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Sixth Edition {Aprils 1923) 



No. 7 


THE COVENANT 

OF THE 

LEAGUE OF NATIONS 


Being a Reprint of the Original 
Text of the Covenant, together 
with the Amendments adopted 
by the Assembly during its 
Second and Third Sessions, 1921 
and 1922 


The footnote on page 11 should read 
* Article 16. The first paragraph is replaced 
by the following four paragraphs. 


LEAGUE OF NATIONS UNION 
15 GROSVENOR CRESCENT, S.W.i 


ONE PENNY 












V 






: 


- 

■ 



LIBRARY 
UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA 



introductory note 

The Covenant of the League of Nations constitutes Part I of the mairi 
treaties drawn up by the Representatives of the Allied and Associated Powers 
at the Peace Conference at Paris at the conclusion of the Great War of 1914- 
18. It is Part I, therefore, of the Treaties of Peace between the Allied and 
Associated Powers and 

(1) Germany, signed at Versailles, June 28, 1919; 

(2) AuSlria, ,, St. Germain-en-Laye, September 10,1919; 

(3) Bulgaria, „ Neuilly-sur-Seine, November 27, 1919; 

(4) Hungary, „ Trianon, June 4, 1920; 

as well as of the unratified and therefore inoperative treaty between the Powers 
and Turkey, signed at Sevres on AuguSl 10,1920. The Covenant took effect 
from the date of the deposit of the instrument of Ratification of the Treaty of 
Versailles by the Representatives of Germany on January 10, 1920. 

Specific references to America in the Covenant muSI be read in the light 
of subsequent events. Article 4 of the Covenant lays down that “The Council 
shall consist of Representatives of the Principal Allied and Associated Powers, 
together with Representatives of four other Members of the League"—of 
Representatives, that is to say, of America, Britain, France, Italy and Japan, 
and four other States. Again, in the liSt of “Original Members of the League 
of Nations Signatories of the Treaty of Peace,” which constitutes Annex I of 
the Covenant, the firSt country mentioned is the United States of America. 
Yet America is not to-day a Member of the League, because the Treaty con¬ 
taining the Covenant of the League of Nations, although signed, has never 
been ratified by America, who accordingly has not taken the seat which Still 
awaits her on the Council of the League. 

It is on the basis of this Covenant, accepted now by fifty-two States, that 
the League has worked since it a&ually came into being with the firSt Meeting 
of the Council on January 16, 1920. The experience of nearly two years 
adive working of the League on that basis induced the Assembly at its 
second Meeting in September, 1921, to adopt the amendments which are 
printed in the following pages as foot-notes to the corresponding Articles of 
the original text of the Covenant. 

Article 26 of the original text States that “Amendments to this Covenant 
will take effed when ratified by the Members of the League whose Repre¬ 
sentatives compose the Council, and by a majority of the Members of the 
League whose Representatives compose the Assembly." To that paragraph, 
however, which deals with the general question of ratification of amendments, 
the Second Assembly adopted as an amendment a new basis of ratification; 
but pending ratification of this new basis, the Assembly decided that all the 
newly-adopted amendments, and not the original text of the Covenant, should 
be considered authoritative. 


Besides the Covenant of the League of Nations, there is only one other 
part of the above-mentioned Peace Treaties which appears identically in 

3 



them all—the part devoted to the international organisation of labour. 
Article 23, Clause (a) of the Covenant Slates that Members of the League 

“will endeavour to secure and maintain fair and humane conditions of 
labour for men, women and children, both in their own countries and in 
all countries to which their commercial and industrial relations extend, 
and for that purpose will establish and maintain the necessary inter¬ 
national organisations “ 

The organisation here foreshadowed was considered by the Peace Confer¬ 
ence, which, accordingly, drafted a Labour Section and incorporated it as 
Part XIII of the Treaty of Versailles, and as Parts XIII, XII, XIII and XII 
respectively of the Treaties of St. Germain, Neuilly, Trianon and Sevres. 

The Labour Section of the Peace Treaties is also reprinted in pamphlet 
form by the League of Nations Union. 

Note .—The text of the Covenant reprinted in the following pages is exadtly 
that of the Peace Treaties mentioned above, except that a descriptive 
title is inserted in brackets at the head of each Article. 


