Skip to main content

Full text of "[Course catalog]"

See other formats


Digitized  by  the  Internet  Archive 

in  2011  with  funding  from 

Boston  Library  Consortium  Member  Libraries 


http://www.archive.org/details/coursecatalog89902nort 


"^n 


] 
1 


University 
College 

Part-time 

Undergraduate 

Programs 

1989-1990 


f"f j   Northeastern 


University 


University  College  Bulletin 

Part-time  Programs 

1989-1990 


Part-time  day  and  evening 
undergraduate  programs  in: 

■  Business  Administration 

■  Criminal  Justice  and  Security 

■  Health  Professions  and  Sciences 

■  Liberal  Arts 


~j* 


#2/  Northeastern  University 


Contents 

Introduction 


2  1989-1990  Academic  Calendar 

4  About  University  College 

8  University  College  Offices 

10  Policies  and  Procedures 


Programs  of  Study 

24 

Overview 

31 

Certificate  Programs 

52 

Business  Administration  Degree  Programs 

84 

Criminal  Justice  and  Security  Degree 

Programs 

92 

Health  Professions  and  Sciences  Degree 

Programs 

123 

Liberal  Arts  Degree  Programs 

144 

Alternative  Freshmen- Year  Program 

149 

Course  Descriptions 

General  Information 

244 

Tuition  and  Fees 

246 

Financial  Aid 

248 

Scholarships 

251 

Facilities  and  Resources 

253 

About  Northeastern  University 

260 

Faculty 

287 

University  College  Administrative  Officers 

289 

University  Governing  Boards  and  Officers 

293 

Campus  Maps 

301 

Index 

About  University  College 


Calendar 


1989-1990 
Academic  Calendar 


Fall  Quarter  1989 
Classes  Begin: 

Monday,  September  25,  1989 

Winter  Quarter  1990 
Classes  Begin: 

Tuesday,  January  2,  1990 

Spring  Quarter  1990 
Classes  Begin: 

Monday,  April  2,  1990 

Summer  Quarter  1990 
Classes  Begin: 

Monday,  June  18,  1990 


Registration  Dates: 

F-Fall,  W-Winter,  Sp-Spring,  S-Summer 

Belmont 

F      -  Wednesday,  September  6  and  Tuesday, 

September  12,  5:30-8  p.m. 
W    -  Tuesday,  December  5,  5:30-8  p.m. 
Sp    -  Tuesday,  March  13,  5:30-8  p.m. 

Boston  Main  Campus 

F      -  Tuesday-Friday,  September  5-8, 

9:30  a.m.-7  p.m. 

Saturday,  September  9,  9  a.m.-12  noon 

Monday-Wednesday,  September  11-13, 

9:30  a.m.-7  p.m. 
W     -  Monday-Thursday,  December  4-7, 

9:30  a.m.-7  p.m. 
Sp    -  Monday-Thursday,  March  12-15, 

9:30  a.m.-7  p.m. 
S      -  First  term:  Monday-Thursday, 

June  4-7,  9:30  a.m.-7  p.m. 
S      -  Second  term:  Monday,  Tuesday, 

July  9-10,  9:30  a.m.-7  p.m. 

Downtown  Boston  Campus  (5  Liberty  Square) 

F      -  Thursday,  September  7,  11  a.m.-7  p.m. 

Monday-Tuesday,  September  11-12 

11  a.m.-7  p.m. 
W     -  Monday,  December  4,  11  a.m.-7  p.m. 
Sp     -  Monday,  March  12,  11  a.m.-7  p.m. 

Burlington  Suburban  Campus 

F      -  Wednesday-Thursday,  September  6-7, 

5:30-8  p.m. 

Friday,  September  8,  12  noon-3  p.m.  and 

5:30-8  p.m. 

Monday-Tuesday,  September  11-12, 

5:30-8  p.m. 
W     -  Monday- Wednesday,  December  4-6,  5:30-8 

p.m. 
Sp     -  Monday- Wednesday,  March  12-14, 

5:30-8  p.m. 
S      -  First  term,  Monday- Wednesday, 

June  4-6,  5:30-8  p.m. 
S      -  Second  term,  Monday,  July  9, 

5:30-8  p.m. 


Chelmsford  High  School 


F      -  Thursday,  September  7  and  Tuesday, 

September  12,  5:30-8  p.m. 
W     -  Tuesday,  December  5,  5:30-8  p.m. 
Sp     -  Tuesday,  March  13,  5:30-8  p.m. 


Calendar 


Dedham  Campus 


F      -  Thursday,  September  7  and  Monday, 

September  11,  5:30-8  p.m. 
W     -  Monday,  December  4,  5:30-8  p.m. 
Sp     -  Monday,  March  12,  5:30-8  p.m. 

Framingham  North  High  School 

F      -  Tuesday,  September  5  and  Monday, 

September  11,  5:30-8  p.m. 
W     -  Monday,  December  4,  5:30-8  p.m. 
Sp    -  Monday,  March  12,  5:30-8  p.m. 


Marlboro  High  School 


F      -  Wednesday,  September  6  and  Monday, 

September  11,  5:30-8  p.m. 
W    -  Monday,  December  4,  5:30-8  p.m. 
Sp    -  Monday,  March  12,  5:30-8  p.m. 


Marshfield  High  School 


F      -  Thursday,  September  7  and  Tuesday, 

September  12,  5:30-8  p.m. 
W    -  Tuesday,  December  5,  5:30-8  p.m. 
Sp    -  Tuesday,  March  13,  5:30-8  p.m. 


Milford  High  School 


F      -  Thursday,  September  7  and  Tuesday, 

September  12,  5:30-8  p.m. 
W    -  Tuesday,  December  5,  5:30-8  p.m. 
Sp    -  Tuesday,  March  13,  5:30-8  p.m. 

Peabody  Veterans  Memorial  High  School 

F      -  Wednesday,  September  6  and  Monday, 

September  11,  5:30-8  p.m. 
W    -  Monday,  December  4,  5:30-8  p.m. 
Sp    -  Monday,  March  12,  5:30-8  p.m. 


Stoneham  High  School 


F      -  Thursday  September  7  and  Tuesday 

September  12,  5:30-8  p.m. 
W    -  Tuesday,  December  5,  5:30-8  p.m. 
Sp    -  Tuesday,  March  13,  5:30-8  p.m. 


Westwood  High  School 


F      -  Thursday,  September  7  and  Tuesday, 

September  12,  5:30-8  p.m. 
W     -  Tuesday,  December  5,  5:30-8  p.m. 
Sp    -  Tuesday,  March  13,  5:30-8  p.m. 

Weymouth  North  High  School 

F      -  Wednesday,  September  6  and  Monday, 

September  11,  5:30-8  p.m. 
W     -  Monday,  December  4,  5:30-8  p.m. 
Sp     -  Monday,  March  12,  5:30-8  p.m. 


Holidays  and  Observances 

Fall  Quarter:  Classes  begin  September  25 

Columbus  Day  - 

Monday,  October  9 

Veterans'  Day  - 

Saturday,  November  11 

Thanksgiving  Recess  - 

Thursday-Saturday,  November  23-25 

Christmas  Vacation  - 

Monday,  December  18-Monday,  January  1 

Winter  Quarter: 

Classes  begin  January  2,  1990 

Martin  Luther  King  Jr.'s  Birthday  - 

Monday,  January  15 

Presidents'  Day  - 

Monday,  February  19 

Spring  Recess  or  make-up  period  for  lost 

snow  days-Monday,  March  26-Sunday,  April  1 

Spring  Quarter:  Classes  begin  April  2, 1990 

Patriots'  Day  - 

Monday,  April  16 

Memorial  Day  - 

Monday,  May  28 

Commencement  - 

Sunday,  June  17 

Summer  Quarter:  Classes  begin  June  18, 1990 

Independence  Day  - 
Wednesday,  July  4 
Labor  Day  - 
Monday,  September  3 

Final  Exam  Periods 

F      -  Monday-Sunday,  December  11-17 
W    -  Monday-Sunday,  March  19-25 
Sp    -  Monday-Sunday,  June  11-17 
S      -  Final  exam  for  summer  quarter 

held  during  last  class  session  of 

each  term. 

Calendar  changes  may  be  made.  The 
University  Community  will  be  notified 
if  such  changes  occur. 


About  UC 


About  University  College 


to  satisfy  changing  professional,  cultural,  and 
social  needs  and  interests  of  all  our  students. 


Profile  of  the  College 

John  W.  Jordan,  Dean 

Ralph  T.  Vernile,  Jr.,  Associate  Dean  for 

Administration 

Marilyn  S.  Wiener,  Associate  Dean  for 

Academic  Programs 

Where  would  you  like  to  be  one  year  from 
now,  five  years  from  now,  or  even  ten?  What 
possibilities  for  your  future  intrigue  you  the 
most,  and  where  might  they  take  you?  With 
your  plans  and  ideas  to  guide  you,  you  can  set 
your  sights  on  any  direction  at  University 
College.  Whether  you  already  have  a  definite 
plan  or  want  to  investigate  new  possibilities, 
our  programs  and  resources  are  designed  to 
help  you  get  to  where  you  want  to  be.  The 
College  attracts  a  talented  and  purposeful 
student  body  that  represents  a  spectrum  of 
educational,  career,  and  personal  interests. 
The  University  encourages  and  supports  your 
explorations,  and  at  the  same  time  the  diver- 
sity of  direction  pursued  by  part-time  day  and 
evening  students  enlivens  the  entire  North- 
eastern University  community. 

University  College  is  the  part-time 
undergraduate  division  of  Northeastern 
University,  which  has  long  been  a  leader  in 
educational  programs  for  adults.  We're  called 
University  College  because  we  tap  the 
energies  and  resources  of  the  entire  Universi- 
ty. Unlike  other  institutions  offering  similar 
programs,  Northeastern  opens  all  its  doors, 
giving  you  unequaled  access  to  the  academic 
facilities  you  need.  At  University  College,  we 
constantly  evaluate  and  update  our  programs 


Offering  What  You  Want:  Our  Programs 

Naturally,  Northeastern  University  offers  all 
the  traditional  academic  programs  you  expect 
from  a  large  university,  including  timely  and 
innovative  programs  in  business  administra- 
tion, criminal  justice  and  security,  health  pro- 
fessions and  sciences,  and  liberal  arts.  Among 
these  programs  are  five  bachelor's  degree  con- 
centrations in  business  that  carry  the  extra 
prestige  of  full  accreditation  by  the  American 
Assembly  of  Collegiate  Schools  of  Business. 

Many  students  come  to  Northeastern 
University  to  take  specific,  job-related  courses. 
To  serve  these  students,  we  have  developed 
more  than  thirty  certificate  programs.  In 
most  cases,  these  programs  incorporate  or 
build  on  the  major  concentration  courses  re- 
quired in  each  of  our  professionally  focused 
undergraduate  degree  programs. 

Northeastern  also  offers  practical,  part-time 
associate  degree  programs  for  students  who 
are  seeking  a  first-rate,  first-level  college 
degree,  as  well  as  bachelor's  degrees  in  all 
four  areas:  Business  Administration,  Criminal 
Justice  and  Security,  Health  Professions  and 
Sciences,  and  Liberal  Arts. 


Getting  the  Attention  You  Need: 
Class  Size 

Everyone  knows  Northeastern  is  big.  What 
many  people  don't  realize  is  that  because  we 
operate  at  fifteen  different  locations,  our 
classes  tend  to  be  small.  And  many  of  our 
specialized  degree  and  certificate  programs 
enroll  only  small  numbers  of  students  because 
of  their  unique  focus.  Last  year,  our  average 
class  size  was  fifteen  students.  Many  classes 
ran  with  fewer  students,  and  only  10  percent 
of  all  classes  offered  ran  with  enrollments 
larger  than  twenty-seven. 


About  UC 


Making  Our  Programs  Work  For  You:   We're  Here  to  Help:  Counseling 
Convenience  Services 


We  know  you're  busy,  and  finding  the  time  to 
continue  your  education  can  be  a  real 
challenge.  To  help  you  out,  Northeastern  not 
only  schedules  classes  at  fifteen  different  loca- 
tions in  eastern  Massachusetts,  but  also  pro- 
vides different  course  formats.  Recently  the 
University  added  six-  and  eight-week  courses 
to  the  regular  schedule  of  twelve-week  courses 
to  make  things  that  much  more  convenient. 


Offering  Knowledge  and  Experience: 
The  Faculty 

A  course  is  only  as  good  as  its  teacher.  That's  why 
University  College  carefully  selects  both  full- 
time  Northeastern  University  faculty  and 
practicing  professionals  for  its  teaching  staff 
of  1,650.  Corporate  executive  officers,  publish- 
ed authors,  established  health  professionals, 
artists,  graphic  designers,  computer  experts, 
lawyers,  professors,  and  others  offer  students 
the  benefit  of  their  experience  and  current  in- 
formation about  how  careers  in  their  fields 
are  changing.  Many  have  found  teaching 
adults  particularly  rewarding  and  have  ex- 
pressed their  pleasure  at  having  such  commit- 
ted, hard-working,  and  enthusiastic  students. 


Meeting  Your  Colleagues:  The 
Students 

Approximately  15,000  adults  come  to  Univer- 
sity College  every  year  to  pursue  a  degree, 
update  their  careers  with  a  certificate,  or  take 
a  course  in  a  subject  that  has  long  interested 
them.  These  adult  students  range  in  age  from 
18  to  80  and  come  from  all  walks  of  life: 
women  re-entering  the  work  force,  young  men 
and  women  seeking  to  start  new  careers, 
older  people  polishing  their  skills,  people  of 
every  age  intent  on  finishing  an  education 
that  time  or  circumstances  interrupted.  All 
have  one  thing  in  common— they  are  making 
a  change  in  their  lives  through  their  own  ac- 
tions, expanding  their  world  by  investing  in 
themselves.  This  diversity  is  a  source  of 
stimulation  and  enrichment  for  all— students, 
faculty,  and  administration  alike. 


University  College  offers  a  range  of  career 
and  academic  counseling  services  to  assist  you 
in  making  both  educational  and  career  deci- 
sions. The  College  provides  academic  advisers 
and  career  counselors,  offers  credit  and  non- 
credit  career-planning  workshops  and  special 
programs,  and  serves  as  a  link  to  other  stu- 
dent support  services  offered  by  Northeastern 
University. 

Open  House  and  Registration  Week 
Orientation  Programs 

Individuals  who  are  thinking  about  enrolling 
in  University  College  for  the  first  time  are 
encouraged  to  attend  an  Open  House.  Open 
Houses  introduce  potential  students  to  the 
many  University  College  programs  and  ser- 
vices designed  to  meet  the  educational,  job- 
related,  and  personal  needs  of  adult,  part-time 
students.  They  also  orient  new  students  to  the 
University  as  a  whole  and  address  concerns 
that  many  students  have  about 

•  transfer  credit, 

•  international  student  applications, 

•  admission  to  degree  programs,  and 

•  certificate  programs. 

Students  currently  enrolled  in  University  Col- 
lege are  also  invited  to  attend  an  Open  House. 

Open  houses  are  ordinarily  scheduled  each 
quarter  at  selected  campus  sites  at  or  about 
the  same  time  that  registration  takes  place. 
Students  wishing  to  attend  should  reserve  a 
place  by  calling  the  Office  of  Academic  and 
Student  Affairs,  617-437-2400  (voice), 
617-437-2825  (TTY).  Details  appear  in  the 
Schedule  Guide  for  each  term. 

Academic  Advising 

Academic  advisers  are  available  by  appointment 
to  talk  with  University  College  students 
about  courses,  transfer  credit,  degree  require- 
ments, career  counseling  referrals,  and  other 
matters  of  individual  concern. 

To  arrange  an  appointment  at  a  specific 
campus,  please  call  the  appropriate  number, 
as  listed  below. 

•  Main  Boston  Campus:  Advisers  are 
available  weekdays  from  8:30  a.m.  to  7  p.m. 
Call  617-437-2400  (voice),  or  617-437-2825 
(TTY,  for  the  hearing  impaired  only). 


About  UC 


•  Burlington  Suburban  Campus:  Call 
617-272-5500. 

•  Downtown  Boston  Campus  (5  Liberty 
Square):  Call  617-367-6373. 

•  All  other  branch  locations:  Advisers  are 
available  from  5:30  to  7  p.m.  on  the  even- 
ings when  classes  are  in  session.  Call 
617-437-5544  for  an  appointment. 
During  registration,  the  advising  staff  in 

Boston  is  available  to  meet  with  students  on 
a  walk-in  basis  from  9  a.m.  to  7  p.m.  Students 
may  also  call  in  with  questions  during  these 
times.  In  addition,  registration  advisers  are 
available  at  all  campuses  during  registration 
hours  to  assist  students  with  course  selection 
and  to  explain  registration  procedures. 

The  Health  Professions  Advisory  Committee 
provides  counseling  for  students  interested  in 
taking  courses  to  meet  medical  or  dental 
school  entrance  requirements.  For  medical 
school  entrance  requirements  and  procedures, 
contact  Professor  Thomas  McEneaney 
617-437-2430.  For  information  on  the  schedul- 
ing of  science  courses  that  meet  these  require- 
ments, call  617-437-2818. 

Tutorial  Services 

University  College  offers  tutorial  assistance 
in  several  subjects.  Tutoring,  which  is  on  a 
one-to-one  basis,  provides  an  opportunity  for 
student  and  tutor  to  focus  on  specific  prob- 
lems that  might  not  have  been  covered  dur- 
ing class  time.  You  may  request  tutorial  in- 
formation from  the  Office  of  Academic  and 
Student  Affairs,  617-437-2400.  A  flyer  describ- 
ing tutorial  services  is  also  available  at  all 
campus  locations. 

Self-Assessment  and  Career  Development 

Often  one  of  the  strongest  motivations  for 
continuing  education  is  the  desire  for  career 
advancement  or  change.  In  order  to  help  stu- 
dents develop  career  and  educational  planning 
skills,  University  College  offers  a  three-quarter- 
hour  course  in  career  development  (INT  4110). 
For  more  information,  see  the  course  descrip- 
tion on  page  198  of  this  Bulletin. 

Job-Search  Seminars 

Each  quarter  the  Department  of  Career 
Development  and  Placement  offers  a  series  of 
two-  and  three-hour  evening  job-search 
seminars.  The  seminars  are  specifically 
designed  for  students  seeking  a  job  change 
and  who  have  identified  the  field  or  career 
area  in  which  they  would  like  to  work. 


The  seminars,  offered  at  several  campus 
locations,  are  intended  to  help  students  assess 
their  skills,  develop  effective  job-search 
strategies,  write  resumes,  and  prepare  for  job 
interviews.  Seminar  schedules  are  announced 
in  the  student  newsletter,  Perspectives,  and  in 
classes  prior  to  the  start  of  each  series. 
Students  who  wish  to  participate  in  the  job- 
search  seminars  must  reserve  a  place  by  call- 
ing the  Department  of  Career  Development 
and  Placement  at  617-437-2428. 

Career  Development  and  Placement  Services 

The  Department  of  Career  Development  and 
Placement  has  designed  services  to  support 
your  professional  development.  The  depart- 
ment can  help  you  to  identify  career  paths, 
establish  a  network  of  professional  contacts, 
and  assist  you  with  placement.  Free  services 
for  University  College  students  include: 

•  individual  career  counseling 

•  job  placement  advising 

•  resume  referral  to  employers 

•  job  bank  of  current  employment 
opportunities 

•  company  files  and  employer  contacts 

•  panel  presentations  on  careers  of  interest 

•  job-search  seminars 

•  annual  Career  Expo  (held  during  evening 
hours) 

•  on-campus  corporate  recruiting  for  seniors 

•  credential  service  for  individuals  applying 
to  graduate  school 

Students  may  ask  to  have  copies  of  current 
job  notices  sent  to  them  by  mail.  There  is  a 
$15  charge  per  quarter  for  this  service. 

Counselors  are  available  at  the  Boston, 
Burlington,  and  Dedham  campuses.  To  make 
an  appointment  or  to  receive  additional  infor- 
mation on  any  of  the  department's  services, 
call  617-437-2428  or  visit  the  Career  Develop- 
ment and  Placement  Office  on  the  Boston 
campus  in  124  Ruggles  Building.  Call  for 
office  hours. 

Counseling  and  Testing  Services 

Enrolled  and  prospective  students  can  receive 
confidential  counseling  or  testing  to  address 
personal,  educational,  or  career  concerns. 
Assistance  is  available  to  all  students  during 
days  and  certain  weekday  evenings  until  8:30 
p.m.  at  the  Counseling  and  Testing  Center. 
For  information  and  appointments,  call 
617-437-2142  or  drop  in  at  302  Ell  Building. 


About  UC 


Personal  Counseling 

People  come  to  the  center  for  help  with  a 
variety  of  personal  concerns.  Anxiety  and 
depression,  adjustment  reactions  to  college 
life,  personal  or  family  relationship  concerns, 
drug  and  alcohol  abuse,  and  sexual  adjust- 
ment questions  are  among  the  issues  that 
University  College  students  may  want  to 
discuss  with  a  professional  therapist.  The 
center  is  committed  to  short-term  therapy, 
with  a  maximum  of  twelve  consecutive 
counseling  sessions.  If  the  center  cannot  meet 
your  needs,  appropriate  referrals  are  provided. 

Academic  and  Life  Skills  Development  Workshops 

Academic  and  life  skills  development 
workshops  are  offered  each  term,  generally 
during  the  day.  The  Study  Skills  Develop- 
ment Workshop,  among  the  most  popular  of 
these,  helps  students  become  more  effective  in 
organizing  their  time,  taking  notes,  preparing 
for  exams,  and  other  areas  of  academic  perfor- 
mance. Other  workshops  include  Stress 
Management,  Assertiveness  Training,  Over- 
coming Procrastination,  Surviving  Parental 
Alcoholism,  Food  Challenges  and  Choices, 
and  Surviving  Family  Break-up. 

Educational-Vocational  Counseling 

With  so  many  fields  to  choose  from,  students 
sometimes  have  difficulty  selecting  a  major  or 
a  career.  You  may  want  help  in  defining  your 
interests,  abilities,  and  values.  At  the  center, 
educational-vocational  counseling  usually  in- 
volves an  evaluation  of  the  student's  in- 
terests, aptitudes,  abilities,  values,  and  per- 
sonality characteristics.  Many  kinds  of  tests, 
available  at  the  center,  may  be  used  in  this 
process.  Counseling  is  done  on  an  individual 
basis,  although  small  groups  may  be  organiz- 
ed when  this  approach  seems  useful. 

Career  Information 

The  center  maintains  a  small  reference  library 
of  vocational  resources.  In  addition,  a  com- 
puter is  available  to  help  students  in  obtain- 
ing career  information,  as  well  as  to  help 
clarify  values,  skills,  and  interests. 


Testing  Materials 

Information  and  application  packets  for  such 
standardized  tests  as  the  GRE,  LSAT,  GMAT, 
MAT,  and  CLEP  exams,  are  available  at  the 
center.  CLEP  exams  are  given  at  the  center 
ten  times  each  year,  and  the  center  is  also  a 
national  testing  site  for  the  LSAT,  GMAT, 
MAT,  and  other  exams. 


About  UC 


University  College  Offices 


Chelmsford 

% 

• 

i-w    S 

Peabody        _^» — 'v 
Stoneham         •  «f- — 

Burlington  • 

Marlboro            Belmont 

•    jfcgV,  Liberty  Square 

Framingham 

Boston 

•     Dedham • 

^k 

Westwood  • 

*-^^X- 

Weymouth        J 

\ 

Milford 

•  Marshtield 

General  Information 

617-437-2400 
617-437-2825  (TTY) 

Office  of  the  Registrar 

120  Hayden  Hall 

617-437-2300 

Monday -Thursday , 

8:30  a.m.-7:30  p.m. 

Friday, 

8:30  a.m.-4:30  p.m. 

Belmont  High  School 

221  Concord  Avenue 
617-484-4418 
Tuesday  and  Thursday, 
5:30-10  p.m. 

Boston  Main  Campus 

180  Ruggles  Building 

360  Huntington  Avenue 

617-437-2400 

TTY:  617-437-2825 

(for  the  hearing-impaired  only) 

Monday-Friday, 

8:30  a.m.-8:30  p.m. 

Saturday, 

8:30  a.m.-l  p.m. 

Downtown  Boston  Campus 

5  Liberty  Square 
617-367-6373 
Monday-Thursday,  * 

7  a.m-10  p.m. 
Friday, 

8:30  a.m.-4:30  p.m. 

Burlington  Suburban  Campus 

South  Bedford  Road 

617-272-5500 

Monday-Friday, 

8  a.m-10  p.m. 
Saturday, 

8  a.m.-12  noon 

Burlington  High  School 

123  Cambridge  Street 
617-273-1870 
Monday-Thursday, 
5:30-10  p.m. 

Chelmsford  High  School 

200  Richardson  Road 
508-251-8792 
Tuesday  and  Thursday, 
5:30-10  p.m. 


About  UC 


Dedham  Campus 

Common  Street 

617-329-8000 

Monday-Thursday, 

8  a.m.-lO  p.m. 

Friday, 

8:30  a.m.-4:30  p.m. 

Saturday, 

8  a.m.-l:00  p.m. 

Framingham  North  High  School 

A  Street 
508-877-2333 
Monday-Thursday, 
5:30-10  p.m. 

Marlboro  High  School 

Bolton  Street 
5084854122 
Monday  and  Wednesday, 
5:30-10  p.m. 

Marshfield  High  School 

Forest  Street 
617-837-1835 
Tuesday  and  Thursday, 
5:30-10  p.m. 

Milford  High  School 

31  West  Fountain  Street 
508473-2565 
Tuesday  and  Thursday, 
5:30-10  p.m. 

Peabody  Veterans  Memorial  High  School 

485  Lowell  Street 
508-535-1226 
Monday  and  Wednesday, 
5:30-10  p.m. 

Stoneham  High  School 

149  Franklin  Street 
Tuesday  and  Thursday, 
5:30-10  p.m. 

Westwood  High  School 

200  Nahatan  Street 
617-329-3030 
Monday-Thursday, 
5:30-10  p.m. 

Weymouth  North  High  School 

1051  Commercial  Street 
617-335-9112 
Monday-Thursday, 
5:30-10  p.m. 


Summer  Office  Hours 
Office  of  the  Registrar 

120  Hayden  Hall 
Monday-Thursday, 
8:30  a.m.-7:30  p.m. 

Boston  Main  Campus 

180  Ruggles  Building 
Monday-Thursday, 
8  a.m.-8:30  p.m. 

Downtown  Boston  Campus 

5  Liberty  Square 
Monday-Thursday, 
7:30  a.m.-lO  p.m.* 

Burlington  Suburban  Campus 

Monday-Thursday, 
8  a.m.-lO  p.m. 

Dedham  Campus 

Monday-Thursday, 

8:30  a.m.-10  p.m. 

Friday, 

8  a.m.-4:30  p.m. 

Framingham  North  High  School 

Monday  and  Wednesday, 
5:30-10  p.m. 

Weymouth  North  High  School 

Tuesday  and  Thursday, 
5:30-10  p.m. 

*Office  hours  may  vary  due  to  changes  in  class  schedules. 


Policies  and  Procedures 


Policies  and  Procedures 


Open  Enrollment 

University  College  has  an  open  enrollment 
policy  that  enables  students  to  take  most 
courses  simply  by  registering  for  the  course. 
Applications  for  admission,  entrance  examina- 
tions, and  College  Board  Examination  scores 
are  not  required.  The  open  enrollment  policy 
applies  to  both  degree  and  nondegree  students 
at  University  College.  Credits  earned  for  in- 
dividual courses  taken  at  University  College 
may  be  applied  to  a  degree  program. 

Students  who  are  enrolled  at  University 
College  and  who  decide  to  pursue  a  degree 
program  must  apply  for  admission  to  the  pro- 
gram. See  page  14  for  more  information  on 
the  admissions  process.  Special  requirements 
apply  to  students  entering  the  Bachelor  of 
Science  in  Business  Administration  degree 
program.  For  information  on  the  admissions 
process  for  this  program,  please  see  pages 
56-58.  Students  must  be  admitted  to  a  degree 
program  in  order  to  be  eligible  for  most  finan- 
cial aid.  See  page  246  for  more  information  on 
obtaining  financial  aid.  All  international 
students  must  be  admitted  to  a  degree  pro- 
gram in  order  to  apply  for  an  1-20  form.  See 
page  12  for  more  information  on  international 
students. 

Both  degree  and  nondegree  students  are  en- 
titled to  make  use  of  the  student  support  ser- 
vices offered  by  University  College. 

Registration 

Students  may  register  for  courses  by  repor- 
ting to  any  University  College  campus  during 
the  registration  periods  that  are  scheduled 
each  quarter.  It  is  not  necessary  to  register  at 
the  campus  where  a  particular  course  actually 
meets;  students  may  register  at  any  campus 
for  a  course  scheduled  at  any  other  campus. 
Attendance  at  class,  even  with  the  instruc- 
tor's permission,  does  not  constitute  registra- 
tion unless  the  student  has  filled  out  a 
registration  form.  Academic  credit  will  not 


be  awarded  to  students  who  are  not  properly 
registered.  See  the  Academic  Calendar  on 
pages  2-3  for  a  complete  registration 
schedule. 

Courses  listed  in  this  Bulletin  are  not 
necessarily  offered  each  quarter.  Students 
may  not  be  able  to  take  all  of  the  courses  re- 
quired for  a  particular  program  at  any  one 
campus  location.  Each  fall,  winter,  spring, 
and  summer  quarter  the  list  of  courses  being 
offered  is  printed  in  a  University  College 
Schedule  Guide.  Schedule  Guides  are 
distributed  at  all  campus  locations.  To  request 
a  schedule  by  mail,  call  617-437-2400. 

Course  Selection 

Academic  advisers  (see  page  5)  are  available 
by  appointment  at  all  campuses,  to  help 
students  plan  their  academic  programs  and 
select  courses. 

Students  who  have  earned  credits  from 
other  schools  are  urged  to  have  their 
transcripts  evaluated  prior  to  the  registration 
period  to  avoid  duplicating  course  work  com- 
pleted elsewhere.  Students  should  allow  at 
least  three  weeks  from  the  time  all  transcripts 
have  been  received  for  processing  transfer 
credit  petitions.  During  the  official  registra- 
tion periods  at  all  campuses,  advisers  are 
available  without  an  appointment  to  answer 
general  questions  and  to  help  students  make 
initial  course  selections.  Because  the  process 
of  evaluating  transfer  credit  is  complex, 
students  should  not  expect  advisers  to 
evaluate  their  petitions  during  advising 
appointments. 

Academic  Integrity 

The  Code  of  Student  Conduct  states  that  "any 
attempt  of  a  student  to  present  as  his  or  her 
own  work  that  which  is  not  his  or  her  own  or 
aiding  and  abetting  another  student  in  such 
an  attempt"  results  in  a  charge  of  miscon- 
duct, which  is  cause  for  disciplinary  action. 
Students  must  accept  the  responsibility  to 
be  honest  and  to  respect  ethical  standards  in 
meeting  their  academic  assignments  and  re- 
quirements. Integrity  in  academic  life  re- 
quires that  students  demonstrate  intellectual 
and  academic  achievement  independent  of  all 
assistance  except  that  authorized  by  the  in- 
structor. Consequently,  all  work  submitted  to 
meet  course  requirements,  whether  it  take 
the  form  of  papers,  examinations,  laboratory 
reports,  computer  projects,  quizzes,  or  any 


Policies  and  Procedures         11 


other  work  assigned,  is  expected  to  be  the 
student's  own  work. 

In  the  preparation  of  all  papers  and  other 
written  work  submitted  to  meet  course  re- 
quirements, students  should  be  careful  to 
distinguish  between  ideas  which  are  their 
own  and  those  which  have  been  derived  from 
other  sources.  Proper  forms  of  citation  must 
be  used,  and  sources  must  be  indicated. 
Students  who  have  questions  about  these  pro- 
cedures should  see  their  instructors  before 
beginning  their  projects.  Presenting  another's 
work  as  one's  own  or  improper  attribution  of 
sources,  is  plagiarism. 

Computer  programs  written  to  meet  course 
requirements,  like  papers,  are  to  be  the 
original  work  of  the  student  submitting  them. 
Copying  a  program  from  another  student  or 
from  any  other  source  is  a  form  of  academic 
dishonesty. 

Collaboration  in  the  completion  of  written 
assignments  is  also  a  form  of  academic 
dishonesty,  unless  explicitly  permitted  by  the 
instructor.  Students  must  acknowledge  any 
collaboration/editing  and  its  extent  in  all  sub- 
mitted work. 

Students  may  not  submit  the  same  paper  in 
two  or  more  courses  without  the  prior  written 
permission  of  the  instructors  involved. 

Students  who  fail  to  meet  the  responsibility 
of  academic  integrity  as  defined  here  are  sub- 
ject to  disciplinary  sanctions  ranging  from  a 
reduction  in  grade  or  failure  in  the  assignment 
or  course  to  dismissal  from  the  University. 
Complete  disciplinary  procedures  are  outlined 
in  the  University  College  Student  Handbook. 

Academic  Monitoring 

All  students  are  monitored  once  each 
academic  year,  after  the  end  of  spring  term. 
Nondegree  students,  undeclared  majors,  and 
unadmitted  students  whose  quality-point 
averages  fall  below  2.0  are  contacted  by  the 
Office  of  Academic  and  Student  Affairs  and 
are  offered  all  possible  assistance.  These 
students  may  also  be  subject  to  academic 
review,  probation,  and  dismissal  from  Univer- 
sity College  when  such  action  is  warranted. 
Students  who  feel  they  would  benefit  from 
academic  assistance  are  encouraged  to  work 
closely  with  an  academic  adviser.  Students 
may  make  appointments  by  calling 
617-437-2400  or  TTY:  617-437-2825  (for  the 
hearing-impaired  only). 


Academic  Standing  Committee 

The  University  College  Academic  Standing 
Committee  convenes  at  least  once  each 
month,  more  often  if  necessary,  to  consider 
student  petitions  and  requests  for  exceptions 
to  the  academic  policies  and  procedures  con- 
tained in  this  Bulletin.  The  Committee  has 
the  power  to  dismiss  students  who  do  not 
meet  the  academic  standards  of  University 
College.  The  Committee  also  serves  as  a  hear- 
ing board  for  academic  grievances,  as  outlined 
in  the  University  College  Student  Handbook. 

Attendance 

University  College  expects  students  to  meet 
attendance  requirements  in  all  courses  to 
qualify  for  credit.  Attendance  requirements 
vary,  and  it  is  the  student's  responsibility  to 
ascertain  what  each  instructor  requires. 
Absence  from  regularly  scheduled  classes  may 
seriously  affect  the  student's  academic  standing. 

If  a  student  is  consistently  absent  without 
having  made  arrangements  with  the  instruc- 
tor, the  instructor  may  take  this  to  mean  that 
the  student  has  withdrawn  and  may  issue  a 
final  grade  of  "W".  Permission  to  make  up 
work  missed  because  of  absence  may  be 
granted  by  the  instructor  on  presentation  of  a 
reasonable  excuse. 

Auditing  Policy 

Students  are  permitted  to  audit  courses  upon 
submitting  the  usual  registration  forms  and 
on  paying  the  regular  tuition  fees.  There  is  no 
reduction  in  fees  for  auditing.  An  auditor  may 
participate  in  class  discussion,  complete 
papers  and  projects,  and  take  tests  and  ex- 
aminations for  informal  evaluation.  However, 
regardless  of  the  amount  or  quality  of  work 
completed,  academic  credit  will  not  be 
granted  at  any  time  for  an  audited  course. 

The  student's  decision  to  audit  a  course 
must  be  communicated  in  writing  to  the 
Registrar's  Office  prior  to  the  fourth  class 
meeting.  Exceptions  to  this  procedure  cannot 
be  approved  without  authorization  by  the 
University  College  Academic  Standing 
Committee. 

Change  of  Address  or  Name 

Change  of  address  and/or  name  should  be 
reported  in  writing  both  to  the  Registrar's  Of- 
fice, 120  Hayden  Hall,  Northeastern  University, 
360  Huntington  Avenue,  Boston,  MA  02115, 
and  to  the  Office  of  Academic  and  Student 
Affairs,  180  Ruggles  Building. 


Policies  and  Procedures 


Class  Changes 

University  College  reserves  the  right  to 
cancel,  divide,  or  combine  classes  when 
necessary.  Although  this  policy  ensures  that 
students  will  almost  never  be  excluded  from  a 
class  because  it  is  oversubscribed,  it  also 
means  that  a  course  may  occasionally  be 
canceled  because  of  inadequate  enrollment. 
Cancellations  are  more  likely  to  occur  among 
upper-level  or  advanced  courses  than  among 
introductory  courses.  While  students  may 
register  as  late  as  the  first  week  of  class, 
cancellation  decisions  are  based  on  pre- 
registration  figures.  Students  are  therefore 
encouraged  to  register  in  advance  to 
increase  the  likelihood  that  the  courses 
they  want  will  run.  Seniors  who  are 
adversely  affected  by  course  cancellations 
should  contact  an  academic  adviser  or  their 
program  office  for  help  in  identifying 
alternatives. 

Credit  Hours:  Quarter-Hour  Credit 

Credit  hours  are  assigned  to  a  course  based 
on  the  established  educational  standard  of 
one  credit  hour  for  every  three  hours  of  stu- 
dent learning  time  per  week  over  a  term. 
Thus  one  hour  of  lecture  or  discussion  plus 
two  hours  of  individual  study  outside  of  class 
equals  one  credit. 

Northeastern  University  operates  on  a 
quarter-hour  credit  system.  A  quarter-hour 
credit  is  the  equivalent  of  three  quarters  of  a 
semester  hour.  Most  University  College 
courses  are  assigned  three  quarter  hours 
(abbreviated  "q.h.")  of  credit  and  meet  for  two 
hours  and  ten  minutes  each  week. 

Students  who  would  like  to  take  courses  at 
Northeastern  and  then  transfer  these  credits 
to  another  school  are  urged  to  receive  permis- 
sion from  an  adviser  at  the  other  school  prior 
to  registering. 

Disciplinary  Action 

The  University  College  Board  of  Inquiry  has 
the  authority  to  warn,  censure,  suspend, 
expel,  or  remove  from  the  list  of  degree  can- 
didates any  student  who,  because  of  disrup- 
tive or  illegal  conduct  or  poor  character,  is 
considered  an  unsuitable  member  of  the 
College  community.  The  Board  of  Inquiry  is 
convened  to  hear  a  case  when  a  member  of 
the  University  College  community  charges  a 
student  with  a  violation  of  the  Code  of  Stu- 
dent Conduct.  Complete  procedures  are  con- 
tained in  the  University  College  Student 


Handbook,  which  can  be  obtained  at  all  cam- 
pus locations  or  by  calling  617-437-2400 
(voice)  or  617-437-2825  (TTY). 

Examinations 

Tests  are  scheduled  throughout  each  quarter 
at  the  option  of  the  instructor  and  are  regard- 
ed as  part  of  the  term's  course  work.  A  final 
examination  is  held  at  the  end  of  each 
quarter  in  each  course  unless  an  announce- 
ment is  made  to  the  contrary.  The  procedure 
for  making  up  final  examinations  missed  due 
to  student  absence  may  be  found  on  page  20. 

Homework 

The  specific  work  required  for  each  course  in 
University  College  is  determined  by  the  in- 
structor. In  general,  University  College 
students  are  expected  to  spend  an  average  of 
six  to  eight  hours  per  week  outside  of  class  on 
assignments  for  each  course.  Students  who 
are  absent  are  responsible  for  obtaining  then- 
homework  assignments  from  their  instructors 
or  from  other  students.  Homework  assign- 
ments are  not  available  from  the  Office  of 
Academic  and  Student  Affairs. 

International  Students 

Northeastern  University  is  authorized  under 
Federal  law  to  enroll  non-immigrant  alien 
students.  International  Student  Applications 
must  be  filed  by  all  non-immigrant  students. 
Because  the  process  of  applying  to  University 
College  is  complex,  deadlines  for  completed 
applications  are  well  in  advance  of  the  start 
of  each  term: 


Deadline 


for       Term  Starting 


July  14,  1989  September  1989  (Fall) 

October  13,  1989  January  1990  (Winter) 

January  12,  1990  April  1990  (Spring) 

April  13,  1990  June  1990  (Summer) 

Students  who  miss  the  deadline  for  a  given 
term  will  need  to  defer  attendance  to  the 
following  term.  Proficiency  in  English  is  a 
prerequisite  to  admission.  Also,  there  is  an 
application  fee  of  $75.00. 

Questions  may  be  directed  to  the  Office  of 
Academic  and  Student  Affairs,  180  Ruggles 
Building,  617-437-2400  or  to  the  International 
Student  Office,  270  Holmes  Hall,  617-437-2310. 

International  students  who  are  resident  aliens 
in  the  U.S.  must  file  an  International  Credentials 
Evaluation  Form  for  admissions  and/or  transfer 
credit  and  must  provide  proof  of  their  resident 


Policies  and  Procedures 


alien  status  (green  card).  There  is  an  evalua- 
tion fee  of  $45.00.  Questions  may  be  directed 
to  the  Office  of  Academic  and  Student  Affairs. 
(See  page  18  Evaluation  of  International 
Educational  Credentials  for  further  details.) 

Maximum  Course  Load  Policy 

It  is  recommended  that  new  students  and/or 
students  who  are  working  full-time  not  take 
more  than  12  quarter  hours  of  credit  per 
term.  However,  students  may  take  up  to  18 
q.h.  per  term  without  special  permission.  Any 
student  wishing  to  take  more  than  18  q.h.  in 
a  given  term  must  file  a  course  overload  peti- 
tion with  the  Office  of  Academic  and  Student 
Affairs  at  least  one  week  prior  to  the  start  of 
the  term.  In  no  case  may  a  student  with  a 
quality  point  average  under  2.0  take  more 
than  12  q.h.  per  term. 

Petition  for  Course  Overload  forms  are 
available  from  the  Office  of  Academic  and 
Student  Affairs,  180  Ruggles  Building, 
617-437-2400. 

Pass/Fail  Courses 

Students  may  register  for  one  elective  course 
per  quarter  on  a  pass/fail  basis  and  may  not 
take  more  than  five  pass/fail  courses  total  at 
University  College.  To  be  eligible  for  pass/fail 
status,  the  student  must  be  in  good  academic 
standing  (have  at  least  a  2.0  quality-point 
average)  and  must  also  meet  all  prerequisites 
for  the  course. 

To  be  graded  on  a  pass/fail  basis,  the  student 
must  file  a  Pass/Fail  Petition  and  have  it  signed 
by  an  academic  adviser.  Pass/Fail  Petitions 
are  available  from  the  Office  of  Academic  and 
Student  Affairs,  180  Ruggles  Building, 
617-437-2400.  Requests  to  take  a  course  on  a 
pass/fail  basis  must  be  made  prior  to  the 
fourth  class  meeting.  Exceptions  to  this  pro- 
cedure cannot  be  approved  without  authoriza- 
tion from  the  University  College  Academic 
Standing  Committee.  Please  see  also  the  sec- 
tion on  Pass/Fail  Grades,  page  20. 

Placement  Tests 

Placement  tests  are  given  to  students  enrolled 
in  Critical  Writing  1  (ENG  4110),  Business 
Writing  and  Reports  1  (ENG  4380),  and 
Technical  Writing  1  (TCC  4101)  during  the 
first  class  session.  Some  students  may  be  re- 
quested to  register  for  Elements  of  Writing 
(ENG  4011),  a  three-quarter-hour  course  offer- 
ing additional  help  in  writing,  or  English  for 
International  Students  (ENG  4005,  ENG  4006, 


or  ENG  4007). 

Students  registering  for  Mathematics  1 
(MTH  4110)  must  take  a  placement  test  on 
the  first  night  of  class.  The  results  will  deter- 
mine whether  the  student  should  take  Basic 
Mathematics  1  and  2  (MTH  4001  and  MTH 
4002)  prior  to  taking  Mathematics  1.  Students 
registering  for  College  Algebra  1  (MTH  4107) 
must  also  take  a  placement  test  at  the  first 
class  meeting.  Some  students  may  be  asked  to 
register  for  Technical  Mathematics  (MTH 
4006)  to  help  improve  their  Math  skills. 

Prerequisites 

Before  registering  for  a  course,  students 
should  read  the  course  description  in  this 
Bulletin  to  determine  if  they  need  to  have 
taken  a  prerequisite  course.  In  order  to  en- 
sure academic  success,  students  are  strongly 
advised  to  adhere  to  course  prerequisites. 
Students  with  questions  about  prerequisites 
should  contact  the  program  office  that  ad- 
ministers the  course. 

Special  Students 

University  College  students  who  wish  to  take 
Basic  College  courses  may,  in  certain  in- 
stances, enroll  on  a  term-by-term  basis.  These 
students  must  obtain  prior  approval  from 
both  the  Office  of  the  Dean  of  the  college  of- 
fering the  course  and  the  University  College 
Office  of  Academic  and  Student  Affairs,  180 
Ruggles  Building.  Students  must  collect  both 
signatures  on  a  Special  Registration  Form 
and  submit  the  form  to  the  Registrar's  Office. 
Tuition  is  charged  at  the  Basic  College  rate. 

Basic  College  students  who  wish  to  enroll  in 
University  College  courses  must  obtain  prior 
approval  from  the  academic  dean  of  their  col- 
lege or,  if  they  are  freshmen,  from  the  Office 
of  Freshman  Affairs,  203  Ell  Building. 

Student  Records 

In  accordance  with  the  Family  Educational 
Rights  and  Privacy  Act  of  1974,  Northeastern 
University  permits  students  to  inspect  their 
records  whenever  appropriate  and  to 
challenge  specific  parts  of  them  when  they 
feel  it  is  necessary.  Specific  details  of  the  law 
as  it  applies  to  Northeastern  are  available  in 
the  University  College  Student  Handbook. 

Students'  Rights  and  Responsibilities 

The  University  subscribes  to  the  view  that  all 
students  have  certain  rights  and  freedoms. 
For  these  reasons,  the  University  has  adopted 


Policies  and  Procedures 


and  published  specific  policies  and  procedures 
governing  student  rights  and  freedoms, 
general  conduct,  student  discipline,  grievance 
procedures,  disclosure  of  information  from 
student  records,  and  University  judicial  pro- 
cedures. Judicial  procedures  are  related  to 
issues  of  discipline  and  conduct,  the  right  of 
students  to  appeal  judgments  of  their 
academic  performance,  grievances  based  on 
the  fact  that  a  student  is  handicapped,  and 
allegations  of  sexual  harassment.  All  policies 
and  procedures  governing  the  above  matters 
may  be  found  in  the  University  College  Stu- 
dent Handbook.  Copies  are  available  in  the 
Office  of  Academic  and  Student  Affairs  or  by 
calling  617-437-2400.  In  general,  copies  are 
also  available  at  each  campus  location. 

Withdrawal  Policy 

Students  who  wish  to  withdraw  from  a  course 
must  complete  a  Course  Drop  Form  in  the 
Registrar's  Office  or  notify  the  Registrar  in 
writing  of  their  intention  to  withdraw  prior  to 
the  week  in  which  final  examinations  are 
given.  These  forms  are  available  at  all  cam- 
pus locations. 

Students  who  withdraw  from  a  course  will 
have  no  record  of  the  withdrawal  on  their 
transcripts.  See  page  245  for  information  on 
tuition  refunds. 


Degree  Program  Policies  and 
Procedures 

Applying  for  Admission  to  a  Degree 
Program 

A  student  who  wishes  to  be  admitted  to 
University  College  as  a  degree  candidate 
must  follow  one  of  the  following  procedures. 
Students  are  urged  to  apply  for  admission 
as  soon  as  they  are  eligible.  Students  must  be 
admitted  to  a  degree  program  in  order  to  be 
eligible  for  most  financial  aid.  Non-immigrant 
international  students  must  also  be  admitted 
to  a  degree  program  and  must  follow  the  pro- 
cedures outlined  on  page  12  International 
Students.  International  students  who  are  resi- 
dent aliens  must  follow  the  procedures  outlin- 
ed on  page  18  Evaluation  of  International 
Educational  Credentials. 

Option  1 

In  general,  students  who  want  to  apply  for  ad- 
mission to  a  degree  program  must  have 


•  completed  at  least  eighteen  quarter  hours  of  i 
credit,  which  may  include  transfer  credit, 
and  must  include  English  courses  ENG 
4110,  ENG  4111,  and  ENG  4112  or  their 
equivalents; 

•  a  minimum  grade-point  average  of  at  least 
2.0  (C)  at  University  College  (i.e.  successful- 
ly completed  at  least  one  U.C.  course);  and 

•  a  high  school  diploma  or  a  high  school 
equivalency  certificate  (GED). 

Students  who  meet  these  requirements 
must  file  an  application  for  admission  in  the 
Office  of  Academic  and  Student  Affairs  or  at 
any  branch  campus.  Applications  may  also  be 
submitted  by  mail.  Call  617-437-2400  (voice) 
or  617-437-2825  (TTY)  to  obtain  an  applica- 
tion. Students  will  be  notified  of  their  accep- 
tance by  mail. 

Option  2 

Students  who  want  to  apply  for  admission  but 
do  not  meet  the  above  requirements  must 

•  arrange  an  admission  interview  with  an 
academic  adviser,  by  calling  437-2400, 
(367-6373  Downtown  or  272-5500 
Burlington); 

•  complete  an  Option  Two  application  for  ad- 
mission and  bring  it  to  the  interview, 

•  bring  an  official  copy  of  the  high  school 
transcript  or  GED  certificate  to  the 
interview; 

•  bring  official  copies  of  any  college 
transcripts  to  the  interview. 

Interviews  may  be  arranged  at  the  Boston, 
Burlington  and  Liberty  Square  campuses  only. 

Students  who  have  been  admitted  to  a 
degree  program  under  Option  2  will  have 
their  transcripts  reviewed  after  one  academic 
year  to  ensure  that  they  are  making  satisfac- 
tory academic  progress.  Satisfactory  academic 
progress  is  defined  as  follows: 

•  Completion  of  at  least  eighteen  quarter 
hours  of  University  College  or  transfer 
credit.  This  credit  must  include  English 
courses  ENG  4110,  4111,  4112,  or  their 
equivalents. 

•  A  minimum  grade-point  average  of  at  least 
2.0  (C)  at  University  College. 

The  Office  of  Academic  and  Student  Affairs 
will  notify  the  Office  of  Financial  Aid  of  those 
students  who  are  not  making  satisfactory 
academic  progress. 


Policies  and  Procedures 


Note:  Students  who  wish  to  be  admitted 
to  the  Bachelor  of  Science  in  Business  Ad- 
ministration degree  program  must  meet  addi- 
tional requirements,  as  listed  on  page  56. 

Academic  Probation 

All  students  are  monitored  once  each 
academic  year  after  the  end  of  spring  term. 
Students  who  have  been  admitted  to  a  degree 
program  must  maintain  an  overall  quality- 
point  average  of  not  less  than  2.0  (C)  and  a 
2.0  (C)  average  in  the  major  concentration 
courses  in  order  to  be  considered  in  good 
academic  standing.  Any  degree  student  whose 
overall  quality-point  average  or  major  concen- 
tration average  falls  below  2.0  is  placed  on 
academic  probation  for  a  one-year  period. 
Students  receive  formal  notification  of  their 
probation  and  the  level  of  performance  re- 
quired to  return  them  to  good  academic 
standing.  Students  on  probation  are  encourag- 
ed to  meet  with  their  assigned  adviser  at 
least  once  per  term. 

Students  who  do  not  raise  their  overall 
quality-point  average  or  major  concentration 
to  2.0  within  the  probationary  period  will 
have  their  cases  referred  to  the  University 
College  Academic  Standing  Committee  for 
review.  This  Committee  has  the  power  to 
remove  students  from  their  degree  programs 
but  allow  them  to  continue  taking  courses  at 
University  College,  or  to  dismiss  them  from 
University  College. 

Students  who  have  been  dismissed  from 
University  College  must  petition  the 
Academic  Standing  Committee  no  sooner 
than  one  year  from  the  date  of  dismissal  if 
they  wish  to  return  to  University  College. 

Additional  Degree  Status 

Any  student  who  has  received  a  bachelor's- 
level  degree  from  University  College  and 
wishes  to  earn  a  second  bachelor's  degree 
must  fulfill  an  additional  45  quarter  hours  in 
residence  after  full  completion  of  the  first 
degree,  at  least  12  quarter  hours  of  which 
must  be  in  the  new  major  concentration. 

A  student  who  has  already  received  an 
associate's-  or  bachelor's-level  degree  from 
University  College  and  who  wishes  to  earn  a 
second  degree  at  the  associate's  level  must 
fulfill  an  additional  24  quarter  hours  in 
residence  after  full  completion  of  the  first 
degree,  at  least  6  quarter  hours  of  which 
must  be  in  the  new  major  concentration. 

In  either  case,  the  additional  degree  and 


major  must  be  distinctly  different  from  the 
previously  conferred  degree.  This  policy  does 
not  apply  to  students  earning  an  associate's 
degree  who  wish  to  go  on  for  a  bachelor's 
degree. 

Certificates  Contained  Within  Degrees 

When  a  certificate  is  contained  within  a 
degree  program  (such  as  economics  or  graphic 
design),  the  grouping  of  certificate  courses  is 
treated  like  all  other  courses  and  the  student 
receives  a  diploma  only.  However,  if  the  stu- 
dent wishes  to  receive  both  a  diploma  and  a 
certificate,  the  higher  standard  for  certificate 
courses  (minimum  2.0  in  each  certificate 
course)  will  apply.  Students  must  file  a  cer- 
tificate completion  petition  separately  in 
order  to  receive  the  certificate. 

Change  of  Major 

Students  wishing  to  change  majors  within 
University  College  should  file  a  Change  of 
Major  Petition  with  the  Office  of  Academic 
and  Student  Affairs,  180  Ruggles.  Petitions 
are  available  at  all  campus  locations  or  by 
calling  617-437-2400  (voice),  617-437-2825 
(TTY).  Students  who  have  received  an 
associate's  degree  who  are  now  working 
toward  a  bachelor's  degree  should  be  sure  to 
change  their  majors  to  their  new  programs. 

Changes  in  Requirements 

The  continuing  development  of  University 
College  requires  frequent  revisions.  When  no 
undue  and  unusual  hardship  is  imposed  on 
students  because  of  these  changes,  students 
are  expected  to  meet  the  requirements  of  the 
most  current  Bulletin.  If  a  particular  student 
finds  it  impossible  to  meet  those  requirements, 
the  Bulletin  for  the  year  in  which  he  or  she 
declared  a  major  is  binding.  University  Col- 
lege makes  every  effort  to  inform  students 
who  are  admitted  to  a  degree  program  when 
there  are  changes  in  the  curriculum. 

Academic  programs,  course  content,  and 
rules  and  regulations  are  subject  to  change 
without  notice. 

Course  Substitutions 

Students  may  request  to  replace  a  required 
course  in  an  academic  program  with  another 
comparable  course.  Although  such  requests 
are  not  encouraged,  the  University  recognizes 
that  students  may  occasionally  have  very 
good  reasons  for  requesting  such  substitu- 
tions. Students  must  complete  a  Petition  for 


Policies  and  Procedures 


Course  Substitutions  and  submit  it  to  the 
Office  of  Academic  and  Student  Affairs.  Peti- 
tions are  available  at  each  campus  location  or 
by  calling  617-437-2400  (voice),  617-437-2825 
(TTY).  Petitions  are  routinely  forwarded  to 
the  appropriate  program  director.  The  pro- 
gram director  reviews  the  request  and  notifies 
the  student  of  the  outcome.  A  copy  of  the 
completed  request  is  kept  in  the  student's  file 
in  the  Office  of  Academic  and  Student  Affairs. 

Dean's  List 

All  degree  candidates  who  have  taken  a 
minimum  of  18  quarter  hours  during  the  fall, 
winter,  spring,  and  summer  quarters,  and 
who  have  completed  this  coursework  with  a 
quality-point  average  of  3.25  or  better  with  no 
"I"  grades,  grades  below  C— ,  and  no  pass-fail 
grades  (except  where  there  is  no  alternative 
or  where  required  by  the  program)  are  placed 
on  the  Dean's  List.  These  students  receive 
certificates  of  commendation  from  the  Dean  of 
University  College  after  the  summer  quarter 
has  ended.  See  page  21  for  information  on 
graduation  with  honor. 

In  Absentia  Status 

If  a  student  moves  beyond  a  reasonable  com- 
muting distance  from  University  College  or 
its  branch  campuses  and  has  completed  one 
hundred  thirty-five  or  more  quarter  hours  of 
credit  (at  least  75  q.h.  of  which  must  have 
been  taken  at  University  College),  the  Com- 
mittee on  Academic  Standing  will  consider  a 
petition  to  allow  the  student  to  complete  his 
or  her  requirements  for  a  University  College 
degree  at  another  approved  college.  The  re- 
maining courses  must  be  completed  within 
two  years  of  the  date  of  official  in  absentia 
status  approval.  The  student  must  submit 
course  descriptions  to  the  Committee  for  ap- 
proval prior  to  taking  the  courses. 

Special  Studies 

Qualified  students  may  have  the  opportunity 
to  take  up  to  six  special  studies.  Those  who 
meet  the  specifications  described  below  may 
take  a  combination  of: 

•  two  advanced  tutorials 

•  one  field  work 

•  three  independent  studies  or 

•  three  honors  programs 

Petitions  for  these  studies  are  available  in 
the  Program  Offices,  located  on  the  second 
floor  of  Ruggles  Building.  Petitions  should  be 


filed  at  least  six  weeks  prior  to  the  quarter  in 
which  the  special  study  is  to  be  taken. 

Most  special  studies  are  taken  under  the 
direction  of  a  faculty  adviser  who  will  meet 
with  the  student  at  least  three  times  during 
the  quarter,  and  will  be  available  for  frequent 
phone  conferences.  The  language  and  lab 
tutorials  will  meet  weekly.  Students  may  re- 
quest a  specific  faculty  member,  however,  no 
special  study  may  proceed  without  the  Pro- 
gram Director's  approval. 

Special  studies  are  not  offered  in  all  subject 
areas.  To  find  out  if  they  are  offered  in  your 
area  of  interest,  check  the  course  descriptions 
for  your  program  in  this  Bulletin. 

Before  petitioning  for  a  special  study  you 
may  wish  to  consult  with  your  program  office. 
In  many  cases,  taking  a  full  course  will  be  of 
greater  value  to  you. 

Advanced  Tutorial:  The  Advanced  Tutorial 
was  designed  primarily  for  students  with 
declared  majors  who  have  been  unable  to 
take  a  needed  upper  level  course  in  the  usual 
format  because  the  course  has  not  been 
available  for  two  consecutive  years.  The  Ad- 
vanced Tutorial  is  essentially  a  full  course 
taken  independently  under  the  tutelage  of  a 
faculty  adviser  who  will  provide  a  syllabus, 
test  the  student's  progress,  and  ascribe  a 
grade.  With  the  exception  of  languages  and  a 
few  labs,  Advanced  Tutorials  are  3  q.h. 
credits  each. 

Students  may  take  no  more  than  two  Ad- 
vanced Tutorials  and  should  have  completed 
87  q.h.  before  petitioning. 

Field  Work:  Field  work  courses  are  designed 
to  enhance  career  development  by  allowing 
students  to  earn  credit  for  the  application  of 
their  academic  backgrounds  to  practical  pro- 
blems in  the  work  place.  Field  work  courses 
are  offered  for  qualified  Business  students 
and  Liberal  Arts  majors.  Please  refer  to  in- 
dividual course  descriptions  for  details,  in- 
cluding prerequisites. 

A  student  must  have  a  3.0  cumulative 
average  to  be  eligible  and  may  take  only  one 
quarter  of  field  work  for  6  q.h.  credits.  Each 
student  shall  make  his  or  her  own  arrange- 
ments for  doing  field  work  at  an  approved 
work  site,  and  shall  spend  a  minimum  of 
fifteen  hours  per  week  at  the  site,  whether  on 
a  paid  or  volunteer  basis. 

Each  student  shall  meet  with  a  departmen- 
tal field  work  adviser  no  fewer  than  three 


Policies  and  Procedures 


times  per  quarter:  once  to  plan  the  project, 
once  to  discuss  the  student's  progress,  and 
once  to  present  and  discuss  a  final  written 
report.  The  student's  grade  shall  be  depen- 
dent upon  the  quality  of  the  experience  as 
demonstrated  by  reports,  work  products,  and 
other  documentation  and  upon  discussions 
between  the  U.C.  faculty  adviser  and  the 
work  site  supervisor. 

Independent  Study:  The  Independent  Study, 
is  an  opportunity  for  degree  students  who 
have  completed  96  q.h.  and  maintained  a  3.0 
q.p.a.  to  undertake  special  research,  reading, 
or  experimental  study  projects  in  areas 
related  to  their  major.  In  addition  to  filing  a 
petition,  interested  students  should  submit  a 
study  proposal  for  the  Program  Director's  ap- 
proval. The  proposal  should  include  a  detailed 
outline  of  the  objectives  and  plan  of  study, 
and  should  be  accompanied  by  a  supporting 
statement  from  the  faculty  member  under 
whose  direction  the  study  will  take  place. 
Students  may  take  up  to  three  Independent 
Studies  at  3  q.h.  each.  Usually  these  courses 
would  count  toward  major  elective 
requirements. 

Honors  Program '.  The  Honors  Program  is 
similar  to  the  Independent  Study,  with  two 
exceptions:  the  student  must  have  a  3.5  q.p.a. 
to  be  eligible,  and  submit  a  more  in  depth 
work  product  to  earn  the  additional  1  q.h. 
credit. 

Students  may  take  up  to  three  Honors 
Courses  at  4  q.h.  each.  Usually  these  courses 
would  count  toward  major  elective 
requirements. 

Please  Note:  Students  may  not  take  more 
than  three  of  either  independent  studies  or 
honors. 

Status  Reports 

The  Office  of  Academic  and  Student  Affairs 
provides  status  reports  for  students  who  want 
to  know  where  they  stand  in  a  particular 
academic  program.  Status  Report  Request 
forms  are  available  at  all  campus  locations 
and  by  calling  617-437-2400  (voice), 
617-437-2825  (TTY). 

No  more  than  one  status  report  for  the 
same  program  will  be  issued  to  a  student  in  a 
given  academic  year.  Generally  requests  are 
held  to  be  processed  in  either  February  or 
August.  The  Office  of  Academic  and  Student 
Affairs  will  issue  status  reports  at  the  time  of 
request  under  the  following  circumstances: 


•  when  issuing  a  transfer  credit  award; 

•  when  the  request  is  for  a  senior  status 
report; 

•  when  the  curriculum  changes  in  an 
academic  program; 

•  when  the  student  has  been  away  from 
University  College  for  a  period  of  time  and 
has  noted  this  on  the  request  form;  or 

•  when  the  student  is  changing  majors  and 
has  noted  this  on  the  request  form. 

Transfer  Credit  Policies  and 
Procedures 

Students  may  transfer  credit  from  accredited 
institutions  of  higher  education  when  courses 
completed  are  applicable  to  the  student's  pro- 
gram in  University  College.  The  minimum 
course  grade  acceptable  for  transfer  credit  is 
C,  or  2.0  on  a  four-point  scale.  The  total 
amount  of  transfer  credit  that  may  be  award- 
ed may  not  exceed  128  quarter  hours.  Courses 
for  which  transfer  credit  has  been  awarded 
may  not  be  repeated  at  University  College 
without  a  reduction  in  the  transfer  credit 
award.  An  accredited  institution  of  higher 
education  is  an  institution  having  recognition 
and  membership  in  one  of  the  six  regional  ac- 
crediting associations  recognized  by  the  Coun- 
cil on  Post-Secondary  Accreditation. 

Transfer  Credit  Procedure 

Students  who  would  like  to  obtain  an  evalua- 
tion of  credits  earned  from  another  institution 
must  file  a  Transfer  Credit  Petition  with  the 
Office  of  Academic  and  Student  Affairs.  The 
student  must  then  write  to  the  registrar  of 
the  institution  previously  attended  and  re- 
quest that  an  official  transcript  (one  bearing 
that  institution's  seal)  be  forwarded  to  the  Of- 
fice of  Academic  and  Student  Affairs,  Univer- 
sity College,  180  Ruggles,  Northeastern 
University,  360  Huntington  Avenue,  Boston, 
MA  02115.  Upon  receipt  of  official  transcripts, 
the  Office  of  Academic  and  Student  Affairs 
issues  an  evaluation  of  all  credits  as  they 
apply  to  the  student's  program  in  University 
College.  Students  should  allow  at  least  three 
weeks  for  processing  transfer  credit  petitions 
from  the  point  when  all  transcripts  have  been 
received.  Since  the  process  of  evaluating 
transfer  credit  is  complex,  students  should  not 
expect  evaluations  of  their  transcripts  during 


Policies  and  Procedures 


advising  appointments.  Official  awarding  of 
credit  is  recorded  on  the  student's  University 
College  transcript  when  admission  to  a  degree 
program  is  approved.  Students  who  wish  to  be 
admitted  to  a  degree  program  may  indicate 
this  on  the  transfer  credit  petition  and  should 
attach  proof  of  high  school  graduation  (official 
high  school  transcript,  or  notarized  copy  of 
diploma  or  GED  certificate).  Please  see  page 
14  for  admissions  requirements. 

Validation  of  Required  Upper-Level 
Business  Courses  for  Transfer  Credit 

It  may  be  necessary  for  students  entering  the 
Bachelor  of  Science  in  Business  Administra- 
tion (BSBA)  degree  program  to  validate  re- 
quired upper-level  business  courses  that  they 
have  taken  outside  the  framework  of  the 
program. 

The  Bachelor  of  Science  in  Business  Ad- 
ministration degree  programs  offered  by 
University  College  conform  to  all  standards 
established  by  the  American  Assembly  of 
Collegiate  Schools  of  Business  (AACSB). 
AACSB  has  been  recognized  by  the  Council 
for  Post-Secondary  Accreditation  and  by  the 
United  States  Office  of  Education  as  the  sole 
accrediting  organization  for  university 
bachelor's  and  master's  degree  programs  in 
business  administration. 

Validation  is  the  set  of  procedures  that  tests 
whether  an  upper-level  course  completed  at 
the  lower  division  of  a  bachelor's  degree  pro- 
gram should  be  accepted  for  transfer  credit  in 
the  upper  division  of  a  bachelor's  degree  pro- 
gram recognized  and  approved  by  the 
AACSB. 

In  general,  students  are  able  to  validate 
previously  earned  course  credits  by  taking  a 
sequential  course  in  a  reserved  section,  a 
department-approved  examination,  or  a  CLEP 
(College  Level  Examination  Program)  or  PEP 
(Proficiency  Examination  Program) 
examination. 

For  more  information  on  course  validation, 
see  page  56.  Students  should  talk  with  a 
University  College  academic  adviser  for  infor- 
mation about  the  validation  of  upper-level 
business  courses  for  transfer  credit. 

Evaluation  of  International  Educational 
Credentials 

United  States  citizens  and  international 
students  with  Resident  Alien  status  who  have 
international  high  school  or  college  creden- 
tials must  file  an  International  Educational 


Credentials  Form  and  pay  a  $45.00  evalua- 
tion fee.  An  evaluation  for  purposes  of  admis- 
sion and/or  transfer  credit  is  issued  by  the 
Office  of  Academic  and  Student  Affairs. 
Requirements  include  completion  of  an  inter- 
view and  receipt  of  the  completed  form, 
official  copies  of  all  transcripts  translated  into 
English  and  a  check  or  bank  draft  for  $45.00 
payable  to  Northeastern  University.  The  of- 
ficial assessment  of  international  educational 
credentials  is  made  in  accordance  with  cur- 
rent standards  for  awarding  transfer  credit  at 
University  College  or  as  recommended  by  the 
Center  for  International  Higher  Education 
Documentation. 

International  students  with  non-immigrant 
status  must  file  an  International  Student  Ap- 
plication (see  page  12  International  Students) 
and  will  have  any  transfer  credit  evaluated  ai 
part  of  that  process. 

Course(s)  at  Another  College  or  University 

Students  who  are  admitted  to  a  degree  pro- 
gram at  University  College  and  want  to  com- 
plete one  or  more  courses  at  another  institu- 
tion for  transfer  purposes  must  first  file  a 
petition  to  enroll  in  such  courses  and  provide 
course  descriptions  to  the  Office  of  Academic 
and  Student  Affairs.  Courses  taken  at  other 
institutions  may  be  disallowed  unless  a 
petition  has  been  submitted  and  approved  in 
advance.  Students  may  not  take  courses  at 
any  other  institution  during  their  senior  year 
for  the  purpose  of  transferring  credit.  See  the 
section  on  Residence  Requirement  on  page  21. 

Credit  by  Examination 

University  College  awards  credit  by  examina- 
tion, provided  the  examination  does  not 
duplicate  previously  earned  academic  credit. 
Credit  is  granted  for  successful  completion  of 
examinations  currently  available  through  the 
College  Level  Examination  Program  (CLEP) 
of  the  College  Entrance  Examination  Board 
and  through  the  Proficiency  Examination 
Program  (PEP)  of  the  American  College 
Testing  Program.  Both  programs  have  been 
designed  to  help  students  obtain  college-level 
credit  for  knowledge  acquired  through  non- 
traditional  means,  such  as  on-the-job  training; 
educational  television;  or  correspondence,  ex- 
tension, or  independent  study.  University  Col- 
lege defines  a  passing  score  as  500  on  General 
Examinations  and  50  on  Subject  Examina- 
tions. Information  about  these  programs  is 
available  from  the  Office  of  Academic  and 


Policies  and  Procedures 


Student  Affairs  at  University  College  and 
from  the  Northeastern  University  Counseling 
and  Testing  Center. 

Modem  Language  Proficiency  Examination 

Students  may  be  eligible  to  receive  credit  for 
proficiency  in  a  modern  language.  Examina- 
tions are  currently  offered  in  French,  Spanish, 
German,  and  Italian.  Students  should  contact 
the  Liberal  Arts  Program  office,  telephone 
617-437-2416,  for  more  information  or  an  ap- 
plication form. 

Assessment  of  Prior  Learning  (APL) 

Some  students  may  petition  for  prior  learning 
credit,  which  is  available  only  for  liberal  arts 
courses.  See  page  121  for  details. 

Prior  learning  credit  is  not  available  for 
business  courses,  except  through  CLEP  or  PEP 
examinations.  (See  Credit  by  Examination, 
previous  page.) 

Credit  cannot  be  awarded  through  APL 
when  an  appropriate  examination  is  available 
through  CLEP  or  PEP. 

Credit  for  Extra-institutional  Learning 

Extra-institutional  learning  is  learning  that 
takes  place  outside  the  sponsorship  of  legally 
authorized  and  accredited  post-secondary 
educational  institutions.  The  term  applies  to 
learning  acquired  from  formal  courses  spon- 
sored by  associations,  governments,  business, 
and  industry. 

In  awarding  credit  for  extra-institutional 
learning,  University  College  uses  the 
National  Guide  to  Credit  Recommendations 
for  Noncollegiate  Courses,  published  by  the 
American  Council  on  Education. 

Students  applying  for  credit  for  extra- 
institutional  learning  must  submit  a  Transfer 
Credit  Petition  and  provide  official  credentials 
from  the  sponsoring  noneducational  organiza- 
tion to  the  Office  of  Academic  and  Student 
Affairs.  The  credit  may  be  applied  toward 
degree  requirements  at  University  College  if 
recommended  in  the  National  Guide,  provided 
credit  is  not  otherwise  obtainable  through 
CLEP  or  PEP.  (See  Credit  by  Examination.) 


Grading  System  Policies  and 
Procedures 


Grading  System 

A  student's  work  in  each  course  is  evaluated 
by  the  instructor,  who  awards  a  letter  grade 
at  the  end  of  the  quarter.  This  grade  is 
officially  recorded  by  the  Registrar's  Office. 
The  grades  and  symbols  used  are  given  below, 
together  with  the  numerical  equivalents  used 
for  computing  quality-point  averages: 


A 

(4.000) 

A- 

(3.667) 

B+ 

(3.333) 

B 

(3.000) 

B- 

(2.667) 

C+ 

(2.333) 

c 

(2.000) 

c- 

(1.667) 

D+ 

(1.333) 

D 

(1.000) 

D- 

(.667) 

F 

(0) 

I 

Incomplete 

L 

Audit  (no  credit) 

S 

Satisfactory  (pass/fail  grade) 

u 

Unsatisfactory  (pass/fail  grade) 

X 

Incomplete  (pass/fail  grade) 

* 

Grade  not  received 

Change  of  Grade  Policy 

The  period  for  clearing  an  "I"  grade  is 
restricted  to  one  calendar  year  from  the  end 
of  the  quarter  in  which  the  course  was 
originally  taken.  "I"  grades  outstanding  for 
twelve  months  or  longer  shall  remain  per- 
manently on  all  records. 

Beginning  with  grades  recorded  at  the  end 
of  Fall  Quarter  1986,  the  period  for  changing 
any  grade  is  restricted  to  one  calendar  year 
from  the  end  of  the  quarter  in  which  the 
course  was  taken. 

Requests  for  exceptions  to  this  policy  must 
be  made  to  the  University  College  Academic 
Standing  Committee,  180  Ruggles. 


Policies  and  Procedures 


Grade  Reports  and  Transcripts 

All  efforts  are  made  to  mail  grades  prior  to 
the  beginning  of  the  following  quarter.  A  sup- 
plementary grade  report  is  issued  when  a 
missing  grade  or  a  grade  change  is  received. 
University  regulations  prohibit  issuing  grades 
by  telephone.  Grade  reports  of  degree  can- 
didates indicate  both  their  quarterly  quality- 
point  average  and  their  cumulative  quality- 
point  average.  Problems  with  grades  not 
received  (*)  or  grade  changes  that  have  not 
been  posted  on  transcripts  should  be  address- 
ed to  the  Program  Office  that  administers  the 
course. 

Students  may  obtain  a  transcript  of  their 
grades  by  making  a  request  in  writing  to  the 
Registrar's  Office,  117  Hayden  Hall,  North- 
eastern University,  Boston,  MA  02115.  Unofficial 
transcripts  are  issued  free  of  charge;  official 
transcripts  bearing  the  University  seal  cost  $2. 

Incomplete  ("I")  Grades 

The  "I"  grade,  or  incomplete,  may  be  given 
only  when  the  student  fails  to  complete  a 
major  requirement  of  a  course,  such  as  a  term 
paper  or  a  final  exam,  but  has  been  in  regular 
attendance.  Students  who  have  missed  a 
substantial  number  of  class  meetings  without 
the  instructor's  permission  receive  a  grade  of 
"W".  An  instructor  may  decide  that  a  student 
has  done  so  poorly  in  the  course  that  even  a 
perfect  grade  in  a  make-up  final  examination 
could  not  raise  the  grade  from  "F";  in  this 
case  "F"  is  the  proper  grade,  regardless  of  the 
missed  final  examination. 

All  deficiencies  must  be  made  up  in  the 
manner  prescribed  by  the  instructor  no  later 
than  twelve  months  following  the  recording  of 
the  "I"  grade.  Students  requesting  an  excep- 
tion to  this  policy  must  petition  the  Universi- 
ty College  Academic  Standing  Committee  in 
writing.  To  remove  an  "I"  grade,  the  instruc- 
tor must  file  a  change  of  grade  form  with  the 
program  office,  to  indicate  the  grade  that  the 
student  is  to  receive.  A  student  who  elects  to 
make  up  an  "I"  grade  by  taking  the  same 
course  over  again  will  be  given  a  new  grade 
and  will  be  billed  accordingly.  The  original 
"I"  grade  will  remain  on  the  student's  record. 

Missed  Final  Examinations 

Students  who  miss  a  final  examination  are 
given  a  grade  of  "I"  (incomplete)  unless  the 
student  has  done  so  poorly  in  the  course  that 
even  a  perfect  grade  on  a  make-up  final  could 


not  raise  the  grade  from  "F",  in  which  case 
an  "F"  shall  be  given  as  the  proper  grade. 
Students  do  not  automatically  have  the  right 
to  make  up  a  missed  final  examination. 
Students  must  petition  for  this  privilege  and 
pay  a  fee  of  $50  for  each  make-up  examina- 
tion. Petitions  are  available  at  each  campus 
location  or  by  calling  617-437-2425.  Students 
are  notified  whether  or  not  their  petitions 
have  been  approved  prior  to  the  date  of  the 
make-up  examination. 

Students  who  make  up  a  missed  final  ex- 
amination will  have  the  appropriate  letter  or 
pass/fail  grade  substituted  for  the  "I"  grade 
on  their  transcripts. 

Pass/Fail  Grades 

Satisfactory  completion  of  work  in  all  courses 
taken  on  a  pass/fail  basis  is  designated  on  the 
transcript  by  the  letter  "S".  Unsatisfactory 
work  is  designated  on  the  transcript  by  the 
letter  "U".  Any  unsatisfactory  grade  must  be 
handled  according  to  the  existing  policy  of 
University  College  but  may  never  be  cleared 
by  enrolling  in  the  same  course  on  the  basis 
of  the  pass/fail  system  of  grading. 

An  incomplete  in  a  course  taken  on  a 
pass/fail  basis  is  designated  by  the  fetter  "X" 
on  the  transcript  and  is  treated  according  to 
the  normal  procedure  for  grades  of  incomplete. 

Please  see  also  Pass/Fail  Courses  on  page  13. 

Quality-Point  Average 

To  obtain  the  quality-point  average,  the 
numerical  equivalent  of  each  grade  received 
is  multiplied  by  the  credit  hours  earned,  the 
quality  points  are  added  together,  and  the 
total  quality-points  are  divided  by  the  stu- 
dent's total  quarter  hours.  An  example 
follows: 


Grade 

Numerical 

Credit 

Quality 

Achieved 

Equivalent 

Hours 

Points 

A 

4.000 

3 

12.0 

B- 

2.667 

3 

8.0 

C 

2.000 

6 

12.0 

F 

0.000 

3 

0.0 

Total  Quality  Points  (32.0) 
Quality-Point  Average  =  Total  Credit    =2.13 

Hours  (15) 

The  quality-point  average  is  equal  to  the 
total  quality  points  (in  this  case  32.0)  divided 
by  the  total  credit  hours  (15),  which  comes  to 
an  average  of  2.13. 

Pass/fail  grades  (S,  U,  and  X),  incompletes 
(D,  and  audits  (L)  are  not  included  in  the 


Policies  and  Procedures 


quality-point  average.  Similarly,  transfer 
credits  are  not  included  in  quality-point 
averages.  However,  the  total  earned  hours 
appearing  on  the  student's  transcript  include 
both  transfer  credits  and  "S"  grades. 

A  cumulative  quality-point  average  below 
2.0  is  unacceptable  and  does  not  allow  a  stu- 
dent to  continue  in  University  College  or  to 
receive  a  degree  from  Northeastern  Universi- 
ty. The  "F"  grade  is  a  failure  and  requires 
repetition  of  the  course  in  its  entirety. 


Graduation  Policies  and 
Procedures 

Residence  Requirement 

Every  candidate  for  the  bachelor's  or 
associate's  degree  must  fulfill  the  minimum 
residence  requirement,  which  is  defined  as 
the  satisfactory  completion  of  at  least  forty- 
five  quarter  hours  of  course  work  for  the 
bachelor's  degree,  or  twenty-four  quarter 
hours  of  course  work  for  the  associate's 
degree,  in  University  College  immediately 
preceding  graduation.  At  least  twelve  of  the 
forty-five  quarter  hours,  or  six  of  the  twenty- 
four,  must  be  in  the  candidate's  major  field 
of  study. 

Because  of  this  residence  requirement, 
students  may  not  take  courses  at  any  other 
institution  during  their  senior  year  for  the 
purpose  of  transferring  credit. 

Students  whose  enrollment  in  a  degree  pro- 
gram is  interrupted  for  a  period  of  one  year  or 
more  will  be  reinstated  in  that  program  or  a 
comparable  program  at  the  time  of  re-entry 
into  University  College. 

Graduation  Requirements 

Except  for  certain  health  professions  pro- 
grams, the  requirement  for  graduation  from 
University  College  is  174  quarter  hours  for  a 
bachelor's  degree  and  96  quarter  hours  for  an 
associate's  degree,  with  attainment  of  an 
overall  quality-point  average  of  2.0  (C).  In 
addition,  the  student  must  have  a  2.0  average 
in  the  major  concentration  courses.  Although 
the  credits  allowed  for  acceptable  work  com- 
pleted elsewhere  by  transfer  students  count 
toward  fulfillment  of  quantitative  graduation 
requirements,  neither  the  credits  nor  the 
grades  earned  in  such  courses  are  included  in 
the  quality-point  computations  for  graduation. 
Course  requirements  for  each  degree  are 
outlined  in  this  Bulletin. 


Graduation  with  Honor 

Graduation  with  honor  is  reserved  for 
bachelor's  degree  candidates  who  have  com- 
pleted a  minimum  of  72  quarter  hours  of 
work  at  University  College  and  who  have 
demonstrated  distinctly  superior  academic 
achievement  as  evidenced  by  the  following 
quality-point  averages: 

Graduation  with  Honor  3.00  to  3.49 

Graduation  with  High  Honor  3.50  to  3.74 
Graduation  with  Highest 

Honor  3.75  to  4.00 

Courses  transferred  from  another  educa- 
tional institution  are  not  considered  in  deter- 
mining honors. 

Credit  by  Examination  During  the 
Senior  Year 

CLEP  or  PEP  examinations  (see  page  18, 57)  may 
be  taken  by  students  during  their  final  year 
of  study  provided  they  have  met  the  forty-five 
or  twenty-four  quarter-hour  residence  require- 
ment for  graduation  described  above.  Because 
of  the  time  it  takes  for  CLEP  and  PEP  ex- 
aminations to  be  graded  and  returned  to  the 
University,  students  requesting  June  gradual 
tion  must  take  their  CLEP  and  PEP  ex- 
aminations no  later  than  the  winter  quarter 
of  their  senior  year,  and  students  requesting 
September  commencement  must  take  their 
examinations  no  later  than  the  spring  term  of 
their  senior  year. 

Senior  Status  Procedure 

Each  student  who  intends  to  graduate  during 
the  current  academic  year  must  notify  the 
Office  of  Academic  and  Student  Affairs  of  his 
or  her  intention  to  graduate  by  filing  for  a 
senior  status  report. 

Senior  status  reports  are  issued  to  assist 
students  with  selecting  the  courses  they  need 
to  complete  their  program  requirements. 
Seniors  are  encouraged  to  request  their  senior 
status  reports  during  the  summer  prior  to  the 
academic  year  in  which  they  plan  to  graduate. 
Petition  forms  are  available  at  each  campus 
location  or  by  calling  617-437-2400  (voice)  or 
617-437-2825  (TTY).  At  this  time,  seniors  are 
also  encouraged  to  clear  up  missing  grades, 
incompletes,  transfer  credit,  admissions,  or 
other  problems. 

Once  a  Senior  Status  Report  has  been  com- 
pleted, the  Office  of  Academic  and  Student 
Affairs  mails  the  student  a  Commencement 


Policies  and  Procedures 


Data  Card,  which  the  student  must  return  by 
the  date  specified  on  the  card  to  be  guaranteed 
inclusion  on  the  official  graduation  list. 

Academic  Audit  of  Seniors 

The  Office  of  Academic  and  Student  Affairs 
conducts  an  academic  audit  of  all  seniors  ap- 
proximately one  month  prior  to  graduation. 
During  this  audit,  academic  problems  such  as 
incompletes  or  missing  grades  are  noted. 
Every  effort  is  made  to  relay  this  information 
to  the  student  through  mail  and  telephone 
contact.  If  these  problems  remain  unresolved, 
seniors  are  notified  by  certified  mail  that  they 
have  failed  to  qualify  for  their  degree. 

Commencement  Ceremony 

Information  concerning  commencement  is 
mailed  to  all  seniors  who  have  returned  a 


Commencement  Data  Card  (see  Senior  Status, 
page  21)  during  the  spring  term,  for  June 
graduation,  or  the  summer  term,  for 
September  graduation. 

Attendance  at  Commencement  for  all 
University  College  degree  candidates  is 
optional.  Students  who  do  not  attend  Com- 
mencement should  receive  their  diplomas  by 
mail  approximately  six  to  eight  weeks  after 
the  ceremony. 

Students  must  have  cleared  all  academic, 
financial,  and/or  disciplinary  deficiencies  in 
order  to  graduate.  Students  who  have  ques- 
tions about  the  commencement  ceremony 
should  direct  them  to  the  Commencement 
Office,  617-437-3190. 


Programs  of  Study 


Programs  of  Study 


Overview 


Business  Administration 


At  University  College,  your  options  are 
almost  unlimited.  Our  programs  of  study  can 
take  you  in  any  direction  you  determine 
toward  the  fulfillment  of  your  professional  or 
personal  objectives.  You  may  enroll  as  a  stu- 
dent pursuing  a  degree  program  or  as  a 
nondegree  student  taking  a  single  course  or  a 
special  program. 

Our  programs  leading  to  the  Bachelor  of 
Science,  Bachelor  of  Science  in  Business  Ad- 
ministration, and  Bachelor  of  Arts  degrees 
provide  opportunities  for  cultural  and  profes- 
sional development  equivalent  in  quality  and 
scope  to  those  offered  in  the  conventional 
four-year  college  enrolling  full-time  students. 
The  bachelor's  degree  requires  174  quarter 
hours  of  credit  or  more. 

Programs  leading  to  the  Associate  in 
Science  degree  enable  students  to  establish  a 
knowledge  base  in  business  administration, 
criminal  justice  and  security,  health  profes- 
sions and  sciences,  or  liberal  arts.  The 
associate's  degree  requires  96  quarter  hours 
of  credit  and  is  equivalent  to  the  conventional 
two-year,  or  junior  community  college  pro- 
gram in  scope  and  quality.  University  College 
also  offers  certificate  programs  in  a  wide 
range  of  disciplines. 

Degree  and  certificate  programs  are  offered 
in  the  following  areas.  (The  numbers  indicate 
the  page  on  which  detailed  curricula  appear.) 


Accounting 

Associate  in  Science  60 
Bachelor  of  Science  in  Business 

Administration  71 
Certificate  28 

Business  Administration 

Associate  in  Science  61 
Certificate  30 

Compensation  and  Benefits  Management 
Certificate  31 

Computer  Programming  and  Systems 
Analysis 

Certificate  32 

Computer  Systems  Specialist  Program 

Certificate  32-33 

Culinary  Arts  (Chefs  Institute) 

Certificate  34 

Electronic  Composition 

Certificate  34 

Entrepreneurship  and  Small  Business 

Certificate  35 

Executive  Management 

Certificate  49 

Finance 

Associate  in  Science  62 
Bachelor  of  Science  in  Business 

Administration  73 
Certificate  35 

Food  Service  Management 

Certificate  35 

Hotel  and  Restaurant  Management 

Associate  in  Science  63 
Certificate  37 

Human  Resources  Management 

Associate  in  Science  64 
Certificate  37 

Industrial  Management 

Associate  in  Science  65 

Industrial  Technology 

Bachelor  of  Science  (Operations  Technology 

Concentration)  75 
Bachelor  of  Science  (Electronic  Publishing 

Technology  Concentration)  76-77 

International  Business 

Certificate  49-50 

Management 

Bachelor  of  Science  in  Business 

Administration  78 
Certificate  39 


Programs  of  Study 


Management  Information  Systems 

Associate  in  Science  66 
Bachelor  of  Science  in  Business 
Administration  80 

Marketing 

Associate  in  Science  67 
Bachelor  of  Science  in  Business 

Administration  82 
Certificate  40 

Operations  Management 

Certificate  41 

Preparation  for  National  Certification 

APICS  50 
NAPM50 

Purchasing  and  Materials  Management 

Associate  in  Science  68 
Certificate  43 

Quick  Start 

Certificate  43 

Real  Estate 

Associate  in  Science  69 

Certificate  44 

Broker/Salesperson  Examination  Preparation  51 

Small  Business 

Program  45 

Transition  Programs 

Career  Transition  31 

Transition  to  Higher  Education  47 

Transportation  and  Physical  Distribution 
Management 

Associate  in  Science  70 
Certificate  47 

Criminal  Justice  and  Security 

Corrections 

Associate  in  Science  85 

Bachelor  of  Science  86 

Law  and  Criminal  Justice  Certificate  38 

Policing 

Associate  in  Science  87 
Bachelor  of  Science  88 
Certificate  41 

Security 

Associate  in  Science  89 
Bachelor  of  Science  90 

Security  Administration 

Certificate  44 

Security  Technology 

Certificate  44 


Health  Professions  and  Sciences 

Biomedical  Illustration 

Certificate  29 

Chemical-Biological  Technology 

Associate  in  Science  94 
Bachelor  of  Science  95 

Health  Management 

Bachelor  of  Science  96-97 
Option  in  Continuing  Care 

Administration  97 
Option  in  Community  Health  Management  98 
General  Option  98 

Health  Record  Administration 

Bachelor  of  Science  99-100 
Certificate  101 

Health  Science 

Bachelor  of  Science  in  Health  Science  101-103 

Medical  Laboratory  Science 

Associate  in  Science  105 
Medical  Technology,  Bachelor  of  Science  106 
Hematology,  Bachelor  of  Science  107-108 
Phlebotomy  Certification  Preparation  51 

Nursing 

Bachelor  of  Science  in  Nursing  (in  affiliation 
with  the  College  of  Nursing)  109-110 

Paramedic  Technology 

Associate  in  Science  111 
EMT-Basic  Program  51 

Radiologic  Technology 

Associate  in  Science  112-113 

Therapeutic  Recreation  Services 

Activity  Leader  Certificate  114-115 
Associate  in  Science  116 
Learning  Disabilities  Specialization 

Certificate  39 
Professional  Parenting  Certificate  42 

Liberal  Arts 

Acting 

Certificate  28 

Advertising 

Certificate  28 

American  Sign  Language  and  Deaf  Studies 

Certificate  29 

American  Sign  Language-English 
Interpreting 

Certificate  48 

Arts  and  Sciences 

Associate  in  Science  122 

Business  Communication 

Certificate  30 


Programs  of  Study 


Computer  Graphic  Design 

Certificate  33 

Economics 

Bachelor  of  Arts  122 
Bachelor  of  Science  123 

English 

Bachelor  of  Arts  124 
Bachelor  of  Science  125 

Fine  Arts 

Bachelor  of  Arts  126 
Bachelor  of  Science  126 

Gerontology 

Certificate  36 

Graphic  Design  and  Visual 
Communication 

Associate  in  Science  127 
Bachelor  of  Science  128 
Certificate  36 

History 

Bachelor  of  Arts  129 
Bachelor  of  Science  130-131 

Interpersonal/Family  Communication 

Certificate  38 

Journalism 

Advertising  Certificate  28 
Public  Relations  Certificate  42 


Liberal  Studies 

Bachelor  of  Arts  132-133 

Music  Therapy 

Certificate  40 

Political  Science 

Bachelor  of  Arts  134-135 
Bachelor  of  Science  136-137 

Psychology 

Bachelor  of  Arts  138 
Bachelor  of  Science  139 

Public  Relations 

Certificate  42 

Sociology-Anthropology 

Bachelor  of  Arts  140 
Bachelor  of  Science  141 

Speech  Communication 

Certificate  45 

Technical  Communications 

Bachelor  of  Science  143 

Technical  Writing 

Certificate  46 

Writing 

Certificate  47 

Course  descriptions  are  listed  in  alphabetical 
order  by  subject  area  beginning  on  page  149. 


Certificate  Programs 


Certificate  Programs 


University  College  offers  a  variety  of  cer- 
tificate programs  designed  to  meet  the  needs 
of  individuals  who  seek  specific,  job-related 
skills  rather  than  the  traditional  course  se- 
quence of  a  degree  program.  Students  enroll- 
ing in  our  certificate  programs  include 

•  individuals  who  plan  to  complete  an  associate's 
degree  but  first  want  to  acquire  the  marketable 
skills  offered  in  a  certificate  program; 

•  individuals  who  seek  intensive  study  in  a 
discipline  but  who  do  not  wish  to  acquire  a 
degree;  and 

•  individuals  who  already  hold  a  degree  but 
wish  to  acquire  specialized  knowledge  for  a 
career  change  or  professional  development. 

Students  entering  a  certificate  program 
should  file  a  certificate  petition  with  the  Office 
of  Academic  and  Student  Affairs.  When  they 
have  completed  all  coursework  toward  their 
certificates,  they  should  file  again.  Petitions 
are  available  from  the  Office  of  Academic  and 
Student  Affairs,  180  Ruggles  Building, 
617-437-2400,  and  at  all  campus  locations. 


For  assistance  in  determining  course  prere- 
quisites or  in  deciding  on  the  appropriate  pro- 
gram, call  617-437-2400  for  an  appointment 
with  an  academic  adviser,  or  call  the  number 
listed  for  each  individual  certificate  program. 

Most  certificate  programs  are  designed  to 
facilitate  transfer  into  a  related  degree  pro- 
gram. In  addition,  a  limited  amount  of 
transfer  credit  for  introductory  courses  taken 
at  another  school  may  be  applied  toward  cer- 
tificate program  requirements.  The  number  of 
transfer  credits  permitted  varies  by  certificate 
but  is  usually  limited  to  9  quarter  hours. 

A  student  may  be  awarded  only  two  certi- 
ficates. Students  who  choose  to  complete  a 
second  certificate  in  a  subject  related  to  the 
first  may  find  that  the  two  have  certain 
courses  in  common.  However,  a  second  cer- 
tificate will  not  be  awarded  if  more  than  50 
percent  of  the  course  work  is  duplicated. 

On  occasion,  students  have  good  reasons  for 
requesting  permission  to  replace  a  required 
course  with  a  substitute  course.  Permission  to 
substitute  a  course  must  be  granted  by  the  ap- 
propriate program  office.  Students  should  sub- 
mit a  completed  Petition  for  Course  Substitu- 
tions to  the  appropriate  office.  Petitions  are 
available  at  all  campus  locations. 

Beginning  with  courses  taken  Fall  term 
1987,  students  must  achieve  a  grade  of  C  (2.0) 
or  better  in  each  course  in  order  to  receive  a 
certificate. 


Certificates 


Accounting  Certificate  Program  i& 


quarter  hours 

ACC  4101 

ACC  4102 

ACC  4103 

Accounting  Principles  1,  2,  3 

9 

ACC  4301 

ACC  4302 

ACC  4303 

Intermediate  Accounting  1,  2, 

3*                     9 

ACC  4310 

or 

ACC  4410 

Cost  Accounting  1 

3 

FI  4301 

or 

FI  4401 

Principles  of  Finance 

3 

Total  Quarter  Hours  (Possible  transfer  credit:  9  quarter  hours) 

24 

For  more  information,  call  617-437-2418. 

*Or  students  may  select  ACC  4401,  ACC  4402  and  ACC  4403. 


itti/iMm 


Acting  Certificate  Program  £$ 

quarter  hours 

DRA  4101                                                                   Introduction  to  Theatre 

3 

DRA  4140         DRA  4141                                       Introduction  to  Acting  1,  2 

6 

DRA  4151                                                                   Acting  for  the  Camera 

3 

DRA  4152                                                                Acting  for  Commercials 

3 

DRA  4153                                                                Acting  for  Voice  Overs 

3 

DRA  4250                                                                   Theatre  Movement 

3 

DRA  4260                                                                Theatre  Speech 

3 

Total  Quarter  Hours  (Possible  transfer  credit:  9  quarter  hours) 

24 

For  more  information,  call  617-437-2416  or  617-437-2423. 


EJ3JHB3H 


Advertising  Certificate  Program  J$ 

quarter  hours 

JRN  4112 

Writing  for  Media  1 

3 

JRN  4349 

Advertising  Basics 

3 

JRN  4350 

Advertising  Copywriting 

3 

JRN  4351 

Advertising  Practice 

3 

ART  4115 

Graphic  Design  for  Non-Majors 

3 

ART  4143 

Advertising  Design 

3 

MTH  4520 

Statistical  Thinking 

3 

MKT  4301                or                MKT  4401 

Introduction  to  Marketing  1 

3 

Choose  one  elective. 

MKT  4302                or                MKT  4402 

Introduction  to  Marketing  2 

(3) 

MKT  4310               or               MKT  4410 

Advertising  Management  1 

(3) 

JRN  4300 

Photojournalism 

(3) 

ART  4160 

Basic  Photography 

(3) 

MGT  4101 

Introduction  to  Business  and 
Management  1 

(3) 

Total  Quarter  Hours  (Possible  transfer  credit:  9  quarter  hours) 

27 

For  more  information,  call  617-437-2416  or  617-437-2423. 


Certificates 


American  Sign  Language  and  Deaf  Studies  Certificate  Program  t& 

Explore  the  language  and  culture  of  the  American  deaf  community.  This  program  introduces  sign- 
ing, gives  the  student  the  chance  to  practice  communicating  with  the  hearing-impaired,  and  helps 
the  student  build  needed  confidence. _^^ 

quarter  hours 

ASL  4101  ASL  4102 American  Sign  Language  1,  2* 8 

ASL  4201          ASL  4202                                        Intermediate  American  Sign 
Language  1,  2" 8 

ASL  4301  ASL  4302  Advanced  American  Sign 

Language  Proficiency  1,  2  8 

ASL  4412 American  Deaf  Culture 3 

ASL  4410  Linguistics  of  American  Sign 

Language  3 

ASL  4411  Deaf  History  (3) 

or  or 

ASL  4413                                                                 American  Sign  Language 
Literature (3) 

Total  Quarter  Hours  (Possible  transfer  credit  for  ASL  4101  and  ASL  4102: 

8  quarter  hours;  all  other  credits  must  be  completed  in  residence;  a  3.0 

cumulative  grade-point  average  is  required  to  receive  this  certificate.)  33 

*An  Advanced  Placement  examination  is  available  for  this  course.  If  ASL  4101  or  ASL  4102  is  waived,  a  substitution 
must  be  made  so  that  the  quarter  hours  earned  still  total  33. 

For  more  information,  call  617-437-3064  (voice)  or  617-437-3067  (TTY). 

Biomedical  Illustration  Certificate  Program  2$ 


quarter  hours 

ART  4121                                                                   Principles  of  Drawing  and 

Composition 

3 

ART  4122                                                                   Introduction  to  Figure  Drawing 

3 

ART  4123                                                                 Drawing  Workshop 

3 

BIO  4175                                                                  Anatomy  and  Physiology  1 

3 

BIO  4374                                                                  Histology  1 

3 

BIO  4420                                                                    Biomedical  Illustration 

4 

BIO  4441                                                                  Parasitology 

4 

BIO  4801                                                                    Independent  Study  in  Biology 

4 

Recommended 

ART  4112                                                                   Visual  Foundation 

(3) 

ART  4140                                                                   Graphic  Communication  and 

Production 

(3) 

BIO  4375          BIO  4376                                        Histology  2, 3 

(6) 

Total  Quarter  Hours  (Possible  transfer  credit:  9  quarter  hours) 

27-39 

For  more  information  call  617-437-2818. 


Certificates 


m.iiui-iAfi 


Business  Administration  Certificate  Program  2$ 


quarter  hours 

ACC  4101 

Accounting  Principles  1 

3 

ECN  4115 

Economic  Principles  and 
Problems  1 

3 

FI 4301 

or 

FI  4401 

Principles  of  Finance 

3 

HRM  4301 

or 

HRM  4401 

Organizational  Behavior 

3 

MIS  4101 

Introduction  to  Data  Processing 
and  Information  Systems  1 

3 

MKT  4301 

or 

MKT  4401 

Introduction  to  Marketing  1 

3 

MGT  4101 

or 

MGT  4105 


MGT  4102 


Introduction  to  Business  and 

Management  1,  2 

or 

Introduction  to  Business  and 

Management  Intensive  (may  be  taken 

in  lieu  of  MGT  4101  and  4102) 


(6) 


MGT  4323 

Management  and  Leadership 

3 

SPC  4101 

Fundamentals  of  Human 
Communication 

3 

Total  Quarter  Hours  (Possible  transfer  credit:  9  quarter  hours) 

30 

For  more  information,  call  617-437-2418. 

Business  Communication  Certificate 

EJ5HBH13 

Program  & 

quarter  hours 

JRN  4335 

Public  Relations  Basics 

3 

MGT  4101 

Introduction  to  Business  and 
Management  1 

3 

SPC  4102 

Group  Discussion 

3 

SPC  4152 

Interviewing 

3 

SPC  4153 

Techniques  of  Persuasion 

3 

SPC  4154 

Negotiation  Skills 

3 

SPC  4155 

Organizational  Communication 

3 

SPC  4251 

Business  and  Professional 
Speaking 

3 

Choose  one  writing  course, 

ENG  4380 

Business  Writing  and  Reports 

(3) 

JRN  4112 

Writing  for  Media  1 

(3) 

TCC  4101 

Technical  Writing  1 

(3) 

or  choose  any  acceptable  substitute  in  written  communication,  with  prior 
approval  of  the  department  consultant  or  program  director. 

Total  Quarter  Hours  (Possible  transfer  credit:  9  quarter  hours) 

27 

For  more  information  call  617-437-2416  or  617-437-2423. 


Certificates 


Career  Transition  Certificate  Program 

People  interested  in  planning  a  change  in 
employment  —  either  re-entry  into  the  work- 
force or  advancement  in  their  career  are  in- 
vited to  participate  in  a  new  certificate  pro- 
gram at  University  College.  The  program, 
Career  Transition,  is  designed  to  assist 
students  in  making  the  shift  in  career  life  by 
integrating  academic  theory,  work  experience, 
and  personal  growth  through  seminars. 

The  program  offers  students  completing 
designated  business  certificate  programs  the 
opportunity  to  gain  experience  by  doing, 
supervised  field  work.  The  program  is 


Career  Transition  Certificate  Program  2$ 


outlined  below.  An  explanation  of  field  work 
can  be  found  on  page  16  of  this  Bulletin. 

Specialized  support  seminars  are  available 
to  students  in  this  certificate  program.  For 
this  reason  it  is  essential  that  you  complete  a 
certificate  petition  for  this  program  prior  to 
beginning  your  studies.  (Petitions  are 
available  at  the  Boston  campus  in  room  180 
Ruggles  Building  and  at  all  branch  locations.) 

Students  who  have  already  completed 
certificates  in  Accounting,  Computer 
Programming,  Finance,  Marketing,  or 
Purchasing  are  not  eligible  for  this 
program. 


quarter  hours 

INT  4110                                                                  Self-Assessment  and  Career 

Development 

3 

Business  Certificate  Program:  Accounting,  Computer  Programming, 
Finance,  Marketing,  or  Purchasing 

24-30  credits 

MGT  4323                                                                Management  and  Leadership 

3 

ACC,  MIS,  MKT,  PUR,  or  FI  4900                        Field  Work 

6 

2  Seminars  (No  cost  to  student) 

0 

Total  Quarter  Hours  (possible  transfer  credit:  9  quarter  hours) 

36  to  42  credits 

For  more  information  call  617-437-2418. 


Compensation  and  Benefits  Management  Certificate  Program  £$ 


quarter  hours 

HRM4310 

HRM  4311 

Personnel  Management  1,  2*                           6 

HRM  4321 

Wage  and  Salary  Administration                    3 

HRM4322 

Employee  Benefits                                            3 

HRM  4323 

Job  Evaluation                                                 3 

HRM  4330 

HRM  4332 

Employment  Rights  1,  2*                                 6 

Elective  in  Human  Resources 

Management                                                     3 

Total  Quarter  Hours  (Possible  transfer  credit: 

9  quarter  hours)                                                      24 

For  more  information,  call  617-437-2418. 


*This  certificate  may  be  taken  by  students  who  have  also  completed  the  Human  Resources  Management  Certificate. 
Asterisked  courses  do  not  have  to  be  repeated. 


Certificates 


Computer  Programming  and  Systems  Analysis  Certificate  Program   i& 


quarter  hours 

MIS  4101 

MIS  4102 

Introduction  to  Data  Processing 

and  Information  Systems  1,  2                          6 

MIS  4221 

MIS  4222 

MIS  4223 

COBOL  Programming  1,  2,  3                           9 

MIS  4230 

PC  Software  for  Professionals                          3 

MIS  4241 

MIS  4242 

Programming  in  BASIC  1,  2                            6 

MIS  4301 

or 

MIS  4401 

Structured  Systems  Analysis  and 

Design  1                                                               3 

MIS  4302 

or 

MIS  4402 

Structured  Systems  Analysis  and 

Design  2                                                            3 

Total  Quarter  Hours  (Possible  transfer  credit:  9  quarter  hours)                                                      30 

This  certificate  differs  from  the  Computer  Systems  Specialist  Program  (described  below)  in  that  the 
courses  for  this  certificate  are  regularly  offered  at  all  campuses  and  may  be  completed  over  a  longer 
period  of  time  than  in  the  Specialist  Program.  For  more  information  about  both  programs,  call 
617-437-2418. 


Computer  Systems  Specialist 
Program 

The  Program 

This  program  is  designed  to  offer  students 
training  as  computer  systems  specialists.  In- 
tended for  students  who  are  interested  in 
entry-level  programming  positions  in  business 
arid  industry,  the  program  addresses  the 
career  goals  of  individuals  who  have  little  or 
no  academic  or  work-related  background  in 
computer  programming.  Students  who  suc- 
cessfully complete  the  program  receive  a 
Computer  Systems  Specialist  certificate. 

Admission 

Computer  Systems  Specialist  Program  can- 
didates will  be  evaluated  for  acceptance  into 
the  program  on  the  basis  of  their  transcripts 
from  high  school  or  most  recently  attended  col- 
lege, motivation,  and  expressed  goals.  Enroll- 
ment is  limited.  This  program  is  offered  only  if 
a  sufficient  number  of  qualified  candidates 
apply. 

Time  and  Place 

The  program  is  scheduled  twice  during  the 
academic  year,  in  the  fall  and  spring 
quarters.  Classes  are  scheduled  for  thirty 
weekends:  Friday,  6  to  10  p.m.,  and  all  day 
Saturday,  9  a.m.  to  5:30  p.m.  Sections  are 
offered  at  the  Burlington  campus. 


Academic  Credit  and  Certification 

Upon  satisfactory  completion  of  the  program, 
students  will  have  accumulated  forty-five 
quarter  hours  of  academic  credit,  and  will 
receive  the  program  certificate.  The  credits 
represent  26  percent  of  the  credits  necessary 
for  a  bachelor's  degree. 

Placement  Assistance 

Although  job  placement  is  not  guaranteed, 
most  students  who  successfully  complete  the 
program  find  suitable  employment.  Placement 
services  include  individual  counseling;  job- 
search  seminars  on  career  opportunities,  self- 
assessment,  resume  preparation,  and  inter- 
viewing skills;  and  resume  referrals  to 
employers. 

For  More  Information 

For  more  information  about  the  program  and 
an  application  form,  contact  the  Business  Ad- 
ministration Programs  Office,  Northeastern 
University,  University  College,  360  Huntington 
Avenue,  Boston,  Massachusetts  02115, 
telephone  617-437-2418. 


Certificates        33 

Computer  Systems  Specialist  Program  i& 

quarter  hours 

MIS  4101 

MIS  4102                                        Introduction  to  Data  Processing 

and  Information  Systems  1,  2 

6 

MGT  4101 

MGT  4102                                       Introduction  to  Business  and 

Management  1,  2 

6 

MIS  4221 

MIS  4222          MIS  4223               COBOL  Programming  1,  2,  3 

9 

MIS  4235 

Advanced  COBOL  Programming 

3 

MIS  4236 

Advanced  PC  Software 

3 

MIS  4241 

Programming  in  BASIC  1 

3 

MIS  4273 

PC  DOS  and  Assembly 

3 

MIS  4301 

MIS  4302                                        Structured  Systems  Analysis 

and  Design  1,  2 

6 

MIS  4307 

Communications  and  Networking 

3 

MIS  4345* 

Database  Management  Systems 

3 

Total  Quarter  Hours 

45 

*  For  course  description  see  MIS  4445. 

Computer  Graphic  Design 
Certificate  Program 

This  program  addresses  the  needs  of  both 
novice  and  professional  designers  seeking  to 
pursue  careers  in  the  area  of  electronic  graphic 
design.  While  the  core  curriculum  is  struc- 
tured with  little  or  no  computer  experience 


an  alternative  curriculum  affords  professional 
designers,  subject  to  approval  of  the  Program 
Director,  the  opportunity  of  substituting  up  to 
three  basic  design  courses  with  more  advanc- 
ed design  or  computer  electives. 

Some  courses  will  be  offered  only  on  the 
Boston  campus.  Up  to  nine  hours  of  APL 
(Assessment  of  Prior  Learning)  credit  can  be 
applied  to  the  certificate. 


Computer  Graphic  Design  Certificate  Program  i$ 

quarter  hours 

ART  4135 

Design  Foundations  and  Techniques* 

3 

ART  4140 

Graphic  Communication  and  Production 

3 

ART  4151 

Typography 

3 

ART  4141         ART  4142 

Graphic  Design  1*,  2* 

6 

ART  4181 

Introduction  to  Computer-Aided 
Graphic  Design  * 

3 

ART  4182 

Computer  Graphic  Design  Workshop* 

3 

ART  4183 

Electronic  Publishing  Design* 

3 

ART  4184 

Business  Presentation  Graphics 

3 

ART  4185 

Creative  Imaging:  Custom 
Computer  Design 

3 

ART  4186 

Computer  Graphic  Design  Portfolio 

3 

Recommended 

ART  4187         ART  4188         ART  4189 

Graphic  Software  Studies  1,  2,  3 

(9) 

Total  Quarter  Hours  (possible  transfer  credit: 

9  quarter  hours) 

33-42 

For  more  information,  call  617-437-2416  or  617-437-2423. 
*3  y2-hour  studio. 


34         Certificates 

Culinary  Arts  (Chef's 

iiiiiiiumn 

Institute)  Certificate  Program  i$ 

quarter  hours 

HTL  4307 

Food  Service  Engineering 
and  Sanitation 

3 

HTL  4308 

Food  and  Beverage  Cost  Control 

3 

HTL  4320 

Food  Preparation  Intensive 

6 

HTL  4322 

Consumer  Food  Preparation 

3 

HTL  4324 

Dining  Room  Beverage  Operation 

and  Preparation                                                3 

HTL  4325 

Intensive  Chefs  Training 

6 

HTL  4326 

The  Joy  of  Catering 

6 

Total  Quarter  Hours  (Possible  transfer  credit:  9  quarter  hours) 

30 

For  more  information,  call  617-437-2418. 


Electronic  Composition  Certificate  Program  £$ 

quarter  hours 

ART  4140 

Graphic  Communication  and 

Production                                                           3 

ART  4115 

Graphic  Design  for  Non-Majors*                      3 

ART  4139 

Color  Theory  and  Practice                                3 

ART  4151 

Typography                                                       3 

ART  4431 

Graphic  Composition  Systems  1*                     3 

ART  4181 

Introduction  to  Computer-Aided 

Graphic  Design*                                               3 

ART  4410 

Electronic  Imaging  Systems                             3 

ART  4415 

Electronic  Document  Production*                    3 

ART  4366 

Promotional  and  Technical 

Publications  Design  and  Production                3 

ART  4416 

Style  Set-up  for  Electronic 

Document  Production                                       3 

Total  Quarter  Hours  (Possible  transfer  credit:  9  quarter  hours)                                                    30 

*Studio  Courses 

For  more  information,  call  617-437-2416  or  617-437-2423. 


Certificates 


Entrepreneurship  and  Small  Business  Certificate  Program  i$ 


quarter  hours 

ACC  4101 

Principles  of  Accounting 

3 

MKT  4301 

or                MKT  4401 

Introduction  to  Marketing 

3 

MKT  4310 

or                MKT  4410 

Advertising  Management  1 

3 

BL  4101 

Business  Law  1 

3 

HRM  4301 

or                HRM  4401 

Organizational  Behavior 

3 

MGT  4328 

Creating  New  Ventures 

3 

MGT  4329 

Managing  Small  Businesses 

3 

MGT  4340* 

MGT  4341* 

Small  Business  1,  2* 

6 

Total  Quarter  Hours  (Possible  transfer  credit: 

9  quarter  hours) 

27 

For  more  information  call  617-437-2418. 

*Must  be  taken  as  last  2  courses  of  certificate,  and  cannot  be  transferred  into  program. 


Finance  Certificate  Program  b& 


quarter  hours 

ACC  4101         ACC  4102         ACC  4103              Accounting  Principles  1,  2,  3 

9 

FI 4301                    or               FI  4401                  Principles  of  Finance 

3 

FI  4302                     or                FI  4402                  Financial  Management 

3 

FI  4310                    or               FI  4410                  Investment  Principles 

3 

FI  4320                    or               FI  4420                  Credit  Principles 

3 

FI  4325                     or                FI  4425                  Budgeting  and  Planning 

3 

Total  Quarter  Hours  (Possible  transfer  credit:  9  quarter  hours) 

24 

For  more  information,  call  617-437-2418. 

Food  Service  Management  Certificate  Program  £$ 

quarter  hours 

ACC  4101                                                                   Accounting  Principles  1 

3 

HTL  4301                                                                Introduction  to  Hotel  and 

Restaurant  Management 

3 

HTL  4304                                                                   Hotel  and  Restaurant  Law 

3 

HTL  4307                                                                   Food  Service  Engineering  and 

Sanitation 

3 

HTL  4308                                                                   Food  and  Beverage  Cost  Control                     3 

HTL  4309                                                                Managerial  Accounting  for  the 

Hospitality  Industry 

3 

HTL  4320                                                                   Food  Preparation  (Intensive) 

6 

Total  Quarter  Hours  (Possible  transfer  credit:  9  quarter  hours) 

24 

For  more  information,  call  617-437-2418. 


Certificates 


I.U;lilM\fl 


Gerontology  Certificate  Program*  £$ 


Choice  of  quarter  hours  or  CEUs 

SOC  4225/SOC  5225 

Social  Gerontology 

3 

PSY  4242/PSY  5242 

Development:  Adulthood  and  Aging 

3 

SOC  4226/SOC  5226 

Work,  Leisure,  and  Aging 

3 

PSY  4243/PSY  5243 

Aging  and  Mental  Health 

3 

ECN  4312/ECN  5312 

Economic  Concerns  of  Older  Adults 

3 

PHL  4220/PHL  5220 

The  Meaning  of  Death 

3 

POL  4375/POL  5375 

Consumer  Advocacy  1 

3 

SOC  4240/SOC  5240 

Sociology  of  Human  Service 
Organizations 

3 

HSC  4610/HSC  5610 

Geriatric  Nutrition 

3 

Total  Quarter  Hours  (Possible  transfer  credit: 

9  quarter  hours) 

27 

For  more  information,  call  617-437-2416  or  617-437-2423. 

*Course  numbers  that  begin  with  "4"  are  for  credit,  course  numbers  that  begin  with  "5"  are  for  Continuing  Educa- 
tion Units  (CEUs). 


Graphic  Design  and  Visual  Communication  Certificate  Program  i& 


quarter  hours 

ART  4140 

Graphic  Communication  and 
Production 

3 

ART  4135 

Design  Foundations  and 
Techniques* 

3 

ART  4139 

Color  Theory  and  Practice 

3 

ART  4151 

Typography 

3 

ART  4367 

Illustration 

3 

JRN  4349 

Advertising  Basics 

3 

ART  4141 

ART  4142 

Graphic  Design  1*,  2* 

6 

ART  4143 

Advertising  Design* 

3 

ART  4251 

Advanced  Graphic  Design* 

3 

Total  Quarter  Hours  (Possible  transfer  credit:  9  quarter  hours; 
possible  APL  credit:  9  quarter  hours.  See  p.  19) 

30 

For  more  information,  call  617-437-2416  or  617-437-2423. 

*3  Vfe-hour  studio. 


Certificates 


Hotel  and  Restaurant  Management  Certificate  Program  2$ 

quarter  hours 

HTL  4301 

Introduction  to  Hotel  and 
Restaurant  Management 

3 

HTL  4303 

Front  Office  Management 

3 

HTL  4304 

Hotel  and  Restaurant  Law 

3 

HTL  4307 

Food  Service  Engineering  and 
Sanitation 

3 

HTL  4308 

Food  and  Beverage  Cost  Control                    3 

HTL  4309 

Managerial  Accounting  for  the 
Hospitality  Industry 

3 

HTL  4313 

Introduction  to  Tourism 

3 

HTL  4320 

Food  Preparation  Intensive 

6 

Total  Quarter  Hours  (Possible  transfer  credit: 

9  quarter  hours) 

27 

For  more  information,  call  617-437-2418. 


Human  Resources  Management  Certificate  Programf  2$ 


quarter  hours 

HRM  4301 

or 

HRM  4401 

Organizational  Behavior 

3 

HRM  4302 

or 

HRM  4402 

Introduction  to  Human  Resources 
Management 

3 

HRM  4303 

or 

HRM  4403 

Applied  Human  Resources 
Management 

3 

HRM  4310 

HRM  4311 

Personnel  Management  1,  2* 

6 

HRM  4330 

HRM  4332 

Employment  Rights  1,  2* 

6 

HRM  4340 

Public  and  Private  Sector 
Collective  Bargaining  in  the 
United  States 

3 

HRM  4325 

Training  and  Development  in 
Organizations 

3 

Total  Quarter  Hours  (Possible  transfer  credit: 

9  quarter  hours) 

27 

For  more  information,  call  617-437-2418. 

tThis  certificate  may  also  be  taken  by  students  who  have  completed  the  Compensation  and  Benefits  Management 

certificate. 

*Courses  with  asterisks  do  not  have  to  be  repeated. 


38         Certificates 

IiH:HIM\H 

Interpersonal/Family  Communication  Certificate  Program  l& 

quarter  hours 

SPC  4101                                                                   Fundamentals  of  Human 

Communication 

3 

SPC  4221                                                                   Interpersonal  Communications  1 

3 

SPC  4225                                                                   Family  Communication 

3 

Choose  three. 

SPC  4150                                                                   Self-Concept  and  Communication 

(3) 

SPC  4151                                                                   Listening 

(3) 

SPC  4240                                                                   Managing  Interpersonal  Conflict 

(3) 

SPC  4231                                                                   Female/Male  Communication  1 

(3) 

Choose  one. 

PSY  4272                                                                   Personality 

(3) 

PSY  4240                                                                   Development:  Infancy  and  Childhood 

(3) 

PSY  4241                                                                   Development:  Adolescence 

(3) 

PSY  4242                                                                   Development:  Adulthood  and  Aging 

(3) 

Choose  one. 

SOC  4155                                                                 Sociology  of  the  Family 

(3) 

SOC  4156                                                                Violence  in  the  Family 

(3) 

REC  4304                                                                   Dynamics  of  Family  Life  for 

the  Disabled 

(3) 

Choose  one. 

PHL  4170                                                                   The  Human  Search  for  Meaning 

(3) 

PSY  4280                                                                   Human  Sexuality  and  Love 

(3) 

Total  Quarter  Hours  (Possible  transfer  credit:  9  quarter  hours) 

27 

For  more  information,  call  617-437-2416  or  617-437-2423. 


Law  and  Criminal  Justice  Certificate  Program  ifc 

Core  Courses 

quarter  hours 

CJ  4101 

Administration  of  Justice 

3 

CJ  4108            CJ  4109 

Criminal  Law  and  Procedure  1, 

2                   6 

CJ  4110 

Constitutional  Law 

3 

CJ  4511 

Survey  of  Criminal  Evidence 

3 

Total  Quarter  Hours  (Possible  transfer  credit: 

6  quarter  hours) 

15 

For  more  information,  call  617-437-2425. 


Certificates 


Learning  Disability  Specialization  Program  J$ 


quarter  hours 

REC  4102                                                                Principles  and  Practices  of 

Therapeutic  Recreation 

3 

REC  4200                                                                  Introduction  to  Learning 

Disabilities 

3 

REC  4210                                                                Pyschosocial  Aspects  of 

Disabilities  and  Illness 

3 

REC  4250                                                                Assessment  of  Learning 

Disabilities 

3 

REC  4304                                                                Dynamics  of  Family  Life  for 

the  Disabled 

3 

REC  4350                                                                Legal  Issues  of  Disability  and 

Rehabilitation 

3 

REC  4450                                                                Vocational  Planning  for  the 

Learning  Disabled 

3 

REC  4470                                                                The  Learning  Disabled  at  Work 

3 

Total  Quarter  Hours  (Possible  transfer  credit:  9  quarter  hours) 

24 

For  more  information,  call  George  Ransom,  at  617-437-3167  or  437-3153. 

Management  Certificate  Program  ifc 

quarter  hours 

HRM  4301               or               HRM  4401             Organizational  Behavior 

3 

MIS  4101                                                                 Introduction  to  Data  Processing 

and  Information  Systems  1 

3 

MGT  4101        MGT  4102 

or 

MGT  4105 


Introduction  to  Business  and 

Management  1,  2 

or 

Introduction  to  Business  and 


Management  Intensive 

(6) 

MGT  4320                                                               Managing  Change 

3 

MGT  4323                                                               Management  and  Leadership 

3 

MGT  4330                                                               Essentials  for  Managers 

of  Small  Business 
or                                                                                or 
MGT  4329                                                               Managing  Small  Businesses 

3 

(3) 

Elective 

3 

Total  Quarter  Hours  (Possible  transfer  credit:  9  quarter  hours) 

24 

For  more  information,  call  617-437-2418. 


40         Certificates 

IiU:IIIJIiHU 

Marketing  Certificate  Program  tfc 

quarter  hours 

MKT  4301                or                MKT  4401 

Introduction  to  Marketing  1 

3 

MKT  4302                or                MKT  4402 

Introduction  to  Marketing  2 

3 

MKT  4310                or                MKT  4410 

Advertising  Management  1 

3 

MKT  4315                or                MKT  4415 

Sales  Management  1 

3 

MKT  4320         MKT  4321  or   MKT  4420 

Marketing  Management  1,  2 

6 

MKT  4330                or                MKT  4430 

Marketing  Research  1 

3 

MKT  4307 

Telemarketing  Management 

3 

Total  Quarter  Hours  (Possible  transfer  credit: 

9  quarter  hours) 

24 

For  more  information,  call  617-437-2418.          ^\ 

Music  Therapy  Certificate  Program  i$ 

quarter  hours 

MUS  4100 

Introduction  to  Music 

3 

MUS  4160 

Music  Therapy 

3 

MUS  4163 

Sound  Health:  Music  and 
Relaxation 

3 

PSY  4110 

Introduction  to  Psychology- 
Fundamental  Issues 

3 

SOC  4100 

Roles,  Culture,  and  the 
Individual 

3 

REC  4200 

Introduction  to  Learning 
Disabilities 

3 

SPC  4101 

Fundamentals  of  Human 
Communication 

3 

Choose  one: 

MUS  4200 

How  to  Read  and  Write  Music 

(3) 

MUS  4201 

Music  Theory  1 

(3) 

Choose  one  instrument  course: 

MUS  4241 

Piano  Class 

(3) 

MUS  4244 

Voice  Class 

(3) 

MUS  4247 

Guitar  Class 

(3) 

Choose  one  psychology  or  sociology  course: 

PSY  4111 

Introduction  to  Psychology- 
Developmental  Aspects 

(3) 

PSY  4112 

Introduction  to  Psychology- 
Personal  Dynamics 

(3) 

SOC  4101 

Inequality  and  Institutions 

(3) 

SOC  4102 

Institutions  and  Social  Change 

(3) 

Total  Quarter  Hours  (Possible  transfer  credit: 

9  quarter  hours 

30 

For  more  information,  call  617-437-2416  or  617-437-2423. 


