Skip to main content

Full text of "The Daily Colonist (1980-07-24)"

See other formats


Home 

TELEPHONE 

383-4111 

CLASSIFIED 

388-2121 


t laila 



> Colonist 


No. 190 — 122nd Year >»@<» 


l ancouver Island's leading newspaper since 1858 

Victoria, British Columbia, Thursday, July 24,1980 


Sunny, 

high 21 

Weather Details 
on Page 2 


25« Daily, 30t Sunday 



Viet with Soviets in space 


MOSCOW (CP) — The Soviet 
Union launched a Soyuz spaceship 
Wednesday with a 33-year-old Viet¬ 
namese air force pilot and a Soviet 
cosmonaut aboard, the official news 
agency Tass announced. 

Lt.-Col. Pham Tuan, a cosmonaut- 
researcher, became the first Asian 
space traveller and the sixth citi¬ 
zen of a Soviet Bloc country launched 


into orbit along with Soviet space 
commanders. 

The latest flight, commanded by 
Col. Viktor Gorbatko, was to link up 
within 24 hours of launching with the 
Salyut 6 space laboratory, in which 
two cosmonauts have been orbiting 
for more than three months. 

Tass said Pham Tuan was a Viet- 
nanese air force pilot who studied in a 


Soviet flight school as a cadet with 
Gorbatko. and returned in 1979 to 
prepare for a space flight under the 
Intercosmos program. Gorbatko 
made two previous space flights, in 
1969 and 1977. 

Gorbatko and Pham Tuan are the 
third space pair to join Salyut 6 crew 
members Valery Ryumin and Leonid 
Popov, who went up April 9. 



Tuan and Gorbatko 


New Bolivia: 
It’s ‘savage’ 


Tehran arcade after bombs killed six 

20 Iran officers 
executed, bombs 
rip shops arcade 

United Press International 

Twenty Iranian air force officers were executed 
Thursday for their part in the abortive coup attempt 
against Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, and the acting 
head of the police force emerged as a leading con¬ 
tender for the post of prime minister, Tehran radio 
reported. 

On Wednesday, terrorist bombs ripped through a 
Tehran shopping arcade, killing at least six people 
and injuring about 100, and firing squads executed an¬ 
other four people accused of plotting against the Is¬ 
lamic regime, according to reports from Iran. 

It was the 263rd day of captivity for the 52 Ameri¬ 
can hostages. 

Thursday's executions brought to 26 the number of 
officers executed in the failed attempt to overthrow 
Khomeini, the state radio said. 

Moslafa Mir-galim, acting head of the police force 
and undersecretary for political affairs at the in¬ 
terior ministry, emerged as a favorite for Iran’s new 
prime minister after meeting with Khomeini and presi¬ 
dent Abolhasan Bani-Sadr Wednesday afternoon, the 
state radio reported. 

The radio said Mir-Salim met with Khomeini and his 
son, Ahmad, to present a report on the police force. 
After the meeting, Mir-Salim said, they discussed the 
“over all political situation of the country and the neces¬ 
sity of respecting the limits of the three branches of 
executive, judicial and legislative powers in the constitu¬ 
tion." 

The radio said the two-hour meeting with Bani- 
Sadr was “very important," because the president was 
due to name his prime minister soon. 


WASHINGTON (AP) 
— The U.S. state depart¬ 
ment protested “wide¬ 
spread, even savage 
violations of human 
rights” by Bolivian 
armed forces and said 
Wednesday more reduc¬ 
tions in U.S. assistance 
were being considered. 

Spokesman John Trat- 
tner said the department 
had received "reliable re¬ 
ports" that the Bolivian 
military was holding hun¬ 
dreds of dissidents after 
last week's coup d'etat 
which ended the country's 
halting progress toward a 
democratically elected 
government. 

Trattner said the depart¬ 
ment believed the military 
had taken some of its pris¬ 
oners to a centre near the 
capital. La Paz, where they 
were being beaten and tor¬ 
tured. 

"We strongly urge that 
the human rights of all Bo¬ 
livians be respected,” 
Trattner said. He said the 
U.S. still wanted the mili¬ 
tary to restore the civilian 
government it deposed. 

Trattner said the U.S., in 
reviewing its relations with 
Bolivia, was considering a 
reduction in the U.S. diplo¬ 
matic staff in the country. 
Ambassador Marvin 
Weissman has already 
been recalled. 

Also under review, he 
said, was a range of U.S. 
economic development as¬ 
sistance programs to Bo¬ 
livia, some the subject of 
contracts which might be 
changed or cancelled alto¬ 
gether. 


The United States last 
week cut of f all military aid 
to Bolivia, totalling about 
$10.6 million, and suspend¬ 
ed an estimated $115 mil¬ 
lion in economic aid, ex¬ 
cept for humanitarian food 
assistance to the poor. It is 
the $115 million that is 
being reviewed for possible 
reductions or withdrawal. 

Meanwhile, the Council 
on Hemispheric Affairs, a 
private organization which 
opposes military govern¬ 
ments in Latin America, 
charged that one of the 
leaders of the Bolivian 


coup was involved in drug 
smuggling. 

The council said Gen. 
Hugo Echeverria, com¬ 
mander of the garrison at 
Santa Cruz in eastern Bo¬ 
livia, was one of a group of 
generals eager to keep con¬ 
trol of the lucrative Bolivi¬ 
an drug trade. 

U.S. state department of¬ 
ficials confirmed that the 
area around Santa Cruz 
produced coca leaves 
which made their way 
through Colombia to the 
United States in the form of 


Many-voiced actor 
dies of heart attack 


LONDON (UPI) — Peter Sellers, 54, the British 
actor of many voices who played roles from the 
bumbling Inspector Clouseau to the terrifying Dr. 
Strangelove, died early today after a massive heart 
attack. Other story Page 25 

Sellers’ comic genius was often compared to 
that of Charlie Chaplin. 

“It is with very great regret that wo have to in¬ 
form you that Mr. Sellers died at 12:28," a spokes¬ 
man at London's Middlesex Hospital said. “His wife 
and children were at his side ... His heart just 
faded away . . 

Sellers’ fourth wife, Lynn Frederick, had flown 
from Los Angeles. His second wife, Britt Ekland, 
and their daughter, Victoria, 15, flew from Stock¬ 
holm on learning of his heart attack Tuesday. 

“There was not a flicker of recognition," Miss 
Frederick said, "Peter was completely uncon¬ 
scious." 



Sellers 

. as Strangelove 


INSIDE 


Israel denounces 
Arab walkout 

—Page 3 

RCMP lawyer 
recalls Gouzenko 

—Page 7 

Dome finds 
oil again 

—Page 13 

Youngster hooks 
surprise catch 

—King Fisherman, 10 

Japap aims at top 
in world economy 

—Page 26 

Region pressed 
to acquire park 

—Page 32 


Breweries claim 
lockout provoked 

—Page 37 

Monty Hall 
moves to B.C. 

—Page 39 

St. Helens sports 
new red crater 

—Page 51 


Dental plan missing 
neediest, says Cocke 


Bridge 
Business 
Classified 
Comics 
Crossword 
Editorials 
Entertainment 
Horse Happenings 
King Fisherman 
Letters 
Living 

Marine Calendar 
Medical 

Names in the News 
Provincial Court 
Sports 


30 
12-15,24 

40-50 

22 

31 

4 

38-39 

28 

10 

5 

27-31 

32 
28 

33 
- • 

10-21,23 


The provincial govern¬ 
ment's new dental plan will 
not help those who need it 
most, New Democratic 
health critic Dennis Cocke 
said Wednesday. 

“It does nothing to help 
children and senior citizens 
in areas of the province 
where there are no den¬ 
tists, or (there) are too few 
dentists to carry out work 
under the plan,” Cocke 
said. 

“The main weakness of 
the plan put forward is that 
it does not take into con¬ 
sideration the poor distri¬ 
bution of dentists in this 
province. Many areas of 
the province outside of the 
Lower Mainland do not 
have enough dentists to go 
around now." 

Cocke said dental care 


schemes in New Zealand 
and Saskatchewan used 
dental clinics and dental 
nurses to provide primary 
dental care and hygiene, in 
some cases directly in 
schools. 

"When a superior system 
is in place and working we|J 
elsewhere, I eafl’t sec why 
the government wouldn’t 
have adopted a similar 
plan here." 


Cocke said only 50 per 
cent coverage for basic 
dentistry for children 
would be a disincentive for 
low-income families. While 
the cost of an annual 
checkup for children is co¬ 
vered by the plan, the cost 
of further dental work is 
shared 50 per cent by the 
province. Orthodontics, 

Page 2—Paying 


Baby off car roof 
recovered unhurt 


Shining success: region’s parks 


Modest 

budget, 

steady 

growth 



Second* five parts 

By NANCY BROWN 

Colonist staff 

There was a time, some 15 years 
ago, when the Capital Region Board 
seemed headed for success. 

P 

To be sure, there had been com¬ 
plaints when the provincial govern¬ 
ment invented a new level of govern¬ 
ment, and Sooke even went so far as to 
try to avoid taking part. That revolt, 
entailing refusal to nominate a candi¬ 
date for director, was easily crushed 
by the appointment of a representative 
by the provincial government. 

There were complaints that the re¬ 
gion represented amalgamation the 
back door, but most responsibilities 
accepted then were by mutual agree¬ 
ment and the venture seemed fairly 
satisfactory. 

URBAN AREAS were able to get to 
gether as needed to deal with mutual 
problems such as sewage disposal, and 
the unorganized areas could use re¬ 
gional resources for pl anning, or fin 
xnring recreational builUlffl and so 
avoid formal incorporation 

The main concern was acquisition 
of parks, and at a later stage the 
development of those parks 


And the region’s parks system, with 
a single exception, has been an out¬ 
standing success. 

The region owns nearly 6,000 acres 
of parkland, ranging from the tiny 
half-acre Reeson Park on Victoria’s 
waterfront to the 3,514-acre East Sooke 
Park. 

Parks supervisor Jack Kanhoffer 
has worked quietly and unobtrusively 
over the years, developing the parks* 
for public use by adding trails and 
signs to allow good access. 

BUT THE PARKS themselves re¬ 
main in their natural state, and trails 
and signposts blend in naturally. 

And over the years, the annual 
parks budget has remained modest. 

While the region's total budgets 
have jumped from just under $400,000 
to $21 million over the last IS yean, the 
parks budget has increased gently 
from $3*3450 to $000,070, pegged as it is 
to a half-mill levy. 

The ooly Mot on the parks landscape 
and budget came last year when the 
region was given half an acre near the 
Johnson Street bridge to provide a 
“window on the harbor " 

Development of that gift into a 
professionally landscaped mass of 



Nature Improved—tails la Witty's lagaaa Park 


NEW YORK (AP) — A 
six-week-old baby rolled 
off a car roof when his 
mother drove off without 
realizing he was there, but 
was found uninjured half 
an hour later. 

Police said Robert Korn- 
bach, 19, stopped to let his 
I8-year-old wife, Maureen, 
drive. 

Her sister, Elizabeth 
McGrath, got out of the 
front seat, put six-week-old 
Brian on the roof of the car 
and went to the back seat. 

Unaware that the baby 
had been left on the roof, 
Mrs. Kornbach began driv¬ 
ing, police said. 

Half an hour later, the 
family realized the baby 
was missing. 

They called police, and 
as they were rushing in a 
patrol car to the spot where 
they had first stopped, they 
learned by radio that Brian 
had been found and taken 
to hospital with only a few 
scratches. He was admit¬ 


ted for observation and was 
expected to be released 
today. 


Canadian 
fish boats 
arrested 

PRINCE RUPERT (CP) 
— Four Canadian fishing 
boats were seized Wednes 
day morning in Portland 
Canal north of here by 
Alaska fish and wildlife 
protection officers. 

. Three of the gillnetters 
are owned by fishermen 
from nearby Kinkolith, 
B.C., who fish for the B.C. 
Packers cannery at Prince 
Rupert and the fourth by a 
Vancouver man. 

The boats have been 
towed to Ketchikan, where 
their owners are to be ar¬ 
raigned this morning. 




Bloodied burglar 
bagged by ferret 

WINNIPEG (CP) — A man who broke into a home 
here found a new crime-fighter waiting for him—a 
tiny, ferocious ferret named Shazam. 

Shazam, who is about 36 centimetres long and 
weighs about .7 kilogram, held the burglar at bay 
after he broke through a second-storey sun porch 
window Monday to get into the house. 

"She's not meant to be a watch-ferret. To her, it was 
probably Just another wrist to bite," said Craig Eros, 
mother afflhazam't owner, Glenn Eras. 

Glenn sail he and Ms brother arrived home from 
work to find the burgtfh, his arm covered with blood. 

“That animal of yours tore me apart," the burglar 
complained. 

Shazam. a gift from a friend, was meant a* a pet, not 
protection, Craig said 

"Rut the do es n’t like strangers," Glean added 

The aioak animals, used to hunt rabbits and rats 
I aa $13$ at pet stores 


r 








































2 THE COLONIST, Thursday July 24, 1980 


OFF PAGE ONE/WEATHER 


100 more troops sent to New Hebrides 



( 

dl 

oh-ohh) 

i 

F i! 


h —it 

e 



Pipeline ruling 
may face court 


OTTAWA (CP) — New 
Democrat MP Ian Waddell 
plans to launch court action 
soon .to challenge the legal¬ 
ity of the government deci¬ 
sion to authorize early con- 
struction of southern 
Canadian sections of the 
Alaska Highway natural 
gas pipeline. 

Waddell said his lawsuit 
would question the legality 
of the cabinet order the 
government used to amend 


the Northern Pipeline Act 
to authorize the prebuild. 

The MP for Vancouver- 
Kingsway said the decision 
to proceed with the pre¬ 
build and the export of 
Alberta natural gas was a 
"completely different pro¬ 
ject” from the morc-than- 
$20-billion pipeline outlined 
in the act to transport gas 
from Alaska through Can¬ 
ada to the lower 48 states. 


SYDNEY, Australia 
(AP) — A force of 100 Brit¬ 
ish and French troops flew 
to the rebel-held island of 
Espiritu Santo today to 
help quell a two-month-old 
rebellion which threatens 
to prevent the formal inde¬ 
pendence of the New He¬ 
brides scheduled for July 
30. 

Peter Taragato, personal 
secretary to the New He¬ 
brides’ chief minister, Rev. 
Walter Lini, said in a tele¬ 
phone interview the British 
and French troops flew to 
Santo in a French helicop¬ 
ter and a British C-130 Her¬ 
cules transport. 

“We have had no reports 
yet from Santo," he said. 
There has been no public 
announcement in Port Vila, 
the capital of the joint Brit¬ 
ish-French condominium. 

Taragato said the British 
and French administra¬ 
tions had told the New He¬ 
brides government they 
would send troops to Santo 
shortly before they left Vila 
mid-morning. 


Western 

Express 

WINNIPEG (CP) —Five 
$100,000 tickets drawn in 
the Western Express lot¬ 
tery Wednesday night were 
3268905, 2753029, 3244274, 
2079542 and 3627958. 

The $10,000 tickets were 
1687204, 2915909, 2457938, 
2163655 and 2361411. 


‘Paying twice,’ says Cocke 

| From Page I 


crowns and bridges are not 
covered at all by the plan. 

Cocke added that people 
currently covered by a den¬ 
tal plan would be paying 
twice, once for their plan at 
work and again for the pro¬ 
vincial plan through taxes. 

“I think people arc going 
to resent that.” 

In a press conference 
Wednesday at which the 
dental plan was an¬ 
nounced, Health Minister 
Rafe Mair said “50 per cent 
coverage is a heck of a lot 
better than no per cent. 

“A lot of people would be 
happier if it were 100 per 
cent, but we have to tailor it 
to what people can afford.” 

The health ministry esti¬ 
mates that the plan will 
cost $85 million in its first 
year. 

Mair indicated there 
were no immediate plans to 
make the plan universal, as 
had been indicated in the 
throne speech last Febru¬ 
ary, but said, “It's a fair 
guess that in due course 
coverage will be univer¬ 
sal.” 


Only about 100,000 Brit¬ 
ish Columbians were not al¬ 
ready covered by a dental 
plan, and many of them 
would benefit from the in¬ 
surance coverage given 
theirchildren, Mairsaid. 

Mair and Dr. Ted Ram- 
age, president of the B.C. 
College of Dental Sur¬ 
geons, said the availability 
of dentists in the province 
was not a problem, and that 
the province’s 1,400 gen¬ 
eral-practice dentists 
should be able to handle the 
415,000 children who would 
be taking advantage of the 
free annual preventive 
care package. 

Ramage said 80 to 85 per 
cent of children in the prov¬ 
ince already received some 
kind of dental care, and the 
dental plan might persuade 
the rest to do so. 

Except for a few areas in 
the far north which were 


One blemish on park slate 

. | From Pag«* I j 


concrete, rock and wood cost taxpay¬ 
ers $250,000, and at the official opening, 
parks chairman Shirley Dowell was at 
pains to disclaim any responsibility for 
the costs or the design. 

And so the one bright spot fn region¬ 
al events was blemished, and region 
watchers settled into the continuing mo¬ 
rass of argument and dithering. 

Regional politicians aren’t entirely 
to blame for the problems they encoun¬ 
ter. 

Responsibilities which have been 
dumped on them for planning and zoning 
bylaws in the unorganized areas, for dog 


control, transit, and sewage disposal, are 
not designed to win friends. 

But municipalities seem to have han¬ 
dled most of those tasks at least without 
ending up in court, while regional taxpay¬ 
ers time after time have been riled up 
enough to put up the money to hire law¬ 
yers and head into court. 

Next: Legal fees bring twitches to region¬ 
al faces. 



July 24, 1986 

Sunny with morning 
c(oudy periods. Winds mod¬ 
erate westerly. Wednes¬ 
day's precipitation: nil. 
Sunshine 13 hours 36 
minutes. Recorded high 
and low at Victoria airport 
22 and 12. Today’s forecast 
high and low 21 and 13. 
Today’s sunrise 5:38, sun¬ 
set 9:01. Moonrisc 6:25 
p.m., moonset 2:49 a m. 
Friday outlook: mainly 
cloudy. 

East coast of Vancouver 
Island — Sunny with morn¬ 
ing cloudy periods. Winds 
light and variable. Wednes¬ 
day's precipitation: nil. Re 
corded high and low at 
Nanaimo 23 and 15. Fore¬ 
cast high and low 22 and 13. 
Friday outlook: mainly 
cloudy 

West coast of Vancouver 
Island — Mainly cloudy 
with morning fog patches 
Winds light to moderate 
and variable. Forecast 
high and low at Tofino IK 
and 12. Friday outlook 
mainly rloudy 

North coast of the Main 
land — Mainly cloudy with 


a few showers, patches of 
morning fog and drizzle 
along the coast. Winds light 
to moderate southerly. 
Forecast high and low 17 
and 12. Friday outlook: a 
few showers. 

Extended outlook, Satur¬ 
day through Monday — 
Mostly dry except slight 
chance of a few showers or 
drizzle about Sunday or 
Monday. Highs 19 to 24 
coast, 22 to 28 inland. Lows 
10 to 15. 


Comox 

Prince George 
Williams Lake 
Kamloops 
Whitehorse 
Fort Nelson 
Fod St. John 
Peace River 
Yellowknife 
Inovlk 
Seattle 
Sookane 
Portland 
San Francisco 
Los Angeles 
Phoenix 
Las Vegas 
New York 
Miami 


A force of 200 British 
Royal Marine commandos 
has been in Vila for more 
than a month. French para¬ 
troopers were flown in 
from the nearby French 
possession of New Cale¬ 
donia on Wednesday. 


The New Hebrides gov¬ 
ernment has been demand¬ 
ing joint British-French ac¬ 
tion against the rebels led 
by former bulldozer driver 
Jimmy Stevens since they 
took over the island with 
bows and arrows May 28. 


Stevens has said his men, 
who number about 600 in 
the capital of Santo,-or I.u- 
ganville as it is also known, 
would offer no resistance if 
troops landed. 

France, however, had 
vetoed any unilateral ac¬ 


tion by the British because 
about 4,000 French citizens 
live on the island. 

The rebels want auton¬ 
omy for the island. 

Negotiations aimed at 
giving the island a form of 
autonomy within the New 


Hebrides political system 
broke down a month ago. 

But British and French 
officials sent from London 
and Paris have been in the 
New Hebrides for the last 
two weeks seeking a politi¬ 
cal solution. 


covered by mobile dental 
units, virtually everyone in 
the province now had ac¬ 
cess to a dentist, Mair said. 

B.C. had relatively few 
trained para dental techni¬ 
cians, such as dental 
nurses, but a good supply of 
dentists, which was why 
the B.C. plan steered away 
from the use of para-den¬ 
tals, he said. In Saskatche¬ 
wan, dental nurses were 
widely used because there 
was a shortage of dentists. 

The impact of the dental 
plan on those currently co¬ 
vered by insurance would 
be up to the insurance com¬ 
panies, Mair indicated, but 
children now covered by 
private insurance com¬ 
panies could be covered by 
the government plan if the 
insurance company per¬ 
mitted them to opt out of 
the plan. 

Spokesmen for the pri¬ 
vate insurance companies 
were non-commital as to 
what direction they would 
take. 


ro.s 

15.4 

23.0 


SI John’s 

Halifax 

Fredericton 

( har lotletown 

Montreal 

Ottawa 

Toronto 

Thunder Bay 

North Bay 

Kenora 

Winnipeg 

Churchill 

The Fas 

Brandon 


Max. MM. PrvcM 

12 10 — 


Prince Albert 
North Battietord 
Witt Currant 


n 

20 

25 

23 

25 

20 

23 

22 

33 

15 

20 

33 

32 

10 

20 

27 

30 

31 
» 
25 
U 
31 
» 
31 
n 
22 
It 


1.7 

10 


57 

7.0 


NORWAY SWEDEN DENMARK NEW ZEALAND ENGLAND 


Special of the Week 

FREYBE’S _ 

LY0NER SAUSAGE 9 69 

NOW .. in ft. 

DUTCH MEDIUM _ 

GOUDA 945 

R*(. 345 ft,_NOW V ft. 


CAI1A0A HOtlAHO riNLAHO FRANCE 


Your downtown 
international 
choaaa specialty 
•tore at 

14 CENTENNIAL SO. 


emtst 

CEttAP. 


TIDES FOR MONTH OF 
JULY 

TIOES AT VICTORIA 
(Tides listed are 
Pacific Standard Time) 

Time Ht Time HtiTIme HI l Time Ht 
IM M Ft .lH M Ft.lH M Ft.tH M Ft. 

24 0630 2 411400 7.0HMO 7 *12250 1 2 

25 0720 1.1! 1430 7III8I5 7 6i2J45 2.1 

76 0005 1 4 1720 7 711150 7AI 

27 0040 9 2IOI35 I 011750 7 H 2005 7.5 

n 0115 2 14)915 211015 7JI210S 7.2 

22 0205 0 94)955 1 HIM 722205 *4 

TIDES AT SOOKE 1 

I Time Ml Time Mt Time HtlTMttHl 
_IM M Ft .MM Ft ,H M Ft.lH M »I 

24 Mt5 2 911230 * 9 1510 7 «220S 24 

25 0*50 2 7II4M 7 7 1441 7 112250 94 

26 0/40 I * l4» 7 3II7J0 7 1 2340 9.2 

77 4005 1 JiIS4R 7 5 )045 * 21 

70 0035 Iu0 0l45 17 1545 74*45 *7 

79 41* 94(0225 I 5.1045 7.2(2144 * 5 


Tune MtTmie MtiTMw HtiTanr Ml 
IN V M H V Ft IHM Ft I H4A F t 
•010 9 2)0010 2 ) 1*45 94’MN 24 
40*5 9 mm I M7NI4 WI» 24 
0145 KlMM I I 1714 tO4(025 44 
•715 »A DI5 4 MM 1444014 41 
0171.100 *53 7 If* 14442*5 4 I 

04J0 94 11ft 14*75 *2 


NEW SHIPMENT 

MUSTANGS 



50 to choose from 

Includes: White wall tires, rack and pinion 
steering, deluxe wheel covers, 2.3 litre en¬ 
gine, 4-speed and more. "32 M.P.G. (8.6 
rating code) City and Hwy. combined. 

‘Transport Canada Rating 
O.L. #6616 


den 


©a 1 !* 

ram 


CALL COLLECT 

384-1144 

1060 YATES AT COOK 


Spend an 
Even Steven 
weekend with us. 


Do that super Seattle weekend you’ve 
thought about doing. But do it without worrying 
about what you’re losing on your Canadian money. 

That’s what Even Steven is all about. 

It’s all part of the Washington Plaza’s special 
welcome to Canadians. We’ll be happy to accept 
Canadian money at par from registered Canadian 
guests on anything you want to do in,the hotel. 
Relax in a super room with a spectacular view of 
the city. Wine, dine and unwind in a great choice of 
bars and restaurants. Take in some of the lively 
entertainment that’s part of one of Seattle’s finest 
hotels. You’ll also find the Washington Plaza 
beautifully convenient... it’s right downtown, 
near the waterfront, shopping and Monorail. 

The Washington Plaza puts the swing into 
your weekend in Seattle. Even Steven takes the 
sting out. 

Canadian dollars accepted at full 
face value. Use cash, cheque, or major 
cards. Offer valid on weekends only 
(including Canadian and American 
holidays) until Dec. 31,1980. 

Fur reservations, call 

toll free from Canada. 112-800-268-838}. 

Or, call the Washington Plaza direct. 

(206) lidb-7400. 


Washington I’laza 

(*» 



5lh Avenue at Westlake. 


WESTERN INTERNATIONAL TtOTECS i 


AUTO 
BUYS *3 


-- • Prices effective 

until Saturday. 
July 26th 1980 


KM 250 
TIRE SALE 


EACH 

BALAMCED 



For dependable mileage the tread 
wear on the KM 250 Is guaranteed 
— not just rated—tor 41,000 km. 

* mMm / 


Vie're convinced our 
N.A.C. Plen Is the best 
tire service In Canada! 
Drop In end heve our 
quellfled steft explein 
our exclusive service. 


M.A.C. PLAN 

NO ADDITIONAL CHAAOE F0A 

• FregM 

Dll' IM A! 


Institution • Bunemg 

Fitiani • Road Hut* instance • Single T»e Putcbeve • Punctu'e 
lepti' III AOOiTiON Every 8 000 fim tor the life of yout * man lues »e «*tii 
perform without ih»'Qo these munttnanct service* i Property rotate 
itres 2 Thoroughly inspect lire* 3 Check an pressure 4 Check veive 
stem* 5 Check wheel Balance 6 Rebalance it necessary 7 Check front 
alignment 8 Seasonal rtmoval and installation ol * mart tires ‘TOR 
ANTY SERV'CE SlMPlY BRING THE WARHANTiEO PROOuCT WiTm SALES 
'NvOiCt TQ ANY X mart AUTOMOTIVE DEPARTMENT WiTm SERVICE BAvS 


The wide low 
profile of the 
KM 250 combines 
great handling and 
smooth riding com¬ 
fort in one quality 
whitewall lire! 


DON T EVEN CONSIDER 
TAKING YOUR CAR ON 
A LONG TRIP WITHOUT 
GETTING A COMPLETE... 


(mmstsn. 


Our Service Includes: e power flush and refill the 
cooling system e pressure test tor leaks e check 
water pump, radiator, cap, belts and hoses e check 
coolant/anti-freeze protection level # bleed the cool¬ 
ing system it required e check battery condition 
e clean and tighten battery terminals • perform a 
complimentary K mart maintenance check 


K mart Special Price 

Wmm 


aumm 



COMPLETE ENGINE TUNE-UP 

Out Sirvin tOCludM: 4 n**r 


Our Service locludM: kutaWofl: 4 f*e 

plugs • new rotor • new points and con 
denser Checking: e plug wires • gas 
tiller and PCV valves a air fJlar 
a distributor cap a hosas and bans AAao 
• test and claan battery and cables a per 
form a diagnostic engine analysis - set 
engme timing e comcifcmantary K men car 
mamtananct ohack Faria and addfbonai 
aarv to a aitra H required 


INCLUDING DIAGNOSTIC ENGINE 
ANALYSIS AND SCOPE CHECK 


4 CYLINDER 

K marl SpacEM Price 

2900 

6 CYUNDER 

K mart Spaclai Price 

33 00 

8CYUNDER 

K merl Specie! Price 

39 00 

FOR MOST CARS 
BY APPOINTMENT 
ONLY 


UNIVERSITY HEIGHTS SHOPPING CENTRE 
3986 SHELBOURNE, VICTORIA, B.C. 


y 


\ 




































































































WORLD 


THE COLONIST, Thursday July 24, 1980 3 


Israel denounces Arab walkout 


UNITED NATIONS (AP) 
— The Israeli ambassador 
told the General Assembly 
on Wednesday its emer¬ 
gency session on Palestine 
was a "phoney event,” and 
a walkout by more than 
two-dozen delegates before 

Capital 

annex 

nearer 

JERUSALEM (AP) — 
The Israeli parliament 
Wednesday approved the 
first stage of a controver¬ 
sial bill making Jerusalem, 
including the annexed Arab 
sector, Israel's capital. 

Prime Minister Mena- 
chem Begin left his sickbed 
to appear for the vote and 
lead a 65-to-12 majority. 
The bill now goes to a com¬ 
mittee for final prepara¬ 
tion for enactment. 

The bill has drawn strong 
criticism from Arab coun¬ 
tries and other countries 
that maintain Israel has no 
right to claim sovereignty 
over predominantly Arab 
East Jerusalem, which it 
captured from Jordan in 
the 1967 Mideast War. 

The United States, Is¬ 
rael’s main ally, is embar¬ 
rassed by the bill because 
the question of who will 
govern East Jerusalem is 
one of the points to be 
worked out in the U.S.- 
sponsored Camp David 
peace process between Is¬ 
rael and Egypt. 

Introduction of the bill in 
May was one reason Egyp- 
tian President Anwar 
Sadat temporarily sus¬ 
pended talks on a form of 
autonomy for Palestinians 
living in Israeli-occupied 
Arab territory. 

Egypt regards East 
Jerusalem as part of the 
West Bank of the Jordan 
River, and wants the city’s 
100,000 Arabs to vote in 
elections for a Palestinian 
self-rule council. 


he spoke symbolized the 
Arab refusal to come to 
terms with Israel's exis¬ 
tence. 

All 21 members of the 
Arab League and about 
nine Communist and non- 
Arab delegates left the 


emergency session Wed¬ 
nesday when Israel’s Ye¬ 
huda Blum rose to deliver 
an address. 

Blum said the walkout 
symbolized “the root cause 
of the Arab-Israeli conflict, 
that is, the refusal of the 


Arab world to come to 
terms with Israel’s exis¬ 
tence.” He called it chil¬ 
dish and ridiculous. 

The absentees were 
“precisely the same states 
which have put themselves 
on the sidelines of the 


mainstream of real de¬ 
velopments in the Middle 
East and have become by¬ 
standers—somewhat neu¬ 
rotic bystanders—fo the 
current peace process,” 
Blum said. 

He told the remaining 
delegates, gathering for 
the second day of the five- 
day session, that the meet¬ 
ing was illegal and that any 
resolutions it adopted 
would be illegal. He pre¬ 
dicted that it would not 
bring any practical results. 

Wednesday’s meeting 
was Israel’s chance to 
reply to the General As¬ 
sembly majority that de¬ 
mands it surrender all Pa¬ 
lestinian and other Arab 
territories, including pre¬ 
dominantly Arab East 
Jerusalem, occupied since 
1967, and create a Palestin¬ 
ian state to be ruled by the 
Palestine Liberation Orga¬ 
nization. 

Egypt, suspended from 
the Arab League for the 
Camp David accords and 
its subsequent peace talks 
with Israel, was the only 
Arab country that did not 
walk out. Boutros Ghali, 
Egypt’s negotiator and its 
foreign minister, sat 
through Blum’s 72-minuto 
speech. 

Soviet and eastern Euro¬ 
pean ambassadors walked 
out but left lower-level per¬ 
sonnel in the hall to listen. 

Meanwhile, in Copenha¬ 
gen acommittee of the UN 
women’s conference Wed¬ 
nesday adopted a' strong 
anti-Zionist document call¬ 
ing for a role for the Pales¬ 
tine Liberation Organiza¬ 
tion in helping two million 
Palestinian women in Is¬ 
rael and Israeli-occupied 
lands “cope with the de¬ 
mands of daily life." 

The document was 
worked out by the Arab-do¬ 
minated UN Economic 
Commission of Western 
Asia over the strenuous ob¬ 
jections of western dele¬ 
gates to the internatidnal 
conference. The document 
may be altered before it 
reaches the 133-country 
plenary session next week, 
but it is bound to create 
controversy. . 



Keeping an eye on the gold 


New York State investigators, some 
armed with submachineguns, unload 
$1 million in gold coins from a heli¬ 
copter on Wall Street. Investigators 


went to Kansas to retrieve the coins 
from the brother of deceased Bronx 
coin dealer Allan Horowitz to deter¬ 
mine who inherits the gold. 


Doom and gloom 
in report on future 


WASHINGTON (AP) - Overcrowd¬ 
ing, poverty and hunger will haunt the 
globe in the year 2000 and food and energy 
prices will continue to spiral, according to 
a report on a three-year study of the 
world's prospects for the end of the 20th 
Century. 

In addition, the report said there will 
be more shortages, increased interna¬ 
tional tensions and it is likely that as 
many as 20 per cent of the earth’s animal 
and plant species will become extinct. 

“Barring revolutionary advances in 
technology, life for most people on Earth 
will be more precarious in 2000 than it is 
now — unless the nations of the world act 
decisively to alter current trends," the 
report said, r 


The Global 2000 Report to the Presi¬ 
dent, to be presented to the White House 
today, estimated that real food prices will 
double and energy prices more than 
double by the turn of the century. 

The report includes these major find¬ 
ings: 

• World food production should in¬ 
crease 90 per cent from 1970 to 2000, but 
world population will swell more than 50 
per cent — from about four billion in 1975 
to about 6.35 billion. 

• Land used for agriculture will in 
crease only about four per cent and soil 
deterioration will continue, so most of the 
increase in food production will rely on 
higher yields through techniques depen¬ 
dent on costly oil and natural gas. 


Now you’re 
talkin’taste. 



Some success scored 
in fish talks in U.S. 


WASHINGTON (CP) — 
A Canadian parliamentary 
grouip-^HHmed success 
Wednesday in convincing 
American politicians to 
take the issue of unsettled 
East Coast fisheries trea¬ 
ties more seriously, but 
won no U.S. commitments 
to do so. 

The one-hour session, 
stretching over lunch at the 
U.S. Capitol, was intended 
to impress upon the Ameri¬ 
can senators Canada's dis¬ 
pleasure at U.S. refusal to 
ratify fishing-rights trea¬ 
ties signed between the two 
countries in March, 1979. 

“We told them that this 
has become the major area 
of conflict between the two 
of us,” said Liberal MP 
Herb Breau of Gloucester, 
N.B., who acted as co- 
chairman of the Canadian 
delegation. 

‘‘It is creating large 
■problems in Canada and 


has become a matter of 
national conern.’ v 

Canada has been frus¬ 
trated by the U.S. senate 
foreign relations commit¬ 
tee’s reluctance to ratify 
the treaty, which is neces¬ 
sary to put its provisions' 
into effect. It would divide 
up fish quotas for each 
country’s fishermen. 

Senator Edward Ken¬ 
nedy (Dem. Mass), has 
proposed amendments to 
the treaty limiting its life to 
three years and giving 
American scallop fisher¬ 
men a bigger catch at the 
expense of Canadian fish¬ 
ermen. 

These charges are 
strongly backed by another 
influential East Coast sen¬ 
ator, Clairborne Pell of 
Rhode Island, who attend¬ 
ed Wednesday’s meeting 
with Kennedy. 

James McGrath, Conser¬ 
vative fisheries critic. 


commented later that 
while the Canadians “got a 
good bearing," he was per¬ 
sonally unhappy about 
Kennedy’s attitude. 

“He made a brief ap¬ 
pearance, didn't listen to 
our arguments, and then 
left," McGrath said. 



1980 DODGE 


BIOO VAN 


UUE 


So H5995" 


3200 DOUGLAS ST. 

382-2313 723 g 

!■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■ 


t ---- 

Something special 
from Grassie's 



Ruby ... birthstone of July. 

You can enjoy special 25% savings this month on 
these unique ruby and diamond rings. Hand-crafted in 
lOkt yellow gold mountings. 

Other fine ruby jewellery such as: rings, earrings, 
pendants, bracelets & brooches are available at special 
25% off regular prices during this event 


jouu 



• y?s ‘xvwuf • 4t>l/ tt. lOU. 

• P* N* Cr nUm • Park Royal • bfc-fitwuud 

• Lsnuiownr • Gutfitfirfd • WhAe K<xh 

• <tmCu a Cottonwood Cnr 

• HMamo • Port Hardy • Victoria • Parv.t>viHt- 
f Karnkxjpa • Vernon • Kelowna • UevnbUjki- 


fiargr Anu-m an 1 apreM. end Caa 










DON'T BE 
A SLAVE 
TO HOME 
UPKEEP! 


DOUBLE-SEALED 
INSULATING GLASS 


The aim of the people at GRANITE it to bong you TOTAL 
HOME COMFORT. To keep you warm in the Winter and cool 
In the Summer we have the TV advertised DOUBLE-SEALED 
INSULATING GLASS WINDOWS 


Converting or replacing single pane windows reduces thru 
glass heat loss up to 50%. And remember, only the 2-Seal 
Sealing System warrants a 10-year guarantee against 
leakage — twice as long as the industry standard of 6 years 
for run of the m»H 1-Seal units exclusive Black spacer bar 
prevents annoying light reflection between the sealed 
glass. 


THE GREAT 
COVER UP! 

SUNDECK COVERS 
AND ENCLOSURES 

• INCLUDING RAILINGS • 

For a SUNDECK that gives you all-year-round use. mstsU 
GRANITE s all-season maintenance-tree, insulated enclo¬ 
sure consisting of double-sealed insulating glass windows, 
patio doors and insulated panels arranged to give you 
maximum privacy Precision engineered and factory asaem 
bled for accurate and rapid installation If you only require a 
cover, the GRANITE Quality is still there with the rigid domed 
akyhgntm and precision-fitted extruded aluminum framings 

• CALL NOW • 


5" CONT INUOUS 

HURRICANE GUTTERS W.yvxyvwvv>:» ■> 


These gutters take c£re of 
themselves for twenty years! 
They're continuous from cor¬ 
ner to corner, are strong 
enough to support a ladder 
Installation is fully guaranteed. 
Facia and soffits to match! 


LOW INTEREST B.C. HYDRO LOANS AVAILABLE 
ON INSULATION AND STORW WINDOWS! 






y 




































































Sbc Bails Colonist. 


Published every morning except 
1 fiCwQ Monday by Canadian Newspapers 1 QQA 
XOtJO Company Limited at 2621 Douglas XtfOU 
Street, Victoria, B.C., V8W 2N4. 

RICHARD BOWER 
Publisher and Editor-in-chief 


DON VIPOND 
Associate Editor 


DAVID A. BROWN 
Acting Managing Editor 


COMMENT/BACKGROUND 


THURSDAY, JULY 24, 1980 


Canada’s dismal 


report card 


> 


In October of last year, while the Clark 
government was still in power, the then fed¬ 
eral minister of labor Lincoln Alexander re¬ 
leased a report on the state of literacy 
in Canada. 

The report was, to say the least, a shocker. 

What it revealed was that some 5 million 
adult Canadians cannot read, write or do 
arithmetic well enough to function adequately 
in society. Further, it noted public officials 
are virtually ignoring this sorry situation. 

Despite the seriousness of the findings and 
the half-dozen recommendations made by the 
commission to rectify this frightening state of 
affairs, little or nothing had been heard of the 
matter since. Apparently it was just one of 
those things the government was unable, un¬ 
willing or just too disinterested in to tackle. 

But how long can Canada remain unre¬ 
sponsive to this vital shortcoming? What, in 
effect, the report says is that Canada’s liter¬ 
acy rate on a total population basis stands at 
about 79 per cent — some 20 per cent less than 
the average enjoyed by European nations on 
both sides of the iron curtain. 

Instead of being up there with countries 
like Britain, France, East and West Germany, 
Belgium, Poland, Holland and, yes, the Soviet 
Union, we are in the same league as such 
countries as Panama, Paraguay, Sri Lanka, 
Singapore and Venezuela, and much lower on 
the list than Trinidad and Tobago, South 
Korea, Israel and Lebanon. 

If we take our adult population (that is all 
Canadians over 15 years of age) our record is 
even worse. Related to that figure, our literacy 
statistics stand at 64 per cent — a little less 
than Brazil’s, considerably less than the Do¬ 
minican Republic’s and just a little better than 
Burma’s. 

The mention of other countries in this 
context is not meant to be derogatory toward 
them in any sense but simply to place the 
Canadian statistics in their proper perspec¬ 
tive. Of those other nations named, none enjoy 
the wealth, the economic stability, the afflu¬ 
ence or the security of Canada. Many are 
undeveloped, others are in a state of war or in 
the midst of civil or social upheaval. Most, at 
best, live a life of frugality unknown to most 
Canadians. 

When one considers all the disadvantages 
stacked against them, one must give them an 
A-plus for accomplishing what they have in 
this area of discussion. 

But for Canada: a C-minus. 


The dental plan 

The limited dental care insurance pro¬ 
gram which the provincial government will 
put into operation five months from now has at 
least three good features and one major flaw. 

The worthwhile aspects: It will help first 
the people who need it most, the poor. So often 
that means the old and poor. For other seniors 
and for the parents of children up to 14, dental 
bills of up to $700 a year will be cut in half. 

The net effect of the plan should be to 
encourage better dental health, particularly 
among young people. If you are squeezed for 
money, it is easy enough to talk yourself out of 
visits to the dentist or to postpone check-ups 
for the kids. Now that excuse has been sub¬ 
stantially reduced or eliminated for many. 

Any social service which promotes 
health—efficiently—represents public money 
well spent. It will pay dividends down the road 
And the 50-50 coverage is a sound feature 
too. It will discourage abuse and hopefully 
remind users that nothing—nothing—is free. 

But as every parent learns, the care of 
children from 14 to 19, or to the end of 
schooling, is even more expensive than the 
years this plan covers. Stretching coverage in 
this direction should have first priority. 


Billy Carter incident may be final straw 


WASHINGTON — For officials in 
the State Department, the Billy 
Carter controversy is more than a 
messy public incident: it is an inci¬ 
dent that could, they fear, worsen 
America's already touchy relations 
with Libya, the thlrd-largest supplier 
of imported crude oil to the United 
States. 

The White House revealed Tues¬ 
day that Zbigniew Brzezinski, the 
president’s national security adviser, 
used Billy Carter last year as an 
intermediary to arrange a meeting 
with the Libyan charge d’affaires in 
Washington. 

That meeting between Brzezinski, 
Billy Carter and Ali el Houderi, took 
place last Nov. 27, 23 days after the 
American hostages were seized in 
Tehran. 

While House press secretary Jody 
Powell said Tuesday that Brzezinski 
asked the Libyan for his govern¬ 
ment’s help in winning the hostages’ 
release from Iran. Soon afterward, 
Powell said, Houderi informed Brze¬ 
zinski that the Libyan leader, Moam- 
mar Khadafy, had sent a message to 
the Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini 
asking for the hostages’ release. 

Senior White House officials ack¬ 
nowledged Tuesday night that the 
revelation that Brzezinski had used 
Billy Carter as a go-between “built up 
Billy in Libyan eyes,” as one of them 
put it, and thus could have contribut¬ 
ed to the Libyans' view that Billy 


Peter Elkind 

The Washington Post 


Carter was a valuable agent in the 
United States. 

Billy Carter revealed in a registra¬ 
tion with the Justice Department last 
week that he received $220,000 from 
the Libyan government in January 
and April of this year as payments on 
a $500,000 “loan.” The money came in 
two checks conveyed tp Carter 
through an intermediary by Houderi, 
the Libyan diplomat. 

U.S. ties with Libya have been 
volatile. In the last eight months 
alone, for example, Libyans have 
stormed and burned the U.S. Em¬ 
bassy in Tripoli, expelled dozens of 
Americans and vigorously denounced 
the American-sponsored Mideast 
peace effort. The United States, in 
turn, in May booted four Libyan dip¬ 
lomats out of this country, saying 
they were involved in a campaign to 
kill exiled opponents of Libyan leader 
Col. Moammar Khadafy. , 

Indeed, says one State Depart¬ 
ment official, "I don’t see how our 
relations could get any worse.” 

But others express concern that 
the Billy Carter controversy could 
end a brief period of relative quiet 
that has prevailed since May, when 
Libya, after protesting for days, 
finally recalled the four diplomats 



The Anderson opening 



WASHINGTON — The 
presidential campaign ini¬ 
tiated by the Republican 
convention 
last week i- 
promises * 
to be the 
meanest in 
half a cen¬ 
tury. For 
the two 
main can¬ 
didates ex¬ 
hibit weak¬ 
nesses so 
glaring as 
to compel attack. Which 
leaves an opening for the 
third-party candidate, 
John Anderson. 

Carter’s albatross is his 
performance on the major 
issues. Inflation has dou¬ 
bled during his term, and is 
now contained only by a 
recession bound to’ drive 
unemployment over 8 per 
cent. The country remains 
heavily dependent upon 
foreign oil. The Soviet 
Union and its allies have 
made gains in Asia, Latin 
America and Africa at the 
expense of America. 

A widespread theory is 
that the president will re¬ 
deem the past by some 
spectacular develop¬ 
ment—an October miracle. 
In fact, events now run the 
other way. The release of 
one hostage from Iran un¬ 
derlines the plight of 52 
others. 

The opening of the Olym¬ 
pics in Moscow combines 
with the legal ups and 
downs of draft registration 
to highlight anew the weak 
American response to the 
Soviet invasion of Afghan¬ 
istan. Billy Carter's trou¬ 
bles serve to remind the 
world of the low quality 
found in many of those 
around the president. 

Ronald Reagan and the 


SCOOPS 



MOW miS riOOSf WAS WU WIN ALL 

nt wm up-twwi am 
smmm. 


S 0 WH 8 W (Xto SURE. CfltWh 
AWCPMmfM. 


Joseph Kraft 


Republicans can hardly be 
expected not to batten on 
the Carter record. But it is 
not as though they have 
much that is positive to 
offer. On the contrary, a 
fair reading provides no 
evidence the Republicans 
will do better than the 
Democrats in addressing 
the country’s pressing 
problems. 

Inflation especially. If 
elected, Ronald Reagan 
would inherit a deficit run¬ 
ning at over $50 billion an¬ 
nually. He has promised a 
tax cut of $36 billion, and 
increases in defence spend¬ 
ing of at least $10 billion. 
That leaves a budget defi¬ 
cit of close to $100 billion. 

Energy conservation, by 
reducing demand and fos¬ 
tering a glut in the interna¬ 
tional market, could yield 
the most immediate relief 
from rising prices. But the 
Republican approach to the 
energy problem features 
incentives to produce more 
oil, and a turn away from 
conservation symbolized 
by the call to end the 55- 
mile-per-hour speed limit. 

Because of physical 
limits, it seems very doubt¬ 
ful that more oil can be 
drawn from American soil 
by higher prices. In the 
process of trying, however, 
conservation would be de 
emphasized, consumption 
will rise and OPEC will 
be in better position to hike 
prices—thus forcing a new 
burst of inflation. 

The same conflict be¬ 
tween promise and pros¬ 
pect characterizes the in¬ 
ternational security field. 
Reagan addresses strong 
language to the Russians. 


by Dtrag Sneyd 


the United States had ordered out of 
the country. 

Dpring Khadafy’s 11-year revolu¬ 
tionary rule, America’s relationship 
with Libya has operated on two very 
different levels. 

On one hand, the United States and 
the North African state of 2.7 million 
people have an extensive and mutu¬ 
ally beneficial economic relation¬ 
ship. 

America gets 8 per cent of its 
imported oil from Libya, 650,000 bar¬ 
rels a day. Only Saudi Arabia and 
Nigeria export more to the United 
States. 

For its part, Libya in 1979 grossed 
almost $5.5 billion from its exports to 
the United States, and rising prices 
are expected to push that figure to $9 
billion this year. In addition, Ka- 
dafy’s nation depends heavily on 
U.S. oil technology. Last year alone, 
the Libyans purchased $330 million in 
heavy equipment. 

On the other hand, a string of 
incidents and policy disagreements 
between the two nations has left dip¬ 
lomatic relations so rocky that a State 
Department official now sees 

E regress In that “nothing really bad 
as happened lately.” 

Khadafy’s government has been 


But he has backed away 
from the grain embargo 
and draft registration. 

This country's friends 
and allies—the Germans, 
the French and the Chinese 
in particular—already 
show signs that they have 
less confidence in Reagan 
than they have in Carter. 
They continue to do busi¬ 
ness on their own. 

Anderson, of course, is 
not free from blemishes. 
He is in constant danger, as 
witness his recent trip to 
Europe and the Middle 
East, of identifying him¬ 
self with narrow causes 
dear only to small minori¬ 
ties. 

But Anderson—and An¬ 
derson alone—stands for a 
truly constructive ap¬ 
proach to the central knot 
of national problems. His 
proposal for a 50-cent-a- 
gallon tax on gasoline em¬ 
phasizes the best short¬ 
term approach to the en¬ 
ergy problem—conserva¬ 
tion through higher prices 
to the consumer. By using 
the revenues to offset pay¬ 
roll taxes, he and he alone 
moves to constrain infla¬ 
tion without promoting un¬ 
employment. The combi¬ 
nation of decreased 
dependence on foreign oil 
and steady economic 
growth provides the only 
good base for dealing with 
foreign problems. 

To be sure, the prospect 
that Anderson can win the 
election is remote. He has 
no capacity to publicize 
himself by such circuses as 
the national conventions. 
His organization remains 
poor. 

Still he enjoys advan¬ 
tages not previously avail¬ 
able to third-party candi¬ 
dates. He will have 
available substantia) 
sums—over $5 million at 
least—for use in television 
toward the end of the cam¬ 
paign. He will be able to 
target his appeal to the 
states where he has a 
chance—Massachusetts, 
Connecticut, New York. Il¬ 
linois, Michigan, Oregon 
and Washington. 

So the congressman from 
Illinois can make a differ 
ence. He can build a con¬ 
stituency for the policies 
required to save this coun 
try from four more fallow 
of 


in constant conflict with U.S. notions 
of how nations should behave. 

Libya has helped arm and finance 
international terrorist groups; Kha¬ 
dafy has armed his nation to the 
teeth—largely with Soviet weapons— 
and nought nuclear capability; his 
troops fought unsuccessfully to save 
the regime of Ugandan dictator Idi 
Amin, who later took refuge in Libya; 
and Khadafy repeatedly has de¬ 
nounced U.S. Mideast policy, espe¬ 
cially the Egyptian-Israell peace 
treaty. 

Then there have been the Inci¬ 
dents. 

In 1972, Khadafy exercised an op¬ 
tion to buy eight American C-130 
cargo planes for $4.5 million apiece, 
only to have the United States refuse 
to grant export licences for them. The 
United States said C-130s Libya pur¬ 
chased in 1969 had been used for 
terrorist activities. In January 1979, 
Libya tried again to buy Ameri¬ 
can planes—this time three Boeing 
747s. But the U.S. government 
blocked that $186 million purchase as 
well, saying Libya had recently used 
similar passenger planes to aid ter¬ 
rorists. 

In December 1979, a mob of 2,000 
Libyans stormed and burned the U.S. 
Embassy in Tripoli. The United 
States pulled all diplomatic personnel 
out of the country and threatened 
further action until Libya agreed to 
pay for the damage. The embassy 
remains empty. 


Military bureaucrats working 
to bury deunification report 


Robert Cameron 



Tabbed to be minister of defence 
just when many people were holding 
their breath waiting to hear whether 
the F-18 or cheaper 
F-16 would be our 
new fighter, Giles i 
Lamontagne said: 

“ ...the winner 
must be the one want¬ 
ed by those who will 
have to fly it.” 

This doesn’t imply 
that the minister has 
been a patsy for the 
defence bureau¬ 
cracy. However, if I 
the negative reaction of some top 
bureaucrats to the Pyffe task force 
on unification ordered by Conserva¬ 
tive Defence Minister Allan McKin¬ 
non is any criterion, Lamontagne 
may find he has a "Cosa Nostra" on 
his hands should he wish to do other¬ 
wise than rubber stamp recommen¬ 
dations of his senior staff. 

An important part of the Pyffe 
report concerned this hierarchy of 
civilian and military bureaucrats at 
National Defence Headquarters. 
What Paul Hellyer set up after unifi¬ 
cation was a council including the 
senior officers of all three services, a 
deputy minister, and a scientific ad¬ 
viser, together with “integrated” 
staff support. 

As a result of subsequent manage¬ 
ment reviews, the present arrange¬ 
ment differs from this in three im¬ 
portant respects. 

First, being based in Winnipeg, 
Montreal and Halifax as force com¬ 
manders, the three senior environ¬ 
mental experts are effectively cut out 
of decision making in Ottawa. (This 
will be denied, but it is so). 

Secondly, the civil service deputy 
minister—once mainly concerned 
with civil servant establishments, 
legal and audit services, properties, 
the budget and political interface—is 
now first among equals between him¬ 
self and the chief of defence on all 
aspects of management. 

And thirdly, the senior staff of five 
assistant deputy ministers is domin¬ 
ated by three other civil servants 
since their responsibilities include 
the important policy post—in a mili¬ 
tary department—and their tour of 
duty normally lasts much longer than 
that of their military colleagues. 

The oddity of this superstructure 
in Ottawa attracted considerable at¬ 
tention from those consulted by the 
task force, i.e., 1,100 people consist¬ 
ing of civilians, both serving and 
"tired military personnel, and 28 
. sociations representing more than 
600,000 people from across Canada. 
Practically none of them supported 
the status quo. 

Hence I was shocked to be told by 
one of the top members of the bureau¬ 
cracy that the task force was a “com¬ 


plete waste of time” and that its 
report “should be chucked in the 
wastebasket." 

Unification was imposed by the 
Liberals against almost total mili¬ 
tary’ opposition, in 1964. Neverthe¬ 
less, with the added clout given 
top management, it is not unreason¬ 
able that new generations of civilian 
and military bureaucrats, who now 
wield great power in defence head- 

a uarters, would regard recommen- 
ations for change in the system with 
less than complete objectivity. 

Pyffe's effort was simply tabled in 
the House, with no request that there 
be agenda time for parliamentary 
consideration. Despite its inherent 
public importance (as anyone who 
has read press reports about several 
Reserve units now buying their own 
distinctive dress uniforms, will real¬ 
ize), strong representation to have 
the Pyffe report published by the 
Queen's Printer was rejected. The 
work was done in house by the de¬ 
fence department—and you had bet¬ 
ter believe it wasn't for economy. 

As a further indication of a snow 
job in Ottawa, consider the recent 
announcement of a second “in house' ’ 
group to review Pyffe’s review. 

So what is the message we get 
from all this for parliamentary—and 
in the broader sense—public con¬ 
trol of the military in Canada? 

Lack of control of the military is 
generally associated with countries 
that breed military juntas, who may 
elect to dictate the political line or, 
alternatively, set up a military dic¬ 
tatorship. 

Canada is of course never likely to 
be threatened with this type of politi¬ 
cal-military problem. Nevertheless 
we have our own version. One where 
the tail simply wags the dog: a highly 
professional military-civilian bu¬ 
reaucracy calling the shots for par¬ 
liament, and with practically no sub- 
stantive dialogue between 
them—particularly during the Tru¬ 
deau decade. 

The result should not surprise any 
one. Frustrated politicians have be¬ 
come the revolutionaries: Hellyer 
with his drastic unification act, then 
Trudeau with a 40 per cent hack at the 
size of the armed forces, followed 
with a 50 per cent pull-out from 
NATO—all on a personal judgment of 
what was best for the country. 

Lamontagne should get the three 
lieutenant-general service com¬ 
manders back to defence headquar¬ 
ters as quickly as possible and give 
them responsibilities as environmen¬ 
tal chiefs. Not to worry about the 
command problem in the field; 
major-generals are quite adequate if 
they don’t have to cope with a staff In 
Ottawa dominated not supported by 
civiliair bureaucrats. 

(Cwncron I* • retired air vice-marshal of Can 
•da's armed forces.) 


Export tax power grab 


The Globe and Mail 


yean of 
kaflatioa 


fMI 

*. 


It all depends on whose ox is 
being gored. 

British Columbia Premier Wil¬ 
liam Bennett and Alberta Premier 
Peter Lougheed contend that if Ot¬ 
tawa were to place an export tax on 
natural gas going to the United 
Stales, it would be an Invasion by 
Ottawa into provincial jurisdiction 
over natural resources. Federal En¬ 
ergy Minister Marc Laiode, who with 
Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau has 
considered such aa export tax, has 
said that he la eeaMdaM« aa expert 
tax on any form of euergy, including 
electricity 

This p r odu ce d a howl from On 
laris which tried to see a difference 


between exporting energy in the form 
of gas and exporting it as electrical 
power and held that no export tax 
should be placed on electricity going 
south (quite a lot of Ontario power 
goes south). 

But perhaps Quebec Energy Min¬ 
ister Yves Berube put it most factu 
ally. He also opposed an e^ort tax on 
electrical power, but he saw it in the 
full context. “Ottawa,” *-e said, “is 
involved in a grab for more power 
over natural resources and once it 
starts with natural gas and oil M will 


>- 


Mr. Trudeau and Mr Laloade 
may yet ualte Caaadiaas la op 
position to themselves, that is 


r\ 
























• T 


I • 


OPINION/LETTERS 


THE COLONIST, Thursday July 24, 1980 5 


Punch 



Gorde 

Hunter 

One man's 
opinion 


The old cliche tells us we only come this way 
once, but that if we play our cards right, once is 
enough. I reject the theory out of hand, being a firm 
believer in reincarnation—that there will be an 
encore although few, If any, will know anything 
about it. My one-time corpulent friend, Ken Dobson, 
the sportcasting fella, disagrees, while at the same 
time keeping the avenues open just in case I might 
be right. 

“I don't believe in reincarnation,” the Dobber 
says, "gnd didn't the last time I was here either." 

AnyWay, he sends along a piece from The 
Seattle Post Intelligencer dealing with the complex¬ 
ities of and the belief in, reincarnation. It seems 
there is a Shafenburg Research Foundation in 
Kingfisher, Oklahoma, which just happens to be a 
flourishing centre for the study of reincarnation— 
that’s right, smack dab in the middle of the famed 
Bible belt of the south. 

Most proponents of the theory believe the soul is 
constantly reborn in different lifetimes. The end¬ 
lessly reincarnated soul forms Its own pattern or 
obligations to fulfil its development. It learns 
lessons in each life and eventually, some insist, ends 
up in a genius or super person. 

I realize the story of Brldey Murphy was a 
monstrous hoax perpetrated by a fiction writer on a 
believing Satevepost many years ago. I place little 
faith in astrological readings or in the planets 
having anything to do with my destiny. I am also a 
skeptic in the regions of ESP. Therefore, how do I 
equate these skepticisms with a belief in two or 
more turns here on this earth? 

I’M GLAD YOU asked that if for no other reason 
than the fact I’m going to tell you anyway. It all has 
to do with unusual or what appears to be excessive 
talent in one person. 

For instance, when Yehudi Menuhin was just 
seven years old, he debuted with the San Francisco 
orchestra as a guest violinist. He did the same with 
the Paris orchestra at age 10, with the New York 
Philharmonic at II and the Berlin orchestra at 13. 
The argument being he could not have been that 
great at age seven without having stored up some 
prior violin experience in a previous life. Similar 
claims could be made for Winnipeg’s Donna Gre- 
scoe, who, as a pre-teener, gained international 
repute for her wizardry on the voilin. 

The older in my audience will remember when 
yet another Winnipegger, Abe Yanofsky, became 
the Canadian chess champion at a ridiculous age- 
something like 10 or 12. He was beating the best 
Canada had to offer and was confusing some of the 
world’s best players as well. Was Abe that smart as 
a youngster or had he received superior chess 
teaching in an earlier fling ort earth? 

IT WAS REALLY only yesterday that we 
thrilled to the on-ice heroics of Bobby Orr. He was 
only 18 when he joined the NHL and in that very first 
year he served undeniable evidence that be was on 
the threshold of a brilliant hockey career. Waa it 
possible that Orr corraled all that marvelous ability 
in one short lifetime or was some of It willed from a 
previous life? Can we not surmise the same today 
about the new wunderklnd, Wayne Gretzky? 

I can’t even recall his name now, but away back 
when radio was thd big entertainment box, there 
was a program about whiz kids and one of them had, 
at age nine, I believe it was, a knowledge of 
mathematics that left learned professors of the 
subject completely baffled. How was it possible for 
one so young to amass such copious knowledge of a 
difficult subject? 

In this same vein, it is not unusual to hear of a 
13-year-old who has completed four years of univer¬ 
sity training and that the work load was a piece of 
cake. Prior exposure? 

Tracey Austin is still attending high school and 
yet she earns in excess of a quarter of a million 
bucks a year as a touring tennis pro, beating, in the 
process, every top player in the game. Natural 
ability or an ability honed to a reasonably high 
degree during an earlier visit? 

The examples are far too numerous to com¬ 
pletely catalogue, but the theory should be reason¬ 
ably clear to support at least a "maybe" position 
relative to reincarnation. 

I am relatively certain of one fact, Ken Dob¬ 
son—you won't be coming back as the Jack Nfcklaus 
of 2050. But you might well be the Howard Cosell of 
that same year. So start learning to be humble, just 
like ol’ Howard is today. 


Nylons showed 
how so-so songs 
should be sung 


King Lee was so fascin¬ 
ated by naming, dating and 
identifying original per¬ 
formers of the songs that 
he missed completely the 
virtuosity of The Nylons. 

He, not the rest of the 
audience, is the wrong age 
to know that this was a 
collection of so-so songs 
which deserved another 
listening only as vehicles to 
illustrate what could be 
done with them given the 
imagination, harmonic 
adeptness, and outstanding 
talent of The Nylons. 

There was opportunity to 
appreciate the range and 
tonal quality of Marc Con¬ 
ners, the basic bottom bass 
of Ralph Cole and the fabu 
lout falsetto of Fabulon it 
was a truly remarkable 
muticil preMnutlon 

TO dots them at nostal- 
glsU it to miss the forest 
for the trees Lacklustre, 
superficial reviews such at 
King Lae’s will encourage 
The Nytaas to go abroad If 
we're lucky they may re 






( 

mm ■ ■_ c? _ - _ _ / 


Civic Scene /Hubert Beyer 



turn as acclaimed artists 
and we Canadians can then 
recognize what some of us 
have known from the first 
arpeggios—these guys are 
great 

W. PAUL SMITH, 
494 Beach Drive, 
Victoria. 


Editor's Note: King Lee 
responds: To Each His 
Own, Ink Spots, circa un¬ 
known. 


Tve been replaced by a younger conservation¬ 
ist.” 


Fotheringham 
taken to task 

To Allan Fotheringham, regarding comments on the 
nomination of Ronald Reagan for the Republican party 
candidate. 

Tsk, tsk, Mr. Fotheringham! In one fell swoop you 
managed to demean a vast portion of the continent's 

people. 

To take to task a man because his father was a 
drunken shoe salesman; because he worked at me¬ 
nial chores to put himself through college; because 
Warner Bros, cast him in several trite epics (he was 
under contract, remember?); because he was once 
divorced; because his children are college dropouts 
and have problems of the|r own; I find demeaning and 
deplorable entirely! Greatly beneath your role of re¬ 
sponsible reporting. 

Lastly to cast slurs of incapability because he's 
69 years old denotes senility on a goodly portion of 
our elderly citizenry. 4fany great leaders were much 
older than that, as I sincerely trust you are aware. 

Mr. Reagan, God knows, has his faults. But none of 
these are among them! 

For shame, Mr. Fotheringham; for your bigotry 
in our supposed enlightened society. 

PATRICIA THEOFAN, 
2025 Crescent Road, 
Victoria. 


* ★ * 

In your July 16 Colonist, Allan Fotheringham wrote 
that U.S. Vice-President James Vance Garner made the 
“warm spit" saying, when it was actually Franklin 
Roosevelt’s 1933-41 vice-president, John Nance Garner. 

Since no respectable newswriter could be suspected 
of making such a glaring error stupidly, it must have been 
deliberate. Mr. Fotheringham must have decided to 
enliven this dull summer not merely with his august 
presence, but also with a July present of a new word 
game. I suggest it be called Name Slopping (or, Get Close 
and Look Good) and offer these slopped names: 

Spiro Agony, Lester Vowels Pearson, Herrol Flynn, 
Winston Churchbell (he tolled us), Dolly Parting, Hubert 
Horatio Alger, Harry (The Hat) Truman and Muhammad 
Alley (paved with Clay). 

BRUCE LOWTHER, 
1219 Hillside Ave., 

■* Victoria. 


B.C. pension plans 
secure in the future 

I am wrjting in response to the article by Don Collins 
on pensions which appeared in the June 24ColonisL 

Mr. Collins referred to my press release of March 
5 in which I said that the financial position of the 
British Columbia public sector pension nlans is ex¬ 
cellent. That press release was issued in response to 
over-stated claims by some that unfunded liabilities of 
approximately $1 billion under the various public sector 
pension plans meant that the plans were in a fi¬ 
nancial mess. 

Once again, I must emphasize that this is not the 
case. The government of British Columbia has al¬ 
ways had a policy of substantially funding the basic 
pension benefits under the various pension statutes. In 
this regard, British Columbia has a record of facing 
its pension responsibilities which is one of the finest in 
North America and, as a result, our pension plans 
are well funded by public sector standards today. 

I also indicated in my March 5 press release that 
government would continue to keep a "vigilant eye” on 
the financial status of the pension plans. While I was not in 
a position to make public statements on the matter at the 
time, we have been aware for the past several years that 
the present indexing provisions of our pension plans are 
not financially sound. In addition, there is a need to im¬ 
prove the funding of basic benefits under the Teach 
ers, and Municipal Plans. . * 

The legislation which I introduced to the Legisla¬ 
ture in May represents government’s response to the 
pension financing problems which have been iden¬ 
tified by our independent consulting actuaries. The 
amendments will improve funding of the basic bene¬ 
fits under the Teachers' and Municipal Plans as well as 
revising and making financially responsible the indexing 
system under all the pension statutes These amendments 
continue the long-standing tradition in British Columbia 
of the government facing its financial responsibili¬ 
ties and thereby ensuring that benefits promised under 
the pension plans will be secure in the future. 

EVAN M. WOLFE, 
Provincial Secretary. 


So you think it’s impossible to have your cake and 
eat it. Take some lessons from Victoria city council. 

Council wants to protect Victoria’s commercial 
heritage buildings from demolition and drastic altera¬ 
tions, but doesn't want to designate them because that 
would cost money. 

Trust Aid. Robert Wright and city solicitor Jakob 
de Villiers to provide the solution to the problem. 

Owners of commercial buildings worth saving will 
find their property on a list of heritage buildings that 
stops just short of designation. Being on that list 
doesn't entitle the owner to a tax break. Only designa¬ 
tion does. 

But the moment the owner of a listed building 
applies for a demolition or building permit, sirens start 
screaming, sprinklers go off and red lights begin to 
flash. 

The application is immediately forwarded to the 
appropriate committee and council, which will lower 
the boom. 

A 39-DAY FREEZE will be imposed during 
which the building in question cannot be demolished or 
altered. 

Before the 30 days are up, a designation bylaw will 
be in place, protecting the heritage building forever 
and a day. 

And only at that point will the owner get a tax 
break. The assessment on the building will bo frozen 
for three years and assessment on improvements 
for up to seven years. 

The commercial heritage bylaw, awaiting coun¬ 
cil’s final approval, will not only protect some of the 
beautiful old buildings, but will actually encourage 
restoration. 

There is a chance some building owners will apply 
for a demolition permit just to get the benefits of the 
heritage bylaw, but then, there always will be cheap¬ 
skates. 

★ * * 

PARSIMONIOUS AND HYPOCRITICAL are two 


words that come readily to mind In connection with the 
ticket spitter at Thetis Lake Park. 

It doesn’t cost anything to enjoy East Sooke Park, 
operated by the Capital Region. Nor does the city of 
Victoria charge anyone to enter Beacon Hill Park. 

But the city, which owns the park, argues that 
Thetis Lake is used by a lot of people who don’t pay 
taxes in Victoria. The upkeep, the city says, is expen¬ 
sive and a little help by way of admission comes in 
handy. 

Well, actually, the city calls it a parking fee. If you 
want to park your car at the parking lot, you have to 
purchase a ticket. But since the park is miles from any 
built-up area and has no bus connections, the only way 
to get there is by car. Ergo: To get in, you pay 
admission. 

The ticket spitter, by the city's own admission, 
isn't the world's greatest money-maker. But even that 
doesn’t seem to make a difference. The automatic 
bandit keeps fleecing park users and generates a lot of 
frustration. 

WHICH GETS US TO the second point, the hypoc¬ 
risy of towing away cars from the park's parking lot 
which don’t display a valid ticket purchased from the 
spitter. 

’ That’s the same city which has been trying hard to 
bring Victoria towing firms to heel. Many a Victoria 
alderman has expressed his indignation over the 
indiscriminate operations of Gordon's Towing. 

Aid. John Cooper is right when he demands the 
removal of the ticket spitter from Thetis Lake Park. 

Nobody should have a pay to enter a park, muni¬ 
cipal or regional. In fact, I don't think anyone should 
have to pay to pitch a tent in a provincial or federal 
park either. 

If the city is unhappy with having to maintain 
Thetis Lake Park at the expense of Victoria taxpayers, 
while everybody and his uncle from outside Victoria is 
using it, there’s an easy solution. 

The city can turn the park over to the Capital 
Region, but that would never do. You see, the park 
looks good on the ledgers where it's listed as an asset. 


Rail travel cheaper without meals, bed 


Gorde Hunter, in his July 11 column, comments that 
"rail... is not competitive with air Havel.” 

He goes on to make a general statement that the cost 
for two from the West Coast to Winnipeg is “consider¬ 
ably more” by train. 

If Mr. Hunter is referring to bedroom accommoda¬ 
tion, plus the cost of meals, yes, the cost might very 
well be higher. 

I would, however, point out that the current coach 
fare between Vancouver and Winnipeg is 382, sub¬ 
stantially below regular economy air fares. 

. VIA also offers a number of incentive plans, al¬ 
though not all are available during the summer travel 
period. These include round trip excursion fares, group 
fares, senior citizens' fares and special rates for children. 


In addition, VIA’s Canrailpass offers unlimited travel at a 
fixed cost throughout Canada. 

I do feel that Mr. Hunter’s statement was a bit 
misleading, if not unfair. 

C. MICHAEL WILLIAMS, 
Manager, Public 
Relations, 
VIA Rail Canada Inc., 
Winnipeg, Manitoba. 

Editor's Note—Hunter replies: It is not misleading 
unless you don’t mind sitting up for two nights or 
going hungry for nearly three days. 


Writers’ views supported 


In the Opinion—Letters 
section of the July 17 Colo 

nist there was a total of 
four letter* to the editor 
aad io each of the four 
there wo* to very much of 



time pay for duties neglect 
ed;G G Smith’s support of 

a unified Canada; M. Bear 
don’s Sex education a par¬ 
ents right and Monica Old 
ham’s Graduation 
rffriiwj t se kid ides Is 
However, eo (he same 
page appeared Gorde 
Hunter’s "Gold I 


journalistic master¬ 
piece. "On (he giving of. 

advice to young people" 


it all" 


prehensively "says 
as being an ideal I 


(Am ceremony i4rtrrfi 

TOM GRAHAM. 
12U Fairfield Road 

Victoria 


AT WESTCOAST 
SAVINGS,WE’RE 
LARGE ENOUGH 
TO SERVE YOU. 

BUT SMALL ENOUGH 
TO CARE. 


i 



t seems everywhere you 
turn these days, the personal 
touch just isn’t always there 
like it used to be. The corpo¬ 
rate financial giants seems to 
be treating their customers 
like customers instead of like 
people. 

At Westcoast Savings we re¬ 
fuse to believe that bigger al¬ 
ways means better. 

We’re not a large financial empire stretching across 
the country. But we're large enough to offer you 
almost every service the banks can offer And small 
enough to provide a few that thev can't, services 
like: ' 

Prime 55 - a chequing/sav ings account (or those over 
55 that pays competitive interest 

The Westcoaster a chequing account especially fur 
those under 55 with many benefits including 
monthlv interest 


Insurance is available at 
every branch and Personal 
Counselling from your 
Branch Managers All De¬ 
posits are fully guaranteed. 
We provide you with full in¬ 
ter-branch banking, six day 
service, and extended bank¬ 
ing hours. 


But the best part of our 
service is our people. All our 
staff try to be helpful, friendly and efficient - never 
too busy to help. 

So, if you're tired of bftng treated like a number 
instead of a name, come and talk to us . we ll 
listen. 


til 


WESTCOAST SAVINGS 
CREDIT UNION 

I .arge enough lo fcerve you Small enough to care 

































I 


6 THE COLONIST, Thursday July 24, 1980 


furniture 


FINAL THREE 
DAYS ONLY 




centre 10-DAY 


TOSHIBA MICROWAVE 
OVEN DEMONSTRATION 
ON SAT. 12 to 4 P.M. 


SELL-A-THO 


European Style 
Bentwood 
Rocker 


DOOR BUSTER SPECIALS 


195 


Pickup 


5-PIECE 

DINETTE 

SUITE 


r 


(r- 


Hat and 

Coat 

Rack 




BUILT-IN 
DISHWASHER 

Limited Quantities 


195 


ELECTROHOME 
14" COLOR TV 

$ 


Pickup 


auto, white level, in¬ 
line black matrix 
N.G.B. picture tube 


\ 


r *f‘\ 




L 




16 U Ft 


MOFFAT 
FROST-FREE 

REFRIGERATOR 


KELVINATOR 

RANGE 

• Automatic oven timer 

• Clock and minute minder 

• Easy dean range 


Sr ~t I u Lfutrijutr 

WASHER DRYER 

• 3 drying cycles, 
limed normal, timed 
permanent press. luH 


■tar 


Store _-J 

Full 4 
of 

More 
Sellathon 
Values 



. A ' 7 >' f ** $ ■' 

’ 


SOFA, CHAIR, OTTOMAN 

*449 

LOVE SEAT 

*279 

MATCHING SOFA BED 

4-6” Springfilled Mattress 

*399 




AM/FM STEREO RECEIVER 
WITH 8-TRACK TAPE PLAYER 


Plays AM. FM; FM-Stereo broadcasts 
plus 8-track tape cartridges. Slide con¬ 
trols for Volume. Balance. Bass, Treble. 
Built-in AFC for better FM reception 
Lighted dial with FM-stereo indicator 
light. 8-track playback mechanism with 
automatic tape program indicator lights 
and manual program selector pushbut¬ 
ton. Jacks for headphones, tape output, 
aux/tape input, phono input, speakers 
Includes FM dipole antenna Dimen¬ 
sions: I8”wx4 Vhx10"d. 


99 


EASY PAYMENT PLANS AVAILABLE 
ON THE SPOT (OJLC.) 


CHARGEX 

VISA 


FREE PARKIHG 


FREE DEUVERY 


Wee. SKLAR SOFA 
CHAIR and OTTOMAN 





% 9K) ViEW ST. 388-7411 

V VV*4rVL V Stal — Ttarv In *«*> H I 




I 

















































































& 


CANADA 


*» 


RCMP lawyer cites Gouzenko case 




OTTAWA (CP) — Although 
Igor Gouzenko ‘‘came to the 
RCMP with documents he 
stole from the government of 
Russia” in 1946, he was 
rewarded, not prosecuted, 
RCMP lawyer Claude Thom¬ 
son of Toronto contended 
Wednesday. 

Thomson told a royal commis¬ 
sion into RCMP wrongdoing that 
Gouzenko apparently had com¬ 
mitted an indictable offence by 
‘‘knowingly possessing stolen 
property." 

But the subject wasn't even 
mentioned in 1946 as Gouzenko, 


who had been a cipher clerk at 
the Soviet embassy here, was 
given asylum. He has been sup¬ 
ported by the government ever 

since. 

The documents he took with 
him from the embassy exposed 
Soviet espionage efforts in North 
America and helped launch the 
Cold War. 

Thomson used the Gouzenko 
case to illustrate his argument 
that some illegal acts are “rea¬ 
sonably necessary” in the inter¬ 
est of national security and 
should not be prosecuted. In a 
written brief to the royal com¬ 
mission, he suggested that 
RCMP security service men 


should have immunity from the 
law when performing “reason¬ 
ably necessary” acts in the line 
of duty. 

In a separate submission Wed¬ 
nesday, the civil liberties section 
of the Canadian Bar Association 
argued strongly against Thom¬ 
son's proposal, saying it would 
mean anarchy. 

Thomson, who represents 
RCMP Commissioner Robert 
Simmonds, and Montreal lawyer 
Pierre Lamontagne, who repre¬ 
sents RCMP interests, heckled 
occasionally as the association 
spokesman argued for the rule of 
law. 

Later, retired deputy RCMP 


commissioner W. H. Kelly, now 
69, was called to testify about a 
brief presented in 1967 to a previ¬ 
ous royal commission on security 
by the Canadian Association of 
Chiefs of Police. Kelly testified 
that he had talked the chiefs out 
of presenting a brief on organ¬ 
ized crime and—as the senior 
RCMP officer working with the 
commission—drafted a memo 
outlining to the association what 
might interest the commission. 

Kelly’s main point, which was 
included in the association brief, 
was that the RCMP was the best 
place for the security service. 

The chiefs also echoed Kelly in 
saying that critics of the force 
probably didn't know what they 


were talking about. 

Commission counsel Ross 
Goodwin noted (that it was un¬ 
likely the 1960s royal commission 
realized the brief from the chiefs 
was based on ideas from the 
RCMP. 

As he asked Kelly about a line 
from the brief calling for "full 
freedom of action" for the 
RCMP, Lamontagne, the RCMP 
lawyer, interjected that the 
phrase was "rather refreshing" 
compared to the civil liberties 
brief. 

"It’s unlikely that (the civil li¬ 
berties) brief was prepared by 
anyone n the RCMP,” Mr. Jus¬ 
tice David C. McDonald com¬ 
mented. 


IMPERIALOIL IS CREATING 
JOBS BY INVESTING $1 BILLION 
IN CANADA THIS YEAR. 

PROFITS MAKE THIS POSSIBLE. 


Most of Imperial Oil’s investment is used in the 
search for new energy supplies and to conserve 
existing supplies. But the effects of our investment 
go far beyond this. Businesses across Canada 
benefit as suppliers of goods and services. 

if 


When you hear about oil company profits, we ■ 
hope you will remember oil company investments 
and how they help create employment. 

Here are examples of the many companies we 
are working with: 



Gerhard Dietz and his fellow workers at Bingham- 
Willamette Company in Vancouver which manufactures 
pumps that Esso uses to transport crude oil. 


John Bergen. Yard Foreman 
for Interprovincial Steel and 
Pipe Corporation in Regina.- 
i*. ' ! helps make the pipe we use in 

( our oil fields. 


Dave Ross of 
Geonautics Company 
in St. John's and 
his survey crew 
specialize in highly 
technical seismic 
work.They are under 
contract to Esso, 
surveying in the 
Atlantic. 



John Thomas. Assembler for 
Foremost Industries in Calgary, which 
designs and manufactures all-terrain 
vehicles used extensively in 
our exploration and drilling activities. 


9 




w 


Kook Hee Kang and his 
associates work for 
, Muirhead Engineering 
in T oront o, which sup¬ 
plies heat exchangers 
that help Esso 
. conserve energy 
its refineries. 


Guy Belanger and his 
colleagues at SNC FW 
Montrea l are working on 
engineering designs for 
Esso's heavy oil project at 
Gild Lake Alberta. 


1880-1980 
Imperial Oil Limited 




THE COLONIST, Thursday July 21, 1980 7 
"" 1111 


Lucky 
Dollar 


FOODS 


HI 


BABY’S ONLY 

BATHROOM 
TISSUE 4 roiu 


19 


KRAFT 500 g 


WHIZ 


MAPLE LEAF 6'/2 oz. 

FLAKES 
OF HAM 


PACIFIC 385 ml 

EVAPORATED A f 
MILK L S' 


MAZOLA 

OIL 


1 litre 



NABOB DELUXE 120 s A 

919 

TEA ‘ 

BAGS 1 

9 


CLOVERLEAF 200 g 

PINK 

SALMON 


Pi 


SUNRYPE 10 oz. 

,,100 

GRAPE ' 
JUICE i 

j. 1 

NALLEY’S 200 g 

RQc 

POTATO 

CHIPS 

09 

10% OFF 

EVERY 

WEDNESDAY 

All Store Items (with minimum $5 order) 
EXCLUDING Butter & Cartons of Cigarettes 

• CANADA GRADE A • 

BEEF BLADE 


CHUCK 

129 

STEAK 

, b 1 


CROSS RIB 
ROAST 


89 


1 
1 

WIENERS P 


BEEF 
STEW 

SWIFT REG. Cello 


lb. 


lb. 


89 


WASHINGTON 

CORN on 
the COB 

NEW ZEALAND MANNY SMITH 


4i79* 
APPLES .49* 

CALIFORNIA _ _ 

RED HUMS .49* 


Mu,, ■flu-tlui 

rncfs •ntcui® 

f \ I irirv\ JULY 25-21 
JA A d N T \ „ . .. .... 

Dollar\ 

KEE’S 


4ID1 ttQwniiK 

477-1747 
























































I 


8 TUF. COLONIST. Thursday July 21, 1980 * * 


MTON’S 

MOREHOUSE 

STORE 

749 View Street 

Next Door to the Civic Parking Garage 

CLEARANCE 

Starts Wed., July 23rd, Continues through 
Sat., July 26th with Special Savings 
in Home Furnishings 

MAJOR APPLIANCES 


30’ 


Viking Range 

629 95 


Self-cleaning model with digital clock, rotis- 
serie. 2 ultra-high speed elements and a 
black glass oven door. White Full warranty. 

Model DS833PRW 
1 only. 


30" Viking Range 

499 95 

Self-cleaning model with digital clock, oven 
door window White. Has a full warranty 
Model S937W 

1 only. 

Gourmet 300 Moffat Range 

799 88 

New. Dented left side Features an oven door 
window with eye-level broiler White Full 
warranty. Model MSS4058W 
, 1 only. 

30” Viking Range 

449 95 

Damaged. Self-cleaning range with 2 ultra 
high-speed elements, digital clock, black 
glass oven door. Full warranty Almond 
color. Model DS835PT. 

1 only. 


30” Viking Range 

599 95 

Self-cleaning range with 4 elements (2 
ultra-high speed), digital clock, rotisserie. full 
black glass door panel. Full warranty. Model 
DS938PRT 
1 only. 


G.E. Concept II Fridge 

699 97 

Damaged. 2-door model with cantilever 
shelves. 3 crispers. butter conditioner. Ap¬ 
pro*. 17 cu ft. capacity Full warranty 
Harvest gold color. 

1 only. 

Viking Refrigerator 

599 95 

Left hand door model with 3 crispers. cantile¬ 
ver shelves. Frost tree model in white Full 
warranty. Model DR816FW 

1 only. 

Moffat Refrigerator 

559 97 

Lett hand door model Almond color Full 
warranty Model MFA679T. 

1 only. 

13 cu. ft. Moffat Fridge 

479 97 

Right hand door model with twin crispers. 

mealkeeper Has a full warranty 

Viking Automatic Washer 

419 97 

Apartment-size washer in white only. Full 
warranty. Model EW224RW. 

1 only. 

Viking Automatic Dryer 

249 97 

One only in white Features a full warranty. 

Model DE124RW 

Viking Dishwasher 

319 97 

Almond color dishwasher with a full war¬ 
ranty Model F813T. 

1 rfhly 


“COTTAGE SPECIALS" 

Now is the time to pick up those extra furnishings for the 
weekend cottage, all on special at Eaton's Warehouse! 


Bedchesterfield 

259 88 

Double bed size chesterfield with foam-filled 
mattress for mammum sleeping comfort. 
Choose from assorted upholstered colors.. 


5-Pce. 
Kitchen Suite 

8488 

Suitable for cottage or home Arborite table 
lop. appro* 30‘ *40 extends to 48”. 
Chairs have a sturdy metal frame and are 
vinyl upholstered Assorted colors and fin¬ 
ishes. 


Siesta 2-Pce. Sleeping Unit 
4/6 Size 139 88 

Reversible spring-filled mattress with sturdy 
posture box base offers comfort m sleep. 

Available m double, 4/6 size only. 

Selected Bedroom Pieces 

All pieces are finished in a rich 
walnut tone and have decorative 
metal pulls Double dresser with 
mirror, 99.95, 4-Drawer chest, 
54.95, 5-Drawer chest, 59.95, 6- 
Drawer chest. 64.95. Single 3- 
Drawer chest with mirror, 59.95. 
Drop front desk/chest. 88.95. Sin¬ 
gle pedestal desk. 69.95. Head¬ 
boards. 3/3, 4/6, Queen size, 
, 34.88 


LIVING ROOM PIECES 


Colonial Chesterfield Suite 

549 96 

2-pce suite styled with excellence in com¬ 
fort Covered in 100% nylon in colors of gold 
^ and green. 

2 only. 

Modern Sectional 
oo 


649 


Styled by Sklar/Peplar High back design 
upholstered in gold colored 100% Acrylic 
pile 
1 only 

Biltmore Sofa 

199 88 

Sofa is upholstered in brown and gold tones 
This sofa would make a great living or family 
unit addition 

1 only 


3-Pce. Grouping 

1288 °° 

Attractive Lawson style sofa, 
loveseat and chair all have 
reversible seat and back cushions. 
Decorative flower print with 
quilting on one side. 

5-Pce. 

Sectional 

995 00 

High back modular sectional 
comes in five individual pieces 
Upholstered in a rich colored 
burgundy polyester and cotton 
fabric. 


Look for Many Non-Advertised Specials 
Throughout Eaton's Warehouse Store 

PERSONAL SHOPPING ONLY 
DELIVERY EXTRA 

EATON'S 


CANADA 


Oil offer ‘more attractive’ 


OTTAWA (CP) — Prime Minis¬ 
ter Trudeau will present a new, 
‘‘more attractive” oil-pricing 
package to Alberta Premier Peter 
Lougheed today when they begin 
crucial face-to-face negotiations 
at the prime minister’s secluded 
Harrington Lake retreat. 

A spokesman for Trudeau said 
Wednesday the new proposal, not 
yet handed to Eoughecd, would im¬ 
prove on four previous offers from 
the Liberal government that both 


sides conceded left them far 
apart. 

Lougheed arrived here Tues¬ 
day night and spent the day pre¬ 
paring for the key round of bar¬ 
gaining that would determine the 
rate at which oil and natural gas 
prices increase across the coun¬ 
try. 

Last-minute consultations with 
Saskatchewan Premier Allan Bla- 
keney, following an earlier meet¬ 


ing with the B.C. cabinet, pro¬ 
duced a united Western stand on 
the need for significant and rapid 
increases in domestic oil prices 
toward world levels. 

Trudeau also spent the day bon¬ 
ing up for the talks which he wants 
held in a relaxed setting. Conse¬ 
quently the pair are to meet alone 
for a morning session at the prime 
minister’s summer residence in 
the nearby Gatineau Hills. An 


afternoon meeting is set for the 
official Sussex Drive residence. 

Trudeau hinted last week he 
would offer more money to Alber¬ 
ta from the billions of .dollars in 
higher petroleum revenues—a 
windfall resulting from the inevit¬ 
able climb in world energy prices. 
But he also rejected any idea of 
offering tradeoffs in return for 
speedy agreement on constitution 
al reform from the resource rich 
West. 


Aviation disaster 
waiting to happen 


QUEBEC (CP) — All in¬ 
gredients now exist for an 
aviation disaster over Mon¬ 
treal, air traffic controller 
Paul Bibeau told a federal 
inquiry into air safety Wed¬ 
nesday, recommending im¬ 
mediate corrective mea¬ 
sures. 

Bibeau. head of the Mon¬ 
treal safety committee of 
the Canadian Air Traffic 
Control Association, said 
red tape, administrative 
stupidity, chronic person¬ 
nel shortages and obsolete 
radar equipment could 
lead to “a catastrophe.” 

"And if it’s not in Mon¬ 
treal, it will take place else¬ 
where," Bibeau told the 
commission, headed by 
Charles Dubin of the On¬ 
tario Court of Appeal. 

In his brief to the hear¬ 
ing, Bibeau concluded that 
all matters concerning 
aviation should be taken 
away from Transport Can¬ 
ada and transferred to a 


separate, independent gov¬ 
ernment agency. 

“Montreal controllers 
remind you of the urgency 
of the situation, the deplor¬ 
able state of air safety in 
Montreal and the need to 
rapidly provide corrective 
measures." 

Bibeau listed many in¬ 
stances in Montreal where 
problems had been detect¬ 
ed and little or no correc¬ 
tion undertaken. 


In a separate brief. Serge 
Dorion, a Quebec City air 
traffic controller, com¬ 
plained of countless break¬ 
downs of radio and radar 
equipment installed 23 
years ago. 

Faced with periodic 
breakdowns in the control 
centre’s radar system, con¬ 
trollers recommended in 
1976 that procedures be es¬ 
tablished for operating 
when the radar fails. 


Dilapidated barn 
a downright steal 

OTTAWA (CP) — Some people will steal any¬ 
thing. Ask Greg Weston. 

Two weeks ago, he and a partner were proud 
owners of a 130-year-old farmhouse and a slightly 
dilapidated, 15-by-9-metrebarn. 

. Today, they still have the farmhouse but the 
barn has disappeared. 

All that was left when they inspected the site 
this week was a pile of manure, four upright 
supports and some suspicious truck tracks. 

Weston, a reporter at the Ottawa Citizen, fi 
gured the timber from the barn could have been sold 
for $15,000. 

“Fortunately, the house is a little more difficult 
to move," he says. "The walls are 32-inch thick 
stone." 


Jobless MAs ‘exception’ 


OTTAWA (CP) — That 
deflated young adult who 
spent several ambitious 
years in university to get a 
master degree only to land 
on the unemployment rolls 
or behind the wheei of a cab 
was an exception, not a 


rule, contrary to popular 
wisdom. 

That, in so many words, 
was the message Montreal 
economist JeamMichel 
Cousineau took Wednesday 
to the seven-member all¬ 
party Commons committee 


on employment opportuni¬ 
ties in the 1980s. 

He said the extent of un¬ 
employment among uni¬ 
versity graduates had been 
and remained highly exag¬ 
gerated and the common 
belief that the country was 



CORRECTION 

Four Seasons Travel advertisement of July 
19 Times and July 20 Colonist should have 
read Economy $1,999, First Class $2,999. 

We apologize for any inconvenience this may 
have caused our customers. 


FOUR SEASONS TRAVEL 

1214 Broad St. 384-7108 


Celebrate 
Saskatchewan with 


§ l 

'’%5^9'e. 0 

Pacific Western Airlines’ 


Homecoming Discounts 


Celebrate 
Saskatchewan this 
year. 

Come to a party! Saskatchewan 
is celebrating ... celebrating 75 
years as a province. Every village, 
town and city is preparing tor 
homecomings, family and school 
reunions, rodeos, exhibitions, 
sports days and community 
festivals. 

Make this the year to 
visit family or make 
new friends in 
Saskatchewan. 

This year make Saskatchewan 
home. Visit our friendly people, 
experience our clean air, wide 
open spaces, blue skies and 
sensational sunsets. It you like 
sporting events, cultural activities, 
tun and relaxation. Saskatchewan 
has it. Saskatchewan has 
something for everyone. 

It’s so easy to afford a 
visit with Pacific . 
Western Airlines’ 
Homecoming 
Discounts. 

Look for Pacific Western Airlines' 
Homecoming Discount coupons in 
your paper, or check with your travel 
agent or airline ticket office 
Just present your Homecoming 
Discount coupon to your travel 
agent or airline ticket office and 
you're eligible tor a discount on your 
Pacific Western Airlines tare home to 
Saskatchewan This Summer 
Celebrate Saskatchewan with 
Pacific Western Ariines 



Celebrate vlu,OH,A 
Saskatchewan with 
S.T.C. 

Book one of the Saskatchewan 
Transportation Company's many 
Tour Saskatchewan packages. 
$49.00 buys SASK PASS, a seven 
day unlimited Saskatphewan 
travel package for motor coach 
travel anywhere S.T.C. travels. 




Check out S.T.C.'s PICK YOUR 
CITY, REGINA CITY or the 
NORTH SASKATCHEWAN 
packages. Contact your travel 
agent, Pacific Western Airlines 
ticket office or the Saskatchewan 
Transportation Company on how 
you can Celebrate Saskatchewan 
with S.T.C. 

Make your 
arrangements soon! 

You'll want to enjoy the sunshine 
and the festivities that 
Saskatchewan has to otter in 
1980. For more intormation write 

SaskTravel 

Saskatchewan Tourism an'd 
Renewable Resources 
3211 Albert Street 

Regina. Saskatchewan 
S4S 5W6 


Saskatchewan 
Tourism and 
Renewable As sources 


Reg Gross 
Minister 


brimming with highly-edu¬ 
cated persons with no job 
opportunities was a myth. 

“A university diploma is 
still the best-guarantee for 
a job,” he said. 

Cousineau, an industrial 
relations professor at the 
University of Montreal and 
former member of the Eco¬ 
nomic Council of Canada, 
was the last witness the 
committee had called to 
Parliament Hill before it 
breaks for the summer. 

A study he prepared for 
the Quebec government's 
Coujncil of Universities 
found that virtually all 
graduates in the province 
had jobs within three years 
after they leave university. 
Only 21 per cent of them 
were in jobs unrelated to 
their education. 

His findings basically 
conform to a recent study 
by Statistics Canada in ail 
provinces but Quebec 
which said about one-quar¬ 
ter of college and univer¬ 
sity graduates faced tem¬ 
porary unemployment 
immediately after gradua 
lion, but that most even¬ 
tually found jobs related to 
their education and were 
satisfied with their work 
and their wages. 


Alberta’s 
beer run 
drying up 

EDMONTON (CP) — 
Strikes and lockouts re¬ 
duced beer production in 
Alberta to a trickle Wed 
nesday—16,000 gallons a 
day from Uncle Ben's 
Brewery in Red Deer, the 
only independent brewer in 
the province. 

Alberta’s major 
brewers—Carling O'Keefe, 
Labatt's, Molson and Sicks’ 
Lethbridge—locked their 
doors at midnight Tuesday 
night when they were un¬ 
able to reach a contract 
agreement with their work 
ers. 

The lockout was the 
brewer’s response to strike 
action earlier this month by 
workers at Labatt's in Ed- 
monton and Alberta 
Brewers Agents employees 
in Edmonton and Calgary. 
It signalled Alberta’s third 
consecutive summer beer 
drought. 

Things weren’t much 
better for drihkers who 
prefer something stronger 
than beer. Workers at Al¬ 
berta liquor control board 
warehouses in Calgary and 
Edmonton are off the job 
despite government anti- 
strike legislation and sup 
plies at board stores are 
being depleted. 

Eight million 
acres burned 

OTTAWA (UPfc) — The 
Canadian Forestry Service 
said Wednesday that 2,t06 
forest fires burned across 
Canada through the munlh 
of June, bringing the sea 
sona I total hi 6.360 
A total 2.369.042 acres 
were lost during June 
bringing the seasonal total 
to the end of that month al 
8.061.366 acres 


























r 


i 



Eaton's introductory offer! 

1981 energy saving RCA 
20" remote color television. 

689.00 

Energy saving Xtended life chassis of this RCA color portable uses an average of 
#nly 82 watts of power, resulting in better performance and reliability plus 
reduced energy consumption. Other features include automatic color and 
fleshtone correction control to keep colors consistently accurate from program to 
program. Super Acculine black matrix picture tube provides sharp color 
reproduction. With ChanneLock remote control for chairside tuning, volume 
adjustment and channel selection. 5" oval speaker for clean, crisp sound. 

f Model FER469WR. 

Televisions. Main Floor. Home Furnishings Building 


COURTS/B.C. 


THE COLONIST, Thursday July 24. 1980 9 


‘Rape of interior’ 
demands hearing 


OTTAWA (CP) — The federal gov¬ 
ernment should conduct a rigorous 
environmental assessment of the 
$2.5-billion hydroelectric project In 
northern B.C. proposed by the Alumi¬ 
num Co. of Canada Ltd., according to 
former environment minister John 
Fraser. 

A spokesman for the company in Van¬ 
couver said Alcan was not opposed to 
public hearings on the project and was 
expecting one to be called by the pro¬ 
vincial government. He refused comment 
on whether a further federal cnirin- 
mental assessment was necessary. 

B.C. Environment Minister Stephen 
Rogers declined comment on the issue, 
saying the dispute was a matter for 
Ottawa and the company. 

Rogers did not mention any plans for a 
provincial hearing into the application 
to build a dam. 

The company had already begun sev¬ 
eral enviromental impact studies in the 


affected area and was holding talks with 
fisheries officials, the spokesman said. 

Fraser told the Commons fisheries 
committee Tuesday that Alcan's "rape of 
interior B.C.” demanded public hearings 
Into the project, something the former 
Conservative government had promised 
to do. 

Fraser, MP for Vancouver South, also 
said the fisheries department should be 
making public the potential dangers of 
two proposed dams to the B.C. fishing and 
tourism industries to counter Alcan's at¬ 
tempts to "soften upthe public” through 
public relations exercises in nearby com¬ 
munities. 

West Coast environmentalists say new 
diversions of water in the area thfgg- 
ten rivers in which salmon and rainbow 
trout spawn. 

The company wants to triple its alumi¬ 
num smelting capacity at nearby Kiti- 
mat by adding one or two new smelters. 
They would be supplied with electricity 
from a watershed in the Kemano area. 


pHospitali 

meeting 

erased 

Canadian Pr*u 

Federal health offi¬ 
cials have cancelled 
their meeting with 
Health Minister Rafe 
Mair to discuss financ¬ 
ing of a badly-needed 
hospital and detoxifi¬ 
cation centre at Alert 
Bay. 

No reasons were 
given for the cancella¬ 
tion, Mair said Wed¬ 
nesday. 

Mair said federal 
participation was 
necessary. 

Alert Bay's health 
service problems were 
highlighted last year 
when Renee Smith, an 
11-year-old Nimpkish 
Indian band member, 
died in hospital of a 
ruptured appendix. 


‘Kid gloves’ bias attacked 


nPrm 

A section of a govern¬ 
ment manual which urges 
highways department 
crews to treat Indians liv¬ 
ing on reserves with kid 
gloves is discriminatory 
and should be removed im 
mediately, Frank Howard 
(NDP—Skeena) said Wed¬ 
nesday. 

The construction fore¬ 
man's manual issued by 
the provincial highways 
ministry tells crews to use 
caution when working on 
Indian reserves because 
the Indians are motivated 
by emotions instead of law 
and logical reasoning, he 
said. 

“It’s a special note for 
construction on Indian re¬ 
serves and it says to con¬ 
struction crews, 'Look, pay 
attention, be careful when 
you're working on Indian 
reserves because they are 
more militant, more know- 
ledgable of legal matters 
and are more likely to be 
motivated by their emo¬ 


tions than by law and logi¬ 
cal reasoning’,” Howard 
said. 

“Really what it is doing 
is denigrating the position 
of the native people and 
saying to construction 


crews and to department of 
highway personnel, ‘Just 
watch what you're doing 
here—treat these people 
like somebody who's ready 
to rear back and shoot you 
because they’re operated 


by emotion.’ ” 

Highways Minister Alex 
Fraser said he was not 
aware of the section but 
would order It removed if it 
did exist and was discrimi¬ 
natory. 


Three fined $1,000 for abalone catch 


EATON'S 

First at Eaton's! 

Braun's new coffee maker 
at our low introductory price. 

66.99 


You'll save 5 00 when you send in the five dollar cash rebate 
coupon enclosed with every Braun Traditional coffee maker It 
filters coffee the good old fashioned way . . with a pause after the 
first water extraction so coffee has a chance to develop a full 
bodied taste. Shower-head type spray distributes water evenly to 
further enhance flavor. 12 cup Braun Traditional features a hot 
plate for optimum coffee temperature, too. With 5 year warranty. 

Small Electricals. Mam Floor. Home Furnishings Building 


EATON'S 


The Sanyo stereo system. 
A lot of listening pleasure 
at Eaton's sale price 

549.99 


This system offers a lot of listening pleasure for one low Eaton 
price. Set includes: 

AM/FM stereo receiver delivers 26 watts RMS per channel 
with less than 0.4% total harmonic distortion. With 2 tape 
monitors. FM muting and loudness. Model JCX2300K. 

2-speed semi automatic turntable with auto return, cueing and 
anti-skate control. Magnetic cartridge included. Model TP1005E 
2-way air auspenaion apeakars with 40 watts handling 
capacity Model AD4040 

Sttrex. Man floor. Horn# fummhmgt Building 


Also available at/or through Eaton's, Duncan 


i%... 




Provincial Court 


Turnham drnng the trial, 
marine biologist Al Gould 


Three persons were fined 
$1,000 each Wednesday in 
Victoria provincial court 
for having more than the 
legal limit of sport-caught 
abalone. 

Judge Lome Pearce 
found 31-year-old Sandra 
Lee Taylor, 32-year-old 
Taras Cwyk, and 34-year- 
old David Kirby, all of 2436 
Whidby Lane, Sidney, 
guilty of violating the Pa¬ 
cific Fisheries regulation. 

The trio was charged 
after fisheries officers ap¬ 
proached a five-metre 
speedboat near Sidney Is¬ 
land on Feb. 7 and con¬ 
fiscated 106 abalone. 

Under questioning by 
crown counsel Harold 


testified that it took 10 to 15 
years for the shellfish to 
grow to the minimum legal 
size limit of 10 centimetres 
(four inches). 

Testimony was also 
heard that a commercial 
fisherman approached the 
trio Jan. 24 and spoke to 
them about taking abalone 
in a restricted, or closed, 
area. 

As they sped off, court 
was informed, the fisher¬ 
man saw three sacks of 
abalone thrown overboard. 


He dived down, retrieved 
the sacks, and freed the 
shellfish. 

"It is my view,” Pearce 
said before imposing the 
fines, “that courts, in some 
instances, have taken a far 
too lenient view.” 

Earlier this month, 49- 
year-old Raymond Eric 
Linden and 36-year-old Sid- 
ney Roger Norman 
Howard, both of 1010 Mc¬ 
Kenzie, were fined a total 
of $800 each by Judge Wil¬ 
liam Ostler for offering 
sport-caught abalone for 


sale, possession of under¬ 
sized abalone, and having 
more than the legal daily 
limit. 

They had 210 abalone. 25 
of which were under the 
legal size. 

In that case, Ostler de¬ 
scribed the offence as “a 
gross overcatch.” 

JUDGE BLAKE ALLAN 

denied bail to a 53-year-old 
man charged with theft 
under $200 and possession 
of stolen property. 

Norman Joseph Giroux, 
of 521 Johnson, was arrest¬ 
ed in connection with an 
incident Tuesday after¬ 
noon in which a man. 
passed out from drinking at 


Wharf and Yates, had his 
watch taken and pockets 
rummaged. 

Following a bail hearing, 
Giroux was remanded in 
custody until next Wednes¬ 
day for plea. 

FINED FOR drinking¬ 
driving offences were: 
Charles Alexander Watson, 
40, of 640 Broadway, $400; 
Gerald Wayne Gould, 34, of 
1009 McKenzie, $400; Joyce 
Nicole Shannon, 37, of 908 
Lyall, $400; Vyrna May 
Martin, 37, of 942 Preston 
Way, $350; Gordon Richard 
Chapman. 35, of 724 Sea 
Terrace, $300; and Bette 
Jean Quirico, 41, of 2625 
Selwyn, $250. 


_ 












































10 THE COLONIST, Thursday July 24, 19X0 


1 


KINGFISH/B.C. 


Boy hooks 40-pound surprise catch 


Ten-year-old Ken Aten 
from Brentwood Bay had 
a bin surprise while jigging 
for rockfish with his father,. 
Bill, in Port Renfrew. He 
was using his new rod and 
reel and 15-pound-test line 
when he hooked into a 40- 
pound Chinook. 

Young Aten played the 
fish all by himself for 20 
minutes until his father 
helped him to net it. 

Young Ken wins a King 
Fisherman fun decal for 
his catch and will be a con¬ 
tender for the junior Fish 
of the Year prize. 

The charter fishing boats 
operating from the Cana¬ 
dian Princess at Ucluelet 
are getting some big sal¬ 
mon. Two tyee were en¬ 
tered into the King Fisher¬ 
man Contest from the 
Canadian Princess when 
Howard Boone from Puyal¬ 
lup, Washington, weighed 
in a 33Vi-pounder and 
Marion Lett from Spokane, 
Washington, weighed in a 
32-pounder. Both were 


caught on plug cut herring. 

Latest King Fisherman 
entries: 

Tree 

Canadian Princetj — Oduetet 

Howard Boone, Puyallup. Wa.; 33.4, 
Barkley Sound, plug cut herring. 

Marlon Lett, Spokane, Wa.; 32.0, 
Barkley Sound, plug cut herring 

CatonHt 

Ernie Fedoruk; 44.8, Stuart Island, 
Super Herring Teaser 

SPRING (CHINOOK) 

Sooke Harbor Marina 
Ralph Egusqulza, Nampa, Idaho; 
26.0. Secretary Island, anchovy 
A Brohman, 11.12,14.3,23.12, Secre¬ 
tary Island, Spring King, minnow. 

Karen Foster, Sutton West, Ont.; 9.2, 
trap shack. Spring King, anchovy 
J. J. Hiebert, 5.4, Secretary Island, 
strip 

Don Patterson; 5.8, humpy. Otter 
Point, spoon. 

Gordon Robinson; 20.2, Otter Point, 
dear fast flip, Spring King 
Thomas White; 5.0, Secretary Is¬ 
land, minnow. 

Ken Seargeant; 7 0, sockeye, Secre¬ 
tary Island, strip 

A. Brohman; 12.10, Secretary Is¬ 
land, minnow 
Esquimau Service 
Charles Truelt; 22.0, Esquimau wa 
terfr ont. minnow. 

Colonist 

Ernie Fedoruk; 14.0, 8 0. 12.0, 7.0, 
8.0, Minstrel Island, Stuart Island. 
Super Herring Teaser 
Ken Aten; 40.0, Port Renfrew. Sflng- 
silda. 

Gilbert's Marina 

Bob Colborne, Surrey; 24.8, Bam- 
ber ton, Gilbert's Minnow. 


Leif Schlutter; 20.4, Bamberton, 
Strooctiv. 

Susan Smith; 18.10, Bamberton, 
strip. 

Jack Day; 8.0, Bamberton, Krippied 
Octopus. 

John Knechtel; 5.7, Bamberton, 
Krippied Octopus. 

E. B. Houston; 5.3, Henderson Point, 
Captain Blue. 

Leonard Sawyer; 8.0, 6.8, 5.0. Bam 
berton. strip. 

F. Wratten. 7.0, 5.6, Bamberton, 
hootchie. 

Vic Holman; 6 1. Bamberton, Uncle 
Tom Strip. 

Doug Waoo, Bamberton, strip. 

Marge Cartwright; 7.12, Bamberton, 
Radiant Squirt. 

F. Wratten. 5.8, 6.0, Bamberton, 
strip. 

Thetis Island Marina 
Waneeta Pehlke, Nanaimo; 11.6, 
Thetis Island, Super Strip Teaser. 

Ricky Seburn. chemainus; 14.0, 
Porller Pass, white hootchie 
South Shore Service 
Earl LaForge, LakeCowichan; 30.4, 
mouth of Nitinat River, herring 
Kevin LaForge, Lake Cowichan; 
24.8, mouth of Nitinat River, herring. 

Joe DeBodt, Lake Cowichan; 26.0, 
mduthof Nitinat River, barfing. 

Four All Seasons Resort 
A. M. Parker, Ladysmith; 13.0. Yel¬ 
low Point, Apex, 

Qualicum Beach Marina 
Fred Hayward, Qualicum Beach; 
4.2,8.6, Qualicum Point, Stringsllda 
Canadian Princess — Udoelet 
Phyllis Sieved, Puyallup, Wa.; 20.0, 
Barkley Sound, plug cut herring 
R B. Weaver, Sumner, Wa.; 24.0, 
Barkley Sound, plug cut herring 
Ann Lett, Puyallup, Wa.. 24.0, Bark¬ 
ley Sound, plug cut herring. 


Bates Beach Boathouse 

Bill Pedersen, Courtenay; 15.10, 
Bates Beach, Buzz Bomb. 

Steve Horwood, Courtenay; 9.14, 
Bates Beach, strip. 

Don Johnson, Courtenay; 8.4, Bates 
Beach, strip. 

. Margaret Carter, Union Bay; 11.2, 
Bates Beach, Buzz Bomb. 

Chris Cannon, Ruthertordton. North 
Carolina; 18.4, Bates Beach, Buzz 
Bomb. 

Harold Bates, Courtenay; 10.11, 
Bates Beach, Buzz Bomb 
Don Johnsgn, Courtenay; 8.4, Bates 
Beach, strip. 

Arlyn Wasylin, Courtenay; 18.0, 
Bell's Bay, green hootchie. 

Bevan Horton, Courtenay; 11.0, 
Bates Beach, Buzz Bomb, v. 

Bates Beach Resort 

Dave Sauter. Courtenay; 12.0, Bates 
Beach, strip. 

Paul Finlay, Courtenay; 13.15, Bates 
Beach, plug cut herring. 

Doris Card, Williams Lake; 7.10, 
Bates Beach, green Flashtail. 

George Seykora, Courtenay; 6.9, 
Bates Beach, strip. 

J. D. Duerden, Kamloops; 13.9, 
Bates Beach, strip. 

George Dunbar; 19.15, Bates Beach, 
strip. 

Miracle Beach Resort 

Frank Rollins, Fort Nelson; 7.5, 
Miracle Beach, green Flashtail 
Phillip Rollins, Fort Nelson; 9.2, 
Miracle Beach, green Flashtail. 

Bill Nelmes, Prince George; 8.4, 
Miracle Beach, gold hootchie 
Chuck Reed, Dubuque, Iowa; 6.12, 
Century Shaol, white Apex. 

Tyee Marine * Fishing Supplies 
Doug Foster, Campbell River; 21.0, 
lighthouse, plug. 


COHO 

Mir ode Beech Resort 

Paul DeHod, Kamloops; 5.8, 5.8. 
Miracle Beach, goid hootchie. 

O. J. Devilln, Sardis; 6.0.5.4.5.3,6.1. 
Miracle Beach, hootchie. 

Hugh Nelmes, Prince Georoe. 5.8, 
Miracle Beach, gold hootchie. 

Norm Solomon, Burnaby; 7.0, 6.0, 
Miracle Beach, Apex. 

Bates Beach Resort 

Paul Finlay, Courtenay; $.11, Bates 
Beach, plug cut herring. 

Mike Young, Campbell River; 5.2. 
5.2,5.5,6.2, Bates Beach, strip. 

Dionne Soutor, Courtenay; 5.0, 
Bates Beach. 

M. Wood, Sutherland, Ore.; 5.8, 
Bates Beach, strip. 

Anne Klassen, Black Creek; 6.8, 
Bates Beach, strip. 

Muriel Pedersen, Courtenay; 5.7, 
Bates Beach, hootchie. 

Marg Chown, Red Deer, Alta.; 5.9, 
Bates Beach, strip. 

Larry Fontaine, Kelowna; 5.7, Bates 
Beach, strip. 

Frank Duncanson. Courtenay. 5.0, 
Bates Beach. 

Bud Herin, Fort Collins. Colo; 5.0, 
5.3, Bates Beach, strip. 

Bates Beach Boathouse 

Ross Glover, Como*; 7.4, Bates 
Beach, red Flashtail. 

Frank Paslawski, High River, Alta.; 
5.0, Bates Beach, hootchie. 

Pat Paslawski, High River, Alta.; 
5.0.5.0, Bates Beach, hootchie 
Bob McHaie, Courtenay; 5.12, Bates 
Beach, Buzz Bomb. 

John Kapalka; 6.7, Bates Beach, 
strip. 

Art Butts, Comox; 5.2. Bates Beach, 
hootchie. 


Grant Moroslc. Ontario, Calif.; 
Bates Beach, bucfctail. 

Don Johnston, Courtenay; 5.15, 
Bates Beach. 

Stanley Stevenson, Courtenay; 5.6, 

5.6.5.13, Bates Beach, hootchie. 

E. Erickson, Vancouver; 7.0,5.0,5.4, 
Bates Beach, strip. 

Eve Gamer, Bakersfield, Calif.; 5.4, 
Bates Beach, strip. 

Randal Stacev, Courtenay; 5.3, 
Bates Beach, hootchie. 

Pete Paus, Courtenay; 5.8, Bates 
Beach, Buzz Bomb. 

Qualicum Beach Marina 

Chales Peterson. 6.5, Qualicum 
Beach, Stlngsilda. 

Keith Poole, Vancouver; 5.12, Quali¬ 
cum Beach, bucktail. 

Jack Hilton, Nanaimo; 5.4, 5.12, 
Norris Rock, herring 

Thetis Island Marina 1 

E Thompson, Ladysmith; 5.13, 5.3, 
Tent Island, flasher, strip. 

P N. Lazosky, New Westminster; 

6.13, Porller Pass, stripcasting. 

P. Brenton. Duncan; 6.7, Porller 
Pass, red hootchie. 

Twin Gables Motel 

M. Croll, Edmonton; 6.3, Stuart 
Channel, spoon. 

Gilbert's Marina 

Art Huck; 5.12, Whittaker Point. 
Krippied K. 

Vic Holman; 6.0. McKenzie Bay, 
Uncle Tom Strip. 

Colonist 

Ernie Fedoruk; 7.8, Minstrel Island. 
Super Herring Teaser. 



Ken and Bill Aten with 40-pound chinook 


Deputy appointed 
for transportation 


Dr. Donald Kasianchuk 
is the provincial govern¬ 
ment’s newest assistant 
deputy minister. 

Transportation and 
Highways Minister Alex 
Fraser Tuesday announced 
Kasianchuk’s promotion 
from the transport re¬ 
search and planning 
branch to the head of trans¬ 
port poliey. 

In his new position he will 
become responsible for the • 


administration and plan¬ 
ning of all areas of trans¬ 
portation policy analysis 
and intergovernmental 
liaison. 

In the motor vehicles 
field, R. G. Whitlock will 
assume additional respon¬ 
sibilities, including all as¬ 
pects of motor vehicle 
regulation, operation and 
inspection. Whitlock has 
been motor vehicles su¬ 
perintendent for several 
years. 


End fish derbies—former winner 


VANCOUVER (CP) — Fishermen 
should fish for sport, not for “loot or 
booty” as in salmon derbies, says a Van¬ 
couver psychiatrist and environmentalist 
who once won a second prize in a derby 
himself. 

Dr. David’Kirkpatrick said the deple¬ 
tion of salmon stocks in B.C. waters 
was just one reason to halt derbies. 

He said he deplores the commercial¬ 
ization of a sport that pits humans against 
"the fighting instincts of a beautiful crea¬ 
ture” like the salmon. 

Kirkpatrick, who now calls himself a 
reformed crook after winning that second 


prize, says “salmon were not put in B.C. 
waters to push beer, tobacco, grocery 
stores and newspapers." 

He now is the founder of a group called 
Save Our Salmon which wants salmon 
derbies stopped. 

Kirkpatrick said he sent a telegram to 
Fisheries Minister Romeo LeBlanc ask¬ 
ing him to end ail derbies. 

LeBlanc said during a visit to Vancou¬ 
ver last month that he was considering 
closing all fishing derbies because of low 
salmon escapement and depletion of fish 
stocks. 

Rob Davidson, manager of the B.C. 


Salmon Derby, said sports fishermen ac¬ 
counted for less than two per cent of 
salmon caught in B.C. 

He,said the derby had been changed 
from i "one-day, one-area" event to a 
province-wide, all-summer event, to com¬ 
ply with requests from fishing conser¬ 
vation groups. 

Alec Merriman, Colonist outdoors edi¬ 
tor and co-ordinator of the King Fisher¬ 
man contest, has written Kirkpatrick to 
say his main objection to big-money 
fishing derbies is that they make it diffi¬ 
cult for him and others to argue against 
undue commercial exploitation of the sal¬ 
mon resource. 


Merriman said that few if any extra 
fish are caught on derby days unless there 
happen to be lots of fish available. 

He added that the King Fisherman 
contest had been invaluable to federal 
fisheries experts by providing statistics 
on fishing patterns for the past 26 years, 
alerting them to how a Juan de Fuca net 
fishery for pinks was severely reducing 
chinook and coho stocks. 

In addition, the contest drew attention 
to dwindling salmon stocks due to over¬ 
fishing of herring in the 1960s and again 
recently. 




Koret's Separate Impressions 

Impressive today, tomorrow and all the tomorrows to come. 

Dressing tor today means freedom — the freedom to move, to feet relaxed without having to worry about 
what to wear today Tomorrow Or the day after that. And that's the whole idea behind Koret's Separate Impressions Each 
piece, while impressnre on its own. is designed to be worn interchangeably to give you the most in fashion options end wardrobe 
potential The jacket, blazer, pant and skirt are cut from 100% polyester gabardine and come m ripe cherry, deepest black and 
soft grey The co-ordinating tie blouses are in 100% polyester One. m cream and cherry The other, m black, grey and cherry 
stripes All in sizes 8-18. at Eaton s 

Collarless pleat skirt 47.00 J Blazer 82 OO Front pleat skirt 32 OO 

Pants 28 OO Paisley scarf blouse M OO Striped bow blouse 30 OO 

Alao available at or through Eaton * Duncan HtwetSaOeea BUYLINE 388-4373 


EATON'S 

h 

J 


bptMiomm# Fima* iM Ipgliiun 
















I 


Y* 


[ t yi 


r ■ ‘ 

TI 

IE CAPITAL 

> 


} 

* * Section Two/Thursday, July 24,1980/Page 11 

a 


Weatherman calls the shots as best he can 



Dressier checks weather readout 


It was the practice in ancient times for 
disgruntled potentates to execute mes¬ 
sengers bearing ill tidings, and that old 
legend seems to have some modern-day 
applications. 

These days it’s the local weatherman 
who is sometimes the victim of the shoot- 
the-messenger syndrome. 

Weather forecasters are the people we 
love to hate—the culprits who spoil pic¬ 
nics, rain on parades, cause baseball 
games to be cancelled and make car 
tires feel square in winter. 

BUT WEATHERMEN point out they 
don’t bring the weather, they only predict 
it. 

And it just happens that Victoria is one 
of the most difficult areas around when it 
comes to predicting the weather. 

Environment Canada operates a pre¬ 
sentation office manned 24 hours a day by 
a meteorologist and eight technicians at 
Victoria International Airport near Pat 
Bay. 

It works under a kind of double jeop¬ 
ardy, for not only is the area famed for 
unpredictability but the weather assess¬ 
ments come from Vancouver. 

“The forecast comes from Vancouver 
and the Victoria office can ‘massage,’ 
that is, Rework the start of the issued 


forecast if it doesn't agree with current 
weather conditions,” says Victoria me¬ 
teorologist Norm Dressier. 

DRESSLER SAID the Victoria office, 
equipped with sophisticated electronic 
gear including visibility sensors and 
infra-red sensors to scan cloud height, 
provides weather information to central 
and southern Vancouver Island. 

Part of the job involves answering 
inquiries from a range of ’publics.’ 

"We supply information to the media, 
aviation, marine and travel industries, 
sportsmen and farmers, among others,” 
says Dressier. 

He said the workload varies and is 
dependent on the weather. "The worse 
the weather, the more calls we have. For 
example, during the snowstorm last Janu¬ 
ary the office logged 1,700 calls in one 
24-hour period.” 

Public response to inaccurate fore¬ 
casts varies, but Dressier says that by 
and large Uje public is quite understand¬ 
ing. 

"Predicting the weather is a bit like 
predicting the outcome of a football 
game,” he says. "You go into intricate 
detail and arrive at the most likely 
choice, but you still might be wrong.” 

VICTORIA WEATHER office techni- 


Centre rehash draws crowd 


By HUBERT BEYER 

Colonist staff 

More than 120 people crowded 
into the Victoria city council 
chamber Wednesday night for a 
second public hearing to allow the 
proposed Wharf Street convention 
centre to go ahead. 

Both opponents and supporters 
of the $8-million project were well 
represented. The number of 
speakers against the development 
slightly outnumbered those in 
favor, but the frequent applause 
and cheering was balanced. 

The second hearing was neces¬ 
sary because the bylaw permitting 
construction of the convention 
centre was declared invalid by the 
B.C. Supreme Court, which ruled 
that the city didn’t give proper 
notification of the first public 
hearing to property owners and 
tenants adjacent to the site that 
was to be rezoned. 

Wednesday night was exclu¬ 
sively devoted to the expression of 


public opinion on the proposed re- 
zoning which will permit public 
buildings, including a convention 
centre, to be built on the Inner 
Harbor waterfront. 

City council won’t vote on the 
rezoning until next Thursday’s 
regular meeting. 

Much of the opposition centred 
around the “desecration" of the 
Inner Harbor by concrete and 
glass. 

But supporters pointed out that 
the Inner Harbor was an urban 
setting which should be used for 
development that will attract peo¬ 
ple to the waterfront. 

Opponents said no public 
money should be spent on a project 
that will primarily benefit the 
downtown business community, 
but supporters countered that 
everybody will benefit from a con¬ 
vention centre. 

Betty Gibbons of 933 Convent 
Place, a member of the Victoria 
Harbor Enhancement Society, 
said the matter should be put to 
referendum. 


She said the Reid site (so known 
because Vancouver developer 
Sandy Reid proposed a massive 
highrise for that property 10 years 
ago) was the wrong location for a 
convention centre. 

To be successful, a convention 
centre should be located near 
hotels and transportation facili¬ 
ties. 

Former Saanich alderman 
Edith Gunning said: “It is difficult 
to find fault with the use of that 
site for public buildings, consider¬ 
ing the existing mess.” 

Former Victoria alderman 
Murray Glazier levelled a broad¬ 
side at his late colleagues, calling 
the rezoning "preposterous.” 

He said since the rezoning co¬ 
vered the entire waterfront from 
south of Johnson Street Bridge to 
Laurel Point, buildings of 11 
metres in height could conceivably 
be constructed all around the 
Inner Harbor. 

"It’s preposterous. What hap¬ 
pened? You’ve gone far, far over¬ 
board,” Glazier said. 


Robert Wheaton of Wheaton 
Construction, vice-president of the 
Victoria Chamber of Commerce, 
later said Glazier was a master of 
the irrelevant. 

Peter Hartnell, owner of the 
Queen Victoria Inn, speaking on 
behalf of the Victoria Harbor En¬ 
hancement Society, said the issue 
should be decided by referendum. 

He said Victoria developer and 
former Social Credit cabinet min¬ 
ister Sam Bawlf should be given 
the opportunity to make good his 
pledge of building a convention 
centre anywhere the citizens want 
it at no cost to the taxpayers, 
provided he can add a hotel to the 
project. 

Eric Makovski of 3935 Ply¬ 
mouth said if the beneficiaries of 
the convention centre had to pay 
for the project, they wouldn’t put 
it at the waterfront. 

Without nearby accommoda¬ 
tion and restaurant facilities that 
could feed 1,500 people, a conven¬ 
tion <centre couldn’t be operated 
successfully, he said. 


_ C£ _ 

Escape triggers 
call for alarm 

The latest escape incident at William Head pris¬ 
on has rekindled a call for some kind of alarm 
system to warn residents near the federal, me¬ 
dium-security penitentiary of possible danger. 

Three men cut their way out of a dormitory over¬ 
night Monday and used a section of the prison wharf 
to gain their freedom. On July 4, a convicted armed 
robber also used a raft to escape from the prison. A 
week later, two others used a section of old wharf to 
get to an adjacent beach and also made good on 
their getaway. 

None of the six has yet been recaptured. 

A total of 10 prisoners have escaped so far this 

year. 


$60 million Greater Victoria sewage plan 


Tap Ottawa call 


Victoria Aid. Robert Wright wants to 
tap Ottawa for funds to build a $50 
million sewage treatment plant that 
would serve Greater Victoria. 

Wright, chairman of the regional solid 
waste management committee, says 
without federal help, the cost of con¬ 
structing a secondary sewage treatment 
plant is too much for local taxpayers. 

Such a project, he says, would result in 
a 10 per cent tax increase in the four core 
municipalities, or $80 to $90 a year for the 
average single-family home at current as¬ 
sessments. 


the region and the core municipalities ask 
Ottawa for a special grant covering 15 per 
cent of the capital costs of sewage treat¬ 
ment facilities. 


The $60 million estimate, he says, is in 
1980 dollars. Considering inflation and 
delays, the cost would eventually go to 
$100 million, or more. 

Victoria Aid. William McElroy mean¬ 
while told regional directors: “Wright has 
found several precedents and he’s looking 
into ways of getting money from Ottawa 
for such a plant.” 


cian George Kyle says he is pleasantly 
surprised by the public's understanding of 
the problems of forecasting. 

“There- was a classic scries of poor 
forecasts caused by the infamous group of 
cold low pressure systems in June and 
part of July but most people were pretty 
understanding about the imponderables 
and complexities of predicting weather 
around Victoria,” Kyle says. 

“We have plenty of technological 
hardware—satellite pictures, informa¬ 
tion from the weatherstrips and so on, but 
the fact remains ft is hard to tell what will 
transpire in meteorology.” 

He added the media can be notorious in 
misinterpreting what the weather office 
says. “The office will say a few showers 
are expected and next thing you hear is a 
broadcaster telling listeners the weath¬ 
er office is calling for rain. 

“The real test for the weather office is 
the success rate and, while we’re not 
always on, it's certainly better than look¬ 
ing out of a window and sticking your 
finger up in the air,” Kyle says. 

“We must be serving a function as 
people keep listening.” 

PREDICTING IS a complicated pro¬ 
cess. The 15-second forecast heard on 
radio results from hours of preparation 
that could have begun as far away as Mos¬ 
cow. 

B.C.’s nerve centre for weather is the 
Atmospheric Environment Service 
branch in Vancouver, where 50 people, 
including 27 meteorologists, keep the 
office going around the clock. 

Frank Williams, chief of weather 


services for the Pacific region, has been 
in the business for 30 years, but even with 
that kind of experience concedes that 
mistakes are an occupational hazard. 

Forecasting the weather, he says, de¬ 
pends primarily on flow patterns (wind 
and pressure systems) and moisture pat¬ 
terns (rain and snow). 

Flow patterns are disseminated to 
points throughout the world from one of 
three meteorological centres—Washing¬ 
ton. D.C., Moscow and Melbourne, Aus¬ 
tralia-fed by 35,000 observation stations 
around the world. 

FOR EXAMPLE, a British weather 
report would go the national meteorologi¬ 
cal centre at Bracknell near London, then 
to Moscow and Washington, and finally to 
a computer in Canada's meteorological 
centre in Montreal. 

The Montreal computers and two in 
Washington take collected world data and 
produce a three-dimensional picture of 
atmospheric movement, from which pro¬ 
jections are made. The Vancouver of¬ 
fice receives a picture from each of these 
computers, and meteorologists must 
choose the one they think most accurate. 

“These models do not give 100 per cent 
accurate solutions,’’ said Williams. 
“Sometimes none of the solutions is 
right." 

The moisture pattern is harder to pre¬ 
dict. The constant growth and dissipa¬ 
tion of clouds allows forecasters to pre¬ 
dict only 36 hours ahead, making the 
margin for error in an extended forecast 
that much greater. 



—Colonist photo by Alex Barta 

Dolly in a doughnut 


Sunny skies and accompanying warm 
temperatures have sent Greater Victoria 
residents flocking to beaches. Here, Mi¬ 


chele Waters, 11, carries one of the big 
gest inner-tubes around on way to invi¬ 
gorating dip in Elk Lake. 


John Waterman, a resident in the area, suggest¬ 
ed Wednesday that the time might be right to make 
another pitch to the federal justice ministry for 
some kind of warning device. 

The original proposal was turned down by the 
federal government, which felt an alarm might only 
cause the community and the escaper to panic and 
possibly lead to a violent situation. 

Waterman countered that the argument was not 
valid because the prison was in a rural area where 
the escaper could avoid going near residences. 


Wright stressed the regional board has 
no plans for the immediate construction 
of sewage treatment facilities. Outfalls at 
Clover and McMicking Points, he says, 
are necessary as short-term solutions. 

Even if planning for a treatment plant 
began now, it would take up to 10 years to 
complete, Wright says. 

He says he will submit a report to tbe 
regional board within 60 days, recom¬ 
mending that tbe provincial government, 


His comments came as directors were 
discussing a request from executive 
director Dennis Young for a $10,000 ex¬ 
penditure so Willis, Cunliffe and Tail 
could complete construction drawings 
and tender specifications for the contro¬ 
versial McMicking Point outfall, opposed 
as unnecessary by many South Oak Bay 
residents. 

Tenders for the McMicking Point out¬ 
fall close Aug. ll. 


Serviceman robbed 


Two men are to appear in provincial 
court today charged in connection with 
the robbery of an Esquimau serviceman 
early Wednesday morning. 

Police said the victim, whose name 
was not released, was walking in the 
1000-block Dunsmuir shortly before 3 a.m. 


when accosted by two men who had 
been following him in their car. 

Police say that the man turned over his 
wallet to the two after they threatened 
him with violence.' 

The two accused were arrested Wed¬ 
nesday afternoon in Saanich. 


Reporters' Notebook 


Gift of orange juice—Okanagan style 


Nobody can say that tourism 
minister Pal Jordan isn’t one of the 
province's big boosters. She’s also 
rather high on the Okanagan fruit 
industry, since her constituents live 
there. 

So nobody should have been sur¬ 
prised by the little presentation Jor¬ 
dan made to Catherine McKinnon at a 
Wednesday night reception for the 
singer and her husband Don Harron 
who scripted The Wonder of If All. 

To many television viewers, 
McKinnon is the new Flordia orange 
juice lady Naturally. Jordan didn't 
want her to leave the province with¬ 
out a ribbon bedecked tin of orange 
juice from sunny B.C. 

What really upset some people at 
the parly hosted by Mel and Gae 
< aaprr was Ihe startling realization 
that the Okanagan could ever be mild 
enough for oranges After all. Vic¬ 
toria is supposed to be Canada's 


banana belt and the trees aren't la¬ 
den with oranges. 

It was explained that the orange 
juice was canned in the Okanagan, 
but came from someplace else. 

GARY LAUK (NDP Vancouver 
Centre) has special titles for most 
cabinet ministers, his favorite target 
being Industry and Small Business 
Minister Dm Phillips who is Invari¬ 
ably addressed as the small minister 
of business and industry. Wednesday 
Lauk introduced a new one when he 
asked a question of Municipal Affairs 
Minister William Vander Zalm. the 
minister in charge of urban transit 
l-auks question was addressed to the 
Minister of Municipal Affairs and 
Lack of Transit 

As are most of his questions with 
the quips woven la. it was ruled out of 
order because it was improperly 
prefaced 


ANYONE INTERESTED in the 
Afghanistan crisis can get a first¬ 
hand look on CBC’s Summerseope se¬ 
ries at 10 p.m. Thursday. 

Canadian newyman Arthur Kent, 
brother of former CBC newsreader 
Peter Kent, himself no mean report 
er. got some unique footage while on a 
sojourn with the rebels earlier this 
year 

The result has been highly rated 
and replaces a withe r program for 
merly scheduled for this time 

IT WAN MUNICIPAL Affairs 
Mini-,i. r William Vender/.aim ’s I urn 
to withdraw a four letter word in llu 
legislature this week. * 

Growing weary of what he 
termed Charles Barbel > holier 


than-lhou ” comments, Vander Zalm 
said socialists tended to think of 
themselves as the only honest people 
in the world and then added a few 
other stinging comments with his 
final line "I get fed up with this old 
socialist crap line ...” 

Not as bad as that other four-let¬ 
ter word, but still unparliamentary 
and ordered withdrawn 

WHEN NDP HEALTH critic 
DeMis Cocke (New Westminster I set 
a trap for Health Minister Kafr Mair 
Wednesday. the cagey minister deft 
ly Mile stepped 

Cocke noted that tucked in among 
the welter of words ouaouaciag the 
new denlu are program was a phrase 


from dentists urging Mair to continue 
to support fluoridation programs at 
the municipal level. Cocke wanted to 
know if Mair intended to respond to 
that plea. 

Mair's answer to the politically 
sensitive question was classic: “I 
certainly encourage municipalities to 
take whatever steps they ran—to win 
the support of their citizens.” 

No further questions 

THE LECIbLATURK has its 
share of sporty buffs and none more 
avid than soccer affirianado Ernie 
Hall, the N’DP’s rotund represents 
dive from Surrey 

Emu- was mostly smiles Wedars 
day as be told reporters lu- nipped 


over to Vancouver on Tuesday eve¬ 
ning “to meet the lads.” 

"The lads,” if you are a soccer 

fan, were from Nottingham Forest of 
the English First Division and the 
Vancouver Whitecaps. The teams 
played at Empire Stadium last night 

For Ernie, a former soccer play 
er of some skill, it was the height of 
the social season 

AMONG THE WHY is its of llu 
real estate game is the following 
Why is it that writers of those real 
estate ads refer to the Kockheighls 
area as "the Uplands of EsquimalL . 
but never refer to a bouse in the 
Uplands as being in “the Kockheighls 
of Oak Bay ”' 


































12 THE COLONIST, Thursday July 24, 1980 


Toronto trading 


TORONTO (Ct*) — The 
Toronto stock market 
broke past a record high set 
more than four months ago 
Wednesday, spurred by 
more heavy buying In the 
real estate and cosntruc- 
tion sector and another an¬ 
nouncement about oil in Ca¬ 
nadian offshore waters. 

The TSE index of .100 se¬ 
lected stocks surpassed its 
previous record high of 
2192.58 set last Feb. 29. 


Distributed by CP 
Toronto Stock E xchange—J#»v 23 
Compete tabulation of Wednesday 
transactions. Quotations in cents un¬ 
less marked $ /—Odd lot, xd—Ex- 
dlvld3nd, xr—Ex-rights. xw — Ex- 
warrants. Net change is from previous 
board-lot closing sale. 


Leading the advances 
was the real estate and 
construction group, which 
soared to its second-best 
daily gain on records dat¬ 
ing back to January, 1976. 

Dome Petroleum Ltd. 
said it found oil at 1,372 
metres during drill-stem 


aoxscoaE 


Issues traded 
Advances 
Declines 
Unchanged 


*99 

246 

223 

221 


Stock 

A.G.F.M 

Abv Gin m 
A bti Prce 
Abitbi 10 
Acklands 
Acklnd 2p 
Adanac M 
Advocate 
Atlon Mm 
Agnlco E 


Alta Nat 
Alcan 
Algo Cent 
Algoma St 
AStet o 
Allarco Dv 


Aquitaine 
Arbor C 
Args 230 p 
Argus C pr 
Asamera 
Asbestos 
Asoc Pore 
Astral 
AtCO A 
Atl C Cap 
Atlas Yk 


25 
135 

25'* ♦ % 
87 ♦ 1 

6 V. 

91 


Sales High Low Close Ch'te 

2300 53V* 5% S%- 
i 1500 $13 12% 13 

24639 }D% 70% 20% ♦ % 

Z2 $32% 32% 52% 

133 $13% 13% 13% 

Z50 $17% 12% 12% 

3600 390 385 383 -5 

300 130 150 130 *10 

3800 $32% 30'/a 32% ♦2% 

14830 $15% 15% 15% ♦ % 

Agra Ind A 3100 $5% 5 5% ♦ % 

Akaitcbo 6010 215 200 215 *15 

Albany 34150 73* 240 253 *13 

All Energy 27196 $23 22% 22% ♦ % 

Alta Gas A 32388 $33% 33% 33% - % 
Alta G O p zl $330 330 330 

Alta G E p 300 $22% 22% 22% — % 
Alta G 6% 11870 $46% 46 46%—% 

Alta G 6% 8390 $30% 79% 29% — % 

1250 $21% 21% 21% - % 

33257 $36% 36 36% - % 

240 $25% 25% 25% 

9339 $36% 36 36% ♦ % 

7000 $25 75 

602 $140 135 

Alum 3rd p 1800 $75% 25 
Am Larder 13700 87 85 

Am Eagle 9700 $6% 6 

Am leduc 48700 94 90 

Andres W A 575 $10% 10% 10% 

Aog CT 4% 1 30 $27% 22% 22% 

Ang CT 315 zS $32% 32% 32% 

Ang O Gld 10050 410 390 410 *10 

Ang U Dev 500 310 305 305 - 5 

7314 $67% 67 67V. ♦ % 

1501 305 300 300 -20 

270 $24% 24% 24% 

220 $6% 6% 6% 

20000 $73% 73 23% ♦ % 

615 $35% 35% 35% - % 
527 400 400 400 *15 

1000 290 290 790 

44755 $27% 25% 27 *1% 

7000 103 100 103 - 6 

5000 84 80 80 -5 

Ato Hard A 7100 $10% 10' i 10' ; 

BC Sugar A 100 $40% 40% 40% ♦ % 

BC Sugar P 25 $12% 12% 12% 

BP Can 23148 $46’; 45% 46% ♦ % 

Bachelor 70600 485 470 485 *10 

Bakertak 1500 120 120 120 —5 

Bakertk r 15700 6 6 6 

Banister C 600 $10% 19% 19% a % 
Bank BC 111] $34% 33% 33%-% 
bk Mil 472484 $?9% 29 29% ♦ % 

Bank N S 44072 $32%- 31% 32% ♦ % 
Bankeno 7050 87% 7% 7% 
Barbee on 4*0 $19 19 19 

Bare* 1000 28 27 28 ♦ I 

Barv E*pt 1700 155 145 155 ♦ 5 

Basic Res 4550 $15 14% 14%-% 

Baton B 31500 $13% 13% 13%-% 

Becker B p 225 $9% 9% 9% 

Bell Can 141325 $20% 19% 19% — % 

Bell A pr 24 $58% 58% 58% 

Bell C pr 100 $27% 77% 27% ♦ % 

Bell 6 pr z» $60% 60% 60% 

Bell 2 28 1200 $30 29% 29% - 1 

Bel! 1 96 1150 $24% 73% 73%-% 

Bell 7 05 19520 $23% 22% 23 — % 

Beth Cop 300 $22 71% 22 ♦ % 

Bighart O G 3650 $8% 8% 8%- % 
Biakwod A 1000 $5 5 5 a % 

bomac A 1000 $8% 8 1% a % 

Bombr 276 $14% 14% 14% 

Borua O 23294 $11% 11% ll%-% 

Bonan 2 a W 7000 $5% 5% 5% - % 
Bow Val 3205)1 $25% 23% 25% a2% 
Bow Vly 7 3480 $90 86 90 aft'/j 

Bow-m pr 2120 $45 45 45 

Brator Res 5900 $15% 15% 15% 

Bramatea 660 $11% 11% 11% a % 

Brascan A 26793 $30 29% 29% a % 

Brscn 8% 2750 $25% 25 25 - % 

Brenda M 5500 $35% 33% 35% at% 

Bright A 100 $13 13 13 — % 

Brinco 3679 $8 7% 8 

Brinco p 408 $5% 5% S%- % 

BCFP 60277 $15% 15 15% a % 

BCFP pr 250 $32% 32% 32% 

BCRIC 40485 $6% 6% 6% 

BC Phone 4593 $17% 16% 16%-% 
BCP 704 p 250 $18% 11% 18% 

BCP 10 16 p 100 $26% 26% 26% - % 
BCP 2 32 p 150 $33% 33% 33% a % 
Broul Reef 61941 144 130 144 all 
Brunswk 9490 $14% 13% 14 

Budd Can 1900 $7 6% 7 a V* 

CAE 27568 $20% 20% 20% a % 
CCL Ind 3570 $6% 6 6%-% 

CME Res 3300 330 330 330 - 5 

CMS Mines 1200 114 110 til a I 

Cad Fw 405887 $25''. 24% 25''. a % 
Cad Frv A 750 $8% 1% 8% - % 

Cal Pow A 67840 $18% 11% 18% a % 
Cal P 7 p 225 $85 85 85 

Cal P tOp 90 $103 102 103 a)% 


Cal P 2.36 1500 $26 76 26 

Cal P 8% 750 $98% 98% 91% 

Calvert 66500 340 315 335 ♦» 
Camfto 30669 $30 28% 29% a % 

Camp RL 15779 $67% 65 66% a % 

Can Cem 2736 $12% 12% 12% 

C Cem 6% 275 $12% 12% 12% 

CCem 7 p 2100 $14% 14% 14% a % 

CDC 8400 $13 12% 13 a % 

CDC or B 1655 $143 142 142 
Can Malt 125 $33% 33% 33% 

C Nor West 14344 $24% 23% 24% a % 

CanP Ent 2S51S $24% 23% 24% a % 

C Padtrs 500 $32% 32% 32% - % 

Can Perm 25435 $19 18% 18% 

CPerm 6% 1600 $22% 22 22% 

CPerm 8 176 $22% 22% 22% 

CS Pete 3300 $17% 17% 17% a % 

Can Trust 965 $27 26% 27 a % 

C Trust 7% 2050 $20% 20% 20% 

C Tung 900 $3!% 30% 31% al% 
Cdn Arrow 6900 140 130 135 

CCabtesy A 11165 $9% 9% 9% 

CCablesv B 11480 $9% 9 9% - % 

Cdn Cet 400 $14% 14% 14% 

C Forms! 2100 $14% 13% 13%-l% 

CG invest 1100 $22% 27% 22% a % 

Cl Bk Com 66935 $26% 26% 26% a % 
C Lencour 11900 130 177 127 - 5 

C Manoir 3400 $5% 5% 5%- % 

C Marconi S310 $20% 20% 20% 

CNat R 19425 $20% 20% 20% - % 

C Nat 8.50 200 $44 44 44 

C Ocdental 2800 $14% 14% 14% a % 

CP Ltd 14551 $42% 41% 42 - % 

CPI A p 2030 $8% 8% 8% 

C Reserve 1306 $21% 20% 21% a % 

Cdn Tire 100 $26% 26% 76% - % 

Cdn Tire A 2687 $29% 29% 29% - % 

C UHtieS Z40 $23 23 23 

CUttl 6 pr Z50 $68% 68% 61% 

CU H)% 375 $26% 26% 26% - % 

CUtil 2nd 500 $27% 26% 26% - % 

CWN G 4 pr *75 $8% 1% 1% 

Candei Oil 700 $34 34 34 

24800 325 310 325 a 15 
16970 $18% 17% 11% ♦ % 
4050 $9% 9 9% - % 

700 $7% 7% 7% — % 

19020 $9% 8% 9 a % 

400 $23% 23% 23% 

22965 $22% 21% 22% a1% 

1700 $18% 18% ll%-% 

7500 $13% 13% 13% 

1S308 $7**4 7 7% 

z50 $11% 11% 11% 

4000 440 430 430 - 5 
77000 $6 5% 5% a % 

500 290 290 290 ♦ 10 

4300 $12% 12% 17% 


testing of the Tarsuit A-25 
well in the Beaufort Sea. 

ACTIVE STOCKS 

Sleek Seles H«h Law Oase Ch’ge 
Bank Mtl 472484 $29% 29 29% a % 

Cadillac F 405887 $25% 24% 25% a % 

Gulf Can 375458 $15% 34 35 al% 

Bow Vally 320511 $25% 23% 25% a2% 

Stefco A 257865 $34% 34 34% a % 


N Senator 217020 134 123 126 —5 
Deiour M 180250 157 141 145 -6 
Gulfstrm 101650 $9% 9% 9% a % 

Sudbury Ct 86300 $5% 460 460 —AS 
Placer Dev 81850 $22 21% 21% 

Ulster Pet 14)880 $7 6% 7 a % 

Calvert Gs 669)0 340 315 335 a20 

Trinity Res 40643 $16% 15% 16% a % 

DPete A p 3600 $21% 21% 21% ♦ % 

DPete Bp 631 $21% 21% 21% a % 

D Bridge 9050 $19% 19% 19% - % 

DExptor 6000 85 82 82 —1 

Dofasco A 3772 $36% 35% 36% a % 

Dofasco p z50 $53% 53% 53% 

Dorn Store 1202 $18 17% 17% a % 

D Textie 7295 $147% 14% 14% - % 

Domllm A 250 $17% 17% 17% 

Domtar 7012 $25% 25% 25%-% 

Dr Me C A 2400 $11 10% 10% 

Dunrale 7000 173 170 170 

1100 $26% 26% 26% a % 
Z99 $7% 7% 7% 

ZlS $10% 10% 10% 
y730 $5% 5 5% — 


TSE »INDEX 
Cleat CA'ge High Lew 
TSE a* 31YS.M a 14.81 219SJ6 1792-51 


Minerals 

F inane'I 

OK, Gas 

Industry 

Utilities 

Comum 

March 

Forest 

Transpt 

Pipeline 


Comm. 