Membership of the League, September, 1922, 52 States 


Original Members 


Argentine 

Japan 

Belgium 

Liberia 

Bolivia 

NETHERLANrS 

Brazil 

Nicaragua 

British Empire 

Norway 

Canada 

Panama 

Australia 

Paraguay 

South Africa 

Persia 

New Zealand 

Peru 

India 

Poland 

Chili 

Portugal 

China 

Roumania 

Colombia 

Salvador 

Cuba 

Serb-Croat-Slovene S' 

Denmark 

Siam 

France 

Spain 

Greece 

Sweden 

Guatemala 

Switzerland 

Haiti 

Czecho-Slovakia 

Honduras 

Uruguay 

Italy 

Venezuela 

Elected Members 

Elected by 

Albania 

First Assembly, 1920 

Austria 

n 

Bulgaria 


Costa Rica 


Finland 


Luxemburg 


Esthonia 

Second Assembly, 1921 

Lithuania 


Hungary 

Third Assembly, 1922 


4 




The Covenant of 
The League of Nations 

[the preamble] 

THE HIGH CONTRACTING PARTIES 

In order to promote international co-operation and to achieve 
international peace and security 

by the acceptance of obligations not to resort to war, 
by the prescription of open, ju£t and honourable relations between 
nations, 

by the firm establishment of the understandings of international law 
as the actual rule of condudt among Governments, and 
by the maintenance of juStice and a scrupulous respedt for all treaty 
obligations in the dealings of organised peoples with one another. 
Agree to this Covenant of the League of Nations. 

ARTICLE i [membership] 

The original Members of the League of Nations shall be those of the 
Signatories which are named in the Annex to this Covenant and also 
such of those other States named in the Annex as shall accede without 
reservation to this Covenant. Such accession shall be effected by a 
Declaration deposited with the Secretariat within two months of the 
coming into force of the Covenant. Notice thereof shall be sent to all 
other Members of the League. 

Any fully self-governing State, Dominion or Colony not named in 
the Annex may become a Member of the League if its admission is 
agreed to by two-thirds of the Assembly, provided that it shall give 
effective guarantees of its sincere intention to observe its international 
obligations, and shall accept such regulations as may be prescribed by 
the League in regard to its military, naval and air forces and armaments. 

Any Member of the League may, after two years' notice of its inten¬ 
tion so to do, withdraw from the League, provided that all its inter¬ 
national obligations and all its obligations under this Covenant shall 
have been fulfilled at the time of its withdrawal. 

ARTICLE 2 [executive machinery] 

The adlion of the League under this Covenant shall be effected 
through the instrumentality of an Assembly and of a Council, with a 
permanent Secretariat. 


5 


Article 3 [assembly] 

The Assembly shall considl of Representatives of the Members of 
the League. 

The Assembly shall meet at Stated intervals and from time to time as 
occasion may require at the Seat of the League or at such other place 
as may be decided upon. 

The Assembly may deal at its meetings with any matter within the 
sphere of adtion of the League or affedting the peace of the world. 

At meetings of the Assembly each Member of the League shall have 
one vote, and may have not more than three Representatives. 

ARTICLE 4 [ council ] 

The Council shall consist of Representatives of the Principal Allied 
and Associated Powers, together with Representatives of four other 
Members of the League. These four Members of the League shall be 
seledted by the Assembly from time to time in its discretion. Until the 
appointment of the Representatives of the four * Members of the League 
firSI seledted by the Assembly, Representatives of Belgium, Brazil, 
Spain and Greece shall be members of the Council. 

With the approval of the majority of the Assembly, the Council may 
name additional Members of the League whose Representatives shall 
always be members of the Council; the Council with like approval 
may increase the number of Members of the League to be seledted by 
the Assembly for representation on the Council.! 

The Council shall meet from time to time as occasion may require, 
and at lead! once a year, at the Seat of the League, or at such other place 
as may be decided upon. 

The Council may deal at its meetings with any matter within the 
sphere of adtion of the League or affedting the peace of the world. 

Any Member of the League not represented on the Council shall be 
invited to send a Representative to sit as a member at any meeting of 
the Council during the consideration of matters specially affedfing the 
interests of that Member of the League. 