Certificates        41 

mjiniiMH 

Operations  Management  Certificate  Program  i$ 

quarter  hours 

IM4301 

or               IM  4401 

Introduction  to  Operations 
Management 

3 

IM4302 

Operations  Analysis 

3 

IM4314 

Productivity  Enhancement  and 
Quality  Management 

3 

IM4317 

Purchasing  and  Materials 
Management 

3 

IM4321 

Operations  Planning  and  Control 

3 

IM4326 

Operations  Management  Policy 

3 

MS  4332 

Statistical  Quality  Control 

3 

Total  Quarter  Hours  (Possible  transfer  credit 

9  quarter  hours) 

21 

For  more  information,  call  617-437-2418. 

Policing  Certificate  Program  £$ 

Core  Courses 

quarter  hours 

CJ  4105 

Computer  Applications  in 
Criminal  Justice 

3 

CJ  4108 

CJ  4109 

Criminal  Law  and  Procedure  1,  2 

6 

CJ  4201 

CJ  4202 

Criminal  Investigation  1,  2 

6 

C  J  4205 

C  J  4206 

Patrol  Theory  and 
Administration  1,  2 

6 

CJ  4211 

Police  and  Social  Problems 

3 

CJ  4213 

Police  Discretion 

3 

CJ  4212 

Police  Community  Relations 

3 

Total  Quarter  Hours  (Possible  transfer  credit: 

9  quarter  hours) 

30 

For  more  information,  call  617-437-2425. 


Certificates 


Professional  Parenting  Certificate  Program  i& 

quarter  hours 

REC  4105 

Childhood  Medical  Procedures 

2 

REC  4118 

Coping  Skills  for  Child  Rearing 

2 

REC  4215 

Causes/Detection  of  Child  Abuse 

3 

REC  4250 

Assessment  of  Learning 
Disabilities 

3 

REC  4378 

or 

REC  4380 

REC"  4379 

Parenting  Skills  1,  2 

or 

Parenting  Skills  Intensive 

6 

(6) 

PSY  4240 

Development:  Infancy  and 
Childhood 

3 

PSY  4241 

Development:  Adolescence 

3 

SPC  4225 

Family  Communication 

3 

Select  one  course  from  the  following: 

REC  4210 

Psychosocial  Aspects  of  Illness 
and  Disability 

(3) 

REC  4304 

Family  Dynamics  for  the 
Disabled 

(3) 

REC  4425 

Mental  Illness/Mental 
Retardation 

(3) 

REC  4460 

Process  of  Aging 

(3) 

Total  Quarter  Hours  (possible  transfer  credit: 

9  quarter  hours) 

28 

For  more  information,  please  call  George  Ransom  at  617-437-3167. 


m.Hjy.m 


Public  Relations  Certificate  Program  i& 


quarter  hours 

JRN  4112          JRN  4113 

Writing  for  Media  1,  2 

6 

JRN  4335 

Public  Relations  Basics 

3 

JRN  4336 

Public  Relations  Practices 

3 

JRN  4337 

Public  Relations  Problems 

3 

JRN  4480 

Copy  Editing 

3 

MTH4520 

Statistical  Thinking 

3 

SPC  4153 

Techniques  of  Persuasion 

3 

Choose  one  elective. 

JRN  4300 

Photojournalism 

(3) 

MGT  4101 

Introduction  to  Business  and 
Management  1 

(3) 

MKT  4301                or 

MKT  4401 

Introduction  to  Marketing  1 

(3) 

ART  4368 

Graphic  Design  for  Media 

(3) 

Total  Quarter  Hours  (Possible  transfer  credit:  9  quarter  hours) 

27 

For  more  information,  call  617-437-2416  or  617-437-2423. 


Certificates 


m.Hnwtn 


Purchasing  and  Materials  Management  Certificate  Program  i& 


quarter  hours 

ACC  4101 

ACC  4102 

Accounting  Principles  1,  2                                 6 

MGT  4101 

Introduction  to  Business  and 

Management  1                                                  3 

PUR  4351 

PUR  4352 

Purchasing  1,  2                                                   6 

PUR  4357 

Business  Negotiations                                      3 

PUR  4358 

Materials  Requirement  Planning                    3 

PUR  4365 

Production  Activity  Control                              3 

PUR  4370 

Inventory  Management                                    3 

TRN  4305 

Traffic  Management                                         3 

Total  Quarter  HOUrS  (Possible  transfer  credit:  9  quarter  hours)                                                      30 

For  more  information,  call  617-437-2418. 


Quick-Start  Certificate  Program  m 
The  Program 

This  fall  students  will  be  able  to  enter  a 
week-end  program  which  will  allow  them  to 
earn  45  quarter  hours  of  credit  toward  an 
associate's  degree.  The  program  will  run  on 
Friday  evenings  and  Saturdays. 

Admission 

College  Board  Examinations  are  not  required 
for  admission.  For  purposes  of  evaluation  for 
admission,  however,  high-school  transcripts 
and  personal  recommendations  are  required. 
Enrollment  is  limited.  The  program  will  be 
offered  only  if  a  sufficient  number  of  qualified 
candidates  apply. 


Academic  Credit  and  Certification 

Upon  satisfactory  completion  of  the  program, 
students  will  have  accumulated  45  quarter 
hours  of  academic  credit.  The  credits  repre- 
sent 47  percent  of  the  credits  necessary  for  an 
associate's  degree. 

Time  and  Place 

Classes  are  scheduled  for  thirty  weekends: 
Friday,  6  to  10  p.m.  and  all  day  Saturday,  9 
a.m.  to  5:30  p.m.  The  Quick-Start  Program 
will  be  offered  at  the  Burlington  campus. 

For  More  Information 

For  further  information  about  the  program 
and  an  application  form,  contact  the  Business 
Administration  Programs  Office,  Northeastern 
University,  University  College,  360  Huntington 
Avenue,  Boston,  MA  02115,  617-437-2418. 


The  program 

includes  the  following  courses: 

ENG  4110 

ENG  4111 

Critical  Writing  1,  2 

6 

ENG  4112 

Approaches  to  Literature 

3 

ACC  4101 

ACC  4102 

Accounting  Principles  1,  2 

6 

BL  4101 

BL  4102 

Business  Law  1,  2 

6 

FI  4301 

Principles  of  Finance 

3 

HRM4301 

Organizational  Behavior 

3 

HRM  4302 

Introduction  to  Human  Resources  Mgt. 

3 

MGT  4101 

MGT  4102 

Introduction  to  Business  and  Mgt.  1,  2 

6 

MIS  4101 

MIS  4102 

Introduction  to  Data  Processing  1,  2 

6 

MKT  4301 

Introduction  to  Marketing  1 

3 

Total  Quarter  Hours 

45 

44         Certificates 

IMllMHiyij 

Real  Estate  Certificate  Program  b& 

quarter  hours 

RE  4301            RE  4302                                          Real  Estate  Fundamentals  1, 2 

6 

RE  4323            RE  4324                                           Real  Estate  Appraisal  1, 2 

6 

RE  4328            RE  4329                                          Real  Estate  Financial  Analysis 

1,2                6 

RE  4341            RE  4342                                          Real  Estate  Law  1, 2 

6 

Total  Quarter  Hours  (Possible  transfer  credit:  9  quarter  hours) 

24 

For  more  information,  call  617-437-2418. 

IiU:»HIiHH 

Security  Administration  Certificate  Program  i& 

quarter  hours 

C  J  4403                                                                       Introduction  to  Security 

3 

C  J  4405                                                                       Current  Security  Problems 

3 

CJ  4406             CJ  4407                                           Security  Administration  1, 2 

6 

C  J  4408                                                                    Legal  Aspects  of  Security 

Management  and  Operations 

3 

C  J  4701                                                                    '  Independent  Study  1 

3 

Criminal  justice  and  security  electives 

6 

Total  Quarter  Hours  (Possible  transfer  credit:  9  quarter  hours) 

24 

For  more  information,  call  617-437-2425. 

ESUiliUi 

Security  Technology  Certificate  Program  ifc 

quarter  hours 

C  J  4403                                                                      Introduction  to  Security 

3 

C  J  4404                                                                      Industrial  Safety  and  Fire 

Prevention 

3 

C  J  4408                                                                    Legal  Aspects  of  Security 

Management  and  Operations 

3 

CJ  4409             CJ  4110                                            Physical  Security  Methods  and 

Technology  1,  2 

6 

C  J  4411                                                                      Electronic  Information  Security 

3 

Criminal  justice  and  security  electives 

6 

Total  Quarter  Hours  (Possible  transfer  credit:  9  quarter  hours) 

24 

For  more  information,  call  617-437-2425. 


Certificates 


Small  Business  Program 

The  Small  Business  program  is  designed  to 
help  the  entrepreneur,  small  business 
manager,  or  prospective  small  business  owner 
formulate  an  effective  business  plan. 

Students  in  the  program  must  complete  the 
two  consecutive  courses  over  two  academic 
quarters.  Each  course  carries  three  quarter 
hours  of  credit,  and  neither  may  be  taken  as 
a  business  elective. 


Admission 

There  are  no  admission  requirements  to  the 
first  course,  but  first-time  admission  to  the 
program  at  the  beginning  of  the  second  course 
is  not  allowed. 

Scheduling 

The  program  is  usually  scheduled  to  begin  in 
the  fall  quarter  at  the  main  Boston  campus 
and  in  the  winter  quarter  at  the  Burlington 
campus,  and  runs  for  two  consecutive  quarters. 
The  number  of  sections  and  locations  that  are 
offered  varies  according  to  demand. 


Small  Business  Program 

quarter  hours 

MGT  4340 

Small  Business  1 

3 

MGT  4341 

Small  Business  2 

3 

Total  Quarter  Hours 

6 

For  more  information,  call  617-437-2418. 


Ui.il\l\J\(I 


Speech  Communication  Certificate  Program  bfc 

quarter  hours 

SPC  4101 

Fundamentals  of  Human 
Communication 

3 

SPC  4102 

Group  Discussion 

3 

SPC  4150 

Self-Concept  and  Communication 

3 

SPC  4111 

Voice  and  Articulation 

3 

SPC  4151 

Listening 

3 

SPC  4152 

Interviewing 

3 

SPC  4153 

Techniques  of  Persuasion 

3 

SPC  4154 

Negotiation  Skills 

3 

SPC  4251 

Business  and  Professional  Speaking 

3 

Total  Quarter  Hours  (Possible  transfer  credit: 

9  quarter  hours) 

27 

For  more  information,  call  617-437-2416  or  617-437-2423. 


Certificates 


m.iiumti 


Technical  Writing  Certificate  Program  £& 

quarter  hours 

ART  4140 

Graphic  Communication  and 

Production                                                           3 

MIS  4101 

MIS  4102 

Introduction  to  Data  Processing 

and  Information  Systems  1,  2                           6 

TCC  4101 

TCC  4102 

Technical  Writing  1,  2                                       6 

TCC  4105 

Editing  for  Science  and  Technology                 3 

TCC  4301 

TCC  4302 

Computer  Software  Technical 

Writing  1,  2                                                         6 

Choose  one 

computer  language. 

MIS  4221 

or 

MIS  4240 


or 

MIS  4250 

or 

MLS  4270 


Cobol  Programming  1 

or 

Introduction  to  Programming  in 

BASIC 

or 

FORTRAN  Programming  1 

or 

Pascal  Programming  1 


(3) 

(3) 

(3) 

J3) 
27 


Total  Quarter  HOUrS  (Possible  transfer  credit:  9  quarter  hours) 


For  more  information,  call  617-437-2416  or  617-437-2423. 


Transition  to  Higher  Education 
Certificate  Program 

This  certificate  program  was  developed  for 
people  who  are  taking  courses  at  the  college 
level  for  the  first  time  and  who  are  experienc- 
ing some  apprehension  about  their  academic 
abilities.  The  program  is  designed  to  help 
develop  basic  skills  in  math,  writing,  and 
computer  literacy.  It  may  assist  you  in  plan- 
ning a  program  of  study,  increasing  your  self 
awareness  and  self-esteem,  and  improving 
communications  with  others.  Lastly,  the  pro- 
gram may  help  you  to  see  how  you  fit  into 
the  organization  in  which  you  may  work. 

Most  students  come  to  Northeastern 
University  to  prepare  for,  or  to  advance  their 


careers.  This  program  emphasizes  skills 
which  are  essential  ingredients  not  only  for 
academic  success  but  also  for  career  mobility 
in  today's  market. 

Specialized  support  services  are  available  to 
students  in  this  certificate  program.  For  this 
reason,  it  is  essential  that  you  complete  a  cer- 
tificate petition  for  this  program  prior  to 
beginning  your  studies.  (Petitions  are 
available  at  the  Boston  Campus  in  room  180 
Ruggles  Building  and  at  all  branch  locations.) 
When  we  receive  your  application  for  the  pro- 
gram, we  will  send  you  information  contain- 
ing a  recommended  sequence  of  study  and 
support  services. 


Certificates        47 

Transition  to  Higher  Education  Certificate  Program  £$ 

quarter  hours 

INT  4110 

Self  Assessment  and  Career 
Development 

3 

ED  4050 

College  Reading  &  Study  Skills 

3 

ENG  4011 

Elements  of  Writing 

3 

ENG  4012 

Elements  of  Grammar 

3 

MTH  4001 

Introduction  to  Mathematics 

3 

PSY  4242 

Development:  Adulthood  and  Aging 

3 

HRM  4301 

Organizational  Behavior 

3 

COM  4101 

Computer  Literacy 

4 

Choose  one  communications  course: 

SPC  4101 

Fundamentals  of  Human 
Communications 

(3) 

SPC  4150 

Self  Concept  and  Communication 

(3) 

SPC  4155 

Organizational  Communication 

(3) 

Total  Quarter  Hours 

28 

Transportation  and  Physical  Distribution  Management  Certificate  ^ 

quarter  hours 

TRN  4301         TRN  4303 

Elements  of  Transportation  1,  2 

6 

TRN  4302         TRN  4304 

Physical  Distribution  Management 
1,2 

6 

MGT  4101 

Introduction  to  Business  and 
Management  1 

3 

Transportation  electives 

6 

Total  Quarter  Hours  (Possible  transfer  credit:  9  quarter  hours) 

21 

For  more  information,  call  617-437-2418. 

tii:U\i\MiM 

Writing  Certificate  Program  £$ 

quarter  hours 

ENG  4349        ENG  4350 

Expository  and  Persuasive 
Writing  1,  2 

6 

ENG  4352 

Expository  Communications 

3 

JRN  4112 

Writing  for  Media  1 

3 

JRN  4113 

Writing  for  Media  2 

3 

TCC4101          TCC4102 

Technical  Writing  1,  2 

6 

ENG  4356 

Creative  Writing 

3 

ENG  4363 

Writing  for  the  Marketplace 

3 

Total  Quarter  Hours  (Possible  transfer  credit:  9  quarter  hours) 

27 

For  more  information,  call  617-437-2416  or  617-437-2423. 


Certificates 


Intermediate  and  Advanced 
Certificate  Programs 

University  College  offers  several  certificate 
programs  designed  to  meet  the  needs  of 
students  who  have  already  completed  a 
substantial  body  of  college  work.  These  pro- 
grams all  have  specific  pre-requisites  for  entry 
and  students  should  read  the  descriptive  in- 
formation provided  to  determine  whether  they 
are  eligible. 
Students  wishing  to  enter  one  of  these  pro- 


grams should  file  a  petition  with  the  Office  of 
Academic  and  Student  Affairs.  If  documenta- 
tion of  transfer  credit  is  important  for 
establishing  that  pre-requisites  have  been 
met,  copies  of  college  transcripts  should  be  at- 
tached to  the  petition.  Petitions  are  available 
from  the  Office  of  Academic  and  Student  Af- 
fairs, 180  Ruggles  Building,  617-437-2400, 
and  at  all  campus  locations. 

All  certificate  policies  stated  on  page  27 
apply  to  Intermediate  and  Advanced  Cer- 
tificate Programs  as  well. 


American  Sign  Language-English 
Interpreting  Certificate  Program 

The  Program 

The  American  Sign  Language-English  Inter- 
preting Certificate  Program  is  designed  to 
offer  students  education  and  training  as  sign 
language  interpreters.  Developed  for  students 
already  proficient  in  American  Sign  Language 
and  English,  the  nine  courses  in  the  program 
cover  the  theory  and  practice  of  interpreting. 
Students  who  are  looking  for  entry-level  staff 
positions  or  freelance  assignments  may  find 
this  program  helpful.  Students  preparing  for 
state  quality  assurance  screening  and  national 
evaluation  may  also  benefit  from  this  program. 

Admission 

Candidates  for  admission  must  have  received 
a  B  or  better  in  Advanced  American  Sign 
Language  Proficiency  2  (ASL  4302),  or  have 


attained  equivalent  skills.  Prospective 
students  must  complete  an  application  process 
in  which  they  demonstrate  proficiency  in 
English  and  American  Sign  Language  as  well 
as  display  an  aptitude  for  tasks  involved  in 
the  interpreting  process.  Previous  experience 
in  the  deaf  community  is  also  highly 
recommended. 

Certification 

Students  must  complete  all  required  course 
work  and  maintain  an  overall  average  of  3.0 
or  better  in  the  program  to  attain  the  certificate. 

For  More  information 

Applications  and  further  information  are 
available  from  the  Sign  Language  Programs 
office,  276  Holmes  Hall,  Northeastern  Univer- 
sity, 360  Huntington  Avenue,  Boston, 
Massachusetts  02115,  617-437-3064  (voice);  or 
617-437-3067  (TTY). 


American  Sign  Language— English  Interpreting  Certificate  Program 

Courses  include  the  following. 


R& 


quarter  hours 

ASL  4600 

Introduction  to  Interpreting 

3 

ASL  4601 

ASL  4602          ASL  4603 

American  Sign  Language 
Interpreting  1,  2,  3 

12 

ASL  4604 

ASL  4605 

Special  Topics  in 
Interpreting  1,  2 

6 

ASL  4606 

Interpreter  Roles  and  Ethics 

3 

ASL  4607 

Interpreting  Lab 

4 

ASL  4608 

Practicum 

4 

Total  Quarter  Hours  (Possible  transfer  credit: 

8  quarter  hours) 

32 

Advanced  placement  examinations  are  available  for  ASL  4202,  ASL  4302,  ASL  4412,  and  ASL  4410, 
which  are  prerequisites  for  courses  for  this  certificate. 


Certificates 


Executive  Management  Certificate 
Program 

The  Program 

This  program  is  designed  for  upper-level 
business  students  who  have  earned  degrees 
already  or  who  are  majoring  in  areas  other 
than  management.  Its  intent  is  to  provide  a 
second  dimension  or  specialization  in  manage- 
ment for  the  accounting,  finance,  marketing 


or  management  information  systems 
professionals. 

This  program  is  open  only  to  students  who 
have  completed  at  least  80  quarter  hours  of 
college-level  work,  primarily  in  business  sub- 
jects. As  part  of  this  80  q.h.  students  must 
meet  the  prerequisites  for  each  course  as 
outlined  in  the  individual  course  descriptions. 
Students  enrolled  in  the  University  College 
BSBA  Management  degree  are  not  eligible  to 
receive  this  certificate. 


■m.tiunfll 


Executive  Management  Certificate  Program  ttfi 


quarter  hours 

MGT  4410 

Project  Management  Process: 

Planning  and  Implementation                         3 

MGT  4323 

Management  and  Leadership                           3 

MGT  4450 

MGT  4451 

Business  Policy  1,  2                                          6 

MGT  4455 

Manager  and  Society                                        3 

MGT  4456 

International  Business  Management 

and  Operations                                                   3 

MGT  4460 

MGT  4461 

Management  Seminar  1,  2                               6 

MKT4420 

Marketing  Management  1                                3 

Total  Quarter  Hours  (Possible  transfer  credit:  9  quarter  hours)                                                      27 

For  more  information,  call  617-437-2418. 


International  Business  Certificate 
Program 

The  Program 

This  program  is  designed  for  students  who 
I  have  earned  business  degrees  already  or  who 
are  upper-level  students  currently  majoring  in 
business.  Its  intent  is  to  provide  a  specializa- 


tion in  international  business  issues  in  addi- 
tion to  the  major  concentration. 

This  program  is  open  only  to  students  who 
have  completed  at  least  80  q.h.  of  college-level 
work,  primarily  in  business  subjects.  As  part 
of  this  80  q.h.  students  must  meet  the  prere- 
quisite for  each  course  as  outlined  in  the  in- 
dividual course  descriptions. 


Certificates 


International  Business  Certificate  Program  2$ 

quarter  hours 

BL  4316 

International  Law                                             3 

ECN  4334 

Comparative  Economic  Systems                      3 

FI4450 

International  Finance                                       3 

HRM  4345 

Comparative  International  Labor 

Relations  Systems                                             3 

MGT  4456 

International  Business                                     3 

MGT  4357 

Cultural  Issues  in  International 

Business                                                            3 

MKT4453 

International  Marketing                                  3 

TON  4350 

International  Transportation  and 
Distribution  Management                                3 

Total  Quarter  Hours  (Possible  transfer  credit:  9  quarter  hours)                                                       24 

For  more  information  call  617-437-2418. 

Professional  Preparation 

Programs 

Preparation  for  National  Certification— APICS 


The  following  courses  are  preparation  for  national  exam  certification  leading  to  the  title  Certified 
Production  and  Inventory  Control  Manager  (CPIM). 


quarter  hours 


PUR  4358 


Materials  Requirements  Planning 


PUR  4365 


Production  Activity  Control 


PUR  4370 


Inventory  Management 


PUR  4390 


Just-In-Time  Manufacturing 


PUR  4395 


Master  Production  Scheduling 


Total  Quarter  Hours 


15 


For  more  information,  call  617-437-2418. 


Preparation  for  National  Certification— NAPM 


The  following  courses  prepare  students  to  take  the  NAPM  certification  exams  leading  to  Certified 
Purchasing  Manager  (C.P.M.).  These  courses  may  be  applied  toward  the  Purchasing  and  Materials 
Management  Certificate  and/or  the  associate's  degree  in  Purchasing. 


quarter  hours 


PUR  4351 


Purchasing  1 


PUR  4352 


Purchasing  2 


Total  Quarter  Hours 


For  more  information,  call  617-437-2418. 


Certificates 


Phlebotomy  Certification  Preparation 


This  program  is  geared  toward  students  who  want  to  enter  the  health  field  as  well  as  to  currently 
practicing  phlebotomists  who  want  to  be  certified.  These  courses  are  designed  to  prepare  students 
for  the  national  certification  examination  for  medical  laboratory  personnel.  Students  should  speak 
to  the  Medical  Laboratory  Coordinator  prior  to  the  start  of  the  term  to  indicate  their  interest  in 
the  program. 


quarter  hours 


MLS  4104  Introduction  to  Phlebotomy 

MLS  4108  Phlebotomy  Applied  Study 


Total  Quarter  Hours 


For  more  information,  call  the  Medical  Laboratory  Coordinator  at  617-437-3664. 

Reai  Estate  Broker  or  Salesperson  Examination 

The  following  courses  cover  the  basic  principles  and  terminology  of  real  estate,  and  the  practices 
of  real  estate  brokerage,  including  appraisal,  finance,  development,  management,  and  investment. 
Upon  successful  completion  of  these  courses,  students  may  take  the  Massachusetts  real  estate  broker's 
or  salesperson's  examination. 


quarter  hours 

RE  4301 

Real  Estate  Fundamentals  1 

3 

RE  4302 

Real  Estate  Fundamentals  2 

3 

Total  Quarter  Hours 

6 

For  more  information,  call  617-437-2418. 

A  Basic  Program  For  Emergency  Medical  Technicians 

This  course  is  designed  for  those  who  wish  to  become  certified  EMTs  as  well  as  for  those  who  just 
want  to  be  prepared  for  emergencies.  Students  who  successfully  complete  the  course  receive  nine 
quarter  hours  of  credit,  a  Northeastern  University  certificate,  and  a  CPR  certification  from 
the  American  Heart  Association.  They  also  become  eligible  to  take  the  state  EMT  licensing 
examination. 

The  EMT  Basic  course  is  offered  at  the  Boston,  Burlington,  and  Dedham  campuses.  Students  spend 
6  hours  in  class  weekly  for  12  weeks,  4  all-day  Saturday  exercises  and  10  hours  of  in-hospital 
emergency  room  observation.  There  is  a  special  tuition  rate. 


quarter  hours 

EMS  4107 

EMT-Basic 

9 

Total  Quarter  Hours 

9 

For  more  information  call  617-272-5500. 


Business  Administration 


Business  Administration  and 
Technology  Degree  Programs 


Martha  P.  Welch,  Assistant  Dean,  Director, 
Business  Administration  Programs 

270  Ruggles  Building 
617-437-2418 

Program  Consultants 

ACC:  Accounting 

Consultant- 
Professor  Paul  A.  Janell  (College  of  Business 
Administration)  (617-437-4645) 
Associate  Consultant  (Accounting  Principles): 
Dean  Walter  E.  Kearney,  Jr.  (College  of 
Business  Administration)  (617-437-2312) 

BL:  Business  Law 

Consultant- 
Thomas  J.  Ahem,  Esq.  (617-426-4211) 

FI:  Finance 

Consultant: 

Professor  Jonathan  Welch  (College  of 

Business  Administration)  (617-437-4572) 

Associate  Consultant: 

Joseph  Stanford  (617-383-9299) 

HTL:  Hotel  and  Restaurant  Management 

Consultant: 

Donald  A.  Witkoski  (617-362-2131,  x361) 

HRM:  Human  Resources  Management 

Consultant: 

Professor  Brendan  Bannister  (College  of 

Business  Administration)  (617-437-2503) 

Associate  Consultant: 

Ronald  E.  Guittarr  (508475-4422) 

IM:  Industrial  Management 

Consultants: 

Professor  Robert  A.  Parsons  (College  of 

Business  Administration)  (617-437-4749) 

Joel  M.  Rosenfeld  (617-491-9200) 

Associate  Consultant: 

James  D.  Mukjian  (617-451-4004) 


INT:  Career/College  Transition 

Consultant: 

Kathleen  H.  Hayes  (617-437-4261) 

MGT:  Management 

Consultant: 

Professor  Daniel  McCarthy  (College  of 

Business  Administration)  (617-437-3255) 

Associate  Consultants: 

W.  Arthur  Gagne  (508-263-5819) 

Robert  L.  Goldberg  (617-267-6400) 

MIS:  Management  Information  Systems 

Consultant: 

Professor  Victor  Godin  (College  of  Business 
Administration)  (617-437-2418) 
Associate  Consultant  (Systems): 
James  F.  Ferreira  (617-969-3100) 
Associate  Consultant  (EDP): 
Thomas  M.  Kelly  (617468-7900) 
Associate  Consultants  (Programming): 
Andrew  E.  Efstathiou  (617-727-6524) 
Bennett  L.  Kramer  (508-588-9100,  x208) 
Associate  Consultant  (Computer  Systems 

Specialist  Programs) 
Alan  M.  Tattle  (617-595-3696) 

MKT:  Marketing 

Consultant: 

Professor  Dan  T.  Dunn,  Jr.  (College  of 

Business  Administration)  (617-4374563) 

Associate  Consultant: 

William  T.  Hadley  (617-266-8400) 

MS:  Quality  Control  and  Management 
Sciences 

Consultant: 

Professor  Robert  A.  Parsons  (College  of 
Business  Administration)  (617-4374749) 
Associate  Consultant- 
William  E.  Grady  (617-721-5770) 

PUR:  Purchasing 

Consultant- 
Stephen  F.  Armstrong  (508-281-2000,  x2519) 

RE:  Real  Estate 

Consultant- 
Peter  Flynn  (617-233-2284) 

TRN:  Transportation  and  Physical 
Distribution  Management 

Consultant- 
Professor  James  F.  Molloy  (College  of 
Business  Administration)  (617-437-4812) 


Business  Administration 


A  Wide  Variety  of  Options: 
Certificates  and  Degrees 

Recognizing  that  adult  students  seek  educa- 
tional opportunities  in  business  and  related 
areas  to  satisfy  many  professional  needs, 
University  College  offers  a  wide  selection  of 
business  and  technology  courses  as  well  as 
structured  academic  programs.  Options  in- 
clude certificate  programs,  associate's  degree 
programs,  and  bachelor's  degree  programs. 
All  certificate  and  degree  programs  offer 
students  an  opportunity  to  achieve  profes- 
sional competence  in  a  formal  set  of  career- 
related  subjects  while  laying  the  foundation 
for  further  professional  growth. 


Certificates  in  Business 

Individuals  can  pursue  a  certificate  program 
to  build  on  or  prepare  for  a  new  career,  to 
qualify  for  a  promotion,  to  stay  current  in  a 
chosen  field,  or  simply  to  acquire  new  skills 
and  knowledge.  Some  individuals  enroll  in  a 
certificate  program  as  part  of  their  traditional 
degree  program.  University  College  offers  cer- 
tificates in  the  following  program  areas: 

Business  Administration 

•  Accounting  (page  28) 

•  Business  Administration  (page  30) 

•  Career  Transition  (page  31) 

•  Compensation  and  Benefits 
Management  (page  31) 

•  Computer  Programming  and 

Systems  Analysis  (page  32) 

•  Computer  Systems  Specialist 

Program  (page  32) 

•  Culinary  Arts  (Chefs  Institute)     (page  34) 

•  Entrepreneuership  and  Small 

Business  (page  35) 

•  Executive  Management  (page  49) 

•  Finance  (page  35) 

•  Food  Service  Management  (page  35) 

•  International  Business  (page  49) 

•  Hotel  and  Restaurant 

Management  (page  37) 

•  Human  Resources  Management    (page  37) 

•  Management  (page  39) 

•  Marketing  (page  40) 

•  Purchasing  and  Materials 
Management  (page  43) 

•  Quick  Start  (page  43) 

•  Real  Estate  (page  44) 

•  Small  Business  (page  45) 


•  Transition  to  Higher  Education    (page  47) 

•  Transportation  and  Physical 
Distribution  Management  (page  47) 

Technology 

•  Electronic  Composition  (page  34) 

•  Operations  Management  (page  41) 

Preparation  for  Certification 
(CPIM  and  C.P.M.) 

Clusters  of  courses  are  being  offered  to  prepare 
students  for  the  national  examinations 
leading  to  the  titles  of  Certified  Production 
and  Inventory  Control  Manager  (CPIM)  and 
Certified  Purchasing  Manager  (C.P.M.).  See 
page  50  for  details. 


Career  Transition  Program 

If  you  are  interested  in  re-entering  the  job 
market  or  changing  careers,  we  offer  a  new 
program  this  year  called  Career  Transition 
Program,  detailed  on  page  31. 


Transition  to  Higher  Education 
Certificate  Program 

If  you  are  thinking  of  taking  courses  at  the 
college  level  for  the  first  time  but  are  in- 
secure about  your  academic  abilities,  consider 
this  program.  It  may  assist  you  in  planning 
courses  of  study  to  develop  basic  skills  in 
math,  writing,  and  computer  literacy.  See 
page  51  for  details. 


Degree  Programs 

Associate  in  Science  Degrees  (AS) 

Through  a  core  of  professional  business 
courses  and  a  well-balanced  sequence  of 
liberal  arts  courses,  students  in  the  Associate 
in  Science  degree  program  acquire  specialized 
knowledge  for  future  managerial  growth. 

To  receive  the  associate's  degree,  a  student 
must  successfully  complete  the  96  quarter 
hours  of  course  credit  specified  for  the  degree. 
Students  who  have  completed  a  certificate 
program  may  then  enroll  in  an  associate's 
degree  program.  (Although  credits  earned  in  a 


Business  Administration 


certificate  program  may  be  applied  toward 
this  degree,  completion  of  a  certificate  pro- 
gram is  not  required.) 

Students  who  wish  to  earn  one  of  the 
Associate  in  Science  degrees  in  business  and 
have  not  earned  80  quarter  hours  of  credit 
are  required  to  enroll  in  the  Open  Business 
courses  listed  on  page  57.  Open  Business 
courses  include  a  required  component  that 
may  be  used  for  course  validation  in  the 
Bachelor  of  Science  in  Business  Administra- 
tion (BSBA)  degree  programs. 

Associate's  degrees  are  offered  in  the  follow- 
ing areas: 


Business  Administration 

•  Accounting 

(page  60) 

•  Business  Administration 

(page  61) 

•  Finance 

(page  62) 

•  Hotel  and  Restaurant 

Management 

(page  63) 

•  Human  Resources  Management 

(page  64) 

•  Management  Information 

Systems 

(page  66) 

•  Marketing 

(page  67) 

•  Purchasing  and  Materials 

Management 

(page  68) 

•  Real  Estate 

(page  69) 

•  Transportation  and  Physical 

Distribution 

(page  70) 

Technology 

•  Industrial  Management 

(page  65) 

Bachelor  of  Science  in  Business 
Administration  (BSBA) 

University  College  offers  a  Bachelor  of 
Science  in  Business  Administration  degree 
with  course  concentrations  in  these  areas: 

•  Accounting 

•  Finance 

•  Management 

•  Management  Information  Systems 

•  Marketing 

The  Bachelor  of  Science  in  Business  Ad- 
ministration degree  programs  of  University 
College  are  designed  for  men  and  women 
seeking  to  prepare  themselves  for  managerial 
responsibility  in  business,  government,  and 
other  organizations  with  the  goal  of  develop- 
ing the  ability  to  recognize  and  solve  pro- 
blems and  to  understand  the  role  of  the 


business  firm  in  the  community,  the  nation, 
and  the  world.  In  developing  these  skills, 
students  have  the  opportunity  to  gain  not 
only  a  broad  understanding  of  business  and 
organizational  problems  through  specialized 
courses,  but  also  through  first-hand  knowl- 
edge of  effective  teaching  practitioners. 

To  ensure  a  well-rounded  background  that 
is  so  valuable  in  the  business  world,  the  col- 
lege combines  its  business  curriculum  with 
courses  from  the  sciences,  humanities,  and 
social  sciences. 

After  the  course-work  foundation  is  com- 
pleted, (See  "Planning  your  Program  of  Study 
Toward  a  Bachelor  of  Science  in  Business  Ad- 
ministration degree,"  p.  55)  the  various  func- 
tional areas  of  business  are  emphasized  and 
students  concentrate  their  studies  in  specific 
areas.  (Detailed  descriptions  of  these  areas 
follow  this  section.)  In  most  of  these  upper- 
level  courses,  the  traditional  lecture-and- 
recitation  format  is  supplemented  by  problem- 
solving  and  case-study  methods  where 
students  analyze  actual  businesses  and 
business  problems  and  present  recommenda- 
tions for  possible  solutions.  Students  are  en- 
couraged to  develop  independent  thinking,  to 
support  ideas  with  fact  and  logic,  and  to 
analyze  and  challenge  propositions. 

Upon  completion  of  the  Bachelor  of  Science 
in  Business  Administration  degree,  the 
graduate  may  choose  to  go  on  to  pursue 
higher  degrees.  In  general,  students  find  that 
graduate  schools  view  a  Bachelor  of  Science 
degree  in  Business  Administration  as  solid 
preparation  for  graduate  work,  not  only  in 
business  but  also  in  public  administration, 
health-care  administration,  and  educational 
administration.  Law  schools  look  favorably  on 
the  prelegal  background  obtained  in  business 
school.  Although  the  Association  of  American 
Law  Schools  does  not  recommend  particular 
courses  or  curricula  for  prelegal  students,  it 
does  advise  undergraduates  to  develop  critical 
understanding  of  the  institutions  and  values 
with  which  the  law  deals.  Many  careers  in 
law  are  directly  involved  in  the  business 
world,  either  in  large  corporations  or  in 
private  practice. 

Accreditation  by  the  American  Assembly 
of  Collegiate  Schools  of  Business 

University  College's  Bachelor  of  Science  in 
Business  Administration  Degree  is  fully 
accredited  by  the  American  Assembly  of 
Collegiate  Schools  of  Business,  indicating 


Business  Administration 


that  the  programs  meet  the  accrediting 
agency's  standards  for  faculty  and  student 
quality,  curriculum  design,  and  overall 
University  support. 

Industrial  Technology  Bachelor  of  Science 

Degrees  (BS)  are  offered  in  the  following 
areas: 

•  Electronic  Publishing  Technology  (page  76) 

•  Operations  Technology  (page  75) 

The  technology  programs  are  designed  to 
prepare  the  student  to  meet  the  challenge  of 
interfacing  technology  and  society.  The 
technology  student  not  only  learns  related 
disciplines  but  also  becomes  oriented  in 
disciplines  to  which  his  or  her  technological 
skills  will  be  applied. 

Opportunities  for  Associate's  Degree 
Graduates 

Graduates  of  the  engineering  technology  or 
science  technology  programs  in  Northeastern 
University's  School  of  Engineering 
Technology,  community  colleges,  or  other 
similar  colleges  and  institutions  who  have 
earned  the  Associate  in  Engineering  or  the 
Associate  in  Science  degree,  may  transfer  ap- 
plicable credits  toward  the  degree  requirements 
of  the  baccalaureate  programs  in  industrial 
technology. 

Special  Studies 

University  College  offers  a  variety  of  Special 
Studies.  These  courses  give  students  an  oppor- 
tunity to  earn  credits  in  Advanced  Tutorials, 
Independent  Studies,  Honors  Programs,  and 
Field  Work.  Consult  course  descriptions  on 
pages  16-17. 

Planning  Your  Program  of  Study  Toward 
a  Bachelor  of  Science  in  Business 
Administration  Degree 

Students  who  plan  to  work  toward  the 
Bachelor  of  Science  in  Business  Administra- 
tion Degree  should  submit  transcripts  of 


previously  completed  college-level  course  work 
and  a  Transfer  Credit  Petition  to  the  Office  of 
Academic  and  Student  Affairs.  (Transfer 
Credit  Petitions  may  be  requested  by  calling 
617-437-2400.  Petitions  are  also  available  at 
all  campus  locations.)  Students  will  receive  by 
mail  a  transfer  credit  evaluation  and  a  sug- 
gested plan  of  study  to  prepare  for  admission 
to  this  program.  When  this  paperwork  has 
been  completed,  students  are  encouraged  to 
schedule  an  appointment  to  discuss  their  pro- 
grams with  an  academic  adviser. 

Students  who  do  not  have  any  academic 
courses  that  may  be  transferred  from  another 
educational  institution  or  program  should 
meet  with  an  academic  adviser  early  in  their 
studies  at  University  College.  These  students 
are  required  to  complete  80  quarter  hours  of 
credit,  including  English  courses  ENG  4110, 
ENG  4111,  and  ENG  4112;  mathematics 
courses  MTH  4110  and  MTH  4111;  and  a  social 
science  elective  from  the  course  list  that 
follows.  This  course  work  must  be  completed 
prior  to  admission  to  the  BSBA  degree  program. 

Once  students  have  met  these  requirements, 
they  should  complete  a  Petition  for  Admission 
to  the  Bachelor  of  Science  in  Business  Admin- 
istration Degree  program  and  return  it  to  the 
Office  of  Academic  and  Student  Affairs  to  in- 
itiate the  admissions  process.  This  petition 
may  be  obtained  at  all  campus  locations  or  by 
calling  617-437-2400. 

Admission  to  the  BSBA  Degree  program  is 
restricted  to  students  who  have  maintained  a 
2.0  cumulative  grade-point  average  and  com- 
pleted a  minimum  of  80  quarter  hours  of 
credit. 

Students  should  choose  their  80  quarter 
hours  of  credit  from  the  course  list  that 
follows. 


Business  Administration 


Recommended  Lower-Level  Courses 

ACC  4101 

ACC  4102 

ACC  4103 

Accounting  Principles  1,  2,  3 

BL  4101 

BL  4102 

Law  1,  2 

ECN  4115 

ECN  4116 

ECN  4117 

Economic  Principles  and  Problems  1,  2,  3 

ECN  4250 

ECN  4251 

Statistics  1,  2 

ENG  4110 

ENG  4111 

Critical  Writing  1,  2 

ENG  4112 

Approaches  to  Literature 

ENG  4380 

ENG  4381 

Business  Writing  and  Reports  1,  2 

HST  4101 

The  Civilization  of  the  Ancient 
and  Medieval  Worlds 

HST  4102 

or 

HST  4103 

The  Civilization  of  the  Early  Modern  World 

or 

The  Civilization  of  the  Modern  World 

MGT  4101 

MGT  4102 

MGT  4103 

Introduction  to  Business  and 
Management  1,  2,  3 

MIS  4101 

MIS  4102 

•  - 

Introduction  to  Data  Processing  and 
Information  Systems  1,  2 

MS  4325 

Business  Decision  Models 

MTH  4110 

MTH  4111 

Math  1,  2 

PHL  4100 

Philosophical  Thinking 

PSY  4110 

Introduction  to  Psychology: 
Fundamental  Issues 

PSY  4111 

or 

PSY  4112 


Introduction  to  Psychology: 

Developmental  Aspects 

or 

Introduction  to  Psychology: 

Personal  Dynamics 


SOC  4100 


Roles,  Cultures,  and  the  Individual 


SOC  4101 

or 

SOC  4102 


Inequality  and  Institutions 


or 


Institutions  and  Social  Change 


SPC  4101 


Fundamentals  of  Human  Communication 


3  quarter  hours  of  a  natural  science  elective 


Special  Requirements  for  BSBA 
Degree  Programs 

Northeastern  University  is  unique  in  the 
New  England  region  in  that  both  its  full-time 
and  part-time  bachelor's  degree  business  pro- 
grams are  accredited  by  the  American 
Assembly  of  Collegiate  Schools  of  Business 
(AACSB). 

The  following  procedures  assure  that 
University  College's  BSBA  programs  conform 
to  AACSB  standards. 

1.  Reserved  and  Open  Sections 

Business  courses  in  the  BSBA  programs  are 
classified  as  reserved  and  open.  Reserved 
courses  are  upper-level,  some  of  which  are 
mandatory  for  students  who  have  enrolled  in 
the  BSBA  degree  program.  To  be  qualified  to 


register  for  a  reserved  course,  the  student 
must  have  earned  a  total  of  80  or  more 
credits  (including  transfer  credits).  Reserved 
courses  are  offered  at  the  Boston,  Burlington, 
Dedham,  Framingham,  and  Weymouth  cam- 
puses. A  student  may  register  for  an  open 
course  anytime,  providing  he  or  she  has 
fulfilled  the  prerequisites. 

2.  Validation 

Validation  is  the  term  used  to  describe  pro- 
cedures that  test  whether  an  open  course 
completed  at  the  lower  division  of  a  bachelor's 
progam  should  be  accepted  for  transfer  credit 
in  the  upper  division  of  an  AACSB-approved 
bachelor's  degree  program.  There  are  three 
approved  validation  methods: 


Business  Administration 


•  Sequential  Course.  Students  who  enroll  in 
a  Bachelor  of  Science  in  Business  Ad- 
ministration Degree  program  can  validate  a 
course  taken  at  University  College  or 
elsewhere  by  successfully  completing  a 
course  that  is  sequential  to  the  course 
already  completed.  The  sequential  course 
must  be  taken  in  a  reserved  section.  For 
example,  successful  completion  of  Cost 
Accounting  2  in  a  reserved  course  can 
validate  Cost  Accounting  1,  regardless  of 
where  the  student  completed  Cost 
Accounting  1. 


•  College-Level  Examination  Program 
(CLEP)  and/or  Proficiency  Examination 
Program  (PEP).  These  standard  examina- 
tions can  be  used  to  validate  some  previously 
taken  upper-level  business  courses. 

•  Departmental  Examination.  In  cases 
where  a  sequential  course  does  not  exist  or  is 
not  desired  by  a  student,  and  no  appropriate 
CLEP  or  PEP  examination  exists,  validation 
can  be  accomplished  through  a  departmental 
examination.  Required  upper-level  courses  are 
listed  as  follows  under  Reserved  and  Open 
Sections. 


Open  Business  Courses 


Open  business  courses  are  available  on  an  open  enrollment  basis  as  long  as  the  stated  prerequisites 
are  met  and  the  student  has  earned  under  80  quarter  hours  of  credit.  Open  business  courses  are 
used  to  fulfill  associate  degree  requirements.  Candidates  for  the  BSBA  degree  should  enroll  in  reserved 
business  courses;  however,  validated  open  business  courses  are  transferrable  into  the  BSBA  degree 
program.  See  page  18. 


ACC  4301         ACC  4302 

ACC  4303              Intermediate  Accounting  1,  2,  3 

ACC  4310 

Cost  Accounting  1 

FI  4301 

Principles  of  Finance 

FI  4302 

Financial  Management 

FI  4310 

Investment  Principles 

FI  4320 

Credit  Principles 

FI  4325 

Budgeting  and  Planning 

HRM  4301 

Organizational  Behavior 

HRM  4302 

Introduction  to  Human  Resources 
Management 

HRM  4303 

Applied  Human  Resources  Management 

IM4301 

Introduction  to  Operations  Management 

MIS  4301          MIS  4302 

Structured  Systems  Analysis 
and  Design  1,  2 

MIS  4307 

Communications  and  Networking 

MKT  4301 

Introduction  to  Marketing  1 

MKT  4302 

Introduction  to  Marketing  2 

MKT  4310 

Advertising  Management  1 

MKT  4315 

Sales  Management  1 

MKT  4320 

Marketing  Management  1 

MKT  4330 

Marketing  Research  1 

Business  Administration 


Reserved  Business  Courses 

The  courses  below  are  offered  for  students  in  the  Bachelor  of  Science  degree  programs  and  for  those 
students  who  have  earned  80  quarter  hours  of  credit.  Appropriate  course  prerequisites  are  required. 

ACC  4400 

Accounting  Informations  Systems 

ACC  4401 

ACC  4402 

ACC  4403 

Intermediate  Accounting  1,  2,  3 

ACC  4404 

Intermediate  Accounting  4 

ACC  4410 

Cost  Accounting  1 

ACC  4411 

Cost  Accounting  2 

ACC  4425 

ACC  4426 

Auditing  1,  Auditing  2 

ACC  4440 

ACC  4441 

Federal  Income  Taxes  1,  2 

FI4401 

Principles  of  Finance 

FI4402 

Financial  Management 

FI  4403 

Financial  Strategy 

FI4410 

Investment  Principles 

FI4411 

Investment  Management 

FI4420 

Credit  Principles 

FI4421 

Credit  Management 

FI4425 

Budgeting  and  Planning 

FI4426 

Financial  Control 

FI4450 

International  Finance 

HRM4401 

Organizational  Behavior 

HRM4402 

Introduction  to  Human  Resources 
Management 

HRM4403 

Applied  Human  Resources  Management 

IM4401 

Introduction  to  Operations  Management 

MGT  4410 

Project  Management  Process:  Planning 
and  Implementation 

MGT  4450 

MGT  4451 

Business  Policy  1,  2 

MGT  4455 

Manager  and  Society 

MGT  4456 

International  Business 
Management  and  Operations 

MGT  4460 

MGT  4461 

Management  Seminar  1,  2 

MIS  4401 

MIS  4402 

Structured  Systems  Analysis  and  Design  1,  2 

Business  Administration         59 

MIS  4407 

Communications  and  Networking 

MIS  4445 

Database  Management  Systems 

MIS  4448 

Information  Resource  Management 

MIS  4485 

Applied  MIS  Development  Project 

MKT  4401 

MKT  4402 

Introduction  to  Marketing  1,  2 

MKT  4410 

MKT  4411 

Advertising  Management  1,  2 

MKT  4415 

MKT  4416 

Sales  Management  1,  2 

MKT  4420 

Marketing  Management  1 

MKT  4430 

MKT  4431 

Marketing  Research  1,  2 

MKT  4453 

Competitive  Strategy 

MKT  4457 

International  Marketing 

Business  Administration 


Accounting  Associate  in  Science  Degree  (Major  Code  470)  <x=3 


See  also:  Accounting  Bachelor  of  Science  in 

Business  Administration  Degree,  page  71. 

Core  Courses 
Liberal  Arts 

quarter  hours 

ENG  4110 

ENG  4111 

Critical  Writing  1,  2                                         6 

ENG  4112 

Approaches  to  Literature                                  3 

MTH  4110 

MTH  4111 

Math  1,  2                                                           6 

ECN  4250 

ECN  4251 

Statistics  1,  2                                                    6 

ECN  4115 

ECN  4116         ECN  4117 

Economic  Principles  and 

Problems  1,  2,  3                                                9 

PSY  4110 

Introduction  to  Psychology: 

Fundamental  Issues                                          3 

PSY  4111 

or 

PSY  4112 


Introduction  to  Psychology: 

Developmental  Aspects 

or 

Introduction  to  Psychology: 

Personal  Dynamics 


Business  Administration 

BL  4101 

BL  4102 

Law  1,  2 

6 

MS  4325 

Business  Decision  Models 

3 

FI  4301 

Principles  of  Finance 

3 

HRM  4301 

Organizational  Behavior 

3 

HRM  4302 

Introduction  to  Human  Resources 
Management 

3 

MGT  4101 

MGT  4102 

Introduction  to  Business  and 
Management  1,  2 

6 

MIS  4101 

MIS  4102 

Introduction  to  Data  Processing 
and  Information  Systems  1,  2 

6 

MKT  4201 

Introduction  to  Marketing  1 

3 

Major  Concentration  Courses 

ACC  4101 

ACC  4102         ACC  4103 

Accounting  Principles  1,  2,  3 

9 

ACC  4301 

ACC  4302         ACC  4303 

Intermediate  Accounting  1,  2,  3 

9 

ACC  4310 

Cost  Accounting  1 

3 

Nonbusiness  electives 

6 

Total  Quarter  Hours 

96 

Business  Administration         61 

Business  Administration  Associate 

in  Science  Degree  (Major  Code  401)  S3 

See  also  Management  Bachelor  of  Science 

in  Business  Administration  Degree,  page  78. 

Core  Courses 
Liberal  Arts 

quarter  hours 

ENG  4110 

ENG  4111 

Critical  Writing  1,  2                                           6 

ENG  4112 

Approaches  to  Literature                                 3 

MTH4110 

MTH  4111 

Math  1,  2                                                          6 

ECN  4250 

ECN  4251 

Statistics  1,  2                                                    6 

ECN  4115 

ECN  4116         ECN  4117 

Economic  Principles  and 

Problems  1,  2,  3                                                9 

PSY  4110 

Introduction  to  Psychology: 

Fundamental  Issues                                         3 

PSY  4111 

or 

PSY  4112 


Introduction  to  Psychology: 

Developmental  Aspects 

or 

Introduction  to  Psychology: 

Personal  Dynamics 


(3) 


(3) 


Business  Administration 

MGT  4101 

MGT  4102          MGT  4103 

Introduction  to  Business  and 
Management  1,  2,  3 

9 

ACC  4101 

ACC  4102         ACC  4103 

Accounting  Principles  1,  2,  3 

9 

MIS  4101 

MIS  4102 

Introduction  to  Data  Processing 
and  Information  Systems  1,  2 

6 

MS  4325 

Business  Decision  Models 

3 

HRM  4301 

Organizational  Behavior 

3 

HRM  4302 

Introduction  to  Human  Resources 
Management 

3 

HRM  4303 

Applied  Human  Resources 
Management 

3 

FI4301 

Principles  of  Finance 

3 

MKT  4301 

Introduction  to  Marketing  1 

3 

Electives 

Nonbusiness  electives 

6 

Open  electives 

12 

Total  Quarter  Hours 

96 

Business  Administration 


Finance  Associate  in  Science  Degree  (Major  Code  476) 


See  also:  Finance  Bachelor  of  Science  in  Business  Administration  Degree,  page  73. 

Core  Courses 
Liberal  Arts 

quarter  hours 

ENG  4110 

ENG  4111                                       Critical  Writing  1,  2                                         6 

ENG  4112 

Approaches  to  Literature                                 3 

MTH  4110 

MTH  4111                                      Math  1, 2                                                           6 

ECN  4250 

ECN  4251                                       Statistics  1, 2                                                    6 

ECN  4115 

ECN  4116         ECN  4117              Economic  Principles  and 

Problems  1,  2,  3                                                9 

PSY  4110 

Introduction  to  Psychology: 

Fundamental  Issues                                         3 

PSY  4111 

or 

PSY  4112 


Introduction  to  Psychology: 

Developmental  Aspects 

or 

Introduction  to  Psychology: 

Personal  Dynamics 


Business  Administration 

MGT  4101 

MGT  4102 

Introduction  to  Business  and 
Management  1,  2 

6 

ACC  4101 

ACC  4102 

ACC  4103 

Accounting  Principles  1,  2,  3 

9 

BL  4101 

BL  4102 

Law  1,  2 

6 

MS  4325 

Business  Decision  Models 

3 

MIS  4101 

MIS  4102 

Introduction  to  Data  Processing 
and  Information  Systems  1,  2 

6 

HRM  4301 

Organizational  Behavior 

3 

HRM  4302 

Introduction  to  Human  Resources 
Management 

3 

MKT  4301 

Introduction  to  Marketing  1 

3 

Choose  one 

computer  programming  course  from: 

MIS  4221 

or 

MIS  4241 

or 

MIS  4250 


COBOL  Programming  1 

or 

Programming  in  BASIC  1 

or 

FORTRAN  Programming  1 


Major  Concentration  Courses 

FI  4301 

Principles  of  Finance 

3 

FI  4302 

Financial  Management 

3 

FI  4310 

Investment  Principles 

3 

FI  4320 

Credit  Principles 

3 

FI  4325 

Budgeting  and  Planning 

3 

Electives 

3 

Total  Quarter  Hours 

96 

Business  Administration 


Hotel  and  Restaurant  Management             <=g^ 
Associate  in  Science  Degree  (Major  Code  472)  S3 

Core  Courses 
Liberal  Arts 

quarter  hours 

ENG  4110        ENG  4111 

Critical  Writing  1,  2 

6 

ENG  4112 

Approaches  to  Literature 

3 

MTH  4110        MTH  4111 

Math  1,  2 

6 

SPC  4101 

Fundamentals  of  Human 
Communication 

3 

ECN  4115         ECN  4116 

Economic  Principles  and 
Problems  1,  2 

6 

PSY  4110 

Introduction  to  Psychology: 
Fundamental  Issues 

3 

PSY  4111 

or 

PSY  4112 


Introduction  to  Psychology: 

Developmental  Aspects 

or 

Introduction  to  Psychology: 

Personal  Dynamics 


(3) 


(3) 


Business  Administration 

MGT  4101 

MGT  4102 

Introduction  to  Business  and 
Management  1,  2 

6 

ACC  4101 

ACC  4102 

Accounting  Principles  1,  2 

6 

MIS  4101 

MIS  4102 

Introduction  to  Data  Processing 
and  Information  Systems  1,  2 

6 

HRM4301 

Organizational  Behavior 

3 

HRM  4302 

Introduction  to  Human  Resources 
Management 

3 

HRM  4303 

Applied  Human  Resources 
Management 

3 

Major  Concentration  Courses 

HTL4301 

Introduction  to  Hotel  and 
Restaurant  Management 

3 

HTL4303 

Front  Office  Management 

3 

HTL4304 

Hotel  and  Restaurant  Law 

3 

HTL  4307 

Food  Service  Engineering  and 
Sanitation 

3 

HTL  4308 

Food  and  Beverage  Cost  Control 

3 

HTL  4309 

Managerial  Accounting  for  the 
Hospitality  Industry 

3 

HTL  4313 

Introduction  to  Tourism 

3 

HTL  4320 

Food  Preparation  Intensive 

6 

Electives 

12 

Total  Quarter  Hours 

96 

64         Business  Administration 

Human  Resources  Management                  <y^\ 
Associate  in  Science  Degree  (Major  Code  477)  G=5 

Core  Courses 
Liberal  Arts 

quarter  hours 

ENG  4110         ENG  4111 

Critical  Writing  1,  2 

6 

ENG  4112 

Approaches  to  Literature 

3 

MTH  4110        MTH  4111 

Math  1,  2 

6 

ECN  4250         ECN  4251 

Statistics  1,  2 

6 

ECN  4115         ECN  4116         ECN  4117 

Economic  Principles  and 
Problems  1,  2,  3 

9 

PSY  4110 

Introduction  to  Psychology: 
Fundamental  Issues 

3 

PSY  4111 

or 

PSY  4112 


Introduction  to  Psychology: 

Developmental  Aspects 

or 

Introduction  to  Psychology: 

Personal  Dynamics 


MIS  4221 

or 

MIS  4241 

or 

MIS  4250 


COBOL  Programming  1 

or 

Programming  in  BASIC  1 

or 

FORTRAN  Programming  1 


(3) 
(3) 


Business  Administration 

MGT  4101 

MGT  4102 

Introduction  to  Business  and 
Management  1,  2 

6 

ACC  4101 

ACC  4102 

Accounting  Principles  1,  2 

6 

MIS  4101 

MIS  4102 

Introduction  to  Data  Processing 
and  Information  Systems  1,  2 

6 

MS  4325 

Business  Decision  Models 

3 

BL  4101 

Law  1 

3 

FI  4301 

Principles  of  Finance 

3 

MKT  4301 

Introduction  to  Marketing  1 

3 

Choose  one 

computer  programming  course  from: 

(3) 
(3) 
(3) 


Major  Concentration  Courses 

HRM  4301 

Organizational  Behavior 

3 

HRM4302 

Introduction  to  Human  Resources 
Management 

3 

HRM  4303 

Applied  Human  Resources 
Management 

3 

HRM  4310        HRM  4311 

Personnel  Management  1,  2 

6 

HRM  4330        HRM  4332 

Employment  Rights  1,  2 

6 

HRM  4340 

Public  and  Private  Sector 
Collective  Bargaining 

3 

Nonbusiness  electives 

3 

Total  Quarter  Hours 

96 

Business  Administration 


Industrial  Management  Associate  in 

Science  Degree  (Major  Code  478) 

■ilUM.'M 

Core  Courses 
Liberal  Arts 

quarter  hours 

ENG  4110         ENG  4111 

Critical  Writing  1,  2 

6 

ENG  4112 

Approaches  to  Literature 

3 

MTH  4110        MTH  4111 

Math  1,  2 

6 

ECN  4250         ECN  4251 

Statistics  1,  2 

6 

ECN  4115         ECN  4116 

ECN  4117 

Economic  Principles  and 
Problems  1,  2,  3 

9 

MTH  4130        MTH  4131 

Calculus  for  Nonengineers  1,  2 

6 

PSY  4110 

Introduction  to  Psychology: 
Fundamental  Issues 

3 

PSY  4111 

or 

PSY  4112 


Introduction  to  Psychology: 

Developmental  Aspects 

or 

Introduction  to  Psychology: 

Personal  Dynamics 


MIS  4221 

or 

MIS  4241 

or 

MIS  4250 


COBOL  Programming  1 

or 

Programming  in  BASIC  1 

or 

FORTRAN  Programming  1 


(3) 


(3) 


Business  Administration 

MGT  4101 

MGT  4102 

Introduction  to  Business  and 
Management  1,  2 

6 

ACC  4101 

ACC  4102 

Accounting  Principles  1,  2 

6 

MIS  4101 

MIS  4102 

Introduction  to  Data  Processing  and 
Information  Systems  1,  2 

6 

MS  4325 

Business  Decision  Models 

3 

MS  4334 

Statistical  Quality  Control 

3 

FI  4301 

Principles  of  Finance 

3 

Choose  one 

computer  programming  course  from: 

(1) 

(3) 
(3) 


Major  Concentration  Courses 

IM4301 

Introduction  to  Operations 
Management 

3 

IM4302 

Operations  Analysis 

3 

IM4314 

Productivity  Enhancement  and 
Quality  Management 

3 

IM4317 

Purchasing  and  Materials  Management 

3 

IM4321 

Operations  Planning  and  Control 

3 

IM4326 

Operations  Management  Policy 

3 

Electives 

3 

Total  Quarter  Hours 

96 

Business  Administration 


Management  Information  Systems 
Associate  in  Science  Degree  (Major  Code  475) 


See  also:  Management  Information  Systems  Bachelor  of  Science  in  Business  Administration, 
page  80. 

Core  Courses 
Liberal  Arts 

quarter  hours 

ENG  4110 

ENG  4111 

Critical  Writing  1,  2 

6 

ENG  4112 

Approaches  to  Literature 

3 

MTH  4110 

MTH  4111 

Math  1,  2 

6 

ECN  4250 

ECN  4251 

Statistics  1,  2 

6 

ECN  4115 

ECN  4116         ECN  4117             Economic  Principles  and 

Problems  1,  2,  3 

9 

SPC  4101 

Fundamentals  of  Human 
Communication 

3 

Business  Administration 

ACC  4101 

ACC  4102 

Accounting  Principles  1,  2 

6 

MGT  4101 

MGT  4102 

Introduction  to  Business  and 
Management  1,  2 

6 

MS  4325 

Business  Decision  Models 

3 

FI  4301 

Principles  of  Finance 

3 

HRM  4301 

Organizational  Behavior 

3 

HRM  4302 

Introduction  to  Human  Resources 
Management 

3 

HRM  4303 

Applied  Human  Resources 
Management 

3 

IM4301 

Introduction  to  Operations  Management 

3 

Major  Concentration  Courses 

MIS  4101 

MIS  4102 

Introduction  to  Data  Processing 
and  Information  Systems  1,  2 

6 

MIS  4221 

MIS  4222 

COBOL  Programming  1,  2 

6 

MIS  4230 

PC  Software  for  Professionals 

3 

MIS  4236 

Advanced  PC  Software 

3 

MIS  4301 

MIS  4302 

Structured  Systems  Analysis  and 
Design  1,  2 

6 

MIS  4307 

Communications  and  Networking 

3 

Electives 

6 

Total  Quarter  Hours 

96 

business  Administration 


Marketing  Associate  in 

Science  Degree  (Major  Code  479)  53 

See  also:  Marketing  Bachelor  of  Science  in 

Business  Administration  Degree,  page  82. 

Core  Courses 
Liberal  Arts 

■ 

quarter  hours 

ENG  4110 

ENG  4111 

Critical  Writing  1,  2 

6 

ENG  4112 

Approaches  to  Literature 

3 

MTH4110 

MTH4111 

Math  1,  2 

6 

ECN  4250 

ECN  4251 

Statistics  1,  2 

6 

ECN  4115 

ECN  4116 

ECN  4117 

Economic  Principles  and 
Problems  1,  2,  3 

9 

ENG  4380 

Business  Writing  and  Reports  1 

3 

SPC  4101 

Fundamentals  of  Human 
Communication 

3 

Business  Administration 

MGT  4101 

MGT  4102 

Introduction  to  Business  and 
Management  1,  2 

6 

ACC  4101 

ACC  4102 

Accounting  Principles  1,  2 

6 

HRM4301 

Organizational  Behavior 

3 

HRM  4302 

Introduction  to  Human  Resources 
Management 

3 

MIS  4101 

MIS  4102 

Introduction  to  Data  Processing 
and  Information  Systems  1,  2 

6 

MS  4325 

Business  Decision  Models 

3 

FI  4301 

Principles  of  Finance 

3 

Major  Concentration  Courses 

MKT  4301 

MKT  4302 

Introduction  to  Marketing  1,  2 

6 

MKT  4310 

Advertising  Management  1 

3 

MKT  4315 

Sales  Management  1 

3 

MKT  4320 

MKT  4321 

Marketing  Management  1,  2 

6 

MKT  4330 

Marketing  Research  1 

3 

MKT  4307 

Telemarketing  Management 

3 

Nonbusiness  electives 

6 

Total  Quarter  Hours 

96 

68         Business  Administration 

Purchasing  and  Materials  Management           <j==n 
Associate  in  Science  Degree  (Major  Code  431)  (j=±> 

Core  Courses 
Liberal  Arts 

quarter  hours 

ENG  4110 

ENG  4111 

Critical  Writing  1,  2 

6 

ENG  4112 

Approaches  to  Literature 

3 

MTH  4110 

MTH  4111 

Math  1,  2 

6 

ECN  4250 

ECN  4251 

Statistics  1,  2 

6 

ECN  4115 

ECN  4116         ECN  4117 

Economic  Principles  and 
Problems  1,  2,  3 

9 

Business  Administration 

MGT  4101 

MGT  4102 

Introduction  to  Business  and 
Management  1,  2 

6 

ACC  4101 

ACC  4102 

Accounting  Principles  1,  2 

6 

MIS  4101 

MIS  4102 

Introduction  to  Data  Processing 
and  Information  Systems  1,  2 

6 

HRM  4301 

Organizational  Behavior 

3 

HRM  4302 

Introduction  to  Human  Resources 
Management 

3 

MS  4325 

Business  Decision  Models 

3 

IM4301 

Introduction  to  Operations  Management 

3 

MKT  4301 

Introduction  to  Marketing  1 

3 

Major  Concentration  Courses 

PUR  4351 

PUR  4352 

Purchasing  1,  2 

6 

PUR  4357 

Business  Negotiations 

3 

PUR  4358 

Materials  Requirements  Planning 

3 

PUR  4365 

Production  Activity  Control 

3 

PUR  4370 

Inventory  Management 

3 

TRN  4305 

Traffic  Management 

3 

Nonbusiness  electives 

12 

Total  Quarter  Hours 

96 

Business  Aamimsiraiion 


Real  Estate  Associate  in  Science  Degree  (Major  Code  471)7x5 

Core  Courses 
Liberal  Arts 

quarter  hours 

ENG  4110 

ENG  4111                                       Critical  Writing  1,  2                                         6 

ENG  4112 

Approaches  to  Literature                                   3 

MTH4110 

MTH  4111                                     Math  1, 2                                                        6 

ECN  4250 

ECN  4251                                       Statistics  1, 2                                                    6 

ECN  4115 

ECN  4116         ECN  4117              Economic  Principles  and 

Problems  1,  2,  3                                                  9 

Business  Administration 

MGT  4101 

MGT  4102                                      Introduction  to  Business  and 

Management  1,  2                                              6 

ACC  4101 

ACC  4102                                       Accounting  Principles  1,  2                                6 

FI 4301 

Principles  of  Finance                                         3 

HRM  4301 

Organizational  Behavior                                  3 

HRM  4302 

Introduction  to  Human  Resources 
Management                                                       3 

Major  Concentration  Courses 

RE  4301 

RE  4302                                          Real  Estate  Fundamentals  1, 2                        6 

RE  4323 

RE  4324                                          Real  Estate  Appraisal  1,  2                               6 

RE  4328 

RE  4329                                          Real  Estate  Financial 

Analysis  1,  2                                                     6 

RE  4341 

RE  4342                                          Real  Estate  Law  1,  2                                        6 

Real  Estate  Elective                                           3 

Nonbusiness  electives                                                                                        is 

Total  Quarter  Hours                                                                                            96 

Business  Administration 


Transportation  and  Physical  Distribution  Management  Associate  in  %jl 
Science  Degree  (Major  Code  483)                                           C3 

Core  Courses 
Liberal  Arts 

quarter  hours 

ENG4110 

ENG  4111 

Critical  Writing  1,  2 

6 

ENG  4112 

Approaches  to  Literature 

3 

MTH  4110 

MTH  4111 

Math  1,  2 

6 

ECN  4250 

ECN  4251 

Statistics  1,  2 

6 

ECN  4115 

ECN  4116 

ECN  4117 

Economic  Principles  and 
Problems  1,  2,  3 

9 

Business  Administration 

MGT  4101 

MGT  4102 

Introduction  to  Business  and 
Management  1,  2 

6 

ACC  4101 

ACC  4102 

Accounting  Principles  1,  2 

6 

MS  4325 

Business  Decision  Models 

3 

FI  4301 

Principles  of  Finance 

3 

HRM  4301 

Organizational  Behavior 

3 

HRM  4302 

Introduction  to  Human  Resources 
Management 

3 

IM4301 

Introduction  to  Operations 
Management 

3 

MKT  4301 

Introduction  to  Marketing  1 

3 

Major  Concentration  Courses 

TRN  4301 

TRN  4303 

Elements  of  Transportation  1,  2 

6 

TRN  4302 

TRN  4304 

Physical  Distribution  Management  1,  2 

6 

Electives 

Transportation  electives 

6 

Nonbusiness  electives 

18 

Total  Quarter  Hours 

96 

Business  Administration 


Accounting  Bachelor  of  Science  in  Business  Administration  Degree 
(Major  Code  460)  


See  also:  Accounting  Associate  in  Science  Degree,  page  60. 

Liberal  Arts 

quarter  hours 

ENG  4110 

ENG  4111                                       Critical  Writing  1,  2 

6 

ENG  4112 

Approaches  to  Literature 

3 

MTH  4110 

MTH  4111                                      Math  1,  2 

6 

ECN  4250 

ECN  4251                                       Statistics  1,  2 

6 

ECN  4115 

ECN  4116         ECN  4117              Economic  Principles  and 

Problems  1,  2,  3 

9 

PSY  4110 

Introduction  to  Psychology: 
Fundamental  Issues 

3 

PSY  4111 

or 

PSY  4112 

Introduction  to  Psychology: 

Developmental  Aspects 

or 

Introduction  to  Psychology: 

Personal  Dynamics 

CO                    CO 

ENG  4380 

ENG  4381                                       Business  Writing  and  Reports  1 

,2 

6 

SOC  4100 

Roles,  Culture,  and  the 
Individual 

3 

SOC  4101 

or 

SOC  4102 

Inequality  and  Institutions 

or 

Institutions  and  Social  Roles 

(3) 
(3) 

SPC  4101 

Fundamentals  of  Human 
Communication 

3 

HST  4101 

The  Civilization  of  the  Ancient 
and  Medieval  Worlds 

3 

HST  4102 

or 

HST  4103 

The  Civilization  of  the  Early 

Modern  World 

or 

The  Civilization  of  the 

Modern  World 

(3) 
(3) 

PHL  4100 

Philosophical  Thinking 

3 

continued  on  next  page 


72        Business  Administration 

Business  Administration 

ACC  4101 

ACC  4102 

ACC  4103 

Accounting  Principles  1,  2,  3 

9 

BL  4101 

BL  4102 

Law  1,  2 

6 

MGT  4101 

MGT  4102 

Introduction  to  Business  and 
Management  1,  2 

6 

MIS  4101 

MIS  4102 

Introduction  to  Data  Processing 
and  Information  Systems  1,  2 

6 

MS  4325 

Business  Decision  Models 

3 

FI4401 

or 

FI  4301 

Principles  of  Finance 

3 

HRM4401 

or 

HRM  4301 

Organizational  Behavior 

3 

HRM  4402 

or 

HRM  4302 

Introduction  to  Human  Resources 
Management 

3 

MKT  4401 

or 

MKT  4301 

Introduction  to  Marketing  1 

3 

FI4402 

or 

FI  4302 

Financial  Management 

3 

IM4401 

or 

IM  4301 

Introduction  to  Operations  Management 

3 

MGT  4450 

MGT  4451 

Business  Policy  1,  2 

6 

MGT  4456 

International  Business  Management 
and  Operations 

3 

Choose  one 

computer  programming  course  from: 

MIS  4221 

or 

MIS  4241 


COBOL  Programming  1 

or 

Programming  in  BASIC  1 


or 

MIS  4250 

or 

FORTRAN  Programming  1 

(3: 

Major  Concentration  Courses 

ACC  4401 

ACC  4402 

ACC  4403 

Intermediate  Accounting  1,  2,  3* 

9 

ACC  4404 

Intermediate  Accounting  4 

3 

ACC  4410 

or 

ACC  4310 

Cost  Accounting  1 

3 

ACC  4411 

Cost  Accounting  2 

3 

ACC  4425 

ACC  4426 

Auditing  1,  2 

6 

ACC  4440 

ACC  4441 

Federal  Income  Taxes  1,  2 

6 

ACC  .4400 

Accounting  Information  Systems 

3 

Electives 

Natural  science  elective  (BIO, 

CHM,  or  ESC) 

3 

Open  electives 

18 

Total  Quarter  Hours 

174 

*Students  may  select  ACC  4301,  ACC  4302,  and  ACC  4303. 


Business  Administration 


Finance  Bachelor  of  Science  in  Business  Administration  Degree  <s=^ 
(Major  Code  433)                                                              5=? 

See  also:  Finance  Associate  in  Science  Degree, 

page  62. 

Liberal  Arts 

quarter  hours 

ENG  4110 

ENG  4111 

Critical  Writing  1,  2                                         6 

ENG  4112 

Approaches  to  Literature                                 3 

MTH4110 

MTH  4111 

Math  1,  2                                                          6 

ECN  4250 

ECN  4251 

Statistics  1,  2                                                    6 

ECN  4115 

ECN  4116         ECN  4117 

Economic  Principles  and 

Problems  1,  2,  3                                                9 

PSY  4110 

Introduction  to  Psychology: 

Fundamental  Issues                                         3 

PSY  4111 

or 

PSY  4112 


Introduction  to  Psychology: 

Developmental  Aspects 

or 

Introduction  to  Psychology: 

Personal  Dynamics 


HST  4102 

or 

HST  4103 


The  Civilization  of  the  Early 
Modern  World 


or 


The  Civilization  of  the  Modern 
World 


(3) 
(3) 


ENG  4380         ENG  4381 

Business  Writing  and  Reports  1,  2 

6 

SOC  4100 

Roles,  Culture,  and  the 
Individual 

3 

SOC  4101 

or 

SOC  4102 

Inequality  and  Institutions 

or 

Institutions  and  Social  Change 

(3) 
(3) 

SPC  4101 

Fundamentals  of  Human  Communication 

3 

HST  4101 

The  Civilization  of  the  Ancient 
and  Medieval  Worlds 

3 

(3) 
(3) 


PHL  4100 

Philosophical  Thinking 

3 

Business  Administration 

MGT  4101 

MGT  4102 

Introduction  to  Business  and 
Management  1,  2 

6 

ACC  4101 

ACC  4102 

ACC  4103 

Accounting  Principles  1,  2,  3 

9 

BL  4101 

BL  4102 

Law  1,  2 

6 

MS  4325 

Business  Decision  Models 

3 

MIS  4101 

MIS  4102 

Introduction  to  Data  Processing 
and  Information  Systems  1,  2 

6 

HRM4401 

or 

HRM  4301 

Organizational  Behavior 

3 

HRM4402 

or 

HRM  4302 

Introduction  to  Human  Resources 
Management 

3 

MKT4401 

or 

MKT  4301 

Introduction  to  Marketing  1 

3 

IM4401 

or 

Introduction  to  Operations  Management 

3 

continued  on  the  next  page 


0 


Business  Administration 


MGT  4450        MGT  4451 


Business  Policy  1,  2 


MGT  4456 


International  Business 
Management  and  Operations 


Choose  one  computer  programming  course  from: 


MIS  4221 

or 

MIS  4241 

or 

MIS  4250 


COBOL  Programming  1 

or 

Programming  in  BASIC  1 

or 

FORTRAN  Programming  1 


Major  Concentration  Courses 

FI4401 

or 

FI  4301 

Principles  of  Finance 

3 

FI4402 

or 

FI  4302 

Financial  Management 

3 

FI4403 

Financial  Strategy 

3 

FI4410 

or 

FI  4310 

Investment  Principles 

3 

FI4411 

Investment  Management 

3 

FI4420 

or 

FI  4320 

Credit  Principles 

3 

FI4421 

Credit  Management 

3 

FI4425 

or 

FI4325 

Budgeting  and  Planning 

3 

FI4426 

Financial  Control 

3 

FI4450 

International  Finance 

3 

Electives 

Natural  science 

elective  (BIO,  CHM,  or  ESC) 

3 

Open  electives 

27 

Total  Quarter  Hours 

174 

Business  Administration 


Industrial  Technology  Bachelor  of  Science  Degree  (Major  Code  490) 
Operations  Technology  Concentration 

quarter  hours 

96 


Engineering  or  Technology  Courses 

(Must  also  include  English  courses  ENG  4110,  4111,  4112,  or  equivalent) 


Liberal  Arts 


ECN  4115         ECN  4116 


ECN  4117  Economic  Principles  and 

Problems  1,  2,  3 


_9 
_3 

(3) 


PSY  4110 


Introduction  to  Psychology: 
Fundamental  Issues 


PSY 4111 

or 

PSY  4112 


Introduction  to  Psychology: 

Developmental  Aspects 

or 

Introduction  to  Psychology: 


Personal  Dynamics 

(3) 

SOC  4100 

Roles,  Culture,  and  the 
Individual 

3 

SOC  4101 

or 

SOC  4102 

Inequality  and  Institutions 

or 

Institutions  and  Social  Change 

(3) 
(3) 

Business  Administration 

MGT  4101 

Introduction  to  Business  and 
Management  1 

3 

ACC  4101         ACC  4102 

Accounting  Principles  1,  2 

6 

BL  4101            BL  4102 

Law  1,  2 

6 

HRM  4301 

Organizational  Behavior 

3 

MIS  4101 

Introduction  to  Data  Processing 
and  Information  Systems  1 

3 

MKT  4301 

Introduction  to  Marketing  1 

3 

MS  4332 

Statistical  Quality  Control 

3 

Major  Concentration  Courses 

IM4301 

Introduction  to  Operations 
Management 

3 

IM4302 

Operations  Analysis 

3 

IM4314 

Productivity  Enhancement  and 
Quality  Management 

3 

IM4317 

Purchasing  and  Materials 
Management 

3 

IM4321 

Operations  Planning  and  Control 

3 

IM4326 

Operations  Management  Policy 

3 

Nonbusiness  electives 

12 

Total  Quarter  Hours 

174 

Business  Administration 


Industrial  Technology  Bachelor  of  Science  Degree  <g^ 
Electronic  Publishing  Technology  Concentration       (j==±> 


Liberal  Arts 

quarter  hours 

ENG4110 

ENG  4111 

Critical  Writing  1,  2 

6 

ENG  4112 

Approaches  to  Literature 

3 

ECN  4115 

ECN  4116 

ECN  4117 

Economics  Principles  and 
Problems  1,  2,  3 

9 

PSY  4110 

Introduction  to  Psychology: 
Fundamental  Issues 

3 

PSY  4111 

or 

PSY  4112 


Introduction  to  Psychology: 
Developmental  Aspects 


or 


Introduction  to  Psychology: 
Personal  Dynamics 


SOC  4100 

Roles,  Culture,  and  the 
Individual 

3 

SOC  4101 

or 

SOC  4102 

Inequality  and  Institutions 

or 

Institutions  and  Social  Change 

(3; 
(3: 

Business  Administration 

ACC  4101 

ACC  4102 

Accounting  Principles  1,  2 

6 

BL  4101 

BL  4102 

Law  1,  2 

6 

HRM  4301 

Organizational  Behavior 

3 

MGT  4101 

Introduction  to  Business  and 
Management  1 

3 

MIS  4101 

MIS  4102 

Introduction  to  Data  Processing 
and  Information  Systems 

6 

MKT  4301 

Introduction  to  Marketing  1 

3 

MS  4332 

Statistical  Quality  Control 

3 

Technology  Courses 

TCC  4101 

Technical  Writing  1 

3 

ECN  4250 

ECN  4251 

Statistics  1,  2 

6 

MIS  4301 

MIS  4302 

Structured  Systems  Analysis 
and  Design  1,  2 

6 

IM4301 

Introduction  to  Operations 
Management 

3 

IM4317 

Purchasing  and  Materials 
Management 

3 

IM4321 

Operations  Planning  and  Control 

3 

MTH4110 

MTH  4111        MTH  4112             Math  1,  2,  3 

9 

ART  4471 

Quality  Control  in  the  Graphic 
Arts  Industry 

3 

ART  4469 

Operations  Analysis  in  the 
Graphic  Arts  Industry 

3 

ART  4475 

Graphic  Arts  Production  Control 

3 

continued  on  the  next  page 


Business  Administration 


ART  4479 

Estimating  Procedures  for 
Graphic  Arts 

3 

ART  4461 

Applications  of  Electronic 
Publishing  and  Printing 

3 

ART  4443 

Imaging  Procedures  and  Systems  1 

3 

ART  4431 

Graphic  Composition  Systems  1* 

3 

ART  4410 

Electronic  Imaging  Systems 

3 

ART  4416 

Style— Setup  for  Electronic 
Document  Production* 

3 

Major  Concentration  Courses 

ART  4140 

Graphic  Communication  and 
Production 

3 

ART  4115 

Graphic  Design  for  Non-Majors* 

3 

ART  4139 

Color  Theory  and  Practice 

3 

ART  4151 

Typography 

3 

ART  4181 

Introduction  to  Computer-Aided 
Graphic  Design 

3 

ART  4415 

Electronic  Document  Production* 

3 

ART  4366 

Promotional  and  Technical 
Publications  Design  and  Production* 

3 

Nonbusiness  electives 

33 

Total  Quarter  Hours 

174 

*Studio  Courses 


Business  Administration 


Management  Bachelor  of  Science  in  Business  Administration  Degree  <5=v 
(Major  Code  463) (s^=±> 


See  also  Business  Administration  Associate  in  Science  Degree,  page  61. 

Liberal  Arts 

quarter  hours 

ENG  4110 

ENG  4111                                        Critical  Writing  1,  2 

6 

ENG  4112 

Approaches  to  Literature 

3 

MTH  4110 

MTH  4111                                      Math  1,2 

6 

ECN  4250 

ECN  4251                                       Statistics  1,  2 

6 

ECN  4115 

ECN  4116         ECN  4117              Economic  Principles  and 

Problems  1,  2,  3 

9 

PSY  4110 

Introduction  to  Psychology: 
Fundamental  Issues 

3 

PSY  4111 

or 

PSY  4112 


Introduction  to  Psychology: 

Developmental  Aspects 

or 

Introduction  to  Psychology: 

Personal  Dynamics 


ENG  4380 

ENG  4381 

Business  Writing  and  Reports  1,  2 

6 

SOC  4100 

Roles,  Culture,  and  the  Individual 

3 

SOC  4101 

or 

SOC  4102 

Inequality  and  Institutions 

or 

Institutions  and  Social  Change 

(3; 

(3: 

SPC  4101 

Fundamentals  of  Human 
Communication 

3 

HST  4101 

The  Civilization  of  the  Ancient 
and  Medieval  Worlds 

3 

HST  4102 

or 

HST  4103 


The  Civilization  of  the  Early 

Modern  World 

or 

The  Civilization  of  the  Modern 

World 


PHL  4100 

Philosophical  Thinking 

3 

Business  Administration 

ACC  4101 

ACC  4102 

ACC  4103 

Accounting  Principles  1,  2,  3 

9 

BL  4101 

BL  4102 

Law  1,  2 

6 

MGT  4101 

MGT  4102 

MGT  4103 

Introduction  to  Business  and 
Management  1,  2,  3 

9 

MIS  4101 

MIS  4102 

Introduction  to  Data  Processing 
and  Information  Systems  1,  2 

6 

MS  4325 

Business  Decision  Models 

3 

HRM4401 

or 

HRM  4301 

Organizational  Behavior 

3 

HRM4402 

or 

HRM  4302 

Introduction  to  Human  Resources 
Management 

3 

continued  on  the  next 


Business  Administration 


HRM4403 

or 

HRM  4303 

Applied  Human  Resources 
Management 

3 

FI4401 

or 

FI  4301 

Principles  of  Finance 

3 

FI4402 

or 

FI  4302 

Financial  Management 

3 

IM4401 

or 

IM  4.301 

Introduction  to  Operations  Management 

3 

MKT  4401 

or 

MKT  4301 

Introduction  to  Marketing  1 

3 

Choose  one 

computer  programming  course  from: 

MIS  4221 

or 

MIS  4241 

or 

MIS  4250 


COBOL  Programming  1 

or 

Programming  in  BASIC  1 

or 

FORTRAN  Programming  1 


(3) 
(3) 
(3) 


Major  Concentration  Courses 

MGT  4410 

Project  Management  Process: 
Planning  and  Implementation 

3 

MGT  4450 

MGT  4451 

Business  Policy  1,  2 

6 

MGT  4455 

Manager  and  Society 

3 

MGT  4456 

International  Business  Management 
and  Operations 

3 

MGT  4460 

MGT  4461 

Management  Seminar  1,  2 

6 

MKT  4420 

or               MKT  4320 

Marketing  Management  1 

3 

Electives 

Natural  science  elective  (BIO,  CHM, 

or  ESC) 

3 

Open  electives 

30 

Total  Quarter  Hours 

174 

Business  Administration 


Management  Information  Systems  Bachelor  of  Science  in  Business  g-^ 
Administration  Degree  (Major  Code  465)  G~3 


See  also  Management  Information  Systems  Associate  in  Science  Degree,  page  66. 

Liberal  Arts 

quarter  hours 

ENG  4110 

ENG  4111                                       Critical  Writing  1,  2 

6 

ENG  4112 

Approaches  to  Literature 

3 

MTH  4110 

MTH  4111                                      Math  1,  2 

6 

ECN  4250 

ECN  4251                                       Statistics  1,  2 

6 

ECN  4115 

ECN  4116         ECN  4117              Economic  Principles  and 

Problems  1,  2,  3 

9 

SPC  4101 

Fundamentals  of  Human 
Communication 

3 

PSY  4110 

Introduction  to  Psychology: 
Fundamental  Issues 

3 

PSY  4111 

or 

PSY  4112 


Introduction  to  Psychology: 

Developmental  Aspects 

or 

Introduction  to  Psychology: 

Personal  Dynamics 


ENG  4380 

ENG  4381 

Business  Writing  and  Reports  1,  2 

6 

SOC  4100 

Roles,  Culture,  and  the 
Individual 

3 

SOC  4101 

or 

SOC  4102 

Inequality  and  Institutions 

or 

Institutions  and  Social  Change 

(3: 
(3; 

HST  4101 

The  Civilization  of  the  Ancient 
and  Medieval  Worlds 

3 

HST  4102 

or 

HST  4103 


The  Civilization  of  the  Early 

Modern  World 

or 

The  Civilization  of  the  Modern 

World 


PHL  4100 

Philosophical  Thinking 

3 

Business  Administration 

ACC  4101         ACC  4102 

ACC  4103 

Accounting  Principles  1,  2,  3 

9 

BL  4101            BL  4102 

Law  1,  2 

6 

MGT  4101         MGT  4102 

Introduction  to  Business  and 
Management  1,  2 

6 

continued  on  the  next  page 


Business  Administration 

81    1 

MIS  4101 

MIS  4102 

Introduction  to  Data  Processing 
and  Information  Systems  1,  2 

6 

MIS  4221 

MIS  4222 

COBOL  Programming  1,  2 

6 

MIS  4230 

or 

MIS  4236 

PC  Software  for  Professionals 

or 

Advanced  PC  Software 

(3) 
(3) 

MS  4325 

Business  Decision  Models 

3 

FI4401 

or 

FI  4301 

Principles  of  Finance 

3 

FI4402 

or 

FI  4302 

Financial  Management 

3 

HRM  4401 

or 

HRM  4301 

Organizational  Behavior 

3 

HRM  4402 

or 

HRM  4302 

Introduction  to  Human  Resources 
Management 

3 

HRM  4403 

or 

HRM  4303 

Applied  Human  Resources 
Management 

3 

IM4401 

or 

IM4301 

Introduction  to  Operations  Management 

3 

MKT4401 

or 

MKT  4301 

Introduction  to  Marketing  1 

3 

MGT4450 

MGT  4451 

Business  Policy  1,  2 

6 

MGT  4456 

International  Business 
Management  and  Operations 

3 

Major  Concentration  Courses 

MIS  4401 

MIS  4402 

Structured  Systems  Analysis  and 
Design  1,  2* 

6 

MIS  4407 

or 

MIS  4307 

Communications  and  Networking 

3 

MIS  4445 

Database  Management  Systems 

3 

MIS  4448 

Information  Resource  Management 

3 

MIS  4485 

Applied  MIS  Development  Project 

3 

MGT  4410 

Project  Management  Process: 
Planning  and  Implementation 

3 

Electives 

Natural  science  elective  (BIO,  CHM,  or  ESC) 

3 

Open  electives 

21 

Total  Quarter  Hours 

174 

*Students  may  select  MIS  4301  and  MIS  4302. 


Business  Administration 


Marketing  Bachelor  of  Science  in 

Business  Administration  Degree  (Major  Code  461) 


See  also:  Marketing  Associate  in  Science  degree 

,  page  67. 

Liberal  Arts 

quarter  hours 

ENG  4110 

ENG  4111 

Critical  Writing  1,  2 

6 

ENG  4112 

Approaches  to  Literature 

3 

MTH  4110 

MTH  4111 

Math  1,  2 

6 

ECN  4250 

ECN  4251 

Statistics  1,  2 

6 

ECN  4115 

ECN  4116         ECN  4117 

Economic  Principles  and 
Problems  1,  2,  3 

9 

PSY  4110 

Introduction  to  Psychology: 
Fundamental  Issues 

3 

PSY  4111 


Introduction  to  Psychology: 
Developmental  Aspects 


or 


or 


HST  4102 

or 

HST  4103 


The  Civilization  of  the  Early 
Modern  World 


or 


The  Civilization  of  the  Modern 
World 


(3) 


PSY  4112 

Introduction  to  Psychology: 
Personal  Dynamics 

(3) 

ENG  4380         ENG  4381 

Business  Writing  and  Reports  1,  2 

6 

SOC  4100 

Roles,  Culture,  and  the  Individual 

3 

SOC  4101 

or 

SOC  4102 

Inequality  and  Institutions 

or 

Institutions  and  Social  Change 

(3) 
(3) 

SPC  4101 

Fundamentals  of  Human  Communication 

3 

HST  4101 

The  Civilization  of  the  Ancient 
and  Medieval  Worlds 

3 

(3) 
(3) 


PHL  4100 

Philosophical  Thinking 

3 

Business  Administration 

ACC  4101 

ACC  4102 

ACC  4103 

Accounting  Principles  1,  2,  3 

9 

BL  4101 

BL  4102 

Law  1,  2 

6 

MGT  4101 

MGT  4102 

Introduction  to  Business  and 
Management  1,  2 

6 

MIS  4101 

MIS  4102 

Introduction  to  Data  Processing 
and  Information  Systems  1,  2 

6 

MS  4325 

Business  Decision  Models 

3 

FI4401 

or 

FI  4301 

Principles  of  Finance 

3 

FI4402 

or 

FI  4302 

Financial  Management 

3 

continued  on  the  next  page 


Business  Administration 


HRM  4401 

or 

HRM  4301 

Organizational  Behavior 

3 

HRM  4402 

or 

HRM  4302 

Introduction  to  Human  Resources 
Management 

3 

IM4401 

or 

IM  4301 

Introduction  to  Operations  Management 

3 

MGT  4450 

MGT  4451 

Business  Policy  1,  2 

6 

MGT  4456 

International  Business  Management 
and  Operations 

3 

Choose  one  \ 

computer  programming  course  from: 

MIS  4221 

or 

MIS  4241 

or 

MIS  4251 


COBOL  Programming  1 

or 

Programming  in  BASIC  1 

or 

FORTRAN  Programming  1 


(3) 
(3) 
(3) 


Major  Concentration  Courses 

MKT4401 

or 

MKT  4301 

Introduction  to  Marketing  1 

3 

MKT  4402 

or 

MKT  4302 

Introduction  to  Marketing  2 

3 

MKT  4420 

or 

MKT  4320 

Marketing  Management  1 

3 

MKT  4410 

or 

MKT  4310 

Advertising  Management  1 

3 

MKT  4411 

Advertising  Management  2 

3 

MKT  4415 

or 

MKT  4315 

Sales  Management  1 

3 

MKT  4416 

Sales  Management  2 

3 

MKT  4430 

or 

MKT  4330 

Marketing  Research  1 

3 

MKT  4431 

Marketing  Research  2 

3 

MKT  4453 

International  Marketing 

3 

MKT  4457 

- 

Competitive  Strategy 

3 

Electives 

Natural  science 

elective  (BIO,  CHM,  or  ESC) 

3 

Open  electives 

18 

Nonbusiness  elective 

3 

Total  Quarter  Hours 

174 

Criminal  Justice 


Criminal  Justice  and 
Security  Degree  Programs 


Richard  J.  Comings,  Assistant  Dean 
Acting  Director,  Criminal  Justice  and 
Security  Programs 
290  Ruggles  Building 
617-437-2425 


Program  Consultants 

Corrections/Criminology  and  Research 
Prof.  Edith  E.  Flynn 
College  of  Criminal  Justice 
617-437-2394 

Law 

Prof.  Frank  A.  Schubert 

College  of  Criminal  Justice 

617-437-3349 

Policing 

Prof.  George  L.  Kelling 

College  of  Criminal  Justice 

617-4374532 

Security 

Prof.  Norman  Bates 

College  of  Criminal  Justice 

617-437-3367 


Purpose 

Criminal  Justice  and  Security  programs  are 
designed  to  provide  a  professional  focus  to 
students  with  a  broadly  based  undergraduate 
education,  to  ensure  that  program  graduates 
are  prepared  to  enter  or  advance  in  careers  in 
criminal  justice  or  security  administration  or 
to  enroll  in  graduate  or  professional  schools. 

Requirements  for  each  program  are  outlined 
on  the  following  pages.  Upon  petition,  students 
may  be  permitted  to  substitute  other  courses 
that  will  more  adequately  serve  their  specific 
objectives. 


Bachelor  of  Science  Degree  Programs 

Programs  leading  to  the  Bachelor  of  Science 
degree  are  offered  in  corrections,  policing,  and 
security.  Students  should  choose  their  major 
in  consultation  with  a  program  adviser. 

Each  curriculum  provides  for  not  less  than 
174  quarter  hours  of  work,  including  at  least 
75  quarter  hours  of  advanced  work  in  a  major 
field. 

Transfer  students  must  complete  at  least  45 
quarter  hours  of  academic  work  at  University 
College  immediately  preceding  graduation  in 
order  to  be  eligible  for  a  degree. 

Associate  in  Science  Degree  Programs 

Programs  leading  to  the  associate's  degree  are 
offered  for  those  who  wish  to  obtain  a  general 
background  in  corrections,  policing,  or  securi- 
ty and  who  may  later  wish  to  pursue  a 
bachelor's  degree. 

Candidates  for  the  associate  in  science 
degree  must  complete  a  minimum  of  ninety- 
six  quarter  hours  of  credit.  This  is  approx- 
imately one  half  of  the  requirements  for  the 
bachelor  of  science  degree  and  includes  at 
least  forty-eight  quarter  hours  of  work  in  a 
major  field. 

Certificate  Programs 

Students  who  seek  specialized  skills  to  ad- 
vance their  careers  may  choose  a  certificate 
program,  which  they  may  take  independently 
or  in  conjunction  with  degree  study. 


Course  Sequence 

Upon  completion  of  the  courses  required  for 
admission,  the  student  should  elect  courses 
from  the  core  and  major  concentration  areas 
to  fulfill  the  requirements  for  the  associate  in 
science  and  the  bachelor  of  science  degrees. 
Degree  requirements  may  be  completed  at 
the  student's  own  pace.  A  total  of  thirty-two 
courses  is  required  for  an  associate  in  science 
degree,  which  can  be  completed  in  as  few  as 
three  years,  or  nine  academic  quarters.  A 
bachelor  of  science  degree  can  be  completed 
over  a  period  of  five  years,  or  fifteen  academic 
quarters.  This  schedule  averages  four  courses 
per  academic  quarter. 

Distribution  Requirements 

In  order  to  satisfy  the  distribution  requirements 
in  any  criminal  justice  and  security  program, 


Criminal  Justice 


students  should  first  discuss  their  programs 
with  an  academic  adviser. 

English  courses  ENG  4110,  ENG  4111,  and 
ENG  4112  (nine  quarter  hours)  must  be  taken 
before  admission  to  a  degree  program.  The  re- 
maining required  courses,  amounting  to  33  to 
36  quarter  hours,  should  be  taken  from  the 
core  and  major  concentration  courses  as  listed 
on  the  following  pages. 


Special  Studies 

University  College  offers  a  variety  of  Special 
Studies.  These  courses  give  students  an  oppor- 
tunity to  earn  credits  in  Advanced  Tutorials, 
Independent  Studies,  Honors  Programs,  and 
Field  Work.  Consult  descriptions  on  pages 
16-17. 


Corrections  Associate  in 

Science  Degree  (Major  Code  949)  \j=±> 

Core  Courses 

quarter  hours 

ENG  4110 

ENG  4111 

Critical  Writing  1,  2 

6 

ENG  4112 

Approaches  to  Literature 

3 

HST  4202 

American  History  1848-1917 

3 

POL  4104 

Introduction  to  American  Government 

3 

PSY  4110 

Introduction  to  Psychology: 
Fundamental  Issues 

3 

SOC  4100 

Roles,  Culture,  and  the  Individual 

3 

SOC  4186 

Social  Control 

3 

C  J  4101 

Administration  of  Criminal  Justice 

3 

CJ  4102 

Crime  Prevention  and  Security 

3 

CJ  4103 

Criminology 

3 

CJ  4104 

Dimensions  of  Crime 

3 

CJ  4105 

Computer  Applications  in 
Criminal  Justice 

3 

CJ  4108 

CJ  4109 

Criminal  Law  and  Procedure  1,  2 

6 

CJ  4110 

Constitutional  Law 

3 

Major  Concentration  Courses 

CJ  4301 

American  Correctional  System 

3 

C  J  4302 

C  J  4303 

Correctional  Administration  1,  2 

6 

C  J  4304 

Jail  Administration  and  Management 

3 

CJ  4305 

Case  Management  and  Correctional 
Services 

3 

C  J  4306 

Correctional  Security  Methods 
and  Technology 

3 

C  J  4307 

The  Rights  of  Offenders  and  Prisoners 

3 

C  J  4308 

Correctional  Counseling 

3 

C  J  4309 

Comparative  Correctional  Systems 

3 

CJ  4310 

Community  Corrections 

3 

CJ  4311 

Probation  and  Parole 

3 

Electives 

Criminal  justice  and  security  electives 

6 

Other  electives 

9 

Total  Quarter  Hours 

96 

86        Criminal  Justice 

Corrections  Bachelor  of  Science  Degree  (Major  Code  948)  S3 

Core  Courses 

quarter  hours 

ECN  4115 

ECN  4116         ECN  4117              Economic  Principles  and 

Problems  1,  2,  3 

9 

ENG  4110 

ENG  4111 

Critical  Writing  1,  2 

6 

ENG  4112 

Approaches  to  Literature 

3 

HST  4101 

The  Civilization  of  the  Ancient 
and  Medieval  Worlds 

3 

HST  4103 

The  Civilization  of  the  Modern 
World 

3 

HST  4202 

American  History  1848-1917 

3 

PHL  4100 

or 

PHL  4200 

Philosophical  Thinking 

or 

Logic 

(3) 
(3) 

POL  4103 

Introduction  to  Politics 

3 

POL  4104 

Introduction  to  American 
Government 

3 

PSY  4110 

Introduction  to  Psychology: 
Fundamental  Issues 

3 

PSY4112 

Introduction  to  Psychology: 
Personal  Dynamics 

3 

SOC  4100 

Roles,  Culture  and  the  Individual 

3 

SOC  4102 

Critical  Issues  Facing  Society 

3 

SOC  4186 

Social  Control 

3 

Mathematics/science  courses 

6 

CJ  4101 

Administration  of  Criminal  Justice 

3 

CJ  4102 

Crime  Prevention  and  Security 

3 

CJ  4103 

Criminology 

3 

CJ4104 

Dimensions  of  Crime 

3 

CJ  4105 

Computer  Applications  in 
Criminal  Justice 

3 

CJ  4106 

CJ  4107 

Criminal  Justice  Research  1,  2 

6 

CJ  4108 

CJ  4109 

Criminal  Law  and  Procedure  1,  2 

6 

CJ  4110 

Constitutional  Law 

3 

Major  Concentration  Courses 

CJ  4301 

American  Correctional  System 

3 

C  J  4302 

C  J  4303 

Correctional  Administration  1,  2 

6 

C  J  4304 

Jail  Administration  and 
Management 

3 

C  J  4305 

Case  Management  and  Correctional 
Services 

3 

C  J  4306 

Correctional  Security  Methods 
and  Technology 

3 

C  J  4307 

The  Rights  of  Offenders  and 
Prisoners 

3 

continued  on  the  next  page 


Criminal  Justice 


C  J  4308 

Correctional  Counseling 

3 

C  J  4309 

Comparative  Correctional  Systems 

3 

CJ  4310 

Community  Corrections 

3 

CJ  4311 

Probation  and  Parole 

3 

Electives 

Criminal  justice  and  security  electives 

24 

Other  electives 

30 

Total  Quarter  Hours 

174 

Policing  Associate  in  Science  Degree  (Major  Code  947)  1x3 

Core  Courses 

quarter  hours 

ENG  4110        ENG  4111 

Critical  Writing  1,  2 

6 

ENG  4112 

Approaches  to  Literature 

3 

HST  4202 

American  History  1848-1917 

3 

POL  4104 

Introduction  to  American 
Government 

3 

PSY  4110 

Introduction  to  Psychology: 
Fundamental  Issues 

3 

SOC  4100 

Roles,  Culture,  and  the  Individual 

3 

SOC  4186 

Social  Control 

3 

CJ  4101 

Administration  of  Criminal  Justice 

3 

C  J  4102 

Crime  Prevention  and  Security 

3 

CJ  4103 

Criminology 

3 

C  J  4104 

Dimensions  of  Crime 

3 

CJ  4105 

Computer  Applications  in 
Criminal  Justice 

3 

CJ  4108            CJ  4109 

Criminal  Law  and  Procedure  1,  2 

6 

CJ  4110 

Constitutional  Law 

3 

Major  Concentration  Courses 

C  J  4201             CJ  4202 

Criminal  Investigation  1,  2 

6 

C  J  4203            C  J  4204 

Criminalistics  1,  2 

6 

C  J  4205             C  J  4206 

Patrol  Theory  and  Administration  1,  2 

6 

C  J  4207 

Comparative  Police  Systems 

3 

C  J  4208 

Police  Operations 

3 

CJ  4209             CJ  4210 

Police  Management  1,  2 

6 

CJ  4211 

Police  and  Social  Problems 

3 

Electives 

Criminal  justice  and  security  electives 

6 

Other  electives 

9 

Total  Quarter  Hours 

96 

88         Criminal  Justice 

Policing  Bachelor  of  Science  Degree  (Major  Code  946)  G3 

Core  Courses 

quarter  hours 

ECN  4115 

ECN  4116         ECN  4117 

Economic  Principles  and 

Problems  1,  2,  3                                                9 

ENG  4110 

ENG  4111 

Critical  Writing  1,  2                                           6 

ENG  4112 

Approaches  to  Literature                                   3 

HST  4101 

The  Civilization  of  the  Ancient 

and  Medieval  Worlds                                         3 

HST  4103 

The  Civilization  of  the  Modern 

World                                                                 3 

HST  4202 

American  History  1848-1917                            3 

PHL  4100 

or 

PHL  4200 

Philosophical  Thinking                                   (3; 

or 

Logic                                                                 (3; 

POL  4103 

Introduction  to  Politics                                     3 

POL  4104 

Introduction  to  American 

Government                                                        3 

PSY  4110 

Introduction  to  Psychology: 

Fundamental  Issues                                           3 

PSY  4112 

Introduction  to  Psychology: 

Personal  Dynamics                                           3 

SOC  4100 

Roles,  Culture  and  the  Individual                    3 

SOC  4102 

Critical  Issues  Facing 

Society                                                               3 

SOC  4186 

Social  Control                                                      3 

Mathematics/science  courses 

6 

CJ  4101 

Administration  of  Criminal 

Justice                                                                  3 

CJ  4102 

Crime  Prevention  and  Security                        3 

CJ  4103 

Criminology                                                         3 

CJ  4104 

Dimensions  of  Crime                                          3 

CJ  4105 

Computer  Applications  in 

Criminal  Justice                                                 3 

CJ  4106 

C  J  4107 

Criminal  Justice  Research  1,  2                         6 

C  J  4108 

CJ  4109 

Criminal  Law  and  Procedure  1,  2                     6 

CJ  4110 

Constitutional  Law                                           3 

Major  Concentration  Courses 

CJ  4201 

C  J  4202 

Criminal  Investigation  1,  2                               6 

C  J  4203 

C  J  4204 

Criminalistics  1,  2                                              6 

C  J  4205 

C  J  4206 

Patrol  Theory  and  Administration  1,  2            6 

C  J  4207 

Comparative  Police  Systems                             3 

C  J  4208 

Police  Operations                                                3 

CJ  4209 

CJ  4210 

Police  Management  1,  2                                    6 

CJ  4211 

Police  and  Social  Problems                                3 

continued  on  the  next  page 


Criminal  Justice         89 

Electives 

Criminal  justice  and  security  electives 

24 

Other  electives 

30 

Total  Quarter  Hours 

174 

Security  Associate  in  Science  Degree  (Major  Code  943)  63 

Core  Courses 

quarter  hours 

ENG  4110 

ENG  4111 

Critical  Writing  1,  2 

6 

ENG  4112 

Approaches  to  Literature 

3 

HST  4202 

American  History  1848-1917 

3 

POL  4104 

Introduction  to  American 
Government 

3 

PSY  4110 

Introduction  to  Psychology: 
Fundamental  Issues 

3 

SOC  4100 

Roles,  Culture,  and  the 
Individual 

3 

SOC  4186 

Social  Control 

3 

CJ  4101 

Administration  of  Criminal  Justice 

3 

C  J  4102 

Crime  Prevention  and  Security 

3 

C  J  4103 

Criminology 

3 

CJ  4104 

Dimensions  of  Crime 

3 

C  J  4105 

Computer  Applications  in 
Criminal  Justice 

3 

CJ  4108 

C  J  4109 

Criminal  Law  and  Procedure  1,  2 

6 

CJ  4110 

Constitutional  Law 

3 

Major  Concentration  Courses 

CJ  4201 

C  J  4202 

Criminal  Investigation  1,  2 

6 

C  J  4403 

Introduction  to  Security 

3 

C  J  4404 

Industrial  Safety  and  Fire 
Prevention 

3 

C  J  4405 

Current  Security  Problems 

3 

C  J  4406 

C  J  4407 

Security  Administration  1,  2 

6 

C  J  4408 

Legal  Aspects  of  Security 
Management  and  Operations 

3 

C  J  4409 

CJ  4410 

Physical  Security  Methods  and 
Technology  1,  2 

6 

CJ4411 

Electronic  Information  Security 

3 

Electives 

Criminal  justice  and  security  electives 

6 

Other  electives 

5 

9 

Total  Quarter  Hours 

96 

90        Criminal  Justice 

Security  Bachelor  of  Science  Degree  (Major  Code  942)  S3 

Core  Courses 

quarter  hours 

ECN  4115 

ECN  4116         ECN  4117 

Economic  Principles  and 
Problems  1,  2,  3 

9 

ENG  4110 

ENG  4111 

Critical  Writing  1,  2 

6 

ENG  4112 

Approaches  to  Literature 

3 

HST  4101 

The  Civilization  of  the  Ancient 
and  Medieval  Worlds 

3 

HST  4103 

The  Civilization  of  the  Modern  World 

3 

HST  4202 

American  History  1848-1917 

3 

PHL  4100 

or 

PHL  4200 

Philosophical  Thinking 

or 

Logic 

(3) 
(3) 

POL  4103 

Introduction  to  Politics 

3 

POL  4104 

Introduction  to  American 
Government 

3 

PSY  4110 

Introduction  to  Psychology: 
Fundamental  Issues 

3 

PSY  4112 

Introduction  to  Psychology: 
Personal  Dynamics 

3 

SOC  4100 

Roles,  Culture,  and  the 
Individual 

3 

SOC  4102 

Critical  Issues  Facing  Society 

3 

SOC  4186 

Social  Control 

3 

Mathematics/science  courses 

6 

C  J  4101 

Administration  of  Criminal 
Justice 

3 

CJ  4102 

Crime  Prevention  and  Security 

3 

C  J  4103 

Criminology 

3 

CJ  4104 

Dimensions  of  Crime 

3 

CJ  4105 

Computer  Applications  in 
Criminal  Justice 

3 

CJ  4106 

CJ  4107 

Criminal  Justice  Research  1,  2 

6 

CJ  4108 

C  J  4109 

Criminal  Law  and  Procedure  1,  2 

6 

CJ  4110 

Constitutional  Law 

3 

continued  on  the  next  page 


Criminal  Justice 


Major  Concentration  Courses 

C  J  4201             CJ  4202 

Criminal  Investigation  1,  2 

6 

C  J  4403 

Introduction  to  Security 

3 

C  J  4404 

Industrial  Safety  and  Fire 
Prevention 

3 

C  J  4405 

Current  Security  Problems 

3 

C  J  4406             C  J  4407 

Security  Administration  1,  2 

6 

C  J  4408 

Legal  Aspects  of  Security 
Management  and  Operations 

3 

CJ  4409             C  J  4410 

Physical  Security  Methods  and 
Technology  1,  2 

6 

CJ4411 

Electronic  Information  Security 

3 

Electives 

Criminal  justice  and  security  electives 

24 

Other  electives 

30 

Total  Quarter  Hours 

174 

Health  Professions  and  Sciences 


Health  Professions  and 
Sciences  Degree  Programs 


Paula  M.  Vosburgh,  Assistant  Dean,  Director 
Health  Professions  and  Sciences  Programs 
266  Ruggles  Building 
617-437-2818 


Program  Directors  and  Coordinators 

Area  program  directors  and  the  Director  of 
Health  Professions  and  Sciences  Programs 
have  overall  responsibility  for  the  academic 
quality  of  the  health  programs  in  their  areas 
of  specialty.  The  program  coordinators  for 
each  area  serve  as  the  chief  academic  advisers 
for  students  in  their  programs. 


Health  Professions 

HMG:  Health  Management 

Consultant: 

Prof.  Carl  W.  Nelson  (Health  Care  Area  Coor- 
dinator, College  of  Business  Administration) 
(617-437-4751) 

HRA:  Health  Record  Administration 

Program  Director: 

Prof.  Judith  Weilerstein  (College  of  Pharmacy 

and  Allied  Health  Professions)  (617-437-3663) 

Program  Coordinator: 

Annalee  Collins  (College  of  Pharmacy  and 

Allied  Health  Professions)  (617-437-2525) 

Clinical  Coordinator: 

Honey  Schmase  (College  of  Pharmacy  and 

Allied  Health  Professions)  (617-437-3614) 

HSC:  Health  Science 

Consultant: 

Dr.  Theodore  Blank  (Massachusetts  Depart- 
ment of  Public  Health)  (617-727-1960) 


MLS:  Medical  Laboratory  Science 

Program/Clinical  Coordinator: 

Barbara  Martin  (College  of  Pharmacy  and 

Allied  Health  Professions)  (617-437-4194) 

Nursing 

Academic  Coordinator: 

Sandra  Conant  (University  College) 

(617-437-2818) 

RAD:  Radiologic  Technology 

Program  Director: 

Kevin  J.  Powers  (University  College) 

(617-437-2818) 

Assistant  Director: 

Valerie  A.  Lamb  (University  College) 

(617-437-2818) 

REC:  Therapeutic  Recreation 

Consultant: 

Prof.  George  Ransom  (Boston-Bouve  College 

of  Human  Development  Professions) 

(617-437-3167) 


Sciences 

BIO:  Biology 

Consultant: 

Prof.  Fred  A.  Rosenberg  (College  of  Arts  and 

Sciences)  (617-4374042) 

Laboratory  Coordinator: 

Kevin  Mautte  (Biology  Department) 

(617-437-2263) 

CHM:  Chemistry 

Consultant: 

Prof.  Philip  W.  LeQuesne  (College  of  Arts 

and  Sciences)  (617-437-2822) 

Major  Adviser,  Chemical! Biological  Technology: 

Dr.  Carl  F.  Moxey  (Senior  Lecturer  in 

Biology)  (617-437-2260) 

Laboratory  Coordinator: 

Bernard  Lemire  (College  of  Arts  and  Sciences) 

(617-437-2811) 

ESC:  Earth  Science 

Consultant: 

Malcolm  Hill  (College  of  Arts  and  Sciences) 

(617-4374381) 

MTH:  Mathematics 

Consultant: 

Francis  X.  Finigan  (Educational  Consultant) 

(617-484-8496) 


Health  Professions  and  Sciences 


Purpose 

University  College  offers  part-time  programs 
in  allied  health  to  prepare  students  for  ad- 
vancement and  service  in  hospitals  and  other 
health  agencies. 

The  associate's  and  bachelor's  degree  pro- 
grams are  designed  to  provide  both  profes- 
sional specialization  and  general  education. 
All  programs  meet  the  accreditation  stan- 
dards of  the  Committee  on  Allied  Health 
Education  and  Accreditation  (C AHEA)  of  the 
American  Medical  Association  (AMA)  and/or 
of  licensing  or  registration  boards  where  such 
exist. 


Clinical  Assignments 

Clinical  assignments  are  generally  available 
for  students  whose  programs  require  directed 
applied  study  in  a  clinical  setting.  In  most  in- 
stances, lectures  are  presented  at  the  Univer- 
sity, and  clinical  practice  is  conducted  at 
hospitals  or  other  health  agencies  in  the 
Greater  Boston  area.  Positions  in  applied 
clinical  studies  are  often  offered  on  a  com- 
petitive basis,  with  the  student's  academic 
performance  used  as  the  basis  for  acceptance. 
Students  who  accept  clinical  assignments  in 
health  facilities  are  expected  to  adhere  to  the 
requirements  of  the  facilities,  which  are  out- 
side University  control. 

Special  Studies 

U.C.  offers  a  variety  of  Special  Studies.  These 
courses  give  students  an  opportunity  to  earn 
credits  in  Advanced  Tutorials,  Independent 
Studies,  Honors  Programs,  and  Field  Work. 
Consult  descriptions  on  pages  16-17. 


Chemical-Biological  Technology 
Associate  in  Science  Degree 

The  program  in  chemical-biological 
technology  helps  provide  the  chemistry  and 
biology  foundation  required  for  medical  and 
industrial  laboratory  assistants  and  techni- 
cians and  for  persons  who  have  paramedical 
responsibilities.  Employment  opportunities 
may  be  found  in  hospitals,  health  clinics, 
research  foundations,  chemical  and  drug  in- 
dustries, public  health  organizations,  water 
and  sanitation  departments,  and  the  emerg- 
ing field  of  oceanographic  technology. 

Bachelor  of  Science  Degree 

The  Bachelor  of  Science  degree  program  in 
chemical-biological  technology  integrates 
theoretical  and  laboratory  courses  from  the 
fields  of  chemistry  and  biology.  The  program 
is  designed  to  help  prepare  students  for 
responsibilities  in  laboratory  careers  and  in 
teaching  general  science.  Employment  oppor- 
tunities may  be  found  in  a  variety  of  in- 
dustrial, pharmaceutical,  clinical,  and 
hospital  laboratories,  and  in  teaching  general 
science,  chemistry,  biology,  and  related 
courses  at  the  secondary  school  level. 

General  Science  Teacher  Option:  Students 
who  plan  to  apply  to  the  University's 
graduate  program  at  Boston-Bouve'  College  of 
Human  Development  Professions  should  con- 
tact their  Department  of  Education  (437-3302) 
for  specific  course  requirements. 


Health  Professions  and  Sciences 


Chemical-Biological  Technology  Associate  in  Science  Degree  a-=-\ 
(Major  Code  803)                                                        IS 

Core  Courses 

quarter  hours 

ENG  4110 

ENG  4111 

Critical  Writing  1,  2 

6 

ENG  4112 

Approaches  to  Literature 

3 

History  (HST)  Courses  of  your  choice 

9 

MTH4110 

MTH  4111 

MTH  4112 

Math  1,  2,  3 

9 

MTH  4120 

MTH  4121 

Calculus  1,  2 

8 

Major  Concentration  Courses 

BIO  4103 

BIO  4104 

BIO  4105 

Biology  1,  2,  3 

12 

BIO  4175 

BIO  4176 

BIO  4177 

Human  Anatomy  and  Physiology 

1,  2,  3                                                                 9 

BIO  4190 

BIO  4191 

BIO  4192 

Microbiology  1,  2,  3 

9 

CHM4111 

CHM  4112 

CHM  4113 

General  Chemistry  1,  2,  3 

9 

CHM  4261 

or 

CHM  4221 

CHM  4262 
CHM  4222 

CHM  4263 
CHM  4223 

Organic  Chemistry  1,  2,  3 

or 

Analytical  Chemistry  1,  2,  3 

(12) 
(9) 

PHY  4101 

PHY  4102 

College  Physics  1,  2 

8 

Electives 

Liberal  Arts 

6 

Chemistry  or 

Biology  as  needed  to  complete  total  credits 

Total  Quarter  Hours 

97-100 

Health  Professions  and  Sciences 


Chemical-Biological  Technology  Bachelor  of  Science  Degree 
(Major  Code  804) 


Core  Courses 

quarter  hours 

ENG  4110 

ENG  4111 

Critical  Writing  1,  2 

6 

ENG  4112 

Approaches  to  Literature 

3 

MTH4110 

MTH  4111 

MTH  4112 

Math  1,  2,  3 

9 

MTH  4120 

MTH  4121 

Calculus  1,  2 

8 

BIO  4103 

BIO  4104 

BIO  4105 

Biology  1,  2,  3 

12 

BIO  4175 

BIO  4176 

BIO  4177 

Human  Anatomy  and  Physiology 

1,2,3                                                                9 

CHM  4111 

CHM  4112 

CHM  4113 

General  Chemistry  1,  2,  3 

9 

PHY  4101 

PHY  4102 

College  Physics  1,  2 

8 

Economics  (ECN)  Courses  of ) 

pour  choice 

6 

History  (HST)  Courses  of  your  choice 

9 

PSY  4110 

Introduction  to  Psychology: 
Fundamental  Issues 

3 

PSY  4111 

or 

PSY  4112 


Introduction  to  Psychology: 

Developmental  Aspects 

or 

Introduction  to  Psychology: 


(3) 


Personal  Dynamics 

(3) 

Sociology  (SOC)  Courses  of  your  choice 

9 

Major  Concentration  Courses 

BIO  4190 

BIO  4191 

BIO  4192 

Microbiology  1,  2,  3 

9 

BIO  4224 

BIO  4225 

BIO  4226 

Ecology  1,  2,  3 

9 

BIO  4235 

or 

BIO  4246 

BIO  4236 
BIO  4247 

BIO  4237 
BIO  4248 

Genetics  1,  2,  and  Lab 

or 

Cell  Biology  1,  2,  and  Lab 

(8) 
(8) 

BIO  4374 

BIO  4375 

BIO  4376 

Histology  1,  2,  3 

9 

BIO  4456 

Introduction  to  Biotechnology 

3 

CHM  4221 

CHM  4222 

CHM  4223 

Analytical  Chemistry  1,  2,  3 

9 

CHM  4261 

CHM  4262 

CHM  4263 

Organic  Chemistry  1,  2,  3 

12 

CHM  4321 

CHM  4322 

Instrumental  Analysis  1,  2 

6 

CHM  4323 

or 

CHM  4333 

Radiochemistry 

or 

Chemical  Separations 

(3) 
(3) 

CHM  4381 

or 

CHM  4371 

CHM  4382 
CHM  4372 

CHM  4383 
CHM  4373 

Physical  Chemistry  1,  2,  3 

or 

Biochemistry  1,  2,  3 

(9) 
(9) 

Earth  Science  Electives 

6 

Electives  as 

needed  to  complete  total  credits 

Total  Quarter  Hours 

177 

Health  Professions  and  Sciences 


Health  Management 

The  health  care  industry  is  changing  rapidly 
in  response  to  increasing  competition,  rising 
costs,  technological  advances,  the  growth  of 
alternative  delivery  systems,  and  an  aging 
population. 

University  College's  Bachelor  of  Science 
Degree  program  in  Health  Management  is 
intended  for  those  who  wish  to  prepare,  on  a 


part-time  basis,  for  entry  into  or  advancement 
in  managerial  positions  in  the  health  care  field. 

The  program  combines  professional  compe- 
tencies with  a  liberal  arts  education  to  help 
direct  students  toward  either  entry-level 
positions  or  positions  of  increasing  responsibi- 
lity in  health  services  administration.  The 
curriculum  also  provides  a  foundation  for 
graduate  studies  in  MBA  and  MHA  programs. 


Health  Management  Bachelor  of  Science  Degree  (Major  Code  860) 


Core  Courses 
General  Education 

quarter  hours 

ENG  4110 

ENG  4111 

Critical  Writing  1,  2 

6 

ENG  4112 

Approaches  to  Literature 

3 

MTH  4110 

MTH  4111        MTH  4112 

Math  1,  2,  3 

9 

HMG  4200 

Health  Science  Statistics 

3 

ECN  4115 

ECN  4116         ECN  4117 

Economic  Principles  and 
Problems  1,  2,  3 

9 

SOC  4100 

Roles,  Culture,  and  the 
Individual 

3 

POL  4103 

Introduction  to  Politics 

3 

PSY  4110 

Introduction  to  Psychology: 
Fundamental  Issues 

3 

COM  4101 

Foundations  of  Computer  Literacy 

4 

Management 

MGT  4101 

MGT  4102 

Introduction  to  Business  and 
Management  1,  2 

6 

ACC  4101 

ACC  4102 

Accounting  Principles  1,  2 

6 

FI  4301 

Principles  of  Finance 

3 

HRM  4301 

Organizational  Behavior 

3 

MKT  4301 

Introduction  to  Marketing  1 

3 

Major  Concentration  Courses 

HMG  4301 

Health  Care  Delivery  Systems 

3 

HMG  4100 

HMG  4101 

Hospital  Organization  and 
Management  1,  2 

6 

HMG  4325 

Health  Planning  and  Regulation 

3 

HRA  4302 

Medical  Terminology  Survey 

3 

continued  on  the  next  page 


Health  Professions  and  Sciences         9 

71 

—J 

HMG  4390 

The  Patients'  Impact  on  Decision-Making 

3 

HSC  4310 

Public  Health  1 

3 

HMG  4580 

Information  Processing  in  Health  Care 

3 

HMG  4215 

Health  Law 

3 

HMG  4400        HMG  4401 

Health  Care  Financial 
Management  1,  2 

6 

HMG  4445 

Health  Care  Marketing  and 
Communication 

3 

HMG  4440 

Health  Care  Operations  Management 

3 

HMG  4260 

Senior  Seminar  in  Health  Care 
Management* 

1 

HMG  4429 

Health  Care  Delivery's  Changing 
Environment* 

2 

HMG  4650 

Supervised  Field  Experience  If 

6 

HMG  4651 

Supervised  Field  Experience  2t 

6 

Electives 

Liberal  Arts  electives 


12 


Health  science  or  health  management  electives 


Science  electives  (CHM,  BIO,  ESC,  MTH) 


12 


*Must  be  taken  concurrently  during  the  student's  last  year  in  the  program. 

t  Students  must  have  completed  seventy-five  percent  of  their  degree  requirements  before  taking  these  courses.  Students 
must  apply  for  each  assignment  no  later  than  two  full  quarters  prior  to  the  desired  starting  date. 


Professional  Specialization 

Students  complete  their  course  of  study  by 
electing  one  of  the  following  27-quarter-hour 
options  designed  to  meet  their  professional 
objectives. 

Option  1:  Continuing  Care  Administration 


Licensure  as  a  nursing  home  administrator  requires  an  internship,  a  licensure  examination,  and 
a  bachelor's  degree.  The  required  courses  in  this  option  help  prepare  students  for  the  Massachusetts 
Licensure  Examination.  Students  are  advised,  however,  to  contact  the  Board  of  Registration  of  Nur- 
sing Home  Administrators  for  the  specific  eligibility  requirements  needed  for  this  examination. 

HMG  4600        HMG  4601        HMG  4602 

Long-Term  Care  Administration  (A,  B,  Q*  18 

Choose  nine  quarter  hours  from  the  following. 

