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TALMUDIC SAYINGS, 


SELECTED AND ARRANGED UNDER APPROPRIATE HEADS. 


BY THE 


REV. HENRY COHEN, 


GALVESTON, TEXAS. 


G 


A 2 BA 
V) 


CINCINNATI AND CHICAGO. 
THE BLOCH PUBLISHING AND PRINTING COMPANY. 





Pn nieniainn 








COPYRIGHT 1894, 
Rev. HENRY COHEN, 
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. 





2 ga — 


Nec | 


/60¢3/ Page 


* 


Dulius H. Meyey: 


TO THE 
REV. JOHN CHAPMAN, 
FORMERLY OF 
Jews’ HospiTAL, LoweR NoRwoop, 
THIS LITTLE WORK !S RESPECTFULLY DEDICATED. 


“ Let the fear of thy instructor be as the fear of Heaven.” 
PIRKE ABOTH. 


211732 





— 








PREFACE. 


Believing that little is known of the Tal- 
mud (313 B. C.-498 C. E.) by English-speaking 
people, I have ventured to compile these few 
hundred quotations. To many thousands of 
Jews and Christians, the Talmud is but a 
name, and, in these busy times when one who 
is not a Rabinic student, can hardly hope to 
drink deeply at the fountain of Talmudic lore, 
a collection of maxims, proverbs and sayings 
from the Talmud—characteristic of that whole 
stupendous york—is not out of place. A 
glance through these pages will at once show 
the purity of Jewish moral teachings, and bring 
home to the uninitiated, some of the beauties 
of Jewish Ethics. 

The work consists strictly of Talmudic 
sayings, as the title states; no specific com- 


mands of the Pentateuch, or proverbs of the 























hagiographists find a place therein. The trans- 


lations are as literal as consonant with the 
proper use of the English language—a free 
rendition being given when the exact transla- 
tion of the quotation would sound strangely, 
or be entirely incomprehensible to those un- 
acquainted with the manners, customs and en- 
vironment of the editors of the Talmud. As will 
be seen, the subjects are alphabetically arranged. 
The “headings” are as comprehensive as the 
general run of Quotation-book titles usually 
are. In two instances, and for reasons which 
are obvious, the same text has been placed 
under two captions. It needs ,but a short 
acquaintance with the book to enable the 
reader to locate exactly an appropriate saying 
for any subject that he may wish to illustrate. 

For special English renditions, I have laid 
under contribution the following works, whose 
authors and publishers I particularly wish to 


thank. “Tracts of the Association for the 

















Diffusion of Religious Knowledge,” “ The Three- 


fold Cord” (Rey. B. Spiers’), “‘ Literary Remains 
of Emanuel Deutch,” and “ Der Wahre Talmud- 
jude” (Albert Katz), translated into English 


by the undersigned. 
Henry COHEN. 


GALVEsToNn, TExAs, October 1894. 





Adversity, 
Agriculture, 
Anger, - 
Appearances, 
Benevolence, 
Charity, 
Cleanliness, 
Commerce, - 
Companionship, 
Conduct, - 
Contentment, 
Cruelty, - 
Damage, 
Death, : 
Deceit, - 
Discord, = 
Enmity, 


Example, - 


Fellow-Creature, 


Filial Affection, 


CONTENTS. 


18 
19-20 



































Flattery, 
Friendship, - - - 
Future Life—Immortality, 
God—Holy Law, - - 
Guilt, - - - 


Haughtiness, see Pride, - 
Honesty, - - = 
Hospitality, > - 


Hypocrisy, - - 
Idleness, - - 
Ignorance, see Knowledge, 
Immortality, see Future Life. 
Ingratitude, E = 
Insolence, - = 
Instruction, = = 
Justice, - . - 
Knowledge—Tgnorance, 4 
Life, - - 

Loans, - ° = 


Loye, 





| Home, - - - - 


Honor, - - - -- 


Humility, = - =. 


35 

36 

36-37 

37 

46 to 48 
29 








~~ 





Marriage, - - 


Merey, - - 
Moderation, ; 
Modesty, 
Oaths—Vows, - 
Old Age—Youth, 
Parental Duties,  - 
Passion, - z 
Patriotism, - - 


Peace, - 


Penury, see Poverty, 


Poverty—Penury, 
Prayer, G : 
Pride—Haughtiness, 


Publie Opinion, = 


2ecompense—Revenge, 


Religion, 7 - 
Repentance, - 
teproof, - E 


Resignation, - 


Revenge, see Recompense, 


Riches, - - 


Righteousness, 


66-67 
68 
69 








Robbery, - 


Secrecy, - - 
Silence, see Speech, 
Sin, - = - 
Slander, see Speech, 
Slaveholding, - 
Speech—Slander, 
Temptation, 2 
Testimony, : 
Tolerance, - - 
Truth, - - 
Usefulness, - : 
Usury, - - 


Vows, see Oaths, - 


Wisdom, = 
Work, - - 
Workman, 

Youth, see Old Age, 











80 

82-83 

81 

- 82-83 


88 

59-60 

- 89-90 
91 to 93 

2 94 
60 





TALMUDIC SAYINGS. 





ACD NW RS bl 


Adversity is the true school of the mind. 
* ig * 
A man should be opposed to taking alms, as well 
as to being a burden on the community. 
se 


* 


To him who is dependent upon his neighbor’s 


table, the world looks dark. 


* 


It is better to become a menial than live upon 


the charity of others. 


* 


He who pretends to be halt or blind, in order to 
appeal to popular sympathy, will be afflicted 


with these infirmities sooner or later. 








AGRICULTURE. 











a ns pag 


He who possesses no land is no man. 


* 
* * 


What enjoyment has he who continually craves 


money, but possesses no land ? 


* 


* * 





Cultivate your field, and do not buy your com- 


a 


modities at the market, even if you believe 


SEE 
* 


it to be cheaper. 


° 


It is not right to sell your field to buy cattle or 


tools unless poverty compels you. 


* 
* * 


a 


If you rent ground from your neighbor, cultivate 
it as if it were your own. 


ie * 
Ki a” 


He who walks over his estate daily, finds a coin 


daily. 











ANGER. 


Be not provoked to anger, and thou wilt not sin. 
He who gives way to anger in order to revenge 
himself upon anyone, destroys his own 


house. x 


He whom it is difficult to provoke to anger, but 
easy to pacify, is pious; but he who is easily 
provoked, and with difficulty pacified, is 


wicked. : 


He who curbs his wrath merits forgiveness for 


his sins. # 


The sins of the bad-tempered are greater than 


his merits. *& 


Anger showeth the character of the man. 