At meetings of the Council, each Member of the League represented 
on the Council shall have one vote, and may have not more than one 
Representative. 

ARTICLE 5 [voting and procedure ] 

Except where otherwise expressly provided in this Covenant or by 
the terms of the present Treaty, decisions at any meeting of the As¬ 
sembly or of the Council shall require the agreement of all the Members 
of the League represented at the meeting. 

* In September, 1922, the Third Assemby raised the number of non - permanent 
Members of the Council to six. 

t Article 4 , as amended, has the following clause inserted here :— 

The Assembly shall fix by a two-thirds majority the rules dealing with the election 
of the non-permanent Members of the Council, and particularly such regulations as 
relate to their term of office and the conditions of re-eligibility 

6 


All matters of procedure at meetings of the Assembly or of the 
Council, including the appointment of Committees to investigate 
particular matters, shall be regulated by the Assembly or by the Council 
and may be decided by a majority of the Members of the League 
represented at the meeting. 

The firSt meeting of the Assembly and the firSt meeting of the 
Council shall be summoned by the President of the United States of 
America. 


ARTICLE 6 [secretariat] 

The permanent Secretariat shall be established at the Seat of the 
League. The Secretariat shall comprise a Secretary-General and such 
secretaries and Staff as may be required. 

The firSt Secretary-General shall be the person named in the Annex; 
thereafter the Secretary-General shall be appointed by the Council with 
the approval of the majority of the Assembly. 

The secretaries and Staff of the Secretariat shall be appointed by the 
Secretary-General with the approval of the Council. 

The Secretary-General shall aCt in that capacity at all meetings of 
the Assembly and of the Council. 

*The expenses of the Secretariat shall be borne by the Members of 
the League in accordance with the apportionment of the expenses of 
the International Bureau of the Universal PoStal Union. 

ARTICLE 7 [seat, qualifications for officials, immunities] 
The Seat of the League is established at Geneva. 

The Council may at any time decide that the Seat of the League shall 
be established elsewhere. 

All positions under or in connection with the League, including the 
Secretariat, shall be open equally to men and women. 

Representatives of the Members of the League and officials of the 
League when engaged on the business of the League shall enjoy 
diplomatic privileges and immunities. 

The buildings and other property occupied by the League or its 
officials or by Representatives attending its meetings shall be inviolable. 

ARTICLE 8 [reduction of armaments] 

The Members of the League recognise that the maintenance of peace 
requires the reduction of national armaments to the lowed point con¬ 
sistent with national safety and the enforcement by common aCtion of 
international obligations. 

* Article 6. This last paragraph, as amended, reads :— 

The expenses'of the League shall be borne by the Members of the League in the pro¬ 
portion decided by the Assembly. 


7 


The Council, taking account of the geographical situation and cir¬ 
cumstances of each State, shall formulate plans for such redudtion for 
the consideration and action of the several Governments. 

Such plans shall be subject to reconsideration and revision at leaSt 
every ten years. 

After these plans shall have been adopted by the several Govern¬ 
ments, the limits of armaments therein fixed shall not be exceeded 
without the concurrence of the Council. 

The Members of the League agree that the manufacture by private 
enterprise of munitions and implements of war is open to grave objec¬ 
tions. The Council shall advise how the evil effedts attendant upon such 
manufacture can be prevented, due regard being had to the necessities 
of those Members of the League which are not able to manufacture the 
munitions and implements of war necessary for their safety. 

The Members of the League undertake to interchange full and frank 
information as to the scale of their armaments, their military, naval and 
air programmes and the condition of such of their industries as are 
adaptable to war-like purposes. 

ARTICLE 9 [permanent military commission] 

A permanent Commission shall be constituted to advise the Council 
on the execution of the provisions of Articles i and 8 and on military, 
naval and air questions generally. 

ARTICLE io [guarantees against aggression] 

The Members of the League undertake to respeCt and preserve as 
againSt external aggression the territorial integrity and existing political 
independence of all Members of the League. In case of any such 
aggression or in case of any threat or danger of such aggression the 
Council shall advise upon the means by which this obligation shall be 
fulfilled. 