SOC  4225 

Social  Gerontology                                           (3) 

HMG  4300 

Home  Health  Care                                          (3) 

HSC  4610 

Geriatric  Nutrition                                          (3) 

REC  4401 

The  Nursing  Home  Experience                       (3) 

REC  4460 

The  Process  of  Aging                                       (3) 

HSC  4210 

Basic  Nutrition                                                (3) 

HSC  4220 

Basic  Pharmacology                                        (3) 

•"This  series  of  courses  offered  in  even  numbered  academic  years. 


Health  Professions  and  Sciences 


Option  2:  Community  Health  Management 

HMG  4310 

HMG  4311 

Principles  and  Practices  of 
Community  Health  1,  2 

6 

MLS  4341 

MLS  4342 

Epidemiology  1,  2 

6 

HSC  4311 

Public  Health  2 

3 

Choose  twelve  quarter  hours  from  the  following. 

ACC  4110 

Management  Control  for 
Nonprofit  Organizations 

(3) 

HMG  4300 

Home  Health  Care 

(3) 

HMG  4550 

HMG  4551 

Contemporary  and  Controversial 
Health  Care  Issues  1,  2 

(6) 

HMG  4610 

Principles  and  Practices  of 
Community  Mental  Health 

(3) 

HRM  4320 

Techniques  of  Employee  Selection 

(3) 

HRM4340 

Public  Sector  Collective 
Bargaining  in  the  United  States 

(3) 

HSC  4315 

Environmental  Problems  and  Health 

(3) 

MKT  4335 

Public  Relations  1 

(3) 

SOC  4215 

Medical  Sociology 

(3) 

SOC  4240 

Sociology  of  Human  Service 
Organizations 

(3) 

SOC  4241 

Human  Services  Professions 

(3) 

Option  3:  General 

Choose  courses  from  (EMS,  HMG,  HRA,  HSC,  MLS,  REC,  RAD)* 

15 

Choose  12  quarter  hours  from  the  following. 

ECN  4130 

Medical  Economics 

(3) 

ECN  4321 

Urban  Economic  Problems  and 
Policies 

(3) 

ENG  4380 

Business  Writing  and  Reports  1 

(3) 

FI  4326 

Financial  Control 

(3) 

FI  4325 

Budgeting  and  Planning 

(3) 

FI  4321 

Credit  Management 

(3) 

HRM  4321 

Wage  and  Salary  Administration 

(3) 

HRM  4322 

Employee  Benefits 

(3) 

HRM  4323 

Job  Evaluation 

(3) 

HRM  4341 

Private  Sector  Collective 
Bargaining  in  the  United  States 

(3) 

MGT  4320 

Managing  Change 

(3) 

POL  4300 

Introduction  to  Public 
Administration 

(3) 

Total  Quarter  Hours 

175 

"These  courses  must  be  taken  at  Northeastern  University. 


Health  Professions  and  Sciences 


Health  Record  Administration 

The  health  record  administrator's  varied 
responsibilities  relate  to  health  information 
systems  and  include  the  organization,  opera- 
tion, and  management  of  health  record  ser- 
vices. Required  skills  for  this  profession  in- 
clude the  ability  to  design  health  information 
and  retrieval  systems;  plan,  organize,  and 
direct  health  record  services;  develop,  analyze, 
and  evaluate  health  records  and  indexes; 
work  with  medical  and  administrative  staffs 
in  developing  methods  for  evaluation  of 
patient  care;  and  conduct  research  projects 
using  health  care  information. 

Students  who  successfully  complete  this  pro- 
gram qualify  for  admission  to  the  professional 
registration  examinations  conducted  by  the 
American  Medical  Record  Association. 

Potential  students  must  be  interviewed  by 
the  Program  Coordinator.  Arrangement  can 
be  made  through  the  Health  Records  Office, 
205  Mugar  Building,  telephone  617-437-2525. 

Professional  Certification 

An  individual  who  wishes  to  qualify  for  regis- 
tration as  a  medical  record  administrator  and 
who  already  holds  a  bachelor's  degree  in 


another  field  of  study  from  a  college  or 
university  acceptable  to  Northeastern  Univer- 
sity may  take  the  Health  Record  Administra- 
tion Certificate  Program.  Upon  completion  of 
this  program  with  a  cumulative  quality-point 
average  of  2.5  or  higher,  students  will  receive 
certification  from  University  College.  In  addi- 
tion to  the  required  courses,  students  must 
complete  one  year  of  a  natural  science,  such 
as  biology,  chemistry,  or  microbiology. 
Students  also  must  demonstrate  an 
understanding  of  the  principles  of  descriptive 
statistics.  This  requirement  may  be  satisfied 
by  successful  completion  of  an  approved 
statistics  course  with  a  grade  of  C  or  better. 
These  requirements  are  in  addition  to  the 
laboratory  course  in  anatomy  and  physiology. 

In  designated  professional  courses  (*), 
students  must  obtain  a  grade  of  C  or  better. 
Only  one  professional  course  may  be  repeated. 
Students  who  receive  a  grade  of  D  in  more 
than  one  professional  course  will  be  asked  to 
withdraw  from  the  program. 

Students  who  apply  for  the  clinical  courses 
HRA  4335,  HRA  4336,  and  HRA  4337  must 
have  a  quality-point  average  of  2.5  and  the 
approval  of  their  adviser. 


Health  Record  Administration  Bachelor  of  Science  Degree 
(Major  Code  866) 


Core  Courses 

quarter  hours 

ENG  4110 

ENG  4111 

Critical  Writing  1,  2 

6 

ENG  4112 

Approaches  to  Literature 

3 

MTH  4110 

MTH  4111 

Math  1,  2 

6 

ECN  4115 

ECN  4116         ECN  4117 

Economic  Principles  and 
Problems  1,  2,  3 

9 

Psychology  (PSY)  Courses  of  your  choice 

9 

BIO  4103 

BIO  4104          BIO  4105 

Biology  1,  2,  3 

12 

BIO  4175 

BIO  4176          BIO  4177 

Human  Anatomy  and  Physiology 

1,  2,  3*                                                              9 

ECN  4250 

or 

HMG  4200 

ECN  4251 

Statistics  1,  2 

or 

Health  Science  Statistics 

(6) 

(3) 

continued  on  the  next  page 


o 


100         Health  Professions  and  Sciences 


Choose  either: 

History  (HST)  Courses  of  your  choice 

or 

Political  Science  (POL)  Courses  of  your  choice 


MIS  4101 

or 

COM  4101 


Introduction  to  Data  Processing 

and  Information  Systems  1 

or 

Foundations  of  Computer  Literacy 


(9) 
(9) 


Sociology  (SOC)  Courses  of  your  choice 

9 

Major  Concentration  Courses 

HMG  4215 

Health  Law* 

3 

HMG  4301 

Health  Care  Delivery  Systems* 

3 

HRA4305 

HRA  4306 

Language  of  Medicine  1,  2f 

4 

HRA  4308 

Hospital  Management  for  Health 
Record  Administrators* 

3 

HRA4310 

HRA  4311 

HRA  4312 

Health  Record  Science  1,  2,  3* 

18 

HRA  4313 

HRA  4314 

Health  Record  Science  4,  5* 

12 

HRA  4320 

HRA  4321 

HRA  4322 

Organization  of  the  Health 
Record  Department  1,  2,  3 

9 

HRA  4335 

HRA  4336 

HRA  4337 

Clinical  Practicum  1,  2,  3* 

8 

HRA  4330 

Health  Record  Computer  Science* 

3 

HRA  4332 

Topics  in  Health  Records 

3 

HRM4301 

Organizational  Behavior 

3 

HSC  4301 

HSC  4302 

Mechanisms  of  Disease  1,  2 

6 

(3) 
(4) 


Electives 


Social  science  or  humanities  electives 


21 


Total  Quarter  Hours 


177-178 


*Students  must  obtain  a  grade  of  C  or  better  in  this  course. 

tA  challenge  examination  is  available  for  this  course.  Call  617-437-2525  for  details. 


Health  Professions  and  Sciences         101 


Health  Record  Administration  Certificate  Program  (Major  Code  867) 

Core  Courses 

quarter  hours 

BIO  4175 

BIO  4176           BIO  4177 

Human  Anatomy  and  Physiology 
1,  2,  3 

9 

HMG  4215 

Health  Law 

3 

HMG  4301 

Health  Care  Delivery  Systems 

3 

HRA  4305 

HRA  4306 

Language  of  Medicine  1,  2* 

4 

HRA  4308 

Hospital  Management  for  Health 
Record  Administrators 

3 

HRA  4310 

HRA  4311         HRA  4312 

Health  Record  Science  1,  2,  3 

18 

HRA  4313 

HRA  4314 

Health  Record  Science  4,  5 

12 

HRA  4320 

HRA  4321         HRA  4322 

Organization  of  the  Health 
Record  Department  1,  2,  3 

9 

HRA  4324 

HRA  4325         HRA  4326 

Applied  Health  Record 
Science  1,  2,  3 

8 

HRA  4330 

Health  Record  Computer  Science 

3 

HRA  4332 

Topics  in  Health  Records 

3 

HSC  4301 

HSC  4302 

Mechanisms  of  Disease  1,  2 

6 

MIS  4101 

or 

COM  4101 

Introduction  to  Data  Processing 

and  Information  Systems  1 

or 

Foundations  of  Computer  Literacy 

(3) 
(4) 

Total  Quarter  Hours 

84-85 

*A  challenge  examination  is  available  for  this  course.  Call  617-437-2525  for  details. 


Health  Science 

The  Bachelor  of  Science  Degree  in  health 
science  is  available  to  students  holding 
registration,  certification,  or  licensure  (as 
defined  by  University  regulations)  in  a 
specific  health  profession.  A  further  prere- 
quisite is  training  in  an  approved  program 


accredited  by  an  appropriate  medical  associa- 
tion such  as  the  American  Medical  Associa- 
tion, National  League  for  Nursing,  or 
American  Dental  Association. 

Students  interested  in  this  program  should 
consult  with  an  academic  adviser  to  determine 
their  eligibility. 


Health  Science  Bachelor  of  Science  in  Health  Science  Degree  g — > 
(Major  Code  865)  IS 


Core  Courses 

quarter  hours 

ENG  4110         ENG  4111 

Critical  Writing  1,  2 

6 

ENG  4112 

Approaches  to  Literature 

3 

Humanities  (art,  asl,  dra, 

ENG,  JRN,  LN,  MUS,  PHL,  SPC,  TCC) 

9 

Social  Sciences  (ecn,  hst,  pol,  psy,  soa,  soo 

9 

General 

Choose  12  quarter  hours  from 

any  of  the  humanities  or  social  science  areas 

listed  above: 

continued  on  the  next  page 


102        Health  Professions  and  Sciences 

Basic  Sciences 

BIO  4103 

BIO  4104 

Biology  1,  2 

8 

BIO  4175 

BIO  4176 

BIO  4177 

Human  Anatomy  and  Physiology  1,  2,  3 

9 

BIO  4190 

Microbiology  1 

3 

COM  4101 

Foundations  of  Computer  Literacy 

4 

CHM4111 

CHM  4112 

CHM  4113 

General  Chemistry  1,  2,  3 

9 

MTH4110 

MTH  4111 

MTH  4112 

Math  1,  2,  3 

9 

Advanced  Sciences 

Choose  a  minimum  of  9  quarter  hours  from 

the  following: 

BIO  4235 

BIO  4236 

BIO  4237 

Genetics  1,  2,  and  Lab 

(8) 

BIO  4246 

BIO  4247 

BIO  4248 

Cell  Biology  1,  2,  and  Lab 

(8) 

BIO  4258 

BIO  4259 

Advanced  Human  Physiology  1,  2 

(6) 

BIO  4320 

Medical  Microbiology 

(4) 

BIO  4461 

Immunology 

(4) 

CHM  4261 

CHM  4262 

CHM  4263 

Organic  Chemistry  1,  2,  3 

(12) 

HSC  4600 

Advanced  Nutrition 

(3) 

HSC  4601 

Advanced  Pharmacology 

(3) 

MLS  4321 

Hematology 

(3) 

MLS  4322 

MLS  4323 

Morphologic  Hematology  1,  2 

(6) 

PHY  4101 

PHY  4102 

College  Physics  1,  2 

(8) 

Major  Concentration  Courses 

Basic 

HMG  4200 

Health  Science  Statistics 

3 

HSC  4301 

HSC  4302 

Mechanisms  of  Disease  1,  2 

6 

HMG  4100 

HMG  4101 

Hospital  Organization  and 
Management  1,  2 

6 

HSC  4320 

HSC  4321 

Training  and  Development  in  the 
Health  Professions  1,  2 

6 

Choose  18  quarter  hours  from 

the  following: 

HMG  4215 

Health  Law 

(3) 

HMG  4301 

Health  Care  Delivery  Systems 

(3) 

HMG  4310 

HMG  4311 

Principles  and  Practices  of 
Community  Health  1,  2 

(6) 

HMG  4550 

HMG  4551 

Contemporary  and  Controversial 
Health  Care  Issues  1,  2 

(6) 

HMG  4610 

Principles  and  Practices  of 
Community  Mental  Health 

(3) 

HSC  4210 

Basic  Nutrition 

(3) 

HSC  4220 

Basic  Pharmacology 

(3) 

HSC  4310 

HSC  4311 

Public  Health  1,  2 

(6) 

HSC  4315 

Environmental  Problems  and  Health 

(3) 

continued  on  the  next  page 


Health  Professions  and  Sciences 

103 

MLS  4341 

Epidemiology  1 

(3) 

REC  4460 

Process  of  Aging 

(3) 

Students  with 

a  clinical  laboratory  background 

may  choose  18  quarter  hours  from  the  following: 

BIO  4235 

BIO  4236 

BIO  4237 

Genetics  1,  2,  and  Lab* 

(8) 

BIO  4246 

BIO  4247 

BIO  4248 

Cell  Biology  1,  2,  and  Lab* 

(8) 

BIO  4461 

Immunology* 

(4) 

CHM  4224 

Analytical  Chemistry 

(4) 

CHM  4381 

CHM  4382 

CHM  4383 

Physical  Chemistry  1,  2,  3 

(9) 

Advanced 

Choose  6  to  9  quarter  hours  fr 

om  the  following: 

HMG  4210 

HMG  4211 

Medical  Care  and  Current  Social 
Problems  1,  2 

(6) 

HMG4400 

HMG  4401 

Health  Care  Financial  Management 
1,2 

(6) 

HSC  4602 

Methods  and  Materials  in  Public 
Health  Education 

(3) 

HSC  4610 

Geriatric  Nutrition 

(3) 

HSC  4613 

Oral  Microbiology 

(3) 

HSC  4614 

HSC  4615 

Advanced  Periodontology  1,  2 

(6) 

MLS  4342 

Epidemiology  2 

(3) 

RAD  4450 

Computerized  Body  Tomography 
Pathology 

(3) 

RAD  4304 

Cross-Sectional  Anatomy 

(4) 

RAD  4400 

Anatomy  of  the  Head  and  Neck 

(3) 

Students  with 

a  clinical  laboratory  background  may  choose  6  to  9  quarter  hours  from  the  following: 

BIO  4191 

BIO  4192 

Microbiology  2,  3 

(6) 

BIO  4258 

BIO  4259 

Advanced  Human  Physiology  1,  2* 

(6) 

BIO  4320 

Medical  Microbiology* 

(4) 

CHM  4321 

CHM  4322 

Instrumental  Analysis  1,  2 

(6) 

CHM  4323 

Radiochemistry 

(3) 

MLS  1323 

Hemostasist 

(2) 

MLS  1324 

Histochemistryt 

(2) 

MLS  1331 

Clinical  Immunologyt 

(3) 

MLS  1333 

Immunohematologyt 

(2) 

MLS  4322 

MLS  4323 

Morphologic  Hematology  1,  2* 

(6) 

MLS  4365 

Quality  Control 

(3) 

EleCtiveS  and/or  transfer  credits  to  equal 

40 

Total  Quarter  Hours 

175-178 

*These  courses  may  be  used  in  only  one  category;  requirements  must  be  fulfilled  in  each  category. 
tTuition  for  this  course  is  at  the  special  rate. 


104         Health  Professions  and  Sciences 


Medical  Laboratory  Science- 
Medical  Technology 

Medical  laboratory  science  (MLS)  is  concerned 
with  laboratory  examination  of  material 
necessary  for  monitoring  health  and  for 
diagnosing  and  treating  illness.  Medical 
laboratory  technicians  and  technologists  work 
in  a  variety  of  specialized  fields  such  as 
microbiology,  blood  banking,  hematology,  or 
clinical  chemistry,  or  as  generalists  in  all 
these  areas. 

The  medical  laboratory  technician  holding 
an  associate's  degree  works  under  the  direct 
supervision  of  a  medical  technologist  and  per- 
forms most  common  medical  laboratory  tests. 
The  medical  technologist,  who  must  have  a 
bachelor's  degree,  is  considered  qualified  to 
perform  tests  with  little  or  no  direct  supervi- 
sion. With  additional  education  or  experience, 
medical  technologists  can  become  educators, 
researchers,  or  supervisors.  They  may  serve 
as  sales  and  technical  representatives  for 
scientific  supply  and  equipment  companies  or 
serve  in  government  positions. 

Both  degree  programs  are  conducted  in 
affiliation  with  Boston-area  hospitals  and  are 
accredited  by  the  Committee  of  Allied  Health 
Education  and  Accreditation  of  the  American 
Medical  Association.  Upon  successful  comple- 
tion of  either  the  associate's  or  bachelor's 
degree  program,  the  student  is  eligible  to  take 
a  national  certification  examination  given  by 
the  National  Certification  Agency  for  Medical 
Laboratory  Personnel  or  the  Board  of  Registry 
of  the  American  Society  of  Clinical  Pathology. 

The  basic  courses  in  medical  laboratory 
science,  science,  and  education  are  offered 
evenings,  but  the  advanced  medical 
laboratory  science  courses  and  the  clinical 
experience  are  offered  full-time  during  the 
day  only. 

Associate's  Degree  Professional  Requirements 

A  clinical  applied  study  program  (or  appropri- 
ate work  experience)  is  required  toward  this 
degree.  Work  experience  is  acceptable  if  it 


meets  the  requirements  for  certification  of 
either  the  National  Certification  Agency  for 
Medical  Laboratory  Personnel  or  the  Board  of 
Registry  of  the  American  Society  of  Clinical 
Pathologists.  Students  without  appropriate 
work  experience  can  apply  for  clinical  applied 
studies  through  the  University  College  MLS 
Clinical  Coordinator,  206  Mugar,  617-437-3664. 
This  should  be  done  one  year  in  advance  of 
the  anticipated  entry  into  clinical  courses. 

Prerequisites  for  clinical  applied  studies  are 
a  minimum  of  a  2.0  quality-point  average  in 
the  required  courses  and  a  C-  or  better  in 
each  medical  laboratory  science  (MLS)  course. 
These  basic  courses  are  available  during  the 
evening  and  on  an  every-other-year  basis 
through  the  College  of  Pharmacy  and  Allied 
Health  Professions.  Students  register  for 
these  courses  in  the  College  of  Pharmacy  and 
Allied  Health  Professions,  206  Mugar.  Tuition 
is  at  a  special  rate.  These  courses  should  be 
completed  within  three  years  of  applying  to 
the  AD-MLT  Clinical  Applied  Studies. 

Bachelor's  Degree  Professional  Requirements 

Clinical  applied  study  courses  are  available 
on  a  full-time  basis  only  and  are  offered 
through  the  College  of  Pharmacy  and  Allied 
Health  Professions.  Students  must  apply  for 
applied  study  courses  one  year  in  advance. 
Students  should  note  that  although  most 
courses  are  offered  evenings,  it  is  necessary  to 
attend  full-time  days  for  3  quarters  of  clinical 
and  1  quarter  of  classroom  course  work.  Dur- 
ing this  time  the  student  must  meet  all  the 
requirements  of  the  last  four  quarters  of  the 
undergraduate  Basic  College  curriculum  for 
the  Bachelor  of  Science  Degree.  Students 
register  for  clinical  applied  study  in  the  College 
of  Pharmacy  and  Allied  Health  Professions, 
206  Mugar.  Tuition  is  at  a  special  rate. 

Prerequisites  for  the  clinical  applied  study 
component  include  completion  of  each  MLS 
course  with  a  C—  or  better  within  five  years 
of  application  to  the  applied  study  and  com- 
pletion of  all  other  courses  with  a  quality- 
point  average  of  2.5  or  better. 


Health  Professions  and  Sciences         105 

Medical  Laboratory  Science— Medical  Laboratory  Technician  cg^ 
Associate  in  Science  Degree  (Major  Code  800)                 S=? 

Core  Courses 

quarter  hours 

ENG  4110 

ENG  4111 

Critical  Writing  1,  2 

6 

ENG  4112 

Approaches  to  Literature 

3 

HMG  4210 

Medical  Care  and  Current  Social  Problems 

3 

HMG  4215 

Health  Law 

3 

MTH4107 

MTH4108 

College  Algebra  and  Introduction 
to  Calculus 

8 

BIO  4103 

BIO  4104 

BIO  4105 

Biology  1,  2,  3 

12 

BIO  4175 

BIO  4176 

BIO  4177 

Human  Anatomy  and  Physiology  1,  2,  3 

9 

CHM  4111 

CHM  4112 

CHM  4113 

General  Chemistry  1,  2,  3 

9 

Major  Concentration  Courses 

MLS  4301 

Medical  Laboratory  Science  Orientation 

2 

MLS  1311 

Basic  MLS  Urinalysis* 

2 

MLS  1321 

MLS  1322 

► 

Basic  MLS  Hematology  1*,  2* 

4 

MLS  1330 

Basic  MLS  Immunohematology* 

2 

MLS  1331 

Basic  MLS  Clinical  Immunology* 

3 

MLS  1341 

Basic  MLS  Clinical  Microbiology* 

4 

MLS  1351 

Basic  MLS  Clinical  Chemistry* 

4 

MLS  1412 

MLT  Special  Topics 

2 

MLS  1423 

MLT  Hematology  Applied  Study 

2 

MLS  1432 

Immunohematology  Applied  Study 

2 

MLS  1442 

MLT  Microbiology  Applied  Study 

2 

MLS  1452 

MLT  Clinical  Chemistry  Applied  Study 

2 

MLS  1480 

MLT  Seminar  1 

2 

Electives 

Computer  science 

3 

Humanities 

6 

Social  science 

3 

Open  electives 

6 

Total  Quarter  Hours 

104 

*Tuition  for  this  course  is  at  a  special  rate. 


106         Health  Professions  and  Sciences 


Medical  Technology—Medical  Technologist 
Bachelor  of  Science  Degree  (Major  Code  801) 


quarter  hours 

Credits  from  Medical  Laboratory  associate' 

3  degree  program 

104 

BIO  4235 

BIO  4236          BIO  4237 

Genetics  1,  2,  and  Lab 

8 

BIO  4246 

BIO  4247          BIO  4248 

Cell  Biology  1,  2,  and  Lab 

8 

CHM  4261 

CHM  4262        CHM  4263 

Organic  Chemistry  1,  2,  3 

12 

MLS  4341 

Epidemiology  1 

3 

PHY  4101 

PHY  4102 

College  Physics  1,  2 

8 

Major  Concentration  Courses 

Please  refer  to  the  current  Northeastern  University  Basic  Day  College  Course  Description  and 
Curriculum  Guide  for  course  descriptions  of  the  following  clinical  applied-study  courses.  Tuition 
for  these  courses  is  at  a  special  rate;  to  register,  call  617-437-3664. 

MLS  1523 

Applied  Hematology 

4 

MLS  1532 

Applied  Immunohematology 

3 

MLS  1544 

Applied  Clinical  Microbiology 

7 

MLS  1552 

Applied  Clinical  Chemistry 

7 

MLS  1621 

MLS  1622 

Advanced  Hematology  1,  2 

5 

MLS  1631 

Advanced  Immunohematology 

2 

MLS  1642 

Medical  Parasitology 

2 

MLS  1643 

Medical  Mycology 

3 

MLS  1645 

MLS  1646         MLS  1647 

Advanced  Clinical  Microbiology  1,  2, 

3            6 

MLS  1651 

MLS  1652         MLS  1653 

Advanced  Clinical  Chemistry  1,  2,  3 

6 

MLS  1661 

MLS  Education 

2 

MLS  1665 

MLS  Management 

2 

MLS  1680 

MLS  Special  Topics 

2 

MLS  1681 

MLS  Senior  Seminar 

2 

MLS  1890 

Undergraduate  Research  (Optional) 

(2) 

Electives 

Psychology  and  statistics  are  strongly  recommended  electives. 

Computer  science 

3 

Humanities 

3 

Social  science 

3 

Open  electives 

3 

Total  Quarter  Hours 

208-210 

Health  Professions  and  Sciences         107 


Medical  Laboratory  Science— 
Hematology 

Hematology  is  a  specialty  within  medical 
laboratory  science.  Hematology  technologists 
may  be  employed  in  hospitals  and  clinical 
laboratories,  where  they  perform  specific 
laboratory  tests  that  aid  in  the  diagnosis, 
treatment,  and  follow-up  of  infections, 
anemias,  leukemias,  and  bleeding  disorders. 
The  requirements  for  categorical  certifica- 
tion in  hematology  are  indicated  by  the  Board 
of  Registry  of  the  American  Society  of 
Clinical  Pathologists  and  the  National  Cer- 
tification Agency.  Students  should  contact  the 
American  Society  of  Clinical  Pathologists, 
Board  of  Registry,  P.O.  Box  96215,  Chicago, 
EL  60693,  and  the  National  Certification 
Agency  for  Medical  Laboratory  Personnel, 


Department  4064,  Washington,  D.C. 
20061-4064,  for  details  concerning  eligibility 
to  write  the  hematology  examination. 

The  hematology  curriculum  is  designed 
primarily  for  those  who  already  work  in  this 
field.  Documentation  of  hematology  work  ex- 
perience must  be  supplied  to  the  Office  of 
Academic  and  Student  Affairs,  prior  to  enter- 
ing the  professional  (MLS)  courses.  Necessary 
forms  and  procedures  may  be  obtained  by  con- 
tacting the  Medical  Laboratory  Coordinator, 
617-437-3664. 

All  professional  clinical  courses  in  medical 
laboratory  science  are  offered  directly  through 
the  College  of  Pharmacy  and  Allied  Health 
Professions.  Students  must  register  for  the 
courses  through  this  college,  206  Mugar, 
617-437-3664.  Tuition  is  at  a  special  rate.  A 
grade  of  C—  or  better  is  required  in  the  pro- 
fessional courses. 


Hematology  Bachelor  of  Science  Degree  (Major  Code  807)    <&=±> 


Core  Courses 

quarter  hours 

ENG  4110 

ENG  4111 

Critical  Writing  1,  2                                         6 

ENG  4112 

Approaches  to  Literature                                 3 

MTH  4107 

MTH  4108 

College  Algebra  and  Introduction 

to  Calculus                                                        8 

BIO  4103 

BIO  4104 

BIO  4105 

Biology  1,  2,  3                                                 12 

BIO  4175 

BIO  4176 

BIO  4177 

Human  Anatomy  and  Physiology  1,  2,  3         9 

BIO  4190 

or 

MLS  1341 

or 

BIO  4320 


Microbiology 

(3) 

Basic  MLS  Clinical  Microbiology 

(4) 

Medical  Microbiology 

(3) 

BIO  4235 

BIO  4236 

BIO  4237 

Genetics  1,  2,  and  Lab 

8 

BIO  4246 

BIO  4247 

BIO  4248 

Cell  Biology  1,  2,  and  Lab 

8 

CHM  4111 

CHM  4112 

CHM  4113 

General  Chemistry  1,  2,  3 

9 

CHM  4221 

or 

CHM  4224 

CHM  4222 

CHM  4223 

Analytical  Chemistry  1,  2,  3 

or 

Analytical  Chemistry  (Summer  Intensive) 

(9) 
(4) 

CHM  4261 

CHM  4262 

CHM  4263 

Organic  Chemistry  1,  2,  3 

12 

HMG  4100 

HMG  4101 

Hospital  Organization  and 
Management  1,  2 

6 

HMG  4210 

HMG  4211 

Medical  Care  and  Current  Social 
Problems  1,  2 

6 

HMG  4215 

Health  Law 

3 

PHY  4101 

PHY  4102 

College  Physics  1,  2 

8 

continued  on  the  next  page 


0 


108        Health  Professions  and  Sciences 

Major  Concentration  Courses 

HSC  4320 

HSC  4321 

Training  and  Development  in  the 
Health  Professions  1,  2 

6 

MLS  1311 

Basic  MLS  Urinalysis* 

2 

MLS  1321 

Basic  MLS  Hematology  1* 

2 

MLS  1322 

Basic  MLS  Hematology  2* 

2 

MLS  1323 

Advanced  Hemostasis  Techniques* 

2 

MLS  1324 

Histochemistry  * 

2 

MLS  1330 

Basic  MLS  Immunohematology* 

2 

MLS  1331 

Basic  MLS  Clinical  Immunology* 

3 

MLS  1333 

Immunohematology  * 

2 

MLS  1351 

Basic  MLS  Clinical  Chemistry* 

4 

MLS  1642 

Medical  Parasitology  (offered  days  only)* 

2 

MLS  1890 

Undergraduate  Research* 

2 

MLS  4301 

MLS  Orientation  (required  if  not 
working  in  the  field) 

2 

MLS  4322 

MLS  4323 

Morphologic  Hematology  1,  2 

6 

MLS  4365 

Quality  Control 

3 

Electives 

Histology,  psychology,  economics,  sociology,  statistics,  hematology,  a  computer  course,  and 
epidemiology  are  strongly  recommended  electives. 

Humanities 

9 

Social  sciences 

9 

Open  electives 

18 

Total  Quarter  Hours 

181-189 

*Tuition  for  this  course  is  at  a  special  rate.  Please  refer  to  the  current  Northeastern  University  Basic  Day  College  Course 
Description  and  Curriculum  Guide  for  the  course  description.  To  register,  call  617-437-3664. 


Health  Professions  and  Sciences         109 


Nursing  (Evening  Section) 

University  College  offers  a  Bachelor  of 
Science  in  Nursing  Degree  program  for 
registered  nurses  in  collaboration  with  the 
College  of  Nursing,  which  is  fully  accredited 
by  the  National  League  for  Nursing. 

The  program  is  unique  in  that  it  allows 
students  to  fulfill,  in  the  evening,  both 
classroom  and  clinical  components  of  Nursing 
Transition  (NUR  4300),  Community  Health 
Nursing  (NUR  4500),  Contemporary  Nursing 
(NUR  4501),  and  Introduction  to  Nursing 
Research  (NUR  4502).  The  program  is  also 
unique  in  that  students  are  able  to  accelerate 
their  course  of  study  by  taking  advantage  of 
subject  matter  examinations.  Approximately 
75%  of  the  curriculum  is  able  to  be  tested  out 
in  this  manner. 

Admission  Procedure 

The  following  credentials  are  required  to  enter 
the  part-time  evening  program  and  should  be 
forwarded  to  the  Office  of  Academic  and  Stu- 
dent Affairs,  University  College,  Northeastern 
University,  180  Ruggles,  360  Huntington 
Avenue,  Boston,  MA  02115: 

•  a  resume  detailing  education,  professional 
work  experience,  and  professional  and  com- 
munity activities 


•  official  transcripts  from  high  school,  college 
or  university,  and  basic  nursing  school  (the 
nursing  school  transcript  should  include  a 
senior  summary  statement) 

•  a  copy  of  your  Massachusetts  Registered 
Nurse  license 

•  a  completed  Nursing  Program  Application 
(available  from  the  Office  of  Academic  and 
Student  Affairs) 

•  a  reference  from  your  most  recent  nursing 
employer 

•  proof  of  satisfactory  completion  of  the  NLN 
Mobility  Profile  II  Examination. 

Pre-admission  counseling  is  available  by 
calling  the  Office  of  Academic  and  Student 
Affairs  at  617-437-2400. 

Planning  a  Program  of  Study 

Potential  students  must  plan  their  program  of 
study  with  the  Academic  Coordinator.  Appoint- 
ments can  be  arranged  by  calling 
617-437-2818. 

Potential  and  current  students  are  encour- 
aged to  attend  group  information  sessions  in 
order  to  increase  their  awareness  of  University 
College  and  College  of  Nursing  policies.  These 
sessions  cover  course  requirements,  promo- 
tional policies,  advanced  placement  examina- 
tions, and  nursing  course  petition  procedures. 
To  register,  call  617-437-2818. 


110         Health  Professions  and  Sciences 


Nursing  (Evening  Section)  Bachelor  of  Science  in  Nursing  Degree 
(Major  Code  809) 


Core  Courses 

quarter  hours 

ENG  4110 

ENG  4111 

Critical  Writing  1,  2 

6 

ENG  4112 

Approaches  to  Literature 

3 

BIO  4103 

BIO  4105 

Biology  1,  3 

8 

BIO  4175 

BIO  4176          BIO  4177 

Human  Anatomy  and  Physiology  1,  2 

3         9 

BIO  4190 

Microbiology  1 

3 

CHM4111 

CHM  4112        CHM  4113 

General  Chemistry  1,  2,  3 

9 

NUR4302 

or 

HSC  4601 

Pharmacodynamics 

or 

Advanced  Pharmacology 

(3) 
(3) 

PSY  4110 

Introduction  to  Psychology: 
Fundamental  Issues 

3 

PSY  4111 

Introduction  to  Psychology: 
Developmental  Aspects 

3 

PSY  4112 

Introduction  to  Psychology: 
Personal  Dynamics 

3 

PSY  4240 

Development:  Infancy  and  Childhood 

3 

PSY  4241 

Development:  Adolescence 

3 

PSY  4242 

Development:  Adulthood  and  Aging 

3 

PSY  4270 

PSY  4271 

Social  Psychology  1,  2 

6 

SOA  4101 

Cultural  Anthropology:  Preliterate  Societies  3 

SOA  4102 

Cultural  Anthropology:  Industrial  Societies    3 

SOC  4100 

Roles,  Culture,  and  the  Individual 

3 

SOC  4101 

Inequality  and  Institutions 

3 

one  history  course  of  your  choice 

3 

Major  Concentration  Courses 

NUE4300 

Nursing  Transition** 

9 

NUR4301 

Psychiatric/Mental  Health  Nursingt 

7 

NUR4400 

Maternal  and  Child  Nursingt 

9 

NUR4401 

Medical  Surgical  Nursingt 

9 

NUR4500 

Community  Health  Nursing* 

9 

NUR4501 

Contemporary  Nursing* 

5 

NUR4502 

Introduction  to  Nursing  Research* 

4 

Electives 

Humanities 

9 

Open  electives 

15 

Total  Quarter  Hours 

177-178 

*  Students  must  submit  a  petition  to  the  Academic  Coordinator  to  enter  each  nursing  course.  Petitions  must  be  submitted 
at  least  one  full  quarter  in  advance  of  registering.  Students  petitioning  to  enter  NUR  4300,  Nursing  Transition, 
must  also  obtain  a  health  clearance  from  the  Lane  Health  Center  and  present  evidence  of  having  had  a  tuberculin 
skin  test  within  the  previous  twelve  months.  ** Advanced  standing  credit  of  twenty  quarter  hours  is  awarded 
upon  successful  completion  of  this  course. 

t  Challenge  examinations  are  available  for  this  course  through  the  NLN  Mobility  Profile  II  Examination,  a  component 
of  the  admissions  process. 


Health  Professions  and  Sciences         111 


Paramedic  Technology 

The  Paramedic  Technology  Program  provides 
the  opportunity  to  earn  an  Associate  in 
Science  Degree.  Major  concentration  areas  in- 
volve the  EMT-Paramedic's  roles,  respon- 
sibilities and  the  subject  areas  required  by 
Massachusetts  Department  of  Public  Health 
regulations  and  national  guidelines.  These 
areas  include:  medical  terminology,  patient 
assessment  and  initial  management,  airway 
and  ventilation,  pathophysiology  of  shock, 
general  pharmacology,  trauma  and  burns, 
respiratory  system,  cardiovascular  system, 
endocrine  emergencies,  nervous  system,  acute 
abdomen,  genitourinary  and  reproductive 
systems,  anaphylaxis,  toxicology,  alcoholism 
and  drug  abuse,  infectious  diseases,  en- 
vironmental injuries,  geriatrics,  pediatrics, 


obstetrics,  gynecological  and  neonatal 
emergencies,  behavioral  emergencies,  EMS 
systems,  medical/legal  considerations,  com- 
munications, rescue,  major  incident  response, 
and  stress  management. 

Admissions  requirements:  completion  and 
submission  of  an  application  form;  high  school 
diploma  or  equivalent;  national,  state  or  pro- 
vincial certification  as  an  Emergency  Medical 
Technician;  official  high  school  or  college 
transcripts;  entrance  examination;  Admis- 
sions Committee  interview;  and  physical 
examination. 

Students  who  successfully  complete  the 
Paramedic  Certificate  Courses  curriculum 
may  apply  for  and  take  the  National  Registry 
of  Emergency  Medical  Technicians  Paramedic 
Certification  Examination.  For  further  infor- 
mation, call  617-272-5500. 


Paramedic  Technology  Associate  in  Science  Degree 
(Major  Code  874) 


Core  Courses 

quarter  hours 

EMS  4117 
EMS  4120 

EMS  4118         EMS  4119 

Emergency  Medical  Services 
1,  2,  3,  4 

24 

EMS  4121 

EMS  4122 

Emergency  Medical  Services  5,  6 

22 

EMS  4123 

Emergency  Medical  Service  7 

3 

BIO  4178 

BIO  4198 

Human  Anatomy  and  Physiology  1 
and  Lab 

4 

BIO  4179 

BIO  4199 

Human  Anatomy  and  Physiology  2 
and  Lab 

4 

Liberal  Arts  and  Computer  Courses 

ENG  4110 

ENG  4111 

Critical  Writing  1,  2 

6 

ENG  4112 

Approaches  to  Literature 

3 

MTH4110 

MTH  4111 

Math  1,2 

6 

SPC  4101 

Fundamentals  of  Human  Communication 

3 

PSY  4110 

Introduction  to  Psychology: 
Fundamental  Issues 

3 

PSY  4112 

Introduction  to  Psychology: 
Personal  Dynamics 

3 

HST  4103 

Civilization  of  Modern  World 

3 

LNS  4101 

LNS  4102 

Beginning  Conversational  Spanish  1,  2 

8 

COM  4101 

Foundations  of  Computer  Literacy 

4 

Total  Quarter  Hours 

96 

112         Health  Professions  and  Sciences 


Radiologic  Technology 

The  Radiologic  Technology  program  is  a  joint 
offering  of  the  University  and  several  area 
hospitals.  Classroom  experience  is  provided  by 
the  University,  and  the  laboratory  practicum 
is  conducted  at  an  assigned  affiliated  hospital. 
The  program  is  accredited  by  the  Council  on 
Medical  Education  of  the  American  Medical 
Association. 

The  Radiologic  Technologist  is  an  important 
figure  in  the  diagnostic  and  therapeutic  envi- 
ronment of  the  hospital  or  clinic,  as  well  as  in 
industrial  production,  quality  control,  and  in- 
spection laboratories.  Responsibilities  demand 
rapport  with  internists,  surgeons,  pathologists, 
nurses,  and  laboratory  personnel.  Each  of  the 
three  associate  of  science  degree  options  pro- 
vides graduates  with  full  tracking  into 
bachelor  of  science  degree  programs  in  health 
science  or  health  management  through 
University  College.  Bachelor  degree  courses 
may  be  taken  on  a  full  or  part-time  basis  and 
are  designed  to  assist  graduates  in  their 
career  growth  as  health  managers,  health 
educators  and  advanced  imaging  specialists. 

Prerequisite:  Satisfactory  completion  of 
three  years  of  high  school  math  {Algebra  1 
and  2  and  geometry),  one  year  of  biology,  and 
one  year  of  chemistry  or  physics.  Applicants 
must  also  satisfactorily  complete  the 
Scholastic  Aptitude  Test  (SAT)  and  submit 
one  letter  of  recommendation  from  a  science 
instructor.  In  addition,  applicants  must  satisfy 
general  University  requirements.  Candidates 
who  successfully  meet  the  above  requirements 
may  then  schedule  an  interview  with  the 
Radiologic  Technology  Program  Director. 


Associate  in  Science  Degree  Full-Time  Day 
Program  (806) 

The  associate  in  science  degree  program  is  a 
full-time  day  program.  Graduates  are  eligible 
to  take  the  examination  for  certification  by 
the  American  Registry  of  Radiologic  Tech- 
nologists. The  full-time  day  curriculum  is 
scheduled  over  twenty-seven  months  with 
early  exit  options  available  for  students  with 
transfer  credit  or  students  who  wish  to  take 
an  accelerated  course  sequence.  Early  exit 
provides  graduates  with  the  opportunity  to 
enter  the  job  market  and/or  begin  work  on 
their  bachelor  degree  studies. 

Associate  in  Science  Degree  Part-Time 
Evening  Program  (811) 

A  part-time  evening  option  exists  for  students 
unable  to  participate  in  the  full-time  day  pro- 
gram. Candidates  must  recognize  that  a  full- 
time  day  clinical  practicum  commitment  is 
necessary  after  completion  of  all  part-time 
evening  course  requirements. 

Part-Time  Evening  Program  for 
Radiographers  (810) 

University  College  also  offers  an  associate  of 
science  degree  program  for  registered  tech- 
nologists; the  program  requires  fewer  major 
concentration  courses. 

Candidates  who  wish  to  apply  to  this  pro- 
gram must  be  registered  by  the  American 
Registry  of  Radiologic  Technologists. 


Radiologic  Technology  Associate  in  Science  Degree 
(Major  Codes  806/811) 


Core  Courses 

quarter  hours 

BIO  4103 

Biology  1                                                           4 

BIO  4175 

BIO  4176          BIO  4177 

Human  Anatomy  and  Physiology  1,  2,  3         9 

COM  4101 

Foundations  of  Computer  Literacy                   4 

ENG  4110 

ENG  4111 

Critical  Writing  1,  2                                         6 

ENG  4112 

Approaches  to  Literature                                   3 

HMG  4100 

Hospital  Organization  and 

Management  1                                                    3 

MTH4110 

MTH4111 

Math  1,  2                                                            6 

PSY  4110 

Introduction  to  Psychology: 

Fundamental  Issues                                           3 

Health  Professions  and  Sciences         113 

Major  Concentration  Courses 

RAD  4100 

RAD  4101 

Radiologic  Technology  Orientation  1,  2 

6 

RAD  4102 

RAD  4103 

Radiologic  Science  1,  2 

8 

RAD  4104 

RAD  4105 

Principles  of  Radiology  1,  2 

8 

RAD  4106 

RAD  4107 

Radiologic  Photography  and 
Exposure  1,  2 

8 

RAD  4116 
RAD  4119 

RAD  4117         RAD  4118             Radiology  Practicum 

1,  2,  3,  4 

16 

RAD  4121 

RAD  4122 

Principles  of  Photography  and 
Exposure  Lab  1,  2 

2 

RAD  4304 

Cross-Sectional  Anatomy 

4 

RAD  4305 

Advanced  Radiologic  Technology  1 

4 

RAD  4306 

Radiation  Protection— Radiobiology 

4 

Total  Quarter  Hours 

98 

Part-Time  Associate  in  Science  Degree  Program  for  Radiographers 
(Major  Code  810) 


Transfer  credit  for  completion  of  prerequisite." 

!  50  q.h. 

Core  Courses 

quarter  hours 

BIO  4103 

Biology  1                                                           4 

COM  4101 

Foundations  of  Computer  Literacy                  4 

ENG  4110 

ENG  4111 

Critical  Writing  1,  2                                         6 

ENG  4112 

Approaches  to  Literature                                 3 

HMG  4100 

Hospital  Organization  and 

Management                                                       3 

MTH  4110 

MTH  4111 

Math  1,  2                                                          6 

PSY  4110 

or 

SOC  4100 

Introduction  to  Psychology: 

Fundamental  Issues                                        (3) 

or 

Roles,  Culture,  and  the  Individual                 (3) 

PSY  4111 

or 

SOC  4101 

Introduction  to  Psychology: 

Developmental  Aspects                                   (3) 

or 

Inequality  and  Institutions                             (3) 

Major  Concentration  Courses 

RAD  4300 

Advanced  Radiologic  Technology  1                   4 

RAD  4303 

Radiation  Protection— Radiobiology                 3 

RAD  4304 

Cross-Sectional  Anatomy                                  4 

RAD  4460 

Medical  Imaging  Quality  Assurance                3 

Total  Quarter  Hours 

96 

*  Prerequisite:  Satisfactory  completion  of  an  accredited  certificate  program  in  radiologic  technology  or  registration  by  the 
American  Registry  of  Radiologic  Technologists. 


Health  Professions  and  Sciences 


Therapeutic  Recreation  Services 

Therapeutic  recreation  is  the  use  of  leisure 
recreation  services  to  improve  or  maintain 
physical,  mental,  emotional,  and/or  social 
functioning  to  assist  individuals  in  expressing 
independent  lifestyles.  Comprehensive 
therapeutic  recreation  services  involve  a  con- 
tinuum of  care,  including 

•  treatment  that  uses  leisure  activities  to 
remediate  or  rehabilitate  functional  abilities 
and  to  assist  in  diagnosis; 

•  leisure  education  that  uses  activities  to 
acquire  skills,  knowledge,  and  attitudes 
that  facilitate  an  independent  lifestyle  and 
avocational  competence;  and 

•  recreation  that  uses  activities  to  enhance 
health,  growth,  development,  and 
independence. 

This  comprehensive  approach  uses  the 
needs,  interests,  and  abilities  of  the  client, 
as  well  as  the  mandate  of  the  service  agency, 
to  direct  the  therapeutic  recreation  services 
provided. 


The  Therapeutic  Recreation  Certificate 
verifies  that  a  basic  level  of  competence  in 
this  field  has  been  attained.  The  Massachusetts 
Recreation  and  Park  Association  recognizes 
both  the  certificate  and  associate's  degree  pro- 
grams in  its  professional  registration  plan. 
The  associate's  degree  program  leads  to  a 
paraprofessional  classification  with  the 
National  Council  for  Therapeutic  Recreation 
Certification. 

Students  in  the  certificate  and  associate's 
degree  programs  may  go  on  to  pursue  the 
bachelor  of  science  degree  in  health  manage- 
ment or  sociology  in  University  College,  or 
the  bachelor  of  science  in  Therapeutic  Recrea- 
tion degree  in  the  undergraduate  day  pro- 
gram of  Northeastern  University's  Depart- 
ment of  Health,  Sport,  and  Leisure  Studies. 


Therapeutic  Recreation  Services  Activity  Leader  Certificate  Program  A 
(Major  Code  601)  £& 


Core  Courses 

quarter  hours 

ENG  4110 

Critical  Writing  1 

3 

Major  Concentration  Courses 

REC  4101 

REC  4102 

REC  4103 

Principles  and  Practices  of 
Therapeutic  Recreation  1,  2,  3 

9 

REC  4110 

REC  4111 

Group  Dynamics  and 
Leadership  1,  2 

6 

REC  4500 

REC  4501 

Practicum  1,  2* 

8 

I 

Health  Professions  and  Sciences 

115 

Electives 

Choose  six  quarter  hours  from  the  following: 

REC  4300         REC  4301 

Arts  and  Crafts  1,  2 

(6) 

REC  4310 

Social  Recreation 

(3) 

REC  4311 

Music  Therapy 

(3) 

Choose  six  quarter  hours  from  the  following: 

REC  4200 

Introduction  to  Learning  Disabilities 

(3) 

REC  4210 

Psychosocial  Aspects  of 
Disabilities  and  Illness 

(3) 

REC  4250 

Assessment  of  Learning 
Disabilities 

(3) 

REC  4304 

Dynamics  of  Family  Life  for  the 
Disabled 

(3) 

REC  4350 

Legal  Issues  of  Disability  and 
Rehabilitation 

(3) 

REC  4401 

The  Nursing  Home  Experience 

(3) 

REC  4410 

Therapeutic  Recreation  in 
Rehabilitation 

(3) 

REC  4425 

Mental  Illness  and  Retardation 

(3) 

REC  4430 

Therapeutic  Recreation  in 
Child  Development 

(3) 

REC  4440 

Humanistic  and  Holistic 
Approaches  to  Therapeutic  Recreation 

(3) 

REC  4445 

Community  Recreation  for  the 
Handicapped 

(3) 

REC  4450 

Vocational  Planning  for  the 
Learning  Disabled 

(3) 

REC  4460 

The  Process  of  Aging 

(3) 

REC  4461 

Camping  for  the  Disabled 

(3) 

REC  4462 

Leisure  Counseling 

(3) 

REC  4470 

The  Learning  Disabled  at  Work 

(3) 

Total  Quarter  Hours 

38 

"See  course  description  for  prerequisites;  eligibility  is  determined  by  the  program  consultant.  Petitions  can  be  obtained 
in  the  Health  Professions  Program  office  and  should  be  filed  at  least  one  quarter  in  advance  of  the  start  of  the 
practicum. 


116         Health  Professions  and  Sciences 


Therapeutic  Recreation 
(Major  Code  600) 


Services  Associate  in  Science  Degree  <5-=\ 


Core  Courses 

quarter  hours 

BIO  4103 

BIO  4105 

Biology  1,  3                                                       8 

BIO  4175 

BIO  4176          BIO  4177 

Human  Anatomy  and  Physiology  1,  2,  3         9 

ENG  4110 

ENG  4111 

Critical  Writing  1,  2                                         6 

ENG4112 

Approaches  to  Literature                                   3 

HSC  4301 

HSC  4302 

Mechanisms  of  Disease  1,2                              6 

PSY  4110 

Introduction  to  Psychology: 

Fundamental  Issues                                         3 

PSY4111 

Introduction  to  Psychology: 

Developmental  Aspects                                    3 

PSY  4112 

Introduction  to  Psychology: 

Personal  Dynamics                                           3 

Major  Concentration  Courses 

REC  4101 

REC  4102         REC  4103 

Principles  and  Practices  of 

Therapeutic  Recreation  1,  2,  3                         9 

REC  4110 

REC  4111 

Group  Dynamics  and  Leadership  1,  2              6 

REC  4210 

Psychosocial  Aspects  of 

Disability  and  Illness                                       3 

REC  4300 

REC  4301 

Arts  and  Crafts  1,  2                                          6 

REC  4310 

Social  Recreation                                              3 

REC  4425 

Mental  Illness  and  Retardation                       3 

REC  4500 

REC  4501 

Practicum  1,  2*                                                 8 

continued  on  the  next  page 


Health  Professions  and  Sciences 

117 

Electives 

Choose  24  quarter  hours  from  the  following: 

REC  4105 

Childhood  Medical  Procedures 

(2) 

REC  4118 

Coping  Skills  for  Child  Rearing 

(2) 

REC  4200 

Introduction  to  Learning  Disabilities 

(3) 

REC  4210 

Psychosocial  Aspects  of 
Disabilities  and  Illness 

(3) 

REC  4215 

Causes/Detection  of  Child  Abuse 

(3) 

REC  4250 

Assessment  of  Learning  Disabilities 

(3) 

REC  4304 

Dynamics  of  Family  Life  for  the 
Disabled 

(3) 

REC  4311 

Music  Therapy 

(3) 

REC  4312 

Media  Resources  and  Techniques 

(3) 

REC  4313 

Therapeutic  Use  of  Dramatics 

(3) 

REC  4350 

Legal  Issues  of  Disability  and 
Rehabilitation 

(3) 

REC  4378         REC  4379 

or 

REC  4380 

Parenting  Skills  1,  2 

or 

Parenting  Skills  Intensive 

(6) 
(6) 

REC  4401 

The  Nursing  Home  Experience 

(3) 

REC  4402 

Leisure  and  Lifestyle 

(3) 

REC  4403 

Concepts  of  Leisure: 
Sociopsychological  Perspectives 

(3) 

REC  4405 

Management  in  Mentally  Handicapped 
Residences 

(3) 

REC  4410 

Therapeutic  Recreation  in 
Rehabilitation 

(3) 

REC  4425 

Mental  Illness  and  Retardation 

(3) 

REC  4430 

Therapeutic  Recreation  in 
Child  Development 

(3) 

REC  4440 

Humanistic  and  Holistic  Approaches 
to  Therapeutic  Recreation 

(3) 

REC  4445 

Community  Recreation  for  the 
Handicapped 

(3) 

REC  4450 

Vocational  Planning  for  the 
Learning  Disabled 

(3) 

REC  4460 

The  Process  of  Aging 

(3) 

REC  4461 

Camping  for  the  Disabled 

(3) 

REC  4462 

Leisure  Counseling 

(3) 

REC  4470 

The  Learning  Disabled  at  Work 

(3) 

Total  Quarter  Hours 

103 

118         Health  Professions  and  Sciences 


Preprofessional  Medical  Courses 

The  information  provided  below  is  for 
students  who  plan  to  apply  for  admission  to 
schools  of  medicine,  osteopathy,  dentistry, 
podiatry,  or  optometry.  Those  who  wish  to 
pursue  veterinary  medicine  may  need  to  meet 
different  entrance  requirements  and  should 
consult  the  chair  of  the  Health  Professions 
Advisory  Committee  for  additional  advice. 

Medical  School  Admission  Requirements 

Students  must  complete  the  following  courses 
before  they  may  enroll  in  medical  school,  and 
should  complete  them  before  taking  the 
school's  particular  admission  test  (MCAT, 
DAT,  and  so  on). 


one  year  (with  labs) 
one  year  (with  labs) 
one  year  (with  labs) 
one  year  (with  labs) 
one  year  (with  some 
calculus) 
one  year 


Biology 

General  chemistry 

Organic  chemistry 

Physics 

College  mathematics 

College  English 

Northeastern  University's  Health  Profes- 
sions Advisory  Committee  provides  academic 
advice  and  help  with  professional  school  ap- 
plications for  students  in  any  of  the  Universi- 
ty's health  programs.  Although  advice  is 
available  to  anyone  enrolled  in  a  course,  the 
Committee  can  prepare  evaluation  letters  on- 
ly for  those  who  have  taken  enough  course 
work  at  Northeastern  to  be  able  to  have  at 
least  two  Northeastern  faculty  members  write 
letters  to  the  Committee. 

Sources  of  Advice: 

Dr.  C.  H.  Ellis,  Jr. 

Chair,  Health  Professions  Advisory  Committee 

Biology  Department 

Northeastern  University 

445  Richards  Hall 

617-437-4032 

Professor  T.  J.  McEneaney 

Office  of  Career  Development  and  Placement 

Northeastern  University 

124  Ruggles  Building 

617-437-2430 

Dr.  Paula  Vosburgh 

Director,  Health  Professions  and  Sciences 

Programs 
University  College 
266  Ruggles  Building 
617-437-2818 


Course  Sequences  to  Meet  Minimum 
Admission  Requirements 

The  following  list  shows  acceptable  University 
College  course  sequences  that  students  can 
take  in  preparation  for  health  professional 
schools.  Completing  one  sequence  from  each 
category  should  meet  the  minimum  re- 
quirements of  most  medical  or  dental  schools. 
If  you  have  questions  about  whether  other 
courses  might  be  applicable,  talk  with  Dr. 
Ellis  or  another  member  of  the  Health  Profes- 
sions Advisory  Committee. 

General  Biology    BIO  4103,  BIO  4104,  BIO  4105 
—lab  must  be  taken.  Other 
biology  work,  such  as 
anatomy  and  physiology  and 
microbiology,  may  be  accep- 
table, depending  on  the  pro- 
fessional school.  General 
biology  is  highly  recom- 
mended even  if  you  have 
already  taken  the  other 
courses. 


General 
Chemistry 

Organic 
Chemistry 

General 
Physics 

Mathematics 

English 


CHM  4111,  CHM  4112, 
CHM  4113-lab  must  be 
taken 

CHM  4261,  CHM  4262, 
CHM  4263-lab  must  be 
taken 

PHY  4117,  PHY  4118,  PHY 
4119,  and  labs  PHY  4173, 
PHY  4174* 

MTH  4108,  MTH  4120, 
MTH  4121 

ENG  4110,  ENG  4111, 
ENG  4112 

Two  additional  areas  that  are  often  required 
are  behavioral  science  and  biochemistry.  The 
following  courses  meet  these  requirements. 

Behavioral  PSY  4110,  PSY  4111,  PSY 

Sciences  4112,  and/or  other 

psychology  courses 

Biochemistry       CHM  4371,  CHM  4372, 
CHM  4373  or  BIO  4246, 
BIO  4247,  BIO  4248 

*These  courses  are  scheduled  through  the  School  of 
Engineering  Technology.  Call  617-437-2500  for  more 
information. 


Liberal  Arts         119 


Liberal  Arts  Degree 
Programs 


Diane  Wald,  Director,  Liberal  Arts  Programs 
Nancy  Bandoian,  Assistant  to  the  Director, 
Liberal  Arts  Programs 
266  Ruggles  Building 
617-437-2416,  437-2423 


Program  Consultants  and  Advisers 

ART:  Arts  and  Graphics 

Consultant: 

Prof.  Peter  Serenyi,  Dept.  of  Art  &  Architec- 
ture (College  of  Arts  and  Sciences) 
(617-437-2347) 

Associate  Consultant  and  Program  Adviser: 
Frank  Trocki 
(617-437-2390) 

ASL:  American  Sign  Language 

Consultant  and  Program  Adviser: 
Nancy  V.  Becker,  Coordinator,  Educational 
Services,  ASL  Program  (College  of  Arts  and 
Sciences)  (voice  617-437-3064;  TTY 
617-437-3067) 

ECN:  Economics 

Consultant: 

Prof.  M.  A.  Horowitz,  Chair,  Economics  Dept. 

(College  of  Arts  and  Sciences)  (617-437-2882) 

Associate  Consultant: 

Prof.  H.  Goldstein,  Executive  Officer, 

Economics  Dept.  (College  of  Arts  and 

Sciences)  (617-437-2882) 

Assistant  Consultant/ Program  Adviser: 

Herbert  J.  Eskot  (617-964-4718) 

ENG:  English  (Literature  or  Writing) 

Consultant: 

Prof.  M.  X.  Lesser,  English  Dept.  (College  of 

Arts  and  Sciences)  (617-437-2512) 


HST:  History 

Consultant: 

Prof.  Raymond  H.  Robinson,  Chair,  History 

Dept.  (College  of  Arts  and  Sciences) 

(617-437-2660) 

Associate  Consultant/Program  Adviser: 

Prof.  Gerald  H.  Herman,  History  Dept. 

(College  of  Arts  and  Sciences)  (617-437-2660) 

JRN:  Journalism,  Public  Relations,  or  Advertising 

Consultant  and  Program  Adviser: 

Prof.  Larue  W.  Gilleland,  Chair,  Journalism 

Dept.  (College  of  Arts  and  Sciences) 

(617-437-3236) 

LN:  Modern  Languages 

Consultant- 
Prof.  Holbrook  Robinson,  Chair,  Modern 
Languages  Dept.  (College  of  Arts  and 
Sciences)  (617-437-2234) 
Modern  Languages  includes  the  following: 
LNA:  Arabic  LNJ:  Japanese 

LNF:  French  LNL:  Latin 

LNG:  German  LNN:  Swedish 

LNH:  Hebrew  LNR:  Russian 

LNI:  Italian  LNS:  Spanish 

MUS:  Music 

Consultant- 
Prof.  Joshua  R.  Jacobson,  Music  Dept. 
(College  of  Arts  and  Sciences)  (617-437-2240) 
Associate  Consultant/ Program  Adviser: 
Charles  Mokotoff,  Music  Dept.  (College  of 
Arts  and  Sciences)  (617-437-2240) 

PHL:  Philosophy  and  Religion 

Consultant- 
Prof.  Susan  Setta,  Philosophy  Dept.  (College 
of  Arts  and  Sciences)  (617-437-3636) 

POL:  Political  Science 

Consultant: 

Assoc.  Prof.  L.  Gerald  Bursey,  Political 

Science  Dept.  (College  of  Arts  and  Sciences) 

(617-437-2796) 

Program  Adviser: 

Prof.  Robert  Gilbert,  Chair,  Political  Science 

Dept.  (College  of  Arts  and  Sciences) 

(617-437-2796) 


120         Liberal  Arts 


PSY:  Psychology 

Consultant/Program  Adviser: 

Prof.  Charles  Karis,  Psychology  Dept.  (College 

of  Arts  and  Sciences)  (617-437-3076) 

Associate  Consultant: 

Prof.  Harold  Zamansky,  Psychology  Dept.(Col- 

lege  of  Arts  and  Sciences)  (617-437-3076) 

SOA:  Sociology-Anthropology,  and  SOC:  Sociology 

Consultant: 

Prof.  Christine  Gailey,  Sociology  Dept.  (Col- 
lege of  Arts  and  Sciences)  (617-437-2686) 
Associate  Consultant/Program  Adviser: 
Prof.  Elliot  Krause,  Sociology  Dept.  (College 
of  Arts  and  Sciences)  (617-437-2686) 

SPC:  Speech  Communication 

Consultant/Program  Adviser: 
Prof.  Roberta  Kosberg,  Speech  Communica- 
tions Dept.  (College  of  Arts  and  Sciences) 
(617-437-5517) 

TCC:  Technical  Communications 

Consultant/Program  Adviser: 

Neil  F.  Duane  (Boston  Documentation 

Design)  (617-965-5300) 


Purpose 

Through  the  liberal  arts  curricula  offered  by 
University  College,  students  are  guided  in 
their  independent  and  creative  discovery  of 
ideas  and  methods  in  the  areas  of  humanities, 
natural  sciences,  and  social  sciences. 

University  College  holds  that  a  liberal  arts 
education  enables  students  to  make  more  in- 
telligent and  realistic  appraisals  of  self  and 
career.  The  Liberal  Arts  Programs  at  the  col- 
lege present  students  with  both  a  challenge  to 
bring  meaning  and  focus  to  the  educational 
experience  and  an  opportunity  to  acquire 
marketable  knowledge  and  skills.  As  the 
president  of  a  large  corporation  put  it,  "It  is 
no  longer  enough  for  management  to  be  well- 
trained  rather  than  well-educated." 


Programs 

University  College  offers  bachelor  of  arts  and 
bachelor  of  science  degrees  in  art,  economics, 
English,  history,  political  science,  psychology, 
and  sociology-anthropology.  Unlike  the 
bachelor  of  science  degree,  the  bachelor  of 


arts  degree  includes  a  language  requirement. 
Bachelor  of  science  degrees  are  offered  in 
graphic  design  and  visual  communication, 
and  technical  communications;  the  technical 
communications  degree  includes  a  profes- 
sional experience  opportunity.  In  addition, 
degree  programs  in  English,  and  sociology- 
anthropology  present  professional  concentra- 
tions designed  to  teach  specialized  skills. 

Bachelor's  Degree  in  Liberal  Studies 

University  College  offers  a  bachelor  of  arts 
degree  in  liberal  studies  designed  to  help 
students  develop  communication,  analytical, 
and  research  skills  while  exploring  the  great 
ideas  of  the  ages  as  well  as  contemporary 
issues.  The  program's  courses  are  grouped  in 
four  areas: 

•  Communication  and  Critical  Thinking 

•  Cultural  Heritage 

•  Science,  Research,  and  Quantitative  Methods 

•  Contemporary  Studies. 

The  courses  in  each  area  are  selected  to  pro- 
vide students  with  a  breadth  of  disciplinary 
perspectives. 

Forty-five  quarter  hours  of  elective  credits 
are  awarded  to  allow  students  to  take  a  cer- 
tificate program  or  select  individual  courses 
in  accordance  with  their  personal  and  career 
interests. 

Upon  approaching  completion  of  individual 
course  work  in  Cultural  Heritage  and  Con- 
temporary Studies,  students  take  an  inter- 
disciplinary seminar  in  each  area  to  integrate 
their  learning  experiences. 

Bachelor's  Degree  in  Graphic  Design  and 
Visual  Communication 

In  response  to  the  rising  demand  for  profes- 
sional training  in  the  field  of  visual  com- 
munications, University  College  has  introduced 
a  bachelor  of  science  degree  program  in  graphic 
design  and  visual  communication. 

The  program  has  a  unique,  three-tiered 
structure  that  enables  students  to  begin  with 
the  certificate  program,  continue  through  the 
associate's  program,  and  finish  with  the 
bachelor's  program. 

Business  Administration  Minor 

Liberal  arts  bachelor's  degree  candidates  have 
the  option  of  completing  a  minor  in  business 
administration.  Students  who  elect  to  do  so 
must  apply  some  of  the  open  electives  permit- 


Liberal  Arts         121 


ted  in  their  degree  programs  to  this  purpose, 
and  should  meet  with  an  academic  adviser 
from  the  Office  of  Academic  and  Student 
Affairs  to  identify  the  appropriate  courses. 
These  students  are  permitted  to  accumulate 
up  to  44  quarter  hours  (25  percent  of  the 
credits  toward  a  bachelor's  degree)  in  business 
subjects.  Business  credits  accumulated  beyond 
this  limit  cannot  be  used  to  fulfill  the  gradua- 
tion requirements  for  a  Bachelor  of  Science 
degree  in  a  liberal  arts  area. 

Associate  in  Science  Degree 

An  associate  in  science  degree  program  in 
arts  and  sciences  is  offered  for  those  who 
want  a  general  background  in  liberal  arts, 
but  who  do  not  want  to  pursue  a  major  field 
of  concentration  for  the  bachelor's  degree. 

Certificate  Programs 

Students  who  seek  specialized  skills  to  ad- 
vance their  careers  may  choose  from  the 
following  liberal  arts  certificate  programs, 
which  they  may  take  independently  or  in  con- 
junction with  degree  study:  acting,  advertis- 
ing, American  Sign  Language  and  deaf 
studies,  American  Sign  Language  inter- 
preting, business  communication,  computer 
graphic  design,  gerontology,  graphic  design 
and  visual  communication,  interpersonal/ 
family  communication,  music  therapy,  public 
relations,  technical  writing,  speech  communi- 
cation, and  writing. 


Special  Studies 

University  College  offers  a  variety  of  Special 
Studies.  These  courses  give  students  an  oppor- 
tunity to  earn  credits  in  Advanced  Tutorials, 
Independent  Studies,  Honors  Programs,  and 
Field  Work.  Consult  descriptions  on  pages 
16-17. 


Assessment  of  Prior  Learning 
Program  (APL) 


periences,  whether  work-related  or  personal. 
The  primary  method  for  documenting  the 
value  of  a  prior  learning  experience  is 
through  portfolio  assessment,  although  in 
some  instances  an  exam  may  be  requested. 
The  student,  with  assistance  of  an  academic 
adviser,  must  submit  a  written  narrative,  ac- 
companied by  documentation,  to  support  his 
or  her  claim  to  prior  learning  credit  for  one  or 
more  courses.  Documentation  may  include 
such  evidence  of  accomplishment  as  published 
materials,  writing  samples,  or  copies  of  artistic 
works.  Whenever  possible,  students  should 
link  prior  learning  to  University  College 
courses;  however,  when  the  appropriate 
course  is  also  critical  to  the  academic  sound- 
ness of  a  program,  the  student  may  be  re- 
quired to  take  the  course,  but  may  receive, 
in  addition,  APL  credit  in  the  related  subject 
area. 

The  student's  application  and  portfolio  will 
be  reviewed  by  the  department  consultant 
and  program  office  who  will  make  a  specific 
credit  recommendation. 

Students  will  be  permitted  to  enter  the  APL 
program  only  after  all  traditional  sources  of 
transfer  credit  have  been  fully  utilized. 
Students  will  not  receive  credit  for  courses 
that  normally  would  not  transfer  to  Universi- 
ty College.  If  a  course  has  a  CLEP,  PEP,  or 
challenge  examination  available,  students 
will  be  required  to  take  the  exam.  Credits 
earned  through  the  APL  program  may  be 
applied  to  certificate  programs  as  transfer 
credit,  within  the  limit  designated  for  the 
certificate. 

Students  are  encouraged  to  apply  for  APL 
credit  as  early  as  possible  in  their  program. 
All  previous  college  credits  must  be  transfer- 
red and  a  status  report  completed  by  the 
Office  of  Academic  and  Student  Affairs  before 
an  APL  application  can  be  submitted.  All 
portfolio  evaluations  must  be  completed  six 
months  prior  to  graduation. 

Any  student  wishing  to  pursue  APL  credit 
should  contact  an  adviser  in  the  Office  of 
Academic  and  Student  Affairs  (437-2400)  to 
begin  the  application  procedure. 


University  College  students  may  obtain  up  to 
18  quarter  hours  of  Liberal  Arts  credit  for 
knowledge  gained  through  prior  learning  ex- 


Liberal  Arts 


Arts  and  Sciences  Associate  in  Science  Degree  (Major  Code  372) 


Core  Courses 

quarter  hours 

ENG  4110         ENG  4111 

Critical  Writing  1,  2 

6 

ENG  4112 

Approaches  to  Literature 

3 

Major  Concentration  Courses 

Humanities  (ART,  ASL,  DRA,  ENG,  JRN,  LN,  MUS,  PHL,  SPC,  TCC) 

24 

Math-Science  (BIO,  CHM,  ESC,  MTH,  PHY) 

18 

Social  Sciences  (ECN,  HST,  POL,  PSY,  SOA,  SOC) 

24 

Electives 

21 

Total  Quarter  Hours 

96 

Economics  Bachelor  of  Arts  Degree  (Major  Code  390)  5=3 

Core  Courses 

quarter  hours 

ENG  4110         ENG  4111 

Critical  Writing  1,  2 

6 

ENG  4112 

Approaches  to  Literature 

3 

Modern  Language 

Elementary  or  Conversational 
Intermediate 

12 
12 

Humanities  (ART,  ASL,  DRA,  ENG,  JRN,  LNA  to  LNS,  MUS,  PHL,  SPC,  TCC) 

24 

Math-Science  (BIO,  CHM,  ESC,  MTH,  PHY) 

18 

Social  Sciences  (HST,  POL,  PSY,  SOA,  SOC) 

18 

Major  Concentration  Courses 

ECN  4115         ECN  4116         ECN  4117 

Economic  Principles  and  Problems  1,  2,  3       9 

ECN  4250         ECN  4251         ECN  4252 

Statistics  1,  2,  3 

9 

ECN  4310 

Labor  Economics 

3 

ECN  4342         ECN  4343 

Money  and  Banking  1,  2 

6 

ECN  4344 

Government  Finance 

3 

Electives 

Economics 

27 

Open  electives 

24 

Total  Quarter  Hours 

174 

Liberal  Arts 

123 

Economics  Bachelor  of  Science  Degree       <g^ 
with  Certificate  in  Finance  (Major  Code  390)   (j=± 

Core  Courses 

quarter  hours 

ENG  4110 

ENG  4111 

Critical  Writing  1,  2 

6 

ENG  4112 

Approaches  to  Literature 

3 

Social  Sciences  (HST,  POL,  PSY,  SOA,  SOC) 

18 

Major  Concentration  Courses 

ECN  4115 

ECN  4116         ECN  4117 

Economic  Principles  and  Problems  1, 

2,3       9 

ECN  4215 

- 

Macroeconomic  Theory 

3 

ECN  4216 

Microeconomic  Theory 

3 

ECN  4250 

ECN  4251         ECN  4252 

Statistics  1,  2,  3 

9 

ECN  4310 

Labor  Economics 

3 

ECN  4342 

ECN  4343 

Money  and  Banking  1,  2 

6 

ECN  4344 

Government  Finance 

3 

Finance  Certificate  Courses 

ACC  4101 

ACC  4102         ACC  4103 

Accounting  Principles  1,  2,  3 

9 

FI 4301 

Principles  of  Finance 

3 

FI  4302 

Financial  Management 

3 

FI  4310 

Investment  Principles 

3 

FI  4320 

Credit  Principles 

3 

FI  4325 

Budgeting  and  Planning 

3 

Electives 

Economics 

21 

Liberal  Arts 

42 

Open  electives 

24 

Total  Quarter  Hours 

174 

124      Liberal  Arts 

English  Bachelor  of  Arts  Degree  (Major  Code  330)   5=5 

Core  Courses 

quarter  hours 

ENG  4110        ENG  4111 

Critical  Writing  1,  2 

6 

ENG  4112 

Approaches  to  Literature 

3 

Modern  Language 

Elementary  or  Conversational 
Intermediate 

12 
12 

Math-Science  (BIO,  CHM,  ESC,  MTH,  PHY) 

18 

Social  Sciences  (ECN,  HST,  POL,  PSY,  SOA,  SOC) 

24 

Major  Concentration  Courses 

ENG  4120 

English  Literature:  Faith  and  Humanism      3 

ENG  4121 

English  Literature:  Reason  and 
Romanticism 

3 

ENG  4122 

English  Literature:  Victorians 
and  Moderns 

3 

ENG  4123 

Early  American  Literature: 
Faith,  Reason,  and  Nature 

3 

ENG  4124 

American  Romantics  and 
American  Realists 

3 

ENG  4125 

American  Literature: 
The  Modern  Temper 

3 

ENG  4131 

God,  Gods,  and  Heroes:  The 
Literature  of  the  Ancient  and 
Medieval  Worlds 

3 

ENG  4132 

Man,  Reason,  and  Imagination: 
Literature  from  the  Renaissance 
to  the  Romantic  Age 

3 

ENG  4133 

Order  and  Disorder:  Literature 
of  the  Moderns 

3 

ENG  4349        ENG  4350 

Expository  and  Persuasive 
Writing  1,  2 

6 

ENG  4352 

Expository  Communications 

3 

ENG  4604* 

Major  Figures  in  Literature 

6 

ENG  4658 

Shakespeare  the  Dramatist 

3 

Choose  one  of  two  concentrations  for  twenty-seven  quarter  hours: 

I.  Literature 

Select  nine  courses  from  the  ENG  4200  or  ENG  4600  series  in  the  course  descriptions  on 

pages  178-181. 

H.  Writing 

Choose  six  courses  from  the  ENG  4300  or  ENG  4500  series  in  the  course  descriptions  on  pages  180-181, 
and  three  courses  from  either  the  JRN  or  TCC  courses  on  pages  198-199  and  240-241. 

Electives 

English 

9 

Open  electives 

18 

Total  Quarter  Hours 

174 

*Course  must  be  taken  twice,  focusing  on  a  different  figure  each  time. 


Liberal  Arts 

125 

English  Bachelor  of  Science  Degree  (Major  Code  330)   bi=b 

Core  Courses 

quarter  hours 

ENG  4110         ENG  4111 

Critical  Writing  1,  2 

6 

ENG  4112 

Approaches  to  Literature 

3 

Math-Science  (BIO,  CHM,  ESC,  MTH,  PHY) 

18 

Social  Sciences  (ECN,  HST,  POL,  PSY,  SOA,  SOC) 

24 

Major  Concentration  Courses 

ENG  4120 

English  Literature:  Faith  and 
Humanism 

3 

ENG  4121 

English  Literature:  Reason  and 
Romanticism 

3 

ENG  4122 

English  Literature:  Victorians 
and  Moderns 

3 

ENG  4123 

Early  American  Literature: 
Faith,  Reason,  and  Nature 

3 

ENG  4124 

American  Romantics  and 
American  Realists 

3 

ENG  4125 

American  Literature: 
The  Modern  Temper 

3 

ENG  4131 

God,  Gods,  and  Heroes:  The 
Literature  of  the  Ancient  and 
Medieval  Worlds 

3 

ENG  4132 

Man,  Reason,  and  Imagination: 
Literature  from  the  Renaissance 
to  the  Romantic  Age 

3 

ENG  4133 

Order  and  Disorder:  Literature 
of  the  Moderns 

3 

ENG  4349         ENG  4350 

Expository  and  Persuasive 
Writing  1,  2 

6 

ENG  4352 

Expository  Communications 

3 

ENG  4604* 

Major  Figures  in  Literature 

6 

ENG  4658 

Shakespeare  the  Dramatist 

3 

Choose  one  of  two  concentrations  for  twenty-seven  quarter  hours: 

I.  Literature 

Choose  nine  courses  from  the  ENG  4200  or  ENG  4600  series  in  the  course  descriptions  on  pages 
178-181. 

II.  Writing 

Select  six  courses  from  the  ENG  4300  or  ENG  450( 
and  three  courses  from  either  the  JRN  or  TCC 

)  series  in  the  course  descriptions  on  pages 
courses  on  pages  198-199  and  240-241. 

180-181, 

Electives 

English 

9 

Open  electives 

42 

Total  Quarter  Hours 

174 

*Course  must  be  taken  twice,  focusing  on  a  different  figure  each  time. 


126         Liberal  Arts 

Fine  Arts  Bachelor  of  Arts  Degree  (Major  Code  327)   Es 

Core  Courses 

quarter  hours 

ENG  4110        ENG  4111 

Critical  Writing  1,  2 

6 

ENG  4112 

Approaches  to  Literature 

3 

Modern  Language 

Elementary  or  Conversational 
Intermediate 

12 
12 

Math-Science  (BIO,  CHM,  ESC,  MTH,  PHY) 

18 

Social  Sciences  (ECN,  HST,  POL,  PSY,  SOA,  SOC) 

24 

Major  Concentration  Courses 

ART  4100 

History  of  Art 

3 

ART  4101 

History  of  Art  to  the  Sixteenth 
Century 

3 

ART  4102 

History  of  Art  to  the  Twentieth 
Century 

3 

ART  4106 

Introduction  to  Art 

3 

ART  4112* 

Visual  Foundations 

3 

Electives 

Art 

36 

Open  electives 

48 

Total  Quarter  Hours 

174 

Fine  Arts  Bachelor  of  Science  Degree  (Major  Code  327)   5=5 

Core  Courses 

quarter  hours 

ENG  4110        ENG  4111 

Critical  Writing  1,  2 

6 

ENG  4112 

Approaches  to  Literature 

3 

Math-Science  (BIO,  CHM,  ESC,  MTH,  PHY) 

18 

Social  Sciences  (ECN,  HST,  POL,  PSY,  SOA,  SOC) 

24 

Major  Concentration  Courses 

ART  4100 

History  of  Art 

3 

ART  4101 

History  of  Art  to  the  Sixteenth 
Century 

3 

ART  4102 

History  of  Art  to  the  Twentieth 
Century 

3 

ART  4106 

Introduction  to  Art 

3 

ART  4112* 

Visual  Foundations 

3 

Electives 

Art 

36 

Open  electives 

72 

Total  Quarter  Hours 

174 

*  3  y2-hour  studio 


Liberal  Arts         127 

Graphic  Design  and  Visual  Communication       ^^ 
Associate  in  Science  Degree  (Major  Code  362)   G=3 

Core  Courses 

quarter  hours 

Communication 

ENG  4110        ENG  4111 

Critical  Writing  1,  2                                         6 

ENG  4112 

Approaches  to  Literature                                 3 

PHL  4100 

Philosophical  Thinking                                      3 

SPC  4101 

Fundamentals  of  Human 

Communication                                                3 

Social  Sciences 

HST  4101 

The  Civilization  of  the  Ancient 

and  Medieval  Worlds                                        3 

HST  4102 

The  Civilization  of  the  Early 

Modern  World                                                   3 

HST  4103 

The  Civilization  of  the  Modern  World             3 

SOC  4100 

Roles,  Culture,  and  the  Individual                   3 

SOC  4101 

Inequality  and  Institutions                              3 

Business 

MGT  4101 

Introduction  to  Business  and 

Management  1                                                  3 

MKT  4301 

Introduction  to  Marketing  1                             3 

ACC  4101 

Accounting  Principles  1                                    3 

Major  Concentration  Courses 

Art/Graphics 

AET  4105 

Art  through  the  Ages                                       3 

ART  4110 

Modern  Art                                                       3 

ART  4121* 

Principles  of  Drawing  and  Composition          3 

ART  4112* 

Visual  Foundations                                          3 

ART  4175 

History  of  Graphic  Design                                3 

Graphic  Design  and  Communication  Certificate 

ART  4135* 

Design  Foundations  and  Techniques               3 

ART  4139 

Color  Theory  and  Practice                                3 

ART  4140 

Graphic  Communication  and 

Production                                                         3 

ART  4141*        ART  4142* 

Graphic  Design  1,  2                                          6 

ART  4143* 

Advertising  Design                                           3 

ART  4151 

Typography                                                         3 

ART  4251* 

Advanced  Graphic  Design                                3 

ART  4367 

Illustration                                                        3 

JRN  4349 

Advertising  Basics                                             3 

Additional  courses  in  humanities 

12 

Total  Quarter  Hours 

96 

*3  y2-hour  studio. 


128         Liberal  Arts 

Graphic  Design  and  Visual  Communication       cj^ 
Bachelor  of  Science  Degree  (Major  Code  360)   S3 

Core  Courses 

quarter  hours 

Credits  from  associate  in  science  degree  in 

graphic  design  and  communication 

96 

Business  Communication  and  Research 

ENG  4380         ENG  4381 

Business  Writing  and  Reports  1,  2 

6 

SPC  4251 

Business  and  Professional  Speaking 

3 

ECN  4115 

Economic  Principles  and  Problems  1 

3 

MGT  4330 

Essentials  for  Managers  of 
Small  Businesses 

2 

Computer,  Math,  Science 

COM  4101 

Foundations  of  Computer  Literacy 

4 

MTH  4110        MTH  4111        MTH  4112 

Math  1,  2,  3 

9 

Choose  one  of  the  following  pairs: 

BIO  4103 

BIO  4104 

or 

CHM  4111 

CHM  4112 

or 

ESC  4103 

or 

ESC  4104 

or 

PHY  4104 


PHY  4105 


Biology  1,  2 

(6) 

General  Chemistry  1,  2 

(6) 

Introduction  to  Earth  Sciences: 

The  Solid  Earth 

(3) 

or 

Introduction  to  Earth  Sciences: 

The  Fluid  Earth 

(3) 

or 

General  Physics  1,  2** 

(8) 

Major  Concentration  Courses 

ART  4160* 

Basic  Photography 

3 

ART  4176 

International  Directions  in 
Graphic  Design 

3 

ART  4181* 

Introduction  to  Computer-Aided 
Graphic  Design 

3 

ART  4182* 

Computer-Aided  Graphic  Design 
Workshop 

3 

ART  4183* 

Electronic  Publishing  Design 

3 

ART  4366 

Promotional  and  Technical 
Publications:  Design  and  Production 

3 

ART  4368 

Graphic  Design  for  Media 

3 

ART  4500 

Senior  Project 

3 

ART  4501 

Portfolio  Development 

3 

Electives** 

18 

Total  Quarter  Hours 

174-176 

*3  y2-hour  studio  or  lab. 

**Physics  and  additional  courses  in  humanities  are  recommended 


Liberal  Arts         129 

History  Bachelor  of  Arts  Degree  (Major  Code  323)  G==5 

Core  Courses 

quarter  hours 

ENG  4110        ENG  4111 

Critical  Writing  1,  2 

6 

ENG  4112 

Approaches  to  Literature 

3 

Modern  Language 

Elementary  or  Conversational 
Intermediate 

12 
12 

Humanities  (ART,  ASL,  DRA,  ENG,  JRN,  LN,  MUS,  PHL,  SPC,  TCC) 

24 

Math-Science  (BIO,  CHM,  ESC,  MTH,  PHY) 

18 

Social  Sciences  (in  three  of  the  following  areas: 

ECN,  POL,  PSY,  SOA,  SOC) 

18 

Major  Concentration  Courses 

Introductory  Courses 

HST  4101 

The  Civilization  of  the  Ancient 
and  Medieval  Worlds 

3 

HST  4102 

The  Civilization  of  the  Early 
Modern  World 

3 

HST  4103 

The  Civilization  of  the  Modern  World             3 

HST  4201 

American  History  1763-1848 

3 

HST  4202 

American  History  1848-1917 

3 

HST  4203 

American  History  Since  1917 

3 

Historical  Skill  Requirement 

HST  4241 

The  Historian's  Craft 

3 

HST  4265 

Introduction  to  Public  History 

3 

Regional  Distribution 

Choose  one  course  from  each 

of  the  following  three  regional  groupings: 

European:  any  course  with  a 

HST  44  prefix 

3 

American:  any  course  with  a 

HST  45  prefix 

3 

Other:  any  course  with  a  HST  46  prefix 


Thematic  Distribution 


Choose  four  courses  from  one  of  the  following  groups  A-E,  or  choose  Group  F: 


Group  A:  America's  Ethnic  Roots  (HST  4404,  4434,  4435,  4455,  4466,  4467, 
4501,  4543,  4602,  4604,  4611,  4632,  4636) 


Group  D:  Technological  History  (HST  4301,  4302,  4303,  4304,  4305) 


(12) 


Group  B:  America's  Social  and  Economic  History  (HST  4530,  4540,  4542, 

4546,  4547,  4548) (12) 

Group  C:  Contemporary  History  (HST  4424,  4425,  4460,  4468,  4469,  4513,  4549, 

4602,  4603,  4611,  4622,  4644,  4645,  4646)  (12) 


(12) 


Group  E:  Women  and  Family  History  (HST  4434,  4435,  4540,  4542,  4640,  4641) 


(12) 


Group  F:  Honors  (HST  4811,  4812,  4813) 


(12) 

36 

174 


Electives 


Total  Quarter  Hours 


130         Liberal  Arts 

History  Bachelor  of  Science  Degree  (Major  Code  323)   G=± 

Core  Courses 

quarter  hours 

ENG  4110         ENG  4111 

Critical  Writing  1,  2 

6 

ENG  4112 

Approaches  to  Literature 

3 

MIS  4101          MIS  4102 

Introduction  to  Data  Processing 
and  Information  Systems  1,  2 

6 

SOC  4331          SOC  4332 

SOC  4333 

Social  Research  Methods  1,  2,  3 

9 

Humanities  (ART,  ASL,  DRA,  ENG,  JRN,  LN,  MUS,  PHL,  SPC,  TCC) 

24 

Social  Sciences 

Choose  two  sequences  of  three  < 

wurses  from 

the  following: 

ECN  4115         ECN  4116 

ECN  4117 

Economic  Principles  and  Problems  1,  2,  3 

(9) 

POL  4103 

Introduction  to  Politics 

(3) 

POL  4104 

Introduction  to  American  Government 

(3) 

POL  4105 

Introduction  to  Comparative  Politics 

(3) 

PSY  4110 

Introduction  to  Psychology: 
Fundamental  Issues 

(3) 

PSY  4111 

Introduction  to  Psychology: 
Developmental  Aspects 

(3) 

PSY  4112 

Introduction  to  Psychology: 
Personal  Dynamics 

(3) 

SOA  4100 

Physical  Anthropology 

(3) 

SOA  4101 

Cultural  Anthropology: 
Preliterate  Societies 

(3) 

SOA  4102 

Cultural  Anthropology: 
Industrial  Societies 

(3) 

SOC  4100 

Roles,  Culture,  and  the  Individual 

(3) 

SOC  4101 

Inequality  and  Institutions 

(3) 

SOC  4102 

Institutions  and  Social  Change 

(3) 

Major  Concentration  Courses 

Introductory  Courses 

HST  4101 

The  Civilization  of  the  Ancient 
and  Medieval  Worlds 

3 

HST  4102 

The  Civilization  of  the  Early 
Modern  World 

3 

HST  4103 

The  Civilization  of  the  Modern 
World 

3 

HST  4201 

American  History  1764-1848 

3 

HST  4202 

American  History  1848-1917 

3 

HST  4203 

American  History  since  1917 

3 

continued  on  the  next  page 


Liberal  Arts         131 


Historical  Skill  Requirement 


HST  4241 


The  Historian's  Craft 


HST  4265 


Introduction  to  Public  History 


HST  4263 


Oral  History 


HST  4821 


Field  Work  in  History  (or 
related  NCE  credit) 


Regional  Distribution 


Choose  one  course  from  each  of  the  following  regional  groupings: 


European:  any  course  with  a  HST  44  prefix 


American:  any  course  with  a  HST  45  prefix 


Other:  any  course  with  a  HST  46  prefix 


Thematic  Distribution 


Choose  four  courses  from  one  of  the  following  groups  A-E,  or  choose  Group  F: 


Group  A:  America's  Ethnic  Roots  (HST  4404,  4434,  4435,  4455,  4466,  4467, 
4501,  4543,  4602,  4604,  4611,  4632,  4636) 


Group  D:  Technological  History  (HST  4301,  4302,  4303,  4304,  4305) 


(12) 


Group  B:  America's  Social  and  Economic  History  (HST  4530,  4540,  4542, 

4546,  4547,  4548) (12) 

Group  C:  Contemporary  History  (HST  4424,  4425,  4460,  4468,  4469,  4513, 

4549,  4602,  4603,  4611,  4622,  4644,  4645,  4646)  (12) 


(12) 


Group  E:  Women  and  Family  History  (HST  4434,  4435,  4540,  4542,  4640,  4641) 


(12) 


Group  F:  Honors  (HST  4811,  4812,  4813) 


(12) 


EleCtiveS  (preferably  other  than  history) 


54 


Total  Quarter  Hours 


174 


132         Liberal  Arts 

1 

Bachelor  of  Arts  in 

Liberal  Studies  Degree  (Major  Code  495)  (j=±> 

Core  Courses 

quarter  hours 

Communication  and  Critical  Thinking 

ENG4110         ENG4111 

Critical  Writing  1,  2                                           6 

ENG  4112 

Approaches  to  Literature                                   3 

INT  4200 

The  Creative  Process                                         3 

PHL  4100 

Philosophical  Thinking                                      3 

PHL  4105 

Philosophy  of  Knowing  and  Reality                 3 

PHL  4200 

Logic                                                                    3 

SPC  4101 

Fundamentals  of  Human 

Communication                                                  3 

SPC  4102 

Group  Discussion                                                3 

SPC  4251 

Business  and  Professional  Speaking                3 

Cultural  Heritage 

ART  4105 

Art  through  the  Ages                                         3 

ECN  4137 

History  of  Economic  Thought                            3 

ENG  4131 

God,  Gods,  and  Heroes:  Literature  of 

the  Ancient  and  Medieval  Worlds                    3 

ENG  4132 

Man,  Reason,  and  Imagination: 

Literature  from  the  Renaissance 

to  the  Romantic  Age                                          3 

ENG  4133 

Order  and  Disorder:  Literature 

of  the  Moderns                                                    3 

HST  4101 

The  Civilization  of  the  Ancient 

and  Medieval  Worlds                                        3 

HST  4102 

The  Civilization  of  the  Early 

Modern  World                                                     3 

HST  4103 

The  Civilization  of  the  Modern 

World                                                                   3 

INT  4201 

Cultural  Heritage  Seminar                               3 

MUS  4120 

History  of  Musical  Styles                                   3 

POL  4110 

The  Great  Political  Thinkers                            3 

continued  on  the  next  page 


Liberal  Arts 

133 

Science,  Research,  and  Quantitative  Methods 

CHM  4105 

Chemistry  and  the  Environment 

3 

ECN  4250 

ECN  4251 

Statistics  1,  2 

6 

ESC  4680 

Science,  Technology,  and  Ancient 
Societies 

3 

ESC  4681 

Science,  Technology,  and  Modern 
Societies 

3 

ENG  4381 

Business  Writing  and  Reports  2 

3 

MIS  4101 

MIS  4102 

Introduction  to  Data  Processing 
and  Information  Systems  1,  2 

6 

MTH  4110 

MTH  4111        MTH  4112 

Math  1,  2,  3 

9 

Contemporary  Studies 

ECN  4115 

ECN  4116 

Economic  Principles  and  Problems  1,  2 

6 

ECN  4334 

Comparative  Economic  Systems 

3 

POL  4105 

Introduction  to  Comparative  Politics 

3 

PSY  4110 

Introduction  to  Psychology: 
Fundamental  Issues 

3 

PSY  4111 

Introduction  to  Psychology: 
Developmental  Aspects 

3 

SOA  4155 

Individual  and  Culture 

3 

SOC  4100 

Roles,  Culture,  and  the  Individual 

3 

SOC  4101 

Inequality  and  Institutions 

3 

SOC  4102 

Institutions  and  Social  Change 

3 

INT  4202 

Contemporary  Studies  Seminar 

3 

Electives 

45 

Electives  may  be  used 

•  to  take  a  University  College  certificate  program 

•  to  study  a  modern  language  or  other  area  in  greater  depth 

•  to  study  areas  of  personal  or  career  interest 

Students  are  encouraged  to  make  an  appointment  with  a  University  College  counselor  for  help  in 
selecting  electives.  Call  617-437-2400  for  an  appointment. 


Total  Quarter  Hours 


174 


Liberal  Arts 


Political  Science  Bachelor  of  Arts  Degree  (Major  Code  322) 


Core  Courses 

quarter  hours 

ENG  4110        ENG  4111 

Critical  Writing  1,  2 

6 

ENG  4112 

Approaches  to  Literature 

3 

Modern  Language 

Elementary  or  Conversational 
Intermediate 

12 
12 

Humanities  (ART,  ASL,  DRA,  ENG,  JRN,  LN,  MUS,  PHL,  SPC,  TCC) 

24 

Math-Science  (BIO,  CHM,  ESC,  MTH,  PHY) 

18 

Social  Sciences  (in  three  of  the  following  areas 

ECN,  HST,  PSY,  SOA,  SOC) 

18 

Major  Concentration  Courses 

POL  4103 

Introduction  to  Politics 

3 

POL  4104 

Introduction  to  American  Government 

3 

POL  4105 

Introduction  to  Comparative  Politics 

3 

POL  4331 

International  Relations 

3 

POL  4370 

Introduction  to  Political  Theory 

3 

American  Government 

Choose  three  of  the  following: 

POL  4310 

American  Political  Thought 

(3) 

POL  4313 

State  and  Local  Government 

(3) 

POL  4314 

Urban  and  Metropolitan  Government 

(3) 

POL  4318 

The  American  Presidency 

(3) 

POL  4319 

^The  Legislative  Process 

(3) 

POL  4320 

American  Constitutional  Law 

(3) 

POL  4321 

Civil  Liberties 

(3) 

POL  4322 

Procedural  Due  Process 

(3) 

continued  on  the  next  page 


Liberal  Arts 

135 

Comparative  Government 

Choose  two  of  the  following: 

POL  4330 

Comparative  Politics 

(3) 

POL  4338 

European  Political  Parties 

(3) 

POL  4339 

Government  and  Politics  in  the 
Soviet  Union 

(3) 

POL  4342 

Communism  in  Eastern  Europe 

(3) 

POL  4350 

Politics  and  Policies  of  the 
Developing  Nations 

(3) 

POL  4352 

Government  and  Politics  of  Latin 
America 

(3) 

POL  4356 

Government  and  Politics  of 
Northern  Africa 

(3) 

POL  4357 

Government  and  Politics  of 
South  Africa 

(3) 

POL  4359 

Government  and  Politics  in  the 
Middle  East 

(3) 

POL  4362 

Government  and  Politics  of 
Southeast  Asia 

(3) 

POL  4365 

Government  and  Politics  of  China 

(3) 

POL  4367 

Government  and  Politics  of  Japan 

(3) 

International  Relations 

Choose  one  of  the  following: 

POL  4332 

International  Organization 

(3) 

POL  4333 

International  Law 

(3) 

POL  4335 

Formulating  American  Foreign  Policy 

(3) 

POL  4336 

American  Foreign  Policy 

(3) 

POL  4341 

Soviet  Foreign  Policy 

(3) 

POL  4364 

China's  Foreign  Policy 

(3) 

Theory  and  Methodology 

Choose  one  of  the  following: 

POL  4371 

Contemporary  Political  Theory 

(3) 

POL  4311 

Research  Methods 

(3) 

Electives 

Political  science 

18 

Open  electives 

27 

Total  Quarter  Hours 

174 

136         Liberal  Arts 

Political  Science  Bachelor  of  Science  Degree  (Major  Code  322)  53 

Core  Courses 

quarter  hours 

ENG  4110         ENG  4111 

Critical  Writing  1,  2 

6 

ENG  4112 

Approaches  to  Literature 

3 

ECN  4250         ECN  4251 

Statistics  1,  2 

6 

MIS  4101          MIS  4102 

Introduction  to  Data  Processing 
and  Information  Systems  1,  2 

6 

Humanities  (ART,  ASL,  DRA,  ENG,  JRN,  LN, 

MUS,  PHL,  SPC,  TCC) 

12 

Social  Sciences  (in  three  of  the  following  areas: 

ECN,  HST,  PSY,  SOA,  SOC) 

18 

Choose  one  of  the  following: 

MIS  4221 

COBOL  Programming  1 

(3) 

MIS  4240 

Introduction  to  Programming  in 
BASIC 

(3) 

MIS  4250 

FORTRAN  Programming  1 

(3) 

MIS  4270 

Pascal  Programming  1 

(3) 

Major  Concentration  Courses 

POL  4103 

Introduction  to  Politics 

3 

POL  4104 

Introduction  to  American  Government 

3 

POL  4105 

Introduction  to  Comparative  Politics 

3 

POL  4331 

International  Relations 

3 

POL  4370 

Introduction  to  Political  Theory 

3 

American  Government 

Choose  three  of  the  following: 

POL  4310 

American  Political  Thought 

(3) 

POL  4313 

State  and  Local  Government 

(3) 

POL  4314 

Urban  and  Metropolitan 
Government 

(3) 

POL  4318 

The  American  Presidency 

(3) 

POL  4319 

The  Legislative  Process 

(3) 

POL  4320 

American  Constitutional  Law 

(3) 

POL  4321 

Civil  Liberties 

(3) 

POL  4322 

Procedural  Due  Process 

(3) 

continued  on  the  next  page 


Liberal  Arts 

137 

Comparative  Government 

Choose  two  of  the  following: 

30L  4330 

Comparative  Politics 

(3) 

30L  4338 

European  Political  Parties 

(3) 

30L  4339 

Government  and  Politics  in  the 
Soviet  Union 

(3) 

50L  4342 

Communism  in  Eastern  Europe 

(3) 

DOL  4350 

Politics  and  Policies  of  the 
Developing  Nations 

(3) 

30L  4352 

Government  and  Politics  of  Latin 
America 

(3) 

5OL  4356 

Government  and  Politics  of 
Northern  Africa 

(3) 

5OL  4357 

Government  and  Politics  of 
South  Africa 

(3) 

5OL  4359 

Government  and  Politics  in  the 
Middle  East 

(3) 

>OL  4362 

Government  and  Politics  of 
Southeast  Asia 

(3) 

DOL  4365 

Government  and  Politics  of  China 

(3) 

>OL  4367 

Government  and  Politics  of  Japan 

(3) 

nternational  Relations 

Choose  one  of  the  following: 

>OL  4332 

International  Organization 

(3) 

>OL  4333 

International  Law 

(3) 

>OL  4335 

Formulating  American  Foreign  Policy 

(3) 

>OL  4336 

American  Foreign  Policy 

(3) 

DOL  4341 

Soviet  Foreign  Policy 

(3) 

>OL  4364 

China's  Foreign  Policy 

(3) 

rheory  and  Methodology 

choose  one  of  the  following: 

3OL  4371 

Contemporary  Political  Theory 

(3) 

3OL  4311 

Research  Methods 

(3) 

Electives 

Political  science 

18 

3pen  electives 

66 

fotal  Quarter  Hours 

174 

138         Liberal  Arts 

Psychology  Bachelor  of  Arts  Degree  (Major  Code  319)  GS? 

Core  Courses 

quarter  hours 

ENG  4110         ENG  4111                                       Critical  Writing  1,  2 

6 

ENG  4112                                                                Approaches  to  Literature 

3 

Modern  Language                                                     Elementary  or  Conversational 

Intermediate 

12 
12 

Humanities  (ART,  ASL,  DRA,  ENG,  JRN,  LN,  MUS,  PHL,  SPC,  TCC) 

24 

Math-Science  (BIO,  CHM,  ESC,  MTH,  PHY) 

18 

Social  Sciences  (in  three  of  the  following  areas:  ECN,  HST,  POL,  SOA,  SOC) 

18 

Major  Concentration  Courses 

PSY  4110                                                                 Introduction  to  Psychology: 

Fundamental  Issues 

3 

PSY  4111                                                                    Introduction  to  Psychology: 

Developmental  Aspects 

3 

PSY  4112                                                                   Introduction  to  Psychology: 

Personal  Dynamics 

3 

PSY  4220          PSY  4221          PSY  4222              Statistics  in  Psychology  1,  2,  3 

9 

PSY  4231                                                                 Psychology  of  Learning  1 

3 

PSY  4272                                                                   Personality  1 

3 

PSY  4351                                                                 Physiological  Psychology  1 

3 

PSY  4381                                                                 Sensation  and  Perception  1 

3 

PSY  4561          PSY  4562                                        Experimental  Psychology  1,  2 

6 

PSY  4611                                                                 Senior  Seminar  in  Psychology 

3 

Electives 

Psychology 

21 

Open  electives 

21 

Total  Quarter  Hours 

174 

Liberal  Arts         139 


Psychology  Bachelor  of  Science  Degree  (Major  Code  319)  b=3 


Core  Courses 

quarter  hours 

ENG  4110        ENG  4111 

Critical  Writing  1,  2 

6 

ENG  4112 

Approaches  to  Literature 

3 

Math-Science  (BIO,  CHM,  ESC,  MTH,  PHY) 

30 

Major  Concentration  Courses 

PSY  4110 

Introduction  to  Psychology: 
Fundamental  Issues 

3 

PSY  4111 

Introduction  to  Psychology: 
Developmental  Aspects 

3 

PSY  4112 

Introduction  to  Psychology: 
Personal  Dynamics 

3 

PSY  4220 


PSY  4221 


PSY  4222 


Statistics  in  Psychology  1,  2,  3 


PSY  4231 


Psychology  of  Learning  1 


PSY  4272 


Personality  1 


PSY  4351 


Physiological  Psychology  1 


PSY  4381 


Sensation  and  Perception  1 


PSY  4561 


PSY  4562 


Experimental  Psychology 


PSY  4611 


Senior  Seminar  in  Psychology  1 


Electives 


Psychology 


21 


Open 


electives 


75 


Total  Quarter  Hours 


174 


140         Liberal  Arts 

Sociology-Anthropology  Bachelor  of  Arts  Degree  (Major  Code  321)  1x3 

Core  Courses 

quarter  hours 

ENG  4110         ENG  4111 

Critical  Writing  1,  2                                         6 

ENG  4112 

Approaches  to  Literature                                   3 

Modern  Language 

Elementary  or  Conversational                        12 
Intermediate                                                      12 

Humanities  (ART,  ASL,  DRA,  ENG,  JRN,  LN, 

MUS,  PHL,  SPC,  TCC)                                    24 

Math-Science  (BIO,  CHM,  ESC,  MTH,  PHY) 

18 

Social  Sciences  (in  three  of  the  following  areas: 

ECN,  HST,  POL,  PSY)                                    18 

Major  Concentration  Courses 

SOA  4100 

Physical  Anthropology                                       3 

SOA  4101 

Cultural  Anthropology: 

Preliterate  Societies                                          3 

SOA  4102 

Cultural  Anthropology: 

Industrial  Societies                                           3 

SOC  4100 

Roles,  Culture,  and  the  Individual                   3 

SOC  4101 

Inequality  and  Institutions                                3 

SOC  4102 

Institutions  and  Social  Change                        3 

SOC  4300          SOC  4301          SOC  4302 

Social  Theory  1,  2,  3                                         9 

SOC  4331          SOC  4332          SOC  4333 

Social  Research  Methods  1,  2,  3                       9 

Electives 

Sociology- Anthropology  (at  least  nine  quarter  hours  in  SOA)                                                        21 

Open  electives 

24 

Total  Quarter  Hours 

174 

Liberal  Arts         141 


Sociology-Anthropology  Bachelor  of  Science  Degree  (Major  Code  321) 


Core  Courses 

quarter  hours 

ENG  4110 

ENG  4111 

Critical  Writing  1,  2 

6 

ENG  4112 

Approaches  to  Literature 

3 

Social  Sciences  (ECN,  HST,  POL,  PSY) 

18 

Major  Concentration  Courses 

30A  4100 

Physical  Anthropology 

3 

30A  4101 

Cultural  Anthropology: 
Preliterate  Societies 

3 

30A  4102 

Cultural  Anthropology: 
Industrial  Societies 

3 

SOC  4100 

Roles,  Culture,  and  the  Individual 

3 

30C  4101 

Inequality  and  Institutions 

3 

30C  4102 

Institutions  and  Social  Change 

3 

30C  4300 

SOC  4301         SOC  4302 

Social  Theory  1,  2,  3 

9 

30C  4331 

SOC  4332         SOC  4333 

Social  Research  Methods  1,  2,  3 

9 

Electives* 

Sociology-anthropology  (at  least  nine  quarter 

hours  in  SO  A) 

39 

Qpen  electives  (preferably  in  the  humanities  and  math-science) 

72 

fotal  Quarter  Hours 

174 

"Students  may  use  these  electives  to  take  the  Human  Services  Concentration  or  the  Gerontology  Certificate  Program. 
See  pages  36,  142  for  certificate  program  requirements. 


142 

Jberal  Arts 

Human  Services  Elective  Concentrations  (open  only  to  B.S.  degree  candidates) 

quarter  hours 

SOC  4125 

Social  Problems 

3 

SOC4240 

Sociology  of  Human  Service 
Organizations 

3 

SOC  4241 

Human  Services  Professions 

3 

SOC  4245 

Poverty  and  Inequality 

3 

SOC  4260 

SOC  4261 

SOC  4262 

Introduction  to  Social  Work 
Practice  1,  2,  3 

9 

PSY  4110 

Introduction  to  Psychology: 
Fundamental  Issues 

3 

PSY  4111 

Introduction  to  Psychology: 
Developmental  Aspects 

3 

PSY  4112 

Introduction  to  Psychology: 
Personal  Dynamics 

3 

PSY 4372 

PSY  4373 

PSY  4374 

Abnormal  Psychology  1,  2,  3 

9 

Total  Quarter  Hours 

39 

Recommended  Electives  for  Human  Services  Concentration  Students: 

ECN  4130 

Medical  Economics 

3 

ECN  4311 

Human  Resource  Planning 

3 

ECN  4315 

Income  Inequality  and 
Discrimination 

3 

POL  4300 

Introduction  to  Public 
Administration 

3 

POL  4301 

Case  Studies  in  Public 
Administration 

3 

POL  4306 

Public  Policy  Analysis 

3 

POL  4321 

Civil  Liberties 

3 

PSY  4240 

Development:  Infancy  and 
Childhood 

3 

PSY  4241 

Development:  Adolescence 

3 

PSY  4242 

Development:  Adulthood  and  Aging 

3 

PSY  4272 

Personality  1 

3 

SOC  4170 

Race  and  Ethnic  Relations 

3 

SOC  4185 

Sociology  of  Deviant  Behavior 

3 

SOC  4186 

Social  Control 

3 

SOC  4190 

Juvenile  Delinquency 

3 

SOC  4215 

Medical  Sociology 

3 

SOC  4220 

Sociology  of  Mental  Health 

3 

SOC  4225 

Social  Gerontology 

3 

Liberal  Arts         143 

Technical  Communications  Bachelor  %^ 
of  Science  Degree  (Major  Code  380)  tS 

Core  Courses 

quarter  hours 

Advanced  Standing  Credit,  including  eng  4110, 

,  ENG  4111,  ENG  4112  or  their  equivalents 

83 

Basic  Communication 

ART  4140 

Graphic  Communication  and  Production 

3 

PHL  4100 

Philosophical  Thinking 

3 

PHL  4200 

Logic 

3 

ENG  4349 

ENG  4350 

Expository  and  Persuasive  Writing  1,  2 

6 

ENG  4381 

Business  Writing  and  Reports  2 

3 

JRN  4112 

Writing  for  Media 

3 

SPC  4152 

Interviewing 

3 

Technology 

MIS  4101 

MIS  4102 

Introduction  to  Data  Processing 
and  Information  Systems  1,  2 

6 

MTH4107 

College  Algebra 

4 

PHY  4101 

PHY  4102 

College  Physics  1,  2 

8 

PHY  4173 

PHY  4174 

Physics  Lab  1,  2 

4 

Choose  one  of  the  following: 

MIS  4220 

Introduction  to  Programming  in  COBOL 

(3) 

MIS  4250 

FORTRAN  Programming  1 

(3) 

MIS  4270 

Pascal  Programming  1 

(3) 

Major  Concentration  Courses 

TCC  4101 

TCC  4102 

Technical  Writing  1,  2 

6 

TCC  4105 

Editing  for  Science  and  Technology 

3 

TCC  4340 

Technical  Writing  Portfolio  Development 

3 

Choose  four  ot 

f  the  following: 

TCC  4110 

Technical-Promotional  Writing 

(3) 

TCC  4301 

TCC  4302 

Computer  Software  Technical 
Writing  1,  2 

(6) 

TCC  4311 

TCC  4312 

Instruction  Manual  Writing  1,  2 

(6) 

TCC  4320 

Proposal  Writing 

(3) 

TCC  4330 

The  Business  and  Technical  Presentation 

(3) 

Electives 

18 

The  following  electives  are  recommended: 

ACC  4101 

ACC  4102 

Accounting  Principles  1,  2 

(6) 

ART  4366 

Promotional  and  Technical 
Publications:  Design  and  Production 

(3) 

ENG  4352 

Expository  Communications 

(3) 

MGT  4101 

MGT  4102 

Introduction  to  Business  and 
Management  1,  2 

(6) 

TCC  4805 

Field  Work  in  Technical  Communications 

(6) 

Total  Quarter  Hours 

174 

144         Alternative  Freshman-Year  Program 


Alternative  Freshman-Year 
Program 


Richard  Wilson,  Manager, 
Alternative  Freshman-Year  Program 
250  Ruggles  Building 
617-4374626 


Program  Goals 


Students  in  the  Alternative  Freshman- Year 
Program  are  considered  full-time  day  students 
and  are  degree  candidates  with  an  undeclared 
major.  The  program  is  designed  to  help 
students  strengthen  their  basic  skills  in 
writing  and  mathematics.  While  helping 
them  gain  confidence  in  their  ability  to  do 
college-level  work,  the  program  also  offers 
students  an  opportunity  to  consider  several 
areas  of  study  before  committing  themselves 
to  a  specific  major.  Through  the  combination 
of  a  carefully  prescribed  curriculum  and  the 
attention  of  professional  counselors,  each  stu- 
dent is  helped  to  establish  a  program  suited 
to  his  or  her  individual  needs.  These  same 
counselors  are  normally  available  throughout 
the  student's  entire  freshman  year. 


Program  Structure 

Students  in  the  Alternative  Freshman- Year 
Program  normally  take  sixteen  quarter  hours 
of  credit  during  each  of  their  three  freshman 
quarters,  but  may  take  12  quarter  hours  dur- 
ing the  first  quarter  and  still  be  considered 
full-time  students.  Students  in  the  health 
science  track  take  seventeen  quarter  hours  in 
their  third  quarter  and  twelve  quarter  hours 
in  their  fourth  quarter. 


After  completing  the  prescribed  Alternative 
Freshman- Year  Program  and  achieving  both 
a  cumulative  quality-point  average  of  1.400  or 
better  and  specific  program  requirements  as 
noted,  students  may  generally  continue  their 
degree  programs  by  transferring  with  sopho- 
more status,  to  any  program  in  the  College  of 
Business  Administration  or  the  College  of 
Criminal  Justice  as  well  as  certain  nonscience 
programs  in  the  Boston-Bouve  College  of 
Human  Development  Professions  and  the  Col- 
lege of  Arts  and  Sciences.  Students  may  also 
continue  their  degree  programs  within 
University  College.  In  addition  to  the 
cumulative  quality-point  average  of  1.400  or 
better,  the  College  of  Business  Administra- 
tion requires  a  1.800  average  in  5  key 
courses,  namely,  MTH  1113,  ENG  4013,  ENG 
4014,  ECN  4601,  and  MGT  4110.  Additional 
program  requirements  for  students  who  seek 
sophomore  status  in  the  College  of  Pharmacy 
and  Allied  Health  Professions  are  listed  in 
the  Student  Handbook  for  Basic  Colleges. 


Faculty  and  Resources 

For  the  Alternative  Freshman- Year  Program, 
the  University  has  carefully  selected  faculty 
members  who  are  aware  of  the  individual 
needs  and  goals  of  students  working  to  adjust 
to  a  college  program.  Faculty  and  students 
meet  in  small  classes  of  not  more  than 
twenty-five  students. 

As  members  of  the  program,  students  are 
considered  regular  Northeastern  University 
day  students  even  though  they  have  unique 
schedules  and  a  distinctively  tailored  cur- 
riculum. Therefore,  they  generally  have  ac- 
cess to  all  counseling  services,  physical  educa- 
tion facilities,  dormitory  arrangements,  and 
extracurricular  programs  at  the  University's 
main  campus  in  Boston. 

Alternative  Freshman- Year  students  are  en- 
couraged to  make  extensive  use  of  the  up-to- 
date,  programmed  learning  resources  available 
for  self-instruction  through  Northeastern's 
Learning  Resources  Center.  For  additional 
assistance,  these  students  are  also  frequently 
referred  to  the  Academic  Assistance  Center  or 
the  Math/Writing  Center.  A  third  and  very 
important  resource,  the  Counseling  and 
Testing  Center,  is  also  available  to  students 
for  personal  and  academic  counseling  as  well 
as  for  vocational  testing  and  counseling. 


Alternative  Freshman-Year  Program         145 


Tuition  and  Fees 


Application  Procedures 


Tuition  and  fees  for  the  Alternative  Freshman- 
Year  Program  are  the  same  as  for  students  in 
the  Basic  Day  Colleges.  Payment  of  the  stan- 
dard tuition  during  the  first  three  academic 
quarters  of  residence  entitles  students  to 
forty-eight  credit  hours  of  instruction.  Thus, 
those  who  take  the  forty-four  programmed 
credits  are  entitled  to  a  four-quarter-hour  tui- 
tion adjustment  at  the  regular  freshman  rate. 


For  more  information  on  the  Alternative 
Freshman- Year  Program,  or  to  request  an 
application,  write  or  call  the  Dean  of  Admis- 
sions, Department  of  Admissions,  Northeastern 
University,  360  Huntington  Avenue,  Boston, 
MA  02115,  617-437-2200. 


Sample  One-Year  Program:  Business  Track 

Quarter  1 

quarter  hours 

ED  4003                                                                   Integrated  Language  Skills  A 

4 

ENG  4013                                                                Fundamentals  of  English  1 

4 

MTH  1000                                                               Mathematical  Preliminaries  1* 

4 

HST  4110 

or 

ECN  4601 

or 

MGT  4110 


HST  4110 

or 

MGT  4110 

or 

ECN  4601 


History  of  Civilization  At  (4) 

or 

Economics  1**  (4) 

or 

Survey  of  Business  and  Management**         (4) 


Total  Quarter  Hours 

12-16 

Quarter  2 

ED  4004 

Integrated  Language  Skills  B 

4 

ENG  4014 

Fundamentals  of  English  2 

4 

MTH  1010 

Mathematical  Preliminaries  2* 

4 

History  of  Civilization  A  (4) 

or 

Survey  of  Business  and  Management**         (4) 

or 

Economics  1**  (4) 


Total  Quarter  Hours 

16 

Quarter  3 

ECN  4601 

Economics  1  (or  Directed  Elective)** 

4 

HST  4111 

History  of  Civilization  B 

4 

MGT  4110 

Survey  of  Business  and  Management 
(or  Directed  Elective) 

4 

MTH  1113 

Mathematics  for  Business* 

4 

Total  Quarter  Hours 

16 

*  Students  will  be  placed  in  one  of  three  math  courses  depending  on  placement  test  results.  Those  receiving  advanced 

placement  have  the  option  of  completing  MTH  1114  during  freshman  year. 
t  Eligible  students  may  take  HST  4110  in  the  first  quarter;  all  others  take  HST  4110  in  the  second  quarter. 
**Business  Track  students  may  be  assigned  to  ECN  4601  or  MGT  4110  in  any  quarter,  but  all  are  required  to  complete 

both  courses  by  the  third  quarter. 


146         Alternative  Freshman-Year  Program 


Sample  One-Year  Program: 

Criminal  Justice,  Education,  Arts  and  Sciences  Track 


Quarter  1 

quarter  hours 

ED  4003 

Integrated  Language  Skills  A 

4 

ENG  4013 

Fundamentals  of  English  1 

4 

MTH1000 

Mathematical  Preliminaries  1* 

4 

SOC  4010 

Principles  of  Sociology  1 

(4) 

Total  Quarter  Hours 

12-16 

Quarter  2 

ED  4004 

Integrated  Language  Skills  B 

4 

ENG  4014 

Fundamentals  of  English  2 

4 

HST  4110 

History  of  Civilization  At 

4 

SOC  4011 

or 

MTH1010 

Principles  of  Sociology  2 

or 

Mathematical  Preliminaries  2 

(4) 

(4) 

Total  Quarter  Hours 

16 

Quarter  3 

HST  4111 

History  of  Civilization  B 

4 

POL  4106 

Introduction  to  Politics 

4 

SOC  4011 

Principles  of  Sociology  2 
(or  Directed  Elective) 

4 

Directed  Elective  $ 

4 

Total  Quarter  Hours 

16 

*Students  will  be  placed  in  one  of  two  math  levels,  depending  on  placement  test  results. 
tEligible  students  may  take  HST  4110  in  the  first  quarter,  followed  by  an  elective  in  the  second  quarter.  Most 
students  will  take  HST  4110  in  the  second  quarter. 
tThe  Directed  Elective  is  to  be  chosen  with  consideration  for  the  student's  intended  major. 


Alternative  Freshman-Year  Program         147 

Sample  One-Year  Program: 

Health  Sciences  Track 

Quarter  1 

quarter  hours 

MTH  1010 

Mathematical  Preliminaries  2 

4 

ENG  4013 

Fundamentals  of  English  1 

4 

CHM  1110 

Pre-Chemistry 

5 

ED  4001 

Integrated  Language  Skills 
Development  1 

2 

Total  Quarter  Hours 

15 

Quarter  2 

MTH  1106 

Fundamentals  of  Mathematics 

4 

CHM  1111 

General  Chemistry  1 

5 

ED  4002 

Integrated  Language  Skills 
Development  2 

2 

ENG  4014 

Fundamentals  of  English  2 

4 

Total  Quarter  Hours 

15 

Quarter  3 

BIO  1140 

Basic  Animal  Biology  1 

4 

CHM  1122 

General  Chemistry  2 

5 

ENG  1111 

Freshman  English  2 

4 

Directed  Elective 

4 

Total  Quarter  Hours 

17 

Quarter  4 

BIO  1141 

Basic  Animal  Biology  2 

4 

MTH  1107 

Functions  and  Calculus 

4 

Directed  Elective 

4 

Total  Quarter  Hours 

12 

Course  Descriptions 


150         Course  Descriptions 


Course  Descriptions 


Not  all  the  courses  listed  in  this  bulletin  are 
offered  every  year. 

A  final  list  of  courses  to  be  offered  is  con- 
tained in  the  University  College  Schedule 
Guide,  which  gives  the  hours  and  days  that 
classes  meet  and  their  locations.  These 
schedules  are  issued  prior  to  the  fall,  winter, 
spring,  and  summer  quarters. 

Abbreviations 

q.h.:  quarter  hours  (credit  earned) 
cl.:  hours  required  in  class  per  week 
Prereq.:  Prerequisite 


Key  to  Department  Codes 

ACC 

Accounting 

ART 

Art  and  Graphics 

ASL 

American  Sign  Language 

BIO 

Biology 

BL 

Business  Law 

CHM 

Chemistry 

CJ 

Criminal  Justice  and  Security 

COM 

Computer  Literacy 

DRA 

Drama 

ECN 

Economics 

ED 

Educational  Skills 

EMS 

Emergency  Medical  Science 

ENG 

English 

ESC 

Earth  Sciences 

Fl 

Finance 

HMG 

Health  Management 

HRA 

Health  Record  Administration 

HRM 

Human  Resources  Management 

HSC 

Health  Science 

HST 

History 

HTL 

Hotel  and  Restaurant  Management 

IM 

Industrial  Management 

INT 

Interdisciplinary 

JRN 

Journalism 

LNA 

Language— Arabic 

LNF 

Language— French 

LNG 

Language— German 

LNH 

Language— Hebrew 

LNI 

Language— Italian 

LNJ 

Language— Japanese 

LNL 

Language— Latin 

LNN 

Language— Swedish 

LNR 

Language— Russian 

LNS 

Language— Spanish 

MGT 

Management 

MIS 

Management  Information  Systems 

MKT 

Marketing 

MLS 

Medical  Laboratory  Science 

MS 

Management  Science 

MTH 

Mathematics 

MUS 

Music 

NUR 

Nursing 

PED 

Cardiovascular  Health  and  Exercise 

PHL 

Philosophy  and  Religion 

PHY 

Physics 

POL 

Political  Science 

PSY 

Psychology 

PUR 

Purchasing 

RAD 

Radiologic  Technology 

RE 

Real  Estate 

REC 

Recreation 

SOA 

Sociology-Anthropology 

SOC 

Sociology 

SPC 

Speech  Communication 

TCC 

Technical  Communications 

TRN 

Transportation 

Accounting         151 


ACCOUNTING 

ACC  4101  Accounting  Principles  1  (3  q.h.) 
Study  of  accounting  issues  and  objectives  for 
proper  preparation  and  interpretation  of 
financial  statements.  Covers  the  nature,  func- 
tion, and  environment  of  accounting,  the 
basic  accounting  model,  and  the  accounting 
cycle,  while  emphasizing  accounting  for  ser- 
vice and  merchandising  businesses.  Also 
covers  cash  and  accounts  receivable. 
ACC  4102  Accounting  Principles  2  (3  q.h.) 
Continuation  of  ACC  4101.  Emphasizes  issues 
in  financial  reporting,  valuation,  and  income 
measurement.  Includes  inventories,  plant  and 
equipment,  bonds,  stockholders'  equity,  and 
changes  in  financial  position.  Prereq.  ACC  4101. 
ACC  4103  Accounting  Principles  3  (3  q.h.) 
Preparation  and  interpretation  of  cost 
accounting  information  and  its  use  in  the 
managerial  decision-making  process.  Includes 
ratio  analysis,  present  value,  analysis  of  cost- 
volume  relationships,  fixed  and  variable  costs, 
break-even  analysis,  job  order,  and  process 
cost  systems.  Prereq.  ACC  4102. 
ACC  4105  Accounting  Principles  1  and  2 
(intensive)  (6  q.h.) 

Same  as  ACC  4101  and  ACC  4102. 
ACC  4120  Essentials  of  Personal  Income  Taxation  (3  q.h.) 
Special  course  for  nonaccounting  majors,  de- 
signed to  teach  important  aspects  of  personal 
income  taxation  on  both  federal  and  state 
levels.  Tax  laws,  tax  planning,  and  the  prep- 
aration of  individual  returns  are  emphasized. 
ACC  4301  Intermediate  Accounting  1  (Open)  (3  q.h.) 
Introduction  to  financial  accounting  concepts, 
techniques,  and  procedures.  Areas  of  intensive 
treatment  are  the  development  and  frame- 
work of  accounting  theory,  basic  financial 
statements,  and  cash  and  receivables. 
Prereq.  ACC  4103. 

