Barnham Ingol. Leg., House¬ 
warming, The strawberriesi . . Which our 
Grandmother's Uncle tucked in like a pig. 1861 
Hol.lAND Less. Lifexn. 144 Let's go over and see if 
we can't tuck away any of that grub. 

b. intr. To feed heartily or greedily;: esp. with in, 
into. 

1810 [seeTucKiNG vbl. sb.' 4]. 1838 Dickens Nich. 
Nick. If you'll just let little Wackford tuck into 
something fat. 1869 THAt:KERAY Round. Paperswii, 
There is Rasherwell 'tucking' away in the coffee 
room. i887EdnaLyall A'«;^/>/-£rr/?«rxv,(i889) I29 
Always in at dinner-time and to be found at odd 
hours tuckine-in. 


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LUNCH AND DINNER 

Lunch Tues. - ^t.l 1:30 - 2:(X) • Dinner 7 Nights a Week Starting at 5:30 pm 

626-9319 B 


For more information contact: 

Ruth LaGrange, 625-4111, 624-9241 

The Shops at The Lodge, Pebble Beach 


Reservations 





& ' V «■ 

.A 








February 3, 1994 


A r& r Pebble Beach National Pro-Am 


37 








































Gallery grabbers 


PEBBLE BEACH NATL PftO-AM 


Fans will hover around ‘The Shark ’ Clint 


GREG NORMAN (left) and Clinf Eastwood are always sure to attract a crowd 
wherever they're playing during the AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am. 
Norman's best finish in this tournamentcame in 1988 when he placed third, one 
stroke behind Steve Jones and Bob Tway. Jones later won the tournament in a 
sudden death playoff. Eastwood, the former mayor of Carmel and Academy 
Award-winning director of Unforgiven, is an avid golfer who plays with a 19 
handicap. 


AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am February 3, 1994 


the rin^t 






irri^ 




ii 


A 


CARMEL 

2 BLOCK SO. OF 
OCBANAVBNUB 
Sale or Lease/Option 

This 3 bedroom, 2 bath home sits on a quiet 
street behind a high fence with a private 
setting (sorry, no drive-bys; you won't see a 
thing). Within its 1750 sq. ft. are featured 
wood,floors, remodeled kitchen & baths, 2 
fireplaces, family room/bedroom, skylights 
and storage shed. Call for details. $425,000. 


CARMEL VALLEY 
CABIN 

White Rock Membership— Limited occu¬ 
pancy. Hunting, fishing, hiking—5 ac. lake. 
Ownerfinancing. $60,000. 

70ACRES 
CARMEL VALLEY 

Spectacular Views — Private Well — Near 
Village—Desperate Seller... 

$295,000. 


John 

Caldwell's 

659-1901 


ASSOCIATED BROKERS 

real estate investment specialists 


P.O. Box 5944 • CARMELCALIFORNIA 93921 


I armol 

Allegro 
Cactus Jack's 
Cafe Berlin 
Clam Box 
Flaherty's 
General Store 
Golden Buddha 
Hamaichi 
Jack London's 
L Escargot 
Scbo's 

Toots Lagoon 

DESSERT 
Pieces of Heaven 


onterev 

Bradley's 

India's Clay Oven 

Sakura 

Sardine Factory 
Spadaro's 
Tony Roma's 
Tutto Buono 

acific Grove 

Fandango 

Allegro 


llournu't Tt) Ck) is a new concept in dining! Choose lunch or 
dinner from twentv-one ot the area's finest restaurants and 
one caiTd\' store, ^bllr fax'orite food w ill be deli\’ered to \’our 
office, home or hotel rooriT. We are as close as vour telephone! 


ULTIMATE MENU 






SJl.V 












































Watch for our blue banners! 




Oo'O'tf' 3'.C S »•’ P 0 Bo> ■ 3Crt 


'SrK\N VIM s 
( om: 

DIOR AM V " 

t)\ Andri' on 


( ariiul's I atm-st (>il 
I’aitiliiii! (120" \ 3%"i 
paiiili-d on iiit'M'd 
Mirfair '\ilh sprtiai 
\is(ial and Noiind 
dlidv dt'pKiinu oni' 
ot Monliri) 
IVninstda's inosl 
s|M'clai.(ilar sti'iii''* in 
all its cion, as \iturd 
from ('ariiul's 
Miuarl lltaili. 


^^^rmel...the most 
bi^utiful art colony in the^ 
world...with more than 
seventy art galleries & 
studios in a one-square 
mile village! More than 
forty of these world 
renowned art galleries & 
studios will be open Friday 
evening, February 4th, 

6 - 9 pm, welcoming art, 
lovers and collectors. The 
diversity represented will 
feature artists past & . 
present - from traditional to 
the avant garde. Use the 
map on the next page... 
and enjoy some of tne 
finest art in the world. 


Offering ^ 
one of the 
largest 
selections of 
fine art in 
California. 


EXCELLENCE IN FINE ARTSINCE 1959 
TWO LOCATIONS ON 6TH AVENUE • CARMEL • (408)624-8314 


Masterful 
paintings 
capturing 
a Jewel-rich 
tapestry 
of color. 


Corner of Lincoln & 6th. Carmel 
P.O Box 2986, Carmel, CA 93921 • 408 / 625-0425 


Richard 

Erdman 

Sculpture 


ON SIXTH AVENUE 

Detailed Wood Sculptures 
Original Oils & Watercolors 
Antique Decoys 

Custom Framing 
Service 

M0N.-SAT.10-B* 

BUN. 11-B 


Dolores St. biwn. Sth & 6th 
P.O. Box 6612 • Caimel.'cA 93921 
408 • 624-4355 


6th Avenue between Dolores & 
Lincoln • Carmel 
(408)625-1881 DECOY-88 


On Lincoln between Ocean & Seventh / Box 5146 
Carmel-by-the-Sea, CA 93921 □ 408/624-0757 


DOhifiDiD LiiPirri 
riNE APT (STUDIO 


FOTA 


Friends of the Arts 
Fine Art Gallery 


Quality Fine Art 
AT Realistic Prices 


6TH AVENUE BTWN. LINCOLN & DOLORES 
CARMEL • (408) 626-4444 


OCEAN AVENUE BETWEEN SAN CARLOS k DOLORES 
CARMEL, CA. 625-4151 


(^' On 6th At Dolores (next to Flaherty's) 


A'P&r Pebble Beach National Pro-Am 39 


February 3, 1994 
































































SAN CARLOS BTWN. FIFTH A SIXTH 
P.O. BOX 1S96, CARMEL. CA 93921 
HOURS: 10- 6 DAILY • 4O»/f)M-*20O 


SYBFLL/DAWSON 


FrieU^ Art Walk—Bismyard Gallery 
(Highway 1 & C armel Vtdley Rd.) • 622-0939 
& Dolores btum.Ocean & Ttb (at tbeTuck Box) 622-1133 
CARMEL Oxan btwn. Lino^ & Dolores • 62S-1927 


*AShop/ou 
muMvisirn 
CrnmeL' 
GoN OigM 


vX Coll 


LECTION 


Ask for 

OurNaw 

Cttilfto 


• Memorabilia 

• Alt 

•Antiques 

• Exclusive Gifts 

• Accessories 

• Apparel 

• Books 


Dolores St. at 6 th • Carmel. Caufornia 
(406) 62&4488 

Operated by MICHAEL C. ROSETO ^ 

Under exclusive license by Golden Bear International ^ 




tne 




A Gallery of 
Distinctive Gifts 
& Highly 
Decorative 
Wooden Objects 


Studio & Gallery 

^ Specializing in figurative 

iU painting in vivid colors. 

■ works include angels 

brides & fairy tales 

Emelda Shtrinian dsrge to minimum) 

Stonehouse Terrace. San Carlos betwn. 7th & dth 
6264122 • Carmel 


A ItftdnMktg (Mvclion in 
vMiod turning by Ih* artiun 
who ultlizM hieorical Indian 
pociary datignt at a guida 
for hit work. 


Segmented bo¥rl 


SPECIAL EVENTS FOR FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 4TH • 6:00 - 9:00 PM 

BENNETT SCULPTURE GALLERY - San Caiios btwn. 5th & 6th 626-0470 Demonstration - Wier Amiture, 6 - 9 pm 

BLEICH GALLERY • Dolores btwn. Ocean & 7th 372-2717 Oil painting demonstration by Artist George Bleich. 6 - 9 pm 

CARMEL LEATHERSMITH - San Carlos btwn. Ocean & 7th, Carmel Square 626-6555 
Leather carving demonstration by David Manchel, 6 - 9 pm 

THE COLLECTION OF ANN CUNNINGHAM - Dolores btwn. 5th & 6th, Su Vecino Court 622-9323 
Watercolor demonstration. 6 - 6 pm 

DODGE/La RUE GALLERY - Dolores btwn. 5th & 6th 625-5636 Oil painting by artist Jim Kelly, 6 - 9 pm 

RNE WOODWORKING OF CARMEL - San Carlos btwn. 5th & 6th. The Mall 622-WOOD 
Video on the art of wood turning by Karl Pohl, 6 - 9 pm 

FRIENDS OF THE ARTS - 6th btwn. San Carlos & Dolores 624-1305 
Stephen Wood - Painting florals and still life, 6 - 9 pm 

HARTLEY HILL GALLERY - Lincoln btwn. Ocean & 7th 624-0757 Film by Richard Erdman, 6 - 9 pm ongoing 

HIGHLANDS SCULPTURE GALLERY - Dolores btwn. 5th & 6th 624-0535 
Welded bronze sculpture demonstration by Frank Sunseri. 6:30 - 8:30 pm 

LISA’S STUDIO - Mission btwn. Ocean & 7th, Court of the Fountain 626-5435 Equestrian painting by artist Lisa Bryan 


(lai tk ii (lallcrio ol C annc l 


PAaFIC 




0^) 


m 


m 


SAN CARLOS 


MISSION 


JUNIPERO 


P JC 


HIGHWAY 1 


CARMEL 

RANCHO 

BLVDJ 


NORTH TO MONTEREY 


Also Featuring 
Other Important 
Regional & 
International 
Artists 


■PORT aiQAr BY COSBY, OB. ON LNEN 2B X 38 


Smith 


(408) 626-6563 

San Carlos btwn. 

Ocean & 7th 
Carmel, CA. 93921 


"Storyteller” 




2068, 


40 AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am 


Malcolm_. 

^ulpture 


MALCOI. M MORAN STUDIOS 

Mission Patio btwn. 5lh & 6th, Carmel 

408-626- 3 300 


February 3, 1994 


‘Dod^c/La J\ue Cjaflcni 


I'C(itttn'n}> 

CjI'M: Spix k 

aiul otluT 
liiK* ariisis 


On l>olorcs bi'lNNcen I iltli sixth 

(>25-5(>.U> 

P.O. Hox • < JU’iiicl. < alifornia 


















































H 



S O R h D 



C a\ R M E L li IJ S I r^-l ESS ASS O C I A I 





First Annual Carmel Gallery Walk, Friday, Februa^ 4th - 6:00 - 9:00 

P^I^TICtfATING OAILERIES & STUDIOS 

.. - 

1. Graphic Tiaflic, Garmel PIcm 25 New Mostefs Gdbry Ddoes blwn. Ocean & 7lh 

2. lixjs Sfcxio, A^ssion & 7lh, Court of the Fountain 26 (julece Gallery, Dolores blwn. 5lh <& 6li 

3 RosanriofdGaleryAAlssk^ 27 A. Balyon Galery Dolores blwn. 5lh & 6lh 

4 Ffienck of tie Arts, 6(h blwn. San Carlos & Dolores 28 Dodge/b Rue Galery, Dolores b^Mi. 5lh & 6lh 

5 2artnan Art Galleries, 6lh & M'ssion 29 lindscry/S.R. Brennen Gallery Dolores blwn. 5lh & 6lh 

6 AAalcolm Moran Studied, AAission btwn. 5th & 6th 30 Montaia Galery, Dolores blwnr,5lh & 6lh 

7 The ludwa Studio, Off San Carbs btwn. 5th & 6th 31 Highbnds Sculpture Gallery, Dolores blwn. 5lh & 6ti 

8 f^\AfcocWilangofCciTTiel,OlfSanGalo6kAMi. 5fi&6ti 32 Skalogards Square Rigger Art Galery 