Golds 

Building 


2097.68- 9.65 
1395.72 a 15.19 
5054 72 aia.97 
13D.99 a 6.69 
132144 - 39.62 
1919.36 a 4.14 
1391.76- 1.58 
1798.11 a 21.07 
2017.10- 25.62 
2275.99- 10.41 
2319 .19 a 35 .19 
1943-51 a 6.84 
471448 a 5129 
5834.14 a 281 41 


2404.00 1634.87 
1395.72 1073.19 
5155 a 3S57 04 
1345.60 1121.53 
1598.67 1320.8? 
1919.36 1476.21 
1395.28 1203.12 
1919.58 1470.31 
3193.20 2305.01 
7343.22 1806.10 
2408.51 1861.26 
194151 1458.68 
4714 08 2553.68 
5834.14 3732JO 


877 360 
3010 335 
11300 111 
2500 222 
42100 6 

42550 S8% 


Canrav 
Canron A 
Cara 
Cara A 
Carl OK 
Carl A p 
Carma A 
Carohn M 
Cassiar 
Cdanese 
Ctl Est A 
Cent Pat 
Chnclr 
Charter Ot 
Cherokee 
Chib Kay 
Chief!an D 
Chrysler 
Clbor A 
Cock field 
Coin Lake 
Cmptx 
Comlnco 
Cominco A 


Du Pont A 
Dusfbane 
Dvlex L A 
Dynamar 
Est Mlrtk 
East Sul 
Estn Prov 
Ego Res 
Ego r 
Elhom 
Elks Stars 
Emco 
Emco w 
Enrgy Res 
EgulTrvst 
Extndcar 
Extd A 
Flbrg Nik 
Fed ind A 
Fed Trust A 200 325 
Fidelity Tr z 100 400 
Finning T 
F Calgary 
F Cty Tr C 
F Mar 
Foodex p 
Ford Cnda 
Francana 
Fraser 
G£H Steel 
G M Res 
Galtaco 
Galveston 
Gaz Metr 
G Dlstrb A 


345 360 a10 

325 335 ♦ 10 

10% 11 a % 

216 217 
5% 5% — % 
7% 8 a % 


600 450 450 450 —50 

625 Si? 11% 11%-% 
3900 290 275 275 -S 

200 180 180 180 -7 

1100 $5% 5% 5% a % 

800 $9% 9% 9% - % 

5000 $9% 9% 9% 

33697 $125% 121 125% a 3% 

100 $7% 7% 7% 

325 325 a 20 


275 $34 
S45 275 
150 $7 
3740 240 
86 % 


34 34 

770 775 -10 
7 7 

231 231 - 4 
6% 6% a % 


66000 44 


41 a 4 


100 $47 47 47 

1628 $19% 19% 19% 

700 $17% 17% 17% a % 

300 175 175 175 -20 

7825 $6% 6% 6% - % 
100 450 450 450 

3000 250 245 245 -W 

7210 $7 7 7 - % 

100 $10% W/4 10% - % 

G DiStlb w 1500 445 440 440 - 5 

GMC 207 $57% 57% 57% - % 

Genstar L 50345 $36% 35% 36% ♦ % 

Gmtar 2 15 11450 $37% 36 37 

Gescx> Dfs 400 300 300 300 a 35 
Giant Yk 2470 $26% 24% 26% a 1 

Gibraltar 9050 $13% 13 13% a % 

Gibe Rfty p 6600 $22 21% 21% - % 

Goidale A 1700 $5% 5% 5% 

9900 320 310 310 

100 $20 20 20 a 1 

200 $15% 15% 1S% 

Z60 $31% 31% 31% 


839 


$77% 26% 26%-)% 
$1 7% 8 


5500 100 

300 430 430 430 —20 

28000 69 66 68 a 3 

5183 $6 5% 5% - % 

19372 $65 62% 64 al% 

100 $25 25 25 

Comrd O G1S500 385 375 375 

Con Bath A 7772 $15% 15% 15% a % 

Con Bath p 300 $15% 15% 15% 

‘ ' 568 290 280 290 aW 

11300 783 275 280 a 3 

2400 275 275 275 -15 

16150 415 405 405 - 5 

800 $7% 7% 7% 

10500 2)9 218 218 
100 475 475 475 - 5 
1800 $6% 6% 6% a % 

8245 $9% 9% 9% a % 

200 $18 18 18 

5080 $17% 17% 17% — % 

2600 $5% 5% 5% 

1000 435 425 425 -20 
100 475 475 475 a 35 
2850 $18% 17% 18% a % 
300 $31 30 30 

C Falcon C 19162 $12 11% 12 

Coseka R 19651 $21 20% 20%-% 

Costaln Lid 4700 $9% 9% 9% a % 

Costn wt 3 594 $5% 5% 5% a % 

3500 175 165 165 -10 
1800 $5% 5% 5% 

2470 $11% 11% 11% - % 
809 $71 70% 71 al% 

100 $24 24 24 - % 

151 $13% 13% 13%-% 
7050 95 90 90 a 3 

52185 $22% 21% 22 a % 

16430 $18% 18% 18% a % 

O le G 

DRG Ltd A 1800 $7% 7 7% — % 

Datco Pet 3900 $9% 9 9 — % 

Datmys 100 $7 7 7 ♦ % 

Datmv C 400 $7% 7 7% a % 

Daon D I853S3 $K>% 10% 10% a % 
Daon A 510 $7% 7 7% 

Daon 8% p 1300 $8% 8% 8% a % 

Deiour 180250 157 Ml 145-6 

- 2)800 234 221 234 -2 

13625 95 91 91 -2 

19075 $46% 46 46 - % 

20220 $17% 17% 17% 

4700 $9% 9% 9% 

4300 210 202 204 -3 

2550 $10% K>% 10% a % 
Dome Mine 6320 $119 115 117% al% 
Dome Pete 92220 $91% 86 91 a6% 


Con Ferdy 
C Durham 
C Marben 
C Morlsn 
Cons Pipe 
Com Prof 
C Rambler 
Comoltex 
Con Dlstrb 
Con Glass 
Conventrs 
Conwest A 
Con west B 
Cooper C 
Cop Fields 
Corp Food 


Courvan 
Craigmt 
Crain R L 
Crwn Lite 
C Zelrba A 
Crush Inti 
Cuvier M 
Cyprus 
Czar Res 


D EWona 

Delhi Pec 

Denison 

Okknsn 

Oigtech 

Discovrv 

Domen I 


Gotdund M 
Goodyear 
Graft G 
Graft G p 
Grandma 
Granduc 
G L Nkkl 
GL Forest 
GN Fin 
Gt West S 
G Wesl wt 
Greyhnd 
Guar Trst 
Guard Cap 
Guff C 
Gutfstr 


-to 


7150 255 250 255 a 5 

1100 320 320 320 

3800 130 125 125 -5 

9000 $54% 54 54 a Vj 

400 425 425 425 

100 415 415 415 

zWO 57 57 57 

1300 $16% 16% 16% a % 
600 $8 8 8 

100 $9% 9% 9% — % 

375458 $35% 34 35 al% 

101650 *9% 9% 9% a % 

N to L 

MCI Hidg A 233 $30% 30 30% a % 

MCI Hktg B 300 $30 29% 30 a % 

H Group A zSO 415 4)5 415 

Hardee 1300 75 69 69 -6 

Hard Crp A 100 200 200 200 atS 

Harlequin 3750 $22% 22% 22% — % 

. 337S $5% 5% 5% — % 

5910 $5% 5% 5% 

7400 $18% 18% 18% 

3205 $8% 8 8 — % 

500 470 470 470 al5 

1200 3)5 315 315 -S 

Z66 $59% 59% 59% 

H Bav Mng 2840 $30% 29% 29% a % 

H Bav Co 1368 $25% 25 25*- a % 

HBC pr 935 $20 20 20 

HB Oil G6S 8645 $35% 35 35 

Hu-Pam 500 75 75 75 a 5 

Husky 011 85765 $18% 17% 18 a % 

Husky A pr 100 $37 37 37 a 1 

‘ “ 420 $37 35 37 a 2 

5040 90 90 90 * 

5040 $10% 10% 10% a % 

3094 $18% 18% 18% 

1425 $50% 50*4 50% 

Imp Oil A 55420 $45% 44% 45V* a % 

Imp Oil B 382 $45*4 45 45% - 'a 

Inco 56191 $27 26*4 26* i a % 

Inco 7.85 z20 $27% 22% 22% 

Indal 66300 $15% 14% IS a % 

Indusmln 109 $18 18 18 a % 

inland Gas 500 $15 14% IS a % 

z2S $11% 11% 11*4 

2659 $17% 17% 17% — % 

300 330 330 330 

400 $1) 11 11 

247S $74% 73*4 73*4 
723 $9 8% 8% - % 

2500 $9% 9% 


Up 9, down S. Volume 8 J4 million (8.31 
million). Value $159.29 million ($137.67 
million). 


Jarmgck 5600 $11% 11% 11% a % 
Jannoc* 8 630 $12% 12 12 — % 

Janock wt 2 6100 $5% 5% 5% 

Jorex Ltd 24600 107 102 102 -2 
joule! 10000 155 151 151 a 1 

Kaiser Re 30207 $31% 30% 31% a % 

Korn Kotla 2000 $6% 6% 6% a % 

Kaps Tran 41660 169 156 160 - 5 

Keeprtte 200 $16% 16% 16% a % 
Kelly DA 200 $8% 8% 8% — % 

3019 $18% 18 18% - % 

9000 87 83 87 a 2 

300 $6% 6% 6% a % 

1310 $23% 23% 23% 

1350 $70 70 70 

6300 $9% 9 9 

1800 $6 5% 6 

400 $7 7 7 — % 

1500 $7% 6% 6%— % 

597 $8 8 8 

700 $5% 5% 5% a % 

1200 $K>% 10% 10% 

Lasltr Km 23300 250 190 205 a IS 

Laurasia 57710 K» 99 105 a 6 

1537 |12% 12% 12% 

700 $8% 8% 8% 

700 $9% 9% 9% a % 

500 420 420 420 -15 

17063 $14 13% 13% 

2927 $5% 5% 5% 

3S2 $24% 24% 24% 

200 $16% 16% 16% - % 
1200 $8% 8% 8% 

280 $13% 13% 13% a % 
5000 95 85 95 -W 

MHO 

800 $13 12% 12% - % 

539 $11% 11% 11% - % 
700 $24% 24% 24% 

11675 259 245 250 —9 

1710 $17*4 17 17 

19800 $32% 31% 32 ♦ % 

3550 2S5 250 2S5 

2438 191 191 191 

200 $10% 10% 10% a *4 
8000 155 ISO 154 a 4 

Malstc WII 10500 $7% 7% 7% 

Malartk 1800 300 265 265 -15 
11100 126 123 125 —7 

100 $15 IS 15 a % 
753 $25% 25% 25% - % 
Zl6 $9% 9% 9% 

384 $10 10 K> a % 

Mark Spnc 11500 $7% 7% 7% a % 

Mass Fee 1)495 $8% 8% 8% a % 
2200 $16% 16% 16% a % 
900 $16% 16% 16% a V, 
65 64 65 a 1 

79 TV 79 
$8% 8% 8% a % 

3000 $85 
125 *8% 

100 $18’ 


MARKET 

REPORT 

Closing quotations for Wed. July 23 ,1981 


New York 


NEW YORK(AP)— 
Stock prices showed little 
movement Wednesday as 
the government reported 
an increase in inflation. A 


CLOSING AVERAGES 
Owl Hub M CtouCIl'te 

*a,i?*j7 7ira>»?a.» .in 
3M to 314.36 X7.95 309.71 —i.U 
lUBlIUSm.W 113.47 —0X1 
33* 34 341.67 334 S3 337,17 -I ® 


K olicy, said they might 
ave been wrong. Bond 
prices rose, pushing down 
interest rates. 

The NYSE’s composite 
average of common slocks 
fell .18 to 69.76. 


a Ind. 

TOTtto. 

is urn 

6SSIks. 

Stocks volume: Indus. 3.741,600; 
Tram. 1.169,W0. Utils 14)37.700 ; 65 
Stfcs. 5,948.400. Total volume 45.89 mil¬ 
lion. 


NS Savngs zlO $1?* 12% 12% 

Nowsco W 2700 $27% 27 27 - % 

Nu-Wst A 91967 $24 21% 24 a 3 

Nu-Wst Bp TOO $18% 18% 18% 

Nutart Res 4033 104 98 104 

WO® $36 
1350 $35 
3800 $20 
5300 276 
200 1® 


Kerr Add 
K Anacon 
La Luz 
Labett A 
Lab Min 
Lacana 
Lacana w 
laidlaw A 
Laidlaw B 
Laidlaw 8 
LOm Cam 
L Shore 


Leu Fin p 
Lava Cap 
Leigh Imt 
Liberian 
LL Lac 
Lobiaw Co 
Lob Co Pr 
Lob Ltd Bp 
LocMet 
Loch lei A 
Lyttan M 

MDS Metth 
MICC 
MICC A 
MSI Res 
Mden H A 
MB Ltd 
Madeline 
Madsen 
Magna A 
Megnetcs 


Man Bar 
Mrtme El 
Maritime 
Mar T 860 
Mar T 940 


900 


Mas F A 
Mas F B 
Matchan 
Me Adam 
McGrew H 
Me Intyre 
McLeghln 
McLght 9 p 
McLghl 10 p WO $12 
McLght w zSO $5% 


84 14% ♦ % 

8 % 8 % — % 
18% 18% 

12 12 . ♦ 1 
S% 5% 


Hatteigh A 
Hattetgh B 
Hawker 
Haves D 
Hedwav A 
Hightietd 
Holinger A 


Husky B pr 
Hydra Ex 
IAC 
IU Inti 
Imesco 


Inland G p 
Inter-City 
Int Dlv 


Mekor 530 $18 18 18 

Mentor 5350 $*% 8% 8% 

Mercantll 1)66 $20% 20% 20% - % 
Merland E 21955 $H) 9% 9%—% 

Midcon 500 245 245 245 - 5 

Mlnrl Res 9110 255 251 251 *1 

Mitel Corp 30852 $29% 28% 28%- % 
Mol son A 9034 $33 32% 33 

375 $37% 32 32% ♦ % 

" $12% 12*4 12% ♦ % 

10000 $20% 20% 20% ♦ % 

17S95 $35% 35% 35% ♦ % 

9600 $10% 10 H)% - % 

200 $9% 9% 9% 

37080 $36 34 35% *1% 

500 16% 6 6 

100 375 375 375 

Nat Bk Can 9800 $13% 13% 13%-% 

Nat Drug 740 $12% 12% 12% 

- • - - 17400 375 355 355 -20 

300 $14% 14% 14% — % 
7900 $25% 25 25 - % 

40550 340 330 335 -10 

742 395 385 395 

1131 $19% 19% 19% ♦ % 


Numec 
OPI 
Oak wood P 
Obrien 
Oceanus I 
Ocelot A 
Ocelot B 
Omega 
Onaping 
Oshewa A 

S’cflndlBt 
Pec Coper 
Pec Nth G 
Page Pet 


Pemour 
Pancena A 

Pane ana B 
Pan Centr 
PanCan P 
Pango Gld 
Partake 
Patino N V 
Pe Ben O 
Pedlar ind 
Pembina 
Pennant 
P Jewt A 
Petro Sun 
F»etroflne 
Petrol 
Phillips a> 
Phomx OH 


Place G 
Placer 
Ptw 840 
Pominex 
Ponder 
Pop Shops 


Oue Sturg 
Ram 
Ram wt 
Rchmn 
Ranger 
_ Rayrock 
RedMth 
Redstone 


Reich 7% p 
Redman 
Reltman A 


♦ 1 


Mol son B 
Monenco A 
Mtl Trust 
Moore 
Mtn States 
MSL p 
Murphy 
N B Cook 
NBU Mine 


Nat Pete 
Nat Sea A 
Nat Trust 


35 36 

34 34 

19% 19% ♦ % 
270 270 -5 

160 160 a IS 

300 $31% 31% 31% 

3620 $31% 30% 31% ♦ % 

1400 $7% 7% 7% — % 

2500 485 475 485 - 20 

2340 $9 8% 8% — % 

*8 4 A A -s 

800 345 345 345 

200 $10 K) 10 

2149 $29 28% 79 ♦ % 

Page Pet 7 4200 $15% 15% 15% 

Pagurian A 2000 $8% 8% 8%-% 

Paloma P 2400 $6% 6 6 - % 

2)425 $18 17% 18 ♦ % 

2900 $4% 6 6 - % 

2100 $6 6 6 — % 

8900 255 240 240 —IS 

1713 $82% 81% 81% — 1 
2000 130 120 120 -W 

1500 290 290 290 

100 $33% 33% 33% ♦ % 
31101 425 400 425 ♦ 25 

100 300 300 300 -50 

2600 $12% 12% 12% ♦ % 
40100 265 256 256 -2 

300 $13% 13% 13% 

4200 360 150 350 -15 

6319 $60% S*% 60% -1% 
750 $9% 9% 9% 

750 112% 12 12*% ♦ % 

7)00 $8% 8 8 — % 

Phnx Oil w 3MJ0 200 190 190 -W 

Pine Point 7380 $35% 35 35% ♦ '/« 

3800 310 305 305 

81850 $22 21% 21% 

2200 $24% 24% 24% - % 

5800 159 15? 152 ♦ 1 

700 212 21? 212 

800 160 160 160 -15 

Powr Corp 11280 $16% 15% 16% ♦ 1 
Prado Exp 7500 93 91 91 -2 

Precemb 9635 $6% 6% 6% - % 

Premier C 100 S24% 24% 24% 

Provigo zlOO $33 32% 32% 

QMG Hldg 22150 $6% 6% 6%-% 

Qasar Pet 7750 $5% 5% 5%— % 

12100 $6 5% 5%-% 

3855 $23% 23 23% ♦ % 

600 $14% 14% 14% - % 

1371 $10% WH 10% - % 

13850 $41% 40% 41% ♦)% 

14400 440 425 430 -5 

2200 $16% 16% 16% 

10450 170 165 168 -4 

Reed Pap p34768 $13% 13% 13*4 

R Sift A 576 $9% 9% 9% 

ReicbhoW 880 $13% 12% 12% — % 

400 $16% 16% 16% - % 

400 $15 15 15 

800 $17 17 17 

Res Servic 16440 $12% 11% 12% ♦ V- 

Revetstk 1600 $9% 9% 9% 

Revnu Pro 28390 204 191 191 — 4 

Rileys D 3000 735 235 235 

Rio Aloom 560 (34% 34 34 — % 

388 445 445 445 —5 

3400 310 300 305 ♦ 5 

$ 1 % 8 % 8 % ♦ % 


Suncor or 
Takorp A 

Tara 


Sonor I A p 500 410 385 385 -25 
Southm 7680 $37 36% 37 ♦ % 

Spar Aero 28564 $10% 10% 10% - % 
Spar Aero p 500 $22 21% 21% ♦ % 

Spar w 6000 3)0 310 310 a!0 

Spooner 73600 149 141 141 ♦ 3 

St Brodcst 300 $13 13 13 

Stand 1 A 100 $8% 1% 1% 

Steep R 3050 440 430 430 - 5 

Steinbg Inc 600 $22 21% 21% ♦ % 

Stlco A 257*65 $34% 34 34% ♦ % 

StekO C P 75330 $27% 26% 27% ♦ % 
StefYStm 4600 345 340 340 -10 

Stratam A 100 132 132 132 ♦ 1 

Sod Cant 16300 $5% 460 460 -65 
Suloetro B 25190 $26% 25% 26% ♦ !% 
Sulpetro 7 plllOO $24% 24 24% ♦ % 

Sulivan 3200 340 330 335 - 5 

Sunbrst E 318® 79 74 74 -3 

229 $27% 77% 77% 

1400 $9 1% 8% 

200 $ 1 ? 12 12 ♦ % 
Tec* Cor A 2560 $20 19% 30 ♦ % 

Tec* Cor B 41940 $18% 18% 18% ♦ % 
Td Metr B 25200 $23% 23% 23% - % 
Teledyne 814 $10% 9% 9% - % 

Tex Can 4527 $115*% 114% 115 -1 
Txsgtf 16447 $51 50 50 - % 

Thom L 3400 ISO 135 ISO -IS 

Thom N A 25200 $18 18 18 a % 

Thom N pr 200 $39% 39*4 39% 
Tombill 7500 ISO 145 145 -6 

Tordom 1400 $25% 25% 25% - % 
Toromonl 1900 360 355 355 -5 

Tor Dm Bk 12755 $32% 31% 32% a % 
TD RttV p 350 $20% 20 20% - % 

Tor Sun 630 $19 18% 19 

Torstar B 2681 $26% 26 26% a % 

Total Pet 10067 $28% 27% 28% a % 
Total PA p 1500 $48% -48% 48% a % 
Toll Pet w 3400 $17% 16% 16% 
Traders A 4385 $15% 15*4 15%-% 
Traders 5 p zBO $20% 20% 20% 

Trader A p z80 $19% 19% 19% 

Tr 10% 500 $10% 10% 10% a % 

Tr Can Res 8600 $7 6% 6% 

Trns Mt 5960 $13% 13% 13% - % 

Trns Wst 5300 $7% 7% 7% 

12922 $25% 25 25 a % 

4700 $19% 19% 19%—% 

16740 $29% 27% 29 al% 
3500 49 46 46 -3 

Trinity Res 60643 $16% 15% 16% a % 
Trlz»C Cn> zW2 $33% 33% 33% 
Turbo Cl A 1075 $27% 27% 27*4 - % 

Turbo Cl B 8200 $27% 77% 77% - % 

Turbo 8% 11350 $31% 31% 31% - % 

1745 $21% 21 21 - % 

141880 $7 6% 7 a % 

500 $9% 9% 9% a % 
150 $5% 

ISO $5% 

5100 $29 


TrCan PL 
Trlcentrol 
Trimac 
Trin Chib 


top Carter official said the 
recession is likely to end 
this year and automakers 
provided more evidence 
that Detroit is still reeling 
from the downturn. 

The consumer price rise 
of one per cent in June was 
slightly higher than the 0.9 
per cent rises the previous 
two months, but it was not 
taken as a sign of renewed 
inflation. 

Auto companies reported 
sales for mid-July were 
down 27 per cent from a 
year ago, leaving a sales 
pace that is the worst in 20 
years. 

An oil find off Canada in 
the Beaufort Sea provided 
some excitement, causing 
Canadian oil stocks to rise. 

The Federal Reserve 
Board, which has been baf¬ 
fling Wall Street for the 
last week, threw another 
curve Wednesday with new 
intervention in the federal 
funds market. Analysts, 
who had concluded the day 
before that the board was 
not easing monetary 


Rio IS 

Rio Alto 
RollanO 
Roman 
Ronyx Cor 


Turbo w 
Ulster P 
Ultramar 
Unico A 
Unko B 
Un Carbtd 
UGas A 
UGas 5 % 
UGas 8 % 
Union Oil 
Un Aibstas 
U Canso 
Un Corp 
U Keno 
Un Reef P 
U Siscoe 
UW OG 
VGM Trsco 
VS S«fv 


ACTIVE STOCKS 

Slock 

Texaco Inc 
Ctty Invest 
EngMnCh 
WPolaroid 
IBM 

LOuLd Exp 
ArlzPub Svc 


5% i 
5% 

29 


700 $65 
2100 465 


465 465 


4% - % 


54 55 -2 


-15 
- 5 
a 20 


IBM 

Int Mogul 
Inti Thom 
Intpr Pipe 16730 $18% 18% 18% a % 


Ipsco 
Irwin Tov 
island Trt 
Ivaco 
Ivaco 8.85 
J O Res 


2185 $32% 32 32% ♦ 

5685 395 390 390 
500 $15% 15% 15% 

800 $18% 18 18 

100 $44% 44% 44% a 1 

2000 135 130 130 -5 


NB Trt 

N Kelorc 31400 58 
N Prov id D 44025 60 
N Que Ragt 5500 490 
N Sen 212020 134 123 126 
N York Oil 3525 320 310 315 
Nftd LP A 2100 $25 25 25 

NfW Trt 185 $10% 10% 10% 

Nftd Te 975 191 $20% 20% 20% - % 

Ntld Te 885 1000 $19*4 19*4 19% - % 

51000 42 36 37 -3 

8400 46 45 45 —3 

300 $11% 11% 11% 

13500 145 140 140 - 5 
58890 $28 27% 27% - % 

5000 76 76 76 a 1 

19031 $35% 34% 35%-% 
Z5 $20 20 20 

97S $64 63 63 - V* 

ZlO $14% 14% 14% 

30200 39 35 38 - 1 

2300 $7% 7% 7% ' 

*50 $19 19 19 

Nor Ct 7850 400 $21 21 21 

Nor Trt 1046S $39% 38% 38%-% 
Northgat 7500 $11 10% 10% a % 

NortaW 71700 101 98 99 -1 

Northstar 12450 $7 7 7 - % 

NW util P Z)0 $41% 41% 41% 

N Beauc 3000 55 50 50 -10 


Rothman 

2960 

$25 

24% 

25 


Rothm A p 

Z30 

$68 

68 

68 


Roy at Bnk 

17230 

$51 

50% 

51 ♦ *% 

Ryl T £ M 

*75 

$9% 

9% 

9% 


Ry Trsco A 4677? 

$16 

15% 

16 ♦ 

% 

Ruprtlod 

1100 

$5% 

5% 

5% — 

% 

Russel A 

1000 

$20 

20 

20 


Russet 9% 

650 

$19% 

19% 

19% ♦ 

% 

Russel 170 

*50 

$18 

18 

18 


St Febien 

80700 

65 

59 

61 - 

2 

Sandwell A 

400 

$11% 

11% 

l!%- 

% 

Sceptre 

14218 

$14 

13*% 

13% — 

% 

Sceptre w 

2816 

$7 

6% 

6% — 

% 

Schneid p B 200 

$16 

16 

16 


Sdntrex 

800 

$7% 

7% 

7% ♦ 

% 

Scot Paper 

2150 

$17% 

17 

17*4 


Scot York 

3333 

$6% 

6% 

6% 


Scoffs 

7350 

$6 

6 

6 


Scoffs C 

400 

$6 

6 

6 



Nick Rim 
Noma A 
Nor Acme 
Noranda 
Norbaska 
Nor cen 
Norcen B 
Norcn 288 
Nordair A 
Nortex 
Norm I c* P 
NC Oils 


Scurry Rn 
Seagram 
Seaway M 
Seco Cem 
•Selkirk A 
Shaw Ind 
Shell Can 
Sberrltt 
Sigma 
Silvana Mn 
Silvmq 
Siiverwd A 
Stlverwd B 
S Sears A 
Sklar M 
Skye Res 
Slater Stl 
Slater B pr 
Sobey Star 
Sogepet 


100 $104 104 104 a 2 

5860 $64% 63% 64 — % 
100 $7 7 7 

300 $7% 7% 7% — % 

200 $26 26 26 -1 

41700 $15% 15 

75242 $35% 35% 35'% — % 
37989 $13% 13% 13% 

1350 $40% 39' i 40% a!% 
7800 $6 6 6 

14000 55 51 51 -3 

ZK) $15% 15% 15% 

100 $14% 14% 14%-% 
100 $ 1 % 8 % 8 % 

1750 240 235 235 -3 

7850 $15 14% 14% a % 

466 $17% 17% 17% a % 

ZSO $13% 13% 13% 

100 $ 12 % 17 % 12 % - % 

7200 M0 135 140 


9% 

57* 

5% 

29 

19035 $11% 11% 11% a 
*65 $30 30 30 

200 $25% 25% 25% 

3200 $42% 41% 42% a 1% 
1950 $5% 5% 5% 

2650 $22% 22 22% - % 

28194 $28 27 27 -1% 

4365 $42% 41% 42% a 1 
WOO 95 95 95 a 5 

8285 $20 19% 19%—% 

2100 400 395 395 -5 

1102 $8 7% 7% a % 

500 $7% Ay 7% - % 

500 240 240 740 a30 

Verst) Cor 4450 $17% 16% 17 a % 

Verstl Cor p 350 $14 14 14 

Verstl wt 2 21450 $6% 6% 6% a % 

Vestgron 560 $17 17 17 a % 

Vllkentre 165 SK>% 10% 10% a % 

Vukan ind 4125 $22% 72% 22% a % 

Wrtkr Cons 26876 $28% 28 28% a % 

Wtkr Con 6 300 $60’'* 60% 60% a V 4 

Wtkr Con 9 *50 $37 37 37 

Wlfc C 7% 9175 $27% 27% 27% a % 

Wei Redkp 200 $6 6 6 

Wordeir 10500 $7 6% 7 a V* 

Warn Can 225 $i% 8%. 8% 
Wrintn 6200 109 107 *07 a 1 

WeWwod 9510 $24% 24% 24% a % 

Wstbume 450 $35 34% 35 - * i 

Wcoest Pt 5040 $27% 27% 27% 

Wcoasl T 15290 $14% 13% 14 - % 

W C«t w 1050 $5% 495 5 

West Mine 4800 $20 19% 19% 

Westfield 2000 365 360 365 - 5 

Westnhse 200 $43 43 43 a 2 

Weston 600 $25% 25% 75% a % 

Wstn 4%p z2 $54% 54% 54% 

Wstn 6pr z70 $65% 65 65 

Whonok A 25876 $13% 12% 13 a % 

Wllanour 6800 $6% 6 6 — % 

Wiko 23500 105 95 100 - 5 

Wlllrov 22699 $9% 9% 9'z a % 

Win-EW 10400 82 80 80 —4 

Windfall 16100 220 215 215 —3 

woodreef 26500 61 59 60 a 3 

Woodwd A 1890 $26% 26*4 26% a V, 
Wr Haro 1600 445 425 425 

Yk Bear 4800 $12% 12% 12% 

York Cons 2500 60 60 60 

Zellers A 16672 $10% 10% 10* * 

Trust Units 

BBC R un 100 $14% 14% 14% a % 

BM Rt un 480 $9% 9% 9% 

C Perm un 1750 $7% 7% 7%- % 

C Realty u 920 $6 6 6 

TD Realty 20190 $24% 24% 24% a % 


Boeing 
PepsiCo 
Gen Motors 
Citicorp 
StautfGvn 
Mobil 
CocaCoia 
FordMot 


774400 

*76700 

567800 

478100 

449000 

414700 

397500 

379500 

361700 

348000 

327900 

327200 

321500 

312600 

304700 


CtaMCh'H 

39% al% 
25% -1% 
39 a 2% 
26% a 1 
64% - % 
45% 

19 - % 
39 -% 
24% a % 
50% a % 
22 % - % 
19% - % 
78% a1% 
34% - % 
27% - % 


Akan 

31% 

IBM 

64% 

Alcoa 

67*% 

Int Herv 

31% 

AldChem 

53 

INCO 

22% 

AF-Chlm 

77% 

Int Pager 

40% 

Am Air 

9 

ITT 

30% 

Am Bmd 

79% 

Johns-Man 

24% 

Am Beast 

29% 

Kaiser Al 

_ 

Am Can 

31% 

Kennecott 

30% 

Am El P 

19% 

Kraft co 

44% 

Am Motor 

5 

LTV 

12»/2 

Am Trt T 

52% 

Uttan 

57 

Ampex 

24% 

Lockheed 

31% 

Asarce 

40 

McDDoug 

35% 

Ashland 

36% 

McLean 

9 

AH Rich 

48 

Merc* 

76% 

AVCO 

24 

Mer Lvn 

2ft 

Avon 

38% 

Minn MM 

56% 

Bell How 

25 

Mo Pec 

67% 

Bendtx 

48% 

Mobil 

78% 

Beta St 

25% 

Monsanto 

54*. 

Boeing 

39 

Motorola 

53% 

Boise Cas 

39% 

NCR Corp 

69% 

Borden 

25*4 

Natomes 

5652 

Borg-W 

37% 

Newmont 

47% 

Brl Mv 

43% 

NortSim 

15% 

Brunswk 

12% 

Nwest En 

15% 



Owen III 

25% 

Burl Nor 

39% 

Pec Gas 

24% 

Burroughs 

63% 

Pan Am 

5% 

Catarpill 

58% 

Pan El P 

33% 

Col Beast 

50% 

Peop En 

49V; 

Ceianese 

53% 

PepsiCo 

24% 

Chase M 

44 

Phil El 

14% 

Chessie 

36 

Phil Morr 

42% 

Chrysler 

6% 

Phil Pete 

46% 

Clave El 

16% 

PHBotaes 

36% 

Coca-Cola 

34% 

Polaroid 

26% 

CeFPakn 

15% 

ProcGem 

75% 

Comsat 

37*4 

Pub Sv EG 

20% 

Con Frt 

25% 

RCA 

24% 

Con Nat G 

44 

Repub St 

24% 

Cont Data 

60% 

Reyn 1 

37% 

Con Ed 

25% 

Revlon 

50% 

Cont OH 

57% 

Rockwell 

30. 

Crown Ck 

29% 

Scott Pap 

18% 

Crown Zell 

46% 

SeeCsfte 

47% 

Delta Air 

47*% 

Sears 

17% 

Disney W 

so 

Seatrain 

6% 

Digital E 

76% 

Shell 

38% 

OowChem 

35% 

Singer 

8% 

du Pont 

44% 

Sony 

9% 

East Air 

10% 

So Cal E 

25% 

East Kod 

60% 

South Pac 

37*4 

El Paso 

20 

Sperry 

53% 

Exxon 

71% 

Stand Cal 

79% 

Fairchild 

27 

Sun Oil 

39% 

Firestone 

7% 

Teledvne 

•53% 

Ford 

27% 

Telex 

3% 

Gam Sko 

42% 

Texaco 

39% 

Gen Dvn 

73% 

Tex Gulf 

43% 

Gen El 

54% 

TWC 

16% 

Gen Food 

30% 

UnCarb 

47 

Gen Mot 

50% 

Un Pec 

48% 

G Tel El 

27% 

Un Brd 

13% 

Gen Tire 

17% 

Un OH 

57% 

Ga Pec 

29% 

UAL Inc 

19% 

Gillette 

Goodyear 

26% 

15 

U S. Steel 
West Air 

22% 

7% 

Greyhound 

17 

Westghw 

25 

Guff Oil 

44 

Weverhv 

35% 

Hilton 

36% 

Wometco 

19% 

Homestake 

65 

Wool worth 

27% 

Honeywell 

88% 

Xerox 

56% 

Houston 

29% 

Zenith 

12% 

Inland St 

30% 



Metals 

LONDON (AP) - London closing 
metals Wednesday, in pounds sterling 
a tonne; silver in pence a troy ounce. 

Copper spot 952.5-953.54; future 
967.5-968. 

Tin spot 7,220-7.240; future 7,200- 
7,210. 

Lead spot 360-362; future 371-372 

Zinc spot 304.5-305.5, future 315.5- 
316. 

Silver spot 67*681, future 705-706 

Aluminium spot 767-7*9, future 735- 
736. 

Nickel spot 2,795-2400; future 2,831- 
2432. 


issues traded 
Advances 
Declines 
Unchanged 


Twes. 

1923 

760 

761 
402 


Gold 


LONDON (AP) — Closing gold 
prices Wednesday, in U.S. dollars a 
trov ounce. London 631.00; Paris 
635.77; Frankfurt 629.95; Zurich 
630.50; Hong Kong 630 46. 


Montreal 

CLOSING AVERAGES 

IN UT BA CO PA 

Choe: a3.27-1.45 a3.97 a2.2) a 1.22 

wed: 398.07 258.54 375.46 366 38 190.93 

Precto: 394.80 7S9 99 371.49 364.17 119.71 
Wk ago; 388 34 257.76 356.21 357.76 182 65 
Mtago: 377 32 252.22 358.00 349 30 178 63 
80 hi: 428 98 270.35 372.46 381 38 209 16 

80k>: 315.25 214 57 282.55 292.02 161.23 

Volume 1463,067 

Silver 

Closing basic price of ’.OOOoorx,. 
certificates In me Victoria area. a< 
cording to tbe Scollabank, SI6.00 U.S 
bid per trov ounce end $16.40 asked. 
Previous dev same price. 


It 




C Tm Col 

4500 

45 

42 

45 *3 


4500 ® 

45 

45 

—3 


243® 

375 

3® 

325 

♦ 25 

Armor 

®0 

50 

150 

ISO +9 

Mrquts 

30® 

« 

58 

60 ♦) 

VANCOUVER (tr) — 

Con Sv 

2500 

700 

690 

700 ♦ 1C 

Mndee 

5200 100 

90 

im 


Thnrwd 

38166 

17S 

17? 

175 


Arowbd 

10® 

40 

*0 

40 

Mma 

47® 

ITS 

ID 

ID -S 

v x_I _ _ .. 


Cop Gnt 

100 

250 

750 

250 

Musto E 

7000 119 

111 

119 

5 

Tintina 

■79® 

375 

370 

375 


ARY 

707® 

09 

105 

109 ♦? 

Mecca 

75® 

55 

55 

55 ♦$ 



Cop Lak 

375850 

229 

171 

225 aS5 


5500 90 

80 

M 

-5 


6555 

33S 

330 

33S 


Ashcrft 

37® 

45 

340 

340 -10 

Mertdn 

15® 

® 

80 

» -4 

heavy trading Wednesday 

foratta 

72825 

625 

610 

610 

N Aston 

12700 135 

131 

135 


Trnsclt 

68® 

370 

325 

3® 


Avlnch 

77W0 

>85 

255 

285 ♦» 

Metro 

10® 

l» 

ID 

ID 


Comwl 

600 

485 

480 

480 -10 

N Cinch 

6800 2® 

245 

2® 

♦ 5 

Trident 

70® 

182 

176 

182 

♦ 6 

Avarice 

105® 

61 

60 

61 

Moiv Mil 

z3® 

7? 

65 

6S 



1000 

149 

149 

149 -1 


23700 180 

174 

174 


Tri Powr 

sno 

320 

320 

320 


Aver ok 

20® 

745 

240 

240 -10 

NCA Mr! 

60® 

14? 

140 

1® *7 

Exehanee. Volume was 5.- 

Cosmos 

9500 

92 

90 

92 *2 

N Frontr 

14000 480 

460 

4® 


TRV Mn 

16® 

$13% 

13 

13 

- % 

Backer 

5® 

50 

50 

50 

N Congr 

z7® 

53 

S3 

53 

116.786." 


Coyne x 

1350 

130 

1® 

1® O 

Newhk 

7000 101 

101 

101 

♦ 1 

Tundra 

ssoo 

95 

91 

95 


Bnqwsl 

10® 

X 

X 

30 

New rid 

43® 

136 

1® 

136 *4 



15700 

US 

117 

112 —4 

N Mlncx 

2300 2® 

2® 

260 


70th Cen 

84® 

*5 

4® 

4® 


Beach 

85® 

68 

*5 

65 -3 

Ntn enov 

10® 

90 

89 

90 *1 


Cusac 

7520 

590 

550 

5® -35 

N Nadna 

1000 135 

1.15 

135 


UCbrge 

70® 

43 

43 

43 


Beaver 

70® 

55 

150 

ISO 

N Lights 

40® 

54 

52 

52 a2 

vaneed, 

... g tv a J 

Danfcoe 

1000 

795 

295 

795 

N Privtr 

71® » 

47 

47 


U Fortne 

25® 

44 

43 

44 

♦ 1 

Belmnt 

55® 

65 

160 

160 -9 

N Hrzon 

20® 

1® 

106 

1® 


Oamsc 

780183 

170 

93 

117 *20 

N Scope 

11® 140 

13$ 

1® 


U Herne 

6® 

$1? 

11% 

11% 


Bencrp 

50® 

70 

6S 

65 -3 

Northil 

20® 

SO 

50 

50 


David 

3400 

300 

77S 

775 - IS 

New tye 

5® 65 

65 

65 


U Rayor 

IS® 

34 

34 

34 


BED 

45® 

133 

1® 

1® -S 

NugoW 

SO® 

70 

65 

65 -5 


„ . • , g ■ 

Davnpt 

6500 

55 

S3 

SS 

Ni Cal 

73® 11® 

1105 

11® 


U Wstld 

158® 

990 

965 

975 

- 15 

Bmc oil 

30® 

161 

155 

IM +5 

Nu lady g 

180® 

173 

150 

173 *73 


Dav Kvs 

Z250 

43 

43 

43 

Norco 

31® 475 

415 

415 

-10 

Valiev 

1® 

$23 

23 

23 


Bonevil 

30® 

50 

50 

50 +2 

Oliver 

12® 

® 

® 

M 

trading 


Dll pet 

11550 

450 

475 

425 -25 

Norex 

10® 80 

81 ) 

80 

♦ 7 

val Pclc 

54® 

128 

125 

175 

♦ 5 

Bounty 

30® 

75 

70 

70 -10 

Or tana 

15® 

24 

24 

24 -2 


DPP 

700 

175 

175 

175 


76® 215 

M5 

®5 


Ventra 

189® 

I/I 

160 

171 

♦ 9 

Brandy 

70® 

ITS 

169 

169 -6 

Palisr 

10® 

2® 

2® 

2® -5 

ana guinea iu 10 on 

Dlv vrd 

1100 

435 

430 

435 

Nortek 

7® $12% 

12 

12 


Veronx 

17® 

153 

1® 

153 

♦3 

Br S ilbk 

16® 

S3S 

525 

525 -15 

Paa 

108® 

1® 

155 

155 *5 

178.200 


Dora 

12100 

160 

150 

155 *5 

Ntaair 

57® 5® 

5® 

5® 

- 10 

Vestor 

97® 

95 

90 

90 

-S 

Bro res 1 

30® 

80 

75 

75 -5 

Pan tar 

10® 

75 

75 

75 

Investment Corp. 

Dorado 

29000 

72 

65 

7? ♦* 

Nth Hart 

100® 46 

45 

46 

♦ 1 

Warior 

10® 

425 

425 

425 


Bronsn 

10® 

46 

46 

46 

Parkin 

30® 

60 

55 

55 

sources 

Dual res 

2200 

90 

90 

90 

NW vent 

35® 140 

140 

1® 

♦ 1 

Wasp 

15® 

175 

125 

ITS 


Brx min 

75® 

85 

W 

80 -6 

Pawn# 

SM 

70 

D 

D 


Dungnn 

2000 

42 

40 

42 

NRD Mn 

65® 4® 

4® 

4® 

♦ 10 

Wkm N 

1® 

225 

725 

225 

—5 

Bur GW 

no® 

72 

68 

68 —5 

Pngtv 

30® 

60 

60 

60 


Dustv M 

1650 

5/5 

560 

575 ♦ 25 


19® $9"; 

9% 

9% ♦ % 

W Warnr 

Z 25 

250 

2® 

2® 


Cetor 

no® 

1® 

v$ 

1® *5 

Penn E 

5650 

4® 

415 

4® ♦» 

Damascus Resources led 

Eaok R 

4600 

165 

160 

1® -5 

Nuspar 

673® ® 

57 

60 

♦ 3 

Wstfort 

32® 

775 

770 

770 

- S 

Cmron 

15® 

6? 

6? 

62 -1 

Phiico 

15® 

55 

55 

55 


Erlv Brd 

9000 

29 

77 

29 *2 

Ohio 

23566 1® 

146 

160 

♦ IS 

Wgroth 

3510 

490 

485 

490 


Cannon 

10® 

70 

70 

70 -5 

Phoenx 

25® 

60 

60 

60 


El Coco 

2500 

W 

7% 

7% - % 


25® 78 

28 

28 

—1 

Westlv 

15® 

37S 

375 

375 


Canzna 

15® 

VS 

SS 

S5 

Pico 

20® 

70 

D 

D 

board traders and rose .20 

Egx 

5500 

340 

3® 

3® -5 

Omni 

89® 2® 

255 

260 

♦ 5 

wstmnt 

TWO 

795 

775 

79S 


Cardro 

25® 

35 

35 

35 

Pp. 

340® 

265 

250 

760 ♦ 5 


Ertex 

16900 

170 

165 

170 oi 

Osec A 

40® I® 

1® 

1® 

♦ 5 

Wward 

95® 

385 

375 

3® 

♦ 20 

Car me 

100® 

47 

47 

47 

Pistol 

30® 

95 

94 

94 -8 


Entrpr 

6500 

150 

150 

I® 

P Cassar 

6® 215 

215 

215 

♦ 10 

Whart 

17W0 

7® 

735 

7® 


Crpnter 

75® 

74 

73 

73 -1 

Ponev 

60® 

77 

72 

72 -3 


Foully si 

2300 

$17 

32 

32 

P Cst tad 

35® 42 

41 

41 


wndmll 

8® 

140 

1® 

1® 

♦ 10 

Casla pt 

35® 

44 

* 

44 

Psidn 

$5® 

145 

140 

140 -10 


Eurocn 

41400 


375 

325 -5 


167® 445 

410 

44S 

♦ ® 

Ykn Rev 

60® 

W 

® 

n 


Catatna 

70® 

310 

3* 

310 -10 

Pdt 

101® 

55 

55 

55 


Forum 

1600 

115 

1)5 

115 -3 


17® 1® 

1® 

1® 


Ykn GW 

5® 

115 

115 

115 


Catadrl 

10® 

57 

57 

57 

Prvme 

80® 

295 

7® 

295 *X 


Futurtv 

1000 

37 

37 

37 -3 

P Actier 

50® 42 

40 

® 


Zenore 

zS® 

64 

64 

64 


Check e 

75® 

$5 

SI 

St 

Ouinto 

7133 

123 

ID 

17) *7 


Galvstn 

1700 

750 

2* 

7® -10 

P Arctic 

15® 225 

216 

225 


Zone 

95® 

2S5 

2® 

2S5 

♦s 

Choper 

75® 

77 

77 

72 -2 

Rado 

43® 

220 

2D 

270 

Stock 

Saks High Low Close Ch ge 

Gni Egy 

9775 

565 

5SS 

560 ♦ 10 


704® 2® 

1® 

190 

♦ 10 . 

Warrants 

and 

Rights 


Ckaver 

110® 

40 

38 

a -2 

Ratnbw 

50® 

no 

106 

no -s 

Resource and Development 

Geodm 

1000 

717 

717 

212 

Pthtadr 

35® 50 

49 

M 


Amfk) w 

28® 

45 

43 

45 


C Reaclr 

17® 

45 

45 

45 

Rmp 

IM 

165 

165 

165 

Aaron 

6310 465 450 465 a IS 

Giant Ex 

10300 

175 

170 

174 kll 


14® $7% 

. 7*4 

7% 


Bss W 

30® 

35 

30 

30 

♦ 1 

Cont MM 

13® 

176 

125 

125 -5 

Rebel 

10® 

40 

40 

* 

Abella 

1400 145 145 145 -5 

Global 

500 

80 

80 

80 -10 

Pen wst 

58® 7® 

725 

2.10 

♦ 5 

Bee w 

16® 

20 

20 

20 


Cod 

790® 

139 

135 

135 

Redfm 

5® 

85 

85 

85 *7 

Action 

4100 140 136 140 

Goidblt 

4550 

795 

780 

795 *9 


30® 1® 

140 

1® 

♦ S 

Cni w 

41000 

9 

8 

9 


Corona 

15® 

50 

45 

50 

Redlnd 

16® 

MS 

115 

ns —4 

Agassiz 

300 191 191 191 

G Gate 

1400 

150 

150 

1® 


70® 55 

55 

55 


Cobre w 

70® 

79 

79 

29 

—1 

Cor vet 

147® 

170 

16? 

170 +6 

Regts 

65® 

33 

® 

® -3 

Aleta 

MW) 105 100 105 *5 

Gokx 

27203 

85 

81 

85 -1 

Perry R 

S3® 90 

85 

90 


Cow w 

30® 

M 

84 

84 

-1 

Cresent 

7*55 

155 

150 

150 65 

Rtdeau 

10® 

36 

35 

36 *1 

Altex 

3400 120 120 120 

Gowga 

6500 

84 

80 

82 *2 

Piper 

38® ®5 

5® 

60S 

♦ 35 

Drr w 

100® 

30 

27 

X 


Cumo 

no® 

295 

7® 

295 65 

Rvr Mta 

65* 

5/ 

5? 

54 ♦ 1 

Amcd 

18700 380 370 380 

G N Pete 

2500 

70 

68 

70 

Plains 

7® 170 

1® 

1® 

-S 

Enex w 

55® 

1? 

It 

1? 


Decker 

1 wo 

785 

7® 

7® 

Rusk in 

ISM 

75 

D 

D -S 

Am Flrit 

7100 550 525 S45 - 10 

Grt Pac 

3500 

190 

180 

185 

Prmcss 

50® » 

29 

79 

♦ 4 

Ete w 

18® 

6 

6 

6 


Oenvr 

4J® 

no 

110 

no 

Samsn 

10® 

6) 

61 

6) -3 

Am Pyd 

300 325 325 325 -10 

Grnwd 

36100 

435 

415 

4® *15 

Prism 

70® 415 

415 

415 


Grnwd w 

50® 

65 

60 

65 

♦ 5 

Diana 

wro 

55 

47 

55 *1 

San Anf 

70® 

70 

D 

D ♦ 1 

Amflo 

3330 390 370 370 

Grndst 

35345 

210 

175 

20? *19 


17® 172 

I® 

12? 


Ibr w 

ns® 

70 

60 

70 

♦ 10 


TOM 

50 

so 

50 -5 

Santa S 

1350 

450 

440 

4 SO ♦ IS 

Anchor 

3750 $9% 9% 9% - % 

Grove 

11600 

350 

345 

3® -S 

QC Exp 

20® 70 

65 

65 


Kds wt 

717® 

1? 

U 

11 


D eagle 

33® 

415 

3® 

41$ ^25 

Scheer 

sa® 

145 

121 

121 -24 

Andex 

12500 95 89 90 ♦ 5 

Hecate 

5000 

W 

90 

90 -10 

Quintin 

76® 395 

355 

355 


Lion w 

60® 

14 

14 

14 

♦ 2 

Eagkl 

27® 

395 

390 

395 -5 

Sew 

142® 

150 

140 

ISO rD 

Anglo Bo 

1700 355 350 350 -15 

Hilnd Cr 

1520 

170 

165 

170 


75® 7® 

2® 

2® 


Meg w 

380® 

63 

56 

57 

♦ 7 

Eaton 

66® 

its 

115 

115 ♦$ 

Senator 

4375 

43 

43 

43 

Arcdia 

3D00 75 69 71 

Hohwd 

8100 

190 

175 

190 +9 

Rainier 

73® 3® 

3® 

360 

♦ 10 

Par w 

110® 

20 

18 

18 

♦ 2 

Eoalite 

234® no 

98 

I® -10 

Sevmor 

SM 

82 

82 

82 *1 

Argo 

1650 S8 . 8 6% ♦ % 

HOSt 

2300 

130 

1® 

1® 

Reako 

44® 69 

66 

69 


Pwt w 

8760 

* 

37 

37 

-13 

Fldor 

186® 

170 

167 

162 -2 

S.boia 

20® 

44 

40 

*0 -7 

Argyll 

-5600 310 305 305 

Ice Sin 

8W 

130 

115 

115 -S 

Redtrd 

316® 1® 

1® 

177 

♦ 9 

Reef w 

90® 

31 

30 

X 


Ekctra 

10® 

75 

75 

75 ♦ 1 

Sienna 

IS® 

99 

99 

99 —I 

Arizona 

1000 675 675 675 - 1$ 

Imp Met 

10000 

86 

80 

80 -10 

Reef 

101® 5® 

540 

S4S 

♦ 5 

Set w 

70® 

1? 

T? 

12 


El paso 

70® 

97 

97 

97 

Ssy 

10® 

90 

90 

90 -S 

Ascot 

23300 640 585 625 ♦ 35 

Intrcp 

1100 

700 

195 

TOO 


TO® 50 

® 

® 


Tko w a 

180® 

10 

8 

10 


Erl Res 

65® 

60 

60 

60 ♦S 

SipakJ 

30® 

5/ 

56 

56 

Avino 

>400 205 197 705 aS 

Int Balfr 

4300 

400 

375 

400 *15 

Rex silv 

1102 1® 

I® 

1® 

-10 

Tru w 

66® 

24 

74 

24 

-1 

Eskimo 

7250 

76 

75 

7$ -1 

Spectm 

65® 

67 

6J 

63 -7 

Azure 

WT) 78 78 78 a2 

Itl Brmc 

89*40 

220 

202 

710 4 5 

Rhodes 

47240 7® 

2® 

»3 

-17 

Thor r 

10® 

35 

35 

35 


Exclibr 

25® 

1® 

t® 

1® 

Slankv 

25* 

n 

W 

» 

Banner 

10800 445 440 440 

intt mak 

1300 

150 

1* 

1® -5 

Rimrck 

70® 35 

32 

34 

♦ 2 

Twd w 

®® 

34 

31% 

34 

♦3 

tktwd 

7® 

215 

715 

215 

Statesd 

60® 

ID 

112 

11? -8 

Barr ter 

6000 90 86 86 —4 

IShasla 

500 

145 

145 

145 -5 

Rto Plat 

40® 137 

125 

125 

-S 

utc wl 

Z2® 

7 

7 

7 


Fury 

15® 

75 

75 

75 

Sunrise 

10® 

31 

31 

31 

Bath N 

3300 155 151 151 -4 

I Stndrd 

4220 

195 

185 

185 -5 

Risbv T 

10® 95 

95 

95 

♦ 3 

Uwr w 

90® 

99 

95 

95 


Gatlin 

20® 

» 

W 

» 

Tagus 

18350 

1* 

ID 

ID -2 

Bhnorl 

6700 $73% 21% 73% - % 

Invx Res 

16400 

160 

155 

1® -5 

Riviera 

30® 35 

35 

35 


Vnt w 

798® 

7 

4 

5 

-2 

Gallant 

20® 

260 

260 

760 -S 

Tmr 

95® 

33 

3? 

32 

Benson 

74000 36 36 36 

Iona Svr 

2400 

365 

3® 

3® -15 


11® 65 

65 

65 


Ygp W 

70® 

17 

17 

17 


Gasiite 

13® 

185 

185 

185 

Tandm 

5® 

D 

D 

D -3 

Betma 

6500 20 5 700 704 «4 

Jet Star 

5700 

240 

7® 

225 -IS 

Ronrco 

76® 335 

325 

325 

-to 

Ykr w 

80® 

14 

13 

14 


Gave* 

65® 

44 

42 

42 —2 

Terrm 

15® 

60 

60 

60 

Bianca 

5100 755 750 755 -S 

Jov ind 

2000 

265 

765 

265 

Rosmc 

10® 140 

140 

1® 

♦ 2 

Tenor w 

45® 

1? 

10 

10 

-2 

GHIian 

12550 

120 

no 

120 ♦$ 

Thnrbit 

30® 

)« 

WO 

1® 

Blk Dmd 

4175 108 100 100 

Kamad 

16000 

145 

1® 

US 4 IS 

Sabma 

-00 75 

75 

75 



INDUSTRIALS 



GW Anoi 

3® 

2® 

7® 

7® 

Tor cal 

30® 

D 

65 

D a2 

Bikdme 

3000 230 225 725 

Kndahr 

11500 

285 

270 

27S -S 

Sabk 

JO® 86 

85 

85 

—1 

Baico 

75® 

$7 

*% 

7 


Gold cug 

15® 

57 

55 

55 

Tracer 

1S5M 

425 

410 

4D ♦$ 

B Giant 

3900 tOO MB M0 aJ 

Kann Ik 

2400 

70 

61 

70 

St etias 

97*5 SS 

53 

S5 

♦ 2 

BCRIC 

7® K) 

460 

640 

*55 

♦ S 

Gotdstk 

17® 

75 

75 

75 -S 

Tm Pac 

9® 

® 

n 

M ♦ W 

Bkt sky 

4400 $17% 17 17% - % 

Kerta 

42750 

73 

M 

71 42 

Saxton 

67® *75 

6® 

655 

♦ S 

Cantor 

15® 

$5% 5% 

5% 

♦ % 


172* 

78 

75 

7* ♦) 

Tunkw 

10® 

45 

45 

45 

Bfcv pr a 

900 $17 17 12 a % 

Krttv 

1700 

160 

143 

l® 

Start) 

75® 440 

4J0 

430 

-S 

Daon 

6W0 

$10 

Wi 

10% 

♦ % 

Ghp 

71® 

175 

165 

175 

Uke res 

12® 

no 

no 

no -to 

Bratc 

6000 55 SS 55 

Kent E 

7500 

65 

65 

65 41 

Scott K 

58® 7* 

7* 

7® 

♦ is 

GN Land 

73® 

125 

120 

120 

♦ 5 

Grange 

30® 

46 

45 

45 

Urn vex 

MM 

35 

3$ 

35 -J 

brent 

4500 $10 ; 10 M - % 

Klondx 

700 

120 

115 

IIS 45 

Seat rth 

119® 175 

1® 

1® 

-2 


3® 

$7 

7 

7 


G Centrl 

30® 

90 

•0 

90 

vat Dor 

709® 

775 

236 

2D *35 

Bncan 

7 M0 Jta 350 370 

knobbv 

11500 

770 

2* 

270 ♦ 70 

Seadrtt 

40® 48 

46 

4* 

♦ 2 

Gutt Cda 

5® 

$34% 34% 

34% ♦ % 

G Work) 

2543 

140 

135 

140 -1 

Vtsconl 

10® 

I* 

1* 

1* 

f.dr Res 

3413) 75 70 74 *4 

La Te*.o 

4500 

62 

62 

62 

Seatu 

15® 85 

85 

8$ 


H Roach 

7973 

355 

3® 

3S5 

♦ S 

Gm 

85* 

179 

125 

179 4 4 

Warslr 

203® 

145 

125 

ID -a 

' T fc«, 

6700 82 82 12 -3 

UCO 

11800 

IM 

105 

MS 44 

Selkrk 

ITT® 12S 

1® 

125 

♦ 2$ 


7® 

725 

225 

22S 


Hat Crk 

ZMO 

57 

S? 

s? 

weoco r 

95* 

♦1 

85 

fl ♦* 

BX Dev 

375*0 $9 8% 8% - % 

lansco 

15000 

n 

64. 

71 45 

Sheba 

100C 37 

37 

37 


N Gesttt 

ITT?* 

775 

760 

775 

*40 

Hod 

105* 

7* 

70 

70 — M 

w Joy 

5* 

2* 

2® 

DC 

catdma 

$300 400 400 400 

Laredo 

71* 

760 

7» 

7® 

Slider 

75® TOT 

190 

7® 


Podef A 

701 

139 

1)9 

1)9 


Hrmpr 

IDO 

1* 

150 

1* -S 

W Trend 

8* 

2D 

275 

2D 

C Brnca 

700 $5 5 5 - % 

Liberty 

MS35 

335 

375 

325 -10 

Sh.eld 

9® 1*. 

1 * 

1® 


Protkx 

taoc 

21 

70 

70 


nesca 

a* 

3D 

ao 

ITS -5 

Wildcat 

20* 

71 

71 

71 -2 

Cdn poor 

taao 4«£ aeO 46C -$ 

imcota 

2900 

$v 

V 

9% ♦ % 

Sivrdo 

797* 3M 

30C 

»S 


Renn In 

MOOC 

I® 

ITS 

179 


hi cor 

M* 

111 

III 

III 

W.Wrs 

57* 

70 

D 

D 

i anatta 

33W HV HO 115 a3 

L*W Mn 

25* 

IM 

1* 

170 4 IS 

S Chief 

15® 325 

310 

325 


Seabrd 

a* 

$14 

14 

14 


Mwnac 

me 

140 

150 

IM 

wmdra 

65* 

81 

« 

a 

Caabec 

200 130 1» t» 

Logtng 

7* 

3M 

3M 

JW 

S Prmss 

Mb 335 

325 

335 

♦ S 

Taro 

225 

405 

405 

405 


HOkO 

5* 

75 

75 

7S 

Zod.ec 

DM 

IS* 

t» 

la 


























< rtko R 

1400 445 445 445 «$ 

Lome. 

14* 

$45 

45 

45 ♦ 1 

S Stadrd 

19*0 164 

140 

M4 

♦ 4 

N grslt v 

■wt 

rm 

DO 

120 


14* 

J44® 

4K 

DO 

m *4b 

Amor w 

71* 

37 

» 2$ -D 

1 far ft* 

34500 62 59 60 -J 

M 88 Prr 

37* 

75 

ta 

ta -ft 

Svr Tusk 

I* Its 

11$ 

11} 

-3 

VANCOUVER CUM EXCHANGE 

intrlke 

2IO® 

92 

17 

* 

Amore • 

14ft* 

a 

17 

17 

fharwt 

29460 3ta 355 3ta ♦ 15 

Mart* 

59* 

3® 

325 

325 -* 

Sonor 

87® l» 

123 

12} 


Acacia 

wxr 

40 

* 

* 


island M 

57* 

ITS 

lift 

118^ -2 

Art » 

/ ftOCi 

4 1 

*0 

* 

' haven 

47» 3W 105 305 —6 

Mat Ian 

till 

l» 

!» 

l» —4 

SOvrgn 

15* 75 

® 

® 

-ft 


«8M 

85 

05 

*5 

♦s 

Jerwler 

to* 

W 

* 

« 

epa w 

•Wt 

t 

t 

7 

' htko 

-330 iao 350 2V 


lM> 

54 

54 

$4 

Stall Left 

74* W. 

vo 

w 


AWt 

mot' 

ft) 


47 


Jewrt 

75* 

1» 

115 

l» 

HI w 

tm 

• 

1 

ft -2 

• hrm* 

25 25 25 ♦ 7 

Mark V 

•it 

i* 

MK 

t* 

Stampd 

te* 7* 

TOO 

m 

4 10 

Alma l«tf 

3034* 

97 

tv 

09 


Juba 

mo 

57 

$2 

SS 

EW » 

40* 

29 

n 

79 ♦? 

cmw 

-JM0 155 154 155 *7 

Mvrfca 

a 

IK 

3* 

J* -2$ 


*4U .* 

12 

* 

«M 

AM Star 

wan 

* 

47 

41 

-2 

Josten 

SMC 

l* 

MS 

1 * #s 

Goto* wt 

** 

12 

n 

1? 


tm m J9 w 

Mar r» 

71* 

715 

IV 

m -» 


JJM7 7* 

234 

?k 

-2 

Alta tap 

HU, 

•5 

1$ 

ft} 


k enadr 

. M 

Di 

X75 

375 

HC> « 

I** 

* 

t 

• 

•rtrta. 

tm IJD 173 138 

Mr.Xtrt 


V 

$5 

•i 


J*® Ml 

•« 

Ml 

♦ t 

Amedr 

75* 

its 

Mi 

185 

♦ 15 

o niton 

5* 

* 

* 

a 

Mam* 

tour 

t$ 

ts 

1* -f 

Hrmr 

it* to 67 70 a 1 

Mrska. 

w* 

$75 

5® 

565 • K 

Soft 

ftjt* m 

7® 

2*S 

♦ 1} 

Amarft « 

«* 

21$ 

21$ 

71} 

♦ IS 

Karr v 

m 

77 

77 

77 

Mr a • 

9D8 

II 

M 

* -ft 

'Mr e 

118 1*5 It* at 

a*. 

774* 

t* 

14} 

MS -J 

Srdftr* 

tm Kr, 

Mi 

*5 

• 7 

Am**) 

1*0 

J5 

» 

X 


LOR 

m 


ID 

I* -ft 

Pt>a m 

On w 

MM 

) 

1 

3 

1 

1 

' kx*4* 

7380 4v. «* a* -« 

M.e tort 

A 

* 

* 

* -1 

Duma 

im it 




Aim 


41 

* 

ft* 




Ui 

ID 

ID a* 

RM w 

oft* 

It 

to 

D -1 

Bvunrt 

MM’ IV « *6 

Mateo 

m 

S' 

te to- • 

f a 

6J 

6V 

ti 


AlUa 

ui 

idfk 

1*4 

M6 

~4 

i wad- 

*4 

X 

* 

a -ft 

m 

’4*1 

il 

* 

it aft 


















at 

-i 











y 

m. Wj m m •* 

Mi'One 

■m 


e 8% te 


ft* Ik 

4 4* 1* 


Anr. 

4*U 

m 

m 

m 

MckJu. 

■m 

48 

63 

49 -i 

JSZ l 

> DM 

8 

t 

ft 

si 

im 775 /Ti ?7S all 

V /■-’/ 


■M 

4*5 

*8 

•e«ak 

VHL MS 

It 

*9- 

#?s 



41 

t. 

*• 

_ j 

V-agg- 

V 



* -i 

• 

•«K 

1} 


1} 

< !> *<» 

tm <Bf »71 :25 44 

M«r. Jt* 

I* 

IK 

4 t* 


terra 

mn a jti 

rn 

ft* 

a « 

Ait* 

ft* 

7* 

» 


-*» 

Mar® 

taa* 

>1$ 

7X 

M *1 

TOTAL VOLUME 



SON % 




Regular CartlflcatM 

Cashabl* Certificates 

1 year 

10 3/4% 

10 1/4% 

2 years 

11 1/4% 

10 1/4% 

3 years 

11 1/2% 

10!/?% 

4 • 5 years 

11 3/4% 

10'/?% 

6 years 

10 1/4% 

9 3/4% 

7 • 20 years 9 3/4% 

9 1/4% 


Above rates are for certificates where interest is 
paid annually. $1,000 minimum. Cashable 
certificates can be cashed at any time at 
reduced rates. Semi annual and monthly interest 
is available at 1/4% less than the above rates. 
Monthly interest is reduced a further 1/4% on 
amounts less than $10,000. 

All rates subject to change without notice. 

Canada Trust n 

Member Canada Deposit Insurance Corporation 

View at Broad 

(Mon - Thurs 8:30 to 4:30; Fri to 6) 


ALCOHOLISM 

Treatment with Dignity 

Alcoholism is an illness. It is treatable. You. 
someone close to you. perhaps someone you 
work with, may be suffering from this devas¬ 
tating affliction Our professional staff offers 
men and women treatment'for the medical, 
emotional, social and spiritual aspects of al¬ 
coholism in confidence...with dignity 

GIL1A1N 

Operated by the nonprofit Gillain Foundation 
1515 McTavish Road. (P.O. Box 2369) 
Sidney, British Columbia V8L 3Y3 
For advice telephone the 
Intake Counsellor at (604) 656-5525 (24 hours) 
Dr Nelson. Bradley. Medical Director 













































t 


BUSINESS 


THE COLONIST, Thursday July l\, 1980 1 3 


Mutual 

funds 

TORONTO (CP)—Recent prices of 
Investment funds supplied bv The In¬ 
vestment Funds Institute of Canada 
Wednesday. They are the net asset 
value per share or unit (NAVPS) last 
circulated by the fund In accordance 
with its pricing practice as contained 
In the prospectus of the fund, n—no 
sales charge, x—U.S. Fund, v—de¬ 
layed NAVPS. xd-ex-divldend. 

institute Universal Group 


Alberta 

Complete tabulation of Wednesday 
transactions. Quotations In cents un¬ 
less marked V Net change Is from 
previous board-lot closing sale. 

Stack Sates Hied Law Close Oi'te 
Acrotl am MO 2SS MO ♦$ 

Amelia 500 MS 145 US -5 

Am Chrome MTS 435 425 435 
Beretta 4800 St* 6% 6% ♦ % 

• Barons 2110 233 230 230 —3 

Bearcat 1500 V5V, 5V, 5V, 

Bom 200 250 250 250 *10 

Calms 2300 S9 


Grain 

WINNIPEG 

(Quotations in tonnes.) 

Open HI# Law Close Tues. 
Flax 

JlY - - - 383.50 377.00 

Oct 385.50 390.80 385.50 390.80 383.50 
Nov 387.08 390.00 387.00 390.00 304.00 


Dome hits oil again in Beaufort 


Spt 

NOV 

Jan 

Bartev 

JlY 

Oct 


353.00 355.50 351.40 
340.50 345.00 340.50 
341 JO 371.80 367.70 


355.20 348 SO 
365.00 358.50 
371.10 365.50 


143.50 144.20 143.50 144.20 143.00 
137.00 138.20 137.00 138.00 136.50 


Members 

Equity 

15.13 

Camel 

6855 

$8% 

§H 


Dec 

135.00 135.70 135.00 135.60 134.50 

AGF Group 

Income 

4.41 

Cdn Aran 

5166 

64 

60 

60 


Oats 


Amer Grwlti 8.09 

Internatnl 

4.96 

Cdn Bashaw 9400 

280 

280 

280 

—5 

JlY 

127.70 128.00 177.70 138.00 137.00 

Cdn Gs Eov 10.15 

Resource 

8.59 

Cdn Pioneer 

800 

16 

5% 

6 

♦ % 

OCt 

136.50 128.00 126.50 128.00 125.40 

Cdn Sec Gth 11.04 

Non-Members 

Chlpman 

100 

200 

200 

200 

-20 

Dec 

- 126.40 125.40 126.40 124.70 

Cdn Trusteed 4.16 

nAltamira Fd 

6.51 

Clmiron 

2900 

440 

430 

440 


Feed wheat 

Corp Invest 7.96 

Assoc Inv 

9.63 

Cirwlbar Pk 

1500 

85 

as 

85 

-7 

JlY 

158.50 158.50 156.70 156.70 156.00 

Corp Inv Stk 13.83 

yBcaucanagx 

6.64 

Clarepine 

2500 

98 

96 

98 

♦ 2 

Oct 

158.50 1S9 50 158.00 158.00 158.00 

Gwth Equity 6.00 

Canape* Gr 


Cochrane 

600 

230 

220 

230 

♦ IS 

Dec 

156.30 156.60 155.90 155.90 155.40 

Japan 15.05 

vHypotheq 

10.04 

Concept 

9275 

17% 

7% 

7% 

- Vi 

Rye 

197 00 195.50 193.00 195.50 191.50 

nAAMF 11.21p 10.00 

yObllgatns 

8.97 

Cuttas 

50000 

95 

91 

95 

♦ 1 

Jly 

Option Equity 4.99 

Capital Grth 

5.66 

Dixie 

6500 

30 

30 

30 

♦ 5 

Oct 

198.00 198.70 197.00 198.00 196.00 

Soedal 929 

xChase 

1.25 

Edmonton 

200 

280 

780 

280 

-IS 

Dec 

187.50 187 50 185.00 185.10 184.90 

Bolton Tremblay 

ynComCp Mtg 9.66 

Flag 

3400 

750 

250 

250 

-10 


CHICAGO 

Cda Cumut 12.05 

Co-op Trust i 

&r 

Flin Flon 

1000 

230 

230 

730 

♦ 13 


(Quotations In bushels.) 

income Fnd 9.87 

ynCo<p Fnd 14.73 

Ft Norman 

800 

370 

350 

150 

-20 


Open High Low Close Ch'ge. 

Internatnl 10.75 

ml smbM 

18.70 

Gascome 

1200 

390 

390 

390 


Whea 

1 

Pld Resourcs 11.73 

DesiardMs Gr 

Gold Lake 

1600 

390 

380 

385 

—5 

Sep 

446V, 4.61 4.46 4.S9 ♦ .16% 

Taurus 13.57 

vAcllons 

12.71 

Gulch 

35300 

430 

415 

430 

♦ IS 

Dec 

4.63 4.78V„ 4.63 4.77 ♦.18V, 

Calvin Bullock Gr 

vHypotheq 

4.19 

Golden Briar 3800 

145 

145 

145 

♦ 1 

Mar 

4.74»/a 4.89 4.74 4.86V, ♦ 16% 

Acrotund 252 

vinternatnl 

10.06 

Inti Tika 

26900 

255 

230 

245 

♦ 20 

Cent 


vBanner Fd 5.68 

yObligatns 

4.67 

Jupiter 

4200 

180 

170 

175 

-45 

Sep 

3.33 3 28 3.21V, 3.27% ♦ 09 

CIF 6.31 

vQueber 

6 18 

Klltucan 

100 

400 

300 

260 

300 

300 

260 


Dec 

3 30% 3 36 3.29V, 3.35% ♦ .08V, 

CIF Income 10.15 


8.89 

Lk Res 

240 

*• 

Mar 

3.39V, 3.45% 3.39 3.45% ♦ .09’* 

Central Group 

Dixon Krog i 

Gr 

Lobeil 

4600 

75 

72 

74 

♦ 3 

Oats 

vCam Grwth 7.87 

Dixon, Krog 

17.48 

LOll 

500 

70 

70 

70 

-5 

Sep 

1.84 V, 1.80 V, 1.84% 1.08 V. +.05V, 

vCompound 8.04 

Heritage 

4.66 

Matrex 

2000 

87 

85 

87 

♦2 

Dec 

1.94 V, 1.90 V, 194'/, 1.98 ♦.04% 

yDividend 8.52 

Vanguard 

13.38 

Madre 

3500 

W1 

100 

100 


Mar 

2.05 2 05 3.03 2.04 ♦.02% 

vFund 4000 5.66 

vOomequIty 

17.19 

Major 

4200 

160 

140 

160 

♦ 10 

Saybeans 

ylntl Energy 3.16 

y Dorn in Comp 13.62 

Mid East 

35000 

95 

80 

95 

♦ 20 

Aug 

7.53 7.63V, 7.49 7.62% ♦.20% 

V loti Gwth 5.59 

Dreyfus Group 

Mlssi 

6900 

165 

159 

159 

-6 

Sep . 

7.63 7.72V, 7.58 7.71% ♦.20% 

vlntt income 3.89 

Vine 

14.91 

Mt Jamie 

8700 

180 

160 

160 

-20 

Nov 

7.75% 7.88 7.71 7.84'/, +.31 

vNat Res Gth 6.28 

vinternatnl 

22.01 

Maxvllle. 

5000 

90 

85 

90 


Soybean oil 

vNorthn Eov 5.90 

nExecutv Inti 

1.22 

Nahannl 

3000 

100 

100 

100 


Aug 

27.03 27.45 27.00 27.33 +.50 

yRevenue Gth 4.32 

xFId Trend 

27.94 

New 44 

1294 

17Vj 

7Vi 

1 TV] 

i- % 

Sep 

27.28 37.70 27.20 27.58 *SS 

vUnlvest 7.37 

nfst Cdn Mtg W.12 

N Gateway 

6650 

$7 

7 

7 


Oct 

27.48 27.90 27.40 27.76 +.61 

CSA M«mt Gr 

FI scon Fund 

6.72 

Newpass 

500 

59 

59 

59 

-1 

Soybean meal 

Goldtund 5.52 

Harvard 

13.52 

NfWPOd 

Nimrod 

4200 

190 

190 

190 

-5 

Aug 

205.50 206 50 202.00 206.30 ♦6.00 

Gotdtrust 6.49 

Industrial Gr 


3500 

135 

130 

130 


Sep 

306 00 309 30 205.00 308 70 ♦S.TO 

Conted Group 

Indust Amer 

3.49 

Normlnco 

4200 

135 

130 

134 

—6 

Oct 

207.00 211.50 207.00 2 M) 80 *5.30 


CALGARY (CP) — 
Dome Petroleum of Cal¬ 
gary Ltd. announced Wed¬ 
nesday it has struck oil 
with a test well-in the Beau¬ 
fort Sea, ISO kilometres 
northwest of Tuktoyaktuk, 
N.W.T. 

Dome, operators of the 
well for its two other part¬ 
ners, Gulf Canada Re¬ 
sources Ltd. and Mobil Oil 
Canada Ltd., said in a news 


release that oil was found 
at a depth of 1,350 metres. 

The well was drilled to 
test depth last year but op¬ 
erations were halted by 
winter weather and it was 
finished this summer. 
Dome said oil flowed to the 
surface, indicating good 
pressure. 

Dome spokesman Bill 
Payne said tests will be 
conducted to determine the 
grade of the oil. 


The well is the third 
strike for Dome in the 
Beaufort Sea, where it is 
the major explorer. Last 
year Kopanoar M-13 tested 
out at a flow rate of 12,000 
barrels a day. 

Dome has a 31 '/, -per-cent 
share in the new find, with 
Gulf the major partner 
with 5614 per cent and 
Mobil with 1214 per cent. 

Meanwhile, in Ottawa, a 


subsidiary of Dome Petro¬ 
leum Ltd. was given ap¬ 
proval Wednesday by the 
federal government to 
build an artificial island in 
the Beaufort Sea for oil and 
gas exploration. 

The island, used In place 
of a drilling rig because of 
ice conditions, will be about 
25 nautical miles off Tuk¬ 
toyaktuk Peninsula and 
should be completed for the 
1982 drilling season. 


In another development, 
Northern Affairs Minister 
John Munro announced 
Wednesday an environ¬ 
mental assessment of po¬ 
tential petroleum produc¬ 
tion in the Beaufort. 

Companies wanting to 
start oil or gas production 
will have to prepare a study 
of its environmental, social 
and economic effects on 
the North. 


Exxon first again in Fortune’s leading 50 


Dolphin Eqty 7.15 
vDolphln Mtg 4.98 
Cundill Group 
v Security 8 88 
Value 7.34 

Dynamic Group 
ynDyn Amer 5.80 
vnOvn Fnd 15.45 
vnDvn Incom 5.91 
Eaton Bay Group 
Commwth 21.29 
Oividend 5.33 
Growth 7.46 
Income 3.90 
Internafnl 7.09 
Viking 9.S9 

Guaranty Trust Gr 
vplnv Equity 12.67 
vnlnv Income 3.90 
vnMortgage 9.84 
Guardian Group 
Enterprise 1.66 
GIS Income 555 
vGwtti Fund 21.87 
North Amer 8.30 
Mutual Acu 7.58 
Sec Income 9.85 
World Equity 7.04 
Investors Group 
vBond 4.45 

yDividend 8.17 
yGrowth 
vinternatnl 
vJapan 
vMortgage 
vMutual 
vProvIdt Stk 9.97 
vRetiremnt 11.41 
vn Jones Hewrd 4.64 
Montreal Trust Gr 
yEquIty 23.07 
v income 7.82 
vinternatnl 10.83 
v Mortgage 946 
Principal Gr 
yColledtve 12.92 
vGrowth 7.17 
v Venture 6 50 
vBond 2.94 

Prudential Gr 
Growth 10.46 
Income 4.83 
vSask Dev Fd 4.74 
5cotiafund Gr 
Scotiafund 1.68 
Scotiald tytg 97 
Templeton Gth 8.10 
United Bond Share 
RoyFund 13.2? 
RovFnd Inc 495 


Indust Dlv 7.29 
Indust Eq 11.39 
indust Gth 7.28 
Indust Incom 8.82 
Indust Pens 32.59 
Keystone Or 
xCus K-2 6.35 

xCus $-1 19.35 

xCus 5-4 8 04 

xLex Rsrdt 18.27 
xManhatn 3.75 
yMarMme Eq 4.00 
Marlborough 10.09 
nNatrusco 21.81 
NW Group 
Canadian 8.56 
Equity 12.38 
xOne Wm St 18.01 
xOppenhmr 9.73 
Pemberton Gr 
ynPacIfic Div 7.81 
vnPactflc Ret 5.68 
ynPadtlc US 7.02 


9.53 


North Cant 

Onyx 

Orbit 

Paramount 
Penstar 
Peregrine 
, Poco 
Radial 
Renabie 
Sasttx 
Savanna 
Seagull 
Sparrow 
Strom 
Son Mist 
Sort 
Tiber 
Tiverton 
Tobe 

Troy Gotd 
Twin Rich 


5000 49 49 49 *2 

1000 56 V. 6 V, 6 V. 
2800 566k 6* 6* 

900 17V, 71% TV, 
3400 110 106 107 el 

2330 55V. S 
5000 330 32$ 


25900 IK) 100 105 

3700 400 385 385 

5000 60 60 60 

7200 140 135 135 


- V% 

♦ 5 


5700 400 
15090 155 
2200 395 
4900 165 
18367 125 120 120 

3000 470 450 470 


-5 

♦ to 

190 190 -5 
390 395 ♦ 25 
165 165 


anaJan 


vBond 

vCi 

vDiv mo 
Fund 
vPooied 
nvRRSP 


7300 340 340 340 

1000 41 41 41 -4 

1300 56V, 6% 6V, 

300 Wi W 5^4 — Ma 
Universl X 20600 390 335 350 >10 

Univ Fuels 1800 400 395 400 

Wlndlamr 600 275 275 275 
XRG 16300 435 425 435 -IS 


18.21 

9.75 

10.12 

4.73 

7.77 


nPenslon Mu 12.71 
nXanadu Fd 8.12 
nPutnam 12.87 
Pret at Revanu Gr 

American 13.90 
Canadian 9.45 
yFonds H 4 82 
Retraltc 10.19 
Sterling Group 
Equity 8.94 
vMortgage 4.81 
vSvnchorvest 7.24 
xTech 11.79 

yTradex 5.37 
Trans Canada Gr 
A 6.34 

B 69 35 

C 11.65 

United Group 
Accumula 7.66 
Accumula R 8.09 
American 2.37 
vCont Mortg 5.04 
Horizon 5.18 
ecurlty 4.24 
Venture 6.03 
Venture Ret 9.81 
nyWaHam* 33 60 
Western Grth 7.30 

London 

LONDON (CP) — Closing stock quo¬ 
tations Wednesday In new pence un¬ 
less pounds or U.S. dollars are Indicat¬ 
ed Associated Brit Foods 101; 
Babcock and Wilcox 89; Bass Char- 
unaton 232; BICC 133; Blvvoors 517; 
BOC International 81; Boots 211; 
bowater 184; Brit Am Tob 280; Brit 
Assets Trust 84’“,; Brit Petroleum 344; 
Broken Hill Prop 770; Butfels 541; 
Bufmah 011 704; Canadian Pac £14%; 
Charter Cons 220; Cons Gold 560; 
Courtaulds68. De Beers 930; Distillers 
708; Dunlop80; F.S. GeduldSASV,; Gen 
Elec 472; Glaxo 224.* Grand Metropoli 
tan Hotels 158; Gr Un Stores A 442; 
Guest Keen 252; Hawker Siddetev 228; 
Hoover A 162; ICI 376; Imp Tob 80; Inti 
Thomson 344, K loot 533*/,; Marks and 
Spencer 95; Mlnorco 343; Metal Box 
302; Philips 409; Pllkfngton Bros 236; 
Plessev 212; Rank A 168; Rio Tlnto 
Zinc 468; Roan Consol 180; Set Trust 
£12 S-16; Second Scott Inv 106; Shell T 
and T 424; Tanganyika 325; Thom EMI 
310; Trusthouse 107;- Tube Invest¬ 
ments 280; Ultramar 336; Unilever 
508; Vaals$74%; Vickers 141; Western 
Driefontein*87%; Western Deep Level 
555'/,; West Mines 269; W Holding 
577V,; Wool worth 60; Zambian Copper 
36 Bonds; Brit Trans £63%; Brit Cons 
2V, £22Vi; Treasury 8V, £94*; War 
Loan £33*. The Financial Time s In¬ 
dustrial index 486.0, off 0.7. 


14.25 

Zephyr 

IKK) 

15% 

5% 

5% 

- % 

f 11.10 

Deb Units 

700 

118 

16 

17 

♦ 1 

19.84 

Beguforl x 

TOO 

$19 

19 

19 

♦ )', 

45.07 

BeeuftPt prB 

200 

250 

250 

250 

♦ 50 

. 23.49 







mitt 

Total sales: 

443441. 





Money 


The bank's purchase price of U.S. 
funds In this area Wednesday, accord¬ 
ing to the Royal Bank of Canada, was 
1.1480 for cash, 1.1485 tor travellers 
cheques and 1.1080 for coins. Their 
selling price was 1.1600 for cash and 
1.15^5 for cheques. 

MONTREAL (CP) — U.S. dollar In 
lerms of Canadian funds closed Wed 
nesdav up 1-20 at 51.1534, Tuesday's 
close was 51.1529 Pound sterling was 
down 23-50 at 52.7503. In New York, the 
Canadian dollar was down 1-25 at 
50.8670 and pound sterling was down 

1 2 at 52.3845. 

Nominal selling price of other mon¬ 
ies in Canadian funds: Australia dollar 
1.3375; Austria shllllno .0932; Baha¬ 
mas dollar 1.1560; Barbados dollar 
.5780; Belgium env franc .04110, Ber 
muda dollar 1.1560; Brazil cruzeiro 
.0654; xBulgarla lev 1.3939; China rem 
mlnbi .800; Colombia peso .231; xCze- 
choslovak crown .2300, Denmark 
krone .2)45; E Caribbean dollar .4300, 
France franc .2860; Germany mark 
.6650, Greece drachma .0275, Hong 
Kong dollar .2350; Hungarian forint 
.0368; India rupee .1520; Irish pound 

2 4800; Italy lira .001395. Jamaica do! 
lar .6500; Japan yen .005230; Kuwait 
dinar 4.3300; Mexico peso 0500; Neth 
erland guilder .6060, N.Z. dollar 
1 1400; Norway krone .2395, Portugal 
escudo .0237; xRomanla leu .2572, 
Saudi Arabia rival .3470; Singapore 
dollar .5460; South Africa rand 1.5100; 
Spain pseta .01625, Sweden krona 
.2795; Switzerland franc .7250, Trin- 
Tob dollar .4835; xU.S.S.R ruble 
1.0149; Venezuela bolivar 2.782. (x- 
fixed monthly rate). 


Bonds 

TORONTO (CP) — Prices were 
tower In light trading on the Canadian 
bond market Wednesday The short 
end of the market was down 30 cents. 
Mid-, long-term, provincial and corpo¬ 
rate Issues fell one-half of a point. 
Day-today money was available at 
11 '/, per cent. 


Commodities 

Skw, New Yert (per Mlet.) 

Open High Law Close Chge 

Jul 1605-0 1635.0 1595.0 1603.5 -6.5 

Aug - - - 1605.0 -5.5 

Sep 1615.0 1660.0 1605.0 1620.0 -5 0 
Caapar, New Yert (per Ml lbs.) 

Jul 103.00 104.50 102.45 102.45 -0.85 

Aug - - - 102.85 -0.8S 

Sep 104.90 105.75 103.40 103.70 -0.80 
Lumber, Chicago (per 1488M.) 

Sep 715.00 716 30 209.30 211.30 -3.00 
Nov 216.80 217.90 210.60 213.30 -2.10 
Jan 715.00 216.K) 2)0.00 213.00 -1.80 
Ptyweod, Chicago (par lJ88ta.lt.) 

Sep 205.90 707.00 203.K) 205.90 ♦ MO 

Nov 206.50 206 50 204.00 206 00 ♦ 1.20 

Jan 711.50 712.00 207.50 209.00 unch 
Live came, Otfcapo (per Ml lbs.) 

Aug 72 50 73.25 72.25 73.23 41.25 

Oct 69.70 70.85 69.60 tt.80 41.35 

Dec 70.40 71.50 70.32 71.35 41.20 

Live kept, Chicago (per leaibt.) 

Aug 42.25 4137 42.25 43.15 41.00 

Ocl 40 80 41.67 40.78 41.35 4 .82 

Dec 4390 44.80 43.90 44.60 4 .82 

Perkbetltes, Chicago (per IMIbt.) 

Jut 40 27 41.S5 39.30 41.10 4 .70 

Aug 40.40 41.45 39 H) 40.80 4 .87 

Feb 56.15 58.00 55.47 57.72 41.75 

GeM, CMcape (perez.) 

Jul 63) .00 635.00 628.00 628.00 - 4.5 
Aug 641.00 644.50 630.00 630.00 - 5.5 

Sep 638.25 6S3.50 635.50 636.00 - 

GeM, Winnipeg (peru.) 

W8 ounce contracts 

Open High Law Close Tues. 

Jon - - - 494.00a 696.00b 

Spt 638.00 652.00b 634.40b 615.00a 644,00b 
Dec - - - 65f00a 663 00b 

Livestock 

CALGARY (CP) — Receipts Wed 
nesday at the Calgary public stock- 
yards totalled 583 cattte and calves 
consisting of a light supply of slaugh 
ter steers, heifers and cows with a 
normal run of good condition bologna 
bulls. Trade was moderate to active 
from local and B.C. buyers while bolo¬ 
gna bulls trades to a strong export de 
mand. AI-2 steers sold steady to 50 
cents higher Slaughter heifers re 
gained the 51 lost in Tuesday trade and 
saw sales to 571.50. All grades of 
slaughter cows traded steady Bologna 
bulls tradedsi higher Al-2 steers over 
1,000 lbs. 572.50-575.50^ A3-4 71-73.50. 
Al-2 heifers over 850 lbs. 69.50-71 with 
sales to 71.50; A3-4 6569. Dl-2 cows 
47 50-50; D3-5 4448. Gobd butts 5862 
with sales to 63. Light supplies of short 
keep feeder steers sold steady. Feeder 
heifers traded 51 higher while feeder 
cows remained steady Good feeder 
steers over 800 lbs. 72-77. Good feeder 
hellers over 700 lbs. 67-72.50 Feeder 
COWS47 57.50. 


NEW YORK (AP)— 
Exxon Corp. reclaimed the 
No. 1 position (rom General 
Motors Corp. as Fortune 
magazine's rankings of the 
world's 50 largest indust¬ 
rial companies were re¬ 
leased Wednesday. 

Oil companies held 20 of 
the top 50 positions, includ¬ 
ing three of the first four 
rankings and seven of the 
top 10 ratings which are 
based on 1979 sales. 

The automotive industry 
had 11 companies on the 
list, with the embattled 
Chrysler Corp. plunging 
from No. 14 to 40th place. It 
was one of only two com¬ 
panies among the 50 that 
lost money in 1979. 

It'S MB 
for B.C. 

Forestry giant MacMil¬ 
lan Bloedel Ltd. again led 
B.C.’s top 50 public com¬ 
panies in sales in 1979, ac¬ 
cording to the annual rank¬ 
ings of B.C. Business 
magazine. 

The magazine points out 
that MB had sales of $2.18 
billion compared with sec¬ 
ond-place Canada Develop¬ 
ment Corp., which had a 
$1.96-billion sales figure. 
Others of the top five are 
Kelly Douglas ($1.32 bil¬ 
lion), Cominco ($1.27 bil¬ 
lion), and Westcoast 
Transmission ($1.08 bil¬ 
lion). 

All are in the positions 
they occupied for their 1978 
performance. 

Leading Vancouver Is¬ 
land company was Doman 
Industries Ltd. of Duncan, 
and 24th on the list, two 
down from the previous 
year, with sales of $113 mil¬ 
lion. Two mining com¬ 
panies, Teck Corp. and 
Lorncx, moved ahead of 
Doman during 1979. 


Exxon had sales of $79.1 
billion last year, while Gen¬ 
eral Motors slipped to sec¬ 
ond place with sales of $66.3 
billion. 

The Royal Dutch-Shell 
Group of Companies was 
third, followed by Mobil 
Corp. and the Ford Motor 

Co. 

Mobil rose from fifth 
place, swapping positions 
with Ford. 

Rounding out the top 10 
were The British Petro¬ 
leum Co. Ltd., Texaco Inc., 
Standard Oil Co. of Califor¬ 
nia, Gulf Oil Corp. and In¬ 
ternational Business Ma¬ 
chines Corp. 

In a year of international 
inflation, the 50 largest in¬ 
dustrial companies posted 
a 22 per cent total sales 
increase in 1979, compared 
with 14 per cent in 1978, 
Fortune reported. Com¬ 
bined sales of the top 50 
companies exceeded $1 
trillion in 1979. 

The $9.5 billion in 1979 
sales of the London-based 
B.A.T. Industries, the 
smallest company ranked 
in the magazine’s annual 
list, were $1.9 billion above 
last year’s level for the 
50th-ranked industrial 
company. 

Three of four newcomers 
to the list are American oil 
companies — No. 46 Sun 
Co., 48th-ranked Occiden¬ 
tal Petroleum Corp., and 
No. 49 Phillips Petroleum 
Co. One of the four com¬ 


panies dropped from the 
list, National Iranian Oil, is 
also an oil producer. 

Other dropoffs were 
Procter and Gamble Co., 
ranked 47 last year; Union 
Carbide Corp., which was 


No. 48; and the Saint-Go- 
bain-Pont-a-Movsson, a 
French maker of building 
materials and metal prod¬ 
ucts, rated 50th last year. 

Among automakers, 
Italy's Flat, which was not 


ranked last year, vaulted to 
15th place. France’s Peu- 
geot-Citroen jumped 15 
places to No. 17 with the 
consolidation ol Chrysler’s 
European operations, pur¬ 
chased in December 1978. 


Insurance Person Wanted 

Progressive and long established Victoria gen¬ 
eral insurance agency is looking for an experi¬ 
enced insurance person. Responsibilities in¬ 
volve production, servicing accounts, with 
management future. 

Reply in confidence to: 

BOX NO. 505, VICTORIA PRESS 




OFFSET PRESSMAN 1 

Progressive commercial printing plant in Okanagan 
Valley requires experienced journeyman offset press¬ 
man Must have 4-colour experience and desire to con¬ 
sistently produce high quality work. Excellent working 
conditions Salary commences at $10.38/hour (mini¬ 
mum) with quarterly increments and attractive em¬ 
ployee benefits. 

Submit resume stating qualifications and experience 
(4 colour press samples Would also be helpful I in con¬ 
fidence to: . 

WAYSIDE PRESS LTD. 

Box 446, VBmon, B.C. V1T 8M3 Ph.(604)545-2341 



( MATTHEWS AGENCIES ^ 


MT. TOLMIE 

3430 BONAIR 
OPEN THURSDAY 1:30-400 

Located in a private elevated view position on Mount 
Tolmie, this home has an attractive garden setting on .39 
of an acre in an area of desirable homes. The main floor 
provides a pleasant light living room with fireplace, good 
dining area and modem bright kitchen with access to 
sundeck — all with views to the south — plus 2 
bedrooms and den with fireplace. On the lower ground 
level is a pleasant family room with access to the garden 
patio plus a guest room with ensuite bathroom. Listed at 
$178,000. 

GEOFF JACKSON 

477-1841 592-0135 

I salty Ltd. 


HEADQUARTERS 
IN VICTORIA 


3319 Douglas St. 

(Opp ICBC) 

384-1 161 

O.l 64)05 


On Vancouver 

Island there is a 


quality book 
printing 


656-0171 

ASK FOB ONE OF 
(K it SALE* STAFF TO, 

CA1X ON VOL 

Manning I Vws 



to. a. 

SUary. * < V»l 44 I 


VICTORIA 
PUBLIC 
SAVINGS 



•Three years 
Min. *5MQ 


TERM DEPOSITS 

ASK ABOUT ULTRA SAVINGS — An 
escalating daily rate that rises with your balance. 


Options 
Page 24 


SILVERW00D INDUSTRIES LIMITED ANNOUNCEMENT 



W. I. Barton 


G. R. Carton, Esq. Q.C. 


D. A: Pettit 


Eric F. Findlay, Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer of 
Silverwood Industries Limited, is pleased to announce recent appointments 
at the Corporation's Head Office. 

Mr. W. I. Barton has been appointed a Vice-President. Mr. Barton was 
previously Secretary-Treasurer. G. Ft. Carton, Esq. Q.C., previously 
Vice-President. Legal and Corporate Affairs, has been appointed Secretary 
of the Board, as an addition to his previous responsibilities, with the new 
title Secretary and Vice-President Legal and Corporate Affairs. 

Mr. D. A. Pettit, who was previously Corporate Controller, has been 
appointed Treasurer, reporting to Mr. R. G. Pardy, Vice-President, 
Finance. 


/ 


FLOOR COVERING 


Sales representative required by National 
and distributor of carpet and resilient prod¬ 
ucts. Experience essential but can be either 
wholesale or retail related. Successful candi¬ 
date will be resident in Victoria and be 
responsible for all Vancouver Island ac¬ 
counts. 

Contact: 

R. Regan | 

2471 Simpson Road .Q 

Richmond, B.C. fSJT 

270-1175 


PLANERMAN 

Required for our hemlock sawmill located 
at Tahsis on Vancouver Island’s west 
coast. 

Thq person we seek for this position will have 
had extensive experience as No. 1 Planer- 
man in setting up,'adjusting and making major and 
running repairs to Stetson-Ross MA-12 Planer. 
Tahsis is a completely modern town. It's location 
on Tahsis Inlet is one of the most scenic in British 
Columbia. All modern amenities, including school¬ 
ing up to Grade 12. Good working and living 
conditions. Pay rates and fringe benefits are 

ovrqllpnt 

Apply to: ERICA M. HERBERT 
Employment Officer 
Tahsis Company Ltd. 

1201 West Pender Street 
Vancouver, B.C., V6E 2V4 



WATERYIEW — SIDNEY 


Comfortable home close to water in quiet area 
close to downtown Sidney. Three or four bed¬ 
rooms, ensuite plqjnbing, thermal windows, unique 
design with upstairs livingroom providing water 
views. Large lot with subdivision potential. Listed 
$124,500. Offers considered. 

BILL MOSHER 

656-5584 656-7117 

BLOCK BROS. REALTY LTD. 


E 3 



PANORAMIC VIEWS 


Quality construction with many extras in this 
tastefully designed large family home. Five bed¬ 
rooms, three bathrooms, two fireplaces, thermal 
windows, double driveway. Large assumable 
mortgage at 10.25%. Price reduced to $157,500. 
All reasonable offers considered. ML 46828. 

65 6-5584 BILL MOSHER 656-7117 

BLOCK BROS. 

||«ti REALTY LTD. 



GORDON HEAD WATERVIEW 

$ 139 , 500.00 
FAMILY HOME 


hood on a cut-dawc 
purchaaad and hama 

‘ i. CM 


way to de aert ba thw Una family home Fiva 
o twapiaco*. a targe family room, 
condrtfon In addition there is a large lot 
d whh trust iraas. Bowers and tfirubt with a 
your uaa The large, wrap-around sondaefc 
am ol Homo Straits In a great neighbour- 
th*k wM m* vary quickly Vendor has 
Is priced to seM Available lor early 



JOHN F. COLWELL 
( 592 - 0828 ) 


SIDNEY WATERFRONT 



" 3RD AND BAKER STREET 
JUST THREE LEFT 
CALL NOW FOR A 
PRIVATE VIEWING 

Ml three uni* left. eh untH Km meuit* new, at the bow Ur eit. 
Old hotour Bail dakeee old do-mown Sfdeev ot wHMn 
M*hW dMoic* M htw (traaldcM. ta* Ml tolhroonu Old roigt 
tran I4M to 20], ta ft end ell hot* leper ete entreatn Trod, In 
your grew* home en ■ wont, lownhouw condominium 



See you on Saturday. 

|. f. COtWfll 

s«-c 


mik 













































































DAYS) 

ONLY! 


Thurs. 
July 24 
Sun. 
Aug. 2 




f USEOUR 
' REVOLVING 
CHARGE PLAN! 


14 THE COLONIST, Thursday July 24, 19H0 


CUSTOM 
NEON " 
SIGNAGE 


"PERFORMANCE 

For more Information 


WHEN YOU 
WANT IT!” 


tnatr sign division 

1810 VERLING 652-3937 


bacon . 99 


MAPLE LEAF 

COOKED 

HAM 


175j 


WESTERN FAMILY ^ |gjh 

MARGARINE £ 1" 


COFFEE '£ 3 29 


TETLEY 


TEA 

BAGS 


TULIP 


LUNCHEON 

MEAT 


12-oz. 

tin 


KRAFT 


CHEEZ 

WHIZ 


500 g 


LIBBY 


TOMATO 

JUICE 


48-oz. 

tin 


SUN GOLD ORANGE 

FLAVOUR 

CRYSTALS 


4 

3-oz. 

Pfcg- 


MAZOLA 

CORN 

OIL 


COLONIAL ASSORTED 

CREAMED 
BISCUITS 


16 -oz. 

Rfcg- 


BURNS 


STEW 


24-oz. 

Tin 


AUSTRAL 


FRUIT 

COCKTAIL 


14-oz. 

tin 


McCAIN FANCY 


VEGETABLES a 79 


BUSINESS 


Dividends 

Bow Valley Industries Ltd., 7 per 
cent pfd. B, $1.09, Auo- IS, record July 
31. 

Canadian Occidental Petroleum 
Ltd., 7.5cents, Oct. 1, record Sept. 5. 

Chum Ltd., 24 cents, Class B. six 
cents;, botti Sept. 1, record Aug. IS. 

Cities Service Co., 40 cents (U.S.), 
Sept. 2, record Aug. 4. 

Pacific Northern Gas Ltd., 25 cents. 
Sept. 12, record Aug. 29. 

Tordom Corp., $2,375 pfd., 59.375 
cents, Sept. 1, record Aug. 1. 

United Corp. Ltd., 22.5 cents, 1st 
pfd. A, 38 cents, $1.50 2nd. pfd. 1959, 38 
cents, $1.50 pfd. 1963, 38 cents; all 
payable Aug. 15, record July 31. 


Charges shrink U.S. accounts 


WASHINGTON (AP) — 
Banks and other financial 
institutions in the United 
States are taking in mil¬ 
lions of dollars a year by 
using service charges to 
raid the dormant accounts 
of missing or forgetful cus- 


FAST 


VOLVO 


SERVICE 


OXFORD 

FOODS 

271 COOK STREET 


WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO UNIT QUARTITIES 
Prices Effective Wet, July 23 te SaL, July 26 


► Factory trained Technicians 
► GENUINE VOLVO PARTS 


EDWARD 

motors ltd. 


3319 DOUGLAS • 384-1161 
Across From ICBC 

!.■■■■■■■■« 


tomers, witnesses told a 
congressional subcommit¬ 
tee Wednesday. 

“In what is probably one 
of the worst consumer rip- 
offs now taking place, last 
year alone banks, savings 
and loans and trust com¬ 
panies simply took as their 
own income more than 640 
million that is actually the 
property of their missing or 
forgetful customers," .said 
David J. Epstein, special 
counsel to an organization 
of 35 state governments. 

In addition, the witnesses 
told the House of Repre¬ 
sentatives subcommittee, 
the financial institutions 
usually quit paying interest 
on dormant accounts — 


those in .which no deposits 
or withdrawals are made 
during a specified period. 

The amounts taken in 
service charges are usually 
small — usually $i to $3 per 
month — but they can wipe 
out an account over several 
years, the witnesses said. 

An official of the Ameri¬ 
can Bankers Association 
said the material presented 
to the subcommittee basic¬ 
ally “was collected from a 
few people in a handful of 
states." 

But the official, who de¬ 
clined to be identified, said 
the association is forming a 
study group to look into the 
issue of unclaimed prop¬ 
erty, which he said is com¬ 


plicated by “a host of state 
laws." 

Jim Lord, Minnesota 
state treasurer, said his in¬ 
vestigators found that one 
large savings and loan in¬ 
stitution had contracted 
with a Minnesota school 
district to encourage chil¬ 
dren to save. 

The savings and loan in¬ 
stitution “had taken almost 
$H0,000 from schoolchil¬ 
dren’s savings accounts.” 


Earnings 

Alco Ltd. tor year ended March 31: 
1980, $22,005,000. $2 20 a share; 1979, 
$18,226,000, $2.64 a share. 

Canada Packers Inc, tor 13 weeks 
ended June 28 1980, $6,957. $1.16 a 
share; 1979. $6,893, $1.15 a share. 


“It wiped out an estimat¬ 
ed 10,000 of these Recounts 
through service charges," 
said Lord. "Neither the 
children, nor their parents, 
were ever notified they 
were going to do this.” 

Eppsteln, counsel to the 
National Association of 
Unclaimed Property Ad- 
ministratorsd, said new 
audit information showed 
that banks in the United 
States are holding $443 mil¬ 
lion belonging to missing or 
forgetful depositors. 

He said most banks de¬ 
clare an account dormant 
and start assessing service 
charges after six months to 
two years of inactivity. 




on one of the best ^ 


laundry pairs 
money can buy! 

HEAVY DUTY... 

SPEED QUEEN — 

FEATURING: 

The exclusive SPEED QUEEN y 
stainless steel wash tub and 
dryer drum with lifetime war- 


NABOB jm m 

INSTANT 4 1 

PUDDING *1 

00 

DR. BALLARD A 

DOG 2 QQC 

FOOD bUU 

COAST 

BAR 3 bar, 1 

SOAP fi | 

49 

delsev m 

TOILET 4 1 
TISSUE 1 

19 

SUNKIST 

ORANGES S 8! 

9' 

LOCAL HOTHOUSE Ho 1 ■■ 

TOMATOES . 59* 


m 


WASHER: 


DRYER: 


* Two speed washer 

* Five wash/rinse temperatures 

* Three wash cycle selections 

* Four agetate spin/speed selections 

* Fabric softener dispenser 

* Stainless steel tu* 

ALMOND $10 EXTRA 


M...!«' 

u SPEED QUEEN 
WARRANTY 

Two year replacement war¬ 
ranty on all parts. Ten year 
replacement warranty on 
transmission. Lifetime re¬ 
placement warranty on 
stainless steel wash tub and 
dryer drum. 


* Five fabric selections 

* Three automatic drying cycles 

* Two timed drying cycles 


* End of cycle signal tone 

* Interior light 

* Stainless steel drum 


ALMOND $10 EXTRA 


AVAILABLE IN WHITE & ALMOND 




"I 


V 




























































































- -yv 


BUSINESS 


THE COLONIST, Thursday July 24, 1980 15 


B.C. lumbermen dispute housing jump 


VANCOUVER (CP) — 
Forest industry officials 
are still pessimistic about 
the future of the B.C. lum¬ 
ber trade, despite a 30.4- 
per-cent increase in U.S. 
housing starts announced 
by the U.S. commerce de¬ 
partment last week. 

“I wonder how and where 
they came up with that fig¬ 
ure so quickly," said Mike 
Lepage of Barnett Lumber. 
He said the reported May- 
to-June increase had some 
effect on the industry "but 
it will not sustain itself be¬ 
cause the (U.S.) market 
simply isn't there.” 

Ray Lcclair, U.S. lumber 
trader for Northwood 
Mills, said in a telephone 
interview from Toronto 
that the 30-per-cent figure 
sounds “pretty hefty.” 

“When you look at the 
actual number of starts for 
June and its effect on the 
B.C. lumber industry, the 
figure becomes watered 
down quite a bit," Leclair 
said. 

The U.S. accounts for 55 
to 65 per cent of B.C. saw¬ 
mill sales and about 80 per 
cent of Interior lumber 
sales. 

Prices for premium lum¬ 
ber species remain lower 
than prices a year ago and 
housing starts still are 
down from rates last June. 

Doug Morter, general 
manager of Mountain Pine, 
and Gordon Shaw of West 
Fraser Mills both said the 


VIA packs 
them in 

TORONTO (CP) —Cana¬ 
dians arc turning to train 
travel in such high num¬ 
bers that VIA Rail Canada 
cannot handle demand at 
peak periods, the crown 
corporation said Wednes¬ 
day. 

Train travel this month is 
up more than 30 per cent 
from last year because 
more Canadians are vaca¬ 
tioning within the country 
and are looking to allerna- 
tives to car travel with its 
high gasoline costs, the 
corporation said in a state¬ 
ment. 

A spokesman said: "We 
are receiving upwards of 
1,000 calls per hour at our 
Toronto office during the 
busiest times of the day. 
We’re swamped." 

VIA Rail said that de¬ 
spite its use of a compu¬ 
terized reservation and 
call-directing system, 
some callers are not re¬ 
ceiving an answer and the 
problem is being investi¬ 
gated by Bell Canada. 

Earnings 

Canadian Utilities Ltd., tor six 

. months ended June 30 1980. $29,606, 
000. SI.41 a Share. 1979. $28,839,000. 
$1 $4 a share 

Comoro Ltd-, tor nine months ended 
Mav 31 1980, $1,073,200. $166 a share 
19/9, $1,317.400. $2 03 a share 

Crown Zellerbach Canada Ltd., tor 
si* months ended June 30 1980. $19,7 
million. $2.38 a share; 1979, $26 7 mil 
lion. $3 2Sa share 

Economic Investment Trust Ltd., tor 
six months ended June 1980, $897,239. 
.76 cents a share 1979, $741,098. 61 
cents a share 

Interprovincial Steel and Pipe Corp. 
Ltd., tor nine months ended Mav 31 
1980. $18.92.285. $3.0S a share. 1979, 
$9,180,948.$! 80 a share 

Kaiser Resources Ltd., tor six 
months ended June 30; 1980, $246.5 
million. $11 51 a share. 1979. $31 0 mil 
lion. $1.15a share 


I960 5-DOOR 
HATCHBACK 


4 

*1 



*6278 ■ 



3200 DOUGLAS ST. 
382-2313 . 73 ! 


PACIFIC 

SEAFOODS 

(1977) LTD. 

SMOKED 
ALASKA 
BLACK COD 

Two small fiHets to ssch 
vacuum packed pouch. 
Individually frozen 
10 lbs per carton 

$O00 

mm fmA 

phone orders 

ONLY PLEASE 

388-7555 

Momter tfvoueh 1 ,i«*r 

Treasure 

Island 


announced increase had a 
temporary effect on busi¬ 
ness but they questioned 
the accuracy of the 30-per¬ 
cent figure. 

Morter said strikes at the 
Abitibi-Price mills in east¬ 


ern Canada had a greater 
effect on B.C. lumber sales 
to the U.S. than reported 
U.S. housing increases. 

West Fraser is closing its 
Quesnel mill this week. 

Al Renton of Canadian 


Forest Products said pro 
duction is up but remains 25 
to 35 per cent lower than the 
same time last year. 

He said improved sales 
will continue for the sum¬ 
mer but may drop during 


the fall, when the indus¬ 
try’s slow period begins. 

“Nevertheless, I think 
that it (increased starts) is 
an indication that the U.S. 
housing industry is improv¬ 
ing,” he said. 


K. P. Clark, of B.C. 
Forest Products said the 
"psychological benefit" of 
the announcement coupled 
with lower interest rates 
indicates a turnaround in 
the U.S. building industry. 


Suncor sells excess coke 

FORT MCMURRAY (CP) — Suncor Inc. has sold 
20,000 tonnes of excess coke to the International Mineral 
and Chemical Corp. of New York. Suncor says the coke 
will be sent from Fort McMurray to Vancouver by rail, 
then shipped loan unnamed Japanese company. It marks 
the first time Suncor has sold Us excess coke. The 
Japanese company will blend the petroleum cuke with 
coal on a test basis to use in the production of cement. 
If the tests prove favorable, the company may buy a 
significant amount of Suncor coke. 


Bucket seats. 1.7 litre. ■ 
4-speed, rear wiper. Z 
Stock No. 80258. 

SALE 
PRICE 
ONLY 


INTRODUONG 





Inc dentalI 

CARE PLAN OF 


BRITISH COLUMBIA. 


On January 1st, 1981, 

British Columbia 
will introduce the 
most comprehensive 
public dental care 
program in Canada. 

Designed to bring 
basic dental services 
to those who need it 
most, and can afford 
it least, the plan will 
provide coverage for 
over 900,000 British 
Columbians. It'll cost $85 
million the first year, but 
that’s a practical investment 
in dental health care for the 
people of this province, particu¬ 
larly for the more than 400,000 
children who wall be covered. 

WHO IS ELIGIBLE 

■ Dejjendent children 14 years of 
age and under. 

■ All old-age pensioners. 

■ Those whose Medical Services 
Plan premiums are paid bv the 
Ministry of Human Resources, 
and their dependents. 

■ Those who receive premium 
assistance from the Medical 
Services Plan, and their 
dependents. 

Tliere are no premiums to 

pay. You arc Automatically 
covered if you are in one of the 
alxjve groups and an* presently 



registered under the Medical 
Services Plan. If you're not 
registered, you should write to 
Dental Care Plan of B.C., P.O. 

Box 1500, Victoria, B.C. 

V8W 3G8. 

BENEFITS 

Our new Dental Care Plan wall 
pay up to $700 a year per person 
for basic dental services available 
from general practice dentists, 
and for dentures. These seivices 
include check-ups, X-rays, 
cleaning, fluoride treatment for 
children, fillings, extractions, root 
canals, gum and bone treatment, 
and denture repairs. Full 
dentures provided by a dentist or 
licenced dental mechanic will be 
covered, as well as pailial 
dentures provided by a dentist. 
Tlw plan will abut pay UX)% of a 
otuTi earh • pin •entii r care 
fku kay for ehiblren Niears of 
ay and under. 


OUT-OF¬ 
PROVINCE 
COVERAGE 

If you are covered 
bv the Plan, vou 
will lx* entitled to 
dental benefits in 
an emergency 
anywhere outside 
British Columbia. 

You will be reimbursed for 
the amount the Plan would 
have paid if the treatment had 
been given in British Columbia. 
More detailed information on 
the Denfal Care Plan will be 
published prior to the intro¬ 
duction in Jan nan', 1981. 

British Columbia’s health care 
system is among the finest in the 
world . . . the addition of this 
unique dental insurance plan 
represents a major step in im¬ 
proving that system even further. 


THE DENTAL 
CARE PLAN OF 
BRITISH COLUMBIA. 


Province of Ministry of 
British Columbia Health 


2S*/ Hon. K Rafe Mair. Minister. 












































SPORTS 

Page 16/Thursday, July 24, 1980 



Colonist. 


Ranjit, fans, Shamrocks 
receive Dillon Night gifts 


By REG REYNOLDS 
Cetonist staff 

Victoria Shamrocks pre¬ 
sented Ranjit Dillon with a 
several real nice gifts Wed¬ 


nesday night but they also 
gave themselves and their 
fans one big win. 

A crowd of about 1,000 
turned out to see Dillon 


honored with a special 
night and they were treated 
to the finest performance 
by the Rocks this season. 

The Irish outran, outhus- 


Speedy shortstop 
earns club a split 


By STAN COOPER 

CoMnlsI Half 

It may be a bit late to 
nickname Mike Madril the 
Roadrunner, even though 
the Phoenix shortstop put 
on a dazzling display of 
baserunning Wednesday 
night at Royal Athletic 
Park. 

Madril, who also made 
some fine defensive plays 
in the doubleheader, scored 
both runs for his club in the 
second game to help the 
Southern Truck Raiders 
score a 2-1 victory over 
Victoria Budgets and earn 
a split in a four-game exhi¬ 
bition men's fastball se¬ 
ries. 

Budgets, now 17-7 in 
Super Series play against 
top visiting teams, cruised 
to a 3-0 win in the opener 


but were down by a run 
shortly after the second 
game began. 

Madril opened the game 
by stretching a single into a 
two-base hit, stole third 
and scored when catcher 
Bob Burrows’ pickoff at¬ 
tempt sailed Into left field. 

The speedy shortstop sin¬ 
gled and reached third in 
the third inning and scored 
what proved to be the win¬ 
ning run in the fifth. 

Madril doubled, took 
third on an error by third- 
baseman Norm Goudie and 
scored when a double-steal 
attempt was successful. 

Budgets scored their run 
in the bottom of the fourth, 
Bob Wilson doubling and 
taking third when Goudie’s 
grounder was misplayed. 
Wilson scored on a Randy 
Benn single. 


Blues’ rally wrecked 


BELLINGHAM — Bell¬ 
ingham Mariners put even 
more daylight between 
themselves and the rest of 
the Northwest League's 

’Runners 

triumph 

COQUITLAM (CP) — 
Richmond Roadrunners 
edged Coquitlam Junior 
Adanacs Wednesday night 
18-16 in Western Canada 
Junior Lacrosse League 
action. 

Bob Jude scored four 
goals for Coquitlam while 
Gordie Dean scored three. 

Brent Greig scored three 
goals for Richmond. 


Northern Division Wednes¬ 
day night, nipping Victoria 
Blues 6-5 before 425 base¬ 
ball fans. 

Paul Kirsch’s two-run 
double keyed a three-run 
eighth inning as Victoria 
battled back from a 5-2 
deficit to tie. But Mari¬ 
ners, now eight and one- 
half games ahead of the 
Blues, came back with the 
winning run in their half of 
the inning. 

Rob Butler took the loss, 
his first, in relief of starter 
Paul Vaulman and Tony 
Nigro. 

Victoria 100 001 030- S 0 1 

Bellingham 100 0M oil— « 10 1 

Vaulman, Nigro (5), Butler (0-1) (6) 
and Hyman. Young. Peterson (6) and 
Firova. 


Jim Sharp scattered six 
hits for the victory while 
Dave Wilson, who struck 
out 11, was tagged with the 

loss. 

Budgets struck early in 
the first game, scoring a 
run in the first inning and 
two more in the third to 
back the six-hit pitching of 
national-team member 
Rob Guenter, now 1(H) for 
Victoria this season. 

Burrows tripled home 
Carl Walker in the first 
inning and, after Reg Un¬ 
derwood had singled in the 
third inning, had a line shot 
hobbled for a two-base 
error. That put runners on 
second and third base and 
Dennis Eckert promptly 
singled them home. 

Phoenix had a sixth-in¬ 
ning rally snuffed out 
when, with a runner at sec¬ 
ond base, second-baseman 
Walker made a spectacular 
leaping grab to take a sure 
hit away from pinch-hitter 
Mark Rice. Jerry Under¬ 
wood followed with a two- 
out single to put runners at 
first and third but Guenter 
struck out Mark Strausser 
to end the inning and fol¬ 
lowed with three straight 
strikeouts to finish the 
game. 

Guenter struck out nine 
and didn’t walk a batter 
while opposing pitcher 
Brent Stevenson was 
touched for six hits, struck 
out three and allowed three 
bases on balls. 


PIIO«Ml ocooooo — til 

BUDGETS m«B0l-Iil 

Brent Stevenson and Butch Cham¬ 
bers; Rob Guenter 1(H) and Bob Bur 
rows. 

Phoenix 1M 010 0-2 4 3 

BUDGETS 000 010 0-14 4 

Jim Sharp and Jerry Underwood. 
Dave Wilson 9-7 and Burrows. 


’Caps and Forest tie 


Vancouver Whitecaps 
and Nottingham Forest 
played to a 1-1 draw in an 
international soccer exhi¬ 
bition Wednesday night 
that was notable for its 
missed opportunities. 

Scoring was confined to 
the first half and both 
teams failed to capitalize 
on second-half chances be¬ 


fore appearing to be willing 
to settle for the tie. 

The match against the 
defending North American 
Soccer League champions 
was the first in a five-game 
exhibition swing of North 
and South America,for 
Forest, which will end July 
31 in Toronto against the 
Blizzard. 


Baseball 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 
East 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 
East 



W 

L 

Pci GBL 


w 

L 

Pet. GBL 

Pittsburgh 

52 

4) 

.559 

— 

New York 

60 

33 

.645 

— 

Montreal 

50 

41 

549 

1 

Milwaukee 

52 

42 

553 

8V, 

Philadelphia 

47 

44 

.516 

4 

Detroit 

49 

39 

.557 

8V, 

New York 

45 

48 

484 

7 

Baltimore 

51 

42 

548 

9 

St. Louis 

43 

51 

.457 

9'j 

Boston 

47 

45 

.511 

12V, 

Chicago 

38 

52 

422 

12V, 

•Cleveland 

42 

47 

.472 

16 


West 




Toronto 

41 

50 

.451 

18 

Houston 

S3 

41 

564 

— 


West 




Los Angeles 

S) 

44 

.537 

2 V, 

KansasCitv 

57 

37 

.606 

— 

Cincinnati 

50 

45 

526 

3'/, 

Texas 

46 

47 

.495 

10 1 ; 

San Francisco 

47 

48 

.495 

tv* 

Oakland 

45 

51 

.469 

13 

Atlanta 

44 

49 

.473 

8V, 

Minnesota 

43 

51 

.457 

14V, 

San Dt ego 

39 

55 

.415 

14 

Chicago 

42 

51 

.452 

13 






•Seattle 

38 

54 

.413 

17 Vi 

Las Angeles 

001 000 003— 3 

70 

California 

34 

58 

.370 

22 

St. Louis 

230 200 00x— 7 12 0 






Welch (9-5), Beckwith (4), Forster 

• Net including late game 




(7) and Yeager, Martinez (3-3). Often 
(9), Littlefield (9) and Simmons. 


man* 


•io too tJi— s io i 

Atlanta M2 M0 Ml- 4 M 1 

Lea. Norman (3). Bahnsen (6). Sosa 
(71. Fryman (8). Gullicfcson (1-3) (9) 
and Carter, Alexander, Camp (3-3) (!) 
and Benedict HR Mil — Valentine 

(9). 

San Francisco M4 3M 410-14 21 I 
Chicago 0M Ml Ml- 4 12 0 

Riptev 144). Minton (7) and Little- 
lohn. Capilla (2-3). Hernandez (4). 
McGlofhen (7). Tidrow (0) and Black 
well. HRs: $F - Clark (19). Pettmi 
(II. 

cieSnST** OMMim- 7 }| 

Espinosa (12). Brusstar (7). Sau 
ci«r (0) and Boone. Berenyl (2-0). 
><ume (0) and Nolan HR Pha — 
S'ltrmdf (24) 

New York 009 Ml MS- 4 9 2 

Hawslaa IMOMOOS- 2 71 

I ekone Reardon (VS) (7). Allen (9) 
and Stearns RuM*. Anduiar (41. 
O Smith (4). LeCorte 44-1) (0) and 
PUMliS 

PrfftMirM Ml M0 MO- t 9 I 

Van (Napa MOMORta- I 70 

RNudL-n komb (V4> (7| and OR 
**r f taperv 40 7) iOi and fanner 


sport 

lie If* Me Zl,U 


- 2 4 1 
-4 93 

Kucek (2-3). Moore (4). Buskev (4). 
McLaughlin (4). Barlow (7) and Whitt. 
McCatty (8-9), Lacev (7) and Essian 
HR Oak —Armas (22) 

Milwaukee 0M OM 004— 0 4 2 

NewYark OM 124 01a— 4 11 

Haas (10-9). McClure (I) and 
B Martinez. C Moore (I); Guidry <11- 
6) and Car one. 


M- 2 10 

• City IN 141 OOP— 9 IS 0 
Baumoarten (2-7). Kravec (2). Hoyt 
(S). Hoffman (4) and Kimm, Gura 
(13-4), Martin (0) and Porter HRs KC 
— Washington (S), Aikans (11), Brett 
<M) 

Ml MOMS— S 12 

•II Ml S4a—12 110 
Medtcti j Johnson (B-l) (4). Hough 
(7). Lyle (•) and Sumtwrg. 6 Stanley. 
Drapo (4-4) (S) and Fisk HRs Tex - 
Rivers (3). Putnam (7), Bos - Perez 
(IS) 

BaNwnare Ml M0 IIP- 1 12 4 

M.—l«l M0 Ml Ml— 7 112 

McGrapor (MS). Stewart (7). Mar 
fnei It) and Graham' Arroyo (2 3). 

Mill 


M0 Mi MS— 7 l| I 
Ml M0 IM- 4 111 
Pair * taper (Bit (S) and Parr.* 
inMadK Ma t dapur tii. Matelar 47#. 
Claar 4*71 10) and DMuRwar CMBwrr. 
to mr» (jt» r«» id). Cal - 


John McGovern gave the 
two-time European Cup 
champions an early 1-0 
edge before 28,710 fans at 
Empire Stadium, almost 1,- 
000 more than the turnout 
for Vancouver's 5-0 victory 
over Manchester City ear¬ 
lier this year. I 
The Whitecaps drew 
even when striker Trevor 
Whymark headed in a free 
kick in the final minute of 
the opening half. 

McGovern opened the 
scoring at 15 minutes — 
just after he had missed a 
gilt-edged opportunity. 

The Nottingham captain 
accepted an outswinging 
cross from John Robertson 
from deep in the comer to 
the right of goalkeeper 
Bruce Grobbelaar and 
hammered it to the back of 
the net. 

Grobbelaar was caught 
out of position as he tried to 
catch up with Robertson's 
sharply-curving ball and 
eventually stumbled to the 
artificial turf. 

The opportunity came 
moments after McGovern 
was sent in alone on White- 
cap defender John Craven. 
Craven met him at the 18- 
yard-line and Grobbelaar 
came off his line to chal¬ 
lenge for the ball, which 
McGovern casually direct¬ 
ed toward the goal. 

Midfielder Roger Ken¬ 
yon. who falls back when 
sweeper Rudi Krol pushes 
forward, got back just in 
time to clear the ball off the 
line 

Whymark. who has had 
good fortune in games 
against English sides this 
year and who has said he 
wants to return to First 
Division play, equalized 
with only If seconds re- 
maining in the half 
North American League 
scores Wednesday 
LasaasmtiMaumsM i 
* wiLsvavae. jSMwLsaianas 
t m; —■ s w um mai.. 1 

WWIlalwl ' 

D*R** )OMbM8 

UstaasTUMut i ISO) 


tied and outmuscled the 
newly-crowned world 
champions and received a 
superb goaltending perfor- 
mance from Larry 
Smeltzer as they posted a 
12-5 victory at Memorial. 
Arena. 

The win gives Victoria a 
tie for first place with Co¬ 
quitlam and both teams 
have two games remain¬ 
ing. If the teams should 
finished tied, Victoria 
would get first place for 
having a better goals-for- 
and-against record in 
games involving the two 
clubs. The teams split their 
six games this season but 
Coquitlam held only a two- 
goal edge going into Wed¬ 
nesday's contest. 

All that spoiled the game 
was an incredible no-class 
move by Dave Cochrane of 
Coquitlam. There were 
only seconds left in the 
game when Cochrane 
slashed Kevin Alexander, 
compounded that by cross¬ 
checking Alexander to the 
floor and then stepped on 
the scoring ace’s back on 
the way to the penalty box. 

Cochrane was give a 
match penalty for the 
move. That means an auto 
matic suspension until 
commissioner Wally Don¬ 
aldson reviews the matter. 

The game was a rugged 
affair in the first two 
periods and featured one of 
the few helmets-off, closed 
fist yd punchups of the sea¬ 
son at the Atena. Paul Mi¬ 
chael decisioned Gord 
Quilty and both were given 
minors, majors and mis¬ 
conducts. 

The Shamrock one-two 
punch of Alexander and 
Jim Lynch was outstanding 
and only a rule that insists 
on the visiting team getting 
one star kept Lynch, who 
had two goals and four as¬ 
sists, from earning one of 
the honors. Smeltzer was 
first star, Alexander with 
four goals, all of them spec¬ 
tacular, was second star 
and beleagured Coquitlam 
goaltender Greg Thomas 
was third star. 

Smeltzer wound up with 
50 saves and two of the 
goals he allowed were after 
he had left the net for 
an extra-attacker in a new 
penalty-killing format that 
coach Joe McCrea is ex¬ 
perimenting with. 

Victoria led 3-2 after one 
period and 8-4 after two. 

“It’s the best we’ve 
played this season,” said 
McCrea. 

* “Our defence was better, 
we were pressing them 


The Original Knight 

Ksolunar tables 

Y^When To Fish^V 
Hun, 


around the net and intimi- 
dating them,’’ said 
Smeltzer. 

Dillon, who played 14 full 
seasons and parts of three 
others for the Shamrocks 
before retiring at the end of 
last season, was honored in 
a special ceremony be¬ 
tween the second and third 
periods. 

Besides receiving some 
excellent gifts, he was pre¬ 
sented with his No. 5 sweat¬ 
er and was told it was being 
officially retired. 

"I thought winning the 
Mann Cup last year would 
be the biggest thrill of my 
career but this is a bigger 
one," said an emotion 
choked Dillon as he re¬ 
ceived a standing ovation 
from the crowd. 

Tcj Labh scored two 
goals for Victoria and Jim 
Boyd, Chris Hall, Scott 
Browning and Paul Mi¬ 
chael scored once each. 

All five Coquitlam goals 
were singles. 

The Adanacs were with¬ 
out scoring ace Dan Wilson 
and checking specialist 
Frank Nielsen because of 
work commitments. Wil¬ 
son has joined the fire de¬ 
partment and because he 
will be on work probation 
for six months may not be 
able to play the rest of the 
season. 

♦ * * . 

G W L T F A Pti 

Victoria 22 13 0 0 252 232 26 

Coquitlam 22 13 0 0 252 247 26 

New Weal 22 II II 0 200 272 22 

Nanaimo 20 e 12 0 252 207 16 

Vancouver 20 6 12 0 249 2S2 16 

Next game: Tonight —Vancouver at 
New Westminster. 



FORMER SHAMROCK ACE Ranjit 
Dillon accepts his old No. 5 sweater, 
which is being retired by the club, 
from team captain Larry Bell dur¬ 
ing presentation ceremonies Wed- 


Colonist photo by Alex Berta 

nesday night at Memorial Arena. 
The Shamrocks and fans honored 
Dillon who was a standout per¬ 
former for the club from 1966 
through last season. 


Rider kicker up to third 


According to the Solunar Tatoles cal¬ 
culated for this area, the best times 
for hunting and fishing for the next 
48 hours will be as follows (times 
shown are Pacific Dailight Saving 
Time): 

Minor Major Minor Major 
A.M. P.M. 

TODAY 

2:25 9:00 2:55 9:25 

TOMORROW 
3:10 9:50 3:40 10:20 

Minor periods, shorter duration, 
light type 

Malor periods, lasting V/t to 2 hours, 
are shown in bold 


Coton lit win services 

Gerry Organ kicked a 40- 
yard field goal with less 
than two minutes remain¬ 
ing to secure a 20-16 victory 
for Ottawa Rough Riders 
over Toronto Argonauts 
Wednesday night and es¬ 
tablish himself as the third 
all-time scorer in the Cana¬ 
dian Football League. 

Organ, with 974 career 
points, moved ahead of for¬ 
mer all-star Tommy Joe 
Coffey (971) but still trails 
Dave Cutler of Edmonton 
Eskimos (1,482) and re¬ 
tired Larry Robinson for¬ 
merly of Calgary Stam- 
peders, who finished a 14- 
ycar career with 1,030 
points. 

In Calgary, meanwhile, 
the Stampeders outdis¬ 
tanced Saskatchewan 
Roughriders 40-24 in the 
only Western Conference 
game. 

Canadian fullback Jim 
Reid, on a two-yard run, 
and split-end Martin Cox on 
a 45-yard pass play from 
quarterback Condredge 
Holloway accounted for Ot¬ 
tawa touchdowns, both of 
which were converted by 
Organ. 

Toronto quarterback 
♦ ¥ ¥ 

Eastern Conference 

G W L T F A P 
Ottawa 3 2 1 0 69 77 4 

Toronto 3 2 1 0 54 48 4 

Hamilton 2 1 1 0 55 40 2 

Montreal 3 1 2 0 36 51 2 

Western Conference 
B.C. LIONS 2 2 0 0 65 30 4 

Edmonton 2 2 0 0 57 19 4 

Calgary 3 2 1 0 79 58 4 

Winnipeg 3 0 3 36 82 0 

Saskatchewan 3 0 3 0 54 100 0 
Next games: Tuesday — Toronto at 
Ottawa, Calgary at Winnipeg 


Mark Jackson and running 
back Terry Metcalf scored 
the Toronto majors before 
a crowd of 40,112. 

At McMahon Stadium, 
James Sykes ran for 19-1 
yards and scored three 
touchdowns to lead the 
Stampeders, whose record 
goes to two wins and a 
* * ¥ 

OTTAWA?!), TORONTO 16 
First Quarter 

Oft —TO Neid2run (Organconvert) 
2:25 

Tor—Single Andrusyshyn 5011:47 
Second Quarter 
Oft —FG Organ 34 2:56 
Tor — TO Jackson 11 run (Andrusv- 
Shyn convert) 6:49 
Tor — TO Metcalf 39 pass from 
Jackson (Andrusyshynconvert) 11:24 
Ott — TO Cox 45 pass from Holloway 
(Organ convert) 12:41 

Third Quarter 
No scoring. 

Fourth Quarter 

Tor — Single Andrusyshyn 35 2:07 
Ott —FG Organ 40)3:09 


loss, behind unbeaten B.C. 
Lions and Edmonton Eski¬ 
mos. Each are 2-0. 

All three of Sykes’ touch¬ 
downs came on runs, one 
from the two-yard line, one 
from the one and another 
on a draw play that went 75 
yards. Willie Burden ran in 
another from the 16 and 
Leo Lewis picked up six- 
points on a 62-yard reverse. 
Calgary kicker J. T. Hay 
had a 12-yard field goal and 
converted all five touch¬ 
downs. Calgary also got 


two points on a safety 
touch. 

Saskatchewan’s Jim 
Washington scored two 
touchdowns, one on a nine- 
yard pass from rookie 
quarterback Tom Rozantz, 
and the other on a one-yard 
run. 

Gerry Fellncr got the 
other Roughrider touch¬ 
down on a five-yard throw. 
Bob Macoritti collected 
three points on a field goal 
from the 15 and added three 
converts. 


Ottawa 

Toronto 

Attendance — 40,112. 


7 10 0 3-20 
1 14 0 1—16 


Cathcart, mates 
romp to victory 


YARDSTICKS 


First downs 
Yards rushing 
Yard passing 
Net offence 
Passes made-tried 
interceptions 
Puntsaverage 
Fumbles-lost 
Penalties-yards 


Today's menu 

HARNESS RACING 

5:39 p.m. — Ten-race program, Sandown Race¬ 
way. g 

BASEBALL 

3 and 6 p.m. — Coatimutioii of B.C. Senior Babe 
Ruth championships, Lambrick Park. 

6:39 p.m. — Cosmopolitan Senior League: Lum- 
berworld vs. Warehouse, Lambrick Park. 

AUTO RACING 

9 p.m. — Gates open for Speedwcek Northwest 
open super-storks races. Time trials at 7 and racing 
at 8, Western Speedway. 

SOFTBALL 

M9 p.m. — Stuffy McGinnis Men’s Leagae: 
Athletics vs. Tally Be, Central Park. 

U9 p.m. — H e y w ted Men’s Leagae: Mean vs. 
Bernes. Hrywoed A venae Park. 

9:19 p.m. - Ma cd onald Men’s Leagne: Caast 
Projec ts vs. Rebels; Trafalgar Legtea vs. Saints. 
Mardnnald Park. 

9:19 p.m. — V idaria-Kaaairh Women s leagne: 
Butler Bras. vs. New Vert New Vert: Bemisters vs. 
McDonald Farwitae. Hyariart Part. 

SOCCER 

1 p.m.~ I ewer Island l ader-19 tteterfs vs. 
Austrian tJader-lds Own laashrwrt. Rs»al AtMrtu 
Part. 


Ott Tor 
15 26 

131 107 

168 351 

267 424 

11-17 28-46 
1 1 

10- 42 10-46 

2-2 3-3 

11- 95 10-97 

Net offence is yards passing plus 

yards rushing, minus team losses such 
as yards lost on broken plays. 

Individual 

Rushing: Ottawa — Crump 8-49. 
Murphy 7-39, Toronto — Jackson 6-49, 
Harrison 6-26. 

Receiving Ottawa — Murphy 3-23, 
Cox 2-59; Toronto — Gaddis 11-147, 
Newman 5-90. 

Passing: Ottawa — Hoi low ay 11-17, 
168yds., 1 Intercept.; Toronto —Jack- 
son 28-46,351 yds., 1 intercept. 

SASKATCHEWAN 24, CALGARY 40 

First Quarter 

No scoring 

Second Quarter 

Cal—TO Svkes2 (Hay convert) 0:22 

Sask—FG Macoritti 156:35 

Sask—TD Fdlner 5 pass from Ro¬ 
zantz (Macoritti convert) 11:59 

Cal—TO Burden 22 run (Hay con¬ 
vert) 12:16 

Cal—Safety Macoritti conceded 
13:05 

Cal—FG Hav 12 14:47 

Thtrd Quarter 

Cal—TD Sykes 74 run (Hav convert) 
1:17 

Cal—TD Lewis 62 run (Hay convert) 
3:09 

Sask—TD Washington 9 pass from 
Rozantz (Macoritti convert) 8:50 

Feurtfc Quarter 

Sask—TO Washington I run (Ma¬ 
coritti convert) 0: M 

Cal—TO Sykes I run (Hav convert) 
6:2S 


Saskatchewan 

Calgary 


0 10 7 
0 19 14 


7-24 


A masterful pitching per¬ 
formance by Mike Cath¬ 
cart and the slugging of his 
Victoria Firefighters’ 
teammates proved too hot 
a combination for East 
Vancouver Wednesday. 

Cathcart spun a one-hit¬ 
ter, his pals erupted for 
11 hits and Firefighters 
coasted in a 10-0 decision 
during B.C. Senior Babe 
Ruth baseball playoffs at 
Lambrick Park. 

Firefighters, host club 
and one of two Victoria- 
league entries in the tour¬ 
nament, now move to a 
winners’ bracket contest 
against Prince George at 
noon Friday. 

In Wednesday’s other 
game, Prince George 
moved up in the same 
bracket by defeating North 
Vancouver 4-1. 

Gordy Gervais matched 
Cathcart’s feat, also serv¬ 
ing up just one hit, but 
failed to notch the shutout. 

Trevor Dalziel connected 
for two hits in the winning 
effort. 

Action resumes today at 
3 and 6 p.m. with losers' 
bracket games featuring 
Trail vs. Nanaimo and 
North Vancouver vs. Van- 
couverguquitlam. 

At Prince George. Trail 
defeated Gordon Head 34) 
in the provincial Babe Ruth 


championships for 14 and 
15-year-olds. 

In Greater Victoria Dis¬ 
trict Little League play¬ 
offs, Triangle edged Gor¬ 
don Head 4-3 on pinch- 
hitter Jason Strandlund's 
two-run double in the fifth 
inning at Hampton Park. 

Chris Barteaux also 
knocked in a run with a 
single in the three-run 
frame. 

Gordon Head had 
jumped to a 34) lead in the 
first inning when Jim 
Pringer belted a three-run 
home run. 

Starter Darren Halls 
went the distance for the 
win. allowing five hits, 
while Steve Branyik took 
the loss, also with a com¬ 
plete-game performance. 

The tournament con¬ 
tinues tonight at Hampton 
with a game between Lake- 
hill and Layritz. Game 
time is 6:30 p.m. 


EM Var 


■RUTH 

•66 6M 6 • 11 

M2 Ml—H11* 
Ken Maxwell. SIeve Ptwlen (St and 
Tod Soiling; Mike CalWcart ond Bill 
Havman. 


North Van 


•010 


■111 
•« SI 

Dave Bromland and Brian Mllrov; 
Gordy Garvals and Renzo Berra. 

LITTLE LEAGUE 


Sieve Branyik and Jim Senate. Oar 
ren Hell* and Stew Couttar. 

HR: — GM—Jim Prtngar 



























SPORTS 


THE COLONIST, Thursday July 24, 1980 1 7 



EARNING B.C. TEAM SPOTS dur¬ 
ing annual B.C. senior women's 
championship which concluded 
Wednesday at the Victoria Golf Club 
were (from left) Anna-May Taylor 
of Vancouver; Joan Lawson of Vic¬ 
toria, who won the championship tor 


the second time; and Lorraine Mac- 
Kenzie of Vancouver. A playoff 
will be held to determine the fourth 
member of the team which will 
represent the province in the Cana¬ 
dian championships in August in 
Sydney, N.S. 


Uplands ace regains 
B.C. senior golf title 


Joan I.awson fought the 
winds for the second 
straight day as she 
squeaked to the B.C. senior 
women's golf champion¬ 
ship Wednesday. 

The attractive Uplands 
member shot an Il-over- 
par 85 for 54-hole total of 
252 as she finished one 
stroke ahead of Lorraine 
Mackenzie of Vancouver 
Marine Drive at Victoria 
Golf Club. 

Mackenzie shot 83 to ac¬ 
tually beat Lawson for the 
second straight day but 
Lawson was able to make 
her eight-stroke (80-88) 
first day lead stand up 

Mackenzie was in the 
ihreesomc just ahead of 
Lawson but the champion 
didn't know how close it 
was at the finish. 

"Fortunately I didn’t 
know the situation. I didn’t 
want to know, I think it's 
better that way,” she said. 

Lawson came close to 
winding up in a playoff 
when she put her second 


shot on the par-five 18th 
hole in a bunker, but she 
reached the green in four 
and two putted for a 
bogey. 

"My putter was spastic 
but I guess it was the same 
for a lot of people today.” 

The winds weren’t as 
strong as they were Tues¬ 
day but Lawson said they 
were strong enough to both¬ 
er her game. 

It was the second provin¬ 
cial seniors (50 and over) 
title for Lawson. She also 
won in 1977 and she has 
been on the B.C. team 
every year since the inter¬ 
provincial tournament 
started in 1970. 

Anna-May Taylor of Van¬ 
couver Seymour also made 
the four-member team but 
the final berth won’t be 
decided until Aug. 6 when 
Maureen Hibberson of Up¬ 
lands and Frances Hansen 
of kamloops meet an 18- 
hole playoff. Hansen shot a 
final round 86 to tie Hibber¬ 
son, who shot 87, for fourth 
place at 262. 


The Canadian champion¬ 
ships are late next month at 
Sydney, N.S. 

Defending champion Col¬ 
leen McCullogh of Vancou¬ 
ver Point Grey had a frus¬ 
trating day. She hit four 
straight sand traps at one 
point, took a nine on the par 
five 15th and finished with 
92 and a share of eighth 
place at 265. 

Edythc McCormick of 
Royal Colwood captured 
net honors with 222. Vio- 
lette Maldowan of Rich¬ 
mond was second at 224 and 
Florence Chapman of Col¬ 
wood was third with 225. 

J«n Lawson, vie 80-85-87—25? 

Lori MacKcmic, Van 88-82-83-253 
Anna May Taylof. van 8S-A5-89—2S9 
Maureen Hibberson, Vic 84-9147—262 
Frances Hansen, Kam 8947 86-262 
Joyce O'Connor, Nan 86-90-86-263 
Jan Annabie. Van 87 8948-264 

Jean Stewart, Van 86-904^-265 
l na Guile, Chase 8943-93-265 

Colleen McCullough, van 8744-94—265 
Gert Pumfrev, Vic 8947-90-266 
Bobby Collett, Van • 90-90-88-268 

Mona Pump, Van 9245-93—270 

Bernice Breffltt, Vic 92 9247—271 
Gladys Penwill, Lang 92-9446-272 
Jean Richardson, Kel 92-91 90-273 
Tory Reid. Salm Arm 90-9043-273 


Nadia slip helps Soviets to gold 



MOSCOW (CP) — Nadia 
Comaneci, the gymnastics 
star of the 1976 Montreal 
Olympics, fell off the un¬ 
even bars Wednesday and 
the Soviet Union women 
beat Comaneci's Roma¬ 
nian squad for the Olympic 
team gold medal. 

Preserving an unbeaten 
record going back to the 
1952 Helsinki Olympics, the 
Soviet women, led by new 
star Natalia Shapeshniko- 
va, took revenge for a loss 
to Romania at the 1979 
world gymnastics cham¬ 
pionship. 

It was one of the most 
exciting team competitions 
in Olympic gymnastics his¬ 
tory, with the outcome un¬ 
certain until the last of 
eight events over two days. 

Comaneci's embarrass¬ 
ing fall on her last event 
and a brilliant Soviot finish 
in the floor excercises, In¬ 
cluding one mark of 10 and 
three 9.95s, decided the 
* * * 


Medals 


Medal standings after 
events at the Olympic 
events competed): 

Soviet Union 
East Germany 
Hungary 
Bulgaria 
Sweden 
Britain 
Italy 
Cuba 
Greece 
Romania 
Poland 
North Korea 
France 
Menico 
Australia 
Brazil 

Czechoslovakia 
Finland 
Jamaica 
Spain 


Wednesday's 
Games <34 

Gold Sll. Br 
17 10 '5 
6 13 7 


I 1 
I 0 
1 0 
0 4 
0 1 
0 1 


medals. East Germany 
took the bronze. 

Elsewhere, Soviet Union 
athletes swelled their lead¬ 
ing gold medal total to 17 
with victories by fencer 
Vladimir Smimov in the 
men’s individual foil; 
shooter Victor Vlasov in 
small-bore rifle; Vakhtahg 
Blagidze in Greco-Roman 
wrestling; swimmer Lina 
kachushite in the women's 
200 -metre backstroke and 
the men’s 4x200-metre 
freestyle swimming relay 
team. 

Aleksandr Portnov 
gained another gold medal 
for the Soviet Union after a 
protest against his victory 
in the men’s three-metre 
springboard diving was re¬ 
jected. 

The second, third and 
fourth-place finishers — 
Carlos Giron of Mexico, 
Franco Cagnotto of Italy 
and Falk Hoffman of East 
Germany — complained 
that Portnov was allowed 
to repeat one of his dives 
because of crowd noise. 
Hoffman said he asked to 
repeat one of his dives for 
the same reason but was 
not allowed to do so. 

Officials first said a deci¬ 
sion on the protest would 
not be announced until Fri¬ 
day but later issued a state¬ 
ment saying the protests 
were rejected. Portnov will 
receive his medal on Fri¬ 
day.. 

The host country’s domi¬ 
nation of the Games was 
emphasized in the women’s 
200-metre backstroke 
where kachushite set a 
world record in leading a 


Nadia dejected after fall from uneven bars 


Soviet Union sweep of the 
medals and shutting out the 
powerful East German 
women for the first time in 
the swimming events. 

The East Germans, still a 
strong second in the medals 
table, picked up only one 
gold Wednesday when Rica 
Reinisch set a world record 
in winning the women’s 
100-metre backstroke. 

The Soviet Union has 17 
gold medals, 10 silver and 
five bronze while East Ger¬ 
many now has six gold, 13 


Greek offer under review 


ABIDJAN, Ivory Coast (AP) — An 
International Olympic Committee offi¬ 
cial studying prospects of creating a per¬ 
manent home for the Summer Games in 
Greece says that country could provide a 
solution if the Olympics run into trouble 
again. 

Louis Guirandou N'diayc of the Ivory 
Coast, who was elected IOC vice-presi¬ 
dent last week, made the comment at the 
Moscow Olympics in an interview pub¬ 
lished Wednesday in the Ivory Coast 
newspaper Fraternite Matin. 

Guirandou N'diaye chairs a four-man 
commission set up by the IOC ear¬ 
lier this year to study Greece’s offer of a 
permanent site for the Games near Olym¬ 


pia, where the ancient Olympics were 
held. 

The proposal was an attempt to keep 
the modem Olympics out of future politi¬ 
cal controversies, such as the one created 
by the Soviet military intervention in 
Afghanistan. 

“With Greece having promised us a 
piece of its territory, near Olympia, 
we must examine if such a project is 
feasible," Guirandou N’diaye said. 

“If it is, that does not mean that the 
Games will always be held there," he 
added. "But the IOC will have its own land 
to fall back on if trouble is made for the 
Olympic movement." 

The commission is to report to the IOC 
in a year. 


silver and seven bronze. 
Hungary is a distant thin) 
with three, two and two. 

Back at the Lenin Sports 
Palace, three young gym¬ 
nasts scored perfect 10s in 
the optionals of the 
women's competition, du¬ 
plicating Comaneci’s 10 on 
the balance beam and Sha- 
poshnikova’s perfect mark 
in vault in Monday’s open¬ 
ing compulsories. 