ARTICLE 11 [action in case of war or danger of war] 

Any war or threat of war, whether immediately affedting any of the 
Members of the League or not, is hereby declared a matter of concern 
to the whole League, and the League shall take any adtion that may be 
deemed wise and effedtual to safeguard the peace of nations. In case 
any such emergency should arise the Secretary-General shall on the 
request of any Member of the League forthwith summon a meeting of 
the Council. 

It is also declared to be the friendly right of each Member of the 
League to bring to the attention of the Assembly or of the Council any 
circumstance whatever affedting international relations which 
threatens to disturb international peace or the good understanding 
between nations upon which peace depends. 

8 


ARTICLE 12 [DISPUTES TO BE SUBMITTED TO ARBITRATION OR INQUIRY] 
* The Members of the League agree that if there should arise be¬ 
tween them any dispute likely to lead to a rupture, they will submit the 
matter either to arbitration or to inquiry by the Council, and they agree 
in no case to resort to war until three months after the award by the 
arbitrators or the report by the Council. 

In any case under this Article the award of the arbitrators shall be 
made within a reasonable time, and the report of the Council shall be 
made within six months after the submission of the dispute. 

ARTICLE 13 [arbitration of disputes] 
f The Members of the League agree that whenever any dispute shall 
arise between them which they recognise to be suitable for submission 
to arbitration and which cannot be satisfactorily settledhyllfplomacy, 
they will'submit the whole subj eft-matter to arbitration. 

Disputes as to the interpretation of a treaty, as to any question of 
international law, as to tHeexistence of any faft which if established 
would constitute a breach of a*" international obligation, or as to the 
extent and nature of the reparation to be made for any such breach, are 
declared to be among those which are generally suitable for submission 
to arbitration. 

For the consideration of any such dispute the court of arbitration to 
which the case is referred shall be the court agreed on by the parties to 
the dispute or Stipulated in any convention existing between them. 

The Members of the League agree that they will carry out in full 
good faith any award that may be rendered, and that they will not 
resort to war againSt a Member of the League which complies there¬ 
with. In the event of any failure to carry out such an award, the Council 
shall propose what Steps should be taken to give effeft thereto. 

* Article 12, as amended, reads :— 

The Members of the League agree that, if there should arise between them any dispute 
likely to lead to a rupture, they will submit the matter either to arbitration or judicial settle¬ 
ment or to inquiry by the Council and they agree in no case to resort to war until three 
months after the award by the arbitrators or the judicial decision, or the report by the Council. 

In any case under this Article, the award of the arbitrators or the judicial decision shall 
be made within a reasonable time, and the report of the Council shall be made within six 
months after the submission of the dispute, 
t Article 13, as amended, would read :— 

The Members of the League agree that, whenever any dispute shall arise between them 
which they recognis e to be suitable for submission to arbitration or judicial settlement, and 
whfPlrcatfflbt be satfefactorHy-settled by diplomacy, they will submit the whole subject- 
matter to arbitration or judicial settlement. 

{ Disputes as to the interpretation of a treaty, as to any question of international law, as to 
1 the existence of any fact which, if established, would constitute a breach of any international 
l obligation, or as to the extent and nature of the reparation to be made for any such breach, 

' are declared to be among those which are generally suitable for submission to arbitration or 
judicial settlement. 

For the consideration of any such dispute, the court to which the case is referred shall be the 
Permanent Court of International Justice, established in accordance with Article 14, or any 
tribunal agreed on by the parties to the dispute or stipulated in any convention existing between 
them. 

The Members of the League agree that they will carry out in full good faith any award or 
decision that may be rendered, and that they will not resort to war against any Member of the 
League that complies therewith In the event of any failure to carry out such an award 
cr decision, the Council shall propose what steps should be taken to give effect thereto 

Q 


ARTICLE 14 [permanent court of international justice] 

The Council shall formulate and submit to the Members of the 
League for adoption plans for the establishment of a Permanent Court 
of International JuStice. The Court shall be competent to hear and 
determine any dispute of an international character which the parties 
thereto submit to it. The Court may also give an advisory opinion upon 
any dispute or question referred to it by the Council or by the Assembly. 

ARTICLE 15 [disputes not submitted to arbitration] 

* If there should arise between Members of the League any dispute 
likely to lead to a rupture, which is not submitted to arbitration in 
accordance with Article 13, the Members of the League agree that they 
will submit the matter to the Council. Any party to the dispute may 
effedl such submission by giving notice of the existence of the dispute 
to the Secretary-General, who will make all necessary arrangements for 
a full investigation and consideration thereof. 