9 Dream Gallery, Off San Carbs btwn. 5th & 6th Dolores between 5ti 

10 Bennett Sculpture, Off San Carlos blwn. 5fh <& 6th 33 TheColeclonof AnnCunnirigham, DoloresbkA/n. 5<i&6lh' 

11 Srnic Galleria, San Carbs between 5lh<Si6lh 34 Martin \A^eW/s Galery Dobra blwn. 5 

12 Sybl/Dowson Fine Art, San Carbs blwn. 5lh &6lh 35 Jock Nickbus Coledon, Dobres blwn. 5lh & 6th 


Representing ^ 

WULBUUAS 
DEWnr WHBTLER JAYNE 
DOROriHY SPANGLER 
MERRY KOHN 
DAVDTHIMGAN 
STAN STOKES 
BRENDA MORREON 
GORDON MORIENSEN 
KETIHLINDBERG 
and many otheis 


West side of IDokro Betiveen Ocean A 7tti 
Carawi CA 99921 •(«» 625-1511 


13 Trotter Gallery San Carlcfi blwn. 5lh & 6lh 36 Gallery Sur, Dobres blwn. 5lh <& 6lh ^ 

14 Classic Art Gallery, 6lh near San Carlos 37 Lilbna Braioo Galery, 6lh bwn. Dobres & lincoln 

15 Hc^M3rdPortncyGalefie, 6lh near Dobra 38 bonSpeckGolery 6*i blwn. Doha AUnooln 

16 Hanson Gcrlerfes, Ocean & San Garbs 39 Galerie Blue Deg, 6lh btwn. Dobra & lincoln 

17 Roberfolupei Galery Obean bwn. San Carbs 40 Deex?/Gallery 6lh bwn. Dobra & br^ 

18 SmilhCosb/ Galeries, San Carbs bwn Ooean & 7lh 41 Lyrm Lupelli Gallery, 6th betwe^ Dobra 8^ Lincoln 

19 Carrnellealfiersrnlfi, San Carbs near 7h, next bNtekens 42 Jim Mler Gallery, Lincoln & 6lh 

20 llrorms Kinkade Galery, Dobes blwn. Ooean & Tih &Tbe Bcmyard 43 Trailside Americana, Lincoln & 6th 

21 A/bry Titus Galery Tl 3 Crossroads 44 G. H. Rothe Galery, Unooln between Ocean & 7lh 

22 Viloge Artislry, Dobra btwn. Ocean & 7th & 26364 Carmel Rancho bne (behind Barnyard) 

23 Galery Twenty One, Ddoia btwn. Ocean & 7th 45 Hartley Hill Gallery, Lincoln between Ocean & 7th 

24 Bleich Gallery \Afest, Dobra btwn. Ocean & 7th i 46 ShirinonSlidb, Slonehouse brace, Scr Cab 

MOKSPeaALEVeNTS¥ORf«DAY,^B«UMtr4m,6KiO-9iOOPM... 



LU0WAS1UDIO-Mssionblwn.5(hS6lh.TheMa< £25^135 
Stoerianoilpairter, Abino Tsbicova, from Buryat Repubfic on Lake Baikal, 6 - 9 pm 

LYFMLUPEniGiAIJL£RY-6(hbtvm.Doicxa&Li^^ 6240622^26-0418 at portrat sketching from »e. ^ 

ROBERTO LUPETT1 GALLERY - Ocean btwn. San Carbs & Dobra 6254151 OI pakitkig by artist Roberto Lupetti, 6 - 9 pm 

MALCOLM MORAN STUDIOS-Mission blwn. 5th & 6th 626-3300 Wax model, 630 • 7:30 pm 

MARY TITIJS GALLERY-113 Crossroads Btwi. 626-6628 
Wateroolor painting demonstration by artist Mary Ttus, 630 - 730 pm 

NEW MASTERS GALLERY-Dolores blwn. Ocean & 7th 625-1511 

Video demonstration by Wl Bulas, Gordeon Mortensen, and Dorothy Spangler, 6 - 9pm 

SKALAGAROSSQUARE4KK»ARrGALLERY-Dotoiwblwn.5th&Gth 6246B79 
Nautical parting denfxxistrat i on by artist Hans Skabgard, 730-830 pm 

SMTHTOOSBY GALLERY - San Cartos btwa Ocean 4 7th 626-6563 Olpartingsby artist John Cosby, 7-8pm 
SYBLLOAWSON-San Carlos btwa 5th 4 eth 624-8200 

Scu^redemonstratbn by artist Richard MacDonald, 7'8pm ^ 

THOMAS WNKADE GALLERY AT THE TUCK BOX -Dolores btwn. Ocean 4 7th 626-1927 
Luminostity display of ight, 5 - 8 pm 

TRAILSH3E AMERICANA - Linooin 4 6ih 624-6071 Painting demonstration, 6 - 8 pm 





rYVIND EARl E 

"(iciiiHs is Rare" 


(;\LLKR^ 


n itK' c-i-i Mvk’ ol Dolores 
\ "ih lUH 


PRIfvlTS 

GLASS 

CERAMICS 

JEWELRY 

DOLORES BETWEEN. 
OCEAN & 7TH 
624-7628 


paintings 

portraits 


limited editions 


posters 


art cards 


aico ^ 

GALLERY ^ 

6th Street S. W. of Dolores up the path by the tree. 624-2512 


February 3, 1994 A F&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am 


Nudes, Horses, 
Scenes & Florals 
in Oils, Watercolors 
and Ink. 

p 

In Court of the Fountain 
off Mission 
btwn. Ocean St 7th 
(Behind Anton St Michel) 

Ph/Fax: 626-5435 _ 

@ 


@ 

CarmeVs Most 
Magical 
Gallery 


Sixth between Dolores 
St Lincoln • P.O. 5776 
Carmel, Ca. 93921 
408-624-0622 




I *a 111 f I tVoni I lu‘ 
Silit'i ittn ol 

Bui'n alia 


Ludlua Studio 


piiseiils 


SlLdina ^sibiKOVa 


Bet Mission & S.in rnrlos 
6th & 5th 


408 625 3135 Q 
























































41 Watch for our blue banners! 


JEWELRY • ART • WEARABLE ART • GIFTS 

One should hang a work of art, 
wear a work of art, 
or be a work of art. 


GRAPHIC TRAFFIC 
CARMEL PLAZA 
CARMEL ^ 
626 6820 


SCULPTURE . PAINTINGS 


C AKMM 


lOS ANX.M.tS 


The years first "Carmel Galle^VValk", Friday, February 4th, 6:00 - 9:00 pm 


Bleich 


"Jl PmUet Day at Lona Cypfasa" (24x40) 
f on sHont auction through February 


^^armeL..the most 
beautiful art colony in the 
world.. .with more than ' 
seventy art galleries & 
studios in a one^quare mile 
village! Over forty will be 
open Friday evening, 
February 4th, 6 - 9 pm, 
welcoming art lovers and 
collectors. More than twenty 
will be offering displays & 
demonstrations. The 
diversity represented will 
feature artists past & preserjf 
- from traditional to the 
avant garde. Use the map 
on the previous page... 
and enjoy some of the 
finest art in the world! 


50% of all p r ooaad a fio banafit LA. Quaka RaUafFuttd 
Ooloraa SL 4 doora S. of Ooaan Avo. ^ 

Carmal-bytho-Saa • 624-9447 ^ 


G.H. Rothe Gallery 

Master of the Mezzotint 


26364 Cannel Rancho Lane 
(Behind the Bernyerd), Carmel • 636-1SS8 
Morgan Court., Lincoln bet. Ocean A 7th 
Carmel • 624-9377 


Future...Fantasy 
Metaphysical Art 


CAHMEL CALIFORNIA 


Speciauzing in 
Fantasy Portraits 


Demonstration in watercolor 

Feb. 4 • 6:30-7:30 

'113 Crossroads Blvd. * Carmel • 626-8628 


Bennett Sculpture 


LASSie FINE ART GALLERY 


Classic 19th 
Century and 
Contemporary 
Paintings 


BronzeSculptures 
by Bob, Tom 
& Terry Bennett 


(408) 6260470 


Warm Textured Compositions of CHRISTIAN /EQUEL 
A Twentieth Century Master of Color 

Dolores at 6th 

Carm e 1 -bV -1hc-Sea • 624-0204 


6thandSanCarlm, 

Box 1462 Carmel, *‘*T^*-^ 

CA. 93921 " 

62^-0464 fc- 

IWO/ -COMING HOMP 3(r*4(r S. BALYON 


San Carbs bet. 5th & 6th, The Mall 



‘flic Ct-^rmcl 
Lcaihcrsmitli 


( 'alifoniia .s jjallcrij 

of leather art 

■ ‘ f'r*" k 

1 «. ' ■' 

( 408 ) 626-6555 


Tues.-Sat. 10-5 or by 


appt. 

San Carlos near 7th in 


Catmcl Square 

"Wogabondi Bog' Carved and tnnied 

(next to Nielsens Market) 

coMhldc travel fay David Manchel 



42 AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro*Am 


February 3, 1994 
































































^aust/v ojo 

DESIGNER FASHIONS 


PHOTO/ATAT PfUt£ BEACH NATl PfOAM 


TWO-TIME Crosby winner Tom Watson (1977, 1978) surveys his scorecard 
following a round at the AT&T. Not only has Watson captured this tournament 
twice, but he won the 19^2 U.S. Open at Pebble Beach with the legendary chip 
shot on the 17th hole to'tbrn back jack Nickbus. i 


Panoramic Ocean Views 
from Victorine Ranch Estate 


JUST 5 MILES SOUTH OF CARMEL finds this magnificent 
home site on 5-t- plateau acres overlooking breathtaking 
ocean views. Hand-crafted of massive wood columns, beams 
and granite walls, there are 3 fireplaces, 4 bedrooms & 5 
baths. A residence of some 7500 sq. ft. boasting the finest of 
cabinetry, wood finishing and meticulous attention to detail. A 
pool and spa add to its amenities. Brochure/video. 
$4,875,000. 

f 

^ For more information contact: 

Greg Kraft, 625-0300/626-2747 ^ 

Junipero near 5th, Carmel ^ 


It*s elementary, my dear Watson 


LEVIN 


Spring 1994 


228 Crossroads Blvd. •The Crossroads •Carmel • 626-0276 

Located in Mayfair Court 


February 3, 1994 AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am 






RYAN Ranch 






All Selections available 
for take out 

Catering available 
for all occasions 

Enjoy our hotnetnade 
desserts, baked daily 

In the tradition of 
Ryan Ranch, our entire menu 
is available family style 
Ask your server 


RESTAURANT • DELI • CATERING 

ONE HARRIS COURT • BUILDING A 
MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA 93940 
(408)655-5590 • FAX (408) 655^360 


Del Monte 

REALTY COMPANY 


CARMEL • MONTEREY • PEBBLE BEACH 











































92 Buick Parklane Ultra Supercharged #618498 
87 Volvo 740 GLE Wagon s R A T #112134 

91 Olds 88 '.Vhiie Blue. Clean' #806462 

92 Olds Cutlass Supreme S 4 Door' #3578^6 
89 Nissan Maxima GXE a t, Moon Roof #22ii25 

91 Alfa 164L 4 Door, 5 Speed. Loaded' #i947i2 . 

87 MBZ 190D White Palommo. Super Value #4531 10 

91 BMW 325i 2 Door. A T. Local. #C52922 . 

85 MBZ 300TD Wagon 3rd Seat. #04i 76i . 

86 MBZ 300E Smoke Palommo. Leather. Local. #683091 . 

91 Ford Explorer XLT 4x4 Red Grey. Leather, #C89295 

84 MBZB 300SE ivory Palommo, Leather #069044 . 

85 MBZ 300TD Wagon. Leather. #055035 . 

88 MBZ 190E 2 6. Low Miles. Power Seats. #460908 ... 

89 Jaguar XJ6 Sedan Grey Tan #558576 . 

85 MBZ 500SEL S Class. Local. #114575 . 

89 MBZ 190E 2.6 Black Pearl Grey. #651573 . 

92 Jeep Cherokee LTD 4x4 4 Door, #121600 . 

90 Jaguar XJ6 Vanden Plas Blue Grey, #608070 

91 Infiniti Q45 Black Emerald Tan. Compare, #112947 ... 


Carmel tour firm gives its 
clients a taste of golf world ^ 


Has THE week of action at the 
AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am 
got you to thinking about treating 
yourself to a golHng vacation? 

If so, you may not need venture any 
further than Wide World of Coif, a 
Carmel-based company that has been 
offering luxury golf tours since 1957. 