% 


When the wise is angry he is wise no longer. 


* 


Anger profiteth nobody. 








APPEARANCES. 


Look not at the flask, but at its contents. 


* 
* * 


Few are they who see their own faults. 


* 
* * 


Judge not thy neighbor until thou hast been 
placed in his position. 


* 
* * 


The rose grows among thorns. 


* 
* * 


Man sees the mote in his neighbor’s eye, but 
knows not of the beam in his own. 


* 
* * 


One man eats and another says grace. 


* 
* * 


The soldiers fight, and the kings are heroes. 





oe 








Two pieces of coin in one bag make more noise 


than a hundred. 


* 
* * 


Unhappy is he who mistakes the branch for the 
tree, the shadow for the substance. 
* 
* * 


Judge everybody favorably. 


* ‘ 
% * 


Judge a man by his deeds, and not by his 


words. - 





cea a 


Sa 


[Saree 


BENEVOLENCE. 












If thou hast commenced a good action, leave it 


* not incomplete. 


He who induces his neighbor to perform a good 


action, shares the merit. 


He who performs a single good action, gains 
for himself an advocate; he who commits 
a single sin, procures for himself an ac- | 
cuser. : | 


* * 


Good deeds are better than good creeds. 


Cling steadfastly to that which is good. 


* 


* * 
He who closes his eyes to beneficence, is equal 
to an idolator. 





The good actions which we perform in this 


world, take shape and meet us in the world 


to come. & 


Hasten to perform the slightest good deed. 


* 
* * 


Even he who lives upon charity should practice 
benevolence. 
* a * 
The true benefactor searches out the poor. 


* 
a % 


Be always ready to perform an act that will be 


pleasing in the sight of the Lord. 


* 
* * - 


The practice of beneficence will assure the main- 


tenance of one’s possessions. 


* 
* * 


Like the tree, man is known by his fruit. 
* 
* * 
Those who perform one precept in this world, 
will find it recorded to their credit in the 


world to come. 





Se 

















CLES TMTY = 


Charity is the salt of riches. 


* 
* * 


To lend is often better than to give, but to give 
employment is better than either. 


* 
* * 


He gives little who gives much with a frown ; 
he gives much who gives even little with 
a smile. © 


* 
* * 


Since the destruction of the Temple, alms are 


the only sacrifiées that we can offer at the 


altar of God. 


* 
* * 


He who gives charity in secret, is greater than 
Moses. 


* 
* * 


The practice of charity is one of the three chief 


virtues of the Israelite. 





Re 





Kindness is the highest form of charity. 


* 
* * 


To him who lacks nobility of heart, nobility of 


blood is of no avail. 


CLEANLINESS. 


Cold water, morning and evening, is better than 
all cosmetics. 


* 
* * 


Cleanliness is next to godliness. 


* 
* * 


Keep the body clean; let thy garments be 
changed daily, for clean garments honor 


the wearer. 





10 


COMMERCE. 


An Israelite is prohibited from deceiving even 
an idolator. 


* 
* * 


Those who monopolize food to increase its price, 

Hi) those who lend money usuriously, or who 
employ false weights and measures, wound 

the honor of Jacob, and will bring upon 


themselves the punishment of God. 


* 
* * 


If thy goods sell not in one city, take them 





to another. 


* 
* * 


He who avoids law-suits, frees himself from 
hatred, robbery and false swearing. 


* 
* * 


Attend no auctions if thou hast no money. 











Make but one sale, 


and thou art called a 
merchant. 


* 


Money belonging to orphans should only be 


invested when the chance of gain is greater 
than the chance of loss. 
* * 


Always be honest in your trading; if your goods 


are damaged, acknowledge it. 


The smallest payment in hand binds the trade. 


{ 
* 
* * 








Credit and mutual trust should be the founda- 


tion of commercial intercourse. 
* 


Do not buy stolen goods. 








12 





COMPANIONSHIP. 


A myrtle remains fragrant though it grows 
| among thorns. 


* 
* * 


Associate not with the wicked man, even if thou 


canst learn from him. 





} * bd 
Peer 


A man without a proper companion is like the 


left hand without the right. 





fi a" x 

| 

I If you touch pitch it will stick to your fingers ; 
i" 

so, if you associate with evil companions, 


All you will acquire their vices. 


ie 

| Keep at a distance from a bad neighbor, and 
associate not with a wicked man. 

iD) 


If Iam not for myself, who is for me ? And if 


i I am for myself (only), what am I? 











He who mixes with the unclean, becomes un- 


clean himself, he whose associations are 
pure, becomes more holy each day. 
* * 
In communicating your sorrows to others always 
say, “ May the Lord protect you from like 


troubles.” 
a 
* * 


Be not mournful amongst the joyous, neither 


rejoice amongst the mournful. 


* 
* * 


He who participates in the sorrows of a com- 
munity, shall likewise receive the solace of 
the community. 

* 
* * 

Those that make the sorrowful rejoice, will par- 

take of life everlasting. 


* 
* * 


Associate with kind-hearted people, and you will 


become kind-hearted yourself. 























14 


CONDUCT. 
A man may be known by three things; by his 


conduct in business, at table, and when 
angry. 
ee 
* * 


The path of duty leads to salvation. 


* 


Keep to the right path; go not to extremes, 


* 


Improve thyself, then endeavor to improve 
others. 
* 
He who strives to improve, will be assisted 
from above. 
x * Mv. 


The end does not justify the means. 


* 
* * 


Night was created that therein we might ponder 


over the work of the past day. 





Contemplate three things, and thou wilt not 


easily be led to sin. Consider whence thou 
comest, whither thou goest, and _ before 
whom thou must ultimately render an 


account of thine actions. 


Be respectful to a superior, affable to an inferior, 


and receive all men with cheerfulness. 
How may a man obtain greatness? By fidelity, 
truth, and inspiring thoughts. 


ogee 
* * 


Every union for a divine purpose is destined 


to last. 

















16 


CONTENTMENT. 


Who is rich? He who is satisfied with. his lot. 


* 
* * 


Do not use unlawful means to become rich. 


* 
* * 


Blessed is the man who trusts in God. 


* 
* * 


He who trusts in the Lord will never act dis- 
honorably. 


* 
* * 


Be contented. The camel wished to have horns, 


but ultimately lost his ears. 

















17 


CRUELTY. 


Be not tyrannical and cruel toward thy inferiors. 


