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Vol.  IX.-N0.  1 


Toronto,  January,  1919 


1919 


lEGAL  for  the  New  Year  presents  features  of  par- 
ticular and  timely  importance. 

The  general  feeling  of  contentment  born  of  a  settled  peace 
will  bring  with  it  untold  opportunities  to  the  retailer  who  is  ready 
to  meet  the  demands  of  changed  conditions. 

Regal  is  ready. 

Regal  Shoes  have  been  nationally  advertised  and  sold. 
Their  success  is  already  a  fact.  Are  you  prepared  to  meet  the 
demand  of  your  customers  for  Regal  Shoes  ? 

Men^s  and  Women^s  Regal  Shoes 
for  Spring,  1919 


REGAL 


SHOES 


Regal  Shoe  Company,  Limited 


472-474  Bathurst  Street 


TORONTO 


Report  of  Canadian  Shoe  Manufacturers^  Convention 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


January,  1919 


PANTHER 


13ANTHER  Soling  is  composed  of 
-■-  fibre  and  rubber  thoroughly  tested 
for  maximum  wearing  qualities.  The 
result  is  a  sole  for  all  footwear  that  is 
greatly  superior  to  leather.  Panther 
Soles  look  like  leather  and  can  be 
worked  m  the  same  manner.  In  ad- 
dition they  wear  longer  than  leather, 
are  waterproof  and  much  more  flexible. 
They  hold  stitching  perfectly  and  do 
not  crack. 


Panther  Sure  Step  Rubber  Heels 
are  another  excellent  product  that 
will  bring  new  business. 


Panther  Rubber 

Company,  Limited 

SHERBROOKE,  QUE. 


i 


TREA  D 

pfi^NTHER  RUBBER  MFQ.  CQ 

J,    3T0UCHT0N,MASSr  - 


January,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


Soles  that  mean 

more  sales  of 
Winter  Footwear 

Weather-proof  soles  that  withstand 
slush  and  snow,  water  and  ice,  are 
the  best  sales  builders  in  Winter 
Footwear. 


'Rinex 

is  your  guarantee  of  such  a  builder  of  sales 
— whether  for  men,  women  or  children. 

Rinex-soled  shoes  insure  waterproofness 
without  bulk,  long  wear  without  thickness 
and  elasticity  that  helps  the  shoes  retain 
the  same  style  and  form  that  marks  the 
light  weight  summer  shoes. 

Many  of  your  customers  will  insist  on 
Rinex-soled  shoes.  Prepare  now  to  meet 
the  demand. 

Rinex  soles  are  made  and  guaranteed 

by 


Distributing  points  at 

Halifax,  St.  John,  Quebec,  Ottawa, 
Belleville,  Toronto,  Hamilton,  Brant- 
ford,"  London,  Kitchener,  North  Bay, 
Fort  William,  Winnipeg,  Brandon, 
Regina,  Saskatoon,  Calgary,  Leth- 
bridge,  Vancouver,  X'ictoria. 


4 


FOOTWEAR    TN  CANADA 


January,  1919 


MINER 

FELTS 

For  all  the 
Family 

Before  making  their  regular  trips  for  all  leather 
lines,  our  representatives  are  making  special  rounds 
for  the  convenience  of  dealers  who  desire  to  see 
early  showings  of  the  above  lines  for  Fall  trade.  If 
you  are,  by  some  mistake,  overlooked,  write  us  at 
once. 


Our  samples  of  Felts,  Hockey  Boots,  Warm  Lined 
Goods,  etc.,  comprise  a  very  complete  range  of  goods  for 
your  regular  Fall  and  Winter  trade. 

These  are  lines  which  are  always  in  demand  as  soon 
as  the  cold  weather  comes.  We  believe  that  no  far-seeing 
retailer  will  overlook  the  importance  of  preparing  early 
for  his  stock. 

Don't  fail  to  let  us  know  your  needs.  We  can  supply 
you. 


The  Miner  Shoe  Company,  Limited 

MONTREAL  OTTAWA  QUEBEC 


1919 

The  New  Year  will  usher  in 
an  era  of  growth  and  pros- 
perity such  as  has  been 
hitherto  unknown. 

The  Footwear  trade  must 
be  ready  to  participate  in  its 
share  of  business  by  carry- 
ing good  normal  stocks  of 
products  in  popular  demand. 
Don't  understock  for  1919. 

We  wish  our  patrons  a  good 
New  Year  and  a  generous 
share  of  future  prosperity. 


Agents  for  the  Celebrated  Miner  Rubber  Footwear 


January,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


You  Can't  Do  It 


You  would  not  try  to  shave  with  an  iron  razor.  You  want  an 
edge  of  keen  steel — the  very  keenest  for  a  good  shave. 

You  can't  make  a  good  shoe  with  a  weak  counter  —  it's  got  to 
stand  up.    You  must  use  the  very  best  for  a  good  job. 

What  steel  is  to  the  razor,  high  grade  Fibre  is  to  the  counter. 

BENNETT 
COUNTERS 

differ  from  other  counters  as  iron  does  from  steel.  They  have  strength 
which  is  increased  by  flexibility. 

Bennett  Counters  are  made  completely  from  high  grade  fibre  man- 
ufactured especially  for  the  counter  —  an  exclusive  feature.  Our 
counter  fibre  is  not  only  made  on  a  strictly  counter  formula,  but  also 
in  a  seperate  plant  where  skill  is  directed  by  science. 

BENNETT  LIMITED 

J^a^ers  of  Shoe  Supplies 
Chambly  Canton,  P.Q.,  Canada 


Sales  Office,  59  St  Henry  St.,  MONTREAL 


Ontario  Office,  225  King  Street,  KITCHENER 


0 


l-OOT\VEAR    IN  CANADA 


January,  1919 


McLaren  &  Dallas 


FALL  and  WINTER  SEASON 

-  1919-1920  = 


Build  for  the  Future  with 

These  Lines 


"SUPERIOR" 
Brand 

Canadian  Make  of  Heavy 
Felts. 

"TRICKETT'S" 
and  "PARKERS" 

English  Slippers  in  Felt, 
Velvet  and  Arctic  Cloth. 

"LITTLE  FALLS" 
and  "RUMPELS" 

Felt  Juliets  and  Soft  Sole 
Bedroom  Slippers  in  all 
Styles  and  Colors. 

Moose,  Buck,  Elk, 
and  Horsehide 
MOCCASINS 


OPTIMISM  seems  to  be 
the  dominant  note  in 
forecasting"  future  business. 
Judicious  buying,  however, 
is  an  essential  safeguard  for 
the  retailer,  and  the  reli- 
ability of  his  stock  is  the 
best  security  for  his  future 
trade. 

Take  a  look  over  the  list  of 
lines  mentioned  here.  They 
are  offered  with  our  reputa- 
tion back  of  them,  and  have 
been  selected  with  a  know- 
ledge of  the  Canadian  public 
needs  for  in  and  out  door 
fall  and  winter  wear.  You 
can  be  assured  of  the  good 
value  and  reliability  of  every 
article  and  of  a  quick  turn- 
over during  your  selling"  sea- 
son. 


Sheepskin  Wool 
Lined  Sox  and 
Wanagans 

Oil  Tan  Larigans 

Men's,  Boys',  and  Youth's 

Knit  and  Felt 
Socks 

Men's,  Boys'  and  Youth's 

Leather  and 
Canvas  Leggings 

Men's,  Boys',  Youth's, 
Women's  and  Misses' 

Hockey  Boots 

Men's  Fine 

Leather  Slippers 

in  Romeo,  Opera  and 
Everett  Pattern. 


Do  not  fail  to  see  these  samples  with  our  salesmen  who  will  call  on  you  at  an 
early  date.  They  will  at  the  same  time  carry  assorting  lines  for  the  present  win- 
ter trade,  as  well  as  our  whole  range  of  spring  and  summer  samples,  including 
all  the  best  and  newest  lines,  and  these  will  be  in  stock  for  early  shipment. 


McLAREN  &  DALLAS 


WHOLESALE 
SHOE 
DISTRIBUTORS 


30  Front  Street  West,  TORONTO 


January,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


7 


To  Jobbers 


F.  &  B.  SHOES, 

A  popular  line  of 
McKays  and  Turns 


We  want  every  Jobber  coming  to 
Montreal  to  get  acquainted  with  our 
line.  We  will  send  samples  on  request. 

Our  factory  is  running  full  time  now, 
but  we  are  able  to  accept  a  few  more 
accounts. 

Skilled  workmen,  modern  daylight 
factory.  We  manufacture  Women's, 
Misses'  and  Children's  McKays  and 
Turns. 

We  specialize  on  Children*s  Footwear 


F.  &  B.  SHOE  LIMITED 

Montreal  East,        -  Quebec 


January,  1919 


Pulling  Trade  with 
the  Right  Lines 

Stock  will  determine  success,  more  than  any 
other  factor. 

1919  sees  us  with  better  facilities  than  ever  to 
to  equip  the  shoe  retailer  with  saleable  lines. 

Bostonians 

are  still  the  safest  line  to  offer  your  custom.  If 
you  have  been  selling  them  you  will  know  their 
merit.  If  not,  we  can  give  you  many  reasons  why 
they  have  so  consistently  held  trade.  "Bostonians 
for  1919"  is  a  good  slogan  for  the  shoe  retailer. 


James  Robinson 

Specialist  in  Fine  Footwear 

MONTREAL 


i 


January,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


illliliiiillii!liliillllill|l|liililiiiliiiiiip^ 


What  about  Your 
Rubber  Stock? 

In  the  middle  of  a  busy  rubber  season,  the 
progressive  dealer  can  add  to  his  turnover  in  this 
department.  A  reliable  line  with  an  In  Stock  de- 
partment is  the  necessary  support  for  the  Shoe 
Store  going  out  for  the  rubber  trade. 

Independent  Rubbers 

are  always  ready  for  sorting  requirements.  We 
make  a  point  of  filhng  rush  orders  with  despatch. 

Tell  us  your  needs.  The  following  Indepen- 
dent Brands  will  fill  every  rubber  request  you 
have  —  "Dainty  Mode,"  "Veribest,"  "Dread- 
naught,"  "Kant  Krack,"  "Royal,"  "Bull  Dog." 


James  Robinson 

Specialist  in  Fine  Footwear 

MONTREAL 


10 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


January,  1919 


■ 

■ 

* 

^^UR  Good 
wishes  to 
J¥  Soldiers, 
returned  and 
to  return,  to  our  Cus- 
tomers and  Friends. 
Let  us  make  1919  a 
year  of  harmony 
and  goodwill  with 
Peace  and  Pros- 
perity to  allCanada's 
Sons. 

The  Miner  Rubber 

Company,  Limited 

Montreal 

■ 

■ 

amiary,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


UPERIOR 

LINES  OF 
FOOTWEAR 
FOR  1919 


"MetropolitaN" 


WOMEN'S  McKAYS 


MEN'S  WELTS 


Success  has  al- 
ways att  e  n  d  e  d 
the  stocking  of 
these  three  lines. 
Every  retailer 
showing  them 
has  the  best  op- 
portunity  to 
clinch  profitable 
sales. 


"Paris" 

WOMEN'S  McKAYS 
MEN'S  WELTS 

"Patricia" 

WOMEN'S  WELTS 
AND  TURNS 


Capable  Work- 
manship, well 
chosen  materials 
and  a  care  de- 
voted to  the  fin- 
ish are  features 
that  give  this 
footwear  a  claim 
to  preference. 


Daoust,  Lalonde  &  Co. 

Limited 

Montreal   -  Que. 


12 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


January,  1019 


a  "Kumfort  Shoe"  for  Women 


"  Kushion  Soles  "  bring  "  Kumfort  "  to  the  wearer, 
and  they  detract  nothing-  from  the  Style  and  Quality  of 
the  shoes.  Old  in  principle — new  in  design  and  per- 
fection, there  is  a  wonderful  opportunity  to  the  dealer 
in  Thompson's  Kushion  Sole  Shoes. 


Thompson's  Kushion  Sole  Shoes 

A  soft  springy  cushion  of  resilient  cotton  felt 
placed  between  the  inner  and  outer  soles,  extending 
from  heel  to  toe,  forms  the  feature  part  of  Thompson's 
Shoes.  Our  In-Stock  business  is  extensive,  and  the 
service  we  give  is  dependable.   Send  for  information. 

NOTICE — Toronto  and  Western  Ontario  buyers — Thompson's  Kushion 
Sole  Shoes  are  carried  in  stock  in  Toronto  by  Mr.  Geo.  E.  Boulter, 
3  Wellington  St.  E. 

THOMPSON  SHOE  CO. 

LIMITED 

MONTREAL 


Patented 
Dec.  30thy  1913 


Patented 
Oct.  26th,  1915 


Vulco-Unit  Box  Toe 

SUMMED  UP  IN  THREE  WORDS 

GIVES 

Economy 
Style  •  .  . 
Durability 

Absolutely  Water-proof  and  Perspiration-proof 

BECKWITH  BOX  TOE  LIMITED 

Sherbrooke,  Quebec,  Canada 


January,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


13 


When  the  Boys  Come  Home 


'^J^HE  return  of  our  soldiers  from  overseas  means 
more  business  for  the  shoe  retailer.  They 
will  want  civilian  shoes  when  they  put  on  civilian 
clothes  again. 

But  the  trade  should  bear  in  mind  that  many 
of  them  will  not  want  to  go  back  to  the  pointed  toe 
and  narrow  last — and  some  of  them  cannot.  The 
Department  of  Soldiers'  Civil  Re-establishment  has 
already  issued  a  warning  against  fitting  returned 
soldiers  with  pointed-toe  shoes.  Discomfort  is  likely 
to  be  the  result,  and  in  some  cases  actual  injury. 

You  will  want  a  fairly  representative  stock  of 
broad-toed  wide  fitting  shoes  in  order  to  properly 
care  for  this  demand.  We  are  in  a  position  to 
supply  your  needs  quickly  with  broad  toed  shoes 
which  will  retain  the  customer's  good  will  for  your 
store. 


ST.  JOHN 


AMES  HOLDEN  McCREADY 

"Shoemakers  to  the  Nation"  _ 
MONTREAL        TORONTO         WINNIPEG         EDMONTON  VANCOUVER 


14 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


J: 


amiary,  1919 


Prospects  Were 
Never  Better 


for  Tetrault  Sales  than  at  the  entrance  of  1919.  With  a 
popularity  that  has  grown  tremendously  each  successive 
year,  and  with  the  Tetrault  organization  extended  to  new 
factory  space  and  an  additional  army  of  skilled  workers 


TETRAULT 
WELTS 


are  out  to  win  further  honors  in  the  footwear  field  this 
year. 

That  rare  combination  of  quality  and  workmanship  is  fully 
maintained  throughout  our  newest  productions. 

Associate  your  business  with  the  Tetrault  success.  Tetrault 
Welts  moving  from  your  shelves  will  assuredly  prove  your 
best  business  builders  for  1919. 


Tetrault  Shoe  Manufacturing  Company 

MONTREAL 

European  Office  and  Warehouse :  9  Rue  des  Marseilles,  Paris,  France 


January,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


15 


Representing  Sterling  Value 

AIRD 

The  Name 
Is  a  Guarantee 


Handle  Standard  Lines 

AIRD  Shoes  for  1919  present  stronger  in- 
ducements than  ever  before,  to  the  Jobber  who  is 
building  bigger  business  in  standard  lines. 

Our  output  is  keeping  pace  with  the  large  de- 
mand while  we  continue  to  uphold  the  quality  which 
has  made  AIRD  shoes  such  a  success. 

You  will  do  well  to  see  our  High  Grade  Mc- 
Kays and  Turns.  You  can't  go  wrong  with 
AIRD  Lines. 


Send  for  Prices 

AIRD  &  SON 

Registered 

MONTREAL 


16 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


January,  1919 


EDWIN  CLAPP  SHOE 
EXCLUSIVENESS  IN  DESIGN 
AND  EXCELLENCE  OF  FIT  IS  UN- 
EQUALLED. 

PROGRESSIVE  RETAILERS  REALIZE 
THE  SELLING  STIMULUS  IMPARTED 
TO  A  STORE  STOCKING  THE  EDWIN 
CLAPP  SHOE. 


mm^^  The 

EAST  WEYMOUTH,   MASS.  1^^^^  Bar  Harbor 


ESTABLISHED  1853 


iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 

MADE   IN   CANADA  I 


Our  line  of  Channel  Cements,  Sole  Laying 
Cements,  Chrome  Cements,  and  Surefold 
is  a  quality  line. 

The  first  consideration  given  to  their  make- 
up is  QUALITY. 

You  may  depend  on  them  being  as  good  a 
Cement  as  can  be  made. 


Boston  Blacking  Company 

I  152  McGill  Street,  MONTREAL,  Canada  | 


January,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


17 


H.  o.  Mcdowell 


H.  N.  LINCOLN 


INTERNATIONAL  SUPPLY  CO. 


SHOE 


MANUFACTURERS.  JOBBERS.  IMPORTERS 


MACHINERY  AND 


MAIN  OFFICE  AND  FACTORY 


SHOE    FACTORY  SUPPLIES 


EASTERN  BRANCH 


37  FOUNDRY  ST.  s. 

KITCHENER 


THE  LARGEST  SHOE  FACTORY  SUPPLY  HOUSE  IN  CANADA 


401  CORISTINE  BUILDING 


MONTREAL 


Representing 

American  Lacing  Hook  Co. 

Waltbam,  Mass. 
Lacing  Hooks  and  Hook 
Setting  Machines 

Armour   Sand   Paper  Works 

Chicago.  111. 
Crystolon  Paper  and  Cloth 
for  Buffing  and  Scouring 

Boston  Leather  Stain  Co. 

Doston,  Mass. 
Inks,  Stains,  Waxes,  etc. 
Cyclone  Bleach 

The  Ceroxylon  Co.. 

Jioston,  Mass. 
Ceroxylon,  the  Perfect 
Lif|uid  Wax 

Dean  Chase  Co., 

Boston,  Mass. 
Shoe  Goods,  Cotton 
Thread 

The  Louis  G.  Freeman  Co., 

Cincinnati,  O. 
Shoe  Machinery 

Hazen,   Brown  Co., 

Brockton,  Mass. 

Waterproof  Box  Toe 
Gum,  Rubber  Cement 

Markem  Machine  Co., 

Boston,  Mass. 
Marking  and  Embossing 
Machines,  Compounds, 
Inks,  etc. 

M.  H.  Merriam  &  Co., 

Boston,  Mass. 
Binding,  Staying,  etc. 

Puritan  Mfg.  Co., 

Boston,  Mass. 
Wax  Thread  .Sewing 
Machines 

Poole  Process  for  Good- 
year Insoles 

The  S.  M.  Supplies  Co., 

Factory  Supplies, 
Needles,  etc. 

J.  Spaulding  &  Sons  Co., 

N.  Rochester,  N.H. 

Guaranteed  Fibre  Coun- 
ters, Fibre  Innersoling 

The  Textile  Mfg.  Co., 

Toronto,  Ont. 

Shoe  Laces 

United  Stay  Co., 

Cambridge,  Mass. 
Leather  and  Imitation 
Leather  Facing,  Welting, 


Are  YOU  Taking  Full  Advantage 
of  Our  Service? 


Do  yoM  realize  that  we  are  carrying  TWO  large 
stocks — at  Kitchener  and  Montreal — for  your  con- 
venience ? 

Aside  from  Machine  Parts  and  minor  items  of 
Findings  our  lines  are  usually  ordered  in  quantities  to 
enable  us  to  make  shipment  from  the  factory — saving 
freight  charges  for  you.  Our  stocks  are  carried  to  help 
out  in  case  of  freight  delays,  etc.,  but  you  w^ould  be  sur- 
prised at  the  quantity  and  variety  of  goods  we  stock 
for  your  protection. 

Our  prices  to  you  are  simply  American  prices  plus 
Duty,  although  in  some  cases  w^e  are  able  to  save  you 
part  of  the  Duty. 

For  example;  CYCLONE  BLEACH,  which  is  in- 
dispensable to  many  manufacturers,  takes  a  very  high 
rate  of  Duty.  We  arranged  with  Boston  Leather  Stain 
Co.  to  make  CYCLONE  BLEACH  in  CANADA  and 
for  two  years  we  have  furnished  the  Canadian  trade  at 
the  American  price  plus  the  REGULAR  Duty  that 
applies  to  Blackings,  etc. — a  saving  of  about  $2.00  per 
gallon. 

If  you  buy  QUALITY  goods  we  can  show  you  a 
saving.  We  do  not  handle  any  but  the  BEST  goods  all 
of  which  are  doubly  Guaranteed — by  the  manufacturers 
and  by  us. 


BUYING  FROM  US  IS  NOT  A  GAMBLE :    IT'S  A  SAFE-GUARD 


etc. 


18 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


January,  1910 


THE 

:marsh 


Draw  Back 
the  Curtain 
to  Better  Trade 
in  1919 

Stock 
Marsh  Shoes 


We  Wish 
Our  Many  Patrons 
a  Successful 
1919 


"104"  LAST 
Made  in  All  Leathers 
Widths  V,  to  E 


OTOGK  liberally  and 
^  order  early.  These 
excellent  lines  of  Men's 
wear  will  secure  for  you 
a  big  volume  of  the  best 
trade. 


"99"  I,AST 
Made  in  All  Leatliers 
Widths  1!  to  E 


Sold  in  30  pair  cases  only,  in  30  pairs  of  a  width 


The  Wm.  A.  Marsh  Co.,  Limited 

Quebec 


January,  1919 


FOOTWEAR   IN  CANADA 


19 


No  disfiguring 
rid^e  Kere 


SPAULDING'C 
fibwCounters*' 


The  wide  scarf  is  an   exclusive  feature  of 

CPAULDlNffC 

C/Rbre  CountersC) 

Cuetranteed 

It  assures  you  of  a  shoe  that  conforms  exactly 
with  the  shape  of  the  last  and  prevents  the 
sharp  outline  of  the  edge  of  counter  showing 
through  no  matter  how  fine  or  light  the  stock. 


W 


e  make  our  ow 


n  fib 


re. 


J.  Spaulding  &  Sons  Co. 


Main  Office  and  Factory 

NORTH  ROCHESTER,  N.  H. 


Boston  Office 

203.B  ALBANY  BUILDING 


CINCINNATI 
The  Taylor-Poole  Co. 
410-412  E.  Sth  St. 


PHILADELPHIA 
John  G.  Travel-  &  Co. 
329  Arch  St. 

SEVEN  FACTORIES 
Tonawanda,  N.  Y.  Rochester,  N.  H 

No.  Rochester,  N.  H.-  Milton,  N.  H 

Townsend  Harbor,  Mass. 


ST.  LOUIS 
The  Taylor-Poole  Co. 
1602  Locust  St. 


CHICAGO 
J.  E.  P.  McMechan  &  Co. 
217  W.  Lake  St. 


Canadian  Agents : 
International  Supply  Co.,  Kitchener,  Ontario  and  Quebec  City. 


English  Agents:  J.  Whitehead  &  Co.,  Ltd. 
Leicester,  England. 


V.  Champigny,  Montreal. 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


January,  1919 


THE 

MAPLE  LEAF 
RUBBER  A, 


MAPLE  LEAF 


These  marks  on  Rubber  Footwear  distinguish  a 

Dominion  Rubber  System  Product. 


Link  Up  Your  Store 

with  Our  National 
Advertising  Campaigns 

Get  all  the  benefit  that  can  possibly  accrue  to  you  from  handling  the  best  ad- 
vertised— as  well  as  the  best  made — Rubber  Footwear  in  Canada. 

For  the  past  three  months,  we  have  put  out  the  greatest  advertising  campaign 
on  Rubbers  ever  launched  by  any  Canadian  manufacturers.  We  have  covered 
the  Dominion  from  coast  to  coast. 

We  have  educated  your  customers  to  the  necessity  of  wearing  rubbers,  and  to 
the  importance  of  asking  for  a  Dominion  Rubber  System  product. 

Link  up  your  store  to  this  advertising.  Mention  our  brands  of  Rubbers  in  your 
own  advertising.  Make  attractive  window  displays,  featuring  these  rubbers. 
See  that  store  cards  and  hangers  are  in  prominent  positions.  Put  out  these 
Rubbers  where  every  customer  is  sure  to  see  them  and  thus  be  reminded  of  the 
need  of  rubbers.    This  is  the  way  to  make  our  advertising  your  advertising. 

Dominion  Rubber  System  Branches  Located 

at  Halifax,  St.  John,  Quebec,  Toronto,  Hamilton,  Brantford 
London,  Kitchener,  North  Bay,  Fort  William,  Winnipeg, 
Brandon,    Regina,    Saskatoon,    Edmonton,  Calgary, 

Lethbridge,  Vancouver,  Victoria.  jg 


IMINIO] 

RUBBER 


January,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


21 


iw    f  ¥ 

in  1 


III  \ji.iici.i«ifli 


A  Journal  of  its  Findings,  Making  and  Sale. 
Published  Monthly  for  the  Good  of 
the   Trade  by 

HUGH  G.  Maclean,  limited 

HUGH  C.  MacLEAN,  Winnipeg,  President. 
THOMAS  S.  YOUNG,  General  Manager. 


HEAD  OFFICE  -  347  Adelaide  Street  West,  TORONTO 
Telephone  A.  2700 

MONTREAL  -  Telephone  Main  2299  -  119  Board  of  Trade 
WINNIPEG  -  Tel.  Garry  85C  -  Electric  Railway  Chambers 
VANCOUVER  -  Tel.  Seymour  2013  -  Winch  Building 
NEW  YORK  -  Tel.  3108  Beekman  -  1123  Tribune  Building 
CHICAGO  -  Tel.  Harrison  5351  -  1413  Gt.  Northern  Bldg. 
LONDON,  ENG.    -  16  Regent  Street  S.W. 

Authorized  by  the  Postmaster  General  for  Canada,  for  tiansniissioii 
as  second  class  matter. 

Entered  as  second  class  matter  July  ISth,  1914,  at  the  Postoffice  ai 
Buflfalo,  N.  Y.,  under  the  Act  of  Congress  of  March  3,  1S79. 

SUBSCRIPTION  RATES 
Canada  and  Great  Britain,  $1.00.    U.  S.  and  Foreign,  $1.50. 
Single  copies  15  cents 


Vol.  9 


January  1919 


A  Forward 
Step 


The  formation  of  the  Shoe  Manu- 
facturers' Association  of  Canada 
at  Montreal,  recently,  is  a  very 
forward  step  toward  the  goal  for  which  Canadian 
shoe  manufacturers  have  been  striving  during-  the 
past  years.  Through  co-operative  endeavor  there  can 
be  little  doubt  that  Canadian-made  footwear  can  be 
made  to  occupy  a  position  befitting  the  art  and  crafts- 
manship embodied  in  it,  for,  it  goes  without  say- 
ing, our  factories  are  to-day  turning  out  the  equal 
of  imported  shoes,  in  all  lines. 

A  full  report  of  the  proceedings  of  the  first  con- 
vention of  Canadian  shoe  manufacturers  is  printed 
in  this  issue.  The  talks  were  largely  devoted  to  trade 
problems  and  two  or  three  addresses  by  representa- 
tive tanners  are  particularly  informative  as  to  the 
present  leather  situation  and  general  commercial 
outlook.  Manufacturers  who  have  been  considering 
seriously  the  possibilities  underlying  the  export 
trade  were  unanimous  in  placing  the  results  of  their 
investigations  before  the  convention.  A  larger  trade 
in  this  direction  will  surely  mean  a  sounder  footing 
for  Canadian  industry. 

Mr.  F.  S.  Scott.  M.P.,  is  at  the  head  of  the  new 
association  and  under  his  guidance,  and  with  the  as- 


sistance of  other  capable  members  of  the  Executive, 
the  trade  is  confident  of  the  outcome  of  their  endea- 
vor to  surmount  present  and  future  conditions,  even 
though  entirely  lacking  in  precedent.  If  the  enthu- 
siasm evident  at  the  convention  is  consistently  main- 
tained there  can  be  no  doubt  as  to  the  result. 

*  *  * 

A  large  store  in  a  large  Canadian 
Wisleading  the  recently  had  a  fine  window 

Window  Shopper       ...        ,  ,  , 

display  of  women  s  shoes.  Al- 
most all  of  the  shoes  one  could  see  at  a  glance  were 
marked  $10.00.  It  appeared  to  be  a  $10  window  out 
and  out,  although  there  were  perhaps  three  or  four 
pairs  of  shoes  without  a  ticket  on  at  all .  A  lady  pass- 
ing was  attracted  and  her  fancy  caught,  it  so  hap- 
pens, by  one  of  the  shoes  not  marked  with  a  price 
ticket.  As  practically  every  pair  was  priced  $10.00. 
however,  she  took  it  for  granted  that  they  were  the 
same.  A  clerk  informed  her  in  dulcet  tones  that  this 
particular  pair  was  $16.00,  and  one  of  the  other  pairs 
without  a  price  ticket  was  $18.00.  The  prospective 
customer  was  completely  set  back  and  walked  out 
of  the  store  with  a  very  disagreeable  impression. 

Certainly  there  is  something  radically  wrong  with 
a  window  of  this  type.  It  can  hardly  be  called  fraudu- 
lent, but  it  can,  without  any  great  stretch  of  imagina- 
tion, be  called  very  misleading  and  annoying.  It  sav- 
ors greatly  of  that  practice  of  putting  the  good  apples 
on  the  top  of  the  barrel  and  whether  or  not  there  was 
any  deliberate  intention  to  create  a  wrong  impression, 
it  had  that  efifect  on  the  customer  just  the  same.  Even 
if  half  of  the  shoes  had  been  without  a  price  ticket 
the  window  would  probably  have  been  all  right,  but 
to  put  in  just  two  or  three  pairs  among  a  whole  win- 
dow full  of  $10  shoes  does  not  seem  to  be  exactly  the 
right  sort  of  practice. 

*  +  * 

On  March  1st.   1919,  the  fourth 
International  Fair    International   Fair  to  be  held  at 
at  Lyons  ^  „  , 

L3^ons,   France,   will   be  opened 

and  will  remain  open  for  two  weeks.  This  fair  was 
organized  during  the  war  primarily  to  give  impetus 
to  French  commerce.  Its  development  during  the 
four  years  it  has  been  in  existence  has  been  pheno- 
menal and  it  will  probably  replace  the  world-famed 
annual  fair,  which,  before  the  war,  was  held  at  Leip- 
sig.  Germany.  Mr.  W.  M.  Clarke,  Canadian  Trade 
Commissioner  at  Milan.  Italy,  states  that  the  fair  is 
not  a  place  where  merchants  assemble  their  products 
and  sell  them  to  visitors,  but  it  is  a  sample  show 
where  i^roducers  and  buyers  meet  and  from  samples 
shown  important  purchases  are  made,  delivery  of 
which  is  made  direct  from  the  seller  on  conditions 
that  \ary  as  regards  time  and  place. 

At  the  1916  fair,  there  were  1,342  exhibitors  and 
business  amounting  to  $10,400,000  was  transacted. 
In  1917,  there  were  2,503  exhibitors  and  business 
valued  at  $82,000,000  resulted.    In  1918,  there  were 


S2 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


January,  1010 


3,176  exhil)itors  who  did  l)iisiness  amountiiii^-  to  $130,- 
000,000. 

It  is  worthy  of  note  that  of  the  543  exhil)itors 
from  the  United  States  in  1918,  405  displa3ed  cata- 
logues and  price  lists  only,  orders  being  placed  un- 
der the  direction  of  the  American  Consul-General  at 
Lyons.  Nevertheless,  it  is  reported  that  the  business 
transacted  by  United  States  firms  formed  a  very  im- 
portant part  of  the  total  sales. 

The  Canadian  Minister  of  Trade  and  Commerce 
has  applied  for  thirty  booths  at  the  next  fair.  A  few 
of  these  will  be  used  for  Government  exhibits,  but 
most  of  the  booths  have  been  placed  at  the  disposal 
of  the  Canadian  Manufacturers'  Association  for  al- 
lotment, and  application  for  space  should  be  made 
to  that  Association.  The  Department  will  pay  for 
the  booths  and  also  the  freight  on  exhibits  from  the 
port  of  embarkation  to  Lyons. 

This  is  an  excellent  opportunity  for  Canada  to 
display  what  she  can  furnish  to  help  re-build  war- 
wasted  France  and  at  the  same  time  improve  our 
national  financial  standing.  Canadian  manufacturers 
should  co-operate  with  the  Department  of  Trade  and 
Commerce  to  "get  the  business." 

*    *  * 

Though  a  retailer  may  have  the 
A  Deposit  Is         best  of  intentions,  it  is  often  that 
Binding  his  store  makes  enemies  through 

a  misunderstanding  on  the  part  of  customers  who 
make  a  deposit  in  connection  with  a  request  to  have 
goods  held,  and  a  bulletin  from  the  National  Vigilance 
Committee  of  the  Associated  Advertising  Clubs  sug- 
gests that  store  good-will  is  often  destroyed  through 
a  failure  to  make  customers,  and  especially  women, 
understand  that  when  a  deposit  is  made,  this  amounts 
to  a  contract  on  the  part  of  the  customer  to  take  the 
goods. 

From  various  communities  in  the  United  States 
where  there  are  local  vigilance  committees,  the  Na- 
tional Vigilance  Committee  has  had  reports  of  trou- 
ble arising  from  misunderstandings  of  this  character. 

"Can  you  hold  this  for  me?"  the  woman  asks. 

"Yes,  if  you  will  make  a  deposit  of  $  ,"  says 

the  salesman,  naming  the  amount  to  her. 

That  is  all  there  is  to  the  conversation  in  too  many 
instances.  The  salesman  presumes  that  she  knows 
that  when  she  makes  the  deposit,  she  enters  into  a 
contract  to  buy,  but  that  is  often  a  violent  presump- 
tion, says  the  vigilance  committee.  In  a  large  num- 
ber of  instances,  women  return,  announce  that  they 
have  changed  their  hands,  and  ask  for  the  return  of 
their  money. 

Many  such  cases  come  to  the  attention  of  local 
vigilance  committees,  for  the  committees  advertise 
that  they  are  i)repared  to  receive  complaints  from 
persons  who  feel  they  have  been  mistreated.  In  such 
cities,  the  committees,  of  course,  take  the  part  of  the 
merchant,  but  even  where  there  is  a  vigilance  commit- 


THE  LID  IS  off!!    K  EEPTHEPOf^A^BOrLING! 

—Shoe  Economist 

tee  on  the  job,  some  customers  still  feel  that  an  ex- 
ception might  be  made  in  their  case. 

The  vigilance  committee  suggests  that  one  certain 
way  to  insure  that  all  customers  will  understand  the 
terms  of  such  sales  would  be  to  print  a  special  receipt 
for  payments  of  this  kind,  the  receipt  to  set  forth  the 
fact  that  unless  the  goods  are  taken  by  a  certain  date, 
the  cash  deposit  will  become  the  property  of  the  store. 


It's  the  Net 
Tliat  Counts 


Mr.  Dooley  was  one  of  the  lead- 
ing restaurant  keepers  in' a  small 
town.  Recently  he  ]nirchased  a 
cash  register.  The  documents  of  the  first  trade  to  be 
recorded  were  a  27  cent  check  and  a  five  dollar  bill. 
The  proud  proprietor  rang  up  $5  and  paid  out  $4.73  in 
change.  When  the  next  customer  presented  a  ten- 
spot  in  payment  for  his  check  of  35  cents,  Dooley 
poked  the  $10  key.  Thus  things  progressed  through- 
out the  day.  That  night,  upon  checking  up,  he  dis- 
covered that  according  to  the  machine  he  ought  to 
have  $250  on  hand,  although  a  careful  inventory  of 
the  cash  drawer  revealed  only  $17.39. 

"Terrance,"  said  Dooley  to  his  assistant,  "have  yez 
taken  anything  outen  the  new  cash  machine  to-day  r" 
"Shure,"  said  Terrance,  'T  took  me  carfare  home." 
"And  whare  d'yez  li\e,"'  inquired  Dooley,  "  .Aus- 
tralia?" 

Like  Mr.  Dooley,  many  a  man  in  charge  of  a  busi- 
ness is  ringing  up  gross  receipts  instead  of  net  profits. 
He  may  not  fall,  as  did  Dooley,  into  the  error  of  punch- 
ing the  $5  key  every  time  a  $5  bill  is  tendered,  but  if 
he  is  measuring  his  business  by  its  mere  volume  in- 
stead of  by  its  net  results,  he  is  likely  to  come  up 
short  with  the  same  sudden  disappointment,  for  after 
all  it  is  getting  the  net  that  really  counts. 


The  shortest  road  to  success  is  the  "straight" 
road.  There  is  nothing  to  be  gained  by  violating 
business  ethics  in  the  hope  of  establishing  a 
short-cut. 


January,  1019 


FOOTWE/\R    IN  CANADA 


2a 


Opening  of  Rannard's  Handsome  New  Store 

Building  Destroyed  by  Fire  a  Year  Ago  Rebuilt  and  Again  Occupied  by  Progressive 
Winnipeg  Shoe  Firm— Some  Novel  Features  in  Store  Layout 


IT  is  just  a  little  over  a  year  ago  that  the  Euder- 
ton  Block  in  Winnipeg  was  destroyed  by  a  fire 
which  wiped  out  the  No.  2  store  of  Rannard  Shoe 
Limited  on  the  ground  floor.  The  building  has 
been  completely  rebuilt  and  on  December  18th  the 
Rannard  company  resumed  business  on  the  old  site, 
but  in  a  much  larger  and  more  handsome  store  than 
formerly. 

Mr.  C.  F.  Rannard,  the  president,  needs  very  little 
introduction  to  the  Canadian  shoe  trade.  He  has  been 
a  resident  of  Winnipeg  for  thirty-eight  years  and  fif- 
teen years  ago  purchased  the  retail  business  of  the 
Kilgour-Rimer  Company,  with  H.  Chapman  as  part- 
ner. In  1908  Mr.  Rannard  assumed  entire  control  and 
has  sticceeded  in  building,  through  honest  and  pains- 
taking service,  one  of  the  largest  shoe  retail  organiza- 
tions in  Canada,  consisting  of  three  stores,  all  in  the 
city  of  Winnipeg.  He  takes  justifiable  pride  in  the 
fact  that  he  started  life  as  a  poor  boy ;  sold  papers 
until  he  was  17  years  of  age,  and  that  his  success  is 
due  entirely  to  his  one  big  asset — -the  desire  and  abi- 
lity to  work  hard  and  faithfully  in  the  interests  of 
"public  service."  He  was  born  in  Boston,  England, 
his  father  being  first  a  general  storekeeper  and  later 
a  farmer.  While  in  the  railway  telegraph  business  in 
Winnipeg  Mr.  Rannard  made  up  his  mind  to  start  a 
grocery  or  boot  and  shoe  business.  When  his  partner. 
Mr.  Chapman,  decided  to  go  to  California,  Mr.  Ran- 
nard set  out  to  have  the  biggest  and  best  shoe  busi- 
ness in  the  city.  "And,"  he  said  to  a  representative  of 
Footwear  in  Canada,  "I'll  leave  it  to  anybody  who 
comes  in  here  to  decide  whether  or  not  I've  reached 
the  goal  I  sought.  And  if  my  present  good  health  con- 
tinues as  in  the  past,  the  end  is  not  yet." 

On  the  day  of  the  opening  the  firm  had  arranged 
for  a  splendid  musical  programme  and  entertainment 


Mr.  C.  F.  Rannard — President  Rannard  Shoe 
Limited 


I 

] 
1 
I 

•4 


to  be  held  in  the  evening  which,  together  with  the 
beautiful  floral  decorations,  attracted  widespread  in- 
terest throughout  the  city. 

Several  features  of  the  store  will  be  of  general 
interest  as  indicating  to  some  extent  the  care  and 
forethought  with  which  the  layout  has  been  arranged. 
There  is  approximately  one  thousand  square  feet  of 
plate  glass  in  the  windows  and  the  displays  are  ar- 
ranged so  as  to  constitute  a  "stock  index"  to  passers- 


View  of  side  display  window — 72  feet  long — New  Rannard  Shoe  Store,  Winnipeg 


24 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


January,  1919 


by.  The  practical  and  artistic  are  combined  in  order 
that  all  clases  of  buyers  may  make  a  mental  selection 
before  entering  the  store.  Mr.  Rannard  has  never  un- 
derestimated the  value  of  window  advertising.  In  this 
connection  good  use  is  made  of  wax  models  for  the 
more  effective  display  of  modish  footwear. 

The  front  display  windows  have  a  length  of  thirty 
feet.   Men's  high-grade  footwear  is  dis])layed  on  the 


View  looking  from  above  main  entrance  to  rear,  showing  aisles  and 
diiTerent  departments 


left  hand  side  and  women's  high-grade  dress  shoes 
and  evening  slippers  on  the  right-hand  side. 

Special  attention  has  been  given  to  adequate  and 
proper  window  illumination.  The  fixtures  are  of  the 
X-Ray  type,  equipped  with  100  watt  nitrogen  lamps 
and  spaced  12  inches  apart.  The  floors  of  the  win- 
dows are  of  hard  maple  and  the  backgrounds  are  hard- 
wood trimmed  with  ivory. 

The  Reception  Foyer 

Entering  the  store  from  the  front  through  double 
doors,  one  for  entrance  and  the  other  for  exit,  the  vis- 
itor's attention  is  arrested  by  the  reception  foyer  in 
the  foreground.  This  also  contains  the  hosiery  de- 
partment which  is  very  complete  and  well  stocked. 
Stockings  to  match  the  different  colored  shoes  and 
slippers  as  closely  as  possible  are  stocked  and  if  a 
difficult  shade  is  encountered,  provision  is  made  to 
have  hosiery  made  to  order. 

Each  Department  Semi-Private 

Consideration  for  the  customer  is  evidenced  in  the 
arrangement  of  the  different  departments.  Instead  of 
having  a  straight  passageway  down  the  middle  of  the 
store  and  in  full  view  of  all  and  sundry,  the  position 
of  the  show-cases  diverts  "traffic"  to  two  side  aisles. 
Commencing  from  the  front  the  departments  are  plac- 
ed as  follows:  Men's,  children's,  women's  walking 
shoes,  women's  slippers  and  gaiters,  women's  dress 
shoes.  The  newly  arrived  customer,  after  passing  the 
hosiery  department,  simply  walks  down  one  of  the 
side  aisles  until  the  proper  department  is  reached  and 
then  turns  in  as  one  would  enter  a  room. 


The  selling  stock  in  the  store  consists  of  some- 
thing over  12,000  pairs  of  shoes,  not  including  the 
large  reserve  supply  which  is  kept  in  the  basement. 
Mr.  Rannard  states  that  the  selling  stock  in  this  new 
store  is  larger  by  over  3,000  pairs  than  any  other 
single  stock  he  ever  carried. 

There  are  110  chairs  in  the  store,  distributed  as 
follows:  Men's,  24;  children's,  24;  women's  walking 
shoes,  24;  women's  slippers  and  gaiters,  12;  women's 
dress  shoes,  26. 

Attractive  Fixtures 

The  shelves  are  of  white  enamel  finish,  less  than 
one-half  inch  in  thickness  and  measured  to  the  small- 
est fraction  of  an  inch  so  as  to  avoid  waste  of  space. 
Much  of  the  interior  trim  is  mahogany,  such  as  the 
woodwork  in  the  show  cases,  the  balustrade  to  the 
general  office  on  the  mezzanine  floor,  the  panelling 
of  the  parcel  and  telephone  office  and  so  on,  affording 
a  handsome  contrast  to  the  pure  white  of  the  shelves. 

Before  purchasing  fixtures,  Mr.  Rannard  visited 
many  of  the  newest  and  best  equipped  shoe  stores  on 
the  continent  and  the  new  store  embodies  the  best 
and  most  practical  of  the  ideas  picked  up  on  this  tour. 

All  of  the  shelves  are  within  easy  reach  of  the 
salesmen,  thus  doing  away  with  the  ladders  so  often 
used.  The  partitions  which  separate  the  various  de- 
partments are  themselves  composed  of  stock  shelves 
and  thus  the  goods  in  most  ordinary  demand  in  each 
department  can  be  reached  by  simply  turning  around. 

The  show  cases  too,  are  the  latest  type  and  of 
very  attractive  design.  Aside  from  the  handsome  cases 
in  the  hosiery  department,  which  have  mahogany 
frames  and  Vermont  marble  bases,  each  of  the  par- 
titions which  seperate  the  various  departments,  has 
on  top  of  it,  reaching  from  end  to  end,  a  glass  show 
case.   In  these  are  displayed  samples  of  the  various 


One  of  the  women's  departments,  given  over  exclusively  tO:  medium  priced 
walking  shoes 


styles  of  shoes  and  slippers  handled  in  each  depart- 
ment, as  well  as  skates,  gift  suggestions,  shoe  acces- 
sories and  so  on. 

On  the  top  of  each  of  these  display  cases  a  shaded 
electric  lamp  casts  a  softened  light  over  the  display, 
the  joint  effect  of  these  lights  being  to  impart  a  cosy 
and  homelike  atmosphere  throughout  the  store.  The 
store  itself  is  illuminated  from  end  to  end  by  semi- 


January,  1919  FOOTWEAR 

indirect  fixtures — twelve  in  all — supplemented  by  six 
smaller  lights  extending-  along  under  the  mezzanine 
floor. 

Time-Savers 

The  parcel  and  wrapping  department  is  establish- 
ed in  the  centre  of  the  store  and  takes  care  of  wrap- 
ping, deliveries,  repairs,  call  parcels  and  telephone 
messages.  Deliveries  are  made  by  a  co-operative  deli- 
very system,  in  which  several  other  large  city  firms 
are  partners,  and  good  service  is  thus  rendered  at  a 
minimum  cost.  The  parcel  office  is  equipped  with  an 
electric  cash  register  with  multiple  and  separate  ad- 
der, taking  care  of  the  sales  of  14  clerks  as  well  as 
c.o.d.'s.  and  refunds.  Another  convenience  is  the  large 
clock  hanging  on  the  wall  of  the  office  in  plain  view 
from  any  point  in  the  store. 

The  Basement 

In  the  basement  every  foot  of  space  is  made  to  serve 
a  useful  purpose.  The  larger  portion  of  available 
wall  space  is  taken  up  with  shelves  holding-  the  re- 
serve stock  and  from  these  the  selling  stock  is  filled 
up  as  rapidly  as  depleted.  One  of  the  features  of  the 
store  is  also  a  well  appointed  rest-room  for  women 
customers.  In  the  basement  is  also  installed  a  cloak 
room  with  locker  system  for  employee's  wraps  and  a 
washroom  for  men. 

The  Office 

The  office  is  situated  on  the  mezzanine  floor  on 
the  Hargarve  Street  side  of  the  store  and  is  36  feet 
long  by  10  feet  wide.  It  is  well  lighted  by  windows 
and  a  bird's  eye  view  is  obtained  of  the  whole  store. 

The  Rannard  Idea 

The  spirit  behind  the  Rannard  org-anization  is  ex- 
pressed in  the  "Rannard   Idea":    "To   do  the  right 


The  centrally  located  cash  and  wrapping  department.     Also  takes  care  of 
deliveries,  repairs  and  telephone  calls.    There  are  two  trunk  lines  with 
branch  telephones  to  the  office  above 


thing  at  the  right  time,  in  the  right  way ;  to  do  some 
things  better  than  they  were  ever  done  before  ;  to  eli- 
minate errors;  to  know  both  sides  of  the  question; 
to  be  courteous ;  to  be  an  example ;  to  work  for  the 
love  of  the  work ;  to  anticipate  requirements ;  to  deve- 
lop resources ;  to  recognize  no  impediments ;  to  mas- 


IN    CANADA  •  25 

ter  circumstances  ;  to  act  from  reason  rather  than  rule  ; 
to  be  satisfied  with  nothing  short  of  perfection." 

The  officers  of  the  company  are:  President,  Chas. 
F.  Rannard ;  vice-president,  A.  P.  Rannard ;  secretary- 
treasurer,  R.  F.  Eadie  ;  directors,  M.  A.  Caft'erky  and 
J.  Waddington.    Footwear    in    Canada    joins  with 


The  right  hand  front  display  window  in  which  is  displayed  women's  high 
grade  dress  shoes  and  evening  slippers 


many  other  friends  in  wishing  them  the  added  pros- 
perity to  which  they  are  justly  entitled. 


Breithaupt  Christmas  Dinner 

A UNIQUE  event  in  Woodstock,  just  before 
Christmas,  was  a  dinner  and  Christmas  tree 
presented  by  the  Breithaupt  Leather  Com- 
pany to  their  employees  and  their  families. 
The  dinner  was  followed  by  a  programme  of  enter- 
tainment during  which  Santa  Claus  appeared  and  pre- 
sented every  kiddie  with  a  stocking  full  of  sweets  and 
oranges,  as  well  as  some  other  remembrance  of  the 
Christmas  season.  Mr.  Albert  I.  Schultz,  general 
manager  of  the  Woodstock  organization,  presided  and 
opened  the  evening  with  an  address  of  appreciation  to 
the  employees  and  a  sincere  wish  for  their  future  hap- 
piness and  prosperity.  The  dancing  and  musical  pro- 
gramme was  specially  attractive  and  very  much  en- 
joyed. A  feature  of  the  evening  also  was  a  presenta- 
tion to  Mr.  Schultz,  by  the  employees,  of  a  handsome 
electric  reading  lamp ;  to  Mrs.  Schultz,  a  silver  rosary, 
and  to  Mr.  Julius  Schultz,  superintendent  of  the  plant, 
a  silver  cigarette  case,  pipe  and  smoker's  set. 

+  „„_,„ — , —  — .  + 

1  ,  I 

I  Awfu'  Profiteering  j 

!  "Speaking  about  profiteering,"  said  the  tall  | 

j        man,  "brings  to  my  mind  the  story  of  the  Scotch  j 

shopkeeper,  Sandy  Macfee,  who  while  talking  to  3 

the  manager  of  a  London  emporium,  said:  'Ye'll  } 

pardon  my  askin'  ye,  sir,  but  what  profits  can  ye  1 

mak  in  Lunnon?'  1 

"  'Oh,  as  for  that,'  was  the  reply,  "on  some  j 

articles  5  per  cent.,  on  others  10  per  cent.,  and  j 

1        on  some  20  per  cent.'  j 

j  "  'Twenty  per  cent!   Man,  it's  awfu'  !"  ! 

I  "  'But  don't  you  ?'  asked  the  Londoner.  \ 

I  "  'Nae  sic  luck,'  exclaimed  Sandy,  '"I  can  only  ! 

I        mak  1  per  cent.  I  just  buy  a  thing  for  a  shullin'  I 

•i        and  I  sell  it  for  twa.' "  | 

!  T 

.1 — .._.._.«  „„_,,»_, — „_.„—.,  .„_.„  .—..—.4. 


26 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


January,  1919 


Manufacturers  Discuss  Action  to  Promote 
Export  Trade  in  Boots  and  Shoes 


FOLLOWING  the  discussion  at  the  Shoe  Manu- 
facturers convention  in  Montreal,  fully  describ- 
ed elsewhere  in  this  issue,  action  is  being  taken 
to  promote  the  Canadian  export  trade  in  boots 
and  shoes.  Inciuiries  among  manufacturers  show  that 
opinion  is  divided  as  to  the  posibilities  of  the  business. 
Some  manufacturers  believe  that  there  is  practically 
no  money  in  the  line;  that  speaking  generally,  Cana- 
dian factories  are  not  ecjuipped  for  the  economical 
production  of  shoes  from  the  export  point  of  view  ; 
that  some  of  the  larger  factories  may  find  it  of  value 
in  disposing  of  surplus  production ;  and  that  the  better 
way  to  build  up  Canadian  trade  is  to  pay  more  atten- 
tion to  the  domestic  market. 

On  the  other  side  there  are  manufacturers  who 
think  that  there  is  a  big  field  abroad  for  our  goods, 
provided  that  the  business  is  cultivated  in  the  right 
way.  There  will  be  an  immense  demand  for  boots 
and  shoes  in  Europe,  and  Canada  has  the  opportunity 
to  secure  a  considerable  portion  of  the  business.  At 
any  rate,  it  is  worth  trying  for.  Unless  we  make  a 
serious  effort,  we  cannot  ascertain  the  possibilities  in 
this  direction.  It  is  ■  suggested  that  arrangements 
should  be  made  through  a  boot  and  shoe  export  asso- 
ciation to  guarantee  at  least  75  per. cent,  of  the  for- 
eign acounts ;  in  other  words  that  any  losses  should 
be  pooled. 

In  connection  with  the  promotion  of  foreign  trade 
the  following  letter  has  been  sent  by  the  Canadian 
Manufacturers'  Association  to  shoe  manufacturers 
who  may  be  interested  in  this  branch.  The  letter  is 
dated  December  28th,  1918,  and  is  as  follows : 

The  Canadian  Manufacturers'  Asociation  has  been 
asked  by  the  Government  to  keep  the  manufacturers 
posted  as  to  its  trade  policies  and,  where  necessary, 
to,  organize  them  as  quickly  as  possible  into  trade 
groups  or  guilds  so  they  may  become  more  efficient 
in  production.  There  is  a  very  obvious  reason  for  this 
on  account  of  the  fact  that  within  the  next  two  or 
three  months  European  countries  will  come  into  the 
market  for  enormous  quantities  of  various  kinds  of 
goods.  From  other  parts  of  the  world  there  will  also 
be  a  big  demand  for  all  kinds  of  articles,  due  to  stocks 
having  become  exhausted.  In  the  export  market, 
whether  for  transient  reconstruction  business  in  Eur- 
ope or  for  permanent  business  from  any  part  of  the 
world,  Canada  will  have  to  compete  with  the  most 
efficient  producers  of  every  country,  and  therefore 
she  will  only  be  able  to  secure  a  share  of  that  busi- 
ness by  being  efficient  herself. 

In  the  shoe  business  there  is  already  in  existence 
several  district  organizations  and  covering  Canada 
as  a  whole,  the  recently  formed  Shoe  Manufacturers' 
Association  of  Canada,  of  which  Mr.  F.  S.  Scott  of 
Getty  &  Scott,  Limited,  Gait,  Out.,  is  President;  Mr. 
Jos.  Daoust,  of  Daoust,  Lalonde  &  Co.,  Limited,  Mon- 
treal, is  first  vice-president;  and  Mr.  J.  D.  Palmer  of 
the  Hartt  Shoe  Co.  Limited,  Fredericton,  N.B.,  is 
second  vice-president,  the  secretary-treasurer  having 
not  yet  been  appointctl.  It  will  no  doubt  be  best  to 
build  on  this  foundation  which  has  already  been  laid 


and  to  have  such  work  dealt  with  by  the  Shoe  Manu- 
facturers' Asociation.  One  of  the  purposes  of  this  let- 
ter is  to  urge  on  all  shoe  manufacturers  the  desirabil- 
ity of  joining  this  new  organization.  As,  however  the 
Shoe  Manufacturers'  Association  is  immediately  not 
in  a  position  to  handle  the  work  in  the  way  it  would 
desire,  you  are  hearing  from  the  Canadian  Manufac- 
turers' Association  direct. 

Point  is  given  to  the  need  for  prompt  action  by 
the  fact  that  the  Government  is  already  in  receipt  of 
information  to  the  effect  that  boots  and  shoes,  for 
men,  boys,  women,  girls  and  children,  made  of  heavy 
leather,  cheap  and  durable,  will  be  most  urgently  re- 
quired. 

At  a  small  conference  of  manufacturers  held  on 
the  23rd  inst.,  it  was  their  judgment  that  men's  and 
boys'  shoes  to  suit  the  purpose  should  be  standard 
screw  in  Mennonite,  wax  split  or  waterproof  chrome, 
of  the  plainest  and  simplest  type,  eliminating  toe-caps 
and  any  features  that  add  chiefly  to  appearance  with- 
out improving  wearing  qualities.    For  women's  the 

+»_,„,_„„_„„_,„_„„_„„_„„_„„ — ._„„_„„_„._, — „_„„_„„_„„_„_„„ — ^ 
1 

!  World  Shortage  of  Leather 

j  The  following  extract,  taken  from  a  state-  j 

i  ment  issued  by  the  War  Service  Committees  of  : 

1  the  shoe  manufacturing  industry,  Tanners  Coun-  ' 

1  cil  and  shoe  wholesalers  and  retailers  of  the  Un-  ! 

I  ited  States  is  of  timely  interest:  j 

I  A   careful   survey   of  the   situation   develops  I 

I  the  fact  that  the  world   is   bare  of  leather  and  | 

J  leather  products,  and  that  exports  will  be  large  j 

I  as  soon  as  shipping  facilities  and  credit  are  avail-  j 

s  able.    Raw  stock  has  been  selling  at  maximum  5 

1  prices  in  this  country,  and  in  foreign  countries  : 

J  at  a  premium  over  maximum  prices.   It  is  clear  ! 

1  that  shoe  stocks  are  low  throughout  the  world,  1 

j  and  there  is  no  surplus  of  finished  leather  or  raw  j 

j  materials  for  civilian  needs.    Shoe  factories  are  \ 

J  sold  ahead  from  four  to  five  months. 

1 

4  4. 

choice  seemed  to  lie  between  pebble,  blucher,  unlined, 
with  toe-cap,  and  pebble,  plain  toe,  bal. 

A  general  conference  of  shoe  manufacturers  likely 
to  be  interested  in  making  these  shoes  for  export  is 
being  arranged  to  take  place  in  Ottawa  in  the  first 
week  of  January,  and  it  is  hoped  that  a  large  attend- 
ance will  be  present.  The  business,  of  this  conference 
will  be  to  .select  representative  samples,  confer  with 
the  tanners,  and  supply  men  as  to  prices  and  supplies 
of  material,  to  be  addressed  by  special  representatives 
of  the  Repatriation  and  Employment  Committee,  and 
to  select  a  delegation  to  interview  the  Ministers  of 
Finance  and  Trade  and  Commerce,  the  Canadian 
Trade  Commission,  and  officials  of  the  Customs  and 
other  departments  whose  co-operation  may  be  neces- 


January,  1919 


FOOTWEAR 


IN  CANADA 


37 


sary  for  the  successful  carrying  on  of  such  business 
as  may  eventuate.  It  is  desirable  that  the  manufac- 
turers should  be  prepared  to  furnish  a  statement 
showing  approximately  the  quantities  that  they 
might  supply  weekly  after  the  receipt  of  orders. 

Some  manufacturers  have  already  made  known 
their  intention  of  making  samples  in  accordance  with 
their  ideas  of  what  is  required,  and  will  no  doubt 
bring  them  to  the  conference.  Other  manufacturers 
will  desire  to  present  their  ideas  and  it  is  anticipated 
that  the  conference  will  be  well  supplied  with  samples. 
Without  going  into  further  detail,  at  this  time,  may 
I  request  that  you  will  take  prompt  action  in  joining 
the  Shoe  Manufacturers'  Association,  so  that  you 
-will  be  duly  notified  as  to  the  date  and  place  of  the 
future  meetings  that  will  be  called  for  the  purpose 
of  finally  deciding  upon  standard  types  of  shoes  and 
allocating  such  business  as  may  come  through  on  the 
basis  of  each  plant's  producing  capacity. 

Mr.  Slater's  Opinion 

Mr.  Geo.  A.  Slater,  of  Geo.  A.  Slater,  Limited, 
Montreal,  who  have  already  sold  a  large  number  of 
shoes  in  the  Old  Country,  states :  "The  possibilities 
for  export  under  normal  conditions  are  worthy  of  in- 
vestigation. A  careful  survey  of  the  situation  develops 
the  fact  that  the  world  is  bare  of  leather  and  leather 
products.  We  may  say  that  Eurpoe  is  barefoot  and 
this  for  a  time,  but  we  have  got  to  help  clothe  them . 
Shoes  are  one  of  the  most  essential  articles  of  apparel 
and  people,  as  a  whole,  have  to  have  footwear  when 
they  manage  to  get  along  with  a  few  new  clothes. 
Assuming  that  there  will  be  some  way  worked  out 
by  which  these  countries  can  pay  for  the  goods  they 
need  and  if  our  manufacturers  will  consolidate  their 
lines  and  concentrate  their  efforts  on  an  export  trade 
it  would  seem  as  if  a  large  business  in  export  trade 
may  be  obtained. 

"That  prices  may  eventually  come  down  is  not 
unlikely,  but  such  recession  is  not  likely  to  occur  for 
a  year  or  more  and  then  will  be  subject  to  external 
conditions.  The  shoe  industry,  dependent  as  it  is  on 
leather  as  the  main  material  used  in  its  products,  finds 
itself  afifected  as  to  supply  and  price  on  the  cattle  svip- 
ply.  Leather  is  simply  a  by-product  over  which  the 
shoe  industry  and  the  tanner  have  no  control,  so  that 
despite  a  lower  wage  scale  and  even  reduced  costs 
of  other  materials,  the  price  of  leather  may  rule  high 
for  years  and  may  show  increases  because  there  is 
every  indication  of  a  sadly  depleted  cattle  supply, 
which  may  not  be  increased  for  years  to  come.  The 
•proper  preparation  of  leather  takes  months  and  auth- 
orities seem  unanimous  in  their  opinion  that  higher 
prices  of  leather  can  only  be  prevented  by  pursuing 
a  sane,  non-speculative  merchandising  and  manufac- 
turing policy." 

Goods  Must  be  Suitable 

Mr.  Oscar  Dufresne,  of  Dufresne  &  Locke,  Limit- 
ed, Montreal,  who  spent  a  considerable  time  in  France 
— about  two  years  ago — in  connection  with  French 
army  orders,  has  the  following  to  say :  In  order  to 
secure  business  in  France  and  Belgium  it  is  impera- 
tive that  we  send  goods  suitable  for  those  markets. 
You  must  give  the  people  what  they  want.  Any  man 
sent  from  this  side  to  investigate  foreign  markets 
should  be  fully  qualified.  My  idea  is  that  such  a  re- 
presentative should  secure  samples  of  the  various 
lines,  and  that  Canadian  manufacturers  should  copy 
these  samples,  as  it  would  be  useless  to  send  Cana- 
dian goods  regardless  of  the  particular  wants  of  the 


Pointerfor  Manufacturers  :  The  importance  of  a  good  welting,  properly 
applied,  cannot  be  emphasized  too  strongly 


French  or  Belgians.  When  such  samples  are  made  up, 
the  representative  of  the  Canadian  manufacturers 
would  be  in  a  position  to  go  right  after  the  business 
with  goods  suitable  for  the  people.  It  would  be  more 
economical  for  a  man  to  represent  an  association  of 
manufacturers,  as  it  would  obviate  the  different  manu- 
facturers being  represented  by  different  people.  It 
must  not  be  overlooked  that  Great  Britain  will  strong- 
ly compete  for  trade  in  France ;  they  had  a  large  bus- 
iness there  before  the  war  and  will  no  doubt  again  go 
after  this  trade.  Foreign  business  of  this  kind  involves 
considerable  financing,  as  it  will  be  at  least  four 
months  before  the  goods  will  be  paid  for. 

A  Recognized  Authority  on  Export  Trade 
No  man  in  Canada  is  better  qualified  to  speak 
on  the  export  trade  in  boots  and  shoes  to  France  than 
Mr.  Nap.  Tetrault,  of  the  Tetrault  Shoe  Manufactur- 
ing Co.,  Limited,  Montreal,  who  have  an  office  and 
warehouse  in  Paris.  Mr.  Tetrault  has  visited  France 
three  times,  and  leaves  on  the  21st  inst.  for  another 
trip. 

He  states  that  the  Canadian  Government  are 
equipping  a  special  train  with  Canadian  natural  and 
manufactured  products  to  visit  all  the  principal  centres 
in  France.  The  exhibits  will  include  Canadian  boots 
and  shoes.  The  French  Government  will  give  free 
transportation  to  the  train,  which  will  be  in  charge 
of  an  accredited  representative. 

Mr.  Tetrault  continued :  AVe  had  to  open  a  ware- 
house in  Paris,  owing  to  the  fact  that  the  French  trade 
will  not  send  money  to  Montreal  or  New  York  before 
they  receive  the  goods. 

The  outlook  for  Canadian  trade  in  shoes  with 
France  is  very  good.  Firms  can,  just  now,  sell  all  the 
goods  they  have,  providing,  of  course,  they  are  suit- 
able for  the  market.  If  any  firm  sends  the  usual  Cana- 
dian style  goods  to  France  they  will  simply  be  losing 
their  money — one  must  study  the  wants  of  the  peo- 
ple. The  demand  is  for  medium  grade  Goodyears,  pre- 
ferably box  calf  and  box  kip,  both  for  men  and  wo- 
men. The  goods  must  have  a  short  tip  and  a  short 
vamp  made  on  French  lasts,  which  have  a  fairly  wide 
but  low  toe.  The  recede  toe  does  not  sell  in  France, 
and  it  would  be  waste  to  make  samples  of  this  char- 
acter. I  or  my  firm  will  be  very  glad  to  give  all  in- 
formation as  to  the  trade  and  as  to  the  technicalities 
to  be  observed ;  we  are  also  willing  to  show  papers 
to  any  firm  contemplating  doing  business  with  France. 
At  the  present  time  any  one  shipping  to  France  must 
secure  a  permit  from  the  French  Government,  al- 
though no  doubt  this  law  will  be  rescinded  within  the 
next  three  or  four  months.  We  have  obtained  per- 
mits right  along,  partly  no  doubt  because  our  business 
was  of  the  semi-government  order. 

It  is  hard  to  do  business  unless  a  firm  has  a  re- 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


January,  1919 


presentative  in  France.  By  having  a  man  on  the  spot 
he  can  look  after  shipments  coming  into  the  country ; 
otherwise  it  will  probably  be  two  months  before  the 
goods  get  through,  owing  to  the  freight  congestion. 
We  have  a  man  at  the  port  to  meet  the  steamer  on 
its  arrival,  with  a  view  of  seeing  that  the  goods  are 
placed  on  the  train  immediately.  Such  a  representa- 
tive secures  cars,  gets  the  goods  loaded,  and  sees 
that  the  cars  are  attached  to  a  train  leaving  for  Paris 
within  a  couple  of  days.  No  goods  should  be  shipped 
unless  they  are  insured  for  marine  risk  and  also  for 
pilfering.  The  French  people  are  very  good  payers. 

We  have  just  received  an  order  for  30,000  pairs 
I^ayable  in  Montreal,  50  per  cent,  of  the  amount  having 
been  already  deposited  in  New  York.  This  is  the 
lirst  time  that  payment  has  been  made  through  paper 
on  this  side  against  allotment  of  goods.  In  addition 
to  the  above  order,  we  have  accepted  contracts  for 
67.000  ]  airs  payable  on  arrival  in  Paris. 


Meeting  of  Ontario  Tanners 

THE  annual  meeting  of  the  tanners'  section  of 
the  Board  of  Trade  was  held  in  Toronto  on 
December  19.  Mr.  Theodore  King,  chairman 
of  the  section,  in  his  address,  stated  that  both 
leather  goods  manufacturers  and  tanners  have  been 
very  busy  and  expect  to  be  for  some  time  to  come. 
Their  chief  difficulty  now  would  be  the  labor  situa- 
tion.  The  following  is  extracted  from  his  talk: 

"In  the  beginning  of  the  year  the  market  for  hides 
commenced  an  upward  movement  and  the  prices  did 
not  cease  advancing  until  the  United  States  War 
Trade  Board  fixed  a  maximum  price  for  all  hides  in 
North  and  South  America.  These  maximum  prices 
were  well  maintained  and  assisted  in  keeping  the  mar- 
ket from  fluctuating  and  in  keeping  prices  firm.  This 
stability  has  resulted  in  less  leather  being  made  in 
Canada  during  the  year  191<S  than  for  some  years  pre- 
vious. There  are  no  stocks  of  leather  on  hand,  and 
with  the  lifting  of  embargoes  all  classes  of  leather 
will  be  required  and  high  prices  obtained. 

"The  only  cloud  on  the  horizon,  which,  however, 
may  be  only  a  mirrage,  is  the  labor  situation.  I  feel 
confident,  however,  that  the  present  situation  of  un- 
rest is  only  a  passing  phase,  and  that  with  wise  ad- 
ministration of  our  public  afifairs,  labor  will  receive 
a  full  and  complete  compliance  with  all  reasonable 
demands,  with  the  result  that  the  future  will  show  a 
combination  of  Capital  and  Labor  working  together 
for  the  attainment  of  that  for  which  we  should  all 
strive — peace  on  earth  and  good-will  to  men." 
Officers  of  Section. 
The  following  are  the  officers  of  the  Tanners'  Sec- 
tion:  Chairman,  W.  J.  Heaven;  Vice-Chairman,  John 
Sinclair;  Secretary-Treasurer,  F.  G.  Morley. 

Executive  Committee — A.  O.  Beardniore,  J.  C. 
Breithaupt,  G.  B.  Clarke,  Hon.  E.  J.  Davis,  H.  B. 
Johnston,  Theo.  King,  G.  C.  H.  Lang,  C.  G.  Marlatt, 
W.  G.  Parsons,  Chas.  Robson,  J.  Sinclair,  C.  W.  To- 
bey,  S.  R.  Wickett. 

Legislation  Committee — R.  M.  Beal,  A.  O.  Beard- 
more,  G.  B.  Clarke,  N.  D.  Clark,  Hon.  E.  J.  Davis,  H. 
B.  Johnston,  C.  G.  Marlatt,  W.  G.  Parsons,  Charles 
Robson,  Frank  Robson,  C.  W^  Tobey  and  S.  R.  Wick- 
ett. 

Transportation  Committee — R.  M.  Beal,  A.  O. 
Beardmore,  L.  J.  Breithaupt,  W.  J.  Heaven,  Theo. 
King,  G.  C.  H.  Lang,  W.  G.  Parsons,  Chas.  Robson, 
John  Sinclair  and  S.  R.  Wickett. 


Popular  Traveller  Makes  Change 

Mr.  R.  J.  McAllister  is  now  with  L.  H.  Packard 
&  Company,  Montreal,  covering  the  Western  Canada 
territory.  A  couple  of  years  ago  he  handled  the  Geo. 


Mr.  R.  J.  McAllister 


A.  Slater  lines  throughout  Western  Ontario,  but  later 
went  with  the  Brandon  Shoe  Company.  His  many 
friends  wish  him  success  in  his  latest  endeavor. 


Toronto  Repairers  Elect  Officers 

AT  a  recent  meeting  of  the  Toronto  Shoe  Re- 
pairers' Association  the  officers  were  elected 
for  the  ensuing  year.   The  voting  was  very 
keen  and  resulted  in  several  changes  of  office, 
the  following  being  the  result : 

President,  J.  W.  Hendry,  2191  Queen  East. 
Vice-President — Walter  Burnill,  75  Queen  E^ast. 
Treasurer,  A.  Butterworth,  457  Yonge  street. 
Financial  Secretary,  S.  Burnett,  761  Yonge  street. 
Recording  Secretary,  T.  McGuffin,  251  Pape  Ave. 
Executive:  C.  F.  Robertson,  497  Queen  West. 

J.  L.  Weir,  462  Parliament  Street. 
H.  E.  Carley,  1067  Gerrard  Street. 
Mr.  Hayward,  2852  Dundas  West. 
J.  Ozard,  174><  Avenue  Road. 

The  members  of  the  Association  are  planning  to 
make  things  even  more  lively  than  last  year  and,  as 
a  starter,  a  complimentary  smoker  was  given  to  the 
shoe  repairmen  of  Toronto,  on  Wednesday  evening, 
January  8,  in  Foresters  Hall.  An  excellent  programme 
was  provided  and  it  is  hoped  that  the  event  will  do 
much  towards  creating  a  more  friendly  feeling  among 
the  non-members  which  will  eventually  lead  them 
to  cast  in  their  lot  with  the  Association. 


It  is  not  uncommon  for  merchants  to  use  advertis- 
ing space  on  the  pay  envelope  of  local  manufacturers 
or  other  large  employers.  An  employer  using  pay 
envelopes  will  usually  be  glad  to  allow  an  advertiser 
to  imprint  them  with  his  advertisement  for  the  privi- 
lege of  which  he  supplies  the  envelopes. 


January,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


29 


Mr.  A.  Brandon,  Hon.  President, 
Shoe  Manufacturers'  Association  of  Canada 


Mr.  F.  S.  Scott,  M.P.,  President, 
Shoe  Manufacturers'  Association  of  Canada 


Mr.  Geo.  A.  Slater,  Hon.  President, 
Shoe  Manufacturers'  Association  of  Canada 


Dominion  Association  of  Manufacturers  Formed 

Enthusiastic  Convention  of  Canadian  Shoe  Men  Results  in  Formation 
of  The  Shoe  Manufacturers'  Association  of  Canada — 
Complete  Report  of  the  Proceedings 


THE  Shoe  Manufacturers'  Association  of  Canada 
is  now  an  accomplished  fact — the  various  meet- 
ings with  a  view  to  its  organization  having  cul- 
minated in  a  convention  held  at  the  Windsor 
Hotel,  Montreal,  on  December  19th,  1918.  This  was 
exceptionally  well  attended,  the  feature  being  the  large 
delegation  from  Quebec.  The  proceedings  were  en- 
thusiastic, and  the  decision  to  form  an  association  was 
unanimous. 

The  speeches  at  the  morning  session  were  largely 
devoted  to  trade  problems,  and  the  addresses  by  Mr. 
J.  L.  Breithaupt,  Sr.,  of  the  Breithaupt  Leather  Co., 
Ltd.,  Kitchener,  and  Hon.  E.  J.  Davis,  of  the  Davis 
Leather  Co.,  Limited,  Newmarket,  Ont.,  were  particu- 
larly informative  as  to  the  leather  situation,  and  also 
as  to  the  general  commercial  outlook.  The  question  of 
export  possibilities  was  dealt  with  by  Mr.  H.  T.  Mel- 
drum,  and  although  there  seemed  to  be  some  hope  of 
business  in  this  direction,  no  positive  action  was  taken. 

It  was  generally  agreed  that  this  was  ihe  best  shoe 
convention  ever  held  in  Canada.  All  the  speeches  were 
of  the  most  optimistic  character,  and  if  the  Association 
measures  up  to  expectations  it  should  prove  one  of  the 
livest  organizations  in  the  Dominion.  The  speeches  of 
Mr.  F.  S.  Scott,  M.P.,  gave  the  convention  a  great  lead; 
he  is  full  of  fight  for  the  interests  of  the  shoe  and  allied 
industries;  and  it  clearly  will  not  be  due  to  either  want 
of  initiative  or  virile  action  if  the  Association  does  not 
accomplish  the  objects  set  forth  in  the  constitution. 

The  Delegates 

The  following  is  a  list  of  the  delegates  registered 
and  the  companies  they  represented: — Paul  Bertrand, 


Bertrand  &  Thibault,  Quebec;  Eugene  Thibault,  Bert- 
rand &  Thibault,  Quebec;  Bisson,  Omer,  Quebec;  L. 
Blondeau,  Children's  Shoe  Mfg.,  Quebec;  J.  B.  Drolet, 
Drolet  Ltee,  J.B.,  Quebec;  Ludger  Duchaine,  Quebec; 
John  Perkins,  Duchaine  &  Perkins,  Quebec;  Herbert  \'. 
Gale,  Gale  Bros.,  Ltd.,  Quebec;  J.  H.  Gosselin,  Quebec; 
J.  B.  Goulet,  O.  Goulet,  Quebec;  Elie  Jobin,  Elie  Jobin, 
Ltd.,  Quebec;  Louis  Tanguay,  Lachance  &  Tangua)', 
Quebec;  P.  C.  Lachance,  Lachance  &  Tanguay,  Quebec; 
Eudor  Fournier,  La  Cie  des  Cuir  &  Chaussures,  Plessis- 
ville;  J.  P.  Lagace,  Lagace  &  Lepinay,  Limoilou;  G. 
Plante,  Marier  &  Trudel,  Quebec;  David  Marsh,  The 
Wm.  A.  Marsh  Co.,  Ltd.,  Quebec;  Jos.  Martin,  J.  &  A. 
Martin,  Quebec;  J.  E.  Warrington,  The  John  Ritchie 
Co.,  Ltd-,  Quebec;  M.  J.  Sheehey,  The  John  Ritchie  Co., 
Ltd.,  Quebec;  E.  Saillant,  Saillant  &  Lessard,  Quebec; 
J.  Lessard,  Saillant  &  Lessard,  Quebec;  J.  E.  Samson, 
Samson,  J.  E.,  Quebec;  Stobo,  J.  M.,  Quebec;  Tanguay, 
Jos.,  Quebec;  A.  E.  Marois,  Tourigny  &  Marois,  Que- 
bec; Alfred-  Marois,  Jr.,  Tourigny  &  Marois,  Quebec: 
Ed.  Tremblay,  Quebec;  Luc  Routier,  Quebec;  G.  W. 
McFarland,  Williams  Shoe,  Ltd.,  Brampton,  Out.;  A. 
Brandon,  Brandon  Shoe  Co.,  Brantford,  Ont.;  Richard 
Weston,  Weston  Shoe  Co.,  Ltd.,  Campbellford,  Ont.; 
F.  S.  Scott,  Getty  &  Scott.  Gait,  Ont.;  F.  H.  Ahrens, 
Chas.  A.  Ahrens,  Ltd.,  Kitchener,  Ont.;  A.  Campbell, 
Bennett,  Ltd.,  Kitchener,  Ont;  G.  P.  Stockton,  The  C. 
S.  Hyman  Co.,  Ltd.,  London,  Ont.;  A.  M.  Jarvis,  Mur- 
ray Shoe  Co.,  Ltd.,  London,  Ont.;  J.  Dombard,  Scott- 
Chamberlain,  Ltd.,  London,  Ont.;  G.  H.  AnsleJ^  Perth 
Shoe  Co.,  Ltd.,  Perth,  Ont.;  C.  E.  Hurlbut,  Hurlbut  Co.. 
Ltd.,  Preston,  Ont.;  S.  H.  Parker,  Solid  Leather  Shoe 
Co.,  Ltd.,  Preston,  Ont.;   G.  A.  Blachford,  Blachford 


;{() 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


January,  11)19 


1 


Mr.  Joseph  Daoust, 
First   Vice-President   of   the  Association 


Mr.  J.  D.  Palmer, 
Second   Vice-President   of  the  Association 


Mr.  Albert  Tetrault, 
Elected  to  the  Executive  Committee 


Shoe  Mfg.  Co.,  Toronto,  Ont.;  1-".  W.  Manson,  The 
King  Shoe  Co.,  Ltd.,  Toronto,  Ont.;  C.  S.  Sutherland, 
Amherst  Boot  &  Shoe  Co.,  Ltd.,  Amherst,  N.S.;  K.  E. 
Crosby,  Crosby  H.  H.  Co.,  Ltd.,  Hebron,  N.S.;  Clark 
Bros.,  Ltd.,  St.  Stephen,  N.B.;  J.  A.  Reid,  The  Hartt 
Boot  &  Shoe  Co.,  Ltd.,  Fredericton,  N.B.;  Narcisse 
Gagnon,  Aird  &  Son,  Montreal;  Chester  F.  Craigie, 
Ames,  Holden,  McCready,  Ltd.,  Montreal;  C.  H.  De- 
Guise,  Charbonneau  &  DeGuise,  Montreal;  J.  B.  Cor- 
Ijeil,  Montreal;  Jos.  Daoust,  Daoust,  Lalonde  &  Co., 
Ltd.,  Montreal;  Ralph  Locke,  Dufresne  &  Locke,  Mon- 
treal; A.  L.  Dupont,  Dupont  &  Frere,  Montreal;  Thos. 
H.  Robinson,  Eagle  Shoe  Co.,  Ltd.,  Montreal;  J.  Bru- 
net,  Eagle  Shoe  Co.,  Ltd.,  Montreal;  R.  L.  Stiles,  J.  R. 
Evans  Leather  Co.,  Ltd.,  Montreal;  E.  J.  Holliday, 
Footwear  in  Canada,  Montreal;  F.  H.  Devenish,  Foot- 
wear in  Canada,  Montreal;  R.  Lanthier,  Kingsbury 
I'^ootwear  Co.,  Montreal;  W.  F.  Martin,  Kingsbury 
Footwear  Co.,  Ltd.,  Montreal;  B.  Vaillancourt,  La- 
Duchesse  Shoe  Co.,  Ltd.,  Montreal;  D.  F.  Desmarais, 
LaDuchesse  Shoe  Co.,  Ltd.,  Montreal;  N.  Macfarlane, 
Macfarlane  Shoe  Co.,  Ltd.,  Montreal;  M.  L.  Packard,  L. 
H.  Packard  Co.,  Ltd.,  Montreal;  J.  I.  Chouinard,  Re- 
gina  Shoe  Co.,  Ltd.,  Montreal;  Geo.  A.  Slater,  Geo.  A. 
Slater,  Ltd.,  Montreal;  W.  Smardon,  Smardon  Shoe 
Co.,  Ltd.,  Montreal;  A.  Tetrault,  Tetrault  Shoe  Mfg. 
Co.,  Ltd.,  Montreal;  P.  A.  Doig,  Tetrault  Shoe  Mfg. 
Co.,  Ltd.,  Montreal;  W.  V.  Matthews,  Tetrault  Shoe 
Mfg.  Co.,  Ltd.,  Montreal;  F.  W.  Knowlton,  United 
Shoe  Machinery  Co.  of  Canada,  Montreal;  W.  J.  Sadler, 
Sadler  &  Haworth,  Montreal;  Art.  Harries,  Canada 
Paper  Box  Co.,  Montreal;  Geo.  V.  Davis,  Bennett  Ltd., 
Montreal;  Major  J.  A.  Scott,  Quebec. 

Opening  Formalities 

Proceedings  were  a  little  late  in  commencing,  ow- 
ing to  the  Toronto  train  not  being  on  time.  The  first 
business  of  the  convention  was  to  appoint  a  chairman, 
and  secretary  protem,  Mr.  F.  S.  Scott,  M.I:  .,  being  voted 
to  the  chair  and  Mr.  W.  P.  Hughes  named  as  secretary. 

Three  addresses  of  welcome  were  given  the  dele- 
gates.   Mr.  Geo.  A.  Slater,  speaking  for  the  Montreal 


Boot  &  Slioe  Manufactui ers'  Association,  referred  with 
satisfaction  to  the  large  response  to  the  invitations-  sent 
out.  He  suggested  the  time  was  ripe  for  the  shoe 
manufacturers  to  discuss  question.s  of  vital  importance 
to  the  trade,  and  believed  that  the  convention  would 
result  in  greater  freindship  among  the  trade. 

Mr.  Jos.  Daoust  made  the  \v'elcome  speech  in 
French.  He  reminded  the  French  Canadians  that  this 
was  a  bi-lingual  organization.  The  committee  were 
anxious  that  the  convention  should  be  on  such  lines  as 
would  make  all  delegates  feel  at  home,  discussion  and 
questions  being  freely  invited.  He  believed  that  the 
meeting  would  result  in  a  better  understandi'ig  ?mong 
the  shoe  manufacturers  of  Canada. 

Lieut. -Col.  Sadler,  vice-president  of  the  Montreal 
branch  of  the  Canadian  Manufacturers'  Association,  de- 
clared that  the  convention  would  be  of  great  and  mutual 
benefit  to  themselves  and  also  of  advantage  to  the 
country.  The  shoe  industry  was  one  of  the  most  im- 
portant industries  of  the  country,  and  the  convention 
would  be  the  means  of  demonstrating  this  fact  to  the 
country  more  than  in  the  past.  From  his  large  experi- 
ence of  associations  in  Canada  and  the  United  States, 
he  believed  that  they  resulted  in  considerable  lienefit 
to  all  concerned. 


The  Leather  Market 

The  convention  then  took  up  the  question  of  trade 
problems.  The  first  speaker,  Mr.  L.  J.  Breithaupt,  Sr., 
who,  in  considering  the  future  possibilities  of  the  lea- 
ther market,  spoke  of  the  great  conflict  whicli  had  now 
closed,  and  from  which  the  British  Emjiire  had  emerged 
victoriously,  owing  to  the  British  Xav)-.  .\s  Canadians, 
he  said,  they  could  look  with  satisfaction  upon  the  part 
they  had  taken  in  the  war,  and  the  engagements  of 
Cambrai,  Mons,  and  others,  bore  witness  to  Canada's 
great  achievements.  But,  he  continued,  we  had  to  face 
conditions  as  they  are  at  present  and  also  to  face  seri- 
ous problems  in  regard  to  the  future.  He  personall)- 
had  changed  liis  mind  as  to  conditions '  in  tlie  leather 


January,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


Mr.  W.  F.  Martin, 
Elected  to  the  Executive  Committee 


Mr.  J.  I.  Chouinard, 
Elected  to  the  Executive  Committee 


The  late  Mr.  R.  E.  Dildine, 
Elected  to  the  Executive  Committee 


market.  He  had  l^een  of  the  opinion  that  a  slump  was 
inevital)le,  but  he  had  now  taken  up  a  more  optimistic 
attitude.  Prices,  of  course,  were  abnormal  to-day,  but 
he  did  not  see  how  they  could  be  reduced  in  the  im- 
mediate future.  Labor  was  not  going  to  be  cheaper, 
and  as  long  as  wheat  and  other  commodities  remained 
at  their  present  level  there  was,  in  his  view,  little  chance 
of  wages  coming  d(mn.  Besides  the  labor  situation, 
raw  material  was  high  in  price  and  in  this  connection 
he  pointed  particularly  to  the  high  cost  of  tanning  ma- 
terials and  to  the  heavy  increase  in  the  cost  of  ma- 
chinery. There  was  no  great  surplus  of  leather  in  this 
country;  the  only  immediate  surplus  was  army  leather 
which  had  been  refused  by  the  government,  and  in  this 
matter  he  was  hopeful  that  a  fair  settlement  would  be 
made.  There  was  a  surplus  of  heavy  army  leather  and 
leather  made  from  prime  packer  steer  hides;  there  was 
a  surplus  of  heavy  army  upper  leather.  Mr.  Breithaupt 
pointed  out  difficulties  in  securing  hides,  and  then  went 
on  to  discuss  the  ,probable  demand  from  Europe  for 
boots  and  shoes  and  leather.  While  it  was  possible 
that  England  might  not  require  so  much  leather  as  m 
the  past.  Continental  Europe,  he  said,  was  exceedingly 
short  of  leather  and  boots  and  shoes.  Summing  up 
the  whole  situation,  he  believed  that  there  was  no 
prospect  of  an  immediate  slump;  probably  there  would 
be  a  gradual  decline,  for  prices  would  have  to  come 
down  sooner  or  later.  Canada  had  a  wonderful  future 
which  was  just  beginning  to  be  realized  and  he  ex- 
pected the  country  to  go  ahead  by  leaps  and  bounds. 
With  regard  to  the  export  of  shoes,  there  was  no  doubt 
an  opening  in  this  direction;  one  Montreal  manufac- 
turer had  already  done  a  great  deal,  and  the  speaker 
thought  that  more  could  yet  be  done.  In  that  con- 
nection he  advocated  Canadian  manufacturers  exhibit- 
ing at  the  great  fair  at  Lyons,  France. 

Address  by  Hon.  E.  J.  Davis 

Hon.  E.  J.  Davis  expressed  his  pleasure  at  seeing 
Mr.  F.  S.  Scott,  a  member  of  the  Dominion  Parlia- 
ment, in  the  chair;  there  never  was  a  time  when  the 
country  needed   such   practical   Inisiness   men   as  Mr. 


Scott  in  the  House  of  Commons.  He  congratulated  the 
shoe  manufacturers  upon  getting  together;  there  should 
be  harmony  and  unity  in  the  industry  not  only  for  the 
sake  of  the  manufacturers  themselves,  btit  for  the  sake 
of  the  country.  It  was  by  this  getting  together,  by  the 
rubbing  of  shoulders,  that  they  received  hints  of  im- 
mense value.  Mr.  Davis  went  on  to  point  out  the  ad- 
\antages  of  the  Canadian  Manufacturers'  Association 
in  dealing  with  such  problems  as  freight,  transporta- 
tion, customs  rates,  etc.  His  experience  was  that  an 
association  was  of  even  more  value  to  the  small  manu- 
facturer than  to  the  large  manufacturer. 

Discussing  the  leather  situation,  Mr.  Davis  said 
that  there  was  no  reason  to  believe  that  there  would 
l)e  an  excess  quantity  of  hides  for  some  time  to  come, 
neither  was  the  price  likely  to  depreciate.  As  an  in- 
dication of  the  opinion  held  in  England  he  stated  that 
his  firm  had  received  a  cable  offering  to  buy  a  large 
quantity  of  wax  splits  to  be  stored  in  this  country  for 
twelve  months;  this,  at  any  rate,  indicated  the  feeling 
abroad.  With  regard  to  calf  skins,  the  speaker  referred 
to  the  great  difficulty  in  securing  skins  during  the  war 
owing  to  the  sources  of  supply  lieing  largely  cut  of¥. 
If  he  were  a  shoe  manufacturer  he  would  certainly  not 
go  short  of  supplies  for  his  business  and  would  watch 
the  situation  day  by  day.  Mr.  Davis  then  proceeded  to 
discuss  the  question  of  costs,  which  he  divided  into 
"controllable"  and  "uncontrollable,"  and  on  comment- 
ing on  the  latter  pointed  out  how  the  manufacturers 
had  cheerfully  liorne  the  heavy  war  taxes  for  patriotic 
purposes.  At  the  same  time,  the  imposition  of  these 
taxes  was  a  handicap  in  securing  foreign  business.  He 
was  glad  to  notice  that  the  government  had  decided  to 
secure  shipping  facilities  for  this  country  so  that  Can- 
ada would  be  in  a  position  to  carry  goods  in  Canadian 
l:)oats,  thus  giving  her  a  decided  advantage. 

As  to  the  period  of  readjustment,  all  classes  must 
do  their  part.  Personally,  he  was  willing  to  run  his 
factory  without  profit  to  give  the  returned  men  work. 
The  farmers  were  agitating  to  secure  legislation  which 
would  put  the  burden  of  the  country's  debt  on  other 
people's  shoulders,  Init  he  insisted  that  the  farmer,  tlie 


32 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


January,  1919 


4... 
1 

i 


.,,4. 
I 


manufacturer  and  the  laborer  must  each  do  their  part 
and  come  to  a  common  understanding  in  order  to  ad- 
vance the  interests  of  Canada. 

Mr.  R.  E.  Dildine,  general  manager  of  Ames,  Hol- 
den,  McCready,  Ltd.,  was  to  have  read  a  paper  on 
"Trade  Conditions  from  the  Selling  Standpoint,"  i)ut 
the  chairman  announced  with  regret  that  Mr.  Dildine 
had  undergone  an  operation  for  appendicitis.  (His 
death  later  came  as  a  distinct  shock  to  the  entire  shoe 
trade). 

Standardizing  of  Cartons 

After  extending  greetings  from  the  Canadian  Paper 
Box  Makers'  Association,  of  which  he  is  president,  Mr. 
Art.  Harries  stated:  As  I  was  largely  responsible  for 
the  formation  of  the  paper  box  section  of  the  Can- 
adian Manufacturers'  Association,  I  was  very  much 
amused  when  one  of  the  members  warned  me  rot  to 
let  the  shoe  men  know  of  our  association.  My  answer 
was,  "The  shoe  men  have  their  own  association,  and  do 
not  fix  prices,  therefore  they  would  certainly  not  ac- 
cuse us  of  doing  so." 

I  am  going  to  try  and  convince  you  of  the  import- 
ance of  adopting  a  standard  size  of  shoe  carton.  I  am 
sure  you  have  standard  sizes  of  shoes;  why  not  the 
same  in  boxes?  I  consider  the  backbone  of  the  paper 
box  business  is  "service  and  prompt  delivery,"  and 
certainly  with  standard  sizes  your  box  maker  could  give 
better  service,  as  they  could  be  cut  in  large  runs  and 
more  quickly  if  required.  Prices  also  might  be  con- 
sidered, as  raw  material  could  be  procured  from  the 
mill  in  a  size  to  eliminate  waste. 

The  regular  size  of  board  is  30  x  -tO  inches  and 
the  cost  is  based  on  the  number  of  boxes  that  can  be 
cut  from  this  sheet.  One  carton  that  I  make  cuts  four 
from  this  sheet,  so  for  this  contract  I  buy  :!3  x  40  and 
cut  six  boxes  from  a  sheet. 

The  retailer's  shelving  would  be  made  to  suit,  if 
he  knew  that  all  his  shoes  would  be  delivered  in  a 
standard  size  carton,  and  your  carton  with  your  ad- 
vertisement on  it  would  be  passed  on  to  the  wearer, 
but  under  .present  conditions  the  majority  of  large  re- 
tailers change  to  their  own  boxes  and  your  advertising 
is  lost. 

I  know  of  a  large  retailer  who  made  his  shelving 
to  suit  the  American  standard  sizes  and  supplied  a 
sample  carton  to  the  Canadian  factories,  which  they 
were  obliged  to  copy  when  selling  shoes  to  his  firm. 
I  also  have  a  factory  to  manufacture  fil^re  shipping  con- 
tainers, and  know  well  the  inconvenience  of  odd  sizes 
in  packing  cases  and  feel  sure  that  the  manufacturers  of 
wood  and  corrugated  boxes  would  also  be  delighted  to 
hear  of  the  adoption  of  standard  sizes.  Unlike  shoe 
cartons,  the  makers  of  fibre  and  corrugated  cases  make 
the  board  themselves,  and  make  it  in  a  size  to  suit  the 
case  ordered,  therefore  a  difference  of  or  54  of  an 
inch  in  the  shoe  cartons  makes  a  difference  in  the  size 
of  the  sheet  and  the  price  of  the  container. 

We  often  receive  mail  and  even  telegraph  enquiries 
for  quotations  and  delivery  of,  we  will  say,  as  an  ex- 
ample, a  fifteen  pair  men's  container.  Before  we  can 
quote  a  price  we  have  to  request  the  customer  to  send 
us  a  sample  of  the  carton  he  uses,  from  this  sample 
we  make  up  15  boxes  to  test  our  container, .  which  is 
really  a  needless  expense  and  delay.    I  remember  well 


an  incident  which  occurred  in  my  factory  which  shows 
what  trouble  even  of  an  inch  will  cause,  wliich  would 
have  been  avoided  had  standard  sizes  been  in  use. 

John  Doe  was  using  a  men's  carton  12J/2  x  x 
■iy%  score  size,  buying  from  two  box  factories.  One 
morning  his  purchasing  department  demanded  delivery 
within  a  few  hours  of  2,000  cartons  with  a  special  label. 
There  were  none  of  that  size  cut  but  we  had  a  lot 
partly  made  of  John  Brown's  size,  which  was  12H  ^ 
(>%  X  4^.  To  get  immediate  delivery,  John  Doe  ac- 
cepted this  size  and,  as  we  got  away  with  it  that  time, 
we  continued  the  one  size  for  the  two  customers  for 
over  two  years,  but  our  sin  was  at  last  found  out. 

John  Doe  wanted  some  24  pair  fibre  containers  and 
we  made  them  to  suit  the  carton  we  were  supplying 
him,  but  when  delivered  were  found  to  be  Y2  inch  too 
short  for  the  cartons  he  was  purchasing  from  the  other 
box  factory,  who  liad  continued  the  12J/$  inch  size. 
It  would  have  been  no  inconvenience  to  either  of  these 
shoe  firms  to  have  used  the  I214  or  the  12>^  inch  as 
a  standard  size. 

The  United  States  War  Board  made  very  severe 
restrictions  on  the  paper  box  industry,  which  seemed 
to  us  at  first  sight  as  unnecessary,  such  as  the  elim- 
ination of  the  gold  trim,  the  paper  fly,  the  bottom 
piece,  the  news  lining  on  the  board,  tissue,  etc.,  but 
no  doubt  they  had  studied  the  question  thoroughly 
before  making  the  rule,  and  it  has  at  least  taught  us 
the  lesson  that  we  must  do  all  in  our  power  to  save 
material  and  labor  and  avoid  unnecessary  waste.  Now, 
gentlemen,  that  is  the  trouble,  what  is  the  cure? 

I  have  here  a  card  which  reads: 

Standard  Sizes  of  Cartons 

Resolved,  that  this  Association  adopt  stand- 
ard measurements  for  cartons  as  follows: — Men's 
12%  X  6^  X  4>^;  boys'  11^4  x  6  x  3%;  youth's 
10^  X  5^  x  3^;  women's  11J4  x  5/4  x  3J4;  mis- 
ses' lOH  X  4%  X  3^;  children's  8%  x  414  x  2)^— 
outside  measurements. 

And  be  it  further  resolved  that  the  members 
and  the  trade  generally  be  urged  to  put  same  in- 
to general  use  for  standard  cartons  when  no 
special  cartons  are  ordered  and  when  new  fix- 
tures are  installed. 

Adopted  January  14,  1914,  National  Boot  & 
Shoe  Manufacturers'  Association. 
To  a  boxmaker  these  sizes  seem  about  right.  I  am 
not  sure  that  they  are  in  force  now,  perhaps  some  of 
your  members  could  inform  us  on  that,  but  certainly  if 
my  proposal  should  meet  with  your  favorable  con- 
sideration it  would  be  easy  to  adopt  a  standard  size  that 
would  be  acceptable  to  all. 

Discussion  on  Cartons 

At  the  afternoon  session  the  question  of  the  stand- 
ardization of  cartons  came  up,  the  chairman  stating  that 
some  movement  had  been  made  in  this  direction  in 
Ontario.  They  had  adopted  certain  standards,  but 
probaljly  the  time  was  ripe  for  the  whole  country  to 
get  down  to  a  standard. 

Mr.  Geo.  A.  Slater  was  of  the  opinion  that  it  was 
to  the  general  interest  that  a  standard  carton  should 
l)e  adopted.  It  would  be,  he  thought,  more  economical 
and  would  also  please  the  retailer,  making  their  shelves 
look  more  uniform. 

Later   in   the   day   the   following   resolution  was 


I 

..4. 


January,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


33 


4... 
I 


Mr.  A.  E.  Marois, 
Member  of  the  Executive  Committee 


Mr.  G.  W.  McFarland, 
Member  of  the  Executive  Committee 


Mr.  Geo.  A.  Elachford, 
Member  of  the  Executive  Committee 


adopted:  "That  this  Association  endorse  the  idea  of 
standardization  of  cartons  and  shipping  cases  and  that 
a  committee  ■be  appointed  to  work  out  the  details  in 
this  connection." 

Our  Export  Trade 

A  very  interesting  address  followed,  on  "Export 
Trade  Possibilities,"  by  Mr.  H.  T.  Meldrum,  Canadian 
representative  for  R.  Martens  &  Co.,  Ltd.,  London, 
England.     Mr.  Meldrum  said: 

I  very  much  appreciate  the  honor  of  having  been 
asked  to  address  you  on  this  important  occasion,  and 
in  the  first  place  I  must  take  opportunity  of  congratu- 
lating you  on  at  last  coming  together  in  an  all-Can- 
adian convention  of  shoe  manufacturers.  It  was  a  mat- 
ter which  I  had  often  discussed  with  some  of  you,  and 
more  particularly  with  my  good  friend  Mr.  George 
Slater,  who,  as  you  know,  holds  very  strong  and  very 
sound  views  on  the  benefits  to  be  obtained  by  co-opera- 
tion in  the  industry.  When  I  was  secretary  of  the 
Canadian  Manufacturers'  Association  at  Montreal,  there 
were  difficulties  in  the  way  which  seemed  to  preclude 
the  formation  of  a  National  Association.  I  am  very 
happy  indeed  to  learn  that  these  have  been  overcome. 

The  shoe  industry  is  one  of  the  most  important 
in  the  Dominion  and  by  meeting  often  for  discussion 
of  your  problems,  and  by  united  action  aimed  to  reform 
abuses  which  exist  in  the  trade,  you  will  enhance  that 
importance  and  take  a  stronger  place  in  the  country. 

I  have  been  asked  to  speak  on  "Export  Oppor- 
tunities," with  reference,  of  course,  to  the  boot  and 
shoe  industry.  You  will  not  misunderstand  me  when 
I  say  that  it  is  a  subject  which  I  approach  with  some 
hesitation.  In  every  country  of  the  world  there  is  a 
certain  production  of  footwear,  though  in  some  places, 
no  doubt,  it  is  of  a  primitive  nature.  However,  when 
customs  tariflfs  were  formulated  no  one  ever  overlooked 
shoes,  because  the  industry  was  one  capable  of  expan- 
sion at  home.  The  result  is  that  wherever  you  go 
with  shoes  for  export  you  are  up  against  a  wall.  Your 
aim  is  to  discover  where  such  walls  are  surmountable. 


But  coincident  with  such  endeavor  you  should,  in 
my  opinion,  carry  on  a  more  vigorous  campaign  for 
an  expansion  of  business  at  home.  Despite  the  import 
duty  of  30  per  cent.,  and  lyk  per  cent,  war  duty,  there 
was  a  big  importation  of  shoes  from  the  United  States 
last  year.  There  seems  to  be  two  reasons  chiefly  con- 
tributory to  this  situation.  One,  a  silly  prejudice  which 
still  exists  in  the  minds  of  some  Canadians  towards  an 
imported  shoe,  although  there  are  shoes  of  as  good 
quality  and  as  good  value  made  in  Canada  as  there  are 
in  the  world.  You  must  carry  on  a  campaign  of  educa- 
tion along  these  lines.  Money  spent  on  the  propaga- 
tion of  the  Made  in  Canada  idea,  is  money  well  spent 
and  you  must  keep  this  slogan  to  the  fore.  A  second 
cause  is  "dumping,"  and  for  this  there  is  a  remedy. 
No  doubt  most  of  you  hesitate  to  report  a  case  of  dump- 
ing, lest  it  become  known  and  you  offend  a  desirable 
customer.  But  if  you  will  all  agree  to  report  such 
cases  as  come  to  your  attention  you  would  soon  stop 
it.  You  cannot  expect  the  customs  authorities  to  deal 
with  this  problem  unaided,  and  I  am  well  assured  that 
they  would  welcome  your  co-operation.  You  must 
get  a  stronger  grip  on  your  home  market. 

In  the  past  you  have  scarcely  looked  at  all  for 
outside  business.  I  note  that  in  1914  exports  of  leather 
boots  reached  a  value  of  only  $82,000;  since  that  time 
there  has  been  a  considerable  increase,  but  largely  on 
war  l)usiness.  Undoubtedly,  however,  the  changes 
brought  about  by  the  war  will  affect,  all  classes  of 
trade  very  considerably,  and  you  may  now  find  an  out- 
let which  has  heretofore  been  denied. 

I  have  understood  that  one  considerable  factor  in 
the  price  of  shoes  in  Canada  was  the  high  wages,  and 
as  we  know,  the  cost  of  labor  in  Western  Europe  was 
50  to  100  per  cent,  below  ours.  This  condition,  how- 
ever, will  no  longer  obtain.  Standards  of  living  have 
advanced  materially  in  Europe  during  the  past  four 
years,  and  at  the  same  time  labor  has  become  a  strong- 
political  force.  Therefore,  while  I  fear  that  there  may 
be  a  great  deal  of  distress  in  the  Old  World  due  to 
unemployment,  yet  it  will  not  result  in  a  reduction 
of  the  wage  scale  to  anything  like  the  old  figures.  You 


■+ 


34 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


January,  1919 


will  therefore  have  less  to  fear  from  European  com- 
petition in  outside  markets  than  was  previously  the 
case. 

I  am  strongly  of  the  opinion  that  you  should  make 
a  serious  attempt  to  get  into  foreign  markets;  and  I 
will  offer  some  suggestions  as  to  how  it  might  he  un- 
dertaken. Now  I  may  he  wrong,  as  1  am  only  a  lay- 
man, but  I  am  inclined  to  think  that  the  great  major- 
ity of  you  do  not  specialize  sufficiently,  but  dissipate 
a  certain  amount  of  your  strength  in  variety  produc- 
tion.   For  successful  export  you  must  specialize. 

Briefly,  my  idea  is  this:  that  the  makers  of  each 
class  of  shoes  should  get  together  and  pool  their  in- 
terests. They  should  draw  up  a  questionnaire  cover- 
ing all  the  information  desired  concerning  their  par- 
ticular line.  Then  as  a  preliminary  step  they  might 
send  this  out  to  the  Canadian  Trade  Commissioner  in 
the  country  in  which  they  desire  to  trade.  Our  Trade 
Commissioner  Service  covers  practically  all  the  desir- 
able markets  and  it  comprises  men  of  ability  and  en- 
ergy who'  are  most  anxious  to  assist  Canadian  busi- 
ness. The  Commissioner,  l)y  a  study  of  the  situation 
on  the  lines  indicated  by  the  questionnaire  and  by  the 
comparison  of  Canadian  styles  and  prices  with  com- 
peting lines,  would  be  able  to  furnish  such  a  report  as 
would  enable  you  to  decide  whether  or  not  it  were 
worth  while  to  go  further.  If  the  report  was  favor- 
al)le,  then  send  out  your  qualified  representative  to 
make  a  closer  study  of  the  market  and  to  make  sales 
arrangements. 

I  suggest  the  group  system  because  the  work  of 
direct  investigation  is  costly  and  one  of  you  alone 
would  hesitate  to  go  out  on  an  extensive  survey  of 
world  markets.  But  acting  jointly  you  divide  the  ex- 
pense and  at  the  same  time  provide  a  striking  force 
which  will  make  you  much  more  important  in  foreign 
fields. 

Now  you  will  ask  what  are  the  available  markets? 
To  follow  the  line  of  least  resistance  you  would  natur- 
ally look  first  to  those  countries  where  Canada  enjoys 
preferential  fiscal  treatment, — New  Zealand,  which 
gives  our  products  an  advantage  of  3:!  l/;>  per  cent,  of 
the  duty  over  non-British  countries, — South  Africa, 
which  gives  a  preference  of  I!  per  cent,  ad  valorem — 
the  islands  of  the  British  West  Indies,  with  most  of 
which  we  have  special  tariff  arrangements.  In  France, 
too,  we  have  a  slight  preference  under  the  Treaty  of 
1908.  It  is  true  that  this  treaty  has  l)een  denounced 
as  from  September  next,  but  this  will  probably  l^e 
arranged  again  on  somewhat  similar  lines. 

There  is  an  especially  strong  possibility  in  France 
during  the  next  three  or  four  years,  pending  the  set- 
tlement of  the  social  disturbances  e.\istent  in  so  great 
a  portion  of  industrial  Europe. 

I  am  given  to  understand  that  South  America  of- 
fers very  large  opportunities,  and  another  very  import- 
ant field  is  Siberia.  That  is  a  vast  agricultural  coun- 
try with  a  population  approaching  twenty  millions. 
The  efforts  of  the  All-Russian  Government,  assisted  by 
.\llied  tropps,  have  practically  brought  order  out  of 
the  chaos  which  existed.  There  is  an  absolute  short- 
age of  footwear  of  all  kinds,  and  our  manufacturers 
should  be  prepared  to  do  business  there  just  as  soon  as 
some  proper  money  value  can  be  established. 

I  have  expressed  these  ideas  with  a  view  to  open- 
ing the  subject  for  discussion,  and  I  trust  that  they 


maj'  l)e  at  least  helpful  in  arriving  at  a  solution  of 
tile  problem. 

Discussion  on  Export  Possibilities 

Mr.  V.  Doig,  in  discussing  the  question  of  export 
trade,  said  that  one  of  the  most  discouraging  features 
was  the  initial  cost  of  introducing  goods.  He  was  in 
favor  of  sending  out  a  first-class  shoe  man  to  study 
the  requirements  of  the  foreign  business  and  to  bring 
hack  samples  of  what  was  required.  Mr.  Doig  went  on 
to  say  that  some  of  the  commercial  commissioners 
were  easily  discouraged  because  of  the  higher  costs 
of  Canadian  goods.  One  reason  why  Canadians  diil 
not  get  more  foreign  trade  was  because  of  the  timidity 
of  the  manufacturers. 

Mr.  G.  A.  Slater  said  that  Canadian  manufacturers 
did  not  realize  the  opportunities  ofTering  in  the  export 
line.  It  was  not  a  good  thing  for  men  representing 
other  lines  to  also  represent  shoes;  specialization  was 
needed.  He  suggested  the  appointment  of  a  number 
of  groups  among  Canadian  manufacturers,  who  would 
agree  amongst  themselves  as  to  the  amount  of  orders 
they  would  be  able  to  execute,  such  manufacturers  also 
concentrating  upon  a  certain  number  of  lines. 

Mr.  Meldrum,  as  representing  an  English  com- 
pany, offered  to  co-operate  with  the  manufacturers  ex- 
porting boots  and  shoes,  particularly  to  l-iussia. 

Invitation  to  Inspect  Leatherboard  Factory 

Mr.  Geo.  Davis,  of  Bennetts,  Limited,  extended  an 
invitation  to  the  delegates  to  visit  their  counter  and 
leatherboard  factory  at  Chambly.  He  pointed  out  that 
his  company  bought  their  raw  material  from  the  shoe 
manufacturers  and  resold  the  finished  product  to 
them  again,  which  was  a  rather  unique  feature  in  in- 
dustry. At  the  factory  they  would  see  the  scrap  lea- 
ther l)eing  converted  into  heelboard,  and  he  add- 
ed, that  there  vvas  a  greater  demand  for  this  com- 
modity every  day. 

Mr.  Jos.  Daoust  then  spoke  in  French,  and  re- 
peated his  speech  in  English  for  the  benefit  of  those 
not  acquainted  with  the  French  language.  Incident- 
ally he  referred  to  the  great  value  of  being  bilingual 
and,  in  alluding  to  a  previous  remark  by  Hon.  E.  J. 
Davis,  that  he  would  give  a  thousand  dollars  to  be 
able  to  speak  French,  stated  that  he  (Mr.  Daoust). 
would  not  be  without  his  knowledge  of  English  for 
a  hundred  thousand  dollars.  Mr.  Daoust  went  on  to 
speak  of  the  benefit  of  such  an  association  as  they 
were  about  to  form.  He  recalled  the  existence  of  the 
pool  of  sole  leather  tanners,  which  agreed  to  give 
a  rebate  of  5  per  cent,  to  those  doing  business  en- 
tirelj'  with  the  members  of  the  pool.  This  existed 
for  several  3'ears  and  went  to  pieces  because  of  in- 
ternal dissensions,  after  putting  up  the  price,  and 
thus  getting  back  the  rebate. 

On  the  question  of  export  Mr.  Daoust  had  re 
ceived  during  the  war  a  letter  of  enquiry  from  an 
Egyptian  importer,  asking  as  to  the  possibilities  of 
l;)uying  shoes  in  this  country.  He  replied  that  the 
importer  could  obtain  all  the  goods  he  required  in 
Canada,  and  since  then,  he  had  received  another  let- 
ter, announcing  that  tlie  importer  was  coming  to  this 
country. 

Personally,  lie  had  received  l)enefit  from  sucli 
associations,  and  he  related  how  he  had  picked  up  at 


1 


January,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


35 


I 


 ._.  


Mr.  N.   B.  Detwilei, 
Member  of  the  Executive  Committee 


Mr.   C.   S.  Sutherland, 
Member  of  the  Executive  Committee 


Mr.  L.  J.  Breithaupt  gave  a  very  interest- 
ing and   informative  talk  on   the  leather 
situation 


a  meeting,  in  Toronto,  methods  to  oliviate  certain 
difficulties  encountered  in  making  harness  leather. 
Mr.  Daoust  concluded  by  moving  in  favor  of  the  for- 
mation of  a  Shoe  Manufacturers"  Association  for  Can- 
ada. 

Mr.  A.  Brandon  seconded  Mr.  Daoust's  motion. 
Organization,  he  said,  meant  the  success  of  their 
business;  it  led  to  efficiency  and,  without  efficiency, 
costs  would  be  too  high.  In  Ontario  they  had  been 
endeavoring  to  organize  the  shoe  manufacturers  and 
they  had  to  thank  the  war  for  Ijringing  their  forces 
together.  Organization  had  saved  Canada  and  the 
world.  He  hoped  that  the  members  of  the  association 
would  be  as  loyal  as  the  Allies  had  been  to  Mar- 
shal Foch  in  the  war.  He  paid  a  tribute  to  Mr.  Geo. 
A.  Slater  for  his  work  in  connection  with  the  asso- 
ciation. 

The    resolution    was    unanimously  carried. 

The  Constitution 


I. — Name 


1.  The  name  of  tlie  .\ssociation  sliiill  lie  the  Shoe  Manufac- 
turers' Association  of  Canada,  (section  of  the  Canadian  Manu- 
facturers' Association). 

2.  The  Head  Office  of  the  Association  shall  be  situated  at 
Montreal. 

II. — Purposes 
.'!.     The  purjioscs  of  tl.is  Association  shall  he — 
(a)  To  jironiote  and  foster  the  interests  of  those  individuaK. 
firms,  jiartnersiiips  and  corporal  ions  en(J::iged  in  the  manu- 
facture of  1  oots  and  shoes  in  tlie  Dominion  of  Canada, 
(h)  To  cncouiage   the   fornialion   of   local   shoe  manufacturers' 
associatior.s. 

(c)  To  reform  abuses  existing  in   the  trade. 

(d)  To  secure  freedom  from  unjust  or  unlawful  exactions. 

(e)  To  ditTuse  to  its  members  accurate  and  reliable  information. 

(f)  To  procure  uniformity  in   the  customs  and  usages  of  the 
trade. 

(g)  To  encourage  export  business. 

(h)  To  promote  fiiendly  intercourse  among  members. 

III. — Membership 
4.     .\ny  individual,  firm,  iiartnership  or  corporation  who  is  now, 
or  may  become,  a  member  of  the  Canadian  Manufacturers'  Asso- 
ciation, and  who  is  engaged  in  tlie  manufacture  of  boots  and  shoes 
in   Canada,  sliall  be  eligible  for  menibersliip. 


.").  .\i)pIication  for  membershiii  shall  be  maile  in  writing  to 
tile  Secretary-Treasurer. 

li.  Power  to  deal  with  a])plicatiims  shall  be  vested  in  the 
Kxecutive  Committee.  On  receipt  of  an  application,  the  Committee, 
if  not  in  session,  shall  at  once  be  notilled  by  mail.  If  the  majority 
of  the  Committee  advises  acceptance,  the  applicant  shall  be  so  iioti- 
licd  and  he  shall  be  considered  elected  on  payment  of  fees. 

T.  .\ny  member  wishing  to  withdraw  from  this  Association 
must  give  notice  to  that  effect  to  the  Secretary-Treasurer  three 
months  in  advance,  in  writing,  and  pay  all  arrears  of  dues  and 
assessments  of  the  .\ssociation. 

IV.— Officers 

N.  The  officers  of  this  .\ssociation  shall  be  an  Honorary  Pre- 
sident, a   President,  two  Vice-Presidents,  and  Secretary-Treasurer. 

0.  The  President  shall  have  general  supervision  over  the  affairs 
of  the  .\ssociation.  He  shall  jneside  at  all  meetings  of  the  Asso- 
ciation and  of  the  Executive  Committee.  He  shall  be  a  member 
ex-officio  of  all  other  committees. 

1(\  The  Vice-Presidents  in  order  of  their  seniority  shall,  in 
the  abser.c2  or  disability  of  the  President,  assume  his  duties. 

11.  It  shall  be  the  duty  of  tlie  .Secretary-Treasurer  to  keep  a 
correct  list  of  the  members  and  their  addresses  and  a  true  and 
correct  record  of  all  proceedings  wdiether  of  the  .\ssociation  or  of 
its  Executive  Committee  or  of  any  committee  reporting  thereto. 
He  shall  conduct  the  correspondence  of  the  Association.  He  shall 
collect  and  carefully  preserve  all  books,  papers,  letters,  record  and 
accounts  relating  to,  or  of  interest  to  the  Association.  These  he 
shall  deliver  up,  when  directed  to  do  so  by  the  Executive  Com- 
mittee to  such  person  or  jiersons  as  it  shall  direct,  and  shall  per- 
form all  duties  wdiich  the  nature  of  his  office  may  require,  or  the 
Executive   Committee  may  order. 

He  shall  be  custodian  of  the  funds  of  the  .Vssociation  ;  he  shall 
cause  to  be  deposited  with  a  chartered  bank  to  the  credit  of  the 
.\ssociation  in  a  general  account  all  moneys  received,  and  no 
moneys  shall  be  withdrawn  therefrom  without  the  signature  of  the 
President  or  the  Secretary-Treasurer  and  the  signature  of  such 
other  officer  or  member  as  may  be  determined  by  resolution  of  the 
Executive  Committee.  He  shall  report  regularly  to  the  Executive 
Committee  uiion  the  .Xssociation's  financial  standing.  He  shall  pro- 
vide a  surety  bond  at  the  expense  of  the  Association,  and  in  such 
amount  as  shall  be  determined  by  the  Executive  Committee.  The 
books  and  accounts  shall  be  kept  at  the  head  office  of  the  Associa- 
tion, and  shall  be  open  to  the  inspection  of  any  member  of  the 
Executive  Committee  dtuing  business  hoius. 

12.  The  Secrf-tary-Treasurer  who  may  be  a  salaried  officer, 
shall  be  appointed  by  the  'Executive  Committee  and  his  remunera- 
tion shall  be  determined  by  that  body. 

V. — Committees 

lo.  The  Executive  Committee  shall  be  composed  of  the  Presi- 
dent, the  two  N'ice-Presidents  and  one  representative  for  every  five 


T 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


January,  1919 


1 


members  or  fraction  tliereof  according;  to  tlic  following  geographical 
divisions — ■ 

(1)  Western — including  tlie  i'rairie  Provinces  and 
British  Columbia. 

(2)  Province  of  Ontario. 

(3)  Province  of  Quebec. 

(4)  Maritime  Provinces. 

14.  The  Executive  Committee  shall  carry  out  or  supervise  the 
carrying  out  of  the  instructions  of  ilie  Association.  It  shall  act 
as  the  representative  of  tlie  A^^-.u  iaiiun,  when  the  latter  is  not  in 
session.  It  shall  have  general  supervision  over  the  policies  of  the 
Association ;  to  it  all  committees  shall  report,  and  the  actions  of 
such  committees  shall  at  all  times  be  subject  to  its  revisions.  It 
shall  be  empowered  to  fill  any  vacancies,  whether  within  itself  or 
on  any  committee  caused  by  a  death  or  resignation  and  to  iill 
tini]U)rarily  the  place  of  any  ofHccr  or  any  member  nf  any  com- 
mittee who,  from  any  cause,  may  be  absent  from- duty. 

15.  Tlie  President  may  call  a  meeting  of  the  E.xecutive  Com- 
mittee at  his  pleasure  and  shall  do  so  on  the  written  requisition 
of  any  three  members  of  the  Executive  Committee  within  tlnee 
days  of  bis  receipt  of  such  request.  Me»nbers  of  tlie  .\ssociatioii 
shall  have  the  privilege  of  attending  Executive  Committee  meet- 
ings, but  only  members  of  the  Committee  shall  have  votes. 

1C«.  Written  notice  of  same  shall  be  sent  by  the  Secietary- 
Trea^iirer  to  all  members  of  the  Committee  at  least  three  days  be- 
foie  llie  (late  fi.xed  for  the  meeting. 

17.  At  the  Executive  Conuuittee  meetings  regularly  called, 
five  members  shall  constitute  a  quorum. 

IS.  Special  committees  may  be  appointed  by  the  Executive 
Committee  from  time  to  time. 

19.  Meetings  of  special  committees  shall  be  called  at  the  dis- 
cretion of  the  respective  Chairnun  or  by  the  President  of  the  As- 
sociation. 

20.  At  all  special  committee  meetings  a  majority  of  the  mem- 
bers shall  constitute  a  quorum. 

21.  The  Committee  on  Nominations  and  Resolutions,  com- 
posed of  seven  members,  shall  be  appointed  by  the  Executive  Com- 
mittee at  a  meeting,  regularly  called,  not  less  than  thirty  days  be- 
fore the  Annual  meeting  of  the  Association. 

22.  The  Committee  on  Nominations  and  Resolutions  shall  pre- 
pare the  ballot  for  the  Annual  Meeting  of  the  Association.  It  shall 
also  report  upon  and,  if  necessary,  prepare  all  resolutions  sub- 
mitted for  the  consideration  of  the  said  Annual  Meeting. 

2.3.  It  shall  meet  not  less  than  fifteen  days  before  the  Annual 
Meeting  to  perform  its  duties. 

24.  Notice  of  meeting  shall  be  seent  to  all  members  of  the 
Committee  not  less  than  ten  days  before  the  date  fixed  for  the 
meeting. 

25.  A  majority  of  the  members  of  the  Committee  shall  con- 
stitute a  quorum  at  any  meeting  regularly  called. 

VII. — Nominations  and  Elections 

2C.  The  Secretary-Treasurer  shall,  not  less  than  one  month 
prior  to  the  date  fixed  for  the  Annual  Meeting  make  a  written  call 
upon  all  members  for  nominations  for  President,  two  Vice-Presi- 
dents and  the  Executive  Committee. 

27.  Nominations  may  be  made  by  any  active  member  in  good 
standing. 

28.  No  nomination  shall  be  valid  which  does  not  carry  with 
it  the  consent  of  the  party  nominated. 

29.  Nominations  for  President,  Vice-Presidents  and  Executive 
Committee  shall  be  sent  to  the  Secretary-Treasurer  not  less  than 
two  weeks  before  the  Annual  Meeting,  but  this  shall  not  apply 
in  the  case  of  nominations  put  forward  by  the  Committee  on  Nom- 
inations and  Resolutions. 

30.  Any  active  member  in  good  standing  shall  be  eligible  for 
election  or  appointment  to  any  office  or  to  any  Committee. 

31.  The  President  and  the  two  Vice-Presidents,  no  two  of 
whom  shall  be  residents  of  the  same  district,  and  the  Executive 
Committee  shall  be  elected  at  the  Annual  Meeting  and  shall  hold 
office  until  their  successors  are  elected. 

VIII. — General  and  Annual  Meetings^ 

32.  A  special  general  meeting  of  the  y\ssociation  may  be  called 
at  the  pleasure  of  the  Executive  Committee  and  shall  be  called  by 
the  President  upon  the  written  re<|uisition  of  fifteen  members  with- 
in three  days  of  his  receipt  of  such  requisition. 

33.  Written  notice  of  the  same  shall  be  sent  by  the  Secretary- 
Treasurer  to  all  members  at  least  five  days  before  the  date  fixed 
for  the  meeting. 

34.  The  Annual  Meeting  of  the  Association  shall  be  held  in 
the  month  of  January,  the  time  and  place  to  be  fixed  by  the  Ex- 
ecutive Committee. 


35.  Written  notice  of  the  same  shall  be  sent  by  the  Secretary- 
Treasurer,  to  all  members  at  least  one  month  before  the  date  fi.scd 
for  the  meeting. 

36.  At  all  General  and  .\nnual  Meetings  of  the  Association 
regularly  called,  twenty-five  members  shall  constitute  a  quorum. 

37.  At  any  General  or  Annual  Meeting  of  the  Association 
regularly  called,  any  member  who  is  prevented  from  attending 
may  be  represented  by  proxy  by  any  other  member  in  good  stand- 
ing. The  said  proxy  shall  be  in  writing,  and  shall  be  filed  with 
the  Secretary-Treasurer,  provided,  however,  that  no  menilier  shall 
represent  more  than  one  proxy. 

38.  At  all  General  and  Annual  Meetings  of  the  Association 
regularly  called,  no  firm,  partnership  or  corporation  shall  be  en- 
titled to  more  than  one  vote  but  any  firm,  partnership  or  corpora- 
tion shall  have  the  privilege  of  being  represented  by  any  number 
of  individuals  connected  with  said  firm,  partnership  or  corporation. 

.'lit.  The  order  of  ISusines;  at  all  (ieneral  and  Annual  meet- 
ings of  the  Association  shall  be  as  follows — 

(a)  Reading  of  Minutes  of  previous  meeting. 

(b)  Business  arising  out   of  Minutes. 

(c)  Reports. 

(d)  Unfinished  Business. 

(e)  Election   of  cfiicers  and  committee. 

(f)  New  Business. 

This  order  of  Business  may  be  suspended  or  varied  at  any 
meeting  by  a  two-thirds  vote  of  the  members  i)r(.sent. 

IX. — Dues  and  Assessments 

40.  The  following  annual  dues  shall  be  payable  in  advance 
and  shall  be  paid  to  the  Secretary-Treasurer  within  thirty  days  from 
the  date  on  which  they  become  due.  Based  upon  the  amount  of 
sales  of  goods  manufactured  in  each  case — 

Up  to  .$20lt,(l(M»  $  2().n(t 

$  200,000— if  500,000    30.00 

500,000—     750,000    50.00 

750,000—  1,000,000   100.00 

1,000,000—  1,500,000    150.00 

1,500,000—  2,000,000    200.00 

2,000,000—  3,000,0(X)   250.00 

3,000,000  or  over   300.0tl 

41.  Whenever  the  Association  is  in  need  of  funds,  money  shall 
be  raised  by  an  assessment  upon  the  members  of  the  Association. 

42.  All  assessments  must  be  ratified  by  a  two-thirds  vote  of 
tlie  Executive  Committee. 

43.  Assessments  shall  become  due  and  payable  after  15  days 
notification  thereof;  and  such  notification  shall  be  complete  with 
the  mailing  of  a  notice  in  writing  by  the  Secretary-Treasurer  ad- 
dressed to  the  members. 

X. — Alteration  of  Constitution 

44.  This  constitution  may  be  altered  or  amended  by  a  vote  of 
the  majority  of  the  members  present  at  any  Annual  Meeting  of  the 
Association. 

45.  Notice  of  such  alterations  or  amendments  shall  be  placed 
in  the  hands  of  the  .Secretary-Treasurer  one  month  prior  to  the 
date  of  the  Annual  Meeting.  It  shall  be  the  duty  of  the  Secretary- 
Treasurer  to  immediately  notify  the  members  of  the  proposed  al- 
terations or  amendments. 

40.  This  Constitution  shall  come  into  force  on  the  date  of 
its  adoption. 

XI. — CM. A.  Constitution 

47.  In  all  matters  not  specified  in  the  above  articles  the 
officers,  committees  and  members  of  the  Association  shall  be  gov- 
erned by  the  Constitution  and  By-Laws  of  the  Canadian  Manufac- 
turers' Association. 

4S.  Nothing  in  the  above  articles  shall  be  interpreted  as  giv- 
ing any  powers  or  privileges  not  in  accordance  with  said  Con- 
stitution and  By-Laws. 

Discussion  on  the  Constitution 

The  convention  then  took  up  the  discussion  of 
the  constitution.  The  delegates  from  Quebec  made 
a  strong  stand  in  favor  of  the  proceedings  of  the 
association  being  issued  both  in  French  and  English, 
and  further  that  the  secretary-treasurer  should  have 
a  knowledge  of  both  languages.  The  suggestion  met 
with  general  approval,  and  an  amendment  was  in- 
serted in  the  by-laws  providing  that  the  secretary 
should  have  these  qualifications.     The  official  report 


January,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


^. — 


Hon.  E.  J.  Davis,  who  spoke  on  the 
advantages  of  organization  and  conditions 
in  the  leather  market. 


Mr.  Nap.  Tetrault,  whose  authoritative 
pointers  on  export  trade  were  of  great 
interest. 


Mr.  Art.   Harries  delivered  an  excellent 
address  on  the  "Standardization  of 
Cartons." 


of  the  proceedings  and  the  constitution  will  be  in 
both  languages,  and  the  notices  to  French  firms  will 
be  sent  out  in  the  French  language. 

Mr.  Routier  raised  the  question  as  to  the  form- 
ation of  local  associations,  one  of  the  clauses  under 
the  head  of  "Purposes"  stating  that  the  object  was 
to  encourage  the  formation  of  local  shoe  manufac- 
turers associations. 

The  chairman  said  that  this  question  had  been 
considered  and  the  general  idea  was  that  local  asso- 
ciations should  continue  with  the  object  of  dealing  with 
local  questions;  matters  of  national  importance  should 
be  brought  to  the  attention  of  the  national  association. 
It  was  entirely  a  matter  of  discretion  as  to  whether  the 
local  associations  should  continue. 

Mr.  Brandon  said  there  was  no  idea  of  any  in- 
terference with  a  local  association. 

Messrs.  Gale  and  Tanguay  also  spoke  on  this 
question,  and  made  inquiries  with  a  view  to  ascer- 
taining the  general  feeling. 