Maxi Gnauck, 15, of East 
Germany notched a 10 in 
the uneven bars in leading 
her team to the bronze, and 
finished with the best indi¬ 
vidual score to lead the 
qualifiers for the Olympic 
all-round championship 
today. 

Romanian 15-year-old 
Melita Ruhn scored 10 in 
the vault and Yelena Davy¬ 
dova, 18, of the Soviet 
Union got her perfect mark 
in floor exercises to the 
delight of nearly 12,000 
boisterous fans. 

Comaneci was leading 
the individual standings 
until her embarassing fall 
from the bars. She lost her 
grip while trying to flip 
from the higher to the 
lower of two horizontal 
bars and fell flat on her 
back. 


Hardly changing her 
famous stoic expression, 
she bounced back up and 
successfully completed the 
manoeuvre, but she only 
got 9.50 points for appara¬ 
tus following three straight 
9.90s. 

Comaneci ended up in 
fourth place, but still is a 
big threat for a gold medal 
in. the all-round and on the 
individual apparatus ex¬ 
cercises Friday. 

She won the all-round 
gold medal and the uneven 
bars and balance beam in 
Montreal four years ago. 

The top three finishers of 
the nine teams compete for 
the medals today. Gaunek 
was top qualifier with 79.35 
points, followed by the 19- 
year-old brunette Shaposh 
nikova. 

In swimming, Reinisch 
set a world record of one- 
minute 0.86 seconds in 
leading an East German 
sweep of the women’s 100 
metre backstroke. She had 
earlier set the world record 
of 1:01.49 in the heats 
Team-mate Ina Richer and 
Petra Riedel finished sec¬ 
ond and third. 

kachushite had an Olym¬ 
pic record time of 2:29.54 in 
winning the 200 breast¬ 
stroke. Soviet team-mate 
Svetlanda Varganova, who 
set the previous Olympic 
mark of 2:29.77 in the heats, 
finished second in 2:29.61 
and Julia Bogdanova com¬ 
pleted the Soviet medals 
sweep by finishing third. 

Sergie Ropliakov, Vladi¬ 
mir Salnikov, Ivar Stukol- 
kin and Andrei Ryylov 
teamed to win the men’s 
4x200-metre freestyle relay 
for the Soviet Union in a 
time of 7:23.50 with East 
Germany second and Bra¬ 
zil third. 

Par Arvidsson of Swe¬ 
den, who attends the Uni¬ 
versity of California, 
claimed the gold medal in 
the men’s 100-metrc butter¬ 
fly with a 54.92 clocking, 
ahead of East Germany 
Roger Pyttel, 54.94, and 
Spaniard Lopez, 55.13. 

On the shooting range, 
Vlasov claimed the three- 
position. small bore rifle 
title with a world record 
score of 1,173, one belter 
than the previous record 
score held by Bulgarian 
Nonka Matova. 

Wednesday results on 
Page 20. 



The continued popularity and sales 
success of these fine car stereo 
products have made them A and B 
Sound certified values. 


ereA1C3 

V-350 3-way 


A-15 

8” COAXIAL 


AUTO I 
SPEAKERS 


A-30 

6”x9” COAXIAL 


CERTIFIED VALUE 


Craig’s 

3-Year 

Warranty 


Craig T-688 R3 AM-FM 
In-Dash Racafvsf and Cassatts Player 
with 24 watts RMS dotby noise reduc¬ 
tion, separate bass and treble. Loud¬ 
ness contour auto reveres and FM 
muting. 


PLUS! CRAIG V-303 5V 
Flush mount speakers. 

25 watts RMS and 
wire mesh grilles 


CAR ^ 
AUDIO by 
y/ILPINE 


BESTSfll JiKK 
czreAics. T-610 

^ AM-FM in-dash cassette 

with auto shutoft and locking FF 


Alpine 7205 AM-FM 




we’re having our 

40th BIRTHDAY PARTY 

ond 

YOURf INVITfD! 

Thursday, July 24,1980 

Coffee and cookies will be served all day in all three branches. 

Take this opportunity to look behind the scenes of a successful 
community credit union. Come and meet staff and some of the 
directors, and find out what a credit union's all about! 




VICTORIA 
PUBLIC 
SAVINGS 

Credit Union 


M7 I 

























































18 THE COLONIST, Thursday July 24, 1980 

" SPORTS 



DON’T BUY ANY PHOTO EQUIPMENT 

Until You See What’s Happening at 
THE ELECTRIC EYE (1006 Broad St.) 


PRICES AT COST OR BELOW! 


Batesons to represent Island at B.C. Summer Games 


Saanich Batesons, who won the B.C. juvenile 
softball champions for the second straight year 
on the weekend, will travel to the B.C. Summer 
Games in Kelowna next month as representa¬ 
tives of the Island zone. Club members are (back 
row from left): Trev Hill, Rob DuCharme, Mike 


Piechnik, Dave Bown, Randy Hess, Brent Wil¬ 
son, Rick Clarke, Dave O’Brien, coach Ron Hill. 
Front row: Jay Wilson, Marty Irvine, Brian Ford, 
Rory Fatt, Keith Lindner, Darrell Stone, Rob 
Lawrence. Missing: Assistant coach/manager 
Kevin Ford, Mike Kadar. 


Sundown Park entries 


I960 DODGE 
DIPLOMAT SALON 


PENTAX MV 



F2 Lens 
No case 

1 only 

188 77 


VIVITAR LENSES 

110 00 
99 99 
99 " 
199 " 


28 mm/f 2.5 Olympus Mount 

200 mm/1 3.5 Screw Mount 
135 mm/f 2.5 Nikon. 
Olympus. Minolta 

135 mm/f 2.3 Series 1 Nikon 


YASHICA FX-3 

1 only 

199” 


*\ 


KODAK COLOR BURST 
#so 29 " 
#100 29 95 
#200 39 ” 

Handle 19 9B 


SUPER CHROMEGA 

C67XL 

complete with lens and voltage stab. 


500 “ 


POLAROID 

One Step 24 95 

4.Q95 

Sonar One Step ■* ^ 


Entries for tonight's 
standardbred racing at 
Sandown Raceway: 

Post Time: 5:35p.m. 

FIRST — One mile pace and trot. 
PwneWSO, claiming. 

1. Bruiser Lad (K. Quinlan) 

2. Surrey Leader (t+. Ericsson) 

3. Milt Rodney (T. Burke) 

4. B.C. Flyer (D. Guest) 

5. Valley Jim (M.Vukellch) 

6. Pason Ell Roy (J. Gagnon) 

7. ByTheWay (R.Tutty) 

8. Sugar Hill Trophy (G. Tonkin) 

Also eligible: Sudsey Dudsev (M. 
Bouvier). 

SECOND — One mile pace and trot. 
Purse 5800, claiming 

1. MontecristoChip (M. Green) 

2. Gladys Command (C. Sibiga) 

3 Stopwatch (P Matthews) 

4. Avalon Don (G. Tonkin) 

5. Battle Chips (W. Urquharl) 

6. Royal Toreador (M. Bouvier) 


7, Little Duster (E. Arsenault) 

8. Tobies Spark (D. Linford) 

Also eligible: Todds Choice (M. Sty 
mest). 

THIRD — One mile pace and trot. 
Purse 5800, claiming. 

1 Successful Order (E. Arsenault) 

2. Andys Buzzer (D. Jungquist) 

3. Baroness Love (G. Tonkin) 

4. Ben Quest (M. Stvmest) 

5. Charms All (M. Ollto) 

6. Worthy D A (D. Smith) 

7 Andys Wayne (T. Burke) 

8, Hidden Time (L. Vlrag) 

Also eligible: Speedy Bluebird (R. 
Tutty); Vov Von (G. Hworth). 

FOURTH — One mile pace. Purse 
51150, claiming. 

1. Candy Legs (B. Boyd) 

2 B.C. Adios (J. Hudon) 

3. Senga Bogey (A. Bowman) 

4. Dunhoe (M Armstrong) 

5. Pride Bay (D. Jungquist) 

6 Open Range (D. Sibiga) 

7 Nevercantell (G. Hworth) 

8. Mark Missile (W. Hainlng) 


Howe Shield golf Friday 


A field of 112 golfers 
making up 28 teams will 
chase the Gordie Howe 
Shield in the annual 
Eaton's Invitational Golf 
Tournament Friday at 
Royal Colwood Golf and 
Country Club. 

The competition is best- 
ball, four-ball medal play 
and the Shield goes to the 
four-man team with the 
best net score. 

Play starts at 10:52 a.m. 
with the following draw: 

10:52 a.m. — A Bryant, J, Northup, 
A. Ferguson, A. Robertson 

11:00 —D.M. Wilson. D. Cassels, R. 
Mason, I. Witherspoon 
11:08 — J. Barlow, W. A. Wilson, D. 
Egles, a McCall. 

It: 16 — D. Pearce, M. Currie, F. 
Nelson, J. Fraser. 

1124 — D. S. Woodruff, D. Cohoon, 
R Bird, A Aldous 

11:32 — L. Kerr, B. Dunaway, K. 
Dagg.JC. Wilson. 

11:40 — J. W. Anderson, D. Stubbs, S. 
Exton, J. Reid. 

11:48 — D. Hogarth, H. Drudul, R. 
Labonte.M. Dow. 

11:56 — B. Peters, J. Irving, D. 
. McCaghey, R. Buller. 

12:04 p.m. — F. Ranson, B. French, 
J Ledger, J. G. McDiarmld. 

12:12 — G. Murphy, J. Dunbar, C. 
McCallum, W. A. Noel. 

12.20 — H. K. Reid, J. Eaton. T. 
Housdorl, E. Fedoruk. 

12:28 — F. Ritchie, A. Scott. . G. 
Clark. R. W. Denson. 


12:36 — G. Hunter, D. Philip, A. 
Flnerty, V. Fuggle. 

12:44 — R. Ahrensback, D. McLean, 
D. R. MacDonald, B. Craig. 

12:52- E. Betteridge. G. Taylor, N. 
Melnechuk, A. Beardshaw 
I 00—R. Gray, W. Halbert, G. Dun¬ 
away, D. Schoeman. 

1 08 — J Proudfoot. J. Quatsch, B. 
Aylesworth, L. Leisch. 

1:16 - N. Whitlet, A. Perks. P 
Rodgers, K. Little 

1:24 — B Appleton, J. D. Stuart, j 
Ansel I, L. Shields 

1:32 — W. McColl, W. De Silva, E. 
Son moods, R. Hind. 

1:40 - D. Ledding, L. Chisholm, G. 
Johnston, D. Duncan. 

148 — K. Lawrence. G. Clay, J. 
Radley, K. King. 

1:56 — D. J. Jones, J. Balloch, F. 
Cole, A. Woronlecki. 

2:04 — T. Murphy, S. Leake, F. 
Bond, W. Cannon. 

2:12 — B. Carlson, O. Jull, C. Jones, 
D. Dennis 

2:20- R. Bell, R. J. FrpsLP. Mob- 
berlev, R. Duff 

2:28 - W. E. Beck, A. Logan. G. 
Green, J. lannarelll. 


FIFTH — One mile pace. Purse 
51350. 

1. Senga Lark (E. Arsenault) 

2. Holrldge Emily (K. Quinlan) 

3. Dario (K. Hayworth) 

4. Cashiers Window <M. Stvmest) 

5. Excel B Arnold (D. Jungquist) 

6 . Mr Graham Belle (J. Hudon) 

7. Shadows Sienna IP. Coleman) 

8 . Winsome Shadow (B. Cameron) 

SIXTH — One mile pace. Purse 
51500, claiming. 

1. Zinger IK. Quinlan) 

, 2. Handle Carefully ID. Smith) 

3. Tiger Adios (G. Hworth) 

4. Fort Tllden IP. Matthews) 

5. Conestoga Tiger (J. Hudon) 

6 . Freemans Memory <M. Stvmest) 

7. Doc The Dauber I J. Hudon) 

SEVENTH — One mile pace. Purse 
51700, claiming. 

1. Irish Dawn (J. Hudon) 

2. Boozers Delight ID Jungquist) 

3. Mark Doc (R.Tutty) 

4. Buck N (M. Armstrong) 

5. Combat Lands (J Wiggins) 

6 . TangvSuelD. Smith) 

7. Kentucky Rain IL. Hill) 

8 . Antique Adios (G. Hworth) 

EIGHTH — One mile pace. Purse 
51700. 

1. Pegassus Ernie ID. Linford) 
2.SmoklnElen(T. Burke) 

3. Eager Song (A. Bowman) 

4. Shady Hill Donna (G. Tonkin) 

5. Pardner Jove I J. Hudon) 

6 . Call N Raise (G. Hworth) 

7. Tobies Fort (L. Hill) 

NINTH — One mile pace. Purse 
57200. 

l Louiabelle}Choice (L. Hill) 

2. Irish Flame (H. Ericsson) 

3. Come Local (G. Tonkin) 

4. Holridge Elaine IE. Arsenault) 

5. Matsqui Miss I J. Wiggins) 

6 . Flash Fire (J. Hudon) 

7. Maple Hills Smoky (D. Linford) 

TENTH — One mile pace. Purse 
51100. 

1. Crystal Set (P. Coleman) 

2. Cut The Deck I J. Hudon) 

3. Jump Oft Joe IK. Quinlan) 

4 Active Pass ID. Linford) 

5. Wickanninish (P. Matthews) 

6 . B.C. Lionel (M. Stvmest) 

7. Dolls Duke (G. Hworth) 

8 . Frosty Fonz (R. Tutty) 

Also eligible: A.E. Sincous ID. 
Junoqulst); Hoiridoe Gi Gi IE. Arsen¬ 
ault). 



ALL DARKROOM SUPPLIES AT 1/2 THE MARKED PRICES 


AM/FM 
dows, power steering, 
power brakes, deluxe In¬ 
terior, 8-cylinder auto¬ 
matic, console. 

sss *8600 



3200 DOUGLAS ST. 
382-2313 7-a 



CANON A1 

Body 

used 

350 “ 


MAMIYA ZE KIT 

includes Std. 1.7 lens, case, 
Mamiya Lite Flash. Mamiya 
28/3.5 lens 


339 


85 


SAWYERS 

670E 

PROJECTOR 

129“ 


MAMIYA ZE KIT 

includes Std. F2 lens, case, 
auto winder, Mamiya lite flash 
and Mamiya 200/4 lens 


397 


88 



B&H 
AUT0F0CUS 
CUBE PROJECTOR 

129“ 


MINOLTA LENSES 
135/2.8 149” 

135/3.5 88 “ 

28/2.8 110 00 
200/4 119” 


PENTAX MX 

1 only 

279 “ 


•s Imu 



ALL FILTERS AT 

1/2 MARKED PRICES 


OLYMPUS OM 10 KIT 

1.8 STD. LENS. MANUAL ADAPTER POWER 

WINDER •425°° 


5x7 Enlargements from 135 mm or 126 color negs, 1.49 



615 FORT ST. 


384-2242 


# 


HILLSIDE GULF 

Service Centre and Car Wash 

Complete Automotive Repairs 

MECHANIC ON DUTY 

Mon., Tues. and Saturday 8 a.m.-5 p.m. 
Wed., Tliurs and Friday 8 a.m 9 p.m. 


592-2444 

Gulf Gulf, 

W 3099 Shelbourne 



udgeti 

ONE WAY 

~ TRUCK RENTALS 

PHONE 386-7715 3*57 HARRIET RO. 



TMBK11 SAVINGS 
FOR ALL SEASONS. 

TRAX12 is our all season radial tire that virtually eliminates the need for seasonal tire change-overs. 

The unique multipurpose tread grips rain-soaked roads, bites through snow and runs quietly 
on dry pavement And you get ail the benefits of radial tire construction, in the TRAX 12. improved 
road handling, improved gas mileage and smooth ride. 

A new generation of all season radial tires now on sale for the first time. TRAX 12-designed 
and engineered from a world of experience. 


SIZE 

OUR REG PRICE 

SALE PRICE 

P18575R13 

BR78-13) 

\ $ 61 52 / 

$5400 

P19575R14 

(ER78-14) 

\ 71.25 / 

6300 

P20575R14 

IFR78-14] 

\ 77.79 

6900 

P21575R14 

(GR78-14) 

84.50 

7500 

P22575R14 

(HR78-14) 

aaoi 

79 00 ' 

P20575R15 

(FR78-15) 

/79.T5 

7000 

P21575R15 

KJR78-15) 

/ 87.82\ 

7800 

P22575R15 

(HR78-15) 

/ 92.63 \ 

82.00 

P23575R15 
ULR78-15) 

/ 107.00 \ 

94.00 



FIRESTONE STORES: Victoria: 2HS2 DougUu St.. MS-1404/ 
Nanaimo 33 Terminal Atm.. 753-1241 


him OmtUtm 


( 









































































































SOME PEOPLE 
JUST DONT BELONG. 



“HI. I’M YOUR AVERAGE 
EVERYDAY RICH NE'ER-DO-WELL.. 
WHO ALWAYS GETS 
THE GIRL IN THE END. 

BUT THAT'S HER PROBLEM” 





WHAT IS CHEVY CHASE UP TO? 


SPORTS 


THE COLONIST, Thursday July 24, 1980 1 9 


City junior favored for title 


By REG REYNOLDS 

UtaMUUMI 

Nancy Callan at the tend¬ 
er age of 15 is the favorite 
to win the B.C. junior 
women’s golf champion¬ 
ship. 

The slim brunette from 
Uplands has won j ust about 
everything possible on the 
Island this year and is 
playing more golf than 


1980 DODGE 
MAXIVAN 


[ Radio, bucket aaata, J 

r >war atoaring, power 

rakae. Stock No. 

| 00352. 



■ 3200 DOUGLAS ST. 

■ 382-2313 


ever before and was well 
prepared for the 36-hole 
test this weekend when she 
left Wednesday for Van- 
couer and Fraserview Golf 
Club. 

“I’m even playing a lot 
more than 1 expected,” 
said Callan who played a 
considerable amount of 
golf last year. 

She has won six B.C. 
tournaments since June 15, 
and last week competed 
in the world junior cham¬ 
pionships at Torrey Pines 
in San Diego. 

Nancy finished second to 
Dawn Coe of Lake Cowi- 
chan in the B.C. junior 
last year but Coe is over¬ 
age this year. 

This year, Nancy topped 
both rounds of the Centen¬ 
nial tournament at Victoria 
and Cedar Hill golf 
courses, won the Vancou¬ 
ver City and District cham¬ 
pionship, the Mid-Island 
championship at Cowi- 
chan, the Victoria and Dis¬ 
trict at Gorge Vale and the 
Vancouver Island title at 
Glen Meadows. 


Her success in the Cen¬ 
tennial and Vancouver 
tournaments qualified her 
for a berth in the world 
junior championships. 

At San Diego, she shot 
rounds of 80, 78 and 83 to 
make the cut and actually 
held a two-stroke lead at 
one point but she blew to a 
92 on the final round and 
didn’t bother to check to 
see where she finished. 

“I think I was in the top 
20,” was her only specula¬ 
tion. 

Nancy admits to playing 
badly in the final round but 
says the international com¬ 
petition was valuable. 

The first three rounds 
were played on one course 
and the final round played 
on another. To top things 
off, the style of the courses 
was quite different from 
what she’s used to in B.C. 

“I had a lot of bare lies. 
I’m not used to that and 
they have Bermuda and 
crab grass, not like up 
here.” 

Nancy has more interna¬ 
tional experience coming 


up next week as she is 
one of eight Canadian girls 
selected for the Sixth An¬ 
nual Langfeld Intemation- 4 
al Junior Girls Challenge 
Team Matches. 

Canada, the U.S;, -Mexi¬ 
co, Bahamas and Venezue¬ 
la have players in the tour¬ 
nament which runs July 27 
to 31at Shaughnessy Golf & 
Country Club in Vancou¬ 
ver. 

There are four teams of 
six players each, with at 
least one member from 
Canada, the U.S. and Cali¬ 
fornia on each team. 


Ali ‘perfect’ 

ROCHESTER, Minn. 
(AP) — Three-time former 
heavyweight boxing cham¬ 
pion Muhammad Ali said 
Wednesday that medical 
tests at the Mayo Clinic 
show him to be “100 per 
cent perfect” and in excel¬ 
lent condition to fight 
Larry Holmes for the 
World Boxing Council title 
this October in LasVegas. 



FREE 

CARRY-IN SERVICE 
i ESTIMATE 

• TV •STEREO 

■MiCROWAVT- rvv^XUSE OUR 
•VIDEO ^ SI 0.00 

IN-HOME 
SERVICE CALL 

JOE CHOW - homark >- 

Sorvtce Manage. • SALES • SERVICE »RENTALS 

27 BURNSIDE RD. (WEST) 381-5622 MO to !H)0 



THE SHOWROOM CAR SHINE 
THAT IMPROVES WITH TIME 


• H—r Wax Your Car Again 
(GUARANTEED) 

• TRY US — g#1 satisfaction anti 
sava your tioUarm. 


$10 


OFF with this 
COUPON 


Court—y Pickup and Dak—ty 

BUFFER KING"£ D0WUSST 



WoolwortK 


VISIT OUR 

CLEARANCE COUNTER 
ON THE LOWER FLOOR 


MONTH END 


Ladies’ and Teens’ 
Novelty T-Shirts 

Ass t, sizes. 

400 

Ladies’ and Teens’ 
T-Shirts 

100% Polyester. 

Ass't. colours and sizes. 

Ladies’ and Teens’ 

Tube Halter Tops 

Sizes S-M-L. 

Ass't. solids and prints. 

100 

Ladies’ and Teens’ 
T-Shirts 

Ass’t. styles and sizes. 

2/7°° 

Ladies’ and Teens’ 

Ladies' 

Ladies' 

Men's 

. 1-Piece Rompers 

Ass't. styles and sizes. 

000 

T-shirts 

Ass’t. styles and sizes. 

300 

Dresses 

Ass't. styles and sizes. 

15“ 

Casual Shirts 

Ass’t. styles and sizes. * 

000 

Men's 

Mesh Shirts 

Ass't. colours and sizes. 

1000 

Ladies' 

Canvas Sandals 

Navy, Brown or Natural. 

Aaa’t. sizes. 

10” 

Ladies' 

Vinyl Sandals 

Tan or Navy. 

5“ 

Ladies’ High Heel 
Slip-On Shoes 

Ass’t. sizes. 

goo 

Trio 

Earrings 

Ass’t. summer colours. 

Woolworth reg. pries; 3.00 and 3.50 

900 

WOOLWORTH 

SALE PRICE 

Campfire 

Marshmallows 

270 b bag 

2/100 

Maple Flavored 
Cones 

IS per box 312 g 

66* 

Ladies' Canvas 
Sandals 

Navy or Black 

11“ 




^T| 19AA nnmrlac STORE HOURS: ^Downtown 

l£UU DUUglda Mon.. Tue*.. Wed . Sat. 9:» a m. to 5:30 p.m. * MoEffect*. 

I w Thurt. and Fri. 9:30 a m. to 9.-00 p.m. wmm Quantities lm 


Use These Cards in Woolworth Stores Across Canada 


SPECIALIZING IN 
FUEL EFFICIENT jf 

MODELS. fatfUK 

m 



1964 PARISIENNE SUPER SPORT 


Local car, one careful owper. 283 V8 auto¬ 
matic. power steering and brakes, 132.382 
miles, immaculate condition. 




s 2800 

IS—*,*# 




1970 KARMANN 6HIA COUPE 

4 speed, radio. 60,580 miles, attention collec¬ 
tors, it s a 10/10 (ten). 


■rp i 

... .y.y,.:«. : x ^ 


*6000 



1976 V.W. SCIROCCO 

Local car. 4 speed, radio, electric rear defros¬ 
ter. aHoy wheels. 20,162 miles. 


*6300 



1978 VETTE LS2 

One careful owner, panel top. leather, 
power windows, 4 speed. tWt and tele¬ 
scopic. air, AM-fM, wheels and tires, 
tinted glass. 36.256 mites 


* 14,000 



1971 V.W. BEETLE CONVERTIBLE 


Rare, local car. One careful owner. 4 speed. 
AM-FM stereo and stereo cassette. 32,223 


*9000 



1910 HORIZON TC3 HATCHBACK 


Local car, one careful owner, automatic, power 
steering, power brakes. AM-FM radfc), dual 
remote control mirrors, largest steel-belted ra¬ 
dial tires, clock, electric rear defroster, balance 
of new car factory warranty 1,758 miles. 


*7000 


1967 BEAUMONT SUPER SPORT 

Local car. one careful owner. 327 4V. 275 HP; 
buckets console. AT. PS. P8. radio, clock, low 
fuel warning Hie, remote mirror, speed alert, 
wwe wheel covers, vinyl top. 108.888 mMes. 
immaculate condition. 

1972 MAZDA 618 COUPE 

Automatic, radio, tach, dock, gauges, local 
car. one careful owner. 29.630 miles. 

1974 ASTRE SAFARI WA60H 

4 speed, radio, wheels, immaculate con¬ 
dition. 70.000 miles 

1974 DATSUH B210 

2 door, local car, one careful owner. 4 
speed, radio, electric rear defroster. 78.- 
OOO mMes. 

1974 6RAH TORIHO BROUGHAM 

4 door, local car. one careful owner. 351 
2V V8; automatic, power steering, power 
brakes, power windows, dual outside remote 
control racing mirrors, bumper guards front and 
rear, radio, rear speakers, dual comfort lounge 
front seats. 60,337 mMes, vinyl top. 

1975 VEGA KAMMBACK WAGON 

Local car. one careful owner. 4 speed, radio, 
roof rack, electric rear defroster. 31.566 


1975 V.W. GRANDE BUG 

4 speed, radio, sun-roof, new tires. 42.- 

116 mMes 

1979 ACADIAN 

6 door hatchback, local car. one careful 


ele c tric rear defroster, balance ol new car 
factory warranty 5.988 mMes 


*3000 

*2800 

*2300 

*2400 

*2800 

*2700 

*4000 

*5500 


CW Mcfc NeUs at 384-1721 sr to m<* 384-8875. 

111 . 


iite sp ^ ic 

'SiP '•t® CARS LTD. 


MS (lower) Hillside 


3*4-1721 


• MU 


\ 


V 


























































i 


r 


20 THE COLONIST, Thursday July 24, 1980 




SPORTS 


Exhibition Park racing 


VANCOUVER — Results 
of Wednesday night thor¬ 
oughbred racing at Exhibi¬ 
tion Park and entries for 
today: 


Flrel—H4M. t'4 MOmi 
Stock Operator (Loseth) IS 10 7 60 4.00 
Bunt, And Buck (Creiohton) 4.202.90 

Northern Era (H<yv«rson) 2.80 

Tima: 1:201-5 

Prince Of Tover. Bluenose. Alder 
Jet, B C. Weed. Oefla Ovnamo, Run'n 
Renegade. Green Timber also ran 


Fourth — $4,368. al lew a n ce, maiden 
3 year okh, 4'i furlongs 

Serene Ladv Be (Oemorest) 115 
Salt Treaty (Krasner) 120 
Rifle BlrdllS 
Shambre (RVcroft) 120 
Gray Ferine (Frailer) 120 
Blushing Minstrel (Williams) IIS 
RaqusaMagic (Loseth) 1)5 
Blue Angel's image (Gold) 115 
Tranquility’s Dream (Mena) 115 


O'Gorman (Creighton) 122 
Paladin (Rycroft) 115 
Coaltown Ghost (Krasner) 114 
Saucy Verdict (Hoverson) 114 
Better Business (Oemorest) HI 
Buddy Lea (Carter) 114 
B.DonB. (Mena) 1)4 


.Second-$2^01,4 v> furlongs 

Charting (Rycroft) 5.203.502.70 
RumWer (Owen) 3.703.00 

My Bov Charlie (Bodnard) 4.00 

Time: 1:21 

Quinelta: $14.20. Daily Double: 

$71.50 

Tiger'Darren, Easter Bud, Saanich 
Mist. Bonnie Premier, Minor Detail, 
New Balance, Heritage Day also ran. 


Third—S2/468,4Vi furtones 

Gold Bar (Munoz) 5.603.002.60 

Rovaltlna (Loseth) 4.303.00 

Hemlock Valiev (Creighton) 3.10 
Time 1:21 

Ladv Be Prompt, Shady Perch, 
Token Jenny, Northern Delight, Easy 
Niki. Slow Dancer. Rocking Horse O 
also ran 
Qutnella: $17.20 


Fourth - $2,400,4V, furlongs 

CherysCapri (Crton) 14.10 5.404.10 
Do Attend (Rycroft) 5.205.60 

Tracy's Tenuity (Patzer) 7.40 

Time: 1:204 5 

Low Nickers. Proserpine, Favorite 
Star. Easter Gem, Ladv Occo. Lang¬ 
ley's Sanva. Pass The Wire also ran. 
Exactor: $65.70 


Fifth—$3,200, claiming, 4 V, furlongs 

Phoenix Grove (Arnold) 4.303.202.70 
Northern Faith (Frazier) 7.604.90 

Peace In Mideast (Loseth) 4.80 

Time 1:193-5 Quinella $22.10 
Lorenzo, Tobefast, Sipapu, Pop's A 
Cop. Gummotion, Turn 01 The Tide, 
Around Three Turnsalsoran. 


Sixth — $2,700,4* i furlongs 

SherrysXtra Star (Jnsn) 7.703.402.80 
Winzealot (Loseth) 2.802.60 

Charily (Owen) 3.90 

Time: 1:20 Exactor $16 70 
Remy'sMaoic, Neuka. Decker Lake 
Miss, Button Hooker. Surely Shirley 
also ran. 


Seventh—$4,000,4', furlongs 

Ja Aglonette(Mena) B.604.602.90 

Whispering Sal (Hoverson) 5.803.50 
Sass Me Back (Loseth) 2.70 

Time: 1:192-5 Quinella $24 80 
Command Of Time. Mag Talk. 
Cindy's Back, Burning Drum. Boss's 
Command also ran 


E ighth - $5,200,4' s furlongs 

Charlescrest (Hoverson) 11.905.703.80 
Beat Fast (Creighton) 4.503.80 

Never Charge's Jr. (Carrasco) 3.50 
Time: 1:184-5 Exactor $47.10 
Wily Waters, Park Dancer. Sinful 
Duke. Leavin', Thel Jay also ran. 


Entries 




■ J 


U-^-Iai-Xk- 



HEADQUARTERS 
IN VICTORIA 


3319 Douglas St. 

(Opp ICBC) 

384-1 161 

D l 


TIRE BTOI 


RETREADS 


000 xt2 

A7Sx13 

878*13 

C70x13 


B76x14 
C78x14 
540xt5 


24* 


C53 


£78x14 

F70x14 

078x14 

H78x14 


F70X18 
070x16 
H78xtf 
J70x15 


27? 

29? 


(33 


S3 


3030 

NANAIMO ST. 


Tufn off Fmtsyeo* 
st Trsdei Vic $ 


i — $8400. allow ence, 3 year 


4W 


Fifth — $2400. claiming. 3 year o 
and eg, 4*-> furlongs 

Artie Saber (Meianson) 119 
Major Return (Owen) 114 
Fielder Frank (Mena) 122 
It's l mpossible (Krasner) 119 
Solid Rhythm (Demorest) 119 
Ceder Orbit (Johnson) 119 
Grey North (Creighton) 119 
My Son Eclipse (Frazier) 119 
Western Ben (Williams) 119 
Hoodlum (Hoverson) 122 
Alse eligible 

Ruken's Rookie (Arnold) 122 
Royal Lord (Carrasco) 119 
Gallant Dave (Krasner) 119 
Elky Jr. (Hoverson) 119 


Run Reno Run (Creighton) 117 
Denny's Honey (Carrasco) 120 
Stav'n Step 110 
Miss Affair (Mena) 113 
Aunlta Leswlck (Williams) 112 
Cinder's Shadow (Rycroft) 114 
DeiaSall (Johnson) no 
Boundary Girl (Hoverson) 117 
Palica (Loseth) 114 
Sweet Skeet (Krasner) 114 


Sixth — $3400, claiming, 3 year oMs. 
1114 miles 

Jolly Guy (Johnson) 114 
Korvlk (Creiohton) 112 
Wina Dream (Wilkinson) 113 
High Hawk (Loseth) ill 
CourageousCiem(Witllams) 113 
Lucky Haze (Hoverson) 112 
Jennifer D. (Krasner) 110 


Tenth — $3,700, claiming, 3 year a 
and up, 1V6 miles 

One Night Stand ill 
Energy Ace (Hoverson) 115 
Shipping Money (Rycroft) 116 * 

Pet Theory (Demorest) 112 
Talk On (Wilkinson) 113 
Sprltz (Mena) 113 
Little Mt Lehman (Meianson) 113 
Sweet Ribs (Loseth) 113 
Great Shanty (Williams) 113 
Reformed (Krasner) 113 


Oak Bay trio 
wins city title 


- $3,500, allowance, 3 year 
o4dt and up, 6Vi furlongs 

First Attempt (Meianson) 117 
Ticket Count (Rycroft) ii4 
Run the Tide (Johnson) 117 
Nirod (Munoz) 117 
Jo Jo's Mac (Krasner) 116 
Dawn Duster (Arnold) 117 
BalsamLeaf (Williams) 117 
Zac Zac (Patzer) 107 
Northern Dandy (Loseth) 113 
Also eligible 

Captain Courgge (Hoverson) 117 

Eighth - $4,700, claiming, 3 year 
olds and up, 4’/i furlongs 
Mick a Rooney (Williams) 116 
Copper Castle (Johnson) 116 ' 


John Green, Pat Colbert 
and Doreen Green of Oak 
Bay have emerged victori¬ 
ous from a field of 3d teams 
to capture the Wilf Sadler 
Memorial Trophy and the 
city mixed triples lawn 
bowling title. 

Runners-up were Percy 
Hawes, Doug Day and Mae 
Shepheard of Gordon 
Head. 


Weslock builds leadn 
in senior title chase 


SASKATOON — Veteran Nick Weslock of 
Oakville, Ont., carded a three-under-par 69 
Wednesday to take a three-stroke lead in the 
Canadian seniors golf championship. 


In second place with a par 72 was Len Bray ton of 
Calgary who led Alberta into a one-stroke lead over 
Ontario in the team championship race. 

Five golfers, Curt Christophe of Dorion, Que¬ 
bec, Vem Mohs of Saskatoon. Archie MacDiarmid 
of Moose Jaw, Walt South of Regina and Eugene 
Mealey of St. John, N.B. shared third place with 
74s. 

British Columbia, led by Bruce Pelmore of 
Victoria's Royal Colwood Club, was iftfifth place at 
237 going into today’s final round of the team 
competition. Pelmore fired a 77. Jack McGill of 
Vancouver and Percy Barradell of Mission had 80s 
while Herb Fritz of Coquitlam carded an 85. Only the 
best three scores are used for the team total. 

Alberta compiled a 228 total, Ontario 229, New 
Brunswick 231 and Quebec 232. Manitoba followed 
B.C. at 240, Saskatchewan had 242, Nova Scotia 246, 
Prince Edward Island 252 and Newfoundland 279. 


Olympic Games results 


MOSCOW - Results of 
finals Wednesday in the 
Olympic Games: 


SHOOTING 

Tdrm-PMIHOII unalt-bort rlttf 1 

Viktor Vlasov, Soviet Union, (prone 
position 398, standing position 378, 
kneeling position 397), 1,173 (World 
record: previous record 1.172, Nonka 
Matova. Bulgaria, 1976); 2. Bernd 
Hartstein, E Germany, (399,374.393). 
1,166; 3. Sven Johansson, Sweden, 
(398. 379, 388), 1,165, 4. Mauri Roppen 
en. Finland, (397, 379, 388) 1,164; 5. 
Alexandr Mitrofanov, Soviet Union, 
(397,371,389), 1,164. 


bauwen, Belgium, loj.&z; t. Larisa 
Gorchakova. Soviet Union, 1:03.87. 
Women's 206-metre bronaHtroke: 1. 

Lina Kachushlte, Soviel Union. 2:29.54 
(Olympic record, previous record 
2:29.77, Svetlana Varganova, Soviet 
Union, 1980); 2. Svettanda Varganova, 
2:29.61; 3. Julia Bogdanova. Soviet 
Union, 2:32.39 ; 4. Susanne Schultz 
Nielson, Denmark. 2:32.75; 5. Irena" 
Fleissnerova, Czechoslovakia. 
2:33.23; 6. Ute Geweniger. E: Ger¬ 
many. 2:34 J4. 


392.55; 4. Czechoslovakia, 388.88; 5. 
Hungary, 384.30; 6 Bulgaria, 3I&40 

FENCING 

Men's individual fell: 1. Vtsdimir 
Smirnov, Soviet Union, (24-16);T'P9S- 
kal Jolyot, France, (24-17); 3. Alck 
sandr Romankov. Soviet Uniin, (22- 
15); 4. Sabirzhan Ruziev, Soviet UhfOn, 
(20-19); 5. Lech Kozielowski, Roland, 
(15-21). ,_ 


DIVING 

Men's springboard: 1. Aleksandr 
Portnov, Soviet Union, 905.025 points; 
2. Carlos Giron, Mexico, 892 140. 3. 
Franco Cagnotto, Italy, 871 500 ; 4. 
Falk Hoffman, East Germany. 858.510. 


Man's 4x206-metre freestyle relay: 
1. Soviet Union (Sergei Kopllakov. 
Vladimir Salnikov, Ivar Stukolkln, An¬ 
drei Krylov), 7:23.50; 2. E. Germany, 
7:21.60; 3 Brazil. 7:29.30; 4. Sweden, 
7:30.10; 5. Italy, 7:30.37; 6. Britain, 
7:30.81. 


SWIMMING 

Men's 186metre butterfly: t. Par 

Arvidsson. Sweden, 54.92 seconds; 2. 
Roger Pyttei, E. Germany, 54.94; 3. 
David Lopez, Spain, 55.13, 4. Kees 
Vervoom, Netherlands, 55.25; 5. Ev¬ 
geny Seredln, Soviet Union. 55.35; 6. 
Gary Abraham, Britain. 55.42. 

Woman's 166 metre backstroke 1. 
Rica Relnisch, E. Germany, 1:00.86, 
(World record, previous record, 
1:01.49, Relnisch, 1980); 2. Ina Kleber. 
E. Germany, 1:02.07; 3. Petra Riedel, 
E. Germany, 1:02.64; 4. Carmen Bune- 
du. Romania. 1:03.81; 5. Carlne Ver- 


WRESTLING 
Greco Roman 

52 kilo class: 1 Vakhtang Blagidze, 
Soviet Union; 2. Laios Racz, Hungary; 
3. Mladen Mladenov. Bulgaria. 

76klle class I. Ferenc Kocsis. Hun¬ 
gary, 2. Anatoly Blkov, Soviet Union, 
3. NlkkoHuhtala. Finland. 

186kilo dess: 1. Gheorghi Ralkov, 
Bulgaria; 2. Roman Blerla. Poland; 3. 
Vaslle Andrei, Romania; 4. Ref Ik Me- 
mlsevic, Yugoslavia'. 


WEIGHTLIFTING 
67.5-kile class: Yanko RoussevrDul- 
garia, snatch 147.5 kilos, terk »95 kilos 
(world record), total 342.5 kilos (world 
record); 2. Joachim Kinz, E. Cer 
many, 145-190-335. 3. Mlntcho Pachov. 
Bulgaria. 142.5-182.5-325; 4 Daniel 
Senet, France. 147.5-175-3V^- * 
Gunter Ambrass, E. Germany, 14G 
180320; 6. Zbigniew Kaczmarek, Po 
land, 140-177.5-317.5. 


GYMNASTICS 


1. So¬ 


viet Union. (Yelena Davydova, 
Marlyua Filatova, Nelli Kim, Yelena 
Nalmoushtna, Nataliya Shaposhnlko- 
va. Stetl Zakharova), 394.90 points; 2. 
Romania, 393.50; 3. E. Germany, 


Leask wins u 

Pat Leask recorded-the 
best time Wednesday afthe 
City Bicycle Club's weekly 
time trial at Ogden Point. 
Leask timed in aT 17 
minutes, 58.4 seconds, out¬ 
distancing Chris Cooney 
(18:17.4) and Phil Langrish 
(18:20.4). Twenty nidexs 
competed. 


Ninth—>I7.»1S, tvs turlonyi 

Bramble Hill (Hvrsn) 20 70 5 80 4.80 
Summer Sauce (Creiohton) 15.00 9.80 
Boundary Drifter (Carrasco) 8.00 
Time: 1:20 2-5. Exactor $288 80 
Sukev Tawdry. Chemainos Belle. 
Blushing Minstrel. Oakev's Shadow. 
Sweeter ‘N Willi also started 


T enth — $2,400,6 1 1 furlongs 

Welcome North (Wilms) 14.80 7.20 4.10 
Poona Shot (Arnold) 3.50 2.80 

Appenglow (Johnson) 3 20 

Time: 1:193 5 Quinella $23 90 
God's Penny. Kaka De Heart, 
Beachmastcr. Ole Conkie. Royal 
Truce. Protractor, Lord Benjamin 
alsoran. 

Attendance: 7,001 
la: $869,187 



Woolwortlv 

your everyday store 


First — $2,400, claiming, maiden 3 
year olds, 6'7 furlongs 

Mr. McCarthy (Demorest) 115 
Follow That Car (Meianson) 115 
Lehman Glen (Mena) 115 
JonathanM.(Krasner)117 
Si lent Ghost (Arnold) 115 
Sudden Fury (Creiohton) 115 
Duck L'Orange (Rycroft) 117 
Pass thoGold (Loseth) 112 
Green Pride (Hoverson) 115 
Home Town Hero (Munoz) 115 • 

Also eligible 

rQothanieChief (Owen) HO 
'-secondOut (Williams) 115 w 


Totally non-corrosive 
Outstanding dimensional stability 
Extraordinary heat insulation 
Completely norvporous 
Unaffected by the elements 
Actually stronger than steel 
“Makes all other swimming pools 
obsolete. Can we build one for you?” 


Second — $2,600, claiming, 3 year 
olds and up, 4 Vj furlongs 

LaBelleLune(Owen) 115 
Little JandD(Wolskl) 120 
Lady Selina 115 
Azullla (Frazier) 120 
Craig's Treasure (Bodnard) 112 
Charm Bracelet (Munoz) 120 
Speck O'Dust (Meianson) 120 
Star Lodge 115 
Sointula(Wilkinvn) 120 
Northern Button (Carrasco) 120 



„ POOLS 

493 EAST BURNSIDE RD. . 

(BY THE POP SHOPPE) £ SPAS 


388-7921 


HOT TUBS SOLAR HEATING 
CHEMICALS — SUPPLIES — SPAS 

ABOVE-GROUND POOLS_ 



Third — $3,260, claiming, maiden 2 
year olds, 4' i furlongs 

More Talk (Demorest) 115 
ComeonFigonero (Creighton) 120 
Famous Symbol (Bodnard) 115 
Good Class (Loseth) 115 
Dustmans Glory 115 
Berts Bandit (Meianson) US 
Windy Shawn (Owen) 115 
Darcy (Frazier) 114 



908-3106 


charge it 


chargex & master charge 


Kngledew’s 


VICTORIA STOKE ONLY 

CLEARANCE SALE 


LAST 3 DAYS 

MEN’S SHOES 


FL0RSHEIM 

SALE 


Selected Florsheim lines — most were formerly 

74 MM» to MMH) 


(95 

t« 


49 

t«« 

44 


95 


For 87 yeers, 

men's shoes 
shoes et‘sets 

up to 13's . 
excellent. 


Flor shorn? has boon tho groatost nemo in 
wo oft or sofoctod linos of thoso fmo 
. . . good size ranges, including somo 
fact our aiza and pattam choica is 


Open Friday night ’til 9 



for fiie great names in fashion 

740 YATES STREET 

m Mt tfStf « rutaten" m *MiM Mfc pm* 



RED RIDER 

“Don’t Fight It” 

4" 


LP, ea.: 



HELEN REDDY MERLE HAGGARD 

“ “Long Hard Climb” “Keep Movin’ On" 

099 099 

LP, ea.: A LP, ea.: mm 

Plus A Good Assortment Of Other LP’s, each: 2.99 



V . 


LP, ea.: 


BOB SEGER 

Against The Wind” 

499 


THE GOOD BROTHERS 

"The Best Of’ 

499 


LP, ea.: 


PRISM 

“Young & Restless" 

5 49 


WAYLON JENNINGS 

“Music Man” 

5 49 


LP, ea.: 




GENESIS 

"Duke" 


LP, ea.: 


149 


LP, ea.: 


WILLIE NELSON 

"San Antonio Rose" 

599 


VAN HALEN 

"Women And Children First" 

599 


LP, ea.: 


paul McCartney 

"McCartney II” 

599 


LP, ea.: 





THE SMURFS 

"Smurfing Sing 


Clearance Of 
l Assorted 8-Track 
Tapes, ea.: 


► 

► 


LP, ea.: 


S 7" L* 



itiiAAAAA 


AAAh 



pdYGfam 
itmoi sramo 



"Reality ... What 
A Concept " 
8 -T 1 . Tape* 099 


GLORIA GAYNOR 

" Love Track*" 

B-Tr. Tape* 299 



Other Selected 8-Tr., ea.: 2.99 

STORE HOURS: ^ omn '°” n 


1200 Douglas 


Mon., Tuee., Wed.. Sat 0:30 ua. to 6:30 p.m. 

Thure. and Frt. 9:30 a m. to MX) p.m. *0216 


Use These Cards in Woolworlh Stores Across Canada 







































































































VIEW ROYAL SETTLEMENT 
PLAN REVIEW 

An Open House will be held to bring all residents up 
to date as to what has been done and what is being 
considered in the 1980 Plan Review which is now in 
progress. The opportunity is yours in an informal setting: 

— To meet the Planner 

— To find out about development trends and possible 
projects in your area 

— To examine a proposed road and trail system 
for View Royal 

^To discuss the results of neighbourhood meetings to 
date (extra copies of the minutes will be available) 

— To familiarize yourself with zoning and other 
planning controls presently in force on your properly 
and to comment on these 

— To discuss any aspect of planning and development 
.controls you feel should be included in the new 
Plan 

A slide show and talk on the Planning Problems and 
Opportunities for View Royal'' will be presented at 7:30 
p.m. with a view to stimulating some dialogue on the future 
course of planning for the area. 

We hope to see you there. 

PLACE: View Royal Community Hall. 279 Old Island 
Highway 

TIME: Thursday, July 31st. from 2 p.m. to 10 p.m. 

For further information call: 

388-4421 Local 282. 

Al Lubkowski 

(C.R.D. Community Planner) 


SPORTS 


Wilkin sparks victory 


THE COLONIST, Thursday July 24, 1980 21 


FULL MEASURE OF FOOD VALUE FOR YOUR FOOD DOLLAR 


Pitcher Barry Wilkin 
supplied offensive muscle 
in his own behalf Wednes¬ 
day night as Tod-Hackett 
walloped Seaspray Proper¬ 
ties 12-3 in Stuffy McGinnis 
Men’s Softball League play 
at Central Park. 

Wilkin hurled the dis¬ 
tance, yielding four hits, 
and drove in three runs, 
two with a first-inning 
home run. 

Bob Wheeler supplied 
more fireworks, rapping 
out three hits in four trips 
and producing three RBls. 

In a Heywood Avenue 


Softball 


Men’s League game, 
Knowles pounded Capital 
Builders 7-3 as both Russ 
Walker and Bob Lougheed 
tagged two-run homers. 

Larry McKinnon sur¬ 
vived a two-run homer by 
Henry Klat in the sixth in¬ 
ning to get the win. 

At Sans'cha ParkJoe 
Thompson drove in Tour 
runs as Travelodge ran 
away from Victoria Ambu- 


Shoulder surgery for Brewer star 


INGLEWOOD, Calif. 
(AP) — Milwaukee 
Brewers sluggeiYLarry 
Hisle underwent surgery 
on his Injured shoulder 
Wednesday and team doc¬ 
tor Paul Jacobs said Hisle 


should be recovered to take 
part in spring training in 
1981. The surgery repaired 
a tom muscle in the rotator 
cuff area of Hisle’s shoul¬ 
der and removed several 
bone spurs. 


lance 8-2 in a Sidney Men’s 
League game. 

Pam Jones and her glit¬ 
tering won-tost record re¬ 
ceived a JoltTrom Bev Kar- 
puk and Strathcona 
Stingers in Victoria-Saan- 
ich Women's League play 
at Hyacinth Park. 

Karpuk spun a four-hit¬ 
ter as Stingers upset 
Breakers, still tied for first 
place, 2-1. Karpuk’s record 
improved to 9-5 while 
Jones’ mark is a 
still-sparkling 17-3. 

Karen Cowles belted two 
hits and scored the winning 
run. 

In another game, Carol 
Newcomb earned the win 
as Athletics defeated Vida- 
lin Construction 6-3. Joanne 
Grimsson clubbed three 
hits for the winners. 

STUFFY MCGINNIS LEAGUE 
Suvrn 044 140 1 1 4 S 

TadHackttt ZNIWa—11111 

Jim Bowden. Dave Spoor (3) and 
Garth Hastings; Barry Wilkin and 
Tom Robertson. MR: TH—Wilkin. 



■ Lm Cert, Hfttifc Avmm Safe Lm Cast M ErewauM tut 

Twin's lm Cast JM* Carey tut Waftm's Sager Hart 1051 Pandari 

tee* Ceve Lm Cert. 10944 W. Sueick >4. las t San lm Cast 4005 Dufra Street 
ami's Lm Cast Hstctasia 04. WMaway Law Cast 1400 Hsatsrey Ays, I 

Oram's Lm Cast 230 A Hamits St Supareray Lm Cast 2007-2000 Oak lay **e.| 

Rayaar Lm Cast 3031 Haatiassf tut Lem Lm Cast 2107 Fsal lay Rsa4 

Tams way Lm Cast Natehashi R4. Waag's Lm Cast 2090 Saaks Laka R4. 

Wa raaarva tha right to limit quantities 


KRAFT PARKAY 


Woolivorth 



on everyday merchandise 


TRENDY 

TARTANS 

Ass't. colours. 

Woolwoith reg. price: 
metre 8.99 

Woolworth 
Sale Price 


6 


77 


— mj metre 


—— Style House 

fLANKETS 

180 cm x 210 cm. 
Fof Twin or Double beds. 
Woolworth rag. price: 10.99 

-«. Woolworth 
Sale Price 


8 


99 


Vy 


Family Pack 

FREEZE 

POPS 

80 per pkg. 1600 ml. 

tyoolworth reg. price: 1.97 

Woolworth 
... Sale Price 


I 17 


COLOURFUL 

HANGERS 


Set of 3. 


Woolworth reg. price: 1.29 

- Woolworth 



Ladies' Vinyl 

HANDBAGS 

Ass t, colours. 

Style #1001. 
Woolworth reg. price: 15.50 

Woolworth 
Sale Price 


10 


97 


FOAM 

CHIPS 

2-lb. bag. 

Woolworth reg. price: 4.29 

Woolworth 
Sale Price 


2 


97 


Salt Water 

TAFFY 

350 g bag. 

Woolworth reg. price: 9g' 

Woolworth 
Sale Price 

77 * 


MAGNETIC 

BROOMS 

Assorted colours. 


Woolworth reg. price: 2.89 

Woolworth 
Sale Price 


7" 


2 


29 


UNIFOAM 

PILLOWS 

Polyurethane chipped foam 
filling. Non-allergenic. 

Woolworth reg. price: 2/11.99 

Woolworth 
Sale Price 


2/9 


97 


Terylene 

QUILT BATT 

100% Polyester Fibrefill. 
78" x 100" (1.98 mx 2.54 m). 

Woolworth reg. price: 6.89 

Woolworth 
Sale Price 

5 47 


Planters Cocktail 

PEANUTS 

350 g tin (12.4 oz). 


Woolworth reg. price: 1.79 

Woolworth 
Sale Price 


97 


Luncheon Feature 

Baked Ham 
Cold Plate 

With regular size beverage 


2 


59 


Texmade Flannelette 

SHEETS 

Polyester/Cotton 
80" x 100" (203 cm x 254 cm). 

Woolworth reg. price: 13.49 

Woolworth 
Sale Price 


9 


99 


Assorted Woolcrest 

COOKIES 


700 g (1-lb. 8.7 oz.) bag 

Woolworth reg. price: 1.89 

Woolworth 
Sale Price 


I 47 


Playtex Hand Saver 

GLOVES 

Sizes S-M-L. 


Woolworth reg. price: 1.17 

Woolworth 
Sale Price 


76 


BAKERY 

Apple Pies 

Woohwonh reg. price: 2.09 


1” 


1200 Douglas 


downtown 


lacM ytRukiRiJ 
bn ai fa t.M «* H Ml »«. 


iMyMw 
i Quantum L 



KRAFT CRACKER BARREL 

CHEESE 


12 OZ. 
STICK 


FLAT BREAD 


McVITIE 


THIN CRISP 

69* 


DAD'S 


SALADA 


TEA BAGS 


COCONUT 
CHOC. CHIP 
OATMEAL CHOC. 


120 

BAGS 


RED ROSE 


NABOB 


ICED TEA MIX COFFEE 


LB. 


SQUIRREL 


MOTT’S 


PEANUT BUTTER CLAMATO JUICE 


1 


19 


500 

9 


1 


65 


48 

OZ. 


CHEF BOY 
AR DEE 


CHEF BOY AR DEE 

ROLLER COASTER 


71 


15 

OZ. 


BYE THE SEA 


UNDERWOOD’S 


CHUNK LIGHT TUNA DEVILLED HAM 


15 


6’/z 

OZ. 


79 


4’/a 

OZ. 


PALMOLIVE LIQUID 


A.B.C. 


DETERGENT DETERGENT 


24 

OZ. 


1 


49 


3 

LITRE 


MOP MAGIC 


B0RATEEM CLEANER 


15 


1.1 

kg 


99 


900 

mL 


TODDLERS 

PAMPERS 
3" i. 


KRAFT 


■mums 


59 


11 

OZ. 


FROZEN TOTINOS 

PIZZAS 

KPPEMNI, 4-5", 354 (1 ** 
DELUXE. 4-5", 371 g 1 " 


CAN. No. 1 VINE RIPENED 

TOMATOES 

49* u, 


COLGATE 

TOOTHPASTE 

2 r99‘ 


FROZEN RUPERT 
BRAND 

COD FISH STICKS 

1 " 

I FISH SLICES 0 z 4 1 M 


GREEN BELL 

PEPPERS 


Use These Cards in Woolworth Stores Across Canada 


39 


LB. 


CALIFORNIA 

mum 

59* 


EACH, 


FULL MLA'JJW OF FOOD VALUE FOP VOU* FOOD DOUAP 


FULL MEASURE OF FOOD VALUE FOR YOUR FOOD DOLLAR FULL MEASURE Of FOOD VALUE FOR YOUR FOOD DOLLAR FULL MEASURE OF FOOD VALUE FOR YOUR FOOD DOLLAR 






























































I 


THE COLONIST, Thursday July 21, 1980 






You can certainly find yourself in 
an embarrassing situation some¬ 
times when a neighbor passes you 
some plants over the back fence, 
especially if that neighbor is in the 
habit of dropping over to view your 
garden with fair regularity. 

A few years back, our next-door 
neighbor brought me over a small box 
loaded with daylilies. They were the 
common orange daylily that abso¬ 
lutely everyone has in the garden. 
What do you do? Plant them and hope 
they will die? With daylily roots, you 
can be assured this plan will fail. 
Daylilies arc among the toughest and 
most persistent of plants. Asa matter 
of fact. 1 suspect you'd need a blow¬ 
torch to kill them 

This patch of gift roots spread so 
fast 1 could visualize that whole side 
of the garden being devoured by 
them. Finally, after passing of what I 
hoped was a decent interval, I crept 
out into the garden while our neigh 
bors were away and dug up the entire 
patch. 

After that, I tended to rather turn 
up my nose at daylilies. ignoring the 
sections of catalogues that described 
many of the new and beautiful varie¬ 
ties on the market. Now, with the 
planning of a semi-shade garden on 
our new property, I have been enticed 
into investigating some of the new 
daylilies now being offered. 

The daylily, by the way, is not a 
true lily. It has a fleshy root system 
rather like the iris, not at ail like the 
scales of the true lily root. It is 


called lily because its blooms do look 
just like real lily blooms. 

Its botanical name is Hemcrocal- 
lis, from the Greek hemero. a day, 
and kallos, beauty. Beauty fbr a day 
—because each individual bloom 
lasts only one day. This, you may 
think, is too bad—but wait. Each 
flower stem has as many as 20 
or more buds. So once a clump is 
established it can be expected to 
bloom three weeks or more. Some 
even bloom f rom July to Jaek Frost's 
first visitation. 

Grown in a fertile loam, given sun 
or partial shade and adequate mois 
ture, you can expect a long season of 
luxuriant bloom from a clump of 
Hemerocallis. With plantings of 
early, mid-season and late bloomers 
you will have bloom from May 
through (all. 

Now there are more than 20,000 
cultivars available in a huge range of 
flower types and colors. Flowers are 
plain and tailored, or ruffled and 
cerped, from two to eight inches (five 
to 20 cm) across. You can choose 
from bright to black-reds, pink, or¬ 
chid-mauve, lavender, lemon, char¬ 
treuse. Some have a contrasting 
throat color. For example, you might 
choose one with a large ruffled vel¬ 
vety-red bloom with a bright orange 
throat. 

There are dwarf daylilies for rock 
gardens, edgings and ground covers. 
Others grow to six feet. All make good 
cut flowers and the plants are tough 
and as pest-free as a plant can get. 


Clumps can be divided and replanted 
in early spring, or fall, which.means 
you can plant some this fall aqJfSpmc 
more in the spring if you want to try 
out some new ones. 

Get your hands on a good cata 
logue with a fairly extensive listing of 
Hemerocallis. One example is'C. A. 
Cruickshank Ltd. (1015 Mount Pleas¬ 
ant Road, Toronto, Ont. MtP 2M1) 
which has two pages of listings* 

Here are some that strike tne as 
especially interesting. An August 
bloomer, Heirloom Lace, is described 
as extremely frilled, flat deep gold 
with a green throat. An excellent 
rebloomer with a heavy bud count, it 
stands 30 to 34 inches (76 gto 86 cm). 
Lady Inara blooms in July, an “ex¬ 
quisite heavily substaneed flower.” 
It has peach midribs with a lavender 
touch and a gold throat; heavily ruf¬ 
fled with 30 or more buds per flower 
stem. 

Wild Wine blooms in July with 
deeply piled, black-red blooms. This 
gorgeous velvety black red six-inch 
(15 cm) flower has a beautiful char¬ 
treuse throat. Hall of Fame’s daintily 
ruffled blooms are an azaloa pink 
mellowing to Venetian pink with a 
glowing apricot throat. '■■■■ 

Miniatures have 16 to 28-inch (40 to 
70 cm) wiry stems and many little one 
to 214-inch (three to six cm) flowers. 
Dwarfs are shorter with gonerally 
larger flowers. Thumbelina. bloom 
ing in July and August, is a dwarf- 
miniature growing 12 to 15 inches (30 
to 38 cm) high with sun-resistant 
blooms of golden orange. 



1 have promised to deliv¬ 
er the reflections of a 
critic, a poet, and a few 
more posslq before setting 
aside, for the time being, 
the question of what to call 
the unmarried parties to a 
marriage-like relationship. 

Though not everyone 
likes posslq (persons of op¬ 
posite sex sharing living 
quarters), John B. Atwood 
write that he and his 
possslq (person of same 
sex sharing living quar¬ 
ters) consider it "a signifi¬ 
cant contribution" to their 
lives. "When playing 
Scrabble we now have a 
word that does not require 
a U to make use of the Q 
tile. Many thanks." 

None of the many words 
suggested has yet caught 
on in any pre-emptive way, 
but some that were pro¬ 
posed when I first joined 
the search a few years ago 
keep turning up. One of 
them is mentioned by Fran 
Krimston. w ho writes: "My 
dear friend and former 
rabbi, Karl Richter, had a 
wonderful story. A congre¬ 
gant came to him and told 
of her difficulty in intro¬ 
ducing her daughter’s live- 
in to her friends. He sug¬ 
gested she introduce him as 
her sin-in-law." 

Sin-in-law is amusing, 
but has two flaws: It makes 
a moral judgment, which 
our word must not; also, 
being a pun on the word 
son. it doesn't work for the 
female partner. Betty 


Ahlm suggests in mate. I 
like it, except for its un¬ 
happy connotation of bon¬ 
dage in prison or asylum. 
Cecil Conard suggests 
playmate, which I also like, 
except that it might seem 
too frisky or frivolous for 
some liaisons. 

Nancy Lobdell of Califor¬ 
nia State University Long 
Beach, writes that the term 
we seek was coined several 
years ago by Fred Friendly 
when he was running a se¬ 
ries of conferences on "The 
Media and The Law." The 
conferences took place at 
resort-like sites, and 
Friendly was concerned, 
Lobdell says, about “group 
dynamics." 

"Twenty or so partici¬ 
pants were invited and a 
larger number of observ¬ 
ers. Friendly now had a 
real problem. He was anx¬ 
ious that both participants 
and observers bring a 
spouse ora 'serious friend.’ 
However . . . Friendly was 
also anxious that guests un¬ 
derstand that a ‘casual’ 
guest was inappropriate. 
His problem: How to con¬ 
vey that idea. Thus devel¬ 
oped the term meaningful 
associate.” 

That might have suited 
Friendly’s crowd, but it is 
much loo pretentious for 
my ear. the very kind of 
gobbledygook we should be 
trying to avoid. 

Irvin Borders asks what 
is wrong with paramour, 
which he offers as "under¬ 


standable, pronounceable, 
spellable. meaningful, un- 
confusable, and well vali¬ 
dated in the English lan¬ 
guage. It’s also French, 
which helps. And bisex¬ 
ual." An insidious argu¬ 
ment. Paramour is too 
French for me. It isn't at 
case in the North American 
idiom. Anyway, we got all 
the French words we need¬ 
ed in 1066 

Critic Sylvie Drake and 
her posslq Ty Jurras 
(legal, as far as I kifttW), 
point out. as others have, 
that posslq assumes that 
only people of opposite sex 
may be sharing living quar 
ters and "all the conjugal 
benefits therein implied." 
Instead of posslq they sug 
gest posspslq (persons of 
similar sexual persuasion 
sharing living quarters). 
"It would be fine.” they 
say, “if it could be pro¬ 
nounced." 

Drake and Jurras go 
down hill from there, get¬ 
ting deeper and deeper into 
acronymic d+fficulties. 
They suggest Significant 
Other, which shortens to 
S.O. "Japanese friends," it 
occurs to them, "can re¬ 
spond to the introduction of 
yourS.O. with ’Ah. so!" 

To avoid this they try 
Significant Other Person, 
but that acronyms out (a 
new verb?) to Sop. They try 
being, instead of person, 
but that makes sob, or 
s o b. They make it Signifi¬ 
cant Loving Other Being,' 


which makes slob, and Sig¬ 
nificant Alternate Person, 
which makes sap. 

"We agree that a word 
must be found,” they con¬ 
clude, “but we leave it up to 
you." 

The poet Robert Nathan 
gracefully defines the 
problem and offers a solu 
tion. 

"To paraphrase an old 
Fftnch saying; ’Autres 
temps, autres inoenrs,' 
-manners change from age 
to age. and along with man¬ 
ners, morals; and that calls 
for some new language. So 
what does one call a man 
and a woman who live to¬ 
gether out of wedlock these 
days? The old names, with 
their implication of sin, 
won’t do anymore; the 
pradtice is too general, and 
too generally accepted. At 
(he same time. He is not her 
Husband, and She is not his 
Wife. As they rise qut of 
bed together, who are 
they? What are we to call 
(hem? ' 

"I think that we ought to 
go back to the old days and 
the old language, over 
which age and nostalgia 
have drawn a softening 
veil. So I suggest She call 
him her comfit—a dry 
sweetmeat containing a nut 
or piece of fruit—and that 
He call her his leman (ar¬ 
chaic) 1. beloved. 2. sweet¬ 
heart. 3. mistress; and that 
they be considered to be 
living in eomfiture." 



Things f Learned Kn Route to Look¬ 
ing Up Other Things: 

• That in Restoration England, 
even though all theatre performances 
were matinees, ladies of "respect¬ 
able" station attended only wearing 
masks. (Actresses were considered 
"tarts" then, and King Charles II 
made mistresses out of at least three 
of them.) 

• That of the three historic capi¬ 
tals of the state of Wisconsin, one was 
in Burlington, Iowa. 

• That .Stradivarius, who lived to 
be 93, and spent 70 years making 
violins, kept on working through 
three military sieges of his native 
Cremona, paying no attention at all to 
any of them. 

• That the late Justice William O. 
Douglas, who died this winter, after 
nearly 37 years on the U S. Supreme 
Court, sat with a third of the justices 
who were ever on the court since its 
inception. 


• That Gen. U.S. Grant, head of 
the Union forces in the Civil War, was 
repelled by (he sight of blood; even a 
serving of rare meat placed on the 
table turned him queasy. 

• That, apart from computer 
technologies (which barely existed 
then), the largest percentage in¬ 
crease in jobs in America since the 
1950s has been in banking, w ith a 259 
per cent rise in employment. 

• That the distant hard-riding 
scenes in John Wayne's early cow boy 
pictures were all dubbed from film 
footage of the great western star, Ken 
Maynard, who later taught Wayne 
how to ride a horse properly. 

• That the killdeer, a shore bird, 
pretends to be injured if its nest is 
threatened or approached. (And the 
American puff adder rolls over on its 
back and pretends to be dead when 
attacked.) 

• That in the area of gambling, the 
lottery has the longest record of legal 


ity: it was used by Augustus. Nero and 
other Roman emperors to finance 
building projects and swell the impe¬ 
rial revenues. (Count Cavour de¬ 
nounced lotteries as "a tax upon 
imbeciles.") 

• That Frederick the Great made 
his coffee with champagne, and 
added mustard to give the exotic- 
drink a still stronger taste. 

• That the Battle of Gettysburg, 
regarded as the decisive fuming 
point of the Civil War, occurred 
purely by a chance encounter, not 
through any plan or tactics of either 
side. 

• That Karl Gauss, one of the 

three greatest mathematicians in 
history, taught himself to read and 
learned the meaning of the.aiumber 
symbols without help, so thqr before 
he was three years old he detected 
an error in his father's payQ)ll by a 
mental calculation. « 


- I Thursday Prime Time 


■ 

7:00 

7:30 

8:00 

8:30 

9:00 

9:30 

10:00 

10:30 

tl :00 


Happy Days 

B C Irons 

Morfc 

Mappers 

Barney Miller 

Kensington 

Summer scope 

Authors 

Ne«A 

o 

Puhton 

Tec «u Tac 

[ Cinema 

Houvetles 

cinftn 

S3 

PM Maw/me 

w*is 


j Benson 

Barney Miller 

1 N Peeled 

[“ 

hep 

53 

Seattle Tanitfn 

Tk Tat Oouflfi 

BuC* ROpFft 

Movie OoM Of The Amazon Women 

hep 

o 

Hopen s Her at, 

Pt**U 

The Mi attom 

Mov« Ammeh Are Beautiful People 


53 

M*# 1*|W 

PM Maw** 

* attorn 

| Bernal* Jones 

Mots Lanpmp 

Hews 

53 

Amor 

LffllMlfMtfiO 

! 

1 

UttttUp 

feap 

Mots tenfl.no 

Hews 

-J- 

O 

Mw.Mr.i 

— 

[ laMtDNr. 


tmaprs 

j Mr** Hodirw. Gentlemen 

o 

Mapan - Mar or. 

Ada* t? 

ft** feu* 

Maws 

Beam MM 


** - «« 

Tk far On# 

I MM- 


Oaf to BmrsJ Mean 

Alter tew*. 

R 

T1- J j 

•Me*e ~ 

StfrtPepi 






















































































































































































































y 


SPORTS 


THE COLONIST, Thursday July 24, 1980 23 


Bruins and Wings 
swap goaltenders 


BOStON (AP) — Boston 
Bruins, seeking durability 
in the net, swapped veteran 
goaltenders Wednesday 
with Detroit Red Wings, 
sending Gilles Gilbert to 
Detroit for Rogatien Va- 
chon. 

Vachon, 34, spent four 
seasons with Montreal 
Canadiens, seven with Los 
Angeles Kings and two with 
Detroit. Gilbert, 31, played 
seven years in the National 
Hockey League with Bos¬ 
ton after starting out with 
Minnesota North Stars in 
1969. He was sidelined the 
last third of last season 
with a back injury. 

"Gilbert’s back has 
given him absolutely no 
problem,” said Harry Sin- 
den, Bruins' general man¬ 
ager. "He’s gone through 
two post-season physicals 
and come through both 
with flying colors.” 

Vachon was unhappy In 
Detroit, where his signing 
after the 1977-78 season as a 
free agent caused a furor. 
An arbitor originally or¬ 
dered Dale McCourt sent to 
Los Angeles as compensa¬ 
tion, but when McCourt 
challenged the award, the 
Kings settled for two draft 
choices. 

The acquisition of Va¬ 
chon allows the Bruins to 
bring along goalie Jim 
Craig the way they prefer, 
Slnden said. Craig was ob¬ 
tained from Atlanta 


| Briefly | 

Flames, where the Massa¬ 
chusetts native played 
after leading the U.S. 
Olympic hockey team to a 
gold medal. 

★ * * 

NEWPORT, R.I. (AP) — 
Ted Turner’s faltering bid 
to repeat his America's 
Cup defender role suffered 
another setback Wednes¬ 
day when his yacht, Coura¬ 
geous, snapped its main¬ 
mast during an observation 
trial race with Russell 
Long's yacht, Clipper. The 
crippled Courageous, its 
mast folded double in 16 
knot winds, was towed back 
to Newport Harbor by the 
yacht’s tender. 

It was not immediately 
known how long it will take 
to replace the 85-foot-tall, 
aluminum mast, but the 
Courageous syndicate does 
have a spare. 

★ ★ ★ 

WENTWORTH, England 
(Reuter) — Spanish ama¬ 
teur Marta Figueras-Dotti 
shot a two-under par 71- to 
take the first-round lead 
Wednesday In the British 
Women’s Open golf cham¬ 
pionship. Dotti, 22, a medi¬ 
cal student at the Univer¬ 
sity of Southern California, 
left the big names behind 
when she fired birdie, par, 
eagle over the last three 


holes to take a one-shot 
lead. American Sue Bern- 
ing was the only other play¬ 
er to finish the day under 
par when she covered the 
back nine in 34 for a 72. 

A A * 

BLSLEY, England (Reu¬ 
ter) — Bob Barwise, a ho¬ 
telier from Charlottetown, 
put all 21 shots in the bull- 
seye in the first stage of the 
Queen’s Prize competition 
at the Bisley rifle meet 
Wednesday to win the 
Bronze medal. Barwise, a 
member of the P.E.I. Rifle 
Association, was the only 
one of 1,200 competitors to 
hit the bullseye on each 
shot. It was the first time in 
several years a tiebreak 
had not been required. 
Alain Marlon, a police offi¬ 
cer from Luskville, Que., 
also qualified for the next 
stage, scoring 104 of a pos¬ 
sible 105 points. 

★ ★ ★ 

BOSTON (AP) — Out¬ 
fielder Jim Dwyer of Bos¬ 
ton Red Sox was released 
from hospital Wednesday 
about 12 hours after he was 
hit in the head by a pitch 
thrown by Texas Rangers 
right-hander Gaylord 
Perry. Dwyer, 30, was car¬ 
ried from the field on a 
stretcher in the seventh in¬ 
ning Tuesday night but did 
not lose consciousness. He 
was held at the hospital 
overnight and allowed to 
return home to rest. 


Tire Sale 

For better mileage and out¬ 
standing over-all performance! 



Woodward’s 
Freeway Tires 

4 ply polyester whitewall with 
20,000 mile warranty! 


SIZE 

SALE PRICE 

INSTALLED 

6.00*12 

..28.99 

A78 x13 

29.99 

C78 x13 

32.99 

C78 x 14 

.32.99 

E78 x14 

36.99 

F78 x14 

38.99 

G78 x 14 

..40.99 

H78 x 14 

42.99 

5.60x15 

35.99 

G78 x 15 

40.99 

H78 x 15 

42.99 



Most*r Cool Cushion Ap^ 

pro* 21" x 3b" Spring coil 
open weave, allows air to 
circulate Heavy duty 

SALE. 6.99 


10-30 W All-Season Motor 

Oil Woodward's detergent 
type, multi grade oil War¬ 
ranty approved for all cars 

sa£eL_. -... 5.99 


Resistor Spark Plugs “The 
Tuner" by Autolite With 
built in interference sup¬ 
pressor 


SALE - - 


1.19 




Micro Eye Deluxe Radar 
•Detector Especially effective 
on moving radar Audible 
,apd visual warning Internal 
regulator rnnn 

sale. 59.99 




Woodward's Oil Filters Full 
flow spin-on type. No’s. 
Two is. 55. 58. 63. 68 and 
69. Others at similar sav- 

SALE. 1.99 


Bosch Headlight Replace¬ 
ments SBQ5 or SBQ7 
quartz iodine units Give 
lOO'tri more visibility than 
conventional sealbeams 

SALE.49.99 

Rectangular Headlight Re¬ 
placements SBQ20O 

SALE . 69.99 

SBQ40 SALE. 54.99 


Brake Drum and Disc Special 

Brake Re-Line Safety Check available lor most cars. Additional parts or service will 
be quoted before proceeding By appointment at our .service centres: Oakridge. 
Guildford. Clearbrook. and Victoria (Also included Brake Return Springs and 
Brake Shoe Holdown parts ) 

4 Wheel Drum Brake Service includes ‘Supply and install 4 sets of linings 
•overhaul 4 wheel cylinders (kits included) »Turn 4 drums ‘Inspect master cylinder 
•Repack front wheel bearings •Replace front wheel oil seals (veals included) *Bleed 
brake system (includes brake fluid) *Road test 

SALE.-..-...-.99.99 

2 Wheel Disc and 2 Wheel Drum Brake Service includes *Supply and install disc 
pads ‘Supply and install linings ‘Overhaul 2 wheel cylinders (kits included) 
•Overhaul 2 calipers (kits included for single piston claiper) ‘Turn 2 drums ‘Turn 2 
rotors •lnsp* , rt master cylinder ‘Repack front wheel bears ‘Replace front wheel oil 
seals (seals included) ‘Bleed brake svstem (brake fluid included) ‘Road test 

SALE.-..~. 139.99 

Car motors high pressure ck'aned at our Guildford Service Centre EACH - 12.00 

WOODWARD'S TIRE AND AUTO CENTRES 


Wot/diWidj 

The Store Thai Hm It All 
Woo***** Marla* pkont MSI12X 
* * dm.- S:M pm Moadjp. I urtdat ao4 Wwui 
IhoHday amt lrtdat wfMt 'Id 


*m pm 


STANDARD OFFERS YOU SPECIAL 
feature^ SAVINGS ON AFFORDABLE NEW 

LOOKS FOR YOUR HOME 


SPECIALS 4 


FROM STANDARD’S IMPORT SHOP — VICTORIA’S 
CENTRE FOR AFFORDABLE TEAK FURNITURE 

-jl «***• 4 

^ * C SORLAND 

yr' 6-PIECE TEAK DINING ROOM SUITE 



Here is the functional elegance of contemporary teak at its 
best, warmed by the glow of richly 
crafted oiled teak. 60 " long teak 
buffet, dining table 31 "x47" extend¬ 
ing to 83” plus 4 beech teak side- 

chirirQ 

COMPLETE . NOW ONLY 


939 


00 


SAVE 224.00 
6-PIECE TEAK DINING ROOM SUITE 


SAVE 70.00 
3-PIECE TEAK DINETTE 


Imported from Denmark. 71 ” long teak buffet with adjustable shelves 
and cutlery drawer. Round dining table 48” in - 40 arm 

diameter extending to i>H' plus four sidechairs ^ Ml M»0v 
with upholstered seat and back. I I ■ WAN M ww 

NOW ONLY ....*.. IWWW 


Table 36" x36" plus two teak sidechairs with 
upholstered seat 

NOW ONLY . 

Extra chairs available at 79.00 each 


319 


00 




TEAK BOOKCASES 

A new huge stock of bookcases have 
arrived from Denmark, in both teak 
and walnut. 

35” wide, 11" deep, ICCOO 
40” high. Teak . IUJ 

24" wide, 11" deep, 17Q00 

75" high, Walnut . I f 

35" wide, 11" deep 1QC00 

75” high, Teak . . lUv 

Walnut . 209.00 

24" wide, 11" deep, ioqoo 
75” high, Teak . I tmot 


TEAK ROOM DIVIDER 


Exotic teak room divider or wall unit completely finished on both sides. 
Exceptionally sturdy, ample space for Hi-Fi equip¬ 
ment. portable TV. books and other paraphenalia. 

A small bar section is also featured. 16" deep. 

72" high. 58" long. A M 

COMPLETE . 


779‘ 


P® ■ 

1 

i* t&i' ' f 

■ i'v : l 



1 

> ' , 


f 

w 


g$y..A, 




SORVIK 


TEAK MUSIC CENTER 

249°o 


SAVE 3090 on this sturdy teak music center. It 
expands and can be usep as a desk too. 48" long, 
16" deep, 27" high — extends to 92". 


SAVE 12540 on this chair which has become a classic in interior 
design. Exceptionally comfortable, the laminated frame is specially 
designed to achieve maximum strength and resis¬ 
tance. The luxuriously soft cushions are uphol- __ — 
stqfed in genuine patchwork leather. Highback mr ■■QQ 
chair and ottoman. ll wv 

COMPLETE, ONLY 


549* 


A MID-SUMMER PREVIEW SALE OF 

SANDERSON FABRICS 



A mid-summer preview and sale of two of Sanderson’s outstanding and 
popular fabrics. You don’t have to wait tor our Sanderson fall fabric event to 
take advantage of purchasing your requirements of a wide range of 
beauteous screen printed satins, as well as imported fine quality linen and 
cotton plain fabric. An ideal time to have those custom slip covers, draperies 
or upholstery work done, before the big fall rush. See these delightful fabrics 
on display now and let us show you how they could become part of your home 
decor. 

VERY SPECIAL PREVIEW PRICES - PERSONAL SHOPPING ONLY 

PRINTED SATINS 


54” wide 

RED. 24.00 YD. 


NOW 


12 


00 

y«L 


RUIN UNION CLOTH 

00 

yd- 


48" wide 

REG. 23.00 VD. 


NOW 


16 ( 


END AFTER-DINNER HASSLE WITH 

INGLIS 

CITATION UNDER-COUNTER DISHWASHER 


• 2 speed 

• 5 push buttons 

• pot cycle .. 

• super wash cycle 

• short cycle 

• china/crystal cycle 

• plate warmer cycle 

• 2 full-size spray arms 

• rinse agent dispenser 


• self-clean filter 

• indoor silverware basket 


Available in 
white, almond, 
avocado, 

<joro fronts 


469 " 


• FKEKUVEIY 

• EASY CtEMT TEUS 

• JUKI TON kJ 


STANDARDJ 
FURNITURE T 



X 


/37 


YATES ST. ^OWntOVim 382-51 


11 
























































































24 THE COLONIST, Thursday July 24, 1980 


BUSINESS 


Closing prices of all traded ootlons. 
Sales unit Is 100 shares, P denotes puts. 
(Trans-Canada options combine Mon¬ 
treal and ToronSo exchange option 
trading): 


Options 


Ab PTC 
Ab Prc 
Ab Prc 
Ab Prc 
Ab Prc 
Ab Prc 
Alt GA 
Alt GA 
Alt GA 
All GA 
Alt GA 
AH GA 
Alcan 
Alcan 
Alcan 
Alcan 
Alcan 
Alcan 
Alcan 
Alcan 
Alcan 
Alcan 
Alcan 
Alcan 


Fb 20 
Fb 22* 
Ag 17Vj 
Ao 20 
Nv 20 
Nv 2S* 
AO 27Vi 
Ag 30 
Ag 32* 
Nv 30 
Nv 32* 
Nv 35 
Fb 30 
Fb 32*/* 
Fb 35 p 
Ag 27*/* 
Ag 30 
Ag 32Vj 
Ag 35 
Ag 35 p 
Ag 37V, 
Nv 25 
Nv 27*/, 
Nv 30 


39 651 12 $20* 
12 12100 $20* 
17 284 V3 1 v $20* 
61 950 80 $20* 
20 732 150 $20* 
32 450 « $20* 
4 190 $5* $33* 
1 257 $3 $33* 

7 420 175 $33* 

1 564 $4 $33* 

2 346 $2* $33* 

51 661 160 $33* 
4 76 $7* $36* 

1 23 $5* $36* 

1 11 $3 $36’a 

4 200 $9* $36' a 
15 512 $ 6 * $36'/4 
50 672 $4 $36* 
70 479 175 $36* 

2 39 100 $36* 

35 414 50 $36* 
2 285 $11* $36* 

8 365 $9* $36* 
104 528 $6Va$36Vi 


Alcan 

Nv X 0 

10 

S3 75 $36* 

Alcan 

Nv 32* 

12 

784 $4* $36* 

Alca 

Nv 32 '/tD 

1 

103 125 $36* 

Alcan 

Nv 35 

n 

548 $2* $36* 

Alcan 

Nv 35 p 

54 

108 $2* $36* 

Alcan 

Nv 37* 

X 

168 155 $36-4 

Alcan 

Nv 40 

2 

11 85 $36-4 

Aqutin 

Mr 65 

1 

14 $12* $67* 

Aqutin 

SC 50 

1 

195 $17 $67* 

Aqutin 

Sp 60 

4 

XI $9* $67-/4 

Aqutin 

Sp 65 

24 

488 $5’. $67' . 

Aqutin 

Sp X 

6 

XI $4 $67* 

Aqutin 

DC 50 p 

2 

T9 125 $67* 

Aqutin 

Oc 55 p 

2 

8 $2 $67* 

Aqutin 

DC X 

4 

89 $7* $67* 

Asama 

Ja 25 

14 

76 $2* $23* 

Asama 

Ap 25 

2 

3 $3* $23* 

Asama 

Oc X 

5 

79 $4 $73* 

Asama 

Oc 22* 

93 

341 $2* $23* 

Asama 

Oc 22*p 

X 

63 125 $23* 

Asama 

Oc 25 

71 

748 160 $23-* 

Asama 

Oc 27* 

15 

415 75 $23* 

Bdl Can 

Fb X 

1 

2S4 IX $19* 

Bell Can 

Ag 17* 

12 

X $2 $19* 

Bell Can 

Ag X 

31 

1401 X $19-4 

Bell Can 

Nv X 

15 

835 X $19* 

Bell Can 

Nv X p 

10 

125 50 $19* 

Bell Can 

Nv 22* 

50 

86 ? 15 $19* 

Bell Can 

Nv 22- ->P 

4 

56 $2* $19* 

flrscn A 

Ag 22* 

10 

49 $7 $29* 

Brscn A 

Ag 25 

10 

273 $4* $29* 

Brscn A 

Ag 27* 

35 

343 $2* $29* 

Brscn A 

Ao X 

24 

262 75 $29* 

Brscn A 

Nv 22* 

41 

306 $7* $29* 

Brscn A 

Nv 27* 

37 

623 $3* $29* 

Brscn A 

Nv X 

39 

277 195 $29* 

Brscn A 

Nv 32* 

24 

168 100 $29* 

Bk Mtl 

Fb 25 

10 

208 $5 $29* 

Bk Mtl 

Fb 25 p 

10 

11 60 $29* 

Bk Mtl 

Fb 27* 

X 

X7 $3* $29* 

Bk Mtl 

Fb X 

709 

752 IX $29* 

Bk MM 

Ag 22* 

3 

X $7 $29* 

Bk Mtl 

Ag ?7 Vb 

57 

345 $7V. $29* 

Bk Mtl 

Ag X 

10 

T9 25 $29* 

Bk Mtl 

Nv 22* 

X 

252 $ 6 * $29* 


8 k Mtl 
Bk Mtl 
Bk MH 
Bk MM 
Bk Mtl 
Bk NS 
BP Can 
BP Can 
BP Can 
Bow Val 
Bow Val 
Bow Val 
Bow val 
Bow Val 
Bow Val 
Bow Val 
Bow val 
Bow Val 
Bow Val 
Bow Val 
Bow val 
Bow val 
Bow val 
Bow Val 
Bow Val 
Bow Val 
Bow Val 
Bow val 
Bow val 
Bow Val 
Bow Val 
Bow Val 
CBIti A 
C Im B 
C Im B 
CP Lid 
CP Lid 
CP Ltd 
CP Ltd 
Denis 
Denis 
Denis 
Denis 
Denis 
Denis 
Denis 
Dorn M 
Dom M 
Don M 
Dom M 
Dom M 
Dom M 
Dom M 
Dom M 
Dom M 
Dom M . 
Dom M 
D Pete 
Pete 
Pete 
Pete 
Pete 
Pete 
Pete 
Pete 
Pete 
Pete 
Pete 
Pete 
Pete 


Nv 25 
Nv 27V, 
Nv 27*p 
Nv 30 
Nv 30 p 
DC 30 
Oc 45 
Oc 50 
Oc 55 
Ja 15 
Ja X 
Ja 20 p 
Ja 22 V, 
Ja 22 Wp 
Ja 25 
Ja 25 p 
Ap 22* 
Ap25 
Oc 11* 
Oc 13* 
Oc 15 
Oc 16* 
OC 17V, 
Oc 18* 
Oc 20 
Oc 20 P 
Oc 21* 
Oc 21*p 
Oc 22* 
Oc 22*p 
Oc 25 
Oc 25 p 
Oc 17*/, 
Mr 27V, 
Oc 27* 
Fb 35 
Ag 40 
Ag 45 
Nv 45 
Ja 45 
OC 40 
Oc 40 p 
Oc 45 
Oc 45 p 
OC 50 
OC 55 
Ja 1)0 
Ja 120 
Apl20 
Oc 60 
Oc 70 
Oc 60 
Oc 85 
Oc 90 
Oc WO 
OC 110 
Oc 120 
Ja 70 
Ja 75 
Ja 80 
Ja 80 p 
Ja 85 
Ja 90 
Ap 80 
Ap 90 
Ap 90 p 
OC 55 
OC 60 
OC 65 
Oc 65 p 
OC 70 
OC 75 
Oc 75 p 
Oc 80 
Oc 60 p 


50 327 $4* $29* 
11 567 $2* $29* 
6 6 SP $29* 

1229 1275 60 $29* 
8 10150 $29* 

25 125 $3* $32* 
14 346 $4* $46 
H) 342 $2 $46 
1 226 130 $46 
50 291 $10* $25* 
59 416 $ 6 * $25* 

1 52 175 $25* 

16 259 $4* $25* 

3 11 $2* $25* 

29 310 $4 $25* 
10 10 $3 $25* 

2 902 $ 6 * $25* 

8 33 $4* $25* 

1 393 $12* $25* 

10 357 $11* $25* 
48 802 $10* $25* 
78 1323 $ 6 * $25* 

17 243 $8 $25* 
101 560 16* $25* 
563 2512 $6 $25* 

82 263 85 $25* 
283 1130 $4* $25* 
40 140 150 $25* 
287 1785 $4 $25* 
36 111 190 $25* 
933 1695 $2* $25* 


O Pete 

Oc 

8 S 

212 XIS $17 $91 

1 Pipe 

Nv 17* 

S 

O Pete 

Oc 

85 p 

3 

126 $4* $91 

1 Pipe 

Nv X 

X 

0 Pete 

Oc 

90 

504 1364 $9* $91 

Kaiser 

Ja X 

16 

O Pete 

Oc 

90 p 

70 

116 $ 6 * $91 

Kaiser 

Ja X p 

1 

OTex 

DC 

12 * 

X 

123 $2* $14* 

Kaiser 

Ja 32* 

2 

CanP E 

Ag 

17* 

w 

271 $ 6 * $24* 

Kaiser 

Ap 32* 

X 

CanP E 

Ag 

22 * 

55 

904 195 $24* 

Kelser 

Oc X 

7 

CanP E 

Ag 

25 

6 

450 X $24* 

Kaiser 

Oc 32* 

3 

CanP E 

Nv 

17* 

W) 

105 $ 6 * $24* 

Kaiser 

OC 35 

9 

CanP E 

Nv 

X 

7 

117 $5 $24* 

Kaiser 

OC 40 

2 

CanP E 

Nv 

22 *p 

5 

18 110 $24* 

MB Ltd 

Ag 25 

, 3 

CanP E 

Nv 

25 

21 

358 155 $24* 

MB Ltd 

Ag 27* 

25 

GuM C 

Fb X 

58 

345 $9* $35 

MB Aid 

Ag X 

3 

Gulf C 

Fb 35 

43 

414 $5* $35 

MB ltd 

Nv 27* 

X 

Guff C 

Ag 22 

51 

560 $12* $35 

MB Ltd 

Nv X 

12 

GuM C 

Ag 26 

48 

165 $9 $35 

MB Ltd 

Nv 32* 

16 


Guff 

Gulf 

Gulf 

GuM 

Gulf 

Gulf 

Gulf 

Gulf 

GuM 

Gulf 

GuM 

Gulf 

GuM 

Gulf 

GuM 


Ag 27V, 
Ag 28 
Ag X 
Ag 30 p 
Ag 32 
Ag 32 p 
Ag 34 
Ag 34 p 
Ag 36 
Ag 38 
Ag 38 p 
Nv 24 
Nv 26 
Nv 27*p 


3 127 $7* $35 
36 1451 $7* $35 
160 4211 $5* $35 
X 315 30 $35 

199 3789 $3* $35 
67 347 60 $35 

402 3634 $2* $15 
16 265 135 $35 

318 4354 150 $35 

316 2761 70 $35 

5 26 $4 $35 

5 149 $11* $35 
2 326 $10 $35 

10 109 100 $35 

20 946 $ 8 * $35 


MB Ltd Nv 35 
Moore Nv 32* 


Inco 

Inco 

inco 

inco 

inco 

Inco 

Inco 

Inco 

Inco 

Inco 

Inco 

Inco 

Inco 


Fb 20 
Fb 27V, 
Ag 20 
Ag 22* 
Ag 25 
Ag 27* 
Ag X 
Ag 35 
Nv 25 
Nv 27* 
Nv 27* o 
Nv X 
Nv X p 


437 IX $18* 
265 X $11* 
X $4* $31* 
101» $31* 

9 $2* $31* 

10 $3* $31* 
178 $3*831* 
66 1S0 $31* 
151)25 $31* 
68 40 $31* 

3 201 $7* $32 
349 $4* $32 
710 $2* $32 
514 $5 $32 
12 290 $3* $32 
282 $2 $32 

10 95 100 $32 

1 101 $4 $35* 

5 45 $8 $26* 

15 136 $2* $26* 
10 182 $ 6 * $26* 

11 629 $4 $26* 
25 1124 $2* $26* 
63 1309 SO $26* 
48 1641 15 $26* 
10 1539 10 $26* 
54 807 $3* $26* 
57 917 160 $26* 
10 68 $ 2 * $26* 

2 799 X $26* 
5 23 $3* $26- 


6 

1 

5 

3 

10 

27 $2* $25* 
337 25 $95* 
5190 $26* 

97IX $26* 

5 $ 8 * $42 

Gulf C 
. GuM C 
GuM C 
GuM C 
Gulf C 

Nv X 

Nv X p 
Nv 32 

Nv 34 

Nv 34 p 

23 1266 $7* $35 

X 336 140 $35 

126 1154 $ 6 * $35 

181 1756 $5* $35 

5 X $2* $35 

Nat Bk 

Norcn 

Norcn 

Norcn 

Norcn 

Fb 12* 
Fb 35 

Fb 40 

Ag 35 

Nv X 

102 

3 

6 

10 

2 

166 185 $13* 
63 $3* $35* 
XIX $35* 
693 IX $35* 
X $5* $35* 

X 

598 $2* $4? 

Gulf C 

Nv 36 

m vm 

$J* $J5 

NOTCH 


Nv 32* 

2 

233 $4 $35* 

10 

X7 X 

$42 

Gult C 

Nv 36 p 

10 

75 

$4* $35 

Norcn 


Nv 35 

a 

S44 $2* $35* 

5 

217 IX 

$42 

Gulf C 

Nv X 

68 2953 

$2* $35 

Norcn 


Nv 35 p 

3 

48 IX $35* 

X 

113 $7 

$46 

Gnstar 

Ap 35 

10 

10 

$4* $36* 

Norcn 


Nv 40 p 

5 

16 $5* $35* 

6 

159 $ 8 * $46 

Gnstar 

Oc X 

3 

84 

$ 6 * $36* 

Nor an 


Fb 25 

15 

101 $4* $26* 

3 

21 X 

$46 

Gnstar 

OC 32* 

4 

137 

$4* $36* 

Nor an 


Fb X 

6 

35 $2* $26* 

13 

538 $4* $46 

HBOG 

Fb 40 p 

1 

1 

$6 $35 

Nor an 


Ag X 

102 1123 $7* $26* 

13 

74 $2* $46 

HBOG 

Ag X 

8 

X 

$6 $35 

Nor an 


Ag 22* 

10 1845 $5* $26* 

22 

458 $2 

$46 

HBOG 

Nv 35 

23 

101 

$4 $35 

Nor an 


Ag 25 

54 1667 $2* $26* 

24 

IX 75 

$46 

HBOG 

Nv 40 

11 

85 in $35 

Nor an 


Ag 27*/} 

5 1403 IX $26' 4 

1 

36 $X* 117* 

Husky 

Ja IT** 

6? 

146 

$3 $18 

Nor an 


Ag X 

12 

961 40 $26* 

1 

16 $14* 117* 

Husky 

Ja X 

34 

164 IX $18 

Nor an 


Nv 25 

3 

78? $4 $26* 

8 

6 $ 22 *. 

i 117-/} 

Husfcv 

Ap X 

7 

81 

$ 2 * $18 

Nor an 


Nv 27* 

194 1486 $2* $26* 

6 

13 $59 

1)7-/} 

Husky 

Oc 10* 

2X 

722 

$7-/} $18 

Nor Tel 

Ja 35 

19 

44 $6 $38* 

1 

16 $52 

1)7* 

Husky 

Oc 12* 

14 1855 

$5* $18 

Nor Tel 

Ap 40 

10 

10 $3* $38* 

7 

5? $40* 117*/} 

Husky 

Oc 15 

4 

386 

$3* $18 

Nor Tel 

Ap 45 

S 

7 $2* $38* 

1 

45 $35 

117* 

Husky 

Oc 17*/} 

475 1133 

$2-/4 $18 

Nor Tel 

OC. 35 

5 

32 $4* 838* 

2 

82 $33 

117-/} 

Husky 

Oc X 

217 

906 125 $18 

Nor Tel 

OC 40 

6 

41140 $38 * 

23 

76 $21 

117*/} 

IAC 

Mr 12* 

5 

18115 $10* 

Powr 

C 

Fb 15 

5 

171 $2* $16* 

3 

167 SIS* 117* 

IAC 

Sp 13* 

5 

XI 

X $10* 

Powr 

C 

Fb 17* 

S 

17 X $16* 

18 

US $10 

117*/} 

IAC 

Dc 7*/} 

6 

14 

$3* $10* 

Powr 

C 

Ag 12* 

10 

155 $3* $16* 

1 

IX $24'. 

.$91 

IAC 

Oc 10 

45 

308 IX $ 10 * 

Powr 

c 

Ag IS 

X 

356 IX $16* 

14 

X $X* $91 

IAC 

Oc 12* 

3 

83 

60 $ 10 * 

Powr 

c 

Nv 15 

13 

328 $2* $16* 

3 

206 $17* $91 

IOII A 

Fb 35 

2 

79 $12* $45* 

Powr 

c 

Nv 17** 

X 

132 X $16* 

1 

X $6 

$91 

IOII A 

Fb 40 

10 

134 

$9 $45* 

Rang 


Ja 45 

2 

148 $5* $41* 

7 

IX $14'. 

.$91 

lOil A 

Fb X 

9 

149 

$4 $45* 

Rang 


Oc X p 

19 

89 X $41* 


Shell C 
Shell C 
Shell C 
Shell 
Sttco 
SMco 
Sttco 
Sttco 
Sttco 
SMco 
Sttco 
Sttco 
Sttco 
T-D Bk 
Total P 
Total P 
Total P 
Total P 
Total P 
Total P 
Total P 
Total P 
Total P 
Total P 
Total P 
Total P 
Total P 
TrC PL 
TrC PL 
TrC PL 
TrC PL 
Segrm 
Segrm 
Segrm 
Segrm 
Segrm 


Ag 35 p 
Ag 40 

Nv 35 
Nv 40 
Fb 27* 

Fb X 
Fb 32* 

Ag 22* 

Ag X 
Ag 32* 

Nv X 
Nv 32* 

Nv 35 
Sp 27-/5 
Ja 25 p 
Ja 27* 

Ja X 
Ap 27* 

Ap 27*p 
Ap X 
Ap X p 
OC 25 
Oc 27* 

Oc X 
Oc 32* 

Oc 32- jo 
O c 35 
Fb 25 
Nv 22* 

Nv 25 
Nv 27* 

Ja 60 
Ja 65 
Qc 60 p 
Oc 65 
OC 65 p 
Sfgrm Oc 70 
Wlkr C Mr X 
Sp 27* 

Sp X 
DC 25 
DC 27-/, 

Dc X 
Sp 15 

__ DC 15 

Total vbtume 15638 
Total open interest 206770. 


C 

Wlkr C 
Wlkr C 
Wlkr C 
Wlkr C 
Wlkr C 
Wcoast 
Wcoast 


1 69 IS $35* 

39 1443 X $35* 
IX 1076 $2*i $35* 
46 636 IX $35* 
10 21 $8 $34* 

1 155 $6* $34* 
5 IX $3* $34* 

40 74 $11* $34* 

452 389 $4* $34* 

69 547 $2 $34* 
75 SB $5* $34* 
5 722 $3* $34* 
36 74 190 $34* 

K> » $4* $32* 
10 32 115 $2** 

3 64 $4* $28 . 
8 253 $2* $28* 
10 8 $5* $28* 

2 5 $2* $28* 

2 3 $3* $28' 4 

1 2 $3* $21* 

31 316 $4* $28* 
39 669 $2* $28* 
X 1417 160 $28-4 
112 495 100 $28* 

3 8 $4* $28* 

25 Ml 70 $28* 

3 69 $2* $25 
10 216 $3* $25 
X 254 185 $25 
3 143 X $25 
1 M $8* $64 
1 37 $6* $64 

5 14 $2'*S64 

1 727 $3* $64 

1 1 $4 $64 

61 233 IX $64 
31 73 $2* $2|* 

2 892 160 $28* 
M 1431 75 $28* 

2 1639 $4* $28* 
2 352 $2* $28* 
13 386 150 $28-4 
X 2790 50 $14 
25 1082 85 $14 


10X 1129 $13 $91 
28 27 $21* $91 

48 61 $16 $91 

2 3 $11* $91 

3 286 535 . $91 
2 326 531* $91 
7 375 527 $91 
I 59 X $91 

44 646 $23 $91 
39 881 $18* $91 
10 105 $2* $91 
186 1X1 $15 $91 
14 169 $3* $91 


lOil 
lOil 
lOil A 
lOil A 
lOil A 
IOM A 
IOII A 
IOII A 
IOII -A 
IOII A 
IOII A 
I Pipe 
I Pipe 


Ag 39* 
Ag 44* 
Ao 44 *p 
AO 49* 
Nv 39* 
Nv 44* 
Nv 44*p 
Nv 49* 
Nv 49*0 
Nv 54* 
Nv 59* 
Fb 17* 
Fb X 


37 1619 $5* $45* 
144 2264 $2* $45* 

1 105 125 $45* 
67 2200 » $45* 
17 758 $7-* $45* 
31 1514 $4 $45* 

2 42 $2* $45* 

61 1000 $2* $45* 

1 26 $5* $45* 

' 1 560 ISO $45* 
11 390 75 $45* 
X 142 175 $18* 
13 13 50 $18* 


Rang 
Rang 
Rang 
Rang 
Rang 
Rang 
Rang 
Rov Bk 
Rov Bk 
Shell C 
Shell C 
Shell C 
Shell C 


Oc 35 
Oc 35 p 
Oc 40 
Oc 40 p 
Oc 45 
OC 45 p 
Ap X 
OC 45 
Fb 32* 
Fb 40 
Ag X 
Ag 35 


M 75 $41* 
393 $8 $41* 
83 100 $41* 
257 $5* $41* 
73 $3 $41* 
404 $3* $41* 
31 $6 $41* 
10 $S $51 
135 $ 6 * $51 
44 $ 6 * $35* 
7 $2* $35* 
758 $5* $35* 


1 1568 140 $35* 


Earnings 


Acklands, for six months ended May 
31: 1980,-$367,765. 11 cents a share; 
1979, $1.2 million, 43 cents a share. 

Alcan Aluminium Ltd., for six 
months ended June »: 1980. $285.2 
million, $3.53 a share, 1979, $205.7 mil¬ 
lion, $2.54 a share.(Figures In U.S. 
dollars.) 

Concept Resources Ltd., for the year 
ended Oec. 21: 1979, $17,177, seven 
cenlsa share; 1978, si.120,716 loss, .049 
cents a share loss. 

London Life Insurance Co., for three 
months ended June X: 1980, $ 8.8 mil¬ 
lion, $8.21 a share, 1979, $6.2 million. 
$5.50a share. 

Teledyne Canada Ltd., for six 
months ending June X: $1,471,000, 68 
cents a share; 1979, $1,688,000, X cents 
a share. 


Prime 
in U.S. 
at 11% 


NEW YORK (AP) — Led 
by giant Bank of America, 
major banks across the 
country cut their prime 
lending rates Wednesday to 
11 per cent amid signs of 
further credit easing by the 
Federal Reserve. 

On Monday, Morgan 
Guaranty Trust Co. of New 
York started the move to 11 
per cent — the lowest rate 
since November 1978. 

Some banks are still 
charging an 11^ per cent 
prime, while the country’s 
second and third largest 
banks — Citibank and 
Chase Manhattan Bank — 
are quoting an liy 4 per 
cent rate. 

Money market analysts 
oh Wall Street said they 
detected signs that the Fed¬ 
eral Reserve may be eas¬ 
ing its grip on credit, thus 
leading to lower borrowing 
costs for banks. 

The prime is the rate 
banks charge on short¬ 
term loans to their most 
credit-worthy corporate 
borrowers. Other busi¬ 
nesses pay as much as 2 or 3 
percentage points above 
the prime. 

The prime does not apply 
to consumer loans. 


Yukon not kee# 
over pipe plans , 

WHITEHORSE (CP) — For Yukoners, the decision 
to proceed with the southern sections of the massive 
Alaska Highway natural gas pipeline mpy be the 'flfcDth 
knell for dreams of pipeline prosperity and an economic 
boom. 

Ottawa's long-expected decision last week to ailow 
the $21-billion project’s proponent Foothills (YukonVLtd. 
to begin construction this summer of the southenrCana- 
dian leg of the pipeline to permit export of surplus Alberta 
gas to the U.S. may prolong an already gloomj'.’bco- 
nomic outlook in the territory. 

Yukon Liberal leader Iain MacKay said Tuesday 
he expects the northern section of the line, running 
through the Yukon from Alaska’s north slope to southern 
Canada, may never be built and will at best be delayed. 

MacKay said the Yukon still hasn’t received £1 mil¬ 
lion in property taxes due this year from the pipeline 
company and set out in a schedule as part of the pro¬ 
visions of the Northern Pipeline Act.Tie said the 
company’s reluctance to pay is a good indicator of 
its commitment to the entire project. - ' 

“The Yukon won’t see a pipeline for at least a dec¬ 
ade," predicted MacKay, adding the prebuild may 
even turn out to be the start of a Mackenzie Valley pipe¬ 
line rather than one crossing the Yukon. — 


* DISCOUNT HOUSE* 

272 GORGE RD. W. at GORGE CENTRE 

MON.-THURS. 9-9 PRICES EFFECTIVE 

FRI., SAT. 8-9 THURS, FRI„ SAT. - 

SUNDAY 9-6 JULY 24, 25, 26 .. 

W« R— cy the Right to Umtt Quantity* 

WhM* Stocks Lost ic 


SelectaVision 625 

RCA’s exciting 6-hour Video Cassette Recorder with 7-day electronic 
programming plus special effect functions. At our greatest sale price EVER! 



The SelectaVision 625 has the playback capability for slow 
(notion, double speed, slop action, single frame advance — plus 
pause arftl channel change. As an added convenience, these 
variable speed functions are controlled entirely from a handsome, 
lightweight remote control hand unit with 6 separate function 
buttons and variable slide control, and 20-foot cord for convenient o a V E? 

chairside operation The newest most advanced VCR by RCA oALt-- 

See it today! 


$1499 


U/ootlHkikcJs 

The Store That Has It AIK 


WOODWARD’S MAJOR APPLIANCES 


Wuod»*,d . May. m, pk ww UN, i 122. itmre 


Hour* ui.-VM pm M ond*r, , 

td f Afar 'tM Mi pjm. 


CAN. GRAIIFFED BEEF G r 




STANDING RIB A 

ROAST 5 

2 


4! 

9 




.95' 
1.19" 


BREAKFAST DELIGHT 

SLICED SIDE BACON 

CANADA GRAIN-FED BEEF 

CHUCK STEAK.Aa 

CANADA GRAIN-FED BEEF 4 Ml ( > 

CROSS RIB ROAST.a*. At 1.09+ 

FRESH SHOULDER Govt. Inspctod 

WHOLE PORK PICNIC. 

FRESH BONELESS 

PORK CUTLETTES. 

FRESH BONELESS PORK 

SWEET ’N SOUR CUT. 

FRESH CHINESE STYLE BONELESS 

PORK BUTT ROAST 


65*:: 

2.69 
1.59 
1.39 

FROZEN Approx. 3-lb. bag AA£ 

CHICKEN WINGS.*03 

NEW ZEALAND 4 A A 

LAMB SHOULDER CHOPS. *. 1.39 

SAT. - OPEN 8 A.M.-9 P.M. 


FRI, 


NESCAFE REGULAR H ■ 

INSTANT C 1 

:a 

COFFEE^., 

)v 


... 1J kg 

WHITE FLOUR. 10 ^ 


PURITY ENRICHED 


SUCCESS TAtl I 

SLICED PEACHES.zeil^/STh 

KRAFT SMOOTH, CRUNCHY A A A , . 

PEANUT BUTTER ...mu *2.99 

3.89 

HARVEST 

MARGARINE.>*** i. 

«.u^i s S.«. T T TS suctD * mi QQ»' 1 

PINEAPPLE. 2t>n, < i 

NARCISSUS AAt< I 

WHOLE MOSHROOMS.lo^mbS n 

k PURITY CANNED 4 4A, 

| BEEF, IRISH STEW. 2411 «.» 1.1SJJ 

100 % corn oil .... 11 *.* 1.89;; 

BEST FOOD 4 jP A < > 

MAYONNAISE.75.^1.59; 

LUNCHEON MEAT . 121 *.*99*n 


KRAFT PROCESSED 4 AA | i 

CHEEZ WHIZ.son* 1.09, > 

KRAFT LIQUID IOOO ISLAND 4 4 A A k 

SALAD DRESSING. . 500 ml btL lalS I 

COUNTRY TIME LEMONADE FLAVOUR 4 AA ' ’ 

CRYSTALS.,,.*1.99:: 

DIGESTIVE BISCUITS ...<.,* 1.69' > 

79*:: 
99*:: 

«1.39 


WESTON 100% 

WHOLE WHEAT BREAD. 


WELCH'S FROZEN 

GRAPE JUICE 

NtoCAIN FROZEN 

...,2 H K. II. 


PUIIStEHHE VEGETABLES 

McCAIN FROZEN 

CREAM PIE. 

MEADOW GOLD 

ICE CREAM. 

U.S. CELLO PAK 

FRESH CAULIFLOWER 


.14 


.14 «. 44. 


.4Rb*M 


GREEN 

HONEY 




























































PROFILE 


THE COLONIST, Thursday July 24, 1980 25 






FREE INSPECTION 


IF YOU CAN HEAR 
YOUR BRAKES 
IT’S TIME TO GET 
THEM CHECKED 

Get A Free 
Inspection Today 


384-2022 


PHONE 

1901 GOVERNMENT ST. 


PETER SELLERS: Deep cellar, childish corners 


VANCOUVER — NORTH VAN — BURNARY — COQUITLAM 

$10. OFF AMY REPAIRS WITH THIS AD 


By MICHAEL SEILER 

Ce*ooM $»—Lot Angetei Tlmos 

Peter Sellers was a 
edntft genius whose film 
p|Mnlts ranged from the 
grotesque Dr. Strangelove 
to (jie bumbling Inspector 
Clouseau and on to the mid- 
dtfc-dged TV baby, Chance. 

Sellers, 54, was long pla¬ 
gued by heart trouble. He 
was in his suite at the Dor¬ 
chester Hotel in London 
wnen he complained of 
chestpains. He was rushed 
by ambulance to Middlesex 
Hospital and underwent in¬ 
tensive resucitatlon proce¬ 
dures after his heart 
stopped, despite the pres¬ 
ence of a pacemaker de¬ 
vice buried in his chest. 


SELLERS WAS at the 
height of his career. His 
lalc&L film, Being There, 
earned him wide critical 
a&l£m as an actor whose 
teeMjique and intelligence 
earned him beyond his pre- 
vidBffly acknowledged co¬ 
medic gifts. 

Those who knew him well 
said he was a perfectionist, 
driven but full of self¬ 
doubt. Some said he hid 
behind the make-up and ac¬ 
cents of his roles, almost 
the stereotypical actor — 
shy j "^nd unsure, his ego 
riding on the continued 
faitfg>f his fans, co-work- 
ers and lovers. 

• m 

Burmosl never lost sight 
of one essential truth when 
dlsjnsing Sellers. Said one 
friend some years ago: 


3JETER IS a deep cel¬ 
lar fhc proportions are 
Stride, but everything in¬ 
siders incredibly complex. 
Thete are heaps of all kinds 
of dunk strewn about in 
thefsi lots of it childish, but 
th^Jg is also a lot of the 
puM'gold bullion of a real 
artist." 

(rOieing There, Sellers 
PlAUtfl Chance, a middle- 
agedigardener, who, when 
the Master of his walled-in 
house dies, is left wander- 
inf.t£rough the streets of 
Washington. 


It wasn't that Kubrick 
was trying to stretch a thin 
budget. “It is Just that 
there is nobody else in the 
world who can play each of 
those parts like Sellers,'* 
the director said after film¬ 
ing was completed in 1963. 
“He was the best possible 
for each one of them, and I 
wanted the best.” 

Sellers created his most 
popular persona later in the 
1960s with Inspector Clou¬ 
seau of the Pink Panther 
movies. 


CHARMINGLY inept 
and obtuse, Sellers' Clou¬ 
seau was a classic cinema 
character — a French de¬ 
tective who fancied him¬ 
self a great lover and 
crime-solver, practised ka¬ 
rate on his Filipino house- 
boy, and blundered his way 
through ambushes and 
pratfalls. 

A good deal of it was 
slapstick and though 
Sellers was fond of Clou¬ 
seau and the series made 
him rich, Sellers looked on 
Chance as his favorite 
character and Being There 
as his best movie. 

Perhaps Sellers was 
being a bit pessimistic 
when he told Time maga¬ 
zine in a cover story in 
April that, "My ambition in 
the cinema, since I came 
across it, was to play 
Chance ... I have realized 
that ambition, and so I have 
no more." 


BUT, BY most accounts, 
Sellers was at the time of 
his death a not terribly 
happy man. He had a repu¬ 
tation as a fiendishly hard . 
worker, touchy and diffi¬ 
cult for other actors, writ¬ 
ers, and directors to deal 
with. 

Personally, life was far 
from smooth. Sellers first 
marriage — to an Austra¬ 
lian actress named Anne 
Howe — ended in divorce 


CRITICS called it a mas- 
tei^u) performance, eco¬ 
nomic and thoughtful, and 
a HISnge. from the more 
flamboyant, occasionally 
slaifiick Sellers of earlier 
years. The portrayal re¬ 
sulted in an Academy 
Aw»rd nomination for best 
actor 

I 

Sellers first came to the 
attention of U.S. film audi- 
erifcJS in the late 1950s in a 
serjes of sharply-drawn 
rotes in small British co- 
mitftys — The Ladykillers, 
I 'makll Right Jack, and The 
AfoftSe that Roared. 


He is blank-faced and 
simple-minded, only the 
glare of a television set 
hoiHt his attention. But 
somehow his passivity is 
mistaken for strength, his 
intellectual emptiness for 
wisdom, and Chance be¬ 
come Chauncey Gardiner, 
talteehow eminence and 
presidential adviser. 


Tlltn Sellers played 
Claire Quilty, the pervert¬ 
ed playwright who tries to 
steah Humbert Humbert's 
nymphet in Lolita, and fol¬ 
lowed thht with his tour 
de.larce in Stanley Ku- 
brlEJc' s Dr. Strangelove. 


A SECOND marriage to 
Swedish starlet Britt Ek- 
land ended after five years. 
And Sellers was angry with 
Ekland's recently pub¬ 
lished autobiography that 
pictures him as a cold, dis¬ 
trustful husband. 

“A professional girl¬ 
friend and an amateur ac¬ 
tress,” said Sellers of Ek- 
land. 

There was a relatively 
brief third marriage to 
London socialite Miranda 
Quarry and then marriage 
to his fourth wife, actress 
Lynne Frederick. 


“SELLERS IN his latdr 
years seemed entranced by 


STRANGELOVE was 
Seflyfs at his most flam¬ 
boyant — a brilliant mime 
and .master of accents — 
the German-accented sci¬ 
ential whose arm kept in¬ 
voluntarily snapping into a 
NazLsalute. To top it off, 
Seilers also played the 
weak-willed president and 
a fjflher sappy RAF offi¬ 
cer* „ 

til 


B Kite hen Aid Tra*h Compactor •Compacts to ofk’ fourth 
ol the original volume •Large capacity trash door •Handy 
built m litter two lets you load large <n small amounts •!.» 

I elusive activated dwuoai air (liter removes odours completely 


SALE 


578.00 


C Kite hen Aid Batch Feed Disposer *<.rmds a hatch at a 
time with patented maynestart •Stainless steel grind chamber 
•Cast mm drain chamber *Cast stainless steel grind wheel 
with IX undercutters •Sohd stale m" 1 breaker eliminates the 
toughest jams 


SALE 


248.00 


D. inglis Undercounter Dishwasher *2 speed 9 push 
buttons with a high temperature option (or extra tough 
washes *2 full st/e counter revolvtng spray arms •Racks in 
elude 2 Hip down shelves, adiustable upper rack and indoor 
cutlery basket •BuiH m versatility 


SALE 




498.00 


E. Hoi point Built-in Dishwasher *X pushbutton control 
with choice of 17 cycles, including X sam wash options 
•Multi level wash *Solt lood disposer *Rmse agent dispenser 
•AdtustabU- lop rack *3 indicator lights j 

SALE _ 

Convertible, as above, with interchangeable color panel and 

SALE 528.00 

WOODWARD S APPLIANCES 


498.00 




The Store That Has It All! 

WoutfMMd * pkuna Hte 1122 Uwr Hot** t Ml am-i.M pm tdundav. IteW* aatd Stew 4 <t fr— I 


V r dm r tdaj, 


IhwMiit and Iridav ntghia itl tm pm. 


MYSTICAL afid moody, 
feeling deceived by an ex¬ 
lover and and ex-wife. 
Sellers had about him the 
saving grace of humor. 

During the Time inter¬ 
view, he suddenly turned to 
his wife, dropped into a 
lower class British accent 
^pd punctured his self-pity: 

‘"Ere 'e is, Mabel, wit’ 
all ‘is money and ‘Is big 
fancy cars an 'is wlmmen 
cryln’ about ‘ow depressed 
'e Is. Gawd in ‘eaven, am I 
supposed to feel sorry for 
‘im?" , 


SELLERS WAS born in 
Southsea, England, on 
Sept. 8, 1925, the son of 
William Sellers and Agnes 
Marks Sellers. They were 
vaudeville performers and 
Sellers could trace his lin¬ 
eage on his mother’s side 
back to Benjamin Disraeli, 
the Victorian Era prime 
minister. 

His childhood, when not 
in school, was spent in a 
succession of theatrical 
boarding houses and the 
backstages of music halls. 


The youthful Peter Sellers 
wanted to be a drummer, 
but Jobs were few. 

In the Second World War 
he was in an RAF musical 
troupe, entertaining air¬ 
men in India and the Mid¬ 
dle East. After the war, he 
worked his way up through 
vaudeville, variety shows 
at London's Paladium, 
radio and into the movies. 


BY THE MID 1960s, he 
was ranked with Britain's 
other great comic actor. 
Sir Alec Guinness, and 
there were offers to branch 
out in other directions. 

Sir Lawrence Olivier was 
producing Shakespeare at 
the time and asked Sellers 
to play King Lear, but, said 
Sellers, he turned it down 
because “it was too big a 
risk.” 

Sellers lacked confi¬ 
dence, but never drive. He 
did some films, when per¬ 
haps he would have been 
better off not working. For 
every Lolita there was a 
Hoffman, and for every 
Dr. Strangelove, a Casino 
Royale. 


“I hear from her fre¬ 
quently,” Sellers said in an 
Interview with The Los An¬ 
geles Times earlier this 
year. “I am not at the stage 
yet where I can hear her 
aurally. I feel her through 
my head, sort of like vibra¬ 
tions. I have reason to be¬ 
lieve I may reach a stage 
where I can actually hear 
her. Probably in two 
years.” 


SELLERS WAS deeply 
influenced by his first, 
massive heart attack in 
1964: 


“It is impossible to say 
how much it has influenced 
my work, but it is consider¬ 
able. As for the rest life is 
so very short. 


Sellers in his role as the obtuse Inspector Clouseau 


after 10 years and two chil¬ 
dren. 

Sellers blamed the 
break-up on an affair he 
claimed he had with ac¬ 
tress Sophia Loren in 1961, 
but Loren said they were 
just good friends. This 
seemed to annoy Sellers. 


mysticism and spiritual¬ 
ism, claiming he was on the 
verge of being able to com¬ 
municate with his mother 
from beyond the grave. 


She was an actress who 
dreamed of fame and when 
it eluded her concentrated 
on her ambition for her 
only child. She died in 1967. 


“David Niven was telling 
me about a dinner he had 
with Noel Coward once at 
which Coward was lament¬ 
ing his contemporaries 
dying off. He said to Niven, 
(and at this point, Sellers 
slipped into a perfect imi¬ 
tation of Coward) ‘I’m 
grateful if they get through 
lunch with me.’ I know 
what he meant.” 


VI IWOC. UVIILI CIUI yiCAU JVII-VUVI i Vi* 

National Brand appliances that you 
know and trust for quality, all with our 
2-year guarantee.* A first in Canada! 


NO EXTRA CHARGE FOR COLOR! 


A. Kitchi-nAid Under-counter Dishuasher •Built in energy saver •( on circulates 
uarm air built up (r>rm wash cycle •140'*. more insulation for heat and sound retention 
•Saniheat feature 
automattcallv heats water 

588.00 

Portable (as above) SALE _ : 1 . - 748.00 


•Rinse dispenser 
guard 

SALE 


’Woodward's agree to repair or replace defective parts and will 
render the necessary home service and labour for twp years at 
no extra tost. 


578.00 


248.00 


ROMANIAN ACQ 

HAM Z* 

FINNISH 4QQ 

EDAM I” 

™»ii“ 

GERMAN 4 QQ 

EDAM 1 » 

slum 1“ 

CAN. «QQ 

MOZZARELLAl” 

NEWZUUttMTE f%0 Q 

cheddarZ" 

NEW ZEALAND 4%M 

GOUDA 2“ 

CAN. MILD Aoq 

cheddarZ. 

MONTEREY A 90 

jack Z 2 : 

NORTH DOUGLAS DELICATESSEN 

3891 Douglas St. moncmy 


jmam packaf. 1 1 Mia 
4 cylinder 4 speed 


^*6521 




MHO 




































































26 THE COLONIST, Thursday July 24, 1980 


CANADA 


Japan sets sights at No. 1 in economic power race 


OTTAWA (CP) — Japan intends to 
become the world’s top economic 
superpower within 20 years, becom¬ 
ing the dominant force in Canadian 
markets along the way, says a report 
released Wednesday by the Institute 
for Research on Public Policy. 

“The Japanese view of Canada is 
unflattering," says Zavis Zeman in 
his study, The Men With the Yen. 

"They sec Canada as sliding back¬ 
wards with important economic deci¬ 
sions made outside the country by 
multinational banks and corpora¬ 
tions.” 

The institute is financed by the fed¬ 
eral and provincial governments and 
the private sector to research a 
wide range of issues. 

Zeman says Canada, like Australia 
which is already solidly under Japa¬ 


nese economic domination, offers 
Japan secure supplies of badly-need¬ 
ed resources, stable markets for 
manufactured goods and almost no 
competition In manufacturing. 

It also suffers from low productiv¬ 
ity, high unemployment, labor strife 
and a seemingly incurable balance- 
of-payments deficit. 

Judging from the Australian ex¬ 
perience, Canada can expect Japan 
to attempt to take over the uranium, 
forest and fishing industries, he 
says. 

Japan already controls 20 per cent 
of West Coast fisheries and is also 
making overtures on the East Coast. 

Restaurant menus printed in Japa¬ 
nese in Vancouver and in Banff Na¬ 
tional Park, Alta., are the first indi¬ 
cation that Alberta and B.C. will fall 


within Japan's economic sphere of 
influence within the next 10 to 20 
years, Zeman says. 

Japan is Canada’s second major 
trading partner after the United 
States, but in B.C. more than half of 
all trade is with Japan. 

More than 125,000 Japanese tourists 
visited Canada last year and this 
number is expected to climb dramati¬ 
cally. Large resort communities may 
even be built in the West to cater 
specifically to Japanese tourists, 
Zeman says. 

These development will accelerate 
the transfer of power and the migra¬ 
tion of people to the West, he says. 

Both the East and West coasts will 
benefit from increased Japanese in¬ 
vestments, but Quebec and Ontario 
will be hurt by more competition 


from Japanese manufactured goods, 
he says. 

These two central provinces may 
be hurt even further if the U.S. im¬ 
poses measures to protect American 
manufacturers from Japanese im¬ 
ports. Such protectionism would keep 
out Canadian goods as well. 

Zeman says there are only a few 
years left to figure out a way to fight 
increased Japanese domination of 
the economy. 

The country has no hopes of export¬ 
ing manufactured goods to Japan, but 
might trade off exports of natural 
resources for deals to include Cana¬ 
dian components In Japanese cars 
and other goods sold in this country. 

Canada could also compete with 
Japan in selling manufactured goods 
to China and other Asian countries. 


But Zeman admits “it appears un¬ 
likely that Canada has any choice 
other than even closer economic links 
with the U.S.” 

Zeman concludes that Japan's as¬ 
piration to become the top economic 
power by the year 2000 is realistic. 

"Japan is no longer imitating tech¬ 
nological change, it is initiating it," 
Zeman says. The Japanese computer 
industry is competitive with that of 
the traditional world leader in this 
field, the United States. 

Japan's blueprint for economic su¬ 
premacy calls for specialization in 
high technology and ruthless pruning 
of industries—such as textiles, ply¬ 
wood, shipbuilding, aluminum and 
fertilizers—that are not competitive. 

In contrast to the United States and 


Canada, where the economy is 
shrinking in a recession, economists 
predict the Japanese economy will 
grow between five and six per cent 
every year this decade. 

The Japanese government intends 
to invest four per cent of gross na¬ 
tional product in research and de¬ 
velopment by 1985, a figure signifi¬ 
cantly higher than in other industrial 
countries. 

By contrast, in Canada such invest¬ 
ment stands at .94 per cent of gross 
national product and the federal gov¬ 
ernment aims to reach a level of 1.5 
per cent by about 1985. 

There are already 50 per cent more 
scientists and engineers working on 
research and development in Japan 
than in the U.S. 






Chateau Garden Shed Gable type, 
hot dipped galvanized, baked on 
finish With woodgrain feature panels 
Approximate sizes 

SALE: 10' x7' 8'x7’ 8* x5' 

249.99 199.99 179.99 


Outdoor Extension Cord 30 m foi all 

outdoor garden power tools Resistant 
to oil. grease, dampness and ultra 
violet rays in sunlight 

' SALE... 14.99 




The Store That Has It All! 

IVoodwinfi Mevldtr, Phone JMh-3322. Store Hour*: 9:3O *jn.~S:30 p.m Monday to SetunUy. 
I vetting chopping Wedneuiey, IhuruUy and fridsy night » 'til 9D0 p.m. 


C.G.E. Electric Mulching Mower 

Quiet instant starts Fingertip control, 
wheel height ad)usters Swing over 
handle Recessed safety controls 

SALE 


Woodward's Cut’N’Vac 20" rotary, 
gas mower with vacuum action deck 
Single lever, height adjuster, rear 
discharge With grass catcher 
Unassembled 

249.99 


, .SALE 


Woodward’s Exterior Latex House 
Paint Acrylic latex low sheen emul 
sion Exterior Oil Paint (Not shown) 
Non chalking, high hiding, good dry 
mg. excellent weathering, self priming 
SALE. GALLON 13.99 


Woodward’s Feed & Weed New for 

mula 20 5 10 with Killem Formulated 
for lawn feeding and broad spectrum 
weed control including chickweed. 
clover, dandelion and plantain 9 kg 
covers 450 m- SALE.-.7.99 


Aluminum Extension Ladders' made 
of sturdy aluminum, with spring load¬ 
ed locks, poly rope and pully 

20* reaches 16' SALE.—54.99 

24' reaches 20' SALE..69.99 

28' reaches 24' SALE —l-93.99 


Spacemaker Garden Shed Barn style shed in long lasting hot dipped galvanized 
metal Baked on enamel finish Approximately 10' x 9’ Unassembled 


SALE.—.--- . ....339.99 

Approximately 10' x 11' Garden Shed SALE.. 399.99 


Sunbeam 18" Lawn Champ Mower 

Custom deluxe model, single blade, 
vacuum-action deck 10 amp motor 5 
lever height adjuster With catcher 
Some assembly required 

SALE.—-219.99 


Woodward's Interior / Exterior Porch 
and Floor Enamel Fast drying, highly 
abrasive and wear resistant Washable. 
Self priming 

SALE. GALLON 13.99 


B&D Whipper Snipper Grass Trim¬ 
mer Deluxe self feeding nylon line 
trimmer 12" cutting swath Tough 
enough to handle heavy weeds Light 
weight 6*/? lb /7.9 kg Easily assembl 
ed SALE..-.49.99 


Gas Powered String Trimmer Ex 

elusive ' idle line" string advance 
system Cuts full 20" swath Fuel tank 
is in the handle Weighs only 7* 4 lb / 
3 29 kg Unassembled 

sale 159.99 


Six Foot Step Ladder Household 
aluminum ladder for light duties With 
pail shelf Front and rear legs braced. 
Sure-grip slip-resistant feet 


SALE . 


Hove Reel Wall mount water flow 
reel Keeps your hose neat and ac 
lessible Holds 150* of 1 1" hose 
Connector hose included __ 

SALE 15.99 


Oscillating Sprinkler ‘Sway'N*Spray‘ 

Waters lawns up to 34 * x 65 * (22(H) 
sq ft ) 10m x 20m (200 m2) Ad 
lustabledial Perma sealed motor, brass 

SALE 899 


Aluminum Door White or brown 
baked on enamel finish, with screen, 
self storing glass and lock Door grille 
not included SALE 149.99 

Door Grille SALE 1299 


July Home Living Sale 

We have what it takes to make beautiful things happen in your home 
and garden. Check our colorful catalogue for more outstanding values! 


Chateau Barn Style Garden Shed Hot dipped galvanized, baked on enamel 
finish High roof line with distinctive shingle design Gambrel roof profile provides 
vCalk around head room Approximately 10' x 14' Unassembled 


SALE 


599.99 


Woodward’s Paint Interior Flat Latex — easily applied, fast drying, no objec¬ 
tionable odour Washable, self priming For walls and ceilings "I /"V QQ 

SALE. GALLON 1U.77 

Semi-Gloss Latex and Semi-Gloss Enamel Alkyd — dries overnight, highly 
washable, extremely durable 

SALE. GALLON.....~=- 


night, highly 

13.9$ 


50 F<jot Soaker Hove Triple tube 
sprinkles evenly and thoroughly for a 
lush green lawn Great foi flower 
beds 50' 1524m 

SALE 7.99 


Rubber Vinyl Hose 50 # * 1 z" 

diameter Withstands low- 

temperature Guaranteed not to crack 
or kink SALE" 7.99 

100' Hove SALE 1599 


Portable Toilet Completely self con¬ 
tained chemical toilet Fresh water 
•flush Eavy-to empty tank ,-*-*-* 

sale —. 69.99 

WOODWARD SjjARDWARE 


S ei 


a 



































































LIVING 

' ^ 

Section Three/Thursday, July 24,1980/Page 27 


k £!k Colonist 


Child’s adventure 
built into furniture 


and dresser 


Hot dog! Funk has status 


By MARILYN HOFFMAN 

Colonist- Monitor Service 

LOS ANGELES, CALIF. 
— Jim Hull was trained as 
an architect, and his wife 
Penny was a primary 
teacher when they mar¬ 
ried. When they had chil¬ 
dren, they couldn’t find the 
kind of furnishings they 
thought urban children 
today should have. 

So they pooled their tal- 
ents and formed 
H.U.D.D.L.E., which 
stands for Hull Urban De¬ 
sign Development Labora¬ 
tory, Etc. With their com¬ 
pany, the two began to 
design, manufacture and 
sell the kind of tough, intri¬ 
guing, altogether delight¬ 
ful furniture they thought 
kids would enjoy. 

It’s not mini-grown-up 
stuff, but a whole new con¬ 
cept recognizing that chil¬ 
dren have active imagina¬ 
tions; love to hide and 
play-act; climb, draw and 
slide, and love color, com¬ 


fort and flexibility. They 
wanted to make furniture 
that encouraged artistic 
expression and sparked 
imagination. 

When they began in 1970 
they had one child, Heath¬ 
er. Another, Kory, was on 
the way. They knew their 
children probably never 
would have the tree houses 
and hideaways they had 
enjoyed as youngsters 
growing up in small towns, 
so they decided to build 
some of the same feeling of 
adventure into the furni¬ 
ture they made of high- 
density vinyl and wood. 
Their own youngsters were 
so pleased with the system 
that they began to tell cus¬ 
tomers that it was child- 
tested and approved, right 
in their own home. 

The system is made to be 
both safe and sturdy; 
comes in an assortment of 
primary colors like green, 
yellow, red and blue; and 
can be assembled in a vari¬ 
ety of ways to meet the 


needs of a child as he 
grows. 

The elements also can be 
assembled to suit the indi¬ 
vidual requirements of 
each youngster. There are 
add-on shelves, trundle 
beds, bunk beds, loft beds, 
desks with slant tops and 
chairs that adjust in height 
from 13 to 17 inches. 

The pieces can be bought 
singly or as a group, and 
they are engineered to be 
practically indestructible. 
Many have several pur¬ 
poses, such as the “child- 
space art-gym,” which 
combines a slide, a paint¬ 
ing easel and puppet the¬ 
atre all in one piece. The 
chests are made to begin 
single, low and shallow 
when a child is small, then 
to stack up slowly to col¬ 
lege-age capacity. 

The Hulls make a wide 
range of innovative de¬ 
signs, and they keep col¬ 
lecting awards for their 
very different approach. 


Huge 
decoration 
on side 
of building 
jn New York 


esign of affluent time 


Dresser, 
crib and 
change table 
convert 
to twin bed 


* By SAM KAPLAN 

C>l—Irt-Lt A—l« t Timet Swvkt 

LOS ANGELES — In this off-ramp city 
where life so often is viewed through a 
windshield, it is only natural that an archi¬ 
tecture evolved to catch the eye of the 
motorist. 

There have been orange juice stands in 
the shape of an orange, hamburger em¬ 
poriums molded into giant buns, a restaurant 
as a brown derby and mammoth doughnuts 
on the top of doughnut shops, among many 
others. 

One of the more venerable pop art struc¬ 
tures is the Tail o' the Pup, a hot dog stand 
shaped, naturally, as a huge hot dog in a 
roll coated with, of course, mustard. 

In recognition of its contribution to the 
Los Angeles landscape, the stand has been 
recommended by the city’s Cultural Heri¬ 
tage Board for historic-cultural status The 
designation non goes to tbe city coun 
cil for action 

The board cited the 29 b) 29 foot stucco 


stand as “one of the last remaining examples 
(in Los Angeles) of programmatic architec¬ 
ture" and "a remarkable piece of pop archi¬ 
tecture." The style also is known as “funk.” 

Whatever it is called, the stand's survival 
as a living landmark appears to be based less 
on the htjge stucco bot dog and roll sculpted 
on a chickenwire frame and more on the 
Hoffman NC7 (natural casing, 7-inch long), 
all beef boiled and imaginatively dressed hot 
dogs served alfresco. 

About too of the hot dogs, along with 200 
hamburgerMnd indeterminate amounts of 
french friesTuina salad, soda, orange drink, 
coffee and pickles, are served over the 
counter daily from 9:30 in the morning to 
midnight, to a faithful clientele 

"Aside from the architecture, this place 
is a part of the history of L.A. It is & 
people place, a (us place, and for that reason 
alone it should be saved." exclaiaas Bernard 
Zimmerman as hr munches an a No. t (the 
baseM special a hot dog coaled with mua 
laid, relish and unions f or M cents) 


An architect and planner with an office a 
few blocks away, Zimmerman and an associ¬ 
ate, Phillip Hawkins, helped draft and sub¬ 
mit the application on behalf of the stand to 
the cultural heritage board. “We enthusias¬ 
tically received it,” says Ueana Welch, coor¬ 
dinator for the board. 

The customer of longest standing is 
claimed by Betty Tracy, who lives two 
blocks away and has been coming to the 
stand since it opened in 1946. 

"Most of my customers are regulars.” 
says Eddie Blake, the stand's owner, as he 
takes orders over a counter cut into the 
stucco hot dog and roll. He writes the orders 
down in shorthand on a paper plate ("to 
go") and hands them to Ms son. Dennis who 
works the grill. 

"My customers also are creatures of 
order the same thing all the 
“Nee that guy coming 
No 7 (a Mexicans ole; a 

man steps up to the counter 
No. 7. Eddie beams 


They 


BOSTON, JMASS.— 
Whatever happened to the 
days when a gas station 
looked like a gas station? 
And a supermarket was ex¬ 
actly that, not a spacious 
hall with skylights and 
plants hanging over the 
lamb chops, and silver¬ 
framed posters lining the 
walls over the canned 
goods? 

"The simplest, most 
mundane places and prod¬ 
ucts are being decorated 
these days," said Heidi 
Dizer, an interior decora¬ 
tor from Buffalo, NY. 

Sides of old buildings are 
ornamented with portraits 
of ballerinas leaping over 
jutting bricks and creeping 
ivy. 

Dishwashers, refrigera 
tors and ovens enhance kit- 
chen color and style 
schemes. 

Roorfi deodorizers, small 
and sleek, come in hues 
that complement interiors. 

One Bostonian told of a 
gas station that “looked 
more like ‘ye olde carriage 
house.’ The sign out in front 
certainly held the company 
name and prices high 
enough, but vmiught iron 
•gas lanterns' lit the shing¬ 
le-housed gas tanks. The 
station building was fa¬ 
shioned out of hand-hewn 
shingles and worn wood 
trim with plastic rock 
panels along the bottom." 
(She decided to hold out for 
a "normal” gas station.) 

“In an effort to cuphe- 
mize and disguise all the 
necessities of life, tissues 
and paper towels look like 
designer fashions, napkins 
look like Monet paintings 
and restaurants look like 
bams or greenhouses,” 
said Dizer. 

Richard Schneider, the 
manager of industrial de¬ 
sign for Digital Equipment 


MUNDANE LOOK TURNED INTO COMPLEMENT 


By WENDY GRISTMACHER 

Cotonist-Monitor Service 


Corp., explained that this 
trend in design is not new. 

"At the beginning of the 
Industrial Revolution basic 
tools were made with orna¬ 
mental etchings, and 
household equipment, such 
as sewing machines, was 
manufactured with elabo¬ 
rate enameled designs,” he 
said. 

Somewhere along the 
line, said Schneider, this 
ornamentation became 
passe, and the more severe 
functional designs took 
over. 


"Ornamental detail is 
making a comeback,” said 
Charles Harden, president 
of the New England Society 
for Interior Designers. 
“The increased attention to 
design is a sign of what’s 
happened to our economy. 
As we become more afflu¬ 
ent, we pay more attention 
to detail. We have more 
money to spend on the ni- 
cietiesof life.” 

Peter Lawrence, direc¬ 
tor of the Design Manage¬ 
ment Institute of Massa¬ 
chusetts, praised the 


increasing decoration; 
"Consumers are more 
aware of what they’re buy¬ 
ing and where they’re buy¬ 
ing it. Functional designs 
are giving way to more vi¬ 
sually attractive designs 
that complement the home 
or neighborhood." 

Lawrence feels that co- 
lonially styled gas stations, 
neatly landscaped banks, 
multicolored fire hydrants 
and lanternlike street 
lights are efforts to visual¬ 
ly integrate communities. 
For instance, "A typically 
designed gas station looks 
out of place in an old whal¬ 
ing town,” he said. 

Stores, warehouses, fac¬ 
tories and restaurants are 




being designed not only to 
attract customers, but 
also, according to Harden, 
to make the place nicer for 
employees who spend a 
large amount of time 
there. 

Even the most blase, 
utilitarian household items 
are being jazzed up. 

Tissues come in floral 
patterns as pretty as the 
designs on lace handker¬ 
chiefs. Glass jelly jars are 
etched and shaped so they 
look like fine crystal. Tele¬ 
phones are Trimlines, car¬ 
toon characters or gold 
trimmed “antiques.” 

Traditional phones still 
are selling well, but novelty 
and decorator phone sales 
are on the increase. “Peo¬ 
ple tend to look at the phone 
as purely utilitarian,” said 
a representative of New 
England Telephone Co. 
"And we’re trying to prove 
that it doesn’t have to be 
that way.” 

Lawrence agreed. 
“There’s nothing wrong 
with wanting to make 
things look more attrac¬ 
tive. People can still buy 
plain, generic household 
goods, and they can still 
find plain old cafeterias to 
eat at, and classic concrete 
banks to put their money 
in. But it’s important that 
people have an option.” 

Still, the design efforts 
are unnecessary in the eyes 
of some critics. A grocery 
shopper in New York City 
shook her head as she 
picked up paper towels 
with birds and vines vividly 
printed on them, “All this is 
just a waste of effort and 
wealth,” she said. “I’m 
going to clean the floor with 
these. I’m not going to 
frame them.” 




/ 


Owner Eddie Blake and son Dennis: ‘a remarkable piece of pop architecture’ 
























































28 THE COLONIST, Thursday July 24, 198(1 


LIVING/MEDICAL 


Quarter horse show circuit pounds Duncan ring 


Cowichan Exhibition 
Grounds in Duncan took a 
pounding during a 10-day 
Quarter Horse Show Cir¬ 
cuit, sponsored by the Van¬ 
couver Island Quarter 
Horse Association. Satur¬ 
day night’s award banquet 


was the culmination of a 
week of hard work by more 
than 100 exhibitors. 

Wool-lined cotton blan¬ 
kets were presented to the 
individual event cham¬ 
pions. Champion colt of 
1979 for the circuit was 


JULY CLEARANCE SALE 




NOW IN FULL SWING! 

HAVE WE GOT A A A A/ 

SALE FOR YOU! ■Jf|7o 
EVERYTHING IN OUR /|I«*h 
STORE ON SALE. fcVOFF 

Fantastic Selection of Shower Curtains 

BATH KITCHEN 

• Quilted fabric piecametv matching pep¬ 
tone pot hotter*, oven mitt*, toeater cover* 
— 2 and 4 shea. Mender cover* 

• Kitchen wftchee, meet grt 

• Kitchen gadget*, sheer*. 


• Paper finger tip i 

Shampoo and bath sprays, personal 


• Taper and other plain and scented cen¬ 


to Crossword t< 
• Tension and 


• Acrylic pieatk soap eftehee. toothbrush 
hotter*, towel bar* and ring*, waste basket, 
boutique and regular tissue bore*, toilet tts- 


bruehes. open and closed shelve*, rob* 
hook*, make up mirror*, coemetic, (ewettry, 
Hpettcfc boss*, large mirror* 

• Space saver*, johnny pole*, seal** gator* 

• Bath pMows. rod cover*, shower cape 

• SAFE-T-CTCN norveNp tub formula 

• Sachets, Imported soap*, cologne*, bub¬ 
ble bath 

• Complete bee ot klnch shower rods and 
(no more 

a Wooden ware — medicine cabinets, irto- 


bar* and rings 
• Loofah pad*, mitts, backttrape, sponges 


• Wicker place mat*, bamboo, tudte and 
wooden napkin ring*, retractable clothe* 
line* 

• Locally mads kltchan pottary and 

• Ceramic frog*, mushroom clean*- 
or* — Bunnies 

• Cookie jars, jam dtohe*. salt and papper 
sat* 

• Kitchen guide*, accordion recipe tiles, 
waste bag hotter* 

• Canister sat*, chefs froien and other food 
knives 

• Cutting boards, cheasa boards, mugs, 
ate. 

• TEAKnapkmrtngs.satadbowts.traya.satt 
and peppers, coasters, wine racks, condiment 
sets, salad tong* and aarvsrs 

• Fabric and plastic ptacamats, tea coda*. 


• Eerthenwere, chins, ceremic fugs end 
betme. ceramic, piaabc wail and countar bath 


onmg board cow 
I. gretarWfancy 
lichen Omits Ei 


inghsh Sheffield eurgtoal 


• Famous brands towais and bath mats, tub 
mats. Itrgs bath towais 

• Ortantai wicksr war*, comer and regular 
shelve*, baskets, magazine racks, hangers, 
hampers, plant stands, picture ham**, tans, 
towel stand* 

• Picture*, wail plaque*, mirrors, bath trays, 
showsr caddiss 

• Metal towel stands, towel trees, tables, 
benches. b*ek-of-th*door racks 

• Psddsd plastic, woodsn, plastic toils! 


• Tea towais. butcher. Mb and half aprons 

• Tabto towns, piscemats, napkin* m cro¬ 
chet lace, dacron poiyestsr lac*, franch AF 
gincon lacs, outwork lace, no-iron table¬ 
cloth* prtated vinyl cloth*, norai print*, bum- 
out taMa clothe, m all ahapea and sue* 


OUR LARGE STORE IS CROWDED WITH 
GIFT IDEAS FROM AROUND THE WORLD 


James 

% 

Square 


BATH & 
KITCHEN 



GIFT CERTIFICATES — BRIDAL REGISTRY 

GFT MAS FOf AMNVHtSAIKS, MTMMTS, SHOWERS mt WHNNH6S 

HARGEX 

■■■■ Sorry. No Refunds or Deposits on sslo Items 

VISA Exchanges and Store Credit Notes Welcome 

JAMES BAY SQUARE SHOPPING MALL 
10435 SIMCOE ST., AT MENZIES 385-2523 

FHEE COVERED PARKING BEHIND SAFEWAY 7-13 


Pinkstaff’s Major Ex¬ 
pression. American's Lad. 
owned by R. Hall and 
shown by Darwin Gunder¬ 
son, was top colt of 1978. 
Colt of 1977 was Solitaire 
Sun, owned by Mike Smith. 
Fritzy Red, owned by the 
Fritzy Red Syndicate, was 
champion aged stallion. 
Champion filly of 1979 was 
Annie Dee Bars. Gary Cun¬ 
ningham showed both the 
top filly of 1978, Cas6ade 
Katie, and the top filly ^of 
1977, Kim’s Little Sugar. 
Hyline Hi Fi, shown by 
Leannc Petersen, was 
champion aged marc. Jean 
and Len Wakeman's geld¬ 
ing Triple U Kan was 
champion gelding of 1979. 
Gelding of 1978 was Snip’s 
Dyno Mac, owned by Sheila 
Wagner. Aged gelding 
champion was Century 72, 
owned by Jordan Hett. 

AMATEUR rider circuit 
champion was Heather 
Rimmer, who rode Ho Sil¬ 
ver to first in the following 
individual event champion¬ 
ships: amateur reining, 
amateur western riding, 
amateur westen horseman¬ 
ship, and amateur hunt 
seat equitation. Reserve 
championship wend to 
Shelby Sheppard and 
Showdown Sugar Pal, who 
were named champions in 
amateur bridle path hack. 


Horse Happenings 


By MARILYN McCALL 


Youth 11 years and under 
chammpion was Jill Thom¬ 
son, who rode Tracey’s 
Gold to championships in 
youth western pleasure, 
youth western hor^man- 
ship, youth bridle path 
hack. Reserve went to 
Sharon Szepat and Bob's 
Mistake, who were named 
champions in showman¬ 
ship 11 years and under. 
Youth 12 to 14 years cham¬ 
pion was Jody Thomson, 
who rode Ima Century Two 
to championships in youth 
showmanship (12 to 14), 
youth reining (18 an 
under), youth hunt seat 
equitation (12 to 14), and 
youth trail (12 to 14). 

Bitsy Cook and Real Re¬ 
nown were reserve cham¬ 
pions, taking the cham¬ 
pionship in youth western 
riding 18 an under. Jean 
Matheson and Lucky Dia¬ 
mond Dell were not only 
youth 15 to 18 champions, 
but were also senior horse 
champions. This pair won 
the championship in senior 
trail, youth western horse¬ 
manship (15 to 18), youth 
bridle path hack (15 to 


“MEAT” WITH THE BIG 
CHEESES... 

in the newly expanded 

BACK 
ALLEY I 

DELI 

2000-2002 
OAK BAY AVE. 

