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For the second successive month employment in Ontario's leading industries showed 
increases above the corresponding month last year ( 2 . 8 $) and in comparison with the 
Preceding month (2.5$). These increases represent the largest gains so far recorded 
this year, MANUFACTURING as a whole employed 1.2$ more persons than in 1949 and 2$ more 
than in June, 1950* Employment in the manufacturing of ELECTRICAL APPARATUS showed the 
greatest jump over the year (13$), while PLANT PRODUCTS recorded the largest monthly 
gain (10.9$). Employment in the TEXTILE industry continued to deteriorate - 2.9$ below 
last year and 1 . 7 $ lower than June, 1950 . In the remaining industries, noteworthy jumps 
in employment over the year were recorded in LOGGING ( 11 . 7 $), CONSTRUCTION ( 9 . 0 $), 

MINING (7-5$), and COMMUNICATIONS ( 6 . 5 $). The improvement shown in the overall employ¬ 
ment picture may be attributed chiefly to increased activity in logging, construction 
and the manufacturing of household goods. (Table - l) 

MANUFACTURING employment increased over the month in all zones of the Province except 
in the Upper St. Lawrence where the index remained relatively unchanged. (Table - 2 ) 

UNEMPIOYMENT in the Province currently stands at 4l,664 (Aug. 31, 1950) . This com¬ 
pares with a total of 36 , 1+63 persons last year at this time. (Table - 1+) 


Table 1. Percentage Change in Employment in the Eight 

Leading Industries of Ontario(l) 


Weight^) 

July 1950^ 

July 1950^ 

Industry 

July 19^9 /u 

June 1950 /0 

1. Manufacturing: 

59.9 

+ 1.2 

+ 2.0 

Lumber Products 


+ 1.7 

+ 4.2 

Plant Products 


- 3.5 

+10.9 

Pulp and Paper 


+ 2.8 

+ 2.1 

Textiles 


- 2.9 

- 1.7 

Chemicals 


+ 3.9 

+ 1.5 

Electrical Apparatus 


+13.0 

+ 2.2 

Iron and Steel 


+ 1.6 

+ 1.6 

Non-Ferr. Metal Pdts. 


- 2.7 

+ 0.6 

2. Logging 

1.5 

+11.7 

+ 23.2 

3. Mining 

3.0 

+ 7.5 

+ 1.4 

4. Communications 

2.6 

+ 6.5 

+ 2.6 

5. Transportation 

6.5 

- 0.4 

+ 1.6 

6. Construction 

9.!+ 

+ 9.0 

+ 6.2 

7. Services 

3.7 

+ 1.3 

+ 2.4 

8. Trade 

13 + 

+ 4.2 

+ 0.5 

Eight Industries 

100.0 

00 

• 

CM 

+ 

+ 2.5 


1) Original data reported by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics, Ottawa. 

2) Shows the distribution of employees among the reporting firms of the eight 
leading industries in July, 1950. 




