* 
* * 


Do not put a greater burden upon thy beast than 
it can bear. 


* 
* * 


To have compassion upon animals is one of the 
laws of Moses. 


* 
* * 


He who has no mercy upon animals shall him- 


self suffer pain. 


* * 


A man should not buy cattle or poultry without 
first having bought food for them. 


* 


Rather be the persecuted than the persecutor ; 


rather be the sufferer than inflict suffering. 

















| i : : 

ik 18 

. ! 

| DAMAGE. 

i — 

i é 
Remove from the highway anything that might 
I cause damage to another’s property. 

h, 

+) * 

i! Re ee, 

I) 
i Sell nothing that could inflict damage. 

he 

at 

iH Do not damage a public road. 

hi * 


Use not another’s money for your own purpose. - 


. 


* 
* * 


Your neighbor’s possessions should be as dear 


to you as your own. 


* 
%* * 


Man is always responsible for the injuries 


—- 


caused by him, whether inadvertently or 
wilfully. 











19 


DEATH. 


Death is the haven of life, and old age is the 


ship which enters the port. 


* 
* * 


No man dies before his time. 


* 
* * 


Trust not thyself until the day of thy death. 


* 
* * 


Death relieves man of all pain and sorrow. 


* 


Do not speak ill of the departed, but remember 
that his soul still lives, tho’ his body is 


dead. 


* 
* * 


It is our duty to comply with the last wishes of 


a dying person. 


















Po not attempt to dispute a man’s last will and 


testament. 


He who follows others to the grave, performs a 


duty. 


In order to be able to distinguish one grave from 


another, crect a tombstone. 











He who deceives his neighbor would also deceive 
his God. 


* 
* * 


He who talks deceitfully is despised by the Lord. 


* 
* * 


Under no consideration lead men astray. 


* 
* * 


The thief’s end is the gallows. 


* 


* * 
There is no greater villain than he who takes 
away the earnings of the poor. 


* 
* * 


A lie has not a leg to stand upon. 


* 
* * 


When a liar speaks the truth; he finds his pun- 


ishment in being generally disbelieved. 



































DISCORD. 


Keep far from contentious men, for they are 


dangerous. % 


Discord creates incalculable harm. 
* 
* * 
The house in which discord reigns will never be 


firmly established. 


* 
* * 


One loose cord loosens many. 





EN MITY. 
One enemy is one too many, a thousand friends 
are none too many. 


* 
* * 


It is easy to make an enemy, it is difficult to 
make a friend. 
Ta ees 


When the ox is down, many are the butchers. 














EXAMPLE. 


Beautiful are the admonitions of those whose 


lives accord with their teachings. 


* 
* * 


Precept without example is no precept. 
* 
%” & 
Blessed is the generation in which the old listen 
to the young; and doubly blessed is the 
generation in which the young listen to 


the old. be 


* * 
The daughter is as the mother was. 


* 
* * 
What the child says on the street, he has ‘learnt 
at home. * 
* * 


A single light answers as well for a hundred 


men as for one. 


* 
* * 


Let every man watch his own doings, that he 
may be an example to his fellow-man 


through life. 





















24 


FELLOW-CREATURE. 


What is displeasing unto thee, do not unto 
another. 
~* * 
* * 
Guard with jealous care your neighbor’s honor. 


* 
* * 


Let the honor of thy neighbor be as dear unto 
thee as thine own, 


* 
* * 


Whosoever scorns his neighbor in public, com- 


promises his future happiness. 


* 
* * 


Attempt not to comfort thy neighbor when the 


dead is lying before him. 


* 
* * 


Mention not a blemish which is thine own, in 


detraction of thy neighbor. 


* 
* * 


Do not continually praise your neighbor; from 


praise you may turn to blame. 














Rejoice not in the faults of your neighbor. 


* 
* * 


Go not into your neighbor’s house unannounced, 


lest he be embarrased. 


* 
* * 


When your neighbor departs, say, “ Depart in 


peace.” - 


If your neighbor is sick, pray for him. 


* 
* * 


Do not visit a poor, sick man, with empty hands. 


* 
* * 


It is a bounden duty to visit the sick. 
Coe 
Birds of a feather flock together; and so with 
,man, like to like. 
* * 
Do not separate thyself from society. 


* 
% * 


He who makes himself beloved by his fellow- 


creatures, makes himself acceptable to God. 



















26 


FILIAL AFFECTION. 


Great is the child’s veneration for its parents; 


equal in the eye of the Lord as the venera- 
tion for Himself. 


* 
* * 


The son should stand in the- presence of his 
father. 


* 
* * 


The son can be compelled to support the father. 


and to supply him with life’s necessities. 


* 
* * 


Only when the father attempts to induce the*son 


to commit sin, is disobedience justifiable, 





r) 


FLATTERY. 


Keep far from the flatterer. 


* 


* * 
The flatterer is an abomination to the Lord. 


* 
* * 


Let not your lips speak that which is not in 
your heart. 


* * 


Love those who reprove thee, not those who 
flatter thee. 
2 
* * 


* 


The dog follows thee for the crumbs in thy 


* pocket. 





| 
| 
} 
| 
| 
| 
| 
| 








28 


FRIENDSHIP. 


Remind not your friend of his erstwhile failings. 


* 
* * 


Do not take too many friends into thy house. 


* 
* * 


Three friends hath a man; God, his mother, 


and his father. 


* 



































Ascend a step in choosing a friend. 


* 
* * 





If you find a friend after your own heart, love 


him honestly and truly. 














29 


a2 


FUTURE LIFE (IMMORTALITY). 


This world is an ante-chamber to the next. Pre- 
pare thyself in the ante-chamber, that thou 
mayest worthily enter the throne-room. 


* 
* * 


Better one hour’s happiness in the next world, 
than a whole life of pleasure in this. 


* 
* * 


This world is a world of work, the next, a world 


of recompense. 


* 
* * 


He who divorces himself from the pleasures of 
this world, weds himself to the glories of 


the next. 


* 
* * 


é One man may earn immortality by the work of 
a few short years, while others earn it by the 


work of a long life. 























30 


GOD—HOLY LAW. 





The consciousness of God’s presence is the great 
teaching of religion. 
* * 
Know before whom thou standest. 
* ig * 
Happy is he, who fears God while yet in the 


prime of life, 


* 
* * 


The fear of God is the talisman which brings 
us wisdom and knowledge. 


* 


Fear of God is the centre of morality. 


* 
* * 


Everything is in the hand of God, except the 
fear of God. 


* 
* * 


Whoever desecrates God’s name in secret, will 


be punished publicly. 