090-0311 

OPEN 

9 a.m. to 6 p.m. 

Mon. to Sat. 




636 YATES 383-2921 


SHOE SHOPS 


‘Just Below Douglas’ 


SEMI-ANNUAL 

CLEARANCE 

OF SUMMER STOCK 
IS STILL IN PROGRESS 



and 



sorry—all sales are final on this greatly reduced stock. 

STILL A GOOD SELECTION OF SIZES AND STYLES 

SMART YOU! 

COME IN AND BE GLAD YOU DID! 


NEW SIZE RANGE FOR FALL ... 

Some styles will now be available 
starting at size 4 and up to 11. 

Naturalizer has your size featuring AAA-AA-A-B-C-D. 

NOTE! SOMETHING NEW 

A brochure showing all Naturalizer shoes for fall, outlining styles, size and 
colours available. This can be yours by simply leaving your name and address 
at the counter. 


V 


REMEMBER, ONLY 


*/ 



k&- 


SHOE SHOPS 


18), and youth hunt seat 
equitation (15 to 18). Re¬ 
serve championship went 
to Kami Irwin and Old 
Lady Irwin, who took the 
championship in youth 
showmanship (15 to 18). 


pion (18 and under) was 
Kirk Waton who rode 
Tinky’s Vic to the cham¬ 
pionship in youth trail (15 
lo 18), youth stake race (18 
and under), open pole 
bending, youth pole bend¬ 
ing (18 and under), youth 
barrel race (18 and under), 
youth breakaway roping 
(18 and under), and dally 
team roping—heeling. Mil¬ 
lie Ann Reimer and Brush¬ 
wood Kittyhawk were re¬ 
serve champions, winning 
the champinship in open 
barrels. Champion junior 
horse was Ms. Debutante, 
owned by Wayne and Mary 
Burwash. This horse was 
named champion in junior 
trail and junior western 
pleasure. Reserve went to 
Tuff N’Shifty, shown to 
championship in bridle 
path hack junior horse by 
Darlene Forsyth. Reserve 
champion senior horse was 
Lighting Beau, owned by 
Lorna Sims. Champion¬ 
ships in senior western 
pleasure, and in youth 
western pleasure (15 to 18) 
went to this pair. 

CHAMPION in youth hal¬ 
ter geldings was Jordan 
Hett and Century 72. Youth 


halter'mares champion 
was Kid Fantasy and Gay- 
lenc Gunderson. Amateur 
trail was won by Judy 
Schneider and Otoe’s Hou- 
dini. Riding Opie’s Page 
Boy, Phyllis MacDonald 
was named champion in 
amateur western pleasure. 
Youth western pleasure (12 
to 14) was won by Lieta 
Hartmann and Frosted 
Hobby. Both youth Western 
horsemanship (12 to 14) 
and youth bridle path hack 
(12 to 14) were won by 
Kristine McConnell and Vic 
Wahluke. Open westen rid¬ 
ing champion was Denise 
Shields, riding Baron Bey. 
Championsips in both open 
reining and working co- 
whorse went to Fritzy Red, 
owned by the Fritzy Red 
Syndicate. Senior bridle 
path hack champion was 
Hyline Brother, ridden by 
Leanne Petersen. Cham¬ 
pionships in both youth 
hunt seat equitation (11 and 
under) and youth trail (11 
and under) went to Tara 
Rimmer. mounted on Del’s 
Dancer. 

Champion in dally team 
roping heading was Gwen- 
bar Barb, ridden by Wes 
Hewitt. 

THE ROCKING Horse 
Ranch held its second an¬ 
nual rodeo in Nanoose Bay 
recently. At the end Of 
three days of events. 
Heather Noble was named 
hi point cowgirl and Al 
Noble was named hi point 
cowboy. First in bull rid¬ 
ing, with a score of 62, was 
Dwayne Nikkels. Larry 
Erickson won steer wres¬ 
tling with a time of 7.55 
seconds. In saddle bronc 
riding, first went to George 
Palmantier, who had a 
score of 61. Gord Madlll 


won bareback bronc riding 
with a score of 57. Rose 
Davis was first in the ladies 
barrel race, turning in a 
time of 17.2 seconds. Calf 
roping was won by Al Noble 
in a time of 14.25 seconds. 
In the junior steer riding, 
first went to Blair Erick¬ 
son, who had a score of 59. 

THE PAIR of Al Noble 
and Norm Mitton won team 
roping, with a score of 7.7 
seconds. In junior rope and 
touch, first went to Shayne 
Hutchison, who had a time 
of 9.15 seconds. In the girls’ 
barrel race, the fastest 
time was turned in by Ivy 
Rinehart (18.9 seconds). 
Glen Card's team won the 
wild cow milking, with a 
time of 22.15 seconds. First 
in ladies goat tying went to 
Carol Ann Bird, who had a 
time, of 12.35 seconds. Wes 
Elzinga’s team won the 
wild horse race with a time 
of 24.9 seconds. 

The Victoria Saanich 
Pony Club recently hosted 
the British Columbia Re¬ 
gional “D” Rally at the 
Saanichton Fairgrounds 
with 14 teams from Van¬ 
couver Island and the lower 
Mainland participating in 


the three-day event, which 
included the three 
phases—dressage, cross¬ 
country and stadium jump¬ 
ing. 

Teams were also judged 
on stable management and 
turn out. Members of the 
Victoria-Saanich team 
were Michelle Oubshoorn 
(captain), Anna-Marie 
Oudshoorn, Debbie Camp¬ 
bell, Janet Laurie, and 
Amanda Ledrew (stable 
helper).. The Victoria- 
Saanich team placed first 
in both cross-country and 
stadium jumping, fifth jn 
dressage, third in stable 
management, and second 
in the over all competition. 
Debbie Campbell received 
third place for high individ¬ 
ual riding. 

COMING EVENTS 

July 27: Sherwood Creek 
Barn Show—all welcome— 
(478-1227) 

Aug. 2,3: Open and VIHC 
Show—English and west¬ 
ern—River Valley Ranch, 
Che ma I nus—(112-246- 
4240). 

Aug. 3: Oak Meadows 
Summer Show—children’s 
and open classes—(479- 
6843). 


Your Good Health 

By PAUL G. DONOHUE, M.D. 


Bulletin Board 


ot •uMMj'aoL/'’ 0 * 


DISARMAMENT 

Victoria Coalition for 
Disarmament will meet at 
9:30 a.m. today at 1831 Fern 
Street. Coming activities 
will be discussed, including 
the August 9 anti-nuclear 
demonstration at Comox. 
For more information 
phone 386-0186. 


DANCE 

Saanich International 
folk dance lessons from 7 
p.m.to9p.m. Fridayatthe 
Cameron Bandshell in Bea¬ 
con Hill Park. 


VARIETY 

Variety of top local 
entertainment 8:30 p.m. 
every Friday at the Elks 
Club, 732 Cormorant. 

OUTDOORS 

Victoria YM-YWCA still 
has vacancies in its 4 week 
Wilderness Experience 
program for 14 to 16 year 
olds beginning Monday. 
Co-ed program will feature 
lessons in developing out¬ 
door skills like canoeing, 
rock climbing, back pack¬ 
ing and outdoor living. For 
more information phone 
386-7511. 


Dear Dr. Donohue: I un¬ 
derstand that taking vita¬ 
min A (50,000 units a day) 
for a period of time will 
cause skin rash and liver 
damage because the vita¬ 
min is oil soluable and is 
stored in quantities in the 
body. My question is: 
Would these harmful ef¬ 
fects also result from tak¬ 
ing large quantities of the 
vitamin A in water soluable 
form?— J.R.W. > 

Yes, they would. “Fat so¬ 
luable’’ refers to the action 
of the vitamin in the body. 
It means that any excess is 
attracted to and stored in 
fatty deposits (in the liver 
chiefly for vitamin A). 
There is almost always 
enough of this vitamin 
stored in the liver at any 
given time to take care of 
needs for up to two years. 

An excess dose of vita¬ 
min A in whatever oral 
form will increase the body 
stores of that vitamin. The 
reason water preparations 
are used is to increase ab¬ 


sorption by the body for 
people who may require 
this. The storage still 
occurs ultimately in the fat 
tissue. 

Too much vitamin A on a 
prolonged basis can cause 
fatigue, bone pain, head¬ 
ache and dry scaly skin. 
You don’t interpret the 
term “period of time." 
Your 50,000 units a day 
should not hurt. But if you 
continue that for more than 
a month or so, you might 
develop vitamin poisoning. 

The water soluble vita¬ 
mins (like B) are that way 
naturally. They just are not 
attracted to fatty deposits, 
hence are not stored. 
Therefore, the excess is ex¬ 
creted harmlessly. 

If you have learned you 
have a vitamin A defi¬ 
ciency (which is rare) you 
probably have deficiencies 
of other vitamins as well. 
In any event, I urge caution 
in dosing yourself with any 
fat soluble vitamins. 



ufits 50%otf 

Cm 

imam 

1200 BROAD STREET 385-5114 
ALL SALES FINAL 


v't’ - 





































A 


LIVING 


THE COLONIST, Thursday July 24, 1980 29 


Born-again Galloping Gourmet’s 
happiest role helping Third World 


By JUDY CREIGHTON 
CP Lifestyle Editor 


TORONTO (CP) — The 
Galloping Gourmet says he 
has become the happiest 
man alive since turnin(tto 
God. 

Graham Kerr, who at one 
point needed $80,000 a year 
just to maintain his trendy 
lifestyle, said this week he 
has developed a positive 
outlook toward society's 
problems since becoming a 
born-again Christian. He 
was speaking at the first 
global conference on the 
future. 

British-born Kerr was 
host of a highly successful 
daily television cooking 
show during the 1960s and 
early 1970s. 

But he gave it all up 
a bout five years ago to turn 
his energies to Christianity 
and working in developing 
countries. 

"We are going to have to 
do something about the 
waste, the starving in the 
TI\ird World or it will be 
done for us—politically,” 
he told a panel on waste. 

"But when we speak of 
massive personal change, 
our detractors insist that 
there could be disaster to 
the economy. But the per¬ 
sonal action of giving is the 
only one we’ve got." 

Kerr said the current 




FINAL CLEARANCE H 


OF SUMMERWEAR! 

NOW PRICED AT 


ya.ott OFF 


• Koret and lantzen Co-ordinates 

• Sundresses — Vi Price 

• Sujnmer Dresses 25% OFF 

• Special Rack $5 to $25 

• Swimsuits, Shorts, Lingerie and Misc 

Sportswear, up to Vi OFF 
(UNTIL |UIY 31st) 



/ i CLOTHES 

CLOSET 



Esquimau Shopping Centre , 

384-4311_ jj 


Kerr gave up television cooking role five years ago to turn his energies to Christianity 

contrast to the sums doled 
out by the world's wealth¬ 
ier nations, he said. 


mass feeding programs for 
the malnourished in devel¬ 
oping countries could re¬ 
sult in violence because 
they do not provide lasting 
solutions. 

He said he’d prefer a sys¬ 
tem in which micro-farms 
would be developed for 


Third World peoples. 

If every man, woman 
and child in North America 
saved 50 cents a day, he 
said, $37 billion could be 
raised annually to foster 
agricultural improvements 
in the Third World. 

That would be in sharp 


“In the U.S., 0.24 per cent 
fcof the gross national prod¬ 
uct) or $lAi billion is given 
to aid underdeveloped 
countries in the form of 
loans." Kerr said. “I think 


we put more against arma¬ 
ment spending. 

“If the individual 
changes, the system can be 
altered. Yet at the present 
moment in the U.S. restau¬ 
rant industry alone $57 bil¬ 
lion in -food is wasted, 
thrown out.” 


Ice cream tastes like a rose smells 


. AND THE LEGEND SPREADS 


SAN FRANCISCO (UPI) 
— In Ted and Lydia Han¬ 
sen's ice cream shop, nes¬ 
tled in a quiet neighborhood 
just a few blocks from the 
Pacific Ocean, you can get 
an ice cream cone that 
tastes like a rose smells. 

"Here, try this,” says 
Ted, his baseball cap 
slightly askew from scur¬ 
rying around. He hands me 
a miniature-size cone with 
a small scoop of ice cream. 

It's true. It does taste like 
a rose smells. I lean over to 
smell the ice cream. There 
is no odor. He laughs. 

“I told you. It tastes like 
a rose smells. Here. Try 
this." 

This one is green, with 
little bits of something in it. 
It’s good. Ted hands me a 
card. This ice cream, it 
says, contains 14 different 
types of vegetables. I start 
to pick out the flavors in it. 
Celery. Tomatoes. Carrots. 
Zucchini. Spinach. Spin¬ 
ach? I hate spinach. 

“The kids all love it ‘til 
they find out what’s in it,”' 
he laughs. “The parents 
love me when they find 
out,” 

Ted and Lydia, whom 
everyone calls “Lee,” have 
run Polly Ann’s Ice Cream 
for 14 years. With a combi¬ 
nation of hard work, cheer¬ 
fulness and humor they 
have created a local legend 
whose fame has spread to 
all parts of the world. 

Where else are you 


guaranteed a doggie cone 
for your pet, even if it's an 
otter or a snake? Where 
else can you get five differ- 
-ont-Junds of whiskey fla- 
voredice cream? 

Children have to say 
“please” or “thank you” or 
they don't get served. 

Kids unruly enough to 
spout an obscenity get 
blasted with a squirt gun 
wielded by dead-eye Lee, 
who countenances no prd- 
fanity. 

Foreign tourists are 
treated with respect. 

The shop itself has just 
enough room between the 
counter and the wall to 
wedge a Little League 
team. The wall behind the 
counter is covered with 
decorated placards con¬ 
taining the names of cur¬ 
rently available flavors. 
About 50. 

On the other wall hangs a 
large 1874 photograph of 
San Franeisco’s baseball 
team. Ted's great-grandfa¬ 
ther, sprouting great mut- 
tonchops, is in the second 
row. 

Over the years, Lee and 
Ted have cooked up 277 
flavors, ranging from 
Greek ouzo to black va¬ 
nilla. 

“The kids ask me why the 
vanilla's black," Ted says. 
“I tell them I put black shoe 
polish in it.” 

A city bus driver halts 
outside, his bus idling, pas¬ 
sengers gazing out the win¬ 


dow. He rushes in and 
orders a chocolate shake. 
Ted whips it up and he’s 
gone again. 

Ted, 58, and Lee, 57, have 
been happily married for 38 
years. When he quit his 
machinist job, they decided 
to open a business that 
everybody liked. They 
chose ice cream and bought 
Polly Ann’s. It had only 
eight flavors at the time. 

The place is always 
packed. Kids getting free 
samples. Lee or one of the 
young helpers trying to fill 
the orders. Ted in the back, 
mixing up some new con¬ 
coction or rushing out front 
to say “hello” and offer 
homespun advice. 

“I tell people, whatever 
your job, just make sure 
you like it,” says Ted. “If 
you like your job, you can 
work 20 hours a day. If you 
don't, nothing goes right." 

Lee loves the children. 
She jokes that their four 
grandchildren were all al¬ 
lergic to ice cream but now 
can eat it. 

It’s an American success 
story. And Ted and Lee 
believe they know how to 
keep it that way. 

"To be honest with you, 
they want us to franchise. 
I’ve had chances to expand 
and I don’t want to,” Ted 
said. “We’ve talked it over 
but we’re a small shop and 
we know many of our cus¬ 
tomers and we won’t cut 


our product no matter what 
happens. 

“The minute you expand 
you lose something. I don’t 
know what it is but you lose 
something. You lose con¬ 
tact with your customers. 
The customers are always 
coming in asking for me or 
Lee and if we were off 
somewhere else it just 
wouldn't be right.” 

Ted's next project is an 
ice cream flavor for every 


country in the world, with a 
tiny paper flag from the 
appropriate country stuck 
on top. 

“It’ll give the kids a 
chance to learn about the 
flags of other countries," 
he beams, offering me a 
taste of Bumpy Freeway. 


“What’s Bumpy Free¬ 
way?” I ask. 

“Don’t you know?” he 
chided. "Rocky Road.” 


1980 CHRYSLER 
CORDOBA 


RENT ME 




Deluxe Interior, radio, 6 
cylinder, Automatic. 
Stock No. 80291. 


7760 “ 



382-2313 | 


rv v»l r- 
ilVZlliCii XV 


TV STEREO 


27 


Read (Watt) 


w • RENTALS 

• SALES 

MICROWAVES 

381-5622 


MICROWAVE 
RENT ME 


PURCHASE OPTION 
AVAILABLE 



PHONE FOB IMMEDIATE DELIVERY - 381-5622 


SOME PE0P1E 
JUST DON’T BELONG. 


FINALLY 

I’M GONNA GET 
MORE THAN RESPECT. 



WHAT IS RODNEY DANGERFIELD 
UP TO? 


FINAL 3 DAYS 


new reductions in 



semi-annual shoe clearance 


THURSDAY 9 A.M. TO SATURDAY 5 P.M. 


FOUR SPECIAL GROUPS 

; Reg. to $35 

Reg. to $50 

Reg. to $78 

10 “ 

20 “ 

30 00 

; Reg. to $100. 


NOW 40“ 


remainder of sale shoes and handbags 
at final reductions 



1203 Douglas St. 1 9 /,rV riAA M/VI ** Chargex, 

383-2211 w \J MasterCharge 

ALL SALES FINAL AT SALE PRICES 


^ The Linen Cupboard 

ACCENT ON VALUES 

CLEARANCE SALE C0HTDI1IGS 

SHEET SETS 

17 " 

27 " 



Twin.... 
Double 


King. 

Includes fitted, flat and case(s) 


44 " 


BREEZE RUGS 


TASTENAKER 

SHEETS 

In rust, brown, royale blue 
(broken range) mostly percale. 

Twin.6" 

Double.8" 

Queen.. 10 " 

Cases. 4 " 


DRAPES 



Custom made right on our own 
premises, our export craftsman¬ 
ship will save you time and money 
... but bast ol all ... you’ll have 
the satisfaction of choosing your 
materials and hardware from our 
fabulous selection and knowing 
the drapes you select will do 
beautiful things for your wln- 



2030 Douglas Street 


382-6323 


CALL FOR IN-HOME SERVICE 


OR CALL 

382-6323 


AMO WE WILL BMNO THIS SUPERB 
SELECTION OF FABRICS TO VOUR 
HOME AT NO COST OR OBLIGA¬ 
TION TO YOU 



By 

neldcrest 

Reg. 

Sale 

Std. Lid 

12.50 4 ” 

21x36 

28.05 10 ” 

27*' Brand 

25.05 10 ” 

27x44 

04.05 15” 


Twin 


COMFORTERS 

29 " 
34 " 
39 " 


Double 


Queen 


CENTURY TO VELS 


Reg. 

m - Oftn&9# 
and leery 

Teak 

Sale 

Twin ... 

* 800 $ 

11.98 

399 

Double 

Hand 

7.98 

599 

Queen . 

Wash 

3.75 

2 " 



BEDSPREADS 

. 29 ” 

... 34 ” 

. 44 ” 

. 54 ” 


• COMPLETE DESIGN SERVICES FOR • 
BATH — BEDROOM — KITCHEN 


3960 QUADRA ST. Ph. 479-2812 


, 



i 


< 















































































I 


30 THE COLONIST, Thursday July 24, 1980 


LIVING 


Cold turkey best way to quit 


WASHINGTON (UPI) — 
Those who try to stop 
smoking by phasing out the 
use of cigarettes only pro¬ 
long their agony and rein¬ 
force their desire to keep 
puffing, a new study has 
found. 

The UCLA study said 
three out of four cigarette 
smokers trying to stop 
eventually start smoking 
again because of severe 
symptoms of tobacco with¬ 
drawal. 

Those who quit cold tur¬ 
key are less affected by the 
symptoms than those who 
attempt to quit gradually, 
the study said. 


Psychologists Saul Shift¬ 
man and Murray Jarvik at 
the University of Califor¬ 
nia at Los Angeles sur¬ 
veyed 40 people who tried 
to stop smoking during a 
two-week period. They said 
phasing out the use of ciga¬ 
rettes “precipitates a 
chronic state of withdraw¬ 
al" that only reinforces the 
habit. 

Another study concluded 
that smokers over 45 and 
those whose fathers did not 
smoke are more successful 
in their attempts to quit. 

The tobacco withdrawal 
syndrome includes irrita¬ 
bility, weight gain and an 


acute craving for tobacco. 

The researchers said 90 
per cent of all smokers re¬ 
port the tobacco craving, 
and three out of four find it 
so hard to resist that they 
resume smoking. 

Half the UCLA study's 
subjects quit cold turkey. 
The others reduced their 
smoking slowly. 

Although both the cold 
turkey and phasing-out 
groups initially reported 
similar symptoms, the 
cravings among the cold 
turkey quitters dropped off 
significantly during the 
first week. 

"The cigarettes indulged 


in by smokers who attempt 
to cut down may serve only 
to prolong their agony by 
intermittently reinforcing 
their symptoms and their 
smoking,” Shiftman and 
Jarvik said. 

In the other study, psy¬ 
chologists from Los An¬ 
geles' Kaiser-Permanente 
Mental Health Centre sur¬ 
veyed 134 smokers who 
averaged 1% packs a day. 
Six months after the 
smokers participated in a 
five-day stop-smoking clin¬ 
ic, 60 per cent said they 
completely kicked the 
habit. 

Age appeared tq be the 


most important factor in 
determining if a smoker 
can quit successfully. 
Smokers over 45 proved to 
be the most successful 
long-range quitters, the 
Kaiser-Permanente re¬ 
searchers said. 

Family smoking habits 
are also important. Those 
whose fathers did not 
smoke are more likely to 
quit for good than those 
whose fathers did, the re¬ 
searchers said. 

People who smoke heavi¬ 
ly at social gatherings and 
in the evenings also have a 
more difficult time quit¬ 
ting, they said. 


THE ACES 


® 


IRA G. CORN. JR. 


"It is less important to 
redistribute wealth than it is 
to redistribute opportunity." 
- Arthur H. Vandenberg. 


NORTH Hl-A 

♦ AQJ54 
4 A764 

♦ A63 

♦ K 


Opportunity may come in 
different ways In todays 
interesting thriller, a differ¬ 
ent bidding sequence left a 
crack in the door and a dev 
astating defense took full 
advantage of the opportuni¬ 
ty. The hand was played in 
the 1979 World Champion- 
ships won by the United 
States over Italy. 

When first played, former 
Aces Bill Eisenberg and 
Eddie Kantar of Los Ange¬ 
les played in four spades 
from the North position. 
This proved a cakewalk as 
North's club king won, a dia¬ 
mond put him in the South 
hand for a losing trump 
finesse. The defenders col¬ 
lected two hearts and a 
trump, and four spades 
made (one of North’s hearts 
goes on the club ace). 

With the Italians playing 
four spades. North opened 
an artificial and forcing one 
club and South showed three 
controls by bidding one 
spade. The net result was 
that South played four spade 
instead of North. 

This opened the door and 
West led the heart king, won 
by dummy’s ace. Dummy's 
club king was cashed and a 
diamond was led to South’s 
king to try the trump 
finesse. 

East won and returned a 
heart and. when West 
cashed his second heart 
winner. East threw his last 
diamond. The door was now 
wide open and West led a 
diamond for East to ruff 
and the game went one 
down. 

Unlucky? Yes But per¬ 
haps declarer should have 
been more careful. He had 
10 tricks in sight as long as 
he did not lose two spade 
tricks.. 

So, after winning the ace 
of hearts, he could have 
cinched his game by cashing 
the king of clubs and play¬ 
ing the ace and another 
spade The defense would 


WEST 

43 

4KQJ 10 
♦ 1098 54 
410 8 4 


EAST 
4 K 8 7 2 
452 
4 J 7 

4 Q J 9 5 3 


SOUTH 
4 1096 
4983 
4 KQ2 
4 A 7 6 2 

Vulnerable Both. Dealer: 
South. The bidding: 

South West North East 

Pass Pass 1 4 Pass 
2 4 Pass 3 4 Pass 
4 4 All pass 

Opening lead: Club queen 

get one spade and two 
hearts, but declarer would 
score the game 

Bid with Corn 

South holds 6-11 -B 

4 K 8 7 2 
452 
4 J 7 

4 Q J 9 5 3 

North South 

14 14 

2 NT ? 


ANSWER: Three no trump 
A minimum, but the five card 
club suit should be a plus. 




THURS., FRI., SAT. ONLY 
JULY 24-26 

THE REMAINING 
SUMMER STOCK OF 
INDIES’ DRESSES AND 
BLOUSES AND PANTS 

NOW REDUCED 
TO 


GMS m 

LADIES’ WEAR I 

7 Days of Savings 


Vs 


2 PRICE 


All SPRIN6 and SUMMER MERCHANDISE 

includes Dresses, Gowns, Sportswear, Blouses, 
Slacks. Skirts, Sweaters, etc. 


Sale Ends f. 

July 31. 1980 | 


H “ 



SAANICHTON 

PLAZA 

652-4721 


649 JOHNSON ST. 
DOWNTOWN 
386-2213 


HATLEY PARK 
SHOPPING CENTRE 
478-7743 


1 


9 PRICE! 

bd ALL SALES FINAL 



706 FORT STREET 

MASTER CHARGE, CHARGEX rn 


383-7552 
OPEN 9:30-5:30 MON. to SAT. 


Fro^h air 
Hraplaca^ 


OPENING SOON 
IN VICTORIA 

For more information 
see Wednesday's paper. 


hfii4ht§ of Bath. 

HILLSIDE MALL (VICTORIA) 598-6221 and HARBOUR PARK MALL (NANAIMO) 754-2044 


GIANT SUMMER 
WHITE SALE!! 

SAVE 20% to 50% 

ON ALL tireMcrest, TOWELS and MATS 





WH.TE CROSS 
GOLD CROSS 
AIR STEP 
NICCOLINI 
DUVAL 
HELENA 

fine shoes for women 

st 1453 DOUGLAS 


OUR BIGGEST SALE OF THE SEASON 


SARABAND ulu umneae __ __ KHUbKtsSivt 

HRS. 22“ 22“ S~“ 22* 

SAVE 4096 ON THESE BATH SHEETS 


OLD CHINESE 


PROGRESSIVE 


Sr* 35" 

Ala MELODY 

24* 

24" Sr* 19“ 

EMBASSY m 

1 M**d. 1 bith, 1 watfi. Nat. 26.96. 
Witow Oram SALE . 

13 “ 

SHOP EARLY 

WHILE QUANTITIES 

LAST 


Taylor's 

SUMMER SALE CONTINUES 


REG. TO 30.00 


PANTS 

SKIRTS 

BLOUSES 

T-SHIRTS 



CO-ORDINATED 

SPORTSWEAR 

AND 

ACTIVEWEAR 


40 % 


to 


60 % 


OFF 


DRESSES REG. TO 65.00 




to 


SUITS REG. TO 140.00 



.'50 

Taylor's a 


WHERE THE PRICES FIT UKE THE FASHIONS 

OPEN 9-5:30 FRIDAY NIGHTS ’TIL 9 

713 YATES ST. ^OMHltONWI 383-6916 


r 






























































.'•*n ; 

\ 


N. 


LIVING 


THE COLONIST, Thursday July 24, 1980 31 



Dear Ann Landers: I 

learned Monday what I’ve 
been fearing for seven 
weeks. I am pregnant. At 
20, I'm old enough to know 
bettor and thoroughly 
ashamed of myself. 

I am a part-time student 
and working to put myself 
through college. I live at 
home with my parents. I 
didn't date much in high 
school, but in the last two 
years I sort of blossomed 
and have gone with several 
nice fellows. But I never 
slept with anyone but my 
brother-in-law. The first 
time was when I had had 
too much to drink and he 
drove me home. 

Yesterday, I told my par¬ 
ents 1 was PG. Mom cried 
and Dad demanded that I 
tell him who was respon¬ 
sible for my condition. I 
said, "lam responsible. 
This is my fault.” He re¬ 


plied, “That’s not good 
enough. Who Is the 
father?" I answered, 
’’That’s my secret, and I’ll 
take It to my grave." 

Actually, the man Is my 
brother-in-law. If my sister 
knew, It would be the end of 
their marriage. I am mak¬ 
ing plans to go to another 
state before I begin to 
show. I’ve also decided to 
give up the baby for adop¬ 
tion. Meanwhile, my par¬ 
ents are putting terrific 
pressure on me to tell them 
who fathered my child. I 
need strength to carry on 
and I cannot talk to a single 
soul about this problem, so 
I am —Turning To You 

Dear Tnrnlng: Your plan 
sounds exactly right to me. 
Naming your brother-in- 
law would only hurt inno¬ 
cent people. He’s lucky you 
are a person of Integrity. 
Keep your secret and God 
bless. 


ACROSS 
1 ••-is 

BooT 
6 Femmes 
10 Squabble 

14 left-hand 
page 

15 Awry 

16 Hindu 
••Olympus" 

17 Ridge 
10 Studies. 

3 words 

20 Path 

21 Totals: 

2 words 

22 Cargo unit 

23 Container 
25 Thrift 

27 Volcanic rock 

30 Before 

31 Want ad 
abbr. 

32 Gives off 

34 Mischievous 
36 Farm worker 

40-and 

took notice 

42 Ore deposit 

43 Register 
45 Tasty 

47 "Rah!": Sp. 

48 Sack 

1 w 


50 Sliver 
52 Caesar s foe 

56 Madagascar 
mammal 

57 Leftover 

58 — the Sailor 
60 Singer 

63 Kind of actor 

65 Edicts 

66 Roman garb 

67 Ftedact 

68 N Y. city 

69 Full of won¬ 
der 

70 Hardens 

71 "Beau —” 
DOWN 

1 Grandparen¬ 
ts 

2 Antitoxins 

3 Penetrating 

4 Fall flowers 

5 Fish delicacy 

6 Madders 

7 Old 

8 Rent 

9 Lead astray 

10 Tex. unlv. 

11 Protein dert- 
vate: Prefix 

12 "-with 

a View' 1 

13 Bluefln 



19 Seed 
21 Particles 
24 Supped 

26 Ms. Gwyn 

27 Soreness 

28 Bridge 

29 Kett. at al 
33 Displaces 

35 Track events 

36 Not working 

37 — -do-well 
39 Socialist 

Eugene — 
41 Heaped 


46 Faint 
49 Leads 

51 Ready to 
marry 

52 Tana — 

53 Dari 

54 Platform 

55 Mean 
59 Decoy 

61 Off. copy 

62 Lucid 
64 Wander 
05 Canine 



rr 



w 



■ 

« 




ta 




M 





Dear Ana Landers: I am 

a 14-year-old boy who needs 
some answers. Will you 
please tell me what is 
wrong with people who 
enjoy going around de¬ 
stroying property? Last 


Ann 

Landers 


year I saw so much of it in 
our school It made me 
sick. 


Kids slash hunks of wood 
off desks and chairs, cut 
holes in window shades. 


break windows on purpose, 
write all over walls with ink 
and lipstick. I once saw a 
kid drop a typewriter out of 
a window and laugh about 
it. That same kid took some 
seats apart in the audi¬ 
torium and threw away the 


nuts and bolts. Why do peo- 
ple act this way? — 

Stumped In Stamford, 
Conn. 

Dear Stumped: People 
who destroy property are 
angry with their parents, 


teachers, friends, them¬ 
selves and the world. The 
solution is to channel the 
anger into constructive 
outlets. And it isn't easy. 
But it can be done by com¬ 
petent teachers and expert 
counselling. 



UNITED Feature Syndicate 


.■L i . i .i. r . i 

r■°M | o 

|X sm : 


UUUUUU UQUL) 11311 
uuqcjij □cjuudcia 


□aaaauau □□□ 


1 

« 

ir 

ir 

ir 

it 




m 






■ 

“ 











K 





■ 

* 




* 

H"' 











m 

m 

** 


•1 


r 

















★ *-★ * * * * * * * * ****** 


Jsr 


£un» 


* 

* 

* 

* 

* 

* 

* 

* 

* 

* 
k 
k 
k 
k 
* 

♦ 

* 

* 

» 

* 

* OFF MOST CURRENT STOCK * 

* ALL SALES FINAL * 

H m : 

t SHOES 383-7815 * 
742 YATES STREET * 

TOO Mock Ve4et" *• * 

***************** 

S. 


WOMENS 
SHOE SALE 
CONTINUES 

DRESS SHOES 
CASUAL SHOES 






AUGUST FUR SALE 

• • 

STARTS THURSDAY, JULY 24th, 9 A.M. 

FASHION DESIGNED FINE QUALITY 

MINK 

AT TREMENDOUS SAVINGS 

SAMPLE LISTING ONLY: 

FULL LENGTH COATS 


Black Crass MM Cost 

1, Size 8, Reg. $5600 

Bu nn ltd MM Cost 

1, Size 10, Reg. $5900 

Psstsl MM Cent 

Fur tie belt. 

1, Size 12, Reg. $4750 

Lavender MM Coat 

1, Size 14, Reg. $4800 

Mack Crass MM Ceat 

1, Size 14, Reg. $4950 

SaffMra MMCeat 

1, Size 16, Reg. $5600 

VMetMMCeat 

1, Size 18, Reg. $4900 

S appklra MM Coat 

1, Size 20, Reg. $5200 

Pastel MM Paw Ceat 

1, Size 6, Reg. $2650 

Sapplslra MM Paw Ceat 

1, Size 18, Reg. $2795 

Dark MM Ovals Ceat 

1, Size 20, Reg. $2500 

% COATS 

Pastel MM 

1, Size 6, Reg. $3400 

Pastel MM and Leather 

1, Size 10, Reg. $1500 

Shadew MM Feather Cut 

1, Size 10, Reg. $2550 

Brawn Crass Fsm. MM 

1, Size 12, Reg. $3950 

Dark Ranch Fen. MM 

1, Size 12, Reg. $3995 

Mack Crass MM 

1, Size 14, Reg. $3950 


NOW *4599 
now *4899 

NOW *3799 
now *3799 
NOW *3999 
NOW *4599 
NOW *3900 
NOW *4100 
now *2199 
*1999 


NOW 


NOW 


1999 



now *2199 
now * 1099 


OPENING SPECIAL 


NOW 


1999 


1, Size 18, Reg. $3550 


JACKETS 


now *2799 
now *2999 
now *2799 
now *2299 


:L>CM $4QQQ 

1, Size 10. Reg. $2995 NOW 1 999 

1, SUe 12, Reg. $2300 NOW *1699 

1, Size 14, Reg. $3500 NOW *2799 

1. Size 18, Reg. $2560 now *1899 

1, Skim IS, Reg. $3200 now *2399 

Sorry, No Repeats 
at List Prices 


LUXURIOUS LONG HAIRS 



NORWEGIAN BLUE FOX COAT 

One only 
Size 10 

R^ 200 *2899 


MUSKRAT 

TO CLEAR AT COST 


& 


v ; 


k «•* 



MUSKRAT 

TOPPERS 


*899 


FULL LENGTH $ 4 ftQQ 
MUSKRAT COATS 1 UUU 


OUR MAGNIFICENT SELECTION IS TOO EXTENSIVE TO LIST 


NO CARRYIN6 CHARGE 
FORM DAYS. 



911 


SL 


2 Blocks up from the Empress 































































































































































32 THE COLONIST, Thursday July 24, 1980 

City park 
Should go 
to region’ 

The Capital Region should acquire Royal Ath¬ 
letic Park from the city of Victoria as a “dramatic 
example” of the broadening of the regional park 
concept, according to a recommendation in the 
draft master parks plan for Greater Victoria. 

The report, prepared by Professional Environmen¬ 
tal Recreation Consultants of Surrey, is currently being 
considered by regional board directors. 

The consultants said that city and inner-core taxpay¬ 
ers were subsidizing others in the region by pro¬ 
viding facilities that were truly regional in nature. 

The use of Royal Athletic Park “is obviously regional 
and City of Victoria taxpayers are thereby subsi¬ 
dizing the use of the facility by non-resident users,” the 
consultants said. 

“(Royal Athletic) park is more appropriately a re¬ 
gional responsibility and the organized outdoor re¬ 
creational use of the park is not fundamentally differ¬ 
ent from other forms of outdoor recreational uses 
of existing regional parks.” 

It could be acquired as a regional park, with the 
maintenance being contracted back to the city which has 
the resources and expertise to maintain it, the consultants 

said. 

City fathers would be unlikely to agree with turning 
over Royal Athletic Park, which runs at a break-even 
level or a slight profit, but they might agree with 
handing over some other facilities. 

Royal Athletic hosts international sporting events 
as well as senior A softball and soccer, professional 
baseball, international rugby and junior football. 

The consultants said that similarly, many recrea¬ 
tional facilities were clearly regional in nature. 

These facilities are the only ones of their kind in 
.the area while patrons reside in all parts of the re¬ 
gion. 

They include: 

• The McPherson Theatre, venue of most of the 
major performing arts in the region, requiring large 
audiences to make the events economically viable. 

• Royal Theatre, the only performing arts theatre 
with seating capacity for more than 1,000 in the Capital 
Region. 

• Crystal Pool, the only 50-metre competitive pool 
in Greater Victoria. 

• Memorial Arena, the only large spectator-oriented 
arena. 

• Victoria Racquet Club, the only full-service pri¬ 
vate recreation club. 

• Sandown Raceway, the only facility that complete¬ 
ly accommodates horseracing. 

• University of Victoria, which among its wide range 
of recreation facilities has Centennial Stadium, the re¬ 
gion’s single major spectator-oriented running track. 

• Western Speedway, the area's only completely 
equipped car racing facilities. 

“It is suggested that very few major recreational fa¬ 
cilities need be developed over the next five to 10 
years. In most cases current supply meeds or ex¬ 
ceeds projected demand for facilities.” 

Turning to the Royal Theatre, the consultants be¬ 
lieve the demand for a performing arts theatre with 
its seating capacity “is probably sufficient to jus¬ 
tify the more moderate costs of renovating the ex¬ 
isting facility” rather than build a new one. 

Although the consultants were not as optimistic as 
the Purdy Report to the Royal Theatre Commission' 
(the report predicted an operating surplus) any operating 
deficit would not have significant impact if assumed by 
three or four participating municipalities. 

They recommended the theatre be used primarily 
for performing arts and only incidentally for show¬ 
ing motion pictures to fill any excess capacity, and 
said it should be managed in co-operation with Mc¬ 
Pherson Theatre Foundation or possibly by the foun¬ 
dation itself on contract to the co-owning municipali¬ 
ties, Victoria, Oak Bay and Saanich. 



WHAT IS TED KNIGHT UP TO? 


SOME PEOPLE 


CAPITAL REGION 


Langford unity stressed 


The inevitability of de¬ 
velopment around Lang¬ 
ford Lake prompted a call 
by a Capital Region Board 
director Wednesday for de¬ 
velopers and residents to 
“try and get together." 

Metchosin’s Mac Tipton 
told a local works and ser¬ 
vices committee it was to 
everyone’s advantage to 
get together because there 
was going to be develop¬ 
ment. 

He issued the appeal dur¬ 
ing lengthy debate on a re¬ 
zoning application by Gold- 
stream Meadows Ltd. for 
development of a 56-lot 
subdivision and septic tank 


disposal system at the 
north end of the lake. 

Spokesmen for the Lang¬ 
ford Lake Planning Asso¬ 
ciation and the Langford 
Lake Improvement Dis¬ 
trict were successful in ap¬ 
peals to have the request 
tabled until additional stu¬ 
dies on groundwater move¬ 
ment had been completed 
and a secondary plan 
drafted for the area. 

Association secretary 
Deborah Acheson said the 
plan, expected to be com¬ 
pleted early next year, was 
intended to supplement the 
western community offi¬ 
cial plan. 


Marine Calendar 


MAVY COASTGUARD 


Endeavour. Mackenzie. Yukon. 
Qu'Appelle. Cowichan. St. Anthony. 
Provider. Terra Nova. Fundy. Mira- 
mlchi. Kootenay, Restigouche. Gatin¬ 
eau— In port. 

Porte de la Reine. Quebec. Dau- 
phine—F alse Creek- 
Oriole— Agpuna Bav. Hawaii. Due 
back Aug. 16. 


Vancouver —in port 
Camsell—Yarrows. 

Narwhal—Bull Harbor. 

Ready— K vuquoI patrol 
Douglas- Georgia Strait. 

Quadra—on station. 

Racer—Victoria patrol. 

Rider— Sandheads patrol. 

J.E. Bernier—Sachs Harbor, N.W.T. 


OCEAN SCIENCES 
Parizeau- Cape Flattery area. 
Richardson— Naden Harbor. 
Vector—Howe Sound. 

Pandora /t-Balllle Islands, N.W.T. 
Pender— Barkley Sound. 


MERCHANT MARINE 

Pacemperor —Ogden Point. 

Key Glory— Nanaimo. 

Emma Johanna- -Harmac. 

Ocean Bounty— drill rig in for re¬ 
pairs at Nanoose Bay. 


"We are extremely dis¬ 
turbed the committee is 
about to approve an appli¬ 
cation to rezone property 
located in the planning 
area when to do so would 
severely compromise the 
planning process,” she 
said. 

The application covered 
about 50 acres of land with¬ 
in the boundaries of the 
association “and conse¬ 
quently involves a decision 
over a major portion of 
undeveloped land,” Ache- 
son said. 

If secondary community 
planning (provided for in 
the western community 
settlement plan) was to 
have any meaning then it 
was necessary for the asso¬ 
ciation to have time to com¬ 
plete the document, the 
spokesman said. 

Improvement district 
chairman Ed Marten said 
the application directly af¬ 
fected the group's main re¬ 
sponsibility: the mainte¬ 
nance and improvement of 
the quality of water in the 
fhke. 

Assumptions in reports 
about groundwater move¬ 
ment in the area between 


Langford Lake and the 
Goldstream watershed 
were not borne out by the 
facts and lacked support¬ 
ing evidence, he contend¬ 
ed. 

Developer spokesman 
Thomaj Loney told the 
committee he was dis¬ 
mayed that after working 
on the plan for four years 
“we’re now being told to 
forget it for another year.” 

In other business, the 
committee: 

• Endorsed rezoning 
property at 2015 Mill- 
stream from rural to in¬ 
dustrial. 

• Ordered preparation 
of a bylaw covering rezon- 
ing land in View Royal, 486 
Island Highway, from com¬ 
mercial to residential. 

• Approved rezoning of 
property owned by Brian 
Brown and L.E. Zelenko on 
the West Coast Road at 
Sookc from rural to village 
residential. 

• Tabled until comple¬ 
tion of the View Royal set¬ 
tlement plan an application 
to rezone a nine-acre site 
north of Parson’s Bridge to 
allow townhouse develop¬ 
ment. 


Region rejects 
running licence 

Capital Region Board directors want no part of 
administering business licences in electoral areas. 

Instead, the local planning and zoning committee 
will recommend to Finance Minister Hugh Curtis that 
the proposed Business Licence Act be amended so 
licences not be granted until an applicant has satis¬ 
fied requirements of local authorities regarding zon¬ 
ing, building inspection, health and fire. 

The committee was told Wednesday that under cur 
rent legislation the region lacked authority to adopt 
bylaws requiring persons to obtain a licence before- 
operating a business. 

Chief community planner James Masterton said in a 
report there had been several occasions where li¬ 
cences had been obtained from the province by per 
sons operating a business in the region that did not 
conform with local zoning regulations. 


$17,000 FOR SCHOOL 


A $17,000 grant for the 
preservation and reloca¬ 
tion of Saanichton School 
has been approved by Pro¬ 
vincial Secretary Evan 
Wolfe. 

The money will be held in 
trust for the Saanich His¬ 
torical Artifacts Society 
until it is required. 

The old schoolhouse was 


recently purchased for $1 
from the Saanich School 
District and will soon he 
moved from its Mount 
Newton Cross Road loca¬ 
tion to a new site where one 
of the school’s two rooms 
will be restored to 1900 
style and the second room 
coverted into a meeting 
room. 



OPEN DAILY 
9-9 



SUPER 





50 WEST 
BURNSIDE 


Price. Effectiv e July 24, 25, 26 # AMPLE PARKING • EVERYDAY SAVINGS t CONVENIENT HOURS W« reserve the right to limit quantit ies I 

HONEST TO GOODNESS_ 


VALLE pv«*T 

” FRESH CUT UP A A ▲ 


SILVERWOOD 

COTTAGE 

CHEESE 500 1 

SILVERWOOD 

ICE 

CREAM .. 2 litre tub 

SUNRYPE BLUE LABEL CLEAR 

APPLE 

J UICE .48-cz. tin 

" l . 

YORK 

UNSWEETENED 
ORANGE JUICE « 

YORK UNSWEETENED PINK 

GRAPEFRUIT 
JUICE. 

VORK WHOLE 

KERNEL 
CORN. 


CANADA NO. 1 

GREEN 

CABBAGE 


.25* 

ORANGES .5>.1°° 

CANADA NO. 1 CALIFORNIA V 

CANTAUMITE 59* 


oz. 


48 oz. 


12 oz. 


HAWAIIAN PUNCH 

FRINT FLAVOR 
CRYSTALS.anz. «n 

WELCHAOE 

GRAPE 
DRINK .II ez. 

CLOVERLEAF 

CHUNK LIGHT 
TUNA. 

PINE TREE 

DRY ROASTED 
PEANUTS.32., 


PLUSH 


CARPET 

CLEANER 


KRAFT 

\ _ 

CHEEZ 

199 

WHIZ 

PURE 

STRAWBERRY 

100 s 1 

199 

JAM. J.. 

24 oz. 1 

PURE 

APRICOT 

I 79 

JAM 

24 oz. 1 

PURE 

GRAPE 

139 

JELLY 

24 oz. 1 

PURE 

CREAMED 

119 

HONEY 

1 

PURE 

PEANUT 

019 

BUTTER 

. 1 kt £ 

MAYONNAISE 99* 

sum.WW 

TUCK LANGE SIZE 

GARBAGE 

90* 


FRYING 


CHICKEN 

.lb. 


SCHNEIDER'S 

HEAD 

CHEESE 


.375i 


SCHNEIDER'S 

ASSORTED 

SPREAD ROU.250 g 

NEW ZEALAND LAMB 

SHOULDER 
CHOPS. 

NEW ZEALAND 

LAM a 
LOIN 
CHOPS 

NEW ZEALAND 

LAMB 
LEGS 


lb. 


129 


lb. 


FRESH . 

SOLE 9*9 

FILLETS...» £ 

McCAIN FROZEN 

CREAM PIES 

CHOC., BANANA, 

COCONUT, LB MON . 14 ez. 

McCAIN FROZEN 

VEGETABLES 

PAMWANON 

CAPITAL 

BUTTERCUP 


24-ez. team 


BAGS 


TUCK 

KITCHEN 


it i 


































































WORLD 


THE COLONIST, Thursday July 24, 1980 33 


Borg bows out as single champ 


Five-time Wimbledon 
tennis champion Bjorn 
Borg savored his last day 
as a bachelor Wednesday, 
disco dancing until dawn at 
a Bucharest nightclub in 
Romania before his mar¬ 
riage today to his Roma¬ 
nian girlfriend, Mariana 
Slmlonescii. Dressed in an 
Ike and Tina Turner t-shirt 
and chewing bubble gum, 
the blond 24-year-old tennis 
star was the last person to 
leave the Hotel Athenee 
disco-club when it closed 
early Wednesday morning. 
The couple has been living 
together for four years and 
will first take their vows at 
a civil marriage ceremony 
in a Bucharest town hall 
before driving to their 
villa, where the bride will 
change Into her $8,000 wed¬ 
ding gown. At mid-after¬ 
noon. they will celebrate a 
religious ceremony in a 
story-book setting at a 
medieval monastery not 
far from Snagov. A private 
reception, then another 
gala party in Monte Carlo 
will follow. 

Judgment was reserved 
Wednesday in an appeal by 
Garth Brewer. 42, a New 
Brunswick customs officer 
fired from the public ser¬ 
vice after writing letters to 
newspapers supporting 
New Democratic Party po¬ 
licies. Brewer, of Wood 
stock, w as fired Feb. 1 
after he wrote four letters 
criticizing the former Pro¬ 
gressive Conservative gov¬ 
ernment during the Feb. 18 
federal election campaign. 

Simon Wicsenthal. who 
gained fame through his 
successful hunt for Nazi 
war criminal Adolf Eicb- 
mann, says he favors the 
release of former Hitler 
deputy Rudolf Hess from 
Berlin's Spandau prison. 

Wiesenthal, 72, founder 
of the Vienna-based Jewish 
Documentation Centre, 
was quoted as saying in an 
interview with the Ger¬ 
man-language edition of 
Playboy magazine that the 
86-year-old Hess—in jail 
for life—should be freed 
for health reasons. 

Senator Sarto Fournier, 
a Quebec Liberal MP for 28 
years and a former mayor 



NAMES in the NEWS 


Washington's 

Centre. 


Kennedy 


Borg 

. last to leave 


of Montreal for three 
years, died Wednesday 
aged 72, Fournier lived in 
Hull with his wife, the for¬ 
mer Elizabeth Lamoureux, 
and leaves two daughters. 

Henry Kissinger, with 
wife Nancy and 19-year-old 
son David, on vacation 
from Brandeis University, 
this week took in the Tony 
Award-winning show A 
Day In Hollywood—A Night 
in the Ukraine—the Marx 
Brothers takeoff with 
Frank Lazarus, Priscilla 
Lopez and Davtd Garrison. 


Teeny-tfopper heartthrob 
Andy Gibb will be the first 
invited guest to appear at a 
command performance by 
President Carter July 30 at 



Hess 

. plea for freedom- 


The old mining town of 
Tellurlde, nestled at the 8,- 
000-foot level in Colorado’s 
San Juan Mountains, is 
ready for this weekend’s 
Jazz Festival featuring Ro¬ 
berta Flack, Herbie Han¬ 
cock, Paul Butterfield and, 
appropriately, Orchestra 
of the Clouds 


After raising 21 kids, 18 
of them foster children, 
you would think Patricia 
Andras of Westfield Mass., 
has done her fair share of 
work but she doesn't think 
so. The 42-year-old woman, 
who still has two foster 
children in her care, 
marched into her local post 
office Tuesday and signed 
up for the draft, stunning 
her family and postal offi¬ 
cials. "It’s no joke to me,” 
she said later.” 


An unemployed Army re¬ 
servist in Pittsburgh, Vic¬ 
tor Belmonte, 23, accused 
of killing four people in a 
sniper attack was held 
without bail Wednesday in 
Allegheny County jail 
pending a hearing July 29. 
He was arraigned Tuesday 
for the slayings on a quiet 
tree-lined street in the 
nearby borough of Corao- 
polis where his father is a 
councilman. 


There won’t be a penny 
shortage at Mark HelPs 
Belleville III., surplus store 
for a while and the puzzle is 
what to do with the haul of 
30,000 pennies used last 
weekend by an impulse 
buyer who bought a boat 
from the store stock. Mary 
Ann Reed, whose husband, 
Raymond, purchased the 
boat for their five children, 
said she and her hubby had 
been buying pennies as an 
investment, hoping the 
copper might increase in 
value but decided they 
wanted the boat more. 



\ 


Dietrich 

in gold and silver 


Pope John Paul hasac 
copied an invitation to visit 
West Germany, sources at 
the West German Bishops' 
conference in Bonn said 
Wednesday. It has not been 
decided whether the Pope 
will start his visit Nov. 15, 
the 700th anniversary of the 
death of Saint Albertus 
Magnus, or in May. 


Convicted Irish Republi¬ 
can Army commander 35- 
year-old Martin Meehan 
called of f his 66-day hunger 
strike Wednesday soon 
after a doctor reported he 
was “sinking fast.” Mee¬ 
han's wife, Briege, told re¬ 
porters he took the decision 
after a personal appeal 
from Tomas Cardinal 
O'Flaich not to allow him¬ 
self to die because it would 
provoke bloodshed in Bel¬ 
fast. 


The Stratford Festival is 
pulling in some big names 
this year. Dustin Hoffman 
slipped into the south-west¬ 
ern Ontario city recently, 
Saw performances of Vir¬ 
ginia and Titus Androni- 
cuir—two of the festival’s 
most praised productions 
—and slipped away before 
most people knew he was 
there. Some people also say 


they saw Robert Redford. 
says festival publicist 
Leonard McHardy. 


One of the Soviet Union’s 
best-known writers of the 
1960s, Vasily Aksyonov ar¬ 
rived in Paris after leaving 
Moscow, saying he didn’t 
know whether he had been 
expelled. "It will be clear 
later,” he told reporters in 
English at the airport. 
“Right now, I am so tired, I 
don’t know who I am.” Ak¬ 
syonov, once popular with 
Soviet youth, especially for 
his novel, Starry Ticket, is 
travelling with his family 
on a two-year exit visa 
from the Soviet Union and 
is expected to settle in the 
United States. 

Backgammon may never 
be the same. When film idol 
Marlene Dietrich insisted 
she needed something out 
of the ordinary, artist Neal 
Orfaley went to work. Now 
the actress plays constant¬ 
ly with her housekeeper in 
Paris—on a $17,000 board 
encrusted in gold and solid 
silver with dice cups cast in 
silver bearing the actress's 
monogram in gold. 




Price Sale 



ricki’s 

Mayfair Centre — Victoria 
Country Club Mall — Nanaimo 

Visa & Mastercharge Accepted 



2 exceptional 
furniture buys! 

Shop now through Saturday while quantities last. 





Save s 155 

2-pc. sectional 
living room suite 

*699 


Regular 

$854.98 


Comfortable styling includes no-sag 
spring construction in seats; 7" thick 
convoluted foam seat cushions; 
semi-attached polyfoam-filled back 
cushions and arm bolsters; sturdy 
hardwood frame. Beautiful 
Brown/floral 'Moonfiower' pattern on 
100% cotton cover. Suite includes 
regular sofa plus one-arm loveseat. 

01R 051 349. 

Fall A Winter Catalogues are now 
available at Sears Catalogue Counter. 


Save $ 60 

Velvet Swivel 
Rocker for relaxing 


*199 


Reg. 

$259.98 


Buy now at this excellent saving, men ait 
back and relax. Has sturdy hardwood 
frame and foam padding throughout for 
your seating comfort. Covered in Green. 
Brown. Blue. Rust or Gold color Hocked 
nylon velvet 5-leg swivel base rotates a 
full 360° 01R 043 250 




Ltd.- 

Be ar s Ltd. 
































































34 THE COLONIST, Thursday July 24, 1980 


CANADA/REGION 


r 



SNOBOY 


Personal Shopping 


WELLBURNS 


Conservatory announces music examination list 


The Victoria Conserva¬ 
tory of Music has an¬ 
nounced the results of this 
year's examinations. The 
examinations were held in 
June in the following cate¬ 
gories: piano, violin, viola, 
cello, guitar, voice, flute, 
trumpet, French horn, 
speech arts and music lan¬ 
guage. 

PIANO: 

Grade XII — first class honours: 
Kevin Fltz-Gerald; honours: Kristine 
Benv. 

Grade XI — first class honours: 
Teresa Cheno. Carolyn Wong. Yvette 
Llem; honours Susan Grant-Evans, 
Heather McLeod, Wlllette Neilmeijer 

Grade X — first class honours: An¬ 
gela Carter, Linda Mee; pass: Brenda 
Maree. Alison Nishihara. 

Grade IX — first class honours: Eve 
Ego van, Daphne K a if on, Karen Yee. 
Grace Baek. Ingrid Brandstetter, 


Keith Low; honours: Karen Kllng, Ann 
Stack, Sherry Lee; pass: Gabrleila 
Tong. 

Grade VI — first dass honours: Mi¬ 
chelle Hlmick, Denise Oliver; hon¬ 
ours: Wendy Severn, Leslie Bowers. 
Shirting Mah. pass: Annie Ho. Donald 
Swainson. Patricia Armstrong. Heidi 
Slat. Amos Wong. 

Grade y — first class honours: Jan¬ 
ice Boothman, Li I-Anne Yee. 

Grade IV — first class honours: 
Krysta Taytor, Meets Williams. Kris¬ 
tin Scott. Deborah Jackson; honours: 
Emtyn Ngal. Rosalind Beale. Petra 
Johns, pass: Melanie McRae, Daniela 
Cubelic. Doreen Hopkins, Shannon 
Takacs, Christopher Chew. Lois Cor¬ 
bin, Monica Marcoux. 

Grade 111 —first class honours: Erin 
Scott, Megan Hughes. Kim Svendsen, 
Derk Wotmuth. David Lee. Curtis Lov. 
Marguerite Teles lord, Evan Thomp¬ 
son, Ingetlse Lov, Marlowe Hogg; hon¬ 
ours: Tabitha-Sue Glllman, Loralee 
Gower. Ann Olllla. Jackl Oanylchuck. 
Bryan Johnson, Maurlne Johnson, Arv 
drea Mlsovk. Nora Wood, pass: Julie 
Iverson, Kathleen Rawlins. Boblev 
Mah, Julie McAulcy 


Wings-clipped 
Eagle hoping 
for clearance 


BA1E COMEAU, Que. (CP) — Eagle Sarmont, his 
wings clipped by the federal transport department, 
is waiting and hoping for an official change of heart to 
allow him to continue his transatlantic flight by mo¬ 
torized hang glider to Paris. 

The transport department grounded him Tuesday 
after ruling that his glider was an aircraft and that it 
failed to meet Canadian safety standards, but the Califor¬ 
nia daredevil denied that and other claims in an interview 
Wednesday. 

"We've been hearing that we entered Canada il¬ 
legally," he said. "We did not. 

"We also hear that we don’t have survival or safe¬ 
ty gear. That, too, is untrue." 

Sarmont, 28, said he was trying to get in touch with 
Transport Minister Jean-Luc Pepin to lodge an ap¬ 
peal. 

“The ministry has designated us as an aircraft 
under the regulations." he said, "but the minister may 
exempt any person or aircraft under the same regu¬ 
lations." 

Meanwhile, the Eagle and his two-member ground 
crew are stuck here on the north shore of the St. Lawrence 
River, where he landed Monday night after a flight from 
Montmagny, Que. 

He had intended to go another 150 kilometres north- 
cast to Sept-Iles, “but I do not have lights and am not 
equipped for night flying, so I went ahead and cut the 
flight short.” 

Sarmont said he, girlfriend Claudine Chouinard and 
buddy Dennis Curasi are staying at the home of Hubert 
Castonguay, the air traffic controller who gave him 
permission to land. 

He had no idea how long his stay would last, but he 
had nothing but praise for the people he had met—includ¬ 
ing the RCMlf* officers who seized his glider, dubbed the 
"Spirit of California." 

"The RCMP have been incredibly courteous. They're 
caught in the middle. I've been very impressed with their 
professionalism and courtesy.” 

Sarmont, who officially changed his name from Jo¬ 
seph Carter Whitmore five years ago, said the engine 
that drives the single propeller of his hang glider 
"started life as a snowmobile.” 

“But I took a year developing it as a hang glider 
model. It's now been re-engineered. So it’s a dif¬ 
ferent engine with only the casing left." 

The glider weighs 65 kilograms and carries ID kilo¬ 
grams of gear, while Sarmont himselkweighs about 
60 kilograms. ^ 


Grade II — first class honours: 
Diane Rennie. Anthea Rippin; hon¬ 
ours: Lisa Rippington. Joanna Gisla- 
son. Maureen Daniel. Jennifer Clark, 
pass: Bonnie Trip. Michelle Berry. 
Dawn Guilbauft. Celia Bowker. Doug¬ 
las Cook. 

Grade I — first class honours: 
Christopher White, Melody Lise. Miles 
Takacs. Tracey Murphy. Jennifer Mi¬ 
chelle Spencer. Jennifer Looten. Tod 
Molnar; honours: Jennifer Rawlins, 
Eric Chemeff, Jennifer Cook. Terence 
Coulter. Jennifer Smyty. Monique Het 
big. Ian Mead-Robins. Marion New¬ 
man. Joclne Tylor. Heather Diggle, 
Jennifer Screech, pass: Caltriona 
Haarsma. Gordon Stark. Elizabeth 
Bowker. 

Preliminary — first class honours: 
David Noel, Anne Marie Middleton. 
Nadine Voegeli. Andrew Wllmott. 
honours: Colleen Peets, Gabrielle 
Wenman. Brian Angene. Terry Chase. 
Brent Molnar, Fritz Helblg. Wade 
Mayer, Veronla Coulter. Carolyn 
Howe, pass: Hilary Skinner. Jennifer 
Beltel. Diana Jollv. Stephenie Mac- 
Vlcar, Nicole Whitfield. Stephen Mc¬ 
Kenzie, Tim Stamper. 


-» STRINGS-VIOLIN 

Grade XI — first class honours: 
Jean MacRae; honours: Patricia 
Armstrong. 

Grade X — honours: Maxwell Ngal. 
pass: Lillian Jen. 

Grade IX — pass: Lisa Cownden, 
Douglas Thordarson. 

Grade VIII — first class honours: 
Emtyn Ngal. 

Grade VII — first class honours: 
Ramsey Husser. 

Grade VI — Chantal Cownden. Irene 
Cheung, Celia Bowker. Adrian Smith 

Grade V — first class honours: Kim 
Linekln; honours: Christopher Ker¬ 
shaw 

Grade IV — first class honours: Tim 
Swanson. John Cave; pass: Earl Plea- 
sance. Rita Jewkes. Ruth Gill. Sandra 
Jewkes 

Grade III — first class honours: 
Janice Boothman; Heather Martin, 
Scoff Newton, Justin Harlnel. 

Grade II — firs! class honours: 
Phoebe MacRae. Michelle Hlmick. 
honours: Carolyn Swanson, Sara 
Baade. John Pazden; pass: Diane Blr 
kenhead. Jennifer Diggle, Timothy 
Padmore, Keel-Lynn Watkins. Joanne 
Padmore. 


• — first class honours: Joel 
Legate. Bonnie Neriuoke. Max 
Humphreys. Marie Lluboievlc. hon 
ours: Sophia Trltt, Catherine McCaw; 
pass: Andrew Nordstrom. R. J. Fish¬ 
er. Rebecca Howard 

Primary - honours: Teresa Cheng; 
tlrst class honours: Donna Robert 
son. 

VIOLA 

Grade XI — honours: Christine 
Prince. 

Grade IX—honours: SusanSavle. 

Grade III — pass: Lauretta Morin. 
Jody Barber 

Grade III — pass: Michael McCrae. 
Ian Whan-Tong. 

Grade II—pass: Brando Maree. 


CELLO 

Grade XI — first class honours: 
Marlena Tureski, Kenneth Nachtlgal 
Grade VII — first class honours: 
Eugenie Ngal. 

Grade VI — first class honours: 
Bridget MacRae. Emily Walter; pass: 
Sandra Birkenhead. 

Grade V — honours: Alasdalr 


Papers must adapt 


TORONTO (CP) — 
Newspapers will be in deep 
trouble unless they adapt to 
new technology, but for 
those that do change there 
are glory days ahead, the 
executive editor of The 
Globe and Mail said Wed¬ 
nesday. 

Cameron Smith, who also 
holds a law degree, tuirLjJie 
first global conference on 
the future that the time has 
passed when newspapers 
could simply recite events. 


Instead, they must grapple 
with problems and inter¬ 
pretations. 

"There are great issues 
to be faced and enormous 
problems to be solved and 
there is great use for news¬ 
papers—never more so 
than now,” Smith told a 
panel discussion on how 
telecommunications and 
video systems are altering 
news and other Informa¬ 
tion delivery systems. 


In a generally gloomy 
look at the future, he pre¬ 
dicted robots and compu¬ 
terized automation will add 
quickly to unemployment, 
leaving 2^ million out of 
work in Canada 10 years 
from now. 

Technology will take 
away five to 10 jobs for 
every one created and 
newspapers will lose a lot 
of advertising when two- 
way television moves into 
homes. 


New from 

Precious purse jewellery sculptured in Oscar's exclusive flower shape. 
Magnificent jeweller's box. 1 quarter ounce perfume spray $53.00 refill 
$37.50. If you haven't tried Oscar s fragrances yet you are in for a treat — 
ask one of the cosmeticians at Blink Bonnie for your free sample. 


(Blink Be 


onnie 

HILLSIDE MALL 595-6262 


Grad* III — pass: Anthony Nord¬ 
strom 

Grad* I — first class honours: 
Dorothy Andrews. Peter Tyrrell. 

Primary — pass: Kelly Charlton, 
Kevin Fltz-Gerald. 

GUITAR 

Grade IX — honours: Jack Duck¬ 
worth. 

Grad* VIII—pass: Henry Kolenko. 
Grade VII — first class honours 
Greg Laewen, pass. Peter Baek 
Grade IV — first class honours. 
James Miller, honours: Karen For¬ 
res! 

Grade IV—honours: Lisa Barton. 
Grade I—pass: SheahanEpp. 

VOICE 

Teacher training (year i) — first 
class honours: Maureen Branch. 
Erika Kurlh; honours: Richard Mar- 
gison. 

Teacher training (year 1) — first 
class honours: Amy Kaellls. Roland 
Renton; honours: Elizabeth Lutz. Bar¬ 
bara Keefe: pass: Margaret Dean, 
Megumi Koshibe. 

Grade XII — first class honours: 
Deborah Millar. Maureen Branch 
Grad* XI — first class honours: Ste¬ 
phen Bouev. Ingrid Attrot. 

Grade X — first class honours: 
Meredythe Broadway. Carol Harder. 
Roland Renton, Margaret Dean. Me¬ 
gumi Koshibe, Elizabeth Lutz. Gordon 
Thomson. Barbara Keefe, Amy Kael- 
lis. 

Grad* IX — firs! class honours. Ju¬ 
liette Kirk, Sara Weicker, Loralee 
Gower; honours: Corale* Johnson. 
Margaret McLynn; pass: Lois Corbin. 
GradOri 11 — honours: Susan Thorn. 
Grade VII — first class honours: 
Jodi Amos. 

Grad* VI — first class honours: Wil- 
lette NeMmelier; pass: Peter Titus. 

Grad* V — pass: Susan Grant- 
Evans 

Grade IV — pass: Kristine Benv. 
Paris Wright. Barbara Blower 
Grade II — first class honours: Jen¬ 
nifer Dovle. 

Grade I—pass: Margaret Chan. 

WIND JURIES—FLUTE 

First class honours: Yvptte Llem, 
Sharron McMorran; pass: Heather 
McLeod. 


FLUTE 

Grade V — honours: Laurena Hig¬ 
gins. 

Grade III — first class honours: 
Frances Padmore; honours: Joy Em- 
mond. 

TRUMPET 

Grade V—pass. Lane Watson. 

FRENCH HORN 

Grade II — first class honours : 
Joanne Damant. 

SPEECH ARTS 

Grade VIII — tlrst class honours: 
Hilary Stark. 

Grade VII — first class honours: 
Sandra Foweraker. 

Grade VI — first class honours: 
David Wlngrove; honours: Richard 
Thompson. 

MUSIC LANGUAGE 

Grad* XII — first class honours: 
Wendv Rankin; honours: Rosemary 
Bhattacharwa 

Grade XI — honours: Barbara 
Sunter 

Grade X — first class honours. Wii- 
lette Nellmeller, Malcolm Woodland; 
honours: Margaret Chapman. 

Grade IX — first class honours: In¬ 
grid Attrot. Barbara Blower; honours: 
Loma Hansen. Hilda Kwong. Gloria 
Wong, pass: Lillian Jen. Amy Kaellls, 
Elizabeth Lutz, Deborah Millar. Gor¬ 
don Thomson, Amanda Watson. 

Grade VIII — first class honours: 
Deborah Jackson. Candy Wyatt; hon¬ 
ours: E*ve Egovan. Bemle Hodges; 
pass: Laura Glover, Rebecca Kelly. 
Brenda Maree. Laura Low. Timothy 
Williams. 

Grade VII VII-tlrstclass honours: 
Carolyn Anderson. Margaret McLynn, 
Fern Spring; honours: Catherine An¬ 
derson. 

Grade VII — first class honours: 
Grace Baek, Keith Low; honours: In¬ 
grid Brandstetter, Melinda Cownden. 
Rosalind Coy. Joyce Fairbrother. 
Mark Ferris. Corelee Johnson. 
Daphne Kalfon, Julette Kirk. Cindy 
Uebermann, Thomas E. Middleton, 
Gerry Morin. Catherine Mountain, Eu¬ 
genie Ngai. Alison Nishihara, Sandra 
Prestwlch, Loreen Schmltre, Betsy 
Taylor. Sara Weicker. Rosemary 
Whltehouse, Adriana Wong; pass: Ste¬ 


phen Bouey. Margaret Chan. Lana 
Chin. Loralee Gower, Barbra Keefe. 
Gordon McLeod. April Mitchell. Chris- 
tine Mohamed. Jim Moulton, Mike 
Simpson. Douglas Thordarson. Peter 
Titus. Herbert Van Kampen, Paris 
Wright 

Grade VI — first class honours 
Cary Chow. Lisa Cownden. Carolyn 
Gook, Margo Man. Maxwell Ngai; 
honours Christopher James. Dennis 
Lee. Colleen Lowe. David Moulton. 
Rubv Hul. Roger Jones, Garth Low, 
Marlis Neumann, Zoe Williams. 
Sheryl Yung. Brenda Young; pass 
Lois Corbin. Maroaret Dean, Timothy 
Lupton. Rovston Yeo. Robin Hrvcluk. 
Rachel Staples. 

Grad* V — first class honours: Ml 
chelle Hlmick, Denise Oliver. Donald 
Swainson; honours: Frank Boudewvn. 
Kevin Bradv, Angela Kemna, Edward 
Chan. Colin MacRae. pass: Julia 
MacRae. Heidi Slat. Wendv Tse. Wes 
lev Yuen, Judy Parfltt, Brendan Hed- 
ley. Susan Yuen. 

Grade IV — first class honours 
Alard Ages, Celia Bowker. Greg 
Loewen, June Loewen; honours 
Grace Lee. Eri Tonning, Jackie 
Brown. Heather Fowler, Penny Leong, 
M e - 

lanle McRae; pass: Jenny Nahlev, 
Laurena Higgins. Louise H amble ton, 
Petra Johns. Candy Peterson. Lisa 
Barton, Leila Casseis. Adrian Smith. 
Douglas Thomson 

Grade III — first class honours: 
Christopher Chew, Julia Fellman, 
David Lee. Bridget MacRae. Emlyn 
Ngal. Merls Williams, Karen Zorn, 
Kim Linekln, Shirting Mah; honours: 
Janice Boothman, Casev Manarev. 
Nora Wood, Llli-Anne Yee; pass: 
Teresa Guedlo. Derk Wolmuth. Danie¬ 
la Cubelic. Sandra Lougheed, Lisa 
Rippington. 

Grade II — first class honours: San¬ 
dra Birkenhead, Elly Mae Catton. 
Tracy Franzen, Erin Scott, Kristin 
Scott. Rachel Curran. Roopa Ghosh. 
Maurlne Johnson, Marlowe Hogg. 
Frances Padmore. honours: Ann 
Dixon, Sarah Mothersill; pass: Chan¬ 
tal Cownden, Christopher Kershaw, 
Jackie Slat. 

Grade I — first class honours: Jim 
Lai; honours: Nico Tritt, Christooher 
Dyson. Linda Yuen; pass: Susan Bar¬ 
ron. 


Sears 


12x13 Baig* ton# plush 619060 . Rag. $207.78 

12x14 3' Rust tons Hard Twist 

•17030 . Rsg.S264.81 

12x12' Gold tons Hard Twist 

•17030 . Rag. $239.64 

12x15 9 Moss Grssn Cut and Loop 

•12100 .Rag. $420 

12x11' Forsst Groan Cut and Loop 

•12100 . Rag. $293.40 

12x14' Bsioa Iona Cut and Loop 

•12460 . Rag. $377.20 

12x11 Groan Hard Twist 911160 .Rag. $300 

12x13 9" Rust tons Hard Twist 

•17030 . Rag. $274.76 

12x9 Gold Bargs Mum isvsi Loop 

•16290 . Rag $119.66 

12x1$' Rust tons (Pound) Cut and Loop 

•12460 . Rag. $339 60 


The Magnificent 

GREER 

Wig Designed by Adolpho 

Jusf one of the many 
styles that Blink 
Bonnie has in its 
collection. The 
experienced staff at 
Blink Bonnie are delighted 
to help you choose just the 
right style and colour. 

And — they can recurl, 
recondition, cut, clean 
and comb out any wig 
you may now have. 


155 ” 

189 s1 

159 s4 

272 ” 

190” 

242 ” 

*200 

183 ” 

77 ” 

259 ” 


•re on* only ct tpU U In Nylon and Acritan* materials rntm ru 


In MmXor euee at of* Pereanai I 


-Simpsons-Sears Ltd* 'Wee-' and Wee rata* to Sewpeone-Seers LI4 pocaa 1 


211* 1 
•183 
225 " 
242 “ 
259 ” 
251 ” 
•200 
164 ” 
197 “ 
175 ” 


Rag. $334.72 
Rag. $264.63 
Rag. $346.60 
Rag. 637340 
... Rag. 6400 
Rag. 636600 
.... Rag. 6263 
Rag. $224 66 
Rag. $66642 
Rag. 6336-64 


12x16*9" Gold Hard Twist 611060 . 

12x12*8" Rust tons Plush 612600 . 

12x13* Coral Cut and Loop 612300 

12x14* Groan Cut and Loop 912300 

12x15’ Bsigs Cut and Loop 912300 
12x14*6" Mus Iona Cut and Loop 

•12100 . 

12x12*6" Rust tons Cut and Loop 
•12460 . 


12x11'3 Off-Whits Plush •13400 .. 
12x13*6" 6a*ga Light Plush 916410 
12x12 Dtrfc 6sigs Plush 613410 ... 


WELLBORN' 

FOOD STORE 


ON THE CORNER OF 
PANDORA and COOK 

We Reserve the Right 
to Limit Quantities 

OPEN US 

PRICES EFFECTIVE 
JULY 23-26 

LOTS OF PARKING 
FAST SERVICE 


Q C 

THUDS. 3-0 

FRI. 9-9 


SAT. 9-6 
sun. 10-6 


GR. A 

TOP ROUND 


GR. A BONELESS 

RUMP or 
BOTTOM ROUND 


BARON 

BEEF 


LEAN 


GR. A 

SIRLOIN TIP 


GROUND 
BEEF . 


ROAST 


HAWAIIAN 


PINE¬ 

APPLE 


CAN. #1 


CANTA¬ 

LOUPE. 


VALLEY FARMS FROZEN 


PEAS 


YORK 

APPLE 

JUICE 


48-oz. tin 


HARVEST 

MARG¬ 

ARINE 

34b. pkg. 


YORK UNSWEETENED 

V I nXvIf 

ORANGE 

JUICE 


48-oz. tin 


NABOB 


YORK UNSWEETENED 

GRAPEFRUIT 

JUICE 


48-oz tin 


PANDORA AVE. at COOK ST. 


n 










































































CANADA/REGION 


THE COLONIST, Thursday July 24, 1980 35 


Chretien warms 
to flexible policy 


VANCOUVER (UPC) 
— Federal Justice Min¬ 
ister Jean Chretien said 
Wednesday he was will¬ 
ing to Consider a Saskat¬ 
chewan suggestion that 
a co-operative, ongoing 
approach to preserving 
a Canadian economic 
union was preferrable.to 
entrenching such safe¬ 
guards in a revised con¬ 
stitution. 

Chretien, co-chairman of 
the federal-provincial con¬ 
stitutional reform talks, 
said he would have to ex 
amine the legal meaning of 
the Saskatchewan delega¬ 
tion's text but said he was 
initially pleased that the 
province had recognized 
the principle of an eco¬ 
nomic union. 

“I'm looking for a mech¬ 
anism that is acceptable to 
the provinces and us to 
make sure that the concept 
of an economic union—the 
movement of people, 
goods, services and capital 
across the land—be 
achieved," Chretien said 
following Wednesday’s 
closed-door meetings. 

“I’m not married to a 
precise formula ... If my 
way is best or your way is 
best, we’ll have a discus¬ 
sion about it." 

The Saskatchewan pro¬ 


posal is aimed at ending 
what provincial Attorney- 
General Roy Romanow 
called an Impasse in re¬ 
solving the economic union 
issue. 

"We have made, 1 think, 
a major proposal,’’ Ro¬ 
manow said. “I think Mr. 
Chretien has made a major 
move in saying he will look 
at this as an alternate to his 
view.” 

“We would see as prefer¬ 
able (to entrenchment) an 


VANCOUVER (CP)— 
Justice Minister Jean 
Chretien has promised 
amendments to the Crimi¬ 
nal Code to help police 
combat prostitution. 

The amendments will in¬ 
clude “a new definition of 
soliciting that will permit 
the law-enforcement offi¬ 
cers of every province 
to ... clean the streets, be¬ 
cause It’s kind of embar¬ 
rassing in the present situa- 
tion,” Chretien said 
Tuesday. 

His statement followed a 
meeting with B.C. Human 
Resources Minister Grace 


option that places in the 
constitution a statement of 
commitment by the federal 
government and the pro¬ 
vincial governments to the 
effective operation of the 
economic union,” the Sas¬ 
katchewan statement said. 

“This commitment could 
include a reference to an 
ongoing review by federal 
and provincial ministers to 
ensure that government 
policies are harmonized to 
enhance our economic 
union.” 


McCarthy and Attorney- 
General Allan Williams. 

Chretien, here for consti¬ 
tutional talks, said the fed¬ 
eral prostitution bill, to be 
introduced this fall, “would 
permit the prosecutors to 
make sure the people who 
solicit—offering sex for 
money or asking for sex for 
money—would be guilty of 
an offence.” 

Chretien rejected an 
offer Tuesday from MP 
Pat Carney (PC—Vancou¬ 
ver Centre) to tour her rid¬ 
ing to observe the problem. 
The minister noted he could 
see prostitutes from his 
downtown hotel room. 


Laws promised 
to battle hookers 



Bill Halkett photo 

35,000-ton carrier cranes for metal 


Monrovian-registered 35,000-ton bulk carrier Pacemporer 
uses its own crane during loading Monday of 1,850 
tons of scrap metal destined for Korea. The 607-foot long 


ship arrived Saturday and was anchored at Royal 
Roads before shifting to Ogden Point docks to take on 
cargo. 


Here’s results 
of Toronto 
music exams 


Results of written exami¬ 
nations of the Royal Con¬ 
servatory of Music in To¬ 
ronto which took place 
recently in Victoria were 
announced today. Names 
are listed in order of 
merit. 

A R C T VIOLIN - Teacher's Writ 
ten. Honors: Michelle N. V. McCona- 
chle 

A.R.C.T. PIANO Teacher's Writ¬ 
ten, First Class Honors. Lorraine 
Horita, Barbara Jov Sunter. 

Honors: Allen Stiles, Kevin Hudklns, 
Carmen Goidan, Clarlsa Schoentno, 
Elizabeth Weeks. _ 

GRADE 5 THEORY - Harmony and 
Counterpoint, First Class Honors: 
PuttenE. VanDer. 

Honors: Allen Stiles, Kenneth E. 
Nachtioal 

Pass: Elizabeth Weeks. Lorna'S. 
Hansen, Alvin Deshaver, Robert G. 
Hollingsworth. 

History. First Class Honors: Darde 
Hine. Patricia Williamson. Allen 
Stiles. 

Analysis. First Class Honors: Clari- 
sa Schoenino, Allen Stiles. Gloria M. 
Wong, Susan Grant Evans. 

Honors: KennethE Nachtigal. 

GRADE 4 THEORY — Harmony, 
Honors CathvMcGann, David Hamil¬ 
ton, Shauna Cavavne, Fern Spring, 
Carolyn Anderson. 

Pass Heather Davidson, Lawrence 
Puszka, Brenda Tromburg, Bethany 
Anne Codd, Cathrlne Anderson, Fiona 
Donald 

History, First Class Honors: Lauren 
E Jackson. Hilda Kwong. Alvin De¬ 
shaver, Susan Smart, Bernie Hodges, 
Cathy McGann. Joan Burbank. 

Honors: Heather Davidson. Crystal 
0 Harvev, Brenda Bambie Maree, 
David Hamilton, Lorraine Robinson. 

Pass: Heather Robertson. Rebecca 
Kelly 

Counterpoint, Honors: Allen Stiles. 

Pass: Hilda Kwong 

GRADE 3 THEORY - Harmony. 
First Class Honors: Susan Smythe. 
Catherine Yeomans 

Honors: Colleen Bryden, Shelley M. 
Buhr, Diana Knowles, Brent Weeks. 
Susan Ferguson 

Pass: Janice Simpson, Loreen J. 
Schmitke. 

History. First Class Honors: Jim 
Fidler, Emily Weiss. Anette Riches, 
Marlene Ann Roberts. 

Honors Mark Pov 

GRADE 3 RUDIMENTS — First 
Class Honors. Margaret Louise An¬ 


derson. Derek William Lowe. Heather 
Watson, Celia Greenwood, Juliette 
Kirk, Rosalind Coy. Elln Plumb, Brian 
Smythe, Tammy Chan, Lisa Orchard, 
Carment Farrell, Mark Ferris, Mar 
garet Eve Lereverend. Feme E. Sal- 
mond. Royston Yeo, Pamela Stacey, 
Sandra J Lacey, Guv Macpherson, 
Bernice Cameron, Cathy Brooks. Mar 
nle Candida Colin Gardiner. Karen 
Armitage. Jannelle Jordan, Sheryl 
Yung, David Moulton. 

Honors: Garth Low, Beatrix Nord- 
leth, Ruby Slu, Carolyn Gook, Hilda 
Kwong, Christopher Smith, Melissa 
Clarke. Jody Barber. Lisa Leung, Ce¬ 
leste Morton, Jennifer A. Parsons. 
Barbie Hanam. 

Pass: Margaret McLynn, Rachel 
Claire Staples. Gillian Donald. 

GRADE 1 RUDIMENTS — First 
Class Honors: Nellie Stadt. Lisa Mel 
lor, Sandra Fetl, Bernadette Welle, 
Greg Launder, Mindy Varlev, Frank 
Van Staaldvlnen, Corinne Rochini, 
Henry Yu, Janice Andrews, Daryl Lee, 
Robert M. Van Veen, Barbara West, 
Sandra Grace Lutz. Alison C. Fuller, 
Janet Ballantyne. Kevin Kotorynski, 
Dawn Macpherson, Kim Quon, Jody 
Bomford, Rowen S. Hives. 

Honors: Jacqueline Bergerman. 
Heather Rolston. Lindsay A M. Neil 
son, Stephen John Bachop, Susan Lee, 
Katherine Lukaz, Elisa F. Llnuzzi, 
Julie Quon. 

Pass Douglas C. McCarthy, David 
Nicolson. Tia J. Benn, Robyn McArth¬ 
ur. Carla M. Mead-Robins. Tracey A. 
Rumsbv 

PRELIMINARY CLASS HONORS — 

Carolyn Clark. Jennifer Clark, An¬ 
nette Tyson, Kathleen Demacedo. Ei¬ 
leen Gould, Wynne Neufeld, Marilyn 
Akre, Eric Chu, Lisa Hayton, Julia F. 
Kolkema, Gerald Mlkfcers, Bita Er- 
fanifar, Jennifer Sam. Jacqueline T. 
Stuart, Lily Yee, Eric Cherneff, Ste¬ 
phen E. Gates. Debbie Strawson, Jody 
Lundgren. Alison M. Murray. Shelley 
Quinlan. Nona lee Dong, LeslTe K. 
Pearce, Donna C. Rarmerls, Larisa 
Searle. Christy Anne Co|lis, Betsy 
Donald. Emlllne Newlove, Ian Bullen, 
Barbara Curtis, Annette Floyd, Janet 
McKerracher, Lana Chan, Lauren L. 
Dobell, Pamela Jean Townsend, Ro¬ 
sanna Belusic. Cindy M. Carbol. Chris 
tina Wilson. 

Honors: Helen Cheung, Darcy J Do¬ 
bell, Joey Dobson. Roderick Lee, 
Christina Noble. Wendy Chan, David 
Lewis, Christine Madison. Corinne 
Mol. Kathleen R. Creswick. Richard 
Harris, Michael Holland. 

Pass: Pamela Der, V. Glenn 
blanker, Kathleen Curtis, Nicola M. 
Hives. Joanne L Shiu,Betty Borkovlc, 
Stephen Lindahl. 


Tax probers 
dug deeply 


MONTREAL (CP) — As 
(hi- trial uf former Mon 
troal chief sessions judge 
Andre Fabien on tax eva¬ 
sion charges unfolds, it is 
becoming apparent that 
police investigators delved 
into the most minute de¬ 
tails of his personal fi¬ 
nances. 

At the third day of pro¬ 
ceedings Wednesday, 
crown prosecutor Yves 
Ouellette entered as evi¬ 
dence dozens of bills, re¬ 
ceipts and cheques dealing 
with everything from Fa 
bien's home heating bills to 
his personal loans 

Fabien. who quit the 
bench in September. 1977. 
to return to private law 
practice, has pleaded not 
guilty to charges that he 
failed to report revenue to 
tailing fl2l.X57.il on gut- 
bee tax returns filed be¬ 
tween January. I MM. and 
Deermber. IV7« 

The Crown alleges this 
resulted in failure to pay 
$22,241 412 in provincial in 
lomrlux 


When the trial opened, it 
appeared proceedings 
would be extremely 
lengthy. The Crhwn told 
sessions Judge John 
D'Arcy Asselin it would 
need at least a week to 
present nearly 75 wit¬ 
nesses. 

But it now looks as if the 
trial will be shorter than 
expected. 

Defence lawyer Marcel 
Cinq-Mars agreed Wednes¬ 
day that Fabien spent as- 
yet undisclosed sums on 
mortgage payments, home 
improvements, restaurant 
meals, electricity, tele 
phone, municipal and 
school taxes, education for 
his children, insurance, 
clothing, leisure activities, 
medical expenses and 
more 

The financial docummts 
seized by investigators 
were entered as evidence, 
and more than Ml witnesses 
who were to have testified 
about them were die 
missed 


Sears ] For dependability you 

can trust Kenmore! 


Attention Shoppers 

No extra charge for delivery of 
large appliance* to home* in de¬ 
signated areas In Sooke and Dun¬ 
can. 



Save $ 30 

3-program washer handles 
your clothes with care 

439 


98 

Reg. $469.98 


a-Cotton/sturdy, Knit/Delicate, Permanent Press programs 
plus 3 wash/rinse temperature combinations with the Roto 
Swirl agitator team up to give your fabrics special care. 
Variable water level control helps prevent water waste 
White 26R 040 200 DL. Golden Wheat or Almond only $10 
extra 

Suds Saver model. White 26R 050 200 DL Reg $499.98. 

Now $469.98. 

Save $ 20 

Our Fabric Master dryer 
won’t over-dry your clothes 


309 


98 


Reg. $329.98 

b-Features Fabric Master setting, timed heat and unheated 
air settings; 3 temperature choices; drum light. White 
26R 080 200 DL. 

Golden Wheat or Almond only $10 extra. 

Sears: Washers and Dryers (26) Phone Enquiries: 596-9111 

Sears Appliance Consulting Service 

Shop at home for your appliances Call 595-9111. local 222 and an appointment will be 
made at your convenience tor a Kenmore Appliance Consultant to call on you lo aid you in 
choosing the appliances most suited to your needs. 


We service 
what we 
sell from 
coast 
to coast 


Every Kenmore appdence is de¬ 
signed engineered and tested to 
give you maximum performance and 


Oer htgMy framed 


A 

coMy 


Kenmor^ products 

range ef parts** 


j don I gat a patchwork tab 


Save $ 30 

All-frostless 13.8 cu. ft. 
refrigerator sale-priced! 


Save $ 20 

Make Cooking convenient 
with our Mark 2 range 


529 “.. 379 “»~ 2892 ? 


Save $ 20 

7-cu. ft. freezer needs 
only 1 sq. yd. floor area 

98 


Features adjustable shelves, juice, egg and 
butter alorage. hem crisper*, separata lam 
perature controls Freezer holds 116 lb 
White R H 46ft 036 910 OL Colors only 
$10 extra 16<* ft model 1 36-lb cap 
if t*e/er White ft H 46ft 066 010 OL 
fteg $619 96 $599 96 

mn 

i i 


features like dm dock-controlled 


Holds 240 «>. 2 V, thick 
aeve energy Stackable 


33ft 062 090 DL 
?2ft 062 7 90 OL I 
Colors lor models l 


6629 96 6499 96 

r 610 extra 


r.su 


White 47ft 030 760 OL Golden 
• < 47) 


bottom 
§10 


till 


Simpsons- Sears Ltd!, -w«a ne i*ix*g*M»4*«nur rm** 1 
















































































































* 


36 THE COLONIST, Thursday July 24, 1980 


CANADA/B.C. 


Hospital board stymied in obstetrics power play 


By PAULDE GROOT 

Colonist staff 

A first step was taken 
Wednesday toward 
direct intervention by 
the Capital Regional 
hospital board in the re¬ 
gional obstetrics debate, 
but the board was 
stopped short, at least 
temporarily, in an at¬ 
tempt to assume control 
of the decision-making. 

And regional hospital 
and health planning com¬ 
mission chairman Charles 
Perkins, whose decision¬ 
making powers are under 
attach from the board, 
served notice that be will 
stick to his guns and make 
thf board fight the whole 
distance if it expects to 
overturn the commission's 
decisions on obstetrics and 
pediatrics. 

At issue is a decision by 
the commission to create a 
single regional facility for 
obstetrics and pediatrics at 
the new Helmcken Road 
hospital. 

BOARD MEMBERS who 

oppose the decision said 
Wednesday that people 
should not be forced to tra¬ 
vel past one hospital 
(Royal Jubilee) to get ser¬ 
vice in a more distant hos¬ 
pital. 

They argued that a pro¬ 
posal to keep Royal Jubilee 
open for two years after the 
Helmcken Road hospital 
opens will give the region 
time to assess its options 
and determine public sup¬ 
port for continuance of ob¬ 
stetric and pediatric ser¬ 
vices at Jubilee. 

THE BOARD'S dilemma 
is that it cannot make that 
decision itself, since in set¬ 
ting up the commission in 
1974, which it did to remove 
politics from hospital plan¬ 
ning, it delegated to the 
commission final authority 
to "direct that an existing 
hospital service or pro¬ 
gramme be revised, ex¬ 
tended, relocated or dis¬ 
continued.” 

As long as the commis¬ 
sion keeps within its budget 
it only requires hospital 
board approval for prop¬ 
erty acquisitions, major 
building projects, and hos¬ 
pital closures, a brief from 
the region’s executive 
director Dennis Young 
said. 

TO CHANGE that, the 
hoard had two resolutions 
on the table, one giving the 
board power to review and 
change decisions of the 
commission, and the other 
providing for the two-year 
transition period during 
which both hospitals would 
maintain.obstetrical and 
pediatric services. 

On the first, directors ar¬ 
gued that as elected repre¬ 
sentatives they have final 
responsibility for spending 
public money while the 
commission, whose mem- 

Laid-off 

workers 

rehired 

Canadian Press 

Jobs have been found for 
all but 26 of the 410 men and 
women seeking work since 
Ocean Falls Corp. shut 
down June 1, Labor Minis¬ 
ter Jack Heinrich told the 
Legislature Wednesday. 

There are an additional 
dozen former employees of 
the newsprint plant who re¬ 
main unemployed, but “I 
think in all fairness, 
they're not looking to move 
at all and really are looking 
for (financial) assis¬ 
tance,” he said during de¬ 
bate on his ministry’s esti¬ 
mates. 

Heinrich said tradesmen 
were quickly rehired by 
other companies but pro¬ 
duction workers were hav¬ 
ing problems finding work. 

The crown-owned B.C. 
Cellulose Corp., which 
owns the mid-coast plant, 
gave mounting losses and 
an inadequate supply ot 
timber as reasons for the 
closure. 

Heinrich also said he ex¬ 
pected lower production 
losses because of strikes in 
19H0 than in any year in the 
last decide. 

About 160,000 man days 
were lost to labor disputes 
in the first quarter of the 
year. At this rate, 4W.000 
would be lost by the end of 
the year compared with 
Mm.uuu days last year, he 
said 

"The indications are, if 
in fart the construction in 
duslry does securr a settle 
mem. I think we re getac to 
find HUN to be an esiep 
'he said 


bership is appointed from 
among elected and non- 
elected officials, is not 
directly responsible to tax¬ 
payers. 

BUT BOARD chairman 
James Campbell argued 
that hospital board review 
of commission decisions 
should be subject to a time 
limit, so that the board does 
not go back to the commis¬ 
sion's inception more than 
five years ago and second- 
guess its decisions. 

The resolution is clearly 
aimed at a specific com¬ 
mission decision which was 
made long ago with the full 
knowledge of all hospital 
board directors, who re¬ 
ceive the minutes of com¬ 
mission meetings, Camp¬ 
bell said. 


“I’M CONCERNED 
about the incredible cost to 
the taxpayer of reversing 
this decision.” 

Among other things, 
-commission chairman 
Charles Perkins said a de- 
. cision to continue obstet¬ 
rics at Jubilee on a trial 
basis would seriously af¬ 
fect a $45 million recon¬ 
struction at Jubilee by 
throwing future planning in 
doubt. 

When told that the deci¬ 
sion to centralize obstetrics 
and pediatrics was made 
two or three years ago, and 
would thus be beyond the 
hospital board's reach if a 
60 or 90-day limit on review 
of commission decisions 
were implemented, the 


board rejected a time-limit 
amendment. 

THE SECOND resolu¬ 
tion, to permit Jubilee to 
remain open, in direct con¬ 
tradiction to current com¬ 
mission plans to close it 
when the new hospital 
opens, ran afoul of the need 
for ministry approval of 
any amendments to the 
commission’s governing 
bylaw. 

Until the first resolution, 
giving the hospital board 
the right to “approve, 
amend or rescind” any 
commission decision, is ap¬ 
proved by the ministry, the 
commission retains the 
final say, Young said. 

ALTHOUGH the hospital 
board then moved to rec¬ 


ommend to the the com¬ 
mission that Jubilee be 
given the two-year re¬ 
prieve, it is not binding on 
the commission, and com¬ 
mission chairman Perkins 
indicated after the meeting 
that the commission will 
not follow the recommen¬ 
dation unless the hospital 
board does get the power to 
make it stick. 

For the commission to 
change its current position 
would be "a shameful 
thing,’' Perkins said. 

“IF WE CAVE in to 
pressure we are not a good 
commission. If the mistake 
is going to be made, and we 
think it is a mistake, it is 
going to have to be made by 
the board.” 

He indicated that min¬ 


istry approval of the 
amendment to the commis¬ 
sion’s bylaw might not be 
automatic if the ministry 
interprets it as a direct at¬ 
tack on planning for the 
obstetric and pediatric unit 
at the new hospital. 

“I DON'T know that the 
ministry will uphold (the 
amendment). I think they 
might not, because the 
ministry is very strongly in 
favor of centralized obstet¬ 
rics,” Perkins said. 

Among other things, 
deputy health minister Dr. 
Chapin Key was a member 
of the steering committee 
for a nearly-completed 
child-health care study 
which strongly recom¬ 
mends the centralized fa¬ 
cility, and the study coor¬ 


dinator was Jim Mainguy, 
Key’s predecessor as depu¬ 
ty minister. 

YOUNG SAID that based 
on previous experience, the 
ministry could take any¬ 
where from one day to two 
months, to approve the 
amendment to the commis¬ 
sion bylaws. He added that 
all previous amendments 
had been relatively minor, 
and the controversial na¬ 
ture of this amendment 
could affect the speed with 
which it went through the 
ministry. 

OAK BAY’S Dr. Scott 
Wallace, however, inter¬ 
preted the results of the 
hospital board meeting as a 
victory. A tireless cam¬ 
paigner for maintaining 


obstetrics at Jubilee, Wal¬ 
lace said after the meeting 
that the hospital board's 
actions were “a gain for 
the total community, in 
that the most basic thing, 
choice, will continue. 

“This is a very final deci¬ 
sion,” he said of obstetrical 
planning. “If you close 
down a unit and the other 
one doesn't function the 
way we hope it will, you 
have really burned your 
bridges. 

“If people find a very 
modern and centralized 
unit works, they will want 
to go there for their 
babies,” thus proving that 
the new facility is better, 
and paving the way for 
Jubilee’s service to be 
phased out after the evi¬ 
dence is in, Wallace said. 


i seaffi Save 20 % 


SteadyRider shocks 
they’re our finest! 

Gives a smooth, stable ride and uniform load-resistance 
in any weather . . . and it's guaranteed for as long as 
you own your carl Innovative design and quality 
components are combined in a unique system that 
adjusts automatically to any temperature. Exclusive 
piston-valve compensates for changing thickness of fluid 
so ride is never too soft in summer, or too hard in winter! 

Chrome-plated piston rod with O-ring seal virtually 
eliminates leakage past the piston — channels all fluid 
through valving. 25% more fluid capacity and large 
1 13/16” piston with 40% more njtopcontrol area than 
standard 1" bore shocks. 28R 035 600 series. 

Scare: Automotive (26) Phone Enquiries: 595-V 11 1 


Save $ 4 
Booster shocks 
for front or rear 

Reduce roll and sway, 
increase load capacity up to 
500 lbs. per pair. 

Guaranteed 30 months or 
48,000 km. 28R 035 300 
series. 

Reg. $47.99 pr. pr. $43.99 


Guardsman 2+2 fibre- 
glass belted polyester 

39" 


A78-13 



Save *2 
Supramatic heavy- 
duty shocks 

Guaranteed for as long as 
you own your car! Have 
stiffer action to restore 
new-car control. 

28ft 035 200 series. 

Reg. $9.99 ea.ea. $7.99 


For many years the most popular and 


Size 

Each 

desirable type of construction Combines 

A78-13 

$39.99 

good mileage and reliability — doesn't 

C78-14 

$44.99 

have nylon's flat-spot thump. Top value 

E78-14 

$45.99 

for the commuter or weekend dover. 

F7&-14 

$48.99 

Tubeless Whitewall. 95R 015 000 DU 

G78-14 

$50.99 

series. 

G78-15 

$51.99 

Soars: tires (95). 

H78-15 

$54.99 

Phone Enquiries: 5064111 


Our best! 

The DieHard battery 

69" 


Stop at Sears 
Full Service 
Gas Island 
While Shopping 
at Hillside 


exchange, 
group 22FC 


Sears best maintenance-free battery! Delivers more 
cranking power than any other battery on the market. 
Thin-wall case makes more room for lead and acid, 
more power to start your car. Has greater resistant to 
overcharging than any other battery sold. 

28R 010 600 series. 

Scare: Automotive (26) Ptiona Enquiries: 5V5-V1 11 


Save 20% 

French design steel-belted radials 

68 " 


A smooth-riding steel beOed redial 
that often you superb handling, 
impressive mileage, and lor a very 
limited time only — a low eats price! 
Oeelgned lor Sean by the famous 


185x14, Reg. $86.99 ea. 


Size 

Fits 

Reg- 

Sale 

185R-14 

ER78-14 ‘ 

$ 66 99 

$ 68.99 

195R-14 

FR78-14 

* 91.99 

$ 72.99 

206R-14 

GR78-14 

S 98 99 

$ 78.99 

206R-14 

QR78-16 

' $104 99 

$ 83.99 

216R-15 

HR78-15 

$110.99 

$ 87.99 

225R 15 

JR78-16 

$114.99 

$ 91.99 

236R-15 

LR78-15 

$137.99 

$109.99 


product is ganaraty recognized as 
tho world's flnaat radial Soars 
incredible mileage guarantee is an 
important plus' you don't got with 


noev tttrau^i 6 30 





Simpsona-Sears Ltd. 


l«een LM. 













































































, S . e M|-TRANSPA£ENI 

^OODrS^T 


STOP 

£XPlOITATIOM 
i UNIONIZE 
| AJMtBF.StT 


i AMBEBtr 
I Kxpto»r« 
I unions 
1 VWOYECr 


UKIOHl** 


Breweries claim 
lockout provoked 


VANCOUVER (CP) 
— A spokesman for 
three major B.C. 
breweries has accused 
brewery union leaders 
of provoking an industry 
lockout by refusing to let 
their members vote on 
the companies’ final 
offer. 

The breweries have said 
they will lock out the work¬ 
ers at midnight Friday 
night if there is no settle¬ 
ment. 


Eric Harris, chief man¬ 
agement negotiator, said in 
a news release Wednesday 
there are encouraging 
signs that a growing num¬ 
ber of the 1,400 workers 
want a free vote on the 
offer, which would make 
them the highest paid 
brewery employees In Can¬ 
ada. 

Harris said the union ex¬ 
ecutive is not abiding by 
the wishes of its member¬ 
ship and intends to provoke 
a lockout to make employ¬ 
ers take the blame for a 
shutdown. 


N-waste dumped 
into Pacific 
without approval 

OTTAWA (CP) — The Atomic Energy Control Board 
said Wednesday that nuclear waste was dumped into the 
Pacific Ocean in the 1950s without the board's approval. 

Larry Henry, head of the board’s nuclear waste 
management branch, said the board learned almost 
by accident in 1959 or early 1960 that the University of 
British Columbia had dropped insignificant amounts of 
radioactive waste about 1,000 fathoms deep off the coast. 
The board is the federal nuclear regulatory agency. 

Henry said the quantity of the waste from chemical 
and medical laboratories on the campus was quite 
low. The material was “a couple of millicuries” with 
“a half-life of around six months.” 

A half-life refers to the amount of time it takes for 
half an amount of radioactive material to decompose 
and become stable. 

A millicurie refers to one-thousandth of a curie 
—which is a unit of radioactivity. 

Fred Boyd, a scientific adviser to the board, said 
officials learned of the dumping when it was dis¬ 
cussed briefly at an international conference. 

"We then asked UBC to supply information about 
the situation and to cease and desist further disposal. 
The net result was that they just stopped doing it." 

Henry said the university was contacted in January, 
1960, and asked not to dispose of further material 
without prior approval from the board. 

Since then, the university has sent its waste to the 
Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. nuclear laboratories 
at Chalk River near Ottawa which safely stores radio¬ 
active material, he said. 

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency report¬ 
ed recently that four Pacific Ocean dumps sites were used 
between 1946 and 1965 by American and Canadian labora¬ 
tories, including the University of British Columbia and 
the Pacific naval laboratory at Equimalt. 

Board officials had no details on the naval labora¬ 
torydumping. 


He said the union's cur¬ 
rent work slowdown is ef¬ 
fectively a strike and man¬ 
agement is continuing to 
show restraint. 

The union said Wednes¬ 
day afternoon it has for¬ 
mally asked Labor Minis¬ 
ter Jack Heinrich to 
appoint an industrial in¬ 
quiry commissioner into 
the dispute. 

Appointment of a com¬ 
missioner would avert a 
possible lockout by the 
breweries, said John Lang¬ 
ley, president of the Brew¬ 
ery, Winery and Distillery 
Workers Union, but in Vic¬ 
toria, Heinrich said he was 
not aware of any such re¬ 
quest. 

Heinrich said he “cer¬ 
tainly is not going to jump 
in or interfere” before Fri¬ 
day's strike-lockout dead¬ 
line. 

“I don’t think that we 
should precipitate or make 
any rapid move,” he said. 

"It may be that the peo¬ 
ple are going to drinking 
lots of Kool-Aid and lemon 
juice.” 


—Colonist photo bv Alex Barta 


Standing out in the crowd 


Trio walking up and down in front of the 
Waddington Building Wednesday stood 
out in the crowd. And that’s the way 
they wanted it, said Rick Story, right. 
With him are his wife Kathy and Chan 
Gurprasad, all former employees of 
Amberly Building Maintenance Ltd. Re¬ 
cently, after the provincial labor stan¬ 
dards branch examined the company’s 
books, Amberly was found to owe a 
group of its employees $700 in back over¬ 
time pay. The three were among seven 


employees who walked off the job last 
month, claiming they had been forced 
to work long hours with no overtime 
pay. The three are still out of work. 
Story said Wednesday there are a number 
of other issues involved in the dispute and 
further developments are expected soon. 
“In the meantime we are trying to show 
that we were proven right by the govern¬ 
ment with our first complaint and that 
further investigation will prove us to be 
right on other issues." 


Socreds’ cast-off 
scrubs meeting 

The provincial public accounts committee, self-de¬ 
signated watchdog of the public purse at the political 
level, cancelled its scheduled Wednesday morning meet¬ 
ing and chairman Ernie Hall (NDP-Surrey) isn’t happy 
about it. 

Word of the cancellation drifted first to the press 
gallery via the Social Credit caucus and then, official¬ 
ly to Hall. 

The reason? The half-dozen Social Credit MLAs or. the 
committee couldn't make it owing to pressure of other 
business. 

A quick check of offices at the 10 a m. meeting time 
showed that only Health Minister Rafe Mair, busy 
unveiling his new denticare program, had a positive 
event scheduled. 

v Said Hall: “Shocking behavior, totally foreign to 
the attitude of a concerned committee member. It’s 
hard to believe that they were all busy.” 

The next meeting is scheduled for next Wednesday 
at 10 a.m. if the Socreds can find the time. 

Shades of dirty tricks: 
Letter forge surfaces 


With the latest echoes of 
the dirty tricks of the last 
provincial election close to 
fading, the issue has been 
revived, with the Social 
Credit Party on the receiv¬ 
ing end. 

The latest forgery comes 
in the form of a letter 
signe<Jj“Evan” to constitu¬ 
ents in Provincial Secre¬ 


tary Evan Wolfe’s Vancou¬ 
ver-Little Mountain riding. 
The letter urges constitu¬ 
ents to sign Social Credit 
membership cards now 
and to be ready for a fall' 
election. 

But Wolfe said Wednes¬ 
day that he neither signed 
nor authorized the mailing 
of such a letter. 


Sale 


ends 


July 


26 th 


Valu 


way 


FLORIST & FOODS 

101 W. BURNSIDE ROAD 


PROVINCE 


* * THE COLONIST, Thursday July 24, 1980 37 


men tra i m raws, wr m to ran, jolt n 

M RESERVE TIRE RttMT TO UNIT QUMTITKS 


PORK BUTT 

ROAST 


SMALL SIDE 

PORK 

SPARERIBS 


GRADE A FRESH WHOLE 

FRYING CHICKEN 


BURNS NO. 1 

BACON 


89 * 

X 


MAPLE LEAF 4 rn 

COTTAGE ROLL .... I 59 


M.J.B. 

INSTANT 

COFFEE 

TO-oz. jar 


SALADA 
Orange Pekoe 

TEA BAGS 

120s 


WEST BEST FLAKED 

LIGHT TUNA 


6-ez. tin 


PURITAN 41A 

IRISH STEW^a, l 19 


NALLEY’S 


POTATO CHIPS 


2M(bM 


WEST BEST 

TOILET TISSUE 




CAT FOOD *. 2 / 99 * 


i CORN 

ONTHC 

COB 

5 / 89 * 


U.S. PLUMS 
a 59* 


U.S. CELERY 
.39* 


Rez stains penetrate and protect the wood’s 
surface and heighten its beauty by emphasizing 
the grain and texture. Rez is easy to use and 
economical, because a little goes a long way, 
whether you’re staining a big cottage or a small 
chair. Indoors or out, Rez has a product to suit 
your staining needs! 

SEMI-TRANSPARENT 


Gallon 


4 DAYS 
TO GO 


JULY 

FIX-UP 

FLYER 


In effect until 
store closing 
Saturday. 
July 26th 


u S f °UD colour 

WOOD STAIN 


n °t blister or ' 
knots and hL‘ ,lll '' h 
and beautif* 5 


SOLID COLOUR 

12 98 

CLEAR FINISHES 

15®* 
17 ®,!! 


• REZ-EX 
HIGH GLOSS 

• SATIN WOOD 
SATIN GLOSS 

• CLEAR 
URETHANE 


BEAVER VICTORIA 

BEAVER home centre 
1580 Hillside Ave. 

Hillside Shopping Centre 1 

595-1225 





















































\ 


38 THE COLONIST, Thursday July 24, 1980 


iEn»ioi^a1maeP!fe 


mm 



THE BUTCIIART GARDENS — OPEN EVERY DAY 

— Gatos open 0 a.m. to 11 p.m. 

NIGHT ILLUMINATION — The entire 35 acres and 
the Ross Fountains are transformed into a fairyland at 
dusk. 

ENTERTAINMENT — A SHOW BARGAIN — All 

listed entertainment ineiuded in regular admission to 
Gardens. 

MON. THRU FRI. — “JEST FOR FEN" — Delightful 
outdoor musieal revue. Songs, danees, laughter, with a 
full company of performers and musielans. 8:45 p.m. 
Mon. thru Fri. 

MON. THRE SAT. - THE BETCHART GARDENERS 

— 6 to 8 p.m. Mon. thru Fri. and Saturdays 7 to 9 p.m. 
Musical fun for children of ail ages. 

SATERDAVS — FIREWORKS! — “THEATRE OF 
FIRE" — a superb pyrotechnic spectacle devised in 
France expressly for the Gardens. With music. At 
dark. (Saturday, July 26 — 10:00 p.m.) 

SENDAYS — Grace Tuckey Puppets — 3:30 and 4:30 
p.m. Enjoy the tranquility of the Gardens under the 
night illuminations. From dusk. 

THE BETCHART DINING ROOM — 10 to 7:30 | 
Lunches and Teas unUI 4:30 — THE BENV 
BUFFET, 5 to 7:30 p.m. 

THE GREENHOESE RESTAERANT - Cafeteria 
style, 10 to 7:30 p.m. — COFFEE BAR SERVICE 
always available. 

THE SEED AND GIFT SHOP — Always open 
35 ACRES OF GARDENS — The Sunken Rose. Japa¬ 
nese and Italian Gardens and The Ross Fountains. 


STEJUU 



1QC folLSfEAt 

Iw 

SltOtO -SXUkD, 

(3MZUC PilAf 
OP 

Hen */me. 

IVMM0ES 

1514 60«RJJ MINT ST. 
CMl 585 0915 


STRATHCONA HOTEL — British Columbia’s largest 
night-life centre, 919 Douglas St., 383-7137. Fc 
luring “THE OLD FORGE” Nightclub with li 
music of “THE BROTHERS FORBES AN 


live 


THE BROTHERS FORBES AND 
FRIENDS." 3 Discotheques — "THE STING," "THE 
CUCKOO’S NEST” and "IVY’S” and a unique lounge 
called "BIG BAD JOHN’S” featuring Hillbilly atmo¬ 
sphere. Luncheon served daily in "THE STING” and 
lunch and dinner served in the “CUCKOO’S NEST”. 
"Everybody know who’s Number One!" 


CENTURY INN — “DECA-DANCE DISCO¬ 
THEQUE”, "Our Pub”, entertainment daily. 

THE ROYAL OAK INN — 4890 Falk Lake Dr. — Invites 
you to your choice of entertainment nightly — THE 
STRATHMORE DINING ROOM, LE CHEVAL 
LOUNGE, THE THATCH with rock ’n roll music, THE 
PUBLIC HOUSE and THE TOBY JUG COFFEE 
SHOP. 658-5231. 

THE CRYSTAL GARDEN — Explore the exotic world 
of plants, birds and reptiles as displayed at the Crystal 
Garden, open 10:00 a m. to 9:00 p in. every day! Visit 
Gift Shops, Tea Room — and Restaurant. 

STEWARTS — Nightly dining par excellence — 
. ~ if the I 



Victoria’s best — Louise 1 Rose at 


i piano. 388-7021. 


SHAWNIGAN LAKE INN — NOW OPEN TO EVERY¬ 
ONE! — Full outdoor facilities. Dine daily in the 
Hidawav with Live Entertainment nightly. Featuring 
Sat. and Sun Brunch. Just 40 minutes from Victoria. 

743-2312. 


Music Spot — Featuring Nashville, lTc~ in the Big T 
Cabaret Top Live Bands. Friday and Saturday, 9-2 
a.m. This Friday and Saturday — Norm Watson and 

"Woodshed.’ 

OLDE ENGLAND INN — For a night to truly remem¬ 
ber, dine by romantic candlelight and savour our fine 
English Menu — Roast Sirloin of Beef and Yorkshire 
Pudding — our Specialty. Nightly 5 9, 388-4353. 

RECREATION: OAK BAY — Your place for fun and 
fitness! Swimming, roller skating, ice skating, tennis, 
socializing ... for more information please dial 595- 
SWIM. 


RIFF 

RAFF 

Tues.-Thurs. 
July 22-24 

15 Bastion Square 
'Information . 


The ROYAL 


UPIZZAN 


ENTERTAINMENT 

Actors’ strike 
hits impasse 

HOLLYWOOD (AP) — A “terribly serious impasse" 
has developed in efforts to end a three-day walkout by 
thousands of American television and movie actors 
and a lengthy strike appears likely, the actors' chief 
negotiator said Wednesday. 

Chester Migden of the Screen Actors Guild said 
the impact of pay TV and videocassettes on actors’ 
pay and the future of the guild are key matters of 
dispute. 

“It would appear, indeed, that we are in for a 
rather lengthy work stoppage," he said. 

Negotiations recessed Tuesday and Migden said Wed¬ 
nesday he was waiting to hear from producers about when 
they might resume. 

He said the strike has idled 5,000 of the guild’s 
47,000 members and thousands of prime-time TV actors 
under contract with producers through the American 
Federation of Television and Radio Artists. 

Migden appeared at a news conference with Ed 
Asner, star of the Lou Grant television show. 

“There is very little we can offer other thanjnoral 
and vocal support,” said Asner, who plays the title 
role of the city editor on the CBS series. Asner is not a 
member of the joint negotiating team. 

“I am one of those two per cent in this business 
who’ve made it,” he said. "I’m thinking of those 98 
per cent who too often go from hand to mouth." 

Migden said the talks "are at a terribly serious 
impasse on several Issues” including pay TV, basic 
scale and payments for series that are being shown in 
reruns. The pay-TV isSue seems to be the main stum¬ 
bling block, however. 

The producers want to delay payment to actors for 
an average of two years for films and other shows exhi¬ 
bited on pay TV, he said. 

"That Is what we call the point of utter exhaustion,” 
he said, arguing that the show by then would have 
lost its value. 



EVERYDAY LUNCHEON SPECIAL 

FOR ONLY $3.25 

Include*: Bowl of Home-made Soup 

Super Sandwich and Salad or Coleslaw 
Coffee or Tea with Refill 
Bakery Goody for Dessert 
• Different Salad Platters to choose from. 

Also: MORNING COFFEE and AFTERNOON TEAS at 

CASEY’S BAKERY l TEA ROOM 


2032 Oak Bay Ave. (V? block East of Foul Bay) 

SPECIAL: . A99 

. lb. a 


Swift's e xtra lean sliced HAM 



A STANlfY KUBRICK FIUIT 
JACK NICHOLSON SHELLEY DUVAL1 

ome'sz 

frightening 
cunc ecenee; nudity and 

THURSDAY! lac ovwST 

FUTURE NI6HTLY HO l MO 

BOX OFFICE OPENS 8:18 


What has 2 wings 
has trouble landing] 
and carries nuts? 

AT 70S md 9:15 P.M. 

MATINEE 2:15 SAT. & SUN. 

Aa tTi M fS WARNING: Occasional nudity; coarse and sugges- 
VSSlZSr thre language (B.C. Director) 



MtDNITE FRIDAY — ANIMAL HOUSE” 

TICKETS NOW ON SALE AT KELLY S STEREOMART 

AIR CONDITIONED 
382-5922/808 DOUGLAS 


toWne ciqerna 


Qudra at WbM* M2-317R 





MADEFAMOUS 


DISNEY MOVIt 


ROY L. FUCHS RUDY RUSSO 

(Nihonest. MwaputaMe. Dishonest. Disreputable. Disgraceful. 
Disgraceful. He's the good guy. 

He’s the bad guy. - 



PUB 


605” 


featuring Canada s 

Jania Joplin 

Wed. thru 
Saturday 
night 


Open ’til 2 a.m. Fri. and Sat. Nite 
Next Week: “ REFUGEE" 

TOWER “DIFRENT 
LOUNGE STROKES” 

Naxt Watk “WIZARD’’ 

Open 'tit 2 a.m. nightly 

UK ENTERTAINMENT AND DANCING NNHTIY 

Victoria ’» Entertainmant Contra 

RED LION 
MOTOR INN H 


THE MIRACLE 
OF THE 
: STALLIONS 
PLUS... 

• the Spectacular \ 

HORSES OF SPAIN' 

• TONY THE WONDER HORSE! 

• T HE AIRS ABOVE THE GROUN D' 

PRESENTED BY THE 
CITY Of VICTORIA 
VICTORIA 
MEMORIAL ARENA 
TUCSOAY. AUGUST 5— 

SCO P M. 

AU SEATS RESERVED 
8.50-7.80 

SPECIAL PRICES O.A.P. 

A CHILDREN 
12 VRS and UNOER 
2.00 OfF REGULAR PRICE 
TICKETS NOW ON SALE ARENA BOX 
OFFICE. MAYFAIR MALL. HILLSIDE 
MALL. BRANOYWINE HATLEY PARK. 
KEVS SOUND CENTRE. SfOHEY 
IOC A.M.-5:00 P.M. 

DAILY EXCEPT SUNOAY 


THE WORLD'S GREATEST 
EQUINE EXTRAVAGANZA! 


L> 



BARBARA FUCHS 

Hon est . Moral. Decent. 
>he*» got a lot to learn. 


THE PERSON PICTURED ABOVE IS: 

A) VERY POPULAR 

B) A PHI BETA KAPPA ’68 
Q SPENDING TOO MUCH TIME AT THE 

BALLWASHER 

D) STARRING IN A HILARIOUS NEW MOVIE. 


I WHAT IS BILL MURRAY UP TO? 1 


'Mm M . 

325 “ 



Trust us. 

COLUMBIA PICTURES Present’. 
•USID CARS 1 KURT RUSSELL 
GERRJT GRAHAM fRANK McRAI 
DEBORAH HARMON 
M JACK WARDEN «n« noaMOiHc 
*. RkTRlCK WILLIAMS ^ NORMAN GIMBEL. BOBBY BARE -~ROBERT ZEMECKIS & BOB GALL 

i..ROBERT ZEMECKIS f^cBOB GALE STEVEN SPIELBERG & JOHN MIUUS 



Cmatuw) 


(UATUet) 




WARNING: Freeuent Coarse Lt 
ee and Swearing (B.C. Dirt 


NIGHTLY 
4:50# 9:8$ 



3366 DOUGLAS 385-3366 
illlll I T T IITTT 


McPherson Summer Theatre Company 
lq Co-operation with CFAX 1070 
presents 



WARNING Frequenl Coarse Lan¬ 
guage: Some Nudity and Some 
Suggestive Scenes and Not Suit¬ 
able lor Children (B.C. Director). 


odtoN 1 


780 YATES STREET 


STARTS 

FRIDAY! 


SHUT 
YOUR 
EYES 
AND 
THINK 
OF 
ENGLAND 

outrageously 
funny 

British Comedy! 

Directed by 
Allan M. Purdy 



Wed. through Sat. 

JULY 25 to AUGUST 31 —• PJL 

(no ohowo Aug. 20-23) 

McPHCJtaON PLAYHOUSE 

TUMI MM, MM (7 M until m 
n W#Mw.lHMcalMMII1|M<MWMW. 


UNIVERSITY CENTRE 
AUDITORIUM 

Thur*., July 24, 8 PJL 

Concern 

Extravaganza’ 


SUNK* FHTNU 
ORCHESTRA 

Mozart 

FLUTE CONCERTS 

klM* 

Robert AITREM — flute 
Max Bruch: 

VnUHCMCCRTO 

Ha. I la • Mmt 

DanW nm — violin 
Conductor: GovgoMMi 

Joapeh Horowitz 

CONCERTANTE No. 1 
Garvase RE PETER - 

clarinet 

tnmn ml m 

“Tie Ikf VOS 

Conductor: Gervase 


TICKETS AT 
MCPHERSON BOX OFFICE 
87 M M.80 MOO 
OAP/STUD «pooM OWcmaf 


4-000^ 


JUST WHAT 
WE ALL NEED... 

A really good hit! 

<&£!!$) WARNING: N.1 I 
' Suitable for Children; Frequent I 
Caarse L angyaf * . a Satire on Drugs 
and Sax (B.t. Director). 

7N YATUSTitm FRI.# SAT., SUN. NIGHTLY 

1:40. 3:20. 5:10 7:00, 9.00 



MM*. Ady & I pjk 
Man of Today and 
Tomorrow COWO#l 



COLUMBIA PICTURES Prraena 
-USE D CARS - —. KURT RUSSELL 
GERRTT GRAHAM FRANK McRAE 
DfcSQRAH HARMON 
_ WARpEN «. 

PATRICK WtUJAMS 
S.C NORMAN CkMBEL ^..BOeeYBAW 

-ROBERT ZEMECKIS A BOB GALE 

--.ROBERT ZEMECKIS-BOB GALE 

„SU VEG SPtLBERG & )OHN MUUS 



JOHN BELUSHI 
DAN AVKROVD 


THE BLUES BROTHERS 


A story of 
natural love. 


^ .. .. 
R»ea aomaame •< iAW >8 Kwm 

e <000 COl UMAiA l-ir TORES INOUS'P'IS INC 

it Nudity# Same Suggestive Scenes and 
B.C. Director). 


MATS SAT., SUN. 
1:38# 3:15# 5.•$ 


NIGHTLY 
7:10, t:15 


theTin 4 

Drum 


AN 

HONORED 
WINNER 

WA^itoD-i SmmeJV M e mc e, im—e shve 


Naditv (B.C. Director). 


count isc, housi 1 


Trust us. 


HATS. FIB . SAT.. SUN 
UO 111 MO 
MtGHTLT 7.1 S, Mf 


A WAY OF LIFE 1 

5^# ARMING 

F&SrS? 

MONTI.V I* 9:00 


NIGHTLY 

#45.9:15 


a f 

to £ 

t i 

\ r 










































































































































ENTERTAINMENT 


Monty Hall moves to B.C. for 200 new shows 


VANCOUVER (CP) — 
Game show fans here will 
have a chance for a piece of 
the action when Let’s Make 
A Deal arrives at Pano¬ 
rama Studios in West Van¬ 
couver at the end of Au¬ 
gust. 

Show host Monty Hall 
will be at the helm, just as 
if the syndicated (and for¬ 
mer NBC and ABC) show 
hadn’t gone off the air 
three years ago after more 
than 12 years on daytime 
television and 10 years at 
night. 

Two hundred new epi¬ 


sodes are to be made here 
at the rate of three a day 
well into next year. In all, 
40 weeks of shows will be 
made for the all-new Let's 
Make A Deal which has a 
U S. air date of Sept. 22. 
The show has not yet been 
sold in Canada, although 
negotiations are under 
way. 


Almost everything will 
be the same as the old 
show, says Hall, a Winni¬ 
peg native. Only sidekicks 
Jay Stewart and Carol 
Merrill will be missing 
from the team because it is 
an all-Canadian produc¬ 
tion—except for the cash 
prizes, which will be given 
in U.S. funds. 


No one connected with 
the show seems to know 
how Revenue Canada will 
react to Let’s Make A Deal 
prizes. 

In the U.S., winners are 
taxed. In Canada, however, 
winnings on quiz shows and 
other such operations 
where skill or intelligence 


are tested are usually ex¬ 
empt. 

’’The psychlogy depart¬ 
ment of Yale University 
came to study our contes¬ 
tants and to find out what 
motivates people to get 
dressed up in those crazy 
costumes and go down to a 
game show, thinking that 
when they came there 


they’d strip the layers 
away and find a bunch of 
idiots," Hall says. 

"Well, they were sur¬ 
prised and they came back 
with their mouths wide 
open saying there were 
seven doctors on the show 
and the district attorney of 
Orange County who was 
dressed as an orange.” 


o 


Island 
Saw Co. 

SAW and 
kftPCMMG 


LETS DELUXE CHINESE 

SMKtiMH tpa M| $ pa 

$6.25 


1410 BROAD ST. 385-6764 




PLAYING TONIGHT 


By Michel Tremblay as 
translated by John VanBurek 
and BHt Qlassco 

A Poignant Story of 
A Family . . 

8 p.m. Phoenix Theatre 
On UVic Campus 
TICKETS m MRMlATION 
477-4W1 

UNIVERSITY OF VICTORIA 



THE 

SMILE SHOW 

Monday to Saturday 
Now Playing until 
September 6th. 

■ IM 

BtPRfSS 


8:30 P.M. 


sssa 


Teleglobe Canada 

Lake Cowichan 

[Satellite Earth Station 

Open for Guided Tours 
daily 10 A.M. - 4 EM. 
until Labor Day 

I Located 32 Kilometers West of Duncan, 4 Kilometers 
I West of Lake Cowichan on Lake Cowichan-Youbou 
I section of Highway 18. 

Tetejj_ 

Canada 


MMNL HOME MHOS CLEAMNCE 


Contemporary Style 

SOFA and ARM 
CHAIR 

Earthtone plaid fabric. 2- 
ptece suit*?. 


0m Fiscal Yew-End is My 31st ... W. need to i 
bnsntwy is much as pstsibie Infers cur Business Ysw-End 
... this is a Gigantic WsJMo-WsH Sale ... hr othar words 
•verything b •« sals ... Yes ... 4LL REASONABLE OFFERS 
WILL BE ACCEPTED! 


346 


46 


5-Shelf Upright 

BOOK CASE 


79 

I V 


95 


with 2 

sliding doors 


89 


95 


Hi-Back, Matching^ 

LOVESEATand 5 
ARM CHAIR 

Nylon fabric, coil construc¬ 
tion. Martlex cushions 


1046 


Large Extension 

DINING ROOM 
TABLE 

2 arm chairs and 4 side 
chairs, 7 -pee suite 


896 


46 


Deluxe Style and 
Quality 

LAWN CHAIRS 


2/‘20 


39 Quitted 

MATTRESS and 
FOUNDATION UNIT 

2-piece set. 


94 


95 


SOFA, LOVESEAT, 
CHAIR and OTTOMAN 

Rolled arm in beige/brown 
plaid 4-piece group. 


576 


95 


SOFA TABLES 

Reg list to 369 95. Clear- 

•»>0. 


169 


95 


L0VESEATS 

Several to choose from. 
Plaids. 


146 


46 


Convertible 

SOFA BED 

with coil spring filled mat¬ 
tress. Floral nylon velvet. 
Sheppard casters 


416 


46 


Solid Flock Maple 

ROCKING CHAIR 


148 


Colonial Mi-back 

LOVESEAT 

nylon floral. 


296 


46 


Contemporary lo os e cushion 
comer 

SECTKMUL 


with flip-out 
bed with 
coil mat- 


946^1^ 49 95 |i£ 599 95 

GThglrade 


388-6264 


715 Finlayson St., Victoria. 


Traditional Hi-back 

SWIVEL 

ROCKERS 

T cushion and valance. 
1 QO% acrylic 


158" 


Oak Double Pedestal 


DESK 


7 drawers with lock. 


496 


46 


OIL PAINTINGS 

on canvas. Large size in beautiful 
assorted ‘frames. 


89 


95 


7-piece luxury kitchen 

DINETTE SUITES 

by Douglas of California. 
From.'. 


237 


50 


Queen-Sirs 

QUILTED 

MATTRESS 

with Matching Foundation 


179 


95 


54" Quitted 

MATTRESS 

with Matching Foundation 
2-piece set..*.... — 


147 


50 


THE COLONIST, Thursday July 24, 1980 


39 



woNDengnTAu.^ 

A Wonderful new musical from 
the authors of Anne of Green Gables. 
r Newcombe Auditorium, Provincial Museum 


Tickets at McPherson, Visitors Bureau, 

Hillside Mall, Brandywine and 

Museum Box Offices. (FINAL WEEKS) 


365-3424 J 


jffritjl’? 


■ i r? 




Thai Beautiful 
Old Home on 
the corner of 
Menzies and 
Simcoe ... 


In lames Bay Know the one ; 
It's been many things in its 
time, private residence in the 
late 1800s, and in the last few 
years, amany different restau¬ 
rants have called it home 
Now. it's come into its own 
once more, as Fritzf'v with 
several rooms offering privacy 
and real dining elegance 


;4j ns; \ 


r wA 


Open 

11 a.m. to 11:30 p.m 
TUIS. to SUN. 

Closed Mondays 


Private roomy 
available for 
special parlies 
01 up lo 50 people 


Dinners from $7.95 

Reservations — Call .382-4202 



*51 JAPANESE VILLAGE 

" F TCDDAM CTCAV AMnCCACDfin Ufll ICC 


TEPPAN STEAK AND SEAFOOD HOUSE 
(Our chefs cook before your very eyes) 

734 Broughton Street 
Reservations: 382-5165 

Four locations across Canada 
Victoria, Calgary, Edmonton, Ottawa 


s umme rfunthing 


1st 


THIS 
WEEK’S 
PRIZES 


Play it daily and 
be eligible to win 
weekly prizes. 

It’s easy and it’s 
fun — just follow 
the instructions 
below... 

HOW TO PLAY 

Locked inside the SUMMERFUNTHING sate are many valuable prizes Some of those 
prizes could be yours if you find the correct PASSWORD that opens the combination lock It's 
an exciting game that’s fun and easy to enter The instructions on the dial give you the position 
of the letters in the SUMMERFUNTHING PASSWORD All you have to do is find the first 
letter lo start For instance, suppose you started at the letter E and the instructions read 2nd 
LETTER-FOUR COUNTER CLOCKWISE Count four spaces in a counter-clockwise direction 
from the letter E and you arrive at the letter A The next instruction reads 3rd LETTER-EIGHT 
COUNTER CLOCKWISE, so count off eight spaces in a counter-clockwise direction from the 
letter A and you arrive at the letter S Finally the 4th letter SIX CLOCKWISE means you count 
in a clockwise direction from the letter S and you arrive at the letter Y In this example the 
PASSWORD is the word E-A-S-Y. To give you another clue and to add to the interest, each 
day's password is scrambled and you will find it at the bottom of the illustration 

GAME RULES 

1. Winners will be chosen by random drawing 
from all valid entries All winners must answer a 
skill testing question 

2. Winners from the previous week will be pub¬ 
lished in (he Saturday Times and Sunday Colo¬ 
nist 

3. It is not necessary tor contestants to buy the 
Colonist or Times to enter the SUMMERFUNTHING 
contest An exact drawing ot the entry form printed 
in the Colonist or Times may be made on a plain 
piece ot paper Note copies produced by any other 
process will not be accepted 

4. The SUMMERFUNTHING lodges wHI have the 
(mat decision on any interpretation of Game 
rules 



A SET OF SAMSONITE 

LUGGAGE 


2nd 



A METAL DETECTOR 

with built-in discriminating device 


3rd 



DENIM BARBECUE SET 

Chefs apron, hat and mitts 
(5 sets to be won) 


5 As a condition of receiving prizes, recipients 
agree to allow publication of their names and pic¬ 
tures in the Colonist or Times tor no additional 
consideration Submission of an entry indicates 
acceptance of all rules. No prize substitutions 

6. The contest is open to ail readers ot the Daily 
Colonist and Victona Times on Vancouver Is¬ 
land and the Gulf Islands Employees ot Victoria 
Press and their immediate families are not eli¬ 
gible to u.'ter 

7. In fairness to all. the Colonist or Times cannot 
answer questions or respond to phone calls or 
letters regarding THE SUMMERFUNTHING CON¬ 
TEST 

8. All winners will be determined by a random 
draw from all valid entries 


HOW TO ENTER 

Complete the puzzle and fill in the PASSWORD on the entry form Clip out the 
entry form and send it to us in an envelope with the puzzle number printed in the top 
left hand corner ot the envelope (As illustrated ) 

Be sure to include your name, address and phone number on the entry form. 

Enter as many limes as you wish but make sure each entry is in a separate 
envelope. 


unscramble the 
clue, then 

CRACK 

THE 

SAFE! 



PUZZLE NO. 33 


Mail your entries to 

' Summerfunthing " 
Post Office Box 1390 
Victoria, B.C. 

V8W 304 


or drop your entries off at 

Victoria Press 
2621 Douglas St. 

Monday through Friday 
8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. 


fuzzlc no. mm true 


WCTONU.BX 
VSW 3C4 


THE 

PASSWORD IS 


A new puzzle will appear each day. but the weekly winners will be selected from all 
entries submitted tor the previous week s puzzles 

To be eligible, your entry must be recurved by 5 30 p m on the Thursday following 
the week the puzzle was published 

Enter deny, or as otten as you wtsh. but be sure each entry is submitted m a 
separate envelope 

CRACK THE SAFE DAILY IN THE COLONIST and TIMES 


VOUR NAME. 

YOUR ADDRESS . 

VOUR POSTAL COOE . 
VOUR PHONE NO. 


o 


Today's Summerfunthing 
password relates to an 
Item that may often be 
found in a safe. 

PUZZLE NO. 33 


1st latter: 
2nd tetper: 
3rd tetter: 
4th tetter: 
5th tetter: 
6th tetter: 
7th tetter: 
8th tetter: 
9th tetter: 
OOth tetter: 


YOUR GUESS 
13 clockwise 
1 clockwise 

1 counter clockwise 
13 counter clockwise 
13 clockwise 

9 clockwise 

11 counter clockwise 

2 clockwise 

12 countar clockwise j 


o 


TODAY S SCRAMBLED CLUEl 
WORD IS 

CRENEFRESE 

J - 






























































































































C-1 

r- 


THURSDAY, JULY 24,1980 


I 



VITAL STATISTICS 


1 Births 

8 Miscellaneous Cards of 
Thanks 

308 Deceased Cards of 
Thanks 

305 Deaths and Funerals 

312 Florists 

310 Funeral Directors 

309 inMemorlam 

313 Miscellaneous 

311 Monuments 

NOTICES 


14 Announcements 

16 Catering. Banouets and 
Reception Rooms 

15 Coming Events and 
Meetings 

20 Lost and Found 
18 Places to Visit 

EMPLOYMENT 


28 Employment Service 

21 Help Wanted —General 

22 Office Help 

26 Part Time—Temporary 
Help 

24 Sales Personsand 
Agents 

30 Situations Wanted 

23 Skilled Trades 

25 Teachers 

BUSINESS SERVICES 


INDEX 

116 Coins and Stamps 
135 Farm implements 
60 Fuel 

97 Furniture 
105 Garage Sales 
120 Garden Supplies 

99 Groceries, Meats and 
Produce 

95 Heating & Fireplaces 
130 Heavy Equipment and 

Machinery 

128 Livestock, Supplies and 
Events 

96 Malor Appliances 

100 Miscellaneous for Sale 
103 Miscellaneous Wanted 
109 Miscellaneous to Rent 

77 Motorcycles 
70 Musical Instruments 
125 Pets and Supplies 
92 Sporting Goods 
81 Sailboats 
94 Store and Office 
Furniture and 
Equipment 
115 Swaps 
63 Timber 

98 TV, Stereo, Radio Sales 
and Service 

112 Wanted to Rent, 
Miscellaneous 

AUTOMOTIVE 


36 Services Directory 

PERSONAL SERVICES 


33 Bands, Musicians and 
Orchestras 

40 Business Personals 
43 Dancing 

42 Education 

41 Legal Services 
71 Music Teachers 
39 Personals 

.34 Pre-Recorded Music 
32 Trade Schools 
38 Travel 

MERCHANDISING 


83 Aircraft 
117 Antiques and Arts 
78 Bicycles 
80 Boats and Marine 
65 Building Supplies 
93 Cameras, Supplies and 
Photo Finishing 
127 Chicks, Poultry, 

Hatching Eggs, Supplies 
101 Children's 
Miscellaneous 


155 Automobile Financing 
and Insurance 

164 Auto Body and Painting 
168 Campers, Trailers and 
Motor Homes 

166 Cars and Trucks Wanted 

150 Cars for Sale 

148 Lease Vehicles 

149 New Car Directory 
160 Parts, Accessories and 

Service 

151 Sports, Import Cars 
158 Tires 

154 Trucks, Buses and Vans 

156 U-Drive and Auto 
Washing 

ACCOMMODATION 


185 Convalescent and 
Rest Homes 
175 Hotels 
178 Summer Homes, 
Cottages and Resorts 
181 Tourist Accommodation 

RENTAL 


201 Apartments to Rent, 
Furnished 

200 Apartments to Rent, 
Unfurnished 
203 Apartments Wanted 
206 Duplexes to Rent 


207 Duplexes Wanted to 
Rent 

202 Furniture to Rent 
215 Halls, Warehouses, 
Stores and Offices to 
Rent 

197 Housekeeping Rooms to 
Rent 

199 Housekeeping Rooms 
wanted 

211 Houses to Rent, 
Furnished 

210 Houses to Rent, 
Unfurnished 

212 Houses Wanted to Rent 
205 Rental Agencies 

190 Room and Board 

191 Room and Board Wanted 

193 Rooms to Rent 

194 Rooms Wanted 
204 Shared 

Accommodations 

FINANCIAL 


155 Automobile Financing 
and Insurance 

233 Mortgage Loans and 
Insurance 

234 Mortgages for Sale 
230 Personal Loans and 

Insurance 

235 Wanted to Borrow 

REAL ESTATE 


240 Business Opportunities 

241 Business Opportunities 
Wanted 

247 Commercial or 

industrial Properties 

258 Condominiums 
253 Country Homes and 

Properties 

270 Exchange Real Estate 
290 Farms for Sale and 

Wanted 

263 Garages for Sale, Rent, 
Wanted 

293 Gulf Island Properties 
250 Houses for Sale 

265 Houses Wanted to Buy 
295 Listings Cancelled 
268 Listings Wanted 

271 Lots for Sale 

294 Mainland and 
Out-of-Province 
Properties 

169 Mobile Homes and 
Parks 

273 Property for Sale 

274 Property Wanted 

244 Revenue Property 

245 Revenue Properties 
Wanted 

259 Townhouses 

285 Up-Island Properties 
256 Waterfront Properties 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES 


All rates quoted are for in- 
sertion in both The Daily 
Colonist and Victoria Times. 


PRIVATE PARTY 
WORD RATES 

10 word minimum 
1 or 2 days 

17c per word per day 

3 to 5 consecotlve days 
14c per word per day 

6 consecutive days or more 
12c per word per day 

Real estate, mobile home, 
rental, clubs, organizations 
and business advertising 
does not qualify for these 
rates. 


COMMERCIAL 
WORD RATES 

10 word minimum 
1 or 2 days 

23c per word per day 

3 to 5 consecutive days 
20c per word per day 

6 or more consecutive days 
17c per word per day 


SEMI-DISPLAY 
LOCAL RATES 
Any advertisement which 
varies from 6 pt. regular 
classified style shall be con¬ 
sidered semi-display. 


1 or 2 days 

81c per.agate line per day 
3 to 5 consecutive days 
74c per agate line per day 

6 or more consecutive days 
67c per agate line per day 


Contract rates for local busi¬ 
nesses availableon request. 


Regular Classified 22* per 
word. 

Semi-Displby 854 per agate 
line. 

14 agate lines per column 
inch. 


BIRTH NOTICES 


Up to 30 words 15.00 
Each additional word 17c 


DEATH NOTICES. 
MEMORIAL NOTICES 
ANDCARDSOFTHANKS 

75c per count line per day 

3 consecutive days 
65c per count line per day 
SINGLE PAPER 
DEATH NOTICESONLY 
67c per count line per day 


PRIVATE BOX NUMBERS 
17.00 

Private Victoria Press box 
numbers are for use only for 
replies to advertising pub¬ 
lished in the Victoria Times 
and The Dally Colonist. 


VICTORIA OFFICE 

2621 DOUGLAS ST. V8W 2N4 
Classified counter service, 
8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Mon. 
to Frl. Closed Saturday. 

DUNCAN OFFICE 

Advertising, Circulation, 
Editorial and General Infor¬ 
mation, 

746-6181. 

109 Ingram St. V9L1N8 


TERMS OF PUBLICATION 

Canadian Newspapers Company Limited shall not be liable for non-lnsertlon of aov 
advertisement beyond the amount paid for such advertisement. 

In the event of error occuring the liability of Canadian Newspapers Company Limited shall 
not exceed the charge for the space actually occupied by the Item In question. 

All claims of error in publication shall be made within 12 hours thereafter and If not 
made shall not be considered. No claim will be allowed for more than one Incorrect 
Insertion nor for errors not affecting the value of advertisement. 

All estimates of cost are approximate Advertisers will be charged with space actually used. 

All advertising copy will be sub I ret to the approval of Victoria Press, who reserves 
the r ioht In its sole discretion to classify, reied or Insert copy furnished. 

All advertisements must comply with the British Columbia Human Rights Act This act 
states no advertisement may state or Imply a preference, limitation or specification on the 
basis of an applicant's race, religion, colour, marital status, ancestry, place of origin, age: 
or sex (unless the matter relates to the maintenance of public decency AND prior ap 
provai has been obtained through the Human Rights Branch). 

While every endeavor will be made to forward replies to box numbers to the adver¬ 
tiser as soon as possible, we accept no liability In respect of loss or damage alleged to 
arise through either failure or delay in forwarding such replies, however caused whether by 
negi-gence or otherwise. 


NOTICE OF COPYRIGHT 

Full complete and sole copyright in any advertisement produced by Canadian Newspapers 
Company Limited Is vested in and belongs to Canadian Newspapers Company Limited, 
provided, however, that copyright IN THAT PART AND THAT PART ONLY of any such 
adver nsement consisting of illustrations, borders, signatures or similar coa*x>nents which is. 
or are supplied to Victoria Press by the advertiser in the form of reproduction proofs, vi ‘ 
etc . and incorporated in said advertisement shall remain in and belong to the advertiser. 


CIRCULATION INFORMATION 

The Oaily Colonist Ml-41 II Victoria Times 382 3131 

. *^*r* r J^2^? r lfrv*ce Is maintained. IS 00per month 

Outside cJSSHtiOM permaJJh^ 1240 per year 


...MO OOPor 
Mt BO par 6 


BY MAIL 

. ^ _ iaturday Tunes only Sunday Colonist OW 

la <£ cents per copy MO 00per year Owts.de Canada. S' 10per 

the Pady C O M M** Second Hass mail reparation No 0516 
Victoria Times Second Class mad registration No 0625 

IM-ANP R1PRE 5* NT A TIVfc 5 
Owncen Oheme.nus-Mr MIL TON HOC T 7466101 
Nanatmo 74§d6J3 i akc Uwirhen /ava/ut 

MpMAIbari*.-Mr Fradbuhr TO4JU 


Only 

copy 055 OOper year 


BIRTHS 


BOWLES—Born to Kim and 
Susan, a beautiful baby girl. 
Jennifer Brianne, 7 lbs. 3V» 
ozs, on July 19. 1900. Many 
thanks to Dr. Mackle, his staff, 
and the wonderful staff at Vlc- 
torla General Hospital. 


HOBBS — Born to Lance and 
Debbie, a girl, Kendra Anne, 7 
lbs. 8'/» ozs., on July 16, 1900. 
Thanks to Dr. Guy and staff at 
Victoria General Hospital. In¬ 
sured. 


MAH — Born to Anson and Pat 
(nee Lee) on July 17, 1900 at 
RJH a son, Brandon Curtis, 6 
lb. 14 oz. Thanks to Dad for 
great coaching, Dr. M. Smith 
and Maternity Staff, and Carol 
at YMCA Lamaze. 


14 ANNOUMCCMENTS 


OPENING SOON 
THE 

Property Store 

I nqulres welcome, 382-5444 


ANIMAL'S CRUSADERS GAR- 
den party, will definitely take 
place Saturday July 26,2-5pm. if 
tine, 2199 Lafayette Street, if 
wet, St John Ambulance Hall, 941 


MARILYN'S FOREST OF 
Dolls is now open from Tuesday- 
Soturdav. 9:30-5 at 3318 Oak St. 
The store for doll makers and 
collectors. 


VISIT “THE ROBERT 
Browning, Elizabeth Barrett 
Musical Photo Story" stall 4t Es¬ 
quimau Sports Centre next Sun¬ 
day July27th. 


is 


COMIM EVENTS 
AND MEETINGS 


Victoria's Finest 


8 


Announces: 

In conjunction with the 
Rising Star Country 
Faire, Swappe & Shoppe 
will be held both Sat. & 
Sun., July 26 8, 27. Times: 
10am-7pm. Information: 
388-6120 ( 8am-2pm). 

Join us at the Vic West 
Community “Y", 521 
Craigflower for a fun- 
tilled weekend. 



f EVERY 
THURSDAY 

Early birds 6:45 pm 
Victoria Curling 
Rink QUADRA ST. 


EVERY 

WEDNESDAY 

VICTORIACURLING 

CLUB 

Early Birds 6:45 p.m. 


HOW WOULD YOU LOOK 
IN A PORTRAIT?? 

The Artists' Showcase Is pleased 
to feature talented portrait ar 
fist, James Plant, Thursday, 
July 24th through Saturday, July 
26th. Capture vour child or your 
sell in a watercolour or pencil 
sketch while you wait or bring 
your favourite photooraph, 2nd 
floor, Maynard Court, 733 Johrv 
son Street. 382 5444. 


SINGLES SCENE DANCE, 
Saturday July 26th, everyone 
welcome. White Eagle Hall. 
Tickets available at Hillside 
Mall. Sorry no tickets sold at the 
door. Information 384-5683, 
382-6020, 479-6050. 


NEW YORK YANKEES 
By bus, August 19, 20 & 21 In 
Seattle. Reserve 381-5847 


20 LOST mi FOUND 


LOST GINGER STRIPED 13 
month old neutered male cat'"* 
appeared from Fllmer Rd near 
Cedar Hill Golf Course while 
blasting was going on 3 weeks 
ago. Great family pet. Reward 
offered. Cats' Protection 
League, 598-5731, 


LOST: APPROXIMATELY 2 
weeks ago, ladles diamond ring 
along route Bethune Avenue. 
SaanTch Road, Quadra Street, 
West Saanich Road, Wallace 
Drive, Woodward Drive, Sea 
Drive. Reward. Please phone 
598-1389 - 


SUBSTANTIAL REWARD OF- 
fered for information leading to 
the return of young cream col¬ 
ored male cat, answers to Stan 
ley, Belmont Park area, July 19. 
478-8809, 47^7767. 