ACC  4302  Intermediate  Accounting  2  (Open)  (3  q.h.) 
Continuation  of  the  study  of  accounting  con- 
cepts and  procedures.  Detailed  examination  of 
inventories,  tangible  and  intangible  assets,  and 
depreciation.  Prereq.  ACC  4301  or  ACC  4401. 
ACC  4303  Intermediate  Accounting  3  (Open)  (3  q.h.) 
Comprehensive  examination  of  stockholders' 
equity  and  earnings  per  share.  Other  topics 
include  accounting  changes  and  statements  of 
cash  flow.  Prereq.  ACC  4302  or  ACC  4402. 
ACC  4310  Cost  Accounting  1  (Open)  (3  q.h.) 
Introduction  to  cost  accounting,  including 
terminology,  purpose,  and  relationship  to 
financial  accounting.  Familiarizes  students 


with  product  costing  systems  and  their 
usefulness.  Prereq.  ACC  4103. 
ACC  4320  Advanced  Accounting  1  (3  q.h.) 
Problems  associated  with  business  combinations. 
A  study  of  the  purchase  and  pooling  methods 
of  consolidations.  Prereq.  ACC  4304  or  4404. 
ACC  4321  Advanced  Accounting  2  (3  q.h.) 
Accounting  problems  associated  with  partner- 
ships and  multinational  corporations.  Examines 
accounting  for  nonprofit  organizations.  Prereq. 
ACC  4320. 

ACC  4400  Accounting  Information  Systems 
(Reserved)  (3  q.h.) 

Examines  the  fundamentals  of  computer- 
based  technology  and  the  basic  accounting 
system  concepts.  Examines  the  fundamentals 
of  central  systems  and  design  and  implemen- 
tation issues.  Prereq.  4103  and  80  q.h. 
ACC  4401  Intermediate  Accounting  1  (Reserved)  (3  q.h.) 
Introduction  to  financial  accounting  concepts, 
techniques,  and  procedures.  Areas  of  intensive 
treatment  are  the  development  and  frame- 
work of  accounting  theory,  basic  financial 
statements,  and  cash  and  receivables.  Prereq. 
ACC  4103  and  80  q.h. 
ACC  4402  Intermediate  Accounting  2 
(Reserved)  (3  q.h.) 

Continuation  of  the  study  of  accounting 
concepts  and  procedures.  Detailed  examina- 
tion of  inventories,  tangible  and  intangible 
assets,  and  depreciation.  Prereq.  ACC  4401  or 
ACC  4301  and  80  q.h. 

ACC  4403  Intermediate  Accounting  3  (Reserved)  (3  q.h.) 
Comprehensive  examination  of  stockholders' 
equity  and  earnings  per  share.  Other  topics 
include  accounting  changes  and  statements  of 
cash  flow.  Prereq.  ACC  4402  or  ACC  4302 
and  80  q.h. 

ACC  4404  intermediate  Accounting  4  (Reserved)  (3  q.h.) 
In-depth  analysis  of  such  topics  as  deferred  in- 
come taxes,  pensions,  leases,  and  price-level 
accounting.  Prereq.  ACC  4403  or  ACC  4303 
and  80  q.h. 

ACC  4410  Cost  Accounting  1  (Reserved)  (3  q.h.) 
Introduction  to  cost  accounting,  including  ter- 
minology, purpose,  and  relationship  to  finan- 
cial accounting.  Familiarizes  students  with 
product  costing  systems  and  their  usefulness. 
Prereq.  ACC  4103  and  80  q.h. 
ACC  4411  Cost  Accounting  2  (Reserved)  (3  q.h.) 
Budgetary  planning  and  control,  with  em- 
phasis on  the  use  of  cost  data  for  current 
operations,  special  decisions,  and  long-range 
planning.  Prereq.  ACC  4410  or  ACC  4310 
and  80  q.h. 


152         Art  and  Graphics 


ACC  4425  Auditing  1  (Reserved)  (3  q.h.) 
Auditing  concepts  and  standards  relevant  to 
the  attest  function.  Includes  ethical  respon- 
sibilities of  the  independent  certified  public 
accountant,  internal  controls,  an  overview  of 
sampling,  and  auditor  reports.  Prereq.  ACC 
4403  or  ACC  4303  and  80  q.h. 

ACC  4426  Auditing  2  (Reserved)  (3  q.h.) 
Continued  examination  of  auditing  concepts 
and  standards  relevant  to  the  attest  function. 
Includes  compliance  and  substantive  tests  as 
they  relate  to  specific  transaction  cycles  and 
the  use  of  EDP  and  statistical  sampling 
techniques.  Prereq.  ACC  4425. 
ACC  4440  Federal  Income  Taxes  1  (Reserved)  (3  q.h.) 
Application  of  federal  tax  laws  to  the  indi- 
vidual's income,  gains,  losses,  and  expenses. 
Includes  study  of  the  individual's  itemized 
deductions.  Prereq.  ACC  4403  or  ACC  4303 
and  80  q.h. 

ACC  4441  Federal  Income  Taxes  2  (Reserved)  (3  q.h.) 
Continuation  of  ACC  4440.  Property  transac- 
tions, including  non-taxable  transactions;  fun- 
damental tax  law  relating  to  corporate  forma- 
tion and  operation,  partnerships,  and  S  cor- 
porations. Prereq.  ACC  4440. 
ACC  4442  Federal  Income  Taxes  3  (Reserved)  (3  q.h.) 
Continuation  of  ACC  4441.  Covers  application 
of  federal  tax  laws  to  estates,  gifts,  and  trusts; 
and  corporate  and  partnership  taxation. 
Prereq.  ACC  4441. 
ACC  4600  Honors  Program  1  (4  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  undertake  an  in-depth 
research  study  project.  See  page  17  for  details. 
Prereq.  96  q.h.,  3.5  q.p.a. 
ACC  4601  Honors  Program  2  (4  q.h.) 
See  ACC  4600. 

ACC  4602  Honors  Program  3  (4  q.h  j 
See  ACC  4600. 

ACC  4701  Independent  Study  1  (3  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  undertake  special  research. 
See  page  17  for  details.  Prereq.  96  q.h., 
3.0  q.p.a. 

ACC  4702  Independent  Study  2  (3  q.h.) 
See  ACC  4701. 

ACC  4703  Independent  Study  3  (3  q.h.) 
See  ACC  4701. 

ACC  4800  Advanced  Tutorial  1  (3  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  take  upper  level  course  in- 
dependently. See  page  16  for  details. 
Prereq.  87  q.h. 

ACC  4801  Advanced  Tutorial  2  (3  q.h.) 
See  ACC  4800. 
ACC  4900  Field  Work  (6  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  enhance  career  development 


by  applying  academic  background  to  practical 
problems  in  the  workplace.  See  page  16  for 
details.  Prereq.  Approval  of  Program  Director. 

ART  and  GRAPHICS 

ART  4100  History  of  Art  (3  q.h.) 

Survey  of  history  of  Western  art  from 
prehistoric  times  to  the  end  of  the  Roman 
Empire.  Includes  the  study  of  major 
monuments,  artists,  and  stylistic 
developments  that  evolved  during  the 
Prehistoric,  Primitive,  Egyptian,  Mesopota- 
mian,  Aegean,  Greek,  and  Roman  periods. 
Slide  lectures  and  discussions. 
ART  4101  History  of  Art  to  the  Sixteenth  Century  (3  q.h.) 
Survey  of  history  of  Western  art  from  the  end 
of  the  Roman  Empire  to  the  late  sixteenth 
century.  Includes  the  study  of  major  monuments, 
artists,  and  stylistic  developments  that  evolv- 
ed during  the  Early  Christian,  Byzantine, 
Early  Medieval,  Romanesque,  Gothic,  Early 
and  High  Renaissance,  and  late  sixteenth- 
century  Mannerist  periods.  Slide  lectures  and 
discussions. 

ART  4102  History  of  Art  to  the  Twentieth  Century  (3  q.h.) 
Survey  of  history  of  Western  art  from  the  late 
sixteenth  century  to  the  twentieth  century. 
Includes  the  study  of  major  monuments,  ar- 
tists, and  stylistic  developments  that  evolved 
during  the  Baroque  and  Rococo  periods,  and 
in  nineteenth-  and  twentieth-century  Europe 
and  America.  Slide  lectures  and  discussions. 
ART  4105  Art  through  the  Ages  (3  q.h.) 
Concentrated  historical  survey  of  Western  art 
from  prehistoric  cave  paintings  to  the  twen- 
tieth century.  Includes  the  study  of  major 
monuments,  artists,  and  stylistic  develop- 
ments found  in  the  Pre-Classical,  Classical, 
Medieval,  Renaissance,  and  Baroque  periods, 
and  in  nineteenth-  and  twentieth-century 
Europe  and  America.  Slide  lectures  and 
discussions. 

ART  4106  Introduction  to  Art  (3  q.h.) 
Introduction  to  the  language,  techniques, 
aesthetics,  and  visual  styles  of  painting, 
sculpture,  graphic  art,  and  architecture.  In- 
cludes individual  and  comparative  studies  of 
major  works  of  art  in  each  field,  discussion  of 
terminology,  and  historical  examination  of 
the  social,  political,  and  cultural  significance 
of  each  art  form.  Slide  lectures  and  discussions. 
ART  4108  History  of  Landscape  Painting  (3  q.h.) 
A  survey  of  landscape  painting  from  its 
origins  in  cave  painting  (pre-history)  to  its 
contemporary  forms,  charting  the  major 
movements  in  Western  art,  as  well  as  signifi- 
cant developments  in  Eastern  art. 


Art  and  Graphics         153 


ART  4110  Modern  Art  (3  q.h.) 
Examination  of  major  movements  and 
developments  in  painting,  sculpture,  and 
architecture  from  the  late^  nineteenth  century 
to  the  present.  Emphasizes  changing  aesthetic 
views  and  the  artistic,  philosophical,  historical, 
sociological,  and  political  influences  shaping 
those  views  and  the  modern  movement  as  a 
whole.  Slide  lectures  and  discussion. 
ART  4112  Visual  Foundations  (Studio)*  (3  q.h.) 
An  introduction  to  the  fundamental  prin- 
ciples, nature,  and  meaning  of  visual 
organization,  leading  to  an  understanding  of 
the  concepts  of  two-  and  three-dimensional 
art.  Topics  include  problems  of  space,  balance, 
and  formal  inter-relationships  as  they  occur 
in  a  variety  of  fine  arts  and  design. 
ART  4115  Graphic  Design  for  Non-majors 
(Studio)*  (3  q.h.) 

An  introduction  to  graphic  design  processes, 
principles,  and  concepts.  Students  have  the 
opportunity  to  learn  how  to  estimate  jobs, 
design  layouts,  and  prepare  mechanicals  and 
page  layouts.  Other  topics  include  typography 
and  type  specification,  copyfitting,  design  ter- 
minology, and  an  introduction  to  printing 
processes. 

ART  4121  Principles  of  Drawing  and  Composition 
(Studio)*  (3  q.h.) 

Introduction  to  the  fundamental  principles  of 
drawing  and  composition  through  formal 
graphic  studies  of  line,  shape,  value,  form, 
light,  space,  pattern,  and  texture.  Stresses  the 
use  of  pencil,  charcoal,  conte  crayon,  and 
other  dry  media.  Slide  lectures  and  critiques 
as  needed.  (Laboratory  fee.) 
ART  4122  Introduction  to  Figure  Drawing 
(Studio)*  (3  q.h.) 

Introduction  to  drawing  the  human  form.  In- 
cludes basic  studies  in  anatomy,  proportion, 
negative/positive  space,  contour,  gesture, 
mass,  line,  composition,  and  drawing  techni- 
que. Slide  lectures,  critiques,  and  weekly 
sessions  drawing  from  the  model. 
(Laboratory  fee.) 

ART  4123  Drawing  Workshop  (Studio)*  (3  q.h.) 

Introduction  to  more  advanced  problems  in 
the  analysis  of  visual  language  and  its 
creative  organization.  Emphasizes  strengthen- 
ing drawing  techniques  and  developing  a  per- 
sonal style. 


ART  4125  Art  Projects  Workshop  (Studio)*  (3  q.h.) 
This  course  is  designed  for  students  who  have 
completed  one  or  more  basic  courses  in  the 
visual  arts.  This  workshop  furthers  the  com- 
petency in  the  creation  of  two-dimensional 
visual  art.  The  student's  creative  resources 
will  be  stressed  as  the  source  for  traditional 
and  non-traditional  approaches  to  portrait, 
figure,  and  other  subject  matter.  Investiga- 
tions will  center  on  drawing,  painting,  and 
printmaking  as  interactive  means  of  art  ex- 
pression. Watercolor,  oil,  acrylics,  pastels,  and 
other  media  will  be  used  as  drawing  and 
painting  methods.  Monotype  printing  will  be 
examined  as  a  printing  method  that  evolves 
from  painting  and  drawing. 
ART  4126  Landscape  Painting  (Studio)*  (3  q.h.) 
An  introduction  to  the  art  of  landscape  paint- 
ing. This  course  will  draw  upon  the  traditions 
of  landscape  representation  in  the  history  of 
art,  and  the  creative  and  expressive  potential 
of  each  student.  Sketching  and  painting  out- 
doors are  treated  as  an  integral  part  of  the 
course. 

ART  4127  Basic  Painting  (Studio)*  (3  q.h.) 
Introduction  to  the  fundamentals  of  painting. 
Includes  formal  studio  assignments  in  the 
study  of  color,  light,  pictorial  space  systems, 
form,  texture,  and  composition  to  establish  a 
foundation  for  more  individual,  creative  ex- 
pression. Critiques  and  slide  lectures  as 
needed. 

ART  4128  Intermediate  Painting  (Studio)*  (3  q.h.) 
Fundamental  principles  of  painting,  followed 
by  more  advanced  studies  in  shape,  scale,  tex- 
ture, brushstroke,  and  edge  as  well  as  color, 
light,  form,  and  composition.  Examines  pro- 
blems in  a  variety  of  stylistic  approaches  and 
techniques  from  the  past  and  the  present. 
Critiques  and  slide  lectures  as  needed. 
ART  4129  Painting  Workshop  (Studio)*  (3  q.h.) 
Individual  development  through  a  structured, 
project-oriented  approach.  Encourages 
recognition  of  the  conceptual  aspects  of  pain- 
ting as  well  as  the  development  of  a  personal 
painting  style  and  unique  visual  imagery. 
Critiques  and  slide  lectures  as  needed. 
ART  4130  Printmaking:  Relief  (Studio)*  (3  q.h.) 
Fundamental  course  in  the  production  of 
prints  using  the  relief  process.  Includes  wood- 
cut, linoleum,  block-cut,  and  other  relief  print 
techniques.  Also  explores  paper  stocks,  inks, 
and  carving  and  printing. 


"Courses  designated  "(Studio)"  meet  for  3-3%  hours. 


154         Art  and  Graphics 


ART  4132  Printmaking:  Intaglio  (Studio)*  (3  q.h.) 
Fundamental  course  in  the  production  of 
prints  using  the  intaglio  process.  Includes 
etching,  aquatint,  dry  point,  engraving, 
sugar-lift,  and  other  intaglio  techniques. 
Focuses  on  drawing  and  design  skills  and  on 
understanding  the  printmaking  craft. 
ART  4134  Color  and  Design  Practice  (Studio)*  (3  q.h.) 
Intermediate-level  problems  in  the  aesthetic 
organization  of  color  and  design  elements.  In- 
cludes expressive  possibilities  of  color  or- 
chestration, color  harmonies,  light  as  color, 
and  the  spatial  characteristics  of  color. 
ART  4135  Design  Foundations  and  Techniques 
(Studio)*  (3  q.h.) 

Introduction  to  the  basic  principles  of  two- 
dimensional  design.  Emphasis  on  tools  and 
techniques  used  in  the  design  field.  Projects 
in  two-dimensional  visual  perception  and 
organization  of  forms  in  composition.  Students 
develop  their  "design  sense"  while  becoming 
proficient  with  fundamental  board  skills. 
ART  4136  Basic  Watercolor  Painting  (Studio)*  (3  q.h.) 
Practice  and  creative  expression  in  the 
technical  fundamentals  of  watercolor. 
ART  4137  Watercolor  Painting  Practice 
Studio)*  (3  q.h.) 

Creative  expression  in  various  watercolor 
techniques.  Prereq.  ART  4136  or  instructor's 
permission. 

ART  4138  Techniques  of  Watercolor  Painting 
(Studio)*  (3  q.h.) 

Advanced  expression  in  watercolor.  Prereq. 
ART  4137  or  instructor's  permission. 
ART  4139  Color  Theory  and  Practice  (3  q.h.) 
Exploration  of  the  objective  nature  and  ex- 
pressive possibilities  of  color.  Through 
classwork  and  projects  students  examine  the 
major  theories  and  laws  of  color,  its  har- 
monies and  special  characteristics  as  well  as 
color  psychology,  symbolism,  and  orchestra- 
tion. Students  discover  their  intuition  for 
color  and  develop  its  application  in  art  and 
design. 

ART  4140  Graphic  Communication  and 
Production  (3  q.h.) 

Overview  of  the  design  and  production  pro- 
cesses of  printed  materials.  Examines  the 
designer's  role  in  concept  development  and 
layout  and  introduces  reprographics,  typeset- 
ting, printing  and  color  techniques,  paper, 
and  bindery  methods.  The  scheduling  and 
economic  factors  involved  in  bringing  a  piece 
to  print  are  also  addressed. 

♦Courses  designated  "(Studio)"  meet  for  3-3%  hours. 


ART  4141  Graphic  Design  1  (Studio)*  (3  q.h.) 
Introduction  to  professional  problem  solving 
in  graphic  design,  including  typographic  and 
pictorial  elements  and  their  integration  with 
verbal  content  to  communicate  ideas.  Em- 
phasis is  on  the  fundamentals  of  visual  think- 
ing, concept  development,  and  two-dimensional 
layout.  Students  gain  experience  with  the 
design  process  from  thumbnail  sketches  to  the 
finished  mechanical.  Prereq.  ART  4135  or  in- 
structor's permission. 
ART  4142  Graphic  Design  2  (Studio)*  (3  q.h.) 
Intermediate  study  and  creative  work  in  pro- 
fessional problem-solving  in  graphic  design, 
with  emphasis  on  creating  overall  design  con- 
cepts. Students  explore  effective  problem- 
solving  techniques  by  taking  a  variety  of  pro- 
jects from  concept  to  finished  presentation. 
Prereq.  ART  4151. 

ART  4143  Advertising  Design  (Studio)*  (3  q.h.) 
Introduction  to  advertising  and  to  the 
language  and  design  problems  commonly  met 
in  the  field.  Study  and  creative  work  in 
advertising  research  analysis,  layout,  and 
preparation  of  client  presentations.  Marketing 
fundamentals  are  also  addressed.  Prereq.  in- 
structor's permission.  Prerequisite  for  Advertis- 
ing Certificate  students:  ART  4151. 
ART  4151  Typography  (3  q.h.) 
The  evolution  of  typography  and  its  current 
applications.  Emphasizes  understanding  basic 
typographic  terms  and  techniques,  acquiring 
composition  skills  such  as  copyfitting  and 
type  specification,  understanding  typography 
as  symbol  and  as  written  record,  exploring 
design  concepts  through  typography,  and  lear- 
ning the  creative  potential  of  new  typesetting 
systems.  Field  trips  to  view  state-of-the-art 
phototypesetting  systems. 
ART  4160  Basic  Photography  (Studio)*  (3  q.h.) 
Use  of  the  camera,  the  negative,  and  the 
black-and-white  print  for  the  beginning  stu- 
dent. Includes  weekly  shooting  assignments, 
demonstrations,  and  hands-on  darkroom  ex- 
perience. (Laboratory  fee.) 
ART  4162  Photography  Workshop  (Studio)*  (3  q.h.) 
Through  close  interaction  with  the  instructor, 
students  refine  their  technical  skills  and 
learn  to  make  meaningful  decisions  about 
their  relation  to  the  world  through  the  use  of 
photography.  Alternative  processes  such  as 
infrared,  toners,  and  large  format  are 
demonstrated  and  used.  Contemporary  trends 
in  photography  are  illustrated  through  fre- 
quent slide  presentations.  (Laboratory  fee.) 
Prereq.  ART  4160  or  equiv. 


Art  and  Graphics         155 


ART  4163  Introduction  to  Color  Photography 
(Studio)*  (3  q.h.) 

Basic  color  theory  and  contemporary 
photographic  processes  and  practices. 
Students  work  with  color  negative  materials 
and  print  from  color  slides  and  negatives. 
Color  printing  facilities  are  provided.  Lectures 
and  critiques  when  appropriate.  (Laboratory 
fee.)  Prereq.  ART  4160  or  equiv. 
ART  4171  The  American  Film:  from  Arcade  to  Dream 
Factory  (3  q.h.) 

Rise  of  the  American  film  from  the  early  days 
of  kinetoscope  peepshows  and  primitive  ar- 
cade projections  through  the  1930s  and  1940s 
and  the  golden  age  of  Hollywood.  Films 
representing  major  aesthetic,  technical,  or  in- 
dustry developments  through  1946  are  screen- 
ed and  discussed.  Lectures,  discussions,  and 
assigned  readings. 

ART  4172  The  American  Film:  Hollywood  After 
Television  (3  q.h.) 

Development  of  the  American  film  from  the 
late  1940s  to  the  present.  Examines  the 
threat  of  television,  the  breakdown  of  the 
studio  system,  the  rise  of  the  independents, 
and  the  lateral  development  of  the  major 
studios  within  entertainment  conglomerates. 
Emphasizes  recent  activity  in  American  films, 
including  the  work  of  Coppola,  Lucas, 
Spielberg,  Allen,  Altman,  and  others.  Key 
recent  films  are  screened  and  discussed.  Lec- 
tures, discussions,  and  assigned  readings. 
ART  4173  International  Directions  in  Film  (3  q.h.) 
Comparative  study  of  international  film 
movements  since  1950  and  their  influence  on 
film  as  an  art  form.  Emphasizes  key  recent 
films,  major  directors,  and  writers.  Includes 
Italian  Neo-Realism  (1940s);  Polish  and  Czech 
postwar  films;  the  French  New  Wave;  the  per- 
sonal cinema  of  Fellini,  Bergman,  and  others; 
the  American  "whiz  kids";  New  German 
Cinema;  and  the  Australian  school.  Lectures, 
discussions,  and  assigned  readings. 
ART  4175  History  of  Graphic  Design  (3  q.h.) 
Graphic  design  from  the  mid-nineteenth  cen- 
tury (the  Industrial  Revolution)  to  the  pre- 
sent, with  references  to  earlier  influences. 
Focuses  on  the  evolution  of  the  graphic  design 
field,  its  nature  and  function,  major  periods 
and  trends,  and  the  influence  of  technology 
and  society.  Slide  lectures  and  discussion. 


ART  4176  International  Directions  in  Graphic 
Design  (3  q.h.) 

Contemporary  theories  and  practices  in  inter- 
national graphic  design.  Focuses  on  design  ac- 
tivities in  such  major  industrial  nations  as 
Germany,  Italy,  France,  England,  Canada, 
Japan,  and  the  United  States.  Case  studies 
reflecting  graphic  design  solutions  to  a  varie- 
ty of  visual  communication  problems  are  ex- 
amined. Slide  lectures  and  discussion. 
ART  4181  Introduction  to  Computer-Aided  Graphic 
Design  (Studio)*  (3  q.h.) 

Introduction  to  the  terminology,  concepts,  and 
applications  of  computer-aided  graphic  design. 
Through  lectures,  demonstrations,  and  labs, 
students  explore  the  range  of  computer 
graphics  technology  from  personal  computers 
to  large-scale,  dedicated,  turn  key  systems;  in- 
put and  output  devices  and  their  applications; 
the  advantages  and  limitations  of  computers 
as  design  tools;  and  the  future  impact  of  com- 
puter graphics  on  graphic  design  and  com- 
munication. Lectures  are  complemented  by 
hands-on  computer  sessions.  Guest  lecturers 
and  field  trips.  Limited  enrollment. 
(Laboratory  fee.)  Prereq.  ART  4140. 
ART  4182  Computer-Aided  Graphic  Design  Workshop 
(Studio)*  (3  q.h.) 

An  interdisciplinary  course  further  exploring 
the  creative  potential  of  computer  graphics 
applications.  Students  work  with  various 
forms  of  input  and  output  devices  to  become 
acquainted  with  the  artistic  potential  of  each 
interface.  Limited  enrollment.  (Laboratory 
fee.)  Prereq.  ART  4181  or  equiv. 
ART  4183  Electronic  Publishing  Design  (Studio)*  (3  q.h.) 
Designed  to  teach  the  computer  novice  how  to 
apply  the  basics  of  electronic  publishing  soft- 
ware for  business  and  corporate  publications. 
Students  will  use  a  variety  of  PC  application 
programs  including  Ventura,  PageMaker,  and 
popular  paint  and  draw  programs.  Design, 
page-layout,  typography,  hardware,  and 
management  issues  will  be  applied  to  real  life 
publications  and  business  documents. 
(Laboratory  fee.)  Prereq.  ART  4140. 
ART  4184  Business  Presentation  Graphics  (3  q.h.) 
Students  will  create  and  produce  computeriz- 
ed slide  presentations  for  specific  corporate 
problems.  Emphasis  is  placed  on  the  selection 
and  layout  sequencing  of  type,  visuals  and 
peripheral  elements  for  word  slides,  graphs, 
charts,  and  support  data  relevant  to  business 
sales  and  agenda  presentations. 


156         Art  and  Graphics 


ART  4185  Creative  Imaging:  Custom  Computer 
Design  (3  q.h.) 

Vector  drawing  programs,  raster-based  paint 
programs,  scanning,  and  image  enhancement 
techniques  are  utilized  to  create  original 
visuals  appropriate  for  advertising, 
publishing,  and  television  graphics.  Students 
will  create  logo  designs,  new  graphics,  book 
and  magazine  cover  designs,  and  editorial 
illustrations. 

ART  4186  Computer  Graphic  Design  Portfolio  (3  q.h.) 
Students  may  choose  to  either  edit  and  refine 
a  series  of  their  best  computer  graphic 
designs  or  to  work  on  a  specific  portfolio 
design  project.  All  students  will  design  a  self- 
promotion  piece  using  the  layout  application 
of  their  choice. 

ART  4187  Graphic  Software  Studies  1  (3  q.h.) 
Identification  and  application  of  popular 
vector-based  drawing  programs  including: 
MacDraw,  Adobe  Illustrator,  Free  Lance,  Free 
Hand,  and  AGX  Custom. 
ART  4188  Graphic  Software  Studies  2  (3  q.h.) 
Identification  and  application  of  pixel/raster- 
based  paint  programs  including:  MacPaint, 
Targa  Tips,  Pixel  Paint,  and  Lumena. 
ART  4189  Graphic  Software  Studies  3  (3  q.h.) 
Identification  and  application  of  pagination, 
layout,  and  design  programs  including: 
PageMaker,  Ventura,  ReadySetGo,  Interleaf, 
and  Quark  Express. 
ART  4204  Italian  Renaissance  Art  (3  q.h.) 
Survey  of  Italian  painting,  sculpture,  and  ar- 
chitecture of  the  fifteenth  and  sixteenth  cen- 
turies, with  special  attention  to  their 
historical,  cultural,  and  social  contexts.  Con- 
siders how  Renaissance  ideals  were  reflected 
in  the  renewed  interest  in  classical  harmony 
and  order,  and  in  the  growing  self-awareness, 
individualism,  and  naturalism  of  the  time. 
Covers  such  artists  as  Giotto,  Donatello, 
Botticelli,  Michelangelo,  da  Vinci,  Raphael, 
and  Titian. 

ART  4210  French  Painting  (3  q.h.) 
Development  of  French  painting  from  the 
French  Revolution  through  the  nineteenth 
century.  Examines  Neoclassicism,  Roman- 
ticism, Realism,  Impressionism,  and  Post- 
Impressionism,  focusing  on  such  figures  as 
David,  Delacroix,  Courbet,  Manet,  Degas, 
Monet,  Renoir,  Cezanne,  and  Van  Gogh.  Also 
examines  the  French  interest  in  the  formal 
problems  of  painting  and  the  painting  process 
as  distinct  from  its  narrative  content. 


ART  4213  Modem  Painting  (3  q.h.) 
Developments  in  painting  from  the  late  nine- 
teenth century  through  the  early  1930s,  ex- 
amining major  schools,  movements,  and  ar- 
tists from  Post-Impressionism  through  Sur- 
realism. Focuses  on  important  shifts  in  pain- 
ting concepts  and  the  rise  of  innovative  modes 
of  expression  instrumental  in  establishing  the 
foundation  of  Modernism. 
ART  4214  Contemporary  Painting  (3  q.h.) 
Developments  in  painting  from  the  early 
1940s  to  the  present,  including  major  schools, 
movements,  and  artists.  Focuses  on  the 
cultural  impact  of  the  exodus  of  artists  from 
Europe  to  the  United  States  prior  to  World 
War  II,  the  meteoric  rise  of  Abstract  Expres- 
sionism, and  the  diversity  of  movements  since 
World  War  II,  such  as  Pop  Art,  Minimalism, 
Conceptual  Art,  and  New  Realism. 
ART  4220  American  Painting  and  Sculpture  (3  q.h.) 
American  painting  and  sculpture  from  col- 
onial times  through  the  early  1930s.  Includes 
the  study  of  painting  from  itinerant  colonial 
"limners"  through  Copley,  Benjamin  West, 
and  the  English  tradition;  the  Hudson  River 
School;  Eakins,  Hopper,  Marin,  Stella,  and 
O'Keeffe;  and  the  founding  of  American 
Modernist  painting.  Also  examines  sculpture 
from  colonial  gravestone  reliefs  through  Rush, 
Augur,  and  the  public  monuments  of  French, 
Saint-Gaudens,  and  Calder. 
ART  4221  Women  in  Art  and  Women  Artists  (3  q.h.) 
Women  in  the  arts  from  prehistoric  times  to 
the  present.  Focuses  on  women  as  symbols, 
religious  figures,  and  erotic  objects,  and  on 
idealized  images  of  femininity.  Examples  in- 
clude fertility  images,  Venus  images,  Madon- 
nas, portraits,  and  genre  works.  Also  ex- 
amines the  historical  role  of  women  as  artists! 
ART  4223  American  Architecture  (3  q.h.) 
American  architecture  from  the  Colonial 
period  through  the  early  1930s.  Includes  the 
seventeenth-century  Early  American  style, 
the  eighteenth-century  Georgian  style,  the 
Republican  style,  mid-nineteenth-century 
Revival  styles,  the  Stick-and-Shingle  styles, 
Richardsonianism,  Sullivan  and  the  rise  of 
the  skyscraper,  and  Frank  Lloyd  Wright. 
ART  4228  Twentieth-Century  Architecture  (3  q.h.) 
Introduction  to  European  and  American  ar- 
chitecture of  the  twentieth  century.  Examines 
Gropius's  Bauhaus  tenets  concerning  housing, 
urban  planning,  and  utilitarian  mass  produc- 
tion; Mies  van  der  Rohe,  Le  Corbusier,  and 


Art  and  Graphics         157 


the  International  style;  Frank  Lloyd  Wright; 
and  the  foundation  of  American  architectural 
Modernism  as  exemplified  by  Neutra, 
Johnson,  Saarinen,  and  Buckminster  Fuller. 
ART  4230  History  of  Photography  (3  q.h.) 
Developments  in  photography  from  the  early 
daguerreotypes  to  the  present.  Includes  major 
movements,  styles,  artists,  and  significant 
technological  developments.  Slide  lectures  and 
assigned  readings. 

ART  4231  Contemporary  Photography  (3  q.h.) 
Evolution  of  styles  and  techniques  in  contem- 
porary photography  since  World  War  II.  Em- 
phasis is  on  the  variety  of  image-making 
techniques  and  photographic  styles  and  con- 
cepts of  the  last  twenty  years.  Slide  lectures 
and  assigned  readings. 

ART  4251  Advanced  Graphic  Design  (Studio)"  (3  q.h.) 
Portfolio-development  course  for  students  who 
have  successfully  completed  all  other  Graphic 
Design  and  Visual  Communication  certificate 
program  requirements.  Emphasis  is  on  profes- 
sional design  skills  and  personatstyle.  Prereq. 
27  q.h.  of  graphic  certificate  courses.  Prereq. 
ART  4151. 

ART  4366  Promotional  and  Technical  Publications: 
Design  and  Production  (3  q.h.) 
Design,  production,  and  economics  of  promo- 
tional and  technical  publications.  Using  a 
case-study  approach  with  a  micro-based  com- 
puter system,  students  explore  design  and 
production  of  marketing,  advertising,  and 
sales-support  publications  as  well  as  technical 
service  manuals,  operating  guides,  and  other 
documentation.  Prereq.  ART  4151.  Not  open 
to  students  who  have  taken  ART  4364 
or  ART  4365. 
ART  4367  Illustration  (3  q.h.) 
Introduction  to  promotional  and  editorial 
illustration,  including  applications  in  adver- 
tising and  publishing.  Covers  the  objectives, 
tools,  and  techniques  unique  to  illustration. 
Lectures,  demonstrations,  and  hands-on 
studio  projects.  Prereq.  ART  4151.  Biomedical 
Illustration  certificate  students  see  BIO  4420. 
ART  4368  Graphic  Design  for  Media  (3  q.h.) 
Surveys  the  expanding  use  of  slide-tape, 
multi-image,  and  multi-media  video  and  film 
in  areas  ranging  from  public  relations  and 
sales  to  documentary  and  entertainment 
presentations.  The  collaborative  role  of 
writers,  producers,  and  art  directors  in  the 
design  and  production  of  media  projects,  par- 
ticularly audio-visual  projects  is  explored. 
Prereq.  ART  4151. 


ART  4402  Marketing  Strategies  for  Printing  and 
Publishing  (3  q.h.) 

Topics  include  the  integrated  nature  of 
marketing;  the  relationship  of  marketing  to 
product  development;  advertising,  promotion, 
and  sales;  the  creation  of  marketing  support 
materials;  and  the  development  of  an  overall 
marketing  plan  and  timeline. 
ART  4410  Electronic  Imaging  Systems  (3  q.h.) 
An  introduction  to  current  black-and-white 
and  color  image  scanning,  processing  and 
separation  technology  for  page  and  film 
assembly.  Concepts,  terminology,  and  techni- 
ques of  manipulating,  merging,  and  creating 
graphics  electronically. 
ART  4415  Electronic  Document  Production  (3  q.h.) 
Current  principles  and  methods  of  electronic 
publishing  and  electronic  document  produc- 
tion. Instruction  on  text  inputting,  text 
markup,  and  editing  during  the  review  cycle, 
selection  of  style  prior  to  input/composition, 
tagging,  development  of  page  layouts, 
graphics  development,  integration,  and 
manipulation. 

ART  4416  Style  Set-Up  for  Electronic  Document 
Production  (Studio)*  (3  q.h.) 
Style  specifications  for  electronic  document 
production.  Instruction  on  format  definitions; 
pagination,  hyphenation,  and  justification 
specification;  page  layout  definition;  and  in- 
teractive layout  tool  usage.  Prereq.  ART  4415. 
ART  4421  Methods  of  Book  Design  (Studio)*  (3  q.h.) 
The  basic  terminology,  tools,  and  skills  of  book 
design.  Students  practice  drawing  layouts, 
casting  off  manuscript,  specifying  type,  and 
dummying  pages.  Prereq.  ART  4141. 
ART  4431  Graphic  Composition  Systems  1 
(Studio)*  (3  q.h.) 

Current  principles  and  methods  of  photocom- 
position as  compared  to  desktop  publishing 
systems.  Covers  all  aspects  of  the  composition 
process,  including  markup,  copyfitting, 
parameter  set-up,  input,  correcting,  and  out- 
put. A  variety  of  popular  software  including 
Pagemaker,  Ready-Set-Go,  Ventura  Publisher, 
and  Deskset  Design  Edition  II  is  translated 
and  output  on  laser  and  photocomposition 
systems. 


"Courses  designated  "(Studio)"  meet  for  3-3%  hours. 


158         Art  and  Graphics 


ART  4432  Graphic  Composition  Systems  2 
(Studio)*  (3  q.h.) 

Emphasis  is  on  computer  mainframe  interfac- 
ing, ACI  operation  and  telecommunications, 
networking,  developing  translation  tables, 
word  processing/data  conversion,  automatic 
tabulation,  and  pagination.  Prereq. 
ART  4431. 

ART  4443  Imaging  Procedures  and  Systems  1 
(Studio)*  (3  q.h.) 

Methods  and  operations  involved  in  producing 
film  negatives  and  assembled  flats.  Students 
have  the  opportunity  to  create  line  and 
halftone  negatives.  Also  covered  are  contac- 
ting, darkroom,  and  film  assembly  pro- 
cedures; signature  imposition,  halftone,  and 
combination  flat  techniques;  and  reflection 
transmission  densitometry. 
ART  4444  Imaging  Procedures  and  Systems  2 
(Studio)*  (3  q.h.) 

Creating  black  and  white  color  mechanical 
separation  masks  by  conventional  contacting 
methods.  Includes  planning  and  preparing 
separation  masks  for  "fake"  color,  selecting 
screen  tint  values,  making  and  correcting 
color  proofs;  creating  special  effects  with 
posterization,  making  duotones,  and  process 
color-film  assembly.  Prereq.  ART  4443. 
ART  4461  Applications  of  Electronic  Publishing  (3  q.h.) 
Examination  of  how  electronic  and  desktop 
publishing  system  technology  applies  to 
publishing,  typesetting,  and  printing.  Topics 
include  a  review  of  electronic  publishing  fun- 
damentals, state-of-the-art  systems,  and 
trends  in  graphic  arts  technology,  with  ses- 
sions devoted  to  book  publishing;  magazine 
publishing;  pre-press  and  type  house  applica- 
tions; commercial,  corporate,  or  in-plant 
publishing;  newspaper  publishing;  and 
government  and  small  business  applications. 
Also  covers  organization  structure,  business 
issues,  product,  and  in-depth  analysis  of  pro- 
duction/workflow procedures  and  cost 
justification  criteria. 

ART  4465  Business  Operations  for  the  Graphic 
Arts  (3  q.h.) 

Introduction  to  operations  management 
specifically  designed  for  the  graphics  industry. 
Basic  business  concerns  of  accounting, 
finance,  budgeting,  marketing,  planning,  com- 
munications, personnel,  motivation,  and 
leadership. 


ART  4466  Establishing  and  Operating  a  Small 
Graphics  Business  (3  q.h.) 
The  positioning  process  used  to  determine  the 
proper  market  for  the  service  or  product. 
Students  explore  how  positioning  and  market 
research  affect  image,  public  relations 
materials,  advertising,  pricing,  and  actual 
production  methods  for  a  given  graphics 
business.  Establishing  hourly  rates,  record 
keeping,  job  quoting,  billing  procedures,  sales 
techniques,  and  state  and  federal  tax  re- 
quirements for  small  businesses. 
ART  4468  Safety  and  Health  Issues  for  the  Graphic 
Arts  (3  q.h.) 

A  thorough  examination  of  potential  hazards 
including  fire,  electrical,  sound,  chemicals, 
and  toxic  fumes.  Study  of  the  rules  and 
regulations  of  OSHA,  the  role  of  safety  com- 
mittees in  complying  with  OSHA  require- 
ments, and  the  effect  these  requirements  have 
on  various  business  operations  within  the 
company.  Additional  information  is  provided 
on  ergonomics,  job  stress,  and  employer- 
employee  rights  and  responsibilities. 

ART  4469  Operations  Analysis  for  the  Graphic  Arts 
Industry  (3  q.h.) 

The  principles  and  practices  of  work 
simplification  as  they  apply  to  the  graphic 
arts  industry.  Topics  include  process  analysis, 
operations  analysis,  motion  and  micromotion 
study,  plant  and  workplace  layout,  equipment 
design  and  selection,  labor  cost  reduction, 
operator  training,  human  relations  problems, 
time  study  and  time  standards,  and  techni- 
ques for  improving  productivity. 
ART  4471  Quality  Control  in  the  Graphic  Arts 
Industry  (3  q.h.) 

Basic  concepts  and  costs  of  quality,  organiza- 
tion for  quality,  programs  for  improving 
quality  and  reducing  waste  and  spoilage, 
materials  processes,  and  product  quality- 
control  procedures  as  they  relate  to  printing 
and  publishing.  Basic  statistical  quality- 
control  concepts  such  as  process  capability 
and  analysis,  control  charts,  and  sampling. 
ART  4474  Research  and  Technology  Evaluation  for 
Electronic  Publishing  and  Printing  (3  q.h.) 
Developing  and  conducting  needs  assessment 
tools  for  the  identification  of  appropriate  elec- 
tronic publishing  technology.  Topics  include  a 
description  of  various  electronic  publishing 
businesses;  current  and  future  staffing  and 
training  needs;  current  and  future  control  forms; 
current  design  standards;  determining  produc- 
tivity levels;  and  matching  vendor  functions 
and  features  to  the  needs  of  the  organization. 


American  Sign  Language         159 


ART  4475  Graphic  Arts  Production  Control  (3  q.h.) 
The  techniques  of  managing  production  in 
commercial  printing  and  publishing  plants. 
Specialization  vs.  standardization,  production 
forecasting  and  control;  routing  and  planning; 
records  of  production;  quality  control;  and 
effective  use  of  personnel.  Various  production 
management  controls  of  web-  and  sheet-fed, 
commercial,  and  publication  printing  are 
presented,  analyzed,  and  discussed. 
ART  4479  Estimating  Procedures  for  the  Graphic 
Arts  (3  q.h.) 

Basic  estimation  procedures  and  principles  for 
single-  and  multi-color  printing.  All  facets  of 
planning  the  job  for  estimating:  design  and 
layout,  typography,  paper,  prep  and  plates, 
presswork,  binding,  and  finishing.  Emphasis 
throughout  is  on  active  student  participation 
in  solving  practical  estimation  problems. 
ART  4500  Senior  Project  (3  q.h.) 
Seniors  choose  a  final  major  project  to 
demonstrate  professional  proficiency  and 
originality  in  a  specific  area  of  design. 
Finished  projects  are  reviewed  by  a  board  of 
design  faculty  with  the  student  present  to 
discuss  and  defend  the  effectiveness  and 
merit  of  the  project. 
ART  4501  Portfolio  Development  (3  q.h.) 
Opportunity  for  students  to  select  and  polish 
their  best  design  pieces  and  create  a  unified, 
professional  portfolio.  Concentration  is  on 
materials  and  options  available  for  showing 
two-  and  three-dimensional  works  in  one-to- 
one  and  group  situations.  Attention  is  also 
given  to  the  design  resume  and  to  interview 
and  presentation  skills. 
ART  4810  Honors  Program  1  (4  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  undertake  an  in-depth 
research  study  project.  See  page  17  for  details. 
Prereq.  96  q.h.,  3.5  q.p.a. 
ART  4811  Honors  Program  2  (4  q.h.) 
See  ART  4810. 

ART  4812  Honors  Program  3  (4  q.h.) 
See  ART  4810. 

ART  4815  Advanced  Tutorial  1  (3  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  take  upper-level  course  in- 
dependently. See  page  16  for  details. 
Prereq.  87  q.h. 


ART  4816  Advanced  Tutorial  2  (3  q.h.) 

See  ART  4815. 

ART  4820  Independent  Study  1  (3  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  undertake  special  research. 
See  page  17  for  details.  Prereq.  96  q.h., 
3.0  q.p.a. 

ART  4821  Independent  Study  2  (3  q.h.) 

See  ART  4820. 

ART  4822  Independent  Study  3  (3  q.h.) 

See  ART  4821. 

AMERICAN  SIGN  LANGUAGE 

ASL  4101  American  Sign  Language  1  (4  q.h.) 
Introduction  to  American  Sign  Language,  the 
language  used  by  members  of  the  deaf  com- 
munity in  the  United  States  and  parts  of 
Canada.  Focuses  on  conversation  in  signs, 
basic  rules  of  grammar,  and  cultural  aspects 
of  the  deaf  community. 
ASL  4102  American  Sign  Language  2  (4  q.h.) 
Continuation  of  basic  American  Sign 
Language  and  culture  study,  with  emphasis 
on  building  receptive  and  expressive  sign 
vocabulary;  use  of  signing  space;  use  of  non- 
manual  components,  including  facial  expres- 
sions and  body  postures;  and  an  introduction 
to  finger  spelling.  Prereq.  ASL  4101  or  by 
examination. 

ASL  4201  Intermediate  American  Sign 
Language  1  (4  q.h.) 

Further  development  of  receptive  and  ex- 
pressive skills,  finger  spelling,  vocabulary 
building,  and  grammatical  structures.  En- 
courages more  creative  use  of  expression, 
classifiers,  body  postures,  and  the  signing 
space.  Introduces  sign  variations  (regional 
and  ethnic),  and  political  and  educational  in- 
stitutions of  the  deaf  community.  Prereq.  ASL 
4102  or  by  examination. 
ASL  4202  Intermediate  American  Sign 
Language  2  (4  q.h.) 

Intensive  practice  involving  expressive  and 
receptive  skills  in  storytelling  and  dialogue. 
Introduces  language  forms  found  in  ASL  poetry 
and  cultural  features  as  they  are  displayed  in 
art  and  theatre.  Prereq.  ASL  4201. 


Himn  ifin 


ASL  4301  Advanced  American  Sign  Language 
Proficiency  1  (4  q.h.) 

Vocabulary  building  and  mastery  of  grammar 
through  rigorous  receptive  and  expressive 
language  activities.  Includes  student-led 
discussions,  debates,  and  prepared  reports  on 
topics  in  deaf  culture,  society,  and  current 
affairs.  Prereq.  ASL  4202. 
ASL  4302  Advanced  American  Sign  Language 
Proficiency  2  (4  q.h.) 

Continuation  of  ASL  4301.  Prereq.  ASL  4301. 
ASL  4410  Linguistics  of  American  Sign  Language  (3  q.h.) 
For  skilled  ASL  signers  with  no  previous 
training  in  linguistics.  Conducted  in  ASL,  the 
course  is  descriptive  and  data-oriented  rather 
than  theoretical.  Includes  the  parts  of  a  sign; 
building  words  in  ASL;  sentence  structure 
(questions,  statements,  relative  clauses,  etc.); 
the  meaning  and  issue  of  iconicity;  organiza- 
tion of  sentences  according  to  old  and  new  in- 
formation; and  the  structure  of  stories.  Also, 
grammatical  features  of  ASL,  such  as  classifiers, 
specifiers,  verb  modulations  and  aspects,  and  the 
role  of  facial  expression.  Not  open  to  students 
who  have  taken  ASL  4404.  Prereq.  ASL  4102. 
ASL  4411  Deaf  History  (3  q.h.) 
The  history  of  deaf  people  in  the  Western 
world,  with  emphasis  on  the  American  deaf 
community,  its  language,  education,  and  rela- 
tion to  hearing  society.  Not  open  to  students 
who  have  taken  ASL  4403.  Prereq.  ASL  4101 
or  instructor's  permission. 
ASL  4412  American  Deaf  Culture  (3  q.h.) 
The  status  of  deaf  people  as  both  a  linguistic 
and  cultural  minority  group.  Designed  for  in- 
dividuals who  may  or  may  not  have  had  prior 
experience  with  deaf  people,  the  course  raises 
questions  concerning  the  nature  of  sign 
language  and  its  varieties,  the  education  of 
deaf  people,  the  historical  treatment  of 
deafness,  the  sociological  and  cultural 
makeup  of  deaf  individuals,  and  the  nature 
of  ASL  literature  and  poetry.  Not  open  to 
students  who  have  taken  ASL  4402. 
ASL  4413  American  Sign  Language  Literature  (3  q.h.) 
Students  read  and  discuss  in  ASL  various 
genres  of  American  Sign  Language  literature. 
Concentration  is  on  the  work  of  current 
recognized  narrators  in  both  literary  and  face- 
to-face  storytelling  traditions.  Includes 
selected  autobiographical  sketches,  lectures, 
stories,  and  letters  from  the  early  1900s  by 
such  figures  as  Clerc,  Veditz,  Hotchkiss, 
Gallaudet,  and  others.  A  videotaped  research 
essay  is  required  at  the  end  of  the  course.  Not 


open  to  students  who  have  taken  ASL  4401. 
Prereq.  ASL  4202  or  by  examination. 
ASL  4600  Introduction  to  Interpreting  (formerly 
ASL  4501  Sign  Language  Interpreting  1) 
(3  q.h.) 

An  overview  of  the  interpreting  profession, 
including  the  responsibilities,  ethics,  and  ap- 
titudes of  interpreters;  professional  associa- 
tions; the  law  and  business  of  interpreting; 
the  bicultural,  bilingual  context  in  which  in- 
terpreting takes  place;  basic  translation  and 
interpretation;  environment  and  audience; 
special  populations;  free-lance  versus  in-house 
positions;  and  evaluation  and  certification. 
Prereq.  ASL  4302  or  instructor's  permission. 
ASL  4601  American  Sign  Language  Interpreting  1  (4  q.h.) 
Translations  dealing  with  a  variety  of  styles 
and  registers,  study  of  the  interpreting  pro- 
cess, discourse  analysis,  and  consecutive  inter- 
preting. Prereq.  ASL  4410;  ASL  4302  and 
ASL  4600  may  be  taken  concurrently. 
ASL  4602  American  Sign  Language  Interpreting  2  (4  q.h.) 
Breakdown  of  the  simultaneous  interpretation 
task  into  several  phases.  Emphasizes  divided 
attention,  paraphrasing,  cloze  skills,  and  flex- 
ibility in  English  and  ASL.  Prereq.  ASL  4601. 
ASL  4603  American  Sign  Language  Interpreting  3  (4  q.h.) 
Refinement  of  skills  learned  in  ASL  4601  and 
ASL  4602.  Prereq.  ASL  4602. 
ASL  4604  Special  Topics  in  Interpreting  1  (3  q.h.) 
Topics  concerning  interpretation  for  special 
deaf  populations,  including  the  oral,  deaf- 
blind,  emotionally,  and  multiply  handicapped. 
Covers  theory  and  practice.  Prereq.  ASL  4601. 
ASL  4605  Special  Topics  in  Interpreting  2  (3  q.h.) 
Deals  with  interpretation  in  specific  situa- 
tions, including  educational,  legal,  psychiatric, 
and  medical.  Emphasizes  work  with  the  in- 
termediary interpreter.  Prereq.  ASL  4601. 
ASL  4606  Interpreter  Roles  and  Ethics  (3  q.h.) 
Discussions,  hypothetical  situations,  and  role 
playing  that  explore  ethical  standards  and 
dilemmas  in  sign  language  interpreting  and 
in  other  professions.  Also,  culturally  objective 
standards,  ethics,  and  professional  principles; 
power  versus  responsibility;  and  the  RID 
Code  of  Ethics.  Prereq.  ASL  4601  and  ASL 
4412,  which  may  be  taken  concurrently. 
ASL  4607  Interpreting  Lab  (4  q.h.) 
Practice  in  simultaneous  interpreting  skills, 
with  constructive  feedback.  Prereq.  ASL  4603. 

ASL  4608  Practicum  (4  q.h.) 
Practical  interpreting  experience  in  agencies 
serving  deaf  people.  Biweekly  seminar  focuses 
on  linguistic  and  ethical  questions  and  dilem- 
mas. Requires  six  hours  per  week  in  an  agen- 


Biology         161 


cy.  Prereq.  ASL  4603,  ASL  4604,  ASL  4605, 
ASL  4606,  and  ASL  4607. 
ASL  4800  American  Sign  Language  Interpreting 
Seminar  (formerly  ASL  4507-ASL  4510 
American  Sign  Language  Interpreting 
Seminars)  (1  q.h.) 

Short-term  training  opportunities  for  currently 
practicing  sign  language  interpreters, 
scheduled  for  two  Saturdays  each  fall,  winter, 
and  spring  quarter.  Because  the  topics  or  skill 
areas  addressed  change  from  quarter  to  quarter, 
students  may  take  this  course  repeatedly  for 
credit.  Limited  enrollment.  For  topic  informa- 
tion, call  American  Sign  Language  Programs, 
617-437-3064  (voice)  or  617437-3067  (TTY). 
ASL  4801  Advanced  Tutorial  in  ASL  1  (4  q.h.) 
Opportunity  for  qualified  students  to  take  an 
upper-level,  required  course  as  a  tutorial 
when  it  is  not  available  in  the  usual  format. 
The  tutorial  format,  which  involves  a  com- 
bination of  meetings  with  the  tutorial  adviser, 
phone  conferences,  and  outside  course  pre- 
paration, will  conform  with  University  stan- 
dards of  12  hours  of  academic  work  per  week. 
ASL  4802  Advanced  Tutorial  in  ASL  2  (4  q.h.) 
Opportunity  for  qualified  students  to  take  an 
upper-level,  required  course  as  a  tutorial 
when  it  is  not  available  in  the  usual  format. 
The  tutorial,  which  involves  a  combination  of 
meetings  with  the  tutorial  adviser,  phone  con- 
ferences, and  outside  course  preparation,  will 
conform  with  University  standards  of  12 
hours  of  academic  work  per  week. 

BIOLOGY 

BIO  4103  Biology  1  (General)  (3  cl.,  3  lab.,  4  q.h.) 
Biology  of  the  cell,  including  its  ultrastruc- 
ture,  function,  diversity,  genetics,  and 
reproduction.  Also  examines  the  molecular 
composition  of  cells,  including  enzymes, 
chemistry,  bioenergetics,  respiration,  and 
photosynthesis.  (Laboratory  fee.)  To  receive 
credit  for  this  course,  you  must  also  register 
for  BIO  4153,  Lab  for  BIO  4103. 
BIO  4104  Biology  2  (Animal)  (3  cl.,  3  lab.,  4  q.h.) 
Systematic  comparative  study  of  the  diversity 
of  animal  life  forms,  including  structure,  func- 
tion, environment,  and  evolution.  (Laboratory 
fee.)  To  receive  credit  for  this  course,  you  must 
also  register  for  BIO  4154,  Lab  for  BIO  4104. 
Prereq.  BIO  4103  or  equiv. 
BIO  4105  Biology  3  (Animal)  (3  cl,  3  lab.,  4  q.h.) 
Functional  anatomy  of  animal  organ  systems, 
including  locomotion,  nutrition,  internal 
transport,  gas  exchange,  molecular  regula- 


tion, defense  systems,  nervous  and  hormonal 
control,  and  sensory  reception.  Also  covers 
ecology,  population  dynamics,  and  the  origin 
of  life.  (Laboratory  fee.)  To  receive  credit  for 
this  course,  you  must  also  register  for  BIO  4155, 
Lab  for  BIO  4105.  Prereq.  BIO  4104  or  equiv. 
BIO  4133  Special  Topics  in  Botany  (3  q.h.) 
Topics  covered:  How  botany  impacts  human 
life  and  society;  current  genetic  manipulation 
of  agricultural  plants;  historical  role  of  plants 
in  pharmacology;  the  role  of  plants  and  agri- 
culture in  the  cultural  evolution  of  man 
(nomad  to  farmer);  botany  in  literature  and 
poetry. 

BIO  4175  Human  Anatomy  and  Physiology  1 
(2  cl,  2  lab.,  3  q.h.) 

Introduction  to  human  gross  anatomy,  in- 
cluding osteology,  myology,  and  angiology  of 
the  thorax,  abdomen,  pelvis,  head,  and  neck. 
The  laboratory  generally  includes  a  study  of 
human  bones  and  cat  dissection.  (Laboratory 
fee.)  The  required  laboratory  is  BIO  4195,  Lab 
for  BIO  4175. 

BIO  4176  Human  Anatomy  and  Physiology  2 
(2  cl.,  2  lab.,  3  q.h.) 

Anatomy  and  physiology  of  the  nervous 
system,  endocrine  glands,  senses,  respiratory 
system,  and  membranes.  The  laboratory 
generally  includes  gross  and  microscopic 
anatomy  of  the  nervous  and  endocrine 
systems,  and  physiology  of  the  nerves, 
muscles,  vision,  hearing,  and  respiratory 
system.  (Laboratory  fee.)  The  required 
laboratory  is  BIO  4196,  Lab  for  BIO  4176. 
BIO  4177  Human  Anatomy  and  Physiology  3 
(2  cl.,  2  lab.,  3  q.h.) 

Anatomy  and  physiology  of  the  cardiovascular, 
digestive,  urinary,  and  reproductive  systems; 
fetal  development.  The  laboratory  generally 
deals  with  the  microscopic  anatomy  of  these 
systems  and  the  physiology  of  the  blood, 
heart,  and  urinary  tract.  (Laboratory  fee.)  The 
required  laboratory  is  BIO  4197,  Lab  for  BIO 
4177.  Prereq.  BIO  4176  or  equiv. 
BIO  4178  Anatomy  and  Physiology  A  (4  q.h.) 
Human  anatomy  and  physiology.  Describes 
the  cell  and  its  physiology,  the  structure  of 
tissues,  and  the  anatomy  and  physiology  of 
the  cardiovascular  system  and  blood,  the 
respiratory  system,  and  the  urinary  system. 
(Laboratory  fee.)  Prereq.  BIO  4198.  BIO  4178 
and  BIO  4179  may  not  be  substituted  for  BIO 
4175,  4176,  4177. 


162         Biology 


BIO  4179  Anatomy  and  Physiology  B  (4  q.h.) 

Continuation  of  BIO  4178.  Describes  the 

anatomy  and  physiology  of  the  nervous 

system,  skeletomuscular  system,  digestive 

system,  endocrine  and  reproductive  systems. 

(Laboratory  fee.)  Prereq.  BIO  4199.  BIO  4178 

and  BIO  41 79  may  not  be  substituted  for  BIO 

4175,  4176  and  4177. 

BIO  4185  The  Natural  World  of  Massachusetts  V 

(3  cl.,  3  q.h.) 

Ecological  analysis  of  the  human  situation 

and  human  interaction  with  other  organisms; 

the  necessary  foundation  of  biological 

principles. 

BIO  4186  The  Natural  World  of  Massachusetts  2* 

(3  cl,  3  q.h.) 

Continuation  of  BIO  4185.  Prereq.  BIO  4185 

or  equiv. 

BIO  4190  Microbiology  1  (2  cl.,  3  lab.,  3  q.h.) 

Morphology  and  biochemistry  of  bacteria. 

(Laboratory  fee.)  The  required  laboratory  is 

BIO  4200,  Lab  for  BIO  4190.  Prereq.  BIO 

4105  or  equiv. 

BIO  4191  Microbiology  2  (2  cl.,  3  lab.,  3  q.h.) 

Survey  of  pathogenic  microorganisms. 

(Laboratory  fee.)  The  required  laboratory  is 

BIO  4201,  Lab  for  BIO  4191.  Prereq.  BIO 

4190  or  equiv. 

BIO  4192  Microbiology  3  (2  cl.,  3  lab.,  3  q.h.) 
Examination  of  the  characteristics  and  role  of 
microorganisms  in  the  environment. 
(Laboratory  fee.)  The  required  laboratory  is 
BIO  4202,  Lab  for  BIO  4192.  Prereq.  BIO 

4191  or  equiv. 

BIO  4198  Laboratory  for  Anatomy  and  Physiology  A 
Laboratory  for  Anatomy  and  Physiology  A 
BIO  4178.  (Laboratory  fee.) 
BIO  4199  Laboratory  for  Anatomy  and  Physiology  B 
Laboratory  for  Anatomy  and  Physiology  B 
BIO  4179.  (Laboratory  fee.) 
BIO  4224  Ecology  1  (3  cl.,  3  q.h.) 
Environmental  factors,  such  as  the  soil 
system,  water,  the  atmosphere,  temperature, 
light,  wind,  and  pressure;  physio-chemical  fac- 
tors such  as  carbon  dioxide,  nitrogen,  and 
mineral  nutrients;  the  habitat;  and  the 
distribution  of  plants  and  animals  in  the 
world  according  to  temperature  and  precipita- 
tion. Prereq.  BIO  4104  or  equiv. 
BIO  4225  Ecology  2  (3  cl.,  3  q.h.) 
Study  of  the  ecosystem;  ecological  niches;  pro- 
ducers, consumers,  and  decomposers;  the 
pond,  desert,  forest,  and  seashore  ecosystems; 
energy  cycle  and  efficiency  of  energy  utiliza- 


tion; mass,  weight,  and  energy  pyramids. 
Prereq.  BIO  4224  or  equiv. 
BIO  4226  Ecology  3  (3  cl.,  3  q.h.) 
Study  of  population  ecology,  biotic  communities 
and  population  growth,  relations  between  the 
species,  symbiosis,  competition,  predation,  and 
succession.  Prereq.  BIO  4225  or  equiv. 
BIO  4235  Genetics  1  (3  cl.,  3  q.h.) 
Topics  include  nucleic  acid  structure,  replica- 
tion of  genetic  materials,  mitosis,  meiosis,  and 
Mendelian  inheritance.  Prereq.  BIO  4103. 
BIO  4236  Genetics  2  (3  cl.,  3  q.h.) 
Examination  of  mutation,  regulation  of  gene 
expression,  population  genetics,  engineering, 
and  genetics  of  bacteria  and  viruses.  Prereq. 
BIO  4235. 

BIO  4237  Genetics  Laboratory  (4  lab.,  2  q.h.) 
Laboratory  exercises  involving  principles  of 
Mendelian  inheritance,  linkage,  and  crossing- 
over.  Classical  genetics  utilizing  Drosophila; 
biochemical  studies  utilizing  Neurospora  and 
E.  coli.  (Laboratory  fee.)  Prereq.  BIO  4236  or 
equiv. 

BIO  4246  Cell  Biology  1  (3  cl.,  3  q.h.) 
Chemical  composition,  structure  of  cells  and 
organelles,  transport  processes,  cell  motion 
and  excitability,  and  growth.  Prereq.  BIO 
4103,  BIO  4236,  and  CHM4263  or  equiv. 
BIO  4247  Cell  Biology  2  (3  cl.,  3  q.h.) 
Cellular  energy  supply,  enzyme  function, 
respiration  and  metabolism,  photosynthesis 
and  other  synthetic  pathways,  and  control  of 
cellular  processes.  Prereq.  BIO  4246  or  equiv. 
BIO  4248  Cell  Biology  Laboratory  (4  lab.,  2  q.h.) 
Laboratory  techniques  in  cell  biology, 
microscopy,  structure  and  chemical  composi- 
tion of  cells,  enzyme  measurements,  photosyn- 
thesis, respiration,  active  transport,  and 
growth.  (Laboratory  fee.)  Prereq.  BIO  4247 
or  equiv. 

BIO  4258  Advanced  Human  Physiology  1  (3  cl.,  3  q.h.) 
Study  of  human  physiology  emphasizing 
cellular  processes  and  underlying  organ  func- 
tions and  the  interactions  and  control  of 
organ  systems.  Selected  physiological  topics 
are  considered  as  time  allows.  Prereq.  BIO 
4177  and  CHM4113  or  equiv. 
BIO  4259  Advanced  Human  Physiology  2  (3  cl.,  3  q.h.) 
Cardiovascular  considerations;  the  immune 
system;  the  AIDS  problem.  Biological  control 
mechanisms;  selected  endocrine  topics.  Prereq. 
BIO  4258. 


''Taught  odd-numbered  academic  years. 


Biology         163 


BIO  4260  Cell,  Tissue  and  Organ  Culture  (3  q.h.) 
General  principles  and  technique  of  tissue 
culture.  The  behavior  of  cells  in  culture,  cell 
lines  and  relevant  media  are  discussed. 
Methodology  of  animal  and  plant  culture  and 
its  use  in  virology,  cancer  research  and 
radiobiology. 

BIO  4320  Medical  Microbiology  (2  cL,  4  lab.,  4  q.h.) 
Major  characteristics  of  disease-producing 
organisms.  (Laboratory  fee.)  The  required 
laboratory  is  BIO  4330,  Lab  for  BIO  4320, 
which  generally  meets  on  a  different  night. 
Prereq.  BIO  4192  or  professional  laboratory 
experience  in  bacteriology. 
BIO  4374  Histology  1  (2  cl,  2  lab,  3  q.h.) 
Examination  of  cell  structure  and  tissue 
organization,  including  epithelium,  muscle, 
and  corrective  tissue.  Also  covers  cartilage, 
bone,  and  nervous  system.  (Laboratory  fee.) 
The  required  laboratory  is  BIO  4384,  Lab  for 
BIO  4374.  Prereq.  BIO  41 75. 
BIO  4375  Histology  2  (2  cl.,  2  lab,  3  q.h.) 
Examination  of  the  blood,  skin,  cardiovas- 
cular and  lymphatic  systems,  as  well  as  the 
gastrointestinal  system,  including  the  oral 
cavity,  GI  tract,  liver,  and  gall  bladder. 
(Laboratory  fee.)  The  required  laboratory 
is  BIO  4385,  Lab  for  BIO  4375. 
BIO  4376  Histology  3  (2  cl.,  2  lab,  3  q.h.) 
Examination  of  the  respiratory,  urinary,  and 
male  and  female  reproductive  systems,  as 
well  as  the  endocrine  glands  and  the  eyes  and 
ears.  (Laboratory  fee.)  The  required  laboratory 
is  BIO  4386,  Lab  for  BIO  4376. 
BIO  4411  Embryology  and  Development  1  (3  q.h.) 
Topics  include  gametogenesis,  reproductive 
physiology,  fertilization,  blastulation, 
gastrulation,  and  early  embryogenesis. 
Required  laboratory  BIO  4421,  emphasizes 
invertebrate  and  amphibian  embryology. 
Prereq.  BIO  4374  or  equiv. 
BIO  4412  Embryology  and  Development  2  (3  q.h.) 
Topics  include  morphogenesis  and  pattern  for- 
mation, placentation,  and  organogenesis. 
Required  laboratory  BIO  4422,  emphasizes 
chick  and  pig  embryology.  Prereq.  BIO  4411 
or  equiv. 

BIO  4420  Biomedical  Illustration  (4  q.h.) 
Examines  the  uses  of  biomedical  illustration 
in  the  preparation  of  visual  materials  in- 
cluding teaching  visuals,  illustrations  for 
publications,  models  and  graphics  for  films 
and  television.  Anatomy  and  skeletal 
characteristics  will  be  surveyed  including 


specific  skills  and  techniques  necessary  to 
draw  three-dimensional  subjects  from  direct 
observation,  interpreting  them  in  two- 
dimensional  media.  In  addition  to  discussions 
and  demonstrations,  students  will  undertake 
individual  projects  in  preparing  materials  for 
publications,  scientific  illustration  and 
preparation  of  educational  materials. 
BIO  4441  Parasitology  (2.5  cl.,  3.25  lab,  4  q.h.) 
Parasitic  organisms,  particularly  those  affec- 
ting humans  and  domestic  animals,  and  their 
life  cycles,  modes  of  transmission,  and 
diagnosis  and  treatment.  Includes  microscopic 
examination  of  prepared  and  live  material. 
(Laboratory  fee.)  The  required  laboratory  is 
BIO  4451,  Lab  for  BIO  4441.  Prereq.  BIO 
4103  or  instructor's  permission. 
BIO  4455  Introduction  to  Biotechnology  (3  q.h.) 
Examines  the  historical  development,  basic 
technologies,  and  commercial  potential  of 
biotechnology.  Basic  biological  concepts  are 
first  reviewed  including  the  steps  leading  to 
the  20th  century  revolution  in  molecular  and 
cell  biology.  The  technologist  of  recombinant 
DNA,  monoclonal  antibody  production,  and 
nucleic  acid  probe  development  are  outlined 
along  with  their  therapeutic,  diagnostic,  and 
experimental  uses.  Newer,  emerging 
technologies  and  applications  are  discussed 
where  appropriate.  The  commercial  state  of 
the  art  and  its  developmental  marketing  pro- 
blems are  included.  Prereq.  Knowledge  of 
chemistry  and  biology. 
BIO  4461  Immunology  (2  cl.,  4  lab.,  4  q.h.) 
Biological,  chemical,  and  physical  attributes 
of  antigens  and  antibodies,  together  with 
their  serological  interactions.  (Laboratory  fee.) 
The  required  laboratory  is  BIO  4462,  Lab  for 
BIO  4461,  which  generally  meets  on  a  dif- 
ferent night.  Prereq.  BIO  4191,  CHM4263, 
or  equiv. 

BIO  4700  Advanced  Tutorial  1  (4  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  take  upper-level  course  in- 
dependently. See  page  16  for  details.  Prereq. 
87  q.h. 

BIO  4701  Advanced  Tutorial  2  (4  q.h.) 

See  Bio  4700. 

BIO  4801  Independent  Study  1  (3  q.h.) 

Opportunity  to  undertake  special  research. 

See  page  17  for  details.  Prereq.  96  q.h. 

and  3.0  q.p.a. 

BIO  4802  Independent  Study  2  (3  q.h.) 

See  BIO  4801. 


164         Business  Law/Chemistry 


BUSINESS  LAW 

BL  4101  Law  1  (3  q.h.) 

Introduction  to  the  legal  system.  Study  of  the 
nature,  formation,  and  essential  elements  of 
contracts,  including  performance  and 
remedies  for  breach.  Also  covers  agency  law, 
including  the  rights  and  duties  of  principal 
and  agent,  the  scope  of  authority,  and  rela- 
tionships to  third  persons. 

BL  4102  Law  2  (3  q.h.) 

Sales  as  governed  by  the  Uniform  Commer- 
cial Code,  including  the  law  of  warranty, 
business  organizations,  partnerships,  corpora- 
tions, and  other  important  business  forms. 
Prereq.  BL  4101. 
BL  4103  Law  3  (3  q.h.) 

Commercial  paper,  the  function  of  negotiabili- 
ty, bank  checks  and  promissory  notes,  real 
property,  personal  property,  bailments, 
bankruptcy,  and  secured  transactions. 
Prereq.  BL  4102. 
BL  4105  Law  (Intensive)  (6  q.h. ) 
Same  as  BL  4101  and  BL  4102. 
BL  4110  Law  for  Managers  (3  q.h.) 
Study  of  legal  problems  for  managers  in- 
cluding rights  and  duties  in  the  employment 
relationship,  acquisition  of  computer  software 
and  hardware,  effective  use  of  legal  counsel, 
personal  liability  issues  for  managers,  credit 
and  collection  law,  and  other  selected  topics  of 
interest. 

BL  4115  Law  and  Social  Issues  (3  q.h.) 
Structure  and  dynamics  of  the  American  legal 
system  through  analysis  of  selected  cases 
dealing  with  social  issues. 
BL  4120  Law  for  Personal  Planning  (3  q.h.) 
Legal  aspects  of  personal  and  family  plan- 
ning, including  consumer  rights,  wills  and 
estate  planning,  marital  law,  real  estate  pur- 
chase, tenants'  rights,  and  other  selected 
topics  of  interest. 

BL  4316  International  Business  Law  (3  q.h.) 
Surveys  the  leading  principles  in  interna- 
tional business  law  as  applied  in  decisions  of 
domestic  and  international  courts;  the 
sources,  development  and  authority  of  inter- 
national business  law,  such  as  the  laws  of  the 
European  Common  Market;  and  the  making, 
interpretation  and  enforcement  of  treaties, 
and  the  organization  and  jurisdiction  of  inter- 
national tribunals. 


CHEMISTRY 

CHM  4105  Chemistry  and  the  Environment  (3  cl.,  3  q.h.) 
Fundamental  chemical  principles,  using  ex- 
amples from  the  geochemical  and  the  internal 
environments  of  human  beings  as  well  as  the 
home,  the  farm,  and  the  workplace. 
CHM  4111  General  Chemistry  1  (2  cl.,  2.4  lab.,  3  q.h.) 
Fundamental  chemistry  concepts,  such  as 
symbols,  formulas,  equations,  atomic  weights, 
and  calculations  based  on  equations.  Also 
covers  gases,  liquids,  solutions,  and  ionization. 
(Laboratory  fee.)  The  required  laboratory  is 
CHM  4117,  Lab  for  CHM  4111.  Prereq.  MTH 
4112  or  equiv.  (can  be  taken  concurrently). 
CHM  4112  General  Chemistry  2  (2  cl,  2.4  lab.,  3  q.h.) 
Atomic  structure,  bonding,  molecular  struc- 
ture, oxidation  and  reduction  reactions,  and 
equilibrium  and  kinetics.  (Laboratory  fee.) 
The  required  laboratory  is  CHM  4118,  Lab  for 
CHM  4112.  Prereq.  CHM  4111  or  equiv. 
CHM  4113  General  Chemistry  3  (2  cl.,  2.4  lab.,  3  q.h.) 
Thermochemistry  and  electrochemistry,  acids, 
bases,  and  solubility  products,  nuclear 
chemistry,  introductory  organic  chemistry, 
and  biochemistry.  (Laboratory  fee.)  The  re- 
quired laboratory  is  CHM  4119,  Lab  for  CHM 
4113.  Prereq.  CHM  4112  or  equiv. 
CHM  4221  Analytical  Chemistry  1  (2  cl.,  2.4  lab.,  3  q.h.) 
Principles  of  gravimetric  and  titrimetric 
analysis  (wet  chemistry).  Introduces  statistics 
as  applied  to  analytical  chemistry  and  ex- 
amines such  topics  as  chemical  equilibrium 
and  acid-base  equilibria  in  simple  and  com- 
plex systems.  Gravimetric  and  titrimetric  ex- 
periments are  performed.  (Laboratory  fee.) 
The  required  laboratory  is  CHM  4227,  Lab  for 
CHM  4221.  Prereq.  CHM  4113  or  equiv. 
CHM  4222  Analytical  Chemistry  2  (2  cl.,  2.4  lab.,  3  q.h.) 
Continuation  of  CHM  4221.  Covers  complex 
formation  titration,  precipitation  titrations, 
and  oxidation-reduction  titrations.  Electrical 
methods  of  analysis,  such  as  potentiometry, 
electrolysis,  coulometry,  and  polarography, 
are  discussed  and  titrimetric  analyses  and  ex- 
periments involving  electricity  are  performed. 
(Laboratory  fee.)  The  required  laboratory  is 
CHM  4228,  Lab  for  CHM  4222.  Prereq.  CHM 
4221  or  equiv. 

CHM  4223  Analytical  Chemistry  3  (2  cl.,  2.4  lab.,  3  q.h.) 
Spectrophotometry  as  a  method  of  analysis, 
including  ultraviolet,  visible,  infrared,  and 


unemistry         ma 


fluorescence  methods;  flame  emission;  and 
atomic  absorption.  Studies  of  solvent  extrac- 
tions and  chromatographic  methods  of  separa- 
tion, such  as  gas-liquid  chromatography  and 
liquid  chromatography.  (Laboratory  fee.)  The 
required  laboratory  is  CHM  4229,  Lab  for 
CHM4223.  Prereq.  CHM  4222  or  equiv. 
CHM  4224  Analytical  Chemistry  (Lectures  and  lab., 
4  q.h.,  summer  quarter  only) 
Principles  and  theories  of  volumetric, 
gravimetric,  and  instrumental  analysis. 
Application  made  in  the  laboratory  with 
analysis  of  unknown  samples.  (Laboratory 
'fee.)  The  required  laboratory  is  CHM  4226, 
Lab  for  CHM  4224.  Prereq.  CHM  4113  or 
equiv. 

CHM  4261  Organic  Chemistry  1  (2  cl.,  4  lab.  and 
discussion,  4  q.h.) 

Nature  of  carbon  in  organic  compounds. 
General  principles  of  structure,  nomenclature, 
preparation,  uses,  and  reactions  of  aliphatic 
hydrocarbons:  alkanes,  alkenes,  alkynes, 
dienes,  cycloalkanes.  Position  and  geometric 
isomerism.  Introduces  free  radical  and  ionic 
mechanisms  of  reactions.  The  laboratory 
generally  deals  with  the  preparation  and  pro- 
perties of  compounds  discussed  in  the  lecture. 
(Laboratory  fee.)  The  required  laboratory  is 
CHM  4267,  Lab  for  CHM  4261.  Prereq.  CHM 
4113  or  equiv. 

CHM  4262  Organic  Chemistry  2  (2  cl.,  4  lab.  and 
discussion,  4  q.h.) 

Structure  of  benzene,  electrophilic  aromatic 
substitution  reactions.  General  principles  of 
structure,  nomenclature,  preparation,  uses, 
and  reactions  of  the  various  types  of  organic 
compounds,  including  alcohols,  alkyl  and  aryl 
halides,  ethers  and  epoxides,  and  carboxylic 
acids.  Also  covers  optical  isomerism  and  in- 
troductory chemical  kinetics.  The  laboratory 
generally  deals  with  the  preparation  and  pro- 
perties of  compounds  discussed.  (Laboratory 
fee.)  The  required  laboratory  is  CHM  4268, 
Lab  for  CHM  4262.  Prereq.  CHM  4261  or 
equiv. 

CHM  4263  Organic  Chemistry  3  (2  cl.,  4  lab.  and 
discussion,  4  q.h.) 

Continuation  of  CHM  4262.  Emphasizes  the 
application  of  chemical  conversions  to  syn- 
thetic problems.  Includes  functional 
I  derivatives  of  carboxylic  acids,  sulfonic  acids 
and  their  derivatives,  amines,  diazonium  com- 
pounds, phenols,  aldehydes,  and  ketones.  The 
laboratory  generally  deals  with  the  prepara- 
tion and  properties  of  compounds  discussed. 
(Laboratory  fee.)  The  required  laboratory  is 


CHM  4269,  Lab  for  CHM  4263.  Prereq.  CHM 
4262  or  equiv. 

CHM  4271  Introduction  to  Immunodiagnostics  (3  q.h.) 
Fundamentals  of  immunodiagnostics  with  em- 
phasis on  the  application  of  principles  to  nurs- 
ing, medical  laboratory  science,  and  biology. 
Prereq.  CHM  4113,  BIO  4103  or  equiv. 
CHM  4321  Instrumental  Analysis  1  (3  cl.,  3  q.h.) 
Basic  theory  of  electrochemistry  and  elec- 
trochemical methods  of  analysis,  including 
electrode  and  cell  potentials,  potentiometric 
titrations,  direct  potentiometry  (pH  meters 
and  specific  ion  electrodes),  coulometry, 
voltametry,  polarography,  electrogravimetry, 
and  conductometric  methods.  Prereq.  CHM 
4223  or  equiv.  (This  course  may  serve  as 
preparation  for  certain  graduate  courses.) 
CHM  4322  Instrumental  Analysis  2  (3  cl.,  3  q.h.) 
Basic  theory  of  absorption  and  emission  spec- 
troscopy, including  ultraviolet  and  visible 
spectroscopy,  molecular  fluorescence  and 
phosphorescence,  atomic  absorption  spec- 
troscopy (flame,  arc,  spark,  and  plasma),  and 
infrared  and  X-ray  spectroscopy.  Prereq.  CHM 
4321  or  equiv.  (This  course  may  serve  as 
preparation  for  certain  graduate  courses.) 
CHM  4323  Radiochemistry  (3  cl.,  3  q.h.) 
Basics  of  radioisotopes,  including  basic 
physics;  the  atomic  nucleus;  properties  and 
production  of  radioisotopes;  properties  of 
nuclear  radiation;  dose  calculations;  ionization 
chambers;  proportional,  Geiger-Muller,  and 
crystal  and  liquid  scintillation  counters;  and 
the  statistics  involved  in  counting  radiation. 
Prereq.  CHM  4322  or  equiv. 
CHM  4333  Chemical  Separations  (3  q.h.) 
Theory  of  solvent  extractions  and  chromato- 
graphic separations;  gas  chromatography, 
liquid  chromatography,  high  liquid 
chromatography,  thin  layer  chromatography, 
paper  chromatography.  Chromatographic 
detectors.  Mass  spectrometry  as  utilized  in 
tandem  with  chromatography  methods  for 
analysis  of  structures. 
CHM  4371  Biochemistry  1  (3  cl.,  3  q.h.) 
Cellular  organization,  pH  buffers,  and  the 
biochemistry  of  amino  acids,  proteins,  en- 
zymes, and  vitamins.  Prereq.  CHM  4263  or 
equiv. 

CHM  4372  Biochemistry  2  (3  cl.,  3  q.h.) 
Biochemistry  of  carbohydrates,  lipids,  and 
nucleic  acids;  bioenergetics;  and  the 
metabolism  of  carbohydrates.  Prereq.  CHM 
4371  or  equiv. 


166         Criminal  Justice 


CHM  4373  Biochemistry  3  (3  cl.,  3  q.h.) 
Metabolism  of  lipids,  amino  acids,  and 
nucleotides  and  the  biosynthesis  of  proteins, 
DNA,  and  RNA.  Prereq.  CHM  4372  or  equiv. 
CHM  4381  Physical  Chemistry  1  (3  cl.,  3  q.h.) 
Thermodynamics,  thermochemistry,  First  and 
Second  Laws,  entropy,  and  free  energy  in 
spontaneous  processes.  Prereq.  CHM  4113  or 
equiv. 

CHM  4382  Physical  Chemistry  2  (3  cl.,  3  q.h.) 
Chemical  equilibria,  acids  and  bases,  elec- 
trochemistry, colligative  properties,  phase 
diagrams,  thermodynamics  of  multicomponent 
systems,  and  kinetic  molecular  theory.  Prereq. 
CHM  4381  or  equiv. 

CHM  4383  Physical  Chemistry  3  (3  cl.,  3  q.h.) 
Kinetics,  quantum  chemistry,  and  photo- 
chemistry. Prereq.  CHM  4382  or  equiv. 
CHM  4391  Introduction  to  Recombinant  DNA 
Technology  (3  q.h.) 

Principles  of  gene  manipulation  in  bacteria 
and  yeasts.  Principles  and  methods  of  gene 
cloning  and  splicing. 

CHM  4392  Affinity  Chromatography  in  Biological 
Separations  (3  q.h.) 

Principles  and  practice  of  affinity  chroma- 
tography as  utilized  in  separation  and  puri- 
fication of  biomolecules.  Prereq.  CHM  4263  or 
equiv.  Required  laboratory  CHM  4394. 
CHM  4700  Advanced  Tutorial  1  (4  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  undertake  upper  level  course 
independently.  See  page  16  for  details. 
Prereq.  87  q.h. 

CHM  4701  Advanced  Tutorial  2  (3  q.h.) 
See  CHM  4700. 

CHM  4801  Independent  Study  1  (3  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  undertake  special  research. 
See  page  17  for  details.  Prereq.  96  q.h.,  3.0  q.p.a. 

CRIMINAL  JUSTICE 

CJ  4101  Administration  of  Criminal  Justice  (3  q.h.) 

Survey  of  the  contemporary  criminal  justice 
system  from  initial  contact  with  the  offender 
through  prosecution,  disposition,  incarcera- 
tion, and  release  to  the  community.  Emphasis 
on  major  systems  of  social  control:  police,  cor- 
rections, juvenile  justice,  mental  health 
systems,  and  their  policies  and  practices 
relative  to  the  offender.  Legal,  empirical,  and 
sociological  materials  covered. 
CJ  4102  Crime  Prevention  and  Security  (3  q.h.) 
Introduction  to  the  concept  that  all  citizens  are 
responsible  for  preventing  crime  and  promoting 
security.  Content  ranges  from  the  theoretical 


level  to  community,  organization,  and  per- 
sonal strategies  necessary  to  prevent  crime. 
CJ  4103  Criminology  (3  q.h.) 
Classical  and  contemporary  criminological 
theories.  Examines  their  historical  develop- 
ment and  empirical  bases,  as  well  as  their 
significance  to  the  criminal  justice  process 
and  the  rehabilitation/deterrence/ 
punishment  of  offenders. 
CJ  4104  Dimensions  of  Crime  (3  q.h.) 
An  examination  of  empirical  knowledge  about 
crime:  the  magnitude  of  the  crime  problem  in 
the  United  States;  characteristics  of  those  who 
commit  crimes;  information  about  dangerous 
repeat  offenders;  characteristics  of  victims; 
and  financial  costs  of  crime  to  neighborhoods 
and  communities.  Assessment  of  the  strengths 
and  weaknesses  of  current  crime  measure- 
ment techniques,  especially  the  Uniform 
Crime  Reports  and  victimization  surveys. 
CJ  4105  Computer  Applications  in  Criminal 
Justice  (3  q.h.) 

A  survey  of  computer  technology  applications 
to  criminal  justice  research  and  decision- 
making in  criminal  justice  agencies.  Topics 
include  statistical  and  data-base  software, 
data-base  management,  word  processing,  com- 
puter mapping,  forecasting  techniques, 
simulations  and  modeling,  and  mainframe 
relations. 

CJ  4106  Criminal  Justice  Research  1  (3  q.h.) 
A  survey  of  methods  for  basic  and  applied 
research  in  criminal  justice,  combining 
statistics  and  research  methods.  Examines 
research  techniques  in  criminal  justice  in- 
cluding interviews,  questionnaires,  observa- 
tions, and  scales  for  survey  analysis.  Issues  of 
measurement  and  casual  reasoning  examined 
in  regard  to  criminal  justice  research. 
CJ  4107  Criminal  Justice  Research  2  (3  q.h.) 
An  extension  of  Criminal  Justice  Research 
Focuses  on  the  uses  of  statistics,  with  special 
reference  to  use  of  data  from  the  field  of 
criminal  justice.  Covers  basic  descriptive 
statistics,  including  measures  of  central 
tendency,  tests  of  significance,  probability, 
sampling,  and  methods  of  forecasting. 
Concentrates  on  research  application  by 
stressing  discussion  of  the  general  role  of 
research  in  the  discipline  and  specific  con- 
tributions advanced  by  studies  in  the  field 
Prereq.  C J  4106. 


., 


Criminal  Justice         167 


CJ  4108  Criminal  Law  and  Procedure  1  (3  q.h.) 
Examination  of  the  concepts,  responsibilities, 
and  liabilities  of  criminal  law  and  procedure. 
Reviews  the  evolution  of  the  criminal  law 
system.  Topics  include  an  analysis  of  substan- 
tive criminal  law  and  the  procedural  process, 
as  well  as  basic  definitions;  discussions  of  in- 
teraction between  federal  and  state  constitu- 
tions as  they  relate  to  criminal  law. 
CJ  4109  Criminal  Law  and  Procedure  2  (3  q.h.) 
Application  of  vital  constitutional  and 
statutory  concepts,  including  selected 
statutory  crimes,  law  of  arrest,  right  to 
counsel,  search  and  seizure,  and  applicable 
criminal  procedures.  Students  are  expected  to 
be  familiar  with  basic  concepts  as  well  as 
changing  interpretations  so  that  they  can  cite 
cases  to  support  their  conclusions.  Prereq. 
CJ4108. 

CJ  4110  Constitutional  Law  (3  q.h.) 
The  history  and  development  of  the  U.S.  Con- 
stitution and  Amendments  using  text  com- 
mentary and  case  analysis.  Topics  include  the 
Commerce  Clause,  procedural  due  process, 
state's  rights,  individual  rights  and  civil  liber- 
ties, the  concept  of  federal  supremacy,  and 
state  constitutions.  Prereq.  C J  4109. 
CJ  4201  Criminal  Investigation  1  (3  q.h.) 
The  evolution  of  contemporary  investigative 
techniques.  Topics  include  investigative  effec- 
tiveness and  organization,  and  modern  in- 
vestigative techniques,  especially  as  they 
relate  to  particular  crimes  such  as  arson, 
sexual  offenses,  larceny,  burglary,  robbery, 
forgery,  and  homicide. 
CJ  4202  Criminal  Investigation  2  (3  q.h.) 
Continuation  of  Criminal  Investigation  1. 
Focuses  on  staffing  the  investigation  unit,  in- 
formational management,  control  of  evidence, 
establishment  of  investigative  priorities,  fiscal 
restraints,  and  the  relationship  between 
criminal  investigation  and  patrol  and  special 
units.  Examines  special  police  operations  such 
as  electronic  surveillance,  raids,  and  under- 
cover operations;  affidavit  construction,  court 
preparation,  and  the  use  of  scientific  methods; 
and  Federal  law  with  regard  to  due  process 
and  other  constitutional  protections.  Prereq. 
CJ4201. 

CJ  4203  Criminalistics  1  (3  q.h.) 
Survey  of  the  elements  of  microscopy,  spec- 
troscopy, and  basic  chemistry  as  they  apply  to 
the  study  of  materials  that  comprise  physical 
evidence.  Covers  the  procedures  for  searching, 
sketching,  and  photographing  crime  scenes  as 


well  as  the  recognition,  collection,  marking, 
and  handling  of  physical  evidence,  emphasiz- 
ing the  importance  of  maintaining  the 
chemical  integrity  of  each  sample.  Studies  the 
types  of  analysis,  their  value  and  limitations 
with  regard  to  glass,  soil,  hairs  and  fibers, 
firearms,  toolmarks,  and  questioned 
documents. 

CJ  4204  Criminalistics  2  (3  q.h.) 
An  introduction  to  the  analysis  of  biological 
items  of  physical  evidence  collected  at  the 
scene  of  the  crime  or  submitted  for  laboratory 
examination,  and  to  the  fields  of  serology  and 
toxicology.  Covers  methods  of  collecting 
samples  and  the  value  of  blood  distribution 
patterns,  as  well  as  laboratory  techniques  us- 
ed to  identify  and  characterize  blood  stains 
and  other  body  fluids.  Pharmacology  and  tox- 
icology of  medical  and  chemical  substances 
having  potential  for  misuse  and  abuse  are 
studied.  Includes  laboratory  demonstrations 
and  practical  exercises  to  examine  types  of 
physical  evidence,  including  gunshot  residue, 
paints  and  polymers,  and  arson  and  explosive 
residues.  Prereq.  C J  4203. 
CJ  4205  Patrol  Theory  and  Administration  1  (3  q.h.) 
History  of  the  evolution  of  patrol  practices; 
the  changing  patrol  function  over  time;  the 
history  of  patrol  management  and  supervi- 
sion; the  development  of  preventive  patrol 
and  rapid  response  to  calls  for  service; 
theories  of  patrol  allocation;  the  influence  of 
operations  research;  the  development  of  com- 
munity relations  as  an  adjunct  to  patrol. 
CJ  4206  Patrol  Theory  and  Administration  2  (3  q.h.) 
Contemporary  patrol  developments  and  func- 
tioning: directed  patrol,  team  and  community 
policing,  the  re-emergence  of  foot  patrol,  the 
legacy  of  community  relations;  neighborhood 
beat  construction,  patrolr  management  and 
supervision;  and  current  patrol  research. 
CJ  4207  Comparative  Police  Systems  (3  q.h.) 
Comparative  study  of  police  systems  in  Anglo- 
Saxon,  Continental,  Asian,  Russian,  African, 
and  other  cultural  traditions  with  focus  on 
the  influence  of  nineteenth-century  English 
and  twentieth-century  American  police  tradi- 
tions on  policing  systems  in  other  cultures 
and  countries. 

CJ  4208  Police  Operations  (3  q.h.) 
A  general  survey  of  police  operational  pro- 
cedures, including  traffic  safety  and  control, 
report  writing,  interviews  and  interrogations, 
and  identification  and  records. 


omiiiiidi  JUMiue 


CJ  4209  Police  Management  1  (3  q.h.) 
Introduction  to  the  philosophy  and  theories  of 
management  in  policing.  Historical  view  of 
the  development  of  "professional/bureaucratic" 
managerial  approach  in  policing.  The  develop- 
ment of  organizational  strategy;  and  under- 
standing and  managing  the  external  environ- 
ment within  which  police  operate. 
CJ  4210  Police  Management  2  (3  q.h.) 
Internal  management  of  police  organizations: 
policy  development,  implementation, 
maintenance  of  ongoing  operations,  and 
evaluation  of  program  outcomes. 
CJ  4211  Police  and  Social  Problems  (3  q.h.) 
Investigation  of  police  functioning  with 
regard  to  contemporary  social  problems: 
drugs,  prostitution,  domestic  assault,  gangs, 
serial  murderers,  dangerous  offenders,  illegal 
aliens,  and  others,  with  a  special  focus  on 
related  research  into  police  functioning. 
CJ  4212  Police  Community  Relations  (3  q.h.) 
The  role  and  function  of  police  with  both  in- 
dividuals and  groups,  including  minority 
groups;  police  responsibilities  regarding  civil 
rights,  civil  disorders,  and  public  protection. 
CJ  4213  Police  Discretion  (3  q.h.) 
The  nature  and  impact  of  discretion  as  it 
relates  to  police  decision-making.  Covers  the 
forms  of  police  discretion  and  ways  in  which 
it  can  be  structured,  confined,  and  checked. 
Students  examine  and  learn  to  analyze  sam- 
ple police  department  policies  and  study  dif- 
ferent methods  for  their  development. 
Students  also  study  the  relation  of  discretion 
to  controlling  police  behavior  and  police 
corruption. 

CJ  4301  American  Correctional  System  (3  q.h.) 
A  critical  analysis  of  the  American  system  of 
corrections.  Covers  important  historical 
developments  and  the  range  of  treatment 
and/or  punishment  options  available  to 
government,  including  prisons,  jails,  refor- 
matories and  community  treatment  programs. 
Probation  and  parole  are  considered  as  an  in- 
tegral part  of  corrections.  Current  correctional 
philosophy  and  treatment  approaches  on 
federal,  state,  and  local  levels  of  government 
are  assessed.  The  interrelated  nature  of  all 
aspects  of  corrections  is  emphasized,  with  par- 
ticular focus  on  policy  analysis  and 
decision-making. 


CJ  4302  Correctional  Administration  1  (3  q.h.) 

An  intensive  examination  of  the  American 
correctional  process.  Programs,  services,  stan- 
dards, methods  of  service  delivery,  and  con- 
tracting procedures  are  analyzed.  Critical 
issues  in  personnel  administration  and 
management  are  discussed,  as  are  the  alloca- 
tion of  scarce  resources  and  staff  development 
and  training  programs.  Stresses  motivation, 
productivity,  and  accountability  in  corrections 
and  the  role  of  community  outreach  and  in- 
terface programs  and  volunteer  services. 
Prereq.  C J  4301. 

CJ  4303  Correctional  Administration  2  (3  q.h.) 
Continuation  of  intensive  examination  of  the 
correctional  process,  with  focus  on  special  pro- 
blems facing  correctional  administrators. 
Topics  include  the  management  of  offenders 
with  special  needs  (dangerous  and/or  violent 
offenders  and  inmates  with  histories  of 
substance  abuse);  management  and  control  of 
prison  violence;  and  preventive  techniques 
and  programs.  Also  explored  are  institutional 
management  of  illegal  immigrants  and  other 
special  prisoners,  as  well  as  the  special  needs 
of  female  offenders.  Prereq.  CJ  4302. 
CJ  4304  Jail  Administration  and  Management  (3  q.h.) 
Study  of  local  adult  correctional  institutions 
ranging  from  police  lock-ups  to  jails  and 
houses  of  corrections.  Topics  include  ad- 
ministrative, management,  and  security 
issues;  intake,  regional,  and  network  ap- 
proaches; local  versus  state  control;  offender 
classification,  programs,  residential  care,  in- 
spection, and  standards;  pretrial  detention; 
staffing  patterns;  interface  with  courts  and 
law  enforcement;  release  programs;  emergen 
cy  management;  and  suicide  prevention. 
CJ  4305  Case  Management  and  Correctional 
Services  (3  q.h.) 

An  overview  of  treatment  and  rehabilitative 
work  conducted  in  jail  and  prison  environ- 
ments. Basic  counseling  concepts  and  techni- 
ques, individual  and  group  therapy,  and  in- 
stitutional services  are  discussed.  Case  studies 
and  class  projects  used  to  illustrate  offender 
and  inmate  management  in  a  variety  of  set- 
tings. Students  study  a  range  of  innovative 
approaches  in  corrections  and  assess  their 
fiscal  and  personnel  requirements,  and  effec- 
tiveness. Prereq.  C J  4301. 


Criminal  Justice         169 


CJ  4306  Correctional  Security  Methods  and 
Technology  (3  q.h.) 

Examination  of  the  technology  and  manage- 
ment methods  that  provide  a  secure,  safe,  and 
humane  environment  in  which  to  incarcerate 
offenders  while  protecting  both  inmates  and 
staff.  A  primary  course  objective  is  creating  a 
correctional  environment  that  supports  pro- 
ductive human  relations. 
CJ  4307  The  Rights  of  Offenders  and  Prisoners  (3  q.h.) 
Study  of  the  rights  of  persons  under  correc- 
tional control.  Examines  traditional  methods 
and  assesses  the  magnitude  and  pace  of 
judicial  intervention  in  corrections.  Topics  in- 
clude access  to  courts  and  legal  services; 
health  and  medical  care;  searches;  non- 
discriminatory treatment;  rehabilitation; 
retention  and  restoration  of  rights;  rules  of 
conduct,  disciplinary  procedures;  grievance 
procedures;  exercise  of  religious  beliefs  and 
practices;  and  remedies  for  violations  of  an 
offender's  rights. 

CJ  4308  Correctional  Counseling  (3  q.h.) 
Survey  of  basic  counseling  concepts  and  prin- 
ciples, individual  and  group  therapy  carried 
on  in  the  correctional  field,  and  institutional 
services.  Case  studies  and  projects.  Prereq. 
C J  4301. 

CJ  4309  Comparative  Correctional  Systems  (3  q.h.) 
Correctional  systems  and  practices  in  selected 
jurisdictions  in  the  United  States  and  other 
countries.  Introduces  students  to  innovative 
approaches  in  community  corrections,  local 
correctional  institutions,  prisons,  alternatives 
to  incarceration  practices,  rehabilitative  and 
reintegrative  programs,  and  improved 
management  approaches.  Prereq.  C J  4301. 
CJ  4310  Community  Corrections  (3  q.h.) 
The  concept  of  community  corrections  from 
historical,  philosophical,  and  pragmatic 
perspectives,  and  analysis  of  program  options 
serving  as  alternatives  to  imprisonment  or  in- 
stitutionalization. Discussions  of  program  ac- 
tivities range  from  work  and  study  release 
programs,  family  visiting  furloughs, 
community-based  correctional  efforts  aimed  at 
helping  offenders  become  law-abiding  citizens. 
Topical  issues  include  private  and  public  pro- 
grams, control  and  surveillance  issues, 
residential  and  non-residential  programs, 
marshalling  and  coordinating  community 
resources,  and  volunteer  involvement.  Pro- 
gram and  cost-effectiveness  of  community  cor- 
rections, community  safety,  and  managerial 
issues  are  also  discussed.  Prereq.  C J  4301. 


CJ  4311  Probation  and  Parole  (3  q.h.) 
Introduction  to  probation  and  parole  as 
dispositions,  systems  or  subsystems,  processes, 
and  offender  statuses.  Includes  the  history  of 
promotion  and  parole,  their  conditions  and 
revocation  procedures,  offender  eligibility  re- 
quirements, supervision  styles,  due  process 
issues,  and  prediction  and  measurements  of 
effectiveness.  The  role  of  volunteers,  and  pro- 
bation and  parole  officer  responsibilities  also 
discussed.  Introduces  students  to  presentence 
investigations,  shock  probation,  probation 
subsidy,  expansion  of  probation  into  pretrial 
and  restitution  programs,  and  to  current 
debates  on  the  governmental  framework  of 
probation  and  parole,  parole  boards,  and 
parole  hearings.  Prereq.  C J  4301. 
CJ  4312  Correctional  Planning  and  Management  (3  q.h.) 
Issues  and  techniques  of  analysis,  planning, 
and  evaluation  in  corrections.  Demonstrates 
how  a  correctional  organization's  climate, 
structure,  and  leadership  style  affect  its 
responses  to  changing  environmental  condi- 
tions. Topics  include  long-,  intermediate-,  and 
short-range  planning  for  administrative  and 
operation  functions;  regional,  state,  and  local 
planning  techniques;  capital  and  operations 
budgeting  procedures;  organizational  goals 
and  objectives;  key  social,  economic,  and  func- 
tional influences;  the  development  of  monitor- 
ing, assessment,  and  evaluation  procedures; 
corrections  interfaces  with  the  legislative 
and  judicial  branches  of  criminal  justice;  and 
the  development  of  information  systems  vital 
to  the  improvement  and  effectiveness  of  the 
corrections  mission.  Prereq.  C J  4301. 
CJ  4313  Correctional  Institutions  (3  q.h,) 
The  historical  development  of  correctional  in- 
stitutions in  the  United  States  and  present 
trends  in  correctional  practices  with  focus  on 
institutions.  Topics  include  the  characteristics 
of  correctional  facilities;  issues  of  deterrence, 
rehabilitation,  and  reintegration,  and  the 
social  environment  for  inmates  and  staff. 
Students  discuss  security  issues,  reception 
and  classification,  institutions  for  women, 
disciplinary  and  grievance  procedures,  and 
prerelease  programs,  as  well  as  education  and 
vocational  training,  religious,  recreation,  and 
counseling  services,  prison  labor  and  in- 
dustries. Prereq.  C J  4301. 


170         Criminal  Justice 


CJ  4314  Classification  of  Offenders  (3  q.h.) 
Surveys  major  methods  of  classifying  offenders 
and  constructing  offender  typologies.  Topics 
include  classification  for  risk,  security, 
management,  and  program  assignments 
within  institutions  and  for  probation,  parole, 
and  related  community  programs.  The 
reliability  and  validity  of  classification 
methodologies  are  assessed,  as  are  their 
relevance  to  explaining  criminal  and  deviant 
behavior.  Also  examined  are  classification 
systems  at  the  local  and  state  levels,  suicide 
prevention  techniques,  and  classification  for 
reintegrative  purposes,  such  as  education, 
work-release,  and  furlough  programs.  Prereq. 
C J  4301. 

CJ  4403  Introduction  to  Security  (3  q.h.) 
The  organization  and  administration  of 
security  and  loss  prevention  programs  in  in- 
dustry, business,  and  government.  Emphasizes 
the  protection  of  assets,  personnel,  and 
facilities,  and  the  relations  between  security 
organizations  and  government  agencies. 

CJ  4404  Industrial  Safety  and  Fire  Prevention  (3  q.h.) 

Problems,  methods,  and  technology  in 
establishing  safe  working  environments. 
Emphasizes  the  prevention  of  accidents  and 
the  effects  of  natural  disasters  with  special 
focus  on  hazardous  substance  risks.  Prereq. 
C J  4403. 

CJ  4405  Current  Security  Problems  (3  q.h.) 
Contemporary  security  problems  affecting 
society  including,  but  not  limited  to,  white- 
collar  crime,  drug  abuse,  theft  control,  es- 
pionage and  sabotage,  and  terrorism.  Prereq. 
C J  4403. 

CJ  4406  Security  Administration  1  (3  q.h.) 
The  historical  basis  of  the  security  manage- 
ment function  and  the  development  of  the 
field  in  general  and  its  various  specialties. 
Examines  concepts  of  organizational  security 
and  risk-management  methods.  Prereq.  CJ 
4403. 

CJ  4407  Security  Administration  2  (3  q.h.) 
Organization,  administration,  and  manage- 
ment of  the  security  function,  including  the 
systems  approach  to  security  operations. 
Focuses  on  planning,  organizing,  staffing, 
directing,  controlling,  representing,  and  in- 
novating. The  manager's  responsibility  is 
also  explored. 

CJ  4408  Legal  Aspects  of  Security  Management  and 
Operations  (3  q.h.) 
Provides  a  comprehensive  examination  of  the 


legal  environment  and  issues  impacting 
security  operations  and  management. 
Elements  of  criminal,  civil,  property, 
regulatory,  and  business  law  are  analyzed 
from  the  perspective  of  organizational  securi- 
ty management  concerns.  Includes  legal  basis 
of  security  practices,  civil  liability,  corporate 
security,  investigations,  labor  law,  industrial 
espionage,  governmental  security  issues,  and 
other  relevant  topics.  Prereq.  CJ  4403,  CJ 
4406,  and  CJ  4407. 

CJ  4409  Physical  Security  Methods  and  Technology  1 
(3  q.h.) 

An  examination  of  the  management  methods 
and  technology  that  comprise  a  cost-efficient 
security  program.  Students  develop  planning 
and  management  skills  to  integrate  person- 
nel, equipment,  and  procedures  with  the  goal 
of  organizational  security.  Concentrates  on 
the  technologies  of  barriers,  intrusion  detec- 
tion, security  containers,  and  access  control. 
Prereq.  C  J  4403. 

CJ  4410  Physical  Security  Methods  and  Technology  2 
(3  q.h.) 

A  continuation  of  CJ  4410.  Concentrates  on 
the  technologies  of  closed-circuit  television, 
computer-assisted  systems,  information  securi- 
ty, communications,  merchandise  protection, 
personnel  protection,  natural  hazard  detection 
and  control,  and  aids  to  investigations. 
Prereq.  C J  4409. 

CJ  4411  Electronic  Information  Security  (3  q.h.) 
Survey  of  the  complex  and  developing  securi- 
ty problems  inherent  in  the  use  of  electronic 
information  systems.  Provides  a  comprehen- 
sive examination  of  the  management  methods 
and  technology  used  to  counter  the  security 
risks  related  to  the  use  of  computers,  word 
processors,  and  other  communication  devices 
and  methods.  Prereq.  CJ  4403. 
CJ  4501  Patterns  of  Criminal  Behavior  (3  q.h.) 
Examination  of  the  theories  and  research  on 
the  formation,  structure,  and  basis  for 
criminal  behavior  patterns.  Surveys  current 
knowledge  concerning  the  various  forms  of 
criminal  behavior.  Topics  include  the  con- 
struction of  types  of  crime,  the  formulation 
and  use  of  typologies  of  crime  based  on 
criminal  behavior  systems,  and  critical 
research  on  a  range  of  criminal  behavior 
patterns.  Prereq.  C J  4103. 
CJ  4502  Fire  Investigation,  Arson,  and  Explosives 
(3  q.h.) 

Introduction  to  examination  and  behavior  of 
fire,  including  fire-related  phenomena  such  as 
convection,  radiation,  conduction,  and  igni- 


Criminal  Justice         171 


tion.  Arson,  explosions,  asphyxiations,  and 
combustibility  are  addressed,  with  emphasis 
on  the  chemistry  of  other  combustible 
materials.  Sessions  include  the  recovery, 
analysis,  and  evaluation  of  physical  evidence 
from  fires  and  explosions. 
CJ  4503  Forensic  Laboratory  (3  q.h.) 
A  hands-on  laboratory  course  focusing  on  in- 
dividual experimentation.  Surveys  the  basic 
examinations  and  techniques  performed  in  a 
crime  laboratory.  Topics  include  general 
microscopy,  hairs  and  fibers,  blood  and  other 
body  fluids,  paint,  glass,  soil,  fingerprints, 
gunshot  residue,  toxicology,  questioned 
documents,  and  firearm  and  toolmark  ex- 
aminations. Prereq.  C J  4203  and  C J  4204. 
CJ  4504  Juvenile  Justice  1  (3  q.h.) 
Examination  of  the  contemporary  juvenile 
justice  system,with  focus  on  the  key  decision 
points  within  the  juvenile  justice  system  in- 
cluding jurisdiction,  police,  detention,  court 
intake,  adjudication,  disposition,  and  after- 
care. Critical  issues  facing  the  juvenile  justice 
system  components  are  discussed. 
CJ  4505  Juvenile  Justice  2  (3  q.h.) 
Continuation  of  material  discussed  in  C  J 
4504.  In  particular,  consideration  is  given  to 
the  history  of  juvenile  justice  in  the  U.S.;  the 
major  reforms  of  the  juvenile  justice  system 
(diversion,  the  development  of  due  process, 
decriminalization  of  status  offenders, 
deinstitutionalization,  and  waiver  to  adult 
court);  and  future  trends  in  juvenile  justice. 
Prereq.  C J  4504. 
CJ  4506  Crime  Victims  (3  q.h.) 
Examination  of  current  theories  and  research 
relating  to  victims  of  crime.  Particular  atten- 
tion to  special  victim  groups  such  as  children, 
the  elderly,  and  women.  Victim  interactions 
with  the  criminal  justice  system  are  explored. 
Current  victim  initiatives  such  as  restitution, 
mediation,  compensation,  and  victim  rights 
legislation  are  also  assessed.  Prereq.  CJ  4101 
and  C J  4103. 

CJ  4507  Organized  Crime  (3  q.h.) 
The  nature  and  problems  of  organized  crime, 
its  causes  and  effects,  comparative  and 
historic  roots,  and  activities,  organization,  and 
economics.  Considers  possible  solutions  and 
the  scope  of  techniques  used  in  combating 
organized  crime. 

CJ  4508  Crime  Scene  Investigation  (3  q.h.) 
A  competent  search  of  a  crime  scene  demands 
specialized  training.  This  course  covers  cer- 
tain basic  considerations,  guidelines,  and  pro- 


cedures that  help  the  crime  scene  technician 
avoid  oversight,  ensure  thoroughness  of 
search,  and  comply  with  both  the  legal  and 
scientific  requirements  pertaining  to  the  use 
of  physical  evidence.  The  procedures  for  recor- 
ding the  crime  scene~i.e.,  note-taking,  sket- 
ching, and  photography-as  well  as  the  basic 
steps  that  minimize  the  omission  or  con- 
tamination of  evidence  are  studied  in  detail. 
CJ  4509  White-Collar  Crime  (3  q.h.) 
Basic  survey  of  white-collar  crime.  The  nature 
and  extent  of  white-collar  crime,  the  social- 
psychological  makeup  of  white-collar  crime 
typologies,  present  efforts  directed  toward  it's 
control,  and  interagency  and  jurisdictional 
problems  and  the  benefits  of  cooperation. 
CJ  4510  Terrorism  (3  q.h.) 
An  overview  of  what  terrorism  is  and  why  it 
has  become  so  popular.  Topics  include  the  role 
of  news  media,  political  consequences  of  ter- 
rorism, the  military  as  a  resource,  and  the 
role  of  the  hostage. 

CJ  4511  Survey  of  Criminal  Evidence  (3  q.h.) 
The  fundamentals  of  criminal  trial  procedure 
and  the  rules  of  evidence  as  they  apply  to  the 
trial  of  a  criminal  case.  Students  read  and 
brief  criminal  court  cases.  Prereq.  CJ  4108 
and  CJ  4109. 

CJ  4512  Women  and  the  Criminal  Justice  System 
(3  q.h.) 

Introduction  to  issues  relating  to  roles  taken 
by  women  involved  with  the  criminal  justice 
system  and  to  the  system's  various  responses 
to  women  in  these  roles.  Specific  focus  on 
women  as  victims  of  crime,  as  offenders,  and 
as  practitioners. 

CJ  4701  Independent  Study  1  (3  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  undertake  special  research. 
See  page  17. 

CJ  4702  Independent  Study  2  (3  q.h.) 
See  CJ  4701. 

CJ  4703  Independent  Study  3  (3  q.h.) 
See  CJ  4701. 

CJ  4805  Advanced  Tutorial  1  (3  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  take  upper  level  course  in- 
dependently. See  page  16  for  details. 
CJ  4806  Advanced  Tutorial  2  (3  q.h.) 
See  CJ  4805. 

CJ  4811  Advanced  Tutorial  Intensive  (6  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  take  upper  level  course 
sequence  independently.  See  page  16  for 
details. 


172         Computer  Literacy/Drama 


COMPUTER  LITERACY 

COM  4101  Foundations  of  Computer  Literacy  (4  q.h.) 
Introduction  to  computers,  including  data- 
base management,  word  processing,  systems 
analysis  and  design,  software  packages,  ar- 
tificial intelligence,  and  trends  in  specialized 
types  of  office  automation.  Students  have  the 
opportunity  to  learn  to  program  in  BASIC. 
Hands-on  labs  reinforce  lectures. 

DRAMA 

DRA  4101  Introduction  to  Theatre  (3  q.h.) 

How  a  theatrical  performance  is  made 
through  the  eyes  of  those  who  make  it: 
writers,  producers,  actors,  designers,  and 
audience.  Designed  to  increase  the  student's 
awareness  of  theatre  as  a  business  as  well  as 
to  provide  a  basis  for  enjoyment  of  theatre  as 
an  art  form  dealing  with  ideas  and  emotion. 
Visits  to  local  theatres  and  viewing  of  perfor- 
mances in  the  Boston  area.  Guest  lectures  by 
practicing  professionals.  Cost  of  theatre 
tickets  not  included  in  tuition. 
DRA  4120  Acting  for  the  Non-Actor  (3  q.h.) 
Shakespeare  said  "All  the  world's  a 
stage .  .  . . "  We  are  all  actors  in  our  private 
and  professional  lives.  Basic  acting  principles 
and  performance  experiences  can  benefit 
anyone  who  interacts  with  other  people.  This 
course  deals  with  stress,  relaxation,  presenta- 
tion of  self,  status  in  relationships,  and  perfor- 
mance anxieties.  Acting  exercises  assist  the 
student  in  finding  methods  for  dealing  com- 
fortably and  positively  with  real-life  situations. 
DRA  4130  Prizewinning  Plays  (3  q.h.) 
What  makes  a  play  win  a  Pulitzer  Prize  or  a 
Tony  Award?  To  find  out,  students  examine 
selected  plays  that  have  received  one  or  more 
of  these  prizes. 

DRA  4140  Introduction  to  Acting  1  (formerly 
Workshop  for  the  Actor  1)  (3  q.h.) 
Physical  preparation  for  the  actor,  including 
basic  stage  movement  and  deportment,  con- 
trol of  the  stage  voice,  analysis  and  establish- 
ment of  characterization  through  observation 
and  awareness  of  the  body,  and  improvisa- 
tions and  short  scenes. 
DRA  4141  Introduction  to  Acting  2  (formerly 
Workshop  for  the  Actor  2)  (3  q.h.) 
Psychological  preparation  for  the  actor,  in- 
cluding analysis  and  establishment  of 
characterization  through  memory,  emotion, 
imagination,  and  recall;  analysis  of  specific 
roles;  the  creation  of  a  character  analysis 
book;  and  improvisations  and  short  scenes. 
Prereq.  DRA  4140  or  instructor's  permission. 


DRA  4142  Acting  3  (formerly  Workshop  for  the 
Actor  3)  (3  q.h.) 

Preparing  and  performing  the  role,  including 
the  physical  and  psychological  preparation  of 
specific  roles.  Also  includes  short  classroom 
scenes  and  the  presentation  of  a  one-act  play. 
Prereq.  DRA  4141  or  permission  of  instructor. 
DRA  4150  Introductory  Mime  Workshop  (3  q.h.) 
In-depth  introduction  to  mime,  featuring  illu- 
sionary  technique,  silent  acting,  and  the  crea- 
tion of  material  for  mime  theatre. 
DRA  4151  Acting  for  the  Camera  (3  q.h.) 
The  adaptation  of  theatre  acting  techniques 
to  the  camera.  In-studio  experiences  relative 
to  the  performer's  physical  and  vocal  persona 
in  creating  a  character,  developing  the  role 
and  revealing  the  personality.  On-camera  in- 
volvement in  short  dramatic  pieces. 
(Laboratory  fee.) 

DRA  4152  Acting  for  Commercials  (3  q.h.) 
Understanding  the  "art"  of  movement  and 
gesture  in  commercials;  with  commercial  ter- 
minology and  procedures;  with  manipulating 
commercial  dialogue  as  well  as  handling  the 
"product."  In-studio/on-camera  practice  with 
commercial  scripts.  (Laboratory  fee.) 
DRA  4153  Acting  for  Voice  Overs  (3  q.h.) 
The  use  of  the  voice  for  "selling"  a  product  or 
service.  Understanding  microphone  and  sound 
booth  techniques.  Developing  your  own 
"voices;"  analyzing  commercial  dialogue  and 
speaking  it  effectively.  (Laboratory  fee.) 
DRA  4160  Drama  Movement  and  Therapy  (3  q.h.) 
Exploration  of  teaching  and  rehabilitative 
methods  using  the  techniques  of  creative 
dramatics  and  dance/movement  therapy.  Em- 
phasizes the  exceptional  child  and  the 
physically  and  emotionally  handicapped. 
DRA  4170  Creative  Dramatics  for  Teachers  (3  q.h.) 
Introduction  to  the  methods  and  creative 
techniques  of  using  dramatics  for  programs  in 
schools,  churches,  and  recreational  facilities. 
Teachers  can  learn  how  to  use  improvisation 
for  self-improvement  with  students  of  all  ages. 
DRA  4200  The  Comic  Theatre  (3  q.h.) 
Comic  performance,  from  its  beginnings  in 
ancient  Greece  through  its  use  in  radio  and 
television  sitcoms,  movies,  and  by  stand-up 
comedians.  Includes  an  examination  of  comic 
theory,  the  comic  writer,  and  the  comic  per- 
former. The  course  centers  around  the  basic 
notion  that  "comedy  is  serious  business."  Lec- 
tures, movie  and  television  viewing,  and  at 
tendance  at  live  performances.  Cost  of  theat: 
tickets  not  included  in  tuition. 


" 


Economics         173 


DRA  4230  The  Boston  Theatre  Scene  (3  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  view  and  critique  live  perfor- 
mances presented  in  the  Boston  area's  major 
and  "off-Broadway"  theatres.  Cost  of  theatre 
tickets  not  included  in  tuition. 
DRA  4250  Theatre  Movement  (3  q.h.) 
Deals  with  relaxation,  concentration,  and  the 
use  of  the  body  to  free  the  emotional  self. 
DRA  4260  Theatre  Speech  (3  q.h.) 
Focuses  on  vocal  technique  and  speech  pro- 
blems unique  to  actors  performing  in  contem- 
porary and  classical  theatre. 

ECONOMICS 

ECN  4001  Overcoming  Statistics  Stress  (noncredit) 
This  seminar  is  designed  to  show  students 
how  to  put  aside  anxieties  by  understanding 
the  components  of  statistics  and  developing 
techniques  to  simplify  seemingly  difficult 
word  problems.  Mathematical  skills  needed 
include  addition,  subtraction,  division, 
multiplication,  knowledge  of  square  roots,  and 
basic  algebra. 
ECN  4115  Economic  Principles  and  Problems  1 

(3  q.h.) 

Application  of  the  basic  principles  of 
economics  to  current  public  problems.  Focus- 
ing on  macroeconomics,  students  explore 
unemployment,  inflation,  national  income  and 
employment  theory,  and  government  expen- 
ditures and  taxation. 
ECN  4116  Economic  Principles  and  Problems  2 
(3  q.h.) 

Continuation  of  ECN  4115,  focusing  on  the 
role  of  the  banking  system,  the  Federal 
Reserve  System,  and  supply-side  policies. 
Topics  in  microeconomics  include  the  role  of  a 
market  pricing  system;  supply  and  demand, 
the  costs  of  production;  profits;  and  the  supply 
decision.  Prereq.  ECN  4115  or  equiv. 
ECN  4117  Economic  Principles  and  Problems  3  (3  q.h.) 
Continuation  of  ECN  4116,  focusing  on 
markets  and  the  allocation  of  resources. 
Topics  include  competitive  markets,  monopoly, 
oligopoly,  factor  markets,  and  income  distri- 
bution. Economic  principles  are  applied  to 
selected  problem  areas,  including  poverty, 
pollution,  energy,  international  trade,  and  the 
balance  of  payments.  Prereq.  ECN  4116  or 
equiv. 

ECN  4118  Economics  (Intensive)  (9  q.h.) 
Same  as  ECN  4115,  ECN  4116,  and  ECN 
4117. 


ECN  4130  Medical  Economics  (3  q.h.) 
Topics  include  health  care  trends  in  the 
United  States;  causes  for  increases  in  medical 
care  costs;  supply  and  training  of  health  care 
personnel;  the  nation's  need  for  physicians, 
nurses,  pharmacists,  and  other  allied  health 
personnel;  the  quality  of  medical  care; 
economics  of  health  insurance  plans;  and  con- 
sumer demand  for  health  care,  medical 
facilities,  and  professional  and  semiprofes- 
sional  personnel. 

ECN  4137  History  of  Economic  Thought  (3  q.h.) 
Development  of  economic  thought,  including 
Mercantilism  as  the  first  economic  doctrine; 
analysis  of  the  older,  classical  school  with  its 
later  refinements  (Modern  Marginalism)  and 
its  important  critics  (socialists,  Marxists);  and 
Keynesian  and  modern  developments. 
ECN  4140  Economics  of  Crime  (3  q.h.) 
Theoretical  and  empirical  analyses  of  the 
economic  causes  of  criminal  behavior.  The 
social  costs  of  crime,  its  prevention,  and 
techniques  for  designing  optimum  law  en- 
forcement policies. 
ECN  4150  Energy  Economics  (3  q.h.) 
Economic,  political,  and  historical  background 
of  energy  and  other  resource  problems,  in- 
cluding examination  of  the  future  impact  of 
primary  resource  limitations  on  U.S.  and 
world  economics  and  feasibility  studies  of 
resource  substitution. 
ECN  4215  Macroeconomic  Theory  (3  q.h.) 
A  discussion  of  conceptual  and  empirical  pro- 
blems of  creating  and  using  national  ac- 
counts; price  index  problems;  conceptual  and 
empirical  evaluation  of  several  consumption 
and  investment  functions  and  their  policy  im- 
plications; and  multiplier  and  accelerator 
models.  Includes  a  brief  history  of  recent 
cyclical  fluctuations  as  well  as  an  analysis  of 
inflation  and  growth  theories  in  light  of  re- 
cent economic  history.  Prereq.  ECN  4117 
or  equiv. 

ECN  4216  Microeconomic  Theory  (3  q.h.) 
Topics  include  supply  and  demand  analysis, 
elasticity  concepts  and  applications,  theory  of 
consumer  demand,  theory  of  production,  and 
derivation  of  cost  curves.  Also,  pricing  and 
output  behavior  in  the  several  market  struc- 
tures, their  welfare  implications,  and  the  pric- 
ing of  resources.  Prereq.  ECN  4117  or  equiv. 


174         Economics 


ECN  4250  Statistics  1  (3  q.h.) 
Introduction  to  the  collection  and  organization 
of  data,  including  the  measurement,  presenta- 
tion, and  uses  of  elementary  set  theory; 
measures  of  central  tendency  and  variability; 
basic  probability;  and  probability  distributions. 
ECN  4251  Statistics  2  (3  q.h.) 
Sampling  and  basic  estimation  techniques, 
"t"  distribution,  testing  of  statistical 
hypotheses,  and  analysis  of  variances.  Prereq. 
ECN  4250  or  equiv. 
ECN  4252  Statistics  3  (3  q.h.) 
Methods  of  econometric  estimation  and 
forecasting,  including  linear  regression 
analysis,  correlation  analysis,  time  series 
analysis,  and  index  numbers.  Prereq.  ECN 
4251  or  equiv. 

ECN  4253  Statistics  Intensive  A  (formerly 
Statistics  Intensive)  (9  q.h.) 
Same  as  ECN  4250,  ECN  4251,  and  ECN 
4252. 

ECN  4254  Statistics  Intensive  B  (6  q.h.) 
Same  as  ECN  4250  and  ECN  4251. 
ECN  4255  Hands-On  Statistics  (4  q.h.) 
Statistics  techniques  and  applications,  in- 
cluding frequency  distributions,  measures  of 
central  tendency,  measures  of  dispersion,  pro- 
bability and  probability  distributions,  and 
sampling  and  estimation  techniques.  Class 
time  is  divided  equally  into  lecture  and 
laboratory;  the  latter  focuses  on  individual, 
supervised  problem  solving.  Not  open  to 
students  who  have  taken  ECN  4250. 
ECN  4310  Labor  Economics  (3  q.h.) 
Economic  analysis  of  the  labor  market,  in- 
cluding the  labor  force,  the  demand  for  labor, 
and  the  institutions  and  policies  dealing  with 
them.  Examines  employment,  unemployment, 
wage  determination,  and  the  development 
and  efficient  use  of  labor  resources  as  well  as 
collective  bargaining  issues  and  their  economic 
consequences.  Prereq.  ECN  4117  or  equiv. 
ECN  4311  Human  Resource  Planning  (3  q.h.) 
Assessment  of  government  and  private  efforts 
to  fight  poverty  and  improve  the  labor  market 
position  of  impoverished  groups.  Considers 
the  relationship  between  causes  of  poverty 
and  discrimination  and  possible  remedies. 
Also  considers  training  programs,  negative 
income  tax,  family  allowances,  and  other  in- 
come maintenance  schemes. 