Grouping  of  Manufacturers 

Mr.  H.  J.  Daly,  of  the  Repatriation  and  Employ- 
ment Committee,  Ottawa,  spoke  at  some  length  on 
the  question  of  the  grouping  of  manufacturers  to 
study  questions  of  interest  to  their  own  industries. 
One  of  the  most  important  questions  to  be  considered 
by  such  groups  was  the  proper  distribution  of  pro- 
duction. There  were  groups  of  manufacturers  in 
Canada  who  got  together  and  agreed  to  manufacture 
a  smaller  variety  of  goods  in  order  to  obtain  quantity 
production  of  those  particular  goods,  thus  eliminating 
many  lines  and  enabling  costs  to  be  lowered.  Mr. 
Daly  also  spoke  of  the  desire  of  the  Government  to 
co-operate  with  manufacturers  in  regard  to  export 
and  home  industry.  It  was  proposed,  he  said,  to  es- 
tablish a  chain  of  employment  offices  throughout  the 
Dominion  and  to  distribute  the  returned  soldier  and 
civilian  in  such  a  way  as  to  benefit  employers  and 
employees.  He  asked  the  manufacturers  to  exercise 
patience  with  the  returned  men,  who,  for  a  long  time. 


had  been  in  a  different  atmosphere  from  that  of  in- 
dustrial pursuits.  It  was  a  problem  which  would 
have  to  be  carefully  worked  out  with  the  assistance 
of  the  manufacturers. 


Election  of  Officers 


The  following  were  elected  as  officers  for  the  en- 
suing year: 

Hon.  Presidents — Mr.  A.  Brandon,  Brandon  Shoe 
Ca.  Ltd.,  Brantford,  Ont.;  Mr.  Geo.  A.  Slater,  Geo. 
A.  Slater  Ltd.,  Montreal. 

President— Mr.  F.  S.  Scott,  M.P.,  Getty  &  Scott, 
Limited,  Gait,  Ont. 

First  Vice-President — Mr.  J.  Daoust,  Lalonde  & 
Co.,  Limited,  Montreal. 

Second  Vice-President — Mr.  J.  D.  Palmer,  Hartt 
Boot  &  Shoe  Co.,  Fredericton,  N.B. 

Executive  Committee — Messrs.  J.  Leckie,  J.  Lec- 
kie  &  Co.,  Vancouver;  Albert  Tetrault,  Tetrault  Shoe 
Mfg.  Co.  Ltd.,  Montreal;  Geo.  A.  Slater.  Geo.  A. 
Slater,  Limited,  Montreal;  W.  F.  Martin,  Kingsbury 
Footwear  Co.  Ltd.,  Montreal;  J.  I.  Chouinard.  Re- 
gina  Shoe  Co.,  Montreal;  Ralph  Locke,  Dufresne  & 
Locke,  Montreal;  R.  E.  Dildine,  Ames  Holden  Mc- 
Cready,  Montreal;  H.  V.  Gale,  Gale  Bros.  Ltd..  Que- 
bec; J.  E.  Warrington,  John  Ritchie  Co.,  Quebec:  J. 
A.  Duchaine,  Duchaine  &  Perkins,  Quebec:  Fred  Ma- 
rois,  Tourigny  Marois.  Quebec;  G.  W.  McFarland, 
Williams  Shoe  Limited,  Brampton,  Ont.;  George 
Blachford,  Blachford  Shoe  Co.,  Toronto;  A.  Brandon, 
Brandon  Shoe  Ltd.,  Brantford,  Ont.;  N.  B.  Detwiler. 
Hydro  City  Shoe  Manufacturers,  Kitchener,  Ont.;  C. 
S.  Sutherland,  Amherst  Boot  &  Shoe  Co.,  Limited, 
Amherst,  N.S. 

Mr.  Scott  thanked  the  members  for  their  confi- 
dence in  him  and  said  he  would  endeavor  to  deserve 
the  honor  conferred  on  him. 

Mr.  Joseph  Daoust  expressed,  in  French  and 
English,  the  appreciation  of  the  other  officers,  and 
their  determination  to  make  the  association  a  suc- 
cess in  the  attainment  of  its  objects. 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


January,  lilll) 


Resolutions 

On  the  motion  of  Mr.  Geo.  .-\.  Slater,  seconded  by 
Mr.  G.  McFarland,  the  following  resolution  was 

passed:  That  this  Association  petition  the  Minister 
of  Militia  that,  owing  to  the  great  shortage  of  oper- 
ators in  the  boot  and  shoe  manufacturing  industry 
and  the  importance  of  securing  help  to  produce  goods 
for  export  trade,  that  soldiers  overseas  who  are  shoe- 
makers l)y  trade  lie  returned  home  at  the  earliest 
ojiportunity.  .-V  committee  will  be  appointed  to  wait 
on  the  Go\'ernment  at  the  earliest  possible  oppor- 
tunity . 

Mr.  P'red  H.  Ahrens,  of  Kitchener,  raised  the 
question  of  the  date  of  the  annual  meeting  and,  on 
the  suggestion  of  Mr.  Albert  Tetrault,  seconded  by 
Mr.  Geo.  .\.  .Slater,  the  month  of  January  was  tixed. 

Mr.  Geo.  A.  Slater  proposed,  and  Mr.  C.  Craigie 
seconded,  the  following  resolution,  which  was  carried 
unanimously:  That  this  convention,  representative  of 
the  boot  and  shoe  manufacturers  of  Canada,  do  hereby 
petition  the  honorable  the  Ministers  of  Finance  and 
Customs,  that  no  changes  affecting  the  custom  tarif¥ 
on  boots  and  shoes  or  leather  be  formulated  without 
gi\'ing  the  said  manufacturers  the  opportunity  of  sub- 
mitting a  statement  of  conditions  in  the  industry,  and 
of  the  effect  which,  in  their  opinion,  any  such  revision 
of  the  tariff  might  have  on  the  industry. 

Mr.  Slater  moved  the  following:  That  this  As- 
sociation views  with  favor  the  organization  of  re- 
tailers throughout  the  country,  and  will  l)e  pleased  to 
co-operate  with  them  for  the  correction  of  evils  in 
the  trade,  and  for  the  general Hiplift  of  the  shoe  indus- 
try.  This  was  agreed  to. 

Mr.  Slater  further  moved:  That  the  members 
of  the  Shoe  Manufacturers'  Association  ask  the  aid 
of  the  retailers  and  their  Association  in  the  correc- 
tion of  the  evil  of  .  returned  merchandise  for  trivial 
causes,  and  cancellations  of  orders  after  goods  are 
in  process  to  the  end  that  what  are  termed  "floor 
goods"  may  be  lessened  in  quantity,  thus  materially 
lowering  the  source  of  supplies  of  the  fake  sample 
shoe  stores  or  so-called  factory  outlets.  Be  it  further 
'resolved  that  our  Secretary  be  instructed  to  take  up 
with  the  Association  of  retailers  the  question  of  for- 
mulating a  plan  for  the  summarizing  of  these  evils. 

Mr.  K.  Lanthier  stated  that  he  was  in  favor  of 
a  stronger  resolution,  by  which  manufacturers  would 
absolutely  refuse  to  cancel  orders  when  the  goods 
were  in  process  of  manufacture.  Mr.  Geo.  .\.  Slater 
asked  the  Association  to  go  slow  in  this  matter,  and 
to  seek  the  co-operation  of  retailers.  Mr.  Doig  sup- 
ported Mr.  Slater's  idea.  This  matter,  he  said,  should 
be  handled  with  discretion:  he  was  not  in  favor  of 
coercive  measures. 

Mr.  Craigie  said  that  they  should  all  recognize 
that  the  retailers  were  interested  in  this  matter  as 
well  as  the  manufacturers.  He  suggested  that  the 
retailers  should  Ije  invited  to  co-operate  and  reach 
a  better  understanding  so  as  to  remedy  any  griev- 
ance which  existed. 

Mr.  Slater  said  his  idea  was  that  associations  of 
manufacturers  and  retailers  should  discuss  this  mat- 
ter: committees  ould  lie  ajipointed  so  as  to  reach 
a  fair  understanding  on  the  matter.  Tlie  resolution 
was  then  agreed  to. 

Mr.  Slater  nioxcd.  and   Mr.  Mch'arland  seconded. 


-+ 

I 


the  following:  That  manufacturers  shall  not  give 
credit  for  any  shoes  that  have  been  worn,  without  be- 
ing allowed  fair  credit  for  such  wear  as  the  shoes 
have  been  given. 

Mr.  Wayland  suggested  that  a  tag  lie  attached 
to  each  pair  of  shoes  to  the  effect  that  no  allowances 
would  be  made  on  the  goods  if  they  were  returned 
after  being  worn. 

Mr.  Nap.  Tetrault  said  the  manufacturers  must 
be  fair;  they  must  recognize  that  errors  were  made 
l)y  manufacturers,  and  they  should  certainly  make 
allowances.  His  firm  had  in  operation  a  system  of 
allowances,  which  was,  in  effect,  a  scale  providing  for 
graduated  credits,  according  to  the  amount  of  wear. 
This  had  proved  very  satisfactory. 

Mr.  Wayland  said  that  the  United  States  manu- 
facturers had  sent  out  a  circular  to  the  retail  trade, 
notifying  that  they  would  not  give  credit  for  shoes 
after  they  had  been  worn.  Why  could  not  this  Asso- 
ciation do  the  same  thing? 

Mr.  Slater  pointed  out  that  the  National  Boot  & 
Shoe  Manufacturers'  Association  had  passed  a  reso- 
lution on  this  subject  which  had  been  endorsed  by 
the  National  Shoe  Retailers'  Association.  It  was  to 
the  effect  that  "we  will  not  give  credit  for  any  shoes 
that  have  been  worn,  without  lieing  allowed  proper 
credit  for  such  wear  as  the  shoes  shall  have  given,  no 
allowance   being  made   for  patent  leather  shoes. 

The  convention  then  passed  the  resolution  pro- 
posed by  Mr.  Slater. 

.On  the  motion  of  Mr.  F.  Marois,  seconded  by 
Mr.  X.  Tetrault,  it  was  decided  that  the  next  meet- 
ing should  be  held  in  Quebec. 

Votes  of  thanks  were  passed  to  Lieut. -Col.  Sad- 
ler, the  Montreal  Boot  &  Shoe  Manufacturers'  .\sso- 
ciation.  the  convention  organization,  the  various 
speakers,  and  to  the  trade  press,  without  whose  as- 
sistance the  Shoe  Manufacturers'  Association  of 
Canada  could  not  have  been  formed. 

The  Banquet 

The  dinner  in  the  evening  was  one  of  the  most 
representative  gatherings  of  shoe  manufacturers  and 
allied  industries  ever  held  in  the  Dominion.  Every 
section  of  these  industries  had  several  representa- 
tives and  the  tallies  were  so  arranged  that  given 
firms  were  able  to  obtain  the  exclusive  use  of  these 
tables  for  the  heads  of  the  firms  and  their  employees. 
The  organization  of  the  dinner  involved  a  consider- 
able amount  of  work  on  the  part  of  the  committee, 
who  are  to  be  congratulated  upon  the  satisfactory 
manner  in  which  the  dinner  was  carried  out.  The 
musical  program  was  arranged  under  the  direction  f)f 
Mr.  W.  V.  Matthews. 

The  toast  to  the  King  was  proposed  by  the  Pre- 
dent,  Mr.  F.  S.  Scott,  who  contrasted  the  loyalty 
shown  throughout  the  British  Empire  to  the  King 
and  Queen  with  the  way  in  which  certain  crowned 
heads  in  Europe  had  come  to  grief.  The  British  Em- 
pire stood  for  all  that  was  h^st  in  democratic  govern- 
ment. 

Mr.  Geo.  A.  Slater  proposed  the  health  of  Mr. 
Scott,  who.  he  said,  was  the  right  man  in  the  right 
place. 

The  President,  after  expressing  his  appreciation  of 
the  honor  accorded  him,  dealt  with  .general  commer- 


January,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


3a 


cial  conditions.  In  a  masterful  speech  he  pointed  cut 
that  the  shoe  manufacturers  of  Canada  represented  ;i 
very  important  industry.  It  was  not  a  small  thing  for 
a  comparatively  young  man  coming  from  a  small 
town  in  Ontario  to  be  honored  as  the  first  president 
of  such  an  association.  He  assured  them  that  he 
would  give  the  members  of  the  association  the  best 
service  that  was  in  him.  He  hoped  that  when  they 
met  at  the  next  annual  convention  the  members 
would  have  reason  to  look  back  with  pride  upon  tlie 
work  that  had  been  accomplished. 

The  shoe  manufacturers  had  met  in  convention 
with  the  purpose  that,  in  the  time  that  was  before 
them,  they  would  be  better  able  to  take  their  proper 
place  in  the  industries  of  Canada.  They  must  all  real- 
ize that  absolutely  new  conditions  faced  the  people 
of  the  Dominion,  and  he  believed  the  world  was  ex- 
pecting great  things  from  the  Dominion  and  that  the 
Canadian  people  would  live  up  to  those  expectations. 
The  Government  was  confronted  with  many  pvoh- 
lems,  but  he  was  certain  as  to  the  future.  Increased 
revenue  would  have  to  be  raised  from  increased  trade; 
shoe  manufacturers  should  share  in  that  increased 
commerce,  and  so  take  care  of  their  share  of  the 
necessary  additional  revenue. 

Mr.  Scott  then  dealt  with  the  question  of  the 
tariff.  He  pointed  out  that  the  farmers  were  de- 
manding that  customs  duties  should  be  reduced  and 
that  the  country  be  put  on  something  like  a  free 
trade  basis.  There  were,  however,  other  interests  to 
be  considered  besides  those  of  the  farmers,  and 
while  they  would  be  willing  to  co-operate  with  the 
farmers,  they  could  not  agree  to  the  elimination  of 
the  tarif?,  as  this  action  would  be  ruinous  to  the 
business  interests  of  the  country.  He  was  of  the 
opinion  that,  but  for  a  protective  tariff,  this  country 
would  not  have  taken  such  a  glorious  part  in  the 
war.  There  had  been,  he  continued,  differences  be- 
tween Ontario  and  Quebec.  These  should  be  brought 
to  an  end,  and  he  believed  that  their  association  could 
do  much  to  foster  a  better  understanding  and  to  bring 
this  unfortunate  antagonism  to  a  termination.  He 
understood  that  about  two-thirds  of  the  capital  in- 
vested in  the  shoe  industries  came  from  French- 
Canadian  sources,  and  gave  this  as  one  reason  for  a 
more  complete  understanding  between  the  two  races. 
It  had  been  said  that  the  returned  soldiers  would  find 
this  country  in  a  state  of  labor  agitation,  and  as  shoe 
manufacturers  they  were  interested  in  seeing  that 
such  a  state  of  affairs  should  not  take  place.  They 
must  give  the  returned  soldier  a  square  deal;  they  de- 
sired that  wages  should  ht  at  such  a  level  as  to  give 
a  living  wage  to  the  worlcers,  and  he  urged  that  em- 
ployers and  employees  should  get  together  on  such 
questions. 

The  President's  speech  was  followed  by  the  sing- 
ing of  "O!  Canada." 

The  Hon.  G.  Robertson,  Minister  of  Labor,  in 
the  course  of  a  very  complete  speech,  dealt  with  the 
many  existing  problems.  He  made  particular  refer- 
ence to  the  desirability  of  developing  Canada's  nat- 
ural resources  in  order  that  the  country  might  give 
employment  to  the  thousands  of  men  thrown  out  of 
work  by  the  cessation  of  war  orders.  He  quoted  sta- 
tistics to  show  that  this  displaced  labor  was  gradu- 
ally   being   absorbed    by    other   industries,    and  con- 


cluded hy  urging  that  industrial  disputes  could  be 
avoided  by  taking  matters  before  competent  tribun- 
als. 

Senator  C.  I'.  Beauljien,  who  spoke  in  Englisli 
and  French,  pointed  out  the  work  which  had  been 
done  by  both  races  for  the  upljuilding  of  the  coun- 
try. In  an  eloquent  speech  he  appealed  for  mutual 
trust  and  work  for  future  prosperity  with  the  recon- 
struction that  would  come  after  the  war. 

Brief  speeches  by  Mr.  Joseph  Daoust  and  Mr. 
Nap.  Tetrault  concluded  the  proceedings.  The  for- 
mer speaker  dealt  in  a  jocular  way  with  his  dual 
position  of  shoe  manufacturer  and  tanner — as  a  shoe 
manufacturer  he  might  advise  his  fellow  manufacturers 
to  be  careful  in  their  purchases  of  leather;  on  the  other 
hand,  as  a  tanner  his  inclination  might  be  to  urge  heavy 
purchases  of  his  goods.  He  presented  these  two  sides 
and  concluded  that  it  was  up  to  their  judgment  to  de- 
cide which  was  the  better  and  safer  way. 

The  arrangements  for  the  entire  convention  were 
in  the  hands  of  the  following  committee: — Messrs.  G. 


Mr.  H.  T.  Meldrum,  Canadian  agent  for 
R.  Martens  &  Company,  of  London,  Eng., 
offered  some  timely  suggestions  in  con- 
nection with  export  trade. 

A.  Slater,  R.  Locke,  R.  E.  Dildine,  W.  F.  Martin,  Al- 
bert Tetrault,  J.  1.  Chouinard,  A.  L.  Dupont,  J.  P.  Cote, 
Joseph  Daoust,  W.  V.  Matthews.  A.  Brandon,  G.  W. 
McFarland,  J.  E.  Warrington,  R.  Lanthier,  and  F.  S. 
Scott. 

Convention  Briefs 

.  Everyone  said  the  convention  was  a  marked  suc- 
cess. The  attendance  was  large  and  representative; 
the  proceedings  were  marked  by  enthusiasm  and  the 
business  transacted  with  promptitude.  The  organiza- 
tion involved  considerable  work  but  it  was  worth 
while.  Much  is  expected  as  the  result  of  the  forma- 
tion of  the  Association  and  if  a  wide-awake  president 
and  a  splendid  executive  count  for  anything,  those  ex- 
pectations will  be  fulfilled. 

The  delegation  from  the  city  of  Quebec  was  in 
strong  force  and  very  much  in  evidence.     .Mso  they 


4U 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


January,  1919 


I 


made  their  views  known  in  no  uncertain  way,  particu- 
larly in  relation  to  the  recognition  of  the  French  langu- 
age. Having  regard  to  the  fact  that  a  majority  of  the 
shoe  manufacturers  in  the  Province  of  Quebec  are 
French  speaking,  it  was  not  unreasonable  that  they 
should  ask  that  the  official  report  and  the  Constitution 
should  be  printed  in  French  and  that  the  notices  to 
French  firms  should  also  be  in  French.  The  English- 
speaking  members  agreed  with  them  on  tliese  points. 

Visitors  from  Quebec  City 

The  visitors  from  Quebec  City  were  indeed  a  lively 
gathering,  and  put  a  lot  of  vim  into  the  convention. 
Credit  for  organizing  the  delegation  is  due  to  Major 
"Jimmie"  Scott,  assisted  by  Mr.  W.  A.  Lane.  This  in- 
volved a  large  amount  of  work,  both  prior  to  and  at 
the  convention.  The  idea  was  to  foster  the  get-to- 
gether spirit,  to  insure  that  the  men  from  the  Ancient 
City  should  get  better  acquainted  with  the  men  from 
the  west,  thus  tending  to  convert  acquaintances  into 
friends.  It  was  with  this  object  in  view  that  the  firm 
of  J.  A.  Scott,  Quebec  and  Montreal,  engaged  a  suite 


Mr.  W.  V.  Matthews,  of  the  Tetrault  Shoe 
Mfg.  Company,  to  whom  great  credit  is 
due  for  the  success  of  the  entertainment 
plans. 

of  four  rooms  at  the  Windsor  Hotel,  where  they  en- 
tertained all  and  sundry.  The  wants  of  the  delegation 
were  carefully  looked  after;  the  members  were  met 
at  the  station,  conveyed  to  the  hotel  in  taxis,  and  en- 
tertained at  breakfast  by  Major  Scott  and  Mr.  Lane. 
Moreover,  taxis  were  at  the  disposal  of  the  delegation 
throughout  the  day. 

The  activities  of  Major  Scott  and  Mr.  Lane  were 
not,  however,  confined  to  the  Quebec  delegation.  On 
the  evening  prior  to  the  convention  they  provided  an 
abundance  of  entertainment  for  the  organization  com- 
mittee, the  Montreal  shoe  manufacturers,  and  such 
Western  delegates  as  were  in  town.  They  held  high 
carnival.  First  of  all  there  was  a  dinner  at  the  Wind- 
sor, followed  by  a  theatre  party,  and  afterwards  sup- 
per at  the  Corona.  The  dinner  was  the  big  event. 
Probably  the  Windsor  Hotel  has  never  been  the  scene 
of  a  more  harmonious  and  lively  gathering.  There 


were  speeches  by  Mr.  F.  S.  Scott,  M.P.,  Major  J.  A. 
Scott,  Mr.  A.  Brandon  and  Mr.  Nap.  Tetrault.  The 
great  feature  of  the  evening,  however,  was  the  singing 
of  that  well-known  French  chanson  "Gentille  Allouette" 
by  Major  Scott.    It  was  immense. 

Then  followed  the  tlieatre  party  and  the  supper, 
and  the  evening  was  far  spent  when  entertainers  and 
the  entertained  sought  their  rooms. 

Mr.  Joseph  Daoust  was  a  busy  man.  In  addition 
to  making  speeches  in  both  French  and  English,  he 
was  official  interpreter.  Mr.  Daoust  is  equally  at  home 
in  the  English  and  French  languages,  and  the  com- 
mittee made  no  mistake  when  they  requested  this  ver- 
satile shoe  manufacturer  and  tanner  to  undertake  the 
work. 

The  addresses  by  Mr.  L.  J.  Breithaupt  and  Hon. 
E.  J.  Davis  had  a  patriotic  flavor.  From  the  trade 
point  of  view  they  were  also  illuminating,'  while  they 
were  no  positive  indication  of  the  course  of  the  leather 
market,  they  showed  at  any  rate  that  there  was  no 
likelihood  of  an  immediate  slump.  Both  struck  the 
key-note  of  co-operation,  without  which  the  efforts  of 
the  convention  will  be  of  little  value.  This  key-note 
was  indeed  the  outstanding  feature  of  nearly  all  the 
speeches,  it  being  clear  that  with  unity  of  purpose  the 
Association  will  achieve  the  objects  for  which  it  has 
been  formed. 

The  members  of  the  convention  were  the  guests 
of  the  Montreal  Boot  &  Shoe  Association  at  the  lunch- 
eon. There  was  no  speech  making,  the  efforts  in  this 
direction  being  postponed  until  tlie  evening. 

One  notable  feature  stood  out  in  the  afternoon 
discussion — the  desire  of  the  manufacturers  to  co-oper- 
ate with  the  retailers  and  to  meet  them  for  the  discus- 
sion of  subjects  in  which  there  is  a  common  interest. 
Both  branches  of  the  industry  can  help  in  furthering 
the  interests  of  all  concerned,  and  it  is  recognized  that 
by  the  friendly  discussion  of  trade  questions  that  fric- 
tion can  be  reftioved  and  a  better  understanding  arrived 
at.  As  one  speaker  said,  "concilliation  is  better  than 
using  the  club,"  and  it  is  from  this  point  that  the  as- 
sociation welcomed  the  formation  of  retail  associa- 
tions. 

The  banquet  was  attended  by  nearly  two  hundred 
people,  representatives  of  every  branch  of  the  shoe  in- 
dustry.   Here  is  the  menu: — 

Malpecque  Oysters 
Celery  Olives 
Cream  of  Tomato  Bisque 
Lake  Fruit  Meuniers 
Roast  Turkey  Cranberry  Sauce 

Rissolees  Potatoes  Early  June  Peas 

Coupe  St.  Jacques 
Petits  Fours 
CofTee 

The  speech  of  the  Hon.  J.  D.  Robertson,  Minister 
of  Labor,  was  of  the  rather  solid  type,  packed  with  facts 
and  figures,  while  Senator  C.  P.  Beaubien^s  addre.^s 
was  in  lighter  yein  and  characterized  by  Gaelic  sparkle. 
The  president  made  a  most  effective  speech — he  was  in 
rather  an  aggressive  mood  when  defending  the  rights 
of  Canadian  manufacturers,  and  it  was  clear  that  when 
it  comes  to  standing  up  for  the  interests  of  shoe  manu- 
facturers the  industry  will  have  a  bonnie  figliter. 

When  it  comes  to  providing  entertainments  for 

(Concluded  on  page  43) 


January,  1919 


FOOTWEAR 


IN  CANADA 


41 


Tanners  and  Manufacturers  Have 
Confidence  in  Future 

OPTIMISM  characterizes  the  Montreal  shoe 
manufacturers.  Every  one  believes  that  1919 
be  a  satisfactory  year.  At  present  they 
have  plenty  of  orders,  the  great  difficulty  be- 
ing to  secure  supplies  and  also  to  obtain  sufficient 
skilled  help.  Notwithstanding  the  release  of  a  large 
number  of  men  from  other  industries,  there  is  still  a 
great  want  of  men  in  the  shoe  factories,  and  apparently 
this  lack  is  not  confined  to  IMontreal,  as  there  are  re- 
ports of  Ontario  firms  trying  to  obtain  labor  in  the 
Province  of  Quebec. 

Mr.  L.  A.  Gauthier,  president  of  the  Canadian  Foot- 
wear Co.,  who  with  Mr.  A.  Lecours,  recently  visited 
New  York  and  Boston,  reports  that  light  skins  are  very 
difficult  to  secure.  These  supplies  are  limited  and  the 
tanners  in  the  United  States  are  simply  awaiting  ship- 
ments of  skins  from  abroad.  As  far  as  Mr.  Gauthier 
can  see  the  prospects  are  that  the  prices  of  shoes  will 
not  come  down ;  the  tendency,  he  thinks,  will  be  in  an 
upward  direction,  especially  for  kid  goods. 

Mr.  W.  F.  Martin,  of  the  Kingsbury  Footwear  Co., 
states  that  prospects  are  very  rosy.  He  too,  is  of  opin- 
ion that  prices  will  certainly  be  maintained,  having  re- 
gard to  the  scarcity  of  raw  materials. 

Mr.  F.  W.  Knowlton,  manager  of  the  United  Shoe 
Machinery  Co.,  of  Canada,  thinks  the  immediate  out- 
look is  encouraging.  He  says :  I  look  for  a  satisfactory 
A'olume  of  trade  in  1919,  with  good  prices.  Stocks  are 
not  heavy.  One  significant  fact  is  that  firms  who 
bought  supplies  from  us  for  the  army  shoe  contracts, 
did  not  cancel  their  orders,  but  on  the  contrary  placed 
further  orders  with  us  for  similar  goods — which  looks 
as  if  the  trade  is  confident  as  to  the  immediate  future. 
General  orders  are  coming  in  well,  and  the  orders  for 
machinery  are  also  keeping  up. 

The  Glazed  Kid  Market. 

In  the  course  of  a  review  of  the  glazed  kid  market, 
Mr.  W.  A.  Lane,  the  Montreal  representative  of  J.  A. 
Scott,  Quebec,  states :  The  question  of  the  situation 
of  the  glazed  kid  market  is  very  problematical.  When 
the  United  States  embargo  was  lifted  on  all  skins  pur- 
chased prior  to  June  15th,  the  Government  insisted  that 
there  should  be  an  allocation  of  these  skins  when  they 
came  in.  Now,  according  to  the  figures  of  the  skins 
that  were  in  that  country,  and  all  that  were  being  re- 
leased by  the  embai^go,  the  trade,  as  a  whole,  would  be 
given — on  a  40  per  cent,  production — skins  for  155 
days  from  September  15th,  which  would  give  the  tan- 
ners skins  up  to  February  15th.  In  the  meantime,  the 
Government  requested  the  tanners  not  to  buy  any 
skins — particularly  in  India,  which  supplies  the  bulk 
of  the  raw  stock — and  they  (the  tanners)  were  not 
given  permission  to  ship  any  skins,  only  those  that 
were  embargoed.  The  United  States  Government  has 
since  lifted  the  embargo  on  raw  stock  of  every  de- 
scription necessary  to  the  manufacture  of  leather  from 
November  27th  to  February  27th,  up  to  forty-eight 
thousand  tons.  This  ruling  also  applies  to  Canadian 
hides  and  skins.  There  is  not  much  finished  leather 
around,  and,  from  what  we  can  learn,  the  shoe  manu- 
facturers are  working  on  depleted  stocks.  We  know 
that  all  the  foreign  countries  are  absolutely  bare  of 


kid  leathers,  and  everybody  feels  that,  just  as  soon  as 
export  is  resumed,  outside  buyers  will  practically  buy 
all  the  finished  leather  that  is  in  the  United  States. 
Should  such  be  the  case,  there  will  be  very  litttle  leather 
left  for  home  consumption.  We,  of  course,  feel,  as 
everybody  does,  that  there  is  going  to  be  a  drop  in 
prices  in  all  lines  of  business  sooner  or  later,  and, 
having  figured  it  all  out  in  our  minds,  as  far  as  the 
glazed  kid  business  is  concerned,  we  cannot  see  where 
there  can  be  any  change  for  at  least  six  months.  We 
personally  know  that  some  of  the  largest  kid  houses  in 
the  United  States  are  to-day  refusing  orders,  and,  in 
one  or  two  cases,  they  are  claiming  that  they  have 
orders  on  their  books  to  cover  their  output  for  the 
next  three  months. 

Mr.  L.  J.  Breithaupt  Explains  the  Outlook 

Our  belief  in  the  future  strength  of  the  mar- 
ket, as  mentioned  or  outlined  in  your  Decem- 
ber issue,  has  been  fully  justified  by  the  facts 
since.  The  leather  market  to-day  has  greater 
inherent  strength  than  is  realized  by  most  leather 
buyers.  The  cost  of  manufacture  cannot  be  reduced, 
as  labor  and  tanning  material  are  as  high  as  ever,  and 
will  be  so,  we  believe,  the  greater  part  of  1919.  On 
the  other  hand  the  hide  market  seems  to  be  just  now 
daily  gaining-  in  strength,  instead  of  the  opposite,  as 
is  usually  the  case  at  this  time  of  the  year  when 
quality  is  deteriorating. 

We  have  before  us  a  letter  from  the  New  York 
agent  of  one  of  the  largest  South  American  hide 
houses,  which  states : 

"The  market  in  hides  is  very  strong,,  and 
you  will  find  that  when  business  opens  after  Jan- 
uary 1st,  prices  which  will  be  paid  will  be  con- 
siderably higher  than  are  now  anticipated.  Eur- 
ope is  our  great  competitor  to-day  and  Europe  is 
paying  considerably  more  than  we  have  the  cour- 
age to  ask  here." 
We  also  have  another  letter  to-day,  re  South  Am- 
erican hide  markets,   from    a   most  reliable  source, 
reading  as  follows : 

"This  market  has  gone  wild  on  all  their  hide 
products  which,  we  believe,  is  due  to  large  buy- 
ing of  European,  South  American  and  United 
States  speculators.  This  market  is  also  stimulat- 
ed by  the  fact  that  some  of  the  neutral  European 
countries  are  offering  prices  on  all  South  Ameri- 
can products  that  are  far  in  excess  of  our  Allied 
Government  maximum  prices." 

Furthermore,  stocks  of  hides  are  much  lower  than 
usual  in  January  and  those  of  most  lines  of  leather 
likewise  so.  While  the  demand  already  facing  us  in 
the  New  Year  shows  that  there  will  be  a  large  busi- 
ness done  as  confidence  is  being  fully  restored  and 
the  re-adjustment  and  re-construction  periods  before 
us  will  probably  require  greater  quantities  of  the 
necessary  staples  of  life  (including  shoe  leather)  than 
ever  before. 

We  may  also  state  that  our  plants  are  in  first-class 
shape  to  turn  out  large  quantities  of  our  various  lines 
of  sole  leather.  While  owing  to  various  causes,  such 
as  shortage  of  labor  and  influenza,  we  have  not  been 
able  to  supply  our  friends  as  fast  as  we  desired.  We 
will,  however,  soon  again  be  in  our  normal  "stride" 
when  we  shall  doubtless  also  be  able  to  resume  ex- 
port trade,  which  we  have  been  unable  to  supply  for 
man}'  months  past. 


42 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


January,  1919 


4.  


Boston    Style  Show  a    Great  Success 

War  conditions  Have  Greatly  Reduced  the  Number  of  Lasts  and  Styles  —  Grays,  Blacks, 
Patents,  Browns  and  ^JliCahogan^  were  the  Leading  Colors  Shown  — 
Some  Advance  Styles  an  Inch  Higher 


THE  Boston  Style  Show  is  now  a  semi-annual 
event  and  although  a  good  success  in  the  past 
has  been  totally  eclipsed  by  the  four  day  session, 
January  6  to  9.  Representative  gatherings  of 
shoe  retailers,  manufacturers  and  tanners  thronged 
Symphony  Hall,  night  and  day,  and  it  is  also  quite 
evident  that  an  increasing  number  of  the  general  public 
are  becoming  interested  in  the  latest  modes  and  in 
getting  advance  information.  New  England's  heritage 
as  a  shoe  manufacturing  centre  is  indeed  well  borne  out 
in  the  splendid  examples  of  footwear  styles  that  were 
on  display.  Events  of  this  kind  are  of  special  value  to 
Ijuyers  who  are  enabled  to  see,  almost  at  a  glance,  con- 
ditions and  styles  that  would  take  them  weeks  to  find 
out  in  the  ordinary  way. 

Many  Canadians  Present. 

While  our  list  of  the  Canadian  visitors  is  not  com- 
plete at  the  time  of  going  to  press,  the  following  were 
noticed  by  our  Boston  representative:  Mr.  Walker,  of 
Walker,  Parker,  Toronto;  Mr.  Jarvis,  Manager  Murray 
Shoe  Company,  London;  Mr.  J.  A.  Lavoie,  La  Paris- 
ienne  Shoe  Co.,  Limited,  Montreal;  Messrs.  Albert  and 
Napolean  Tetrault,  Tetrault  Shoe  Manufacturing  Com- 
pany, Montreal;  Mr.  W.  F.  Martin,  Kingsbury  Foot- 
wear Company,  Montreal;  Mr.  Moles  and  Mr.  Frank 
DeLancy,  of  J.  &  T.  Bell,  Limited,  Montreal;  Mr.  J.  E. 
Pare,  Star  Shoe  Company;  Mr.  J.  L  Chouinard,  Regina 
Shoe  Company,  Montreal;  Mr.  Blachford,  Blachford 
Shoe  Manufacturing  Company,  Toronto;  Mr.  Geo. 
Chambers,  Kilgour  &  Chambers,  Toronto,  and  Mr. 
Walter  Burnill,  Toronto. 

Living  Models  Displayed  Styles. 

During  the  entire  four  days,  afternoon  and  evening, 
the  hall,  which  was  artistically  decorated  with  United 
States  and  Allied  flags  interspersed  with  flowers,  was 
filled  to  capacity  with  shoe  manufacturers,  retail  and 
wholesale  shoe  buyers  from  all  parts  of  the  world,  as 
well  as  the  general  public.  They  came  to  see,  and  saw. 
the  final  word  in  shoe  craftsmanship. 

Plenty  of  entertainment  was  provided  1)y  the  man- 
agement to  interest  spectators,  the  principal  feature  of 
which  was  the  display  by  real  living  models,  appropri- 
ately and  tastily  gowned  and  groomed,  in  apparel  in 
keeping  with  the  style  of  shoe  or  leather  displayed,  and 
the  style  of  dress  conforming  to  that  of  the  season  when 
such  style  is  popular,  whether  the  demonstration  was 
to  exhibit  a  street  boot,  a  Colonial  slipper  or  pump,  or 
a  sport  shoe. 

\  long  "runway"  extending  from  the  platform  three 
quarters  of  the  way  down  the  centre  of  the  hall  toward 
the  rear  was  brilliantly  lighted  and  the  models  as  they 
appeared  toward  the  front  were  brought  before  the  spot- 
light and  their  pretty  costumes  more  advantageously 
displayed.  The  "runway"  was  elevated  about  five  feet 
so  that  the  feet  of  the  pretty  models  were  clearly  in 
evidence  from  any  part  of  the  hall. 


Preceding  the  appearance  of  each  model,  who  came 
on  the  stage  two  at  a  time,  the  name  of  the  maker  of 
the  shoe,  leather  or  fabric  to  be  represented,  as  well  as 
photographic  reproduction  of  two  or  three  of  the  lead- 
ing styles,  were  thrown  upon  a  large  screen  immediate- 
ly over  the  stage  settings,  so  that  the  visitors  were  no- 
tified in  advance  exactly  what  they  were  about  to  see. 

Many  of  the  styles  exhiljited  in  high  cuts  were  no- 
ticeably an  inch  higher  than  their  predecessors,  owing  to 
the  new  models  of  closer  adhering  skirts,  although 
the  8  in.  standard  was  more  generally  adopted.  Colon- 
ials with  high  heels,  decorated  with  bright  and  dull  steel 
buckles,  oxford  ties,  boy  scout  shoes,  sport  shoes.  Red 
Cross  comforts  were  all  displayed  on  the  "runway." 
Welts,  turns,  McKays  and  stitchdowns  took  their  turn, 
according  to  the  manufacturer  exhibited.  That  blacks 
are  not  to  be  in  vogue  is  conspicuous  by  their  absence. 
Patent  leather  shoes  in  blacks  showed  by  their  occas- 
ional appearance  that  they  were  to  be  more  and  more 
popular.  A  few  shades  of  grays,  pearl  gray  being  the 
leading  shade  shown;  browns  in  a  few  darker  shades, 
and  cordovans  of  mahogany  color  predominated,  re- 
flecting war  time  restrictions.  A  sand  colored  effect 
was  one  of  the  newer  shades  shown.  Shoe  toppings 
seemed  to  be  in  as  much  evidence  as  leather  topped 
shoes,  showing  that  the  public  like  the  cloth  tops.  Or- 
namentation on  colonials,  pumps  and  slippers  were 
centered  on  the  metal  adornment.  The  appearance  of 
a  few  exhibits  of  buttons  shoes  lent  evidence  to  the 
talk  that  the  button  shoe  is  coming  back.  There  were 
several  exhibits  of  white  fabrics  and  shoes  reflecting 
the  continued  popularity  of  the  cool  summer  footwear. 
Fibre  and  rubber  soled  styles  also  do  not  seem  to  have 
abated  at  all. 

Monday  was  Massachusetts  Day,  and  the  opening 
address  was  made  by  Senator-elect  David  L  Walsh.  Mr. 
Walsh  emphasized  the  need  at  this  time  of  the  co-oper- 
ative and  allied  efforts  of  all  the  shoe  manufacturers 
and  said  that  never  has  there  been  a  time  when  their 
combined  energies  were  so  needed.  Unity  of  purpose 
and  ideals  of  service  should  be  the  watchword  of  all,  to 
maintain  the  stability  of  business. 

Tuesday,  New  England  Day,  was  largely  attended 
with  the  same  features  as  the  preceeding  day  as  far  as 
the  display  of  shoes  went.  In  the  afternoon,  an  educa- 
tional picture  film  showed  the  process  of  shoe  and 
leather  manufacturing.  This  movie  exhibition  illus- 
trated the  making  of  the  Queen  Quality,  Sweet  Sally 
Lunn  shoes,  Catspaw  Rubber  heels,  and  also  products 
of  the  United  States  and  Hood  Rubber  Companies. 
Great  interest  was  shown  l)y  those  present  in  these  film 
displays. 

Leather  Day,  Wednesday,,  was  the  big  day  of  the 
Show,  as  this  is  always  visiting  buyers'  day  in  the  Bos- 
ton shoe  and  leather  markets.  Large  crowds  filled  the 
halls  day  and  night.  In  the  evening  Mr.  Fred  Vogel, 
president  of  the  Tanners'  Council,  and  a  leading  spirit 


January,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


43 


in  all  leather  matters,  addressed  the  gathering-,  which 
numbered  close  to  3,000,  explaining  that  the  Tanners' 
Council  of  the  United  States  was  formed  as  a  war  emer- 
gency organization  and  was  responsible  for  the  creation 
of  the  National  Association  of  Tanners,  the  Morocco 
Manufacturers'  Association,  and  the  Patent  Leather  and 
F.namel  Leather  Manufacturers'  Association.  Later  the 
three  associations  were  absorbed  by  the  council.  An 
interesting  feature  of  his  address  was  the  details  of  an 
industrial  l)ureau  recently  established.    Mr.  \'ogel  said: 

"We  are  going  to  put  at  the  head  of  this  bureau,  one 
of  the  ablest  men  in  the  country,  who  has  made  a  study 
of  the  psychology  of  labor,  and  who  knows  about  that 
class  we  employ  better  than  any  other  man.  We  have 
established  this  bureau,  not  with  the  idea  of  comliatin.g 
labor,  nor  with  the  idea  of  doing  any  uplift  or  charity 
work.  This  bureau  is  established  to  conscientiously 
study  labor  from  all  its  angles  with  the  spirit  of  fair- 
mindedness  that  will  prevent,  and  must  prevent,  all  in- 
dustrial disputes  and  bickerings." 

This  address  was  very  enthusiastically  applauded. 

During  the  evening,  living  models  appeared  on  tlic 
"runway"  or  "\'ictory  Court,"  as  it  was  termed,  shciwing 
the  latest  styles. 

Thursday  was-  National  Day,  and  the  clo>ing  day  of 
what  was  generally  conceded  to  be  the  best  style  show 
ever  held  in  America.  This  day  brought  together  l)uy- 
ers  of  shoes  and  leather  from  all  parts  of  the  country 
and  including  guests  from  Canada  and  F,ngland.  Manx- 
leading  style  experts  from  all  fashionable  shoe  centres 
were  among  the  distinguished  critics  also. 

Among  the  companies  exhibiting,  in  both  shoes  and 
leather,  and  who  are  generally  well  known  to  the 
Canadian  trade,  are  the  following:  The  Daniel  Cireen 
Felt  Shoe  Company,  the  Preston  B.  Keith  Company. 
Thomas  Lake  &  \\'hiton.  Inc.,  T,  A.  Kelley  Coniijany. 
(Kelley  Kid).  New  Castle  Leather  Com;)any,  S.  I^. 
Agoos  Tanning  Company,  H.  S.  &  M.  VV.  Snyder, 
(showing  shoes  from  their  colored  kid  leathers),  J. 
Spaulding  &  Son,  Beckwith  Box  Toe  Company,  Farns- 
worth-Hoyt  Coinpany,  Avon  Sole  Company,  Pfister  & 
\'ogel  Leather  Co.,  Standard  Kid  Manufacturing  Co. 


Can  I  Be  af  Any  Help? 

One  of  the  largest  retail  merchants  in  To- 
ronto was  recently  in  Chicago  and,  while  there, 
visited  the  store  of  Marshall  Field  &  Company 
in  quest  of  a  book  for  his  five-year-old  boy. 
While  wandering  around  the  book  department 
a  saleslady  approached  him  and  asked:  "Can  I 
be  of  any  help  to  you?"  'Yes,"  he  answered, 
"I'm  looking  for  a  book  for  my  boy."  What  age 
is  he?"  asked  the  saleslady,  and  on  finding  it 
was  five  years,  replied:  "Why  yes,  I  have  just 
the  thing  here  for  a  five-year-old  boy."  And 
she  produced  the  book  and  explained  just  why 
it  was  suitable  for  a  boy  of  that  age.  It  was  a 
very  pleasant  transaction  and  this  merchant 
came  back  to  Toronto  with  that  thought  in  his 
mind:  "Can  I  be  of  any  help  to  you?"  He 
thought  it  would  be  an  excellent  substitute  in 
his  store  for  the  dozen  and  one  other  expres- 
sions now  used  by  his  clerks. 


Dominion  Association  of  Shoe 
Manufacturers  Formed 

(Concluded  from  page  40) 


shoe  manufacturers  "Bill"  Matthews  is  certainly  a 
winner.  The  programme  was  quite  to  the  liking  of  the 
diners,  lieing  made  up  of  turns  fron-i  the  theatres  and 
\ariety  houses. 

Mr.  W.  1'".  Martin  was  (piite  prominent  in  looking 
after  the  delegates.  He  was  here,  there  and  every- 
where. Certainly  no  convention  was  better  organized, 
and  the  conimittee  that  had  the  n-iatter  in  hand  are  to 
be  congratulated  upon  the  sn-ioothness  with  which  the 


Mr.  J.  A.  Duchaine,  of  Duchaine  &  Perkins, 
Quebec.    Elected  to  the  Executive,  Shoe 
Manufacturers'  Association  of 
Canada. 


whole  af¥air  was  conducted.  In  that  connection,  Mr. 
\V.  P.  Hughes,  the  secretary  of  the  Montreal  Associa- 
tion, must  not  be  forgotten. 

The  address  by  Mr.  Art  Harr:es,  president  of  the 
Canadian  Paper  Box  Makers'  Association,  on  standard- 
izing of  cartons,  was  particularly  welcome.  The  ap- 
pointment of  a  committee  to  consider  the  subject  points 
to  son-iething  being  done  at  last  in  the  direction  ad- 
vocated by  Mr.  Harries.  A  uniform  carton  will  l)e  a 
boon  to  manufacturers  and  retailers  alike. 

Mr.  Geo.  A.  Slater  and  Mr.  A.  Brandon  were  happy 
men,  and  they  beamed  with  satisfaction  at  the  know- 
ledge that  their  work  of  promoting  a  national  associa- 
tion had  borne  fruit. 

Mr.  Tanguay  was  ver_\-  much  to  the  fore  and  had 
a  number  of  ideas  when  the  question  of  the  Constitu- 
tion was  discussed. 

Mr.  J.  E.  Samson,  of  Quebec,  was  also  heard 
from,  discussing  two  or  three  points  in  the  proposed 
Constitution.    His  points  -were  well  taken. 

The  next  Convention  will  be  held  in  Quebec  City 
and  a  big  time  is  already  promised. 


44 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


January,  1919 


Three  of  Kingston's  representative  shoe  repairing  shops.  On  the  left,  Mr.  Robert  Paynter,  Princess  Street,  one  of  the  best  known  local  shoemakers; 
in  the  middle,  Mr.  John  E.  Johnson,  particularly  well  known  to  military  men  ss  a  rr.aker  of  high  class  bespoke  shoes,  all  work  being  done  on  the 
premises;  the  right-hand  picture  shows  Mr.  James  McGall,  who  is  a  very  popular  member  of  the  trade.     All  of  these  shops  use  Goodyear  outfits. 


January,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


45 


Death  of  Mr.  R.  E.  Dildine 

WIDE  spread  regret  has  been  expressed  at  the 
unexpected  death  of  Mr.  R.  E.  Dildine,  Gen- 
eral Manager  of  Ames-Holden-McCready, 
on  December  23rd.  Mr.  Dildine  died  in  the 
Royal  Victoria  Hospital,  Montreal,  following  an  op- 
eration for  appendicitis.  He  was  one  of  the  younger 
members  of  the  shoe  manufacturers,  and  was  rightly 
regarded  as  one  of  the  most  promising  men  in  the 
industry. 

He  went  to  Montreal  as  advertising  manager  for 
Ames-Holden-McCready,  and  was  later  appointed 
sales  manager.  On  the  retirement  of  Mr.  Feltes,  he 
was  appointed  general  manager.  Prior  to  going  to 
Montreal  he  was  with  Endicott,  Johnston  &  Co.  of 
Endicott,  N.Y.  He  had  also  been  editor  of  the  shoe 
section  of  the  "Dry  Goods  Economist,"  and  had  done 
editorial  work  for  "Printers'  Ink." 

Mr.  Dildine  had  made  a  considerable  study  of 
selling  methods;  had  written  on  this  subject,  and  had 
some  pronounced  ideas  on  selling  campaigns,  how  to 
reach  the  consuming  public  and  also  how  to  cultivate 
the  retail  trade.  He  read  a  paper  recently  before  the 
Montreal  Retailers'  Asociation  on  "Curtailing  Stock"  ; 
contributed  to  our  October  issue  an  article  of  the  "Re- 
tailer as  Seen  by  the  Manufacturer"  ;  and  was  to  have 
read  a  paper  on  "Trade  Conditions  from  the  Selling 
Standpoint"  at  the.  convention  of  the  Shoe  Manufac- 
turers of  Canada. 

Mr.  Dildine  took  a  great  interest  in  the  new  asso- 
ciation and,  besides  being  a  member  of  the  convention 
organization  committee,  was  elected  on  the  executive 
committee. 

The  funeral  service  was  held  on  Christmas  Day 
at  the  Royal  Victoria  Hospital  chapel  and  was  attend- 
ed by  a  very  large  number  of  representatives  of  shoe 
and  allied  firms  and  also  by  many  of  the  staff  of  Ames- 
Holden-McCready. 

The  body  was  then  conveyed  to  Binghampton,  N. 
Y.,  where  the  burial  took  place  on  the  following  day. 


The  "Little  Concern"  Progresses 

A STRIKING  feature  in  boot  and  shoe  manu- 
facturing history  is  the  progress  made  by 
that  shoe  factory  in  St.  Hyacinthe,  Que.,  that 
many  have  been  wont  to  call  "The  Little  Con- 
cern." It  was  started  in  the  spring  of  1913  with 
an  authorized  capital  of  $10,000  and  only  $1,000  paid 
up.  Custom  repair  work  was  handled  and  a  shine  par- 
lor was  conducted  in  addition  to  making  a  few  lines 
of  soft  sole  baby  shoes.  Thus  originated  the  charter 
name  of  the  St.  Hyacinthe  Soft  Sole  Shoe  Company, 
Limited. 

Later  on  the  company  started  making  sandals  and 
stitchdown  shoes  until,  in  1915,  realizing  that  much 
more  could  be  done  in  that  line,  they  entered  new 
and  larger  premises,  introducing  boys',  youths',  and 
little  gents',  box  kip  standard  screwed  lines.  A  line 
for  men  was  subsequently  added. 

At  the  present  time  the  company  is  building  a  new 
boot  and  shoe  factory,  75  by  45  feet,  two  storeys  and 
basement,  which  will  be  in  operation  in  the  early 
spring  and  in  which  will  be  manufactured  exclusively 
men's,  boys',  youths',  little  gents'  and  children's  Mc- 
Kay and  Standard  screwed  shoes.  We  understand 
the  "Little  Concern"  will  apply  for  supplementary  let- 


ters patent  increasing  its  capital  stock  to  $99,000  and 
also  to  change  their  name  to  cvne  more  befitting  the 
nature  of  their  output. 

+„_„„_„„_„„  ,_„„ — „_„„_„„  „„_„„  „  f 


5  Mr.    L.   O.    Breithaupt,   of  the   Breithaupt  f 

I  Leather  Co.,   Kitchener,   was  one  of  four  1 

I  new  members  elected  to  the  City  Council  T 

I  for   1919.  i 

1  1 

4.„  ,„  u_„„_„  4. 

Shoe  Ornaments  Coming  Back 

AFTER  the  long  period  of  patriotic  sacrifice 
it  is  fairly  certain  that  shoe  ornaments  and 
millinery  styles  will  be  more  than  ever  in 
evidence.  Pretty  decorations  on  shoes  and 
slippers  will  be  insisted  on  by  the  feminine  trade. 
Owing  to  the  fact  that  large  quantities  of  footwear 
will  be  made  and  delivered  according  to  wartime  sam- 
ples there  will  quite  likely  be  a  g'ood  demand  in  re- 
tail stores  for  shoe  ornaments  of  the  type  that  can  be 
attached  by  the  wearer  and  this  should,  during  the 
next  year,  furnish  a  very  considerable  volume  of  busi- 
ness for  shoe  merchants  in  all  parts  of  the  country. 
A  larg^e  United  States  manufacturer  has  informed  us 
that  there  is  already  a  big  demand  from  jobbing 
houses  for  ornaments  of  metal,  leather  and  silk,  and 
that  reports  from  all  parts  of  the  country  indicate 
that  the  revival  of  this  necessary  trade  will  result  in 
a  large  amount  of  extra  business  for  retailers. 


The  Chiropody  Record 

THE  Illinois  College  of  Chiropody,  Chicago,  111., 
commenced  last  year  the  publication  of  a  little 
magazine  called  "The  Chiropody  Record" — a 
I  eriodical  record  of  progress  in  the  profession 
of  chiropody.  While  much  that  is  instructive  and 
helpful  will  be  contained  in  all  numbers,  it  is  also  the 
intention  to  print  a  quantity  of  news  and  gossip  of 
members  of  the  profession.  In  'a  word,  the  complete 
selection  of  matter  is  calculated  to  instruct  and  serve 
those  who  have  cast  their  lot  in  the  profession.  Sam- 
ple copies  may  be  secured  by  addressing  the  Illinois 
College  of  Chiropody,  1321  North  Clark  Street,  Chi- 
cago. 


46 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


January,  1919 


Taking  Larger  Premises 

The  Vancouver  business  of  Ames-Holden-Mc^ 
Cready  has  increased  to  such  an  extent  during  the 
past  year,  due  principally  to  the  well-assorted  and 
up-to-the-minute  stock  they  carry,  that  it  is  neces- 
sary to  move  into  larger  premises.  They  are,  accord- 
ingly moving  to  125  Pender  Street  West,  adjoining 
the  "Sun"  newspaper  office. 


orthopedist  or  chiropodist  will  have  no  difficulty  in 
selecting  a  complete  line  of  office  outfits,  equipment, 
instruments,  specialties,  etc.  As  Dr.  Scholl  has  an 
international  reputation  as  a  foot  authority,  his  ideas 
as  incorporated  in  this  catalog,  are  of  considerable 
value  to  those  in  the  market  for  such  merchandise. 


Promotion  for  Mr.  Craigie 

Mr.  Chester  F.  Craigie  has  been  appointed  General 
Sales  Manager  for  Ames,  Holden,  McCready,  Ltd., 
Montreal,  in  succession  to  the  late  Mr.  R.  E.  Dildine, 
who  was  also,  however,  general  manager.  Mr.  Craigie 
was  formerly  assistant  sales  and  advertising  manager. 


Will  Exhibit  at  Lyons  Fair 

The  Canadian  Consolidated  Rubber  Co.,  Montreal, 
Lagace  &  Lepinay,  Quebec,  and  Beardmore  &  Co., 
Toronto,  and  Daoust,  Lalonde  &  Co.,  Montreal,  will 
be  among  the  Canadian  firms  exhibiting  at  the  Inter- 
national Fair  at  Lyons,  France,  in  March  next. 


New  Catalogue  of  Chiropody  Supplies 

The  Scholl  Mfg.  Co.  cannot  be  accused  of  doing 
things  by  halves.  This  is  exemplified  in  the  new  com- 
plete Chiropody  catalog  which  they  have  just  issued 
and  a  copy  of  which  has  just  reached  us.  The  modern 


Best  Wishes  for  Mr.  Chamberlain 

Mr.  Wm.  Chamberlain  has  severed  his  connection 
with  the  firm  of  Getty  &  Scott,  Limited,  and  the  firm 
of  Scott-Chamberlain,  Limited,  Gait,  Ont.  His  health 
for  a  considerable  length  of  time  has  not  been  good 
and  it  is  his  present  intention  to  spend  the  winter  in 
California.  We  sincerely  trust  Mr.  Chamberlain  will 
return  with  fully  recovered  health  and  strength. 


BJS^issiiiassiiiiaiaiaHiMiHiaHHiaiaHiMiiaHiiHiiisiiHHiiiaH 

FOOTWEAR  FINDINGS 


Happenings  in  the  Shoe  and  Leather  Trade 

HiaiisiiwiisiaiaiaiasisiiaiigiiiiisiiiaiiiisiiiHiasiiaiaiiBiiMiHii 


VV.  x\.  Smith,  shoe  retailer,  34  West  King  street,  Ham- 
ilton, Ont.,  sent  an  attractive  little  Christmas  card  to  his 
many  friends  and  business  acquaintances. 

The  Dunlop  Tire  and  Rubber  Goods  Company  distributed 
to  their  customers  and  friends  a  very  attractive  and  sincere 
Chrisnias  greeting  card. 

Lester  Levy,  formerly  with  the  Royal  Air  Force,  has 
been  granted  his  discharge  and  has  resumed  as  manager  of 
the  Canadian  Shoe  Findings  Novelty  Company,  2  Trinity 
Square,  Toronto. 

Griffith  B.  Clarke,  president  of  A.  R.  Clarke  &  Com- 
pany, patent  leather  manufacturers,  Toronto,  has  been  in 
New  York,  Philadelphia,  and  other  points  on  business, 
spending  the  Christmas  holiday  in  Atlantic  City. 

The  Sicilia  Shoe  Store  Limited,  Montreal,  has  been  in- 
corporated with  a  capital  stock  of  ten  thousand  dollars  to 
take  over  as  a  going  concern  the  business  heretofore  car- 
ried on  by  the  Sicilia  Shoe  Store.  Reg'd,  1053  St.  James  St., 
Montreal. 

.\lfred  Lambert,  of  .\lfred  Lambert,  Inc.,  Montreal,  was 
one  of  the  arbitrators  appointed  to  adjust  on  the  claims  for 
increased  pay  by  the  employees  of  the  Montreal  police,  fire, 
waterworks,  and  incineration  departments. 

The  assets  of  the  Lillian  Shoe  Co.  Limited,  Montreal, 
arc  announced  to  be  sold  by  auction  under  the  Winding  up 
Act. 

Retail  merchants  of  Chatham  have  organized  an  Asso- 
ciation in  that  city  with  the  following  officers:  President,  W. 
P'orcman;  First  \'ice-President,  E,  Walness;  Second  Vice- 
President.  G.  W.  Cowan;  Secretary,  F.  W.  Brigden;  Treasur- 
er. James  Gray.  Representatives  from  each  line  of  business 
in  the  city  constitute  the  executive  committee. 

Mr.  J.  M.  Stobo,  of  Quebec,  was  a  recent  visitor  to  Mon- 
treal. 

The  Kaufman  Rubber  Company,  Ltd..  Kitchener,  have 
issued  a  handsome  calendar  for  the  year  1919.  It  is  a  reprint 
of  a  painting  by  Phillij)   R.   Goodwin,  entitled  "A  Timely 


Catch"  and  shows  two  hunters  in  a  canoe  just  making  a 
good  catch,  while  another  on  the  shore  is  kindling  a  fire 
preparatory  to  cooking  supper. 

The  Rochester  Style  Shoe  is  being  held  January  Oth 
to  15th  inclusive. 

H.  N.  Lincoln,  of  the  International  Supply  Company, 
Kitchener,  recently  visited  Boston,  accompanied  by  H.  L. 
Taylor,  Montreal  representative  of  the  same  firm. 

The  Champion  Shoe  Machinery  Company  of  St.  Louis, 
Mo.,  have  been  working  night  and  day  on  government 
work. 

James  O'Flynn,  boot  and  shoe  dealer,  Wallaceburg, 
Ont.,  recently  suffered  loss  by  an  explosion  which  occurred 
close  to  his  store. 

It  has  been  decided  to  reorganize  the  Quebec  Shoe 
Manufacturers'  Association,  Mr.  H.  Gale  having  been  re- 
elected president  and  J.  S.  Langlois  secretary.  The  reorgan- 
ization of  the  association  was  decided  on  at  a  supper  given 
by  Mr.  H.  Gale,  the  supper  being  followed  by  an  entertain- 
ment. The  function  was  largely  attended,  and  several 
speeches  were  made  enthusiastically  endorsing  the  reorgan- 
ization and  its  affiliation  to  the  Shoe  Manufacturers  Asso- 
ciation of  Canada. 

Many  friends  will  regret  the  death  of  Gilbert  Campbell, 
manager  of  the  Shoe  Findings,  Glove  and  Mitten  Depart- 
ment of  the  Great  West  Saddlery  Company,  Edmontop, 
on  December  27. 

With  a  view  to  taking  care  of  the  increasing  business 
and  to  separate  the  manufacturing  from  the  sales  and  dis- 
tribution, the  Dominion  Rubber  System,  Limited,  have  in- 
corporated a  number  of  companies  in  the  provinces,  the 
head  office  and  control  will  still  be  in  Montreal.  The  fol- 
lowing is  a  list  of  the  various  new  companies,  their  capital- 
ization and  the  head  offices  in  the  provinces.  Dominion 
Rubber  System  (Quebec)  Limited,  Montreal,  $1,500,000;  Do- 
minion Rubber  System  (Ontario)  Limited,  Toronto,  $1,- 
000,000;     Dominion    Rubber   System    (Manitoba)  Limited, 


January,  1919 


FOOTWEAR 


IN  CANADA 


47 


Winnipeg,  $500,000;  Dominion  Rubber  System  (Saskatche- 
wan) Limited,  Regina,  .$500,000;  Dominion  Rubber  System 
(Alberta)  Limited,  Calgary,  $500,000;  Dominion  Rubber  Sys- 
tem (Pacific)  Limited,  Vancouver,  $250,000;  Dominion  Rub- 
ber System,  Maritime,  St.  John,  $500,000. 

Just  as  we  go  to  press  we  learn,  with  regret,  of  the 
death  of  Mrs.  Irwin,  wife  of  Ed.  Irwin,  the  well-known 
West  Toronto  shoe  retailer. 

Captain  Aubrey  Davis,  son  of  Hon.  E.  J.  Davis,  of  New- 
market, Ont.,  has  returned  from  overseas.  He  is  a  veteran 
of  the  220th  Battalion,  which  he  was  active  in  organizing,  but 
when  sent  to  France  was  transferred  to  the  ;^5th.  He  is  vicc- 
piesident  of  the  Davis  Leather  Company. 

Harry  Thompson,  of  the  Thompson  Shoe  Company, 
Montreal,  has  been  at  the  Queen's  Hotel,  Toronto,  for  the 
past  few  days. 

Mr.  Geo.  Boulter,  of  Toronto,  has  been  on  a  business 
trip  to  Montreal. 

Walter  Burnill  and  Geo.  Chambers  were  among  the 
Toronto  shoemen  attending  the  Boston  style  show. 

W.  F.  Collins  is  now  a  partner  in  the  business  of  T.  .\. 
Wilson,  shoe  retailer,  579  Bloor  West,  Toronto. 

H.  Smith,  of  tlie  Fit-Eze  Shoe  Store,  Granville  Street, 
^'ancouver,  has  sold  out  to  Mr.  Murphy  of  the  same  city 
and  has  gone  to  California. 

T.  W.  Hart,  formerly  representative  in  Western  Can- 
ada for  the  Nugget  Shoe  Polish  Company,  has  been  award- 
ed the  D.C.M  for  gallant  service  in  France.  He  enlisted  in 
1915  and  his  iiome  is  in  Toronto. 

The  shoe  business  formerly  conducted  by  A.  Rodway, 
1379  Gerrard  East,  Toronto,  has  been  purchased  by  Thos. 
L.  Marshall. 

J.  \V  Miiir,  late  chief  auditor  of  taxation  fur  the  Do- 
minion Government,  is  now  with  the  Blachford  Davies  Com- 
p.'uiy,  Toronto,  having  assumed  the  duties  of  the  late  Mr. 
Emery. 

H.  E.  Thomas,  shoe  retailer,  Toronto,  is  moving  to  new 
premises  just  a  few  doors  west  of  his  old  stand  at  468  Col- 
lege Street. 

Mr.  Mulligan,  formerly  with  the  Arrowsmith  Company 
in  the  United  States,  is  now  with  the  Canadian  Arrowsmith 
Company  and  resides  in  Toronto. 

A.  Hockham,  formerly  manager  of  the  shoe  store  of 
'I'hos.  Creswell,  St.  Thomas,  Ont.,  has  opened  for  himself 
at  437  Talbot  Street  in  the  same  city. 

Mr.  W.  A.  Puncher,  of  the  Breithaupt  Leather  Company, 
Ki'^chener,  recently  returned   from  a   four  weeks'  business 


trip  to  Montreal.  Quebec  and  the  Maritime  Provinces.  He 
reports  a  very  good  trip  and  also  that  the  trade  is  in  a  very 
optimistic  mood  regarding  tlie  future  outlook  in  the  shoe 
business. 

The  shoe  busine.~s  of  H.  C.  Wilson,  241  King  St.  East. 
Tr.ronto  has  been  purchased  bj'  N.  Adel. 

Mr.  C.  Duclos,  of  Duclos  &  Payan,  Montreal,  visited 
the  trade  in  Western  Ontario,  recently,  accompanied  by  their 
representative,  Mr.  Ed.  Lewis,  45  Front  Street  East,  Toron- 
to. 


Experienced  shoe  traveller  with  large  connection.  Fort  William  to 
Vancouver,  desires  good  line  for  all  or  part  territory.  Box  835,  Footwear 
in  Canada,  Toronto,  Ontario.  1 


From  War  to  Peace 

Have  you  solved  the  ])rol)lem  of 
steadying'  your  bu.siness  during  the 
transition  of  war  to  peace?  You  doubt- 
less have  stock  that  you  paid  war- 
time prices  for  and  are  anxious  to  di.s- 
pose  of  it  without  loss. 

Our  special  services  will  jirove  of  in- 
^•aluable  assistance  to  you.  We,  as  ex- 
perts, can  pilot  your  business  past  the 
shoals  of  changing-  conditions,  and  help 
you  sell  your  stock  to  advantage  and 
profit. 

Write  us  to-day. 

Beadle  Sales  Service  Co. 

59  Yonge  Street 
TORONTO 


THE  NEW 
UNIQUE  TRADE 
MARK  OF  THE 
COBOURG  FELT 
CO..  COBOURG, 
ONT.    THE  "K" 
IN  KIMMEL  HAS 
FOR  MANY 
YEARS  BEEN 
SYNONYMOUS 
WITH  QUALITY 


.   MADE  IN 

^"^COBOURG 

COBOURG 

'A.J.KINMEL  Pres 


CANADA  BY> 


FELT  C8 


LIMITED^ 


ONTARIO 
A.C.KINNEL  Kgr> 


48 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


January,  1919 


ALPHABETICAL  LIST  OF  ADVERTISERS 


Aird  &  Son   15 

Ames-Holden-McCready   13 

Armstrong,  W.  D   68 

Beadle  Sales  Service   47 

Beckwith  Box  Toe  Company   12 

Bennett  Limited   5 

Boston  Blacking  Company    16 

Borne,  Lucien   57 

Boot  and  Shoe  Union   60 

Breithaupt  Leather  Company   63 

Brodie  &  Harvie  '    69 

Canadian  Consolidated  Ivubber  Co.  3-20 

Canadian  Wood  Products   59 

Champion  Shoe  Machinery  Company  61 

Clapp  &  Son,  Edwin   16 

Clark  Bros  

Clarke  &  Company,  A.  R   72 

Cleland,  Regd.,  James   66 

Cobourg  Felt  Company   47 

Cote,  J.  A.  &  M   53 

Daoust-Lalonde  &  Company   11 

Duchaine  &  Perkins   67 

Duclos  &  Payan   62 

Eastern  Shoe  Mfg.  Company   55 

Edwards  &  Edwards   52 

Evans'  Son  Company,  L.  B   55 


Fortuna  Machine  Company    54 

Franklin  Machine  Co   67 

Friedman,  S.  J   66 

F.  &  B.  Shoe  Company   7 

Gagnon,  Lachapelle  &  Hebert   54 

Globe  Shoe  Company   68 

Goodyear  Tire  &  Rubber  Co   65 

Hinde  &  Dauch  Paper  Company  ...  55 

Home  Shoe  Company   69 

Independent  Rubber  Company   58 

International  Supply  Co                 ...  17 

Kelly,  Thomas  A   56 

Kenworthy  Bros                            ...  71 

Landis  Machine  Company   56 

Lamontagne  Racine  &  Co   56 

La  Duchesse  Shoe  Company   69 

Lagace  &  Lepinay   66 

Marsh  Company,  Wm.  A   18 

McLaren  &  Dallas   6 

Mears,  Fred  W   68 

Miner  Rubber  Company   10 

Miner  Shoe  Company   4 

Mooney  Company,  A.  G   62 


Narrow  Fabric  Company   68 

National  Cash  Register  Company..  50 
New  Castle  Leather  Company   54 


Panther  Rubber  Company  Cover 

Perfection  Counter  Co   69 

Perkins  &  McNeely   66 

Pullan,  E   66 


Regal  Shoe  Company   1 

Robinson,  James  8-9 


Samson  Enr.,  J.  E   57 

Sisman  Shoe  Company   53 

S.  M.  Supplies  Co   63 

Snyder,  M.  S.  &  M.  W   52 

Spaulding  &  Sons,  J   19 

Standard  Kid  Mfg.  Company   49 

St.  Hyacinthe  Soft  Sole  Company  . .  68 


Tetrault  Shoe  Company   14 

Textile  Mfg.  Company    52 

Thomas,  Lake  &  Whiton   51 

Thompson  Shoe  Company   12 

Toronto  Heel  Company   55 


United  Shoe  Machinery  Co.,  Ltd.  64-70 
United  States  Hotel,  Boston   57 


Subscribers'  Information  Form 

Many  letters  reach  us  from  subscribers  enquiring  where  certain  goods  can  be 
obtained.  We  can  usually  supply  the  information.  We  want  to  be  of  service  to 
our  subscribers  in  this  way,  and  we  desire  to  encourage  requests  for  such  informa- 
tion.   Make  use  of  this  form  for  the  purpose. 


Date  19 

"FOOTWEAR  IN  CANADA," 

347  Adelaide  Street  West,  Toronto. 

Please  tell  us  where  we  can  secure  (give  description  as  fully  as  possible)   


Name  . 
Address 


January,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


49 


VVTHEN  you  see  one  bundle  of  a 
grade,  you  see  all  of  that  grade, 
now  and  always. 

It  takes  maximum  skill  and  infinite 
care,  but  it  insures  you  the  fullest  possible 
realization  of  weight  and  grade  uniformity. 

The  ever-widening  market  for  Standard 
Kid  bears  convincing  testimony  to  an  achieve- 
ment in  standardization. 

Always  reasonably  priced 
Inquiries  Solicited 

Standard  Kid  Mfg.  Co. 

MANUFACTURERS  OF  BLACK  AND  COLORED 
GLAZED  KID  AND  PATENT  KID 

207  SOUTH  STREET       -:-       BOSTON,  MASS.,  U.S.A. 
New  York  Office,  610  Tribune  Bidg.,  Spruce  and  Nassau  Sts. 
Factory.  Wilmington,  Del. 


AGENCIES 


CHAS.  A.  BRADY,  Rochester,  N.Y. 
GEO.  A.  McCiAW,  Cliicago,  III. 


F.  W.  BAILEY  &  CO.,  St.  Louis,  Mo. 
J.  LOUIS  POPPER,  Cincinnati,  Ohio. 


CtandardIOd 

/r\    TRUE  TO  ITS  NAME 

tl/  "^iT's  standardized 


mm 


50 


FOOTWlwVR    IN  CANADA 


January,  1010 


Every  merchant  needs  the  Protection  a  complete 
N.C.R.  System  will  give  him 

2.  They  will  prevent  the  mistakes  and 
disputes  which  cause  loss  of  trade. 

3.  They  will  enable  you  to  give  cus- 
tomers the  quick,  satisfactory  service 
which  wins  new  trade. 

4.  They  will  give  you  the  accurate 
records  which  you  need  to  control 
your  business. 

5.  They  will  protect  your  money, 
your  clerks,  your  customers  and 
yourself. 


Peace  is  bringing  increased  compe- 
tition in  your  business. 

You  must  meet  that  competition. 
You  cannot  afford  to  run  the  risk  of 
loosing  a  single  cent  of  profit. 

A  modern  National  Gash  Register 
and  an  N.C.R.  Credit  File  will  en- 
able you  to  get  all  your  profits  on 
every  transaction  in  your  store. 

Because— 

1.  They  will  make  it  possible  for 
you  to  run  your  store  with  the  least 
expense. 


The  National  Gash  Register  Company,  Limited,  of  Canada,  Toronto,  Ont. 
Offices  in  all  the  Principal  cities  of  the  world 


January.  1010  FOOTWEAR     IN     CANADA  51 


SHOE  FABRICS 


We  can  offer  for  Spot  Delivery 
a  large  supply  of  all  the  popular 
colors  in  Worsted  and  Cotton  Cork- 
screw Cloths. 


For  WHITE  SHOES,  our  POLAR-KLOTH  is 

without  a  superior— For  STRENGTH,  FINISH, 
FINE  FACE,  and  EVEN  WEAVE,  we  invite 
comparison  with  any  cloth  you  can  buy. 


TITE-SEAM  COTTON  THREAD  for  Making 

Room — We  guarantee  this  thread  made  from  Sea 
Island  Cotton  and  for  sole  sewing  work,  you  will  get 
satisfaction  in  the  work  and  the  wear. 


COTTON  GOODS— We  convert  linings  of  every 
description  —  Twills,  Drills,  Duck,  Flannels,  Sheet- 
ings, etc. 


THOMAS,  LAKE  &  WHITON,  Inc. 

Manufacturers  and  Converters 
103  Bedford  Street   (Cor.  Lincoln)  BOSTON,  Mass.,  U.S.A. 


52 


FOOTWEAR 


IN  CANADA 


January,  1919 


SHOE 
LACES 


MADE  IN 
CANADA 


Supply 

Shoe  Manufacturers  and  Wholesale  Trade 
only 

Textile  Manufacturing  Co.,  Ltd. 

439  Wellington  Street  West 
TORONTO 


Edwards  &  Edwards 


TANNERS 
OF 


SHEEPSKINS 


FOR 

Shoes,  Gloves,  Saddlery 
Upholstering 
Bags  and  Suit  Gases 
Bookbinding 
Fancy  and  Novelty  Goods 
Skivers 
Embossed  Leathers 

Etc.,  Etc. 

EDWARDS  &  EDWARDS 


Head  Office  and  Sale  Rooms 


Tannerie* 


27  Front  E.  Toronto       Woodbridge,  Ont. 

Quebec  and  Maritime  Province* 
Represented  by 

JOHN  McENTYRE  LTD.  ^AaJir'ilEAL.'Qu'^: 


65  SOUTH  ST.,  Boston. 
HORSE  FRONTS    HORSE  BUTTS 


MADE  IN 

MAHOGANY,  PEARL  AND 
OYSTER  GREY,  MEDIUM 
AND  LIGHT  TAN 


MADE  IN 

BLACK,  TAN  AND 
MAHOGANY,  INCLUDING 
BOX  AND  SPECIAL  FIGURES 


INDIA    GOAT   and    CHROME  KID 
HAVANA    BROWN  and    OYSTER  GRAY 
ALL    POPULAR    COLORS   and  SHADES 


OOZE  SPLITS 
For  Gussets 


CANADIAN  AGENTS 


DOPED  SPLITS 
Better  known  as  YORKO 
in  Black  &  Colors 


INTERNATIONAL  SUPPLY  CO. 


KITCHENER,  ONT. 


MONTREAL,  QUE. 


January,  1!)19 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


53 


1919 

By  selecting  a  line  that  meets 
the  requirements  of   the  great 
majority  of  the  public,  you  are 
handling    merchandise   that  is 
most  profitable  to  yourself  by 
reason  of  a  broader  market. 

To  Jobbers 

The 

T.  Sisman 
Shoe  Co. 

Limited 

Aurora,  Ont. 

The  Best  Everyday  Shoes 

and 

The  Aurora  Lines 

are  well  established  lines,  and  have  made  good 
with  the  public  and  the  retailers.    Their  quality, 
service  and  reasonable  price  are  factors  of  their 
success  as  necessary  everyday  shoes. 

A  Product 
of  Quality 


YAMASKA 


This  all-leather  shoe — for  men  down  to  the  little 
chap — enters  the  new  year  with  added  laurels  to  its 
reputation  as  a  seasoned  seller. 

YAMASKA  comes  to  the  retailer  maintaining  all 
the  merit  of  manufacture  and  material  that  has  won 
for  it  such  a  large  share  of  business  during  1918. 

Given  a  place  in  your  stock  this  year  YAMASKA 
will  prove  your  best  link  between  you  and  your  cus- 
tom. 

Let  us  hear  from  you. 

La  Compagnie 

J.  A.  &  M.  COTE 

St.  Hyacinthe,  Quebec 


54 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


January,  1919 


7oTtuna 

Skiving  Machine 


For  Manufacturers  who  Skive  Leather,  Felt, 
Cork,  Rubber  or  Paper 

Used  extensively  by  Manufacturers  of 

Shoes,  Box  Toes,  Trimmings,  Insoles,  Ankle 
Supporters,  Welting,  Arch  Supporters 

Sole  Agent*  for  Canada 

Fortuna   Machine  Co. 

127  Duane  Street       •      NEW  YORK 


Jobbers  Should  Note! 
New  Castle 


Quality 


Kid 


Supplies  either  glazed  or  natural 
surface,  black  or  colored,  this 
famous  product  is  always  reliable 
and  uniform  in  quality. 

Quantities   shipped  promptly. 
Samples  supplied. 

WRITE  DIRECT 

New  Castle  Leather  Co. 

NEW  YORK 

Canadian  Branch:— 335  Craig  St.  W.,  Montreal 
Factory: — Wilmington,  Del.,  U.S.A. 


We  Sell  to  the  Jobber 


and  we  make  it  our  business  to  supply  him  with 
a  product  in  which  are  embodied  the  principles 
of  better  business  making, 

Women's  Leather  Shoes,  Misses',  Children's 
and  Infants'  footwear  of  Standard  quality  in  all 
the  popular  styles,  await  your  approval.  We 
solicit  your  inspection. 


Gagnon^  Lachapelle  &  Hebert 

Shoe  Manufacturers 
55  Kent  Street  -  -  Montreal 


1 


January,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


55 


MENS,  BOYS,  and  YOUTHS 
TURN  PUMPS  and  OXFORDS 
— Now  in  Stock— 
PATENT  AND  DULL  CALF 

Men's  B-D,  Sizes  6/11    $:!.2.j 

Boys'  C-E,  Sizes  2>4/5   2.83 

Youths,  C-E,  Sizes  111/4/2      2.50 

MEN'S  PATENT  PUMP,  TURN  BOSTON  OFFICE-lIO  Summer  St. 

L.B.EVANS^'  5X)N  CO.         WAKEFIELD ,  JHASS". 


The  New 

"EASTERN" 

Shoe  Lines 

offer  Jbig  possibilities  to  Jobbers 
desirous  of  handling  a  first-class 
product  at  popular  prices. 

We  will  be  pleased  to  show 
you  a  very  complete  assortment 
of  shoes  for  Misses,  Children 
and  Infants  for  Spring  and  Sum- 
mer, upon  receipt  of  a  post  card 
from  you. 

See  us  when  in  Montreal 

Write  us  now. 

The  Eastern  Shoe 

Manufacturing  Company,  Limited 

152  Frontenac  Street 
Phone-La  Salle  2561  MONTREAL 


SCRAP  LEATHER 
WANTED 

Soft  or  Upper  Leather  Cuttings 
Hard  or  Sole  Leather  Cuttings 
New  Felt  Clippings        Wool  Waste 

Best  market  prices  F.O.B.  your  (own. 

E.  PULLAN 

20  Maud  Street       -  TORONTO 


We  Can  Save  Money  for  You  on  Your 
Shipping  &  Packing 

H  &  D  Solid  Fibre  Board  Boxes 


1.  — They  protect  your  shipment 

against  loss  from  dampness 
and  water. 

2.  — They    are    extremely  light, 

which  means  low  freight 
charges. 

3.  — They     cannot     be  opened 

without  breaking  the  seal. 


—They  save  time  in  packing. 

—They  save  storage  space. 

—They  have  strong  adver- 
tising value. 

—They  can  be  made  to  your 
specifications. 

—Their  first  cost  is  lower 
than  wood. 

Our  booklet  "How  to  Pack 
It"  explains  all — vfrite  for 
it. 


The  Hinde  &  Dauch  Paper  Co. 

of  Canada  Limited 
TORONTO  ONTARIO 


TORONTO  HEEL  CO. 

Manufacturers  of 

All  styles  of  Heels  in  Leather 
and  Composition 

We  are  also  Makers  of  the 
Haverhill 

Write  for  Samples  and  Prices.    These  will  interest  you 

The  Toronto  Heel  Company 

13  Jarvis  St.,  Toronto 


56 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


January,  1919 


COUNTERS 

BOX  TOES  and 
INNER  SOLES 


Our  union  and  all  leather 
inner  soles  are  what  you 
need  in  your  shoes  as  they 
are  cheap  and  of  a  good 
quality.     Ask  for  samples. 

LAMONTAGNE,  RACINE  &  CO. 

115  ARAGO  ST. 
QUEBEC 


KELLEY  KID 

LEADS  THEM  ALL 
in  Uniformify, 
Fine  Texture,  Wearing  Qualities  and  Finish 


In  our  West  Lynn  l-"actory  during  310  working 
days,  the  average  daily  output  has  been  800  dozen 
finished  skins,  or  an  equivalent  of  9,600  skins  per  daj'. 
This  represents  60,000  feet  of  leather  turned  out  each 
day,  or  18,600,000  square  feet  of  leather  in  one  year. 
This  amount  provides  over  6,200,000  people  once  a 
year  with  one  pair  of  shoes — a  large  army! 

Sold  in  All  Foreign  Countries 

Thomas  A.  Kelley  &  Co. 

Tannery  and  Main  Office,  LYNN,  MASS. 

Selling  Agents  : 

ROUSMANIERE,  WILLIAMS  &  CO. 
87-93  Lincoln  St.,   BOSTON,  MASS. 


Landis  Outfits  are  Money-Makers 

Equalize  the  increased  cost  of  material  by  installing  machinery  to 
do  your  shoe  repair  work. 

Landis  Stitchers  and  Finishers  are  unequalled  in  quality,  the  prices 
are  reasonable  and  the  terms  are  easy. 

We  have  many  models  of  stitchers  and  finishers.    Write  for  com- 
plete catologue  with  prices  and  terms. 


.     Landis  No.  12  Shoe  Stitcher.  Landis  No.  12-25  Outfit.    Landis  No.  12  Shoe  Stitcher  coupled  to 

Sold  outright— No  royalty.  Landis  Model  25  Finisher. 

Landis  Machine  Co.,  isis  N.zsthst.,  St.  Louis,  U.S.A. 


January,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


57 


The  United  States  Hotel, 

BOSTON,  MASS.,  U.  S.  A. 


Beach,  Kingston 
and   Lincoln  Streets 


Only  two  blocks  from  the  South  Terminal  Station  in  the  centre  of  the  Shoe  and  Leather 
District  and  within  easy  walking  di^ance  of  the  shopping  diitrid,  theatres,  etc. 
Good,  comfortable  rooms,  unexcelled  cuisine,  and  reasonable  rates. 
American  and  European  plans.    Send  for  circulars. 


TILLY  HAYNES,  Proprietor 


JAS.  G.  HIGKEY,  Manager 


Built  for  Service 

Made  for  wear.  Something  reliable  in  a 
strong  working  boot  for  men.  We  can 
supply  you  with  either  screw  or  pegged 
in  this  sure  selling  line  of  well-made  foot- 


wear. 


JOBBERS 

Write  us  for  particulars. 


J.  E. 
SAMSON 
ENR. 


QUEBEC 


Middle  and  Western  Canada 
Demands  the  Best 
in  Footwear 


To  successfully  introduce  your  lines  and  maintain 
a    satisfactory    business    you    must    interest  the 

General  Merchants  in  the  Prairie  Prov- 
inces and  British  Columbia. 

The  General  Merchants  are  Departmental  Stores — in  miniature — 
found  in  every  hamlet,  village,  town,  and  city  in  the  Great  Western 
Provinces  of  Canada.  Every  General  Merchant  sells  boots  and  shoes 
— there  are  no  exceptions.  No  exclusive  shoe  paper  can  interest  this 
trade,  because  the  General  Merchant  is  not  an  exclusive  shoe  dealer. 


rMwuta  riiuiiau..c«iiua/a  <i 

«KMl  TUK  WWVWU^Ma  OWI  WUI. 

Over  33  years  in  its  field 

''CANADA'S    GREATEST   TRADE  PAPER:' 

Issued  twice  a  month  at  WINNIPEG,  Canada. 

Is  the  ONLY  PAPER  reaching  the  General 
Merchants  in  all  points,  Port  Arthur  and  West 
to  the  Pacific  Ocean. 

Get  a  sample  and  advertising  rates,  of  "That 
Western  Paper  that  brings  results." — "THE 
COMMERCIAL." 

Branches  at 

Vancouver.  Toronto,  Montreal,  Chicago,  New  York,  London,  Eng. 


CURFACE  KID 


IN  BLACK  and  COLORS 


Beautifully  pliable  and  with  a  glove-like  grain — 
Surface  Kid  is  particularly  suitable  for  dressy  shoes. 

It  rivals  the  beauty  of   Real   Kid  and  is  very 
much  cheaper. 
Made  in  black  and  colors  and  sold  at  attractive  prices. 
Send  to-day  for  samples. 

BUTTS  IN  GUN  METAL,  DULL,  GLAZED 
CABRETTAS,  GLAZED  KID,  SHEEPSKINS 

491  S."V&  Quebec    LUCIEN  BORNE 


Montreal  Office — 225  Lemoine  St. 


5S 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


January,  1919 


The  Rush  for  Rubbers 


is  now  on  ! 


Royal  ' 
Kant  Krack'' 
Dainty  Mode 
Dreadnaught 
''Veribest'' 


6( 


6C 


66 


99 


99 


Any  of  these  dealers  will  supply  you 

Amlierst  Boot  &  Slioe  Co.,  J-td., 
Amherst  Boot  &  Slioe  Co.,  I. tel., 
E.  A.  Dagg  &'  Cunii>aiiy. 
.\.   W.  Ault  &■   Company,  Limitcil, 

.\mlierst,  X.S. 
Halifax,  N.S. 
Calgary,  .\lta. 
Ottawa,  Ont. 

VVIiite  Shoe  Company, 
McLaren  &  i:)allas, 

'i'hc   London  Shoe  C'ompany,  Limited, 

Toronto,  Ont. 
Toronto,  Ont. 
London.  Ont. 

KilKOiU',  Rimer  Coni])any.  I^imitetl, 

The  .T.   Leckie  Comi>any,  Limited, 

.lames  Roljinsem, 

Brown  Rochette,  Limited, 

T.   l-oiig  &  Brother, 

Dowers,  I^imited, 

Winnipeg,  Man. 
X'aneniuer,  B.C. 
Montreal,  (Jue. 
Cnchec,  (jue. 
Ccillingwood,  Ont, 
lidnionton,  Alta. 

The  Independent  Rubber  Co.,  Limited 

MERRITTON,  ONTARIO 


i 


January,  1010 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


59 


Let  us  quote  on  your  requirements  in 

Packing  Cases 

WE  ARE  MANUFACTURERS  OF  THE 

4 -One 
Wirebound  Boxes 

Famous  for  Economy 


End( 


Outside 


Inside 


Easily  Assembled 

They  are  Light — means  a 
saving  in  freight. 

They  are  Strong — means 
goods  arriving  in  good 
condition,  thereby  elimi- 
nating claims. 

They  are  Secure — means 
contents  cannot  be  pil- 
fered in  transit. 


VIEW   SHOWING   BOX   IN  KNOCK-DOWN 


VIEW  SHOWING  BOX  READY  FOR  SHIPMENT 


When  requesting  samples  and  prices  give  the  following  information 
consecutively  :     Size   of   Box   (inside  measurements)    length,  width, 

depth,   weight  of  contents. 

CANADIAN  WOOD  PRODUCTS 

LIMITED 

TORONTO 


60 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


January,  1919 


.WORKERS  UNION. 
UNIO^STAMP 

[ador/ 


INSIST 

ON  THE 

UNION  STAMP 


.WORKERS  UNION. 
UNIO^^STAMP 

l^ctory 


j^^O   excuse,    subterfuge,   or  expla- 
nation should  satisfy  any  retailer 
for  the  absence  of  the  union  stamp  on 
his  footwear. 

Union  Stamp  shoes  bearing  the  stamp 
of  the  Boot  and  Shoe  Workers'  Union 
are  the  one  and  only  shoes  guaranteed 
to  be  the  product  of  Union  workers. 

Insist  upon  Union  Stamp  footwear 
that  you  may  meet  the  trade  of  all  the 
people  all  the  time. 


Boot  &  Shoe  Workers*  Union 

Affiliated  with  the  American  Federation  of  Labor 
246  Summer  Street  -:-  Boston,  Mass. 

JOHN  F.  TOBIN         :  General  President 

CHARLES  L.  BAINE  :         Gen'l  Sec'y-Treas. 


January,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


61 


A  Shoe  Merchant 


Every  customer  for  a  new  pair  is  a  prospect  for  the  repair 
department. 


With  a 

Champion  Shoe  Repair 

Department,  said 

By  installing  the  shoe  repair  department  behind  a 
glass  partition,  customers  can  look  right  into  the  repair 
shop  and  see  how  the  work  is  done.  I  would  put  the 
Stitcher  right  up  near  the  glass  partition,  where  it 
would  attract  as  much  attention  as  possible.  The  cost 
of  a  complete  repair  outfit  is  very  small.  The  neces- 
sary stock  and  accessories  to  start  this  department  do 
not  call  for  any  large  expenditure  of  money.  Any  live 
merchant  could  start  right  in  making  such  a  depart- 
ment pay.  An  ordinary  shoe  repair  department  will 
easily  pay  the  running  expenses  of  the  entire  store,  in- 
cluding light,  heat,  rent,  clerk  hire,  advertising,  insur- 
ance, etc.  This  would  leave  the  profit  obtained  from 
the  selling  of  shoes  a  clear  sinking  fund  for  that  rainy  day  we  all  talk  about.  All  live  shoe  dealers  would 
become  wealthy  if  they  had  no  expenses.  The  installation  of  a  shoe  repair  department  will  result  in  tak- 
ing care  of  expenses  of  a  first-class  shoe  store,  and  may  still  leave  a  margin  of  profit  in  the  Repair  Depart- 
ment. 

Champion 
Machines  are 
sold  outright 
(no  royally) 
for  cash  or 
on  monthly 
payments. 

Champion  New  Model,  No.  F-50,  Repair  Outfit,  equipped  with  Standard  Straight 
Needle  and  Awl  Shoe  Stitcher,  with  motor  extension. 

Over  20,000  Champion  Machines  of  various  types 
in  use-That  means  MERIT  and  QUALITY. 

The  Champion  Line  consists  of: 

Seven  different  types  of  Shoe,  Harness  and  Auto  Tire  Stitchers. 
Forty  dififerent  models  of  Repair  Outfits,  consisting  of  Stitchers 
and  Finishers.  ■  . 

Two  distinct  types  of  Nailing  Machines. 
Many  different  Models  of  Finishers. 
A  complete  line  of  Double  Tread  Tire  Machines. 
Many  labor  and  material  saving  auxiliary  machines. 


Universal    Model    Curved  Needle 
and  Awl   Shoe  Stitcher  —  heated 
by  gas,  gasoline,  or  electricity. 


CHAMPION  SHOE  MACHINERY  CO.,  372341  F«r.st  Park  Bvd.,  St.  Louis,  Mo. 

Please  send  me  particulars  about  a  shoe  store  repair  department. 


Name   Street 

City   State 


62 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


January,  1919 


Mooneyes  Thread 
^Will  Do  It=^ 


Hundreds  of  pleased  customers  have  found  that  Mooney's 
high  grade  cotton  thread  is  giving  entire  satisfaction. 

We  should  like  to  send  you  samples  of  this  thread  and  let 
you  see  its  merits  for  yourself. 

For  strength,  lustre  and  easy  working  it  is  admirable.  The 
price  makes  it  economical.    Send  for  a  sample  reel  at  once. 


Brushes 


Thread 


Cement 


The  A.  G.  Mooney  Company 

220  Lemoine  Street   -  MONTREAL 


Buy  D  &  P  Counters 

You  Run  No  Risk 


Every  counter  turned  out  of  the 
D.  &  P.  Factory  is  guaranteed  to 
give  lasting  satisfaction. 


Our  Canadian-made  fil)re  board  counters 
outlast  leather.  Made  from  selected  fibre 
compressed  by  the  special  D.  &  P.  process. 
Write  for  samples.  We  also  solicit  your  or- 
ders for  u])per  and  sole  leather,  and  shall 
be  glad  to  quote  on  your  requirements. 


Ed.  R.  Lewis,  45  Front  St  East 
Toronto 
Ontario  Selling  Agent 


DUCLOS  &  PAYAN 


Richard  Frere»,  Quebec 
Selling  Agents  for 
Quebec  City 


Tannery  and  Factory:  ST.  HYACINTHE,  P.Q. 
Sales  Offices  and  Warehouses:  224  Lemoine  Street  MONTREAL 


January,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


63 


Excelsior  Brand 
Needles 


Wheeler  and  Wilson 


Singer  Machines 


Puritan  National  Wax  Thread  Machines 


Its  superiority  lias  caused  it  to  be  the 
recognized  standard  the  world  over. 
Its  sturdy  reliability  is  due  to  the  quality 
of  material  and  workmanship  that  enters 
into  the  manufacture  of  every  needle 
that  bears  the  name  "Excelsior  Brand" 


THE  S.  M.  SUPPLIES  GO. 


121  Beach  St.         -       Boston,  Mass.,  U.  S.  A. 


for 


and — 


64 


1-OOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


January,  1919 


THE  ANSWER 


8ft.  Shoe  Repairing  Outfit  Model N.  Showing  Mod.  B.  Skate  Sharpening  Machine  Attached 

To  the  Demand 

For 

A  High  Class  Practical 

Shoe  Repairing  Outfit 

that  could  be  installed  in  the  shop  of  limited  size 
Compact^  efficient^  convenience  in  a  small  space 

United  Shoe  Machinery  Company  of  Canada^  Limited 

Montreal,  Que. 

TORONTO  KITCHENER  QUEBEC 

90  Adelaide  Street  West,  179  King  Street  West,  28  Demers  Street, 


January,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


65 


AMONG  men  who  make  and  sell  shoes  to-day, 
NeoHn  is  admitted  to  I)e  the  hardest-wearin<^-  ma- 
terial ever  used  for  making  shoes. 

They  admit  it,  for  millions  of  pairs  of  Neolin  Soles 
have  proved  it  true. 

Now  Neolin  may  be  had  for  Half-Soles. 

That  means  you  can  now  make  new  profit  selling 
Neolin's  comfort,  flexibility,  waterproofness — and  long 
wear — to  folks  who  do  not  want  to  pay  the  price  of  a 
Neolin  full-sole  job. 

You  saw  the  advertising  that  put  Neolin  Soles 
across — day  after  day,  week  after  week,  big  space  in 
newspapers  and  magazines  all  over  Canada. 

Neolin  Half-Soles  are  now  being  advertised  in  a 
campaign  just  as  powerful,  just  as  dominating,  just  as 
convincing. 

We're  telling  folks  by  the  thousands  that  Neolin 
Half-Soles  can  be  nailed  or  sewn  in  your  store;  that 
they  bring  all  Neolin's  many  advantages ;  that  they  will 
help  cut  down  the  family  shoe  bill. 

Be  the  first  in  your  territory  to  co-operate.    Be  the 
first  to  make  the  initial  sales;  be  the  first  to  win  the 
trade  and  confidence  of  people  who  are  wide 
awake  enough  to  see  the  economv  of  shoe-re- 
pairing— with  Neolin  Half-Soles. 

Go  after  this  new  business.  To-day.  Get 
a  supply  of  Neolin  Half  Soles.  Display 
them  in  your  window. 


a  new 


profit-maker 

smashingly 
advertised 


Goodyear  Tire  & 
Rubber  Co. 

of  Canada,  Limited 
TORONTO 


66 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


Januar\',  1919 


S.  J.  Friedman 
Vancouver's 
Leading  Surgi- 
cal Bootmaker 


Makers  of  boots  and  fine 
shoes  for  all  deformities  and 
lame  feet. 

Endorsed  by  medical  offic- 
ers of  Militia. 

Satisfaction  guaranteed. 

Information  cheerfully  sent 
on  request. 

West  End  Boot  Hospital 

320  Granville  St.  Vancouver,  B.C. 


Pan  American 

KID 

Seal  Brown  and  Black 


Perkins  &  McNeely 

Philadelphia 

Canadian  Representative— 

Ed.  R.  LEWIS 

45  Front  St.  E.,  TORONTO 


Jobbers 

Our  Lines  Are 

Good  Examples 

Of  up-to-date  Footwear.  They  are  giving  entire  satisfaction  in  style,  fit  and 
wear,  pleasing  the  customer  and  therefore  appeal  to  the  retailer  on  account 
of  steadily  increasing  sales.  An  asset  to  the 
business  of  any  jobber  who  handles  them. 

Carry  our  lines  and  be  sure  of  having  stock 
that  will  move  quickly  and  give  a  generous 
margin  of  profit. 


No.  46 


UGACE  &  LEPINAY 


22  ST.  ANSELME  ST. 
QUEBEC 


No.  50 


Call  on  us 
or 

Drop  a  line 


Largest  Manufacturers  in  Canada 

STEEL  DIES 

for 

Shoe  and  Rubber  Manufacturers 


Prompt 
Service 


Guaranteed 
Work 


JAS.  CLELAND,  REGD. 

16  St.  George  St.,  Montreal 


E.  PULLAN 

Scrap  Leather 
Cotton  Clippings 

20  Maud  St.  M  TORONTO 


January,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    [N  CANADA 


67 


ADVERTISERS 

Mike  your  Advertising  space  give  better  results. 

Use  bright,  snappy 
cuts.  Our  cuts  cost 
little  and  accom- 
plish much.  Proof 
sheets  and  prices 
mailed  free  upon 
request. 

CANADIAN 
ADVERTISERS 

SERVICE 
511  Church  St. 

Toronto,  Canada 


The  Best  and  Most  Durable 
Shoe  Laces  Are  Made 

With  Our 

Power  Shoe  Lace 
Tipping  Machines 

Textile  and  Special  Machinery 
Harris-Corliss  Steam  Engines 

Send  for  Catalogue 

The  Franklin  Machine  Company 

Engineers       Founders  Machinists 
189  Charles  Street,  Providence,  R.I. 


Better 


Shoes 


mean 


Better 


Sales 


A  Word  to  Jobbers 

T  T  is  easy  to  tell  you  of  the  superiority 
of  our  McKays,   but   to   prove   it  you 
must  see  them. 

Duchaine  &  Perkins  Shoes  bespeak  the 
thoroughness  and  care  which  goes  with  the 
making  of  absolutely  reliable  footwear. 

Get  in  touch  with  us  before  buying  and 
we  will  show  you  "Something  Worth 
While." 

Duchaine  &  Perkins 

QUEBEC 

Montreal    Sample  Room 

E.  T.  Bank  Bldg.,  St.  James  St. 


68 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


January,  1919 


Frld  VM^^iklCELCo. 
WOODT^ 

TELEf 

HAVERHILL.  M^^CHUSETTS 


Have  You  Heard  About  This? 

The  Paiow  Welt 


1 


A  distinctive  feature  in  our  footwear  for  Misses,  Girls,  Child- 
ren  and  Infants.  It  is  designed  with  special  regard  to  comfort 
and  ease  for  growing  feet.  The  Welt  is  sewn  right  into  the  shoe 
and  is  the  Genuine  Goodyear. 

The  soft  cushion  insole,  and  the  waterproof  cork  filling 
between  the  inner  and  outer  soles  are  two  features  that  help  to 
make  these  shoes  the  most  popular  on  the  market. 

GLOBE  SHOE  LIMITED 

Factory  TERREBONNE,  QUE. 

Selling  Agents 

L.  H.  PACKARD  &  CO.,  LIMITED 
MONTREAL,  P.Q. 


Our  Standard  Screw  Shoes 

WILL  STAND  PLENTY  OF    HARD  WEAR 
Made  on   foot-fitting  lasts  that   will   give   comfort   to   the  wearer 
and  are  durable. 
The  Range  Includes 
Men's,  Boys',  Youths',  Little  Gents'  and  Children's  Box  Kip 
Your  Jobber  will  quote  you  [irices,  or  write  us  direct 

St.  Hyacinthe  Soft  Sole  Shoe  Co. 

St.  Hyacinthe,  Quebec  Limite 


i  •V.D.t\rm STRONG* 

I  ENGRAVERofFINESTEELSTAMPS&DIES 
23Q^c,^>NES;jMONTREALPHo>y^  675 

CR^^^C^^fP)   c>  QUE.  c)  (^n^*  AfAIN 


t 


Q  QUE,  t)  C^^«J 
mystampsare"uptodate"in  design 

&  ADD  AN  ARTISTIC  FINISHTO  VOUR  SHOES«!ji» 
•  WHICHMUILL  INCREASE  YOUR  SALES 


January,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


69 


The 

Home  Shoe 

for  better  business 

tbis  year 

is  represented  in  a  variety  of  in- 
teresting lines  for  retail  trade. 

We  should  like  you  to  be 
sure  to  see  the  samples  we  are 
showing.  If  our  traveller  does 
not  call,  write  us  at  once. 


Retailer's  Opportunity 

In  buying  from  us,  the  retailer  is  dealing 
direct  with  the  manufacturer  who  understands 
his  needs  and  supplies  him  accordingly. 


Home  Shoe  Company,  Ltd. 

327  Amherst  Street,         -  MONTREAL 


JOBBERS 
ONLY 


Very  Attractive 

Our  showing  of  "La 
Duchesse"  McKay  Shoes 
for  Women,  and  Turn 
Slippers  for  Men.  For 
your  inspection.  When- 
ever you  want  high  grade 
shoes  it  will  pay  you  to 
handle  "  La  Duchesse  " 
manufacture. 


La  Duchesse  Shoe  Co. 

Registered 

MONTREAL 


BRODIE'S 

Patent  Paste 

This  famous  product  covers 
a  wide  range  of  usefulness 
being  used  with  equal  success 
and  efficiency  by  manufactur- 
ers of  the  finest  grade  shoes  and 
makers  of  heavy  work  shoes. 

Supplied  in  quantities  to 
meet  your  needs. 

Let  us  send  you  sample  and 
price. 

Brodie  &  Harvie 

Limited 

14  Bleury  St.  MONTREAL 


Perfection 


Your  New  Year's  Good  Resolutions  are  not 
complete  unless  you  have  resolved  to  use  nothing 
but  the  best  in  Counters. 

Try  PERFECTION  COUNTERS  and  let  us 
show  you  wherein  they  excel.  Send  for  prices  and 
particulars. 

Our  Felt  Box  Toes  are  Now  Ready. 

Perfection  Counter  Limited 

699  Letourneux  Ave.  Cor.  Ernest  St 

Maisonneuve,  Montreal 


FOOTWEAR    IN    CANADA  January,  1919 


YOUR 
FUTURE 
EQUIPMENT 

1919  1925  ^7 

If  you  are  going  to  install  a 

SHOE  REPAIRING  OUTFIT 

THIS  SEASON 

Install  one  that  will  be  good  for 

1925 

and  a  score  years  after  that 

HI. 

Goodyear  Outfits  are  Quality  Outfits 

United  Shoe  Machinery  Company  of  Canada,  Limited 

Montreal,  Que. 

Toronto,  Ont.  Kitchener,  Ont.  Quebec,  Que. 

90  Adelaide  Street  West,  179  King  Street  West,  28  Demers  Street, 


January,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


SPECIALTIES 

for 

Shoe  Manufacturers 

HEEL  PADS:  Cut  from  several  qualities  of 
white  felt,  also  all  colors  of  Imitation  Leather 
and  Combmed  Imitation  Leather  and  Felt. 
Large  assortment  of  patterns  that  will  fit  any 
shoe.  Our  facilities  mean  service  to  you  at  a 
minimum  cost. 

Felt  for  Box  Toes:  Hard  Insole,  Cushion 
Insole,  Lining  Fillers,  Shoe  Racks  and  Shoe 
Rolls. 

Imitation  Leather,  all  colors.  Combined 
Imitation  Leather  and  Felt. 

Kendex  Insole  Stock,  made  in  oak  and  white, 
all  weights.     Advise  us  of  your  requirements. 

WE  SPECIALIZE  FOR  SHOE  MANUFACTURING 

KENWORTHY  BROS.  COMPANY 

STOUGHTON,  MASS. 

Represented  in  the  Province  of  Quebec  by  HORACE  D'ARTOIS,  224  Lemoine  St.,  Montreal 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


January,  1911) 


PATENT  LEATHER 


A  Product 
of  Constant 
Excellence 


Consistent  quality  has  given  CLARKE'S  Patent  Leather 
an  undis]Hitable  lead.  An  inferior  patent  usually  results 
in  lost  custom,  and  for  that  reason  CLARKE'S  should 
always  be  specified.  It  is  the  acme  of  patent  leather  pro- 
duction and  it  never  fails  to  bear  out  the  fact  in  service  to 
the  wearer. 


A  Spread  of  Patent  Leather  in  Final  Process 

A.  R.  Clarke  &  Co.,  Limited 

MONTREAL  TORONTO  QUEBEC 

''Makers  for  the  Nation  " 


Vol.  IX.-N0.  2 


Toronto,  February,  1919 


From  Transient  Trade 
to  Regular  Custom 


You  gain  regular  custom  through  your  store 
and  your  goods  being  known.  When  you  handle 
a  national,  trade  marked  product  possessing  the 
merit  that  warrants  the  trade  mark,  you  have 
your  advertisement.  The  trade  mark  identifies 
not  only  the  product  but  your  store  as  well. 
That's  your  guarantee  of  regular  custom. 


o 


REGAL 


is  a  trade  mark  that  stamps  an  invariable  excellence  of  shoe  pro- 
duction. The  Regal  trade  mark  has  been  a  big  national  factor 
in  converting  transient  trade  into  regular  custom.  That  is  why 
the  dealer  has  nothing  to  lose  and  everything  to  gain  by  having 
his  business  associated  with  the  name  of  Regal. 

There  is  a  lot  of  Regal  business  to  be  had  this  year,  and  you 
should  secure  it.  Our  specific  co-operation  with  dealers  and 
Regal  repute  are  your  strong  supports. 

Regal  Shoe  Company,  Limited 


472-474  Bathurst  Street 


TORONTO 


Alphabetical  Index  to  Advertisers,  Page  66 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


February,  1919 


Panther 

Tested  Fibre  Soles 


This  is  present-day  soling.  This  is  the  common- 
sense,  practical,  economical  soling  that  brings  greater 
numbers  of  satisfied  customers  to  manufacturer  and 
retailer  alike.  If  you  have  not  already  made  an  inves- 
tigation covering  "Panther"  Tested  Fibre  Soling,  do 
so  at  once  by  all  means. 

*^Sure  Step^^  Tread  Rubber  Heels 

In  combination  with  Panther  Soling  these  "Sure  Step" 
Rubber  Heels  ofifer  the  ideal  wearing  surface  for  all 
footwear.  They  are  a  well-known  product.  Panther 
Soles  look  like  leather,  and  can  be  supplied  in  black, 
white,  or  tan.  They  can  be  worked  up  the  same  as 
leather,  but  they  wear  better.  They  are  crack-proof 
and  slip-proof.  They  are  comfortable  and  resilient  the 
first  time  worn.  They  are  waterproof.  W rite  us  im- 
mediately for  information  that  will  be  to  your  advan- 
tage. 


Panther  Rubber  Co. 


Limited 


Sherbrooke,  Quebec 


PA 
TREA  D 

PANTHER  RUBBER  MFG. 

J,  ~STOUCHTON,MASS^ 


Co. 


February,  101!)  FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


Hold  Your  Orders 
for  Rubbers 

/^UR  Salesmen  will  soon  be  on  the  road  to  show  you  the  most 
complete    line    of    Guaranteed    Rubbers    ever   offered    to  the 

trade. 

The  Dominion  Rubber  System  does  more  than  give  you  six 
brands  of  Guaranteed  Rubbers — does  more  than  give  you  styles  and 
shapes  to  fit  every  shoe  worn  by  man,  woman  and  child. 

The  Dominion  Rubber  System  also  educates  your  customers,  by 
advertising,  to  appreciate  the  protection  and  economy  of  Rubbers. 
All  the  leading  papers  from  coast  to  coast  are  carrying  the  big, 
striking  advertisements  of  Dominion  Rubber  System  Rubbers. 

Keep  clearly  in  mind  what  we  do  for  you,  and  you  will  see 
the  wisdom  of  keeping  your  orders  for  Rubbers  for  the  Dominion 
Rubber  System  Salesmen. 


Dominion  Rubber  System  Service  Branches  are  Located  at 

Halifax,  St,  John,  Quebec,  Montreal,  Ottawa,  Toronto,  Hamilton,  Brantford,  London, 
Kitchener,  North  Bay,  Fort  William,  Winnipeg,  Brandon,  Regina,  Saskatoon, 
Fidmonton,  Calgary,  Lethbridge,  Vancouver  and  Victoria. 


4 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


FIELD  MOUSE  AND  GRAY 


To  attain  the  same  perfect  uniformity  of  shade  in 
the  butt  and  in  the  flank,  only  the  tightest  grained 
of  the  best  raw  skins  are  used  for  these  delicatecolors. 

Each  piece  of  finished  leather  is  graded  with  severest 
attention  to  every  detail,  that  there  may  be  full 
compliance  with  the  uncompromising  requirements 
of  a  standardized  classification. 

Whether  it  be  Field  Mouse,  Gray,  Black  or  Brown, 
you  know  exactly  what  to  expect  from  a  duplicate 
order,  for  one  bundle  of  a  grade  is  the  same  as  all  of 
that  grade,  now  and  always. 

Prices  Reasonable 
Inquiries  Solicited 


STANDARD  KID  MFG.  CO. 

MANUFACTURERS  OF  BLACK  AND  COLORED  GLAZED  KID  AND  PATENT  KID 

207  SOUTH  STREET,  BOSTON,  MASS.,  U.  S.  A. 

NEW  YORK  OFFICE,  610  TRIBUNE  BLDG. 
Factory,  Wilmington,  Del. 
AGENCIES 


CHAS.  A.  BRADY,  Rochester,  N.Y. 
GEO.  A.  McGAW,  Chicago,  III. 


F.  W.  BAILEY  &  CO.,  St.  Louis,  Mo. 
I.  LOUIS  POPPER,  Cincinnati,  Ohio. 


IWIPIfflWlfPPlWPIl  IPIWIWWMIPIIIWW 


^tandardIOd 

rr\  TRUE  TO  ITS  NAME 
\U  '^IT'S  STANDARDIZED 


|i|i|i|iiiiiii|i|iii|iiiii|i|iiiii{in^ 


February,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


5 


Time  Will  Condemn 
or  Extol 
Your 
Footwear 

According 
to  the 
Counter 
You  Use 


BENNETT 
COUNTERS 


are  impervious  to  the  ravages  of  time  and  wear — made  to  outlast  the  life 
of  any  shoe.  Their  use  ensures  a  shapely  shoe  as  long  as  it  is  worn. 
Bennett  fibre  makes  the  counter  easy  to  shape  to  your  lasts  and  the  process 
of  its  treatment  makes  it  "Stay  Put". 

Time  will  prove  that  it  is  folly  to  use  an  inferior  counter  in  a  good  shoe. 
Always  use  BENNETT'S. 

BENNETT  LIMITED 

^M^a^ers  of  Shoe  Supplies 
Chambly  Canton,  P.Q.,  Canada 

Sales  Office,  59  St  Henry  St.,  MONTREAL  Ontario  Office,  225  King  Street,  KITCHENER 


6 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CAN.MM 


February,  1910 


H,   O.  MCDOWELL 


IMPORTERS  llLTHrJtl  JOBBERS  K^fJ 
MANUFACTURERS  SALES  AGENTS  M 


H.  N.  LINCOLN 


EAGTERN  BRANCH 
<C1  ^.D^ISTINE  BUILDING 

MONTREAL 


Representing 

American  Lacing  Hook  Co. 

Waltham,  Mass. 
Lacing  Ifoolis  and  Hook  ' 
Selling  Machines 

Armour   Sand   Paper  Works 
Chicago.  111. 
C'rystolon  Paper  and  Cloth 
for   lUiffing  and  Scouring 

Boston  Leather  Stain  Co. 

Boston,  Mass. 
Inks,  Stains,  Waxes,  etc. 
Cyclone  lileacli 

•  The  Ceroxylon  Co,, 

Boston,  Mass. 
Ceroxylon,  the  Perfect 
Liquid  Wax 

Dean  Chase  Co., 

Boston,  Mass. 
Shoe  Goods,  Cotton 
Thread 

The  Louis  G.  Freeman  Co., 
Cincinnati,  O. 
Shoe  Machinery 

Hazen,   Brown  Co., 

Brockton,  Mass. 
Waterproof  Box  Toe 
Gum,   Ruhljcr  Cement 

Lynn  Wood  Heel  Co., 

Keene,  N.H. 
Wood  Heels  and  Hie 
lilocks. 

Markem  Machine  Co., 

Boston,  Mass. 
Marking  and  Embossing 
Machines,  Compounds, 
Inks,  etc. 

M.  H.  Merriam  &  Co., 

Boston,  Mass. 
Binding,  Staying,  etc. 

Puritan   Mfg.  Co., 

Boston,  Mass. 
Wax  Thread  .Sewing 
Machines 

Poole  Process  for  Good- 
year Insoles 

The  S.  M.  Supplies  Co., 
Factory  Supplies, 
Needles,  etc. 

H.  S.  &  M.  W.  Snyder,  Inc., 

Boston,  Mass. 
Kids,  Cabrcttas  and  Horse 

J.  Spaulding  &  Sons  Co., 

X.  Kochester,  N.H. 
Guaranteed    Fibre  Conn- 
leis,  Fibre  Innersoling 

The  Textile  Mfg.  Co., 

Toronto,  Ont. 

.Shoe  Laces 

United  Stay  Co., 

Cambridge,  Mass. 
Leather  and  Imitation 
Leather  Facing,  Welting, 
etc. 


MACHINERY  FINDINGS 
AND  FACTORY  SUPPLIES 

THE  LARGEST  SHOE  FACTORY  SUPPLY  HOUSE  IN  CANADA 


SHOE 


Ma:n  omzs  A^^D  F  : 

57  rOUNOKY  ST. 

K.TCHENEf; 


Shoe  Hooks 

AND 

Hook  Setting  Machines 

High  Speed  Automatic  and  Semi-Automatic 

American  Lacing  Hook  Co. 

Waltham,  Mass. 

Manufacturers  of  Steel  Hooks  in  Black  and  Colors 
Brassed  and  Nickeled    All  Sizes 
Machines  are  Rapid  and  Accurate 
No  Hooks  Wasted  Attractive  Terms 

We  Carry  Hooks  in  Stock  and  Give 
Service  on  Machines 


For  the  BEST  scouring  on  straight  breasted  heels 

USE  THE 

Freeman  Heel  Breast  Scouring  Machine 

For  the  BEST  Heel  Breast  trimming  on  Louis  Heels 

USE  THE 

Freeman  Louis  Heel  Breast  Trimming 

Machine 

These  machines  are  indispensable  for  those 
manufacturers  interested  in  time  and 
money  saving  machinery 

The  Louis  G.  Freeman  Co. 

Cincinnati,  Ohio 

We  have  complete  stocks  of  parts  and  supplies  for 
Freeman  Machines 


February,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


1 


A- 


FALL  SAMPLES 

ALL  the  new  ideas,  lasts  and 
patterns  will  be  found  in 
Ritchie's  range  of  Men's  Welts 
for  the  coming  Fall  Season. 

For  Winter  we  have  a  particu- 
larly strong  line  of  Felt-soled  and 
warm-lined  boots  at  business- 
getting  prices. 

Samples  ready  for  your  inspec- 
tion about  the  loth  inst. 


The  John  Ritchie  Company  Limited 

BOOT  AND  SHOE 

MANUFACTURERS 

QUEBEC 


8 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


February,  1919 


James  Robinson 

Specialist  in  Fine  Footwear 

MONTREAL 


Where  Quality 
Counts 


If  one  sale  is  to  make  another,  the  shoe  has  to 
maintain  in  wear  all  that  you  claim  for  it  in 
the  sale. 

Be  on  the  safe  side  by  serving  your 
customers  with  our  lines  of  foot- 
wear. 

For  all-round  satisfaction  you  can- 
not handle  a  better  shoe  than  the 


Bostonians 


All  the  best  principles  of  shoe 
making  are  embodied  in  their 
manufacture.  And  all  your 
best  customers  will  be  well  sat- 
isfied with  their  service. 

The  Bostonian  Shoe  has  the  reputation  of  "a 
seller."    Are  you  stocking  it? 


February,  19J9 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


James  Robinson 

Specialist  in  Fine  Footwear 

J^IONTREAL 


We  are  Busy  with 
Rubbers 


The  rush  of  sorting  orders  we  have  handled  is 
unmistakable  evidence  of  public  regard  for  a 
good  rubber.    They  want 


Independents 


Have  you  got  your  order? 
If  not  take  a  look  over 
your  stock,  and  write, 
phone  or  wire  your  needs 
now.  We  will  fill  them  right  away,  and  see 
that  you  have  the  goods  with  satisfaction  as 
well. 


10 


FOOTWEAR     IN    CANADA  February,  11)1!) 


What  Does 
This  Shoe 
Indicate 
to  You  ? 


if  you  have  had  a  special  training  in  scientific  slioe  fitting  and  have 
studied  Practipedics,  you  would  instantly  recognize  this  as  a  severe  case 
of  flat  foot. 

Reading  shoes  is  most  interesting  for  they  frequently  tell  a  wonder- 
ful story. 

Nine  times  out  of  ten  "kicks"  about  poor  wearing  and  ill  fitting 
shoes  are  the  result  of  foot  trouble  and  not  the  fault  of  the  shoes.  By 
studying  Practipedics  and  by  scientifically  fitting 


DsScholls 

Foot  Comfort  Appliances 


you  can  overcome  practically  all  shoe  complaints  and  in  addition  you 
can  relieve  and  correct  the  foot  trouble  which  is  the  cause  of  the  shoe 
trouble. 

Result  1  You  establish  a  reputation  for  yourself,  keep  your  cus- 
tomers satisfied,  you  build  up  a  permanent  business  and  your  profits  are 
materially  increased. 

Note  the  illustration  below.  That  shows  how  Dr.  SchoU's  Foot- 
Eazer  bridges  the  arch  of  the  foot,  protects  the  shoe,  gives  instant  relief 
and  corrects  the  weakened  condition. 

Write  today  for  our  new  cata- 
log and  let  us  tell  you  all  about  this 
interesting  foot  comfort,  business 
building  proposition. 


The  Scholl  Mfg.  Co.,  Ltd. 

Largest  Makers  of  Foot  Appliances  in  the  World 

112  Adelaide  St.  E.,  TORONTO 

also 

Chicago  New  York  London 


"WATCH  YOUR  CUSTOMERS*  FEET 


February,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


11 


By  Their  Sales 
You  May  Know 
Three  Successful 

Shoes 

Shoes  carrying  with  them  an  assurance  of  satisfaction 
to  your  customers ;  an  important  factor  in  your  prospects  for 
increased  trade. 

You  cannot  afford  to  overlook  the  importance  of  these 
superb  lines. 

"MetropolitaN" 

WOMEN'S  McKAYS  MEN'S  WELTS 

"Patricia" 

WOMEN'S  WELTS 
AND  TURNS 


Daoust,  Lalonde  &  Co. 

Limited 

Montreal   -  Que. 


"Paris" 

WOMEN'S  McKAYS 
MEN'S  WELTS 


12  footwi<:ar  in  Canada  Feiimary.  loio 


T3EGINNING  the  first  week  in  March  and 
continuing  through  the  season,  the  Spring 
series  of  Ames  Holden  McCready  newspaper  ad- 
vertisements will  carry  your  message  to  the  Cana- 
dian public.  We  shall  continue  our  policy  of 
giving  sound  and  impartial  advice  on  How  to  Buy 
Shoes,  and  Where  to  Buy  Them ;  the  same  sort 
of  advice  which  you  give  your  customers  when 
they  come  to  your  store;  advice  which  is  useful 
whether  they  buy  A.  H.M.  shoes  or  not. 

This  series  of  advertisements  will  be  run  on  the 
same  nation-wide  scale  as  in  past  seasons.  They 
will  be  read  in  your  town,  by  your  customers.  And 
it  is  easily  possible  for  any  dealer  in  Canada  to 
make  this  advertising  of  special  benefit  to  his  own 
store.  Begin  planning  noW  to  get  your  full  share 
of  it. 


AMES  HOLDEN  McCREADY 

"Shoemakers  to  the  Nation" 

ST.  JOHN         MONTREAL         TORONTO         WINNIPEG         EDMONTON  VANCOUVER 


February,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


13 


SOLE  LEATHER 

Served  with  our  Boys  in  France 

and  Flanders 

Don't  expect  them  to  be  satisfied  with 
substitutes  upon  their  return. 

Give  them  the  real  thing. 

The  best  is  none  too  good. 

There  Is  Nothing  Like  Leather  " 

SOLE  LEATHER 

OF 

Highest  Cutting  Value 

IN 

HEMLOCK,  UNION  and  OAK 

Tanneries :  Kitchener,  Penetang,  Hastings,  Woodstock.  Ont. 
Cut  Sole  Factory :  Provincial  Cut  Sole  Co.,  Kitchener,  Ont. 

THE  BREITHAUPT  LEATHER  CO.  LIMITED 

Head  Office,       -       Kitchener,  Ont. 


14 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


February,  1919 


Milton  Shoes 

Harry  E.  Thompson  wishes  to  announce 
to  the  jobbing  trade  that  he  is  now  handling  the 
Milton  Shoes,  representing  a  superb  line  in  Stan- 
dard Screw  and  nailed  goods  for  men,  boys  and 
youths. 


Factory : 

Milton  Shoes  Ltd. 

MILTON,  ONT. 


Sample  Rooms : 
110  Victoria  Sq. 

MONTREAL,  QUE. 


Patented 
Dec.  30th,  1913 


Patented 
Oct,  26th,  1915 


Vul co-Unit  Box  Toe 


SUMMED  UP  IN  THREE  WORDS 

GIVES 

Economy 
Style  ... 
Durability 

Absolutely  Water-proof  and  Perspiration-proof 

BECKWITH  BOX  TOE  LIMITED 

Sherbrooke,  Quebec,  Canada 


February,  1919 

llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 

lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll! 


15 


Two  Outstanding 
Features  of 

TETRAULT 


Value 


You  will  find  TET- 
RAULT right  as  to  price 
and  consistent  as  to  worth. 
Each  shoe  is  an  example 
of  first  class  material  and 
expert  workmanship  at  a 
minimum  cost. 

We  invite  your  thor- 
ough inspection  of  TET- 
RAULT lines.  For  real 
value  in  high  grade  men's 
shoes  they  are  unexcelled. 


Service 


Our  superior  facilities 
for  the  manufacture  of 
high  grade  men's  welts  in 
large  quantities  enables  us 
to  serve  the  trade  prompt- 
ly In  ordering  from 
TETRAULT  you  may 
be  sure  of  having  your  or- 
der filled  in  the  shortest 
possible  time.  You  may 
also  be  assured  that  no 
degree  of  quality  will  be 
sacrificed  for  speedy  de- 
livery. Try  TETRAULT 
Service. 


Tetrault  Shoe  Manufacturing  Company,  Ltd. 

MONTREAL 

European  Office  and  Warehouse :  9  Rue  de  Marseille,  Paris,  France 


LARGEST  MANUFACTURERS  OF  GOODYEAR  WELTS   IN  CANADA 


illlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllll 


llllllllllllll 


16 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


February,  1919 


Juvenile  Footwear 

For  Jobbers 

For  your  best  trade  in  juveniles  you  cannot 
do  better  than  see  our  samples  of  children's 
and  infants'  McKays,  also  our  complete  line 
for  misses,  newly  added. 

Our  up-to-date  factory  equipment  and  facili- 
ties for  high  grade  production  should  be  of 
particular  interest  to  Jobbers. 

AVith  a  staf¥  including  men  of  many  years 
practical   shoe    manufacturing   experience  in 
large  Canadian  factories,  we  are  fully  prepared 
to  produce  nothing  but  the  best.    Jobbers,  get  in  touch  with  us. 

Childrens  Shoe  Mfg,  Co.,  Limited 


11  Belleau  St. 


Quebec  City 


I  MADE   IN   CANADA  I 


Our  line  of  Channel  Cements,  Sole  Laying 
Cements,  Chrome  Cements,  and  Surefold 
is  a  quality  line. 

The  first  consideration  given  to  their  make- 
up is  QUALITY. 

You  may  depend  on  them  being  as  good  a 
Cement  as  can  be  made. 


Boston  Blacking  Company 

152  McGill  Street,  MONTREAL,  Canada 


February,  1919  FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


M  III 


Ready  Service 

to  Support 

Ready  Sales 


From  one  pair  upwards  —  to  any  number  —  you  can 
order  Slater  Shoes,  and  be  sure  of  a  quick  delivery 
from  an  adequate  stock. 

THE  SLATER 
40  IN-STOCK 
LINES 

enable  you  to  fit  and  please  every  customer  with 
the  most  popular  shoe  in  the  Dominion,  The  Slater 
40  in-stock  department  is  at  your  service  for  im- 
mediate shipment  of  all  your  requirements.  Make 
full  use  of  it,  and  multiply  your  sales. 


If  you  have  not  yet  received  a  copy 
of  our  handsome  catalogue  write 
for  it  to-day.  It  displays  the  full 
Slater  Line. 


The  Slater  Shoe  Co 

LIMITED 

Montreal,  Canada 


18 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 
llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll^ 


February,  1919 


I 

I 


A  Special 
Invitation 


If  you  are  unable  to 
call  on  us,  we  will  be 
pleased  to  forward 
samples  of  any  of  our 
lines.  Let  us  hear 
from  you  early. 


WE  should  like  you,  Mr. 
Jobber,  to  visit  our  show- 
rooms, and  see  what  we  are  offer- 
ing for  the  coming  season's  busi- 
ness. We  believe  that  the  Aird 
Shoes,  now  being  shown,  will 
particularly  commend  themselves 
to  you — there  are  many  reasons. 
Come  and  see  them. 


Aird  &  Son 


Registered 

MONTREAL 


llllllll 


February,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


19 


Co-operation 


You  supply  the  last— We  will  produce 

CPAULDING'C 

ORbreCountersC) 


Guaranteed 


that  will  fit  it 


J.  Spaulding  &  Sons  Co. 


Main  Office  and  Factory 

NORTH  ROCHESTER,  N.  H. 


PHILAnELPHIA  CINCINNATI 

John  G.  Traver  &  Co.  The  Taylor-Poole  Co. 

329  Arch  St.  410-412  E.  Sth  St. 
SEVEN  FACTORIES 

Tonawanda,  N.  Y.  Rochester,  N.  H. 

No.  Rochester,  N.  H.  Milton,  N.  H. 

Townsend'  Harbor,  Mass. 


Boston  Office 

203-B  ALBANY  BUILDING 


ST.  LOUIS 
The  Taylor-Poole  Co. 
1602  Locust  St. 


CHICAGO 
E.  n.  McMechan  &  Co. 
217  W.  Lake  St. 


English  Agents:  J.  Whitehead  &  Co.,  Ltd., 
Leicester,  England. 


Canadian  Agents : 

International  Supply  Co.,  Kitchener,  Ontario  and  Quebec  City.  V.  Champigny,  Montreal. 


20 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


February,  1919 


SHOE  FABRICS 


We  can  offer  for  Spot  Delivery 
a  large  supply  of  all  the  popular 
colors  in  Worsted  and  Cotton  Cork- 
screw Cloths. 


For  WHITE  SHOES,  our  POLAR-KLOTH  is 

without  a  superior— For  STRENGTH,  FINISH, 
FINE  FACE,  and  EVEN  WEAVE,  we  invite 
comparison  with  any  cloth  you  can  buy. 


TITE  SEAM  COTTON  THREAD  for  Making 

Room — We  guarantee  this  thread  made  from  Sea 
Island  Cotton  and  for  sole  sewing  work,  you  will  get 
satisfaction  in  the  work  and  the  wear. 


COTTON  GOODS — We  convert  linings  of  every 
description — Twills,  Drills,  Duck,  Flannels,  Sheet- 
ings, etc. 


THOMAS,  LAKE  &  WHITON,  Inc. 

Manufacturers  and  Converters 
103  Bedford  Street   (Cor.  Lincoln)  BOSTON,  Mass.,  U.S.A. 


February,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


21 


THE 

:marsk 

3N0I 


Are  You 

Displaying 

these 

Marsh 

Models? 

They  possess  so  many  features 
of  high-grade  shoemaking,  and  are 
realizing  such  a  generous  share  of 
business  that  they  merit  a  place  in 
the  store  of  every  progressive  dealer. 

Marsh  design,  workmanship  and 
material,  combine  to  give  in  an  un- 
usual degree  a  selling  value  that  will 
increase  your  turnover. 

Sold  in  30  pair  cases  only,  in  30 
pairs  of  a  width. 

Keep  in  mind  the  Marsh  value  in 
Women's  Shoes. 