LOST: FRIOAY, APRICOT 
colored cockapoo dog around 
Cedar Hill golf course area. An¬ 
swers to Sparky. Reward. 
477-1408,386-3690 


LOST: BROOCH, CRESCENT 
shaped, diamond set, on Dalhou- 
sle, between Beach and East- 
downe, Saturday night. 592-1319. 
Reward 


FOUND LOVING OBEDIENT, 
very hungry male dog. Black 
Lab cross with white markings 
at Camp Pringle, Shawnigan 
Lake 598-8165 112-743-2189. 


LOST: WOMANS DOUBLE 
band gold tone wedding ring, 
vicinity of doctors medical clin¬ 
ic. Reward 385-9184 after 
5:15pm. 


LOST: FROM MEADOW 
Place. Oak Bay. small thin old 
tiger tabby cat. Any information 
really appreciated, good or bad. 


FOUND VIC WEST AREA, 
young Siamese cat. Phone 
J87S381 before 5 pm. ask for 
Mrs Schoor After 5 pm. phone 


LOST FEMALE GERMAN 
Shepherd, answering to the 
name of Kala. missing from 
North Saanich area. Reward 
654-1644 


LOST WHITE AND BLACK 
female cat with white collar. an 
swers to ’ Prudence", possibly 
West Saanich Road area Re¬ 
ward. 452-4934 after 6 


LOST FRIOAY THE IITH 
mens gold Seiko watch, digital 
Quartz et or near Mount Doug 
Park/Trail Rewer^ 477 3761 
ahar 4 34pm 


LOST BLUE POINT SIAMESE 
f a ai i lt cat, ok white with gray 
points. Gordon Head area 
477 7749 


LOST BLACK SMALL FEMALE 
bernese cat, large golden eves. 
Brentwood Bav/Wallace Drive 
area. 150 reward. 652-4104. 

FOUND: SATURDAY ON.WIL- 
klnson near West Saanich road, 
cushions with flowered covet for 
chesterfield or chair. 658-5778 

FOUND GRAY AND WHITE 
female kitten, approximately 
10-weeks old, house broken. 
656-0074. 

FOUND: YOUNG ALL WHITE 
kitten. Clover dale Tatter sal 
ye^on Lovat. 382-8488 or 

LOST: TWO KITTENS, 1 OR- 
ange, 1 grey short-haired tabby, 
Haultaln/Fernwood area. Con¬ 
tact: 1528 Haultaln or 592-0033. 

LOST 2-YEAR OLD MALE 
Irish Setter Retriever Cross. 
Oak Bay area, reward. 594-2215, 
382-3996. 

LOST: BLACK AND WHITE 
female kitten, with pink collar, 
probably Esquimalt area. 
382-5967 598-1720 

LOST: LADIES YELLOW 
gold wedding band set with 11 
diamonds, July 22nd. Reward. 
385-8444. 

FOUND: VERY SMALL GREY 
striped tabby kitten, Toronto St 
White on paws. 383-1538 
385-8124. 

LOST: BLACK TRUCK ANC 
trailer hitch. In vicinity of Tulip 
Avenue and In ter urban Urgent 
lv needed for work. 479-9833 

LOST TORTOISE SHELL CAT 
(black with some orange), whlt« 
flea collar. Marigold. Reward 
479-1334. 

LOST: GREEN MALE BUD 
59S-87V6 BaV ReC ar<a ’ MOOdav 

LOST SINCE JUNE 20TH 
blue budgie, Burnside/Tllllcum 
area. 385-4706 

LOST: JAPANESE SPANIEL, 
O^^gfjower-Admirals area, 

LOST: FROM WEST SAANICH 
Road, fluffy grey female cat. 
652-1688 

FOUND: FLUFFY HALF- 
grown tabby kitten, Brentwood 
Drive. 652-2792 


20 LOST mi FOUND 


21 


HELP WANTED 
GENERAL 


HAIRDRESSING 

INSTRUCTOR 

To teach theory and practical. 
Previous experience or have 
held a Provincial licence for 
two years. Salary 112,000 ♦. Vic 
tor Hairdressing School Ltd. 669 
Fort St. Victoria. B.C. Business 
388-6222, Home 386^547. 


VICTORIA SECURITY 
PATROL LTD. 

Requires full and part time se¬ 
curity guards. Must be neat In 
appearance and bondable. Pre¬ 
vious police, military or security 
experience an asset. Apply In 
person at 3453 Quadra St. Motv 
day to Friday, 8:30-4:30pm 


CARETAKER 
September 1st. Couple to man¬ 
age two small apartments. Oak 
Bay area. Duties: halls and 
lawns, approx 1 hour per day. 
2-bedroom suite supplied re¬ 
duced rent. Suit couple one work 
Ing or retired couple. Victoria 
Press Box 507. 


FULLTIME TELLER 

Required by the Bank of Nova 
Saotla, experience preferred but 
not essential, willing to train in¬ 
dividual who meets our require¬ 
ments. We offer full benefits and 
competitive salary. Apply In 
person at Hillside Shopping 
Centre branch. 


THE DAILY COLONIST HAS 
profitable adult sized routes 
available in the Saanichtoo Pen¬ 
insula. Brentwood and Saanictv 
ton routes have monthly profits 
from 160 00 to 1250.00 taking 
from 40 minutes to 2Vj hours 
dally. For further information 
please call G. ROSS. 383-4114 
local 163 


DAYCARE SUPERVISOR TO 
direct new group daycare pro¬ 
gram at the Fern wood Commu¬ 
nity Centre. Qualifications: min¬ 
imum of 5 years experience and 
graduation of Early Childhood 
Education and Care Program. 
Submit letter of application and 
resume by August 15th, 1240 
Gladstone, Victoria, V8T1G6. 


FOUND: SET OF KEYS NEAR 
Crystal Gardens, SundaV eve- 
ning. 384-3390. 


LOST: TAME GREEN BUDGIE 
with yellow head, Lake Hill area, 
reward. 479-5820 


FOUND: WHITE FEMALE 
kitten, 3 months old. Gorge Rd 
near Mill, July 22nd. 727-3177. 


LOST: AT BEAVER LAKE 
Park, ladies gold Seiko watch, 
July 21st. Call 384-7671. 


CHILD CARE WORKER FOR 
Nanaimo Theraputic group 
home. Salary 11,000 to 11,300 per 
month dependent upon experi¬ 
ence and eductatlon. Job de¬ 
scription: shift work, working 
with teenagers, using a team 
approach. Send resume to 2935 
Wildwood Ave., Nanaimo B.C. 
by July 28th, 1980. 


LOST: YELLOW AND GREEN 
female budgie. Gordon Head 
area. 477 ,337 


NIGHT AUDITOR/ 
DESK CLERK 
for mid size downtown Vancou¬ 
ver Hotel. Must be fully experi¬ 
enced and have oood work rec¬ 
ord. Apply in writing or In 
person, Sands Best Western, 1755 
Davie Street. 


FOUND: SET OF KEYS ON 
Shawnigan Lake Rd. 478-5722. 


LOST: ONE SATCHEL* BLUE, 
one book, car keys, etc. 382-8876 


FOUND 3 KEYS AT TOPAZ 
Park tennis court 384-3158 


HELP WANTED 
GENERAL 


Alpha Home Care 

Is accepting applications Mon¬ 
day through Friday 9:30am-3pm 
for a part time homemaker posi¬ 
tion (4 hours per day) In the 
Cordova Bay area. Please apply 
In person at 3371 Oak Street. 


EDITOR 

STUDENT 

NEWSPAPER 

The Alma Mater Society re¬ 
quires an Editor for the weekly 
newspaper, The Marlet. Candi¬ 
dates must be students at the 
University of Victoria or other 
post secondary Institution. Can¬ 
didates should be knowlegable 
and proficient In writing, editing, 
staff recruitment and must be 
able to work with diverse inter 
ests groups. Salary is on a per 
issue basis and Is under review at 
present. Interested persons 
should apply In writing to the 
Vice President Finance. Alma 
Mater Society. University of 
Victoria, P.O. Box 1700, Victoria 
V8W 2Y2. Deadline tor applica- 
tions is August 1,1960. 


WANTED - MANAGER FOR 
small city hotel and beer paro 
lour located in interior of British 
Columbia. Salary commensu¬ 
rate with experience and ability. 
Equity position available for 
qualified individual. Send com¬ 
plete resume to Victoria Press 
Box 451. 


PSC WORKERS CO-OP SEEKS 
male or female and worker- 
manager owner to distribute 
whole foods In Victoria area. 
Knowledge of natural foods, 
business management skills, co¬ 
op process and ability to drive 
truck would be assets. 386-3880; 
Monday to Saturday. 


EUROPEAN SPA 
Wanted instructor for mens de¬ 
partment. Must be mature, slim, 
dynamic personality and enjoy 
working in a friendly atmo¬ 
sphere. Personal interviews 
only between 10 am. - 1 pm. 
weekdays. 1570 Hillside (no 
phone calls please). 


i 

THE PANTRY 
FAMILY RESTAURANT 

Chain is opening in Victoria at 

3214 DOUGLAL ST 

Across from the Mayfair Shop¬ 
ping Centre and wifi be requiring 
the following part time and full 
time staff. Experience is not 
necessary but wl 11 be helpful. On 
theiob training will be given i 

TRAINING COOKS 

HOSTS/HOSTESSES 

WAITERS/WAITRESSES 

BUS PERSONS 

DISHWASHERS 

Interviews for these positionsi 

will be held at the 

Red Lion Motor Inn. Banquet, 

Room, 3366 Douglas St, Victoria. I 

on Tuesday July 29th from 

1 pm-7pm and Wednesday July 

30th from 10am-2pm, 


Alpha Home Care 

Is accepting applications Molt 
day through Friday 9:30am-3pm 
for live in homemaker. Please 
a fee? in person at 3371 Oak 


MATURE AND RELIABLE BA 
bysitter required to look after 
our 1 year old in our South Oak 
Bay home, commencing Sep¬ 
tember. This Is a permanent 
part time position, Mondav-Fri- 
day, 8am-2:J0pm. 598-1260 after 
6pm 


SHORT ORDER COOK 
Small private social club re¬ 
quires mature, experienced per¬ 
son for night shift. Prefer some¬ 
one who also enjoys home 
baking, must be personable and 
responsible. Apply Mrs. War¬ 
wick, 383-7721, 3 to 4pm 


MIMES 


HILLSIDE MALL 


_ -irdtworkino, conscien¬ 

tious individual who has a mini¬ 
mum 2 years ladles fashion 
experience. Previous supervi¬ 
sory responsibility an asset. 
Please apply In person between 
9-12am, Mooday-Frlday 


SUB—STATION 
MANAGERS 
The COLONIST will soon have 
positions open for SUB—MAN¬ 
AGERS. These postlons are 

salaried position and requires 
1-1 ’/j hours each morning, 6 days 
a week. A car would be an asset 
but Is not essential. For an Inter¬ 
view and more Information call 
383-41 1 1 CIRCULATION 
DEPT —MR. FAERBER 


Wl [REMHEES 


HILLSIDE MALL 

Looking for outgoing friendly 
sales personnel for ladies fash¬ 
ion boutique. Full time and part 
time hours available. Previous 
sales experience required 
Please apply In person before 


$ SUMMER MONEY $ 
Colonist morning routes are now 
available In the ESQUIMALT 
AND VIC WEST area. Adult size 
routes can tern up to 1200 per 
month for l-l'/j hours daily. Stu¬ 
dent size routes can earn stoo or 
more per month all In your free 
spare time. Call now to place 
your application to MR. 
FAERBER at 3434111. 


BABYSITTER NEEDED GOR- 
don Head school area September 
- June, Monday through Thurs¬ 
day. Maximum 25 hours. 2 boys 3 
and 5 (afternoon kinder oar den) 
Car necessary, prefer parent 
with play mate for 3 year old. 
477 5055. 


HAIR STYLIST. WE HAVE AN 
opening for experienced hair 
stylist. Good working conditions 
in a new modern salon. Commls 
sion plus. For more information 
call George at 388-6364 or come 
in to Head Liners at 850 Blan- 
shard Street 


LIVE IN HOUSEKEEPER FOR 
professional family. Cordova 
Bay. Two school aged children. 
1400 a month. Can move In Au¬ 
gust, begin September 1. 
477-6911, extension 4890 or 
658-8689 after 6pm and week 
ends 


HEADMASTERS 

HAIR DESIGNERS 
Requires hair stylist, full or part 
time. Excellent working condi¬ 
tions. Phone Joel, 384-2010 after 
6pm for Interview. 


MOTEL CARETAKER FOR 
Duncan area. Mature couple. 
Good salary, good living quar¬ 
ters. Apply PQ Box 395, Duncan 
BC V9L3X5, stating experience, 
age, telephone number, etc. All 
replies confidential. 


EUROPEAN DELICATESSEN 
requires experienced sales per¬ 
son for full or part time tor shift 
to tom. Please only if fully ex¬ 
perienced, able to work alone 
and interested In a permanent 
lob- Apply 3844991. 


JAMES BAY PIZZA PIEMAN 
has an opening for an expert 
enced sandwich lunch cook. 4 
hours per day or possibility of a 
split shift over dinner hour If 
additional hours required. Apply 
at 858 Esquimalt Rd from 14pm 


NEEDEO EXPERIENCED in¬ 
terpreters, Inult, Porteuguese, 
Turkish, Pharsl—Persian, Pol¬ 
ish, Swiss, Italian, Greek, Pan¬ 
jabi, and other languages Send 
resume including phone number 
to Victoria Press Box, 512. 


MANAGER 

CARETAKER 

Caoabie person to manaoe trail¬ 
er park, cabins and camp ground 
year round, in ParksvWe, B.C. 
Some experience necessary 
Starting September 1st, 1*40 
Comfortable home provided 
Write Victoria Prese Box S13 


PERMANENT POSITION FOR 
combination alarm Installer and 
security guard. This position is 
flexible In either field but re¬ 
quires experience in all aspects 
of electronic protection Send re- 
sume to Victoria Press Box 502 


LOST GLASSES ON OA* BAV 

but or on Margate Rd between 




SIAMESE KITTE 


GOVERNMENT LICENSEO 
driving Instructors or will con¬ 
sider training To instruct on 
trucks and buses Must have a 
valid Class 1 drivers license 
Must have 3 5 veers truck driv 
<qp experlenca APPLY BY 
LETTER to Safer way Driver 
Training School Ltd 483 Burn¬ 
side Road East. Victoria. V4T 
7X3 

FRIENDS&C0. 

HAIRSTYLISTS 

RtuWty tar 

w mIihJ it 

32 


INTELLIGENT APPREN- 
t ice. welder or mechanic to work 
with a progressive company in 
the Victoria area Please apply 
in own handwriting to 1442 Keel¬ 
ing Cross Road, R.R. 3, Vic¬ 
toria, V8X 3X1. 


LICE N!_ __ 

per visor required for The Kaat 
is Daycare Canter co mmen c ing 

B C before August 15th, 1940 All 
applifcotlom confident! al 


PERSON WHO IS ABLE TO 
work hard and produce, know! 

- j-j. 


helpful but epfitud, Mf dill 
genre more Important. Part 
time leading to full time Celt 


348-9771 for appointment 

DANCE TEACHERS. REG 



21 KEIFWMTB) 

GEMEU1 

_ BEVERAGE MANAGER 

Fully experienced In all aspects 
of beer parlour. Including a li¬ 
censed pub for large Vancouver - 
Island hotel. Victoria Press Box 

COOK-HOUSEKEEPER 
needed tor island estate. July 
15th to Sept 15th. 1500 monthly 
plus room and board. Student I 
OK. Call Victoria Radio - 
N6—28340. 

SHORT ORDER COOK WANT- i 

ed Immediately, evening shift 1 - - 
9 pm Apply In person, Jacob's 
Famllyltestaurant, K Mart 
Shopping Centre.Must be clean - 
and fast. 

REQUIREO FOR ADULT, NO 
pet, prestige apartment, mature ■ 
bondable caretaking couple, 
written references required on 
Interview. Victoria Press Box 
481. 

EXPERIENCED DINING 
room cook wanted. Shortts Res¬ 
taurant. Apply in person with 
references, between 
1:30-3:30pm, ask for the Chef. No 
phone calls. • 

RELIABLE PART-TIME BA- J 
bysitter needed Immediately in ■ 
Sooke. My home, or yours If near 
Sooke Elementary. References 
required. Call after 7pm or on 
weekends, 642-4281. 

IMMEDIATE OPENINGS 

Full and part-time chamber¬ 
maids. Applications at front P 
desk. 

ROYALOAK INN 

4640 Elk Lake Drive 

REQUIRED IMMEDIATELY t 
combination cocktail wait¬ 
er/waitress bartender for cock- 1 
tail lounoe. Apply In person. 
Coachman Inn, 229 Gorge Road P 
East. 

WOULO LIKE LIVE-IN n 
housekeeper, someone needing p 
home. Must be attractive, non- t 
drinker, responsible, love chil- t 
dren and domestic life. 
112-748-6164, anytime. 

l 

sity area, for 2 children, ages 1 f 
and 2. Tuesday, Wednesday, Frl- n 
day; beginning September; ref- D 
erences please. 477-5606. 

HAIRTRENOS 

James Bay Square, requires an 
experienced hairstylist who is 
versatile In all facets of hair 
care. Please phone 348-3245 to - 
arrange an Interview. 

MATURE PERSON WITH 
pleasant telephone manner re¬ 
quired. Must Be able to deal with 
public.and be willing to work 
evenings. 28 hours per week. 
Victoria Press Box 403. 

s 

LIVE-IN HOMEMAKER. FOR 
family In country home. Monday 
- Friday. Live in, evenings and c 
weekends free. Private room 
and board Included. References r 
please 656-5024 0 

experienced desk ; 

clerk for modern Victoria hotel. 
Good working conditions with all t 
benefits. Fulltime employment, e 
Salary negotiable. Apply Vic- 
torla Pres Box 404 fj 

TRUCK DRIVER—WAREHOU- f 
seman, experienced, must know „ 
Victoria and surrounding dls- „ 
trict. For other details call ; 
weekdays 386-6414 and on Sal or- 
day 592-6891. J* 

COUPLE FOR CARETAKING r 
DUTIES in small adult oriented v 
apartment block, centrally to » 
cated. Apply Victoria Press Box t 

521. J 

HAIRSTYLIST, EXPERI- * 
ence, clientele necessary. High 2 
commision Phone for appoint- - 
ment, 595-4711. Evenings 
383-1096. 

EXPERIENCED, LIVE-IN . 
caretaker required for 13-sulte v 
Esquimalt apartment block. * 
References. Call 478-0580,6-8pm * 
only. .. n 

EXPERIENCED WAIT- b 
ers/waltresses and hostess/host c 
with bar experience. Apply c 
2pm-4pm afternoons, Dlno's * 
Place, 4011 Quadra. r 

EXPERIENCED SHORT- b 
order cook. Tues.—Sat., d 
2pm -6pm. Apply In person be- h 
fore 4pm at The Esquimau Dell, 4 
11 S3 Esquimalt Road. 

WANTED. PERMANENT MA „ 
ture person to work in fast food * 
coffee shop, most be quick and « 
have very pleasant personality. n 
Phone Mr Howard, 383-8232 " 

BABYSITTER REQUIRED 1 
for 15-month boy, September 2, : 
1980.110 a day. 8-5:30, Monday to ° 
Friday Gordon- Head to town * 
preferred. 721-3117, after 6. • 

OAK BAY r 

Live-in housekeeper required £ 
for mobile elderly gentleman. * 
Car available for licensed driv¬ 
er. 1350 per month. 592-9835 

REQUIREO IMMEDIATELY, 
picture framer, commercial ex¬ 
perience necessary. Apply In c 
person at Fast Frames, 1213 b 
Wharf, 385-6722. 

ENERGETIC YOUNGER PER » 
son to work in glass shop No 
experience necessary 40 hour 
week at 14.50 hour. Reply to Vic¬ 
toria Press 510 

HOSTESS/HOST CASHIER 
Experience preferable. Respon - 
sible attitude a must! Evening 
shift. Apply in person, Smittys 
Pancake House, 850 Douglas. ^ 

SIDNEY, EXPERIENCED V 
desk clerk night auditor wanted 3 4 
nights per week. Phone for ap¬ 
pointment 656-1176 ask for Den- < 
I 

WE REQUIRE PEOPLE WITH r 
pleasant personalities to make . 
appoints for our staff, 3 9pm, ^ 
Monday-Friday. 386-3444, “ 
3-9pm 

HAIRSTYLIST £ 

Wanted with some Clientele for t 
downtown Salon. 386-6188. a 

COOK REQUIREO FOR 1 

hotel restaurant, union estab- * 
llshment. Apply In person, 2852 1 
Douglas Street, ask for the Chef. ? 

EXPERIENCED SHQRT p 
order cook required. Apply In 
person between 4-6pm, 404 Que¬ 
bec Street 

DRIVER/ OWNER WITH 
small P/U truck or van tor couri¬ 
er service. Reply Victoria Press 
Box 497. E 

WANTEO: ROOFER WITH » 
all types of roofing knowledge, p 
must have 3 years experience. H 
595-7722. d 

URGENT, MATURE SITTER u 
for 4 and 1 vear-dd, on-call situ- T 
attofwny home (Esquimalt). u 

WANTED MATURE. EXPERI- £ 
enced waltress/cook helper. 
Apdv Douglas Hotel. No phone J 

WANTED PERSON WITH 1 
good working experience and _ 
handling power tools. Victoria _ 
Press Box 408. E 

MATURE CASHIER HOST- b 
ess/host, for night shift only. • 
Apply in person after 4:30pm at P 
Peacock Restaurant. R 

SALAD PERSON ANO SHORT P 
order cook. Apply The Apple - 
Tree Restaurant, Hillside Shop- a 
ping Center A 

EXPERIENCED BARTEND- ? 
ar, 4 or 5 avantnqs per week J 
including weekends. 65^ 5596, Z 
9785 SthStreef. Sidney *5 

RELIABLE BABYSITTER b 
wanted to care tor 4 year old girt, _ 
occasional evenings WqoIco— s 

Carev Road area. 3a- 2308 

WANTEO: EXPERIENCED « 
housekeeper, 4 hours dally Mon- h 
day Friday. Gordon Haad. ' 
4T7-7710 G 

WANTEO MATURE HOUSE F 

WANTEO DAYTIME BABV- 2 

aESHBr-**'**- i 


tobui 508 7140 0>656l 3M J 


HUP WANTED 
GENERA! 




CEO 
ufl c 


OFFICE HEIR 


KEYPUNCH 
OPERATOR 
Temporary 

A temporary Keypunch Opera¬ 
tor Is required by the Computer 
Services Division of the British 
ibia Assessment Authority 
din victoria. 

euypunch Operarfor will 
fie ability to operate alpha- 

-jnd/or numeric keypunch 

and verifier machines with an 
extremely high degree of accu¬ 
racy; ability to produce above- 
average volume production of 


slay Initiative and consider- 
e Independent lodgement In 


s grade 12 with e mlnl- 
* 3 veers experience; will 
»te produce accurately a 


Director of Personnel 
B.C. Assessment Authority 
1537 Hillside Avenue 
Victoria, B.C. 

V8T 4Y2 


CLERK/TYPIST II 
for the 

CAPITAL REGIONAL 
DISTRICT 
ENGINEERING 
DEPARTMENT 

Salary: 11040-11120per month. 


■ uaiiuiuoic will uc 

eligible for a broad range of 
employee benefits as provided In 
the Union Agreement. 


of 50 w.p.m., 
J experience 
. Preference 


OFFICE MANAGER/ 
GIRL FRIDAY 
ONE PERSON OFFICE 


I general 
sting va- 


PERSON FRIDAY 


385-7012 


IMMED. 


ROYALTRUST 
TELLER 


to stateaoe, experience and 
^u^l|^refiY»hcas. Victoria 


>lng experience and 
I of meat Industry an 
- 1 included. For 


HH M a w yer ^Larga, I 

[’•nSt'Si f 



- ■*■ TRAVEL CUSSSUL f AMT 


c-i 


SKIUED TRADES 


MacMILLAN 

BL0EDEL 

requires a 

STEAMFITTER/ 

PIPEFITTER 

for Chemalnus Sawmill Division 
located on southern Vancouver 
Island. This Is swlngshlft work 
with the union wage at 112.885 

r r hour. Applicants must have a 
C.T.Q. with sawmill expert- 

. please 

contact: 

Personnel Department 
P.O. Box 540 

Chemalnus, B.C. V0R 1K0 
Phone: 246-3221 


ELECTRONICS 
TECHNICIAN 
To service broad range of audio 
visual, communications, stereo 
and hifl equipment. Good wor¬ 
king conditions. Reply In writing 
staling salary expected to. 
Queale Electronics, 1004 North 
Park St, Victoria, V8T 1C6. 


DINING LOUNGE 

Requires cooking staff. If you 
are enthusiastic, responsible 
and looking for an opportunity to 
work with a fast-growing restau¬ 
rant apply In person only with 
references to Mrs. Carter, 
Charles Restaurant, Royal Oak 
Center between 11am and6pm. 


AUTO MECHANIC 
Competent licensed auto me¬ 
chanic required bv service sta¬ 
tion, 521 Lvall St. Knowledge of 
all make* and wheel alignment 
experience essential. Refer¬ 
ences required. For Interview 
call Manager at 382-0015 be¬ 
tween 8am-4pm 


EXPERIENCED MECHANIC 
required to service and repair 
single axle and tandem dump 
trucks. Must be able to work with 
minimum supervision. Excel¬ 
lent wages commensurate with 
experience. Apply to Circle 6 
Trucking Ltd, 2720 Turner St. 
386-1421. 


ONE PERMANENT FULL 
time and 3 casual nurse aides 
required Immediately. Mini¬ 
mum 3 month Camosun College 
Nurse Aide course, or 2 years 
hospital Nurse Aide experience 
required. Contact Queen Alex¬ 
andra Hospital for Children, 2400 
Arbutus Road, Victoria. 477-1826 


BACKHOE OPERATORS 

Qualified Case 580 rubber tired 
backhoe operators. Experienced 
operators only need apply to OK 
Trucking Co. Ltd., Dispatch Of- 
flce, 2720 Turner St 


time or part time for the Port 
McNeill and District Hospital on 
Northern Vancouver Island. 
Phone collect 112-956-4461 or 
wlrte P O Box 790 Port McNeill, 
B.C. 


EXPERIENCED CEMENT 
finisher needed, for small Vic¬ 
toria business. Own transporta¬ 
tion needed. Call evenings 
388-6275 pager 2924. Leave name 
and number 


ONE CARPENTER'S HELPER 
and one experienced carpenter 
required for approximately 4 
weeks work, starting immedi¬ 
ately 478-5218 after 5pm 


ALIGNMENT MAN, MUST BE 
fully qualified in brakes and 
front end and familiar with Vi¬ 
sual I r>er\ own tools preferred. 
Call Ed, 8:30-5:30, 3864)214 


EXPERIENCED CABINET 
maker for local shop specializ- 
65^-32n apar,men ' s - Phone 


EXPERIENCED DECKMAN, 
shingle sawyers, shake and 
shingle packers, 112-726-7269 

after 5pm 


WANTED QUALIFIED CRIB 
bing and framing carpenters. 
388-5113. 


WANTED: EXPERIENCED 
dump and boom person. 479-7960 
or 592 9697 


CRANE OPERATOR, MUST BE 
-fenced, for lob In town 


experlen 

341-6727 


CAPABLE AND RELIABLE 
handyman to do minor renova 
tlons, pay negotiable 479-6108 


24 


UUS PERSONS 
MOMENTS 


K Mi 

1 BESTffllEK" 
MATE 
CAREER 

TRAINING 

PRODUCES 

SUCCESS 

Block Bros, will train you in 
sound proven methods enabling 
you to quickly reach your de¬ 
sired level of success. Successful 
progressive salespeople 

ARE NOT BORN, THEY 
ARE TRAINED 

Call today. Interviews by ap¬ 
pointment only. (Held strictly 
confidential.) 

CALL 

“THE BESTSELLERS" 
Sldnev-Colwood 478-5561 
Bill Wonnacott 
Douglas St. 386-3231 

Bob Hahn 

Shelbourne 477-1841 

BobCullum 
Bernle Wilkinson 


LICENSED 
REAL ESTATE 
SALESPEOPLE 
WANTED 

Modern office with good park¬ 
ing, needs more PROFESSION 
AL SALESPEOPLE, excellent 
COMMISSION SPLIT, some fin 
anctno available to assist In our 
many varied company listings. 
For further details call In cqnfl 
dence to Ken Porter7348-7864, or 
drop In to 23 Burnside Rd. W. 

DUNSMUIR 

PROPERTIES 

LTD. 


^QntujcT 

tH P.H Zl(j 

WESTERN HOMES LTD. 
V1Q17 ClOinraBM 10* 14Ny 


REAL ESTATE 
PRE-LICENCE 

railed par 



EXPER^N^O SALES 

Wa are expanding into the 
Victoria area, and we naad more 
•aam members To qualify you 

|Tt exper (enced in direct 

□L’SEijyr 

T Hava ahawe avarage moame 

ttjrxsn rsssx 























































































































































































































































C2 

24 SALESPERSONS 
AND AGENTS 


THURSDAY, JULY 24,1980 


EXPANDING WESTERN CA- 
nadian Company requires sales 
oi iented men or women to work 
Victoria. Sookc, Duncan and up- 
island areas. Opportunity for ex¬ 
cellent income, travel Incentive, 
and advancement to manage¬ 
ment level for right individuals, 
f or interview phone. Marketing 
Manager, Norm Hansen, 
3B3 4464 between 9-?pm 

FASHION RELATED COM- 
pany require managers In 
Greater victoria area. Sales ex¬ 
perience an asset but not neces¬ 
sary Must be self motivated, 
and relate well to people Some 
evenings Involved. Transporta¬ 
tion necessary. For Information, 
call 4/4-2535 

SELL THE HOTTEST 
PRODUCT IN TOWN! 

Sell subscriptions for Victoria 
Symphony's exciting 1980-81 
season bv telephone. Salary- 
F’hone Mary at 385-9771 during 
business hours 

UNIQUE OPPORTUNITY 
WITH 

the Monach Life Assurance 
Company can bo vours. An inter 
view can tell us both If we need 
each other. Please phone 
384 6511. 

WANTED. SALES REPRE 
sentative in victoria and up-Is¬ 
land for small kitchen appli¬ 
ances Capable of doing store 
and in home demonstrations. 
Commission basis. Call collect 
384 497? or 771-3988 

LOOKING FOR A FUTURE? 
Want more out of life? Could you 
use 150.000 a year or more? In¬ 
terested? Invest one hour of vour 
time to investigate this opportu- 
n'ty tor appointment call 
4/7 8928 

EXPERIENCED SECURITY 
sales person required to service 
commercial downtown core In 
all aspects of security Including 
alarm leasing and service. Sal¬ 
ary and commission Send re- 
sumc to Victoria Press Box 502. 

TAKE ADVANTAGE OF TAX 
benefits, vacations. «automo- 
biles. early retirement, plus 
great income potential. Minimal 
fee No risk. No obligations. Call 
Jack at 381 1711 

VICTORIA'S FINEST LADIES 
wear store requires qualified 
full time sales people First 
class working conditions in a 
prestige environment Reply to 
Victoria Press Box 501 

TELEPHONE SOLICITORS 
needed Preferably experienced 
and mature Wotk from your 
own home Hourly wage plus 
bonus. Please call between 
8 JOan 5pm 386 6958 Ext 109 

MATURE TELEPHONE SO 
lictor needed for local business. 
Experience essential Call be 
tween 7PM 9P/y\ 3885129 ask for 
brant 

TELEPHONE SOLICITORS 
required, work in your own 
home, experienced preferred 
but not essential, excellent com- 
mtssion. Call 385-1476. 

CAREER POSITION PLEASE 
( all 381 6134 after 5 for recorded 
message. 

25 TEACHERS 


School District 85 

VACOUVER ISLANDNORTH 

Applications are invited for the 
following vacany effective Sep¬ 
tember 1.1980 

50 lV o Home Ec/50% S.S. 
Grades 8 10 
Alert Bay. B.C. 

The successtul applicant will be 
responsible for development of 
C areer Education in Home Eco¬ 
nomics. 

Please send information on 
background, training and refer¬ 
ences to 

District Superintendent of 
Schools. Box 90. Port Hardy, 
B C vOn 7p0. 

26 PART-TIME or 
TEMPORARY HELP 


PART TIME TELLERS. 

55-57 per hour 
Wcstcoast Savings Is looking for 
a tew bright and enthusiastic 
people tor steady Monday and 
Saturday part time teller posi 
tions in our Victoria branches. If 
vou have good people skills and 
enjoy challenging and interest¬ 
ing work call us. Previous bank 
mg experience preferred but not 
essential Reply to Bob Craw¬ 
ford. 388 7924 


Vi 


WESTCOAST 
SAVINGS 
CREDIT UNION 


Budgeting again this 
week? Excellent earnings 
for part-time selling. No 
experience necessary. 
Call 384-7345, answering 
24hrs. 


COOK REQUIRED FOR SUM- 
mer school. 4 1 ? weeks. Duties 
included regular meals to be 
served 3 times per day for ap¬ 
prox 170 people Shift work in- 
c ludmg weekends. Salary nego¬ 
tiable according to experience 
f or Interview please call, 
595 7626. 


DENTAL RECEPTIONIST, 
permanent part time, after¬ 
noons, experience in dentistry or 
related fields. Dr. L Talarico, 
595 7933 

COOK NEEDED FOR SPECIA 
h/ed tare home for holiday re¬ 
bel, good salary, must like peo¬ 
ple Phone Mrs. Clancy. 
381909 


COMMISSION SALES PER 
son. suit outgoing personality, 
attractive, congenial. Flexible 
hours All leads supplied. 
384 1771_ 

EXPERIENCED PART-TIME 
cashier for supermarket. Oak 
Bay area. Send resume to Vic- 
tut ia Press Box 475 


WANTED: TWO PART-TIME 
floral designers, must be experi¬ 
enced. Apply. Phone 592-2923. 
evenings 598 2069. 


EXPERIENCED MAIDS RE 
quired for professional team 
cleaning service. 3-4 days per 
wuek 384 8694 


PART TIME COOK RE 
quired, 7 day week, institutional 
cooking Apply. Salvation Army, 
575 Johnson St 

t XPE RIE NCED JEWEL 
Icrv sales clerk, part-time 4 
hours daily 20 hour week Vic- 
tuna Press Box 525 

MATURE PERSON FOR AN 
•wermq service Night shift 
weekends 478 5558 

LIVE IN COMPANION HELP 
fu» woman writer. I month only 

4/90769 

28 EMPLOYMENT SERVICE 


PROf ESSIONAL RESUMES 
Realistic prices 
Personal, individual attention 
_384 4471_ 

RESUMES THAT GET JOBS 
Professionally prepared 
Personal, <onfidential service 
385 6145 

30 SITUATIONS WINTER 


I H>A ISM AUTOMOTIVE ANO 
commercial partvman man 
out* salesman, highly seM mot* 
vated 11 year \ eapur tenta in Hir 
pad- wholesale bade looking tor 
miaresimg and challenging pov 
Ihm> Ji any level in the Victoria 
area I ur r.-sotnr and ur mler 
■ a 01^479 8839_ 

lAPAfclt I I 1st Hi r C OU 
pir ami ride* Iy lady willing to 
• are ltjr ypur hwuw u apart 
burnt Ort Me. While VOU hull 
nay I'w.od lirniilr Victoria 


30 SmiATHMS WANTED 

TOOLS SHARPENED 

Free pick-up and delivery. Gar 
den tools, scissors, knives, lawn 
mower blades, axes, etc. 
598 4872. 

QUALIFIED, EXPERIENCED 
hotelman seeking management 
position in hotel. Presently em 
ployed Vancouver. Phone 
598-8295 (message) 

YOUNG MAN SEEKS GAR- 
denlng work; yard cleanups or 
maintenance; tough lobs wel 
corned, 384-0912. 

UNIVERSITY STUDENT WILL 
do gardening and house clean 
ing. Call between 7-8am and 

8 :30 10pm. 3824)768 

SAVE NOW! INTERIOR/EX- 
terlor painting, quality work, 
reasonable, reliable, 479-3250. 
Norm. 

MATURE R.N. WITH TYPING 
seeks full-part time position Is 
doctors office or similar. Vic¬ 
toria Press Box 519. 

EXPERIENCED PAINTER 
needs work, interior, exterior, 
small plaster repairs. 592 7137. 

EXPERIENCED GARDENING 
couple have 2 open days per 
week. 3866336 

WANTED: SMALL CARPEN- 
try lobs, fence building, renova¬ 
tions. Mike,384 1089 

MAN WILL DO GARDENING 
and yard cleanup. Phone 
658-5003. 

RENT—A—KID 

Help with odd iobs, 387-5506 

33 BANDS. NUSKMNS 

ANO ORCHESTRAS 

ROXXLYDE 

Requires sound man with experi¬ 
ence or knowledge of large P A. 
immediately. 381 5853. 5961604 
or contact VJ .P. Promotions 

LEGACY RECORDING STU- 
dlo. lop qualify demos and rec¬ 
ord production. 3865501. 

34 PRE-REC0RDID HUSK 

ASHLEY SOUND. EXCEL- 
lent sound system, fantastic 
light show, music system for all 
tastes, special wedding package 
$100. Please call 383 6866 after 
5pm, 

SPINKY'S 
$100 and up. 

6561652 

CJR CANNEDMUSIC. 

598 4717 

MUSIC MAN CANNEDMUSIC. 
Give us a call. 479-8043 

X BUSINESS SERVICES 

AND DMECTMIV 

Accenting 

CHARTERED ACCOUNTANT, 
available for bookkeeping, write 
up work, financial statement 
preparation. From personal 
residence Murray Ellis, 
3861011. 

AffiiMK* R«f<irt 

LOW RATES 

Refrigerators, freezers, ranoes. 
automatic washers, dryers, 
dishwashers repaired. Phoenix 
Appliances, 384-0423. 

Aggr tttrii 

APPRAISALS 

Fast Efficient Service 

Lynn Holmes F R l R l. (B.C.) 
Landmark Properties Ltd. 
3866762 

BakyiHtag 

MOTHER OF TWO DAUGH 
ters (4 and 6 years) would like to 
babysit full time on weekdays at 
her own home. Central Saanich 
652-9341 

WILL BABYSIT, MY HOME, 
daytimes, Mondav-Frlday, ages 

3 and over, Tattersall-Quadra 
area 382 3786. 

BRENTWOOD BAY DAY CARE 
Mother with 2 years licensed ju 
perience has vacancies as of Au¬ 
gust 1st. Call 3865039 

WILL BABYSIT. MY HOME. 
Woolco area, anytime, reasorv 
able. 385-6907. 

WILL BABYSIT IN LAKEHILL 
home, Monday to Friday, 3-5 
year olds. 479 4788 

MOTHERING HEIGHTS 
offers excellent day care on 1 
acre quiet street 479-0496 

BUTTONS 8i BOWS DAYCARE 
Center, 312 Benhomer 4761314 

8rickUr«n 

STEVE'S MASONRY, SPECIA 
lizing in chimneys, facings, and 
chimney repairs. Work guaran¬ 
teed 721-5012 

ANY KIND OF BRICK OR 
block work. Quality workman 
ship guaranteed 478-1108 after 

FIREPLACES, ARCHES, CIR 
cular hearths, feature walls, re¬ 
taining walls, etc. 3867890 

CakiMt Hakias 

KITCHEN CABINETS. BATH 
room vanities, counter tops, all 
custom built or refacing old cabi¬ 
nets with new modern designs 
with low price. For free estimate 
477 6954. 

CanMrtwt 

RENOVATING? 

Want some Ideas! Kitchens, 
bathrooms and rec rooms my 
specialty, for a free estimate call 
Terry, 479-9573. 

COMPLETE INTERIOR REN 
ovations Including kitchens and 
bathrooms, storage and striving 
a speciality Guaranteed prices 
and craftsmanship. Call Larry 

G Smeltzer, 382 8492 

OAK BAY 

Community Carpenter. Oeslons 
and construction. Sundecks, ad¬ 
ditions, cabinets, finishing. Call 
Terry 5966046. 

FINISHING CARPENTRY, 
basements, sundecks. siding 
Free estimates. Reasonable 
Terry 652 4577 

SORRY, DUE TO WORK 
overload. Bob Innes 598 2795 will 
not be taking on any new work 
until August 11th. 

COMPLETE HOME CON 
struction and renovation ser 
vice, design assistance and estl 
mates 479-8733 

CEOAR SIDING IS OUR SPE 
claltv All types and styles 
Guaranteed workmanship 

PERMACONST. LTD. 

F REE ESTIMATES. 384 2323 

FINISHING CARPENTER, 
cabinet maker Don Milter. 
642 5339 

SUNOECKS ANO ALL OTHER 
carpentry work, free estimates, 
ask for Tom or Paul 7?) 5786 

CARPENTERS AVAILABLE 

3114)145 

QUALITY fRAMING CREW 
available Jones Bros Cons 
*56 7164,656 1*97 

FRAMING CREW AVAIL 
able Call * ase 657 343J 

ALL TYPESOF CARPENTRY 
work and renovations 4/8 8$M 



< APITAE ( ARRt T AND UP 
holster H rua«*fi r« s.dent.al 
a .d > urnmer i ial **-«ak* <» .dt 
•n our work *4 44/7 10 d*i 
c uun> with mmMion of Hus ad 


X BUSINESS SERVICES 

AND DIRECTORY 

X BUSINESS SERVICES 

END DIRECTORY 

0«V«t CtuMtg 

Dressmaking 

REGIONAL CARPET CLEAN 
Ing, steam cleaning Living 
room, dining room, hall, $45. 
478-8518 

GISELE'S CUSTOM DRESS- 
making. Design, alteration, res¬ 
tyling. All work guaranteed 
Mondav-Frlday, 85pm. Satur¬ 
day by appointment. 3864434 

SPECIALIZING IN UPHOL 
stery, carpet, steam cleaning 
Guaranteed lob, low rates. 

A beer, 3860846 

ALTERATIONS FROM $1.50. 
New dresses, $15. 1112 May 
Street. 3886548 

PHIL'S CARPET CLEANING, 
steam cleaning carpets, chester¬ 
fields, chairs. 474-1808. 

ALTERATIONS AND RE- 
pairs, also, girl's and Barbie 
clothes sewn. 383 4108 

CvptiaDlMrai 

Onml 

HOURIGANS 

CARPETS AND LINOS LTD. 
FLOOR COVERING 
SPECIALISTS 

715 PANDORA AVE. 3867401 

“SPRAYMAN" 
Specializing In all types of tex 
ture ceilings and walls satisfac 
tlon guaranteed. 652-3601. 

BOARD, TAPE, TEXTURE. 
Over the phone estimates. 
5989593 or 595-1541 evenings 

EMriul Cariredsn 

FRED SHORT FLOOR COVER 
Ing, expert Installation of car 
pets, linos, tiles, hardwood. R6 
pair work a speciality. For 
estimates 478-5788, 388-6275 
pager 1473. 

RG HELLER ELECTRIC 
Resident, commercial, small In¬ 
dustrial. Old home rewiring. 
Very reasonable rates. 4784032, 

If no answer 385-5335. 

VICTORIAN, 18 YEARS Ex¬ 
perience. cheap for cash. Small 
room or whole house. Written 
guarantee. 384-4252 anytime. 

OLDER HOMES REWIRED— 
No down pymt. We finance at 
bank rates with approved credit. 
EDDY'S ELECTRIC—385-7666 

CORMlt 

Construction or Service E lect. 
Free estimates. Call Henry 

384-3323 ( 24hrs) 

G AND R CONCRETE FINISH- 
ers, all type of concrete work. No 
l ob too small Phone 383-8985 
after 4. 

DO YOU HAVE SMALL ELEC- 
trlcal wiring lobs? No one Is in¬ 
terested? Please call evenings. 
652 5809. 

CONCRETE WORK. PATIOS, 
driveways, sidewalks. Free estl 
mates. 381-1361 

Eldred Electric 
382-8728 

Oumk Tlag 

SMALLER JOBS, OLD. NEW. 
Service calls. Most reasonable. 
384-6315 evenings 

CUSTOM CERAMIC TILING, 
free estimates. All work guaran 
♦eed. 656 5494. 

LICENSED ELECTRICIAN 
will do new wiring, rewiring, hot 
water tanks Installed. 479-9765 

CERAMIC TILING, TOP QUAL- 
Itv work, low reasonable rates 
5965884 

Eicivatiag 

Ckmap $«rnc< 

MANSELL BOBCAT SERVICE. 
Weekend specialists. Call 
4789458. 478-2570. for leveling, 
backfilling, septic fields, post 
holes, sand, gravel or topsoil 
supplied, spread, leveled 

NOCASH NEEDED 

Attics, basements, yards. Any 
kind of lunk hauled away. Also 
buy & sell anything of vatue 
Bob'S, 3862451 or 478-8789 

A 1 BOBCAT SERVICES 
Complete range of Bobcat ser¬ 
vices Including power raking 
and stone removal. For profes¬ 
sional service call Steve Cook, 
479-2205. 

VICTORIA RECYCLING 

Free removal, scrap cars, hlde- 
a beds, square (ridges and treez 
ers. working or not 388 6275 
pager 877 anytime 381 5353 eve¬ 
nings 

LYLE'S BOBCAT SERVICE 
Residential, commercial, land 

384*740? an<, drlvewdv ° r «Hng 

REASONABLE CLEANUP 
Yards, basements, etc. also 
hauling, free estl mates. 479-5823. 
6565671. 

ROBERTSON'S EXCAVATING 
Track machine with backhoc. 
Roads, basements, backfilling. 
595-8530 

CLEAN UP YARDS. COM 
posts and basements, prompt 
service, reasonable rates. 
4784943. 

BRENTWOOD BOBCAT SER- 
vlce, backhoe work, sand fills, 
leveling, etc. 652-3519. 6567089 

R 8 B CLEAN UPS. BASE 
ments, yards, compost, etc $12 
hourly or lob rate. 595-3928. 
382 4493. 

Fancfcg 

BEST WAY CLEANUP, 
yards, compost, garage, etc 
Free estimate. $12.hourly or lob 
rate. 479-0285. 

Phoenix Fencing 

We specialize In chain link fenc 
ing from yards to tennis courts. 
For free estimate call 384-2024. 

CLEANUPS. BASEMENTS, 
attics, yards, composts, and 
lunk hauling 6585406 

MILLER'S FENCE ANDGATE, 
supply and/or install chain link 
fences, residential. Industrial, 
tennis courts, dog runs and re¬ 
pairs. Free estimates. 6567529. 

HAULING AND CLEANUPS. 
Basement, yard, compost. Free 
estimates Eugene's, 383-3528. 

FILL IT TO THE BRIM, $30. 
ton truck with racks. Phone any¬ 
time 3866142 

FENCE CITY 

All types fencing, chain link, or 
wood, tennis courts, dog runs, 
etc Nothing too big or small 
Call 383 3425 for estimate 

HAVE TRUCK, WILL HAUL 
refuse removal at flat rates. 
384-4649 

ISLANDCHAIN LINK 
Fencing In wire or wood 
Smalllobs a specialty 
477-0332. 

CLEANUP MAN AND EMPTY 
truck looking for work,reason 
able 3867965. 

PROFESSIONAL, FAST, 
courteous cleanups and roof 
cleaning. 479 1268 or 479-4472. 

EUROPEAN CRAFTSMAN, 
all types of fenclno and repairs 
Guaranteed work. Gordon Head, 
721 3759. 

WILL PICK UP ANYTHING, 
big or small. Call Paul. 4786832 

ROUGH CEDAR, ALL DIMEN 
sions. Hidden Valiev Sawmills. 
Open daily, till noon Sundays 
112 743-2830. 

FATHER AND SON WITH VAN, 
delivery, cleanups, etc 3869500 

NO JOB TOO SMALL. WILL 
clean and haul Paul; 477-4537 

FlMriig mV Sanding 

Cwtractwi 


M & M FLOOR 

COMPLETE FLOOR CENTRE 
Hardwood, Carpets and Linos 

532 William St., 384-0343 
Nights: Al, 3863078 

Mike. 652 4308 

STEVE BUTLER 
CONST. LTD. 

Commercial-residential, reno¬ 
vations and design. Please call 
652-1440 

JONES BROS. 
CONSTRUCTION 

Complete custom homes. Let us 
give vou an estimate on any 
phase of your home Top refer 
ences 6562164,6561897. 

ftiriwln 

QUALITY LANDSCAPING 
Ltd. Pruning, gardening, main 
tenance and cleanup New lawn 
preparation, power raklno, 
aerlating, stone work. Monthly 
rates. Reasonable prices, free 
estmates. 4785114, 478-4216. 

WHEATON 

CONSTRUCTION LTD. 
General Contractors 
Building Consultants 
385-5702 

FREE ESTIMATES, ROTO- 
tllling, rotovatlng, lawn care, 
tall grass cut, edging, chain saw 
Ing, tree removal, brush 
cleared, oeneral cleanups, open 
or covered hauling. Call the 
Hardy Bunch, 385-5620. 5-9 pm 

FARMER 

CONSTRUCTION 

Design — Renovations 
3885121 

HARVEYS LANDSCAPE 6 
Garden Service. Experienced 
Chinese gardener, garden main¬ 
tenance and new lawn specialty. 
Garden designing, redesign. All 
phases 479-TO78, 384-8621. 

T.&C. 8UILDERS LTD. 
Framing 

385-5293 385-8587 

EVERGREENS, HEDGES EX 
pertly shaped. Very reasonable 
Call 382-7410. 384 4014. 

QUALITY FRAMING 
Free estimates. 

6564861 or 652 2421. 

DON'S TRACTOR SERVICE. 
Rotovatlng & level. 477-3913. 

ROTOTILLING NO JOB TOO 
small. Free estimate. 65? 2984 

DALE MILLER CONSTRUC 
tlon. Custom homes. Renova 
tions. Framing, siding and fin 
Ishing. 6562597. 

GARDENING AT FAIR PRICE 
3884752 

GARDENING, OOO JOBS. $6 
per hour Your tools 3866275 

FOUNDATION AND FRAMING 
crew available now. Will build to 
suit. Licensed contractor. 
3887835. 

Glass and Glazing 

RUSSELL'S CONTRACTING 
You name It, I do It. 381-0169 
after 5. 

HAVE YOU GOT YOUR ESTI 
mate? Try ours! Storm win¬ 
dows, residential conversion 
Call John. 384-4042 or Rick 
382-7130. 

CEDAR HILL CONST. LTD 
Custom homes; framing, sid¬ 
ing. Free estimates, 384-1436 

HARRY, 477-6534 
Residential, picture or glass. 

QUALITY FRAMING CREW 
available. Jones Bros. Cons 
6562164, 6561897 

tuttm mi Pwwyim 

!i 

5" CONTINUOUS GUTTERS, 
special contractor rates. Old 
wooden gutters renewed Irwin 
Industries, 382-5154. Free est 

ARCHITECTURAL,STRUC 
tural drawings, quantity takeoff 
and estimates prepared. 19 
years experience, hourly-con 
tract. 721-5047. 

Wrekfwn 

REMOOELING 

RENOVATIONS 

Painting, carpentry, landscarv 
•ng Reasonable rates for quality 
work Phone Sam. to 10pm 
383-3704 

ARCHITECTURAL DRAFT- 
ing Energy efficient residential 

?», H 7?Sfe r * , ' COn,,K ’ 

Braptriti 

STRONG TRUCK. STRONG 
back, will do anything, moving. 

raid's 

F loor Covering Specialists 

CUSTOM 

DRAPERIES 

—Bedspreads— 

PROMPT IN HOME SERVICE 
715 PANDORA AVE *62461 

etc Phone Randy 312-1261 
382 5460 

NO JOB TOO BIG OR SMALL, 
we do them all Call Mark or 
Dave, 387-0391 or 383 2972 after 5 
pm Satisfaction guaranteed 
firee estimates 

NO JOB TOO BIG. NO JOB TOO 
small Painting, carpentry, ren 
ovations, fencing, finishing car 
gentry, smell cement ioos. haul 
Ing Cell Terry or Bob. *5 5620 


/ *$et CCP4P teu • ROAp 

CwHemDvapes Bed^cedt 

111 95 PER HR. 

V veer (Xd student with h ton 
buck will do hauling end mov 
•ng 388 71* 

STRONG MAN WITH 1 TQM 
truck will clean attics, base 
ments yards sports reason 
aMe rates Cali Me *74 days 
only 

SE Ml RE TIREO BRITISH 
dv apery <unwH««i< will m«b 
Rrapes bam vour n.#tar i#i or 

HAULING tgp VOU SAND 

manure wuud garbage etc tu 

Were A* j./t 

back puiRm» shades -ann •> 

blliipv 5*laii• 

» R it V BY *4 
«un van $k* W hum 187 <4* 


BUSINESS SERVICES 
AND DIRECTORY 


TWO YOUNG HANDYMEN 
598^4§3 C 4^5735 * ^ anyrthlr>0 


2 MEN WITH TON TRUCK 
with racks, haul anything, 7 days 
a week, S30 a load. 385-6142. 


thi . 

BATHTUB 

DOCTOq 


When remodelling your bath¬ 
room your choice should be qua I 
ItV- service, a meaningful guar 
antee. experience - and lots of It, 
then price! Our in home bathtub 
resurfaclng/chlp repair. In over 

30 coUx-~~ 

expens!_ 

It - Over 25 years experience 
serving you! 

“Often Imitated... 

Never duplicated" 


383-5614 



WOODWORKERS LTD. 
Manufacturers of K.D. lumber 
and cabinets. Introduces Its new 
line of fashion furniture. Intro¬ 
ductory offer on 3 piece teak or 
walnut melamine wall units, 
5491; coffee tables. »85; end 
tables, 568 

ALSO — New exclusive line of 
Eurooean Blum cabinet hard 
ware Come down to the old mill 
and see us. Weekdays 7:30-5:00. 
Cr. Hillside and Bridge 388-6645 


REGLAZE BATHTUBS ON 
premises white or coloured, also 
sinks, stoves and fridges. Porce- 
llr» or fiberglass surface also 
chip repairs Phone Abbey Re 
finishing Company, 381-2073. 


COMPLETE REPAIRS. RENO- 
vations and hauling done. Satis 
faction guaranteed. 384-8075 
pager 1708. 


SUNDECKS, CARPORTS, 
stairs, or perhaps a finished 
basement. Whatever your need, 
give us a call, 388-7835 


Janitor Service 


VICTORIA MAID SERVICE, 
experienced maids and lanltors. 
no lob too laroe or small, work 
guaranteed 384-3344. 


36 BUSINESS SERVICES 
AND DIRECTORY 


Piinttrj anT Dtctraten 

INTERIOR PAINT SPE.CIAL 
1st; reasonable, free estimates. 
Margot, 383-4798 

PAINTING, NO JOB TOO 
small, interior and exterior. 
Contact Steve 382-6566. 

Plutmre 

PLASTERING AND STUCCO 
Ing. also small lobs In patching 
and lathing. Ask for Jim. Eve^ 
nlng calls welcome. 478-1118, 
Jlmv's Plastering & Stucco. 

STUCCO 

New and older homes stuccoed 
Quality work. Brook Plastering, 
4788775 

PLASTERING, STUCCO ANO 
stucco wire Quality work, com 
petltlve rates. Free estimates. 
652-9029, 477 4084 

STAN OLSON 

383-0897 

COLEMAN PLASTERING 
Quality lath and stucco. 
478-9976. 

FRIEDRICH PLASTERING 
and stucco. Older homes. 
6562064 

PLASTERING.STUCCO. RE 
pairs, reasonable, 479-4779. 

PMhiriHukg 

NEWFIRM 

Renovations, new construction, 
discounts. Law and Son Plumb¬ 
ing Service Ltd. 658-8112. After 
hours 6588163 

REPAIRS AND RENOVA 
tions, 20 years experience, rea 
sonable rates, 24 hour service. 
652-5813. 

LOW COST PLUMBING RE- 
pairs, excellent workmanship. 
Days: 383-0149; evenings and 
weekends: 3866553. 

DAVIDS PLUMBING 

Hot water tanks, plumbino re 
pairs, drain cleaning. 3868881 

D & S PLUMBING SERVICE, 
alterations and repairs. Reason 
able. 478-0965. 

REASONABLE RATE PLUMB 
er, 24 hour service. Free esti¬ 
mates, 477 5742. 

JIM MCGREGOR REPAIRS. 
384 5320, 385-9239 

Prwttag l TypcuHhg 


ATTENTION LANDSCAPERS 
Professional or amature 
No more raking or picking 
stones Call A 1 Bobcat Service, 
479-2205 tor complete pre-seed- 
ing preparation 


ATS T vpesetting Services 
Quality typesetting and paste-up 
service Fast turn around at 
competitive prices. 

81? Cormorant St. 385-2076 


DUTCH LANDSCAPING LTD. 
Professional Services In new 
lawn preparations, designing, 
layouts, planting, low mainte- 


teed. Free estimates. 4 


F1023. 


PORTUGESE LANDSCAPING. 
Stone work, rock walls, fire¬ 
places, and landscaping. Free 
estimates. Reasonable prices. 
Jose Viveiros 386-4665 


CREATIVE LANDSCAPING 
Designing and redesigning Ar¬ 
tistic layouts. Free estimates. 
Dutch Horticultural back¬ 
ground 477-7882. 


LANDSCAPING AND STONE 
work, retaining walls and fac¬ 
ing, good workmanship, 
598-2111. 


RifripratiM and 
Air CwiditioMig 


BURNETT REFRIGERATION 
Fridges and freezers serviced In 
vour home 382-4134 ( 24 hrs) 


WHITE'S REFRIGERATION. 
Prompt, efficient service In your 
home 381 2653 ( 24 hrs.) 


Roefag 


ALL TYPESOF ROOFING AND 
repairs. Call Blue Diamond 
Roofing for free estimates, all 
work guaranteed. 595-7722, 
595-4219 


K&M BUILDING 
Building, renovations, roofing 
and drvwall. Free estimates. 
595-6332, 478 7180 


ED'S TRACTOR SERVICE. RO 
tovatino, leveling yards, brush 
cutting. 479-2204. 


Masonry 


JOE'S MASONRY ALL TYPES 
of masonry. Call anytime 
381-1462 


ROCKWORKS. RETAINING 
walls, stone-facings. Call Dave 
595-7746. 


10 YEAR WARRANTY ON 
reroofing shingles supplied by 
Hesloj) Brothers Roofing 


ASPHALT SHINGLES. ROOF 
ing and re—roofing. Reasonable 
rates. Free estimates. 386-9891. 
656-3492. 


PARKER JOHNSTON LTD. 
1855 BLANSHARD. 382-9181 
“Roofing Victoria Since 1935" 


MtscoiaBOOtu Service 


EXCELLENT SHOE REPAIR 
Reg 485 BURNSIDE E. 3860272 


Movfcg t Storage 


DRUM CARTAGE 

Truck for every move. Fully In¬ 
sured Reasonable rates. Free 
estimates, call 383 9861 


TAR AND GRAVEL ROOFING 
and rebooting Phone Central 
Sheet Metal, 478-1814. 

INEXPENSIVE RE ROOFING, 
materials plus labour, period 
Call Ken, 3868637. 

SUNDOWN ROOFING SPECIA 
lizing in duroid shingles, cedar 
shakes, tar and gravel. 383-8972 

Sew Slurpeeing 


C &M CARTAGE 
Experienced Movers, large or 
small moves From $15 hour 
595-4376 9 - 4 pm. weekdays or 
6563651. 

MOVING SOON? CALL 477-0422 
for fast, free estimate. Pension 
er rates; flat or hourly rates. 
Everoreen Transfer Movers. 

MBNCARTAGE 
$20 per hour for 2 men and 3 ton 
truck with 20' box. Insured. 
595-3226. 

MOVES AND DELIVERIES. 
Experienced, efficient. Insured. 
Eugene's, 383-3528. 

LIGHT DELIVERY SERVICE. 
$12 a call. 592 7068 

ACCEL MOVES. EFFICIENCY 
at a lower rate 381-2059 

Pttatm al D*c«ratere 

PAINTING AND DECORAT 
ino. Interior and exterior, paper 
hanging a speciality. 30 years 
experience. All work guaran¬ 
teed Immediate service on 
small lobs. 479-9401 after 5 pm. 

EXPERIENCED PAINTER, 
Interior and exterior Small re 
pairs If needed. References 
available Guaranteed work af 
reasonable rates. Free esti¬ 
mates. 479-2210. 

TWO EXPERIENCED PAINT 
ers. Interior, exterior, special 
rates for senior citizens. Com 
pleteiv equipped, to get the lob 
done fast. Very Inexpensive 
Phone after 5pm 385-3888 

EXPERIENCED PAINTER, 

interior and exterior, small re¬ 
pairs If needed, references 
available, guaranteed work at 
reasonable rates, free esti¬ 
mates 479 9975. 

GARRETT PAINTING, PA 
oerhanging, interior and exteri¬ 
or, fast and friendly service. 
For free estimate please call 
Charles Garrett 4784)992 

EXCELLENT WORK, PRO 
fessional Interior and exterior 
painter, wallpapering a spe 
claltv. Haynes Palntlno, 384 5263 
or 384-8075 paoer 1227. 

OLO AGE PENSIONERS PRE 
ferred Residential painting 

«!X 0 'S&& G * r * GIOVW 

B M B PAINTING, RESIOEN 
tlal & Commercial, tree estl 
mates, reasonable rates. 70 
years experience 642-4572 


IF QUALITY AS WELL AS 
^1 si mportont call Specialty 

5914424 0 


386-1122^ _ 

r -'CANDU 

l SlRVlCt CENTRE ___ _ 

2825 S INSTAMT SAW 

8069* St. EXCHANGE 


Secretarial Sink* 
and Word Practising 


CALL THE PROFESSIONALS 
at Effective Information Pro- 
cesslng Ltd 383-525? 


durodek 

Vinyl sundeck floor covering for 
new and old decks. Free esti¬ 
mates. 478-064! 


Toilers 


LEATHERWEAR ALTERA- 
tions, repairs, remodellino, 
cleaning and dyeing. Ellev's 
Leather Fashions. 738 Johnston, 
383-7834 


BRITISH CUSTOM TAILORS 
Closed for July. Back Aug. 5 with 
our annual Aug. sale. 

1311 BLANSHARD 383-7637 


OAK BAY TAILORS 
Custom tailoring, alterations, 
ladies and mens. Leather altera 
tions. 1876 Oak Bay, 598-4131. 


Tree Service 


DANGEROUS TREES RE 
moved, accurate toopino and 
falling. Thlnlng and limbing In 
sured. 478 9346 


OLYMPIC TREE SERVICE 
Falling, topping, dangerous tree 
removal Insured. 478-2850. 


GREGG FURNITURE 
Est 1959. Guaranteed work, free 
estimates. Competitive prices on 
new furniture or reupholsterv 
1000's of fabrics, fabric rem 
nants small or laroe yardage at 
oreetiv reduced prices 
388-7365_2300 DOUGLAS 


ACE UPHOLSTERY 
381-1321 

Quality workmanship Europe 
an craftsman Frae estimates 


Solid references 


INTE R IOR/EXTE RI OR 
painting Reasonable rates 
F rae estimates References len 
Oownie. 479-0146 


EXPERT PAINTING BY FULL 
time professionals Work 
guaranteed Free estimates 
*6-0508 or 384-4201 


STEEL SHELVING. LOCKERS. 
B1 nn 1 ng and stor age equipment 
J N.D Enterprises 
1431 Lena St_588 0380 


MERINO PAINTING AND 

18 EXPERIENCE. PAINTING 
and decoratmg Fraeastin 
Guar <n « aad work 381*67 


JOURNEYMAN PAINTER 
bet own equipment wM wort by 

Hour or contract 4)8)W 

PAINTING. iNSlDt ANO OUT 
f r#e esllmefei. low rales. 
*"<*u 


WELDING REPAIRS, REA- 
soneble price. 823 Caledonia. 
Barny, 386-1164 


BOB'S JANITORIAL SERVICE 

Take a aummer vacation tel us 


TRAVEL 



a BUSINESS 
~1 PERSONALS 


Janmar 

381-1125 


The Floliday Home Sitter* 

BON VOYAGE? 

Before you place your vacation 
reservations, place a call to Jan 
Mar. We'll worry about your 
yard, your pets, your plants and 
your mall, while you’re having 
the vacation of your life. Next 
time you leave town, leave the 
worrying to us. Bonded. 


Hawaii Waterfront 

Summertime bargain tor large 
family — several families? Five 
bedroom house usually 5200 per 
day U S. funds — available Aug. 
8-Aug. 24 only 5125 per day Cana 
dlan funds. Comfortable for up to 
10 people. 

STAN STUART 
Days 592-2407 

Evenings 595-0601 

MARGETTS& GOWER 
OAK BAY PROPERTIES LTD. 


SAIL ADVENTURE 

Sail Barclay Sound on the 120' 
schooner The Ruber Ison II 6. 
backpack the West Coast Trail of 
Vancouver Island. Guides, sail¬ 
ing Instruction and camping 
gear Included In this reasonably 
priced excursion to depart vic¬ 
toria July 28th or July 3lst. Con¬ 
tact Ken Murray 586-7604, Sur- 
rey, B.C. 


MAUI—BEACHFRONT 

DELUXE 2-BEDROOM, 
FULLY FURNISHED CONDO¬ 
MINIUM. PLENTY OF REC¬ 
REATION ANO MILES OF 
SANDY BEACH WEEKLY 
AND DAILY RATES AVAIL¬ 
ABLE 383-4124. 


MAUI 

Deluxe 2 bedroom fully 
furnished condominium avail¬ 
able Located on a safe sandy 
beach. 

OK Trucking Co Ltd 386-3414 


DELUXE 2 BR., 2 BATH Con¬ 
dominium on sunniest beach In 
Maul. Good bookings still avail¬ 
able. 5500 for month of August. 
477 3039, 383-9512 


FATHER AND YOUNG SON 
going to Toronto, first week In 
August. Will deliver your car for 
flat rate, or need a ride however 
far 384-6171, Larry 


LADY WITH TICKET TO LAS 
Vegas would like lady with 
same. Pav vour expenses. Lat 
ter part of August. Victoria 
Press Box, 500 


HAWAII BOUND? ONE BED- 
room condo in Waikiki with pool 
and view. 656^4111 or 656 5321 


TRADE USE OF HOUSE ONE 
month Texas coast for BC. Box 
403, Rosharon, Texas, 77583. 


MAUI 1 BEDROOM CONDO- 
minlum on beach. Pool, lacuzzl, 
sauna 478-3504. 


PERSONALS 


I'M A SINGLE 30 YEAR OLD 
male, 6', 145 pounds. Likes 
camping, traveling, dining, 
dancing, sports and quiet times, 
seeking slim girl or similar In¬ 
terests or can add to mine. I 
work up island but travel to 
Victoria frequently. We can't 
meet unless you write. All letters 
answered. Thank you. Victoria 
Press Box 484. * 


PROFESSIONAL MAN, Di¬ 
vorced, mid-forties, good health, 
considerate and affectionate, 
seeks lady on whom to lavish his 
affection, a woman to care for, 
lovingly and tenderly. I enloy 
sailing, hiking, music, elegant 
restaurants, lir* - * — 

versa!ion " * 


is, light 
386-0041 


hearted con- 


63 YEAR YOUNG WIDOW 
newly moved to Victoria, attrac¬ 
tive, petite and lonely, enlovs 
classical music, chess, walking, 
travel, Intellectual conversation 
and the outdoors, wishes to meet 
for companionship. Please write 
Victoria Press Box 522. 


BUSINESS MAN. DIVORCED, 
no children. Like to meet slim 
32-38 year old attractive woman. 
I like to start new life and give 
vou full financial support. I own 
beautlutl 5 bedroom city home. 
Victoria Press Box 523. 


WITNESSES 


Anyone who witnessed the acci¬ 
dent at McKenzie & Saanich. 
July 22nd, involving a taxi. After 
6pm. 658 8989 or before 384-1121. 


32 YEAR OLD MALE WOULD 
like to meet a woman 20-32 for a 
sincere relationship, social 
drinker, but not into the bar 
scene. Reply Victoria Press Box 


ATTRACTIVE COUPLE. LATE 
30's, would like to meet another 
couple for quiet dinners and ro¬ 
mantic evenings. Victoria Press 
Box 487, 


RAGING ECCENTRIC. NA- 
ture lover, child hater, musi¬ 
cian, working man, 34, wants to 
meet lady with similar tenden¬ 
cies. 479-0177. 


GENTLEMAN. SIXTIES, 
seeks lady companion for car 
outings, etc, non-smoker prefer¬ 
red. Replies guaranteed confl- 
dentlal. Victoria Press Box 518. 


NO ADVICE, NO PUTDOWNS, 
but a caring listener Call us at 
NEED, 24 hours a day. We are 
here for you. NEED CRISIS 
LINE, 386-6323 


MALE. 28, FRUSTRATED 
with everyday life, seeks new 
lovers and experiences. Victoria 
Press Box 398. 


SINCERE BI-MALE, 28, 
wants an honest and genuine 
friendship with a younger male. 
Victoria Press Box 496. 


PREGNAN C*Y AND BIRTH 
control counselling. Victoria 
Birth Control Clinic. For ap- 
polntment phone 385-3351. 


WHO CARES IF YOU ARE 
pregnant? Birthright does. 
Phone 3861431. 


WARREN is back with Churlev 
Morn naturally 385-7223. 


* BUSINESS 
PERSONALS 


PERSONALIZED 
DATING SERVICE 
Helps you meet the people who 
want to meet you. whether 
you're looking for sincere friend¬ 
ship or a life long relationship. 
Call today 

478-3213 

Canada's largest and most ac- 
tive dating service. 


INCORPORATE 

LOW COST 

OVE R THE PHONE FAST 
Phone THE LAW SHOPPE 
TOLL FREE 112-800-663-3035 
(In Vancouver area call 
687 2442) 

Chargex and Master charge ac 


“Legal Help You Can Afford" 


IF YOU DON'T NEED AN 
OFFICE BUT YOU DO 

nee 8seooi?s ,ess 

Mailing address (lockup boxes) 
Telephone answering 

C AP?TAJU^ICESE^C E 5 
?18-l207Dc»»e*St 3861324 


“SWINGERS’ 
Cenede's feet 
con* eel nu 
piece F i 




LOST? ALONE? 

PecMic GeMe end Escert Sar 
xKe^er ladles and genfs 


Self Care Hair - Churlev Morn 
Natural Halrstvllng • You owe it 
to yourself. Phone for comp 11 
mentary consultation, 385-7223. 


COMING TO VICTORIA SOON: 
Silva Mind Control Course: Free 
lecture. For more Information 
call 385-3877. 


INSTANT CASH FOR 
B.C.R.I.C. Shares, Harbour 
Square Ticket Sales, 910 Govern- 
ment St. 381-6114. 


ACHY FEET, HEADACHE, 
backache? Vita-Flex Reflexo- 
ogv relieves. Feet: 5 minutes, 
lunch-hour. 3885562, 3863841. 


TENSION RELIEF RELAXA- 
tlon exercises and/or massage. 
Phone Hugh Macpherson, 
595-4914. 


QUIT SMOKING. SEND 52 98 
and stamped self addressed en 
velope tor secret to success, Sta 
tlQOC, Box 6191, V8P 5L5. 


MASSAGE PRACTITIONER 
Gafle Dlxson, B.A . r.m. 
Relocated to620 View St. »22! 
Appointments 381-2424 


HYPNOSIS COUNSELLING 
Licensed consultant Bill Bov- 
chuk. Call 382-4092 


STOP SMOKING PERMAN- 

safci. t aaaa»j5^gMr- 


ASTROLOGY READINGS. FOR 
3&4044 tmCnt C * M Wavne at 


MRS. PAYN-JONES, TRANCE 
medium, questions answered. 
386-3603 


PSYCHIC READINGS, TEA- 
cups and cards. Fondue Pot Rev 
taurant, 1100 Yates, 388-4468 


CARD READING IN DEPTH 
Seventh Year_6561753 


EUROPEAN FOOT CARE 
By Monika 478-1245 


REFLEXOLOGY-FOOT 
Massage. Call Marilyn 5960789 


EDUCATION 


Onluw- 

— uZI. 


WESTERN HOMES LTD. 
\J037 CtovrdaH 380-3464 J 


REAL ESTATE 
PRE-LICENCE 

Tutoring for all interested par¬ 
ties. Small groups. No future em¬ 
ployment obligation. For full de- 
tails call now CENTURY 21 
Western Homes Ltd. 3863494 (24 

hrs). 


TUTORING—PROFESSIONAL 
help by experienced teacher 
French, math, new and old 
methods. 598 2331 


PRIVATE TENNIS LESSONS. 
510 per hour, my court. 592-1705. 


FUEL 


BEAVER FUELS 
Full cord of green alder, 570. 
Well split, free delivery. 
382 9325. 


FULL y» TON PICKUP LOAD 
of seasoned alder, split and de- 
llvered, 545.479-7444. 


PRESTO LOG SPECIAL 
240 for 559 95 delivered 
3861750, 479-8877. 


SPLIT ALDERWOOD FOR 
sale, 570 cord delivered. 477-9853 
between 6-8pm 


ALDER WOOD, SPLIT, DE 
llvered, 545 pickup load, 570 
cord. 478-4815. 


2 LARGE CORDS OF WOOD, 
low, low price. 6562940, ask for 
Peter 


CUT YOUR OWN ALDER, THIS 
weekend only. 520 a pickup load. 
479-7444 John. 


PRESTO LOGS, FIREWOOD. 
383-3528, Eugene's 


TIMBER 


WANTED TIMBER 

FELLED, BUCKED or 
STANDING 
FIr, Cedar or Hemlock 
Ideal Sawmill Ltd. 
385-0441 


WANTED 
Standing or felled timber Selec¬ 
tive logging and bulldozir 
ELK LAKE TIMBER '* 


Dzing. 
658 5046. 


IS MMMNC SUPPLIES 


lit 


HOME LUMBER 

»r “■ 


PLYWOOD SALE 

STANDARD 

4x8—5/16 Stdtir J6.25 
4x8—% Std fir 57.50 
4x8—Va Std fir $10.25 
4x8—HStdfirT8.G $12.50 
4x8-44 Std $14.50 

Factory D:UnS 
4x8—V, 8.50 $5.95 

4x8—44 11.50 $6.50 

4x8—% 16.50 $10.25 

4x8—% 18.50 $13.50 

LUMBER SALE 

STD. and BTR FIR 
2x4—6' $155 

2x4—92V, pet Studs $255 
2x4—8'—14' $285 

2x6—8'—14' $285 

2x8—8'—24' $310 

2x10—8'—24' $365 

Louvered Bifolds 

#1 Select Mahooany 

c/w hardware 

’/j LouverFull Louver 
2668 $38 $34 

5068 $74 $65 

Duroid Shingles 

210 wt. No. 1 Asphalt selt 
seal. All colours In stock, 
per bundle. $9.95 

INSULATION 

FIBREGLASS - 

PRICE PER 1,000 SQ.tt. 
R12—4" $165 

R20—6" $265 

R28—8" $375 

GYPROC 

Price per 1,000 Sq. Ft. 
W GYPROC $135 
H" FIRESTOP $180 
STUCCO WIRE $30 
PERMAX $6.50 

Deliveries made any¬ 
where on Vancouver Is¬ 
land and Gulf Islands. Be¬ 
fore you buy compare our 
prices For duality, ser¬ 
vice and guaranteed sav¬ 
ings, phone: 


mam 


C-2 

BUILDING SUPPLIES 


JUBILEE BUILDING 
SUPPLIES Ltd. 


INSULATION 
R12 $160 M 

R20 $260 M 

R28 $370 M 

ROOFING 
DOMTAR 
Asphalt Shingles 
Permatlte $10.95 Bdl 

Truseal $ 9.95 Bdl 

LUMBER 

2x4x6' shorts 62< each 

2x4x8'utility $1.18 each 

2x4x10'utility $1.45 each 

Dash wood Windows 
Merit Cabinets 
Floor Coverings 


7:30- 5:30 

Saturday, 8:00 • 5:30 

6772 Kirkpatrick 652*9141 

OFF KEATING X ROAD 



buHdtng malarial* 

3005 JACKLIN RD. 

2x4—ECON $99/M 

1x8 —ECONshlplap $ 120/M 
H"K3 BOARD per sheet $5.50 
4" CERAMIC TILE 85«asq.tt 
'/-"ASPEN ITE per sheet $5.95 
4x8 - W' Drvwall per sheet $4.19 

OPEN MON. SAT. 

478-5509 



^vNORSECRAFT 
HARDWOOD 

'' Industrie# Ltd. 

_3S 3-4233 J 

NOW IN STOCK 
ALDER 
North America 

ALSO: opens 
531 David St. 


FENCING 

Light constructed 3' picket fence 
50 r — $49 Standard 3' picket 
fence 50' — $69. 4' board or good 
neighbor fence 50' — $72. 
SAANICH LUMBER 
1496 ADMIRALS RD 
385-2486 


SS LUMBER, 6535 FORD ROAD 
Duncan opposite Forest Mu 
seum, up Dr Ink water Rd, second 
road on right. 7 /»x12" cedar bevel 
siding, $325 BM. 1x8" cedar 
channel siding, $285 BM. 1x8" 
rough red cedar 234 lineal fool 
1127465041 


CHEAP. NEW FACTORY SAL 
vage glass, and thermo units. 
Less than '/»regular price. Win- 
dowscreens, $1 $4. Can deliver 
Works rear of Slegg's Lumber. 
Fifth Street, Sidney, Open Mon 
day-Frlday 12:30-4pm, Saturday 
8-12noon. 6566656 


ALUMINUM WINDOWS 
Discounted prices for odd sizes 
Also, thermal conversions, patio 
doors, screens, aluminum sid¬ 
ing and gutters. 

Alcan Building Products, 6680 
Mirah Rd (off Keating X Rd > 
652 3901 


SLUGGETT& BROWN 
JOINERY 

Wood Windows, Doors, Frames 
526DISCOVERY ST. 382 3011 


ROUGH CEDAR. ALL DIMEN- 
sions. Hidden Valiev Sawmills 
Open daily, till noon Sundays 
112-743 2830 


ITALIAN TILE AT DIRECT IM 
gortgPrlce, a genuine saving. 


18" HANDSPLIT BARN 
shakes, top quality, good supply 
$S6. Delivery available. 652-4368 


CEDAR FENCE POSTS. SPLIT 
or round, also fence rails. Phone 
652-4870. 


SINGLE PAIN 8X5 FIXED 
window $50. Single pain opening 
5x4 $35. 65642M 


40004USED RED CHIMNEY 
bricks?404 each. 477-3010, 


70 


MUSICAL 

INSTRUMENTS 


USED PIANO 

Next to new Heintzman Studio 
piano. Slight cabinet damage, 
oak finish $2/95 

USED ORGANS 

Hammond, Draw bars, percus¬ 
sion $1495 

Many More Too Numerous 
To Mention. 

Delivery and Lessons Included 
Terms Available 

BALDWIN PIANO & 
ORGAN CENTRE 
tight Across F 
1736 DOUGLAS 


JUST FOR YOU! 

A guitar tailored to vour needs — 
from ODYSSEY. You select the 
components, wood and finish, to 
the finest detail. We'll give vou a 
price In one day's time, and your 
guitar In 6-8 weeks — satis 
faction guaranteed at 

|V|c|V| usic 


WE ARE OVERSTOCKED!! 
TAKE ADVANTAGE OF 
THIS! ! NEW THOMAS 
ORGANS AT LOW LOW PRICE 
OF $1299 REDUCTIONS IN 
OTH&R MODELS TOO!! 

BERNIE PORTER 
MUSIC 

725 CALEDONIA 382-9542 

PARK FREE 
CLOSED MONDAYS 
JULY AND AUGUST 


CLEARANCE SALE 

All guitars and amps must go, no 
reasonable offer refused. ELEC 
TRIC STRINGS ONLY $4.75 
Still the best oultar and amp 
servicing and repairs at 

THE GUITAR SHOP 

Soft Sounds Music 
535YATES 381 5814 


THIS WEEKS SPECIAL 
HAMMOND 2 manual organ 
model 9722 with rhythm and 
bench was S1S95 NOW $1495. 

GLEESON MUSIC CITY 
Home of HAMMOND Organ 
714 FORT_ 388 96J7 


ANTIQUE 
PIANO STOOLS 

STARTING AT $75.1 UP. 
SCOTT PIANO & ORGAN 
1400Blenshard_3862434 


PLAYER PIANO 
American make, p a Stark, 
circa 1916. cabinet retinlshed 
Mechanism rebuilt and guar an 
teed %?99i or closest offer 
Phone Anderson's Plano Tuning. 
477-6439 


FENDER PROFESSIONAL 
torn neck bass guitar, as new 
with case and accessories Po 
land studio bass 100 amplify, 
with optional aoudizar. model SB 
108. as new Cost $2800, best offer 
fakes both 478-4500 



t X Ft Pli tttfc D PAINT ft 
NHI 0l • 

w«Rpi« 


• tyax 


it PAINT I 0 
«n«J friar. 





























































































































































































































































































































































































































































8 


C-3 


70 


MUSICAL 

INSTRUMENTS 


RENTALS 

reserve now for best selection 
Hall and Fairfield Music, 714 
Fort, 385-3307. 

BGW 250 POWE R AMP, TAPCO 
6 channel mixer, folded horn 
cabinet with vega 18", offers. 
384 8848 

PIANO RECONDITIONED BY 
piano tuner, for sale, oood condi¬ 
tion $1200. Leave message, 
178-8058 


oood condition bass with or with¬ 
out amp. S300-S500. Greg. 
592 4484, 

CANADIAN UPRIGHT PIANO, 
excellent condition. 384-3935. 
384 1154 

MANN GIBSON COPY 5 
string banjo with hard case, ex¬ 
cellent $350. 385-1747._ 

MASON & RISCH PIANO, EX 
cellent condition. $2100. 
384 8363. 


$1,000, excellent condition. 
Cabinet fair. 598-2523 

HAMMOND ORGAN, L100. 
mct^condltlon, offers on $900. 

SELMER MARK VI ALTO SAX- 
ophone. 5 piece drum set with 
Zildjian cymbals, 595 3768 

TRAYNOR PA, 4 CHANNELS, 
812, 2 monitors, $375. 479-7680 or 
592 8380 

JOHN SPENCER OLDER 
piano with brass ornate. Asking 
$600 or best offer. 382-4156. 


I960 GUILDS SIZE ACOUSTIC. 
$260. 477-4904 after 6._ 

UPRIGHT GRAND. $700. 
384 1336. 

71 MUSIC TEACHERS 


"Enroll To-Day" 

FOR 

PROFESSIONAL 
INSTRUCTION 
Guitar - Accordion 
Piano-Drums 
Organ - Violin 

BERNIE PORTER 
MUSIC 


725 Caledonia 
Near The Bay 


382 9542 
Park Free 


EVERGREEN CENTRE FOR 
Creative Musicianship. Profes¬ 
sional Instruction In guitar, 
piano and voice. 388-9153 

GUITAR LESSONS AVAIL- 
able In Pop, Rock and Country 
styles Theory lessons also 
available. Call Karl, 386-0605. 

MRS DIANE FERGUSON 
B.A., A.R.C.T. Teacher of piano, 
oroan, and theory, Gordon Head 
area* 477-7078 

PIANO AND THEORY. JIM 
Anderson, A.R.C.T. R.M.T, in 
Gordon Head area, 477-6439 

PIANO LESSONS. KEYED TO 
suit your style and personality. 
Your home. 386-4210 

77 M0TWCTCUS 


NEW 79 


400 CUSTOMS 

INCLUDES 

* F reioht and Prep 

* Carrier and Backrest 

* Deluxe Eng. Guard 

$2199 

ALL 1980 

HONDA CUSTOMS 

200,400,650. 750.900 

INSTOCK NOW 
“PLUS 

^ NEW 79 

HONDA CB 650 
$2699 


77 MOTORCYCLES 


1979 YAMAHA XS400S, MAG 
wheels, disc brakes, back rest, 
mint condition. $1800. Keith 
656-1170 652-4768. 


75 YAMAHA RD2S0, EXCEL- 

nltee, r« 


lent shape, 7850 miles, rebuilt 
motor. $750. View at 61 Cat 
Place 


1978 HONDA 250 XLS. LADY 
conditioned, road driven, helmet 
included. 4000 kms, $1450 or best 
offer. Colleen, 381-5124. 


1977 YAMAHA YZ80, NEW 
sprockets, chain, tune-up, excel- 
lent condition, $450 firm. 
112-748-1527 Duncan 


WINDJAMMER WITH BRACK- 
et for 1980 Suzuki 750 or 1100. 
Almost new, $500. 5954)051 after 

5. 


'74 650 TRIUMPH, ENGINE 
bored out to 750, chopped and 
chromed, 500 miles on engine. 
Best offer .478 8067. 


1979 YAMAHA XS750F STD. 
Slipstreamer fairing. Immacu¬ 
late $2950 Guthrie, Gillespie 
Rd. 642-5932 evenings. 


1976 BULTACA 350 SHERPA— 
T. New piston, clutch, chain and 
sprockets. Excellent condition. 
$875 Offers 477-2033 


Brook lands Motorcycles 
HARLEY-DAVIDSON HONDA 
937 Fort Dealer 6121 383-5926 


79 YAMAHA 750 SPECIAL, 
custom paint, good running con- 
dltlon. $2300. 385-2936. 


1974 HONDA 500 CB, EXCEL- 
lent running, fully dressed. 
$1800. 383-7751. 


75 HONDA GOLDWING 1000, 
$2900. 


SUZUKI 500, GOOD CONDI- 
tlon, new tires, $800or best offer. 
656-249? or 652-9655 


excellent condition. $2600. 
592 9298. 


1979 750K HONDA, 1300 KM. 
windshield, back traveling case, 
extras, 382-3326 


1980 YAMAHA 1100 SPECIAL, 
4000 kms, excellent condition, 
479 5338 


1965. YAM AH A 250, NEEDS A 
little bit of work, $200 or best 
offer. Ask for Terry, 384-4805 


77 SUZUKI DS185, NEW PARTS 
and extras. Very good condition. 
Offers on $800. 38^1254. 


1979 KAWASAKI 400 LTD, Ex¬ 
cellent condition, $1850. 
656-1723. 


76 CAN AM 250, PAIR 
leathers, size 32 waist; pair size 
11 motocross boots 386-4216. 


1975 200CC YAMAHA STREET 
bike 6200 miles. Excellent. $650. 
477-3319 (Peter) 


1976 YAMAHA DT-175, BEAU 
titul, not a mark on it $800. 
112-743-306? after Spm 


1975 HONDA SUPER SPORT, 
400 cc. 4 cylinders, $750. 
384 5659. 


1976 HONDA SUPER SPORT 4 
cylinder 750 with windjammer, 
19,600 miles. 652 2728 evenings 


1978 YAMAHA XS-1100E. LOW 
highway miles. Immaculate, 
extras, $3500 386-1048,477-6560. 


1975 360 CB HONDA, 9500 
rmles^ back rest. Offers on $750. 


79 YAMAHA 650 SPECIAL II. 
592-3236. weekdays, after 5. 
112-390-2692, weekends. 


1978 HONDA CB550, 10,000 KM, 
A-1 condition. 2 helmets. Serge, 
after Spm 385-9207 


1971 HARLEY DAVIDSON 
Sportster, fair condition, $2600, 
offers. 383-0103 evenings. 

l 79 YAM X750F, TESTED, LOW 
miles, bars and luggage. After 
1 4pm, 595-1304 _ 


condition, extras. Must sell 
$750. 477-3917, 479-1122 Mike. 


1979 RM125N. EXCELLENT 
condition, runs well, looks trick. 


1978 YAM 100, STREET, NEW 
condition, 2 helmets, must sell, 
$700 592-5475 or 592-0261. 



lffl> BSA ROYAL STAR A50. 
Springer front end. Completely 
rebuilt. Offers. 656-4139. 

1980 HONDA CM400T, LIKE 
new, low mileage, lady 
$2000. 595-7622, 388-4433 


1978 BLACK YAMAHA 500, 
mag tires, front and back disc 
brakes. $1400. 383-4074. 


1970 185 SUZUKI, GOOD CONDI- 
tion, helmets included. $650. 
112 743-5780 


NEW YAMAHA YZ80, $750 in¬ 
cludes new bumper bracket. 
478-3167 


M-X SALE 
ON NOW 

ALL 1980 MODELS 
MX 100 reg. $939 SALE $859 

MX 175reg $1399 SALE $1299 


I 1971 BMW R50/5. WIND 
screen and Craven bags, low 
mileage, $1600 firm. 592-0359. 


MAXIM 1 

More available 
NOW!! 

PS. 


ALL AT 



I960 HONDA 750 CUSTOM. 
like new, $3200. 652 2171_ 

j 73 SPORTSTER. LOTS OF 
chrome 6566502, after 5. 

TRIUMPH 1958, 650CC, CHOP- 
per. 382-6856 after 7pm . 

'•978 HOtffcA 400 f2. CALL 
after 6: pm 382-4203 

MUST SELL. 78 SR500 YAMA- 
ha, low mileage. $1200.383-3128 

1979 GS750 SUZUKI, VERY 
clean. Open to offers. 382 2549 


1977 YAMAHA XT 500 EN- 
duro, good condition. 592-4222. 


1977 HONDA 125 TRAIL BIKE, 
2500 miles, $750. 656-2637. 


TOO MANY 
USED BIKES! 

From 50 CC to 1400 CC 
HONDAS, YAMAHAS 
SUZUKI, HARLEY 
Many 500 cc and up 

NO REASONABLE 
OFFER REFUSED 

AT 


«5 Yates St. Dealer 5245 
382-1926 _ 382-4515 

VICTORIA HONDA 

Harley Davidson 
2851 DOUGLAS 386-8364 

Dealer 5854 

1979 HARLEY DAVIDSON 
Soortstrr 1000 . candy apple red. 
completely stock, excellent con 
dition. 3300 kilometers. $4500 
300 7157_ 

1970 BLUE HONDA 400 TWIN, 
windscreen, helmet, luggaoe 
rack, crash bar, low mileage 

Excellent condition $1450. 
656-6604 

VE SPA MQTORSCOOTE RS 
MOPCDS- 18 MODELS 
ISLAND MOTORS. 305 3515 
60? E summed Rd Dealer 5130 

1977 BMW RIOOS 1000 CC, 
large kraoser bags, excellent 
common Phone 6564)0/6 any 
tune after 4 30pm 

IV// YAMAHA TRIALS. LOW 
mileage, great ^ 
offers 47/ 

«/$ 5451 att<< 


78 HONDA TWIN 400, LOW 
mileage, $1,000 385-7259. 


76 YAMAHA TY175. GOOD 
shape, $675 477-1705 


1973 HONDA 350, 18,000 MILES. 
Good condition $750 652-9853 


1979 TY250 FOR SALE. PRICE 
$975. Phone 385-9126. 


71 BICYCLES 



,_RUSS HAY 

"al BICYCLE 
SHOP 

2S42 GOVERNMENT ST 
364-4722 
1215 E SOUIMAL T RO 
366-6712 

LARGE SELECTION OF 
NEW A USED BIKES! 
TRADESWELCOME 

FIVE NEW 3-SPEEO BIKES, 
two ladies, three men's, com¬ 
plete with lights and many 
extras Phone 65? 4240. 6-8 pm, 
Monday to Friday 


BOATS mi MARINE 


CENTRE LTD. 

BOATS 

GLAS-PLY 

» t c°r1£ l t ascraft 

BAYLINER 

CANAVENTURE 

STERN DRIVES 

BMW-Votvo Penta 
OMC—Merer u I ser 

OUTBOARDS 

JOHNSON 

SEAGULL 

NEW LOCATION 
730 HILLSIDE. 

382-8291 

Service entrance from 
Market St. 


DOUBLE EAGLE 

New 17' Deluxe 

* Full camper top 

* 2 elec wipers 

a 80 HP Mercury el 
a 20001b. galv. EZ Loader 
a battery and box 
a Reg. list $10,267 

PACKAGE $9,240 

****** 

GOOD SELECTION 
MERCURY and 
HONDA Oulboards 
INSTOCK NOW 

MULLINS 

MARINE 

925 Yates St. 382-4515 


1975 YAMAHA 100. LOW MILE 
ago, oood condition. 385-5,77 
after 5pm. 


CAMPION 
DOUBLE EAGLES 
SUNRUNNERS 

LUND Aluminum 
JOHNSON Outboard 
ROADRUNNER Trailers 

M ufhifte 
maria* 114. 

SALESANO SERVICE 
Corner Harbour and Resthaven 
656-7286 

SUMMER HOURS 

OPEN 7 OAYS 
9a.m.-6pm. 


6uy, 


1978 TELSTAR 26' FIBER 
glass boat. 350 V8 Chrlscraft, 
FWC. command bridge, sleeps 5. 
3 burner propane stove, oven, 
standup head, 25 gal. fresh water 
tank Cabin finished In teak, dual 
controls, sounder, 24 channel 
CB. 100 gallons of fuel, 2 tanks. 
Nlea Prime mufflers, stainless 
steel shaft, 16" propeilor. 3 bat¬ 
teries, power steering, elec, trim 
tabs, breakfast nook, 6'6 clear¬ 
ance In cabin, auto, blloe pump, 
Kistar filter, fire extinguisher, 
vapour fan, stainless steel rail- 
I nos, bow and stern, oas snifter, 
anchor and chain, running 
lights, anchor light, self draining 
deck, top windshield. Boat has 
lust been completely over¬ 
hauled. Asking price $23,500 
Can be seen at anytime. Is now In 
the water. Call Bruce Lockhart. 
386-5714 or 382-6315. 


FOR QUALIFIED LISTINGS 


386-7555 

CAPITAL CITY 


Complete Repairs & Service 
Commercial & Pleasure 
Call Tom or Wavne Lewis 
130 Kingston St 


MARINERS 
compare our services & prices 
MERCURY ENGINES 
EZ LOADER TRAILERS 
MARINE SERVICES 
Open7davs: 7a.m.• 7p.m. 
2072 Henry Ave., Sidney 


656-7311 


656-7664 



FIBERGLASS 

SUPPLIES 

We have a complete stock of 
resins, mat, cloth, roving, etc. 
Expert technical advice and ser¬ 
vice. 


428 E. Burnside 
386-1811 _ 386-7814 


NAVIGATIONAL 

AIDS 

We have charts, books, parallel 
rules, dividers, protractors, 
compasses and much more for 
charting your course at 

McQUADE S 

MARINE SUPPLY 

125? Wharf St. 


ADVAfKE 
VACHTS ITD. 

SALES and BROKERAGE 
4 LOCATIONS TO SE RVE YOU 
Boson's Marina 656-5558 

10775 McDonald's Park Rd. 
Sidney, B.C. 

Oak Bay Marina 596-3366 

Pedder Bav Marina 476-1771 
NANAIMO 

Newcastle Marina 753-1512 


THUNDERBIRD 
YACHT 


WCSTFOftT MAXIMA 


Next to Swartz Bay Ferry 
2075 Tryon Ro ad ^S Idney, B.C. 

NEW and BROKE RAGE boats 
OPEN 10a.m.-7p.m. 
CLOSED TUESDAY 


Bob Allison will take your 
car, boat, trailer, mo- 
home or PROPERTY in 
trade on a 26' TOLLY- 
CRAFT, new power and 
reconditioned. Phone Bob 
at 385-8756. Reg Midglev 
Motors Ltd. 


177 85.8 

HlV tpfTI 


548 after Spm. 


) * A WAV, AIM WO tACfcl. 

• < ondiftun mu>« sell this 
l> 4/100 or belief offer 
'4*0*0!. 


/* Ail LA YEN lOURlNO SPl- 

• i a I < omplefrfy Veffer 

• •dipped 1‘iune uisit 652-43HI 

Arlgti _ 


MEN S SEARS It SPEED L 1 * 
racer and Raleigh lady's 5 
speed Both hardly used Offers 
312 0/35 after ipm 

NISHIKI 10 SPEED (OLYM 
pa) 23" frame As new SI90 

303 5657 

GIRLS OR LAOIES 3 SPEED 

bike Raltegh good comRIton 

4/V 6t 16 

7 » GIRLS HIGH RISER b< 
(vcbn^Mdcundrtmn $45each 

St RIME 25 10 SPt ED. ALLOT 

.maw— 

*•MAD *, ARO« t O t« SHE t O 
tike new 8 WO feijeO _ 


IT'S 

BOTTOM TIME! 

Come and lef us do your bottoms 
with our fast and efficient 
pressure washer Phone * 
poi fitment for In 



>0 (OATS and MARINE 


THURSDAY, JULY 24,1980 

kl MMTS 8*4 MARINE 


jStar 
o Marine 


MARINE BROKERS 
SAIL & POWER 
9843 — 2nd. St., Sidney 
656-3112 


20' BRANDLMAYR DAY 
cruiser. Gaiter tandem trailer, 
duel battery, CB, tape deck, full 
caravan top new, rlde-glde 
steering. 20 gallon tank, port-a- 
pot, tack speedometer, cello fln- 
ished 
chor. 

tlon. Pri____ 

call Bruce 386-5714 or 382-6315 


tack speedometer, cello flrv 
j hull, running lights, an- 
. Boat is In excellent condl- 
Prlced to sell $2675. Please 


fflcfcuiy 

fltafine 

385-1457 800 Cloverdale 


BOATS mt HUME 


VHF 


SPECIAL — 55 channel dual 
watch marine radio telephone 
with antenna and PA horn 
$699.50. CB units $109.95, VHF 12 
channel $399.95. 

B.C. SOUND & RADIO Service 
931 FORT_383-4731 


GAS DOCK 

Open Every Day 
8a.rn.-9p.rn. 
VAN ISLE MARINA 


Box 2130 
Sidney, B.C. 


FOR SALE BY OWNER. 1979 26' 
Campion "Toba". Twin 140-280 
Volvo. 180 operating hours on 
each. (80% trolling time). Com¬ 
mand bridge. Alcohol stove and 
oven. Head, extra long range 
fuel tank. Depth sounder, VHF 
This boat Is Immaculate and like 
new, $29,900. 656-3125 


24' COMMAND BRIDGES 
Bell Bov, 188 f w.c. $15,900 

Reinell 1901.0. $13,900 

Sangster marlin, clean $15,900 
Bell Bov 188 f .w.c. $15,900 

Sea Rav 188f.w.c. $16,900 

CEDAR GROVE YACHTS 
656-2580 


17 Kill 

New cedar planked on oak 
frame, copper fastened. 2 rowing 
positions. Professionally bullf 
656-5466. 


27' ALUMINUM DOUBLE 
endec, 8'6beam, 2-cvcllnder die^ 
sel power, very economical, lots 
of room (could be used as llve- 
aboard), many extras. $9800. 
She's not that fast or pretty but 
very reliable and comfortable. 
479-3689 


RUNABOUT LISTINGS 
REQUIRED 

14' 21' models. We also offer new 
Bayllner and Vanguard out¬ 
board runabouts. Contact Harry 
for further Information at Thun- 
derblrd Yachts (Runabout Dlv.) 
656-7323 


1979 14'4" GREGOR ALUMIN- 
um, welded quality construction 
(no rivets to leak), 1979 20hp 
Johnson, approximately 25 
hours use, 19796001b Roadrunner 
trailer with large wheels, spare 
tire, bearing buddies plus other 
accessories, $2300. 382-8806 


FOR SALE OR TRADE FOR 
Corvette, 18' Flbreform 233 
Merc I.O. 6 horse Johnson out 
board. 2500 pound Roadrunner 
gelvinized trailer with power 
winch. Swim grid. AM-FM cas¬ 
sette Low hours. Must be seen. 
384-3569 


22' SANGSTER DOLPHIN. Ex¬ 
cellent condition, Mercury I/O, 
fresh water cooled, 302 Ford, 188 
Merc leg, full cabin and head, 
tandem boat trailer with electric 
winch, VHF, CB, and many 
extras, $14,500. 478-9203. Will ac- 
cept small boat In part trade 


CHEOYLEE 
Diesel Trawlers 
For Information Call 
ANGLE R'S ANCHORAGE 
MARINA 

652-3531 933 Marchant Rd. 

Brentwood Bav 


BOTTOM PAINTING 10' 70' 
SHAFT & PROP REPAIRS 
ENGINE OVERHAULS 
SPEEDY & EFFICIENT 
SERVICE 

Phllbrooks Shipyard Ltd., 2324 
Harbour Rd., Sidney. 656-1157 


40' MOTOR YACHT GREN- 
fell design professionally willt 
1962. Now the home of an expert 
enced shipwright. Mint condition 
throughout June 1980 survev 
$72,500 Phone Squire & Coombs, 
384-3363. 


EXCELLENT CONDITION. 
Must sell. 17' ply. No leaks, 60 HP 
motor recently checked out, hull 
and top side new paint, head, 
lockup cabin, electric start, 
bulltln 10 gallon tanks, $1400. 
382-8614 or ^1-5139 


22' CABIN CRUISER, VOLVO 
I/O, head, sink, compass, CB, 
trim tabs, blower, blloe pump, 
depth sounder, anchor pack, din¬ 
ghy Boat In too-notch condi¬ 
tion. Can be seen anytime; 
656-6968. 


NEW 23' CARLSON CV HT 
Ultimate luxury and perfor¬ 
mance In an overnight ski boat 
cruiser complete with trailer. 
Unique futuristic deslon, pres 
tjoe at It's finest. $23,000. 
477-8249. 


MERCURY 

MERCRUISER 

SERVICE 

Marine & Power Products 
402 A Esquimau Rd 382-1211 


Boat Trailer Springs 

Parts and repairs. Prompt ser¬ 
vice. Logan Spring and Suspen¬ 
sion Ltd. - 

384-2744. 


60 Crease Ave., 


CALIFORNIA 

20' Fleetcraft, 135 Johnson out¬ 
board, Inboard tanks, gauges, 
and extras. One of a kino In 
Canada. After 6pm, 642-4944 


NEAR NEW 16' RUNABOUT, 
full canvas, trailer. 85HP Mer¬ 
cury, kicker. AM—FM stereo, 
CB.3fuel tanks. Excellent condi¬ 
tion throughout. $5,995 . 383-5879 
after Spm. 


SPECIALIZING IN BOAT 
flags, pennants, and banners. 
Your name, logo and deslon ap- 
pllqued on heavy duty nylon. 
Guaranteed work and service. 
382-8924. 


28' 1964 OWENS, MAHOGANY 
lepstrake hull, rebuilt 327 flao- 
shlp engine, has had an exten¬ 
sive refit, beautiful and nicely- 
equipped cruiser. Must be seen. 
$18,W 652 2351. 


built by Phllbrooks. fully 
equipped, value$40,000 For sale 
or exchange tor real estate In 
Gordon Head First time on 
market 4774804 


MERCRUISER 
PARTS & SERVICE 

Canoe Cove Marina Ltd 656 5633 


TIPTON'S 
OUTBOARDS LTD 

Vancouver Island's largest 
Evlnrudedeeler 112 749 3263 


40 T. PACKER INS, FIBER 
GLASS AL FISH MOLD, IV 71 
G M C OR L 4 HERR. GILL- 
NET LIC AVAIL SOME HAL. 
GEAR 112436-5154 


CHARTERS 

Fishing, cruising, diving, etc 
Hourly, daily, weekly retes Also 
weekday specials Venture Boat 

.nTTssf— 


Charters 


t >53» 


SELLING 75 TOLY CRAFT EX 
press Cruiser, valued to taOlKi 
Consider smaller boat or truck 
4§v *‘ 

14' KBC WITH TRAILER. 8DMP 
Johnson, much recent work 

ist 



19* BRANDLEMA YR, 2 50 OUT 
boards, upper cabin, needs work 
and repainting, $2000 or offers 
Will sell engines separately. 
384-2901. 

22' CALGLASS SEDAN. MERi 
cruiser 165, trim tabs, sounder. 
CB radio, oallev, dinette, head, 

V-berth, anchor pack, dinghy 
656-4267. 

VANGUARD SKI-BEE. 6! 
mere, and trailer, O'Brien't 
sklls and accessories, excellen 
condition. $2400. Phone 595-443- 
or 652 1682 Jerry. 

INFLATABLE 12' CALAGH 
arl-Ghlgl, Immaculate condl 
tion, plus Johnson 18 horsepowet 
outboard. $1,500. Leave messagi 
for Michael 479-8112. 

VICTORIA BOAT MART HAS A 
large selection of stern drive as 
well as Inboard gas ♦ diesel 
power boats, priced from $6,500. 
453 Head St., 383 3324. 

ONE STOP FAST AND COM- 
petltive service for all vour boat 
log needs — sail or power. Phil 
brook's Shipyards Ltd., 2324 
Harbour Rd., Sidney, 656-1157. 

9'6" FIBERGLASS DINGY, 
doubled hulled, windshield, 
steering wheel and cables. Ask 

1 ng $550. Phone evenings 656-7686 
or 656-5044. 

14' RUNABOUT, GLASS OVER 
plywood, 18 hp Johnson and trail¬ 
er, $600. 10 hp Johnson, in good 

479 58391 50 ^ Wl11 ^ CC0P< 

17' BRANDLMAYR, 65 HP 
Merc, Lowrance sounder, Nautl 
lex top. 2200 pound Calkins trail¬ 
er, excellent shape. $4200. 
478-4176 

27'5 BAYLINER VICTORIA,! 

command bridge, aft cabin, I 
under 300 hours, like new, value 
30,000. Reduced to 26,000 
338-8816, Courtenay 

CAPT. KIDD'S MARINE 

1980 models have arrived. In 
stock 18' Mini Cruiser. For In 
qulries and demonstration, 
386-4497 

15W GLASSCRAFT, 75 AND 7V* 
hp motors, convertible top. tilt 
boom trailer, sounder and rod 
holders, ideal fishing boat. $2500. 
592-9307 

SQUIRE & COOMBS 

MARINE BROKERS. 

45 Bastion Square. 384-3363. 

CHRYSLER — SEAGULL 
MARINER OUTBOARDS 

Ken Prasing Equipment 

934 Coldstream 478-9313 

QUALITY REPAIRS AND FIN 
Ishlnp by journeyman ship 
wrlpht. Reasonable rates. 
598-9495. 

LATE 75 BAYLINER. NIS 1 

queallv Sedan 22VV, 200 Volvo, 
FWC. many extras, $12,900 or 
offers 478-1963 

CANOE, 14' SPORTSPAL, EX 
cellent condition, with seat and 
attachment for motor. $275. 
479-3757. 

MUST SELL 22' FISHING 
boat, 318 Chrysler Inboard FWC, 
radio, sink, anchor, head. Best 
otter will take it. 388-9602 

1977 16' GLASPLY, 55 HP 
Evinrude, galvanized trailer, 
anchor, rod holders. New condi¬ 
tion. 479-4347. 

14' HYDROPLANE. 73 50 
horse Merc, with trailer. Very 
oood condition. Askino $2200. 
474 2693 

CAMPWAYS 4-MAN INFLAT-1 

able boat, complete with floor 
boards, windshield, pump and 
repair kit. After 6 pm, 652-2277 

1978 DOUBLE EAGLE 16', 551 

Johnson, trailer, tach, CB, aux¬ 
iliary bracket, $6000 . 592-7911 
after 2pm, 384-3119 after 7pm 

18' KLINKER WITH DEPTH 1 
sounder, fiberglass bottom. $625 
lor best offer. 478-9361 or 

112-743-4419. 

15VV BOWRIDER TRI-HULL,65 
Merc, 7Vj Merc, tilt boom trail 
i er, many extras. $4500 or best, 
Offer. 112 743-5291 

YOUNG MAN’S BOAT 

Great starter boat, 15', fiber¬ 
glass over wood, motor and trail¬ 
er, $750 firm. 385-4396. 

35 HP VIKING ELECTRIC i 
start. Short shaft outboard. Con 
trols and tank. Older motor used 
very little. $500. 478-4500 

74 E-Z LOADER TANDEM 
boat trailer, electric winch, hv 
draulic brakes, will take up to 30' 
boat, $2500. 383-4973 

LANGFORD FIBERGLASS 
canoe 14' lightweight. $275. Also 
C—1 decked Whitewater canoe 
$300. 598-7147 after 6pm 

CHARTERBOATS 

MARSH MARINE 

Deep Cove Marina 656-1611 

THE BOAT LOFT 
Inflatable Boat Centre 
381-1323 563A Johnson 

MARINE REPAIRS 

Gas. diesel, I.O. 477-6288 days 
and evenings. 

69 20 HORSE POWER MERC. 
Good running condition. 
656-4837. 

STEEL HULLS BUILT TO Cus¬ 
tomers specs. Scoria boats, 
phone 386-9715 

14'6" K&C FIBERGLASS BOAT. 

condi - 

16' FIBERGLASS OVER PLY- 
wood boat and trailer. $500 or 
best offer 479-5044 

2 MAN RUBBER BOAT, LIKE 
new, oars, pump. Included. $75. 
598 7859. 

BUDGET HARDWOODS LTD. 

MuiFWed 4-5 Sat 9-5 

415-B Hillside 386-3334 

13' RUNABOUT, FIBERGLASS 
over plvwood, $100. 59S4631 or 
477-1225 

WANTED: BOAT TRAILER. 
600 800 pounds tor 14' aluminum 
boat. 652-3265 

16*6" GLASSCRAFT, 75 AND 9.9 
Johnson, new Caulklns trailer, 
$3000 firm. Call after 6,384^4198 

WANTED: 2Mi TO 3'^HP SEA- 
oull. Must be top condition. 
656-2576 

18* COBRA JETBOAT. 455 
Olds, new trailer, $8500 or best 
otter . 388-7709 

45' CLASSIC TRI-CABIN DIE 
sel powered, motor cruiser, $55, 
000 381-2343 

14' ALUMINUM BOAT, 7V* HP 
moty^^and^h-aMer. Asking $800. 

12W FIBERGLASS SKI BOAT 
and trailer, no engine, asking 
$1000. 595-3092 

HERRING SKIP. 7 X 22. TERR- 

Sifi’SCHSf""" 60 *' *”“■ 

It' SKI BOAT, INBOARD 337 
Goes well $3500 or best offer 
595-7868. 

16' WOODEN INBOARD, WITH 1 

trailer, greet for fishing, offers. 
479-0790 

1SW SANGSTERCRAFT 1 

n&ttztfr <Ur 

SEARS ESKASHP OUTBOARD 
motor, lust been rebuilt. $135. 
388-6467. 382-0677 

27' MONK CABIN CRUISER, j 

9' MINTO SAILING DINGY, ' 
bare fibreglass hull. $150 
i 656-4382. 

WHITE WATER SLALOM 
i kayak, one lever Kevlar, ofters 

477-4804 aftar 6 

14' COfRA SKI BOOT, 116 

ditto** 85480 47/ 7819 

SUMNER WHEEL. 40 X26", ' 

* r ‘* l,r * "*• 

I4W' BOAT AND TRAILER, 
excellent condition 8600 

m4m 

UV PLYWOOD BOAT. VERV 

SrsrjftK Vzff 

I0HP JOHNSON WITH CON 
B>*it < on(M•on 81S6 

44/ fiez 


171V GLASSTRON V176. 1—HP 
Johnson, trailer, no salt. $4595. 

477-8035. 


\r SEARS ALUMINIUM BOAT, 
covered bow, rod holders, oars, 
etc. $350. 385-2708 after 5pm. 

SMALL SEAGULL OUTBOARD 
motor tor sale, good condition. 
$200. 721 3003. 


31' CHRIS CRAFT, TWIN EN- 
gine and boathouse. 642-4838 


18' CUSTOM JET BOAT. MINI- 
cruiser, seats 6,386-4497 


2 INBOARD/OUTBOARD 
Mercury propellers. 479-1S39.L 


10' RACE HYDROPLANE, $125. 
383-0875. 


"C" LICENSE OFF OF 20' 
boat, $8,000 479-0548. 


WANTED 4 CYLINDER KER- 
math parts. 652-3271, 


17W FISHING BOAT, 35 HP 
Johnson, electric start. 477-7075. 


60 HORSE EVlNRUDE, $600 OR 
best offer 479-0082. 


7317Vj' K&C, DEEP V. 120 OMC. 
$4900 or best offer. 656-7867. 


WANTED 5 GALLON GAS 
tank. 478-1042. 


AIRCRAFT 


AEROCOUPE STOCK 1951, 1100 
hours to go, current C/A. Nav/ 
Com and hanger, $7500. 


sronsa toons 




SALESSERVICE 
SELECTION 
WIN COLLECTORS SPECIAL 
Klondike $295 — Apache $279 — 
66 Cent $395— Comanche $325 — 
Antlered Game $499 — N/West 
Terr. $695 — Win 94 30/30 1935 
Vintage $359 — RIFLES — 
Roger 7mm mag 4x5429. — Rem. 
308 pump 4XS389 — Husqvarna 
8mm $199— Park/hale 30/06 $274 

— Sako 308 3x9 $450—Whitworth 
7x57 $219 — Savage 300 4x$249 — 
Win 30/30 $179 — SHOTGUNS — 
Aye 12G Dble $329—Stevens 12G 
Pump $119— Rem 1100 12G auto 
3"$424 — S.K.B. 12B auto$294 — 
PISTOLS — Browning 22 auto 
chal. 11 $285— Roger 22 Auto$169 

— Colt 4.5 auto $395 — S.C.W. 
Mod 41 22 Auto $459 — S.C.W. 44 
mag 8A*"$599 

USE OUR 

FREE LAY AWAY PLAN 
EXPERTGUNSMITHING 
1307 Broad_385-3429 


tl SAILBOATS 


’ CRUISING BOAT SALESl 

[ Off-shore cruising sail boats 
only. Pat and John Samson, Can¬ 
ada's cruising boat specialists. 
Will help you find the right boat 
tor your budget. 

36' Ketch, immaculate, $49,000. 
37' Schnr. Pacific Vep. $60,000. 
42' Cutter, guality, $68,000. 

40' Sloop, art cabin, $89,000 
48' Ketch, family boat, $79,000. 
30' Tahitl ketch, new, $45,000. 

30' Pacific 30, new, $30,000. 

These and more-write or phone 
for Information. Open 7 days a 
week Birds Eve Cove, Maple Bav 
near Duncan. 112-748-895(1 


4 ,— 

New C & C Yachts 

15% Yacht Mort.O.A.C. 

T rades welcome. 

Trade-Ins 

78 I SLANDER 32 $68,950 

72C8.C27 $25,950 

79C&C24 $19,900 

79J24 $18,900 

2270 Harbour Rd., Sidney 
Days 656-7744 
Eves. 592 5606 


f§PECIAij?! 
■GUNS ’ 1 


NOTE our new Gun Line number 
VICTORIA'S ONLY 
* SPECIALTY GUN SHOP 
OVER 1JW0GUNS IN STOCK 


576 Yates St. 


383-1044 


RIMPAC DIVERS Ltd 

If you have always wanted to 
learn to scuba dive, now Is the 
time to enroll In a course starting 
Aug. 11. It's safe. It's fun, It's 
exciting, and the cost Is reason 
able when you loin In a scuba 
dlvlno course taught by “The 
Professionals'' at Rlmpac 
Divers, 9818 Fifth St., Sidney or 
phone 656-6313. 



FRANK WHITE’S 
SCUBA SHOP 

832 Fitgard 38S4713 


Next Scuba Course 
I Starts July 28—Register Now 
! Advance course starts July 25 


HOCKING & FORBES 

AT OUR NEW LOCATION 
2111 DOUGLAS 
AT PEMBROKE 
383-2342 

MEN'S JANTZEN SHORTS 
REGULAR $15 95, SALE $11.98 
FREE PARKING 
AT FRONT DOOR 


San Juan Yachts 


21' Used 
21'Used 
21'New 
23'New 
28' New 


$ 8,500 SOLO 
$ 8,500 
$10,979 
$17,577 SOLD 
$45,960 SOLD 


7.7 New ARRIVINGSOON 
The Above Sold Yachts 
are on display courtesy 
of the new owners 


eep 

rf c Y* 


and t Yarhl Sales^Ltd 


10992 Madrona Dr. 

656-2810 


Family Camping Equipment 
Backpacking, clothing, tents 
SALES-RENTALS-SERVIC 
629 Pandora 


.RVICE 

384-2224 


WATER SKI 

Taperflex, slalom intermediate- 
advanced slalom ski, dual boots. 
Excellent condition. $160. 
592-0417. 


WATER SKIING 
Equipment sales, lessons, and 
tows available. Enquiries and 
reservations please call the 
Shawnlgan Lake Inn at 743-2312. 


% 


THUNDERBIRD 
YACHT 
SALES 

WESTPOeiMARINA 

Next to Swartz Bav Ferry 
2075 Tryon Road, Sidney, B.C. 
656-5832 

NEW SAILBOATS and 
BROKERAGE SAILBOATS 
OPEN I0a.m.-7p.m. 
CLOSED TUES 

UNDER $20,000 

76 T-BIRD 26 $17,900 

79 CAC 24 $19,900 

79J-24 $18,900 

All 1-owner boats In mint condi¬ 
tion. All have North Sails, all on 
display at Gypsv Yacht Sales, 
2270 Harbour Rd., 656-5591 

TANZER 7.5 

Ready to sail away, all basic 
equipment, 9.9 Johnson, canopy, 
moorage. Immaculate condition, 
used 2 seasons. B Dock, Van Isle 
$18,000. 721-3073 after 6pm. 


BRESCIA SINGLE BARREL 
trap gun Remington 20 gauge 
automatic, new. 38-55 Winches¬ 
ter. AH in good condition. 
479-0473. 


GUN SALE CONTINUES TILL 
Saturday July 26th, Rlc's Trad¬ 
ing Post, 555 Johnson Street, 
384-5422. 


REMINGTON MODEL 1100, 
deluxe orade. 20 gauge, 3" mag 
nem, vent-rib. Brandnew,never 
been fired Asking $475.478-3508 


WET SUIT AND ACCESS- 
orles, 135 lb., 5.6' Best offer. 
386-1158. 


NEW EXPOSURE SUITS. FIT 


93 


GRAMPION 23. EXCELLENT 
condition, 4 sails, 6 hp Evinrude, 
anchor pack, running lights, CB 
radio, 26gallon water tank, Glm- 
balled stove plus many other 
extras, $12,500. 383-3353 or 
388 6275 pager 2525. 


VAN EAGLE 

Cruising 26' Haida MKT 11, main 
and Genoa, Outboard, propane 
stove and oven, wood and elec¬ 
tric heat, stereo, Aladln lamp, 
dinghy. Insulated, teak and ash 
throughout, $17,500. 382-2849. 

29' CUSTOM '77, 8'9" BEAM, 
fiberglass on wood, stabilized 4 
ton cruiser, 4 sails. 42 HP Gray 
marine. Solid, safe and spotless. 
$22,500. Deep Cove Marina, 
656^810. 


SAILTREND 

Marine Supplies & Clothing 
~~ 6. Closed S - 


SAANICH LUMBER YARDS 
PRAM DINGHY KIT 
SABOT KIT 

KAYAK (Partly assembled) 

1496 ADMIRALS ROAD 38S-2486 

26' FIBERGLASS CRUISING 
sloop, main and jib, 25 HP In 
board, full dinette, inclosed 
head, sleeps 6-8, dinghy, paid 
moorage to April 652-5848 


ENDURANCE 35, CUSTOM 
built, 1976, aft cabin, centre 
cockpit, modified cutter rlo, 
ocean proven, large inventory, 
excellent condition. 656-2386 


GYPSY YACHT SALES 
"Exclusively Sailboats" 
Listings Wanted 
656-5591 2270 Harbour Rd 


10' PLYWOOD. PARTIALLY 
fibreglassed, very stable, ideal 
for children or beginner, new 
sail, offers. 59S-S561. 


14' WOODEN SAILING DIN- 
ghv. almost new, tan sails, lee 
boards, boat cover. $785. 
598-2719. 


POCKET CRUISER, GAFF 
sloop. 73'LOA. Seagull engine, 
good condition: Strong boat. $7,* 
700 656-1554 


20' SAILBOAT, 10 HORSEPOW 
er Evinrude motor. In excellent 
condition. Call 5 7 pm, 
II? 752 9795or 11? 752 9424 


STEEL HULLS BUILT TO Cus¬ 
tomers specs. Scoria boats. 
386-9715 


76 CATALINA 27, EXCELLENT 
condition, ilb. ganoa, VHF. 
479-8179 after 5:30pm 


WANTED: FIBERGLASS 
Sabot sailboat, complete with 
sails, etc 112 74*9027 


ran with 2 masts. 3 salts, teats 4, 
only $1200. 304-5158 


CAMERAS, SUPPLIES 
mt PHOTO FMISHINt 


island 

colour 

labs 

615 FORT 




384-2242 


Plus 8 locations to serve you 
SAME DAY SERVICE on all C41 
films — in by 10 a.m. out by 5 
p.m. 


FANTASTIC SALE 
ATTHE ELECTRIC 
EYE NOW ON. 
GIVE AWAY 
PRICES. 


city photo 

1227 Gov't. 
385-5633 


LENS SPECIAL 

Elford speed and M.G. 
paper. Another 10% off 
our regular low selling 
price. Sale ends Aug 15. 


Wnit* 

PHOTO SUPPLIES 

P.O. Box 750 
Phone 246-4741 
On Trans-Canada Highway at 
Chemainus 


CUSTOM ONLY 
Colour & B8.W enlargements for 
reproduction & display to 16 x 20 . 
Outstanding quality and service 
time, impressive professional 
prints. Western illustrators Ltd, 
604 Yates St at Govarnmant. 
384-4511. 


PENTAX SP500, S5MM LENS 
with case llSmm telephoto with 
2X tele-extender. Also, recharg- 
able flash unit, cable release, 
extension tube set and skylight 
filter. $290. 592-9323 


PENTAX SP 1.8, 1/1000THS OF 
a second, 35, 200 and 400 mm 
telephoto lenses, with Auto 4 
flash, immaculate. $1000 firm. 

385-4665 


CANON MODEL 7, 3SMM CAM 
era In excellent condition with 
following lenses. 50 mm FI.8, 
35mm F2.8, 135mm F1.S. $250 
382-3818 


KITS CAME RAS 
New and Usad Equipment 
•-4821, Lower Commerce am 
388-5226, Meytelr Mall 


HASSELBLAO ! 


ir A CLASS UNICORN CATA 
mar an, on trailer. »950 Cell 
Cref, 384-3*3* 

23' CUB SAILBOAT. OAK BAY 
moor 4m.Um. 477-1318 

DAVIDSON It. 3 SAILS $2588 
Q B O Phone M2-H647U 

10' F IRE BALL. JIB AMO MAIN 
Sail away tor $1058 478-46H 


80mm planar Ion*. 1131 


camera plus 78mm wide angle, 
leather case Braun flash, $425 

o^d. 477-1382 


C-3 


4/8 hif 


extra* $458 firm 4 


lenses end mm* mn 


CAMERAS, SUPPLIES 
mt PHOTO FMISHMS 


WANTED: 8X10 ENLARGER, 
used 112-724-5892 

HANIMEX DUEL 8 PROJEC- 
tor, 6 x 6 screen. Call 385-9554. 

SPOTMETER, ENLARGER, 
dark room equipment. 595-3768 

11 

VICTOR 510 CASH REGISTER. 

1 year old, excellent condition. 
$490; steeicase filing cabinet, 

TEXAS INSTRUMENTS 
T.I.—59 calculator, PC—100A 
printer, 5 modules and 100 pro¬ 
grams. $500. Stuart 598-4236. 

STEELCASE DESK. PITNEY- 
Bowes photo copier. And other 
office furniture. 9am-12 noon, 685 
Wilson St or phone 386-3672. 

2 SERVICE DELI CASES. COM- 
plete with refrigeration com 
pressor, excellent condition 
$2500 592-5621. 

NCR CASH REGISTER. 4 
totals. $350. Phone airport gift 
shop 656-3600. 

FULL SIZE OAK OFFICE 
desk, with fold away typewriter 
table, and chair, 656 8303 

NEWOFFICE DESKS 
Private. 656-5929 

IS HEATING l FIREPLACES 

ELECTRIC HOT WAT lx R 
heater. 3400 watt. Elco, outer 
casing bashed and outer case 
needs minor work. $10. Guar an 
teed to work. 383-6629. 

FURNACE, TANK AND DUCT 
work. What offers? 1102 Locklev 
Rd. 382-6498. 

USED OIL FURNACE, AND 
tank, reconditioned motor. Ask 
lng$550. 477-9678. 

OIL COOK STOVE WITH TANK 
and stand $75. 479-3938 

N NAJOH APPLIANCES 

BILL'S BARGAIN BARN AP 
pllance Warehouse located at 
98 West Burnside Road next to 
Capital Market has the laroest 
selection of reconditioned appli 
ances In Victoria. Stoves, wall 
ovens, fridges, some with left 
hand doors, washers, dryers, up¬ 
right and chest freezers, all in a 
variety of sizes and colours. 30 
day warranty Buy, sell, trade, 
dicker and deliver. 384-5721, 
384-5235. 

RECONDITIONED 

Washers, dryers, ranges, 
fridges. All fully guaranteed. 
Allmake Appliances, 385-2033, 
Open Saturdays, 9:30 til 4pm. 
2519 Douglas. 

KITCHEN AID DISHWASHERS 
1980 models In stock Moffat ai> 
pi lances for less. 

KENYON SALES 

386-1214 ( 24 hrs ) 

6MONTH WARRANTY 
Reconditioned refrigerators, 
freezers, washers, dryers and 
ranges. Trade-Ins wanted 
PHOENIX APPLIANCES 
384-0423 2009 Fern wood 

JUST ARRIVED, LIKE NEW, 
Inglls washers and dryers, per 
feet condition, fully gauranteed, 
$185 and up. First come, first 
served. 2519 Douglas Street, 
385-2033. 

CLEARANCE OF MAYTAG 
Dishwashers both Built-in and 
Convertible models ... Please 
see our display at 1724 Douglas 
St BUTLER BROTHERS 
383-6911. 

GIBSON 

Sales Service Parts 

HASTINGS APPLIANCES 

2100 Douglas 386-7734 

KENMORE HEAVY DUTY 
enamel stacking apartment 
sized washer and dryer. I'/j 
years old. $575. After 6pm, 
382 2387 

FRIDGE, STOVE. GE TALIS- 
man frost free refrigerator, 
$300. McLarv Easy stove. $150. 
After 6, 382-4408. 

STAINLESS STEEL GE 
built—In oven and range with 
steel cabinets attached, good 
working condition. 59^2288 

MOVING MUST SELL RCA 

dishwasher, top loading, excel 
lent running condition. $125. 
477-0575. 

MOFFET DELUXE 30" 
ceramic top self cleaning oven. 
Harvest Gold, like new. $550. 
382 9401. 

REFRIGERATOR, PHILCO. 
Coppertone, left hand door, 9.4 
cubic feet. Excellent condition 
$95 or best offer. 478-6987. 

APARTMENTSIZE STACKING 
portable washer and dryer, gold, 
near new, excellent condition 
$425. 382-8368 after 5 

30" RANGE, CONTINUOUS 
clean, rotlsserle, removable 
door, new condition. $290. 
479-0768. 

COPPERTONE 2 DOOR 
fridge $250. White range $135. 
Washer $165. Dryer $125. 
479-3209 after 4. 

MATCHED PAIR BAYCREST 
spin washer and portable dryer, 
as new, $420 or near otter, 
384-2574. 

SEARS FRIDGE AND STOVE, 
jopfl^ondltlon. $250. Phone 

KENMORE DISHWASHER, S- 
cycle, excellent condition, $350. 
474-1992,383-1403. 

VIKING WASHER AND 
dryer, good condition. $120. 
385-6989. 

WASH 1NG MACH 1N E, 
Beatty Town, good working con 
dition, $100. Must sell. 383&74. 

WASHER AND DRYER, GOOD 
workinoorder,$200or best offer. 
59S-392* and 382-4493 

WHITE HOOVER WASH- 
er/spln dryer, good condition, 
$507385-9048 after 4:30 

30" MOFFAT RANGE. ROTIS- 
serle and meat thermometer, 
good condition, $225/477-6936. 

FREEZER. $125. GAS STOVE. 
Electric stove. 416 Cecelia, oft 
Washington 

HARVAST GOLO FROST- 
free fridge and self-cleaning 
stove. 478-5157 

WANTED: STOVE, FRIDGE 
and built-in dishwasher. Garden 
toots. 383-3482. 

MUST SELL. FRIDGE AND 
stove 3866051 after Spm 

23' CUBIC DEEP FREEZE, 
S100, offers. 652-5733 after 6pm 

23 CU.FT. FREEZER, $225. 
478-7013 

RCA DISHWASHER, EXCEL 
lent condition. 721 5286 

HIDE-A BED NEW CONDI- 
tlon $250 firm 592 3*36 


KENMORE WASHER ANO 
dryer, epertment'size 385-287) 

r raumu 


TILLICUM 

FURNITURE 

M Mellon I 


i of swivel reck 


WA88TEO ZOOM LENS /S 

iff itt'e* ******* *anta* 


fxii 



97 FURNITURE 


F ICOLWOOD LAMOFOHD 

urnitureland 

NOW OR NEVER! 

Buy now and fake advan¬ 
tage of super savings on 
brand new, quality home 
furnishings before we 
take Inventory on the last 
day of this month. 

20 io urn 

on almost everything in 
our store. Chesterfield, 
bedroom, and dining 
room suites, chairs, re- 
cliners, sofa beds, mat¬ 
tress and box units, bunk 
and mates beds, kitchen 
sets, coftee and lamp 
tables, wall systems, open 
stock of dressers, chest of 
drawers, night tables etc. 
- also lawn and patio sum¬ 
mer furniture and much 
much more! Need credit? 
Open a revolving charge 
account today. Sale hours 
-10 am to 6pm daily. Sun¬ 
days 11am to Spm. Shop 
early for best selections. - 
It's really worth a drive to 
1610 Old Island Hwy. (Six 
Mile Market). Tel. 
478-1921. 

r \cOLWOOD ■ LANGFORD 

urnitureland 


LATEX 


The m«ttres$ that gives even 
of the body. 


MATTRESSES 

3'3" size, each piece $199 

Regular size, each piece $249 

Queen size, each piece $289 

King size mattress $399 

MATTRESS 
TOPPER PADS 

ENJOY the luxurious comfort 
Thick Size Rubber Foam 

1 In. 39x75 $27 25 $8 55 

2 in. 39x75 $52.75 $17.25 
lin. 54x75 $37.75 $11.85 
2 in. 54x 75 $72.90 $23.65 
11n. Queen $44.65 $14.00 
2 in. Queen $86.50 $28.00 
lin. King $58.50 $17.75 
2In. King $112.35 $36 40 

IMMEDIATE OELIVERY 
Open Fridays 'til9p.m. 
EASY CREDIT terms available 

Gregg Furniture 

"The quality furniture store — 
where you can see how It's 
made" 

2300 DOUGLAS_388 7365 



CLEARANCE 

CENTRE 

Furniture, Carpet, 
Appliances, More... 
Tues.-Sat. 9-5:00 

765 Vanalman Ave. 

Just off Pat Bay Hwy. 

Good Savings—Free Parking 


f r Tillicum 
Furniture 


1*33 HILLSIDE 595 3331 

Across From 
Hillside Shopping Centre 

VICTORIA'S 
FINE FURNITURE 
CENTRE 


.,,QPS- 



General.'^ 

1115 FORT ST. 364-6441 

BUY-SELL 

APPRAISE 

11)5 Fort St, 384-644) 


“ 



Butcbar 

■lock 

Shop 


4011 QUADRA 479-5921 
Solid maple butcher block 
tables and counter tops 
also authentic Bentwood 
chairs. 


CONSOLE PIANO. WALNUT. 
$1250. Hammond organ. M-300. 
mehooanv. $1100. Stereo, teak, 
modern, $125. Captains bed/ 
desk, maple. $200 Childs white 
dresser, desk, bench. $75. Ches¬ 
terfield, 4 seater, loose cushions, 
$ 200 . Chesterfield, chair, wood 
trim, $200. Ping pong table, $75 
Wool shag area rug. 8x10. 
green/gold. $100 Tiffany swag 
tamp, $60. Table lamps, green, 
$75 pair , 658-1066, 4-8pm. 


Introducing Comfort! 

MATRIX — Solid Pine contem 
porarv furniture designed with 
vour body In mind. 
MONASTERY 
REAL WOOD 
FURNITURE 

94? Fori St 383 2431 


FOAM MATTRESSES 
The sensible alternative 
4" & 6" in all sizes 
THOMPSONS' 

FOAM SHOP 

3318 OAK ST _ 385-742? 


LiVING. DINING AND BCD 
room furniture at clearance 
prices. If you find any price 
lower then us we wiM pev you 
triple the difference 

DODO'S Furniture 

2543Quedra 


. HOSPITAL BEDS MOOt NN 
•dluKeble with toperb ms* 
tretaet 8175 to 8318 each (td»«< 

5*8•99/7 or view an ie*urdev t l 
W tr H i i#9? van 


I9TM CtMTURV 


tWTURYELEGANT 
i <*«*''. three curlet 
trf verwot *lae$, in e# 

he ark r ennerfien 

























































































































































































































































































































































































































I 


C-4 

97 FURNITURE 


NEW CIRCULAR KITCHEN 
breakfast nook, with brown vinyl 
cover. 2 matching chairs, ar- 
borlte table with stainless steel 
legs. Seats 8. $225. Two patio 
tables, S25. Franklin stove, insu 
idled base stand for wood heater, 
$75 383 3668 

BARGAIN BASEMENT SPE- 
ciat— 7 pc. colonial solid hard¬ 
wood dinino room suite to.clear 
$998, consists of buffet, hutch, 
round extension table, 4 chairs. 
Echo Furniture, 704 View St., 
J84-2214_ 

GRANGE CHIROPRACTIC 
mattress and box spring and 
heavy duty frame, double size, 
excellent condition, $200. Sears 
Opedic extra firm mattress and 
box spring, 39", $100. Call after 
Spm, 479-8741. 

ROUNO OAK DINING ANO 
coffee tables. Variety of Oak 
chairs and buffets. Specializing 
in restoring YOUR wood furni¬ 
ture Call Middle Earth Furni- 
turc & Oak Ltd. 652 4740 

TEAK BEDROOM SUITE, 
teak frame with two sidetables, 
mattress. Two 9 drawer dress 
ers, one with mirror. 1 year old 
$1400 firm. 385-3736 after 
4,30pm. 

MOVING MUST SELL PLUSH 
wine velvet chesterfield and 
chair with 4' high black tri-light 
floor lamp. Replacement $2,000, 
asking $825 or best offer. 
477-8943. 

SOLID WALNUT SINGLE BED 
room suite, headboard, box¬ 
spring, and mattress, 6 drawer 
dresser with mirror, small desk, 
$500 Also curtains, different 
sizes and colours. 479-J551 

SIMMONS HIDE-A BED, $175. 
39" box spring and mattress $45. 
Occasional chair $25. Arrxxlte 
chrome table and chairs $75. 
Walnut chest of drawers, $125. 
383-1927 

KING SIZE BOX SPRING BED, 
mattress and headboard, oood 
condition, $85. Chesterfield, $35. 
Dresser, $50. Pole lamp, $20 And 
assorted small end tables. 

382 9991 after 5pm. 

FLEXSTEEL CHESTER 
field suite. Excellent condition 
Needs recover. Over $2000 to 
replace, $400, Spanish telephone 
bench, $40; Large table lamp, 
$10 479 3676 after 6pm. 

"ENROLL NOW" 
Accepting applications for fall 
beginners woodworking and 
lathe courses Tools & space, 

383 9600,338 Catherine St. 

LARGE 4-CUSHION COLO 
nial chesterfield and chair, off- 
white and brown design, excel¬ 
lent condition, must sell, $675 or 
best Offer 479-2402. 

ALL WOOD DINETTE SUITE, 
with buffet, $375. Rectangular 
teak table and 4 chairs, $239. 
Both in excellent condition. 
381 1513, 474 2971. 


HIDE-A BEDS FOR SALE, 
custom rebuilt, fabrics your 
choice, save $$$ 388-6275 pager 
877 anytime, 381-5353 evenings 


LARGE WINGED CHESTER 
field suite, top quality. $475. Lo- 
veseat in gold velvet $180. Both 
excellent condition. 592-4060. 


SINGLE SEAR POSTURE — 
Mate box spring and mattress, 
excellent condition, $150. 
474 1992, 383-1403. 


MOVING OUT OF TOWN, 
must sell. Twin bed and mat¬ 
tress, oval kitchen table, 3-piece 
sectional couch. 388-4973. 


7 PIECE MAPLE DINING 
room suite, round table, 30" 
hutch and buffet. $650 or offers. 

478 7833. 

DINING ROOM SUITE, 2 
years old, 6'X3' Parsons table, 6 
ladderback chairs, dark stained 
pine $350 658-5411. 

WATERBED, FEW MONTHS 
old, $950 Contemporary couch, 
$50 Filter Queen vacuum, $250. 
384 1336. 

SIMMONS DOUBLE BED, $150. 
Arborite kitchen table and 4 
chairs, $50. Dresser. $30. 
382 9588 

CANOPY BED. COMPLETELY 
portable with box spring and 
mattress- $250. After 6, 382-4408. 

WANTED USED hIdE-A BED 

in good condition. $150-200. 
386-9604. 

CHESTERFIELD AND CHAIR 
$350 Chrome table and 4 chairs 
$/5 656-5246 

WOODEN PLANT STANDS; 
wooden lamp; pictures; miscel- 
laneous furniture. 477-9216. 

WALNUT DINING ROOM 
suite, table, 2 leaves, buffet, 6 
chairs, $1000 477-7390 

SOLID WOOD DESK FOR 
sale, well made. After Spm, 
595 2976 

CONTEMPORARY DINING 
table, six upholstered chairs, 
brown/gold. $295. 592-8595. 

SET OF fit)NK BEDS FOR 
sale 7 cu.ft. deep freeze. 
384 1047 

ATTRACTIVE CHESTER- 
field and chair, like new, $400. 

592 4527 


QUEEN SI iE MATTRESS. 
Scandinavian type layered 
loam, $195. 477-6936. 


MAPLE TABLE, 6 CHAIRS, 
large sofa and chair New queen 
size bed, king size bed. 479-8074. 

8 PIECE DINING ROOM SUITE 
including buffet and hutch, ex¬ 
cellent condition, $700 474 2683 


room suite, $795. • 


DOUBLE BED AND METAL 
frame, $75.384^7. 


LARGE MAPLE COFFEE 
table. $75. 652 2057 


COUCH AND CHAIR, 2-END 
tables $150 656-4939 


TV. STEREO. RADIO 
SALES mi SERVICE 


• microwave 

• color TV 

• stereo 


• rentals 

• service 

• sales . 


TV. STEREO. RADIO 
SALES mi SERVICE 


Open 'til 9 Nightly! 

. 385-5555 

STEREOS-TV's-VIDEO 

Technics-Panasonic 

SPEAKERS 
AR-KLH-Cerwin Vega 

FULL SERVICE WARRANTY 
—5 vrs. parts & labor on most 
new sound equipment 1 
—Loaner supplied during ser¬ 
vice. Nocharoe 
—Full credit upgrading 1st yr. 

—Nodown payment (OAC) 

—In store bank financing 
—Yes. we take trades! 

—Free delivery 

CHANGE X-MASTERCHARGE 

Technics Sound Pkge. 

35 watt Technics receiver SA300, 
turntable SLD2 SBP25 3 way 
speakers with ADC Mag car¬ 
tridge Special $749 
No Down Payment . 

Low Monthly Payments (OAC) 

Color TV Specials 

Panasonic 26" consoles 

special$899 
Panasonic 20" color TV special 
$599. No Down Payment, Low 
Monthly Payments (OAC) 

VIDEO-PANASONIC 

Panasonic PV1100K Video 
machine. Special $1099. No Down 
Payment. 

Car Stereo Specials 
• Pioneer—Panasonic 
Open 10-9 Daily 10-6PM 
Sat. 





Imagine! A full sobwoofer sys¬ 
tem for less than $500. The all 
new Staub sub-svstem features 
dual woffers and two mini speak¬ 
ers with dome tweeters for opti 
mal imaging and dispersion. 
Near it now atCAV 


CAV 


388-6564 


764-A YATES (IN THE MALL) 


TRADE-INS WANTED 

Our stock of good used stereos is 
low, so we'll give you top dollar 
for your old stereo when you 
trade up now. 


JtOONGS 


HILLSIDE 
/ ight £ found 
595-8331 


IN THE HILLSIDE MALL 


COLOUR ff REM 

Now at a low price of $15 a 
month. Call today City Centre 
TV Sales and Rentals 477^971. 


FREE 

CARRY INSERVICE 

ESTIMATE 

Bring your TV • stereo to Ho- 
mark We will give you a free no 
obligation service estimate, we 
guarantee if 

USE OUR 

$ 10 . 

SERVICE CALL 
the lowest price service call 
anywhere by qualified techni 

dans. 

SPECIALS 

7Cr colour $100 Off $449.95 

20 Remote $750off $499 95 

55 watt receiver $100 off $449 95 
Sanyo m<crow4ve$l50 off $599 95 

TRADES WANTED 

Use your trade m as your down 
payment Come in end make a 
deal 


MAGNAVOX, HITACHI 
The home of quality service 
ELECTRON TV SALES and 
SERVICE 100 Burnside Rd. W., 
383 5432 


26" ELECTROHOME COLOUR 
TV Good working order with 90 
day full warranty. $199.95. 

ATLAS STEREO & TV 
763 Fort St. 385-2712 


YAMAHA CR1020 RECEIVER 
2x70 watts RMS, Teac A1200 
open reel tapedeck. Dual CS504 
manual turntable, Telec MX I 
disco mixer. 383-8832, 6-9 pm 


ONE STEREO SYSTEM: 
Marantz amp II50-D, Bose 501 
speakers. Pioneer PL-540 turn¬ 
table. $1200 or will sell separ 
ately. 382-9810, anytime. 


YAMAHA CA600 AMPLIFIER, 
CT600 tuner. Dual 510 turntable, 
Akai CS707D cassette deck and 2 
EPI1Q0 speakers, one year old. 
479-2523 


SACRIFICE. SANSUI AMP, 
BSR turntable. Akai front load¬ 
ing cassette deck, 2 Akai 2-wav 
speakers. record$»and tapes. 3 
months old $500 firm. 383-64SO 


SILVERTONE RADIO, 
stereo and black and white tv 
combination, cabinet 57" long, 
all in good working order. Excel¬ 
lent tone 656-5002. 


$45 BLACK AND WHITE, $145 
color. Good condition with no 
risk guarantee. 383-8774 or 
382 1234 


STEREO COMPONENT SET, 
turntable, amplifier and speak¬ 
ers, Noresco, 3 years old, $400. 
After 6, 382-4408. 


SONY 70 WATT AMP, $295. 
Sears Pro turntable. $125. Sony 
Mic. $25. Mic stand. $30. Or clos¬ 
est otters. 595-4376. 


ACCUTRAC 4000, $429. KEN- 
wood KR2300, $195. Akai 
GXC760D, 3-head, 3-motor, $599. 
Branch Circuits, 386-2544 


COBRA 139 XLR EXTRA 
power mike, $400 DX 160 short 
wave receiver, $100. Phone Ken, 
598-8104. 


MUST SELL. SEARS STEREO 

Mttd. 

rltice. $300. 388-4973 


EXCELLENT RECONDI- 
♦ ioned 20" Zenith Color TV, only 
$299 at Butler Brothers, 1724 
Douglas, 383-6911 


40—CHANNEL NEW REALIS- 
tic Base complete with antenna 
and Co-axial, still boxed. $225. 
386-4497 


ONE PIONEER CT-F4242 CA Sj 


e tape pi 
if. 477-475 


53 after 4:30pm 


AKAI 260D REEL TAPEDECK; 
cost $850; as new, $500. 479-1836. 


26" COLOUR TV CABINET, 
good working order 384 1208 


A ROOMIES, Hat 
and PRODUCE 


SEAFOOD 

"From processor to you 
No Middlemen" 

10lb boxes IOF Sole filets. 
*20. 301b boxes IQF Grey- 
cod filets, *37.50. 301b 
boxes IQF Lingcod filets, 
*40.50. K)lb boxes IQF Red 
Snapper filets, *12.00. 
Frozen whole tuna 79« lb. 
-IOF Individually Quick 
Frozen” 

Much more frozen and fresh. 

- No brokers or wholesalers 
Please 

801 Goldstreem Aye 
Open Sundays 478 2S44 



SEAFOOD 

Your food bills loo high? From 
processor to you, no middleman 

This week's special 

Fresh whole dressed Ling Cod 

Frest Turbot fillets, 884 tt> 

F resb sole f Matt. $1.89 lb 
i test cod fillets, $1 59 lb 

Freeze Your Orders 

Will custom freeze any order of 
f.,ti you require 

F4H Processors e» the t tshu> 

1 Ave 


W BurovidpRO' j»l 5672 t*_ 


m jk-WU-l ALL MAA-EUO# 
>uiour TV's lf« in->liup esti 
ftales < ail >w* 477 6971 ( Hp 
- ttft. f V J971 ShetbuuMM V 


GROCERIES, MEAT 
mi PRODUCE 


GRAINFED A-l BEEF 

Hinds $1.99 lb. 

Fronts $1 39 lb. 
Sides$1.65lb 

Extra Lean Local Pork 

Sides $1.05 lb 
Alberta Pork 954 lb. 

Local lamb$2.45 lb. 