Ontario Centres with Estimated Populations of 
2,500 and over by Economic Zones 


. 2 - 


1. Metropolitan 

7. St. Clair 

River 

12. Upper St. Lawrence 

*Greater Toronto 

1,021,000 

*Sarnia 

23,500 

^Cornwall 

17,800 

*Brampton 

8,000 

Petrolia 

3,000 

*Brockville 

12,800 

Oakville 

6,200 

Zone Total 

68,000 

*Gananoque 

4,500 

Newmarket 

4,8oo 



Prescott 

3,500 

Aurora 

3,700 



Zone Total 

136,300 

Georgetown 

3,300 

8. Upper Grand River 



Acton 

3,000 

■^Kitchener 

42,200 

13. Ottawa Valley 

Port Credit 

3,000 

*Guelph 

26,600 

^Ottawa 

195,400 

Zone Total 

1,150,000 

*Stratford 

18,800 

Pembroke 

12,900 



Walt 

18,100 

Eastview 

12,100 

2. Burlington 

Waterloo 

11,300 

^Smith's Falls 

8,400 

*Hamilton 

192,100 

Preston 

7,300 

^Renfrew 

7,000 

*Brantford 

37,100 

St. Marys 

4,000 

*Hawkesbury 

6,800 

Dundas 

6,4oo 

Hespeler 

3,700 

Perth 

4,900 

Burlington 

5,600 

Fergus 

3,^00 

*Arnprior 

4,500 

Paris 

5,100 

Pis towel 

3,200 

*Carleton Place 

4,500 

Zone Total 

310,300 

Zone Total 

230,000 

Almonte 

2,800 





Zone Total 

365,000 

3. Niagara 



• V . • 


*St. Catharines 

38,000 

9. Blue Water 

14. Highlands 

*Niagara Falls 

22,000 

*0wen Sound 

17,500 

*North Bay 

18,200 

Welland 

16,000 

*Barrie 

12,800 

Parry Sound 

4,800 

*Port Colborne 

7,800 

*0rillia 

11,900 

*Sturgeon Falls 

4,700 

Port Erie 

7,600 

^Midland 

7,200 

Gravenhurst 

3,700 

Thorold 

6,300 

*Collingwood 

7,100 

Huntsville 

3,200 

Merritton 

Moo 

*Goderich 

4,900 

*Bracebridge 

2,700 

Humberstone 

3,600 

Penetang 

4,500 

Zone Total 

109,000 

Zone Total 

195,000 

Hanover 

3,700 





Orangeville 

3,300 



4 . Lake Erie 

*Walkerton 

3,200 

15. Clay Belt 

*Simcoe 

7,100 

Meaford 

3,100 

Pimmins 

27,400 

Dunnville 

Moo 

Kincardine 

2,800 

Pirkland Lake 

20,000 

Delhi 

2,500 

Wingham 

2,600 

Papuskasing 

4,800 

Zone Total 

61,200 

Clinton 

2,500 

New Liskeard 

Moo 



Zone Total 

260,000 

Cochrane 

3,300 

5. Upper Thames River 



Zone Total 

l4l,4oo 

*London 

92,800 





*St. Thomas 

19,700 

10. Kawartha 

lakes 



*Woodstock 

14,100 

Peterborough 

36,000 

16. Nickel Range 

*Ingersoll 

6,400 

*0shawa 

28,600 

*Sudbury 

U3,700 

Tillsonburg 

5,000 

Pindsay 

9,100 

Copper Cliff 

3,900 

Strathroy 

3,500 

*Cobourg 

7,500 

Zone Total 

115,500 

Aylmer 

3A00 

Whitby 

6,700 



Zone Total 

255,000 

Port Hope 

6,000 





Bowmanville 

4,600 

17. Sault 


6, Border 

Campbellford 

3,200 

*Sault Ste. Marie 

30,700 

Windsor 

120,500 

Zone Total 

215,400 

Zone Total 

60,000 

^Chatham 

21,100 





Peamington 

7,400 





Wallace burg 

7,200 

11. Q,uinte 


18. Lakehead 


Riverside 

7,100 

Pings ton 

32,700 

Port William 

34,200 

Amherstburg 

3,500 

*Belleville 

23,000 

Port Arthur 

30,900 

Tecumseh 

3,300 

*Trenton 

9,600 

Penora 

9,000 

Essex 

2,600 

Picton 

4,000 

Port Frances 

7,700 

Kingsville 

2,500 

*Napanee 

3,600 

Geraldton 

3,100 

Tilbury 

2,500 

Portsmouth 

3,200 

*Sioux Lookout 

2,500 

Zone Total 

285,000 

Zone Total 

170,000 

Zone Total 

165,000 


*Indicates location of offices of the Unemployment Insurance Commission. 




























- 3 - 


Employment and Payrolls and Average Weekly Earnings in the 
Leading Manufacturing Industries of Ontario by Zones 


Employment increased substantially in all zones of the Province in July except 
for the Upper St. Lawrence area where the index remained almost unchanged from the 
previous month. The largest percentage gains were recorded in the Clay Belt, Lake 
Erie and Lakehead areas. Payrolls increased throughout the Province over the month, 
most noticeably in the Lake Erie, Border and Clay Belt zones. Average weekly earnings 
were higher in fifteen regions, led by the Border zone with an increase of $ 2 . 64 . 



Compared with July, 1949 , twelve zones recorded increases in employment, the 
greatest percentage improvement being evident in the Sault, Nickel Range and Kawartha 
Lakes areas. Payrolls were substantially higher in fifteen areas, the largest jump 
occurring in the Kawartha Lakes zone. Average weekly earnings increased over the year 
in all areas except Lake Erie. 


Table 2. Index Numbers of Employment and Payrolls as Reported by Leading Manufacturers 

in Eighteen Economic Areas in Ontario. 