ECN  4312  Economic  Concerns  of  Older  Adults  (3  q.h.) 
Designed  to  provide  a  basic  knowledge  of 
economic  principles  as  they  apply  to  senior 
members  of  the  community.  Includes  how  the 
U.S.  economic  policies  and  market  system 
determine  the  price,  quality,  and  availability 
of  medical  care  and  other  allied  services. 
ECN  5312  Economic  Concerns  of  Older  Adults  (3  CEUs) 
Same  as  ECN  4312. 
ECN  4313  Women  in  the  Labor  Force  (3  q.h.) 
Economic  analysis  of  women's  labor  market 
position  in  the  context  of  the  changing 
economic  structure  and  labor  market  institu- 
tions. Analysis  of  female  labor  force  participa- 
tion differences;  male-female  differentials  in 
earnings  and  unemployment;  occupational 
concentration,  occupational  segregation; 
theories  and  evidence  of  sex  discrimination; 
and  new  opportunities  for  women. 
ECN  4315  Income  Inequality  and  Discrimination  (3  q.h.) 
Analysis  of  the  composition  of  impoverished 
groups  and  recent  trends.  Examines  the  labor 
market,  demographic  and  institutional  forces 
contributing  to  poverty,  the  role  of  education, 
the  economics  of  race  and  sex  discrimination, 
the  public  welfare  system,  and  proposed 
reforms. 

ECN  4321  Urban  Economic  Problems  and  Policies  (3  q.h.) 
Economic  analysis  of  selected  urban  problems 
such  as  housing,  poverty,  transportation, 
education,  health,  crime,  and  the  urban  en- 
vironment. Includes  discussion  of  public 
policies  relating  to  such  problems. 
ECN  4322  Economics  of  Transportation  (3  q.h.) 
Transportation  and  land-use  patterns,  owner- 
ship, regulations,  financing,  social  costs  and 
benefits  of  various  modes  of  transportation, 
and  economies  of  new  technology. 
ECN  4323  Environmental  Economics  (3  q.h.) 
(formerly  Economics  of  the  Quality  of  Urban 
Environment  and  Control) 
Economic  analysis  of  air,  water,  thermal,  and 
noise  pollution.  The  utilization  of  urban  space 
and  other  urban  resources;  identification  of 
possible  economic  effects  of  urban  environ- 
ment, such  as  crime,  delinquency,  immobility, 
and  congestion. 
ECN  4330  Economic  Growth  and  Development  (3  q.h.) 
Prospects  for  economic  growth  and  develop- 
ment in  impoverished  nations  as  indicated  by 
economic  analysis  and  historical  experience. 
Includes  the  social,  cultural,  and  institutional 
determinants  of  growth  and  an  analysis  of 
agriculture  and  development. 


Economics         175 


ECN  4331  American  Economic  History  (3  q.h.) 
Economic  development  of  the  United  States, 
with  emphasis  on  the  post-Civil  War  period 
and  the  effect  of  certain  European 
developments. 

ECN  4333  European  Economic  Development  (3  q.h.) 
Historical  survey  of  European  economic 
development  from  overseas  expansion  to  the 
dissolution  of  empires  and  the  Common 
Market.  Examines  the  environmental  impact 
of  industrialism  and  the  implications  of  living 
in  a  technological  society. 
ECN  4334  Comparative  Economic  Systems  (3  q.h.) 
Competing  types  of  theoretical  economic 
systems;  analysis  of  the  organization  and 
operation  of  currently  existing  types  of  com- 
munist, socialist,  and  capitalist  economies; 
and  comparison  and  evaluation  of  the 
economic  behavior  and  performance  of  dif- 
ferent economic  systems. 
ECN  4335  International  Trade  (3  q.h.) 
(formerly  International  Economics  1) 
Economics  of  international  trade,  including 
tariffs,  use  of  resources,  and  balance-of- 
payment  mechanisms.  Prereq.  ECN  4117 
or  equiv. 

ECN  4336  International  Monetary  Economics  (3  q.h.) 
(formerly  International  Economics  2) 
International  commercial  policy,  financial 
organizations,  and  recent  problems.  Prereq. 
ECN  4335  or  equiv. 

ECN  4341  Money  and  Banking  Intensive  (6  q.h.) 
Same  as  ECN  4342  and  4343.  Prereq.  ECN 
4117  or  equiv. 

ECN  4342  Money  and  Banking  1  (3  q.h.) 
Introduction  to  money  and  credit,  commercial 
banking  structure,  and  money  creation  as 
well  as  the  problems  and  policies  of  centraliz- 
ed banking  in  the  United  States.  Prereq.  ECN 
4117  or  equiv. 

ECN  4343  Money  and  Banking  2  (3  q.h.) 
Topics  include  theory  of  money,  prices,  and 
monetary  policy;  interest  theory;  debt  manage- 
ment; and  international  monetary  problems 
and  analysis.  Prereq.  ECN  4342  or  equiv. 
ECN  4344  Government  Finance  (3  q.h.) 
Topics  include  fiscal  functions,  institutions, 
and  politics;  growth  of  the  public  sector;  ex- 
penditure planning  in  theory  and  practice; 
cost-benefit  analysis;  principles  of  taxation 
and  tax  incidence;  major  taxes  at  federal,  state, 
and  local  levels;  fiscal  policy  for  high  employ- 
ment, price  stability,  and  growth;  and  current 
fiscal  problems,  such  as  tax  reform,  urban  fiscal 
problems,  fiscal  federalism,  and  income  maint- 
enance programs.  Prereq.  ECN  4117  or  equiv. 


ECN  4345  Business  Cycles  1  (3  q.h.) 
Intermediate  macroeconomic  theory,  in- 
cluding theory  of  cyclical  fluctuations  in  the 
context  of  multiplier  and  accelerator  models. 
Prereq.  ECN  4117  or  equiv. 
ECN  4346  Business  Cycles  2  (3  q.h.) 
Business  cycle  analysis,  measurement,  and 
public  policy.  Prereq.  ECN  4345  or  equiv. 
ECN  4347  Business  Cycles  3  (3  q.h.) 
Business  cycle  forecasting  methods  and  ser- 
vices. Prereq.  ECN  4346  or  equiv. 
ECN  4348  Business  Cycles  (Intensive)  (9  q.h.) 
Same  as  ECN  4345,  ECN  4346,  and  ECN 
4347.  Prereq.  ECN  4117  or  equiv. 
ECN  4350  Introduction  to  Econometrics  (3  q.h.) 
Methods  of  econometric  estimation  and 
forecasting,  including  various  statistical 
techniques.  Students  are  given  the  opportuni- 
ty to  construct  their  own  models  and  use  com- 
puter facilities  for  estimation  and  forecasting. 
Prereq.  ECN  4117  and  ECN  4252. 
ECN  4351  Problems  in  Economic  Research  (3  q.h.) 
Research  methods  used  by  practicing 
economists.  Topics  include  typical  problems 
from  areas  of  applied  economics,  such  as 
choices  of  modeling  framework,  development 
of  static  and  dynamic  adaptive  policy  models, 
problems  of  data  collection,  review  of  estima- 
tion techniques,  and  interpretation  of  results. 
Prereq.  ECN  4117  and  ECN  4252. 
ECN  4353  Introduction  to  Mathematical  Economics 
(3  q.h.) 

Introduction  to  mathematical  analysis,  with 
an  in-depth  study  of  theory  of  distribution. 
Prereq.  ECN  4117  or  equiv. 
ECN  4360  Managerial  Economics  (3  q.h.) 
Theory  of  demand,  price,  and  output  as  ap- 
plied to  business  firms  and  capital  budgeting. 
Prereq.  ECN  4117  or  equiv. 
ECN  4362  Industrial  Organization  and  Public  Policy 
(3  q.h.) 

Theoretical  framework  for  analysis  and 
evaluation  of  the  static  and  dynamic  perfor- 
mance of  real  markets.  Examines  empirical 
studies  that  test  the  usefulness  of  applying 
theory  to  real  markets  and  the  existence  of 
antitrust  laws  as  a  public  policy  designed  to 
promote  better  market  performance.  Prereq. 
ECN  4117  or  equiv. 

ECN  4363  Government  and  Business  1  (3  q.h.) 
The  rationale  for  government  involvement  in 
markets,  the  role  of  government  in  national 
economic  affairs,  and  the  relationship  bet- 
ween government  and  business,  including  the 
application  of  antitrust  laws  to  business. 


176         Educational  Skills 


ECN  4364  Government  and  Business  2  (3  q.h.) 
The  government's  role  in  economic  activities. 
The  relationships  between  the  government 
and  industry,  labor,  agriculture,  public 
utilities,  and  consumers.  The  changing  role  of 
government  from  laissez-faire  policy  to  direct 
intervention  in  the  economy.  Wage  and  price 
controls,  environment  and  antipollution 
policies,  consumer  protection,  conglomerate 
mergers,  and  regulation  of  industries. 
ECN  4384  The  Economics  of  the  Stock  Market  (3  q.h.) 
Topics  include  the  organization  of  the  stock 
exchange,  the  highly  speculative  nature  of 
the  stock  exchanges,  the  functions  of  the  ex- 
changes, capital  gains,  equity,  dividends, 
stock  options,  splits,  puts  and  calls,  the  crash 
of  1929,  the  crash  of  1987,  the  Great  Depres- 
sion, controls  on  the  stock  market,  and  the 
Federal  Reserve  Board. 
ECN  4492  Economic  Policy  Seminar  (3  q.h.) 
Most  advanced  course  for  senior  economic  ma- 
jors, with  emphasis  on  independent  study  and 
contemporary  issues.  Prereq.  ECN 41 17  or  equiv. 
ECN  4495  Honors  Program  1  (4  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  undertake  an  in-depth 
research  study  project.  See  page  17  for  details. 
Prereq.  96  q.h.,  3.5  q.p.a. 
ECN  4496  Honors  Program  2  (4  q.h.) 
See  ECN  4495. 

ECN  4497  Honors  Program  3  (4  q.h.) 
See  ECN  4495. 

ECN  4500  Advanced  Tutorial  1  (3  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  take  an  upper-level  course  in- 
dependently. See  page  16  for  details.  Prereq. 
87  q.h. 

ECN  4501  Advanced  Tutorial  2  (3  q.h.) 
See  ECN  4500. 

ECN  4510  Independent  Study  1  (3  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  undertake  special  research. 
See  page  17  for  details.  Prereq.  96  q.h., 
3.0  q.p.a. 

ECN  4511  independent  Study  2  (3  q.h.) 
See  ECN  4510. 

ECN  4512  Independent  Study  3  (3  q.h.) 
See  ECN  4510. 
ECN  4601  Economics  1  (4  q.h.) 
Development  of  macroeconomic  analysis, 
review  of  national  income  concepts,  national 
income  determination  fluctuation  and  growth, 
the  role  of  the  banking  system  and  the 
Federal  Reserve  system,  government  expen- 
ditures and  taxation,  international  trade,  and 
balance  of  international  payments.  For  Alter- 
native Freshmen  Year  Students  only. 


EDUCATIONAL  SKILLS 

ED  4001  Integrated  Language  Skills  Development  1 

(2  q.h.) 

Reading  comprehension  and  related  study 
and  language  skills.  Time,  discussion,  and 
considerable  practice  devoted  to  meaning 
skills  such  as  basic  reading  comprehension 
and  interpretation,  including  work  in  critical 
reading  and  other  interpretational  acts  (in- 
ferences, understanding  imagery,  and  sym- 
bolic usage).  Study  skills,  previewing,  finding 
main  ideas  and  details,  outlining  and  sum- 
marizing, and  interaction  of  all  the  com- 
munications skills-reading,  writing,  listening, 
and  speaking.  For  Alternative  Freshmen-Year 
students  only. 

ED  4002  Integrated  Language  Skills  Development  2 
(2  q.h.) 

Continuation  of  ED  4001.  For  Alternative 
Freshmen-Year  students  only.  Prereq.  ED 
4001. 

ED  4003  Integrated  Language  Skills  A  (4  q.h.) 
Covers  basic  reading  comprehension  and  in- 
terpretation; study  skills  such  as  previewing, 
finding  main  ideas  and  details,  outlining,  and 
summarizing;  and  the  interaction  of  com- 
munications skills,  such  as  reading,  writing, 
listening,  and  speaking.  For  Alternative 
Freshmen-Year  students  only. 
ED  4004  Integrated  Language  Skills  B  (4  q.h.) 
Continuation  of  ED  4003,  emphasizing  such 
study  skills  as  researching,  writing,  and 
organizing  term  papers.  Explores  critical 
thinking  in  relation  to  the  learning  process. 
How  to  choose  an  academic  major  and  career 
direction  are  also  addressed,  with  emphasis 
on  self-assessment  and  personal  decision- 
making. For  Alternative  Freshmen-Year 
students  only.  Prereq.  ED  4003. 
ED  4050  College  Reading  and  Study  Skills  (3  q.h.) 
Reading  comprehension,  text  and  lecture 
note-taking  skills,  and  examination-taking 
skills.  Students  practice  with  excerpts  from 
texts  and  taped  lectures,  and  apply  the  skills 
to  materials  in  other  courses.  Intended  for 
students  who  are  beginning  college  work  and 
wish  to  develop  reading  and  study  skills.  (Not 
for  students  who  have  already  taken  the 
Basic  Day  College  courses  Reading/Study 
Skills  1  or  Integrated  Language  Skills 
Development  1.) 


Emergency  Medical  Service/English         177 


EMERGENCY  MEDICAL  SERVICES 

EMS  4107  EMT-Basic  (9  q.h.) 
The  course  covers  evaluation  and  manage- 
ment of  the  following  medical  emergencies; 
cardiopulomonary  arrest,  severe  bleeding  and 
shock;  fractured  bones;  care  for  heart  attack, 
stroke,  burn  and  poisoning  victims;  extrica- 
tion and  removal  of  victims  from  crashed 
vehicles  and  collapsed  buildings;  emergency 
childbirth  and  various  other  medical,  emo- 
tional and  environmental  emergencies. 
EMT-Basic  includes:  6  hours  of  class  weekly 
for  12  weeks.  Two  (2)  all  day  Saturday  exer- 
cises (combination  of  indoor  and  outdoor)  that 
include  practical  demonstration  of  ambulance 
and/or  emergency  vehicles  and  techniques. 
Ten  (10)  hours  of  in-hospital  emergency  room 
observation. 

EM T  Basic  Skills:  CPR  (cardiopulmonary 
resusitation),  obstructed  airway  maneuvers, 
control  of  bleeding,  taking  vital  signs 
(pulse/respiration/blood  pressure),  patient 
assessment,  bandaging  and  splinting, 
emergency  carries  and  lifting  and  moving 
devices  (ambulance  and  orthopedic  stretchers, 
etc.),  triage  at  multi-victim  accident. 

EMS  4117  Emergency  Medical  Services  1 

(4  cL,  6  lab.,  6  q.h.) 

Introduction  to  the  Paramedic  Program:  role 
and  responsibilities  of  Paramedics,  medical 
terminology,  human  systems,  patient  assess- 
ment, blood,  fluids  and  electrolytes,  shock  and 
shock  management.  The  laboratory  compo- 
nent provides  the  opportunity  to  correlate 
didactic  knowledge  while  developing 
psychomotor  skills.  To  receive  credit  for  this 
course,  you  must  also  register  for  BIO  4178. 
EMS  4118  Emergency  Medical  Services  2 
(4  cl,  6  lab.,  6  q.h.) 
Continuation  of  Paramedic  Program: 
respiratory  system,  cardiovascular  system, 
pathophysiology  and  emergency  management, 
electrocardiograms,  life-threatening 
dysrhythmias.  The  laboratory  component  pro- 
vides the  opportunity  to  correlate  didactic 
knowledge  while  developing  psychomotor 
skills.  Prereq.  EMS  4117  or  equiv. 

EMS  4119  Emergency  Medical  Services  3 

(4  cl.,  6  lab.,  6  q.h.) 

Continuation  of  Paramedic  Program:  central 
nervous  system,  soft  tissue  injuries, 
musculoskeletal  system,  medical  emergencies, 
acute  abdomen,  genitourinary  system, 
geriatric  emergencies.  The  laboratory  compo- 
nent provides  the  opportunity  to  correlate 


didactic  knowledge  while  developing 
psychomotor  skills.  To  receive  credit  for  this 
course,  you  must  also  register  for  BIO  4179. 
Prereq.  EMS  4118  or  equiv. 
EMS  4120  Emergency  Medical  Services  4 
(4  cl.,  6  lab.,  6  q.h.) 
Continuation  of  Paramedic  Program: 
obstetric/gynecologic  emergencies,  including 
emergency  childbirth,  neonatal  and  pediatric 
patients,  emotionally  disturbed  patient  stress 
management,  gaining  access  and  extrication, 
multiple  casualty  incidents,  emergency  com- 
munications. The  laboratory  component  pro- 
vides the  opportunity  to  correlate  didactic 
knowledge  while  developing  psychomotor 
skills.  Prereq.  EMS  4119  or  equiv. 
EMS  4121  Emergency  Medical  Services  5 
(27.5  lab.,  11  q.h.) 

Clinical  Practicum  I  of  the  Paramedic  Pro- 
gram: application  of  theoretical  knowledge 
and  psychomotor  skills  in  hospital  unit  rota- 
tions. Prereq.  EMS  4120  or  equiv. 
EMS  4122  Emergency  Medical  Services  6  (27.5  lab., 
11  q.h.) 

Clinical  Practicum  II  of  the  Paramedic  Pro- 
gram. Prereq.  EMS  4121  or  equiv. 

EMS  4123  Emergency  Medical  Services  7 

(100  lab.,  3  q.h.) 

Field  internship  component  of  the  Paramedic 
Program:  opportunity  to  practice  and  develop 
all  necessary  psychomotor  skills  on  an  urban 
advanced  life  support  system.  Prereq.  EMS 
4122  or  equiv. 

ENGUSH 

ENG  4005  Introduction  to  English  as  a  Second 

Language  (noncredit) 

Introduction  to  the  grammar  and  rhetoric  of 

English  as  a  second  language.  Practice  in 

listening,  speaking,  and  writing,  with  selected 

readings  and  exercises  for  improving  vocabulary 

and  pronunciation. 

ENG  4006  Intermediate  English  as  a  Second 

Language  (noncredit) 

Intermediate  course  in  English  as  a  second 

language.  Practice  in  preparing  written  and 

oral  reports,  including  business  and  social 

letters.  Prereq.  ENG  4005  or  equiv. 

ENG  4007  Advanced  English  for  International 

Students  (3  q.h.) 

Advanced  course  in  English  as  a  second 

language.  Practice  in  special  forms  of  writing 

to  improve  clarity,  syntax,  and  organization. 

Prereq.  ENG  4006  or  instructor's  permission. 


178         English 


ENG  4011  Elements  of  Writing  (3  q.h.) 
Review  of  the  structural  patterns  of  current 
English.  Practice  in  writing  sentences, 
paragraphs,  and  short  papers. 
ENG  4012  Elements  of  Grammar  (3  q.h.) 
A  study  of  grammar  and  the  way  the  English 
language  works.  Helps  students  understand 
the  parts  of  speech,  the  mechanics  of  punctua- 
tion, and  the  vagaries  of  spelling.  Exercises  in 
solving  problems  of  number,  case,  tense, 
degree,  and  usage. 

ENG  4013  Fundamentals  of  English  1  (4  q.h.) 
Intensive  introduction  to  the  principles  of 
effective  expository  writing,  emphasizing 
description,  paragraph  construction,  and 
organization.  Includes  a  review  of  the  conven- 
tions of  English  usage,  punctuation,  and  syn- 
tax. Essay  assignments.  For  Alternative 
Freshmen  Year  Students  only. 
ENG  4014  Fundamentals  of  English  2  (4  q.h.) 
Intensive  instruction  in  exposition,  argument, 
and  academic  essay  and  research  paper 
writing,  in  addition  to  continued  study  of  the 
conventions  of  English  usage,  punctuation, 
and  syntax.  Essay  assignments.  For  Alter- 
native Freshmen  Year  Students  only.  Prereq. 
ENG  4013  or  equiv. 
ENG  4110  Critical  Writing  1  (3  q.h.) 
Detailed  examination  of  the  principles  and 
methods  of  rhetoric,  especially  narration, 
description,  and  exposition.  Includes  frequent 
practice  in  writing  paragraphs  and  themes  in 
those  modes.  A  writing  proficiency  test  is  given 
at  the  first  class  meeting. 
ENG  4111  Critical  Writing  2  (3  q.h.) 
Continued  examination  of  the  principles  and 
methods  of  rhetoric,  especially  persuasion  and 
argument,  the  study  of  short  fiction,  and  the 
development  of  research  skills.  Includes  prac- 
tice in  writing  persuasive  and  critical  themes 
and  in  preparing  research  papers.  Prereq. 
ENG  4110  or  equiv. 
ENG  4112  Approaches  to  Literature  (3  q.h.) 
Further  refinement  of  writing  and  analytical 
skills  through  the  study  of  drama  and  poetry. 
Practice  in  writing  longer  critical  papers. 
Prereq.  ENG  4111  or  equiv. 

ENG  4120  English  Literature:  Faith  and  Humanism 

(3  q.h.) 

English  literature  from  its  beginnings  to 
1700,  including  works  by  Chaucer,  Spenser, 
Shakespeare,  Donne,  and  Milton. 


ENG  4121  English  Literature:  Reason  and 
Romanticism  (3  q.h.) 

English  literature  from  the  Neoclassical 
period  to  the  Romantic  age,  including  works 
by  Pope,  Swift,  Johnson,  Blake,  Wordsworth, 
and  Keats. 

ENG  4122  English  Literature:  Victorians  and  Moderns 
(3  q.h.) 

English  literature  from  the  Victorian  Age 
through  the  twentieth  century,  including 
works  by  Browning,  Arnold,  Hardy,  Yeats, 
and  Eliot. 

ENG  4123  Early  American  Literature:  Faith,  Reason, 
and  Nature  (3  q.h.) 

American  literature  from  its  beginnings 
through  the  nineteenth-century  Transcenden- 
talists,  including  works  by  Bradstreet,  Taylor, 
Edwards,  Franklin,  Emerson,  and  Thoreau. 
ENG  4124  American  Romantics  and  American 
Realists  (3  q.h.) 

The  fiction  and  poetry  of  nineteenth-century 
America,  including  works  by  Hawthorne, 
Melville,  Whitman,  Dickinson,  Twain,  James, 
Crane,  and  Dreiser. 

ENG  4125  American  Literature:  The  Modern  Temper 
(3  q.h.) 

The  prose  and  poetry  of  twentieth-century 
America,  including  works  by  Eliot,  Stevens, 
Fitzgerald,  Hemingway,  Wright,  and  Plath. 
ENG  4131  God,  Gods,  and  Heroes:  The  Literature  of 
the  Ancient  and  Medieval  Worlds  (3  q.h.) 
Literary  traditions  of  the  ancient  world  and 
the  Middle  Ages  in  the  work  of  such  writers 
as  Homer,  Virgil,  Sophocles,  Aristophanes, 
Dante,  and  Chaucer  as  well  as  in  the  art  of 
biblical  narrative. 

ENG  4132  Man,  Reason,  and  Imagination:  Literature 
from  the  Renaissance  to  the  Romantic  Age  (3  q.h.) 
Literary  traditions  of  the  Renaissance, 
Neoclassicism,  and  Romanticism  in  the  work 
of  such  writers  as  Shakespeare,  Milton, 
Voltaire,  Racine,  Wordsworth,  and  Whitman. 
ENG  4133  Order  and  Disorder:  Literature  of  the 
Moderns  (3  q.h.) 

Literary  traditions  of  Realism  and  Modernism 
in  the  work  of  such  writers  as  Dostoyevsky, 
Ibsen,  Joyce,  Kafka,  Woolf,  and  O'Neill. 
ENG  4210  Science  Fiction  (3  q.h.) 
Myths  and  rhetorical  strategies  of  science  fic- 
tion, including  such  novels  as  Frankenstein, 
Childhood's  End,  and  Stranger  in  a  Strange 
Land. 


English         179 


ENG  4211  Fantasy  Literature  (3  q.h.) 
Exploration  of  fantasy  literature  of  the  nine- 
teenth and  twentieth  centuries  and  its  roots 
in  myth,  fairy-tales,  and  popular  legends. 
Focuses  on  the  works  of  such  authors  as  T.H. 
White,  Lewis  Carroll,  Lord  Dunsany,  Kenneth 
Grahame,  Richard  Adams,  J.R.R.  Tolkien, 
Ursula  Le  Guin,  and  Patricia  McKillip. 
ENG  4212  Horror  Fiction  (3  q.h.) 
Horror  literature  and  its  concerns  with  the 
supernatural,  the  irrational,  the  nature  of 
evil,  and  the  landscape  of  dreams,  including 
such  novels  as  Dracula,  Dr.  Jekyll  and  Mr. 
Hyde,  and  The  Turn  of  the  Screw. 
ENG  4213  Detective  Fiction  (3  q.h.) 
Elements  of  intrigue,  logic,  and  thought  con- 
verge in  this  study  of  the  whodunit.  Students 
sample  a  wide  range  of  detective  fiction  to  ex- 
plore the  questions  of  innocence  and  guilt,  ac- 
tion and  responsibility,  power  and  authority, 
and  victim  and  victimizer,  and  to  see  connec- 
tions between  this  popular  form  of  literature 
and  its  classical  antecedents. 
ENG  4214  The  Psychological  Novel  (3  q.h.) 
A  study  of  the  mental  and  emotional  pro- 
cesses affecting  the  form  and  style  of  such 
works  as  Crime  and  Punishment,  The 
Metamorphosis,  and  The  Stranger. 
ENG  4220  Children's  Literature  (3  q.h.) 
The  psychology  of  creation,  the  ways  of  the 
imagination,  and  the  role  of  fantasy  and  play 
in  such  children's  books  as  Alice  in  Wonderland, 
The  Wizard  ofOz,  and  Charlotte's  Web. 
ENG  4221  Images  of  Women  in  Literature  (3  q.h.) 
Images  of  women  and  their  underlying  ar- 
chetypes in  imaginative  literature.  Includes 
such  writers  as  Homer,  Austen,  Ibsen,  and 
Lawrence. 

ENG  4222  American  Women  Writers  (3  q.h.) 
Representative  nineteenth-  and  twentieth- 
century  American  women  writers,  including 
such  poets  as  Dickinson  and  Plath  and  such 
novelists  as  Chopin  and  Cather. 
ENG  4223  British  Women  Writers  (3  q.h.) 
Important  historical  and  thematic  connections 
in  the  work  of  British  women  writers  of  the 
last  two  hundred  years,  including  the  novels 
of  Austen,  Eliot,  Woolf,  and  Lessing. 
ENG  4230  Modern  Irish  Literature  (3  q.h.) 
Irish  literature  in  English  from  1885  to  the 
present,  including  such  writers  as  Yeats, 
Joyce,  O'Casey,  and  Behan. 


ENG  4231  Irish  Writers  in  America  (3  q.h.) 
Irish  themes  and  attitudes  in  the  fiction  and 
drama  of  twentieth-century  America,  in- 
cluding such  writers  as  O'Neill,  Donleavy, 
Alfred,  and  McHale. 

ENG  4232  Ethnic  Literature  in  America  (3  q.h.) 
The  range,  variety,  and  themes  of  ethnic 
literature  in  America  in  the  work  of  such 
writers  as  Philip  Roth,  Toni  Morrison,  Max- 
ine  Hong  Kingston,  and  F.  Scott  Momaday. 
ENG  4233  Outside  the  Mainstream:  The  Literature  of 
America's  Subcultures  (3  q.h.) 
Literature  that  reflects  the  specific  interests, 
values,  and  concerns  of  America's  diverse  sub- 
cultural  populations,  including  such  works  as 
Black  Elk  Speaks,  City  of  Night,  Woman  War- 
rior, and  the  stories  of  Isaac  Bashevis  Singer. 
ENG  4234  Modern  American  Voices:  The  New 
Essayists  (3  q.h.) 

Major  nonfiction  of  the  1960s,  1970s,  and 
1980s,  stressing  the  fresh  styles  and  often 
disturbing  cultural  perspectives  of  such  works 
as  Mailer's  The  Armies  of  the  Night,  Pirsig's 
Zen  and  the  Art  of  Motorcycle  Maintenance, 
Dillard's  Pilgrim  at  Tinker  Creek,  and 
Brautigan's  Trout  Fishing  in  America  as  well 
as  the  "new  journalism"  of  such  writers  as 
Joan  Didion,  Tom  Wolfe,  Susan  Sontag,  and 
Woody  Allen. 

ENG  4235  The  American  Dream  (3  q.h.) 
Explores  the  American  dream  through  im- 
ages of  the  world  of  business  in  novels  and 
plays,  biographies  and  autobiographies,  such 
as  The  Rise  of  Silas  Lapham,  Death  of  a 
Salesman,  and  The  Autobiography  of  Ben- 
jamin Franklin. 

ENG  4240  Fiction  and  the  Movies  (3  q.h.) 
Reading  and  seeing:  an  examination  of  the 
success  (and  failure)  of  turning  famous  novels 
and  stories  into  movies.  Original  works,  such 
as  The  Great  Gatsby,  Lolita,  One  Flew  Over 
the  Cuckoo's  Nest,  and  Looking  for  Mr.  Good- 
bar,  compared  to  film  versions.  Includes 
elementary  film  theory  and  criticism. 
ENG  4241  Topics  in  Film  (3  q.h.) 
Examination  of  a  theme  or  problem  in  film,  a 
period  in  film  history,  a  film  genre,  or  the 
work  of  a  particular  director  in  order  to  assess 
technique  and  meaning.  Topics  change  from 
quarter  to  quarter— for  example,  film  and 
society,  American  films  of  the  forties,  the 
western,  Hitchcock— so  that  students  may 
take  this  course  more  than  once. 


180         English 


ENG  4250  Biography  and  Nonfiction  (3  q.h.) 

Study  of  biography  in  an  attempt  to  unders- 
tand how  individual  behavior  and  achieve- 
ment relate  to  social,  cultural,  political,  and 
artistic  values. 

ENG  4260  The  Literature  of  Adolescence  (3  q.h.) 
Adolescence  as  depicted  in  works  drawn  from 
different  cultures  and  times.  Examines 
popular  versus  literary  views  of  adolescence, 
focusing  on  such  themes  as  the  struggle  for 
self-definition,  the  role  of  peers,  and  the  ef- 
fects of  gender  and  class. 
ENG  4261  The  Literature  of  Old  Age  (3  q.h.) 
Old  age  as  depicted  in  works  drawn  from  dif- 
ferent cultures  and  times.  Examines  popular 
versus  literary  views  of  old  age,  focusing  on 
such  themes  as  old  age  as  a  period  of 
psychological  reassessment;  the  role  of  family, 
class,  and  gender;  and  the  emotional  implica- 
tions of  confronting  death. 
ENG  4349  Expository  and  Persuasive  Writing  1  (3  q.h.) 
Designed  to  help  students  develop  confidence 
and  proficiency  in  writing.  Through  first 
drafts  to  revisions,  weekly  writing 
assignments  concentrate  on  mastering  the 
skills  of  subject  focus,  clarity  of  expression, 
controlled  development,  and  organization. 
Prereq.  ENG  4110  or  equiv. 
ENG  4350  Expository  and  Persuasive  Writing  2  (3  q.h.) 
Development  of  precise  and  persuasive 
writing  patterns  through  experiments  with 
various  rhetorical  strategies.  Students  are  ex- 
pected to  write  extensively  on  topics  of  cur- 
rent interest  to  gain  fluency  and  to  learn  how 
to  target  their  writing  toward  different  au- 
diences. Assignments  also  provide  practice  in 
persuasive  writing  and  in  using  different 
writing  models  to  gain  control  of  the  material. 
Prereq.  ENG  4349  or  equiv. 
ENG  4352  Expository  Communications  (3  q.h.) 
Workshop  in  expository  prose,  emphasizing 
the  practical  problems  of  the  writer  on  the  job 
in  advertising,  public  relations,  or  publishing. 
Includes  practice  in  designing  and  writing 
special  projects.  Prereq.  ENG  4349  or  equiv. 
ENG  4356  Creative  Writing  (3  q.h.) 
An  opportunity  to  write  and  develop  a  variety 
of  forms,  including  experiments  in  journals 
and  short  stories,  plays  and  poems.  Features 
in-class  discussion  of  students'  work  and  a 
final  project  of  choice. 
ENG  4357  Creative  Writing:  Poetry  (3  q.h.) 
Practice  in  writing  different  forms  of  poetry 
for  beginning  poets.  Includes  discussion  and 
criticism  of  student  work  and  selected  texts. 


ENG  4358  Creative  Writing:  Fiction  (3  q.h.) 
Practice  in  writing  various  types  of  short 
stories  for  beginning  writers  of  short  fiction. 
Includes  discussion  and  criticism  of  student 
work  and  selected  texts. 
ENG  4359  Creative  Writing  Workshop  (3  q.h.) 
Discussion  and  criticism  of  student 
manuscripts  for  practicing  writers. 
ENG  4360  Topics  in  Writing  (3  q.h.) 
An  examination  of  a  subject,  genre,  or  figure 
in  non-fiction  prose,  such  as  the  language  of 
politics,  the  informal  essay,  or  the  work  of  E. 
B.  White.  Because  the  topics  change  from 
quarter  to  quarter,  students  may  take  this 
course  more  than  once,  provided  they  focus  on 
a  different  topic  each  time. 

ENG  4363  Writing  for  the  Marketplace  (3  q.h.) 
Workshop  for  writers  venturing  into  the 
marketplace,  designed  to  provide  a  working 
knowledge  of  the  publishing  industry  and 
useful  practice  in  preparing  and  editing 
manuscripts  for  publication.  Includes  the 
development  of  effective  strategies  for  compos- 
ing query  letters,  synopses,  outlines,  and  sam- 
ple manuscripts. 

ENG  4380  Business  Writing  and  Reports  1  (3  q.h.) 
Introduction  to  the  vocabulary  and  philosophy 
of  business  communications.  Practice  in  plan- 
ning, writing,  and  analyzing  effective  business 
letters  and  memoranda.  A  writing  proficiency 
test  is  given  at  the  first  class  meeting. 
ENG  4381  Business  Writing  and  Reports  2  (3  q.h.) 
Methods  and  principles  of  research  and 
documentation  of  semitechnical  analyses  and 
business  reports.  Practice  in  organizing  and 
writing  complex  forms  of  business  com- 
munications. Prereq.  ENG  4380  or  equiv.  No 
prereq.  for  Liberal  Studies  or  Technical  Com- 
munications degree  candidates. 
ENG  4383  Business  Writing  and  Reports  (Intensive) 
(6  q.h.) 

Same  as  ENG  4380  and  ENG  4381.  A  writing 
proficiency  test  is  given  at  the  first  class 
meeting. 

ENG  4500  The  English  Language  (3  q.h.) 
Development  of  modern  English  from  its  pre- 
Anglo-Saxon  beginnings.  Effects  of  Roman, 
Scandinavian,  and  Norman  invasions;  dialect 
geography;  evolutionary  change;  and  word 
formation  and  borrowing. 
ENG  4501  Linguistics  (3  q.h.) 
Theories  of  the  nature  and  origin  of  language, 
review  of  historical  and  comparative  linguistics, 
prescriptive  and  descriptive  grammars,  and 
structural  and  generative-transformational 
phonology,  morphology,  and  syntax.     / 


English         181 


ENG  4502  Semantics  (3  q.h.) 
The  relation  between  language  and  behavior, 
levels  of  abstraction  in  communication,  habits 
of  evaluation  of  linguistic  phenomena,  and 
the  modification  of  such  habits  for  human 
understanding  and  survival. 
ENG  4600  Topics  in  Literature  (3  q.h.) 
Examination  of  a  variety  of  subjects  and 
themes,  such  as  the  relationship  between 
literature  and  the  arts;  the  censored  novel; 
alienation;  and  the  Holocaust.  Because  the 
topics  change  from  quarter  to  quarter, 
students  may  take  this  course  more  than 
once,  provided  they  focus  on  a  different  topic 
each  time. 

ENG  4604  Major  Figures  in  Literature  (3  q.h.) 
Examines  in  detail  and  depth  the  work  of  a 
major  writer  of  poetry,  fiction,  or  drama,  such 
as  Walt  Whitman,  Leo  Tolstoy,  Virginia 
Woolf,  or  Samuel  Beckett.  Students  may  take 
this  course  more  than  once,  provided  they 
focus  on  a  different  figure  each  time. 
ENG  4610  The  American  Short  Story  (3  q.h.) 
Development  of  the  American  short  story 
from  its  nineteenth-century  origins  to  its  pre- 
sent forms.  Includes  such  writers  as  Poe, 
Hawthorne,  James,  Hemingway,  Roth,  and 
Updike. 

ENG  4611  The  American  Novel  (3  q.h.) 
Development  of  the  novel  in  America  and  its 
characteristic  qualities.  Includes  such  writers 
as  Cooper,  Melville,  James,  Wharton, 
Faulkner,  and  Ellison. 
ENG  4612  Contemporary  American  Poetry  (3  q.h.) 
Structure  and  themes  of  poetry  in  post-1945 
America.  Includes  such  writers  as  Ginsberg, 
Plath,  Snodgrass,  and  Wilbur. 
ENG  4640  The  Twentieth  Century  (3  q.h.) 
The  prose  and  poetry  of  such  twentieth- 
century  writers  as  Yeats,  Eliot,  Joyce, 
Lawrence,  Woolf,  Thomas,  and  Lessing. 
ENG  4641  Contemporary  English  Poetry  (3  q.h.) 
Structure  and  themes  of  poetry  in  post-1945 
England.  Includes  the  work  of  Gunn,  Hughes, 
and  Larkin. 

ENG  4642  The  English  Novel  (3  q.h.) 
Development  of  the  English  novel  from  its 
beginnings  in  the  eighteenth  century  through 
its  concern  with  manners  and  morals  in  the 
nineteenth  century  to  the  experimentation  of 
the  twentieth  century.  Includes  such  writers 
as  Fielding,  Richardson,  Austen,  Dickens, 
Eliot,  and  Woolf. 


ENG  4649  European  and  English  Short  Story  (3  q.h.) 
Development  of  the  short  story  in  Europe  and 
England  in  both  the  nineteenth  and  twentieth 
centuries.  Includes  such  writers  as  de 
Maupassant,  Balzac,  Mann,  Camus,  Kipling, 
Lawrence,  Greene,  and  Boll. 
ENG  4650  Modern  Bestsellers  (3  q.h.) 
The  fascinating  world  of  modern  bestsellers,  a 
world  of  romance  and  adventure,  of  high  liv- 
ing and  sinister  intrigue,  by  such  popular 
writers  as  Rona  Jaffe,  Harold  Robbins, 
Jacqueline  Susann,  and  Irving  Wallace. 
ENG  4651  The  Continental  Novel  (3  q.h.) 
Development  of  the  European  novel  through 
its  various  forms  and  themes,  from  Balzac 
and  Tolstoy  to  Proust  and  Mann. 
ENG  4652  Russian  Masterworks  (3  q.h.) 
The  work  of  such  Russian  masters  of  the 
novel  and  the  short  story  as  Pushkin, 
Turgenev,  Dostoyevsky,  and  Tolstoy  in  the 
nineteenth  century  and  Zamyatin,  Pasternak, 
Babel,  and  Solzhenitsyn  in  the  twentieth. 

ENG  4653  Latin  American  Fiction  (3  q.h.) 
The  variety  of  Latin  American  fiction  of  the 
past  generation  of  writers,  such  as  Marquez 
and  Puig,  Borges  and  Cortazar,  Bombal  and 
Lispector. 

ENG  4655  Contemporary  Fiction  (3  q.h.) 
The  range  and  variety  of  such  post-1945  fic- 
tion writers  as  Bellow,  Updike,  Lessing,  Gor- 
dimer,  Baldwin,  and  Roth. 
ENG  4658  Shakespeare  the  Dramatist  (3  q.h.) 
Detailed  examination  of  representative  plays 
from  Shakespeare's  early,  middle,  and  late 
periods  in  order  to  illustrate  his  development 
as  a  dramatist  and  define  his  principal 
themes  in  such  plays  as  A  Midsummer  Night's 
Dream,  Romeo  and  Juliet,  and  King  Lear. 
ENG  4659  Shakespeare:  The  Major  Tragedies  and 
Comedies  (3  q.h.) 

Study  of  examples  of  Shakespeare's  mature 
dramatic  art,  such  as  As  You  Like  It,  Much 
Ado  About  Nothing,  Hamlet,  Macbeth,  and 
Antony  and  Cleopatra. 
ENG  4662  The  Bible  as  Literature  (3  q.h.) 
Studies  selected  books  of  both  the  Old  Testa- 
ment and  New  Testament  as  literature  in  an 
historical  and  cultural  context. 
ENG  4802  Honors  Program  1  (4  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  undertake  an  in-depth 
research  study  project.  See  page  17  for  details. 
Prereq.  96  q.h.,  3.5  q.p.a. 
ENG  4803  Honors  Program  2  (4  q.h.) 
See  ENG  4802. 


182         Earth  Sciences 


ENG  4804  Honors  Program  3  (4  q.h.) 
See  ENG  4802. 

ENG  4815  Advanced  Tutorial  1  (3  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  take  an  upper-level  course  in- 
dependently. See  page  16  for  details.  Prereq. 
87  q.h. 

ENG  4816  Advanced  Tutorial  2  (3  q.h.) 
See  ENG  4815. 

ENG  4820  Independent  Study  1  (3  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  undertake  special  research. 
See  page  17  for  details.  Prereq.  96  q.h, 
3.0  q.p.a. 

ENG  4821  Independent  Study  2  (3  q.h.) 
See  ENG  4820. 

ENG  4822  Independent  Study  3  (3  q.h.) 
See  ENG  4820. 

EARTH  SCIENCES 

ESC  4103  Introduction  to  the  Earth  Sciences: 
The  Solid  Earth  (formerly  ESC  4100,  Earth 
Sciences  1)  (3  q.h.) 

Studies  the  differential  structure  of  the  solid 
Earth,  including  the  components  and  forces 
responsible  for  the  organization  of  its  internal 
structure  and  for  the  formation  and  reshaping 
of  its  external  surface. 
ESC  4104  Introduction  to  the  Earth  Sciences: 
The  Fluid  Earth  (formerly  ESC  4101,  Earth 
Sciences  2)  (3  q.h.) 

Studies  the  liquid  and  gaseous  components  on 
and  surrounding  the  solid  Earth.  Includes  the 
way  in  which  these  components  are  organiz- 
ed, the  factors  and  forces  that  differentiate 
them,  the  dynamics  of  the  interactions  bet- 
ween them,  and  the  long-range  consequences 
of  their  interactions  in  shaping  and  reshaping 
land  masses. 

ESC  4105  Introduction  to  the  Earth  Sciences: 
The  Celestial  Earth  (formerly  ESC  4102,  Earth 
Sciences  3)  (3  q.h.) 

An  analysis  of  the  Earth  and  its  satellite,  the 
moon,  as  objects  in  space.  Includes  their  pro- 
bable mode  of  origin,  their  physical  charac- 
teristics of  shape,  mass,  surface,  magnetism, 
and  differentiated  motions;  their  usefulness  as 
a  model  for  understanding  the  other  planets 
and  satellites  in  the  solar  system,  and  how 
the  solar  system  may  serve  as  a  model  for 
understanding  the  universe. 
ESC  4109  Introduction  to  the  Earth  Sciences 
(Intensive)  (9  q.h.) 

Same  as  ESC  4103,  ESC  4104,  and  ESC  4105. 
ESC  4203  Gemoiogy  (3  q.h.) 
Topics  include  aspects  of  crystallography  and 
physical  properties  of  minerals  relevant  to 


gemstones;  gem  cutting  methods;  origin  of  col- 
or in  minerals;  behavior  of  light  in  minerals 
and  its  influence  on  gem  cutting;  types  of  in- 
clusions found  in  gemstones  and  their  effects 
on  optical  properties  (star  sapphire,  cat's  eye); 
techniques  of  growing  crystals;  geology  and 
geography  of  selected  gem  deposits;  properties 
of  the  major  types  of  gemstones  and  imitations. 
One  or  more  field  trips  to  local  museums  are 
scheduled. 

ESC  4204  Physical  Geology  (3  q.h.) 
A  detailed  study  of  the  plate  tectonic  process 
believed  to  underlie  the  creation  of  the  in- 
dividual continental  masses.  The  vulcanic  and 
volcanic  processes  responsible  for  the  creation 
of  new  land  masses  and  radical  changes  in 
the  old  land  masses.  The  environmental  fac- 
tors of  wind,  water,  ice,  etc.  responsible  for 
slow  consistent  changes  in  the  landscape. 
Prereq.  ESC  4103  preferred. 
ESC  4205  Historical  Geology  (3  q.h.) 
A  comprehensive  study  of  the  rock  and 
paleologic  fossil  evidence  available  for 
establishing  the  evolution  of  the  Earth  from 
Pre-Cambrian  time  to  the  present.  Special  at- 
tention is  paid  to  rock  sequences  and  the 
evolutionary  development  of  living  forms  as  a 
basis  for  understanding  the  history  of  the 
Earth's  existence.  Prereq.  ESC  4103  preferred. 
ESC  4206  Descriptive  Mineralogy  (3  q.h.) 
A  study  of  the  physical,  chemical,  and 
crystalographic  factors  involved  in  the  crea- 
tion of  the  mineral  substances  ranging  from 
the  pure  metallic  ore  forms  to  the  extremely 
complex  varieties  that  characterize  most  of 
the  common  rock  forms  as  well  as  a  few  of 
the  rarer  varieties.  Prereq.  ESC  4204  preferred. 
ESC  4207  Hard  Rock  Petrology  (3  q.h.) 
An  examination  of  the  numerous  rock  forms 
generated  by  the  vulcanic  and  volcanic  ac- 
tivities of  the  Earth.  Consideration  of  the 
physical  and  chemical  interactions  responsible 
for  the  production  of  the  complexity  of  many 
of  these  rock  types.  Prereq.  ESC  4204  preferred. 
ESC  4208  Soft  Rock  Petrology  (3  q.h.) 
Consideration  of  the  physical  and  chemical 
processes  that  are  responsible  for  the  vast 
assortment  of  consolidated  and  unconsolidated 
rock  forms  generated  by  the  varied  assort- 
ment of  erosion  phenomena  acting  upon  the 
solid  Earth.  Prereq.  ESC  4205  preferred. 
ESC  4210  Physical  Oceanography  (formerly  ESC 
4215)  (3  q.h) 

Origin  of  the  global  ocean,  the  physical  and 
chemical  properties  of  sea  water,  the  develop- 


Earth  Sciences         183 


ment  of  ocean  currents  and  their  effects  on 
land  masses  of  the  world,  and  the  problems  of 
ocean  pollution.  Prereq.  ESC  4104. 

ESC  4211  Biological  Oceanography  (formerly  ESC 

4216)  (3  q.h.) 

Study  of  habitat  zones  and  organisms  of  the 
sea  and  the  economic  importance  of 
renewable  marine  resources  for  an  expanding 
world  population.  ESC  4210  recommended. 
ESC  4212  Geological  Oceanography  (formerly  ESC 

4217)  (3  q.h.) 

Topics  include  physiography  and  structure  of 
ocean  basins;  marine  geological  processes  and 
features;  sedimentation,  erosion,  shorelines, 
and  the  topography  of  the  ocean  floor;  and 
methods  and  techniques  of  marine  geological 
exploration.  ESC  4211  recommended. 
ESC  4213  Marine  Resources  (formerly  ESC  4332) 
(3  q.h.) 

Quantitative  and  qualitative  considerations  of 
energy  from  the  marine  environment  and  cur- 
rent technological  developments  in  the  use  of 
tidal  power,  off-shore  oil,  natural  gas,  and 
thermal  and  nuclear  energy  from  the  sea. 
Topics  include  food  resources  of  the  sea,  in- 
cluding analysis  of  world  marine  food  produc- 
tion and  technology,  conservation,  and 
mariculture,  and  shore  erosion  and  coastal 
zone  recreation  resources.  Prereq.  ESC  4104. 
ESC  4233  Atmosphere,  Circulation,  Air  Masses  and 
Fronts  (3  q.h.) 

A  detailed  study  of  the  tropospheric  layer  of 
the  atmosphere  and  its  relational  behavior 
with  respect  to  a  rotating  Earth.  Concern  is 
for  the  consequential  development  of  the  ma- 
jor latitudinal  divisions  of  the  atmosphere, 
the  generation  of  isolated  air  masses  and  the 
frontal  zones  developing  at  regions  of  interac- 
tion. Prereq.  ESC  4104  preferred. 
ESC  4234  Storms  and  Weather  Phenomena  (3  q.h.) 
A  detailed  examination  of  the  physical  and 
chemical  consequences  of  interacting  air 
masses.  Topics  include  storm  types,  precipita- 
tion, and  the  associated  weather  phenomena 
such  as  lighting  and  wind  intensities.  Prereq. 
ESC  4104  preferred. 

ESC  4235  Weather  Data,  Maps  and  Forecasts  (3 
q.h.) 

A  study  of  the  various  instruments  and  in- 
strumental techniques  by  which  the 
meteorologist  gathers  data.  Examine  how  this 
data  generates  weather  maps,  and  how  data, 
maps  and  computers  assist  in  forecasting  the 
weather.  Prereq.  ESC  4104  preferred. 


ESC  4239  Observational  Astronomy  (formerly  ESC 
4159)  (3  q.h.) 

Introduction  to  the  planets,  stars,  and  con- 
stellations visible  to  the  naked  eye  through 
lectures,  visits  to  the  planetarium,  and  actual 
viewing  sessions.  Emphasizes  stars  and  con- 
stellations easily  seen  from  mid-northern 
latitudes.  Prereq.  ESC  4105. 
ESC  4240  Historical  Astronomy  (formerly  ESC 
4248)  (3  q.h.) 

Study  of  the  numerous  efforts  to  comprehend 
the  nature  of  the  universe  through  naked  eye 
observations  and  simple  instrumental  techni- 
ques. ESC  4239  recommended. 
ESC  4241  Archaeo-Astronomy  (formerly  ESC  4249) 
(3  q.h.) 

Study  of  the  artifacts,  sites,  and  alignment 
factors  recently  recognized  as  evidence  that 
primitive  cultures  had  a  very  sophisticated 
understanding  of  the  night  sky  and  its  ap- 
parent behavior.  ESC  4240  recommended. 
ESC  4242  Solar  System  Astronomy  (formerly  ESC 

4390)  (3  q.h.) 

Study  of  individual  components  of  the  solar 
system.  Contemporary  results  from  the  space 
probes  are  used  to  reassess  our  understanding 
of  the  origin  and  development  of  the  solar 
system.  Prereq.  ESC  4105. 
ESC  4243  Celestial  Astronomy  (formerly  ESC 

4391)  (3  q.h.) 

Topics  include  the  sun  as  a  model  star;  varia- 
tions of  characteristics  in  single  stars,  star 
systems,  and  stellar  populations;  the  H-R 
diagram  and  stellar  evolution;  and  the 
significance  of  radio  astronomy  for  stellar 
structure  and  stellar  evolution.  ESC  4242 
recommended. 

ESC  4244  Cosmology  (formerly  ESC  4392)  (3  q.h.) 
Topics  include  structure  and  organization  of 
the  Milky  Way  galaxy;  the  nature  of  in- 
terstellar and  intergalactic  space;  quasars, 
pulsars,  and  black  holes;  and  cosmology.  ESC 
4243  recommended. 

ESC  4250  Conservation  and  the  Nation  (formerly 
ESC  4420)  (3  q.h.) 

Study  of  conservation  problems  and  land-use 
practices  in  the  U.S.  Includes  an  in-depth 
study  of  the  irrelevance  of  national  boun- 
daries to  conservation  issues. 
ESC  4251  Conservation  and  the  Community  (former- 
ly ESC  4421)  (3  q.h.) 

Study  of  conservation  problems  and  land-use 
practices  at  the  local  level.  Includes  an  in- 
depth  study  of  urban  development  and  its  im- 
pact on  the  environment.  ESC  4250 
recommended. 


184         Finance 


ESC  4252  Conservation  Management  (formerly 
ESC  4422)  (3  q.h.) 

Examination  of  current  conservation  practices 
at  the  local  level.  Includes  the  role  of  relevant 
agencies,  sources  of  knowledge  and  assistance, 
the  nature  and  scope  of  needed  practices,  and 
the  feasibility  of  community  action.  ESC  4251 
recommended. 

ESC  4680  Science,  Technology,  and  Ancient 
Societies  (formerly  ESC  4650)  (3  q.h.) 
Interdisciplinary  course  conducted  using  an 
independent  study/seminar  approach.  An  ex- 
amination of  changes  in  sciences, 
technologies,  and  societal  structures  from 
prehistory  through  classical  cultures  and  the 
beginning  of  the  Renaissance. 
ESC  4681  Science,  Technology,  and  Modern 
Societies  (formerly  ESC  4651)  (3  q.h.) 
Interdisciplinary  course  conducted  using  an 
independent  study/seminar  approach.  An 
examination  of  changes  in  sciences,  technologies, 
and  societal  structures  from  the  beginning  of 
the  Renaissance  through  the  period  of  in- 
dustrialization and  the  present  day. 
ESC  4682  Science,  Technology,  and  Society 
(Intensive)  (formerly  ESC  4652)  (6  q.h.) 
Same  as  ESC  4680  and  ESC  4681. 
ESC  4683  Science,  Technology,  and  Medieval 
Societies  (3  q.h.) 

An  interdisciplinary  course  using  an  indepen- 
dent study/seminar  technique.  Topics  include 
the  sciences,  technologies  and  social  struc- 
tures (especially  those  of  the  Near  and  the 
Far  East)  and  their  interactions  with  the 
societies  of  western  civilization  between  300 
A.D.  and  the  phenomenon  of  the  Italian 
Rennaissance. 

ESC  4700  Advanced  Tutorial  1  (3  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  take  upper  level  course  in- 
dependently. See  page  16  for  details.  Prereq. 
87  q.h. 

ESC  4701  Advanced  Tutorial  2  (3  q.h.) 
See  ESC  4700. 

ESC  4801  Independent  Study  1  (3  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  undertake  special  research. 
See  page  17  for  details.  Prereq.  96  q.h.,  3.0  q.p.a. 

FINANCE 

Fl  4101  Personal  Finance  (3  q.h.) 
A  practical  approach  to  problems  involved  in 
managing  personal  finances.  Includes  finan- 
cial planning,  budgeting,  obtaining  credit  and 


loans,  income  taxes,  savings  and  investments, 
life  insurance,  home  buying,  and  estate  plan- 
ning. Subjects  are  treated  in  a  nontechnical 
manner.  Recommended  for  nonfinance  majors. 
Fl  4301  Principles  of  Finance  (Open)  (3  q.h.) 
The  scope  and  nature  of  finance,  introducing 
basic  financial  concepts  and  principles.  In- 
cludes financial  analysis,  financial  planning, 
working  capital  management,  the  time  value 
of  money,  and  an  introduction  to  financial 
markets  and  different  types  of  securities. 
Prereq.  ACC  4102  and  ECN4116. 
Fl  4302  Financial  Management  (Open)  (3  q.h.) 
Introduction  to  financial  management  from 
both  a  domestic  and  an  international  perspec- 
tive. Includes  valuation,  leverage,  financial 
analysis  and  planning,  working  capital 
management,  capital  budgeting,  cost  of 
capital,  and  long-term  and  short-term  financ- 
ing decisions.  Spreadsheets  used.  Prereq. 
FI4301  or  Fl  4401  and  MIS  4101. 

Fl  4330  Management  of  Financial  Institutions  (3  q.h.) 

Operation  of  bank  and  nonbank  financial  in- 
stitutions and  their  role  in  the  economy. 
Discusses  operating  objectives,  services,  asset 
management,  and  sources  of  financing  and 
profitability.  Prereq.  Fl  4402  or  Fl  4302. 
Fl  4335  Bank  Management  (3  q.h.) 
Financial  management  of  commercial  banks 
and  thrift  institutions.  Problems  of  liquidity 
and  investment  management,  loan  portfolio 
and  capital  management,  and  various  pricing 
problems  in  the  context  of  a  changing 
economic  and  regulatory  environment.  Lec- 
tures, discussions,  and  case  studies.  Prereq.  Fl 
4402  or  Fl  4302. 

Fl  4360  Speculative  Markets  (3  q.h.) 

Studies  futures  contracts  and  options  con- 
tracts, their  rapid  growth  in  speculative 
markets,  and  the  uses  of  these  contracts.  All 
of  these  new  instruments  have  simultaneously 
increased  the  complexities  of  and  oppor- 
tunities in  financial  markets.  Both  individual 
investors  and  institutional  investors  such  as 
portfolio  managers,  banks,  multinational  cor- 
porations, and  mutual  funds  can  now 
minimize  their  exposure  to  movements  in 
stock  prices,  exchange  rates,  and  interest 
rates  by  following  active  and  dynamic  port- 
folio strategies  that  employ  these  new  in- 
struments. Prereq.  Fl  4411  or  instructor's 
permission. 


Finance         185 


Fl  4383  Personal  Financial  Planning  (3  q.h.) 
Development  of  financial  planning  expertise 
useful  to  those  considering  careers  as  personal 
financial  planners.  Includes  budgeting,  in- 
surance, taxes,  estate  planning,  basic  invest- 
ment vehicles  and  strategies,  and  related 
legal  aspects.  Prereq.  FI4301  or  FI4401. 

Fl  4401  Principles  of  Finance  (Reserved)  (3  q.h.) 
The  scope  and  nature  of  finance,  introducing 
basic  financial  concepts  and  principles.  In- 
cludes financial  analysis,  financial  planning, 
working  capital  management,  the  time  value 
of  money,  and  an  introduction  to  financial 
markets  and  different  types  of  securities. 
Prereq.  ACC  4102  and  ECN4116  and  80  q.h. 
Fl  4402  Financial  Management  (Reserved)  (3  q.h.) 
Introduction  to  financial  management  from 
both  a  domestic  and  an  international  perspec- 
tive. Includes  valuation,  leverage,  financial 
analysis  and  planning,  working  capital 
management,  capital  budgeting,  cost  of 
capital,  and  long-term  and  short-term  financ- 
ing decisions.  Spreadsheets  used.  Prereq.  Fl 
4401  or  4301  and  MIS  4101  and  80  q.h. 
Fl  4403  Financial  Strategy  (Reserved)  (3  q.h.) 
Financial  management  using  the  case-method 
approach.  Includes  advanced  capital  budgeting, 
capital  structure,  decision-making,  dividend 
policy,  leasing,  convertibles  and  warrants, 
mergers,  failures  and  reorganization,  and  the 
timing  of  financial  policy.  Prereq.  Fl  4402  or 
Fl  4302  and  80  q.h. 

Fl  4410  Investment  Principles  (Reserved)*  (3  q.h.) 
Investment  concepts,  practices,  and  pro- 
cedures. Reviews  various  types  of  invest- 
ments, including  the  role  of  security  markets 
and  security  analysis.  Prereq.  Fl  4401  or  Fl 
4301  and  80  q.h. 

Fl  4411  Investment  Management  (Reserved)  (3  q.h.) 
Relationship  between  the  economy  and  stock 
prices.  Covers  corporate  analysis,  earnings, 
dividends,  and  cash  flow  and  introduces  port- 
folio analysis.  Studies  technical  analysis  ver- 
sus fundamental  factors.  Prereq.  FI4410  or  Fl 
4310  and  80  q.h. 

Fl  4420  Credit  Principles  (Reserved)*  (3  q.h.) 
Introduction  to  credit  and  its  functions.  Ex- 
amines the  role  of  the  credit  executive,  credit 
investigation,  documentary  credit,  trade 
credit,  and  organization  of  the  credit  depart- 
ment. Prereq.  Fl  4401  or  FI4301  and  80  q.h. 
Fl  4421  Credit  Management  (Reserved)  (3  q.h.) 
Forms  of  credit  and  collection  services,  in- 
cluding analysis  of  financial  statements, 
determination  of  credit-worthiness,  creditors' 


rights,  adjustment  bureau  operations,  credit 
insurance,  and  guarantees.  Prereq.  Fl  4420  or 
Fl  4320  and  80  q.h. 

Fl  4425  Budgeting  and  Planning  (Reserved)*  (3  q.h.) 
Managerial  planning,  budgetary  control,  and 
financial  analysis.  Studies  the  interrelation 
between  functional  areas  in  an  organization 
using  consolidated  profit  planning  as  an  in- 
tegrating device.  Covers  fundamental  finan- 
cial analysis,  comprehensive  profit  planning, 
general  expense  planning,  production  plan- 
ning, materials  planning,  purchasing. 
Prereq.  Fl  4401  or  FI4301  and  80  q.h. 
Fl  4426  Financial  Control  (Reserved)  (3  q.h.) 
Development  and  application  of  variable 
budgets,  planning  and  control  of  capital  ex- 
penditures, computer  applications  in  profit 
planning,  cash  flow  planning  and  control, 
cost-profit-volume  analysis,  performance 
reporting  ,  and  analysis  of  budget  variations. 
Prereq.  Fl  4425  or  Fl  4325  and  80  q.h. 
Fl  4450  International  Finance  (Reserved)  (3  q.h.) 
Introduction  to  international  financial 
management  in  the  multinational  corpora- 
tion. Analyzes  basic  problems  and  finance 
considerations  involved  with  international  in- 
vestments, trade,  and  payments.  Also  covers 
planning  in  the  international  environment 
related  to  exchange  rates,  financial  strategy, 
sources  of  capital,  working  capital  manage- 
ment, fund  flows,  and  management  control 
through  accounting  and  financial  reporting. 
Prereq.  Fl  4402  or  Fl  4302  and  80  q.h. 

Fl  4600  Honors  Program  1  (4  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  undertake  an  in-depth 
research  study  project.  See  page  17  for  details. 
Prereq.  96  q.h.,  3.5  q.p.a. 
Fl  4601  Honors  Program  2  (4  q.h.) 
See  Fl  4600. 

Fl  4602  Honors  Program  3  (4  q.h.) 
See  Fl  4600. 

Fl  4701  Independent  Study  1  (3  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  undertake  special  research. 
See  page  17  for  details.  Prereq.  96  q.h.,  3.0  q.p.a. 
Fl  4702  Independent  Study  2  (3  q.h.) 
See  Fl  4701. 

Fl  4703  Independent  Study  3  (3  q.h.) 
See  Fl  4701. 

Fl  4800  Advanced  Tutorial  1  (3  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  take  upper  level  course  in- 
dependently. See  page  16  for  details. 
Prereq.  87  q.h. 

*Open  section  available.  Call  617-437-2418. 


186         Health  management 


Fl  4801  Advanced  Tutorial  2  (3  q.h.) 

See  FI  4800. 

Fl  4900  Field  Work  (6  q.h.) 

Opportunity  to  enhance  career  development 

by  applying  academic  background  to  practical 

problems  in  the  workplace.  See  page  16  for 

details.  Prereq.  Approval  of  Program  Director. 

HEALTH  MANAGEMENT 

HMG  4100  Hospital  Organization  and  Management  1 

(3  q.h.) 

Study  of  hospital  organizational  structure  and 
administration.  Focuses  on  the  complex 
nature  of  health  administration,  its  in- 
terdependent relationships  and  organizational 
strategy. 

HMG  4101  Hospital  Organization  and  Management  2 
(3  q.h.) 

Continuation  of  HMG  4100,  emphasizing 
organizational  issues  and  management 
techniques.  Prereq.  HMG  4100. 
HMG  4103  Hospital  Organization  and  Management 
(Intensive)  (6  q.h.) 

Same  as  HMG  4100  and  HMG  4101. 
HMG  4200  Health  Science  Statistics  (3  q.h.) 
Designed  to  give  health  practitioners  the  op- 
portunity to  learn  to  apply  basic  statistical 
techniques  in  the  gathering,  display,  and  in- 
terpretation of  health  data.  Discusses  prin- 
ciples of  research  design  and  agencies  involv- 
ed in  collecting  statistical  data.  Prereq. 
MTU  4111. 

HMG  4210  Medical  Care  and  Current  Social  Problems  1 
(3q.h.)     , 

Presentation  of  some  of  the  complex  dilemmas 
faced  in  medical  ethics  today  through  lectures, 
seminars,  and  case  studies.  Includes  the 
escalating  cost  of  health  care  versus  the  abili- 
ty to  pay;  teenage  pregnancy;  abortion;  genetic 
counseling  and  screening;  behavior  control; 
alcoholism;  and  the  "right  to  health  care." 
HMG  4211  Medical  Care  and  Current  Social  Problems  2 
(3  q.h.) 

Introduction  to  such  problem  areas  as  child 
abuse;  suicide;  euthanasia;  the  withholding  of 
treatment;  the  concept  and  exercise  of  inform- 
ed, voluntary  consent;  patients'  rights;  the  liv- 
ing will;  human  experimentation;  and  the 
allocation  of  scarce  medical  resources.  Prereq. 
HMG  4210. 

HMG  4215  Health  Law  (3  q.h.) 
Basic  hospital  legal  issues  relating  to  cor- 
porate and  individual  liability.  Includes  an 
analysis  of  consent  and  competency  in  health 
care,  emphasizing  bioethical  questions  raised 
by  the  removal  of  life-support  systems. 


HMG  4300  Home  Health  Care  (3  q.h.) 
Programs  and  techniques  for  providing  effec- 
tive community  home  health  care  and  the  im- 
pact of  these  programs  on  the  health  care 
delivery  system. 

HMG  4301  Health  Care  Delivery  Systems  (3  q.h.) 
The  structure,  function,  and  organization  of 
health  care  services. 

HMG  4310  Principles  and  Practices  of  Community 
Health  1  (3  q.h.) 

Community  health  care  activities.  Em- 
phasizes community  health  promotion  and 
the  coordination  and  integration  of  medical 
and  self-care  activities  with  the  needs,  goals, 
and  resources  of  the  community. 
HMG  4311  Principles  and  Practices  of  Community 
Health  2  (3  q.h ) 

Continuation  of  HMG  4310.  Emphasizes 
specific  community  health  problems.  Prereq. 
HMG  4310. 

HMG  4325  Health  Planning  and  Regulation  (3  q.h.) 
Analysis  of  past  and  present  interventions 
that  affect  the  supply  and  demand  side  of  the 
health  care  system  at  the  community,  state, 
regional,  and  national  levels.  Planning  and 
regulations  are  discussed  in  the  context  of 
political  considerations  influencing  their  im- 
plementation and  effectiveness. 
HMG  4390  The  Patient's  Impact  on  Decision-Making 
(3  q.h.) 

Explores  some  of  the  personal  dimensions  of 
illness  and  treatment  and  the  nature  of  the 
relationships  between  ill  people  and  those  try- 
ing to  care  for  them.  Emphasis  on  how  this 
interaction  effects  and  influences  health 
management  decisions. 
HMG  4400  Health  Care  Financial  Management  1 
(3  q.h.) 

Introduction  to  health  care  financial  manage- 
ment, including  issues  in  fund  accounting, 
control,  and  reimbursement.  Prereq.  FI  4101. 
HMG  4401  Health  Care  Financial  Management  2 
(3q.h.) 

Continuation  of  HMG  4400.  Prereq. 
HMG  4400. 

HMG  4429  Health  Care  Delivery's  Changing  Environ- 
ment (2  q.h.) 

Health  care  delivery  systems  are  experiencing 
a  multitude  of  changes.  Keeping  up  with  the 
changes  and  anticipating  future  changes  are 
the  subjects  covered  in  a  series  of  five 
seminars.  Topics  include  quality  health  care 
in  the  '80s,  financing  health  care,  alternative 
health  care  delivery  systems,  computers  and 
health  care,  and  future  trends. 


Health  Kecord  Administration         187 


HMG  4440  Health  Care  Operations  Management 

(3  q.h.) 

An  applications-oriented  case  course  focusing 
on  selected  operations  management  planning, 
restructuring,  and  control  problems  common 
to  hospitals  and  other  health  service 
organizations. 

HMG  4445  Health  Care  Marketing  and 
Communication  (3  q.h.) 

The  "how"  and  "why"  of  marketing  in  health 
care.  Presents  basic  principles,  including  for- 
mulating a  marketing  plan,  strategic 
marketing  practices,  and  specific  marketing 
for  specialized  organizations  such  as  HMOs 
and  mental  health  nursing  homes.  Prereq. 
MKT4301. 

HMG  4550  Contemporary  and  Controversial  Health 
Care  Issues  1  (3  q.h.) 

Study  of  current  health  care  problems.  Em- 
phasizes the  interrelationships  between  the 
economic,  social,  political,  and  environmental 
factors  involved  in  the  development  and 
delivery  of  health  care. 
HMG  4551  Contemporary  and  Controversial  Health 
Care  Issues  2  (3  q.h.) 

Continuation  of  HMG  4550.  Prereq.  HMG 
4550. 

HMG  4580  Information  Processing  in  Health  Care 
(3  q.h.) 

Introduction  to  computer  applications  and 
management  in  health  care  facilities,  in- 
cluding the  evolution  and  application  of  com- 
puter use  in  health,  clinical,  and  business  in- 
formation systems;  patient  care;  management; 
public  health;  and  reimbursement.  The  infor- 
mation flow  of  clinical  and  nonclinical  patient 
data  is  applied  to  the  principles  of  informa- 
tion system  life-cycle  development.  The  role  of 
the  health  manager  in  selecting,  implemen- 
ting, and  evaluating  information  systems  for 
health  care  facilities  is  considered. 
HMG  4600  Long-Term  Care  Administration  1*  (6  q.h.) 
Organization  of  care  for  the  long-term  and 
chronically  ill  patient.  Examines  the  goals, 
purposes,  and  design  of  long-term  care 
facilities  as  well  as  budgeting,  financing, 
capital  funding,  and  administration.  Prereq. 
HMG  4101. 

HMG  4601  Long-Term  Care  Administration  2*  (6  q.h.) 
Study  of  internal  and  external  systems  perti- 
nent to  the  long-term  care  facility.  Examines 
such  topics  as  the  nursing  unit,  the  role  of  the 
physician,  therapies,  licensing  agencies, 
hospitals,  and  methods  for  improving  services. 
Prereq.  HMG  4600  or  equiv.  or  permission  of 
Director  of  Health  Professions. 


HMG  4602  Long-Term  Care  Administration  3*  (6  q.h.) 
Examination  of  long-term  care  institutions 
and  their  impact  on  the  health  care  industry. 
Considers  the  nature  and  problems  of  aging 
and  the  care  of  the  elderly  in  the  home,  in  the 
community,  and  in  institutions.  A  general 
survey  and  summary  of  the  Massachusetts 
Nursing  Home  Administrators  Licensure  Ex- 
amination is  included.  Prereq.  HMG  4601  or 
equiv.  or  permission  of  Director  of  Health 
Professions. 

HMG  4610  Principles  and  Practices  of  Community 
Mental  Health  (3  q.h.) 

Introduction  to  the  principles  of  community 
mental  health,  emphasizing  the  development, 
implementation,  operation,  delivery,  and  use 
of  community  mental  health  services. 
HMG  4620  Senior  Seminar  in  Health  Care 
Management  (1  q.h.) 

A  review  of  current  health  care  management 
topics,  expanding  on  topics  covered  in  HMG 
4429.  Must  be  taken  concurrently  with  HMG 
4429. 

HMG  4650  Health  Management  Practicum  1  (6  q.h.) 
Working  in  conjunction  with  a  preceptor,  the 
student  performs  independent  work  within  an 
administrative  setting.  Projects  include  pro- 
blem identification,  data  gathering,  analysis 
of  alternatives,  and  implementation  of  a  plan 
of  action.  Students  must  have  completed  75 
percent  of  the  degree  requirements  before 
registering  for  this  course.  Applications  for 
registering  must  be  submitted  two  full  quarters 
prior  to  the  desired  starting  date. 
HMG  4651  Health  Management  Practicum  2  (6  q.h.) 
A  continuation  of  HMG  4650. 
HMG  4700  Advanced  Tutorial  1  (3  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  take  upper  level  course  in- 
dependently. See  page  16  for  details. 
Prereq.  87  q.h. 

HMG  4701  Advanced  Tutorial  2  (3  q.h.) 
See  HMG  4700. 

HEALTH  RECORD  ADMINISTRATION 

HRA  4302  Medical  Terminology  Survey  (3  q.h.) 
Introduction  to  the  medical  terminology  of  a 
variety  of  medical  disciplines.  Not  open  to 
health  record  students. 
HRA  4305  Language  of  Medicine  1  (2  q.h.) 
Analysis  and  definition  of  medical  terms,  in- 
cluding anatomical,  diagnostic,  operative, 
symptomatic,  and  pathological  terms.  Prereq. 
courses  in  anatomy  and  physiology. 


*Offered  even  numbered  academic  years  only. 


ioo  nunidii  nesuurues  maiiaytimeni 


HRA  4306  Language  of  Medicine  2  (2  q.h.) 
Continuation  of  HRA  4305.  Prereq.  HRA 
4305. 

HRA  4308  Hospital  Management  for  Health  Record 
Administrators  (3  q.h.) 

Introduction  to  health  care  facility  manage- 
ment principles.  Examines  the  interaction  of 
the  board  of  trustees,  administration,  staff, 
and  interdisciplinary  departments  within  a 
facility  as  well  as  licensing  and  accrediting 
agencies  that  set  the  standards  and  policies 
for  health  care  facilities. 
HRA  4310  Health  Record  Science  1  (6  q.h.) 
Introduction  to  health  records,  covering 
health  record  history,  numbering,  filing, 
security,  and  the  health  record  admini- 
strator's relationship  to  the  health  care 
facility.  Stresses  quantitative  and  qualitative 
analysis  of  the  record;  includes  laboratory 
experience.  Prereq.  80  q.h.,  including  BIO 
4177  and  HRA  4306. 
HRA  4311  Health  Record  Science  2  (6  q.h.) 
Methods  of  record  retention,  security,  and 
preservation;  laws  related  to  patient  care  and 
health  records;  classification  theory;  basic 
disease  coding;  and  word  processing  and 
transcription.  Prereq.  HRA  4310. 
HRA  4312  Health  Record  Science  3  (6  q.h.) 
Basic  principles  of  compiling  statistics  for 
hospital  and  health  facilities.  Includes 
preparation  of  reports,  vital  statistics  repor- 
ting, classification  theory,  principles  of 
disease  coding,  and  special  indices.  Prereq. 
HRA  4311. 

HRA  4313  Health  Record  Science  4  (6  q.h.) 
Topics  include  health  care  legislation,  quality 
assurance,  utilization  review,  PSROs,  and 
planning  agencies  and  their  impact  on  record 
management.  Introduction  to  specialized 
record  systems.  Prereq.  HRA  4312. 
HRA  4314  Health  Record  Science  5  (6  q.h.) 
Continued  study  of  specialized  record  systems. 
Includes  ambulatory  care,  home  care,  and 
long-term  care,  approached  in  terms  of  infor- 
mation management  and  quality  assurance. 
Discusses  problems  presented  by  changing 
patterns  in  health  care  delivery  and  reviews 
current  literature.  Prereq.  HRA  4313. 
HRA  4320  Organization  of  the  Health  Record 
Department  1  (3  q.h.) 
The  health  record  department  and  its 
organization,  lines  of  responsibility  and 
authority,  and  personnel  roles  and  functions. 
Stresses  management  principles  and  practices. 


Prereq.  HRA  4308,  HRA  4312,  and  HRA 
4324,  or  Clinical  Coordinator's  permission. 
HRA  4321  Organization  of  the  Health  Record 
Department  2  (3  q.h.) 

Study  of  health  record  department  office 
management  problems  and  their  solutions,  in- 
cluding quality  control,  time  standards, 
budgeting,  office  manuals,  and  work 
simplification  systems.  Prereq.  HRA  4320. 
HRA  4322  Organization  of  the  Health  Record 
Department  3  (3  q.h.) 

Advanced  management  studies  designed  to 
address  practical  applications  in  health  record 
management.  Prereq.  HRA  4321. 
HRA  4330  Health  Record  Computer  Science  (3  q.h.) 
Electronic  data  processing  in  the  health 
record  and  hospital  environment.  Assesses 
state-of-the-art  information  systems  and  their 
future  in  health  record  management.  Prereq. 
MIS  4101  and  HRA  4314. 
HRA  4332  Topics  in  Health  Records  (3  q.h.) 
Current  issues  in  health  record  administra- 
tion, focusing  on  inservice,  personnel  manage- 
ment, health  care  finance,  and  computer  ap- 
plications and  trends. 

HRA  4335  Clinical  Practicum  1  (formerly  Applied 
Health  Record  Science  1)  (3  q.h.) 
Clinical  practicum  in  health  record  science  in 
the  general  hospital.  Prereq.  HRA  4312. 
HRA  4336  Clinical  Practicum  2  (formerly  Applied 
Health  Record  Science  2)  (3  q.h.) 
Clinical  practicum  in  health  record  science  in 
specialized  health  settings.  Prereq.  HRA  4324. 
HRA  4337  Clinical  Practicum  3  (formerly  Applied 
Health  Record  Science  3)  (3  q.h.) 
Clinical  practicum  in  health  record  manage- 
ment in  the  health  care  facility.  Prereq. 
HRA  4325. 

HRA  4700  Advanced  Tutorial  1  (3  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  take  upper  level  course  in- 
dependently. See  page  16  for  details.  Prereq. 
87  q.h. 

HRA  4701  Advanced  Tutorial  2  (3  q.h.) 
See  HRA  4700. 

HUMAN  RESOURCES  MANAGEMENT 

HRM  4301  Organizational  Behavior  (Open)  (3  q.h.) 
Fundamentals  of  organizational  life,  em- 
phasizing the  structure  and  discipline  of 
groups  typically  found  in  a  business  setting. 
Issues  and  data  related  to  leadership  styles, 
employee  motivation,  and  organizational 
dynamics.  Requires  significant  student 
participation. 


nuiiidii  ncbuuitcb  ividiidueintjiii 


HRM  4302  Introduction  to  Human  Resources 
Management  (Open)  (3  q.h.) 
Introduction  to  the  rights  and  responsibilities 
of  employer  organizations,  individual 
employees,  and  employee  organizations  and 
how  they  influence  personnel  and  labor  rela- 
tions activities  within  an  organization.  Prereq. 
HRM  4301  or  HRM  4401 . 
HRM  4303  Applied  Human  Resources  Management 
(Open)  (3  q.h.) 

Goals  and  structures  of  various  employer  and 
employee  organizations  are  examined  and 
evaluated  in  terms  of  effective  human  resources 
management.  How  the  collective  bargaining 
process  changes  in  anticipation  of  future  labor- 
management  relations.  Prereq.  HRM  4302  or 
HRM  4402. 

HRM  4304  Organizational  Behavior  and  Introduction 
to  Human  Resources  Management  (Intensive)  (Open) 
(6  q.h.) 
Same  as  HRM  4301  and  HRM  4302. 

HRM  4310  Personnel  Management  1  (3  q.h.) 
Study  of  the  role  of  the  human  resources 
manager,  the  role  of  the  personnel  department 
in  personnel  planning  and  selection,  and  em- 
ployment development  and  evaluation  programs. 
Significant  student  participation  required. 
HRM  4311  Personnel  Management  2  (3  q.h.) 
Continued  examination  of  human  resources 
management.  Includes  labor-management 
relations,  compensation  programs,  safety,  and 
affirmative  action  functions.  Case-study 
analyses  require  student  participation. 
Prereq.  HRM  4310. 

HRM  4313  Personnel  Management  (Intensive)  (6  q.h.) 
Same  as  HRM  4310  and  HRM  4311. 
HRM  4320  Techniques  of  Employee  Selection  (3  q.h.) 
Recruitment,  selection,  and  placement  techni- 
ques, including  interviewing  and  employment 
testing. 

HRM  4321  Wage  and  Salary  Administration  (3  q.h.) 
Wage  and  salary  determination,  including 
merit  and  incentive  plans,  wage  and  salary 
structure,  compensation  methods,  and  the  im- 
pact of  employer-employee  relations  on  com- 
pensation systems. 
HRM  4322  Employee  Benefits  (3  q.h.) 
Study  of  private  and  public  programs  related 
to  job  and  worker  income  security.  Includes 
unemployment  compensation,  training  and 
employment  services,  private  guaranteed  in- 
come, retirement  pension  plans,  and  disability 
and  group  insurance. 
HRM  4323  Job  Evaluation  (3  q.h.) 
Wage-payment  systems,  wage  determination, 


job  elements,  rating  scales,  the  writing  of  job 
descriptions  and  specifications,  selection  of 
plans,  development  of  wage  structures,  and 
principles  of  merit  rating. 
HRM  4324  Creative  Problem-Solving  (3  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  learn  and  practice  new  ways 
of  thinking.  Discusses  ways  to  sense  and  analyze 
problems,  develop  ideas,  and  evaluate  and  im- 
plement solutions,  and  examines  the  attitudes 
and  climates  conducive  to  creative  thinking. 
Also  provides  methods  for  developing  imagina- 
tion, the  key  part  of  the  creative  process. 
HRM  4325  Training  and  Development  in  Organizations 
(3  q.h.) 

Explores  the  basics  of  training  in  a  variety  of 
settings  in  organizations.  Special  emphasis  is 
placed  on  training  and  development  as  a 
human  resource  function  by  providing  an 
overview  of  the  principles  of  adult  learning, 
needs  assessment,  goal  setting,  and  design 
and  evaluation. 

HRM  4330  Employment  Rights  1  (3  q.h.) 
Topics  include  minimum  wage,  hours  of  work, 
overtime,  and  other  pertinent  rules  and 
regulations,  and  child  labor  laws.  Study  of 
laws  dealing  with  health,  safety,  disability, 
and  compensation  for  work-related  injuries, 
such  as  OSHA,  ERISA.  Prereq.  HRM  4303. 

HRM  4332  Employment  Rights  2  (3  q.h.) 
Examination  of  the  old  Civil  Rights  Laws 
(Sections  1981,  1983,  1985  [3],  1988);  Title  VI, 
VH,  and  IX  of  the  Civil  Rights  Act  of  1964; 
Age  Discrimination  in  Employment  Act; 
Equal  Pay  Act;  Sections  503  and  504  of  the 
Rehabilitation  Act  of  1973;  Equal  Opportunity 
Act  11246;  Affirmative  Action  and  related 
areas;  and  current  rulings  and  court  decisions 
regarding  discrimination  on  the  basis  of  race, 
sex,  religion,  national  origin,  age,  and 
disability.  Prereq.  HRM  4303. 
HRM  4340  Public  and  Private  Sector  Collective 
Bargaining  in  the  United  States  (formerly  HRM 
4341,  Private  Sector  Collective  Bargaining  in 
the  United  States)  (3  q.h.) 
Comparison  of  critical  issues  and  problems  af- 
fecting collective  bargaining  between  unions 
and  national,  state,  and  local  governments; 
and  between  unions  and  the  private  domestic 
sector  of  the  economy.  Student  participation 
required.  Prereq.  HRM  4303. 
HRM  4345  Comparative  International  Labor  Relations 
Systems  (3  q.h.) 

Comparison  and  contrast  of  selected  interna- 
tional labor  relations  systems  with  that  of  the 
United  States,  including  recent  developments 


iiiTinia^nniir 


such  as  worker  participation  and  co- 
determination.  Research  and  preparation  of 
position  paper  by  the  student;  class  discus- 
sion. Prereq.  HRM4303. 
HRM  4346  Negotiations  in  Labor  Management  (3  q.h.) 
Negotiation  skills,  the  use  of  mediation  and 
fact-finding  in  collective  bargaining  agree- 
ments, the  interpretation  and  application  of 
such  agreements,  and  the  use  of  arbitration. 
Student  participation  in  simulated  negotia- 
tion and  grievance  procedures.  Prereq.  HRM 
4303. 

HRM  4401  Organizational  Behavior  (Reserved)  (3  q.h.) 
Fundamentals  of  organizational  life,  emphasiz- 
ing the  structure  and  discipline  of  groups 
typically  found  in  a  business  setting.  Issues 
and  data  related  to  leadership  styles,  employee 
motivation,  and  organizational  dynamics.  Re- 
quires significant  student  participation. 
Prereq.  80  q.h. 

HRM  4402  Introduction  to  Human  Resources 
Management  (Reserved)  (3  q.h.) 
Introduction  to  the  rights  and  responsibilities 
of  employer  organizations,  individual 
employees,  and  employee  organizations  and 
how  they  influence  personnel  and  labor  rela- 
tions activities  within  an  organization.  Prereq. 
HRM  4401  or  HRM  4301  and  80  q.h. 
HRM  4403  Applied  Human  Resources  Management 
(Reserved)  (3  q.h.) 

Goals  and  structures  of  various  employer  and 
employee  organizations  are  examined  and 
evaluated  in  terms  of  effective  human 
resources  management.  How  the  collective 
bargaining  process  changes  in  anticipation  of 
future  labor-management  relations.  Prereq. 
HRM  4402  or  HRM  4302  and  80  q.h. 
HRM  4404  Organizational  Behavior  and  Introduction 
to  Human  Resources  Management  (Intensive) 
(Reserved)  (6  q.h.) 

Same  as  HRM  4401  and  HRM  4402.  Prereq. 
80  q.h. 

HRM  4600  Honors  Program  1  (4  q.h.) 

Opportunity  to  undertake  an  in-depth 

research  study  project.  See  page  17  for  details. 

Prereq.  96  q.h.,  3.5  q.p.q. 

HRM  4601  Honors  Program  2  (4  q.h.) 

See  HRM  4600. 

HRM  4602  Honors  Program  3  (4  q.h.) 

See  HRM  4600. 

HRM  4701  Independent  Study  1  (3  q.h.) 

Opportunity  to  undertake  special  research. 

See  page  17  for  details.  Prereq.  96  q.h., 

3.0  q.p.a. 


HRM  4702  Independent  Study  2  (3  q.h.) 

See  HRM  4701. 

HRM  4703  Independent  Study  3  (3  q.h.) 
See  HRM  4701. 

HRM  4800  Advanced  Tutorial  1  (3  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  take  upper  level  course  in- 
dependently. See  page  16  for  details.  Prereq. 
87  q.h. 

HRM  4801  Advanced  Tutorial  2  (3  q.h.) 
See  HRM  4800. 
HRM  4900  Fieldwork  (6  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  enhance  career  development 
by  applying  academic  background  to  practical 
problems  in  the  workplace.  See  page  16  for 
details.  Prereq.  Approval  of  Program  Director. 

HEALTH  SCIENCE 

HSC  4210  Basic  Nutrition  (3  q.h.) 
Introduction  to  nutrition  and  foods.  Focuses 
on  current  scientific  knowledge  of  nutrition 
and  how  this  knowledge  can  guide  an  in- 
dividual toward  making  appropriate  food 
choices. 

HSC  4220  Basic  Pharmacology  (3  q.h.) 

Introduction  to  the  major  classes  of  drugs. 
Presents  the  mode  of  action,  common  side  ef- 
fects, dosage,  pharmaceutical  forms,  rate  and 
route  of  administration,  and  known  interac- 
tions and  toxicities  of  the  most  commonly  used 
drugs.  Prereq.  BIO  4177,  CHM4113,  or 
equiv.,  or  instructor's  permission. 
HSC  4301  Mechanisms  of  Disease  1  (3  q.h.) 
The  pathophysiology  of  major  diseases. 
Discusses  diagnosis  and  treatment,  emphasiz- 
ing inflammation,  immunology,  infectious 
disease  oncology,  endocrine  disorders,  and 
trauma.  Prereq.  BIO  4177  or  equiv. 
HSC  4302  Mechanisms  of  Disease  2  (3  q.h.) 
Continuation  of  HSC  4301,  using  an  organ- 
system  approach  to  disease.  Emphasizes  car- 
diovascular, gastro-intestinal,  pulmonary,  and 
musculoskeletal  diseases.  Prereq.  HSC  4301. 
HSC  4310  Public  Health  1  (3  q.h.) 
Study  of  principles  of  public  health  and  cur- 
rent mental  and  physical  health  problems.  In- 
cludes communicable  diseases,  mental  health, 
maternal  and  child  health,  alcoholism,  and 
chronic  diseases.  Also  examines  federal,  state, 
and  community  resources  mobilized  to  aid  in 
prevention,  identification,  treatment,  and 
rehabilitation. 

HSC  4311  Public  Health  2  (3  q.h.) 
Continuation  of  HSC  4310.  Includes  en- 
vironmental health;  official,  voluntary,  and 


nisiory  lai 


international  health  organizations;  preventive 
medicine;  and  public  health  education. 
HSC  4315  Environmental  Problems  and  Health  (3  q.h.) 
Environmental  conditions  on  land  and  in  the 
air  and  water,  including  the  causes  of  pollu- 
tion, its  effects  on  human  and  other  life,  and 
a  general  discussion  of  current  control 
methods.  Emphasizes  the  significance  of  en- 
vironmental problems  for  the  individual. 
HSC  4320  Training  and  Development  in  the  Health 
Professions  1  (3  q.h.) 

Educational  program  design  for  the  practi- 
tioner, including  program  planning,  teaching 
strategies,  and  the  development  and  evalua- 
tion of  educational  objectives. 
HSC  4321  Training  and  Development  in  the  Health 
Professions  2  (3  q.h.) 

Continuation  of  HSC  4320.  Emphasizes  pro- 
gram implementation  and  evaluation  and  stu- 
dent motivation.  Prereq.  HSC  4320. 
HSC  4600  Advanced  Nutrition  (3  q.h.) 
Study  of  food  chemistry,  nutrition,  and 
physiology  as  applied  to  diet.  Includes  recent 
developments  in  normal  nutrition  and  a 
critical  review  of  the  literature  and  experi- 
mental data  on  which  principles  of  human 
nutrition  are  based.  Prereq.  HSC  4210. 
HSC  4601  Advanced  Pharmacology  (3  q.h.) 
Prereq.  HSC  4220  or  equiv. 
HSC  4602  Methods  and  Materials  in  Public  Health 
Education  (3  q.h.) 

Introduction  to  public  health  education. 
Prereq.  HSC  4311  or  instructor's  permission. 
HSC  4610  Geriatric  Nutrition  (3  q.h.) 
Integration  of  basic  nutrition  principles  with 
the  most  current  information  on  the  aging 
process.  Reviews  state,  local,  and  federal 
nutrition  programs  in  terms  of  services, 
eligibility,  and  effect  upon  the  elderly.  Prereq. 
knowledge  of  basic  nutrition  or  instructor's 
permission. 

HSC  5610  Geriatric  Nutrition  (3  CEUs) 
Same  as  HSC  4610. 
HSC  4613  Oral  Microbiology  (3  q.h.) 
Study  of  microbiota  inhabiting  the  ecologic 
niches  of  the  oral  cavity.  Examines  factors 
that  contribute  to  the  role  of  bacteria  in  oral 
pathology,  particularly  caries  and  periodontal 
disease,  and  the  relationship  of  bacteria  and 
therapy.  Prereq.  BIO  4190. 

HSC  4614  Advanced  Periodontology  1  (3  q.h.) 

Diagnosis,  treatment,  and  control  of  periodon- 
tal diseases,  starting  with  a  review  of  the 


structure  and  purposes  of  the  periodontal 
tissues.  Emphasizes  the  role  of  the  dental 
hygienist  in  recognizing  and  treating  disease, 
motivating  and  instructing  the  patient,  and 
carrying  out  periodontal  maintenance 
therapy.  Includes  mucogingival  problems,  fur- 
cation involvements,  acute  gingival  infections, 
root  planing,  and  gingival  curettage.  Students 
prepare  a  paper  on  a  topic  of  special  interest. 
Prereq.  Dental  Hygiene  Certificate. 
HSC  4615  Advanced  Periodontology  2  (3  q.h.) 
Latest  advances  and  theories  in  periodon- 
tology. Includes  the  role  of  bacteria  in  pathology, 
immunopathology,  and  therapeutic  alter- 
natives. Class  participation  is  stressed. 
Prereq.  Dental  Hygiene  Certificate  or  instruc- 
tor's permission. 

HSC  4700  Advanced  Tutorial  1  (3  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  take  upper-level  course  in- 
dependently. See  page  16  for  details.  Prereq. 
87  q.h. 

HSC  4701  Advanced  Tutorial  2  (3  q.h.) 
See  HSC  4700. 

HSC  4801  Independent  Study  1  (3  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  undertake  special  research. 
See  page  17  for  details.  Prereq.  96  q.h., 
3.0  q.p.a. 

HSC  4802  Independent  Study  2  (3  q.h.) 
See  HSC  4801. 

HSC  4803  Independent  Study  3  (3  q.h.) 
See  HSC  4801. 

HISTORY 

HST  4101  The  Civilization  of  the  Ancient  and 
Medieval  Worlds 

(formerly  History  of  Civilization  1)  (3  q.h.) 
Development  of  human  institutions  up  to  the 
end  of  the  Middle  Ages.  Emphasizes  the  con- 
tinuities and  changes  that  occur  within 
civilizations  and  the  similarities,  differences, 
and  relationships  that  exist  among  contem- 
porary civilizations  around  the  world.  Ex- 
plores implications  of  each  historical  period 
for  our  lives  today. 

HST  4102  The  Civilization  of  the  Early  Modern  World 
(formerly  History  of  Civilization  2)  (3  q.h.) 
The  period  from  the  end  of  the  Middle  Ages 
to  the  French  Revolution  in  1789.  Emphasizes 
the  intellectual,  technological,  and  political 
expansion  of  Europe  and  the  reactions  of  the 
rest  of  the  world  to  it.  Special  attention  is 


19Z         History 


given  to  such  topics  as  the  rise  of  dynastic 
states,  the  rise  and  fall  of  mercantilism,  the 
scientific  revolution,  exploration  and  gun- 
powder technology,  and  order  and  revolution. 
HST  4103  The  Civilization  of  the  Modern  World 
(formerly  History  of  Civilization  3)  (3  q.h.) 
The  world  from  1789  to  the  present.  Includes 
capitalism,  industrialization,  nationalism,  im- 
perialism, the  clash  of  ideologies  in  the  nine- 
teenth century,  and  a  study  of  total  war  in 
the  present  century.  Based  on  this  historical 
study,  explores  prospects  for  the  future. 
HST  4110  History  of  Civilization  A  (4  q.h.) 
Major  ideas  and  institutions  of  civilizations 
from  ancient  times  to  1648.  For  Alternative 
Freshmen-Year  Students  only.  Not  open  to 
students  who  have  taken  HST  4101  or  HST 
4102. 

HST  4111  History  of  Civilization  B  (4  q.h.) 
Continuation  of  HST  4110,  covering  the 
period  since  1648.  For  Alternative  Freshmen- 
Year  Students  only.  Not  open  to  students  who 
have  taken  HST  4102  or  HST  4103. 
HST  4201  American  History  1763-1848 
(formerly  American  History  1)  (3  q.h.) 
America  from  1763  to  1848,  with  attention  to 
the  development  of  political,  economic,  and 
social  institutions  in  the  new  republic. 
HST  4202  American  History  1848-1917 
(formerly  American  History  2)  (3  q.h.) 
The  United  States  from  1848  to  1917,  with  at- 
tention to  the  Civil  War,  economic  develop- 
ment thereafter,  and  the  Progressive  Era. 

HST  4203  American  History  Since  1917  (formerly 
American  History  3)  (3  q.h.) 
The  United  States  since  1917,  an  age  of  ur- 
banized industrialism  and  international  in- 
volvement and  crisis. 
HST  4241  The  Historian's  Craft  (3  q.h.) 
Discussion  of  ways  in  which  the  historian 
studies  the  past,  with  emphasis  on  research 
and  writing. 

HST  4263  Oral  History  (3  q.h.) 
Learning  history  from  those  who  lived  it. 
Students  conduct  tape-recorded  interviews  of 
first-hand  experiences  in  a  selected  area  of 
twentieth-century  history.  Students  need  ac- 
cess to  an  audiotape  recorder. 
HST  4265  Introduction  to  Public  History  (3  q.h.) 
Topics  include  the  new  discipline  of  public 
historical  archiving,  the  construction  of 
historical  displays  and  exhibits,  the  preserva- 
tion and  restoration  of  historic  sites  and  struc- 
tures, the  editing  of  historical  documents  and 


journals,  the  operation  of  historical  societies, 
and  the  production  of  historical  media 
programs. 

HST  4301  Technological  Transformation  of  Society 
(3  q.h.) 

The  relation  between  technological  innova- 
tions and  the  world  in  which  they  take  place. 
Discusses  conditions  necessary  for  discovery 
and  innovation  and  the  impact  of  technology 
on  the  political,  economic,  and  social  environ- 
ment. (Thematic  Group  D) 
HST  4302  History  of  Flight  and  Space  (3  q.h.) 
Beginning  with  the  ancient  Greeks'  and 
Leonardo  da  Vinci's  dreams  of  flight,  the 
course  traces  the  history  of  nonpowered  flight 
from  the  balloon  experiments  of  the  Mont- 
golfier  brothers  to  contemporary  hang-gliders;  of 
powered  flight  from  the  Wright  brothers 
through  supersonic  transport;  and  of  rocketry 
and  space  travel  from  their  beginnings 
through  the  Enterprise.  (Thematic  Group  D) 
HST  4303  History  of  the  Automobile  (3  q.h.) 
History  of  the  automobile  in  Europe  and 
America.  Includes  invention,  production,  im- 
pact on  social  and  economic  life,  and  the  pro- 
blems of  pollution  and  energy.  (Thematic 
Group  D) 

HST  4304  History  of  Energy  (3  q.h.) 
Examination  of  how  human  beings  have 
mobilized  the  forces  of  nature  to  survive,  to 
alter  and  improve  their  lifestyles,  and  to 
dominate  their  fellow  human  beings.  Em- 
phasizes the  transformation  from  one  energy 
source  to  the  available  alternatives  and  the 
reasons  for  the  choices  made.  Includes  the 
change  from  human  power  to  animal  and 
machine  power,  the  energy  crisis  of  the  six- 
teenth century,  the  turning  from  wood  to 
water  and  coal  power,  the  rising  use  of  elec- 
tricity and  fossil  fuels,  the  birth  of  the  Atomic 
Age,  and  the  contemporary  history  of  the  oil 
crisis.  (Thematic  Group  D) 
HST  4305  Health  and  Sickness:  Historical 
Perspectives  (3  q.h.) 

Survey  of  medical  theories  from  ancient  times 
to  the  present,  emphasizing  concepts  of 
disease  causation  and  the  health  care  systems 
or  institutions  derived  from  them.  Medical 
theory  and  practice  are  related  to  both  the 
general  history  of  the  period  and  the  par- 
ticular political,  economic,  or  social  cir- 
cumstances that  influenced  attitudes  regar- 
ding health  care.  (Thematic  Group  D) 
HST  4401  Ancient  Middle  East  (3  q.h.) 
Study  of  ancient  cultures  and  peoples  in  the 
Middle  East  to  the  rise  of  Islam. 


History  193 


HST  4403  History  of  the  Jews  1  (3  q.h.) 
Cultural  and  intellectual  survey  of  the  Jews 
from  the  end  of  antiquity  to  early  modern 
times. 

HST  4404  History  of  the  Jews  2  (3  q.h.) 
Role  and  position  of  the  Jews  in  modern 
history.  (Thematic  Group  A) 
HST  4407  Ancient  Greece  (3  q.h.) 
Origin  and  development  of  Greek  civilization. 
HST  4408  Ancient  Rome  (3  q.h.) 
Ancient  Roman  civilization,  emphasizing  the 
rise  of  the  Republic  and  the  decline  of  the 
Empire. 

HST  4410  The  Middle  Ages  (3  q.h.) 
History  of  Europe  from  the  fall  of  Rome  to 
1350. 

HST  4412  Islamic  History  (3  q.h.) 
History  of  the  Muslim  Arab  world  from  the 
seventh  century  to  the  end  of  the  Abbasid 
Caliphate  in  1258. 

HST  4420  Renaissance  and  Reformation  (3  q.h.) 
History  of  Europe  from  1350  to  1648,  with  at- 
tention to  intellectual,  religious,  political,  and 
economic  developments. 
HST  4424  Europe  1870-1921  (3  q.h.) 
Background  of  World  War  I,  including  na- 
tionalism, militarism,  imperialism,  and  the 
alliance  system,  as  well  as  the  making  of  war 
and  peace.  (Thematic  Group  C) 
HST  4425  Europe  Since  1921  (3  q.h.) 
Europe  after  World  War  I;  World  War  II;  the 
Cold  War;  and  the  efforts  to  unify  the  conti- 
nent. (Thematic  Group  C) 
HST  4434  Family  History  (3  q.h.) 
History  of  the  family  in  Europe  and  America 
from  1600  to  the  present.  Includes  the  chang- 
ing nature  and  role  of  the  family,  marriage 
and  divorce,  child  rearing,  and  aging. 
(Thematic  Group  E) 

HST  4435  Women  in  European  History  (3  q.h.) 
Historical  examination  of  the  position  and 
role  of  women  in  European  life.  (Thematic 
Group  E) 

HST  4443  European  Intellectual  History  Since  1815 
(3  q.h.) 

Main  currents  of  European  thought  from 
Romanticism  to  the  present  and  their  social 
and  political  contexts. 
HST  4455  Ireland  Since  1800  (3  q.h.) 
The  Irish  question  in  British  politics  from  the 
Act  of  Union  to  the  present.  (Thematic  Group  A) 
HST  4460  Hitler's  Germany  (3  q.h.) 
Origins  and  nature  of  Hitler's  Third  Reich, 
emphasizing  the  personal  lives  of  Nazi  leaders 


in  an  attempt  to  understand  how  seemingly 
ordinary  people  could  enthusiastically  pro- 
mote wars  of  aggression  and  revel  in 
genocidal  policies.  (Thematic  Group  C) 
HST  4466  History  of  Eastern  Europe  Since  1500 
(3  q.h.) 

Topics  include  Stefan  Bathory  and  papal  in- 
terest in  Orthodox  Russia;  Western  inter- 
ference in  Russia's  "Time  of  Troubles"; 
Swedish  invasions  and  the  Northern  War; 
the  decline  of  Poland  through  Stanislaw 
Poniatowski  and  Czarina  Catherine  the  Great 
of  Russia.  Also  covers  the  partitions  of  Poland 
and  Tadeusz  Kosciuszko;  Napoleon;  revolu- 
tionary movements  through  1848;  Slavic 
romantic  revolutionaries  and  the  fin  de  siecle; 
World  War  I  and  the  reconstruction  of  eastern 
Europe;  Hitler;  Stalin;  World  War  II;  and  the 
Iron  Curtain. 

HST  4467  Russia  to  1917  (3  q.h.) 
Emergence  of  Russia  as  a  recognized  Euro- 
pean power;  history  of  the  Russian  people  and 
government  to  the  revolutions  of  1917. 
HST  4468  Russia  Since  1917  (3  q.h.) 
The  revolutions  of  1917  and  the  subsequent 
history  of  the  Russian  people  and  govern- 
ment, with  special  emphasis  on  foreign  rela- 
tions. (Thematic  Group  C) 
HST  4469  Russian  Expansionism  (3  q.h.) 
Russia's  quest  for  territory  after  1500,  with 
attention  to  the  conquest  of  neighboring  ter- 
ritories, the  Sino-Russian  disputes,  and  cur- 
rent issues  in  Soviet  geopolitics.  (Thematic 
Group  C) 

HST  4501  American  Indians  (3  q.h.) 
Survey  of  native  Americans  from  pre- 
Columbian  times  to  the  present.  (Thematic 
Group  A) 

HST  4502  Colonial  America  (3  q.h.) 
Topics  include  exploration  and  settlement  of 
North  America;  the  development  of  political, 
social,  and  economic  institutions;  and  the  in- 
ternational rivalry  to  1763. 
HST  4503  The  American  Revolution  (3  q.h.) 
British-American  relations  after  1763;  war 
and  peace. 

HST  4505  The  Making  of  the  American  Constitution 
(3  q.h.) 

Beginning  with  the  weaknesses  of  the  Ar- 
ticles of  Confederation,  this  course  examines 
the  movement  for  a  stronger  national  govern- 
ment, the  drafting  of  the  Constitution  and  the 
first  twelve  amendments,  and  their  implemen- 
tation in  the  early  years  of  the  Republic. 


194         History 


HST  4506  American  Constitutional  History,  1835-1910 

(3  q.h.) 

American  constitutional  development  in  the 
time  of  Chief  Justice  Taney;  the  constitu- 
tional impacts  of  secession  and  Civil  War; 
post-Civil  War  Supreme  Court  cases  involving 
economic  affairs,  social  problems,  and  in- 
dividual rights  in  the  terms  of  Chief  Justices 
Chase,  Waite,  and  Fuller. 
HST  4507  American  Constitutional  History  Since  1910 
(3  q.h.) 

American  constitutional  development  from 
the  Progressive  Era  to  the  present,  with  at- 
tention to  amendments  to  the  Constitution, 
the  growth  of  the  national  government,  and 
Supreme  Court  cases  involving  economic 
affairs,  civil  liberties,  and  civil  rights. 
HST  4511  Populism  and  Progressivism  (3  q.h.) 
Topical  history  of  the  United  States  from 
1890  to  1920,  concentrating  on  its  reactions  to 
industrialization  and  urbanization. 
HST  4512  The  Age  of  Roosevelt  (3  q.h.) 
Topical  history  of  the  United  States  in  time  of 
world  war,  prosperity,  depression,  and  war 
again. 

HST  4513  Contemporary  America  (3  q.h.) 
The  American  people  from  the  close  of  World 
War  II  to  the  present.  (Thematic  Group  C) 
HST  4523  American  Diplomatic  History  (3  q.h.) 
Selected  topics  in  the  history  of  American 
foreign  relations  and  policy  since  1789. 
HST  4530  American  Economic  History  (3  q.h.) 
Selected  topics  in  the  development  of  the 
capitalist  economy  in  the  United  States,  with 
attention  to  the  role  of  government  since 
1789.  (Thematic  Group  B) 
HST  4540  American  Social  History  (3  q.h.) 
Selected  topics  in  the  life  of  the  American 
people  since  1789.  (Thematic  Group  B  or  E) 
HST  4542  Women  in  American  History  (3  q.h.) 
Historical  examination  of  the  position  and 
role  of  women  in  American  life.  (Thematic 
Group  B  or  E) 

HST  4543  African-American  History  (3  q.h.) 
History  of  African  Americans  from  colonial 
times  to  the  present.  (Thematic  Group  A) 
HST  4546  Americans  at  Play:  A  History  of  Leisure 
(3  q.h.) 

An  examination  of  300  years  of  leisure  from 
the  colonial  quilting  bee  to  modern  profes- 
sional football,  with  special  attention  to  class, 
gender,  and  ethnicity  and  attempts  to 
regulate  leisure  activity.  (Thematic  Group  B) 


HST  4547  History  of  Sport  in  America  (3  q.h.) 
History  of  the  major  sports  and  their  impact 
on  American  life.  (Thematic  Group  B) 
HST  4548  American  Heroes  (3  q.h.) 
Comparative  exploration  of  the  nature  and 
functions  of  heroism  in  American  history,  us- 
ing such  individuals  as  George  Washington, 
Jesse  James,  Amelia  Earhart,  Martin  Luther 
King,  and  Bruce  Springsteen  as  specific  case 
studies.  (Thematic  Group  B) 
HST  4549  American  Inquisitions  (3  q.h.) 
Study  of  inquisitions  in  modern  America,  con- 
centrating on  the  suppression  of  radical 
movements  by  both  government  and  private 
groups.  (Thematic  Group  C) 
HST  4550  Boston  to  1822  (3  q.h.) 
Study  of  the  Town  of  Boston  from  its  estab- 
lishment in  1630  to  1822  and  the  develop- 
ment of  political,  economic,  and  social 
institutions. 

HST  4551  Boston  Since  1822  (3  q.h.) 
Study  of  the  City  of  Boston,  its  annexations, 
and  the  changes  in  the  ethnic  nature  of  the 
population. 

HST  4602  Contemporary  Latin  America  (3  q.h.) 
Social,  economic,  and  political  development  of 
the  Latin  American  republics  in  the  twen- 
tieth century.  (Thematic  Group  A  or  C) 
HST  4603  The  United  States,  Central  America,  and 
the  Caribbean  (3  q.h.) 

Latin  American  countries  nearest  the  United 
States  and  most  affected  by  U.S.  policies,  par- 
ticularly Cuba,  Mexico,  Nicaragua,  El 
Salvador,  and  Guatemala.  Emphasizes  the 
historical  background  of  current  issues. 
(Thematic  Group  C) 
HST  4604  Mexico  Since  1848  (3  q.h.) 
Political,  economic,  social,  and  cultural  evolu- 
tion of  Mexico  since  the  Mexican- American 
War.  Other  topics  and  issues  include  the 
Juarez  Reforma,  Diaz's  dictatorship,  the 
Revolution  of  1910,  and  the  on-going  Institu- 
tional Revolution. 
HST  4606  Canadian  History  (3  q.h.) 
The  history  of  Canada  from  the  time  of  the 
European  settlement  to  the  present,  with  em- 
phasis on  Canadian  relations  with  the  U.S. 
and  the  background  of  the  Quebec  separatist 
movement. 

HST  4611  Africa  Since  1885  (3  q.h.) 
The  European  impact  on  Africa,  the  rise  of 
African  nationalism,  and  the  emergence  of  in- 
dependent African  states  and  their  relations 
with  other  nations.  (Thematic  Group  C) 


Hotel  and  Restaurant  Management         195 


HST  4622  Modem  Middle  East  (3  q.h.) 
The  Middle  East  since  1914,  with  attention 
to  Zionism,  Pan-Arabism,  the  effects  of  two 
world  wars,  and  the  postwar  settlements. 
(Thematic  Group  C) 
HST  4632  China  Since  1850  (3  q.h.) 
A  century  of  China's  history,  emphasizing  the 
Western  impact  on  Chinese  civilization, 
China's  struggle  to  maintain  independence, 
and  the  victory  of  communism  in  the  mid- 
twentieth  century.  (Thematic  Group  A) 
HST  4636  Japan  Since  1850  (3  q.h.) 
Analysis  of  Japanese  domestic  developments 
and  foreign  relations  since  the  mid-nineteenth 
century.  (Thematic  Group  A) 
HST  4640  Third  World  Women  (3  q.h.) 
Role  of  women  in  the  less  developed,  Third 
World  areas,  with  special  emphasis  on  aspects 
of  change,  development,  and  continuity. 
(Thematic  Group  E) 

HST  4641  Global  Women's  Movement  (3  q.h.) 
Examination  of  the  origins,  issues,  organiza- 
tions, networks,  and  resources  of  the  global 
women's  movement.  Attention  is  given  to  the 
place  of  the  U.S.  women's  movement  within 
this  global  movement,  the  movement  in 
developing  countries,  and  the  role  of  the 
United  Nation's  Conferences  on  Women  in 
fostering  the  movement's  development. 
(Thematic  Group  E) 

HST  4644  War  and  Peace  in  the  Nuclear  Age  (3  q.h.) 
The  history  of  the  nuclear  age  based  on  a 
Corporation  for  Public  Broadcasting/Annenberg 
telecourse.  By  incorporating  a  variety  of 
perspectives  on  the  nuclear  past— political, 
historical,  philosophical,  and  scientific— the 
programs,  lectures,  and  accompanying  print 
materials  provide  students  with  a  solid  foun- 
dation of  knowledge  upon  which  they  can 
base  their  views  of  the  nuclear  future. 
(Thematic  Group  C) 

HST  4645  History  of  the  Vietnam  Wars  (3  q.h.) 
History  of  military  conflict  in  Vietnam,  with 
attention  to  the  rise  of  the  Viet  Minh  during 
World  War  II,  the  struggle  against  the 
French  in  the  first  Indochina  War,  the  impact 
of  the  Cold  War,  and  the  involvement  of  the 
United  States  after  1950  in  Laos  and  Cam- 
bodia (now  Kampuchea)  as  well  as  in  Viet- 
nam. Emphasizes  the  role  of  communism  and 
nationalism  in  Indochina  and  the  motives  for 
American  intervention.  Includes  films  reveal- 
ing American  reaction  to  the  escalating  con- 
flict. (Thematic  Group  C) 


HST  4646  The  Heritage  of  the  Vietnam  Wars  (3  q.h. ) 

Examines  the  impact  of  the  American  in- 
volvement in  Vietnam  on  American  foreign 
and  domestic  policy  as  well  as  on  American 
attitudes  toward  themselves  and  toward  the 
world  in  the  period  since  1975.  Emphasis  will 
be  placed  on  post-war  interpretations  of  that 
conflict,  on  its  effects  on  American  ideals,  on 
ideas  of  military  preparedness,  on  the 
economy,  on  popular  culture,  and  on  the 
"healing  processes"  that  have  marked  the 
last  decade.  An  assessment  of  the  extent  to 
which  Vietnam  continues  to  haunt  the 
American  people  and  the  extent  to  which  the 
country  has  put  the  experience  behind  it  will 
be  made  and  an  agenda  for  future  action  set 
forth  by  the  class.  (Thematic  Group  C) 
HST  4811  Honors  Program  1  (4  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  undertake  an  in-depth 
research  study  project.  See  page  17  for  details. 
Prereq.  96  q.h.,  3.5  q.p.a.  (Thematic  Group  F) 
HST  4812  Honors  Program  2  (4  q.h.) 
See  HST  4811. 

HST  4813  Honors  Program  3  (4  q.h.) 
See  HST  4811. 

HST  4815  Advanced  Tutorial  1  (3  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  take  an  upper-level  course  in- 
dependently. See  page  16  for  details.  Prereq. 
87  q.h.  - 

HST  4816  Advanced  Tutorial  2  (3  q.h.) 
See  HST  4815. 

HST  4821  Field  Work  in  History  (6  q.h.) 
Designed  to  enhance  career  development  by 
allowing  students  to  earn  credit  for  the  ap- 
plication of  their  academic  backgrounds  to 
practical  problems  in  the  work  place.  See 
page  16  for  details.  Prereq.  HST  4101,  4102, 
4103,  4202,  4203,  4241,  and  Program  Direc- 
tor's approval. 

HST  4822  Independent  Study  1  (3  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  undertake  special  research. 
See  page  17  for  details.  Prereq.  96  q.h., 
3.0  q.p.a. 

HST  4823  Independent  Study  2  (3  q.h.) 
See  HST  4822. 

HST  4824  Independent  Study  3  (3  q.h.) 
See  HST  4822. 

HOTEL  AND  RESTAURANT  MANAGEMENT 

HTL  4301  Introduction  to  Hotel  and  Restaurant 
Management  (3  q.h.) 

The  hospitality  industry  in  today's  economy. 
Emphasis  is  on  industry  growth  and  develop- 
ment, management  problems,  and  principles 
of  hotel  and  restaurant  management. 


196         Hotel  and  Restaurant  Management 


HTL  4303  Front  Office  Management  (3  q.h. ) 
Role  and  functions  of  the  front  office  as  they 
relate  to  the  operation  of  the  entire  hotel. 
Covers  front  office  structure,  registration, 
payment,  reservations,  and  night  audit. 
HTL  4304  Hotel  and  Restaurant  Law  (3  q.h.) 
Introduction  to  the  fundamental  laws,  rules, 
and  regulations  applicable  to  the  hospitality 
industry.  Includes  hospitality  management 
policies  that  minimize  the  danger  of  legal 
liability;  innkeeping;  restaurant  management; 
alcoholic  beverage  control;  labor  laws;  and 
legislation  affecting  the  hospitality  industry. 
HTL  4305  Food  Preparation  1  (3  q.h.) 
Introduction  to  the  fundamentals  of  food 
preparation  and  service,  with  emphasis  on 
food  service  industry  terminology  and  equip- 
ment. Includes  menu  planning,  requisition- 
ing, pricing,  and  preparation  and  service.  In 
addition  to  classroom  instruction,  students 
prepare  food  in  a  small-quantity  laboratory. 
(Laboratory  fee.) 
HTL  4306  Food  Preparation  2  (3  q.h.) 
Continuation  of  HTL  4305.  Prereq.  HTL  4305. 
(Laboratory  fee.) 

HTL  4307  Food  Service  Engineering  and  Sanitation 
(3  q.h.) 

Organization  of  the  maintenance  and 
engineering  function.  Includes  the  technical 
information  necessary  to  establish  effective 
preventive  programs.  Details  the  fundamen- 
tals of  sanitation  for  food  service  employees 
and  includes  practical  guidelines  for  safe  food 
handling.  Provides  the  future  hospitality 
manager  with  an  opportunity  for  certification 
in  Applied  Food  Service  Sanitation  from  the 
National  Institute  for  the  Food  Service 
Industry. 

HTL  4308  Food  and  Beverage  Cost  Control  (3  q.h.) 
Introduction  to  management  attitudes  toward 
cost  controls  through  analysis  of  all  aspects  of 
the  food  service  operation.  Includes  classifica- 
tion of  food  service  facilities,  cost  accounting, 
purchasing,  inventory,  production  control 
methods,  and  the  essentials  of  food  and 
beverage  controls.  Develops  management- 
mindedness  through  examination  of  organiza- 
tional structures  of  food  service  and  specific 
topics,  such  as  menu  pricing,  break-even 
analysis,  and  cost-volume-profit  theory.  Em- 
phasizes forecasting  and  achieving  a  pro- 
fitable bottom  line. 


HTL  4309  Managerial  Accounting  for  the  Hospitality 
Industry  (3  q.h.) 

Financial  practices  and  systems  used  in  the 
hospitality  industry.  Analyzes  controls, 
budgeting,  financial  statements,  and  specializ- 
ed industry  accounting  procedures.  Prereq. 
ACC  4102. 

HTL  4310  Hospitality  Marketing  Management  (3  q.h.) 
The  market  in  which  the  hospitality  industry 
operates.  Students  have  the  opportunity  to 
develop  and  implement  a  marketing  plan  to 
meet  operational  goals.  Prereq.  MKT4301. 
HTL  4313  Introduction  to  Tourism  (3  q.h.) 
Introduction  to  the  science,  art,  and  business 
of  attracting,  transporting,  and  accommodating 
visitors  and  graciously  catering  to  their  needs 
and  wants.  Includes  sociological  and  psycho- 
logical aspects,  marketing,  and  the  economics 
of  tourism. 

HTL  4320  Food  Preparation  (Intensive)  (6  q.h.) 
Same  as  HTL  4305  and  HTL  4306. 
HTL  4322  Consumer  Food  Preparation  (3  q.h.) 
Concepts  and  skills  learned  in  HTL  4305  and 
HTL  4306  are  applied  in  a  restaurant  setting. 
Preparation  of  complete  menus  for  a  service 
dining  room,  including  appetizers,  soups, 
salads,  entrees,  vegetables,  and  desserts. 
Stresses  costing,  menu  planning,  quantity 
recipe  production,  menu  terminology,  and  kit- 
chen organization.  Coordinates  food  produc- 
tion with  students  in  the  dining  room  service 
course  (HTL  4324).  Work  in  classic  kitchen 
stations  on  a  rotating  basis.  Prereq.  HTL 
4306  or  HTL  4320. 

HTL  4324  Dining  Room  Beverage  Operation  and 
Preparation  (3  q.h.) 

Introduction  to  the  operation  of  a  dining  room 
with  beverage  service.  Includes  organization, 
personnel,  methods  of  table  service,  menu  ter- 
minology, table  arrangement,  requirements 
for  supplies  and  equipment,  sales  promotion 
techniques,  and  revenue  control.  Students 
serve  meals  prepared  by  students  in  the  food 
production  course  (HTL  4322).  Also  covers 
wine  service  and  alcoholic  beverage  prepara- 
tion and  control.  Prereq.  HTL  4301. 
HTL  4325  Intensive  Chef's  Training  (6  q.h.) 
For  the  individual  who  already  has  a  culinary 
background  and  wishes  to  continue  to  upgrade 
his  or  her  skills  and  understanding  of  the 
changing  role  of  today's  food  industry.  Ex- 
amines chef-management  relationship  and 


Industrial  Management         197 


the  preparation  of  finer  cuisine  for  hotels, 
restaurants,  clubs,  catering,  and  buffet.  Prac- 
tical demonstrations  from  hors  d'oeuvres, 
through  fancy  desserts.  Tableside  and  wine 
cookery,  ice  carving  and  extensive  menu 
planning. 

HTL  4326  The  Joy  of  Catering  (6  q.h.) 
How  to  create  truly  great  dinners  and  buffets. 
Garnishing,  vegetable  carving,  hors  d'oeuvres, 
bartending,  and  liquor  planning.  How  to  cost- 
out  a  party  and  plan  staff,  equipment,  and 
food  quantities. 

HTL  4600  Honors  Program  1  (4  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  undertake  an  in-depth 
research  study  project.  See  page  17  for  details. 
Prereq.  96  q.h.,  3.5  q.p.a. 
HTL  4601  Honors  Program  2  (4  q.h.) 
See  HTL  4600. 

HTL  4602  Honors  Program  3  (4  q.h.) 
See  HTL  4600. 

HTL  4701  Independent  Study  1  (3  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  undertake  special  research. 
See  page  17  for  details.  Prereq.  96  q.h., 
3.0  q.p.a. 

HTL  4702  Independent  Study  2  (3  q.h.) 

See  HTL  4701. 

HTL  4703  Independent  Study  3  (3  q.h.) 

See  HTL  4701. 

HTL  4800  Advanced  Tutorial  1  (3  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  take  upper  level  course  in- 
dependently. See  page  16  for  details.  Prereq. 
87  q.h. 

HTL  4801  Advanced  Tutorial  2  (3  q.h.) 
See  HTL  4800. 
HTL  4900  Fieldwork  (6  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  enhance  career  development 
by  applying  academic  background  to  practical 
problems  in  the  workplace.  See  page  16  for 
details.  Prereq.  Approval  of  Program  Director. 

INDUSTRIAL  MANAGEMENT 

IM  4301  Introduction  to  Operations  Management 
(Open)  (3  q.h.) 

Concepts  and  principles  related  to  the 
management  of  operation  functions,  taught 
from  a  management  point  of  view.  Relation- 
ships to  other  business  functions.  Operations, 
as  a  transformation  process,  with  inputs  of 
materials,  investment,  and  people  producing 
finished  goods/services.  Topics  covered  include 
product  and  process  design,  forecasting  de- 
mand, capacity  planning,  facilities  design,  ag- 
gregate planning,  scheduling,  and  quality 
control  and  assurance.  Prereq.  MS  4325. 


IM  4302  Operations  Analysis  (3  q.h.) 

Structuring  problems  and  the  application  of 
analytical  techniques  in  the  development  of 
solutions  to  operating  systems  problems. 
Topics  covered  include  operations  planning 
and  scheduling,  analyzing  operating  perfor- 
mance, quality  issues,  facilities  layout, 
materials  planning,  and  workforce  planning. 
Examination  of  the  operations  audit  as  it 
relates  to  manufacturing  and  service 
organizations  developed  as  a  tool  for  opera- 
tions analysis.  Prereq.  IM  4401  or  IM4301. 
IM  4314  Productivity  Enhancement  and  Quality 
(formerly  Production  Control  and  Inventory 
Management)  (3  q.h.) 