The 

Wm.  A.  Marsh 

Company  Limited 

QUEBEC 


"100"  LAST 
Made  in  All  Leatliers 
Widths  B  to  E 


"104"  LAST 
Made  in  All  Leathers 
Widths  B  to  E 


"99"  LAST 
Made  in  All  Leathers 
Widths  B  to  E 


33 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


I'-el)ruar.v,  1019 


Fashion 
Decrees 

■  fancy  colors 

for 

Spring  and  Summer  wear 

Colors  CITADEL  MOLE  BROWN 

These  standard  shades  predominated  at 
the  Style  Show  held  recently  in  Boston 


MANUFACTURERS  PLACING  THESE  COLORS  IN  THEIR  SAMPLE  LINE  MAY 
REST  ASSURED  OF  PROMPT  DELIVERY  AS  REQUIRED 


J.  A.  SCOTT 

MONTREAL  QUEBEC 
218  Notre  Dame  St.  W.  566  St.  Valier  Street 


February,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


23 


A  T  this  season  of  the  year  there's  a  good  lot  of  windy 
-^"^  weather,  and  we  must  needs  watch  to  not  have  the 
heavy  sails  spread  until  we  are  sure  we  have  the  right 
reckoning. 

Business  men  can  only  be  patient,  trim  boat,  sit  tight 
and  be  on  deck  for  whatever  emergencies  arise. 

There  will  be  plenty  of  employment  and  lots  to  do 
for  those  who  know  how.  The  present  moment  calls 
for  presence  of  mind. 


J.  A.  SCOTT 

QUEBEC  MONTREAL 
566  St.  Valier  Street  218  Notre  Dame  St.  W. 


24 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


February,  1919 


Rubber  Footwear 

Our  representative  will  call  on  you 
during  the  coming  placing  season 
and  you,  Mr.  Retailer,  will  make  no 
mistake  in  ordering  Rubbers  which 
have  stood  the  test,  year  after  year, 
and  have  added  new  customers  to  the 
long  list  of  Retailers  who  believe  in 
.  and  buy  their  rubber  footwear  from 
our  Agents  and  Branches. 

Your  order  sent  to  any  of  the  fol- 
lowing Miner  Branches  and  selling 
Agents  will  get  immediate  attention. 


Edmonton,  Alta. 
Fredericton,  N.  B. 
Hamilton,  Ont.  . 
London,  Ont.  . . 


Montreal,  Que. 

Ottawa,  Ont.  . 
Quebec,  Que. 
Regina,  Sask. 


..The  Miner  Rubber  Co.,  Ltd. 
..H.  S.  Campbell. 
.  .R.  B.  Griffith  &  Co. 
..Coates,  Burns  &  Wanless. 


(  The  Miner  Shoe  Co.,  Ltd. 
I  The  Miner  Rubber  Co.,  Ltd. 

(The  Miner  Shoe  Co.,  Ltd. 
IThe  Miner  Rubber  Co.,  Ltd. 

.  .The  Miner  Rubber  Co.,  Ltd. 

fCongdon,  Marsh,  Limited 
IThe  Miner  Rubber  Co.,  Ltd. 


St.  John,  N.B  The  J.  M.  Humphrey  Co., 

Limited. 

Sydney,  C.B  The  J.  M.  Humphrey  Co., 

Limited. 

Charlottetown,  P.E.I.  .The  J.  M.  Humphrey  Co., 

Limited. 

Toronto,  Ont  The  Miner  Rubber  Co.,  Ltd. 

Trenton,  Ont  C.  Weaver. 

Vancouver,  B.C  The  J.  Leckie  Co.,  Limited. 

Winnipeg,  Man  Congdon,  Marsh  Limited. 


February,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


25 


The"GreatWest- 
Cold  Proof 
Felts" 

High-Grade 

in 

Every  Respect 

and  a  felt  shoe  that  is  making 
abundant  sales  by  sheer  merit 
of  manufacture  and  material. 

It  is  all  our  own  product, 
produced  entirely  under  one 
roof  from  the  making  of  the 
felt  to  the  last  finishing  touch. 
This  fact  explains  the  unvary- 
ing quality  throughout  its 
manufacture  and  the  extensive 
sales  it  is  making. 

We  manufacture  a  full 
range  of  Men's  Women's, 
Boys*,  Youths',  Misses', 
Child's  and  Infants'  "Great 
West  Cold  Proof  Felts"  for 
outdoor  or  indoor  wear. 

Sold  by  all  leading 
Jobbers.    Order  Now  ! 


Great  West 
Felt  Company 

Limited 

Elmira,  Ontario 


26 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


February,  1919 


) 

:) 
(:) 
(:) 
(:) 
(:) 
(:) 
0 
0 
0 
(:) 


Let  Our  Advertising 
Help  You  to  Sell 
More  Rubbers 

Our  Proposition  is  simply  this: 

We  put  the  quality  in  our  Rubbers.  There  is  no  question  about 
the  sturdy  wear,  the  snug  fit,  the  trim  shapes,  of  Dominion  Rubber 
System  Rubbers.  They  are  right  in  every  way. 

Then,  we  help  to  sell  them  for  our  dealers  by  means  of  the  greatest 
advertising  campaigns  that  have  ever  been  inaugurated  by  any 
manufacturers  of  Rubbers  in  Canada.  Thousands  of  people  have 
been  educated  to  the  fact  that  Rubbers  are  economical — that  they 
protect  the  health — that  they  are  the  sensible  thing  to  wear  in  bad 
weather. 

Dealers  who  handle  any  of  our  six  brands  of  reliable  Rubbers  get 
more  business  because  of  our  advertising. 

Everything  else  being  equal,  the  best  advertised  Rubbers  are  the 
best  selling  Rubbers.  Order  Dominion  Rubber  System  Rubbers 
and  let  our  advertising  help  you  to  sell  more  Rubbers. 

Dominion  Rubber  System  Service  Branches 

are  Located  at 

Halifax,  St.  John,  Quebec,  Montreal,  Ottawa,  Belleville,  Toronto,  Hamilton, 
Brantford,  London,  Kitchener,  North  Bay,  Fort  William,  Winnipeg', 
Brandon,  Regina,  Saskatoon,  Edmonton,  Calgary,  Lethbridge,  Vancouver, 
Victoria. 


(:) 
(:) 
(:) 
(:) 
(:) 
(:) 
(:) 
(:) 
(:) 
(:) 
(:) 

i 

I 


February,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


27 


f  ? 


IF 


A  Journal  of  its  Findings,  -Making  and  Sale. 
Published  Monthly  for  the  Good  of 
the   Trade  by 

HUGH  G.  MACLEAN,  LIMITED 

HUGH  C.  MacLEAN,  Winnipeg,  President. 
THOMAS  S.  YOUNG,  General  Manager. 


HEAD  OFFICE  -  347  Adelaide  Street  West,  TORONTO 
Telephone  A.  2700 

MONTREAL  -  Telephone  Main  2299  -  119  Board  of  Trade 
WINNIPEG  -  Tel.  Garry  856  -  Electric  Railway  Chambers 
VANCOUVER  -  Tel.  Seymour  2013  -  Winch  Building 
NEW  YORK  -  Tel.  3108  Beekman  -  1123  Tribune  Building 
CHICAGO  -  Tel.  Harrison  5351  -  1413  Gt.  Northern  Bldg. 
LONDON,  ENG.    -------    16  Regent  Street  S.W. 

Authorized  by  tlie  Postmaster  General  for  Canada,  for  transmission 
as  second  class  matter. 

Entered  as  second  class  matter  July  18th,  1914,  at  the  Postofifice  at 
Buffalo,  N.  Y.,  under  the  Act  of  Congress  of  March  3,  1879. 

SUBSCRIPTION  RATES 
Canada  and  Great  Britain,  $1.00.    U.  S.  and  Foreign,  $1.50. 
Single  copies  15  cents 


Vol.  9 


February,  1919 


Lower  Prices 
Not  Likely 


Contrary  to  expectation  in  some 
quarters  the  close  of  the  war  has 
not  resulted  in  a  noticeable  decline 
in  prices.  On  the  other  hand  it  has  been  quite  evident 
that  the  prices  on  many  commodities  are  capable  of 
going  still-  higher  and  we  do  not  have  to  look  very 
far  for  the  reason.  It  must  be  remembered  that  Euro- 
pean countries  are  practically  bare  of  many  of  the  raw 
materials  and  manufactured  products  with  which  we 
are,  perhaps,  plentifully  supplied.  Consequently,  the 
demand  from  overseas  will  tend  to  keep  prices  on  this 
side  very  firm  and  where  European  bidding  is  higher 
than  prevailing  domestic  rates  the  natural  outcome 
is  "higher  prices."  An  example  of  this  is  seen  in  the 
recent  increase  in  the  price  of  kid.  European  buyers 
presumably  bid  an  average  of  seven  or  eight  cents  in 
advance  of  the  Boston  market  price.  This  had  the  im- 
mediate effect  of  raising  the  domestic  rate  proportion- 
ately. It  will  thus  be  seen  that  we  can  hope  for  little 
decrease  in  the  price  of  any  article  for  which  there  is 
a  big  foreign  demand. 

Manufacturers  are  also  faced  with  a  labor  unrest 
that  seems  to  have  assumed  world-wide  proportions. 
It  was  intimated 'by  the  Boot  and  Shoe  Workers  Un- 
ion, at  a  recent  meeting  in  Toronto,  that  they  would, 


very  shortly  demand  a  further  increase  of  10  per  cent, 
in  wages — and  shorter  hours.  This  would  seem  to 
make  it  evident  without  doubt  there  can  be  no  falling 
off  in  prices  through  reduced  labor  costs.  On  every 
hand  the  consensus  of  opinion  seems  to  be  that  prices 
will  be  well  maintained,  or  even  higher,  for  at  least 
another  year. 

*    *  * 

Tax  Mail  Order      ^^^^  ^^""^  forthcoming  session  of  the 
Houses  Ontario  Legislature  the  Ontario 

Retail  Merchants'  Association 
will  request  that  action  be  taken  to  have  a  tax  placed 
on  mail  order  houses,  this  assessment  to  be  figured 
on  the  amount  of  business  done  in  each  district.  No 
specific  amount  of  taxation  has  yet  been  decided  upi- 
on  until  it  is  learned  just  what  action  the  Ontario  Leg- 
islature may  see  fit  to  take  in  the  matter.  In  the  event 
of  securing  a  favorable  decision  the  Retail  Merchants' 
Association  propose  extending  the  measure  to  all  pro- 
vinces in  the  Dominion. 

At  a  meeting  of  the  Assessment  Committee  of  the 
Ontario  House  Mr.  Proudfoot  raised  the  question  and 
those  present  were  unanimous  in  the  opinion  that  the 
I)ig  departmental  stores,  through  their  mail  order  com- 
l^etition,  were  making  the  lousiness  situation  desperate 
for  the  small  local  merchants.  It  was  also  thought 
that  maintaining  the  parcel  post  system  at  a  loss  and 
l)aying  it  out  of  the  carrying  of  letters  was  giving  the 
mail  order  houses  the  big  end  of  the  stick. 

We  hope  the  Government  will  act — it  should  have 
done  so  long  ago.  Mail  order  houses  are  a  menace  to 
the  legitimate  mercantile  trade  of  the  country.  They 
give  no  service ;  their  goods  are  no  cheaper — often 
higher  in  cost ;  they  have  no  further  interest  in  a  sale 
once  made ;  they  pay  no  local  taxes  ;  their  catalogue 
illustrations  frequently  misrepresent ;  they  keep  down 
the  prosperity  of  any  district  in  which  they  are  at 
work  because  no  money  is  ever  returned  that  they 
take  out  of  it.  Furthermore  there  is  no  financial  ne- 
cessity for  departmental  stores  to  conduct  a  mail  order 
business — their  tremendous  local  business  is,  or  should 
be,  sufficient  for  their  needs.  If  it  is  their  desire  to 
play  the  "greedy  octopus"  let  us,  by  all  means,  fetter 
their  tentacles  by  the  imposition  of  such  a  tax  as  that 
proposed. 

*    *  * 


Premature 
Sales 


Judging  by  the  number  of  adver- 
tisements of  cut-price  clearance 
sales  during  January  it  might  ap- 
pear to  the  casual  observer  that  many  shoe  retailers 
incorporated  price-cutting  among  their  New  Year 
resolutions.  We  cannot  help  feeling  that  most  of 
these  sales  are  entirely  premature  and  unnecessary. 
There  is  something-  almost  ridiculous  in  a  merchan- 
dizing policy  that  embodies  cut-price  clearance  sales 
within  a  few  weeks  after  the  opening  of  the  selling 
season  and  a  plan  adopted  by  the  merchants  of  Syra- 
cuse, N.Y.,  shows  how  they  are  endeavoring  to  remedy 


28 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


February,  1919 


the  evil.  Realizing  the  great  mistake  of  launching 
sales  of  seasonable  merchandise  in  the  middle  of  a  sea- 
son, they  formed  an  organization  and  agreed  that  spe- 
cial sales  would  not  be  put  on  until  a  certain  date  in 
the  three  seasons — spring,  summer  and  winter.  Pre- 
viously, every  retailer  sought  to  get  ahead  of  his  com- 
petitor with  the  result  that  the  whole  trade  was  upset 
and  profits  reduced  for  all.  By  deferring  the  sales  un- 
der this  mutual  agreement  they  believe  they  will  get 
a  large  amount  of  trade  at  regular  prices  during  the 
extended  period. 

*    *  * 

A  Time  for  ^°  ^8°        ^''^^^  atten- 

Everything  ^io"  ^^'^^  ^^^^  that  a  great  many 
retailers  were  in  the  habit  of 
using  the  fragrant  weed  in  a  sometimes  unfragrant 
pipe  during  business  hours — to  the  very  evident  detri- 
ment of  their  trade.  Now  here's  another  little  story 
on  the  same  subject.  The  other  day  we  were  talking 
with  a  traveller — a  very  successful  one  by  the  way — 
who  made  the  very  unusual  statement  that  he  did  not 
smoke.  We  asked  him  why-  "Well,"  he  said,  "it's 
like  this.  I  used  to  smoke — was  an  inveterate  smoker 
— but  at  the  same  time  I  knew  that  it  was  bad  policy 
to  approach  a  retailer  with  a  cigar  in  my  mouth.  One 
day  I  set  out  to  make  a  sale  to  a  man  I  knew  was  in 
the  market  for  a  large  amount  of  goods.  After  getting 
of¥  the  train  I  felt  the  need  of  a  smoke  and  lighted  up 
a  good  cigar.  By  the  time  I  got  to  the  retailer's  store 
my  cigar  was  just  nicely  going,  so  I  thought  I  would 
take  a  little  stroll  and  finish  my  smoke.  Half  an  hour 
later  I  called  on  my  man.  'Hullo  Jones,'  he  said,  'why 
didn't  you  get  around  sooner;  I  just  placed  that  order 
with  Brown  &  Company ;  must  have  been  on  the  same 
train  with  you.'  All  for  the  sake  of  a  smoke  I  missed 
the  largest  order  of  the  year.  Then  and  there  I  made 
the  high  sign  and  resolved  I'd  never  smoke  again — 
and  I  haven't." 

Nothing  so  drastic  is  needed  in  the  average  case, 
and  this  is  not  intended  to  be  a  sermon  against  tobac- 
co. It  all  goes  to  show,  however,  that  there  is  a  time 
for  everything  and  that  certain  things  can  be  over- 
done. A  man  in  any  line  should  not  let  smoking  inter- 
fere with  his  business. 


I 


Destructive 
Advertising 


*    *  * 

A  woman  was  heard,  not  long 
ago,  to  read  an  advertisement  of 
$8.00  shoes  for  $4.98,  and  to  ex- 
press a  wonder  that  store  could  sell  them  at  such 
a  low  figure  and  still  make  a  profit,  for  she  did  not 
believe  the  store  proposed  to  lose  money  "Think 
what  a  profit  I  would  have  paid  them  at  $8,  she  said. 
That  is  one  side  of  the  story,  says  a  bulletin  from  the 
Associated  Advertising  Clubs  of  the  World.  The  other 
side  is  that  a  great  many  other  women  refuse  to  be- 
lieve that  the  article  advertised  was  ever  worth  the 
higher  figures  named — or  $8.00,  as  in  this  case. 

"Uusual  value,"  or  "value"  or  "worth"  are  destruc- 


Time  to  Call  a  Halt 

A  number  of  Canadian  firms  have  been  put- 
ting on  Eensational  cut-price  sales  recently,  ad- 
vertising values  that  are  ridiculous  in  the  ex- 
treme. Among  these  "slashing  reductions"  we 
recall  "Imported  Silk  Stockings,  regular  $1.75  for 
19  cents";  "Men's  $6.00  shoes,  $1.48,"  and  so  on. 
We  understand  the  Toronto  section  of  the  Re- 
tail Merchants'  Association  has  taken  the  matter 
up  with  the  Police  Department  and  have  been 
promised  immediate  investigation.  A  man  recent- 
ly opened  up  in  Toronto  and  advertised  $5.00 
safety  razors  for  98  cents.  The  city  called  his 
bluff  and  the  magistrate  decided  that  $50  and 
costs  would  be  a  fair  assessment.  If  similar  ac- 
tion is  taken  against  those  men  who  are  doing 
their  utmost  to  discredit  legitimate  shoe  retail- 
ers there  will  surely  be  little  cause  for  regret. 


I 
I 

4.,,, 


I 


tive  advertising  expressions.  They  dull  the  appeal  of 
advertising.  When  a  store  does  have  a  real  sale  to 
move  ofif  odds  and  ends,  a  great  many  readers  of  its 
advertisement  are  in  the  same  attitude  as  the  men 
who  declined  to  come  when  the  little  boy  in  the  old 
story  called  "Wolf,  wolf!" 

It  is  being  proved,  the  bulletin  says,  that  business 
of  a  more  permanent  character  can  be  built  without 
such  statements.  If  there  has  been  a  special  purchase, 
a  store  can  get  a  crowd  by  announcing  that  a  fortunate 
find  has  been  made  by  its  buyers.  It  is  needless  to 
"compare  prices."  Business  men  are  learning  that 
truth-in-advertising  has  an  economic  value,  and  that 
in  the  long  run,  it  pays  to  understate  rather  than  over- 
state an  advertisement.  The  under-stated  advertise- 
ment may  bring  fewer  people,  at  times,  but  it  will  sell 
more  goods,  for  when  the  customer  is  surprised  to  see 
such  goods  at  such  a  price,  sales  are  more  readily 
made.  There  is  less  of  a  tendency  to  "shop  around." 


Clinching 
Sales 


Plain  English  sells  goods.  Mixed 
rhetoric  is  misleading.  The  hook 
of  convincing  argument  often 
bends  under  the  bait  of  too  technical  language. 
Eliminate  the  vocabulary  of  the  shoe  factory  and  treat 
your  customers  to  something  easy  of  mental  digestion. 
Very  few  purchasers  are  interested  in  the  technical 
make-up  of  shoes.  Salesmen  particularly  often  sei/Jc 
upon  words  and  statements  that  are  used  without  the 
support  of  actual  knowledge,  thus  lea\ing  themselves 
open  to  sales-killing  argument. 

The  purchaser  usually  is  interested  in  only  two 
questions:  "Is  this  what  I  require?"  "What  is  the 
price?"  If  you  can  answer  the  first  as  brieflv  and  as 
convincingl}'  as  the  second,  the  sale  is  made. 


February,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


29 


World  Survey  of  Raw  Stock  Conditions 

Prospect  is  for  Smaller  Domestic  Supplies  and  Keen  Foreign  Competition — European 
Buyers  Scouring  the  World — Increase  in  Price  is  a  Logical  Conclusion 

  By  Mr.  Owen  C.  Howe*   —  " — 


WHEN  Lewis  B.  Jackson  addressed  the  con- 
vention one  year  ago  in  regard  to  raw  stock, 
he  closed  his  remarks  by  saying  that  "Any 
outside  factor,  such  as  cutting  off  of  supplies 
from  foreign  countries  through  lack  of  ships  and 
freight  embargoes,  may  quickly  change  an  apparently 
quiet  market  into  an  advancing  one."  His  warning 
was  a  timelv  one.  In  a  few  months  there  was  a  lack 
of  ships  anv]  an  embargo.  In  April  the  government 
called  to  Washington  representatives  of  The  Cattle 
Men's  Association,  The  Elide  &  Skin  Importers'  Asso- 
ciation, the  packers,  the  country  hide  dealers,  the  hide 
brokers,  and  the  Eood  Administration,  to  discuss  the 
advisability  of  placing  maximum  prices  on  all  leather 
raw  stock.  When  these  representatives  started  for 
W^'lshington  ihey  did  not  consider  that  maximum 
prices  were  necessary,  but  they  changed  their  mind 
after  tliey  heard  that  the  government  would  probably 
embargo  importations  of  raw  stock  for  government 
use,  and  that  government  requirements  would  be  very 
large 

Difficulties  of  the  Price  Situation 

The  task  of  placing  maximums  on  all  kinds  of  raw 
stock  was  a  huge  one.  No  one  man  in  the  world  knows 
all  kinds  of  raw  stock.  When  the  Chairman  of  the 
Price  Fixing  Committee  of  the  War  Eixing  Committee 
of  the  War  Industries  Board  told  the  hide  men  how 
easily  the  steel  situation  had  been  handled,  Mr.  White, 
of  Chicago,  arose  and  remarked  that  the  steel  busi- 
ness was  a  kindergarten  beside  the  hide  business.  No 
one  had  ever  attempted  to  prepare  a  catalogue  of  all 
the  various  kinds  of  hides  and  skins.  However,  by 
working  day  and  night  the  various  committees  pre- 
pared schedule  of  maximum  prices,  which  was  put 
into  effect  May  1st.  It  embraced  about  500  dift'erent 
kinds  and  about  2,000  different  prices,  to  say  nothing 
of  the  stipulation  of  conditions  peculiar  to  transactions 
in  various  kinds  of  hides  and  skins,  and  to  say  nothing 
also,  of  regulations  which  it  became  necessary  to  for- 
mulate in  order  to  make  maximum  prices  a  reality 
and  not  a  farce.  It  covered  all  raw  stocks  on  hand, 
also  those  for  shipment  from  abroad  and  those  to  be 
produced  in  this  country  for  three  months.  Each 
three  months  the  schedule  was  revised  and  renewed, 
the  last  revision  taking  place  Nov.  1st,  which  covered 
domestic  production  to  Feb.  1st,  1919,  and  foreign  ship- 
ments to  Jan.  1st,  1919  (excepting  River  Plate  frigori- 
ficoes,  on  which  prices  were  to  cover  production  to 
Jan.  1  in  accordance  with  an  agreement  with  England). 

Government  Maximum  Prices  Lower  Than  High 
Points  Reached  in  1916 

Generally  speaking,  the  maximums  put  on  by  the 
government  were  below  the  high  points  of  1916  and 
1917  by  about  15  per  cent,  on  heavy  hides,  and  about 
30  to  35  per  cent,  on  light  hides,  kip  and  calf  skins. 
The  maximums  on  goat  skins  were  placed  below  the 
high  point  by  about  twenty-five  per  cent. 

Leather  raw  stocks  were  held  at  a  very  much 

*  Of  Sands  &  Leckie,  Boston,  before  Manufacturers'  Convention,  New 
York, 


lower  level  than  other  raw  materials,  such  as  cotton, 
wool,  etc.  Hides,  relatively  speaking,  were  and  are  the 
cheapest  things  in  the  world.  Cotton,  wool  and  p\g 
iron  were  about  three  times  their  normal  value.  But 
the  best  heavy  hides  in  this  country  were  only  up  about 
50  per  cent,  over  the  average  price  which  ruled  be- 
tween July,  1913,  and  June,  1914.  Sole  leather  dry 
hides  were  only  up  10  to  12  per  cent.  Light  hides  and 
kips  were  only  up  about  20  per  cent.  Calf  were  up 
about  65  to  70  per  cent.,  due  largely  to  our  being  for 
over  three  years  shut  off  from  Russia,  the  principal 
source  of  supply. 

Effect  of  Embargo  on  Importing  Hides 

On  June  15  an  embargo  became  effective  against 
the  importation  of  raw  stocks  except  for  government 
use.  This  cut  down  our  importations  very  drastically. 
Only  a  few  hides  were  allowed  to  come  from  the  Far 
East.  Our  svipplies  came  principally  from  Argentine 
and  Uruguay ;  a  fair  amount  from  Brazil,  Cuba  and 
Mexico,  and  a  few  from  the  West  Coast  of  South 
America  and  from  Canada.  The  embargo  shut  out 
nearly  16,000  of  raw  stock — principally  goat  and  sheep 
skins — which  people  here  had  contracted  for,  and,  in 
many  cases,  had  paid  for.  After  a  few  months  the 
embargo  was  partially  raised  to  admit  about  one-third 
of  the  tonnage  which  was  held  on  the  East  Coast  of 
South  America.  It  was  not  until  November  that  the 
embargo  was  raised  on  the  remainder. 

The  results  of  the  embargo  will  be  seen  in  the  fact 
that  importations  for  the  first  10  months  of  1918  were 
less  than  the  same  period  in  1917  by  60  per  cent,  in 
cattle  hides,  75  per  cent,  in  calfskins,  30  per  cent,  in 
goatskins,  50  per  cent,  in  sheepskins,  and  87'/  per  cent, 
in  horse  hides. 

Imports  Will  Continue  Sub-Normal 

Our  importations  will  probably  continue  to  I)e  sub- 
normal until  tanners  here  can  afford  to  pay  the  prices 
which  Europe  will  pay.  If  shoe  manufacturers  find  it 
necessary  to  have  the  leather,  or  if  tanners  find  it  pos- 
sible to  ship  leather  freely  to  Europe,  then  they  can 
afford  to  operate  in  foreign  markets  and  hides  will 
come  more  freely  to  America. 

It  must  be  remembered,  however,  that  England, 
France,  Holland,  Spain,  Italy,  Japan,  India,  Russia, 
Mexico,  Cuba,  and  some  parts  of  South  America  have 
increased  their  tanning  capacities.  Therefore,  the  tan- 
ning industry  here  will  no  doubt  find  that  raw  stocks 
will  be  competed  for  as  they  never  were  before. 

World  Competition  for  Hides  and  Skins 

England  increased  her  tanning  capacity  25  to  35 
per  cent.  Rough  tannage  in  India  has  about  doubled 
since  1913,  and  the  number  of  hides  thus  tanned  there 
during  1918  is  estimated  at  nearly  4,000,000.  These  are 
practically  all  cow  hides.  There  is  an  embargo  against 
shipping  them  here.  The  effect  of  this  is  noted  when 
we  remember  that  we  imported  1,200,000  cow  hides 
from  India  in  1915.  and  2,000,000  in  1916, 

Japan  increased  her  purchases  in  India  (principallv 
goat  and  sheepskins)  over  1,000  per  cent.   France  es- 


30 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


February,  191.) 


tiniates  that  she  has  lost  12,000,000  cattle,  which  means 
she  will  need  to  go  abroad  for  raw  supplies  more  than 
formerly. 

In  connection  with  this  taiming  development  in 
foreign  countries  and  what  it  means  as  regards  com- 
petition for  raw  stocks,  it  is  well  to  remember  that 
during  the  years  1915  to  1917  we  imported  the  follow- 
ing' percentages  of  raw  stock  tanned  here : 

Ninety-seven  per  cent,  of  the  goatskins,  66  per  cent, 
of  the  sheep  and  lambskins,  55  per  cent,  of  the  calf 
and  kip-skins  and  45  to  50  per  cent,  of  the  cattle  hides. 

Smaller  Domestic  Supply  During  1919 

Temporarily  the  situation  has  been  assisted  by  the 
fact  that  the  domestic  production  of  cattle  hides  and 
skins  during  1918  was  the  largest  in  our  history.  It 
is  estimated  that  the  take-off  amounted  to  about  24,- 
000,000  pieces,  comprised  roughly  of  about  16,000,000 
heavy  and  light  hides  and  about  8,000,000  calf  and  kip- 
skins.  The  sheepskin  take-off  in  this  country  during 
1918  is  estimated  at  about  11,000,000.  It  is  scarcely 
to  be  expected,  however,  that  production  in  this  coun- 
try will  be  maintained  on  this  basis.  The  domestic 
supply  during  1919  will  no  doubt  diminish- 

Therefore,  the  prospect  which  we  face  for  1919 
promises  smaller  supplies  at  home  and  keener  compe- 
tion  than  ever  before  for  supplies  abroad.  And  as  raw 
stocks  in  this  country  are  lower  priced  than  anywhere 
eke  in  the  world,  it  would  follow  that  as  shipping  faci- 
lities increase  we  must  go  up,  or  the  rest  of  the  world 
must  come  down. 

Government  Prices  Stabilized  Hide  Prices 

A  year  ago  the  total  of  both  domestic  and  imported 
raw  stocks  on  hand  were  larger  than  usual.  This  was 
partly  due  to  the  fact  that  hide  dealers,  and,  in  some 
cases,  butchers  were  still  hording  hides  and  skins 
which  they  missed  the  opportunity  of  selling  on  the 
boom  in  the  last  half  of  1916,  or  they  were  holding 
stocks  bought  or  accumulated  during  1917  in  anticipa- 
tion of  the  rise  in  prices  which  they  felt  would  come 
in  1918,  and  which  surely  would  have  come  had  not  the 
government  fixed  maximum  prices.  It  was  very  for- 
tunate for  this  country  that  stocks  were  large ;  other- 
wise the  embargoing  of  importations  would  have  been 
very  keenly  felt.  We  lived,  so  to  speak,  on  our  fat  to 
an  appreciable  extent  during  1918. 

New  Condition  in  Raw  Markets 

However,  conditions  are  quite  dift'erent  now.  For- 
eign and  domestic  raw  stocks  in  this  country  are  pret- 
ty closely  cleaned  up,  especially  on  light  hides  and  kip 
and  calf.  In  view  of  this  situation  it  is  remarkable  that 
raw  stocks  here  are  cheaper  than  anywhere  else  in  the 
world,  but  the  explanation  is  no  doubt  found  in  the 
English  embargo  against  our  leather  and  in  the  diffi- 
culty in  shipping  leather  and  hides  from  here  to  other 
European  countries.  Conditions  as  regards  shipping, 
however,  seem  bound  to  improve,  and  already  there 
are  dealers  who  are  buying  hides  here  and  in  Canada 
for  shipment  to  Europe  when  possible.  Please  note 
also  that  domestic  calf  and  kijjskins  and  foreign  goat- 


skins are  held  as  high  as  25  to  30  per  cent,  over  the 
maximum  prices. 

Census  of  Raw  Stocks 
Before  passing  from  the  subject  of  raw  stocks  on 
hand  a  year  ago  and  to-day,  it  should  be  noted  that 
any  estimate  of  raw  stocks  is  a  difficult  matter  to  de- 
termine and  involves  some  guess  work.  In  view  of 
the  importance  of  having  definite  information  on  this 
subject,  the  Department  of  Agriculture  will  probably 
secure,  monthly,  from  each,  dealer  in  domestic  and 
foreign  hides  a  list  of  stocks  oh  hand  and  from  each 
tanner  a  list  of  stocks  on  hand  and  in  process.  If  an- 
other national  emergency  ever  arises  we  should  know 
our  position  better  than  we  did  last  time.  And  in  an}- 
case  a  stabilizing  effect  will  be  afforded  the  hide,  leath- 
er and  shoe  industries. 

No  Large  Stock  of  Hides  or  Skins  in  Foreign  Lands 

There  is  one  thing  more  I  w^ish  to  mention,  and 
that  is  the  fact  that  owing  to  embargoes  and  lack  of 
shipping  facilities,  one  would  suppose  immense  stocks 
had  accumulated  in  Russia,  China,  India  and  South 
America.  Such,  however,  does  not  seem  to  be  the  case. 
It  is  hard  to  tell  about  Russia.  No  doubt  Germany 
got  most  of  what  was  movable.  When  Mr.  Boyd  re- 
turned from  Europe,  he  brought  word  that  stocks  in 
Russia  did  not  amount  to  much.  Another  gentleman 
said  that  he  knew  1,000,000  skins  were  available.  How- 
ever, transportation  facilities  are  so  broken  down,  and 
general  conditions  so  chaotic,  that  it  is  not  likely  that 
Russian  supplies  will  cut  much  figure  here  for  a  con- 
siderable time  to  come.  It  must  be  remembered  also, 
that  stocks  in  Russia  are  probably  in  bad  shape. 

If  China  has  large  stocks,  they  are  well  hid.  Of- 
ferings from  there  are  not  as  large  as  usual  at  this 
time  of  the  year.  However,  the  China  hide  merchants 
are  as  smart  as  any  in  the  world,  and  it  may  be  that 
they  are  holding  back  more  or  less  in  anticipation  of 
a  higher  market. 

India  is  not  offering  any  buffaloes  as  usual  al- 
though the  price  is  now  four  cents  higher  than  our 
maximum  prices  which  expired  January  1st.  Less 
than  a  normal  amount  of  calfskins  is  being  offered, 
and  India  cow  hides,  as  stated  before,  cannot  be  ex- 
ported here  at  present. 

European  Tanners  Scouring  the  World 

South  America  has  been  selling  all  along  to  S])ain, 
Italy,  France  and  England,  and  to  a  certain  extent,  to 
Norway  and  Sweden,  whenever  shipping  facilities 
were  available,  at  10  to  20  per  cent  and  sometimes 
even  40  per  cent,  higher  than  our  maximum  prices- 
Practically  all  South  American  countries  apparently 
have  at  present  nothing  more  than  a  normal  supply 
of  hides  to  offer,  and  in  a  general  way  they  are  holding 
these  at  about  15  per  cent,  above  our  former  maxim- 
ums. Tanners  here  are,  in  some  cases,  willing  to  pay 
about  half  this  advance.  However,  whatever  the  price, 
there  does  not  seem  to  be  any  extraordinary  amount 
of  stock  available,  either  in  South  America  or  any  other 
part  of  the  world. 


Life  is  Service  —  The  one  who  progresses  is  the  one  who  gt\)es  his  fellow-beings  a  little 

more  —  and  a  little  better — Service. 


February,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


31 


Mr.  Nap.  Tetrault 


Mr.  Oscar  Dufresne 


Mr.  Joseph  Daoust 


Canadian  Manufacturers  to  Extend  Trade  in  Europe 

Banquet  Given  to  Departing  Delegation — Foreign  Buyers  Will  Have  Opportunity 
to  Inspect  Various  Canadian  Samples— Lyons  Fair  Will  be  Visited 


IN  order  to  promote  Canadian  trade  with  Europe, 
and  following  up  the  efforts  of  the  Trade  and 
Commerce  Department,  Ottawa,  to  foster  the  ex- 
port business,  Mr.  Napoleon  Tetrault,  of  the  Tet- 
rault Shoe  Manufacturing'  Company,  Montreal ;  Mr. 
Oscar  Dufresne,  of  Dufresne  &  Locke,  Maisonneuve ; 
and  Mr.  J.  Daoust,  of  Daoust,  Lalonde  &  Co.,  Ltd.,  of 
Montreal,  have  left  for  Europe.  Prior  to  leaving, 
these  gentlemen  were  entertained  at  a  complimentary 
dinner,  given  on  January  16,  in  Montreal,  by  the  Lea- 
ther and  Shoe  findings  trade  of  Montreal.  Mr.  W.  A. 
Lane  presiding.  The  arrangements  were  made  by 
Mr.  R.  M.  Eraser,  who  acted  as  secretary. 

It  will  be  recollected  that  the  question  of  shoe  man- 
ufacturers cultivating  European  trade  was  discussed 
at  the  recent  shoe  manufacturers'  convention,  and  as 
the  outcome  of  this,  and  the  belief  held  by  many  that 
there  is  a  large  field  for  our  goods  in  Europe,  at  any 
rate  in  the  immediate  future,  these  representatives  have 
left  to  investigate  conditions  and  to  do  aggressive  work 
for  the  shoe  and  leather  industries.  Prompt  action  was 
necessary,  and  this  has  been  taken.  The  delegation 
have,  we  understand,  taken  samples  of  lines  other  than 
those  they  individually  manufacture,  thus  giving  an 
opportunity  to  European  buyers  to  see  what  Canadian 
manufacturers  can  offer  in  various  styles. 

As  it  is  the  object  to  find  a  more  extended  market 
in  Europe,  it  is  fortunate  that  the  representatives  of 
the  shoe  industry,  who  have  gone  abroad,  are  able  to 
speak  both  French  and  English  fluently,  so  that  they 
can  deal  in  an  intimate  way  with  the  French  and  Eng- 
lish buyers.  The  representatives  will  visit  the  Lyons 
Fair,  where  Canadian  shoes  and  leather  will  be  exhib- 
ited. It  may  be  noted  that  Mr.  Daoust  is  a  tanner  as 


well  as  a  shoe  manufacturer,  and  is  thus  in  a  position  to 
further  the  interests  of  the  Canadian  leather  trade. 

The  bancjuet  was  attended  by  men  who  are 
thoroughly  representative  of  the  leather  and  findings 
trade,  and  included  some  from  out  of  town.  The  fol- 
lowing is  the  toast  list:  The  King;  Shoe  Manufactur- 
ers, proposed  by  John  McEntyre ;  responded  to  by  Mr. 
Albert  Tetrault ;  Guests,  proposed  by  ]\Ir.  J.  A.  Scott, 
responded  to  by  Messrs.  O.  Dufresne  and  N.  Tetrault; 
Leather  Trade  and  Shoe  Findings,  proposed  by  Mr.  J. 
Clark  Acton,  responded  to  by  Mr.  W.  Sadler;  Trade 
Papers,  proposed  by  Mr.  R.  M.  Eraser,  responded  to  by 
Mr.  E.  J.  Holliday;  Ladies,  proposed  by  Mr.  Henry 
Whitley,  responded  to  by  Mr.  J.  T.  R.  Hicks. 

Most  of  the  speakers  dealt  in  an  eulogistic  manner 
with  the  way  in  which  the  shoe  manufacturers  did  busi- 
ness with  the  leather  and  findings  representatives. 
Comment  was  also  made  on  the  enterprise  of  the  man- 
ufacturers in  endeavoring  to  expand  Canadian  trade 
and  make  our  goods  more  widely  known  outside  Can- 
ada. The  pioneer  work  of  Mr.  Nap.  Tetrault,  who  has 
for  some  time  maintained  a  branch  in  Paris,  was  re- 
ferred to.  In  this  connection  Mr.  Tetrault,  in  his  re- 
sponse, enlarged  on  the  prestige  which  had  resulted 
from  the  filling  of  orders  at  the  prices  taken,  even  in 
face  of  the  advance  of  materials.  He  showed  the  photo- 
graph of  a  cheque  for  $83,000.  which  had  been  sent 
his  firm  in  advance  payment  for  goods  ordered  by  a 
French  buyer. 

Mr.  J.  Sinclair,  of  the  Barrie  Tanning  Co.,'  manu- 
facrurers  and  exporters  of  splits,  prophesied  that  prices 
woidd  continue  firm,  and  declared  that  there  was  lictle 
prospect  of  any  break  in  quotations. 

Mr.  Irving  C.  Webster,  manager  of  the  C.  Mocnch 


:i3  FOOTWEAR 

Sons  Co.,  Boston,  spoke  with  pride  as  to  the  part  Can- 
adians had  taken  in  the  war. 

Mr.  F.  W.  Knowlton,  of  the  United  Shoe  Machinery 
Co.  of  Canada,  referred  to  his  many  years  connection 
with  the  trade,  and  the  pleasure  of  attending  such  a 
representative  gathering. 

Mr.  C.  A.  Davies,  of  Blachford  Davies  &  Co.,  Ltd., 
of  Toronto,  was  also  among  the  speakers. 

During  the  evening  a  musical  programme  was  given, 
including  some  fine  vocal  selections  by  Mr.  H.  A.  Nor- 
mandin. 

The  following  were  the  invited  guests  :  Messrs.  F.  J. 
Boyden,  Slater  Shoe  Co. ;  J.  O.  Tetrault,  Tetrault  Shoe 
Mfg.  Co.;  Paul  Roy,  Einstein,  Inc.;  Jas.  J.  McCaron ; 
J.  A.  Scott,  Montreal ;  R.  E.  Woodward,  F.  E.  Wood- 
ward &  Sons;  J.  F.  Scully,  New  Castle  Leather  Co. ;  J. 
C.  Acton,  Toronto ;  R.  L.  Stiles,  J  ohn  R.  Evans  &  Co., 
Ltd. ;  G.  S.  Hubbell,  Adanac  Leather  Co. ;  Edmond 
Mallette,  M.  Moffat,  Robson  Leather  Co. ;  Jules  R. 
Payan,  Duclos  &  Payan  ;  J.  P.  O'Shea,  H.  D'Artois,  Mr. 
PL  C.  Parker,  Parker,  Irwin  &  Co. ;  M.  L.  Sturgis,  LTnited 
Last  Co. ;  W.  V.  Mathews,  Tetrault  Shoe  Manufactur- 
ing Co.;  Frank  C.  Smith,  John  Ritchie  Co.;  Henry  E. 
Whitley,  F.  Whitley  &  Co.;  H.  Kavanagh,  Acton  Pub- 
lishing Co. ;  R.  M.  Eraser,  Breithaupt  Leather  Co. ;  Nap. 
Tetrault,  Tetrault  Shoe  Manufacturing  Co. ;  O.  Du- 


I  N    CANADA  February,  lOlJ 

frcsne,  Dufresne  &  Locke;  W.  A.  Lane,  of  J.  A.  Scott; 
F.  W.  Knowlton,  United  Shoe  Machinery  Co.  of  Can- 
ada ;  Edgar  Clement,  J.  H.  Goyer,  H.  B.  Johnson  Co.; 
L.  S.  Odell,  Geo.  A.  Blanipied,  Clarke  &  Clarke  Ltd.; 
J.  A.  Belanger,  Robin  Freres ;  Albert  Tetrault.  Tet- 
rault Shoe  Manufacturing  Co. ;  J.  A.  Sinclair,  Barrie 
Tanning  Co.,  Ontario;  J.  A.  Scott,  Quebec;  W.  J.  Sad- 
ler, Sadler  &  Haworth ;  Ralph  Locke,  Dufresne  & 
Locke;  W.  H.  Algeo,  United  Shoe  Machinery  Co.  of 
Canada;  G.  P.  Stockton,  C.  S.  Hyman  Co.,  Ltd.,  Lon- 
don, Out.;  H.  A.  Normandin,  John  McEntyre,  John 
McEntyre,  Ltd.;  F.  W.  Laskey,  Tetrault  Shoe  Mfg. 
Co. ;  J.  Wiezel,  St.  John  and  Halifax;  I.  C.  Webster,  C. 
Moench  Sons  Co.,  Boston;  P.  A.  Doig,  C.  A.  Davies, 
Blachford,  Davies  &  Co.,  Ltd.,  Toronto ;  J.  R.  Labelle 
C.  E-  Perras,  Adanac  Leather  Co. ;  Geo.  Bergeron,  Can- 
adian Consolidated  Rubber  Co.;  Geo.  H.  Bray,  C.  Gali- 
bert  &  Son  ;  J.  S.  Constantineau,  King  Paper  Box  Co., 
Ltd.;  M.  A.  Gauthier,  Kingsbury  Footwear  Co.;  H. 
Hurtubise,  Panther  Rubber  Co.,  Sherbrooke ;  Chas.  A. 
Joslin,  Panther  Rubber  Co.,  Sherbrooke;  E.  J.  Holli- 
day,  "Footwear  in  Canada";  Geo.  H.  Carter,  Anglo 
Canadian  Leather  Co. ;  G.  F.  Lister,  Morson,  Boswell 
&  Co.;  J.  T.  R.  Hicks,  Dominion  Textile  Co.;  A.  G. 
Mooney,  A.  G.  Mooney  Co. ;  Linklater,  Boston  Black- 
ing Co. ;  J.  Muir,  J.  H.  Keeler,  Frank  &  Bryce,  Ltd. 


What  is  Your  Gross  Profit? — I  Don't  Know,  but  it 
Must  be  All  Right  or  I  Wouldn't  be  in  Business 


GREAT  interest  was  evinced  by  a  large  numl)er  of 
dealers,  at  the  National  Convention,  in  St. 
Louis,  in  the  question  of  store  records  and 
proper  accounting.  No  better  man  than  Ben 
Jacobson,  of  New  York,  could  have  been  selected  to 
lead  the  discussion  on  this  topic,  for  it  one  which  has 
been  a  hobby  with  him  for  many  years.  Mr.  Jacobson 
said : 

Most  of  you  who  attend  these  conventions  are  of  the 
better  class  merchants,  perhaps  not  all  millionaires, 
Init  merchants  who  know  the  necessity  of  proper  store- 
keeping.  You  come  here  to  exchange  ideas  and  if  pos- 
sible to  learn  how  to  improve  your  business  methods. 

The  topic  assigned  to  me  is  really  for  the  l)enefit  of 
the  man  who  still  tries  to  conduct  a  store  on  ancient 
methods,  and  does  not  even  know  that  these  conven- 
tions are  held  for  his  benefit.  When  you  get  home  and 
meet  one  of  these  "would-be"  merchants  who  takes  no 
interest  in  modern  business,  tell  him  some  of  the  things 
you  learn  here.    Do  not  condemn  him — pity  him  ! 

The  man  who  conducts  a  store  without  records  is 
blind  to  modern  possibilities,  and  every  time  you  open 
the  eyes  of  one  of  those  fellows  by  showing  him  the 
right  way  to  do  business,  you  not  only  help  him,  but 
you  help  yourself.  Don't  say  that  you  do  not  recog- 
nize competition.  The  telephone,  the  street  car,  and 
the  mail  service  makes  competition  easy,  and  if  ever 
you  get  along  side  of  your  store  one  of  those  fellows 
who  do  not  know  the  cost  of  doing  business,  you  will 
soon  know  that  he  is  there  all  right,  even  though  his 
business  life  may  be  a  short  one. 

It  is  surprising  that  manufactturers  and  wholesalers 
extend  credit  to  some  of  these  blind  merchants  who  run 
stores  on  guesswork  when  lucrcantile  agencies  tell  us 


that  more  than  75  per  cent,  of  the  business  mortality  of 
the  country  is  among  dealers  who  keep  no  records  of 
their  business.  The  few  who  accidentally  succeed  in 
their  blind  way  are  the  ones  who  lure  others  to  their 
financial  ruin  by  giving  them  the  wrong  advice  on  how 
to  run  a  store. 

I  met  two  retailers  from  the  coal  mining  region  of 
Pennsylvania.  The  one  who  had  good  figures  of  his 
business  told  how  the  war  brought  him  increased  pros- 
perity :  that  the  miners  were  getting  big  wages  and 
spending  it  freely,  that  his  store  rent  is  cheap — and 
inasmuch  as  there  was  no  manufacturing  in  his  town, 
he  was  able  to  get  reliable  women  clerks  at  nominal 
salaries,  that  his  total  overhead  expense  is  only  about 
16  per  cent,  and  his  gross  profit  about  35  per  cent, 
which,  of  course,  put  'him  on  Easy  Street.  To  sort  of 
verify  his  story  he  asked  his  friend,  who  is  in  business 
in  a  nearby  town,  whether  or  not  he  found  the  same 
conditions,  to  which  his  friend  replied,  "I  do  not  keep 
such  fine  figures ;  all  I  know  is  that  I  can  pay  my  bills 
better  than  I  used  to."  The  fellow  who  does  keep  re- 
cords was  rather  surprised  at  the  answer,  and  said  "Joe, 
you  remind  me  of  the  old  colored  man  during  the 
slavery  days  who  was  asked  how  old  he  was  and  he 
replied,  'I  don't  know,  but  I  must  be  all  right  yet  or 
my  master  wouldn't  keep  me.'  I  am  surprised  your 
store  kee])s  you."  Yet  the  fellow  who  had  no  records 
of  his  business  told  how  he  helped  another  man  open  a 
store. 

Business  Records  Most  Important. 

There  are  many  such  slaves  just  because  they  have 
not  the  necessary  records  which  would  show  them  how 
to  be  masters  of  their  business.  The  old  slip-shod 
methods  may  have  been  excusable  years  ago  when 


February,  1919 

bookkeeping  was  considered  a  complicated  art,  and  the 
average  dealer  could  not  afford  the  services  of  a  book- 
keeper, but  now  that  bookkeeping  has  been  reduced  to 
simple  records,  which  anyone  can  keep  and  under- 
stand, the  dealer  who  still  conducts  his  store  without 
records  of  purchases,  sales,  gross  and  net  profits,  has 
no  business  to  stay  in  business. 

Business  records  are  even  more  important  to  the 
small  dealer  with  moderate  means  than  to  his  larger 
competitor.  The  increased  stocks  with  increased  ex- 
pense and  decreased  profits  are  sometimes  enough  to 
break  a  small  dealer  before  he  knows  it. 

Actual  Figures  Month  by  Month  Would  Have  Pre- 
vented Loss. 

I  recently  saw  the  inventory  sheets  of  an  average 
sized  store  where  no  records  are  kept  excepting  that 
the  owner  takes  inventory  once  a  year.  The  inventory 
of  1917  showed  a  handsome  profit,  while  his  1918  in- 
ventory showed  an  actual  loss  on  an  equal  volume  of 
business.  After  some  study  of  the  crude  figures,  we 
found  that  his  gross  profit  of  1917  was  about  6  per  cent, 
larger  than  in  1918.  This  is  accounted  for  by  the  fact 
that  he  sold  his  early  purchased  stock  on  replacement 
basis,  while  in  1918  most  of  the  sales  were  made  on 
normal  profits,  yet  the  store  expense  and  personal  liv- 
ing was  larger  than  in  1917.  If  this  man  had  figures 
showing  the  condition  of  his  business  at  least  once  a 
month  he  would  not  have  shown  a  loss,  for  he  could 
have  increased  the  profit  or  decreased  the  expense,  or 
perhaps  spent  some  of  the  wasted  money  for  adver- 
tising and  store  improvements,  which  would  have  in- 
creased the  business  thereby  reducing  the  percentage 
of  expense. 

Comparative  Figures  Tell  the  Story 

Business  efficiency  or  the  art  of  conducting  business 
for  profit  without  showing  greediness  for  it  is  certainly 
worth  studying.  The  only  method  of  learning  one's 
business  is  through  an  analysis  of  its  records.  In  no 
other  way  can  the  retailer  merchandise  and  finance  the 
business  with  safety.  Every  now  and  then  we  see  a 
good  paying  store  or  department  ruined,  or  a  poor  pay- 
ing one  made  to  pay  by  a  change  of  ownership  or  man- 
agement— all  due  to  the  fact  that  one  man  runs  his 
business  on  guess  work  and  another  by  comparative 
figures.  • 

The  man  who  does  everything  by  comparative  fig- 
ures knows  enough  not  to  overbuy  or  oversell,  and  he 
knows  how  much  he  can  afford  to  spend  for  the  good 
of  the  business.  Overselling  is  sometimes  as  bad  as 
overbuying.  Many  a  man  has  gone  broke  because  he 
did  too  much  business  for  the  size  of  his  capital — others 
go  broke  because  they  carry  too  much  stock  for  the 
size  of  the  business.  The  man  who  has  records  of  his 
business  knows  that  if  his  stock  is  on  a  proper  turn- 
over basis,  and  his  sales  increase  10  per  cent.,  he  can 
allow  the  stock  to  increase  in  proportion.  If  his  profit 
increased  3  per  cent.,  he  can  allow  his  expenses  to  in- 
crease 2  per  cent.,  but  no  one  can  know  anything  about 
turnovers,  profits  or  losses  without  the  records  that  tell 
these  things. 

Master  of  His  Business. 

It  is  the  general  belief  that  owing  to  increased  costs, 
the  .shoe  stocks  of  the  country  are  higher  in  dollars  and 
cents  than  they  have  been,  yet  the  head  of  the  largest 
retail  shoe  business  in  New  York  has  figures  that  show 
his  stock  to  be  lower  than  it  has  ever  been  though  the 
sales  are  larger.  He  knows  each  morning  the  sales  of 
the  previous  day  at  cost  and  selling  price,  and  the  kind 


33 

lof  shoes  that  were  sold.  He  also  has  a  trial  balance  for 
each  week  showing  the  condition  of  the  stock  in  dollars 
as  well  as  kinds,  and  the  gross  and  net  profit  for  the 
week.  If  things  happen  to  go  wrong  one  week  he  cor- 
rects it  at  once.  It  is  these  figures  that  make  him  mas- 
ter of  his  business.  Such  figures  can  easily  be  kej^t  in 
any  shoe  store  by  giving  up  a  little  time  to  it  each  day. 
If  there  is  anyone  here  who  does  not  know  how  I  will 
gladly  show  him. 

Interested  and  Satisfied  Employes  Big  Asset. 

In  conclusion  let  me  remind  some  of  you  big  mer- 
chants who  know  the  value  of  stock  turnovers  that 
there  is  another  turnover  equally  as  important,  and  that 
is  the  help  turnover.  You  make  money  by  turning 
your  stock  often  and  lose  money  in  help  turnover. 

It  is  your  duty  to  look  after  the  welfare  of  your 
clerk.  Every  good  man  ■as  entitled  to  earn  a  living  and 
something  besides,  or  he  is  dissatisfied.  You  cannot 
expect  to  get  the  best  there  is  in  him  unless  he  is  satis- 
fied. Large  mercantile  houses  are  solving  this  prob- 
lem by  making  the  worthy  employes  partners  to  the  net 
profits.  The  employe  who  has  been  with  the  house 
six  months  or  longer  gets  a  dividend  on  his  past  earn- 
ings. This  sounds  big  and  is  big  to  the  employe,  but 
really  not  so  big  to  you. 

For  example,  a  $100,000  business  which  earned  a  net 
IM-ofit  of  $10,000  has  paid  out  about  $10,000  in  salaries, 
about  25  per  cent,  of  this  is  paid  to  floating  help,  such 
as  extras  or  clerks  who  have  not  been  with  you  six 
months.  You  will  then  pay  10  per  cent,  on  about 
$7,500  worth  of  salaries — this  equals  only  three-quar- 
ters of  one  per  cent,  on  the  business.  This  amount  can 
easily  be  made  up  in  extra  profits  by  interested  clerks. 
But  when  you  pay  dividends,  p.  m.'s  or  bonuses,  do  it 
gracefully  as  if  you  are  glad  to  do  it,  otherwise  you  lose 
the  goodwill  power. 


Rochester  Style  Show 

E EXHIBITING  manufacturers  at  the  Rochester 
I  Style  Show  were  generally  of  the  opinion  that 
prices  will  go  even  higher — certainly  there  was 
no  present  indication  of  a  reduction.  Several 
new  models  were  displayed,  a  white  shoe  Avith  black 
stitching  and  black  eyelets  attracting  considerable  at- 
tcntion.  Heels  were  noticeably  higher — a  condition 
brought  about,  it  is  said,  by  the  lengthening  of  women's 
skirts.  The  idea  is  that  the  long-  skirt  inspires  a  ten- 
dency for  shoes  to  be  longer  in  the  vamps  with  higher 
heels  because  a  shoe  with  a  short  vamp  and  low  heel 
v,'Ould  be  hidden  by  a  long  skirt.  Black  satin  boots 
seemed  to  be  favorably  received  and  a  number  of  or- 
ders were  booked.  Rochester  manufacturers,  however, 
are  desirous  of  conforming  to  the  United  States  govern- 
ment restrictions,  which  do  not  expire  until  June  1, 
and  consequently  there  were  very  few  deviations  in 
style. 

^„ — ,_„„_,„,_„._„„_„„_„„_,„  ,  ,  „._„ — ._„._„_..^ 

[  I 

I             There  is  little  use  looking  for  trade  through  I 

I  the  windows  or  door  of  your  store.   If  there  is  J 

t  one  thing  that  causes  the  passer-by  to  hurry  by,  = 

1  it  is  to  see  a  clerk  or  the  proprietor  standing  at  1 

j  a  point  of  vantage  staring  out.   A  watched  per-  | 

!  son  is  always  uncomfortable — so  get  the  habit  of  ! 

1  making  yourself    as    inconspicuous    as  possible  1 

1  until  the  customer  actually  enters  the  store.  | 

1  1 
^.  „  „.  „„  .  ^ 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


34  FOOTWEAR 

Glazed  Kid  Takes  a  Jump 

ONE  of  the  largest  glazed  kid  manufacturers  in 
the  United  States  has  just  sold  his  entire  out- 
put of  black  kid  at  76  cents  for  export,  which 
is  a  jump  of  6  or  seven  cents  a  foot.  Colored 
kid  is  quoted  from  $1.05  to  $1.10  on  the  domestic  mar- 
ket.   These  abnormal  advances,  coming  just  at  a  time 
when  one  would  naturally  expect  some  decline,  seem 
to  indicate  that  a  large  export  business  will  have  the 
efifect  of  maintaining,  or  even  increasing,  the  present 
high  cost  of  all  kinds  of  leather.    As  indicating  condi- 
tions on  the  Boston  market,  the  following  item  from 
the  Shoe  and  Leather  Reporter  is  interesting- 
Glazed  kid  is  firming  up  in  New  England  and  prices 
at  the  present  writing  are  promising  to  go  beyond  the 
dealers'  control.    Some  grades  of  black  leather  have 
been  quoted  at  70  cents,  but-.it  is  questionable  if  any 
quantity  of  this  stock  could  be  had  at  this  price.  The 
lower  grades  of  suitable  stock  are  also  pretty  well 
cleared  up  and  a  very  small  quantity  of  this  stock  is  to 
be  had.  News  of  the  recent  rise  in  the  glazed  kid  ex- 
port market  has  had  its  effect  on  the  domestic  markets 
and  sales  have  been  talked  of  at  $1.15  for  colored  goods 
in  the  Boston  market.   The  high  speculative  prices  pre- 
vailing in  the  primary  raw  stock  markets  have  forced 
the  tanners  here  to  seek  a  greater  margin  of  safety  for 
stocks  of  kid  on  hand.    Quotations  have  consequently 
been  marked  up  sharply,  which  has  had  the  usual  effect 
of  bringing  increased  buying;  70  cents  is  regarded  as  a 
bottom  figure  for  actual  business  on  extreme  grade  of 
Brazilian  blacks  with  some  tanners  asking  higher  fig- 
ures.   Top  selections  of  Patna  black  65  to  69  cents  as 
to  tannage  with  some  quotations  running-  above.  Stocks 
are  closely  cleaned  up  except  on  low  grades.  Raw 
skins  from  India  are  coming  forward  more  slowly  than 
was  anticipated,  and  the  tannery  output  is  expected  to 
be  short  for  some  months  to  come.    Back  orders  foi 
some  European  countries  are  now  being  shipped  more 
freely.    One  tanner  made  a  shipment  of  100  cases  to 
Greece  which  had  been  held  up  for  almost  one  year. 
British  buying  for  storage  here  appears  to  be  increas- 
ing.   Certain  leading  tanners  are  discouraging  specu- 
lative buying  by  shoe  manufacturers  on  the  ground 
that  despite  a  world  shortage  of  kid,  the  excessive  ad- 
vance in  raw  stock  markets  is  incompatible  with  the 
falling  tendency  in  other  commodity  price  levels  and 
that  further  stimulation  is  not  to  the  best  interest  of 
any  branch  of  the  trade. 


Well  Known  Toronto  Retailer  in  California 

MR.  WARREN  T.  FEGAN,  proprietor  of  the 
Big  <S8  Shoe  Store,  Toronto,  is  now,  with 
his  family,  enjoying  a  well-earned  vacation 
in  California.  Mr.  Fegan  took  the  middle- 
western  route  through  Chicago,  Denver  and  Salt  Lake 
City,  and  while  in  Chicago  wrote  of  his  observations 
in  shoe  and  leather  circles.  He  has  always  been  a  firm 
believer  in  the  value  of  meeting  other  retailers  in 
other  cities  and  learning  something  of  their  business 
methods  and  outlook  of  the  styles  situation.  The  fol- 
lowing extracts  from  his  letter  are,  therefore,  of  par- 
ticular interest : 

"I  have  visited  a  few  of  the  main  shoe  stores  and 
met  their  managers.  There  is  a  desire  upon  the  part 
of  all  to  put  intf)  operation  some  plan  whereby  better 
service  may  be  rendered  by  their  employees.  Prices 
are  much  the  same  as  in  Toronto,  although  many  Jan- 
uary sales  are  being  held.  Styles  are  no  different.  For 


IN    CANADA  rebruary,  1919 

spring,  oxfords  and  pumps  will  be  strong.  Most  of  the 
oxfords  are  made  very  light,  having  covered  wooden 
heels.  Grey  and  field  mouse  are  being  shown  a  great 
deal.  A  long  vamp,  recede  last,  with  fairly  large 
buckle,  i)ump  or  Colonial,  is  also  being  shown.  These 


Mr.  Warren  T.  Fegan 


styles  are  all  made  for  us  in  Montreal.  Was  in  Mar- 
shall Field's  basement  women's  shoe  department  and 
found  it  a  perfect  beehive — no  less  than  110  salespeople 
being  employed  in  that  one  department — nearly  as 
many  as  I  have  at  the  Big  88  on  a  Saturday." 

Mr.  Fegan  also  states  that  he  "hiked"  out  to  the 
stockyards  and  had  a  good  look  at  the  genuine  article 
on  the  hoof.  We  sincerely  trust  he  will  return  from 
his  holiday  very  much  refreshed,  mentally  and  physi- 
cally. 


Meeting  of  Ontario  Shoe  Manufacturers 

A MEETING  of  the  Ontario  .Shoe  Manufactur- 
ers' Association  was  held  recently  at  the  Roy- 
al Connaught  Hotel,  Hamilton.  As  this  was 
the  anual  meeting  of  the  Association,  the  elec- 
tion of  officers  for  the  ensuing  year  took  place.  These 
are :  Hon.  Chairman,  Mr.  A.  Brandon  of  the  Brandon 
Shoe  Company,  Brantford;  chairman,  Mr.  G.  W.  Mc- 
Farland,  Williams  Shoe  Company,  Brampton ;  vice- 
chairman,  Mr.  C-  E.  Hurlbut,  Hurlbut  Shoe  Com- 
pany, Preston  ;  directorate,  Messrs.  J.  A.  Dunbar,  F. 
A.  Ahrens,  J.  A.  Walker,  G.  H.  Ansley,  G.  H.  Charles 
and  W.  S.  Duffield. 

Mr.  Brandon,  retiring  chairman,  delivered  an  ad- 
dress in  which  he  referred  at  some  length  to  the  year's 
work  of  the  Association.  Dr.  W.  A.  Riddell,  superin- 
tendent of  the  Ontario  Trades  and  Labor  Branch  of 
the  Ontario  Government,  spoke  in  an  interesting-  man- 
ner of  government  employment  agencies  and  his  talk 
was  well  received.  Mr.  Fryer,  Deputy  Vocational  Of- 
ficer for  Ontario  told  of  the  work  of  his  department 
in  re-establishing  soldiers  in  civil  life.  He  urged  that 
manufacturers  extend  every  patience  to  returned  men 
— especially  those  who  hacl  been  wounded.  They  had 
been  through  a  very  trying  ordeal  and  it  was  every- 
one's duty  to  extend  them  every  consideration. 

The  special  committee  appointed  some  time  ago  to 
look  into  the  matter  of  standardizing  cartons,  present- 


February,  1919 


FOOTWEAR 


IN  CANADA 


35 


ed  their  report  of  proposed  sizes  which,  if  adopted,  will 
simplify  packing  problems,  permit  standardizing  pack- 
ing cases,  enable  cartons  to  be  cut  more  economically 
by  the  maker  and,  not  the  least  important,  will  benefit 
the  retailer  who  may  install  standard  and  uniform 
shelving. 

In  the  evening  a  very  enjoyable  dinner  party  was 
held,  at  which  the  spirit  of  good-fellowship  was  further 
extended . 


Toronto  Stores  Join  in  Early  Closing 

AN  advertisement  recently  appeared  in  the  To- 
ronto papers  over  the  signatures  of  H.  &  C. 
Blachford,  Limited,    Owens-Elmes,  Limited, 
and  the  Walk-Over  Boot  Shop,  three  of  the 
leading  Yonge  Street  shoe  shops.  This  advertisement 
read  as  follows : 

THAT  WE  MAY  SERVE  YOU  BETTER 

We,  the  undermentioned  shoe  firms,  have  al- 
ways endeavored  to  give  the  utmost  in  service 
to  our  patrons.  We  beUeve  that  the  shortening 
of  the  shopping  time  on  Saturdays,  the  busiest 
day  in  the  week,  is  a  step  in  the  right  direction, 
as  well  as  an  improvement  in  conditions  for  our 
employees. 

We  have  agreed,  therefore,  that,  commencing 
February  1,  our  stores  shall  close  each  Saturday 
evening  at  6  o'clock,  the  same  as  other  days. 

We  know  that  you  will  gladly  co-operate  and 
arrange  to  do  your  Saturday  shopping  before 
six.  This  rule  will  apply  throughout  the  year. 

This  is,  we  believe,  a  decided  'innovation  among 
down-town  merchants.  Evidently  they  have  reached 
the  common  conclusion  that  their's  is  a  class  of  trade 
quite  able  and  willing  to  shop  in  the  daytime;  busi- 
ness men  who  prefer  to  do  their  purchasing  during 
noon  hour  or  in  the  afternoon,  and  women  who  have 
the  leisure  and,  as  a  matter  of  fact,  always  do  their 
shopping  in  the  afternoons.  Such  an  early  closing  ar- 
rangement would  not  be  suitable  for  those  stores 
catering  more  particularly  to  the  working  classes,  but 
for  the  more  exclusive  shops  the  idea  is  certainly  a 
good  one. 


Have  Opened  Women's  Department 

THE  Hartt  Boot  &  Shoe  Co..  Limited,  Frederic- 
ton,  N.B.,  have  added  a  ladies'  department  to 
their  retail  store,  467  St.  Catherine  St.  We.st, 
Montreal.  The  company  have  had  a  men's  shoe 
store  at  this  address  for  several  months,  and  as  they 
have  added  a  full  range  of  ladies'  goods  to  their  lines, 
it  was  decided  to  put  in  a  ladies'  department  in  the 
Montreal  store. 

In  order  to  obtain  the  necessary  additional  room, 
a  partition  has  been  removed  from  what  was  formerly 
the  rear  of  the  store,  this  giving  a  further  space  of  30 
X  26  feet.  The  arrangement  of  the  store  has  also  been 
remodelled  ;  under  this  plan  the  women's  department 
is  at  the  right  on  entering  the  store  and  the  men's 
department  at  the  left. 

The  interior  trim,  show  cases,  and  fixtures  are  of 
Italian  walnut  throughout.  At  the  end  of  the  ladies' 
department  a  ladies'  rest  room,  with  lavatory,  has  been 
fitted  up.  It  is  furnished  with  a  mirror,  dressing  table 
and  chair,  a  settee  and  a  large  standard  electric  lamp. 
The  wall  panels  are  of  Italian  walnut  with  plaster 


Children's  playroom  provided  by  a  large  Southern  Shoe  Store — 
They  say  it  is  a  great  attraction 


above.  The  entrance  to  the  rest  room  is  hung  with 
plush  portieres.  Adjoining  this  room  is  a  small  reserve 
store  room,  the  balance  of  the  stock  being  kept  on 
the  two  floors  above.  The  storeroom  is  reached  by  a 
door  in  the  centre  of  the  rear  panels.  Persian  rugs  are 
laid  throughout  the  store  and  in  the  rest  room. 

In  order  to  carry  out  the  alterations  it  was  neces- 
sary to  remove  the  office,  which  was  formerly  at  the 
side  of  the  store.  A  considerably  larger  office  has  now 
been  placed  in  the  centre  of  the  floor.  This  is  square 
in  form  and  af¥ords  accommodation  for  office  work, 
cashier,  safe  and  a  number  of  drawers.  Behind  the  of- 
fice is  a  shoe  shining  stand.  The  scheme  of  show  in- 
serts in  the  fixtures  previously  carried  out  has  been 
repeated  in  the  addition  to  the  store  ;  these  are  elec- 
trically lighted  from  the  interior  and  exhibit  to  great 
advantage  the  goods  displayed.  Two  of  these  inserts 
are  placed  in  the  panels  at  the  end  of  the  store  and 
face  customers  who  patronize  the  shoe  shining  stand. 

Two  additional  show  cases  of  Italian  walnut,  elec- 
trically lighted  from  the  interior,  have  been  placed 
in  the  front  section  of  the  store.  These  show  cases 
have  glass  sides  and  are  long  and  narrow ;  they  are 
very  neat  in  appearance  and  also  serve  to  break  up 
the  view  from  the  entrance. 

The  store  is  one  of  the  most  finely  furnished  in 
the  city ;  the  entire  arrangements  are  harmonius  in  col- 
or and  are  very  attractive.  Mr.  E.  J.  Hanlon  is  the 
manager. 


W.S.S.  Not  Trading  Stamps 

A  large  Toronto  department  store  recently  adver- 
tised W^ar  Savings  Stamps  with  each  purchase — the 
number  of  stamps  varying  with  the  size  of  the  purchase. 
It  has  been  announced  by  the  War  Savings  Stamp 
Committee  however,  that  it  was  not  intended  that 
that  thrift  stamps  should  be  used  as  trading  stamps 
and  that  instructions  had  been  issued  to  see  that  this 
practice  is  not  indulged  in. 


Statistics  prepared  by  the  L'nited  States  government 
show  that  wearing  apparel  of  all  kinds,  including  shoes, 
advanced  an  average  of  93  per  cent,  during  the  fifty-two 
months  of  war. 


36  FOOTWEAR    IN     CANADA  February,  1919 


Shoeman  Elected  Deputy-Reeve 

Mr.  H.  A.  Graham,  shoe  retailer,  Burlington, 
Ont.,  was  elected  Deputy-Reeve  by  a  majority  of 
one  hundred  and  eight  over  his  opponent.  Mr. 
Graham  has  served  the  town  as  member  of  the  Wa- 
ter Commission    for   four   years.    This  is  the  first 


^  .flHI 

im  ^  /* 

Mr.  H.  A.  Graham 


year  for  Burlington  to  have  a  deputy-reeve,  owing 
to  the  fact  that  there  has  not,  until  this  year,  been  a 
thousand  names  on  the  voters'  list. 


Eight  and  a  Half  Inch  Height  Favored 

THE  Trades  Conference  Committee,  representing 
all  branches  of  the  shoe  industry — retailers, 
manufacturers,  tanners  and  travelling  salesmen, 
held  their  annual  meeting  recently  at  the  Astor 
Hotel,  New  York.  One  of  the  outstanding  topics  was 
the  question  of  women's  styles,  and  it  was  almost  uni- 
versally agreed  that  9-inch  boots  are  rapidly  coming 
into  popularity  in  medium  grades.  Retailers  of  high- 
grade  footwear,  hpwever,  were  positive  that  9-inch 
tops  would  not  be  bought  or  sold  by  them,  believing' 
that  the  8  and  8^  inch  pattern  was  better  for  their 
trade.  The  following  are  recommendations  passed  by 
the  Committee : 

Reafifirmed  the  action  of  the  War  Service  Committees 
of  the  industry  in  adhering  to  and  continuing  to  observe  the 
restrictions  on  styles  and  shoes  until  June  1,  when  all  re- 
strictions will  expire. 

Decided  that  the  standard  height  of  women's  lace  boots 
for  Fall,  1919,  carrying  all  the  heights  of  heels,  should  be 
8}^  to  9  inches,  measured  from  the  breast  of  the  heel  at  the 
side  to  the  centre  of  the  top  at  the  side,  4  B  size  to  be  the 
standard  model. 

Endorsed  the  style  recommendations  for  Fall  and  Win- 
ter, 1919,  adopted  at  a  meeting  of  the  War  Service  Council 
or  the  Industry  at  the  Astor  Hotel,  New  York,  Dec.  11. 
These  recommendations  were:  limiting  colors  for  women's 
shoes  to  three  shades  of  brown — medium  and  dark  brown 
and  l)eaver  Ijrown;  medium  and  dark  gray,  bronze,  black, 
white  and  patent  (black)  leather;  S"^  inch  tops  for  lace  boots 
(which  the  Conference  sul^sequently  voted  should  be  chang- 
ed to  include  boots  with  9  inch  tops);  limiting  the  height  of 
women's  button  boots  to  8  inches,  but  registering  opposition 
to  the  introduction  of  button  boots  during  1919;  the  use  of 
pieced  and  foxed  patterns;  the  use  of  lasts  that  measure  114 
sizes  over  standard  and  the  non-use  of  needle  toe  lasts. 

-Authorized  the  appointment  of  a  committee  of  three, 
consisting  of  one  retailer,  one  manufacturer  and  one  whole- 
saler, each  representing  his  National  Association,  to  prepare 


and  insert  a  statement  in  various  trade  papers,  informing  all 
Ijranches  of  the  industry  of  the  colors  of  leathers  the  indus- 
try approves  for  use  in  women's  shoes  for  the  Fall  and  Win- 
ter of  1919. 

The  appointment  of  a  Styles  Committee,  to  consist  of 
representatives  of  the  National  Associations  of  retailers, 
manufacturers,  wholesalers,  last  manufacturers,  travelling 
salesmen,  pattern  makers  and  textile  manufacturers.  This 
committee  will  meet  at  intervals  and  consider  the  trend  of 
style  in  footwear  and  report  back  its  conclusions  to  the  Con- 
ference Committee. 

New  Colors  in  Kid 

Although  not  permisible  under  the  United  States 
restrictions  an  attempt  is  being  made  to  introduce  two 
new  colors  in  kid.  One  is  a  light  gray  and  the  other 
ivory,  in  a  shade  that  has  less  of  a  yellow  cast  than 
the  old  ivory,  popular  some  time  ago.  Although  it 
is  thought  in  some  quarters  that  there  will  be  very 
little  demand  for  ivory,  a  few  samples  of  it  will  be  seen 
in  some  manufacturers'  new  models. 

A  prominent  Brooklyn  manufacturer  informed  the 
assembled  shoemen  that  the  trend  was  distinctly  to- 
ward needle  toes,  and  that  at  present  he  is  selling  more 
shoes  made  over  this  last  than  any  other ;  in  fact,  he 
said  orders  were  coming  in  such  numbers  that  he 
would  be  compelled  to  buy  more  lasts  of  this  style. 
A  Philadelpia  manufacturer  went  on  record  in  favor 
of  the  9  inch  pattern,  stating  that  "everyone  wants 
them  now,"  and  always,  of  course,  with  Louis  wood 
heels. 

This  view  seemed  to  be  the  opinion  of  most  manu- 
facturers and  retailers  of  medium  priced  lines,  but 
when  high  grade  men,  like  John  Slater,  of  J.  &  J.  Sla- 
ter, and  Sam  Frank,  of  Frank  Bros.,  and  J.  R.  Ley- 
cock,  of  Hanan's,  New  York,  were  asked  their  opinion 
of  9  inch  tops,  they  one  and  all  said  they  did  not  be- 
lieve in  that  height  and  that  they  w^ould  not  consider 
buying  or  selling  them.  They  were  unanimous  that 
8/4  inches  was  the  correct  height  for  women's  stylish 
boots.  Mr.  Slater  went  on  record  stating  that  if  women 
wear  longer  and  narrower  skirts  an  8  or  8j4  inch  top 
was  sufficient,  for,  he  said,  as  skirts  come  down  the 
height  of  tops  would  come  down,  and  when  skirts  were 
short  the  height  of  boots  would  be  increased. 

A  Rochester  manufacturer  said  that  many  of  his 
customers  were  writing  in  for  9  inch  boots,  especially 
dealers  in  Chicago,  where  it  was  reported  the  women 
are  not  in  favor  of  the  new  long  skirts,  preferring  the 
shorter  models,  which  have  been  so  popular. 

The  consensus  of  opinion  was  that  9  inch  boots  in 
medium  priced  lines  will  be  popular,  but  that  8  or  Syi 
inch  tops  would  be  the  only  correct  thing  in  high- 
grade  lines. 

C.  Q.  Adams,  of  the  Bristol  Patent  Leather  Co., 
Boston,  raised  an  important  point  when  he  urged  the 
necessity  of  manufacturers  using  pieced  and  foxed 
patterns,  instead  of  whole  quarter  and  full  foxed  pat- 
terns, in  view  of  the  scarcity  of  the  top  selections  of 
calf,  kid  and  side  upper  leather.  He  said  if  the  trade 
went  strong  for  whole  quarters  and  full  foxed  patterns 
its  action  would  immediately  increase  the  cost  of  the 
better  selections  of  all  upper  leather,  whereas  the  gen- 
eral use  of  pieced  patterns  would  help  to  stabilize  and 
control  leather  prices  and  the  cost  of  shoes. 

4.  .  ,  

1            A  Toronto  merchant  remarked  the  other  day  j 

1  that  he  was  not  at  all  disturbed   by   the  lying  ! 

I  statements  in  competitive  advertisements.    "You  | 

I  cannot,"  he  said,  "build  a  business  on  a  founda-  f 

1  tion  of  falsehood."  s 

I  1 
4  .  .  * 


February,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


37 


Co-operation  Should  Not  Be  One-Sided— A  Few 
Suggestions  to  Retailers  and  Manufacturers 

  By  Mr.  L.  R.  Greene   


WE  hear  much  discussion  as  to  the  possibihties 
of  co-operation  of  the  manufacturer  and  deal- 
er. Unfortunately,  we  do  not  as  yet  appear 
to  have  generally  arrived  at  a  proper  idea  of 
the  meaning  of  this  much  used  word  "co-operation." 
"Co-operation"  from  the  standpoint  of  many  manu- 
facturers means  the  dealer  should  do  just  what  the 
manufacturer  wishes  him  to  do,  and  that  the  dealer 
should  feature  such  manufacturer's  goods  in  prefer- 
ence to  those  made  by  rival  manufacturers. 

On  the  other  hand,  to  a  good  many  dealers,  this 
word  "co-operation"  means  that  the  manufacturer 
should  makt  all  the  concessions  the  dealer  has  a  mind 
to  suggest. 

The  important  thing  then  is  for  both  manufacturer 
and  dealer  to  broaden  out,  each  to  get  in  some  measure 
the  other  fellow's  viewpoint  and  to  be  willing  to  give 
and  take.  Working  together  much  may  be  accomplish- 
ed for  the  common  good. 

The  retailer  who  is  alive  to  the  possibilities  of  co- 
operation, naturally  gives  special  attention  uo  the  pro- 
ducts of  those  manufacturers  who  appreciate  the  valine 
of  working  with  the  dealer.  Such  a  merchant  is  build- 
ing a  progressive  and  successful  business. 

Many  manufacturers  believe  that  probably  after 
the  war  will  come  an  era  of  keener  competition  than  we 
have  yet  experienced.  If  increased  prosperity  comes  to 
us  with  a  further  great  development  of  Canada,  it  will 
mean  that  on  this  coimtry  will  be  focused  the  eyes  of 
many  foreign  manufacturers  who  will  come  to  this 
market  to  place  and  distribute  their  goods.  So  now 
is  the  time  for  the  Canadian  manufacturer  to  thorough- 
ly entrench  himself  with  the  dealer.  It  is  even  worth 
while  for  the  retailer  to  aid  the  manuufacturer  is  shap- 
ing his  plans  to  fit  the  retailer's  needs.  Working  to- 
gether, both  will  benefit.  If  such  a  spirit  is  predomin- 
ant throughout  the  country,  it  will  never  be  said  that 
we  business  men  of  Canada,  with  our  wonderful  heri- 
tage, failed  to  play  our  part  in  the  development  of  our 
country  through  a  lack  of  foresight  or  through  self- 
ishness. Bigness  of  view  is  necessary  to  us  all.  It 
will  pay  in  the  long  run. 

The  German  nation  claimed  a  great  efificiency.  They 
had  it  in  many  directions,  and  this  efficiency  was  large- 
ly the  rosult  of  compulsory  co-operation,  iron-bound 
and  enforced  with  the  mailed  fist.  We  in  Canada  live 
in  a  democratic  country,  and  if  we  fail  to  develop  our 
businesses  along  the  best  modern  lines,  it  will  be  large- 
ly because  we  lack  the  spirit  to  co-operate  voluntarily. 

So  let  us  come  down  to  a  little  closer  analysis  of 
the  problem  we  have  before  us,  the  co-operation  of 
dealer  and  manufacturer,  and  what  each  may  suggest 
to  the  other  so  as  to  draw  together  on  the  best  working 
basis. 

Now,  what  can  the  dealer  expect?    First  of  all,  he 


expects  the  manufacturer's  salesmen  to  be  well  posted 
on  their  own  line  of  goods  and  on  business  conditions 
affecting  their  sale,  so  that  they  can  instruct  the  dealer 
on  the  selling  points  and  put  him  in  the  right  position 
to  properly  explain  and  demonstrate  the  goods  to  the 
consumer.  The  salesmen  should  be  more  than  simply 
order  takers.  They  should  vinderstand  the  principles 
of  merchandising. 

I  remember  well  the  remark  of  a  department  man- 
ager and  buyer  in  a  large  department  store.  He  spoke 
particularly  of  the  representative  of  one  of  the  firms 
from  which  he  bought.  He  explained  why  he  featured 
the  lines  made  "by  that  representative's  house.  "They 
were  of  good  quality,  but  not  of  better  quality  than 
several  similar  lines  of  other  manufacturers.  But  the 
man  who  represents  that  house  is  well  posted.  He 
always  comes  to  me  with  information  and  ideas  he  has 
picked  up  on  his  travels  around  the  country  and 
through  the  educational  methods  of  his  house.  This 
is  all  helpful  to  me  and  of  value  in  my  work.  I  ap- 
preciate the  assistance  given  me  by  this  salesman, 
Avhicli  aids  me  not  only  in  pushing-  his  lines,  but  helps 
me  in  my  general  merchandising  plans.  Therefore,  I 
give  special  attention  to  his  lines."  The  manufacturer 
is  truly  co-operating  with  the  dealers  when  he  posts 
his  men  so  that  they  carry  valuable  information  to  the 
dealers  and  are  a  helpful  factor  in  producing  better 
merchants. 

The  dealer  wants  information  about  lines  served 
up  to  him  in  an  untechnical  way,  so  that  he  in  turn  can 
explain  the  goods  to  his  customers.  By  giving  such 
correct  information,  he  not  only  makes  a  sale,  but  the 
customer  understanding  the  use  of  the  goods,  gets  full 
satisfaction. 

The  dealer  wants  co-operation  in  the  way  of  giving 
him  a  living  profit.  This  does  not  mean  too  great  a 
liberality  in  that  direction,  too  great  a  margin  usually 
encourages  price-cutting-  on  the  part  of  some  who  have 
that  tendency.  Average  wholesale  prices  not  only  to 
give  a  fair  profit,  but  also  consider  the  dealer's  needs 
from  that  same  standpoint. 

The  dealer  wants  co-operation  in  the  way  of  honest 
g-oods,  a  product  that  he  can  get  behind  and  recom- 
mend and  know  that  it  will  give  satisfaction  to  the 
consumer.  The  dealer's  customers  usually  hold  him 
personally  responsible  for  the  goods  and  not  the  man- 
ufacturer. The  customer  may  have  little  or  no  know- 
ledge of  the  manufacture,  but  he  does  know  the  dealer, 
and  when  he  pays  the  dealer  money,  he  expects  a 
square  deal.  The  dealer  should  not  be  embarrassed  by 
giving  him  goods  that  are  not  up  to  the  claims  made 
for  them. 

The  retailers  expect  that  in  manufacturers'  adver-  • 
tising  and  selling  plans,  they  will  consider  his  view- 


It  is  Well  to  Make  Plans  Ahead  hut  Don't  Make  Them  in  Cast  Iron. 


38 


FOOTWEAR 


IN  CANADA 


February,  lOiJ 


point  and  work  out  the  details  to  fit  in  with  the  average 
dealer's  requirements. 

What  Can  The  Manufacturer  Expect? 

On  the  other  hand,  What  can  the  manufacturer  ex- 
pect? What  should  the  manufacturer  expect  of  the 
retailer? 

That  where  a  demand  has  been  created  in  a  legiti- 
mate way,  the  retailer  will  give  the  manufacturer's 
goods  a  showing  in  his  stores  and  not  substitute  other 
lines  unfairly. 

That  the  retailer  will  use  the  advertising  furnished 
him  by  the  manufacturer,  particularly  if  sent  to  him 
upon  his  request  or  with  his  consent,  that  he  will  not 
"build  chicken-houses  or  coal  bins  with  iron  display 
signs,"  nor  feed  the  wastepaper  basket  with  expen- 
sively printed  booklets  or  folders,  window  trimming 
material,  etc.,  which  the  manufacturer  has  prepared  to 
help  the  retailer  market  his  merchandise. 

That  he  will  not  disturb  trade  conditions  and  rob 
himself  and  other  merchants  of  legitimate  profit  by 
cutting  prices. 

One  great  problem  for  the  manufacturer  is  how  to 
obtain  the  active  interest  of  the  retailer  in  his  (the 
manufacturer's)  advertising.  Certainly  the  first  step 
is  to  thoroughly  post  his  own  salesmen.  Sell  them  the 
plan,  let  them  realize  its  value  as  a  business  getter, 
and  so  stir  up  their  enthusiasm.  Coach  them  thorough- 
ly in  every  detail  until  each  man  on  your  sales  force  is 
in  a  position  to  explain  the  whole  idea  to  his  customers. 
You  can't  expect  a  dealer  to  co-operate  in  a  campaign, 
the  object  and  details  of  which  he  has  little  or  no 
knowledge.  It  is  logical  to  make  the  manufacturer's 
sales  force  the  greatest  factor  in  posting  the  trade,  and 
yet  many  a  well  planned  campaign  has  fallen  far  short 
of  a  full  success,  simply  because  they  were  not  in  har- 
mony with  it  or  behind  it  for  everything  that  was  in 
them. 

It  is  often  well  worth  while  to  undertake  the  extra 
ex])ense  of  mailing  comprehensive  broadsides  or  folders 
giving  the  dealer  the  story  of  the  advertising  drive, 
show  how  it  is  reaching  the  consumer,  and  how  it  is 
well  worth  his  while  to  tie  up  to  it  and  reap  the  bene- 
fit in  the  way  of  bigger  sales. 

There  is  no  question  but  that  advertising,  if  in  suf- 
ficient volume  and  sanely  conducted,  produces  demand, 
be  that  advertising,  magazine  or  newspaper.,  billboard 
or  sign,  direct  by  mail  or  one  or  more  of  the  many 
other  effective  methods.  It  pays  the  dealer  then  to 
display  and  push  any  product  which  is  being  force- 
fully advertised  to  the  public  in  his  locality.  By  doing 
so,  he  focuses  on  his  own  business  the  interest  aroused 
in  the  line  advertised.  He  draws  customers  to  his  store 
and  not  only  has  the  opportunity  to  sell  them  the  ad- 
vertised line,  but  his  other  merchandise  as  well.  He 
makes  new  customers  and  holds  his  old  ones.  He 
builds  a  reputation  of  being  alive,  progressive,  up-to- 
the-minute. 


Backbone  an  Essential  of  Good  Merchandising 

"While  I  am  always  willing  to  make  good  any  legi- 
timate defects  in  the  goods  I  sell,  and  to  consider  any 
complaints,  I  find  it  .sometimes  necessary  to  draw  the 
line,"  said  a  Montreal  retailer.  "In  some  instances  I 
have  discovered  that  shoes  have  been  burned,  unin- 
tentionally of  course,  but  customers  have  wanted  me 
to  replace  the  goods,  on  the  ground  that  the  shoes 


have  proved  unsatisfactory.  This  is  rare,  but  it  has 
occurred  in  my  experience.  One  of  the  nerviest  exam- 
ples that  came  under  my  notice  was  that  of  a  woman 
who  changed  the  shoes  twice  before  finally  deciding 
on  what  she  considered  to  be  the  right  shoes.  She  was 
difificult  to  fit,  and  I  thought  I  had  at  last  satisfied  her. 
xA.gainst  my  advice,  she  wore  the  shoes  home  after 
making  the  purchase.  To  my  surprise  she  turned  up 
two  or  three  days  later,  and  wanted  me  to  again 
change  the  goods — although  they  had  been  worn  in  the 
rain, — suggesting"  that  I  had  friends  who  might  be 
glad  to  buy  the  shoes  at  a  slight  reduction.  I  declined 
to  accept  this  suggestion,  and  told  her  plainly  but  pol- 
itely that  what  she  desired  was  not  within  reason.  I 
had  already  changed  the  goods  twice,  and  that  to  me 
was  the  limit,  especially  as  the  goods  had  been  de- 
preciated by  being  worn." 


Pushing  Accessories  Creates  Better 
Merchandising 

Do  retailers  sufficiently  appreciate  the  oppor-  . 
tunity  for  making  a  little  extra  profit  by  stock- 
ing and  prominently  displaying  shoe  accessor- 
ies, such  as  polishes,  laces,  etc.?  This  is  busi- 
ness which  is  strictly  within  the  province  of  a  shoe 
retailer,  and  it  is  not  only  a  convenience  to  his  custom- 
ers, but  is  the  source  of  additional  revenue.  Many  of 
the  goods  can  at  present  be  obtained  from  stores  other 
than  shoe  stores,  but  more  and  more  of  the  trade  will 
be  diverted  into  its  legitimate  channels  if  shoe  retail- 
ers will  make  a  point  of  pushing  these  lines.  One  pro- 
gressive Montreal  retailer  always  has  on  hand  a  large 
display  of  polishes,  etc.,  these  being  placed  in  a  posi- 
tion where  they  are  bound  to  come  under  customers' 
attention.  "I  find,"  he  stated,  "that  since  I  prominent- 
ly displayed  the  goods  that  the  revenue  from  them 
has  very  largely  increased.  The  mere  fact  of  the  goods 
being  brought  under  the  customers'  notice  is  a  remin- 
der that  they  often  require  them — and  of  course,  I 
benefit.  The  individual  sales  are  not  of  large  amounts, 
but  in  the  aggregate  they  bring  in  a  very  satisfactory 
profit.  It  is  of  little  use  stocking  the  lines  unless  you 
push  them,  and  a  prominent  display  goes  a  long  way 
to  effect  this  purpose." 


Patience  Should  Be  the  Shoeman's 
Middle  Name 

"Shoe  retailers  must  have  a  more  than  ordinary 
stock  of  patience,"  said  a  Montreal  retailer.  "  Some 
prospective  buyers  are  very  trying;  they  do  not  ap- 
pear to  know  what  they  want,  and  it  requires  a  lot 
of  tact  to  deal  with  such  people.  If  I  kept  all  the  goods 
I  am  asked  for — some  of  them  quite  out  of  the  way — 
I  should  have  a  stock  of  extraordinary  variety.  It 
is  difiicult  to  make  some  vmderstand  that  the  ordinary 
retailer  can  only  carry  the  goods  for  which  there  is  a 
live  demand,  and  that  it  is  not  a  business  proposition 
to  purchase  lines  which  may  be  on  the  shelves  for 
many  months,  depreciating  in  value  and  representing 
the  investment  of  a  large  sum  of  money.  We  want  to 
turn  over  our  stock  as  quickly  as  possible,  and  there- 
fore we  buy  what  we  consider  will  sell.  But  retailers 
make  mistakes,  and  we  sometimes  find  to  our  cost 
that  certain  goods  which  we  believed  would  prove  the 
best  sellers  prove  to  be  the  reverse.  This  means  an 
inevitable  loss,  and  is  undoubtedly  one  of  the  most 
serious  drawbacks  to  this  line  of  business." 


February,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


39 


Merchandising  Broken  and  Discontinued  Lines 


THIS  sul)ject,  one  of  the  most  practical  of  all 
those  discussed  in  the  round  table  talks  at  the 
National  Convention,  was  handled  by  I'rank  P. 
Meyer,  of  Danville,  111.  Mr.  Meyer  emphasized, 
in  a  brief  but  "peppery"  talk,  that  the  first  point  to  re- 
member in  this  connection  is  right  buying  in  the  first 
instance,  for  the  simple  reason  that  proper  buying  .will 
go  toward  eliminating  left-overs  to  be  disposed  of. 

"Buy  for  your  own  trade,"  said  Mr.  Meyer.  "Buy 
what  they  want,  what  they  should  have,  and  left-overs 
will  not  be  a  problem." 

He  pointed  out  that  in  any  event  the  disposition  of 
broken  lines  and  left-overs  is  more  of  a  problem  in  the 
shoe  trade  than  in  any  other  line  of  retail  business, 
owing  to  the  number  of  sizes  and  widths  in  each  model 
which  the  retailer  must  buy,  and  that  this  fact  makes 
it  all  the  more  necessary  to  use  intelligent  rriethods  in 
disposing  of  such  goods. 

The  use  of  p.  m.'s  was  strongly  recommended  by 
Mr.  Meyer,  as  he  declared  emphatically  that  without  an 
incentive  there  is  no  reason  for  salespeople  to  sell  the 
old  oi-  otherwise  undesirable  shoes.  There  must  be  a 
system  in  the  use  of  p.' m.'s,  however,  in  his  own  store, 
for  example,  a  separate  section,  known,  of  course,  only 
to  the  sales  people,  being  used.  To  avoid  the  danger 
of  sales  for  the  sake  of  the  p.  m.  only,  Mr.  Meyer  said 
he  has  the  salesman  put  his  name  on  the  carton,  and  too 
many  come-backs  of  such  shoes  mean  the  removal  of 
the  salesman's  name  from  the  p.  m.  list  of  the  store. 
A  25-cent.  p.  m.  is  given. 

Clearance  sales  are  one  of  the  best  methods  for  the 


disposition  of  left-over  merchandise,  the  speaker  said. 
He  has  two  a  year,  well  advertised,  and  disposes  of  all 
left-overs.  The  importance  of  honest  and  trustworthy 
advertising  of  such  sales  cannot  be  too  greatly  em- 
phasized, however,  because  otherwise  the  public  will 
not  patronize  them. 

Speaking  of  slow-moving  shoes,  the  desirability  of 
the  owner  of  the  store  spending  at  least  four  hours  a 
day  on  the  floor  was  suggested,  as  this  puts  him  directly 
in  touch  with  what  is  going  on  and  frequently  shows 
that  the  sales  force  is  not  pushing  a  given  shoe  and 
why.  Frequently  this  can  be  adjusted,  and  a  slow 
mover  turned  into  a  good  seller. 

Many  retailers  listening  to  the  discussion  contribut- 
ed valuable  sugg"estions,  indicating  not  only  that  the 
sale  of  odds  and  ends  is  a  matter  which  receives  much 
thought,  but  that  it  is  successfully  handled  in  most 
stores.  It  was  emphasized  and  agreed  to  by  all  that 
the  sooner  the  retailer  takes  his  loss  on  bad  numbers 
and  left-overs  the  better,  and  the  less  the  amount  of 
the  loss. 

A  unique  plan  used  by  one  shoeman,  he  said,  was 
the  establishment  of  a  se])arate  store  where  the  left- 
overs and  odds  and  ends  from  his  principal  stock  are 
handled,  together  with  cheap  shoes  of  other  sorts,  thus 
giving  a  profitable  business.  The  suggestion  that  a 
basement  department  can  be  utilized  to  dispose  of 
broken  lines  was  accepted,  with  the  qualification  that  it 
will  work  only  in  the  larger  cities,  50,000  being  about 
the  minimum. 


Retailers  Discuss  Cancellations  and  Early  Closing 


CANCELLATIONS  of  goods  in  process  of  man- 
ufacture and  early  closing  formed  the  principal 
subjects  of  discussion    at  a  meeting  of  the 
Montreal  Shoe  Section  of  the  Retail  Mer- 
chants' Association  of  Canada,  held  on  January  15th. 
Mr.  Geo.  G.  Gales  presided. 

Mr.  L.  Adelstein  read  a  letter  from  the  secretary  of 
the  Shoe  Manufacturers'  Asociation  of  Canada,  en- 
closing a  resolution  passed  at  the  recent  conference, 
asking  the  aid  of  the  retailers  in  the  correction  of  the 
evil  of  returned  merchandise  for  trivial  causes  and  can- 
cellations of  orders  after  goods  are  in  process,  to  the 
end  that  what  are  termed  'floor  goods'  may  be  lessened 
in  quantity,  thus  materially  lowering  the  source  of  sup- 
plies of  the  fake  sample  shoe  stores  or  so  called  factory 
outlets.  A  further  resolution  from  the  Association  was 
to  the  effect  that  manufacturers  shall  not  give  credit 
for  any  shoes  that  have  been  worn,  Avithout  being  al- 
lowed fair  credit  for  such  wear  as  the  shoes  have  been 
given. 

The  chairman  suggested  that  the  retailers  would  be 
glad  to  co-operate  with  the  manufacturers  on  the  lines 
named,  such  action  being  of  benefit  to  the  retailers. 

Mr.  Singer  was  in  favor  of  the  manufacturers  look- 
ing after  themselves,  "and  the  retailers  doing  the  same 
thing. 

Mr.  Adelstein  thought  that  they  should  discuss  the 


question  of  cancellations  of  orders  with  the  manufac- 
turers and  arrive  at  some  solution  which  would  be  of 
mutual  benefit.  He  pointed  out  that  since  the  retailers 
and  manufacturers  in  the  United  States  had  got  to- 
gether they  had  been  able  to  alleviate  a  number  of 
grievances  and  come  to  a  bettetr  understanding.  There 
was  no  reason  why  retailers  and  manufacturers  in  Can- 
ada should  not  proceed  along  similar  lines. 

Mr.  J.  G.  Watson  suggested  that  the  resolution  was 
rather  a  reflection  on  members  of  the  association  ;  he 
did  not  think  that  members  of  the  association  were 
guilty  of  the  practices  indicated  in  the  resolution.  In 
any  case  the  remedy  was  in  the  hands  of  the  manufac- 
turers themselves,  who  could  refuse  to  deal  with  re- 
tailers known  to  be  guilty  of  the  action  complained  of. 
He  was  willing  to  co-operate  with  the  manufacturers' 
Association,  as  the  abolition  of  the  evil  referred  to 
would  be  of  benefit  to  the  merchants  who  were  doing 
a  legitimate  trade. 

Mr.  Adelstein  pointed  out  that  as  the  manufacturer 
had  the  right  to  cancel  an  order  sent  into  him,  so  the 
retailer  had  the  right  to  do  the  same,  provided,  of 
course,  the  goods  were  not  in  process  of  manufacture. 

The  chairman  said  the  retailers  had  everything  to 
gain  by  working  with  the  manufacturers.  '  He  had 
found  the  average  manufacturer  a  fair,  broad-minded 
business  man,  and  he  was  strongly  in  favor  of  getting 


40  FOOTWEAR 

together  to  discuss  questions  arising  between  the  re- 
tailer and  manufacturer. 

On  the  motion  of  Mr.  Watson,  seconded  by  Mr. 
Singer,  it  was  resolved :  "We  are  pleased  to  welcome 
the  new  association  and  promise  our  co-operation  in  all 
matters  for  the  betterment  of  the  boot  and  shoe  busi- 
ness. In  the  matter  of  the  specific  complaints  sub- 
mitted for  our  consideration  we  will  be  pleased  to  have 
the  manufacturers  apply  the  remedy  lying  in  their  own 
province  in  dealing  with  their  individual  customers, 
and  the  benefit  will  accrue  to  the  retailer  doing  busi- 
ness in  honorable  ways  and  legitimate  business 
methods." 

The  question  of  early  closing  was  discussed  at 
great  length.  There  is  a  movement  in  the  city  to 
amend  the  civic  by-law  referring  to  early  closing,  and 
resolutions  had  been  passed  at  two  meetings  of  the 
general  retailers  of  the  city  in  favor  of  closing  on  Mon- 
day, Tuesday,  Wednesday  and  Thursday,  at  7  o'clock, 
instead  of  two  evenings  a  week  as  at  present.  The 
shoe  retailers  passed  a  resolution  in  favor  of  closing 
on  the  four  evenings  named,  the  chief  point  of  discus- 
sion being  as  to  whether  it  should  be  at  6  or  7  p.m. 
The  meeting  decided  in  favor  of  the  latter  time,  it 
being  argued  that  it  would  be  to  the  disadvantage  of 
the  -retailers  in  the  suburbs  if  the  time  were  fixed  at 
6  o'clock.  In  the  by-law  provision  is  made  for  exemp- 
tion to  the  early  closing  rule  on  days  preceding  holi- 
days. Mr.  J.  G.  Watson  was  appointed  the  delegate 
of  the  shoe  retailers  to  confer  with  those  who  will 
bring  the  subject  before  the  city  council. 

Mr.  Charles  Holmes  of  the  Montreal  Publicity  As- 
sociation, asked  the  retailers  to  attend  a  series  of  five 
lectures  by  Mr.  Frank  Stockdale,  of  Chicago,  to  be 
held  in  Montreal  in  March  next.  These  will  be  on 
retail  merchandising  and  should  prove  of  benefit  to 
retailers. 

On  the  motion  of  Mr.  Singer,  seconded  by  Mr. 
DeLauniere,  a  resolution  was  passed  in  favor  of  a 
banquet  being  held  with  a  view  to  boost  the  member- 
ship, and  Messrs.  Singer,  De  Launiere  and  Adelstein 
were  appointed  a  committee  to  report  as  to  the  ar- 
rangements . 

It  was  decided  to  hold  the  meetings  on  every  sec- 
ond Thursdav  in  the  month. 


Buy-in-Kitchener  Campaign 

THE  News-Record  of  Kitchener,  Ont.,  has  been 
conducting  a  "Buy-in-Kitchener"  campaign  for 
some  time,  using  one  full  page  in  their  paper 
each  week.  In  the  centre  of  the  page  is  printed 
a  good,  snappy  argument  in  favor  of  patronizing  local 
merchants  and  surrounding  this  are  the  business  cards 
of  a  number  of  the  Kitchener  merchants.  The  heading 
on  the  last  .page  to  hand  was :  "If  you  buy  out  of  town 
and  I  buy  out  of  town,  what  will  become  of  our  town?" 
That's  surely  to  the  point. 

The  following  are  typical  of  the  business  cards  in- 
serted by  Kitchener  shoemen  : 

We  handle  a  well  selected  stock  of  boots  and  shoes 
of  national  reputation.  Ladies'  and  gentlemen's  shoes  in 
all  colors  and  the  latest  fashions.  Buy-in-Kitchener  is 
right.  J.  Hessenaur  &  Sons. 

T  am  building  up  a  nice  business  in  boots  and  shoes 
by  giving  a  square  deal.  A  big  line  of  all  the  best  makes 
at  very  low  prices.  See  me  and  "buy-at-home."  Charles 
J.  Seyler. 

You  cannot  fit  shoes  by  "absent  treatment"  and  you 
know  that  when  you  buy  shoes  by  mail  you  take  long 
chances  on  comfort,  fit,  quality  and  style,  and  invariably 


IN    CANADA  February,  1919 


Military  Shoemaking  Class  at  Kingston,  Ont,,  using  Goodyear  Repair  Outfit 


you  pay  higher  prices  than  we  would  charge  you  for 
shoes  of  equal  worth.  John  Agnew,  the  Home  of  Good 
Shoes  and  Fair  Prices. 

It  is  up  to  you  to  know  you  can  do  better  with  us 
than  from  any  mail  order  house.    We  will  l)eat  their  * 
prices  any  time  in  a  full  range  of  boots  and  shoes.  Make 
us  prove  it.    A.  Sippel  &  Son.  .  Where  the  good  shoes 
come  from. 


The  Rule  of  Six  Explained  at  the  Recent 
St.  Louis  Convention 

BY  this  rule  the  retail  selling  price  of  a  shoe  is 
determined  by  adding  a  cipher  to  the  cost,  and 
dividing  by  six.  This  gives  a  retail  figure  which 
provides  a  gross  profit  of  about  40  per  cent. 
It  was  brought  out  that  in  the  larger  cities  an  over- 
head cost  of  30  per  cent,  or  less  may  be  expected,  while 
in  the  smaller  towns,  on  account  of  lower  rents  and 
other  costs,  the  figure  should  run  around  25  per  cent. 
If  it  is  more,  iii  either  case,  there  is  danger,  and  the 
merchant  should  investigate.  These  percentages,  of 
course,  like  all  others,  are  percentages  of  the  selling- 
price.  Managerial  and  selling  expenses  was  said  by 
the  speaker  to  run  about  13  or  14  per  cent. 

In  this  connection,  the  necessity  for  proprietors 
making  due  allowance — not  less  than  5  per  cent. — for 
their  own  services  as  managers,  as  well  as  for  the  use 
of  their  own  property  and  capital,  was  emphasized.  It 
was  pointed  out,  for  instance,  that  unless  this  is  done 
the  net  income  will  shoAv  up  much  larger  than  it  legiti- 
mately should.  In  short,  every  legitimate  expense  of 
the  store  should  be  taken  into  account  in  reckoning 
overhead,  no  matter  who  furnishes  the  service  or  the 
property  used  ;  because  it  is  only  by  so  doing  that  store 
records  can  be  made  to  perform  properly  their  function 
of  showing  a  true  picture  of  the  business. 


Accounts  Missing 

"Fire  do  much  damage  in  your  store  last  night?" 
asked  one  of  the  boys  of  Uncle  Eben  Sander,  the  vil- 
lage storekeeper." 

"Didn't  hurt  my  stock  or  the  building  much,"  re- 
plied the  old  man,  "but  them  gosh  dinged  firemen 
turned  the  hose  on  my  slate  and  I  dunno  where  I  stand 
this  morning." 


Ji'eljruary,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


41 


Things  Your  Advertising  Should  Aim  To  Do 

Publicity  Methods  That  Have  Helped  One  Retailer— A  Good  Rule  is  Never  To 
Make  a  Rule— Did  You  Ever  Notice  the  "Sin"  in  Advertising? 


By  Mr.  John  F.  Raab* 


ADVERTISING  covers  a  large  field.  It  also 
covers  a  multitude  of  sins.  I  have  committed 
some  of  them  myself.  All  I  can  say  is,  that  I 
have  tried  to  avoid  making-  the  same  mistake 
twice.  After  being  in  the  retail  shoe  business  for  15 
or  20  years,  and  being  a  more  or  lless  consistent  adver- 
tiser during  that  time,  I  have  some  rather  firm  convic- 
tions on  the  stibject,  at  least  as  far  as  refers  to  my 
l)usiness.  One  good  rule  in  advertising  is  never  to 
make  a  rule.  What  is  one  man's  meat  is  another  man's 
poison.  Methods  that  work  well  for  one  store  may  be 
a  flat  failure  for  another.  I  can  only  tell  you  of  my 
own  experience. 

Keep  At  It. 

In  the  first  ])lace,  I  believe  absolutely  in  keeping 
everlastingly  at  it.  I  don't  believe  that  there  is  any 
short  and  easy  way  to  succeed  through  advertising.  A 
l)usiness  can  be  built  without  advertising,  but  it  can  be 
ljuilt  more  c^uickly  and  surely  with  advertising.  In 
other  words,  advertising  ought  to  be  regarded  as  a  part 
of  the  business. 

In  the  second  place,  I  believe  that  any  one  operating 
a  shoe  store  with  a  big"  general  public  appeal  will  find 
the  newspapers  to  be  the  best  possible  medium.  It  is 
the  same  with  newspapers  as  with  shoes — the  best  are 
the  highest  priced.  They  are  also  the  cheapest  in  the 
end.  An  Eastern  manufacturer  of  men's  fine  shoes 
says  that  their  shoes  "cost  more  by  the  pair  and  less 
by  the  year."  Similarly,  some  newspapers  may  cost 
more  by  the  inch  but  less  figured  by  the  number  of 
sai'  -  they  make  for  you. 

What  Advertising  Does. 

Now,  I  think  that  your  newspaper  advertising  ought 
to  do  two  things  for  your  store.  It  ought,  first  to  in- 
fluence the  good  will  of  the  public  towards  your  store, 
and,  second,  it  ought  to  increase  the  confidence  of  the 
people  in  your  store  and  in  your  business  methods.  In- 
directly this,  of  course,  will  make  sales.  Of  course,  it 
goes  v/ithout  saying  that  it  is  the  height  of  folly  to 
adverti'-e  a  iuisiness  that  is  not  conducted  honestly,  and 
\'  iLh  a  firm  determination  to  give  good  values  and  good 
service.  Nothing  will  expose  the  weakness  of  a  busi- 
ness like  advertising.  No  store  that  is  built  on  an  im- 
l^roper  foundation  can  stand  the  result  of  successful 
advertising.  I  mean  by  this  that  the  business  that  your 
advertising  will  bring  will  be  worse  than  no  business 
at  all  unless  the  merchandise  sold  through  the  advertis- 
ing proves  satisfactory  to  the  purchaser.  Advertising 
requires  a  merchant,  if  he  is  to  be  successful  in  the 
long  run,  to  sell  only  thoroughly  dependable  merchan- 
dise. 

Good  Will  and  Direct  Sales. 

In  addition  to  creating  good  will  for  the  store,  ad- 
vertising- can  give  the  public  the  impression  that  your 
srore  is  the  leader  in  style  and  value  giving.  I  think 
these  are  the  big  things  your  advertising  should  aim 
to  do.  Then,  it  should  also  be  aimed  at  the  creation 
of  direct  sales.    Maybe  you  think  that  I  am  emphasiz- 

*Before  National  Shoe  Retailers'  Convention,  St.  Louis. 


ing  too  much  the  general  good-will  value  of  advertis- 
ing. I  don't  think  I  am.  Whenever  the  time  comes 
that  }  ou  do  want  to  put  on  a  big  .sale,  such  as  a  season's 
clearance,  the  response  of  the  public  will  be  in  propor- 
tion to  the  general  confidence  in  your  store,  your  values 
and  your  methods,  and  these  can  be  very  largely  built 
up  during  the  season  by  the  character  of  advertising 
that  you  are  doing.  At  least,  that  is  my  experience. 

Advertising  to  Women  and  Men. 

When  it  comes  to  responsiveness  I  have  noticed  a 
marked  difir'erence  in  advertising  to  women  and  to  men. 
Of  course  it  is  a  pretty  well  established  fact  that  women 
are  more  responsive  to  sales  than  men.  I  think  that 
the  average  man  is  frankly  skeptical  toward  sales. 
Neither  does  he  look  for  sales  in  the  way  in  which 
women  do.  I  do  know,  however,  that  men  will  respond 
to  sales  advertising  if  you  are  advertising  goods  in 
which  they  have  confidence.  I  believe  too,  that  men 
are  less  responsive  to  newspaper  advertising  than  wo- 
men, and  for  that  reason  I  am  rather  a  firm  believer 
in  other  methods  of  advertising  .shoes  to  men.  Street- 
car cards  have  been  rather  successful  with  us.  They 
have  the  additional  advantage  of  allowing  you  to  show 
your  goods  in  life  sizes  and  also  natural  colors.  Young- 
men  are  influenced  by  style  features,  and  that  is,  of 
course,  what  appeals  especially  to  women,  rather  than 
value,  although  it  goes  without  saying  that  the  shoes 


Mr.  Henri  Viau,  L.I. A.,  of  Montreal,  who  has  just  been 
elected  secretary-treasurer  of  the  Shoe  Manufacturers' 
Association  of  Canada.  His  specialized  training  and  ex- 
pert financial  knowledge  will  be  of  great  assistance  to 
this  new  organization. 


I 


43 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


February,  193  0 


must  l)c  thoroughly  good  if  they  are  to  keep  their  style 
and  give  satisfaction  to  the  wearer.  But  for  advertis- 
ing purposes  it  pays  to  feature  style. 

Use  Space  Regularly — Feature  One  Shoe  at  a  Time. 

As  far  as  space  in  the  ne\vsi)apers  is  concerned,  our 
own  experience  has  been  that  moderate  sized  space, 
4., — , — , — ,„_„„_„„_„„_„„_„„_„„  „„  „„_,  ^ 


Mr.  John  Sinclair,  of  the  Barrie  Tanning  Co.. 
Barrie,  Ont.,  recently  elected  vice-chairman  of 
the  Tamers'  Section  of  the  Toronto  Board  of  | 
Trade.    Mr.  Sinclair  is  universally  liked  among  I 
the  trade.  J 

4.„_„_»„_„„_„„_„„_„„_„„_,,„_,„,  ,_„„_„„_,„,_,,i,_i,«_m,— 4 

used  frequently,  and  featuring  only  one  particular 
style  of  shoe  at  a  time,  is  the  most  successful.  Our 
store  has  not  run  any  large  shoe  ads.  for  a  good  many 
years.  We  have  aimed  to  show  exactly  the  style  that 
we  are  featuring  at  the  time,  having  drawings  made 
from  the  shoes  themselves,  and  we  have  found  that 
women  will  read  a  rather  minute  description  of  the 
characteristics  of'the  particular  style  featured. 

How  Much  to  Spend. 

As  far  as  advertising  appropriations  are  concerned, 
J  believe  that  a  shoe  store  doing  a  general  business  can 
well  spend  2}4  to  3  per  cent,  of  its  total  sales  for  ad- 
vertising. I  am  a  firm  believer  in  making  a  definite 
appropriation,  and  while  this  should  be  flexible,  so  as 
to  allow  for  developments  during  the  season  in  case  of 
need,  the  advertising  should  be  planned  on  some  logical 
basis.  People  naturally  get  accustomed  to  a  certain 
style  of  ad.,  and  it  is  a  mistake  to  change  the  style  too 
frequently,  in  my  opinion.  Where  newspapers  will  sell 
preferred  positions,  that  is,  next  to  reading  matter,  I 
believe  it  is  well  to  pay  the  extra  charge  for  it.  I  would 
rather  use  less  space  and  have  it  in  a  good  position 
than  use  larger  space  mixed  up  with  other  ads. 
Advertising  Should  Be  Truthful. 

One  thing  that  shoe  merchants  ought  to  do  is  to 
take  a  firm  stand  for  truthful  advertising.  It  is  an  un- 
fortunate fact  that  a  great  deal  of  advertising  is  not  be- 
lieved. If  it  were  believed,  we  could  all  cut  our  ad- 
vertising expenditures  away  below  the  present  mark, 
and  get  much  better  results.  The  honest  merchant 
^ufi:'ers  from  the  faults  of  his  less  truthful  brother.  Per- 
haps 1  should  not  say  less  truthful,  because  what  in 
many  cases  appears  to  be  a  wilful  misstatement  is  often 


merely  an  exaggeration  due  to  over-enthusiasm  of  the 
advertiser  for  his  merchandise. 

Take  the  "Sin"  Out  of  Advertising. 
If  all  advertising-  can  be  made  more  truthful  and 
more  sincere,  it  will  become  even  a  greater  force  in  the 
building  of  a  business  than  it  is  to-day,  and  I  believe 
that  it  is  one  of  the  greatest  forces  tha-t  we  have.  I 
think  that  the  whole  argument  for  advertising  can  be 
pretty  well  summed  up  in  the  old-fashioned  phrase — 
"The  wheel  that  squeaks  is  the  one  that  gets  the  oil." 
And  1  think  that  we  all  want  more  "oil"  in  our  busi- 
ness. 


A  Distinct  Loss  to  the  Shoe  Trade 

FRANK  W\  SLATER,  president  of  the  Eureka 
Shoe  Company,  Three  Rivers,  Que.,  died  of 
pneumonia  at  his  Montreal  residence,  on  Jan- 
uary 21,  at  the  age  of  52.  Mr.  Slater  was  widely 
known  in  the  shoe  trade,  belonging  to  a  family  whose 
name  is  a  household  word  in  the  Canadian  shoe  busi- 
ness. His  father  was  the  founder  of  the  shoe  manu- 
facturing firm  of  G.  T.  Slater  &  Son,  and  the  four  sons 
also  entered  the  same  line  of  business.  Mr.  Geo.  A. 
Slater  is  head  of  Geo.  A.  Slater,  Ltd.,  INIontreal ;  Mr. 
Charles  Slater  is  connected  with  the  Tally-Ho  Shoe 
Co.,  Quebec  ;  Mr.  A.  J.  Slater  is  in  the  United  States, 
but  formerly  was  a  shoe  retailer  in  Montreal,  while  the 
late  Mr.  E.  W.  Slater  was  noted  for  his  sales  ability. 


The  late  Mr.  Frank 
W.  Slater 


He  was  formerly  with  the  Eagle  Shoe  Co.,  Montreal, 
manufacturers  of  the  Ei-ank  W.  Slater  "Strider"  Shoe. 
.Subsequently  Mr.  Slater  became  interested  in  the  Eure- 
ka Shoe  Co.,  of  which  Mr.  Geo.  Beaufois  is  secretary- 
treasurer.  A  short  time  ago  Mr.  Slater  was  appointed 
president  of  the  company.  The  factory  was  moved 
from  Montreal  to  Three  Rivers,  and  is  now  located  in 
the  fine  building-  erected  by  the  city  for  industrial  pur- 
poses. 


Export  Licenses  Not  Now  Required 

THE  British  Trade  Commissioners  in  Canada 
Mr.  G.  T.  Milne,  at  Montreal,  and  Mr.  E.  W. 
Field,  at  Toronto,  have  received  cable  advices 
from  the  Department  of  Overseas  Trade  (De- 
velopment and  Intelligence),  that  the  following  wide 
range  of  British  manufactures  have  been  placed  on  the 
free  list,  and  now  require  no  export  license:  Artists' 
materials,  athletic  goods,  bicycles,  but  not  tires,  bi- 
cycle accessories  (various),  buttons  except  military, 
horn  and  vegetable  ivory,  cigar  and  cigarette  holders, 
china  and  earthenware,  china  clay,  clocks,  cutlery, 
drugs  (various),  fancy  goods  of  paper,  ivory,  leather, 
etc. ;  films  subject  to  censorship,  flower  seeds,  foun- 
tain pens,  furs  (dress,  dyed  or  manufactured);  glass- 
ware, hardware  (iron  and  steel  builders)  ;  hats,  house- 
liold  efi^ects  of  wood,  iron  or  steel,  ink  jewellery  (imi- 
tation or  pearl),  laces,  laundry  machinery,  ledgers. 


February,  1919 


FOOTWEAR 


IN  CANADA 


43 


marble,  mineral  waters  (unsweetened),  musical  in- 
struments, office  furniture,  pictures,  paintings,  phono- 
o-raphs,  photographic  materials  (not  chemical),  razors, 
(safety  and  blades),  ribbons  (silk),  spectacles,  sewing- 
machines,  wallpaper. 

Lists  of  goods  for  which  export  licenses  are  still 
rccjuired  for  shipment  from  the  United  Kingdom  will 
shortly  be  in  the  hands  of  the  British  Trade  Commis- 
sioners noted  above.  They  will  also  be  advised  week- 
ly, by  cable,  by  their  department  in  London  of  the 
goods  removed  from  such  list  and  any  alterations 
thereto.  The  British  Trade  Commissioners  will  be 
glad  to  take  up  these  matters  with  local  importers  and 
others  interested. 

The  following  are  some  of  the  principal  commod- 
ities for  which  licenses  are  still  required :  Abrasives, 
agricultural  machinery,  cement,  chemicals  (various), 
coal  and  coke,  oils,  pipes  (cast  iron),  packing  cases, 
railway  material,  resins,  coal  tar  products,  copper 
(wrought  and  unwrought,  including  Avire);  alloys, 
dyes,  foodstuffs,  food  for  live  stock,  glue,  iron  angles, 
bars,  billets  and  constructional  material,  steel  angles, 
ingot  plates  and  similar  raw  materials,  textile  mach- 
inery, textile  yarns,  hbres  and  waste;  tin  plates,  war 
material,  wire  rope,  wood  and  timber. 

The  prohibition  of  the  exportation  of  raw  materials 
does  not  extend  to  goods  manufactured  from  such 
materials. 


Breaking  of  Backs  and  Seams  at  the 
Bend  of  the  Heel 


AN  old-established  shoe  retailer  and  shoemaker 
has  written  us,  setting  forth  what,  in  his 
opinion,  are  glowing  defects  in  modern  shoe- 
making,  although  remedies  are  ready  to  hand 
in  each  case.  With  regard  to  the  breaking  of  backs 
and  seams  at  the  bend  of  the  heel,  he  says :  There  is 
a  constant  recurrence  of  this  evil — an  evil  easy  to 
remedy  if  taken  at  the  proper  time.  There  is  no  part 
of  a  boot  subject  to  a  greater  strain  in  walking  and 
in  putting  on  and  off  the  foot  than  the  back  seam  and 
its  immediate  surroundings  just  above  the  stiffening. 
In  a  high-leg  boot  the  strain  is  even  more  pronounced 
than  in  a  lower  cut — say  5^  to  6  inches.  This  is  eas- 
ily understood  when  you  consider  the  mechanical 
principle  in  which  a  long  lever  exerts  more  power  than 
a  short — hence  a  high  leg  exerts  more  strain  than  a 
short  leg  boot — all  the  more  noticeable  in  this  day  of 
high-tops. 

A  simple  remedy,  if  adopted,  would  almost  entirely 
remove  the  cause  of  so  much  damage  in  every  class 
of  boot.  In  closing  the  back  seam  add  a  double  or  sec- 
ond row  as  far  as  the  strained  portion  extends — the 
second  row  quite  close  to  the  first,  or  in  the  same 
holes.  This  will  cause  a  slight  increase  of  seam  at 
the  heel  bend,  but  if  sewn  the  proper  distance  from 
the  edge  and  properly  rubbed  down  it  will  not  be  no- 
ticeable in  the  finished  boot.  In  addition  to  the  out- 
side back  strap,  or  inside  seam  stay,  put  a  reinforce 
of  good  drill — such  as  is  used  for  boot  lining — a  semi- 
heart  shaped  piece  2^^  to  3  inches  wide  at  the  top 
and  to  4  inches  long,  gradually  tapering  to  a  point 
at  the  bottom.  This  should  be  sewn  in  with  the  back- 
strap  or  inside  stay  stitching.  The  warp  of  the  ma- 
terial should  run  in  line  with  the  back  seam  so  that 
its  fullest  strength  is  assured  and  should  be  lasted  in 
with  the  stiffening.   In  placing,  the  reinforcing  ma- 


terial may  be  cemented  to  the  quarters  or  held  in  jjlace 
by  the  stitcher. 

Should  the  stitching  at  the  back  of  the  foxing  wear 
off  at  the  surface,  or  give,  the  reinforcing  which  is 
placed  between  the  lining  and  the  outside  and  lasted 
in.  at  the  seat,  keeps  the  parts  in  place  and  prevents 
the  stretching  and  displacing  which  otherwise  occurs. 

This  is  not  an  innovation,  as  the  writer  has  used 
the  method  for  nearly  50  years  and  would  not  consider 
a  pair  of  boots,  for  which  he  is  responsible,  safe  with- 

<f.„  ,„i  „„  „„  „„  „„  ,„,  m,  „„  ,„,  ,„,  „.  „„  m  ,ui  ,„i  m,  

1 

1 


"Foot  Films" — a  new  bedroom  slipper  made 
by  L.  B.  Evans'  Son  Co.,  Wakefield,  Mass. 
This  slipper,  on  account  of  being  made  with- 
out a  last,  is  finished  in  the  fitting  room  and 
the  overhead  expense  is  very  low.  Comes  in 
brown  and  black  kid. 


out  it.  He  strongly  urges  its  general  adoption  as  a 
really  worth-while  knack  of  '"Ye  Olde  Time  Shoe- 
maker." 

Heels  Pulling  Off  Skating  Boots 

Another  point  raised  by  our  correspondent  is  the 
matter  of  heels  pulling  off  skating  boots.  Now,  he 
says,  is  the  winter  of  the  shoe  dealer's  discontent.  He 
is  continually  annoyed  and  harrassed  by  the  heels 
pulling  oft"  skating  boots.  He  is  held  responsible,  but 
is  not  to  blame,  because  the  manufacturer  has  failed 
to  secure  the  heels  properh^  In  this  connection  man- 
ufacturers should  follow  that  old  motto — "Anything 
worth  doing  is  worth  doing  well."  Their  experts 
should  visit  among  the  shoe  retailers  and  shoemakers 
finding  out  in  just  what  way  their  shoes  are  lacking — 
not  in  appearance  to  the  eye,  but  in  wearing  quality. 
Remedial  measures  should  be  applied  to  shortcomings 
so  discovered.  I  may  state  here  that  shoe  manufac- 
turers and  superintending  staft's  are  not  sufficiently 
brought  face  to  face  with  the  defects  in  their  product. 
The  shoes  are  disposed  of  by  dealers  at  a  distance  from 
the  factory.  As  considerable  time  and  expense  is  in- 
volved the  dealers  chooses  what  he  considers  the  less- 
er evil  and  "fixes  it  up"  with  his  customer,  thus  with- 
holding manv  valuable  object  lessons  from  the  factorv 
staff. 

With  regard  to  skating  boots  I  may  say  that  al- 
though the  heels  are  apparently  secured  by  the  addi- 
tion of  an  extra  number  of  flathead  nails  which  ap- 
pear to  be  driven  through  the  heel  and  clinched  on 
the  insole,  I  have  found  through  many  investigations 
that  the  nails  are  not  long  enough  to  clinch  on  the 
insole — thus  leaving  the  heel  insecure  at  the  founda- 
tion. 


44 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


February,  191i) 


Merchants  Discuss  Reforms 

THE  annual  convention  of  tlie  Retail  Merchants' 
Association  of  Canada,  (Eastern  Ontario  and  Ot- 
tawa district),  was  held  in  Ottawa  recently,  the 
following-  officers  being'  elected  for  the  ensuing 

year. 

Mr.  H.  Watters,  Ottawa,  president:  Mr.  L.  N.  Pou- 
lin,  Ottawa,  first  vice-president;  Mr.  D.  V.  Sinclaii, 
Belleville,  second  vice-president;  Mr.  T.  W.  Collins, 
Ottawa,  treasurer;  Mr.  D.  V.  Sinclair,  auditor;  Mr.  J. 
C.  Campbell,  Ottawa,  secretary. 

Three  resolutions  formed  the  principal  topics  for 
conversation.  The  first  of  these  had  to  do  with  the 
subject  of  taxation  and  the  recommendation  contained 
was  that  "if  any  change  be  made  in  the  Assessment  Act 
reducing  the  percentage  on  the  business  tax,  that  the 
percentage  be  reduced,  as  far  as  the  retail  trade  is  con- 
cerned, from  25,  30  and  35  per  cent,  to  a  flat  rate  of  10 
per  cent,  in  all  provinces." 

The  second  resolution  dealt  with  the  cjuestion  of 
wholesalers  selling  at  retail.  It  impressed  upon  the 
Dominion  executive  "the  necessity  of  taking  some  de- 
finite and  prompt  action  at  once,  so  as  to  prevent  a 
large  number  of  wholesale  merchants  from  selling 
goods  direct  to  the  consumer." 

The  third  resolution  urged  upon  the  Provincial 
Board  the  necessity  of  securing,  if  possible,  a  Small 
Debt  Court  for  Ontario.  In  this  connection  Mr.  Trow- 
ern  stated  that  some  such  leg^islation  as  is  in  force  in 
Quebec  would  meet  the  situation,  as  it  would  jarovide 
means  whereby  the  small  debtor  would  be  able  to  pay 
into  the  court  a  stipulated  amount  every  week  and  this 
could  be  applied  pro  rata  in  payment  of  his  obligations. 

All  of  these  resolutions  were  adopted. 


Presentation  to  Mr.  C.  E.  Lepinay 

THE  approaching  marriage  of  Mr.  C.  E.  Lepinay, 
of  Legace  &  Lepinay,  Quebec,  with  Miss  Bertha 
Boutin,  was  the  occasion  of  a  gathering  of  tan- 
ners, leather  and  findings  men  in  the  office  of  Mr. 
J.  A.  Scott,  on  January  24,  when  a  very  complete  and 
handsome  cabinet  of  silverware  was  presented  to  Mr. 
Lepinay.  It  may  be  assumed  that  any  gathering  of  this 
nature  in  Mr.  Scott's  office  is  carried  through  with  his 
characteristic  thoroughness.  The  capacious  office  lent 
itself  to  just  such  an  occasion.  After  drinking  the  toast 
to  the  bride  and  bridegroom,  there  was  a  round  of 
speechmaking,  practically  everyone  contributing  to  this 
l)art  of  the  proceedings.  The  business  acumen  of  Mr. 
Lepinay  was  dwelt  on,  while  naturally  there  were  con- 
gratulations on  his  approaching  marriage.  Mr.  E.  J. 
Ilolliday,  representing  Footwear  in  Canada,  compli- 
mented the  trade  on  having  such  a  spirit  of  good  fel- 
lowshi])  that  they  could  gather  so  happily  on  such  oc- 
casions. 

There  was  an  abundant  supply  of  good  things  in 
the  way  of  refreshments.  Mr.  Lucien  Borne  being  in 
chief  charge  of  this  department.  No  gathering  of  this 
nature  is  com])lete  without  Mr.  J.  A.  Scott  singing 
"Allouette."   This  he  did  in  great  style. 

After  the  marriage  ceremony  Mr.  Lepinay  and  his 
bride  sailed  for  Europe. 

It  may  l)e  noted  that  Mr.  Scott  has  in  course  of  con- 
struction above  his  office,  club  rooms  for  such  gather- 
ings as  the  one  referred  to  and  where  the  Quebec 
leather  and  shoe  men  may  always  feel  at  home. 