New Zel. Lamb$1.85 lb. 
Dairy Veal $2.45 lb. 

Cut, wrapped a, flash frozen 
Weight loss In trimming will In¬ 
crease the price per lb 

OLD COUNTRY 
MEAT & DELI 
479-8911_642-5849 


All of This Meat 
For $87.88/52 Ibs./A-l 
Cut, wrapped, frozen, 3 lbs. 
prime rib roast, 3 lbs. barbecue 
steaks, 4 lbs. pork chops. 3 lbs. 
cross r lb roast, 3 lbs. bacon, 2 lbs 
breakfast steaks, 12 lbs. ground 
beef, 5 lbs. spare ribs, 4 Ids. pot 
roast, 3 lbs. boneless pork roast, 
4 lbs. stew beef, 4 lbs. pork 
steaks. 2 lbs. short ribs. Avail 
able with the above order -10 lbs. 
GR.A fryers, 404 lb or homemade 
beef sausages, 10 lbs., 494 lb. 

Phone 479-8911 
Old Country Meats & Dell 
4011 Quadra at McKenzie 


GOURMET 
MEAT PACK 
•35 lb. Gr. A. $115 
5 lb. T-bone steaks or porter¬ 
houses 

51b. Baron of beef 
5 lb. New York or Delmonico 
steaks 

5 lb. Lean Gr . beef 

4 lb Chicken or veal Cordon Bleu 

5 lb Butterfly pork chops 
31b. Veal cutlet 

3 lb. Homesmoked bacon 

OLDCOUNTRY 
MEAT & DELI 
479-8911_642-5849 


OPEN DAILY EXCEPT SUN. 
10:30-4:30 

LOCAL AND B.C. PRODUCE 
Berries in season 
Blueberries 
Peaches 
Apricots 
Nectarines 
Fresh vegetables 
Tomatoes 
Cucumbers 

Saanich Fruit Growers, edrner 
of Keating X Rd. and Vevaness, 
652-1138 


FRESH HALIBUT, COD, 
AND RED SNAPPER 
The commercial fishing vessel 
"Wah-Mlsh" will be at the foot 
of Fort at Wharf, Saturday and 
Sunday, dawn to dusk. 

Halibut $2.25per lb 

Cod and Snapper $1 per lb 
Please bring your own container 
652-4997 


CAPTAIN COOKS BAKERY 
Ltd. 1025 Cook St., corner Fort 
St., 316-1020. Closed Saturdays 
and Sundays Closed for holidays 
from Aug. 4-9. Our white bread is 
made from unbleached flour and 
honey, no sugar added or try our 
100% whole wheat bread made 
with honey, no sugar added. 

10 for $6 


FRESH SALMON 
Direct from the fisherman to you 
fresh salmon dallyl.Buv now for 
canning and freezing while the 

C ices are right. We have the 
rgest selection at the lowest 
prices at Fishermens Market, 
16)0 island Highway, open 7days 
a week . 478-4522. 


ALBERTA GRAIN FED BEEF 
Sides of beef S1.65LB Canada 
Grade A steers, hinds of beef 
$1 95LB. Sides of pork 60-80LB 
weight S1.09LB. Call Josle at 
478-6233. 


U-PICK RASPBERRIES. BOOK 
orders before August 10th 654 
per lb. bring your own contain 
ers, reservations only. 
112-748-0813 Cowlchan Delta Pro¬ 
duce Ltd. 


LOGANBERRIES 

Crate berries, lam and wine ber¬ 
ries In 5 and 10 lb. bags Phone 
652-3653,9am-7pm. 


RASPBERRIES. ORDERS 
taken now, 15 lb flat for $13.50 
(904 lb) Phone Bam to 7pm, 
479 4033 5550 West Saanich Rd. 
blucoerr 


Ask about b 


■cries. 


FIRBANK FARM 
1180 Royal Oak Drive 658-8313 
Fresh frying 
and roasting chickens 
I Also freezer specials 


RASPBERRIES 
9 pound flats of freshly picked 
berries may be ordered by call¬ 
ing 652 1525. U-pick raspberries 
also available. 


FRESH LING COD AND SNAP- 
per, direct from commercial fish 
boat, (BC Maid). For informa- 
tlon call, 477-2434. 


RASPBERRIES 904 PER LB. 
by the flat Book orders before 
August 10th. 112-748-0813 Cowi- 
chan Delta Produce Ltd. 


RASBERRIES FOR WINE. 404 
pound when available. Phone 
Cowlchan Delta Produce, 
112 748-0813 


RASPBERRIES, LARGE SIZE, 
$1.05 lb; apricots, eating and 
canning sizes, blueberries, 
peaches; 383-9126 


ALBERTA GRAIN FED BEEF 
Pork, veal, lamb. Information: 
381-6621 


PORK SIDES, CUT, WRAPPED 
and frozen 954 per lb. also beef 
and veal sides. 479-3021. 


LAST CALL FOR CHOICE 
raspberries, $1 lb. picked. 


CANNING TOMATOES, 20 LBS. 
for $7. Le Coteau Farm, 304 Wal- 
ton PI. off Oldfield Rd., 658-5888. 


100 


THURSDAY, JULY 24,1980 


MISCELLANEOUS 
FOR SALE 


CHILDS BIKE, $19. 9X12 OVAL 
braided rug, $45. Fridge/freezer 
sxs doors, excellent, $495 Sew¬ 
ing machine, $39. Coleman 
camping stove, $22. Camping 
lantern, $19. Brass table, S3?. 
Crab trap, $24. Captains bed $99. 
Chesterfield and chair, modern, 
$89. Push I awn mover. $9. Over 
stuffed chesterfield and chair, 
newly reupholstered, very com¬ 
fortable. $895. Teak dining room 
suite, 7 piece $495. Telephone 
table, $19. TV stand $19. Propane 
tank, 20 pound, $25. Recllner 
with vlbrater and heater, $159. 
Acordlan Hohner, 120 bass, $149. 
Colour TV, oood. $149. 30" elec¬ 
tric range, copoertone, contin¬ 
uous clean, $350. Automatic 
washer and dryer, oood condl- 
ton. $350 pair. Dresser with mir¬ 
ror. $39. Spanish saddle, very 
elaborate, $495. Acetylene torch 
and hose, $49 Coffee table, $19. 
And lots more at Royal Oak 
Trading next to Royal Oak Shop- 

S no Centre, 4488 West Saanich 
oad. Open 7 days. 10am-6pm. 
weekdays 479-1913. 


CUT VELVET SOFA & LOVE- 
seat $599.95; sofa bed, as new 
$196.46; deluxe Admiral port¬ 
able dishwasher $289.95, as new 
deluxe 5 pc. dinette suite $299.95; 
30" Kenmore elec, range 
$189.95, Walnut 4 drawer chest 
$79 95; Colonial hi back tweed 
sofa $189.95; brown tweed Colo¬ 
nial chair $79.95; pr. of royal 
blue swivel rockers $249.95; 
French Provincial sofa and 
chair $269.95, Simmons hide-a¬ 
bed $189.95; console style coffee 
table $69.95; old walnut dresser 
and chest $299.95; assorted re¬ 
el I ners from $89.95; old over- 
stuffed sofa, recovered $150, 
dinette with swivel chairs 
$159.95. ' 


Qhglrodgg 


715 Finlayson 


New and Used 

Hida-beds. $169 to $389; Single 
size Hi da-bed, $249 ; 2 pc. Ches¬ 
terfield suites, $119 to $639; 
Wooden rocking chairs, $79 to 
$139; 3 pc. Coffee table sets, 
$44 95 to $199; 5 pc. Dinette sets. 
$79 to $449; Duncan Phyfe drop 
leaf tables, $179 to $349; Set of 4 
chairs, $299 ; 8 pc round oak 
dining suite, $1195; Cedar chests, 
•$199; Complete bedroom suites, 
$249 to $549; Chest of drawers, 
$39 to $219; Dressers, $79 to $299; 
Single beds, $39.95 to $199; Va 
cuum cleaners, $34 to $79; 9x12 
rugs, $29 to $299 Visa or Master 
Card 

Pandora Furniture 

1050 PANDORA 383-4319 


FRESH OKANAGAN EATINC^ 
apples, peaches, apricots, case 
lots. 382-4695. 


U-PICK RASPBERRIES AND 
Logans, careful adults only. 
4784)252. before 9 pm 


LIVE CRABS DELIVERED 
$1 25 per lb. Phone 656-3444 


RASBERRIES, PICKED 
$1.25 tb 652-2271 


RASBERRY ORDERS TAKEN. 
658-8933. 


RASPBERRY ORDERS 
Taken after 6pm, 652-1338. 


101 MISCELLANEOUS 
FOR SALE 


RENT TO OWN 

Refrigerators, freezers, wash¬ 
ers, dryers, dishwashers, micro¬ 
wave ovens. televisions, stereos. 
Extremely low monthly rates. 
Sample-TV's from 
$l(7per month 

INSTANT 
DELIVERY AND 
NOCREDIT 
HASSLES. 

100% of your rental payments 
will apply If you decide to pur¬ 
chase First 6 months interest 
free Cell now : - 

ATLANTA TV & Stereo 

1575 PANDORA 


MR 


t* «4m» have a co m ple te setec 
ion of meets et competitive 

t«Jt% 


DRV IMG ISCHEAPtR 

lev** end mere AuirMMiMRiefi 

. enmne or freezing Heme food 
dtsyOreforv IHWh 






1115 FORT ST. 


BUY-SELL 

APPRAISE 

1115 Fori St. 384-6441 


PERSONAL JEWELRY COL- 
lection Dispersal Sale. Apprai 
sals available on Items Chain of 
22 diamonds and white gold; 
white gold and diamond arrow 
earrings; art deco yellow gold 
and diamond earrings; contem¬ 
porary yellow oold and diamond 
earrings; hand-carved lade and 
gold pendant; diamond, ruby 
and yellow gold dinner ting; aq¬ 
uamarine diamond and plati 
num dinner ring; white gold, dia¬ 
mond and pearl dainty pendant; 
Moulin Rouoe diamond, ruby 
and yellow gold stupendous pen¬ 
dant or pin; Chinese Ivory 
scrimshaw, unusual beads, plus 
many other smaller Items. 
381 2332 days 10-5, 384-1819, eve- 
nings, for appointment to view. 


M 


ISTER 

SWEEPER 


le« 


vacuums on Vancouver 
Island. Compact, Filter 
Queen, Electrolux, 
Kirby, Hoover, Eureka 
etc .etc. always instock. 
Also built-in vacuums at 
super low package price.. 

* We Service What We Sell * 
901 ESQUIMALT (At Head St.) 
386-3717 

UNIT 8-310 GOLDSTRE AM 

Next to Hwy Supermarket 
474-1011 


CORNER BOOKSHELF. MADE 
to hold TV, stereo, books, knick- 
nacks. $125. Two older chairs, 1 
red velvet, 1 blue cord, $30 each. 
One set bible stories, new, $100. 
Colour TV, $150. Babv basket, 
$20 Small dressing table and 
stool, $15. Overstuffed living 
room furnture. sef of 3, $400. 
Three piece pine bedroom suite, 
6 months old, asking $300. Set of 2 
teak chairs and bench, needs 
new cushion, $50. Other miscel¬ 
laneous 384 3003 


LARGE 12 LIGHT CRYSTAL 
chandelier, $350. Round china 
cabinet, $800. Double divan bed, 
$50. Single bed with padded 
headboard, $75. Roxton maple 
oval dining room table and 4 
hlghback chairs, $450. Electro- 
home console colour TV, work¬ 
ing order, $60. Kenmore heavy 
duty washer and dryer, Almond, 
6 months old, $700 firm. With 
many other items, includin'' 
large Jade plant. 479-2354. 


The Plastic Shop 

We are now at our NEW LOCA¬ 
TION — bioger and better with 
lots of parking See us tor Fiber¬ 
glass, Plexiglass', Polyethylene, 
Storm Windows and much more. 
THE PLASTIC SHOP 
Now at 2215 Government 
386-1477 


MOVING MUST SELL 
100 hp Merc, $300.90 hp Johnson, 
$150. Miscellaneous cabin cruis¬ 
er parts. Tires A78-13. Toyota 
radiator. Child's bed. Hood for 
kitchen range. Dodge hubcaps. 
Limoges china dollhouse furni¬ 
ture. Motorcycle helmets. Com¬ 
pressor Skis Antique pot belly 
stove Water purifier Artists 
easel. 383-3482 


NEED A WEDDING GIFT? 
Birthday? Anniversary? Choice 
an or iglnal work of art and give a 
piece of yourself for lasting ap¬ 
preciation. Also avftllable pot¬ 
tery, wall hangings, photog¬ 
raphy, iewefery and much more, 
all at unbelievably fair prices. 
The Artist's Showcase. • 203-733 
Johnson St opposite the Johnson 
St. carpark »2 5444 


KNOTTY PINE KITCHEN 
cabinets, new condition. Also 
ribbon grain mahogany kitchen 
cabinets and bath vanity, rea¬ 
sonable. Painted single panel 
doors In frames 2'6"x6'8" and 
other sizes $12 each. 65 sin 
gle casement windows 27"x50" 
$5 each. Indoor outdoor carpet 
appr ox i matel v 14'xi4* 
$30.595-7733 v 


BATON'S 

MOREHOUSE 

STORE 

749 View St. 


New Flush 


SIZE U WEDDING DRESS 
end viol, used In I979 R 
true* bumper G arbor, 
voM Trolling motor 

e hmmc hiw. HN. __ 

Air Grabber hood Two W 
Chrysler Keystone mops 3 club 
van seats Swivel motorcycle 
trailer After Spm. 479 8385, 
479-Q035 

Rebuilt Vacuums 

US 


111 


MISCELLANEOUS 
FOR SALE 


TWO VIKING OIL SPACE 
heaters with fans, as new. $50 
each; old-fashioned bath, wall- 
hung sink, toilet, excellent condi¬ 
tion, $75. seven solid exterior 

lambs, various sizes. $15 each. 
477-6274, after 4 pm. 


BRAND NEW MEDIUM 
green sculptured commercial 
apartment grade carpet. Only 
200 square yards; available at 
$4.75 per square yard. First 
come, first sold, no holds. Phone 
Friday only, 384-4257 for Satur¬ 
day morntng cutting only; in¬ 
stallation available. 


HOMELITE 

CHAINSAWS 

SALES—PARTS —SERVICE 
RENTALS 

GIBSON POWERCRAFT 
NOW AT 730 HILLSIDE t 
382-8291 


HERO PAINT PUMP, MODEL 
1100C. $200 Graco airless spray 
gun (gold) $100. Speedaire com¬ 
pressor, 2 cylinder, automatic 
shut off, regulator, $250. Devil 
dlss spray gun and quart cup, 
$100 Craftsman spray oun. 
quart cup, $50. 479-20/5 


HOUSE GROWN PLANTS. 
Couch, coffee table. Portable 
washer spin dryer. Macrame 
hanging. Portable TV. Old TV 
and stereo component. 150-gal 
Ion wood cabinet fish tank, needs 
front glass. Everything must go 
by Thursday. 382-5012. 


FOR SALE ABOUT 50 STORE 
counters, plywood construction, 
with peg-board sliding front 
dbors, 60 x 30 x 28" high. A few 
smaller also available. For 
quick sale $35 and $25 firm. Also. 
3 only, spiral display fixtures. 
$30 each 642 3331 


CHEAP NEW FACTORY SAL- 
vage glass, and thermo units. 
Less than V» regular price. Wln- 
dowscreens, $1 $4. Can deliver. 
Works rear of Slegg's Lumber, 
Fifth Street, Sidney, Open Mon- 
day-Frldav )2:30-4pm, Saturday 
8 12 noon 656-6656 . 


24" GOLD KENMORE ELEC- 
trlc range $175; 6pc. vanity bed¬ 
room suite $160; Simplicity 
super twin spin dry washer $225; 
5 pc. walnut dinette suite $145; 
Craftsman electric lawnmower 
$160. Mel's Bargains, 3460 Qua¬ 
dra St 384 3152. 


STIHL Chainsaws 

SALES—PARTS —SERVICE 
RENTALS 

GIBSON POWERCRAFT 
NOW AT 730 HILLSIDE 
382-8291 


ABC ELECTRIC LTD. 

831 YATES ST. 382-7221 

Rebuilt vacumms. Various 
makes and types $39 up. 6 mos 
guarantee. "Who better than 


WASHER ANO DrTRT BAR 

stereo, electric mower, B&D 
lawn trimmer, garden tools, 2 
single beds, chesterfield, two 5 
gallon outboard gas tanks, 
household drapes. 477-1434 after 
5pm ^ 


BEAUTIFUL KELVINATOR 
portable/bulltln dishwasher 
with maple cutting board top 
Excellent condition. Moving to 
home with bulltln $225 Older GE 
dryer, good condition $40. Gold 
nylon carpet 9 x 12815. 721-3296. 


RAISIN FRIEZE HIDEABED 
$175, left hand Moffat zero zone 
fridge $375; 7 pc. walnut arborite 
dining room suite $350; gold 

E l recllner $100; 3 pc. walnut 
00 m suite $200. Mel's Bar 
s, 3460 Quadra St 384-3152. 


SAVE UP TO 50% ON YOUR 
new kitchen Replace your old 
doors with new. In your choice 
of woods. Existing framework 
can be covered to match. Sup- 
Plledor Installed. 656-2905. 


SET OF T.V. TABLES, $15. 
Bookcase, $20. Sealy Colonial hi- 
deabed couch, $250. Chair, $20. 
End table, $10. Exercise bike, 
$100 Guitar and case, $70. Quick 

*■ after 5pm. 


broom, $20. 385-5590 a 


USED SEWING MACHINES 
1 only Bernina 831 open arm, 
$799. Many others to choose 
from, storting at $39 95. Fully 
guaranteed. Sawyer Sewing, 
Centre 840 Fort St., 38*6228. 


cord oroan $150. 4 drawer filing 
cabinet $100. Reel-to-reel Grurv 
dig tape recorder with 25 tapes 
$100. Refrigerator, $75. 20' hall 
runner, $60. 598-8702. 


ROYAL COPHAGEN CHRIST- 
mas plates: 1963. $120. 1965. $55, 
1966, $59;. 1967, $49; 1968. $39; 
1970. $35; 1971, $30; 1972, $30, 
1973. $30, 1974, $30. Prices are 
firm. 479-006). 


IS YOUR TELEPHONE UNAT- 
tended, you could be losing busi¬ 
ness. Buy or rent an anwsering 
machine from Interconnect, 3586 
Quadra St 384-0511. 


an 01 wgwn vel¬ 

vet drapes $50. One weight set 
$225 or best offer, vinyl bench, 
bars, squat stand. 382-5015 


COLEMAN STOVE, COUCH, 
assorted luggage, door mats, 
glassware, lamp shades, socket 
wrench, golf clubs and cart 
-3.1508 


595-1543, 


B Haultaln 


90-16X12X2" CEMENT 
blocks $1 each. One wood finish 
crib without mattress $95, one 
jouth bed without mattress $15. 


BABY BUGGIE, $50. BEATTY 
clothes dryer. $150. Picnic table, 
cedar, $75. Inglls 24" frldoe, $50 
GE 24" stove, $50. Steel locker, 4 
door, $50. 479 2075 


GREENHOUSE GLAM. WOUL 
rugs, playpen, wicker chair, 
black antique cabinet, books, 
etc etc. 8545 East Saanich Road, 
Saturday and Sunday 


UTILITY TRAILER $150. 
Ping-pong table $75. Lined floral 
drapes 150X50". $25 pair, oval 
braided ru^$25. Lamps, stereo. 


mlsc 642- 


OLDER TIPI WANTED FOR 
Sale rocking chair and Singer 
straight stitch sewing machine 
in cabinet $65. Please call 
385-9554. 


SMALL TRUNK. WRINGER 
washer, automatic " 
electric heater, man 1 
two step end tables, pal 
tains. 384-7412 


HKI nvzC n 

: baseboard 
i's fliohtbag. 
», pair cur 


CANNON BALL F ISH 
weights, 754 per LB. One CB 
mobile, one CB base with side¬ 
band and antenna $750. Bio wood 
burner $35.478-4788. 


ILLUMINATED BUSINESS 
sign Suitable for office or store 
window. Bo* Is 65"x 14" with 
neon light tube. $240. 3854012 or 
598-4903 eves 


MOVING SALE. LARGE 4- 
door wooden storage cupboard 
Old trunk. Car ramps. Prints. 
---—-2770 


ag&m* 


Sundry Items 598-21 


MOVING MUST SELL: PORT 
able Kitchenald dishwasher. 
$295; like new. I' long velour 
chesterfield end chair, $495; 
Moffat range, t9S. 4780605 


SINGLE BOX SPRING, $20. 
Sun lounger, $16. Antique lamp, 
small. $7 Maote spindle bed. 
Swag lamp Chandeliers $ 
swap. 477 3139 


..Sell or 


MOVING MUST SELL 
women's 3 1 

Smell stereo.__ _ 

$40 6 volt converter. 


speed CCM, $50 
, $100. Car I track. 
$40. 6 volt converter. $15. Royei 
manual typewriter, IM 388 4917 


PICTURE GLASS 
Compere Prices end Give Me A 
Cell - HARRV 477j$$4 


CHAINSAWS 

AM Becker end ten LM 

7911 TIHkum _M644$ 


Waterbeds 

■°rasr ■ 



IN 


MISCELLANEOUS 
F0N SALE 


HARRY - 477-6534 
"Broken Window Specialist" 
TRY ME, I'M REASONABLE 


RENT INDUSTRIAL SEWING 
machines, day, week, month or 
rent to own. Sawyer Sewing 
Centre, 840 Fort St. 3W-6228. 


15 CHESTERFIELD SUITES, 
all in good condition, make me 
an offer. Mlsc. Items. 474-1311 or 
479-3231 


WOODS-9X12 TENT, NEVER 
used and In box, as now have tent 
trailer. Paid $229, asking $180 or 
best offer. 478-3380. 


ments handwritten on sheep 
skin, 16th to 19th century $25 to 
$100. 592 7301. 


MASON & RISCH PIANO. Ex¬ 
cellent condition. $2)00; twin box 
spring and mattress $30. Metal 
student's desk $25.384-8563. 


NYLON CARPET 12 X 10 WITH 
underlay, very good condition 
$150. Kenmore vacuum with at 
tachmenfs $50. 992-4776. 


COMMERCIAL SLATE POOL 
table. $908kx best offer: Double 
Vilas maple colonial bed, $300. 
477-31S6. 


CHINA; ROYAL WORCESTER 
"Concerto" 7 complete place 
settings, 9 cups and saucers. $550 
112-594-8909 


BEDROOM SUITE. BAY- 
crest washer/spin dryer, port¬ 
able dryer, single bed, drawers. 
382-1741 


SOUTH BENO METAL LATHE, 
9" swing. 4* bed, includes steady 
rest, stand, gears, $1395.385-7693 
after 6pm 


OAK BARRELS, $15. COLO- 
nial easy chair, $20. Chrome kit¬ 
chen table, $10. 592-4141 eve- 
nlngs. 


FRIDGE. STOVE. TV. 
stereo, chair and umbrella set, 
cassette tape deck, set of 
snooker balls. 656-3147. 


BAR STEREO. OLDER 
fridge, color tv, standard bike, 
kindling, cookbook, student erv 
cyclopedias. 477-9791. 


COUNTER GLASS DOORS, 
180"L 24"W 38"H. Office divid¬ 
ers. City Office Equipment Ltd. 
386-8396 


COLONIAL MAPLE CRIB AND 
mattress, good condition $130. 
Double stroller, swivel wheels, 
good condition $45. 478-7493. 


CONCERT PIANO. LARGE 
mirrored oak wardrobe. Pos- 
turepedlc bed on Shepherds cas¬ 
ters 382-0670 or 386-2187. 


ROTOR TYPE TV ANTENNA, 
complete with signal applifier 
and stainless steel guv wires. 
$250 479-7852 


VIKING FRIDGE 16 CU. FT., 
bottom freezer $199.95, sleeper, 
nylon cover $199.95. Mais Furni- 
ture, 1821 Cook, 385-2435. 


HAND AND POWER TOOLS, 
saw, router, sender, plane, va¬ 
cuum, motor, drawers, and bat- 
tery charger. 721-3115 


WATERBED. $200. 7Vj CUBIC 
foot deepfreeze, $200. 20" colour 
TV, $100. Couch and chair, $35. 
386-5996 


3 PIECE SOLID WALNUT BED- 
room suite, $ 200 , kitchen suite, 
$40; black and white TV. 12". 
$75, 478-4086 


10,000 BTU WESTINGHOUSE 
air conditioner for easy slidino 
window installation. Asking 
$325.479-0713. 


TWO PORTABLE TYPEWRIT- 
ers. One manual typewriter. 
Electric adding machine. 
477-6358. 


SINGER SMALL HANDY VA- 
cuum cleaner, almost new, $30 
Brand new commode (home) 
$25.477-5507 after 4. 


QUALITY TENT, 10X10, OUT- 
side frame with rain cover. 
Adaptable for stationwagon. 
$125. 386-2797. 


TWO BURNT ORANGE CAR- 
pets, very good quality and con¬ 
dition. 13 and 15X9. $79, $89. 
658-5782 


OAK TOILET TANK AND 
seat, reconditioned. Brass 
lamps. Oak flatback bench. 
384-5284 after 6. 


18' COLECO POOL COMPLETE 
with sand filter, fiberglass tank, 
partial deck and other extras. 
$400 479-6423 


FRANKLIN STOVE $100, PAR- 
lour stove $125, Airtight stove 
$200. All Sears models. Excellent 
condition. 112-745-3751. 


CLASSICAL RECORDS FOR 
sale, near mint. Buy and sell 
records. The Bookshelf. 
382-8422. 


NEW ANO USEO CLEAN CAN- 
ning jars. Quarts, $4.50 per 
dozen. Pints, $4 per dozen. 
478-4838 


PRINCESS BED. LIKE NEW. 
ping pono table, full size oak 
office desk, other household 
effects, 658-8303 


ELECTROLUX VACUUM, 
with power head, must sell. 
474-1311. 


barrels. Ready for use, $6.95 de¬ 
livered 383-1328. 


REFRIGERATOR COUNTER 
top coppertone, almost new $220 
And mlsc. 592-4251. 


NEW QUEEN SIZE MAT- 
tress, Sears Posturepedlc, clos- 
est $200 takes 385-6044,6-9 pm 


eludes tank $350 or best offer. 
478-8430 days only. 


CHiTST Ol^ DRAWERS. $65. 
Good condition. Misc household 
items. 474-1311 or 479-3231 


MIRROR 36X56" PLATE 
glass, Va" bevelled edges, other 
smaller mirrors. $125.474-131) 


8 SLATE POOL TABLE, 1 
L ar old. reduced to $625. 


EIGHT BAGS MANURE, SOIL, 
chips or bark, $12 delivered. 
592-7068. 


GRAVEL OR SAND $19; NEW 
concrete slabs 95« delivered. 
592-7068, 


LADIES DIAMOND RINGS, 
oak sideboard, 2 dressers, odd 
wooden chairs. 595-7918. 


aircondltloner 8000 btv with side 
extensions. Evenings 721-3943. 


TOYOTA KNITTING MA 
chine. ‘ ' 


t condition. Size 


LIKE NEW, BRIGHT RUST 
patterned 8x12 carpet, suitable 
for playroom, $25. 477-057S 


MAPLE BURLS. DRIED 4 
years, unfinished, for tables, etc. 
656-5434 


APPROXIMATELY 60 YARDS 
of used green shag carpet $100. 
477-0603 


colour TV. Almost new. 
721-5149. 


electric hot water tank. 


ELIMINATOR 10 SPEED $55. 
Cl e veland Kino flute $70. Phone 
after 5 pm. 592-5831. 


STUROV SUITCASE. SIZE 
Electric** "* 0 °°^ condition. 


ONITREX ADOIMG MACHINE 
edth^m end Muntz 8-track 






IN MISCfLUMEOUS 
FOR SALE 


HIDE-A BED.$125. FREEZER. 
$125. Gas stove. Electric stove. 
416 Cecelia off Washington. 


WOOD GRAIN ARBORITE 
table with 6 chairs $12S. 386-5219 
after 5pm 


HAND WINCH. HEAVY DUTY 
cornea king, with 25' cable, 
new, $80 479-9653 


COMMERCIAL ICE MAKING 
machine, excellent condition 
$550 656-1176 ask for Oentro. 


CAPTAINS BED, NEW CONDI- 
tlon; washer and dryer, dryer 
needs maintenance. 598-1840 


WARDROBE TRUNK $25. 
Electric floor polisher $10. Good 
condition. 477-5744. 


SALON TYPE HAIRDRYER 
and matching comb-out chair, 
like new. 478-9243 after 6pm 


VACUUM CLEANER $45, 
working good. 479 2523. 


UTILITY BOX TRAILER. 
8'XSW. Wired. 386-6939 


5 YEAR OLD ELECTROLUX IN 
good condition. 479-2523. 


REEL TYPE LAWNMOWER, 
$75.381-0842. 


CCM EXERCISE BIKE, LIKE 
new, $85. 479-7678 


GAMES TABLE AND 4 
matching chairs, $275. 598-2647, 


HOT TUB, 6'X4', $1500OR BEST 
offer. 598-2174 


PORTABLE MASSAGE 
table, brand new. $225. 385-6986 


REEL LAWNMOWER, GOOD 
condition, reasonable. 477-6526 


Compact vacuum, $ 175 . 

478-0877 


18' AWNING FOR TRAILER. 
$50 or best offer. 477-3676. 


12 HP TORO REEL MOWER, 6' 
cut, $600. 658-8089 


101 CH ILMEN'S 
MISCELLANEOUS 


ROUND-ABOUT 
CHI LOREN'S CLOTHES 
We will sell quality used chil¬ 
drens clothing. 1005 View, Tues- 
Sat, )0-5p.m.385-6S52 


KIDDIES' KAROUSEL 
Now accepting winter maternity 
& childrens wear, toys, hand- 
craftsctc. 2666Quadra, 383-1)22. 


BABY STROLLER $45. CAR 
safety seat $35 L arge playpen 
$35. Carbed $12. High chair $12 
Vacu—sweep $20. 479-0713. 


WANTED: INFANTS TO SIZE 
10 childrens wear & accessories. 
After 6pm, 383-1856 or 477-1073 


WANTED: CRIB AND MAT 
tress in good condition around 
$25.381-151X474-2971. 


LARGE DELUXE GENDRON 
478^8^9 h 4 rd, Y used, $60. 


6-YEAR CRIB AND MAT 
tress, $65. 477-1366 


103 


MISCmJUIEOUS 

WANTED 


Are vou getting the 
most from vour 

GARAGE SALE? 

for an auction estimate or a cash 
offer contact LUNDS today. 
386-3308. The auclioners and ap¬ 
praisers for Victoria. 926 Fort 
St. 


OAK BAY AUCTIONS 

CONSIGNMENTS WANT E D 
Good household furnishings, 
tools, oarden equipment, etc. 
PHONE 592-5111 

AUCTION EVERY 
WEDNESDAY 7 P.M. 
2036OAK BAY AVE. 


WANTED URGENT. GOOD 
quality furniture, appliances, 
tools, anything with resale 
value Phone for cash apprais¬ 
als. Royal Oak Trading. 4488 
West Saanich Rd. next to Royal 
Oak Shopping Centre. Open 7 
days, )0am-6pm weekdays. 
479-1913 


CASH 

We buy and sell vintage clothing 
and accessories, furs, jewelry. 
China and all collectible nostal 
gia items Estate appraisals. 
384-4547 11 5 P.M., 577- Johnson. 
The Bay Window. 


URGENT! 

Good Hunting Guns Wanted by 
SPECIALTY GUNS (Dlv of in¬ 
ternational Knives Ltd ). 576 
Yates St. 383-1044. 


THE SALVATION ARMY 
needs your clothing, furniture, 
household goods. Help us to 
help others." Family Thrift 
Stores. Victoria. Sidney, Lang- 
ford For Pickup—386-3295 


105 GAUGE SALES 


YARD SALE, FRIDAY. SAT- 
urday, Sunday, July 25—27th, 
lOam Spm. 1920 Maple Avenue, 
Soofce. 642-4453. Antique fir pan¬ 
elling. windows, shower doors, 
furniture, bicycles, toys, Gen- 
dron 3-ln-l, fridge, washer, 
dryer, oak dresser with mirror, 
etc. Moving Everything must 


GIANT GARAGE SALE 

Furniture, china, glassware, 
brlcabrac. English portable 
bike, housewares, books, and as- 
sorted oddities. From 
10am-6pm, Sat Mon. 228 Hart 
Road, corner of Old Island Hwy, 
across bridge from 6 Mile House 


DEMOLITION SALE, 63S 
Rothwell, daily 9 am. 2 pm. 
385-7789. Kitchen cabinets with 
double ss sink, toilets and sinks, 
old style bath, hot water system, 
radiators, water pumps and 
pipes, furnace, 250 oallon oil 
tank, variety of doors, 2 x.4s, 
panelling and mlscellanous 


MOVING. GOROON HEAD. 
Teak k i tchen r abi nets and count 
ertop, stove, dishwasher, some 
furniture, babv Clothing and 
equipment, books, 6 man tent 
and poles, Coleman stove, skis, 
miscellaneous household Items. 
Saturday and Sunday 10-2. 1905 
Ferndale Road 


"DEMOLITION SALE". 2 OLD 
duplexes at corner of Fairfield 
and Cook. Hardwood floors, red 
brick, doors, windows, oil fur¬ 
naces and tanks, fridges, stoves, 
hot water heaters, etc. Week 
days 12 to 7pm. Sat and Sun, 26th 
and 27th, 11 to 4pm or phone 
112 748-2472 


WEATHER PERMITTING, 
Sunday 10 until 3, 2856 Heath Dr, 
off Gorge Rd West. Childrens 
rockers, chairs, tables, wringer 
washer, older 30" stove, old 
school desk, mens and womens 
clothes, 64 Oldsmoblle F85,4 16" 
Ford split rims, dolls, much 
mlsc. No presales. 


FRIDAY AND SATURDAY, 220 
Government. Laundry tub, lloht 
fixtures, sheers, small tables, 
older sewing machine, mirrors, 
car radio, sander, lamps, oolf 
cart, desks, other wood furni¬ 
ture, hardware, records, books, 
lots and lots of small Items, 
cheap. 383-6777. 


MUST SELL EVERYTHING 
Saturday, July 26. 3841 Hobbs 
Street. Nice furniture, stereo, 
bicycles, roller skates, toys, 
childrens clothes, books, plants, 
many Items. Make an otter. No 
selling before 10 am 


SAANICH LACROSSE BOOST- 
er Club, Braefoot Park. 11-3 Sat¬ 
urday July 26. Donations mav be 
dropped off Thursday July 24 
between 6-8pm at Braeioot 
Park. 


GARAGE SALE, FRIDAY, SAT 
urdav, Sunday. 10 til 4. Movino- 
many household effects- 70 yards 
kitchen carpet, new; babv odd¬ 
ments; acoustic ceiling tiles; 50' 
ABS plastic pipe 4390 Tyndall. 


GARAGE SALE. SATURDAY 
July 26th, I0am-4pm. Macrame, 
berries, vegetables, toys, nick 
nocks and more 6140 Central 
Saanich Road off Keating Cross 
Road 


GARAGE SALE. 12 TIL 6PM, 
Saturday, July 26th. 2763 
Grainger Rd. off Goldstream 
Ave. Queen size bed, stereo 
stand, household Items. . 


BEAUTIFUL LEADED GLASS, 
cedar front door, $150. All sorts 
of miscellaneous Items. July 26 
and 27. 8am 4pm. 132 Eberts 
Street, Fairfield 


TOOLS, BOOKS. RADIO, 
crocks, lamps, iewelry, orna¬ 
ments. Lots of miscellaneous. 
Friday Saturday 8am. 659 Niag- 
ara St. 


BASEMENT SALE. HOUSE 
hold Items, office furniture, tools 
and misc. items. 1725 Arbutus 
Terrace, Mill Bay. View daily 
11am-9pm, 112 743-2698 


WORLD VISION GARAGE 
Sale Many items. 876 Leslie St 
(off Saanich Rd). Saturday 
10am. 


DEEP FREEZE, $100, MUCH 
more miscellaneous. 2203 
Savward. 1:30pm 4:30pm. 
595-8026 


SUPER GARAGE SALE IN 
Sidney, something for every 
body. Salurdav 26th and Sunday 
27th, 9-5 at 235/ Malaview Ave. 


URGENTLY WANTED 
Refrigerators, freezers, ranges, 
automatic washers and dryers 

TOP PRICES PAID ... - 

Phoenix Appliances 384^2} ar)d Stamps, 100 BurnsidfuRd. 

1 -■ ■■ »n^38j 2634. 

Ca’sH FOR SWORDS, BAYO 
nets, medals, badges, milltaria, 
also, old clothing, furniture, 
crystal and china. 386 0911, 

384-3941 


WANTED TO GIVE AS A GIFT 
King George. Queen EJizabeth 
cup and saucer. Would consider 
other pieces too. Must be reason- 
atoly priced 595-3528. 


DIAMONDS, GOLD, SILVER & 
coins wanted. Cash for vour dia¬ 
monds and rings In any condi 
tion. Universal Trading. 584 
Johnson, 383-951? 


Beer Bottles and cans 604 doz. 
soft drink bottles, old car bat¬ 
teries. radiators, copper, brass, 
lead etc. 526 David, MX1328,8-4. 


WE PAY CASH FOR ALL 
square cornered fridges, stoves, 
washers, dryers, deep freezes, 
working or not 384-5721 


WANTED: PLAIN LINED 
drapes. IS'xSI", 6 x48" Also, 
freezer, washer and dryer. 
382-8956, after 5 


AIR CONDITIONER, LADIES 
bike, camping and canning 
equipment Reasonable please 


SELL OLD BOOKS TO THE 
HAUNTED BOOKSHOP 
382-1427 


FRIDGES. SQUARE COR- 
nered. working or not. 478-2313, 
478-5449. 


CASH FOR YOUR USED SEW 
Ing machine Sinoer Sewing 
Centre. HUHIde Mall, 995-4545 


WANTED: CHILD RELATED 
hendcrefts for cute shoo. 
383-1122; offer 4pm, 477 1073 


WANTED: SCRAP LEAO UP 
-V —V 


GRANDFATHER CLOCK 
Phone Jerry 652-4546 


FRIDGES. FREEZERS 
bought 383-72U. All Temp 

WANTED MOUNTED WILO 
' lR&gr3lMiB4. 


24' ALUMINUM EXTENSION 

- 


'■ 477-034 


UTILITY TRAILER 


PATIO SALE. FURNTURE 
and household Items 2830 Fifth 
Street 384-3003. Saturday, 
1-6pm x 


SATURDAY, 10AM 4PM. 506 
Goldstream. Toys and mlsc. 
household Items 


GARAGE SALE SATURDAY 
July 26.11-3.1652 Begbie. Plants, 
tools, miscellaneous. 


GARAGE SALE. FRIDAY 
3 6pm, Saturday 9-12. 4058 
Grange Road. 


BACKYARD SALE. 2663 FERN 
wood Road. Saturday July 26, 
10-4. 


YARD SALE. 231 MARY ST., 
down to ocean Sam to 6pm 


IIS SWAPS 


'64 SEDAN DEVILLE CADIL- 
lac, fully rebuilt, must be seen. 
Will swap for best travel trailer 
642 3298. 


IIS COINS mi STAMPS 


SILVER COINS 
Will buy or sell Canadian and US 
silver coins. Wanted Canadian 
'66 and prior, 1967 and 1968 US 
1964 and prior. Capital City Coins 


WE BUY SILVER COINS AND 
sterling. Universal Trading 
Centre, 383-9512 


COLLECTOR WILL BUY BRIT 
Ish Commonwealth stamps and 
foreign stamps. Paul, 477-7978. 


117 JUmQU£S mi UTS 


Collectibles Auction 
Tues., Aug. 12,7om. 

This Interesting Auction will In¬ 
clude fine Edwardian and Period 
FURNITURE. Royal Doulton 
and Royal Dux FIGURINES.- 
R C D And other fine Quality 
CHINA and GLASS. Older SIL¬ 
VER and Estate JEWELLERY. 
CLOCKS, ARTIFACTS, CAR 
PETS, PAINTINGS and 
PRINTS. BOOKS, MEMORIL 
BILIA and other articles of In¬ 
terest and Value 
CONSIGNMENTS ARE NOW 
BEING ACCEPTED 

926 Fort St. 386-2308 

LUNDS 


OAK BAY AUCTION 
CONSIGNMENTS WANTED 
For OUT ANTIQUE & 
COLLECTABLE SALE. 
Wednesday. July 30 

PHONE 592-5111 

AUCTION EVERY 
WEDNESDAY 7 P M. 
2036 OAK BAY AVE 


JACOBEAN HANQCARVED 
oak chrvefle fable mirror. Jaco¬ 
bean hendeerved oak 3 panelled 
room screen Handmade 6 x4' 
stained glass window, perfect 
condition Mahogan^settee. 

|njm ~ 

X led or 
turners 


MTEO: TV AMTEMNA 

Hee w phene 383 M8» 


Used furniture antiques end of 
flceequMmanf 

' «M4IOw 


C-4 

117 ANTIQUES mi UTS 


CHIN*. 85 PIECES OF COAL 
port "The President". Designed 
by A. Langford. Including ser 
vice for eight plus cream soups, 
tea plates, tea pot. Extra plates, 
tea plates and saucers. Stood 
firm. 721 5009. 


SOLID MAHOGANY QUEEN 
Anne style extending leaf table 
and chairs, seats 4; matching 
buffet with bevelled mirror, 
beautiful condition. $1500 firm. 
652-3148, phone after 4:30, 


HAND OPERATED CREAM 
separater In pood condition, 
$100. Cast with brass hand water 
pump. $100. 3220 Marlin hexagon 
barrel, good condition, $280 
After 5pm, 479-8385, 479-0935 


FURNITURE REFINISHING 
and antiaue restoration by 
museum trained professional. 
Satisfaction guaranteed. 
388-9153 


VICTORIA MEDAL 
& MIL4TARIA LTD 
Medals, swords, badges, etc. 
"‘and sold. 1109 Langley St 


Bcxtohf 

384-4041 




SNOW TIGER SILK SCREEN 
painting by Stephen Lowe. Ap 
proxlmatelv 2'x4'. Exchange for 
silver or money equivalent. 
Phone 613 546-4127. 


Fort Mt buy quality furniture, 
silver, china, crystal. TOP 
PRICES PAID 382-0511. 


WANTED: QUALITY AN 
tique furniture, rugs, clocks, 
paintings, silver. Highest prices. 
D. Robinson, 1019 Fort, 384-6425 


COLLECTOR WILL BUY OR 
repair any Wind-up grama- 
phone, outside horn or other- 
wlse. 595-4768 


CASH FOR OLD OIL PAINT- 
logs, antique and estate I ewe 
I erv Brandon's, 18 Centennial 
Square. 385-0623 


ANTIQUE LEGAL DOCU- 
ments handwritten on sheep 
skin, 16th to 19th centurv $25 to 
$100. 592 7301. 


BEST PRICES PAID FOR AN 
tique furniture, porcelain, crys¬ 
tal, copper, brass etc. Jadis An- 
ttques, 609 Courtney St. 384-4523. 


FOR SALE LARGE SELEC 
tion of anitique light fixtures and 
shades Waterglass Studio. i040 
North Park Street, 384-1515. 


FURNITURE REPAIRED AN 
ti^ues our specialty. Phone 


PAIR FRENCH BRONZE 
Marly horses, sioned Coustou 
Best offer. 592-6560. 


PLAYER PIANO. PHONE AN 
Person's Plano Tuning. 477-6439, 


COLLECTOR'S CLOCK, VERY 
old records 656-5434 


120 GARDEN SUPPLIES 


8HP SEARS LAWN TRACTOR, 
3 speed forward one reverse, 36" 
mower attachment. Utility cart, 
36" spreader feeder and sweep- 
er. $750 complete. 479^423 


AS NEW LAWN MOWER $75. AS 
new weed eater $25 385-9729 


120 GARDEN SUPPLIES 


F«rtiltz«r 


SAANWOODFARMS LTD. 
Cow manure 652-2026 or 
652-1743. No Sunday calls 
please 


Plowing, Rotovnting 
and Cuttiviting 


DON STRACTOR SERVICE 

477-3913 

We rotovate, plow, cut grass and 
brush, also loading andhaullng. 


TED'S TRACTOR SERVICE. 
Rotlvatlng, plowing, leveling. 
Hay cutting 478-4059 


Top Soil, Rocks and FW 


SCREENED TOP SOIL WITH 
manure and sand, $12,'vd. Deliv¬ 
ery extra. Sterilized potting soil 
by bag E Nixon Ltd 478-0511, 
Nights 479 1937, 479 2995 


NO. 1 MIXED TOPSOIL. DARK, 
sandy loam. Large and small 
orders Also no 2 and perk soil 
Phone; 658-5172, 479-1582, 
658 8921 


FREE FILL 

Trucking charges only Call 
386-6308 Mon. Fri. 8:30-4 30 


GOOD NO 2 BLACK TOP SOIL. 
$6.50 per yard. Over 100 yards, 
.50 per yard. 652-2523, 
~ weekdays. 


85 , 

9am-lpm 


GOOD UNSCREENED TOP 
soil $10 yd. delivered within 
Greater Victoria in 10 yd. loads. 
727-2211. 


BY SACK, WEED FREE 
black soil. Open 7 days a week, 
382 2843 


SAND, GRAVEL, DRAIN 
rock, crushed rock, and top soil, 
l to 6 yard loads 658 5406 


• 1 SHREDDED SOIL, 15 YARD 
loads, $10 per yard. After 6, 
479-8349. 


ROCK FILL WANTED. VIEW 
Royal 478-7970 


125 PETS mi SUPPLIES 


RESERVATIONS NOW BEING 
taken for registered champion 
sTred Doberman Pinscher dup 
pies lust whelped. Show homes 
preferred, as last years litter 
from the same bitebhas already 
produced 4 champions to date. 
These fully guaranteed, quality, 
puppies will be ready to go with 
ears cropped and shots by mid 
September Just Jayne Dober 
mans, 478-6450. 


10 GALLON FISH TANK. COM 
plete with filter, pump, heater 
and plants, $100. 24" light cover, 
$15.17" light cover $10.16" lighl 
cover, $8. 14" Duomatic tank 
heater, $20 7" Universal tank 
heater $5. Large air pump, $20 
Water circulator pump $20. 
479-2075 


NORWEGIAN ELK HOUNDS 
8 months old. Male and female, 
points already earned in show 
ring $400 Spayed female obedi 
ence prospect $250 Bearberrv 
Kennels. Ganges, 537-2377. 


ANIMAL'S CRUSADERS GAR 
den party, will definitely take 
place Saturday July 26. 2 5pm. If 
fine, 2199 Lafayette Street, if 
wet, St John Ambulance Hell. 941 
Pandora 386-9832 


PULI PUPS, INTELLIGENT 
little black Hungarian sheep 
dogs.natural guards, herders, 
personable companions. Suit 
able homes only 658 5259 


FREE. 4 ADORABLE 8 WEEK 
oid kittens, litter box trained, 
very loving and affectionate, 
good with small children 
65? 3357, Brentwood 


WANTED GOOD HOME FOR 
small black soayed Cocker 
cross. 11 months old. had shots 
$30. Phone Diane work 3«64jai 
or home 4 7» 82*8 


BEAUTIFUL FRE^ KITTENS. 

7 weeks old. male end female, 
black with white noses end paws 
Will reciprocate female spaying 
479 7654, 



78 GALLON AQUARIUM IN 

Good working condition** $75 
479-4716 offer fem or ewefcend 

AIREDALE 

tswzrsi '"* 1k,iwA " 

» «* SHOftF Ft T SHOP LTD 

on I Treplf at Ink- Birds 

TewnpLeunby 

Rf GltTERRO CREAM PER 
Mae me* kJNeatt Mew* in 

mtmrnm* m*V. I tfSm 


V 

























































































































































































































































































































































































































16 1HH REGISTERED THOR- 
oughbred gelding, 8 years old, 
successfully evented training di¬ 
vision 1980. 112-758-7439 

WELSH PONY, llVi HH, $450 
or best offer, 12-vears old, well 
taken care of. pulls carts on 
ropes 478-8946. 

15 MONTH QUARTER HORSE 
filly, excellent bloodline, Triple 
Chick, Breeze Bar. Sorrel with 
star. 478-8113. 

HORSE SHOEING. GUARAN 
teed work. Don Burritt, 479-9128 
betweeen 5-8pm 

POTOTOES $2 PER 100 LB 
sack. Mlchell Farm, island View 
Rd 

MANFREDF HUNDERT 
dressage clinic, August 15-18, 2 
lectures. 652-3014 

WANTED: 2.THOROUGH 
bred trailer, 2600 lbs. Call collect 
evenings, 112-754-5691. 

FIRST CUT HAY, HIGH PRO- 
tein, fine hav. $2.50 per bale. 
652 3096. 1463 Stelly's XRd. 

FOR SALE 1 MALE BUFFALO, 
for information phone 
112-754 2276 

HEREFORD COW WITH 
month old heifer calf, also ho- 
Isleln heifer due soon. 479-3021. 

SAVE $100 PLUS TAX ON 
brand new Stubben saddle 
479-0787 

HOLSTEIN HEREFORD X 
Heifer veal calf, Holstein bull 
calf. 656-3420 

WILL HALF LEASE ARAB 
quarter horse, experienced rider 
only. 479*415. 

HORSES BOARDED 

479 2205 

WANTED STUBIN SADDLE, 
urgent 595-1467 

POTATOES, $35 PER TON OR 
$2 per sack. 652 1546. 

TWO WESTERN BRIDLES 
with one bit, $40. 592-0100 

YORKSHIRE SOW AND 13 PIG- 
lets, $500 4 78-3871 

4 MONTHS OLD SAANEN 
buck kid, for meat. $20. 656-4296. 

WEANER PIGS. 6 WEEKS, $30. 

9 weeks. $35. 479-4545. 

PIGLETS. 6 MONTHS. $50. 
479-4405 

LOCAL HAY FOR SALE, AL- 
fafa mix, $90 ton. 652 1317. 

130 HUVY EQUIPMENT 

AND MACHINERY 


★ 12 ★ 

MONTHS 

WITH AN OPTION 
TOBUYTHE VEHICLE 
YOU HAVE DRIVEN AT 

^ FULLY 
rf DEPRECIATED 
Y VALUES 

ENSIGN LEASE 
LTD. 

Quadra at 
Caledonia 
386-2411 . 

DEALER NO. 5620 


t« NEW CM 
DIRECTORY 



1976 John Deere 9550 beckhoe at¬ 
tachment, fits most JD ma¬ 
chines, good condition S4.500 

1977 Drott 50 excavator 1 '/• yard 

GM diesel power, low hours, runs 
well 169,000 

1974 Massey Ferouson 44 loader, 
2 yard bucket, runs well $24,500 

1973 Case 580B loader backhoe, 
oood condition $17,500 

Finning Tractor, Victoria 

384-4144 


IS 


D8 CAT, SERIAL NUMBER 
D8H-10.046. DAT angle dozer, 
89B winch, fully screened and 
guarded Bush blade available. 
With work. 112-749-3365 or 
112 749-6987 


AS LOW AS 

16187 

Stock No. 80206 

384-1144 
Yates at Cook 

GlenQak 


78 DATSUN 200 SX Sport, 
auto., AM-FM stereo, 
power mirrors, metallic 
blue, immac. $5995 

71 TR6 Roadster, me 
chanlcallv fine, needs 
some detail work and fin¬ 
ishing. Super buy at $2395 

* * * 

ECONOMY 

79 CHEVETTE Hatch 
back 2-dr auto. Choice of 2 
— red or yellow. $4595 

79 SUBARU FE (fuel effl 
clent) 5 spd. coupe. Super 
low mileage. $5995 

75 VEGA Hatchback, low 
mileage, 4 spd. $2495 

74 PINTO wagon, auto. 
Highway mileage, me 
chanically sound. $1995 

73 VW Super-Bug, stick 
shift auto, low 1 owner 
mileage. „ $3395 

71 DODGE Colt, 4 dr, 4 
spd, unbelievable 40,000 
miles! Must be seen. $2195 

70 MAZDA 1800 4 dr, 4 spd, 
low mileage, 1 owner. 

$1895 

69 SUNBEAM Alpine GT 
Hardtop, automatic, new 
mag wheels, fun to drive. 

$1695 

69 VW Squareback wagon, 
4 spd, 1 owner, some rust, 
needs minor mechanical 
attention. $1295 

* * * 

MANY MORE TO 


EDWARD 

motors ltd. 


3319 Douglas 
(Opposite ICBC) 
Dealer 6605 384-1161 



C-5 

125 PETS and SUPPLIES 


GERMAN SHEPHERD PUP- 
pies, too world bloodline, guard 
r family dogs Excellent oopor 
• • $125-112 3/- 

REGISTERED GERMAN SHE- 
Jhard puppies, also grown dogs 
obedience trained. Gerberts 
Kennels, 11? 748-8884, 

JACK RUSSELL PUPS RE- 
sembling Fox Terriers. Pure¬ 
bred Grow to 12”. After 6pm. 
479-4028. 

BOSTON BULL TERRIER, 
purebred puppies for sale, 3 
male, one female with shots. 
245-3290 .. 

DACHSHUND 1-YEAR OLD 
female, not suited for apartment 
life, and needs children, $150 to 
good home 384-6647, 

ONE VERY PLAYFUL KIT- 
ten to give away, approx. 3'^ 
months old, housetrai 
477-7947 

PUREBRED COLLIE FOR 
sale to go to good family on farm, 
12 months old and in excellent 
health. After 5pm, 65* *0241. 

KITTENS. READY FOR GOOD 
homes. 2 snowy white, others 
orange stripe with white mark¬ 
ings 592 6990 anytime _ 

GOOD NATURED 5 MONT* 
old male Doberman pup requires 
good home with a master that 
has time to train him. 656-4712. 

FEMALE DOBERMAN, 3'/» 
months, purebred, must sell 
moving, $75. Call after 5:30, 
658-1026. 

WALKER AND RED BONE 
cross Cougar hounds. $175-5200. 
Shipped All males. Vernon, 
54 5-9797 

6 WEEK OLD KITTENS, LIT- 
ter trained, one black and white. 
2 tabby 383-8567 

HOME WANTED FOR A 2 
year old female spayed dog who 
needs T.L.C 386-6017 evenings 

FREE TO GOOD HOMES 2 
male litter trained kittens. 
478 8210 

BEAUTIFUL MALAMUTE 
dog for sale, V'? years old, male, 
S?S0 112 743 4146 


4 REGISTERED MALE SHEL- 
tie puppies, $200 each. Salt 
Spring, 112 537—5082. 

3 YEAR SPAYED BLUE PER 
slan Loveable and affectionate. 
$75 384-1930 

FREE KITTENS. 6 WEEKS 
old. all male, pretty and playful. 

479-0736. 

PUREBRED MALE SABLE 
sheltie pups, $75. No papers. 
474 1400 

MALE FERRET, 3'4-MONTHS 
old. good pet, use to children. 
479 9890 

TO A GOOD HOME, 2 YEAR 
old female Maltlpoo, $60. 
478 3860 

BLACK LAB PUPS, FREE TO 
good homes preferably with 
children. 479-0507. ^ 

FREE 5 LITTER TRAINED 
healthy kittens, used.to big dog 
642 3676 anytime 

PUREBRED NORWEGIAN 
Elkhound puppies, registered. 
Ready August IQ, 656-6639 

2 ,/ j YEAR OLD DOBERMAN 
with papers, must be sold, owner 
moving, best otter, 658 5675. 

FREE, TWO 8 WEEK OLD FE 
male kittens. Litter box trained. 

477 8227 

BIRD CAGE. LIKE NEW, SUIT 
myna or budgie birds, paid $95, 
selling for $40 386-604S, 383-4680. 

BEFORE BUYING A PURE 
bred puppy call Vic City Kennel 
Club r Watchdog” 477-9781. 

HOUSE BROKEN 
2 lovely kittens free 386 0829 
388 9134. 

AQUARIUM, 100 GALLON, 
with stand, under gravel filter, 
light fixture. $250. 386-5951. 

DOBERMAN WITHOUT 
papers, 2-years old, needs oood 
home. $75 384 8193. 

COCKATOO, MEDIUM 
sulpher crested, talks, very 
friendly, $1250. 479 7474 j 

FREE TO GOOD HOME 3 
year old male Pomeranian. 
479-7010 after 6pm 


WISCONSIN ROBIN 
New 4 cycle engines two 4 HP 
$175 each, 8 HP electric start 
$450 New 2 cycle engines 1.5 HP 
$75. 2 5 HP $125, 4 HP $175. 
Private sale, 658-5*63. 


73 INTERNATIONAL 2050 
dump, DV 550, 6^speed Alison 
automatic, 3-speed auxllliary, 14 
yard reliance box, excellent con¬ 
ditional 5,000 After 5, 478-8682 


PUREBRED SIBERIAN 
Husky pups $125 including first 
shots 384-8193 

FREE SILVER SHEPHERD 
Cross, 11-month old female. 
6S8 5549 

WANTED: ONE FEMALE 
cock a poo, must be house broken 
477 7090 

BABY FERRETS 10 WEEKS 
old, $60 After 5pm, 386-1058 

GLOUSTER CANARIES, 1980 
singers $29. 386-9236 


WANTED: DACHSHUND 
puppy, female. 382 5510. 


arles for sale. 382-4049, 

FEMALE MALTESE PUPS, 
unregistered. $150. 477 2928 

FEMALE LAB, 11 MONTHS. TO 
give to loving home. 388-9421 

FREE KITTENS, COMPLETE- 
ly trained, colourful. 478*175. 


trained, to good h 


127 


CHICKS, POULTRY 
HATCHING EGGS 
SUPPLIES 


STANDARD FANCY SILVER- 
lace Winedots, 1-3 months old. 
Silky bantams for sale. 474-2063 

PIGEONS AND SQUABS 
598-6474 

LAYING HENS, 3 YEARS OLD. 
$ I 50 each 479 2357 

12S LIVESTOCK SUPPLIES 
AND EVENTS 


1965 JOHN DEERE 2010 
crawler, R O.P.S, angle blade, 
brush blade, plus 1959 Interna¬ 
tional 190 tandem ramp truck 
and extras 642 5358. 


1972 KENWORTH W924 CAB 
and chassis. Rebuilt NTC400. 5 
and 4 trans, SRD 44 rear end. 
478 1951 


14 YARD DUMP TRUCK. 1973 
Mac, 325 engine, 12-speed trans, 
44 rears 478 2428 after 5:30pm 


135 FARM IMPUMENTS 


BUTLER 

BROTHERS 




Satoh and Power King Tractors 
* Gas and Diesel/12-38 h.p. * 


Serving the Peninsula and 
islands for 50 years 

2046 KEATING XRD. 
652-4437 _ 652-1121 


Rollins 


MACHINERY LIMITED 
610 ALPHA STREET 38*0541 


Lawn and Garden Tractors 
10-20H.P. 

Farm Tractors 
2 Wheel and 4 Wheel Drive 
13-335H.P. 
DL-595-4A 



JOHN 

MacNUTT 

TRUCKING 

SAWDUST—SHAVINGS 
HOGFUEL 
Large or Small Loads 

479*6560 

MANDER 

TRUCKING LTD. 
SAWDUST 
SHAVINGS 
CEDAR HOG FUEL 
385-3041 

After 6, 479-7629 

REGISTERED PUREBRED 3 
year old Arabian filly, very 
fypev head, 15 hands, chestnut, 
has placed when shown Moving 
Must sHi Offer s being accepted 
117 748 8120 or 595 2062 eve 
mops 

IS/I6TH REGISTERED ARAB 
•ridmg. 5 years. IS hands, beau 
Iw show and dressegr hgrse. 
(-Fper>en< ed rider Only show 
horn* and smearety interested 
< all 65*41*7 

WEIL TRAINED WELSH 
isaty !•'. hand-, high guud with 
Li Irk**- 10 years old. (w W 
But* skm wi«h u< own manr and 

• ad 'mryfl Western or f rig 

i'sh tkkbar Ue- » uHt* ■*» 91 '' 


J. GRIEVE 
MOTORS 
LTD. 


Lawn & Garden Tractors 
7hp- 28hp 

Diesel Farm Tractors 
22 hp- 275 tip 

Full Line of Attachments 
Good Supply Of Used Tractors 
652 1642 _ SAANICHTQN 


hie::: 


GARDEN TRACTORS 
-TiSONf “ 


ISLTD 

384-6414 


J GRIEVE MOTORS LTD 
Vancouver island's largest farm 
implement dealer now selling 
I Yanmar 4 wheel drive tractors, 
113 to 33 h.p. Full line of attactv 
i ments 

652 1642 _ SAANICHTQN 

MASSEY HARRIS PONY, 
good running condition, with 
good rubuer. blade, fuel attach 
ment i'250 652 5517,652 2704 

MASSEY 10. BALER. EXCE 
' lond m^ n, new 




You. Ml in these columns 
will drew the mention or 
feeders who ere in the 
merket lo buy something 
Reech those potentiel 
boxers with e clessilied 
odo< your cum 


LEASING 

★ is ★ 

INTEREST 

All lease plans consist of two fac¬ 
tors — depreciation and the cost 
of money. For a limited time. 
ENSIGN CHRYSLER 
PLYMOUTH will build you a 
competitive lease on any 1980 
Chrysler built car or truck for 



Dealer No. 6616 


tit CMS FOR SA1£ 


GlenQak 



Ford 

'TELL A FRIEND' 


73 CAMARO 

S 3950 

73 COUGAR 

S 3950 

74 VOLVO S.W. 

S 5250 

74 AUSTIN 

S 2250 

74 L.T.D. A.C. 

S 3450 

75 GREMLIN 

S 2150 

75 VALIANT, 6, ATS 2450 

76 L.T.D., 51.000M 

S 3450 

76 TORINO S.W. 

S 3450 

77 RABBIT Sedan 

S 5750 

77 CAMARO 

S 5950 

77 PINTO S.W. 

S 4450 

78 BOBCAT 

S 4250 

78 L.T.D. . 

S 5450 

78 MONTE CARLOS 5450 

79 LTD WAGON 

S 7450 

79 PLYMOUTH 

S 5750 

79 SUNBIRO 

S 6250 

79 COUGAR XR7 

S 6450 

79 OMNI AT 

S 4950 

80 T-BIRO, Deluxe S 8250 

80 CAMARO 

TDI iri/c 

S 7450 

TRUCKS 

68 FORD Wton 

S 1650 

72 VAN, 1 owner 

S 3450 

77 BLAZER 

S 6850 

77 G.M.C. %TON 

S 4950 


GLENOAK FORD 

YATES AT COOK 
384-1144 

OE ALE Bt.lt 




SAUNDERS 
SUBARU 

telet I service 

1824 Isiersd Highway 

Coteood 474-2211 


77 Gremlin 6 auto $3(95 
77 Chev 4x4 PU $5,895 
76 Mazda 4 dr, 4 sod, 

30,000 mi. $2995 

7S Fiat 131 S $3(95 

73 Olds 442, swivel seels 
$2395 

72Torino4dr. $109$ 
72 Charger 2 dr. $(95 
72 Dodge PU, V(. AT 

' 12,695 

474-2111 474-2211 


1979-1380 


1979 LEBARON WAGON, 
beautiful condition, automatic, 
power steering, power brakes, 
cruise control, undercoat, posi¬ 
tive traction, 360 cu. In, lean 
burn, uses any gas, remote mir 
rors, rear speaker, deluxe light 
package, approx. 31,000 kilome¬ 
ters, will consider Beetle or Im¬ 
port pickup trade uo to value of 
S1S00. Price $6900, 477-6184. 


1979 CAMARO 

POWER STEERING & POWER 
BRAKES. SMALL V8 WITH 
AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION, 
LESS THAN 7000 MILES. S6850. 
112-746-7641 


1979 MUSTANG. 2.8 LITRE, V6. 

HO. 


orange. 


automatic p.s., radl 
15195 

1979 Mustang, automatic, 2.3 
litre, 4-cyl, p.s, radio, dark blue, 
$5095 

1979 Cougar XR7, 302 V8, auto, 
P-S., P.B., radio, buckets, Lan¬ 
dau roof, $5495 

1980 Citation X—body, V6. auto, 
P S.. 4—OR hatchback, $5995 
1980 Trans Am. V8. PS/. P.B., 
auto, red, S819S. 

1978 Ford Econoline van, V* ton, 
351 V8. auto, radio, p.s, p.b, 
$5395. 

HERTZ RENT A CAR 
(Division of Howbar Leasing) 
901 Douolas St., Victoria, B C. 
Open 7 days a week 388-4411 
Dealer a 6499 


MUST BE SOLD 

Brand new 19B0 Oldsmoblle 
Toronado. loaded, sun roof, 
leather Inferior, undercoated, 
derma shine Must be seen and 
driven Regularly $19,993,2 davs 
only $17,767. Call 385-5777 ask for 
Jack Hennen, Cornell Chev Olds. 
Dealer 5378 


Special Edition 

1979 Dodge Aspen Special Edi¬ 
tion Waoon. Deluxe Interior, 
AM/FMradio. P.S, P.B. Must be 
seen — priced to sell. 382 2313. 
Wiiie Dodge Chrysler. 3200 
Douglas. Dealer 5881 


1980 FORD THUNDERBIRD, 
blue, V-8, auto., ps., pb , power 
windows, radio, white vinyl roof, 
bucket seats with console, 
DEMO ON TODAY for $8,795. 
Don't miss this one — trades 
welcome, 388 5714, 382-6315, 
Bridge St. Motors — Dealer 
5161. 


1980 4 DOOR CITATION 
Hatchback Demo, 4 cylinder, 
automatic, steering, radio, de¬ 
froster, 2-tone paint and much 
more. Retail $8275. Sale $7295. 
Bridge St Motors DLS161, 
388-5714, 382-6315, 652-4244. 


1980 ELDORADO BERRITTZ 
Demo, blue, under 500 miles. 
This car is loaded Including 
sunroof. Retail $27,400 can be 
bought reasonable. Trades wel 
come. Bridge St Motors DL5161, 
388-5714, 382*3IS, 652-4244 


TRY US FIRST! 

79 Horizon, hatchback. Tremen¬ 
dous M.P.G. One owner, low 
miles! Make an otter! 388-6921. 
Metro Honda, Dealer 5876. 


TRY US FIRST! 

- unbird station wagon, auto¬ 
matic, $4995. 388-69217 Metro 
' Dealer 5876 


auto, P.S , P.B.! r buckets; 
Landau roof, 15495 
gper^7 days a week 388-4411 


79 VOLVO 244 DL 

4 door. 4 cylinder, automatic, 
tall. $7995. 


gower^steering, n 


1980 CITATION X—BODY, V*. 
auto, P.S , 4—OR hatchback. 
$5995. 




pynktc_ 

RflN (aft 477 1*21._ 

3*a 17*6 before 4 Mr Conway 


ri. SUNROOF, 
p seats. Blau 
Kao. moving te 
1021 attar 5 or 


198* OLDS CUTLASS 
Brougham sedan Lists at $12, 
000 selling for 893B0 firm 


1979 DATSUN 110 WAGON, EX 
ceilent condition $5*00 
112 743 rm (Mill Bay) 


W7.1971 


I 00004 ASR4N M il 
MR highway car. 171*0 



ALL UNITS 
CHECKED 
BY CAR CLINIC 
DIAGNOSTIC 
CENTRE 


79 CHRYSLER 
NEWPORT 

V8, Automatic 
Power steering/Brakes 
Power windows. Radio 
Power door locks 
Air-conditioning 
Cruise control 


Stock 8456 


80 Olds Omega 
80 Dodge D150 PU 
79 Ford Mustang II 
79 Plymouth Caravelle 
79 Buick Skyhawk S 
79 Datsun 510 
79 Chrysler 300 
79 Dodge Omni 
79 Chev.Camaro 
78 Plymouth Horizon 
78 Mercury Cougar 
77 Pontiac Trans Am 
77 Ford Pinto 
77 Chevette 
77 Cordoba T-Bar 
77 Toyota Corolla S.W. 
76 Dodge Charger 
75 Olds Cutlass 
75 Ford Pinto S.W. 

75 Pontiac Ventura 
74 Plymouth Cricket 
74 Datsun B210 
74 AMC Gremlin X 
74 Dodge Dart 
74 Jeep Cherokee 
72 Datsun 1200 
72 Cortina 

72 Mercury Montego 
S.W. 


PLUS MANY 
MORE 

GOV'T TESTED 
PLUS 2-YEAR 
WRITTEN 
WARRANTY 


WANTED! 

GOOD CLEAN 
USEDCARS 
CONTACT: 
DON REDECOPP 



Chrysler-Plymouth 

Ltd. 

DOWNTOWN 
YATES AT COOK 

Dealer licence number 
D5295 

386-2411 

Open Weekdays 
Till 9:00 


78 VOLVO 242 GT, UNIQUE 
looking, many GT options, im¬ 
maculate $9500 47*4701 


1971 CELICH GT LIFTBACK, 
sunroof, tape deck em/fm radio. 
rrt.uBio. 112 245-2539 


78 HONDA S-SPEEO, NEW 


MOVING MUST SELL *78 
Honda civic. Best offer. 

m-nm 


11977 BUICK REGAL. 2*>OOR 


1978 FI RE BIRO ESPRIT ,20,000 
miles Many options 8*895 
*54-5147 aNar 4pm 


77 MUSTANG, 47JM MILES 4 
cylinder. raWals mint condi 
hon %iim 884 mil 


mi IRANSAMP't.R/R.tLIV 


VOLVO 

72 VOLVO 4-door 144 
model, 4 cylinder, auto¬ 
matic, radio. Finished In 
blue, blue cloth trim. Ex¬ 
ceptionally clean local 
car. Only $3950 

RABBIT 

76 RABBIT 4 cylinder, 4- 
speed, radio. Finished In 
yellow, black vinyl trim. 
Great for short hops. 
Only $4450 

HORIZON 

78 HORIZON 4-door 
hatchback, economical 4 
cylinder, automatic, fin¬ 
ished in green with 
matching trim. Only 7300 
km. Only $5850 

MOST CARS 
BCAA INSPECTED 

MON.-FRI. 
1:30a.m. - 9p.r 
SAT. 9 - 6 

Millstream Chevrolet 
Oldsmoblle Ltd. 

1730 Island Highway 
474-1211 

Dealer Lie. 0-5831 


Must sell '77 Plymouth Fury sta- 
tlonwagon, gold, 58,000 miles, 
still 11 months international war¬ 
ranty on it. $2500 or best otter. 
383-3163 


77 Mercury Marquis 

4 dr. HT, P.S, P.B, V8 AT. Only 
14.000 mi. A beautiful car $5795. 
B Madsen Motors Ltd. 47B-S011. 
Dealer 5450. 


1977 DODGE ASPEN 4 DR.CUS- 
tom sedan, slant 6 auto, P.S.P B, 
radio Light green with dark 
green Interior. 31,000 ml. Extra 
excellent condition. $4895. 
Bridge St. Motor Co Ltd , Bruce 
382-631 Sot.. . 


5 or 388-5714. Dealer 5161. 


19/7 SUBARU, 5 SPEED, 
sports coupe, deluxe model, 
front wheel drive, radial tires, 
AMFM radio, excellent condi¬ 
tion Highway 45 miles per gal¬ 
lon $4500 2840 Craigowan Road 
384-0191 


77 HONDA 

2 dr Hatchback, 4 cyl., 4 spd., 
radio, radial tires $3,495. Paint 
er Motors, 3005 Douglas. 
388-6196 Dealer 5802. 


TRY US FJRST! 

'77 Cougar 4-door Brougham 
sedan. 26*000 miles—mint condi 
tion! 388-6921, Metro Honda. 
Dealer 5876. 


1977 CHARGER SE. MUST 
sell, all the styles and features of 
the Cordoba. A fully loaded and 
family car and exceptional buy. 
Replacement $12,000, 

$4/500.- 


i. 477-8943. 


77 VOLARE 

6 cyl.. auto. Excellent condition, 
ps., po., vinyl roof. $3495. Painter 
Motors Ltd. 388-6196/3005 Douo- 
las St. Dealer 5802 


TRY US FIRST! 

77 Honda Accord. 5 speed. Mint! 
388-6921, Metro Honda. Dealer 
5876. 


TRY US FIRST! 

77 Honda Hatchback, standard. 
388-6921, Metro Honda. Dealer 
5876. 


TRY US FIRST 

'77 Pinto, only 31.000 Km. 

Honda. Dealer 


TRY US FIRST! 

1977 Honda CVCC, 5 speed, new 
motor. Top condition! Metro 
Honda, 388-6921. Dealer 5876 


1977 HONDA CIVIC, NEW 
front tires, new snow tires, vinyl 
roof, new exhaust system, excel¬ 
lent running condition, $3100 or 
offers. 386-2980 after 5pm. 


78 TRANSAM. AUTOMATIC, 
power steering, power brakes, 
power windows, radlals, flit 
wheel, velour interior. $8,500. 


77 COUGAR XR7, POWER 
steering, power brakes, auto¬ 
matic transmission, maos and 
radlals, 25,000 miles. 477-4435 
after 5. 


1977 HONDA ACCORD. ONE 
owner, 50,000 miles. Michel In re¬ 
dials. AM-FM. 5 speed. Mainly 
highway driven. Very good con¬ 
dition. Otters to $5395.479*633 


TRY US FIRST! 

78 Honda Accord, automatic. 
Very low miles! 388*921, Metro 
Honda Dealer 5876. 


'78 CAMARO, Z28. POWER 
steer!no. power brakes, power 
windows, tilt steering, 4-speed 
console. For quick sale. $7008 or 
best offer. 656-6918. 


1978 CHEVETTE CHEVRQ- 
let. 4 cylinder, excellent condi¬ 
tion. $4500. Call after Spm. 
477-8863 


MOVING, MUST SELL 77 AUS- 
tln Marina, excellent condition. 
30,000 miles, $3300 or best offer 
Call after Spm, 383-3216 


1978 TRANS AM 

6 litre auto. T-Top, black on 
btack^OOO kilometers, $7500 


1977 HONDA CIVIC HATCH- 
back, excellent condition. $3300 
or best otter. 38S-73SS after 


1978 ZEPHYR. 2 DOOR. 

Powor. steering, power brakes, 
radio, low mileage After * 


LEAVING COUNTRY. 70 Off¬ 
set Rabbit Deluxe. AM/FM, Im¬ 
maculate. 87500 or offors. 


'7 7 MA VtRtC X, A 

yjjgpXirri 


11 MONOA CIVIC, EXCEL- 

mat 

418*579 


79 DATSUN 510 
STATION WAGON 

Nice 510 with automatic, custom 
roof rack, radio, other extras 
$6,995 

79 CORONA 

Very nice Toyota 5-speed hatch 
back, power steering, power 
brakes, AM/FM radio $6,995 

78 DATSUN 510 

Several to choose from. Auto¬ 
matic or standard. All with 
radio, side mouldings and under 
seal.Lowmileaoe $4,995 

78 MERCEDES 

300 CD two-door hardtop 1 1nlhsed 


diesel engine Automatic, power 
steering, power disc brakes, 
sunroof, AM/FM station-seeker 
and cassette stereo $25,700 ($10, 
000 less than replacement cost) 

76 MERCEDES 

Magnificent 450SEL sedan fin¬ 
ished In brown metallic with off 
white leather Interior. Sunroof, 
AM/FM statlon-seeker/cassette 
stereo, light alloy wheels Only 
36,500 miles $29,770 ($20,000 less 
than replacement cost) 

73 VOLVO 145 
STATION WAGON 

Fuel-ln| acted, automatic, air 
conditioning, radial Tires. A very 
nice unit! $3,995 

72 MERCEDES 

Beautiful 300SEL 4.5 finished In 
anthracite grey with burgundy 
leather Interior. Features In¬ 
clude sunroof, air conditioning, 
automatic, power steering, 
power disc brakes, power win 
dows.etc. $11,975 

OPEN WEEKDAYS 
TILL6P.M. 

Government 

at 

Hillside 
385-6737 
Dealer 5053 


1978 HONDA CIVIC. 5 SPEED 
hatchback. $3995. After 5pm, 
592-4751 


78 DOGE ASPEN. SLANT SIX. 
ps, pb. radio. $4SOO. Phone 
386-7155 after 6pm. 


1978 DODGE ASPEN WAGON. 
41.000 km, slant 6. new condition, 
$4800 479-6526. 


1977 T BIRD. 36.000 MILES, 
every option Including power 
moonroof $6000 382*836 


1975- 1976 


ECONOMY 
Low mileage one owner 1976 
Rabbit, 4 dr. AT, radio. Local 
car. Priced to sell. For appoint 
ment to view call BOB DOBISH, 
Empress Pontiac Buick GMC 
Ltd 382-7121. 478-5784. Dealer 
5701. 


75 CADILLAC 

Fleetwood Brham de Elegance 
Fully loaded, air, windows, tilt 
steering. Independent 6 wav 
seats, cruise. A beautiful auto¬ 
mobile. $7295. B. Madsen Motors 
Ltd. 47*5011. Dealer 5450. 


VICTORIA 1 OWNER 

1976 Mercury Comet, 4 door, 6 
cylinder automatic, 23,000 miles, 
$3,995. McCallum Motors, call 
Lindon 382-6122 or 642-4425 
Dealer 5603 


AIR CONDITIONING 
1976 Olds Custom Cruiser 
wagon, 455 V8, loaded, power 
windows, seats, door locks, tape 
deck, roofrack, excellent. 64,000 
miles. $3775 . 658-8878 nights. 
387-9236 days. 


1976 TOYOTA COROLLA SR5, 
mint condition throughout, 1600 
cc, 5 speed, 30 miles per gallon 
city. 36 miles per gallon high¬ 
way. Must sell due to layoff. 
478 5863 


QUICK SALE, 1976 CHE VELLE 
Malibu 4 door, one owner, power 
steering, power brakes, tilt 
wheel, AM radio, very low mile¬ 
age, excellent condition, $3,500. 
479-0691 after 5pm. 


75 MUSTANG 

V6 4 spd. radio. Very clean. 
$3895. B. Madsen Motors Ltd 
478 SOU Dealer 5450 


75 RABBIT 

2 dr, 4 cvl, 4 spd. Like new. Only 
$3795 B. Madsen Motors Ltd. 
478-5011. Dealer 5450. 


TRY US FIRST! 

76 Honda Civic, 4 speed, silver In 
colour, $3295. Metro Honda, 
388*921. Dealer 5*76. 


TRY US FIRST! 

76 Honda station waoon, $3495. 
388*921. Metro Honda: Dealer 


TRY US FIRST! 


5876 


'76 CORDOBA POWER WIN- 
ctowv seats, trunk 60-40 seats, 
air conditioning. Very clean. 
$5200 Phone after 6pm, 
99S-7409 


1*76 CAMARO. MS, AUTO 
mafic, power steering, 

brr - 41 —*- 


1? 


c. power steering, power 
ei, excellent condition 
i or best otter 4777718 attar 


TRY US FIRST! 

j[gypr:sx:£X: 


itM Fttitmo t teen, 



Lice t uiuaa 


79 Acadian 
79 Corolla 
78Cellca 
78 Toyota PU 
78 Datsun PU 

77 Ventura 

78 Subaru 
77TR7 

77 Bobcat SW 
77 Civic 
77 Monarch 
77Chevelle 
77Camaro 
77Volare 
77 Cougar 
77 Granada 
77 Corona 
76 Rabbit 
76 Malibu SW 
76 Corolla 
76 Dodge Van 
76 Toyota PU 
76 Mazda 
76 Dart 

76 Ramcharger 
76 MG Midget 
76 Datsun Wgn. 
75 Corona 4 dr. 
75 Volvo SW 
75 Coroll a SW 
75 Pacer 
75 Audi 
75 Corolla 
75 Dart Sport 
75 Comet 
75Landcrulser 
75 Cadillac 
74 VW Beetle 
74 GMC Van 
73 Dart 
72 Westphalia 


74 Marina 
74 Gremlin 
74 Comet 
74 Appolo 
74 Colt 
74 Toronado 
74 Ambassador 
73 Corolla 
73 Corona 
73 Cortina 
73 Pinto 
73TR6 
72 Datsun PU 
72Celica 
72 Cougar 
72 Fiat 
72 Mazda PU 
71 Duster 
71 Capri 
71 Ford PU 
70 Datsun 
70 Mini 
69 Sunbeam 

68 Datsun SW 
67 Jeep 

66 Pontiac 
66 Mustang 
61 Mercedes 

69 Austin Healey 


OPEN FROM 
8a.m.-9p.m. 
SAT., 8a.nv5p.rn. 

100% Bank Financing 

386-3516 


METROTOYOTALTD. 
645 FINLAYSON 
(Across from Woodwards) 
DEALER 6290 


mElnS 



1975 MID SIZE OLDSMOBILE 
luxury waoon, economical 350, 
every conceivable option. Well 
kept local car 5X395 59Z 92S9, 


76 ACADIAN, 4 SPEED, RA 
dials, radio, new brakes, new 
exhaust, oood condition. 37,000 
miles. $3200.479-0696 evenings. 

1976 DATSUN B210, EXCEL- 
lent condition, new cassette deck 
and speakers, 37,000 original 
miles. $3200. 656-2355. 

76 CAMARO RALLY SPORT, 
factory 350 4-speed, new T/A ra¬ 
dlals. excellent shape. Best offer 
to $4800. 388-9972. 

1975 VEGA. COPPER Co¬ 
loured, automatic, hatchback, 
low mileage 41,000. $1700. 
386-5540 

75 DODGE VALIANT. 318. 2 
barrel, lady driven, bills toprove 
work recently done, lust tested. 
$3300. Must sell. 385*496. 

76 CELICA GT LIFTBACK. 5 
speed, AM/FM radio, 8 track 
stereo. $4,200 or b«st offer. 
385-8554. 

1976 GREMLIN. AUTOMATIC, 
new tires, exhaust, battery, 
br^s^ust. $2395 or best 

75 FIREBIRD ESPRIT, $3,750. 
Power steering, power brakes, 
tilt wheel. After 4 477-0779. 

75 DUSTER, 6-CYLINDER 
standard, 29,000 miles Excel 
lent condition $2800. 479*968 • 

1975 HONDA HATCHBACK, 57.- 
000 miles. 4-speed. Offers. 
312*903 

1975 HONDA CIVIC *SPEED. 
AM radio, 8-track. $2300 or 
otters. 386*018 

1976 HONDA WAGON. AM FM 

condition $3850. otters 386-9604 

75 PI NT O. CLEAN, NEW 
paint, shocks, brakes. $2100, 
otters. 595*197 

76 THUNOERBIRO. EXCEL 
(ent^coodltion. every option. 

7* RABBIT 2 DOOR 4 SPEEO. 
excellent condition. $4100 
479 JO* 

76 MAZDA 100 WAGON. GOpO 
oes economy, asking $2950 Coll 
4784121 after 5 J*pm 

1*76 COUGAR XR7, WHITE. 

7f CELICA. STANDARD. fX 



625*6 4 /8 97V? 


79 Bronco 4x4 
79 Volvo 245 SW 
78 Mazda GLC 
78 Volvo 242 DL 
77 Volks Rabbit 2 dr 
77 Volvo 242 DL 
76 Peugeot 504 SL 
76 Pontiac Firebird 
75 Volvo 164 E 
74 Merc Bobcat SW 
72 Volvo 144S 
71 Volvo 145 SW 
67 Volvo 123 GT 
67 Mercedes diesel 


BCAA INSPECTED 
FOR YOUR 
PROTECTION 


100% BANK 
FINANCE 
0AC 


VICTORIA'S 
VOLVO CENTRE 

★ MU ★ 

Corner Yates and Cook 
Dealer 5603 


1976 HONDA CIVIC HATCH 
back, 46,000 miles, $3000 or best 
offer. 598-5675 after 6. 


75 FIAT 131 STATION WAGON. 
5 speed, radials, cassette, asking 
$3,000. 727 2029 


1975 OLDSMOBILE ROYALE 
Custom, options, low mileage. 
Immaculate, $4,500 3S1-596T 


1973-1974 


■ECONOMY 

74 Datsun B210. Only 44.000 
miles, motor in top shape - 
excellent gas mileage! New 
paint Economical 4 cyl . 4 spd 
Must be seen Only $2495 
382 2313. Wille Dodge Chrysler. 
3200 Douolas Dealer S8flI 


KARLKUESTER 

SPECIAL 

1973 Astre SW. Only 32,000 miles, 
4 spd. In excellent condition 
Please contact karl kues 
TER at 387 7121, tes 477 5798 dt 
Empress Pontiac Buick GMC 
Ltd. Dealer 5701 


1973 OLDSMOBILE DELTA 88 
Royale. excellent condition 
Power brakes, power steering, 
power windows, power trunk, 
power doorlocks. air condition 
Ing, AM radio and tape, tilt 
wheel. 70,000 miles. Good Miche^ 
lln radial tires. Offers on $2100. 
658-5013 


1974 MAVERICK, AUTO 
malic, power steering, air condi¬ 
tioning, vinyl roof, rear window 
defogoer, tinted windshield, ra 
dial tires including snows, new 
battery and brakes, very good 
condition. $1995 or best otter. 
384-3194, 


73 DART 


4 dr. sedan. V8, P.S, P.B, AT. 
vinyl top, 30,000 ml. Excellent 
condition. $2895 B Madsen 
Motors Ltd. 478-5011 Dealer 
5450 


74 DATSUN 710 

2 dr., htp„ 4 cvl., 4 spd . In 
excellent condition —- only 44 000 
miles. $2,595. Painter Motor s, 
3005 Douglas, 388*196. Dealer 
5802 


ELCAMINO 

73 454 consol auto., swivel buck 
ets, p. windows, mags, radial 
TA's. $3,295. Painter Motors, 
3005 Douglas. 388*196. Dealer 
5*02. 


73 CELICA ST. AUTOMATIC. 
77,000 miles, recent paint, black 
vinyl top, $400 stereo, good ra 
dial tires, no rust or bondo. tn 
excellent condition. $3200 or 
Otters 477 8725 bet 
7pm, ask tor Allan 


74 MUSTANG 

i., bucket seats, radio, white 
I tires. 4-spd. $2995 382 7313 
Wille Dodge Chrysler. 3200 
Douglas Dealer 5881 


1*74 FORD LTD WAGON. 61.000 
miles, power beakers, power 
s t eering, power windows, radio, 
heavy duty towing gear. 721 ra 
dials, beautiful condi» on 1 Vic 
forte owners, $3500 59S 7659 


TRY US FIRST! 

74 Boot at Sin wgn V 
standard shift 3e$o92t. 
Honda Dealer 58/6 


TRY US FIRST! 

73 Ff«t IS Excellent runn.no 
condition. $iiv 5 Metro 

Honda 208*971 Prater 58 it 




73 MAIDA. OML OMNI R, i X 
cetfenTcandHwn UAUU mites 
recant p oi nt new bettery mut 
liar, MidWM redials stereo. 

mk 87MTW 


H CdLlCA *1, 7 COO** HARO 


- 















































































































































































































































































































C-6 

150 CARS FOO SALE 


gOmllGM 

USED CARS 

VOU CAN 
EXPECT A 
GREAT DEAL 
FROM CORNELL 


79CHEVETTE 
Auto-$4995 
* * * 

78 VW RABBIT 
Auto-$5695 
* * * 

78 CHEVETTE 
4 spd — $4295 

* * * 

79 CAMARO RS 

$7895 

* * * 

78 CAMARO 
Auto-$7495 

* * * 

76 ASTRE WGN 
„ Auto-$3495 

79 IMPALA 
$6795 

* * * 

75 SUPER 
BEETLE 
$4295 
* * * 

70 VW BEETLE 
$1295 
* * * 

73 TORI NO WGN 
$1995 
* * * 

73 TOYOTA 
Auto-$2495 

* * * 

77 VOLARE 
Htp —$4295 
* * * 

78 LAURENTIAN 
$5295 
* * * 

77 CUTLASS 
Loaded —$6495 

79 JEEPCJ 7 
$8995 
* * * 

80Z28 

Loaded — $11,700 

★ * * 

74 COMET 
$1695 

♦ * ★ 

74 HORNET 
$1695 
★ * ★ 

73 LINCOLN 
$2494 
★ * ★ 

69 COBRA 
4 spd-$1295 
* * * 

o Many More 
To Choose From 
Good Selection 
Of Z28 Camaro's, 
Trans-Am, 
Firebirds 
* * ★ 

"HIGHEST $$$ 
PAID" 

For Clean Low 
MILEAGE TRADES 

OPEN MON.—FRI.,9-9 
SAT., 9-5 
Finlavsonand 
Burnside 

385-5777 Dealer 5378 


73 PONTIAC GRAND AM, LIM- 
itfd Edition, white with racing 
stripes. One owner. Loadecf 
Must be seen. $3500. 3360 Beach 
Drive. 597-6231, 592-6367 


SUPER STOCK 

1973 Z28 Camaro, 283, 3-speed, 
full syncro. Ford 9” rear end, 
posl track, Readv To Race. 
$3600 4 77-2918. 


MOVING, MUST SELL, 73 
Toyota Mark II station wagon, 
excellent mechanical condition, 
r»eeds new paint, 60X100 mites, 
$800 384-3003. 


1974 VOLVO 145 SW, AMFM 
cassette. 4 spd, fuel Injected 
Low miles Exclusive with LEA 
WALLE 382 7121, home 479-8934. 
Dealer 5701 


•74 SATELLITE SEBRING. 
Sundance Package, good condi 
non Best offer 477-0278. 


1973 TOYOTA COROLLA STA 
lionwagon, 1600 cc. clean and 
economical $1600 tirm. 479-2695 


'74 BUICK 2 DOOR HARDTOP, 
7 1 .000miles, excellent condition. 
$2795 or best otter 478-6032 


1974 BUICK APOLLO 2 DOOR 
hatchback, low mlleaoe. 

652 223) 


19/4 HONDA CIVIC. 6 f 
dials, radio. $2200 386-1 
(days). 652 4992 (evenings) 


1974 CHE VELLE STATIONWA 
oon. 78. good condition, tested. 

$1,750 385 7654. 


A STEAL. LIKE NEW. 1973 
LTD. 4 door, air, power brakes 
and steering $2195 47» 3481 


V73 DATSUN 510, STANDARO 
sh«tt. good motor, some rust and 
--•ns clutch. $900 479-0631 


73 DA 1 SUN 610. 2 DOOR HARO 
<op. 4 speed, oood condition. 

$7200 4776747 


73 TOYOTA CORONA. GOOD 


iso cmnnsou 




DATSUN 

CENTRE 



★ ★ ★ 

78 DATSUN 210 

25,000 KM *4195. 

76CELICA 

coupe, auto, trans. 38,900. 
mi. _ $1995. 

77FIREBIRD 
35.000 mi._ $5995 

76 CAPRI 

H/B, 52,000 mi. $3995. 

79 DATSUN 310 

front wheel drive, 16,681 
KM _ $5195. 

75 DATSUN 710 
4 spd, 4 2,100 ml, $3495. 

ffl BLOCK YATES 

381-5222 

FORT and*F 0 UL BAY 


ABOVE AVERAGE 
from General 
Motors 

.'71 OLDSToronado $3495 
^7 CADILLAC Coupe 

$11,500 

'80 CAMARO Cpe $7995 

from Ford: 

'77 FORDcust 4dr $3995 
'78 ME RC Bobcat won 

$4695 

'79 FORD LTD 4 dr $5995 

from AMC: 

'68 RAMBLER American 
$2195 

'75 MATADOR Cpe $2495 
'75 PACER 2 dr $2695 

REGMIDGLEY 
MOTORS LTD. 

"The Super Lot" 

Douglas at Cloverdale 

385-8756 

Dealer Lie 5186 


592-2471 


u\d 


2040 Cadboro Bay Road 
“ ‘ 5059 


1974 PINTO RUNABOUT, 
sunroof, 2300cc, automatic, 
radio, other extras. 57.000 miles. 
Excellent condition. Original 
owner $2650. 592-3340, 


CONVERTIBLE 

73 cougar 351. 598-9859 or 
656-3121, 


73 VEGA, 4 CYL.. AT. PRICED 
to sell, $888. Palm Auto World 
Inc 386-8385. 3342 Oak St. Dealer 
5260. 


73 CHRYSLER NEW YORKER, 
black, oold Interior, must be 
seen, otters on $2400 . 383-5514 
days, 382 9806 evenings. 


1974 LINCOLN CONTINENTAL 
Mark IV, gold, 54,000 miles, good 
condition. $8,000 or best offer 
592 8593. 


1973 DATSUN 610 STATIONWA- 
gon, excellent family car with 
only 38.000 miles. $2795. 
477-9893. 


73 AUSTIN MINI, NEW 
brakes and exhaust. 60.000 
miles. $1500 or best offer. 
382-0210 after 5:30pm 


74 DATSUN B210 2 DOOR 4 
speed, excellent condition, city 
tested, $2100. Roger. 388-5445 
days, after 5pm 3885193 


1974 BOBCAT STATIONWA- 
gon, real clean car. New clutch 
and tires, $2200 . 4794)946 after 
5:30pm 


1974 DATSUN STATIONWA 
gon, l owner, service records 
available, very economical. 80.- 
000 mites $2500. 721-3790. 


73 DATSUN 1200 HATCHBACK, 
automatic, high mileage but well 
maintained^ $995. Offers. 
478-2541 


74 VW SUPER SUN BUG, 
offers Afternoons and evenings, 
478-1317 


73 NOVA 4-DOOR, 6-CYLIN- 
der, 60^000 miles, asking $2599or 
best offer. Phone 477-0612. 


1974 FIAT 128, GOOD Eco¬ 
nomical transportation, $975. 
65^5268 


73 Z28 CAMARO, VERY 
clean, asking $6000 . 383-0246 
after 6pm 


1974 OLOS OMEGA, 2 DOOR, V8 
automatic, mags, low mileage. 
$3600 479 9629 after 5pm 


1*71-1*71 


BARGAIN! 

197? Flrenza SL, 2 dr., automatic 
console shift, sport stripes, low 
miles. A good buy $1,295. Will# 
Dodge Chrysler, 3200 Douglas. 
Dealer 5881. 


1971 MUSTANG MACH I. 
brand new burgandy paint, 
chrome spoked mags, tilt and 
power steering, power brakes, 
electric windows, other options. 
A high profit investment, $8500 
or reasonable otter 5985483 


RETIRED GENTLEMAN'S 
1971 Ford LTD. power seats, air 
conditioning, beautiful Interior, 
very attractive, rust free exteri¬ 
or, has been garage kept. Excel 
lent mechanically, only 63,000 
mites Asking$1450 5984)015 


SECOND OWNER, 35 M.P.G, 
197? Renault R 12, 4-door sedan, 
standard, radio, Michel Ins plus 
mounted grips, tested, excep¬ 
tional^ clean. Asking $1595. 


1971 DODGE POLARA. 2-DOOR 
hardtop, vinyl roof, V8 360, 2- 
barret, automatic, power steer¬ 
ing. power brakes, rear de—fog, 
city fested. Mechanically excel¬ 
lent Must sett; $850. 383-7160. 


ESTATE CAR. 1971 PINTO, 
new motor, transmission, paint 
job, receipts for all work done 
Asking$i900. Before3pm. for ap- 
pomtment to view 386-8256 


‘72 GREMLIN 6-STANDARD, 
clean, low miles, tested $1200 
478-6162. 


'72 VW ST AT I ON WAGON, 
automatic, radio, MIchelTns. 
oood condition, $?t» 383-9723 


1971 CHRYSLER 300. LOADED. 

150 firm 


71 CHEV WAGON, NEW 
transmission, automatic, $800 
negotiable. 38&Y34t 


1971 MUSTANG MACH I. EX 
cel lent shape, priced to sell. 
$2 700 or best Offer 381 5625 


72 VW BEETLE. CLEAN, RE 
liable, new tires and shocks 
Otters 3885976 


71 DODGE MONOCO 
Brougham. 70XXX) miles. $1695 
4788113 




1971CME VELLE MALIBU. 1504 
bprral Asiing $2495 652 UOt 
after 5 10pm 

URGENT SALE, »97l TORINO 
s «0 2 doer herd top 187 auto 
matte, eslunt $1188 184 1075 


1974 FIAT IM OOOD COMOI 
•Km Offers je**7$ 

77 MAZDA ala. 3DXXXI MILES 
USD 

$954943 Offers 

149 URr $227$ FOR DETAILS. 

j$/ -jU: 

»tn AUSTIN MA»,NA)OGO» 

n « 09/L RANCHO 4U, Mi W 

'.jffsrtftTws» 

»'< i j ca. »4Ut> emits, ra 

(Umi lira* guodsbatJi 4TV 4*It 

7? PONTIAC UMAMI STA 


151 CAIS FOR SALE 



V8 •VEGA 

Corvette white, 350 L48, M-20, 
narrowed 12 bolt posl, radlals 
and rally wheels. $6500 Invested. 
656-3238 


72 COMET, 2 DOOR, 302 AUTO- 
matlc, 62,000 miles, 6 Mlchelln 
radlals, buckets, new parts, Im- 
maculate. Must be seen. 
595-8491. 


MOVING, MUST SELL BEAU 


3834)405 


RARE 1972 CUDDA, BLACK 
with plnstrlplng, 318 hioh pert or 
mance, many new parts, very 
sharp and quick. $4200 or otters. 
592-7910. 


71 PLYMOUTH S.W., P.S., P.B., 
roof rack, only $788. Palm Auto 
World Inc. 3888385. 3342 Oak St. 
Dealer 5260 


72 RENAULT R12, 4 CYL., 4- 
spd., be quick at $947. Palm Auto 
world Inc 386-8385. 3342 Oak St. 
Dealer 5260. 


WELL MAINTAINED 1972 4 
door Mazda RX2, great shape 
Inside and out, radlals, tested, 
clean. $1600. 3834)391 days. 


1972 PONTIAC LEMANS LUX- 
ury. 94XXX) miles, 350 V8 auto¬ 
matic, $1750 or best offer. 


1972 CADILLAC SEDAN DE- 
VIIte, 57,000 miles, best offer 
over $3000. 595-6963 between 
7pm-9pm. 


72 DATSUN 4 SPEED, NEEDS 
work on body, everything else In 
good working order. $400 
386-390? after 4 pm. 


72 LINCOLN CONTINENTAL 
black with red leather interior, 
well kept classic but must be 
sold. 383-2937. 


OWNER LEAVING TOWN. 1972 
Impala. oood condition, rebuilt 
engine. $1000 or best offer. 
477-5820 


1971 MERCURY METEOR, 2 
door hardtop, power steering, 
power brakes, radio, good condi¬ 
tion. $1250 385-9179 


1971 TOYOTA COROLLA, NEW 
paint, mags. Good running con¬ 
dition. Just been tested $1300. 
477-2140. 


71 OLOS CUTLASS SUPREME, 

350 eg • - • - - 

excer 
652-4670. 


cu. In. 3-speed auto. TA's! 
client, $2700. 383-9160, 


1972 VW 411 STATION WAGON. 
7XXX) miles on rebuilt engti 
radio, good condition, offers 
$7250 4774936 ' 


it'on. 


1972 SUPERBEETLE, 49,000 
miles, one owner, radio, gas 
heater, rear defogger, $2000. 
4794)768 


’71 VEGA HATCHBACK. 4 
speed, stereo. Very good shape 
Paint not too good. $650. 


384-6276 


72 MUSTANG. 351 CLEVE- 
land, radlals. stereo, new paint. 
Good condition. $2500. 721-3109. 


1972 VOLKSWAGEN FAST- 

ss:,iagam , aKa, ,ood 


77 FORD CUSTOM. GOOO CON- 
dltlon. $1200 or best offer. 


72 2 DOOR SCAMP V8, NEW 
tires, excellent condition. 
652-4280 after 3pm. 


1971 ori tartar 


'64 COMET CALIENTE, 302 
auto, 2-door hardtop. Excellent 
investment; appreciating In 
value. Selling to buv home. All 
new running gear, body work, 
and paint. Stock buckets and 
console. Lots of chrome. Beauti¬ 
ful Interior. - Too many new 
things to mention. $3750.4)94)453 
after 6pm. 


CONVERTIBLE N 
1970 Pontiac Parlsienne, excel¬ 
lent near ly new condition, power 
steering, power brakes. 350 
cubic Inch, V8 automatic, dual 
exhaust, sea green with white 
top and emeral green Inferior, 
Offers. Must sell. 3834)274. 


1967 CHEVROLET BELAIR. 4 
door, well maintained, good con¬ 
dition, power steering, power 
brakes. 283 cubic inch, vf auto¬ 
matic. radio, 1 previous owner, 
blue with black Interior. $900. 
Must sell. 3834)274 


304, headers. 4 barrel 
carter 625. 2M50-15‘s with Key 
stone rims. New radiator, bat¬ 
tery, starter and solenoid Needs 
transmission and body work. 
Offers on $850. 382 5015. 


69 MUSTANG 

2-dr. ht. V-8, auto. PS. PB. low 
mileage An exceptionally clean 
Victoria car 381 5544 BSG Spe- 
clalty Motors. Dealer 6033 


1969 FIREBIRD. RECENTLY 
rebuilt 350, new Holley, headers, 
new trans with shift kit, 60's and 
mags all round, am/fm cassette, 
booster $3500 or nearest offer. 
<77-6190 or can be seen at Ca<$ 
boro Bay Shop Easy 


68 MALIBU 327CIO 
2-dr. HT. new maos and tires 
Aufo, PS, PB All stock and 
Quick 38 ) 5544 BSG Specialty 
Motors Peeler 4033 


1970 VOLVO 145S STATION 
wagon, automatic transmission, 
economical 4 cylinder engine, 
tested, as new Mtchefin redials, 
extra snow tires, immaculate in 
ter lor, radio, roof rack, good 
original palnf.s3»9S 59745^3 


70 CAMARO 

350 std . buckets, mags- r ec 

trade up or down $4,795 P*- 

asTig ^ 


TRY US FIRST! 

68 Veuxhetl automatic Spot 

awsfCT,.*® 

Honda Dealer 58>6 


67 CAMARO. OOOD * VMM IMG 
tgodifiga, 6 cylinder, needs 

Unj'OaM I mmtu *av 


THURSDAY, JULY 24,1980 

IN CUSHMUU ISO CMS FOR SOlf I ISO CMS K* MU 



smmm 


Your Car and 
' Light Truck 
Action Centre 

79 Marquis 4-dr., V8, AT, 
PS, PB, R $6495 

78 Ply Valiant 4-dr., 6, AT, 

PS, PB, R $4595 

77 Cougar XR7 2-dr„ V8, 
AT, PS, PB, R $4995 

77 Camaro 2-dr„ HT, V8, 
AT, PS, PB, R $5495 

76 Lincoln Mark IV. Fully 
equipped. $7995 

75 Monarch Ghia 4-dr., 6, 
AT, PS, PB, R $2995 

74 Montego Won. V8, AT, 
PS, PB, R $1995 

73 Olds Omega 2-dr, HT, 6, 
AT, PS, PB, R $1895 

72 Pinto Villager Wgn. 4 
cvl-» AT $1795 

72 Capri 2-dr., 4 cvl., AT 
$1995 

79 GMC Blazer. Folly 

equipped includes air and 
cruise $11,995 

Many More 
Safe Buy 
Used Cars and 
Trucks 

To Choose From 

Full Finance Available 
On Approved Credit 
Trades Welcome 

SUBURBAN 
MOTORS 
3377 Douglas 
386-6131 

Peeler 5528 


Wands 


CAR CENTRE 

YATES AT QUADRA 


1963 CHEVY II BISCAYNE. 
blue, 6 cylinder, 3 speed stan¬ 
dard, 4 door, tested, new brakes, 
new exhaust. 3 new fires. Needs 
clutch. $250 or best offer. 
652-2377 

1970 1600 DATSUN STATION- 
wagon, 2-owner car, 34,000 origi¬ 
nal miles, 4 new tires. Good con¬ 
dition. Clutch needs repair $1000 
o^neapif offer. 595-6631 or 

1970 PLYMOUTH SUBURBAN 
statlonwagon, power steering, 
power brakes (new), extra snow 
tires on rims, excellent condi 
♦ Ion, must be seen. $1400. 
474-2015 after 6pm 

MUST SELL. LEAVING TOWN, 
66 Ford Falrlane. rebuilt 302 and 
trans, new paint, wide tires, 
mags, excellent condition, many 
extras. $2200 or best offer. 
385-4828 after 4pm, Rob 

69 CODA FASTBACK, 318 
auto, floorshlft, MT valve 
covers, traction bars. Sun tech, 
new paint, good on gas. good 
condition $1700 or best offer 
Phone after 5 :30,656-2097 

1968 DODGE CORONET, 440, 2 
door hardtop, V8, automatic, 
318. power steering, power 
brakes, rear de-fog, new muf¬ 
fler. Runs excellent. Sacrifice 
$750 or best offer 383-7160 

67 COUGAR, RADIO, CAS- 
sette, new paint, 289 four speed, 
special wheels, sharp, with 
many extras. A must to see. 
592-0428 

1965 THUNOERBIRD. AUTO- 
matlc, power steering, power 
brakes, electric windows, power 
seats, black, good condition. 
Must be seen. $5800. 592-7468. 

1969 COUGAR. 52XXX) MILES. 
351 Wlnsor, automatic, power 
steering, power brakes, very 
good condition. $3300 or best. 
After 5pm, 479-8465. 

STREET DUNE BUGGY FOR 
sale. Fiberolass body and top, 
gas heater, chrome wheels, new 
exhaust system, $1200 or offers. 

112-749-6426 after 5 pm. 

ONE OWNER 1969 METEOR 9 
passenger station wagon, 390 V8, 
automatic, power steering, 
power brakes, lust tested. $1095. 
479-1202. 

69 CHEVELLE SHOW CAR, 
asking $6500. Has to be seen. 
478-9252. 

1968 CORTINA. HAS NEW 
motor I600cc. $6S0 for parts bills 
to prove, stereo system, city 
tested, $1100 or best offer. 
592-9598,381-1816. Must sell. 

69 BEAUMONT, 307 3-SPEED 
auto. New exhaust, brakes, 
tires. City tested. Mags- Silver 
with blade vinyl roof. $2000. 9-5 
Monday to Friday 478-8131. 

TOYOTA CORONA MARK II, 
new candy apple red paint, 
motor has60XXX) miles, excellent 
running or^ir, $1800 or best 

1968 BUICK GS 400 4-SPEED, 
car Is immaculate condition, 
less than 500 miles on running 
gar>k> fritters please. 382-6343. 

'69 Z-28. FACTORY 302, SHOW 
room condition. 54XXX) original 
miles Asking price over $10,000; 
no fritters please, contact Bob, 
748-4688 Or 743-5231. 

1969 AMBASSADOR DPL 2 
door deluxe, power steelng, 
power brakes, air conditioning, 
new tires plus much more, test¬ 
ed. Asking $2195. 477.-0949. 

1960 CHEV IMPALA. 4 DOOR 
hardtop, original owner, power 
steering, power brakes, low 
mM*ege. must see. Asking $3900. 

69 T BIRD, BOOY AND ME 
chanlcallv good, $2500 or best 
offar. can be seen at Derick's 
Bay Services, 638 John Street. 
3*2 1314 

1969 BUICK LESABRE. 4 
door, power steering, power 
brakes, 350 automatic, very good 
condition throughout. Asking 
$850 382-6905 

SACRIFICE 

Trip to South America forces 
sate Of 69 LTD. $9837M 

66 AUSTIN 4 CYL., 4 SPD 
Priced to sell $497 Palm Auto 
World Inc 386-8385 3342 Oak St 
Dealer 5260 

1967 CUTLASS SUPREME CON 
vert Ible Rare" Yates Auto 

oilli sSl 

1947PONTIAC, 4 DOOR. IN RE 
Storable condition Excellent 

zxsozusi « 



64 BiAUMONl, 6 CVL , 

g£rjwaaw? 

tetf V AUK MAI J. VIVA. AUTO 



'80 Honda Civic 
4-door Hatchback 

V CHECK THE 
Spacious Interior 

V CHECK THE 
Fuel Economy 

V CHECK THE 
Low Price 

BUY OR LEASE 
FROM 

VICTORIA'S 

FIRST 

HONDA DEALER 
SALES —LEASING 

BANK FINANCING. 

INSURANCE. 
LICENCE PLATES 
ALL AT OUR ONE STOP 
NEW &USEDCAR CENTRE 

386-6707 

Dealer N^5668 



VOLKSWAGEN 


971 YATES at Vancouver 
385 2415 


79 Rabbit Sunroof 
78 Rabbit Diesel 
77 Rabbit 4 speed 
77 Rabbit Diesel 
76 Rabbit 4 speed 


72 Ventura 

*1895 

72 Chev 

*1695 

71 Toyota 

$969 

69 Rambler 

$487 

64 Ford 

$185 


DOWNTOWN at 

Speedway Motors Ltd 
971 YATES 

Dealer 5180 * 385-2415 


‘67 CAMARO. 2S0 CUBIC INCH. 
4-speed. New engine, trans, 
tires. Good condition. $4000 or 
best offer 642-3889, 474-1549. 


.1964 PLYMOUTH FURY, 4 
door sedan, V8, tested, radio, 
new tires, excellent condition. 
$900, 382 5883 after 5pm 


1968 FIREBIRD HARDTOP, 150 
automatic, over $2500 spent In 
last 2 months. Excellent condi¬ 
tion $5200 firm. 721-3046. 


66 VOLKSWAGEN, 2000 MILES 
on new 1600 motor, complete 
with stereo. Offers. 385-4360 
after 4:30pm 


1951 FORD MONARCH. TEST 
ed till 1981. oood shape. 74,000 
original miles. Motor has blow 
by. $2200 firm. 478-3625 


MUST SELL THIS WEEK, 62 
Meteor, new motor, trans, etc 
View at 1861 Newton 7:30-9pm or 
phone 595-1830 



D 
0 
0 

0 _ 

A 

VOLKSWAGEN 
. AUDI ■ 


Your Largest 
Volkswagen 
Audi 

Dealer On The 
Island! 


PREMIUM USED 

80 Capri Ghla, auto $9195 
79 Audi 5000, loaded 

$15,950 

79 Chevette4-spd. $5295 
79 Aspen Sedan, auto 

$6795 

78 Audi Fox, auto. $7895 
78 Audi 5000, loaded 

$13,550 

78 Audi Fox, 4-spd. $7,495 
78 Datsun510Wgn. $5995 
76 Rabbit auto., air con. 



$5,395 

76 Dasher Hatchbk. $5495 

75 Beetle 

$4295 

75 Mustang, auto. 

$3795 

74 VW 412, auto. 

$3695 

73 VW 412,4-spd. 

$3,495 

4X4's 


79 Blazer, auto. 

$8,595 

78 piazdr, auto. 

, air., 

toaded 

$11,450 


76 GMC Jimmy, 4-spd. 

$6,595 


UP TO 60-MONTH 
SCOTIA PLAN 
FINANCING 
AVAILABLE. O.A.C. 


Douglas Volkswagen 
Ltd. 

3329 Douglas Street 

388-5466 

Dealer 5100 



63COMETCONVERTIBLE, IM 
maculate condition, new top and 
clutch, 6 cylinder, $3600 after 
5:30 pm. 477-3383 or 658-8361 


1967 MERCEDES BENZ 250S, 
good condition, runs well. All 
reasonable offers considered 
Must sell. 595-7337. 


76 ACADIAN, AUTO. 

75 MUSTANG 

76 HORNET S/W 

75 VALIANT 2DR., HT 

77 GMC V*. 4x4 

78 TRANS AM 

76 ASPEN S/W 

77 GMC SUBURBAN, 4x4 

78 CORDOBA 
77 CUTLASS4dr. 

76 DODGE V. VAN 

OPEN 
-Thurs.,9-9 
r rl.-Sat.,94 
2867 Douglas at Topaz 
382-7121 Dealer 5701 


Tri: 


69 SWINGER. VERY CLEAN 
and fast, all new. Phone Dave 9-4 
weekdays; anytime weekends. 
382-0789. 

67 TOYOTA CORONA. DE 
luxe, rebuilt engine, new clutch, 
body oood, must sell. $750. 771 
Station Road, Langford 

68 OLDS, GOOD SHAPE, 
power windows, steering, 
brakes, good rubber, radio, $ 600 . 
382 5742. 

69 VAUXHALL, BODY IN 
good shape, needs motor work, 
offers to $300. 388-4232,9anv4pm 
or 598-1470,6pm-8pm 

MUST SELL 

Leaving town In one week, 1969 
Newport, 383 4-barrel, excellent 
condition. 388-4973. 

70 MGB, 7SXXX) MILES, EXTRA 
motor and extra soft top. some 
spare parts, asking $1500. Any 
Inquiries, 642-3344 after 6pm 

1968 2 DOOR SEDAN, CHE- 
velle, rebuilt engine, good run¬ 
ning order, excellent transporta 
tlon, $500 or offers. 478024? 

70 NOVA SS 

350,300 horse. 4 speed, vertloate 
shifter, very clean. 478-7542 after 

'63 LINCOLN CONTINENTAL, 
beautiful shape. Lots of money 
and time Invested. 656-73a after 
5:30. 

66 PONTIAC, V8. AUTO. 4 
door, 80,000 miles. Second 
owner. Perfect condition. $925. 
After 6pm, 642-4944 

a MORRIS 1100, REBUILT EN- 
gine, transmission, new tires 
and brakes, good paint; no rust. 
383-8174 

1965 ELDORADO CONVERT- 
Ible, loaded. California beauty. 
$7950- 1951 Ford stepskte, excel¬ 
lent, $3950. 386-4497 

65 VALIANT WITH NEW 
motor, city tested, $800 or best 
offer. Between 6-9 Mike, 
595-3037. 

67 CAMARO. 350. 3 SPEED 
auto, stall converter, shift kit, 
4:5:6 gears, blue with black in¬ 
terior, offers. 382-8857 after 6pm 

'70 CAMARO. ECONOMICAL 6- 
cvUnder, automatic, only 65,000 
miles, runs great . Good body and 
interior 12650 384-9543. 

1970 TOYOTA CORONA 2 DOOR 
hard top. city tested, low mile¬ 
age, extra tires, asking $1395 or 
nearest offer. 992-7239. 

69 AMBASSADOR. POWER 
steering, power brakes. 8 - track, 
air -conditioned Offers on $750 
384-3866 attar 5pm 

CLASSIC 

64 Rambler Classic 770 3814605 
after 5 

70 MON TE CARLO, ISO, HEAO- 
ers hood scoop, k*s of extras 
Good condition. 658-5)49 

1965 METEOR, 2 OOOR. GOOO 
transportation, lust tested $750 

383 879*,. mornings 

•970 SUNBEAM ARROW. EX 
crptionat condition, low mile 
agr automatic $1580 W8 720 

MUST SELL TRADES CON 
s»d*f rd Mint HI65 California 442 
loaded 478)580 

•947 CHEV BELAIR. GOOO 
rondHkm $1180 or bet* oNar 

479*171 



1964 THUNDER BIRO. EXCEL- 
tent condition, must sell $2800. 
477-9443 

1961 THUNOERBIRD AND 1963 
Corvette. Needs work, otters. 

SACRIFICE, 19« REBEL STA- 
tlonwagon, 6-cylinder auto¬ 
matic, $695. 477-9216. 

1964 VAUXHALL 2 DOOR, 4 
speedy good condition. $350 

1969 RAMBLER AMERICAN, 6 
cylinder, good condition. 
592-6222. 

1970 TOYOTA COROLLA, 
network. $250 firm. 386-1067 

DARK GREEN 69 VOLKSWA- 
gen Fastback, good shape, $1,- 
500. 966 Royal Oak Dr ., 658-8667. 

1968 CADILLAC COUPE DE 
ville, $2,000 or nearest otter. 
592-0149. 

1965 RAMBLER CLASSIC 2 
door automatic, tested until 

479 ^I'-> - - • 

66 MUSTANG, GOOD SHAPE, 
$1800 or best otter. Must sell. 
4789117. 

60 VOLKSWAGEN, RUNS 
great, city tested. Economical. 
$600. 385-1346 after 5pm. 

'64 SEDAN DEVILLE CADIL 
lac, fully rebuilt, must be seen. 
$4500 or best Offer. 642 3298. 

1970 MUSTANG, BOSS 302, NO 
rust, 73XXX) original mites. $8500 
or best offer. 652-3435 

1968 TOYOTA CROWN DE 
luxe, 386-1021 (days); 652-4992 
(evenings). 

'69 VAUXHALL, GOOD RUN 
ning condition, cheap on oas. 

S700 or bestoffer. 4788354. 

1969 CHRYSLER, NEW MU Fi¬ 
tter, brakes, excellent condition, 
$950. Obo, 4794009 

66 BEETLE. RUNS WELL BUT 
needs body wortc-Best on $300. 
3886417 before 4pm. 

MUST SELL. 69 CHRYSLER, 
excellent condition, $600 or best 
offer 3844064 

I960 VOLKSWAGEN BEETLE, 
good condition, tested, 80,000 
original mites. 3880187. 

56 METRIC VW. MANY NEW 
parts. 656-4837. 

1964 FORD GALAXIE STA- 
honwagon 477-2085 after 5pm. 


•968 CH| V BttCAVMC. 4 
4mm mumm 6 ImM 

pw*«Naq tiiiO 4*3 


69 VW BUG, NEEDS SOME 
work, offers. 3811019 


69 AM6ASSAOOR. EXCEL 
tent condition 8980. 3 84 5 546 


1970MAVERICK, 73,600MILE! 
condition. $ipO. 478-5707 


70 MAZDA RI00. NEW MOTOR. 

raBtol ttros, atimn. 382 1467 


1961 OOOGE SLANT 6 STAN 
dard.SI58 479-1317 after 5pm 


1970 FORD MARQUIS STA 
$480 476-2916 after 5 


6? STUDEBAKER 2 DOOR 

a uto ma t ic, m *s M3U1S 


OFFERS 1970 MAVERICK 


- ERS ..._ . 

-orygoadcowdtho* 4+4H77 

1069 MERCURY, 2 DOOR 
good runny, $360 470 3814 






IS* CMS FOR MU 



*Dc Tape) 



80 Chevrolet 4 dr, hatchback, V6. 
auto, ps, pb, 2-tone. Immaculate 
with only 1500 miles. Balance of 
factory warranty available. 
Priced to sell. 


L 



76 Scorpion, 5-speed, leather, 
fold back convertible top. Very 
beautiful — very Italian. A rare 
find. 

77 Cadillac Seville loaded 

78 Seville Custom Opera Coupe 
80 Datsun 280ZX 

80 LeCar, economy plus! 

78 Bronco 4X4 9XXX) miles. 

78 Trans Am, 4-spd, one owner, 
6,000 ml. 

77 Jaguar XJS coupe 

78 Cordoba, 12XXX) ml., as new. 

77 Nova auto,6,21XXX) ml. 

76 Olds Omega Coupe. Clean! 

62 Mercedes 230 SE Coupe. 

78 MGB 18,000ml.-Mint! 

Open 8:30-5:30 Closed Sat. 

DePAPE MOTORS LTD. 

I ndoors at 779 Pandora 
384-8035 Dealer-5311 


£es Carr’s 

SALES and 
LEASING LTD. 


PREOWNED 

80 AUDI 5000S 
79 COBRA 
79 PRIXS.J. 

79 F1ATX1/9 
79 CUT. BRM. 
70 BENZ280S 

Many More 
Quality Pre-Owned 
Vehicles to Choose 
From. 

* * * 


INDOORSAT 

854 Pandora at Quadra 

Parking Rear _ Dealer 6690 


PALM 


Good or Bad 

WHOCARES 
WE FINANCE 
NO CO-SIGNERS 

Let us help re-establish your 
credit. Separated, divorced, old- 
age pensioner.single male or fe¬ 
male. You qualify. Buv and pay 
at same location. Cars from $150 
down and payments as low as $10 
weekly.CHARGEX ACCEPTED 

Instant 

"NO-RED-TAPE" 

CREDIT 

Walk in, Drive Out 


[ paciPic] 


PEUGEOT 


75 VW Bus $5895. 

72 Volvo S.W. $3995. 
78 LeCar GTL $4695. 
77VolareCPE$2895. 

77 Honda H/B $3995. 

76 Mazda wgn $3295. 
2-Diesel Rabbits 

78 Celica GT $5995. 
78 Bronco 4x4 $8995. 

77 Mazda GLC $3995. 
76 Dodge Dart $3395. 

73 Mazda wgn $1895. 
72 Pinto, mags$2195. 

BANK FINANCING 

385-1451 Dealer 5253 
Blanshard at Johnson 


PLIMLEY 


JAGUAR — ROVER 
TRIUMPH 

M.G. — MINI — SAAB 

1010 YATES ST 3(3-9121 


15* CMS FOR MU 


s* 

COLWOOD 

CASNMART 


OPEN 9-9 
474-2233 

1836 Island Hwy Pealer67i6 


SPELL 


When you 
have something 
to sell, the easiest 
way to find 
a buyer is to 
spell it out 
in print! 

You do that 
by placing a 
low-cost 
Classified Ad 
in the newspaper, 
telling our 
readers what 
you have to sell. 
We'll help you! 
Give us a call 
today 
at 386-2121. 


C-G 

1*1 SPOUT, IMPORT CMS 


1975 MGB. IMMACULATE IN- 
ter lor/exterior. Tonneau cover, 
stereo 8-track radio. $5200 
642-4748. 


1967 MERCEDES BENZ 250S, 
oood condition, runs well. All 
reasonable offers considered 
Must sell. 595-7337. 


1963 CORVAIR CONVErV 
ible. new top and brakes. Origi¬ 
nal paint but should be repaint 
ed. $2350 598-2622. 


1980 Z28 4 SPEED. T ROOF, 
8,000 kilometers, $9500. 4786030 
after 5pm 


1972 FIAT 128. WELL CARED 
for, AM/FM radio, radial tires, 
SHOO. 386-4419 S98 9078 


1965 SUNBEAM TIGER, MINT. 
Offers to $14,500. small trade 
considered. 474-1017. 


1977 MGB. 33XXX) MILES. TON 
neau, winter tires, roll bar, oood 
condition. $5800 firm. 474-2640 


WANTED: TR250 OR TR4A IN 
good condition. Reasonable. 
Dana, 598 3133 or 595-1913 


1972 TR6, GOOD RUNNING 
condition, offers to $4300 
477-9685 


1976 TR7, 39.000 MILES. Ex¬ 
cellent condition. Must sell. 
592-8271. 


75 MG MIDGET, 33.000 MILES, 
$2800. Good condition. 381-1784 
after 5pm 


BLACK '68 TR4A, REBUILT 
engine Must sell. $2200 or best 
otter 383-8676. 


73 TRANS AM, $3,000 IN EN 
Oine. very fast. $4800. 477-7413 or 
477-2628. 


74 TR6 IN VERY GOODCONDI 
lion. $4800 or best offer. 479-6005 
or 477-5541, 


74 FIAT X19, NEW TRANS, 
new clutch, new brakes, $4200 
386-7760. 


74 VOLVO, LOOKS AND RUNS 
gxxl $3000 or best otter. Phone 


MUST SELL MOVING. '74 FIAT 
124 Sports Spider, needs front 
end Best offer takes. 477-9713. 


75 FIAT 131 STATION WAGON. 
5 speed, radlals, cassette, asking 
$3.000 727 2029 


1971 TR6, $4700 OR BEST 
Otter 727-3150. 


77 TR7, GOOD CONDITION, 
many extras. Offers 5956744 


1972 CAPRI V6, 2600, EXCEL 
lent condition, $2100 381-2183 


74 MGB, 3 TOPS, 51,000 MILES, 
asking $4500 382 0930. 


74 FIAT 124 SPORT. 5 SPEED, 
nice shape. $2250. 477-8478 


1*4 


TRUCKS, BUMS 
MD VMS 


GlenQak 


1*1 SPORT, MP0RT CMS 




liana 


capital city auto 


BMW 

3201 Sp—one only. 

3201 —choice of 5 
3201 auto—one only 

FIAT 

Spider 2000— 
new shipment. 

4 only. 

Brava —Save S700. 
Strada — Save $500. 

USED CARS 

Good selection of econ¬ 
omy cars. No reasonable 
otter refused. Bank fin¬ 
ancing available. 

1750 GOVERNMENT 
386 7509 Oe.tor 5066 


76 Lancia Scorpion 5 spd. 

77 Jaguar XJS Coupe 

78MGB 1IXXX)miles-Mint! . 
62 Mercedes 220SE Coupe 
DePAPE MOTORS LTD 
Indoors at 779 Pandora 

Daalar-5311 


384-8035 


1976 CORVETTE, YELLOW, 
L82, 350 automatic, power 
brakes, power steering, power 
windows, A M fm radio. T— 
roof, new tires, new brakes, $10,- 
500 382 7165. 


59 MERCEDES 220S CLASSIC, 
completely rebuilt and restored 
with new leather and walnut In¬ 
terior, silver paint, chrome, 
stereo, tape, etc. 477-8249. $14,- 


79 VOLVO 244 DL 

4 door. 4 cylinder, automatic, 
( ■j ow er^steering, must sell, $7995. 


1974 AUDI FOX. VALUED 
over $4000. Sacrifice $3500 or 
best after . Will consider dirt bike 
plus cash. John, between 6-9pm, 


80 Chevy Citation *7995 
79 Ford Granada ESS 

*7495 

79 Saab GLE *15.464 
79 Volkswagen Getaway 
*13.495 

78 Ford Fiesta *4195 
78 Honda Accord *5995 
7* Pinto Pony *4695 
77 Cadillac Sedan de 
Ville *10.995 

77 Chrysler Cordoba*5495 
77 Pontiac Lemans 9 pass 
wag *4595 

75 TR7 Coupe 16295 
75 TR6 Roadster 15995 
74 Mercedes Diesel *9295 
73 Ford Torino (1395 
73 Tovoll Coupe *695 
o*«ie« on 


te AviNO 


IXISi&f 


428, 4 SPEED 




SZ'JL k »?&t Y 




1974 260Z, GOOD SHAPE, 
spoiler, louvers. AM FM, radial 
tires, with spare and 2 snow 
tlras. $4350 or best offer. 
477 9685 


1973 CORVETTE. 454 AUTO- 
ma»lc- power steering, power 
brakgs. power windows. 


1974 VOLVO. 142 GRANLUXE, 
immaculate car - AMFM cas¬ 
sette. leather seats, new tires, 
new exhaust. $4500 firm 
311 2183. 


72 TRIUMPH GT6, GREAT 
condition. 6 cylinder, new trans 
and dutch, sunroof and more 
Mujt£e seen $4500 477-9345 


COLLECTOR'S CLASSIC. 57 
red MGA, rebuilt engine and 
transmission, with papers. 

-ISIS daw 


69 LOTUS EUROPA 

$6900 Excelte 
382-6408e 


•979 CORVETTE 
Beautiful condition, many op- 


"Jj ™*MjtAM fORMULA, 
LeddiewenDr 


TRUCKS 
VANS —4X4'S 
SUPER CABS 

AS LOW AS 

★ 16870 ★ 

STOCK *80286 

384-1144 
Yates at Cook 

GlenOak 



Rmf 

Dealer No. 6616 


Cornell gm 

USED CARS 

YOU CAN 
EXPECT A 
GREAT DEAL 
FROM CORNELL 


GOOD SELECTION 
Vi TON'S, 3 A TON'S 
INSTOCK 

EXAMPLE 

73 GMC 3500 
SERIES 
RUNS GOOD 
$1295 * 

OPEN MON.—FRI. 9-9 
SAT. 9-5 
Finlavsonand 
Burnside 

385-5777 Dealer 5378 


EjiEga 

BhTTI 

AUTOLEASE LTD. 

HOME OF THE 



I WHEEL DRIVE 

30-35 M.P.G. 

77 CHEVV54x4.4SOd 
77 Chev 3 /. 4x4 
77 Super Cab 
77 GMC 46 PU VI auto 
76 Ford Super Cab 
69 Ford PU 46 ton 

TI1AD€> Wf LCOMt 
WUMHNNtOXK trluwl 
1198. FINANCING O A C 

4 OpNllJH 6p m 

t*NOouei.iv 

IP-6111 _ Ortw tni 

EgZSi.SZZSZSZ 

ftieerfia wto< laic down raar 
see*, chrome running boa* d 

*404t fir as m cuHon- whocit 
40CMbK InchwwMw » xcaMant 









































































































































































































































































































































C-7 

154 TRUCKS, BUSES 

4N0V4NS 


Tl 


78 FORD % TON 

stepslde, V 8 AT, P.S, P.B, low 
miles, tilt steerlno. Like new 
15795. 

76 TOYOTA SR5 

short box, excellent buy at $4395. 

74 FORD F100 

•j ton V 8 AT. P.S, P.B. radio, 
heavy bumper with hitch, slider 
window 12195. 

73 DODGE 

Club Cab ’/»ton, V 8 AT. P.S, P B. 
radio. 53.000 ml. 12S95. 

B MADSEN MOTORS LTD. 
2691 Sooke Rd. (Glen Lake) 
478-5011_Dealer 5450 

HOLIDAY SPECIAL 
1977 Chevrolet Scotsdale % ton 
Camper Special PU truck with 
only 22,000 mi. Also 10' Dreamer 
tamper with fridge, 3 burner 
stove, sink etc. Hurry thepricels 
right. Exclusive with 

CHARLIE PETERSON 
at Empress Pontiac Buick GMC 
Ltd 382-7121 or res 592-0458. 
Dealer 5701, 

78 GMC JIMMY 

This 4x4 is a local one-owner unit 
featuring auto. PS. PB, am/fm 
cassette with 40 channel CB. 
White wheels with raised white 
lettered tires. Has not been used 
as an off road vehicle. 381-5544. 
BSG Specialty Motors. Dealer 
6033. 

CHEVVAN 

1979 3 4-ton, long wheelbase. V- 8 , 
auto., ps., pb., radio, side win¬ 
dows 16895 Garden City Auto 
Lease, 382-9111, 1978 Douglas. 
Dealer 5721 

1946 WHITE BUS 
23 seater. running gear in im¬ 
maculate condition. Tires excel¬ 
lent, body better than fair Par 
tially camperized Needs minor 
work. 18-19 miles per gallon. 
Offers. 642 4998 between 5— 8 pm 

6-1 TON ON DUALS 
1971-1976 Chevs and Fords, 
autos, 4-speeds. One with flat 
deck dump. 

George Eng Truck Sales 
Dealer #5166 

2810A Rock Bay Ave-385-3054 

1974 ROYAL SPORTSMAN 
Dodge 5-passenger Window Van. 
.w >0 V 8 , 55.000 miles. Very clean. 
Radio, full factory upholstery 
and carpet. New tires. 14000 or 
best offer Leave message at 
388-4447,9-5 Monday to Friday 

tJAAC JIMMY 


13,295. Painter Motors, 3005 
Douglas, 388-6196. Dealer 5802. 

72 CHEV VAN, EXTERIOR 
customized, captain seats, sun 
roof, roof top scoop. Primed for 
interior finish. Must sell, no rea- 
sonable offer refused. 
386 85846-9 


9 PM 


1974 GMC *4 TON 4X4. 396 4 
speed, customized front end and 
paint, spoke wheels, bucket 
seats, console, AM/FM 8 track 
Best offer 479-5548 evenings, 
478 1515 days, ask for Bob. 

1976 DODGE *i-TON PICKUP, 
6 -cyclinder, 4 speed, power 
steering, power brakes, fiber 
glass canopv. top condition, eco¬ 
nomical to operate. 14100 or best 
offer 656-6864 or 598-4824. 

78 GMC 4X4 SIERRA CLASSIC 
camper special, every available 
option except air conditioning 
and cruise control. Excellent 
condition, 24,000 miles. 18900. 
112 749-3741 

1973 JEEP WAGONEER, 4 
wheel drive stationwaoon, good 
family recreational vehicle, low 
mileage, tested, excellent condi¬ 
tion. 13800. For details call 
382 9223 after 6 pm , 

CUSTOMIZED VAN, CHEVY. 
1972 Sunroof, air horns, mags, 
radials. Captains chairs, nauga 
hyde. velvet, sink, icebox, bed 
and table, extras 14600 or best 
offer. 386-5074. _ 

GMC SUBURBAN, 1975, % TON 
van. power steering, power 
brakes. 13600 Good condition. 
. View at Shelbourrle Texaco Sta¬ 
tion Details phone evenings 
656 2625 


1977 DODGE MAXIWAGON, 
automatic, power steering, 
power brakes, lined, insulated, 
carpeted. 33,500 miles. Very first 
offer over 14600 takes. 
112 748-8405 


1969 F100 CUSTOM SPORT, 
nearly new 302 automatic, 
matching canopy, some rust. 
Trade for statfonwagon or 
Comet or Maverick and cash. 
112 722 2309 


LIKE NEW27.000MILES 
75 Ford van, includes all recrea¬ 
tional facilities. Will accept part 
trade 18900 Must sell. 478-8354 


1977 GMC VAN. SUNROOF, 
visor, finished inside, 305 V 8 , 
dual exhaust, 28,000 miles. Ex¬ 
cellent condition. Offers on 
16300 384-4591 


1973 GMC Vj TON 454 AUTO- 
matlc with power steering, 
power brakes, transmission, 
body and running gear excellent. 
592 9338 


1977 FORD VAN, VELVET CUS- 
tom interior, captains chairs. 
AM/FM cassette, alarm, equal¬ 
izer hitch, digital clock. 17500 
or offers. 383-8319 


1976 FORD 12 PASSENGER 
club wagon, 460 engine, power 
steering, power brakes, cap¬ 
tain's chair. 15500 or best offer. 
478 2731 


76 GMC VAN, 350 AUTOMATIC,, 
power steering, power brakes, 
custom interior, sunroof, head¬ 
ers, new tires 14900 479-8817 
after 6 pm 


77 BLACK DODGE STREET 
van, cruise control, mags, 
extras, 34,000 km. excellent. 
Offers on 15,800 for quick sale 
479 5053. 


1976 TOYOTA PICKUP, 
canopy, automatic, 29,750 miles. 
Excellent mechanical condition. 
Immaculate 14250.939 Redfern, 
595-6618 


1975 FORD *4 TON RANGER 
XLT camper special, dual tanks, 
trailer hookup, canopv with 
bunks, extras Top condition. 
After 5pm, 477-4939 


77 GMC VANDURA 15, ONLY 
38,000 miles, in excellent condi¬ 
tion, black with all chrome. Best 
offer. 479-0216 


FORD TON, 4 SPD , 
iced to sell 11488 Palm Auto 
arid Inc 3868385, 3342 Oak St. 


73 
prl^. 

Wor.v. „ 
Dealer 5260 


74 DODGE CLUB CAB, 8 CYL., 
AT,Onlvll722 PalmAutoWorld 
Inc 386-8385. 3342 Oak St Dealer 

5240 


60 G M C. PANEL. 6 CYL . AT. 
Only 1540 Palm Auto World Inc. 
-M 8385. 3342 Oak St. Dealer 
5260 


154 TRUCKS, BUSES 
AM VANS 


73 DATSUN PICKUP. 1600 CC. 
insulated canopv, snow tires. 80, 
000 miles, offers on 12100 . 

595-5849 


1976 DATSUN SPORT TRUCK 
and canopy. 40,000 miles, sun 
roof, white spoke wheels, 14500. 
598-5226 after 6. 


1976 4k TON CHEV CAMPER 
special plus 8' Galaxie camper, 
both very good condition, 19500 
479-0305 


1976 ECONOLINE. 6-CY- 
cllnder, 3- s peed Hurst, custom 
Interior 95% finished, many 
extras. Offers on 16000. 3860475 


1976 DATSUN LONG BOX WITH 
canopv and radio, 40,000 miles, 
good condition, offers on 13500. 
477-6936. 


1975 DODGE B200 , 6 CYLIN 

J • itic. 


power b 
382 6949 


brakes, insulated. 


leering, 
l. 12700 


1972 FORD Vi-TON. NEW 
power train, transmission, re¬ 
built 3 speed. 3Mcc. 12000 firm. 
384-6607, 5-7pm. 


74 FORD SUPER CAB, 40,700 
miles with 9W 75 Okanagan 
camper, 17500 or will sell separ 
ately. 478-7833 


1976 FORD 12 PASSENGER 
club wagon, power steering, 
power brakes, deluxe interior. 
S45Q0. 383-5432. 


'71 TOYOTA LANO CRUISER, 
soft top and hard doors, black, 
rebuilt motor. 13500. 2727 
Wale.386-5951, 478-3457 


1964ECONOLINE RUNSGOOD, 
new tires. 1690. or trade for car 
with V8 suitable for pulling boat. 
384 7873, 


1969 FORD % TON CAMPER 
special, new tires, dual tanks, 4 
speed trans. good condition, 
Offers on 11800, S9S-S483 


75 DODGE 6. AUTOMATIC, 
camper roof, all power, excel 
lent condition. 478-9430 


1973 FORD F2S0, POWER 
steering, power brakes, 390 V8. 
automatic 12700. 478-5950 


1961 MERCURY Vj TON PICK¬ 
UP, good tires and brakes. 1350. 
John 478-8840, 478-9812. 


1976 JIMMY 4X4, 33,000 MILES, 
350 automatic, 1-owner. 16500. 
477 3043. 


1976 FORD CUSTOM, Vj-TON, 
51,000 miles, good shape, with 
cap, 13800. 385-8770. 


76 JEEP CJS, LOW MILEAGE, 
V8, power brakes and steerlno 
381 5716. 


1958 CHEVY '4-TON, 70.000 
original miles. Call after 6 pm. 
382-6203 


77 VW VAN, EXCELLENT CON- 
ditlon. 24,000 miles. 17850. Phone 
477-0277. 


74 FORD COURIER. 60.000 
original, 12250 firm. Call after 6, 
384-4198. 


1972 CHEV >4-TON, GOOD CON- 
dition, canopy, good oas mile¬ 
age 12200 477 77T8after 5. 


69 KENWORTH LW 923. CAB 
and chassis, 335,5 ♦ 4.38.000 rear 
end. Must be seen. 112-743-4673. 


1973 DATSUN PICKUP TRUCK 
1600. Needs paint lob. 12000. 
474 2596 


1972 GMC VAN, CUSTOMIZED, 
new paint, transmission, 
sunroof, mags. 13950. 477-6003 


37 CHEV PICKUP, ALL ORIGI- 
nal parts, not running. 478-4097. 
Asking 1350 


'72 DATSUN PICKUP, WITH 
canopy, oood condition 12000 
381-0952. 


1979 V„ TON DODGE MAXI VAN. 
many extras, sacrafice 17200 
381-0149 592 1413. 


1975 DODGE 1-TON KARRY 
Van, 374)00 highway miles. Open 
to offers After 5, 478-3719 


1970 GMC V„ 4X4, P.S., P B . 4 
speed, electric winch, radiafs, 
13200 642-3281 after 8 pm. 


77 GMC % ton, 104)00 lb winch, 40 
channel CB. 382 4692 after 5:00 


MUST SELL BY WEEKEND. 66 
Ford Supervan, 1600 or best 
offer . 592-4217 


'74 Jimmy 4X4, good run 

ning condition. 12500 or best 
offer 479-1532. 


CUSTOM 1 TON PIZZA VAN, 
fully equipped, 1978 GM. 120,000 
firm. 112-749-6140 


1977 FORD 250 PICKUP. 6 
cylinder motor, posl traction, 
nice shape, 14500 3850677, Jim. 


FURNITURE VAN, 8X16, REA- 
sonable shape. 11800. 385-0677, 
Jim. 


NEW 1979 FORD TRUCK WITH 
canopy. Excellent shape. Offers 
386-3053. 


1977 DODGE RAMCHARGER. 
Deluxe model, mint condition, 
loaded with extras. 478-6512. 


SACRIFICE 1975 VOLKSWA- 
oen, good condition. 13,600. In¬ 
quiries 384-3938 


1977 GMC JIMMY, 4 WHEEL 
drive, excellent condition, 16500. 
479-7550. 


1966 CHEV 1 TON, RUNS WELL. 

12'x8' deck, 18" duals, 11200 . 
479-5591,6-8pm. 


1972 MAZDA PICKUP,. VERY 
clean, low mileage, no rust. 
385-5687 


1966 CHEV BABY DUAL 1 TON 
with hydraulic dump box and 
tool box. 474-2991. 


1972 EX-MAIL VAN, AUTO- 
matic, good running condition, 6 
cylinder, 12400. 112-745-3751. 


1973 FORD COURIER PICKUP, 
oood condition H300 or offers 
Salt Spring 112-653-4323 


1973 FORD F250, AUTOMATIC, 
good condition. 12495. Days 
656-6612; evenings 652 2006 


DESPERATE, MUST SELL, 
fully equipped, camperized 
school bus. 14400 382-7993 


1950 FORD Vj-TON, GOOD FOR 
restoration. 11000. 642-3949. 


63 MERC Va-TON, 4-SPEED, 
needs box 1450. 4786832 


1972 INTERNATIONAL '/a TON 
6 cylinder 4 speed, 1900.479-3938 


CAMPERIZED 74 OODGE 
van, 13950. 3884436 after Spm. 


72 FORD E200 VAN, 63,500 
miles. 386 1469 after 4pm 


1980 JEEP RENEGADE 
4796066 after Spm 


1978.CHEV VAN, 350 AUTO- 
matlc Call after 5. 3886894 


68 CHEVY % TON 4X4,11800 OR 
best offer. 382 1818 


67 DODGE WINDOW VAN, 
slant 6, runs well. 1595 4796107 


66 JEEP WAGONEER, 4X4 VI. 
55,000 miles. 478S074. 


1977 F(9rD % TON, 351, 4 

speed 13900 479-0548 


73 FORD %-TON 4X4 PICKUP, 
13500 or offers. 642-3958 


1963 INTERNATIONAL 
school bus, partially camper 
• zed 13000 firm 4 78 9954. 
3876554 after 4pm _ 

1977 K5 BLAZER 4X4, AUTO^ j 

matK. excellent condition, 21 ,- i 
000 miles 16JS0 or best offer 
474 1549 _ 

72 GMC SHORT VAN, CUSTO 


77 GMC VANDURA 25, 350 
automatic, 15800 382-4695. 


151 TIKES 


EDWARO MOTORS LTD. 

SEMPERITTIRE 

DISTRIBUTOR 
sizes in stock for your it 


151 TIRES 


FOUR 6.00—12 WHITEWALL 
tires, almost new. 180. 385-4396. 


FOUR 14X6 ALUMINUM SLOT 
mags, 4 hole, 1H». 479-4916 


in runucaioni 

NMsamct 


0*0 

TIRE LTD 


ALIGNMENT 

SPECIAL 

$12.88 

Most North American 
and Import Cars 
Trucks extra 

includes caster and camber act 
lustment, toe-in and checking of 
front end parts. 

We also: 

—Install front end parts 
—Supply and Install Monroe or 
Gabriel stocks. 

-Rebuild brakes 

Your Safety Service Center 
1620Blanshard 382 7283 


Osaka 1~0~1 
Motors 

TOYOTA DATSUN HONDA 
VW RABBIT 
Behind Douglas St. Oaky Queen 
3S3-3043 


1» 


PARTS. ACCESSORIES 
AM SERVICE 


WANTED: STEERING BOX 
for 66-75 Ford F100 4X4, 642 3958 


292 CHEV ENGINE COM- 
plefe. SIOO 656-8418 


AIR CONDITIONING UNIT 
S1S0. 384-5546. 


289 SHORTBLOCK. READY 
for rebuild, 1350. 384-5642 


ALMOST NEW, 4 SPOKE MA(U 
and tires, 5 stud 1350 3860913V 


truck, 1150 or offers. 478-3874. 


1M AUTO BOOT 
AND PAMTIMC 


EXPERT ICBC AND COLLI- 
slon work performed..Specializ 
I no In late model automobiles. 
Andrew Tlmmls 3886229. 




IK CUSAMTMCXS 
WUTQ 


NEVER 

SELL YOUR CAR 



CAR RADIO 

AM, AM/FM, AM/FM stereo, 
radios from 149.95 
Expert installation available 
8 C SOUND & RADIO Service 
931 FORT_383-4731 


SPRINGS 

Complete Repair Service for 
cars and trucks. LOGAN 
SPRING & SUSPENSION LTD., 
60 Crease Ave. (Behind Budget 
Rent-A-Truck) 384-2744 


YOU HAVE 
OUR OFFER 
INSTANT CASH 
Premium Automobiles 
Only 

DePAPE MOTORS LTD. 

77V PANDORA _ 3A4A03S 


EDWARD MOTORS LTD. 
IMPORT PARTSCENTRE 
Filters, Ignition, brakes, suspen¬ 
sion, clutches, engine parts, etc. 
TRY USTODAY 
Phone 384-8066 



T 



THURSDAY,UULY 24,19*0 

in CUFERS, TRAILERS 16J 


1UX »J 

HI ( BKMIOVXI V't HK 11 TTT) 


Ready to Serve 1 

★ VANGUARD ★ 

★ FRONTIER ★ 

★ PROWLER * 

★ TRIPLEE * 


CAMPERS, TRAILERS 
and MOTOR HOMES 


JUST TRADED★ 

1973 RUSTLES 
only 22,000 ml 
1977 FORD FI! 


1973 RUSTLER 20* Motor home. 

' “ miles 111,495 

_F150 w/canopy, 26,- 

000 miles 15595 

1974 VANGUARD 14' Trailer, 

loaded, Incl. toilet comp., 
clean 13495 

1974 terry J5' Trailer, loaded 
and clean 13495 

SCAMPER 8' Truck Camper. 

fridge, heater, lacks 12295 
1973 ARISTOCRAT 17* Trailer, 
fully self-contained, mint 13795 


Holidalre Travel Trailer, 
'mint' condition, well 
equipped with Awning, 3- 
Way fridge, 3 burner 
stove, oven, Furnace, 
Bitty, Dual propane and 
TV aerial. 