The  fields  of  quality  control  and  productivity 
as  a  body  of  managerial,  technological, 
behavioral,  and  economic  knowledge,  together 
with  the  organized  application  of  this  knowledge 
to  the  practical  improvement  of  operations. 
Introduction  to  various  productivity  improve- 
ment programs  currently  in  use,  including 
measurement  and  control;  the  relationship 
between  increase  in  productivity  and  managing 
for  higher  quality.  Reviews  management  prac- 
tices of  modern  quality  control  and  the  dif- 
ferent approaches  to  optimizing  quality.  In- 
cludes the  economics  of  total  quality,  internal 
and  external  quality,  and  management  of  long- 
term  quality  and  reliability.  Prereq.  MS  4332. 
IM  4317  Purchasing  and  Materials  Management 
(formerly  Materials  Management)  (3  q.h.) 
Development  and  analysis  of  factors  considered 
in  the  acquisition  process  and  subsequent 
management  of  the  materials  function.  Ex- 
amines the  relationships  among  price,  quality, 
and  delivery  performance.  Topics  covered  in- 
clude the  make-or-buy  decision,  corporate  pur- 
chasing strategies,  setting  customer  service 
levels,  inventory  analysis,  facility  location, 
storage  and  material  handling,  and  selection 
of  the  transportation  mode.  Prereq.  IM  4401 
or  IM  4301. 

IM  4321  Operations  Planning  and  Control  (formerly 
Management  and  Operational  Control 
Systems)  (3  q.h.) 

The  nature  of  control  in  general  and  the 
specific  characteristics  of  management  and 
operations  control.  Examines  control  struc- 
tures, processes,  and  bases  for  design  and  im- 
plementation. Prereq.  IM  4321. 
IM  4326  Operations  Management  Policy  (3  q.h.) 
Analysis  of  complex  operating  situations 
faced  by  business  managers.  Students  are  ex- 
posed to  integrative  cases  and  are  expected  to 


""  —  "'"" -»-■■■■■■■  ,.,m  ... 


identify  problems  in  organizations,  to  develop 
viable  courses  of  action,  to  conduct  detailed 
analyses,  and  to  identify  a  set  of  recommenda- 
tions and  an  implementation  strategy.  Prereq. 
IM  4314,  IM  431 7,  IM  4321. 
IM  4401  Introduction  to  Operations  Management 
(Reserved)  (formerly  Operations  Management) 
(3  q.h.) 

Concepts  and  principles  related  to  the 
management  of  operation  functions,  taught 
from  a  management  point  of  view.  Relation- 
ships to  other  business  functions.  Operations, 
as  a  transformation  process,  with  inputs  of 
materials,  investment,  and  people  producing 
finished  goods/services.  Topics  covered  include 
product  and  process  design,  forecasting  demand, 
capacity  planning,  facilities  design,  aggregate 
planning,  scheduling,  and  quality  control  and 
assurance.  Prereq.  MS  4325  and  80  q.h. 

IM  4600  Honors  Program  1  (4  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  undertake  an  in-depth 
research  study  project.  See  page  17  for  details. 
Prereq.  96  q.h.,  3.5  q.p.a. 
IM  4601  Honors  Program  2  (4  q.h.) 
See  IM  4600. 

IM  4602  Honors  Program  3  (4  q.h.) 
See  IM  4600. 

IM  4701  Independent  Study  1  (3  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  undertake  special  research. 
See  page  17  for  details.  Prereq.  96  q.h., 
3.0  q.p.a. 

IM  4702  Independent  Study  2  (3  q.h.) 
See  IM  4701. 

IM  4703  Independent  Study  3  (3  q.h.) 
See  IM  4701. 

IM  4800  Advanced  Tutorial  1  (3  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  take  upper-level  course  in- 
dependently. See  page  16  for  details.  Prereq. 
87  q.h. 

IM  4801  Advanced  Tutorial  2  (3  q.h.) 
See  IM  4800. 
IM  4900  Field  Work  (6  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  enhance  career  development 
by  applying  academic  background  to  practical 
problems  in  the  workplace.  See  page  16  for 
details.  Prereq.  Approval  of  Program  Director. 

INTERDISCIPLINARY 

INT  4110  Self-Assessment  and  Career  Development 

(3  q.h.) 

Understanding  the  concept  of  life  and  career 
planning  and  its  practical  implications  for 
future  education  and/or  work.  Students  com- 
plete a  self-assessment,  including  an  evalua- 
tion of  their  competencies  and  skills,  and 
receive  training  in  career  decision  making, 


with  practice  in  the  use  of  field  survey  techni- 
ques. Overview  of  job  campaigning  includes 
introduction  to  resume  preparation  and  inter- 
viewing techniques. 
INT  4200  The  Creative  Process  (3  q.h.) 
Thought  processes  that  allow  individuals  to 
be  creative  or  original.  Through  interactive 
exercises  and  special  projects  in  composition 
and  problem  solving,  students  can  learn  how 
to  tap  their  own  creativity.  Students  are  ask- 
ed to  create  an  original  piece  of  art,  music, 
literature,  or  research. 
INT  4201  Cultural  Heritage  Seminar  (3  q.h.) 
Study  of  the  interconnected  ways  in  which 
art,  music,  literature,  religion,  and  specific 
historical  events  have  shaped  our  culture, 
values,  and  self-perceptions.  Students  under- 
take projects  dealing  with  one  or  more  themes 
included  in  their  Cultural  Heritage  Studies. 
Prereq.  27  q.h.  in  Cultural  Heritage  Studies 
(see  Liberal  Studies  program,  page  16)  or  in- 
structor's permission. 

INT  4202  Contemporary  Studies  Seminar  (3  q.h.) 
Analysis  and  discussion  of  selected  problems 
of  the  contemporary  world,  using  analytical  tools 
appropriate  to  the  disciplines  contained  within 
the  Liberal  Studies  curriculum.  Prereq.  27  q.h. 
in  Contemporary  Studies  (see  Liberal  Studies 
program,  page  133)  or  instructor's  permission. 

JOURNALISM 

JRN  4112  Writing  for  Media  1  (formerly  Fun- 
damentals of  Newswriting)  (3  q.h.) 
Introduction  to  how  to  write  leads,  organize 
basic  news  stories,  gather  facts,  and  inter- 
view. Analyzes  news  values  and  the  structure 
of  news  organizations. 
JRN  4113  Writing  for  Media  2  (formerly 
Newsgathering  and  Reporting)  (3  q.h.) 
Writing  of  multisource  stories,  both  news  and 
feature;  public  affairs  reporting;  advanced  in- 
terviewing techniques;  and  legal  issues. 
Prereq.  JRN  4112  or  equiv. 
JRN  4114  News  Reporting  Techniques  (3  q.h.) 
Introduction  to  writing  in-depth  stories  re- 
quiring significant  research  and  introduction 
to  investigative  reporting.  Includes  libel, 
privacy  invasion,  and  other  legal  matters  af- 
fecting news  media.  Prereq.  JRN  4113  or  in- 
structor's permission. 
JRN  4250  Interpreting  the  News  (3  q.h.) 
The  impact,  both  good  and  bad,  of  newspapers, 
television,  radio,  and  other  news  media  on 
American  life.  Examines  how  news  is 
gathered,  processed,  and  disseminated  by  the 
various  media.  "How  much  do  we  need  the 
press  as  a  watchdog  on  government?"  and 


Language  nyy 


"Who  is  watching  the  watchdog?"  are  among 
the  questions  addressed. 
JRN  4300  Photojournalism  (3  q.h.) 
Introduction  to  how  to  use  the  camera,  the 
negative,  and  the  print  in  news  or  feature 
stories.  Includes  weekly  photo  shooting 
assignments  and  darkroom  work. 
(Laboratory  fee.) 

JRN  4335  Public  Relations  Basics  (3  q.h.) 
Concepts,  components,  and  methods  of  public 
relations,  including  planning  and  research, 
processes  of  influencing  public  opinion,  and 
policies  concerning  corporate  and  institutional 
relations  with  the  media  and  various  publics. 
JRN  4336  Public  Relations  Practices  (3  q.h.) 
Study  of  specific  practices  and  techniques 
employed  in  public  relations,  especially  in 
relation  to  the  handling  of  information  and 
organization  of  activities  and  events.  Also 
discusses  how  to  define  PR  "targets"  and  how 
to  deal  with  such  publics  as  employees, 
stockholders,  and  consumers. 
JRN  4337  Public  Relations  Problems  (3  q.h. ) 
Research  and  communication  techniques  used 
to  solve  public  relations  problems  and  prac- 
tical experience  with  individual  PR  projects, 
programs,  and  campaigns. 
JRN  4340  Press  Power  and  Critical  Issues  (3  q.h. ) 
Study  of  the  impact  of  news  media  coverage 
on  major  political,  economic,  and  other  issues. 
The  increasingly  complex  relationship  bet- 
ween American  society  and  print  and  broad- 
cast journalism  is  analyzed. 
JRN  4349  Advertising  Basics  (3  q.h.) 
Study  of  the  evolution  of  advertising,  in- 
cluding social,  economic,  and  legal  aspects; 
how  advertising  agencies  and  departments 
function;  how  advertising  fits  into  the 
marketing  mix;  and  the  basic  steps  of 
research. 

JRN  4350  Advertising  Copywriting  (3  q.h.) 
Writing  effective  advertising  copy  for  both 
print  and  electronic  media;  coordinating  copy 
with  other  creative  functions.  Elements  of 
good  ad  copy  are  analyzed  and  common  pit- 
falls are  reviewed. 
JRN  4351  Advertising  Practice  (3  q.h.) 
Study  of  media  planning  and  selection.  In- 
cludes defining  objectives  and  determining 
target  audiences;  establishing  the  advertising 
budget;  analyzing  the  market  and  the 
competition. 

JRN  4480  Copyediting  (3  q.h.) 
Practice  in  the  many  facets  of  the  editorial 
process,  including  editing  copy,  writing  heads, 
and  laying  out  pages.  The  course  also  in- 


cludes photo  selection,  cropping,  and  outline 
writing.  Prereq.  JRN  4112. 
JRN  4522  Magazine  Writing  (3  q.h.) 
Practice  in  writing  and  free-lancing  magazine 
articles.  Analysis  of  magazine  markets, 
preparation  of  query  letters,  techniques  of 
research,  and  submission  of  manuscript. 
Travel,  how-to,  profile,  personal  experience, 
and  other  formats  included. 
JRN  4540  Writing  the  Non-Fiction  Book  (3  q.h.) 
This  course  surveys  today's  market  for  the 
journalistic,  non-fiction  book  and  describes 
methods  for  selecting  a  researchable  topic, 
finding  the  facts,  writing  the  query  letter, 
writing  the  manuscript,  and  doing  revisions 
and  final  draft.  By  the  end  of  the  course,  the 
student  submits,  among  other  things,  three 
manuscript  chapters. 
JRN  4560  Developing  Writing  Style  (3  q.h.) 
Developing  and  refining  personal  style  in 
journalistic,  non-fiction  writing.  Emphasis  is 
placed  on  original  and  effective  approaches  to 
features,  columns,  reviews,  editorials,  and 
longer  works. 

LANGUAGE-ARABIC 

LNA  4101  Elementary  Arabic  1  (4  q.h.) 
Introduction  to  the  Arabic  language  and 
culture  through  speaking,  reading,  and  some 
writing. 

LNA  4102  Elementary  Arabic  2  (4  q.h.) 
Continuation  of  LNA  4101  with  practice  in 
elementary  conversation,  reading,  and 
writing.  Prereq.  LNA  4101  or  equiv. 
LNA  4103  Elementary  Arabic  3  (4  q.h.) 
Continuation  of  LNA  4102,  building  the  basic 
skills  necessary  to  carry  on  a  conversation. 
Prereq.  LNA  4102  or  equiv. 

LANGUAGE-FRENCH 

LNF  4101  Elementary  French  1  (4  q.h.) 
Essentials  of  grammar,  practice  in  pronuncia- 
tion, and  progressive  acquisition  of  a  basic 
vocabulary  and  idiomatic  expressions. 
LNF  4102  Elementary  French  2  (4  q.h.) 
Continuation  of  grammar  study,  with  oral 
and  written  exercises.  Prereq.  LNF  4101  or 
equiv. 

LNF  4103  Elementary  French  3  (4  q.h.) 
Reading  of  French  prose  of  increasing  difficulty, 
with  written  and  oral  exercises  based  on  the 
materials  read  and  practice  in  conversation. 
Prereq.  LNF  4102  or  equiv. 
LNF  4104  Intermediate  French  1  (4  q.h.) 
Review  of  grammar,  with  practice  in  composi- 
tion and  conversation.  Prereq.  LNF  4103  or 
equiv. 


Ldiiyuayc 


LNF  4105  Intermediate  French  2  (4  q.h.) 
History  of  French  civilization,  with  discus- 
sions and  conversation.  Prereq.  LNF  4104  or 
equiv. 

LNF  4106  Intermediate  French  3  (4  q.h.) 
Intensive  reading  of  modern  French  prose, 
with  practice  in  conversation.  Prereq.  LNF 
4105  or  equiv. 

LNF  4815  French  Advanced  Tutorial  1  (4  q.h.) 
Advanced  Tutorial  Option:  When  a  student  is 
unable  to  continue  study  of  an  upper-level 
language,  or  when  a  language  course  needed 
for  a  degree  is  not  scheduled  at  appropriate 
intervals,  arrangements  can  be  made  for  the 
student  to  take  three  advanced  tutorials  for  a 
total  of  twelve  quarter  hours.  See  page  16  for 
details.  Prereq.  87  q.h. 
LNF  4816  French  Advanced  Tutorial  2  (4  q.h.) 
See  LNF  4815. 

LNF  4817  French  Advanced  Tutorial  3  (4  q.h.) 
See  LNF  4815. 

LANGUAGE-GERMAN 

LNG  4101  Elementary  German  1  (4  q.h.) 
Essentials  of  grammar,  practice  in  pronuncia- 
tion, and  progressive  acquisition  of  a  basic 
vocabulary  and  idiomatic  expressions. 
LNG  4102  Elementary  German  2  (4  q.h.) 
The  more  difficult  points  of  grammar,  par- 
ticularly the  uses  of  the  subjunctive  mood. 
Prereq.  LNG  4101  or  equiv. 
LNG  4103  Elementary  German  3  (4  q.h.) 
Reading  of  simple  German  prose,  with  oral 
and  written  exercises  based  on  material  read. 
Conversation  in  German  is  encouraged. 
Prereq.  LNG  4102  or  equiv. 
LNG  4104  Intermediate  German  1  (4  q.h.) 
Review  of  grammar,  with  practice  in  composi- 
tion and  conversation.  Prereq.  LNG  4103  or 
equiv. 

LNG  4105  Intermediate  German  2  (4  q.h.) 
History  of  German  civilization,  with  discus- 
sions and  conversation.  Prereq.  LNG  4104  or 
equiv. 

LNG  4106  Intermediate  German  3  (4  q.h.) 
Intensive  reading  of  modern  German  prose, 
with  practice  in  conversation.  Prereq.  LNG 
4105  or  equiv. 

LNG  4815  German  Advanced  Tutorial  1  (4  q.h.) 
Advanced  Tutorial  Option:  When  a  student  is 
unable  to  continue  study  of  an  upper-level 
language,  or  when  a  language  course  needed 
for  a  degree  is  not  scheduled  at  appropriate 
intervals,  arrangements  can  be  made  for  the 
student  to  take  three  advanced  tutorials  for  a 


total  of  twelve  quarter  hours.  See  page  16  for 

details.  Prereq.  87  q.h. 

LNG  4816  German  Advanced  Tutorial  2  (4  q.h.) 

See  LNG  4815. 

LNG  4817  German  Advanced  Tutorial  3  (4  q.h.) 

See  LNG  4815. 

LANGUAGE-HEBREW 

LNH  4101  Beginning  Conversational  Hebrew  1  (4  q.h.) 
Acquisition  of  basic  oral  skills  by  introduction 
of  the  essentials  of  Hebrew  grammar.  In- 
cludes extensive  practice  in  pronunciation  and 
acquisition  of  an  idiomatic  core  vocabulary. 
LNH  4102  Beginning  Conversational  Hebrew  2  (4  q.h.) 
Continuation  of  LNH  4101.  Introduces 
Hebrew  prose  of  moderate  difficulty.  Prereq. 
LNH  4101  or  equiv. 

LNH  4103  Beginning  Conversational  Hebrew  3  (4  q.h.) 
Continuation  of  LNH  4102.  Continued  em- 
phasis on  conversation  and  on  building  a  solid 
vocabulary.  Prereq.  LNH  4102  or  equiv. 

LANGUAGE-ITALIAN 

LNI  4101  Elementary  Italian  1  (4  q.h.) 
Essentials  of  grammar,  practice  in  pronuncia- 
tion, and  progressive  acquisition  of  a  basic 
vocabulary  and  idiomatic  expressions. 
LNI  4102  Elementary  Italian  2  (4  q.h.) 
Continuation  of  grammar  study,  with  oral 
and  written  exercises.  Prereq.  LNI  4101  or 
equiv. 

LNI  4103  Elementary  Italian  3  (4  q.h.) 
Reading  of  Italian  prose  of  increasing  difficulty, 
with  written  and  oral  exercises  based  on  the 
material  read.  Practice  in  conversation. 
Prereq.  LNI  4102  or  equiv. 
LNI  4104  Intermediate  Italian  1  (4  q.h.) 
Review  of  grammar,  with  practice  in  composi- 
tion and  conversation.  Prereq.  LNI  4103  or 
equiv. 

LNI  4105  Intermediate  Italian  2  (4  q.h.) 
History  of  Italian  civilization,  with  discus- 
sions and  conversation.  Prereq.  LNI  4104  or 
equiv. 

LNI  4106  Intermediate  Italian  3  (4  q.h.) 

Intensive  reading  of  modern  Italian  prose, 
with  practice  in  conversation.  Prereq.  LNI 
4105  or  equiv. 

LNI  4815  Italian  Advanced  Tutorial  1  (4  q.h.) 
Advanced  Tutorial  Option:  When  a  student  is 
unable  to  continue  study  of  an  upper-level 
language,  or  when  a  language  course  needed 
for  a  degree  is  not  scheduled  at  appropriate 
intervals,  arrangements  can  be  made  for  the 
student  to  take  three  advanced  tutorials  for  a 
total  of  twelve  quarter  hours.  See  page  16  for 
details.  Prereq.  87  q.h. 


Language  zu i 


LNI  4816  Italian  Advanced  Tutorial  2  (4  q.h.) 

See  LNI  4815. 

LNI  4817  Italian  Advanced  Tutorial  3  (4  q.h.) 

See  LNI  4815. 

LANGUAGE-JAPANESE 

LNJ  4101  Elementary  Japanese  1  (4  q.h.) 
Basic,  practical  Japanese,  emphasizing  the 
essentials  of  grammar,  pronunciation,  pro- 
gressive acquisition  of  a  core  vocabulary,  and 
the  use  of  current,  idiomatic  expressions. 
LNJ  4102  Elementary  Japanese  2  (4  q.h.) 
Continuation  of  LNJ  4101.  Progressive  ac- 
quisition of  practical  skills.  Prereq.  LNJ  4101 
or  equiv. 

LNJ  4103  Elementary  Japanese  3  (4  q.h.) 
Continuation  of  LNJ  4102.  Prereq.  LNJ  4102. 
LNJ  4104  Intermediate  Japanese  1  (4  q.h.) 
Review  of  grammar,  with  practice  in  composi- 
tion and  conversation.  Prereq.  LNJ  4103  or 
equiv. 

LNJ  4105  Intermediate  Japanese  2  (4  q.h.) 
History  of  Japanese  civilization,  with  discus- 
sions and  conversation.  Prereq.  LNJ  4104 
or  equiv. 

LNJ  4106  Intermediate  Japanese  3  (4  q.h.) 
Intensive  reading  of  Japanese  prose,  with 
practice  in  conversation.  Prereq.  LNJ  4105 
or  equiv. 

LNJ  4225  The  Japanese  Mentality  (formerly 
Japanese  Culture  and  Society)  (3  q.h.) 
By  studying  various  aspects  of  Japanese 
cultural  history,  education,  work-ethics,  male- 
female  relations,  and  other  areas,  students 
gain  insight  into  the  Japanese  mentality  and 
how  this  homogeneous  race  is  surviving  in  a 
heterogeneous  world. 

LNJ  4815  Japanese  Advanced  Tutorial  1  (4  q.h.) 
Advanced  Tutorial  Option:  When  a  student  is 
unable  to  continue  study  of  an  upper-level 
language,  or  when  a  language  course  needed 
for  a  degree  is  not  scheduled  at  appropriate 
intervals,  arrangements  can  be  made  for  the 
student  to  take  three  advanced  tutorials  for  a 
total  of  twelve  quarter  hours.  See  page  16  for 
details.  Prereq.  87  q.h. 
LNJ  4816  Japanese  Advanced  Tutorial  2  (4  q.h.) 
See  LNJ  4815. 

LNJ  4817  Japanese  Advanced  Tutorial  3  (4  q.h.) 
See  LNJ  4815. 

LANGUAGE-LATIN 

LNL  4101  Beginning  Latin  1  (4  q.h.) 
Study  of  grammar  needed  for  reading  elemen- 
tary Latin  prose  as  well  as  for  understanding 


some  basic  etymologies.  Recommended  for 
those  interested  in  enriching  their  knowledge 
of  English  and  Romance  languages  and  those 
who  want  to  read  classical  literature  in  the 
original. 

LNL  4102  Beginning  Latin  2  (4  q.h.) 
Continuation  of  LNL  4101.  Prereq.  LNL  4101. 
LNL  4103  Beginning  Latin  3  (4  q.h.) 
Continuation  of  LNL  4102.  Prereq.  LNL  4102. 
LNL  4815  Latin  Advanced  Tutorial  1  (4  q.h.) 
Advanced  Tutorial  Option:  When  a  student  is 
unable  to  continue  study  of  an  upper-level 
language,  or  when  a  language  course  needed 
for  a  degree  is  not  scheduled  at  appropriate 
intervals,  arrangements  can  be  made  for  the 
student  to  take  three  advanced  tutorials  for  a 
total  of  twelve  quarter  hours.  See  page  16  for 
details.  Prereq.  87  q.h. 
LNL  4816  Latin  Advanced  Tutorial  2  (4  q.h.) 
See  LNL  4815. 

LNL  4817  Latin  Advanced  Tutorial  3  (4  q.h.) 
See  LNL  4815. 

LANGUAGE-SWEDISH 

LNN  4101  Beginning  Conversational  Swedish  1  (4  q.h.) 
Acquisition  of  basic  oral  skills  by  introduction 
of  the  essentials  of  Swedish  grammar,  with 
extensive  practice  in  pronunciation  and  ac- 
quisition of  an  idiomatic  core  vocabulary. 
LNN  4102  Beginning  Conversational  Swedish  2  (4  q.h.) 
Continuation  of  LNN  4101.  Introduces 
Swedish  prose  of  moderate  difficulty.  Prereq. 
LNN  4101  or  equiv. 

LNN  4103  Beginning  Conversational  Swedish  3  (4  q.h.) 
Continuation  of  LNN  4102.  Prereq.  LNN  4102 
or  equiv. 

LNN  4815  Swedish  Advanced  Tutorial  1  (4  q.h.) 
Advanced  Tutorial  Option:  When  a  student  is 
unable  to  continue  study  of  an  upper-level 
language,  or  when  a  language  course  needed 
for  a  degree  is  not  scheduled  at  appropriate 
intervals,  arrangements  can  be  made  for  the 
student  to  take  three  advanced  tutorials  for  a 
total  of  twelve  quarter  hours.  See  page  16  for 
details.  Prereq.  87  q.h. 
LNN  4816  Swedish  Advanced  Tutorial  2  (4  q.h.) 
See  LNN  4815. 

LNN  4817  Swedish  Advanced  Tutorial  3  (4  q.h.) 
See  LNN  4815. 

LANGUAGE-RUSSIAN 

LNR  4101  Elementary  Russian  1  (4  q.h.) 
Essentials  of  grammar,  practice  in  pronuncia- 
tion, and  progressive  acquisition  of  a  basic 
vocabulary  and  idiomatic  expressions. 


ittit-iiiutaui 


LNR  4102  Elementary  Russian  2  (4  q.h.) 
Continuation  of  grammar  study,  with  oral 
and  written  exercises.  Prereq.  LNR  4101  or 
equiv. 

LNR  4103  Elementary  Russian  3  (4  q.h.) 
Reading  of  Russian  prose  of  increasing  dif- 
ficulty, with  written  and  oral  exercises  based 
on  the  material  read  and  practice  in  conversa- 
tion. Prereq.  LNR  4102  or  equiv. 
LNR  4225  Russian  Culture  and  Society  (3  q.h.) 
Study  of  various  aspects  of  Russian  cultural 
history,  education,  work-ethics,  male-female 
relations,  and  other  areas,  for  insight  into  the 
Russian  mentality. 

LNR  4815  Russian  Advanced  Tutorial  1  (4  q.h.) 
Advanced  Tutorial  Option:  When  a  student  is 
unable  to  continue  study  of  an  upper-level 
language,  or  when  a  language  course  needed 
for  a  degree  is  not  scheduled  at  appropriate 
intervals,  arrangements  can  be  made  for  the 
student  to  take  three  advanced  tutorials  for  a 
total  of  twelve  quarter  hours.  See  page  16  for 
details.  Prereq.  87  q.h. 
LNR  4816  Russian  Advanced  Tutorial  2  (4  q.h.) 
See  LNR  4815. 

LNR  4817  Russian  Advanced  Tutorial  3  (4  q.h.) 
See  LNR  4815. 

LANGUAGE-SPANISH 

LNS  4101  Beginning  Conversational  Spanish  1  (4  q.h.) 
Acquisition  of  basic  oral  skills  by  introduction 
of  the  essentials  of  Spanish  grammar.  Exten- 
sive practice  in  pronunciation  and  acquisition 
of  an  idiomatic  core  vocabulary. 
LNS  4102  Beginning  Conversational  Spanish  2  (4  q.h.) 
Continuation  of  LNS  4101.  Introduces 
Spanish  prose  of  moderate  difficulty.  Prereq. 
LNS  4101  or  equiv. 

LNS  4103  Beginning  Conversational  Spanish  3  (4  q.h.) 
Continuation  of  LNS  4102.  Continued  stress 
on  conversation,  while  building  a  solid 
vocabulary.  Prereq.  LNS  4102  or  equiv. 
LNS  4104  Intermediate  Spanish  1  (4  q.h.) 
Review  of  grammar,  with  practice  in  composi- 
tion and  conversation.  Prereq.  LNS  4103  or 
equiv. 

LNS  4105  Intermediate  Spanish  2  (4  q.h.) 
Examination  of  Spanish  civilization  through 
texts  of  average  difficulty.  Intensive  reading 
of  modern  prose,  with  occasional  oral  or  writ- 
ten translation  and  conversation  practice 
based  on  assigned  readings.  Prereq.  LNS  4104 
or  equiv. 


LNS  4106  Intermediate  Spanish  3  (4  q.h.) 
Examination  of  Spanish-American  civilization 
through  texts  of  average  difficulty.  Intensive 
readings  of  modern  prose,  with  occasional  oral 
or  written  translations  and  conversation  prac- 
tice based  on  assigned  readings.  Prereq.  LNS 
4105  or  equiv. 

LNS  4815  Spanish  Advanced  Tutorial  1  (4  q.h.) 
Advanced  Tutorial  Option:  When  a  student  is 
unable  to  continue  study  of  an  upper-level 
language,  or  when  a  language  course  needed 
for  a  degree  is  not  scheduled  at  appropriate 
intervals,  arrangements  can  be  made  for  the 
student  to  take  three  advanced  tutorials  for  a 
total  of  twelve  quarter  hours.  See  page  16  for 
details.  Prereq.  87  q.h. 
LNS  4816  Spanish  Advanced  Tutorial  2  (4  q.h.) 
See  LNS  4815. 

LNS  4817  Spanish  Advanced  Tutorial  3  (4  q.h.) 
See  LNS  4815. 

MANAGEMENT 

MGT  4101  Introduction  to  Business  and  Management  1 

(3  q.h.) 

Study  of  the  setting  and  general  structure  of 
American  business,  including  objectives  and 
practices  affecting  the  American  standard  of 
living.  Examines  the  characteristics  of  private 
enterprise  and  the  nature  and  challenge  of 
capitalism  and  other  forms  of  economic  enter- 
prise. Introduces  types  of  businesses,  the 
structures  of  organizations,  and  the  functions 
of  management  as  well  as  what  a  managerial 
career  involves,  what  problems  must  be  faced, 
and  what  decisions  must  be  reached. 
MGT  4102  Introduction  to  Business  and  Management  2 
(3  q.h.) 

Methodologies  in  planning,  organizing,  direc- 
ting, and  controlling  production,  marketing, 
sales,  and  pricing  within  the  American  free 
enterprise  system  and  in  contrast  to  other 
business  systems.  Examines  techniques  for 
coping  with  the  intricacies  of  systems 
management.  Prereq.  MGT  4101. 
MGT  4103  Introduction  to  Business  and  Management  3 
(3  q.h.) 

Basic  management  concepts  and  techniques 
necessary  to  successful  decision  making.  Em- 
phasizes management  as  a  continuous,  active 
process  by  introducing  methods  of  designing 
an  organization;  understanding  and  dealing 
with  people;  evaluating  the  political,  social, 
and  economic  environment;  and  effectively 
planning,  directing,  and  controlling  an 
organization.  Prereq.  MGT  4102. 


maiiayemem  cuo 


MGT  4105  Introduction  to  Business  and  Management 
(Intensive)  (6  q.h.) 

Same  as  MGT  4101  and  MGT  4102. 
MGT  4108  Women  in  Business  Organizations: 
Structural  and  Behavioral  Fundamentals  (formerly 
INT  4102)  (3  q.h.) 

Examine  effective  management  practices  and 
the  factors  that  impede  women  from  acquir- 
ing them;  the  importance  of  effective  com- 
munication and  dealing  with  criticism;  the 
validity  of  common  behavioral  assumptions, 
including  women's  fears  of  success,  inade- 
quate motivation,  lack  of  social  access,  and 
disinclination  to  take  charge  or  withstand 
pressure.  Prereq.  MGT  4102. 
MGT  4109  Women  in  Business  Organizations: 
Leadership  and  Communications  (formerly  INT 
4103)  (3  q.h.) 

Study  of  dynamics  of  leadership  as  they  relate 
to  the  successful  woman  manager,  including 
managing  conflict,  securing  control,  insti- 
tuting change,  motivating  and  disciplining 
others,  gaining  respect,  and  distinguishing 
supervisory  from  management  performance 
standards.  Role  playing  and  case  studies 
assist  in  the  development  of  leadership  and 
problem-solving  capabilities.  Prereq.  MGT 
4102. 

MGT  4110  Survey  of  Business  and  Management 
(4  q.h.) 

Introduction  to  the  setting  and  general  struc- 
ture of  American  business,  the  characteristics 
of  private  enterprise,  and  the  nature  and 
challenge  of  capitalism  and  other  forms  of 
economic  enterprise.  Covers  the  forms  of 
business,  organizational  structure,  and  func- 
tions of  management.  Through  lectures  and 
class  discussion,  students  are  given  an  over- 
view of  the  methodologies  used  in  planning, 
organizing,  directing,  and  controlling  the 
functions  of  production,  marketing,  sales,  pric- 
ing, and  finance.  For  Alternative  Freshmen- 
Year  students  only. 

MGT  4120  Management  of  Nonprofit  Organizations 
(3  q.h.) 

Nonprofit  organizations  are  found  in  many 
areas:  medicine,  education,  human  services, 
arts,  religion,  and  professional  associations. 
This  course  examines  the  scope  and  environ- 
ment of  the  nonprofit  segment  of  our  economy 
and  investigates  characteristics  related  to 
governance,  membership,  organizational 
structure,  financial  management,  and  opera- 
tional techniques.  Special  emphasis  is  placed 
on  business/management  needs  and  profes- 
sional skills  for  those  interested  in  or  af- 


filiated with  nonprofit  organizations. 

MGT  4320  Managing  Change  (3  q.h.) 
Application  of  managerial  concepts  and  prac- 
tices to  real-world  situations  with  policy  or 
resource  constraints.  Explores  decision  mak- 
ing related  to  the  impact  of  change  on  the 
organization  and  its  personnel:  develops  a 
conceptual  framework  for  handling  change  in 
one's  own  business  career.  Prereq.  MGT  4102. 
MGT  4321  Managing  for  Results  (formerly  IM 
4320,  Managing  for  Results)  (3  q.h.) 
A  forum  for  the  discussion  of  the  wide-ranging 
management  theories  of  Peter  Drucker  and 
other  managerial  theorists.  Covers  the  con- 
cepts and  methods  available  to  the  results- 
oriented  manager  and  relationships  between 
theory,  practice,  and  implementing  for 
results.  Prereq.  MGT  4102. 
MGT  4323  Management  and  Leadership  (formerly 
Motivation  Management)  (3  q.h.) 
Designed  to  help  students  differentiate  bet- 
ween the  managerial  position  as  such  and  a 
leadership  role,  evaluating  the  impact  of 
leadership  and  management  styles  on  human 
behavior.  Introduces  and  analyzes  important 
motivation  concepts  through  study  of  the 
working  environment  and  the  processes  that 
influence  both  performance  and  outcome. 
Prereq.  MGT  4102. 
MGT  4328  Creating  New  Ventures  (3  q.h.) 
The  nature  of  entrepreneurship  and  potential 
for  self-employment  by  the  individual.  Includes 
the  sequence  from  generation  of  an  idea 
through  the  design  of  a  plan  for  owning  and 
operating  a  small  business.  Prereq.  MGT  4102. 
MGT  4329  Managing  Small  Businesses  (3  q.h.) 
Study  of  managerial  operations  of  a  small 
business.  Presents  issues  and  problems  en- 
countered by  those  considering  entrepreneurial 
and  small  business  endeavors,  including  the 
facets  of  financing,  planning,  market 
research,  and  strategy  for  small  businesses. 
Prereq.  MGT  4102. 

MGT  4330  Essentials  for  Managers  of  Small 
Businesses  (3.q.h.) 

Designed  for  small  business  entrepreneurs  or 
persons  interested  in  running  a  small 
business.  Covers  fundamental  business  con- 
cepts, including  ownership  forms;  ongoing 
market  research,  capitalization,  and  manage- 
ment and  operating  issues;  personnel  and 
benefits;  risk  management;  tax  considera- 
tions; operating  finances;  and  small  business 
strategic  positioning.  Generally  offered  in  six 
half-day  sessions. 


I  run  nn 


MGT  4340  Small  Business  1  (3  q.h.) 
Development  and  completion  of  a  full 
business  plan  for  entrepreneurs  or  persons  in- 
terested in  operating  a  small  business.  Covers 
the  nature  and  characteristics  of  entrepreneur- 
ship;  personal  analysis;  generation  of  ideas 
and  market  identification;  legal  and  tax 
ramification  of  ownership  forms;  marketing 
research  and  planning.  Optional  Lotus  1-2-3 
seminar  (MIS  4123). 
MGT  4341  Small  Business  2  (3  q.h.) 
The  marketing  research  and  development  of 
the  marketing  plan  portion  of  the  overall 
business  plan.  Topics  include  new  business 
capital  requirements,  including  the  dif- 
ferences in  venture  and  equity  funding;  and 
developing  the  financial  management  plan 
portion  of  the  overall  business  plan,  along 
with  business  strategy  implications,  personnel 
matters,  and  the  use  of  computers.  Prereq. 
MGT  4340. 

MGT  4357  Cultural  Issues  in  International  Business 

(3  q.h.) 

When  a  U.S.  company  opens  an  office  in  a 
foreign  land,  cultural  clashes  may  occur.  How 
does  management  cope  and  help  its  employees 
to  cope  with  these  differences?  This  course  ex- 
amines the  problems  of  doing  business  in 
another  country,  including  third-world  countries. 
MGT  4358  Contemporary  Management  Issues  (3  q.h.) 
Study  business  and  management  issues  affec- 
ting today's  management  decisions.  Includes 
changes  in  our  economic  system  and  the 
economy;  corporate  culture;  social  respon- 
sibility; ethics;  worker's  needs,  motivation, 
and  satisfaction;  demographics;  and 
management-labor  interactions.  Prereq. 
MGT  4102. 

MGT  4410  Project  Management  Process:  Planning 
and  Implementation  (Reserved)  (formerly  Project 
Planning  and  Control)  (3  q.h.) 
The  entire  process  of  implementing  a  project, 
from  project  definition  to  the  evaluation  of 
feasibility,  scheduling,  and  financial  and  budget- 
ary factors.  Management  techniques  and  require- 
ments are  used  in  case  analyses,  along  with 
the  concept  of  using  computer  software  to  help 
oversee  projects.  Prereq.  IM  4401  or  IM  4301 
and  80  q.h. 

MGT  4450  Business  Policy  1  (Reserved)  (3  q.h.) 

For  advanced  students  building  on  all 
previous  management  courses  and  on 
numerous  functional  and  procedural  courses. 
Examines  the  total  management  process  for 
formulating  business  strategy.  Covers  the 


development  of  corporate  objectives,  plans, 
and  policies,  emphasizing  the  interaction 
between  the  enterprise  and  its  environment. 
The  economic  and  social  responsibilities  of 
business  and  managers  are  also  considered. 
Prereq.  100  q.h.  and  completion  of  all  core 
courses  in  business. 

MGT  4451  Business  Policy  2  (Reserved)  (3  q.h.) 
Study  of  organizational  and  administrative 
methods  for  converting  plans  into 
achievements.  Explores  concepts  of  strategic 
planning  and  implementation  from  the 
perspective  of  the  general  manager,  with  at- 
tention to  top  management  functions,  respon- 
sibilities, styles,  values,  and  organizational 
relationships.  Includes  cases  from  profit  and 
nonprofit  enterprises  of  various  types.  Prereq. 
MGT  4450. 

MGT  4452  Business  Policy  (Reserved)  (Intensive)  (6  q.h.) 
Same  as  MGT  4450  and  MGT  4451.  Prereq. 
100  q.h. 

MGT  4455  Manager  and  Society  (Reserved)  (3  q.h.) 
For  managers,  potential  managers,  and  others 
interested  in  the  national  and  international 
issues  confronting  business  and  industry  in 
their  relationships  with  governments,  societies, 
and  individuals.  Includes  issues  of  changing 
work  environments  and  the  variety  of  in- 
fluences and  pressures  that  need  to  be  taken 
into  account  when  making  socially  responsi- 
ble business  decisions.  Prereq.  MGT  4450. 
MGT  4456  International  Business  Management  and 
Operations  (Reserved)  (3  q.h.) 
Principles  and  practices  of  international 
business,  comparing  domestic  and  interna- 
tional business  activities,  responsibilities,  and 
influences.  Explores  the  economic,  social, 
political,  and  legal  contexts  of  conducting 
business  in  a  multinational  environment  and 
examines  how  the  "foreign"  factor  in  the 
business  equation  influences  behavior.  Prereq. 
MGT  4450. 

MGT  4460  Management  Seminar  1  (Reserved)  (3  q.h.) 
Capstone  course  requiring  individual  and/or 
group  investigation  and  analysis  of  a  substan- 
tive management  issue.  Projects  should  in- 
volve broad,  interdisciplinary  knowledge  and 
experience,  use  a  variety  of  research  techniques, 
and  be  original  in  analysis  and  conclusions. 
Topics  to  be  selected  with  the  advice  and  ap- 
proval of  the  instructor.  Prereq.  MGT  4450. 

MGT  4461  Management  Seminar  2  (Reserved)  (3  q.h.) 
Continuation  of  MGT  4460.  Prereq.  MGT  4460. 

MGT  4462  Advanced  Management  Seminar  (3  q.h.) 
Continuation  of  group  projects  from  MGT 


ividiiayciiiciu   iniuiiiiaiiuii   oysicnii 


4460  and  MGT  4461.  The  project  must  be  of 
major  management  significance,  involving 
research  of  a  management  issue,  a  manage- 
ment audit,  or  an  organizational  analysis, 
usually  of  a  real  company.  Enrollment  is 
limited;  both  enrollment  and  the  project  must 
be  approved  by  the  Area  Consultant  and  the 
Program  Director.  Prereq.  MGT  4461. 
MGT  4600  Honors  Program  1  (4  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  undertake  an  in-depth 
research  study  project.  See  page  17  for  details. 
Prereq.  96  q.h.,  3.5  q.p.a. 
MGT  4601  Honors  Program  2  (4  q.h.) 
See  MGT  4600. 

MGT  4602  Honors  Program  3  (4  q.h.) 
See  MGT  4600. 

MGT  4701  Independent  Study  1  (3  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  undertake  special  research. 
See  page  17  for  details.  Prereq.  96  q.h., 
3.0  q.p.a, 

MGT  4702  Independent  Study  2  (3  q.h.) 
See  MGT  4701. 

MGT  4703  Independent  Study  3  (3  q.h.) 
See  MGT  4701. 

MGT  4800  Advanced  Tutorial  1  (3  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  take  upper  level  course  in- 
dependently. See  page  16  for  details. 
Prereq.  87  q.h. 

MGT  4801  Advanced  Tutorial  2  (3  q.h.) 
See  MGT  4800. 
MGT  4900  Fieldwork  (6  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  enhance  career  development 
by  applying  academic  background  to  practical 
problems  in  the  workplace.  See  page  16  for 
details.  Prereq.  Approval  of  Program  Director. 

MANAGEMENT  INFORMATION  SYSTEMS 

MIS  4101  Introduction  to  Data  Processing  and 
Information  Systems  1  (3  q.h.) 
Introduction  to  data  processing  and  com- 
puters, including  an  overview  of  data  process- 
ing history,  business  data  processing  concepts, 
data  processing  organization,  computer  hard- 
ware, the  internal  representation  of  data,  and 
data  communication  concepts.  In-class  demon- 
stration of  DOS,  wordprocessing,  and  spread- 
sheets. Computer  labs  for  students'  completion 
of  projects  available  at  Belmont,  Boston,  Burl- 
ington, Chelmsford,  Dedham,  Framingham,  and 
Liberty  Square.  Students  may  also  complete 
projects  on  any  computer  available  to  them. 
MIS  4102  Introduction  to  Data  Processing  and 
Information  Systems  2  (3  q.h.) 
Continuation  of  MIS  4101.  Concentrates  on 
software  and  systems.  Includes  the  systems- 


development  life  cycle,  programming  tools 
and  program  preparation,  the  use  of  com- 
puters for  specific  business  applications,  data- 
base management  systems,  and  high-level 
programming  and  planning  languages.  Class 
consists  of  in-class  demonstration  by  instruc- 
tor on  database  software.  Computer  labs  for 
students'  completion  of  projects  available  at 
Belmont,  Boston,  Burlington,  Chelmsford, 
Dedham,  Framingham,  and  Liberty  Square. 
Students  may  also  complete  projects  on  any 
computer  available  to  them  Prereq.  MIS  4101. 
MIS  4103  Introduction  to  Data  Processing  and 
Information  Systems  (Intensive)  (6  q.h.) 
Same  as  MIS  4101  and  MIS  4102. 
MIS  4123  Lotus  1-2-3  (1  q.h.) 
For  business  and  management  students 
enrolled  in  certain  University  College  courses. 
Designed  to  acquaint  students  with  Lotus 
1-2-3  for  use  in  their  course  activities.  Scheduled 
for  four  hours  on  two  consecutive  Saturdays. 

MIS  4220  Introduction  to  Programming  in  COBOL  (3  q.h.) 

Fundamentals  of  computer  programming, 
along  with  COBOL  (Common  Business 
Oriented  Language)  and  its  divisions,  data 
file  structures,  and  verb  actions.  Students 
prepare  and  test  several  programs  using  the 
University  computer  system.  Prereq.  MIS 
4102  or  MIS  4103. 
MIS  4221  COBOL  Programming  1  (3  q.h.) 
Beginning  computer  problem  solving  and  pro- 
gramming using  COBOL.  Includes  structured 
flow-charting  and  programming  techniques, 
use  of  an  editor  for  program  generation,  in- 
put/output record  layouts,  and  basic  concepts, 
such  as  COBOL  divisions  and  verbs.  Students 
prepare  and  test  several  programs  using  the 
University  computer  system.  Prereq.  MIS 
4102  or  MIS  4103. 
MIS  4222  COBOL  Programming  2  (3  q.h.) 
Continuation  of  MIS  4221.  Includes  logical 
control  breaks,  creation  of  multipage  reports, 
sign  and  class  tests,  verification  of  input  data, 
and  table  handling  (subscripting  and  index- 
ing). Students  prepare  and  test  several  pro- 
grams using  the  University  computer  system. 
Prereq.  MIS  4221. 

MIS  4223  COBOL  Programming  3  (3  q.h.) 
Continuation  of  MIS  4222.  Includes  advanced 
programming  techniques,  such  as  the  internal 
sort  facility  and  indexed  file  processing. 
Students  prepare  and  test  several  programs 
using  the  University  computer  system. 
Prereq.  MIS  4222. 


MIS  4225  COBOL  Programming  (Intensive)  (9  q.h.) 
Same  as  MIS  4221,  MIS  4222,  and  MIS  4223. 
Prereq.  MIS  4102  or  MIS  4103. 
MIS  4230  PC  Software  for  Professionals  (formerly 
End  User  Software)  (3  q.h.) 
Study  of  the  large  and  rapidly  growing  collec- 
tion of  software  geared  toward  the  needs  of 
the  nontechnical  end  user.  Includes  discussion 
of  various  software  packages  such  as  spread- 
sheets, databases,  and  graphics. 
MIS  4235  Advanced  COBOL  Programming  (3  q.h.) 
Several  kinds  of  programming  disciplines  for 
the  COBOL  programmer.  Techniques  include 
STRING  and  UNSTRING;  CALL  subroutines; 
table  handling  with  one,  two,  and  three 
dimensions;  Indexed  Sequential  Access 
Method  (ISAM)  processing;  DEBUG;  com- 
munications; and  copy.  Prereq.  MIS  4223  or 
MIS  4225. 

MIS  4236  Advanced  PC  Software  (3  q.h.) 
Advanced  skills  in  spreadsheets,  graphics, 
database,  and  advanced  commands  in  PC/MS- 
DOS.  Includes  lectures,  in-class  demonstra- 
tions, and  extensive  assignments  that  apply 
skills.  Not  for  the  first-time  personal  com- 
puter user.  Prereq.  MIS  4230  or  equiv. 
MIS  4240  Introduction  to  Programming  in  BASIC  (3  q.h.) 
Stand-alone  introduction  to  computer  pro- 
gramming using  BASIC,  one  of  the  most 
popular  programming  languages  for  both  per- 
sonal and  mini-computers.  Students  write, 
debug,  and  run  a  number  of  programs  on  the 
computer.  Prereq.  MIS  4102. 
MIS  4241  Programming  in  BASIC  1  (3  q.h.) 
Introduction  to  computer  programming  using 
BASIC.  Includes  arithmetic  operators, 
variables,  expressions,  arrays,  functions,  and 
formatted  printing.  Students  write,  debug, 
and  run  a  number  of  programs  on  the  com- 
puter. Prereq.  MIS  4102. 
MIS  4242  Programming  in  BASIC  2  (3  q.h.) 
Continuation  of  MIS  4241.  Covers  more 
sophisticated  BASIC  programming  techni- 
ques. Includes  subroutines,  nested  loops,  sor- 
ting, and  file  handling.  Students  write,  debug, 
and  run  a  number  of  programs  on  the  com- 
puter. Prereq.  MIS  4240  or  MIS  4241. 
MIS  4250  FORTRAN  Programming  1  (3  q.h.) 
Introduction  to  computer  programming  using 
FORTRAN,  a  high-level  language  used 
primarily  in  scientific  applications.  Includes 
variables,  constants,  expressions,  arithmetic 
operations,  and  looping.  Students  write, 
debug,  and  run  a  number  of  programs  on  the 
computer.  Prereq.  MIS  4102. 


MIS  4251  FORTRAN  Programming  2  (3  q.h.) 
Continuation  of  MIS  4250.  Covers  more  com- 
plex FORTRAN  programming.  Includes  ar- 
rays, functions,  and  subroutines.  Students 
write,  debug,  and  run  a  number  of  programs 
on  the  computer.  Prereq.  MIS  4250. 
MIS  4252  FORTRAN  Programming  3  (3  q.h.) 
Continuation  of  MIS  4251.  Emphasizes  ap- 
plications and  case  studies.  Students  write  a 
series  of  programs  for  scientific  and  business 
problems  to  gain  proficiency  in  the  FOR- 
TRAN language.  Typical  topics  include 
simulation,  sorting  and  merging,  plotting,  and 
financial  analysis.  Students  write,  debug,  and 
run  a  number  of  programs  on  the  computer. 
Prereq.  MIS  4251. 

MIS  4253  FORTRAN  Programming  (Intensive)  (9  q.h.) 
Same  as  MIS  4250,  MIS  4251,  and  MIS  4252. 
Prereq.  MIS  4102. 

MIS  4260  Assembly  Programming  1  (3  q.h.) 
Introduction  to  the  VAX-11  Assembler  run- 
ning under  the  VMS  operating  system.  In- 
cludes the  binary  representation  of  instruc- 
tions and  data,  looping,  instruction  modifica- 
tion, indexing,  indirect  addressing,  and  data 
retrieval.  Includes  a  brief  survey  of  Assembly 
languages  in  general.  Prereq.  Demonstrated 
familiarity  with  any  currently  available  com- 
puter language. 

MIS  4261  Assembly  Programming  2  (3  q.h.) 

Continuation  of  MIS  4260.  Includes  address- 
ing structures,  floating-point  techniques, 
coding,  use  of  macro  instructions,  input- 
output  routines,  use  of  the  operating  system 
for  job  scheduling  resource  allocation,  and  file 
handling.  Prereq.  MIS  4260. 
MIS  4262  Assembly  Programming  3  (3  q.h.) 
Continuation  of  MIS  4261.  Includes  advanced 
use  of  the  operating  system,  device-independent 
file  handling,  and  blocked  and  unblocked  file 
manipulation.  Prereq.  MIS  4261. 
MIS  4263  Assembly  Programming  Intensive  (6  q.h.) 
Same  as  MIS  4261  and  MIS  4262.  Prereq. 
Demonstrated  familiarity  with  any  currently 
available  computer  language. 
MIS  4270  Pascal  Programming  1  (3  q.h.) 
Introduction  to  computer  programming  using 
the  Pascal  language.  Includes  arrays  of 
records,  text  files,  record  files,  and  procedures 
and  functions.  Students  write,  debug,  and  run 
a  number  of  programs  on  the  computer. 
Prereq.  MIS  4102. 

MIS  4271  Pascal  Programming  2  (3  q.h.) 
Continuation  of  MIS  4270.  Covers  more 
sophisticated  Pascal  features.  Includes 


multidimensional  arrays,  recursion,  file  sor- 
ting and  merging  techniques,  sets,  and  struc- 
tures. Students  write,  debug,  and  run  a 
number  of  programs  on  the  computer.  Prereq. 
MIS  4270. 

MIS  4273  PC  DOS  and  Assembly  (3  q.h.) 
Introduction  to  the  Disk  Operating  System 
(DOS),  a  collection  of  programs  that  manages 
the  activities  among  personal  computer  com- 
ponents. The  Personal  Computer  (PC) 
Assembly  language  is  also  discussed.  Students 
have  the  opportunity  to  write  a  small 
Assembly  language  routine  and  one  or  more 
DOS  batch  routines.  Prereq.  MIS  4102. 
MIS  4276  Programming  in  C  (3  q.h.) 
Fundamentals  of  the  C  programming 
language,  1/0  operations,  arithmetic  opera- 
tions, loops,  arrays,  character  strings,  func- 
tions. Structures,  file  organization  (textfiles, 
random  access  files).  Pointers,  queus,  stacks, 
rings,  binary  trees.  Prereq.  Knowledge  of  at 
least  one  other  programming  language. 
MIS  4280  Computer  Operating  Systems  1  (3  q.h.) 
Intended  for  those  familiar  with  data  process- 
ing and  interested  in  developing,  evaluating, 
and  using  systems  programs.  Examines  the 
full  range  of  features  available  in  a  variety  of 
computer  operating  systems  in  terms  of  struc- 
ture and  form.  Compares  operating  systems 
implementation  techniques  employed  by  dif- 
ferent computer  manufacturers,  with  em- 
phasis on  their  value  as  tools  for  application 
program  development.  Refers  generally  to 
IBM  operating  systems,  but  also  to  other 
manufacturers,  including  Digital  and  Data 
General.  Prereq.  MIS  4220  or  MIS  4221. 
MIS  4281  Computer  Operating  Systems  2  (3  q.h.) 
Building  on  concepts  and  techniques 
presented  in  MIS  4280,  introduces  distributed 
systems  and  networking  software,  a  variety  of 
data-base  systems,  and  the  UNIX  operating 
system.  Includes  discussions  of  local  and  wide- 
area  networking  systems  and  operating 
systems  features.  Expands  data  management 
as  an  operating  systems  feature  to  include 
data-base  systems  available  from  various  com- 
puter manufacturers  and  software  suppliers. 
Prereq.  MIS  4280. 

MIS  4301  Structured  Systems  Analysis  and  Design  1 
(Open)  (3  q.h.) 

Systems  analysis  and  design  cycle,  with  em- 
phasis on  the  analysis  phase.  Includes  the 
history  and  life-cycle  of  business  information 
systems,  the  role  of  the  systems  analyst, 
analytical  tools  useful  to  the  systems  study 


process,  development  of  feasibility  studies, 
and  presentation  of  study  phase  findings. 
Prereq.  MIS  4102. 

MIS  4302  Structured  Systems  Analysis  and  Design  2 
(Open)  (3  q.h.) 

Continuation  of  MIS  4201.  Emphasizes  the 
design  phase  and  systems  implementation.  In- 
cludes detailed  systems  design  procedures  and 
techniques,  system  testing,  specification  and 
procedure  writing,  documentation,  design  of 
auditing  and  control  procedures,  performance 
measurement  techniques,  hardware  and  soft- 
ware selection  and  planning,  and  project 
management.  Prereq.  MIS  4301  or  MIS  4401. 
MIS  4305  Structured  Systems  Analysis  and  Design 
(Intensive)  (Open) 

Same  as  MIS  4301  and  MIS  4302. 
MIS  4307  Communications  and  Networking  (Open) 
(3  q.h.) 

Communications,  networking,  and  distributed 
processing  from  the  user's  rather  than  the 
designer's  point  of  view.  Includes  the  economics 
of  distributed  processing,  communications  con- 
cepts, local-area  networks,  and  vendor  selec- 
tion. Prereq.  MIS  4302  or  MIS  4402. 

MIS  4350  Auditing  Data  Processing  (3  q.h.) 

EDP  audit  techniques,  programming,  and 
operations,  emphasizing  EDP  standard  prac- 
tices, procedures,  documentation,  and  safety 
and  security.  Defines  EDP  business  risks  and 
related  exposures,  such  as  fraud,  embezzle- 
ment, misuse  or  destruction  of  company 
assets,  and  business  interruption.  Offers 
discussion  of  the  EDP  portion  of  accounting 
requirements  of  the  Foreign  Corrupt  Practices 
Act  of  1977.  Course  content  is  oriented 
toward  EDP  managers,  internal  auditors,  and 
public  accountants.  Prereq.  MIS  4102. 
MIS  4360  Computer  Privacy  and  Security  (3  q.h.) 
Threats  posed  by  and  to  modern  electronic 
computers  and  their  users.  Includes  a  review 
of  the  issue  of  privacy  and  approaches,  techni- 
ques, and  tools  used  to  safeguard  computers. 
Uses  actual  case  studies  of  computer  abuse. 
Prereq.  MIS  4102. 

MIS  4401  Structured  Systems  Analysis  and  Design  1 
(Reserved)  (3  q.h.) 

Systems  analysis  and  design  cycle,  with  em- 
phasis on  the  analysis  phase.  Includes  the 
history  and  life-cycle  of  business  information 
systems,  the  role  of  the  systems  analyst, 
analytical  tools  useful  to  the  systems  study 
process,  development  of  feasibility  studies, 
and  presentation  of  study  phase  findings. 
Prereq.  MIS  4102  and  80  q.h. 


MIS  4402  Structured  Systems  Analysis  and  Design  2 
(Reserved)  (3  q.h.) 

Continuation  of  MIS  4301.  Emphasizes  the 
design  phase  and  systems  implementation.  In- 
cludes detailed  systems  design  procedures  and 
techniques,  system  testing,  specification  and 
procedure  writing,  documentation,  design  of 
auditing  and  control  procedures,  performance 
measurement  techniques,  hardware  and  soft- 
ware selection  and  planning,  and  project 
management.  Prereq.  MIS  4401  or  MIS  4301 
and  80  q.h. 

MIS  4405  Structured  Systems  Analysis  and  Design 
(Reserved)  (Intensive)  (6  q.h.) 
Same  as  MIS  4401  and  MIS  4402. 
MIS  4407  Communications  and  Networking 
(Reserved)  (3  q.h.) 

Communications,  networking,  and  distributed 
processing  from  the  user's  rather  than  the 
designer's  point  of  view.  Includes  the  economics 
of  distributed  processing,  communications 
concepts,  local-area  networks,  and  vendor  selec- 
tion. Prereq.  MIS  4402  or  MIS  4302  and  80  q.h. 
MIS  4445  DataBase  Management  Systems  (Reserved) 
(3  q.h.) 

Introduction  to  the  database  approach  to 
design  of  integrated  information  applications. 
Covers  the  three  methods  of  database  design; 
data  structures;  diagramming;  data  definition 
languages;  data  manipulation  languages; 
database  implementation  and  evaluation;  and 
the  role  of  the  database  administrator.  Prereq. 
MIS  4222,  MIS  4230,  and  MIS  4302  or  MIS 
4402  and  80  q.h. 

MIS  4448  Information  Resource  Management 
(Reserved)  (3  q.h.) 

Advanced  information  systems  management, 
emphasizing  planning,  organizing,  and  con- 
trolling the  corporate  information  resource. 
Includes  personnel  career  planning,  turnover, 
facilities  and  capacity  planning,  the  user  in- 
terface, standards  development,  RFP  genera- 
tion and  vendor  selection,  hardware  and  soft- 
ware conversion  problems,  and  disaster 
recovery.  Prereq.  MIS  4445. 

MIS  4485  Applied  MIS  Development  Project 
(Reserved)  (3  q.h.) 

Capstone  systems  course  integrates  know- 
ledge and  abilities  gained  through  other 
computer-related  courses  in  the  curriculum, 
within  a  comprehensive  systems  development 
project.  Prereq.  MIS  4448. 
MIS  4600  Honors  Program  1  (4  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  undertake  an  in-depth  research 
study  project.  See  page  17  for  details.  Prereq. 
96  q.h.,  3.5  q.p.a. 


MIS  4601  Honors  Program  2  (4  q.h.) 
See  MIS  4600. 

MIS  4602  Honors  Program  3  (4  q.h.) 
See  MIS  4600. 

MIS  4701  Independent  Study  1  (3  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  undertake  special  research. 
See  page  17  for  details.  Prereq.  96  q.h., 
3.0  q.p.a. 

MIS  4702  Independent  Study  2  (3  q.h.) 
See  MIS  4701. 

MIS  4703  Independent  Study  3  (3  q.h.) 
See  MIS  4701. 

MIS  4800  Advanced  Tutorial  1  (3  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  take  upper-level  course  in- 
dependently. See  page  16  for  details.  Prereq. 
87  q.h. 

MIS  4801  Advanced  Tutorial  2  (3  q.h.) 
See  MIS  4800. 
MIS  4900  Fieldwork  (6  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  enhance  career  development 
by  applying  academic  background  to  practical 
problems  in  the  workplace.  See  page  16  for 
details.  Prereq.  Approval  of  Program  Director. 

MARKETING 

MKT  4301  Introduction  to  Marketing  1  (Open)  (3  q.h.) 
This  course  consists  of  lectures,  readings  and 
small  group  discussions  on  the  role  of 
marketing  in  contemporary  society,  in  the 
business  enterprise,  and  in  the  nonprofit 
organization.  Consideration  is  given  to  the 
planning,  operation,  and  evaluation  of 
marketing  and  promotional  efforts  necessary 
to  the  effective  marketing  of  consumer  and  in- 
dustrial products  and  services  in  both  profit 
and  nonprofit  organizations. 
MKT  4302  Introduction  to  Marketing  2  (Open)  (3  q.h.) 
Continuation  of  MKT  4301.  Develops  the  link 
between  marketing  theory  and  practice.  Covers 
specific  marketing  issues  and  problems.  Includes 
case  study  analysis  and  current  marketing 
issues.  Prereq.  MKT  4401  or  MKT  4301. 
MKT  4304  Introduction  to  Marketing  (Intensive) 
(Open)  (6  q.h.) 
Same  as  MKT  4301  and  MKT  4302. 

MKT  4307  Telemarketing  Management  (3  q.h.) 
The  place  of  telemarketing  in  the  marketing 
program.  Key  concepts  of  telemarketing  in 
the  advertising,  sales  promotion,  market 
research,  and  selling  process. 

MKT  4320  Marketing  Management  1  (Open)  (3  q.h.) 

This  course  is  designed  to  provide  training  in 
marketing  decision  making.  Case  studies 
simulating  actual  business  settings  are  used 
to  help  students  develop  analytical  abilities 


and  sharpen  their  communication  skills. 
Topics  covered  range  from  techniques  used  to 
analyze  a  market  to  the  development  of  a 
total  marketing  strategy  (product  policy,  pric- 
ing policy,  promotion  policy,  and  distribution 
policy).  Prereq.  4401  or  MKT4301. 

MKT  4321  Marketing  Management  2  (Open)  (3  q.h.) 
Continuation  of  MKT  4320.  Presents  skills  for 
controlling  marketing  plans,  and  is  designed 
for  a  more  thorough  understanding  of  overall 
marketing  function.  Emphasizes  managerial 
effectiveness  through  practical  applications. 
Prereq,  MKT  4320. 

MKT  4322  Marketing  Management  (Intensive)  (Open) 

(6  q.h.) 

Same  as  MKT  4320  and  MKT  4321.  Prereq. 
MKT  4301. 

MKT  4330  Marketing  Research  1  (Open)  (3  q.h.) 
Use  of  marketing  research  in  planning  and 
evaluating  marketing  activities  and  in  for- 
mulating marketing  decisions.  Introduces 
marketing  information  systems,  primary  and 
secondary,  quantitative  and  qualitative 
research  use  of  market  research  for  demand 
measurement  and  forecasting,  product 
research,  advertising  research,  and  test 
marketing.  Course  is  taught  from  the  view- 
point of  the  user  of  marketing  research. 
Prereq.  MKT  4420  or  MKT  4320. 

MKT  4335  Public  Relations  1  (3  q.h.) 
Introduction  to  the  basic  principles,  purposes, 
and  practices  of  public  relations  in  both  com- 
mercial and  nonprofit  organizations.  Em- 
phasizes organization,  research,  and  writing 
fundamentals. 

MKT  4336  Public  Relations  2  (3  q.h.) 
Continuation  of  MKT  4335.  Emphasizes  the 
development  of  public  relations  programs  for 
specific  publics.  Prereq.  MKT  4335. 
MKT  4337  Advertising  and  Promotion  (3  q.h.) 
For  nonbusiness  majors.  Focuses  on  advertis- 
ing, sales  promotion,  public  relations,  publici- 
ty, and  personal  selling  as  important 
elements  in  the  marketing  process.  Also 
examines  the  ethical,  social,  and  economic 
aspects  of  advertising  and  promotion. 
MKT  4340  Retail  Management  1  (3  q.h.) 
Concepts  and  techniques  of  store  operations 
and  merchandise  management.  Focuses  on 
the  activities  and  contributions  of  various 
retailing  institutions,  such  as  independents, 
chains,  dealerships,  specialty  stores,  super- 
markets, discount  stores,  and  franchises.  Also 
includes  retail  management,  retail  profit  and 
loss,  starting  a  retail  business,  store  location, 


store  planning,  and  the  retail  organization. 
Prereq.  MKT  4301. 

MKT  4341  Retail  Management  2  (3  q.h.) 

Continuation  of  MKT  4340.  Emphasizes  store 
operations;  merchandising  planning,  control, 
and  management;  pricing;  buying;  sales  pro- 
motion; customer  service;  retail  accounting; 
and  expense  management.  Prereq.  MKT  4340. 
MKT  4352  Professional  Selling  Skills  (Intensive)  (6  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  develop  effective  selling  skills. 
Examines  the  customer  buying  process  and 
the  company  sales  process.  Discusses  prospec- 
ting, preparation,  presentation,  and  post-sale 
activities  and  introduces  advanced  selling 
techniques,  such  as  team  selling.  Focuses  on 
situations  where  personal  selling  is  a  major 
element  of  marketing  strategy,  such  as  in 
industrial-product,  professional-service,  and  high- 
technology  marketing.  Prereq.  MKT  4302. 

MKT  4355  High-Technology  Marketing  (3  q.h.) 
The  company's  marketing  function  in 
transforming  technology  into  products. 
Discusses  planning  for  product  innovation, 
linkages  between  marketing  and  engineering, 
and  communications  strategies  for  marketing 
high-technology  products.  Prereq.  MKT  4302. 

MKT  4358  Marketing  and  Sales  Seminar  (3  q.h.) 
Capstone  marketing  elective  focusing  on  the 
formulation  and  implementation  of  overall 
marketing  strategy.  Prereq.  MKT  4331. 

MKT  4401  Introduction  to  Marketing  1  (Reserved)* 

(3  q.h.) 

This  course  consists  of  lectures,  readings  and 
small  group  discussions  on  the  role  of 
marketing  in  contemporary  society,  in  the 
business  enterprise,  and  in  the  nonprofit 
organization.  Consideration  is  given  to  the 
planning,  operation,  and  evaluation  of 
marketing  and  promotional  efforts  necessary 
to  the  effective  marketing  of  consumer  and  in- 
dustrial products  and  services  in  both  profit 
and  nonprofit  organizations.  Prereq.  80  q.h. 
MKT  4402  Introduction  to  Marketing  2  (Reserved) 
(3  q.h.) 

Continuation  of  MKT  4401.  Develops  the  link 
between  marketing  theory  and  practice. 
Covers  specific  marketing  issues  and  pro- 
blems. Includes  case  study  analysis  and  cur- 
rent marketing  issues.  Prereq.  MKT  4401  or 
MKT  4301  and  80  q.h. 
MKT  4404  Introduction  to  Marketing  (Intensive) 
(Reserved)  (6  q.h.) 
Same  as  MKT  4401  and  MKT  4402. 

*Open  section  available.  Call  617-437-2418. 


MKT  4410  Advertising  Management  1  (Reserved) 

(3  q.h.) 

This  course  focuses  on  the  management  of  the 
advertising  function  in  relation  to  a  firm's 
overall  marketing  objectives.  The  course  ap- 
proaches the  subject  from  the  perspective  of 
the  user  of  advertising  (e.g.,  product  manager, 
marketing  manager).  Case  studies  and  text 
material  are  used  to  help  the  student  develop 
decision-making  skills.  Prereq.  MKT  4420  or 
MKT  4320  and  80  q.h. 

MKT  4411  Advertising  Management  2  (Reserved)  (3  q.h.) 
Continuation  of  MKT  4410.  Surveys  why  and 
how  advertising  works,  and  includes  challeng- 
ing and  practical  case  studies.  Prereq.  MKT 
4420  or  MKT  4320  and  80  q.h. 
MKT  4412  Advertising  Management  (Reserved) 
(Intensive)  (6  q.h.) 

Same  as  MKT  4410  and  MKT  4411.  Prereq. 
MKT  4420  or  4320  and  80  q.h. 

MKT  4415  Sales  Management  1  (Reserved)*  (3  q.h.) 
Allows  student  to  develop  effective  selling 
skills.  Examines  the  customer  buying  process 
and  the  company  sales  process.  Discusses  pro- 
specting, preparation,  presentation,  and  post- 
sale  activities  and  introduces  advanced  selling 
techniques,  such  as  team  selling.  Focuses  on 
situations  where  personal  selling  is  a  major 
element  of  marketing  strategy,  such  as 
industrial-product,  professional-service,  and 
high-technology  marketing.  Prereq.  MKT 
4420  or  MKT  4320  and  80  q.h. 
MKT  4416  Sales  Management  2  (Reserved)  (3  q.h.) 
This  course  is  designed  to  help  the  student 
develop  decision-making  skills  necessary  for 
both  building  and  maintaining  an  effective 
sales  organization.  Cases  and  readings  are 
used  to  examine  the  strategic  and  operating 
problems  of  the  sales  manager.  Major  topic 
areas  include  the  selling  function,  sales 
management  at  the  field  level,  and  the  sales 
executive.  Prereq.  MKT  4415  or  MKT  4315 
and  80  q.h. 

MKT  4417  Sales  Management  (Reserved)  (Intensive) 
(6  q.h.) 

Same  as  MKT  4415  and  MKT  4416.  Prereq. 
MKT  4420  or  MKT  4320  and  80  q.h. 
MKT  4420  Marketing  Management  1  (Reserved)  (3  q.h.) 
This  course  is  designed  to  provide  training  in 
marketing  decision  making.  Case  studies 
simulating  actual  business  settings  are  used 
to  help  students  develop  analytical  abilities 
and  sharpen  their  communications  skills. 
Topics  range  from  techniques  used  to  analyze 
a  market  to  the  development  of  a  total  marketing 
strategy  (product  policy,  pricing  policy,  promo- 

*Open  section  available.  Call  617-437-2418. 


tion  policy,  and  distribution  policy).  Prereq. 
MKT  4401  or  MKT  4301  and  80  q.h. 
MKT  4430  Marketing  Research  1  (Reserved)  (3  q.h.) 
Use  of  marketing  research  in  planning  and 
evaluating  marketing  activities  and  in  form- 
ulating marketing  decisions.  Introduces 
marketing  information  systems,  primary  and 
secondary,  quantitative  and  qualitative 
research  use  of  market  research  for  demand 
measurement  and  forecasting,  product 
research,  advertising  research,  and  test 
marketing.  Course  is  taught  from  the  view- 
point of  the  user  of  marketing  research. 
Prereq.  MKT  4420  or  MKT  4320  and  80  q.h. 
MKT  4431  Marketing  Research  2  (Reserved)  (3  q.h.) 
Course  focuses  on  the  techniques  and  pro- 
cedures required  to  conduct  high  quality 
research  studies.  Topics  include  problem 
definition,  exploratory  research,  research 
design,  sampling  techniques,  questionnaire 
development,  data  collection  methods,  survey 
errors,  and  processing  and  analyzing  research 
data.  Course  is  taught  from  the  viewpoint  of 
the  person  who  conducts  market  research 
studies.  Prereq.  MKT  4430  or  MKT  4330  and 
80  q.h. 

MKT  4453  International  Marketing  3  (Reserved)  (3  q.h.) 
This  course  is  designed  to  help  familiarize  the 
student  with  those  aspects  of  marketing  that 
are  unique  to  international  business  within 
the  framework  of  traditional  functional  areas 
of  marketing.  The  focus  is  on  the  environ- 
ment and  the  modifications  of  marketing  con- 
cepts and  practices  necessitated  by  environ- 
mental differences.  Topics  include  cultural 
dynamics  in  international  markets,  political 
and  legal  environmental  constraints,  educa- 
tional and  economic  constraints,  international 
marketing  research,  international  marketing 
institutions,  and  marketing  practices  abroad. 
Prereq.  MKT  4420  or  MKT  4320  and  80  q.h. 
MKT  4457  Competitive  Strategy  (Reserved)  (3  q.h.) 
A  capstone  marketing  course,  required  of  all 
students  with  a  marketing  concentration.  The 
focus  is  on  the  formulation  of  marketing 
strategy  at  a  policy  level  and  its  implementa- 
tion in  a  dynamic  environment.  Prereq.  MKT 
4420  or  MKT  4320  and  80  q.h. 
MKT  4600  Honors  Program  1  (4  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  undertake  an  in-depth 
research  study  project.  See  page  17  for  details. 
Prereq.  96  q.h.,  3.5  q.p.a. 
MKT  4601  Honors  Program  2  (4  q.h.) 
See  MKT  4600. 

MKT  4602  Honors  Program  3  (4  q.h.) 
See  MKT  4600. 


MKT  4701  Independent  Study  1  (3  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  undertake  special  research.  See 
page  17  for  details.  Prereq.  96  q.h.,  3.0  q.p.a. 
MKT  4702  Independent  Study  2  (3  q.h.) 
See  MKT  4701. 

MKT  4703  Independent  Study  3  (3  q.h.) 
See  MKT  4701. 

MKT  4800  Advanced  Tutorial  1  (3  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  take  upper-level  course  in- 
dependently. See  page  16  for  details.  Prereq. 
87  q.h. 

MKT  4801  Advanced  Tutorial  2  (3  q.h.) 
See  MKT  4800. 
MKT  4900  Field  Work  (6  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  enhance  career  development 
by  applying  academic  background  to  practical 
problems  in  the  workplace.  See  page  16  for 
details.  Prereq.  Approval  of  Program  Director. 

MEDICAL  LABORATORY  SCIENCE 

MLS  Courses  at  Special  Tuition  Rate 

Course  descriptions  for  medical  laboratory 
science  courses  numbered  MLS  1— are 
available  from  the  College  of  Pharmacy  and 
Allied  Health  Professions,  206  Mugar 
Building.  Call  617-437-3664. 
MLS  4301  Medical  Laboratory  Science  Orientation  (2  q.h.) 
Scope,  responsibilities,  opportunities,  and 
educational  requirements  for  the  medical 
laboratory  science  professions.  Medical  ter- 
minology and  laboratory  mathematics  are 
included. 

MLS  4321  Hematology*  (1  cl.,  3  lab.,  3  q.h.) 
Basic  hematological  techniques,  including 
discussion  of  the  differential  smear  and  obser- 
vation of  the  normal  morphology  of  human 
red  cells,  white  cells,  and  platelets. 
(Laboratory  fee.)  Prereq.  BIO  4104  or  equiv. 
Not  open  to  medical  technology  or  hematology 
majors. 

MLS  4322  Morphologic  Hematology  1* 
(1  cl.,  3  lab.,  3  q.h.) 

Morphologic  and  etiologic  classification  of  the 
anemias.  Related  diagnostic  tests  are  discussed. 
(Laboratory  fee.)  Prereq.  MLS  4321  or  equiv. 
MLS  4323  Morphologic  Hematology  2* 
(1  cl.,  3  lab.,  3  q.h.) 

Studies  of  pathologic  and  physiologic  devia- 
tions of  the  white  cells  series  as  observed  in 
leukemias  and  infections.  Some  animal 
hematology  is  included.  (Laboratory  fee.) 
Prereq.  MLS  4322  or  equiv. 
MLS  4341  Epidemiology  1*  (3  q.h.) 
Basic  concepts  in  epidemiology,  the  distribu- 
tion in  determinants  of  diseases  and  injuries 
in  human  populations.  Descriptive  and 


analytical  epidemiology  studies  are  included. 
MLS  4342  Epidemiology  2  (3  q.h.) 
Microbiological  distributions  in  determinants  of 
infectious  diseases;  hospital  epidemiology. 
MLS  4352  Basic  MLS  Electronics  and  Instrumentation 
(2  q.h.) 

Electricity,  with  coverage  of  introductory  elec- 
tronic circuits.  Emphasizes  medical  laboratory 
instrumentation  and  related  electrical  pro- 
cesses of  measurement. 
MLS  4365  Quality  Control  (3  q.h.) 
Development  of  quality  control  programs  in 
each  medical  laboratory  specialty.  Includes 
applications  of  statistical  methods  to  medical 
laboratory  quality  control  programs. 
MLS  4381  Seminar  in  Medical  Technology  (3  q.h.) 
Current  topics  in  medical  technology.  Includes 
required  readings  and  presentations  by 
students;  guest  lecturers.  Prereq.  instructor's 
permission. 

MLS  4700  Advanced  Tutorial  1  (3  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  take  upper-level  course  in- 
dependently. See  page  16  for  details.  Prereq. 
87  q.h. 

MLS  4701  Advanced  Tutorial  2  (3  q.h.) 
See  MLS  4700. 

MANAGEMENT  SCIENCE 

MS  4325  Business  Decision  Models  (formerly  In- 
troduction to  Modeling  and  Simulation)  (3  q.h.) 
Modeling  as  a  method  for  gaining  insight  into 
the  underlying  mathematical  structure  of 
business  problems.  Discusses  specific  modeling 
techniques,  such  as  linear  programming  and 
simulation.  Prereq.  MTH4111  and  ECN  4251. 
MS  4332  Statistical  Quality  Control  (3  q.h.) 
Practical  course  in  analytical  methods  in  quali- 
ty control.  The  application  of  basic  statistical 
controls  in  the  industrial  and  service  sectors. 
Includes  control  charts,  statistical  tolerancing, 
acceptance  sampling  techniques,  life  testing, 
and  reliability  concepts.  Prereq.  ECN  4251. 
MS  4333  Management  of  Quality  Control  (3  q.h.) 
Management  practices  of  modern  quality  con- 
trol and  the  different  approaches  to  optimiz- 
ing quality.  Includes  organizational  strategies, 
economics  of  quality,  internal  and  external 
quality,  and  management  of  long-term  quality 
and  reliability.  Prereq.  MS  4332. 
MS  4334  Advanced  Quality  Control  (3  q.h.) 
Quality  control  topics  of  current  interest.  Typical 
subjects  include  Asian  quality  methods,  advanc- 
ed process  capability  techniques,  use  of  com- 
puters in  quality  control,  and  integration  of 
quality  and  reliability  programs.  Prereq.  MS  4333. 
*Offered  even-numbered  academic  years. 


MS  4335  Principles  of  Material  Inspection  (3  q.h.) 
Bridges  the  gap  between  manufacturing  and 
data  analysis,  with  emphasis  on  the  measur- 
ing process.  In-class  labs  provide  hands-on 
training  in  the  use  of  a  wide  variety  of 
mechanical  measuring  devices.  Lectures 
demonstrate  the  fundamental  measuring 
principles  involved  and  illustrate  their  exten- 
sion to  all  measuring  processes. 
MS  4336  Industrial  Experimentation  (3  q.h.) 
Practical  techniques  for  data  collection  that 
can  greatly  extend  students'  problem-solving 
skills.  Includes  instruction  in  extracting  max- 
imum information  from  small  samples  and 
avoiding  many  common  data-analysis  pitfalls. 
Other  topics  include  randomized  tests,  multi- 
level tests,  two-level  multi-factor  tests,  and 
Taguchi  methods.  Prereq.  ECN  4251  or  equiv. 
MS  4337  Principles  of  Quality  Assurance  (3  q.h.) 
The  modern  quality  function  from  its  begin- 
nings in  product  design  to  vendor  selection, 
incoming  inspection,  monitoring  of  the 
manufacturing  process,  final  product  testing, 
and  customer  acceptance.  Includes  defining 
quality,  quality  organization,  sampling  plans, 
control  charts,  and  quality  assurance 
reporting. 

MATH 

MTH  4100  Conquering  Math  1  (Noncredit) 

Designed  for  those  persons  with  anxiety  about 
using  math,  or  who  have  had  minimal  ex- 
posure to  it.  The  course  begins  with  an  ex- 
planation of  numbers  and  arithmetic  opera- 
tions. It  concludes  with  the  arithmetic 
manipulation  of  numbers,  such  as:  slope, 
averages,  and  percents.  Word  problems  are 
used  throughout  the  course.  Upon  successful 
completion  of  the  course,  the  student  will  be 
prepared  to  take  applicable  college  credit 
mathematics  courses. 

MTH  4101  Conquering  Math  2  (Noncredit) 

A  continuation  of  Conquering  Math  1. 
MTH  4001  Introduction  to  Mathematics  1  (3  q.h.) 
Review  of  elementary  algebra,  including 
operations  on  integers,  algebraic  expressions, 
exponents,  equations,  word  problems,  and 
graphing.  Credit  for  this  course  cannot  be  ap- 
plied to  School  of  Engineering  Technology 
degree  programs. 

MTH  4002  Introduction  to  Mathematics  2  (3  q.h.) 
Further  review  of  mathematics,  including 
operations  with  polynomials,  factoring,  frac- 
tional expressions,  and  radicals.  Credit  for 
this  course  cannot  be  applied  to  School  of 
Engineering  Technology  degree  programs. 
Prereq.  MTH  4001. 


MTH  4006  Technical  Mathematics*  (4  q.h.) 

Reviews  high  school  algebra  equations, 
formulas,  exponents,  polynomials,  factoring, 
scientific  notation,  fractions,  radicals,  complex 
numbers,  quadratic  equations,  and  linear 
equations.  (Credit  cannot  be  used  in  the 
associate  in  engineering,  associate  in  science, 
or  the  bachelor  of  engineering  technology 
degree  programs.) 

MTH  4107  College  Algebra*  (4  q.h.) 
Diagnostic  exam  to  ensure  appropriate  place- 
ment. Topics  include  exponents,  radicals,  fac- 
toring, and  operations  with  fractions;  opera- 
tions with  sets,  and  solving  linear,  quadratic 
and  absolute  value  equations  and  inequalities. 
Also  covered  are  equations  involving  radicals; 
operations  with  imaginary  and  complex 
numbers;  graphing  linear,  quadratic,  and 
polynomial  functions;  direct  and  inverse 
variation;  solving  higher  degree  polynomial 
equations;  and  an  introduction  to  partial 
fractions.  Prereq.  Math  diagnostic  exam  or 
MTH  4006. 

MTH  4108  Pre-Calculus*  (4  q.h.) 
Topics  include  composite  and  inverse  func- 
tions; logarithmic  and  exponential  functions 
and  equations;  properties  of  logs  and  introduc- 
tion to  base  e;  trigonometric  functions,  iden- 
tities, and  equations;  and  solving  triangles  by 
applying  law  of  sines  and  cosines.  Also 
covered  are  polar  form  of  complex  numbers 
and  DeMoivre's  formula;  solving  systems  of 
linear  equations  by  Cramer's  rule;  solving 
nonlinear  systems  in  two  variables;  arith- 
metic and  geometric  sequences  and  series; 
factorials,  combinatorials,  and  the  binomial 
expansion  formula.  Prereq.  MTH  4107. 
MTH  4110  Math  1  (3  q.h.) 
Exponents,  polynomials,  factoring,  radicals, 
algebraic  fractions,  linear  equations,  and 
word  problems.  Prereq.  One  year  of  high  school 
algebra  or  its  equiv.  A  placement  test  is  given 
during  the  first  class  meeting.  Students  who 
obtain  an  unsatisfactory  score  on  this  test  are 
advised  to  enroll  in  MTH  4001  instead  for  ad- 
ditional preparation.  Credit  for  this  course 
cannot  be  applied  to  School  of  Engineering 
Technology  degree  programs. 
MTH  4111  Math  2  (3  q.h.) 
Word  problems,  quadratic  equations  and 
related  problems,  graphs  and  functions,  and 
systems  of  equations.  Credit  for  this  course 
cannot  be  applied  to  School  of  Engineering 
Technology  degree  programs.  Prereq.  MTH  41 10. 
*This  is  a  School  of  Engineering  Technology  course, 
which  is  offered  at  a  different  tuition  rate  than  that  of 
University  College. 


MTH  4112  Math  3  (3  q.h.) 
Exponential  and  logarithmic  functions,  se- 
quences, and  series.  Introduction  to  calculus. 
Credit  for  this  course  cannot  be  applied  to 
School  of  Engineering  Technology  degree  pro- 
grams. Prereq.  MTH  4111. 
MTH  4113  Mathematics  (Intensive)  (9  q.h.) 
Same  as  MTH  4110,  MTH  4111,  and  MTH 
4112. 

MTH  4114  Mathematics  1  and  2  Combination  (6  q.h.) 
Same  as  MTH  4110  and  MTH  4111. 
MTH  4120  Calculus  1*  (4  q.h.) 
Topics  include  plane  analytic  geometry  of  the 
line,  circle,  parabola,  ellipse,  and  hyperbola; 
review  of  inequalities  and  general  function 
operations;  theory  and  evaluation  of  limits; 
derivatives  of  algebraic  and  trigonometric 
functions;  and  general  rules  of  differentiation. 
Also  covered  are  Rolle's  theorem;  Mean  Value 
theorem;  applications  of  differentiation  including 
velocity,  acceleration,  related  rates,  maxima 
and  minima,  curve  sketching,  and  approxima- 
tions by  differentials.  Prereq.  MTH  4108. 
MTH  4121  Calculus  2*  (4  q.h.) 
Examines  antiderivative  and  development  of 
the  fundamentals  theorem  with  applications 
to  areas,  volumes,  and  rectilinear  motion  pro- 
blems. Topics  include  the  logarithmic  expo- 
nentials, and  inverse  trigonometric  functions 
and  their  applications;  techniques  of  integra- 
tion including  parts,  partial  fractions, 
substitution,  and  the  use  of  tables,  numerical 
integration  (Simpson's  and  Trapezoidal  Rule); 
L'Hospital's  Rule;  improper  integrals,  and  the 
geometry  of  vectors  in  a  plane  and  space. 
Prereq.  MTH 4120*. 
MTH  4122  Calculus  3*  (4  q.h.) 
Studies  three-dimensional  space  and  a  treat- 
ment of  functions  of  several  variables;  multi- 
ple integrals  with  applications  in  areas  and 
volumes;  sequences  and  series;  differential 
equations,  including  the  solution  with  applica- 
tions of  first-order  with  variables  separable, 
first-order  linear,  and  second-order  linear 
homogeneous  to  complete  the  sequence. 
Prereq.  MTH  4121*. 
MTH  4123  Differential  Equations*  (4  q.h.) 
Linear  differential  equations  with  constant 
coefficients,  homogeneous  and 
nonhomogeneous,  are  examined.  Explores  the 
variation  of  parameters  and  undermines  coef- 
ficients and  simultaneous  differential  equa- 
tions, the  Laplace  transform  series  and  solu- 
tion of  differential  equations,  and  the  Fourier 
series.  Orthogonal  functions  and  numerical 

*This  is  a  School  of  Engineering  Technology  course,  which 
University  College. 


solutions  of  differential  equations  are  studied. 
Prereq.  MTH 4122*. 

MTH  4130  Fundamentals  of  Calculus  1  (3  q.h.) 
Introductory  course  intended  for  students  in 
liberal  arts,  business  administration,  and 
other  nonengineering  curricula.  Includes  fun- 
damentals of  differential  calculus,  rules  of  dif- 
ferentiation, rates  of  change,  graph  sketching, 
and  growth  and  decay  function.  Credit  for  this 
course  cannot  be  applied  to  School  of 
Engineering  Technology  degree  programs. 
Prereq.  MTH  4112  or  equiv. 

MTH  4131  Fundamentals  of  Calculus  2  (3  q.h.) 
Applications  of  differential  calculus,  including 
problems  in  optimization,  velocity  and  ac- 
celeration, compound  interest,  population 
growth,  and  the  fitting  of  equations  to  data. 
Introduces  integral  calculus,  areas,  average 
values  of  functions,  marginal  cost  and  profit, 
and  depreciation.  Credit  for  this  course  cannot 
be  applied  to  School  of  Engineering  Technology 
degree  programs.  Prereq.  MTH  4130. 
MTH  4132  Fundamentals  of  Calculus  3  (3  q.h.) 
Calculus  of  trigonometric  functions,  techni- 
ques of  integration,  numerical  methods,  and 
differential  equations.  Applications  include 
pricing,  allocation  of  funds,  present  value  of 
an  investment,  manufacturing  efficiency,  and 
product  reliability.  Credit  for  this  course  can- 
not be  applied  to  School  of  Engineering 
Technology  degree  programs.  Prereq.  MTH 
4131. 

MTH  4140  Mathematics  for  Business  Management  1 
(3  q.h.) 

Mathematics  topics  applicable  to  business 
management,  such  as  linear  equations  and  in- 
equalities, matrix  algebra,  linear  program- 
ming, sets,  and  counting  techniques.  Prereq. 
MTH  4112  or  equiv. 

MTH  4141  Mathematics  for  Business  Management  2 
(3  q.h.) 

Business  applications  of  probability,  decision 
theory,  Markov  chains,  game  theory,  and 
competitive  analysis.  Prereq.  MTH  4140. 
MTH  4143  Mathematics  for  Business  Management 
(Intensive)  (6  q.h.) 

Same  as  MTH  4140  and  MTH  4141. 
MTH  4520  Statistically  Thinking  (3  q.h.) 
Introduction  to  statistical  mode  of  thinking. 
Presents  the  essential  logic  of  statistical 
analysis  to  allow  the  student  to  critically 
evaluate  research  published  in  professional 
journals  as  well  as  newspapers.  The  process  of 
collecting,  analyzing,  and  interpreting  data  is 
discussed,  as  well  as  the  use  of  computers  in 
is  offered  at  a  different  tuition  rate  than  that  of 


statistical  analysis.  Lectures  used  in  conjunc- 
tion with  discussions  of  outside  readings  to 
illustrate  concepts. 
MTH  4700  Advanced  Tutorial  1  (3  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  take  upper-level  course  in- 
dependently. See  page  16  for  details.  Prereq. 
87  q.h. 

MTH  4701  Advanced  Tutorial  2  (3  q.h.) 
See  MTH  4700. 

MUSIC 

MUS  4100  Introduction  to  Music  (3  q.h.) 

Selected  works  from  earliest  times  to  contem- 
porary styles.  Primarily  a  survey  and  listen- 
ing course  that  emphasizes  styles,  basic 
theory,  forms,  and  the  historical,  social,  and 
artistic  periods  each  work  represents. 
MUS  4103  Music  and  Society  (3  q.h.) 
The  artist's  involvement  with  recurring  social 
themes  such  as  self-image,  the  search  for 
peace  and  understanding,  personal  relation- 
ships, and  others.  Examines  paintings  and 
literary  works  in  addition  to  works  by 
Beethoven,  Schoenberg,  Britten,  and 
selected  jazz  composers. 
MUS  4105  Music  of  the  U.S.A.  (3  q.h.) 
American  music  from  Puritan  psalm  singing 
to  the  present.  Covers  folk  music  of  ethnic 
origin,  concert  music,  ragtime,  jazz,  and  con- 
temporary styles. 
MUS  4106  Women  in  Music  (3  q.h.) 
The  historical  role  of  women  in  music,  as 
composers,  performers,  patrons,  and 
inspiration. 

MUS  4110  Music  in  Popular  Culture  (3  q.h.) 
Investigation  of  American  attitudes  toward 
culture,  art,  and  beauty  through  considera- 
tion of  contemporary  popular  music.  Com- 
pares the  different  styles  of  pop  music  (jazz, 
rock,  MOR,  and  R&B)  and  traces  their  evolu- 
tion. Examines  the  manipulation  of  public 
tastes  by  large  corporations  for  commercial 
purposes. 

MUS  4111  Rock  Music  (3  q.h.) 
History  of  rock  music  from  its  origins  in 
American  blues  and  other  styles  through  the 
popular  music  of  the  1950s,  the  political  styles 
of  the  1960s,  and  the  diverse  trends  of  the 
1970s.  Emphasizes  the  formative  years  of  rock. 
MUS  4112  Jazz  (3  q.h.) 

Jazz,  from  its  origins  in  New  Orleans  to  the 
avant-garde  experiments  of  today.  Includes 
analysis  of  the  rhythmic,  harmonic,  instrumen- 
tal, and  stylistic  characteristics  of  jazz.  Covers 


the  works  of  such  creative  jazz  artists  as  Arm- 
strong, Beiderbecke,  Parker,  Ellington,  and 
Coltrane. 

MUS  4120  History  of  Musical  Styles  (3  q.h.) 
Chronological  examination  of  Western  music, 
including  its  role  in  society  and  the  contribu- 
tions of  influential  Western  composers. 
Reviews  representative  works  from  each 
period,  with  music  by  Bach,  Handel,  Haydn, 
Mozart,  Beethoven,  Brahms,  Berlioz,  Wagner, 
Mahler,  and  Stravinsky. 
MUS  4121  Medieval  and  Renaissance  Music  (3  q.h.) 
Development  of  sacred  and  secular  monophony, 
vocal  and  instrumental  works,  and  polyphonic 
music  from  their  beginnings  to  about  1600. 
MUS  4122  Music  of  the  Baroque  (3  q.h.) 
The  period  of  the  emergence  of  the  orchestra, 
the  chorus,  and  the  virtuoso  performer  and 
the  development  of  the  oratorio,  opera,  concerto, 
and  symphony  in  the  works  of  Monteverdi, 
Corelli,  Vivaldi,  Handel,  and  J.  S.  Bach. 
MUS  4123  Music  History  of  the  Classical  Period  (3  q.h.) 
Study  of  changing  musical  styles  from  Stamitz 
and  the  Mannheim  School  through  the  works 
of  Haydn,  Mozart,  and  early  Beethoven. 
MUS  4124  Music  History  of  the  Romantic  Era  (3  q.h.) 
Musical  styles  of  the  nineteenth  century,  in- 
cluding the  role  of  music  and  the  musician  in 
the  changing  social,  economic,  political,  and 
cultural  structure  of  Europe.  Analyzes  music 
by  Beethoven,  Schubert,  Berlioz,  Brahms, 
Verdi,  and  Wagner. 

MUS  4125  Music  History  of  the  Twentieth  Century  (3  q.h.) 
The  diversity  of  styles  from  Debussy  through 
Stravinsky,  Schoenberg,  Bartok,  and  Hindemith 
and  more  recent  developments,  including 
musique  concrete,  chance  music,  and  elec- 
tronic music. 

MUS  4130  The  Symphony  (3  q.h.) 
The  symphony  as  the  major  genre  in  the 
Classical,  Romantic,  and  contemporary 
periods.  Covers  works  by  Haydn,  Mozart, 
Beethoven,  Schumann,  Tchaikovsky,  Brahms, 
and  Sibelius. 

MUS  4132  The  World  of  Opera  (3  q.h.) 
Opera  as  a  dramatic  form,  including  discus- 
sion of  aria,  recitative,  ensemble,  and  other 
basic  elements.  Considers  numbers  opera, 
music  drama,  and  Singspiel  and  such  com- 
posers as  Mozart,  Wagner,  Verdi,  and  Puccini. 
MUS  4133  Great  Choral  Literature  (3  q.h.) 
Sacred  and  secular  choral  literature  from 
medieval  to  contemporary  times. 


mrrir 


L3LU 


MUS  4136  Music  and  Art  (3  q.h.) 

How  European  composers  used  the  works  of 
Spanish,  English,  and  German  painters  as  in- 
spiration for  their  musical  scores.  Analyzes 
European  museum  paintings  and  their 
musical  counterparts  to  give  students  an 
understanding  of  the  broad  influence  of  art  on 
musical  composition. 
MUS  4137  Music  of  the  Dance  (3  q.h.) 
The  world  of  the  dance,  with  emphasis  on  the 
creative  art  of  ballet.  Probes  the  dynamic 
qualities  of  music  for  the  dance  and  the  peo- 
ple who  brought  it  to  its  present  position  as  a 
fusion  of  all  the  arts. 
MUS  4138  American  Musical  Theatre  (3  q.h.) 
Historical  survey  and  analytical  study  of 
musical  shows.  Students  attend  performances 
and  write  critical  reviews. 
MUS  4140  Life  and  Works  of  Mozart  (3  q.h.) 
Mozart's  musical  development  from  child  pro- 
digy to  mature  artist,  traced  from  his  own  let- 
ters and  from  biographies.  Includes  analysis 
of  many  of  his  major  works,  including  operas, 
symphonies,  concertos,  and  chamber  music. 
MUS  4141  Life  and  Works  of  J.  S.  Bach  (3  q.h.) 
The  genius  who  summed  up  the  Baroque  era 
and  whose  every  note  reflected  his  profoundly 
humanistic  approach  to  religion.  Works  ex- 
amined include  large  choral  masterpieces, 
such  as  the  St.  Matthew  Passion,  the 
Brandenburg  Concertos,  the  Well-Tempered 
Clavier,  and  the  Suites. 
MUS  4144  Life  and  Works  of  Debussy  (3  q.h.) 
Debussy's  impressionist  music  as  the  turning 
point  toward  modern  trends.  Studies  much  of 
his  work  for  piano,  orchestra,  and  opera,  in- 
cluding Suite  pour  le  Piano,  Suite  Bergamas- 
que  ("Clair  de  Lune"),  Images  for  piano  and 
orchestra,  Nocturnes,  La  Mer,  and  the  opera 
Pelleas  and  Melisande. 
MUS  4145  Life  and  Works  of  Beethoven  (3  q.h.) 
The  complex  personality  and  art  of  this 
figure,  including  his  relation  to  the  turbulent 
times  in  which  he  lived  and  his  role  in 
Classical  and  Romantic  music. 
MUS  4160  Music  Therapy  (3  q.h.) 
Use  of  music  as  a  therapeutic  medium,  em- 
phasizing the  musician  and  nonmusician 
alike.  Course  is  experimental  in  nature  and 
covers  such  topics  as  music  language  and  the 
brain,  music  and  special  populations,  and 
music  and  relaxation. 

MUS  4163  Sound  Health:  Music  and  Relaxation  (3  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  experience  a  heightened 
awareness  of  the  power  of  music  to  effect 


physical  and  emotional  change,  and  to  ex- 
amine the  effects  of  music  on  the  body,  mind, 
and  spirit.  An  exploration  into  the  awareness 
of  sound  and  the  physiological  changes  caused 
by  music.  Covers  theories  and  techniques 
used  to  facilitate  positive  change,  relaxation, 
and  reduction  of  stress.  Includes  sound  pollu- 
tion, the  effects  of  vibrations  on  the  body, 
guided  imagery,  music  and  meditation,  and 
New  Age  and  environmental  music. 
MUS  4165  The  Music  Industry  (3  q.h.) 
Business-related  areas  of  the  music  industry. 
Addresses  the  structure  of  the  record  industry 
and  music  publishing  world,  the  function  of 
performing  rights  organizations  (ASCAP  and 
BMI),  and  the  role  of  concert  and  orchestral 
managers.  Features  guest  lecturers  from 
various  fields  and  trips  to  "behind-the-scenes" 
locations. 

MUS  4168  Building  a  Career  in  Musical  Performance 
(3q.h.) 

Designed  for  performers  representing 
themselves  or  for  those  interested  in  manag- 
ing other  artists.  Topics  include  auditions,  job 
investigation,  resumes,  photographs,  press- 
kits,  recording,  and  debut  recitals.  Students 
assemble  press  kits,  write  press  releases  and 
PSAs,  and  learn  effective  ways  to  garner  and 
handle  publicity,  to  differentiate  among  the 
various  audio  and  video  formats,  and  essay 
their  ideas  on  novel  methods  of  promoting 
themselves  or  others. 
MUS  4171  Computers  and  Music  (3  q.h.) 
History  of  the  use  of  computers  for  music 
composition,  music  and  sound  analysis,  sound 
sampling  and  synthesis,  and  music  scoring 
and  printing.  Emphasizes  the  latest  technology, 
including  the  use  of  MIDI  (Musical  Instrument 
Digital  Interface).  Also  features  hands-on  use 
of  computers,  music  software,  and  synthesizers. 
MUS  4172  The  Recording  Studio  (3  q.h.) 
The  history  and  methods  of  audio  reproduc- 
tion from  Edison's  gramophone  to  today's 
multi-track  digital  techniques.  Includes  in- 
struction and  hands-on  experience  at  the 
recording  facility  in  the  College's  new  Media 
Studio.  Guest  lectures  from  experts  in  the 
field  and  visit  to  a  local  professional  studio. 
MUS  4180  Introduction  to  World  Music  (3  q.h.) 
The  varied  musical  cultures  of  non- Western 
societies.  Exploration  of  characteristics  com- 
mon to  all  musical  systems,  followed  by  in- 
vestigation of  music  in  the  Middle  East, 
southern  and  eastern  Asia,  Africa,  South  and 
Central  America,  and  the  Caribbean. 


MUS  4181  Music  of  Africa  (3  q.h.) 
The  music  of  Africa  is  as  varied  as  its  many 
linguistic  and  tribal  identities.  Surveys  the 
breadth  of  African  musical  traditions  and 
their  historical,  social,  and  cultural  background 
as  well  as  Africa's  approaches  to  musical 
organization,  musical  practice,  and  significant 
aspects  of  style.  Also  examines  the  possible 
contributions  to  contemporary  African- 
American  music. 

MUS  4182  Music  of  the  Middle  East  (3  q.h.) 
Introduction  to  the  music  and  traditional  in- 
struments of  selected  Near  Eastern  and  Arab 
cultures,  such  as  Persian  culture  in  the  East 
and  Ethiopian  and  Berber  cultures  in  Africa. 
Also,  cantillation  styles  and  practices  of 
various  chants  of  the  Hebrew,  Christian,  and 
Islamic  traditions. 

MUS  4200  How  to  Read  and  Write  Music  (3  q.h.) 
Basics  of  musical  notation  for  students  with 
little  or  no  theory  or  performance 
background.  Focuses  on  the  use  of  the  sym- 
bols of  pitch  and  duration.  Includes  sight 
reading  simple  melodies,  following  scores,  ar- 
ranging music  for  small  instrumental  groups, 
transposition,  and  elementary  rhythmic  and 
melodic  composition. 
MUS  4201  Music  Theory  1  (4  q.h.) 
Basics  of  music  theory  as  a  foundation  for  fur- 
ther musical  study  and  activity.  Begins  with 
aural  and  visual  identification  of  pitches,  in- 
tervals, major  and  minor  scales,  and  triads  in 
the  G  and  F  clefs.  Includes  rhythmic  and  sim- 
ple melodic  dictation,  sight-reading,  elemen- 
tary melodic  writing,  and  chord  construction. 
MUS  4202  Music  Theory  2  (4  q.h.) 
Visual  identification  of  pitches  in  the  soprano, 
alto,  and  tenor  clefs;  transposition;  some 
elementary  arranging;  writing  and  aural 
identification  of  cadences;  elementary  musical 
analysis;  melodic  and  rhythmic  dictation;  and 
sight  reading.  Prereq.  MUS  4201  or  equiv. 
MUS  4203  Music  Theory  3  (4  q.h.) 
Continuation  of  MUS  4202.  Covers  elemen- 
tary four-part  writing,  introduction  to  figured 
bass,  score  reading,  and  harmonic  analysis. 
Activities  include  harmonic  as  well  as  melodic 
dictation  and  part  singing  by  sight.  Prereq. 
MUS  4202. 

MUS  4231  Musical  Performance  1  (1  q.h.) 
Participation  in  rehearsals  and  public  perfor- 
mances and/or  research;  and  composition,  ar- 
ranging, conducting,  and  solo  and  ensemble 
activity  with  the  NU  Symphony  Orchestra, 
the  Early  Music  Players,  the  NU  Chorus,  the 


NU  Bands,  or  other  ensembles  under  the 
supervision  of  a  faculty  member.  Evaluation 
of  student  progress  at  the  end  of  the  quarter 
by  audition  or  other  method.  Prereq.  Audition 
or  instructor's  permission. 
MUS  4232  Musical  Performance  2  (1  q.h.) 
Continuation  of  MUS  4231.  Prereq.  MUS 
4231. 

MUS  4233  Musical  Performance  3  (1  q.h.) 
Continuation  of  MUS  4232.  Prereq.  MUS 
4232. 

MUS  4234  Musical  Performance  4  (1  q.h.) 
Continuation  of  MUS  4233.  Prereq.  MUS 
4233. 

MUS  4235  Chamber  Music  1  (3  q.h.) 
Weekly  one-hour  sessions  for  rehearsal,  study, 
and  performance  of  music  for  two  to  six 
players  (matched  according  to  level)  under  the 
guidance  of  a  faculty  coach.  Repertoire 
selected  from  the  full  range  of  European  con- 
cert music  by  the  instructor  in  consultation 
with  the  students.  Special  tuition  rate  for 
Northeastern  University  staff.  For  details, 
contact  the  Department  of  Music,  307  Ell 
Building,  617-437-2440. 
MUS  4236  Chamber  Music  2  (3  q.h.) 
Continuation  of  MUS  4235.  Prereq.  MUS 

4235  or  instructor's  permission. 
MUS  4237  Chamber  Music  3  (3  q.h.) 
Continuation  of  MUS  4236.  Prereq.  MUS 

4236  or  instructor's  permission. 
MUS  4241  Piano  Class  1  (3  q.h.) 

For  beginning  piano  students  who  want  to 
progress  at  their  own  pace.  Grades  are  award- 
ed after  passing  various  step  levels.  Owner- 
ship of  a  piano  is  not  required. 
MUS  4242  Piano  Class  2  (3  q.h.) 
Introduction  of  scales,  arpeggios,  and  triads  to 
help  students  perform  more  advanced  music. 
Repertoire  consists  of  original  compositions  by 
the  instructor  and  simple  works  by  Bartok 
and  Kabalevsky.  Prereq.  MUS  4241  or  equiv., 
or  instructor's  permission. 
MUS  4243  Piano  Class  3  (3  q.h.) 
Two-octave  scales,  argeggios,  and  triads  in  all 
keys.  Repertoire  consists  of  Bartok,  Kabalev- 
sky, original  compositions  by  the  instructor, 
and  duets  specifically  arranged  for  this 
course.  Prereq.  MUS  4242  or  equiv.,  or  in- 
structor's permission. 


MUS  4244  Voice  Class  (3  q.h.) 
Basic  vocal  production  required  for  fine  sing- 
ing. Repertoire,  both  classical  and  contem- 
porary, is  chosen  for  each  student  to  learn 
and  perform  in  lessons  and  outside  of  class. 
Includes  lectures  concerning  diction,  the 
physiology  of  singing,  resonance,  registers,  in- 
terpretation, and  the  basics  of  music  reading 
and  sight-singing.  Also  includes  class  analysis 
of  recordings  of  great  vocal  artists. 
MUS  4247  Guitar  Class  1  (3  q.h.) 
Intended  for  beginners.  Covers  basic  classical 
guitar  techniques,  including  proper  sitting 
and  hand  positions,  note  reading,  and  ensem- 
ble playing.  Instruments,  preferably  nylon- 
strung,  are  required. 
MUS  4248  Guitar  Class  2  (3  q.h.) 
Intended  for  those  who  have  taken  MUS  4247 
or  who  already  have  a  basic  knowledge  of 
classical  guitar  techniques  and  note  reading. 
Introduces  both  solo  and  ensemble  repertoire 
suitable  to  the  advanced  beginner.  Prereq. 
MUS  4247  or  instructor's  permission. 
MUS  4249  Guitar  Class  3  (3  q.h.) 
Continuation  of  MUS  4248,  with  repertoire 
suitable  for  early  intermediate  students. 
Prereq.  MUS  4248  or  instructor's  permission. 
MUS  4250  Conducting  (3  q.h.) 
Introduction  to  how  to  develop  a  clear  beat 
technique  and  prepare,  teach,  and  polish  a 
work  in  rehearsal.  Provides  exposure  to  a 
basic  repertoire  and  the  essentials  of  vocal- 
instrumental  production.  Prereq.  Fundamen- 
tal knowledge  of  music  reading  and  concur- 
rent membership  in  a  performing  ensemble. 
MUS  4254  Music  Tutorial  1  (3  q.h.) 
Individual  instruction  in  a  musical  instru- 
ment or  in  voice.  Features  weekly  forty-five- 
minute  lessons  at  any  level,  presenting 
suitable  instrumental  technique  and  reper- 
toire. Requires  those  taking  the  course  for 
credit  to  play  an  audition  examination  at  the 
end  of  the  quarter.  Fee  for  individualized  in- 
struction; special  rate  for  Northeastern 
University  staff.  For  details,  contact  the 
Department  of  Music,  307  Ell  Building, 
617-437-2440. 

MUS  4255  Music  Tutorial  2  (3  q.h.) 
Continuation  of  MUS  4254.  Prereq.  MUS 
4254. 

MUS  4256  Music  Tutorial  3  (3  q.h.) 
Continuation  of  MUS  4255.  Prereq.  MUS 
4255. 


MUS  4301  Form  and  Analysis  (3  q.h.) 
The  principles  of  unity  and  variety  in  musical 
composition.  Representative  works  from  all 
periods  of  Western  music  are  used  to  analyze 
and  study  such  single-member  forms  as 
theme  and  variation,  rondo,  minuet  and  trio, 
sonata-allegro,  passacaglia,  canon,  and  fugue. 
Prereq.  MUS  4203  or  equiv. 
MUS  4810  Honors  Program  1  (4  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  undertake  an  in-depth 
research  study  project.  See  page  17  for  details. 
Prereq.  96  q.h.,  3.5  q.p.a. 

MUS  4811  Honors  Program  2  (4  q.h.) 
See  MUS  4810. 

MUS  4812  Honors  Program  3  (4  q.h.) 
See  MUS  4810. 

MUS  4815  Advanced  Tutorial  1  (3  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  take  an  upper-level  course  in- 
dependently. See  page  16  for  details.  Prereq. 
87  q.h. 

MUS  4816  Advanced  Tutorial  2  (3  q.h.) 
See  MUS  4815. 

MUS  4820  Independent  Study  1  (3  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  undertake  special  research. 
See  page  17  for  details.  Prereq.  96  q.h., 
3.0  q.p.a. 

MUS  4821  Independent  Study  2  (3  q.h.) 
See  MUS  4820. 

MUS  4822  Independent  Study  3  (3  q.h.) 
See  MUS  4820. 

NURSING 

NUR  4300  Nursing  Transition  (9  q.h.) 

The  first  nursing  course  for  registered  nurses 
in  the  bachelor's  degree  program,  introducing 
program  objectives  and  philosophy.  Through 
guided  and  independent  study,  covers  roles 
and  role  conflicts,  communication,  group 
dynamics,  and  the  nursing  process,  specifical- 
ly with  patients  experiencing  the  stresses  of 
aging,  chronic  and  long-term  illness,  and  the 
presence  of  death.  Also  examines  human 
nutritional  needs,  with  emphasis  on  the  aged 
and  chronically  ill.  Registration  by  permission 
of  the  Academic  Coordinator  one  full  quarter 
in  advance  of  registration.  Open  only  to 
matriculated  BSN  students.  Prereq.  BIO  4104, 
BIO  4177,  BIO  4190,  CUM  4113,  PSY  4112, 
and  ENG  4112. 

NUR  4301  Psychiatric/Mental  Health  Nursing  (7  q.h.) 
Development  of  knowledge  of  mental  and 
emotional  illness  through  a  basic  understan- 
ding of  the  dynamics  of  human  behavior  and 


beginning  skills  in  therapeutic  intervention. 
Also  introduces  the  concepts  of  family  and 
group  therapy  and  crisis  intervention  tech- 
niques. Registration  by  permission  of  the 
Academic  Coordinator.  Prereq.  NUR  4300. 
NUR  4302  Pharmacodynamics  (3  q.h.) 
Intended  for  registered  nurses.  Introduces 
pharmacologic  principles,  the  pharmaco- 
therapeutics  of  drug  groups,  and  individual 
drug  substances  of  particular  importance  in 
the  treatment  and  diagnosis  of  disease. 
Prereq.  CHM  4113. 

NUR  4303  Life  Crisis  Analysis  and  Response  (4  q.h.) 
This  interdisciplinary  course  concerns  per- 
sonal, family  and  community  crises  identified 
from  the  literature  health  agency  clientele 
and  personal  experiences.  Concepts  from  nur- 
sing, sociology,  anthropology  and  social 
psychology  are  used  to  assess  the  crises  and 
develop  strategies  for  dealing  with  them. 
Special  emphasis  will  be  placed  on  ap- 
proaches used  by  providers  in  human  service 
systems  to  help  people  in  crisis,  ex:  at  times 
of  death,  divorce,  job  loss,  illness,  rape  etc. 
Prereq.  SOC  4100,  SOC  4101  or  permission 
of  instructor. 

NUR  4400  Maternal  and  Child  Nursing  (9  q.h.) 
Maintaining  optimal  health  for  child-bearing 
and  child-rearing  families  from  various 
cultural  and  social  backgrounds.  Students  ex- 
amine individuals  at  selected  developmental 
stages.  Provides  opportunities  to  apply  the 
nursing  process  in  client-care  settings  and  to 
assist  families  in  coping  with  stresses  that 
interfere  with  health.  Registration  by  per- 
mission of  the  Academic  Coordinator.  Prereq. 
NUR  4300,  NUR  4302,  and  PSY  4241. 
NUR  4401  Medical-Surgical  Nursing  (9  q.h.) 
Effects  of  acute  illness  on  individuals, 
families,  and  society.  Discusses  alterations 
and  adaptations  in  physiology  characteristic 
of  acute  illness,  the  nurse's  role,  the  impact 
of  illness  on  living  patterns,  and  the  need  for 
health  education  and  continuity  of  care.  In- 
cludes guided  clinical  experiences,  emphasiz- 
ing the  nursing  process  and  the  development 
of  skills  necessary  to  care  for  the  acutely  ill 
adult.  Registration  by  permission  of  the 
Academic  Coordinator.  Prereq.  NUR  4300, 
NUR  4301,  NUR  4302,  and  PSY  4241. 
NUR  4402  Health  Assessment  (4  q.h.) 
Additional  theory  and  skills  relevant  to  the 
clinical,  decision-making  role  of  the  nurse  as 
a  primary  caretaker,  including  history-taking 
and  physical  and  psychosocial  assessment. 
Emphasis  is  on  how  the  analysis  and  syn- 


thesis of  data  obtained  from  a  holistic  health 
assessment  leads  to  the  identification  of  com- 
mon health  abnormalities  and  enhances 
clinical  decision-making  skills.  Limited 
enrollment. 

NUR  4500  Community  Health  Nursing  (9  q.h.) 
Introduction  to  ways  in  which  families, 
groups,  and  communities  meet  the  health 
and  welfare  needs  of  their  members,  with 
particular  attention  to  the  nurse's  role.  In- 
cludes the  political  implications  of  health 
care  delivery  and  current  research  affecting 
family  and  group  health  and  community 
nursing.  Laboratory  experience  involves 
work  with  individuals,  families,  and  com- 
munities. Registration  by  permission  of  the 
Academic  Coordinator.  Open  only  to 
matriculated  BSN  students.  Prereq.  NUR 

4300,  NUR  4302,  NUR  4400,  NUR  4401, 
PSY  4242,  and  SOA  4102. 

NUR  4501  Contemporary  Nursing  (5  q.h.) 
Intended  for  seniors.  Covers  current  trends 
and  issues  in  nursing  and  health  care 
delivery.  Students  define  their  objectives, 
pursue  an  area  of  nursing  in  which  they  are 
particularly  interested,  and  evaluate  their 
own  performance.  Synthesizes  major  concepts 
through  lectures,  seminars,  and  student  par- 
ticipation. Registration  by  permission  of  the 
Academic  Coordinator.  Open  only  to 
matriculated  BSN  students.  Prereq.  NUR 

4301,  NUR  4400,  NUR  4401,  SOA  4102, 
and  PSY  4242. 

NUR  4502  Introduction  to  Nursing  Research  (4  q.h.) 
Builds  on  prior  exposure  to  selected  nursing 
studies.  Covers  qualitative  and  quantitative 
research  and  the  value  of  each  to  nursing 
and  the  health  care  field.  Also  discusses  the 
importance  of  nursing  to  both  practitioner 
and  consumer.  Open  only  to  matriculated 
BSN  students.  Prereq.  NUR  4300,  NUR 
4301r  NUR  4302,  NUR  4400,  NUR  4401, 
SOA  4102,  and  PSY  4242. 

PHYSICAL  EDUCATION 

PED  4200  Cardiovascular  Health  and  Exercise 

(1  cl.,  3  lab.,  3  q.h.) 

Structured  exercise  program  meeting  three 
times  per  week  and  offering  a  choice  of  jogg- 
ing, swimming,  or  aerobic  exercise  classes 
and  a  weekly  cardiovascular  health  lecture. 
Participants  receive  two  comprehensive  car- 
diovascular medical  and  physical  fitness 
evaluations,  prior  to  and  at  the  completion  of 
the  program.  Includes  a  cardiopulmonary  ex- 
amination by  a  cardiologist,  blood  chemistry 
profile,  pulmonary  function  testing,  resting 


EKG,  graded  exercise  treadmill  (stress)  test 
with  EKG  and  blood  pressure  evaluation, 
assessment  of  percent  body  fat  (ideal  weight 
and  projected  weight  loss  where  applicable), 
and  functional  assessment  of  the  lower  back. 
Each  participant  receives  a  computerized 
report;  individual  exercise  programs  are  bas- 
ed on  test  results.  (Laboratory  fee.) 

PHILOSOPHY 

PHL  4100  Philosophical  Thinking  (3  q.h.) 
Methods  and  values  of  thinking  philosophical- 
ly. Reveals  strategies  of  dialogue  and  of  in- 
formational discovery  through  understanding 
and  use  of  the  Socratic  method  of  intellec- 
tual exchange.  Analyzes  the  universal  quest 
for  truth  in  order  to  distinguish  between 
knowing  and  not  knowing,  dogma,  and  ig- 
norance. Proves  value  issues  through  ques- 
tions in  ethics  and  moral  philosophy. 
PHL  4105  Philosophy  of  Knowing  and  Reality  (3  q.h.) 
The  difference  between  knowledge  and  belief. 
Areas  of  theoretical  focus  include  the  nature 
of  ultimate  reality,  the  nature  of  human 
knowledge,  and  the  nature  and  existence  of 
God.  The  investigation  of  a  variety  of  pro- 
blems and  alternative  solutions  helps 
students  think  independently  and  self 
critically.  Emphasizes  the  development  of 
discipline  and  precision  in  communicating 
ideas. 

PHL  4110  Philosophy  of  Right  and  Justice  (3  q.h.) 
Ethics  and  social  and  political  philosophy.  In 
ethics,  addresses  the  questions  "What  sorts 
of  things  are  good  or  bad?"  and  "What  ac- 
tions are  right  or  wrong?"  In  social  and 
political  philosophy,  examines  theories  of 
human  nature,  social  change,  social  institu- 
tions, and  major  twentieth-century  political 
theories.  Possible  additional  topics  include 
aesthetics  and  philosophy  of  history. 
PHL  4165  Moral  Problems  in  Medicine  (3  q.h.) 
Social  and  moral  problems  created  by 
medical  science.  Questions  investigated  in- 
clude "Should  a  human  life  be  prolonged 
under  any  condition  and  at  any  cost?" 
"What  are  the  moral  problems  caused  by  the 
current  medical  definitions  of  death?"  and 
"Is  it  morally  right  to  predetermine  the 
physical  characteristics  of  future  generations 
by  genetic  engineering?" 
PHL  4170  The  Human  Search  for  Meaning  (3  q.h.) 
Examination  of  selected  philosophical  pro- 
blems of  human  existence,  such  as  freedom, 
death,  sexuality,  alienation,  and  becoming  a 
person. 


PHL  4180  Business  Ethics  (3  q.h.) 

Ethical  principles  and  considerations  involv- 
ed in  making  moral  business  decisions. 
Studies  basic  ethical  viewpoints  as  a  founda- 
tion; analyzes  specific  characteristics  of 
business  life  through  particular  cases  and 
examples. 

PHL  4200  Logic  (3  q.h.) 

Essentials  of  lucid  thinking  in  terms  of  basic 
logical  concepts,  including  deductive  and  in- 
ductive reasoning,  valid  and  invalid 
arguments,  and  the  varied  functions  of 
language  and  definition.  Also  examines  how 
to  recognize  and  evaluate  different  kinds  of 
arguments,  methods  of  detecting  and 
avoiding  common  errors  in  reasoning,  and 
the  link  between  structured  thought  and  ef- 
fective communication. 
PHL  4220  The  Meaning  of  Death  (3  q.h.) 
Various  philosophical  and  religious  views 
concerning  the  meaning  of  death.  Discusses 
such  questions  as  "What  attitude  should  one 
take  regarding  one's  own  death?"  "What 
role  does  death  play  in  our  personal  rela- 
tions to  others?"  and  "Is  it  necessary  to 
believe  in  an  afterlife  in  order  to  give  mean- 
ing to  this  life?" 

PHL  4223  Philosophy  of  Consciousness  (3  q.h.) 
Theories  of  consciousness,  the  possibility  of 
higher  states  of  consciousness,  and  some 
techniques,  such  as  meditation,  alleged  to 
lead  to  higher  states  of  consciousness. 
Readings  may  include  psychological  and 
parapsychological  literature  on  the  subject. 
PHL  4230  Ethics  in  Theory  and  Practice  (formerly 
Ethics  1)  (3  q.h.) 

Major  ethical  theories,  emphasizing  ethical 
naturalism,  utilitarianism,  moral  sense 
theories,  intuitionism,  and  theological 
theories.  Applications  of  these  theories  are 
discussed  and  compared. 
PHL  4231  Current  Topics  in  Ethics  (formerly 
Ethics  2)  (3  q.h.) 

Problems  and  issues  encountered  in  impor- 
tant areas  of  moral  concern,  such  as  euthanasia, 
punishment,  professional  conduct,  and  moral 
responsibility  in  general.  Explains  various 
approaches  to  these  problems  within  the 
framework  of  major  ethical  theories. 
PHL  4235  Personal  Ethics  (3  q.h.) 
As  we  live  our  lives,  we  face  many  decisions 
about  the  "rightness"  or  "wrongness"  of  our 
ideas  and  actions.  Explores  two  different  ap- 
proaches to  moral  dilemmas:  utilitarian 
theory,  which  defines  the  good  as  the  best 


possible  outcome,  and  deontological  theory, 
which  states  that  actions  themselves  are 
either  good  or  evil.  Applies  these  ethical 
theories  to  the  moral  choices  we  make  on 
issues  such  as  abortion,  the  AIDS  epidemic, 
capital  punishment,  nuclear  arms,  and 
taxation. 

PHL  4243  Existentialism  (3  q.h.) 
Existential  philosophy  as  understood  through 
study  of  its  greatest  representatives,  such  as 
Kierkegaard,  Nietzsche,  Dostoyevsky, 
Heidegger,  Jaspers,  Camus,  Sartre,  and 
Merleau-Ponty.  Focuses  on  the  central 
themes  of  self-alienation,  authenticity,  and 
existential  experiences. 
PHL  4245  Philosophy  of  Religion  (3  q.h.) 
The  arguments  for  the  existence  of  God. 
Covers  natural  and  moral  evil,  the  soul,  im- 
mortality, the  evidence  for  miracles,  and  the 
nature  of  religious  knowledge. 
PHL  4247  Theistic,  Atheistic,  and  Agnostic 
Philosophies  (3  q.h.) 

Selected  theistic,  atheistic,  and  agnostic 
philosophies.  Questions  studied  include:  "Is 
the  belief  in  God  necessary  for  a  comprehen- 
sive philosophy  of  life?"  "How  does  an 
atheistic  philosophy  explain  and  justify  the 
'higher  values'  such  as  love,  beauty,  and 
justice?"  and  "How  is  it  possible  to  base  a 
philosophy  on  the  principle  of  agnosticism?" 
PHL  4249  Women's  Spirituality  (formerly 
Feminist  Spirituality)  (3  q.h.) 
Women's  religious  experience  as  described  in 
classical  and  contemporary  sources.  Readings 
include  such  works  as  Womanspirit  Rising, 
The  Politics  of  Women's  Spirituality,  and 
Dreaming  the  Dark. 

PHL  4250  Philosophy  of  Human  Nature  (3  q.h.) 
Philosophical  and  literary  study  of  human 
nature.  Questions  include  "What  is  human 
nature?"  and  "What  is  a  human  being?"  Ex- 
amines some  of  the  philosophical  answers  to 
these  questions,  with  special  attention  to  the 
significance  of  tradition,  social  role,  freedom, 
and  decision. 