* 
* * 


Tradition is a fence to the law. 





4 





>. 





31 


The God of Israel is the first and the last, and 


besides Him there is no other. 


* 
* * 


There are three who are especially beloved by 
God; he who is forbearing, he who is tem- 


perate, and he who is courteous. 


* 


We can not comprehend, either the prosperity of 


the wicked, or the sufferings of the righteous. 


* 


From beginning to end God’s law teaches 


kindness. Ex 
* * 


Man should thank God for the evil as well as for 


the good. iz 
Whatever God does is done for our good. 
* 
* * 


Even when death is imminent, man should not 


refrain from imploring the mercy of Heaven. 


* 
* * 


The Sabbath is given to man, not man to the 


Sabbath. 





| 
} 
| 











32 


GUE T: 
If any blame can be attached to thee, be the first 
to declare it. 


* 
* * 





He who denies his guilt, doubles his guilt. 


* 
* * 


The liar is worse than the thief. 


* 
* * 


He who blames others, is often full of blame 
himself; for the fault he sees in others, may 
be seen in himself. 


* 
* * 


No man should be punished for speaking harshly 
in his distress. 


* 


He, through whose agency another has been 


falsely punished, stands outside of heaven’s 


gates. 








HOME. 


Woe to the children banished from their father’s 


table. 
* 
Do not place a blemish on thine own flesh. 
* 
* * 


The humblest man is ruler in his own house. 


——- + + __ 


HONESTY. 


Honest for a penny (Peruta), honest for a 
pound (Dinar). 

* 
* * 

The first question that will be asked by the 
Heavenly Judge, is, “Have you always 
acted honestly ?” 

* 
* * 
He who is honest in his dealings, will have 


the respect of all people. 








34 


HONOR. 


No position can honor the man. It is the man 


who may honor the position. 


* 


Who deserveth honor? He who honoreth man- 


kind. 


* 
* * 


He who honoreth the law, is personally honored 
by mankind; but he who holds the law in 
light esteem, shall be held in light esteem 


by his fellow-man. 


* 
* * . 


Who is worthy of respect?) He who respecteth 


himself. 





i 








HOSP ET ALITY. 


Let thy house be ever hospitably open, and let 


the poor be received therein. = 


* 
* * 


The house which opens not to the poor will open 
to the physician. 
* 
Hospitality is an expression of Divine worship. 


* 
* * 
Receive everybody in kindness, and you will be 


honored and respected. 
* 
* * 
Thy dwelling should be a place of gathering for 
g I g g 
wise people. Ps 


The table at which strangers eat, becomes an 


altar. ¥ 
% * 
If you intend to entertain twenty persons, 


always prepare for twenty-five. 
* 
% * 


During eating hours, open your doors, that the 


needy might enter and partake. 

















36 


HUMILITY. 


Be always humble, for the end of the body is 


corruption. 
* 
* * 
Rather be thou the tail among lions, than the 


head among foxes. 


* 
* * 


The bashful man seldom becomes learned. 


* 
* * 


He who seeks fame, oft loses it. 


* 
* * 


He who can feel ashamed will not readily do 


wrong. 


HYPOCRISY. 
Hypocrites should be unmasked, lest God’s 


name be desecrated through them. 


* 
* * 


Put not thy trust in still waters. 











SE 


If the thief no longer has an opportunity to 
steal, he pretends to be honest. 


* 
* * 


Fear neither the Pharasees not the Sadducees, 


fear only the hypocrites. 


IDLENESS. 


He who passes his life in idleness, is the instru- 
ment of his own ruin. 


* 
* * 


When the woman slumbers, the work-basket falls 


to the ground. 


* 
* * 


Sleep in the morning, wine at noon, trifling 
with children, and spending time with the 


ignorant, shorten a man’s existence. 


ES ss — al i Rea 

















| 38 
iW 

\ 
a INGRATITUDE. 

; 
| Throw not stones into the well from which thou 
1 hast quenched thy thirst. 

1 | * ® 

it He who éats and drinks, but blesses not the 
} : 5 

tii Lord, is even as he who stealeth. 
| ; 
tn Wait not to honor the physician until thou 
4 phy 

i fallest sick. 

Hi | % 
nie * * 
| Despise not small favors. 

y 

rit 

‘| 

i INSOLENCE. 

if os 

Pi If a man be insolent, it is a sign that he has 

) been guilty of transgression. 

mT} 

| * * 

i He who is insolent to his teacher, is as if he 
i were insolent to the King. 

| 

aa 

i 








39 


Arrogance is a kingdom without a crown. 


* 
* * 


Turn a deaf ear to insult, and thou wilt not 


hear it. 
* Xe * 
Do not be insolent. 
INSTRUCTION. y 


The fear of thy instructor should be even as the 


fear of Heaven. 


* 
* * 
A town which has no school, should be de- 
molished. 
* 3 * 


Let the honor of thy pupil be.as dear to thee as 


thine own. 


* 
* * 


The study of the law, that does not go hand in 


hand with industry, is doomed to failure. 


























He who instructs a child is as great a benefactor 
as the parent; honor thy teacher as thy 
parent. 

x. * se. 
s s 

Procure thyself a teacher, that thou remainest 

not in doubt. 
* 
é * * 

Happy the pupil whose teacher approves his 
words. 

* 
* * 

Blessed is the son who has studied with his 

father, and blessed is the father who has 


instructed his son. 


* 
* * 
Who is best taught? He who learns from his 
mother. 
* 
* * 


The hasty man can not teach. 


* 
* * 


He who studies and teaches others, possesses 


treasures and riches. 



















The world exists only by the breath of school 
children. 
* 
* * 


It is a duty to commence to teach the child as 


soon as it can talk. 
Study is one of the three pillars that support 


the world. 


* 
* * 


The name of the man whose child has devoted 
itself to science, will never die. 


* 
* * 


A teacher should be relieved of all taxes, except 
that for digging and building a public well. 


* 
* * 


It is the duty of the scholar to interest him- 
self in the welfare of the place in which 


he lives. 














It is right that the wise man should concern 
himself with the health and life of his 


fellow-creatures. 


* 
* * 


The scholar should correct the wayward, as 
well as expound holy writ on Sabbaths 


and holy days. 


x 
* * 


The learned man should judge himself according 
to his own teaching, and not do anything 
that he has forbidden others to do. 


* 
* * 


The Lord is not with him, who possesses great 


knowledge but has no sense of duty. 