For this purpose the parties to the dispute will communicate to the 
Secretary-General, as promptly as possible. Statements of their case, 
with all the relevant faSts and papers, and the Council may forthwith 
diredt the publication thereof. 

The Council shall endeavour to effect a settlement of the dispute, and 
if such efforts are successful, a Statement shall be made public giving 
such facts and explanations regarding the dispute and the terms of 
settlement thereof as the Council may deem appropriate. 

If the dispute is not thus settled, the Council either unanimously or 
by a majority vote shall make and publish a report containing a State¬ 
ment of the fadls of the dispute and the recommendations which are 
deemed juSt and proper in regard thereto. 

Any Member of the League represented on the Council may make 
public a Statement of the fadts of the dispute and of its conclusions 
regarding the same. 

If a report by the Council is unanimously agreed to by the members 
thereof other than the Representatives of one or more of the parties to 
the dispute, the Members of the League agree that they will not go to 
war with any party to the dispute which complies with the recommenda¬ 
tions of the report. 

If the Council fails to reach a report which is unanimously agreed to 
by the members thereof, other than the Representatives of one or 
more of the parties to the dispute, the Members of the League reserve 
to themselves the right to take such adtion as they shall consider 
necessary for the maintenance of right and justice. 

* Article 15. The first paragraph, as amended, reads:— 

If there should arise between Members of the League any dispute likely to lead to a rup¬ 
ture, which is not submitted to arbitration or judicial settlement in accordance with 
Article 13, the Members of the League agree that they will submit the matter to the 
Council. Any party to the dispute may effect such submission by giving notice of the 
existence of the dispute to the Secretary-General, who will make all necessary arrangements 
for a full investigation and consideration thereof 


10 


If the dispute between the parties is claimed by oiie of them, arid i§ 
found by the Council, to arise out of a matter which by international 
law is solely within the domestic jurisdiction of that party, the Council 
shall so report, and shall make no recommendation as to its settlement. 

The Council may in any case under this Article refer the dispute to 
the Assembly. The dispute shall be so referred at the request of either 
party to the dispute, provided that such request be made within 
fourteen days after the submission of the dispute to the Council. 

In any case referred to the Assembly, all the provisions of this 
Article and of Article 12 relating to the a&ion and powers of the 
Council shall apply to the a&ion and powers of the Assembly, provided 
that a report made by the Assembly, if concurred in by the Repre¬ 
sentatives of those Members of the League represented on the Council 
and of a majority of the other Members of the League, exclusive in each 
case of the Representatives of the parties to the dispute, shall have the 
same force as a report by the Council concurred in by all the members 
thereof other than the Representatives of one or more of the parties to 
the dispute. 

ARTICLE 16 [“sanctions” of the league] 

* Should any Member of the League resort to war in disregard of its 
covenants under Article 12, 13, or 15, it shall ipso facto be deemed to 
have committed an act of war against all other Members of the League, 
which hereby undertake immediately to subje< 5 t it to the severance of 
all trade or financial relations, the prohibition of all intercourse between 
their nationals and the nationals of the covenant-breaking State, and 
the prevention of all financial, commercial or personal intercourse 
between the nationals of the covenant-breaking State and the nationals 
of any other State, whether a Member of the League or not. 

It shall be the duty of the Council in such case to recommend to the 
several Governments concerned what effective military, naval or air 
force the Members of the League shall severally contribute to the 
armed forces to be used to protedf the covenants of the League. 

# Article 16, as amended , reads :— 

Should any Member of the League resort to war in disregard of its covenants under 
Article 12, 13, or 15, it shall ipso facto be deemed to have committed an act of war against 
all other Members of the League, which hereby undertake immediately to subject it to the 
severance of all trade or financial relations, the prohibition of all intercourse between 
persons residing in their territory and persons residing in the territory of the Covenant¬ 
breaking State, and the prevention of all financial, commercial or personal intercourse 
between persons residing in the territory of the Covenant-breaking State and persons re¬ 
siding in the territory of any other State, whether a Member of the League or not. 