And weVe not just'talking about 
little trips here and there. 

Owner Michael Roseto, managing 
director Bill Hogan and the Wide 
World of Coif staff hkve a staggering 
lineup of trips in 1994, including a 
month-long, around-the-world tour. 
Roseto will escort a group — not to 
exceed two dozen travelers — on a 
journey that would begin Sept. 25 and 
end on Oct. 24. The price? How about 
$18,500 per person. The stops? 

Would you believe Auckland, 
Melbourne, Sydney, Singapore, on 
The Orient Express, Bangkok, Hong 
Kong and London? i 

Then there's the suinual junket 
dubbed the “British Open Tour,” 
which this year will feature a round of 
golf at the legendary St. Andrews, and 
also will give the group an opportunity | 
to view the third and fourth rounds of 
the 1994 British Open, which will be 
played at Tumberry Ailsa Course. 

On Tuesday, July 19, the itinerary 
then calls for a round of golf on 
Tumberry — which only two days 
before was reverberating with the 
excitement of the fourth and final 
round. Adding to the feel of the round, ^ 
Hogan says, the grandstands, tents 
and scoreboards from the British Open 


BILL HOGAN, marxaging director 


will still line the course. 

Hogan says Wide World of Coif is 
more than a golf company — “we’re 
more of a travel company, with a golf 


Hogan, who joined Roseto in 1987, 
said his four years abroad primed him 
for his job. 

“You have to know the travel 
industry,” Hogan, 33, says. “You have 
to know about the different cultures, 
the people. And we have to closely 
monitor the world situation.” 

Hogan relates Roseto’s experience 
in 1981 when the tour he was heading 
was in India with Cairo as its next 


'Our pre-owned Mercedes cars may be a 
better buy than a new anything else." 


Stahl Motor Company 

Two Downtown Monterey Locations: 


498 Fremont St. 375-2456 / 


Comer of Abrego & Pearl 655-0255 


See WIDE WORLD 


signed Jewetiy 
White and Yellow Gold 


A Gallery For Distinctive Gifts 
& Highly Decorative Wooden Objects 


SCULPTURE 
IN MINIATURE 


Enchanting 
objects of 
elegant 
proportions 
and simplicity 
made from the 
tagua nut. 


SEGMENTED 

BOWL 


14K yellow gold 
finger sculpture. 


Afaschating 
directton In wood 
turr^ by the 
artisan who 
utilizes historical 
Indian pottery 
desigr^sosa 
guide for 
Ns work. 


Open Monday - Saturday 10 - 5 • Closed Sunday 

SROADS Jeweler, inc 

5th & 6th • Carmel • 624-3044 


February 3, 1994 


44 AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am 














































Carmel tour firm giving golfers the 
opportunity for trip of their dreams 



COME HOME TO FOX & CARSKADON 


WIDE WORLD from page 44 
destination. That day, Egyptian 
President Anwar Sadat was assassi¬ 
nated. Hogan says Roseto, who boasts 
more international miles than many 
airline pilots, was forced to make a 
quick change, and targeted the group 
in the direction of Spain. 

But that example, Hogan says, is an 
aberration. Norm^y, the company's 
^ travel plans have gone uninterrupted 
and, in Hogan's view, have been met 
with great praise. 

‘^Eighty percent of our clients are 
repeat clients — that tells you some¬ 
thing right there," Hogan says. 

‘^We've had many clients who have 
returned to book a tour with us, but 
it’s a different one than they were on 
the last time. 

**And we even have one gentleman, 
who has taken our Scotland trip for 
12 straight years." 

Hogan says Roseto takes pride in 
the fact that he was the trailblazer in 
golf tour operators. Now, Hogan says, 
there are some 50 companies arrang¬ 
ing luxury golf tours. Back in 1957, 
however, Roseto was out there on his 
own. 

In his 37 years of business, Roseto 
has relied far less on advertising than 
on the one ingredient that has been 
instrument to his success — word-of- 
mouth. 

“It’s the best way to do business,” 
Hogan says, who adds that the 
company’s quarterly newsletter allows 
Wide World of Golf to ke^ in touch 
with its customer base. 

In addition to the around-the-world 


tour and the British Open Tour, other 
1994 offerings, according to Hogsui, 
include: 

* The Africa Coif Safari (March 11- 
April 

* Romance & Riviera Coif Cruise (May 
.18-27) 

World Invitational Father & Son Coif 
Event in Ireland (July 6-9) 

* Summer Coif Classic A Reunion at 
The Inn at Squaw Creek near Lake Tahoe 
(June 19-22) 

* Canadian Rockies Trek (Aug. 2-11) 

* French Barge Tour (Aug. 14-25) 

* Second Annual Team Links Chal¬ 
lenge Cup in Ireland (Aug. 25 to Sept. 3) 

* Caribbean With Bob Toski, through 
the Caribbean (Oct. 22 to Nov. 2). 

The prices of the tours run the 
gamut — firom $895/person for the 
Summer Coif Classic & Reunion to 
$18,500 for the around-the-world 
tour. The average price, Hogan says, 
hovers in the $6,000 range. 

Hogan says space is still available 
on the aforementioned tours, and he 
stresses that Wide World of Coif limits 
the tour size to 24 people. 

“We find we can't give proper 
service to our clients in bigger 
groups," Hogan says. “So we limit the 
size to smaller numbers to allow for 
more personal attention.” 

% 

♦ ♦♦ 

Wide World of Coif is located at 
Lincoln Street and Fifth Avenue in 
downtown CarmeL Its mailing address 
U P.O. Box 5217, Carmel CA 93921. 
The company's phone numbers are 
800/214-COLF and 408/624-6667. 


O) 

CM 

CD 



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COTE D’ELEGANCE 
$1,499,999 

Spanish Bay - Truly alagani living • 

Luxuriously designed 3 B^.5 BA, 
3600 sq ft. 2 story town home with ' 
perpetual views of surf, expansive 
beach, and breathtaking sunsets. 
THU1K)0-4KI0 
Pat Strnad hoata 




CARMEL CHARMER 
$595,000 

Enchanting oottaga • 26001^ ft of 
meticulous/artistic design. Terrix^d 
gardens, 3BR/3BA, 3 fireplaces, 
intimate arxl warm. Ocean view, 
balcony deck, windows & skylights. 

THUl1K)0-7.*00 
Stephen Henderson hoata 


ADVANTAGE BUYER $1,649,000 
H Opportunity knocks - Foreclosure of this 
New England style estate situated On a 1.3 
acre witti ocean arte forest views. 4BD/ 
4-f2BA offers custom details, gourmet 
kitchen arte morel 

SEA PINES I $1,850,000 

Quiet elegance - Exquisite 4BD/6BA es¬ 
tate. Expansive ocean views through 
Monterey Pines. Private, gated acre, just 
over a mile from the Lodge at Pebble Beach. 


Kim 


ARROYO SECO RANCH $4,900/)00 
Residential and recreational developmant 
• Nearly 1800 acres of flat river front and Nlly 
woodlands, bordered by the Los Padres 
National Forest, Ventana Wilderness, and 
Arroyo Seco River. Includes 2 mi. of river 
frontage plus several tributary streams. This 
huge scenic arte profoundly peaceful parcel 
offers an exciting investment opportunity for 
the buyer with vision. 


■ BAY B1BGE ■ 

BAY RIDGE VIEWS $1.350,000 

Luxury Living - Elegant 4B0/4.5BA Mediterranean home with breathtaking views. Almost 
6,000 sq.ft, of gracious living with full attention to details. Private guest quarters on lower level. 








CLEVER PLAN $399,500 

Rare Carmel Investment - for now & later. 
Ovn a piece of downtown Carmel Village 
Older Carmel home on large comer lot. A 
short stroll to shops and the beach Ideal 
for rental now while planning for condo or 
apartments in the future Ocean & bay 
views. Owner financing possible. 

Galley & OCEAN VIEWS $ 895,000 

This charming 4 bedroom, 3.5 bath, 3000 
square foot Cotswold cottage offers privacy 
and intimacy at Carmel Point's best k^tion. 
Just 3 houses from the beach on a large 
street-to-street lot with gorgeous planters, 
lush lawns, stone walks and brick patio 


PLEASE CALL TODAY FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION & USTINGS 


CARMEL 

408 / 624-1200 






CLASSIC ELEGANCE $1,695,000 
Gracloua Estate - Nearly 5000 sq/ft, 4BD/ 
4-f2BA near 8th green of Poppy HiNs. Forest 
views, fine details, separate rn^'s quarters, 
3 car gar, private grotto garden off master 
suite. 1 acre 

FRENCH PORTRAIT $2,985,000 
Exquisite French country estate - on 2nd 
fairway of P.B. Golf Links. 3 BR/3.5 BA, 4 
firepla^, 4200 sq ft on 1.1 acre with beau¬ 
tiful ocean & golf course views. 


GRACEFUL PINESONG $2,100,000 

Extraordinary 2 acre estate - 200 yards from The Lodge at Pebble Beach. 4 BO/ 3.5 BA, 
elegantly detailed in every wayl Separate 2 BD/2BA guest house. Will consider trades. 


RANCH ROMANCE $1,190,000 

Authentic adobe rancho - Rare 5,000 + sq 
ft adobe rancho built in 1949. La^e 4BD/ 
6.5BA with darkroom, cedar storage room + 
guest quarters. Warm carved wood details, 
giant rooms, 4 fireplaoes, arte harcMrood floors. 
Unstoppable views, beautiful grounds with 
rose gardens, grape arbor, citrus trees arte 
more! 3 car garage, out buildings & horse 
facilities. 




THE GOOD LIFE $589,000 

Breathtaking Views - Enjoy Pt. Lobos, 
Carmel Bay and VaHey views from this 3BD/ 
2.5BA contemporary Irome. Special features 
indude lovely Master bath with fireplace, 
game room/den with wet bar, arte flower filled 
patio with spa 

GOLD COAST $365,000 

Easy Valley Ufestyle - Private 2BD/2 5BA 
condominium with views of the mountains. 
Pool and spa, exerase room, and dubhouse. 
Generous entertainment deck with^hot tub 
and gas BBQ 


(O 

K) 

<D 



7 2 4 A B K L (I O M O N I K K\:\ 7 6 1 2 16 1 


COME HOME TO FOX & CARSKADON 


February 3, 1994 


AT'& r Pebble Beach National Pro-Am 


f 


/ 


















































PAT SUMMERALL 


/JIM NANTZ 


CBS, USA to televise all four rounds 

I 

As IN recent past years, all four rounds of the will run from 1 to 3 p.m., while the telecast of 
1994 AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am will be Sunday’s final round is scheduled from noon to 3 
televised. p.m. 

The first two rounds will be carried on a ti^>e- A sudden death playoff would be in order Sunday 

delayed basis on USA network (channel 9 on MPTV afternoon in the event of a first-place tie after 72 
cable system), while the third and fourth rounds holes. ^ 

will be carried live on CBS (channel 5, MPTV). CBS’ team of announcers includes Pat 

Thursday and Friday coverage will be shown Summerall, Jim Nantz, Gary McCord, Ken Venturi 

from 4 to 6 p.m. Saturday’s third round coverage and Ben Wright. 


TELEVISION TOWERS can be seen sprinkled across the 
Pebble Beach Golf Links. 


GARY MCCORD. 


KEN VENTURI 


BEN WRIGHT 



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to F>ic’s Deli) 


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& DOORS 


(408) 728-3371 


AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am 


February 3, 1994 







































BOOKS INC 


...Plus 10OO's of 
GREAT SALE BOOKS 
^ 50-90% OFF _ 


By Larry Miller 

PUBLISHER'S PRICE: $15 


New major championship 
highlights NCGA ’94 slate 


The ADomoN of a new major 
championship highlights the Northern 
California Coif Association’s 1994 
tournament sesison that gets underway 
in late March. 

The inaugural NCCA Net Amateur 
Championship will be held at Poppy 
Hills Golf Course May 2-3, Each of 
the NCCA’s member clubs will hold 
local qualifying prior to March 16. 

Sectional qualifying then will be 
held April 15 at designated sites. 
Survivors advance to the finals at 
Poppy Hills. 

Because the NCGA Net Amateur 
will encompass all clubs, the handicap 
divisions of the San Joaquin and 
Sacramento Valley Amateur Champi¬ 
onships will not be held. 

Championship flight action in the 
18th annual San Joaquin Valley will 
be held July 14-15 at San Joaquin 
Country Club. The 15th annual 
Sacramento Valley Amateur is sched¬ 
uled Aug. 11-12 at Sierra View 
Country Club in Roseville. 