* 
* * 


He who is rich, should support the learned. 





| 


43 


The teacher should explain the subject under 
discussion, and to this end, should employ 
a short and efficient. method. 


* 
* * 


The teacher should rule his pupil lovingly and 


kindly. 


* 
* * 


Teach the children of the poor without compen- 
sation, and do not favor the children of the 
rich. 


* 
* * 


The pupil should always remember that, through 
the efforts of the teacher, the world is laid 
open before him. 


* 
* * 


Do not bring ridicule upon your teacher by 
asking him questions that you think he 


can not answer. 








os Sa Ares 


la 
if 
f 
F 
fF 

i 


44 


WS TLC He, 


God Joveth justice and charity more than all 


sacrifices. 


* 


The recompense is proportionate to the sacri- 
fice. 


* 
*  & 


Justice is the guarantee of national stability 
and peace. 


* 
* * 


Let justice pierce through the mountain. 


* 


Choose for the criminal under sentence of death, 
the least painful and the least degrading 


mode of execution. 





Woe unto the generation whose judges must 
be judged. 


* 
* * 


The judge should despise all emolument. 


* 
* * 


Two judges hating each other can not sit on 
the same bench. 


* 
* * 


The judge should not take a bribe, nor should 
he allow himself to be flattered. 


* 
* * 


The judge that turnes the Jaw in favor of one 


or the other, arbitrarily, shall be despised. 


* 
* * 


Justice is one of the three pillars on which the 


moral world rests. 





46 


KNOWLEDGE—IGNORANCE. 





iF os 

If thou hast acquired knowledge, what canst 
i] thou lack? If thou lackest knowledge, 
what canst thou acquire ? 


Mt | * 
7 * * 


He who acquires knowledge, without imparting 


it to others, is like a myrtle in the desert, 





{ 
He 

Hi no one is there to enjoy it. 
i ¥ 

: 


* * 
t 
| If anyone tell thee he has searched for knowl- 





edge, and not attained it, believe him not; 
if he tell thee he has attained knowledge, 
without searching for it, believe him not; 

i but if he tell thee he has searched for 
iI knowledge, and attained it, thou mayest 


I * 


) 
i 
i believe him. 
* * 


The aim and object of learning is moral _per- 


fection. 





47 


Knowledge without religion blesses not its 


possessor. 
= * 
%* * 


Learn first and philosophize afterward. 


* 
* * 


Learn a little here and a little there, and you 
will increase in knowledge. 


* 
* * 


If you interrupt your studies for one day, it 
will take you two, to regain what you have 


lost. 


* 
* * 


It is the duty of the student to greet all wise 


men of his city. 


* . 


Refuse not to assist a fellow-student. 


None are so destitute as the ignorant. - 


* 
* * 


Ignorance and conceit go hand in hand. 































48 


A coin in an empty vessel rattles loudly. 


* 


Without knowledge there is no true morality 
and piety. 


*% 


The rivalry of scholars advances science, 
Study to-day—delay not. 


* 
* * 


He who does not educate his children, is his 


own, and his children’s enemy. 


* 


Distress and poverty should not prevent one 


obtaining an education. 


* 
* * 


Study in your youth; study in your old age. 


* 
* * 
He that increases not his knowledge, dimin- 
ishes it. - 
* * 


It is necessary to have a knowledge of the world, 


besides a knowledge of the Holy Law. 











49 


» LIF HR. 


If I do not work for my own salvation, who 


will for me? 


* 
* * 


The longest life is insufficient for the fulfillment 


of half of man’s desires. 





* 
* * 


Life leads to the tomb, death to resurrection. 


* 
* * 


Life is but a loan to man, death is the creditor 
who will one day claim it. 


* 
* * 


Eat when hungry, drink when thirsty, and 





enjoy life. a 

% 1 

e %” & 
It is a bad sign if a man despise his life; God 


will hold him accountable. 


ey, Ce en ee 




















5O 


A man should not wound, mutilate, or casti- 
gate himself, in order to be considered a 
martyr. 


* 


Self-preservation is a bounden duty. 


% 
% * 


If thou hast the means, enjoy life’s innocent 
pleasures. 


* 


The best preacher is the heart, the best teacher 
is time, the best book is the world, the 


- best friend is God. 


* 
* * 


The Universe is based upon three things: con- 
science, justice and peace. 


* 


Youth is a wreath of roses. 











vo 





ol 


LOANS. 


es ‘ 


Lend to the poor in the time of their need. 


Sie 


Never take the clothes of wife or children in 


payment of a debt. 


* 
* * 


If you have taken of a man his plow or his 
pillow for debt, return his plow in the 


morning and his pillow at night. 


* 
* * 


The possessions of a widow, whether she be 
rich or poor, should not be taken in 


pawn. 























or 
bo 


When love is intense, both find room enough 
on one bench; afterward they may find 
themselves cramped in sixty cubits. 


* 
* * 


{ Love without rebuke is no love._) 


* 
* * 


Love inspired by unworthy motives, dies out 
when those motives disappear, but love 


without such motives, never fades. 





MARRIAGE. 


It is man’s duty to take unto himself a wife. 


* 
* * 


Choose a wife of your own station and a e, and 
y 


thus avoid discord and strife. 


























53 


Be careful in the choice of a wife, and examine 
your heart well ere you marry. 


* 
* * 


Whoever marries a virtuous woman, is blessed 
by the Lord. 
* 
eae 
He who breaks his marriage vow, must expect 
his wife to do the same, sooner or later. 


* 
* * 


The wife should not upbraid the husband in the 


presence of their children. 


* 
* * 


The wife must help the husband by doing 


housework. 
* = * 


The wife should never indulge in idleness. 


* 
* * 


It is the duty of the wife to nurse the child 
herself. 





























54 


Honor your wife and you will prosper. 


* 
* * 


He who loves his wife as himself, and respects 
her above all others, will have peace in 


his household. 


* 
* * 


If thy wife be short, stoop down to her and 


speak. 


* 
* * 


He who has no wife, is not a com plete man. 
’ 


* 
* %* 


He who is unmarried, lives without happiness 
? ’ 


without religion, without blessing. 


* 
* * 


Descend a step in choosing thy wife. 


* 
* * 


All the blessings of a household come through 


the wife, therefore should the husband 


honor her. 





55 


Men should be careful lest they cause women 
to weep, for God counts their tears. 


* 
* * 


A woman’s death is felt by nobody, as by her 
husband. 


* 
* * 


The children of a man who marries for money 
will prove a curse to him. 