It is for the Council to give an Opinion whether or not a breach of the Covenant has taken 
place. In deliberations on this question in the Council, the votes of Members of the League 
alleged to have resorted to war and of Members against whom such action was directed 
shall not be counted. 

The Council will notify to all Members of the League the date which it recommends for 
the application of the economic pressure under this Article. 

Nevertheless, the Council may, in the case of particular Members, postpone the coming 
into force of any of these measures for a specified period where it is satisfied that such a 
postponement will facilitate the attainment of the object of the measures referred to in the 
preceding paragraph, or that it is necessary in order to minimise the loss and inconvenience 
which will be caused to such Members. 


II 


The Members of the League agree, further, that they will mutually 
support one another in the financial and economic measures which are 
taken under this Article, in order to minimise the loss and inconveni¬ 
ence resulting from the above measures, and that they will mutually 
support one another in residing any special measures aimed at one of 
their number by the covenant-breaking State, and that they will take 
the necessary Steps to afford passage through their territory to the 
forces of any of the Members of the League which are co-operating to 
protedt the covenants of the League. 

Any Member of the League which has violated any covenant of the 
League may be declared to be no longer a Member of the League by a 
vote of the Council concurred in by the Representatives of all the other 
Members of the League represented thereon. 


ARTICLE 17 [disputes with non-members] 

In the event of a dispute between a Member of the League and a 
State which is not a Member of the League, or between States not 
Members of the League, the State or States not Members of the League 
shall be invited to accept the obligations of Membership in the League 
for the purposes of such dispute, upon such conditions as the Council 
may deem juSt. If such invitation is accepted, the provision of Articles 
12 to 16 inclusive shall be applied with such modifications as may be 
deemed necessary by the Council. 

Upon such invitation being given the Council shall immediately 
intitule an inquiry into the circumstances of the dispute and recom¬ 
mend such adtion as may seem beSt and moSt effectual in the circum¬ 
stances. 

If a State so invited shall refuse to accept the obligations of member¬ 
ship in the League for the purposes of such dispute, and shall resort to 
war againSt a Member of the League, the provisions of Article 16 shall 
be applicable as againSt the State taking such adtion. 

If both parties to the dispute when so invited refuse to accept the 
obligations of membership in the League for the purposes of such 
dispute, the Council may take such measures and make such recom¬ 
mendations as will prevent hostilities and will result in the settlement 
of the dispute. 


ARTICLE 18 [registration and publication of all future 
treaties] 

Every treaty or international engagement entered into hereafter by 
any Member of the League shall be forthwith registered with the 
Secretariat and shall as soon as possible be published by it. No such 
treaty or international engagement shall be binding until so registered. 


12 


ARTICLE 19 [review of treaties] 

The Assembly may from time to time advise the reconsideration by 
Members of the League of treaties which have become inapplicable 
and the consideration of international conditions whose continuance 
might endanger the peace of the world. 

ARTICLE 20 [abrogation of inconsistent obligations] 

The Members of the League severally agree that this Covenant is 
accepted as abrogating all obligations or understandings inter se which 
are inconsistent with the terms thereof, and solemnly undertake that 
they will not hereafter enter into any engagements inconsistent with 
the terms thereof. 

In case any Member of the League shall, before becoming a Member 
of the League, have undertaken any obligations inconsistent with the 
terms of this Covenant, it shall be the duty of such Member to take 
immediate Steps to procure its release from such obligations. 

ARTICLE 21 [engagements that remain valid] 

Nothing in this Covenant shall be deemed to affedt the validity of 
international engagements, such as treaties of arbitration or regional 
understandings like the Monroe do< 5 trine, for securing the mainten¬ 
ance of peace. 

ARTICLE 22 [mandatories, control of colonies and territories] 
To those colonies and territories which as a consequence of the late 
war have ceased to be under the sovereignty of the States which 
formerly governed them and which are inhabited by peoples not yet 
able to Stand by themselves under the Strenuous conditions of the 
modern world, there should be applied the principle that the well¬ 
being and development of such peoples form a sacred truSt of civilisa¬ 
tion and that securities for the performance of this truSt should be 
embodied in this Covenant. 