The  following  firms  were  represented:  Messrs. 


Edg.  Clement,  Ltd.,  Wilfrid  Cantin,  J.  A.  Cloutier, 
J.  VI.  Lamantagne,  P.  Dugal  &  Matte,  Regd.,  U.  Des- 
laurier,  J.  &  S.  Pouliot,  Richard  Freres,  Jos.  Lalib- 
erte,  Pierre  Blouin,  Regd.,  Breithaupt  Leather  Co., 
Ltd.,  Edg.  Shee,  Dupree  &  Garant,  W.  Blais.  O.  Sam- 


Mr.  C.  E.  Lepinay 


son,  A.  Cote,  J.  P.  Parent,  Alfred  Boivin,  J.  A.  Scott, 
Naz.  Fortier  &  Co.,  A.  Racine  &  Freres,  and  Lucien 
Borne. 


Tanning  Sealskin  in  British  Columbia 

MOST  of  the  leather  used  by  the  big  boot-mak- 
ing establishment  of  the  J  .  Leckie  Company, 
Vancouver,  is  tanned  in  a  plant  in  South 
Westminster.  Leckie  boots  are  known  par- 
ticularly well  in  the  West  for  their  splendid  wearing 
qualities.  They  are  manufactured  in  various  styles — 
men's  and  boys' — and  the  company  state  that  the  de- 
mand is  greater  than  the  capacity  of  the  factory.  The 
close  proximity  of  the  tannery  is  advantageous,  not 
only  in  supplying  leather  to  the  factory  promptly,  but 
also  in  trying  out  new  raw  materials  that  may  be  se- 
cured in  the  province  and  on  the  northern  Pacific  coast. 
A  recent  development  is  the  tanning  of  seal  hides — not 
the  valuable  fur  seal,  but  what  is  called  the  hair  seal, 
found  in  abundance  on  the  Pacific  coast.  The  hide  is 
well  adapted  for  boot  purposes,  being  of  good  weight 
and  highly  waterproof.  It  tans  into  a  pale  colored 
leather  which  many  shoe  men  designate  "pearl."  Some 
very  excellent  seal  leather  is  turned  out  at  the  New 
Westminster  tannery  which  is  located  on  the  south 
bank  of  the  Eraser,  across  the  river  from  the  city. 

The  skin  of  the  whale  has  also  been  tried  out  but 
the  cost  of  preparation  was  found  too  great  to  permit 
the  leather  to  be  used  commercially.  It  is,  however,  of 
great  strength  and  doubtless  some  use  will  be  eventu- 
ally found  for  it.  The  hide  of  the  white  elk,  one  of  the 
species  of  deer  found  in  British  Columbia,  is  also  used. 


Shoe  manufacturers  all  seem  to  be  fairly  busy  al- 
though a  prominent  tanner  of  sole  leather  remarked 
the  other  day  that  they  are  buying  on  a  hand-to-mouth 
basis,  possibly  anticipating  lower  prices,  which,  in  his 
opinion,  cannot  be  looked  for  this  year. 


February,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


45 


Breithaupt  Leather  Co.  Expanding 

AS  indicating-  to  some  extent  tlie  confidence  in 
Canada's  future  held  by  the  majority  of  our 
industrial  leaders  it  is  interesting  to  note  that 
the  Breithaupt  Leather  Company,  of  Kitch- 
ener, are  making  preparations  for  a  greatly  extended 
business.  In  addition  to  the  tannery  at  Kitchener,  the 
company  have  plants  at  Penetang",  Hastings  and  Wood- 
stock. The  Kitchener  tannery  has  been  entirely  re- 
arranged within  the  last  few  weeks,  necessitating  an 
increase  in  the  number  of  employees.  The  tannery  at 
Hastings,  which  was  destroyed  by  fire  a  short  time  ago, 
is  being  rebuilt  according  to  the  most  modern  practice 
and  will  be  devoted  to  the  manufacture  of  Trent  Val- 
ley oak  sole  leather.  This  plant  will  be  operated  from 
power  generated  at  the  company's  own  plant  on  the 
Trent  River. 

With  the  completion  of  additions  and  improvements 
in  the  four  tanneries,  the  Breithaupt  Company  will  be 
able  to  handle  over  twenty-two  hundred  sides  a  day. 
The  Kitchener  tannery  will  manufacture  hemlock  and 
oak ;  the  Penetang  plant  will  turn  out  the  well  known 
"Penetang"  hemlock  brand  and  the  Woodstock  tan- 
nery will  manufacture  "Royal"  oak. 

The  distribution  of  sole  leather  to  the  shoe  fac- 
tories is  usually  made  in  full  sides,  crops,  backs  or 
bends,  but  where  the  demand  is  for  cut  soles,  these  are 
supplied  by  the  Provincial  Cut  Sole  Company,  under 
the  supervision  of  Messrs.  Paige  and  Hoye.  Practic- 
ally all  shipments  of  leather  are  made  from  the  com- 
pany's warehouses  in  Kitchener. 

The  business  was  established  in  1857  by  the  late 
Louis  Breithaupt,  father  of  Messrs.  L.  J.  and  J.  C. 
Breithaupt,  president  and  secretary-treasurer,  respect- 
ively, of  the  company.  Some  years  before  moving  to 
the  hamlet  that  was  then  called  Berlin,  the  late  Louis 
Breithaupt  used  to  accompany  his  father  periodically 
from  Bviffalo  to  Ontario  to  buy  hides.  (Seven  gener- 
ations of  the  Breithaupt  family,  by  the  way,  have  fol- 
lowed the  tanning-  business.)  Buying  hides  was  quite 
a  different  matter  in  the  days  of  1850  to  what  it  is  now. 
In  those  pioneer  days,  when  there  were  very  few  rail- 
roads and  when  the  modern  means  of  communication 
were  in  their  infancy,  horse-back  and  tramping  over  the 
trail  on  foot  through  forest  and  swamps,  or  crude 
wagons  over  miles  of  narrow  lanes  through  the  tim- 
bered stretches  of  country  were  the  common  ways  of 
travelling  between  here  and  Bufifalo.  And  the  journey 
was  not  made  over  night  as  it  is  to-day.  Weeks  were 
required  to  go  back  and  forth. 

The  young  tanner  came  here  and  went  to  the  pion- 
eer hewer  of  timber  on  the  homestead  and  bought 
hides.  There  were  calf,  sheep  and  in  fact  all  kinds, 
which  he  purchased  and  took  to  Buffalo.  On  the  re- 
turn trip  from  Bufiralo  be  brought  back  leather  which 
was  tanned  from  the  hides  which  had  been  collected 
in  this  way.  His  venture  was  a  success  and  soon  he 
opened  a  little  room  where  now  is  the  office  of  the 
president  of  the  company  in  the  big  offices  on  North 
Queen  Street.  There  being  free-trade  in  those  years 
the  business  kept  on  growing  and  in  1857  he  entertain- 
ed the  idea  of  establishing  a  tannery  here  and  m^iu- 
facturing  leather.  Thus  was  the  business  launched 
which  has  grown  from  a  small  beginning  to  the  pre- 
sent large  proportions. 

In  summing  up  the  reasons  for  the  changes  now 
being  made  the  company  express  their  complete  faith 
in  the  growth  and  prosperity  of  Canada ;  there  will 


without  doubt  be  a  more  steady  and  increasing  devel- 
opment than  ever  before  and  their  desire  now.  as  it 
has  always  been,  is  to  assist  in  the  building  up  of  our 
great  country. 


Popular  Traveller  Passes 

The  death  occurred  recently  of  Mr.  Fred  P.  Beem- 
er,  who  for  the  past  four  years  has  represented  the 
Blachford  Shoe  Manufacturing  Company  in  Western 
Canada.  He  had  just  returned  from  a  successful  trip 
when  he  was  taken  ill.  He  was  a  twin  brother  of  Cap- 
tain Harry  G.  Beemer,  O.C.  of  the  Discharge  Depot  at 
the  Exhibition  Camp,  Toronto.  They  were  born  in 
Brantford  forty-four  years  ago,  their  father  being  in 
the  wholesale  shoe  business  in  Brantford.  Mr.  Beemer 
became  connected  with  J.  D.  King  &  Company,  A.  E. 


The  late  Mr.  F.   P.  Beemer 


Little  and  others  before  joining  forces  with  the  Blach- 
ford Company.  He  was  universally  liked  and  his  place 
in  the  trade  will  be  difficult  to  fill. 


A  New  White  Heel  Finish 

THE  Boston 'Blacking  Company,  of  Cambridge, 
Mass.,  and  Montreal,  Que.,  state  that  their  new 
white  heel  finish,  "Wonder-White,"  is  being 
well  received.  Heretofore,  heel  finishes  were 
all  of  the  same  type,  requiring  rubbing  up  and  finish- 
ing. This  new  product  is  made  in  three  different  forms 
— Nos.  1,  2  and  3 — the  No.  1  finish  requiring  no  other 
work  than  that  of  applying  it,  and  drying  with  the 
bright  finish  so  necessary  on  some  types' of  shoes.  No. 
2  finish  is  applied  in  the  same  way,  requiring  no  rub- 
bing up  and  drying  with  a  semi-bright  lustre.  No.  3 
finish  dries  very  dull  and  is  graded  to  produce  any 
dull  effect  required.  For  unglazed  shoes  the  No.  3  fin- 
ish is  particularly  suitable.  The  Boston  Blacking  Com- 
pany state  that  "Wonder-White"  is  more  elastic,  hard- 
ens so  that  it  becomes  part  of  the  heel,  firmly  clinging 
to  the  leather  or  wood,  and  will  not  chip  even  with 
hard  usage.  Another  decided  advantage  is  the  ease 
with  which  it  can  be  cleaned  with  soap  and  water 
without  injury— just  as  often  as  the  wearer  of  the  shoe 
desires. 


46 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


February,  1911) 


m 


How  to  Organize  a  Repair  Department 

An  Address  by  John  Baird,  of  Columbus,  Ohio, 
Before  the  National  Shoe  Retailers'  Convention 


IN  considering  the  growth  of  the  repair  department 
and  how  to  organize  it,  a  number  of  things  must 
be  borne  in  mind  if  the  organization  and  growth 
are  to  be  of  a  substantial  nature. 
Paramount  in  importance  is  the  securing  of  experi- 
enced factory  trained  men  ;  men  who  will  not  be  con- 
tent to  have  a  job  leave  their  hands  looking  "cobbled," 
but  rather  those  who  will  attempt  to  judge  the  finish  of 
their  work  by  modern  factory  standards. 

Next  in  importance  is  equipment.  And  under  this 
heading  we  should  expect  to  include  every  modern 
device  known  to  the  trade  for  the  purpose  of  saving 
labor  or  improving  the  finish  of  the  work.  The  days  of 
the  old  fashioned  hammer  and  awl  cobbler  are  gone. 
It  is  interesting  to  make  a  comparison  of  the  job  turned 
out  by  the  old  timer  and  the  neat,  well  finished  work 
that  leaves  the  average  modern  shoe  repair  shop.  The 
smoky  oil  lamp,  the  old  fashioned  burnishing  iron  and 
the  wood  edge  stick  are  poor,  substitutes  for  the  modern 
edge  setter  and  burnishing  wheel. 

Quality  Must  Be  Considered. 

Next,  we  should  consider  quality  of  materials.  We 
have  found  in  our  business  that  quality  pays.  You  can 
not  get  good  results  out  of  poor  soles  on  the  stock  you 
sell,  then  why  should  you  expect  to  get  good  results 
out  of  poor  sole  leather  in  the  shoe  repair  department? 
Silk  thread  for  patching  and  work  on  uppers,  linen 
thread  for  sole  stitching,  high  quality  burnishing  inks, 
waxes  and  cements  pay  big  dividends  in  satisfied  cus- 
tomers. 

And  please  do  not  forget  that  you  are  entitled  to  a 
legitimate  profit  on  every  job.  It  takes  money  to  run 
a  shoe  repair  factory,  and  your  profits  can  safely  be 
figured  on  about  the  same  basis  as  your  store  profits. 
Many  dealers  have  tried  to  run  their  repair  depart- 
ments on  such  a  close  margin  that  the  line  of  demarca- 
tion between  profit  and  loss  has  been  so  faint  that  the 
repair  department  could  not  be  a  paying  proposition. 
This  is  foolish  and  unnecessary.  The  public  will  pay 
a  fair  price  for  service  rendered.  It  is,  of  course,  neces- 
sary to  make  this  service  of  such  a  high  order  that  a 
difYerence  in  price,  if  such  a  thing  exists,  will  be  a 
matter  of  small  consequence.  Quality  pays  in  the  re- 
l)air  game  as  in  anything  else. 

Advertising  the  Repair  Shop  Important. 

When  business  is  dull  and  you  want  to  stimulate  it 
the  most  natural  thing  to  think  of  is  advertising.  The 
fact  is  when  you  make  up  your  mind  to  stimulate  busi- 
ness under  any  and  all  conditions  your  mind  naturally 
turns  to  advertising.  And,  let  me  say  right  here,  that 
in  this  respect  the  shoe  repair  department  is  often  neg- 
lected. Now  there  is  no  real  reason  for  this  neglect. 
If  your  money  is  tied  up  in  leather  and  findings  and 
shoe  equipment,  it  is  just  as  necessary  for  you  to  make 
that  money  produce  for  you  as  it  is  the  money  invested 
in  your  shoe  stock.  To  all  intents  and  purposes  the 
proposition  is  similar.    And,  besides,  your  repair  shop 


is  an  essential  part  of  your  business,  and  deserves  the 
same  attention  and  the  same  nursing  along  accorded 
your  store.  Many  a  customer  has  been  made  for  the 
store  by  doing  some  difficult  job  of  repairing  in  a  satis- 
factory way.  So  let  us  not  forget  that  the  successful 
organization  and  operation  of  this  department  requires 
advertising.  There  are  many  good  ways  in  which  this 
can  be  done.  The  newspapers  are  effective,  and  you 
can  probably  reach  more  people  through  them  at  a 
given  price  than  in  any  other  way. 

Package  inserts  are  good,. and  they  reach  the  home 
of  your  customers.  But  the  objection  to  this  method 
IS  that  they  do  not  widen  your  sphere.  You  make  an 
appeal  for  additional  business  to  people  who  already 
trade  with  you,  so  taking  it  all  in  all,  the  newspa])er 
advertisement  is  the  most  effective. 

Good  Work  Advertises  Itself 

A  shoemaker  who  can  do  a  neat  job  putting  new 
counters  in  a  shoe  or  new  toe-boxes,  one  who  can  turn 
out  a  fir.st-class  job  of  cutting  a  shoe  down  at  the  top, 
or  putting  in  a  "V"  successfully  and  to  the  customer's 
entire  satisfacttion  is  bound  to  popularize  a  repair  shop 
with  the  people  in  its  vicinity.  Women  have  acquired 
a  habit  lately  of  having  heels  changed.  Unless  you  can 
turn  out  a  good  job  of  this  kind  you  are  overlooking  a 
big  opportunity,  for  a  good  shoemaker  will  do  this  work 
so  well  that  you  will  be  advertised  by  the  people  with 
whom  you  deal. 

Your  equipment  must  be  right  to  enable  you  to 
make  money.  Many  valuable  minutes  are  saved  by  the 
new  devices  with  which  you  are  familiar,  and  who  will 
deny  that  a  machine  stitched  sole  and  the  machine  edge 
and  heel  finish  is  superior  to  the  old  fashioned  method? 
As  for  materials — get  the  best,  and  charge  accordingly. 
It  is  poor  business  to  put  in  a  dollar's  worth  of  labor 
on  a  nickel's  worth  of  material.  We  have  found  that  it 
is  no  trouble  to  secure  a  price  for  repairing  that  is  ade- 
quate and  that  justifies  the  use  of  the  best  of  leathers 
and  findings.  Results  count — always — and  when  cus- 
tomers get  good  results  from  your  work  they  will  en- 
tertain kindly  feelings  towards  your  store,  and  as  we 
all  know  good  will  is  our  most  valuable  asset." 


Repairers'  Banquet  in  March 

THE  Toronto  Shoe  Repairers'  Association  held  a 
well-attended  meeting  in  their  rooms  in  For- 
ester's Hall  on  Thursday,  January  23,  with  Mr. 
J.  W.  Hendry,  the  new  president,  wielding  the 
gavel.  A  considerable  amount  of  routine  business  was 
taken  up  and  the  question  of  the  Association's  annual 
ba'hquet  was  discussed.  The  date  for  this  has  been 
fixed  for  March  5th,  which  ,falls  on  Wednesday,  and 
the  place  will  be  the  Carls-Rite  Hotel,  corner  Front 
and  Simcoe  .streets.  Last  year  the  banquet  room  was 
found  to  be  too  long  and  narrow,  but  this  year  the 
committee  selected  a  place  that  will  be  suitable  from 
every  standpoint. 


February,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


47 


Shoe  Repairers'  Show  Windows 

IT  is  a  very  noticeable  and  regrettable  fact  that 
shoe  repairers'  display  windows  are,  in  about  five 
cases  out  of  ten,  dirty,  untidy  and  generally  re- 
pellant.  Is  it  because  shoe  repairers  have  all  the 
business  they  can  handle  or  because  they  under-esti- 
mate  the  value  of  a  "clean  front"  ?  If  for  the  former 
reason  there  is  certainly  a  grievous  lack  of  foresight 
evidenced  in  deliberately  overlooking  opportunities 
to  build  a  foundation  for  future  business.  But  per- 
haps it  is  the  latter  reason — the  value  of  the  window 
is  not  appreciated.  Every  repairer  knows,  however, 
that  a  dirty  motor  will  not  pull ;  if  his  machinery  is 
sticky  and  gummy  it  will  be  lacking  "pep" — if  he  has 
an  automobile  he  knows  the  aggravation  of  a  dirty 
engine. 

And  there  isn't  any  more  "pull"  to  a  dirty  window 
than  there  is  to  a  dirty  engine. 

Of  all  the  shopkeepers  on  the  face  of  the  earth,  the 
shoe  repairer  seems  to  be  the  most  careless  of  his 
personal  appearance  and  the  appearance  of  his  store. 
A  diamond  in  the  rough  assuredly,  but  even  a  dia- 
mond is  more  valuable  when  properly  cut  and  set. 


Hamilton  Repairers  Elect  New  Officers 

AT  the  annual  meeting  of  the  Hamilton  Repair- 
men's Asociation,  on  January  2,  the  election 
of  officers  for  the  coming  year  resulted  as  fol- 
lows :  J.  Jarvis,  president ;  A.  Miller,  vice-pre- 
sident ;  A.  R.  Wilton,  secretary-treasurer ;  Messrs.  Jar- 
vis,  Tebbs  and  Wilman,  executive  committee.  Mr.  J. 
Ross,  the  retiring  president,  spoke  of  the  work  of  the 
Association  during  the  past  year,  emphasizing  that 
their  splendid  feeling  of  fellowship  had  been  a  good 
thing  for  them  all.  He  referred  also  to  the  outings 
they  had  enjoyed — the  annual  picnic  at  Niagara  Falls, 
the  visit  of  the  Toronto  repairers  and  so  on.  On  tak- 
ing' the  chair,  Mr.  Jarvis  clearly  announced  his  inten- 
tion of  making  things  hum  during  the  coming  year. 


Repairers  Should  More  Than  Ever  Look  to 
Their  Service 

THE  other  day  we  heard  a  shoe  repairer  com- 
plaining because  business  was  quiet.  This  is 
not  unnatural.  With  the  war  over,  people  are 
not  so  keen  about  having  their  footwear  re- 
paired and,  whether  or  not  shoes  in  the  retail  stores 
are  any  cheaper,  we  believe  the  feeling  exists  with 
many  people  that  it  is  no  longer  necessary  to  practice 
such  rigid  economies  with  their  wearing  apparel. 

Now,  the  point  we  have  been  hammering  on  con- 
tinually for  the  last  year  or  so,  is  that  shoe  repairers 
should  have  anticipated  the  very  condition  that  now 
exists  in  many  quarters — a  very  sudden  and  serious 
falling  off  in  trade.  The  repair  shops,  we  said,  must 
be  placed  on  a  par  with  other  business  establishments. 
The  dirty  windows  must  be  cleaned  and  kept  clean ; 
the  windows  must  be  attractively  dressed  and  changed 
at  frequent  intervals ;  the  untidy  and  mussy  shops 
must  be  cleaned  out  and  the  repairer  must  more  con- 
sistently endeavor  to  sell  the  idea  of  shoe  repair  ser- 
vice. And  yet  is  there  any  shoe  repairer  in  the  Do- 
minion who  can  write  us  and  say  that  he  has  consci- 
entiously prepared  for  this  after-war  period  ? 

You  may  have  advertised,  or  you  may  intend  to 
advertise,  but  what  is  the  use  of  advertising  if  you  do 


not  look  the  part?  You  yourself  would  hardly  expect 
a  slovenly  workman  to  live  up  to  the  claim  that  his 
work  was  the  acme  of  neatness  and  perfection. 

A  repair  shop  has  just  one  thing  to  sell  and  that's 
shoe  repair  service.  The  shop  that  sells  poor  service 
is  a  poor  shop.  The  shop  that  sells  good  service  is 
a  good  shop.  And  good  service  implies  a  clean  shop, 
clean  windows  and  general  neatness.  Therefore,  it 
should  be  the  object  of  every  repairman  to  sell  his  cus- 
tomers the  very  best  service  and  the  very  cleanest 
service  possible.  The  public  soon  gets  to  know  which 
are  the  poor  shops  and  which  are  the  good  ones,  and 
the  good  shops  are  least  likely  to  suffer  during  any 
trade  relaxation. 


A  report  from  Haverhill  indicates  an  increasing 
demand  for  patent  leather  in  moderate  priced  shoes. 


Don't  Throw  Away 
Your  Old  Shoes 

Give  them  a  new  lease  on  life,  an- 
other chance  to  serve  you. 
Just  because  the  heels  are  run 
down  at  the  corners  or  the  soles 
are  worn  to  tissue-thickness,  does 
not  mean  that  their  possibilities 
are  exhausted. 

Bring  them  to  us,  and  we  will 
make  them  fit  for  many  more 
months  of  service.  We'll  call  for 
them  if  you  wish,  and  send  them 
right  back — strong,  shapely,  and 
comfortable  again. 

Modern  Shoe  Hospital 


Suggestion  for  Shoe  Repair  Advertisement. 


FOOTWEAR    IN     CANADA  February,  1919 


Ames,  Holden's  New  General  Sales  Manager 

MR.  CHESTER  F.  CRAIGU^,  who  has  been 
appointed  general  sales  manager  of  Ames, 
Holden,  McCready,  Ltd.,  IMontreal,  in  suc- 
cession to  the  late  Mr.  Roy  Dildine,  was  liorn 
in  Rochester,  N.  Y.  He  graduated  from  Rochester 
University  in  1906,  and  while  going  through  the  col- 
lege course  joined  the  reporting  staft  of  the  Rochester 
Herald.  Later  he  became  the  city  editor  of  the  Roch- 
ester Post  &  Express,  and  in  1909  was  appointed  ad- 
vertising manager  of  Utz  &  Dunn,  shoe  manufacturers, ' 
Rochester,  later  having  charge  of  the  firm's  "in  stock" 
department.  Li  1913  he  went  with  Rice  &  Hutchins, 
Inc.,  Boston,  as  manager  of  the  Educative  Sales  De- 
partment, and  during  his  connection  with  that  firm, 
came  in  contact  with  some  of  the  largest  retailers  in 
the  United  States.  He  stayed  in  Boston  until  last 
August,  when  he  was  appointed  advertising  manager 
and  assistant  sales  manager  for  Ames,  Holden,  Mc- 
Cready, Limited,  Montreal,  the  late  Mr.  Dildine  at  that 
time  succeeding  Mr.  Feltes,  as  general  manager  and 
general  sales  manager.  Following  the  death  of  Mr. 
Dildine,  Mr.  Craigie  was  appointed,  on  January  1st, 
general  sales  manager  of  the  company. 


Scholl  Salesmen  Meet  in  Annual  Session 

THE  annual  Eastern  and  Western  salesmen's 
convention  of  the  Scholl  Mfg.  Co.,  the  well- 
known  foot  comfort  a])pliance  manufacturers, 
were  held  simultaneously  in  Chicago  and  New 
York,  Dec.  26-31-.  Those  present  at  the  Chicago 
meeting  were  salesmen  from  territory  west  of  Pitts- 
burgh, and  including  Canada.  The  eastern  represen- 
tatives met  at  the  New  York  office,  where  the  session 
was  directed  by  J.  K.  Ingalls,  Eastern  Manager. 

Great  interest  attached  to  the  address  by  Dr.  Wm. 
M.  Scholl,  president  of  the  Company,  who  outlined 
plans  for  1919  before  both  conventions.  "We  con- 
sider," said  Dr.  Scholl,  "that  we  are  selling  the  deal- 
er not  simply  foot  comfort  appliances,  but  a  service 
that  will  help  him  to  be  a  better  shoe  merchant  and 
business  man.  Therefore  the  keynote  of  our  campaign 
will  be  'Co-operation.' 

"'You  must  give  the  shoe  dealer,"  continued  Dr. 
Scholl,  "such  information  as  will,  in  addition  to  per- 
mitting him  to  more  readily  fit  his  customers,  enable 
him  to  correct  their  foot  troubles  and  show  them  how 
to  prevent  their  recurrence.  Do  this  and  your  dealer 
will  stand  head  and  shoulders  above  his  competitors. 
Through  the  Scholl  course  in  Practipedics — the  sci- 
ence of  foot  comfort,  this  essential  information  is  ex- 
tended to  the  dealer  and  his  clerks,  increasing  their 
earning  ])ower  by  developing  their  sales  ability. 

"For  1919,"  said  Dr.  .Scholl,  "we  have  prepared  a 


number  of  the  leading 
Beyond  this  we  expect 


most  comprehensive  advertising  campaign,  which 
through  the  use  of  national  mediums  of  large  circula- 
tion, will  be  of  a  dominant  character.  A  most  import- 
ant feature  of  our  advertising  will  be  that  directed  to 
physicians.  Full  pages  in  a 
medical  journals  will  be  used, 
to  co-operate  with  the  dealers  even  more  closely  than 
ever  before. 

"This  co-operative  work,"  he  continued,  "will  be 
directed  by  the  new  Department  of  Sales  Promotion. 
.\  monthly  dealer  service  will  provide  the  dealer  Avith 
window  trims,  electros  for  use  in  his  newspaper,  and 
circular  advertising,  lantern  slides,  booklets  and  cir- 
culars, and  form  letters  which  he  may  have  multi- 
graphed  to  send  to  his  trade." 

In  conclusion.  Dr.  Scholl  stated  that  while  1918  had 
been  a  banner  year  for  the  house,  he  confidently  ex- 
pected that  it  would  be  over-shadowed  by  1919,  "for," 
said  he,  "the  dealer  who  avails  himself  of  the  service 
we  ofifer  will  build  prestige  along  with  business,  and 
so  attract  the  best  trade  of  his  community. 

D.  W.  Landon,  treasurer  of  the  company,  spoke 
on  "Salesmanship  and  Its  Relation  to  Trade."  He  em- 
]:)hasized  the  importance  of  salesmen  impressing  on 
the  customers  the  fact  that  the  Scholl  line  is  so  com- 
plete it  is  unnecessary  to  stock  up  with  a  variety  of 
other  lines.  Other  speakers  and  a  general  discussion 
followed  Mr.  Landon's  .address. 


Heel  Company  Expanding 

The  Fred  W.  IMears  Wood  Heel  Company,  of  Hav- 
erhill, Mass.,  have  recently  taken  over  the  plant  of  the 
City  Slipper  Wood  Heel  Company.  This  addition 
will  give  the  Mears  Wood  Heel  Company  double  their 
former  capacity,  making  them  one  of  the  largest  wood 
heel  producers  in  the  country. 


New  Slater  Catalogue 

An  advance  copy  of  the  Slater  Shoe  Company's 
new  catalogue  has  just  come  to  hand.'  Each  page  shows 
a  cut  of  a  slate,  and  a  cut  of  a  shoe  is  displayed  pro- 
minently showing  through  the  slate.  The  booklet  is 
printed  in  colors,  and  the  slate  trade  mark  is  made 
good  use  of.  In  all  over  forty  lines  of  in-stock  goods 
are  shown- 


A  large  Toronto  manufacturer  of  women's  fine 
footwear  says  there  will  be  no  reduction  in  prices  this 
year — as  a  matter  of  fact  there  may  be  increases  on 
some  lines.  He  has  plenty  of  orders  on  hand. 


The  value  of  cut  price  advertising  is  far  less  than 
that  which  shows  a  business  built  on  stability  of  prices 
and  merchandise. 


I 


Convention  of  Eastern  and  Western  Scholl  Salesmen — The  gathering  at  Chicago 


 «.—..—...—»+ 


February,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


49 


New  Neolin  Directory 

THE  Goodyear  Tire  and  Rubber  Company  of 
Canada,  Limited,  Toronto,  have  just  issued  a 
unique  directory,  the  title  of  which  is  "Where 
to  Buy  Neolin  Shoes  for  Them  All."  The 
company  state  that,  in  spite  of  the  fact  that  Neolin  is 
being  used  generally  by  most  manufacturers,  the  im- 
pression has  prevailed  that  this  sole  was  applicable 
only  to  a  limited  number  of  styles  of  shoes.  They, 


therefore,  wrote  to  all  the  manufacturers  in  Canada 
and  asked  them  to  write  about  their  attitude.  This 
booklet  contains  the  replies  that  were  received  and 
also  a  separate  list  of  93  Canadian  shoe  manufacturers 
who  use  Neolin  on  all  classes  of  shoes.  The  directory 
will  be  sent  to  any  retailer  on  request,  together  with  a 
copy  of  the  Neolin  Style  Book,  which  shows  cuts  of 
different  Neolin-soled  styles. 


Scholl  Film  Attracts  Attention 

DEALERS  attending  the  National  Retail  Shoe 
Association  convention  at  St.  Louis,  January 
6,  7  and  8th  were  much  interested  in  the  ex- 
hibit of  the  Scholl  Mfg.  Co.,  at  the  Statler  Ho- 
tel. A  very  complete  display  was  made  of  the  full 
Scholl  line  of  appliances  and  remedies,  but  the  feature 
that  attracted  the  most  attention  was  the  moving  pic- 
ture film,  which  was  run  on  a  screen  every  thirty- 
minutes,  all  day  long.  The  reel  is  250  feet  long  and 
requires  about  four  and  a  half  minutes  to  run  oft'.  It 
was  filmed  on  the  famous  Michigan  Boulevard,  Chi- 
cago, and  first  shows  the  crowds  of  pedestrians.  "Close- 
ups"  are  shown  of  the  busy  boule\-ardiers'  feet  as 
they  pass  to  and  fro,  and  then  we  see  a  fair  maiden 
in  distress,  or  at  least  so  it  would  seem,  from  the  ex- 
pression on  her  face.  She  limps  over  to  one  of  the 
waste  receptacles,  sits  down  on  the  box,  and  loosens 
the  shoe  on  the  painful  foot.  Friendly  -passers-by  di- 
rect her  to  a  near-by  shoe  store,  which  displays  a  full 
line  of  Scholl  appliances  in  the  window.  As  she  enters 
the  film  shows  another  "close-up"  in  which  the  shoe 
salesman  carefully  looks  at  her  foot,  shows  her  what 
is  the  trouble  with  it,  and  how  to  correct  it.  A  Scholl 


Arch-Support  is  fitted  to  her  foot,  and  she  leaves  the 
store  perfectly  satisfied. 

The  film  is  very  interesting,  and  at  the  finish  there 
ap])ears  the  sub-title  "The  Scholl  Foot  Comfort  Ap- 
pliances and  Remedies  are  carried  by   ,"  and  here 

there  is  a  space  left  for  the  insertion  of  the  local  deal- 
er's name.  This  film  will  be  furnished  to  Scholl  deal- 
ers to  run  in  their  moving  picture  theatres,  and  indi- 
cates the  progressive  character  of  the  co-operation 
furnished  by  the  Scholl  Manufacturing  Co. 


Edmonds  Shoe  Company  Increases  Its  Capacity 

The  Edmonds  Shoe  Company,  Milwaukee,  have  re- 
cently increased  their  capacity  200  pairs  per  day.  This 
new  concern  which  was  incorporated  last  June,  is  now 
daily  turning  out  almost  1,300  pairs  of  one  shoe  in  one 
in  one  leather  over  one  last.  Without  any  increase  in 
price  this  firm  is  now  using  a  genuine  full  grain  calf 
skin  of  a  dark,  rich  mahogany  shade.  This  new  leather, 
which  is  of  straight  chrome  tannage,,  is  exceedingly 
popular,  so  much  so  in  fact,  that  this  concern  has  pur- 
chased the  entire  output  of  the  tannery  for  this  one 
shoe  which  it  is  manufacturing.  This  leather  is  known 
as  "Edmo"  full  grain  calf  skin.  A  change  has  also  been 
made  in  the  last,  over  which  the  Edmonds  Everyday 
Shoe  is  i-nade.  The  broad  toe  and  wide  tread  at  the 
ball  of  the  original  Munson  has  been  retained,  but  the 
arch  has  been  raised.  Several  improvements  have  also 
been  made  as  regards  the  pattern.  This  shoe  is  narrow 
and  shapely  at  the  heel  and  follows  the  natural  curva- 
ture of  the  foot  at  the  back- 

Dr.  A.  Reed  Shoe  Dealers  Meet  in  Conference 

f  ■  AKIN(i  advantage  of  the  representative  gather- 
I  ing  of  deleg"ates  attending  the  National  Shoe 
JL  tailers  Association  in  St.  Louis,  the  Dr.  A.  Reed 
shoe  dealers  held  a  meeting  at  the  Hotel  Jef- 
ferson, January  8th.  The  meeting  was  called  by  Mr. 
E.  B.  Steere,  sales  manager  and  a  director  of  the  J.  P. 
Smith  Shoe  Company,  makers  of  the  Dr.  A.  Reed 
shoes  for  men.  For  the  past  two  years  the  John  Eb- 
berts  Co.,  makers  of  Dr.  A.  Reed  shoes  for  women, 
have  conducted  a  forceful  national  advertising  com- 
paign  in  conjunction  with  the  J.  P.  Smith  Shoe  Co., 
and  therefore  both  companies  were  jointly  concerned 
in  this  meeting. 

Man}'  problems  relating  to  the  sale  and  advertising 
of  Dr.  A.  Reed  shoes  were  brought  up,  and  the  dis- 
cussion was  at  all  times  of  the  informal,  "round-table" 
nature.  Such  subjects  as  national  magazine  advertis- 
ing, window  displays,  local  newspaper  publicity,  work- 
ing in  closer  touch  with  retail  shoe  clerks,  and  better 
service  to  customers,  were  talked  about.  S.  J.  Brou- 
wer  of  Milwaukee,  and  Wm.  Pidgeon,  Jr.,  of  Roches- 
ter, N.Y.,  told  of  their  experiences  in  an  interesting 
way,  while  other  dealers  entered  heartily  into  the  con- 
sideration of  various  questions  as  they  arose. 

Much  good  should  come  from  such  a  meeting  since 
an  exchange  of  practical  ideas  among  dealer  and  man- 
ufacturer enables  each  to  form  a  clearer  conception 
of  the  other's  problems. 


A  well-known  Toronto  leather  merchant  states  that 
there  is  no  hope  of  any  reduction  in  the  price  of  kid 
leathers  this  year.  As  a  matter  of  fact  black  kid  shows 
a  slight  advance.  High  and  low  qualities  are  fairly 
plentiful,  but  mediums  are  scarce. 


■(0 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


February,  19t;» 


K 


FOOTWEAR  FINDINGS 


Happenings  in  the  Shoe  and  Leather  Trade  i 

m 

BlElHIlSBHIllglllllSlllllllgllSlllllgllSlillSlllSlSlllglglSl]® 


C.  M.  Hall,  of  Bennett,  Limited,  Montreal,  recently  paid 
a  business  visit  to  Quebec. 

I.  C.  Webster,  representing  the  C.  Moench,  Son  Co., 
leather  manufacturers,  Boston,  has  been  calling  on  the  trade 
in  Montreal. 

Waldo  E.  Stewart,  of  Richard  Young  &  Co.,  Boston, 
leather  manufacturers,  was  recently  on  a  business  trip  to 
Montreal  and  Quebec. 

J.  A.  Sinclair,  of  the  Barrie  Tanning  Co.,  Barrie,  Ont., 
was  among  recent  visitors  to  Montreal,  calling  on  the  trade. 

Mr.  A.  G.  Mooney,  of  the  A.  G.  Mooney  Co.,  Montreal, 
recently  paid  business  visits  to  Quebec  and  Ontario,  and  ap- 
pointed Mr.  E.  r^.  Lewis  representative  for  the  latter  prov- 
ince. Mr.  J.  P.  Parent  represents  the  firm  in  Quebec,  where 
it  is  intended  to  open  a  warehouse,  on  St.  \'alier  Street,  in 
order  to  supply  the  trade  with  promptness. 

Roy  W.  Johnson  has  been  appointed  advertising  man- 
ager for  Ames,  Holden,  McCready,  Ltd.,  Montreal.  Mr. 
Johnson  has  had  many  years'  experience  in  advertising  both 
in  the  United  States  and  in  Canada. 

Walter  Brown,  business  agent  for  the  Boot  and  Shoe 
Workers'  Union,  states  that  the  next  schedule  of.  the  Union, 
to  be  presented  in  April,  will  demand  a  combination  of 
shorter  hours  and  a  ten  per  cent,  increase  in  wages. 

The  City  Footwear  Company,  174  Charlotte  Street,  Peter- 
boro,  recently  advertised  a  winding-up  sale,  owing  to  the 
death  of  their  manager,  Robert  Routly. 

Sewers  in  the  larrigan  factory  of  the  John  Palmer  Com- 
pany, Fredericton,  recently  went  on  strike  for  higher  wages. 
The  company  state  that  the  lowest  average  is  $14.70;  75  per 
cent,  average  $30  and  a  number  earned  up  to  $26.50. 

Ames,  Holden,  McCready,  Ltd.,  Montreal,  held  a  sales 
convention  in  the  week  beginning  February  3.  Various  ques- 
tions relating  to  sales,  advertising,  etc,  were  discussed.  The 
following  were  in  attendance:  Mr.  Chester  F.  Craigie,  gen- 
eral sales  manager,  and  the  following  branch  managers: 
Messrs.  F.  A.  Richardson,  Vancouver;  N.  M.  Lynn,  Edmon. 
ton;  E.  P.  Hall,  Winnipeg;  W.  H.  Pearson,  Toronto;  W.  M. 
Angus,  St.  John;  Ralph  W.  Clark,  Montreal,  together  with 
the  following  special  factory  salesmen:  Messrs.  H.  G.  Mc- 
Cullum,  Winnipeg;  W.  H.  Stagg,  Toronto;  J.  W.  Burt,  Mont- 
real; S.  C.  Mitchell,  St.  John. 

H.  S.  Campbell,  shoe  retailer  and  president  of  the  Fred- 
ericton, N.  B.,  Board  of  Trade,  has  returned  from  a  buying 
trip  to  the  upper  provinces  and  states  that  there  is  little 
likelihood  of  reduced  prices  this  year.  While  it  is  true,  he 
says,  that  there  have  been  some  reductions  in  the  price  of 
materials,  manufacturers  claim  that  these  have  been  more 
than  offset  by  the  increased  cost  of  labor. 

Louis  Klaehn,  foreman  of  the  sole  cutting  department 
of  C.  A.  Ahrens,  Limited,  Kitchener,  died  on  January  15, 
from  influenza.  Mr.  Klaehn  had  been  with  the  company  for 
twenty-four  years. 

P.  Wallace,  formerly  with  Scott-Chamberlain,  Limited, 
London,  has  been  appointed  foreman  of  the  sole  cutting  de- 
partment of  C.  A.  Ahrens,  Limited,  Kitchener. 

J.  C.  Breithaupt.  secretary  of  the  Breithaupt  Leather 
Company,  Kitchener,  Ont.,  has  been  re-elected  by  acclama- 
tion as  Water  Commissioner  for  the  city  of  Kitchener  for 
the  twentieth  term,,  indicating  that  the  people  of  that  city 


thoroughly  appreciate  the  painstaking  service  he  has  en- 
deavored to  give  them.  Mr.  J.  C.  Breithaupt,  like  his  older 
brother,  Mr.  L.  J.  Breithaupt,  and  his  late  father,  Mr.  Louis 
Breithaupt,  has  also  been  mayor  of  Kitchener. 

S.  B.  Howden,  of  Watford,  Ont.,  passed  away  at  his 
home  in  Watford,  on  Tuesday,  January  13,  in  his  70th  year. 
He  had  been  in  the  shoe  business  in  that  place  for  many 
years  and  up  to  the  time  of  his  death  was  actively  engaged 
in  his  store. 

John  Loughlin,  secretary-treasurer  of  the  London  Shoe 
Co.,  London,  Ont.,  died  recently. 

A  local  of  the  Boot  and  Shoe  Workers'  Union  has  been 
formed  in  .St.  Thomas,  Ont. 

The  death  occurred  recently  of  Mrs.  Geo.  J.  St.  Leger, 
wife  of  the  president  of  the  St.  Leger  Shoe  Company,  To- 
ronto. The  late  Mrs.  St.  Leger  was  born  in  Ireland,  77 
years  ago,  and  for  the  past  forty-five  years  had  been  a  resi- 
dent of  Toronto.  She  took  an  active  interest  in  her  hus- 
band's business  when  the  original  store  was  at  the  corner 
of  Queen  Street  and  Denison  Avenue. 

Geo.  Dunning,  of  Aylmer,  has  sold  his  Goodyear  repair 
outfit  to  Mr.  Bottrell,  a  returned  soldier. 

Mr.  Beatty,  of  the  Am-Bri-Can  Distributors,  was  a  visitor 
at  the  Boston  style  show. 

C.  A.  Ahrens,  of  Kitchener,  is  leaving  shortly  for  a  trip 
to  California,  visiting  the  principal  points  of  interest  on  the 
way.  He  will  meet  their  western  representative  in  Vancou- 
vver,  and  will  "make"  the  western  territory,  with  him  on  re- 
turning. 

Members  of  the  Retail  Merchants'  Association  of  Can- 
ada, at  two  meetings  held  in  Montreal,  decided  in  favor  of 
closing  retail  stores  at  seven  o'clock  on  Monday,  Tuesday, 
Wednesday  and  Thursday,  instead  of  two  nights  as  at  pre- 
sent. There  was  opposition  to  the  proposal  on  the  part  of 
retailers  in  the  suburbs,  who  feared  that  such  a  law  would 
operate  in  favor  of  the  larger  stores.  Mr.  Geo.  G.  Gales,  Mr. 
Vinette  and  Mr.  C.  R.  Lasalle,  of  the  shoe  retailers'  section, 
supported  the  early  closing  on  the  four  nights. 

J.  R.  Wells  has  severed  his  .connection  with  the  Canad- 
ian Consolidated  Rubber  Company  and  will  represent  in 
France,  Belgium  and  Switzerland,  the  firm  of  Graton  & 
Knight,  Worcester,  Mass.,  belting  manufacturers. 

Mr.  Lester  W.  Packard,  of  L.  H.  Packard  &  Co.,  Ltd., 
shoe  store  supplies,  Montreal,  died  at  his  home,  Lansdowne 
Avenue,  Westmount,  on  January  19th,  after  three  days  ill- 
ness, the  cause  of  death  being  pneumonia.  He  was  the  sec- 
ond son  of  Mr.  Edward  Packard,  the  president  of  the  com- 
pany, and  had  been  associated  with  the  concern  lor  thirteen 
years.  He  was  taken  ill  while  returning  to  Montreal  from 
a  business  trip  to  the  United  States. 

W.  G.  Thomas,  shoemaker,  Markdale,  Ont.,  has  sold  out. 

Among  recent  company  registrations  in  Toronto  we 
notice  the  name  of  the  British  Slipper  Mfg.  Company. 

J.  B.  Kilgour,  of  Kilgour's  Boot  Shop,  Winnipeg,  visited 
the  Boston  Style  Show  last  month,  taking  in  other  shoe  style 
centres  on  the  same  trip. 

Richard  Woodward,  of  the  firm  of  F.  E.  Woodward  & 
Sons,  shoe  supplies  Montreal,  has  returned  to  Montreal 
from  his  military  'duties  in   the  States,  where  he  enlisted 


February,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


51 


some  months  ago.  "Dick,"  as  he  is  familiarly  known,  is 
again  on  the  job  for  his  firm. 

Adelbert  Dugal  &  Frere,  shoemakers,  Montreal,  suffered 
loss  by  fire  and  water  recently. 

M.  B.  Steine,  wholesale  boots  and  shoes,  Montreal,  suf- 
fered fire  loss  recently.    Loss  fully  covered  by  insurance. 

Mr.  O.  G.  Trudeau,  of  Trudeau  &  Son,  retail  shoe  deal- 
ers, 43  St.  Catherine  Street  East,  Montreal,  died  recently  at 
his  residence,  aged  06.  He  was  in  the  shoe  trade  for  22  years, 
and  lived  for  many  years  in  the  U.  S. 

Mr.  Alf.  Lambert,  of  Alfred  Lambert,  Inc.,  Montreal,  has 
been  elected  first  vice-president  of  the  Montreal  Chamber  of 
Commerce.  At  the  annua.1  meeting  he  declared  that  the 
country  was  tired  of  being  governed  by  commissions,  and 
now  that  peace  had  come  they  v/anted  to  have  Parliament 
act  in  the  old  way.  The  period  into  which  we  had  just  en- 
tered was  likely  to  be  even  more  difficult  than  that  through 
which  we  had  passed,  and  he  looked  to  the  Chamber  of 
Commerce  to  face  many  problems  on  behalf  of  the  mer- 
chants. 

Mr.  Colin  Campbell  Demsmore,  formerly  of  the  Jenckes 
Machine  Co.,  Sherbrooke,  has  been  appointed  secretary- 
treasurer  of  the  J.  M.  Stobo  Co.,  Ltd.,  shoe  manufacturers, 
Quebec. 

Mr.  John  Tebbutt,  of  the  Tebbutt  Shoe  &  Leather  Co., 
Three  Rivers,  was  recently  in  Montreal,  showing  samples  to 
the  jobbers. 

The  J.  M.  Stobo  Co.,  Ltd.,  Quebec,  has  been  incorporated 
with  a  capital  of  $100,000,  to  acquire  the  business  of  shoe 
manufacturers  carried  on  by  Mr.  J.  M.  Stobo.  The  incor- 
porators are  Messrs.  J.  M.  Stobo,  manufactturer;  W.  Q. 
Stobo,  manager,  Quebec;  C.  M.  &  R.  H.  Mills,  salesmen, 
Montreal;  and  C.  C.  Demsmore,  accountant,  Sherbrooke. 

W.  A.  Hamilton,  of  the  W.  B.  Hamilton  Shoe  Company, 
Toronto,  is  spending  a  few  weeks  in  Florida  with  his  family. 

Mr.  W.  A.  Moore,  sales  manager  for  Btardmore  &  Com- 
pany, leather  manufacturers,  has  just  undergone  an  operation. 

A.  W.  Donovan  of  the  E.  T.  Wright  Company,  St.  Tho- 
mas, is  recovering  from  a  recent  sickness. 

The  Hewetson  Company,  of  Brampton,  recently  opened 
a  branch  factory  at  Orangeville,  in  charge  of  Mr.  Homer 
Denney.  About  twenty  hands  have  been  engaged  and  this 
number  will  be  doubled  shortly.  The  company  makes  child- 
ren's lines,  but  at  present  only  the  uppers  will  be  made  at 
Orangeville  and  the  shoes  finished  at  BramiUon.  A  large 
plant  will  be  erected  in  the  spring  capable  of  turning  out 
1,200  pairs  per  day.  The  Brampton  factory  has  been  turn- 


A  Permanent  Resting  Place 

We  were  recently  in  conversation  with  a  tra- 
veller for  a  leading  Canadian  jewellery  firm  and 
our  talk  drifted  around  to  the  mail  order  busi- 
ness. "Why,  in  your  opinion,"  we  asked  him, 
"do  the  mail  order  houses  get  so  much  trade 
from  the  small  towns?"  "Well,"  he  answered, 
"in  most  of  the  stores  in  towns  where  I  call  they 
have  the  same  dead  flies  in  the  windows  that 
were  there  on  my  previous  visit." 

We  told  him  he'd  certainly  said  a  pageful. 
How  does  it  strike  YOU  ? 


ing  out  approximately  8.50  pairs  a  day,  but  the  company  ex- 
pect a  very  large  Inisiness  in  the  near  future. 

Tlie  Amherst  Central  Shoe  Co.  Limited,  have  purch- 
ased a  warehouse  at  the  corner  of  Rose  and  Dewdney 
streets,  Regina,  Sask.  Mr.  Geo.  H.  Anderson,  the  local  man- 
ager at  Regina,  left  recently  for  a  trip  through  Montreal  and 
Boston,  and  will  visit  the  company's  headquarters  at  .\m- 
herst,  N.S.  The  following  are  the  travellers  connected  with 
this  branch:  Foster  Eraser,  Northern  Saskatchewan;  A.  C. 
Paddock,  Southern  Alberta;  A.  A.  Weaver,  city  salesman; 
W.  J.  Dougherty,  Southern  Saskatchewan,  and  H.  S.  Rey- 
nolds, Northern  Alberta.  S.  P.  Meston  is  credit  manager, 
and  Harry  Simpson,  shipper. 

W.  Meyers  has  opened  permanent  sample  roms  in  the 
Queen's  Hotel,  Toronto.  He  handles  the  lines  of  La  Par- 
isienne  Shoe  Company. 

E.  P.  J.  Smith  recently  registered  at  the  Queen's  Hotel, 
Toronto.   He  represents  the  Rena  Shoe  Company,  Montreal. 

Geo.  C.  Wilson,  has  joined  Gale  Bros..  Quebec,  Que.,  as 
sales  representative.  He  was  formerly  with  the  James  Muir 
Company,  Montreal. 

A  repair  shop  has  been  opened  in  \'ancouver  by  J  .  Em- 
ery, who  comes  from  Alberta. 

W.  A.  Clark,  shoe  dealer.  Queen  Street  East,  Toronto, 
has  offered  his  business  for  sale. 

Good  Side  Lines  Wanted 

Wanted  by  Winnipeg  commission  firm,  one  or  two  good 
side  lines  to  Jobbers  and  Mail  Order  firms;  established  co'.i- 
nection;  references.  Apply  to  E.  R.  Coleman.  P.  O.  Box  ,362, 
Winnipeg,  Canada. 


THE  NEW 
UNIQUE  TRADE 
MARK  OF  THE 
COBOURG  FELT 
CO..  COBOURG, 
ONT.    THE  "K" 
IN  KIMMEL  HAS 
FOR  MANY 
YEARS  BEEN 
SYNONYMOUS 
WITH  QUALITY 


MADE  IN 


THE 


COBOURG 

COBOURG 


^A.J.KIMMEL  Pres 


CANADA  bX/ 

FELT  C  LIMITED'^ 


ONTARIO 
A.C.KINNEL  Kg^ 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


February,  1919 


Now  is  the  Time 
to  Cash  in  on 

Rubber  Sales 


Make  quite  certain 
you  are  liberally 
stocked    with  the 


Independent  Rubbers 


They  provide  you 
with^Just  the  thing" 
for  every  customer 


Royar  "KantKrack'' 
^'Dreadnaughf^ 


Dainty  Mode 
Veribesf 


39 


Ask  any  of  these  Leading  Jobbers: 


Amherst  Boot  &  Shoe  Co.,  Ltd.,  Amherst,  N.S. 

Amherst  Boot  &  Shoe  Co.,  Ltd.,  Halifax,  N.S. 

E.  A.  Dagg  &  Company,  Calgary,  Alta. 

A.  W.  Ault  &  Company,  Limited,  Ottawa,  Ont. 

White  Shoe  Company,  Toronto,  Ont. 

McLaren  &  Dallas,  Toronto,  Ont. 

The  I-ondon  Shoe  Company,  Limited,  I^ondon,  Ont. 


Kilgonr,  Rimer  Company,  Limited, 

The  J.  Leckie  Company,  Limited, 

James  Robinson, 

Brown  Rochette,  Limited, 

T.  Long  &  Brother, 

Dowers,  Limited, 


Winnipeg,  Man. 
Vancouver,  B.C. 
Montreal,  Que. 
Quebec,  Que. 
Collingwood,  Out. 
Edmonton,  Alta. 


The  Independent  Rubber  Co.,  Limited 

MERRITTON  -  -  ONTARIO 


February,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


5: 


MENS,  BOYS,  and  YOUTHS 
TURN  PUMPS  and  OXFORDS 
— Now  in  Stock — 
^^l^g^^^^V  PATENT  AND  DULL  CALF 

Men's  B-D,  Sizes  6/11   $3.25 

Boys'  C-E,  Sizes  2^/5   2.85 

Youths,  C-E,  Sizes  11^/2  '.    .'.  .    ...  2.50 

MEN'S  PATENT  PUMP,  TURN  BOSTON  OFFICE-110  Summer  St. 

L.B.EVANS^'5X)N  CO.  WAKEFIELD ,  MASS'. 


The  New 

"EASTERN" 

Shoe  Lines 

offer  big  possibilities  to  Jobbers 
desirous  of  handling  a  first-class 
product  at  popular  prices. 

We  will  be  pleased  to  show 
you  a  very  complete  assortment 
of  shoes  for  Misses,  Children 
and  Infants  for  Spring  and  Sum- 
mer, upon  receipt  of  a  post  card 
from  you. 

See  us  when  in  Montreal 


Write  us  now. 


The  Eastern  Shoe 

Manufacturing  Company,  Limited 

152  Frontenac  Street 
Phone— La  Salle  2561  MONTREAL 


Make  Your  Show  Windows  Pay  Your  Rent 

Many  Sales  are  made  on  the  Sidewalk 

Window  Display  Fixtures 

A  Wonderful  set  of  Palenled  Inlcrchandeable  Window  Display  FiKlurei 
lor  displayinj!  Men  or  Womena'  Shoe!.  Sel  will  Jive  10  Year!  Good  Service  in 
effective  Irade  pulling  window  trims. 

The  Fixtures  you  see  above  are  only  3  very  few  of  the  designs  that  can  be 
set  up  with  the  lull  set,  besides  hundred!  ol  standard  li.xtures  can  be  set  up. 

Made  of  Oak.  either  Golden.  Antique  or  Weathered  Finish.    Set  Is  put  up 
in  a  Hardwood  Hinged  Lid  Storage  Chest,  a  good  place  to  keep  the  ejira 
Younits  not  in  use.     1  here  are  thousands  of  sets  in  daily  use. 
No.  lOl      Sel  has  220  Interchangeable  Younits  For  Large  Windows.  $48.12 
No.  101!4  Set  has  110  Interchangeable  Younits  For  Medium  Windows,  S27.SO 
No.  10154  Set  has    55  Interchangeable  Your.its  For  Small  Windows,  $17.32 
Slock  carried  in  Hamilton,  Ont.   Order  direct  or  thru  your  iobber.    Send  for  catalog.  Patented  ond  made  in  Canada. 

The  Oscar  Onken  Co.  5950  Fourth  Street   Cincinnati,  Ohio,  U.  S.  A. 


We  Can  Save  Money  for  You  on  Your 
Shipping  &  Packing 

H  &  D  Solid  Fibre  Board  Boxes 

4.  — They  save  time  in  packing. 

5.  — They  save  storage  space. 
C. — They     have     stiong  adver- 
tising value. 

7.  — They  can  be  made  to  your 
specifications. 

8.  — Their    first    cost    is  lower 
than  wood. 


1.  — They  protect  your  shipment 

against  loss  from  dampness 
and  water. 

2.  — They    are    extremely  light, 

which  means  low  freight 
charges. 

3.  — They     cannot     be  opened 

without  breaking  the  seal. 


Our  booklet  "How  to  Pack 
It"  explains  all — write  for 
it. 


The  Hinde  &  Dauch  Paper  Co. 

of  Canada  Limited 
TORONTO  ONTARIO 


TORONTO  HEEL  CO. 

Manufacturers  of 

All  styles  of  Heels  in  Leather 
and  Composition 

We  are  also  Makers  of  the 
Haverhill 

Write  for  Samples  and  Prices.    These  will  interest  you 

The  Toronto  Heel  Company 

13  Jarvis  St.,  Toronto 


54  FOOTWEAR     IN    CANADA  February,  1919 


7oTtuna 

Skiving  Machine 


For  Manufacturers  who  Skive  Leather,  Felt, 
Cork,  Rubber  or  Paper 

Used  extensively  by  Manufacturers  of 
Shoes,  Box  Toes,  Trimmings.  Insoles,  Ankle 
Supporters,  Welting,  Arch  Supporters 

Sole  Agent*  for  Canada 

Fortuna   Machine  Co. 

127  Duane  Street       -      NEW  YORK 


Jobbers  Should  Note! 
New  Castle 


Quality 


Kid 


Supplies  either  glazed  or  natural 
surface,  black  or  colored,  this 
famous  product  is  always  reliable 
and  uniform  in  quality. 

Quantities   shipped  promptly. 
Samples  supplied. 

Canadian  Agents  for 

FRED  RUEPING  LEATHER  CO. 

Calf  and  Side  Leathers,  Ooze  Splits  and 
Barrett  &  Co.  Skivers. 

New  Castle  Leather  Co. 

NEW  YORK 

Canadian  Branch: — 335  Craig  St.  W.,  Montreal 
Factory : — Wilmington,  Del.,  U.  S.  A. 


See  Our  New  Fall  Samples 


We  Sell 
Only  to 
Jobbers 


Shoes  of  Satisfaction,  upholding 
a  reputation  which  gives  them  a 
powerful  influence  in  the  market. 

In  buying  your  leather  shoes  for 
Women,  Misses,  Children  and  In- 
fants, do  not  fail  to  consult  us. 


Gagnon,  Lachapelle  &  Hebert 

Shoe  Manufacturers 
55  Kent  Street         -  -  Montreal 


February,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


55 


All  Patriotic 

BOOT  and  SHOE  DEALERS 

Should  Sell  THRIFT  Stamps 

SELL  Thrift  Stamps,  not  because  there  is  any  immediate 
profit  for  you  in  such  sales,  but  because  the  Dominion  of 
Canada  needs  your  patriotic  co-operation  in  its  plans  to 
ensure  prosperity. 

If  the  smaller  savings  of  the  people  can  be  made  available 
to  finance  Government  expenditure,  then  the  larger  public 
investments  will  be  free  for  industrial  securities,  thus  promot- 
ing general  Prosperity  in  which  every  storekeeper  is  vitally 
interested. 

Get  your  customers  to  take  a  Thrift  Stamp  in  place  of  25c 
change  whenever  you  possibly  can.  Display  your  sign.  Ex- 
plain that  Thrift  Stamps  are  a  means  to  acquire  War-Savings 
Stamps,  and  people  should  strive  to  fill  their  Thrift  Cards  as 
quickly  as  possible. 


Have  you  bought  your 


We  sell  them 


FOOTWEAR    IN.  CANADA  February,  1919 


W.D.^rmstrOMG 

EN6RAVER0F  FINE  STEEL  STAMPS  &.DIES 

230,c,^>NES;^MONTREALPWo>i.^  675 
CR^^^v>^fp)  Q,  QUE,  c)  c%^'^  'Wain 

mystampsare'uptodate'in  design 

&ADD  AN  ARTISTIC  FINISHTO  VOUR  SHOES 
•  WHICH  VUILL  INCREASE  YOUR  SALES 


t 


The  Best  and  Most  Durable 
Shoe  Laces  Are  Made 

With  Our 

Power  Shoe  Lace 
Tipping  Machines 

Textile  and  Special  Machinery 
Harris-Corliss  Steam  Engines 

Send  for  Catalogue 

The  Franklin  Machine  Company 

Engineers       Founders  Machinists 
189  Charles  Street,  Providence,  R.I. 


Have  You  Heard  About  This? 


The  PiUow  Welt 


A  distinctive  feature  in  our  footwear  for  Misses,  Girls,  Child- 
ren and  Infants.  It  is  designed  with  special  regard  to  comfort 
and  ease  for  growing  feet.  The  Welt  is  sewn  right  into  the  shoe 
and  is  the  Genuine  Goodyear. 

The  soft  cushion  insole,  and  the  waterproof  cork  filling 
between  the  inner  and  outer  soles  are  two  features  that  help  to 
make  these  shoes  the  most  popular  on  the  market. 

GLOBE  SHOE  LIMITED 

Factory  TERREBONNE,  QUE. 

Selling  Agents 

L.  H.  PACKARD  &  CO.,  LIMITED 
MONTREAL,  P.Q. 


February,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


57 


A  Shoe  Merchant 


Every  customer  for  a  new  pair  is  a  prospect  for  the  repair 
department. 


With  a 

Champion  Shoe  Repair 

Department,  said 

By  installing  the  shoe  repair  department  behind  a 
glass  partition,  customers  can  look  right  into  the  repair 
shop  and  see  how  the  work  is  done.  I  would  put  the 
Stitcher  right  up  near  the  glass  partition,  where  it 
would  attract  as  much  attention  as  possible.  The  cost 
of  a  complete  repair  outfit  is  very  small.  The  neces- 
sary stock  and  accessories  to  start  this  department  do 
not  call  for  any  large  expenditure  of  money.  Any  live 
merchant  could  start  right  in  making  such  a  depart- 
ment pay.  An  ordinary  shoe  repair  department  will 
easily  pay  the  running  expenses  of  the  entire  store,  in- 
cluding light,  heat,  rent,  clerk  hire,  advertising,  insur- 
ance, etc.  This  would  leave  the  profit  obtained  from 
the  selling  of  shoes  a  clear  sinking  fund  for  that  rainy  day  we  all  talk  about.  All  live  shoe  dealers  would 
become  wealthy  if  they  had  no  expenses.  The  installation  of  a  shoe  repair  department  will  result  in  tak- 
ing care  of  expenses  of  a  first-class  shoe  store,  and  may  still  leave  a  margin  of  profit  in  the  Repair  Depart- 
ment. 

Champion 
Machines  are 
sold  outright 
(no  royalty) 
for  cash  or 
on  monthly 
payments. 

Champion  New  Model,  No.  F-60,  Repair  Outfit,  equipped  with  Standard  Straight 
Needle  and  Awl  Shoe  Stitcher,  with  motor  extension. 

Over  20,000  Champion  Machines  of  various  types 
in  use-That  means  MERIT  and  QUALITY. 

The  Champion  Line  consists  of; 

Seven  different  types  of  Shoe,  Harness  and  Auto  Tire  Stitchers. 
Forty  different  models  of  Repair  Outfits,  consisting  of  Stitchers 
and  Finishers. 

Two  distinct  types  of  Nailing  Machines. 
Many  different  Models  of  Finishers. 
A  complete  line  of  Double  Tread  Tire  Machines. 
Many  labor  and  material  saving  auxiliary  machines. 


Universal     Model     Curved  Needlt 
and  Awl  Shoe  Stitcher  —  heated 
by  gas,  gasoline,  or  electricity. 


CHAMPION  SHOE  MACHINERY  CO.,  372341  F«rest  Park  B,d.,  St.  Louis,  Mo. 

Please  send  me  particulars  about  a  shoe  store  repair  department. 

Name   Street  

City   State   


58 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


February,  1919 


It  Makes  a  Good  Job 

Shoe  manufacturers  and  repairers  say  that  for  strength, 
lustre  and  easy  working,  they  get  splendid  results  from 


MOONEY'S  THREAD 


A  sample  reel  or  two  will  give  you  an  idea  of  the 
good  work  obtained  by  the  use  of  our  cotton  thread. 
Drop  us  a  card  to-day. 

Our  supplies  to  the  trade  are  well  known  for  reliability 
and  our   attention  to  enquiries  is  always  prompt. 


Brushes 

Thread 

Cement 


The  A.  G.  Mooney  Company 


Toronto 
Ed.  R.  LEWIS 
45  Front  St.  East 


220  Lemoine  Street,  MONTREAL 


Quebec 
J.  P.  PARENT 
St.  Valier  St. 


Buy  D  &  P  Counters 


Every  counter  turned  out  of  the 
D.  &  P.  Factory  is  guaranteed  to 
give  lasting  satisfaction. 


You  Run  No  Risk 


Our  Canadian-made  fibre  board  counters 
outlast  leather.  Made  from  selected  fibre 
compressed  by  the  special  D.  «&  P.  process. 
Write  for  samples.  We  also  solicit  your  or- 
ders for  upper  and  sole  leather,  and  shall 
be  glad  to  quote  on  your  requirements. 


Ed.  R.  Lewis,  45  Front  St.  East 
Toronto 
Ontario  Selling  Agent 


DUCLOS  &  PAYAN 


Richard  Freres,  Quebec 
Selling  Agents  for 
Quebec  City 


Tannery  and  Factory:  ST.  HYACINTHE,  P.Q. 
Sales  Offices  and  Warehouses:  224  Lemoine  Street  MONTREAL 


February,  19]!) 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


59 


T^^ALGARY  DAILY  HERAXD- 


LLE 


Canada's  National  Fa 


rm     Tlirr*  o- 


—1       ^^^"^ItHE  TORONTO  STAR  WEEKIjy 

"       »  ■■"•-luuttgajEjj.,.,^  f         ^  Kears  "/»  tlie  Public  YervicP' 


GfiOWEBs 


LE  PLUS  VOHT  ' 


--—^  ,  ..■■■MS  y^.rllD^K^.^^^>■ 


*  ALBEfTA.    MONDAY  DECT: 


Newspapers  and  Farm  Papers 
That  Tell  the  Public 
About  Neolin  Half  Soles 


The  man  who  advocates  NeoHn  Half- 
Soles  for  repairs  does  not  advocate 
them  unaided.  A  master  advertising 
campaign  made  Neolin  Soles  the  quick- 
est success  and  the  most  talked-of  fac- 
tor in  the  shoe  trade.  The  same 
thought,  time  and  money  are  behind 
the  advertising  of  Neolin  Half-Soles. 

Make  a  display  of  Neolin  Half-Soles 
on  your  counter.  You  will  be  surpris- 
ed at  the  number  of  people  who  prefer 
them. 


Don't  forget  that  every  job  of  sole- 
repairing  can  be  a  Neolin  job.  They 
can  be  nailed  or  sewn.  They  come  in 
all  sizes.  They  win  new  customers  by 
their  virtues  of  long  wear  and  flexi- 
bility. 

Neolin  Half-Soles  come  in  a  hand- 
some display  carton  of  a  dozen  assort- 
ed sizes.    Order  from  your  wholesaler. 

The  Goodyear  Tire  &  Rubber  Co. 

of  Canada,  Limited 

Toronto 


60 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


February,  1919 


COUNTERS 
BOX  TOES  and 
INNER  SOLES 


Our  union  and  all  leather, 
flexible  inner  soles  are  bet- 
ter than  ever,  with  no 
change  in  prices.  Try  them 
and  be  convinced. 

LAMONTAGNE,  RACINE  &  CO. 

115  ARAGO  ST. 
QUEBEC 


KELLEY  KID 

LEADS  THEM  ALL 
in  Uniformify, 
Fine  Texture,  Wearing  Qualities  and  Finish 


In  our  West  Lynn  Factory  during  310  working 
days,  the  average  daily  output  has  been  800  dozen 
finished  skins,  or  an  equivalent  of  9,600  skins  per  day. 
This  represents  60,000  feet  of  leather  turned  out  each 
day,  or  18,600,000  square  feet  of  leather  in  one  year. 
This  amount  provides  over  6,200,000  people  once  a 
year  with  one  pair  of  shoes — a  large  army! 

Sold  in  All  Foreign  Countries 

Thomas  A.  Kelley  &  Co. 

Tannery  and  Main  Office,  LYNN,  MASS. 

SelHng  Agents : 

ROUSMANIERE,  WILLIAMS  &  CO. 
87-93  Lincoln  St.,    BOSTON,  MASS. 


Landis  Outfits  are  Money-Makers 

Equalize  the  increased  cost  of  material  by  installing  machinery  to 
do  your  shoe  repair  work. 

Landis  Stitchers  and  Finishers  are  unequalled  in  quality,  the  prices 
are  reasonable  and  the  terms  are  easy. 

We  have  many  models  of  stitchers  and  finishers.    Write  for  com- 
plete catalogue  with  prices  and  terms. 


Landis  No.  12  Shoe  Stitcher. 
Sold  outright— No  royalty. 


Landis  No.  12-25  Outfit.    Landis  No.  12  Shoe  Stitcher  coupled  to 
Landis  Model  25  Finisher. 


Landis  Machine  Co.,  isis  N.25thst.,  St.  Louis,  U.S.A. 


February,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


61 


The  United  States  Hotel, 

BOSTON,  MASS.,  U.  S.  A. 


Beach,  Kingston 
and   Lincoln  Streets 


Only  two  blocks  from  the  South  Terminal  Station  in  the  centre  of  the  Shoe  and  Leather 
District  and  within  easy  walking  di^ance  of  the  shopping  di^rid:,  theatres,  etc. 
Good,  comfortable  rooms,  unexcelled  cuisine,  and  reasonable  rates. 
American  and  European  plans.    Send  for  circulars. 


TILLY  HAYNES,  Proprietor 


JAS.  G.  HIGKEY,  Manager 


Built  for  Service 


Made  for  wear.  Something  reliable  in  a 
strong  working  boot  for  men.  We  can 
supply  you  with  either  screw  or  pegged 
in  this  sure  selling  line  of  well-made  foot- 
wear. 

JOBBERS 

Write  us  for  particulars. 


J.  E. 
SAMSON 
ENR. 

QUEBEC 


Middle  and  Western  Canada 
Demands  the  Best 
in  Footwear 


To  successfully  introduce  your  lines  and  maintain 
a    satisfactory    business    you    must    interest  the 

General  Merchants  in  the  Prairie  Prov- 
inces and  British  Columbia. 

The  General  Merchants  are  Departmental  Stores — in  miniature — 
found  in  every  hamlet,  village,  town,  and  city  in  the  Great  Western 
Provinces  of  Canada.  Every  General  Merchant  sells  boots  and  shoes 
— there  are  no  exceptions.  No  exclusive  shoe  paper  can  interest  this 
trade,  because  the  General  Merchant  is  not  an  exclusive  shoe  dealer. 


K40yiU.m  rrKANOAL.CDMHUOAL  & 
«UUUL  TIADC  rCWSPAPU^tfK*  CWJ  WUT, 

Over  33  years  in  its  field 

^'CANADA'S    GREA  TEST   TRA  DE    PA  PER. ' ' 

Issued  twice  a  month  at  WINNIPEG,  Canada. 

Is  the  ONLY  PAPER  reaching  the  General 
Merchants  in  all  points.  Port  Arthur  and  West 
to  the  Pacific  Ocean. 

Get  a  sample  and  advertising  rates,  of  "That 
Western  Paper  that  brings  results." — "THE 
COMMERCIAL." 

Branches  at 

Vancouver,  Toronto,  Montreal,  Chicago,  New  York,  London,  Eng. 


SURFACE  KID  WILL  NOT  SCUFF 


Surface  Kid  is  a  decided  improvement  on  real  kid 
l)ecau.se  it  wear.s  better — will  not  .scuff  and  is  much  less 
expensive. 

The  beautiful  grain  shows  to  advantage  in  dressy 
shoes,  while  the  soft  pliable  texture  equals  chamois.  Send 
at  once  for  samples  of  Surface  Kid  in  Black  and  Colors. 

Batts  in  Gan  Metal— Dull— Glazed 


Head  Office 

491  St.  ValierSt.,  Quebec 


LUCIEN   BORNE  Montreal  Office-225  LemoineSt. 


(i3 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


February,  1919 


The  Practical  Buyer 

The  Union  man  may  be  no  more  cautious 
in  his  buying  than  the  average  customer  but 
he  is  particular  on  one  detail  above  all  others 
in  the  shoes  he  buys. 

He  insists — in  nine  cases  out  of  ten — on 
the  Stamp  which  marks  the  Union  made  shoe, 
the  Stamp  of  the  Boot  and  Shoe  Workers' 
Union. 

More  and  more  the  demand  is  increas- 
ing for  Union  shoes  among  Union  men  and  it 
is  the  wise  retailer  who  wishes  to  extend  and 
broaden  the  scope  of  his  business  who  insists 
on  Union  Stamp  footwear. 

Write  for  our  free  list  of  manufacturers 
making  Union  Stamp  footwear  and  prepare 
next  season  for  the  trade  of  the  Union  man 
in  your  community. 

Boot  and  Shoe  Workers'  Union 

Affiliated  with  the  American  Federation  of  Labor 

246  Summer  Street 
BOSTON     -   -  MASSACHUSETTS 


JOHN  F.  TOBIN 

General  President 


CHAS.  L.  BAINE 

Gen'I  Sec'y-Treasurer 


WORKERS  UNION/ 


UNION/riSTAMP 


^WORKERS  UNION/ 


UNION/flSTAMP 


February,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


63 


SHOE 
LACES 


MADE  IN 
CANADA 


Supply 

Shoe  Manufacturers  and  Wholesale  Trade 
only 

Textile  Manufacturing  Co.,  Ltd. 

439  Wellington  Street  West 
TORONTO 


A  Message  For 

Ontario  Merchants 

We  can  do  many  things 
for  You 

Especially  as  follows: 

(1)  We  can  turn  your  present  stock 

into  cash. 

(2)  We  can  do  it  at  once. 

(3)  We  can  make  the  community 

think  of  your  store— first,  last 
and  all  the  time. 

Consult  our  specialists  on  Sales 
of  all  kinds 

Beadle  Sales  Service 
Agency 

59  Yonge  Street,  TORONTO 


Edwards  &  Edwards 


TANNERS 
OF 


SHEEPSKINS 


FOR 

Shoes,  Gloves,  Saddlery 
Upholstering 
Bags  and  Suit  Gases 
Bookbinding 
Fancy  and  Novelty  Goods 
Skivers 
Embossed  Leathers 

Etc.,  Etc. 

EDWARDS  &  EDWARDS 


Head  Office  and  Sale  Rooms 


1  anneries 


27  Front  E.  Toronto'      Woodbridge,  Ont. 

Quebec  and  Maritime  Provinces 

JOHN  McENTYRT'LTD.''^«aJiT'ilFAu''Qu'^: 


Extend  Your 
Sales  with  this 

BOY'S 
SCOUT 
BOOT 


Illustration  shows  our  No. 
191  Boys  Scout  Boot  which 
has  had  marked  success  as  a 
seller.    Made  with  oiled  tan- 
ned vamp  12  in.  Menonite  leg 
bellow    tongue    to    top,  full 
single  sole  and  heel  nailed  to 
a  solid  leatiier 
sole.  Guaran- 
teed water 
proof    if  dub- 
bin is  reason- 
a  b  1  y  applied. 

Splendid  val- 


Write     us  to-day. 


The  Copeland  Shoepack  Co. 

Midland,  Ontario,  Canada 


64 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


Fel)ruary,  1010 


Makers  of  boots  and  fine 
shoes  for  all  deformities  and 
lame  feet. 

Endorsed  by  medical  offic- 
ers of  Militia. 

Satisfaction  guaranteed. 

Information  cheerfully  sent 
on  request. 


S.  J.  Friedman 
Vancouver's 
Leading  Surgri-      320  Granville  St 

cal  Bootmaker 


West  End  Boot  Hospital 

Vancouver,  B.C. 


Pan  American 

KID 

Seal  Brown  and  Black 


Perkins  &  McNeely 

Philadelphia 


Canadian  Representative— 

Ed.  R.  LEWIS 

45  Front  St.  E.,  TORONTO 


LAGACE  &  LEPINAY 

22  ST.  ANSELME  ST. 

QUEBEC 


No.  50 


The  problems  confronting  the  Jobber 
are  well  considered  by  us  in  our  effort  to 
produce  footwear  that  will  meet  his  de- 
mands. We  are  showing  a  full  range  of 
Women's  McKays,  also  shoes  for  Boys, 
Youths  and  Men,  and  we  believe  they  hold 
real  value  as  business  getters.  You  had 
better  see  them  for  yourself. 

Write  for  samples  or 
visit  our  Showrooms 


No.  46 


Largest  Manufacturers  in  Canada 
-of- 

STEEL  DIES 

for 

Shoe  and  Rubber  Manufacturers 


Prompt 
Service 


Guaranteed 
Work 


JAS.  CLELAND,  REGD, 

16  St.  George  St.,  Montreal 


E.  PULLAN 

Scrap  Leather 
Cotton  Clippings 

20  Maud  St.  -  TORONTO 


February,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


65 


Put  Away  the  Methods 

of  the  Tallow  Candle  and 
Stage  Coach  Days 


Employ 


Goodyear  Shoe  Repairing  Outfits,  with  and  without  stitcher. 

EQUIPMENT  THAT  PRODUCES 

RESULTS 

A  Machine  for  every  purpose.       A  size  for  every  business. 

United  Shoe  Machinery  Company  of  Canada,  Limited 

Montreal,  Que. 


Toronto,  Ont. 
90  Adelaide  Street  West, 


Kitchener,  Ont. 
179  King  Street  West, 


Quebec,  Que. 
28  Demers  Street, 


or,  FOOTWEAR     IN    CANADA  February,  191') 


ALPHABETICAL  LIST  OF  ADVERTISERS 


Aird  &  Son   18 

Ames-Holden-McCready   12 

Armstrong,  W.  D   Mi 

Beadle  Sales  Service   01! 

Beckwith  Box  Toe  Company   L  I 

Bennett  Limited   5 

Boston  Blacking  Company    16 

Borne,  Lucien   i>1 

Boot  and  Shoe  Union   o;J 

Breithaupt  Leather  Company   V.', 

Brodie  &  Harvie   0« 

Canadian  Advertising  Service   70 

Canadian  Consolidated  Ruliher  Co.  '.j-'/.O 

Champion  Shoe  Machinery  Company  '<i 

Children's  Shoe  Mfg.  Co   iG 

Clarke  &  Company,  A.  11   73 

Cleland,  Regd.,  James   64 

Cobourg  Felt  Company   '>1 

Copeland  Shoepack  Co   63 

Cote,  J.  A.  &  M   GO 

Daoust-Lalonde  &  Company    Jl 

Diichaine  &  Perkins   70 

Duclos  &  Payan     58 

Eastern  Shoe  Mfg.  Company   ;");> 

Edwards  &  Edwards   63 

Evans'  Son  Company,  L.  B   53 


Fortuna  Machine  Company    54 

Franklin  Machine  Co   ."ifi 

Friedman,  S.  J   G4 

Gagnon,  Lachapelle  &  Hebert   .")4 

Globe  Shoe  Company   5G 

Goodyear  Tire  &  Rubber  Co  

Great  West  Felt  Company  

Hinde  &  Dauch  Paper  Company  ...  53 

Home  Shoe  Company   G8 

Independent  Rublier  Company  ....  52 

International  Supply  Co   G 

Kelly,  Thomas  A   60 

Kenworthy  Bros   71 

Landis  Machine  Company   60 

Lamontagne  Racine  &  Co   GO 

La  Duchesse  Shoe  Company   G8 

Legace  &  Lepinay   64 

Marsh  Company,  Wm.  A  

Miner  Rublier  Company   24 

Mooney  Company,  A.  G   58 


Narrow  Fabric  Company   ."6 

National  Cash  Register  Company  . .  07 

New  Castle  Leather  Company   54 

Oscar  Onken  Company    53 

Panther  Rublier  Company  Cover 

Perfection  Counter  Co   68 

Perkins  &  McNeely   G4 

Pullan,  E   64 

Regal  Shoe  Company   1 

Ritchie,  John   7 

!\obinson,  James   8-',) 

Samson  Enr.,  J.  E   61 

SchoU  Mfg.  Company   10 

Scott,  J.  A  22-33 

Slater  Shoe  Company   i7 

Sisman  Shoe  Company  

Spaulding  &  Sons,  J   lo 

Standard  Kid  Mfg.  Company   4 

St.  Hyacfnthe  Soft  Sole  Company  . .  7(i 

Tetrault  Shoe  Company   i5 

Textile  Mfg.  Company    (>.; 

Thomas,  Lake  &  Whiton   20 

Thompson  Shoe  Company   14 

Toronto  Heel  Company   5:; 

United  Shoe  Machinery  Co.,  Ltd.  G5-(ilt 

United  States  Hotel,  Boston   ci 


There's  No  Uncertainty  About 

YAMASKA 

IT'S  ALL  LEATHER 


THE 

MAN'S  SHOE 


The  genuine  material  seasoned  to  wear  and  shaped 
to  fit.  No  haphazard  methods  are  ]:)ermitted  in  the 
]3rcduction  of  YAMASKA.  We  find  it  is  the  best 
policy  to  stick  to  thoroughness  in  every  particular. 

You  will  recognize  this  adherence  to  quality,  in 
YAMASKA  shoes.  Your  customers,  from  the  big- 
footed  man  down  to  the  little  chap  will  obtain  the  full- 
est value  from  their  wear — a  factor  in  creating  more 
sales. 

Give  YAMASKA  the  chance  to  create  more  sales 
for  you. 

La  Compagnie 


J.  A.  &  M.  COTE 

St.  Hyacinthe,  Quebec 


^'ebruary,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


The  best  store  improvement  you  can  make 


The  best  store  improvement  you  can 
make  today  is  to  install  a  modern 
National  Gash  Register— because  it 
will  build  up  and  systematize  your 
business. 

A  modern  National  Gash  Register 
will  raise  the  tone  of  your  store, 
make  your  clerks  more  efficient,  and 
put  you  in  the  class  of  up-to-date 
merchants. 

It  will  enable  you  to  save  expense 
in  running  your  store,  and  thus  re- 
lease money  for  other  purposes. 

It  will  make  possible  quick,  accurate 
service  to  customers — the  greatest 


inducement  that  any  merchant  can 
offer  to  get  and  hold  trade. 

It  will  give  you  unequalled  protection, 
that  will  check  every  cent  of  your 
profits  into  the  bank . 

It  will  give  you  information  that  will 
enable  you  to  control  your  business. 

A  modern  National  Gash  Register  is 
a  store  improvement  that  will  quickly 
pay  for  itself  out  of  what  it  saves. 

In  the  face  of  increased  competition 
you  cannot  afford  to  postpone  mak- 
ing this  improvement. 


The  National  Cash  Register  Company,  of  Canada,  Limited,  Toronto,  Ont. 
Offices  in  all  the  Principal  cities  of  the  world 


FOOTWEAR   IN  CANADA 


February,  1910 


The 


Home  Shoe 


COMES  DIRECT 
FROM  FACTORY 
TO  RETAILER 

With  a  minimum  of 
selling  expense  and  an 
appreciably  extra  value 
to  the  public. 

Let  us  demonstrate  to 
you  the  profitable  sales 
awaiting  the  dealer 
who  handles  the  many 
excellent  models  of  the 
HOME  SHOE. 

Write  us — To-day 

Home  Shoe  Company,  Ltd. 


327  Amherst  Street, 


MONTREAL 


JOBBERS 
ONLY 


Very  Attractive 

Our  showing  of  "La 
Duchesse"  McKay  Shoes 
for  Women,  and  Turn 
Slippers  for  Men.  For 
your  inspection.  When- 
ever you  want  high  grade 
shoes  it  will  pay  you  to 
handle  **  La  Duchesse  " 
manufacture. 


La  Duchesse  Shoe  Co. 


Registered 

MONTREAL 


BRODIE'S 

Patent  Paste 


This  famous  product  covers 
a  wide  range  of  usefulness 
being  used  with  equal  success 
and  efficiency  by  manufactur- 
ers of  the  finest  grade  shoes  and 
makers  of  heavy  work  shoes. 

Supplied  in  quantities  to 
meet  your  needs. 

Let  us  send  you  sample  and 
price. 

Brodie  &  Harvie 

Limited 

14  Bleury  St.  MONTREAL 


Perfection 


Your  New  Year's  Good  Resolutions  are  not 
complete  unless  you  have  resolved  to  use  nothing 
but  the  best  in  Counters. 

Try  PERFECTION  COUNTERS  and  let  us 
show  you  wherein  they  excel.  Send  for  prices  and 
particulars. 

Our  Felt  Box  Toes  are  Now  Ready. 

Perfection  Counter  Limited 

699  Letourneux  Ave.  Cor.  Ernest  St. 

Maisonneuve,  Montreal 


February,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


69 


to  Specifications 


1 

■■■5BS9 

^^■■11 

■ 

Reduced  Photographic  Blueprint  Facsimile  of  12  ft.  Goodyear  Shoe  Repairing  Outfit  Model  N  with  Skate  Sharpening 

Machine  Model  B  Attached 

GOODYEAR  OUTFITS 

Are  All  Standardized  and  Assembled  to 
Exact  Measurements^  Assuring 

SHOE  REPAIRING  OUTFITS 

Correct  In  Every  Detail 

Write  for  Complete  Catalogue  Today 

United  Shoe  Machinery  Company  of  Canada,  Limited 

Montreal,  Que. 


TORONTO 

90  Adelaide  Street  West, 


KITCHENER 

179  King  Street  West, 


QUEBEC 

28  Demers  Street, 


ro 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


February,  1919 


Retailers 

Sell  your  shoes  by 
pictures. 

Use  our  cuts  and  make 
your  ads.  stand  out 
attractively  and 
prominently. 

Cuts  from.  75c.  to  $2.50 

Send  for  Catalogue  and  Prices 

Special  Illustrations 
Made  to  Order 


CANADIAN  ADVERTISERS 
SERVICE 

511    CHURCH  STREET 

TORONTO 


Our  Standard  Screw  Shoes 

WILL  STAND  PLENTY  OF    HARD  WEAR 

Made   on   foot-fitting  lasts   that   will   give   comfort  to  the  wearer 
and  are  durable. 
The  Range  Includes 
Men's,   Boys',   Youths',   Little   Gents'  and  Children's  Box  Kip 
Your  Jobber  will  quote  you  prices,  or  write  us  direct 

St.  Hyacinthe  Soft  Sole  Shoe  Co. 

St.  Hyacinthe,  Quebec  Limited 


BOOKS  FOR  SALE 


Advertising  by  Motion  Pictures,  by  Ernest  A.  Dench, 
Just  published — 255  pages.    Price  $1.00. 

Footwear  in  Canada '"t^orSStI'  * 


A  Good  Investment 
For  Any  Jobber 


Let  us  show  you  what  we  can  do  for  you  in  high  grade 
McKays. 

A  number  of  samples  of  unquestionable  value  await  your 
approval.  We  believe  you  will  appreciate  in  these,  the 
quality  of  the  three  essentials  of  good  shoemaking — ma- 
terial, workmanship,  and  style.  Write  if  you  cannot  call. 


Duchaine  &  Perkins 


QUEBEC 


Montreal    Sample  Room 

E.  T.  Bank  Bldg.,  St.  James  St. 


February,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


SPECIALTIES 

for 

Shoe  Manufacturers 

HEEL  PADS:  Cut  from  several  qualities  of 
white  felt,  also  all  colors  of  Imitation  Leather 
and  Combined  Imitation  Leather  and  Felt. 
Large  assortment  of  patterns  that  will  fit  any 
shoe.  Our  facilities  mean  service  to  you  at  a 
minimum  cost. 

Felt  for  Box  Toes:  Hard  Insole,  Cushion 
Insole,  Lining,  Fillers,  Shoe  Racks  and  Shoe 
Rolls. 

Imitation  Leather,  all  colors.  Combined 
Imitation  Leather  and  Felt. 

Kendex  Insole  Stock,  made  in  oak  and  white, 
all  weights.     Advise  us  of  your  requirements. 

WE  SPECIALIZE  FOR  SHOE  MANUFACTURING 

KENWORTHY  BROS.  COMPANY 

STOUGHTON,  MASS. 

Represented  in  the  Province  of  Quebec  by  HORACE  D'ARTOIS,  224  Lemoine  St.,  Montreal 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


February,  1919 


Make  Your  Custom  Secure 


Clarke's  patent  leather 
is  shipped  to  all  parts  of 
the  world,  and  is  produced 
by  the  largest  patent  lea- 
ther manufacturers  in  the 
British  Empire. 


CLARKE'S 

Patent  Leather 


never  varies  from  one  standard — the 
best.  It  is  the  product  of  patent  lea- 
ther specialists  with  a  strict  supervi- 
sion that  permits  of  nothing  inferior 
to  the  Clarke  standard,  leaving  our 
factory.  That  is  why  you  are  justi- 
fied in  looking  for  further  sales  from 
your  custom.ers  when  you  sell 
Clarke's  patent. 


If  iVs  a  Patent,  it 
should  be  Clarke's 


A.  R.  CLARKE  &  CO. 


MONTREAL 


LIMITED 

TORONTO 


QUEBEC 


Back  to 
Business 
Number 


REGAL  f  SHOES 


\„l.  IX— No.  3 


Hii<:h  C.  MacLean.  Limited.  Publishers 


Toronto.  March,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


Marcli,  I'.ir.) 


PANTHER 


pANTHER  Soling  is  composed  of 
fibre  and  rubber  thoroughly  tested 
for  maximum  wearing  qualities.  The 
result  is  a  sole  for  all  footwear  that  is 
greatly  superior  to  leather.  Panther 
Soles  look  like  leather  and  can  be 
worked  in  the  same  manner.  In  ad- 
dition they  wear  longer  than  leather, 
are  waterproof  and  much  more  flexible. 
They  hold  stitching  perfectly  and  do 
not  crack. 


Panther  Sure  Step  Rubber  Heels 
are  another  excellent  product  that 
will  bring  new  business. 


Panther  Rubber 

Company,  Limited 

SHERBROOKE,  QUE. 


pf^NTHER  RUBBER  MFC 

.  ~ST0UCHT0N,MASST^ 


March,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    TN  CANADA 


3 


Rubbers 

To  fit  all  your  New  Styles 
in  Footwear 

What  a  satisfaction  it  is  to  a  dealer  to  have  such  a  complete  range  of  styles  and  sizes  as  are  offered  in 
Dominion  Rubber  System  Rubbers! 

Think^  of  the  extra  sales  and  extra  profits  that  a  Dealer  makes,  now  that  he  can  get  these  Rubbers  to 
perfectly  fit  every  shoe  for  men,  women  and  children! 

Stocks  are  carried  at  all  branches,  so  that  orders  are  lilled  promptly  and  accurately — a  service  that  every 
dealer  appreciates. 

More  than  this,  our  advertisements  in  all  the  leading  papers  are  helping  the  dealers  to  sell  more  Rubbers. 

Get  the  benefit  of  this  big  advertising  by  mentioning  Dominion  Rulilier  System  Brands  in  your  own  ad- 
vertising, by  putting  Rubbers  in  your  window  displays  of  spring  footwear — by  suggesting  Rubbers  to  every- 
one who  buys  new  shoes. 

Before  placing  your  orders  see  the  complete  line  of  Dominion  Ruliljer  System  Brands. 

Dominion  Rubber  System   Service  Branches  are  Located  at 

Halifax,  St.  John,  Quebec,  Montreal,  Ottawa,  Belleville,  Toronto,  Hamilton, 
Brantford,  London,  Kitchener,  North  Bay,  Fort  William,  Winnipeg, 
Brandon,  Regina,  Saskatoon,  Edmonton,  Calgary,  Lethbridge,  Vancouver, 
rictoria. 


4 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


March, 


1 !)  1 '.) 


We  probably  give  more  attention  to  grading  than 
any  other  large  tanning  concern. 

In  no  other  way  can  we  keep  Standard  Kid-  in 
color,  in  weight,  and  in  grade— always  true  to  its  name. 

With  us  grading  means  not  merely  sorting  and 
passing,  but  a  careful  examination  and  re-examination 
of  each  and  every  bundle. 

Our  whole  purpose  is  to  produce  kid  leather  that 
will  never  vary  in  grade. 

Ask  for  samples  of 

Color  18    Field  Mouse. 
Color  8  Grey 

Prices  Reasonable 

STANDARD  KID  MFG.  CO. 

MANUFACTURERS  OF  liLACK  AND  COLORED  C.LAZED   KID  AND  TATENT  KU) 

20/  SOUTH  STREET,  BOSTON,  MASS.,  U.  S.  A. 

NEW  YORK  OFFICE,  CIO  TRIBUNE  BLDG. 
Factory,  Wilmington,  Del. 
AGENCIES 

CHAS.  A.  BRADY,  Rochester,  N.V.  F.  W.  BAILEY  &  CO.,  St.  Louis,  Mo. 

CEO.  A.  McC.AW,  Chicago,  111.  I.  LOUIS  POPPER,  Cincinnati,  Ohio. 

PIERRE  ISLOIUN,  Oiiebcc,  Canada. 


■iiiiiiiii  I II  iiipiifflipp^inn 


QtandardKid 

rr\  TRUE  TO  ITS  NAME 
JJy  *^IT'S  STANDARDIZED 


March,   191  ii 


FOOTWl'w'XR    IN  CANADA 


5 


^^Back  Up  Business" 


with 


BENNETT 

DEPENDABLE  COUNTERS 

Results  obtained  have  justified  the  men  who  laid 
aside  prejudices  and  tried  the  Bennett'  Counter. 
To  date,  defective  counters  returned  have  been  /ess 
than  one  counter  in  every  million  pairs  sold. 

YOU  CAN  T  MAKE  BETTER  SHOES 
WITH  ANY  OTHER  COUNTER 


ONTARIO  OFFICE 
28  King  St.  East 
Kitchener 


BENNETT  LIMITED 
MAKERS  OF  SHOE  SUPPLIES 


CHAMBLY  CANTON,  P.Q.,  CANADA 


SALES  OFFICE 
59  St.  Henry  Street 
Montreal 


(1 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


March,  191!) 


The  Season  is 
Opening  For 

Independent  Rubbers 


THE  White  Shoe  Company  is  ready  to  supply  your 
needs  for  next  fall  and  winter  in  this  unexcelled 
line  of  rubber  footwear. 

Our  traveller  will  call  on  you  shortly  with  these 
well  known  brands: — 

Dreadnaught      —      Kant  Krack 
Dainty  Mode  and  Royal  Brands 


WHITE  SHOE  COMPANY,  LIMITED 

Wholesale  Shoe  Distributors 

9  Wellington  St.  West       :       Toronto,  Ont. 


March,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


u- 


S 


THE  RITCHIE  LINE 

is  designed  for  the  jobbing  trade,  but  incorporated 
in  Ritchie  shoes  in  a  greater  degree  than  in  any 
other  Hne  you  will  find  the  accuracy  of  detail  that 
appeals  to  the  retailer  and  consumer  which  makes 
the  selling  quality  attractive. 


CAREFUL  SELECTION  OF  LEATHER 
CORRECTNESS  OF  FIT 
SNAPPY  LASTS  AND  PATTERNS 
HIGH  QUALITY  WORKMANSHIP 
BUSINESS  GETTING  PRICES 


The  John  Ritchie  Company  Limited 


MAKERS  OF 
MEN'S  SHOES 

QUEBEC 


8 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


March.  191'.) 


i 


CLASSIC 


They  Typify 
Excellence  of 
Workmanship 


Classic  Shoes  for  W^omen 
for  Fall  and  Winter  trade 
bear  the  distinctive  fea- 
tures of  style  and  design. 
They  meet  the  approval 
of  feminine  fashion  of  the 
day. 


Travellers  now  on  their 
respective  territories. 


GETTY  &  SCOTT,  LIMITED 

GALT       -  ONTARIO 
Makers  of  the  ''Classic"  Shoe  for  women. 


March,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


9 


YOUR  Children's 
trade  demands  shoes 
which  please  the  kiddies. 
Their  parents  insist  upon 
maximum  wear.  Classic 
Tru-Trod  meet  these  re- 
quirements fully,  while 
presenting  that  appear- 
ance of  neatness  and  style 
which  is  such  an  import- 
ant factor  in  influencing  a 
customer  to  purchase. 

CLASSIC 
TRU-TROD 

Fall  Samples  now  ready 


CLASSIC 


GETTY  &  SCOTT,  LIMITED 

GALT,       -  ONTARIO 
Makers  of  the  ^'Classic"  Shoe  for  children. 


10 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


March,  1919 


We  use  this  space  this  issue 
to  give  our  customers  the  ad- 
vantage of  our  information 
of  the  leather  situation. 


I 


Market  indications  point  to  still 
higher  prices.  Calf,  Kid  and  Sole 
Leather  show  an  increase  and  are  still 
on  the  rise.  Shoes  will  certainly  not  be 
cheaper  for  a  very  considerable  time, 

We  desire  that  our  customers 
shall  thoroughly  understand  this,  so  that 
they  may  pick  up  their  stock  or,  at  least, 
place  orders  early. 

Our  forty-live  lines  of  "In  Stock," 
are  at  your  disposal. 


If  you  have  not  yet  received  a  copy 
of  our  handsome  catalogue  write 
for  it  to-day.  It  displays  the  full 
Slater  Line. 


The  Slater  Shoe 

LIMITED 

Montreal,  Canada 


V, 


March,  1919 


FOOTWEAR   IN  CANADA 


11 


J  To  the  - 

Canadian 
Shoe  Trade 


WE  are  now  in  the  market  with  Linen  Thread.  The 
cessation  of  army  demands  places  us  in  a  position 
to  supply  you  with  Barbour's,  Finlayson's,  and  Knox's 
standard  brands  of  thread. 

The  superior  quality  of  our  threads  is  well  known  to 
the  shoe  trade.  True  economy  is  based  on  QUALITY,  not 
the  PRICE.  Shoes  stitched  with  a  cheap  grade  of  Linen 
or  Cotton  Thread  will  not  give  as  much  service  as  those 
stitched  with  our  STANDARD  makes  of  LINEN 
THREADS,  and  the  difference  in  the  cost  per  pair  is  hardly 
noticeable.  By  placing  your  orders  with  us  you  may  be 
sure  of  getting  the  best. 

We  carry  in  stock 

BARBOUR'S  FINLAYSON'S 
LINEN  THREADS     LINEN  THREADS 

for  Goodyear  Welt  for 

Lockstitch  Goodyear  Welt 

McKays  Turns  Lockstitch 

KNOX'S  LINEN  THREADS  for  McKays  and  Turns 

Also    STANDARD    SHOE    THREADS    FOR  HAND 
WORK,  and  all  kinds  of  UPPER  STITCHING 
THREADS. 


Frank  &  Bryce  Limited 

Toronto  ^  MONTREAL  >-  Quebec 


12 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


March,  1919 


Back  to 
Business 
with 

"The  Best 
Everyday 
Shoes" 

TO  THE  JOBBER 

The  steady  money-making  business  is  that  which  comes 
from  the  working  classes,  who  by  their  numbers  constitute 
the  jobbers'  principal  and  most  profitable  trade. 

It  is  this  trade  that 

"The  Best  Everyday  Shoe" 

obtains.  If  you  value  the  regular  flow  of  business  coming 
through  the  retailer  from  the  working  man  and  his  family 
you  can  secure  it  with  "The  Best  Everyday  Shoes^'  by  dint 
of  thorough  shoemaking,  good  serviceable  wear  and  reason- 
able price. 

If  you  have  not  yet  inspected  our  lines,  drop  us  a  card. 
Some  further  information  will  convince  you  there  is  a  lot  of 
available  business  for  you  with  "  The  Best  Everyday  Shoes" 
among  your  stock. 


The  T.  Sisman  Shoe  Co.,  Limited 

Aurora  Ontario 


March,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


13 


Hundreds  of  Retailers 


Will  Want  a  Case  of  This  Boot 


But 


Only  Twenty  Will  Be  Sold 


No.  15X  Men's  Brown  Seamless  Bal. 

Neolin  Sole,  Goodyear  Welt,  Medium  Recede,  $4.00 

3/6,  2,  5/7,  3,  8/8,  3,  3/9,  2,  1/10  to  each  case 

No.  115X  Boys'  Brown  Seamless  Bal. 

Acme  12  Gauge  Sole,  Goodyear  Welt,  Medium  Recede,  $3.60 

2/2,  3,  3  3,  4,  4/4,  5,  4/5,  5  to  each  case. 


Don't  Pass  This  Chance  Away 

Order  To-day 

The  Midland  Shoe  Company 


In 


Kingston 


Ontario 


Phone  691  W. 


14 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


March,  1919 


By  Their  Sales 
You  May  Know 
Three  Successful 

Shoes 

Shoes  carrying  with  them  an  assurance  of  satisfaction 
to  your  customers ;  an  important  factor  in  your  prospects  for 
increased  trade. 

You  cannot  afford  to  overlook  the  importance  of  these 
superb  lines. 


"MetropolitaN" 

WOMEN'S  McKAYS  MEN'S  WELTS 

"Patricia" 

WOMEN'S  WELTS 
AND  TURNS 


Daoust,  Lalonde  &  Co. 

Limited 

Montreal   -  Que. 

Branch  ;   METROPOLITAN   SHOE   CO.,    91  St.  Paul  St.  East 


"Paris" 

WOMEN'S  McKAYS 
MEN'S  WELTS 


March,  1119 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


McLaren  &  Dallas 


RUBBER  FOOTWEAR 

1 9 1 9  -  FaU  and  Winter  - 1 920 

Dreadnaught 
Veribest      -      Kant  -  Krack 
Dainty  Mode    -  Royal 
Bull  Dog 


THESE  Independent  Brands  of  reliable  rubbers  are  being  shown  by 
traveling  representatives  throughout  all  Canada  for  the  season  of  1919- 
1920,  and  our  suggestion  to  our  good  friends  who  have  been  handling  these 
well  known  lines,  and  who  know  their  merit  is 

Place  Your  Orders  Promptly 

when  our  traveler  calls  so  as  to  give  the  factory  a  chance  to  do  its  part  in 
getting  the  goods  to  you  early.  This  is  what  in  sporting  circles  would  be 
called  "Good  Team  play";  that  is,  where  each  one  does  his  part  for  the  suc- 
cess of  the  whole. 

To  those  who  haven't  handled  the  "Independent"  Brands  we  would  say 
that  perhaps  you  haven't  realized  what  good  trade  makers  they  are.  Ask 
the  opinion  of  the  dealer  who  has  sold  them  and  knows  how  good  a  thing  it 
is  to  have  pleased  rubber  customers. 

Our  travelers  are  now  on  the  road — 
one   of  them    will   see   you  soon. 

McLaren  &  Dallas  o::h 

30  Front  Street  West,  TORONTO 


16 


F  ()  O  T  W  l':  A  R    IN  CANADA 


March,  lUlU 


CITADEL  LEATHERS 


Black 


Glazed 


KID 

Gray    -     Mole  Brown 

HORSE 

Dull    -    Havana  Brown 


KIP 

Velour    -    Gun  Metal    -  Mahogany 

SHEEP 

Chrome  and  Combination 

in  all  Finishes 

SPLITS 

Black  -  Colors 

CHROME  SOLE 


J.  A.  SCOTT 


218  Notre  Dame  St.  W. 
MONTREAL 


566  St.  Valiers  St. 
QUEBEC 


Marcli,  I'Jil) 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


17 


"106"  LAST 
Made  in  All  Leathers 
Widths  r,  to  E 


"104"  LAST 
Made  in  All  Leathers 
Widths  B  to  E 


Marsh  Models 


of 

Highest  Merit 

Three  Marsh  Shoes  which 
are  proving  very  successful  as 
to  sales.  They  are  sold  in  30 
pair  cases  in  30  pairs  of  width. 
We  advise  you  to  order  early. 


The 


Wm.  A.  Marsh 

Company  Limiied 

QUEBEC   


'!)!)"  LAST 
AL'ide  in  All  Leathers 
Widllis  F.  to  E 


18 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


March,  1019 


IN  STOCK 


Line  361 — Fine  black  kid  bal,  %  fox,  plain 
toe,  syi  in.  Sea  Gull  Grey  Kid 
Top,  4  in.  Vamp,  13/8  Cuban  heel. 
Price  $7.00. 

Line  806 — Duchess  calf  bal,  J4  fox,  imitation 
square  wing  tip,  spray,  8J^  in.  No. 
.■)  Khaki  buck  top,  Vamp  Eyelet 
Row  and  top  No.  0  Perforations, 
4  in.  Vamp,  13/8  Cuban  heel. 
Price  $6.50. 


Line  437 — All  Champagne  kid  bal,  %  fox, 
plain  toe,  syi  in.  top,  4  in.  vamp, 
White  welt,  leather  Louis  heel 
enamelled  to  match.    Price  $7.50. 

Line  438 — All  white  kid  bal,  %  fox,  plain 
toe,  Sl4  in.  top,  4  in.  vamp,  white 
welt,  leather  Louis  white  enamel- 
led heel.    Price  $7.50. 


Terms  2%  30  days 
Subject  to  previous  sale. 

Packed  in  cases  ready  to  ship 

36  pr.  case — 6  prs.  A,   8  prs.  B,  13  prs.  C,  9  prs.  D. 

30  pr.  case — 7  prs.  B,  12  prs.  C,  11  prs.  D. 

18  pr.  case — 6  prs.  B,  12  prs.  C. 

12  pr.  case — C's  only,  3's  to  7's. 

Perth  Shoe  Company,  Limited 


Largest  Manufacturers  Exclusively  of 
Womerj's  Welts  in  Canada 


Perth 


Ontario 


March,  1910 


F  O  O  T  W  F  A  R    I  X    C  A  X  A  D  A 


1!> 


JAMES  ROBINSON 

Who  has  been  associated 
with  the  footwear  industry 
for  many  years  and  whose 
business  is  one  of  the  best 
known  in  the  Dominion  for 
high-class  footwear. 


AT  YOUR 
SERVICE 


Equipped  with  the  best 
lines  of  footwear,  as  well  as 
a  competent  staff,  organized 
to  give  the  utmost  in  service, 
we  have  unusual  facilities  for 
keeping  you  well  supplied  in 
merchandise  that  will  give 
you  and  your  customers 
complete  satisfaction.  We 
ask  your  inspection  of  our 
lines  either  by  visit  to  our 
showrooms,  or  by  writing  us 
for  Salesman  to  call. 

Care  in  the  filling  of 
every  order  and  promptness 
of  dispatch  are  features  of 
our  business  policy. 


James  Robinson 

Specialist  in  Fine  Footwear 

MONTREAL 


20 


FOOTWEAR    IX  CANADA 


March,  1919 


m 


m. 
I 


m  ii  ■■■^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 


BOSTONIAN 
SHOES 


The  best  line  you  can  offer 
your  customers  in  men's  and  women's 
serviceable  footwear.  The  new 
"BOSTONIAN"  models  exhibit 
selling  points  that  warrant  their 
choice  for  your  shelves.  They  are 
distinctive  in  style,  thorough  in  manu- 
facture and  capable  of  giving  absolute 
satisfaction  in  wear.  Don't  miss  these 
Bostonians.  We  have  an  efficient 
"In-Stock"  Service  to  take  care  of 
your  requirements. 


James  Robinson 

Specialist  in  Fine  Footwear 

]>10NTREAL 


lllllllllllUli!' 


March,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


21 


i 


m 


m 


m 


INDEPENDENT 
RUBBERS 


^  As  a  means  of  acquiring  a 
generous  share  of  the  rubber  trade, 
the  "INDEPENDENT"  range  is 
a  valuable  asset  to  the  retailer's  stock, 
because  it  is  so  well  suited  to  the  re- 
quirements of  the  public. 

We  are  ready  for  your  orders 
in  any  of  the  INDEPENDENT 
styles.  See  that  you  have  a  liberal 
supply  for  the  busy  fall  and  winter 
season. 

Don't  overlook  the  Speed 
King  Tennis  Shoes  for  summer. 
With  the  season  almost  here,  you 
should  tell  us  your  needs  now. 


James  Robinson 

Specialist  in  Fine  Footwear 

MONTREAL 


22 


FOOTWEAR   IN  CANADA 


March,  191!» 


THE  HOUSE  FOR 

FINE  FOOTWEAR  . 


James  Robinson 

Specialist  in  Fine  Footwear 

MONTREAL 


lillllHiii'iij 


March,  1919 


FOOTWEAR   IN  CANADA 


23 


The  Biggest  Event  of 
the  Season 

OUR  Spring  advertising  campaign,  which  started  the  first 
week  in  March,  will  reach  the  shoe-buying  public  on  a 
wider  scale  than  ever.  It  will  carry  into  the  homes  of  your 
customers  the  same  broad  minded,  impartial  advice  which  you 
have  learned  to  expect  from  Ames  Holden  McCready. 

No  matter  where  you  are,  you  can  hardly  fail  to  feel  the  effects 
of  this  campaign.  The  big  daily  newspapers  will  carry  our 
message  in  the  large  cities;  the  small 'town  dailies  and  week- 
lies will  spread  it  abroad;  the  farm  papers  will  carry  it  into 
thousands  of  countryside  homes.  We  shall  reach  returned 
soldiers  through  "The  Veteran,"  and  the  Daughters  of  the 
Empire  through  their  official  publication.  Nor  is  that  all.  A 
list  of  magazines  of  general  circulation  will  strengthen  and 
reinforce  the  whole  campaign.  It  is  our  object  to  reach  every 
buyer  of  shoes  in  Canada,  and  we  are  going  to  come  mighty 
close  to  it. 

Read  the  February  Number  of  "Shoe  Facts"  carefully,  and  get 
ready  to  secure'your  full  share  of  the  beneiit. 


AMES  HOLDEN  McCREADY 

LIMITED 

"Shoemakers  to  the  Nation" 

ST.  JOHN  MONTREAL         TORONTO         WINNIPEG         EDMONTON  VANCOUVER 


24 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


March,  1919 


Designed  to 
Help  the  Jobber 
Build  Business 


Let  us  show  you  our  new 

mo 

dels  for  next  season.    In  ad- 

dition  to  the  characteristic  relia- 

bility of  our  lines,  they  have  a 

smartness  and  style  which  will 

undoubtedly  play  a  strong  part 

in  footwear  trade  next  Fall. 

Our  samples  include  a  com- 

plete  line  of  McKay's  for  all  re- 

quirements   in   feminine  foot- 

wear,  also  canvas    shoes  for 
Summer  business.    We  will  be 
pleased  to  have  you  call  upon  us. 

We 

Sell 

Only 

To  Jobbers 

Gagnon,  Lachapelle  &  Hebert 

Shoe  Manufacturers 
55  Kent  St.        •  -  -  -  Montreal 


March,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


25 


DUCLOS  &  PAYAN 

COUNTERS 

Every  counter  carries  a  guarantee  backed  by  absolute  satisfaction  in 
the  past.  You  cannot  go  wrong  by  using  our  counters,  they  are  un- 
equalled. Our  long  experience  has  taught  us  to  fit  counters  to  any  last. 

We  also  supply  upper  and  sole  leather  of  the  very  best.    Let  us  quote 
you  on  these  supplies. 


Ed.  R.  Lewis,  45  Front  St  East 
Toronto 
Ontario  Selling  Agent 


Tannery  and  Factory :  ST.  HYACINTH E,  P.Q. 
Sales  Offices  and  Warehouses:  224  Lemoine  Street  MONTREAL 


26 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


March,  191<J 


For 
Your  Trade  in 


Women's  Lines 


Everything  desirable  in  feminine  footwear 
is  presented  in  all  samples  now  being  shown  by 
the  Canadian  Footwear  Co. 

We  particularly  call  your  attention  to  our 
Oxfords  and  Pumps  in  both  leather  and  white 
footwear  for  immediate  shipment. 

You  cannot  do  better  than  lay  in  a  good 
stock  of  these,  to  be  fully  prepared  for  Spring 
and  Summer  Selling. 

We  expect  a  large  demand  for  Oxfords, 
and  evidence  is  already  shown  of  the  immense 
popularity  of  our  line. 

Let  us  hear  from  you  immediately. 


Canadian  Footwear  Co. 

Limited 

MONTREAL 

Salesroom :  36  St.  Genevieve  St.       Factory :  Pointe-AuxMTrembles 


March,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


27 


iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiit^ 


The  Monarch  and 
Brandon  Shoes 

For  Well  Dressed  Men 

Our  years  of  manufacturing  experience  have  placed 
us  in  a  position  to  supply  our  customers  with  style 
and  quality  in  Men's  Fine  Welts,  second  to  none. 

We  are  now  in  a  position  to  resume  our  21  days 
service  which  we  featured  so  strongly  before  the 
war,  and  which  gave  such  satisfactory  service. 
From  this  date  all  mail  rush  orders  will  be  given 
this  21  days  service. 

Our  salesmen  are  now  in  their  territories  with  Fall 
samples,  one  of  the  best  lines  they  have  ever  shown. 

As  our  salesmen  will  be  unable  to  see  you  all  early 
in  the  season  kindly  wait  and  inspect  our  samples 
before  placing  your  orders. 


The  Brandon  Shoe  Co.,  Ltd. 

Brantford  -  Ontario 


iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 


38  FOOTWEAR   IN    CANADA  March,  i'ji9 


MONARCH 


Why  do  hundreds  of  merchants  continue  to  sell  "MONARCHS"  year 
after  year? 

Because  every  time  a  merchant  sells  a  pair  of  "MONARCHS"  he  makes 
his  profit  in  two  ways.  He  gives  his  customer  the  value  of  two  pairs, 
and  he  assures  himself  of  his  customer's  continued  patronage. 

Every  pair  of  "MONARCHS"  he  sells  builds  up  a  reputation  that 
brings  him  business  for  his  other  lines. 


"  'Monarchs'  Outwear  Others  Two  to  One'' 

PUT  THIS  SLOGAN  TO  WORK  FOR  YOU 


The  Miner  Rubber  Co.,  Ltd.,  Montreal 

Factories       -       GRANBY,  QUE. 


March,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


29 


The  "Miner"  Test  for  "Monarch"  Goods 


SEND   FOR  A  TRIAL  PAIR 

Sell  this  pair  to  that  customer  who  is  hardest  on  his  rubber 
footwear. 

After  they  have  been  worn  out,  ask  the  man  who  tried  them 
what  he  thinks  of  them. 

We  know  what  the  answer  will  be.  He'll  want  a  second 
pair — and  he'll  tell  his  friends.  Put  them  to  the  ''Miner" 
test.  The  harder  the  test  the  stronger  you'll  be  convinced 
that  you  have  a  real  interest  in  stocking  "Monarch" 
goods. 


The  Miner  Rubber  Co.,  Ltd.,  Montreal 

Factories      -       GRANBY,  QUE. 


30 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


Maicli,  11)11) 


Men's  Elkala  Blucher,  Black,  Tan  and  Mahogany 


Men's  Hockey  in  Mahogany,  Elkola  and  other  suitable  leathers 


Misses  School  Boot  in  Box  Calf  and  Colored  Leather 


CANADA'S 
STANDARD 
Staple  Shoe 

for  the  Whole  Family 

Quality  is  the  keynote  of  our  many  lines  of 
Footwear,  and  they  exhibit  thoroughness  of  ' 
shoe-making-  to  the  last  detail.    Their  value  to 
your  customers  will  be  evinced  by  ready  and 
satisfactory  sales. 

()ur  tra\'eller  will  soon  be  giving  you  a  call 
with  a  complete  range  of  samples  for  h'all, 
embracing  everything  from  infants'  to  men's 
high-cut  boots.  On  no  occount  miss  an  in- 
spection of  these  Williams'  .shoes. 

We  Specialize  in  Men's  and  Boy's 
High  Cut  Boots. 

Williams  Shoe 

Limited 

Brampion,  Ont. 


Branch  at  Regina 


Boy's  Brown  Willow  Calf  Bal 


March,  I'Jl!) 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


31 


STOCK  No.  12— Havana  Brown  Calf  Custom  Bal.  Talbot  Last 

NOT  merely  "just  as  good" — but  "something  better"  is 
this  line  of  Just  Wright  Shoes.  And  you  don't  have  to 
overbuy  to  find  out.  Try  a  dozen  pairs  some  day  soon.  It 
may  open  up  some  good  accounts  for  you— and  new  customers 
are  always  welcome.  You'll  like  this  In  Stock  service,  quick 
turnover,  and  all  that.    It  pays. 


IN  STOCK 


E.  T.  Wright  &  Co.,  Inc. 

St.  Thomas,  Ontario 


33  FOOTWEAR    IN    CANADA  March,  iyi<j 


What  is  your  alibi  for  this 
shoe  trouble? 

If  you  were  a  master  of  the  science  of  foot  comfort,  your  customers  should  not 
wear  out  the  soles  of  their  shoes  in  certain  spots  at  the  hall. 

To  the  trained  eye  the  cause — Anterior  Metatarsal  Arch  trouhle — is  readily  ap- 
parent.   The  shoe  is  not  at  fault  and  should  not  be  condemned.    Put  in  a  stock  of 

DlScholls 

Foot  Comfort  Appliances 

learn  how  to  rtt  them  scientilically  and  you  not  only  eliminate  your  shoe  complaints, 
but  you  will  relieve  and  correct  the  abnormal  foot  condition. 

As  a  result  you  win  a' life-long  friend  and  a  booster  for  your  business.  And  you 
are  shrewd  enough  to  know  what  this  means  to  a  retail  shoe  merchant. 

Note  carefully  the  three  illustrations.  The  shoe  is  the  visible  result,  the  linger 
points  to  the  seat  of  the  troulile  and  Dr.  Scholl's  Anterior  Metatarsal  Arch  Support 
relieves  the  pain  and  restores  the  foot  to  normal  condition. 

Thousands  of  the  most  progressive  shoe 
dealers,  in  metroi^olitan  cities,  as  well  as  small 
towns,  are  "cashing  in"  on  Dr.  .Scholl's  Foot 
Comfort  Service.  If  you  are  not  thoroughly 
familiar  with  what  this  service  is — if  you  are 
not  handling  Dr.  Scholl's  Foot  Comfort  Appli- 
ances and  Remedies — if  you  are  not  a  Gradu- 
ate Practipedist — now  is  the  time  to  fall  in  line 
and  develop  this  \'aluable  branch  of  your  shoe 
business. 


The  SchoU  Mfg.  Co.,Ltd. 

Largest  Makers  of  Foot  Appliances  in  the  World 

112  Adelaide  St.  E.,  TORONTO 

also 

Chicagfo  New  York  London 


Traie. 
Mark 


/ATCH  YOUR  CUSTOMERS*  FEET" 


March,  1919 


FOOTWEAK    IN  CANADA 


33 


For  Jobbers 


\Ve  arc  now  manufacturing-  a  complete  line  of  McKays 
for  infants,  children  and  misses.  It  has  been  our  aim  to  make 
a  shoe  for  juveniles  which  is  excelled  by  nothing  else  on  the 
market.  How  well  we  have  succeeded  you  ma}'  know  by  ex- 
amining our  product.    \\'rite  for  samples. 


Childrens  Shoe  Mfg,  Co.,  Limited 


11  Belleau  St. 


Quebec  City 


With  an  ui)-to-date  factory  equipment  and 
facilities  for  high  grade  production,  directed 
by  men  of  many  years  practical  experience, 
you  may  place  your  orders  with  us  knowing 
that  we  are  prepared  to  deliver  the  footwear 
of  our  claims. 


lillllllililllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll^ 

I  MADE   IN   CANADA  I 


Our  line  of  Channel  Cements,  Sole  Laying 
Cements,  Chrome  Cements,  and  Surefold 
is  a  quality  line. 

The  first  consideration  given  to  their  make- 
up is  QUALITY. 

You  may  depend  on  them  being  as  good  a 
Cement  as  can  be  made. 


I  Boston  Blacking  Company  | 

I  152  McGill  Street,  MONTREAL,  Canada  | 

liiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 


34 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


March,  lui!) 


Cotton 
Thread 


The  merits  of  Mooneyes  Thread  have  been  proven 
beyond  question.  Its  lustre,  strength  and  the  facility 
with  which  it  may  be  worked  have  gained  for  it  a  wide 
popularity. 

If  you  are  not  already  a  user  of  our  thread  we  shall 
be  pleased  to  mail  you  samples  on  request. 

Let  us  show  you  the  promptness  of  our  service  and 
the  reliability  of  our  supplies. 

The  A.  G.  Mooney  Company 


Toronto 
Ed.  R.  LEWIS 
45  Front  St.  East 


220  Lemoine  Street,  MONTREAL 


Quebec 
J.  P.  PARENT 
St.  VaJier  St. 


Have  You  Heard  About 

TheGlobePillowWelt? 


A  distinctive  feature  in  our  footwear  for  Misses,  Girls,  Child- 
ren and  Infants.  It  is  designed  with  special  regard  to  comfort 
and  ease  for  growing  feet.  The  Welt  is  sewn  right  into  the  shoe 
and  is  the  Genuine  Goodyear. 

The  soft  cushion  insole,  and  the  waterproof  cork  filling 
between  the  inner  and  outer  soles  are  two  features  that  help  to 
make  these  shoes  the  most  popular  on  the  market. 

GLOBE  SHOE  LIMITED 

Factory  TERREBONNE,  QUE. 

Selling  Agents 

L.  H.  PACKARD  &  CO.,  LIMITED 
MONTREAL,  P.Q. 


March,  I'Ji!)  FOOTWEAR   IN    CANADA  35  . 


A  Special 
Invitation 


■flTE    should   like   you,  Mr. 
W  V     Jobber,  to  visit  our  show- 

rooms, and  see  what  we  are  offer- 
ing for  the  coming  season's  busi- 

If you  are  unable  to 
call  on  us,  we  will  be 
pleased    to  forward 
samples  of  any  of  our 
lines.      Let  us  hear 

ness.    We  believe  that  the  Aird 
Shoes,  now  being  shown,  will 
particularly  commend  themselves 
to  you — there  are  many  reasons. 
Come  and  see  them. 

from  you  early. 

Aird  &  Son 

Registered 

MONTREAL 


iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 


36 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


March,  1919 


Be  Ready  for  the  Rush 


Our  Travellers 
are  now 
on  the  road 


with  a  good  stock  of 

Independent  Brands 

''Dainty  Mode''  ''Kant  Krack'' 
"RoyaV  "VeribesV* 
and  "DreadnaughV* 

The  wise  dealer  knows  that  rub- 
ber footwear  sales  depend  largely 
upon  weather  conditions.  A  spell 
of  sloppy  or  wet  weather  will  cause 
a  line  up  for  rubbers  when  the  bus- 
iness has  been  quiet  for  weeks. 

Returns  from  your  trade  in  rubbers  will  be  success- 
ful in  accordance  with  your  ability  to  meet  these  fluc- 
tuating demands.  You  should  fortify  your  business  by 
keeping  a  good  stock  on  hand  to  be  ready  for  the  line- 
up when  it  comes. 

Now  is  the  time  to  place  your  orders  for  next  season. 
You  cannot  be  too  early,  you  may  easily  be  too  late. 
Stock  early  with  rubbers  which  always  draw  repeat 
orders— INDEPENDENT. 


The  Independent  Rubber  Co.,  Limited 

MERRITTON  ONTARIO 


March,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


37 


Independent 

Rubbers  for 

Season  1919-20 

Now  Ready — 

Our  representative 
will  call  on  you. 


Amherst  Root  &  Shoe  Co.,  Ltd., 

Amherst  Boot  &  Slioe  Co.,  Ltd., 

E.  A.  Dagg  &  Company, 

A.  W.  Aiilt  &  Company,  Limited. 

White  Shoe  Company, 

McLaren  &  Dallas, 

The  London  Shoe  Company,  Limited, 


OUR  WHOLESALERS 


Andierst,  N..S. 

Halifax,  N.S. 

Calgary,  Alta. 

Ottawa,  Ont. 

Toronto,  Ont. 

Toronto,  Ont. 

London,  Ont. 


Kilgom',  Rimer  Comp.Tny.  T-imited. 

The  T.  Lcckie  Company,  Limited, 

James  Robinson, 

r.rown  Rochette,  Limited. 

T.  Long  &  Brother, 

Powers,  Limited, 


Winnipeg.  Man. 
Vancouver.  B.C. 
Montreal,  One. 
Quebec,  Que. 
Collingwood,  On! 
Edmonton.  Alta. 


The  Independent  Rubber  Co.,  Limited 


MERRITTON 


ONTARIO 


38 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


March,  I'Jl'J 


For  Jobbers  Only 

MEN'S 
BOYS' 
YOUTHS' 

Str  le  Nailed  and 
Standard  Screw  Shoes 

Manufactured  by 

MILTON  SHOE  CO. 

Can  be  seen  anytime  at  my 
Sample  Rooms 

Sales 

Representative  Managfer 

HARRY  E.  THOMPSON 

10  Victoria  Street  MONTREAL 


Patented  Patented 
Dec.  30th,  1913  Oct,  26th,  1915 

Vulco-Unit  Box  Toe 

SUMMED  UP  IN  THREE  WORDS 

GIVES 

Ec  onomy 
Style  .  .  . 
Durability 

Absolutely  Water-proof  and  Perspiration-proof 

BECKWITH  BOX  TOE  LIMITED 

Sherbrooke,  Quebec,  Canada 


Women's  White  Canvas 
and  Satin  Slippers 

turns  only** 

Latest  up-to-date 

Lasts  and  Patterns 

Manufactured  by 

Wakefield  Slipper  Co. 

Sanbornville,  N.H. 
Canadian 


March,  IDli) 


I'  C)  O  T  W    A  R    I  N    C  A  X  A  I )  A 


Patent  Leather  Makers 
to  the  Empire 


Offices  and  one  of  the  factories  of  the  A.  R.  Clarke  organization,  wlnich  supplies  a  trade  of  world-wide  dimensions.  The  total 
production  of  1918  was  over  two  million  dollars,  and  covered  all  parts  of  the  British  Empire  and  the  United  States  of  America. 


A.  R.  Clarke  &  Co.,  Ltd. 

MONTREAL  TORONTO  QUEBEC 


40 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


March,  1919 


Some  idea  may  be  formed  from  the  accompanying-  jiliotographs  oC  the 
ecjuipment  and  splendid  facihties  for  maintaining-  a  large  output  of  high  grade 
materials  and  products.  The  A.  R.  Clarke  Company,  since  its  establishment 
in  1852.  has  enjoyed  a  steady  growth  which  has  made  it  the  largest  manu- 
facturing concern  of  its  kind  in  the  Empire. 


A.  R.  Clarke  &  Co.,  Ltd. 

MONTREAL  TORONTO  QUEBEC 


March.  1919  F  O  O  T  W  R  A  R   I N    C  A  N  A  D  A  41 


Throughout  the  plant,  Clarke's  Patent  Leather  is  handled  with  such  ex- 
acting care  in  each  process  of  its  manufacture  as  to  make  its  reputation  for 
faultless  quality,  unimpeachable. 

Users  of  Clarke's  know  how  well  we  maintain  our  quality  standards. 

This  is  largely  the  reason  for  our  success,  and  the  success  of  manufac- 
turers who  use  our  products. 


A.  R.  Clarke  &  Co.,  Ltd. 

MONTREAL  TORONTO  QUEBEC 


42 


I'OOTVVEAR    IN  CANADA 


March,   1 !)]'.! 


Mr.  Griffith  B.  Clarke  under  whose  leadership 
the  business  has  grown  very  rapidly,  until  it 
now  occupies  the  proud  position  of  the  greatest 
Patent  Leather  concern  in  the  British  Empire. 


A.  R.  Clarke  &  Co.,  Ltd 

MONTREAL  TORONTO  QUEBEC 


March,  1919 


FOOTWKAR    IN  CANADA 


4.T 


FOR 
RETAIL 
FAMILY 
TRADE 


In  Stockino-  Miner  shoes,  the  retailer  is  a 

ble  to  su])- 

his  customers,  both  cliildren  and  adults. 

with  foot- 

wear  of  uniform  make.    He  is  sure  of  beini;- 

able  to  re- 

commend to  them  a  shoe  in  which  he  has  ah 

solute  con- 

lldence,  a  reliable  ])roduct  in  every  way. 

Vou  certainly  cannot  s^'o  wron;:"-  with  M 

iner  Shoes 

■■'for  all  the  family."    Order  early  and  stock  v 

•ell. 

The  Miner  Shoe  Company,  Limited 

MONTREAL  OTTAWA  QUEBEC 

Agents  for  the  Celebrated  Miner  Rubber  Footwear 


Miner 
Service 
Gives 
Satis- 
faction 


44 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


March,  191  (» 


OUR  TRAVELLERS 
NOW  OUT 


The  Lady  Belle  Shoe  Company  Limited 


KITCHENER 
ONTARIO 


March,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


45 


KITCHENER'S 

—  COMING  

SHOE  STYLE  SHOW 

The  first  Canadian  Shoe  Style  Show  will  be  held  in  Kitchener,  Ontario, 
from  the  17th  to  the  23rd  of  July,  1919. 

This  city,  well  known  for  its  high  place  in  the  output  of  Canadian  Foot- 
wear, will  present  to  the  trade  a  showing  of  Canadian  shoes  produced  there 
and  in  adjoining  towns. 

At  least  thirty  manufacturers  will  exhibit  for  your  inspection,  shoes  and 
allied  products,  representative  of  Kitchener's  activity  and  prominence  in  the 
trade. 