* 
* * 


It is a man’s duty to honor his wife’s parents, 
as his own. 
et 
Love your wife truly and faithfully, and do not 
compel her to do hard work. 


* 
* * 


Man is born to work, hence it is his bounden 
duty to support his wife and family, and 


not depend upon others. 

















——— 




















56 


MERCY. 


To deserve mercy, practice mercy. 


* 
* * 


The mercy we to others show, Heaven will 


show to us. 


* 
* * 


He who has compassion on his fellow-man, is 


accounted of the offspring of Abraham. 


* 
* * 


He who wishes to be forgiven, must forgive 
others. 


* 
* * 


Hatred is sinful, parden is sweet. 











MODERATION. 


Be moderate in all things. 


* 
* * 


. When Satan can not come himself, he sends 
wine as a messenger. 


* 
* * 


The horse fed too freely with oats oft becomes 


unruly. 
%*% 2 * 


Drink not to excess, and thou wilt not be led 


into sin. 


* 
* * 


Eat and drink to live. Live not to eat and 
drink; for thus do the beasts. 


* 
* * 


Do not waste your money in luxuries. 


* 
* * 


The sensible man drinks only when he is thirsty. 














58 


MODESTY. 


They who are modest will not easily sin. 


* 
* * 


Who is modest? He whose conduct in the 


dark is the same as in the light. 


* 
* * 


Be humble before all men. 


* 
* %* 


Modesty prevents discord. 


* 
* * 


Be as flexible as a reed and not as hard as 


a cedar. 














OATHS—VOWS. 


Good men promise little and do much; wicked 
men promise much and perform nothing. 


% 
e % 


Do not accustom yourself to use oaths; or 
you will be led to perjury. 


* 
* * 


Swear not, even to the truth, unless the court 
compels you to do so. 


* 
* * 


The world trembles at the sentence: “Thou 
shalt not take the name of the Lord thy 
God in vain.” 

* 
* * 

The sin of perjury is great. 
* 


The punishment of perjury falls not only upon 


the sinner, but upon the family of the one 


who sins. 























60 


He who allows his neighbor to perjure himself 


will lose his possessions. 


* 
* * 


To act contrary to a given promise, is a grave 


breach of trust. 





OLD AGE — YOUTH. 
No one can be accounted venerable, unless his 


old age has purchased wisdom. 


* 
* * 


Happy is the old age that atones for the folly 
of youth! But happier still the youth for 


which old age needs not to blush. 


* 
* * 


He who asks advice of the bearded, will seldom 


fail in what he undertakes. 


* 
* * 


Some are old in their youth, others young in 


their old age. 











61 


PARENTAL DUTIES. 


Do not spoil the child by allowing it to have 
its own way. 


* 
* * 


Treat young children carefully. Do not threaten 
them with punishment unless you mean to 
inflict it. 


* 
* * 


Do not inflict corporal punishment on grown-up 


children. 


* 
* * 


It is the duty of the father to support his sons 
and daughters, until they are thirteen years 
old, at least. 


* 
* * 


To give one’s daughter in marriage to an igno- 


ramus, is like throwing her before lions. 





































62 


PASSION. 


Passion is at first as slender as a spider’s web; 
but in the end, it becomes like a thick 


cable. 


* 
* * 


Who is‘a hero? He who controlleth his 


passions. 


* 
* * 


He that forges arrows, may one day be killed 


by one of his own arrows. 


* 
* * 


Envy, lust and ambition take men from the 


world. 











63 


PATRIOTISM. 


Pray to heaven for the prosperity of the govern- 
ment, for by indifference to its welfare, we 


cause anarchy and disorder to reign. 


* 
* * 


If there be no law, there can be no civilization. 


* 
* * 


Follow the custom of the country in which 
you dwell. 


* 
* Ke 


The Law of the country is binding. 


* 
* * 


He who revolts against the government, com- 
mits as great a sin’ as if he revolted 


against God. 


























Be a disciple of Aaron, loving peace, and 


pursuing peace. 


* 
* Herr 


Be the first to hold out the hand of peace. 


* 
* * 


Where there is no peace nothing flourishes. 


* 
* * 


Sow peace at home; scatter its fruits abroad. 


* 
* * 


Peace is the wisp of straw that binds the sheaf 
of blessings. 


The Bible was given to establish peace. 


* 
* * 


He who maketh peace between strivers, will 


inherit eternal life. 


* 
* * 


Where peace is, there, also, is happiness. 





iia 


ane 


65 


POVERTY — PENURY. 


Be mindful of the children of the poor, for 


learning comes from them. 


* 
* * 


Healthy poverty is opulence, compared with 
ailing wealth. 


* 
* * 


Poverty sits as gracefully upon some people 
as a red saddle upon a white horse. 


* 
* * 


The Eternal is the advocate of the poor. 


* 
* * 


The birds of the air despise a miser. 


* 
* * 


A miser is as wicked as an idolator. 





66 


PRAYER. 


Prayer without devotion is like a body without 


breath. 


* 
* * 


When the gates of prayer are closed, the gates 


of repentence are yet open. 











a es 
i eS 
i Better little prayer with devotion, than much 
i without devotion. 
aa % * 
t The value of the words uttered with the lips, 
Hy [ is determined by the devotion of the heart. 
an x 
| * * 
; He who prays for others, will be heard favora- 
| bly when he prays for himself. 
i 
1 * 
: i * * 


Look not upon thy prayers as on a task; let 


| | thy supplication be sincere. 

















It is the duty of every Israelite to pray for 
the idolator. 


x: 
* * 


It is more profitable to pray than to bring 
sacrifices. 


* 
* * 


‘Cleanse your heart before praying. 


* 
* * 


Always pray with humility, and with a clear 
conscience. 


* 
* * 


Before praying, give alms to the poor. 


* 
* * 


Prayer is one of the three things on which the 


world rests. 


* 
* * 


Blessed are the women who send their children 


to the house of prayer. 














68 


PRIDE—HAUGHTINESS. 


The Messiah will not come until haughtiness 
shall have ceased among men. 
* : 
* * 


The proud man is distasteful even to his nearest 


relatives. re 
* % 
Pride leads to the destruction of man. 
at. * or 
- eT 


Haughtiness indicates poverty of mind. 
* 
* * 
The proud man suffers torments, the modest, 


experiences bliss. 
* 
Pride is a sign of ignorance. 
“ke * 


He who hardens his heart with pride, softens 


his brain with the same. 


* * 


The prayers of the proud are never heard. 


* 
* * 


Despise nobody, and you will not be despised. 





or 





69 


PUBLIC OPINION. 