The beSt method of giving practical effedt to this principle is that the 
tutelage of such peoples should be entrusted to advanced nations who 
by reason of their resources, their experience or their geographical 
position can beSt undertake this responsibility, and who are willing to 
accept it, and that this tutelage should be exercised by them as Manda¬ 
tories on behalf of the League. 

The character of the mandate muSt differ according to the Stage of 
the development of the people, the geographical situation of the 
territory, its economic conditions and other similar circumstances. 

Certain communities formerly belonging to the Turkish Empire have 
reached a Stage of development where their existence as independent 
nations can be provisionally recognised subjedt to the rendering of 
administrative advice and assistance by a Mandatory until such time 
as they are able to Stand alone. The wishes of these communities muSt 
be a principal consideration in the selection of the Mandatory. 

13 


Other peoples, especially those of Central Africa, are at such a Stage 
that the Mandatory muSt be responsible for the administration of the 
territory under conditions which will guarantee freedom of conscience 
and religion, subject only to the maintenance of public order and 
morals, the prohibition of abuses such as the slave trade, the arms 
traffic and the liquor traffic, and the prevention of the establishment 
of fortifications or military and naval bases and of military training 
of the natives for other than police purposes and the defence of 
territory, and will also secure equal opportunities for the trade and 
commerce of other Members of the League. 

There are territories, such as South-WeSt Africa and certain of the 
South Pacific Islands, which, owing to the sparseness of their popula¬ 
tion, or their small size, or their remoteness from the centres of civilisa¬ 
tion, or their geographical contiguity to the territory of the Mandatory, 
and other circumstances, can be beSt administered under the laws of 
the Mandatory as integral portions of its territory, subjedt to the safe¬ 
guards above-mentioned in the interests of the indigenous population. 

In every case of mandate, the Mandatory shall render to the Council 
an annual report in reference to the territory committed to its charge. 

The degree of authority, control, or administration to be exercised 
by the Mandatory shall, if not previously agreed upon by the Members 
of the League, be explicitly defined in each case by the Council. 

A permanent Commission shall be constituted to receive and examine 
the annual reports of the Mandatories and to advise the Council on all 
matters relating to the observance of the mandates. 

ARTICLE 23 [social activities] 

Subject to and in accordance with the provisions of international 
conventions existing or hereafter to be agreed upon, the Members of 
the League: 

(a) will endeavour to secure and maintain fair and humane con¬ 
ditions of labour for men, women, and children, both in their own 
countries and in all countries to which their commercial and in¬ 
dustrial relations extend, and for that purpose will establish and 
maintain the necessary international organisations; 

( b ) undertake to secure juSt treatment of the native inhabitants of 
territories under their control; 

(c) will entrust the League with the general supervision over the 
execution of agreements with regard to the traffic in women and 
children, and the traffic in opium and other dangerous drugs; 

( d) will entruSt the League with the general supervision of the 
trade in arms and ammunition with the countries in which the 
control of this traffic is necessary in the common interest; 

(e) will make provision to secure and maintain freedom of com¬ 
munications and of transit and equitable treatment for the commerce 

14 


of all Members of the League. In this connexion, the special 
necessities of the regions devastated during the war of 1914-1918 
shall be borne in mind; 

(/) will endeavour to take Steps in matters of international concern 
for the prevention and control of disease. 

ARTICLE 24 [international bureaux] 

There shall be placed under the direction of the League all inter¬ 
national bureaux already established by general treaties if the parties 
to such treaties consent. All such international bureaux and all com¬ 
missions for the regulation of matters of international interest hereafter 
constituted shall be placed under the direction of the League. 

In all matters of international interest which are regulated by general 
conventions but which are not placed under the control of inter¬ 
national bureaux or commissions, the Secretariat of the League shall, 
subjedt to the consent of the Council and if desired by the parties, colledt 
and distribute all relevant information and shall render any other 
assistance which may be necessary or desirable. 

The Council may include as part of the expenses of the Secretariat 
the expenses of any bureau or commission which is placed under the 
direction of the League. 

ARTICLE 25 [promotion of red cross] 

The Members of the League agree to encourage and promote the 
establishment and co-operation of duly authorised voluntary national 
Red Cross organisations having as purposes the improvement of 
health, the prevention of disease and the mitigation of suffering 
throughout the world. 