™ (1939 - 100) 








Average 






Jul /50 


Jul/50 

Weekly Wages 

Jul/50 





Jun/50 


Jun/50 

and 

Jun/50 

Zone 

Weight' 1 Date' ^' 

Employment 

+ or - 

Payrolls 

+ or - 

Salaries 

+ or - 





% 

$ 

1 o 

$ 

$ 

^jk. Metropolitan 

34.0 

Jui.i /49 

177.7 


326.2 


44.81 


(Halton, Peel, 


Jun.1/50 

182.9 


350.0 


46.67 


York) 


Jul.l/50 

184,5 

+ 0.9 

357.2 

+ 2.1 

47.23 

+ .56 

2 , Burlington 

13.1 

Jul.l/49 

188.0 


380.0 


47.85 


(Brant., Went., 


Jun.1/50 

185.1 


396.0 


50.63 


Burlington) 


Jul.l/50 

190.2 

+ 2.8 

400.3 

+ 1.1 

49.82 

- .81 

3 . Niagara 

6.7 

Jul.l /49 

187.4 


379 + 


49.73 


(Lincoln. 


Jun.1/50 

180.4 


39 *+ .6 


53.73 


Welland) 


Jul.l/50 

187.5 

+ 3.9 

4 o 8 .7 

+ 3 .6 

53.54 

- .19 

4 . Lake Erie 

0.6 

Jul.l /49 

136.7 


281.8 


38.76 


(llaldimand, 


Jun . 1/50 

116.7 


233.2 


37.15 


Norfolk) 


Jul.l/50 

122.8 

+ 5.2 

254 .4 

+ 9.1 

38.51 

+ 1.36 

, 5 • Upper Thame s 

4.9 

Jul.l /49 

179. it 


337 .9 


41.38 


(Elgin, Midd., 


Jun.1/50 

177.6 


351.2 


43.54 


Oxford) 


Jul.l/50 

181.6 

+ 2.3 

367.3 

+ 4 .6 

44.55 

+1.01 

6 . Border 

8.9 

Jul.l /49 

205.9 

■ 

405.9 


52.24 


(Essex, 


Jun.1/50 

208,3 


424.8 


5 ^- .02 


Kent) 


Jul.l /50 

214 .5 

+ 3.0 

458.9 

+ 8.0 

56.66 

+ 2.64 

7 . St. Clair R . 

1.8 

Jul.l /49 

256.8 


401.3 


53.00 


a. (Lambton) 


Jun.1/50 

251.3 


420.8 


57.05 


• 


Jul.l/50 

257.3 

+ 2.4 

+ 33.6 

+ 3.0 

57.41 

+ .38 


(l) Indicates the distribution of employees among the reporting manufacturing firms of 
the Province as of September, 1949 . 























- 4 - 


Table 2 Cont. 




Jul/50 


jui/50 

Average 
Weekly Wages 

Jul/50 


( 

Date* 2 > 


Jun/50 


Jun/50 

and 

Jun / c 0 

Zone 

Weight' 

Employment 

+ or - 

Payrolls 

+ or - 

Salaries 

± °v.. 





$ 

$ 

lo 

$ 

$ 

8. Upper Grand 

7.9 

Jul.l /49 

156.8 


314.0 


40.44 


(Perth, Water., 
Wellington) 


Jun.1/50 

152.9 


314.8 


41.56 



Jul.l/50 

15^.8 

+ 1.2 

326.2 

+ 3.6 

42.55 

+ .99 

9 . Blue Water 

2.4 

Jul , 1/49 

181.6 


368.2 


35-59 


(Bruce, Duff., 


Jun . 1/50 

173 A 


359.0 


36.42 


Grey, Huron, 
Simcoe) 


Ju. 1 . 1/50 

176.1 

+ 1.6 

371.9 

+ 3.6 

37.15 

+ 

10 . Kawartha 

b .9 

Jul . 1 / 1+9 

187.0 


405.5 


48.30 


(Durham, Ont., 


Jun.I/50 

194.9 

+ 2.4 

459.4 

+ 1.8 

52.42 


Peter., Vic., 
Northumberl' d) 


Jul.l/50 

199.5 

467.7 

52.12 

- .30 


• 







11 . Quinte 

2.6 

Jul . 1/49 

308.5 


614.6 


37.02 

% 

(Front., Hast., 


Jun .1/50 

239.9 


535.5 


41.52 


Lenn. & Add., 
Pr. Edward) 


Jul.l/50 

249.6 

+ 4.0 

564.5 1 

+ 5 > 

42.07 

+ .55 

12 . U. St. Lawr. 