The voice of the people is as the voice of God. 


% ‘ 
* * 


Despise not public opinion. 


* 
° * * 


Whosoever is loved by mankind, is also loved 
by the Supreme, but whosoever is not 
loved by mankind, is not loved by the 


Supreme. 


* 
* * 


Sacrifice thy will for others, that they may be 


disposed to sacrifice their will for thee. 


* 
* * 


He who fears the opinion of the world more 
than his own conscience, has but little 


self-respect. 




















70 


RECOMPENSE— REVENGE. 


Be not as servants who work for wages, but 
fulfill all your duties without an inter- 


ested motive. 


* 
* * 


Man receives measure for measure. 


* 
* * 


The physician who prescribes gratuitously, gives 
a worthless prescription. 


* 
* * 


As the pains, so the gains. 


* 
* * 


He who gratifies revenge, destroys his own 
house. 


* 
* * 


Misery and remorse are the children of revenge. 








71 


RELIGION. 


Religion is the light of the world. 


* 
* * 


Religion makes .the man. 


* 
* * 


He who devotes himself to the mere study 
of religion, without engaging in works 
of mercy and love, is like one who has no 
God. 


* 
x 


Without religion there can be no true morality. 











72 


REPENTANCE. 

! | —— 

To him who repeatedly sins, looking forward 
to penitence to cover his transgression, 
repentance will avail nothing. 

i * 

} * * 


Repentance and good deeds will ward off pun- 





ishment. ee 
| * % 


Hi The tears of true repentance are not shed in 
vain. fs 
* * 

Ef When a man has turned away from sin, reproach 


him no more. rs 
Yi * * 
Happy is he who repents betimes. 3 
| * 


; * * 
an Repent one day before thy death. 
i} ‘ 
' jj * * 
i | As the ocean never freezes, so the gates otf 
\ repentance never close. 


* 
i * * 


There is even some merit in a resolution to 





qt repent. 








73 


REPROOF. 


Love those who reprove thee, and hate those: 


who flatter thee; for reproof may lead thee 
to eternal life, flattery to destruction. 


* 
* * 


Grass dreads the scythe. 


* 
* * 


He who can not bear one word of reproof, will 
have to bear many. 


* 
* * 


The love that shrinks from reproving, is no 


love. 


* 
* * 


Correct not a man in company, for it will bring 
the blush of shame to -his cheek. 


* 
* * 


Every man is not competent to correct his 


neighbor. 




















74 


RESIGNATION. 


Blessed is he who bears his trials—every one 


has his share. 


* 
* * 


He who cheerfully submits to suffering, brings 


salvation to the world. 


* 
* * 


The world will be judged in righteousness 
and truth. 


* 
* * 


He who rebels against God’s decree will lose 
his soul’s salvation. 


* 
* * 


When misfortune befalls you examine your con- 
> 


duct, and acknowledge that God’s chastise- 


ment is just. 





Po. 





~~] 
Or 


RICHES. 


It is not the amount of trade that makes the 
man poor or rich, but honest working and 
dealing. 


* 
* * 


The rich man does not know but that at some 
time poverty will come to his children or 


his grandchildren. 


* 
* * 


The most worthy crown is a good reputation. 


* 
* * 


To be patient is to have much wealth. 





76 


RIGHTEOUSNESS. 


The righteous need no monument; their deeds 


are their monument. 


* 


When the righteous die, they may be considered 
living; for their example lives. 
* 
* * 
The righteous are even greater in death than 


in life. 


* 


The loss of a pious‘man is a loss to his whole 


generation. 
With the pious, God is strict even unto a 
hair’s breadth. 
* 
* * 
The righteous of all nations will enjoy eternal 


bliss. 


* 
* * 


The pious do everything from love, and even 


find consolation in their own afflictions. 





Q 








oT 
~I 


ROBBERY. 


The thief’s end is the gallows. 
* 


* * 
There is no difference between the robbery of a 
Jew, or the robbery of a Gentile; if any, to 
rob a Gentile is a greater sin than to rob 


a Jew. 8 
* * 


One should not buy of a woman suspected 


of selling without the knowledge of her 


husband. 2 
* * 


The sin of robbery can not be expiated by 


repentance, nor by the Day of Atonement. 


* 
* * 


Buy nothing from a thief. 
* = * 

It is wrong to receive a present from a thief. 
* = * 

If one finds a marked article he should adver- 

tise it publicly, so that the owner might 


recover it. 











SECRECY. 


Thy secret is thy slave. If thou let it loose, 
thou becomest its slave. 


* 


That which man conceals in his innermost 
chamber, is piain and manifest to the eye 
of God. 


* 


Pry not into things that are beyond thy ken. 


* 
* * 


Thy friend has a friend, and thy friend’s friend 
has a friend—be discreet, 


* 
%" & 


If thou tellest thy secret to three persons, ten 


know it. 


* 
* * 


When the wine is in, the secret is out. 





~S 


ioe 


(8) 


SITLENCE— Ser Spesrcu. 


= 
If silence is becoming to a wise man, how 


much more so to a fool. 


* 
* * 


To know when to be silent, is the strongest 


quality in man. 


* 
* * 


If a word spoken in its place is worth one 
piece of silver, silence in its place is worth 
two. 


* 
* * 


Silence is the fence round wisdom. 


* 
* * 


When two men quarrel, he who is first silent, 


is the greater gentleman. 











Habit strips sin of its enormity. 


A man commits a sin in secret, God brings it 
to light. 
Sinful thoughts are-even more dangerous than 


sin itself. 


Sin begets sin. 
* * 
Curse the sin, not the sinner. 


* 


“Satan,” and “Evil inclination,” are one and 


the same thing. 


* 


The wiser the man, the more careful should 


he be of his conduct. 


* 


Ill weeds grow apace ; neglect is their gardener. 








81 


SLAVEHOLDING. 


Saul obtained the kingdom because he con- 
sidered the honor of his slaves equal to 
his own. 


* 
* * 


Slaves should never be addressed as such, for 
the name itself is contemptible. 


* 
* * 


Tho’ your slave be a Canaanite, it is your duty 
as an Israelite to treat him humanely, and 


not break his spirit with hard work. 


* 
* * 


It is your duty to support the slave who was 
crippled while in your employ. 


* 
* * 


When your slave leaves you, give him as much 


as you are able. 














bo 


oO 


SPEECH—SLANDER. 