ARTICLE 26 [amendments] 

* Amendments to this Covenant will take effedt when ratified by the 
Members of the League whose Representatives compose the Council 
and by a majority of the Members of the League whose Representa¬ 
tives compose the Assembly. 

No such amendment shall bind any Member of the League which 
signifies its dissent therefrom, but in that case it shall cease to be a 
Member of the League. 

* Article zb, as amended, reads :— 

Amendments to the present Covenant the text of which shall have been voted by the 
Assembly on a three-fourths majority, in which there shall be included the votes of all the 
Members of the Council represented at the meeting, will take effect when ratified by the 
Members of the League whose Representatives composed the Council when the vote was 
taken and by the majority of those whose Representatives form the Assembly 

If the required number of ratifications shall not have been obtained within twenty-two 
months after the vote of the Assembly, the proposed amendment shall remain without 
effect. 

The Secretary-General shall inform the Members of the taking effect of an amendment. 
Any Member of the League which has not at that time ratified the amendment is free to 
notify the Secretary-General within a year of its refusal to accept it, but in that case it shall 
tease to be a Member of the League. 


15 


*ANNEX, 


I. [states qualified to be] ORIGINAL MEMBERS OF THE 
LEAGUE OF NATIONS 
SIGNATORIES OF THE TREATY OF PEACE 


United States of America 

Cuba 

Nicaragua 

Belgium 

Ecuador 

Panama 

Bolivia 

France 

Peru 

Brazil 

Greece 

Poland 

British Empire 

Guatemala 

Portugal 

Canada 

Haiti 

Roumania 

Australia 

Hedjaz 

Serb-Croat-Slovene 

South Africa. 

Honduras 

Sta 

New Zealand 

Italy 

Siam 

India 

Japan 

Czecho-Slovakia 

China 

Liberia 

Uruguay 

STATES INVITED TO ACCEDE TO THE COVENANT 

Argentine Republic 

Norway 

Sweden 

Chile 

Paraguay 

Switzerland 

Colombia 

Persia 

Venezuela 

Denmark 

Salvador 


Netherlands 

Spain 



II. FIRST SECRETARY-GENERAL OF THE LEAGUE OF 
NATIONS 

The Honourable Sir James Eric Drummond, K.C.M.G., C.B. 

• To the Annex, as amended, the following is added :— 

HI. ALLOCATION OF THE EXPENSES OF THE LEAGUE FOR 
1923, as adopted by the Assembly, September 30, 1922 

Units Units 


States 



Payable 

States 



Payable 

Albania 



.. 1 

Japan 



• • 73 

Argentina 1 .. 



• • (35) 

Latvia 



3 

Australia 



.. 26 

Liberia 



.. 1 

Austria 



.. 1 

Lithuania .. 



• • 4 

Belgium 



• • 15 

Luxemburg .. 




Bolivia 



5 

Netherlands 



. . 20 

Brazil 



• • 35 

New Zealand 



. . 10 

British Empire 



• • 95 

Nicaragua .. 



.. 1 

Bulgaria 



• • 7 

Norway 



.. II 

Canada 



• • 35 

Panama 



.. I 

Chile 



•. 15 

Paraguay 



I 

China 



.. 65 

Persia 



.. 6 

Colombia .. 



7 

Peru.. 



.. 10 

Costa Rica .. 



.. 1 

Poland 



• • 25 

Cuba 



.. 9 

Portugal 



.. 10 

Czecho-Slovakia 



• • 35 

Roumania .. 



• • 3i 

Denmark 



.. 12 

Salvador 




Esthonia 



• • 3 

Serb-Croat-Slovene State.. 

26 

Finland 



.. 10 

Siam .. 



.. 10 

France 



. . 78 

South Africa 



.. 15 

Greece 



.. 10 

Spain 



.. 40 

Guatemala .. 



• • 1 

Sweden 



.. 18 

Haiti 



. . 2 

Switzerland.. 



.. 15 

Honduras 



. . I 

Uruguay 



• • 7 

Hungary 



4 

Venezuela .. 



- 5 

India 



.. 65 




— 

Italy .. 



.. 61 




944 


1 Subject to any observations which may be made by the Argentine Goverment. 
No corresponding provision will be made in the accounts. 

Printed at the Pelican Press, 2 Carmelite Street, E.C.