2.0 

Jul. 1/49 

152.3 


310.3 


41.78 


(Dun., Glen., 


Jun.1/50 

152.3 


326.3 


44.36 


Gren., Leeds, 
Stormont) 

1 


Jul.l/50 

152.0 

-* — 

331.9 

+ 1.7 

45.19 

+ '% 

13 . Ottawa V. 

3.5 

Jul. 1/49 

172.3 


309.4 


\ ' 

40.23 


(Carl., Lan., 


Jun.1/50 

157.2 


291.4 


41.53 

+ 1.04 

Pres ., Pen., 
Russell) 


Jul.l/50 

162 .7 

+ 3.5 

309.1 

+ 6.1 

42.57 


lb . Highlands 

0.8 

Jul. 1/49 

185.1 


352.4 


39.68 


(Hal., Muskoka. 


Jun.l /50 

178.8 


341.4 


39.80 

+ i» 

Hip., Parry S.) 


Jul.l /50 

185.3 

+ 3.6 

365.1 

+ 6.9 

4 l .07 

15 . Clay Belt 

1.0 

Jul. 1/49 

165.4 


329.9 


53.17 


(Cochrane, 
Timiskaming) 


Jun .1/50 

158.8 


331.8 


55.71 



Jul.l/50 

170.7 

+ 7.5 

357.2 

+ 7.7 

55.81 

+ .10 

l6. Nickel Range 

1.6 

Jul. 1/49 

168.5 


303.7 


55.35 

, 

(Manit.oulin, 


Jun.1/50 

179.1 


335.2 


57.53 


Sudbury) 


Jul. 1/50 

181.3 

+ 1.2 

342.3 

+ 2.1 

58.07 

+ % 

17 . Sault 

1.4 

Jul. 1/49 

188.6 


359.3 


52 .77 


(Algoma) 


Jun.l /50 

199.1 


381.1 


53.03 




Jul. 1/50 

204.6 

+ 2.8 

398.1 

+ 4.5 

53.88 

+ .85 

18 . Lake he ad 

1.9 

Jul. 1/49 

225.8 


419.0 


52.27 


(Kenora, Rainy 


Jun.I/50 

215.8 


420.6 


5^.90 

+ im 

River, Thunder 

Jul. 1/50 

226.9 

+ 5.1 

452.7 

+ 7.6 

56.20 

Bay) 







* 


ONTARIO 

_ 

100.0 









( 2 ) The latest figures are preliminary; those for the preceding month have been revised 
where necessary, Original data reported by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics, Ottawa. 



































EMPLOYMENT iN THE MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES OF D ONTARIO BY ZONES, IQ49 iQoQ iQ39~ioO 










































































































































































EMPLOYMENT IN THE MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES OF b ONTARIO BY ZONES, IQ4Q-IQSQ IQ3Q--IOO 































































































































































































































Employment and Payrolls Reported Toy 
Leading Mine Operators in Ontario fry Zones 


Employment increased in four of Ontario's mining regions over the month and 
declined in two, while payrolls were higher in three zones. The most favourable 
situation appeared in the Lakehead region where employment increased 1 . 5 $, 
payrolls 11.1 $>; and average weekly earnings jumped $4 .77 . 

Compared with last year at this time, employment, payrolls and earnings are 
at a higher level in all areas except the Border where weekly earnings showed a drop 
of $ 2 . 73 . Employment in the Clay Belt was unchanged from last year at this time. 


Table 3 . Indices of Employment and Payrolls Reported by Leading Ontario Mines 

(1939 - 100) 


Zone 

Date^ 

Employment 

Jul/50 
Jun/50 
+ or - 

Payrolls 

Jul/50 

Jun/50 
+ or - 

Average 
Weekly Wages 
and 

Salaries 

Jul/50 

JUn/50 

+ or - 




* 

$ 

i 

$ 

$ 

. Border 

Jul U/k 9 

100.6 


180.1 


47.81 


(Salt, Natural 

Jun.l/50 

112.5 


196.3 


46.59 


Gas) 

Jul.I/50 

116.4 

+ 3.5 

196.6 

-- 

45.08 

- 1.51 

. Clay Belt 

Jul. 1/49 

77.1 


114.8 


51.80 


(Gold, Silver) 