PHL  4251  Images  of  Women  in  Philosophy  (3  q.h.) 
Philosophical  approach  to  the  study  of 
women  in  society.  Drawing  from  sources 
within  the  history  of  philosophy  and 
literature,  includes  the  role  (ideal  and  actual) 
of  women  in  society,  love  and  marriage,  op- 
pression and  isolation,  and  the  cult  of 
virginity. 


PHL  4252  Women's  Ethical  Issues  (3  q.h.) 

The  emerging  feminist  ethos  as  distinct  from 
traditional  descriptions  of  feminist  morals 
and  values.  Discusses  questions  of  politics, 
power,  values,  and  actions.  Readings  include 
such  works  as  De  Beauvoir's  The  Ethics  of 
Ambiguity  and  Daly's  Gyn-Ecology. 
PHL  4255  Women  and  Religion  (3  q.h.) 
The  role  and  place  of  women  in  the  major 
religions  of  the  world  and  contemporary 
feminist  challenges  to  these  traditional 
understandings.  Readings  include  such  works 
as  Carmody's  Women  and  Religion  and  Da- 
ly's Beyond  God  the  Father. 
PHL  4256  Introduction  to  Feminist  Thought  (3  q.h.) 
Introduction  to  feminist  scholarship  in 
various  fields.  Explore  what  constitutes 
knowledge  when  women's  experiences  rather 
than  men's,  frame  the  questions,  provide  the 
data,  and  interpret  that  data. 
PHL  4265  Contemporary  Religious  Issues  in 
America  (formerly  Understanding  Religion  in 
America  Today)  (3  q.h.) 
Study  America's  remarkable  religious 
pluralism.  Includes  contemporary  Christiani- 
ty and  Judaism,  nontraditional  Christian 
and  non-Christian  movements,  cults,  sects, 
and  quasireligious  organizations.  After 
becoming  familiar  with  American  religious 
foundations,  students  study  the  connections 
between  religion  and  sociotechnological 
change,  sex,  biomedical  ethics,  politics,  and 
the  media.  May  include  guest  speakers. 
PHL  4266  The  Religious  Right  in  Contemporary 
America  (3  q.h.) 

Evangelism,  fundamentalism,  extremist 
groups,  and  nontraditional  Jewish  and  Chris- 
tian movements.  Also  examines  "priesthood 
of  all  believers,"  grace  and  the  idea  of  the 
"elect,"  and  the  state  of  being  "born  again" 
as  well  as  the  New  Deal,  the  Great  Society, 
and  the  "conservative  revolution."  Includes 
background  on  the  roots  of  these  movements, 
from  precolonial  Europe  and  Puritan 
America  to  the  development  of  the  Social 
Gospel.  May  include  guest  speakers. 
PHL  4270  The  Great  Western  Religions  (3  q.h.) 
Study  of  the  basic  teachings  of  Judaism, 
Christianity,  and  Islam. 
PHL  4273  Judaism  (3  q.h.) 
Philosophy  of  the  Jewish  religion,  its 
metaphysical  and  ethical  beliefs,  and  the 
philosophical  origins  of  these  beliefs. 


PHL  4275  The  Great  Eastern  Religions  (3  q.h.) 

Study  of  the  basic  teachings  of  Taoism, 
Confucianism,  Buddhism,  Hinduism,  and 
Shintoism. 

PHL  4277  Hinduism  (3  q.h.) 
The  Hinduism  of  the  Upanishads,  the  most 
explicit  of  the  mystical  religions.  Also  in- 
cludes the  devotional  aspect  of  Hinduism  as 
expressed  in  the  Bhagavad  Gita. 
PHL  4279  Buddhism  (3  q.h.) 
Central  teachings  of  Buddhism,  including 
the  doctrines  that  there  is  no  independently 
existing  immutable  self  or  soul,  that  all 
phenomena  are  impermanent,  that  existence 
is  suffering,  that  suffering  has  a  cause,  and 
that  there  is  a  way  to  eliminate  suffering. 
PHL  4280  Islam  (3  q.h.) 

History  of  Islam,  its  conflicts  with  the  West 
in  the  past  and  in  the  present,  Islamic 
beliefs,  and  the  future  of  Islam  as  a  world 
religion. 

PHL  4293  Mysticism:  East  and  West  (3  q.h.) 
Inquiry  into  mystical  experience  through  a 
comparative  study  of  the  writings  of  Chris- 
tian, Buddhist,  and  Hindu  mystics  and  of 
secondary  interpretive  sources.  Explores  the 
potential  oneness  of  humanity  with  God,  the 
conflict  of  mysticism  with  traditional  forms 
of  religion,  and  the  possibility  of  a  common, 
cross-cultural  basis  for  mysticism. 
PHL  4315  Understanding  the  Bible:  The  Old 
Testament  (3  q.h.) 

Exploration  of  the  traditions  of  the  Hebrew 
people  in  cultural  and  historical  perspective. 
Topics  to  be  considered  include  changing 
ideas  of  the  nature  of  God,  the  roles  of  prophet, 
priest,  and  king,  and  the  development  of  the 
covenant  motif. 

PHL  4316  Understanding  the  Bible:  The  New 
Testament  (3  q.h.) 

Christianity  began  as  a  reform  movement 
within  Judaism  but  soon  became  a  unique 
religious  tradition.  Examines  earliest  Chris- 
tianity in  its  cultural  and  historical  setting 
focusing  on  the  Gospel  portraits  of  Jesus,  the 
Kingdom  of  God,  theories  of  afterlife,  and 
Pauline  theology. 

PHL  4330  The  Encounter  of  Psychology  and 
Religion  (3  q.h.) 

Exploration  of  the  ways  the  sense  of  self 
shapes  and  is  shaped  by  religion.  Emphasis 
on  dominant  Western  psychologies  and 
religions.  Examination  of  the  role  of  religious 
values  in  defining  cultural  values,  and  of 
these  values  in  determining  a  sense  of  self. 


PHL  5220  The  Meaning  of  Death  (3  CEUs) 

Same  as  PHL  4220. 

PHYSICS 

PHY  4101  College  Physics  1*  (4  q.h.) 

Introduction  to  mechanics,  including  units  of 
measurement,  vectors,  accelerated  motion, 
and  Newton's  laws  of  motion.  Further  topics 
include  conservation  of  energy,  work, 
momentum  and  introduction  to  elements  of 
heat,  mechanical  waves  and  vibrating  bodies. 
Laboratory  experiments  and  classroom 
demonstrations  are  an  integral  component  of 
this  course.  (This  course  is  intended  for  the 
Health  Professions  and  Science  Programs 
and  cannot  be  utilized  for  credit  towards 
technology  degrees  in  the  School  of 
Engineering  Technology). 
PHY  4102  College  Physics  2*  (4  q.h.) 
Introduction  to  magnetism,  magnetic  fields, 
electromagnetic  induction,  electrostatics  and 
electric  circuits.  Further  areas  covered  in- 
clude appropriate  topics  in  optics,  nuclear 
and  atomic  physics.  Laboratory  experiments 
and  classroom  demonstrations  are  an  in- 
tegral component  of  this  course.  (This  course 
is  intended  for  the  Health  Professions  and 
Science  Programs  and  cannot  be  utilized  for 
credit  towards  technology  degrees  in  the 
School  of  Engineering  Technology).  Prereq. 
PHY  4101. 

PHY  4117  Physics  1*  (4  CH,  4  q.h.) 
Topics  include  vectors  and  balanced  forces, 
accelerated  motion,  Newton's  laws,  projectile 
motion,  work  and  energy,  momentum, 
angular  motion,  centripetal  force,  rotation  of 
rigid  bodies,  and  moment  of  inertia.  Prereq. 
MTH  4107  or  MTH  4107  must  be  taken 
concurrently. 

PHY  4118  Physics  2*  (4  q.h.) 
Topics  include  elasticity,  density  and 
pressure,  temperature,  the  gas  laws,  heat 
transfer,  thermodynamics,  vibratory  motion, 
wave  motion,  properties  of  sound,  and  pro- 
perties of  light.  Prereq.  PHY  4117. 
PHY  4119  Physics  3*  (4  q.h.) 
Studies  electrostatics,  circuit  elements,  direct 
current  circuits,  magnetism,  electromechanical 
devices,  alternating  current  circuits,  elec- 
tronics, and  electromagnetic  waves.  Prereq. 
PHY  4118. 

PHY  4173  Physics  Laboratory  1*  (2.3  lab,  2  q.h.) 
Offers  experiments  in  mechanics,  elastic 
deformation,  work,  energy,  thermometry,  and 
calorimetry.  Prereq.  PHY  4117. 

*This  is  a  School  of  Engineering  Technology  course, 
which  is  offered  at  a  different  tuition  rate  than  that  of 

T Tniwrgj-Hr  PViIIpctp 


PHY  4174  Physics  Laboratory  2*  (2.3  lab,  2  q.h.) 
Continues  PHY  4173.  Offers  experiments  in 
gas  laws,  wave  motion,  optics,  electrical  cir- 
cuits, and  nuclear  and  atomic  physics.  Prereq. 
PHY  4173. 

POLITICAL  SCIENCE 

POL  4103  Introduction  to  Politics  (3  q.h.) 
Introduction  to  contemporary  political  science, 
including  consideration  of  basic  concepts  in 
political  analysis,  the  role  of  government  in- 
stitutions, political  representation,  political 
ideologies,  and  the  scope  and  methods  of 
political  science. 

POL  4104  Introduction  to  American  Government  (3  q.h.) 
American  governmental  and  political  pro- 
cesses, constitutional  institutions,  political 
behavior,  and  liberties. 

POL  4105  Introduction  to  Comparative  Politics  (3  q.h.) 
Comparative  study  of  constitutional  and 
totalitarian  systems,  including  the  Western 
European  and  Soviet  patterns. 
POL  4106  Introduction  to  Politics  (4  q.h.) 
Basic  political  concepts  and  forces  of  organiza- 
tion from  the  classical  Greeks  to  the  modern 
nation-state.  The  Soviet  Union  and  the 
United  Kingdom  are  contrasted  as  contem- 
porary illustrations  of  the  institutional 
distinction  between  a  totalitarian  and  a  con- 
stitutional system.  For  Alternative  Freshmen- 
Year  Students  only. 

POL  4110  The  Great  Political  Thinkers  (3  q.h.) 
Explore  the  great  political  thinkers  from  an- 
cient Greece  to  the  twentieth  century.  Probes 
the  creative  genius  of  such  theorists  as  Plato, 
Aristotle,  Aquinas,  Hobbes,  Hegel,  Locke, 
Rousseau,  Mill,  and  Marx. 
POL  4300  Introduction  to  Public  Administration 
(formerly  Public  Administration  1)  (3  q.h.) 
Introduction  to  the  theory,  forms,  and  pro- 
cesses of  administration  at  the  national  and 
state  levels. 

POL  4301  Case  Studies  in  Public  Administration  2 
(formerly  Public  Administration  2)  (3  q.h.) 
Case-study  examination  of  the  relationship 
between  the  theory  and  practice  of  public  ad- 
ministration. Prereq.  POL  4300  or  equiv. 
POL  4302  Public  Administration  (Intensive)  (6  q.h.) 
Same  as  POL  4300  and  POL  4301. 
POL  4303  Public  Personnel  Administration  (3  q.h.) 
Study  basic  elements  of  personnel  administra- 
tion, including  recruitment,  training,  classifica- 
tion, promotion,  and  executive  development. 


such  as  equal  opportunity,  public  employee 
unionism,  and  collective  bargaining. 
POL  4304  Public  Budgeting  (3  q.h.) 
Politics,  procedures,  and  goals  of  government 
budgeting  at  the  federal,  state,  and  local 
levels  are  covered.  Includes  expense,  capital, 
and  program  budgeting. 
POL  4305  Organizational  Theory  (3  q.h.) 
Examines  people  and  organizations,  focusing 
on  organizational  and  societal  problems  as  a 
way  of  understanding  how  we  can  survive  in 
a  bureaucratic  system. 
POL  4306  Public  Policy  Analysis  (3  q.h.) 
Procedures  for  the  analysis  of  public  policy 
are  studied,  including  discussion  of  selected 
cases  of  public  policy  at  the  local,  state,  or 
federal  level. 

POL  4307  The  Politics  of  Health  (3  q.h.) 
Explore  the  problems  of  health  in  developing 
countries,  particularly  during  the  last  decade. 
Examines  the  political  dynamics  at  the 
village,  national,  and  global  levels  that  have 
hindered  efforts  to  establish  health  care 
delivery  systems.  Analyzes  issues  of  na- 
tionalism and  problems  of  refugees. 
POL  4310  American  Political  Thought  (3  q.h.) 
Topics  include  political  thought  from  the  Col- 
onial period  to  the  present,  including  study  of 
the  impact  of  religious,  economic,  and  judicial 
theories  on  the  structure  of  American  ideas. 
POL  4311  Research  Methods  (3  q.h.) 
Introduction  to  some  of  the  most  common 
methods  of  conducting  political  science 
research.  Includes  problems  of  theory  con- 
struction and  data  gathering  and  such 
analytical  research  tools  as  bibliographical 
aids  and  the  computer. 

POL  4312  Political  Parties  and  Pressure  Groups  (3  q.h.) 
Discuss  party  government  in  the  United 
States  and  Great  Britain,  focusing  on  the  in- 
teraction of  party  and  government. 
POL  4313  State  and  Local  Government  (formerly 
Government  and  Politics  and  the  States) 
(3  q.h.) 

State  and  local  governments,  their  problems, 
and  functional  and  operational  responses  to 
these  problems  are  examined. 
POL  4314  Urban  and  Metropolitan  Government  (3  q.h.) 
Explore  political,  structural,  and  functional 
problems  of  an  urbanizing  United  States.  In- 
cludes an  analysis  of  urban,  suburban,  and 
metropolitan  governments. 


Pays  special  attention  to  current  problems, 

*This  is  a  School  of  Engineering  Technology  course,  which  is  offered  at  a  different  tuition  rate  than  that  of 
University  College. 


Political  Science         223 


POL  4318  The  American  Presidency  (3  q.h.) 
Study  the  nation's  chief  executive.  Includes 
topics  such  as  the  presidential  electoral  pro- 
cess, the  president's  many  constituencies,  and 
the  differing  styles  of  twentieth-century 
presidents.  Also  covers  constitutional  and  ex- 
traconstitutional  powers  of  the  office. 
POL  4319  The  Congress  (3  q.h.) 
Institutional  and  functional  analysis  of  the 
roles  of  Congress  are  examined,  as  well  as  the 
chief  executive  and  political  parties  in  the 
legislative  process. 

POL  4320  American  Constitutional  Law  (3  q.h.) 
A  case  analysis  of  the  development  of 
Federalism,  the  separation  of  powers,  and  the 
role  of  the  federal  and  state  courts  in  constitu- 
tional development. 

POL  4321  Civil  Liberties  (formerly  Civil  Rights) 
(3  q.h.) 

Examination  of  quality  and  content  of  civil 
liberties  in  the  United  States.  Emphasizes  the 
First,  Fifth,  Sixth,  Fourteenth,  and  Fifteenth 
amendments  to  the  Constitution. 
POL  4322  Procedural  Due  Process  (3  q.h.) 
Study  of  due  process  in  the  American  con- 
stitutional scheme. 
POL  4325  The  Politics  of  Films  (3  q.h.) 
The  relationship  between  films  and  politics  is 
explored.  Films  are  analyzed  for  their  political 
content  and  impact  on  specific  controversies 
and  on  politics  and  society  as  a  whole. 
POL  4327  Sex  Roles  in  American  Politics  (3  q.h.) 
Topics  such  as  the  roles  of  women  in 
American  government  and  politics,  including 
the  traditional  roles-or  absence  thereof-of 
women  in  American  politics,  the  suffrage 
movement,  the  impact  of  sex  on  achieving 
political  power  and  office,  the  growing  impor- 
tance of  the  women's  vote,  the  women's  move- 
ment, and  political  action  to  support  women's 
issues  are  covered. 
POL  4330  Comparative  Politics  (3  q.h.) 
Discuss  political  culture,  organization,  and 
behavior  in  different  national  settings. 
POL  4331  International  Relations  (3  q.h.) 
Study  elements  of  and  limitations  on  national 
power.  Discusses  contemporary  world  politics, 
problems  of  war,  and  peaceful  coexistence. 
POL  4332  International  Organization  (3  q.h.) 
The  development  of  international  organiza- 
tions, emphasizing  the  United  Nations, 
specialized  agencies,  and  regional  organiza- 
tions is  explored. 


POL  4333  International  Law  (3  q.h.) 
Examine  the  procedural  and  substantive 
study  of  the  legal  relations  among 
nation-states. 

POL  4335  Formulating  American  Foreign  Policy  (3  q.h.) 
The  Constitution  and  political  instruments  for 
the  formulation  of  American  foreign  policy 
are  discussed. 

POL  4336  American  Foreign  Policy  (3  q.h.) 
Study  of  recent  and  current  American  foreign 
affairs. 

POL  4337  The  Politics  of  Arms  Control  (3  q.h.) 
Discuss  the  nuclear  arms  rivalry  between  the 
United  States  and  the  Soviet  Union,  along 
with  opportunities  for  curtailing  it  through 
arms  control.  Includes  the  nature  and  pur- 
poses of  nuclear  weapons,  past  arms-control 
agreements,  and  recent  breakthroughs.  Ex- 
plores current  options  for  arms  control. 
POL  4338  European  Political  Parties  (3  q.h.) 
Emphasizes  political  party  systems  in 
England,  France,  and  Germany,  and  their 
ideology,  organization  in  and  out  of  Parlia- 
ment, electoral  strategies,  and  voter  behavior. 
POL  4339  Government  and  Politics  in  the  Soviet 
Union  (3  q.h.) 

Explore  modern  totalitarian  theory  and  prac- 
tice, follow  up  with  studies  of  the  ideological 
and  historical  bases  of  the  Soviet  dictatorship. 
POL  4341  Soviet  Foreign  Policy  (3  q.h.) 
Discussion  of  the  evolution  of  Soviet  foreign 
policy  since  1917,  emphasizing  the  development 
of  the  international  Communist  movement. 
POL  4342  Communism  in  Eastern  Europe  (3  q.h.) 
Study  the  conditions  and  circumstances  sur- 
rounding the  establishment  of  Communist 
regimes  in  eastern  Europe  following  World 
War  II  and  their  relations  with  the  Soviet 
Union. 

POL  4350  Politics  and  Policies  of  the  Developing 
Nations  (3  q.h.) 

Covers  colonialism,  the  struggles  for  in- 
dependence, and  the  common  problems  of 
developing  nations.  Includes  economic 
development,  urbanization,  cultural  fragmen- 
tation, and  revolution. 

POL  4352  Government  and  Politics  of  Latin  America 
(3  q.h.) 

Explore  the  historical  background  of  the 
Latin  American  nations  and  their  cultural, 
economic,  social,  and  political  characteristics, 
including  political  violence  and  the 
breakdown  of  democratic  governments. 


ruimudi  oucnue 


POL  4356  Government  and  Politics  of  Northern  Africa 

(3  q.h.) 

A  comparative  analysis  of  political  culture, 
organization,  and  behavior  of  African  states 
north  of  the  Sahara,  with  emphasis  on  Morocco, 
Algeria,  Tunisia,  and  Egypt. 
POL  4357  Government  and  Politics  of  South  Africa 
(3  q.h.) 

An  analysis  of  political  culture,  organization, 
and  behavior  of  South  Africa.  Examines  the 
South  African  history  to  show  how  South 
Africa  got  where  it  is  today,  including  the 
nature,  implications,  and  problems  of  apar- 
theid, and  prospects  for  the  future. 
POL  4359  Government  and  Politics  in  the  Middle 
East  (3  q.h.) 

Political  change,  economic  growth,  and  social 
adaptation  in  selected  countries  is  discussed. 
The  emergence  of  the  Middle  East  from  sub- 
jection to  self-assertion  is  examined,  focusing 
on  such  topics  as  the  influence  of  Western 
Modernism,  Muslim  fundamentalism,  inter- 
Arab  rivalries,  Arab-Israeli  conflict,  and  the 
civil  strife  in  Lebanon. 

POL  4362  Government  and  Politics  of  Southeast  Asia 
(3  q.h.) 

Topics  such  as  political  instability  and  pro- 
blems of  establishing  democratic  structures 
and  processes  in  the  Philippines,  Thailand, 
and  India  are  explored. 
POL  4364  China's  Foreign  Policy  (3  q.h.) 
Examine  Bejing's  relations  with  Africa,  the 
rest  of  Asia,  the  Soviet  orbit,  and  the  West. 
Covers  policy  objectives,  strategy,  tactics,  and 
the  methods  of  decision  making  in  both  the 
party  and  state  apparatus. 
POL  4365  Government  and  Politics  of  China  (3  q.h.) 
Discuss  Chinese  political  culture,  emphasizing 
the  nineteenth-century  cultural,  economic, 
and  political  impact  of  the  West,  the  emergence 
of  the  Communist  party  under  the  leadership 
of  Mao  Tse-Dung,  and  the  progressive 
disintegration  of  Kuomintang  leadership. 
POL  4367  Government  and  Politics  of  Japan  (3  q.h.) 
Examine  the  historical  development  of  the 
Japanese  nation,  with  particular  attention  to 
the  growth  of  fascism  and  efforts  to  create  a 
viable  democracy  since  World  War  II. 
POL  4370  Introduction  to  Political  Theory  (3  q.h.) 
Development  of  the  political  ideas  of  the 
Western  world,  including  the  ideas  of  the  ma- 
jor philosophers  of  Greece,  Rome,  the  Chris- 
tian Era,  and  the  Renaissance  is  discussed. 


POL  4371  Modern  Political  Theory  (3  q.h.) 
Exploration  of  political  ideas  and  systems  of 
political  thought  from  Machiavelli  to  the  pre- 
sent. Prereq.  POL  4370  or  equiv. 

POL  4372  Contemporary  Political  Thought  (3  q.h.) 
Analyzes  current  ideas,  ideologies,  and 
political  movements.  Examination  of  such 
topics  as  neo-conservatism,  neoliberalism,  neo- 
Marxism,  and  women's  liberation. 
POL  4373  Islamic  Political  Thought  (3  q.h.) 
Introduction  to  Islamic  thought  and  political 
theory.  Analyzes  such  classical  theorists  as 
Avicenna,  Averroes,  Al-Ghazali,  and  Ibn 
Khaldun,  and  such  modern  theorists  as 
Abduh,  Iqbal,  and  Shari'ath. 
POL  4375  Consumer  Advocacy  1  (3  q.h.) 
A  pragmatic  course,  designed  to  define  and 
expand  the  role  of  consumers  in  the 
marketplace.  Focuses  on  contemporary  con- 
sumer issues,  touching  upon  the  legal,  social, 
economic,  and  political  aspects  of  consumer 
problems  and  the  role  of  consumer  lobbies  as 
special  interest  groups.  More  specific  con- 
sumer problems,  such  as  those  of  the  elderly, 
may  also  be  explored. 
POL  4376  Consumer  Advocacy  2  (3  q.h.) 
Continuation  of  POL  4375.  Prereq.  POL  4375 
or  equiv. 

POL  4377  Consumer  Advocacy  3  (3  q.h.) 
Continuation  of  POL  4376.  Prereq.  POL  4376 
or  equiv. 

POL  4378  Current  Political  Issues  (3  q.h.) 
Explore  the  constitutional  and  political  basis 
of  selected  problems  in  American  political  life. 

POL  4815  Advanced  Tutorial  1  (3  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  take  an  upper-level  course  in- 
dependently. See  page  16  for  details.  Prereq. 
87  q.h. 

POL  4816  Advanced  Tutorial  2  (3  q.h.) 
See  POL  4815. 

POL  4820  Independent  Study  1  (3  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  undertake  special  research. 
See  page  17  for  details.  Prereq.  96  q.h., 
3.0  q.p.a. 

POL  4821  Independent  Study  2  (3  q.h.) 
See  POL  4820. 

POL  4822  Independent  Study  3  (3  q.h.) 
See  POL  4820. 

POL  4830  Honors  Program  1  (4  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  undertake  an  in-depth 
research  study  project.  See  page  17  for  details. 
Prereq.  96  q.h.,  3.5  q.p.a. 


rsycnoiogy         zza 


POL  4831  Honors  Program  2  (4  q.h.) 

See  POL  4830. 

POL  4832  Honors  Program  3  (4  q.h.) 

See  POL  4830. 

POL  5375  Consumer  Advocacy  1  (3  CEUs) 

Same  as  POL  4375. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

PSY  4110  Introduction  to  Psychology:  Fundamental 
Issues  (formerly  Fundamental  Issues  in 
Psychology)  (3  q.h.) 

Explore  fundamental  principles  and  issues  of 
contemporary  scientific  psychology,  which  are 
approached  as  a  method  of  inquiry  as  well  as 
a  body  of  knowledge.  Examines  the  origins 
and  methods  of  psychology,  biological  founda- 
tions of  behavior,  states  of  consciousness,  lear- 
ning, and  memory. 

PSY  4111  Introduction  to  Psychology:  Developmental 
Aspects  (formerly  Developmental  Aspects  in 
Psychology)  (3  q.h.) 

Covers  growth  and  the  life-cycle,  language, 
mental  abilities,  sensory  and  perceptual  pro- 
cesses, and  social  interaction.  Prereq.  PSY 
4110  or  equiv. 

PSY  4112  Introduction  to  Psychology:  Personal 
Dynamics  (formerly  Personal  Dynamics  in 
Psychology)  (3  q.h.) 

Examines  motivation,  emotion,  personality 
theory  and  measurement,  abnormal 
psychology,  and  therapy.  Prereq.  PSY  4110 
or  equiv. 

PSY  4113  Introduction  to  Psychology  Intensive  A 
(formerly  Psychology  Intensive)  (9  q.h.) 
Same  as  PSY  4110,  PSY  4111,  and  PSY  4112. 
PSY  4114  Introduction  to  Psychology  Intensive  B  (6  q.h.) 
Same  as  PSY  4110  and  PSY  4111. 
PSY  4220  Statistics  in  Psychology  1  (3  q.h.) 
Scales  of  measurement  in  psychological 
research,  measures  of  central  tendency,  and 
variability  are  discussed.  Prereq.  PSY  4111 
and  PSY  4112  or  equiv. 
PSY  4221  Statistics  in  Psychology  2  (3  q.h.) 
Introduction  to  measures  of  correlation,  pro- 
bability, and  statistical  distributions.  Prereq. 
PSY  4220  or  equiv. 

PSY  4222  Statistics  in  Psychology  3  (3  q.h.) 
Explores  parametric  and  nonparametric  tests 
of  significance,  including  chi  square,  t-test,  F 
test,  and  simple  analysis  of  variance.  Prereq. 
PSY  4221. 

PSY  4231  Psychology  of  Learning  1  (3  q.h.) 
Study  the  basic  principles  and  techniques  of 
operant  and  Pavlovian  conditioning  and  their 


applications  to  therapeutic,  educational,  and 
specialized  training  programs.  Prereq.  PSY 
4111  or  PSY  4112  or  equiv. 
PSY  4232  Motivation  (3  q.h.) 
Topics  include  various  aspects  of  motivation, 
including  primary  and  secondary  reinforce- 
ment, unconscious  motivation,  effectuate 
motivation,  and  the  assessment  of  motives. 
Prereq.  PSY  4112  or  equiv. 
PSY  4240  Development:  Infancy  and  Childhood 
(formerly  Developmental  Psychology:  Infancy 
and  Childhood)  (3  q.h.) 
Human  development  from  infancy  through 
late  childhood  is  explored.  Covers  physical, 
cognitive,  and  psychosocial  development,  in- 
cluding the  development  of  language,  morali- 
ty, and  interpersonal  relationships. 
PSY  4241  Development:  Adolescence  (formerly 
Developmental  Psychology:  Adolescence) 
(3  q.h.) 

Examines  development  during  the  second 
decade  of  life,  emphasizing  the  tasks  and  pro- 
blems confronting  the  individual  adolescent. 
Includes  topics  such  as  biological,  social,  and 
cognitive  changes  as  they  relate  to  the  crea- 
tion of  a  stable,  individual  identity. 
PSY  4242  Development:  Adulthood  and  Aging 
(formerly  Developmental  Psychology: 
Adulthood  and  Old  Age)  (3  q.h.) 
Discuss  the  unique  features  and  problems  of 
development  from  the  adult  years  to  death. 
Emphasizes  changes  that  accompany  career, 
marriage,  and  family  developments  and  the 
specific  psychological  adjustments  required  of 
the  aging  person. 

PSY  4243  Aging  and  Mental  Health  (3  q.h.) 
Emotional  -reactions  to  age-related  issues, 
such  as  retirement,  bereavement,  and  health 
status  are  covered.  Discusses  depression  and 
suicide,  behavior  disorders,  substance  use  pro- 
blems, and  the  dementias  of  old  age  and  the 
effects  these  problems  have  on  families  and 
the  community.  Includes  a  survey  of  special 
assessment  techniques,  mental  health  ser- 
vices for  the  elderly,  and  public  health 
policies  for  improved  care. 
PSY  4262  Memory  and  Thinking  (3  q.h.)  (formerly 
Cognitive  Psychology) 

Explores  the  mental  processes  involved  in  the 
acquisition,  organization,  and  use  of  knowledge, 
including  pattern  recognition  and  memory. 
Prereq.  PSY  4111,  PSY  4112,  or  equiv. 


rayoiiuiuyy 


PSY  4263  Psycholinguistics  (3  q.h.) 
Topics  such  as  the  nature  and  structure  of 
language,  various  theories  of  human  produc- 
tion and  perception  of  language,  and  related 
experimental  findings  are  covered.  Prereq. 
PSY  4111  orequiv. 
PSY  4270  Social  Psychology  1  (3  q.h.) 
Study  the  socialization  process,  social  motives, 
interpersonal  perception,  and  group  member- 
ship and  structure.  Prereq.  PSY  4111  or  equiv. 
PSY  4271  Social  Psychology  2  (3  q.h.) 
Topics  include  attitudes,  prejudice  and  ethnic 
relations,  leadership,  mass  behavior  and 
social  movements,  and  the  effects  of  mass 
media  on  communication.  Prereq.  PSY  4270 
or  equiv. 

PSY  4272  Personality  1  (3  q.h.) 
The  normal  personality  and  its  growth  and 
development  is  studied.  Includes  concepts 
such  as  environmental  and  genetic  contribu- 
tions, assessment  of  personality,  research,  and 
a  survey  of  the  major  personality  theories. 
Prereq.  PSY  4112  or  equiv. 
PSY  4275  Group  Processes  (3  q.h.) 
An  analysis  of  group  structure  and  its  effect 
on  behavior.  Topics  include  leadership,  com- 
munication, conflict  resolution,  and  group 
problem-solving.  Student  participation  used  to 
illustrate  and  develop  group-related  concepts. 
PSY  4276  Stress  and  Its  Management  (3  q.h.) 
An  analysis  of  stress  and  its  effects  on  human 
behavior.  Considers  the  causes  of  stress  from 
a  variety  of  theoretical  perspectives.  Techni- 
ques and  procedures  for  stress  management 
and  reduction  examined  in  detail. 
PSY  4280  Human  Sexuality  and  Love  (3  q.h.) 
An  examination,  both  theoretical  and  ex- 
perimental, of  psychological,  biological,  and 
social  aspects  of  sexuality  and  loving.  Topics 
include  sexual  anatomy  and  physiology;  birth 
control;  gender  identity  and  gender  role; 
romantic  love  (with  emphasis  on  successful 
love  relationships);  diverse  sexual  lifestyles; 
sexual  dysfunctions  and  therapy;  and 
enhancement  of  one's  own  sexual  awareness 
and  pleasure  and  that  of  one's  partner. 
PSY  4290  Psychology  of  Women  (3  q.h.) 
Examination  of  women,  historically  and  in 
contemporary  life,  including  their  social  roles 
and  their  behavior  as  determined  genetically, 
physiologically,  and  psychologically.  Includes 
discussion  on  the  implications  for  women's 
future  lifestyles,  roles,  and  contributions. 
Prereq.  PSY  4111  or  PSY  4112  or  equiv. 


PSY  4351  Physiological  Psychology  1  (3  q.h.) 
Introduction  to  how  nerves  function  and  work 
together  in  the  nervous  system;  how  our 
sense  organs  provide  the  brain  with  informa- 
tion about  the  outside  world;  how  the  brain 
acts  to  produce  behavior;  and  how  such 
psychological  concepts  as  perception,  learning, 
motivation,  arousal,  and  emotion  may  relate 
to  nervous  system  activity.  Prereq.  PSY  4111 
or  PSY  4112  or  equiv. 
PSY  4352  Drugs  and  Behavior  (3  q.h.) 
Application  of  quantitative  behavior  techni- 
ques in  animals  and  humans  to  determine  the 
behavioral  effects  of  pharmacological  agents. 
Includes  systematic  survey  of  experimental 
literature.  Prereq.  PSY  4111  or  PSY  4112 
or  equiv. 

PSY  4370  Impact  of  Psychology  on  Society  (3  q.h.) 
Topics  include  developments  such  as  the  uses 
of  intelligence  and  aptitude  tests,  psycho- 
surgery and  electroconvulsive  therapy,  techni- 
ques of  behavior  modification  and  control, 
minority  and  women's  rights  movements, 
direct  brain  stimulation  by  implanted  elec- 
trodes, use  of  psychoactive  drugs,  use  of  the 
lie  detector,  and  the  application  of  experimen- 
tal techniques  to  human  beings.  Prereq.  PSY 
4111  or  equiv. 

PSY  4372  Abnormal  Psychology  1  (3  q.h.) 
Introduction  to  the  etiology  and  dynamics  of 
the  abnormal  personality.  Prereq.  PSY  4112 
or  equiv. 

PSY  4373  Abnormal  Psychology  2  (3  q.h.) 
Symptomatology  and  treatment  of  the 
neuroses  and  psychoses.  Prereq.  4372  or  equiv. 
PSY  4374  Abnormal  Psychology  3  (3  q.h.) 
Explores  psychosomatic,  psychopathic,  and 
organic  disorders;  varieties  of  psychotherapy. 
Prereq.  PSY  4373  or  equiv. 
PSY  4381  Sensation  and  Perception  1  (3  q.h.) 
Introduction  to  the  nature  of  the  perceptual 
world,  the  nature  of  object  recognition  and 
identification,  spatial  organization,  contextual 
effects,  learning  and  perception,  and  the  in- 
fluence of  attitudinal,  motivational,  and  per- 
sonality factors  on  perception.  Prereq.  PSY 
4111  or  equiv. 

PSY  4390  Industrial  Psychology  1  (3  q.h.) 
Examines  psychology  as  applied  to  industry, 
including  such  topics  as  selection  and  place- 
ment procedures,  employee  assessment,  in- 
dividual differences  and  their  evaluation,  and 
the  place  of  psychological  tests  in  industry. 
Prereq.  PSY 4111  or  PSY 4112  or  equiv. 


Purchasing         227 


PSY  4391  Industrial  Psychology  2  (3  q.h.) 
Covers  personnel  training  and  development, 
motivation  and  work,  attitudes  and  job 
satisfaction,  engineering  psychology,  and 
human  factors  in  accident  causation.  Prereq. 
PSY  4390  or  equiv. 
PSY  4392  Industrial  Psychology  3  (3  q.h.) 
Discusses  supervision  and  leadership,  morale, 
personnel  counseling,  the  psychology  of  labor- 
management  relations,  human  relations,  and 
organizational  behavior.  Prereq.  PSY  4391. 
PSY  4471  Psychological  Therapies  (3  q.h.) 
Studies  techniques  used  for  treating  deviant 
behavior,  from  classical  psychoanalytical 
therapies  through  methods  of  behavior 
modification.  Prereq.  PSY 4374  or  equiv. 
PSY  4561  Experimental  Psychology  1  (3  q.h.) 
Students  conduct  experiments  focusing  on  the 
scientific  method  in  the  design,  execution, 
analysis,  and  reporting  of  psychological  in- 
vestigations. Prereq.  PSY 4222. 
PSY  4562  Experimental  Psychology  2  (3  q.h.) 
Continuation  of  PSY  4561.  Prereq.  PSY  4561. 
PSY  4611  Senior  Seminar  in  Psychology  (3  q.h.) 
Small  groups  of  students  meet  to  discuss 
topics  of  mutual  interest  in  psychology.  Each 
seminar  has  a  different  focus,  depending  upon 
the  student  group  and  the  instructor.  Prereq. 
Senior  status  or  instructor's  permission. 
PSY  4813  Field  Work  in  Psychology  (6  q.h.) 
Designed  to  enhance  career  development  by 
allowing  students  to  earn  credit  for  the  ap- 
plication of  their  academic  backgrounds  to 
practical  problems  in  the  work  place.  See 
page  16  for  details. 

PSY  4815  Advanced  Tutorial  1  (3  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  take  an  upper-level  course  in- 
dependently. See  page  16  for  details.  Prereq. 
87  q.h. 

PSY  4816  Advanced  Tutorial  2  (3  q.h.) 

See  PSY  4815. 

PSY  4820  Independent  Study  1  (3  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  undertake  special  research. 
See  page  17  for  details.  Prereq.  96  q.h.,  3.0  q.p.a. 

PSY  4821  Independent  Study  2  (3  q.h.) 

See  PSY  4820. 

PSY  4822  Independent  Study  3  (3  q.h.) 

See  PSY  4820. 

PSY  4891  Honors  Program  1  (4  q.h.) 

Opportunity  to  undertake  an  in-depth 

research  study  project.  See  page  17  for  details. 

Prereq.  96  q.h.,  3.5  q.p.a. 

PSY  4892  Honors  Program  2  (4  q.h.) 
See  PSY  4891. 


PSY  4893  Honors  Program  3  (4  q.h.) 
See  PSY  4891. 

PSY  5242  Development:  Adulthood  and  Aging 

(3  CEUs) 

Same  as  PSY  4242. 

PSY  5243  Aging  and  Mental  Health  (3  CEUs) 

Same  as  PSY  4243. 

PURCHASING 

PUR  4351  Purchasing  1  (3  q.h.) 
Introduction  to  the  function  of  purchasing  in 
the  industrial  organization.  Includes  purchas- 
ing responsibilities,  objectives,  organization, 
and  personnel  requirements;  purchasing 
policy  and  systems;  the  role  of  the  computer 
in  regulating  purchasing  planning,  transac- 
tions, and  information  retrieval;  acquisition  of 
purchased  materials,  development  of  sources 
of  supply,  and  quality  assurance;  and  deter- 
mination and  maintenance  of  required  inven- 
tory levels.  Also  covers  control  of  inventory 
investment,  price  determination,  cost  and 
price  analysis  of  purchase  transactions,  make 
or  buy  decisions,  and  the  role  of  standardiza- 
tion and  value  analysis. 
PUR  4352  Purchasing  2  (3  q.h.) 
The  process  of  purchase  negotiations,  budgets, 
and  purchase  of  capital  equipment  is  examin- 
ed. Includes  purchasing  for  public  and  non- 
profit institutions,  disposition  of  surplus  and 
obsolete  materials,  traffic  and  material  handl- 
ing, forward  buying  and  speculation,  ethical 
considerations  in  purchasing,  purchasing  law, 
contract  cancellations,  purchasing  reports, 
evaluation  of  purchasing  performance,  and 
control  and  audit  procedures.  Prereq. 
PUR  4351. 

PUR  4353  Purchasing  (Intensive)  (6  q.h.) 
Same  as  PUR  4351  and  PUR  4352. 
PUR  4357  Business  Negotiations  (3  q.h.) 
Explores  buyer-seller  communication  and  ex- 
change. Includes  the  interactive  process  for 
arriving  at  a  satisfactory  agreement  between 
buyer  and  prospective  vendor  and  accepted 
strategies  employed  by  both  parties.  Discusses 
economic  and  technical  considerations  and  the 
psychological  and  interpersonal  environments 
of  negotiations.  Prereq.  PUR  4351. 
PUR  4358  Materials  Requirements  Planning  (3  q.h.) 
Includes  determination  of  material  require- 
ments based  on  the  master  production  schedule; 
as  well  as  calculation  of  the  time  periods  in 
which  materials  must  be  available.  The 
computer-based  MRP  system  may  be  used  as 
preparation  for  APICS  certification  exams. 


228         Radiologic  Technology 


PUR  4365  Production  Activity  Control  (3  q.h.) 
Topics  include  principles,  approaches,  and 
techniques  used  to  plan,  schedule,  control, 
and  evaluate  the  effectiveness  of  factory  pro- 
duction operations.  Examines  scheduling  and 
control  techniques  used  in  various  manufac- 
turing environments.  Course  may  be  used  as 
preparation  for  APICS  Certification 
examinations. 

PUR  4370  Inventory  Management  (3  q.h.) 
Explores  basic  inventory  management  objec- 
tives, from  the  control  of  raw  materials  to 
finished  goods  and  distribution  inventory 
management.  Includes  aggregate  inventory 
controls,  lot  sizing,  customer  service  objec- 
tives, and  the  financial  and  physical  controls 
necessary  for  effective  inventory  manage- 
ment. Course  may  be  used  as  preparation  for 
APICS  Certification  examinations. 
PUR  4390  Just-In-Time  Manufacturing  (JIT)  (3  q.h.) 
Just-In-Time  manufacturing  is  a  natural 
evolution  of  traditional  practices  which  strives 
towards  increasing  through-puts,  decreasing 
inventory  investments,  decreasing  operating 
expenses,  improving  quality,  etc.  This  course 
has  been  developed  to  introduce  the  student 
to  the  philosophies,  principles,  concepts,  and 
techniques  of  Just-In-Time  purchasing  and 
manufacturing.  Emphasis  on  the  differences 
between  traditional  and  J.I.T.  manufacturing 
will  be  discussed  in  detail.  This  course  will 
also  help  the  student  to  prepare  for  the  APICS 
Just-In-Time  certification  examination. 
PUR  4395  Master  Production  Scheduling  (MPS)  (3  q.h.) 
This  course  is  divided  into  two  sections: 
Forecasting  and  Master  Production  Schedul- 
ing. The  Forecasting  Section  develops  the 
concept  of  Forecasting;  qualitative,  intrinsic 
and  extrinsic  techniques,  Forecast  source 
data,  Forecast  accuracy,  statistics,  the  rela- 
tion of  Forecasting  to  other  processes  and 
Management  Considerations.  The  Master  Pro- 
duction Scheduling  Section  develops  the  con- 
cepts of  Master  Scheduling  Planning  and 
Control,  development  and  utilization  of  a 
Master  Production  Scheduler.  Finally,  the 
course  discusses  the  link  between  Forecasting, 
the  Master  Production  Schedule  and  Customer 
Orders.  This  course  can  be  used  for  prepara- 
tion for  the  APICS  certification  examination. 
PUR  4600  Honors  Program  1  (4  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  undertake  an  in-depth 
research  study  project.  See  page  17  for  details. 
Prereq.  96  q.h.,  3.5  q.p.a. 


PUR  4601  Honors  Program  2  (4  q.h.) 

See  PUR  4600. 

PUR  4602  Honors  Program  3  (4  q.h.) 

See  PUR  4600. 

PUR  4701  Independent  Study  1  (3  q.h.) 

Opportunity  to  undertake  special  research. 

See  page  17  for  details.  Prereq.  96  q.h., 

3.0  q.p.a. 

PUR  4702  Independent  Study  2  (3  q.h.) 

See  PUR  4701. 

PUR  4703  Independent  Study  3  (3  q.h.) 
See  PUR  4701. 

PUR  4800  Advanced  Tutorial  1  (3  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  take  upper-level  course  in- 
dependently. See  page  16  for  details.  Prereq. 
87  q.h. 

PUR  4801  Advanced  Tutorial  2  (3  q.h.) 

See  PUR  4800. 

PUR  4900  Fieldwork  (6  q.h.) 

Opportunity  to  enhance  career  development 

by  applying  academic  background  to  practical 

problems  in  the  workplace.  See  page  16  for 

details.  Prereq.  Approval  of  Program  Director. 

RADIOLOGIC  TECHNOLOGY 

RAD  4100  Radiologic  Technology  Orientation  1  (3  q.h.) 

Examines  history  of  X-radiation,  radiology 
department  organization,  medical  ter- 
minology, patient  care  and  nursing  pro- 
cedures, and  contrast  media. 
RAD  4101  Radiologic  Technology  Orientation  2  (3  q.h.) 
Study  of  medical  and  surgical  diseases. 
Prereq.  RAD  4100. 
RAD  4102  Radiologic  Science  1  (4  q.h.) 
Basic  concepts  of  physics,  units  of  measure- 
ment, Newton's  law  of  motion,  work,  energy, 
atomic  theory  of  matter,  electric  currents, 
magnetism,  generators,  motor  production, 
control  of  high  voltage,  and  X-ray  production 
are  covered.  Prereq.  MTH  4110. 
RAD  4103  Radiologic  Science  2  (4  q.h.) 
Topics  include  interaction  of  X-rays  and  matter; 
modern  X-ray  tubes;  X-ray  circuits;  simulator 
experiments;  fluoroscopic  systems;  and  proper- 
ties of  solids,  liquids,  and  gases.  Also  covers 
temperature  and  heat  transfer  and  their  ap- 
plication. Prereq.  RAD  4102. 
RAD  4104  Principles  of  Radiology  1  (4  q.h.) 
Practical,  basic  radiation  protection  and  the 
principles  of  positioning  patients  for  radio- 
graphic studies  are  covered.  Prereq.  RAD 
4114. 


Real  Estate         229 


RAD  4105  Principles  of  Radiology  2  (4  q.h.) 
Explores  principles  of  precise  body  positioning 
for  detailed  radiographic  studies.  Prereq.  RAD 
4104. 

RAD  4106  Radiologic  Photography  and  Exposure  1 
(4  q.h.) 

Emphasizes  basic  principles  of  image  forma- 
tion, electromagnetic  spectrum,  X-ray  tube 
construction,  and  factors  controlling 
radiographic  quality.  Prereq.  RAD  4103  and 
MTH  4110  or  equiv. 

RAD  4107  Radiologic  Photography  and  Exposure  2 
(4  q.h.) 

Examines  mathematical  formulas  used  in 
radiography.  Includes  in-depth  study  of  sen- 
sitometry,  phototiming  principles, 
tomography,  and  radiographic  film  techni- 
ques. Prereq.  RAD  4102  and  RAD  4106. 
RAD  4116  Radiology  Practicum  1  (4  q.h.) 
Students  apply  theoretical  principles  by  per- 
forming radiographic  procedures  under  super- 
vision in  a  direct  patient  care  setting.  Re- 
quires four  hours  of  classroom  education  and 
assigned  homework.  Emphasizes  patient  safety, 
radiation  protection,  and  basic,  routine 
diagnostic  procedures. 
RAD  4117  Radiology  Practicum  2  (4  q.h.) 
Continuation  of  RAD  4116.  Emphasizes 
routine  diagnostic  procedures,  including 
fluoroscopy,  operating  room  and  portable 
radiography.  Prereq.  RAD  4116. 
RAD  4118  Radiology  Practicum  3  (4  q.h.) 
Continuation  of  RAD  4117.  Emphasizes  ad- 
vanced diagnostic  procedures,  including  in- 
vasive and  interventional  studies.  Minor  rota- 
tions are  scheduled  for  related  imaging 
departments.  Prereq.  RAD  4117. 
RAD  4119  Radiology  Practicum  4  (4  q.h.) 
Continuation  of  RAD  4118.  Final  clinical 
practicum  leads  to  demonstration  of  ac- 
complishment of  terminal  clinical  competen- 
cies. Prereq.  RAD  4118. 
RAD  4121  Principles  of  Photography  and  Exposure 
Lab  1  (1  q.h.) 

Energized  x-ray  laboratory  activities  designed 
to  complement  RAD  4106. 
RAD  4122  Principles  of  Photography  and  Exposure 
Lab  2  (1  q.h.) 

Continuation  of  RAD  4121.  Designed  to  com- 
plement RAD  4107. 
RAD  4304  Cross-Sectional  Anatomy  (4  q.h.) 
Introduces  regional  approach  to  anatomy. 
Reviews  standard  anatomy,  with  emphasis  on 
relations  of  organs  and  structures  to  transverse 
and  longitudinal  section  appearance. 


RAD  4305  Advanced  Radiologic  Technology  (4  q.h.) 

Special  procedures  including  cardiovascular 
procedures,  neuroradiology,  lymphangiography, 
and  intervention  studies  are  explored.  Exam 
methodology,  required  equipment,  special  pa- 
tient care,  contrast  media,  and  contra  indica- 
tions are  also  covered.  Prereq.  RAD  4103, 
RAD  4105,  RAD  4107. 

RAD  4306  Radiation  Protection-Radiobiology  (4  q.h.) 
Topics  include  atomic  structure,  properties  of 
radioactive  materials,  units  of  radiation,  long- 
and  short-term  biological  effects,  life  span 
shortening,  radiation  detection  and  survey  in- 
struments, radiographic  facilities  design, 
reduction  of  exposure  to  patients,  federal 
x-ray  standards,  and  radiopharmaceuticals. 
Prereq.  RAD  4107. 

RAD  4400  Anatomy  of  the  Head  and  Neck  (3  q.h.) 
Explores  anatomy  of  the  head  and  neck  in 
regional  approach.  Both  standard  and  sec- 
tional anatomy  are  presented.  Topics  include 
brain,  orbits,  nasal  cavity  and  paranasal 
sinuses,  oral  cavity  and  pharynx,  larynx, 
thyroid  and  salivary  glands,  and  angiology  of 
head  and  neck. 

RAD  4450  Computerized  Body  Tomography  Pathology 
(3  q.h.) 

Studies  abnormal  anatomy  of  the  neck, 
thorax,  abdomen,  and  pelvis  as  demonstrated 
by  computed  tomography.  Appropriate  cor- 
relations made  to  normal  anatomic  structure. 
Prereq.  RAD  4304  or  consent  of  instructor. 
RAD  4460  Medical  Imaging  Quality  Assurance 
(3  q.h.) 

Establishing,  conducting,  and  interpreting  the 
results  of  a  medical  imaging  quality 
assurance  program  are  disussed.  Covers  basic 
imaging  chain,  film  characteristics  and  sen- 
sitometry,  test  equipment  and  operation,  data' 
collection  and  interpretation.  Prereq.  RAD 
4305  or  equiv. 

REAL  ESTATE 

RE  4301  Real  Estate  Fundamentals  1  (3  q.h.) 
Introduction  to  the  basic  principles  and  ter- 
minology of  real  estate  useful  in  various  real 
estate  business  practices. 
RE  4302  Real  Estate  Fundamentals  2  (3  q.h.) 
Examine  practices  of  real  estate  brokerage, 
including  real  estate  appraisal,  finance, 
development,  management,  and  investment. 
Upon  successful  completion  of  RE  4301  and 
RE  4302,  students  may  take  the  Massachusetts 
broker's  or  salesperson's  examination.  Prereq. 
RE  4301. 


rseai  csiaie 


RE  4303  Real  Estate  Fundamentals  (Intensive) 

(6  q.h.) 

Same  as  RE  4301  and  RE  4302. 
RE  4304  Real  Estate  Fundamentals  (Brokers)  (4  q.h.) 
Reviews  the  general  principles  and  practices 
of  real  estate  fundamentals.  General  prin- 
ciples are  examined  with  specific  attention 
given  to  those  areas  of  real  estate  that  are 
tested  on  the  Massachusetts  broker's  real 
estate  examination.  On  successfully  com- 
pleting RE  4304,  students  are  certified,  which 
enables  them  to  take  the  Massachusetts 
broker's  exam.  Prereq.  RE  4302  or  permission 
of  instructor. 

RE  4305  Real  Estate  Title  Examination  (3  q.h.) 
Review  of  the  general  principles  of  abstracting 
and  the  function  of  the  Registry  of  Deeds  in 
the  real  estate  business.  General  principles  of 
title  examinations  are  explored  in  detail,  with 
attention  given  to  recording  deeds  and  the 
transfer  of  title  in  the  conveyance  of  real 
estate.  The  function  of  the  land  court  and 
registered  land  is  also  treated.  Prepares  the 
students  for  a  possible  career  in  title  ex- 
amination and  may  require  field  work  in  the 
form  of  activities  to  be  performed  at  the 
Registry  of  Deeds. 
RE  4323  Real  Estate  Appraisal  1  (3  q.h.) 
Fundamental  survey  of  the  appraisal  of 
single-family  residences.  Examines  city  or 
town  neighborhood  influences,  site  evaluation, 
building  diagnosis,  depreciation,  the  various 
approaches  to  value,  and  appraisal  report 
preparation.  Prereq.  RE  4302. 
RE  4324  Real  Estate  Appraisal  2  (3  q.h.) 
Specialized  overview  of  the  appraisal  of  in- 
come properties.  Includes  application  of  the 
cost,  market,  and  income  approaches  to  apart- 
ment buildings  and  other  commercial  and  in- 
dustrial properties  and  of  the  various  methods 
of  capitalization  and  residual  techniques. 
Prereq.  RE  4323. 

RE  4326  Appraising  a  Single-Family  Dwelling 

(3  q.h.) 

Fundamental  survey  of  the  appraisal  of 
single-family  dwellings  for  the  beginning 
appraiser,  real  estate  broker,  salesperson, 
lender,  assessor,  or  builder.  Includes  city  and 
neighborhood  analysis,  site  evaluation, 
building  materials  and  cost,  and  depreciation. 
Also  includes  selected  research  into  ap- 
propriate market  data,  assembling  pertinent 
information,  applying  relevant  analytical 
techniques,  and  preparing  appraisal  reports, 
including  FNMA/FMAC  report  forms. 


RE  4328  Real  Estate  Financial  Analysis  1  (3  q.h.) 
Analysis  of  how  to  critically  examine  and 
analyze  any  proposed  real  estate  investment. 
Explores  in  detail  the  financial  aspects  of  ac- 
quisition, ownership,  and  disposition,  and  con- 
siders taxation  of  investments,  forms  of  pro- 
perty ownership  (organization  of  the  venture), 
analysis  of  operating  statements,  financial  ac- 
counting, use  of  leverage,  "tax-sheltered"  in- 
vestments, and  special  situations.  Develops 
criteria  of  risk  and  return  on  investment 
(ROD  that  should  be  established  by  various 
types  of  investors.  Spreadsheets  utilized. 
Prereq.  RE  4324  or  instructor's  permission. 
RE  4329  Real  Estate  Financial  Analysis  2  (3  q.h.) 
Detailed  analysis  of  the  risks  and  rewards  of 
real  estate  investments  and  problems  involv- 
ed in  financing  income  properties,  using  case 
studies,  homework  problems,  and  class  discus- 
sion and  debate.  Stresses  class  participation. 
Prereq.  RE  4328. 

RE  4330  Real  Estate  Financial  Analysis  (Intensive) 
(6  q.h.) 

Same  as  RE  4328  and  RE  4329.  Prereq.  RE 
4324. 

RE  4340  Real  Estate  Development  (3  q.h.) 
Practical,  step-by-step  approach  to  the 
organization  and  development  of  a  real  estate 
project  for  the  entrepreneur,  banker,  or 
broker.  Includes  the  role  of  the  developer,  ac- 
quisition of  land,  site  analysis,  construction 
finance,  gap  financing  and  permanent  com- 
mitments, project  budgeting  for  capital  costs 
and  for  income  and  expense,  selection  of  pro- 
fessionals, negotiations  of  agreements  with 
contractors  and  owners,  and  marketing  the 
completed  project.  Case  studies  and  guest  lec- 
turers may  be  featured.  Prereq.  RE  4329  or 
instructor's  permission. 
RE  4341  Real  Estate  Law  1  (3  q.h.) 
Covers  private  real  estate  law,  including 
ownership  rights  in  land,  leasehold  rights, 
and  easements  in  the  land  of  another;  legal 
forms  of  ownership;  the  transfer  and  acquisi- 
tion of  title  and  of  other  interests;  recording 
of  deeds,  leases,  and  other  instruments;  and 
the  landlord-tenant  relationship. 
RE  4342  Real  Estate  Law  2  (3  q.h.) 
Includes  topics  such  as  public  real  estate  law, 
including  government  powers,  rights,  and  con- 
trols on  privately  owned  real  estate;  zoning 
and  subdivision  controls;  conservation  con- 
trols; taxation  of  real  estate;  rent  controls; 
and  eminent  domain.  Prereq.  RE  4341. 


Therapeutic  Recreation         231 


RE  4344  Real  Estate  Management  1  (3  q.h.) 
Prepares  students  for  the  practical  problems 
of  real  estate  management.  Stresses  the  re- 
quisite day-to-day  management  of  commer- 
cial, industrial,  and  residential  properties  as 
well  as  the  need  for  a  management  strategy 
relating  to  long-term  property  values.  Prereq. 
RE  4302  or  instructor's  permission. 
RE  4345  Real  Estate  Management  2  (3  q.h.) 
Continuation  of  RE  4344.  Prereq.  RE  4344. 
RE  4346  Real  Estate  Management  3  (3  q.h.) 
Continuation  of  RE  4345.  Prereq.  RE  4345. 
RE  4347  Real  Estate  Title  Examination  (3  q.h.) 
Specialized  examination  of  real  estate  titles 
and  the  preparation  of  a  complete  report. 
Prereq.  RE  4341  or  instructor's  permission. 
RE  4600  Honors  Program  1  (4  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  undertake  an  in-depth 
research  study  project.  See  page  17  for  details. 
Prereq.  96  q.h.,  3.5  q.p.a. 

RE  4601  Honors  Program  2  (4  q.h.) 
See  RE  4600. 

RE  4602  Honors  Program  3  (4  q.h.) 
See  RE  4600. 

RE  4701  Independent  Study  1  (3  q.h.) 

Opportunity  to  undertake  special  research. 
See  page  17  for  details.  Prereq.  96  q.h.,  3.0  q.p.a. 

RE  4702  Independent  Study  2  (3  q.h.) 

See  RE  4701. 

RE  4703  Independent  Study  3  (3  q.h.) 
See  RE  4701. 

RE  4800  Advanced  Tutorial  1  (3  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  take  upper-level  course  in- 
dependently. See  page  16  for  details.  Prereq. 
87  q.h. 

RE  4801  Advanced  Tutorial  2  (3  q.h.) 
See  RE  4800. 
RE  4900  Fieldwork  (6  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  enhance  career  development 
by  applying  academic  background  to  practical 
problems  in  the  workplace.  See  page  16  for 
details.  Prereq.  Approval  of  Program  Director. 

THERAPEUTIC  RECREATION 

REC  4101  Principles  and  Practices  of  Therapeutic 

Recreation  1  (3  q.h.) 

Overview  of  the  field,  including  rationale, 

history,  philosophy,  goals,  treatment  settings, 

problems  of  institutionalization,  adjunctive 

therapies,  and  professional  development. 

REC  4102  Principles  and  Practices  of  Therapeutic 

Recreation  2  (3  q.h.) 

Basic  medical  terminology  with  an  overview 

of  traumatic,  sensory,  neurological,  or- 


thopedic, and  cardiovascular  disabilities.  Also 
includes  prosthetics,  orthontics,  and  an  ex- 
amination of  attitudinal  and  societal  barriers 
for  the  handicapped.  Prereq.  REC  4101  or  con- 
sultant's permission. 

REC  4103  Principles  and  Practices  of  Therapeutic 
Recreation  3  (3  q.h.) 

Integrated  case-method  and  systems  approach 
to  planning  with  individuals  and  groups. 
Focus  is  on  assessment;  quality  assurance; 
designing,  charting,  and  understanding  the 
fundamental  elements  of  activities;  current 
legislation;  and  standards  of  service.  Prereq. 
REC  4102. 

REC  4105  Childhood  Medical  Procedures  (2  q.h.) 
Explores  emergency  care/first  aid  and  medical 
procedures  for  infants,  children  and  adolescents 
who  are  in  the  care  of  professional  parents  in 
group  homes,  foster  homes  and  day  care 
facilities  based  on  the  practices  of  the 
American  Red  Cross  and  Standard  of  Care  by 
Pediatricians.  Prevention  will  be  a  major  focus. 
REC  4110  Group  Dynamics  and  Leadership  1  (3  q.h.) 
Emphasis  on  self-awareness,  identity,  and  in- 
terpersonal and  intergroup  communications. 
Includes  process  factors  influencing  the  need 
to  join  the  group;  motivation  to  participate; 
membership  screening;  size  and  purpose  of 
the  group;  open-ended  and  closed  approaches; 
group  problem  solving;  brainstorming;  and 
conflict  resolution. 

REC  4111  Group  Dynamics  and  Leadership  2  (3  q.h.) 
Discussion  of  organization,  development,  and 
structure  of  groups;  team  building;  role  and 
value  clarifications;  ramifications  of  change; 
group  characteristics;  and  leadership  styles 
and  techniques.  Prereq.  REC  4110. 
REC  4112  Group  Dynamics  and  Leadership  (Intensive) 
(6  q.h.) 
Same  as  REC  4110  and  REC  4111. 

REC  4118  Coping  Skills  for  Child  Rearing  (2  q.h.) 
A  basic  introduction  to  understanding  coping 
skills  for  those  in  a  parenting  role.  A  primary 
focus  of  this  course  is  to  introduce  cognitive, 
behavioral,  emotional  and  environmental 
changes.  Life  style  changes  as  well  as  various 
relaxation  techniques  will  be  presented. 
REC  4200  Introduction  to  Learning  Disabilities  (3  q.h.) 
Review  of  the  behavioral  characteristics  of 
people  with  deficits  in  perceptual,  integrative, 
or  expressive  processes  that  impair  learning. 
Appropriate  curricula  and  teaching  methods 
surveyed. 


mrnTiimimminii 


REC  4210  Psychosocial  Aspects  of  Disabilities  and 
Illness  (3  q.h.) 

Exploration  of  issues  and  attitudes  related  to 
disability,  such  as  societal  understanding, 
handicapping  conditions,  adjustments,  social 
networks,  coping,  and  the  interaction  of  care 
providers  with  the  disabled. 
REC  4215  Causes/Detection  of  Child  Abuse  (3  q.h.) 
Introduction  to  the  causes  of  abuse  in  individ- 
uals and  in  society.  Detailed  description/ 
definitions  of  domestic  violence,  child  abuse, 
neglect  and  sexual  abuse.  Assessing  treatment 
services  and  intervention  strategies  are 
introduced. 

REC  4250  Assessment  of  Learning  Disabilities  (3  q.h.) 
Presentation  of  the  formal  and  informal 
assessment  procedures  for  general,  specific, 
and  behavioral  learning  deficits.  Techniques 
for  the  remediation  of  these  deficits  in  schools 
and  home  are  reviewed.  Prereq.  REC  4200. 
REC  4300  Arts  and  Crafts  1  (3  q.h.) 
Overview  of  the  creative  media  available  for 
individual  projects.  Includes  how  to  develop 
the  technical  capability  to  use  a  wide  variety 
of  materials  in  imaginative  ways  and  the 
compilation  of  a  personal  arts  and  crafts 
manual  as  a  reference  tool. 
REC  4301  Arts  and  Crafts  2  (3  q.h.) 
Adaptation  of  creative  skills  to  a  therapeutic 
setting.  Emphasizes  continued  development  of 
technical  capabilities  and  of  instructional  skills 
(one-to-one  and  group).  Also  discusses  the  plan- 
ning, implementation,  and  integration  of  craft 
programs. 

REC  4302  Arts  and  Crafts  (Intensive)  (6  q.h.) 

Same  as  REC  4300  and  REC  4301. 

REC  4304  Dynamics  of  Family  Life  for  the  Disabled 

(3  q.h.) 

Surveys  the  internal  and  external  dynamics 
of  family  life.  The  significance  of  these  factors 
to  the  mental  health  of  the  disabled  is  ex- 
plored. Approaches  to  working  with  families 
is  reviewed,  as  well  as  the  effects  of  disabilities 
on  the  family  unit  itself. 

REC  4310  Social  Recreation  (3  q.h.) 
Planning,  organizing,  and  motivating  for 
social  recreation  activities,  including  ice 
breakers,  mixers,  active  and  inactive  games, 
joint  projects,  and  special  events  geared  to  a 
variety  of  settings. 
REC  4311  Music  Therapy  (3  q.h.) 
Introduction  to  the  field  of  music  therapy,  in- 
cluding an  exploration  of  historical  and  cur- 
rent theories  and  various  techniques  used  in 


clinical  settings.  Also  includes  a  survey  of  the 
literature  of  therapy,  covering  special  educa- 
tion and  psychiatric  and  geriatric  areas. 
REC  4312  Media  Resources  and  Techniques  (3  q.h.) 
Introduction  to  how  to  design  overlays, 
transparencies,  posters,  brochures,  and  other 
materials  and  creatively  use  slides  and  tapes. 
Also  includes  the  operation  of  public  address 
systems,  16  mm.  opaque  film  strips,  overhead 
projectors,  and  other  photographic  devices. 

REC  4313  Therapeutic  Use  of  Dramatics  (3  q.h.) 
Explores  the  value  of  reinforcement  and 
socialization  through  pantomime,  improvisa- 
tions, puppetry,  skits  and  stunts,  dramatic 
games,  storytelling,  and  one-act  plays.  Em- 
phasizes creativity  in  the  therapeutic  setting. 
REC  4350  Legal  Issues  of  Disability  and 
Rehabilitation  (3  q.h.) 

An  analysis  of  significant  legal  issues  pertain- 
ing to  rehabilitation  and  disability  in  educa- 
tion, employment,  and  housing.  Pertinent 
federal  and  state  statutes  covered. 
REC  4378  Parenting  Skills  1  (3  q.h.) 
Designed  for  both  experienced  and  prospective 
parents/caregivers.  It  will  reinforce  and 
enhance  methods  that  parents/caregivers 
have  already  developed  to  deal  effectively 
with  child  caring  situations.  For  those  who 
feel  less  confident  about  their  ability  or  ex- 
perience, it  will  point  out  the  way  to  an  effec- 
tive, consistant,  philosophical  approach. 
REC  4379  Parenting  Skills  2  (3  q.h.) 
Designed  to  help  parents/caregivers  under- 
stand and  differentiate  between  psychotic  and 
neurotic  behaviors,  as  well  as  to  identify  the 
symptoms  of  the  unattached  child.  Specific 
techniques  will  be  taught  that  will  help  the 
caregiver  work  successfully  with  the  child, 
and  in  the  case  of  the  severely  disturbed 
child,  to  be  able  to  work  as  part  of  a 
therapeutic  team  in  a  treatment  plan. 
REC  4380  Parenting  Skills  Intensive  (6  q.h.) 
Same  as  REC  4378  and  REC  4379. 
REC  4401  The  Nursing  Home  Experience  (3  q.h.) 
Exchange  of  empirical  data  relating  to  case 
experiences  and  institutional  procedures  en- 
countered by  activity  leaders  and  other  practi- 
tioners in  nursing  homes.  Examines  the 
feasibility  of  functional  innovations  in  rela- 
tion to  present  practices. 
REC  4402  Leisure  and  Lifestyle  (3  q.h.) 
Focus  on  aspects  contributing  to  life  styles 
and  the  role  of  leisure.  Examines  specific 
lifestyles  through  reading  and  video-taped 


Therapeutic  Recreation         233 


materials.  Gives  students  the  opportunity  to 

examine  the  impact  of  leisure  on  their  own 

lifestyles  and  future  aspirations. 

REC  4403  Concepts  of  Leisure:  Sociopsychological 

Perspectives  (3  q.h.) 

Explores  the  various  sociopsychological 

perspectives  of  leisure  and  the  relations  on 

mores,  social  structure,  roles  and  values,  and 

personality  to  leisure  expression.  Investigates 

other  pertinent  social  and  environmental  factors 

that  contribute  to  the  phenomena  of  leisure. 

REC  4405  Management  in  Handicapped  Residences 

(3  q.h.) 

Designed  to  provide  students  with  both 
theoretical  and  practical  applications  of 
management  and  leisure  services  on  a  com- 
munity residence  related  to  a  population  of 
mentally  handicapped  persons.  Emphasis  on 
management  techniques  and  skills,  appropriate 
leisure  service  planning  and  implementation, 
and  direct  work  with  both  clients  and  staff  in 
a  community  residence. 
REC  4410  Therapeutic  Recreation  in  Rehabilitation 
(3  q.h.) 

Focuses  on  philosophy,  goals,  and  background 
in  rehabilitation;  team  membership  concepts. 
Includes  the  role  of  therapeutic  recreation  in 
the  acute  and  chronic  hospital,  the  rehabilita- 
tion center,  and  in  various  community  settings. 
REC  4420  Activity  and  Movement  Analysis  (3  q.h.) 
Covers  basic  anatomy  as  it  relates  to  the 
identification  of  muscle  groups  in  action. 
Analyzes  both  the  movement  and  the  ingre- 
dients of  the  activity  and  their  suitability 
with  given  disabilities.  Prereq.  BIO  4175. 
REC  4425  Mental  Illness  and  Retardation  (3  q.h.) 
Origins  and  manifestations  of  mental  illness 
and  retardation  are  discussed.  Historical  and 
contemporary  overviews  include  discussions  of 
treatment,  settings,  case  studies,  and  trends. 
REC  4430  Therapeutic  Recreation  in  Child 
Development  (3  q.h.) 

Explores  growth  and  development  patterns 
from  birth  to  age  12.  Includes  study  of  the 
need  for  play,  learning  through  play,  and  the 
therapeutic  value  of  play.  Examines 
biological,  psychological,  and  sociological 
aspects  by  watching  children  at  play. 
REC  4440  Humanistic  and  Holistic  Approaches  in 
Therapeutic  Recreation  (3  q.h.) 
Examines  the  use  of  trust,  imagination,  ver- 
bal and  nonverbal  communication,  intuition, 
emotions,  the  will,  spirit,  motor  coordination, 
sensory  awareness,  and  self-responsibility  to 
develop  innovative  programming. 


REC  4445  Community  Recreation  for  the 
Handicapped  (3  q.h.) 

Development  and  initiation  of  a  com- 
prehensive special  needs  program  in  the  com- 
munity by  integrating  efforts  with  school  and 
special  education  departments,  municipal  of- 
ficials, and  parent  groups.  Covers  needs 
statements,  concepts  of  budgeting  and  fun- 
ding, publicity,  and  program  development. 
Site  visits. 

REC  4450  Vocational  Planning  for  the  Learning 
Disabled  (3  q.h.) 

Survey  of  the  issues  and  processes  that  need 
to  be  taken  into  consideration  when  assisting 
the  learning  disabled  in  making  vocational 
choices.  Resources  available  for  placement 
and  training  are  covered,  as  well  as  how  to 
design  a  skill  assessment  and  interest  inven- 
tory. The  ultimate  aim  is  to  assist  the  client 
in  the  process  of  self-assessment,  goal-setting, 
and  the  job  search  process. 
REC  4460  The  Process  of  Aging  (3  q.h.) 
Psychosocial  dynamics  of  growing  old, 
physical  changes  as  a  result  of  aging,  the 
needs  of  people  as  they  age,  and  attitudes 
toward  work,  retirement,  and  leisure  are 
discussed.  A  study  of  dependency  versus  in- 
dependence, remotivation,  death  and  dying, 
and  programs  and  services  that  add  quality  to 
the  long  life. 

REC  4461  Camping  for  the  Disabled  (3  q.h.) 
Covers  basic  goals,  values,  and  procedures  for 
operating  outdoor  education  and  camping  pro- 
grams. Emphasizes  social  integration  with 
nondisabled  children  and  the  development  of 
innovative  programs. 
REC  4462  Leisure  Counseling  (3  q.h.) 
Remedial  and  developmental  process  designed 
to  produce  behavior  and  attitude  changes  in 
the  client's  leisure  patterns.  Includes  develop- 
ment of  competence  in  identifying,  using,  and 
referring  to  appropriate  recreational 
resources.  Compares  leisure  counseling  fun- 
damentals in  a  variety  of  recreational 
settings. 

REC  4470  The  Learning  Disabled  at  Work  (3  q.h.) 
Examination  of  the  learning  disabled  in  the 
workplace,  how  their  performance  may  be  im- 
pacted, and  what  accommodations  in  job  con- 
tent may  be  necessary.  The  aim  is  to  develop 
problem-solving  strategies  that  facilitate  the 
positive  contributions  a  learning  disabled  per- 
son can  make  with  some  accommodations. 


£04  ouuiuiuyy-Himirupuiuyy 


REC  4500  Practicum  1  (4  q.h.) 
Assigned  field  experience  in  a  treatment 
facility  under  supervision  of  a  qualified  pro- 
fessional. Students  have  the  opportunity  to 
learn  about  the  direct  service  application  of 
classroom  theory  through  observation  and 
participation  and  written  reports,  evaluations, 
and  seminars.  The  experience  averages  eight 
hours  a  week  for  twelve  weeks.  Prereq.  REC 
4103  plus  12  q.h.  of  professional  courses  and 
consultant's  permission. 

REC  4501  Practicum  2  (4  q.h.) 

Continuation  of  REC  4500.  Prereq.  REC  4500. 

SOCIOLOGY-ANTHROPOLOGY 

S0A  4100  Physical  Anthropology  (formerly 
Anthropology  1)  (3  q.h.) 
Introduction  to  elements  of  physical  an- 
thropology, covering  such  subjects  as 
primates,  fossil  humans  and  evolution,  pro- 
blems of  heredity  and  genetics,  race  and 
racial  classifications,  and  the  bases  of  cultural 
behavior.  Not  open  to  students  who  have  credit 
for  SOC  4010. 

S0A  4101  Cultural  Anthropology:  Preliterate  Societies 
(formerly  Anthropology  2)  (3  q.h.) 
Introduction  to  sociocultural  anthropology. 
Examines  the  nature  of  language  and  the 
cultural  institutions  of  human  groups  with 
simple  foraging  and  horticultural  adaptation. 
Not  open  to  students  who  have  credit  for  SOC 
4011. 

S0A  4102  Cultural  Anthropology:  Industrial  Societies 
(formerly  Anthropology  3)  (3  q.h.) 
The  institutions  and  cultures  of  technologically 
advanced  societies  and  states  are  explored. 
S0A  4103  Anthropology  Intensive  A  (6  q.h.) 
Same  as  SOA  4100  and  SOA  4101. 
S0A  4104  Anthropology  Intensive  B  (formerly 
Anthropology  Intensive)  (9  q.h.) 
Same  as  SOA  4100,  SOA  4101,  and  SOA 
4102. 

SOA  4146  Peasant  Societies  in  a  Changing  World 
(3  q.h.) 

Examines  changes  affecting  traditional  pea- 
sant cultures  in  the  non- Western  and 
Western  worlds.  Includes  the  processes  occurr- 
ing in  situations  involving  culture  contact, 
conquest,  and  colonialism. 
SOA  4155  Individual  and  Culture  (3  q.h.) 
Focuses  on  cross-cultural  comparisons  of  the 
socialization  and  acculturation  of  children  and 
adults  with  respect  to  roles,  values,  and  per- 


sonality. Examines  theories  and  methods  used 
in  psychological  anthropology. 
SOA  4160  Sex,  Sex  Roles,  and  the  Family  (3  q.h.) 
Analyze  popular  and  scientific  notions  about 
sex  and  the  family  by  examining  the  social 
patterning  of  interactions  in  our  culture, 
other  cultures,  and  other  species.  Emphasizes 
the  changing  relationships  between  men  and 
women. 

SOA  4221  Culture  and  Medicine  (3  q.h.) 
Perspectives  on  medicine  and  health  care  are 
rapidly  changing.  As  costs  skyrocket,  alter- 
natives to  "curative"  medicine  are  being 
sought.  Uses  an  anthropological  perspective 
and  draws  on  the  vast  amount  of  cross- 
cultural  literature  in  exploring  the  impact  of 
sociocultural  factors  on  the  incidence,  defini- 
tion, treatment,  and  prevention  of  illness  as 
well  as  the  organization  of  health  services. 

SOA  4266  Folklore  (3  q.h.) 
Focus  on  Folklore,  art,  and  song  in  various 
societies  and  how  they  are  studied.  Examines 
contemporary  American  materials. 
SOA  4322  Anthropological  Theory  (3  q.h.) 
History  of  the  major  orientations  and 
philosophies  of  anthropology,  including  evolu- 
tionist, culture  area,  and  historical  ap- 
proaches and  functional,  structural,  ecological, 
and  cognitive  modes  of  analysis. 
SOA  4430  Native  North  American  Peoples  (3  q.h.) 
Past  and  present  circumstances  of  a  number 
of  native  North  American  peoples  are 
explored. 

SOA  4431  African  Peoples  and  Cultures  (3  q.h.) 
Topics  include  African  geography,  prehistory, 
and  culture;  the  spectrum  of  societal  complex- 
ity ranging  from  Mbuti  egalitarianism  to 
Ashanti  federation;  and  the  problems  of 
political,  economic,  and  social  change  in  con- 
temporary Africa. 

SOA  4434  Latin  American  Peoples  and  Cultures 
(3  q.h.) 

Examine  tribal  and  peasant  adaptations  of 
native  and  Hispanic  populations  to  changing 
conditions  in  Latin  America. 
SOA  4470  Religion  in  Cross-Cultural  Perspective  (3  q.h.) 
Comparative  analysis  of  the  rituals,  beliefs, 
and  religious  institutions  of  various  groups. 

SOCIOLOGY 

SOC  4010  Principles  of  Sociology  1  (4  q.h.) 
Introduction  to  basic  concepts  and  theories 
relating  to  the  study  of  people  as  participants 
in  group  life.  Emphasizes  socialization, 


sociology         l6o 


culture,  social  structure,  primary  groups, 
family,  social  stratification,  and  population. 
For  Alternative  Freshmen-Year  students  only. 
Not  open  to  students  who  have  credit  for  SOC 
4100  or  SOC  4101. 

SOC  4011  Principles  of  Sociology  2  (4  q.h.) 
Continuation  of  SOC  4010.  Emphasizes 
critical  analysis  of  American  society  with  par- 
ticular attention  to  problems  of  social, 
political,  urban,  and  industrial  change.  For 
Alternative  Freshmen-Year  students  only.  Not 
open  to  students  who  have  credit  for  SOC  4101 
or  SOC  4102.  Prereq.  SOC  4010  or  equiv. 

SOC  4100  Roles,  Culture,  and  the  Individual 

(formerly  Fundamental  Issues  in  Sociology) 
(3  q.h.) 

Examines  basic  theoretical  perspectives, 
research  methods,  and  concepts  of  sociology, 
including  society,  status  and  role,  socializa- 
tion, and  social  groups.  Not  open  to  students 
who  have  credit  for  SOC  4010. 
SOC  4101  Inequality  and  Institutions  (formerly  The 
Individual  and  Social  Roles)  (3  q.h.) 
Discusses  involvement  of  individuals  in  socie- 
ty, including  culture,  social  interaction,  de- 
viance, sex  roles,  sexuality,  and  family.  Not 
open  to  students  who  have  credit  for  SOC  4010 
or  SOC  4011.  Prereq.  SOC  4100  or  equiv. 
SOC  4102  Institutions  and  Social  Change  (formerly 
Critical  Issues  Facing  Society)  (3  q.h.) 
Examines  important  social  factors,  including 
business  and  industry,  population  and 
ecology,  science  and  technology,  class,  and 
race  and  ethnic  relations.  Not  open  to  students 
who  have  credit  for  SOC  4011.  Prereq.  SOC 
4100  or  equiv. 

SOC  4103  Introduction  to  Sociology  Intensive  A 

(formerly  Sociology  Intensive)  (9  q.h.) 
Same  as  SOC  4100,  SOC  4101,  and  SOC 
4102. 

SOC  4104  Introduction  to  Sociology  Intensive  B  (6  q.h.) 
Same  as  SOC  4100  and  SOC  4101. 
SOC  4120  Sociology  of  Boston  (3  q.h.) 
The  city  is  a  laboratory  for  exploring  the  peo- 
ple's search  for  a  lifestyle  and  the  satisfaction 
of  their  needs.  The  city  of  Boston  from  the 
perspectives  of  environmental  development, 
neighborhood  and  intergroup  relations,  in- 
stitutional services,  and  symbolic  meanings. 
Includes  field  trips  with  workbook  and  re- 
quires use  of  documentary  and  literary 
sources  for  term  paper  report.  Does  not 
meet  elective  requirements  for  Sociology- 
Anthropology  major. 


SOC  4125  Social  Problems  (3  q.h.) 
Contemporary  American  social  problems  and 
the  application  of  sociological  concepts, 
methods,  and  principles  to  these  problems 
are  explored. 

SOC  4147  Urban  Sociology  (3  q.h.) 
Topics  include  various  causes,  characteristics, 
and  effects  of  urbanization  in  several  different 
cultures.  Gives  specific  attention  to  the  pro- 
blem of  urban  and  suburban  living  and  the 
changing  structure  of  the  city. 

SOC  4154  Sex  and  Gender  Roles  in  Society 

(formerly  Sex  in  Society:  The  Study  of  Sex 
Roles)  (3  q.h.) 

Explores  historical  and  contemporary 
developments,  examining  the  ways  in  which 
men's  and  women's  changing  roles  are  related 
to  society  at  large. 

SOC  4155  Sociology  of  the  Family  (formerly 
Sociology  of  the  Family  1)  (3  q.h.) 
Studies  the  family  as  a  social  institution  in 
several  selected  cultures;  family  interrelations 
with  political,  economic,  and  educational  in- 
stitutions; and  the  changing  nature  of  the 
family. 

SOC  4156  Violence  in  the  Family  (formerly 
Sociology  of  the  Family  2)  (3  q.h.) 
Examines  physical,  emotional,  and  sexual 
violence  that  occurs  in  families,  emphasizing 
child  and  spouse  abuse.  Analyzes  definitions, 
prevalence,  causes,  prevention,  and  treatment 
of  specific  cases  of  violence.  Primary  focus  is 
on  social  and  policy  issues  and  problems  of 
legal  intervention. 

SOC  4170  Race  and  Ethnic  Relations  (3  q.h.) 
Focuses  on  relationships  among  various 
racial,  national,  cultural,  and  religious  groups, 
emphasizing  the  development  of  black-white 
relationships  in  American  society.  Also  covers 
the  problems  of  contemporary  minority 
peoples  in  American  and  other  societies. 
SOC  4175  Sociology  of  Work  (3  q.h.) 
Explores  the  world  of  work,  focusing  on  the 
development  of  occupational  cultures,  the 
nature  of  careers,  and  the  meanings  and  im- 
plications of  professionalization.  Students  are 
encouraged  to  do  a  project  on  a  career  they 
are  considering  or  one  in  which  they  have 
had  practical  experience  on  co-op. 
SOC  4176  Business  and  Industrial  Sociology  (3  q.h.) 
Examines  role  of  industry  in  modern  society. 
Covers  similarities  and  dissimilarities  among 
industrial  societies,  bureaucracy  and  its  alter- 
natives, unions,  supervision  democracy  and 


uo       ouuiuiuyy 


manipulation,  the  individual  on  the  assembly 
line,  sabotage  of  the  organization,  and  the 
role  of  wages  and  alienation. 
SOC  4185  Sociology  of  Deviant  Behavior  (3  q.h.) 
Topics  include  a  variety  of  social  problems 
and  their  relation  to  the  organization  of  society. 
Pays  particular  attention  to  alcoholism,  sex- 
ual offenses,  drug  abuse,  mental  disorders, 
and  other  responses  to  conditions  of  urban  in- 
dustrial society. 

SOC  4186  Social  Control  (3  q.h.) 
Discusses  group  membership  as  a  determi- 
nant of  behavior,  including  analysis  of  status 
and  role,  patterns  of  authority,  power,  and 
group  ideology  as  factors  in  the  evaluation  of 
conduct. 

SOC  4190  Juvenile  Delinquency  (3  q.h.) 
Emphasis  on  factors  involved  in  juvenile 
delinquency  and  their  implications  for  preven- 
tion, rehabilitation,  and  treatment. 
SOC  4195  Drugs  and  Society  (3  q.h.) 
Introduction  to  the  sociology  of  drugs.  Ex- 
amines social  definitions  of  drugs,  conditions 
of  their  use,  and  socialization  into  drug  use. 
Considers  deviant  drug  use  and  effects  of 
social  control  on  definitions  and  use.  A  range 
of  licit  and  illicit  drugs  is  considered. 
SOC  4202  Sociology  of  Drinking  (3  q.h.) 
Exploration  of  how  different  groups  and 
societies  organize  drinking  as  a  social  act,  and 
the  consequences  of  that  organization.  Covers 
the  cultural  meaning  assigned  to  drinking, 
the  social  elements  found  in  all  drinking 
situations,  how  members  of  social  groups 
learn  how  to  drink,  and  the  social  and 
psychological  functions  of  drinking. 
SOC  4205  Law  and  Society  (3  q.h.) 
Topics  include  functions  of  law  in  modern 
society;  legislation,  litigation,  and  adjudica- 
tion as  social  processes;  the  legal  professions, 
the  courts,  and  the  administration  of  justice; 
laws  and  judicial  decisions  on  controversial 
social  issues;  and  laws  regulating  domestic, 
industrial,  and  other  major  social  relationships. 
SOC  4215  Medical  Sociology  (3  q.h.) 
Examination  of  sociological  concepts  and 
research  relating  to  patterns  of  behavior  in 
the  areas  of  health  and  disease.  Emphasizes 
the  family,  community,  medical  organizations, 
class,  and  status  as  social  subsystems  related  to  the 
field  of  health. 

SOC  4220  Sociology  of  Mental  Health  (3  q.h.) 
Covers  sociological  aspects  of  mental  health 
and  mental  disorder.  Examines  the  social 


history  of  mental  illness,  epidemiological  and 
cross-cultural  approaches  to  mental  disorder, 
the  career  of  the  mental  patient,  the  functions 
of  psychiatry  in  society,  community  and  social 
treatment  modalities,  and  social  psychiatry. 
SOC  4225  Social  Gerontology  (3  q.h.) 
Analyzes  issues  and  questions  of  aging,  with 
special  attention  to  social  and  economic  conse- 
quences of  the  aging  process,  such  as  retire- 
ment and  productivity,  health  care  problems, 
nursing  home  residences,  widower-  and 
widowhood,  and  the  approach  of  death.  Gives 
examples  relating  to  aging  in  other  cultures 
in  a  search  for  new  answers  to  social  pro- 
blems of  aging  in  the  United  States. 
Discusses  how  to  anticipate,  cope  with,  and 
even  prevent  problems  of  aging  that  concern 
self,  family,  and  clients  or  patients. 

SOC  4226  Work,  Leisure,  and  Aging  (3  q.h.) 
Includes  discussion  of  theory  and  practice  of 
leisure  time  activities  as  they  relate  to  the 
older  adult.  Examines  the  social,  cultural,  and 
economic  aspects  of  work,  including 
housework,  and  the  meaning  of  leisure.  Ex- 
plores various  types  of  leisure  activities  and 
resources  as  well  as  how  to  build  skills  and 
design  and  implement  activities. 
SOC  4235  Death  and  Dying  (3  q.h.) 
Examines  the  treatment  of  death  and  dying, 
including  problems  faced  by  health  care  pro- 
fessionals, family  members,  institutions,  the 
funeral  industry,  and  the  dying  themselves. 
Covers  cross-cultural  perspectives,  the  social 
distribution  of  mortality,  the  changing  nature 
of  death,  and  the  ethical  problems  in  deter- 
mining life  and  death  with  particular  atten- 
tion to  such  issues  as  abortion,  suicide,  and 
ceasing  medical  intervention. 
SOC  4240  Sociology  of  Human  Service  Organizations 
(3  q.h.) 

Explores  the  contradiction  between  what 
human  service  organizations  set  out  to  do  and 
what  they  actually  accomplish.  Includes  how 
human  service  organization  goals  are  defined, 
how  clients  become  labeled,  and  the  societal 
constraints  placed  on  clients,  workers,  and  the 
organizations. 

SOC  4241  Human  Services  Professions  (3  q.h.) 
Covers  human  services,  viewed  from  the 
perspectives  of  the  recipient,  the  worker,  and 
the  society  at  large.  Includes  analysis  of  why 
they  are  needed,  how  agencies  and  programs 
have  developed,  and  the  basic  skills,  attitudes, 
values,  and  knowledge  required  of  the  human 
service  worker  today. 


sociology        Lit 


SOC  4245  Poverty  and  Inequality  (formerly 
Sociology  of  Inequality) 
(3  q.h.) 

Historical  analysis  of  American  class  and 
ethnic  differences,  drawing  on  comparisons 
with  other  countries.  Includes  critical  evalua- 
tion of  sociological  research  and  theories 
relating  to  the  causes  and  effects  of  poverty 
and  societal  responses  to  it.  Suitable  for 
students  in  applied  fields,  such  as  nursing, 
criminal  justice,  education,  allied  health,  pre- 
med,  and  pre-law. 

SOC  4255  Sociology  of  Sport  (3  q.h.) 
Topics  include  games  and  sport  from  a 
sociological  perspective,  with  particular 
reference  to  contemporary  American  society. 
Includes  the  role  of  play  in  modern  society, 
the  social  organization  of  specific  games  and 
sports,  and  the  relation  of  organized  sport  to 
the  larger  society. 

SOC  4260  Introduction  to  Social  Work  Practice  1  (3  q.h. ) 
Explores  the  functions  of  the  helping  profes- 
sion of  social  work,  its  settings  and  methods. 
Covers  specific  techniques,  such  as  interview- 
ing, history  taking,  and  recording  skills. 
SOC  4261  Introduction  to  Social  Work  Practice  2  (3  q.h.) 
Continuation  of  SOC  4260,  with  particular  at- 
tention to  the  functioning  of  social  workers  in 
selected  settings.  Prereq.  SOC  4260  or  equiv. 
SOC  4262  Introduction  to  Social  Work  Practice  3  (3  q.h.) 
Continuation  of  SOC  4261.  Emphasizes 
enhancement  of  practice  skills.  Prereq.  SOC 
4261  or  equiv. 

SOC  4276  Popular  Culture  (3  q.h.)  (formerly 
Sociology  of  Popular  Culture) 
Significance  of  expressions  of  popular  culture, 
such  as  film,  television,  music,  and  literature 
is  explored.  Examines  media  production, 
organization,  technology,  and  audience  con- 
sumption. Also  covers  the  relationship  bet- 
ween popular  culture  and  existing  socio- 
economic institutions. 
SOC  4300  Social  Theory  1  (3  q.h.) 
Historical  survey  of  sociological  theorists,  in- 
cluding the  work  of  de  Tocqueville,  Comte,  Marx, 
Durkheim,  and  Cooley.  Prereq.  Instructor's 
permission  or  12  q.h.  in  Sociology-Anthropology. 

SOC  4301  Social  Theory  2  (3  q.h.) 
Covers  major  theoretical  issues  in  sociology. 
Discussion  concentrates  on  systematic  ques- 
tions and  topics  rather  than  on  particular 
theorists,  but  material  is  drawn  from  such 
theorists  as  Weber,  Simmel,  Thomas, 
Mannheim,  Merton,  and  Parsons.  Prereq. 
SOC  4300  or  equiv. 


SOC  4302  Social  Theory  3  (3  q.h.) 

Seminar  focuses  on  questions  of  theoretical 
interest,  such  as  the  problem  of  order,  the 
problem  of  change,  and  the  role  of  the  in- 
dividual in  change.  Students  present  papers 
in  class.  Prereq.  SOC  4301  or  equiv. 
SOC  4303  Social  Theory  (Intensive)  (9  q.h.) 
Same  as  SOC  4300,  SOC  4301,  and  SOC 
4302.  Prereq.  Instructor's  permission  or  12  q.h. 
in  Sociology-Anthropology.  Not  open  to  students 
who  have  credit  for  SOC  4300,  SOC  4301,  or 
SOC  4302. 

SOC  4310  Class,  Power,  and  Social  Change  (3  q.h.) 

Discusses  theories  of  social  equality  and  ine- 
quality as  applied  to  the  exercise  of  power 
and  to  the  growth  and  development  of  social 
movements  and  group  conflict.  Takes  a  large- 
scale,  social-change  point  of  view. 
SOC  4331  Social  Research  Methods  1:  Generating 
and  Investigating  Research  Problems  (3  q.h.) 
Examines  methods  for  gaining  knowledge 
through  social  research.  Emphasizes  the  prac- 
tical aspects  of  research,  such  as  the  problems 
sociologists  face  in  doing  research  and  how 
they  have  been  solved.  Students  are  required 
to  design  a  small  study. 
SOC  4332  Social  Research  Methods  2:  Tabulating 
and  Analyzing  Social  Data  (3  q.h.) 
Covers  methods  of  tabulating,  presenting, 
summarizing,  and  analyzing  data,  including 
elementary  descriptive  and  inferential 
statistics  and  how  to  use  them.  Emphasizes 
statistics  as  a  tool  and  introduces  the  use  of 
the  computer.  Prereq.  SOC  4331  or  equiv. 
SOC  4333  Social  Research  Methods  3:  Doing  Social 
Research  (3  q.h.) 

Students  carry  out  the  study  they  designed  in 
SOC  4332,  analyze  data,  and  report  results. 
Includes  the  ethics  and  politics  of  social 
research  and  the  interrelationship  of  social  ac- 
tion, social  research,  and  theory  building. 
Prereq.  SOC  4332  or  equiv. 
SOC  4348  Seminar  in  Urban  Studies  (3  q.h.) 
Interdisciplinary  approaches  to  analysis  of 
urban  issues.  Includes  continuing  student  pro- 
jects. Prereq.  one  course  in  an  urban  studies 
field. 
SOC  4375  Sociology  of  Occupations  and  Professions 

(3  q.h.) 

Topics  include  social  relations  within  occupa- 
tional groups;  occupational  structures;  and 
the  institutional  aspects  of  an  occupation. 
Also  discusses  relationships  among  super- 
visors, peers,  colleagues,  subordinates,  and 
clientele  and  their  significance  for  work-role 
behavior. 


riUiUfatfUitiUiittl 


SOC  4376  Sociology  of  Industry  (3  q.h.) 
Comparison  of  pre-industrial  and  industrial 
society,  stressing  the  impact  of  industry  on 
society  and  the  interrelationship  of  industry, 
culture,  and  values.  Also  discusses  diversifica- 
tion, specialization,  human  relations,  and  for- 
mal and  informal  groups. 
SOC  4805  Field  Work  in  Sociology  (6  q.h.) 
Designed  to  enhance  career  development  by 
allowing  students  to  earn  credit  for  the  ap- 
plication of  their  academic  backgrounds  to 
practical  problems  in  the  work  place.  See 
page  16  for  details.  Prereq.  completion  of  15 
q.h.  in  Sociology  and  Program  Director's 
approval. 

SOC  4815  Advanced  Tutorial  1  (3  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  take  an  upper-level  course  in- 
dependently. See  page  16  for  details.  Prereq. 
87  q.h. 

SOC  4816  Advanced  Tutorial  2  (3  q.h.) 
See  SOC  4815. 

SOC  4820  Honors  Program  1  (4  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  undertake  an  in-depth 
research  study  project.  See  page  17  for  details. 
Prereq.  96  q.h.,  3.5  q.p.a. 
SOC  4821  Honors  Program  2  (4  q.h.) 
See  SOC  4820. 

SOC  4822  Honors  Program  3  (4  q.h.) 
See  SOC  4820. 

SOC  4830  Independent  Study  1  (3  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  undertake  special  research. 
See  page  17  for  details.  Prereq.  96  q.h., 
3.0  q.p.a. 

SOC  4831  Independent  Study  2  (3  q.h.) 
See  SOC  4830. 

SOC  4832  Independent  Study  3  (3  q.h.) 
See  SOC  4830. 

SOC  5225  Social  Gerontology  (3  CEUs) 
Same  as  SOC  4225. 

SOC  5226  Work,  Leisure,  and  Aging  (3  CEUs) 
Same  as  SOC  4226. 

SOC  5240  Sociology  of  Human  Service  Organizations 
(3  CEUs) 
Same  as  SOC  4240. 

SPEECH  COMMUNICATION 

SPC  4001  Speaking  Skills  for  International  Students  1 

(3  q.h.) 

Introductory  instruction  in  pronunciation  and 
intelligibility  for  formal  and  informal  situa- 
tions. Monitors  communication  skills  through 
use  of  video  and  audiotape  recordings  and 
work  in  the  language  laboratory.  Following 
diagnostic  testing,  students  participate  in  in- 


dividualized small-  and  large-group  instruc- 
tional situations.  Placement  tests  are  given 
during  the  first  week  of  class. 
SPC  4002  Speaking  Skills  for  International  Students  2 
(3  q.h.) 

Intermediate-level  course  designed  for  persons 
who  have  previously  studied  English,  but  who 
need  to  develop  oral  communication  proficiency. 
Monitors  communication  skills  through  use  of 
video  and  audiotape  recordings  and  work  in 
the  language  laboratory.  Following  diagnostic 
testing,  students  participate  in  individualized 
small-  and  large-group  instructional  situa- 
tions. Placement  tests  are  given  during  the 
first  week  of  class. 

SPC  4003  Speaking  Skills  for  International  Students  3 
(3  q.h.) 

Advanced-level  course  designed  for  students 
who  have  previously  studied  English  and  who 
can  make  themselves  understood  easily,  but 
who  have  difficulty  conversing.  Includes  task- 
oriented  interaction,  a  variety  of  two-person 
communication  situations,  and  small-group 
interactions.  Progress  is  monitored  through 
use  of  video  and  audiotape  recordings.  Place- 
ment tests  are  given  during  the  first  week  of 
class. 

SPC  4101  Fundamentals  of  Human  Communication 
(formerly  Effective  Communication  1)  (3  q.h.) 
Introduction  to  development  of  personal  com- 
munication skills,  shaping  messages,  sending 
messages,  listening,  understanding  nonverbal 
cues,  trusting,  giving  and  receiving  feedback, 
interacting,  and  coping  with  the  barriers  to 
communication. 

SPC  4102  Group  Discussion  (formerly  Effective 
Communication  2)  (3  q.h.) 
Topics  include  small-group  communication, 
elements  of  group  structure,  task  and 
maintenance  functions,  leadership,  and  for- 
malized methods  of  group  problem  solving 
and  decision  making. 
SPC  4104  Effective  Communication  (Intensive)  (6 

q.h.) 

Same  as  SPC  4101  and  SPC  4102. 
SPC  4111  Voice  and  Articulation  (3  q.h.) 
Development  of  the  speaking  voice,  with  em- 
phasis on  articulation,  pitch  control,  and  vocal 
variety  and  flexibility.  Includes  basic  theory 
of  the  vocal  mechanism. 
SPC  4150  Self-Concept  and  Communication  (3  q.h.) 
Examination  of  the  ways  communication  pat- 
terns are  formed  and  how  they  work  in  our 
personal  and  professional  lives.  Emphasizes 


speecn  uommumcation         ^y 


how  self-concept  affects  communication.  By 
combining  thinking,  feeling,  and  doing, 
students  can  develop  awareness  of  their  at- 
titudes and  habits  and  explore  alternative 
communication  patterns. 
SPC  4151  Listening  (3  q.h.) 
Analyzes  listening  effectiveness  in  profes- 
sional and  personal  situations.  Reasons  for 
poor  listening,  techniques  for  effective  listen- 
ing, and  giving  and  receiving  feedback  are 
covered. 

SPC  4152  Interviewing  (3  q.h.) 
Topics  include  fundamental  communication 
principles  and  how  they  apply  to  the  inter- 
view process.  Examines  these  principles  from 
the  perspectives  of  the  interviewer  and  the  in- 
terviewee, helping  students  to  prepare  for 
both  roles.  Gives  special  attention  to  employ- 
ment, information  retrieval,  and  persuasive 
interviews. 

SPC  4153  Techniques  of  Persuasion  (3  q.h.) 
Covers  communication  strategies  used  when 
attempting  to  influence  others.  Examines  in- 
stances of  persuasion  as  they  occur  in  adver- 
tising, politics,  social  interaction,  sales,  and 
business. 

SPC  4154  Negotiation  Skills  (3  q.h.) 
Examination  of  skills  involved  in  bringing 
matters  to  mutually  acceptable  settlements. 
Through  lectures,  discussions,  case  studies, 
and  classroom  activities,  students  explore  con- 
flict resolution  in  both  personal  and  profes- 
sional settings. 

SPC  4155  Organizational  Communication  (3  q.h.) 
An  exploration  of  communication  manage- 
ment within  organizations.  Topics  include  the 
role  of  communication  in  management,  the 
management  and  control  of  information  flow, 
and  strategic  communication  planning. 
SPC  4160  Communication  and  the  Media  (3  q.h.) 
An  overview  of  the  structure,  functions,  and 
history  of  American  mass  media.  Presents  a 
basic  understanding  of  the  process  of  mass 
media  as  it  intersects  society  in  general,  and 
the  lives  of  individuals  in  particular. 
SPC  4201  Argumentation  (3  q.h.) 
Basic  concepts  of  argumentation,  such  as 
evidence,  research,  and  refutation,  with  em- 
phasis on  the  psychology  of  the  audience  and 
the  various  types  of  group  discussions  are 
discussed. 

SPC  4221  Interpersonal  Communications  1  (3  q.h.) 
Examines  ways  of  becoming  more  aware  of 
one's  self  and  one's  relationship  to  others. 
Presents  options  for  communicating  and  for 


increasing  one's  knowledge  of  the  group  pro- 
cess. Limited  enrollment. 
SPC  4222  Interpersonal  Communications  2  (3  q.h.) 
Continuation  of  SPC  4221.  Prereq.  SPC  4221 
or  instructor's  permission. 
SPC  4225  Family  Communication  (3  q.h.) 
Introduction  to  how  communication  affects 
the  development  and  maintenance  of  family 
relationships.  Topics  include  marital, 
parent/child,  sibling,  and  extended  family 
communication  patterns;  problem  identifica- 
tion and  problem-solving  skills  in  family 
communication. 

SPC  4231  Female/Male  Communication  1  (3  q.h.) 
Examines  ways  in  which  female/male  rela- 
tions are  created,  maintained,  developed,  or 
dissolved  through  communication.  Covers  the 
influence  of  family,  friends,  the  media,  and 
"significant  others"  in  sustaining  stereotypes 
for  both  sexes  and  the  impact  of  such 
stereotyping  on  the  self  and  on  effective  com- 
munication. Also  looks  at  the  use  of  verbal 
and  nonverbal  communication  to  understand 
the  types  of  relationships  between  men  and 
women  and  how  different  female/male 
language  styles  affect  these  relations. 
SPC  4232  Female/Male  Communication  2  (3  q.h.) 
Discusses  interaction  and  transactional  ap- 
proaches to  analyzing  existing  relationships. 
Provides  the  opportunity  to  develop  skills  in 
diagnosing  communication  transactions  and 
in  developing  strategies  for  effective  com- 
munication. The  influence  of  supportive  and 
defensive  environments  and  the  communica- 
tion behavior  of  each  are  examined  and  ap- 
plied to  strategies  for  improving  relationships 
between  males  and  females.  Prereq.  SPC  4231 
or  instructor's  permission. 
SPC  4240  Managing  Interpersonal  Conflict  (3  q.h.) 
Basic  concepts  involved  in  the  management  of 
conflict  in  interpersonal  situations,  such  as 
understanding  attitudes  about  conflict,  study- 
ing message  patterns  in  conflict  interactions, 
and  exploring  a  variety  of  conflict  resolution 
methods  are  discussed. 

SPC  4251  Business  and  Professional  Speaking  (3  q.h.) 
Covers  practice  in  the  organization  and 
presentation  of  material  to  fit  varying  au- 
diences. Emphasizes  delivery  techniques  and 
effective  presentation  of  ideas. 
SPC  4260  Communication  Research  Methods  (3  q.h.) 
This  course  provides  an  overview  of  the 
research  process  and  examines  various  types 
of  research  methods  as  they  relate  to  the 
study  of  human  communication. 


uuu 


UK 


iimnnminiri 


TECHNICAL  COMMUNICATIONS 

TCC  4030  Word  Processing:  A  Comprehensive 
Overview  (2  q.h.)  (formerly  Word  Processing  for 
Writers  and  Editors) 

Topics  include  basic,  intermediate,  and  selected 
advanced  functions  of  one  or  more  of  the  most 
widely-used  word  processing  programs,  such 
as  WordStar,  MultiMate,  or  WordPerfect. 
Minimal  typing  skills  are  recommended. 

TCC  4050  WordStar  (2  q.h.) 
Includes  composing  and  writing  on  a  com- 
puter screen  using  WordStar,  the  professional 
text-editing  system  used  by  many  technical 
writers,  editors,  and  other  publishing  profes- 
sionals. Course  provides  interpretation  of  the 
instruction  manual  as  well  as  hands-on  ex- 
perience with  University-supplied  personal 
computers  and  software. 
TCC  4060  MultiMate  (2  q.h.) 
Using  this  powerful,  menu-driven  word  pro- 
cessor with  university-supplied  hardware, 
students  learn  to  create,  format,  and  modify 
various  types  of  documents.  Selected  advanc- 
ed functions  also  covered.  Minimal  typing 
skills  are  recommended. 
TCC  4101  Technical  Writing  1  (3  q.h.) 
Introduction  to  basic  technical  writing  skills, 
emphasizing  selecting  and  organizing  data. 
Includes  audience  analysis,  research  techni- 
ques, and  descriptions  of  objects,  mechanisms, 
and  processes.  Provides  practice  in  descriptive 
writing,  classification  and  definition, 
paragraphing,  and  preparing  technical 
documentation  outlines.  Includes  frequent 
technical  writing  exercises  and  projects  ap- 
plicable to  both  software  and  hardware 
writing  tasks.  A  writing  proficiency  test  is 
given  at  the  first  class  meeting. 
TCC  4102  Technical  Writing  2  (3  q.h.) 
Application  of  the  information  gathering, 
organizational,  and  technical  writing  skills 
acquired  in  TCC  4101  to  more  advanced  pro- 
jects. Extensive  practice  in  formatting, 
organizing,  writing,  and  editing  technical 
reports.  Prereq.  TCC  4101. 
TCC  4103  Technical  Writing  (Intensive)  (6  q.h.) 
Same  as  TCC  4101  and  TCC  4102.  A  writing 
proficiency  test  is  given  at  the  first  class 
meeting. 

TCC  4105  Editing  for  Science  and  Technology  (3  q.h.) 
Covers  fundamentals  of  editing  as  they  apply 
to  scientific,  technical,  and  engineering 
writing.  Examines  the  role  of  the  editor  in 
business,  industry,  and  the  sciences;  basic 
editorial  services  such  as  proofreading,  copy 


and  content  editing,  production  editing,  and 
project  editing;  analysis  and  critique  of 
manuscripts;  work  with  authors;  the  editor  as 
writer  and  interviewer;  and  science  inter- 
pretation and  technical  translation.  Ac- 
celerated work  for  students  already  skilled  in 
spelling  and  grammar.  Prereq.  TCC  4101  or 
instructor's  permission. 

TCC  4110  Technical-Promotional  Writing  (3  q.h.) 
Explores  structure,  style,  and  graphic  presen- 
tation of  technical-promotional  writing  in  a 
high-tech  environment.  Students  are  trained 
to  combine  technical  knowledge  and  writing 
skills  in  developing  quality  technical 
brochures,  articles,  product  catalogs, 
demonstration  kits,  slide  presentations,  and 
video  scripts.  Prereq.  TCC  4101,  TCC  4102,  or 
instructor's  permission. 

TCC  4301  Computer  Software  Technical  Writing  1  (3  q.h.) 
Introduction  to  the  tasks  and  problems  uni- 
que to  software  technical  writing.  Includes 
review  of  fundamental  software  concepts,  the 
role  and  importance  of  software  documenta- 
tion, component  parts  of  software  technical 
manuals  and  their  purposes,  tutorial  and 
reference  functions  of  manuals,  research  tools 
for  manual  writing,  and  the  writing  process 
itself.  Prereq.  TCC  4101  and  MIS  4102  or  in- 
structor's permission. 

TCC  4302  Computer  Software  Technical  Writing  2 
(3  q.h.) 

Continuation  of  TCC  4301.  Prereq.  TCC  4301. 
TCC  4303  Seminar  in  Software  Technical  Writing  (3  q.h.) 
An  advanced  case-study  seminar  on  contem- 
porary problems  in  technical  writing  for  the 
working  or  prospective  writing  professional. 
Emphasizes  integrating  the  viewpoint  of  the 
software  developer  with  the  task-oriented 
needs  of  the  end  user.  Includes  system 
manual  design;  computer  design;  modularity; 
and  system  evolution.  Prereq.  TCC  4302  or 
instructor's  permission. 
TCC  4311  Instruction  Manual  Writing  1  (formerly 
Hardware  Technical  Manual  Writing  1) 
(3  q.h.) 

Introduction  to  the  fundamentals  of  technical 
manual  writing,  including  the  theory  and 
practice  of  manual  design,  organization,  and 
content.  Covers  copyright  law,  product  liabili- 
ty, graphic  design,  readability,  manual 
specifications  and  standards,  illustrations,  and 
reproduction  techniques.  Emphasizes  hard- 
ware operations  manuals.  Includes  individual 
and  class  design  and  writing  projects.  Prereq. 
TCC  4101  and  TCC  4102. 


iransportation         241 


TCC  4312  Instruction  Manual  Writing  2  (formerly 
Hardware  Technical  Manual  Writing  2) 
(3  q.h.) 

Application  of  skills  acquired  in  TCC  4311  to 
an  entry-level  technical  manual  writing  pro- 
ject. Students  elect  individual  or  group 
writing  and  production  projects  for  high- 
technology  equipment  or  systems  lacking  ade- 
quate documentation.  Includes  instruction  in 
writing  safe,  legible  operating  instructions 
and  descriptions  of  installation  procedures, 
principles  of  operation,  and  maintenance.  Also 
covers  manual  changes  and  updates.  Prereq. 
TCC  4311  or  instructor's  permission. 
TCC  4313  Instruction  Manual  Writing  Intensive  (6  q.h.) 
Same  at  TCC  4311  and  TCC  4312.  Prereq. 
TCC  4101  and  TCC  4102. 
TCC  4320  Proposal  Writing  (3  q.h.) 
Background  in  the  preparation  of  proposals, 
including  how  to  analyze  a  request  for  pro- 
posal or  bid  set.  Introduces  the  various  types 
of  proposals  generated  by  industry  and  pro- 
vides an  opportunity  to  prepare  a  proposal  in 
a  simulated  situation,  through  role  playing 
and  participation  on  a  proposal  preparation 
team.  Includes  considerable  analysis  and 
writing  practice.  Prereq.  TCC  4102  or  instruc- 
tor's permission. 

TCC  4330  The  Business  and  Technical  Presentation 
(3  q.h.) 

Application  of  the  principles  of  technical  com- 
munication to  audiovisual  presentations.  In- 
cludes audience  analysis,  techniques  of 
organization,  script  preparation,  media  selec- 
tion, the  design  and  production  of  visuals,  the 
influence  of  physical  factors  on  communica- 
tion, and  the  elements  of  effective  delivery. 
Participants  prepare  and  deliver  presenta- 
tions and  receive  video  playback  and  peer 
critiques. 

TCC  4340  Technical  Writing  Portfolio  Development 
(3  q.h.) 

Covers  techniques  and  methods  of  developing 
a  professional  portfolio  of  published  technical 
writing  projects.  The  organizational  and  com- 
munications skills  acquired  in  lower-level 
technical  writing  courses  are  brought  together 
and  applied  to  "real-world"  technical  writing 
problems.  Prereq.  TCC  4302  or  instructor's 
permission. 

TCC  4350  Concepts  of  Modern  Technology  1  (3  q.h.) 
Surveys  applications  of  physical  science  to 
mechanical  devices  and  introduces  the  laws  of 
thermodynamics.  Considers  the  influence  of 
material  properties  on  design  and  manufac- 


turing techniques.  Prereq.  MTH  4006  or 
equiv. 

TCC  4351  Concepts  of  Modern  Technology  2  (3  q.h.) 

Surveys  applications  of  physical  science  to 
electrical  and  electronic  devices  and  in- 
troduces electronic  circuit  design.  Includes  a 
comparison  of  various  devices  used  for 
amplification  and  control,  and  a  study  of  the 
development  of  the  electronic  digital  computer 
and  the  components  involved  in  the  manufac- 
ture of  computers.  Prereq.  TCC  4350. 
TCC  4802  Independent  Study  1  (3  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  take  upper-level  course  in- 
dependently. Prereq.  87  q.h.  See  page  17. 
TCC  4803  Independent  Study  2  (3  q.h.) 
See  TCC  4802.  Prereq.  TCC  4802. 
TCC  4805  Field  Work  in  Technical  Communications 
(6  q.h.) 

Designed  to  enhance  career  development  by 
allowing  students  to  earn  credit  for  the  ap- 
plication of  their  academic  backgrounds  to 
practical  problems  in  the  work  place.  See 
page  16  for  details.  Prereq.  completion  of  18 
q.h.  in  Technical  Communications  and  Pro- 
gram Director's  approval. 

TRANSPORTATION 

TRN  4301  Elements  of  Transportation  1  (3  q.h.) 
Introduction  to  regulatory,  economic,  and 
management  aspects  of  transportation.  Covers 
concerns  of  shipping  industry,  government, 
and  carriers.  Includes  history  of  cost,  rate- 
making,  operations,  entry,  mergers,  and  inter- 
city passenger  and  cargo  carriage.  Essential 
to  students  in  business,  law,  or  government. 
TRN  4302  Physical  Distribution  Management  1  (3  q.h.) 
Introduction  to  the  physical  distribution 
management  concept.  Studies  time  and  place 
utility  of  manufactured  products.  Includes 
customer  service  and  profitability  require- 
ments: getting  merchandise  to  the  customer 
at  the  right  time,  place,  and  in  the  right  con- 
dition. Covers  transportation  alternatives,  in- 
ventory control,  warehousing,  cost  control, 
and  location  strategy.  Contemporary  texts 
and  case  methods  are  used. 
TRN  4303  Elements  of  Transportation  2  (3  q.h.) 
Continuation  of  TRN  4301.  Examines  new 
thrust  of  lower  costs,  including  contracting 
and  negotiating  for  carrier  service  that  has 
resulted  from  deregulation.  Prereq.  TRN  4301. 
TRN  4304  Physical  Distribution  Management  2  (3  q.h.) 
Continuation  of  TRN  4303.  Analytical  skills 
developed  through  presentation  of  problems 
and  cases.  Prereq.  TRN  4302. 


^jMAfetiWU 


TRN  4305  Traffic  Management  1:  Rates  and  Tariffs  (3  q.h.) 
Includes  the  interpretation  and  use  of  tariffs. 
Examines  classifications,  rate  scales,  tariff 
rules,  rate-making  procedures,  and  ICC  law 
and  practice.  Prereq.  TRN  4301. 
TRN  4306  Traffic  Management  2--SeIected  Topics  (3  q.h.) 
Further  study  of  traffic  management,  cover 
ing  such  topics  as  routing,  claims,  insurance, 
consolidation,  and  packaging.  Prereq.  TRN  4305. 
TRN  4316  Carrier  Management  (3  q.h.) 
Explores  the  transportation  system  from  the 
carrier  viewpoint.  Covers  managerial 
response  to  a  heavily  regulated  and  rapidly 
expanding  environment.  Includes  carrier 
decision-making  involving  routes,  scheduling, 
financing,  and  pricing  of  services. 
TRN  4321  Transportation  Negotiations  (3  q.h.) 
Principle  elements  of  transportation  regula- 
tion, public  policy,  and  the  role  of  federal  and 
state  regulatory  agencies  are  covered.  In- 
cludes types  of  commerce,  carriers,  and  ser- 
vices subject  to  changing  regulation,  entry 
and  exit  requirements,  economic  and  cost  con- 
siderations, and  selective  rate  and  tariff  con- 
struction rules.  Examines  industry  practices 
covering  performance,  requirements, 
liabilities,  and  responsibilities  of  shippers, 
regulated  carriers,  and  exempt  forms  of 
transportation.  Discusses  rules  and  pro- , 
cedures  established  by  the  ICC  and 
Massachusetts  DPU.  Prereq.  TRN  4301. 
TRN  4325  Management  of  Warehouse  Operations  (3  q.h.) 
Management  of  warehouses  is  analyzed.  In- 
cludes site  selection,  construction,  finance, 
operations,  measurement  of  performance,  and 
warehouse  technology. 
TRN  4334  Private  Trucking  (3  q.h.) 
The  formation  of  a  private  trucking  operation 
from  a  management  focus  is  explored.  In- 
cludes legal  guidelines,  purchase  versus  lease, 
operations,  and  performance  measurement. 
TRN  4340  Air  Transportation  (3  q.h.) 
Topics  include  economics  and  regulation  of  air 
carriage  certified  by  the  Civil  Aeronautics 
Board.  Includes  entry,  operations,  pricing, 
mergers,  cost  analysis,  and  financing. 
TRN  4341  Commuter  Transportation  (3  q.h.) 
The  scope  and  status  of  transportation  in  the 
metropolitan  area  is  examined.  Includes  plan- 


ning and  financing  urban  transportation 
systems,  the  role  of  local,  state,  and  federal 
government  units,  and  the  problems  of  transit 
management. 

TRN  4342  Transportation  Loss,  Damage,  and  Other 

Claims  (3  q.h.) 

Covers  rules,  regulations,  and  other  pertinent 

elements  of  transportation  claims  resulting 

from  the  loss  or  damage  of  cargo,  overcharges 

and  undercharges,  and  related  carrier  and 

shipper  activities. 

TRN  4350  International  Transportation  and 

Distribution  Management 

(3  q.h.) 

Examines  the  safe  and  efficient  overseas 

transportation  of  products  by  air  or  water. 

Covers  major  indirect  supporting  business 

and  agencies  involved  in  the  international 

movement  of  people  and  goods. 

TRN  4600  Honors  Program  1  (4  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  undertake  an  in-depth 
research  study  project.  See  page  17  for  details. 
Prereq.  96  q.h.,  3.5  q.p.a. 

TRN  4601  Honors  Program  2  (4  q.h.) 
See  TRN  4600. 

TRN  4602  Honors  Program  3  (4  q.h.) 
See  TRN  4600. 

TRN  4701  Independent  Study  1  (3  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  undertake  special  research. 
See  page  17  for  details.  Prereq.  96  q.h., 
3.0  q.p.a. 

TRN  4702  Independent  Study  2  (3  q.h.) 
See  TRN  4701. 

TRN  4703  Independent  Study  3  (3  q.h.) 
See  TRN  4701. 

TRN  4800  Advanced  Tutorial  1  (3  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  take  upper-level  course  in- 
dependently. See  page  16  for  details.  Prereq. 
87  q.h. 

TRN  4801  Advanced  Tutorial  1  (3  q.h.) 
See  TRN  4800. 
TRN  4900  Fieldwork  (6  q.h.) 
Opportunity  to  enhance  career  development 
by  applying  academic  background  to  practical 
problems  in  the  workplace.  See  page  16  for 
details.  Prereq.  Approval  of  Program  Director. 


General  Information 


ucneidi  iiiiuMiimiuii 


Tuition  and  Fees 


Tuition 

Tuition  for  all  credit  courses  is  $106  per 
quarter  hour  of  credit.  Checks  and  drafts  for 
all  charges  are  to  be  made  to  the  order  of 
Northeastern  University.  Charges  for 
registration  and  tuition  for  special  courses  are 
at  the  rate  specified  for  each  course,  with  the 
exception  of  drama  and  nontutorial  courses. 
There  is  no  reduction  in  fees  for  auditing 
courses. 

Noncredit  courses  are  charged  at  quarter- 
hour  rates  comparable  to  those  of  credit 
courses  meeting  on  an  equivalent  contact- 
hour  schedule. 

Students  are  not  permitted  to  attend  class 
sessions  or  take  any  examination  or  test  until 
they  have  paid  their  tuition  fees  or  have 
made  satisfactory  arrangements  for  payment. 

It  is  the  student's  responsibility  to  ensure 
that  all  tuition  charges  and  fees  are  paid 
when  due.  If  a  bill  has  not  been  received  prior 
to  the  start  of  classes  each  quarter,  the  stu- 
dent should  come  in  person  to  the  Bursar's 
Office,  where  a  bill  will  be  processed. 

Any  discrepancies  in  billing  should  be  im- 
mediately brought  to  the  attention  of  the  Bur- 
sar's Office.  If  there  is  a  billing  problem,  the 
undisputed  portion  of  the  bill  should  be  paid 
on  time  to  avoid  any  additional  late  fees. 
Failure  to  receive  a  bill  through  the  mail  or  to 
pay  the  undisputed  portion  of  the  bill  is  not 
justification  for  late  payment  of  amounts  ac- 
tually owed. 

Students  will  not  be  advanced  in  class  stand- 
ing or  permitted  to  re-enroll  in  the  University  nor 
will  degrees  be  conferred  until  all  financial  obliga- 
tions to  the  University  have  been  met. 

Tuition  for  Courses  in  Other  Northeastern 
Departments  or  Colleges 

University  College  students  assigned  to 
courses  in  other  departments  or  colleges  of 
the  University  are  charged  the  tuition  fees 
effective  in  the  departments  or  colleges  in 
which  they  are  enrolled. 

Initial  Registration  Fee 

A  nonrefundable  $10  registration  fee  for  first- 
time  University  College  students  is  billed 
with  tuition  fees. 


Tuition  Budget  Payment  Plans 

Occasionally  situations  develop-usually 
beyond  the  control  of  the  student-that  make 
it  difficult  to  meet  the  payments  in  the  man- 
ner outlined  above.  Under  such  circumstances, 
the  student  is  advised  to  contact  the  Bursar's 
Office  to  arrange  for  deferred  payment.  The 
only  deferred  payment  plan  offered  is  as 
follows  and  applies  only  to  the  amount  owed 
for  the  current  quarter: 

First  payment       1/3  due  first  week  of  quarter 
Second  payment    1/3  due  approx.  fourth  week 

of  quarter 
Balance  1/3  due  approx.  eighth  week 

of  quarter 

Such  arrangements  should  be  made  before 
the  end  of  the  first  week  of  the  quarter  or 
within  one  week  of  the  date  of  registration  if 
the  student  enters  late.  Deferred  payment  of 
tuition  entails  a  fee  of  $10,  which  is  levied  on 
all  accounts  not  paid  by  the  end  of  the  second 
week  of  classes.  Failure  to  take  immediate 
action  will  result  in  a  late  payment  fee  of  $50. 

Tuition  Underwritten  by  Employers 

An  increasing  number  of  companies  are 
underwriting  part  or  all  of  the  cost  of  tuition 
for  students  in  their  employ.  In  cases  where 
payment  is  to  be  made  directly  by  the 
employer  to  the  University,  the  student 
should  furnish  the  Bursar's  Office  with  a  pur- 
chase order  covering  registration  or  a  state- 
ment from  an  officer  of  the  company  certify- 
ing that  the  company  is  underwriting  the  tui- 
tion. In  cases  where  students  are  being  reim- 
bursed by  their  employer,  tuition  must  be 
paid  by  the  student  according  to  the  prescrib- 
ed regulations  to  avoid  late  payment  charges. 

Veterans'  Benefits 

Any  veteran  covered  by  Public  Law  89-358 
should  report  to  126  Hayden  Hall  to  fill  out 
the  proper  enrollment  forms. 

Late  Payment  Fee 

Bills  for  tuition  and  fees  are  payable  in  accor- 
dance with  the  due  date  shown.  A  late  pay- 
ment fee  of  $50  is  charged  for  failure  to  make 
payments  in  accordance  with  the  prescribed 
regulations. 