] A word is like milk, which being once drawn 
from its original source, can never be 


; 
returned. 
; * 
* * 


Rather allow thyself to be reviled, than to 


revile others. 


if 
: Open not thy mouth to speak evil. 
; 
' 
He who changes his word, saying one thing, 
and doing another, is even as one who 
serveth idols. 
%* 
| * * 
th | ; : 
i} To slander is to commit murder. 
is | ‘ : 
ail The scoffer, the liar, the hypocrite, and the 
i 
: slanderer, can have no share in the future 
| |i 
| life. 
} a 


Say little and do much. 











Sa 


If speech is worth one piece of silver, silence 


is worth two. 


* 
* * 


Teach thy tongue to say, “I do not know.” 


* * 


Man should always make use of pure language. 


* 
* * 


He who talks too much, will talk sinfully. 


* 
* * 


Be always sincere in your “Yea” and your 
J 


“ Nay.” 
* 
* * 
Speech is the messenger of the heart. 


* 
* * 


Suffer not thine ear to hearken to vain discourse. 


* 


Better no ear at all, than one that listeneth 
to evil. 
* 
* * 
It is even worse to deceive in matters of 


speech, than in money matters, 








84 


| TEMPTATION. 
i | pre 
i The study of the Holy Law is the only anti- 
i dote against temptation. 
DT | ieee 
‘| The hole in the wall invites the thief. 
* 
* * 

Let no man wilfully expose himself to tempta- 

| tion. ots 


Happy is he who resists temptation. 





TESTIMONY. 


He who can testify in favor of his neighbor 
| and does not, is a transgressor. 
it * 
a * * 
The witness should testify only to that which 


he has seen and heard himself. 


* 


f 
| 
t * * 


| He who testifies falsely, shall be disgraced. 





a 


85 


TOLERANCE. 


Support the aged without reference to religion; 


respect the learned without reference to age. 


* 
* * 


The virtuous of all nations participate in eternal 
bliss. 


* 
*- * 


The Lord who proclaimed the Law of Sinai is 


the God of all nations. 


* 
* * 


“ Before me,” said the Lord, “there is no dif- 
ference between Jew and Gentile; he that 
accomplishes good, will I reward accord- 


ingly.” 
* 
* * 


God scattered Israel in order that the Gentiles 


may know the purity of Jewish teachings. 





86 


TRUTH. 





Truth is the seal of God. 


* 
* * 


Truth will stand, but falsehood must fall. 


* 
* * 


Truth is its own witness. 


* 
* * 


Truth tells its own tale. 


* 
* * 


There is no occasion to light thy lamp at 
noontide. 


* 
* * 


Truth is heavy, therefore few care to carry it. 
~~) 


* 
* * 


Always acknowledge the truth. 











87 


> USEFULNESS. 


In all God’s creation, there is not a single 


object without a purpose. 


* 
* * 


Use thy best vase to-day, for to-morrow it may, 


perchance, be broken. 
) 


* 
* * 


A vessel used for holy purposes should not be 


put to uses less sacred. © 














88 


USURY. 


No Israelite is allowed to lend usuriously to a 


non-Israelite. 


* 
* %* 


The practice of usury is as wicked as the 
shedding of blood. 


* 
* * 


The possessions of him who lends usuriously, 
shall sooner or later decrease and vanish. 


* 
* * 


The testimony of a usurer is not valid before 


the court of Justice. 


7* 
* * 
The usurer will have no share in-an everlasting 
life. 


* 
* * 


The usurer will not prosper. 





ieee 


89 


WISDOM. 


Wisdom increaseth. with years; and so, often, 


does folly. 


* 
* * 


Without the fear of God, there is no wisdom. 


* 
* * 


Wisdom is a tree, and active virtue, its fruit. 


* 
* * 


Be not only wise in thy words, be wise in thy 


deeds. 


* 
* * 


Who is a wise man? He who learns from all 


men. 
* 
* * 


Let thy house be a place of meeting for the 
wise, and eagerly drink in their words. 


* 
* * 


It is a good sign if one’s body suffers in the 


attempt to gain wisdom. 



































90 


It is hard to find a man who loves his 
opponent; it is only the wise, who loves 


his own kind. 


* 
* * 


Whenever there are two learned men in one 


city, there should be peace between them. 


* 
* * 


Those who are truly wise, advance the peace 
of the world, for they banish hatred and 


jealousy from their hearts. 


* 
* * 


Controversies carried on for the purpose of 


expounding the Law, are blessed of God. 


* 
* * 


Emulation among learned men increases the 


_ Stores of knowledge. 





' 
f 





WORK. 


Rather flay a carcass in the street to earn 
an honest livelihood, than say, “I am a 
respectable man, and such employment 
is beneath my dignity.” 


* 
* * 


The tradesman at his work is the equal of the 
most learned doctor. 


* 
* * 


He who lives by the work of his hands, enjoys 
life. 
* 
* * 
The Eternal did not allow his glory to shine 
over the Israelites, until they became pro- 
ductive workers. 


* 
* * 


Work is more pleasant in the sight of the Lord 


than the merits of our fathers. 


























Great is the power of work, for it supports, as 
well as honors, him who practises it. 


* 
* * 


The man who has a handicraft may be com- 
pared to a vineyard surrounded by a fence. 


* 
* * 


The famine lasted seven years, but it passed 
by the door of the worker. 


* 
* * 


He who helps himself will be helped by God. 


* 
* * 


Great is labor—it honors the laborer. 


“4 % 
Se 


He who does not teach his son a trade, is as 
if he teaches him to thieve. 


* 
* * 


He who attempts too much, does little. 





93 





Say not, “I will do nothing,” because thou 
canst not do everything. 


* 
* * 


The day is short, but the labor is great. 
* 
* * 


Love thy work. 
* 
* * 
Bad servants ask permission after the thing 


is done. 
* 
* * 


Victuals prepared by many cooks, will be 


neither cold nor hot. 


* 
* * 


It is well to add a trade to your studies, if 


you would be free from sin. 


* 
* * 


a The sun will set without thy assistance. 


* 
* * 


Every man has his opportunity. 









































94 


WORKMAN. 


If you are a day laborer, fulfill your duty faith- 
fully, and thereby please your employer. 


* 
* * 


Do not interrupt your work in order to greet 
a passer-by. i 


* 
* * 


The laborer is allowed to shorten: his prayers. 


* 
* * 


You are forbidden to look longingly upon the 
grapes when you are working at the dates. 


* 
* * 


The laborer is forbidden to eat more of the 
fruit than is necessary to stay his hunger. 


* 
* * 


Do not hold back the wages of the laborer 


after his work is done.