Jun.l/50 

76.1 


117.0 


53.51 



Jul.1/50 

77.1 

+ 1.3 

118.8 

+ 1-5 

53.58 

+ .07 

. Nickel Range 

Jul.1/49 

108.2 


192.0 


58.95 


(Nickel, Copper, 

Jun.l/50 

128.8 


234.6 


60.55 


Gold, Silver) 

Jul.1/50 

128.5 


232.5 

- 0.9 

60.13 

- .42 

. Sault 

Jul. 1/49 

179.8 


306.3 


55.32 


(Iron Ore) 

Jun.l/50 

202.6 


378.0 


60 .58 



Jul.1/50 

204.4 

+ 0.9 

368.9 

- 2.4 

58.61 

-1.97 

. Lakehead 

Jul. 1/49 

78.1 


126.5 


54.56 


(Gold, Iron 

Jun.l/50 

87.6 


132.0 


50 .77 


Ore) 

Jul.1/50 

88.9 

+ 1.5 

146.6 

+11.1 

55.5 1 * 

•a .77 

. James Bay 

Jul.1/49 

93.1 


l4o .5 


52.50 


(Gold, 

Silver) 

Jun.l/50 

105.2 


161.0 


53 >3 


Jul. 1/50 

103.2 

- 1.9 

158.9 

- 1.3 

53.81 

+ .38 


(l) Reported by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics; latest figures are subject to revision; 
those for the preceding month have been revised where necessary. 

























- 8 - 


Statistics Relating to Unemployment - Aug. 31, 195^ 

- - £j 

The month of August saw an increase of almost 6,400 in the number of 
unfilled vacancies in the Province as a whole. Outstanding increases in 
jobs available were shown in the Lakehead. Metropolitan, Lake Erie and 
Border zones. At the same time, the number of jobless jumped by some 1,150 
persons. The result has been a drop in the ratio of unplaced applicants to 
unfilled vacancies from 2.8 to 1, to 2 to 1. The country-wide rail strike 
which commenced on August 22, largely accounts for the increase in unemployment w , 
in the Province as a whole. ^ 

Unemployment currently stands at 4l,664 persons as compared with 36,463 at 
this time last year. In three areas of the Province - Lake Erie, Clay Belt and 
Lakehead - available jobs exceed applicants, and five other regions show encour¬ 
agingly low ratios. Numerically, unemployment decreased over the month in nine 
zones, while one area, the Nickel Range, registered a three-fold increase. The 
latter jump reflects the numerous lay-offs occasioned by the rail strike. % 


Table b. 


Unfilled Vacancies and Unplaced , . 

Applicants in Ontario by Zones as at Aug. 31, 195° 



I 

II 



I 

II 



Unfilled 

Unplaced 

Ratio of 


Unfilled 

Unplaced 

Ratio of 

Zone ^ 

Vacancies 

Applicants 

II to I 

Zones 

Vacancies 

Applicants 

II to I* 

1. Metro. 

7,90k 

9,216 

1.2 

11. Quinte 

361 

1,887 

5.2 

2. Burling. 

1,089 

5,553 

5.1 

12. U.St.Law. 

79 

1,122 

14.2 

3. Niagara 

419 

2,6o4 

6.2 

13. Ottawa V. 

1,230 

4,151 

3 A 

4. Lake Eri< 

? 159 

126 

0.8 

14. Highlands 

191 

691 

3-6 1 

5. U.Thames 

1,551 

1,830 

1.2 

15. Clay Belt 

770 

721 

0.9 

6. Border 

620 

3,410 

5.5 

16. Nickel R. 

1,242 

2,288 

1.8 

7. St.Clair 

110 

323 

2.9 

17. Sault 

231 

375 

1.6 

8. U .Grand 

807 

l,4o8 

1.7 

18. Lakehead 

2,967 

1,816 

0.6 








..."f 

9. Blue Wat< 

3r 475 

1,297 

2.7 

TOTAL 

20,734 

41,190 

2.0 

10. Kawartha 

529 

2,372 

4.5 

Exec. & Prof. 

434 

474 

1.1 





GR. TOTAL 

21,168 

41,664 

2.0 


• ft 

(1) Figures reported by the various offices of the Unemployment Insurance Commission. 

Owing to the fact that these offices serve areas not entirely coincident with the 
economic zones shown here, some degree of overlapping has resulted. 