$4995 

Reg Midglev 
Motors Ltd. 

736Cloverdale 385-8754 
Dealer Lie. 5184 


over the island, fighting traffic, 
searching for campsites? Solve 
these problems by becoming 
owner of a lot equipped with a 21 ' 
trailer and metal shed In a pri¬ 
vately owned park on Shawnlgan 
Lake. Reduced to 114,500 for 
quick sale. Call Lanolev 5380404 
evenings. 


★ CLEAN* 
TRADES 

1979 Komforf 23* 5th-wheelll0995 

1974 Terry 30' Sttvwheel 18995 

1975 Scamper 13' Trailer 12695 

197813' Bofer Tral ler 13995 

1977 23' Prowler Trailer 17995 


RENTALS 

MOTORHOMES — CAMPERS 
—TRAILERS— 

July and Aug. bookings full. 
Book early for Sep) and Oct. 

PEDEN RV LTD. 
386-3464 

DOGWOOD TRAILER SALES 
PARTS—PROPANE 
WESTERN WILDERNESS 


2630 Devllle Road 
Highway 1 at Midstream 
4786841 Dealer 5390 


RADIATOR REPAIRS. FAST 
top quality repairs at Maurice's 
Auto Body, 427 Beta St., phone 
386-3381 or 384-8094. Located be¬ 
hind the Burnside Pay and Save 
Gas Station 



JAPANESE AND DOMESTIC 
car and truck parts. Serving i 
Great Victoria and the Saanich 
Peninsula. BC Auto Wrecking . 
Ltd, 7481 West Saanich Ro. 1 
652-1181. _ j 


CLEAN PRE-OWNER 
VEHICLES NEEDED 
LESCARR'S 

854 PANDORA AT QUADRA 


★ NEWUNIT ★ 
SPECIALS 

* 1980 FRONTIER 8' Camper, 

c/w heater, one only 13495 

V Plus Special Prices on 15 
other New Vanguard and 
Frontier Campers. 

★ 1980 PROWLER 17* Tandem 

Trailer, fully self-contained, 
one only $7595 

V Plus Special Prices on All Re¬ 
maining i960 Trailers. 

a 1980PROWLER 35' 5tt>-Wheel. 
for year-round living 118,995 

V Plus Special Prices on our 27*. 
32' and other 35' 5th Wheels. 

a I960 FRONTIER 18' Motor 
Home, fully equipped, ore only 

V Plus Special Prices on our Re- j 
maining Vanguard, Frontier 
and Triple E Motor 


BRITANNIA VANS 
1980 Maxi van conversions, 
raized roof, all appliances. 
Start i no from 114,900. 

1080 Golds tream 
478-2713_Dealer 6703 


1976 VANGUARD MOTOR- 
home. on Ford chassis, power 
steering, power brakes, cruise 
control, roof air. CB, AM/FM 
6-track stereo, trailer towing 
package. Immaculate condition. 
Nanaimo, 758-2718, after 5 pm. 


22' NOMAD TRAVEL TRAIL- 
er. tandem wheels, sleeps 6-7, 
3-wav fridge, stove and oven, full 
bathroom with shower, hot 
water heater, furnace, battery 
charger, equalizer hitch. 14800. 
595-5367 after 4 pm. 


1975 VANGUARD 20' Motor- 
home, excellent condition. 
112,995. 384-0213 CAMOSUN RV 
CENTRE, 650 Burnside E. 
Dealer 6732. 


385-4444 


VICTOR IA 4-WHEEL DRIVE 
FREE WHEELING HUBS for 
any make of 4-wheel drive 
597 Hillside at Rock Bay 
P-13531 _3866511 


CAR TRAILER. TANDEM. UN- 
finished, offers. Utility trailer, 
unfinished, offers. 474-1493 after 
5, 384 1231 between • and 4:30, 
ask for Pat. 


1965 FORD 260 CUBIC INCH 
engine, new pistons and rings, 
stock crank, new cam bearings 
and bored .030 over. Offers on 
1500. Ken 477 5584. 


OEMO CARS 

Built 67 Ford 1250.63 Ford 2 door 
hardtop, nice black button in¬ 
terior. 352 auto, 1200 firm. 

478-4248 


I PAY 

♦he Highest Prices tor 
Your Clean Used Car 
TRY US—YOU'LL BE 
SURPRISED! 

CONTACT 
CARL SPICER 
Used car mgr. 
Empress Pontiac Buick 
GMC LTD. 

382-712) DL01227A 


J Large Parts and 
Accessories Store 

V Repairs and Rentals 

PEDEN RV LTD. 

285QUESNEL ST. (D6418) 
386-3464 

! Behind Empress Pontiac Buick 



USED PARTS FOR DATSUNS. 
Toyotas, Pintos and Hondas. 
Bob & John's Auto Body, 
112-743-9141, Cobble Hill. 


FIAT SPYDER PARTS, RE 
bultt transmission, good engine, 
etc 385-7740 days, 383-1650 eve¬ 
nings. 


64 ACADIAN, EXCELLENT 
parts Including 68 synchro trans 
mission with hurst shifter. Good 
giass and rubber, etc 479 3864 


VICTORIA RECYCLING 
Free scrap car remova1.3886275 
pager 877 anytime, 381-5353 eve¬ 
nings^ 


MUST SELL, FIBERGLASS 
canopy with side louvered win¬ 
dows, good condition. 1350 or 
Offers. 479-8051. 


3-1976 FORD VAN BLUE PAS- 
senger seats. Excellent condl 
tlon, barely used. Call 479-0864 
after 5pm. 


WE NEED CLEAN 
USED CARS 

SEE LES STARLING 

SUBURBAN 
Motors Ltd. 

13377 Douglas 386-6131 

Dealer 5528 

WE BUY 
ALL 
MAKES 

McCallum Motors Ltd. 

Corner of Yates & Cook 
3826122 _D5603 


LAYTON- 
CHINOOKS 
LITTLE CHIEF 
KITKAMPERS 

76—23' Winnebago Chieftan mo¬ 
tor home 440. PS and PB. cruise, 
dual gas tanks, furnace, roof air, 
eye level oven, large fridge and 
freezer, generator power lacks, 
power step and Mkhelln tires. 
21,000 miles! 119,950 

77 — 32* Layton 5th wheel. Fully 
self contained plus large fridge, 
duct furnace, roof air with heat, 
in new condition. A bargain at 
19,950 

I 74 Sundowner HT trailer, frit 
1 and furnace 


76 FORD F250 CAMPER SPE- 
1 cial c/w 8' custom built camper. 
3 wav fridge, porta potti, fur 
I nace, intercom. Excellent condi¬ 
tion. 16495. complete. On display 
Colwood Car Mart, 474-2233. 

; D6716. _ 

! 1977 VW FACTORY VAN CON- 

version, excellent condition, 
i Propane and cold water. Only 
27,000 miles. This unit must be 
seen! Wllle Dodge Chrysler, 3200 
Douglas St. 382-2313. Dealer 
- 588I_- 

1979 FRONTIER 10* CAMPER, 
j stove/ oven, 3-wav fridge, 3- 
piece toilet facilities. Excellent 
condition. 1976 Dodge Club Cab 
; Camper Special, dual tanks, low 
I mileage, 111,500. Will sell separ- 
ately. 384-8803, 3846720. 

13*6 TRAILER, HOMEMADE. 
: fibreglass insulation, propane 
stove, sink. Icebox, lacks, elec¬ 
trical and water hookups Sleeps 
2 adults, and 1-2 children. 1875. 
2860 Tudor _ 

1979 SHAMROCK MOTOR 
home. 25' long, 20,000 km, bunk 
i house style, fully loaded, re- 
I placement value 1980 129,000. 
New costs $26,500 best offers on 
! 123,500. 112-722-2111 _ 

i 73 Timber land camper for im- 
i port truck, propane water, 
1 jacks, dual liohts, sleeps 4. Sell 
for 11700. or rent 150. per week. 
478-5011. 


ridoe 

11995 


63 RAMBLER AMBASSADOR 
wagon, full glass, body sound, 
repairable. Best offer gets whole 
car 592-3954. 


TURBO400 TRANS. 1150. CHEV 
^ tor 2 speed power glide, S75 
1955 57 Crev bellhousing, $40 
385-0027. 


VEGA PARTS 

3856775 befoce 2pm. 


EMILIO'S 

Auto Trans — Brake Specialists 
402-p Esquimau Rd. 386-S522 


CHEV 3 SPEED STANDARD 
trans with new floor shift, 175. 
3846290 after 4pm 


'68 727 TRANS, RAD AND 
grill for 61 Satellte. Steve 
478-5481. 


2 MOBILE HOME AXLES, 
hubs, tires, springs, 1250. 
474-2083 


HOLLEY 650 OOUBLE PUMP, 
170. Hooker headers, for 289 or 
302,175.478-3712 


WRECKING OR MAKE GOOD 
demo car: 68 Chev, 283 v8, auto- 
matie. 474-1848. 


WANTED: 67 OR LATER VW 
Beetle transaxle, 387-3609 days, 
(Lorraine) or 382-0139 evenings. 


283. TOTALLY REBUILT, 
many jtxtras. $450 or best offer 


DUAL POINT CRAGAR Dis¬ 
tributor for 302 Ford with 351 
cam. 165.2860 Tudor 


57 BAJA BUG, RUNS, NOT RE- 
istered, 477-4846 call after 


a' 


WANTED: SCATTER SHIELD 
for small block Chevy After 6 
weekdays, 474-1793. 


CHASSIS MOUNT CAMPER 
tie-downs, 140 each or 175 pair 
383-9847. 


phone 381-1227 after 7pm or 
477-0330 anytime 


6 CYLINDER 194 MOTOR AND 
transmission, 30,000 miles. 1110 
385-0326. 


FOUR TURBINE MAGS, 
14 "x6", to fit Toyota, complete 
1175. After 6pm, 388-7516 


61 FORD ENGINE FOR SALE. 
Excellent condition. 381-0167 or 
384-9294 ask for Tina or Dennis. 


with Pioneer speakers, brand 
new. 4789174. 


WANTED 

TRUCKS & VANS 
Also will take 
consignment vehicles 

GARDEN CITY AUTO 
LEASE CENTRE 
382-9111_2978 Douglas 


7221' Terry, fully self contained. 
Very clean $4995 

YOUR DOWNTOWN 
R.V. PARTS DEPOT 
1703 BlanshauFSt- 385-5012 

Dealer 5183 


EXPLORER 25' CLASS A MO- 
tor home, Dodge chassis with 413 
motor, low mileage. Too many 
extras to list. Immaculatecondi- 
I tion. 5986749, after 6 pm. _ 

I 1975 20' MOTORHOME, 360 V8, 
PS. PB. CC, air conditioning, 
new tires, awning, AM/FM, CB, 
completely self contained. $14,- 
900 or best offer. 478-51&4. 

I 31' PROWLER TRAVEL 
trailer, like new and 79 Deluxe 
! Ford Van with complete towing 
ackage. Call after 6 pm. 


package 

383-7538. 


INSTANT CASH 
FOR YOUR CAR 
Any make or model. 

METRO HONDA 
3886921 



1980 COLEMAN-Seneca tent 
trailer, loaded. 384-0213. 
CAMOSUN RV CENTRE, 650 
Burnside E Dealer 6732. 


1975 DODGE SPORTSMAN 
1 Royal, complete van conversion, 
I in excellent condition. 360 V8, 
61,000 miles. 18700 or offers. 
| 477-9761 


CASH FOR GOOD. 
CLEANUSEDCARS 
THOMAS PLIMLEY LTD. 
1010 Yates St._382-9121 


CASH FOR GOOD USEDCARS. 
B Madsen Motors. 2691 Sooke 
Rd (Glen Lake), 478-5011. Dealer 
5450. 


196466 VALIANT STATIONWA 
oon. 6-cyclinder, tested, good 
condition. 11000 maximum. 
386-1368. 


CASH FOR CLEAN CARS 
E 8 K MOTORS LTD. 

642 Burnside E. 3836231 


! TRAILER SUPPLIES 
LTD. 

PROPANE —REPAIRS 
AND 

APPLIANCE SERVICE 
Custom Building 
. and 

Van Conversions 
Large Parts 
and Accessories Store 

652-3941 

Mdn.-Sat.9to5 
Sun.12 to 4 

6459 Patricia Bay Hwy, 


17' TRAVEL TRAILER, 
1 sleeps 6, fridge, stove, furnace, 
toilet, electric brakes, equalizer 
hitch and bars. Good condition. 
$3500. 381 2028. 


HAVE CASH FOR A 65 TO 70 
Mustang or 67 to 69 Cougar. 
384 8075 Pager 1332. 


CAR IN GOOD CONDITION, 
able to go through Esso Clinic 
test. 3866545 


1977-79 FORD F250 RANGER 
XLT or Larlet, 460 motor, air, 
camper special. 478 7130. 


69-70 CHEV OR PONTIAC. 1300 
or less. 479-0135 


lit CAMPERS, TRAILERS 



WHOLE OR PARTS. 64 RAM 
bier American 220 automatic. 
642-4359 


65 CHEVELLE. A STOCK CAR, 
new^enjXre. lots of spare parts 


WANTED 780X15 "TIRE AND5 
stud rim to fit Ford pickup 

384-1089 


WANTED: FRONT END 1*71 
Plymouth Crkfcct Mo corrosion. 


72 GMC SHORT VAN. CUSTO Most sizes In stock <1 
mized. brand rew 60 watt stereo Pori car Try our prl 
package. 15508 or best otter 38 1 8881 

6+4JH y - - - 


1980 SECURITY Class A 
24W motorhome, fully 
loaded with the com¬ 
forts of home. $35,900 

1980 SECURITY wide- 
body 20' motorhome, 
fully loaded — AM/FM 
cassette, air condition¬ 
ing, flush toilet. $23,900 

1977 VW factory van con¬ 
version, excellent con¬ 
dition. Propane and cold 
water. Only 27,000 
miles. This unit must be 
seen! 


I*t* OOOOE MAXI VAN. 
automatic. power steerlno. low 
mileage $45flu or nearest otter 
387 7116, *am > pm_ 

78 TOYOTA LANDCKUlfcfcft 
pirfup 4*4 4 spe e d canopy, 
many extras, 1S,M8 miles 
387 tell ONarson 17)88 

»VK> t < ONOl iNt FORO vAM 
full * < empe# <zad pood cond< 

16*441 $4*80 or bast after1866181 
after ppm 


FOUR 15L68 TIRES, LESS 
than 1088 milts, mounted on 
Citev S on 5. Ha/ tornados, with 

w _ 

NEW TIRES 

Four l»" Fires t on e steel betted 

ggjosvtwas 


73 PINTO WAGON FOR PARTS. 

ivies’ ,ltc 

HI PERFORMANCE 427 MUN I 



WE HAUL SCRAP 


'iMT 




SCRAP METAL ANO CARS 

rT' iai V’T"*-* 0 ^ 


382 2313 
3200 DOUGLAS 
AT CLOVE ROALE 

DCALE* Mil 

1*7* PODGE CAMPfi NIZE D 
x*r> van. 1*4 Main*. «uto 
m**(c. NM, UMfin* poww 

see*,” 

'BPS .* 1 


LEAVING COUNTRY SOLID, 
! high compression motorhome. 
22' custom made with quality 
materials. Offers to 16,500. 

, 479-7571. 


canopy, aluminum skin, fully in¬ 
sulated and lined, Interior light, 
4 windows. Asking 1325. Phone 
evenings 656 7686 or 656-5044 


miles, c/w 1971 10' Freeway 
camper, self contained, best 
deal in town at 12500. After 
4:30pm, 383-3933 


NEW 1981 

NOMADS 
HERE NOW 


9' CAMPER INCLUDES ROOF 
rack and ladder, hydraulic 
camper jacks, siove with oven 
and porta potti. $2000 or best 
offer. 727-2940 


at 

1980 PRICES 

18Vj' Fully equipped, Incl. 

18Vj* Fully equipped Incl. bath¬ 
tub. 

21* Fully self-contained and 
winterized for year-round 
use. 


TOCM&OSEFROM 

PROPANE 

PARTS—SERVICE 

BOB'S 

MOBILE HOMES LTD. 

25 Crease 386-3623 

Dealer 5689 


V HC 


TRIANGLE 
HOMES LTD. 

INDOOR 
SHOWROOM 
OPEN 7 DAYS 

Weekdays 8 a.m.-9p.m. 

Sat ,9a m.-Sp m 
Sun., Noon-5 p m 
CARWASH OPEN 24 HRS 
Franchised dealer tor Citation, 
Corsair, Aristocrat. Centurion, 
Falkland. Southwtnd. Jamboree 
and Diplomat 

In Sidney on the Pat Bay Hwy., 
across from Sandown Raceway 
656-1122 6567251 

Dealer lOSSB 



Dealers Far: 

★OKANAGAN* 

★SCAMPER* 

★COLEMAN* 


FOR RENT 

25' Pace Arrow motorhome, 
sleeps 7.1300 a week, 84 a mile. 
Last 2 weeks in Auoust still 
available. 477 7094. 


with Galaxie camper unit, power 
steering, power brakes, auto¬ 
matic transmission, radio, low 
mileage After 6pm, 598-1191. 


RAVEN RV'S 
VAN CONVERSIONS 
479-3178 


plefely self-contained, with 
extras, ready to go. 15500. 
382 2167 or 3846072. 


15' TRAVEL TRAILER, 
sleeps 5. Icebox, propane stove 
and oven, electric brakes, oood 
condition. 11500 383-9073 


FORD 8' FIBREGLASS TRUCK 
canopv, sliding glass side win 
dows, in oood condition. $S00 
382 5266 


1976 COACHMEN 23' MOTOR 
home, excellent condition, 16.000 
miles. Ford 460 chassis. 3836212 
or 383-9168. 


1979 8' CUSTOM BUILT CAMP 
er, 3-way fridoe, stove, heater, 
jacks, excellent condition, offers 
on 13200. 479-6377 


URGENT. MUST SELL 11*6" 
deluxe Caveman, completely 
sett-contained, like new condi 
tlon, many extras 4760629 


RENTING^ MOTORHOME. 23' 
Winnebago 1250 week, M mile, 
available August 73 30, after 
I)rfr479-3421. 


69 CHAMPION MOTORHOME. 
26' with 110 volt generator, fully 
equipped. Government sticker 
to June It 15688. 384-1350 


72 GMC VAI 

Steeps 2 On 
i s Colwood C 


06716 


VAN CONVERSION 
*n display 149*5 es 
Car Mart. 4762233 


NEW MAXIVAN CONVER 
sion. fully camparlzad. raised 
roof, factory air and cruisa. 
extras, warranty 387SSaaton 


in CAMnX$, TRAHZJIS 

<■4 H0TM HOWS 


U VANGARD 11' CAMPER, 
fully self contained, immaculate 
condition. $4500 or offers. 
3861677 after 5pm, 


1971 FORD 300 ECONO CON- 
yerslon. stove with oven, fridge, 
toilet, furnace, 8-track radio 
Stereo 385-2179, 478-1418. 


15W* SOUTH PARK TRAVEL 
trailer, sleeos 6, fridge, stove, 
oven, furnace, toilet Good con- 
dltlon. 12650. <62-3853or 642 5476 


17' SOUTH PARK. 1970, 
steeps 6. sink, stove, fridge, to! 
let site 109 Fort Victoria. Asking 
11800 479 7450 after 5. 


189 MORAL HONES 

worms 


FREE 


1973 WINNEBAGO, IMMACU- 
late condition. Michellns, 
extras, one owner, sacrifice. 
385-6259. 


nished. Sell or trade for 27* Tra- 
vel Trailer and cash. 
112-722 2309 


Mobile RV Doctor 

All RV Repairs —479-2119 


BOAT LOADERS FOR CAMP- 
ers, motor homes, installed. 
478-3796 or 478-2754 


WE WILL BUY YOUR GOOD 
used Rec. Vehicle. Peden R.V. 
Ltd., 28S5Quesrel St., 3863464 


5TH WHEEL 77 PROWLER 30*. 
clean, $9,750 firm. 652-2070, 
652-3232. 


11* CAVEMAN CAMPER. Ex¬ 
cellent condition. $3600. Phone 
after Spm, 479-0228 


8' UNICORN CANOPY. 2 IN 
side liohfs, roofrack, bed, and 
more. 3866347 


1973 VW WESTPHALIA, MUST 
sell, leaving country. Any offer. 
Bill 388-5523 or 4794)719. 


1967 16' VANGUARD TRAILER, 
stove, fridoe, sleeps 4, $1800. 
595-7377 after Spm 


1972 TRAILER. 16W', SLEEPS 
six, hot water, toilet, $3500. 
3867256. 


16' FLYTE TRAILER, SLEEPS 
6, excellent condition, $2400. 
6566851,6567092, 479-1758 


RV SITE ANO MEMBERSHIP, 
Honeymoon Bay Association, 
Cow I chan Lake. 598-2577 


1972 WINNEBAGO 19' VERY 
good condition. Steeps 4. Fully 
contained. 18900 598-9430. 


8' CAMPE R. SLEE PS 4, STOVE 
and fridge, good condition. $1400. 
478-4943. 


PRIVATE, 30' WILDERNESS 
trailer, 2 doors, top shape, ask- 
Ing 18,500- Mr Reid 6563413. 


9V»' VANGUARD CAMPER, 
fridoe, stove, heater, good condl 
tlon, $2000. 477-3948. 


74 TERRY 25', SELF CON- 
taired, good to live In for 2 or 
travel. 15400.6564161 


MOTOR CYCLE CARRIER* 
factory manufactured for motor 
homes. 477-4720. 


CHASSIS MOUNT CAMPER 
tie-downs, $40 each or $75 pair 
383-9847. 


UTILITY TRAILER. 4'X8' IN- 
side, wired and tested. $150. 
479 7485 


8' CAMPER WITH JACKS. 3- 
burner stove, ice box. $1300 or 
offers. 478-4770. 


TENT TRAILER. EXCEL 
lent conditon. $500. Phone 
595-1617, 


SEARS SOFTTOP TENT 
trailer, excellent condition. 
384-4238. 


SHORT BOX CANOPY, GOOD 
condition, $175. Equalizer hitch, 
160. 479-7790. 


OKANAGAN IMPORT CAMP- 
er, very clean, oood condition. 
385-5687. 


1978 VANGUARD 8' CAMPER, 3 
wav fridge, stove, furnace. Hy- 
draullc lacks 13600 382-0798 


74 WESTPHALIA 
Excellent condition. 44,000 
miles. $7,000. S9S0705 


CUSTOM MADE FALTA 
craft camperette, black and red. 
otters. 476602Q 


FOR RENT 1970 FORD VAN, 
fully camperized, sleeps 2. $150. 
per week, 104 mile. 478-0208. 


74 BAR TH_,M OTORHOME. 
383-1212, afTer6 479-02 #. 


11' CAMPER, GOOD CONDI- 
tion. 12150 or offers. 4763892, 


Our latest Craigflower Rd. de¬ 
velopment! First homes going in 
July 1. Only 2 sites left! Enjoy the 
maintenance free living like a 
condo with all the benefits of 
owning a lot without the high cost 
JobuyTt! Look into ore of the best 
home investments of the 80's! 
Homes from 728 to 1440 sq ft 
completely finished inside and 
outside with warranty View our 
showrooms in Langford (off 
Trans Can Hwy) & "Esquimau 
Craigflower Rd". 

ASK ABOUT "OAKVIEW ES¬ 
TATES" ALREADY TAKING 
REFUNDABLE DEPOSITS ON 
SITES. 

Buy Right Homes 

DL6162 4762154 383 2912 

Langford open daily till 8, Craio- 
f lower, 10-SFrl • Tues 


38462H 


FOR RENT OR SALE 
MOTORHOMES 
WEEKLY —MONTHLY 

CJJY ZWTO l-t 


CAMPERETTE, FITS IM- 
pori, 1400 or best otter . 383-8566 


1976 OKANAGAN 9VV CAMP- 
er, lots of extras 14506.385-5171. 


8' FIBERGLASS CANOPY, 
good condition, $350. 478-9224. 


LONGBOX CANOPY, INSU- 
lated, with lights, 1400. 598-7656. 


WANTED: SHINOOK MOTOR 
home. 6562992. 


ItS KOHU HOKES 

worms 


LISTING & APPRAISAL 
H&R MOBILE HOMES 

We h*ve bums who neeO vour 
home-Now" 

Efficient, courteous ser¬ 
vice. 

478-8354 


AFFORDABLE 

3 bedroom, V/» baths, including 
5 appliances on an exceptionally 
nice large lot In Florence Lake 
Park Ideal for family. $44,000. 
Take possession In August 
47675*7 after 5:30. No Agents 


12x68 mobile home, ample stor 
age and parking, patio and 
workshop, huge secluded treed 
lot, adult section at Mill Bay 


112743-9544. 


PRICED TO SELL FAST! 
12x68 4 appl, wrap around sun- 
deck, fenced yard, separate 
D R 4762154 Buyrlght D6162 


1152 SO. FT. OF LUXURY! 
Eye level oven, sunken tub, wet 
bar. beiiutlful water view. Nice! 
474-2154, Buyrlght. 06162. 


5MIN. TOCITY! 

1979 14x60. Beautiful home! A 
buy! 4762154. Buyrlght P6162 


ONLY $9600! 

A great 2 BR. waterfront home! 
Call 4762154, Buyrlght. 06162. 


SPACE AVAILABLE. $75. 7111 
Westcoast Rd. Sooke. 3860857 or 
642-4277. 


WANTED: BY RESPONSIBLE 
working couple, trailer to rent or 
rent toown 3867838 or 385-8046 


12' X 56' KNIGHT MOBILE 
home, with sun porch Must be 
moved 4764003 or 4762330. 


171 SUMMER HOMES, 
COTTAfiES mi RESORTS 


TO LEASE. COTTAM POINT 
(south of Parksvllle) waterfront 
bunoelow, architecturally de¬ 
signed, 3 bedrooms, fireplace, 
electric heat, carpeted, semi 
furnished. Available early Sep¬ 
tember to end of Jure. $550 per 
month. 5963793 after 3 pm. 


LAKE COWICHAN WATER 
front 2-bedroom furnished cot¬ 
tage, boat ramp, golf course Vi- 
biock Week from August 2nd- 
September. 112-745-3436. 


SELF CONTAINED SUITE 
available weekends or weekly, 
10 miles south of Campbell 
River, ocean view. Reasonable 
rates 112-9265106 


LAKEFRONT HOUSEKEEP 
Ing units available. Shawnaire 
Resort. RR1 Shawnigan Lake 
112 743-2062 


111 TOURIST 


HARTNELL HOUSE 
1204 Yates St. 

Fully equipped modern kitchen 
unit by week, day (10 min ). 
Close to downtown. Linen, 
dishes, C.T.V, parking. 3860742, 
3862812 


NOW AVAILABLE 
Immaculate ore bedroom suite 
in prime quiet location 2 blocks 
from downtown New furnish¬ 
ings and Interior decor. Weekly 
rates 3861776 or 3867324 


OCEAN FRONT EXECUTIVE 
home, fully furnished, secluded 
with beautiful panoramic view 
of Victoria. 2 week minimum 
4763680 


OCEAN VILLAGE 
Luxurious, fully - furnished 
oceanfront condominium by day 
or week Adults only 140 $70 per 
day 642 5254. eves 642-5119. 


DUNCAN B.C. 

Thunderbird Motel 
New units. 748-8192 


BEAUTIFUL HOME, FOUR 
bedrooms, fully equipped, ore 
block beach, bus stop. 2-week 
minimum. 382-83)1, 3864353. 


FAMILY SUITE ON THE 
Goroe waterfront In a quiet 
home, by day or week. Available 
July 2L.382-S263. 


HOUSKEEPING ROOM WITH 
TV, linen and maid service sup- 
plled, 175 week 382-8646 


IIS 


CONVUfSCHT 
AHD REST HONES 


JOAN CRESCENT MANOR 
Retirement Home 
Under New Management 
1045 Joan Crescent 
Rooms Now Available 
Mrs. M Baker 595-1315 

A Touch of Distinction 


IM ROOM BOARD 


IRETIRED PENSIONER, 
room and board, everything in¬ 
cluded 384-645? 




MOBILE HOME PARK 
POSSIBLY 

CANADA'S FINEST PARK 

Scenic Water 
and Mountain View 
Overlooking 
The Straits of 
Juan de Fuca and 
the Olympics 

SITES AVAILABLE 

Phone 642 5486/642-5972 


Thinking of Selling?? 


ensure your best market price 
call Buy Right Homes Our ex¬ 
perienced sates staff and exten¬ 
sive sates promotions has result¬ 
ed in most of our listings selling 
m 2 4 weeks! Ask about our 


ROOM AND BOARD AVAIL- 
able August 1st, Quadra-Lake- 
hlll area 3868228. 


113 ROOMS TO RENT 


NICE ROOM USE OF HOT- 
plate, fridge Non-drinker only. 
Near Woolco 3861389 


194 ROOMS WANTED 


FOR QUIET YOUNG MAN, 
non smoker, non drinker, prefer 
ably in Esqulmalt area. 
381-6959. 


WANTED CHEAPER ROOM 
to rent, 6563490 


117 


NOOSEKEEFNIfi 
ROOMS TO RENT 


RICHARDSON CLOSE DOWN- 
town. 3 bedroom suite, fur¬ 
nished. Light cooking, fridoe, 
ore bedsitting room furnished, 
light cooking, fridoe. Both ac¬ 
commodations for quiet, single 
working persons or students 
Many buses available. Refer 
ences. 385-7052 ; 7pm. 


kitchenette. W/W, close to 
Cook and Fairfield, suitable for 
quiet non smoking lady. 


FURNISHED BEDROOM, Liv¬ 
ing room and kitchenette, heat, 
light and water. Quiet working 
lady. Burnside, bus at door 
382-6664. 


1 BEDROOMS, AUGUST 1 AND 
September 1, share kitchen and 
bath, females only $92-4878 


FOR SINGLE GIRL. FAIR- 
field, share beth, utilities includ- 
led.814130-9627 _ 


ROCKLAND AREA 
i tor f 


program or our g 

_ r m (tent dteTtar_ 

appraisal Go with the company 
with me proven sates racord! 
"THEPROFESSIONALS" 

BUY RIGHT HOMES LTO. i 
4762154 _ 3862917 ■ 


NEAR DOWNTOWN. CLEAN, 
quiet jroom. for quiet person 


m tnumotSTt 


david burr 


GOLDSTREAAA 

MOBILE HOMES LTD. 

T/C*n My Sooke Lk Rd .--. 

llB 384-93351 

TJbdr O/wMte*N»L,a*oc«t«o 



C-7 

APMTHEHTS TO 

R€HT UHFUHHISH0J 


Aj£meh, 

WW 2713 


unt^fS’r 


2713 OUADBA 
381-2113 . 

HERE ARE JUST A FEW QF 
OUR MANY EXCLUSIVE 

LISTINGS. ,, , lw 

1.Central Park. Available now 
$160 ) BR. Ground floor^Heaf, 
H/water,over40 

2 Rockland. Aug 1 1350. T BR. 
f/s. w/d. w/w, non smoker 

3 Sooke Aug 1. $175. 1 BR-.'wfw. 

f/s, h/water. Children rtegotl 
able vw-t« 

4.Fairfield. Available now 1300 
I BR Laundry facilities. Roo m 
and board 

5.Sidney Available now 1350.1 
BR. Ground floor, c/v, patio, 
parking, swimming pool 
6 Hillside-Quadra. Aug l.«175.2 
BR. Children welcome. 

7. Hillside. Now. $400. 2 BR 
Large apartment. 

8. Esquimau. Aug 1. $375. 2 BR, 2 
patios, f/s. w/d, drapes. Small 
baby welcome. 

9 Beach Or Aug 1. $750 TBR 
Watervlew. 2nd floor. Hear. Chit 
dren negotiable 

10. Sidney. Aug 1. $425. 2- BR 
Large unit top floor, f/s, drapes 

HOMEHUNTERS THE COM 
PANY WITH THE LARGEST 
SELECTION OF EXCLUSIVE 
LISTINGS. 


OPEN 7 DAYS 
A WEEK 

381 2113-Fee 130 





RENTAL TOWNHOUSES 

1506 Admirals. 

Special features upon comple 
tion of project: <**. 

* Indoor Swimming pool. 

* Sauna 

a Includes —stove trig, drapes, 
carpets. 

a 2 bedroom suites available 
September l 
a 2 Bedroom from $425 
Free Parking 
a Children accepted. 

NO PETS PLEASE.* ... 
Contact Resident Managers 
Gary & Wendv Hardlsty 

383-4757 ~ — 

Pacific Valley MgmU 


OCEAN VILLAGE 


OCEANFRONT 
Four unique waterfront U>ca 
tions on Sooke Basin ranging 
from compact 1 and 2 bedrooms 
to fully equipped luxurious town 
houses, apartments, bungalows, 
duplexes. Acres of landscaped 
grounds and flowers with ^pec 
tacuiar views. Quiet country 5et 
ting minutes from downtown 
Victoria. Located 7 miles ffOm 
the Village of Sooke with two 
supermarkets and plazas,' 3 Ti 
nanclal institutions, churches, 
doctors, lawyers, chlrope#eia« 
etc., plus activities ranging from 
the Legion to Old Age Pensioner s 
Club. Deep water moorage is 
available in the basin. Hiking, 
horseback riding, huntina salt 
and fresh water fishing, crab 
bing, shrimping, golfing are 
some of the year round Aciiyi 
ties. Ocean village is a ofac* to 
grow and live in magnificent * 
surroundings. Yearly leases 
with rents from S260S600 per 
month. For Information regard¬ 
ing availability to lease phone 
64? S2S4 Adults only 



—ON THE WATER— 

* 77 Gorge Rd. Wes* 

All units contain fireplaces. 5pe-_ 
cial features on completion of 
project: SWIMMING.POOL, JA 
CUZZI, SAUNA, TENNIS 
COURT. RACKET BALL 
COURT, Two bedroom’suites 
from 1495. Contact resident Man 
aoer. 

MR TREDGETTat383-7417 
Adult Or iented—ho pets please 
Pacific Valley Mgmt • 


GORDON HEADh 

3-BR suite in 4-vr-old home Kids 
welcome! Large fenced yard and 
driveway and private sundeck! 
(557) Fee 

rente* 38M234 


ROCKLAND SQUARE 
3 bedroom condominium (f,a6o 
sq.ft ), full basement, and’appli 
ances including dishwashfer. 
garberator. vacuum system 
$750 per month References re 
quired Pore 652-4464 local 18/19 
or 477-7528. 


AVAILABLE SEPTEMBER 1, 
1385. Large unique 1 bedroom 
character suite, centra I lyjocat 

S d. Responsible working couple 
nlv. No children or pets Heat 
and hot water included. Damage 
degx>sit and references required 


WINDSOR COURT 

Available August 1, 1 br, 1245 2 
br, $310. Heat included. Full rec 
reation facilities. No children,no 
pets. Resident manager Mr 
Mundy, 385-6075 


$265 PER MONTH. 2 ROOM, 
separate bathroom, bachelor 
suite, in Fernwood area. Lolotk 
from bus, prefer older wqrking, 
non-smoking, non-drinkln 
son. Call between lOarr 
381 1948 


ROCKLAND 

Brand new 1 bedroom su tet on- 
vate entrance Teak catenets, 
carpeted, fridoe, stove, washer, 
dryer, electric heat. Noctiitdren. 
pets, or smokers. August 1st 
1350. 479-8711 


ESQUIMALT APT,., 

Nice 2 bedroom Apt. far.,rent 
Children Welcome, near Ndden 
W W carpets, stove, trtdcjo 
Please call re Info DAVE 
385-4832 or HAL 382-8101. * ' 
National Trust (Douglas) 


BRND NEW SUITE 
i-BR with private entrance in 
older home. (580). Fee. 

rentex 3*1-1734 


1 BRCORNER SUITE 
With wrap around balcony! In 
modernbidg! (587). Fee 

rentex 3*1-1234 


- TVT7— 

NEAR STADACONA PARK 
2 BR suite in Victorian homo 
with hardwood floors and heat 
incl Onlv 1450! (575) 

RENTEX 381 1234 FEE 


AUGUST I. ONE AND TWO 
bedroom suites, in a quiet and 
lovely surrounding locations 
Quiet single lady, no pets 
382-5240 


ll"V.ntLUK JU ■ I w , >IT|. **'**. 

Laundry facilities 5967677 alter 


LARGE I BEDROOM SUITE 
w/w carpet, some furniture 
qutef block, no children or gets 


WATERFRONT. I BEDROOM 
suite, wxw. fridge range MOb 
hydro not included AveilahW 
September 2nd 595 5886 after 


OLD ENGLISH ST VLE 
? BR suite with pr.vete tour • 

RENTjx Mi l?ii 

ESGUIMAL I BE AU6r 
lorae 1 BR m new bide' Carpet . 
andWrnebeftanv 7jP> 
BrMTgk JBt tfu ill 































































































































































































































































































































































































































C-8 ’ 

200 IfUTMEMTS TO 
KMT UNFURNISHED 


DELUXE 2 BR 
Near park. Onlv $375! (594) 
RENTEX 381 1234 FEE 

TOP FLOOR CORNER BACHE- 
lor suite In modern building near 
downtown. $195. 384 5827 

BACHELOR SUITE. FAIR 
a. full) 


201 


APARTMENTS TO 
RENT FURNISHED 


LUXURY LIVING 
Completely remodelled, taste¬ 
fully decorated and furnished 
one bedroom apartments In¬ 
cludes maid service, 


maid service, indoor pool, 
sauna, whirlpool iacuzzl. cen¬ 
trally located. Rents 
Apply 


.. __5 from $500. 

>lv In person 425 Quebec 
Street. 

TO SUBLET: ONE BEDROOM 
fully furnished apartment in 
modern block. Swimming pool 
and tennis court No children or 
pets Saanichton area. Available 
1st August for 6 month period 
$350 per month, utilities not In¬ 
cluded. Responsible adult(s) 
only References. 652 1288 

FULLY FURNISHED 
1-BR suite with pool, games 
room and tennis courts. In Sid¬ 
ney area! (567) Fee. 

rente* 381-1234 


HARTNELL HOUSE 
1204 Yates St. 

Fully equipped modern kitchen 
unit by week, day (10 min.). 
Close to downtown. Linen, 
dishes. C.J.V.. parking. 383-0742, 
3862812. 

NOW AVAILABLE 
Immaculate one bedroom suite 
in prime quiet location 2 blocks 
from downtown. New furnish 
inos and Interior decor. Weekly 
rates. 384 1776or 388-7324 

DOWNTOWN 
__ __ BR avail now! I 
appls and util. Incl. (566). 
RENTEX 381-1234 FEE 

HIGH ROCKLAND, PARTLY 
furnishedbachelor suite. Refer¬ 
ences. $326. 592-2265. 


202 FURNITURE 
TO RENT 


CAMOSUN 
FURNITURE 
. RENTAL 

3 Hoorn groups, bachelor suites, 
individual pieces, hlde-a-beds. 
rollawavw month !o month. 

833 Yales_383-3655 


Mais Furniture 

36 vrs. serving Victoria! 3 room 
groups, bachelor suites, color 
TV's, maior appliances 


1821 CXX* 


385-2435 


203 APARTMENTS 
WANTED 


RESPONSIBLE COUPLE, MID 
20's, seek 1 or 2 bedroom apart¬ 
ment in older block or character 
house No pets, no children Ap¬ 
proximately $350 August or Sep¬ 
tember 1st. Phone before Ham, 
595 5616 


A PLACE TO CALL HOME. 
Bachelor or 1 bedroom apart 
ment needed Immediately by 
rjuiet working woman. Prefer 
James Bay will consider any 
central area. Marian, 382-8171, 
9 5. 


pets or children requires bright 
spacious. 1 bedroom suite in 
character borne, for September 
l Good references supplied. 
595 8838. v 


quiet female church- 

worker requires a 1 bedroom 
apaprtmeot in the Fairfield 
area, will pav up to $230 Please 
phone Ruth Dunbar at 477-8613or 
384 5734. 


quiet famltv, 2 or 3 bedroom 
apartment.’ Rent $250. With bal¬ 
cony and appliances Preferably 
semi furnished but not essential 

595-5971 


PHYSICIAN REQUIRES IM 
mcdiatefv. 1 or 2 bedroom 
apartment. Maximum $400. Pre¬ 
ferably older house. Oak Bav 
Jubilee-Rockland area. 
65? 3278c 


,‘.v 

FEMALE UNIVERSITY PRa 
lessor requires sunny apartment 
in James Bay or Fairfield. Days 
477 691$ local 4245; evenings 

381-0336. 


CAREER LADY. NON 
smoker, seeks bright l bedroom 
character suite, max $230. Ref 
erences. ,387-5041. After 5pm, 
386-8349. . 


RESPONSIBLE YOUNG MAN. 
ige 30, requires lodging, prefer 
iblv to sublet small apartment 
or August. Arriving Victoria 
st,T 657 1249 


tor 

August 


QUIET RESPONSIBLE WORK 
ing male needs one bedroom 
apartment by September 1st. 
Rent up to $300 month Refer 
ences. 385 7365 after 5pm. 


WORKING GIRL DESIRES 1- 
bedroom suite or apartment in 
Oak Bay/ Fairfield area. 
592-0 tti; fMve message. 


NON SMOKING THIRD YEAR 
university student seeks a two 
bedroom apartment to share 
with same. S92-0022 


YOUNG. WORKING COUPLE 
would like 2 bedroom apartment 
in quiet building. Please call 
595 4498 after 5pm. 


MOTHER WITH 15 MONTH 
old baby looking for cheap rea¬ 
sonable aparfment, 2-bedroom. 
$260 477-5230. 


WANTED: APARTMENT OR 
character suite to rent, quiet 
working male, nonsmoker, up to 
$300 per month 598 9388 


QUIET NONSMOKING FE 
male student seeks bachelor. 1 
bedroom suite 592 4091 after 
5pm~ 


IN JAMESBAY, MOTHER AND 
two oirls. excellent references, 
up to $350 386-9659 


VERY QUIET FEMALE 
wants small bachelor or suite. 
Phone 479-3081 after Spm 


SINGLE RESPONSIBLE 
working lady requires 1 bedroom 
suite A&Aff- 385-6774. 


204 SHARED 


WANTED MEDITATIVE FUN 

atmosphere near water tor 
growth and comfort combining 

< on tact with nature and societal 

< tranpe via holistic healthful liv¬ 
ing without drugs for mother and 
5 year ow daughter with shower 
and bath. I am close to being a 
sett supportino professional and 
want hebslK education for my 
doughi-ill 2424 


20S RENEW. MENCIES 


THURSDAY, JULY 24,1980 


PLEASE CALL. MANY FINE 
TENANTS WAITING TO RENT. 
WE AR'E COMPUTERIZED. 
CALL NOW FOR YOUR FREE 
A >! 

RENTEX 

710 MARKET ST. 

38^7368 


4#^ 


unters 

2713 QUADRA 


Save voursetf time and money 
List your vacancies with us and 
eliminate endless calls. We do 
your advertising for free. Open 7 
days a week. 

311-2113 


WE HAVE YOUR LANDLORD! 
—COMPUTERIZED SYSTEM 
—QUALIFIED STAFF 
—GUAR AN TEED SERVICE 
—MON.-SAT. 10 AM.-8 P.M. 

RENTEX 

710MARKET ST. 

381-1234 


204 DUPLEXES 
TO RENT 


SIDNEY 

3 bedrooms. V/» baths, fireplace, 
available Sept. 1st., 1980 NO 
PETS, must nave reference one 
year lease required. 

$500. per month 


__ . .. per moot . _ 
PETS, must have reference. 
Available August 15.1980 


3 bedrooms. Fireplace. Brand 
new. close to school, available 
August 15th. 1980. $500. per 
month, NO PETS must have ref¬ 
erence, one year lease required. 

Phone Mike 656-4066 
or Vic 656-4003 


AJj&neh 

WW 2713 


unters 

2713 QUADRA 
381-2113 


James Bay. July 23. $520. 3 BR. 
w/w. FP. f/s. util. pd. Near 
Breakwater. Children welcome. 
Cedar Hill. July 16. $475. 2 or 3 
BR's. Hydro incl. Garage, patio, 
FP. Children and pets welcome. 
Mon Frl 9-9 
Sat Sun 10-5 
381-2113 Fee $30 


FOR RENT, BRAND 
new home 3 bedrooms, 1 Vi 
bathrooms. Close to town 
and all amenities. One 
year lease, no pets. From 
$600. per month. 

Patterson Construction 
Ltd. 

386-6301. Eve. 656-1455 


Quiet, modern, 2 bed 
room, finished basement. W/W 
throughout, fireplace, beautiful 
sea view, sun deck, laundromat, 
dishwasher, cable TV. covered 
parking View Royal, available 
Aug. 15. References required. 
Prefer quiet career couple No 
children or pets. $500. 479-0645 
after 5 p.m. for Interview and 
viewing, 


3 BEDROOM SIDE-BY-SIDE 
on quiet culdesac in Cotwood, 
wall-to-wall carpet, fireplace, 
two appliances, drapes included. 
Large backyard with storaoe 
shed. Available August 15. One- 
vear lease and references re- 


CENTRALLOCATION 
For this 2-BR. bsmt. home In 
Gordon Head! Hardwood floors 
and yard! $475! (400) Fee 

rente* 38M234 


HIGHQUADRA 

3 BR. Duplex. No Fridge or Stove 
$396.00per month. No Pets. Pay 
own utilities. Avail. Aug. 1st. 1 
yr. Lease. 

David Burr Ltd. 384-9335 


COLWOODAREA 
Has beautiful 3-BR home on 
landscaped lot! (556). Fee 

rente* 38M234 


PROFESSIONAL HOME! 
1-BR brand new waterfront with 
den on large secluded lot with 

B ivate sundeck! Sauna and hot 
J! (586). 

RENTEX 381 1234 FEE 


NEWLY RENOVATED 
2-BR with garden and ocean 
view! Only $425! (581) Fee. 

rente* 38M234 


GRACIOUS COLWOOD SIDE 
by side duplex, fireplace, 3 beet- 
rooms, dining room, 2 children 
welcome. No pets. One year 
lease. $550 month. 652-3249 after 
5pm. 


COLWOOD; Va DUPLEX. Au¬ 
gust 1st. 3 bedrooms, IV* bath¬ 
rooms. 2 years old, temporary 
rental until duplex is sold. $500. 
382-3861, 478-2837 


LANGFORD AREA, 3 BED- 
rooms with fireplace, includes 
heat, hydro, fridge, stove, wash¬ 
er and dryer, no pets. $525. 
478-7335. 


UPPER DUPLEX, 3 BED- 
rooms, reading room. Fern 
wood. No pets please. $475 
383-2125 


211 HOUSES TO RENT 


8B 


B 


ROWN 

ROS on 

IANSMARD 


AVAILABLE AUGUST I. I 
bedroom for female in co-ed I 
*ownhouM. Hillside Mall area 
Includes all maior appliances 

^nThTncVTdesutmf»*T 

5928877 

MOTHS* WITH 3 YEA* OLD 
o*H hailing to share accommo 
datum QUtef and f esuons** 

Wtha* e bouse with 

ROOM FOR KtN! CL CAW 

fSUvuXi Tttrw* 

vu j u» SyUmbT m 499 

MATUffC WOK* IMG ALMJI 1 

to Aet !a*u» bouse mi lank* 


$575.00. • 303 - 229 Ontario St., 3 
bedroom townhouse. 2 bath¬ 
rooms. large family room, 
s/f, w/w. storage space, 
close to downtown. Children 
welcome, sorry no pets. 
Available August 1. 

$500 1031 Cosfin Ave . 3 bed 
room house, w/w, hwf, s/f. 
dishwasher, owner occupies 
basement and will share 
cost of heating and garden 
upkeep with tenant, 1 child 
welcome, no pets. 


location, s/f. FP, drive In 
oarage Lovely garden 
Sorry, no small children or 
pets Available Immedi 
ately 

$700 868 Walfrod Rood. 3-be<F 
room home Custom de 
signed to suit the natural 
park like settino. Available 
August 15 I-veer lease with 
option 

$900 Bear Hill Road, exacutive 
country home Quiet, se 
area surroundad by 
Chalet type, hand 
Manor. 3 lovely bab 
rooms, clear well water ap 
piiences. oil heat, fire 
1. Available August 15 
1 refer ar 


210 


HOUSES TO RENT 
UNFURNISHED 




unters 

2713 QUADRA 
381-2113 

EXCLUSIVE LISTINGS 
Langford. Aug 22. $725. 4 BR, 
w/w, f/s, w/d. dishwasher. 2 
FP's, Vs acre, back onto park. 
Quadra. Oct I. $750. 2 BR. 2Vi 
baths, 2 kitchens. 2 BR. down, 
f/s, w/d, dishwasher, children 
welcome. 

Gordon Head. Aug 1. $575. 3 BR 
1300 sq. ft. w/w. Util. pd. Chil¬ 
dren wetcorroe. 

Mon Frl 9-9 
Sat Sun 10-5 
381-2113-Fee $30 


BRAND NEW FAMILY 
home, 3 bedrooms IV? 
bathrooms, Immediate 
possession. One year 
lease, no pets. Close to 
town, school and all 
amenities. *625.00 per 
month. 

Patterson Construction 
Ltd. 386-6301 Evenings 
656-1455. 


CORDOVA BAY WATERVIEW 
Expansive and modern 3-bed¬ 
room home with 1 -bedroom suite 
down. Spacious living room with 
heatilator fireplace. Separate 
dining room has sliding glass to 
front deck. Large kitchen with 
eating area, and built-ins. Mas¬ 
ter has ensulte and sliding glass 
to back deck. Fully developed 
suite with separate entrance, 
could rent for $350 per month. 
Drlve-ln garage. Present rent at 
$1050 per month. Employment 
and personal references re¬ 
quired. Further inquiries to Mr. 
Les. 386-7545. 


[O 

_SERSPRRV 

PROftRTUS LTD / WAUOR 


$700 per mth — 4 bdrm. 3 bath, 
fireplace, finished bsmt with 
bar. Located In the Cook St. and 
Tatter sal area. No appliances 
Avail, immed. To view call K. 
Giles. 386-3124 


3 bedroom updated character 
home located lust 2 blocks from 
the beach on a quiet street. Sepa¬ 
rate formal dining room, granite 
fireplace In living room, private 
backyard, lease required for I 
year. Preference will be given to 
couples without children or pets 
$700 a month Phone 592-5288 for 
appointment after 5pm. 


THREE BEDROOM COUNTRY 
home on 2 acres In Royal Oak. 
$550 per month, water, hydro, 
and cablevision Included Base¬ 
ment suite presently rented to 
quiet tenant Fridge, stove, and 
freezer Included Available Au 
gust 1. References required. 


TOWNHOUSES! 

2-BR townhouse with stone fire¬ 
place and private patio. Only 
$425. (563). Fee. 

rente* 38M234 


SEPTEMBER 1 

3 BR home In Saanich with large 
yard and hardwood floors! Only 
$500. (519). Fee. 

rente* mi-1234 


SPECTACULAR HOME! 

4 BR bsmt home with rec room 
and wet bar! Double grge and 
In-law suite! Kids and pets both 
welcome and the rent only $725! 
(592). 

RENTEX 381 1234 FEE 


AVAILABLE AUGUST 1ST, 
new easy care house on Saanich 
Peninsula. Includes: new appli¬ 
ances. air-tight stove, thermo¬ 
panes, fireplace, seaview, 
extras. Compare value. $695 
monthly. Particulars 652-3802. 


PRIVATE HOME IN CHOICE 
location, beautiful garden. 
3 bedrooms, separate dining 
room up; 2-bedrooms, large fire¬ 
place living room, In-law suite 
down. References. $700. 
477 5928 


JAMESBAY SEAVIEW 
5 bdrs,, 4-baths, rec room, 2 
F.P.'s, appliances, drapes, etc 
Aug 1st, $1,200/mo. BRIAN Rl 
PLEY, 383-2532, Ocean City Re- 
alty Ltd. 381-2233. 


SIDNEY 

Brand new 2-BR home on acre¬ 
age with 2 baths. (568). Fee 

rente* 381-1234 


CENTRAL SAANICH. 4-BED- 
room executive home, acreaoe. 
appliances and drapes included 
Children welcome. References 
required. Possession August 16. 
$750 per month. 652-5804. 


OPEN HOUSE JULY 24TH. 
4 8pm, 1020 Belmont, spotless 2- 
bedroom house on large corner 
lot, oarage, privacy, area of 
lovely homes. $535 monthly. Ask 
tor Mr Wiens, 383*447. 


METCHOSIN AREA 
3-BR family home on fully land¬ 
scaped grounds with oar den and 
full bsmt! (539) 

RENTEX 381-1234 FEE 


I n order to rent thts 7 8 R home In 
vtew Royal that accepts kids and 

RENTEX 381-1234 FEE 


ESQUIMALT AREA. ATTRAC- 
tlve 4-bedroom home, fireplace, 
waii-to-wall, dose to schools, 
available August l. One family 
only. $430. 3837836. 


NEW BASEMENT SUITE, 
Shelbourne/Hlllslde, for clean, 
quiet individual, no smoking, no 
oeti U» plus hydro. 59? 5454 
after 5pm. 


2 BEDROOM ON Vj ACRE LOT 
In Gordon Head Available Im¬ 
mediately. $595. 477-5285 or 
477-8512. 


GORGE WATERFRONT. NO— 
step home. 2 bedrooms, fire¬ 
place, large yard, suitable coo 
pie with 1-child, $550. 38*0177 


CENTRAL SAANICH. SPA¬ 
CIOUS 3-bedroom. Carport, fire¬ 
place. large lot August 1 occu¬ 
pancy $546 388-6876 


ATTRACTIVE 1 BEDROOM 
cottage, part furnished. Swan 
Lake, $450 monthly. From Au- 
QU$t 1st. 477 7346 


MILL BAY SMALL HOUSE 
tor rent, $300 to retired couple. 
No pets 474-2447 after 6. 


LANGFORD LAKE! 3 BED 
rooms. 1W baths. Fireplace! 
Basement $550 47*5319 


SMALL HOUSE. ELK LAKE 
area. August 15 available. $325. 
653-4654 


211 MOVIES TO ton 


OAK BAY BEACH HOUSE 
2 BR. fully furnished bungalow 
on waterf r ont with beck petto 
end lovely garden! Only $400 
1596) Fee 


311-12)4 


LARGE 4 BEDROOM HOME. 
- location. ' 


pieces 
Must have 

For further intormeftont 
Brown Bros Agencies Lid 
3659771 (onyfMoe) 

|675 rn HH U Vic Lovely tem 
ily home tn quiet residential 
irv l 3 4 totems femMy rm 

a£‘? tiXr 1 *** 

Lrl.«dirtuil v rotlu ?U home or 

/n 

If fCHHjjejJLMJ J M L 


laxusat 

pets J0-676I 


1WO fctSPOMSiBlt WORN 
•eg girls I—>ie| ter a hue bee 

'uom (Hum backyard gar 

den Prefer 



212 


HOUSES WANTED 
TO DENT 


2 YOUNG BUSINESSWOMEN 
looking for 2 bedroom duplex, 
cottage or small home for occu¬ 
pancy September 1st. $400 per 
month or less. Preferably Fair- 
field. James Bay or Esquimau 
area. Pleesecall38*l070iocal2i 
befor e 5pm., 479-2368 after 5: pm, 
thank you. 


WRITER AND HUSBAND 
working In Victoria desire un¬ 
furnished, secluded house or 
cabin within 30 minutes of city. 
Normal comfort standards not 
imperative. Will rent several 
months or longer. Business 
hours. 385-6815. 


215 


NALLS, WAREHOUSES 
STOVES mi OFFICES 
TO RENT 


MARRIED COUPLE NEED 
modest house, prefer Western 
Community, long term tenants 
(6 years In present rental). Non 
drinkers or smokers. No chil¬ 
dren Small pet. Lease OK. 6 
months In advance if suitable 
478-1294,642-4081 


looking for 2 bedroom home In 
Royal Oak or outlying areas 
Rent $400 or negotiable. Needed 
by September 1st. Excellent ref¬ 
erences. 383-1220 


RESPONSIBLE. MATURE 
couple with baby on the wav, 
urgently requires clean, com¬ 
fortable, duplex or house. No 
pets. Reasonable rent. Can pro¬ 
vide excellent references. Call 
598-0024. 


3 SELF EMPLOYED CARPEN 
ters looking tor 3-4 bedroom 
home with working space, any¬ 
where but Esquimau. Will ex¬ 
change repairs for rent. Phone 
384-1812 mornings 


CAN YOU HELP? RESPON- 
slble working couple, to be mar¬ 
ried In August, need apartment 
or small house. No pets. Will 
supply references. Please call 
592-7797 


FOR LEASE 

MEDICAL ARTS BUILDING — 
Doctors' Offices — from 470 to 
1100 square feet. Ample Parking 
— well located — 1105 Pandora 
(at Cook) 

For further information call Mr. 
Jack Mitchell at: 383-4168 

mPL 

M0RGUARD PROPERTIES 
LIMITED 

620-B80 Douglas ((>04)363-4168 


OFFICE SPACE 
PRIME INDUSTRIAL 
AREA 

Entire floor (approx. 1,760 ft), 
well lit partitioned bright of 
flees. Complete with storage 
area, large security valt. etc 
Good entrance and reception 
area Rate of $5.80 per ft. In¬ 
cludes everything, hydro, taxes, 
etc. Can lease. Good access and 
parking, close to downtown. Call 
386-3414 local 55for appointment, 
OK TrucklngCo. 


Quadra/Cloverdale 
Centrally-located, 1300 sq.ft, of 
Ground Floor Commercial 
space, featuring front and rear 
entrances and parking at the 
door. Suitable for professional 
offices or ottlce/warehouse op¬ 
eration. Owner will consider 
short-term as well as long-term 
tenancies with lease rate and 
cost of alterations negotiable. 

Phone 388-447? 

Creighton Property Mgmt. Ltd. 


2 RESPONSIBLE FEMALE 
students urgently need a 2 bed¬ 
room home or townhouse for 
September 1st, approximately 
$350. References provided. 
Please call 3835117 


TEACHER. WIFE ANDONE 18- 
month-old son require small 
house to rent in Victoria area 
Commencing September 1, 1980. 
Call colled. 733-8476. between 2 
pm and 7 pm. 


GAY FAMILY NEEDS TWO 
bedroom house or ground floor 
suite, to $400/month, bv August 
15. Falrfleldor James Bay. Reli 


ences. 1 


leidor James Bay. Reli 
ployed, excellent refer- 
a Press Box 520 


RESPONSIBLE WORKING 2 
sisters require 2 bedroom unfur 
nished house bv August 1st, pre¬ 
fer Vic West-Esquimalt area, 
$300-$350 386-5156 


RESPONSIBLE PROFESSION 
al couple require 2 bedroom 
house, preferably Fairfield. $450 
maximum. No kids or pets. 
385-3736 after 4:30pm. 


REVEREND AND FAMILY 
need house, August 1 -September 
1. Fireplace, 2 3 bedrooms, good 
references. Rent or lease. Rev¬ 
erend Johnson, 386-8900 


5300 SQUARE FEET 

High celling, dry, with loading 
docks ideal for heavy storage 
Available August 15th. 

CEDRICSTEELE 
& ASSOCIATES LTD 
CEDRICSTEELE 388-6258 


PRESTIAGE OFFICE AP 
proxlmately 1164 sq. ft. Beautl 
ful view of waterfront, heat, 
hydro, cablevision, background 
music Included. Swimming pool 
facilities and games room, un¬ 
derground parking, partially 
furnished. $4^50 per sq ft. Laroe 
storage rooms available. 
383-1731. 


COMPARE US 
FOR LOW RATES 
Air conditioned, self-contained 
offices, between Mayfair and 
Town & Country centres. Drive 
by 3318 and 3347 Oak St. For 
further information call: AS 
Bains Development Ltd, 384 5016 
anytime. Courtesy to agents. 


YOUNG COUPLE GETTING 
married require 1 or 2 bedroom 
house or 1 bedroom apartment 
for end of July. 385-4021 ask for 
Derek.• 


CLEAN, BRIGHT, FIRST 
class space available downtown 
victoria. 1242 sq ft newly reno¬ 
vated office space within a few 
doors from parkade, also ap- 

K oxlmatelv 1000 sq ft In a new 
lldlng available Immediately 
For further information call 
385-0991 


MARRIED COUPLE EXPECT- 
ing first child September desper¬ 
ately need house or suite. E xcel- 
lent references. To $375. 
382 3473. 


BEFORE SEPTEMBER 1ST, 
for young Laotian refugee tarn 
Ily who nave proven to be first 
ass tenants. Please phone 


SKDi 


14. 


CITY CORE 
RETAIL 

Approx. 2.000 square feet right 
downtown — less than a block oft 
Douglas St. — would split In half 
for prime retail concern. 
Michael Burr 384-9335 

David Burr Ltd. 


atelv. preferably In University 
area 595-7588 or 477-0672 


WORKING COUPLE WITH 
quiet dog urgently require house 
or duplex, $400. 385-3859 
8am-4pm. 


FAMILY OF FOUR NEED 3- 
bediuom house, August 15 or 
September 1. References. 
383-8093. after 5. 


FREE RENT TO WATCH 
house. Businessman, reliable. 
References. 383-5562, 384-384). 


QUIET FAMILY NEEDS 3 
bedroom house. Call John 
598-2692 after 3:30. 


IN JAMES BAY, MOTHER AND 
2-glrls, excellent references, 
around $450.386-9659. 


H5 


McKenzie Quadra 


panelled 700 sq. I_ 

Northern Pacific Realty Ltd. 
479-1687 


PENN-BRIOGE PROFES- 
slonal Building, Roval Oak Shop¬ 
ping Centre, 4475 Vlewmont Ave. 
Only 4 office areas left. 510 sq.ft, 
to 930 sq.ft For information 
please call 38*6308 Mondev-Frl 
day between 8:30am-4:30pm. 


OFFICE SPACE 

1144 Fort St. Parking, air condl 
tioning, carpets, now renting tor 
August 1st, 1980. Call 38*1417 or 
59S-6319 


CHOICE OF DOWNTOWN OF 
FICE SPACES to rent or lease at 
reasonable rates Apply Prob 
erty Managment, Pemberton, 
Holmes Ltd., 1000 Government 
St., 384-8124. 


HAUS, WAREHOUSES 
STORES mi OFFICES 
TO RENT 


OAK BAY RETAIL 
Approx. 870 sq. ft. available on 
Oak Bay Ave. Rent $450.00 per 
month. 

Call Michael Burr 384-9335 
David Burr Ltd. 


RERLSPRTI 

' m/uj i 


PROPERTIES LTD 


84« BROUGHTON 3884654 

OFFICE SPACE 

COOK ST. — Between Fort and 
View. Professional office build 
Ing —- Medical — Legal, etc. as 
low as $5.50/sq. ft. 

1842 OAK BAY AVE. — Two 1.000 
sq. ft. offices. Very attractive. 
$850/mo. gross. 

1830 OAK BAY AVE. — Prime 
Medical/Dental office space, 
good selection If you act quickly. 
BAINS CENTRE — North Doug¬ 
las area — loads of parking, up fo 
15,000 sq. ft. — air conditioned. 
1*1 J BCawjMARD - jfte) 

of 6,3*9 sq. ft., but take a whofe 
floor of l7ro) sq ft., offices are In 
place, reasonable rent. 
JUBILEE CENTRE — 996 to 
4.538 sq. ft. of super retail/office 
space. Across from Jubilee Ho¬ 
spital. 

RETAIL 

JAMES BAY SQUARE — Prime 
location in this busy shopping 
centre. 4,100 sq. ft. can be subdi¬ 
vided. Super exposure 
NEW "ONE STOP” BUILDERS 
CENTRE — North Douglas. 
Onlv 17unltsof 1,400sq.ft, avail 
able, suppliers should see this 
Immediately 

NEW RETAIL CENTRE — 
Douglas St., across from May 
fair Shopping Centre, good traf 
tic count. Opening July 31. 1980. 

920 to 2,060 and 1,029 sq. 


^paceof 9 


NEW RETAIL CENTRE 
PLANNED — 14,000 sq. ft. cor¬ 
ner of Vernon St. and Pat Bav 
Hwy. Super restaurant .location. 
Sizes from 1,000 sq. ft. and up. 
RESTAURANT LOCATIONS — 
We have two oood locations on 
Oak Bav Ave — If you are think 
ing of a restaurant see us. 

WAREHOUSE/ 
COMMERCIAL 
775 LAMPSON — 5.100 and 8.500 I 
sq. ft. available 
S42HILLSIDE — 2.800sq ft 
786 FARVIEW — 3,500 to 7.000 

so ft. 

We have a good supply of space 
for all kinds. For your require 
ments of office, retail or ware 
house call 


FOR LEASE 

PRIME OFFICE SPACE 
671 sq.ft. 

Phone 386-2441 


OFFICE 
CECELIA ST. 

390 so. *t, good location, good 
parking, reasonable. 384-1713 or 


2,000 SQ. FT. 

Retail space in plaza. 841 Gold- 
stream Ave, available Immedi 
atelv. $1200 per month. Contact 
H Stern, 478-9575 


840 SQ. FT. 

Town and Country Shopping 
Centre. Contact, B. LAWLESS 
382 7276 or 477-0911. Town and 
Country Realty. 


OVER 600 SQUARE FEET OF 
well appointed office space for 
rent. August 1. Excellent loca 
tton. Reasonable rent. 382-5135 
between 10 - 2 . 


PRIME STREET LEVEL OF 
flee space on Beacon Ave., Sid¬ 
ney. 1000 sq.ft. Available tor 3 
year lease at $8.50 per sq.ft. Sid- 
r>ev Realty Ltd. 656-3928 


OFFICE, WAREHOUSE 
1350 and 6350 sq. ft 831 Devoiv 
shire Commerce Park, 381-6233. 
EY CONSTRUCTION LTD. 


650' OR 950* OFFICE ON THOR 
oughfare near Woodward's. 
Reasonable rent. Owner 
383-8774 


SMALL DOWNTOWN OFFICE. 
100 sq.ft., second floor, heat and 
power free, available August 1. 
$75 per month. 479-4405 


WAREHOUSES. 4500 TO 17,000 
sq. ft. In town, 24' celling.' 
docks, ground level enfr 
-.. Story, 3- 


DEEP COVE MARINA HAS 
new office space for rent. 
6S6-281Q 


central location, $250 per month. 
3*6-8435 9 am-5 pm 


AIR CONDITIONED OFFICE 
space to rent at Gorge Shopping 
Centre Phone 388-5812 


STORAGE AREA FOR RENT 
In the Gorge area. 3**-5*12. 


23) MOtTGAtf LOAMS 


1st AND 2nd 
MORTGAGE LOANS 

SOOKE—GULF ISLANDS 
SHAWN I GAN—DU NC AN 
UP ISLAND—MAINLAND 


R. I. MURPHY 
B. DOVEY 
J.F. COLWELL 


We tpecielize In Land and 
Land Development Mortgages 
anywhere in B C 



E xistlng Mortgages Bought 
C^GLASMXwKESl/rO 

fOBLANSHAROST 384 717 


law Blanshard St . three small 
offices now Available Irom 
to J*0 to ti at $7 $0 per 
vu^ft including heat and 

Far further inter mat ion call 


1744 RICHMOND 

U75 M ft mbt y attract i vault it* 

|y* • suit able ter mehHwl 4 m, 


Ne/d MONEY 

We have funds to build, buy 
remodel or refinance Interim 
bridge construction funds — a* 
drM8 — taat. courteous — confi¬ 
dential ter vice Cad new 
Don MacOMnvray 05*5145 

glengarry realty 

- StPJt 

SELLING? BUYING* 

Shorf term 2nd mMoB* loans 
Preferred rates te Realty tZ 
mm 

T t U BOWL* M 406/577 

AUitAR RE At ry gg tftg 


233 MORTGAGE LOANS 
AND INSURANCE 


UP TO $200,000. TO PURCHASE 
existing well seasoned mort- 
gaoes. Victoria Press Box 478 


235 WANTED TO 


WANTED TO BORROW, $18,- 
000, 2% over prime. Security 
apartment. 479-5075 or 386-8998. 


240 BUSINESS 
OPPORTUNITIES 


Retail Store 
Franchise 
Opportunity 

- with 

KITS CAMERAS 

Kits Cameras is a 20 year old 
CANADIAN Company now 
operating 75 Stores in B.C., 
Alberta, The Yukon, California 
and Arizona. 

The Company otters one of the 
most comprehensive start up as 
well as continuing assistance 
programs including. 

1. Aggressive merchandis¬ 
ing program 

2. Advertising and Market¬ 
ing services 

3. Training Program 

4. Bookkeeping and Manage¬ 
ment service 

5. Systems and Operational 
procedures 

Excellent Income and profit 
potential for the right 
person. 

Call us now, we have prime 
mall locations available 
In B.C., Alberta and Sas- 
katechwan. Approx. 
$35,000 to $40,000. Cash 
Investment required. 

KITS CAMERAS 

1601 Yew St , Vancouver 
Call Collect 
(604) 731-8281 


■■SINCE 1887 

O&miUtton, 

3Co£flW4 JjJ. 

1000 Got! SI 384 8124 


RARE OPPORTUNITY 
Well established business locat¬ 
ed downtown and in major mall. 
Excellent history with active 
tourist trade. Good profit with 
only part time involvement or 
excellent return if more ener- 
geticalv Inclined. Cash buyers 
preferred In range of $200,000 
BRIAN SPARK 
RICHARD HOLMES 
384-8124 


HOME INDUSTRY 
$149,500 

Combine business with pleasant 
living. Home with on-going busi¬ 
ness and potential for others, in- 
ground pool plus sauna on V* 
Acre near Sidney. MLS. To view 
call RALPH KELLER, 385-9741. 

FOURPLEX 

$67,500 

Separate meters, good revenue. 
Vendor will carry some financ¬ 
ing. Updated wiring, plumbing 
and electric heat. To view in 
Esquimalt call RALPH 
KELLER 385-9741. MLS. 
HENDERSON REALTY LTD. 
38S-9741 


NATURAL FOODS 

(DOWNTOWN) 

An excellent opportunity to step 
into a well managed growing 
family operation. The store Is 
2,000 sq. ft. In size and comes 
fully equipped to take right over 
Well priced at $24,000. But 
to offers. 


t open 


GARY BRIDGE 384-6119 
Realspan Properties Ltd. 
388-6454 


RESTAURANT 

2 miles south 

OF DUNCAN 

$250,000 

Price includes all equipment, 
laroe beautiful loo building on 2 
acres of land. Was listed at 
$385,000. 

Victoria Motel 

$550,000. 24 units. Super money 
maker Call GERRY FINNI 
GAN 656-5876 CASTLE PROP- 
ERTIES LTD, 386-6164. 


ESTABLISHED 
RESTAURANT 
A well established, attractive 
restaurant and lounoe centrally- 
located in Victoria. Price Is 
below the replacement costs of 
furniture, equipment and lease 
hold Improvements. This Is a 
wonderful opportunity to have 
vour own profitable restaurant. 
Priced at $85,000. For details 


call: (MLS46784) 
BILLMcAULEY 


UNIQUE SPECIALTY FOODS 
RESTAURANT, with little com¬ 
petition and fully licensed. One 
of Victoria's finest and newest 
restaurants, well staffed and 
showing profits. Excellent local 
and tourist trade Centrally lo¬ 
cated with two restaurant areas, 
and bar. Capacity 150 seats. E x- 
cellent 7 year lease with de¬ 
creasing rent In 1981. For further 
details write ComCor. Suite 316, 
560 Johnson St. or telephone 
383-4123 and ask for Pat or BUI 


CITY RESTAURANT 
One of downtown's most exciting 
restaurants. Seats 40. Terrific 
lease of $650.00 PM for 1700 sq. ft 
Buvthls for mom. About $55,000 
worth of equipment and lease¬ 
hold Improvements. Must sell on 
doctor's orders. Try onlv $17,500. 
down!! This won'1 last. FRANK 
WILLS—388-7868. 

DUNSMUIR PROPERTIES 
LTD. 


BUSINESS, STOCK, 
FIXTURES 

Well established second hand 
furniture business. Good invest¬ 
ment. strategically located. 
Thriving business. $55,000. MLS 
LARRY LINEHAM 
5954)134 384-8075 Pgr. 682 

NATIONAL TRUST 
S9S-2121 


B.C. MOTEL? 

If you have ever thought of own¬ 
ing a motel or resort we have a 
selection of these properties In 
all parts of British CoHimbia. 
Call L E. KIRK, Manaoer. 
Motels. Resorts Department, 
386-2955 or evenings 656 1295 
CENTURY 21 Mayfair Realty 
Ltd. 


MOTEL 

75 unit 3 storey total facility 
motel of modern design Parking 
for approx. XX) cars. Complete 
service tor vacationers and bust 
ness PR I NCI PALS ONLY. 

K.O. MOORE 
P R BROWN 4 SONS LTD 
IBH435 


GROCERY STORE 

VJ3J80 can buy you this business 

asisgwegcjg 

a ? BR baaamanMwne is inciud 
od m the rent CeNtedey 
Clifton Mek 
Ocean City Realty Ltd 

»L2S 


'wnt w *o*,< 0, 


240 BUSINESS 


SOOKE SALMON CHARTERS 
Includes 31' Chris Craft twin en¬ 
gine boat, boat house, all sub 
plies needed, fishing gear Ideal 
for retired couple. Will remain 
with business balance of 1980 If 
necessary or will trade motor 
home Phone for more Informa¬ 
tion 6424838 

DELICATESSEN & BAKERY 
Fully equipped $49,500. /Modern 
shooping centre on Saanich Pen 
insula. Business Is good, shows 
steady increase In sales. Un¬ 
tapped possibilities. Phone 
652-4623. After 5:30pm. phone 
477-5258. 

TRAVEL AGENCY 
$69,000 

Centrally located, over y» mll- 
1 ion gross Call: 

RALPH KELLER 385-9741 

HENDERSON REALTY LTD 

BOWLING ALLEY 

For sale or lease Ublsland In 
new shopping center. Excellent 
potential. For infomatlon 
595-1872 or Victoria Press Box 
410 

RESTAURANT 

Excellent potential for restau 
rant in new Ublsland shopping 
center. Leasehold improve¬ 
ments already In place Excel 
lent leasing terms available. 
Reply Victoria Press Box 410 

BECOME MOBILE WITH 
vour own mobile foodstand or 
oftlce. Custom made 22' motor 
home conforms to healthboard 
specifications for vending and 
erHoyment. $6,500 or offers. 

BEAUTY SALON 

For sale or lease, fully equipped. 

5 station. Located In Port 
McNeill largest shopping 
Centre. Excellent terms. Reply 
Victoria Press Box 410 

SMALL BUSINESS IN THE 
home/business decorating line 
Can be operated from vour home 
full or part-time Requires small 
capital Investment. Earning po¬ 
tential unlimited Reply: Vic 
toria Press Box 524. 

LODGE, 5 CABINS. BARN ON 
265 acres, lakefront Lodoe fully 
equipped, located In southern 
Cariboo. $280,000, 35% down, 
owner will carry mortgage at 
12%. Phone 112-245-4959 

BICYCLE SALES AND RE 
pair shop, downtown location, 
complete set of tools, training 
program provided. Phone 
386-3504. 3-5pm. dally. 

LARGE FARM MARKET 

For sale including stock and fix¬ 
tures, victoria area. Full price 
$49,000 Reply to Victoria Press 
Box 498. 

MARINA, $250,000. 285' WATER 
frontage, 35 miles north of Vic¬ 
toria. Excel lent floats and rental 
units provide good year round 
income. 479 9844 or 112-746-5044 

LUCRATIVE BUSINESS FOR 
sale. Work from home for tax 
deduction benefits. Proven loca 
tlons. proven sales. Perfect part 
timework. Phone592-5005 

FOR SALE BY OWNER. TV - 
Stereo Sales & Service business. 
Established customers. 15 vrs. 
same location. Maior franchise 
available. 383-5432 

TAYLOR HOUSE MOVING 
Well established house moving 
business for sale. Plenty of work 
and opportunities. 47*8864 

MEAT MARKET ON GOOD LO- 

642-5849 after 6pm. 

Ml BUSINESS OfftNt- 
TVMTKS WANTED 

CHARTERED ACCOUNTANT 
desires active partnership In ex¬ 
isting business enterprise. Vic¬ 
toria Press Box 506 

244 REVENUE PROPERTY 


SIX 

GOOD 

DEALS 


1. 10 Acre parcels bordering on 
East Sooke Park, some with 
valuable timber, all with fire 
wood, first come — first 
choice. $49,000 

2. Superior office space In new 
building downtown, near pro¬ 
posed Convention centre 
Only 980 sq. ft. left at $7.50 
net. 

3. Trade up or down on revenue 
property with charming 
South Oak Bay 3 bedroom 
house — sensibly priced at 
$134,000 

4. 14 suites — Nanaimo all with 
Harbour views $300,000. 

5. 34 Suite apartment $lte — 
$240X100. 

6. Bargain for August — five 
bedroom waterfront house in 
Hawaii, will accommodate 
several families. $125 per 
day, also available during 
winter $200 per dev 

STAN STUART 
Days 592-2407 

Evenings 595-0401 

MARGE TTS& GOWER 

OAK BAY PROPERTIES LTD 


REVENUE —4SUITES 

Sound building In good rental 
area (One tenant has lived her# 
since 1964), New roof, carpets 
and interior paint. Outside trim 
needs palntlno Possibility of 
parking revenue from next door 
building to Increase present 
rental Income of $956 per month. 
Owner says SELL and will look 
at all offers. For statement and 
tnxif* suites, call: 

DAVID SCOTT 

385-3435 479-4405 

P R BROWN & SONS LTD. 

762 Fort Street 


ME 

1124,500 


This block has 5 self-contained 
suites and 4 shared accommoda¬ 
tion units. The revenue Is al 
ready excellent, and potential 
exists tor Increasing the current 
rents For more Information, 
can DON MARSOEN 3*8-6366 or 
at CASTLE PROPERTIES LTD 
386-6164, 


Investment and tax shel¬ 
ter ooportunltv by pur- 
chase at new duplex units 
direct from builder. Cash 
flow and management 
guarantees, complete 
CCA package. 

Patterson Construction 
Ltd.. 386-6301, Evenings 
656-1455 


DUPLEX 
IMMEDIATE 
POSSESSION 
Older legal up end down duplex 
with basement Separate en 
trances Oiwiers' wife has large 
modem kitchen, specious living 
room with antique working fire 
piece, large mesier bedroom 
care lot. New MLS 

47741*1 SYLSMUMKA 5951337 
Revel True! 



w pm a— - ps ./s'a'aaaa-w 


MONEYMAKER 

"TWBr K * 


TOUR AG, li MG IAWR, 

i VJt /lljitc AM jil 


244 BEVENUt PROPERTY 


HERITAGE DUPLEX 
$76,900 

Built in 1911 this is a fine old up 
and down duplex with two, two 
bedroom self-contained suites in 
original condition. Two fire 
places, high ceilings and plenty 
of character. Victoria west loca 
tlon. Good mortgage. Call now. It 
won't last. MLS 

GLENN OR DONNA NICHOLLS 
385-9741 598-7689 

HENDERSON REALTY LTD, 


C-8 

247 C0MMERCUU. OR 

INDUSTRIAL PROPERTIES 


LONG TERM GROUND LEASE 
available on over an acre of 
commercial property In excel 
lent Saanich area. Call: 

Michael Burr 384-9335 

DAVIO BURR LTD. 


5QUITEX INVESTMENT 
REALTY 

Commercial & Investment 
CONSULTANTS 386-6071 


250 HOUSES FOR SALE 


GONZALES TRIPLEX I 
$96,500 

Walk to the beach and Invest In 
Victoria's best and still afford 
able area. Well maintained and 
updated character building with 
a 2 bdrm and 2-1 bdrm suites 
Call now. this won't last. Prlncl- 
palsonly Call: 

GLENN OR DONNA NICHOLLS 1 
385-9741 

HENDERSON REALTY LTD. 



STADACONA 

REVENUE 

Consisting of 2. one bedroom 
units, l.twobedroomunit. 3 light 
housekeeping plus garage is 
rented. $1200 per month gross 
$104,900. 

LARRY LINEHAM 
5954134 384 8075 pgr . 682 

NATIONAL TRUST 
595-2121 


ESTATE SALE 

New 6 suite Apartment in Sidney 
is ideal for owner occupier. 
There are 4 one bedroom units 
and 2 two bedroom pent house 
type units with excellent sea 
views. Priced at $279,000 For 
detailscall 
JACKHENI 
HENDER! 

385-9741 


NDERSON 6564240 
RSON REALTY LTD. 


SXS DUPLEX $89,900 
Just listed —2039-41 Melville PI. 
Sidney, B.C., 3 bedrooms each 
side, part basements. $41,000. 
Mortgageat 10 Vj% Interest Due 
Feb. 83. View Interior by ap¬ 
pointment only, both rented. Ex¬ 
clusive with Len Thomas (Sr) 
384-9176. Douglas Hawkes Ltd, 
384 7128. 


5 UNITS 


Fairfield, $14,640 GR. INC. 
owner will carry larger first at 
reasonable rate Priced to sell 
quickly at $119,500 
Victoria M. Smith Realty Inc. 
384-1424 388-5464 Paper 6)0 


WHY RENT? 

Let others help pay your mort 
Two attractive suites plus 


K oe. ' 
seen 


isement In-law suite. Jubilee 
area. Otters on $89,900. 595-4063. 
No agents please. 


SOME EXCELLENT APART 
ment properties available. Sub¬ 
stantial down payments req'd 
Sorry no phone information De 
tails by appointment only 
please. Call Aimer Olson, Roval 
Trust 384-8001, 


DUPLEX STARTER. $60,000 
firm; $15,000 minimum down- 
payment; first mortgage $460 
per month; second mortgage 
available 15%. Monthly revenue 
$250—8350. No agents Phone be- 
tween 8am-10am, 6564016. 


D.F.H Real Estate Ltd. 

1559 McKENZIE AVE 

CORDOVA BAY 
OPEN HOUSE 
1006 Westport 
Thurs. 1-3 

Good value on this 8 year old. 
one-owner. 3bedrm home Cath 
entry, spacious LR with beams 
andFP.L shaped dining rm . E a 
I n kitchen One ♦ half baths 
Semi-secluded, fenced yard well 
landscaped Mint condition. 
Vendor transferred Early pos 
session. MLS at $92,900. 

PHIL WARREN 
477-7291 Anytime 

Escape The 
Ordinary 
548 BROADWAY 

1445 so. ft. of finished house nes 
tied on a lot with a valley view 
This home otters quality finish 
Ing throughout. Picture yourself 
this winter comforted from the 
energy crunch by 2"x6” walls. 
R20 Insulation (walls) R28 insu 
; latlon ceilings, and thermo pane 
windows. Built bv Ptarmigan 
Developments. Call: 
l GARY DAVIS 384 8075 Pgr. 234 
| MICHAEL NEWMAN 384-8075 
Pgr. 1617 

Total Tranquility 
286 Goward Road 

Country living with city com¬ 
forts and conveniences situated 
I on the Seven Mile Circle. This 
| comfortable family home at 
fords you room to do your own 
thing on five acres of land. Es 
cape theordlnar v with this home 
of 2500 sq ft finished, 1275 sq. ft. 
sundeck, laroe double garage. 4 
bedrooms. 3 oaths, 2 fireplaces, 
family rm. rec. rm, end more 
This home is a contractors own 
home Must be seen from the 
Inside of maximum apprecia¬ 
tion. For appointment call : 
GARY DAVIS 384-8075 Pgr 234 
MICHAEL NEWMAN 384-0075 
Pgr. 1617 


APARTMENT BLKS 
AVAILABLE 

Contact Bing Richards 388-7868, 
388-5464 Pgr 732 
DUNSMUiR PROPERTIES 
LTD. 


FOR SALE BY OWNER, 21 
suite apartment In choice resi¬ 
dential area. In excellent condi¬ 
tion, No agents please, victoria 
Press Box 425 


245 REVENUE 

PROPERTIES WANTED 


NEEDED 

NOW 

1. Well located newer 20 to 40 
suite apartment — must be 
strata titled. 

2. Apartment that $200,000 will 
handle—must have oood his¬ 
tory and market return. 

Please phone Bruce Davenport. 

5924995. 

GLANGARRY REALTY 

479-7138 


EASTERN INVESTOR 

Will consider any realistically 
priced revenue situation up to 
$750400 Quick decision guaran¬ 
teed Call Inconfidence 
GLENN NICHOLLS, F R 1 
59* 7689 385-9741 

HENDERSON REALTY LTD 


DUPLEX WANTED 
SIDE X SIDE 

Up to $95,000 call 
ROMAMOLYARD 384 4827 

Royal Trust_384-8001 


M7 COMMERCIAL 0« 

INDUSTRIAL RROfERTIES 


Little Things Mean 
A Lot 

420 MONTCALM 

Thinking of buying a brand new 
home? We are very proud to 
offer a 1522 sq ft. Cape Cod 
deslon home built bv Frisia Con 
structlon Sing a song of savings 
In this delightful home free from 
this winter’s chill surrounded bv 
2”x6" walls, R20 insulation In 
walls. R28 insulation callings, 
heatilator fireplace, cedar 
framed thermo windows, and 
comfofted by a 5 yr new home 
warranty Toviewcall: 

GARY DAVIS 384-8075 Por 234 
MICHAEL NEWMAN 384-8075 
Pgr. 1617 

GOOD 

FAMILY 

HOME 

I Situated In a conveniently Quiet 
area, this 3-bdrm , full bsmt 
home is great for the family. The 
basement is roughed In for fur 
ther development into 2 bdrms 
and rec. rm A little TLC would 
I make this a super home For 
more Information and appt. to 
view, call now 

KENHIGHTON 

477-7291 (BUS.) 385-9235 (Res ) 

or 384-8075 (Pgr. 1259) 

Rambling Rancher 

with recent additions — asking 
$117,000. A quiet street In Gordon 
Head and a well-landscaped < 
acre lot A good family home and 
j location, 4 bdrms with a charm¬ 
ing master suite (many extras) 
i Beamed ceilings In family and 
I recreation rooms. Brick fire 
| places in living rm. and family 
rm. Charming deck and patio 
combination. This Is a one-cf a 
I kind opportunity solidly built 
j MLS. See It soon with 
ALLEE 

477-7291 (Bus.) 477-8750 (Res.) 


WESTMONT 

REALTY & 388-4434 

COMMERCIAL 
AND HOUSE 

Located In the Gorge-Tllllcum ' 
area. Is this excellent holding ! 
property. Good revenue now. 
and still better In the near future 
Total lot size is 15,870 sq. ft. on 
approx. 158.7x100. Priced at 
$238,000 For complete details 
contact: 

388-4434 RICKKINNIS 477-9394 

GORGE AREA 
Three bedroom home on large lot 
located close to the Gorge Shop 
ping Centre. This home has great 
potential as holding property In 
the future Price $76,000. For 
complete details contact: 

38*4434 RICKKINNIS 477 9394 


E 

$82,500 


ZONED C-2 
Attention — Doctors 
Lawyers—Dentists 
Parking—16 cars 

Good 3 bedrm home — aprox 
4,000 sq. ft. building — Double 
oarege — 2 storage rooms. Total 
property top condition Located 
In an Ideal area for a clinic or 
office concept, with your own 
home end Irge lot Stores all 
ranted Very different property 
—well xwrth your consideration 
Firm at $29t,000. Please call 
tilhar 

ROMAMOLYARD 38*4827 
ALMER OLSON 47*4446 

Royal Trust_384-800) 


SIDNEY COMMERCIAL 

Over 19,000 sq ft. of prime com 
merclal/otnce In downtown core 
Sidney Approx 3060 sq ft 
available for new owner ideal 
medlcgl office buikBna wilh sup^ 
porting services In building 
Gross income in excess of $7*000 
with potential in excess of 
$100*80 Greet Investment op 

SIVE wtth 

K.O MOORE 
P. R MOWN 4 SOWS LTD 
38*3435 


LOW DOWN 
PAYMENT 
CSI ZONING 

Good location — 1880 tq ft lot 

andte** Largeosau m Mar mtg 

MARjTteOMPSOW 


477*141 ate Ste* 

TBePf RiMUHSfY 


ZONED COMMERCIAL 



This is a MUST SEE if vou like a 
3-bdrm, 1W storey, full bsmt 
well-finished character home 
situated on a HUGE 52x198 lot on 
a quiet street in a super area 
There's a seoarate dining rm 
with French doors to the living 
rm. The master bedrm. on the 
main floor Is very large with 
; huge walk-in closet and an area 
all ready for a 3 pee. ensuite. Call 
! now before It's sold. 

KENHIGHTON 

477-7291 (Bus > 38S-9235 (Res > 

or 384-8075 (Por. 1259) 

AFFORDABLE 

LAKE 

LIVING! 

$28,000! 

| Ideal Shawnigan Lake retreat 
27-tt one-owner Airstream trail 
| er with many extras including 
air-conditioning on 40x20 con 
Crete lot with built-in barbecue 
I and lots of room for outdoor liv 
; Ing. Commute or forget city liv- 
I ina entirely while enlovmg club 
privileges In Shawnigan Lake 
| Recreation Assn Just a short 
hop to private swimming and 
beach area — plus much more' 
Be the first fo discover this 
unique oppor tunity with 

Donnafoss 

(477 7291 384 8075 (Pgr 504) 

NO STEPS 

2 BEDROOMS 
Charming Garden 

A dear little home wifhiivingrm 
with fireplace; kitchen with 
stove, fridge, washer and dryer 
dining area Double glassed win 
dm Near quiet home with « 

, charming English Garden Do 
call! MLS $69,500 

TRlCl A PARKE R 
477-7291 Anytime 

WELL! 

SIDNEY! 

3 BEDROOMS! 

ASSUMABLE $20,000 mortgage 
at 10” PIT at $7JO 37 pet 
month Greene lades school 
nearby family hum* reed* Ur 
a nuttier family Ml 5 4, r. 
MAKE AN Of FER ON $7t SUL 
it, view.eg* 

TBit!A PARKER 
477 TIPI Anytime 

• V CMRN# k ME A/l » REMO 

ruem g ***** 

Lmram living toon, f.impi *. i 
mm jQ wav. 

rnrnmmm NteMg *W m 
rum* seffr* 4*ecNn0 y. 
rage pit,'. 7 teedrewr tewiivo 
NMe (rente* $4* ae 

tnrfeRai dr Mr dnfflgvr' 98’ 

























































































































































































































































































C9 

250 HOUSES FOR SALE 

Royal 
Trust 


OPEN HOUSE 
THURS.,2-4 
1424 ST. PATRICK ST. 
Immaculate south Oak Bay du¬ 
plex — both suites have FP and 
separate entrance and utilities. 
Upstairs suite has 2 bedrooms 
and downstairs one plus. Excel¬ 
lent financing MLS. $149,000 
MRS MARILYN WOODWARD 
477-2722 or 384-8001 

FRI., 2-4 

#205-3244 SEATON ST. 
1-BR CONDO 

Ideal for retired person or couple 
that want a Quiet spot with fire¬ 
place, a glassed in porch for 
growing plants and flowers. Plus 
washer and dryer en suite. Liv¬ 
ing room, dining room in line. 
Close to shopping and busses. 
For more informant 
LEN TAYLOR 
J82 9485or 384 8001 


BLOCK 
[HJBROS 


See Our Week lv 
CATALOGUE 
OF HOMES 



ifioncall 


6.5 ACRES 
WATERVIEWS 

SECLUSION-$205,000 
Beautiful view over Saanich 
Inlet to the West from large part 
ly enclosed sundeck. Eleven 
vear old 3-bedroom home with 
vaulted ceiling in living room 
Lurge country kitchen and a nice 
den with FP. Exclusive listing 
with 

GERRY DAVIS, 592 6961, OLE 
KNUDSE N, 479-2764 or 384-8001 

GORDON HEAD 
5116,900 

Two vear-old. three bedroom 
home with family room off kit¬ 
chen. Wallton built Double 
flooring, thermo windows, vault¬ 
ed ceilingin livinoroom. Assume 
$61,000 first mtoe. at 10%% due 
Oct ,'83. Call 

OLE KNUDSEN. 479-2764 or 
384 8001 

TOWNHOUSE 

$45,000 

Esquimau location with two bed 
rooms on three levels. Call 
OLE KNUDf 
384 8001 


bSEN, 479 2764 or 


THINKING OF SELLING? 
THINK OF GERRY DAVIS 
384-8001 Royal Trust 592-6961 

CENTRAL SAANICH 

$ 110,000 

Just Listed—almost 2 acres with 
older 2 storey. 6 bedroom. 2 full 
bathroom home on West Saanich 
Rd. 2400 sq. ft. of good living 
accommodation including living 
room with heatilator fireplace, 
separate dining room, cosy fam 
ilv room and large updated kit¬ 
chen. Ideal for hobby farm. Ex¬ 
clusive with 

DORA and DEREK WICK, 
595 2062 or 384^8001 

SIDNEY —$69,900 
This Immaculate 3-bedroom 
bungalow is tastefully decorated 
tnroughout Brioht living room, 
large eat-in kitchen, separate 
laundry room and 4 pee. bath 
room. Wall to wall carpets. Ex- 
(cllent storage Beautifully 
landscaped garden with mani¬ 
cured lawns, fenced at rear. Ex¬ 
clusive with 

DORA and DEREK WICK. 
595 2062 or 384 8001 

NEW LISTING 
7035 Linda Place, Sidney. De- 
liqhtful home with 3 bedrooms on 
the main, 2 bdrms and rec room 
down. This home is situated on a 
private lot with fruit trees and it 
has a beautiful big sundeck fac¬ 
ing south. The kitchen has lots of 
cupboards, built-in stove and 
big. big pantry. Drive down this 
quiet cul de sac and see this 
home, notice the shake roof, the 
combination of siding and brick 
and the overall effect, then call 
me to see. New MLS. $85,500. 

NEW LISTING 
Ascot House — Rofal Woods. 
What sets this unit apart from 
others — well — firstly it is 
spotless trom rugs to walls, the 
kitchen is big, the dining room 
is separate and large. The living 
room and bdrm face west and as 
a bonus the crushed velvet 
drapes, stove, fridge and apt. 
size washer ar,e included. New 
MLS. $47,900. 

REDUCED! REDUCED! 

944 Woodhall — a lot of family 
living at a good price. Check and 
compare — 5 bedrooms, 3 fire¬ 
places, 3 bathrooms, den. rec 
"room, vacuum system, inter¬ 
com. All this plus a super loca¬ 
tion with park across the street. 
$138,500. MLS. 

GREAT TASTE 

This ?-bdrm ground floor unit in 
Laurel Point was decorated by a 
professional who has blended 
or ass cloth, mirrors and neutral 
rugs for a most pleasing combi 
nation Step from your living 
room onto a private patio, look 
out at the manicured garden or 
dip in the heated pool. A must 
see MLS $110,000. 

F or any of the above please call: 
477-0191 JOAN FRASER479-6663 

NEW LISTING 
A bi t of T. L.C. w i 11 do wonder s f or 
the outside of this home. Com¬ 
fortable updated 3 bedroom ac 
commodation on the main plus 2 
bedroom in-law suite down. Oak- 
lands area. Close to all ameni¬ 
ties. MLS.$65,000 Toviewcall: 

LES ADAIR WILLIAMS 
477-0191 383-9950 

477-0191 BABEJETKO 721 3851 

OAK BAY 
REDUCED $4,000 
NOW $92,500 

Only on the market 2 weeks but 
vendor wants quick sale on this 
South Oak Bav property 3 bed 
rooms, completely redecorated, 
new roof Phone anytime for 
appointment to view this exclu¬ 
sive. 

GALE CHRISTENSON 
477 0191 477 7047 


ESQUIMALT 

$51,900 

vendor has bought! Solid little 
? bedroom home Living and din 
ino room, fireplace, covered 
ceilings Some sea views. Imme 
diate possession. Exclusive. 
4770191 SYLSHUMKA $95-1337 

GRACIOUS 
WELL PRICED HOME 
This home nestles in the timber 
vet it is only blocks from good 
shopping and schools Theexecu 
five and family will eniov the 
spacious rooms available for 
luxurious living. The property 
has 5 bedrooms. 3 baths with 
vanity, 3 fireplaces, dining 
room, family room and den 
Phone me to view this fine in¬ 
vestment 

EARL REYNOLDS 
384 8085 pager 1432 

TRANSFERRED 
REDUCED $2,600 

A "must sell'’ describes this 
choice Giantof d home wrth over 
1800 sq ft finished A fine 3 bed 
room family home on a fully 
landscaped cul de-sec lot MLS 
Reduced to only 04.900 
v iew with 

4774191 ROB FRASER 595 7505 
GORDON SPALKMAN 
47/4191 658 VU 


BY OWNER 
Prime Gordon Head 
1703 ASH ROAD 
In Artxjtus Grove 
$109X100 
7? 1 3605 


FAMILY DELIGHT 

An attractive modern home with 
3 bedrooms and full basement. 
Bright kitchen with chopping 
block cabinets and counters, rec 
room with additional fireplace 
tor cozy evening fun. Land 
scaped yard with underground 
sprinkling system and abundant 
garden rich with vegetables. 
Mortgage of $47,000 at 10%%. 
Ideal money saver. $73,900. 

ROBFUKUSHIMA 
598 5245 477-1841 

CLASSY COMFORT 
A simplv delightful house taste¬ 
fully appointed with modern 
decor. fashionably designed with 
contemporary kitchen cabinets, 
quality carpeting throughout the 
spacious 1520 sq. ft. of living 
area. 2 bedroom ranch styled 
•ome ideally located for quiet 
njovment in a cul de sac. 
‘ ,900. 

ROBFUKUSHIMA 
5245 477-1841 

OPEN HOUSE 
THURS., 7-9 AND 
SUN., 2-4 * 

3247 IRMA 
UNIQUE 3 LEVEL 
SPLIT, $76,900 
immaculate 3 bedroom home 
with separate dining room, eat 
ing area in kitchen, den, 2 patios, 
double carport plus many 
extras. 

FLO BILINSK Y 

479 7266 477-1841 

DON'T DRIVE BY 
ME 

Outside I look ordinary 
but inside I'm something 
special. 

Open House 
Wed. and Thurs.. 7:30-9 
1579 Gregory, MLS 
LINDA TOMAL 
j 477-0073 477-1841 

ROCKLAND 
FAIRFIELD 
CHARACTER 
RESIDENCE 
; Surrounded by ah excellently 
maintained garden with trees, 
shrubs and flowers, a 3-bedroom 
'residence. Conservatory en 
trance, the "English pub” style 
living room has beams, panel) 
mg, brick fireplace with built-in 
: fireside seats and chandelier. 
Dining room is laroe, attractive 
kitchen has adjoining breakfast 
room. Upstairs the spacious 
| landing has 3 stained-glass win¬ 
dows; the bedrooms are all a 
oood size, bathroom with sepa 
rate toilet. The home is full of 
character and appeal. Is taste¬ 
fully decorated and immaculate 
< throughout. Full basement has 1 
! piece toilet, separate garage. 2 
| driveways A most delightful, 
family home. Offered EXCLU 
SI VELY. $122,500. 

SHELAGHHALL 
Off ice (24 hrs ) Residence 

477 1841 592-2723 

WANT A GOOD BUY 
ON A 

LONELY DUPLEX? 

It's only because it is one of the 
few in the high $80s price range 
It's also lonely because It is 
among the few that Is in top 
shape, it is one of the few that 
have great revenue and where 
the tenants pav the expenses. It 
is lonely because of the value of 
its location. Give me a call and 
lets discuss your financing 
needs. 

388-6275 DAN NUGENT 477 1841 
Pager a 1376 Office 

HANDY 

NEIGHBOURHOOD 
OPEN HOUSE 
1106 LYALL ST. 

FRI.-SAT. 
2:00-4:00 P.M. 

Two bedroom bungalow only 1% 
blocks from elementary school, 
shopping and recreational 
centre. Some of its features In¬ 
clude fireplace and unique light¬ 
ing in living room, bedroom and 
linen closets completely cedar 
lined, family size kitchen has 
breakfast nook with separate 
dining room, excellent basement 
has rooms tor 3rd bedroom and 
family room. Priced at $65,000 
To view please call: 

KATHY PARLEE 
386-3397 477-1841 

VIEW ROYAL 
RANCHERS ARE 
SPECIAL 

The beauty of this rancher Is Its 
spaciousness. The main level is 
1780 sq. ft. You'll love the gra¬ 
cious open feeling in 3 nice size 
bedrooms, 1 % bathrooms, full 
brick fireplace In living room, 
dining room with sliding glass 
doors onto sundeck, family room 
with adjoining den or guest 
room. 

PLUS - 1300 sq. ft. self con¬ 
tained inlaw suite on lower level. 
Priced at $127X100. A must to see. 
for appointments to view call 
KATHYPARLEE 
386-3397 477-1841 

CADBORO BAY 
SEA AND BAY VIEWS 
TERRACEDGARDEN 
Situated on a gently sloping half 
acre garden with superb views, a 
J bedroom bungalow with a fully 
developed basement. 2 bed¬ 
rooms on the main floor with a 
3rd downstairs In the ground 
level basement. Living room, 
dining room, spacious family 
room with fireplace and glass 
doors to the garden 2 bath 
rooms, 2 fireplaces Full view 
kitchen. Workshop EXCLU¬ 
SIVE. $145,000. 

TEDWALFORD 
Res Office Office(24hrs.) 

598-1420 477-1841 

CADBORO BAY 
BUNGALOW 
CLOSE TO BEACH 

On a 65x)00‘ fully fenced and 
beautifully shrubbed garden, a 
nckstep 3-bedroom bungalow In 
immaculate condition. Living 
room with fireplace, dining room 
with glass doors to secluded 
pat ioSoaclous kitchen Nobase¬ 
ment A minutes walk to the 
beach MLS $119,000 

TEDWALFORD 
Res Office Office (24hrs.) 
598 1420 477-1841 


. BQPRMAN INVESTMENT CO. LTO. 

OPEN DAILY 
3:00 to4:30 

1929 BEACH DR —Asklng$159,- 
900. all offers considered! Don't 
be deceived by a drive by — It 
looks small, but has over 2300 sq. 
ft., plus full basement. Well 
planned, very spacious, excel¬ 
lent condition — 3 bedrooms 
plus den; two full baths; much, 
much more For personal ap 
point mem: 

DOUGCODDINGTON 
Off . 595-1535 or 388-5464^ 

Pager 725 

SOUTH OAK BAY 
TREED SECLUSION 
COUNTRY LANE 
TRULY EXCEPTIONAL 

Truly an outstanding character 
residence combining English 
Tudor with superb modern ar 
chltecture. The residence Is sited 
on a beautifully landscaped oar 
den lot, with circular driveway 
and mature shrubery. Inside the 
gracious entrance foyer leads to 
the entertainment sized living 
room with marble fireplace and 
French doors to sun patio, den 
and fireplace, wet bar, and pan 
nelled in oak Separate dining 
room leading to the finest gour 
met kitchen you could ever de¬ 
sire. Now a family room with 
fireplace overlooking a 21'x38' 
heated pool with Its own barbe- 
que and kitchen facilities. Ad- 
ting office and atrium plus 
bedrooms on the main floor, 
up the open staircase to 3 bed 
rooms, plus sewlrxi room The 
master is 17'x27' w - connecting 
sauna, sun patio, envu e, walk in 
closet and fireplace Priced at 
$475,000. Appoint ner ■ s to view 
EXCLUSIVELY vltt 

GORDON CAMS 
Bus. 595-1535 ;es. 592-1353 

SOUTH OAK BAY 
CHARACTER AND 
TRADITION 

I Is the theme to this fine, 2 storey. 
3-bedroom residence situated on 
a picturesque treed and garden 
lot. The main level boasts of 
a large foyer, entertainment size 
living room with fireplace, sepa 
rate dining room, family kitchen 
with sunoorch and a family den 
i with another fireplace, plus a full 
basement. Asking$139,900. View 
, this exclusively with: 

GORDON ADAMS 
Off . 595-1535 Res. 592 1353 

FERNWOOD CHARM 
GARDEN LOT 
$54,500 

Excellent 1% storev. 3-bedroom 
home In a convenient location 
near all schools, stores and 
buses. This home features open 
staircase to upstairs large living 
room, family sized kitchen which 
Is up to date and hot water heat 
Fully fenced lot with fruit trees 
and garden area To view please 
call; 

GORDON ADAMS 
Off . 595-1535 Res 592-1353 


Open Fri. and Sat. 
2-4 

4448 RANGEM0NT 
Gordon Head 
Opportunity 


VENDORS MUST SELL THEIR 
2 YR OLD HOME THIS 
MONTH! A UNIQUE 3 bedroom 
SPLIT LEVEL custom DE 
SIGNED for a voung family. 
Large counti y kitchen — sewing 
room, private living room with 
book cases and old brick FP. 1900 
sq. ft. of immaculate living area 
— all reasonable offers consider 
ed! $109,000 

THE MARTINS 

477-7131 477 7050 

ANOTHER 

CHANCE 

at thls2BR bungalow. This home 
was sold but the offer has col¬ 
lapsed. There's a large living 
room w/FP, a large dining room 
and a galley type kitchen Act 
now for this home sold quickly 
before and will do so again. ML 
$54,500 

477-7131 KEN WILKE 382-9527 


Well, there's lots to love In this 
classic 3 or 4-BR contemporary 
home In Dean Park A long wind¬ 
ing drive through stately ever 
greens br logs you to this garden 
er's delight set on a secluded halt 
acre of graceful landscaping. 
This Is a sturdy family home 
featuring 2 fireplaces, a family 
room and recreation room in a 
full basement plus a double car¬ 
port and huge sundeck. Call us 
now to view this outstanding 
value at only $115,000. 

DONNAor GLENN NICHOLLS 
385-9741 598-7689 

HENDERSON REALTY LTD. 

DEAN PARK ESTATES 


2-Storey 

Charade! 


Just listed, this lovely home Is 
immaculate throughout and re 
tains much of Its 1912 charm 
L.R., D.R., and entrance have 
beautiful bay windows (some 
with stained glass). Large bright 
kitchen with mahogany cabinets 
and eating area. Three bed 
rooms, bathroom and sewing 
room up. Some oak floors. Situ¬ 
ated on a beautiful high lot over¬ 
looking parts of the city. A truly 
lovely nome In an equally lovely 
area of similar homes. CALL 
TODAY TO VIEW. $87,500. 

RANDI COLWELL 
SEASPRAY PROPERTIES 

« LTD. 

477-7131 (24 Hrs.) 

25 Acres Of Privacy 

Great property for animal 
lovers This 2.5 acres has a mix¬ 
ture of rock, trees and clearings 
with a very interesting 2 or pos¬ 
sibly 3 bedroom renovated older 
home The house is loaded with 
charm and character and will 
suit those with a taste for some¬ 
thing a little different. Immedi 
ate possession available Asking 
price $68,500. Act now before it is 
gone Toviewcall: 

DONNA BARTON 
SEASPRAY PROPERTIES 
LTD. 

477-7131 (24 Hrs.) 


FRIDAY 
1:30-4:30 

1754 ORCAS PARK 
TERR. 

You will find privacy, luxury j 
beautv In this lovely three bed 
room home. Nothlnq was spared 
In the building. Quality 1$ every¬ 
where Private fenced qrounds 
completely landscaped. Gra 
clous space, quiet surroundings, 
and a recommended Investment 
at $165,500. ML# 46739. See it 
Friday with your Host: 

HUMPHREY GOLBY 
592-6730 

OAK BAY 


THURS. 1:30-4:30 
2112 PENTLAND 

immaculate 4 bdrm family 
home In traffic free area. Ideal 
for In-law set up. All serious 
offers to new list of $119,000 con 
sldered. See It Thurs. Your 
Host: 


ORVILLE WHITE 


592 7220 


FOUL BAY ROAD 


, home with laroe dining room and 
i living room. Convenient loca 
tion, close to Safeway, rec re 
i atlon centre. Good as residence, 
I excellent Investment. Listed ex 
closivelv for $63,500. 

OLGAZACHARY 
I Off. 595-1535 Res. 592 2265 

OAKCREST/ 
CEDAR HILL 
$94,500 

BACKONTHE MARKET,afour 
i year old 2 storey home, situated 
on a quiet street In a very pretty 
area. There are three bedrooms, 
(master ensuite), spacious Ilv 
Ing and dining rooms, bright kit¬ 
chen. The lower level has rec. 
room plus more space readv for 
development. High bright loca 
tion offers Citv views. Well 
priced —call quickly. 

GAIL WE IN BERG ' 

Off. 595-1535 Res. 598-0267 

PETERDUECK 

| Off . 386-7521 Res. 478-9909 

GORDON HEAD 
! UNIVERSITY AREA 
•*114,500 * 

| JUSTLISTEDthlsImmaculale3 
bedroom family home It's 2 
years old, close to all schools, 
racquet club and University 
Features large living room and 
dining room, large sunny kit¬ 
chen, family room with fire 
place. Assume $57,000 1st at 
10%% duo Sept./83. To view EX¬ 
CLUSIVELY with 

GORDON ADAMS 
Off . 595-1535 Res. 592-1353 


MT.TOLMIE 

CHARACTER 

\ Close to the University and sltu- 
; ated high upon a double mature¬ 
ly landscaped lot, this 3 bedroom 
home features living room, din- 
Inq room with pleasant views to 
Ml Douglas, huge modern kit¬ 
chen ana eating area 14.6 x 14.6. 
Master bedroom and den on the 
main and 2 bedrooms up (2 piece 
bath). Full basment with laun¬ 
dry and area for future develop 
ment. 

The Interior Is very bright and 
retains Its 1930's charm, while 
the 100' wide backyard offers 
total privacy making this home 
well priced at $99,060. For fur 
ther information call 

WYNN WRIGHT 
386-7521 598-9190 

SELLARS DR. 

5 MINUTES TOSOOKE 

I Home on 2 acres Attractive 
I pana-bode 3 bedrooms on main 
Laroe living room and fireplace 
Sunny kitchen. Full basement 
with lots of room. $99,500. MLS 
Call: 

JOHN HOLMS at 386-7521 


PAC-WEST 



TURGOOSE POINT 
AREA 

C ompieted two months ago this 
almost brand new home has five 
bedrooms ensude from master 
— gracious living/dming room 
Superb 16x1? sundeck Thermo 
pane throughout Buy this home 
and tmish the family room to 
your own taste Laroe level kit of 
nearly % acre completes feeling 
of space Priced to sell at 
$104X100 

GORDON BROWN 
658 5036 477 1841 

MARTIN HOLMAN 
386 5249 4 77 1841 

NEW LISTING 
TOWNHOUSE S 

two immaculately metratamed 
tuwremuses m central location to 
James Bay Three bedrooms 
with pr.y«te sunOMk and trim 
yard Praad <0 sell to* toC 
I or lurttar details and arrant 
merits k, *taw 

.AjHlMJ* BROWN 
6U kbit 477 1841 

MAR*tNf40L77AN 
486 $74V 47/ 1841 


INTERNATIONAL REAL 
ESTATE BROKERS INC 

388-6161 

NEW LISTING 
LAKEHILL!! 
$85,500 

A METICULOUS 3 Bedroom, 
full Bsmt home Bright and soa 
cious thru out with entertairv 
ment sized living room, "L” din 
ing room, family kitchen 
features loads of cupboards, eat 
Ing area and B. I oven and count 
er tops, lower level boasts rec 
rm with 2nd fireplace, games 
rm, 4th bedroom. 2 pee. bath, 
laundry and workshop area. At 
tached double carport. Fully 
fenced back garden with manl 
cured lawns and fruit trees To 
view this excellent listing phone 
i Twr^Eden or Sharleen Eden, 

ANXIOUS VENDOR!! 

| LOCATION Is Bay Kings area, 
and the LOT is 4S'x133 7 (zoned 
R32> with back lane access Add 
to this the 2 bedroom, full Bsmt 
home with EXCELLENT Rental 
Potential and you have en EX¬ 
CELLENT INVESTMENT prop 
ertv Priced low STD's but offers 
are WANTED MLS To view 
phone Sharleen Eden or Terry 
Eden, 388-6161 

VALLEY VIEWS! 
SEA GLIMPSES! 

Gorgeous ) or 4Bedroom full 
Bsmt heme with lower level com 

ENTER'AINMENT sized living 
rm with ♦‘replace dining rm, 
family kitchen with eating erea 
largeracrn, 7 4 p< <-bath plot* J 
pee I NSOITI ew ioMd MM 

K eg r tends* aped i kt 
-eohel Lee»u h » AN f AS TIC 
1st MIG «t n. Price uni* 
$kv KK Ml V Pho.sc t© vi*» 
V iter leer- Eden u» r 


BOB FARRELL'S 
HOMES 

METCHOSIN 
1078 Glen Forest wav. Excep¬ 
tional quality. 3 bdrm. home on 
secluded 1 acre parcel, muni 
cipal water supply Drive by and 
call 

BOB FARRELL 386-3124 

MOUNT NEWTON 
Under construction on 10 acre of 
exceptional view property. 
Unique cedar charm with a touch 
of elegance. Act soon to add your 
flare. $256,000. 

BOB FARRELL 386-3124 

WEST SAANICH 
3-bdrm. full bsmt. bungalow. 4th 
in bsmt. Large sundeck in Im¬ 
maculate condition. 10 %% mort¬ 
gage Large heated garage Only 
$58,800 — Act quickly. 

BOB FARRELL 38*3124 

REVENUE 

Multi-suite conversion under¬ 
way. Bus route. Huge lot and low 
rate mortgage. $250,000. 

BOB FARRELL 386-3124 

TOP OF 
THE TOWN 
$148,900 

Perched on a rock surrounded 89 
garden This 2600 sq. ft. home 
exudes quality. 5 bdrms. or 3 and 
2 dens Room for pool table In 
delightful rec. room. Two fire¬ 
places. Spacious plan. Much 
more. 

BOB FARRELL 38*3124 


Castle 

PROPERTIES LTD. 


OPEN HOUSE 
1990 Haultain 

SAT./SUN. 1:30-4 
It's back on the market, now you 
have a chance. 2 bedrms, LR 
with fireplace and w/w, nice 
bright kitchen with good eating 
area, full bsmt — 6' Lovely lot. 
Asking $58,500. Office 3866164 
LOUISE WILTERMUTH 
4776307. 

Mt. Tolmie Views 
$159,900 

I f you refuse to fit Into any pigeon 
hole, but still want to roost high 
up with the very best, consider 
this knock-out, one-of-a-kind 
home gracing the west slope of 
Mt. Tolmie. It features a spa¬ 
cious 1980 open design (1900 sq 
ft.) which accents both privacy 
on an easy care lot and gracious 
multi-level living with views that 
will make your wings flap. 
Hurry, call SHANE BEFURT 
479 0010, MIKE SWEENEY 
388 5050 or at CASTLE PROP¬ 
ERTIES LTD. 386-6164. 

ALLENBYPARK 
COMFORT 
CHARM —$91,500 

This gracious home Is over 2,500 
so. ft of family comfort. The 
upstairs features 2 bedrooms, 
convenience kitchen, cosy living 
room and sep. dining room with 
wrap-around sundeck off. Third 
bedroom and den are located 
downstairs, as well as a huge 
laundry area, a workshop anda 
large medieval rec room with 
F P and bar. Situated on a large, 
fenced lot, this home Is offered at 
$91,500. For prior viewing, call 
PAM MORRY res 592 9770 or 
3886275 pager No 2656 or CAS 
TLE PROPERTIES LTD. 
3866164 

FANTASTIC 
SEA VIEWS 

5 bedrooms, 3 baths, formal dirv 
ing room, rec room, 3 sundecks. 
easy care yard Located in beau 
tifui Dean Park Reduced from 
$ 189.500 to $ 179XX)0 for quick sale 
Call GERRY FINNlGAN res 
656-5876 office J866164 


OPEN HOUSE 
EVENINGS 7-9PM 
4053 Grange Rd 
4030 In ter urban Rd 

T wo oueiH y UAH Homes ere open 

u»»e 

(tor tone i eng jbdr hunm 

be seen Close to bos 

5rx& 


RURAL ELEGANCE 

$169,000, off Otter Point Road 
Lovely 4 bedroom home with 
large Rec. Room, separate Din¬ 
ing. large Qarage on 2 Acres on 
creek. Has horse barn and chick 
en coop. Vendor will carry $60, 
OOOat 11%%. Enclosed patiowith 
outdoor barbeque. MLS. To view 
call. 

RALPH KELLER 385-9741 

BUILT TO LAST 
CUSTOM BUILT 

With a view to energy conserva 
tion, $119,500. 3 Bedrooms, 2% I 
Baths, living room ad family 
room with rock heatilator fire- 1 
place. No-upkeep yard. Pastoral 
and mountain views. Laroe kit¬ 
chen with eating area, separate 
dining room. To view In Saanich 
West. Call RALPH KELLER, 
385-9741. MLS. j 

SAANICH EAST 
$86,900 MLS. 

No-through street, no neigh¬ 
bour son one side 3-Br home with 
in-law suite custom built bv 
builder and rents at $275 00 Low 
up-keep lot but oood small gar 
den area. Near University and 
all shopping. 

RALPH KELLER 385-9741 


OPEN HOUSE 
DEAN PARK 
$115/000 

SAT. JULY 26 
and SUN. JULY 27 
1-4 P.M. 

1914 SADOVER CRES. 
Drive through stately evergreen 
to a gardener's delight set on a 
secluded half acre of fruit trees 
and graceful landscaping. This is 
a classic 3 or 4 B.T. contempo¬ 
rary home featuring 2 fire 
places, a family room and recre¬ 
ation room In a full bsmt., plus a 
double carport and huge surv 
deck. Call now to view tnls out¬ 
standing value. 

DONNAor GLENN NICHOLLS 
385-9741 598 768V 

NEW3 BEDROOMS 
$89,500 

Builder says sell this new quality 
home close to Simpson Sears, 
readv for occupancy In 2 weeks 
Hurry this won't last HOWARD 
TOMLIN 385-9741 or 477 1327 


cupboards. Two good sized 
bedrooms and modern 4-pce 
bath complete the main floor 
of aprox. 1400 sq. ft. Upstairs 
is a third large bedroom. The 
high basement has a 2-pce. 
bath, den or bdrm. with 
great potential for further 
development. Priced at 
$124,000. To view the EX¬ 
CLUSIVE NEW LISTING 
Pleasecall: 

JUNE HOUGHTON 

595-2121 477-5185 

UPPERQUADRA 

Located on a beautifully 
landscaped % acre with fruit 
trees, grape vines and huge 
separate workshop. Modern 
& unique, this lovely home 
features 4 bdrms, master 
with 4 pee. ensuite and 
lounge, livinoroom, den, 2 
fireplaces, 4 baths in all. 
Asking $147,000. MLS. 

JUNE HOUGHTON 

595-2121 477-6185 

NEAR GORGE 
WATERWAY 
Immaculate 3 bedroom 
home In a choice location 
near Gorge Waterway. 2 car 
oarage, large rec. room with 
bar, workshop. New roof & 
oil storaoe tank. Must be 
seen for appreciation of 
value. Favorably priced for 
quick sale. Asking $88,000. 

JOE MADAY 

477 8746 59*2121 

ROCKLAND 

EXCEPTIONAL 

QUALITY 

Brand new brick exterior 
home In a quiet setting near 
Government house. Sea 
glimpses to the south with 
freighter watching views 
from upstairs 4 bedrooms, 
2% baths, fireplaced family 
room, formal living room 
and cross hall dining. 20x21 
rec. room or music room 
above the double oarage. 
This home will be readv for 
occupancy soon, please 
phone for further Informa¬ 
tion. Exclusive $225,000. 

GRAY LAITE 

Res: 656-5267 Off: 595-2121 

LOW DOWN 
$50,000 to $60,000 

i A few homes left in this price 
ranoe In Victoria area Some 
have oood mortgaging already 
and may be assumed. Most have 
basements and 2 or 3 bedrooms. 
Good-szie lots close to every¬ 
thing. For more info please call 
HAL BARBER 385-4995, Office 
382-8101. 


JACK HEARS 
OAK BAY REALTY LTD. 



2194 OAK BAV 


Where Trust Is 
The Basis Of All Business 

UPLANDS ELEGANCE 

Well maintained home built 
In 1957 offering fine family 
accommodation of 3000 sq. 
ft. on one floor. Nicely pro¬ 
portioned living room with 
marble fireplace, panelled 
den with fireplace, 14x13 din¬ 
ing room, cabinets and 
counters galore In the kit¬ 
chen. 2% baths, large rec 
room, HW heat. Landscaped 
lot, almost 3 /4 acre. A super 
buy at $325,000. MLS 47400. 
For appointment 1o view call 
BILL McC ARTE R at 
592 3970 or 598-3321. 

COUNTRY SETTING 
$61,900 

?-bedroom bungalow on high 
lot (64x150). Large living* 
room with fireplace, shake 
roof, good garden area at 
rear of property. This is an 
opportunity. Please call to 
see how you can benefit. 
MLS DARRYL YOUNG at 
388 5464 pager 526 or ANNE 
EDGINGTON at 477-4531 or 
598-1321. 

$49,000 

Tryyour offer on this Mr. Fix 
it. Special 1-bedroom, full 
basement, new electrical. 
MLS. Drive by 815 Bay Street 
then call for appointment to 
view DARRYL YOUNG at 
388-5464 paoer 526 or ANNE 
EDGINGTON at 477-4511 Of 
598-1121. 

WOOLCOAREA 

1 Bedroom, living room with 
fireplace, bright cheery kit 
chen Large lot In an area 
of lovely homes. Asking 
$49,000. Please call PHYL 
US COUTTS at 99*332! or 
38*9563 


0 

Victoria 

Realty 

V 386-3585 J 

CEDAR HILL* 
IN LAW SUITE 

Completely renovated, just like 
a new home, two or three bed 
rooms on the main floor with a 
complete one-bedroom inlaw 
suite. UPPER FLOOR: Otters 
new kitchen cabinets, bathroom 
fixtures, floor coverings, com 
pletelv repainted. LOWER 
FLOOR: Is completely repaint¬ 
ed, new floor coverings, new kit¬ 
chen countertops. Extra laroe 
private lot on a quiet no-thru 
street, easy walk to elementary 
and jr. high. New double carport. 
MUST BE SEEN Asklno$96,500. 
Call today. Jack Lfdstone, 
386-3585,477-9262. 

1174 TRANS CAN 

(At Wilkinson) 

A real nice home at a very at¬ 
tractive price — Only $69,900. 
Trades, terms, offers invited. 
Nice water view too. MLS 47264. 
To view please call Vaughn 
Thompson. 386-3585. res. 
658-8541. 

LANSD0WNE 
SEE ME INSIDE 

Spacious bunoalow, 2 bedrooms 
plus one down. Charming LR 
with rock FP. Separate DR., 
modern kitchen with sep. EA. 
Sundeck over double carport. 
FulI high basement Is R.l. for FP 
and bath. Well priced at $79,500 
Exclusive. Please call Leo Van 
Dyk, 386-3585, res. 4796264. 


Qntup k, 

~nri pin 21® 

WESTERN HOMES LTD. 
V1Q37 Ctovf data 386-3484 ^ 


"GORDON HEAD 
DECEIVER" 

Be dazzled — not dazed — bv our 
new listing. Totally renovated 
inside and out with 1977 addition. 
2 level split offers 3 bedrooms, 2 
bathrooms, den, 2 fireplaces, de¬ 
lightful secluded yard. Master 
bedroom has 3-pce. ensuite and 
beautiful brick fireplace, cedar 
feature wall and office or den off. 
Large living room has fireplace 
Perfect family yard has patio, 
large workshop. Updated 
plumbing, 200 amp electric ser 
vice, aluminum gutters, new 
paint outside, fully Insulated 
with thermopanes in the add! 
lion. HERE IS HOW TO SPEND 
$83,900 and- get a million. Ad 
Quickly on this one JAMES 
ANGUS or CAROL FRANCES 
FENN. 386-3494 ( 24hrs.). 


Member 
Relocation Service Canada 


BLOCK 
0BROS. 


in Sidney, close to marinas. 

Total of SbeWoomt 2 fireplaces 
extra largerar room Excellent 

©iTjjY l ri5?r.ii»ip*. 


OPEN HOUSE 
WED. AND THURS., 2*4 

565MOUNTFIELD 
See this well kept home, 3 baths, 
3-4 bdrms. 2 FPs, office and 
den Over 2300 sq ft Close to 
schools and town Only 6 yrs 
ok) and now to large for me 
owners It's here waiting for 
your family Come end see it 
with CECILE HALSt Y. 38*1494 
(24 hrs) 

OPEN HOUSE 
1340 MOORGRE E N 
THURS AND FRI., 7-9 
3X100 sg ft Of bright beauty en 
compasses 5 bdrms j baths kit 
chen with eating area, unoto 
st rue ted views of Mt Doug from 

1484 (24 to S I 


NORTH GORDON 
HEAD 

Lovely spilt level In area of high 
Tnce homes. Three bedrooms, 
wo bathrooms, large, double 
carport, sea glimpses, large lot. 
Spotlessly clean, immaculate 
possession, $109,000. 
BENGREIG 59*3105 381-2233 

$52,500 

Fantastic value offered here In 
this 3-bedroom, 1%-bathroom 
strata duplex. Immaculate In¬ 
side and out. close to shopping 
and schools. Fullv genced vara. 
Owners have bought. Exclusive 
with 

ANITA & ALEX TAIT 
59*0485 381-2233 


MID 70'S 

Large 3-bedroom family home 
with fully developed In-law suite 
In basement. Living room with 
fireplace. Large yard, fully 
fenced. 12x20 greenhouse. Lots 

dusive^T^h Pr ‘ ce<1 *° se,l ‘ E *' 
Anita or Alex Talt 
381-2233 59*0485 

BRAND NEW — $85,900 
2719 LAKEHURST 
Stucco and brick exterior, this 
lovely new full basement home 
contains a large living room with 
slate rock F.P., diningroom with 
glass doors to deck, bright fam¬ 
ily sized kitchen, 3 BRs (master 
BR ensuite) plus main bath up. 
Completed rec room with brick 
F.P. in base. The rest of the full 
bse. Is rouohed-ln for 3rd. bath 
and other development Thermo 
windows. Large lot, over 80 ft. 
frontage. Carpod with concrete 
driveway. Excellent quality con¬ 
struction. To inspect, please 
call: 

LILLIAN CUMMING 

381-2233 656-fSSO 

FOR THE YOUNG AT 
HEART 

in area ot new homes, this laroe 
spacious home Is lust waiting for 
the growing family. If you DO 
NOT want a fantastic view and 
lots of space, DON'T CALL. But 
bring your cheque book and pen 
If these are your needs or you 
may miss the chance to own this 
1980 home Asking $115,000. Ad 
now and call. 

Marry Murray 721-5485 

Ocean City Realty Ltd. 

381 -2233 24 Hrs. 


REnLSPnn 

fetrt; uj i 


PROPERTIES LTD 


846 BROUGHTON 3884454 

OPEN HOUSE 

SAT. 2-4 P.M. 

810 ANDERSON AVE. 

Do come and see this 2 yr. old, 3 
br. Strata Duplex. Attractive 
stone FP in LR, bath and a halt. 
Part basement. Close to all 
amenities. Early possession. 
Yours for $55,000. MLS. 

8c2.PATRICK SUPEENE 
47*6294 

THETIS HEIGHTS 

Here Is a comfortable 3 br. bun¬ 
galow with everything on one 
floor. Nice lot offers privacy and 
easy care In excellent location. 
Primary school within walking 
distance. Offered at $69,500 with 
quick possession. EXC. 

PATRICK SUPEENE 
478-6294 

NORTH SAANICH 

Here's an Immaculate 3 or 4 
bedroom family home on a malrv 
tenance free one acre lot near 
Deep cove that features a huge 
living and dining room, 3 full 
bathrooms and a country atmo¬ 
sphere onty 30 minutes from 
downtown. Asking $139,900 with 
quick possession available. 
MLS. 

GARY BRIDGE 384-6119 



UPLANDS 

GEORGIAN 

A home for the family who en|ov 
gracious entertaining and fam¬ 
ily living. The residence Is Ide¬ 
ally located In the head of the 
Uplands on a beautifully land¬ 
scaped 132x190 half acre garden. 
Approx. 6000 sq. ft. of accommo¬ 
dation with ample bedrooms, 
bathrooms plus entertainment 
size living and dining areas to 
suit the mftl discriminating. 
Please phone to view. 
EXCLUSIVE! 

VIEWS 

ROCKLAND 

CHARACTER 

Located near Government 
House on an easy care lot with 
dramatic water views and over 
7000 sq. ft. of accommodation. 
The home has 8 bedrooms and 
bathrooms plus den, drawing, 
living, dining and family rooms. 
At present (he owners are 
operating the upper 4 bedroom 
level as guest ac c ommodation 
with monthly revenue of $2,275. 
So, you can carry on the present 
use or fill it up with whoever you 


want Asking $259,400 but WHAT 
WILL IT SELL FOR? 

RANDY SMALL 


38*8275 a 2283 


Mill. 

24 PI 

Attractive quality home very 
convenient location, 3 bdrm., 2 
baths, floor to celling stone F.P., 
vaulted ceilings. Large sundeck. 
dble C.P., Intercom, rl vaccuflo, 
and more. Only 16 out of 30 homes 
sites left. 

DON MILLS 

38*3231 (24 hrs) 479-0570 


FOR QUICK SALE 

New 4 level split located in North 
Quadra area. Total 2500 sq. ft 
sunken living room, master en¬ 
suite, family rm. and rec. room. 
Quality construction. Now 
priced at $114,900. 

RAY MILAN 

38*3231 38*5464 Por . 699 

SIDNEY 
NEARLY NEW 
$73,900 

Spacious 3 bdrm., full bsmt. 
home with 2 fireplaces. 6 In. 
walls and heavy insulation. At 
tractive lot In a nice area. $47,000 
at 10 %%. 

LYLE FRASER 

38*3231 6566198 

ROBFUKUSHIMA 
477-1841 59*5245 

LAPWING PLACE 
SIDNEY 


3 Lovely homes for sale 8 years 
triced from $72,900 to 


- -«.*•/ IWMVJ IlH JOIC 

old priced from $72 
$75,900. 

LYLE FRASER 

38*323) _65*6198 


GARDNER 

REALTY Lid 


895 Fori St. 385-7744 

4 BEDROOMS 
% ACRE 
BEACH ACCESS 
$64,900 

Vacant and readv to move Into. 
Home features 3 bedrooms on the 
main plus 2 full bathrooms. 
Fourth bedroom in basement 
plus developed attic 100x284, 
treed lot has a workshop with 
power- aluminum framed green 
bouse, 3 stall boat shed or ga- 
raoe. 2 miles this side of Soode. 
MLS 46999 

385-7744 Martin Battle 5986605 
385-7744 Cliff Salmond 477-3626 

GREAT VIEWS 

For your retirement! 
OPEN to view 

THURS. FRI. SAT. 
2-4 P.M. 

5695 Patricia Bay Highway 
I mmaculate two bedroom home, 
double-parted windows, sunny 
eating nook. OCEAN and VAL¬ 
LEY VIEWS. M.L.S. Come and 
make vour offer. 

AUDREY MONT 
385-7744 59*7898 


COSY & CLEAN 
$52,500 

Excellent starter. Featuring an 
excellent living room — 19x11, 
wrth 2 bedrooms. Kitchen with 
eating area and a % basement 
for workshop, storaoe and laun 
dry. For further Information and 
viewing please call: 

Art Streloht 

385-7744 3886275 Pgr . 882 


FAIRFIELD 
1575 BROOKE 

Immedate poss. 20 yr. voung 3 
bdrm home with 2-bdrm in-law 
ste. Gorgeous lot — great loca 
tion. 

MARJ THOMPSON 
477-0141 658 5584 

THE UPLANDS 
WITH 

SUPERB VIEWS 

A charmino home eM'bodvIng 
2,800 sq. ft. of luxuriously ap¬ 
pointed accommodation in the 
Islands most exclu$rve area 
Erected In 1940 to exact speclfl 
cation It provides a gracious but 
enjoyable atmosphere. Breath 
taklngvlewsextendover Juande 
Fuca Strait and its deep sea 
vessels enroute to and front Van 
An extremely well prteed resi¬ 
dence at $320,000 View this e* 
elusive offering with: 

477-0141 JOHN BOYLE 598 7878 

QUALITY 
' SEAVIEW 
GORDON HEAD!! 

The perfect family orretlrement 
home In an excellent atea of 
Gordon Head 3 bdrms. LR with 
FP. Seaviews from the DR. Sun 
deck and huge country kitchen 
1500 sq. ft. plus on the hftln, plus 
a 10.300 sq ft. lot. Don't wait, see 
this now Offers on $137,’500. 

HARVEY MERRITT 
477-0141 - 652-9370 

JACK HOWES' 

477-0141 721 5100 

The PERMANENT 



S57,vucP 
GOOD VALUE 

Centrally located 2-BR, full 
basement, stucco home with alu¬ 
minum windows and cosy flre- 

R lace. Nice grounds. Stove, 
•doe, drapes, dresser, bed and 
Venetian Winds Included In the 
asking price. MLS. DON'T 
DELAY ON THISONE! 

385-7744 Martin Battle 59*6605 

SIDE X SIDE 

With full high basements, 
roughed-ln plumbing ready for 
development Into In-law suite. 
One side vacant — other rented 
at $195 1 105-1107 MARY 

STREET adloining Bamfleld 
Park. A good Investment In 
today's real estate market. 
Clear title — Buy while Interest 
rates are low. Immediate pos 
session ASKING $85,000. ML 
46875 

HAROLDGARDNER 
385-7744_ 479-2867 




(,/enoarn 
Rrall\ A 
lnre»lmenl 
I orporalmn 


VIEWS 

W ROCKH^GMTS 

This family split level home 
offers 1950 plus sq ft of pure 
comfort 3-BR, LR with FP. OR. 
F amity Rm, Redone kitchen plus 
much more Add to this the views 
of Go rm Veto G C. end Mt 
fteker from your secluded 
CeNtovtow Exclusive 


P R. BROWN 

A NO SONS LTD 


Or Oft FOdINSOf? SeStoi 


HIC mv.i be 

«•••» wto n4» end a 


GORGC AREA 


JUST LISTED! 

4011 VALLEY VIEW 

lOM-f-UK) m- Ml Ian « 


V SZFfflm mm. | 



PURE LUXURY 

423BKEEWATIN 

£20. 

v heme bum bv R A 

»SE 

'SiHt sr*** ®'*'**«®* 

ALAN MxcCILLI VRAY 

aim 0 

GUNOAMYttAI T r 



Choose now from our 
diming selection of 
3-bedroom, 1-bath¬ 
room, archited-de 
signed homes. ; 

Available from ;J7,000 
down and 1635 per 
month, plus : jxes, 
etc. 

FEATURES 

—3 miles to town 
—Close to schools 
—Next to 42-ac. 
park. 

—12% mortgages 
—Full guaranteed 

OPEN HOUSE 
2:00TO8:ft&' 
DAILY — 


Turn onto Glentana kom Ad 
mlrals lust south of 
Admirais/Craigflower Inter six 
tion. 


hunJkilon, 

'Holme* Ski- 

WESTERN CEDAR 
$68,300 , 

This 4 yr. old muHi level zero tot 
line home « 

M 


one end tonina laonh 

wdto roam, fcHchen w 
■ area end ecce** to Ip 

5 3L llT*3rd 


efjrjtoiyerdend garden »© 

ON William* 

MiKNur m m. 
































































































































C-10 

250 HOUSES FOR SUE 


~rd_ rti4.it 
MAYFAIR REALTY 

Centre 

-386-2955 


CCftSE IN AND 
DESIRABLE 

You'll en|ov the warmth and 
homey feeling of this 3 BR, full 
basement home with extra park¬ 
ing for your motor home and a 
fully fenced and landscaped 
back yard with patio and sun- 
deck format barbecue. A must to 
view. M1_S $67,500. LEIGHTON 
NOBLE, 38*2955 or 388-6275, 
Pager 789 

NEWCOLWOOD 

EXCLUSIVE 

If you like seclusion this Is your 
home. Heavily treed for com¬ 
plete privacy, this offers 3 BRs 
with possibility of two more in 
the finished basement Large 
rec. room with F.P. in large 
living room, IV* baths with an¬ 
other roughed-in in basement. 
Lots qf extra parking and a 12x12 
wired and heated workshop. 
Courtesy to realtors. Only $89, 
900. LEIGHTON NOBLE, 
386-2955 or 38*6275, Pager 789 



PANABODE 
2.07 ACRES 
RQCKY POINT 

Here'S* fine character log home 
of approx. 1500 sq. ft. situated on 
a quiet, .secluded drive. Super 
setting fpr this 2 or 3-bedroom 
home With stone fireplace, large 
rec room, chicken coop, tool 
shed, 'etc. Only 8 years old with 
large kitchen with knotty pine 
cupboards. Priced at a reason¬ 
able -$96,000. For further Infor¬ 
mat ion please contact : 

JIMWEST 

Off. 386-1255 Res. 595-4094 

ROCKLAND 

1345 MANOR 
OPEN HOUSE 
FRI. AND SUN , 1:30-4:30 
ONLY $149,900 

ML. View location. Truly Im¬ 
maculate 3-4 bedroom home. 
Fullv'-'fftndscaped. Exceptional 
value ahd a pleasure to show at 
any tithe. Call: 

GEOROE LEWIS 384-4338 

Office_ 386-1255 


CENTRAL SAANICH 


Well kept, large family home on 
quiet cul-de-sac in an area of fine 
new homes. 3 bedrooms, large 
living room with floor fo ceiling 
brick arched heatilafor fire¬ 
place. and separate dining room. 
Largekltchen with family eating 
area and access to full size deck. 
Full, high basement with fin¬ 
ished utility room. 3 piece bath¬ 
room, and framed in workshop, 

, •-*- space voor 


leaving lots of : 

neeqfos 


\ <84 ft. frontaoe) fully 
I landscaped, includ¬ 
ing house T wo car carport 
with extra parking for R.V. 

Close to schools, shopping, rec¬ 
reation and with the countryside 
at your doorstep. 

PRICED AT $94,500 

Call for further details, or to view 
652-5788 


★ Mount Douglas ★ 
Estates 

HOME OF THE WEEK 

* * * 

ThTsaCialitv built 1,778 sq. 
ft. home in Gordon Head 
features: 

— Cedar exterior and shake roof. 
—The eq bedrooms. 

—Topfull baths. 

—Tygjjreplaces (one heatila- 

—F inished family rm. 

—Vaulted cedar ceiling in living 
rm. 

Doubtegarage 
—Skylight In kitchen. 

-5-year warranty and many 
more distinctive features. 

bPEN HOUSE 
Weekdays 1-7 P.M. 
Weekends 2-5 P.M. 
Right, otf Shelbourne. 

Into Robinwood 

Call Ron at 384-tlOl, 
or Res. 381-2376 
T (xTHacketl Construction 



iso HOUSES FOR SALE 


^ /island 
V " /Monies 

COOK 'VA-A’<'<<//(/ 
STREET jT U i 

386 7545 

Quadra-Tattersall 

area 

View this immaculate back to 
front three level spilt on a quiet 
deadend street. The homefea- 
tyres four bedrooms and two 
bathrooms. The kitchen has an 
eating area with laundry, also a 
23x11 area op the lower level 
ready for development. $88,900. 
For more details call 

Barry Thorndycraft 
477-8487 386-7545 


702 FORT ST. 382-9191 

BOB HUGHES —MANAGER 

OPENTHURS. 2-4 
"3220 Wascana 

Updated farhily home of 2 or 3 
bedrooms, sep DR, thru hall, full 
bsmnt. Rock stucco ent and all 
alum, windows. Big 50x197 lot. 
Vacant. MLS. $49,900. 

FR^NK BOUSFIELD 
382-919! 382 4968 

the Permanent 


BLOCK 

E2 

BF 

IOS. 


BOB PAUL 

4784561 (off I 478-2477 (res) 

STRATA TITLE 
DUPLEX 

Large modern 7ago %m ft five 

i up anddown Strata 


WHITTOMES 

2 BR—$59,900 

Older, but lovely no basement 
home In Spectrum area. Family 
kitchen, living rm. with fireplace 
and fir floors and large utility 
room. Wired and plumbed for 
washer and dryer. Stove and 
frldoe plus all drapes to stay 
Extra large lot wity) many fruit 
trees and a grape vine, right 
location and fright price! 

479-1667 DOUGRELF 479-5761 

A JEWEL 

Lovely 2-bedrm. full basement 
home cose to town. Large living 
room with F.P. and a bright 
charming kitchen with sun porch 
off. Fenced back yard with fruit 
and nut trees. Good parking faci¬ 
lities. $69,900. MLS. 

479-1667 Mary McGuire 479-7668 
.fhlttome * 


J. H. Whl 


e & Co. Ltd. 


1746 Jefferson 
Lambrick Park 
Must Sell! 

This lovely contemporary home 
is one of the best values on the 
market in Gordon Head today. 
Over 2400 sq. ft. of finished area 
offering 3 bdrms., 3 bathrms., 
large deck off dining room, plus a 
private fully landscaped back 
yard. You must come In the 
home to appreciate Its assets. 
The vendor Invites voor offer on 
$125,000. 

WE MUST SELL! 

Leslee Farrell 
592-7246, or 
388-5464, Pgr. 665 
Rod Finch 384-1188 


See Our Weeklv 
BESTSELLERS 
CATALOGUE 

ALBERT HEAD 

QdW^ettlng In a rural atmo¬ 
sphere close to beach and park* 
An immmaculate home with tln- 
■ she<fbesement and large sepa¬ 
rate workshop- ample parking 
This home has an excellent plan 
and affords a view from the llv 
*f >0 ar$a and sundeck Situated 
t* M of an acre of loamy soil for 


mi 


$89,000 

Lovelv 3-Bdrm 7-vrold rancher 
with sliding patio doors from 
both master Bdrm and family 
rm onto a very pleasant V« acre 
garden See through fireplace 
from LR Into Family Rm. This 
laroe (1475 sq ft) home Is perfect 
for the retired who likes to gar¬ 
den. It Is a pleasure to show. 
JOYCE MACDONALD 384-8334 
RUTHASHURST 598-2976 

Office 595-5131 

$69,900 

2-bedroom Bungalow near JUBI¬ 
LEE Hospital. Assumable Mor¬ 
tage of $41,500 at 10*% due July, 
'82. NEW LISTING. MLS. DIS¬ 
APPEARING PRICE RANGE. 
LORNE DOYLE 595-1047 

Office_595-5131 


SWINERTON’S 



REALTY WORLD 
"Not A Duplex" 

Yet any family will immediately 
recognize the value of having 
that "extra" accommodation for 
family and visiting friends. Two 
complete floors (not visible from 
street) and also a basement lead¬ 
ing onto enclosed rear oarden. 
Located close to all amenities, 
this 1973 property Is listed at 
$82,500 with occupancy and 
mortgage negotiable. Call for an 
early appointment to view. 
MLS. 

BOB CARTER 385-2481 or 
598-6143 (anytime). 



B.C. LAND 

AND INSURANCE 
AGENCY LTD. 


QUICK 

POSSESSION 

$73,500 

Attractive home on nicely land¬ 
scaped corner lot In Western 
Community. The right location 
for a one car fami ly. 3 bdrms end 
4 pee bath on main plus 4th bdrm 
and 2 pee bath down. Sap. entry, 
corner F .P. in living rm. Family 
room waiting to be developed. 
Fenced garden area. This is a 

S eat house for raising children 
a family oriented neighbor¬ 
hood. M L.S. 47213. 

478-5588 Shirley Wilde 47*2459 



[A. E. Li: PAGE 

i * 

REALTOR 

"JUST LISTED" 
IMMACULATE! 

Situated on a quiet cul-de-sac m a 
prime Gordon Head location. 
This 3 BOR, full basement home 
features a large LR with floor to 
ceiling rock FP, sep. DR, bright 
kitchen with eating area, master 
BDR with ensufte. Downstairs 
you have a Ige. rec. room with 
bar and floor to celling brick FP 
plus workshop or 4th BDR. 
Sunny and private back yard. 
Ottered at $118,500 MLS. Call 
DENNIS L FERRILL 477-7121 
or 721-5340. 


1052 Craigdarroch 

OPEN FRI. 8. SAT. 

2-4 P.M. 

Be sure to see this deceivingly 
laroe 1964 custom built split level 
home In this much sought after 
area, featuring 4 bedrooms main 
with cozy family room oft the 
laroe bright kitchen. Down we 
have a spacious setf contained 1 
bedroom suite professionally 
finished, ideal for student or su¬ 
perb guest accommodation. Im¬ 
mediate possession possible with 
offers invited on $147,000 

Your Host 

LEEWROBEL 

385-1431 

British American Realty 


GORDON HEAD 

On a ouief cut-de-sac. this is a 
the large family It has 



<&SSS» 

doors onto sundeck, LRwWiFP. 
IS bdrms , ) toetfvrm . a big rec 
-, -—fa grguad — 


hi HOUSES FOR SALE 


Oak Bay Willows 
New Listing 

How about approx 1800 sq. ft. 
home near the beach, on valu¬ 
able 70x150 lot? And upstairs a 
self contained, legal suite, plus 
extra room and bathroom va¬ 
cant, possession can be given of 
all the building, out-of-town ven¬ 
dor. Exclusive listing. Price 
$150,000. 

Leverton Rlty. 