For the second consecutive year, 
the finals of the NCGA’s popular Zone 
competition — now in its 28th season 
will be held at Poppy Hills. Nine 
regional Zone championships will be 
determined at Spyglass Hill Golf , 
Course. The Northeast Zone opens 
CGA tournament play March 24-25. 
The top three teams from the first 
ight zones qualify for the finals that 
dll be held Sept. 2-3. Four teams 
^advance from the Sacramento Zone 


which this year is the last in the 
rotation that changes each season. 

The 28th annual NCCA Four-Ball 
(Two-Man) Championship will be 
held May 6-8 at Spyglass Hill. The 
NCGA/CIF High Sj:hool Champion¬ 
ships will be at a new site in 1994. 
Merced GCC will host that event on 
May 23. 

The pace steps up in June. The 
33rd NCGA Senior Championship will 
be played June 2-3 at Corral de Tierra 
CC near Salinas. Then, the 33rd 
Senior Net titles will be decided June 
6-7 at Poppy Hills. 

The NCGA joins forces with the 
Southern California Golf Association 
for two major events in late June. The 
83rd annual California Golf Associa¬ 
tion (State) Amateur championship ' 
will be played June 20-25 at Spyglass 
Hill (stroke play qualifying) and 
Pebble Beach (stroke play qualifying 
and all matches). 

At the same time, CGA handicap 
flight competition will be held at 
Poppy Hills and Old Del Monte GC. 
And, for the first time, the CGA Senior 
Amateur championship will be played 
(June 22-24) at Poppy Hills, The 'first 
two tournaments have been held at 
Ojai Valley Inn and Country Club. A 
third round also has been added to 
that stroke-play event. 

The 65th annual NCCA Junior 
Amateur Championship returns to the 

See NCCA page 50 


Want To Buy 
A Businesss? 
Restaurant? 
Bed & Breakfast 
or Motel? 

Call 

Carmel Business Sales, Inc. 

Don lioMcii and Associates 

For a free list of what's available in 
Carmel...Monterey... Pacific Grove 
...or on the Monterey Peninsula! 

408-625-5581 
Fax: 408-625-2057 


Southwest corner of Lincoln & 7th 
P.O. Box 4335 

Carmel-by-the-Sea, CA 93921 


Books nc 


Tspeda^for of cry 

Faults and Fixes - How to Correct 


e 80 Most Common Problems in Golf 


By David Leadbetter, the World's No. 1 Golf Coach, with John Huggan 

PUBLISHER'S PRICE: $25 

BOOKS INC. M 8.'V 


GoKna Wisdom from the Genius Who 


Invented the Do-Over 


By TLiomos Mulligan, Fourth Earl of Murphy 

PUBLISHER'S PRICE: $14.95 

BOOKS INC. MO.” 

And If You Play Golf, You're My 


• Further Reflections 


of a Gro^n Caddie 


By Harvey Penick with Bud Shrake 

PUBUSHER'S PRICE: $20 

BOOKS INC. M4.” 

A Breakthrouah Mefhoct ...Holoaraohic Golf 


Uniting the Mind and Bodv to Improve Your Game 


February 3, 1994 


AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am 


47 










































i^HANCE IS inevitable. As time passes, every¬ 
thing must undergo an alteration. In history, the 
world has witnessed the rise and fall of civilizations, 
the births and deaths of great men, and the accep¬ 
tance and denied of new ideas. The global society of 
today is no exertion to this instability. Currently, 
the world’s population is growing at an astounding 
rate and new countries, especisJly in Eastern 
Europe, are forming. Although these changes can 
produce n^ative effects, such as overpopulation, 
the modem world is experiencing a definite positive 
change. Innovation is occurring worldwide that is 
improving many.important areas of society. This 
innovation will continue into the 21st century, thus 
truly creating a global community and strengthen¬ 
ing the bonds between the countries of the world. 

The 21st century will witness massive growth in 
the area of global communication. Such expansion 
will be due to innovations in the computer industry. 
The development of more powerful computers will 
eJIow current businesses to expand and strengthen 

See WALL pace 49 


As 1 AM lazily sitting on the living room sofa 
watching television, a familiar commercial comes 
on. The commercial shows various kinds of future 
products which will eventually become a part of 
everyday life. Among these new items are credit 
card scanners in cars used to pay tolls on the road. 
Another interesting invention is a public pay phone 
with a video screen on it for viewing the person 
being called. Although these inventions, and the 
worldwide installation of them, seem too “futuris¬ 
tic” to imagine, they are something which will 
eventually affect the entire world. 

After watching commercials such as the ones 
mentioned above, 1 feel not only amazement, but 
also apprehension and fear. Is the world ready for 
such inventions? Although innovative phones and 
cars may not seem like something to be concerned 
about, the emergence of such inventions represents 
a new era in world history. With the rapid improve¬ 
ments in computer technology, the possibilities in 
CARMEL HIGH essay contest winners Danielle Wall (left) this new “technical” era seem endless. However, 

and Brandon RobertS 4 

See ROBERTS pace 49 


PHOTO/SCOTT BREAKTON 


T he sun, the sea, great food in comfortable surroundings 
California Market, where the renowned cuisine of 
Highlands Inn takes a casual mood on the spectacular 
Carmel Highlands Coast The Californi'a-fresh menu is hearty 
and flavorful, designed to be an ideal accompaniment to crisp 
ocean breezes and bright coastal sunshine. Pasta, pizelle, 
salads, sandwiches, daily specials—enjoyed al fresco on the 
redwood deck or indoors by the pot-bellied stove. 


ne should"... hang a work of art, 
wear a work of art, or ^ a work of art 


Pre-Vdlentlne's Day 


Come and enjoy the California Market restaurant Open from 
7:30 a m. for breakfast, lunch and dinner, seven days a week 
Gourmet picnic baskets available 


MEN’S NIGHT 


THURSDAY. FEBRUARY 10 • 6 

Complimentary Gift Wrap 
Beer & Wine Served 


CALIFORNIA 
N^V\RKET iHfe 


CARMEL PLAZA / CARMEL / 626-6820 S 

ART WEARABLE ART 


At Highlands Inn • Four Miles South of Carmel on Highway One 


48 AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am 


February 3, 1994 


JEWELRY ART WEARABLE ART GIFTS JEWELRY ART 








) 


1 

Danielle-Wall... . 

WALL page 48 

their companies. Smaller corporations 
may then enter the global market and 
use this new technology to communi¬ 
cate widi established Brms. Further¬ 
more, more efficient methods will be 
invented to produce computers and 
related machines (i.e. fax machines), 
enabling more people to buy these 
items. Thus, despite geographical or 
financial obstacles, communication 
can be established in all areas of the 
globe. A netwoHt will be set up that 
links the woHd, allowing an uninter¬ 
rupted flow of ideas between friends 
and family, clients and colleagues. 

These very innovations in the 
communication industry will provide 
the impetus for future changes in the 
scientiflc community. By creating a 
link between countries of the world, 
new computers will enable direct 
communication between scientists of 
varying nationalities. New theories can 
be discussed and experiments can be ) 
performed that involve scientists from 
diverse laboratories. Data will be 
stored in a global databank, abetting 
the efforts of researchers to find 
essential information for projects. 
These innovations will especially aid 
medicine. Not only will computers 
allow an exchange of ideas between 
doctors that are trying to gather data 
for a cure for a disease, but new 
technology may enable computers, to 
synthesize this data as well. 

In the 21st century, new technology 
will innovate worldwide efforts to 
protect the environment. This innova¬ 
tion will ensure progress in the fight 
against destroying the planet. A 
revolution in transportation will occur. 


Cars will be developed that success¬ 
fully use electric or solar power, thus 
reducing exhaust pollution. Processes 
will be perfected that cleanse polluted 
water and air, suid all factories will be 
fitted with regulation pollution 
controls. A chemical compound will be 
discovered that will produce biode¬ 
gradable plastics, reducing the gar¬ 
bage of the world. 

Innovation signifies a positive 
change, llias, the worid of the 2l8t 
century would definitely benefit from 
the previoiisly mentioned innovations. 
However, these changes create some¬ 
thing more important than mere 
physical evidence, like improved 
computers. These changes produce a 
new mind-set for the worid. They link 
the globe together, promoting a ‘^we” 
generation rather than the current “I" 
generation. 

Hence, by emphasizing the advan¬ 
tages of a global community, the 
ultimate innovation is achieved. A 
worid is bom in which war is nonex¬ 
istent and peace reigns forever. 


Brandon Roberts... 

ROBERTS hrom page 48 

technological advancements could 
cause many prtJslems in the future. 
Jobs will be lost to computers and new 
technology. New sciences involving 
computers will emerge which could 
have disastrous consequences. Popula¬ 
tion could drastically rise due to better 
medical technology. 

All of these factors could become 
potential problems in the future as 
technology advances. 

For many years the auto industry 
has been using new technology to 
carry out tasks previously performed 
by humsms. Most assembly line 
workers have lost their jobs to ma¬ 
chines which were more economical 
and efficient. 

As technology advances, more and 
more jobs will be lost. Operators, 
waitresses, drafters, bus drivers, and 
perhaps even teachers will lose their 


jobs to new technology. It seems that 
there is nothing which a computer 
won*t be capable of doing technology 
advances. 

The movie Jurassic Park showed 
the world the possible consequences of 
genetic engineering. Although scien¬ 
tists are not creating dinosaurs, they 
are dealing with a very powerful 
science. 

Terfect* human beings^ 

With new technology, scientists 
may be able to use genetic engineering 
to create ‘^perfect” human beings. 
Science may be able to prevent flaws 
in a baby before it is even bom. When 
the world begins to see advancements 
such as these, maybe it's time^to ask if 
technology has gone too far. 

As medical technology improves, 
the world will experience a greater 
population increase. New equipment 
will save the lives of many people who 
were destined to die early of disease, 
while other lives will be prolonged. 
With this population increase, there 
will be more elderly people to take 
care of, more homeless to help, and 
more competition in the job market. 
This population boom could be 
disastrous for the entire planet. 

It is tme that advancements in 
technology will bring great things to 
the people of the world. New technol¬ 
ogy will make many things easier, 
faster, and better. 

However, the people of the world 
must make sure they don’t ignore the 
possible consequences of these ad¬ 
vancements. 

As we approach this new era of 
technology we must proceed with ' 
caution; for with any new advance¬ 
ment in'society will come problems 
which shoul(J be considered before 
there is no turning back. 



PHOTO/CCH.E THOMPSON 


JACK LEMMON (right), with his son CKris, is a frequent participant in the 3M Celebrity 
Challenge, which tnis year promises to be memorable for two high school seniors. 



Risifiy Stoiiii. t''V HeliTiut Hotn 



Dok-res ana Sixth, P O Box 7378 Carmel, CA 93921 
1 el 408 62o 2615 Daily 10-6 



THE MITOHELL OROXJH 



g 

□ 



□ 

□ 



bcstatej 

El Paseo Bldg., Dolores at Seventh 
P.O. Box 3777^* Carmel-by-the-Sea 

624-0136 


WELCOME ONE, WELCOME ALL! 


WELCOME TO PARADISE ON 


EARTH! 



WELCOME TO THE AT&T. Welcome to Pebble Beach. Welcome to Carmel-by-the-Sca. 
Welcome to the Monterey Peninsula. We welcome all of you to our little bit of Paradise-by- 
the-Sea! We think we’re the luckiest folks alive to be able to live and work‘here...but, hey! 
We’re nice people...we’re willing to share that with you! 


While you’re here, take some time out and give us a call, or, better yet, stop by our offices in 
the historic El Paseo courtyard at the comer of Dolores and Seventh in the heart of the village 
of Carmel-by-the-Sea. We’d be happy to show you the home of your dreams...from cotuiges to 
castles. 


MEDITERRANEAN ELEGANCE 

- 

AT LAST!—One of the great houses of Carmel has come on the market, meant just for the 
owner who demands a home offering elegance with comfort, and set off by spacious 

landscaped grounds. You enter 
this vintage home through a 
gated courtyard that leads to a 
smaller courtyard, then to a 
foyer, off which is a great 
room with high ceiling, 
baronial fireplace, and tiled 
floor. Youll also fmd a dining 
room, updated kitchen, five 
bedrooms, three full baths, and 
three half-baths. Utility rooms 
are on the lower level. Shown 
by appoinunent only. There is 
not another home like this on 
the Monterey Peninsula! 
$ 2 , 650 , 000 . 