The  show  will  be  held  in  the  city's  splendid  auditorium.  Here,  visiting 
buyers  will  secure  a  comprehensive  and  accurate  knowledge  of  the  import- 
ant development  of  the  shoe  and  leather  industry  in  this  part  of  Ontario. 
Prominence  will  be  given  the  Season's  newest  in  style. 

Kitchener  has  an  important  message  for  the  trade.  You  owe  it  to  your 
business  to  see  the  show  without  fail. 

Address  inquiries  to  Mr.  J.  P.  Scully,  Secretary,  Kitchener,  Ontario. 


Tell  Your  Friends  About  It 


F  C )  ( )  'I'  W  I'.  A  1>1    1  X    C  A  N  A  D  A 


March, 


Life-Buoy  Footwear 


Superior  Quality 


Our  efforts  are  devoted  to 
the  making  of  Rubber  Footwear 
only,  resulting  in  a  brand  of 

Superior  Quality 

See  a  Life-Buoy  Salesman 
before  you  place  for  Fall  1919 
delivery. 

The  Kaufman  Rubber  Co.,  Limited 

Kitchener       -  Ontario 

Complete  Sorting  Stocks  carried 
in  all  principal  Canadian 
Cities 


Kitchener  is  located  in  the  centre  of  Canada's  Largest  Province 


March,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


Superior  Quality 


Life- Buoy  Footwear 


You  cannot  afford  to  take 
chances  on  the  Quahty  of  the 
Rubber  Footwear  you  buy. 

Life-Buoys 

will  give  you  the  maximum  of 
wear  and  real  dollars  in  profit. 


The  Kaufman  Rubber 

Co.j  Limited 

Kitchener       -  Ontario 


All  inquiries  receive 
most  prompt  and 
careful  attention. 


Kitchener's  Manufacturers  are  organized  for  Quality  of  Production 


FOOTWEAR   IN  CANADA 


March,  191!) 


H.  o.  Mcdowell 


IMPORTERS  UUro^liT)!)  JOBBERS 
^  MANUFACTURERS  V'^>-^^^^  <^  A I  P5;  AfSPNT*? 


H.  N.  LINCOLN 


SALES  AGENTS 


EASTERN  BRANCH 
401  CORISTINE  BUILDING 

MONTREAL 


Representing 

American  Lacing  Hook  Co. 

Waltham,  Mass. 
Lacing  Hooks  and  Hook 
Setting  Machines 

Armour  Sand  Paper  Works 
Chicago,  111. 
Crystolon  Paper  and  Cloth 
for  Buffing  and  Scouring 

Boston  Leather  Stain  Co. 

Boston,  Mass. 
Inks,  Stains,  Waxes,  etc. 
Cyclone  Bleach 

The  Ceroxylon  Co., 

Boston,  Mass. 
Ceroxylon,  the  Perfect 
Liquid  Wax 

Dean  Chase  Co., 

Boston,  Mass. 
Shoe  Goods,  Cotton 
Thread 

The  Louis  G.  Freeman  Co., 

Cincinnati,  O. 
Shoe  Macliinery 

Hazen,  Brown  Co., 

Brockton,  Mass. 
Waterproof  Box  Toe 
Gum,  Rubber  Cement 

Lynn  Wood  Heel  Co., 

Keene,  N.H. 
Wood  Heels  and  Die 
Blocks. 

Markem  Machine  Co., 

Boston,  Mass. 
Marking  and  Embossing 
Machines,  Compounds, 
Inks,  etc. 

M.  H.  Merriam  &  Co., 

Boston,  Mass. 
IJiiidiiig,  Staying,  etc. 

Puritan   Mfg.  Co., 

Boston,  Mass. 
Wax   Thread  .Sewing 
Machines 

Poole  Process  for  Good- 
year Insoles 

The  S.  M.  Supplies  Co., 
Factory  Supplies, 
Needles,  etc. 

H.  S.  &  M.  W.  Snyder,  Inc., 
Boston,  Mass. 
Kids,  Cabrettas  and  Horse 

J.  Spaulding  &  Sons  Co., 

N.  Rochester,  N.H. 
Guaranteed    Fibre  Coun- 
ters, Fibre  Innersoling 

The  Textile  Mfg.  Co., 

Toronto,  Ont. 

Shoe  Laces 


United  Stay  Co., 

Cambridge,  Mass. 
Leather  and  Imitation 
Leather  Facing,  Welting, 
etc. 


SHOE 


MACHINERY  FINDINGS 
AND  FACTORY  SUPPLIES 


MAIN  OFFICE  AND  FACTORY 
37  FOUNDRY  ST.  &. 

KITCHENER 


THE  LARGEST  SHOE  FACTORY  SUPPLY  HOUSE  IN  CANADA 


If  You  Make  White  or  Colored  Shoes 

YOU  NEED 

Rubber  Paper 

It  is  the  Ideal  Covering  for  Keeping  Shoes  Clean  in  the 

works — waterproof,  oilproof,  greaseproof,  very  durable, 
being  Creped  it  stretches  and  it  Does  Not  Tear— Works 
easily  in  cutting,  sewing  and  pulling  over — Costs  only 
a  fraction  as  much  as  cloth,  cheaper  than  most  paper. 
We  will  gladly  submit  Sample  for  a  Practical  Test. 

Made  by 

HAZEN-BROWN  CO. 

BOSTON,  MASS. 

Who  also  make 

Rubber  Cement  for  all  purposes  HAZENITE 
Halbro  Waterproof  BOX  TOE  GUM 
BACKO  Paste  Cement  and  Pasting  Machine 
We  Stock  Rubber  Paper,  Halbro  and  Backo 


All  good  finishers  recognize 
this  Trade  Mark.  They 
know  it  Stands  for  Highest 
Grade,  Dependable  Finishes 

for  all  grades  of  Shoes. 


It  is  not  necessary  for  you  to  import  your  finishes,  we 
have  a  complete  line  of  finishes  to  meet  the  require- 
ments of  any  and  all  kinds  of  leather. 

Inksy   Stains,   Dressing,  Dyes, 

Waxes  and  Polishes 
THE  FAMOUS  CYCLONE  BLEACH 


If  you  are  not  familiar  with  these  goods  you  owe  it  to 
yourself  to  get  acquainted.    Now  is  the  time. 

We  are  ready  to  submit  samples  and  demonstrate. 
Kitchener  Possesses  Excellent  Railway  and  Shipping  Facilities 


March,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


ANNOUNCEMENT 


To  Manufacturers  of 
High  Grade  Welts  and  Turns 

We  have  set  aside  one  of  our 
tan  yards  for  the  production  of 

AMERICAN  UNION 
SOLE  LEATHER 

Samples  of  which  will  be  available  in 
the  very  near  future  in 

Crops,  Backs  and  Bends 

With  full  appreciation  for  the  kind  con- 
sideration you  have  given  our  lines  in 
the  past  and  soliciting  your  continued 
patronage. 

We  are, 

Yours  for  the  best  in  Sole  Leather 

The  Breithaupt  Leather 

Company,  Limited 

Manufacturers  of 

"  The  Standard  of  Canadian  Sole  Leather  " 

Kitchener     Toronto     Montreal  Quebec 


3) 


50 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


Marcli,  11)111 


Our  Travelers  Are  Now 

in  Their 
Respective  Territories 


— with  a  full  range  of  samples  for  the  coming  season.  Your  time  spent  in  looking  over  their 
samples  will  prove  a  good  investment  to  you. 

The  "AHRENS"  shoes,  stylish,  yet  good  fitting  staples,  for  Men,  Women,  Boys, 
Youths,  Misses  and  Children  in  both  McKays  and  Standard  Screw,  are  better  than  ever. 

The  "CHUMS"  welts  for  Boys  and  Girls,  ranging  in  sizes  3  to  7^^,  8  to  10^,  and  11  to 
2,  will  daily  increase  your  trade  and  strengthen  your  profits. 

All  lines  are  our  own  manufacture,  and  most  of  them  on 
our  in-stock  lists,  so  that  nothing  is  lacking  as  to  quality, 
quantity  or  service. 


AV^  limited 

•^KITCHENER,  ONT. 


The 


pENS 

Shoe 


Hydro  City  Shoes 


A  Line  of  Solid  Leather  and  one 
of  the  Best  Selling  Shoes 
You  Can  Handle 

An  essential  staple  for  every  stock.    It  has  real  merit  as  a  seller  and  you 
can  offer  it  to  your  customers  with  every  assurance  of  giving  complete 

SSltlsi'SLCtlOIlt  • 

Have  you  your  stock  of  HYDRO  SHOES  for  1919  ? 

Hydro  City  Shoe 

Manufacturers 


Kitchener 


Limited 


Ontario 


Seventy  per  cent  of  Kitchener's  People  Own  Their  Homes 


March,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


51 


Shoe  Manufacturers'  Goods 


< 


rcM0\)IS-CH/O»6(?; 


Canvases,  Topping  Fabrics,  Linings,  Laces,  Buttons,  Stays,  Bindings,  etc. — 
practically  everything  used  in  the  manufacture  of  shoes  except  leather  and 
hardware— one  of  the  longest  lines  in  the  United  States. 


Eve  Cloth 


?EG.  U  S  PAT.  OFF. 


The  Perfect  White  Shoe  Fabric 

The  strongest  and  longest 
wearing  shoe  hnings  made 


FARNSWORTH,  HOYT  COMPANY 


BOSTON 

Samples  and  prices  of  any  line  on  request 


Lawrence  Leathers 

Are  Known  and  Used  the  World  Over 

A.  C.  LAWRENCE  LEATHER  CO. 

BOSTON,  MASS.,  U.S.A. 


March,  I'Jl'J 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


Originators  of 


NUBUCK 

(Trade  Mark  Reed.) 

Makes  cool,  comfort- 
able shoes. 
Easiest  to  keep  clean 
of  any  suede  finished 
side  leather. 
White  and  popular 
shades. 


Originators  of 

ACLOSUEDE 

and 

ACLOTAN 

Chrome  tanned. 

Predominant  in  the 
domestic  glove  lea- 
ther field. 


Originators  of 

BLACK 
DIAMOND 

(Trade  Mark  Regd.) 

Chrome  Patent  Sides 

Black  and  Colors 

The  most  extensive- 
ly sold  Chrome  Pat- 
ent Sides  on  the 
market. 

Originators  of 

GUN  METAL 

(Trade  Mark  Regd.) 

CALF 

The  Old  Reliable 

No  other  calf  leather 
has  ever  approached 
the  degree  of  popu- 
larity established  bv 
Gun  Metal  Calf. 

Black  and  Colors 


Originators  of 

WEILDA 

(Trade  Mark  Regd.l 

Suede-finish  Calf. 
Very    popular  witli 
our  export  trade. 

Originators  of 

COLORED 

GUN  METAL 

(Trade  Mark  Regd.) 

SIDES 

Colors — Tan,  Brown, 
Mahogany,  Cherry 
Red,  Coco. 

Originators  of 

"HUB" 

Pigskin  Welting 

"HUB" 

Pigskin  Sole  Leather 


c- Lawrence  leatuer 

BOSTON:  "^ASS-  U.S.Ao 


NEW  YORK 


CHICAGO 
ROCMESTITR 


ST  LOUIS  CINCINNATI 
GLOVERSVILLE 


54 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


Marcli,  1919 


Henwood&Nowak,  Inc. 


AMERICAN 


GLAZED  KIP 


BLACKS 

and 

COLORS 


Henwood  &  Nowak,  Inc 

95  South  St.,  BOSTON,  MASS,  U.  S.  A. 

Tannery    WILMINGTON,  DEL.,  U.  S.  A. 


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illllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllM^^ 


iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 


March,  1010 


FOOTWEAR    TN  CANADA 


55 


FRENCH'S  UPPER  HANGERS 

Fill  a  Long  Felt  Want 

In  the  Stitching  Room 


2-Arm  Style 

Patented  April  26,  1910 


These  hangers  will  keep 
your  uppers  from  being 
soiled  and  prevent  cases 
from  being  mixed.  The 
hangers  are  made  to 
stand  upright  by  simply 
inserting  the  twisted 
wire  projection  at  the 
bottom  into  a  hole  in 
the  bench.  The  hook 
piece  at  the  top  is  not 
used  until  the  required 
number  of  uppers  are 
strung  on  the  standards. 

When  filled  the  whole 
frame  is  removed  from 
the  bench  avfd  hung 
on  a  rod  for  the  next 
operation. 


4- Arm  Style 

Patented  March  8.  1910 


Once  used  you  would  never  be  without  them 

Order  a  sample  dozen  and  try  them  out 

THE  S.  M.  SUPPLIES  COMPANY 

121  Beach  Street,  Boston,  Mass.,  U.S.A. 


56 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


March,  1919 


White  Shoe  Fabrics 

in  all  qualities  for  all  grades  of  shoes 

Polar-Kloth 

The  exceptional  merits  of  this  fabric  have  developed  a  tremendous 
demand.  If  you  want  a  high  grade  cloth  at  a  reasonable  price,  that 
has  strength,  finish  and  wearing  qualities,  Polar-Kloth  will  meet 
your  strictest  requirements. 

Worsted  Corkscrew 

We  can  deliver  at  once  all  the  popular  shades  in  an  exceptionally 
good  quality  in  about  eighteen  ounce  weight.  Fabrics  in  colors 
tor  fall  wear  are  coming  strong.     Are  you  showing  samples  ? 

Titeseam  Thread 

We  manufacture  ,  and  guarantee  for  Welt,  Turn,  McKay  and 
Shuttlework. 

Cotton  Goods 

We  carry  Twills,  Drills,  Flannels,  Sheetings,  Ducks,  Poplins. 

THOMAS,  LAKE  &  WHITON,  Inc. 

Manufacturers  and  Converters 
103  Bedford  Street  (Cor.  Lincoln)  BOSTON,  Mass.,  U.S.A. 


March,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


F  O  ( )  'I'  W    . \  R    1  X    C  A  X  A  D  A 


March.   11)  in 


Only  One  Line  of  Marking  Ink 

manufactured  that  will  give  satisfactory  results  on  Power  Marking  Machines, 
and  that  is  the  Ink  manufactured  and  sold  by 

THE  MARKEM  MACHINE  CO, 

Other  compounds  may  be  offered,  but  this  is  the  only  one  especially  pre- 
pared for  our  machines. 

If  you  have  any  material  in  your  factory  on  which  you  fail  to  get  satis- 
factory results  with  any  Ink  Stamping  Machine,  write  us  for  information  re- 
garding our 

SILVER  KING  MARKING  MACHINE 


and  our 


Silver  Marking  Compound 

or  better  yet,  send  us  sample  and  let  us  mark  it  and  return  it  for  your  inspection. 

MARKEM  MACHINE  COMPANY 

Manufacturers  of  Marking  and  Embossing  Machines  for  the  shoe  manufacturer's  every  requirement 
232  Summer  Street,  BOSTON,  MASS. 


The  ],.  Ci.   Freeman  Co..  finciniiati,  Ohiu. 
DoUiver  X-   Itros..  S.-m    Francisco,  C"al. 
Maniifacluri.  1  s'   .Suiiplies   Co.,  St.   Loui.s,  Mo. 
J.  .Sinies,  .Milwaukee.  Wis. 


().  .1.   Locke  Co.,  .\e\v    York.    .\.  Y. 
Markeni  Macliine  Co..  Kochestcr,   .\.  ^■. 

International  Supply  Co.,  Kitchener  anil   .Mcnitreal,  Canaila 


The  C.  G.  Flynn  Leather  Co. 

107  South  Street,  BOSTON,  Mass. 

The  Largest  Leather  Remnant  and  Scrap  Leather  Dealers  in  the  World 

SPECIAL  LIST  OF  OFFERINGS 


Sole  Leather  Department 

40  tons  Oak  Buffalo  Hind  Shanks. 

20  tons  Oak  Buffalo  Fore  Shanks. 

50  tons  Oak  Bellies. 

15  tons  Extra  Wide  Russet  Leather 
Bellies. 

8  tons  Russet  Leather  Pieces. 

100  tons  Oak  and  Hemlock  Heeling 
from  5  to  12  cents  per  pound. 

100  tons  Oak  and  Hemlock  Half  Heel- 
ing from  I  to  5  cents  per  pound. 

Factory  Cut  Soles,  Outer  Soles,  Inner 
Soles  and  Half  Soles. 


Upper  Leather  Department 

20  tons  Black  Wax  Split  Shoulders. 
60  tons  Natural  or  Tan  Split  Shoulders 
and  large  Remnants  suitable  for  cutting 
shoes. 

75  tons  Upholsterei"s'  Remnants  from 
the  Automobile  and  Carriage  Trade, 
10  to  35  per  pound  from  hand  and  ma- 
chine Buffed  Leather. 

100  to  200  tons  Upper  Leather,  Hat 
Sheep,  Hat  Skivers,  Book  Sheep  and 
Imitation  Leather  Remnants  at  various 
prices. 

ID  tons  Imitation  Leather  pieces  I  yd. 
and  up  36"  to  55"  wide. 


Correspondence  Solicited  from  Buyers  and  Sellers 


March,  191SJ 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


59 


SPAULDING'<: 

^Fibre  Counters  C/ 


60 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


March,  VdV.) 


FOOTWEAR  SPECIALTIES 


Watch  for  our  salesman,  Mr.  A.  L.  Kenney,  who  expects  to  call  on.  the  trade  between  Montreal  and  Toronto  at 
about  this  time. 

The  Wiley ^BickfordM Sweet  Company 

HARTFORD,  Conn.  (Address  either  Office)  WORCESTER,  Mass. 


A  QUARTER  CENTURY 

ENGAGED  IN  THE  PRODUCTION  AND  DISTRIBUTION  OF 

FELT 

Naturally  FITS  US  to  Meet  Every  Demand  made  for  FELT.  FELT  has  be- 
come the  Most  Common  Product  usedy  outside  of  Leather,  in  the  Making  of 
Shoes.  It  is  Used  for  BOX  TOES,  UPPER  and  TOPPING  STOCK,  SOLES, 
INSOLES,  LININGS,  CUSHION  SOLES,  FILLER,  HEEL  PADS,  SHOE 
ROLLS,  BUFFING  ROLLS,  SHOE  RACKS,  Etc.-Its  Uses  Increase  Daily. 

The  SUPERIOR  Line  of  FELTS  Meets  ALL 
THESE  NEEDS  and  Many  More 

Send  for  Samples  and  Prices 

BOSTON  FELT  MFG.  CO. 

112  Beach  Street,  BOSTON,  MASS.,  U.S.A. 


March,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


GEORGE  C.  VAUGHAN 

Tanneries  at  Peabody,  Massachusetts,  U.  S.  A. 


IVORY  SOLES-IVORY  WELTING 

Greatly  Increased  Capacity.  Prompt  Deliveries. 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


.Marcli.  1919 


WILO 


Re<j.  USA 

Color  14— Smooth  WILO  Sniift  Sides— Dark  P.rown  Shade. 

Color  18 — Smooth  WILO  Snuft  Sides — Medium  Brown  Shade  (Next  Season's  Color). 
Color  23— Smooth  WILO  Snuft  Sides— Light  Tan  Shade  (Our  Latest  Color). 

Chocolate  Chrome  Retanned  (Army  and  Civilian) 

Chocolate  WILO  Elk  Full  Grain  Sides. 

Coffee      WILO  Elk  Full  Grain  Sides. 

Coft'ee  W^P.  WILO  Elk  Full  Grain  Sides. 

r.lack       WILO  Elk  Full  Grain  Sides. 

Chocolate  WILO  Elk  Full  Grain  Sides. 

(Special  Ijoardeil — medium  price) 

Tanned  I'.narded  WII.O  Fidl  Grain  Side.s — Medium  I'.rown  Sliade  (Most  Popular  Color  for  Export) 
Illack  lioaidcd  WII.O  Snuft  Sides— (Our  liest  Tilack  Exi)ort  Line) 
lilack   i'.oavded  WII.O    Print   Snuft   Sides  — (A  cheap  line) 

WILO  SPLITS 
Gusset,  Shoe  and  Glove 

Tan,  Cliocolate,  Illack,  Pearl,  N'ellow,  Khaki 


Exclusive  Selling  Agents 


C.  D.  KEPNER  LEATHER  CO. 


223  West  Lake  St.,  Chicago 


139  South  St.,  Boston 


65  SOUTH  ST.,  Boston. 
HORSE  FRONTS  -HORSE  BUTTS 


MADE  IN 

MAHOGANY,  PEARL  AND 
OYSTER  GREY,  MEDIUM 
AND  LIGHT  TAN 


MADE  IN 

BLACK,  TAN  AND 

MAHOGANY,  INCLUDING 
BOX  AND  SPECIAL  FIGURES 


INDIA  GOAT  and  CHROME  KID 
HAVANA  BROWN  and  OYSTER  GREY 
ALL  POPULAR  COLORS  and  SHADES 


OOZE  SPLITS 
For  Gussets 


CANADIAN  AGENTS 


DOPED  SPLITS 
Better  known  as  YORKO 
in  Black  &  Colors 


INTERNATIONAL  SUPPLY  GO. 


KITCHENER,  ONT. 


MONTREAL,  QUE. 


March,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


63 


I  Has  no  Superior  for  its  Beautiful,  Smooth,  Soft  Grain.  It 
I  is  worn  by  the  Most  Fastidious  Leaders  of  Fashion.  Always 
I     the  same — P.  &  V.  Standard. 


I  Have  won  for  themselves  a  Recognition  well  in  keeping  with  j 

I  that  Standard  of  Quality  and  Durability  which  Users  of  these  | 

I  Leathers  will  Testify  to.     Soft  in  Feel,  Smooth  in  Color,  the  | 

I  Right  Stretchiness,  Easily  Cleaned.     Always  made  true  to  P.  &  j 

I  V.  STANDARD.     These  Features  have  been  Responsible  for  | 

I  the  Big  Popularity  of  P.  &  V.  Glove  Leathers.  | 

I  Made  of  Full  Grain  Horsehide  and  Cowhide  | 

I  '                   both  in  Buffed  Split  and  Full  Grain.  | 

I  Send  for  Samples  before  the  Rush  1 

1  Canadian  Agents :  | 

I  Pfister  &  Vogel  Company,  87  South  St.,  Boston,  Mass.  | 


1 


illlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllil^  East  Side  of  Menominee  Call  and  Kid  Tannery  lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllllliy 


64 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


March,  1019 


for 

Men  and  Women 

Attention  to  the  smallest  details, 
creation  of  features  of  merit  and 
styles  that  are  attractive  and  cor- 
rect, impart  to  these  shoes  the 
values  that  give  them  precedence. 


EAST  WEYMOUTH,  MASS,  U.  S.  A. 


The  "NATIONAL  SHOE  FINDINGS"  Trade-Mark 

Stamped  on  All  Shoe  Goods  Means 

BEST  WORKMANSHIP   BEST  QUALITY 

UNIFORMITY-  PROPER  FITTING  QUALITIES 

All  Stock  is  Cut  by  Machine  with  the  following  advantages — 

Factory  routine  minimized.  Better  efficiency.  Die  cost  eliminated.  Saving  in  factory  space.  These  arc 
valuable  considerations    a    manufacturer  of  shoes  sooner  or  later  learns. 


LININGS 

Sock 
Vamp 
Quarter 
Tongue 


TIPS 

Oil  Paper 
Oil  Sheeting 
Rubber  Backing 
Flannel,  Drill,  etc. 


STAYS 

Button,  Eyelet 
Rubberized 
Heart,  Vamp 


FILLERS 
Felt 

Tar  Felt 
Felt  Paper 
Leatherljoard 


BOX  TOES 
Felt 

Buckram 
Canvas 
Burlap 
Flannel 


MISCELLANEOUS 

Leatherboard  Insoles 
Heel  Pads 
Shank  Veneers 


Tn  sending  for  .samples,  stale  specifications,  giving  slock  clippings  an<l  paper  patterns, 
showing  sizes  wanted.     Let  us  (|uotc  yon  prices. 

NATIONAL  SHOE  FINDINGS  CO.  Lynn,  Mass.  Tel:  2586  Lynn 

Canadian  Agents: -INTERNATIONAL  SUPPLY  CO  ,  Montreal,  Que.,  Kitchener,  Ont. 


March,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


65 


SELBY  SHOES 

FOR  WOMEN 

give  real  satisfaction,  because  they  are 
RIGHl^  in  style,  material  and  work- 
manship. 

MR.  L.  L.  LINDSEY 

with  offices  in  Washington  Arcade,  De- 
troit, Mich.,  has  been  engaged  to  cover 
CANADA. 

He  will  carry  a  most  complete  line  of 
Welts,  Turns  and  McKays  m  the  best 
grades.  High  grade  TURNS  will  be 
especially  well  represented. 

Our  advertised  Shoe — the  famous 

Arch  Preserver 

is  especially  well  adapted  for  Canadian 
requirements. 

The  SELBY  SHOE  Co. 

Portsmouth,  Ohio,  U.  S.  A. 


C6 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


March,  191P 


A  Merchant's  Greatest  Asset  is 
Confidence  and  Enthusiasm 


A  Clerk 

to  acquire  enthusiasm  must  be  inspired  by  the  Article 
he  is  selling. 

Mr.  Merchant 

if  your  sales  people  are  half-hearted  in  their  efforts 

There's  A  Reason ! 

Probably  you  are  forcing  them  to  sell 

An  Alibi  Line 

The  J  &  K  snappy,  arch-fitting  shoes  for  young 
women  will  not  only  cause  your  clerks  to  ENTHUSE, 
but  your  CUSTOMER  as  well,  because  they  are  the 

Easiest  Selling  Shoes  in  America  To-Day 

Therefore,  a  big  asset  in  any  store. 


Canadian  Representative : 
S.  R.  Murphy 

1831-32  Republic  Bldg., 
Chicago,  111. 


eg  INS  1 1999  ATI 


March,  1919 


FOOTWEAR   IN  CANADA 


67 


THE  E-Z  WALK  FELT  BALS  "Foot-Pals" 


No.  839-Men's  Felt  Bals 


Yes,  Foot-Pals  is  the  only  word  that  does  justice  to  our  Bals. 
They're  So  Warm,  So  Comfortable  and  So  Pleasant  to  wear 
under  Boots  or  Overshoes,  that  two  out  of  e\ery  three 
Motormen,  Policemen,  Firemen,  Lumbermen  and  others 
always  demand  E-Z  Walk  Bals. 

They  are  made  of  heavy  felt,  wear  like  iron,  and  ht  real  well. 
Some  have  felt  soles  and  others  ha\  e  leather  ones. 

If  you'd  only  realize  the  great  financial  possil)ili- 
ties  E-Z  Walk  Bals  ofifer,  you'd  do  what  the 
other  wise  Shoe  Retailers  do.  They  always 
have  a  supply  on  hand  and  mighty  glad  of  it. 

^^^^^^^  Ask  your  jobber  to  show  you  E-Z  Walk  Bals  and 

jHHHHjj^  Men's  Felt  Slippers.     The  prices  will  enable 

'jHr  you  to  sell  them  at  a  i)opular  figure,  and  make 

^ff^gjgjfjjlg^^^  a  liberal  profit  besides.    If  your  jobber  can't 

— '  supplv  you  communicate  with  us,  won't  you? 


The  E  Z  Walk  Mfg.  Co.,  Inc. 

62-70  WEST  14TH  ST.  NEW  YORK,  N.  Y. 

Also  Makers  of  the  E-Z  Walk  Arch  Supports 


Hi^h  Grade  McKays 


There  is  no  line  of  footwear  oti'ering 
greater  possibilities  to  Jobbers  than  the 
splendid  McKays  now  being  made  by 
Duchaine  &  Perkins. 

We  should  like  to  i)rove  the  merits 
of  these  shoes  by  showing  them  to 
you.  Let  us  send  samples  for  your 
inspection. 


Duchaine  &  Perkins 

QUEBEC 

Montreal    Sample  Room 

E.  T.  Bank  Bldg.,  St.  James  St. 


The  Institution  With  a 
National  Program 

Important  Announcement 
to  Our  Customers 

The  Success  of  TETRAULT  WELTS  during  the 
past  yesrs  has  made  our  organization  one  of 
National  repute  in  its  line 

Believing  the  development  of 

A  Broad  Reconstruction  Policy 

to  be  the  duty  of  all  good  Canadian  concerns  at 
this  time,  we  are  pleased  to  announce  to  our 
customers  that  we  have  been  successful  in 

Securing  Large  Export  Orders 

with  every  prospect  for  greater  business  in  this 
field.  This  will  assist  in  maintaining  the  domestic 
prosperity  of  the  last  four  years,  and  in  keeping 
production  at  its  normal  volume.  It  is  part  of  the 
policy  of 

Tetrault  Progressiveness 

making  our  own  institution,  and  the  Canadian 
Shoe  Industry  generally,  all  the  stronger,  by  forc- 
ing recognition  internationally. 


Tetrault  Shoe  Manufacturing  Co. 


Largest  Producers  of  Boots  and  Shoes  in  Canada 


Office  and  Warehouse— 

9  Rue  De  Marseille, 

Paris,  France 


Montreal 


LIMITED 


Toronto 


Marcli,   I '.)!!) 


l)iaHHgfiiKiiaiKlijiM«ii«]!E)i5£: 
Si  H 


F  O  0 1^  W  1',  A  R    IN  CANADA 


00 


;i)|K|[giSlliK]|§lgilMI(SIMjiK)HS 


T 


T 


m 


a 


iBHimiiaiiaBiaiaisiiaisfe 


Tetrault  Welts  at  Home 
and  Abroad 

Service  Begins  at 
Home 


Although  the  output  of  our  TWO  FACTORIES 
is  completely  sold  until  early  Summer,  we  can 
assure  our  customers  that  this  will  not  in  any  way 
interfere  with  our  usual  excellent  Service  on  our 
Spring  Orders. 

Canadian  Business  our  First  Consideration 

Going  beyond  the  Canadian  Field  does  not 
mean  neglect  of  the  Canadian  Trade,  either 
in  production  or  delivery.  We  have  ar- 
ranged with  other  manufacturers  to  handle 
any  surplus  export  business. 

Our  undivided  attention  will  always  be  given 
to  Canadian  orders,  and  there  will  be  no 
let-up  to  the 

Tetrault  Concentration 


on  supplying  the  Men's  Welt  Shoe  requirements 
of  the  Canadian  Trade. 


Tetrault  Shoe  Manufacturing  Go. 

LIMITED 

Largest  Producers  of  Boots  and  Shoes  in  Canada 


Office  and  Warehouse— 
9  Rue  de  Marseille, 

Paris.  France 


Montreal  Toronto 


70 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


March,  1919 


YAMASKA 


A  Shoe 
With  an 
Appeal  to 
Common 
Sense 


REAPS  THE 
PROFITS 


BECAUSE  it  sells  readily  and  regularly.  As 
a  strong  serviceable  boot  for  men  and 
boys,  you  cannot  better  it  and  it  gives  the 
satisfaction  that  counts  in  building  business. 
With  an  all  leather  product  like  YAMASKA  to 
offer  your  customer,  you  can  defy  competition 
and  hold  your  trade.  YAMASKA  is  built  for 
every  day  wear  and  long  service. 

You  will  do  well  to  place  your  order  now 
for  a  stock  of  these  shoes  for  men.  Drop  us  a 
postal  to-day. 


La  Compagnie 

J.  A.  &  M.  COTE 

Factory  at  ST.  HYACINTHE,  Quebec 


March,  191!) 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


JOBBERS 

High-Class  Women's  McKay 
and  McKay  Welts 


In  making  our  first  announcement  to  the  jobbing 
trade,  we  want  to  emphasize  the  capability  of  our  Hnes 
for  securing  profitable  business  for  jobbers.  As  specialists 
in  the  process  of  Women's  McKays  and  McKay  Welts, 
we  are  able  to  offer  a  shoe  lacking  nothing  in  quality  and 
high-class  workmanship. 


EUREKA  SHOES 


By  comparing  our  Shoes 
with  others  you  will  be  convinced 
that  there  is  a  large  volume  of 
business  to  be  obtained  with  this 
footwear  by  its  unmistakable 
superiority  in  all  round  thorough- 
ness of  shoemaking.  Shall  we 
send  you  samples? 


Co.  Limited 

Three  Rivers    ^  Que. 


Women's  Shoes 

with  either 
Cuban  or  Louis 
Heels 


Eureka  Shoe 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


March,  1919 


BeforePlacingOrders 


See  what  the  Salesmen  have  to  show  you 
in  these  six  brands  of  Guaranteed  Rubbers 


For  years,  the  Dominion  Rubber  System  has  been  studying  your 
needs. 

With  factories  and  service  branches  all  over  Canada,  and  with  experts 
in  constant  touch  with  the  leading  shoe  manufacturers,  the  Dominion 
Rubber  System  is  in  a  position  to  supply  Rubbers  for  every  style  and 
shape  of  shoe  you  carry  for  men,  women  and  children. 

Salesmen  will  show  you  these  styles,  and  also  show  you  the  big, 
striking  advertisements  that  will  appear  in  the  leading  papers  from  coast 
to  coast,  in  order  to  help  you  sell  more  Dominion  Rubber  System  Rubbers. 

Hold  your  orders  until  you  see  the  big  line— the  complete  line 
— the  advertised  line — of    Dominion  Rubber  System  Rubbers. 


Dominion  Rubber  System  Service  Branches  are  Located  at 

Halifax,  St.  John,  Quebec,  Montreal,  Ottawa,  Belleville,  Toronto,  Hamilton,  Brant- 
ford,  London,  Kitchener,  North  Bay,  Fort  William,  Winnipeg,  Brandon,  Regina, 
Saskatoon,  Edmonton,  Calgary,  Lethbridge,  Vancouver  and  Victoria. 


March,  1919 


F  O  0 1'  \Y  E  A  R 


T  N  CANADA 


7:^ 


mT  -ia. 
Air  ni: 


A  Journal  of  its  Findings,  Making  and  Sale. 
Published  Monthly  for  the  Good  of 
the  Trade  by 

HUGH  G.  MACLEAN,  LIMITED 

HUGH  C.  MacLEAN,  Winnipeg,  President. 
THOMAS  S.  YOUNG,  General  Manager. 


HEAD  OFFICE  -  347  Adelaide  Street  West,  TORONTO 
Telephone  A.  2700 

MONTREAL  -  Telephone  Main  2299  -  119  Board  of  Trade 
WINNIPEG  -  Tel.  Garry  856  -  Electric  Railway  Chambers 
VANCOUVER  -  Tel.  Seymour  2013  -  Winch  Building 
NEW  YORK  -  Tel.  3108  Beekman  -  1123  Tribune  Building 
CHICAGO  -  Tel.  Harrison  5351  -  1413  Gt.  Northern  Bldg. 
LONDON,  ENG.    -------    16  Regent  Street  S.W. 

Authorized  by  the  Postmaster  General  for  Canada,  for  transmission 
as  second  class  matter. 

Entered  as  second  class  matter  July  ISth,  1914,  at  the  Postofifice  at 
Buffalo,  N.  Y.,  under  the  Act  of  Congress  of  March  3,  1879. 

SUBSCRIPTION  RATES 
Canada  and  Great  Britain,  $1.00.    U.  S.  and  Foreign,  $1.50. 
Single  copies  15  cents 

Vol.  9  March,  1919  3 

Footwear  .style.s  of  the  immedi- 
Fal)  Styles         ate  future  will  be   o-,)\-erne(I  by 

eircumstance.^  rather  than  inclin- 
ation. The  demand  from  retailers  and,  incidentally, 
the  con.suming  public,  has  been  for  lower-]jriced  shoes. 
This  i.s  scarcely  possible  so  long  as  production  costs 
are  maintained  at  the  present  high  level.  Curtailment 
of  styles,  therefore,  has  Ijeen  very  much  discussed 
among  manufacturers  as  a  measure  of  economy  and, 
in  the  majority  of  cases,  we  believe,  both  in  Canada 
and  in  the  United  States,  an  effort  is  being  made  to- 
wards conservatism  in  the  matter  of  introducing  radi- 
cal .style  changes. 

There  is,  however,  another  angle  to  the  problem 
which  is,  that  style  in  dress  is  rapidly  becoming  ot 
more  importance  than  ever  before,  and  it  is  not  likely 
that  the  fashionable  element  will  pay  fabulous  sums 
for  gowns,  headgear  and  other  adornment,  and  be  sat- 
isfied with  anything  less  than  the  utmost  in  attractive 
footwear.  The  high  price  of  leather,  however,  can 
no  doubt  be  counted  upon  to  keep  down  the  number 
of  extreme  styles  to  a  minimum.  There  are  "sane" 
styles  and  "freak"  styles,  but  the  day  of  the  latter  has, 
we  believe,  passed,  and  manufacturers  will  confine 
themselves  to  "stylish"  footwear  in  the  real  sense  of 
the  word. 

The  program  adopted  by  manufacturers  in  the  Un- 


ited States  tends  to  confine  the  range  to  the  cofors 
allowed  under  the  war-time  regulations,  although  this 
is  not  necessary  after  July  1.  These  colors  for  wo- 
men's shoes  are:  three  shades  of  brown — dark  medi- 
um and  beaver;  two  shades  of  gray — medium  dark 
and  medium  light;  bronze,  white,  black  and  jjatent 
leather. 

There  will  be  a  more  noticeable  demand  for  iow 
shoes  for  late  summer  and  early  fall  than  ever  beiore, 
and  a  great  variety  f)f  new  buckle  designs  are  obtain- 
able for  what  i)romises  to  be  record-breaking  bnckle 
year.  The  wearing  of  oxfords  is  stimulated  by  me 
vogue  of  woolen  hosiery  in  the  colder  months,  and 
proof  that  they  will  likely  be  a  very  consideraole 
st_\  le  feature  is  found  in  their  general  use  even  at  tne 
present  early  date . 

Mail}'  manufacturers  believe  that,  with  the  return 
of  overseas  soldiers,  there  will  be  an  increasing  de- 
mand for  the  narrower  models  for  men  and,  ])Ossibiy, 
.also  a  certain  call  for  buck  and  fawn  tops. 

Present  indications  are  that  prices  will  continue 
stationary,  possibly  in  some  cases  higher,  for  at  least 
the  remainder  of  the  year.  A  careful  study  of  the  lea- 
ther and  labor  situation,  as  outlined  elsewhere  in  this 
issue,  surely  leaves  no  other  conclusion.  In  view  of 
this  fact  it  should  be  the  aim  of  the  shoe  retailer  to 
be  more  careful  and  accurate  in  his  buying.  Shoes 
well  bought  are  half  sold  and  there  is  no  indication 
apparent  that  buyers,  in  general,  are  not  able  and  will- 
ing to  pay  a  good  price,  providing  they  can  get  what 
they  want.  Simplicity  is  the  keynote  of  style  at  all 
times,  and,  as  a  matter  of  fact,  it  is  one  of  the  surest 
signs  of  good  workmanshij)  and  individuality.  Sanitv 
in  ])atterns  and  an  avoidance  of  "jig-saw"  designs 
should,  we  believe,  govern  present  buying.  Look  for 
beauty  in  design,  rather  than  freakishness  ;  harmonv 
in  color,  rather  than  extremes  and  high'  grade  work- 
manship that  demands  no  apology  for  the  price  asked. 

*  * 


Style  Show  for 
Kitchener 


It  has  been  announced  that  a 
shoe  style  show  will  be  held 
by  the  manufacturers  of  Kit- 
chener, Out.,  and  vicinity,  including  Gait,  Waterloo, 
Preston,  Elmira,  New  Hamburg  and  St.  Jacobs,  some 
time  during  the  month  of  July.  The  exhibition  will  be 
held  in  the  auditorium  at  Kitchener  and  some  thirty- 
five  firms  will  be  represented.  The  preliminary  ar- 
rangements are  being  handled  by  two  committees, 
with  Mr.  Charles  A.  Ahrens  as  president;  Mv.  Alex. 
Inrig,  vice-president,  and  Mv.  J.  P.  Scully,  secretary. 
The  advertising  committee  is  headed  by  Mr.  A.  A. 
Armbrust  and  also  includes  Messrs.  N.  Davidson,  H. 
O.  McDowell  and  A.  R.  Kaufman.  Mv.  Inrig  is  chair- 
man of  the  committee  on  arrangements  and  will  be 
assisted  by  Messrs.  J.  Vallentine,  Fred  Ahrens  and 
Ct.  W.  Charles.  Other  committees  are  to  be  appointed 
later. 

The  idea  of  this  show  is  to  afford  retailers  an  op- 


74 


FOOTWEAR 


IN  CANADA 


March,  191!) 


portiinity  for  styles  comparison  impossible  to  obtain 
in  any  other  way.  Similar  shows  have  been  held  in 
Rochester  and  Boston  from  time  to  time  and  many 
will  recall  the  style  show  staged  by  Messrs.  Getty 
&  Scott,  at  the  King  Edward  Hotel,  in  Toronto. 
These  have  all  been  a  marked  success  and  the  Kitch- 
ener manufacturers  show  considerable  enterprise  in 
promoting-  the  first  Canadian  style  show  where  a 
number  of  manufacturers  are  collectively  represented. 
It  is  felt  that  the  month  of  July  will  be  very  suitable 
as  it  is  a  fairly  quiet  month  among  the  retailers,  and 
many  will  feel  that  a  visit  to  Kitchener  will  be  com- 
bining both  'business  and  pleasure.  Those  who  are 
motor  enthusiasts  will  find  the  trip  by  road  particular- 
ly enjoyable. 

The  following  is  a  list  of  the  firms  who  will  likely 
be  among  the  exhibitors :  New  Hamburg  Felt  Com- 
pany, New  Hamburg;  Canada  Felt  Company,  St. 
Jacobs ;  Hurlburt  Shoe  Company  and  Solid  Leather 
Shoe  Company,  Preston  ;  Great  West  Felt  Company, 
Elmira;  Getty  &  Scott,  and  the  Gait  Shoe  Company, 
Gait;  Vallentine  and  Martin,  Waterloo.  In  Kitcnener 
is  C.  A.  Ahrens  &  Co. ;  Canadian  Consolidated  Rub- 
ber Company;  Canada  Trunk  and  Bag  Company; 
Breithaupt  Leather  Co.;  Greb  Shoe  Co.;  Gouriay 
Shoe  Company;  Getty  Shoe  Company;  Hydro  City 
Shoe  Mfrs. ;  International  Supply  Co. ;  Kauiman 
Rubber  Co. ;  Lady  Belle  Shoe  Co. ;  Lang  Tanning  co. ; 
Provincial  Cut  Sole  Co.;  Oscar  Rumpel  Felt  Co.; 
United  Shoe  Machinery  Company;  Western  Shoe 
Co.;  W.  E.  Woelfle  Shoe  Co. 

^    ^  ^ 


Salesman's  Education 
an  Asset 


Ever  so  much  attention  is 
given  to  stock  keeping,  to 
window  trimming,  merely 
andizing  methods,  to  studying  styles  and  the  many 
other  phases  of  modern  methods  of  retailing,  but 
how  many  are  giving  equal  attention  to  the  education 
of  the  man  or  woman  who  sells  the  shoe?  The  first 
mentioned  items,  one  and  all,  require  proficiency  to 
the  nth  degree.  No  one  would  question  that  for  an 
instant,  but  that  does  not  excuse  the  up-to-date  merch- 
ant from  employing  every  reasonable  method  for  the 
proper  training  of  clerks  and  that  again  implies  some- 
thing besides  proper  decorum  which  is  supposea  to 
prevail  as  a  matter  of  course. 

The  maximum  of  efficiency  must  include  among 
other  qualifications  the  ability  to  convey  information 
about  footwear  to  customers  when  required  to  do  so. 
More  than  ever,  the  purchaser,  by  rea.son  of  higher 
prices,  wants  to  know  why.  He  or  she  has  many 
questions  to  a.sk,  perhaps.  True,  even  to  one  well 
versed,  they  may  not  always  be  easy  to  answer. 
"What  kind  of  leather  is  this?"  "Who  made  this 
shoe?"  "Why  do  they  cost  more?"  "Is  this  a  good 
sole,  who  made  it,  what  kind  is  it,  hemlock  or  oak. 


Rubber  Prices  Same 
As  January  List 


which  is  better?"  "Is  there  an  advantage  in  a  bench 
made  shoe  over  a  machine  stitched?" 

The  clerk  isn't  often  asked,  maybe,  to  give  a  lec- 
ture on  tanning,  or  provide  for  a  liberal  education  on 
shoemaking  methods  while  selling  a  customer,  T)ut  so 
many  are  from  Missouri,  and  if  they  are  of  the  cate- 
chising kind  how  often  it  makes  them  happier,  and 
hence  repeat  customers,  if  they  encounter  a  clerk 
who  knows  something  about  a  shoe  besides  fitting  it 
rather  than  one  whose  only  remark,  if  any,  is:  "Ah, 
um,  not  enough  toe  room — nice  weather  to-day — Let 
me  try  another." 

There  are  few  stores  that  do  not  subscribe  to  one 
or  more  trade  papers  and  these  are  invariably  filled 
with  much  information  which  would  be  invaluable 
to  the  salesman  if  he  absorbed  a  quarter  part  ot  it. 
It  is  wise  to  encourage  him  in  learning  all  he  can 
about  shoes,  how  they  are  made  and  what  they  are 
made  of.  On  him  depends  largely  the  building  of 
your  trade.  His  efficiency  and  knowledge  are  factors 
of  the  utmost  importance  and  the  more  he  knows, 
used  judiciously,  the  greater  should  be  your  sales. 

*      *  * 

The  rubber  companies  this 
season  will  not  likely  in- 
troduce any  new  features. 
The  tendency  for  the  past  few  years  has  been  to  elim- 
inate unnecesary  lines,  rather  than  introduce  new  lines. 
As  far  as  prices  are  concerned,  the  list  prices  issued 
on  January  15th  will  be  used  in  booking  placing  busi- 
ness during  March  and  April.  This  season  opened 
on  March  3rd  and  will  close  on  Wednesday,  April  30th. 
Orders  taken  during  this  period  will  be  delivered  at 
any  time  between  June  1st  and  October  31st  at  prices 
in  force  at  the  time  the  orders  were  booked.  It  has 
been  customary  to  issue  a  higher  list  for  the  winter 
sorting  business  because  of  the  additional  cost  of  hand- 
ling these  goods  through  the  numerous  warehouses 
at  dififerent  points.  Placing  orders  are  always  packed 
and  shipped  direct  from  the  factory. 

Should  it  happen  that  next  fall's  sorting  prices 
are  reduced  below  the  prices  in  force  when  placing 
orders  are  taken  in  March  and  April,  it  is  likely  that 
manufacturers  would  rebate  on  the  placing  shipments, 
thus  giving  customers  their  placing  at  as  low  prices 
as  their  sorting.  It  is  very  doubtful,  however,  if  the 
sorting  prices  can  possibly  be  any  lower  than  the  plac- 
ing prices,  as  all  raw  materials  are  still  very  firm. 
As  a  matter  of  fact  it  is  just  possible  that  another 
slight  advance  may  be  necessary. 

A  false  statement  has  appeared  in  the  press  that 
the  placing  prices  would  be  guaranteed  to  the  end  of 
the  year.  What  should  have  been  said  was  that  they 
would  be  guaranteed  against  decline,  but  the  item  gave 
the  idea  that  prices  would  be  guaranteed  as  well 
against  a  raise,  which  is  not  the  case. 


March,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


75 


Survey  of  Sole  and  Upper  Leather  Supplies 

All  Indications  Point  to  Further  Strengthening  of  Market  and  Shortage  of  Supply— Cost 
of  Production  and  Labor  Higher  Than  Ever— Foreign  Demand  Firms 
Domestic  Prices  for  Raw  and  Finished  Stock 


WK  all  know  that,  contrary  to  every  hope,  the 
cessation  of  hostilities,  instead  of  having  a 
weakening-  effect  on  the  leather  market, 
actnally  created  an  unprecedented  firmness 
that  has  every  sig^n  of  maintaining  for  another  eight 
or  ten  months.  In  our  February  issue  we  mentioned 
the  sale  of  a  large  qvtantity  of  kid  for  export  at  a 
price  six  or  seven  cents  above  market.  This  had  the 
immediate  effect  of  raising  domestic  prices  a  like 
amount,  and  it  is  just  this  continental  demand  that 
is  going  to  keep  leather  prices  on  the  top  rung  of  the 
ladder.  The  present  conditions  regarding  the  kidskin 
market  are  well  outlined  in  a  statement  we  have  just 
received  from  one  of  the  largest  tanning  houses  in 
the  United  States.  They  say,  in  part : 

"Some  months  ago,  at  a  joint  meeting  of  the  shoe 
wholesalers,  retailers  and  manufacturers  in  New  York 
city,  it  was  decided  that  for  fall  business  every  effort 
should  be  made  to  eliminate  the  extravagant  use  of 
leather,  having  particular*  reference  to  the  lighter 
shades  of  kid.  You  will  understand  that,  at  the  pre- 
sent time,  some  kid  tanners  are  completely  out  of  raw 
material,  and  others  are  working  about  50  per  cent, 
of  capacity,  or  less.  Most  of  those  tanneries  running 
50  per  cent,  will  be  pretty  definitely  shut  down  for  a 
more  or  less  indefinite  period  during  the  month  of 
March,  pending  the  arrival  of  new  purchases  of  goat- 
skins. The  cause  for  this  delay  in  securing  skins  was 
the  embargo  which  was  placed  by  the  United  States 
War  Industries  Board  on  the  importation  of  all  g"oat- 
skins.  This  embargo  went  into  effect  on  June  15th 
last,  and  people  are  only  just  beginning  to  receive 
.skins  which  they  had  already  owned  last  June  in 
foreign  markets,  but  which  were  held  up  by  the  em- 
bargo. At  the  same  time  the  government  requested 
kid  tanners  not  to  purchase  any  raAv  material  in  for- 
eign markets  while  the  embargo  was  on.  Most  of  us 
believed  this  to  be  a  wrong  policy,  not  agreeing  Avith 
the  government  in  their  contention  that  prices  would 
be  brought  down  by  this  action.  We  believe  that  our 
ideas  on  this  subject  were  fully  substantiated  by  the 
tremendous  advances  which  immediately  took  place 
when  the  embargo  was  lifted.  Prices  to-day  are,  in 
some  instances,  fifty  per  cent,  higher  than  they  were 
at  the  time  the  embargo  was  placed,  and  a  great  deal 
higher  than  prices  at  which  material  could  have  been 
bought  while  the  embargo  was  in  effect. 

"We  cannot  see  any  slackening  up  in  the  demand 
for  kid.  Conservative  shades,  such  as  Havana  brown, 
dark  gray,  lighter  shade  of  brown  (such  as  "field 
mouse"  or  'beaver")  and  white  and  black  kid  are  sell- 
ing stronger  to-day  than  ever  before.  The  domestic 
market  of  $1.10  for  top  grades  on  any  of  the  colors 
mentioned  above  has  not  stopped  the  demand.  If  the 
shoe  manufacturers  and  retailers  and  tanners,  acting 
in  consort,  had  not  been  wise  enough  to  show  dis- 
fav(^r  at  the  idea  of  using  very  light,  delicate  shades  of 
colors,  there  is  absolutely  no  telling  what  price  top 
grades  of  kid  might  have  reached  at  the  presenr  mo- 


ment. It  seems  the  demand  throughout  the  world  is 
for  the  better  grades  of  kid,  and  the  quantities  of 
these  better  grades  is  reduced,  of  course,  in  relation 
to  the  delicacy  of  the  shade  manufactured.  We  can 
see  absolutely  nothing  but  a  continually  increasing  de- 
mand for  glazed  kid  in  the  colors  mentioned  above, 
and  undoubtedly  for  the  next  spring  season,  provided 
that  there  is  plenty  of  raw  material  in  the  country, 
all  good  shades,  including  the  light,  delicate  shades, 
will  be  selling  as  strongly  as"  ever  before. 

"With  the  pro.spect  ahead  of  us  in  the  very  near 
future  of  the  continental  markets  openings  up  in  their 
demand  for  American  leather,  we  can  see  nothing 
but  a  further  strengthening  of  the  market  and  a  short- 
age of  supply.  If  you  will  consider  that  after  March 
15th  we  will  be  running  practically  on  hand-to-mouth 
basis,  awaiting  steamship  arrivals  of  new  raw  material, 
you  will  probably  agree  with  us  when  we  claim  that 
we  will  not  be  able  to  get  up  to  our  full  capacity  basis 
of  about  1400  dozen  kid  a  day  until  early  in  1920. 
We  are  not  making  as  much  kid  to-day,  in  all,  as  we 
used  to  export  daily  before  the  war,  and  if  the  de- 
mand from  foreign  countries  will  come  up  as  large 
and  strong  as  it  appears  imminent  at  the  present  time. 


NO  CHANGE 
/o>-  -the 
PRE5E1SIX 


The  situation  aptly  pictured  by  the  Boot  and  Shoe  Recorder 


and  if  the  demand  for  kid  leathers  in  this  country 
continues  to  centre  itself  on  the  better  half  of  the  line, 
we  do  not  believe  that  anyone  can  predict  at  what 
prices  glazed  kid,  in  black,  white  or  colors,  will  be 
selling  eight  or  nine  months  from  now." 

Production  40  Per  Cent,  of  1916 

Considering  the  future  possibilities  of  the  kidskin 
situation,  tanners  are  reluctant  and,  perhaps  rightly 
so,  to  express  any  definite  opinion,  and  it  can  be  read- 
ily understood  that  any  forecast  will  be  subject  to 
change  as  new  conditions  arise.  Mr.  S.  Agoos,  of  the 
Standard  Kid  Manufacturing  Company,  tanners  of 


76 


FOOTWEAR 


IN  CANADA 


March,  ]<)li) 


black  and  colored  kid  and  patent  kid,  Boston,  Mass., 
states  that  any  discussion  on  the  subject  may  be 
preceded  by  outlining  several  facts,  upon  which  there 
can  be  little,  if  any,  disagreement.  (1)  That  there 
has  been  imported  into  the  United  States  during  the 


Women's  oxford,  circular  vamp  with  plain  toe 
and  Louis  heel — Ames,  Holden,  McCready 

lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll^ 


past  six  months,  fewer  goatskins  than  probably  were 
imported  in  a  like  period  in  the  past  fifteen  years,  due 
to  the  embargo  placed  by  the  government  in  June, 
1918.  (2)  That  the  supply  of  raw  goatskins  on  hand 
at  the  time  the  embargo  was  placed  was  certainly  no 
greater  than  we  had  for  the  past  three  years.  [3) 
That  the  production  of  glazed  kid  to-day  averages  not 
over  60  per  cent,  of  the  normal  production  and  prob- 
ably not  over  40  per  cent,  of  the  production  of  1916. 
(4)  That  the  present  combined  supply  of  finished 
glazed  leather  and  raw  skins  in  this  country  is  less 
than  we  have  had  for  the  past  three  years. 

Continuing,  Mr.  Agoos  says :  "Within  a  few  weeks 
after  the  Armistice  was  declared  and  the  restrictions 
regarding  importations  were  practically  taken  of¥, 
many  tanners  felt  that  there  was  little  chance  of 
prices  receding-  and  began  to  buy  in  the  markets  that 
were  available,  that  is,  China,  India,  and  South  Amer- 
ica. The  result  is  that,  since  the  Armistice,  prices 
have  advanced  in  China  and  India  from  10  to  15  per 
cent,  above  the  maximum  prices  and  in  Sovith  Amer- 
ica, over  25  per  cent,  above  the  maximum  prices.  The 
reason  for  the  greater  advance  in  price  on  the  South 
Americans  is  because  those  skins  could  arrive  in  this 
country  sooner  than  skins  from  India  and  the  Orient. 

"As  far  as  skins  in  transit  are  concerned  there 
probably  will  not  be  any  available  supplies  in  quan- 
tities arriving  in  tanneries  of  the  United  States  before 
the  first  of  April.  This  is  evidenced  by  the  fact  that 
spot  skins  and  even  skins  which  have  already  been 
forwarded,  can  be  .sold  to-day  from  5  to  10  per  cent, 
above  the  prices  prevailing  at  primary  markets.  Un- 
der these  conditions  it  seems  evident  that  the  present 
suply  of  raw  skins  and  finished  leather  in  this  country 
is  totally  inadecjuate  to  meet  even  a  far  less  than  nor- 
mal demand . 

"Furthermore,  it  seems  evident  that  prices  can- 
not go  down  until  a  surplus  is  created  and  no  sur- 
plus is  possible  until  the  new  skins  which  have  been 
purchased,  will  have  arrived  and  converted  into  fin- 
ished leather.  It  takes  fully  three  months  to  get  raw 
skins  from  India  and  China  into  this  country,  and 


about  two  months  to  finish  them,  and  as  there  were 
only  a  very  few  skins  which  were  shipped  prior  to  the 
middle  of  January,  it  is  evident  it  will  not  be  until 
tiie  middle  of  June  before  there  will  be  any^  quantity 
of  leather  on  the  market.  Also,  it  will  take  fully  two 
months  of  practically  no  business  to  create  any  signs 
of  a  Surplus.  It  seems  to  us,  however,  that  no  surplus 
can  exist  even  then  unless  the  exportation  of  our  fin- 
ished leather  is  barred  to  Euroi)e. 

"Personally,  I  am  of  the  opinion  that  this  embargo 
will  not  continue  much  over  the  middle  of  the  year. 
If  it  should  continue,  there  is  no  question  in  our  mind 
that  the  prices  will  have  to  recede  after  the  summer, 
but  in  view  of  the  fact  that  probably  75  per  cent,  of 
the  world's  normal  consumption  of  glazed  kid  is  manu- 
factured in  this  country,  and  in  view  of  the  extreme 
difficulty  in  shipping  abroad  during  the  past  few 
years,  it  is  evident  that  the  world  is  in  very  much 
need  of  American  glazed  kid  and  will  be  very  anxious- 
to  buy  it  just  as  soon  as  the  financial  situation  abroad 
becomes  more  settled. 

"To  summarize,  therefore,  I  believe  there  is  no 


One  of  the  newest  designs  in  women's  high-grade 
shoes  for  Fall  and  Winter  1919-1920.    Made  in  all 
popular  colors,  by  Getty  and  Scott,  Ltd. 

illlllllllllllllllll!lllllllllllllllllllllllllllll!llll!lllllllll!llll^ 


chance  of  any  reduction  in  the  i)rice  on  glazed  kid 
until  the  first  of  July  at  the  earliest,  and  if,  before 
that  time,  embargos  by  Europe  arc  lifted,  prices  must 
undoubtedly  advance  even  more  than  they  have  in 
the  past  two  months  because  of  the  acute  shortage 
of  the  finished  product.  After  July  1st,  we  believe 
that  prices  will  be  no  higher  even  should  the  free  ex- 


March,  1919 


FOOTWEAR   IN  CANADA 


t7 


I 

4.-. 


yl  Qood  Ruckle  Season  is  Predicted 

ACCORDING  to  exclusive  shops  in  the  styles  centres,  we  are  on  the  edge  of  an  era  of  a  good  business  in 
buckles.  These  range  in  price  from  $2.50  to  as  high  as  $60  a  pair,  and  come  in  cut  steel,  rhinestones  and 
gold  beaded  effects.  Shortly  after  the  signing  of  the  armistice,  one  manager  states,  their  demand  began  for 
buckles  to  ornament  fancy  evening  and  dress  shoes.  Price  appears  to  be  no  object.  A  silver  cloth  slipper 
was  shown  with  a  rhinestone  buckle  at  $22;  black  satin  pumps  with  buckles  of  rhinestone,  silver  and  sometimes 
brass.  A  pair  of  bronze  kid  pumps,  ornamented  with  a  bronze  beaded  buckle,  sold  at  $40,  the  shoes  costing 
$12.50.  A  pair  of  gray  suede  slippers  were  decorated  with  a  pair  of  buckles  of  cut  steel  beads.  A  black  patent 
leather  pump  was  decorated  in  Colonial  effect  with  a  brass  buckle,  and  another  with  silver,  and  so  on.  It 
would  appear  that  the  return  to  ornamentation  in  dress,  so  evident  just  now,  should  have  considerable  bene- 
fit to  shoe  retailers. 


portatioii  of  the  finished  product  I)e  possible  because 
of  the  supplies  which  will  then  be  available.  On  the 
other  hand  there  is  a  possibility  that  prices  will  grad- 
ually tend  to  go  lower  after  that  time  should  restric- 
tions on  the  finished  product  continue  abroad.  This, 
however,  in  my  opinion,  is  not  likely,  and  I  see  no 
prospect  of  any  considerable  reduction  in  prices  for 
the  next  six  months.  To  make  any  prediction  beyond 
that,  would  be  only  the  wildest  of  guesses." 

Montreal  Man  is  More  Optimistic 

While  acknowledging  that  the  kidskin  situation 
is  very  uncertain,  the  manager  of  one  of  the  large 
Quebec  firms  anticipates  a  reduction  in  price  some- 
where about  July,  although  jjrices  might  take  a  fur- 
ther rise  during  the  next  couple  of  months.  His  view 
of  the  sititation  is  that  owing  to  the  strike  in  South 
America,  large  quantities  of  skins  are  accumulatmg 
at  the  ports.  The  chances  are  that  the  industrial  trou- 
ble there  will  be  settled  shortly,  which  means  that 
the  skins  will  then  be  sent  to  the  States  and  Canada. 
They  will  then  be  tanned  and  put  on  the  market 
about  the  period  when  the  usual  midsummer  dullness 
sets  in,  with  the  result  that,  with  little  demand  and 
a  good  cpiantity  of  leather  available,  prices  will  go 
down.  India,  too,  he  says,  will  be  sending  a  consider- 
able number  of  skins,  accentuating  the  downward  ten- 
dency. The  buying  for  overseas  may,  to  a  certain 
extent,  offset  the  factors  referred  to,  but  it  must  not 
be  overlooked  that  European  tanneries  will  soon  be 
getting  into  shape  and  manufacturing  at  least  a  part 
of  their  own  requirements.  Concluding,  this  leather 
man,  said  he  was  quite  aware  that  others  predicted  a 
steady  market  for  a  much  longer  period,  but  he 
thought  all  indications  pointed  to  lower  prices  this 
summer . 

Sole  Leather 

Coming  now  to  a  consideration  of  the  sole  leather 
market  we  find  the  consensus  of  opinion  to  be  that  a 
firm  market  with  present,  or  higher,  prices  maintained 
during  the  whole  year  1919,  will  prevail.  We  have 
been  in  close  touch  with  the  leading  sole  leather  tan- 
ners of  Canada  during  the  past  few  days  and  print 


herewith  several  viewpoints  which  will  be  of  value 
to  the  retailer  in  arriving  at  his  own  conclusions. 
Mr.  W.  J.  Heaven,  manager  of  the  Ang-lo-Canadian 
Leather  Comjjany,  has  gone  into  the  matter  very  com- 
pletely in  a  statement  just  received.  This  is  as  fol- 
lows : 

"The  cost  of  the  stocks  of  leather  and  hides  now 
held  by  the  Canadian  tanners  are  higher  than  at  any 
previous  time.  There  are  three  main  factors  enter- 
ing into  the  cost  of  leather,  namely,  hides,  tanning- 
materials,  and  labor.  A  fourth,  which  might  also  be 
included,  is  overhead.  With  reference  to  hides,  Can- 
adian tanners  have  been  obliged  to  depend  upon  Can- 
adian hides  for  the  past  year  because  it  has  been  mi- 
possible  to  import  foreign  hides  owing  to  shipping  re- 
strictions and  the  United  States  government  regula- 
tions prohibiting  the  exportation  from  that  country  of 
any  hides  produced  or  imported  into  that  countrv. 
The  demand  for  the  Canadian  hides  available  during 
1918  was  keen  enough  to  create  competition  among 
the  buyers,  who,  in  order  to  obtain  the  only  hides 
available,  had  to  pay  a  premium  even  on  the  maxi- 
mum price  as  fixed  in  the  United  States.  These  are 
the  hides  now  in  tan,  purchased  on  this  high  level. 

"With  regard  to  labor,  Ave  all  know  that  it  is  com- 
or  so  has  seen  tanning  materials  on  a  higher  level 
than  ever  before,  and  in  all  probability  the  high  le\  el 
is  here  to  stay  for  some  time  at  least.  Extracts  are 
commanding  prices  to-day  three  and  four  times  as 
high  as  before  the  war,  and  there  is  not  much  relief 
in  prospect  for  lower  prices. 

"With  regard  to  labor,  we  all  know  that  it  is  com- 
manding a  higher  scale  of  wages  and  is  demanding 
greater  privileges  and  shorter  hours  It  is  one  thing 
to  raise  wages  when  labor  is  scarce,  but  .it  is  alto- 
gether another  problem  to  reduce  wages  even  should 
labor  be  more  plentiful.  Our  opinion  is,  therefore, 
that  the  labor  cost  of  production  is  likely  to  continue 
high  for  the  above  reasons. 

"The  other  item  mentioned,  referring  to  overhead, 
has  also  been  a  serious  matter  with  the  tanners,  who, 
owing  to  the  first  three  conditions,  have  been  com- 
pelled to  curtail  their  output  and  every  manufacturer 
knows  that  a  plant  running  at  fiftv.  'fortv  or  thirtv 


78 


F  ( )  O  T  W  K  A  R 


IN  CANADA 


March, 


per  cent,  capacity  produces  necessarily  higher  cost 
goods  than  a  plant  running  full.  Until,  therefore,  the 
tanners  are  in  a  position  to  run  full  this  is  an  added 
c>>^t  in  production  that  has  to  be  taken  into  account. 

"Looking  further  afield  we  find  that  stocks  of  hides 
and  leather  in  Canada  and  the  United  States  are  not 
large.  Great  Britain  and  other  European  countries 
are  some  of  them  starving  for  want  of  hides  and  leath- 


Mr.  W.  J.  Heaven, 
of  the  Anglo-Canadi- 
an Leather  Co.,  re- 
cently elected  Chair- 
man, Tanners'  Sec- 
tion, Board  of  Trade, 
and  whose  review  of 
the  sole  leather  situ- 
ation is  particularly 
informative. 


er,  and  their  buyers  are  already  invading  these  mar- 
kets and  purchasing  ])locks  of  leather,  thereby  reduc- 
ing the  present  available  stocks. 

"Further  we  find  that  the  stocks  of  boots  and  shoes 
in  the  hands  of  the  wholesale  and  retail  trade  are  not 
large,  but  have  been  reduced,  and  will  have  to  be  re- 
plenished at  no  far  distant  date. 

"Reports  of  leather  will  probably  be  much  more 
pronounced  with  more  shipping-  space  available.  Al- 
ready ocean  rates  have  dropped  considerably,  and 
with  the  increased  shipping  space  which  is  going  to 
be  available  the  chances  are  that  instead  of  cargoes 
looking  for  bottoms  we  may  soon  see  shipowners 
bidding  for  cargoes. 

"Another  phase  of  the  situation  appears  to  us  to 
be  the  fact  that  money  is  plentiful  -  in  Canada,  and 
that  there  will  be  shortly  returning  to  Canada  three 
or  four  hundred  thousand  men  and  many  women  and 
children,  all  of  whom  will  need  one  or  two  or  three 
pairs  of  boots  in  the  near  future.  This  would  seem  to 
create  a  demand  in  Canada  for  boots  and  shoes,  and 
leather  with  which  to  make  them.  We  think  that  the 
retailers  should  not  lose  sight  of  this  prospective  de- 
mand, but  should  anticipate  this,  and  at  once  place 
his  orders  with  the  jobber  or  manufacturer  so  that 
the  jobber  may  in  turn  place  his  orders  with  the 
manufacturer,  and  the  manufacturer  may  have  a 
chance  to  turn  out  the  shoes  that  will  be  required 
before  they  are  actually  needed.  There  is  too  much 
disposition  at  the  present  time  for  hanging  ofif  and 
delaying  purchasing,  anticipating  lower  prices.  If 
the  trade  does  not  order  their  normal  requirements 
when  the  manufacturers'  and  jobbers  representatives 
call  upon  them  then  the  manufacturer  is  not  going 
to  be  able  to  produce  the  goods  required  to  meet  the 


demand,  lie  cannot  make  uj)  on  one  month  what 
.ordinarily  requires  four  or  five  months. 

"Finally  we  reason  that  the  cost  of  leather  and 
shoes  and  any  other  manufactured  article  depends  to 
a  large  extent  upon  the  wages  that  have  to  be  paid  to 
])roduce  these  articles  or  to  produce  the  raw  mater- 
ials entering  into  the  manufacture  of  these  articles, 
and  so  long  as  wages  remain  on  a  high  level  the  manu- 
facturer must  get  a  proportionate  j)rice  for  his  output. 
Wages  are  governed,  to  a  large  extent,  by  the  cost  of 
living,  and  the  cost  of  living  is  governed  largely  by 
the  cost  of  foodstuffs.  AVith  wheat  and  all  grain  stuifs 
selling  at  the  present  high  level  the  cost  of  all  foods 
must  remain  high,  and  the  wage  earner  must  receive 
sufficient  wages  to  pay  this  cost  and  the  manufacturer 
must  receive  sufficient  for  his  goods  to  pay  the  wages. 
There  is  no  doubt  that  sooner  or  later  there  will  be 
some  dro])  from  the  present  scale  of  high  prices  all 
along  the  line,  but  we  think  that  this  process  will  be 
gradual  and  will  be  later  rather  than  sooner.  Another 
condition  has  just  come  to  our  notice  which  is  of  in- 
terest, namely  the  Boot  &  Shoe  Workers'  Union  intend 
to  ask  for  an  increase  in  wages  on  the  1st  of  May, 
and  any  increase  which  they  may  receive  will  not 
tend  to  cheapen  the  cost  of  manufacture." 

Market  is  Stronger  Than  Realized 

The  high  cost  of  labor,  tanning  materials  and  the 
efifect  of  food  prices  on  all  commodities  is  again  em- 
phasized by  Mr.  L.  J.  Breithaupt,  of  the  Breithaupt 
Leather  Company,  Kitchener,  who  says  that  although 
conditions  may  seem  at  times  somewhat  uncertain, 
very  considerable  business  is  being  done  right  along 
and,  in  fact,  the  undertone  of  the  market  is  much 
stronger  than  is  generally  supposed.  Continuing,  Mr. 


Women's  circular  vamp  oxford,  Spanish  heel,  spray 
tip. — Ames,  Holden,  McCready 

llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllli^ 


Breithau])t  explains  that  dry  hides  remain  as  higii  as 
ever  in  Sotith  America,  and  are  now,  even  at  the  ex- 
orbitant prices  demanded,  practically  unobtainable, 
owing  to  the  continuation  of  the  great  strike  in  Bue- 
nos Ayres  and  other  parts  of  South  America.  This  has 
I)ractically  "tied"  up  very  many  vessels  and  has  de- 
moralized trade  greatly,  with  as  yet  no  relief  in  sight. 
Any  hides  that  may  be  bought  in  Canada  or  the  Un- 
ited States  at  redticed  prices  are  of  the  present  poor 
season's  take  ofif  and  are  of  the  long-haired,  thin- 
shouldered  and  grubby  variety,  which  knowing  buy- 
ers, of  both  hides  and  leather,  avoid. 

The  cost  of  labor  and  tanning  materials  remain 


March,  I'Jl'J 


FOOTWEAR 


IN  CANADA 


79 


as  high  as  ever  with  some  advances  in  the  latter.  The 
general  advance  in  freight  rates  affects  all  tanners, 
and  the  cost  of  their  prodnct,  very  considerably. 

On  the  other  hand,  Canada  is  prosperous  and, 
with  a  high  price  for  wheat  fixed  by  the  Government, 
and  prices  of  farm  products  throughout  remaining 
comparatively  high,  the  farmers  of  Canada,  who  are 
probably  the  largest  class  of  buyers,  can  readily  pay 
proportionate  prices  for  their  requirements. 

While  export  of  sole  leather  to  Great  Britain  is 


A  patent  leather  Oxford  with  18/8  wood  heel — 
Getty  and  Scott,  Ltd. 


somewhat  delayed,  cjther  European  countries,  such  as 
Greece  and  the  Balkan  States,  are  ready  to  buy  large 
quantities  of  sole  and  other  leathers  for  their  large 
and  abnormal  requirements.  Many  shoes  are  now 
being'  made  in  Canada  for  export  to  France  and  Bel- 
gium, which  will  also  be  a  factor  in  the  demand  for 
leather. 

We  understand  that  the  buyer  for  the  British  Gov- 
ernment, who  has  recently  visited  Canada,  has  bought 
large  quantities  of  various  lines  of  upper  leather  for 
early  shijjment,  which  means  that  sole  leather  will 
soon  be  required  in  connection  with  these  i)urchases. 
Stocks  are  well  in  hand,  and  any  brisk  buying  move- 
ment might  cause  some  advances. 

While  prices  of  sole  leather  will  likely  recede 
later,  we  believe,  for  the  reasons  stated,  that  values 
of  desirable  lines  will  remain  strong  for  the  greater 
part  of  1919;  time  only  will  decide. 

About  the  Future 

A  very  informative  circular  letter,  under  this  head- 
ing, has  been  sent  out  to  the  trade  by  Beardnrore  and 
Company,  sole  leather  manufacturers,  Toronto.  It  is 
pointed  out  that  there  is  little  possibility  of  lower 
prices  in  either  upper  leather  or  sole  leather,  owing 
to  the  large  demand  that  will  come  from  European 
countries  and  that  a  freer  movement  of  trade  would 
result  when  manufacturers,  wdiolesalers  and  retailers 
come  to  a  thorough  realization  of  conditions  in  the 
raw  material  market.    This  letter  follows : 

"All  over  the  country  business  men  naturally  are 
discussing  the  future.  Opinions  widely  dift'er ;  some 
authorities  assert  that  the  signing  of  peace  will  bring 
cheaper  prices  on  commodities,  while,  on  the  other 
hand,  some  of  the  trade  hold  that  the  countries  badly 
in  need  of  supplies  may  be  unable  to  buy  them  for 
some  time,  due  to  the  demand  there  will  be  from 
Europe  for  necessary  supplies  of  foodstuffs,  clothing, 


leather,  shoes,  etc.,  and  that  this  active  demand  from 
Europe,  also  that  for  hides,  .skins  and  tanning  mater- 
ials, will  strengthen  prices  here  on  leather,  as  well  as 
on  raw  materials. 

"We  are  now  getting  orders  and  many  incpiiries 
from  all  over  allied  Europe  for  leather.  These  inquir- 
ies cover  practically  all  kinds  of  leather,  especially 
sole  and  upper  leathers.  In  addition,  Canada  has  re- 
cently allotted  to  three  of  the  allied  countries  in  Eur- 
ope, namely,  Serbia,  Roumania  and  Greece,  loans  of 
twenty-five  million  dollars  each  and  already  an  in- 
quiry has  come  to  the  Canadian  tanners  for  a  large 
quantity  of  upper  and  sole  leather  to  be  supplied  to 
one  of  these  countries  and  applied  against  this  credit. 
In  addition  the  British  leather  buyer  has  been  in  Can- 
ada during  the  past  week  and  has  placed  very  large 
business  for  upper  leather,  which,  in  many  cases,  will 
keep  the  upper  leather  tanners  busy  for,  at  least,  five 
or  six  months. 

"As  regards  the  sole  leather  market  particularly, 
practically  all  the  Canadian  tanners  to-day  have  their 
tanneries  full  of  the  very  highest-priced  and  finest- 
grade  packer  hides,  which  means  that  these  hides  in 
leather — which  will  be  coming  out  for  the  next  five 
or  six  month.s — will  be  used  in  place  of  large  quan- 
tities of  dry  hide  sole  leather  usually  sold  at  lower 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii>iiii;iiiiiiiii!iiiiiiiii!^ 


Cocoa  calf — popular  Fall  model  for  street  wear. 
14  8  heel,  9  inch  top — Shown  by  Getty  & 
Scott,  Ltd. 


iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^^ 

prices,  and  many  shoe  manufacturers  will  be  obliged 
to  figure  their  sole  leather  costs  at  much  higher  fig- 
ures than  they  have  in  the  past.  This  condition  will 
apply  just  as  long  as  this  leather  is  being  produced. 

"In  the  meantime,  it  is  practically  impossible  to  ob- 
tain Cordova  dry  hides  at  a  price  which  will  allow  the 
leather  to  be  tanned  and  sold  at  any  lower  price  than 


80 


FOOTWEAR 


IN  CANADA 


March,  1919 


the  leather  made  from  these  same  packer  hides,  as 
the  best  dry  hides  in  South  America  are  quoted  at 
the  highest  point  reached  in  the  history  of  the  trade, 
largely  due  to  the  competition  for  these  hides  from 
European  buyers.  Naturally,  we  feel  that  any  good 
grades  of  medium-priced  sole  leather,  that  can  be 

lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll^ 


"Aurora,"  new  Polor  Kloth  Pump.  A  striking 
pattern  in  white  fabric  pump.  Turn  sole  Louis 
XV.  heel,  13/8  inches.  One  of  the  popular  In- 
Stock  lines  made  by  Hazen  B.  Goodrich  &  Co., 
of  Haverhill,  Mass.,  U.S.A. 


I|||lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll!lllll!lllillllllllllll»^ 

bought  to-day,  would  be  a  good  purchase,  as  this 
leather  will  be  imobtainable  here  within  a  few  weeks. 

"As  far  as  upper  leather  is  concerned,  we  can  only 
])oint  out  the  fact  that  that  the  large  export  demand 
will  be  more  than  sufficient  to  absorb  any  surplus  of 
leather  produced  in  this  market.  On  the  other  hand, 
some  lines  of  upper  leather,  particularly  calfskins,  are 
higher  to-day  than  ever,  and  with  any  sort  ot  a  de- 
mand at  all  from  the  Canadian  Trade,  there  is  very 
little  possibility  of  lower  prices. 

"You  must  also  take  into  account  that  there  is 
very  little  chance  of  a  lower  manufacturing  cost  on 
leather  and  shoes  and,  in  many  cases,  indications  point 
to  higher  wages  being  paid  workmen.  Taking  every- 
thing into  consideration,  we -cannot  see  where  leather 
can  be  produced  and  sold  to-day  at  less  money  than 
during  the  past  season — in  fact,  everything  points  to 
it  being  absolutely  necessary  to  get  more  money  for 
both  leather  and  shoes." 

Market  Steady  and  No  Gambling 

The  Pfister  and  Vogel  Leather  Company,  of  Mil- 
waukee, are  tanners  of  high  grade  leathers  for  shoe 
uppers  and  soles,  harness  and  gloves.  In  a  letter  to 
Footwear  in  Canada,  dated  March  7th,  they  say : 

Three  separate  factors  have  to  be  considered  in 
analyzing  the  present  high  prices  of  leather.  These 
are  the  supply  and  demand  of  raw  materials,  the  sup- 
ply and  demand  of  the  finished  product,  and  the  high 
cost  of  production.  Or,  to  ])ut  it  differently,  the  short- 
age of  hides  and  skins,  the  increased  demand  for  all 
leather  especially  in  the  better  grades,  and  the  high 
cost  of  labor. 

During  191<S  when  we  had  an  army  of  three  million 
men  to  feed,  and  great  quantities  of  beef  were  needed 


it  was  only  natural  that  the  domestic  production  of 
hides  and  skins  was  the  largest  in  our  history.  The 
entire  take-off  for  the  year  is  estimated  at  approximate- 
ly twenty-four  million  pieces.  The  strong  demand, 
however,  during  the  last  year  for  hides  and  skins  to  be 
worked  into  leather  for  army  and  navy  shoes  and 
equi])ment  made  an  over  supply  of  raw  materials  im- 
possible. That  in  short,  was  the  situation  at  the  be- 
ginning of  last  November  when  the  armistice  was 
signed.  As  to  the  future  it  is  safe  to  predict  that  the 
production  of  better  quality  hides  and  .skins  for  1919 
will  be  smaller  than  that  of  last  year.  There  is  also, 
little  hope  of  obtaining  bettter  quality  of  raw  mater- 
ial from  European  countries.  The  herds  there  are,  in 
general,  depleted  and  there  is  no  surplus  of  raw  ma- 
terial. It  is  true  that  South  and  Central  American 
hides  were  in  fairly  good  supply  all  during  last  year 
but  much  of  this  raw  stock  has  been  going  to  Spain, 
Italy,  France,  and  England,  who  were  willing  to  ])ay 
higher  prices  for  it  than  those  of  the  Price  Fixing 
Committee,  and  thus  when  the  maximum  prices  were 
removed  hides  and  skins  in  the  United  States  at  once 
advanced  to  adjust  themselves  to  prices  on  the  world 
market.  At  the  present  time  limited  ocean  tonnage 
from  South  America  makes  it  still  more  difficut  to  ob- 
tain hides  and  skins  from  there.  Besides  this,  many  of 
the  European  countries  have  increased  their  tanning 
capacities  and  South  American  raw  stock  is  held  at 
competitive  prices.    Investigation  shows  that  no  other 


Women's  9  in.  bal,  military  heel,  imitation  wing 
tip,  spray  toe. — Ames,  Holden  McCready 


lllllllllllllllllllillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllli^^ 

part  of  the  world  has  a  more  than  normal  supply  of 
better  quality  hides  on  hand. 

With  a  world  shortage  of  hides  and  skins  it  would 
of  course,  be  quite  impossible  to  have  an  oversupply 
of  finished  leather.  European  countries  in  particular 
have  experienced  a  great  shortage  of  leather  during 
the  last  two  years.  The  development  of  the  wooden- 
shoe  industry  will  certainly  bear  out  this  fact.  We 
ourselves,  also  have  no  surplus  of  high  quality  sole 


March,  I'Jl'J 


FOOTWEAR 


IN  CANADA 


81 


leather,  and  stocks  of  upper  leather  are  limited,  with 
a  continued  good  demand  for  all  calf  and  side  leath- 
ers in  the  better  grades.  It  is  certainly  very  difficult 
to  see  how  good  leather  and  footwear  can  be  cheaper 
in  the  near  future.  With  the  opening  of  export  busi- 
ness it  may  be  possible  that  some  leather  may  be  worth 
even  more. 

Then  there  is  the  cost  of  production  which  is  on  a 
very  high  plane  at  the  present  time.  We  cannot  expect 
cheaper  labor  until  the  high  cost  of  living  itself  is 
decreased.  Certain  materials  used  in  the  manufacture 
of  leather  will  cost  more  rather  than  less.  All  this 
tends  to  increase  the  price  of  leather  and  shoes. 

In  general,  however,  the  trade  is  to  be  considered 
in  a  healthy  state.  Manufacturers  are  experiencing  a 
good  run  on  all  lines  of  women's  s'hoes  and  also  on  the 
better  grades  of  men's  shoes.  The  public  is  buying  for 
immediate  requirements  only,  shoe  manufacturers  are 
advising  their  customers  to  do  likewise  and  there  is 
no  gambling  on  the  market. 

Prices  Will  be  Maintained 

Duclos  &  Payan,  manufacturers  of  side  leathers,  St. 
Hyacinthe  and  Montreal,  state  that  the  outlook  is  all 
in  favor  of  the  maintenance  of  prices.  Light  hides  are 
dearer  in  consequence  of  a  strong  demand  and  the 
prices  of  tanning  materials  are  still  high.  Inquiries 
from  European  countries  are  coming  very  freely,  and 
when  the  embargoes  are  lifted  there  will  undoubtedly 
be  a  large  increase  in  orders.  The  British  Govern- 
ment (through  Sir  Percy  Daniels,  who  has  been  visit- 
ing Toronto,  Montreal  and  Quebec)  is  in  the  market 
for  very  large  quantities  of  leather,  provided  it  is  fin- 
ished for  the  Old  Country  miirket.  Inquiries  too  are 
out  for  Rumania.  Canadian  shoe  manufacturers  are 
buying  from  hand  to  mouth,  but  it  is  probable  that 
their  requirements  will  increase.    The  European  de- 

iiii;iiiiiiiii;iiiiiiii;iiii;iiii!iiiiiiiii!iiii:iiii;iiii;iiii:iiiiiiH^^ 


Men's  mahogany  calf,  whole  foxed  bal., 
single  sole,  shown  by  the  Slater  Shoe  Co. 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

mand  is  likely  to  be  the  great  factor  in  determining 
values,  as  good  prices  will  be  obtained  from  overseas 
for  our  productions,  ana  in  view  of  this  and  the  heavy 
demand  the  c|Uotations  fore  leather  for  home  consump- 
tion are  not  likely  to  come  down. 

The  Law  of  Supply  and  Demand 

P.  B.  Wallace  &  Son,  dealers  in  leather  and  shoe 
supplies,  see  no  indication  of  a  drop  in  prices  for  some 
time.    In  a  statement  to  Footwear  in  Canada.  Mr.  A. 


E.  Wallace  said :  "Europe  is  about  barefooted  and  they 
have  to  have  leather.  Canada,  being  one  of  the  large 
producing  countries,  they  naturally  turn  their  eyes 
this  way.  European  buyers  are  here  now  and  large 
lots  of  leather — especially  sole  leather — will  find  its 
way  into  Europe  in  the  next  few  months.  There  is 
a  great  scarcity  of  sole  leather,  especially  in  the  heavier 
weights.  One  large  tanner  will  have  no  tannage  to 
olTer  before  some  time  in  May  or  June.  What  we  make 


Women's  circular  vamp  Oxford,  imitation  wing 
tip,  military  heel. — Ames,  Holden,  McCready 


out  of  this  is  the  old  question  of  "supply  and  demand" 
as  to  prices.  Certainly  prices  won't  come  down  while 
the  demand  is  good  and  the  leather  scarce." 

Sheepskin  Higher 

Winslow  Bros,  and  Smith  Company,  manufactur- 
ers of  sheep,  calf  and  kid  leather,  Norwood,  Mass., 
advise  that  ra^y  sheep  skins  are  higher  today  than 
when  the  armistice  was  signed  and  that  finished  leath- 
er is  bound  to  respond.  They  also  state  that  it  is  pretty 
safe  to  product  an  advance  in  the  price  of  shoes  before 
lower  prices  prevail. 

The  Shoe  Fabric  Situation 

Owing  to  the  regulations  set  forth  by  the  United 
States  government  in  the  summer  of  last  year,  limit- 
ing the  colors  of  fabrics  to  black,  white  and  one  shade 
of  brown,  the  use  of  fabrics  in  colors  for  shoe  topping 
was  practically  eliminated.  At  the  same  time  the  pros- 
pects of  obtaining  worsteds  for  future  delivery  were, 
so  slight  that  the  shoe  manufacturers  throughout  the 
U^nited  States  withdrew  all  samples  of  worsted  fabrics 
from  their  lines.  The  result  was  to  practically  destroy 
all  demand  for  cloth  for  shoe  toppings  in  the  styles 
centres.  We  are  advised  by  one  of  the  large  shoe 
fabric  manufacturers  that  since  the  close  of  the  war 
and  the  availability  of  further  supplies  of  worsteds, 
the  manufacturers  are  gradually  putting  new  worsted 
samples  in  their  lines  of  shoes.  They  cannot  tell,  at 
the  present  time,  just  how  much  a  demand  will  follow 
the  return  of  the  samples,  but  the  general  impression 
seems  to  be  that  the  cloth  tops  in  colors  will  return 
to  their  normal  volume  during  the  coming  fall  season. 
The  shades  are  practically  the  same  as  those  used 
last  stunmer,  such  as  Havana  bro-vvn,  burgundy,  grey, 
field  mouse  and  castor.  These  shades  will  be  used  in 
various  combinations,  but  light  shades  such  as  pearl 
grey  and  ivory  are  not  in  demand. 

The  prices  at  which  worsted  corkscrew  cloth  can 


82 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CvVNADA 


March,  1919 


be  obtained  for  next  fall  delivery  cannot  be  stated.  At 
present,  the  price  in  efifect  last  November  remains  the 
selling-  price  as  the  goods  now  being  sold  in  small 
quantities  were  manufactured  during  the  war.  The 
wool  released  by  the  Government  auctions  has  brought 
prices  which  indicate  no  substantial  reduction  in  prices 
during  the  coming  season.  It  is  possible,  however, 
that  conditions  during  the  summer  may  result  in  a 
slightly  lower  quotation  on  worsted  corkscrew  cloth. 
By  that  time  there  also  will  be  a  reasonable  supply  of 
this  material  for  Whatever  demand  may  develop  for 
next  fall's  business. 

Manufacturers'  Supplies 

Mr.  H.  J.  Kenworthy,  of  Kenworthy  Bros.  Com- 
pany manufacturers  of  specialties  for  shoe  manufactur- 
ers, including  heel  pads,  felt,  for  box  toes,  cushion  in- 
soles, imitation  leather  and  felt,  and  insole  stock,  Has 
just  completed  a  trip  through  Canada  and  the  middle 
Western  States  and  advises  that  he  found  most  manu- 
facturers buying  very  cc^iservatively — many  of  them 
in  the  expectation  of  a  considerable  reduction  in  pnc- 


Duchess  calf  bal,  % 
fox,  imitation  square 
wing  tip,  spray,  Syi 
in.  No.  5  Khaki  buck 
top.  Vamp  Eyelet 
Row  and  top  No.  0 
Perforations,  4  inch 
Vamp.  13/8  Cuban 
heel — Perth  Shoe  Co. 


es.  "Our  line,"  said  Mr.  Kenworthy,  "is  no  doubt  a 
little  different  than  the  average  shoe  line  or  manufac- 
turers' supplies,  as  we  are  at  the  mercy  of  the  wool 
and  cotton  market,  more  especially  wool,  our  line  be- 
ing entirely  felt.  We  cannot  see  any  substantial  de- 
crease in  prices  on  manufactured  woolen  goods  for  the 
next  six  months.  There  may  be  a  very  a  slight  de- 
cline in  raw  stocks,  but  hardly  enough  to  make  a 
change  in  our  present-day  manufactured  prices  and  we 
are  naturally  talking  to  our  customers  along  these 
lines.  One  thing  beneficial,  however,  is  that  raw  stocks 
are  becoming  a  little  more  plentiful  and  we  are  ob- 
taining, naturally,  a  better  selection  than  during  the 
war.  Therefore,  the  trade  is  receiving  the  benefit  of 
a  more  uniform  manufactured  article  under  present- 
day  conditions.  We  firmly  believe,  however,  that  in 
the  coming  season  for  shoes  the  market  will  strengthen 
in  all  lines." 

Selling  for  Immediate  Needs 

The  Narrow  Fabric  Company,  of  Reading,  Pa., 
manufacturers  of  "Nufashond"  shoe  laces  and  braided 


and  woven  fabrics,  state  that,  while  conditions  are 
rather  unsettled,  they  are  doing  a  nice  volume  of  busi- 
ness of  that  kind  that  requires  immediate  attention — 
ie.  sfoods  ordered  for  immediate  needs.  '  No  one  seems 
to  be  stocking  up  unnecessarily  but  as  there  is  no  sur- 
plus merchandise  on  the  market  they  are  quite  o])- 
timistic  as  to  the  outlook  for  fall,  by  which  time  it 
is  believed  buyers  will  have  regained  confidence  and 
will  be  ordering  with  greater  assurance. 


Paris  Fashions 

IT  is  felt  by  many  that  the  length  of  women's  skirts 
will  have  much  to  do  with  style,  and,  in  this  con- 
nection, there  has  been  a  decided  tendency  to- 
ward longer  skirts.  In  Paris,  however,  while 
there  is  much  talk  of  the  longer  skirt,  short  styles 
are  just  as  popular  as  ever.  The  trend  in  Paris  foot- 
wear is  given  in  a  recent  letter  to  the  Boot  and  Shoe 
Recorder.  Colonial  ties  are  very  popular  and  show 
a  very  high  tongue  of  more  or  less  intricate  cut.  They 
are  particularly  well  liked  when  made  in  tete  de  negre 
suede  in  v.diich  case  they  are  invariably  ornamented 
with  a  large  buckle  in  round,  scjuare  or  oval  form  in 
nickel,  cut  steel  or  jet. 

Two  leathers  and  two  leather  combinations  are 
prominent,  such  as  suede  and  patent  leather,  or  glace 
kid  and  patent  leather.  Suede  or  buckskin  in  tete  de 
negre  are  also  extensively  employed,  but  alone  not 
in  combination  with  other  leathers  or  with  other  lea- 
thers or  with  other  colors.  Combinations  of  black 
and  white  are  still  very  strong.  Perforations  in  ela- 
borate, intricate  patterns  are  a  marked  feature  in  shoe 
trimmings.  They  are  ordinarily  underlaid  with  white. 
In  general,  styles  show  short  vamps,  high  heels  and 
tip  effects. 

In  high  shoes  the  cloth  top  in  gaiter  style  is  the 
favorite.  For  evening  the  strapped  slipper  in  black 
satin  is  prom-inent,  embroidered  in  metal  threads  or 
in  jet  steel  beads.  When  embroidered  in  metal  the 
heels  are  generally  covered  with  a  metal  cloth  to 
match  the  embroidery. 

Steel  headings  are  also  used  on  slip])ers  for  street 
wear  as  well  as  for  the  house.  One  of  the  latest  nov- 
elties in  this  line  shows  a  patent  leather  flap  tongue 
tie  with  the  monogram  of  the  wearer  embroidered  in 
steel  beads  in  an  oval  medallion  at  the  centre  of  the 
tongue. 


Stockdale  to  Lecture  in  Montreal 

THE  Montreal  Publicity  Association  has  arrang- 
ed for  Mr.  Frank  Stockdale  to  give  a  course  of 
five  lectures  on  modern  merchandising  methods 
on  March  24-28  in  the  Sulpician  Library  Hall, 
340  St.  Denis  street.  Mr.  Stockdale  is  famous  through- 
out the  Continent  as  an  authority  on  retail  subjects, 
and  every  shoe  retailer  in  the  district  of  Montreal 
should  attend  this  course.  "Every  lecture,"  said  one 
Montreal  retailer  who  heard  Mr.  Stockdale  last  Oc- 
tober, "is  worth  five  dollars."  The  lectures,  in  their 
order,  are  to  be  on  "Some  After-War  Retail  Prob- 
lems." "Figuring  Retail  Profits."  "Opportunities  in  Re- 
tail Advertising."  '^How  Turnover  Affects  Net  Pro- 
fits" and  "Retail  Salesmanship  Sizing  up  the  Custom- 
er." The  tickets,  $3  for  the  course,  can  be  obtained 
from  Mr.  H.  Viau,  treasurer  of  the  Association, 
Shaughnessy  Building,  Montreal,  or  from  Mr.  L.  Adel- 
stein,  secretary  of  the  shoe  section  of  the  Montreal 
i)ranch  or  the  Retail  Merchants'  Assaciation. 


March,  191!)  FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


Fashion  Shoes  for  Fall  Show  Judicious  Design 

Return  to  Style  with  Lifting  of  Restrictions  as  to  Materials,  Colors  and  Variety- 
Sensible,  Serviceable  Models  Predominate,  and  No  Tendency 
Toward  Freak  Lasts  and  Patterns 


From  Our  Boston  Office 


MUCH  to  the  relief  of  the  fashionable  world 
the  closed  season  is  off  on  style  and  read- 
justment in  this  respect  to  a  pre-war  Ijasis 
will  be  eft'ected  without  fuss  and  handica]) 
for  the  opportunity  only  was  wanting. 

In  both  women's  and  men's  samples  for  Fall 
which  we  have  seen,  sensi'ble  features  predominate, 
and  freakish  lasts  and  patterns  are  not  figuring.  The 
nearest  approach  to  the  latter  tendency  is  the  narrow- 
er toe  in  men's.  Manufacturers  are  not  featuring  the 
extreme  narrow  toe,  however,  'but  are  merely  carry- 
ing it — some  of  them — in  their  line. 

Long  Vamps  and  More  Vim 

Footwear  is  showing,  on  the  whole,  more  ball  and 
toe  room  with  long  vami)s  and  square  throat  eft'ects, 
an  extra  amount  of  ])erforation,  wing  tips  and  straight 
foxings.  With  largely  increased  expense  of  produc- 
tion and  all  materials  costing  so  much  more,  a  greater 
degree  of  caution  is  evident  and  few  styles  are  noted 
which  are  merely  made  up  for  novelty's  sake  without 
a  view  to  being  practical.  It  is  not  ])rofitable  for  the 
maker  to  get  out  freak  shoes  which  can  ha\'e  but  a 
limited  sale,  nor  is  the  dealer  doing  himself  a  good 
turn  in  seeking  out  such  designs. 

Suggestions  of  Style  Conference  Followed 

It  is  well  known  that  attractiveness  in  style  usu- 
ally sells  more  shoes  and  when  the  common  sense 
element  accompanies  it  the  dealer  is  taking  less  risk. 
The  producer,  while  having  ample  latitude,  by  reason 
of  lifted  restrictions,  has  used  it  judiciously  and  con- 
formed in  a  reasonable  measure  to  the  suggestions 
made  at  the  style  conference.  Some  of  the  tops  on 
women's  boots  are  surely  the  full  height,  but  while 
dresses  continue  to  be  made  very  short,  as  many  of 
them  will  be  next  fall  and  winter,  boots  to  conform 
will  be  in  demand. 

The  colonials,  pumps,  and  slippers,  are  especially 
pleasing  and  a  great  variety  of  buckles,  newly  design- 
ed, are  obtainable.  Some  of  the  buckles  seen  were 
very  expensive.  There  is  little  new  in  the  way  of  heels 
and  the  heights,  as  usual,  vary  from  flat  and  low  to 
the  extreme  heights,  according  to  the  kind  of  foot- 
wear. Some  samples  are  seen  and  manufacturers  are 
l)lanning  to  cover  Louis  heels  with  cloth  covering  to 
match  the  color  and  weave  effects  of  dress  fabrics. 

Heavy  Oxfords  and  Woolen  Hosiery 

A  noticea'ble  feature  is  the  tendency  toward  heav- 
ier oxfords  for  late  fall  and  even  winter  wear,  with 
woolen  hosiery.  While  this  cusitom  began  with  the 
lovers  of  out-of-door  sports,  it  is  likely  to  extend  like 
many  fashions,  to  a  much  more  common  custom,  par- 
ticularly in  northern  climates. 

'  The  reason  for  this  is  again  the  practical  consid- 
eration. The  light,  turn  pump  and  silk  hose  have 
been  worn  in  slushy,  snowy  weather,  and  on  damp 
city  streets  in  winter,  but  this  was  a  fad  which,  for  thb 
good  of  humanity,  it  is  hoped  has  passed.  Woolen 


stockings  and  oxfords  certainly  are  more  comfortable 
in  winter,  if  the  feet  are  properly  taken  care  of,  and 
are  surely  more  sensible  in  a  cold  climate  when  the 
high  top  boot  is  not  worn.  Top  boots,  on  the  other 
hand,  will  be  as  widely  featured  and  sold  as  ever,  but 
there  will  be  more  people  who  will  possess  both. 

In  view  of  the  higher  cost  of  materials  and  neces- 
sarily as  high,  if  not  higher,  priced  footwear,  a  better 
shoe  and  better  workmanship  will  be  assured.  While 
there  has  been  a  determined  eft'ort  to  push  button 
shoes  it  is  not  expected  that  they  will  outnumber,  if 
ec|ual  the  amount  of  lace.  There  are  so  many  com- 
binations of  the  lace  effects,  in  straight  lace,  blucher 
designs,  blind  or  exposed  eyelets  and  either  numerous 
or  spaced  eyelets,  that  women  demand  the  laced  boot 
in  some  form. 

Style  Features  in  Women's  Shoes 

The  more  extensive  use  of  color,  both  in  leather 
and  fabrics,  will  offer  a  Avider  range  to  se'lect  from, 
and  patent  leather  will  be  used,  though  possibly  not 
extensively,  owing  to  the  difficulty  of  getting  enough 
of  the  highest  grade  colt  skin.  Most  of  the  boots  have 
full  Louis  heels  and,  while  many  fancy  suedes  are 
seen,  kid  will  be  the  most  noticeable  leather.  A  wo- 
man's sport  shoe  with  waterproof  white  sole,  next  to 
the  welt,  made  of  cordovan  and  all  leather  lieel  was 
noticeable.  Among  the  most  attractive  boots  there 
are  black  kid  with  mat  top,  a  dark  brown  kid,  9-inch 
high  foxed,  lace  ;  a  light  gray  kid,  Avhole  quarter  boot, 
with  fancy  top ;  a  full  patent  vamp,  with  light  gray 
top  and  double  stitching  up  the  lace  stay.  There  is 
a  return  to  fancy  tips,  principally  imitation  tips  vary- 
ing from  little  to  much  perforation.  Wing  tips  and 
full  wing  tips,  both  imitation  and  otherwise,  are  seen 
on  boots,  pumps  and  colonials,  excepting  for  dress 
wear.  The  suede  and  gray  kid  boot,  lace,  with  high 
tops  and  full  Louis  heels  will  be  principally  shoAvn  for 
street  wear. 

Innovations  in  low  shoes  include  the  blucher  ef- 
fect in  colonials,  square  throats  and  plain,  long-  vamps. 
Some  of  the  tips  are  plain  and  some  imitation  with 
small  perforation.  Turns  are  being  featured  more 
with  black  and  cut  steel  beaded  ornaments.  Brown 
calf  and  kid  oxfords  are  .shown,  .some  with  six  eve- 
lets. 

Fxtension  of  sports  is  accom])anied  by  a  display 
of  heavier  oxfords  with  brogue  effects — wing  tips  and 
stays,  wide  sole  welts  and  extensive  perforation,  many 
of  them  blucher  cut. 

Men's  Models  for  Fall 

Due  possibly  to  the  military  discipline  which  has 
prevailed,  style  in  men's  footwear  runs  to  the  more 
solid  and  sensible  appearing  shoe  with  a  medium 
round,  or  coin  and  half  coin  toe.  The  return  of  sol- 
diers from  abroad,  however,  and  the  discarding  of 
the  arniv  shoe,  has  another  side  which  is  brinmns'  a 


84 


!■  OOTW       R    IN  CANADA 


March,  1919 


Return  to  Style  Sanity  in  Patterns 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 


Women's  Button  Boot,  Patent  Vamp.  Plain 
Toe.  Louis  Heel.  Colored  Kid  Top.  Made 
by  George  E.  Keith  Co.,  Brockton,  Mass. 


Nine  inch  Brown  Seamless  Calf  Women's 
Welt  Boot.  Simulated  Stitching,  Scallop- 
ed Vamp.  Standard  Kid,  Field  Mouse  Grey, 
Topping,  16/8  Louis  Heel,  Made  by  Hil- 
liard  &  Tabor,  Haverhill,  Mass. 


Women's  Black  Kid  Boot,  8^  in.  Imitation 
Tip.    Perforated  Vamp.    16/8  Louis  Heel. 
Made  by  Rickard  Shoe  Co.,  Haverhill. 


March,  I'.'.O 


FOOTWEAR 


IN  CANADA 


85 


demand  from  the  army  youth  for  somethinj^  more 
dressy,  a  buck  top  and  narrow  toe.  It  was  before  his 
day,  or  soon  after,  that  the  toothjjick  and  razor  toes 
caused  so  much  havoc  with  feet  and  loss  to  manufac- 
turer and  dealer. 

There  is  a  demand  among  the  younger  set  for  a 
very  narrow  toe  shoe  and  this  is  being  carried  by 
many  manufacturers.  But  it  is  only  one  of  the  line ; 
it  is  not  being  pushed.  Moreover,  in  the  narrow  toes 
shown  the  vamp  is  long  and  there  is  ])lenty  of  ball 
room,  with  the  toe  high  enough,  and  sufficient  wall 
to  avoid  crowding  the  toes.  The  old,  narrow  or  ra/.or 
toe  was  flat  and  extremely  peaked.  We  do  not  look 
for  a  craze  in  this  direction  further  than  it  has  gone 
and  the  manufacturer  is  certainly  not  seeking  it. 

The  shoes  for  fall  carry  low  heels  with  rather 
close  edges,  mostly  blind  styles,  despite  their  incon- 
venience, and  roomy  lasts.  Combination  and  English 
lasts  are  most  prominent.  The  long  vamp  and  fore- 
part are  the  feature  and  not  many  plain  toes  are  notic- 
ed, although  some  are  seen  in  the  plugged  throat  ox- 
fords for  dress  wear,  especially  where  there  is  a  one- 
piece  vamp. 

Buck  and  fawn  tops  with  Russia  and  and  cocoa 
colored  vamps  are  among  the  popular  styles  and  fen- 
walking  shoes  heavy  Scotch  grain  and  cordovan. 


Fashion  Footwear  Will  Continue 
to  Progress,  But  Unnecessary 
Styles  Not  Wanted 

  From  our  Boston  Office    ~ 

CURTAILMENT  of  the  number  of  styles  has 
long  been  discussed  as  a  measure  of  economy 
and  the  toj)ic  is  brought  up  now  by  several 
prominent  retailers  and  manufacturers  as  be- 
ing more  pertinent  than  ever  by  reason  of  shortage 
of  high  grade  leather  stocks  and  other  circumstances 
which  have  focussed  attention  on  saving.  It  is  doubt- 
less true  that  producers  are  likely  to  be  more  conser- 
vative in  slashing  up  high-priced  leather  for  impracti- 
cal footwear.  Necessity  for  economy  may  automati- 
cally trim  down  the  \'olume  of  styles.  The  variety 
was  larger  than  need  be  before  war  time  restrictions, 
but  we  cannot  agree  that  there  will  be  any  wide- 
spread co-operation  in  the  matter  of  limiting  fashion. 

There  is  likely  to  be  no  such  tendency  in  dress 
and  there  has  never  before  been  given  equal  atten- 
tion to  the  footwear  of  the  fashionable  dressers  that 
we  note  to-day. 

So  far  as  it  effects  the  more  staple  footwear,  it  is 
reasonable  to  suppose  that  the  number  of  styles  could 
easily  be  reduced  without  much  complaint,  but  tliat 
portion  of  the  public  which  can  afford  an  elaborate 
wardrobe,  and  many  who  cannot,  will  look  for  style 
and  novelty  in  footwear  to  match. 

The  society  which  gathers  at  the  great  watering- 
places  of  America  and  the  fashionable  element  of  the 
large  cities  will  seek,  and  find  without  much  trouble, 


at  the  leading  shops  footwear  to  meet  their  taste, 
even  though  the  price  be  higher,  or  much  higher  than 
formerly.  They  will  not  pay  fabulous  sums  for  gowns, 
head  dress  and  other  adornment,  and  be  satisfied  with 
other  than  the  most  attractive  footwear  obtainable. 

St}-le  in  footwear  was  later  in  coming  into  its  own 
than  other  features  of  dress  and  it  is  progressing  more 
rapidly  than  ever,  barring  the  interim  caused  I)y  the 
war.  Necessity  for  economy  should  rightly  affect 
the  useless  number  of  designs  for  staple  shoes,  but 
in  the  avenues  mentioned  above  it  is  safe  to  assert 
that  each  season  will  bring  its  novelties  and  changes 
which  will  suit  the  tastes  of  the  most  fastidious. 


Little  Hope  at  Present  for  Lower-Priced  Foot- 
wear—U.S.  Makers  Advise  Normal  Buying 

LTNLIKE  almost  every  other  commodity  leather 
I  and  shoes  did  not  drop  in  price  at  the  close 
'  of  the  war.  The  conditions  are  vastly  differ- 
ent, which  make  for  a  declining  tendency  in 
leather.  In  some  articles  a  great  amount  of  material 
which  was  being  turned  into  munitions  or  war  goods 
in  some  form  could  be  turned  over  to  other  channels, 
but  in  the  matter  of  leather  not  enough  was  available 
for  military  uses  and  civilian  at  the  same  time  and  the 
use  of  substitutes,  so  called,  was  constantly  increas- 
ing. Had  the  war  continued  we  would  not  only  have 
had  still  higher-priced  footwear,  but  the  supply  of 
first  grade  calf  and  kid  would  have  been  far  smaller 
for  civilan  use  and  shoes  made  of  side  leather,  cheap 
kid  and  fabrics  would  have  been  worn  to  a  consider- 
able extent  by  what  are  termed  the  classes  as  well 
as  the  masses. 

Moreover,  we  may  as  well  face  the  situation  as 
it  is  and  come  to  a  realization  of  the  fact  that  the  day 
of  cheap  leather  of  good  quality  has  passed  for  the 
time  being  and  it  will  not  return  until  the  basic  con- 
ditions for  the  supply  of  raw  material  have  changed 
radically.  The  supply  of  hides  and  skins  may  not 
be  increased  at  will.  Cotton  and  wheat  mav  be  grown 
in  larger  quantities  but  the  production  of  hide  and 
•skin  bearing  animals  is  a  slow  process  and  results, 
if  at  all,  from  the  growing  demand  for  meat  and  not 
the  by-products. 

The  withholding  of  orders  for  shoes  is  likely  to 
be  scattered  and  not  sufificient  to  have  the  effect  of 
concerted  action.  Leading  manufacturers  are  advising 
their  customers  against  such  a  course,  and  the  stocks 
of  shoes  in  wholesalers'  and  retailers'  hands  do  not 
warrant  such  action.  It  is  an  easy  deduction  that 
those  who  delay  purchasing  beyond  a  reasonable 
time  will  have  no  security  for  getting  best  grades  of 
upper  stock,  and  there  is  absolutely  no  indication  at 
this  writing  that  they  would  profit  by  lower  prices. 

There  has  been  some  belief  that  the  embargoes  on 
the  other  side  would  throw  a  lot  of  leather  back  on 
this  market,  but  those  in  touch  with  the  situation  are 
well  aware  that  the  English  Government's  agent  is 
purchasing  very  large  quantities  of  leather  here.  It 
is  generally  conceded  that  the  embargoes  will  of 
necessity  be  liftejd  soon  for  the  whole  of  Europe  will 


The  coming  season  will  bring  fashion  developments,  but  we  may  look  for  a  reduction  in  the  variety  of 
useless  designs.    Style  in  footwear  must  ^eep  abreast  of  style  in  gowns  and  headgear. 


86  !•  OOTW  I':A  R     IN     CAN.VDA  March,  1919 

 „,_„„_,,  ,,_»,  „._.„_,* 

Summer  and  Fall  Designs  Express  Beauty  \ 
of  Outline  and  Color — True  Style  in 

Every  Sense  of  the  Word  \ 


by  Hervey  E.  Guptill,  Haverhill  Ooze  Calf  Five  Eyelet  Oxford — Made  by 

Hervey  E.  Guptill,  Haverhill,  Mass. 


March,  1919  FOOTWEAR    IN    CANADA  87 


need  about  all  of  the  American  leather  and  shoes  that 
can  be  spared  for  some  time  to  come. 

Retailers  will  do  well  to  buy  normally  and  to 
stock  such  goods  as  are  sane  in  style  and  gooci  in 
c|uality.   The  consumer  to-day  realizes  that  he  must 


])ay  high  ]jrices  and  more  than  ever  he  is  anxious 
about  the  (|uality.  He  can  be  told  about  the  ])rice  and 
why  shoes  must  cost  as  much  or  more,  but  he  doesn't 
easily  assimilate  explanations  aljout  i)oor  shoe-mak- 
ing and  1)ad  material. 


Indications  Point  to  Higher  Prices  for  Shoes 

Leading  Manufacturers  Hold  Out  No  Hope  for  Lower  Prices— One  Says  Buyers 
Wlio  Cancelled  Will  Order  Again  at  Advanced  Costs 

 ■  From  our  Boston  Office   '  


TWO  prominent  shoe  manufacturers,  J.  Frank 
McElwain  of  the  W.  H.  McElwain  Shoe  Com- 
pany, and  Henry  B.  Endicott,  of  the  P2ndicott- 
Johnson  Company,  have  spoken  as  regards 
shoe  prices  and  general  conditions  affecting  the  busi- 
ness. The  tremendous  output  of  the  companies  tiiese 
gentlemen  represent  is  too  well  known  to  call  for  men- 
tion here. 

Mr.  McElwain  says  that  there  will  be  no  lower 
shoe  prices.  "The  real  danger,"  he  says,  "is  higher 
prices,  and  that  is  contrary  to  what  the  public  ex- 
pects. They  are  getting  the  lowest  prices  possible, 
lower  than  other  basic  commodities.  We  have  kept 
the  prices  as  low  as  possible,  and  that  is  why  they  can- 
not fail  as  in  some  other  lines.  The  conditions  in  our 
industry  are  not  parallel.  There  has  been  no  profiteer- 
ing- on  shoes.  Demand  finally  regulates  price." 

Will  Have  to  Buy  at  Advanced  Cost 

Mr.  Endicott  said :  "At  the  time  the  armistice  was 
signed  retailers  cancelled  their  orders  and  will  now 
have  to  buy  again  at  advanced  cost.  This  is  the  situa- 
tion facing  them  on  account  of  their  peace  panic.  We 
have  more  orders  than  we  need  at  this  moment,  and 
it  is  simply  a  question  of  delivery  for  next  summer 
and  fall." 

The  price  question  is  one  of  most  absorbing  inter- 
est here  at  present.  It  is  true  now,  as  it  has  been  on 
previous  occasions  of  some  uncertainty,  that  there  is 
a  difference  of  opinion  among  the  leaders  appears  to 
be  that  where  quality  is  maintained  as  high  or  higher 
prices  will  prevail  for  fall  footwear. 

The  manufacturers  quoted  above  have  organiza- 
tions well  equipped  to  name  as  low  prices  as  possible 
and  neither  of  them  would  care  to  speak  publicly  .so 
positively  without  careful  study  of  the  situation  and 
without  knowing  Avhat  to  expect  in  the  way  of  leather 
values  and  producing  costs. 

At  the  time  of  the  armistice  there  was  a  more 
stable  basis  of  hide  and  skin  values  because  of  Gov- 
ernment fixing  of  prices,  but  since  the  restrictions 
were  lifted  there  has  been  nothing  to  prevent  an  ad- 
vance. Calf.skins  wdiich  were  fixed  at  40  cents  a 
pound,  advanced  to  from  45  to  60  cents.  For  city  calf- 
skins the  asking  price  was  60  cents  and  they  are  now 
offered  at  50  cents.  One  of  the  leading  hide  and  skin 
dealers  told  the  writer  the  market  is  now  fluttering 
round  50  cents,  but  even  this  is  a  very  sharp  advance 


and  the  outlook  is  decidedly  for  higher  price  calf  lea- 
ther for  fall  shoes. 

The  situation  is  comparatively  similar  in  choice 
kid  skins.  Tanners  of  kid  are  handicapped  by  a  short- 
age of  raw  stock.  There  is  a  brisk  demand  with  little 
available.  One  of  the  largest  producers  of  glazed  kid 
says  that  shoes  of  ec^ual  cjuality  will  cost  more  and 
even  then  there  will  be  far  less  shoes  on  the  market 
this  fall  made  out  of  as  good  stock  as  appeared  last 
season. 

A  Depleted  Raw  Stock  Market 

Many  more  reasons,  particuladly  productive  ex- 
pense, warrant  the  belief  that  cancelling  of  orders 
and  holding  aloof  from  the  market  will  not  work  to 
the  advantage  of  shoe  buyers.  The  world's  war  has 
had  the  effect  of  greatly  depleting  the  raw  stock  mar- 
ket. Foreign  buyers  have  taken  up  hides  and  skins 
at  prices  that  our  tanners  were  unwilling  to  pay,  or 
could  not  because  of  restrictions. 

Despite  the  declining  tendency  of  foodstuffs  and 
numerous  commodities  the  conditions  are  different 
with  the  raw  materials  from  which  leather  is  made. 
Even  though  the  cattle  census  may  show  more  cattle 
in  the  United  States  than  a  year  ago,  this  is  not  re- 
flected in  a  larger  hide  supply'.  Animals  are  killed  for 
meat  and  not  for  the  resultant  by-products.  More- 
over the  skins  from  which  shoe  uppers,  for  the  classes 
at  least  are  made,  come  from  other  nations.  It  is  true 
that  we  use  a  tremendous  amount  of  split  and  side 
leathers  for  staple  shoes  but  the  markets  show  a 
shortage  on  all  classes  of  ra\v  stock. 

When  it  comes  to  labor,  not  only  is  there  no  pros- 
pect now  of  a  return  to  the  pre-war  basis  of  wages, 
but  strikes  are  in  progress  in  several  centres  seeking  an 
increase  with  shorter  hours,  nor  is  there  any  import- 
ant item  of  expense  entering  into  the  shoe  which 
shows  a  ^decline . 

There  are  buyers  of  shoes  and  manufacturers  who 
still  look  for  a  break  in  the  market,  but  on  what  tney 
base  their  hopes  is  not  evident.  Shoes  indeed  are  re- 
tailing at  a  high  figure,  but  that  does  not  alter  the 
conditions  now  confronting  the  manufacturer,  and 
the  problem  is  most  likely  to  be  in  the  ability  to  fur- 
nish enough  shoes  of  former  quality  rather  than  one 
of  price  before  the  end  of  the  season.  The  situation 
we  face  to-day  is  one  toward  which  we  tended  before 
the  war  and  which  was  hastened  and  intensified  by 
reason  of  the  w^ar. 


Our  adoice  to  every  retailer  is  to  buy  normally  for  fall  requirements.     A  careful  stud^  of 
market  conditions,  as  outlined  in  the  various  articles  in  this  issue,  leaves  no 
hope  for  lower  prices  in  the  immediate  future. 


§8 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


March, 


More  Style  for  Men  Means  More  Pairs 
Sold — Progressive  Trend  is  Shown 
in  Many  Lines  for  Fall 


Men's  Tan   Bal.     Made  by   George  E.  Keith 


Men's  Tan   Bal,   Popular  Seller,  Wide  Tread, 
Waterproof  Sole.     Made  by  Churchill- 
Alden  Co.,   Brockton,  Mass. 


Men's  Tan  Bal.,  Semi-English  Model,  Invisible 
Eyelets.  Double  Sole.  White  Stitched 
Welt,  Narrow  Toe.  Made  by  Churchill  & 
Alden  Co.,  Brockton. 


March,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


89 


Improvement  in  Methods  of  Merchandising 

Business  Ideals  are  Higher  Than  Those  of  Thirty  Years  Ago —Importance  of  Closer 
Attention  to  Modern  Accounting  Systems— Manufacturers  Should 
Use  More  Care  in  Granting  Credit 


MirrHODS  of  doing  lousiness  today  are  quite 
changed  from  those  of  twenty-five  or  thirty 
years  ago.  This  was  Ijrought  out  in  a  very 
instructive  address  by  Mr.  F.  W.  Stewart, 
managing  director  of  the  Cluett,  Peabody  Company, 
before  a  recent  gatliering  of  Toronto  merchants.  Mr. 
Stewart's  address  is  authoritative  ;  he  speaks  with  the 
assurance  of  long  experience  and  careful  study  of  trade 
conditions.  We  believe  his  advice,  if  followed,  will  be 
'of  great  value  to  merchants  in  all  lines  of  business. 

A  short  time  ago  a  friend  put  the  question  to'  me, 
"Are  business  ideals  on  a  higher  jjlane  than  they  were 
ten  years  ago?"  I  had  no  hesitation  in  answering, 
".\bsolutely  yes."  Looking  back  over  a  teim  of  twen- 
ty-five or  thirty  years,  I  can  clearly  see  a  decided  ad- 
vancement of  business  methods  to  higher  levels. 

Recalling  to  my  mind  my  early  days  in  commer- 
cial life,  I  found  that  a  fair  percentage  of  business 
men  were  not  above  carrying  on  small  underhand  de- 
ceptive methods  to  get  the  better  of  the  other  man — 
the  man  he  was  sellmg  to  or  the  man  he  was  buying 
from.  In  many  instances,  it  was  a  case  of  how  high 
a  price  can  I  obtain  for  my  goods  from  each  individual 
I  am  selling  to,  or  how  much  closer  can  I  buy  from  the 
manufacturer  or  wholesaler  than  my  competitor. 

That  may  still  be  felt  by  some  merchants  to  be 
the  keenest  and  best  basis  upon  which  to  conduct  a 
business,  but  I  believe  that  today,  the  majority  of  suc- 
cessful concerns  give  the  best  value  they  can  for  the 
price  asked,  and  on  the  other  hand,  all  the  buyers  ex- 
pect is  100  cents  worth  of  merchandise  for  a  dollar,  and 
the  knowledge  that  the  value  they  are  receiving  is  the 
best  which  can  be  had  from  that  manufacturer  or 
wholesaler,  for  the  price  paid. 

In  my  early  days  it  was  customary  for  some 
wholesale,  concerns  to  have  two  and  three  prices  on 
their  merchandise.  The  price  quoted  was  according 
to  the  merchant  doing  the  purchasing.  Of  course,  the 
goods  were  marked  with  a  private  mark.  Samples  were 
marked  in  the  same  way.  This  system  is  not  yet  en- 
tirely done  away  with. 

Some  manufacturers  gave  special  discounts  to  fav- 
ored customers.  Three  merchants  in  town  would  pay 
one  price,  and  the  fourth  would  be  sold  at  a  lower 
price,  giving  the  latter  the  advantage  of  selling  the 


same  goods  at  a  lower  price  and  securing  the  same  or 
a  better  profit  than  the  others,  or  selling  at  the  same 
jjrice  and  receiving  a  higher  profit  than  his  competi- 
tors ;  giving  one  merchant  with  that  merchandise  an 
unfair  advantage  over  the  others  in  that  town,  and 
from  the  manufacturer's  point  of  view,  in  my  opinion, 
a  dishonest  method  of  doing  business,  as  the  merchants 
paying  the  high  prices  were  not  aware  of  one  merchant 
in  the  town  buying  the  same  goods  at  lower  prices 
than  they  were,  or  they  would  have  demanded  the  low- 
er prices,  and  if  not  given  to  them  would  not  have 
purchased  the  goods. 

I  have  always  been  careful  of  the  man  or  concern 
who  breaks  his  price  or  intimates  that  he  is  going  to 
do  something  in  a  special  way,  by  making  concessions 
in  price  to  me.  If  he  was  doing  something  specially 
for  me,  he  was  likely  doing  something  extra-specially 
for  my  competitor. 

When  a  company  will  not  break  its  prices,  and 
sells  on  the  same  terms  to  everyone,  that  company  is 
entitled  to  the  respect  of  the  merchants,  and  should 
give  them  confidence  to  transact  business  with  that 
company,  for  they  will  be  assured*  that  they  are  ob- 
taining their  goods  atthe  best  price  given,  and  tnat 
is  all  a  buyer  should  expect.  If  prices  are  cut  or  spec- 
ial discounts  given,  the  prices  must  be  based  to  allow 
this  to  be  done,  otherwise  the  goods  would  be  sold  at 
a  loss,  or  at  the  regular  price,  the  profits  were  so  large 
that  the  merchant  who  does  not  secure  the  concessions, 
is  paying  more  than  he  should  for  that  particular  line 
of  goods. 

Modern  methods  mean  samples  and  goods  marked 
in  plain  figures.  There  should  not  be  anything  to  hide 
between  the  seller  and  the  buyer. 

Change  in  Methods  of  Selling 

There  has  been  a  marked  change  in  the  method 
of  selling  goods  during-  the  past  few  years.  Not  so 
long  ago,  treating  and  drinking  were  considered  two 
important  essentials  in  the  buying  and  selling-  of  goods. 
One  of  the  first  essentials  of  a  salesman  today  is  so- 
briety and  steadiness,  and  I  am  sure  that  you  will  agree 
with  me  that  this  also  a])]jlies  in  a  very  large  measure 
to  the  success  of  retail  merchants.  I  find  that  the 
trying  to  take  advantage  of  each  other  by  the  seller 
and  buyer,  has  very  largely  disappeared.    The  ten- 


—  r.oot  and  .Slioe  Recorder 


Did  It  Ever  Happen  To  You? 


00 


FOOTWKAR    IN  CANADA 


March,  1!)19 


Fall  "Regals"  for  Men's  Wear 


'Crest" 


"Pall  Mair 


'Briton" 


dency  is  to  place  confidence  in  and  do  the  l)est  tliey 
can  for  each  other. 

It  was  very  difficnlt  at  one  time  for  salesmen  to 
reach  certain  merchants  and  buyers  to  submit  their 
samples.  Many  times  I  have  been  ig"nored  or  spoken 
to  in  such  a  way  as  would  break  the  heart  of  a  young 
salesman.  It  was  considered  by  some  men  to  be  good 
business  to  treat  salesmen  this  way.  It  meant  pos- 
sibly getting  him  to  break  his  prices,  if  he  finally  con- 
descended to  look  at  his  samples. 

Such  methods  at  the  present  time  are  very  rare. 
Business  is  done  more  on  a  friendly,  man  to  man  bas- 
is, and  it  is  so  much  more  satisfactory  to  all  parties. 
This  is  as  it  should  be. 

It  was  also  very  common  for  merchants  to  take 
more  discounts  and  time  than  they  were  entitled  to 
when  making  settlements,  with  the  idea  in  mind  that 
if  what  was  taken  was  not  allowed,  the  firm  would 
sufifer  ffhrough  loss  of  business  in  the  future. 

It  is  exceptional  for  such  a  case  to  arise  today,  and 
the  merchant  who  would  undertake  to  do  so  would  be 
ostracized  by  reputable  concerns,  which  would  certain- 
ly be  to  the  detriment  of  the  firm  who  undertook  to 
use  such  methods  of  settlement.  A  buyer  has  no  more 
right  to  increase  the  terms  and  discounts  when  remit- 
ting-, than  the  seller  has  to  decrease  them  after  the 
order  has  been  accepted.  In  either  case,  the  change 
would  be  contrary  to  honorable  lousiness  methods. 

Advertising  Standard  Raised 

Advertising-  today  is  undoubtedly  on  a  higher 
I)lane  than  it  was  years  ago.  While  in  many  cases 
statements  are  exaggerated,  advertisements  as  I  find 
them  are  now  very  seldom  untruthful.  Truth  in  adver- 
tising is  one  of  the  strongest  factors  in  building  up  a 
successful  business. 

Time  sj^ent  in  giving  thought  to  the  matter  for 
your  advertisements  and  for  their  set  up,  is  time  well 
spent.  The  more  pulling  power  they  have  and  the 
more  business  they  bring  you,  the  less  your  advertis- 
ing costs  you. 

Do  not  buy  space  and  put  any  old  matter  into  it, 
just  because  you  have  contracted  for  it  and  have  to 
use  it.  Originality  in  })hrasing-  and  good  illustrations 
which  tell  the  story  at  a  glance,  are  sure  to  ])roduce  re- 
sults and  make  your  advertising-  profitable. 

Read  your  trade  journals  closely.  They  publish, 
continuously,  articles  by  experts,  which  •merchants 
should  study  as  they  cover  the  i)rincipal  ])hases  of  re- 
tail merchandi.snig,  and  niucli  beneficial  information 
can  be  secured  from  them. 


There  are  many  other  j)hases  of  retail  merchandis- 
ing- which  are  on  a  higher  level  than  they  have  been  in 
the  past,  but  those  I  have  mentioned  will  be  sufficient 
to  indicate  the  desirable  and  satisfactory  advances 
which  have  been  made. 

I  will  now  refer  to  some  of  the  modern  methods 
which  go  largely  towards  the  making  of  successful  re- 
tail merchandising,  which  will  include  dispensing  oi 
credit  by  manufacturers  and  wholesalers,  and  the  nec- 
essity of  a  knowledge  of  figuring  expenses  and  profits. 

Credit  is  given  on  confidence  in  a  man's  ability  to 
pay;  in  his  character  and  integrity;  in  his  ability  to  so 
conduct  his  business  afifairs,  that  the  companies  from 
whom  his  merchandise  is  procured,  sees  to  it  that  his 
requirements  are  always  fully  supplied,  and  that  he  is 
gTanted  the  line  of  credit  to  which  he  is  entitled,  to 
permit  him  to  conduct  his  affairs  in  a  profitable  and  sat- 
isfactory manner.  The  merchant  who  is  in  a  position 
to  avail  himself  of  the  cash  discounts  allowed  on  his 
purchases  is  naturally  in  a  much  stronger  position  to 
carry  on  an  aggressive,  profitable  business,  than  one 
who  is  not  able  to  do  so. 

A  merchant  with  a  volume  of  sales  of  $50,000  a 
year,  will  purchase  $33,333  of  merchandise,  presuming 
he  is  placing  an  advance  of  50  per  cent,  on  the  average, 
on  invoice  price.  Taking  3  per  cent,  as  the  average 
cash  discount  he  secures  on  his  purchases,  he  would 
save  $1,000  in  discounts,  and  figuring  that  he  has  $10,- 
000  invested  in  his  business,  he  receives  a  return  of  10 
l)er  cent,  on  his  investment'.  Possibly  he  must  borrow 
from  his  bank  at  certain  periods  to  permit  him  to  take 
advantage  of  the  best  discounts.  Presuming  his  bor- 
rowings would  to.tal  $15,000  during  the  year,  at  say 
7  per  cent.,  the  average  length  of  time  on  which  he 
would  pay  interest  on  this  amount  would  be  about  one 
month,  which  would  cost  him  about  $90.00.  So  that 
on  approximately  half  of  his  purchases  he  would  have 
the  benefit  of  the  full  discount  allowed,  and  the  same 
on  the  balance,  less  $90.00.  By  giving  the  bank  this 
amount  and  taking  his  discounts,  he  profits  to  the  ex- 
tent of  $410,  which  he  would  lose  if  he  did  not  have 
banking  facilities  to  obtain  the  loans  required,  and 
which  would  necessitate  making  settlement  only  on 
the  net  due  date. 