385-8012 


GORDON HEAD 

TORQUAY DRIVE 
Five year old Wes* Coast con¬ 
temporary located close to all 
levels of school and recreation 
centra. Two levels, with 1430 
square feet on main. Ilvlno room, 
dining room, and large sundeck, 
all with view of Ml/ Douglas. 
Spacious kitchen with eating 
area and new dishwasher. 5 bed¬ 
rooms, family room with rec 
area. 2 fireplaces. 2V* baths. 
Double carport. Large assum¬ 
able open mortgage at 10V*%. 
$122,5007477-42441 


FTTIDUHSMUIR 

LU 388-7868 


LANSDOWNE 
LOVELY VIEW 
Well appointed family home 
close to good shopping and all 
levels of schools. LR with heatt- 
lator FP. 3 BR. Full Bsmt, (4th 
BR finished). Ideal for irv-law 
situation. Asking $119,000. Leo 
Plgert, 598-1975. 


3-bedroom home, 5-years 
old in Shawnigan Lake 
Village, 1176 square feet 
with ^.-basement and car¬ 
port, corner fireplace, 
dishwasher, built-in vac- 
o—fk) and concrete drive¬ 
way, large landscaped lot. 
Offers on 562,900. Open 
house this weekend. 
112-743-9561. 


OPEN HOUSE 
SAT 8. SUN 1-4 
DEAN PARK ESTATES 
Do vou like: skylights, open lofts 
and the West Coast sty ling? See 
this 2000 sq. ft. home with the 
extras that set it apart. Situated 
at 8803 Portland PI., a quiet cul 
de sac In the prestigious sub¬ 
division of Dean Park Estates 
that overlooks Sidney. 

PRICED LOW$139,500 
JORDAN MILLS 
bus; 384-6434 
res, 656-4365 


FOR SALE BY OWNER 
$55,000 

2 bedrom home on comer lot In 
Vic West. The oarden is neglect¬ 
ed and the house needs decorat¬ 
ing but with a little imagination 
and lots of hard work It could be a 
real gem. No realtors please. 
Marion Webo 

Days 388-5454, Evenings 384-0815 


david burr 


| BB 384-93351 


DIRECT FROM BUILDER 
HOMES AND LOTS 
In Cotwood. City and seavlews 
from this exacutlve tri-level. 
Lots of room to develop. Also lots 
In new subdivision available. Ph. 
KEN MILLAR 478-1721 or 
384-8075 Pager 519 anytime 

DEVELOPMENT £ 


immaculate 3 bedroom, full 
basement home with l'/i baths, 
dining room, Ilvlno room with 
floor to ceiling fireplace, good 
sized kitchen with lots of cup¬ 
board space and built-in dish¬ 
washer. Basement Is partially 
developed. Laroe wrap-around 
sundeck and fenced backyard. 
642-5855. 


LJ 

WESTMONT 

REALTY 388-4434 


BY OWNER 
GORGE AREA 
1538 sq ft, 3 bedrooms, older 
home. With new kitchen, sewing 
room, sauna, leaded glass doors 
in living and dining room, large 
sundeck, new roof. Lot size 
76'xllO'. Asking $88,900. 384-5927 


SOUTH OAK BAY 

BORDER 

Cosy no step 2 bedroom bunga¬ 
low. Excellent oulet location. 
Steps from Village. Could be Im¬ 
mediate possession. By owner. 
$68,900. 11V*% mortgage. 
386-5138,598-4836. 


10’/4%/3 YEARS 

$53,000 mortgage on full price of 
$105,000 buys a new energy 
saver, ^bedrooms, cedar front, 
spacious home. Drive by 3986 
Hopkins (off Cedar Hill X Rd. at 
McKenzie). Viewing appoint- 


CENTRAL SAANICH 

$61,900, 10%% assumable mort¬ 
gage attached only bv carport 
townhouse. Has franklin fire¬ 
place, 3 bedrooms, IV* baths, 
large kitchen, 1350 sq. ft. Phone 
between 5pm-7pm weekdays, 
8am-11 am week e nds, 652-1928. 


SOOKE RIVER RD. EXCEP- 
tlonal property 2 miles from the 
provincial park, almost 3 acres 
of lovelv forest and sunny pri¬ 
vate beach. Large newly built 
artistic home. Must be seen. Sale 
by owner. S1454W). 642-3791 or 
385-3521. 


962,500 

For sale by owner oosv Victorian 
cottage. 3 bedrooms, living room 
with fireplace, dining room, gal¬ 
ley kitchen, basement with play¬ 
room, sundeck. Fenced lot with 
fruit trees. Victoria West. No 
agents. 385-1958. 


BRENTWOOD 

3 bedroom home on quiet ail de 
sac. full basement, thermo pane, 
heatilafor, heavy Insulation. 
Rural view. Large lot. Close to 
amenities. 10%% mortgage due 
In 837^90,000. 1368 ResJklWav. 


PEAR STREET - UNIVER 
sitv $40,000 at 11*%! Solid 3 


Fireplace in living room. Sep* 
rate dining room, recreation 
r oonr Orlve-ln garage. 983,900 


CENTRAL SAANICH 

le family home at 


ComfortebleMMPNMmP 
oulet location. 4-bedrooms, 2 

large landscaped lot. with see 
view Asking 998,900 479-3316 


879^980.—IN FOOTHILLS JUST 

%?«««#» ft fife 

7 In, carterrit Bock, loro, Mv 
mo room vHh rlroploco Vorv 

Tjpflr grag****— ” 


SaSsraw? 

PAULINE CASS 
598-1448, or 
388-5464, Pgr. 70S 


CENT UAL SAANICH. VIEW 
fir spli c es, family ream with 

ffi'^P vf fig , 



hi HOUSES FOR MU 



COACH HOUSE 

RUITT LTO. 381-5255 


LINOEL CEDAR HOME. 2 
bedroom, 2 fireplaces, complete 
3rd In basement unfinished, 2000 
sq. ft. 1 acre, excellent seavlews 
of Sooke Basin, $99,800. To view 
642-5694. No agents. 

$200,000. 4 BEOROOMS, 2 
bathrooms, no basement. One 
block from ocean, walking dis¬ 
tance Glen Ivon and Willows. 
Private sale. No agents. Victoria 
Press Box 504. 

JAMES BAY, COMFORTABLE 
older home. 2 bedroom, living, 
dinino. kitchen with eating, 924 
square feet, l floor, close to 
shops, bus and parks. Phone 
592-4557. 

BY OWNER. NEAR COLWOOD 
Golf Course, ll-veer old, 3-bed- 
room home. $95,000; $15,000 
mortgage at 9'/ 4 % assumeeble. 
Drive by 2304 Marlene Dr. 

FOR SALE BY OWNER, 2-BED- 
room basement home with sepa¬ 
rate oarage at 3400 Wascana 
Street. Please do not disturb ten¬ 
ants. $47,500. Phone 38*5764. 

$57,500 BY OWNER $57,500 

Two bedroom home, on large lot. 
feature wall with fireplace, elec 
trie heat. Garage. 4794)946 after 
5:30pm 

COLWOOD. COSY TWO BEO 
room, 1235 square toot home, 
with 360 square toot garage, no 
basement $60,000. 478-1S40. No 
realtors 

CHARACTER HOME, ORIGI- 
nal 1914 woodwork and brass, 
1000 sq ft, Oaklands. Charming 
but needs some work. $65,000. 
Owner, 59*3389 

TO BE MOVED, 3*YEAR OLD 
stucco and plaster house, 2-bed¬ 
rooms. approximately 1000 
square feet. Offers to $1500. 
479-7019,4 to 6pm. 

FOR SALE BY OWNER 

3 bedroom house on laroe lot, 
brick fireplace, on Coldstream 
Park $67)500. 478-0779 

IMMACULATE 3 BEDROOM 
strata (toplex In Colwood. $55,900 
full price, assumable l0'/4% 
mortgage Call to view 478-4058 

BY OWNER 

2 bedroom no basement home. 

close in, excellent condition. $67,- 
000. 38*6047. 

VIEW ACRE NEAR BEACH 

6 year old custom built home 
near ferries and airport. $124,- 
500 bv owner. 65*5045. 

FAIRFIELD REALTY LTD. 
Call the Fairfield Specialists 
1295FAIRFIELD RCX 383-2244 

PRIVATE, JUBILEE HOSPI- 
tal area, large lovely 3 bedroom 
home, 1833 Newton St. 

4-BEDROOM SPLIT LEVEL, 
1595 Whiff In Spit. Sooke. 
642-5794. 

BY OWNER, SIDNEY AREA. 
House with in-law sulfa. $69,900. 
656-2226 t 

3-BEDROOM BUNGALOW, 1248 
Fairfield Rd, good holding prop¬ 
erty. 

2S3 COWim HOMES 
•Ml PROPERTIES 

CAMOSUN AREA 
5-ACRE SECLUSION 
MINI-FARM 

Careful clearing of frees has 
resulted In e bright, airy site 
exposed to the sun but delightful¬ 
ly secluded. The 2-year-old elec 
trie heat home has 4 bedrooms, 3 
baths, specious L-shaped living 
room/dining room, with area for 
further development. Fully car¬ 
peted. A 40*xl6' barn and con¬ 
siderable fencing for the 7 head 
of cattle currently being run. 
About 15 newly planted fruit 
trees. An excel lent property only 
minutes from downtown. Offers 
Invited on $172,500. MLS. 
BILLREMPLE 

65*5794 477-1841 

BLOCK BROS. REALTY LTD 

HORSE 

COUNTRY 

Peaceful NORTH SAANICH is 
the setting for this quality built 
6-yeer-okffamily home situated 
on 2 ACRES of level land. MUST 
BE SOLD! Owner will assist with 
f Inanclng to quallf led purchaser. 
All reasonable offers on $129,000 
will be considered. 

Maureen Pickup 
477-0463 OR 477-7131 

SEASPRAY PROPERTIES 
LTD. 

COUNTRY LIVING 
JUST LISTED 

Delightful Tudor style home on 
2.4 acres near 17 mile house, 
sooke Rd. Sett contained In-law 
suite. Rural atmosphere. House 

5 years old, Insulated. $109,500 
(MLS). For appointment to 
view, call 

DAVID SCOTT 

38*3435 479-4405 

P. R. BROWN & SONS LTD. 

762 Fort Street 

10.69 ACRES 

Central Saanich on E. 
Saanich Road. ALR at 
present. Great Potential. 
Build one home and horse 
barn now. Later? Who 
knows? Asking $14,500 per 
acre. 

VIDCO 388-4232 

iaa^-dcc 

• luALrCCg 

4 MINUTES 

TO ROYALOAK 

Beautiful water views. Approx. 3 
acres suitable for pasture. Well 
treed. $994)00 with terms. 

R.M. GEODES 

Northern Pacific Realty Ltd. 
479-1687 

2.4 ACRES 

ONLY $119,000 
SUPER RANCH HOUSE 

3 bedrooms — master large with 
ensuite. Beautiful cabinet kit. 
Dining rm., 3 stall barn, riding 
ring. Phone now to view. 

Rum Salaoa 652-4362 

Ocean City Realty Ltd. 381-2233 

2-BEDROOM RENOVATED 
home, has energy-saver wood 
stove, fireplace, sundeck, elec¬ 
tric neat, on %-acre lot, 5 
minutes out of Duncan. $434)00 
firm. 112-746-7659 

$23,900. 3.11 SECLUDED 
acres overlooking the Sooke 
Hills. Road and building site 
roughed In through treed prop¬ 
erty. 642-3263. 

SAANICH PENINSULA 
PROPERTIES LTO. 

2354 Beacon Ave., Sidney 
65*4000 

GORDON HULME LTO. 
Sidney Saanich Peninsula 
65*1154 2444 Beacon Ave 

6 ACRE METCHOSIN FARM, 
house, bam, mobile home, fruit 
trees. $1184)00 47*9819 

SI MTBFMMT 
PMTUTKt 


THURSDAY. JULY 24,1980 

hi W»TMHTO*I 

mretres 


From 6 Last Week 
To3 

1 Watarvlew Arbutus 4 bad 

2 880 dagra* water views Trm- 

The Zieglers 
3846075, Pgr. 310 


TWO WATERFRONT 
HOUSES 

In the beautiful Comox Valley. 
Ideal water and mountain views. 
House (1)3 bdrms. FP. extra 
larga LR, DR. newly broad- 
loomed, completely redec. In and 
out. House (2) extra large 1 
bdrm, carpeted throughout, gas 
furnace, rent 8190 monthly. 
Owner will leave all existing 
draperies, new fridge, stove In 
both houses. Must sell for health 
reasons. Full price for both prop. 
877,500. Owner will hold mort¬ 
gage with reasonable downpay- 
mewt. 656-7078. 


WATER VIEWS 
WITH WATERFRONT 
10 ACRES 
$69,500 

At 17 Mile Road on the southern 
slope of the Malahat. turn right, 
then left onto Rocky Mountain 
Road. Wooded and wonderfully 
rugged with potentially splendid 
water views over Flnlayson Arm 
with more than 350 feet of water¬ 
front. For more details. 

JACK THOMAS. 382-8101 or res. 
385-2119 - 

National Trust (3440-A Douglas) 


SALMON 
OWN 450' 
WATERFRONT 


On 2.6 acres of g 


I. timber, 


oood soil, < 

driveway,"well, perked, hydro) 
all for your dream home. Above 
Juan de Fuca. serene views to 
Olympic Mountains, short dis¬ 
tance to Victoria. Call NOW — 
waterfront becomes like gold. 
George Brelter 478-8493 British 
American Realty 385-1431. 


SAILORS AND 
FISHERMEN 

Deep water moorage at Willis 
Point on Brentwood Bay, your 
own wharf and float, a comfort¬ 
able cottage and a paved drive¬ 
way. This i.?8-acre parcel Is of¬ 
fered at 9105,000. Immediate 
subdivision potential. Call me 
for details. 

652 3006 Alex Davidson 479-1667 
J. H. Whlttome & Co. Ltd. 


10 ACRES 

1100 ft. on SAANICH INLET. 
Highland District. Holding pro¬ 
perty at only 9100,000 ana easy 
terms from owners. Allan Klerv 
man 388-7868, DUNSMUIR 
PROPERTIES. 


EXCEPTIONAL PROPERTY. 2 
miles from Sooke Provincial 
Park, almost 3 acres of lovely 
forest and sunny private beach, 
large newly built artistic home, 
must be seen. Sale bv owner, 
9145,000. 642-3791 or 385-3521. 


PRIVATE CASH BUYER 
seeks waterfront residence In 
Oak Bay, Uplands or Ten Mile 
Point. Reply to Victoria Press 
Box 393. 


WATERFRONT, LAKE COWI- 
chan, .6 acre. 100' waterfron 
taoe, nicely treed, double oarage 
and well on property. 945,060 
383-8529 


WATERFRONT LOT. SHAWNI 
gan Lake, east side, reduced 
from 839,000 to 934,000 firm. 
382-3914. 


VICTORIA WATERFRONT 
PROPERTIES INC. 
388-4477 


WILLIS PT. WATERFRONT. 
9165,000. 652-2008, 6566112. 


251 COH DOMINIUMS 


Treeland Estates 
2 bedroom 
Condominium 
View of Harbour 

This most attractive 2 Bedroom, 
1 V*i bath condominium In a corv 
Crete building, situated on the 4th 
floor. Is a must see tor the adult 
family. Priced to sell at 879,000. 
For appointments to view, 
please call Alec Gower 592-2407. 

Trade Your 
Condominium for 
South Oak Bay 
Home 

This 3 bedroom, 2 bathroom 
home is situated close to the 
VILLAGE on a large, land¬ 
scaped lot. Priced af $134,000. 
Please call Alec Gower 592-2407. 



PAC-WEST 



INTERNATIONAL REAL 
ESTATE BROKERS INC 

388-6161 

GREATVIEWS 

From this delightful bachelor 
suite. Located on the south side 
on the seventeenth floor of Or¬ 
chard House. Plenty of closet 
space. Ottered for $32,000. For an 
appointment fo view, call Rock 
or Brent at 388-6161 on pagers 24 
hrs. 


possession 


LOOK 

#404-1170 ROCKLAND 
OPEN 12-2 P.M. 
TUES., WED., THURS. 

Vendor has purchased end 
therefore will give Immediate 
this desirable top 
lVj-bath Condo 
Inp beautiful floor-to-ceil- 
_ d Bride Fireplace. Located 
in a small quite well managed 
building at Rockland and Un¬ 
den, with excellent essumable 
mortgage. Asking $74,900. 

See It with 

LEEWROBEL 

385-1431 

British American Realty Ltd. 


LADY JANE 

1120 FAIRFIELD 
ONLY 4 LEFT in this 
brand new prestigious 
condominium. 

•JSkTotf 

kitchens _ 

ample closet and storage 
ituOMMw' aland wkukmt. 
9% FINANCING 

BUY DIRECT from 

BUILDER IN ATTENDANCE 

2-5 Tues.-Sat. 

658-1198 or JS1-6452 
Trent PeuslepmswfUld. 


spaciousness of these 
1014-1130 sq. ft ), large 
is with eating areas. 


('Impum 



251 C0H DOMINIUMS 


As You Look 
Through These Ads 


I'm sure you've begun to realize 
lust how high the cost of housing 
can be. That's why I would like to 
point out this spacious 2-bed¬ 
room. condo. It features large 
living rm., 5 appliances, sauna, 
swiripool, ana superb location 
near U Vic, schools and shopping. 
The owner is also willing to part 
with all the furnishings for only 
$47,500. MLS. 

SCOTT OSBORNE 
477-7291 (Bus.) 385-1418 (Res.) 

D.F.H. REAL ESTATE LTD. 


<0> 


fork F^cific 


A GREAT BUY 
$54,900 


Close to all facilities, 
n market 


Call Mike Ruddy 656-4089 

Or Pager 792 38*5464 

Park Pacific Inv. 383-4124 


SEAFORTH HARBOUR 
VIEWS 

Prestige condominium with 2 
bedrooms, 2 balconies, 2-4 pee. 
bathrooms. The living room con 
tains heatilafor rock faced fire¬ 
place and its ceilings are vaulted 
with a skylight. Fascinating 
views from all windows includ¬ 
ing all activity enter I ng harbour. 
Possession on completion of 
documents. Priced $96X100. To 
view call 

Jack Thomas 

Oft . 382 8101 Res. 385-2119 

NATIONAL TRUST 
REAL ESTATE 


ROYAL WOODS 
1005-1009 MCKENZIE 
$70,000 

2-BR, IV* batt|S, 3rd floor, south¬ 
west exposure overlooking oar- 
dens and pool. Most desired loca¬ 
tion In the complex. For further 
Informationcall: 

LAURIE COMO 
(479-1179) 

Realspan Properties Lid. 
388-6454 


ROYAL WOODS 
STUDIO PLUS LOFT 
$48,900 

Dynamite studio condo with loft 
In popular Royal Woods. This 
suite Is in excellent condition and 
a |oy to see. Price includes 3 
appliances. Amenities include a 
pool, sauna, swiripool, tennis 
courts, etc. Call now ML 47011. 
CHERI TIFFANY, 386-3494 ( 24 
hrs.). 

CENTURY 21 
Western Homes Ltd. 

1037 Cloverdale Ave. 
386-3494 (24hrs.) 


"CEDARFAIR" 

FAIRFIELD 

Priced to sell, so act quickly on 
this 2 BR Ste. In an attractive 16 
unit bldg. Enioy the spacious¬ 
ness of the LR with corner Brick 
FP. Lge. MBR. 1 V* Baths, Bal 
cony facing South — no view, but 
offers seclusion. Walk to Beacon 
Hill Park. Bus. stores, hospital 
close bv. EX. $63,900. 

Cathy Atkins 47*1667 

Brian Brown 479-1667 

J.H. Whlttome & Co. Ltd. 


. CORNER SUITE 
$46,000 

This Is a desirable corner suite in 
adult oriented bldg. D/R win¬ 
dow, 2-BRs, '/j baths. Close to 
shopping, on bus line. MLS. To 
view, please call: 

ELEANOR BRAY 
477-0141 592-1130 

CONNY YASEY 
477-0141 477-8751 

The PERMANENT 


OAK BAY 
TWO BEDROOMS 
$119,000 

Located near the marina in a 
very deluxe, concrete building 
with a swimming pool, swirl pool 
and underground parking. A 
spacious suite (master Bdrm. 
ensuite). 

LESLEY BARTON 
Off 595-1S35 Res 59*2447 

BOORMAN INVESTMENT 
CO LTD. 


TOP FLOOR 

Bright 1 bedroom corner suite In 
one of the nicest buildings of 
Esquimalt. Thermopane win¬ 
dows, large rooms, lots of stor¬ 
age, and locker on same floor, in 
immaculate condition. August 
possession. To view please call: 
Colette Wilkins 

38* 7744 592 6742 

(Your Bilingual Realtor) 
GARDNER REALTY (1979) 
LTD. 


3 BEDROOMS 

Fresh on the mar^H Sunny and 
bright corner unit. Spacious L 
shaped living and dlnlhq room. 
Sep. in suite storaoe room and 
laroer than usual galley kitchen. 
Immaculate and well priced. 
$44,900 M L 

4790667 Mary McGuire 479-7668 
Donna Vaiikoski 

388-4271 384-2057 

J. H. Whlttome8, Co. Ltd. 


SPACIOUS BRIGHT 
$36,500 

N. W. exposure cross ventilation, 
laroe bedroom and bathroom, 
kitchen has window ant eating 
area (not a oalley kitchen) Nice 
living room-open to balcony. 
Range, Fridge and drapes. Top 
condition. Call 

ROMA MOL YARD 384 4827 

Royal Trust_ 384-8001 


"WHY RENT" 
Spacious 2-bedroom condomin¬ 
ium with 2 - 4-pce bathrooms. 
Separate dining room. Ensuite 
storage and washing taclltties. 
Fridge, stove and drapes includ¬ 
ed In asking price of $48,500. Call 
JIM BAILLIE to view. 479-6594 
or NATIONAL TRUST 595-2121. 
MLS. 


ESQUIMALT 

tMMACULATE 

Three bedrooms up. Main floor 
cosy LR, compact kitchen, with 
stove and fridge, W.W. ttvuout, 
small utility off" Asking $32,900. 
MLS. 

RUSS FITZSIMMONS 477-2412 
FRANK BOUSFIELD 382-4968 
the Permanent 382-9191 


ROCKLAND 

VIEWS 

One bedroom unit with fantastic 
views from Bay window In large 
living room with hardwood oak 
floors and FP. Exclusive with 
OLE KNUDSEN 479-7764 

Royal Trust_384-8001 


259 TOWN HOUSES 


GRANDOPENING 

BRENTWOOD 

VILLAGE 

TOWNHOMES 

1184 Clark Road 
Brentwood Bay 

18 Two-Bedroom 
Homes 

Priced from $67,900 
to $69,800 

OPEN TO VIEW 
SAT. & SUN. 1:30-5 
DAILY 2-4:30 

Featuring: 

—Three models 
—Enclosed oaraoes 
—Wood-burning fireplaces 
—Dishwashers 
—Vaulted cel linos 
—Five-year Hudac Warranty 
Directions: Clark Road oft West 
Saanich Rd , one block North of 
Wallace Drive, In the heart of 
Brentwood Village Shopping 
area. 

Another superb residential de¬ 
velopment by Hugo Hucker Con¬ 
struction Ltd. and 

. VICTORIA 
REALTY LTD. 

386-3585 or 652-9155 


9% MORTGAGE 

I have lust listed a townhouse In 
Gordon Head. It was one of the 
original display units and is in 
beautiful condition throughout, 
from the carpets to the quality 
grassmat wallpaper so tasteful¬ 
ly done, to the mirrors that cover 
a complete end wall of the MB. 
There's a large DR, a brick fire¬ 
place and built In wood box In 
LR. Good quality kitchen cabi¬ 
nets. Two glass patio doors. 
Three bedrooms, 1 V* baths, and a 
basement for your rec. room and 
storage. You may wish to make 
use of the pool, swirl pool and 
sauna. To top this all otf, there's 
a $37,300 mortgage at 9% not due 
until 1983. This is expected to go 
quickly, so call now. New MLS 
GEORGE WALL, 386 2955 or 
477-0548. CENTURY 21 Mayfair 
Realty Ltd. 


QUALITY 
ROCKLAND 
An excellent Investment, elegi 
ble for capital cost allowance 
and offering an assumable 
$57,800 Mtge. at 11.5 percent. A 
quality development and one of 
me choicest locations In Victoria 
— living room with fireplace — 
large dining room — three bed¬ 
rooms, three bathrooms — 
loc '" on 

LESLEY BARTON 
Off. 59* 1 535 Res 59*2447 

BOORMAN INVESTMENT 
CO LTD. 


CHILDREN WELCOME 
PARKSIDE GARDENS 

Playgrourtd — swimming pool 
for adults and kids. Private 
patio. Treed forecourt!! 3 bed¬ 
rooms. 4 pee. bath uostalrs. L. 
Room, O. Room 2 pee. bath, 
utility rm. Kitchen with 2 appll 
ancesonmain. Vacant. Neattidv 
unit in this popular complex 
which offers lots of accommoda¬ 
tion for $43,900. New M.L.S. Call 
JOHN RUSSELL today 382-8101 
or res. 386-9574. 

National Trust 
(344C-A Douglas) 


3 BEDROOMS 
$59,900 

lmmaculatelv kept—with about 
1400 sq. ft. Living room, dining 
room, modern kitchen with dlrv 
ing nook having glass doors 
opening onto a private patio. 11* 
bathrooms. Basement with laun¬ 


dry. Ford 


>, please call: 


38*3435 JOHN EVANS 477-4452 
P. R. BROWN & SONS LTD. 
762 Fort Street 


UVIC 

- —ner unit. Large 

chen with E.A. and sundeck open 
to fenced patio. Living-dining 
room with brick F.P. and over¬ 
looking green areas. 3 spacious 
bedrooms up. Full bsmnt. with 
finished family room, laundry 
facilities, and laroe STORAGE 
ROOM. IV* bathrms. $69,900. 
EXCL. 

479-1667 Mary McGuire 479 7668 
J.H. Whlttome & Co. Ltd 


$64,900 

this 3 BR Town- 


t to UVic,_ T .. _ 

« offers IV* bath, dining 


Close 

house _ ____ 

room, sundeck off living room, 
thermopane windows, drive-in 
oarage and basamenf could be 
easily developed. Assumable 
$30X100 1st. mortgage at 11*%. 
Call today 

Clifton Mek 479-0788 

Ocean City Realty Ltd. 

381 2233 


DlRECT FROM OWNER 
Unique 5 level, 3 bedroom, V/* 
bath, and unit. Covered parking, 
heatilafor fireplace In living 
room, coloured appliances, 
10'/*% mortgage, convenient lo¬ 
cation. $69,M0. 41- 

2-9pm. 


O. 479-2731 between 


BURNSIDE-TILLICUM TOWN- 
house, 3 bedroom, l 1 /* bath, pri¬ 
vate patio, malor appliances, 
pool, ^39,900. Private sale 


263 GAJMtfS F0K SALE, 
RENT 0ft WANTED 


5 MATURE MUSICIANS NEED 
practice area with access to 
electrical outlets. Between 
*7pm. 38*6373 or 382-2462. 


GARAGE WANTED 
384-1268 


255 


houses drum 
TO HUT 


Calgary Couple 

Require a two or three-bedroom 
home close to buses and shop¬ 
ping vet on a quiet street. Good 
garden area essential. Maxi¬ 
mum $90,000 cash. Call CHRIS 
GREIG, 386-1296 or PETER 
VINCENT 383-5578 at CASTLE 
PROPERTIES LTD. 3866164. 

Retired 

Victoria Couple 

Want to move to a smaller home 
within the 4-mile circle. Must be 
in good shape. Maximum S75.000 
cash. Call CHRIS GREIG 
386-1296 or PETER VINCENT 
383-5578 at CASTLE PROPER 
TIES LTD. 3866164 


JAMES BAY $44,500 
2 Bdrm corner condo, handy to 
Plaza t waterfront. Vacant 
quick post 1 will talk offers, 
trades or farms. 

TEO BOWDEN 386-7577 

ALL STAR REALTY 386-1255 


SALE. BY OWNER. 2 BED 
rooms. lW-batha. wood burning 
fireplace. 2-balconles, under¬ 
ground parking, 1148 aouare 
wet. sunny kitchen with 3-appk 


Central Saanich 
Cordova Bay 

Spacious modern 2 -bdrm home 
plus family room. Privacy and 
large lot preferred Please cell 

JUNE HOUGHTON 
59*2121 4776185 

NATIONAL TRUST 


2SS HOUSES WANTED 
TOWT 


NO STEP 

3-BEDROOM RANCHER OR 
BUNGALOW URGENTLY RE 
QUIRED. POSSESSION ENO 
OF AUGUST. PLEASE CALL: 

DON SINGLE HURST 
477-0191 479-9990 

ROYALTRUSTCORP. 


CASH OR TERMS 

Require 2 or 3 bedroom 
minimum900sq.ft, inoood 
$50. $100,000. suitable for r 
or renovation. 

GARYWHITELEY 
38MB3(34Hrs) I 
OCEAN CITY REALTY LTD. 


homes 

.area, 

rental 


JAMES BAY AREA 

Required by Sept. I. Three bed¬ 
room town house or small home 
up to $60,000. If you can help 
please call Bill Carnegie at 
ISLAND HOME REALTY 
Office 386-7545 Res. 652 3627 


I PROMISE 

To spend a minimum of $400 per 
month advertising If I have the 
iob of selling your home. For 
more Information call: 

Ben Greig 598-3105 or 381-2233 


CALGARY RETIRED 
Urgently require 2 or 3 bedrooms 
with a full basement close to bus 
line. Up to $100,000cash. 
BENGREIG 598-3105 381 2233 
OCEAN CITY REALTY LTD. 


DUPLEX WANTED 
SIDE X SIDE 
Up to $95,000 call 
ROMAMOLYARD 384 4827 

Royal Trust_384 8001 


Character home within 4-mile 
radius. Interior work required 
no problem. Up to $85,000 Call 
MELODY VILLENEUVE, 
OCEAN CITY RLTY. 384-8563 or 
381-2233. 


HAVE 32' MOTOR YACHT 
built by Phllbrooks, fully 
equipped, value $40,000. For sale 
or exchange for real estate in 
Gordon Head. First time on 
market. 477-8804 


CASH CLIENTS 
Wish to buy home with 2-3 
bedrms Basement if possible 
Phone Victor Wono 592-5454. 
Byron Price and Assoc. Ltd. 


SELL TODAY 

Investors have cash available 
for homes under $75,000. Call 
LEEWROBEL 38*1431 

British American Realty Ltd 


HOUSE IN OAK BAY OR 
nearby area, direct from owner. 
Victoria Press Box 493. 


2 BEDROOM HOUSE/TOWN- 
house. Victoria, Colwood, Sid- 
ney Under $50,000. 5986948 


270 EXCHM6E 
REAL ESTATE 


MONEYMAKER 

4 apts, plus commercial. 
$235,000 Nets approximately 
$25,600. Close In, call 
GERRY FINNIGAN res. 
656 5876 CASTLE PROPER 
TIES LTD. 386-6164 


In Greater Victoria, will ex 
change for home In the country 
or sell. No agents. Apply Vic¬ 
toria Press Box 483, leaving 
phone number. o 


10 ACRES, GOOD SOIL, MILL 
Bay area $44,900 exchange for 
similar real estate value. 
3886876. 


271 LOTS FOR SALE 


Rirk Pac ific 


Dean Park Estates 

42 NEW LOTS NOW 
OPEN FOR VIEWING 

Choose vour new home site now 
while selection is the greatest. 
All treed lots in a beautiful natu- 

» l setting, some with spectacu- 
■ ocean views of Haro Strait, 
Mount Baker and the Gulf Is¬ 
lands. 

Located In North Saanich on the 
slopes of Mount Newton adjoin¬ 
ing John Dean Provincial Park 
Fully serviced '<* acre lots priced 
from $40,000 

Entrance close to Panarma Lei¬ 
sure Centre on East Saanich 
Road. From Pat Bav Highway 
turn off at McTavish. Site office 
open dally 10:30 to4:30. 

656-7041 

Mike Ruddy 
388-5464 Paoer 792 
383-4124 anytime 
Park Pacific Investment Ltd. 


BLOCK 
H2JBROS. 


NORTH SAANICH 
CURTEIS POINT 
Two Vi acre, well-treed lots 
available In new development 
Excellent building lots priced at 
$4 5 ,00 0 

656-5337 Ted Phillips 656-5584 


partially treed, some watervlew, 
waterfront access 1 block away 
Reduced to $35,000 
656-5337 Ted Phillips 65*5584 

ARDMORE 

Four well-treed lots In prime 
area. Three lots in excess of one 
acre and one sllghtty less. Close 
to goM courses and other recre¬ 
ation. Excellent value at $50,000 
each 

656-5337 Ted Phillips 656-5584 
656-7319 Jim Ewan 656-5584 


WEST COAST ROAD 
2 Lots of approx, one acre each. 
One fully treed, one cleared. $22,- 
000 end $24,000. On paved road. 
Hydra well water af approx. 100 
ft. 

DO YOUR OWN THING 
on 3 view lots, also several 
-builder owner lots. Avail¬ 
able in Central Saanich, 
for custom lots. Available 
in Central Saanich, for 
custom homes. 
SHAWNIGAN LAKE 

1 lots tooettMr. $14,900 MCh 
Near lekeshore and with beach 
access. One treed, two cleared 
CeM RACPtt KELLER. 30S974). 

for Wlvatov address. 

HC NDE RSON REALTY LTO. 


SEABREEZE 

OCEAN- 

MOUNTAIN 

VIEWS 

Next to salmon fishing & dam 
digging on Mis or 6.7 acres with 
good ti m ber, driveways, 
well, per k ed, hydra— ready tor 
your country home, but cloee to 
Victoria Those view properties 

-- mam 

British 


C-10 

271 LOTS FOR ULE 


BROADMEAD 

Visit us at our 
office-display home. 

950 Royal Oak Drive 
8:30 A.M.-5:00 P.M. 658-5291 

Or Call 

JEANNIE DEWHURST 
384-8001 (24 hrs.) 658-8980 

Royal Trust Co. 


NORTH SAANICH 
BEAUTIFULLY TREED LOTS 
$36,500 - $39,500 

Each acre lot backs onto a 60 
ACRE WILDERNESS PARK re^ 
served for the exclusive use of 
the lot owners at LANDSEND 
ESTATES. Services to Include 
Municipally maintained roads 
and water mains. 12% Financing 
available with 20% down. For 
details or brochure call 
Rick Hawkes— D. Hawkes Ltd. 
382 1754_ 384-7128 


HOME, SUITE PLUS 
EXTRA LOT 

4-BR home with 1-BR In-law 
suite plus 9,000 sq. ft. panhandle 
lot. Ideal home with revenue or 
Investment with building lot 
Close In parklike setting. All for 
only $135,000. Full details bv 
calllno: 

K.O. MOORE 
—38*3435— 


1 ACRE STRATA LOTS 
North Saanich. Prica 
range S3S,000-$42,000. 
Piped water, power, pri¬ 
vate parkland adioining. 
Terms available. 

477-2330,452-3790 
652-2445,479-4484 


I ACRE 

Close to Deep Cove Trading. 
Level lot cleared. Property 
percs and has a 30 gal. per 
minute well, on road & electric¬ 
ity to property. $42,900. 

LARRY LINEHAM 
59*0134 384-8075 pgr. 682 

NATIONAL TRUST 
59*2121 


1-AC. TREED 

In lovely Sherlngham Estates, 
iust 13 mi past”Sooke, on Hydro, 
phone, water and paved road. A 
beautifully-treed lot with sea 
view. Driveway Is In. Asking 
$18,900. 

Frank Wills—388-7868 
DUNSMUIR PROPERTIES 
LTD. 


WEST COAST ROAD 
2 Lots of approxlmatelvone Acre 
each. One fully freed, one 
cleared. $22,000 and $24,000. On 
paved road, Hydro, well water at 
approx. 100 feet. - To view call 
RALPH KELLER 38*9741 HEN 
PERSON REALTLTD. MLS. 


REDUCED FOR QUICK SALE 
Woodley Road, private, treed, 
quiet country atmosphere, 
southern exposure, close to St. 
Michaels University School and 
Lansdowne campus. $69,500 
477-0252. Courtesy to realtors. 


HIGH QUADRA 
Treed 8,000 sq. ft. fully serviced 
"Home" lot. $42,500. Phone Vic 
torla Wong, 592-5454 or 479-6569 
Byron Price & Assoc. Ltd 


OVER AN ACRE 
On Sooke River. New listing well 
priced at $27,900 

AlexTait 381-2233 or 598-0485 


DEAN PARK 

Terrific view, Vj acre, cleared. 
Lot 5. Malnvlew Terrace. $68, 
900. Look and call collect Doug 
Bishop, 403-481-2137 Edmonton 


off Shelbourne, on 1639 Knight St 
Close to Simpson Sears. Ap¬ 
proximately 10,000 square feet 
each Asking $36,000. 727 2595. 


3 ONE ACRE LOTS AT MILL 
Bav. disposal fields installed, 
one lot has a 58' mobile home 
Phone 478-9567 


SOOKE. TWO SPACIOUS 
properties, partially wooded, 
pood elevation, on quiet road. 2 
to 3 acres 642-5508 


CLEARED VIEW LOT. TO^IOS' 
with all amenities. Central 
Saanich, $42,000 cash. Phone 
592 9611. 


SPARKLING OCEAN VIEWS 
'/j-acre in resident, area, $29,500. 
658-8687 


3 SEWERED LOTS, VICKERY 
Road, View Royal. $38,000-$40, 
000. 479 9168. 


273 PROPUTT FOR SJUi 

1 ACRE 
WITH VIEW 

$79,900 

A very attractive high property 
with oak and fir plus a view of 
tranquil Langford Lake. A 3 or 
4-bdrm home that needs minor 
fixing up. A super holding prop¬ 
erty. 

JERRY ESKES 

PEMBE RTON, HOLMES 
LTD. 

RES <7»-S««70mce384-8124 


LANGFORD LAND 
POTENTIALLY 
COMMERCIAL 

Approx. 230 Ft. FRONTAGE x 
184 ft. deep. Langford is a vital 
area: Why wait till Important 
FRONTAGE with good depth is 
jH^one^Prlncipals only please 

JOHN RUSSELL 
382-8101 National Trust 386-9574 


2>/2 ACRES 

7 miles past Sooke Village on 
Westcoest Rd. Parklike setting 
with cleared building site. In¬ 
cludes 2-bedrm. mobile home in 
excellent condition, plus small 
"cabin In the woods." Close to 
boat launching in saltchuck 
Hycko on ppty. Firm price of 

479^1667 DOUGRELF 479-5761 
J.H. Whlttome & Co. Ltd. 


NORTH QUADRA 
1* ACRES. Provislonary ap¬ 
proved subdivision. Low cost of 
development because no roads, 
includas small flx-up house. 
Price: $187J00. 

479-1667 Marion Foster 384 5908 
479-1667 Wlff Davis 65*8884 
J.H, Whlttome * Co. Ltd. 


3.7 ACRES 

Hatf of this parcel is fertile land 
Ideal for horses or oarden, on 
balance, a good home for owners 
and 2 other RENTAL COT 
T AGE S to make this an excellent 
business proposition $725,000 
Allan Ktonman 388-7868 
DUNSMUIR PROPERTIES 


VIEW PROPERTY 
5 ACRES unobstructed OCEAN 
view (sub-dMdable). located 

af WILLIS POINT overlooking 
BRENTWOOD BAY. Full price 
$123,900. TERMS. A. Klenman 
656-4242. Ounsmulr Properties. 

38* 7868 


I HECTARE IN ENCHANTING 
East Sooke. make an offer Acs 
pjoxjmate.y $35 per metre 

FIVE ACRE LOT (DOUBLE 
•laa) Excellent for horses with 
le i mile redies. la<9 Cfcerlton 
$ 110,080 vrFmt 







































































































































































































































I 


50 THE COLONIST, Thursday July 24, 1980 


274 PROHITY WANTED 

HELP • UNITED PENTECOS- 
tal group needs a church to rent 
or buv or cheap property to pur 
chase. Colwood/ Langford area 
preferred. Any Information 
would be appreciated. 478-0802 
or 478-2224. 

210 ACREAGE FOR SAIi 
AND WANTED 

50 AC RES-$75,000 

Priced well below appraised 
value Gently rolling land. Some 
alder — hr. to Victoria. Good 
value MLS 46543. 

MAR J THOMPSON 
477-0141 


658 5 $84 

2'/2 ACRE S—$48,500 

With 2-bdrm mobile — FP, 
fridge, stove. Some outbuildings. 
Vendor has relocated up island 
and anxious to sell. MLS 54263. 

MAR J THOMPSON 
477-0141 658-5584 

HORSE COUNTRY 
$27,500 

Cleared, grassey, fenced Ven¬ 
dor will carry mortgage with low 
downpayment. Exclusive. 

MAR J THOMPSON 
477-0141 6585584 

ThePERMANENT , 

ONE ACRE 
NORTH SAANICH 

This tot Isniceiy treed with water 
hook-eo, paved road, hydro and 
phone Full Price 09,000. 

DON MILLS* 
656-3164 

Knouilc/ 

The HOITIE Team. 

384 8101 

145 ACffcCS 

Prime acreage in 2nd growth 
timber. It is located lust off 
Sooke Rd. beyond the 17 Mile 
House. This acreage backing 
onto the watershed, has a small 
creek running through the centre 
plus old road Vendor ma/con¬ 
sider vour trade or equity on the 
asking price of $250,000. For 
complete details contact: 
388-4434 RICKKINNIS 477-9394 
WESTMONT REALTY 
(1980) LTD. 

WANT TO UNLOAD 
A NUISANCE PROPERTY? 
l to 10 acres wanted. Suitable to 
put storaoe barn and small 
workshop on Must be rural and 
treed. Consider Central Saanich, 
Munn Road, Burnside or Pros¬ 
pect Lake area Vendor to accept 
small down payment with an¬ 
nual lump sum reduction. Prop¬ 
erty need not be pretty. An easy 
quick sale to the right offer 
is needed immediately. Maxi 
mum $50,000.479-5344. 


WILKINSON RD. 
ACREAGE 

3 ,1 quiet, secluded acres only 20 
minutes from downtown. Old 
cottage on property rented for 
S190 p/rnth. $88,000. MLS. To 
view call 

DAVID SCOTT 
Res 479 4405 
Off 385-3435 ( 24 hrs.) 

P R BROWN Si SONS LTD. 

EDMONTON 
16 acres, 20 minutes to city, b* 
side parkland. Near beautiful 
lake Power, gas and phone, well 
treed, water and perc. tested. 
V40.000. Terms. 656-1635. 

SEAFRONT VANCOUVER is¬ 
land West Coast 22 '/ a acres, Vj 
mile of waterfront including 
sheltered anchorage, beaches, 
abundant seafood, virgin tim¬ 
ber. $77,000. 383-2827 or 
598-1421 

5MILE CIRCLE 

5 acres, pond, meadows, treed, 
seclusion among fine new 
homes $85,000 479-6022 

60 ACRES SUBDiVIDABLE 
into 5 lots, sea and country views 
plus stream, 10 miles from Vic- 
toria, $178,000. 383-2827 or 
598-1421 

HAPPY VALLEY, 10 ACRES, 
1000 sq ft home, pasture, city 
water, treed, $137,000. 478-0245, 
478-3370. 

10 ACRE ESTATES. $44,900 
Mill Bay area. Brochure 
388 6876 

215 UPISUND 
PROPERTIES 


AFFORDABLE 
LAKE LIVING! 
$28,000! 

Ideal Shawnigan Lake retreat. 
27-ft. one-owner Airstream trail¬ 
er with many extras including 
air-conditioning on 40x20 con¬ 
crete lot with built in barbecue 
and lots of room for outdoor liv¬ 
ing. Commute or foroet city liv¬ 
ing entirely while enjoying club 
privileges in Shawnigan Lake 
Recreation Assn. Just a short 
hop to private swimming and 
beach area — plus much more! 
Be the first to discover this 
unique opportunity with 
DONNA FOSS 

477 7291 384 8075 (Por 504) 

D.F.H REAL ESTATE LTD. 


250 Ft. COWICHAN 
RIVER 

3 BEDROOMS 

If you eniov the water then you'll 
tall in love with this 3 bedroom 
home on V» acre of property 
Beautifully treed and a pictur¬ 
esque setting with fishing at your 
doorstep Separate oarage and 
wor kshop A unique paradise for 
only $73,900 Listing salesman 
has photographs. 

Jim Gill 478-0008 

Ocean City Realty Ltd. 

381 2233 

VANCOUVER ISLAND COT 
tape for all seasons. Campbell 
River area, semi waterfront 2 
bedroom cottage. Sportsminded 
family retreat close toMt Wash 
ington skiing, and Campbell 
River salmon fishing. Unob 
structed view of the sea and 
mountains. Lot 100 x 194, build 
vour dream home on upper part 
of lot. No Agents Please phone 
338 5260 Courtenay. B.C. 

170 ACRES. SPROAT LAKE, 
two rented houses, two good 
wells, 30 acres cleared, consider 
able timber value, some subdivi 
sion potential, a strategically lo¬ 
cated money-maker with many 
alternate uses. Asking $350,000. 
385^2057 or 658-8760. 

ENGLISHMAN RIVER 
5 acre parcels with access to 
river for swimming and fishing 
Near Parksville. Priced from 
$74,900 Call Ross Harvey, Cen- 
tury 21 Eagle Realty, 248-6191. 

RV.SITE AND MEMBERSHIP. 
Honeymoon Bay Association, 
Cowichan Lake. 598 2577 

2M FARMS FOR SALE 
AND WANTED 


16 Acre hobby farm 
4 BR House 

M6 707i nCrOWS 

213 MtfOUii 


90 ACRES 

SALTSPRING ISLAND 


beautiful Saif spring Island The 
■.•tunutii expose# overlooking 
tt*Gutf island confer tutakvisM 
mto fuu Ms — araiimaar v an 
P*Oval granted Priced at 
14M0 oirtM 


$144- 
Jbt 4 


k 4444 yu $ f INNIS 477*494 

GORDON tUJfc 

4*8 4814 07V 

■nutTh 


fcfc'MON! M . 


283 


GUU ISLAND 
PROPERTIES 


ON SALT SPRING ISLAND 
A .56 acre treed lot, close to 
Ganges, on vlllaoe water, quite 
high above Ganges Road, with 
lovely views and seclusion Of 
feredbv owner at $24,000. if vi 
siting Salt Spring Island, go left 

onto Salt Spring Wav (about 2 
miles before Ganges), and look 
for sign describing Lot 28. Copy 
of plan mailed On request. 
598-4690 after 5pm 


SALT SPRING ISLAND 
ST. MARYS LAKE 
One of these 5 lovely cabins I 
years old and completely reno¬ 
vated on 1.6 acres of waterfront 
(off paved road) can be yours for 
$45,000 

Ruth of Steve Salaga 652-4362 
Ocean City Realty Ltd. 381 2233 


OWNER SALE-100 ACRES 
nicely treed subdividable prop¬ 
erty, fantastic home sites. View 
Gulf Islands and Coast Ranoe. 
$2000 per acre, excellent terms. 
112 748-8672 

294 MAINLAND AND 
OUT OF PROVINCE 
PROfERTIE! 


BY OWNER, $65,900 FP 
3 bdrm home, 6 years old, 1220 sq. 
ft., master ensulte, plus 2 baths, 2 
brick f-p, lower floor fully fin¬ 
ished, 90 s heat, <* * 
attractive lendsca, 

B.C. l hour drive t_ 

on bus line. 112-826-9317. 


r fiwn roily Tiit- 

, double gar ape, 
scaping. Mission 
ve to Vancouver 


HAWAII 
BY OWNER 

Ocean view lot In sunny Kona, 
close to town and beaches,, un¬ 
derground utilities. $49,500 US; 
terms. 629-6305. 

VACATION LOT. EXCELLENT 
future development potential, V» 
acre in NE California, pine 
forest with lake, trout stream, 
stables, pool and lodoe faclll- 
tles, $9000. 478-6388. 

ONE ACRE LOT ON ISLAND 
of Hawaii. Ready to build on. 
$9000 386-8435 daytime; 382-0289 
evenings. 

NEW LOG CABIN. 730 SO FT ON 
75x200' lakeview lot In southern 
Cariboo. $30,000. 112-245-4959 


HOW TO WRITE 
A GOOD 

CLASSIFIED ACTION 
AD 


1—IT'S BEST to start your ad 
v.-th the name of the article or 
service you have to otter if 
you have an apartment, 
room, etc., for rent, or prop¬ 
erty for sale; start your ad 
with the location. 


2 —BE CLEAR. Readers respond 
more quickly and favorably 
by giving complete, definite 
information. Always Include 
the price In your advertise¬ 
ment. 


3—MAKE IT EASY tor the read¬ 
er-prospect to reach you. Al¬ 
ways give vour telephone 
number or your name and 
address. If you do nof have 
regular hours, state a prefer¬ 
red time for the prospect to 
get in touch with you. 


—PLAY SAFE. You get the 
greatest reader attention by 
using consecutive insertions 
A six-day order is best and 
costs less, and you can, of 
course, stop vour ad as soon 
as you get the results you 
want You pay only for the 
days your ad appeared. 
Lower yearly rates are avail 
able to those who wish to keep 
their services or products be¬ 
fore the public. 


5—PLACE YOURSELF in the 
reader's position and ask 
yourself what you want to 
know about your otter. The 
answer you give will make a 
good Want Ad. 


6—GIVE YOUR PROSPECT 
every inducement you can 
with good copy. Classified ac 
tion ad readers have the 
money and are already in 
teres ted in buying the mer 
chandise or service you have 
to otter; the details and infor¬ 
mation you give are the most 
important. 


7—TO PLACE YOUR AD, call 
386-2121. vour direct lirtenum 
ber to fast Want Ad action A 
courteous- efficient advisor 
will be glad to help you word 
and place vour order. And re¬ 
member, Classified Action 
Ads afford you the most com¬ 
plete coverage Telephones 
are open 8:00 a m. to 6:00 
p m. Monday through Friday. 
8 00 to 5:30 p.m. Saturday 
Don't allow the reader to 
speculate 


.cnsiagcv 



AUCTION 

FRIDAY—7 P.M. 

Colonial and VHas 
Chesterfields 
BEDROOM STES. 
TWIN POSTER BEDS 
PROVINCIAL 
DINING STE 
Dinette Seta, Coffee 
,and Lamp Tables 
Cheats. Dressers. 


Occasional Chairs 
Fin# China, glassy/are 
and Brie a brae 

VMwfe CNy Mm 

BICYCLES 

i®) 


Over ISO Lot. to, 
you. Impaction 


KILSNAWS 


ire. 

lilt Fart St 

384-6441 

fm you, mi* o» ■ppnmi 


Three Versions! 

Printed Pattern 



9481 

34-48 

iiMtM, TlUr~ 


Easy surplice line flattery! 
Printed Pattern 9481: Wom¬ 
en's Sues are 34 (38-inch bust 
with 40-inch hip); 36 (40 bust, 
42 hip), 38(42 bust. 44 hip); 40 
(44 bust. 46 hip); 42 (46 bust. 
48 bip); 44 (48 bust, 50 hip), 46 
(50 bust, 52 hip); 48 (52 bust, 
54 hip). 

St 75 lor each pattern — cash, 
chegue or money order Add 50« lor 
each pattern lor fust-class mail and 
landing Send lo Victoria Press Lid 
Pattern Dept. 109 Crocklotd Blvd 
Scarborough, Ontario, Mtn 5Ba 
Print plainly pattern number, your 
name, address 

MORE clothes (or LESS MONEY- 
rt’s still possible when you sew 
Send now Iw our NEW SPRING 
SUMMER PATTERN CATALOG. 
Over 100 styles, tree pattern 
coupon. Catalog, $1. 

107 Instant Sewing .$1.50 

124Pltchwort Quills $1.50 
12VQ«rck/E«sy Transfers $1.50 

130- Sweatafs.Suas 3456 $1.50 

131- Add a Block Quilts.. .$1.50 

132- Quilt Originals $1.50 


Lace-Lovely Crochet 



(rtf £uu>u\\ IvBjsQui 

0 , 

Save a fortune-crochet this 
smart lace dress yourself 

Get in touch with texture 1 
Crochet squares to form yoke and 
skirt bands So lacy, so graceful 
m 2 strands bedspread cotton. 
Pattern 898 directions, Sizes 
8-14 included 

$1 75 lor each pattern — cash, 
cheque or money order Add 50$ lor 
each pattern for first-class mail and 
handling Send lo Victoria Press Lid . 
Pattern Dept. 109 Crocktord Blvd. 
Scarborough. Ontario. MIR 5B4 
Print piamly pattern number, your 
name, addre^. 

NEW* 1980 NEEDLECRMT 
catalog Value packed 1 Over 170 
designs-all crafts 3 free pat 
terns printed inside. Send 31 00 

132-Quilt Originals 31.50 
131-Add a Block Quilts 31.50 
130 SwMttfs-Sim 33 56 31.50 
129-Quick/Easy Transfers 31.50 
I2S Patdnvorli Quilts 31.50 
127-Afghans V OMies 3150 
126-Crafti Flowers 31.50 
125-Petal Quilts 3150 

124-Grfts 'a 1 Ornaments 31.50 
123-SMc* V Patch Qu.ftsSl .50 
122 StuffPuN Quilts 31.50 
121Pidow Show-Offs 31.50 
120-C«8dwf a Wardrobe 3150 
119-flewer Crochet 31.50 
118Crochet with Squares 3150 
11HM* M* Quilts 3150 
HS-lippit Crachet 3150 
UUuapMt Alfham 31 50 
112 Pnxe Afghans 3150 
107 iMlaat iawmg 1150 
IDMatfatf Ciachei 31 50 
mMmmm Qudb 3150 
IDl+dN CMto rt m 3150 


305 DEATHS aud 
FUNERALS 


BECK — In Victoria General 
Hospital on July 20, 1980, Dr. 
Richard Beck, aged 83 years. 
He Is survived by his loving 
wife, Margaret; one son. Ri¬ 
chard, of Iowa; one daughter, 
Margaret, of California; one 
brother, Vaidl Beck, In Wlnnl- 
i,Manitoba; severalgrand- 
nephews. 


pea, Man 
children. 


nieces and 
Funeral service on Thursday, 
July 24, at 1:30 p.m. In Grace 
Lutheran Church, 1273 Fort, with 
Pastor R. Nelson officiating. 
Cremation to follow. McCall 
Bros. In charge of arrange¬ 
ments. 


BOTTfNG — On July 21 . 1980, In 
Victoria, B.C., Robert P. Bet¬ 
ting, In his 72nd year, born In 
London, Enoiand. He Is sur¬ 
vived by his loving wife Jessie 
Marguerite; five slsters-ln- 
law. He was a member of the 
Army, Navy and Airforce Vet¬ 
erans No. 12 and was 47 years 
wlththeC.P.R. Coast service. 
A Private funeral service will 
be held on Friday, July 25, at 2:00 
p.m. In McCall Bros. FAMILY 
CHAPEL with the Rev. D. Noon¬ 
an officiating, followed by cre¬ 
mation. (Flowers gratefully de¬ 
clined). Donations If desired 
may be made to the Respiratory 
Research, 1902 Fort Street, Vic¬ 
toria, B.C. 


BRAID — On July 21, I960, in 
Victoria, B.C., Thomas Wal¬ 
lace Braid, aged 00 years, late 
of 4036 Hodgson Place. He 
leaves his daughter Mrs. Mary 
Sinclair at home, two sons, 
Andrew In Ontario and Tom of 
Nanaimo, eight grandchil¬ 
dren, one great grandchild, a 
brother John In Scotland Mr. 
Braid was the Session Clerk of 
Trinity Presbyterian Church 
for the past 10 years. 

Funeral services will be con¬ 
ducted by the Rev. G. D. Smith In 
Trinity Presbyterian Church, 
2964 Tllllcum Road, on Thurs¬ 
day, July 24, at 11:00 a.m. Inter¬ 
ment to follow In Hatley Memo¬ 
rial Gardens. If friends sodeslre, 
donations may be made to a 
charity of their choice. 
Hayward, Thomson & Irving in 
charge of arrangements. 


DARBYSHIRE — In Victoria. 
B.C., on July 17, 1980. Miss 
Barbara Darbvshlrc, aged 80 
years, bom in England, late 
residence, 712 Yates Street. 
She leaves many friends In 
Victoria, B.C. 

Service In the Sands Mortuary 
Limited, "Family Chapel of Me¬ 
mories," 1803 Quadra Street, 
victoria, B.C., on Friday, July 
25, at 11:00 a.m. Archdeacon A. 
E. Hendy officiating. Interment 

? l the Royal Oak Burial Park, 


DAY — Mandy Lee on July 21, 
1980, age three years. Beloved 
daughter of Marvyn and Judy 
Oav of Coquitlam, B.C. Also 
survived by her orandmoth 
ers, Mrs. Hazel Gallant and 
Mrs. Kathleen Price, both of 
Vancouver. Several aunts, 
uncles and cousins. 

Funeral service to be held 
Thursday, July 24. at 1:00 p.m., 
from the Maple Ridge Funeral 
Chapel, Maple Rldoe, B.C. Rev. 
Sarah Wallace officiating. Cre¬ 
mation. In lieu of flowers, dona 
tlons to Children's Hospital. 250 
West 59th Avenue, Vancouver, 
appreciated. 


EVANS — At his residence. 15- 
2011 Leigh Road, Langford, 
B.C., Mr Frank Evans, age 59 
years, born in Port Albernl. 
B.C. He leaves his son, Robert 
Lloyd Evans, Edmonton, Al¬ 
berta. father, Mr. Ted Evans, 
Nanaimo, B.C.; brothers, Ted, 
Victoria, B.C , Dick, Nanaimo. 
B.C., Jim, Victoria, B.C., Bob, 
New Westminster, BC.; sis¬ 
ters, Mrs. S. (Dede) Cahill, 
Nanaimo, B.C., Mrs. G. (Jean) 
Staplev. San Dieoo'. Califor¬ 
nia; nieces and nephews. 
Service in the Sands Funeral 
Chapel of Heather. 317 Gold 
stream Avenue. Colwood, B.C. 
on Friday, July 25, at 1:00 p.m. 
Rev. H. Silvester officiating. 
Cremation. 

SANDS-COLWOOD 


HE ASMAN — In Victoria. B.C., 
on July 22, 1980, Mr. James 
Thomas Heasman, aged 74 
years, born In Folkestone. 
Enoiand and emigrated to 
Canada in 1961, late residence, 
150 Memorial Crescent. Pre¬ 
deceased by his daughter, 
Pauline, In 1974 He leaves his 
wife, Anne, at home; son, Ro¬ 
bert, four grandchildren, 
Ruth, Marcus, Miriam and. 
Anne; sisters, Queenie. May, 
Peggie and brother, Albert, of 
Folkestone, England. 
Arangements to be announced 
by the Sands Mortuary Limited. 
Flowers gratefully declined 
Those so desiring may contrib¬ 
ute to the Victoria Cancer Clinic, 
1900 Fort Street, Vlcloria, B.C. 

V8R 'sANDS —VICTORIA 


IBBETSON - On July 21. 1980, 
at the Saanich Peninsula Hos 
pltal, Mrs Mildred M Ibbet 
son, aged 92 years, born in 
Saanichton, widow of William 
Ibbet son, she leaves numerous 
nieces and nephews She was a 
teacher for many years in Cen¬ 
tral Saanich. 

A memorial service wilt be 
held at St. Stephens Church on 
Saturday, July 26, at 12 noon with 
Rev. I. Futter officiating. (Flow 
ers gratefully declined). 


JACKSON — On July 21. 1980, in 
Victoria, B.C., Emma Jack- 
son, born in Ireland and a resi¬ 
dent of Victoria for many 
years. Predeceased by her 
husband, Ernest, she Is sur¬ 
vived by dose friends In Vic¬ 
toria. She was a well known life 
member of the Uplands Goff 
Club, having won the B.C. 
Women's Amateur Champion¬ 
ship and was a finalist In the 
CeruRttan Women's Amateur. 
Funeral service will be held on 
Monday, July 2 i, at 3:30 p.m. In 
McCall Bros. Chapel, Vancouver 
and Johnson Streets, with the 
Rev Will Dobson off (elating, fol 
lowed by cremation (Flowers 
gratefully declined.) Friends so 
desiring may contribute to The 
Heart Fund, 1008 Blansherd 
Street, Vldorle. B.C. VSW 2H5. 


LAWRIE — On July 22. 1980, 
John Gibson beloved husband 
of Elizabeth (Daisy) Lawrieof 
Victoria, in his 80tti year. Sur¬ 
vived also by his brother Got 
don. Leduc. Alberta and nieces 
and nephews Mr Lewrie was 
a member of the Carpenter 
and Joiners Local 1598 
Memorial service Friday, July 
25. at 1:30 p.m In the Chapel of 
First Memorial. 4725 Feleise 
Drive Rev Laura Butter offi 
dating Cremation No flowers 
by reauest. Arrangements 
throutfi the Memorial Society of 
B C end First Memorial Ser 


leytor. R.C.M retd 
Memorial service to be held at 
St Polar'* Church. Quamtdian. 
on July 26.4 
ersby re 


Heavy are our Iwarh U 

* 11* mg* you 


I oMwtmtr whMi 
you on* e with us 
IuWk- happy daw 


305 DEATHS a$ 
FUNEMIS 


McNABB — Eleanora of Vic¬ 
toria, formerly of Regina 
Beach, Saskatchewan, sud¬ 
denly In July 20, 1980, In her 
78th year. Predeceasedbv her 
husband, an Infant son. father, 
mother, three sisters and two 
brothers. Survived by one son, 
Murray (Regina); and one 
daughter, Mrs. R. B. Perry 
(LoTs), Victoria; six grand¬ 
children, one oreat-Qrand- 
chlld; also two sisters, Lillian 
Berg and Bernice Krause, both 
of Victoria; nephews end 
nieces. Mrs. McNabb was a 
active member of Eastern 
Star and Oak Bay United 
Church. 

Memorial service will be held 
Friday, July 25, at 2:00 p.m. in 
Oak Bay United Church. Rev. A. 
Jack officiating Cremation. 
Flowers gratefully declined, do¬ 
nations may be mode to the B.C. 
Heart Foundation. Arrange¬ 
ments through the Memorial So 
defy of B.C. and First Memorial 
Services. 


PAWSEY — H. Cecil of Victoria 
B C , suddenly on July 22,1980, 
aoe 70 years. Survived bv his 
loving wife Phyllis. Also one 
sister In England. 

Private family services. Crema- 
tlon. Flowers gratefully de 
dined, donations may be made 
to the B.C. Heart Foundation. 
Arrangements made through the 
Memorial Society of B.C. and 
First Memorial Services Ltd. 


Sleep on dear 
good mother, 

It has been long years 

Since vou left our hearts 
filled wlthsaddness 
and tears 9 

Yours was a heart 

that was blithesome 
and gay 

Scattering sunshine 
all along the way 

You know how we love 
vou and, yes, 
love vou vet 

Though God took 
vou from us, 
we cannot forget. 


310 FUNERAL MRECTMS 



Sine 1912 

24 Hour 
SERVICE 

Visiting Ui$til 9:30 p.m. 
Every Evening 

Ask about the 
LIFE APPRECIATION 
Funeral Service 

We Car, About 
Vancouver Island 
Families 

VICTORIA 383-5155 

SIDNEY 656-2932 

COLWOOD 478-3821 

DUNCAN 746-5212 

LADYSMITH 245-2331 

NANAIMO 753-2032 

PARKSVILLE 248-3238 

LAVERNE and MASON 

SANDS 




THURSDAY 

DUERICHEN 
Mr. Gerrard Guenther 
1:30p.m. FLORALCHAPEL 
BECK 
Dr Richard 
1:30p.m. GRACE 
LUTHERAN CHURCH 
HOULE 

Mrs. Dora Eleanor 
3:00pm FLORALCHAPEL 

FRIDAY 

BOTTING 
Mr. Robert P 
2:00p.m. Private Service 
FAMILY CHAPEL 

MONDAY 

THOMPSON 
Mr. Sander (Sandy) 

2:15p.m. FLORAL CHAPEL 
JACKSON 
Mrs. Emma 

3:30p.m. FLORAL CHAPEL 

McCALL BROS. 
Funeral Chapels 

JOHNSON AT 
VANCOUVERSTREETS 

For Funeral 
and Pre-Arrangement 
Information ' 
Phone 385-4465 


yfjjitHirdr «c i 

Z~hf>mst'n < 5 * ( S’rnnc 


Funeral Chapels 
1625 Quadra St. 
386-3505 

CUNNINGHAM 
FUNERAL CHAPEL 
)155 FORT STREET 
Phone 3MS5120, 3*44426 
Offering dignified moderate ser¬ 
vice for all Geo. S. Cunningham, 
owner, manager. 

FIRST MEMORIAL SERVICES 
Serving the Public end Exclu 
sive Area Undertakers for the 
Memorial Society of B.C. 
658 5744 


311 


STEWART MONUMENTAL 
WORKSLTD 
ESTABLISHED 1896 
Marble fireplace and tabletops 
1403 Mev St 384-3452 

Me m orial of Distinction 


Mortimer's Monuments 
383-6421 

709KINGS RD (el Douglas) 
FOUNDED 1877 


812 


OAJSV CHAIN 

^Co-list 


Oaiw Chain f !ori«t 
_ utitmemu 


NOTICE TO CREDITORS 
AND OTHERS 

Re: Eftete o* PETER MELLING, 
deceased. > 

NOTICE Is hereby given that 
creditors and others having claims 
against the above, late of #101-1270 
Beach Drive, Victoria, B.C., V 8 S 
2N3, are hereby required to send 
them to THE ROYAL TRUST COR¬ 
PORATION OF CANADA. P.O. 
Box 580, Victoria, B.C., VSW 2P6, 
before August 20th, 1980, after 
which date the Executors will dis¬ 
tribute theestate among the parties 
entitled iffeving regard only to 
claims of which they then have no¬ 
tice. 

DATED July 18, 1980. 

NORA EDDISON 
MELLING and 
THE ROYAL TRUST 
CORPORATION 
OF CANAOA, 

Executors. 

HARMAN A COMPANY, 

540-645 Fort Street, 

Victoria, B.C., 

Solicitors. 


NOTICE TO 

GENERAL CONTRACTORS 
AND ROOFING CONTRACTORS 

SEALED TENDERS WILL BE 
RECEIVED bv the Architect for 
the Re-roofing and ancillary work 
to Queen Alexandra Hospital, Vic¬ 
toria, B.C. 

Drawing, specifications, forms of 
tender and detailed Instructions to 
bidders are available to General 
and Roofing Contractors at the of¬ 
fice of: _ 

THE WADE WILLIAMS PART 
NERSHIP, Architects, 914 Gordon 
Street, Victoria. 

A returnable deposit of Twenty- 
Five ($25.00) Dollars is required for 
each set of drawings and specifica¬ 
tions. Tenders must be good for 
thirty (30) d^vs. Tenders must be 
accompanied by a bid bond In the 
form prescribed, which binds the 
tenderer and the surety In the 
amount of ten percent ( 10 %) of the 
tender sum. A performance bond 
and a labour and material payment 
bond, each in the form prescribed 
must be provided by the successful 
tenderer prior to the award of the 
contract. 

Two Tenders will be called for 
Alternate Roofing Systems Con¬ 
tractors may tender either or both 
alternatives for which separate 
tender forms will be provided. 
Tenders will be made separately In 
separate sealed envelopes clearly 
marked: 

TENDERS FOR THE QUEEN 
ALEXANDRA HOSPITAL ROOF 
ING, TENDER #1 end/or TEND 
ERS FOR THE QUEEN ALEXAN B 
ORA HOSPITAL ROOFING, ** 
TENDER #2. 

Tendering documents will be 
available tor viewing at the follow 
Ing Construction Associations: 
Port Albernl, Nanaimo, Victoria, 
Vancouver and Burnaby. 

Contractors' attention is drawn 
to the clause In the Instructions to 
Bidders on depository bids. 

The lowest or any tender is not 
necessarily accepted. 

Tenders must be made out on the 
forms supplied bv the Architect, 
addressed to and delivered to the 
Architect's office at the above ad 
dress not later than 3:00 p.m. on 
Thursday, Auoust 14, 1980 in a 
sealed envelope dearly marked as 
stated above. 

Tenders will be opened publftlv 
In the Board Room of the Architect 
4 3:00 p.m. 



Province of 
British Columbia 


Ministry of 
Forests 


NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS 

SEALED TENDERS FOR: Construction of one temporary workshop - 
to be located al the Saanich Research Station. 4300 North Roaflj., 
Saanich. B C. will bo received by the undersigned at Room 301. 
612 Johnson Street (mailing address 1450 Government Street). 
Victoria. B.C. up to 3:30 p.m. (local time) on August 14. i960, add • 
opened In public at that time. • • 

Plans and specifications may be viewed after July 28. 1980, at: 

(1) Conslruction Association of Victoria. 1075 Alson Street 

Victoria V9A 3S6 F , , , 

(2) Nanaimo Construction Association. 2232 Wllgress Road. 
Nanaimo V9S 4N4 

Plans may be viewed and/or obtained after July 28. 1980, from. 

(1) Technical Services Branch. Ministry of Forests.• 1061 Fdll* 

Street, (mailing address 1450 Government Street) Victoria^ 
V0W 3E7. ^ 

(2) Saanich Research Station. 4300 North Road. Saanich- 4 
V82 5T3 

Al! inquiries should be made to the Technical Services Branch, 
phone. 387-1784. 

A deposit ol $15 is required, which will be refunded to tha..^ 
unsuccessful bidder upon return ot tho plans and specifics--« • 
tions in good condition, within 30 days of award ot tender. 

Tenders must be made subject to the conditions of tender ark)'*'’ 
submitted on the forms and in the envelopes supplied 
No tender shall be considered having any qualifying clauses, 
whatsoever and the lowest or any tender will not necessarily be 
accepted. 

„ 0 . DEPUTY MINISTER. 

Victoria, B.C. 


St 


British Columbia ..« 

Buildings Corporation 
Invitation lo Tender 

Project No. AC-5-80, “Reroofing - Administration Build¬ 
ing*’ for removal of existing roofing and reroofing appro 
mately 80 squares of built-up roofing. ' ni 

Sealed Tenders are invited for the above described 
project Tenders will be received by the British Columbia 
Buildings Corporation, 805 Cloverdale^lNenue, Victoria, 
B.C. V8X 2S9 on or before 3:00 p.m. Al|Kt 13, 1980. 
Tenders available at th<it time will be opened in public,at. 
the above address. Tenders are to be properly completed 
and signed on the forms provided and submitted in tender, 
envelopes provided The lowest or any tender will not 
necessarily be accepted. 

Tender documents may be obtained on July 25,1980 from 
805 Cloverdale Avenue 

Unsuccessful bidders are requested to return the docu¬ 
ments. 

Tender documents may be viewed at Amalgamated Con¬ 
struction Assoc, of B.C., 2675 Oak Street, Vancouver affd 
7503 Sixth Street, Burnaby; The Construction Assoc, of 
Victoria, 1075 Alston Street, Victoria; Nanaimo Construc¬ 
tion Assoc., 2232 Wllgress Road, Nanaimo; Albernl Valley 
Contractors Assoc., 3101 Bird Street. Port Albernl; North 
Vancouver Island Construction Assoc., 101-1180 i/rfrt- 
wood Road, Campbell River. ^ - 

General enquiries may be directed to A Carter in Victoria 
B.C. at 387-5221 local 225. 




FILL OUT AND MAIL TO: SPECIAL OFFER 




SAVE MONEY! 

USE THIS HANDY 
COUPON TO PLACE 
YOUR CLASSIFIED AD 

‘ 1 


VICTORIA PRESS, P.O. BOX 300, VICTORIA, B.C. V8W 2N4 
OR DELIVER IN PERSON TO 2621 DOUGLAS ST., VICTORIA, B.C. 


NAME ... 

ADDRESS ... 

phone no.."I!!!!!:"!!.'!"!]!!!!!"!!! 

SIGNATURE . 

NO. OF INSERTIONS. AMOUNT ENCLOSED $.• 

YOUR AD WILL RUN AS SOON AS POSSIBLE UPON RECEIPT OF THIS COUPON AND 
PAYMENT OR PLEASE SPECIFY CONSECUTIVE DATES 


CLASSIFICATION NUMBER 


10 WORDS MINIMUM | 


"r 

M 


10 

10 

10 


WORDS FOR 1 INSERTION IN THE 
DAILY COLONIST AND VICTORIA TIMES: 
15* PER ADDITIONAL WORD 

WORDS FOR 3 INSERTIONS IN THE 
DAILY COLONIST AND VICTORIA TIMES: 
35* PER ADDITIONAL WORD 

WORDS FOR 6 INSERTIONS IN THE 
DAILY COLONIST AND VICTORIA TIMES: 
55* PER ADOITONAL WORD 


$ <| so 

$350 

$ 5 


50 


.ICTORIA PRESS BOX CHARGE $7.00 PER MONTH: MAILED J PICKUP U 

All real estate, mobile home, rental and business advertising is 
considered to be commercial advertising and will not quality lor 
this special otter. 

* SENB CHEQUE OR MONEY ORDER 





* 





































































































































CANADA 




THE COLONIST, Thursday July 24, 1980 51 


Volcanic 

fallout: 

Warning 

program 

approved 

Vancouver <cp> - 

Vancouver city council ap¬ 
proved an emergency pro¬ 
gram Tuesday for dealing 
wlthash fallout from 
Mount St. Helens. 

City staff expect the 
pulic will get advance 
warnlhg of volcanic ash 
• fronvWashington state 
media. The city’s emer- 
geneymffice will also issue 
basic precautions through 
local media. 

The Pacific Weather 
Centre has advised that in 
most cases it could predict 
uppef-level wind changes 
and provide the city with 24 
to 36 hours advance warn¬ 
ing of wind shifts. 

Some city departments 
have developed procedures 
to protect city facilities, in¬ 
cluding computer rooms, 
cooling towers and air con¬ 
ditioning units in city hall, 
the public safety building 
and the fire department. 

Fallout from the several 
major eruptions Tuesday 
everting was not expected 
to hit the Vancouver area, 
but a light dusting landed in 
southeastern B.C. 


Pay up, 
Strand 
ordered 

Canadian Press 

''SUrand Holidays 
(Canada) Ltd. must 
pay 23 customers $200 
apiece in compensa¬ 
tion, the provincial 
consumer and corpo¬ 
rate affairs ministry 
hasruled. 

The ministry said 
the customers trav¬ 
elled on the cruise ship 
Pelphi in October, 
1976, but claimed the 
truise was not the lux¬ 
ury quality they had 
JR&n led to expect, and 
i!ai. some of the ele¬ 
ments of the cruise ad¬ 
vertised by the com- 
pany were not 
Available. 

J. 


Leaks? 

Not 

• i 

a trace 


^TORONTO (UPC) — 
Tests conducted on video 
display terminals at the To¬ 
ronto Star in response to 
union accusations the units 
werq causing birth defects 
have failed to find any ra¬ 
diation leaks, a spokesman 
for the newspaper said. 

'‘They found no trace of 
radiation," said John 
Brorjks, communications 
director for the Star, Tues¬ 
day.; Ontario ministry of 
labor te;tm:axamined the* 
c^thbde ray terminals of ' 
about 40 of the Star’s 200 
machines, located in the 
classified advertising de¬ 
partment. 

t)fficials checked levels 
of microwave emission and 
ionizing radiation follow¬ 
ing g request to the Star by 
The Newspaper Guild. The 
Gliild said it learned four 
S’tar employees had given 
birth Between October 1979 
aifd January 1980 to babies 
with defects. 

t 

“We’ve asked (ministry 
testers) to come back and 
continue testing of all 200," 
Brooks said, adding he was 
not sure how long the tests 
would take due to other 
commitments of the min¬ 
istry staff. 

Guild local representa¬ 
tive Linda Torney said 
birth, defects in the four 
infants varied. One was 
bortublind in one eye, an 
othffhad throat and mouth 
irruftularities. One baby 
was bom with a heart de¬ 
fect requiring corrective 
surgery and another had 
chritfeet 

Brflpks said the Guild, 
which has representation 
uaS tour year-old commit 
lee with management over 
computer terminal use at 
the newspaper bad ad 
vised m June defects had 
been discovered in (our out 
of seven babies bom to Star 
employees working in tin- 
advertising section 


St. Helens sports new glowing red crater 


VANCOUVER, Wash. 
(AP) — After a major 
eruption that left a 17-kilo- 
metrc high cloud of smoke 
and ash drifting across the 
Canadian border, Mount 
St. Helens revealed a new 
glowing red crater Wednes¬ 
day. 


“The lesson of last night 
is everyone has to be pru¬ 
dent and understand that a 
lull Is a lull for a time." said 


U.S. Geological Survey 
geologist Tim Hait. 

No injuries were report¬ 
ed Tuesday night as the 
volcano’s lava dome, which 
had begun forming after its 
third eruption June 12, was 
blown high into the air in 
three spectacular, pulsat¬ 
ing eruptions. 

The mountain was quiet 
Wednesday, with no seis¬ 
mic activity reported and 
only a very slight steam 


plume wafting from the 
crater. 

"You can say the volcano 
will erupt again,” Haij) 
said. “That is a certainty. 
But day to day, hour to 
hour, you Can’t say. What it 
says is Mother Nature is a 
lot more complicated than 
we can figure out. . . What 
it proves is that we’re not 
all smart." 

In southern Alberta, the 
plume of ash obscured the 


sun. In Lethbridge, about 
70 kilometres north of the 
international boundary, 
visibility was reduced to 
five kilometres and in 
Pincher Creek, in the 
Crowsnest Pass area, it fell 
to 1.3 kilometres. * 

A geologist who flew over 
the volcano Wednesday in a 
U.S. Forest Service plane 
described the new crater as 
a “large, glowing pit," a 
U.S. Forest Service spokes¬ 


man said. 

The new crater emerged 
on the floor of the older, 
1,600-metre-deep crater 
that had formed May 18 
during the mountain's most 
violent eruption. 

“If the May 18 eruption 
was a 10 on a scale of one to 
10, then this eruption would 
be about a two," Hait said. 
“It is comparable to the 
May 25 and June 12 erup¬ 
tions.” 


The May 18 eruption 
killed 30 people and 34 are 
missing and presumed 
dead. 

The mountain had been 
quiet for six weeks until 
Tuesday when a dramatic 
increase in seismic activity 
prompted the evacuation of 
geologists, loggers and 
forest firefighting crews 
who were extinguishing 
blazes still smoldering 
from the May 18eruption. 


A flo.w of superheated 
gases and ash overflowed 
from the north side of the 
crater and ran 10 kilome¬ 
tres down the volcano’s 
northern flank to the shores 
of Spirit Lake, Halt said. 
The flow went about the 
same distance, but was 
much smaller in volume 
than that which took the 
same course during the 
June 12 eruption. 



the 




SAVE 
UP TO 

50 °/c 


O 

SUMMER 

ACCESSORY CLEARANCE 

WE'VE SLASHED PRICES RIGHT, LEFT AND CENTER, SO YOU 
CAN SAVE. AND SAVE. AND SAVE! PRICES ARE IN EFFECT ONLY 
WHILE QUANTITIES LAST, AND IT'S PERSONAL SHOPPING ONLY. 


HIGH FASHION 
SANDALS 

Our final Clearance of top qualify 
§qndals. In our Downtown Van¬ 
couver store only. Broken sizes. Last 
price 39.99. 


Zz OFF 
HANDBAGS 

Choose from an excellent assort¬ 
ment of vinyl, fabric and straw 
bags. Our regr St 1 to $45. 


COLORFUL 
TUBE TOPS 

Terrific assortment in many colors 
and fabrics. One size fits all. Our 
reg. $4 to $6. 


To clear 


19.99 


To clear 


to 


6.99 
29.99 


Fashion Footwear (Dept. 262) 


Handbags (Dept. 210) 


To clear 


to 


Fashion Accessories (Dept. 201) 


249 

349 


CASUAL 

SANDALS 

Selection includes Hang Ten, 
Zapetti, Tender Tootsies and 
others. Broken sizes. Last price 
11.99 to 19.99. 


To clear 


9.99 


V 2 OFF 

SELECTED 

JEWELLERY 

Includes colored beads and gold 
colored pendants and lariats. Our 
reg. $5 to $20. 


COTTON 
SUMMER HATS 

Many styles, including cloches and 
visors, in a wide range of colors. 
Our reg. $4 to $9. 


,o $ 10 dear 2.50 


To clear 


Fashion footwear (Dept 262) 


fashion Jewellery (Dept 236) 


Fashion Accessories 


to 


2.99 

3.99 


201 ) 


AU. ITEMS AVAILABLE IN DOWNTOWN VANCOUVER. VICTORIA. PARK ROYAL. RICHMOND, 
SURREY. LOUGHEED. CHAMPLAIN AND COQUITLAM. UNLESS STATED OTHERWISE 



Show your Bay Shopping Card! 

Master Charge and Visa are also wetoome 


Inriteons Baji (Tompanu 


< 



























ISLAND 


52 THE COLONIST, Thursday July 24, 1980 * * 

i, * 


Fond memories in warrior’s wake 


By RAY KERR 

Colonist Island Editor 

There are about 900 crewmen on a U.S. warship who 
must be wondering if they should forget about the 
Vancouver Sea Festival. 

For good. 

But the crew of the giant USS Belleau Wood will also 
remember Victoria and Vancouver Island with fondness. 

Even though that fondness was born through neces¬ 
sity. 

It all began last year when the 250-metre amphibious 
assault ship, then less than a year old, was supposed to 
enhance the Vancouver Sea Festival. 

But due to a strike, there was no room to anchor and the 
aircraft carrier-type ship wound up in Seattle instead. 

This year a similar situation occurred, although no one 
really knew why there was no Vancouver anchorage for 
the Belleau Wood and the rest of her amphibious assault 
task force. 

"IT WAS probably another strike,” quipped photo 
lab’s assistant chief Richard Kerns as he led me around 
the cavernous warship sitting in the Royal Road anchor¬ 
age about a mile offshore. 

In any event, the big warship and the rest of the 
smaller ships in her task force arrived off Victoria 
waterfront last Wednesday but while the smaller ships 
had no trouble getting in, the Belleau Wood balked, 
eventually being forced to sit in the Royal Roads anchor¬ 
age. 

§o what to do now about the showpiece of the task 
force? 

Organized sightseeing tours by the public were out of 
the question because of the logistic problems but a 
haphazard yet well-functioning “taxi” service was or¬ 
ganized by using two of the ship’s smaller, 20-metrc 
landing craft. 

THE LIBERTY boats ran day and night during the 
five-day Vancouver Island stay and ferried many an 
Islander to the ship to marvel at one of the newest 
and most modern warships in the world. 

At the same time hundreds of crewmen were going 
ashore, making friends and after staying with them for a 
night or two, bringing them back to show them the 
vertical-takeoff Harrier jet fighters, the largest helicop¬ 
ters in the world and the expansive flight deck of the 
40.000-ton warship. 

llow did the crewmen take to Victoria? 

In general, after interviewing scores packed in the 


Controversial 
traffic bid 
dies quietly 

NANAIMO — The demise of the controversial 
north south arterial was a much less painful process 
than the attempt to give it life. 

About 20 people attended a city public hearing to ' 
consider the council’s intent to erase the north-south 
road from the community plan 

Only two members of the public gave briefs, and 
only one. Alf Flett, spoke in favor of retaining even a 
part of the artprial. 

The turnout was a sharp contrast to the hun¬ 
dreds who showed up to protest the arterial proposal 
at a series of public meetings earlier this year. 

The council later gave approval to the bylaw 
removing the arterial from the community plan 

The council cited the city traffic study, which is 
underway, and the highways ministry’sMudy of a 
proposed city bypass as factors in its decision to 
scrub the arterial. 

Several people at the meeting asked if there 
would be a chance for input on future traffic 
decisions, and were promised that the city, at least, 
would be seeking public opinion before making any 
major decisions. 


landing craft on the way to the Belleau Wood, they loved 
every minute of it. 

And Victorians and other Vancouver Islanders loved 
them back. 

A DUNCAN couple went to Victoria on spec Sunday 
and after getting on the ship, was told on the quarterdeck 
someone would have to volunteer to take charge of the 
family before the couple and the two children would be 
allowed to tour the ship. 

The ship’s assistant chaplain took this job and at the 
end of the day, found himself driven to Duncan to enjoy 
the family’s hospitality. 

The husband told me he would get them both up at 3 
a m. Monday morning so he could drive the crewman 
back to Victoria’s Inner Harbor where he could pick up the 
final liberty boat to his ship at 5 a.m. 

Another crewman spent two days with a Nanaimo 
family and yet another made friends with visitors from 
Port Alberni. 

Kerns had was encyclopedic knowledge of his beautiful 
ship, which really could be compared to a floating hotel 
which specializes in taking on and discharging passen¬ 
gers. 

Passengers in this case would be U.S. Marines and the 
Belleau Wood could carry a full batallion of marines, or 
1,900 men. 

And this huge mass of men could be unloaded on a 
beach in between three and 3(4 hours. 

The ship, named after a famous First World War battle 
involving the marines in France, has so many functions 
and innovations it makes one’s head spin. 

FOR EXAMPLE, the big ship’s well deck was dry 
during the five days here and "taxi’’ craft were landing in 
a normal way, thus taking quite a battering. 

But this is really not normal, not on this ship. 

The landing craft would customarily be loaded with 
troops, vehicles and supplies while the well deck would be 


dry, and then the well deck would be lowered by using the 
ballast technique and it would become a small harbor, 
with the landing craft smoothly sailing away. 

They would come back the same way and at the end of 
the operation, water used for ballast would be let out, the 
well deck would be dry once more and the ship would head 
elsewhere for another operation. 

THE SHIP generates so much power that it could 
provide electricity and air conditioning for a small city of 
5,000 people. 

But its hospital, for obvious reasons, could support a 
much larger city. 

The hospital has more than 300 beds, four operating 
rooms, four x-ray machines, a fully-equipped laboratory, 
a burn unit as well as full dental services. 

The ship carries plenty of fresh water, of course, but in 
case more is needed, it can make 560,000 litres of fresh 
water daily with its two evaporators, using salt water. 

THE KITCHEN is spotless and its huge ovens can 
prepare hundreds of roasts at once. 

And the photo lab section is so modern and well 
equipped that an average photographer would probably 
turn so green with envy he’d never get back to his proper 
color. 

Now the Belleau Wood is gone but the many friends she 
made on the Island will be hoping she’ll be back, maybe 
for some Victoria or Nanaimo celebrations. 

The U.S. visitors will be remembered for their helpful¬ 
ness around the ship and their friendliness wherever they 
showed up. 

The ship’s fishermen will be remembered for really 
cleaning up during the five-day stay, admitting on Sunday 
that “we’ve only had such good fishing once before, when 
we were in Mexico.” 

And most of the ship’s young men will be remembered 
for this priceless summation of their Vancouver Island 
stay: 

“Vancouver Island women arc really friendly.” 


Two women die on highway 


Two women were killed in sepa¬ 
rate accidents Wednesday on the 
Trans-Canada highway between Vic¬ 
toria and Duncan. 

A 39-year-old Vancouver woman 
wife of the driver, died when a 1971 
Chevrolet van and a 1979 Mack dump 
truck collided at the interaction of 
fhe Trans-Canada Highway and 
Helmcken about 11:20a.m 

She was Dorothy Patricia Varney, 
of 2268 West 45th Avenue, Vancou¬ 
ver. at 

Drivcrlif the van was 37-year-old 
Edwin Varney. In good condition in 
Royal Jubilee Hospital are 10-year- 


old Ocean Varney and 22-month-old 
Catherine Varney while 10-year-old 
Jonathan Dolphin, the fourth passen¬ 
ger in Varney’s van, was still in seri¬ 
ous condition in Victoria General 
Hospital Wednesday night. Colwood 
RCMP were not able to say what 
injuries Dolphin suffered. 

Driver of the truck was 22-year- 
jfrold Dennis Mark Ridley of 201 Ports¬ 
mouth Drive. 

In another incident Wednesday, 
one elderly woman believed from the 
U.S. was killed and thr$c other per¬ 
sons were injured in an accident 


involving a car and a camper truck 
just south of Mill Bay on the Trans- 
Canada Highway. 

Another unidentified woman 
from the U.S., was reported in serious 
condition at Cowichan District Hos¬ 
pital. 

The driver and his wife in the 
camper truck, Mr. and Mrs. Ray¬ 
mond McKee of Fruitvale, were 
treated at the hospital and released. 

Meanwhile, a five-vehicle rear- 
ender on the Pat Bay Highway at 
McDonald Park Road about 11:05 
a.m. sent three persons to hospi¬ 
tal with minor injuries. 


Public gets say on bus routes 


Municipal planners and 
citizens will have an oppor¬ 
tunity to provide input on 
future transit route 
changes in the Capital Re¬ 
gion. 

Regional board directors 
agreed Wednesday to im¬ 


plement such a policy after 
Saanich Mayor Mel Couve- 
lier said it was essential 
that machinery be provid¬ 
ed to enable open and frank 
discussion by the public on 
proposed changes. 

“My staff feel they have 

VO • 


Rapids victim named 

NANAIMO — Robert Dean Campbell, 24, of Nanai¬ 
mo’s Protection Island, was identified Wednesday as the 
victim of a drowning, at the White Rapids of Nanaimo 
River on Monday afternoon. 


comments to make about 
route changes but they 
have been denied an oppor¬ 
tunity,” Couvelier said. 

“If we are going to pro¬ 
vide a service for people, 
then we should allow them 
to participate in the pro¬ 
cess,” he argued. 

But board chairman 
James Campbell said the 
region had been given re¬ 
sponsibility for transit and 
“I’m concerned about our 
effectiveness if we refer 
transit problems to muni¬ 
cipal staff.” 


Directors agreed to refer 
to Saanich and Central 
Saanich councils recom¬ 
mendations dealing with 
new route plans. They in¬ 
clude proposals for a south¬ 
ern terminus of the 74 West 
Saanich route to be located 
in the Royal Oak area and 
the 70 Pat flay bus run to 
continue along East Saan¬ 
ich Road rather than divert 
along Veyaness Road. 

The board also agreed to 
the sale of monthly bus 
passes to post-secondary 
students at a cost of $18.50. 


the ^ay 

Canadian 
Silver 
Dollars 
1958 to 1967 



Due to a fortunate purchase we 
are able to offer collectors and 
silver investors these early 
numismatic coins. Each silver 
dollar contains 60% of one 
ounce of silver. 

The condition of these silver 
dollars is extremely fine to 
choice uncirculated. Your 
choice of dates whenever 

possible f .13.95 

One set 1958 to 1967, 10 silver 
dollars, all different dates 

137.50 

100 pieces assorted dollars 

*1375 

These silver dollars sold as 
high as $35 each in February, 
1980. 

Coins ond Stomps. Victono 

Telebuy 385-1311 or clip out 
this ad and order by mail. 


Name _ 
Address 


Quantity__ Total Price _ 

Cheque □ Money order □ 
Charge to my Bay Shopping 
Card No_ 

Send to: The Bay 

Coin and Stamp Shop 
1701 Douglas Street, 
Victoria, B.C. 

Please add 4% sales tax. 

Show your Bay Shopping Card, 
Master Card or Visa. 



*** 

*•* 


Home & White Sale 

See our colorful 40 page flyer for more ways to save. Use your Baycard. Master Charge or Visa 


,he $£ay 


SAVE *50 

ON A COMPACT, 
APARTMENT SIZE 
DINETTE 

Dining on a small scale? Consider 
the space-saving, money-saving value 
of our three piece dinette. 

The modern style table features a 
gleaming chrome base with adjustable 
levellers, and a dappled elm look top 
that can be wiped clean in a jiffy. 
When the two drop leaves are 
extended, the table measures a full 36“ 
round When folded, it's a small 25“ x 
^6” size - perfect for apartment 
kitchens 

The two matching chairs otter 
European-look wire back styling, with 
chrome sleigh bases For comfort, there 
are wrap around back pads and all- 
.foam seats, upholstered in washable, 
stain resistant beige vinyl. 

Out reg. 259.95 

„*209 

Price in effect until Saturday. 
August 9, while quantities last 

Dmeffos bownio*r> Voocouvor V*ClOtiO 

one & Of ttvougri aH tioy stouts m B C 


Itosons'Bay. (Company. 




































Island 

109 Ingram, Duncan 
746-0181 


£l)c laila 


1 (Colonist. 


Sunny , 
high 21 

Weather Details 
on Page 2 


No. 190 —122nd Year 




Vancouver Island's leading newspaper since 1858 

Victoria, British Columbia, Thursday, July 24, 1980 


* 25C Daily, 30c Sunday 


Viet with Soviets in space 


MOSCOW (CP) - The Soviet 
Union launched a Soyuz spaceship 
Wednesday with a 33-year-old Viet¬ 
namese air force pilot and a Soviet 
cosmonaut aboard, the official news 
agency Tass announced. 

Lt.-Col. Pham Tuan, a cosmonaut- 
researcher, became the first Asian 
space traveller and the sixth citi¬ 
zen of a Soviet Bloc country launched 


into orbit along with Soviet space 
commanders. 

The latest flight, commanded by 
Col. Viktor Gorbatko, was to link up 
within 24 hours of launching with the 
Salyut 6 space laboratory, in which 
two cosmonauts have been orbiting 
for more than three months. 

Tass said Pham Tuan was a Viet- 
nanese air force pilot who studied in a 


Soviet flight school as a cadet with 
Gorbatko, and returned in 1979 to 
prepare for a space flight under the 
Intercosmos program. Gorbatko 
made two previous space flights, in 
1969 and 1977. 

Gorbatko and Pham Tuan are the 
third space pair to join Salyut 6.crew 
members Valery Ryumin and Leonid 
Popov, who went up April 9. 


Tuan and Gorbatko 


New Bolivia: 
It’s ‘savage’ 


Tehran arcade after bomb killed six 

20 Iran officers 
executed, bombs 
rip shops arcade 

United Press International 

Twenty Iranian air force officers were executed 
Thursday for their part in the abortive coup attempt 
against Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, and the acting 
head of the police force emerged as a leading con¬ 
tender for the post of prime minister, Tehran radio 
reported. 

On Wednesday, terrorist bombs ripped through a 
Tehran shopping arcade, killing at least six people 
and injuring about 100, and firing squads executed an¬ 
other four people accused of plotting against the Is¬ 
lamic regime, according to reports from Iran. 

It was the 263rd day of captivity for the 52 Ameri¬ 
can hostages. 

Thursday’s executions brought to 26 the number of 
officers executed in the failed attempt to overthrow 
Khomeini, the state radio said. 

Mostafa Mir-Salim, acting head of.the police force 
and undersecretary for political affairs at the in¬ 
terior ministry, emerged as a favorite for Iran’s new 
prime minister after meeting with Khomeini and presi¬ 
dent Abolhasan Bani-Sadr Wednesday afternoon, the 
state radio reported. 

The radio said Mir-Salim met with Khomeini and his 
son, Ahmad, to present a report on the police force. 
After the meeting, Mir-Salim said, they discussed the 
‘lover-all political situation of the country and the neces¬ 
sity of respecting the limits of the three branches of 
executive, judicial and legislative powers in the constitu¬ 
tion.’’ 

The radio said the two-hour meeting with Bani- 
Sadr was “very important," because the president was 
due to name his prime minister soon. 


WASHINGTON (AP) 
— The U.S. state depart¬ 
ment protested “wide¬ 
spread, even savage 
violations of human 
rights” by Bolivian 
armed forces and said 
Wednesday more reduc¬ 
tions in U.S. assistance 
were being considered. 

Spokesman John Trat- 
tner said the department 
had received “reliable re¬ 
ports’’ that the Bolivian 
military was holding hun¬ 
dreds of dissidents after 
last week's coup d'etat 
which ended the country’s 
halting progress toward a 
democratically elected 
government. 

Trattner said the depart¬ 
ment believed the military 
had taken some of its pris¬ 
oners to a centre near the 
capital, La Paz, where they 
were being beaten and tor¬ 
tured. 

“We strongly urge that 
the human rights of all Bo¬ 
livians be respected,” 
Trattner said. He said the 
U.S. still wanted the mili¬ 
tary to restore the civilian 
government it deposed. 

Trattner said the U.S., in 
reviewing its relations with 
Bolivia, was considering a 
reduction in the U.S. diplo¬ 
matic staff in the country. 
Ambassador Marvin 
Weissman has already 
been recalled. 

Also under review, he 
said, was a range of U.S. 
economic development as¬ 
sistance programs to Bo¬ 
livia, seme the subject of 
contracts which might be 
changed or cancelled alto¬ 
gether. 


• The United States last 
week cut off all military aid 
to Bolivia, totalling about 
$10.6 million, and suspend¬ 
ed an estimated $115 mil¬ 
lion in economic aid, ex¬ 
cept for humanitarian food 
assistance to the poor. It is 
the $115 million that is 
being reviewed for possible 
reductions or withdrawal. 

Meanwhile, the Council 
on Hemispheric Affairs, a 
private organization which 
opposes military govern¬ 
ments in Latin America, 
charged that one of the 
leaders of the Bolivian 


coup was involved in drug 
smuggling. 

The council said Gen. 
Hugo Echeverria, com¬ 
mander of the garrison at 
Santa Cruz in eastern Bo¬ 
livia, was one of a group of 
generals eager to keep con¬ 
trol of the lucrative Bolivi¬ 
an drug trade. 

U.S. state department of¬ 
ficials confirmed that the 
area around Santa Cruz 
produced coca leaves 
which made their way 
through Colombia to the 
United States in the form of 
cocaine. 


Many-voiced actor 
dies of coronary 


LONDON'(UPI) — Peter Sellers, 54, the British 
actor of many voices who played roles from the 
bumbling Inspector Clouseau to the terrifying Dr. 
Strangelove, died early today after a massive heart 
attack. Other story Page 25 

Sellers’ comic genius was often compared to 
that of Charlie Chaplin. 

“It is with very great regret that we have to in¬ 
form you that Mr. Sellers died at 12:28," a spokes¬ 
man at London’s Middlesex Hospital said. “His wife 
and children were at his side . . . His heart just 
faded away . . 

Sellers’ fourth wife, Lynn Frederick, had flown 
from Los Angeles. His second wife, Britt Ekland, 
and their daughter, Victoria, 15, flew from Stock¬ 
holm on learning of his heart attack Tuesday. 

“There was not a flicker of recognition,” Miss 
Frederick said. “Peter was completely uncon¬ 
scious.” 


Sellers 

. as Strangelove 


INSIDE 


Israel denounces 
Arab walkout 

—Page 3 

RCMP lawyer 
recalls Gouzenko 

—Page 7 

Dome Finds 
oil again 


Breweries claim 
lockout provoked 

—Page 37 

Monty Hall 
moves to B.C. 

—Page 39 

St. Helens sports 
new red crater 

—Page 51 


Dental plan missing 
neediest, says Cocke 


—Page 13 

Bridge 

30 


Business 

12-15,24 

Youngster hooks 

Classified 

40-50 

surprise catch 

Comics 

Crossword 

22 

31 

—King Fisherman, 10 

Editorials 

4 


Entertainment 

38-39 

Japan aims at top 

Horse Happenings 

28 

in world economy 

King Fisherman 
Letters 

10 

5 

—Page 26 

Living 

27-31 


Marine Calendar 

32' 

Region pressed 

Medical 

Names in the News 

28 

; 33 

to acquire park 

Provincial Court 

9 

—Page 32 

Sports 

10-21,23 


The provincial govern¬ 
ment’s new dental plan will 
not help those who need it 
most, New Democratic 
health critic Dennis Cocke 
said Wednesday. 

“It does nothing to help 
children and senior citizens 
in areas of the province 
where there are no den¬ 
tists, or (there) arc too few 
dentjsls to carry out work 
under the plan,” Cocke 
said. 

“The main weakness of 
the plan put forward is that 
it docs not take into con¬ 
sideration the poor distri¬ 
bution of dentists in this 
province. Many areas of 
the province outside of the 
Lower Mainland do not 
have enough dentists to go 
around now.” 

Cocke said dental care 


schemes in Ngw Zealand 
and Saskatchewan used 
dental clinics and dental 
nurses to provide primary 
dental care and hygiene, in 
some cases directly in 
schools. 

“When a superior system 
is in place and working well 
elsewhere, I can't see why 
the government wouldn't 
have adopted a similar 
plan here." 


Cocke said only 50 per 
cent coverage for basic 
dentistry for children 
would be a disincentive for 
low-income families. While 
the cost of an annual 
checkup for children is co¬ 
vered by the plan, the cost 
of further dental work is 
shared 50 per cent by the 
province. Orthodontics, 

Page 2—Paying 


Baby off car roof 
recovered unhurt 


Shining success: region’s parks 


Modest 

budget, 

steady 

growth 


UNLOVED 


CIHD 


ORPHAN 


Second of five parts 

By NANCY BROWN 

Colonist staff 

There was a time, some 15 years 
ago, when the Capital Region Board 
seemed headed for success. 

To be sure, there had been com¬ 
plaints when the provincial govern¬ 
ment invented a new level of govern¬ 
ment, and Sooke even went so far as to 
try to avoid taking part. That revolt, 
entailing refusal to nominate a candi¬ 
date for director, was easily crushed 
by the appointment of a representative 
by the provincial government. 

There were complaints that the re¬ 
gion represented amalgamation by the 
bark door, but most responsibilities 
accepted then were by mutual agree¬ 
ment and the venture seemed fairly 
satisfactory. 

URBAN ARE AS were able to get to¬ 
gether as needed to deal with mutual 
problems such as sewage disposal, md 
the unorganized areas could use re 
gional resources for planning, or fin¬ 
ancing recreational buildings, and so 
avoid formal incorporation. 

The main concern was acquisition 

of parks, and at a later stage, the 
deveiupurnl of those parks 


And the region’s parks system, with 
a single exception, has been an out¬ 
standing success. 

The region owns nearly 6,000 acres 
of parkland, ranging from the tiny 
half-acre Reeson Park on Victoria’s 
waterfront to the 3,514-acre East Sooke 
Park. 

Parks supervisor Jack Kanhoffer 
has worked quietly and unobtrusively 
over the years, developing the parks 
for public use by adding trails and 
signs to allow good access. 

BUT THE PARKS themselves re 
mait in their natural state, and trails 
and signposts blend in naturally. 

And over the years, the annual 
parks budget has remained modest. 

While the region’s total budgets 
have jumped from just under $400,000 
to $26 million over the last 15 years, the 
parks budget has increased gently 
from $393,356 to $609,670, pegged as it is 
to a half mill levy. 

The only blot on the parks landscape 
and budget came last year when the 
region was given half an acre near the 
Johnson Street bridge to provide a 
“window on the harbor .” 

Development of that gift into a 
professionally landscaped mass of 
Page 2—Oar blemish 


Nature improved—falls la Witty's I agoom Park 


NEW YORK (AP) — A 
six-week-old baby rolled 
off a car roof when his 
mother drove off without 
realizing he was there, but 
was found uninjured half 
an hour later. 

Police said Robert Korn- 
bach, 19, stopped to let his 
18-year-old wife, Maureen, 
drive. 

Her sister, Elizabeth 
McGrath, got out of the 
front seat, put six-week-old 
Brian on the roof of the car 
and went to the back seat. 

Unaware that the baby 
had been left on the roof, 
Mrs. Kornbach began driv¬ 
ing, police said. 

Half an hour later, the 
family realized the baby 
was missing. 

They called police, and 
as they were rushing in a 
patrol car to the spot where 
they had first stopped, they 
learned by radio that Brian 
had been found and taken 
to hospital with only a few 
scratches. He was admit¬ 


ted for observation and was 
expected to be released 
today. 


Canadian 
fish boats 
arrested s 

PRINCE RUPERT (CP) 
— Four Canadian fishing 
boats were seized Wednes¬ 
day morning in Portland 
Canal north of here by 
Alaska fish and wildlife 
protection officers. 

Three of the gillnetters 
are owned by fishermen 
from nearby Kinkolith, 
B.C., who fish for the B.C. 
Packers cannery at Prince 
Rupert and the fourth by a 
Vancouver man. 

The boats have been 
towed to Ketchikan, where 
their owners are to be ar¬ 
raigned this morning. 


Bloodied burglar 
bagged by ferret 

WINNIPEG (CP) — A man who broke into a home 
here found a new crime-fighter waiting for him—a 
tiny, ferocious ferret named Shazam. p 

Shazam, who is about 36 centimetres long and 
weighs about .7 kilogram, held the burglar at bay 
after he broke through a second-storey sun porch 
window Monday to get into the house 

“She’s not meant to be a watch-ferret. To her. it was 
probably just another wrist to bite." said Craig Eros, 
brother of Sbazam’s owner. Glenn Eros. 

Glenn said he and his brother arrived home from 
work to find the burglar, his arm covered with blood 
"That animal .ot yours tore me apart," the burglar 
eomplamed 

Shazam. a gift from a friend, was meant as a pet. not 
protection, Craig said. 

“But she doesn’t like strangers.' Glenn added 
The sleek animals, used tv bunt rabbits and rats 
i times, coat at much at flM at prt stores 

































V 


i ‘ 1 




8 THE COLONIST, Thursday July 21. 1980 


EATON’S 

MOREHOUSE 

STORE 

749 View Street 

Next Door to the Civic Parking Garage 

CLEARANCE 

Starts Wed., July 23rd, Continues through 
Sat., July 26th with Special Savings 
in Home Furnishings 

MAJOR APPLIANCES 


30" Viking Range 


629 


95 


£eH-cleaning modwl with digital clock, rotis- 
sene. V ultra-high speed elements and a 
black glass oven door White Full warranty 
Model DS833PRW 
1 only. 


30" Viking Range 

499 95 

SeW-cleaning model with digital clock, oven 
door window White Has a lull warranty 
Model S937W 

1 only. 

Gourmet 300 Moffat Range 

799 88 

Now. Dented left side Features an oven door 
window with eye-level broiler White Full 
warranty Model MSS4058W 
t on(y. 

30” Viking Range 

449 95 

Damaged Self-cleaning range with 2 ultra 
high speed elements, digital clock, black 
glass oven door. Full warranty Almond 
color Model DS835PT 
1 only 


30" Viking Range 

599 95 

Self-cleaning range with 4 elements (2 
ultra-high speed), digital clock, rotissene. full 
black glass door panel. Full warranty Model 
DS938PRT 
1 only. 


G.E. Concept II Fridge 

699 97 

Damaged. 2-door model with cantilever 
shelves. 3 crispers. butter conditioner. Ap¬ 
prox. 17 cu ft capacity Full warranty. 

Harvest gold color. 

1 only. 

Viking Refrigerator 

599 95 

Left hand door model with 3 crispers. cantile¬ 
ver shelves. Frost free model in white Full 
warranty Model DR816FW 

1 only. 

Moffat Refrigerator 

H 559 97 

Left hand door model Almond color Full 
warranty. Model MFA679T. 

1 only. 

13 cu. ft. Moffat Fridge 

479 97 

Right hand door model with twin crispers. 

meatkeoper Has a full warranty 

Viking Automatic Washer 

419 97 

Apartment-si/o washer in white only Full 
warranty Model EW224RW. 

1 only. 

Viking Automatic Dryer 

249 97 

One only m white Features a full warranty 
Model DE124RW 

Viking Dishwasher 

97 


319 


Almond color dishwasher with a full war¬ 
ranty Model F813T 
1 only. 


"COTTAGE SPECIALS" 

Now is the time to pick up those extra furnishings for the 
weekend cottage, all on special at Eaton’s Warehouse! 

Siesta 2-Pce. Sleeping Unit 


Bedchesterfield 

259 88 

Double bed si/e chesterfield with foam-filled 
mattress for maximum sleeping comfort 
Choose from assoned upholstered colors 


5-Pce. 
Kitchen Suite 
88 


4/6 Size 


139 


88 


84 


Suitable for cottage or home Arbonte table 
top. approx 30 x40 . extends lo 48 
Chairs have a sturdy metal frame and are 
vinyl upholstered. Assorted colors and fin¬ 
ishes 


Reversible spring-filled mattress with sturdy 
posture box base offers comfort in sleep 
Available in double. 4/6 sue only. 

Selected Bedroom Pieces 

All pieces are finished in a rich 
walnut tone and have decorative 
metal pulls. Double dresser with 
mirror, 99.95. 4-Drawer chest 
54.95. 5-Drawer chest. 59.95, 6 
Drawer chest. 64.95, Single 3 
Drawer chest with mirror. 59.95 
Drop front desk/chest, 88.95, Sin 
gle pedestal desk. 69.95. Head 
boards. 3/3, 4/6. Queen size 
34.88 


LIVING ROOM PIECES 


Colonial Chesterfield Suite 

549 95 

2-pce suiie styled with excellence m com¬ 
fort Covered in 100 X* nylon in colors of gold 
and green 
2 only 

Modem Sectional 
oo 


649 


Styled by Sklar/Peplar High back design 
upholstered in gold colored 100% Acrylic 
pile 

1 only 

Biltmore Sofa 

88 


3-Pce. Grouping 

1288°° 

Attractive Lawson style sofa, 
lovcseat and chair all have 
reversible seat and back cushions. 
Decorative flower print with 
quilting on one side. 

5-Pce. 
Sectional 
oo 


199 


995 


Sofa is upholstered m brown and gold tones 
This sofa would make a great living or family 
unit addition 

1 only 


High back modular sectional 
comes in five individual pieces 
Upholstered in a rich colored 
burgundy polyester and cotton 
fabric 


Look for Many Non-Advertised Specials 
Throughout Eaton's Warehouse Store 

PERSONAL SHOPPING ONLY 
DELIVERY EXTRA 

EATON'S 


CANADA 


Oil offer 4 more attractive’ 


OTTAWA (CP) — Prime Minis¬ 
ter Trudeau will present a new, 
“more attractive’' oil-pricing 
package to Alberta Premier Peter 
Lougheed today when they begin 
crucial face-to-face negotiations 
at the prime minister’s secluded 
Harrington Lake retreat. 

A spokesman for Trudeau said 
Wednesday the new proposal, not 
yet handed to Lougheed, would im¬ 
prove on four previous offers from 
the Liberal government that both 


sides conceded left them far 
apart. 

Lougheed arrived here Tues¬ 
day night and spent the day pre¬ 
paring for the key round of bar¬ 
gaining that would determine the 
rate at which oil and natural gas 
prices increase across the coun¬ 
try. 

Last-minute consultations with 
Saskatchewan Premier Allan Bla- 
kency, following an earlier meet¬ 


ing with the B.C. cabinet, pro¬ 
duced a united Western stand on 
the need for significant and rapid 
increases in domestic oil prices 
toward world levels. 

Trudeau also spent the day bon¬ 
ing up for the talks which he wants 
held in ai relaxed setting. Conse¬ 
quently the pair are to meet alone 
for a morning session at the prime 
minister's summer residence in 
the nearby Gatineau Hills. An 


afternoon meeting is set for the 
official Sussex Drive residence 
Trudeau hinted last week be 
would offer more money to Alber¬ 
ta from the billions of dollars in 
higher petroleum revenues—a 
windfall resulting from the inevit¬ 
able climb in world energy prices. 
But he also rejected any idea of 
offering tradeoffs in-return for 
speedy agreement on constitution 
al reform from the resource rich 
West. 


Aviation disaster 
waiting to happen 


QUEBEC (CP) — All in¬ 
gredients now exist for ah 
aviation disaster over Mon¬ 
treal, air traffic controller 
Paul Bibeau told a federal 
inquiry into air safety Wed¬ 
nesday, recommending im¬ 
mediate corrective mea¬ 
sures. 

Bibeau, head of the Mon¬ 
treal safety committee of 
the Canadian Air Traffic 
Control Association, said 
red tape, administrative, 
stupidity, chronic person-' 
nel shortages and obsolete 
radar equipment could 
lead to “a catastrophe.” 

“And if it's not in Mon¬ 
treal, it will take place else¬ 
where," Bibeau told the 
commission, headed by 
Charles Dubin of the On¬ 
tario Court of Appeal. 

In his brief to the hear¬ 
ing, Bibeau concluded that 
all matters concerning 
aviation should be taken 
away from Transport Can¬ 
ada and transferred to a 


separate, independent gov¬ 
ernment agency. 

“Montreal controllers 
remind you of the urgency 
of the situation, the deplor¬ 
able state of air safety in 
Montreal and the need to 
rapidly provide corrective 
measures." 

Bibeau listed many in¬ 
stances in Montreal where 
problems had been detect¬ 
ed and little or no correc¬ 
tion undertaken. 


In a separate brief, Serge 
Dorion, a Quebec City air 
traffic controller, com¬ 
plained of countless break¬ 
downs of radio and radar 
equipment installed 25 
years ago. 

Faced with periodic 
breakdowns in the control 
centre's radar system, con¬ 
trollers recommended in 
1976 that procedures be es¬ 
tablished for operating 
when the radar fails. 


Dilapidated barn 
a downright steal 

OTTAWA (Clj) — Some people will steal any¬ 
thing. Ask Greg Weston. 

Two weeks ago, he and a partner were proud 
owners of a 130-year old farmhouse and a slightly 
dilapidated, 15-by-9-metre barn 

Today, they still have the farmhouse but the 
bam has disappeared. 

All that was left when they inspected the site 
this week was a pile of manure, four upright 
supports and some suspicious truck tracks. 

Weston, a reporter at the Ottawa Citizen, fi¬ 
gured the timber from the barn could have been sold 
for $15,000. 

“Fortunately, the house is a little more difficult 
to move,” he says. "The walls are 32-inch thick 
stone.” 


Jobless MAs ‘exception’ 


OTTAWA (CP) — That 
deflated young adult who 
spent several ambitious 
years in university to get a 
master degree only to land 
on the unemployment rolls 
or behind the wheel of a cab 
was an exception, not a 


rule, contrary to popular 
wisdom. 

That, in so many words, 
was the message Montreal 
economist Jean-Michel 
Cousineau took Wednesday 
to the seven-member all- 
party Commons committee 


on employment opportuni¬ 
ties in the 1980s. 

He said the extent of un¬ 
employment among uni¬ 
versity graduates had been 
and remained highly exag¬ 
gerated and the common 
belief that the country was 


$cnn grant 

VUV HOMES BUILT PRIOR TO 1961 


You now have $500 towards your bill lor insulating your 
home if your home was built prior to 1961 The Canadian 
I Home Insulation Program (Chip) offers all home owners 
100% of materials up to $350 and 33% of labour up to 
$150. If you quality why wait! 


Phone lor in In-the-Home Islimilt Without Obligition 

Weathergard 
^—* Shop 652-4411 




CORRECTION 

Four Seasons Travel advertisement of July 
19 Times and July 20 Colonist should have 
read Economy $1.999, First Class $2,999. 

We apologize tor any inconvenience this may 
have caused our customers. 


FOUR SEASONS TRAVEL 

1214 Broad St. 384-7108 


Celebrate 

Saskatchewan with 
Pacific Western Airli 
Homecoming Discounts 


Celebrate 
Saskatchewan this 
year. 

Come to a party! Saskatchewan 
is celebrating ... celebrating 75 
years as a province. Every village, 
town and city is preparing (or 
homecomings, family and school 
reunions, rodeos, exhibitions, 
sports days and community 
festivals. 

Make this the year to 
visit family or make 
new friends in 
Saskatchewan. 

This year make Saskatchewan 
home. Visit our friendly people, 
experience our clean air. wide 
open spaces, blue skies and 
sensalional sunsets. If you like 
sporling events, cultural activities, 
tun and relaxation. Saskatchewan 
has it. Saskatchewan .has 
something ior everyone 

It’s so easy to afford a 
visit with Pacific 
Western Airlines' 
Homecoming 
Discounts. 

Look lor Pacific Western Airlines' 
Homecoming Discoint coupons m 
your paper, or check with your travel 
agent or an line ticket office 
Just present your Homecoming 
Discount coupon to your travel 
agent or airline ticket ottice and 
you re eligible lor a discount On your 
Parjfic Western Amines tare home to 
Saskatchewan Tins Summer 
Celebrate Saskatr he wan with 
Par itic Western Anlines 



VIL, I UHIA 


Celebrate 
Saskatchewan with 
S.T.C. 

Book one of the Saskatchewan 
Transportation Company's many 
Tour Saskatchewan packages 
$49 00 buys SASK PASS, a seven 
day unlimited Saskatchewan 
travel package tor motor coach 
travel yiywhere S T C travels. 



Check out S.T.C.S PICK YOUR 
CITY. REGINA CITY or the 
NORTH SASKATCHEWAN 
packages. Contact your travel 
agent. Pacific Western Airlines 
ticket office or the Saskatchewan 
Transportation Company on how 
you can Celebrate Saskatchewan 
with S T.C. 

Make your 
arrangements soon! 

You'll want to enioy the sunshine 
and the festivities that 
Saskatchewan has to ofter in 
1980. For more intormation write: 

Sask Travel 

Saskatchewan Tounsm and 
Renewable Ftesources 
3211 Albert Street 

Regina. Saskatchewan * 

S4S 5W6 


11 


Saskatchewan Reg Gross 

Tourism sod Min, ster 

Renewable Resource* 


brimming with highly-cdu 
cated persons with no job 
opportunities was a myth. 

"A university diploma is 
still the best guarantee for 
a job," he said. 

Cousineau, an industrial 
delations professor at the 
University of Montreal and 
former member of the Eco¬ 
nomic Council of Canada, 
was the last witness the 
committee had called to 
Parliament Hill before it 
breaks for the summer. 

A study he prepared for 
the Quebec government's 
Coujncil of Universities 
found that virtually all 
graduates in the province 
had jobs within three years 
after they leave university. 
Only 21 per cent of them 
were in jobs unreleated to 
their education. 

His findings basically 
conform lo a recent study 
by Statistics Canada in ail 
provinces but Quebec 
which said about one-quar¬ 
ter of college and univer¬ 
sity graduates faced tern 
porary unemployment 
immediately after gradua 
tion, but that most even¬ 
tually found jobs related to 
their education and were 
satisfied with their work 
and their wages. •*- 


Alberta’s 
beer run 
drying up 

EDMONTON (CP) - 
Strikes and lockouts re 
duced beer production in 
Alberta to a trickle Wed¬ 
nesday—16,000 gallons a 
day from .Uncle Ben s 
Brewery in Red Deer, the 
only independent brewer in 
the province. 

Alberta’s major 
brewers—Carling O'Keefe. 
Labatt's, Molson and Sicks' 
Lethbridge—locked their 
doors at midnight Tuesday 
night when they were un¬ 
able to reach a contract 
agreement with their work 
ers. 

The lockout was the 
brewer's response to strike 
action earlier this month by 
workers at Labatt's in Ed 
monton and Alberta 
Brewers Agents employees 
in Edmonton and Calgary, 
it signalled Alberta's third 
consecutive summer beer 
drought. 

Things weren't much 
better for drinkers who 
prefer something stronger 
than beer. Workers at Al¬ 
berta liquor control board 
warehouses in Calgary and 
Edmonton are off the job 
despite government anti- 
strike legislation and sup 
plies at board stores arc 
being depleted 


Eight million 
acres burned 

OTTAWA (UPCI - The 
Canadian Forestry Sertiee 
said Wednesday that 2. MX. 
forest fires burned across 
Canada through ibe monili 
of June, bringing the sea 
soaal total to i Ml 

A total 2.509.0(2 acres 
were lost during June 
bringing (be seasonal total 
lo Ibe end of thal monili al 

a.dkl /M, aercs - 































THE ISLAND * 

Section Two/Thursday, July 24, 1980/Page 11 



Great U.S. warship presents striking picture while getting underway 


—U.S. Naw photos 

This incredible shot was taken from porthole as anchor was hitting water 


But don’t mention Vancouver Sea Festival 

Fond memories for Islanders, U.S. crew 


By RAY KERR 
Island Editor 

There are about 900 crewmen on a U.S. warship 
who must be wondering if they should forget about 
the Vancouver Sea Festival 

For good. 

But the crew of the giant USS Belleau Wood will 
also remember Victoria and Vancouver Island with 
fondness. 

Even though that fondness was born through ne¬ 
cessity. 

It actually all began last year when the 820-foot am¬ 
phibious assault ship, then less than a year old, was 
supposed to enhance the Vancouver Sea Festival. 

But due to a strike, there was no room to anchor 
and the aircraft carrier-like ship wound up in Seattle 
instead. 

This year a similar situation occurred, although no 
one really knew why there was no Vancouver anchor¬ 
age for the Belleau Wood and the rest of her amphibi¬ 
ous assault task force. 

“IT WAS PROBABLY ANOTHER strike,” 
quipped photo lab's assistant chief Richard Kerns as he 
led me around the cavernous warship sitting in the 
Royal Road Anchorage about a mile offshore. 

In any event, the big warship and the rest of the 
smaller ships in her task force arrived off Victoria 
waterfront Wednesday but while the smaller ships had 
no trouble getting in, the Belleau Wood balked, 
eventually being forced to sit in the Royal Roads An¬ 
chorage. 

So what to do now about the showpiece of the task 
force? 

Organized sightseeing tours by the public were out 
of the question because of the logistic problems but a 
haphazard yet well-functioning “taxi" service was 
organized by using two of the ship's smaller, 20- 
metre landing craft. 

THE LIBERTY BOATS RAN day and night during 
the five-day Vancouver Island stay and ferried many 
an Islander to the ship to marvel at one of the newest 
and most modern warships in the world. 

At the same time hundreds of crewmen were 
going asfiore, making friends and after staying 
with them for a night or two, bringing them back to 
show them the vertical-takeoff Harrier jet fighters, the 
largest helicopters in the world and the expansive 
flight deck of the 40,000-ton warship. 

How did the crewmen take to Victoria? 

In general, after interviewing scores packed in 
the landing craft on the way to the Bealleau Wood, 
they loved every minute of it. « 

- And lc ~.‘*ians and other Vancouver Islanders 

loved them back. 

A DUNCAN COUPLE WENT TO Victoria on spec 
Sunday and after getting on the ship, was told oh the 
quarterdeck someone would have to volunteer to take 
charge of the family before the couple and the two chil¬ 
dren would be allowed to tour the ship. 

The ship's assistant chaplain took this job and 
at the end of the day, found liim&lf driven to Duncan 
to enjoy the family's hospitality. 

The husband told me he would get them both up at 3 
a m. Monday morning so he could drive the crewman 
back to Victoria's Inner Harbor where he could pick 
up the final liberty boat to his ship at 5 a m. 

Another crewman spent two days with a Nanaimo 
family and yet another made friends with visitors 
from Port Albemi. 

Kerns also told me he loved Victoria but coming 
from San Diego, found the prices "very high.” 

WHEN REMINDED THAT MANY OF us go to San 
Diego and find prices of everything there "very high." 
especially when taking into account the neariy-20-per- 
cent premium on the U.S. dollar, he admitted it might 
have been because he just didn't have all that much 
money with him. 

What Kerns had, however, was encyclopedic 
knowledge of his beautiful ship, which really could be 
compared to a floating hotel which specializes in 
taking on and discharging passengers 

Passengers in this case would be U.S. marines and 
the Belleau Wood could carry a full battalion of 
marines, or 1.DM men. - ,, 

And this huge mass of men could be unloaded on a 
beach in between three and 3 V* hours 

The ship, named after a famous First World War 
battle spot in France, has so many functions and in 
novations it makes one s head spin 

HMt EXAMPLE. THE MG SHIP S well deck Was 
dry during the five days here and "Uai" t rail wire 


landing in a normal way, thus taking quite a batter¬ 
ing. 

But this is really not normal, not on this ship. 

The landing craft would customarily be loaded 
with troops, vehicles and supplies while the well deck 
would be dry, and then the well deck would be lowered 
by using the ballast technique and it would become 
a small harbor, with the landing craft smoothly 
sailing away. 

They would come back the same way and at (he 
end of the operation, water used for ballast would be 
let out, the well deck would be dry once more and the 
ship would head elsewhere for another operation. 

And to ensure she gets there quickly, the ships has 
been fited with two boilers, which at the moment 
are reported to be the "largest marine boilers in the 
world." 

THE TWO GENERATE 70,000 shaft horsepower 


By DONNA REIMER 

Colonist correspondent 

Nanaimo officials were shaking their heads 
Wednesday over the recent string of river drown- 
ings in the Nanaimo region. 

Robert Dean Campbell, 24, of Nanaimo's 
Prct-.rttot) Island, waw identified Wednesday as 
the third river victim in less thart two WWk.v 

Ian Hetherington, Nanaimo Emergency Pro¬ 
gram co-ordinator, told the Colonist that he did 
not know what could be done to prevent drown- 
ings such as the ones which claimed two lives on 
the Nanaimo River and one on the Little Quali- 
cum. 

The two drownings on the Nanaimo River 
occurred at the same spot, the White Rapids. 

“It’s an absolute tragedy when it happens for 
the second time,” Hetherington said. 


and drive the gargantuan warhship, according to 
Kerns, at "more than 20 knots." 

Actually, I was told elsewhere that the ship will do 
well over 24 knots if necessary, which is closer to 45 
kilometres an hour than it is to 40 kmh. 

The ship generates so much power that it could 
provide electricity and air conditioning for a small 
city of 5,000 people. 

But its hospital, for obvious reasons, could support 
a'much larger city. 

The hospital has more than 300 beds, four operat¬ 
ing rooms, four x-ray machines, a fully-equipped la¬ 
boratory,' a burn unit as well as full dental ser¬ 
vices. 

The ship carries plenty of fresh water, of course, 
but in case more is needed, it can make 140,000 gallons 
of f resh water daily with its two evaporators, using salt 
water. 


Eric Erickson, 18, of 435 Wharton in Nanai¬ 
mo, drowned July 8 when he was swept into the 
rapids. 

Only four days later Roderick Michael Krei- 
tewolf, 24, of Coquitlam, drowned after being 
swept over the middle section of the Little 
'-tja+icum Kails some 45-kilometres north of 
Nanaimo. 

Hetherington said that someone had gone to 
the trouble of stringing a rope across the Nanai¬ 
mo River above the rapids after the July 8 
tragedy. 

Hetherington added that Campbell ap¬ 
parently had grabbed the rope but was unable to 
hang on. 

The NEP co-ordinator estimated the speed of 
the water at that point, where the river narrows 
into a rocky channel, at 25 to 30 knots. 


THE KITCHEN IS SPOTLESS and its huge ovens 
can prepare hundreds of beef roasts at once. 

And the photo lab section is so modem and well 
equipped that an average photographer would prob¬ 
ably turn so green with envy he’d never get back to 
his proper color. 

Now the Belleau Wood is gone but the many friends 
she made on the Island will be hoping she'll be back, 
maybe for some Victoria or Nanaimo celebrations. 

The U.S. visitors will be remembered for their 
helpfulness around the ship and their friendliness 
wherever they showed up. 

The ship's fishermen will be remembered for 
really cleaning up during the five-day stay, admitting 
on Sunday that “we've only had such good fishing once 
before, when we were in Mexico." 

And most of the ship's young men will be remem¬ 
bered for this priceless summation of their Vancouver 
Island stay: 

“Vancouver Island women arc really friendly.” 


“It would be impossible to hang on there for 
any length of time.” 

Hetherington added that he had told his 
rescue workers not to go into the swifter parts of 
the river during the July 8 search but by Monday, 
the river had dropped a couple of feet and 
searchers were. ab|g to go in by using safety 
lines. 

The NEP head said he was afraid that even 
fencing dangerous spots such as the White 
Rapids would not keep some people out. 

He cited cases in the Nanaimo area where 
people had torn down fences blocking old mine 
entrances to explore the unsafe tunnels. 

Inquiries to be held into the deaths might 
bring some recommendations which would help 
solve this dilemma. 

Meanwhile also on Wednesday, Hetherington 
and RCMP combined forces in a search for an 
84-year-old man who went missing Tuesday from 
a senior citizen outing on Newcastle Island in 
Nanaimo Harbor. 

An RCMP helicopter from Victoria located 
the missing man early Wednesday morning after 
he had spent the night outside. 

It was reported that he was in “good shape” 
when found. . 

In another incident Wednesday, one elderly 
woman believed from the U.S. was killed and 
three other persons were injured in an accident 
involving a car and a camper truck Just south of 
Mill Bay on the Trans-Canada Highway. 

The most seriously injured was an unidenti¬ 
fied woman from the U.S., who was reported to be 
in “serious condition" at Cowicban District Hos¬ 
pital 

The driver and his wife in the camper truck. 
Mr andVMrs Raymond McKee of Fruit vale. 
B.C., were both treated at the hospital and 
later released 


Drinks make headway 


NANAIMO — This city could be following the 
lead of Victoria and Vancouver, by allowing beer at 
sporting events. 

The Nanaimo Region Board Tuesday night 
voted to go along with the proposal that beer be sold 
at events being held at the Beban Park Frank Crane 
Arena. 

The idea ran into some opposition, but directors 
voted 21-12 on a weighted ballot to allow the beer 
sales. 

The board was told that the idea of beer sales 
was first proposed by the Western I-acrosse Asso 
elation, but that the Beban Park Recreation Com 
mission had recommended that the region itself sell 
the beer 

i-Hilllers Krnagfon director Joseph Pul 
I the idea say ing that "burr and spurts 

i't mis " 


Ray Brnokbank. chairman of the region's parks 
and recreation committee, said that there did not 
appear to be any serious problems with beer sales at 
sporting events in Victoria and Vancouver and that 
Beban Park manager John Furlong thought that the 
sales should be allowed on a trial basis. 

Only regional directors from Nanaimo area, 
who participate in the Beban Park tax bill, were 
allowed to vote on the issue. 

The vote split 8-4 among the directors but 
carried by a large margin using the weighted vote 
method, which distributes votes based on popula 
tion 

The directors of the northern area of the region 
said they wupld raise the question of beer sales with 
tile Distriel m Arena Commission as well 

In other Beban Park news, directors agreed to a 
test program for repairs to Beban Paik s dr 
u-riorating roof 


Controversial traffic bid dies quietly 


NANAIMO — The demise of the contro¬ 
versial north-south arterial was a much less 
painful process than the attempt to give it 
life. 

About 30 people attended a city public 
hearing to consider the council’s intent to 
erase the north-south road from the commu¬ 
nity plan. 

Only two members of the public gave 


briefs, and only one, Alf Flett, spoke in 
favor of retaining even a part of the arterial. 

The turnout was a sharp contrast to the 
hundreds who showed up to protest the arterial 
proposal at a series of public meetings earlier 
this year. 

The council later gave approval to the 
bylaw removing the arterial from the commu¬ 
nity plan. 


The council cited the city traffic study, 
which is underway, and the highways min¬ 
istry’s study of a proposed city bypass as fac¬ 
tors in its decision to scrub the arterial. 

Several people at the meeting asked if 
there would be a chance for input on future 
traffic decisions, and were promised that the 
city, at least, would be seeking public opinion 
before making any major decisions. 


Officials baffled by drownings 






























I 


20 THE COLONIST, Thursday July 24, 1980 


SPORTS 


Exhibition Park racing 


VANCOUVEB-Results 
of Wednesday night thor¬ 
oughbred racing at Exhibi¬ 
tion Park and entries for 
today: 

Flnt — tzm. ,‘/> turlonoi 
Stock Operator (Loscth) 15 107 604 00 
Bunk And Buck (Creighton) 4.202.90 
Northern Ere (Hoverson) 2 80 

Time: 1:201-5 

Prince Of Tover. Bluenose. Alder 
Jet. B.C. Weed. Delta Dynamo, Run'n 
Renegade, Green Timber also ran. 

Second—$2400, A'-'j furlongs 
Charting (Rvcrott) 5.203.502.70 

Rumbler (Owen) 3.703.00 

My Bov Charlie (Bodnard) 4.00 

Time. 1:21 

Quinella: $14.20. Daily Double 
$71 50 

Tiger Darren. Easter Bud, Saanich 
Mist. Bonnie Premier. Minor Detail. 
New Balance, Heritage Day also ran. 

Third — 12,400.4V, furlongs - 

Gold Bar (Mono; I 5.603.002.60 

Rovaltlna (Loseth) 4.303.00 

Hemlock Valiev (Creighton) 3.10 
Time: 1:21 

Lady Be Prompt. Shady Perch. 
Token Jenny. Northern Delight, Easy 
Niki. Stow Dancer. Rocking Horse D 
also ran. 

Quinella: $17.20 

Fourth — $2,600,4Vi furlongs 

ChervsCapri (Crton) 14.105.404.10 
Do Attend (Rycroft) 5.205.60 

Tracy's Tenuity (Patzpr) 7.40 

Time: 1:204-5 

Low Nickers. Proserpine, Favorite 
Star, Easter Gem, Lady Occo. Lang 
lev's Sanya. Pass The Wire also ran. 
Exactor: $65 70 

Fifth 13,200. claiming, 4< i furlongs 

Phoenix Grove-( Arnold) 4.303.202.70 
Northern Faith (Frazier) 7.604.90 

Peace In Mideast (Loseth) 4.80 

Time 1:193 5 Quinella $22.10 
Lorenzo, Tobefast, Sipapu, Pop's A 
Cop. Gu mmol ion. Turn Of The Tide, 
Around Thrpe Turns also ran. 

Sixth—$2,780,4't furlongs 
Sherrys Xtra Star (Jnsn) 7.703.402.80 
winzealot (Loseth) 2.802.60 

Charily (Owen) • 3.90 

Time: 1:20 Exactor: $16.70 
Remy’s Magic, Neuka, Decker Lake 
Miss. Button Hooker, Surely Shirlev 
alsoran. „ 

Seventh — $4,880,4’ T furlongs 
Ja Aglonette (Mena) 8.604.602.90 
Whispering Sal (Hoverson) 5.803.50 
SassMe Back (Loseth) 2.70 

Time: 1:192-5 Quinella: $24.80 
Command Of Time, Mag Talk, 
Cindy's Back, Burning Drum, Boss's 
Command also ran. 

E ighth —15,280,4Vi furlongs 

Charlescrest (Hoverson) 11.905.703 80 
Beat Fast (Creighton) 4.503.80 

Never Charge's Jr. (Carrasco) 3.50 
Time: 1:184-5 Exactor: 147.10 
Wily Waters, Park Dancer, Sinful 
Duke, Leavin', Thel Jay also ran. 


Fourth —14,1 
2 year otdi, 4’i furlongs 
Serene Lady Be (Demorest) IIS 
Salt Treaty (Krasner) 120 
Rifle Bird 115 
Shambre (Rvcrott) 120 
Gray Ferine (Frazier) 120 
Blushing Minstrel (Williams) 115 
RagusaMagic (Loseth) 115 
Blue Angel’s Image (Gold) 115 
Tranquility's Dream (Mena) 115 

Fifth —12,600, claiming, 3 year olds 
and up, 4Vi furlongs 

Artie Saber (Melanson) 119 
Maior Return (Owen) 114 
Fielder Frank (Mena) 122 
It's Impossible (Krasner) 119 
Solid Rhythm (Demorest) 119 
Cedar Orbit (Johnson) 119 
Grey North (Creighton) 119 
My Son Eclipse (Frazier) 119 
western Ben (Williams) 119 
Hoodlum (Hoverson) 122 
Also eligible 

Ruken's Rookie (Arnold) 122 
Royal Lord (Carrasco) 119 
Gallant Dave (Krasner) 119 
EIky Jr. (Hoverson) 119 

Sixth —13480, claiming, 3 year olds, 
1114 miles 

Jolly Guv (Johnson) 114 
Korvlk (Creighton) 112 
Win a Dream (Wilkinson) 113 
High Hawk (Loseth) 111 
Courageous Clem (Williams) 1)3 
Lucky Haze (Hoverson) 112 
Jennifer D. (Krasner) 110 

Seventh — 13,380, allowance, 3 year 
olds and up, 4Vi furlongs 

First Attempt (Melanson) 117 
Ticket Count (Rycroft) 114 
Run the Tide (Johnson) 117 
Nlrod (Munoz) 117 
Jo Jo's Mac (Krasner) 116 
Dawn Duster (Arnold) 117 
Balsam Leaf (Williams) 117 
Zac Zac(Patzer) 107 
Northern Dandy (Loseth) 113 
Also eligible 

Captain Courage (Hoverson) 117 

Eighth — $4,708, claiming, 3 year 
olds and up, 4Vi furlongs 

Mick a Rooney (Williams) 116 
Copper Castle (Johnson) 116 


O'Gorman (Creighton) 122 
Paladin (Rycroft) IIS 
CoaltownGhost (Krasner) 114 
Saucy Verdict (Hoverson) 114 
Better Business (Demorest) 118 
Buddy Lea (Carter) 114 
B. Don B. (Mena) 114 

Ninth — 11400, allowance, 3 year 


Run Reno Run (Creighton) 117 
Danny's Honev (Carrasco) 120 
Stav'n Step 110 
MIssAffalr (Mena) 113 
Aunita Leswick (Williams) 112 
Cinder's Shadow (Rycroft) 114 
DelaSail (Johnson) DO 
Boundary Girl (Hoverson) 117 
Pallca (Loseth) 114 
Sweet Skeet (Krasner) 114 

Tenth —13.700, claiming, 3 year o 
and up, 1'4 miles 
One Night Stand 111 
Energy Ace (Hoverson) 115 
Shipping Money (Rycroft) 116 
Pet Theory (Demorest) 112 
Talk On (Wilkinson) 113 
Spritz (Mena) 113 
Little Mt. Lehman (Melanson) 113 
Sweet Ribs (Loseth) 113 
Great Shanty (Williams) 113 
Reformed (Krasner) 113 


Oak Bay trio 
wins city title 

John Green, Pat Colbert 
and Doreen Green of Oak 
Bay have emerged victori¬ 
ous from a field of 36 teams 
to capture the Wilf Sadler 
Memorial Trophy and the 
city mixed triples lawn 
bowling title. 

Runners-up were Percy 
Hawes, Doug Day and Mae 
Shepheard of Gordon 
Head. 


Weslock builds lead- 
in senior title chase 

SASKATOON — Veteran Nick Weslock of 
Oakville, Ont., carded a three-under-par 69 
Wednesday to take a three-stroke lead in the 
Canadian seniors golf championship. 

In second place with a par 72 was Len Brayton of 
Calgary who led Alberta into a one-stroke lead over 
Ontario in the team championship race. 

Five golfers, Curt Christophe of Dorion, Que¬ 
bec, Vem Mohs of Saskatoon, Archie MacDiarmid 
of Moose Jaw, Walt South of Regina and Eugene 
Mealey of St. John, N.B. shared third place with 
74s. 

British Columbia, led by Bruce Pelmore of 
Victoria's Royal Colwood Club, was in fifth place at 
237 going into today’s final round of the team 
competition. Pelmore fired a 77. Jack McGill of 
Vancouver and Percy Barradoll of Mission had 80s 
while Herb Fritz of Coquitlam carded an 85. Only the 
best three scores are used for the team total. 

Alberta compiled a 228 total, Ontario 229, New 
Brunswick 231 and Quebec 232. Manitoba followed 
B.C. at 240, Saskatchewan had 242, Nova Scotia 246, 
Prince Edward Island 252 and Newfoundland 279. 


Olympic Games results 


MOSCOW — Results of 
finals Wednesday in the 
Olympic Games: 

SHOOTING 

Three-position small bore rifle: 1. 
Viktor Vlaiov. Soviet Union, (prone 
position 390, standing position 378, 
kneeling position 397), 1,173 (World 
record, previous record 1,172, Nonka 
Matova, Bulgaria, 1976), 2. Bernd 
Hartstein. E Germany. (399.374,393), 
1,166; 3. Sven Johansson. Sweden, 
(398, 379, 388), 1,165; 4. Mauri Roppan 
en, Finland, (397, 379. 388) 1,164 ; 5. 
Alexandr Mitrofanov, Soviet Union, 
(397,378,389). 1,164. 

DIVING 

Men's springboard: 1 Aleksandr 
Portnov, Soviet Union, 905.025 points; 
2. Carlos Giron. Mexico, 892.140; 3. 
Franco Caonotto. Italy, 871.500 ; 4. 
Falk Hoffman, East Germany. 858.510. 

SWIMMING 

Men's lOtmetre butterfly: 1 Par 

Arvidsson, Sweden, 54.92 seconds; 2. 
Roger Pyttel. E. Germany, 54.94; 3. 
David Lopez. Spain, 55.13; 4. Kees 
Vervoorn, Netherlands, 55.25; 5. Ev¬ 
geny Seredln, Soviet Union, 55.35; 6. 
Gary Abraham, Britain. 55.42. 

Women's 180metre backstroke: 1. 
Rica Reinisch, E. Germany, 1:00.86, 
(World record, previous record, 
1:01.49, Reinisch, 1980), 2. Ina Kleber. 
E Germany, 1:02.07 ; 3. Petra Riedel. 
E. Germany, 1:02.64; 4. Carmen Buna- 
ciu, Romania, 1:03.81; 5. Carlne Ver- 


bauwen, Belgium. l:0J.n; 6. Larisa 
Gorchakova. Soviet Union, 1: 03.87 
Women's 200-metre breaststroke: 1. 
Lina Kachushite, Soviet Union, 2:29.54 
(Olympic record, previous record 
2:29.77, Svetlana Varganoya, Soviet 
Union. 1980), 2 Svetlanda Varganova. 
2:29.61; 3. Julia Bogdanova. Soviet 
Union, 2:32.39 ; 4. Susanne Schultz 
Nielson. Denmark, 2:32.75; 5. Irena 
Fleissnerova, Czechoslovakia. 
2:33.23 ; 6. Ute Geweniger, E. Ger¬ 
many, 2:34.34. 

Men's 4x200metre freestyle relay: 

1. Soviet Union (Sergei Kopllakov, 
Vladimir Salnikov, Ivar Stukolkin, An¬ 
drei Krylov), 7:23.50; 2. E. Germany, 
7:28.60 ; 3. Brazil, 7:29.30; 4. Sweden, 
7:30.10; 5. Italy, 7:30.37; 6. Britain, 
7:30.81. 

WRESTLING 
Greco-Roman 

52 kilo class: 1. Vakhtang Blaoidzc, 
Soviet Union; 2. Laios Racz, Hungary; 
3. M laden Mladenov, Bulgaria. 

74-kilo class: 1. Ferenc Kocsis, Hun¬ 
gary; 2. Anatoly Bikov, Soviet Union. 
3. Nlkko Huhtala. Finland. 

lObkilo class: 1. Gheorghi Ralkov, 
Bulgaria; 2. Romsn Blcrla, Poland. 3. 
Vasile Andrei. Romania; 4. Retik Me- 
misevic, Yugoslavia. 

GYMNASTICS 

Women's team competition 1. So¬ 
viet Union, (Yelena Davydova. 
Marlyua Filatova. Nelli Kim, Yelena 
Nalmoushina. Nataliya Shaposhniko- 
va. St el I Zakharova). 394.90 points; 2. 
Romania, 393.50 ; 3. E. Germany, 


OlSS; 4. Czechoslovakia, 388 80 ; 5. 
Hungary. 384.30; 6. Bulgaria. 382.10. 

FENCING ' 

Men's individual toll: 1. yiMlmir 
Smirnov, Soviet Union, (24-161; 2. Pas- 
kal Jolyot, France, (24-17), 3.,Alek 
sandr Romankov, Soviet Union, (22 
15); 4. Sabirzhan Ruzlev, Soviet Union. 
(70-19); 5. Lech Kozielowskl) Poland, 
(15-21). 

WEIGHTLIFTING 
47.5-kilo class: Yanko Rou&ev, Bul¬ 
garia, snatch 147.5 kilos, jerk 195 kilos 
(world record), total 342.5 klips (world 
record); 2. Joachim Klnz, ( E. Ger¬ 
many, 145-190-335 , 3. Mlntcho Pachov, 
Bulgaria. 142.5-182.5-325; 4. Daniel 
Senet, France, 147.5-175-122.5; 5. 
Gunter Ambrass, E. Germany. 140 
480320; 6. Zbigniew Kaczmgrek. Po¬ 
land, 140177.5-317.5. 


Leask wins 

Pat Leask record'll the 
best time Wednesday at the 
City Bicycje Club’s weekly 
time trial at Ogden Tuint 
Leask timed in »t IT 
minutes, 58.(1 seconds, out¬ 
distancing Chris Cooney 
(18:17.4) and Phil Langrish 
(18:20.4). Twenty riders 
competed. 



Entries 


First — $2,600, claiming, maiden 3 
year olds, 4' i furlongs 

Mr. McCarthy (Demorest) 115 
Follow That Car (Melanson) 115 
Lehman Glen (Mena) 115 
JonathanM. (Krasner) 117 
Si lent Ghost (Arnold) 115 
Sudden Fury (Creighton) 115 
Duck L'Orange (Rycroft) 117 
Pass the Gold (Loseth) 112 
Green Pride (Hoverson) 115 
Home Town Hero (Munoz) 115 

Alsoeliaibie 

BothanicChiet(Owen) 110 
Second Out (Williams) 115 

Second — $2,600, claiming, 3 year 
olds and up, 6 ’'j furlongs 
La Belle Lune (Owen) 115 
Little Jand D (Wolski) 120 
Lady Selina 115 
Azullla (Frazier) 120 
Craig's Treasure (Bodnard) 112 
Charm Bracelet (Munoz) 120 
Speck O'Dust (Melanson) 120 
Star Lodge 115 
Sointula (Wilkinson) 120 
Northern Button (Carrasco) 120 

Third — $3,200. claiming, maiden 2 
year olds, 6' i furlongs 
More Talk (Demorest) 115 
ComeonFIgonero (Creighton) 120 
Famous Symbol (Bodnard) 115 
Good Class (Loseth) 115 
Dustmans Glory 115 
Berts Bandit (Melanson) 115 
Windy Shawn (Owen) 115 
Darcy (Frazier) 114 


Advertising 
brings product 
information 


TV* SPACE T Cf 
SWIMMING 
POOL 

POLYMETRIC 


THE SWIMMING POOL OF 
THE 21st CENTURY 



• Totally non-corrosive 

• Outstanding dimensional stability 

• Extraordinary heat insulation 

• Completely non-porous 

• Unaffected by the el