All of us at The Mitchell Group hope you have a very pleasant visit here, 
and please call us at 624-0136for any and all 
of your real estate needs! 

Jamce Ashjian, Michael Bowery, Anne Bell, Dianne Bohlman, Mark Capito, Eileen Catbagan. 
Perk3(^D’Ambrosio, Donna Dougherty. Brad Dow, Hallic Mitchell Dow, Dick Franklin. Stacey 
Golding. Lee Goodenough, Mary Reese Green, Rodney Guilfoil, Lee Ish, Larry Lombard. Rhenda 
Miller, William B. Mitchell. Vicki Mitchell, Alan Ray, Gail Sceaice, Rob Thompson, 

Sleven Travaille, Richard Warren 



February 3, 1994 


AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am 


49 



















Performing in the World of Real Estate 

1011 Cass St.. Monterey 
(408) 626-LIST (5478) 

FAX: 626-FAXX (3299) 


BUILD YOUR 
DREAM HOME 


; _ ^ J’r • 1 wiili .i|)|iiM\i (1 pi.Ills 

or. ..own .1 piece ol C.uinels liisloiA'; roni im loi Is p.iinl |s lin tiisloiji .|| 
Mni|)ll\' I’oWi IS ('oilisloik si I K lio/l|o||ie. ne.u ll suit- o| S. 111 .Anloniii S| . 
( .lllllel. i’.IIIOI .111111 \'le\\s ol oie.lll . 111(1 I’ellhle I'.t-.K ll l,oll I ml'' \\.ll( ll 
llie I’lo Am lioiii \'oiii Iron! pore li lie.u li .a ress. s'lo.) i u ii i 


Larry Scholink, 
408-626-LIST 
(5478) 

Bill Patterson 
(408) 646-8100 


AFTER THE AT&T 


■ Feb. 10-13 Nissan Los Angolas 
Opan, Pacific Palisades, Calif., NBC- 
TV. 

■ F^. 16-20 Bob Hope Chyslar 
aassic, Indian WeUs, Calif., ESPN/ 
NBC. 

■ Feb. 24-27 Buick Invitational 
of California, La Jolla, NBC. 

■ March 3-6 Doral Ryder Open, 
Miami, USA/CBS. 

■ March 10-13 Honda Classic, 
Fort Lauderdale, Fla., NBC. 

■ March 17-20 Nestle Invita¬ 
tional, Orlando, Fla., NBC. 

■ March 24-27 The Players 
Championship, Ponte Vedra, Fla., 
NBC. 

■ March 31 -April 3 Freeport 
McMoRan Classic, New Orleans, 
NBC. 


■ June 16-19 U.S. Opoi, Oakmont 
CC, Oakmont, Pa., ESPN/ABC. 

■ July 14-17 British Open, 
Tumbenry Coif Links, Scodand, 
ESPN/ABC. 

■ Aug. 11-14 PGA Champion¬ 
ship,. Southern Hills CC, Tulsa, Okla., 
TBS/CBS. 


rtiuh^J 


■ Jan. 6-9 Mercedes Champion¬ 
ships, Carisbad, Calif. — Winner: Phil 
MickeUon. 

■ Jsin. 13-16 Hawuian Open, 
Honolulu — Winner: Brett Ogle. 

■ Jan. 20-23 Northern Telecom 
Open, Tucson, Ariz. — Winner: 
Andrew Magee. 


■ Jan. 27-30 Phoenix Open. 
Scottsdale, Ariz. — Winner: Bill 


■ April 7-10 The Masters, Au 
gusta, Ga., USA/CBS. ) 


Classon 




^ PHOTO/ATAT PfBBlf BEACH NATIONAl PKXAM 

\ 

ALTHOUGH BERNHARD Longer has enjoyed minimal success at Pebble Beach 
(tie for third in 1987, tie for fourth in 1988), he is one of the game's stars and 
always warrants a large gallery at the tournament. Some players on the tour 
complain that Longer is too slow a player,''but Bernhard typically has been able 
to back up his play with some superlative shot making. 


most people 


FLAGS • FLAGPOLES 
DECALS . T-SHIRTS 


BANNERS 

BALLOONS 


Sales 


Installation 


408 / 647-8100 


50 AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am 


February 3, 1994 




'—,1S ^1-:^ 




























625-5956 


FINALLY 


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**Westem Cooking with a Mexican Accent** 

500 Hartnell Street, Old Monterey ★ 373-3737 

Also in: Honolulu. Lahaina. San Francisco, Palo Alto. Sacramento 

Napa Valley, Candlestick Park 


PHOTO/WKLIAM C. MOOKS 


THE MAN who gol this wonderful tradition started — Bing Crosby 


'U BLANK BOOKS • ORGANIZERS • ADDRESS BOOKS 


PHOTO ALBUMS'^ 


HISTORICAL SPORTS BAR 


• Happy flour 

Monday-Friday 4-6pm 
$1 Draft Beer • $2 Well Drinks 


• Join Knuckles 
Hospitality Club 

Membership entitles you to food & drink 
discounts Wed & Thurs Nites! 

• Sunday Brunch Buffet 

w/salad, sushi, omelettes, dessert & more 
Watch your favorite sports and eat at the 
best buffet in town! 


Hyatt Regency 
1 Old Golf Course R.D 
Monterey 

372-12.‘i4 


L5Ad3NOIlViS • d3dVd ONIddVdM 


AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am 


February 3, 1994 


I 


I 

I 

I 


I 

\ 







































Shops, Ri;stai rants, Galiirihs & Gardens 




HIGHWAY 1 
AT CARMEL 
VALLEY RD. 


Centers Ought to Be 


T he moment you step into 
The Barnyard, you know 
you’ve discovered a paradise 
of gardens, shops and 
restaurants. A sense of 
tranquility surrounds you 
in this unhurried atmos¬ 
phere beckoning you to 
capture the magic. 


bookstores invite you to 
browse leisurely. 

E ach store has its own 
special personality and 
flavor, and all blend beauti* 
fully together to create a 


T ucked away m 
quiet comers are 
nine exceptional inter 
national restaurants. 
From British to 
Chinese — French 
to Italian 


Japanese 

to Amikrican — all Wg 

offer relaxed indoor W 

and outdoor dining - 

— perfect for a sunny 
f Chines 

afternoon or romantic 

evenings. Menus pre-- 

I pared with fresh local pro¬ 
duce; attentive, friendly ser¬ 
vice and intimate atmos¬ 
phere make The Barnyard a 
dining favorite for visitors 
and locals alike. 

M erchants of fine crafted 
jewelry, gifts, crafts, 
sophisticated fashions and 
shoes, and children’s wear 


relaxed shopper’s paradise, 
“...truly what shopping 
centers ought to be.” 


will delight you with their 
original selections. 

Shops for the gar -^^ 
dener, music ^EP U 

the whimsica^^^^^^^ 

Art galleries and 

SPECIALTY SHOPS of all kinds i 
What Shopping Centers Ought To Be!” make The Barnyard a shopper’s paradise. 


LUSH GARDENS ^ t 

abound amidst a classic barnyard setting. 


S troll through the brick 
walkways and charming 
rustic barns savoring the 
bursts of vibrant color that 
greet you at every turn. 
Discover shops and galleries 
that cater to every age 
and taste. 


Located at the mouth of SjM 
Carmel Valley, off Hwy. 1, 

The Barnyard is just minutes ^ 

away from downtown Carmel and 
Monterey. Convenient free parking 


SHOPS, RESTAURANTS, GALLERIES & GARDENS 


GIFTS & ACCESSORIES 


Carmel Craftworks Ltd. 
Friends of the Sea Otter 
Gyre & Gimbel Beads 
Holly Berry 
Irish Crystal 
Rainbow Scent Co. 
Succulent Gardens 
Viking Forge 

PHOTO SERVICE 


BEAUTY SALONS & SERVICES 


BOOKS & MUSIC 


Dominique 

Marielle’s 

Yolanda's 

RESTAURANTS 


Do Re Mi 

Thunderbird Bookstore Cafe 
CHILDREN 


APPAREL 


Bam Swallow 
Carmel Lifestyle 
Fast Lane Fashions 
Hedi’s Shoes 
High Tide 

Hudson & Company 

Khaki’s Men’s Clothier of Carmel 

Pappagallo 

JEWELERS _ 

D’Lanor 
Jewel Boutique 

Michael Sherman jewelry Designs 


Knuffels 

Sand Castles by-the-Sea 
Thunderbird for Kids 

CONFECTIONS & ICE CREAM 


Allegro Gourmet Pizzeria 
Carmel Crumpet Company 
From Scratch & 

La Pergola Ristorante 
Golden Buddha 
Robata Grill &ar Sake Bar 
The Sherlock Holmes 
Pub & Restaurant 
Silver Jones 

Thunderbird Bookstore Cafe 
Voila 


Barnyard Photo Lab 

HOME ACCENTS/I URNISHINGS 


Pieces of Heaven 
GALLERIES 


Colton Bale 
Peppercorn 
Pot & Pail 

San Francisco Imports 
Somewhere In Time 


Reid Gallery 

Thomas Kinkade Gallery 
Kerfoot Gallery 
Prism Fine Arts 


52 AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am 


February 3, 1994 













||atjent)iU. Carmel ^allep 

Northern California's finest estate home 
consisting of 19,000 square feet. The twenty- 
one rooms include a master suite and four 
bedrooms, all with cathedral ceilings. Three 
staff bedrooms and baths complete the estate 
in a small private gated community. Amenities 
include a pool, spa, tennis court, exercise 
room, sauna, wine cellar, offices, four-car 
garage, separate servants' quarters and 
complete privacy. Near golf and dining, this 
elegant nearly-new Tudor masterpiece on 7-»- 
acres commands sweeping views of the valley 
and Monterey Bay beyond. Brochure and 
video available. 

$2,950,000 

BOHNEN 

_ REAL ESTATE _ 

MARKET MAKER IN LUXURY PROPERTY 

( 408 ) 626-9100 














The Monterey Wine Festival Presents The 1994 Vintage: 

• 1994 Program Higliliglils 

• Saturday Oelebralion Preview 

• Spotlight on Cuisine: American Culinary Federation Salon 

& (llief s Demos 

• 200 Wineries—More Than 800 Wines 


Register before February 21 and Save!! 























1 

2 

3 

4 


Altend [he Oriyinal andlaryesf Nine Festival! 

Where else but the beautiful Monterey Peninsula can you go to see: 


The Most California Wineries Lnder One Roof 

More than 20() wineries pouring more tlian 8(M) wines participate annually 

representing every important California viticulluial r'egion. ^ ^ i 

I I 


Something For Fveryone 

Special tastings, winemaker luncheons, romantic winemaker dinner's, keynote 
speakers, chef’s demonstrations, a wine auction, wine wor kshops, arid much more! 

Key Wine Industry Personnel 

Talk to wirrery r’epr’esentati\es who courrt. Kxhibits at the Monterey W irre Kestixal ar’t* 
rnarrrred by the winery owner or the wirrernaker, not just a winery sales representatixe. 

i 8-Year history 

The Monter'ey VMrre Kestixal laid the cor’ner’storre irr 1976 for all the wirre festixals to 
come. It’s our country ’s largest and oldest wirre festixal. 



< 



S llp-and-Comin;; Wine Industry Trends 

III llie Miirds „r cluilirnaii Ted Balcslivri, -If »ain |» soo Hhafs 
now In Xmerkan cars, you «o lo IWroH. Ifyou Ham los«. Hhafs 
non In AmerUan wines, you bo lo Monlerey.- Ihe fesmai is f,,,,, - 

II s iiifonnal. and il s wlicir Ifs al if you wain lo leam alniiil wine. 


B Hands-On Tasting and Training* 

ttliellier il Ih' IIiioukIi a ioni|)rellcnsive lasliiiB ol Callloniia ix'd oi- 
w inie wines, a chefs demo or a winemaker Iniiclieon, you kcI IrainiiiB 
to make your business siixAier artd more pr’ofitahle. 



Top Speakers 

Like Mark Kr ickson, Kxart Coldsteirr, Agrrstirr llurr(*eus, Kd Oster larrd, Michaela 
Kodeno, Tim Kyan arrd Boh Thornpsorr. 


B Incredible Scenery 

riie Monterey Wine Festixal is especially desigrred lo make Ihe most of its 
hr'eathtakirrg seltirrg by serrdirrg attendees out artd ahotti ott Ihe IVnittsrtla. 