Every  retail  merchant  must  necessarily,  in  his 
own  interest,  strive  to  place  himself  in  the  position  to 
take  the  best  discounts,  not  only  for  the  reason  men- 
tioned, but  also  for  the  reason  that  it  places  him  in  the 
])osition  of  being  able  to  chose  the  companies  from, 
whom  he  wishes  to  make  his  purchases,  and  whose 


March,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


91 


merchandise  will  best  assist  him  to  build  up  a  large 
and  profitable  business. 

Therefore,  the  merchant  who  makes  settlement 
only  on  a  net  basis,  loses  not  only  the  advantage  of  the 
profits,  he  will  secure  through  the  saving  of  discounts, 
but  he  naturally  will  not  stand  as  high  in  the  credit  de- 
partments of  wholesalers  and  manufacturers  especial- 
ly those  producing  nationally  advertised  goods,  and 
therefore,  is  frequently  deprived  of  securing  goods 
which  would  mean  larger  sales  to  him  and  consequent- 
ly larger  profits. 

Credit  Has  Been  Loosely  Given 

Before  I  leave  the  item  of  credits  I  wish  to  say 
that  the  dispensing  or  credits  by  manufacturers  and 
wholesalers  in  Canada  in  the  past,  has  been  in  my 
humble  opinion  on  what  I  may  term  a  loose  and  unde- 
sirable basis. 

The  granting  of  credit  has  been  altogether  to  the 
disadvantage  of  the  merchant  with  an  established  busi- 
ness. It  has  been  too  easy  for  men  with  little  know- 
ledge of  merchandising,  and  often  without  capital,  to 
start  in  business.  Most  businesses  opened  up  under 
these  conditions  are  doomed  to  failure,  especially  un- 
der extreme  periods  of  depression,  on  account  of  hav- 
ing no  reserves  or  resources  to  fall  back  upon,  to  carry 
them  over  the  depression  period. 

I  believe  that  99  men  out  of  every  100  who  start 
in  business  for  themselves,  do  so  with  a  desire  and  a 
determination  to  succeed,  but  lack  of  experience  in  the 
proper  operation  of  the  details  of  their  business  is  the 
cause  of  the  downfall  of  a  very  large  per  cent,  of  retail 
merchants. 

The  great  detriment  to  well  established  retail 
merchants  in  giving  credit  to  this  class  of  merchant, 
is  that  when  the  creditors  must  step  in  and  force  an 
assignment,  or  even  if  it  is  voluntary,  the  stock  is 
thrown  on  the  market  at  35c  to  50c  on  the  dollar,  which 
means  a  sale  of  goods  purchased  on  this  basis,  which 
other  merchants  in  that  town  have  to  contend,  with 
goods  for  which  they  have  paid  100  cents,  and  this  to 
me  is  the  most  unfair  competition  which  the  merchant 
who  always  pays  in  full  for  his  goods,  has  to  contend 
with,  and  which  in  my  opinion  the  average  merchant 
is  entitled  to  protection  against,  from  the  concerns 
from  whom  he  purchases  his  merchandise. 

Of  course,  credit  departments  cannot  altogether 
eliminate  losses,  but  I  am  sure  the  number  of  failures 


amongst  retail  merchants  can  be  reduced  to  a  mini- 
mum, if  credit  managers  will  be  more  careful  in  the 
granting  of  credit  to  men  who  undertake  to  start  in 
business  for  themselves.  It  is  easy  to  grant  credit,  but 
it  is  very  often  difficult  to  collect  against  the  amount 
of  credit  given,  and  to  avoid  this  condition  as.  much  as 
possible,  and  to  give  the  degree  of  protection  to  the 
established  merchant  to  which  he  is  entitled,  a  man 
seeking  a  line  of  credit,  or  even  being  in  a  position  to 
pay  cash  for  his  first  purchases,  should  be  made  to  de- 
monstrate that  he  has  a  knowledge  of  operating  a  re- 
tail business,  before  he  is  allowed  to  purchase  goods. 

He  should  be  able  to  show  that  he  has  knowledge 
of  the  proper  methods  of  figuring  his  expenses  and  his 
profits.  These  are  the  rocks  upon  which  so  many  con- 
cerns are  stranded. 

He  should  show  that  he  knows  how  to  departmen- 
talize his  business,  so  that  he  will  know  from  day  to 
day,  week  to  week  and  month  to  month,  which  depart- 
ments are  making  and  which  losing  money  for  him. 
If  a  department  in  which  he  has  invested  a  certain  per- 
cent of  his  capital,  is  not  showing  the  proper  volume  of 
sales  for  the  amount  of  stock  carried ;  if  his  sales  are 
largely  made  up  on  goods  on  which  there  is  a  small 
margin  of  profit ;  if  the  sales  of  the  previous  day  were 
to  a  large  percent  on  a  certain  article  which  was  being 
sold  at  a  loss,  and  if  for  many  other  reasons  not  nec- 
essary to  mention,  goods  are  being  stocked  or  sold 
which  do  not  show  the  proper  returns  to  give  the  pro- 
fit desired,  then  he  should  be  in  a  position  to  know  it. 

My  experience  has  shown  me  that  many  merch- 
ants lose  sight  of  the  fact  that  expenses  of  the  business 
go  on  just  the  same  when  goods  are  being  sold  at  a 
loss,  as  when  at  a  profit.  They  are  inclined  to  figure 
that  they  are  getting  their  money  back  if  they  sell  an 
an  article  for  $1.00,  which,  was  invoiced  to  them  at  $12 
per  dozen.  They  overlooked  that,  if  it  costs  them  25 
percent  of  their  volume  of  sales  to  do  business,  that 
that  percent  must  apply  against  the  $1.00  received, 
which  would  show  a  direct  loss  of  25  per  cent  on  the 
article,  as  it  costs  25c  to  sell  it.  That  $1.00  goes  into 
the  sales  of  the  day  and  year  on  which  the  cost  of  do- 
ing business  is  based,  just  the  same  as  if  it  had  been 
sold  at  the  original  price,  which  we  will  assume  was 
$1.50.  The  volume  of  sales  is  reduced  50c,  but  the  per- 
cent of  the  expenses  must  apply  against  the  $1.00  just 
the  same  as  if  the  sale  had  been  made  at  $1.50. 

There  are  many  books  published  and  courses  giv- 


+ — " — ■  


I 


Two  fall  lines  shown 
by  the  Slater  Shoe 
Company.  On  the 
left,  officers'  Russia 
calf  city  blucher — 
also  made  in  Mahog- 
any. 

On  the  right,  gun 
metal  whole  foxed 
bal,  dull  calf  top, 
single  sole. 


92 


FOO'I'W       R    IN  C.VNADA 


March,  1919 


cn  which  can  l)e  taken  to  guide  retail  merchants  in  de- 
partmentalizing their  stores,  and  show  the  proper 
methods  of  figuring  expenses  and  profits.  Merchants 
should  avail  themselves  of  these  courses  of  informa- 
tion. They  cannot  helji  but  iiu])rove  their  merchandis- 
ing- methods. 

Classify  Your  Expenses 

I  would,  however,  strongly  recommend  every  re- 
tail merchant  to  make  up  his  daily  sales  by  depart- 
ments, and  figure  his  expenses  according  to  a  classifi- 
cation similar  to  the  following:  Advertising,  transpor- 
tation, insurance,  interest,  pay  roll,  rent,  delivery,  bad 
debts,  light  and  heat,  depreciation,  general  expense, 
(pa])er,  twine,  cleaning,  etc.) 

It  is  of  course  understood  that  the  salary  or  draw- 
ings of  the  proprietor  are  included  in  salaries  item,  and 
if  he  owns  his  own  store,  that  he  pays  himself  the 
amount  of  rent  he  would  have  to  pay  were  he  renting 
the  store  from  another  party,  such  rent  also  to  be  in- 
cluded in  his  total  expenses. 

Having  departmentalized  his  store,  kept  accurate 
account  of  his  expense,  the  merchant  must  now  be 
careful  to  figure  his  profits  correctly,  and  in  doing  so 
must  be  sure  that,  he  is  placing  sufficient  advance  upon 
his  invoice  ])rice  to  cover  expenses  and  leave  a  per- 
cent of  net  profits  to  which  every  merchant  is  entitled, 
and  which  he  should  have  over  and  above  his  salary  or 
drawings. 

In  figuring  expenses  and  profits,  they  must  be  bas- 
ed on  the  same  figures,  either  invoice  price  or  sales. 
Profits  cannot  be  figured  on  one  set  of  figures  and  ex- 
])enses  on  another. 

I  have  foupd  the  error  to  be  very  generally  made 
by  merchants,  to  figure  their  i)rofits  on  the  invoice 
])rice,  and  their  expenses  on  their  sales.  This  is  a 
fatal  mistake  and  causes  the  downfall  of  many  mer- 
chants.   If  the  volume  of  sales  is  used  upon  which  to 


A  distinctive  Oxford 
for  women,  by  Edwin 
Clapp  &  Son,  East 
Weymouth.  Mass. 


figure  both  expenses  and  profits,  it  will  be  found  the 
most  simple  method,  and  will  solve  the  problems  for 
many  merchants  as  to  the  reason  that  they  find  it  dif- 
ficult to  pay  their  bills  when  due. 

It  may  be  desirable  to  mention  that  one  hundred 
per  cent  advance  on  invoice  is  equal  to  only  50 
per  cent  on  sales;  50  per  cent  advance  on  invoice  is 
equal  to  only  33  1-3  per  cent  on  sales;  33  per  cent  ad- 
vance on  invoice  is  equal  to  only  25  per  cent,  on  sales  ; 
25  per  cent,  advance  on  invoice  is  ^qual  to  only  20  per 
cent,  on  sales. 

The  modern  methods  of  operating  a  retail  business 
today  embrace  the  keeping  of  proper  records  of  pur- 
chases and  sales,  and  expenses  and  ])rofits,  so  that 
waste  may  be  eliminated  and   leaks   discovered  and 


st()])ped.  90  per  cent,  of  the  failures  of  retail  merch- 
ants are  due  to  lack  of  system  and  only  10  per  cent,  to 
lack  of  business.  These  figures  are  based  upon  an  in- 
vestigation of  the  cases  of  failure  bv  a  qualified  author- 
•ty.  ' 

In  closing  my  few  remarks  to  you,  I  would  impress 
upon  you  the  value  of  increasing-  your  volume  and 
holding  down  your  expenses.  Every  dollar  added  to 
sales  without  increasing  expense,  means  lower  cost 


All  Champagne  kid 
bal,  fox,  plain  toe, 
854  in.  top,  4  inch 
vamp.  White  welt, 
leather  Louis  heel 
enamelled  to  match. 
Perth    Shoe  Co. 


of  doing  business,  and  consequently  larger  profits. 

In  conjunction  with  these  features,  the  keeping- 
down  f)f  the  amount  of  stock  on  hand,  and  making 
more  frequent  stock  turnover,  will  go  far  to  strength- 
en your  position  financially  and  give  better  opportun- 
ities of  showing  satisfactory  results  at  the  end  of  the 
year. 

I  cannot  emphasize  too  strongly  the  advantage  to 
retail  merchants,  and  the  firms  they  are  dealing  with, 
to  submit  annual  statements  of  their  financial  position 
each  year,  whether  they  be  satisfactory  or  otherwise. 
It  creates  confidence,  and  that  is  what  should  be  en- 
couraged between  buyers  and  sellers.  It  is  one  of  the 
features  of  modern  merchandising. 


A  Plan  for  Reducing  Costs 

A SCHEME  of  interest  to  Canadian  exporters  of 
leather  to  Great  Britain  is  outlined  by  Mr.  J. 
W.  Smith,  a  shoe  manufacturer  of  Kettering, 
Eng.  The  plan  is  for  the  establishment  of  a 
su])plies  syndicate  (with  a  nominal  ca])ital  of  $1,450,- 
000,  and  a  paid-up  cai)ital  of  $625,000)  to  purchase 
botttom  leather  direct  from  the  tanneries,  and  thus 
abolish  the  holding  of  large  stocks  by  individual  manu- 
facturers and  reduce  charges  on  capital,  and  decrease 
working  costs.  Mr.  Smith  points  out  that  the  scheme 
might  include  the  purchase  of  other  essentials  of  boot 
manufacture,  and  he  appeals  to  manufacturers  to  sub- 
stitute co-operation  for  competition.  By  that  alone, 
he  says,  can  a  standard  of  efificiency  in  organization  be 
maintained  whereby  a  living  wage  can  be  firmly  estab- 
lished for  the  worker  and  a  fair  remuneration  be  assur- 
ed to  the  real  organisers  of  industry. 


March,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


93 


Advertising  a  Special  Sale  With- 
out Using  Comparative  Prices 


T 


'HE  aim  of  the  average  retailer,  in  advertising 
a  sale,  seems  to  be  to  make  the  dif¥erence  be- 
tween the  original  price  and  the  sale  price  as 
great  as  possible — in  the  hope,  no  doubt  that 
people  will  tumble  over  themselves  rushing  to  save 
this  three  or  four  dollars.  Nevertheless,  it  is  commg 
to  be  realized  by  good  business  men  everywhere  tnat 
comparative-price  advertising  is  losing  value.  Pos- 
sibly this  is  a  condition  brought  about  by  unscrupu- 
lous dealers  who  deliberately  inflate  prices  so  as  to  be 
able  to  advertise  a  "smashing"  reduction.  This  has  re- 
flected on  the  legitimate  dealer  who  has  a  genuine  bar- 
gain to  offer — that  is,  unless  he  has  so  established  him- 
self in  the  minds  of  his  customers  that  they  do  not 
question  the  validity  of  his  advertising.  And  if  that 
is  the  case — why  go  to  the  trouble  of  putting  in  com- 
parative prices  at  all?  Those  who  read  his  advertis- 
ing and  are  not  customers  will  not  believe  him  any- 


SEMI-ANNUAL 


SALE 


LADIES'  $2.45 
SHOES 


MEN'S  $3.45 
SHOES 


BOYS'  $2.95 
SHOES 


LADIES'  $1.00 
FELT  SLIPPERS 


MISSES'  $2.45  SHOES 


CHILDREN'S  $1 .65  SHOE 


LADIES'  $2:95  SHOES 


MEN'S  $5.45  SHOES  LADIES  $2.95  SLIPPERS 


A  DROP  IN  SHOES 


KOSEY  CORNER 
SLIPPERS 


I 


Elbert  Hubbard  said:  "Repeated  failures  probably  prove  that  the  world 
is  onto  your  curves."  Some  comparative-price  advertising  fails  for  just 
the  same  reason.  Here  is  an  advertisement  notable  for  the  absence  of 
"regular"  prices. 


Rannard's 


.85 


An  exclusive  custom  model. 
jMahogany  or  Black  Calf. 


"VT'OU  may  be  "due"  right  now  for  a  pair  of  extra 
^  good  shoes.    You  can  get  them  during  this 
special  sale  at  $4.85,  $5.85,  $6.85,  $7.85;  and  you'l! 
get  a  lot  of  extra  value  for  the  money. 

We  offer  you  your  choice  from  our  large  stocks  at  our  three  stores. 
There  are  all  styles,  all  leathers,  all  weights,  all  siz:s.  We  will  see 
that  your  feet  are  properly  fitted  in  the  style  you  like. 

See  about  it  soon,  the  bargains  are  unusual. 
Satisfaction  in  every  pair. 


MAIN  STORE 
9RANCM  SToRE 
PRANCH  SToRE 


FbRTAGE  AVE.CbR.HARGRAVE. 
536MAINSTGdR.JAME9. 

273  Portage  AVE.Ar  9M!tr 


You  know  better  than 
anybody  else  what  you 
want  to  do  with  your 
money;,  but  we  know 
that  there's  a  big  divi- 
dend for  you  in  spend- 
ing some  of  it  now  for 
these  shoes. 


Another  attractive  sales  announcement  that  disregards  pric?e  comparison 

way — those  who  are  customers  will  be  more  interest- 
ed in  the  sale  price,  rather  than  the  original  price. 
Everybody  knows  that  a  retailer  cannot  conduct  his 
business  on  wind  and  to  be  continually  advertising- 
reductions  is  bound  to  raise  a  suspicion  in  the  mmcis 
of  the  public. 

Ninety  per  cent  of  the  advertisements  that  have 
reached  us  during  the  past  month  have  been  sales  ad- 
vertisements. One  can  almo.st  imagine  the  brain-fag 
that  must  be  a  result  of  trying  to  think  up  ncAV  names 
for  these  events.  Here  are  a  few  picked  at  random: 
Pre-Inventor}'  Sale;  Anti-Camouflag"e  Sale;  No  Re- 
serve Sale ;  Victory  Sale ;  Overstock  Sale ;  Red  Tag 
Sale ;  Sample  Shoe  Sale ;  February  Sale ;  Profit-Shar- 
ing Sale ;  Emergency  Shoe  Sale ;  Opportunity  Shoe 
Sale;  H ousecleaning  Sale;  Change-of-Ownership  Sale; 
Family  Shoe  Sale;  Stock-taking  Sale;  Big  Mid-Wint- 
er Sale ;  Factory  Shoe  Sale. 

The  advertisement  reproduced  herewith,  is  a  note- 
worthy departure  from  the  average.  The  absence 
of  "original  prices"  is,  we  believe,  one  of  its  strong- 
features.  In  addition,  it  has  the  advantage  of  a  good 
lay-out  and  well- written  copy. 

It  .should  be  remembered  that  almost  anybody  can 
write  an  advertisement  of  the  "Regular  $10.  now  $4.98 
type" — it  can  be  turned  over  to  the  delivery  boy  be- 
cause it  doesn't  require  the  exercise  of  any  particular 
intelligence.  But  to  advertise  in  such  a  way  that  cus- 
tomers will  be  brought  in  to  the  store  to  purchase  at 


94 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


March,  1919 


"^^I^en   Ke   went   down  tlie 
street  Kis  footprints 
looked  like  tKis — 


.C5 
<5 


But  when  Le 
came  tack  tkey 
looked  like  this — 


He  bad  been  to 
^^oolf  Brothers  Sboe 
Sale,  of  course! 

Entire  Stock  Not  lndnded 


1020-22-24-26  Walnut 


You  11  wish 
you  had  more  than  one 

pair  of  feet — 
when  you  see  the  values 
in  our  Shoe  Sale! 

Over  1,800  pa 
of  J.  ^  M.  and  otKer  malf.e 

SHOES 

at  these  reductions; 

$7.50  Shoes   $5.45 

$3  lo  $9  Shoes   $6.45 

$10,  $11  Shoes   $8.45 

$12.50.  $13.50  Shoes  $10.45 

$14,  $15  Shoes  $12.45 

$17.50  Shoes  $13.45 

Entire  Stock  Not  Included 


1020-22.24-26  Walnut. 


SALE 


AT 


^1 


"When  a  Feller 
Needs  a  Friend 


^polof  IM,  to  Brlcei. 


Three  of  a  series  of  advertisements  used  to 
umn  and  5  inches  deep.    While  comparative 


announce  a  special  sale.  The  originals  were  just  the  width  of  a  newspaper  col- 
prices  are  used  in  one  of  them  they  have  the  merit  of  being  "  different." 


fair  and  leg'itimate  prices,  which  after  all  embodies 
the  ba.sic  principle  of  retail  merchandi.sing,  requires  a 
certain  amount  of  studious  application.  In  the  long 
run,  however,  we  believe  the  effort  will  be  found 
worth  while. 


Manufacturer  Predicts  Higher  Prices 

SHOE  manufacturers  state  that  some  retailers  are 
under  the  impression,  now  that  the  war  is  over, 
that  prices  will  gradually  get  on  a  lower  basis, 
and  with  this  view  in  mind  have  been  cancelling 
orders.  Discussing  this  question,  Mr.  L.  P.  Deslon- 
champs,  of  the  Slater  Shoe  Co.,  Ltd.,  Montreal,  states: 
"My  own  opinion  is  exactly  the  reverse  of  this  view. 
I  rest  my  opinion  on  the  fact  that  prices  of  materials 
are  not  likely  to  recede,  and  the  scarcity  and  trouble 
in  getting  materials  at  all  will  tend  to  hold  up  the  mar- 
ket for  several  months.  Prices  of  labor  too  are  still 
very  high,  and  they  will  not  come  down  while  the  cost 
of  living  stands  at  its  present  level.  Moreover,  there 
is  no  prospect  of  food  prices  being  lower,  having  re- 
gard to  the  fact  that  the  price  of  wheat  has  been  fix- 
ed, and  that  Europe  is  demanding  more  and  more  of 
our  food  products.  Besides  this,  there  is  the  shortage 
of  skilled  help  in  the  shoe  trade — all  making  for  a  con- 
tinuance of  the  present  high  manufacturing  costs. 

"One  must  not  overlook  the  demand  that  will 
probably  come  on  us  from  Europe,  a  factor  which  is 
likely  to  keej)  up  prices  of  the  manufacturer's  raw  ma- 
terials and  of  shoes.  In  connection  with  this  subject, 
I  would  like  to  call  your  readers'  attention  to  the  opin- 
ion of  Mr.  Henry  B.  Endicott,  of  Endicott,  Johnson  & 


Co.,  head  of  the  largest  shoe  manufacturing  concern  in 
the  world.  What  is  true  of  United  States  is  true  of 
Canada,  as  our  conditions  are  similar.  Mr.  Endicott 
says :  I  have  seen  statements  and  advertisements  in 
newspapers  that  would  lead  an  average  layman  to  be- 
lieve that  shoe  prices  were  tumbling  rapidly.  This, 
I  think,  was  more  prevalent  several  weeks  ago  than  it 
is  today,  because  I  understand  that  some  manufactur- 
ers have  already  had  to  raise  the  price  of  their  shoes 
25  cents  and  50  centts  a  pair  over  prices  of  a  month 
or  six  weeks  ago.  This  action  has  rather  checked  the 
talk.  I  am  aware  that  some  commodities  that  were 
very  rapidly  boosted  during  the  war  have  already  start- 
ed on  the  downward  track,  and  they  ought  to,  and 
there  is  a  class  of  shoes  which  certainly  ought  to  be 
cheaper  and  that  is  the  class  of  shoe  where  the  manu- 
facturer has  used  his  reputation  and  put  on  an  enor- 
mous profit.  In  other  words,  where  the  manufacturer 
has  taken  advantage  of  war  conditions  and  got  above 
a  normal  profit  those  prices  ought  to  come  down,  but 
where  the  manufacturers,  as  I  believe  a  large  majority 
did,  continued  to  sell  their  shoes  at  a  normal  profit, 
based  on  costs,  I  think  there  is  more  danger  that  they 
will  have  to  advance  their  shoes  owing  to  advanced 
costs  than  there  is  that  prices  will  be  reduced.  It  has 
been  called  to  my  attention  that  when  the  armistice 
was  signed  the  retailers  apparently  believed  that  the 
'clock  had  struck  twelve,'  and  it  was  their  duty  to  place 
cancellations  instead  of  orders ;  in  other  words,  they 
were  like  a  flock  of  sheep — once  a  flock  of  sheep  start 
there  is  apt  to  be  a  small  panic.  Now,  as  a  matter  of 
fact,  nothing  that  the  average  retailer  could  do,  looking 
at  it  from  merely  a  money  standpoint,  could  have  been 
so  foolish.    We  have  received  cancellations  and  have 


March,  1919  FOOTWEAR   IN    CANADA  95 


4.„_„„  ,  , — „„ — ,_„„_„„_„„  , — „„  ,  „,_„„ — ,_„,_»4, 

The  Advertising  Idea  | 

Keep  your  eyes  open  for  advertising  copy  I 

I        ideas.   An  advertisement  is  often  known  by  the  I 
I        happy  choice  of  a  striking  phrase  or  combina- 
I        tion  of  words.    Take  for  instance  the  Packard 
I        phrase:  "Ask  the  Man  Who  Owns   One";  the 

J        Eastman  Kodak  Company's  suggestion,  "There's  = 

i        a  Photographer  in    Your    Town."    The  Under-  1 

wood  Typewriter  Company  say,    "The  Machine  1 

You  Will  Eventually   Buy";  Ames-Holden-Mc-  I 

Cready,  "Shoemakers  to  the  Nation";  Ford  Mo-  | 

tor  Company,  "The  Universal  Car,"  and  so  on.  | 

Then  there  are  many  combinations  of  words  ! 

that  can  be  used  attractively  in  addition  to  a  I 

standard  phrase.  Often  they  come  upon  you  un-  | 

expectedly  and  it's  well  to  jot  them  down  before  | 

you  forget.    Above  all,  remember  that  it's  bet-  f 

J        ter  to  go  out  and  GET  an  advertising  idea  than  j 

s        to  wait  for  one  to  bump  into  you — and  usually  ; 

1       much  quicker.  I 

I  ! 

f  I 

4.,„_.„_,„_,„_„,_„„_„._,„,_.„_„„_,„,_„„_,„,_,„,_,M,_,,„_»_,„,_,,„_,,„ — 4. 

accepted  them,  and  these  same  people  will  buy  shoes 
again  and  pay  more  for  them. 

"That,"  added  Mr.  Delongchamps,  "is  the  situa- 
tion in  a  nutshell,  and  the  statements  comes  from  an 
authority  whose  views  carry  the  greatest  weight." 


Rubber  Shoe  Manufacturers  Meet  in  Montreal 

AVERY  representative  meeting  of  the  Cana- 
dian rubber  shoe  manufacturers  was  held  at 
the  Windsor  Hotel,  February  19,  Avith  Mr. 
T.  H.  Rieder,  of  the  Canadian  Consolidated 
Company  in  the  chair.  Mr.  R.  H.  Greene,  of  (jrutta 
Percha  and  Rubber  Limited,  acted  as  secretary.  It 
was  explained  by  Mr.  Rieder  that  the  gathering  had 
been  called  to  discuss  matters  of  vital  interest  to  the 
rubber  shoe  trade  and  asked  for  expressions  of  opin- 
ion on  any  subject  of  interest,  the  following  bemg 
suggested,  to  start  with :  Operations  of  methods  of 
sale ;  Opening  dates ;  Suggestions  as  to  lines ;  Sug- 
gestions as  to  prices ;  Advisability  of  the  formation 
of  jobbers'  associations  in  various  provinces  not  now- 
organized  . 

In  connection  with  methods  of  sale,  Mr.  C.  S. 
Sutherland,  of  the  Amherst  Boot. and  Shoe  Company, 
called  attention  to  the  demoralization  in  the  trade 
brought  about  by  the  reduction  of  prices  on  October 
1,  last.  This  brought  about  considerable  clerical  work 
in  adjusting  trifling  claims.  He  urged  some  better 
method  for  securing  regular  prices.  Discussion  then 
followed  on  terms  of  payment.  Some  favored  the  re- 
turn of  the  old  basis  of  2  per  cent,  ten  days,  or  net 
sixty  days.  The  majority,  however,  were  of  the  opin- 
ion that  no  change  be  made  from  the  present  basis. 

It  was  suggested  that  dating  should  be  changed, 
making  light  goods  November  1  and  heavy  goods 
December  1.  It  was  pointed  out,  however,  that  this 
would  involve  a  large  amount  of  trouble,  necessitat- 
ing seperate  orders  and  double  invoicing.  It  was  also 
a  departure  from  the  general  trend  of  maintaining 
short  terms. 

The  opinion  was  general  that  no  change  in  prices 


should  be  made  until  January  in  any  year.  A  contin- 
uance of  the  present  method  of  placing  prices  being- 
announced  in  March  and  assorting  prices  around  May 
1st,  was  considered  satisfactory. 

In  the  matter  of  bonuses  being  granted  to  retailers 
in  the  large  cities  it  was  the  general  opinion  that  dis- 

IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII^ 


llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll^^ 


tributors'  associations  should  be  formed  to  oversee 
and  regulate  such  matters. 

Considerable  discussion  centred  around  opening 
dates  for  the  season  and  the  sentiment  prevailed  that 
a  fixed  opening  date  for  the  whole  of  Canada  should 
be  decided  on.  The  earlier  opening  date  arranged  for 
the  West  was  not  proving  satisfactory. 

It  was  unanimously  decided  to  continue  the  plan 
of  carrying  no  samples  for  the  seasons  1919-20. 

The  following  committee  was  appointed  to  arrange 
for  the  formation  of  distributors'  associations  in  Que- 
bec, Ontario  and  the  Maritime  provinces :  J.  A.  Dube, 
Quebec  City ;  Geo.  Robinson,  Montreal ;  W.  Girou- 


ard,  St.  Hyacinthe  ;  C.  H.  Lockett,  Kingston;  Geo.  E. 
Boulter,  Toronto;  J.  A.  Connor,  London,  and  A.  Up- 
ton, Ottawa. 


Colors  for  Fall  Season 

Many  of  the  prominent  Boston  leather  firms  are 
adding  lighter  color  shades  to  their  lines.  The  C.  D. 
Kepner  Leather  Company,  whose  lines  of  WILO 
leathers  are  familiar  to  Canadian  buyers,  are  meeting 
with  good  response  on  two  new  medium  brown  and 
light  shades  of  WILO  "snuft"  sides.  These  colors 
are  known  as  No.  18  and  No.  23. 


oc 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


March,  1919 


AIME  DE  MONTIGNY 
President 


Mr.    Geo.    DeLauniere,    First  Vice-president 


Mr.  Louis  Adelstein,  Secretary 


Montreal  Shoemen  Elect  Officers 
for  the  Current  Year 


THE  election  of  officers  \va.s  the  principal  busi- 
ness at  the  monthly  meeting  of  the  shoe  section 
of  the  Montreal  branch  of  the  Retail  Merch- 
ants' Association  of  Canada,  held  on  February 
13th,  Mr.  Geo.  G.  Gales  presiding. 

The  following  were  elected:  Messrs.  Ainie  de 
Montigny,  president ;  Geo.  DeLauniere,  first  vice-presi- 
dent ;  S.  E.  Wygant,  second  vice-president ;  Louis  Ade- 
stein,  secretary;  C.  R.  LaSalle,  treasurer;  Geo.  G. 
Gales,  auditor;  J.  T.  Lemire,  G.  DeLauniere,  S.  E. 
Wygant,  A.  de  Montigny,  C.  R.  LaSalle,  delegates  to 
the  Montreal  branch  of  the  Association. 

Mr.  E.  M.  Trowern,  secretary  of  the  Dominion 
Board,  wrote  on  the  subject  of  the  use  of  war  savings 
stamps  as  trading  stamps.  Complaints  had,  he  wrote, 
been  made  that  some  retail  merchants  in  various  lines 
were  so  using  the  war  savings  stamps.  The  Domin- 
ion Board  had  taken  up  this  matter  with  the  Depart- 
ment of  Finance  and  Special  Committee  of  the  Gov- 
ernment in  Ottawa  under  whose  direction  war  sav- 
ings stamps  were  Ijeing  sold,  and  after  calling  their 
attention  to  the  Trading  Stamj)  Act  and  giving  reas- 
ons why  the  Dominion  Board  considered  that  war  sav- 
ings stamps  should  not  be  allowed  to  be  used  as  trad- 
ing stamps,  a  decision  had  been  arrived  at  favoring  the 
Board's  contention.  Notices  had  been  sent  out  by  the 
Department  stating  that  no  person  was  allowed  to 
handle  or  use  war  savings  stamps  for  trading  purpos- 
es. If  any  cases  of  the  violation  of  the  rule  came  to 
the  notice  of  members  of  the  section,  the  Dominion 
Board  should  be  notified.  Mr.  Watson  stated  that  the 
practice  commenced  in  Winnipeg  and  this  had  now 
been  stopped  through  the  action  of  the  Dominion 
Board.  It  was  against  the  criminal  law,  and  both  the 
giver  and  receiver  were  liable  to  penalties. 


A  long  letter  on  the  subject  of  fire  preventions  was 
read.  This  gave  a  number  of  resolutions  passed  at  a 
conference  of  various  associations  held  at  Ottawa. 

Votes  of  thanks  were  passed  to  Messrs.  Geo.  G. 
Gales,  the  retiring  president ;  C.  R.  LaSalle,  retiring 
vice-president;  L.  Adelstein,  the  secretary;  and  to  the 
trade  papers.  The  latter  vote  was  acknowledged  by 
the  Montreal  representative  of  Footwear  in  Canada. 


Style  Briefs 

MR.  C.  S.  CORSON,  manager  of  the  Regal 
Shoe  Company,  Toronto,  believes  that  ox- 
fords will  be  very  strong  for  the  coming 
season.  In  high  shoes,  their  Pall  Mall  bal. 
in  Royal  Purple  calf  is  one  of  the  best  sellers  and  this 
style  also  sets  up  nicely  in  Havana  brown  kid.  A  new 
last  has  been  added  to  the  Regal  lines — one  with  a 
little  more  character  than  the  Pall  Mall,  having  a.  little 
more  pointed  toe  and  being  a  little  wider  across  the 
ball.    This  is  a  very  attractive  last. 

D.  D.  Hawthorne  and  Company,  wholesale  shoes, 
Toronto,  say  they  are  experiencing  a  strong  demand 
for  grey  and  brown  colors  in  women's  lines. 

Dufresne  and  Locke,  Ltd.,  Maisonneuve,  will  put 
in  two  additional  lasts — one  women's  with  a  medium 
recede  toe,  and  with  a  little  higher  heel  that  the  sport 
last.   The  men's  last  will  have  a  medium  round  toe. 

Geo.  A.  Slater  Ltd.,  Maisonneuve  intend  to  add 
considera'bly  to  their  range  of  samples.  There  will  be 
five  women's  lasts  and  three  men's  lasts.  One  of  the 
former  will  be  a  sport  last ;  another  will  have  a  military 
heel  and  pointed  toe ;  and  the  remaining  three  long 
vamps  and  high  heels.  The  men's  samples  will  be 
built  on  conservative  lines;  one  will  be  of  a  dressy 
character  and  another  a  walking  shoe.  The  firm  will 
make  a  feature  of  brogues  in  men's  and  women's.  The 
new  lasts  will  come  mostly  in  dark  shade  tans,  and 
with  some  combinations.  A  number  of  women's  goods 
will  be  in  Nutria  shade. 

The  Swan  Shoe  Company,  makers  of  first  walking 


March,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


97 


shoes,  Foott^luv  folding  slippers  for  travelling,  etc., 
advise  that  the  most  poi)ular  colors  in  their  "soft  sole" 
and  "first  walking"  shoes  are  black,  white  and  tan.  in 
both  high  and  low  styles. 

The  Hurlbut  Company,  Limited,  Preston,  Ont., 
state  that  for  summer  their  predominating  lines  are 
white  buck  button,  blucher  and  straps,  patent  vamp- 
white  buck  tops,  patent  straps,  patent  button-mat  tops, 
gunmetal  calf  buttons,  straps  and  bluchers,  tan  calf 
buttons,  bluchers  and  straps.  For  fall  gunmetal  but- 
tons and  bluchers,  patent-mat  top  buttons  and  bluch- 
ers and  patent-white  tops.  In  the  heavier  lines,  smoke 
and  dark  tan  elks  in  bluchers  are  being  shown.  The 
HurllDut  sizes  run  from  3  to  TYi  and  8  to  10^  in  the 
welt  cushion  sole  shoes  and  from  2  to  5  in  the  "Pussy 
Foot"  lines. 

The  Eagle  Shoe  Co.,  Montreal,  are  adding  four  new 
lasts  to  their  fall  samples — two  for  men  and  two  for 
women.  The  former  lasts  will  have  medium  high  toes 
and  recede  vamps.  One  of  the  women's  samples  will 
have  a  long  vamp  and  the  other  a  medium  round  toe 
with  a  2-inch  heel.  The  goods  will  be  made  in  patent 
leather  and  calf  and  with  suede  tops,  together  with  a 
combination  of  fancy  linings. 

In  the  opinion  of  the  AVeston  Shoe  Company,  Lim- 
ited, there  will  be  no  radical  change  in  style  this  year. 
The  outlook  seems  to  be  for  the  narrow  receding-  toe, 
the  style  that  has  been  popular  during  the  past  seas- 
on. There  is  a  slight  tendency  towards  cuban  heeis, 
although  they  are  making  quite  a  large  number  of  the 
Louis  style.  In  misses'  and  children's  the  Weston 
lines  have  been  remodelled  and  they  are  .showing  a 
range  of  cushion  sole  shoes  for  little  folks  that  will 
have  a  strong  appeal  to  the  public. 

The  Minister-Myles  Shoe  Company,  Limited,  Tor- 
onto, find  dongolas  in  black  predominating,  with  colors 
in  kid  and  calf  a  close  second.  Colored  tops  on  cloth, 
they  say,  are  not  exceptionally  large  sellers  for  this 
season,  although  they  are  having  considerable  call  for 
buck  colors  with  calf  and  kid  vamps. 


I  Mr.   C.  R.   LaSalle,  Treasurer, 

I  Montreal  Association 


Style  Program  for  Fall,  1919 

T H  I''   following  j)rogram   was  endorsed   by  the 
National  Association  of  Manufacturers,  Whole- 
salers, Tanners,  Last  Makers,  Travelling  Sales- 
men in  Conference,  January  13  and  will  be  ef- 
fective nationally  in  United  States  fall  styles. 

On  the  program  of  style  recommendation  for  fall. 
1919,  the  conference  unanimously  voted  to  ratify  and 
endorse  the  complete  text  of  the  December  action  of 
the  Council  of  National  Service  of  the  .Shoe  and  Lea- 
ther Industries  with  the  one  amendment; 

"The  standard  heights  of  women's  lace  boots,  car- 
rying all  kinds  of  heels  be  8^  to  9  inches — measuring 
from  the  centre  of  top  to  the  breast  at  the  side  of  the 
boot  with  4B  as  the  model." 

The  style  program  for  fall,  1919,  therefore  reads: 

1.  Colors — Leathers  for  women's  shoes  to  be 
confined  to  three  shades  of  brown,  dark,  medium  and 
beaver ;  two  shades  of  gray,  medium  dark  and  medium 
light ;  bronze,  white,  black,  and  patent  leather. 

2.  Height — That  the  height  of  women's  lace 
boots  carrying  all  kinds  of  heels  be  8i-4  to  9  inches 
— measuring  from  the  centre  of  top  to  the  breast  at 
the  side  of  the  boot  with  4B  as  the  model. 

That  the  height  of  women's  button  boots  be  not 
more  than  3  inches. 

It  is  recommended,  however,  that  the  manufacture 
and  sale  of  women's  button  boots  for  the  entire  year 
of  1919  be  discouraged. 

3.  Styles — Styles  be  confined  to  pieced  patterns 
and  foxed  effects  in  so  far  as  possible. 

Women's  lasts  should  not  be  longer  than  1]/^ 
size  over  standard  measure,  and  further,  that  the  use 
of  needle  toed  women's  last  be  discourag"ed  for  1919. 


The  Lady  Belle  Shoe  Company,  Kitchener,  Out., 
are  issuing  a  catalogue  which  will  go  to  the  trade  the 
end  of  this  week,  showing  their  white  cloth  samples 
and  also  a  few  of  their  pumps  and  oxfords,  which  are 
carried  in  stock  for  immediate  deliverv. 

_„„_„ — ,  ,„  „  


98 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


March,  1919 


Heavy  Stockings  and  Oxfords 

THE  increasing  use  of  heavy  stockings  worn  with 
low  shoes  is  emphasized  in  a  current  issue  of 
Vogue,  one  of  the  leading  women's  fashion 
mag'azines  and  the  tip  should  be  of  some  little 
value  to  retailers  who  handle  hosiery  or  it  may  be 
accepted  as  an  indication  that  low  shoes  will  be  worn 
to  a  great  extent  in  the  early  spring.  Even  at  this 
early  date  it  is  not  unusual  to  see  oxfords  and  pumps, 
on  the  streets  in  Canadian  cities.    In  many  cases  also 


The  Woollen  Stockings  come  in  a  variety  of  designs 

the  heavier  stockings  are  a  feature.  Vogue  tells  us 
that  the  increasing  use  of  wool  stockings  will  no 
doubt  be  exemplified  in  sports  wear  during  the  spring, 
and  while  these  are  not  in  any  way  unusual  in  charact- 
er, they  differ  slig-htly  from  those  which  have  hereto- 
fore been  seen.  The  stockings  at  the  left  in  the  sketch 
show  a  very  soft  grey  green  shade  made  with  an  al- 
ternating broad  and  narrow  stripe  accomplished  by 
varying  the  weave.  Next  to  that  is  shown  a  black  and 
white  stocking  made  of  a  combination  of  silk  and  wool. 
This  type  of  stocking  will  no  doubt  take  the  place  of 
the  all-wool  stocking  for  sports  wear  when  the  weather 
gets  too  warm  to  permit  the  wool  stockings  to  be 
worn  with  comfort.  Even  about  town  of  late  smartly 
dressed  young  women  have  worn  the  silk  and  wool 
stockings  with  walking  oxfords.  On  just  the  right 
type  they  are  quite  smart,  but  no  one  who  has  not  a 
slim  ankle  should  attempt  to  wear  them.  The  stocking 
in  the  middle  of  this  sketch  is  all  wool  in  a  very  beauti- 
ful shade  of  tete  de  negre  with  a  darker  brown  herring- 
bone running  throug'h  it.  A  fine  black  silk  stocking 
with  a  slightly  novel  clock  is  shown  next  to  the  right, 
and  at  the  extreme  right  is  an  exquisitely  fine  white 
silk  stocking  with  a  rather  wide  rib.  This  stocking 
would  be  excellent  for  pumps  of  white  kid. 


Canadian  Slioes  for  Europe 

THE  Canadian  Trade  Commission  in  Otttawa 
has  received,  by  cable  from  the  Canadian  Mis- 
sion in  London,  a  request  to  secure  information 
from  boot  manufacturers  in  the  Dominion  as 
to  their  production,  facilities  for  delivery  and  approxi- 
mate prices  in  the  cheaper  grades  of  bootts  for  men, 
women  and  children.  These  will  be  for  sale  in  the 
United  Kingdom.  A  later  cable  on  February  14th 
further  defines  the  requirements.  The  class  of  goods 
required  will  be  of  the  cheaper  sorts  for  the  use  of 
working  people,  with  a  small  proportion  of  better  grade 


boots  and  shoes.  Makers  should  figure  on  good  sledge 
boots  at  reasonable  prices. 

Leather  and  boots  of  all  classes  Avill  also  be  re- 
quired in  large  quantities,  among  what  the  Canadian 
IMission  describes  as  "enormous  supplies  of  staple 
goods,"  for  which  they  are  daily  receiving  inquiries 
from  Rumania,  Greece,  and  Serbia.  The  cable  adds : 
'"We  are  badly  handicapped  by  Canadian  industries 
not  having  represeentatives  here.  Prospects  for  busi- 
ness in  Rumania,  Serbia  and  Greece  are  very  favorable 
and  if  we  can  supply  information  promptly  we  should 
be  able  to  secure  large  business." 


Several  New  Lasts 

WE  are  advised  by  Mr.  A.  Brandon,  of  the 
Brandon  Shoe  Company,  Limited,  Brant- 
ford,  Ont.,  that  they  are  showing  several 
new  lasts  this  season — exact  duplicates  of 
the  latest  styles  shown  in  the  United  States.  Mr. 
Brandon  states  that  Canadian  retailers  are  being 
shown  the  same  styles  as  are  shown  by  U.  S.  manu- 
facturers and,  as  our  quality  is  superior,  if  anything, 
there  is  little  need  for  the  Canadian  shoe  retailer  to 
go  outside  of  the  domestic  market.  Canadian  manu- 
facturers, Mr.  Brandon  continues,  now  have  the  art  of 
shoemaking  down  to  a  science  and,  particularly  in 
men's  fine  welt,  our  shoes  are  better  wearing  than 
the  United  States  product  as  well  as  being  as  neat 
and  snappy  as  any  shown  in  America. 

The  Brandon  Shoe  Company  are  looking  for  a 
good  business  this  season.  Prices  are  firm  and  there 
is  no  sign  of  the  leather  market  easing  up.    In  their 


One  of  the  popular  lines  of  the  Brandon 
Shoe  Co. 


opinion,  the  moment  that  peace  is  declared  in  Europe 
and  reconstruction  commences,  the  demand  for  Ameri- 
can leather  will  be  heavier  than  ever  and  this  all  points 
to  even  higher  prices  for  shoes.  Their  advice  to  re- 
tailers is  to  purchase  now  all  the  shoes  they  require 
for  the  coming  season  because  it  looks  more  than 
likely  that  those  who  are  holding  off  in  the  hope  of 
cheaper  prices  will  find  themselves  short. 

Travellers  for  the  Brandon  Shoe  Company  are  now 
in  their  territories  with  Fall  samples.  J.  L.  Trethe- 
wey  is  covering  Western  Ontario ;  E.  E.  Mclntyre, 
Eastern  Ontario ;  K.  F.  Walters,  Montreal  to  Cape 
Breton  and  F.  S.  Redfern  from  Fort  William  to  the 
Coast. 


The  Goodyear  Tire  &  Rubber  Company,  makers  of  Ne- 
olin  soles,  will  open  a  Quebec  City  branch  in  the  near  fu- 
ture. 


March,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  Cx\NADA 


Comfort  and  Appearance 
Combined  in  the  various 
Styles  for  Little  Folks. 


The    "Tru    Trod" — A   splendid    Shoe   for  the 
growing  child,  made  in  widths  B,  C  and  D, 
by  Getty  and  Scott 


First  walking  shoes,  made  by  the  Swan  Shoe  Co.,  Baltimore. 
Popular  colors  are  black,  white  and  tan. 


100 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


March,  191 'J 


The  Goods — How  to  Know  Them  and  Show  Them 

Sales  Are  Often  Lost  Because  Retailers  and  Salespeople  Do  Not  Know  Their  Goods — 
In  Selling  Shoes,  First  Please  the  Eye,  then  the  Foot  and,  last,  the  Pocketbook 


THE  Uni\ersity  of  Manituba  recently  inaugurat- 
ed a  series  of  short  courses  in  merchandising' 
which,  as  the  name  impHes,  are  designed  tf) 
give  helpful  service  to  business  men  desn"ous 
of  improving  their  status  as  merchants.  Talks  at  the 
first  Business  Congress  were  delivered  by  merchan- 
dising' experts  from  the  United  States  as  well  as  Can- 
ada, and  we  are  reproducing-  herewith  a  particularly 
instructive  address  by  Mr.  Geo.  P.  Irwin,  lecturer  on 
Retail  Selling  and  Merchandizing,  University  of  Wis- 
consin : 

I  want  to  tell  you  first  an  experience  in  retail 
stores  which  will  lead  you,  perhaps,  as  it  has  lead  me, 
to  believe  that  there  are  some  very  important  points 
that  a  man  who  is  selling  a  commodity  should  know 
about  the  commodity.  I  remember  here  the  story  of 
a  girl ;  perhaps  she  is  the  kind  of  girl  I  was  talking 
about  yesterday  afternoon,  who  was  given  a  book  and 
pencil,  dropped  down  in  a  store,  and  then  everybody 
hoped  that  she  was  going  to  distinguish  herself,  she 
was  standing  behind  the  counter  shortly  before  the 
holidays.  A  feminine  purchaser  (by  Avhom  80  per  cent 
of  our  purchases  are  made  in  the  majority  of  stores) 
came  walking  into  that  store,  and  because  that  store 
was  displaying  the  merchandise  efficiently  .she  found 
certain  articles  upon  a  table  in  the  aisle.  She  looked 
at  this  particularly  attractive  display  of  merchandise. 
It  was  attractive  to  the  eye.  The  more  she  examined 
it,  the  more  attractive  it  became.  The  woman  was  of 
curious  mind — most  human  beings  are.  When  we  see  a 
new  piece  of  merchandise  which  is  attractive,  the  nat- 
ural thing  for  us  to  ask  is,  "What  is  it  for?"  The  wo- 
man looked  at  the  merchandise,  and  turning  to  the 
sales  girl  said,  "What  is  that  for?" 

The  sales  girl  hesitated  a  moment  because  it  was 
an  entirely  new  line,  out  of  her  de])artment,  and  then 
for  fear  that  the  woman  migdit  think  she  was  not  "on 
her  job,"  decided  "I  will  have  to  tell  her  something," 
and  said,  "Well,  I  think  it  is  for  a  Christmas  present." 

And  that  was  about  all  the  information  the  sales 
girl  had  to  give  to  the  prospective  customer.  Is  there 
any  reason  in  your  mind  why  that  customer  Avas  not 
interested  in  that  commodity?  She  received  no  infor- 
mation on  that  commodity. 

And  so  we  find  in  other  cases  that  it  often  becom- 
es necessary  for  us  to  know  something  a'bout  our  com- 
modities in  order  that  we  may  talk  intelligently.  We 
may  not  be  able  to,  like  that  fellow  who  upon  his  en- 
trance into  the  linen  department  to  serve  customers, 
was  one  day  compelled  to  wait  upon  a  feminine  pur- 
chaser who  desired  certain  pieces  of  linen.  The  man 
knew  practically  nothing  of  linens.  The  stopped  to 
look  at  two  pieces  approximately  equal  size.  One  of 
them  was  priced  $11  more  than  the  other.  The  cus- 
tomer, looking  at  them,  said,  "Yes,  I  see  they  are  both 
very  attractive,"  and  then,  picking  up  the  articles  she 
looked  at  the  linen  very  carefully  and  said  to  the  young 
man,  "I  cannot  see  what  the  difference  is  in  tnese  two, 
and  you  ask  me  $11  difference  in  price." 

The  fellow  was  not  to  be  put  down.  He  took  up 
one  piece  of  linen  which  was  the  most  expensive,  and 


said  to  the  woman,  "  Madam,  you  will  notice  in  this 
particular  piece  the  centre  is  in  the  midde  and  the 
corners  are  on  the  edge." 

The  woman  said,  "Oh,  yes,  I  didn't  notice  that." 

And  that  young  man  was  supposed  to  be  a  sales- 
man. All  of  us  are  not  fortunate  enough  to  be  able  to 
respond  to  the  situation  quite  so  readily 

It  seems  to  me  if  there  is  one  thing  today  that 
it  is  absolutely  necessary,  particularly  with  the  small 
retailer  and  his  employee  to  enable  them  to  compete 
with  yonder  man  who  can  hire  an  expert  to  do  these 
things,  it  is  to  know  something  about  how  to  lay  our 
proposition  before  the  customer  in  an  attractive  form, 
and  what  to  tell  him  about  it  after  we  lay  it  before  him. 
I  am  not  talking  entirely  to  you  men  who  are  laying 
merchandise  down  on  the  table  for  customers  to  pick 
up  and  admire  but,  I  am  really  talking  to  anyone  who 
has  a  proposition  which  he  expects  to  sell  to  some-  » 
one. 

I  heard  a  story  of  a  barber  who,  it  was  said,  at- 
tended our  friend  Billy  Sunday's  meetings.  He  re- 
ceived what  he  thought  was  very  much  benefit.  He 
was  instructed  by  the  evangelist:  "The  first  thing  that 


Mahogany  Oxford,  by  Slater  Shoe  Co. — Also 
made  in  Gun  Metal 


lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll^ 

you  do  when  you  go  out  from  here  tomorrow,  you  pass 
on  the  good  tidings  and  help  some  fellow  get  ready 
for  the  hereafter." 

The  fellow  felt  he  had  received  much  benefit, and 
he  went  out  from  the  meeting"  determined  he  was  go- 
ing" to  jjass  on  the  good  news  to  some  other  fellow.  He 
had  not  studied  how  to  properly  present  the  proposi- 
tion. 

The  next  morning  one  of  his  regular  patrons  came 
in  for  his  usual  shave. 

"Want  a  shave?  All  right.  Bill,  sit  in  the  chair." 

He  went  through  the  preparations  for  shaving 
him,  had  the  man  nicely  lathered  lying  with  his  head 
back  on  the  form  all  ready.  He  pulled  out  his  razor 
strap,  whipped  the  razor  up  and  down  in  good  shape, 
put  his  hand  on  the  customer's  head,  held  the  razor 
above  the  customer's  throat,  and  said :  "Brother,  are 
you  ready  to  die  ?" 

That  reminds  me  of  some  of  the  remarks  we  hear 


March,  1919 


FOOTWEAR 


IN  CANADA 


101 


in  our  merchandising  establishments.  I  walked  into 
a  merchandising  establishment  only  three  weeks  ag'o  in 
our  city.  I  was  trying  to  investigate  some  merchan- 
dising conditions  and  was  concerned  with  this  ])articn- 
lar  problem.  I  walked  into  a  store,  and  inquired  for 
an  article. 

"You  handle  so-and-so?" 

The  salesman  assured  me,  "Yes." 

I  said  I  would  like  to  see  it,  and  he  laid  the  article 
down  on  the  counter  in  front  of  me  and  said,  "I  don't 
suppose  you  will  like  that  kind?" 

Instead  of  saying  something  to  interest  mc,  the 
man  immediately  started  telling  me  he  was  quite  con- 
fident that  I  was  not  going  to  be  interested  in  the  prop- 
osition.   I  didn't  blame  the  fellow  very  much. 

I  walked  into  another  store  to  buy  the  merchan- 
dise.   That  fellow  brought  an  article  over  and  put 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiin^^ 


No.  735 — Queen  Quality  Misses'  White  Reign- 
skin  Cloth  Boot.  Ivory  welt  sole,  12  8  rubber 
heel.  Carried  in  stock  by  Thomas  G.  Plant 
Co.,  Boston. 

Illllllllllllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllll 

it  down  in  front  of  me  with  the  remark,  "I  do  not  know 
whether  you  want  anything  so  expensive  as  that." 

Possibly  I  looked  poverty  stricken. 

The  kind  of  things  I  mentioned  are  what  keep 
people  from  becoming  interested  in  our  propositions, 
instead  of  sales  people  telling  something  interesting 
about  it. 

I  told  you  yesterday  something  about  a  very  prac- 
tical way  of  meeting  a  customer.  Promptly  this  is  an 
insignificant  remark  to  you,  but  to  those  of  you  who 
have  studied  the  people  selling  in  your  stores  it  is  not 
anything  like  as  insignificant  as  it  looks. 

I  walked  into  a  drug  store  last  summer  in  search 
of  an  article.  A  couple  of  young  fellows  were  stand- 
ing there  receiving  money  as  the  representatives  of 
that  store.  I  inquired  if  they  were  handling  certain 
article,  and  one  said,  "Yes."  He  turned  around  to  the 


other  fellow  and  remarked :  "You  know,  I  think  Chi- 
cago will  win  the  pennant.  The  last  wire  they  had  at 
the  office  they  were  so  many  runs  ahead. 

He  finished  his  conversation  about  the  ball  game, 
however,  and  said : 

"What  is  it  you  said  you  wanted?" 

I  said,  "This  is  a  nice  store  to  keep  away  from." 

There  is  nothing  more  important  than  the  man- 
ner in  which  we  meet  our  customer  and  the  way  we 
place  the  commodity  before  him.  If  you  walk  into  a 
store  tomorrow,  the  way  in  which  the  commodity  is 
laid  before  you  on  the  counter  has  very  much  to  do  in 
determining  whether  you  are  attracted  by  that  merch- 
andise or  not.  You  walk  into  a  store  and  call  for  an 
article,  and  the  fellow  throws  it  down  and  says  "That 
is  a  dollar."  You  walk  into  another  store  and  the 
salesman  takes  the  article  and  handles  it  as  though  it 
were  worth  the  full  price.    Compare  the  methods. 

Some  ladies  walk  into  a  store  to  buy  a  garment 
and  the  saleswoman  picks  up  the  garment  and  holds 
it  like  a  rag  in  her  hands.  The  woman  is  not  going  to 
be  interested  in  that  garment,  as  she  would  be  if  it 
were  displayed  in  the  best  form.  What  is  that?  Put 
it  on  the  customer.  Relieve  your  customer  of  any  con- 
structive thinking,  if  possible — meaning  that  you  show 
your  merchandise  as  nearly  in  the  form  it  will  look  in 
use  as  possible.  That  is  not  impossible  in  all  cases,  we 
will  admit,  but  so  far  as  impossible,  show  how  the  com- 
modity is  going  to  serve.  As  an  illustration :  A  young 
lady  in  a  small  Wisconsin  city  was  working  in  a  gen- 
eral store.  She  was  responsible  for  the  sale  of  collars. 
She  saw  people  walk  up  the  side  day  after  day  without 
looking  at  or  apparently  noticing  her  assortment  of 
collars.  After  a  while  she  said,  "I  wonder  why?"  She 
looked  at  her  display  and  saw  that  there  was  no  con- 
trast of  colors.  She  removed  the  majority  of  these 
collars  until  she  had  very  few.  She  took  a  common 
piece  of  purple  paper,  placed  it  beneath  the  white  col- 
lars, and  now  she  had  a  contrast  between  the  white 
and  color  instead  of  white  lying  on  white.  The  white 
collar  was  placed  in  an  attractive  form — just  as  it 
would  be  worn — on  purple  paper.  A  customer  could 
see  the  figures  in  the  collar  and  the  customers  became 
interested. 

She  found  the  majority  of  feminine  purchasers 
would  ask,  "May  I  put  it  on?"  or  "Will  you  put  it  on 
to  see  how  it  looks." 

She  found  an  old  waist  form  that  had  been  thrown 
away  and  displayed  collars  on  it.  She  did  not  use  a 
white  waist  because  she  knew  there  would  be  no  con- 
trast. She  increased  her  sales  60  per  cent,  by  merchan- 
dise display.  If  we  have  a  proposition  to  present,  we 
must  present  it  to  our  customers  in  the  most  attrac- 
tive form. 

I  might  stand  before  you  and  say  that  particular 
lighting  system  is  one  of  the  most  brilliant  lighting 
systems  you  ever  saw.  "If  I  turned  on  those  lights 
and  you  saw  for  yourself  how  they  looked,  you  will  not 
be  compelled  to  think,  "I  wonder  how  they  look?" 

I  might  takes  a  man's  necktie  in  my  hands  and 
say,  "Fellows,  when  this  is  tied  it  is  the  handsomest  tie 
you  ever  saw,"  but  if  I  am  a  clever  salesman  I  would 
take  that  necktie  and  show  the  fellow  how  it  looks,  I 
would  not  wrinkle  it  for  that  would  damage  the  tie. 
The  customer  knows  how  it  looks  and  need  not  guess 
at  it.  Believe  your  customers  of  any  constructive 
thinking. 

I  was  in  a  small  general  store  in  Wisconsin  along 
in  the  early  part  of  the  fall,  when  a  customer  came 


102 


FOOTWEAR 


IN  CANADA 


March,  1919 


in.  A  young  girl  was  selling  merchandise.  This  girl 
was  compelled  one  time  to  let  the  customer  have  a 
bunch  of  toothpicks  and  next  time  to  sell  tooth  paste. 
This  particular  time  the  customer  said,  "Do  you 
handle  certain  goods  by  the  yard?"  and  the  saleswo- 
man assured  her  they  did. 

"I  would  like  to  see  what  you  have." 

Along  the  side  of  the  store  was  this  merchandise 
wrapped  on  the  board  edgeways.  This  saleswoman 
walked  up  and  pulled  down  one  corner  and  said,  "How 
do  you  like  that?" 

Another  one  was  pulled  down  a  little  piece  more, 
then  a  third  one.  The  girl  said  to  the  woman,  who 
didn't  seem  to  be  interested,  "You  do  not  see  any- 
thing you  like  there?" 

The  woman  said,  "No,  I  don't  think  I  see  any- 
thing I  like.  I  think  I  will  look  around." 

I  was  standing  by  the  saleswoman  and  she  said, 
"Tell  me  as  near  as  you  can  why  I  didn't  make  that 
sale." 

"If  I  could  tell  you  how  to  make  every  sale,  I 
could  make  a  million  a  day.  The  woman  wanted  cur- 
tains for  a  bedroom  window.  All  right.  You  stand 
out  here,  ten  feet  from  that  shelf  and  let  me  pull  down 
that  much  of  the  corner  of  those  goods,  and  then  tell 
me  if  you  can  see  enough  of  that  pattern  to  tell  how 
it  is  going  to  look  made  up,  and  what  it  looks  like 
hanging  on  the  window." 

She  said,  "No." 

"There  is  the  first  principle  of  merchandise  dis- 
play. Relieve  the  customer  of  any  efifort.  Let  him  see 
how  the  merchandise  looks  in  use." 

"What  would  you  do  ?  This  is  a  small  store,  and 
we  haven't  fixtures  like  they  have  in  the  city  stores." 

I  replied  that  I  would  get  a  piece  of  stock,  if  I 
could  get  nothing  better,  wrap  it  with  paper,  and  put 
it  across  the  top  of  two  chairs.  "The  next  time  any 
anyone  asks  for  curtain  goods,  open  the  bolt  and  show 
the  pattern." 

I  don't  care  what  your  business  is,  show  your 
goods. 

Take  shoes,  for  instance.  You  may  do  what  a  wise 
salesman  told  me  was  a  very  essential  thing  in  sell- 
ing shoes.  He  said,  "The  very  first  thing  you  are  go- 
ing to  do  with  selling  shoes  is  to  please  the  eye.  You 
bring  out  the  shoes  and  the  customer  says,  'I  don't 
like  that.'  You  say  goodbye  to  that  and  bring  out 
something  else.  Please  the  eye.  When  you  get  the 
eye  pleased,  please  the  foot.  When  you  have  the  foot 
pleased,  when  that  is  comfortable,  then  there  is  one 
thing  more  to  do,  please  the  pocket-book." 

I  leave  that  to  you  whether  or  not  it  is  sound  logic. 

Importance  of  Color 

Most  of  us  do  not  realize  the  importance  of  color. 
It  is  needless  for  me  to  say  anything  about  color  to 
the  man  who  is  selling  ribbons  and  dry  goods.  A 
hardware  man  once  said  to  me  that  it  was  not  worth 
while  telling  him  anything  of  that.  I  stayed  in  his 
store  seven  weeks.  He  had  engaged  a  young  boy  to 
sell  merchandise.  A  young  woman  came  in  fli^om 
the  country  and  wanted  to  buy  paint  for  her  house. 
She  said,  "I  wanted  the  old  man  to  have  it  painted  be- 
fore, but  it  was  a  pretty  expensive  job  and  he  has 
been  putting  it  off,  but  at  last  he  has  decided  to  have 
it  done." 

This  boy  said,  "All  right,  we  have  quite  a  nice  lot 
of  paint  here." 

He  brought  out  his  paints  and  figured  up  approxi- 


The  cartoonist  of  the  Toronto  Star  Weekly  pays  a  visit  to  a  shoe  store 
and  pictures  some  of  his  impressions 

lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll^ 

mately  the  number  of  gallons  it  would  require.  Then 
I  heard  the  woman  say,  "Just  how  would  you  trim 
that  house?  I  am  not  positive  about  the  colors  here. 
If  you  can  help  me  a  little  bit  in  trimming  the  house, 
probably  we  can  decide  on  it.  The  old  man  could  not 
come  in  to-day,  and  he  said,  'Anyhow,  maybe  the  peo- 
ple at  the  store  know  .more  about  it  than  I  do.' " 

The  boy  looked  at  me  as  if  he  was  scared  to  death, 
and  then  said  to  the  woman,  "I  expect  we  will  have 
to  leave  that  to  the  painter.  I  do  not  know  much 
about  that." 

Then  the  woman  said,  "I  cannot  decide  without 
the  old  man."  She  went  out  of  that  store. 

I  found  there  was  a  painter  in  town  who  took  or- 
ders for  paint.  The  woman  went  down  to  Mr.  Paint- 
er, who  told  her  how  to  decorate  the  house,  and  the 
last  time  I  saw  the  merchant  he  still  had  the  paint. 

■  I  have  a  personal  friend  whom  I  went  to  see  dur- 
ing the  Christmas  holidays.  He  was  upstairs  dressing 
for  supper,  and  when  he  came  down  I  heard  his  wife 
say,  "For  heaven's  sake,  who  sold  you  that  hideous 
tie  ?" 

"A  man  of  your  complexion  ought  never  to  wear 
that  color." 

He  thought  of  the  man  who  sold  him  that  tie — 
but  not  in  the  right  way. 

Take  an  opposite,  a  women  attending  a  social  gath- 
ering.  All  her  women  friends  gather  around  her  and 


March,  1919 


FOOTWEAR 


IN  CANADA 


103 


say,  "Really  that  is  such  a  becoming  garment  you 
have.  Where  did  you  get  it  ?" 

"Oh,"  she  says,  "Mary  over  at  the  store  suggested 
.  this." 

Any  real  assistance  that  you  can  give  to  your  cus- 
tomers is  usually  appreciated.  We  walk  into  a  store 
and  want  to  buy  a  chair.  The  salesman  comes  forward 
puts  a  chair  down  in  front  of  you  and  says,  "That's 
a  good  chair."  That  is  what  the  fellow  across  the 
street  said  about  his,  and  that  is  all  the  information 
you  receive.  He  gives  no  reason  why  it  is  a  good 
chair.  You  are  compelled  to  accept  his  simple  state- 
ment. "Why  is  it  good?"  He  gives  you  no  proof.  That 
is  his  opinion  not  yours — the  salesman's  opinion,  not 
the  customer's. 

My  friends,  the  customer's  opinion  is  formed  from 
the  definite  information  which  sales-people  can  give. 
If  you  want  to  buy  a  chair,  what  you  should  know 
is  what  service  you  can  expect  to  get.  Instead  of  be- 
ing told  it  is  "a  good  chair,"  you  expect  to  be  told  that 
the  chair  will  give  you  lots  of  service  because  it's 
made  of  oak  or  because  of  certain  improved  construc- 
tion. 

Instead  of  saying  "Good  shoe,"  say  "Here  is  a 
shoe  which  will  give  you  serivce  because  it  is  con- 
structed in  a  certain  way." 

Instead  of  saying  to  the  woman,  "Here  is  a  nice 
coat,"  say  "Tt  is  a  good  coat  because  ....  "giving 
reasons  that  are  convincing. 

Give  Definite  Information 

I  should  be  able  to  give  definite  information  about 
whatever  I  may  sell.  I  should  take  the  article  and 
study  it,  in  order  to  be  able  to  give  definite  informa- 
tion. I  first  ask  myself,  "If  I  were  a  customer  buy- 
ing," in  this  case  chairs,  "what  would  I  expect  to  get 
in  a  chair?"  Perhaps  it  is  service,  perhaps  comfort; 
most  of  us  like  a  comforting  chair.  The  construction 
:.f  it  might  be  interesting.  The  benefits  I  would  re- 
ceive from  it  are  the  things  interesting  to  me. 

If  I  were  going  to  buy  a  shoe  it  is  quite  probable 
that  I  should  want  it  (as  most  of  the  time  we  heai 
customers  say)  good  looking.  Sometimes  we  say  a 
stylish  shoe.  1  should  want  to  have  it  of  the  proper 
material.  I  should  like  to  know  how  it  was  made,  not 
iiece-<sar;ly  all  the  revolutions  of  the  machinery  that 
made  it^  but  rather  if  there  are  any  advantages  to  me 
in  the  way  in  which  it  was  made. 

And  so  I  might  go  on  and  on  with  this  idea.  One 
might  make  a  general  statement  that  "it  is  reasonable 
in  price,"  without  being  able  to  compare  it  with  other 
products  and  say  why.  That  is  not  sufficient.  We 
must  have  definite  information  as  a  positive  proof  of 
our  statemtnts,  so  far  as  it  is  possible  to  give  it. 

I  am  going-  to  ask  you  for  a  moment  to  let  your 
thoughts  revert  to  the  daih^  newspapers  that  you  all 
read  on  various  occasions.  Across  the  head  of  this 
morning's  paper  you  read,  perhaps  in  red  or  black 
characters,  a  certain  number  of  words,  commonly  call- 
ed headlines.  They  may  have  said  there  was  a  great 
storm  or  a  train  wreck.  Those  black  or  red  lines,  as 
the  case  may  be,  were  placed  on  your  paper  by  a  man 
who  knew  what  definite  information  was,  and  he  knew 
how  to  present  it  in  an  interesting  way.  He  knew 
just  how  to  boil  down  a  long  story  into  a  few  words. 
That  is  what  definite  information  means.  Instead  of 
talking  to  me  half  an  hour  about  this  chair,  if  you  can 
tell  me  quickly  in  three  or  four  words  what  I  am  go- 
ing to  get  out  of  it,  you  are  a  salesman.  So  the  news- 


paper boils  down  the  entire  column  of  this  neswpaper, 
he  writes  across  the  top  of  the  column  four  or  five 
words.  You  read  four  or  five  words  and  you  get  the 
sum  and  substance  of  the  entire  column .  You  know 
what  is  in  the  column,  although  you  did  not  read  it. 
He  tells  it  in  an  interesting  way  that  compels  you  to 
read  the  rest  of  the  column,  if  you  have  the  time. 
There  is  a  much  larger  principle  illustrated  in  the 
headlines  of  the  paper  than  most  of  us  see.  If  you 
and  I  can  follow  that  out,  and  we  can  because  we  can 
see  the  newspapers  daily  and  study  how  they  do  that, 
we  can  learn  to  tell  a  concise  story  in  a  few  words. 
We  can  learn  to  tell  it  in  an  interesting  way  the  inter- 
esting things  about  our  product — what  it  will  do  for 
the  purchaser,  and  why. 

The  Point  of  Interest 

And  then  we  come  to  the  next  step  in  selling,  "the 
most  vital  selling  point,"  which  is  the  most  interest- 
ing point  to  the  particular  customer.  Let  me  illustrate. 
One  man  buys  insurance  for  investment ;  another  man 

lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllliy^ 


-A 


No.'  808— Queen  Quality  Oxford,  White  Reign- 
skin  Clotli  and  White  Ivory  Sole.  15/8  Span- 
ish covered  wood  heel,  welt  sole,  carried  in 
stock  by  Thos.  G.  Plant  Co.,  Boston. 

Illlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll^^ 

buys  insurance  for  protection.  Both  of  them  buy  the 
same  commodity,  but  a  good  insurance  agent  would 
not  talk  to  both  of  them  alike.  To  one  he  would  talk 
investment  and  to  the  other  protection.  To-morrow 
morning  into  your  general  store  come  these  two  class- 
es of  people.  I  am  going  to  apply  this  to  an  article 
we  all  use. 

Customer  Number  One  comes  walking  into  this 
general  store,  walks  up  to  the  salesman  and  says,  "I 
would  like  to  have  a  pair  of  boots.  You  know  I  am 
working  outside,  doing  work  which  is  hard  on  shoes. 
If  you  have  one  that  will  give  me  a  lot  of  service  1 
want  it." 

Now,  this  man  is  interested  in  the  amount  of  ser- 
vice he  is  going  to  get  out  of  the  shoes.  No  salesman 
or  saleswoman  would  think  about  talking  style  to 
that  man,  because  he  has  found  out  what  he  is  in- 
terested in.  The  second  customer  that  comes  into  the 
store  has  an  entirely  dift'erent  viewpoint.  Perhaps  he 
is  a  young  man  about  town  who  rather  prides  himself 
on  being  well-dressed. 

"I  want  shoes,"  he  says,  "something  up-to-date." 

You  say,  "Yes,"  and  you  talk  on  that  point.  "This 
is  the  newest  style,"  and  so  on. 

You  figure  out  that  man's    interest ;    you  have 


FOOTWEAR    IN    CANADA  March,  loio 


found  out  what  he  is  interested  in.  The  third  custom- 
er comes  limping-  in  and  says,  "I  wonder  if  you  have 
a  soft,  comfortable  sort  of  shoe  ?  I  don't  care  how  it 
wears — I  have  a  lot  of  trouble  with  my  feet." 

You  would  ])e  a  hne  salesman  if  you  talked  on  "a 
beautiful  shoe,"  and  how  long  it  is  going  to  wear.  If 
you  are  a  wise  man,  yoit  are  going  to  talk  about  how 
comfortable  it  is  going  to  be,  and  you  are  going  to 
forget  about  important  things. 

Customer  Number  Four  comes  in  and  says,  "I 
have  just  so  much  money.  Can  I  buy  a  pair  of  shoes 
for  that  money?"  He  is  interested  in  the  price,  but  all 
four  are  buying  shoes. 

Try  so  far  as  you  can  to  get  on  the  other  side  of 
the  counter.  Get  the  customer's  viewpoint  and  find 
out  without  asking  too  many  questions  what  the  cus- 
tomer has  in  mind  and  what  he  needs.  Previous  know- 
ledge of  that  customer  will,  in  many  cases,  enable  you 
to  serve  that  customer  in  the  best  way,  because  you 
know  what  his  interests  are.  You  know  whether  or 
not. he  is  working  on  a  farm  or  in  town;  whether  he 
is  a  -minister  or  a  laboring  man.  From  your  know- 
ledge of  merchandise  you  are  able  to  talk  intelligently 
and  get  the  customer's  viewpoint. 

Mr.  Chalmers  who  was  formerly  with  the  National 
Cash  Register  Company  tells  us  that  one  of  their  sales- 
men who  had  been  a  most  successful  salesman,  when 
asked  the  question  as  to  the  reason  for  his  success, 
said,  "Nobody  can  ask  me  a  question  about  my  com- 
modity that  I  cannot  reply  to." 

That  is  exceptional  knowledge.  I  am  not  going 
to  say  to  you  that  any  one  of  you  men  or  perhaps  any 


NEW  YORK 
Na.rrow  Foot 
Widths  A.'vAA,AAA.AA.£rA  All  sizes  inchidini  e'/i.S.gJi.iO 


Fittino  the 


A  SHOECRAFT  COLONIAL— 

"Fayette" 

The  SlnoeCraft  Shop  has  surpassed  itself  in 
the  beauty  of  this  new  spring  pump,  -which 
IS  true  to  ShoeCraft  tradition  in  tiie  excel- 
lence of  Its  quality.  The  snug  fit  at  heel  gives 
security  and  keeps  the  heel  from  slipping. 

Patent  Leather,  $12  Havana  Brown  Kid,  $12 
lilack  Suede,  .$12  Pearl  Gray  Kid,  $15 

Gun  Metal,  $12  Black  Satin,  $11 

Patent  Leather  Vamp  with 
White  Kid  Quarters,  $12  J73S^ 


'Post  ^rejiaid.  Fit 
guaranteed.  Send  for 
Booklet  T>-28  and 
^Measurement  Chart. 


An  advertisement  used  in  one  of  the  leading  women's  fashion  magazines. 
It  possesses  original  qualities  that  make  it  very  attractive 
A  style  note  may  be  also  taken  from  the  patent  leather  Colonial 
illustrated 


of  us  can  hoi)e  to  take  the  large  lines  of  merchandise 
most  of  us  are  carrying  and  say,  "No  man  can  ask  me 
a  question  I  cannot  reply  to."  I  would  sincerely  like 
to  have  the  opportunity  to  talk  to  a  man  who  thinks 
he  can  do  that  with  assorted  lines  of  merchandise. 
So  near  as  you  and  I  can  come  to  that  point,  we  are 
going  to  be  successful.  So  far  as  we  and  our  staft 
can  do  this,  we  are  going  to  build  up  a  following 
which  which  is  going  to  be  pretty  hard  to  get  away 
from  us.  Customers  like  to  deal  with  people  in  whom 
they  have  confidence.  If  you  come  down  to-morrow 
morning  to  my  store  and  ask  me,  "Do  you  think  that 
chair  is  pretty  well  made  and  will  last  a  long  time?" 
and  I  say,  "I  think  so,"  you  will  go  away  and  say, 
"That  is  a  poor  fellow  to  be  in  charge  of  a  furnititre 
store,  'he  thinks  so.'  " 

Why  Sales  Are  Lost 

I  went  into  a  store  and  saw  a  young  woman  put 
a  leather  handbag  down  in  front  of  a  woman  and  tell 
her  the  price.  The  customer  said,  "Do  you  think 
that  is  real  leather?"  And  she  said,"  "It  looks  like  it." 

"What  is  the  idea  in  asking  $3  for  this  handbag?" 
the  customer  inquired. 

"Well,  the  boss  marked  it  that  way,  and  he  gives 
us  the  deuce  if  we  sell  it  for  any  less,"  was  the  reply. 

That  is  the  kind  of  people  we  expect  to  do  business 
for  us  in  our  stores.  If  you  have  only  one  fourteen- 
year-old  boy  helping  you  after  school,  make  that  boy 
intelligent.  Let  the  people  in  your  commtmity  feel 
that  when  that  boy  tells  them  the  things  are  right, 
they  are  right.  Let  the  boy  feel  he  knows  what  he  is 
talking  about,  so  that  next  Saturday  when  they  come 
down,  he  can  look  the  customer  in  the  eye  and  say, 
"Weren't  those  peaches  that  I  sold  you  delicious?" 
Get  somebody  who  will  inspire  confidence  of  your 
customers . 

I  walked  into  a  store  within  the  last  few  weeks. 
The  merchant  was  one  of  those  who  realized  the  im- 
l)ortance  of  the  human  element.  A  farmer  came  into 
the  store  and  the  merchant  asked  him  something  about 
his  child,  and  how  the  roads  were.  Then  he  said, 
"Well,  Bill,  what  I  can  do  for  you  to-day?" 

You  know,  I  like  that.  A  lot  of  people  say,  "What 
shall  I  say  to  the  customer?"  I  am  not  going  to  tell 
you  that.  Please  the  customer.  If  he  wants  to  be 
slapped  on  the  back,  slap  him  on  the  back.  If  he 
wants  to  be  "bowed  to,"  bow  to  him.  Please  your  cus- 
tomer. This  particular  man  greeted  his  customer 
and  said,  "What  can  I  do  for  you.  Bill  ?"  meaning, 
"I  am  here  to  do  everything  to  serve  you  to  the  best 
of  my  ability." 

The  farmer  said :  "At  last  that  old  cookstove 
burned  out..  I  have  been  fighting  for  a  long  time 
against  buying  one  of  those,  but  I  guess  the  'jig'  is 
up  now." 

"What  sort  of  stove  do  you  want  ?"  said  the  hard- 
ware man . 

"Look  here,  Tom,  I  do  not  think  it  necessary  to 
ask  me  that ;  you  know  I  cannot  afiford  to  spend  as 
much  money  as  some  people  in  the  world.  The  old 
woman  has  been  doing  with  that  stove  for  a  long 
time  and  deserves  a  good  one.  Yoti  know  how  much 
money  I  have.  I  want  to  do  anything  within  reason, 
but  do  not  want  to  give  any  more  than  I  have  to.  It 
is  probably  the  last  stove  the  old  woman  is  going  to 
get.  Better  let  you  select'the  stove.  You  know  better 
than  I  do." 

1  was  thinking:  "There  is  a  man  we  ought  to  have 


March,  H)19 


FOOTWKAR    IN  CANADA 


105 


before  the  people  of  the  community  to  show  them  how 
to  run  their  business.  Here  is  a  man  travelling  nine 
miles,  and  he  asks  him  what  sort  of  stove  he  shall  buy 
and  what  he  is  to  pay  for  it."  No  doubt  that  farmer 
had  been  dealing  with  the  storekeeper  for  years  and 
years,  and  he  had  found  out  that  the  storekeeper  is 
honest.  If  the  storekeeper  said  a  thing  was  good,  it 
was  good  ;  if  he  said  it  weighed  a  pound,  it  weighed 
a  pound  ;  if  there  was  any  mistake  in  serving  in  his 
establishment,  he  was  always  ready  to  back  it  up  and 
say,  "I  am  going  to  give  a  square  deal."  That  is  the 
kind  of  confidence  I  commend  to  you. 

Analyze  Your  Merchandise 

You  people  in  the  large  cities  have  not  that  sort 
of  contact.  I  am  not  overlooking  the  man  in  the  large 
city.  In  the  hurry  and  bustle  of  trade,  the  city  people 
have  acquired  the  habit  of  shopping  quickly.  Those 


Felt  "Foot  Pals,"  made  by  the  E-Z  Walk  Mfg. 
Co.,  New  York 


IllllllllllllllllllllllillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllU^^ 

of  you  who  deal  with  the  real  customers  are  finding 
that  the  largest  opportunity  you  have  in  the  world  is 
to  render  a  service  to  your  patron.  If  you  want  him 
to  depend  upon  you,  you  must  study  your  commodity 
so  that  you  may  be  able  to  tell  him  what  he  may  ex- 
pect in  service  so  that  he  may  not  be  disappointed  in 
your  statement.  The  lack  of  it  drives  customers  away. 
I  would  suggest  that  we  analyze  our  merchandise, 
that  we  teach  our  salespeople  to  study  because  the 
•  sales  person  who  can  talk  intelligently  about  a  com- 
modity takes  very  much  more  interest  in  talking  about 
this  commodity  than  the  one  who  knows  little  of  it. 
One  of  you  knows  all  about  shoes,  and  you  push 
shoes ;  another  one  likes  to  sell  furniture ;  another  one 
likes  groceries,  and  he  sells  groceries  because  he 
knows  the  most  about  them.  Put  the  merchandise 
down  before  you.  Ask  yourself  how  it  is  made,  what 
particular  construction  is  there  that  gives  you  an  ad- 
vantage to  that  particular  article.  Know  how  it  com- 
pares with  other  articles  (not  for  the  purpose  of  knock- 
ing the  others,  but  for  the  purpose  of  talking  intelli- 
gently about  it).  What  goes  to  make  money  value  ? 
What  will  it  do  for  the  customer  ?  Only  the  thing  that 
it  wnll  do  for  the  customer  is  the  interesting  thing. 


In  a  city  in  Pennsylvania  I  made  this  kind  of  a 
statement  before  a  body  of  salesmen  and  women  in 
one  of  the  large  stores.  A  young  woman  came  to  me 
and  said,  "Mr.  Irwin,  I  know  you  are  perfectly  all 
right,  but  I  do  not  believe  it  is  possible  for  a  sales- 
man or  woman  in  the  average  store,  particularly  in 
the  smaller,  to  be  able  to  talk  intellignetly  about  their 
merchandise,  or  to  give  a  customer  the  knowledge 
you  talk  about,  because  they  have  never  been  through 
the  factory." 

I  said,  "Perhaps  your  statement  is  right.  I  would 
not  attempt  to  dispute  it." 

I  just  let  it  go  like  that,  waiting  for  the  occasion 
to  present  itself  to  prove  my  statemeht.  Ten  days 
later,  when  she  had  forgotten  this  incident,  I  walked 
into  the  department  in  which  she  was  handling  leather 
goods.  I  had  my  hat  on  and  acted^  as  a  .shopper.  I 
walked  up  to  the  department,  and  said,  "I  want  to 
look  at  these,"  and  she  showed  me  certain  leather  ar- 
ticles. I  looked  at  them  and  said  f>nally,  "I  am  looking- 
for  somethig  appropriate  to. send  to  a  little  sister." 

The  woman  suggested  this  and  that  and  the  other, 
and  finally  laid  down  a  little  handbag,  appar^itly  of 
leather.    I  said,  "What  is  the  price?" 

And  she  said,  "That  is  $3."  ^ 

Just  to  see  what  she  would  say,  I  asked,  "Do  you 
mean  to  tell  me  you  have  the  nerve  to  ask  $3  for  that 
handbag  ?" 

She  looked  at  me  a  moment  and  said,  "You  do  not 
know  what  you  are  talking  about.  That  is  made  of  the 
best  quality  of  grain  leather,  and  because  of  that  a 
woman  would  get  four  of  five  years  of  service  out  of 
that  bag.  If  that  is  not  cheap  service,  I  do  not  know 
what  is." 

I  said,  "It  may  be  good  leather,  but  the  thing  is 
poorly  made." 

Then  she  picked  it  up  and  showed  me  how  care- 
fully it  was  sewed  and  all  about  the  construction. 

"I  think  the  metal  on  that  will  tarnish." 

And  she  proceeded  to  tell  me  it  would  not. 

I  said,  "That  is  a  pretty  poor  fastening." 

And  she  demonstrated  the  fastening. 

I  said,  "All  right,  but  if  a  woman  will  take  that 
handbag  and  go  walking'  down  the  street  with  her 
money  and  handkerchief  and  other  things  in  it  and 
the  handle  breaks,  it  is  gone." 

She  said,  "This  handle  is  fastened  on  securely. 
Some  bags  have  tiny  rings,  but  this  one  has  this  ad- 
vantage." 

Then  she  opened  the  bag  and  said,  "The  inside 
would  delight  the  eye  of  any  woman."  She  showed 
me  the  fittings  and  all  that  went  inside  with  it,  even 
the  advantage  of  the  small  purse. 

I  said,  "'Those  that  I  saw  were  larger  than  that : 
this  looks  small  to  me." 

She  replied,  "That  shows  you  are  not  keeping  up 
with  the  style.  It  has  been  a  long  time  since  a  wo- 
man carried  those  big  things." 

Just  to  see  if  she  knew  all  about  her  other  lines, 
I  examined  another  one  and  asked  her  the  same  ques- 
tions. Finally  I  said  to  her,  "Young  lady,  I  congratu- 
late you  on  the  information  you  have  given  me.  Have 
vou  been  through  the  factorv  to  get  all  that  informa- 
tion ?" 

"No." 

"Where  did  you  get  it  ?" 

.She  laughed  and  said,  'I  guess  you  have  me." 
Look  at  the  product  from  the  customer's  point  of 
view — from  the  other  side  of  the  counter.    Look  at 


106 


FOOTWEAR 


IN  CANADA 


March,  1919 


the  product  and  see  what  it  will  do  for  the  customer. 
Don't  get  your  merchandise  in  and  put  it  on  the  shelf 
and  hide  it.  Bring  it  down  as  soon  as  you  get  a  new 
product.  If  you  get  a  new  product  in,  call  your  em- 
ployees and  say,  "Here  is  something  new.  Come  and 
look  at  it  and  see  what  you  think  of  it."  Tell  them 
what  the  salesman  who  sold  it  to  you  told  you  about 
it.  Be  able  to  talk  intelligently  about  your  commo- 
dity. You  will  build  up  a  following,  and  Mr.  Mail  Or- 
der House  is  going  to  have  a  hard  time.  Your  pat- 
rons will  say,  'T  do  not  know  whether  or  not  it  is 
right  when  I  read  it  in  the  catalogue,  but  if  I  buy  from 
Tom  Smith  over  there  it  is  all  right.  If  it  is  not  al- 
right, Tom  will  make  it  right." 

Know  what  you  are  selling.  So  far  as  you  can 
show  every  individual  in  your  store  the  selling  points 
of  everything  that  comes  in  and  let  them  talk  intel- 
ligently.  I  am  not  g'oing  to  say  that  is  going  to  bring 

llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllll^ 


Men's  patent  chrome 
dancing  and  dress 
pump — sizes  A  to  D 
—5-11.  Light,  flex- 
ible and  cool.  Made 
by  Hazen  B.  Good- 
rich Co.,  Haverhill, 
Mass. 


IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIM^ 

100  per  cent,  success,  but  it  is  going  approximately  in 
that  direction . 

A  traveller  from  this  country  was  travelling  in 
some  foreign  lands,  and  he  tells  this-  little  story : 

He  started  out  one  morning  in  search  of  a  certain 
famous  place  he  had  heard  a  good  deal  about.  As  he 
went  in  search  of  it,  he  met  a  barefoot  boy,  one  of  the 
natives.  He  said  to  the  boy,  "I  am  trying  to  get  to  a 
certain  place.  Can  you  tell  me  where  it  is  ?" 

The  little  boy  stopped  a  minute,  then  he  looked  up 
into  the  man's  face  and  said,  "Sir,  I  do  not  know  just 
where  it  is,  but  this  is  the  way." 

"I  do  not  know,  just  what  your  problem  is,  but 
this  is  one  of  the  ways  of  attaining  success,  "knowing 
what  you  are  doing  and  knowing  your  commodity." 


Information  Bureau  for  Exporters 

CANADA  is  now  making  an  earnest  effort  to  es- 
tablish an  export  trade  in  boots  and  shoes,  and 
three  representatives  are  in  Europe  to  promote 
this  business.  Great  Britain,  too,  is  after  for- 
eign trade,  and  the  Northampshire  Chamber  of  Com- 
merce is  taking  the  most  energetic  steps  to  recovei 
the  commerce  lost  through  the  war  and  to  extend  the 
exports.  The  methods  which  are  being  adopted  may 
give  pointers  to  our  own  manufacturers. 

"Our  first  line  of  attack,"  said  Mr.  Frier,  secre- 
tary of  the  Chamber,  "is  based  upon  the  valuable  K 
Form  information  supplied  through  the  Foreign  Of- 
fice and  the  Board  of  Trade.  The  Chamber  has  been 
circulating  this  information  to  its  members  in  the  shape 
of  a  code  of  which  they  have  the  key,  so  that  if  it  fell 
into  the  hands  of  unapproved  persons  it  would  be  no 
use  to  them. 

"We  have  also  a  service  of  direct  reports  obtain- 
ed through  British  Chambers  of  Commerce  in  foreign 
countries  and  in  our  possession,  with  an  interchange 


of  information  as  to  the  goods  required  by  certain 
markets  and  the  capacity  of  our  manufacturers  to  deal 
with  the  trade  of  various  countries  in  a  more  complete 
and  aggressive  manner  than  would  be  possible  by  in- 
dividual concerns. 

"The  Chamber  has  a  very  efficient  overseas  infor- 
mation department,  which  day  by  da.y  advises  mem- 
bers as  to  the  trend  of  trade  and  the  openings  for  sup- 
plies. We  have  also  organized  a  very  vs  ide  awake  pro- 
paganda scheme,  and  we  are  preparing  a  magnificently 
printed  volume  dealing  with  the  industries  of  the  town 
and  country.  A  sum  of  $5,000  is  being  spent  upon 
this  publication  alone.  The  Chamber  is  issuing  a 
monthly  journal,  with  advertisements  in  English, 
French  and  Spanish,  besides  articles  on  our  products, 
and  6,000  copies  of  each  issue  are  posted  to  merchants 
and  wholesale  buyers  throughout  the  world. 

"Further,  the  Chamber  translates  the  foreign  cor- 
respondence of  its  members,  and  spares  no  effort  to 
secure  that  correspondence  is  conducted  in  the  lang- 
uages of  the  respective  countries. 

"Quotations  are  supplied  in  the  currency  of  those 
countries,  and  metric  weights  and  measures  are  used 
in  the  quotations.  This  greatly  facilitates  business. 
Our  staff  is  efficient  in  French,  Spanish,  and  Italian. 
The  Chamber  has  arranged  for  a  series  of  visits  by 
consuls  and  trade  commissioners." 


The  Navy  and  Mercantile  Marine 

THE  Navy  League  of  Canada  have  issued  a  num- 
ber of  leaflets  as  part  of  their  educational  cam- 
paign in  matters  pertaining  to  the  navy  and 
mercantile  marine.  The  first  paper  outlines 
the  policy  of  the  Navy  League  of  Canada.  The  second 
])aper  is  by  Hon.  Sir  Charles  Hibbert  Tupper  on  "What 
Canada  Owes  to  the  British  Navy."  No.  Ill  is  by  Sir 
Robert  Falconer  and  deals  with  "The  Heroic  War 
Work  of  the  Merchant  Marine.  No.  IV  is  by  the 
Hon.  Benjamin  Russell,  entitled  "The  British  Navy 
and  World  Freedom,"  and  No.  V  is  by  Mr.  J.  Cast- 
ell  Hopkins,  who  outlines  "The  British  Navy  in  His- 
tory." Other  papers  will  be  issued  from  time  to  time 
in  the  near  future  and  may  be  secured  from  the  On- 
tario Division,  34  King  St.,  West,  Toronto. 


Getting  Back  to  Normal 

MONTREAL  retailers  say  the  return  of  our  sol- 
diers and  the  resumption  of  social  functions 
are  proving  of  benefit  to  them.  The  depar- 
ture of  thousands  of  men  for  the  front  natur- 
ally had  a  considerable  eff'ect  on  the  men's  trade,  and 
this  is  now  gradually  returning  to  normal.  As  evidence 
of  the  effect  on  business,  the  head  of  a  very  large  Mon- 
treal retail  firm  doing  a  high  class  trade  stated  that 
he  was  selling-  very  large  numbers  of  men's  shoes,  and 
that  the  evening  slipper  trade  was  booming.  The  sales 
of  evening  footwear  was  astonishing. 

♦ — ,„_,„__„_„„_„„_„„_,,»_„«— ,„,_,,„_„„_»„—„„_„„— »_.._«._„._,„♦ 

!  1 

I  The  net  value  of  manufactures  in  Canada  for  J 

the  year  1917,  just  published,  was  $1,412,686,238;  j 
the  gross  value,  including  labor  costs,  etc.,  was 
$3,015,506,869.    The    boot    and    shoe  production 
amounted  to  $49,170,062  gross    and  $22,389,519 

I        net.  For  leather  the  figures  are  $41,117,128  gross 

j        and  $14,492,651  net. 

1 


March,  1910 


FOOTWEAR   IN  CANADA 


107 


— 


I 


Retailers  Should  Seriously  Con- 
sider Abolishing  Credits 

THE  general  tendency  in  the  commercial  world 
today  is  to  get  down  to  a  cash  basis — a  busi- 
ness-like basis — and,  in  many  lines,  a  good  start 
has  been  made  in  this  direction.  Not  long  ago 
Canadian  railways  announced  that  shippers  must  pay 
cash  for  service  rendered,  or  furnish  bonds  to  cover  the 
amount  involved.  And  even  under  the  bond,  only  96 
hours  was  allowed  for  cash  settlement.  Retailers  and 
manufacturers  are  endeavoring  to  meet  this  movement 
by  demanding  that  the  railways  make  cash  settlement 
promptly  for  all  claims  shippers  may  have  against 
them.  Many  Canadian  manufacturers  have  been  do- 
ing business  on  terms  of  thirty  days'  net  for  some  time. 
Under  old  conditions  the  time  generally  allowed  was 
sixty  days.  Many  retailers  also,  in  different  localities, 
have  made  the  radical  change  from  credit  to  cash  tran- 
sactions and  have  nothing  but  praise  for  the  new  sys- 
tem. 

Is  there  any  reason,  we  ask,  why  every  shoe  mer- 
chant in  the  Dominion  of  Canada,  should  not  place 
his  business  on  a  cash  basis?  These  are  not  normal 
times.  The  price  of  almost  every  commodity  has  gone 
up  and  retailers  must  have  larger  capital  behind  them 
if  they  are  to  do  business  at  a  profit.  A  retailer  who 
recently  made  the  change  says  that  he  has  cleaned  up 
a  large  number  of  accounts  that  have  been  standing 
for  a  long  time.  "Doing  business  on  this  plan,"  he 
states,  "  means  that  I  have  secured  a  lot  of  money  I 
never  expected  to  get.  It  means  that  I  have  the  money 
in  hand  that  I  ought  to  have,  and  that  I  need.  I  can 
put  it  right  back  into  the  business.  It  also  means 
that  many  customers  who  were  avoiding  the  store  be- 
cause they  owed  money,  are  again  buying  as  usual.  I 
have  no  books  to  keep  and  no  bad  debts,  consequently 
I  can  give  lower  prices.  My  customers  are  getting 
just  as  much  benefit  as  I  am." 

The  customer,  as  well  as  the  retailer,  when  once 


he  has  become  accustomed  to  paying  cash  for  his  goods 
will  find  that  the  change  works  out  to  his  benefit  and 
that  it  is  far  preferable  to  running  up  a  long  bill  which 
there  may,  or  may  not,  be  the  possilMlity  of  paying  in- 
side of  weeks,  or  even  months. 

The  change  from  credit  to  cash  can  be  accomplish- 
ed in  such  a  way  that  the  customer  will  see  the  neces- 
sity from  the  retailer's  point  of  A-iew,  as  well  as  the 
benefit  to  be  derived  by  the  purchaser.  One  merchant 
has  successfully  used  the  following  form  of  letter : 

"During  the  past  four  years  we  have  been  doing 
a  certain  amount  of  credit  business.  This  was  started 
in  a  small  way  and  has  gradually  grown  until  today 
there  are  thousands  of  dollars  owing  to  us  by  the  peo- 
ple of  this  city.  This  has  been  a  very  heavy  load  for 
us  to  carry  and  it  is  necessary,  if  we  wish  to  continue 
in  business,  to  conduct  the  same  on  a  cash  basis.  In 
normal  times  this  might  not  have  been  necessary,  but 
a  war  has  been  waging  and  Canada  is  feeling  it.  High 
prices  rule  now  and  higher  prices  are  not  improbable. 
It  is  difficult  to  obtain  money  from  the  banks  and  cred- 
its from  the  wholesaler.  We  are  told  that  manufac- 
turers are  in  a  much  different  position  than  before  the 
war  owing  to  the  greater  demand  for  their  goods  and 
the  scarcity  of  raw  materials.  Consequently  we  have 
to  pay  our  bills  more  promptly. 

"In  view  of  this  we  wish  to  announce  that  on  and 
after  April  1,  1919,  we  will  conduct  our  business  on  a 
strictly  cash  basis.  Bookkeeping,  bad  accounts,  pos- 
tage, paper,  time  and  worry,  all  cost  money.  And  this 
extra  cost  is  paid  for  indirectly  by  the  customer.  By 
doing  business  for  cash  we  hope  to  eliminate  this  ex- 
tra cost  and  sell  you  goods  for  less  money. 

"We  thank  you  for  your  business  in  the  past  and 
trust  you  will  see  our  viewpoint.  We  ask  you  to  give 
the  plan  a  fair  trial  and  we  are  satisfied  that  you  will  be 
pleased  and  convinced  that  it  is  the  best  way  to  do 
business." 

The  time  has  surely  arrived  when  Canadian  re- 
tailers should  take  a  firm  stand  on  this  question. 
Merchants,  who  have  given  credit  for  the  past  twenty- 
five  years,  have  changed  over  to  cash  and  instead  of 
losing  business  they  have  increased  thir  sales.  Little 
more  proof  is  needed  that  the  cash  basis  is  successful. 


108 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


March,  191;) 


No  Possibility  of  a  Drop  in  Prices 

AVERY  clear  exposition  of  the  price  situation 
of  the  immediate  future  is  outlined  by  Mr. 
Charles  A.  Blachford  of  the  Rlachford  Shoe 
Mfg.  Co.,  Toronto  as  follows:  Prices  materials 
used  in  manufacture  of  shoes  are  firm.  For  example, 
during  the  last  month  there  has  been  an  advance  of 
from  five  to  twelve  cents  per  foot  on  glace  kid  skins 
throughout  the  entire  glace  kid  market.  There  has 
also  been  an  advance  amongst  several  of  the  calf  tan- 
ners. These  conditions,  existing  along  Avith  the  labor 
problems  which  will  come  up  during  the  next  two  or 
three  months,  shorter  hours  and  the  increase  of  prices 
taking  place,  will  no  doubt  mean  prices  just  as  firm 
if  not  a  considerable  increase.  Then  we  must  duly  con- 
sider the  demand  there  is  in  Europe  for  all  kinds  of 
raw  material.  Many  of  the  neutral  countries  that 
have  not  been  able  to  secure  their  regular  supplies 
owing  to  embargoes,  have  now  been  in  the  American 
market  paying  high  prices  in  order  to  get  raw  mater- 
ials to  their  country.  They  have  to  a  large  extent 
cleaned  up  the  market  for  the  present,  and  now  that 
the  British  embargoes  on  shoes  has  been  raised  there 
will  be  a  flock  of  buyers  from  the  Old  Country  who 
will  require  supplies  badly  enough  to  purchase  at  any 
will  not  enable  domestic  buyers  to  purchase  at  any 
lower  figures. 

There  is  a  tendency  for  every  one  to  look  for  lower 
prices  but  they  will  be  disappointed  in  the  showmg. 
Trade  merchants  who  are  alive  and  have  been  follow- 
ing conditions  know  just  what  is  going-  on,  but  there 
are  many  who  do  not  know  these  conditions  thereby 
making  it  hard  for  the  manufacturers  to  secure  their 
Fall  placing  business,  and  in  many  instances  the  mer- 
chant will  not  purchase  their  regular  supplies  think- 
ing there  will  be  a  drop  and  this  drop  seems  impos- 
sible to  take  place  for  some  considerable  time. 

The  style  end  of  the  shoe  trade  is  important,  Dut, 
owing  to  the  lack  of  supplies,  we  will,  to  a  large  ex- 
tent, have  to  continue  on  the  same  basis  as  we  have 
been  travelling  during  the  last  year,  inasmuch  as 
more  subdued  shades  of  leather  will  have  to  be  used. 
At  the  same  time  as  conditions  ease  up  no  doubt  we 
will  in  a  short  time  be  back  to  light  shades  in  novelty 
shoes  once  more. 


Those  Wlio  Pass  and  Those  Who  Pause 

IF  there  is  any  doubt  in  your  mind  as  to  whether 
it  pays  to  spend  a  little  time  in  making  your  win- 
dows attractive  try  this  test  yourself.  Station 
someone  outside  your  window  with  instructions 
to  count  the  people  who  pass  your  store,  and  those 
who  pass  in  front  of  your  window.  Then  change  the 
trim,  making  a  special  ef¥ort  to  produce  an  interesting 
display,  and  try  the  same  plan. 

Unless  your  experience  is  an  exception,  you  will 
iind  that  the  well-planned,  carefully  trimmed  window 
will  attract  a  considerably  higher  percentage  than  the 
window  jumbled  together  in  a  hurry  some  Monday 
morning.  Care  and  thought  in  window  trimming  al- 
ways pay. 

You  may  learn  some  things  about  color  and  mo- 
tion and  arrangement  from  this  single  test  that  will 
help  you  in  every  window  you  trim.  But  remember 
this  when  you  look  over  the  tally  sheet  of  people  who 
pass  and  people  who  pause:  The  figures  are  only  an 
indication  of  the  value  of  a  trim  as  an  effective  sales 
factor,    'i'wo  windows,  ior  example,  might  draw  equal 


crowds,  yet  one  would  merely  satisfy  idle  curiosity, 
while  the  other  would  actually  sell  goods.  The  im- 
])ortant  thing  to  remember  is  to  put  sales  interest  into 
the  trim.  The  nearer  you  can  bring  your  message 
home  to  the  passer-by  the  more  effective  is  the  trim. 

Don't  forget  that  the  window  space  is  the  most 
valuable  part  of  your  store.    Make  the  most  of  it. 

Change  your  trims  often.    Keep  up  with  the  times. 


Do  they  Pause  od  do  they  Pass? 

Try  to  have  the  most  attractive  window,  not  only  on 
your  street,  but  in  your  whole  city.  Don't  think  for  a 
minute  that  your  chance  is  limited  by  the  size  of  your 
window,  for  it  isn't  true.  Small  windows  frequently 
are  better  trimmed  than  those  which  can  show  a  half 
block  of  plate  glass. 

The  effectiveness  of  your  window  depends  solely 
upon  the  plan  and  its  execution — and  both  depend  on 
vou. 


Sell  Odds  and  Ends  to  the  Junk  Man 
Rather  Than  Displease  Customers 


THE  most  common  cause  of  odds  and  ends  is  the 
purchase  of  too  many  styles  in  small  lots.  When 
you  purchase  this  way  you  buy  far  too  many 
small  sizes  in  proportion  to  the  big  selling  num- 
bers, thus  leaving-  small  sizes  and  narrow  widths  to 
dispose  of  at  a  loss.  Such  is  the  opinion  of  Mr.  M.  L. 
Bridges,  speaking  at  the  Texas  Shoe  Retailers'  Con- 
vention recently. 

Another  cause,  he  said,  is  not  keeeping  up  with 
just  what  will  be  the  seller  by  failing  to  read  trade 
journals,  and  visiting  conventions  where  style  matters 
are  discussed.  A  third  cause  for  having  discontinued 
lines  is  the  failure  of  tthe  manufacturers  and  railroads 
to  deliver  the  goods  on  time.  The  value  of  go*ods  de- 
creases in  proportion  to  the  delay  in  their  delivery. 

Still  another  cause  for  accumulation  is  the  chang- 
ing of  buyers.  No  two  buyers  have  the  same  ideas. 
Their  tastes  and  judgments  dift'er,  so  when  a  new  buy- 
er takes  charge  he  generally  throws  out  all  the  lines 
he  can  and  replaces  them  with  others  which  in  his 
judgment  are  better  sellers.  In  other  words,  he  junks 
the  greater  part  of  the  stock  and  pushes  his  own  pur- 
chases. This  you  can  readily  see  causes  endless  loss 
and  quantities  of  odds  and  ends. 

Every  case  of  influenza  is  treated  differently  by 
the  doctor  who  knows  best  the  symptons  and  the  con- 
ditions of  his  patients,  and  so  every  retailer  should 
know  best  the  condition  of  his  stock,  and  the  consti- 
tution of  his  trade,  and  he  alone  can  determine  the 
i)est  way  to  g^>t  result.'. 

1  can  here  only  mention  a  few  general  principles 
which  have  given  good  results. 

1.  Running  a  special  sale  and  advertising  in  an  at- 
tractive way  just  what  you  have  to  offer.    In  doing 


March,  1010 


FOOTWEAR   IN  CAN/VDA 


100 


this,  be  sure  you  do  not  mislead  patrons,  because  if 
you  do  you  will  sooner  or  later  destroy  their  confidence 
in  your  advertisements. 

2.  Sell  to  a  junk  dealer  at  a  small  price.  This,  you 
say,  looses  too  much,  but  do  you  realize  that  when  you 
advertise  and  sell  bargain  shoes  to  your  patrons,  you 
are  selling  them  at  a  loss,  when  if  you  dispose  of  them 
to  a  junk  dealer  and  sell  your  customer  a  shoe  at  a 
profit,  you  are  about  even,  and  g'ive  your  customer  sat- 
isfaction in  fit,  style  and  service,  where  by  the  special 
sale  plan,  you  run  a  risk  of  jeopardizing  one  or  more 
of  these  reciuirements. 

Another  and  a  prime  cause  of  accumulation  of 
odds  and  ends  is  competition  sales.  When  a  man  is 
handed  his  sales  at  the  end  of  a  given  period,  and  led 
to  believe  that  his  salary  in  some  degree  depends  on  his 
results  in  dollars  and  cents,  it  is  only  natural  for  him 
to  consummate  sales  as  quickly  as  possible  in  order 
to  get  another  customer.  This  frequently  leads  to 
carelessness  in  fitting  but  more  especially  makes  him 
dispose  of  the  easy  sellers.  He  will  not  show  broken 
lots  for  fear  of  not  being  able  to  fit  or  suit  his  cus- 
tomer quickly. 

Now  if  quality  instead  of  quantity  salesmanship 
was  considered,  it  would  eliminate  to  a  great  degree 
the  accumulation  of  odds  and  ends,  or  if  that  salesman 
knew  it  was  to  his  advantage  in  every  way  to  dispose 
of  the  hard  sellers  they  would  move  out. 

Recently  a  department  manager  brought  to  my  at- 
tention a  man  who  was  selling  far  in  excess  of  others. 
In  a  trade  paper  he  had  seen  by  the  percentage  for 
selling  goods  that  he  was  producing  sales  for  a  g'reat 
deal  less  than  mentioned  and  thought  his  salary  should 
be  raised,  whereas  a  close  analysis  of  his  sales  would 
show  he  had  only  sold  the  cream  of  the  stock.  Now, 
to  my  mind,  if  that  clerk  was  made  to  understand 
just  where  he  failed  I  think  that  both  he  and  the  store 
would  profit  thereby.  We  are  all  jvtst  a  little  selfish, 
and  almost  always  do  the  thing  that  is  to  our  own 
interest,  so  if  a  proprietor  remembers  this  he  can,  by 
giving  a  small  spif¥  or  p.m.,  interest  everyone  on  the 
hard,  slow  sellers,  thereby  benefiting  both  stock  and 
salesman. 

A  great  deal  has  been  said  for  and  against  this 
method,  but  after  all,  it  gets  the  results  when  every- 

4.„_.„_„_„„_„._„„_„„_„,_„„_„„_„,_„„_„„_.._„._„_«._„._,._,,.— 


thing  else  fails.  A  great  many  houses  use  this  meth- 
od on  new  high  priced  goods,  and  find  it  profitable, 
so  if  this  is  the  case  why  is  it  n(^t  more  important  to 
use  it  on  slow  sellers? 

In  conclusion,  I  advise  you  to  first  go  through 
your  stock  personally.  Select  from  it  all  undesirable 
numbers  both  slow  sellers  and  broken  lots,  and  put  a 
ten  or  fifteen  cent  premium  on  the  sale.  After  this 
has  been  worked  as  far  as  you  think  advisable,  put  an 
advertisement  in  the  papers,  stating  just  what  you  have 
to  offer  and  be  sure  to  make  a  reduction  worth  notic- 
ing. Finally,  after  you  have  disposed  of  as  many  as 
possible  by  these  two  methods,  sell  the  balance  to  a 
junk  dealer  for  what  you  can  get  for  them. 


Returned  Men  Want  English  Last 

"While  agreeing  that  the  army  boot  is  comfor- 
table," said  a  Montreal  retailer  sellings  men's  shoes 
exclusively,  "the  returned  soldier  is  very  anxious  to 
get  away  from  the  heavy  type  of  shoe  to  which  he  has 
been  so  long  accustomed.  He  wants  something  that 
is  fancy — and  our  big  demand  is  for  the  English  last. 
The  returned  men  also  want  a  shoe  with  a  toe  cap. 
They  are  tired  of  the  plain  efifect — require  something 
different ;  they  do  not  want  to  be  reminded,  in  their 
footwear,  of  the  old  army  days.  So  they  demand  a 
shoe  that  is  fashionable,  something  on  the  lines  of 
what  they  wore  in  their  civilian  days." 


Grade  Work  as  it  Comes  in 

A  repairer  should  establish  a  difference  in  quali- 
ties. Not  that  inferior  material  should  be  used,  or  the 
work  done  carelessly,  but  the  high-grade  shoes  should 
be  sorted  out  as  they  come  in,  and  such  merchandise 
turned  over  to  the  best  workmen.  The  low-grade 
shoes  can  be  turned  over  to  the  less  competent,  be- 
cause the  owner  of  the  low-grade  shoes  will  not  de- 
mand as  neat  a  job  as  the  owner  of  good  shoes,  and 
even  the  poor  workman  turns  out  a  good  job  now  and 
then.  By  grading  the  work  as  it  comes  in  the  shop 
manager  will  come  considerably  closer  to  satisfying 
all  customers. 

_„„_.„_„._„ — „_,„_.„_.,_,„,_„._,,._. — „_„._„_„_„._„ — ,_.„_...4. 


Sturdy    Staple    Shoes,  made 
by    Williams    Shoe  Limited, 
Brampton 


110 


FOOTWEAR   IN  CANADA 


March,  191; 


m 


Toronto  Repairers'  Third  Annual  Banquet 

Shoemen  Make  Merry  While  Demonstrating  That 
In  Co-operation  There  Is  Strength 


T 


HE  Toronto  Shoe  Re- 
p  a  i  r  e  r  s'  Association 
held  their  third,  and 
most  successful,  annual 
banquet  at  the  Carls-Rite  Ho- 
tel, on  Wednesday,  March  5, 
with  a  splendid  turn-out  trom 
the  members  and  a  large  nuni' 
ber  of  representatives  from  the 
rubber  companies  and  the  jobbing  and  manufacturing 
houses.  It  was  decided  this  year  that  complimentary 
tickets  would  be  given  to  all  members  of  the  jobbing 
or  manufacturing  trades  who  might  care  to  attend.  The 
result  was  very  gratifying  and  demonstrated  the 
friendly  relations  that  have  been  brought  about  by  the 
Association. 

Some  of  the  guests  noted  were:  Mr.  Allen,  of  C. 
Parsons  &  Sons,  Toronto;  Messrs.  Lacey  and  Law- 
ther,  of  the  Anglo-Canadian  Leather  Co;  Beal  and 
Hudson,  of  Beal  Bros.,  Toronto;  Bert  Tilley,  of  Chas. 


Mr.  J.  W.  Hendry,  President 

Tilley  &  Son  ;  Hanson  and  Naylor,  of  the  United  Shoe 
Machinery  Co.,  Toronto;  Mr.  A.  Moore,  Beardmore 
&  Co.,  Toronto;  Messrs.  Puncher  and  McCallum,  of 
the  Breithaupt  Leather  Co.,  Kitchener:  Stockton  and 
Wiman,  of  C.  S.  Hyman  &  Co.,  London  ;  Mr.  Wallace, 
of  P.  B.  Wallace  &  Son,  Toronto;  Mr.  King,  of  Jas. 
King,  Toronto;  Messrs.  Stewart,  Harris,  WilUams 
and  Johnston,  of  the  Goodyear  Rubber  Co..  Mathers, 
Herriott,  Shaw,  Page  and  Sharpe,  of  the  Gutta  Percha 
and  Rubber  Limited;  Mahafify,  Jeffrey  and  Wilson,  of 
the  l.T.S.  Rubber  Heel  Co.;  Thomi)son,  Rogerson  & 
Thompson  of  the  Dunlop  Rubber  Co. ;  Mr.  A.  R.  Wil- 


ton, Secretary  of  the  Hamilton  Association,  Mr.  Legg, 
of  St.  Catharines  and  Mr.  Chambers,  of  the  Kilgour 
Chambers  Co.  The  total  attendance  was  a'bout  one 
hundred  and  fifty. 

The  entertainer  for  the  evening  was  Mr.  Jules  Bra- 
zil, who  made  things  lively  by  leading  the  gathering  in 
singing  old  and  new  songs.  Printed  song  sheets  had 
been  distributed  and  the  vocal  effort  was  at  times  most 
wonderful  and  fearful — especially  when  the  members 
on  one  half  of  the  room  sang  one  tune  and  others  sang 
another  difYerent  tune.  Jules  said  it  was  "bee-eautiful" 
and  he  ought  to  know.  The  Siamese  national  anthem 
"Ova  tannas  Siam"  was  rendered  as  though  everybody 
really  meant  it,  but  some  of  the  banquetters  got  hor- 
ribly twisted  singing  "The  saucy,  soft,  short  shirts  for 
soldiers  sister  Susie  sews."  Arthur  Butterworth,  the 
treasurer,  was  one  of  these,  but  that  was  no  doubt  due 
to  the  fact  that  this  year  he  did  not  wear  his  dress  suit. 
One  member,  who  stumbled  and  fell  in  the  middle  of 
this  song,  said  he  was  going  to  take  it  home  and  try 
it  over  on  the  Goodyear  stitcher.  The  competition 
between  the  rubber  companies,  who  each  took  a  turn 
at  singing  "Mother  Machree"  was  very  good  indeed. 
There  is  a  high  note  in  that  song  that  the  rubber  men, 
even  with  their  stretching  qualities,  found  it  very  dif- 
ficult to  reach. 

The  singing  took  place  between  the  courses  of  the 
dinner,  which  was  very  complete  and  satisfying.  Fol- 
lowing is  the  menu  provided  by  Mine  Host  Wright : 

TORONTO  SHOE  REPAIRERS  ASSOCIATION 
THIRD  ANNUAL  DINNER 
HOTEL  CARLS-RITE 

Wednesday,  March  5th,  1919 
Menu 


Tomato  Gumbo 
Chilled  Celery    Queen  Olives    Pearl  Onions 
Fillet  of  Sea  Bass,  Saute  Meuniere,  Pommes  Victoria 

Roast  Gosling,  Sage  Dressing,  Apple  Fritters 
New  England  Baked  Potatoes    Golden  Wax  Beans 
Chicken  Salad 
Individual  SoufTle  Pudding 
Assorted  French  Pastry    Neapolitan  Ice  Cream 
Compote  of  Canadian  Fruit 
Fromage  Royale       Toasted  Saltines 
Cafe  Noir 

Following  the  cofifee  and  cigars  the  president,  Mr. 
J.  W.  Hendry,  spoke  briefly,  outlining  the  activities  of 
the  As.sociation  during  the  past  year  and  some  of  their 
plans  for  the  future.  He  emphasized  the  necessity  of 
education  along  the  lines  of  better  business  methods 
and,  in  this  connection,  stated  that  Gutta  Percha  ana 


March,  1919 


FOOTWEAR 


IN  CANADA 


111 


Rubber  Limited,  had  offered  to  co-operate  with  the 
members  in  explaining  and  arranging  for  them  an  ac- 
counting system  suitable  for  their  needs.  A  represen- 
tative from  the  company  will  go  into  the  matter  fully 
in  a  series  of  talks  to  be  given  at  the  regular  fortnight- 
ly meetings  of  the  Association. 

P'ollowing  the  president,  Mr.  James  Acton  spoke 
at  some  length  and  in  a  most  interesting  strain  of  the 


Mr.  Walter  Burnill,  Vice-president 


evolution  of  the  shoe  industry.  The  repair  end  of  the 
industry  has  made  wonderful  strides  from  the  slow 
and  laborious  hand  methods  of  former  days  to  the  ef- 
ficient economical  and  rapid  machinery  of  the  present 
time.  Mr.  Acton's  serious  remarks  were  sandwiched 
with  touches  of  humor,  into  which  he  introduced  a 
few  local  hits,  his  reference  to  the  ease  with  which 
Mr.  Walter  Burnill  slipped  past  St.  Peter  at  the  Gol- 
den Gate  being  highly  amusing  We  have  no  doubt 
that  when  the  time  comes  for  Mr.  Burnill  to  make  his 
application  for  passage  through  that  heavenly  portal — 
which  we  earnestly  hope  will  be  many,  many  years 
in  the  future — he  will  find  his  reception,  in  fact,  quite 
as  cordial  and  spontaneous  as  Mr.  Acton  pictured  it 
in  fiction. 

The  Wholesale  Trade 

Mr.  Walter  Burnill,  vice-president  of  the  Associa- 
tion, proposed  the  toast  "The  Wholesale  Trade."  He 
brought  out,  in  the  course  of  a  very  interesting  talk, 
the  value  of  the  human  element  in  business.  The  T. 
Eaton  Company  of  Toronto  had  shown  us  that,  in 
their  recognition  of  this  element,  they  not  alone  secur- 
ed better  co-operation  from  their  associates,  but  also 
secured  for  themselves  some  highly  effective  advertis- 
ing. Mr.  Burnill  referred  to  the  co-operation  they  had 
received  from  the  various  manufacturing  companies 
and  instanced  the  trip  to  Acton  last  summer  provided 
by  the  Beardmore  Company,  which  gave  the  members 
an  opportunity  of  inspecting  one  of  the  largest  sole 
leather  tanneries  in  the  world.  The  speaker  referred 
at  some  length  to  the  work  of  his  association  during 
the  past  year  and  the  various  discussions  at  their  semi- 
monthly meetings.  Mr.  Burnill  certainly  demonstrat- 
ed to  his  hearers  that  the  repairers  association  has 
some  splendid  ideas  and  is  not  only  working  along 


right  lines  'but  is  also  getting  fine  results.  May  the 
work  go  on ! 

The  president  then  called  upon  a  number  of  the 
members  of  the  manufacturing  trades  to  speak  and 
brief,  interesting  addresses  were  delivered  by  the  fol- 
lowing: Messrs.  Moore,  of  Beardmore  &  Company; 
Lawther,  Anglo-Canadian  Leather  Company ;  Pun- 
cher, Breithaupt  Leather  Company;  Stockton,  of  C.  S. 
Hyman  &  Company ;  Thompson,  of  the  Dunlop  Rub- 
ber Company;  Wallace  of  P.  B.  Wallace  &  Son,  Tor- 
ontto ;  Allen,  of  C.  Parsons  &  Son,  Toronto;  Mather, 
of  (jutta  Percha  and  Rubber  Limited  ;  Harris  of  Good- 
year Rubber  Company;  Mahaffy,  of  the  LT.S.  Rubber 
Heel  Company  and  a  representative  of  the  F.  F.  Dal- 
ley  Corporation,  Hamilton. 

Mr.  Moore,  sales  manager  for  Beardmore  &  Com- 
pany, gave  a  short  review  of  the  production  and  ex- 
port situation  during  the  past  year  and  briefly  touch- 
ed upon  some  of  the  problems  of  the  tanning  industry. 
His  talk  was  one  of  the  most  interesting  of  the  even- 
ing, furnishing,  as  it  did,  further  proof  of  the  close  re- 
lationship that  exists  between  the  various  elements 
in  the  footwear  trade. 

The  Trade  Press 

The  toast,  "The  Trade  Press,"  was  proposed  by 
Mr.  C.  Robertson,  who  impressed  upon  the  members 
the  benefit  they  might  derive  by  close  attention  to  the 
trade  papers.  They  had  often  approached  repairer's 
associations  in  other  cities  on  different  matters  and 
were  surprised  at  times  to  hear :  "Yes,  we  know  all 
about  that — it  was  in  the  trade  papers."  This  clearly 
indicated  the  value  of  the  press,  not  alone  in  spreading 
interesting  association  news,  but  also  in  passing  along 
pointers  that  might  be  found  helpful  in  the  shop.  This 
toast  was  responded  to  briefly  by  Mr.  Walter  Carr 


Mr.  S.  Burnett,  Financial  Secretary 


who  spoke  along  the  line  of  closer  operation  between 
the  various  elements  in  the  trade.  Mr.  Carr  instanced 
the  conditions  in  the  electrical  merchandising  industry, 
which  was  fairly  analogous  to  the  footwear  trade,  and 
explained  how  the  retailing  of  appliances  had  been 
stimulated  by  the  assistance  of  the  manufacturers  and 
jobbers.  In  that  industry  it  was  felt  that  the  men 
directly  responsible  for  getting  appliances  into  the 


112 


FOOTWEAR   IN  CANADA 


March,  1910 


hands  of  the  ultimate  consumer  were  not  trained  mer- 
chandisers and,  to  remedy  this  condition,  electrical 
manufacturers  and  jobbers  had  undertaken  to  teach 
the  dealer  how  to  handle  his  business.  One  method 
had  been  to  place  at  the  disposal  of  dealers  and  exper- 
,en^c:d  merchandiser,  to  advise  and  consult  with  them 
individually.  The  result  was  that  there  had  been  a 
phenomenal  increase  in  the  total  aniovmt  of  business 
done.  It  had  been  done  at  a  reasonable  profit,  and  the 
public  had  become  favorably  impressed  with  the  stab- 
ility of  the  electrical  industry. 

These  remarks  were  merely  offered,  the  speaker 
said,  in  case  the  repairers  may  find  something  of  value 
in  them  to  fit  their  own  needs.  The  repair  business 
had  also  changed  greatly  in  recent  years,  more  par- 
ticularly in  that  the  sale  of  "findings"  was  now  recug- 
nized  as  a  legitimate  and  considerable  part  of  the  re- 
pairer's business.  It  may  be  that  the  methods  of  mer- 
chandising might  be  improved  and  that  the  increase 
in  volume  of  business  resulting  would  prove  just  as 
satisfactory  as  in  the  other  industry. 

Visiting  Associations 

Mr.  Wilton,  secretary  of  the  Hamilton  Shoe  Re- 
pairers' Association  was  a  visitor  and  also  Mr.  Legg, 
of  the  St.  ■  Catharines  Association.  Both  of  these 
gentlemen  spoke  briefly  and  told  of  good  progress  be- 
ing made  in  their  respective  cities. 

A  feature  of  the  evening  was  the  presentation  to 
President  Hendry  of  a  gold  watch  fob  bearing  the  crest 
of  the  association.  The  presentation  was  made  by  Mr. 
Hayward  past-president  of  the  association,  who  voic- 
ed the  opinion  of  the  members  in  a  few  words  of  ap- 
preciation of  the  splendid  work  of  Mr.  Hendry  as  an 
officer  of  the  Association.  Mr.  Hendry  made  a  suit- 
able reply. 

The  "Why"  of  the  Missing  Portrait 

On  the  occasions  of  the  two  previous  bancjuets,  the 
Association  had  on  hand  a  photographer  to  "shoot" 


Mr.  A.  Butterworth,  Treasurer 


the  group  so  that  each  member  could  have  a  little 
souvenir  of  the  evening  to  ])aste  in  the  family  album. 
This  year  the  photographer  was  missing.  We  request- 
ed an  explanation  from  Mr.  Arthur  Butterworth  and 
he  explained  that  the  photographer  was  a  very  objec- 


tionable and  mussy  person,  who  only  filled  the  atmo- 
sphere with  a  loud  "bang"  and  a  superfluity  of  smoke 
and  accomplished  no  real  good.  Now  we  ask  you, 
man  to  man,  could  anybody  make  as  much  noise  and  as 
much  smoke  as  a  gathering  of  shoe  repairers?  The 
"nays"  have  it.  But  anyway,  there  is  no  portrait  this 
year  with  which  to  decorate  the  mantlepiece. 

Success  to  the  Association 

"Success  to  the  Toronto  Shoe  Repairers'  Associa- 
tion" was  proposed  by  Mr.  F.  B.  Utley  and  responded 
to  by  Mr.  S.  Burnett,  financial  secretary  of  the  Assoc- 


Mr.  T.  McGuffin,  Recording  Secretary 


iation,  who  also  outlined  at  some  length  the  useful 
work  accomplished  by  the  As.sociation  and  the  larger 
part  they  were  endeavoring  to  take  in  the  Toronto 
industry. 

Following  a  toast  "The  Conclusion  of  the  War" 
and  the  singing  of  the  National  Anthem,  the  gathermg 
broke  up  about  one  o'clock  in  the  morning  with  the 
opinion  generally  expressed  that  the  third  annual  ban- 
quet eclipsed  the  previous  two.  As  the  treasurer  re- 
marked during  the  course  of  the  evening,  "We  learn 
by  experience,"  and,  if  this  is  the  case,  we  may  hope 
for  an  even  greater  fourth  banquet,  although  this 
would  be  hard  to  imagine. 


Practical  Pointers  for  Repairmen 

SOME  repair  men  spoil  a  sewed  shoe  before  it 
leaves  the  shop  by  hammering  it  too  hard  after 
sewing.  Just  to  prove  this  to  yourself  lay  a 
piece  of  thread  on  an  iron  last  and  hit  it  with  a 
hammer  and  see  the  result.  The  same  thing  happens  to 
a  welt  shoe  after  sewing,  especially  to  the  inner  seam 
which  does  not  have  much  wax  on  and  is  dry  and 
brittle.  A  heavy  blow  is  bound  to  break  h  few  strands 
of  the  thread.  Later  the  welt  will  part  from  the  sole 
and  you  will  have  a  dissatisfied  customer. 

Shoe  repair  men,  as  a  rule,  do  not  pay  enough  at- 
tion  to  the  welt  or  innerseam.  .\fter  taking  off  the 
old  sole,  put  in  a  few  stitches  with  a  wax  end  where 
the  seam  is  lose.  It  will  save  you  trouble  later  on, 
for  if  not  fastened  it  will  break  away  and  the  customer 
will  blame  you  for  it.  In  a  way  it  would  be  your  fault 
for  not  fixing  it  when  you  should. 


March,  191!) 


FOOTWEAR 


IN  CANADA 


113 


New  Upper  Hanger 

The  S.M.  Supplies  Co.  Boston,  have  a  very  interest- 
ing device  for  factory  stitching  rooms  known  as 
French's  upper  hanger.    In  use,  this  equipment  pre- 


vents the  uppers  from  being  soiled  and  mixed.  It 
stands  upright  on  the  bench  and  the  uppers  are  strung 
on  the  standards.  When  filled,  the  device  is  simply 
hung  on  a  rod  in  readiness  for  the  next  operation,  it 
is  made  with  two  and  four  arms. 


Bolsheviki  Propaganda 

A DISPATCH  from  Washington,  dated  INIarch 
6,  appeared  in  the  Toronto  papers  .and  caus- 
ed quite  a  little  comment  in  shoe  circles..  It 
bore  the  sensational  heading  "All  Shoe  Fac- 
tories to  Close  Throughout  the  United  States,"  and 
read  as  follows:  "Seventy  thousand  Svvedish  shoe 
workers  will  be  thrown  out  of  employment  April  15 
by  suspension  of  operations  in  all  shoe  factories  of  the 
country.  Dispatches  to  the.  state  department  to-day 
said  that  the  manufacturers  had  decided  to  close  their 
plants  because  of  over-production  during  the  war  and 
unsound  speculation  since  the  cessation  of  hostilities." 