(2) These totals include data on industries other than the leading eight, e.g. Agriculture. 
















































APPENDIX - 1 


-y- 


Cheques Cashed in Onta rio by Economic Zones 
(Millions of Dollars) 


- Zones 




Metro- 

Burlington 

Niagara 


Upper Border St. Clair 



politan 

(Brantford- 


Thames (Windsor- 

Date 

ONTARIO 

(Toronto) 

Hamilton) 

(St. Catharines) (London) Chatham) (Sarnia) 

42fei. (Av.) 

1,518 

946 

106 

12 


4l 

72 9 

i9l2_ 








Jan. 

2,907 

1,911 

190 

26 


87 123 23 

Pel. 

2,1*29 

1,632 

189 

27 


77 l4l 22 

(■§Mar, 

2,981 

1,871 

211 

31 


990 156 24 

«^Apr . 

2,993 

1,961* 

213 

32 


98 146 24 

May 

2,907 

1,975 

230 

32 


93 140 25 

June 

2,980 

1,975 

238 

35 


108 154 28 

July 

3,023 

2,107 

208 

33 


98 150 27 

Aug. 

2,662 

1 , 791 * 

191 

29 


90 139 26 

Sept. 

2,872 

1,930 

197 

27 


95 l44 27 

j^^Oct. 

3,327 

2,289 

211 

30 


109 146 27 

^PNov. 

3,705 

2,576 

232 

36 


105 161 28 

Dec . 

3,682 

2,596 

236 

33 


126 168 28 

191*9 (Av.) 

3,039 

2,052 

212 

28 


98 147 26 

i 

( 100 . 0 ) 

( 67 . 5 ) 

( 7 . 0 ) 

( 0 . 9 ) 


(3.2) (1*.8) (0.9) 

1950 








Jan. 

3,105 

2,115 

221 

34 


109 147 24 

Feh. 

2,520 

1,721 

196 

29 


92 138 22 

, Mar. 

3,l*ol* 

2,1*31 

227 

37 


110 161 27 

s 

> 

• 

3,223 

2,24-9 

218 

34 


115 ll*3 25 

May 

3,322 

2,282 

232 

36 


106 154 26 

June 

!*,530 

3,252 

246 

4o 


125 149 27 

July 

3,1*61 

2,344 

242 

32 


132 171 34 



Kawartha 

Zones 

Upper 





Upper Grand (Peter- 

Quinte 

St. Lawr. 

Ottawa V 

. Nickel R. 

Lakehead 


(Kitchener) (borough) (Kingston 

) (Cornwall) 

(Ottawa) 

(Sudbury) 

(Fort William) 

^ '-<Al (AvJ 

18 

10 

9 

mm mm 

278 

8 

9 

I 9 U 9 








Jan. 

37 

19 

16 

mm 

291 

17 

16 

Feh. 

38 

19 

19 

— 

23 k 

19 

15 

Mar. 

38 

22 

19 

mm mm 

483 

21 

17 

Apr. 

1*0 

23 

19 

- - 

395 

22 

17 

May 

42 

24 

19 

mm mm 

286 

23 

20 

June 

43 

25 

23 

- - 

307 

23 

21 

|^July 

39 

26 

21 


272 

23 

20 


36 

23 

18 

■■ mm 

275 

22 

20 

Sept. 

39 

23 

21 

— 

322 

23 

20 

Oct . 

42 

25 

18 


386 

24 

18 

Nov . 

47 

24 

23 

mm m» 

428 

25 

20 

Dec , 

53 

26 

23 

- - 

348 

25 

20 

19l*9 (Av.) 

4l 

23 

20 

- - 

336 

22 

19 


(1.3) 

( 0 . 8 ) 

( 0 . 7 ) 

«• mm 

(n.i) 

( 0 . 8 ) 

( 0 . 6 ) 

W 1.250 








Jan. 

43 

21 

20 

— 

331* 

21 

17 

Feh. 

38 

19 

17 

mm mm 

213 

18 

16 

Mar . 

42 

24 

22 

-- 

284 

21 

18 

Apr. 

^5 

23 

22 

-- 

312 

21 

16 

May 

43 

29 

23 

13 

335 

25 

20 

June 

47 

29 

28 

14 

529 

24 

20 

July 

45 

27 

24 

14 

351 

25 

22 




















1 % 


I 






I*