IHspiint Hotel, Airfare and Car Rental Rates 

Cel a chattce lo xisit the Monterey I’ettittsttia al prices tirat will make you enjoy 
Ihe scenery exen more. Thanks lo festixal spott.sorship by I rax el indttsity leaders artd 
support from Ihe local hospiialily ittduslty. 







,12.15 and 

. (csiivdl is ,"a ‘ 

one »" „<, ol!''« . M0«*' I ,his ou'ao"' 

o the .esiaents- Th'^ ^^„ter ey » ^ 

O' • '< rnc'a 1"’ ’’“"'r, “ 1 Ihis 

cspe‘>“"^ dor Sui""-^ rsaov- , „„ fee Joui.a , 656-^'^^" 

\l spco- “^Hraoy «■«' peslivd ,honc i'" 

d"V oiFcsIivdl'^^' 

vac lu'pe •" ^ 

jiocert')'' 




, ,qq4Cln""’'“" 








Discoverinp The Pleasures Of Nine" 
Kich-Off Sundaii Brunch uiifh Eli Osierlanil 



Kiijoj, wiiu* ijs you lu'vor have 
before when lire Monierey Wine 
Festival kieks off tlie |)rof>raiu with 
tlie !\K\\ SuiKlay Bruneli on 
Sunday. Mareli 13. at tlie Hyatt 
Keyeuey Monterey. 

Headlininy the hruiieh will be Kd 
Osterland. a iiiulti-talenled .speak¬ 
er. who will set the staye for 
Festival '})4with his su«H(‘s*4ons 
on “l)i.se(|verin« I'lu* I’leasures of 
Wine.” Like navigators eheekin« their compass points, brunch 
attendees will be set on course for a fun-filled Festival after parti¬ 
cipating in this enticing Brunch program. 

\o matter what your knovvli‘d«e of wine is—vvhellier you've been 
attendiny the vviiu* festival for yeai-s or you think (ievvurztraminer 
is a Oerman blessiiiH—you'll enjoy Fd Oslerland's enlerlainin« and 
enli«hlenin« presentation about the joys of wine la.stin«. (Ksteiiand 
is a master at teaching the finer points*of vviiu* appreciation in 
terms evcnone can undei’stand. from the novice to the seasoned 
wine drinker. 


Osterland has a wealth of experience in the wine world and is one 
of a handful ol people worldwide who have earned the title of 
Mast(*r Sommelk'r. lie's also one of only two \mericans to fjradu- 
ate trom the I niversity of Bordeaux in France. Durin#^ this lively 
pres<*nlation. Ost('rland will share ideas he's learned in his l.’i 
years in the industry from professional wine tasters around the 
fjlobe. ideas that help you enjoy whatever you taste. I)e it wine or 
b(*er. bread, cheese or apples. 

Don t mi.ss the opportunity to kick off the best Wine Festival of the 
decade at this XKW event for Festival 'J)4. the Sunday Brunch 
b(‘fiitinin^j at noon. March 13. at lh(‘Hyatt Ke^jency Monterey. 




mmii Bnnual Nunlereu Nine Festival Biu-eottle fluction 




(K)lBi.tlBfcE I 
HOTL! 


m 


I 


Mlhou^h the bidding olten is fast and furious, several of these 
beautilul collector s items «o lor terrific bargains. FiV(*n if you don't 
plan to bid. come see ihe.se rare and special California wines pn*- 
seiited in unusual, lar^ji* Ivottles and one-(»f-a-kind colh'ctions. The 
only cost of admission is your festival name bad«e. 




The terms for the bottles in this auction are almost as biy as the 
bottles lhems(‘lves; M(‘lhus('lah. Salmana/ar. Jeroboam...Any way 
you look at them, these c<»llector's items are impre.ssive! And they 
could be in your wine collection if you place the highest bid at this 
fast-paced. entertainin« bi«-boiile auction Monday afternoon. 
March 14. at 3 p.m. 

l’ro('e(‘ds from this auction su[)port a worthy cause: the Monterey 
Wine Festival Sclndarship fund for students ()ursuin;.; wine and 
hospitality careers. 




! 


Bach bij Popular Bemand... 

The Bpening Night Party BtThe Nontereg Bag Hguarium 





Imagine this; You're at one of the most spectacular a(|uariunis in 
the country, with touchpools. «i#iantic «lass viv'winfi tanks and 
amazing marine plants and animals...and there are no crowds 
around fi^htiiii^ for space! \ot only that, as you wander through 
Hus fantastic playfiround. you have your choice of 100 of the b(*st 
sparklin^i and dessert wines in California to drink and selections 
from the best restaurants and hotels on Hu* Peninsula to eat. It 
must be a dream. ri«hl'.' It's not—it's the one-and-only Opening 
\iyht Parly for the Monterey Wine F(*stival at the incredible 
M(»nl('rey Bay Aviuarium. 

Known worldwide* for its oulsiandinfi exhibits and its aulhenlic 
depiction of the uniepie Monterey Bay. Hu* Monl(*r(*y Bay Aeiuarium 
l(*aves visitors amazed. \o wond(*r it's ofl(*n ch(»s<*n as the lop 
aejuarium in Hu* counli'y. Alonler(*y Wiiu* Festival alten(U*es have a 
special oppmtunity t(» explore Hu* Aepiarium at their leisure* 
b(*ciHiS(* Hu* A(|uarium will be clos(*d to Hu* public during the party. 


In addition to Hu* vviiu*s and the delicious foods from area chefs. 
Hu* Festival Sponsor ’flu* Wisconsin Milk Mark(*Hn« Board will offer 
an array of dess(*rt cheeses. Kach year, this Party has hit a hiyh- 
note to welcome* evei'yeuu* to the* Fe’stival. Make* sure* not to miss it. 
Sunelay . March 13. fre)m 7:30 te) 9:30 p.m. 






















Neui Releases For Vinlage 1994 

Delve further into the world of wine and food as Festival '94 takes these exciting new directions.!. 


I994 American Ciilinarii Federation 
Monterey Bay 
4:ulinary Classic Art Salon 


fm. 

V'*' / 




V 

''/if I) 


\()l since the mid 1980s will so man\ culiiuirA chefs lia\e con- 
\er’«e(l on the Peninsula to liold a “Cold Kood \s An" competilion. 
K\perience spectacular culinar> arlistr’v as the Monterey 8a> 
Chapter of the American Culinar> Kederation (ACF) sponsor’s this 
festi\al hi«hli«ht. Professional and apprentice chefs fr’om ar’ound 
the West Coast will enter their best efforts for ftold. sil\er and 
bronze medals, to be determined by three distinguished ACK- 
appr’o\ed judges: 




Clarke Bernier. CKC. Strongsville, Ohio 


Chef Consultant. I,.J. Minor (vor’por'ation 
executive (]hef Clarke Bernier brings many 
years of culinary expertise to this Salon, having 
shared his judging talerrts in both the I nited 
Stales arrd South Africa ditring his 80 year’s in 
the frrod irtduslry. A gifted chef and teacher, B(*r’rtier’ is corrslanll> 
demonstrating and teaching foodserxice students in e\er\ phase of 
the industry ihr’ough his work as a chef consullartl with b.J. Minor. 
A participant in the 1984 (>ulirtar> Olympics. B<*r’rrier holds medals 
from the 1972 World Culinary Olympics and other culinary conipe- 
titiorrs. 

Raimund flofmeister. CIVIC. AAC. bos Angeles 

President and CKO. Los Angeles Culinary 
Institute 

Master Chef Kaimond Hofmeisler has distin¬ 
guished himself as a gifted chef irt his near ly 80 
years, irt the culittary industry. A 20-year \elet’- 
an of Westin Hotels, Hofmeisler help<‘d bring home medals for the 
l.S. A. National Culitrary Team in the 1984 Olympics arrd the prx's- 
tigious 1980 World Cup Culinary Competition, won by the l .S. 
learn. Hofmeisler left serxice with Westin HoKds in 1991 to follow 
his pursuits as an educator, creating the Los Angeles Culitrary 
Institute, a multi-faceted "hands-on" culinary training cerrter in 
Burbank. 


Klaus liOos. CKC, AAC. San Francisco 

(Ihef/Ow tter. Pacific Sunset Kestaurant 
executive (8ref Klaus Loos has worked in the 
hospitality industry more than 40 years, begin- 
tting in his native Cermany in 1951. In the L.S.. 
he began his climb up the professional culinary 
ladder at New Vork’s famous Waldorf Astoria Hot(‘l. (]h(‘f Loos is 
familiar with the Mottlerey Peninsula, having sperrt the IfHi? acad¬ 
emic year at Monterey Peninsula College as a culinary instructor. A 
memlxT of the 1970 arrd 1980 I S. Culinary Olympic Teams, he is 
the co-author of two Culinary Olympic cookbooks. 




Plus. 

Chef s Demos 


.VVatch and learn from the pros as they share their 
expertise at the 1994 Monterey Wine Festival Ohefs’ 
Staf»e. 


I L. Timothy Ryan. CMC 

I V.P.-Kducalion. Culinary Institute of America. 

I Hyde Park. NV 

i youngest L.S. chef to become a Ortified 

' ^ ' Master Chef (CM(>). Tim Ryan has already built 

an impressixe background, competing on the 
(.ulinary Olympic teams in 1984 and 1988 and heading the grand- 
prize-winning I .S. learn in the 1980 Culinary World Cup 
(iOmpelition. He has directed the CI A's educational progr’ams since 
1988. 


^ ^ Mark \. Krit kson. CMC 

‘ Kxec. (]hef. The Chei’okee Town and Country 

Atlanta 

Author, educator and chef Mark Krickson's 
many awards in his 10 years irt the industry 
include medals for his parlicipalion on the l .S. 
Culinary Olympic learn in 1984 arrd the 1985 Culinary World Cup. 
As Natiorral (.hairmatt of the ACF’s Appretrliceship Program, he 
helps ettroll approximately 1.5(K) students irt the hospitality itrdus- 
try annually. 

Jeffrey Mora 

Kxeculixe Chef. Metropoliiatt Culittary S<‘txices. 
Burbattk. CA 

Chef arrd enttx’prerteitr Jeffrey Mora has be(‘n to 
tiu’ Culittary Olympics twice in his yoitttg career, 
as art apptx’tilice in 1988 and as Natiorral Team 
sous chef in l‘)f)2. Mora will represent the L.S. again as a National 
ream member at the 19fKi competition irt Frankfutl, (lermany. 


Demonstrations will be presettled on Monday and 
Tuesday mornittg by cht'fs from the California Culittary 
Academv 




4 


Gel An Early Start 

Sflfurilfly...flt The FesI 

A Taste ofTlie Monterey Nine Festival 


This year we re goittg “Back To Our Roots," so irt keeping with \ Taste Of The Monterey Wine Festival, a day of fun. food, 

the original spirit of hospitality arrd fun that started this festival xvitte and music arrd nothing but! will premiere Saturday afternoon 

back irt 1978. we'tx’ reirttroducing a little festixity to the feslixal. and xvill feature: 


• Mottlerey Courtly xvittery tastiitgs 

• moulhwaterittg treats front area reslaurattls 

• wailstaff races 


• ch(‘fs demortslratiorts 

• ice catxittg competiliort 

• "Craziest Wittemaker's Hat" cottlesl 


• cookbook sigttings 

• arts attd crafts booths 

• futt for the xvhole family! 


For those of yoit xxho’xe ttexer beett a part of the feslixal before, it 
xvill be a small appetizer to the program. For xeterart feslixal- 
goers. this will Ih‘ a ttexx experiettce attd art ittdicaliott of where xxe 
hope to lake the feslixal irt years to come. Irt either case, joitt us 


Saturday by the bay as the Mottlerey Pettittsula commuttity attd 
Mottlerey V\itte Feslixalgoers alike celebrate “A Taste of the 
Mottlerey W itte Feslixal"! Premierittg Saturday at the Feslixal! 



Dine Under Tlie Stars...Njtl) The Ninemoliers of Chateau Jylien 


A loaf of bread, a glass of xxiite attd....Paradise becotttes the 
couttlry sellittg of Chateau Julieit. Saxor a rotnattlic diittter at this 
charmittg xxittery as Wittetttaker Bill Attdersott attd AssistattI 
Wittetttaker Marta Krafizeck teattt itp xvilh Chef Tracy Cetttry 
of Michael's Calerittg to presettl a feast for all the settses! 