The  item  was  so  ridiculous  that  to  most  retailers 
and  other  members  of  the  trade  it  was  taken  with 
very  little  seriousness,  but,  nevertheless,  there  was 
some  talk  because  nobody  knew  what  it  all  meant. 
We,  therefore,  immediately  communicated  with  Mr. 
Thomas  Anderson,  secretary  of  the  New  England 
Shoe  and  Leather  Asociation,  who  states  that  he  has 
not  heard  of  any  such  likely  action  on  the  part  of  any 
group  of  United  States  shoe  manufacturers,  liven 


supposing  all  the  shoe  factories  did  shut  down,  why 
would  it  be  only  "Swedish"  workers  that  would  be 
afTected  ?  There  has  been  a  shoemakers'  strike  on  in 
Brooklyn,  but  the  number  of  men  involved  is  notning 
like  75,000.  Mr.  Anderson  says  it  has  the  earmarks 
of  Bolsheviki  propaganda  and,  while  the  falsity  of 
such  items  is  quite  apparent,  they  often  do  a  good 
deal  of  mischief  among  those  who  a"e  not  aware  of 
the  real  facts. 


Dr.  Scholl  in  London 

ON  February  8th  Dr.  Scholl,  founder  and  presi- 
dent of  The  Scholl  Mfg.  Co.  sailed  on  the  Ad- 
driatic  for  London,  where  he  expects  to  re- 
main several  weeks  visiting  his  brother,  Frank 
Scholl,  head  of  The  Scholl  Mfg.  Co.,  Ltd.,  of  London. 
Dr.  Scholl  has  been  contemplating  such  a  trip  for  some 
time,  but  owing  ro  the  war  and  the  restrictions  placed 
on  travelling,  his  trip  has  been  delayed  until  the  pres- 
ert. 

The  Scholl  Mfg.  Co.,  Ltd.,  of  London,  has  made 
a  wonderful  growth  even  during  the  war  period,  and 
in  order  to  meet  the  changed  conditions,  installed,  un- 
der adverse  conditions,  a  complete  manufacturing 
plant.  In  the  early  days  of  the  war  the  great  preva- 
lence of  foot  troube  was  quickly  demonstrated  by 
English  army  surgeons,  and,  as  a  result,  thousands  of 
soldiers  were  provided  with  Dr.  Scholl's  Foot  Com- 
fort Appliances,  which  permitted  them  to  remain  in 
the  service,  while  without  this  assistance  they  would 
have  been  rejected  for  service.  It  is  the  Doctor's  in- 
tention to  put  the  factory  in  a  highly  efificient  state  of 


Dr.  Wm.  A.  Scholl 


])roduction  and  to  assist  in  developing  the  business  by 
inaugurating  many  of  the  co-operative  selling"  plans 
which  he  now  so  effectively  uses  in  the  United  States. 
-Mthough  he  expects  to  be  extremely  busv,  the  change 
of  scenery  and  environment  will  give  him  a  much  need- 
ed  rest.  Before  returning  home,  it  is  his  intention  to 
visit  the  continent,  and.  if  possible,  view  some  of  the 
scenes  where  the  world's  greatest  struggle  was  fought. 

The  death  occurred  recently  of  E.  Brown,  chief  acount- 
ant  of  the  Leckie  Company,  \';mcouver.  He  had  been  with 
the  company  for  thirteen  years. 


114 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


March,  1919 


"Shynezy"  Polishing  Chair 

The  Canadian  Shoe  Findings  Novelty  Company, 
Toronto,  have  been  appointed  agents  for  the  sale  of 
the  "Shynezy"  chair,  which,  as  the  name  implies,  is 
designed  to  render  the  rather  irksome  task  of  shoe- 
cleaning  more  easy.  It  is  an  ordinary  chair  in  appear- 
ance, but  in  the  seat  is  contained  a  complete  shoe- 
shining  equipment,  accessible  when  the  seat  is  lifted. 


It  is  made  in  oak  and  white  enamel  and  is  very  jit- 
tractive. 

Mr.  Lester  Levy,  son  of  Mr.  A.  Levy,  shoe  re- 
tailer, is  manager  of  the  Canadian  Shoe  Findings 
Novelty  Company,  and  is  now  Ijack  on  the  job  after 
an  absence  of  some  little  time  with  the  Royal  Air 
Force.  They  handle  shoe  findings  of  all  kinds  for  re- 
tail shoe  stores. 


T 


Montreal  Trade 

HE  Montreal  shoe  manufacturers  arc  busy — 
some  are  very  busy,  with  orders  which  will 
keep  the  factories  going  for  five  or  six  months. 
Those  making  men's  goods  are  benefiting  from 
the  return  of  our  soldiers  who  are  now  requiring  civ- 
ilian footwear.  The  United  Shoe  Machinery  Co.  of 
Canada  report  that  the  company  is  working  overtime — 
a  pretty  sure  indication  of  the  general  condition  of  the 
trade — and  the  United  Last  Co.  state  that  they  are 
running  at  capacity. 

There  is  indeed  a  general  feeling  of  optimism  as 
to  the  current  year's  shoe  business.  The  two  draw- 
backs are  the  shortage  of  skilled  help  and  the  difficulty 
of  securing  adequate  .sup])lies  of  raw  materials.  There 
is  an  undeniable  scarcity  of  certain  leathers,  due  to  the 


impossibility  of  getting  skins.  Prices  will  not  come 
down — on  this  point  tanners,  leather  merchants,  and 
shoe  manufacturers  are  most  emphatic.  There  is  no 
relief  in  sight  as  to  cheaper  raw  materials,  and  until 
then  prices  of  shoes  will  remain  at  their  present  level. 
Manufacturers  state  that  retailers  who  are  hoping  to 
buy  more  cheaply  will  find  that  they  are  mistaken,  and 
those  who  may  cancel  may  find  that  it  will  cost  more  if 
they  re-order  and  that  it  will  be  impossible  to  obtain 
prompt  shipment  of  such  re-ordered  goods. 


National  Shoe  Findings  Company  Appoint 
Canadian  Agents 

The  International  Supply  Company  of  Montreal 
and  Kitchener  have  made  arrangements  with  the  Nat- 
ional Shoe  Findings  Company,  of  Lynn,  Mass.,  to 
handle  their  extensive  line  of  shoe  goods  throughout 
the  Dominion.  The  National  Shoe  Findings  Co.  have 
been  doing  a  large  export  business  for  a  number  of 
years  and  their  trade-marked  merchandise  is  widely 
known  for  its  high  standard  cjualities  of  excellence  and 
uniformity.  They  enjoy  an  excellent  Canadian  busi- 
ness and  their  trade  will  be  pleased  to  learn  that  the 
Canadian  connection  has  been  made,  assuring  their 
clients  of  more  prompt  service.  A  stock  will  be  carried 
by  the  International  Supply  Company  of  the  National 
Shoe  Findings  lines  at  both  their  Canadian  offices 
ready  for  immediate  shipment. 


Mr.  Emile  Larose,  who  has  been  appointed 
sales  manager  of  the  Columbus  Rubber  Co., 
Montreal.  He  was  formerly  with  the  Canadian 
Footwear  Co.,  Ltd.,  Montreal. 


Have  Entered  Canadian  Field 

Henwood  and  Nowak,  leather  merchants,  Boston, 
Mass.,  have  recently  entered  the  Canadian  market  and 
plan  to  cover  the  territory  regularly.  They  manufac- 
ture a  well-recognized  and  excellent  line  of  glazed  kid 
in  both  black  and  the  leading  colors  and  have  devoted 
much  time  and  thought  in  the  development  of  a  line 
which  would  be  acceptable  to  Canadian  makers.  Mr. 
Frank  Seigrist,  who  is  now  in  Canada,  is  the  company's 
representative. 


March,  1919 


FOOTWEAR   IN  CANADA 


115 


Champion  Representative  Weds 

/"E  are  pleased  to  announce  in  this  issue  the 
coming  marriage  of  Mr.  W.  A.  Coles,  Can- 
T  T      adian  representative  for  the  Champion  Shoe 
Machinery    Company,    St.    Louis,  Mo.,  to 
Miss  Mary  Jessica  Smith,  daughter  of  Dr.  and  Mrs.  R. 
A.  Guy  Smith,  Westmount,  Que.    The  event  will  take 
l^lace  on  April  3rd  and  after  a  honeymoon  at  Atlantic 
City  and  New  York,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Coles  will  reside  at 
373  Melrose  Avenue,  Westmount,  Montreal. 

'Mr.  Coles  has  been  connected  with  the  Champion 


Mr.  W.  A.  Coles 


Shoe  Machinery  Co.  for  over  six  years,  and  before 
coming  to  Canada  was  with  the  Boston  office  of  the 
company.  He  has  reported  some  very  interesting- 
sales  of  Champion  Machinery  during  the  recent  past, 
several  of  which  are  noted  elsewhere  in  this  issue.  As 
a  matter  of  fact  he  says  that  selling  the  Champion  line 
is  much  easier  than  selecting  the  furniture  for  his  new 
home.  We  join  with  many  friends  in  extending-  to 
Mr.  Cole  and  his  fiancee  sincere  wishes  for  their  happi- 
ness and  prosperity. 


Cotton  Thread  as  a  Substitute  for  Linen 

  By  Mr.  A.  G.  Mooney   

UNDER  the  stress  of  war,  it  was  impossible  to 
secure  supplies  of  certain  commodities  which 
were  formerly  looked  upon  as  indispensable. 
Resource  was  perforce  made  to  substitutes, 
which  have  often  been  found  to  be  of  great  value — in 
some  cases  better  than  the  original  article.  In  the 
shoe  trade,  we  may  cite  the  use  of  cottgn  threads  as 
an  example  of  a  substitute  which  has  proved  very 
satisfactory.  Before  the  war  shoe  manufacturers 
thought  it  impossible  to  use  cotton  for  turns,  stitch- 
ing, welting  McKays,  etc.  They  absolutely  declined  to 
try  it,  but  as  the  supply  of  linen  gave  out  manufac- 
turers were  compelled,  against  their  will  and  with 
many  misgivings,  to  use  cotton. 

What  was  the  result?  To  their  astonishment,  it 
was  found  that  cotton,  in  many  cases,  answered  the 
purpose.  One  instance  may  be  cited.  In  the  turn  shoe 
the  great  elasticity  of  good  Sea  Island  cotton  lias  off- 


set the  strength  generally  associated  with  the  article 
l)reviously  used.  In  the  lock  made  by  the  stitcher  it 
has  also  been  recognized  as  almost  imperative  to  have 
the  top  thread  at  least  made  of  cotton,  on  account  of 
the  friction  of  the  two  threads  which,  if  both  are  made 
of  a  material  which  has  no  stretch,  will  cut  each  other. 
This  was  recognized  long  before  the  war  by  the  lead- 
ing shoe  manufacturers  in  the  United  States,  where 
the  combination  on  the  stitcher  was  always  linen  in 
the  shuttle  and  cotton  for  top-thread. 

It  may  be  stated  with  confidence  that  for  McKays' 
Goodyear  stitching  and  welting,  and  turns  cotton  has 
more  than  held  its  own  during  the  last  four  years.  It 
is  cheaper,  and  in  tan  shoes  especially  looks  well.  In 
the  machines  it  works  perfectly.  As  to  wearing  qualit- 
ies, experience  has  shown  that  it  is  very  durable. 

We  have  now  had  an  experience  which  proves  that 
the  substitute  is  at  any  rate  equal  to  the  article  former- 
ly regarded  as  indispensable.  As  a  test  of  its  value, 
manufacturers  who  have  used  cotton  may  fairly  ask 
themselves  "How  many  pairs  of  shoes  were  returned 
or  how  many  complaints  came  in  on  account  of  the 
seam  ripping  in  the  sole?"  Certainly  not  more  than  the 
small  average  of  pre-war  days — and  the  saving  by  us- 
ing cotton  is  not  to  be  lightly  disregarded  in  these 
times  when  economy  of  production  counts  for  so  much. 


Promotion  for  Mr.  Fallen 

Mr.  W.  G.  Fallen,  for  the  past  six  years  western 
traveller  for  Getty  &  Scott,  Limited,  Gait,  Ont.,  has 
been  appointed  sales  and  advertising  manager.  He 
will  also  look  after  the  style  selections  for  the  firm. 
Mr.  Fallen  started  in  the  shoe  business  as  a  salesman 


Mr.  W.  G.  Fallen 

with  Mr.  Mark  Mundy  of  Gait  and  established  a  repu- 
tation as  a  window-dresser.  Later,  or  about  fourteen 
years  ago,  he  went  on  the  road  for  Getty  &  Scott,  with 
whom  he  has  been  associated  ever  since.  Many  friends 
in  the  trade  join  in  wishing  him  every  success  and  pros- 
perity. 


The  Champion  Shoe  IMachinery  Company  have 
placed  a  repeat  order  with  the  Palmer  IMcLellaii  Com- 
pany, Fredericton,  N.  B.,  for  a  factory  clincher  nailer. 


116 


F  ( )  ( )  T  W  I{  A  R 


IX  CANADA 


March,  1910 


A  Handsome  Calendar 

The  Breithaupt  Leather  C"om])an_\-,  Kitchener, 
have  distributed  a  very  handsome  calendar  which  is  a 
reproduction  of  a  i)ainting  entitled  "Tlie  \\'arnint; 
Shadows."  The  subject  is  taken  from  the  early  pioneer 
days  and  shows  two  travellers,  in  picturesque  garb,  on 
horseback,  seeking  shelter  in  the  lee  of  a  cliff  when 
the  shadows  of  a  roving  band  of  redskins  are  seen  out- 
lined on  the  opposite  side  of  the  canyon.  Some  very 
artistic  calendars  have  been  sent  out  this  year  and  the 
Breithaupt  selection  is  one  of  the  best. 


Scholl  Educational  Work 

THE  educational  department  of  the  Scholl  ]\Ifg. 
Co.  has  I)een  busily  engaged  in  tilling  dates  in 
and  about  Detroit  during  the  i)ast  month.  Dr.  L. 
R.  Thompson  and  Dr.  W.A.  Hill,  both  associat- 
ed with  Dr.  Wm.  M.  Scholl,  the  famous  foot  authority, 
have  appeared  before  various  organizations  in  that 
city.  Both  of  the  lecturers  use  a  stereoptican  machine 
with  over  100  colored  slides,  as  well  as  moving  ])ic- 
tures,  to  illustrate  their  subject  "The  Care  of  the  Feet." 

Among  the  many  groups  of  business  and  social  or- 
ganizations who  had  the  pleasure  of  hearing  one  of 
these  Scholl  experts  were  the  Detroit  Shoe  Retailers' 
Association,  Detroit  Employment  Managers  Club,  the 
Rotarv  Club,  the  Exchange  Club  and  the  Kiawanas 


Club.  Special  lectures  were  given  before  the  Oakman 
Boulevard  officials  of  the  Railway  Brotherhood  in  one 
of  their  private  cars,  and  to  the  members  of  the  Wood- 
ward Ave.  Presbyterian  Church.  Several  lectures  were 
given  to  the  ])ublic  in  the  store  auditoriums  of  j.  L. 
Hudson  &  Co.  and  Crowley-Milner  &  Co.,  while  the 
Y.  M.  C.  A.  had  Dr.  L.  R.  Thomp.son  occupy  one  even- 
ing of  a  campaign  week  devoted  to  improving  local 
health  conditions.  Scholl  dealers  in  every  city  where 
these  lectures  have  been  given  say  they  have  profited 
greatly  as  a  result. 


In  Canada  April  10 

Mr.  Arthur  L.  Kingman,  who  travels  Canada  in 
the  interests  of  the  Wiley-Bickford-Sweet  Company 
of  Worcester,  Mass.,  and  Hartford,  Conn.,  is  expected 
in  Toronto  on  his  regular  spring  trip  about  the  10th 
of  April,  and  will  work  the  Canadian  territory  from 
Toronto  to  Montreal,  where  he  enjoys  accpuiintances 
of  the  leading  shoe  retail  and  wltolesale  shoe  merch- 
ants in  nearly  all  the  larger  cities  and  towns.  Mr. 
Kingman  will  have  a  few  new  novelties  to  offer  in  felt 
warm  goods  in  all  the  taking  colors  and  effects.  This 
firm  have  built  up  an  excellent  clientele  in  Canada, 
their  variety  of  felt  slippers,  spats,  machine  and  hand 
crocheted  slippers,  lambs'  wool  and  quilted  satin  soles, 
])uttees,  leggings,  etc.,  being  very  extensive  and  up 
to  the  minute. 


iiaajJigi-TiiHHsiiisiiiaiiisiaiaiasasiisiiiissiiaBaHiaHsiiiiHBSiissi® 


FOOTWEAR  FINDINGS 


I 


I 

HHI 


Happenings  in  the  Shoe  and  Leather  Trade  g 

IS 

iiaiiisMiiiigiiiiisasiiiiisiisiisaiiiaiaHiiHiaisisiissisisssisiiiiiiisisiiii® 


Charles  Levinson.  a  Hamilton  man.  who  has  l)een  in  the 
wholesale  and  retail  shoe  business  in  New  York  and  Toron- 
to, is  opening  up  a  shoe  store  in  Hamilton,  to  l)e  called  the 
Fit-Rite  Store.  This  will  be  at  36  King-  West.  Mr.  Levinson 
will  still  carry  on  his  wholesale  lousiness,  havins."-  the  sole 
agency  for  a  few  leading  Boston,  New  York  and  Rochester 
manufacturers. 

The  death  of  George  E.  Jackson  occurred  recently  at 
Egmondville,  Ont.,  where  he  had  resided  for  fifty-seven 
years.  He  had  carried  on  a  general  store  business  and  for 
some  time  was  engaged  in  the  manufacture  of  leather.  He 
is  survived  by  one  daughter  and  six  sons — Robert  E.  being 
with  the  C.  S.  Hyman  Leather  Company,  of  London. 

H.  Frechette,  in  charge  of  sales  of  the  joliliing  depart- 
ment of  the  VV.  A.  Marsh  Co.  Ltd.,  Quebec,  has  returned 
to  Montreal,  and  lias  taken  over  tlie  sales  de]iartnient  of 
the  Canadian  Footwear  Company,  Ltd. 

The  marriage  took  place  on  February  30  of  j.  I'ierre 
\  inet.  Montreal,  to  Miss  Regina  Lafiamme.  at  Notre  Dame 
de  (jrace  Church,  Hull,  Que.  Mr-  \'inct  is  a  well-known 
shr)e  retailer  on  St.  Lawrence  Boulevard. 

VVaterbury  and  Rising  St.  John,  N.B.,~have  secured  the 
agency  in  the  Maritime  Provinces  for  the  lines  of  the  Ideal 
Baby  Shoe  Company. 

The  Lil)erty  .Shoe  Co.  Ltd.,  Montreal,  has  l)een  incor- 
))orated  with  a  capital  of  $2."), ()()()  to  manufacture  boots  and 
shoes  and  rubbers,  and  to  carry  on  a  retail  ov  wholesale 
business.  Mr.  F.  X.  Chatelle.  shoe  manufacturer,  is  inter- 
ested. 

The  death  occurred  in  London,  ICngland,  on  F'ebruary 
.3!!.  of  Eldon  Bradford  Keith,  the  eldest  son  of  Geo.  E.  Keith, 
of  the  Geor.gc  E.  Keith  Company,  Canipello,  Mass.    He  had 


.gone  aljroad  as  a  member  of  the  Federal  Commission  to 
investigate  labor  conditions  overseas  and  was  taken  ill  with 
influenza  on  February  31.  This  developed  into  i^neumonia 
which  proved  fatal  two  days  later.  The  sympathy  of  many 
friends  is  extended  to  Mr.  Keith. 

A  lull  liefore  the  United  States  Hou.se  proposes  a  ta.\ 
on  al'  L'liited  .Slater,  capital  invested  in  Canadian  entrr- 
]-)nscs. 

Mr.  Justice  Allard,  in  the  Superior  Court,  Montreal, 
has  decided  that  the  Tetrault  Shoe  Manufacturing  Co.,  Ltd., 
Montreal,  were  justified  in  cancelling  a  yearly  contract,  with 
a  workman  who  was  engaged^  as  inspector  of  shoes.  The 
plaintiff,  who  sued  for  $.'!:!()  damages,  was  away  several 
weeks,  owing  to  illness,  and  the  company  filled  his  posi- 
tion. They  offered  him,  however,  another  position.  This 
psition  he  occupied  for  one  day  and  then  left.  The  judge 
held  that  the  company's  work  necessitated  the  filling  of  the 
position,  and  that  the  plaintiff  consented  to  the  cancellation 
of  the  contract. 

The  Florian  Block,  on  Charlotte  Street,  .Sydney,  N.S., 
lias  been  purchased  by  Dr.  J.  K.  Redden,  surgeon  chiropo- 
dist of  the  firm  of  A.  W.  Redden  &  Son,  Halifax.  Mr.  Red- 
den will  associate  himself  with  L.  H.  Publicover.  late  man- 
ager of  the  Hub  Shoe  Store,  and  for  the  past  few  months 
with  the  Redden  firm,  and  will  open  a  high-grade  shoe-  store 
in  the  new  premises  which  are  to  l)e  remodelled  to  meet  the 
requirements  of  a  thoroughly  u])-to-date  establishment.  The 
opening  will  take  place  about  .September  1st. 

H.  Manuel,  who  recently  opened  a  repair  shop  on  Davie 
.Street,  \'ancouver,  has  returned  to  his  old  stand  in  Calgary. 

S.  B.  Livingston,  superintendent  of  No.  3  factory  of  tiie 
'J'etrault   .Shoe   Manufacturing  C'o.    Ltd.,   Maisonncuve,  was 


March,  1919 


FOOTWEAR 


IN  CANADA 


117 


presented  with  a  gold  watch  on  resigning  to  become  super- 
intendent and  buyer  for  the  Perth  Shoe  Co.,  Perth.  Ont. 
This  position  was  vacant  owing  to  Mr.  Charles  Albee  being 
appointed  superintendent  of  the  Minister,  Myles  Shoe  Co.. 
Toronto.  Mr.  Livingston  is  succeeded  at  Maisonneuve  i>y 
Mr.  J.  Marceaux,  superintendent  of  No.  2  factory  of  Ames 
Holden-McCready,  Ltd.,  Montreal.  A  presentation  of  an 
Edison  talking  machine  was  made  to  Mr.  Marceau  on  his 
leaving  for  the  Tetrault  factory.  The  position  of  superin- 
tendent of  Ames-Holden-McCready's  factory  has  been  fill- 
ed by  the  appointment  of  Mr.  John  Deegan,  formerly  with 
the  Wayland  Shoe  Co.,  and  latterly  in  charge  of  the  making 
room  of  Ames-Holden-McCready. 

It  is  proposed  by  F.  E.  Partridge,  et  al,  to  erect  a  rub- 
l)er  footwear  factory  in  Guelph,  which  will  employ  500  peo- 
ple.  Mr.  Partridge  has  applied  for  certain  concessions  from 


Splendid  new  premises  of  the  White  Shoe  Company,  9 
Wellington  St.  West,  Toronto.  There  are  four  floors 
and  basement,  giving  them  much  better  facilities  for 
taking  care  of  their  rapidly  expanding  business.  This 
building  was  designed  to  provide  efficient  lighting  for 
display  purposes  and  for  more  efficient  shipping  facili- 
ties. It  is  very  centrally  located,  close  to  all  hotels  and 
the  Union  Station. 


the  city,  among  which  are  included:  Exemption  from  taxa- 
tion for  fifteen  years  and  a  loan  of  $,50,000  for  fifteen  years. 
The  factory  would  cost  approximately  $350,000 

An  experiment  is  being  made  in  France  on  tanning  rab- 
bit skins  for  use  in  the  uppers  of  shoes. 

The  death  occurred  recently  of  George  Ci.  Pursey,  i:i7 
Helendale  .\venue.  North  Toronto,  at  the  age  of  eighty- 
eight  years.   Although  a  shoemaker  by  trade  he  was  a  keen 


student  of  a.stronomy  and  had  many  original  theories  on 
the  formation  of  stars. 

The  boot  and  shoe  section  of  the  Ottawa  Retail  Merch- 
ants' Association  have  passed  a  recommendation  that  all 
shoe  stores  should  close  on  Saturday  afternoons  during 
July  and  August. 

The  Boot  and  Shoe  Workers'  Union  has  inaugurated  a 
welcome  league  in  Toronto  for  returned  soldiers. 

An  addition  is  being  made  to  the  factory  of  La  T'arisi- 
enne  Shoe  Company,  614  LaSalle  Avenue,  Montreal. 

In  opening  his  new  Hamilton  store  Mr.  Charles  Levin- 
son  advertised  that  he  would  give  to  the  first  five  custon?ers 
entering  the  store  and  making  a  purchase  of  shoes,  an  ex- 
tra pair  free  of  charge. 

Mr.  Clarke,  formerly  with  Ames-Holden-McCready, 
Montreal,  has  been  appointed  western  traveller  for  the 
Perth  Shoe  Company,  succeeding  N.  J.  Collins. 

W.  Young  has  joined  the  sales  staft  of  Getty  &  .Scott, 
Limited,  Gait,  Ont.  He  was  formerly  with  Blachford.  Davies 
&  Company,  Toronto. 

Rudolphe  Gratton  has  been  appointed  representative  for 
James  Robinson,  Montreal,  in  Ottawa  and  district.  He  was 
formerly  with  the  Columbus  Rubber  Company  and  A.  W. 
Ault. 

Milton  Gumming,  boot  and  shoe  dealer,  Preston,  Ont., 
has  sold  out  to  Joseph  Dawson. 

Preparatory  to  going  out  on  the  road  for  the  placing 
trip,  on  March  .3,  conventions  of  the  salesmen  of  the  Domin- 
ion Rubber  System  were  held  during  the  last  week  in  Feb- 
ruary. These  conventions  were  of  the  Ontario,  Quebec  and 
Maritime  divisions,  and  were  held  at  Toronto,  Montreal  and 
St.  John,  N.B. 

The  Eagle  Shoe  Co.,  Montreal,  now  occupy  the  new  ad- 
dition to  their  factory,  thus  enabling  the  production  to  be 
doubled. 

Lieut.  Howard  C.  Blachford,  of  H.  &  C.  Blachford.  shoe 
retailers,  Toronto,  is  at  present  in  England,  and  expects 
to  be  home  in  the  near  future.  He  has  been  connected  with 
the  R.  A.  F.  in  Egypt. 

W.  G.  Berscht  for  ten  years  with  McLaren  &  Dallas, 
wholesale  shoes,  Toronto,  has  resigned  to  take  a  position 
with  a  clothing  firm  in  Guelph. 

E.  E.  Yates,  of  Milton,  Ont..  has  sold  out  to  A'Ir.  Hume. 
Mr.  Yates  had  been  in  business  in  Milton  for  twelve  years. 

N.  J.  Collins  has  been  appointed  sales  manager  for  the 
Blachford-Davis  Shoe  Company,  Toronto.  Geo.  Swallwell 
will  be  assistant  manager. 

Dan  McTavish  has  been  appointed  buyer  and  manager 
for  the  shoe  department  of  the  Christie-Grant  Company, 
Winnipeg.  He  was  formerly  western  traveller  for  the  .\danac 
Shoe  Company. 

F.  H.  Meinzer.  sales  manager  for  the  Miner  Rubl)er 
Company,  is  spending  a  short  holiday  in  California. 

Mr.  MahafTy.  formerly  with  Gutta  Percha  and  Rubber. 
Limited,  has  joined  the  selling  staff  of  the  I.T.S.  Rubber 
Heel  Company. 

M  A  Jac'iues,  of  J.  H.  Jacques  &  Fils,  Limited,  shoe 
and  leather  merchants,  Quebec,  Que.,  is  spending  a  four 
months'  holiday  in  Florida,  accompanied  by  his  wife  and 
two  daughters. 

Charles  H.  .\lbee.  formerly  superintendent  of  the  Perth 
Shoe  Company's  factory,  has  been  appointed  factory  man- 
ager for  the  Minister  Myles  Company,  Toronto.  He  has 
been  in  the  shoe  business  for  over  twenty-five  years,  serving 
his  apprenticeship  in  several  factories  in  the  United  States. 
Several  years  ago  he  came  to  Canada  and  was  with  Ames- 


118 


FOOTWEAR 


IN  CANADA 


March,  J'Jl',) 


lJt>Uli.ii-McCrcady  for  a  time.  He  was  a  rccenl  visitor  to 
M  )ntrc=-al. 

M.  Druiiinioiid.  representing  the  New  Castle  Leather 
Company,  was  a  recent  visitor  in  Toronto. 

The  Canadian  Shoe  Findings  &  Novelty  Company,  To- 
ronto, have  appointed  K.  Foster,  of  Hamilton,  their  agent 
in  that  citj-. 

D.  Murry  has  purchased  the  repair  shop  of  H.  A.  Finch, 
Kobson  Street,  \'ancouver.  Mr.  Finch  is  opening  a  shop  in 
Langley  Prairie. 

J.  L.  Sketer,  Hamilton,  Ont.,  dealer  in  boots  and  shoes 
and  men's  furnishings,  has  sold  out  to  H.  Carr. 

John  Caffery,  boot  and  shoe  retailer,  Hamilton,  died  re- 
cently. 

Major  J.  A.  Scott,  Quebec,  was  a  recent  visitor  to  Mon- 
treal. 

L.  J.  Breithaupt,  senr.,  of  the  Breithaupt  Leather  Co., 
Ltd.,  Kitchener,  Ont.,  was  recently  on  a  l)usiness  trip  to 
Montreal, 

Fred  Sutherland,  shoe  retailer,  St.  Thomas,  Ont.,  was 
a  recent  visitor  to  the  trade  in  Toronto. 

Geo.  McVicar,  who  conducts  a  shoe  retail  store  in  Ciod- 
erich,  was  in  Toronto  a  few  days  ago. 

Harvey  ^'alentine,  representing  Beardmore  &  Com- 
pany, leather  manufacturers,  sailed  on  February  18th,  on 
the  S.  S.  Baltic,  for  Europe,  to  take  charge  of  the  company's 
exhibit  at  the  Lyons  Fair  in  Lyons,  France.  Mr.  Valetine 
is  a  fluent  linguist,  speaking  seven  different  languages,  and 
before  returning  will  visit  the  company's  various  European 
customers . 

C.  Cully,  shoe  repairer,  Robson  Street,  \'ancouver,  has 
sold  out  to  B.  Cristiano,  who  was  for  several  years  with  the 
30th  Century  Repairing  Company. 

W.  M.  Angus,  formerly  manager  for  Anies-Holden-Mc- 
Cready  at  St.  John,  N.B.,  has  been  »ppointed  local  manager 
in  Montreal.  On  the  occasion  of  his  leaving  the  St.  John 
office  the  employees  united  in  presenting  him  with  a  hand- 
some travelling  bag  as  a  token  of  their  esteem.  -He  is  suc- 
ceeded in  St.  John  by  Stuart  C.  Mitchell,  who  has  been  with 
the  company  eighteen  years. 

Ed.  Mullarkey,  superintendent  of  Daoust,  Lalonde  & 
Co.,  Ltd.,  Montreal,  has  rejoined  the  staff  of  the  W.  A. 
Marsh  Co.,  Ltd.,  Quebec,  as  general  manager. 

The  following  have  been  appointed  members  of  the 
Hides  &  Skins  Committee  of  the  Montreal  Chambre  de 
Commerce: — Messrs.  Jos.  Daoust,  Alfred  Lambert,  A.  Cor- 
beil,  Wilfrid  Delorme,  Paul  Joubert,  J.  L  Chouinard,  A. 
Tetrault,  L.  E.  Gauthier. 

C.  J.  Didemus,  shoe  retailer,  Niagara  Falls,  Ont,,  has 
sold  out  to  E.  Lefler. 

'J"he  death  occurred  recently  of  James  C.  Soutar,  Super- 
intendent of  the  Blachford  Shoe  Manufacturing  Company, 

^  ,  „  .  ^ 

i 

Free  Service  to  Returned  Soldiers  l 

Returned  soldiers,  who  have  had  experience  I 

in  shoe  retailing  or  manufacturing,  and  who  are  ! 

anxious  to  locate  themselves  satisfactorily,  are  I 

invited  to  send  to   Footwear    in    Canada  their  | 

names  and  particulars  of  their  experience.    We  j 

shall  be  glad  to  help  them  get  "back  to  business"  | 

by  passing  along  their  requirements  to  our  read-  j 

ers — free  of  charge.  : 


Toronto.  Mr.  Soutar  had  gone  to  .'\uburn,  Maine,  to  visit 
his  family  and  while  there  was  taken  ill  with  appendicitis. 

Dainty  &  Merrick,  16  James  Street,  St,  Catharines,  Ont., 
have  installed  a  Champion  combination  clincher-slugger. 

The  United  Shoe  Machinery  Corporation,  Boston,  Mass., 
are  distributing,  with  their  compliments  re-printed  copies  of 
the  L^nited  States  Federal  Revenue  Act  for  1919. 

J.  A.  Wilson  &  Company,  Farnham,  Ont.,  have  installed 
a  Champion  repair  outfit,  consisting  of  an  Ideal  stitcher  and 
a  F-.")0  finisher.  Mr.  Wilson  says  that  he  does  not  see  how 
lie  managed  to  get  along  without  a  modern  outfit  for  as  ung 
as  ha  has. 

Fire  on  the  night  of  March  6  caused  considerable  dam- 
a.ge  to  the  Owl  Shoe  Store,  corner  Bay  and  King  Streets, 
Toronto,  of  which  Ed.  Cook  is  proprietor.  The  cause  is 
sup|)0sed  to  have  been  an  overheated  furnace.  The  damage 
to  the  stock  of  the  Owl  Shoe  Store  is  estimated  at  anout 
$5,000  which  is  fully  covered  by  insurance. 

T.  M.  Carpino,  shoe  repairer,  Sudbury,  (Jnt.,  recently 
installed  a  Champion  "Special"  F-50  finisher  and  combinauon 
clincher-slugger.  This  new  machinery,  in  addition  to  his 
Champion  Universal  stitcher  and  numerous  other  machines, 
makes  this  shop  the  largest  and  most  complete  in  Sudbury. 

Sobba  Brothers,  operating  the  Boston  Shoe  Sttore, 
Yonge  Street,  Toronto,  are  opening  a  store  at  133  Yonge 
Street  under  the  name  of  the  Manhattan  Shoe  Store.  The 
front  of  the  store  is  bein.g  remodelled  but  will  be  ready  lor 
occupation  in  a  short  time. 

The  Gendron  Penetang  Shoepack  Company,  Penetang, 
Ont.,  recently  installed  an  electric  elevator  in  their  factory, 
a  sole  cutter,  a  Peerless  skiver,  a  Champion  Universal  stitch- 
er and  a  special  30  foot  finisher,  together  with  some  other 
small  machinery. 

A  Weseloh,  of  Kitchener,  who  conducted  a  retail  busi- 
ness in  boots  and  shoes  and  clothing,  died  a  few  days  ago. 

W.  J.  Sharp,  foreman  of  the  making  room  of  Ames,  Hol- 
den  McCready,  Ltd.,  Montreal,  has  been  appointed  to  a 
similar  position  in  the  No.  3  factory  of  the  Tetrault  Shoe 
Manufacturing  Co.,  Maisonneuve. 

Jos.  Treboutat,  who  conducts  the  Champion  Slioe  Re- 
pair Shop  at  Timmins,  Ont.,  has  recently  installed  a  Cham- 
pion string  nailer. 

Joseph  Daigle,  134  Durham  Street,  Sudbury,  Ont.,  has 
installed  a  new  model  Champion  Universal  Curved  Needle 
Stitcher,  equipped  with  electric  heat. 

John  Affleck,  of  the  Yale  Shoe  Store,  Winnipeg,  was 
recently  in  Montreal  on  a  buying  trip. 

L.  A;  Campbell,  has  been  appointed  representative  for 
Eastern  Ontario  of  Geo.  A.  Slater,  Ltd.,  Maisonneuve. 

La  Parisienne  Shoe  Co.,  Maisonneuve,  have  let  a  eon- 
tract  for  an  addition  to  their  factory,  which  will  double  their 
capacity.  The  addition  will  have  a  frontage  on  I..aSaIle 
Avenue  and  will  cover  an  area  of  75  x  45  ft.  It  will  be  of 
four  stories,  brick  construction,  with  a  concrete  foundation. 

M.  A.  Desmond,  of  the  Newcastle  Leather  Co.,  Mon- 
treal, has  just  visited  the  principal  shoe  factories  in  Ontario 
and  has  also  taken  a  trip  to  Quebec. 

Harry  M.  Dukelow,  manager  of  the  Slater  Shoe  Store, 
Sparks  street,  Ottawa,  for  the  past  14  years,  died  recently 
after  a  brief  illness.  The  late  Mr.  Dukelow  was  well  known 
in  the  city  and  was  held  in  very  high  esteem  by  local  business 
men. 

S.  Arthur  Bell,  who  spent  his  apprenticeship  in  the  shoe 
business  with  W.  H.  Stewart,  of  Montreal,  later  joining  the 
sales  staf?  of  Geo.  A.  Slater,  Limited,  for  which  firm  he  cov- 
ered Western  Canada  for  four  years,  and  who  for  nearly  five 


March,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


119 


iiiiiiiiiiiii!iiii;iiiiiiiiiiiiii:iiiiiiiiitiiii!iiii;iiii;iiii!iiiM^   


I  ROBSON'S  I 

i  COLORED  SIDES  | 

!                 TAN  i 

I            MAHOGANY  i 

i         ROYAL  PURPLE  j 

I  Featuring  the  leather  and  the  shades  that  enable  manufacturers  to  put  the  | 

I  greatest  measure  of  QUALITY  and  ATTRACTIVENESS  into  their  foot-  | 

I  wear,  that  dealers  and  wearers  may  get  the  greatest  VALUE  out  of  it  | 

I  The  Robson  Leather  Company,  Limited  | 

I  Montreal                     OSHAWA,  ONT.                     Quebec  | 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiip^   iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiy^^  iii:iiiiiiiii;iiiiihiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii  iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiin  iiiiiiiijiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiini 


120 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


Marcli,  1910 


Admiral  Jellicoe^s  Message 

The  primary  cause  of  the  shameful  surrender 
of  the  German  Fleet  was  the  loss  of  morale  on 
the  part  of  the  personnel.  This  was  brought 
about  by  the  strangling  efifect  of  sea  power  on 
sea  communications  and  the  knowledge  gained 
at  Jutland  that  this  power  was  irresistible.  The 
significance  of  this  to  an  Empire  which  is  abso- 
lutely dependent  on  sea  power  for  its  communi- 
cations is  obvious.  The  lesson  to  the  Empire  is 
that  we  should  never  allow  our  sea  power  to  be 
called  into  question.   It  is  our  life  blood. 

(Sgd.)  Jellicoe. 


I 


years  has  been  representing  the  Blachford  Shoe  Manufactur- 
ing Co.  in  Eastern  Ontario  and  Quebec,  will  this  season  be 
showing-  the  Blachford  line  in  Manitoba  and  Saskatchewan. 
Stewart  J.  Anderson,  of  Kingston,  who  received  his  early 
training  with  the  Midland  Shoe  Co.,  and  who  has  represented 
Getty  &  Scott.  Limited,  in  Toronto  and  Northern  Ontario 
for  the  past  six  years,  will  handle  the  Blachford  line  in  East- 
ern Ontario  and  Quebec.  In  British  Columbia  and  .\lberta, 
Blachford  shoes  will  be  shown  by  T.  E.  Bennett,  a  Toronto 
boy  who  has  spent  considerable  of  his  life  in  the  shoe  busi- 
ness in  the  West.  In  1910  he  went  with  Johnston's  Big  Shoe 
House,  of  \'ancouver,  later  joining  the  stafif  of  the  Hudson's 
Bay  Co.,  \'ancouver,  where  he  remained  for  a  couple  of 
years,  after  which  he  represented  Jas.  Muir  Co.,  and  the  Ad- 
anac  Footwear  Co. 

A  meeting  of  the  Shoe  Manufacturers'  Association  of 
Ontario  was  held  in  Toronto  on  Friday,  February  38th,  and  a 
committee  was  appointed  to  confer  with  labor  representa- 
tives on  the  demand  for  shorter  hours.  Manufacturers  are, 
just  now,  striving  to  keep  down  production  costs  and  the 
matter  is,  therefore,  of  vital  consideration. 

R.  J.  Hanna,  who  for  a  number  of  years  ha^^  conducted 
a  shoe  store  at  the  corner  of  Spadina  and  Oxford,  Toronto, 
sold  out  recently  and  is  now  handling  the  city  trade  of  F.  J. 
Weston  &  Son. 

Hon.  E.  J.  Davis,  of  the  Davis  Leather  Company,  New- 
market, is  spending  a  holiday  in  California. 

J.  Abernethy  is  handling  the  lines  of  the  Perth  Shoe 
Company  from  Port  .Arthur  to  the  Coast. 

James  S.  Eraser  and  J.  R.  and  D.  K.  Grieve,  of  Pembroke, 


Out.,  have  joined  forces  in  a  new  firm  to  l)e  known  as  Eraser, 
(irieve  and  Company,  taking  over  the  lousiness  carried  on  by 
Mr.  Eraser.  Grieve  Brothers  conducted  a  successful  shoe 
store  in  Pembroke  ])efore  the  disastrous  fire  last  June. 

Harry  Tew,  who  for  many  years  has  been  with  Beard- 
more  and  Company,  has  resigned  to  go  with  Ed.  Lewis, 
leather  merchant,  Toronto. 

P.  J.  Elward  has  joined  the  staff  of  the  .Adanac  Shoe 
Company  and  will  look  after  the  Toronto  trade.  He  was 
formerly  with  the  Blachford,  Davis  Company. 

The  Singer  Shoe  Co.,  Ltd.,  Montreal,  has  lieen  incorpor- 
ated with  a  capital  of  .$20,000  to  carry  on  a  wholesale  and 
retail  shoe  business. 

The  Hamel  Shoe  Machinery  Company  is  to  move  its 
machine  shop  from  Haverhill  to  Bridgeport,  Conn. 

A.  E.  Marois,  Ltd..  is  the  title  of  a  company  formed  with 
a  capital  of  .$500,000  to  acquire  as  a  going  concern  the  busi- 
ness carried  on  by  the  firm  of  Tourigny  and  Marois,  Que- 
bec, shoe  manufacturers. 

L.  L.  Lindsey,  with  offices  in  Washington  Arcade,  De- 
troit, Mich.,  will  cover  Canada  for  the  Selby  Shoe  Company, 
Portsmouth,  Ohio,  who  make  the  ".A.rch  Preserver"  shoe  for 
women. 


Good  Side  Lines  Wanted 

Wanted  by  Winnipeg  commission  firm,  one  or  two  good 
side  lines  to  Jobbers  and  Mail  Order  firms;  established  con- 
nection; references.  Apply  to  E.  R.  Coleman,  P.  O.  Box  362, 
Winnipeg,  Canada. 

Representation  Wanted 

A  large  manufacturer  of  shoe  threads  in  the  United 
States  desires  to  communicate  with  an  established  shoe 
goods  house  for  representation  in  Canada.  A  good  propo- 
sition to  the  right  house.  Apply  Box  No.  896,  Footwear  in 
Canada,  Toronto,  Ont.  .T 

Making  Room  Foreman 

Factory  making  1,000  pair  per  day,  Mckay  and  nailed 
goods.  Must  be  capable  of  taking  charge  from  nailing  and 
stitching  to  finishing  bottoms.  Also  capable  of  operating 
for  instructional  purposes,  Goodyear  outsole  stitcher,  Mc- 
Kay sewing  machines  and  other  bottoming  machinery.  We 
want  a  first-class  man  looking  for  advancement,  and  with 
organizing  and  co-operative  abilities.  To  take  charge  im- 
mediately. State  wages  expected. — The  T.  Sisman  Shoe  Co. 
Limited,  Aurora,  Ontario,  Canada. 


THE  NEW 
UNIQUE  TRADE 
MARK  OF  THE 
COBOURG  FELT 
CO..  COBOURG. 
O.NT.    THE  "K" 
IN  KIMMEL  HAS 
FOR  MANY 
YEARS  BEEN 
SYNONYMOUS 
WITH  QUALITV 

THE  FELT 
SHOE  BUSINESS 


MADE  IN 


THE 


COBOURG 

COBOURG 


'A.J.KIMMEL  Pres 


CANADA  BY/ 


FELT  C8, 


LIMITED^ 


ONTARIO 
A.C.KIHMEL  Kgr> 


March,  1919 


FOOTWEAR   IN  CANADA 


121 


When  a  White  Shoe  comes  into 
your  Store  —  get  down  a  Case  of 


BLANCO 


RjCO.Tft&D>  Mali. 


TheWHITE  CLEANER 

for  "Blanco"  and  White  Shoes  are 
inseparables ;  and  their  friendship 
outwears  the  Shoes. 

Blanco'  keeps  White  Shoes  White' 

It  satisfies  your  customers  because  it  does 
its  work  so  well.  They  want  "Blanco"  and 
only  "Blanco'  as  long  as  they  have  a  white 
shoe  to  put  it  on. 

It  Whitens  ;  it  Cleans  ;  it  Preserves.  Easy 
to  use  and  always  ready  for  use.  Applied 
in  a  moment.  No  trouble,  no  "  messiness." 
Clean  and  Handy. 

You  don't  h've  to  s!:cck  "Blanco," 
you  just  sell  it  —  or  rather,  it  sells  itself  ! 
'Blanco'  means  good  profits  and  quick  profits. 


Ask  your  Jobber  for  ^Supplies. 


Joseph  Pickering  &  Sons.  Ltd. 

SHEFFIELD,  England. 


1 22 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


March,  1019 


ALPHABETICAL  LIST  OF  ADVERTISERS 


Alliens,   t'lias.    A   50 

Airil  &  Son   35 

Ames-Hoklcn-McCica.ly    2:{ 

Armstrong,   W.   1)   12S 

Canadian  Advertisers  Service   123 

Canadian  Consolidated  Rubber  Co   3-72 

Canadian   Footwear   2(i 

Canadian  Shoe  Findings  &  Novelty  Co   12.J 

Champion  Shoe  jMacliinery  Comjiany    13(1 

Children's  Shoe  Mfg.  Company    33 

Clapp  &  Son,  Edwin   04 

Clarke  &  Company,  A.  R  ;«)  42-140 

Clelaiid,  Jas   133 

Cohourg  Felt   Company    120 

Copclaiid  Shocpack  Company   132 

Cote,  .1.  A.  &  M   70 

lieadle  Salts  Service   133 

lieckwith  Jiox  Toe  Company   3S 

liennett    Limited    5 

J'oot  &  Shoe  L'nion   12(i 

liorne,  jAicien   12!) 

JJoston  Jilacking  Company    33 

lioston  Felt  Company   60 

Hrandon  Slioe  Company   27 

lireithanpt  Leather  Company   49 

Brodie  &  Harvie   13G 

Daoust,  Lalonde  &  Company   14 

Duchaine  &  Perkins   67 

Duclos  &  Payan   25 

Duiilop  Tire  &  Rubber  Goods  Co   127 

]£astern  Shoe  Mfg.  Company   137 

Edwards  &  Edwards   132 

F-iireka  Shoe  Company   71 

Evans,  L.  P.   137 

E-Z-Walk  Mfg.  Company   67 

Farnsworth,    Iloyt   &    Company                      ...  51 

Flynn  J^eather  Company,  C.  C   58 

Fortuna   Machine  C  unipany   128 

Frank  &  P>ryce   11 

Franklin  Machine  Company    122 


Cagnon,  Lachapelle  &  Ilebert   24 

Getty  &  Scott   8-9 

(Slobe  Shoe  Company   ,34 

(ioodyear  Tire  iS;  Rubber  Co   131 

Henwood  &  Nowak   54 

Hinde  &  Dauch  Pajier  I!ox  Company  137 

Home  Shoe  Company  136 

Hydro  City  Shoe  Manufacturers   50 

Independent  Rubber  Company  .3(!-37 

International  Supply  Comiiany    4S 

Julian  &  Kokenge   <i'j 

Kaufman  Rubber  Conijiaiiy  4('>-47 

Kelly,  Thos.  A  133 

Kenwortliy   Bros    l.'l!) 

Kepner  Leather  Company,  C.  1)   62 

La  Duchesse  Shoe  Company   136 

Lady  lielle  Shoe  Company   44 

Lamontagne,  Racine  &  Company    133 

Landis  Machine  Comiiany   122 

Lawrence  J^eatlur  Cdiiijiany,  A.  C  52-53 

Lcgace  &   Lepinay   124 

Lewis,   Ed.   R   12:! 

Markem  Machine  Company   58 

Marsh.  Wm.  A   17 

McLaren  &  Dallas   15 

Midland  .S'hoe  Comiiany   13 

Miner  Rubber   Company    28-29 

Miner   Slioe   Comjiany    43 

Mooney,  A.  G   34 

Narrow  Fabric  Company   12S 

National  Cash  Register  Company   135 

National  .Shoe  Findings  Comjiany   (U 

New  Castle  Leather  C  ompany   12S 

Oscar  Onken  Company   1.".7 


Panther  Rubber  Company   2 

Perfection   Counter   Company   1,'$6 

Perth   Shoe   Company    18 

Pfister  &  Vogel   63 

Pickering  &  Son,  Joseph   121 

Plant,  T.  G   07 

Ritchie  &  Company,  John   7 

Robinson,  Jas  19-22 

Robson  Leather  Company   119 

St.  Hyacinthe  Soft  Sole  Company   128 

Samson,  Enr.,  J.  E   129 

SclioU   Mfg.    Company    32 

Scott,  J.  A   l«i 

Selby  Shoe  Company   65 

Sewing  Machine  Supplies  Company   55 

Signry,  The   12.3 

Sisman   Shoe   Comjiany    .12 

Slater  Shoe  Company   1o 

Snyder,  H.  S'.  &  M.  W   62 

Spaulding  &  Sons,  J   5!) 

Standard  Kid  Mfg.  Comjiany   4 

Tetrault   Shoe   Mfg.   Company    ()S-()9 

Textile  Mfg.  Company   132 

Thom]ison,  Harry  E   3.S 

Thomas,  Lake  &  Whiton   56 

Toronto  Heel  Company   137 

United  Shoe  Machinery  Co  1.34-138 

United  States  Hotel   129 

\'au.gban,  Geo.  C   61 

West  End  Boot  Sliop    12.3 

White  Shoe   Company    6 

Whittemore   Bros   1.32 

Wickett  &  Craig   1.33 

Wiley,  Bickford  &  Sweet   60 

Williams  Shoe  Company   30 

Wright  &  Company,  E.  T   31 

^'oung  Machinery  Company,  W.  J   12.3 


Landis  Outfits  are  Money-Makers 


Landis  No.  12  Shoe  Stitcher. 
Sold  outright— No  royalty. 


Equalize  the  increased  cost  of  material  by  installing  machinery  to 
do  your  shoe  repair  work. 

Landis  Stitchers  and  Finishers  are  unequalled  in  quality,  the  prices 
are  reasonable  and  the  terms  are  easy. 

We  have  many  models  of  stitchers  and  finishers.  Write  for  com- 
plete catalogue  with  prices  and  terms. 


Landis  No.  12-25  Outfit.    Landis  No.  12  Shoe  Stitcher  coupled  to 
Landis  Model  25  Finisher. 


Landis  Machine  Co.,  isis  N.25thst.,  St.  Louis,  U.S.A. 


March,  1919 


FOOTWEAR   IN  CANADA 


12:{ 


Rubber  Heel  Nails 

COLLAR  NAILS 
Steel  Wire 

Heel  Building  Nails 

NAILS  for  Attaching  WOOD  HEELS 
We  make  a  Specialty  of  these  Goods 

Get  our  Samples  and  Prices 

W.  J.  Young  Machinery  Company 

Lynn,  Mass,  U.S.A. 


Space  here 
for  rent 


5th  FLOOR 

(6,000  Square  Feet) 
Tnf  rknfr\  Adelaide  St.  West 

1  Ul  Ul  1 LU     East  of  Spadina  Ave. 

Warehouse  or  very  light  manufacturing — light 
four  sides  —  freight  and  passenger  elevators — 
sprinkler  system,  etc. 

THE  MacLEAN  BUILDING 

347  Adelaide  St.  West,  -  TORONTO 


S.  J.  Friedman 

Vancouver's 
Leading  Surgi- 
cal Bootmaker 


Makers  of  boots  and  fine 
shoes  for  all  deformities  and 
lame  feet. 

Endorsed  by  medical  offic- 
ers of  Militia. 

Satisfaction  guaranteed. 

Information  cheerfully  sent 
on  request. 

West  End  Boot  Hospital 

320  Granville  St.  Vancouver,  B.C. 


THE  SIGNRY 


OUT  DOOR  ADVERTISING 


PAINTED  CITY 
BULLETINS.. 
PAINTED  WALL 
DISPLAYS  .. 


SHOW  CARDS. 
CLOTM  SIGNS. 
BANK  WINDOWS  . 
CARVED  LETTERS. 


BRANCH  :  BROCK  ST.,  WINDSOR 


BRIGHT 

SNAPPY 
CUTS 

w  ill  double  the  value 
of  your  Ad.  space. 
This  cut  will  be 
mailed,  mortised, 
ready  for  your  local 
paper,  upon  receipt 
of  $2.25.  Let  us 
tell  you  how  you 
may  obtain  the  ex- 
clusive rights  of 
using  our  cuts  in 
your  town. 


You  will  find  in  our  stock 
the  smartest  of  fashion- 
able footwear— the  final 
achievement  in  style  and 
durability. 
Our  prices  are  moderate. 
Call  and  see 
YOUR  STORE  NAME 


Canadian  Advertisers  Service 

511    CHURCH  STREET 

TORONTO 


Pan  American 

KID 

Seal  Brown  and  Black 


Perkins  &  McNeely 

Philadelphia 


Canadian  Representative— 


Ed.  R.  LEWIS 

45  Front  St.  E.,  TORONTO 


124 


FOOT  W    .  \  R    T  N    C  A  N  A  D  A 


March,  1919 


FOOTWEAR 

IN  CANADA 

enjoys  the  confidence  of 
all  those  engaged  in  the 
shoe  and  leather  trades. 

If  you  are  seeking  a 
market  in  this  field  you 
can  gain  from  its  columns 
the  greatest  and  most 
forceful  publicity. 

JVrite  our  Service  Dept. 

Footwear  in  Canada 

347  Adelaide  Street  West 

Toronto 


The  Best  and  Most  Durable 
Shoe  Laces  Are  Made 

With  Our 

Power  Shoe  Lace 
Tipping  Machines 

Textile  and  Special  Machinery 
Harris-Corliss  Steam  Engines 

Send  for  Catalogue 

The  Franklin  Machine  Company 

Engineers       Founders  Machinists 
189  Charles  Street,  Providence,  R.I. 


LAGACE  &  LEPINAY 

22  ST.  ANSELME  ST. 

QUEBEC 


The  problems  confronting  the  Jobber 
are  well  considered  by  us  in  our  effort  to* 
produce  footwear  that  will  meet  his  de- 
mands. We  are  showing  a  full  range  of 
Women's  McKays,  also  shoes  for  Boys, 
Youths  and  Men,  and  we  believe  they  hold 
real  value  as  business  getters.  You  had 
better  see  them  for  yourself. 

Write  for  samples  or 
visit  our  Showrooms 


No.  50 


No.  46 


March,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


125 


GRIFFIN  SHOE  POLISHES 

A  DIFFERENT  GUARANTEED  PREPARATION  FOR  EVERY  LEATHER  OR  MATERIAL 

Big  White  Season-Soon  be  Here--"BE  PREPARED"--ORDER  AT  ONCE 


GLACE  MD 
CREAM 

atUIS.SOFItMAIIOPOUSNtS 


a3iiiBkl.l;HJ!<l!^ 

SOFTENS  THE  LEATHER 
AFTER  THE  RAIN 


li  your  Jobber  does  not  handle,  write  direct. 


THE  CANADIAN  SHOE  FINDINGS  NOVELTY  CO. 


2  TRINITY  SQUARE 


Adel  4194 


TORONTO,  CANADA 


=  Sell  =— 
THRIFT  STAMPS 


THE  dealer  who  encourages  his  customers  to 
take  their  change  in  Thrift  Stamps  is  giving 
valuable  aid  to  the  work  of  Reconstruction.  He 
is  helping  to  foster  Prosperity  by  making  small 
savings  assist  in  financing  Governmental  ex- 
penditures. 

Then,  while  he  is  doing  that  much  for  the 
country,  let  him  do  something  for  himself — 


Buy 

War-Savings  Stamps 


126 


FOOTWEAR   IN  CANADA 


March,  191!) 


MARK  WELL  THE  SIGN 
OF  THE  UNION  STAMP 

Every  retailer  who  requires  hundred  per  cent, 
selling  merchandise  needs  Union  Stamp  Foot- 
wear. 

Every  retailer  who  reaches  out  for  all  the  trade 
in  his  community  needs  Union  Stamp  footwear. 

Every  retailer  who  desires  the  best  footwear  at 
the  price,  made  under  honest  conditions,  by 
efficient  workmen,  requires  Union  Stamp  foot- 
wear. 

For  every  demand,  for  efficiency,  for  increased 
volume  of  trade  Union  Stamp  footwear  and 
Union  Stamp  shoes  alone  are  a  sure  and  certain 
asset. 

Boot  and  Shoe  Workers'  Union 

Affiliated  with  the  American  Federation  of  Labor 

246  Summer  Street 
BOSTON     -   -  MASSACHUSETTS 


JOHN  F.  TOBIN 

General  President 


CHAS.  L.  BAINE 

Gen'l  Sec'y-Treasurer 


March,  1919 


FOOTWEAR   IN  CANADA 


127 


138 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


March,  191!) 


7oTtuna 

Skiving  Machine 


For  Manufacturers  who  Skive  Leather,  Felt, 
Cork,  Rubber  or  Paper 

Used  extensively  by  Manufacturers  of 
Shoes,  Box  Toes,  Trimmings.  Insoles,  Ankle 
Supporters,  Welting,  Arch  Supporters 

Sole  Aeent*  for  Canada 

Fortuna   Machine  Co. 

127  Duane  Street       -       NEW  YORK 


•V.D.^RM  STRONG 

ENGRAVERofFINESTEELSTAMPS&DIES 

23Q,6,'V>NES;jM0NTREALPHo>^^  675 
CR^^^c^^fp)  Q  QUE,  t)  (^^>^'^  Wain 

MY  STAMPS  ARE'UPTO  date"  IN  DESIGN 
&  ADD  AN  ARTISTIC  FINISH  TO  VOUR  SHOES* 
•  WHICH  WILL  INCREASE  YOUR  SALES- 


Our  Standard  Screw  Shoes 

WILL  STAND  PLENTY  OF    HARD  WEAR 

Made  on   foot-fitting  lasts   that  will   give   comfort   to  the  wearer 
and  are  durable. 
The  Range  Includes 
Men's,  Boys',  Youths',  Little  Gents'  and  Children's  Box  Kip 
Your  Jobber  will  quote  you  prices,  or  write  us  direct 

St.  Hyacinthe  Soft  Sole  Shoe  Co. 

St.  Hyacinthe,  Quebec  Limited 


Jobbers  Should  Note! 
New  Castle 


Quality 


Kid 


Supplies  either  glazed  or  natural 
surface,  black  or  colored,  this 
famous  product  is  always  reliable 
and  uniform  in  quality. 

Quantities   shipped  promptly. 
Samples  supplied. 

Canadian  Agents  for 

FRED  RUEPING  LEATHER  CO. 

Calf  and  Side  Leathers,  Ooze  Splits  and 
Barrett  &  Co.  Skivers. 

New  Castle  Leather  Co. 

NEW  YORK 

Canadian  Branch: — 335  Craig  St.  W.,  Montreal 
Factory: — Wilmington,  Del.,  U.S.A. 


BOOKS  FOR  SALE 


Advertising  by  Motion  Pictures,  by  Ernest  A.  Dench. 
Just  published — 255  pages.    Price  $1.00. 


Footwear  in  Canada 


347  Adelaide  St.  W 
TORONTO 


March,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


129 


The  United  States  Hotel, 

BOSTON,  MASS.,  U.  S.  A. 


Beach,  Kingston 
and   Lincoln  Streets 


Only  two  blocks  from  the  South  Terminal  Station  in  the  centre  of  the  Shoe  and  Leather 
District  and  within  easy  walking  di^ance  of  the  shopping  di^rid,  theatres,  etc. 
Good,  comfortable  rooms,  unexcelled  cuisine,  and  reasonable  rates, 
American  and  European  plans.    Send  for  circulars. 


TILLY  HAYNES,  Proprietor 


JAS.  G.  HIGKEY,  Manager 


JOBBERS 

HOCKEY  BOOTS 


Are  our  specialty  and  yow  can 
realize  a  big  turnover  on  this 
thoroughly  well  made  product. 

Oui*  Hockey 
Boots  have 
extensive  sales 
and  supply  a 
wide  demand 
at  a  reason- 
a  b  1  e  price. 
Write  us  for 
samples. 


WORKING  BOOTS 

Our  Working  Boots  are  examples  of  strong  service- 
able footwear  for  men.  They  are  consistent  sellers  and 
bring  profitable  trade  to  jobbers  by  reason  of  the  satis- 
faction they  give  to  the  working  class.  An  inspection  of 
them  will  remove  any  doubt. 

J.  E.  SAMSON  ENR. 

QUEBEC 


Middle  and  Western  Canada 
Demands  the  Best 
in  Footwear 


To  successfully  intioduce  your  lines  and  maintain 
a    satisfactory    business    you    must    interest  the 

General  Merchants  in  the  Prairie  Prov- 
inces and  British  Columbia. 

The  General  Merchants  are  Departmental  Stores — in  miniature — 
found  in  every  hamlet,  village,  town,  and  city  in  the  Great  Western 
Provinces  of  Canada.  Every  General  Merchant  sells  boots  and  shoes 
— there  are  no  exceptions.  No  exclusive  shoe  paper  can  interest  this 
trade,  because  tlie  General  Merchant  is  not  an  exclusive  shoe  dealer. 


KAfWUKur  rtKANaAi..unniEiu:iAL  a. 
Over  33  years  in  its  field 

''CANADA'S    GREA  TEST   TRA  DE    PA  PER. ' ' 

Issued  twice  a  month  at  WINNIPEG.  Canada. 

Is  the  ONLY  PAPER  reaching  the  General 
Merchants  in  all  points,  Port  Arthur  and  West 
to  the  Pacific  Ocean. 

Get  a  sample  and  advertising  rates,  of  "That 
Western  Paper  that  brings  results." — "THE 
COMMERCIAL." 

Branches  at 

Vancouver,  Toronto,  Montreal,  Chicago,  New  York,  London,  Eng. 


URFACE  KID 


IN  BLACK  and  COLORS 


Beautifully  pliable  and  with  a  glove-like  grain — 
Surface  Kid  is  particularly  suitable  for  dressy  shoes. 

It  rivals  the  beauty  of  Real  Kid  and  is  very 
much  cheaper. 

Made  in  black  and  colors  and  sold  at  attractive  prices. 
Send  to-day  for  samples. 

BUTTS  IN  GUN  METAL,  DULL,  GLAZED 
CABRETTAS,  GLAZED  KID,  SHEEPSKINS 


Head  Office 

491  St.  ValierSt.,  Quebec 


LUCIEN  BORNE 


Montreal  Office— 225  Lemoine  St. 


130 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


March,  1919 


A  Shoe  Merchant 


With  a 

Champion  Shoe  Repair 

Department,  said 

By  installing  the  shoe  repair  department  behind  a 
glass  partition,  customers  can  look  right  into  the  repair 
shop  and  see  how  the  work  is  done.  I  would  put  the 
Stitcher  right  up  near  the  glass  partition,  where  it 
would  attract  as  much  attention  as  possible.  The  cost 
of  a  complete  repair  outfit  is  very  small.  The  neces- 
sary stock  and  accessories  to  start  this  department  do 
not  call  for  any  large  expenditure  of  money.  Any  live 
merchant  could  start  rig-ht  in  making  such  a  depart- 
ment pay.  An  ordinary  shoe  repair  department  will 
easily  pay  the  running  expenses  of  the  entire  store,  in- 
cluding light,  heat,  rent,  clerk  hire,  advertising,  insur- 
ance, etc.  This  would  leave  the  profit  obtained  from 
the  selling  of  shoes  a  clear  sinking  fund  for  that  rainy  day  we  all  talk  about.  All  live  shoe  dealers  would 
become  wealthy  if  they  had  no  expenses.  The  installation  of  a  shoe  repair  department  will  result  in  tak- 
ing care  of  expenses  of  a  first-class  shoe  store,  and  may  still  leave  a  margin  of  profit  in  the  Repair  Depart- 
ment. 


Every  customer  for  a  new  pair  is  a  prospect  for  the  repair 
department. 


Universal     Model     Curved  Needlt 
and   Awl   Shoe   Stitcher  —  heated 
by  gas,  gasoline,  or  electricity. 


Champion 
Machines  are 
sold  outright 
(no  royalty) 
for  cash  or 
on  monthly 
payments. 


Champion  New  Model,  No.  F-80,  Repair  Outfit,  equipped  with  Standard  Straight 
Needle  and  Awl  Shoe  Stitcher,  with  motor  extension. 


Over  20,000  Champion  Machines  of  various  types 
in  use— That  means  MERIT  and  QUALITY. 

The  Champion  Line  consists  of : 

Seven  different  types  of  Shoe,  Harness  and  Auto  Tire  Stitchers. 
Forty  different  models  of  Repair  Outfits,  consisting  of  Stitchers 
and  Finishers. 

Two  distinct  types  of  Nailing  Machines. 

Many  different  Models  of  Finishers. 

A  complete  line  of  Double  Tread  Tire  Machines. 

Many  labor  and  material  saving  auxiliary  machines. 


CHAMPION  SHOE  MACHINERY  CO.,  3723^1  F,r.s.  p.rk  Bvd.,  St.  Louis,  Mo. 

Please  send  me  particulars  about  a  shoe  store  repair  department. 


Name   Street 

City   State 


March,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


131 


A  New  Product 
Easily  Sold 


Millions  of  pairs  of  Neolin 
Soles  in  active  service  have 
proved  Neolin  to  be  the  hardest- 
wearing  sole  material  made. 

Neolin  Soles  mean  com- 
fort, flexibility,  waterproofness 
and  long  wear. 

Over  four  hundred  shoe 
manufacturers  equip  their  pro- 
duct with  Neolin  Soles. 

Canadian  men  and  women 
have  proved  Neolin's  qualities 
for  themselves.  They  have  the 
confidence  in  it  that  comes  from 
actual  experience. 

Now  a  master  advertising 
campaign  is  driving  home  the 
merits  of  Neolin  Half-Soles — the 
half-soles  with  all  Neolin's  advan- 
tages ;  that  may  be  sewed  or 
nailed  on  worn  shoes. 


Many  of  your  customers 
have  tested  Neolin.  They  will 
want  Neolin  Half-Soles  on  their 
worn  shoes.  Others  have  heard 
of  Neolin  economy  and  will  wel- 
come your  suggestion  that  Neolin 
Half-Soles  will  put  new  life  into 
their  shoes. 

Order  a  supply  of  Neolin 
Half-Soles  at  once.  Display  them 
in  your  window.  They  will  draw 
trade  and  add  a  new  profit  maker 
to  your  business. 

Neolin  Half -Soles  are 
packed  in  an  attractive  carton 
containing  a  dozen  assorted 
sizes.  Order  from  your  whole- 
saler. 

The  Goodyear  Tire  &  Rubber  Co. 

of  Canada,  Limited 

Toronto 


133 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


March,  1919 


SHOE 
LACES 


MADE  IN 
CANADA 


Supply 

Shoe  Manufacturers  and  Wholesale  Trade 
only 

Textile  Manufacturing  Co.,  Ltd. 

439  Wellington  Street  West 
TORONTO 


The  Shine  that  Lasts 

Your  shoes  will  hold  their  shine  a 
surprisingly  long  time  if  you  use 
^Alttemore  'S  Shoe  Polishes 

The  Whittemore  lines  serve  a  double  purpose 
viz— that  of  a  polish  and  leather  preservative. 

Our  Bostonian  Cream  is 

the  ideal  cleaner  for  kid  and  calf  leather 
put  up  in  Brown,  Grey,  White,  in  fact 
all  colors. 

Try  our  Nobby  Brown  Paste  for  brown 
shoes  and   Peerless  Ox- 
bloodPaste  for  Red  Shoes. 

Quick  White  Liquid  Can- 
vas Dressing. 

ALBO  White  Cake  Canvas  Dressing 
GILT  EDGE  SELF  Shining  Dressing 

Ask  your  Jobber.    If  he  cannot 
supply  you  write  us 

Whittemore  Bros.  Corp. 

Cambridge,  Mass,  U.S.A. 


Edwards  &  Edwards 


TANNERS 
OF 


SHEEPSKINS 


FOR 

Shoes,  Gloves,  Saddlery 
Upholstering 
Bags  and  Suit  Gases 
Bookbinding 
Fancy  and  Novelty  Goods 
Skivers 
Embossed  Leathers 

Etc.,  Etc. 

EDWARDS  &  EDWARDS 


Head  Office  and  Sale  Rooms 


Tanneries 


27  Front  E.  Toronto       Woodbridge,  Ont. 

Quebec  and  Maritime  Province. 
Represented  by 

JOHN  McENTYRE  LTD.  '^^li^^l^^^'tlv'l: 


Capture  the  Boys'  Trade 

with  this 


BOY'S 
SCOUT 
BOOT 


It  is  splendidly  built,  and  is 
capable    of   attracting  many 
sales  for  you.  Absolutely  im- 
pervious   to    wet    if  Dubbin 
is   reasonably   applied.  Has 
oiled    tanned    vamp,    12  in. 
Menonite  leg,  bellow  tongue 
to     top,  full 
single  sole 
and  heel  nail- 
ed  to   a  solid 
leather  sole. 
There   can  be 
no  better  value 
than  this  boot 

for  $6.00 


Drop  us  a  postal. 


The  Copeland  Shoepack  Co. 

Midland,  Ontario,  Canada 


March,  1919 


FOOTWEAR   IN  CANADA 


133 


WICKETT  and  CRAIG  Limited 

MAKERS  OF 

High  Grade  Goodyear  Welting 

AND 

Fine  Side  Leathers 
TORONTO  -  -  CANADA 


COUNTERS 

BOX  TOES  and 
INNER  SOLES 


Our  union  and  all  leather, 
flexible  inner  soles  are  bet- 
ter than  ever,  with  no 
change  in  prices.  Try  them 
and  be  convinced. 

LAMONTAGNE,  RACINE  &  CO. 

115  ARAGO  ST. 
QUEBEC 


Largest  Manufacturers  in  Canada 

STEEL  DIES 

for 

Shoe  and  Rubber  Manufacturers 


Prompt 
Service 


Guaranteed 
Work 


JAS.  CLELAND,  REGD. 

16  St.  George  St.,  Montreal 


KELLEY  KID 

LEADS  THEM  ALL 
in  Uniformify, 
Fine  Texture,  Wearing  Qualities  and  Finish 


In  our  West  Lynn  Factory  during  310  working 
days,  the  average  daily  output  has  been  800  dozen 
finished  skins,  or  an  equivalent  of  9,600  skins  per  day. 
This  represents  60,000  feet  of  leather  turned  out  each 
day,  or  18,600,000  square  feet  of  leather  in  one  year. 
This  amount  provides  over  6,200,000  people  once  a 
year  with  one  pair  of  shoes — a  large  army! 

Sold  in  All  Foreign  Countries 

Thomas  A.  Kelley  &  Co. 

Tannery  and  Main  Office,  LYNN,  MASS. 

Selling  Agents  : 

ROUSMANIERE,  WILLIAMS  &  CO. 
87-93  Lincoln  St.,   BOSTON,  MASS. 


A  Message  for 

Ontario  Merchants 

We  can  do  many  things 
for  you 

Consult  our  specialists  on  Sales 
of  all  kinds 

Beadle  Sales  Service  Agency 

59  Yonge  Street,  TORONTO 


134 


FOOTWEAR   IN  CANADA 


March,  1919 


MADE  IN  CANADA 


CUTTING 
DIES 


For 


Leather 

Fabric 

Cloth 

Rubber 

Paper 


CUT 

COSTS 


All  Estimate  Work  Free 


For 


Shoe 

Harness 

Rubber 

Stationery 

Glove 

Trades 


United  Shoe  Machinery  Company  of  Canada^  Limited 

MONTREAL 


TORONTO 

90  Adelaide  Street  West, 


KITCHENER 

179  King  Street  West, 


QUEBEC 

28  Demers  Street, 


March,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    TN  CANADA 


135 


Complete  information  about  the  day's  business 
just  as  soon  as  you  want  it 

That's  what  a  modern  National  Cash  Register  will  give 
you.  At  closing  time  a  glance  at  your  register  will  show 
many  things. 

1.  Total  amount  of  merchandise  sold. 

2.  Total  cash  received  for  goods. 

3.  Amount  of  your  charge  sales. 

4.  Detailed  record  of  cash  received  on  account. 

5.  Detailed  record  of  cash  paid  out. 

6.  Amount  of  each  clerk's  sales. 

7.  Number  of  customers  each  clerk  waited  on. 

8.  Total  number  of  transactions  made  during  the  day. 

All  these  figures  are  there  before  you— absolutely  ac- 
curate and  reliable  because  they  have  been  recorded  by 
modern  machinery,  - 

You  cannot  afford  to  be  without  the  valuable  information 
that  an  up-to-date  National  Cash  Register  will  give  you. 

The  National  Gash  Register  Company,  of  Canada,  Limited.,  Toronto,  Ont. 
Offices  in  all  the  Principal  cities  of  the  world 


me  FOOTWEAR    IN    CANADA  March,  1919 


The 


Home  Shoe 


COMES  DIRECT 
FROM  FACTORY 
TO  RETAILER 

With  a  minimum  of 
selling  expense  and  an 
appreciably  extra  value 
to  the  public. 

Let  us  demonstrate  to 
you  the  profitable  sales 
awaiting  the  dealer 
who  handles  the  many 
excellent  models  of  the 
HOME  SHOE. 

Write  us — To-day 

Home  Shoe  Company,  Ltd. 


327  Amherst  Street, 


MONTREAL 


JOBBERS 
ONLY 


Very  Attractive 

Our  showing  of  "La 
Duchesse"  McKay  Shoes 
for  Women,  and  Turn 
Slippers  for  Men.  For 
your  inspection.  When- 
ever you  want  high  grade 
shoes  it  will  pay  you  to 
handle  "  La  Duchesse  " 
manufacture. 


La  Duchesse  Shoe  Co. 


Registered 

MONTREAL 


BRODIE'S 

Patent  Paste 

This  famous  product  covers 
a  wide  range  of  usefulness 
being  used  with  equal  success 
and  efficiency  by  manufactur- 
ers of  the  finest  grade  shoes  and 
makers  of  heavy  work  shoes. 

Supplied  in  quantities  to 
meet  your  needs. 

Let  us  send  you  sample  and 
price. 

Brodie  &  Harvie 

Limited 

14  Bleury  St.  MONTREAL 


Perfection 


Your  New  Year's  Good  Resolutions  are  not 
complete  unless  you  have  resolved  to  use  nothing 
but  the  best  in  Counters. 

Try  PERFECTION  COUNTERS  and  let  us 
show  you  wherein  they  excel.  Send  for  prices  and 
particulars. 

Our  Felt  Box  Toes  are  Now  Ready. 

Perfection  Counter  Limited 

699  Letourneux  Ave.  Cor.  Ernest  St. 

Maisonneuve,  Montreal 


March,  1019 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


137 


No.  300  Patent 
No.303  Dull  Calf 
Sizes  6-11.  B  D. 
PRICE  $3.50 


L.B.EVANS^'iX)N  CO. 


MENS'  MEDIUM  GRADE 

HOUSE  SLIPPERS 

PUMPS  AND  OXFORDS  IN  STOCK 
FOR  IMMEDIATE  SHIPMENT 

Thirty  Lines  Listed  in  Catalog  No.  16 

BOSTON  OFFICE— no  Summer  Street 

.V    WAKEFIELD ,  ?iPSS. 


The  New 

"EASTERN" 

Shoe  Lines 

offer  big  possibilities  to  Jobbers 
desirous  of  handling  a  first-class 
product  at  popular  prices. 

We  will  be  pleased  to  show 
you  a  very  complete  assortment 
of  shoes  for  Misses,  Children 
and  Infants  for  Spring  and  Sum- 
mer, upon  receipt  of  a  post  card 
from  you. 

See  us  when  in  Montreal 

Write  us  now. 

The  Eastern  Shoe 

Manufacturing  Company,  Limited 

152  Frontenac  Street 
Phone — La  Salle  2561  MONTREAL 


Make  Your  Show  Windows  Pay  Your  Rent 

Many  Soles  are  made  on  the  Sidewalk 

Window  Display  Fixtures 


A  Wonderful  i. 
lor  displaying  Men  c 
effeclive  trade  pullini 

The  Fi 
sel  up  with  the  lull 


you 


of  Patented  InterchanHeable  Window  Display  Fixti 
Womens'  Shoes.  Set  will  give  10  Years  Good  Service 
«indow  trims. 

see  above  are  only  a  very  few  of  the  designs  thai  can 
il.  besides  hundreds  of  standard  li.^tures  can  be  set  up. 


M  ide  of  Oalr.  cither  Golden.  Antique  or  Weathered  Finish.    Set  is  put  up 
in  a  Hardwood  Hinfied  Lid  Storage  Chest,  a  fiood  place  to  keep  the  extra 
Younils  not  in  use.     I'herc  are  thousands  ol  sets  in  daily  u^c. 
No.  lOV      Set  has  220  Interchangeable  Younits  For  LarSe  Windows,  $48.12 
No.  101)4  Set  has  110  Interchangeable  Younils  For  Medium  Windows,  $27.SO 
No.  101V4  Set  has    55  InterchanCeable  Younits  For  Small  Windows.  $17.32 
Stock  earned  in  Homillon,  Onl.    Orjcr  direct  or  thru  yom  iotber.    Send  for  cololog.    Pclenltd  and  made  in  Conoda. 

The  Oscar  Onken  Co.  5950  Fourth  Street   Cincinnati,  Ohio,  U.  S.  A. 


SVe  Can  Save  Money  for  You  on  Your 
Shipping  &  Packing 

H  &  D  Solid  Fibre  Board  Boxes 

1.  — They  protect  your  shipment       4. — They  save  time  in  packing. 

against  loss  from  dampness       5. — They  save  storage  space, 
and   water.  0. — They     have     strong  adver- 

2.  — They    are    extremely    light,  tising  value. 

which  means  low  freight  7. — They  can  be  made  to  your 
charges.  specifications. 

3.  — They     cannot     be     opened       8. — Their    first    cost    is  lower 

without  breaking  the  seal.  than  wood. 

Our  booklet  "Howr  to  Pack 
It"    explains   all — write  for 

it. 


The  Hind  &  Dauch  Paper  Co. 

of  Canada  Limited 
TORONTO  ONTARIO 


TORONTO  HEEL  CO. 


Manufacturers  of 


All  styles  of  Heels  in  Leather 
and  Composition 

We  are  also  Makers  of  the 
Haverhill 

Write  for  Samples  and  Prices.    These  will  interest  you 

The  Toronto  Heel  Company 

13  Jarvis  St.,  Toronto 


138 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


March,  191!) 


Don't  Squander 

TACKS,  NAILS,  TIME,  HEALTH,  ENERGY 

Using  nails  from  broken,  unsanitary  paper 
packages  or  old  tin  cans 

USE  A 

Convenient,  Compact,  Revolving 

Made  in  Canada 

NAIL  DISH 


8  Compartment  Dish  6  Compartment  Dish 

ORDER  YOVRS  NOW 

United  Shoe  Machinery  Company  of  Canada,  Limited 

Montreal,  Que. 


Toronto,  Ont. 
90  Adelaide  Street  West, 


Kitchener,  Ont. 
179  King  Street  West, 


Quebec,  Que. 
28  Demers  Street, 


March,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


INSOLES 

Kendex  has  the  added  quahties  for  an  Insole 
which  gives  satisfaction  and  comfort  to  the  wear- 
er; conforms  to  the  foot;  is  of  uniform  flexibihty; 
will  not  shrink,  swell  or  check  and  prevents  cal- 
loused feet;  is  fast  color;  made  in  all  weights, 
worked  dry  and  sold  in  sheets  or  rolls. 

Kendex  is  made  in  Oak,  White  and  Black 
colors.  Makes  an  excellent  middle  sole;  trims 
to  a  clean  edge,  and  is  a  non-conductor. 

Felt  of  every  description  for  shoe  manufacturers. 

Heel  Pads  cut  from  several  qualities  of  white  felt, 
also  all  colors  of  Combined  Imitation  Leather 
and  Felt.  Our  facilities  mean  service  to  you  at 
a  minimum  cost. 

KENWORTHY  BROS.  COMPANY 

STOUGHTON,  MASS. 

Represented  in  the  Province  of  Quebec  by  HORACE  D'ARTOIS,  224  Lemoine  St.,  Montreal 


I'  O  O  T  \V  EAR    IN    C  A  N  A  D  A 


March.   I!) I!) 


It  Lasts 
Long 
and  Does 
Not  Crack 

CLARKE'S 

Patent  Leather 

Give  your  customers  a 
good  Patent  Leather  shoe  that 
will  retain  its  lustre  and  keep 
from  cracking,  and  you  can 
count  on  future  patronage. 
So  many  patent  leathers  have 
disappointed  the  public  that 
it  behoves  the  shoeman  to 
insist  on  Clarke's  Patent 
Leather  every  time. 

A.  R.  CLARKE  &  CO. 

LIMITED 

MONTREAL  TORONTO  QUEBEC 


Vol.  IX.-No.  4 


Toronto,  April,  1919 


REGAL 
SPRING 
STYLES 


O 


Present  a  matchless  combination  of  design, 
workmanship  and  material.    For  both  men  and 
women  our  new  models  have  the  distinctive- 
ness that  will  create  public  desire  and  attract  profitable  custom 
for  the  dealer.    They  are  diverse  in  style  and  make-up  and  In 
every  model  there  is  the  adherence  to  the  REGAL  standard  of 
quality,  which  means  service  to  the  wearer. 

Let  these  new  REGAL  creations  advertise  your  store  by  show- 
ing them  to  the  public.  We  will  be  pleased  to  co-operate  for  the 
promotion  of  your  sales.    Write  us. 


Regal  Shoe  Company,  Limited 


472-474  Bathurst  Street 


TORONTO 


Alphabetical  Index  to  Advertisers,  Page  56 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


April,  1919 


Panther  Rubber  Products 


Panther  Fibre  Soling  is  the  present  day  ideal  wearing  material 
that  combines  comfort,  good  appearance,  low  cost  and  long  life.  When 
made  up  with  your  stock  models.  Panther  Soles  look  like  leather,  in 
Black,  White  and  Tan.  The  soles  can  be  stitched  same  as  leather 
and  they  hold  indefinitely.  They  are  light  in  weight  and  long  in  dur- 
ability. Waterproof  and  crackproof.  Your  customers  favor  them 
because  they  wear. 

"Sure  Step"  Rubber  Heels  have  been  on  the  market  long  enough 
to  need  no  recommendation.  They  are  nationally  known  and  their 
merit  is  universally  acknowledged. 

—  Write  for  details — 


Panther  Rubber  Co.  Limited 

Sherbrooke,       -  Quebec 


April,  1919 


FOOTWEAR   IN  CANADA 


3 


For  Every  Sport 
and  Recreation 

In  another  month  or  so,  the  "FLEET  FOOT"  season  will  open. 

Remember  to  use  the  display  cards,  window  trims  and  other 
advertising  helps,  as  this  year  promises  to  be  a  great  one  for  this 
popular  footwear. 

If  your  stock  is  not  complete,  you  have  time  to  send  in  orders 
for  what  you  need. 

Wire,  phone  or  write  your  emergency  orders  for  both  RUB- 
BERS and  ''FLEET  FOOT"  to  the  nearest  Dominion  Rubber 
System  Service  Branch. 


Dominion  Rubber  System  Service  Branches 
are  Located  at 

Halifax,                      Toronto,  Fort  William,  Edmonton, 

St.  John,                     Hamilton,  Winnipeg,  Calgary, 

Quebec,                       London,  Brandon,  Lethbridge, 

Montreal,                    Kitchener,  Regina,  Vancouver, 

Ottawa,                      North  Bay,  Saskatoon,  Victoria. 


4 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


April,  1919 


A  determined  and  persistent  resolve 
that  the  name  Standard  Kid  shall  be 
your  assurance  that  the  product  is  good, 
that  the  price  is  reasonable,  and  that  the 
grading  is  accurate  and  uniform — that 
is   the  standard  for  Standard  Kid. 

This  standard  has  received  emphatic  recognition 
from  twelve  concerns  who  recently  ordered  40,000 
dozen  Standard  Kid,  to  be  shipped  during  the  next 
four  months. 

These  orders  bear  convincing  testimony  that 
Standard  Kid  is  a  name  in  which  you  may  place 
confidence  for  quality,  for  value,  and  for  accurate 
and  uniform  grading. 

COLOR  18     FIELD  MOUSE 
COLOR    8  GRAY 
are  in  good  demand  for  next  Fall  styles. 

Inquiries  solicited 

STANDARD  KID  MFG.  CO. 

MANUFACTURERS  OF  BLACK  AND  COLORED  GLAZED  KID  AND  PATENT  KID 

207  SOUTH  STREET,  BOSTON,  MASS.,  U.  S.  A. 

NEW  YORK  OFFICE,  GIO  TRIBUNE  BLDG. 
Factory,  Wilmington,  Del. 
AGENCIES 

CHAS.  A.  BRADY,  Rochester,  N.Y.  F.  W.  BAILEY  &  CO.,  St.  Louis,  Mo. 

GEO.  A.  McGAW,  Chicago,  III.  I.  LOUIS  POPPER,  Cincinnati,  Ohio. 

PIERRE  BLOUIN,  Ouebcc,  Canada. 


April,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


5 


BENNETT 

TPAD£  MAR/f 

DEPENDABLE  COUNTERS 

Better  Counters  are  made  by  Better  Fibre  and  a 
Better  Making  of  that  Fibre  into  the  finished  counter. 

We  could  not  buy  fibre  good  enough  to  make  tlie 
BENNETT  COUNTER.  Thai  is  why  we  made  the 
fibre. 

We  had  a  Better  Way  to  make  That  Fibre  into  the 
Counter.   That  is  why  we  made  the  counter. 


ONTARIO  OFFICE 
28  King  St.  East 
Kitchener 


BENNETT  LIMITED 
MAKERS  OF  SHOE  SUPPLIES 


CHAMBLY  CANTON,  P.Q.,  CANADA 


SALES  OFFICE 
59  St.  Henry  Street 
Montreal 


6 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


April,  1910 


H.  O.  MCDOWELL 


H.  N.  LINCOLN 


IMPORTERS 
MANUFACTURERS 


JOBBERS 
SALES  AGENTS 


Q? 


EASTERN  BRANCH 
401  CORISTINE  BUILDING 
MONTREAL 


Representing 

American  Lacing  Hook  Co. 

Waltham,  Mass. 
Lacing  Hooks  and  Hook 
Setting  Macliines 

Armour   Sand   Paper  Works 
C'liicago,  111. 
Crystolon  Paper  and  Cloth 
for  Buffing  and  Scouring 

Boston  Leather  Stain  Co. 

Boston,  Mass. 
Inks,  Stains,  Waxes,  etc. 
Cyclone  Bleach 

The  Ceroxylon  Co., 

Boston,  Mass. 
Ceroxylon,  the  Perfect 
Liquid  ■  Wax 

Dean  Chase  Co., 

Boston,  Mass. 
Shoe  Goods,  Cotton 
Thread 

The  Louis  G.  Freeman  Co., 
Cincinnati,  O. 
Shoe  Machinery 

Hazen,   Brown  Co., 

Brockton,  Mass. 
Waterproof  Box  Toe 
Gum,  Rubber  Cement 

Lynn  Wood  Heel  Co., 

Keene,  N.H. 
Wood  Heels  and  Die 
Blocks. 

Markem  Machine  Co., 

Boston,  Mass. 
Marking  and  Eml^ossing 
Machines,  Compounds, 
Inks,  etc. 

M.  H.  Merriam  &  Co., 

Boston,  Mass. 
Binding,  Staying,  etc. 

Puritan  Mfg.  Co., 

Boston,  Mass. 
Wax  Thread  Sewing 
Machines 

Poole  Process  for  Good- 
year Insoles 

The  S.  M.  Supplies  Co., 
Factory  Supplies, 
Needles,  etc. 

H.  S.  &  M.  W.  Snyder,  Inc., 

Boston,  Mass. 
Kids,  Cabrettas  and  Horse 

T.  Spaulding  &  Sons  Co., 

N.  Rochester,  N.H. 
Guaranteed    Fibre  Coun- 
ters, Fibre  Innersoling 

The  Textile  Mfg.  Co., 

Toronto,  Ont, 

Slioe  Laces 

United  Stay  Co., 

Cambridge,  Mass. 
Leather  and  Imitation 
Leather  Facing,  Welting, 


SHOE 


MACHINERY,  FINDINGS 

AND  FACTORY  SUPPLIES 


MAIN  OFFICE  AND  FACTORY 
37  FOUNDRY  ST.  S. 

KITCHENER 


THE  LARGEST  SHOE  FACTORY   SUPPLY  HOUSE  IN  CANADA 


the  Hardest  Substance  known 

(Except  the  Diamond) 

Crystolon  is  the  abrasive  for  the  shoe  trade.  Its  extreme  hardness  and 
l)rittleness  make  it  particularly  desiralile  for  snuffing  hides,  buffing  and  scour- 
ing leather  specialties  and  shoes. 

Being  brittle,  the  tiny  points  of  the  abrasive  surface  are  continually  lireak- 
ing  of{,  thus  forming  an  entirely  new  surface  as  sharp  and  effective  as  the  first. 
This  gives  a  continual  sharp  cutting  surface  until  worn  down  to  the  backing. 

Crystolon  is  made  in  paper,  cloth  and  coml^ination  styles,  in  rolls,  sheets 
and  special  shapes. 


IVe  carry  a  variety  of  Specialties 

Cheese  Cloth  Silkoline 
Vel  Chamee 

Very  Fine  Polishing  Cloth 

Round  Belting 


Oak  Tanned 


Indian  Tanned 


Belt  Hooks 
Casters 


Tag  Holders 
Buttons 


Treer's  Shank  Brushes    H.B.  Canvas 
Cotton  Thread 

For  Puritan  Machines 

For  Fair  stitching  and  Upper  Fitting 

You  need  have  no  hesitancy  about  sending  your  orders  to  us.  Our  l)usi- 
ness  is  founded  on  the  princiijle  of  FAIR  DEALING  and  we  handle  only 
GOODS  of  HIGHEST  QUALITY. 

Consider  the  List  of  Houses  WE  REPRESENT. 


April,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


Ritchie's 

Beaver  Brown  Shoes 

are  the  most  popular  colored  side 
leather  shoes  in  the  trade. 

Incorporated  in  the  line  is  the 
same  high  quality  workmanship  and 
materials  that  has  made  the 
RITCHIE  line  so  well  and  favorably 
regarded  from  Coast  to  Coast. 

A  shoe  you  can  depend  upon  and 
recommend  where  price  is  a  consid- 
eration, and  serviceability  and  good 
appearance  are  required. 

All  the  best  Jobbers  carry  the 
line.    Ask  them  to  show  you 

Ritchie's  Beaver  Browns 
The  John  Ritchie  Company  Limited 

MAKERS  OF 
MEN'S  SHOES 

QUEBEC 


m-^,    x-^;  ^^  W        W  ^rW^  w  w 


i 


8 


FOOTWEAR   IN  CANADA 


April,  1919 


James  Robinson 

Specialist  in  Fine  Footwear 

MONTREAL 


Where  Quality 
Counts 

If  one  sale  is  to  make  another,  the  shoe  has  to 
maintain  in  wear  all  that  you  claim  for  it  in 
the  sale. 

Be  on  the  safe  side  by  serving  your 
customers  with  our  lines  of  foot- 
wear. 

For  all  round  satisfaction  you  can- 
not handle  a  better  shoe  than  the 

Bostonians 

All  the  best  principles  of  shoe 
making  are  embodied  in  their 
manufacture.  And  all  your 
best  customers  will  be  well  sat- 
isfied with  their  service. 

The  Bostonian  Shoe  has  the  reputation  of  "a 
seller."    Are  you  stocking  it  ? 


i 

i 


April,  1919 


FOOTWEAR 


IN  CANADA 


9 


James  Robinson 


Specialist  in  Fine  Footwear 

MONTREAL 


We  are  Busy  with 
Rubbers 


The  rush  of  sorting  orders  we  have  handled  is 
unmistakable  evidence  of  public  regard  for  a 
good  rubber.    They  want 


Independents 


Have  you  got  your  order? 
If  not  take  a  look  over 
your  stock,  and  write, 
phone  or  wire  your  needs 
now.  We  will  fill  them  right  away,  and  see 
that  you  have  the  goods  with  satisfaction  as 
well. 


4. 


FOOTWEAR   IN  CANADA 


THERE  IS  BUT 


"ONE  SLATER  SHOE'* 


FALL  1919 


Our  Traxcllers  are  on  the  road  now  witli  full  range  of  J'all 
Samples  and  45  Catalogue  lines  carried  in  Stock. 

Carried  in  Stock  means  ready  to  serxe.  It  means  that  we 
are  prepared  to  fill  your  orders  for  one  pair  or  as  many  as  you 
desire,  at  once. 

No  excuse  then  for  depleted  shelves. 

Ask  for  a  catalogue  and  gix  e  us  a  trial  order. 

We  have  added  a  few  samples  on  new  lasts  that  will  surely 
a])i)eal  to  the  discriminating'  buyer  and  we  solicit  a  careful  in- 
spection of  the  complete  line. 

E\  entually  you  will  handle  Slater  Shoes,  wh\-  not  try  them 
now? 


THE  SLATER  SHOE  COMPANY,  LIMITED 

Established  in  1869 
MONTREAL  -  QUE. 


April,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


11 


By  Their  Sales 
You  May  Know 
Three  Successful 

Shoes 

Shoes  carrying  with  them  an  assurance  of  satisfaction 
to  your  customers ;  an  important  factor  in  your  prospects  for 
increased  trade. 

You  cannot  afford  to  overlook  the  importance  of  these 
superb  lines. 


"MetropolitaN" 

WOMEN'S  McKAYS  MEN'S  WELTS 

"Patricia" 

WOMEN'S  WELTS 
AND  TURNS 


Daoust,  Lalonde  &  Co. 

Limited 

Montreal   -  Que. 

Branch  :   METROPOLITAN   SHOE  CO.,    91  St.  Paul  St.  East 


"Paris" 

WOMEN'S  McKAYS 
MEN'S  WELTS 


12 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


April,  1919 


Throughout  the  Season! 

Our  Spring  campaign  of  consumer  advertising  will 
continue  throughout  the  season.  There  is  still  time  for 
you  to  cash-in  on  this,  if  you  will  act  promptly. 

Inquiries  for  our  booklet,  "  How  to  Buy  Shoes," 
are  reaching  us  in  constantly  increasing  numbers.  And 
it  is  necessary  to  read  our  advertisements  pretty  care- 
fully in  order  to  find  out  that  we  are  offering  a  booklet 
at  all.  For  we  are  advertising  shoes— not  booklets. 
Every  inquiry  means  that  our  message  has  really  been 
read — that  it  has  really  been  planted  in  a  customer's 
mind. 

And  the  dealer  can  readily  turn  this  interest  into 
sales,  simply  by  letting  it  be  known  that  he  has  the  adver- 
tised shoes,  and  that  his  store  is  in  line  with  the  adver- 
tised standards  of  merchandising. 


AMES  HOLDEN  McCREADY 

"Shoemakers  to  the  Nation" 


LIMITED 


ST.  JOHN         MONTREAL         TORONTO         WINNIPEG         EDMONTON  VANCOUVER 


I 


April,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


13 


llllNlllllllilliNlliilill 


llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllNll 


SUPERB 
WELTED 
FOOTWEAR 

for 

WOMEN 

■& 

THE 
PERTH 
SHOE 

A  Correct 
Association 
of  Ideas 

BSIHIIBI!! 


Perth  Shoe  Company,  Limited 

Largest  ^M^anufacturers  Exclusively  of 
Women's  Welts  in  Canada 

Perth  -  Ontario 


14 


FOOTWEAR   IN  CANADA 


April,  1910 


For  Jobbers  Only 

Women  s  White  Canvas 

MEN'S 

and  oatin  olippers 

"turns  only** 

I  yJvJ  1  no 

Latest  up-to-date 

Lasts  and  Patterns 

Staple  Nailed  and 
t^iciiiuciru  ocrcw  onues . 

Manufactured  by 

Manufactured  by 

Wakefie'd  Slipper  Co. 

MILTON  SHOE  CO. 

Sanbornville,  N.H. 

Can  be  seen  anytime  at  my 
Sample  Rooms 

Canadian 

Sales 

Representative 

Manager 

HARRY  E.  THOMPSON 

10  Victoria  Street 

MONTREAL 

Patented  Patented 

Dec,  30thy  1913  Oct.  26th,  1915 

*'Your  designer  may  put  character 

into  your  shoes— but  it  will  take  a 


Vulco-Unit  Box  Toe 

to  keep  it  there." 


Absolutely  Water-proof  and  Perspiration-proof 

BECKWITH  BOX  TOE  LIMITED 

Sherbrooke,  Quebec,  Canada 


April,  1919  FOOTWEAR   IN  CANADA 

pllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll^ 

I SOMKLAS 


15 


Introducing 
Our  Latest 
Up -to -Date 
Last 


Tetrault  Shoe  Manufacturing  Co.,  Limited 


Office  and  Warehouse- 

9  Rue  de  Marseille, 

Paris,  France 


Largest  Producers  of  Boots  and  Shoes  in  Canada 

Montreal 


Toronto 


iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 


16 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


April,  1919 


Important  Lines 


for 


Misses  &  Children 


We  Sell 
Jobbers 
Only 


Let  us  show  you  our  samples  in  these  splendid 
staple  lines  for  your  Juvenile  trade.  They  are  well- 
made  and  comprise  the  lasts  we  have  found  to  be  most 
popular.  We  solicit  your  thorough  inspection  of  our 
complete  lines  for  Infants,  Children,  and  Misses. 

Send  for  Prices 


Childrens  Shoe  Mfg.  Co., 
Limited 

11  Belleau  St.  -  -  Quebec  City 


|iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 

I  MADE   IN   CANADA  I 


Our  line  of  Channel  Cements,  Sole  Laying 
Cements,  Chrome  Cements,  and  Surefold 
is  a  quality  line. 

The  first  consideration  given  to  their  make- 
up is  QUALITY. 

You  may  depend  on  them  being  as  good  a 
Cement  as  can  be  made. 


I  Boston  Blacking  Company  I 

I  152  McGill  Street,  MONTREAL,  Canada  | 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 


April,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


17 


The  Name  Guarantees  the  Quality 

Every  counter  made  by  us  warrants  our  stamping  it 
indelibly  with  our  name. 

QPAULDING'C 

ORbre  CountewC) 

Cuaranteed 

—in  legible  letters,  identify 
them  from  others,  insuring  the  manufacturer  of  excellence 
in  materials  and  construction. 

J.  SPAULDING  &  SONS  CO. 

Main  Office  and  Factory  Boston  Office 

NORTH  ROCHESTER,  N.  H.  203-B  ALBANY  BUILDING 

PHILADELPHIA  CINCINNATI  ST.  LOUIS  CHICAGO 

Tolin  G.  Traver  &  Co.  The  Taylor-Poole  Co.  The  Taylor-Poole  Co.       T.   E.  n.  McMechan  &  Co. 

329  Arch  St.  410-412  E.  8th  St.  1602  Locust  St.  217  W.  Lake  St. 

SEVEN  FACTORIES 

Tonawanda,  N.  Y.  Rochester,  N.  H.  English  Agents:  J.  Whitehead  &  Co.,  Ltd., 

No.  Rochester,  N.  H.  Milton,  N.  H.  Leicester,  England. 

Townsend  Harbor,  Mass. 

Canadian  Agents 

International  Supply  Co,,  Kitchener,  Ontario  and  Quebec  City.    V.  Champigny,  Montreal 


18 


FOOTWEAR   IN  CANADA 


April,  1919 


A  Special 
Invitation 


If  you  are  unable  to 
call  on  us,  we  will  be 
pleased  to  forward 
samples  of  any  of  our 
lines.  Let  us  hear 
from  you  early. 


WE  should  like  you,  Mr. 
Jobber,  to  visit  our  show- 
rooms, and  see  what  we  are  offer- 
ing for  the  coming  season's  busi- 
ness. We  believe  that  the  Aird 
Shoes,  now  being  shown,  will 
particularly  commend  themselves 
to  you — there  are  many  reasons. 
Come  and  see  them. 


Aird  &  Son 


Registered 

MONTREAL 


iiwiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 


April,  I'Jl'J 


FOOTWEAR   IN  CANADA 


19 


IN  STOCK 


No.  06  Havana  Bro.  CALF  Bal.  NEOLIN  &  Wingfoot  Med.  Recede  5.50 

No.  25  Duchess  Bro.  CALF  Bal.  NEOLIN  Narrow  recede  -  5.95 

No.  26  Duchess  Bro.  CALF  Bal.  Natural  OAK  sole,  Recede       -  6.00 

No.  41  Velour  CALF  Bluch..  Slip  sole,  Medium  High  toe  -  5.50 

No.  86  Havana  Bro.  CALF  Bluch.  Wide  toe,  NEOLIN  &  Lea.  slip  6.00 

Many  other  styles  ALWAYS  IN  STOCK 

Order  sample  pairs  TODAY 

We  are  ready  to  hear  from  you 


The  Midland  Shoe  Company 

Kingston,  Ontario 


20 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


April,  I'JIO 


r?7 


mi 


4 


The  Eclipse  line 
is  now  the  most 
complete  range  of 
Children's  Footwear 
on  the  market  and  universally  admitted  a  trade-builder. 


ECLIPSE  AN  ADDED  ATTRACTION  IN  THE  ECLIPSE  LINE.    Has  all 

STITCHDOWN  the  advantages  of  the  regular  WELT  SHOE,  but  on  account  of 


■  WELT 


several  short  cuts  in  construction  can  be  sold  considerably  cheaper.  | 

Eclipse  Welt  is  Repairable.  | 

Do  not  fail  to  see  this  new  line  before  placing.  | 


I  McKAYS 


McKAY  WELTS  added  to  our  already  up-to-date  range  of  McKAYS 
in  all  sizes  and  materials,  makes  this  line  most  complete  and  desir- 
able. Broad,  easy-fitting  lasts,  high  grade  materials,  and  expert 
construction,  are  clearly  reflected  in  our  samples  this  season. 


■  TURNS 


This  line  is  built  to  satisfy  the  most  discriminating  buyer.  In  lasts, 
patterns,  materials  and  workmanship  our  enviable  reputation  in 
childrens'  TURNS  is  being  maintained.  We  offer  the  best  values 
obtainable. 


I  Strengthen  your  Childrens'  Department  and  put  it  on  a  paying  basis  by  | 

I  putting  in  a  full  range  of  ECLIPSE  | 

I  TRAVELLERS  NOW  OUT  | 

I  Wait  for  the  only  complete  range.    Everything  in  Footwear  from  infant's  size  1  to  | 

f  growing  girl's  size  6.  | 

I  The  Gait  Shoe  Manufacturing  Company,  Limited  | 

I  Gait         -         Ontario  | 


April,  1910 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


THE 

:marsh 

^SHOI 


Successful 
Shoes 


LINK  your  business 
with  the  success  of  this 
splendid  Marsh  Footwear. 
The  models  here  shown 
are  sold  in  cases  contain- 
ing 30  pairs  of  one  width. 
We  will  be  pleased  to  send 
you  our  complete  cata- 
logue and  information. 


"106"  LAST 
Made  in  All  Leathers 
Widths  B  to  E 


•'99"  LAST 
Made  in  All  Leathers 
Widths  B  to  E 


"104"  LAST 
Made  in  All  Leathers 
Widths  B  to  E 


The  Wm.  A.  Marsh  Co.,  Limited 

QUEBEC 


FOOT\\'EAR    IN  CANADA 


April,  1919 


FELT 

For  AH  Factory  Purposes 

FELT 

For 

Shoe  Rolls 
Shoe  Racks 
Fillers 
Toppings 

Uppers 


We  Make  up  FELT  of  Any  Kind,  at  Short 
Notice  to  Meet  YOUR  OWN  NEEDS 


We  Carry  a  Large  Supply  IN  STOCK 

SUPERIOR  QUALITY  AND  SERVICE 

We  Solicit  Your  Inquiries 


Commonwealth  Felt  Company 

76  Summer  St.,  BOSTON,  MASS.,  U.S.A. 


Heel  Pads 
Box  Toes 
Cushion  Soles 
Tongue  Linings 


April,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


23 


We 

Are 

Again 

To 

The 

Fore  

CITADEL 

GLAZED  HORSE 

1       Possesses    wearing  and 
cutting   qualities  equal 
1       to  Kid. 

Write 
for 

A  Line  which  will  meet 
your   every    want  when 
Glazed  Kid  is  required. 

1       To  the  Layman's  eye  it 
is  Kid. 

Samples 

On  account  of  the  extreme  scarcity  of  Glazed  Kid  we  have  no 
hesitancy  in  offering  the  above  to  the  Canadian  Shoe  Trade. 

We  can  cover  all  your  wants,  and  you  need  have  no  fear  in 
accepting  all  orders. 

J.  A.  SCOTT 

218  Notre  Dame  St.  West 
MONTREAL 

566  St.  Valier  Street 
QUEBEC 

24 


FOOTWRAR   TN  CANADA 


April,  1910 


Henwood  &  Nowak  Inc. 


BLACKS 

and 


COLORS 


95  South  Street    -    BOSTON,  MASS. 

Tannery  :  Wilmington,  Delaware,  U.S.A. 


The  C.  G.  Flynn  Leather  Co. 

107  South  Street,  BOSTON,  Mass. 

The  Largest  Leather  Remnant  and  Scrap  Leather  Dealers  in  the  World 

SPECIAL  LIST  OF  OFFERINGS 


Sole  Leather  Department 

40  tons  Oak  Buffalo  Hind  Shanks. 

20  tons  Oak  Buffalo  Fore  Shanks. 

50  tons  Oak  Bellies. 

15  tons  Extra  Wide  Russet  Leather 
Bellies. 

8  tons  Russet  Leather  Pieces. 

100  tons  Oak  and  Hemlock  Heeling 
from  5  to  12  cents  per  pound. 

100  tons  Oak  and  Hemlock  Half  Heel- 
ing from  I  to  5  cents  per  pound. 

Factory  Cut  Soles,  Outer  Soles,  Inner 
Soles  and  Half  Soles. 


Upper  Leather  Department 

20  tons  Black  Wax  Split  Shoulders. 
60  tons  Natural  or  Tan  Split  Shoulders 
and  large  Remnants  suitable  for  cutting 
shoes. 

75  tons  Upholsterers'  Remnants  from 
the  Automobile  and  Carriage  Trade, 
10  to  35  per  pound  from  hand  and  ma- 
chine Buffed  Leather. 

100  to  200  tons  Upper  Leather,  Hat 
Sheep,  Hat  Skivers,  Book  Sheep  and 
Imitation  Leather  Remnants  at  various 
prices. 

10  tons  Imitation  Leather  pieces  I 
and  up  36"  to  55"  wide. 


yd. 


Correspondence  Solicited  from  Buyers  and  Sellers 


April,  1910 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


Look  Out 


FOR  THE 


Independent  Brands 


Kant  Krack  Veribest 
Royal 

Dainty  Mode  Dreadnaught 

Our  travellers  are  showing 
a  full  range  of  the  many 
Independent  styles,  which 
fill  every  requirement  in 
rubber  footwear. 

As  to  the  quality  of  material 
and  excellence  of  manufac- 
ture, you  will  find  our  new 
samples  well  maintain  the 
high  reputation  so  long  en- 
joyed by  the  Independent 
lines. 


OUR  WHOLESALERS 


Amherst  Boot  &  Shoe  Co.,  Ltd.,  Amherst,  N.S. 

Amherst  Boot  &  Shoe  Co.,  Ltd.,  HaHfax,  N.S. 

E.  A.  Dagg  &  Company,  Calgary,  Alta. 

A.  W.  Ault  &  Company,  Limited,  Ottawa,  Ont. 

White  Shoe  Company,  Toronto,  Ont. 

McLaren  &  Dallas,  Toronto,  Ont. 

The  London  Shoe  Company,  Limited,  London,  Ont. 


Kilgonr,  Rimer  Company,  Limited. 
The  J.  Leckie  Company,  Limited, 
James  Robinson, 
Brown  Rochette,  Limited, 

T.  ^Long  &  Brother, 
Dowers,  Limited, 


Winnipeg,  Man. 
Vancouver,  B.C. 
Montreal,  Que. 
Quebec,  Que. 
Collingwood,  Ont 
Edmonton,  Alta. 


The  Independent  Rubber  Co.,  Limited 

MERRITTON  ONTARIO 


26 


FOOTWEAR   IN  CANADA 


April,  1919 


We  Pride  Ourselves  on 
Dominion  Rubber  System  Service 

The  mild  winter  may  mean  a  prolonged  wet  spring.  There  may  be  a 
much  greater  demand  for  Rubbers  than  you  have  anticipated. 

The  dealer  who  has  the  complete  stock  is  the  one  that  gets  the  business. 

Just  here  is  where  the  Dominion  Rubber  System  Service  plays  such  an 
important  part  in  your  business— because  it  enables  you  to  get  what  you 
want  when  you  want  it. 

Our  Service  Branches  make  possible  a  prompt  service  to  any  point  in 
Canada. 

Wire,  phone  or  write  your  emergency  orders  to  the  nearest  Dominion 
Rubber  System  Branch. 

Dominion  Rubber  System   Service  Branches  are  Located  at 


Halifax, 
St.  John, 
Quebec, 
Montreal, 
Ottawa, 


Toronto, 
Hamilton, 
London, 
Kitchener, 
North  Bay, 


Fort  William, 

Winnipeg, 

Brandon, 

Regina, 

Saskatoon, 


Edmonton, 

Calgary, 

Lethbridge, 

Vancouver, 

Victoria. 


^^^^^   ^ 

Dominion 


RUBBER 

<2C/ATED 


April,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


27 


How  to  Read  a 
Trade  Paper 


A  Journal  of  its  Findings,  Making  and  Sale. 
Published  Monthly  for  the  Good  of 
the  Trade  by 

HUGH  G.  MACLEAN,  LIMITED 

HUGH  C.  MacLEAN,  Winnipeg,  President. 
THOMAS  S.  YOUNG,  General  Manager. 


HEAD  OFFICE  -  347  Adelaide  Street  West,  TORONTO 
Telephone  A.  2700 

MONTREAL  -  Telephone  Main  2299  -  119  Board  of  Trade 

WINNIPEG  -  Tel.  Garry  856  -  Electric  Railway  Chambers 
VANCOUVER  -  Tel.  Seymour  2013  -  Winch  Building 
NEW  YORK  -  Tel.  3108  Beekman  -  1123  Tribune  Building 
CHICAGO  -  Tel.  Harrison  5351  -  1413  Gt.  Northern  Bldg. 
LONDON,  ENG.  16  Regent  Street  S.W. 

Authorized  by  the  Postmaster  General  for  Canada,  for  transmission 
as  second  class  matter. 

Entered  as  second  class  matter  July  18th,  1914,  at  the  Postoflfice  at 
Buffalo,  N.  Y.,  under  the  Act  of  Congress  of  March  3,  1879. 

SUBSCRIPTION  RATES 
Canada  and  Great  Britain,  $1.00.    U,  S.  and  Foreign,  $1.50. 
Single  copies  15  cents 

Vol.  9  April,  1919  4 

Manufacturers   and  jobbers  have 
Jobbers  May  Have    i^^^^^  requested  to  co-operate  with 
Samples  Earlier  .  i      u  j  i 

a  view  to  samples  being  ordered 

by  the  jobbers  at  an  earlier  date  than  is  now  the  cus- 
tom. It  is  suggested  that  manufacturers  should  have 
their  samples  ready  for  inspection  about  June  15th, 
instead' 'of  in  August.  The  movement  originated  with 
a  Montreal  firm  of  manufacturers,  the  idea  being  that 
the  date  suggested  would  be  of  particular  benefit  to 
Ontario  jobbers  who  would  thus  be  in  a  position  to 
start  out  their  travellers  directly  after  the  Toronto 
Exhibition.  The  15th  of  June  would  give  the  manufac- 
turers ample  time  to  get  the  samples  ready  by  the 
date  of  the  Exhibtion,  so  enabling  retailers  to  inspect 
them  during  their  visit  to  Toronto.  If  the  samples 
were  ordered  earlier  than  at  present,  they  would  be 
in  the  jdbbers  warehouses  early  in  August.  The  mat- 
ter has  been  taken  up  with  the  Montreal  and  Quebec 
branches  of  the  Shoe  Manufacturers'  Association,  and 
although  there  was  not  complete  unanimity  on  the  sub- 
ject, some  manufacturers  in  Ontario,  Montreal  and 
Quebec  have  agreed  to  have  their  samples  ready  by 
June  15th.  One  advantage  claimed  is  that  the  early 
ordering  of  samples  by  jobbers  would  facilitate  the 
prompt  delivery  of  the  satnples,  and  also  make  for  the 
better  filling  of  the  regular  orders. 


A  few  days  ago  we  were  in  the 
office  of  a  large  shoe  manufac- 
turer and  the  talk  drifted  around 
to  the  reading  of  trade  papers.  The  habit  of  many 
business  men  is  to  skim  over  the  book  as  quickly  as 
they  can,  picking  out,  possibly,  a  few  items  that  may 
be  of  interest  to  them  ;  then  the  book  is  thrown  aside 
and  forgotten.  This  manufacturer  says  that  when  the 
trade  paper  comes  in  he  places  it  in  front  of  him  on 
his  desk  and  reads  it  thoroughly  from  cover  to  cover. 
If  his  attention  is  needed  elsewhere  the  book  remains 
open  at  the  place  where  he  left  off.  Then  when  he 
is  able  he  resumes  reading.  This  may  be  in  an  hour, 
or  a  day  or  two  days,  but  in  any  event  the  book  is 
always  open,  ready  for  his  convenience.  Every  news 
item  is  read  just  as  carefully  as  every  advertisement 
and,  in  this  way,  he  gets  the  fullest  value  from  the 
book. 

The  man  who  says  he  "hasn't  got  time  to  read  the 
trade  paper"  might  well  profit  by  this  suggestion. 
Leave  the  book  on  your  de.sk  in  front  of  you — always 
open  at  the  place  you  left  ofif — read  it  sy.stematically 
and  thoroughly.  It  is  only  in  this  way  that  you  can 
hope  to  receive  the  complete  benefit. 

*  *  * 

At  a  meeting  on  March  24th  of 
Open  to  All         ^he  organizers  of  the  first  Cana- 
Manufacturers  ^,  a   j     j.\  u  i 

dian  bhoe  and  Leather  Exhibi- 
tion, to  be  held  in  Kitchener  in  July,  it  was  proposed 
by  Mr.  L.  O.  Breithaupt,  and  seconded  by  Mr.  L.  W. 
Hanson,  that  the  exhibition  be  thrown  open  to  all 
manufacturers  of  footwear  and  the  allied  industries  in 
Canada.  This  resolution  was  carried  unanimously, 
the  general  feeling  being  that  this  would  better  as- 
sist in  the  development  of  the  entire  footwear  indus- 
try throughout  the  Dominion. 

Mr.  A.  Inrig,  of  the  Lady  Belle  Shoe  Company, 
Kitchener,  was  in  Toronto  on  April  7,  and,  with  Mr. 
Hanson  of  the  United  Shoe  Machinery  Company,  vis- 
ited a  number  of  Toronto  manufacturers  with  a  view 
to  ascertaining  just  how  this  proposal  appealed  to 
them.  They  found  the  majority  to  be  highly  enthusi- 
astic and  willing  to  co-operate  in  every  way. 

*  *  * 

What's  in  a  price  ?  Often  it  is 
What's  in  a  Price  the  deciding  point  between  dis- 
trust, confidence  or  real  appreci- 
ation. We  all  know  that  if  a  man  stood  on  a  street 
corner  and  tried  to  sell  five-dollar  gold  pieces  for  98 
cents  he  would  be  arrested  as  a  suspicious  character 
and  remanded  for  medical  inspection.  That's  distrust. 
Sell  an  article  at  its  fair  value  plus  a  legitimate  pro- 
fit and  you  establish  confidence.  Sell  an  old  painting 
or  a  rare  set  of  books  for  a  thousand  dollars  and  you 
create  real  appreciation. 

The  right  selling  price  will  assist  in  sales,  while 
a  wrong  one  may  obstruct  sales.  A  price  that  is  too 
low  is  very  often  more  dangerous  than  one  that  is 


28 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


April,  I'Jl'.i 


"Less  Than  CosV  Announcement 
Out  of  Date 

A  retailer  who  had  been  in  the  habit  of 
announcing  his  clearances  as  "Shoes  worth 
up  to  $8  now  $2.98,  tried  the  experiment  re- 
cently of  saying  that  he  would  sell  shoes 
which  had  been  in  the  house  from  one  to 
three  years,  and  which  were  perfectly  good 
but  out  of  style,  for  $2.98,  without  mention- 
ing previous  prices. .  He  says  he  had  the 
quickest  and  most  successful  clearance  he 
ever  conducted,  also  proving  to  himself  that 
truthful  advertising  yields  the  best  results. 


Concerning  Oiled 
Floors 


too  high.  Sometimes  a  change  in  price,  even  very  lit- 
tle, one  way  or  the  other  will  greatly  increase  sales. 
In  the  psychology  of  selling  we  have  found  that  an 
automobile,  for  instance,  will  sell  at  $495  more  readily 
than  at  $500.  Again  a  car  is  priced  $985  and  many 
people  will  buy  it  who  would  hesitate  to  pay  $1,000. 
Beyond  question  there  is  a  certain  price  for  each 
article  that  will  greatly  increase  its  sale  and  it  would 
l)e  the  part  of  wisdom  for  retailers  to  give  more 
thought  and  study  to  the  matter.  Above  all,  do  not 
create  distrust  by  marking  your  merchandise  too  low. 

A  woman  in  Stirling,  Ontario, 
brought  an  action  for  damages 
against  George  Reynolds,  boot 
and  shoe  retailer  of  that  village,  for  hijuries  alleged 
to  have  resulted  by  slipping  on  the  defendant's  oiled 
floor.  The  action  was  tried  at  the  Supreme  Court  at 
Belleville,  Ont.  The  plaintiff  went  into  the  shoe  shop 
last  summer  to  look  at  some  shoes  and  while  there 
slipped  on  the  floor,  breaking  her  arm  in  two  places, 
injuring  her  knee,  side  and  other  parts  of  her  body. 
The  solicitor  for  the  defendant  contended  that  she 
entered  the  store  of  her  own  volition,  knew  the  floor 
was  oiled  and  that  it  was  usual  and  proper  to  oil  floors. 
A  customer  was  only  entitled  to  be  protected  from 
"unusual"  dangers  and  an  oiled  floor  could  not  in  any 
way  be  defined  as  an  "unusual  danger."  The  case  was, 
therefore,  dismissed  and  the  plaintiff  ordered  to  pay 
the  costs  of  the  action. 

While  this  judgment  should  not  deter  retailers 
from  making  their  floors  as  safe  as  possible  it  is  very 
interesting  as  transferring  the  liability  from  the  mer- 
chant to  the  customer. 

^  ^ 

There  is  a  disposition  on  the 
part  of  many  shoemen  to  avoid 
the  use  of  price  tickets  on  window 
displays — thinking,  in  many  cases  no  doubt,  that  the 
price  will  frighten  away  the  customer  but  that  if  they 
once  get  the  customer  into  the  store  the  value  of  the 
merchandise  will  offset  the  price  objection.    There  is 


Use  of  Price 
Tickets 


another  viewpoint — that  of  the  customer — which  is 
sometimes  not  taken  into  consideration  and  that  is — 
the  customer  is  just  as  likely  to  think  the  price  of  an 
unmarked  pair  of  shoes  is  beyond  his  reach.  The  great- 
est number  of  buyers,  by  far,  consists  of  those  of  limit- 
ed means — ^the  middle,  or  working  classes.  There- 
fore, in  not  quoting  prices  on  goods  in  window  dis- 
plays, the  merchant  is  making  it  very  difficult  to  get 
the  business  of  this  majority.  A  great  deal  of  the 
success  of  "popular-price"  stores  is  due  to  the.  fact 
that  they  are  lil^eral  with  the  use  of  price  tickets  and 
signs  and  it  is  no  doubt  also  true  that  much  busmess 
is  lost  by  "exclusive"  stores  because  they  do  not  dis- 
play prices' and  consequently  frighten  away  window- 
shoppers  who  might  otherwise  purchase.  A  certain  oil 
company  in  Toronto  sends  around  to  automooile 
owners  a  little  monthly  booklet  of  short  stories  and 
news  about  their  different  products.  At  the  ena  of 
each  booklet  there  is  a  post-card  printed  in  order  form, 
the  heading  which  reads:  "Fill  in  and  mail  your 
order  now."  And  yet  nowhere  in  this  book  have  pric- 
es ever  been  given.  Few  people  are  willing  to  order 
on  such  a  blind  basis,  and  so  the  booklet  loses  the 
greatest  part  of  its  value.  It  is  just  the  same  with  a 
show  window  that  does  not  display  the  price.  The 
window  is  an  invitation  to  "come  in  and  buy."  The 
customer  says  to  himself  "I  won't  go  in — I  don't  know 
the  price." 

In  certain  districts  where  much  of  the  shopping  is 
done  from  the  windows  the  scope  of  appeal  is  certam- 
ly  widened,  rather  than  limited,  by  the  plentiful  use  of 
])rice  cards. 

*    *  * 

In  the  recent  revenue  bill  pass- 
ed by  the  United  States  Sen- 
ate, to  become  effective  on 
may  ist,  a  luxury  tax  is  imposed  on  hosiery  and  shoes. 
The  clause  applicable  to  shoe  store  merchandise  is 
as  follows:  "When  sold  by  or  for  a  dealer  or  his 
estate  for  consumption  or  use,  taxes  on  the  followmg 
articles  are  to  be  paid  by  the  purchaser  to  vendor  at 
time  of  sale  on  so  much  of  the  amount  paid  therefor 
as  exceeds  the  price  specified :  boots,  shoes,  pumps, 
and  slippers,  men's,  women's,  misses'  and  boys,  (not 
including  shoes  or  appliances  made  to  order  for  per- 
sons having  crippled  or  deformed  feet)  in  excess  of 
$10  per  pair — 10  per  cent.  Hose  or  stockings,  silk, 
men's  and  boys',  in  excess  of  $1.00 — 10  per  cent.  Hose 
or  stockings,  silk,  women's  and  misses',  in  excess  of 
$2.00 — 10  per  cent."  Retailers  all  over  the  country 
are  urged  by  the  National  Association  to  unite  in  pro- 
test against  a  tax  that  is  deemed  inconsistent  and 
burdensome. 


U.  S.  Luxury  Tax  on 
Slioes  and  Hose 


Bill  Fitsem  says  he  never  asks  a  woman  the 
size  because  it's  more  satisfactory  to  measure 
than  to  argue. 

— HH— nil— M»— •MH^BM— Blt^— UN  ItU  HII— ItM  Mil— HI1-^|III  Itll— Id— ll|l  till— Hll— H*!* 


April,  1919 


FOOTWEAR   IN  CANADA 


29 


Mr.  Shooman  Celebrates  Dollar  Day — The  Story  is 
Told  by  "One  of  the  Extra  Help" 


THE  town  where  Mr.  Shooman  lives  is  a  wide 
awake  little  burg,  and  the  merchants  in  it  like 
to  make  business  hum  every  so   often.  For 
this  purpose  the  majority  of  them  have  banded 
together  to  form  a  Dollar  Day  Association. 

The  executive  of  the  Association  plan  a  sale  twice 
a  year.  They  advertise  the  day  widely,  and  supply 
window  posters  to  the  stores  that  participate.  They 
als'o  plan  a  special  attraction.  Last  time  it  was  a  band 
playing  in  the  centre  of  the  business  section.  The 
individual  merchants  plan  their  own  special  drawing 
cards,  however. 

This  plan  for  setting  coin  in  circulation  and  glad- 
dening the  bargain  lover's  heart  has  met  with  enthus- 
iasm and  success.  It  is  considered  the  red  letter  day 
of  the  shopping  year  when  Dollar  Day  is  celebrated. 

Mr.  Shooman  was  as  eager  as  any  merchant  in 
town  to  lure  the  crowds  in  .through  his  front  door. 
Accordingly,  he  spent  the  week  before  Dollar  Day  in 
reducing"  the  price  of  odd  lines, of  stock  to  a  mere  frac- 
tion of  the  original  cost.  These  were  the  Dollar  Day 
leaders.  He  had  the  clerks  remove  all  slow  sellers 
from  the  shelves  and  stock  rooms.  Off  came  a  fat 
slice  of  the  price  as  they  were  flung  on  the  bargain 
racks.  In  the  course  of  his  investigation  old  styles 
and  unpopular  shades  of  spats,  left  overs  in  boudoir 
slippers,  and  a  few  other  pet  oddities,  found  in  every 
shoe  store,  were  dropped  into  the  melting  pot  of  Ex- 
traordinary Values.  The  choicest  of  these  were  entic- 
ing-ly  displayed  in  the  windows;  and  the  lingering, 
longing  looks  that  would-be  buyers  cast  upon  them 
were  (Miiens  of  Dollar  Day  success. 

There  is  a  dignity  and  pleasing  arrangement  about 
Mr.  Shooman's  store  that  captivates  the  customer. 
The  displays  in  the  show  cases  are  well  arranged. 
The  decorations  are  tasteful.  The  stock  is  clean  and 
well  kept.  The  clerks  are  deft  and  courteous.  But  as 
Dollar  Day  approached  and  huge  bargain  racks  were 
hung  down  the  centre  and  side  aisles  and  across  the 
back  of  the  store,  with  the  thought  of  convenience 
rather  than  good  appearance,  the  quiet  dignity  of  the 
store  gave  place  to  a  more  jocular  air.  It  was  as  if 
one  and  all  were  conscious  that  the  great  commercial 
frolic  of  the  year  was  about  to  take  place. 

The  Lure  of  the  Bargain 

The  announcement  of  a  general  bargain  day  called 
forth  an  enthusiastic  response  from  the  neighboring 
towns  and  villages.  The  radials  that  led  to  Mr.  Shoo- 
man's town  were  crowded.  In  the  early  morning 
trains  there  was  not  even  standing  room  left  in  the 
baggage  cars.  This  deluge  of  women  armed  with 
shopping  bags  and  empty  valises,  pouring  out  of  the 
station  was  the  first  intimation  of  the  throngs  of  bar- 
gain hunters  who  would  soon  flood  the  down  town  sec- 
tion. 

Mr.  Shooman  had  not  thought  that  the  extra  help 
would  be  needed  till  the  middle  of  the  morning.  Less 
than  half  an  hour  after  opening  time  an  excited  but 
brief  message  told  its  own  story.  The  extra  help  lost 
no  time  in  arriving  at  Mr.  Shooman's  store.  Already 
the  crowds  were  lined  out  to  the  pavement  and  on  the 


locked  door  was  the  promising  sign:  "Open  In  Ten 
Minutes."  Fortunately  we  thought  of  the  back  door, 
and  in  less  time  than  one  would  believe  were  mixing 
in  the  indoor  melee  like  veterans. 

Salesmanship  was  a  superfluity  in  that  crowd.  The 
"serveself"  system  of  selling  was  the  only  method. 
The  clerks  were  merely  able  to  make  out  cash  slips, 
send  parcels  to  be  wrapped  and  see  that  customers  re- 
ceived their  correct  change  and  parcels. 

As  the  customers  were  served  they  were  shown  to 
the  back  door.  There  the  grinning  message  boy  glee- 
fully let  them  out  and  refused  admission  to  any  who 
tried  to  come  in.  By  degrees  the  store  would  become 
fairly  empty.  Some  one  would  go  to  open  the  front 
door  and  then  the  fun  would  begin  again.  A  fitful 
strain  of  music  from  the  band,  and  then  came  the 
elbowing,  shoving  advance  guard  with  a  rush.  Woe 
betide  the  clerk  who  hindered  their  onslaught. 

Customers  of  Many  Types 

There  were  customers  of  every  variety  ;  the  jolly 
Irish  mother  with  a  dozen  little  feet  to  buy  for,  and 


The  idea  was  given  prominence  in  window  displays — outside  as  well 
as  inside 

the  thin  nervous  spinster  with  the  hunted  look  in  her 
eye  and  a  pinched  redness  about  the  nose.  The  wo- 
men's name  was  legion  who  grabbed  everything  in 
reach  in  case  she  might  want  it.  There  was  the  fussy 
dame  who  wanted  every  shoe  pulled  out  of  the  window 
becavise  she  was  sure  she  saw  her  size  there  yesterday. 
Italians,  Jews,  Chinamen  and  dozens  of  women  who 
would  like  you  to  put  this  pair  aside  for  a  while,  came 
with  the  throng.  The  shoplifter  came  too,  and  had  the 
distinction  of  being  personally  escorted  to  the  door 
by  the  junior  partner. 