General  Information         245 


Refund  of  Tuition 

The  general  policy  in  all  schools  and  colleges 
of  the  University  with  respect  to  refunds  of 
tuition  is  as  follows:  The  University  provides 
all  instruction  on  an  academic-quarter  basis, 
for  which  students  pay  at  the  beginning  of 
each  quarter.  Tuition  refunds  are  granted 
through  the  first  four  weeks  of  a  quarter  only 
when  specific  conditions  are  met  and  are 
granted  only  on  the  basis  of  the  date  appear- 
ing on  the  official  withdrawal  application 
when  filed  with  the  Registrar  in  120  Hayden 
Hall.  Nonattendance  does  not  constitute 
official  withdrawal.  Questions  regarding 
refunds  should  be  discussed  with  the  Bursar. 
Refunds  are  granted  in  accordance  with  the 
following  schedule: 

Official  withdrawal  Percentage  of 

filed  within  tuition  credited 

First  week  of  quarter  100% 

Second  week  of  quarter  75% 

Third  week  of  quarter  50% 

Fourth  week  of  quarter  25% 


Fees 

New  Low  Rate  for  Friday  and  Saturday 
Intensives 

University  College  offers  a  selection  of  six- 
quarter-hour  courses  at  the  Boston  and  Burl- 
ington campuses  on  Friday  evenings  and 
Saturdays  at  a  special  reduced  tuition  rate  of 
$536  ($100  less  than  the  normal  tuition). 
Check  the  current  Schedule  Guide  for  a  list  of 
these  courses. 

Student  Center  Fee 

All  students  in  University  College  on  the 
Huntington  Avenue  campus  are  charged  $.75 
each  quarter  for  the  services  available  in  the 
Student  Center. 


Laboratory  Fees 

Students  enrolled  in  courses  that  carry  a 
laboratory  fee  must  purchase  a  Laboratory 
Fee  and  Deposit  Card  from  the  Cashier's 
Office  ($15  for  extra  cards). 

A  fee  of  $45  is  charged  for  biology  courses 
and  for  those  health  professions  courses  that 
include  a  laboratory.  For  chemistry  courses, 
cards  cost  $60  per  quarter  with  the  possibility 
of  a  $5  refund  at  the  end  of  the  quarter, 
depending  on  breakage.  Upon  completion  of 
the  course  or  withdrawal  during  the  quarter, 
the  student  must  check  his  or  her  status  with 
the  laboratory  attendant.  The  Cashier's  Office 
will  then  refund  any  unused  balance  shown 
on  the  card. 

A  laboratory  fee  of  $40  is  also  charged  for 
film  and  photography  courses,  for  some  art 
studio  courses,  for  arts  and  crafts  courses,  and 
for  criminal  justice  and  security  students  who 
enroll  in  a  forensic  laboratory.  A  $40  fee  is 
charged  for  the  food  preparation  course  in  the 
hotel  and  restaurant  management  program. 

Music  students  enrolled  in  a  music  tutorial 
pay  a  special  rate.  For  details  contact  Charles 
Mokotoff,  University  College  Music  Coor- 
dinator, 351  Ruggles  Building,  telephone 
617-437-2440  or  617-437-2442. 

Missed  Final  Examination  Fee 

Students  absent  from  the  regularly  scheduled 
final  examination  at  the  end  of  a  course  may 
petition  for  a  missed  final  examination.  The 
fee  for  each  examination  requested  by  the  stu- 
dent is  $50.  The  fee  must  be  paid  when  the 
petition  is  filed  in  the  Office  of  Academic  and 
Student  Affairs. 

Transcripts 

Students  may  request  official  transcripts  of 
their  grades  at  the  Registrar's  Office.  There  is 
a  charge  of  $2  per  copy,  payable  in  advance. 
Unofficial  transcripts  are  issued  free  of 
charge. 


ueneidi   iiiiuiiiidiiuii 


Financial  Aid 


The  Office  of  Financial  Aid,  located  in  254 
Richards  Hall,  offers  several  types  of 
assistance  to  part-time  students.  All  awards 
are  based  on  financial  need.  Aid  granted  from 
programs  sponsored  by  the  federal  or  state 
government  is  dependent  upon  the  amount  of 
funding  allocated  to  Northeastern  University. 
The  University  does  not  award  financial 
assistance  in  any  form  to  students  who  are 
not  citizens  or  permanent  residents  of  the 
United  States.  All  part-time  students  who 
wish  to  apply  for  financial  aid  and  who  have 
not  declared  a  major  (been  admitted  to  a  pro- 
gram) must  complete  an  application,  available 
at  the  University  College  Office  of  Academic 
and  Student  Affairs,  180  Ruggles  Building. 

Satisfactory  Academic  Progress  for 
Financial  Aid  Recipients 

Recipients  of  financial  aid  are  required  to 
make  satisfactory  academic  progress  in  order 
to  continue  their  eligibility  for  aid.  University 
College  defines  "satisfactory  academic  pro- 
gress" as 

•  a  minimum  course  load  of  six  credit  hours 
per  quarter  (requirements  vary  for  the 
Massachusetts  Part-time  Grant  Program, 
the  Massachusetts  State  Scholarship,  and 
the  Adult  Learners  Program);  and 

•  a  minimum  average  of  C,  or  2.0,  in  these 
courses. 

If,  at  the  end  of  any  given  academic  year,  a 
student  receiving  financial  aid  has  failed  to 
make  satisfactory  academic  progress  toward 
his  or  her  degree,  the  Office  of  Financial  Aid 
will  be  notified  by  University  College. 

Pell  Grant 

The  Pell  Grant  Program  is  a  federal  aid 
program  designed  to  provide  financial  assistance 
to  degree  candidates  who  need  it  to  attend 
post-high  school  educational  institutions.  To 
be  considered  for  a  Pell  Grant  you  must 

•  be  enrolled  in  a  degree  or  certificate  pro- 
gram that  is  at  least  six  months  in  length; 

•  be  taking  at  least  six  credit  hours  per 
quarter; 

•  be  a  U.S.  citizen  or  eligible  noncitizen;  and 
be  achieving  satisfactory  academic  progress; 

•  have  not  already  received  a  bachelor's 
degree. 


To  apply  for  a  Pell  Grant,  you  must  submit 
either  a  Financial  Aid  Form  (FAF)  or  an 
Application  for  Federal  Student  Aid  to  the 
proper  agencies;  forms  are  available  in  the 
Office  of  Financial  Aid. 

In  order  to  receive  a  Pell  Grant,  you  must 
submit  to  the  Office  of  Financial  Aid,  a  valid 
Student  Aid  Report  (SAR)  and  a  Northeastern 
University  Aid  Application  (available  in  the 
Office  of  Financial  Aid).  The  amount  of  your 
Pell  Grant  will  be  determined  by  the 
following: 

Quarter  Hours  Taken  Funding 

0-5  quarter  hours  No  funding 

6-8  quarter  hours  Half-time  award 

9-11  quarter  hours  Three-quarter  time 

award 
12  or  more  quarter  hours  Full-time  award 

Pell  Grant  recipients  should  direct  all  ques- 
tions to  the  Pell  Grant  section  of  the  Office  of 
Financial  Aid,  275  Richards  Hall,  telephone 
617-437-3804. 


Massachusetts  Part-Time  Student 
Grant  Program 

The  Massachusetts  State  Legislature  has 
established  a  grant  program  for  part-time 
students.  These  funds,  earmarked  for 
Massachusetts  part-time  students  only,  pro- 
vide a  maximum  grant  of  $1,000  per  year. 

To  be  eligible,  the  student  must  be  a  perma- 
nent legal  resident  of  Massachusetts  for  at 
least  one  year  prior  to  the  opening  of  the 
academic  year,  and  be  a  U.S.  citizen  or  eligi- 
ble noncitizen.  He  or  she  must  also  be  enroll- 
ed in  at  least  3  but  fewer  than  12  quarter 
hours  per  academic  term. 

Students  who  are  not  enrolled  in  a  degree 
or  a  certificate  program  or  who  already  have 
a  bachelor's  degree  are  eligible  for  not  more 
than  15  quarter  hours  of  aid.  In  all  cases  the 
amount  of  the  award  will  not  exceed  the  cost 
of  tuition,  books,  and  fees. 

Awards  will  be  based  on  financial  need 
demonstrated  through  the  Financial  Aid 
Form  (FAF)  and  the  Northeastern  University 
Aid  Application.  The  FAF  must  be  mailed  to 
Princeton,  New  Jersey  for  processing:  The 
completed  Northeastern  University  Aid 
Application  must  be  returned  to  the  Office  of 
Financial  Aid. 

Applications  are  available  in  the  Office  of 
Financial  Aid,  254  Richards  Hall. 


benerai  information         247 


Massachusetts  State  Scholarship 

Massachusetts  residents  enrolled  as  full-time 
students  (i.e.,  those  taking  12  credit  hours  per 
quarter  for  fall,  winter,  and  spring)  may  be 
eligible  for  a  Massachusetts  State  Scholar- 
ship. To  apply,  students  must  submit  the 
Massachusetts  version  of  the  Financial  Aid 
Form  (MFAF).  The  priority  date  for  submit- 
ting the  MFAF  is  May  1.  Massachusetts  State 
Scholarships  are  awarded  based  on  need  as 
determined  by  the  Massachusetts  Financial 
Aid  Form  (MFAF). 

Adult  Learners  Program 

The  Massachusetts  Board  of  Regents  of 
Higher  Education  has  established  the 
Massachusetts  Adult  Learners  Program  as  a 
need-based,  state-funded,  financial  aid  pro- 
gram designed  primarily  to  assist  Aid  for 
Dependent  Children  (AFDC)  recipients  in  ob- 
taining a  college  education.  The  amount  of 
each  award  varies  depending  on  the  appli- 
cant's demonstrated  need.  The  maximum 
award  is  the  same  as  the  Massachusetts  State 
Scholarship. 

To  be  considered  for  the  program,  students 
must  follow  the  same  application  procedures 
as  outlined  under  the  Massachusetts  Part- 
Time  Grant  Program.  The  same  Massachusetts 
residency  requirements  apply.  Applicants 
may  be  eligible  as  a  full  or  part-time 
undergraduate  student  (enrollment  in  at  least 
one  three  quarter-hour  course).  Awards  are 
made  only  to  current  AFDC  recipients. 

Stafford  Student  Loan  Program 

The  Stafford  Student  Loan  Program  (formerly 
the  Guaranteed  Student  Loan  Program) 
enables  a  student  to  borrow  a  maximum  of 
$2,625  per  academic  year  during  the 
freshman  and  sophomore  years  (first  and 
second  grade  levels)  and  up  to  $4000  per 
academic  year  for  subsequent  grade  levels 
directly  from  a  participating  lender  in  the 
student's  home  community.  The  loan  is 
guaranteed  by  a  state  or  private  nonprofit 
agency  and  is  insured  by  the  federal  govern- 
ment. The  interest  on  the  loan  is  paid  by  the 
federal  government  while  the  student  is  in 
school  and  is  subsidized  during  repayment 
after  the  student  has  left  school.  This  loan 
must  be  repaid. 

Students  may  be  eligible  for  a  loan  if  they 
are  enrolled  or  have  been  accepted  for  enroll- 
ment on  at  least  a  half-time  basis  in  a  degree 


or  certificate  granting  program,  are  citizens 
or  permanent  residents  of  the  United  States, 
and  can  show  financial  need  in  accordance 
with  the  federal  guidelines.  The  actual 
amount  a  student  may  be  allowed  to  borrow 
will  be  dependent  upon  a  review  of  the  stu- 
dent's financial  situation  and  the  cost  of  the 
student's  academic  program. 

The  legal  maximum  loan  that  can  be  bor- 
rowed through  the  Stafford  Student  Loan 
Program  for  an  entire  undergraduate 
program  is  $17,250. 

In  order  to  have  a  Stafford  Student  Loan 
application  processed  by  the  Northeastern 
University  student  loan  office,  part-time 
undergraduate  students  must  have  a  North- 
eastern Part-Time  Aid  Application  on  file 
with  the  Office  of  Financial  Aid  and  have 
submitted  a  Financial  Aid  Form  to  the  Col- 
lege Scholarship  Service  prior  to  submitting 
the  loan  application  for  processing. 

Repayment  of  a  Stafford  Student  Loan 
usually  begins  six  months  after  a  student 
withdraws  or  graduates  from  an  educational 
institution  or  ceases  to  carry  at  least  a  half-  . 
time  course  load.  The  repayment  period  may 
be  as  long  as  ten  years.  The  amount  of  the 
payments  depends  upon  the  size  of  the  debt, 
but  must  be  at  least  $50  per  month.  During 
the  first  four  years  of  repayment  the  loan 
carries  a  simple  interest  rate  of  8  percent  per 
year  and  10  percent  thereafter. 

Note:  For  students  who  have  outstanding 
loans  at  7  percent  or  9  percent,  the  interest 
rate  on  subsequent  loans  will  continue  at  the 
same  rate. 

Repayment  on  loans  may  be  deferred  under 
certain  circumstances.  For  details  contact 
your  lender. 

Students  who  borrow  funds  through  this 
program  must  report  any  of  the  following 
changes  to  their  lenders: 

•  withdrawl  from  school 

•  transfer  to  another  school 

•  reduction  of  course  load  to  less  than  half 
time 

•  change  of  address  or  parents'  address 

•  change  of  name. 

Additional  information  about  financial  aid 
is  available  from  the  Office  of  Financial  Aid, 
254  Richards  Hall,  617-437-3190. 

All  federal  financial  aid  programs  are 
subject  to  change  depending  on  adequate 
and  continuing  federal  support. 


Z4o  uenerai  imormauun 


Scholarships 


The  following  University  College  and  School 
of  Engineering  Technology  scholarships  and 
awards  are  available  to  students  who  have 
been  accepted  as  degree  candidates  and  are  in 
good  academic  standing. 

Scholarships  are  awarded  once  a  year  by 
the  Scholarship  Committee.  Final  selection  of 
scholarship  recipients  is  usually  made  in  late 
May,  followed  by  the  awarding  of  the  scholar- 
ships in  late  June  or  early  July.  Funds  are 
usually  applied  to  tuition  expenses  for  the 
following  academic  year.  Awards  range  in 
amount  from  $250  to  $700. 

Application  Procedure 

In  January,  a  mailing  list  of  students  who 
have  requested  applications  is  prepared  and 
applications  are  mailed  out  with  the  stipula- 
tion that  they  be  completed  and  returned  to 
the  Office  of  the  Dean  by  March  31.  A  stu- 
dent can  be  placed  on  the  January  mailing 
list  by  calling  617437-2400  and  leaving  his  or 
her  name,  address,  and  student  ID  number 
with  the  receptionist. 

Dean  Kenneth  W.  Ballou  Family 
Scholarship  Fund 

The  Dean  Kenneth  W.  Ballou  Family 
Scholarship  Fund  was  established  in  1986  by 
the  generosity  of  the  Kenneth  W.  Ballou 
family.  Dean  Ballou  served  Northeastern 
University  in  various  capacities  from  1957  to 
1978,  including  as  Director  of  Undergraduate 
Admissions,  Dean  of  University  Relations, 
Assistant  to  the  President,  Dean  of  Adult 
Education  Programs,  and  dean  of  University 
College.  This  scholarship  is  awarded  annually 
to  a  University  College  student(s)  who 
demonstrates  financial  need,  academic  pro- 
mise, and  leadership  potential. 

James  A.  Buczel  Memorial  Scholarship 
University  College 

This  scholarship  was  established  in  1988  in 
memory  of  James  A.  Buczel,  who  received  his 
Associate  in  Science  degree  in  1978.  The  en- 
dowment funds  were  provided  by  the  family, 
friends,  and  associates  of  Mr.  Buczel  who  was 
a  member  of  the  U.S.  Customs  Service  of  the 
Department  of  the  Treasury.  He  lost  his  life 
in  the  line  of  duty  while  inspecting  cargoes  on 


Sunday,  October  9,  1988  in  New  Haven, 
Connecticut.  The  income  from  this  memorial 
scholarship  fund  is  to  be  awarded  to 
undergraduate  students  in  University  College 
who  are  majoring  in  Law  Enforcement  and 
demonstrate  financial  need,  academic  pro- 
mise, and  soundness  of  character. 

Dorothy  G.  Cooley  Scholarship 

This  scholarship  was  established  in  1988  by 
Dorothy  G.  Cooley,  a  1960  graduate  of  the 
evening  division  of  The  School  of  Business, 
now  University  College.  The  income  from  this 
fund  is  to  be  awarded  to  responsible  women 
students  who  are  candidates  for  a  bachelor's 
degree  and  who  have  demonstrated  soundness 
of  character  and  who  have  above  average 
scholastic  ability. 

Henry  J.  Doherty  Memorial  Scholarship 

The  Henry  J.  Doherty  Memorial  Scholarship 
Fund  was  established  in  1987  through  the 
generosity  of  Doris  R.  Doherty,  as  a  tribute  to 
her  late  husband,  a  1953  graduate  of  the 
Evening  School  of  Business  and  a  successful 
business  leader  in  the  field  of  legal 
publishing.  The  income  from  the  scholarship 
is  awarded  annually  to  deserving  students 
with  demonstrated  financial  need  who  are 
pursuing  part-time  evening  study  and  have 
been  accepted  as  degree  candidates. 

Electronics  Industries  Personnel 
Association  Scholarship 

This  scholarship  was  established  in  1980 
through  the  generosity  of  the  Electronics  In- 
dustries Personnel  Association.  The  income  is 
awarded  annually  to  one  or  more  students 
whose  studies,  to  a  significant  extent,  are  in 
the  field  of  human  resources  management  at 
University  College.  Recipients  shall 
demonstrate  financial  need,  soundness  of 
character,  and  academic  stability. 

Vincent  A.  Forte  Memorial  Scholarship 

This  scholarship  was  established  in  1985  in 
memory  of  Vincent  A.  Forte,  a  graduate  of 
Northeastern  University.  The  endowment 
funds  were  provided  through  the  generosity  of 
his  family,  friends,  and  associates.  Forte  was 
an  ambitious  student  pursuing  a  full-time 
business  career  while  attending  school  part- 
time.  He  received  an  associate's  degree  from 
Lincoln  Institute  in  1957,  a  Bachelor  of 


uenerai  imormauon 


Business  Administration  degree  in  1958,  and 
a  Master  of  Business  Administration  degree 
in  1967.  The  income  from  this  fund  is  award- 
ed to  undergraduate  students  in  University 
College  who  are  pursuing  a  bachelor's  degree 
in  business,  who  demonstrate  financial  need, 
and  who  are  maintaining  a  cumulative 
quality-point  average  of  3.0  or  better  after 
completing  at  least  44  quarter  hours  of  credit. 

Kappa  Tau  Phi  Scholarships 

The  Kappa  Tau  Phi  Sorority  Scholarship 
Fund  annually  makes  scholarship  awards 
available  to  women  students  in  the  science, 
business,  engineering,  and  liberal  arts  pro- 
grams who  rank  highest  at  the  end  of  the 
upper-middle  year.  In  the  event  that  the 
chosen  student  is  eligible  for  an  award  of 
greater  monetary  value,  the  award  is  made  to 
the  next  highest-ranking  woman  student.  To 
be  eligible  for  this  scholarship,  the  student 
must  be  enrolled  in  a  course  meeting  at  least 
two  evenings  per  week  and  must  be  a  can- 
didate for  a  bachelor's  degree.  In  determining 
the  recipient,  grades  of  all  courses  completed 
in  prior  years  are  considered. 

Martin  Luther  King,  Jr.  Scholarships 

This  scholarship  fund  was  established  in  1969 
in  memory  of  the  late  Reverend  Martin 
Luther  King,  Jr.  Awards  are  made,  as  open- 
ings occur,  to  a  limited  number  of  adults  from 
minority  groups  who  would  otherwise  be 
unable  to  continue  their  education.  Stipends 
can  cover  tuition  expenses  not  to  exceed  six 
quarter  hours  in  any  academic  quarter 
(excluding  summer  quarter).  Northeastern 
University's  Office  of  Financial  Aid,  located 
in  254  Richards  Hall,  administers  these 
scholarships. 

Alan  A.  and  Shirley  A.  Mackey 
Scholarship  Fund 

The  Alan  A.  and  Shirley  A.  Mackey  Scholar- 
ship Fund  was  established  in  1987  upon  the 
retirement  of  Alan  A.  Mackey  from  North- 
eastern University.  Dean  Mackey  served 
Northeastern  University  in  many  capacities: 
as  Dean  of  Administration,  University 
Registrar,  Dean  of  Continuing  Education,  and 
as  a  member  of  the  mathematics  faculty  of 
University  College.  The  scholarship  fund  pro- 
vides annual  scholarship  awards  to  deserving 
University  College  students. 


Timothy  F.  Moran  Scholarship  Fund 

This  scholarship  fund  was  established  upon 
the  retirement  of  Dean  Timothy  F.  Moran, 
Associate  Dean  at  University  College  and 
Director  of  the  Law  Enforcement  programs. 
During  his  second  career  as  an  educator, 
Dean  Moran,  a  retired  state  police  officer,  was 
an  innovator  and  leader  in  the  education  of 
law  enforcement  officers  both  in  New 
England  and  throughout  the  world.  His 
former  students,  colleagues,  and  friends  made 
substantial  contributions  to  establish  this 
fund  in  his  honor.  This  scholarship  is  award- 
ed annually  to  students  majoring  in  policing, 
security  or  corrections  who  demonstrate 
academic  excellence  and  financial  need. 

William  J.  McGovern  Memorial  Scholarship 

The  William  J.  McGovern  Memorial  Scholar- 
ship was  established  in  1978  by  an 
anonymous  donor  to  honor  the  memory  of 
William  J.  McGovern.  The  donor  wishes  to 
assist  others  in  realizing  their  potential 
through  higher  education.  The  income  from 
this  scholarship  benefits  worthy  under- 
graduate students  actively  pursuing  studies 
in  University  College  or  the  School  of 
Engineering  Technology.  Recipients  must 
have  declared  a  major,  demonstrated  financial 
need  and  academic  achievement,  and  ex- 
hibited a  high  level  of  professional  promise. 

Professor  Joseph  A.  Mullen  Scholarship 

The  Massachusetts  Chapter  of  the  American 
Society  for  Training  and  Development  has 
established  a  fund  to  provide  annual  scholar- 
ship awards  to  deserving  part-time  students 
upon  the  recommendation  of  the  Dean  of 
University  College. 

Eva  Needle  Memorial  Scholarship 

The  Eva  Needle  Memorial  Scholarship  Fund 
was  established  in  1965  with  the  aid  of  the 
Norman  Knight  Charitable  Foundation  and  is 
maintained  through  the  generosity  of  the 
friends  of  Bob  and  Ted  Needle  in  memory  of 
their  mother.  The  income  from  the  fund  is 
awarded  annually  to  a  deserving  student  in 
the  accounting  program  who  demonstrates 
superior  academic  achievement.  The  recipient 
is  selected  jointly  by  Ted  Needle,  a  long- 
standing member  of  University  College's 
accounting  faculty,  and  the  Scholarship 
Committee. 


Zbu         uenerai  itiTormanon 


Nancy  Lee  Patterson  Memorial  Scholarship 

This  fund  was  established  in  1988  by  the 
family  and  friends  of  Mrs.  Nancy  Lee  Patter- 
son at  the  time  of  her  death.  Income  from  the 
fund  is  awarded  annually  to  female  students, 
age  35  or  over,  attending  University  College 
who  demonstrate  financial  need,  soundness  of 
character,  and  academic  stability. 

Harry  Olins  Memorial  Scholarship 

The  Harry  Olins  Memorial  Scholarship  Fund 
was  established  as  an  expression  of  a  belief  in 
University  College  students  and  "what  they 
stand  for."  The  fund,  presented  by  Mrs.  Olins 
in  recognition  of  her  husband's  long  service 
on  the  business  faculty,  makes  available  an 
annual  tuition  award  to  students  who,  in 
terms  of  scholastic  achievement,  character, 
and  personal  need,  best  typify  the  spirit  of 
Northeastern  University.  To  be  eligible  for 
this  award,  the  student  must  be  a  business 
administration  degree  candidate  and  carry  a 
full  academic  load  during  the  school  year. 

Sigma  Epsilon  Rho  Honor  Society 
Scholarship  Award 

The  Sigma  Epsilon  Rho  Honor  Society 
Scholarship  Award,  established  in  1974  by 
the  membership  of  the  Society,  is  awarded 
annually  to  undergraduate  students  of 
University  College  or  the  School  of  Engineer- 
ing Technology.  Eligible  students  must  have 
a  cumulative  quality-point  average  of  3.0  or 
better  after  completing  75  percent  or  more  of 
their  required  studies. 

H.  Patricia  Taylor  Scholarship  Fund 

The  H.  Patricia  Taylor  Scholarship  Fund  was 
established  in  1974  by  H.  Patricia  Taylor,  a 
graduate  of  University  College,  and  her  hus- 
band, Harry  C.  Taylor,  a  graduate  of  the 
School  of  Business.  The  scholarship  expresses 
their  appreciation  for  financial  assistance 
made  available  to  Mrs.  Taylor  when  she  was 
obtaining  her  degree  and  is  an  attempt  to  pro- 
vide similar  funds  to  assist  others  in  realizing 
their  potential  through  higher  education.  The 
income  from  the  fund  is  awarded  annually  to 
a  student  enrolled  in  University  College  or 
the  School  of  Engineering  Technology  who 
demonstrates  financial  need  and  academic 
stability  and  who  meets  certain  other  condi- 
tions of  eligibility. 


Transportation  Club  of  New  England 
Scholarship 

The  Transportation  Club  of  New  England 
provides  approximately  eight  scholarships 
annually  for  persons  employed  in  transporta- 
tion and  industry  traffic  departments. 
Scholarships  are  applicable  toward  tuition, 
books,  and  incidental  expenses  involved  in 
transportation  management  courses.  The 
club's  purpose  is  to  afford  a  limited  number  of 
people  an  opportunity  to  expand  and  improve 
their  education  by  systematic  study  of 
transportation  and  distribution  management. 
Scholarships  are  administered  cooperatively 
with  the  Scholarship  Committee  of  the 
Transportation  Club  of  New  England. 
Applications  may  be  secured  from  and  filed 
with  Frank  Smith,  Secretary,  Transportation 
Club  of  New  England,  P.O.  Box  121,  Reading, 
MA  01867.  Each  applicant  must  be  sponsored 
by  a  member  of  the  Transportation  Club. 

U.S.  Navy  Field  Training  Supervisors 
Association  Memorial  Scholarship 

A  scholarship  fund  has  been  established 
through  the  generosity  of  the  U.S.  Navy  Field 
Training  Supervisors  Association  in  commem- 
oration of  the  Association's  deceased  members. 
The  scholarship  is  awarded  annually  to  a 
deserving  student,  selected  by  the  Scholarship 
Committee,  who  is  a  management  major  work- 
ing toward  a  bachelor's  degree  in  the  evening 
program  at  University  College. 

University  College  and  the  School  of 
Engineering  Technology  Faculty  Society 
Memorial  Scholarship  Awards 

The  Faculty  Society  of  University  College  and 
the  School  of  Engineering  Technology  offer 
two  awards  annually,  primarily  for  excellence 
in  studies,  to  bachelor's  degree  candidates  in 
University  College  and  the  School  of 
Engineering  Technology  who  have  carried 
and  are  currently  carrying  a  minimum  of 
twenty-four  quarter  hours  annually.  Applica- 
tions, available  during  the  winter  quarter, 
must  be  returned  before  the  spring  quarter. 
These  awards  are  given  in  commemoration  of 
the  Faculty  Society's  deceased  members. 


General  Information         251 


Roberta  Macycove  Wasserman  Memorial 
Scholarship 

This  scholarship  was  established  in  1976 
through  the  generosity  of  family  members 
and  friends  of  Roberta  Macycove  Wasserman, 
who,  at  the  time  of  her  death  in  1975,  was 
pursuing  liberal  arts  studies  within  University 
College.  The  income  from  the  fund  is  awarded 
annually  to  a  deserving  female  student  who  is 
a  homemaker  with  family  responsibilities  and 
who  is  pursuing  part-time  studies  within 
University  College.  The  recipient  shall 
demonstrate  financial  need,  soundness  of 
character,  and  academic  stability. 


Awards 

John  W.  Robbins  Prize 

The  John  W.  Robbins  Prize  was  established  in 
1984  under  the  terms  of  the  will  of  the  late 
Lena  C.  Robbins,  in  memory  of  her  husband, 
John  W.  Robbins,  an  alumnus  of  Northeastern 
University.  The  income  from  this  memorial 
gift  is  awarded  annually  to  the  outstanding 
student  (Class  Marshall)  of  the  graduating 
class  of  University  College. 


Facilities  and  Resources 

Sport,  Dance,  and  Exercise  Facilities 

Northeastern  University  is  concerned  with 
providing  for  the  health  and  fitness  of  our 
students,  and  we  continually  expand  the 
sports,  exercise,  and  recreational  options.  All 
part-time  students  have  access  to  our  exten- 
sive gymnasium  facilities  from  4:00  p.m.  to 
9:30  p.m.,  Monday  through  Friday,  and  din% 
ing  all  open  hours  on  Saturday,  Sunday,  and 
holidays.  The  University  offers  you  a  variety 
of  specialized  facilities,  including  basketball 
courts,  dance  studio,  indoor  athletic  field  and 
running  track,  gymnastics  room,  combatives 
room,  weight-training  rooms,  swimming  pool, 
crew  practice  tank,  racquetball  courts,  and 
motor  performance  and  exercise  physiology 
laboratories.  The  Matthews  Arena,  with 
seating  for  more  than  5,000  fans,  is  home  to 
the  University's  varsity  and  subvarsity^ 
hockey  and  basketball  teams. 

For  organized  athletics  requiring  facilities 
not  available  on  the  main  campus,  North- 
eastern maintains  the  Northeastern  Boat 
House,  which  is  located  on  Memorial  Drive  in 
Cambridge  and  is  home  to  the  University's 
crew  teams.  The  Edward  S.  Parsons  Field,  on 
Kent  Street  in  Brookline,  is  the  playing 
ground  for  the  football,  baseball,  women's 
lacrosse  and  women's  field  hockey  teams,  and 
some  intramurals.  The  Bernard  M.  and 
Jolane  Solomon  Track,  a  recently  completed 
outdoor  track  and  field  facility  in  Dedham, 
has  an  eight-lane,  Action  Trak  200  running 
surface  and  expansive  areas  for  concurrent 
jumping  and  field  events.  This  new  facility  is 
ready  to  host  dual  and  championship  meet 
competitions  and  is  a  permanent  site  for 
Northeastern  University  track  athletes. 

You  must  present  a  valid  Northeastern  stu- 
dent identification  card  and  a  photo  identifica- 
tion card  for  access  to  the  facilities. 


252         uenerai  information 


Social  and  Professional  Clubs 

We  welcome  and  encourage  part-time 
students  in  University  College  and  the  School 
of  Engineering  Technology  to  join  in  the 
social  and  professional  activities  that  are 
organized  and  run  by  the  student  body,  with 
the  assistance  of  the  Office  of  Academic  and 
Student  Affairs.  If  you  and  your  peers  are  in- 
terested in  starting  new  professional  clubs, 
local  or  national,  the  office  will  help  to  plan 
and  organize.  Call  617-437-2400  for  more 
information. 

All  programs  are  designed  to  keep  pace  with 
changing  student  needs  and  interests  and  to 
provide  maximum  opportunity  for  your 
participation. 

Sigma  Epsilon  Rho  Honor  Society 

Sigma  Epsilon  Rho  is  the  University  College 
honor  society.  It  aims  to  promote  fellowship 
among  those  students  who  have  attained 
highest  scholastic  standing  in  the  College;  to 
stimulate  the  student  body  to  higher 
scholastic  accomplishment  through  the  bear- 
ing, influence,  and  work  of  those  selected  men 
and  women;  to  develop  methods  of  mutual 
improvement  and  advancement  among 
members;  and  to  support  high  moral,  profes- 
sional, and  scholastic  ideals. 

Only  honor  graduates  or  seniors  with  honor 
standing  at  the  end  of  their  junior  year  are 
eligible  for  admission  to  the  Society.  Admis- 
sion is  by  invitation  after  nomination  by  the 
Society. 

Ell  Student  Center 

Student  recreation  and  extracurricular  ac- 
tivities of  all  kinds  are  held  at  the  Carl  S.  Ell 
Student  Center.  The  center  houses  the 
Blackman  Auditorium,  which  seats  1,300; 
special  drama  facilities;  a  ballroom;  a  main 
lounge;  fine  arts  exhibition  space;  student 
offices;  conference  rooms;  a  cafeteria  with 
seating  for  more  than  1,000;  and  a  bookstore. 

Office  of  Services  for  the  Handicapped 

No  student  should  miss  or  have  diminished 
opportunities  at  Northeastern  University. 
Any  student  who  has  a  disability-related 
need,  no  matter  how  small  or  individual,  can 
receive  ready  support  services  from  the  Office 
of  Services  for  the  Handicapped  (OSH).  Fre- 


quently, students  are  uncertain  about  how 
they  may  be  helped  by  this  office;  in  these 
situations,  a  discussion  of  possible  alter- 
natives is  useful.  OSH  provides  a  range  of 
support  services  to  eliminate  the  competitive 
disadvantages  that  a  disability  may  create. 
Services  are  tailored  individually  to  meet  the 
needs  of  each  student. 

Types  of  assistance  available  from  OSH 
include  providing  help  during  orientation, 
registration,  and  preregistration;  offering  in- 
formation and  counseling;  arranging  for  hous- 
ing, and  services  for  the  hearing-impaired,  the 
wheelchair  user/mobility-impaired,  and  learn- 
ing disabled  student. 

OSH  is  also  the  gathering  place  for  the 
Disabled  Student  Organization  of  North- 
eastern University,  which  works  cooperatively 
with  OSH  to  plan  programs  and  improve  ac- 
cessibility of  services  for  handicapped  people 
at  Northeastern. 

Lane  Health  Center 

The  well-being  of  all  Northeastern  students  is 
a  crucial  concern  for  the  University.  The 
health  services  clinic  of  the  Lane  Health 
Center,  located  on  the  Boston  campus,  is 
equipped  to  deal  promptly  with  medical 
emergencies  at  all  times. 

Alumni  Association 

Upon  graduation,  you  will  join  the  more  than 
93,000  alumni  united  within  the  Alumni 
Association,  which  was  established  to  promote 
a  mutually  rewarding  relationship  between 
Northeastern  and  its  graduates.  Association 
activities  include  the  Homecoming  celebra- 
tion, presentation  of  the  Outstanding  Alumni 
Awards,  and  the  annual  presentation  of  Pro- 
fessional Promise  Awards  to  outstanding 
seniors  in  each  of  the  colleges. 


HUUUl    N.U. 


About  Northeastern 
University 


Profile  of  the  University 

At  Northeastern  University,  we  value  part- 
time  day  and  evening  students  as  highly  as 
we  do  our  full-time  students.  You  are  impor- 
tant members  of  the  academic  community 
and  reflect  the  changing  profile  of  today's  col- 
lege student,  which  encompasses  new  con- 
cerns for  lifespan  learning  and  professional 
retraining.  Northeastern  supports  your  pur- 
suit of  personal  and  professional  goals  and 
wants  to  contribute  to  your  success.  You  may 
join  all  of  our  students  in  taking  full  advan- 
tage of  the  academic  resources  and  facilities 
we  offer.  In  return,  you  contribute  to  the  in- 
tellectual and  cultural  diversity  upon  which 
this  urban  institution  thrives. 

Founded  in  1898,  Northeastern  University 
is  incorporated  as  a  privately  endowed, 
nonsectarian  institution.  From  its  beginning, 
the  University's  mission  has  been  to  identify 
and  address  the  educational  needs  of  a  diverse 
community  and  student  body  in  distinctive 
and  useful  ways.  Northeastern  did  not  duplicate 
the  programs  of  other  institutions,  but  instead 
became  a  world  leader  in  new  areas  of  educa- 
tional service.  In  particular,  the  University  is 
known  for  its  Cooperative  Plan  of  Education, 
under  which  students  alternate  periods  of 
work  and  study.  All  of  Northeastern's  under- 
graduate day  colleges  operate  on  the 
Cooperative  Plan,  and  several  of  the  Universi- 
ty's graduate  schools  have  structured  their 
programs  to  include  features  of  cooperative 
education.  Today,  the  University  is  comprised 
of  nine  undergraduate  colleges  and  nine 
graduate  schools. 

Our  undergraduate  colleges  are: 

•  Boston-Bouve'  College  of  Human 
Development  Professions 

•  College  of  Arts  and  Sciences,  including  the 
School  of  Journalism 

•  College  of  Business  Administration 

•  College  of  Computer  Science 

•  College  of  Criminal  Justice 

•  College  of  Engineering,  including  the 
School  of  Engineering  Technology 

•  College  of  Nursing 

•  College  of  Pharmacy  and  Allied  Health 
Professions 

•  University  College 


Our  graduate  schdols  are: 

•  Graduate  School  of  Arts  and  Sciences 

•  Graduate  School  of  Boston-Bouve'  College  of 
Human  Development  Professions 

•  Graduate  School  of  Business  Administration 

•  Graduate  School  of  Computer  Science 

•  Graduate  School  of  Criminal  Justice 

•  Graduate  School  of  Engineering 

•  Graduate  School  of  Pharmacy  and  Allied 
Health  Professions 

•  Graduate  School  of  Professional  Accounting 

•  School  of  Law 

At  Northeastern  University,  we  respond  to 
the  needs  of  people  who  already  hold  jobs  or 
are  launched  in  careers,  but  who  wish  to  ad- 
vance or  change  their  professional  lives  as 
well  as  pursue  personal  interests.  The  Univer- 
sity offers  a  variety  of  educational  options— 
both  credit  and  noncredit— to  suit  your  par- 
ticular objectives.  University  College  offers 
part-time  courses  leading  to  certificates  and  to 
associate's  and  bachelor's  degrees.  The  School 
of  Engineering  Technology  offers  part-time 
evening  and  weekend  associate's  and 
bachelor's  degree  programs  in  technological 
areas,  in  addition  to  daytime  undergraduate 
programs. 

All  formal  courses  of  study  leading  to  degrees 
through  part-time  programs  are  approved  by 
the  full-time  day  faculty  of  the  Northeastern 
Basic  Colleges  concerned  and  are  governed  by 
the  same  qualitative  and  quantitative  standards. 


Where  You'll  Find  Northeastern 

The  main  campus  of  Northeastern  University 
is  a  vibrant  and  progressive  urban  communi- 
ty. To  all  Northeastern  students,  the  physical 
setting  of  the  Boston  campus  extends  oppor- 
tunities to  participate  in  the  dynamic,  ex- 
citing environment  that  we  share  with  city 
residents.  Built  around  a  quadrangle,  the 
campus  is  divided  by  Huntington  Avenue,  a 
major  artery.  It  is  located  in  the  midst  of  such 
cultural  landmarks  as  Symphony  Hall,  the 
Museum  of  Fine  Arts,  the  Isabella  Stewart 
Gardner  Museum,  Horticultural  Hall,  and  the 
Boston  Public  Library.  You  can  walk  to  Fen- 
way Park,  Copley  Place,  the  Back  Bay  shop- 
ping district,  and  a  number  of  internationally 
renowned  hospitals.  In  1910,  the  University 
began  construction  on  the  first  piece  of  land 
acquired  at  its  present  site;  it  now  covers 
more  than  fifty-five  acres. 


2b4  ADOUt  N.U. 


To  reach  increasing  numbers  of  students  and 
to  make  participation  in  our  programs  as  con- 
venient as  possible  for  you,  Northeastern 
University  has  established  suburban  campuses 
and  branch  locations,  as  well  as  several  off- 
campus  athletic  facilities.  The  campuses  and 
branch  locations  house  administrative  and 
classroom  facilities  for  Northeastern's 
graduate,  part-time  day  and  evening,  and  con- 
tinuing education  programs.  The  University 
also  maintains  many  affiliations  to  ensure 
access  to  facilities  and  specialized  equipment 
available  at  other  institutions  and 
organizations. 

One  of  Northeastern's  most  recent  acquisi- 
tions is  the  twenty-acre  Dedham  campus,  just 
north  of  Route  128.  This  facility  houses  the 
Center  for  Continuing  Education  and  provides 
space  for  the  College  of  Business  Administra- 
tion's High  Technology  MBA  program. 

Near  the  junction  of  Routes  128  and  3  in 
Burlington  is  the  Suburban  Campus  of  Nor- 
theastern University.  Part-time  undergraduate 
courses  in  a  variety  of  subject  areas  and  part- 
time  graduate  courses  in  engineering  and 
business  administration  are  offered  here.  The 
Burlington  campus  also  offers  special  pro- 
grams for  part-time,  evening,  and  noncredit 
continuing  education  courses,  j 

Located  near  the  Burlington  campus,  the 
Botanical  Research  Station  in  Woburn  con- 
tains a  small  arboretum  and  a  spacious 
greenhouse  for  propagation  and  research. 

Situated  on  fifty  acres  in  Ashland,  the  Warren 
Center  provides  a  practical  laboratory  for  out- 
door education  and  conservation,  and  camping 
administration,  programming,  and  counsel- 
ing. In  the  summer,  the  center  becomes  an  at- 
tractive campsite  for  various  community  and 
University  groups  and  is  available  for  con- 
ferences and  workshops. 

Twenty  miles  northeast  of  Boston,  the 
Marine  Science  and  Maritime  Studies  center 
is  located  in  Nahant,  on  Massachusetts  Bay. 
It  serves  as  a  site  for  national,  international, 
and  University  research. 

Henderson  House,  Northeastern  Universi- 
ty's conference  center,  is  located  twelve  miles 
from  Boston  in  suburban  Weston.  This  facility 
hosts  a  variety  of  activities,  including  residen- 
tial seminars,  workshops,  short  courses,  and 
weekend  meetings. 


University  Libraries 


As  a  reflection  of  our  serious  commitment  to 
part-time  students,  you  have  access  to  all 
seven  of  the  University's  extensive  library 
units.  Located  on  the  Boston  campus  is 
Dodge,  Northeastern's  main  library  facility, 
and  three  libraries  that  house  graduate-level 
collections  in  chemical  and  biomedical 
science,  mathematics  and  psychology,  and 
physics  and  electrical  engineering.  There  are 
also  libraries  on  the  Burlington  and  Dedham 
campuses  and  at  the  Marine  Science  and 
Maritime  Studies  Center  in  Nahant. 

Total  holdings  of  all  University  libraries  in- 
clude the  equivalent  of  more  than  one  million 
volumes  in  print  and  in  microform;  5,000 
periodical  titles;  300,000  government 
documents;  and  24,000  items  in  audiovisual 
and  computer  software  formats.  In  Dodge,  the 
Learning  Resources  Center  provides  computer- 
assisted  instruction,  microcomputer  facilities, 
and  language  and  music  listening  laboratories. 
The  center  also  houses  an  extensive  set  of 
self-paced  media  materials  in  various  interac- 
tive formats,  including  audiotapes,  videotapes, 
and  computer-assisted  lessons  and  exercises. 

Northeastern  University's  membership  in 
the  Boston  Library  Consortium  generally  en- 
titles our  students  to  on-site  use  of  libraries  at 
Boston  and  Wellesley  Colleges,  the  Massachusetts 
Institute  of  Technology,  the  State  Library  of 
Massachusetts,  the  University  of  Massachusetts 
(Amherst,  Boston,  and  Worcester  campuses), 
and  Boston,  Brandeis,  and  Tufts  Universities. 


Academic  Computer  Services 

Northeastern's  Academic  Computer  Services 
supports  the  learning  activities  of  students  at 
all  levels,  as  well  as  the  teaching  and  research 
undertaken  by  faculty,  research  personnel, 
and  graduate  students.  The  programming 
assistance  offered  at  the  Boston,  Burlington, 
and  Dedham  campuses  promotes  effective  use 
of  all  academic  computer  systems.  At  these 
three  campuses  270  assorted  personal  com- 
puters are  linked  in  local-area  networks.  Via 
a  wide-area  network,  students  and  faculty 


About  N.U.  255 


have  time-sharing  access  to  five  large  com- 
puters through  video  and  hard-copy  terminals 
arranged  in  clusters  at  the  three  campuses. 
This  network  connects  a  Digital  Equipment 
Corporation  VAX  8650  system  plus  an  addi- 
tional VAX  11/785  and  a  Data  General 
MV/8000.  A  variety  of  graphics  and  output 
devices  are  available. 

Electronic  spreadsheet  and  word-processing 
packages  are  available  to  you,  in  addition  to 
many  software  libraries  for  numerical, 
statistical,  and  financial  applications.  The 
primary  languages  supported  by  Academic 
Computer  Services  are  FORTRAN,  COBOL, 
BASIC,  Pascal,  and  Assembler. 


Research 

Research,  whether  performed  in  the  laboratory, 
library,  or  field,  is  vital  to  maintain  the 
University's  thriving  academic  atmosphere. 
Through  research,  faculty  members  and 
students  stay  abreast  of  the  most  recent 
developments  in  their  particular  fields.  Every 
department  of  every  college  at  Northeastern 
carries  out  some  basic  or  applied  research 
projects. 

At  Northeastern  University,  research  and 
scholarship  are  taken  very  seriously  and  are 
actively  encouraged.  Each  year  faculty  members 
receive  funding  for  an  ever-increasing  number 
of  research  projects,  for  which  sponsorship 
comes  from  a  variety  of  sources.  Federal  agen- 


cies, private  industry  and  foundations,  and 
the  university  itself  all  contribute  to  North- 
eastern's  growing  research  base. 

Although  much  of  this  research  is  carried 
out  by  faculty  members,  their  graduate 
students,  and  post-doctoral  research 
associates,  ample  opportunities  exist  for 
undergraduate  students.  Research  participa- 
tion can  take  place  as  part  of  regular 
academic  programs,  as  specially  designed 
independent  studies,  or  through  cooperative 
work  assignments.  Research  activities  are 
encouraged  and  are  limited  only  by  the  stu- 
dent's own  motivation  and  curiosity. 

Northeastern  University's  faculty  has 
numerous  distinguished  scholars,  many  of 
whom  have  received  prestigious  awards,  in- 
cluding Sloan  Scholarships,  Guggenheim 
Fellowships,  and  National  Institute  of  Health 
Research  Awards.  Faculty  members  lecture 
worldwide  and  publish  extensively;  through 
these  efforts  the  faculty  enhance  their 
teaching  and  help  to  ensure  an  exemplary 
university  education. 

In  addition,  many  faculty  serve  as  U.S. 
government  consultants  and  participate  on  a 
variety  of  national  and  international  commit- 
tees. But  because  Northeastern  considers 
education  its  primary  mission,  students  will 
always  find  an  enthusiastic  and  accessible 
faculty  to  answer  questions,  solve  problems, 
and  stimulate  inquiring  minds. 


HUUUl    IV. U. 


Programs  at  Northeastern 


Undergraduate  Colleges 


Boston-Bouvd  College  of  Human 
Development  Professions 

Offers  programs  leading  to  the  Bachelor  of 
Science  in  Education  in  early  childhood 
education,  elementary  education,  human 
services,  physical  education,  athletic  training, 
cardiovascular  health  and  exercise,  and  school 
and  community  health  education;  the  Bachelor 
of  Science  in  Recreation  and  Leisure  Studies; 
and  the  Bachelor  of  Science  in  Physical  Therapy. 
For  more  information,  call  617-437-2200. 

College  of  Arts  and  Sciences 

Offers  programs  in  the  visual  and  performing 
arts,  humanities,  social  sciences,  and 
mathematics/sciences  leading  to  the  Bachelor 
of  Arts  and  Bachelor  of  Science  degrees.  Pro- 
grams are  normally  four  years  in  length  on  a 
full-time  plan  or  five  years  in  length  on  the 
cooperative  plan.  For  more  information,  call 
617-437-3980. 

College  of  Business  Administration 

Offers  a  five-year,  cooperative  education  pro- 
gram leading  to  the  Bachelor  of  Science  in 
Business  Administration.  Students  complete  a 
concentration  in  accounting,  human  resources 
management,  marketing,  finance  and  insurance, 
management,  international  business  admini- 
stration, entrepreneurship  and  new  venture 
management,  management  information 
systems,  or  transportation  and  physical 
distribution  management.  For  more  informa- 
tion, call  617-437-2200. 

College  of  Computer  Science 

Offers  a  five-year,  and  a  four-year  cooperative 
education  program  leading  to  the  Bachelor  of 
Science  in  Computer  Science,  with  emphasis 
tracks  in  data-base  management,  program- 
ming languages,  and  systems.  For  more  infor- 
mation, call  617-437-2462. 


College  of  Criminal  Justice 

Offers  a  five-year,  cooperative  education  pro- 
gram leading  to  the  Bachelor  of  Science 
degree.  For  more  information,  call 
617-437-3327. 

College  of  Engineering 

Offers  four-  and  five-year  cooperative  educa- 
tion programs  in  chemical,  civil,  electrical  (in- 
cluding a  power  systems  option  and  a  com- 
puter engineering  option),  industrial,  and 
mechanical  engineering  leading  to  the 
Bachelor  of  Science  with  specification  accor- 
ding to  to  the  department.  A  more  general 
program  leading  to  the  Bachelor  of  Science 
without  specification  is  also  offered.  For 
highly  qualified  students,  the  electrical  and 
computer  engineering,  mechanical  engineer- 
ing, and  industrial  engineering  and  informa- 
tion systems  departments  offer  fice-year  pro- 
grams leading  to  the  bachelor  and  the  masters 
degree;  students  carry  course  overloads  begin- 
ning in  the  third  year.  The  College  also  offers 
a  six-year,  part-time  evening  program  leading 
to  the  Bachelor  of  Science  degree  in  civil,  elec- 
trical, or  mechanical  engineering.  For  more 
information,  call  617-437-2154. 

College  of  Nursing 

Offers  five-year  cooperative  education  pro- 
gram leading  to  the  Bachelor  of  Science  in 
Nursing.  The  College  also  offers  an  R.N.  to 
B.S.N,  option  to  registered  nurses  who  wish 
to  pursue  a  baccalaureate  degree  in  nursing. 
The  R.N.  to  B.S.N.  option  is  offered  for  full- 
time  students  by  the  College  of  Nursing  and 
for  students  desiring  part-time  evening  study 
in  collaboration  with  Northeastern  University's 
part-time  unit  University  College.  The  pro- 
gram is  accredited  by  the  National  League 
for  Nursing.  For  more  information  call 
617-437-3610. 

College  of  Pharmacy  and 
Allied  Health  Professions 

Offers  five-year,  cooperative  education  pro- 
grams leading  to  the  Bachelor  of  Science  in 
Pharmacy,  Respiratory  Therapy,  and  Tox- 
icology, and  to  the  Bachelor  of  Science  with 
specification  in  medical  laboratory  science 
and  health  record  administration.  A  non- 
cooperative  four-year  baccalaureate  program 
is  offered  in  Dental  Hygiene.  Associate's 
degree  programs  are  offered  in  medical 
laboratory  science  and  dental  hygiene.  The 
College  also  offers  post-baccalaureate  cer- 


ADOUt  N.U. 


tificate  programs  for  physicians  assistants, 
health  record  administrators,  respiratory 
therapists,  perfusion  technologists,  and 
medical  laboratory  scientists  (concentrations 
in  blood  banking,  clinical  chemistry, 
hematology,  and  microbiology).  For  more  in- 
formation, call  617-437-3321. 

School  of  Engineering  Technology 

The  School  of  Engineering  Technology,  a  divi- 
sion of  the  College  of  Engineering,  offers  pro- 
grams leading  to  the  Associate  in  Engineer- 
ing, Associate  in  Science,  and  Bachelor  of 
Engineering  Technology  degrees.  A  full-time, 
five-year  cooperative  education  plan  is  offered, 
at  the  baccalaureate  level,  in  electrical  and 
mechanical  engineering  technology  and  com- 
puter technology.  In  addition  to  the  majors 
mentioned  for  full-time  study,  part-time  even- 
ing and  weekend  programs  are  available  at 
the  associate  and  baccalaureate  levels  in 
telecommunications,  energy  systems,  architec- 
tural, environmental,  structural,  and  survey- 
ing and  highway  engineering  technology.  A 
baccalaureate  degree  program  in  aerospace 
maintenance  engineering  technology  is 
available  for  transfer  students,  both  full-  and 
part-time.  Many  of  the  technology  courses  are 
televised  via  Network  Northeastern  to 
satellite  campuses  and  company  sites.  For 
more  information,  call  617-437-2500. 


Graduate  Schools 

Boston-Bouve  College  of  Human 
Development  Professions 

Offers  a  full-  and  part-time  programs  leading 
to  the  Master  of  Science  degree  with  speciali- 
zation in  counseling  psychology;  exercise 
sciences;  human  resource  counseling;  physical 
education;  recreation,  sport,  and  fitness 
management;  rehabilitation  counseling; 
speech-language  pathology  and  audiology. 
The  Master  of  Education  degree  may  be 
earned  with  a  specialization  in  counseling, 
consulting  teacher  of  reading,  curriculum  and 
instruction,  educational  research,  human 
development,  rehabilitation  administration,  or 
special  education.  The  Doctor  of  Education 
degree  may  be  earned  in  leadership:  admini- 
stration and  supervision,  with  a  specialization 
in  counseling,  educational  administration,  or 
rehabilitation  administration.  For  more  infor- 
mation, call  617-437-2708. 


College  of  Arts  and  Sciences 

Offers  programs  leading  to  the  Master  of  Arts 
degree  in  economics,  English,  history,  journalism, 
political  science,  psychology,  sociology,  social 
anthropology,  and  writing.  The  Master  of 
Science  degree  is  available  in  biology; 
chemistry;  economic  policy  and  planning;  law, 
policy,  and  society;  mathematics;  and  physics. 
The  Master  of  Technical  and  Professional 
Writing,  the  Master  of  Science  in  Health 
Science,  the  Master  of  Journalism  in  News 
Media  Management,  and  the  Master  of  Public 
Administration  degrees  are  also  offered.  In 
addition,  there  are  programs  leading  to  the 
Certificate  of  Advanced  Graduate  Study  in 
advanced  literary  study  and  to  the  Doctor  of 
Philosophy  degree  in  biology;  chemistry; 
economics;  law,  policy,  and  society;  mathematics; 
physics;  psychology;  and  sociology.  There  are 
also  certificate  programs  in  economics  of  the 
workforce  and  development  planning  and  in 
technical  writing.  Most  programs  may  be 
completed  through  either  full-  or  part-time 
study.  For  more  information,  call  617-437-3982. 

College  of  Business  Administration 

Offers  five  programs  leading  to  the  Master  of 
Business  Administration  (MBA)  degree.  Op- 
tions include  a  cooperative  education  MBA 
program,  a  full-time  MBA  program,  and  a 
part-time  MBA  program.  An  executive  MBA 
program  tailored  to  the  needs  of  experienced 
managers  and  a  high-technology  MBA  pro- 
gram designed  for  professionals  in  the  high- 
technology  community  are  also  offered  on  a 
part-time  basis.  Additionally,  a  nondegree 
program  leading  to  the  Certificate  of  Advanced 
Study  is  available.  For  more  information,  call 
617-437-2714. 

The  Graduate  School  of  Professional  Account- 
ing offers  a  full-time,  fifteen-month  Master  of 
Science  in  Accounting  program  designed  for 
students  who  hold  bachelor's  degrees  in  the 
arts  and  sciences.  The  program  includes  a 
three-month  paid  internship  with  a  CPA  firm. 
For  more  information,  call  617-437-3244. 

The  Center  for  Management  Development 
offers  a  variety  of  nondegree  programs  and 
graduate  workshops,  including  the  Manage- 
ment Development  Program,  the  Manage- 
ment Workshop,  ad  the  Management 
Workshop-High  Tech.  For  more  information, 
call  617-437-3272. 


College  of  Computer  Science 

Offers  full-  and  part-time  programs  leading  to 
the  Master  of  Science  in  Computer  Science 
with  concentrations  in  artificial  intelligence, 
communications  and  networks,  data  bases, 
systems  software,  and  theory.  The  Doctor  of 
Philosophy  in  Computer  Science  program  in- 
cludes theory,  artificial  intelligence,  data  base 
management,  operating  systems,  program- 
ming languages,  computers,  and  computer  ar- 
chitecture and  hardware.  For  more  informa- 
tion, call  617-437-3539. 

College  of  Criminal  Justice 

Offers  both  full-  and  part-time  programs 
leading  to  the  Master  of  Science  in  Criminal 
Justice.  Criminal  justice  students  may  con- 
centrate in  administration,  or  develop  their 
own  multidisciplinary  concentration  under 
the  supervision  of  a  faculty  adviser.  For  more 
information,  call  617-437-3327. 

College  of  Engineering 

Offers  programs  leading  to  the  Master  of 
Science  with  specialization  in  chemical,  civil, 
industrial,  and  mechanical  engineering;  elec- 
trical and  computer  engineering  and;  com- 
puter systems  engineering.  A  five-year  pro- 
gram leading  to  both  a  Bachelor  and  a 
Master  of  Science  degree  is  offered  in  elec- 
trical, industrial,  and  mechanical  engineer- 
ing. Professional  Engineer's  degrees  are  of- 
fered in  electrical,  industrial,  and  mechanical 
engineering.  The  doctor  of  philosophy  degree 
is  offered  in  chemical,  civil,  electrical, 
mechanical  and  industrial  engineering  and 
information  systems.  A  doctor  of  engineering 
is  offered  in  chemical  engineering.  Women  in 
Engineering  and  Women  in  Information 
Systems  programs  are  also  available.  For 
more  information,  call  617-437-2711. 

College  of  Nursing 

Offers  full-  and  part-time  Master  of  Science  in 
Nursing  program.  The  master  of  science 
degree  may  be  earned  with  a  specialization  in 
Community  Health  Nursing,  Critical  Care 
Nursing,  Primary  Care  Nursing  or 
Psychiatric-Mental  Health  Nursing.  For  more 
information,  call  617-437-3102. 

College  of  Pharmacy  and  Allied 
Health  Professions 

Offers  programs  leading  to  the  Master  of 
Science  degree  in  biomedical  science,  hospital 
pharmacy,  medical  laboratory  science, 


medicinal  chemistry,  and  pharmacology.  The 
Master  of  Health  Professions  is  offered  with 
four  options:  general,  health  policy,  physician 
assistant,  and  regulatory  toxicology.  A  doctoral 
degree  program  is  offered  in  biomedical 
science  with  specialization  in  medical  laboratory 
science,  medicinal  chemistry,  pharmaceutical 
sciences,  pharmacology,  or  toxicology.  A 
graduate  program  in  clinical  pharmacy 
leading  to  the  Doctor  of  Pharmacy  is  also 
available.  For  more  information,  call 
617-437-3211. 

School  of  Law 

Offers  a  full-time  day  program  leading  to  the 
juris  doctor  degree.  The  three-year  curriculum 
includes  four  quarters  of  work  experience  in 
judges'  chambers,  law  firms,  governmental 
agencies,  and  other  legal  settings.  For  more 
information,  call  617-437-2395. 

Division  of  Continuing  Education 

Northeastern  University  established  continu- 
ing education  programs  over  25  years  ago  to 
provide  quality,  practical,  career-related 
education  in  business  and  industry,  consistent 
with  the  University's  tradition  of  adult  educa- 
tion. The  mission  of  the  Division  is  to  be  a 
leader  in  non-degreed  continuing  education 
for  the  career  professional.  Courses  are  taught 
primarily  by  practitioners  in  their  respective 
fields.  Program  development,  courses  and 
seminars  are  based  on  market  needs  and 
wants,  and  are  offered  at  convenient  off- 
campus  locations  and  at  company  sites.  The 
Division  continues  to  expand  Northeastern 
University's  regional  and  national  reputation 
as  a  leader  in  continuing  education  via  such 
technological  advances  as  microwave  and 
satellite  transmission.  For  more  information 
on  the  following  programs,  contact  the  Division 
office  at  617-437-5828. 

Network  Northeastern 

This  service  was  developed  to  serve  the  needs 
of  the  high  tech  community  with  flexible 
education  and  training  programs.  Network 
Northeastern  broadcasts  live  instruction  from 
the  Boston  campus  directly  to  the  company 
sites  and  the  Burlington  and  Dedham  cam- 
puses. Live  classroom  instruction  is  telecast 
in  color  to  these  remote  sites,  where  it  is 
viewed  in  reception  rooms  equipped  with 
television  monitors  and  a  telephone  talk-back 
system.  Videotapes  of  missed  classes  are  pro- 
vided, and  a  courier  service  delivers  and  collects 


homework  assignments  and  serves  as  a  link 
to  the  registrar,  bookstore,  and  other  Univer- 
sity services.  Network  Northeastern  offers 
courses  in  graduate  engineering,  computer 
science,  undergraduate  engineering 
technology,  the  State-of-the-Art  Program,  and 
graphic  arts.  In  1987,  Northeastern  Universi- 
ty became  the  first  university  in  eastern 
Massachusetts  to  install  a  Ku-band  satellite 
dish.  This  enables  the  University  to  broadcast 
courses  throughout  the  United  States  and  to 
redistribute  live  satellite  programs  to 
subscribing  company  sites  via  the  microwave 
system.  Via  the  satellite,  Network  Nor- 
theastern is  a  local  distributor  for  IEEE 
videoconferences  and  other  satellite  providers. 
Network  Northeastern  studio  facilities  and 
experienced  staff  are  available  to  produce 
high  quality  programming  to  respond  to  the 
need  for  efficient,  timely  education  in  today's 
rapidly  expanding  fields  of  knowledge.  Call 
Network  Northeastern  at  437-5620. 

Automobile  Appraisal  Program 

The  Automobile  Appraisal  Program  is  design- 
ed to  prepare  insurance  claims  professionals, 
auto  body  technicians,  and  other  for  the  the 
Automobile  Appraisal  License  Examination 
administered  by  the  Commonwealth  of 
Massachusetts.  The  program  also  offers  train- 
ing in  efficient  auto  repair  center  manage- 
ment and  an  Automobile  Claims  Adjusting 
Course  for  instruction  in  the  Massachusetts 
regulations.  For  more  information,  call 
329-8000,  ext.  47  or  24. 

Test  Preparation  Program 

The  Test  Preparation  Program  offers  courses 
designed  to  help  prepare  students  for  the 
LSAT,  GMAT,  GRE,  and  SAT  examinations, 
providing  the  participant  with  an  in-depth  ex- 
posure to  the  subject  matter.  Call  329-8000, 
ext  47  or  24  for  more  information. 

Urban  Mass  Transit  Program 

The  Urban  Mass  Transit  Program  is  designed 
to  help  participants  develop  improved  med- 
thods  of  meeting  the  unique  challenges  facing 
management  personnel  in  the  urban  mass 
transportation  industry.  The  program  pro- 
vides a  means  of  getting  a  practical  educa- 
tional experience  in  modern  management 
theory  and  practice.  For  information,  call 
329-8000,  ext.  22. 


Insurance  and  Financial  Services  Institute 

Established  to  foster  excellence  in  the  insurance 
and  financial  services  communities  in  the 
Boston  area,  the  institute  offers  courses  and 
seminars  in  general  insurance,  risk  manage- 
ment, insurance  licensing,  and  financial  ser- 
vices. These  study  programs  are  designed  to 
help  students  develop  professional  credentials 
and  to  keep  professionals  current  in  their 
field.  Call  the  Institute  at  508-533-5101. 

State-of-the-Art  Engineering  Program 

The  State-of-the-Art  Program  offers  evening 
courses,  seminars,  and  on-site  training  design- 
ed for  working  professionals  seeking  practical, 
hands-on  education  in  a  job-related  area  of 
technology.  The  curriculum  includes 
CAD/CAM,  high-level  computer  languages, 
VLSI  design  and  certificate  programs  in:  data 
communications,  industrial  automation, 
telecommunications,  microelectronics/semicon- 
ductor science,  artificial  intelligence,  quality 
assurance,  software  engineering  and  technology 
management.  Call  the  State-of-the-Art  Program 
329-8775. 

Building  Technology  Program 

The  program  is  designed  for  a  broad  spectrum 
of  professionals  either  presently  in  or  consider- 
ing some  aspect  of  the  building  technologies. 
The  course  offerings  in  the  Building  Technology 
Program  range  from  introductory  to  advanced 
and  are  conducted  in  an  intensive,  total- 
immersion  setting.  Evening  courses,  on-site 
training  and  seminars  cover  areas  such  as  ar- 
chitecture, construction  law  and  management, 
fire  protection,  general  construction,  engineer- 
in-training  license  examination  preparation 
and  Massachusetts  electricians  code  review. 
Certificate  programs  are  offered  in:  HVAC 
systems  design,  facilities  management,  con- 
struction superintendent,  building  inspec- 
tions, building  technology  and  real  estate 
studies.  Call  the  Building  Technology  Pro- 
gram at  329-8000. 

Paralegal  Program 

The  Paralegal  Program  offers  a  twelve-week 
Paralegal  Certification  Program  and  Specialist 
courses  offer  training  on  specific  legal  topics 
for  any  business  professional  needing  to 
develop  expertise.  Call  329-8000,  ext.  47  or  24 
for  information. 


Faculty 


Samy  A.  Abdel-Baky,  Ph.D.* 

Chemistry 
Northeastern  University 

Barbara  Abeles,  M.B.A. 

Management 
Abeles  Associates 

Kimiko  Abramoff,  M.A. 

Modern  Langauge 
Prime  Computer 

Hon.  Herbert  Abrams,  M.L* 

Criminal  Justice  and  Security 
Superior  Court  of  Massachusetts 

Michael  J.  Abruzzese,  M.B.A.* 

Information  Systems 
University  of  Massachusetts 
Medical  Center 

Deborah  A.  Adair,  M.S. 

Health  Record  Administration 
Elliott  Hospital 

Stephen  D.  Adair,  M.A. 

Sociology/Anthropology 
Northeastern  University 

Henry  Adleman,  B.S.* 

Information  Systems 
Digital  Equipment  Corp. 

John  M.  Aflague,  M.S. 

Health  Science 

Massachusetts  General  Hospital 

Paul  D.  Ahern,  M.B.A. 

Accounting 

Elkay  Products,  Inc. 

Thomas  J.  Ahern,  Jr.,  J.D.* 

Business  Law 
Silver  and  Ahern 

Joseph  Aieta  III,  M.A.* 

History 

Lasell  Junior  College 

Edward  E.  Alessi,  M.A. 

Sociology/Anthropology 
Bedford  VA  Hospital 

Fariba  Aliloo,  M.S. 

Information  Systems 
City  of  Cambridge 

Angelo  S.  Allegretto,  C.P.A. 

Accounting 

Carlson  Metalcraft  Company,  Inc. 


Israel  Aluf,  Ph.D.* 

Modern  Language 
Northeastern  University 

Patricia  L.  Alves,  B.S. 

Hotel  and  Restaurant  Management 
Katherine  Gibbs 

Craig  A.  Andersen,  B.S. 

American  Sign  Language 
Self-Employed 

Janis  L.  Anderson,  Ph.D. 

Psychology 

Brigham  &  Women  Hospital 

Paul  G.  Anderson,  M.F.A.* 

Art 

Artist 

R.  Wayne  Anderson,  Ph.D.* 

History 

Northeastern  University 

Rae  Andre,  Ph.D. 

Human  Resources  Management 
Northeastern  University 

James  P.  Angelini,  Ph.D. 

Accounting 
Northeastern  University 

Robert  B.  Angus,  M.S.* 

Mathematics 
Angus  Associates 

Mary  F.  Annas,  M.A.T. 

Alternative  Freshman/English 

Stanley  S.  Antoniotti,  M.A.* 

Economics 

Bridgewater  State  College 

Robert  J.  Anzenberger,  M.A.* 

Human  Resources  Management 
Zayre  Corp. 

Carol  V.  Apt,  M.A. 

Sociology/Anthorpology 

Alia  A.  Arasoughly,  B.S. 

Art 

Joan  L.  Arches,  M.S.* 

Sociology/Anthropology 
Regis  College 

Joseph  T.  Arcidiacono,  B.S.* 

Information  Systems 
Digital  Equipment  Corp. 

Edward  A.  Arees,  Ph.D.* 

Psychology 
Northeastern  University 

John  C.  Armington,  Ph.D. 

Psychology 
Northeastern  University 

Stephen  F.  Armstrong,  Sr.,  M.B.A.* 

Purchasing 
Varian  Associates 

Jane  Aroian,  Ed.D.* 

Nursing 

Northeastern  University 


Gilbert  N.  Aronson,  M.Ed. 

Technical  Communication 
Bolt  Beranek  and  Newman 

Steven  A.  Aronson,  B.S. 

Information  Systems 
The  Gillette  Company 

Judy  A.  Arraj,  Ph.D. 

Biology 
Emmanual  College 

Roger  M.  Atherton,  Ph.D. 

Management 
Northeastern  University 

Meredith  0.  Atkinson,  M.A. 

English 

Chris  Attaya,  M.B.A. 

Health  Management 

Home  Care  Group,  North  Shore 

Saul  H.  Auslander,  M.B.A.* 

Finance 

Bridgewater  State  College 

Joseph  Autilio,  J.D. 

Political  Science 

Board  of  Real  Estate  Brokers 

Alice  D.  Avakian,  M.S. 

Biology 
Emerson  College 

Jason  M.  Avergun,  M.B.A.* 

Marketing 

York  International  Corp. 

Warren  F.  Averill,  M.S.* 

Chemistry 

Barnstable  High  School 

Ralph  R.  Avery,  M.S. 

Criminal  Justice  and  Security 
Northeastern  University 

Nawal  Awad,  M.A. 

Alternative  Freshman/Mathematics 

Paula  L.  Aymer,  M.A. 

Sociology/Anthropology 
Northeastern  University 

Kenneth  P.  Ayoob,  M.A. 

Music 

Northeastern  University 

Virginia  Ayoob,  M.A. 

Music 

Hocine  Azeni,  M.A. 

Sociology/Anthropology 
Northeastern  University 

David  L.  Bachrach,  Ed.D.* 

Psychology 

Boston  VA  Medical  Center 

Philip  N.  Backstrom,  Ph.D. 

History 

Northeastern  University 

Swaminathan  Badrinath,  M.B.A. 

Finance 

Northeastern  University 


*Denotes  Senior  Lecturer  as  of  October  1988 


Benjamin  Bahan,  M.Ed. 

American  Sign  Language 

Deborah  J.  Baiano,  B.A. 

Alternative  Freshman/Sociology 

John  F.  Bailey  IV,  B.A. 

History 

Anthony  J.  Bajdek,  MA* 

History 

Northeastern  University 

Edward  A.  Baker,  Jr.,  M.B.A. 

Finance 

Bank  of  New  England 

Edward  F.  Baker,  M.S. 

Mathematics 
Westwood  High  School 

Errol  H.  Baker,  Ph.D.* 

Psychology 

Boston  VA  Medical  Center 

Charles  D.  Baker,  M.B.A. 

Management 
Northeastern  University 

Sara  K.  Baker,  M.S. 

Art 

Baker  Design 

Ramaiya  Balachandra,  D.B.A. 

Management 
Northeastern  University 

Peter  S.  Baletsa,  M.S.* 

Biology 

Lynn  Public  School  System 

George  B.  Ballester,  M.A. 

Information  Systems 
The  Boston  Company 

Kenneth  W.  Ballou,  M.A. 

Management 

Wellesley  Motor  Coach  Company 

Louis  E.  Banderet,  Ph.D.* 

Psychology 

U.S.  Army  Research  Institute 

Brendan  Bannister,  D.B.A. 

Human  Resources  Management 
Northeastern  University 

John  J.  Baranofsky,  M.S.* 

Management 
Raytheon  Company 

Antonio  Barbagallo,  M.A. 

Modern  Language 
Salem  High  School 

Ema  Barker,  M.A. 

Modern  Languages 
Northeastern  University 

David  R.  Barkmeier,  Ph.D.* 

Psychology 

Bunker  Hill  Community  College 

Raymond  S.  Barnstone,  M.B.A.* 

Finance 
Codex  Corp. 


Cynthia  L  Barron,  B.A. 

Art 

Northeastern  University 

Robin  C.  Barr,  M.A. 

English 

Barbara  R.  Barry,  Ph.D. 

Music 

New  England  Conservatory  of 

Music 

Scott  P.  Bartis,  Ph.D. 

Psychology 
Lighthouse  School 

Pam  M.  Basile,  B.S. 

Hotel  and  Restaurant  Management 
Quality  Inn,  Boston 

Norman  D.  Bates,  J.D. 

Criminal  Justice  and  Security 
Northeastern  University 

William  W.  Bauser,  M.A. 

Philosophy/Religion 

Maxine  C.  Beach,  M.A. 

Philosophy/Religion 

Anthony  Beadle,  B.A. 

Music 

Marcus  A.  Bearse,  Jr.,  Ph.D. 

Psychology 
Northeastern  University 

Nancy  V.  Becker,  M.Ed.* 

American  Sign  Language 
Northeastern  University 

Robert  Beckett,  M.S. 

Management  Sciences 
Mid  Range  Systems 

Judith  E.  Bedford,  M.A. 

Music 

Judith  A.  Bednatz,  M.S. 

Technical  Communication 
Candela  Laser  Corporation 

Stanley  A.  Beecoff,  M.B.A.* 

Management 
Cole  Hersee  Co. 

Roger  Beer,  M.S.* 

Information  Systems 
Digital  Equipment  Corp. 

Caroline  H.  Beetz,  M.A. 

Economics 
Apollo  Computer 

Richard  E.  Belanger,  B.S.* 

Management 

Digital  Equipment  Corporation 

Robert  E.  Bell,  M.A. 

Art 
Trendlines,  Inc. 

Diane  M.  Bellavance,  M.B.A. 

Marketing 

D.  Bellavance,  Agency 


Ralph  C.  Belmonte,  Ed.D.* 

Speech  Communication 
Revere  Public  Schools 

Barbara  A.  Beltrand,  M.A. 

Accounting 

Lasell  Junior  College 

John  Bena,  J.D. 

Real  Estate 

Racach  Aronson  Shuman 

Patricia  Bench,  M.Ed. 

Alternative  Freshman/Mathematics 

Richard  F.  Benedetto,  M.A.* 

Management 
Merrimack  College 

Paula  Bennett,  Ph.D.* 

English 

Wendy  L.  Bennett,  B.S. 

Radiologic  Technology 
Children's  Hospital 

Maria  F.  Benotti,  M.A. 

Music 

New  England  Conservatory 

Extension 

Marcia  A.  Bergman,  M.Ed. 

Alternative  Freshman/Language 
Skills 

Lisa  M.  Bergman-Parah,  B.A. 

Art 

Northeastern  University 

Benjamin  A.  Berman,  B.A. 

Transportation 

Benjamin  A.  Berman  Assoc. 

Mark  S.  Berman,  M.Ed. 

Health  Management 
Lanessa  Ext  Care  Facility 

Samuel  J.  Bernstein,  Ph.D.* 

English 

Northeastern  University 

James  A.  Berry,  M.S. 

Accounting 
Johnson  &  Johnson 

Bruno  A.  Berszoner,  M.A. 

Economics 
Northeastern  University 

Said  Bhyer,  M.Ed. 

Sociology/Anthropology 
Northeastern  University 

Henry  M.  J.  Biagi,  M.A.* 

Hotel  &  Restaurant  Management 
City  of  Somerville 

Jane  H.  Bick,  Ph.D. 

Speech  Communication 
Northeastern  University 

Deirdre  Bird,  Ph.D. 

Marketing 
Northeastern  University 


n  mi 


John  J.  Bishop,  Ph.D. 

Art 

Samuel  S.  Bishop,  M.F.A.* 

Art 

Northeastern  University 

Susan  Bjorner,  M.L.S. 

Library  Science 
Massachusetts  Institute  of 
Technology 

Carl  Blackman,  B.S.* 

Accounting 

Carl  Blackman  &  Co. 

Charmarie  J.  Blaisdell,  Ph.D.* 

History 

Northeastern  University 

Lorraine  J.  Blake,  M.A. 

Alternative  Freshman/History 

Robert  J.  Blanch,  Ph.D.* 

English 

Northeastern  University 

Dennis  Blanchard,  M.B.A. 

Information  Systems 
Hills  Department  Stores 

Theodore  Blank,  Ed.D.* 

Health  Science 

Massachusetts  Department  of 
Public  Health 

Barbara  A.  Blatner,  D.F.A. 

Alternative  Freshman/English 

Carolyn  L  Blitch,  M.A.* 

Sociology/Anthropology 
Northeastern  University 

Kathleen  Bobick,  B.S. 

Therapeutic  Recreation 
Tufts  University 

Phillip  E.  Bodrock,  Ph.D. 

English 

Index  Group  Inc. 

Phinorice  J.  Boldin,  Esq.,  J.D. 

Real  Estate 

Attorney  General  Office 

Paul  J.  Bolster,  Ph.D. 

Finance 

Northeastern  University 

Laurie  E.  Boris,  B.A. 

Art 

Vincent  C.  Borman,  M.B.A. * 

Transportation 
Raytheon  Company 

Jeffrey  Born,  M.B.A. 

Finance 

Northeastern  University 

Charles  R.  Botticelli,  Ph.D.* 

Biology 

GTE  Laboratories 

Guy  E.  Bottiglio,  M.S. 

Information  Systems 
Digital  Equipment  Corp. 


James  V.  Botto,  B.S. 

Speech  Communication 
Compass  Inc. 

Mark  S.  Bourbeau,  J.D. 

Real  Estate 

Commonwealth  of  Massachusetts 

Alma  Bournazian,  B.A. 

American  Sign  Language 
Massachusetts  Commission  for 
the  Deaf 

Theodore  R.  Bousquet,  B.S.* 

Information  Systems 
Honeywell  Bull 

Patricia  A.  Bowen,  M.A. 

Speech  Communication 

John  F.  Bowes,  Jr.,  M.B.A.* 

Information  Systems 
MBTA 

George  S.  Bowling,  Ed.D.* 

Human  Resources  Management 
Massachusetts  Rehab.  Commission 

Robert  T.  Boyd,  M.S. 

Mathematics 
Town  of  Winchester 

Richard  W.  Boyden,  B.S. 

Information  Systems 
Millbrook  Distributors,  Inc. 

Charles  M.  Boyer,  M.A. 

Alternative  Freshman/English 

Alan  Bradshaw,  M.S.* 

Mathematics 

Sun  Financial  Group 

Thomas  P.  Brady,  Jr.,  M.B.A.* 

Accounting 
Rowe  &  Brady 

Mary  G.  Breed,  B.S. 

Health  Management 
Reading  School  Systems 

Barbara  Breen,  C.P.A. 

Accounting 
Peatmarwick  Mitchell 

Marc  Bremer,  M.B.A. 

Finance 

Northeastern  University 

Joseph  F.  Brennan,  Jr.,  M.S. 

Industrial  Management 
DCASMA 

David  L.  Brett,  M.S. 

Information  Systems 

Reading  Memorial  High  School 

Caroline  B.  Bridgeman-Rees,  M.A.* 

History 
Retired 

Edward  J.  Brigman,  M.A.* 

Economics 
Self-employed 


Barbara  K.  Britt,  B.A. 

Human  Resources  Management 
Britt  Associates,  Inc. 

George  M.  Brooker,  M.B.A.* 

Economics 

Dean  Junior  College 

Miriam  G.  Brooks,  M.F.A. 

Art 

Private  Eves  Sunglass  Corp. 

William  K.  Brotchie,  M.S. 

Chemistry 

Belmont  High  School 

James  Brough,  H.S.D. 

English 
Self-Employed 

Fern  M.  Brown,  M.Ed. 

English 
VOICES 

Sharon  D.  Brown,  M.B.A. 

Marketing 
Boston  Edison 

Charles  K.  Brownlee,  J.D. 

Criminal  Justice  and  Security 
Massachusetts  Trial  Court 
Division 

Ann  S.  Broyer,  B.A. 

Women's  Career  Program 
N.  S.  Stone,  Inc. 

Gordon  L.  Brumm,  Ph.D.* 

Philosophy/Religion 

Richard  P.  Bucci,  M.B.A. 

Accounting 
Self-employed 

Eugene  E.  Bucco,  M.B.A.* 

Accounting 
Newbury  College 

Debra  F.  Buckley,  M.B.A. 

Management 
HCHP 

LeoF.  Buckley,  Jr.,  M.B.A. 

Accounting 
Wang  Laboratories 

Michael  L.  Buckley,  M.B.A. 

Accounting 

Beth  Israel  Hospital 

Anthony  A.  Buglio,  M.S.* 

Speech  Communication 

Kenneth  R.  Buja,  B.S. 

Transportation 
Cullinet  Software  Inc. 

Bruce  Bunten,  B.S.* 

Human  Resources  Management 
Human  Resource  Services 

Paul  Burgoyne,  B.S. 

Real  Estate 
Curran  Associates 

Mary  P.  Burke,  Ph.D. 

Political  Science 


rduuuy  £.00 


Robert  K.  Burke,  M.B.A. 

Information  Systems 
RKB  Associates 

Kathy  S.  Burleson,  B.F.A. 

Art 

Emerson  Lane  Fortuna 

Alfred  C.  Burmeister,  M.B.A. * 

Information  Systems 
Digital  Equipment  Corp. 

Abigail  Burns,  J.D. 

Real  Estate 
A  A  Burns 

Pamoja  Burrell,  Esq.,  J.D. 

Real  Estate 

Budd  Wiley  &  Richlin 

L  Gerald  Bursey,  Ph.D. 

Political  Science 

Harvey  Burstein,  Esq.,  J.D. 

Criminal  Justice  and  Security 
Data  General 

Charles  F.  Burt,  M.B.A.* 

Accounting 

H.  J.  Stabile  &  Son,  Inc. 

Karen  Buzzard,  Ph.D. 

Speech  Communication 

Ronald  J.  Byrnes,  M.B.A.* 

Management  Sciences 
Genzyme 

Janice  L.  Cagan-Teuber,  M.Ed. 

American  Sign  Language 

Diane  P.  Caggiano,  M.B.A. 

Alternative  Freshman/Business 

Susan  M.  Caldarella,  M.A. 

Psychology 
Northeastern  University 

Linda  B.  Caliga,  M.B.A. 

Womens  Career  Program 
Cardinal  Cushing  Hospital 

Bridget  K.  Callahan,  M.A. 

Alternative  Freshman/English 

Joanne  M.  Callum,  M.A. 

Speech  Communication 
Cape  Cod  Community  College 

William  A.  Calore,  B.S. 

Hotel  &  Restaurant  Management 
Rindge  Latin  School 

Charles  Calusdian,  M.B.A.* 

Industrial  Management 
Raytheon  Company 

David  S.  Calverley,  Ph.D.* 

Psychology 

Frank  R.  Campagnoni,  Ph.D. 

Information  Systems 
Northeastern  University    - 

Ballard  C.  Campbell,  Ph.D.* 

History 

Northeastern  University 


James  A.  Canino,  M.A. 

Sociology/Anthropology 
Northern  Essex  Community 
College 

Jananne  S.  Cannon,  M.B.A. 

Marketing 
Northeastern  University 

Raymond  J.  Cannon,  J.D. 

Human  Resources  Management 
Cabot  Corp. 

Edgar  T.  Canty,  M.S.* 

Mathematics 
Bridgewater  State  College 

Kenneth  M.  Capobianco,  M.A. 

English 

Northeastern  University 

Margo  R.  Capparelli,  B.A. 

Alternative  Freshmen/Sociology 

Brian  R.  Caputo,  M.B.A.* 

Management  Sciences 
GTE 

Donald  A.  Carbone,  M.Ed. 

Accounting 

Greater  Boston  Regional 

Education  Center 

Mary  T.  Carbone,  B.A. 

English 

Massachusetts  Bay  Community 

College 

Anthony  M.  Carilli,  A.B. 

Economics 
Self-employed 

Olga  F.  Carito,  M.S. 

Mathematics 

Watertown  School  Department 

Simone  M.  Caron,  M.A. 

History 

Worcester  Polytechnic  Institute 

Charles  J.  Carr,  M.B.A.* 

Accounting 

The  New  Can  Co.,  Inc. 

Janet  H.  Carr,  M.A. 

English 

Northeastern  University 

Joanne  Carr,  M.S. 

Earth  Science 

Rural  Housing  Improvements 

William  F.  Carr,  LLB.* 

Business  Law 
Puopolo  &  Carr,  P.C. 

J.  Christopher  Carroll,  M.S. 

Journalism 

William  S.  Carroll,  Esq.,  J.D.* 

Health  Management 

Brigham  and  Women's  Hospital 

Norman  J.  Cartmill,  M.B.A.* 

Management 
Carnor  Incorporated 


Michelle  Casario,  M.A. 

Economics 
Northeastern  University 

Robert  W.  Casey,  M.Ed. 

Speech  Communication 
Burlington  High  School 

Margaret  P.  Casper,  Ph.D.* 

Mathematics 

King  Philip  Regional  Schools 

Christopher  L.  Cass,  M.A. 

Sociology/Anthropology 
Badger  Engineers,  Inc. 

Edward  C.  Cass,  Ph.D. 

History 

Northeast  Consultants 

Sharron  G.  Cassavant,  Ph.D.* 

English 

Insurance  Cost  Control 

Christopher  J.  Cassidy,  M.S.* 

Information  Systems 
Northeastern  University 

Richard  Castle-Walsh,  M.B.A. 

Womens  Career  Program 
Bethlehem  Steel  Corp. 

Paul  D.  Cayer,  M.B.A. 

Finance 
Building  -19,  Inc. 

Anthony  M.  Celata,  M.Ed. 

Hotel  and  Restaurant  Management 
Somerville  Public  School  System 

Linda  A.  Champa,  M.A. 

English 
Burdett  School 

Terry  H.  Chapman,  Ph.D. 

Women's  Career  Program 
Chapman  Associates 

Sylvia  P.  Charshoodian,  M.A. 

English 

Linda  K.  Cheatham,  B.S. 

Chemistry 
Northeastern  University 

Michael  D.  Chefitz,  J.D. 

Business  Law 
Johnson  Schwartzman 

Kenneth  Chernack,  M.B.A. 

Information  Systems 
Digital  Equipment  Corp. 

Joseph  W.  Chevarley,  Jr.,  M.P.A. 

Management 
Northeastern  University 

Catherine  Chiang,  M.A. 

Economics 
Northeastern  University 

Linda  Chinsen,  B.S. 

Radiologic  Technology 

New  England  Deaconess  Hospital 


HU 


itillll 


John  T.  Chirban,  Ph.D.* 

Psychology 

Harvard  University  and 

Hellenic  College 

Thomas  J.  Chuda,  M.S. 

Criminal  Justice  and  Security 
Massachusetts  Criminal  Justice 
Training  Council 

Curtis  C.  Chui,  M.D. 

Health  Science 
Regional  Health  Center, 
Wilmington 

Henry  0.  Chukwuezi,  Ph.D. 

Health  Management 
Chuzi  Corporation 

Anthony  Cicerone,  M.A.* 

Economics 

Bridgewater  State  College 

Albert  F.  Clark,  Jr.,  M.B.A. 

Finance 

Westlyn  Creamery 

Claudia  A.  Clark,  B.A. 

Mathematics 

Digital  Measurement  Systems 

Kalo  Clarke,  M.A. 

English 

National  Scoliosis  Foundation 

Geoffrey  Clarkson,  D.B.A. 

Management 
Northeastern  University 

Fred  W.  Clarridge,  Jr.,  M.S.* 

Earth  Science 
Wellesley  Public  Schools 

James  A.  Clattenburg,  A.B. 

AH 

Howard  S.  dayman,  B.A. 

Information  Systems 
Dynamics  Research  Corp. 

Richard  W.  Clayton,  Jr.,  M.Ed. 

English 

Dover  Regional  High  School 

Hermine  M.  Cleary,  B.S. 

Alternative  Freshman/Lanaguage 
Skills 

Paul  F.  Cleary,  M.A. 

Economics 
Occupational  Analysis 

Paul  Clemente,  Jr.,  M.S. 

Accounting 
Boston  University 

Jennifer  L.  Clifford,  M.A. 

Economics 

William  M.  Cloran,  J.D.* 

Criminal  Justice  and  Security 
DiCara,  Selig,  and  Holt 

Langdon  D.  Clough,  M.A. 

Earth  Science 

City  of  Central  Falls 


Barbara  A.  Coarr,  B.S. 

Medical  Laboratory  Science 

Sharlene  V.  Cochrane,  Ph.D. 

History 
Boston  College 

Joseph  D.  Codispoti,  M.S. 

Journalism 

Digital  Equipment  Corporation 

Gerald  F.  Cody,  B.A,* 

Marketing 

Dean  Witter  Reynolds,  Inc. 

Mary  C.  Cody,  B.S. 

American  Sign  Language 
Northeastern  University 

Cathy  Cogen,  M.Ed.* 

American  Sign  Language 
Northeastern  University 

William  G.  Coggan,  Ph.D.* 

Human  Resources  Management 
Massasoit  Community  College 

Dennis  L.  Cohen,  M.S. 

Political  Science 

Dorr  &  Shett  Field  Research 

Edward  H.  Cohen,  M.S. 

Earth  Science 

Edward  S.  Cohen,  M.A.* 

Information  Systems 
Hampden  Automotive  Sales 

Richard  A.  Cohen,  B.S. 

Real  Estate 
City  of  Boston 

Robert  F.  Cohen,  B.S. 

Accounting 
Self-employed 

Robert  L  Cohen,  M.S. 

Information  Systems 

Sharon  M.  Cohen,  M.S.M.E. 

Health  Record  Administration 
Trans-Med 

Jaimee  W.  Colbert,  M.A. 

English 
Self-employed 

Janis  I.  Cole,  B.S. 

American  Sign  Language 
Massachusetts  State  Association 
for  the  Deaf 

Annalee  Collins,  R.R.A.,  B.S.* 

Health  Record  Administration 
Northeastern  University 

Eleanor  J.  Collins,  M.S. 

Alternative  Freshman/Mathematics 

Richard  J.  Comings,  M.A.* 

History 

Northeastern  University 

Clinton  H.  Condon,  M.B.A. 

Real  Estate 


Gertrude  A.  Condon,  M.Ed. 

Criminal  Justice  and  Security 
Middlesex  County  District 
Attorney  Office 

Paul  C.  Condon,  M.B.A. 

Marketing 
Xyplex  Inc. 

Elizabeth  M.  Congdon,  M.A.* 

History 

Peabody  School  System 

Christine  M.  Conley,  M.F.A. 

Art 

Spencer  F.  Conley,  B.S. 

Journalism 

Spencer  F.  Conley  Associates 

Leonard  M.  Conlin,  Sr.,  M.Ed.* 

Mathematics  » 

Framingham  North  High  School 

John  F.  Connelly,  Ph.D. 

Information  Systems 
Boston  Edison  Company 

Thomas  F.  Connerty,  B.A. 

Information  Systems 
Prime  Computer,  Inc. . 

Joseph  N.  Connors,  M.P.A.* 

Political  Science 
Liberty  Security 

Louis  E.  Conrad,  M.S. 

Journalism 
Northeastern  University 

John  Conway,  M.A. 

Technical  Communication 
Jack  Conway  Associates 

James  Cook,  A.B. 

Management 
Northeastern  University 

Lindsay  Cook,  M.S. 

Accounting 

Liberty  Mutual  Insurance  Group 

Ellen  M.  Cooney,  M.A. 

English 
Self-employed 

Ronald  P.  Corbett,  Jr.,  M.S. 

Criminal  Justice  and  Security 
Massachusetts  Trial  Court 

John  S.  Corcoran,  M.S. 

Technical  Communication 

Verne  J.  Cordova,  H.S.D. 

Art 

Northeastern  University 

Peter  V.  Corea,  Ph.D. 

Psychology 
Emerson  College 

Norma  Corey,  E.D. 

Alternative  Freshman/Language 
Skills 


rauuuy  cod 


Steven  H.  Cornelius,  M.A. 

Music 
Self-employed 

Dyer  Cornell,  M.B.A.* 

Finance 
Bank  of  Boston 

Richard  S.  Corrente,  M.B.A.* 

Management 
Raytheon  Company 

Leon  L.  Cort,  Ph.D. 

Political  Science 

Edward  V.  Cosgrove,  Ph.D.* 

Biology 

Commonwealth  of  Massachusetts 

James  W.  Cottom,  MA* 

History 

Massasoit  Community  College 

William  J.  Coughlin,  M.A. 

Art 

Blue  Hills  Regional  Technical 

Institute 

Robert  F.  Couture,  B.A. 

Music 

Thomas  F.  Coveney,  M.B.A.* 

Information  Systems 

Stone  &  Webster  Eng.  Corp. 

Wallace  Coyle,  Ph.D. 

English 

University  of  Massachusetts 

Carol  A.  Crane,  M.S. 

English 
Self-employed 

Steven  Crapser,  B.A. 

Purchasing 

The  Kendall  Company 

Bryan  D.  Craven,  B.S. 

Information  Systems 
General  Electric  Company 

Salvatore  A.  Crisafulli,  M.B.A.* 

Information  Systems 
Commonwealth  of  Massachusetts, 
Department  of  Public  Welfare 

Robert  D.  Crofts,  M.A.* 

Economics 

Salem  State  College 

John  F.  Cronin,  Jr.,  M.B.A.* 

Accounting 
Raytheon  Company 

Joseph  V.  Cronin,  Jr.,  J.D.* 

Business  Law 
Massachusetts  Trial  Court 

Joseph  W.  Cronin,  B.S.* 

Management  Sciences 
Cal  Company 

Mary  A.  Cronin,  M.B.A. 

Human  Resources  Management 
Commonwealth  of  Massachusetts 
Personal  Administration 


Hugh  J.  Crossland,  LL.M.* 

Accounting 

Ross  Crossland  Weston  and 

Company 

Bernard  Crowley,  M.B.A. 

Finance 

Putnam  Investment 

Brian  C.  Crowley,  M.B.A.* 

Accounting 
Graftel  Systems  Inc. 

Mark  D.  Crowley,  M.B.A. 

Accounting 

Autex  Systems,  Inc. 

Patricia  L.  Culbert,  M.F.A. 

Drama 

Dean  Junior  College 

David  M.  Culver,  Ph.D.* 

History 

Bridgewater  State  College 

Edmund  Cuoco,  B.A. 

Technical  Communication 
Lexicon,  Inc. 

Helen  M.  Curley,  M.A.* 

Criminal  Justice  and  Security 

Victor  A.  Curran,  B.A. 

Art 

D.C.  Heath 

Joan  Curtice,  M.A. 

Human  Resources  Management 
Micrion  Corporation 

Robert  S.  Curtin,  Ed.D. 

History 

Northeastern  University 

John  J.  Curtis,  M.A. 

Music 

Emerson  College  and  Northeastern 

University 

Madelyn  A.  Curtis,  M.A. 

Music 

Northeastern  University 

Roseann  Cutroni,  M.S. 

Health  Science 

St.  Elizabeth's  Hospital 

Albert  C.  D'Amato,  M.Ed.* 

English 

Northeastern  University 

Miriam  F.  D'Amato,  M.A.* 

English 

Professional  Editorial  Services 

Patricia  Dacey,  M.Ed. 

Women's  Career  Program 
YWCA 

Maria  N.  DaCosta,  Ph.D. 

Economics 

Western  New  England  College 

Robert  E.  Daidone,  J.D. 

Business  Law 
Ricklets,  Uehlein  &  Son 


Carol  A.  Dalto,  Ph.D.* 

Psychology 
John  Hancock 

Bonnie  S.  Dann,  B.F.A. 

Art 

Arnold  E.  Daum,  B.S.* 

Marketing 

Arnold  E.  Daum  Co. 

Ann  M.  Davey,  B.S. 

Real  Estate 
Davey  Associates 

Ellen  Davey,  Esq.,  J.D. 

Real  Estate 
Davey  &  Davey 

Mary  Davey,  Esq.,  J.D. 

Real  Estate 
Davey  &  Davey 

Francis  L  David,  M.Ed. 

Industrial  Management 
Digital  Equipment  Corp. 

Edward  S.  Davidson,  B.S. 

Human  Resources  Management 
Federal  Labor  Relations  Authority 

Lawrence  J.  Davis,  M.B.A. 

Information  Systems 
The  Groton  Group 

Robert  E.  Davis,  M.B.A. 

Accounting 

R.E.  Davis  and  Assoc. 

James  D.  Dawson,  Ph.D. 

Alternative  Freshman/History 

Robert  De  Vries,  M.A. 

Music 
Self-employed 

Bruce  A.  Dean,  Ed.D. 

Criminal  Justice  and  Security 
District  Attorney,  Middlesex 
County 

Lance  M.  Dean,  M.A. 

Alternative  Freshman/English 

Peter  U.  Decenzo,  B.S.* 

Mathematics 
Ashland  High  School 

Peter  F.  DeCosta,  M.S. 

Earth  Science 
United  States  Army 

Paul  DeCristofaro,  M.B.A. 

Accounting 
P  J  C  CPA 

Joyce  Delorey,  M.A. 

Alternative  Freshman/Mathematics 
Northeastern  University 

David  A.  Deluca,  J.D. 

Criminal  Justice  and  Security 
Murphy,  Hesse,  Toomey,  &  Lehane 

John  B.  Deluca,  J.D. 

Business  Law 

Data  General  Corporation 


266         Faculty 


Robert  J.  Dennehy,  M.B.A.* 

Accounting 

Robert  J.  Dennehy,  C.P.A. 

Paul  J.  Derby,  M.B.A.* 

Information  Systems 
Honeywell,  Inc. 

Joseph  B.  OeRoche,  M.F.A.* 

English 

Northeastern  University 

Stephen  R.  Derosier,  M.B.A. 

Management 
Northeastern  University 

Harry  G.  DeSalvatore,  M.S. 

Therapeutic  Recreation 

New  England  Memorial  Hospital 

Ernest  P.  DeSimone,  J.D. 

Real  Estate 

McNamara  and  DeSimone 

Carl  F.  DeSisto,  M.S. 

Transportation 

Stone  and  Webster  Engineering 

Corp. 

Normand  J.  Des  Marais,  M.B.A. 

Purchasing 
Honeywell 

Margaret  D.  Devaney,  M.Ed. 

English 

Braintree  High  School 

Peter  B.  Devaney,  M.A. 

Real  Estate 

Comm  Land  Title  Ins. 

Richard  K.  Deveney,  M.Ed.* 

Mathematics 

Jamaica  Plain  High  School 

James  D.  Devlin,  B.S. 

Marketing 

Digital  Equipment  Corporation 

Emily  Dexter,  M.A. 

American  Sign  Language 
Learning  Center 

Brian  S.  Dextradeur,  B.S.* 

Management  Sciences 
Polaroid  Corp. 

Joanne  C.  Di  Francesco,  M.B.A. 

Marketing 

Mass  Bay  Community  College 

Jeffery  E.  Di  luglio,  M.A. 

English 

Francis  J.  Di  Sabatino,  M.A.* 

Chemistry 
Retired 

Augusto  Diana,  M.A. 

Sociology/Anthropology 
Northeastern  University 

Norma  M.  Diandrea-Alfonso,  B.A. 

Radiologic  Technology 
University  Hospital 


John  Diffenbach,  D.B.A. 

Information  Systems 
Northeastern  University 

Daniel  E.  Dilorati,  J.D. 

Real  Estate 

Department  of  Attorney  General 

Howard  T.  Dimmick,  M.Ed.* 

Earth  Science 
Town  of  Stoneham 

Indralakshmi,  Din-Dayal,  M.Ed. 

Speech  Communication 

Rosemarie  M.  Dittmer,  M.A.* 

English 

Judith  R.  Dituri,  M.A.* 

English 

Mark  Domaszewicz,  M.S.E.E.* 

Mathematics 
Raytheon  Company 

Frederick  Donahoe,  J.D. 

Real  Estate 
Donahoe  Associates 

Marie  L.  Donahue,  M.A. 

Criminal  Justice  and  Security 
Boston  Police  Department 

Diane  M.  Donatio,  M.S. 

English 

West  Suburban  Elder  Services 

Kathryn  Donegan,  B.S. 

Information  Systems 
Textron  Defense  System 

Jane  A.  Donnelly,  M.A. 

Speech  Communication 
J.  E.  Burke  High  School 

Rosemary  T.  Donnelly,  Ed.D. 

English 

Stratus  Computer 

Timothy  R.  Donovan,  Ph.D.* 

English 

Northeastern  University 

Edward  M.  Dormady,  B.A. 

Information  Systems 
Mast  Industries 

Michael  C.  Dornan,  M.A. 

Sociology/Anthropology 

Lynn  E.  Dornink,  M.A. 

Alternative  Freshman/English 

James  W.  Dottin,  Jr.,  M.B.A. 

Information  Systems 
Prime  Computer,  Inc. 

Nadine  V.  Dowling,  M.B.A. 

Human  Resources  Management 
Emerson  College 

Nancy  L.  Dowling,  M.Ed.* 

Alternative  Freshman/Language 

Skills 

Northeastern  University 


Margaret  A.  Downey,  M.A. 

English 

Mary  E.  Dowse,  Ph.D. 

Earth  Science 

Rose  A.  Doyon,  M.A.* 

English 

Middlesex  Community  College 

Ronald  Draper,  M.B.A. 

Management  Sciences 

Gillette 

Joan  F.  Drexelius,  Ph.D.* 

Speech  Communication 
Northeastern  University 

Claire  Driscoll,  M.A. 

Alternative  Freshman/Mathematics 

James  L.  Driscoll,  M.B.A. 

Accounting 

J  and  M  Associates 

John  M.  Driscoll,  M.A. 

Economics 

U.S.  Postal  Service 

William  Driscoll,  Ph.D. 

Accounting 

Internal  Revenue  Service 

David  C.  Dronsick,  M.A.* 

Earth  Science 

Commonwealth  of  Massachusetts 

Neil  F.  Duane,  M.S. 

Technical  Communication 
Boston  Documentation  Design 

Diana  E.  Duarte-Constoch,  B.A. 

Art 

Transcriber  Company  Inc. 

Edward  L.  Dube,  M.B.A.* 

Management 
ELD  Associates 

Catherine  Dube-Fortin,  Ph.D. 

Technical  Communication 
Center  for  Alcoholic  Studies 

James  Ducey,  M.B.A. 

Accounting 

Walter  Martinson,  C.PA. 

Gary  L.  Duehr,  M.F.A. 

English 

Terrance  J.  Duggan,  M.B.A.* 

Finance 

A  Keag  Bank  Shares,  Inc. 

Paula  Duggan,  M.S.A. 

Accounting 

Federal  Home  Loan  Bank 

of  Boston 

Daniel  T.  Dunn,  Jr.,  D.B.A.* 

Marketing 
Northeastern  University 

Laura  W.  Dunn,  M.A.* 

English 


Faculty         267 


Edward  A.  Duprez,  Jr.,  M.B.A.* 

Management 
Emmanuel  College 

Douglas  F.  Durant,  M.F.A. 

Music 

Northeastern  University 

Stephen  Durkin,  Esq.,  J.D. 

Business  Law 

Law  Offices  of  Robert  Karns 

Paul  J.  Duval,  M.B.A. 

Information  Systems 
Commonwealth  of  Massachusetts 

Barbara  Dvorchak,  M.S. 

Mathematics 
Northeastern  University 

William  C.  Dwyer,  M.B.A.* 

Management 

William  C.  Dwyer  Associates 

Joann  L.  Dzink-Fox,  M.S. 

Health  Science 
Forsyth  Dental  Center 

Carl  W.  Eastman,  MA* 

Speech  Communication 
Northeastern  University 

William  T.  Edgett,  M.A.* 

Human  Resources  Management 
Northeastern  University 

Gary  A.  Edwards,  M.B.A. 

Accounting 
Self-employed 

Richard  K.  Edwards,  M.A. 

Sociology/Anthropology 
Pine  Manor  College 

Andrew  E.  Efstathiou,  B.A.* 

Information  Systems 
Commonwealth  of  Massachusetts 

Kathryn  A.  Efstathiou,  B.A. 

Information  Systems 

Judith  R.  Ehlen,  M.A. 

English 

David  M.  Ehrmann,  B.S.* 

Speech  Communication 
Codex  Corporation 

Luckson  E.  Ejofodomi,  Ph.D. 

History 

Abdelmoujib  El-Mernissi,  M.S. 

Alternative  Freshman/Mathematics 

James  H.  Elgin,  M.B.A.* 

Information  Systems 
Digital  Equipment  Corp. 

Irene  A.  Eltos,  H.S.D. 

Art 

Susan  J.  Engelman,  A.S. 

Radiologic  Technology 
University  Hospital 

Louis  J.  Ennis,  M.B.A.* 

Human  Resources  Management 
Brandeis  University 


Binnur  Ercem,  M.A. 

Sociology/Anthropology 
Northeastern  University 

Ali  S.  Errishi,  Ph.D. 

Philosophy/Religion 
Fitchburg  State  College 

Virginia  Eskin,  M.A. 

Music 

Northeastern  University 

Herbert  J.  Eskot,  Ph.D.* 

Economics 

James  A.  Evangelista,  B.S. 

Health  Science 
Leonard  Morse  Hospital 

Ugo  E.  Evangelista,  M.S. 

Mathematics 

Revere  School  System 

Richard  P.  Evans,  M.Ed. 

Human  Resources  Management 
Management  Collaborative 

Anne  C.  Ewers,  M.A. 

Music 

Boston  Lyric  Opera 

Robert  M.  Fahey,  M.Ed.* 

Information  Systems 
Nixdorf  Computer  Corp. 

Sheryl  L.  Fairchild,  B.S. 

Therapeutic  Recreation 
Maiden  Hospital 

Eugene  F.  Fallon,  M.B.A.* 

Finance 
GenRad,  Inc. 

Thomas  J.  Fallon,  M.B.A. 

Marketing 

Digital  Sales  Associates 

Edward  J.  Falvey,  M.B.A.* 

Management 
Keystone  Group 

Ghodratallah  Farahani,  M.A. 

Political  Science 
Boston  University 

Richard  J.  Faulstich,  A.B. 

Human  Resource  Management 
Raytheon  Company 

Joseph  R.  Favaloro,  M.B.A. 

Finance 
Bank  of  Boston 

Trudi  R.  Feinstein,  Ph.D. 

Psychology 

Eileen  Feldman,  M.A. 

English 
Self-employed 

Indira  E.  Fernandes,  M.S. 

Biology 

Northeastern  University 

George  F.  Ferrar,  M.S. 

Art 

Art  Institute 


Elizabeth  M.  Ferrarini,  M.S. 

English 

James  F.  Ferreira,  M.B.A. 

Information  Systems 
Technical  Aid  Corp. 

James  E.  Ferrier,  M.S. 

Criminal  Justice  and  Security 
Northeastern  University 

James  J.  Ferriter,  M.B.A. 

Health  Management 
Industrial  Medical  Center 

William  A.  Ferson,  M.A.* 

Economics 

U.S.  Department  of  Labor 

George  W.  Fiddler  III,  M.B.A. 

Accounting 
Textron  Corp- 

Barbara  Ann  P.  Filo,  Ph.D.* 

History 

Bank  of  New  England 

William  D.  Finan,  Ed.D.* 

Mathematics 

Charles  A.  Findley,  Ph.D.* 

Speech  Communication 

Francis  X.  Finigan,  M.Ed.* 

Mathematics 
Retired 

Joseph  L.  Finigan,  M.Ed. 

Mathematics 

Reading  Memorial  High  School 

Frederick  B.  Fink,  M.B.A. 

Marketing 

Kenneth  Finkelstein,  Ph.D. 

Earth  Science 

National  Oceanic  and  ATM 

Administration 

Albert  J.  Finney,  Jr.,  B.S.* 

Accounting 
Raytheon  Company 

Susan  L.  B.  Fintonis,  J.D. 

Management 
Endicott  College 

Louis  D.  Fiore,  M.D. 

Health  Science 
VAMC 

Harold  R.  Fisher,  J.D. 

Information  Systems 
Commonwealth  of  Massachusetts 

Marjorie  Fisher,  B.S. 

Health  Record  Administration 
Harvard  University  Health 
Services 

William  H.  Fisher,  M.A. 

Criminal  Justice  and  Security 
Massachusetts  Department  of 
Mental  Health 


268         Faculty 


James  E.  Fitzgerald,  M.A. 

Modern  Language 

Leo  J.  Fitzgerald,  M.B.A.* 

Management 
General  Electric  Co. 

Kevin  T.  Fitzpatrick,  M.B.A.* 

Finance 

Boston  Public  Library 

J.  Joseph  Fitzsimmons,  M.B.A.* 

Management 
Polaroid  Corp. 

Roberta  Fitzsimmons,  J.D. 

Business  Law 

Law  Offices  of  Roberta 

Fitzsimmons 

James  C.  Flaherty,  M.L.S. 

Library  Science 
Framingham  Public  Library 

Ruth  W.  Flaherty,  M.B.A. 

Human  Resources  Management 

Frances  B.  Fleming,  B.F.A. 

Art 

Frances  Fleming,  Graphic  Design 

William  P.  Fleming,  M.B.A. 

Marketing 
Goddard  Hospital 

Anne  Fletcher,  M.A. 

Drama 

Myrtle  R.  Flight,  Esq.,  J.O. 

Health  Management 
Self-employed 

David  E.  Floreen,  M.P.A.* 

Political  Science 
Massachusetts  Bankers 
Association 

Edith  E.  Flynn,  Ph.D. 

Criminal  Justice  and  Security 
Northeastern  University 

Leo  M.  Flynn,  M.B.A.* 

Real  Estate 

Leo  Flynn,  R.E.  &  Appraising 

Peter  E.  Flynn,  J.D.* 

Real  Estate 
Flynn  Realty,  Inc. 

Thomas  J.  Flynn,  J.D. 

Human  Resources  Management 
Thomas  J.  Flynn  &  Assoc. 

William  B.  Flynn,  Ph.D.* 

Psychology 

Philip  S.  Fogelman,  M.A. 

Alternative  Freshman/English 

Robert  E.  Foley,  M.B.A. 

Accounting 

Council  for  Economic  Action,  Inc. 

Murray  Forbes,  M.F.A. 

Art 

Navigator  Foundation 


Jacqueline  M.  Fortier,  M.A. 

Psychology 
McLean  Hospital 

Armand  L.  Fortin,  B.S.* 

Purchasing 
Honeywell,  Inc. 

Christopher  C.  Foss,  M.A. 

Alternative  Freshman/English 

James  Foss,  Jr.,  LL.B. 

Human  Resources  Management 
Federal  Mediation  and  Counseling 
Services 

Douglas  G.  Foster,  M.Ed.* 

Earth  Science 

Catholic  Memorial  High  School 

Gale  P.  Foster,  B.S.* 

Marketing 

Foster  &  Associates 

William  M.  Fowler,  Ph.D.* 

History 

Northeastern  University 

Robert  M.  Fox,  M.B.A.* 

Marketing 
Gerber  Electronics 

Walter  Fox  Tree,  M.A.T.* 

Art 

University  of  Massachusetts 

Laura  L.  Frader,  Ph.D. 

History 

Northeastern  University 

Thomas  B.  Francis,  Jr.,  M.P.A. 

Human  Resources  Management 
City  of  Boston 

Audrey  K.  Frank,  M.S.W. 

American  Sign  Language 

Harriet  Fraser,  M.Ed. 

Alternative  Freshman/Language 
Skills 

Rosemary  Frasso,  A.S. 

Radiologic  Technology 
Children's  Hospital 

Howard  H.  Freedman,  M.S.* 

Accounting 
Raytheon  Company 

Paula  M.  French,  M.B.A. 

Management 
Northrup  Corporation 

Melvin  W.  Friedman,  M.B.A.* 

Management 

M.  W.  Friedman  Associates 

Kurt  M.  Frim,  M.B.A. 

Management 

General  Electric  Aerospace 

Ingeborg  Fulepp,  M.A. 

English 

Robert  L.  Fulford,  B.S. 

Purchasing 
Varian/Extrion 


Vincent  J.  Furlong,  M.A. 

Industrial  Management 
Defense  Supply  Agency 

Mira  A.  Furth,  M.B.A. 

Women's  Career  Program 
Furth  Associates 

W.  Arthur  Gagne,  Jr.,  M.B.A.* 

Management 
Edadcon  Services  Co. 

Christine  W.  Gailey,  Ph.D. 

Sociology/Anthropology 
Northeastern  University 

Nona  Gainsforth,  B.A. 

Music 
Self-employed 

Ronald  M.  Galiazzo,  M.Ed. 

American  Sign  Language 
Northeastern  University 

Esther  M.  Gallagher,  D.M.D.* 

Health  Science 
Tufts  University 

Richard  R.  Gallagher,  M.Ed. 

Information  Systems 
Marshfield  High  School 

Mary  E.  Gamerman,  B.A. 

Biology 

Northeastern  University 

Laura  Ganino,  B.F.A. 

Art 
Autographix  Inx. 

Chun  Xin  Gao,  M.S. 

Chemistry 
Northeastern  University 

David  A.  Gardner,  Ph.D. 

Technical  Communication 
Lotus 

Paul  C.  Gay,  J.D.* 

Business  Law 
Harrison  &  McGuire 

Jonathan  Gbur,  M.B.A. 

Transportation 

Northern  Transportation,  Inc. 

Jonathan  M.  Geer,  B.S. 

Earth  Science 

Commonwealth  of  Massachusetts 
Department  of  Environmental 
Management 

Sandra  E.  Geer,  M.Ed.* 

Psychology 

Samuel  S.  Geller,  M.B.A.* 

Accounting 
FSC,  Inc. 

Leanne  M.  George,  B.A. 

Art 
Self-employed 

Anne  M.  Germain,  Ph.D. 

Information  Systems 
Self-employed 


Faculty         269 


Ara  Ghazarians,  M.A. 

Sociology/ Anthropology 
Armenian  Review  Inc. 

David  M.  Ghazil,  M.B.A. 

Human  Resources  Management 
Honeywell 

James  G.  Giammarinaro,  M.B.A. 

Finance 

Dennison  Manufacturing  Company 

Dominic  Giarratani,  J.D. 

Real  Estate 

U.S.  Postal  Service 

Adrian  T.  Gilbert,  M.S. 

Biology 

Northeastern  University 

Katherine  L.  Gilbert,  B.A. 

Sociology/Anthropology 
Northeastern  University 

Robert  E.  Gilbert,  Ph.D. 

Political  Science 
Northeastern  University 

Mary  L.  Gill,  M.A. 

Health  Management 
Blue  Cross/Blue  Shield 

La  Rue  W.  Gilleland,  M.A. 

Journalism 
Northeastern  University 

Ruth  Gilleran,  M.B.A. 

Accounting 

The  Gillette  Company 

William  J.  Gillespie,  Ph.D. 

Therapeutic  Recreation 
Northeastern  University 

Louis  F.  Giorgetti,  M.S. 

Medical  Laboratory  Science 
Milton  Medical  Lab 

Alan  B.  Gladstone,  B.S.* 

Accounting 

Alan  Gladstone,  CPA 

Phyllis  S.  Glick,  D.B.A. 

Political  Science 

James  L.  Glinos,  M.Ed.* 

Human  Resources  Management 
Glinos  Associates 

Victor  B.  Godin,  D.B.A. 

Information  Systems 
Northeastern  University 

Robert  M.  Gogan,  Jr.,  M.A. 

English 

Mount  Ida  College 

Maureen  D.  Goggin,  M.A. 

English 

Northeastern  University 

Peter  N.  Goggin,  M.A. 

Alternative  Freshman/English 


Meryl  Goldberg,  M.A. 

Music 

Robert  L  Goldberg,  M.B.A.* 

Management 

Daniel  Golden,  Ph.D. 

English 
Wheaton  College 

Kenneth  E.  Golden,  M.B.A. 

Information  Systems 
Prime  Computer,  Inc. 

Frederick  T.  Golder,  Esq.,  LL.M.* 

Human  Resources  Management 
Self-employed 

Stan  Goldman,  J.D.* 

Political  Science 
Massachusetts  Department  of 
Mental  Health 

Charles  W.  Goldsmith,  J.D. 

Journalism 

United  Press  International 

Harold  M.  Goldstein,  Ph.D. 

Economics 
Northeastern  University 

Howard  I.  Goldstein,  J.D.* 

Business  Law 
Self-employed 

M.  Alvin  Goldstein,  A.B.* 

Information  Systems 
Consultant 

Robert  J.  Goldstein,  M.A.* 

Sociology/Anthropology 
U.S.  Postal  Service 

Susan  J.  Goldwitz,  A.M. 

English 

Danforth  Museum  of  Art 

Maria  G.  Gonzalez-Rivera,  B.A. 

Economics 

Robert  S.  Goodman,  M.A. 

Human  Resources  Management 
Grossmans,  Inc. 

Stephen  Goodyear,  M.A." 

Modern  Language 

Daniel  D.  Gordon,  M.A.* 

Economics 

Salem  State  College 

Robert  L.  Gore,  M.S. 

Radiologic  Technology 
Carney  Hospital 

Myron  S.  Goretsky,  Esq.,  J.D. 

Hotel  and  Restaurant  Management 
New  Hampshire  Technical 
Institute 

Mary  Jane  Gorton,  M.Ed.* 

Art 

Babson  College 

Leslie  C.  Gosule,  B.S.* 

Accounting 

Leslie  C.  Gosule  &  Company 


Daniel  Z.  Gould,  M.B.A.* 

Industrial  Management 
GTE 

Helen  F.  Gould,  M.S. 

Nursing 

VA  Outpatient  Clinic 

Frank  S.  Govern,  M.S. 

Health  Management 

JCRT  Harvard  Medical  School 

Saeed  Gozashti,  M.S. 

Chemistry 
Northeastern  University 

David  F.  Grace,  C.A.G.S.* 

English 

Lasell  Junior  College 

Daniel  A.  Grady,  M.B.A.* 

Accounting 
Bose  Corp. 

William  E.  Grady,  M.B.A.* 

Industrial  Management 
Grady  &  Associates 

Robert  T.  Granfield,  M.A. 

Sociology/Anthropology 
Northeastern  University 

Daniel  J.  Grant,  Jr.,  M.A. 

Ah 

Textron  Defense  Systems 

William  H.  Grass,  M.A. 

Music 

Boston  Conservatory  of  Music  and 

Boston  University 

Joan  Grasso,  A.S. 

Radiologic  Technology 
Lahey  Clinic 

Sandra  M.  Grasso,  M.S. 

Biology 
Lesley  College 

Leon  S.  Graubard,  M.A.* 

Economics 

Worcester  Polytechnic  Institute 

Albert  E.  Gravelle,  M.P.A. 

Transportation 

Mass  Bay  Transportation 

Authority 

Alec  Grey,  J.D. 

Real  Estate 

Arthur  M.  Graziano,  B.S. 

Human  Resources  Management 
Sweet  Life  Retail 

Lewis  Greenberg,  M.A. 

Psychology 
Northeastern  University 

Claire  M.  Greene,  M.B.A. 

English 

Northeastern  University 

John  T.  Gregg,  B.A.* 

Real  Estate 
Beal  &  Company 


270         Faculty 


Kristo  A.  Gregory,  M.B.A.* 

Finance 

Prudential  Bache  Securities 

Ann  M.  Grenneli,  MA 

Alternative  Freshman/History 
Boston  College 

Ralph  Grieco,  M.B.A. 

Accounting 
Northeastern  University 

Gerald  R.  Griffin,  Ph.D.* 

English 

Northeastern  University 

Julia  A.  Griffin,  Ph.D. 

Music 

Northeastern  University 

John  L.  Griffith,  B.S.* 

Management 

State  Department  of  Environmen- 
tal Management 

Randall  P.  Grometstein,  J.D. 

Business  Law 

Donna  P.  Grosjean,  B.S. 

Biology 

Brigham  &  Womens  Hospital 

Cherif  Guenoune,  M.A. 

Sociology/Anthropology 

Ronald  E.  Guittarr,  B.S.* 

Human  Resources  Management 
Retired 

Margaret  E.  Gundal,  M.A. 

Alternative  Freshman/Mathematics 

Roland  D.  Gunn,  M.A. 

Philosophy/Religion 

Barry  C.  Guthray,  Esq.,  J.D. 

Business  Law 

Commonwealth  of  Massachusetts 

Securities  Division 

Herbert  R.  Haber,  M.A. 

English 

Compugraphic  Corporation 

Reginald  W.  Hache,  M.A/ 

Music 

Northeastern  University 

Katherine  K.  Hacker,  M.B.A. 

Management 
Sheraton  Corporation 

James  Haddad,  B.S. 

Mathematics 
Scituate  Post  Office 

Joanna  Hadjicostandi,  Ph.D. 

Sociology/Anthropology 
Northeastern  University 

William  T.  Hadley,  B.S. 

Marketing 

The  Hadley  Company,  Inc. 

Vivian  M.  Haggis,  M.S. 

Information  Systems 
Haggis  Consulting 


George  W.  Hahn,  M.A.T. 

Earth  Science 

New  England  Marine  Educational 

Services 

Kenneth  W.  Hale,  M.B.A. 

Accounting 
Ernst  &  Whinney 

John  P.  Haley,  C.A.G.S. 

Information  Systems 
City  of  Revere 

Jay  A.  Halfond,  Ph.D. 

Management 

Caroline  G.  Hall,  B.A. 

Real  Estate 

Law  Offices  of  Peter  Flynn 

Raymond  C.  Halliday,  M.A. 

Alternative  Freshman/English 

Paul  M.  Halloran,  B.S/ 

Information  Systems 
Raytheon  Company 

Isadora  Halzel,  M.B.A/ 

Management 

Charles  Stark  Draper  Labs 

Patricia  W.  Hamilton,  M.A. 

Technical  Communication 

Susan  C.  Hammond,  C.P.A. 

Accounting 
Self-employed 

Suzanne  L  Hamner,  M.A. 

Alternative  Freshman/History 

William  F.  Hancock,  Jr.,  M.B.A.* 

Finance 

Digital  Equipment  Corp. 

Carolyn  Haneke,  B.A. 

Technical  Communication 
Self-employed 

Mary  V.  Hanley,  M.A. 

Nursing 
Self-employed 

Phyllis  M.  Hanlon,  M.Ed. 

Alternative  Freshman/Mathematics 

Christine  M.  Hannula,  B.A. 

Technical  Communication 
Wang  Laboratories 

Robert  A.  Hannula,  M.A. 

^Technical  Communication 
Digital  Equipment  Corp. 

Joseph  J.  Hansen,  M.B.A.* 

Mathematics 
Raytheon  Company 

Norman  E.  Hansen,  M.B.A/ 

Marketing 
Endicott  College 

Richard  A.  Hargreaves,  M.A. 

Mathematics 
Westwood  High  School 


James  Hargrove,  J.D. 

Real  Estate 

Priscilla  G.  Harmel,  M.Ed. 

Drama 

David  J.  Harrigan,  M.B.A/ 

Management  Sciences 
D.  J.  Harrigan  Associates 

Paul  E.  Harrington,  M.S. 

Economics 
Northeastern  University 

Raymond  P.  Harrington,  Ph.D. 

Alternative  Freshman/History 

Perry  H.  Harris,  B.A. 

Information  Systems 
Self-employed 

Ruth  Ann  M.  Harris,  Ph.D.* 

History 

Northeastern  University 

Thomas  M.  Hart,  M.S.* 

Accounting 
U.S.  Treasury 

Harold  Harutunian,  Ph.D.* 

Mathematics 
Salem  State  College 

Ruth  Harutunian,  C.A.G.S. 

Mathematics 

Watertown  School  Department 

Donald  A.  Harwood,  Esq.,  J.D. 

Criminal  Justice  and  Security 
Law  Office  of  D.  J.  Piscitelli 

Mohammad  S.  Hasan,  M.A. 

Economics 
Northeastern  University 

Martha  S.  Hassell,  B.A. 

Art 

New  England  School  of 

Photography 

Donald  R.  Hayden,  B.S/ 

Information  Systems 
Digital  Equipment