Resetxaliotts at $50 per persott are litttiled so call ttow at (408) 
858-WINK or place yoitr resetxaliott ott the regislraliott form ott 
page 15 of this brochitre. Resetxaliotts are first conte. first setxed. 
Premierittg Saturday ttighi at 7:(K) p.tti. at the Feslixal. 










Optional Wine Tour 2;(){)-6:0() p.m. 


Festival Hyendo 


Hi.'iO a. 111 . 


‘):(K) a. 111 . 


lOiOOa.m. 


IO::iO a.iii. 


11:00 a. 111 . 


11:30 am. 


12:00 ^(»0M 


12:30 p ill. 


1:00 p in. 


1:30 p.m. 


2:00 p.m. 


2:30 p.m. 


3:00 p.m 


3:30 p.m. 


4:00 [).m. 


4:30 p.m. 


5:00 |).m. 


5:30 p.m. 


0:(K) p.m. 


\larc'h 14 


Oonlinental Breakfast 8:30—9:00 a.ni. 







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Winemaker laineheons 

111 MoiltCIVN 

Moon 


liar«e-Bottle Aiietion 
M<)iil('r(*> {IdiifcrciK'c (Iciitcr 

3:00-4:00 p.m. 


Tuesday. "Vlareh 15 


(Continental Breakfast 8:30-9:00 a.m. 


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Winemaker liUnetieons 

Xi’ouikI the IViiiiisiila 

Moon 



Oranci “Red Mif’ht" - 
M()iiUm'(*> (;<)iif(M'eii('(* (IcilUT 

4:30-7:30 p.m. 


0:30 p.m. 






















































































Mine Horlisliops 


Anchored at the Monterey Conference Center, these entertaining*, informative 
' ' workshops will appeal to all sectors of the wine world: 

w ine buffs, restaurateurs, retailers, w ineries and so forth. 

Serving and Selling Wine In The 90s UJ 

Ar(‘ you MADI), SADD or glad to be in the liospitalit> indiistr> in the 
90s? Wlio can keep traek of all the social, health and political con¬ 
cerns relatitifi to wine today? I.earn how to educate yourself and 
your waitstaff to turti these new responsibilities to your advantage. 

Presented bv V\ omen For W inesense. 


Moderator: 




Panelists: 


Pall> Bo>er. Co-Owner. Kiehaixl Bo.\er Wines 
President, Monlen\\ County Chapter. Women For 
Wines(*nse 




Claudia Di Clemente. Kenwood \in(‘yards 

Monila V\ Fontaine. Lieensed B<*v(‘ra{ie Intormation Council 

James K. Peters, K(‘sponsil)le Hospitality Institute 

Dr, Wells Shoemaker. Co-,Author. The French Pimidox nnd Hesond. 

% 

Whal’s Wrong With WineSpeak? 

Mas the “sizzle” in your wine sales fizzled out? Maybe your wait- 
staff needs to try a different approach. Pick up imaluable pointers 
on how to translate all that "W inespeak" into lan«ua«e you and 
your waitstaff can understand—and explain to your cu.stoiners, 

Manftx'd Ksser, Ptx*sident and Partner, Cuvaison Winery, 
Calistofta. CA 













The Wine World's (ireatesl Untapped Opportunity: pf 
Marketing To Women 

Women now represent more than half of the wine-buyin« public, 
but the wine marketing industry has yet to target this infiuential 
consumer. This panel will investigate what strategies work lo 
attract the “sifjnificant other” wine customei's. 


Moderator: 




Panelists' 


Vlictiaela Kodeno. CF()/lv\ec. \ .l*.. St. Supen Vineyards 
•S W iner\ 


tiT 


Richard Channick, \SP International 

,\ancy Catxlinal, FCBO 

Hvan (Joldstein. Sterling Vineyards 

Anne Hartley, IJ(|uor Control Board of Ontario (I.CBO). Canada 

Are You Trying To Fool All of Your Wine Drinkers f\|l 
All Of The Time? ' 

Sellin^j wine to restaurant customers these days requires more 
savxy than ever befotv. People know more abotit wine than they 
us(‘d to—maybe moix' than operators do. Take some lips from a 
marketing professional on how to hike ttp the perceixed \altie of 
yxttir wine list. 




William F. Miller, Industry Fxecutixe 


Category Management 2000—For Retailers, Wine [Ml 
Brokers and Wineries ^ 

Is shelf space working for or a«ainst w ine sales in yottr retail oper- 
aliott.* Hob B(*ck will lap id(*as from leading’ chain and ind<‘pend(‘nl 
ix'lailers lo help yoti matta^e yotir key cale#’ori(*s and project a bifj- 
«er bottom line for salt's into the next cetitury. 

Boh Beck, V .P. of Retail Bus. DevelopnuMit. H(‘ul)lein Wines 


8 


Nailers of Taste 




Discover new ideas about wine and food in these tasting sessions at the Marriott, 
led by enthusiastic w inemakers, ^rape growers and chefs. 


A Monterey Wine Country Safari [M 

Travel through the wild world of microclitnales within Monterey 
County. Vottr lotir guides are local authorities on the area’s unique 
V iticultuix*. hvsented by the Monterey Mine Country Assoeiutes. 

Moderator: 



Phil Fratisciotii. The Motitetx-y Vitieyard: Presidetil. 1991. 

MWCA 





u 


Panelists: 




Ricli Smitti. Valley Farm Management and Paraiso Springs Winery 
Jim (lallivan. I'lie Douldetree Hotel 

The Art of Making Fine W ine: “Terrolr" 

Has California become so obsessed wilh winemakin^j technology 
that its winemakers have foryollen their art? Find out how lo 
break the mold of making uniform wines through this lively disctis- 
sion and lasting abotil the fine points of makin#’ wine. 

Vyustin Huneeus. Franc iscatt Fstate ScJections. iJd. 



Discover the Wine “ABCs:" Alternatives Beyond pf] 
Chardonnay 

Critics have clainu'd it has "tnore richness and individuality lhan 
most California Chardonnays!" ...that il is "Ihe most underrated 
white wine in California!" Come learn more abotil Ihe wine lhal 
has every body talking: Pinol Blanc. 

Moderator: 

Boh Thompson. Wine Critic X \uthor. The Wine Attns of (.citifornin 
Panelists: 


Bordeau.v a la California: A Alew liOok at Old Blends 

What makes Bordeaux blends so popular? A panel of leadins 
(;alifornia winemakers takes seminar attendees through a lasting 
and overview of the varietals that make up the classic Bordeaux 
blends, seen through Ihe wines of California. 


Don Van Slaaveix'ii, Cliateau St. Jean 


Panelists: 




I jjSwd 

Bi:i 


Onille Magoon. (iuenoc Winery 
Kenny Dies. Flora Springs 
.lolin Hawley. KcMulall-Jackson 
,loe Benziger. Benziger Family Winen 

Perfect Matches: “I\ew Ideas from Alapa Valley” 

■ I,. Timotliv Rvan. CMC. Culinarv Institute of America 




Janet Trefellien, Co-Owner. IrefcTlien Vineyatxis 


Perfect Matches: “To Yoiir Health" pf] 

Frickson. CMC. executive Chef. Ihe Cherokee Town 
^Country Club. Atlanta 


Miljenko (Mike) (irgich. Owner, (irgich Hills Cellar 


M Xr. . 


Terry \olan, B<‘nzig<‘r Family Winery 
Michael Michaud. Chalone Vineyatxis 
Christina Benz. Murphy-Coode Winery 
lorn Slutz. Miras,sou Vineyatxis 


|lM| Scheduled Monday 
ITI Scheduled Iuesday 

















Nondaii Hine-llrounds 


Winemaker limelienns on this (la> will maUii the resUuiranls in 
and around \lonlere\ with the wines of \lonlere> (lounlN. 


Kd Filler, Deer \alley 

“Mieroelimales in Montere> (lounly" 



Phil Franseioni. The IVfonlerey Vineyard 

“Oak and Us Influence On Wine" 


\n>(>ne who has tasted a ylass of (Ireek Kelsina wine has expe¬ 
rienced the effect of pine on wine. Oak has a much subtler influ¬ 
ence hut can make or break the (tualit> of a wine. Winemaker 
Phil Kranscioni will let his lunch partnei’s taste what that oak 
influence is and discuss how the barrel itself pla>s a part in 
winemaking'. 


Joel Kurnslein, Jekel V ineyards 

rite Sancluaiy Kstale" 



\lerlot and (labernet Sau\i«non are two hordeaux red-wine 
\arietals man> winedrinkers are familiar with. Joel Uurnstein 
will introduce his lunch companions to three other Bordeaux 
«rape \arietals: OaberiiO l‘’ranc, \lalbec and Petit \(“rdot. and 
discuss their growth in the winerx's Sanctuarx Kstate. 

Tom Slulz, Vlirassou 

“The Pinot Belt" 



Tom Stutz works xxith'both still and sparkling wines at 
Vlirassou. He will focus his talk on Pinot Blanc and Pinot \oir, 
which lend themselxes iini(tuel> to \lontere>'s climate. 
bunch«oers will «et to taste and discuss Stutz' “interpretations" 
of Pinot BlaiK and Pinot \oir still and sparklin(> xxiiu's. 

Rill Vnderson, Chateau Julien 

"Cabernet Sanxi^non from Monterey Comity" 


Pairing food and wine is familiar territory to Chateau Julien 
winemaker and xice president Bill Vnderson. who regularly 
ho.sts dinners at the scenic winery in C-armel Valley. For this 
exent. Vndei'son will focus on one of the k<*ystones of Chateau 
Julien’s selections. Monterey (iounty Cabernet Sauxiynon. 


Monleivy (bounty is a 22()-mile-lon{> strip of contrasts, bounded 
by the Monterey Bay on <»ne side and the Salinas Valley on the 
other. resultin« in quite a puzzle for its winemakers: Which 
#>ra|M*s xxill ^jroxx best xxhere? Kd Filice will proxide some clues 
and offer stnnples of the xxines pailicularly suited to his noilh- 
ern countx xinexard. 




Kld$>e Watson, Joulllan Vineyards, I,Id. 

“The Carmel Valley Bench: Where We'xc 
Been. Where We re Coiny" 


Joullian Vineyards, xxhich lies on a bench in the Carmel Valley 
mountains, is perhaps best known for its uniipn* Cabernet 
Sauxiynons. thanks to winemaker Kid«e Watson. Watson, who 
has been inxoixed in the California xxine industry since the 
lf)7()s. xxill take a look at the past, present and future of Carnu'l 
Vallex xxines. 


Dr. Koy Thomas, 

VIonlercy Peninsula Winery 

lf)70 to l})f)0: The llistoi'y of \ Small Pioneer 
Monlerex Winei'x 


One of the first limited produdion wineries in VIonterex Countx 
in this centui'y. Vlonterey P(*ninsula WiiH'i’x (VIPVV) be«an making 
wines in lf)7:i. Dr. Koy Thomas, a founding partner of VIPW. xxill 
disc uss how VIonterc'y County winemakiny and the |)ro((‘ss of 
making natural. full-bodi<‘d xxines haxe dexelo|)(‘d oxer time. 

Sp<‘akinK VI One OfThest' Fine Keslaiiraiils in VIoiilerey: 










D ( S f A U 17 A N T 


HrTrbOT'-FrO'Tt —U. 


riiniiL m 


RISTORANTF ITAUaNO 









Peler Watson-(iralT. Durney Vineyards 

“(>armel Valley and Its Cabernet Sau\ i«nons" 


Pet<*r Walson-fJraff’s wine hmiIs run deep in Montenw County 
soil. ha\in#> ftrowii up on the esteenu'd xxinemakin« pro|)erly 
that Is now Chalone VVinei:^. Now the winemaker at Durney 
Vineyaixls. Watson-firaff will discuss how the winery’s Carmel 
Valley location helps produce award-wlnnin^j calxTiK'ts 



10 


I 


Tuesdaii Hine-Rrounds 


I'uesday s xxiin'tnaker luncheons traxel around the Monterey 
Pdtinsula. blending the area's dixerst* inns and hotels with 
xxines from s(*xcral key re^tions around the slab*. 

Tom Rinaldi. Winemaker, Duekhorn 

“CunxMit TixmuIs In Winemaking" 


Torn Rinaldi has been making xxines xxilh Duekhorn Vineyards 
since tin* rust haiA»*st in lf)7H and his bk'iid of Old World theoix 
and state-of-lh(‘-ai1 lechni<|ues has luJped the* wineiA dexelop 
its n'putalion for consi.stcMitlx stunnin;’ xxiiu's. Rinaldi xxill share 
his thoughts on xxhat is happening in the world of xxiiu* while lu‘ 
share's some selections from the Duekhorn cellars. 


John Williams. Owner and W inemaker. ' 
Fro«’s Leap 

“VV iiu'inakiiifi For Tlu' V(*ar 2(MM) and Beyond 


Vs if the xxhimsical bottle labc'l xxerc' not indication enough, the 
“ribbc't" printed on the cork confirms that Fronts l-ea|) Wiiien 
(loc's not take* itself loo sc'i'iously. allhou;*h it does make serious¬ 
ly ^tood xxiiu's. Co-founder John Williams promises a lif’ht-hetUt- 
('d oxeniexx of steps llu' xxlneiy is taking to [irepare itself foi the 
veal's ahead. 


CralK Williams. Joseph Phelps Vineyard 

"Txxc'iity Vears ol Dixersity and Innoxation at 
vioseph Phelps Vineyards 


Nctxx enterin^t its third dc'cade of producin;* premium wines. 
Joseph Plu'lps Vineyards has a lon« history in Hu* Napa Valh'y^ 
Winemaker Crai« Williams, who has bec'ii xxilh the wineiy for l.> 
of its 20 years, xxill lake* a look at how .lose|)h Phelps Vineyards 
has bee'll |)arl of the tremendous {•rowth and change's in this 
important wine' re'^ion. 

Jac k Cakehread. Cakehread Cellars 
“Life in the' VVine*ry and Vine'yard Vfler 
PhylloM'ia" 


Like' many California wine'inake'i^. Jac k Cake'bre'ael did not be'«in 
his care'e'i’ in the' wine' busine'.ss—he' ;>e)l bille'n by the wine uiv, 
late'r em. Neixx he' s «e'ltin« bille'ii by aiieUhe'r kinel eel bu«--p ly - 
, loxe'ia. a xine'yarel pe'st that is plat:uin{> Napa Valley—and he' anel 
his sems are' le'arniiif’ heew lee iqiholel the' family s 20-yi ai le |)U a 
lieeii fetr einality in the' fac e' etf this nexx e halle'iifte 






V1ar4;aret Davenport. Clos du Bols 

“Clos du Bois' X ineyard-d('si«nated wines: 
Fliniweieid. Calcaire.,Briarcrest. Marlstone" 


Takiiitt a lip freun Fureipean xvineries, wheise wines are labelled 
acee)rdin« lei Ihe'ir e'stale. Cleis du Beeis winery be«an a decade 
a«e) le) de'si«nale its xxines by the xineyaixls in which they were 
fjreixxn. Teiday. these xxines haxe de'veleipe'd a leiyal feilleixxinK. 
Taste their unietue eiualilies anel discuss Ihe'ir preis and e euis xxith 
Cleis elu Bois xx ine'inake'r Vlar«aix'l Daxenpeirl. I 


hen Brown, Byron Vineyard & Winery. 
Santa Vlarla Valley 

“Cemipariny Fenir Creat Pinot Noir (ii’oxxiny 
Re«ie)ns" 


Pineil Neiir is a subje'ct lu'ar and elt'ar lei Byreui “ken" Breiwn's 
he'art. as it is euu' eif the' ceux' xarie'lals at his .Santa Barbara 
Ceiunly preiperty. an area xxell-suiK'd feir this temperamental 
;jrape'. Other are'as that haxe fjaine'd a name feir Piiml Neiir 
preiduelieui are' Carnereis. the' Willamette Vallt'y in Ore'^ein anel 
Buryunely. Franee. Breewn xxill ceimpare tlu'se' ix'f’ieins and the'ir 
Pineil Neiir style's in this infeirmalixe talk. 





Vllehael “MIek" Sehroeter. 

(ieyser Peak. (Jeyservllle 
“ Vnsiralian W ine'inakin^ Te'e lmieiiu's" 


Vustralian nalixe Mick Schreie'ler is ein ne'w Hreumd in Seuuuna 
Ceuinty but lu' s xxeirkinjj xxilh familiar ^rape's. Ce'yse'r Pe'ak is 
erne' eif se'xe'ial Califeirnia wiiu'iie's iestin« the wale'i’s feir 
Vustralian xarielals such as Shiraz, the /infaiuU'l eif Vuslralia. 
anel .Se'inilleui. a xarietal eifte'ii blende'd xxilh Sauxif»ne)n Blanc. 
.Se hreu'le'r xxill elise uss his expe'iienee' xxe)rkin« with Ihe'se twee 
xarie'lals in Iwei different micre)climatt's. 

.Speaking VI One Df These Fine Properties On The 
Peninsula: 


THE 

BAY 

CLUB 


The Lodge 


at Pebble Beach 


^ ‘ V 

C A 1 S 


QUAIL 

LODGE 

•ISCWT HAXf ClUi 
( jrmrt ( ahlornia 


ON OlO Otl MONTf 
G O I f C O U » S I 


Stonepine 


The Martinf Inn 


R,.mun.f O'f'l.-’kinK Miwilrrr. Hd. 














NEU Regislrohon Pachages Offer Somefliing For Everyone 


Over the years, we’ve learned that Monterey Wine Festival 
attendees have a variety of interests in the festival, so this 
year, we’ve custom-designed registration packages to meet 
their needs. But you’ll want to register I\OW—prices 
Increase after February 21. 

The Festival Passport—The COMPLKTK lour of the 
Festival, including: 

• all Wine Workshops, Matters of Taste and (Ihef’s 
Demos ^ 

• Festival KJck-Off Brunch 

• Opening l\lght Party 

• (irand White Wine Tasting on Monday 

• Grand Red Wine Tasting on Tuesday 

• two winemaker luncheons. 

• a 1994 Wine Festival Poster (a $15 value!) 

Plus lasting glasses and other surprise festival good¬ 
ies! M $375 per person. 

The Partner Pass*—Fver> Passport holder ma> register one 
partner—be it a spouse, business associate or “significant 
other"—for a special festival rate. Make the festival even 
more entertaining b> sharing it with someone! Partner Pass 
holdei’s receive all the benefits of a Passport holder. At $295. 
*Parlner Passes are only available to Feslixal Passport 
holders. 


The Monterey Plan—Okay, you’re in Monterey and you 
want to golf at one of the Peninsula’s terrific courses. Or 
you need the daytime for meetings and phone calls? Then 
you can still gel what you need out of the festival with the 
Monterey Plan! This includes the Kick-Off Brunch, the 
Opening ^ight Party and the Grand Tastings on Monday and 
Tuesday nights. All for just $5 more than if you purchased 
indiv idual tasting passes for each night. A bargain at $250. 

Individual Tasting Passes—if your lime is limited at the 
Festival, or you’re particularly intert*sted in one wine group, 
this package is for you! Purchase individual tickets to the 
nighttime events at these rates: 

Sunday Night Opening Party $125 

Monday (Jrand While Wine Tasting $60 

Tuesday (irand Red Wine Tasting $60 

Remember, register NOW and save! See the registration 

form on the back cover of this brochure for details. 

To register, fill out the foi tn on the opposite page. 




TMH MOST I.A\1SH TINH KVTNT IN THF COl'NTRY 
MARCH 12-15, l<W/()NTHH MONTFRHV PENINSCLA 

( akfornia's Finetl M’lntrin anJ their Wmemaherr, Imnrmet 
Mealt anJ Famnui SpeJun from the WnrU of FooJ ami 

For TirUu uiJ mifr ininnMtKW ixaiUrt 

Tinr Fwlmal Uwim RoaJ vJtloraM kVhfhTISf 


.””mSerM. 

1 Please send me_# postc'rs ^) $ 1 5 each I 

I as seen on the brochure cover I 

1 Please se^ me_# limited aitisl signed 1 

1 and numbt>r(*d edition postei's (5) $30 each as seen on I 

I the brochure cover (Include $2 postagt* for (‘ach poster) ! 

1 Total $_enclosF'd ! 

I (make clieck payable to MoiUei’ey VMiie Festival) I 

1 (iharge $_ I 

} to Amei'ican Fxpress Card Numbt'r: I 

I □□□□ □□□□□□ □□□□□ i 

1 Signature of ! 

• cardholder_^_ i 

I lv\|) Dale_ 1 

! Mail poster to: | 


vSend ord(‘r form to: 

Monterey Wine Festival. 2()(K) (iardep Road 
MontetX'y. CA J)3f) 10 Phone #: (4()«) 373-5221 


12 


L. 


J 


\ 


negislration Form The Hontereii Mine Feslival 

negisler before Felimry 21 and Save! . 


C)iianlil> 

1. festival Passport; $375 ($410 after fehtuarri 21) I 

itu* COVin.FT'K FeslKal expei ierrce: the Kick-Off Brunv h and Sunda> 
Nifjhl Openinfj Parly, all lasliriHS. all day lime pt'of’rams. winemakers 
lunch(‘ons and morxv 

2. Partner Pass; $235 ($325 after fehruarii 21] I- 

Foi' otre patltver—spouse, business assrn'iale or friend—of a passpotl 
holder, with all lire lM*rn*rils of a passport holder. One per passport 
holder only. 

litre tiontereii Plan; $250 ($275 after febriiarq 21] I - 

For ihe VVIXK in lire Feslival: enlry lo lire Ki< k-Off Biutu h. Surrday 
\if>hl's OjM'nittp* Patty and live (irand T’aslitrys Monday and Tuesday 
nirtil. 


Name 


Name 


4.Individualiiclieis i 

• OpcMiing Night Party at The Monterey Bay Aciuarium.SI2:) ($13:>) t 

• Monday Night White W ine lasting & Celebrity Chef Demo.S(W ($7v5) z 

• Tuesday Night Red Wine Tasting & Celebrity CluT Demo.S60 (S7;y) I-— 

NOTF: Only Festival Passport and Partner Pass holdei's may participate in the wine workshops, masters tastings, 
and winemaker luncheons. 


chefs demos 


5. OpiioniilMineinaliet's Dinner 


ofTilieis ResoHatioii $50 per pei'son Saturday. March 12. 7:00 p.m. at (Chateau Julien Winery 


G.MCeer ,S M I. VI. \\l. (,)uiinlil,\ 

1(K)% Colton l-.shirt $ lO.(K) □□□□□ 

with poster’ screen 
Heavy Sweatshirt 

with poster sereerr $ 20.(M) D D D D D 

l.ealh(‘i’-Sleeve Jacket $250.(M) DODO D 

Supplex Jacket 

with Faiihroidery $12().(K) D D D D D 

limCoiKni Polo Shirt $ 35.(K) D D D D D 


Cotton Canvas Hat 
w/color hill 
KMTit. Wool Baseball 
Titleisl (iolf Balls 
set of three 
W ine opener 
Vtatcli 


$ 12.00 One Si/e 
Cap $ 17.00 One Size 
$ 12.(K) 

$ 7.(M) 

$ 40.(K) 


Shippinp; chai’f>(*s: 

Ouaiitity All items will lK‘ ship|)ed I PS. 

I ploSl.lIM) $ l.rvO 
Slo.Ol-aO.tM) b.(M) 
san.ui-fo.iK) 7.r»() 

- 843.0 l-br).(KI ‘MMI 

$63.()l-F)3.(K» 10.30 

- Sfl3.0l mid up I2.(K) 

_ Calirorniii .Slale Kesideiil.s. 

Please add 7.2.3% siles lav 


/.Paqment , i- 

Filter total payment due in the box at right. L- 

CluH’ks must be made out to Monletey Wine Festival and payable in ll.S. 
dollars. If you are charging your registration to your American Fxpr(\ss 
card, compk'te Section No. 8. 

9. Housing 

□ Check if voii are interested in receiving housing information. 

A spi-ciai rate has Ixrn designed for Montmx'y Wine Festivalgoers. 
For information about that rate, call (108) 656-WINF. 


Name_ 

Coinpiiny 

Addix'ss 


B. If you are charging your registration to American 
Fxpress. you may FAX this form to (408) 649-4124. 

Mail To: 

Monterey Wine Festival. 

Festival R(‘gistralion. 

P.O. Box 1749. 

Monterey . CA 93942-1719 

ln(|iuri('s: Call (108) 65(vWINF ((>5(>9463) 


VMFA Ciii’d XumiMT 


Cardholder Name 


FApii’itlioii Dale 


Signal lire 


Davlime Phone