With  the  advancing  afternoon  it  was  considered 
.'^afe  to  leave  the  front  door  open.  The  crowds  came 
and  went  more  placidly.  The  stock  was  well  picked 
over,  even  the  reserve  bargains  were  almost  gone.  The 
windows  were  bare  except  for  a  hurriedly  inserted 


30 


FOOTWEAR   IN  CANADA 


April,  1910 


sign  "More  Bargains  Inside."  Now  the  customers 
could  get  a  little  more  attention.  Some  even  took  time 
to  try  on  shoes.  Others  became  critical  enough  to 
compare  $1.90  shoes  with  the  regular  ten  dollar  stock. 

However,  there  were  enough  bargain  hunters  to 
ignore  the  critical  ones.  In  fact,  as  the  selection  be- 
came more  meagre  the  purchasers  seemed  to  take  al- 
most anything.  It  was  not  long  before  some  optimist 
had  bought  one  yellow  and  one  green  boudoir  slipper 
for  a  pair,  and.  some  other  fair  purchaser  had  managed 
to  squeeze  her  ankles  into  a  size  two  right  spat  and  a 
gize  four  left. 


At  closing  time  the  store  had  an  indescribably  dis- 
hevelled appearance.  The  racks  were  bare.  Empty 
boxes  and  odds  and  ends  were  littered  broadcast.  The 
jauntiest  clerk  leaned  limply  against  a  show  case.  The 
cashier  was  adding'  and  readding  her  columns,  unable 
to  believe  the  grand  total,  while  Mr.  Shooman  was 
rubbing  his  hands  with  delight. 

As  for  the  extra  help,  one  was  heard  to  say  to  the 
other:  "No  ma'am  we  do  not  deliver  today — strictly 
cash — No  ma'am  we  do  not  exchange  sale  shoes.  I'll 
be  saying  it  in  my  sleep.  But  say,  I  wouldn't  mind 
another  Dollar  Day,  would  you  ?" 


How  Much  of  Your  Stock  Do  You  Own? 


THE  most  profitable  goods  are  sometimes  never 
owned  at  all,  but  often  sold  before  payment  is 
due  on  them.  Four  "turns"  a  year  means  that 
the  manufacturer  furnished  one-third  of  the 
capital  and  the  dealer  never  owns  more  than  two- 
thirds  of  his  stock,  which  all  goes  to  show  that  "turn- 
over" is  vastly  more  important  than  "profit-per-pair." 
Just  how  this  works  out  is  explained  in  an  interesting 
manner  in  a. recent  issue  of  Shoe  Facts. 

If  a  retailer  could  turn  his  whole  stock  every  thirty 
days,  it  might  be  possible  to  do  business  wholly  upon 
capital  furnished  by  the  manufacturer,  and  without 
ever  really  owning  a  dollar's  worth  of  merchandise. 

So  the  question  "How  much  of  your  stock  do  you 
own?"  is  not  so  foolish  as  it  may  appear  at  first  sight. 
The  answer  to  it  has  a  direct  bearing  upon  one  of  the 
vital  facts  of  your  business:  your  rate  of  turnover. 

Old  Silas  Crabtree,  who  ran  the  general  store  of 
our  boyhood  days,  used  to  rub  his  hands  with  satisfac- 
tion as  he  surveyed  his  rows  of  shelVes ;  "Every  dol- 
lar's worth  of  it  mine,  by  ginger,"  he  used  to  say. 
"Bought  and  paid  for.  I  don't  owe  no  man  a  dollar, 
by  heck  !"  Which  was  all  true  enough  ;  but  some  of  the 
goods  on  Silas'  shelves  had  been  there  for  years — 
since  before  we  were  born  probably — and  if  we  re- 
member correctly  Silas'  wife  did  all  her  own  work, 
and  a  couple  of  his  children  "clerked"  in  the  store  out- 
side of  school  hours.  Silas  wasn't  exactly  a  shining  ex- 
ample of  merchandising  wisdom. 

His  stock  was  bought  and  paid  for,  truly,  and  it  re- 
presented an  asset  on  his  books,  if  he  kept  any.  But 
the  only  way  he  could  get  the  value  out  of  it  would 
be  with  a  coal-oil  can  and  a  match,  and  even  then  the 
Insurance  Company  would  question  his  inventory. 

A  Sign  of  Weakness 

Times  have  changed  since  the  days  of  Silas  Crab- 
tree,  and  changed  for  the  better.  The  modern  merch- 
ant appreciates  that  it  is  not  a  sign  of  strength  when 
he  owns  "every  dollar's  worth"  of  his  stock.  It  is  more 
likely  to  be  a  sign  of  weakness — a  danger  signal. 

Silas  bought  his  merchandise  pretty  much  on  price. 
If  the  quality  looked  all  right,  and  the  price  was  such 
that  he  could  make  a  sufficient  margin  of  gross  profit 
(on  paper),  he  stocked  the  goods.  The  modern  merch- 
ant looks  as  closely  at  quality  and  margin  of  profit  as 
ever  Silas  did,  but  he  also  asks  something  else — an 
important  something.  "Will  these  goods  sell  fast 
enough  to  enchance  my  capital,  or  will  they  go  so 
slowly  as  to  reduce  it  ?  Must  I  pay  for  the  whole 
smear  out  of  capital,  or  will  they  bring  me  back  some- 


thing before  they  must  be  paid  for?  Is  there  any 
demand  for  them  among  my  customers  ?  What  do  my 
customers  know  about  them  anyway,  and  is  it  favor- 
able?" 

"Ah,  but  look,"  says  the  salesman,  "at  the  ten  cents 
extra  margin !  Even  if  they  are  unknown  to  your  cus- 
tomers you  can  make  this  extra  profit." 

"Too  slow,"  says  the  retailer.  "I'm  not  interested 
in  owning  goods,  but  in  selling  them.  I'll  buy  the 
well-known  line  at  ten  cents  more,  and  a  third  of  my 
stock  will  be  sold  before  the  bill  comes  due.  I'll  have 
to  furnish  capital  for  but  two-thirds  of  that  purchase, 
as  against  the  whole  of  your  proposition.  That's  a 
saving  which  rather  knocks  the  spots  ofl  your  ten- 
cent  cut  in  prices. 

"It  is  to  my  interest  to  conduct  as  much  ,  of  my 
business  on  the  manufacturer's  capital  as  I  can.  If  he 
>vill  create  a  demand  for  his  goods  among  my  custo- 
mers, so  that  I  can  sell  a  third  or  a  quarter  of  them  be- 
fore payment  is  due,  he  is  simply  increasing  my  finan- 
cial power  by  a  third  or  a  quarter.  My  resources  will 
stretch  a  third  or  a  quarter  farther.  I  can  do  25  to 
33  1/3  per  cent,  more  business  in  a  year,  without  in- 
creasing my  investment,  if  I  can  buy  every  line  I  carry 
on  the  same  basis.  It  will  take  more  than  a  miserable 
ten-cent  cut  in  price  to  offset  an  advantage  like  that." 

The  Modern  Attitude 

Such  is  the  attitude  of  the  modern  merchant — the 
merchant  who  runs  his  business  according  to  real  fun- 
damental principles,  who  understands  the  tremendous 
driving  power  of  consumer  demand,  who  appreciates 
the  big  difl^erence  between  owning  his  stock  and  sell- 
ing it. 

Commercial  agencies  tell  us  that  a  large  proportion 
of  the  retailers  who  fail  do  so  because  of  hisufficient 
capital.  But  what  is  "insufficient  capital?"  Simply 
capital  that  does  not  turn  often  enough .  I  know  of  a 
middle  western  shoe  retailer  who  started  with  a  cap- 
ital of  $167.00,  and  he  owns  and  occupies  a 
seven-storey  building  to-day  vvhich  is  worth  $250,000. 
Another  retailer  within  my  knowledge  started  with  a 
capital  of  $20,000,  and  went  broke  in  ten  years.  The 
$167  was  "sufficient"  and  the  $20,000  was  "insuffi- 
cient." What  is  the  answer?  Turnover. 

What  has  this  to  do  with  owning  your  stock  ?  A 
whole  lot.  The  man  with  the  capital  of  $167  bought 
goods  which  sold  so  fast  that  his  customers  furnished 
him  with  part  of  the  cash  with  which  to  pay  for  them. 
He  never  owned  more  than  2/3  to  3/4  of  his  stock  at 


April,  191'J 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


31 


The  shortage  of  bearled  buckles  caused  by  the  inability  of  manufacturers  to  secure  beads  from  Europe  is  being  relieved  by  the 
introduction  of  imitation  beaded  buckles.  They  are  said  to  be  very  much  more  serviceable,  too.  These  are  manufactured  by  the 
Kescot  Mfg.  Co.,  of  Providence 


I 


any  one  time.  He  never  had  to  go  clear  to  the  bottom 
of  his  re.source.s  in  order  to  pay  his  bills. 

The  $20,000  man,  on  the  other  hand,  bought  stock 
which  sold  so  slowly  (being  unknown  to  the  consum- 
ing public)  that  his  bills  were  due  before  he  had  dis- 
posed of  any  appreciable  quantity.  He  owned  5/6  to 
7/8  of  his  stock  all  the  time,  and  it  was  a  big  stock — a 
slow-moving  stock.  And,  being  slow  moving,  it'grew 
bigger  and  higger.  livery  time  he  bought  new  goods 
a  still  bigger  surplus  was  left  on  his  shelves  to  be  sold 
at  a  loss.  By  and  by  the  time  catne  when  he  had  to 
dig  clear  to  the  bottom  to  meet  his  bills  and  cover 
his  losses.  And  then  he  was  through. 

So  the  cjuestion  as  to  how  much  of  your  stock  you 
own  may  be  of  some  considerable  importance  after  all. 
Assuming  that  you  buy  at  30  days  net : 

If  you  own  2/3  of  your  stock,  you  are  turning  it 
4  times  a  year,  and  are  making  4  profits.  You  are  in- 
creasing the  power  of  your  capital  by  33  1/3  per  cent. 

If  you  own  3/4  of  your  stock,  you  are  turning  it 
3  times  a  year,  making  3  profits,  and  your  capital  pow- 
er is  increased  25  per  cent. 

If  you  own  5/6  of  it,  you  are  making  but  2  turns 
and  2  profits.  Your  capital  power  is  increased  but  16.6 
per  cent. 

In  other  words,  if  you  can  concentrate  your  buying 
upon  fast  selling  lines,  which  have  the  force  of  a  public 
demand  behind  them,  you  can  do  business  on  less  cap- 
ital because  you  never  own  your  whole  stock  at  any 
one  time.  You  are  doing  part  of  3^our  business  on  the 
manufacturer's  capital. 

And  remember  this  ;  the  oftener  you  can  buy,  and 
the  smaller  the  average  investment  you  can  make,  the 
easier  it  is  to  keep  down  the  proportion  of  your  stock 
which  you  own.  That  is  one  of  the  big  advantages  of 
letting  the  manufacturer  carry  your  reserve  stock,  and 
of  sizing-in  weekly  or  oftener.  In  that  way  you  can 
watch  your  stock  more  closely,  concentrate  on  the 
"sellers,"  and  avoid  piling  up  a  bunch  of  "stickers" 
which  vou  own  outright. 


First  Shoemaker:  These  tight  skirts  are  fine  for 
the  shoe  business. 

Second  S.M :  What  have  skirts  got  to  do  with 
shoes? 

First  S.M  :  Well,  where  a  girl  used  to  take  a  hun- 
dred steps  to  the  block,  she  now  takes  four  hundred. 


Opposed  to  Guessing  Contests 


MERCHANTS  in  the  West  have,  in  the  past, 
given  some  support  to  an  auto  contest 
scheme  to  boost  business,  put  on  apparently 
by  some  independent  promoter.  In  this  con- 
nection the  Saskatchewan  and  Alberta  branches  of  the 
Retail  Merchants'  Association  have  gone  on  record  as 
being  opposed  to  sales  plans  of  this  nature  and  in 
their  publication,  "The  Retailer,"  have  the  following 
statement:  "We  are  unalterably  opposed  to  any 
scheme  of  the  nature  of  the  contest  now  being  conduct- 
ed by  the  Auto  Contest  Company,  as  a  means  of  in- 
creasing business  and  have  already  taken  steps  to  see 
that  the  section  of  the  Criminal  Code  of  Canada  deal- 
ing with  such  matters  is  amended  so  as  to  afi:'ectively 
put  a  .stop  to  any  such  scheme  in  the  future.  The  as- 
sociation considers  such  contests  to  be  bad  in  principle 
and  altogether  a  vicious  form  of  advertising.  We  be- 
lieve also  that  instead  of  having  a  beneficial  effect  on 
the  business  of  the  merchant  concerned,  it  has  rather 
the  opposite  effect  and  results  in  raising  a  suspicion  in 
the  minds  of  the  purchasing  public  that  if  the  merchant 
putting  on  such  a  contest  can  aflford  to  give  away  an 
automobile  and  $500  or  $1,000  in  cash,  he  is  pulling 
down  more  profit  on  the  sale  of  his  merchandise  than 
he  is  entitled  to.  The  cry  has  been  raised  that,  "If  I 
don't  go  in,  my  opposition  will."  Well,  let  him,  if  he 
chooses  to  do  so ;  we  presume  each  individual  retailer 
is  running  his  own  business,  and  not  allowing  his  op- 
position to  run  it  for  him.  Moreover,  if  each  individual 
retailer  would  absolutely  refuse  to  have  anything  to 
do  with  any  such  afl:"air  as  this  until  the  promoters  had 
secured  the  endorsement  of  their  Retail  Merchants' 
Association,  it  would  not  be  long  before  the  country 
was  rid  of  them. 

"If  any  proposed  scheme  is  considered  legitimate, 
and  can  be  shown  that  it  will  benefit  the  retailer  and 
his  customer  as  well,  the  Association  will  be  glad  to 
help  it  along  and  the  endorsement  of  the  Association 
will  go  a  long  way  tow^ards  insurmg  its  success ;  but  if 
the  scheme  is  not  up  to  the  mark  no  time  will  be  lost 
in  saying  no,  and  ten  chances  to  one  the  promoters 
will  not  waste  their  time  and  ours  by  approaching  us 
for  our  endorsement.  This  simply  comes  down  to  an 
individual  matter.  Let  every  merchant  absolutely  re- 
fuse to  consider  any  such  proposition  until  the  endorse- 
ment of  the  Association  has  been  secured.  Simple, 


32 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


April,  1010 


isn't  it? — but  ef¥ective — and  tliat  is  wliat  your  Associa- 
tion is  for.  Don't  fall  for  it  first,  and  then  "holler" 
afterwards.  Usually  there  is  a  mighty  poor  chance  of 
recovering  any  of  the  money  you  have  invested.  Do 
l)usiness  with  legitimate  concerns  in  a  legitimate  way." 


Hamilton  Shoemen  Elect  Officers 

THE  annual  meeting  of  the  Hamilton  Shoe  Re- 
tailers' Association  was  held  recently,  and  of- 
ficers elected  for  the  current  year.    Mr.  Fred 
I..  Kickley,  former  secretary,  was  elected  pre- 
sident, and  the  vice-president  will  be  Mr.  W.  Smith, 
with  INIr.  A.  L.  Wilson  as  secretary-treasurer.  The  As- 
sociation has  been  formed  now  about  a  year,  and  al- 


Mr.  F.  L.  Kickley 


though  it  was  merely  a  trial  attair  in  the  first  place, 
the  results  have  made  the  members  highly  enthusias- 
tic. A  l)an(|uet  is  spoken  of  for  the  near  future. 


Manufacturer  Says  No  Cause  for  Worry 

THAT  there  is  no  immediate  cause  for  worry  or 
complaint  over  conditions  in  the  shoe  industry 
is  the  opinion  of  Col.  H.  N.  Lape,  of  Julian  & 
Kokenge,  Cincinnati.  "In  all  probability"  he  continued, 
"the  demand  for  women's  high  grade  footwear  will  be 
even  greater  than  the  supply.  This  will  apply  espec- 
ially to  light,  airy  shoes,  made  from  kid  stocks,  w'hich 
unquestionably  will  have  the  call.  Colored  kids,  such 
as  gray  and  ivory,  will  be  in  wonderful  demand,  but 
unless  the  tanners  make  more  prompt  deliveries  than 
at  present  there  will  be  but  little  use  of  pushing  color- 
ed kids.  Many  of  the  leading  tanners  are  experiment- 
ing in  colors,  but  they  ofifer  no  encouragement  as  to 
time  of  delivery,  or  as  to  the  quantities. 

"There  can  be  no  recession  in  price  for  at  least  an- 
other year,  as  the  great  demand  for  kid,  both  black  and 
colors,  will  prohibit  the  dropping  of  this  particular 
stock,  and  with  the  new  labor  prices  which  are  just 
being  settled  through(;ut  the  shoe  industry,  and  which 
must  remain  in  force  for  at  least  a  year,  prices  cannot 
hope,  to  come  down,  but  may  .s'how  an  increase  of  from 
15  to  50  cents  per  pair  over  six  months  ago.  T  do  not 
mean  that  the  labor  cost  will  be  this  much,  but  with 


the  firm  price  of  leather,  and  with  the  additional  cost 
of  labor  and  the  rising  overhead  expense,  due  to  lack 
of  production,  there  is  no  relief  in  sight  at  present. 
Personally,  I  do  not  feel  that  there  should  be  any  relief. 
Women  are  educated  to  pay  good  prices  for  good 
shoes,  and  the  merchant  who  wishes  for  the  return  of 
old  conditions,  when  he  sold  a  volume  of  shoes  at  $4.00 
to  $6.00,  simply  does  not  know  the  possibilities  of  re- 
tailing merchandise  at  higher  prices. 

"We  are  told  that  in  England  black  kid  stock  is  in 
great  demand,  and  selling  at  $1.50  per  foot,  so  under 
the  circumstances  who  can  look  forward  to  cheaper 
shoes  ? 

"Lace  boots  will  constitute  90  to  95  per  cent  of  the 
sales  for  next  fall,  and  there  should  be  a  great  revival 
in  the  character  of  shoes  sold.  Wood  heels,  narrow 
toes,  longer  vamps,  and  leather  Louis  heels,  ranging 
from  two  to  two  and  one-quarter  inches  in  heig'ht,  will 
be  the  most  popular  sellers.  Of  course,  walking  boots 
will  be  popular,  but  not  in  the  same  proportion  they 
have  been  during  the  past  few  seasons. 

"To  sum  it  up,  I  should  say  that  medium  dark  gray 
kid,  ivory  kid,  field  mouse  and  all  brown  kid,  black  kid, 
and  one  shade  of  tan  calf  will  cover  the  color  situation. 
There  will  be  some  White  boots  sold,  but  the  big  and 
sure  bet  will  be  black  kid  boots,  with  a  marked  in- 
crease in  patents. 

"IVIany  merchants  feel  that  there  is  bound  to  be  a 
drop  in  price,  but  they  are  not  in  touch  with  the  situa- 
tion as  they  should  be.  When  the  selling  season  rolls 
around,  and  they  find  that  prices  have  not  dropped, 
but  have  increased,  they  will  make  their  purchases 
along'  the  same  liberal  and  intelligent  lines  as  they 
have  in  the  past."' 


Joint  Action  to  Get  Orders  Abroad 

CANADIAN  shoe  manufacturers,  at  a  confer- 
ence held  at  Ottawa,  on  April  4,  at  the  invita- 
tion of  the  Canadian  Trade  Commission,  de- 
cided to  form  an  export  association,  which 
every  manufacturer  will  be  asked  to  join  to  undertake 
joint  action  in  securing  for  Canadian  factories  part 
of  the  large  orders  now  known  to  be  pending  in  Fur- 
ope.  The  matter  of  overseas  representation  will  be 
btought  up  as  one  of  urg-ency  before  the  executive  of 
the  Shoe  Manufacturers'  Association  of  Canada,  which 
meets  on  the  15th  instant.  This  was  one  of  a  series 
of  conferences  within  trade  groups  being  arranged 
by  the  Canadian  Trade  Commission  to  bring  clearly 
before  Dominion  manufacturers  the  present  opportuni- 
ties in  foreign  fields,  and  the  all  important  necessity 
for  creating  a  permanent  export  trade  to  keep  factories 
working  full  time. 

Those  present  included  T.  H.  Lane,  of  Ames-Hold- 
en-McCready ;  Geo.  A.  Slater,  of  George  A.  Slater, 
Ltd. ;  F.  W.  Manson,  of  the  King  Shoe  Company,  Ltd. ; 
Ralph  Locke,  of  Dufresne  &  Locke,  Ltd. ;  W.  F.  Mar- 
tin, of  Kingsbury  Footwear  Company,  Ltd. ;  W.  S. 
Duffield,  of  J.  McPherson  Company;  T.  Sisman,  of  the 
T.  Sisman  Shoe  Co. ;  Albert  Tetrault,  of  the  Tetrault 
Shoe  Mfg.  Company,  Ltd.,  and  F.  S.  Scott,  of  Getty  & 
Scott,  Ltd.  Mr.  H.  C.  WiLs'on,  inspector  of  boots  in  the 
Militia  Department,  was  oft'ered  the  post  of  overseas 
representative . 

Frank  Springstead  is  covering  Ontario  from  Fort  Wil- 
liam F.ast,  and  the  province  of  Quebec,  including  Montreal, 
for  the  Minister  Myles  Shoe  Company,  Toronto. 


April,  1919 


FOOTWEAR   IN  CANADA 


33 


T 


HERE  is  not  much  doulDt  l)ut  that  Easter 
weather,  this  year,  unHke  former  years,  will  be 
of  the  kind  highly  favorable  to  the  blossoming- 
out  of  new  Spring  apparel,  and  every  indication 
points  to  phenomenal  spring  business  in  the  shoe 
stores  of  the  Dominion.  Getting  off  to  a  good  start, 
however,  means  quite  a  good  deal  and  it  is  safe  to  say 
that  you  will  get  just  about  as  much  l:)usiness  as  you 


If 


e^e  L^umiies  caiid  spea 
'II  -J  111 

~    Ihcyd  loli^ou  some  * 
riice  tilings  about 


k 


our 


Footwear 


Fig.  1 — Suggestion  for  Siiow  Card 

go  after.  Which  is  just  another  way  of  saying  that  ff 
you  sit  down  and  wait  for  the  people  to  come  in — 
they'll  go  some  place  else. 

Easter  is  a  time  when  the  fashion  idea  is  more 
prominent,  perhaps,  than  at  any  other  time  of  the 
year.  The  minds  of  the  women  in  your  community 
are  already  running  freely  along  the  lines  of  new 
style  in  dress.  They  are  talking  style,  thinking  style, 
and  doubtless  dreaming  it,  too.  The  planning  of  the 
Spring  wardrobe  this  year  will  also  be  free  from  many 
of  the  restrictions  that  applied  to  the  wartime  years. 

Footwear  is  Coming  Into  Its  Own 

Shoes  have  taken  their  rightful  place  in  feminine 
dress  and  the  problem  of  changing  their  thoughts 
from  millinery  to  footwear  is  not  nearly  so  formid- 
able a  task  as  in  former  years. 

An  Easter  campaign,  presupposing  you  have  pur- 
chased correctly,  is  largely  a  matter  of  advertising 
and  window  display. 


This  is  the  time  when  your  Spring  stock  should 
begin  to  move  out  freely. 

The  show  window  should  be  considered  as  a  part 
of  your  store  visible  to  the  customer,  and  which  indi- 
cates the  character  of  the  invisible  portion.  It  need 
not  be  elaborate  but  is  should  be  neat,  attractive  and 
suggestive  of  the  new  spring  styles  on  your  .shelves. 

Plenty  of  Ideas  for  Easter  Displays 

The  Easter  season  lends  itself  particularly  well 
to  novel  and  attractive  window  displays.  There  are 
many  little  kinks  that  can  be  employed,  such  as  eggs, 
rabbits,  bunnies,  Easter  lilies  and  so  on.  In  fact  the 
range  in  ideas  is  almost  unlimited,  and  the  cost  of 
carrying  out  some  such  design  is  a  minor  detail  to 
the  advertising  value. 

An  Easter  Innovation 

This  year  one  of  the  stores  down  in  Boston  startl- 
ed the  natives  with  something  like  an  innovation  in 


UR  WEATMER  MAN 


I     I       will  Le  Li-i^Kl:  blue 

vvcalkt'i"'  if  op  sliini-'S, 

lei  an  lit  vou  wilk  a  pair  ififst; 

Spring  Oxfords 


Fi9 


2 — Card  Design 


Easter  window  trims.  They  wanted  to  get  some- 
thing out  of  the  ordinary — a  window  display  that 
would  be  entirely  dift'erent  from  anything  that  has 
gone  before. 

Here's  how  they  did  it. 

There  is  a  high-class  ladies'  millinery  store  in  the 
same  Iniilding  and  the  manager  of  the  shoe  store  had 


34  FOOTWEAR   IN    CANADA  »  April,  loio 


little  difficulty  in  securing  the  loan  of  three  of  their 
niftiest  Spring  creations.  The  hats  were  then  introduc- 
ed in  combination  with  his  display  of  Easter  footwear 
— the  millinery  being  on  appropriate  stands  slightly 
raised  above  the  footwear  and  the  shoes  were  arrang- 
ed, of  course,  so  that  they  corresponded  with  the  style 
effects  in  the  hats.  For  instance  a  lady's  sport  shoe 
is  displayed  along  with  a  sports  hat  and  a  dress  hat  is 
displayed  in  connection  with  dress  shoes. 

The  background  color  scheme  of  the  window  is 
white  and  purple.  Sixteen  jKiirs  of  shoes  and  three 
hats  in  all  are  contained  in  the  display.  The  shoes  are 
arranged  so  that  eleven  pairs  are  resting  on  the  floor, 
which  is  covered  with  white  material,  and  five  pairs 
are  raised  on  suitable  display  stands.  The  centre  fix- 
ture, which  is  higher  than  the  others,  is  placed  upon 
a  drapery  of  purple  material.  Artificial  flowers  over- 
head are  used  with  good  eft'ect  and  a  tastefully  de- 
signed show-card  tops  off  the  display. 

The  manager  of  the  store  says  that  the  window  is 


attracting  all  the  attention  they  anticipated.  Women 
say :  "I  didn't  know  they  sold  hats  as  well  as  shoes," 
but  any  who  enter  the  store,  with  the  intention  of 
looking  at  hats,  are  directed  to  the  millinery  store 
that  supplied  them — this  being  their  recompense  for 
loaning  the  headgear.  The  combination  of  hats  and 
shoes  in  the  window  display,  however,  links  the  im- 


Easter  Morning  farade  ?  : 

I   *^   Our  Styles  3.ve  ^ 
usT  C3orpcct.  -=i  i 

i 

;  ^  1 

Fig.  4 — There  are  numerous  ideas  for  window  cards 

portance  of  footwear  with  millinery  in  the  minds  of 
the  public,  and  this  is  just  the  thing  that  retailers  are 
striving  for. 

Show  Card  Designs 

For  Easter  show-cards  the  same  ideas  can  be  in- 
corporated that  are  used  in  the  actual  window  trim — 
that  is,  provided  you  wish  to  make  them  a  little  out 
of  the  ordinary,  with  designs  of  bunnies,  chickens, 
lilies,  and  so  on,  and  this  is  quite  worth  the  little  ex- 
tra expense  and  eft'ort.  (See  Figs.  1,  2  and  4.) 

Use  Suitable  Advertising  Cuts 

Some  types  of  advertising  lay-outs  and  display 
cards  are  shown  herewith.  For  newspaper  advertising 
it  is  always  appropriate  to  secure  border  designs  and 
cuts  in  keeping  with  the  season.  Easter  lilies  make 
about  the  most  appropriate  design  and  the  cut  used  in 
Fig.  5  is  fairly  typical. 

By  way  of  change,  and  to  -stir  up  a  little  extra 
business,  children's  shoes  may  be  advertised  for  the 
Easter  season,  and  suitable  cuts  are,  of  course,  ad- 
visable. (See  Fig.  3). 

If  you  have  a  line  of  white  shoes,  say  "White  as 
the  lily  for  Easter-tide."  The  old  expressions  "]nst 
Out,"  "Newly  Flatched,"  and  so  on,  have  lost  none 
of  their  popularity  and  are  always  appropriate,  with 
suitable  designs.  (Fig.  6). 

The  Opportunity  is  Worth  Some  Effort. 

Of  course  it  takes  a  little  time  and  thought  to 
make  the  windows  and  advertising-  work  together  for 
more   Easter   business — but   so   does   anything  else 


Easter  Shoes  for 
the  Kiddies  Too 


Styles  the  latest.  But 
style  is  not  everything— you 
want  serviceable  shoes  — 
and  we  have  just  that  kind 
—  made  of  good  sturdy 
leather,  in  brown  or  black. 

You  may  safely  leave 
the  fitting  to  us. 

Prices  reasonable.  We 
want  you  to  have  value  for 
your  money. 

(Your  Store  Name) 


Fig.  3 — In  advertising  children's  shoes  use  suitable  cuts 


April,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


35 


Fig.  5 — An  advertising  suggestion  using  the  Easter  lily  to  emphasize 

season 

which  really  increases  your  turnover.  It  is  well  worth 
the  effort,  however,  for  it  not  only  helps  to  start  the 
spring  season  with  enthusiasm,  but  it  serves  to  plant 
the  impression  in  the  community  that  your  store  is 
particularly  live  and  wide  awake. 

Try  it  out  this  year.  Go  over  your  stock — plan 
your  Easter  displays  and  advertising.  See  if  the  re- 
sults are  not  big  enough  to  warrant  you  in  giving 
more  time  and  thought  to  seasonal  opportunities 
throughout  the  year. 


the 


Women's  New  York  Fashions 

The  call  at  present  is  for  solid  colors, 
according  to  a  style  report  in  Modern  Shoe- 
making.  Gray  kid,  brown  kid,  and  some 
stores  report  all  blacks  going  very  good  in 
highcuts  at  top  prices.  Combinations  are 
featured  in  sales,  and  that  is  the  only  way 
they  are  selling  this  month.  Low-cuts  are 
more  attractive  to  ladies  at  present,  apart 
from  i)rices,  than  any  bargains  that  can  be 


Fig.  6 — An  Easter  idea  that  may  be  used  in  news- 
paper advertising,   show  cards  or  window  display 


offered  in  high  shoes.  A  few  weeks  ago 
Russia  oxfords  came  forth  \\'\th  full  leather 
heels. — a  real  winter  low-cut, — and  some 
thought  it  would  stop  at  that ;  but  that  was 
only  the  beginning  of  the  early  spring  run 
on  low-cuts. 

Tans  are  still  good,  but  now  the  darker 
leathers  are  in  demand,  but  in  lighter 
weights.  Mat  kid,  black  kid  and  patent  lea- 
ther are  selling  in  equal  proportions  in  the 
regular  pattern  oxfords.  Brown  Suede  is 
also  being  sold.  Gray  kid  and  some  Suede 
in  the  same  color  with  Louis  heels  also  get 
the  call  in  some  sections. 

The  call  for  low  shoes  is  here  to  stay 
for  the  season  and  the  regular  eyelet  ox- 
fords will  have  some  competition  from  the 
call  for  colonials  and  pumps.   Mat  kid  and 
patent  leather  colonials   are   selling  early, 
also  the  new  closed  tongue  pump  in  the 
same  leathers,  and  this  pattern  is  selling  in 
a  plain  front,  some  having  two  or  three 
small  buttons  to  imitate  a  button  oxford. 
A  few  stores  feature  the  tongue  pump  in  patent 
leather  with  a  small  gore  at  the  side,  and  report  it 
selling  heavily . 


The  Biachford  Shoe  Manufacturing  Company,  Toronto, 
have  opened  a  sample  room  at  the  Queen's  Hotel,  Toronto. 


Why  Pumps  Gape 

A  shoe  manufacturer  recommends  that  retailers, 
in  ordering  pumps,  specify  that  they  shall  be  made  on 
regular  pump  lasts  and  not  on  boot  lasts.  When  a 
boot  last  is  used  for  pumps,  the  foot  presses  down  on 
the  shank  of  the  pump  and  that  makes  the  sides  of  the 
pump  gape.  When  a  regular  pump  last  is  used  the 
foot  bears  down  on  the  ball  and  the  heel  of  the  foot. 
This  tends  to  draw^  the  sides  of  the  pump  as  tight  as  a 
string  along  the  sides  of  the  foot. 


36 


FOOTWEAR 


IN  CANADA 


April,  1919 


Canadian  Mission  to  France  Received 
Some  Large  Orders 


THE  deputation  of  Canadian  shoe  manufacturers 
which  visited  England  and  France  have  met 
with  success.  Advices  from  Paris  quote  the 
opinion  of  Mr.  Leoucher,  the  Minister  of  Re- 
construction, that  in  order  to  bring  the  prices  of  boots 
and  shoes  down  to  reasonable  figures  large  quantities 
of  boots  and  shoes  from  the  United  States  and  Canada 
must  be  imported  without  hesitation,  as  was  done  be- 
fore the  war,  the  French  output  having  always  failed 
to  meet  the  demand. 

Mr.  J.  Daoust,  of  Daoust,  Lalonde  &  Co.,  Ltd., 
Montreal,  has  secured  a  considerable  amount  of  bu.s'i- 
ness,  and  already  orders  have  been  received  for  31,000 
pairs  of  men's  shoes.  The  bulk  of  this  trade  was  done 
as  the  result  of  the  firm's  exhibit  at  the  Lyons  Fair.  A 
considerable  order  for  leather  has  also  been  obtained. 
Mr.  Daoust  has  appointed  Mr.  Benezech,  of  Paris,  the 
firm's  representative  for  France  and  Belgium  and  the 
Export  Association  of  Canada,  Ltd.,  British  represen- 
tative. The  entire  business  of  these  representatives 
will  be  placed  with  Daoust,  Lalonde  &  Co.,  who  guar- 
antee to  deliver  given  quantities  per  week  for  England 
and  France,  within  certain  periods  after  the  receipt 
of  the  orders. 

The  Tetrault  Shoe  Manufacturing  Co.,  Montreal, 
has  also  received  some  large  orders  for  France.  Mr. 
Nap.  Tetrault  being  now  in  that  country. 

Mr.  Daoust  and  Mr.  Oscar  Dufresne  are  expected 
to  be  in  Canada  by  the  time  this  issue  is  published.  On 
the  eve  of  his  departure  Mr.  Daoust  sent  us  the  follow- 
ing interesting  letter: 

"You  may  be  interested  in  knowing  something  of 
the  Lyons  Fair.  There  are  3,500  booths  with  4,300 
exhibitors,  representing  all  kinds  of  manufacturers. 
All  the  allied  countries  are  represented  and  so  is 
France.  Our  Canadian  section  is  the  one  which  at- 
tracts the  greatest  attention.  The  C.  P.  R.  has  several 
booths  where  they  show  the  different  cities  of  Cana- 
da, the  Rocky  Mountains,  the  largest  hotels  and  in  the 
cities  we  see  electric  cars,  steam  trains  and  steamers 
running. 

"I  have  done  quite  well  here,  having  booked  about 
$250,000  in  two  weeks,  but  the  only  way  to  do  business 
is  to  quote  in  French  money  and  c.i.f.  French  port,  in- 
cluding also  the  customs  duties ;  freights  and  duties  to 
be  paid  by  the  buyer  and  then  deducted  on  the  invoice 
when  remitting.  Some  of  my  good  friends  of  Canada, 
acting  as  representatives,  did  not  have  the  same  suc- 
cess, as  their  instructions  were  to  quote  prices  in  Can- 
adian money,  f.o.b.  factory  or  Atlantic  port.  I  believe 
that  they  should  have  been  given  fuller  powers  by  their 
principals  and  conformed  themselves  to  the  habits  of 
the  country. 

"There  are  embargoes  and  restrictions  as  to  the 
importation  of  goods,  and  licenses  have  to  be  secured. 
In  England  these  restrictions  have  just  been  removed 
and  France  is  expected  to  do  the  same,  especially  on  es- 
sentials and  as  agricultural  implements,  boots  and 
.shoes  and  some  other  lines. 

"The  Canadian  government  is  opening  a  credit  of 
.$25,000,000  to  France  and  also  similar  amounts  to 
Roumania,  Serbia  and  Greece.  This  will  help  business 
transactions.    Sir  George  Foster,  Mr.  Lloyd  Harris 


and  the  Hon.  Philippe  Roy,  Canadian  High  Commis- 
sioners in  Paris,  were  here  this  week.  All  these  gentle- 
men are  doing  their  utmost  to  foster  trade  for  Canada 
and  they  deserve  much  credit  for  their  efforts.  The 
Canadian  government  is  to  be  commended  for  having 
selected  such  capable  men.  Sir  George  Foster  has 
made  a  few  speeches  in  French  at  some  of  the  ban- 
quets we  had  at  Lyons  and  I  can  assure  you  they  were 
jnuch  applauded,  the  people  understanding  him  per- 
fectly." 


New  Manager  of  Hartt's  Monteal  Storre 

MR.  W.  G.  MILLER  has  been  appointed  man- 
ager of  the  Hartt  Shoe  Store,  St.  Catharines 
Street,  West,  Montreal,  in  succession  to 
Mr.  E.  J.  Hanlon.  He  has  been  in  the 
-h;ie  business  for  seventeen  years,  resigning  as  mana- 
ger of  the  retail  branch  of  the  Amherst  Boot  &  Shoe 
Co.,  Amherst,  to  go  to  Montreal.  Mr.  Miller  held  the  po- 
.-iiion  in  Amherst  for  six  years.  He  is  a  strenuous 
advocate  of  advertising  by  retailers,  and  freely  used 
the  papers  when  in  Amherst.    Rejected  for  overseas. 


Mr.  W.  G.  Miller 

Mr.  Miller  did  a  large  amount  of  work  in  raising  funds 
for  patriotic  purposes,  particularly  in  the  way  of  organ- 
izing entertainments.  Before  leaving  Amherst,  Mr. 
Miller  was  entertained  at  dinner  by  the  Young  Men's 
Civic  Club,  of  which  he  was  president,  and  presented 
with  a  travelling  companion.  The  Daughters  of  the 
Empire  also  presented  him  with  a  silver  cigarette  case 
and  match  case;  and  the  Golf  Club  (of  which  he  was 
secretary-treasurer)  gave  him  a  Victory  bond. 


Changes  in  Hydro  City  Sales  Staff 

Mr.  A.  Foster,  who  has  represented  the  Hydro  City 
Shoe  Manufacturers,  of  Kitchener,  in  Eastern  and 
Northern  Ontario  for  the  last  twenty-five  years,  has 
been  forced  to  retire  through  illness  and  his  territory 
will  be  handled  by  Mr.  John  Lauffer  who  has  been  re- 
presenting the  Hydro  City  Company  in  Ontario  and 
the  West  for  twenty  years.  Mr.  Lauffer's  former  ter- 
ritpry  will  be  covered  by  Mr.  Taaffe. 


April,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


37 


Fourteen  Points  in  Salesmanship 


nnRY  to  understand  ^our  customers. 


Sympathy  is  the  better  half  of  salesrrianship. 

-.|:  *  * 

Be    courteous.      Civility    costs    nothing,    hut    it    earns  dividends. 

*  *  * 
Sell  what  your  customers  want. 

Not  what  you  want  to  sell.     Salesmanship  is  service. 

*  *  * 

Study  your  customers'  feet. 

Squeezed  corns  are  poor  aids  to  business. 

Keep  your  dignity.    Salesmen  are  as  worthy  as  statesmen  and  as 
necessary. 

d^al^e  your  customers  feel  welcome,  but  don't  fuss. 

*  *  * 

Be  straight  in  all  things.     You   are  less  likely  to  get  insomnia 
that  Way. 

*  *  * 

Never    be    above    learning.      No    one    knows    everything  about 
an))  thing. 

Do  not  patronise  ^our  customers.     In  good  salesmanship  obligation 
is  mutual. 

Never  appear  impatient.     The  best  fish  are  generally^  shy  of  the 
bait. 

e5^a^e  suggestions;   but   make   them    intelligently   and  helpfully. 

*  *  * 

Never  talk  goods  above  value.    Repeat  sales  are  better  than  catch 
profits. 

*  *  * 

Have  the  courage  to  sap  no.     //  you  are  out  of  a  line,  you  can 
get  it. 

*  *  * 

Be  businesslike  in  all  things.     Muddle  negatives  success. 

The  Footwear  Organizer 


38 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


April,  1919 


The  Troubles  of  a  Merchant —  How  to  Stop  Them 

One-third  of  Failures  Due  to  Incompetence  and  Inexperience — A  Large  Per  Cent. 
Attributed  to  Lack  of  Capital,  but  Majority  to  Bad  Management 


MR.  G.  W.  Sulley,  of  the  lecture  bureau  of  the 
National  Cash  Register  Company,  Dayton, 
Ohio,  recently  delivered  a  very  interesting- 
lecture  to  the  merchants  of  Winnipeg  and 
Brandon.    His  subject  was:    "The    Troubles    of  a 
Merchant  and  How  to  Stop  Them"  and  was,  in  part, 
as  follows : 

I  am  very  glad  to  speak  tonight  under  the  auspices 
of  the  Manitoba  Board  of  The  Retail  Merchants'  As- 
sociation of  Canada  Inc.  We  bel'ieve  in  such  organiza- 
tions. The  day  of  cut-throat  competition  in  business 
is  past — co-operation  is  the  spirit  of  today  and  it  is 
through  such  organizations  as  this  that  business  men 
learn  to  co-operate. 

An  organization  of  this  kind  may  be  useful  in  many 
ways,  but  undoubtedly  one  of  its  most  important  ser- 
vices is  to  give  its  members  an  opportunity  to  talk 
over  business  problems  and  to  bring  to  them  the  best 
ideas  on  business  organizations  and  management.  It 
is  to  discuss  these  with  you  that  I  am  here  tonight. 

Our  company  does  not  pretend  to  know  all  about 
retail  business,  but  there  are  certain  underlying  prin- 
ciples which  we  have  learned  from  our  own  experience 
and  the  thirty-three  years  spent  in  collecting  retail 
busine.ss  ideas  from  merchants  in  all  parts  of  the  world. 
Merchants  have  their  troubles.  I  do  not  believe  I  need 
to  prove  that  fact  to  you  who  are  present.  But  in  case 
there  may  >be  doubters,  I  wish  to  call  attention  to  some 
figures  on  retail  business  failures  in  Canada  during  the 
year  1916.  These  involved  a  total  loss  of  $5,142,397. 
Over  590  there  were  in  all ;  2  in  every  business  day. 
Undoubtedly  your  community  contributed  its  quota. 

Moreover,  if  there  were  590  legal  failures,  how 
many  merchants  were  there  who  failed  to  make  a 
reasonable  profit,  and  who  worried  along  from  day  to 
day,  making  no  more  than  their  head  clerks? 

If  the  men  who  went  under  in  these  failures  were 
the  only  ones  who  sufifered,  it  would  be  sad,  but  not 
so  serious,  but  each  failure  reacted  through  the  com- 
munity in  which  it  occurred.  Nearly  always  the  bank- 
er or  the  wholesaler  was  involved  in  the  loss.  More- 
over, many  of  the  failures  resulted  from  unwise  price 
cutting,  which  forced  all  competitors  into  unfair  com- 
petition, and  after  the  failures  came  bankrupt  sales. 

Unsound  business  methods  injure  every  one  and  an 
association  like  yours  can  render  no  better  service 
than  to  bring  to  its  members  information  regarding 
the  most  up-to-date  business  methods. 

The  Cause  of  Failure 

When  wc  analyze  the  causes  of  failures  we  find 
some  verv  interesting  facts.  Of  course,  no  absolutely 
accurate  figures  can  be  obtained,  because  many  failures 
are  due  to  a  number  of  causes,  but  the  figures  shov^Mi 
here  are  the  result  of  analysis  by  financial  experts.  I 
would  like  to.  call  your  attention  to  these  figures  be- 
cause they  suggest  so  strongly  the  need  for  better 
business  system. 

One-third  of  the  failures  were  due  to  "Incompe- 
tence and  Inexpei'ience."  These  men  lacked  knowledge 
of  good  business  methods.   They  didn't  know  how  to 


establish  a  system  that  would  give  them  proper  control 
over  their  business,  check  losses,  prevent  neglected 
duties,  and  stop  mistakes. 

A  large  per  cent  failed  because  they  lacked  capital. 
Presumably  they  had  too  little  to  start  with,  and  on  its 
face  it  does  not  appear  that  knowledge  of  good  busi- 
ness methods  would  have  helped  them.  Yet  we  all 
know  that.  The  man  with  little  capital,  who  turns  it 
over  frequently  and  doesn't  allow  it  to  become  tied 
up  in  credit  accounts,  often  forges  ahead.  Moreover, 
in  starting  a  business  and  keeping  it  going  credit  is  as 
important  as  capital  and  the  merchant  whO'  can  show 
his  banker  and  wholesaler  a  clear-cut  and  satisfactory 
statement  of  his  business  standing  will  find  it  as  use- 
ful as  collateral  in  securing  a  loan.  As  evidence  of  this 
I  want  you  to  note  this  statement  of  Edward  N.  Hur- 
ley, former  chairman  of  the  United  States  Federal 
Trade  Commission. 

"In  the  future,  the  business  man,  large  or  small,  will 
n'ot  be  able  to  receive  credit  on  loans  unless  he  is  not 
only  sound  financially,  but  can  show  that  he  is  con- 
ducting his  business  intelligently." 

It  is  evident,  therefore,  that  many  of  the  failures 
listed  under  the  heading,  "Lack  of  Capital,"  might 
have  been  prevented  had  these  merchants  possessed 
a  knowledge  of  good  business  methods  which  every 
merchant  should  employ. 

"Specific  Conditions,"  the  third  largest  cause  of 
failures  we  will  pass  over.    Under  this  head  are  listed 

4.11—  ,i„ — ,.,,_«„ — ,,»_„„ — .„ — „„_„»—«„—,,. — ,„._,„,_„»_«„_„«_„,_„  + 

i  I 

I  Under  the  heading  "Trade  at  a  Glance"  in  | 

J  the  fourteen  largest  cities  of  the  Dominion,  Brad-  j 

1  streets  report  retail  business  "Good"  in  every  one  • 

1  but  Winnipeg,  where  the  exception  was  the  re-  1 

1  suit  of  rainy  weather.  I 

I  i 

4m  »  «.i  ii.  .11  .11  «»— ,«  ...  ..  ...  .1.  1...  1..  ...  ..  ..  .1.  

family  causes,  fires,  and  conditions  peculiar  to  the  res- 
pective businesses  that  failed. 

However,  failure  due  to  fraud,  the  fourth  largest 
cause,  might  just  as  well  be  put  down  as  "Lack  of  Ade- 
quate System,"  for  certainly  no  merchant  with  a  sys- 
tem in  his  business  that  will  enable  him  to  show  a  pro- 
fit, would  even  be  tempted  to  resort  to  a  fraud  to  in- 
crease his  bank  account  or  would  suffer  fraud  on  the 
part  of  his  employees  to  the  extent  that  he  would  be- 
come even  a  near  bankrupt  before  the  discovery  of 
such  a  fraud. 

Lack  of  Proper  System  of  Management 

I  might  go  on  down  the  list,  but  certainly  I  have 
already  esta'l)lished  the  fact  that  a  great  majority  of 
failures  are  due,  not  to  fire,  flood,  or  misfortunte,  but 
to  lack  of  proper  system  in  business  management. 

In  calling  attention  to  these  figures  on  business 
failures,  I  would  not  for  a  moment  suggest  that  any  of 
you  gentlemen  here  tonight  are  on  the  verge  of  failure. 
The  very  fact  that  you  are  here  shows  that  you  are  out 


April,  1919 


FOOTWEAR 


IN  CANADA 


3'J 


for  new  ideas,  and  an  open  mind  is  a  business  man's 
best  asset. 

At  the  same  time,  I  think  1  am  safe  in  saying  that 
few  of  you  are  making  all  the  money  you  think  you 
should  make,  and  without  doubt,  lack  of  an  adequate 
business  system — the  thing  that  causes  the  most  fail- 
ures'— causes  also  the  greatest  disappointment  with 
profits  at  the  end  of  each  business  year. 

One  of  the  greatest  weaknesses  with  the  business 
system  of  many  stores  is  a  poor  form  of  organization. 
I  can  best  illustrate  what  I  mean  by  telling  you  of  our 
own  experience  in  the  early  days,  with  the  wrong  plan 
of  organization. 

The  cash  register  was  invented  in-  1879  by  James 
Ritty,  a  merchant  of  Dayton,  Ohio.  He  was  on  his 
way  to  Europe  and  was  worried  because  he  had  to 
leave  his  business  in  the  hands  of  others. 

During  the  voyage  he  happened  to  go  down  into 
the  engine-room  where  he  saw  the  dial  that  marked 
the  revolutions  of  the  propeller.  It  suddenly  occurred 
to  him  that  he  might  make  a  similar  device  to  record 
transactions  in  his  store,  and  upon  his  return  to  Day- 
ton he  built  the  first  cash  register.  It  was  a  crude  ma- 
chine, however,  and  never  proved  practical. 

The  first  practical  cash  register  was  invented  in 
1891.  It  simply  punched  holes  in  a  roll  of  paper.  At 
the  end  of  the  day  the  merchant  counted  the  holes  in 
the  rows  and  so  determined  the  amount  that  had  been 
recorded. 

At  that  time  Mr.  Patterson,  president  of  our  com- 
pany, was  in  the  coal  business,  and  in  connection  with 
a  small  mine  at  Coalton,  Ohio,  'he  ran  a  general  store. 
The  store  was  doing  a  good  business,  but  for  some 
reason  was  not  making  money.  Mr.  Patterson  heard 
that  registers  were  being  made  in  Dayton,  and  bought 
two.   From  that  day  his  store  began  to  show  a  jjrofit. 

Naturally,  Mr.  Patterson  became  much  interested 
in  the  future  possibilities  of  the  cash  register  as  a  busi- 
ness necessity.  He  thought  that  what  was  good  for 
his  little  store  at  Coalton  would  be  good  for  every 
store  in  the  world.  So  in  1884  he  bought  out  the  busi- 
ness and  established  the  present  company. 

The  business  prospered  until  1892,  when  the  com- 
pany placed  on  the  market  a  new  and  higher  type  reg- 
ister. But  instead  of  receiving  checks  for  these  regis- 
ters, this  is  what  happened.  The  registers  were  re- 
turned from  all  parts  of  the  world  as  defective. 

The  company  then  started  an  investigation  and 
found  many  bad  conditions  in  the  factory  and  in  the 
neighborhood,  which  have  since  teen  corrected.  It 
also  found  that  it  lacked  adequate  plan  of  business  or- 
ganization. The  president,  manager  and  superintend- 
ent were  carrying  the  whole  burden  of  the  business. 
They  were  so  loaded  down  with  petty  details  and  res- 
ponsibilities that  they  had  little  time  to  look  after  its 
larger  needs.   Of  course,  the  business  suf¥ered. 

It  was  decided  to  reorganize  and  at  that  time  the 
pyramid  form  of  organization  was  developed.  Under 
this  plan  each  man  is  given  definite  tasks  for  which  he 
is  accountable.  He  knows  and  the  management  knows 
where  responsibility  lies.  This  shows  our  pyramid  or- 
ganization as  it  stands  today ;  the  stockholders  at  the 
top.  under  them  the  Board  of  Directors,  and  the  Exe- 
cutive Council,  and  under  them  the  whole  factory  or- 
ganization, in  which  each  responsible  employee  is  as- 
signed definite  duties.  As  a  result  of  this  plan  our 
whole  organization  has  been  reversed.  The  officers, 
instead  of  being  at  the  'bottom  of  the  pryamid  bearing 


the  burden  of  all  the  rest  are  now  at  the  top  freed  from 
details  and  with  time  to  plan  bigger  things. 

The  i)resident,  manager,  and  superintendent  no 
longer  have  to  carry  the  whole  factory  on  their  shoul- 
ders.   Each  man  carries  his  part. 

This  is  the  proper  organization  for  a  factory,  and  it 
is  also  the  proper  organization  for  a  store. 

You  Can't  do  all  the  Thinking 

Too  many  merchants  are  wasting  their  efforts  on 
details  and  in  trying  to  do  all  the  thinking  and  plan- 
ning for  their  business.  They  forget  that  clerks  too 
have  brains,  and  that  nothing  will  do  more  to  develop 
their  ability  and  interest  in  the  store,  than  giving  them 
definite  tasks  for  which  they  are  individually  respon- 
sible. 

No  merchant  should  allow  himself  to  be  placed  at 
the  bas^e  of  the  pyramid  bearing  the  whole  weight  of 
his  business.  He  should  distribute  responsibility  and 
place  himself  at  the  top  where  he  may  be  free  to  think 
and  plan. 

I  would  recommend  to  each  merchant  present,  that 
you  draw  up  a  pyramid  of  this  sort  for  your  store.  This 
is  merely  a  suggestive  one  for  a  store  Avith  four  clerks 
and  a  delivery  man.  Each  of  you  should  assign  tasks 
and  fix  responsibility  considering  the  needs  of  your 
particular  lousiness  and  the  number  and  capabilities  of 
)'Our  clerks. 

You  will  notice  that  in  this  pyramid  the  chief  clerk 
supervises  the  other  clerks,  assists  in  buying,  helps  to 
watch  credits  and  to  plan  advertising,  and  watches  for 


The  second  clerk  orders  over  the  telephone.  The 
merchant  selects  for  this  purpose  a  clerk  who  has  a 
clear  voice  and  one  "With  a  smile  behind  it."  A  large 
percentage  of  orders  are  received  over  the  phone,  and 
nowhere  is  courtesy  and  pleasantness  more  necessary. 
This  clerk  also  checks  outgoing  orders.  Mistakes  and 
losses  from  this 'source  must  be  prevented.  And  he  is 
asked  to  watch  other  stores,  for  every  successful  mer- 
chant, in  friendly  rivalry,  not  in  hate,  watches  his  com- 
petitor's prices  and  business.  Department  stores  in 
large  cities  have  emjjloyees  who  do  nothing  else  but 
report  on  competition. 

The  third  clerk  looks  after  the  arrangement  and 


40  FOOTWEAR    IN    CANADA  April,  loio 


keeping-  of  stock.  The  merchant,  in  preparing  him  for 
duty,  has  told  him  that  goods  should  be  displayed  in 
the  store  so  that,  as  far  as  possible,  they  will  sell  them- 
selves. Goods  that  will  tempt  the  customer  should  be 
placed  near  the  door  where  they  will  be  seen  when 
customers  come  in  and  go  out.  Staple  goods  and  ad- 
vertised bargain  articles,  on  the  other  hand,  should  be 
placed  where  the  customer,  in  seeking  them,  will  pass 
displays  of  other  goods.  And  without  crowding  the 
shelves  or  floor  space,  as  much  goods  as  possible 
should  be  displayed  where  customers  may  see  them. 
Many  a  merchant  has  failed  to  make  the  profit  he 
should  make  because  he  allowed  his  storeroom  to  fill 
up  with  unsalable  g'oods.  He  may  have  realized  the 
danger,  but  being  so  busy  with  other  details,  it  escap- 
ed his  attention.  If  however,  he  had  made  this  clerk 
responsible  for  watching  stock  and  then  watched  it 
himself,  as  far  as  possible,  the  liklihood  that  he  would 
accumulate  unsalable  stock  would  have  been  much 
less.  This  clerk  also  sees  that  inventories  are  made 
from  time  to  time  and  watches  the  condition  and  move- 
ment of  stock.  If  a  certain  line  is  not  selling  and  may 
spoil  or  get  out  of  style,  he  calls  it  to  the  merchant's 
attention  so  it  may  be  prominently  displayed  and  push- 
ed. 

The  fourth  clerk  is  assigned  the  task  of  looking  af- 
ter window  display  and  learning  from  other  windows. 
.It  maybe  that  the  merchant's  wife  herself  also  takes  an 
interest  in  this  without  becoming  directly  connected 
with  the  business.  As  a  majority  of  sales  are  made  to 
women  many  of  the  purchases  are  prompted  by  win- 
dow display  and  this  is  a  branch  of  the  business  in 
which  a  woman  can  be  of  real  assistance. 

Finally  the  delivery  man  is  made  responsible  for 
seeing  that  deliveries  are  correct.  He  is  also  instruct- 
ed to  report  all  complaints.  It  is  by  listening  to  com- 
])laints  and  adjusting  them  that  a  retail  business  keeps 
satisfied  customers  and  grows.  Delivery  men  hear 
more  complaints  than  all  clerks  combined,  yet  in  the 
majority  of  cases  the  complaints  to  which  they  listen 
get  no  further.  Surely  the  merchant  does  wisely  in  in- 
structing the  delivery  man  that  one  of  his  specific 
duties  is  to  report  all  criticisms,  either  of  goods  or  ser- 
vice. 

In  suggesting  that  every  merchant  should  thus  dis- 
tri'bute  the  work  in  his  store  I  do  not  mean  for  a  minute 
to  imply  that  he  should  neglect  to  Avatch  these  things 
himself.  He  should  continue  to  check  his  business  in 
every  detail.  But  he  should  not  attempt  to  carry  the 
whole  burden  himself.  Instead  he  will  expect  each 
clerk  to  carry  his  part,  thus  saving  his  own  time  and 
energy  for  more  important  things. 


j  Mr.  Retailer — see  that  your  trade  paper  is  | 

J  PUT  TO  WORK  in  your  store.    See  that  articles  J 

5  YOU  ought  to  read  do  not  escape  your  attention.  f 

1  Then  pass  each  issue  to  your  EMPLOYEES.  1 

I  They  will  give  better  SERVICE  to  your  custom-  1 

I  ers  if  they  are  kept  informed  of  conditions  in  the  I 


shoe  and  leather  industry.  | 


other  the  most  vital  question  which  confronts  ti'ade  to- 
day. To  avoid  the  impression  that  any  comments  on 
the  help  question  are  given  as  instructions  to  others,  I 
think  it  is  well  to  state  that  no  definite  instructions  can 
be  written  on  this  subject.  Conditions  under  which  the 
retail  shoe  business  operates  are  too  variable  for  this. 

"One  is  safe,  however,  in  stating  without  qualifica- 
tions that  there  are  two  great  essential  virtues  that  all 
help  must  have.  They  can  possess  these  the  moment 
they  enter  your  employ.  By  your  recognition  of  these 
qualities  in  a  new  employe,  your  personal  training  of 
the  employe  is  secondary.  They  will  acquire  all  the 
essentials  of  a  good  salesman,  which  are  well  known  to 
us  as  courte.sy,  stock  knowledge,  ability  to  properly  fit 
shoes,  etc.  These  two  essentials  are  Honesty  and 
Ambition. 

"There  is  only  one  kind  of  honesty;  ambition  must 
be  of  the  laudable  kind — that  which  gives  the  employe 
and  employer  impartial  consideration.  With  these  two 
virtues  as  a  base,  any  employe  is  almost  certain  to  learn 
all  the  essentials  required  to  make  him  or  her  an  effici- 
ent, permanent  fixture  in  your  business.  Therefore,  in 
the  training  of  help  one  must  give  the  employe  as  much 
credit  for  the  training  as  the  proprietor  who  generally 
receives  all  the  credit. 

Proper  Environment  and  Stimulation. 

"Your  main  duty  in  their  training,  it  seems  to  me, 
is  to  see  that  they  have  proper  environment  and  stimu- 
lation. Include  under  environment  the  quality  of  mer- 
chandise you  ofi^er  the  public,  and  your  policy  laid  down 
for  its  disposition  to  the  public,  as  well  as  working 
conditions.  Let  them  know  by  your  policy  that  the 
naked  reality  is  preferable  to  the  most  dignified  ap- 
pearing camouflage.  The  bulwarks  of  any  business  are 
its  employes. 

"Your  second  largest  investment  is  in  your  help — 
second  only  to  your  patrons.  Lack  of  stimulation  and 
no  future  have  deteriorated  races,  so  the  greatest  stim- 
ulation (proper  compensation)  should  be  applied  with 
greatest  care  to  your  bulwarks. 


The  Help  Problem  —  Training  Clerks- 
Compensation— Is  the  P.M.  System 
a  Good  One? 

OTTO  HASSEL,  of  Chicago,  who  is  known  as  the 
largest  retail  distributor  of  men's  shoes  in  the 
United  States,  was  in  charge  of  this  topic,  at 
the  National  Convention  of  Shoe  Retailers. 
"The  largest  problem  in  the  world  to-day,"  said  Mr. 
Hassel,  "is  undoubtedly  the  settlement  re(|uired  at  the 
peace  table  after  the  great  World's  War,  and  the  next 
in  importance  is  probably  the  settlement  of  the  help 
question  after  the  world  conflict.  So  you  see  an  ordin- 
ary shoeman  must  decide  positively  one  way  or  the 


War-Time  Humor 

Much  has  been  said  on  the  English  lack  of  the 
sense  of  humor.  In  a  recent  issue  of  Punch  there  ap- 
peared a  cartoon  depicting  a  little  girl  with  her  mother 
examining  a  pair  of  shoes.  The  inscription  accom- 
panying the  picture  is  as  follows : 

Mabel,  (on  seeing  some  war-time  shoes  arrive  on 
approval):  "Mummy,  are  they  real  cardboard?" 

In  commenting  on  this  cartoon,  an  English  shoe 
trade  paper  becomes  quite  wrathy,  winding  up  their  de- 
nunciation of  "a  libel  on  war-time  boots"  with  the 
statement:  "The  artist  who  drew  the  picture  evidently 
does  not  know  that  war-time  boots  are  made  under 
government  control  of  leather  only,  while  the  editor 
appears  to  be  equally  ignorant." 


April,  1919 


FOOTWEAR   IN  CANADA 


41 


The  Merchandising  of  Broken  and  Discontinued 
Lines — A  Few  Suggestions  and  a  Little  Advice 


THE  merchandising-  of  broken  and  discontinued 
lines  formed  the  suibject  of  an  interesting  talk 
recently  delivered  by  C.  A.  Kilbourne,  promin- 
ent Minneapolis  shoe  retailer,  before  a  gather- 
ing of  Minnesota  retailers.  The  disposition  of  broken 
and  discontinued  lines,  he  said,  is  more  of  a  problem  in 
the  shoe  trade  than  in  perhaps  any  other  line  of  retail 
business  on  account  of  the  number  of  sizes  and  widths 
m  each  model  which  the  retailer  must  buy.  This  makes 
it  all  the  more  necessary  to  use  intelligent  methods  in 
disposing  of  such  goods. 

What  can  we  do  to  reduce  short  and  left-over  lines? 
We  all  make  mistakes,  but  let  us  strive  to  make  as 
few  as  possible  that  they  may  be  less  of  this  class  of 
merchandise  in  our  stocks. 

Right  Buying  One  Point 

The  first  point  is  rig"ht  buying",  for  the  simple  reas- 
on that  proper  buying  will  go  far  toward  eliminating 
left-overs.  In  this  connection  let  us  consider  buying 
for  your  own  trade,  and  buying  what  that  trade  wants. 
One  of  the  best  ways  to  do  this  is  to  work  with  your 
own  salespeople,  and  consult  with  them  regarding 
styles  requested  by  cu^stomers.  By  being  on  the  floor 
a  part  of  the  time  every  day  yourself,  you  hear  many 
expressions  from  customers  that  will  help  you  to  a 
knowledge  of  what  to  buy. 

The  traveling  man  in  whom  you  have  confidence  is 
one  of  the  best  sources  of  suggestions  relative  to  the 
new  styles  that  the  trade  will  want.  Another  means 
is  the  "want  slip"  which  each  sale.-nian  can  hand  in  to 
you  at  the  close  of  the  day  covering  requests  for  styles 
and  merchandise  not  included  in  your  stock. 

Study  Your  Sizes 

By  keeping  a  record  of  your  sales  as  to  sizes,  even 
though  you  do  so  for  a  short  time  only,  you  will  learn 
that  a  buyer  must  be  careful  in  scheduling  his  size 
sheet  for  "a  new  style.  It  is  surprising  how  dift'erent 
the  wanted  or  selling  sizes  are  in  difl:erent  sea.sons,  and 
in  this  knowledge  will  make  it  easier  for  you  to  buy 
correct  sizes  and  widths. 

There  was  a  time  when  we  felt  we  could  care  for 
extra  small  and  extra  large  feet  in  almost  every  style 
we  bought.  In  one  way  we  could  afiford  to  do  this  for 
the  reason  that  shoes  were  much  cheaper  than  they  are 
today  but  present  prices  now  make  it  more  important 
that  we  buy  the  sizes  that  are  most  saleable. 

In  selecting  lines  to  include  these  extra  small  and 
extra  large  sizes  v^'e  have  found  from  past  experience 
that  picking  one  good  seller  in  each  different  leather  is 
desirable.  For  instance,  select  one  black  kid  dress  shoe, 
also  a  staple  black,  and  follow  that  idea  through  with 
the  wanted  colors,  such  as  browns,  grays,  etc. 

In  this  way  the  extra  sized  feet  can  be  fitted  proi)er- 
ly,  and  after  all  it  is  not  so  much  the  shoe  as  the  proper 
fit. 

Arrangement  of  Your  Stock 

Arranging  the  styles  you  are  most  anxious  to  dis- 
pose of  in  the  most  convenient  ]>lace  hel])s  greatly  in 


getting  rid  of  them.  Staple  merchandise  can  be  put 
almost  anywhere,  and  the  sale  will  not  be  hurt. 

Having  the  stock  arranged  according  to  a  system 
makes  it  easier  to  find  the  desired  shoe,  and  sales  are 
jnade  much  quicker  and  better  because  the  salesman 
learns  the  stock  more  readily.  In  your  system  of  stock 
arrangement,  for  instance,  you  may  group  your  black 
shoes  according  to  price  with  your  grays,  Avhites, 
browns,  etc.,  arranged  in  the  same  manner.  This  is 
also  helpful  when  extra  help  is  required. 

Keeping  Goods  From  Becoming  Shopworn 

One  of  the  greatest  evils  in  retailing  shoes  is  the 
shopworn  stock,  and  one  of  the  most  prolific  causes  of 
shopworn  merchandise  is  too  much  marking  on  the 
soles.  I  Avould  suggest  that  any  necessary  marks  be 
made  on  the  linings. 

Have  a  system  whereby  shoes,  after  being  shown 
to  customers,  must  be  placed  in  their  cartons.  Where 
there  are  ledges  there  is  a  great  temptation  to  throw 
shoes  on  them,  and  consequently  they  soon  get  shop- 
worn and  lose  their  price  value.  Many  retailers  are 
doing  away  with  all  ledges. 

Many  lines  of  shoes  stay  on  the  shelves  because  the 
cartons  have  become  so  soiled  that  their,  appearance 
kills  the  line  in  the  eyes  of  the  salespeople.  Re-boxing 
makes  the  entire  line  appear  fresh  and  desirable,  and  it 
is  surprising  how  readily  they  sell. 

Overbuying  Common  Evil 

One  great  difficulty  is  that  many  of  us  buy  conflict- 
ing" styles.  I  mean  that  one  style  too  closely  resembles 
another,  and  thereby  ties  up  double  the  capital  needed, 
whereas  one  style  would  have  answered  the  purpose. 

Many  times  we  think  we  should  add  another  style 
when  by  going  through  our  stocks  we  find  that  we  al- 
ready have  styles  that  would  be  a  good  substitute  for 
this  new  one,  and  we  can  accordingly  buy  it  for  our- 
selves. Always  be  open  to  buy.  Never  be  entirely 
bought  up,  then  you  can  always  buy  the  new  things 
which  are  continually  springing  up.  In  that  way  your 
stock  is  always  kept  fresh  and  desirable  in  the  eyes 
of  the  public. 

Study  Your  Prices 

It  is  just  as  important  to  have  shoes  at  the  price 
you  trade  wants  to  pay  as  it  is  to  have  the  styles  they 
want.  One  of  the'best  ways  of  learning  the  price  want- 
ed is  to  keep  a  record  of  every  sale  because  in  this 
way  you  get  accurate  information  regarding  the  price 
which  your  customers  prefer,  but,  of  course,  conditions 
from  one  season  to  another  alter  these  prices  to  some 
extent. 

Buying  Samples  and  Short  Lines 

For  the  ordinary  stock,  bu}-ing  samples  and  short 
lines  is  not  neces.sary;  your  own  stock  makes  plenty  of 
them.  Therefore,  buy  from  yourself.  Under  this  head 
we  can  class  special  orders,  for  they  are  no  more  or 
less  than  samples,  because  no  matter  how  careful  you 
are  in  taking  them  you  always  have  some  left  over,  and 


42 


FOOTWEAR 


IN  CANADA 


April,  1910 


tlic  sooner  wc  cIiscoiir;ii;"c  ,s])ecial  orders  the  better  it 
,\vill  he  for  retailer,  manufacturer  and  customer. 

From  Personal  Experience 

1  have  tried  to  tell  you  some  of  the  precautions  that 
from  experience  we  have  found  helpful  in  making  few- 
er pairs  of  broken  and  discontinued  lines.  Next  comes 
the  question  of  how  to  get  rid  of  these  short  lines  in 
the  most  profitable  manner. 

P.  M.  Excellent  if  Handled  Right 

1  am  a  great  believer  in  the  p.  m.  system  where  it  is 
not  abused,  and  to  jMevent  this  there  must  be  rigid 
rules.  To  dispose  of  short  lines  you  must  keep  them 
.constantly  in  the  minds  of  your  salespeople.  You  can 
tell  them  about  them,  and  you  can  urge  their  sale,  but 
tliere  is  nothing  like  "premium  money"  to  get  action. 

Our  system  is  to  arrange  these  short  lines,  which 
we  are  always  adding  to  as  our  stock  keeps  making 
more,  into  lines  by  themselves;  viz.,  taking  all  black 
leather  styles  and  making  one  line,  sizing  the  sizes  and 
widths  together,  all  novelties  in  another  line,  and  low 
shoes  in  distinct  lines  in  the  same  manner. 

With  this  arrangement  the  salesmen  can  find  the 
.main  thing,  which  is  the  size,  and  when  properly  fitted 
receive  their  money's  worth,  for  no  matter  how  good  a 
style  may  be  unless  it  fits  the  purchaser  does  not  get 
full  value. 

System  of  Marking 

We  have  a  system  of  p.  m.'s  in  card  form,  each  card 
representing  five  dollars  in  numerals  ranging  from  five 
to  twenty-five  cents.  All  premium  merchandise  is 
stamped  on  the  cartons  in  points,  five  cents  for  each 
point.  For  example,  figure  5  represents  twenty-five 
five  cents;  figure  seven  represents  thirty-five  cents, 
etc. 

When  a  salesman  sells  a  pair  of  these  shoes  he 
marks  the  lining  of  the  shoe,  if  it  is  a  five  point  prem- 
ium, with  a  figure  5,  with  a  line  underneath  this,  and 
underneath  the  line  his  sales  number.  This  makes  a 
notation  in  the  form  of  a  fraction.  For  example,  the 
mark  5-10  on  the  lining  of  a  j).  m.  shoe  shows  a  p.  m. 
of  twentv-five  cents  on  a  sale  made  by  salesman  No. 
10. 

The  salesman  then  takes  his  sales  check,  the  shoes 
and  his  card,  and  shows  them  to  whoever  has  author- 
ity to  pass  upon  these  matters.  His  card  is  punched 
the  amount  of  the  p.  m.  to  which  he  is  entitled.  When 
his  card  is  full  he  turns  it  into  the  office,  and  is  paid 
the  amount,  five  dollars,  less  any  returned  p.  m.'s  which 
may  be  charged  up  to  him. 

To  Eliminate  Abuse  and  Carelessness 

To  prevent  abuse  and  to  eliminate  the  dang-er  of  a 
salesman  taking  advantage  of  customers  by  misfitting 
p.  m.  shoes,  we  have  a  check  system  which  works  well. 
If,  after  a  customer  has  worn  a  shoe  she  finds  or  thinks 
she  was  misfitted,  and  on  examination  we  find  that  she 
was  the  shoes  are  taken  back,  and  she  is  allowed  what 
she  paid  for  them  on  another  pair.  The  pair  returned, 
owing  to  failure  to  properly  fit,  is  charged  to  the  man 
who  sold  them,  put  back  into  stock,  and  the  price  there- 
of is  deducted  from  the  salesman's  later  premium 
money. 

When  the  salesman  sells  this  ])articular  returned 
pair  the  amount  for  which  they  are  sold  will  be  credit- 
ed to  him.  You  can  readily  see  that  by  this  system 
there  are  few  misfitted  pairs  of  p.  m.  shoes. 

.\rranging  short  lines  for  clearance  sales  as  I  have 


outlined  makes  it  convenient  to  dispose  of  them.  How- 
ever, no  matter  what  price  we  put  on  shoes  included  in 
clearance  sales  we  always  put  a  p.  m.  on  them  because 
then  they  are  always  on  the  salesman's  mind  and 
stocks  can  be  closed  out  without  taking  such  big  los.s- 
es  as  are  generally  incurred  in  disposing  of  short  and 
discontinued  lines. 

4,  „„_„,_,„_„.—«,,_,„,_,,«_„„_„„_,„,—,„,—»„—,,»— ,,—„,— »,•!• 

1  I 


Mr.   Jas.   Waddington,   formerly   manager   for  f 

J  eight   years   of   No.   1   store   of   the    Rannard  1 

I  Shoe   Limited,   Winnipeg,   has  opened  up  for  ] 

f  himself  in  the  retail  shoe  business  at  340  Port-  1 

I  age  Avenue,  Winnipeg.     Mr.  Waddington  has  j 

?  been  connected  with  the  shoe  business  in  that  1 

!  city  for  the  last  eleven  years,  being  three  years  j 

I  .  with  Thos.  Ryan  &  Co.,  wholesale  dealers,  and  j 

1  the  remainder  with  the  Rannard  Shoe  Limited.  | 

1  f 

^„,  .„  m  .Ml  .11.  ...I  ....  i...  ....  ...1  .."  «..  .."  «"  »"  "»  

Difierent  Sizes  in  Box  Toes  and  Counters 

There  are  as  many  as  five  different  sizes  of  leather 
boxes  put  into  the  toes  of  shoes  in  some  of  the  last- 
ing rooms.  To  make  shoes  perfect  it  is  as  necessary 
to  have  different  sizes  in  boxes  as  in  counters,  al- 
though a  good  many  do  not  think  quite  so  much  of 
the  boxes  as  they  do  of  the  counters.  Where  good 
shoes  are  made  they  run  as  many  as  four  different 
sizes  of  counters  even  in  misses'  shoes  and  three  differ- 
ent sizes  in  children's.  In  infants'  as  many  as  four 
sizes  are  often  used.  To  put  in  a  small  counter  in  a 
large  size  shoe  means  that  it  will  not  fit  and  it  is  the 
same  if  the  counter  is  too  large.  In  either  case  the 
heel-seat  will  not  be  right.  There  may  be  a  very  little 
difference  in  the  sizes  of  counters  but  the  difference 
is  there  just  the  same  and  this  difference  exists  as 
much  in  the  smaller  sizes  as  it  does  in  men's  and  wo- 
men's.— Shoe  Topics. 


Practical  Pointers  for  Repairmen 

In  getting  a  pair  of  welt  shoes  ready  to  sew,  you 
will  find  on  women's  work  that  it  is  much  better  to 
cement  the  sole  and  bottom,  as  the  insole  in  women's 
shoes  never  runs  over  a  5-iron  and  often  much  less. 
Cementing'  the  half-sole  before  welting  it  makes  it 
stick  well  and  holds  the  insole  in  shape,  giving  you  a 
good  job. 

To  mention  the  oiling  of  a  machine  may  seem  to 


April,  1910 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


some  rather  unnecessary,  yet  many  do  not  know  the 
l)est  way  of  oiling"  a  machine.  ]\Iachincs  shonk'i  be 
oiled  sparingly  and  often,  and  excess  oil  should  be 
wiped  off,  for  oil  evaporates  with  exposure,  and  gums 
on  the  machine  parts.  This  will  require  a  mucli  more 
thorough  cleaning  of  the  machine  at  more  frequent 
intervals,  and  in  the  end  will  require  much  more  time. 
Dust  and  dirt  accumulate  more  readily  on  a  machine 
saturated  with  oil,  too,  and  it  will  be  found  that  co\'- 
cring  the  machine  at  night  prevents  this  to  a  great 
extent. 

In  applying  a  new  sole  to  a  double  sole  shoe,  some 
repairers  do  not  shive  down  the  middle  sole.  Instead 
they  add  a  ]5iece  of  shived  leather  so  as  to  e\  en  up  t!ie 
forepart. — Shoe  Repair  Shop. 


Cash  vs.  Credit 


 By  H.  B.  Scales,  of  Boston — ■  

THIS  topic  is  of  interest  to  every  dealer  who  has 
any  reason  to  handle  his  merchandise  in  l;oth 
ways.  Smaller  stores,  of  course,  do  not  have  the 
same  ])roblems  that  the  big  city  face,  and  not  so 
many  of  them  do  much  of  a  credit  business.  The  fact 
is  that  cash  basis  is  best  for  all  concerned.  The  charge 
customer,  as  a  rule,  seems  to  expect  more  than  the 
cash  one.  The  fact  that  the  bill  is  yet  to  be  paid  seems 
to  imi)ly  that  they  expect  an  extra  service  and  are  more 
])rone  to  make  kicks  and  he  harder  to  j^lease. 

This  fact  increases  the  cost  of  doing-  business,  and 
in  the  long  run  the  cash  customer  pays  for  this  over- 
head. This  is  hardly  fair  to  the  latter,  and  gives  a 
premium  to  the  customer  who  does  not  lay  down  his 
money  when  he  gets  his  goods.  Any  system  that  in- 
creases the  cost  of  distribution  makes  for  either  less 
profit  or  a  higher  price,  and  the  merchandising  problem 
becomes  further  complicated. 

Keeping  down  the  overhead  is  an  ever  present  prob- 
lem in  all  stores,  and  the  dealer  who  can  do  bu.siness  on 
a  strictly  cash  basis  is  always  better  off  in  every  way. 
He  is  free  from  captious  customers  who,  feeling  they 
have  yet  to  pay  the  bill,  can  return  merchandise  or 
make  claims  that  are  not  warranted.  This  policy  makes 
for  an  increase  in  the  operating  cost,  especially  in  large 
stores,  where  a  special  office  must  handlle  all  such  ac- 
counts, as  well  as  the  returns  and  complaints. 

Large  city  stores  are  rapidly  abolishing  the  return 
privilege,  or  at  least  cutting  it  down,  as  far  as  time 
limit  is  concerned.  There  is  movement  to  eventually 
permit  nothing  of  the  sort.  A  sale  made  should  stay 
made  and  the  buyer  should  assume  the  responsibility 
when  no  misrepresentations  have  been  made  and  the 
goods  are  all  they  should  be.  The  less  credit  business 
the  less  trouble  any  dealer  will  have,  and  the  same  may 
be  said  of  the  customer. 


How  to  Determine  and  Buy  Women's 
Style  Shoes 

THE  round  table  to  consider  the  question,  "How- 
to  Determine  Style  and  How  to  Buy  Women's 
Style  Shoes,"  le'd'  by  Julius  Goldberg,  of  O'Con- 
nor &  Gold1)erg,  Chicago,  was  perhaps  the  larg- 
est attended  discussion  of  all  at  the  recent  St.  Louis 
Convention,  and  created  great  interest.  Mr.  Goldberg 
expressed  the  opinion  that  the  trend  of  styles  would 
continue  from  the  point  to  which  they  were  evidently 
going  at  the  start  of  the  war.    He  said  he  believed  any 


really  ])rctty  shoe  was  a  good  l)uy,  but  explained  that 
the  Style  Committee  was  endeavoring  to  work  out  a 
])lan  with  the  manufacturers  of  colored  kids  so  that  the 
shoe  retailers  would  in  reality  dictate  the  colors  to  be 
used  in  shoes  rather  than  the  manufacturer. 

Mr.  Goldberg  emphasized  the  fact  that  the  retailer 
was  the  man  who  was  in  touch  with  the  demands  of  the 
generrd  public  and,  therefore,  was  in  a  better  position 
to  know  what  colors  should  be  u>ed  in  the  production 
of  shoes  than  the  manufacturer.  lie  said  the  St\le 
Committee  was  against  a  great  cpuintity  of  colors,  and 
fa\  <ired  limiting  them  to  two  .^'hades  of  brown,  dark  and 
niedium  ;  two  .'■'hades  of  gray,  dark  and  medium  ;  and  a 
new  shade  of  gray  somewhat  on  the  order  of  the  field 
mouse,  but  what  would  really  be  called  beaver. 

Me  said  if  the  models  were  (|uiet,  dignified  and  re- 
lined  a  really  stylish  line  of  shoes  would  result.  He 
also  expressed  the  opinion  that  there  would  be  more 
h'rench  heels  sold  than  ever  before,  giving  as  a  reason 
the  fact  that  women  are  evidently  going  to  wear  longer 
skirts.  He  stated  his  belief  that  combinations  are  really 
up  to  the  length  of  the  skirt  worn  and  that  long  skirts 
will  automatically  cut  out  colored  tops,  but  that  the 
long  skirts  would  create  a  demand  for  more  elaborate 
footwear,  with  the  result  that  there  will  be  an  excellent 
business  in  fancy  buckles,  etc.,  for  pumps. 

In  regard  to  satin  pumps,  he  expressed  the  opinion 
that  they  were  really  too  warm  for  summer  wear.  He 
favored  the  continued  elimination  of  the  very  great 
numl)er  of  lasts  which  fcirmerly  recpiired  a  retailer  to 
buy  a  new  last  before  he  had  received  orders  on  i)re- 
vious  samples. 


Bill  Fitsem  was  called  U])on  the  other  day  to  ex- 
plain to  a  fair  patron  that  "4-B"  on  the  box  did  not 
stand  for  "four  bucks." 


EADY'S  SHOE' HOSPITAL 


Longer  Life 


to  Them! 


You'll  be  surprised  to  find  how  much 
good  service  may  be  had  frotn  an  old 
pair  of  shoes  that  you've  about  de- 
cided to  throw  away. 
Often  the  uppers  ar*  «0  good  that 
new  heels  and  soles  will  m^k«  CHo 
shoes  almost  as  good  as  new. 
Our  Modern  Shoe  Repair  Shop  is 
fully  equipped  for  such  "hospital" 
work  on  shoes  for  men  and  women. 
We  use  the  best  oak  leather  sola* 
or  any  of  the  good  fibre  soles; 
leather  or  rubber  heels. 
1  We  can  do  the  work  quickly  or  while 
!  you  wait  in  our  comfortable  waiting 
1  room. 

Yonge  St. 
Arcade  and 
Victoria  St. 


EADY'S 


Telephone  Main  4331. 


Eady's  Shoe  Hospital 


''Watch  Your  Step! 

You'll  be  surprised  to  find  how  much 
good  aorvice  may  be  had  from  an 
old  pair  of  shoes  that  you've  about 
decided  to  throw  away, 
pften  the  uppers  are  so  good  that 
new  heels,  and  soles  will  make  the 
shoes  almost  as  good  as  new. 
Our  Modern  Shoe  Repair  Shop  is 
fully    equipped    for    such  "hospital" 

]  work  on  shoes  for  men  and  women. 

I  We   use  the   best   oak   leather  soles 

I  or  jtny  of  the  good  fibre  soles;  lea- 

I  ther  or  rubber  heels. 
We  can  do  the  work  quickly,  or  while 
you  wait  in  our  comfortable  waiting 

I  room. 


Yonge  St. 
Arcade  and 
Victoria  St. 


EADY'S 


Telephone  Main  4331 


Type  of  advertising  used  by  Eady's  Shoe  Hospital,  in  Toronto  weekly 
papers.     The  ad.  is  changed  each  week 


44 


FOOTWEAR   IN  CANADA 


April,  1919 


Repair  Department  in  Neili's  Peterboro  Store  One  of 
the  Most  Complete  in  Canada 


THE  R.  Neill  Company,  of  Peterboro,  have  just 
installed  in  their  handsome  new  store  a  com- 
plete shoe  repairing  equipment  consisting  of  a 
No.  F-50  Champion  repair  outfit  with  a  Cham- 
pion "Universal"  new  model  curved  needle  and  awl 
shoe  stitcher ;  a  Champion  new  model  combination 
clincher  fastener  and  heel  slugging  machine;  a  Cham 
pion  new  model.  No.  5,  hand  power  skiver  and  a  Singer 
patcher. 

Several  features  in  connection  with  this  equipment 
,are  of  unusual  interest.  The  finishing  outfit  is  fitted 
with  four  specially  designed  "no-friction"  clutches, 
which,  instead  of  being  thrown  in  by  a  hand  lever,  are 


The  leg  of  the  edge  trimmer  is  solid  to  the  floor, 
and  'being  of  extra  heavy  construction,  prevents  un- 
necessary vibration.  The  edge-finish  pots  are  conven- 
iently located  below  the  burnishing  wheels  and  the 
shelves,  instead  of  being  sloping,  are  level.  In  this  re- 
pair department  the  shelves  on  the  machine  have  been 
extended  clear  back  to  the  wall,  so  as  to  give  room  for 
storing  taps,  rubber  heels,  etc.  Between  the  stitcher 
and  the  finishing  equipment  a  table,  with  drawer,  is 
provided  for  tools  and  oil  cans. 

Special  Features  on  Stitcher 

The  stitcher  is  a  four-cam  machine,  fitted  with  a 
positive  cam-operated  needle  guide,  a  thread  measur- 


Repair  department  in  the  basement  of  the  retail  store  of  R.  Neill  &  Com  pany,  Peterboro 


engaged  and  disengaged  by  means  of  foot  pedals.  The 
whole  equipment  has  been  designed  to  relieve  the  main 
shaft  of  unnecessary  drag  and  this  has  been  so  suc- 
cessfully accomplished  that  a  motor  of  1  to  IVi  h.p.  is 
all  that  is  required.  The  machine  is  wonderfully  quiet 
in  operation.  All  working  parts,  instead  of  being  plac- 
ed over  the  centre  of  the  frame,  hang  forward  allow- 
ing the  operator  to  stand  back  clear  of  the  machine, 
enabling  him  to  work  in  a  natural  position  and  with  a 
minmum  of  effort. 

The  Champion  friction  edge  setter,  with  which  this 
machine  is  equipped,  is  a  wonderful  time-saver.  It  is 
self-adjusting  to  any  width  simply  by  moving  a  small 
lever  on  the  top.  It  is  not,  however,  a  spring  adjust- 
ment, requiring  considerable  force  to  operate.  The 
operator  simply  takes  a  shoe  in  his  left  hand,  moves 
the  adjusting  lever  with  his  right  hand  and  is  ready  to 
go  ahead.    This  device  is  friction-heated. 


ing  device  wdiich  automatically  measures  out  every 
stitch  for  the  work,  irrespective  of  change  in  thickness, 
and  has  an  automatic  thread  lock  which  locks  the 
thread  before  it  is  pulled  in,  insuring  an  even  lock  in 
hard  or  soft  leather.  The  thread  spools  are  at  the 
top  rear  of  the  machine,  high  above  water  or  oil.  The 
stitching  range  is  from  four  to  sixteen  stitches  to  the 
inch,  from  single  thickness  to  five-eights.  A  feature  of 
the  machine  is  that  the  presser-foot  remains  up  while 
the  operator  is  putting  the  work  in  place,  enabling  him 
to  use  both  hands  instead  of  having  to  hold  up  the 
presserfoot  with  one  hand.  A  steel  apron  in  front  of 
the  work  table  prevents  all  damage  to  the  upper.  In 
using  this  stitcher  it  is  not  necessary  to  channel  the 
sole  beforehand,  as  this  is  done  automatically  in  ad- 
vance of  the  stitching.  It  is  worthy  of  note,  also,  that 
instead  of  gouging  out  a  channel  and  leaving  the 
stitching  exposed,  this  machine  simply  raises  a  lip  of 


April,  1919 


FOOTWEAR 


IN  CANADA 


45 


leather  which  can  be  beaten  down  to  cover  up  the 
stitching,  thus  presented  a  very  finished  appearance 
and  adding  to  the  wearing  quabties  of  the  shoe. 

The  stitcher  is  electrically  heated  and  the  wax-pot 
is  situated  within  a  few  inches  of  the  take-up  lever 
which  prevents  undue  cooling  of  the  thread  before  it 
reaches  the  work.  Furthermore,  the  wax-pot  is  small 
in  size,  the  purpose  of  this  being  to  prevent,  as  far  as 
possible,  any  large  amount  of  wax  being  left  in  the  pot 
after  each  day's  work.  The  electric  heat  is  very  simple 
and  convenient.  The  heating  elements  are  in  the  form 
of  cartridges  a  few  inches  long.  Two  are  used,  one  for 
the  wax-pot  and  the  other  over  the  shuttle.  The 


Champion  combination 
clincher,  fastener  and 
heel  slugging  machine, 
installed  in  Neill  Store 
at  Peterboro 


heater  on  the  wax-pot  also  heats  the  take-up  lever, 
which  is  a  feature  not  found  on  gas-heated  stitchers. 
Six  degrees  of  heat  are  obtained  by  means  of  a  con- 
troller located  on  the  stitcher  and  after  the  required 
heat  has  been  reached  it  can  be  maintained  on  a  smaller 
current  consumption.  The  machine  is  ready  for  op- 
eration in  about  twenty  minutes  after  turning  on  the 
current,  the  consumption  being  1  8/10  amperes,  or  just 
about  the  amount  of  current  required  for  a  good  sized 
electric  lamp. 

The  Champion  Nailer 

The  combination  clincher  fastener  and  heel  slug- 
ging machine  installed  in  the  Neill  store  is  one  of  the 
latest  lines  of  the  Champion  Shoe  Machinery  Company 
and  is  a  distinct  improvement  on  the  old  style  loose 
nailers  where  the  work  of  changing  from  one  size  fast- 
ener to  another  involves  much  more  time,  it  being  nec- 
essary to  remove  the  nail  hopper  and  run  out  the  six 
or  eig-ht  inches  of  nails  in  the  magazine.  In  this  new 
model,  which  we  believe  is  the  only  one  of  its  kind  on 
the  market,  the  nails  and  slugs  come  in  reels,  bejng 
wound  around  just  like  wire.  Four  reels — three  of 
clincher  fasteners  and  one  of  heel  slugs — are  placed 
on  the  machine  at  one  time  and  the  change-over  from 
one  size  of  fasteners  to  another,  or  to  heel  slugs,  is 
accomplished  simply  by  moving  a  lever  at  the  side  of 
the  machine.  The  spacing  of  the  fasteners  or  slugs  is 
also  regulated  by  moving  a  lever.  Either  of  these 
operations  is  only  the  matter  of  a  second. 

The  machine  in  operation  simply  makes  a  hole  in 
the  sole  by  means  of  an  awl,  (similar  to  a  stitcher), 
which  also  carries  the  work  around  as  the  nailing  ])ro- 
gresses  to  a  point  under  the  throat  where  the  driver 
forces  the  nail  into  the  awl  hole.   The  nail  is  support- 


ed in  the  throat  on  its  downward  path  by  a  movable 
piece  which  keeps  it  in  the  correct  position  and  every 
nail  is  absolutely  straight.  This  is  a  special  feature 
on  this  new  machine  not  found  in  any  other  type  of 
nailer.  The  principle  is  just  the  same  as  a  carpenter 
holding  the  nails  between  his  two  fingers  while  they 
are  being  driven. 

The  fastener,  going  through  the  leather,  comes  in- 
to contact  with  the  top  of  the  horn  on  which  the  shoe 
rests.  A  slight  depression  in  this  horn  is  so  designed 
that  it  turns  the  point  of  the  nail  up  into  the  leather 
again,  clinching  it  in  the  form  of  a  J.  The  operator  is 
able  to  nail  close  to  the  edge  of  the  shoe,  which  ensilres 
the  job  being  watertight  and  also  gives  a  be  tter  api)ear- 
ance  to  the  work. 

The  working  speed  of  the  machine  is  from  three 
hundred  and  fifty  to  five  hundred  clincher  fasteners  or 
heel  slugs  a  minute.  As  indicating  the  efficiency  of  this 
nailer  we  have  been  informed  that  an  average  work- 
man can  handle  about  100  dozen  pairs  a  day  on  it, 
whereas  by  hand  3  dozen  would  be  a  good  average. 

There  are  nine  different  sizes  of  clincher  fasteners 
from  %ths  to  J^ths  and  heel  slugs  in  five  sizes  from 
Mths  to  Vsths.  An  advantage  over  the  hand  nailing- 
method  is  that  the  work  is  held  under  strong  compres- 
sion during  the  process,  the  innersole  and  outsole  being 
firmly  bound  together  and  making  the  join  absolutely 
waterproof. 

The  repair  department  is  located  in  the  basement  of 
the  building  in  a  location  that  is  bright  and  airy.  \\'ork 
is  raised  and  lowered  to  the  store  by  means  of  a  duml) 
waiter.  This  is  shown  on  the  left  of  the  photograph. 
The  table  in  the  foreground  is  fitted  with  drawers  on 
both  sides  and  these  are  used  for  storing  materials. 
Mr.  T.  Tremblay,  who  is  in  charge  of  the  department, 
is  an  experienced  shoepack  maker  and  is  very  enthus- 
iastic about  the  new  outfit  and  Mr.  Kidd,  vice-presi- 
dent of  the  Neill  Company  anticipates  that  before  long 
they  will  have  more  work  than  they  can  handle. 


Why  Men  Fail 

This   is   Bradstreets'   Classification   of  Business 
Failures 

1.    The  Beginner's  Handicaps — 


Lack  of  capital   . .  29.7% 

Incompetence   30.2% 

Inexperience   4.6% 

Unwise  credits    2.0% 

 66.5% 

2.  Factors  Threatening  Success — 

Competition   1.9% 

Failure  of  others  1.3% 

Sickness,  death,  fire,  etc  16.5%r^ 

 19.7%) 

3.  Character  Breakdown — 

Fraud   ^  10.3% 

Neglect  of  business  2.0 

Personal  extravagance  7% 

Speculation  8% 

 13.8%o 


100.0%o  I 
I 


46 


FOOTWEAR   IN  CANADA 


April,  1910 


Toronto  Repairers  Learn  Benefits  to  be  Derived 

from  Proper  Book-keeping 


AT  a  recent  meeting  of  tlie  Toronto  Shoe  Repair- 
ers' Association  Mr.  James  Herrriot,  account- 
ant Ontario  Division  (iutta  Percha  &  Rul)ber 
Limited,  Toronto,  spoke  to  the  repairers  on 
the  advantages  to  l)e  derived  from  a  good  system  of 
l)Ookkeeping.  The  system  whicli  Mr.  Herriot  dis- 
cussed is  in  the  form  of  a  book  that  is  designed 
to  keep  account  of  a  repair  shop  l)usiness  for  two 
years.  Copies  of  this  systenr  had  been  secured  from 
the  National  Leather  and  Shoe  Finders'  As.sociation 
of  St.  Louis,  and  distributed  by  Gutta  Percha  and 
Rubber,  Limited,  to  all  members  of  the  Toronto  Shoe 
Repairers'  Association  so  that  they  were  able  to  fol- 
low him  clearly  by  referring  to  their  books  as  he  dis- 
cussed each  entry.  Mr.  Herriot  emphasized  the  neces- 
sity of  observing  certain  little  business  rules  before 
any  system  of  bookkeeping  could  be  a  real  success  and 
his  talk  on  accounting  was  sandwiched  with  helpful 
bits  of  advice.    His  address,  in  part,  was  as  follows: 

There  is  no  business  that  can  be  carried  to  success- 
ful results  unless  some  system  of  accounting  is  adopt- 
ed. There  are  various  systems — the  larger  companies 
using  very  complicated  systems — but  what  we  want  to 
discuss  is  a  simple  method  for  the  man  running  his 
own  business,  who  does  not  want  to  employ  a  book- 


keeper l)ut  does  want  to  know  if  he  is  making  both 
ends  meet  and  if  he  is  keeping  the  balance '  on  the 
right  side.  No  man  can  make  a  success  if  he  does  not 
keep  a  record  of  his  income  and  expenditure.  Sooner 
or  later  he  will  find  himself  "at  sea"  and  in  need  of  a 
business  doctor. 

You  do  not  need  a  liookkeeper  to  do  the  things 
shown  in  this  book.  You  can  do  them  just  as  well 
yourself.  Doing  these  things  carefully  each  month 
.will  enable  you  to  watch  your  business  and  make  it 
tell  just  what  it  is  earning.  But  before  we  take  up"the 
matter  of  keeping  the  book  it  might  be  well  to  refer 
to  some  other  matters  which  are  necessary  to  have 
kept  in  good  shape  before  you  can  make  a  success,  and 
which  are  closely  connected  and  lead  up  to  the  ac- 
counting system. 

Some  of  the  Requirements 

One  of  the  first  requirements  is  to  have  a  clean  and 
tidy  store — one  where  everything  has  a  place  and 
everything  is  in  its  place.  You  will  agree  with  me 
that  this  of  itself  is  a  helj)  and  a  time-saver;  to  be  able 
to  lay  your  hands  on  any  article  just  when  you  require 
it  and  not  have  to  sort  over  a  pile  of  articles  to  get  the 
one  you  want.   Keep  all  articles  of  the  same  kind  neat- 


I 


Condition  of  Business. 


Date 


19 


ASSETS 

DEBTS 

Cash  in  Bank 

Owe  on  Machinery 

Cash  on  Hand 

"     "  Tools 

Fair  Value  on  Machinery 

"  Furniture 

"       "  Tools 

Materials 

"       "       "  Furniture 

Materials  on' Hand  (cost  price) 

Accounts  Due  from  Custonners 

Finished  Work  (uncalled  for) 

n        ..  Ki  M.  \Ai       f  Difference  between^ 
Present  Net  Worth  [                  ^^^^^  j 

Total 

Total 

NOTE:    After  you  have  filled  in  the  various  items  of  ASSETS  and  DEBTS,  add  both  columns  and  DEDUCT  the 
DEBTS  from  the  ASSETS.    The  difference  will  show  your  NET  WORTH.    Enter  this  amount  on  the 
line  marked  "Present  .Net  Worth."    Then,  add  the  two  columns  and  their  totals  must  agree. 

+  ... 


Fig.  1 — This  gives  you  the  present  condition  of  your  business 


April,  1919 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


47 


Simplified  Accounting  System  for  Repairers 

Month  _19  


'Day 

This  column  l«  for  cash  salts  only.  Cash  received  for  work 
already  done  Is  a  "Cash  Sale," 

Day 

This  column  Is  only  for  expense  items  which  are  paid  In  cash 
OMtieck,  but  not  for  material 

1 

Total  Cash  Sales  for  this  day 

Paid  for  Rent  for  Month 

2 

(•             «l                If            14          i«  •( 

"    "  1-ight  and  Power  for  Month 

3 

11            11              M           >•         It  <• 

"     "   Heat  for  Month 

4 

l«            II              11           l|         II  II 

"    "   Insurance  (one  month) 

6 

■  •            If              II           II         II  II 

* 

Tax  or  License  » 

6 

"    "  Wages  1st  week 

7 

11            II              II           II         l»  II 

"    "        "     2d  week 

8 

II            II              II           II         M  II 

"    "        "     3d  week 

9 

•  1            II              II           11         11  II 

"    "        "     4th  week 

10 

•  1            II             41           l<         II  II 

"    "       "     6th  week 

II 

■  1            II              II           11         II  II 

Express  or  Freight 

12 

•  1            II              11           If         II  II 

Postage 

13 

■  1            II              II           II         II  11 

Other  Expense  Items  on  lines  below 

14 

•  1            II              II           11         II  II 

16 

II            II              II           II         II  II 

16 

II            II              II           If         II  II 

IT 

.11            11              II           ff         II  II 

18 

II           Jl              «•           ff         II  II 

IS 

11            II              II           ft         II  II 

20 

•  1            II              II           ff         II  II 

21 

II            II              II           11         II  II 

22 

•  1            II              II           ff         II  II 

23 

24 

II            II              II           II         II  II 

25 

•  1            II              II           ff         II  II 

26 

II            II              II           ff         II  II 

27 

II            II              II           II         II  11 

28 

II            11              II           11         II  II 

28 

II            II              11           II         II  II 

Charge  off  on  Machinery,     1  % 

30 

II          <l           M         II       «•  M 

"    "  Tools,  \% 

31 

II          11           II         II  *l 

 Furniture, 

This  total  Boei  In  Gain  or  Loss  celuifin  > 
en  Una  2,  opposite  pace 

This  total  Koes  In  Gain  or  Loss  column 
on  line  7.  opposKa  pace 

Fig.  2 — The  sheet  on  which  you  enter  daily  sales  and  monthly  expenses 


48 


FOOTWEAR 


IN  CANADA 


April,  191!) 


ly  piled  together,  whether  on  shelves  or  in  a  special 
store-room.  You  will  find  that  this  will  enable  you  to 
take  inventory  quickly  and  correctly  and  Will  be  of 
great  assistance  when  the  traveller  calls  for  an  order. 
You  can  tell  in  a  glance  just  how  your  stock  is  and 
whether  you  need  to  order  more.  It  will  perhaps  save 
you  ordering  a  fresh  supply  of  what  you  may  have 
hidden  away  in  the  shelf  or  cupboard.  It  is  also  good 
policy  to  keep  old  stock  to  the  front  so  that  your  stock 
will  always  be  fresh  and  not  shop-worn. 

There  is  another  point  I  would  like  to  impress  on 
all  of  you  and  that  is,  when  a  traveller  calls  on  you 
for  an  order,  insist  upon  his  leaving  a  copy  of  it  with 
you  so  as  to  avoid  future  complications  and  help  you 
to  know  just  where  you  are  at.  I  do  not  know  what 
the  general  practice  is  in  this  respect  but  the  Gutta 
Percha  &  Rubber,  Limited,  salesmen's  books  provide 
for  this  and  you  should  see  that  you  get  your  copy. 
It  will  be  a  guide  to  you  and  prevent  errors  when 
goods  are  received.  Make  sure  that  your  order  is  cor- 
rectly wriitten  ;  that  the  proper  prices  and  discounts 
are  shown  and  proper  terms  and  allowances  for  bulk 
shipments,  etc.,  are  marked  in.  This  may  seem  a  small 
thing  but  you  will  allow  that  many  grievances  and 
much  friction  often  arises  through  what  appears  to  be 
small  things.  Errors  occur  and  countless  troubles 
arise  and  have  to  be  adjusted  when  they  could  have 
been  avoided  by  a  little  precaution.  The  salesman  is 
also  required  to  procure  your  signature  to  the  order, 
which  is  also  a  good  thing. 

Check  Up  Shipments 

When  you  receive  goods,  it  is  the  custom  to  have  a 
delivery  slip,  one  of  which  you  retain  and  the  other 
you  sign,  the  latter  being  taken  by  the  carter  who  de- 
livers the  goods.  Do  you  check  the  goods  as  to  quan- 
tity and  weight  before  signing?  If  not,  you  are  lay- 
ing up  trouble  for  yourself.  Shippers  are  only  human 
and  make  mistakes  just  like  anyone  else.  It  would 
only  take  a  minute  or  two  to  check  the  goods  and 
then  you  are  protecting  yourself  as  well  as  the  man 
who  delivers  the  goods. 

If  you  sign  for  the  delivery  "blindly"  and  then, 
after  an  hour  or  so,  check  up  and  find  a  shortage,  you 
get  sore,  call  up  the  wholesale  and  rase  Cain  generally. 
The  sales  department  has  to  refer  the  matter  to  the 
factory  or  warehouse ;  the  shipper,  as  a  matter  of  prin- 
ciple, claims  his  count  was  correct  and  there  is  a  cer- 
.tain  amount  of  doubt  all  around  because  if  you  signed 
for  the  correct  shipment  his  word  is  as  good  as  yours. 
However,  there  is  a  lot  of  telephoning  and  letter-writ- 
ing and  possibly  after  many  days  you  are  allowed  the 
shortage — as  a  matter  of  policy.  Now  all  this  friction 
could  have  been  avoided  at  the  start  if  you  had  check- 
ed the  goods  on  arrival  because  you  would  have  had 
the  delivery  man  as  a  witness  to  the  shortage. 

When  receiving  express  or  railway  shipments  make 
sure  that  the  packages  are  in  good  condition  and  not 
damaged.  If  there  are  any  signs  of  tampering  or  if, 
the  cases  or  cartons  are  broken,  do  not  give  a  clear  re- 
ceipt, but  mark  the  bill  "In  bad  order."  You  want  to 
have  a  "come-back,"  or  claim,  in  case  the  shipment  is 
damaged. 

Keep  all  delivery  slips,  as  they  are  handy  to  check 
invoices.  It  is  good  practice  to  have  one  or  two  clip 
files  to  keep  all  papers  safe.  There  are  a  great  many 
mistakes  occur  through  the  careless  handling  of  papers 
and  documents.  My  advice  is:  file  the  order,  the  de- 
livery slip  and  the  invoice  together  and  see  that  they 
all  check  with  one  another.   If  you  find  the  delivery  is 


i  I 

!  Was  This  Your  Shop  ?  \ 

I  A  man  went  into  a  Toronto  repair  shop  with  j 

I  a  pair  of  shoes  to  be  fixed.   He  suggested  they  be  7 

1  repaired  in  a  way  that  he  had  heard  was  used  by  j 

I  nany  repair  shops.    This  man  said  "I  don't  do  it  : 

j  that  way."    "But,"  said  the  customer,  more  for  ! 

j  the  purpose  of  securing  enlightment  than  any-  I 

5  thing  else,  "other  repairers  say  this  method  is  | 

1  quite  satisfactory."    "I'm  telling  ya  I  don't  do  it,"  J 

!  the  repairer  snapped,  pushing  the  shoes  back  to  J 

I  the  customer.  j 

I  Some  repairers  seem  to  lose  sight  of  the  fact  : 

I  that  customers  are  necessary  to  their  business.  ■ 


not  according  to  order  or  that  articles  have  been  sub- 
stituted, get  after  the  house  at  once  and  have  the  mat- 
ter straightened  out.  When  the  invoice  is  received, 
check  with  order  and  delivery  slip.  If  the  terms  are 
not  correctly  entered,  you  know  what  to  do.  Do  not 
wait  until  you  get  your  monthly  statement  and  then 
refuse  to  pay  any  of  it  until  correction  is  made.  Re- 
port the  matter  at  once.  All  companies  are  anxious 
to  have  their  customers  satisfied  and  you  can  rest  as- 
sured that  a  corrected  invoice  or  credit  slip  will  be  sent 
you  immediately. 

Keep  all  your  unpaid  accounts  together  so  that 
when  the  monthly  statement  is  received  you  may  be 
able  to  check  the  same  intelligently. 

Now  we'll  get  ahead  with  the  book  which  you  have 
on  your  hands.  On  the  back  of  the  front  cover  you 
will  notice  "Get  a  Memorandum  Book."  You  do  not 
need  an  expensive  book,  but  get  one  with  about  200 
Images.  Divide  this  book  into  four  parts,  to  be  used  as 
follows : 

(1)  The  materials  you  buy — whether  for  cash  or 
credit.  Enter  them  on  the  debit  side,  deducting  al- 
lowances and  cash  discounts.  On  the  credit  side  enter 
the  amounts  you  pay  for  materials  purchased. 

(2)  How  much  you  owe  on  machinery  and  tool's. 
This  is  entered  on  the  debit  side.  On  the  credit  side 
you  enter  how  much  you  pay  each  month  on  machin- 
ery and  tools. 

(3)  How  much  you  owe  on  your  furniture — how 
much  you  pay  each  month  on  furniture. 

(4-  The  credit  yoii  give  to  customers — what  you 
collect  from  these  customers. 

Keep  a  Daily  Record 

If  you  are  not  the  happy  possessor  of  a  cash  regis- 
ter, keep  a  cash  slip  each  day,  on  which  you  will  enter 
each  sale  as  it  is  made,  cash  received  for  work  already 
done  and  to  be  treated  as  a  cash  sale.  Do  not  forget 
to  enter  all  receipts  and  also  payments  as  they  are 
made. 

Now  if  you  are  going  to  start  using  this  book  on 
the  first  of  the  month  you  will  need  to  take  an  inven- 
tory on  the  last  day  of  the  previous  month,  of  all  ma- 
terial you  have  on  hand.  If  you  have  adopted  the 
ideas  outlined  in  the  first  part  of  this  talk  you  will  have 
little  difficulty  in  doing  this,  neither  should  it  take  you 
very  long.  Take  a  list  of  all  your  stock,  not  forgetting 
the  articles  used  for  "window  dressing"  or  show  pur- 
poses for,  strange  to  say,  I  have  known  these  to  be  for- 
gotten. Price  the  inventory  from  your  invoices  or 
memo  book,  entering  actual  or  net  prices  in  all  cases. 


April,  1919 


FOOTWEAR   IN  CANADA 


49 


Simplified  Accounting  System  for  Repairers 

Month  -19  


NOTE:    This  space  is  intended  to  show  the  GAIN  or  LOSS  on  your  month's  business. 
Fill  it  out  at  the  END  of  each  month. 


Material  on  hand  (see  Inventory  below) 

5 

Material  on  hand  1st  of  this  month 

2 

_    ,  _  ,       f  See  total  in  first  column 
Cash  Sales   |        opposite  page 

6 

.  ^  ...               f  See  your  memo- 
bought  this  month  |  pandum  book 

3 

<-i         o  1     /  Work  done  during  month 
Credit  Sales  \  ^^t  paid  for 

7 

P              i  See  total  in  second  column 
txpense          opposite  page 

4- 

Loss  for  this  month 

8 

Gain  for  this  month 

Total 

Total 

NOTE:  After  filling  in  the  items  on  lines  1-2-3-5-6-7,  add  the  two  columns.  The  difference  between  the  figures  will  show 
the  GAIN  or  LOSS.  If  a  loss,  place  the  difference  on  line  4.  If  a  gain,  place  difference  on  line  8.  Then  add  both 
columns  and  they  must  agree. 


NOTE:    This  space  is  intended  to  show  the  PRESENT  NET  WORTH  of  your  business. 
Fill  it  out  at  the  END  of  each  month. 


9 

r    L  1    L    1   /  Get  balance  from 
Gash  In  bank  <^  5^^^     ^^eck  book 

16 

Owe  on  Machinery  and  tools 

!0 

"    cn  naiid 

17 

"      "  Furniture 

1  1 

Machinery  ard  Tools  (see  inventory  below) 

18 

"      "  Materials 

12 

Furniture  (fair  valuation) 

(Get  above  amounts  amounts  from  your 
memorandum  book  ) 

13 

Materials  (see  inventory  below) 

14 

Accounts  due   /See  your  memo- 
from-customers\  randum  book 

19 

Present  net  worth 

io 

Finished  work  uncalled  for 

Total 

Total 

^  NOTE:  Fill  in  the  above  items.  Then,  place  the' difference  f>etween  the  totals  of  each  column  on  line  19.  Then,  add  both 
column,  and  they  must  agree.  Get  item  for  Une  9  from  your  check  book.  Get  items  for  lines  14,  16,  17,  18  from 
your  memorandum  book. 


NOTE:    In  this  space  take  an  inventory  of  the  Materials 
you  have  on  hand  (cost  price). 

NOTE:    This  space  is  for  inventory  of  your  Machinery  and 
Tools.   Deduct  1  %  each  month  for  wear  and  tear. 

Sole  Leather  Blocks  (cost  price) 

Stitcher  (present  valued 

"     .  "       Bends  " 

Finisher       "  " 

"       "        Strips  " 

Rollers 

Rubber  Heels,  Men's    "  " 

Skivers         "  " 

Women's  " 

Sole  Culters"  " 

Upper  Leather  Skins    "  " 

Motor'          "  " 

"        "        Patches  " 

Tools           "  " 

Finishing  Materials     .  *'  .  " 

Sundries      "  " 

Nails 

Thread  ..a 

Ink 

■^otal 

Wax 

Deduct  1  %  for  wear  and  tear 

Sundries  " 

1  — —  

Placs  this  total  on  line  13  above 

Place  thia  total  on  line  11  above  . 

Fig.  3 — This  will  give  you  Profit  and  Loss  on  the  month's  business  and  also  net  worth  each  month 


50 


FOOTWEAR 


IN  CANADA 


April,  191) 


(This  same  inventory  will  need  to  be  taken  at  the  end 
of  each  month.) 

In  your  inventory  of  machinery  and  tools  you  want 
to  be  fair  and  get  the  present  value  of  these  articles. 
Take  the  actual  cost  to  you  at  the  time  purchased,  de- 
duct 105^  per  cent  per  annum  for  the  length  of  time 
you  have  had  them.  This  is  about  equal  to  1  per  cent 
per  month  and  is  a  fair  valuation  for  all  practical  pur- 
poses. Each  month  you  will  deduct  1  per  cent  for  de- 
preciation. 

Treat  your  inventory  of  furniture  just  the  same  as 
your  inventory  of  machinery  and  tools. 

Now  we  are  prepared  to  start  the  book  filling  in  the 
form  on  page  46  (See  Fig.  1).  This  gives  you  the  con- 
dition of  your  business — or,  in  other  words,  your  as- 
sets and  liabilities. 

Now  you  can  start  with  the  monthly  record  on 
page  47  (See  Fig.  2).  Your  cash  receipts  are  entered 
each  day  from  the  sales  sheet  or  your  cash  register.  On 
the  expense  side  you  enter  the  expenses  as  they  occur. 
Referring  to  "rent,"  some  of  you  live  in  apartments 
above  the  store,  and  should  keep  your  house- 
hold expenses  separate  and  distinct  from  your  busi- 
ness. Your  store  should  bear  a  fair  rate  of  the  rent. 
Light  and  power  should  be  treated  in  the  same  manner 
as  s'hould  also  heat,  or  fuel,  insurance,  etc.  If  you  are 
an  employer  of  help,  you  will  see  where  to  enter  these 
charges,  but  how  about  your  own  salary?  Do  you 
charge  your  business  with  a  regularly  weekly  salary? 
If  not,  you  should  because  that's  the  only  way  you  will 
ever  be  able  to  keep  accurate  records.  It  is  unfair  to 
to  keep  taking  a  dollar  or  two  dollars  from  the  till  and 
not  keep  any  record  of  it.  Draw  a  certain  salary  each 
week  and  enter  it  properly.  Several  blank  lines  are 
provided  for  expenses  not  listed,  such  as  advertising, 
etc.  Depreciation  is  figured  as  a  part  of  "overhead" 
expense. 

The  form  shown  on  p.  49,  Fig.  3,  is  intended  to 
show,  at  the  end  of  the  month,  the  gain  and  loss  on 
the  month's  business  and  also  your  net  worth  at  the 
end  of  the  month.  The  two  tables  at  the  bottom  of 
the  page  are  for  figuring  inventories  of  materials  on 
hand  and  machinery  and  tools. 

There  are  twenty-four  sets  of  these  forms  in  the 
accounting  book,  each  set  being  good  for  one  month. 

Mr.  Herriot  also  addressed  the  members  of  the 
Hamilton  Shoe  Repairers'  Association  on  the  same 
subject  on  Wednesd'ay,  April  2nd.  The  system  describ- 
ed is  one  of  the  most  simple  we  have  ever  seen  and 
from  the  interest  already  shown  it  is  certain  to  become 
very  popular  with  Canadian  repairmen. 


Largest  Scrap  Leather  House 

THE  C.  G.  Flynn  Leather  Company,  of  Boston, 
Mass.,  are  recognized  as  the  largest  and  one  of 
the  oldest  scrap  leather  and  leather  remnant 
dealers  in  the  world.  For  over  a  half  century 
this  firm  and  their  predecessor  have  been  located  in 
the  centre  of  the  Boston  shoe  district  buying  and  sell- 
ing remnant  and  scrap  leather.  Mr.  C.  G.  Flynn,  the 
manager  and  principal  owner  of  this  business  house, 
has  been  engaged  jn  this  business  for  over  20  years 
under  his  own  name  and  was  for  15  yearr  preceeding 
employed  by  and  later  a  partner  in  the  firm  of  John 
Spence  &  Co.  to  which  concern  the  C.  G.  Flynn  Co. 
has  succeeded.  Mr.  Flynn  is  well  known,  having  been 
doing  an  export  business  of  good  proportions  for  thirty 
five  years. 

This  particular  industry  or  clearing  house  for  the 


leather  dealer  and  shoe  manufacturer  is  a  decided  fac- 
tor in  the  commercial  transactions  of  the  shoe  and 
leather  industries,  linking  up  buyers  and  sellers  of  odd 
lots  of  merchandise  which  are  perfectly  good  and  have 
real  good  market  values.  A  buyer  in  a  shoe  factory 
frequently  wants  a  small  lot  of  a  particular  leather, 
Avhich  for  illustration  is  not  being  made  but  which  can 
be  found  in  odd  lots  in  the  dealers  hands.  His  particu- 
lar trade  demands  this  particular  tannage,  grade, 
weight,  or  shade  of  leather  and  the  manufacturer  must 
have  it  at  any  cost.  To  have  this  leather  made  up  to 
order  may  be  out  of  the  question  or  at  least  a  great 
expense,  more  than  it  is  worth.  The  remnant  and  scrap 
leather  dealer  probably  has  this  lot  of  leather  in  stock 
and  has  been  sufficiently  introspective  to  see  in  ad- 
vance that  some  day  this  very  lot  would  be  asked  for 
and  he  has  invested  his  money  to  facilitate  the  distribu- 
tion of  this  good  leather  and  prevent  a  total  waste  on 
the  part  of  the  original  shoe  factory  owner. 

It  is  surprising  to  note  to  what  a  volume  of  dollars 
this  business  actually  amounts.  During  one  year  the 
C.  G.  Flynn  Company  carried  on  a  business  of  $1,000,- 
000.00.  Their  advertisement  which  appears  in  this 
issue  of  Footwear  in  Canada  calls  the  trade's  at- 
tention to  several  lots  of  upper  and  sole  leather  which 
are  available  at  attractive  prices. 


Pointers  on  Fitting 

SOME  valuable  pointers  on  how  to  fit  shoes 
aroperly  were  given  by  Dr.  E.  N.  Case,  of  the 
Scholl  Manufacturing  Co.,  Ltd.,  Chicago  and  To- 
ronto, in  a  lecture  before  members  of  the  Mon- 
treal shoe  section  of  the  Retail  Merchant's  Association 
of  Canada,  on  April  3rd.  The  association  is  now  locat- 
ed in  the  Dandurand  Building,  St.  Catharine  Street, 
East,  and  the  lecture  was  given  in  the  hall  of  the  as- 
sociation. 

Dr.  Case,  who  was  assisted  by  Dr..  A.  Pescho^n,  il- 
lustrated his  talk  with  a  large  number  of  slides.  He 
remarked  upon  the  investigations  on  foot  troubles  car- 
ried out  by  Dr.  Scholl,  and  then  explained  the  import- 
ant bearing  that  the  proper  care  of  the  feet  has  upon 
the  general  health  and  efficiency  of  people.  He  men- 
tioned in  particular  curvature  of  the  spine  as  being 
due  to  foot  troubles.  The  speaker  also  described  the 
functions  of  the  nerves,  ligaments,  muscles,  bones, 
etc.,  of  the  legs  and  feet,  this  information  all  leading 
up  to  the  absolute  necessity  of  properly  fitting  the 
shoe  if  foot  troubles  were  to  be  avoided. 

Dr.  Case  emphasized  the  importance  of  fitting  the 
shoe  on  the  third  and  fourth  toes.  Every  business 
man,  he  said,  took  between  3,000  and  4,000  steps  per 
day.  He  asserted  that  90  per  cent  of  the  people  had 
foot  trouble;  out  of  1,385  feet  examined  by  him  1,290 
were  fitted  with  short  shoes,  the  great  source  of  foot 
troubles.  This  point  was  emphasized  again  and  again. 
Dr.  Case  remarking  also  upon  the  trouble  caused  by 
short  stockings.  Many  of  the  slides  showed  the  effect 
of  fallen  arches,  and  how  the  trouble  could  be  relieved. 
There  was,  said  Dr.  Case,  a  great  need  for  education 
in  respect  of  the  care  of  the  feet,  and  this  education 
could  be  given  through  the  retail  shoe  dealers. 

Several  questions  were  asked  and  Dr.  Case  elabor- 
ated many  of  the  topics  referred  to.  In  the  discussion, 
it  was  remarked  that  shoes  were  designed  mainly  from 
the  style  end,  and  that  little  attention  was  paid  to  the 
question  whether  they  complied  with  the  ideals  of 
scientific  and  healthy  conditions  necessary  for  the 
proper  fitting  of  shoes. 


April,  1919 


FOOTWEAR   IN  CANADA 


51 


TheWHITE  CLEANER 

for  "Blanco"  and  White  Shoes  are 
inseparables ;  and  their  friendship 
outwears  the  Shoes. 

''^Blanco  keeps  White  Shoes  White** 

It  satisfies  your  customers  because  it  does 
its  work  so  well.  They  want  "Blanco"  and 
only  "Blanco'  as  long  as  they  have  a  white 
shoe  to  put  it  on. 

It  Whitens  ;  it  Cleans  ;  it  Preserves.  Easy 
to  use  and  always  ready  for  use.  Applied 
in  a  moment.  No  trouble,  no  '*  messiness." 
Clean  and  Handy. 

You  don't  have  to  stock  "  Blanco," 
you  just  sell  it  —  or  rather,  it  sells  itself ! 
'Blanco'  means  good  profits  and  quick  profits. 

Ask  your  Jobbzr  for  Supplies. 


Manufactured  by 

Joseph  Pickering  &  Sons,  Ltd. 

SHEFFIELD,  England. 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


April,  ini'i 


iiisiiiiiiagiiiaiaHiigiiiiiiiisHgiiaiiiiiBsiiaiiiiiciaHiiiiia 


FOOTWEAR  FINDINGS 

Happenings  in  the  Shoe  and  Leather  Trade 

aiiigiaiiiiiisiaiMiiiiiasHHSiiiasiisiiisigiasHiaiSHHisiaiaiiiisiHHHiiiiiaH 


C.  A.  Davies  of  Blachford,  Davies  &  Company,  Toronto, 
accompanied  by  Mrs.  Davies,  sails  for  England,  from  New 
York,  hy  S.  S.  Mauritania,  on  Saturday,  April  12.  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Davies  will  also  visit  the  continent  and  expect  to  he 
absent  about  three  months. 

E.  S.  Scarrow,  shoe  retailer,  Owen  Sound,  was  in  To- 
ronto, recently,  visiting  the  trade. 

The  stock  of  the  Palace  Shoe  Store,  Hamilton,  (Mrs. 
C.  W.  Elliott),  was  sold  by  apction  on  April  3. 

Hyman  Ironstone,  of  Sudbury,  Ont.,  who  handles  boots 
and  shoes  and  men's  furnishings,  suffered  loss  by  fire,  re- 
cently. 

Fred  R.  Foley,  shoe  retailer,  Bowmanville,  recently  clos- 
ed his  annual  anniversary  sale  and  writes  us  that  it  was  a 
sweeping  success — the  best  in  eighteen  years.  The  farmer, 
says  Mr.  Foley,  is  kicking  about  hides  going  down  and 
leather  and  shoes  going  up — the  high  price  of  shoes  being 
about  the  only  fly  in  the  ointment  just  now. 

R.  R.  Dupere  has  joined  the  sales  stafif  of  the  Interna- 
tional Supply  Company,  Kitchener,  Ont.,  and  will  help  out 
H.  L.  Taylor,  who  is  in  charge  of  their  Montreal  branch. 

Adlard  W.  Lanouette,  shoemaker,  has  been  elected  alder- 
man of  Verdun,  defeating  the  former  member  by  114  votes. 

W.  T.  Woodall,  shoe  tack  manufacturer,  Maisonneuve, 
died  recently  after  an  illness  of  three  months.  He  was  one 
of  the  oldest  manufacturers  in  the  city. 

A.  G.  Mooney,  of  the  A.  G.  Mooney  Co.,  Montreal,  was  a 
recent  visitor  to  Toronto. 

Chester  Craigie,  sales  manager  of  Ames-Holden-Mc- 
Cready  Ltd.,  Montreal,  has  been  on  a  coast  to  coast  tour, 
visiting  the  various  branches  of  the  Company.  Mr.  Craigie 
first  went  West  as  far  as  Vancouver,  and  then  returned  to 
Montreal,  leaving  immediately  for  St.  John,  N.  B. 

Felix  Forbert,  shoe  retailer,  Lindsay,  is  opening  a 
branch  store  at  Orillia,  Ont. 

The  stock  and  store  of  M.  L.  Diamond,  shoe  retailer, 
Hull,  Que.,  was  recently  damaged  l)y  fire  and  water.  The 
loss  was  insured. 

Fischell  Segall,  operating  the  Royal  Shoe  Store,  Mon- 
treal, Que.,  has  registered. 

The  Shand  Shoe  Co.,  Limited,  Windsor,  N.S.,  suffered 
fire  loss  recently. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Henry  Elliott,  of  St.  Thomas,  recently 
celebrated  the  48th  anniversary  of  their  marriage.  Mr.  El- 
liott has  been  a  shoe  merchant  in  that  city  fo>r  twenty-eight 
years,  and  Mrs.  Elliott  was  the  daughter  of  E.  C.  Phillips, 
who  conducted  a  shoe  business  in  St.  Thomas  for  many  years. 

A  by-law  has  been  carried  in  Guelph,  Ont.,  granting  cer- 
tain concessions  to  the  Premier  Rubber  Footwear  Company, 
of  which  Mr.  F.  E.  Partridge  is  at  the  head.  The  new  factory, 
it  is  said,  will  be  erected  this  summer. 

C.  H.  Reilly,  l)oot  and  shoe  dealer,  Welland.  Ont.,  suf- 
fered loss  recently  by  fire. 

The  capital  stock  of  the  Murray  Shoe  Company,  Limit- 
ed, London,  Ont.,  has  been  increased  from  $100,000  to  $200,- 
000. 

Dr.  Hastings,  M.  O.  H.  for  Toronto,  has  sent  a  letter 
to  the  Board  of  Education  denouncing  high-heeled  shoes 
and  too  short  shoes  and  stockings.    He  says  that  twenty 


per  cent,  of  the  public  school  pupils  are  flat  footed  and  a 
large  percentage  of  the  girls  have  corns. 

Duchaine  Shoe  Reg.,  Quebec,  Que.,  have  registered  as 
jobbers  of  shoes. 

Rannard  Shoe  Limited,  Winnipeg,  have  been  awarded 
the  contract  to  supply  footwear  for  the  local  police  force. 
They  had  the  contract  last  year  also. 

The  year  old  son  of  Andrew  Davis,  of  the  Davis  Leather 
Company,  Newmarket,  Ont.,  died  as  a  result  of  pneumonia 
recently . 

The  death  occurred  recently  of  Richard  Larmour,  for- 
merly of  Cornwall,  Ont.  For  nearly  thirty  years  he  had 
conducted  a  boot  and  shoe  and  dry  goods  Store  in  that 
place  and  retired  a  few  years  ago. 

Mr.  A.  Grimason  has  opened  a  shoe  store  in  Winnipeg 
at  266  Portage  Avenue. 

Gagnon,  Lachapelle  &  Hebert,  55  Kent  Street,  Mon- 
treal, contemplate  additions  to  their  factory  this  year. 

The  local  branch  of  the  Retail  Merchants'  Association, 
at  Regina  have  gone  on  record  as  being  in  favor  of  closing- 
all  retail  stores  at  6  o'clock  every  evening,  including  Satur- 
day. Petitions  will  be  circulated  in  an  effort  to  have  a  local 
by-law  passed  to  this  effect. 

Getty  &  Scott,  Gait,  Ont.,  have  taken  over  the  former 
Crown  Hat  Company's  building  on  North  Water  Street,  in 
which  is  being  installed  their  turn  shoe  department.  The 
change  has  been  made  necessary  by  a  constantly  increasing 
business,  which  has  greatly  congested  the  original  factory. 

The  annual  meeting  of  the  Dominion  Executive  of  the 
Retail  Merchants'  Association  of  Canada  was  held  in  Otta- 
wa, at  the  Chateau  Laurier,  on  March  17-18.  J.  A.  Banfield, 
of  Winnipeg,  was  appointed  president  for  the  coming  year. 
Three  other  Winnipeg  members  were  in  attendance,  namely, 
Horace  Chevrier,  past  president;  C.  F.  Rannard  and  W.  G. 
Devlin.  The  two  latter  are  well  known  Winnipeg  shoe  mer- 
chants . 

Warren  T.  Fegan,  proprietor  of  the  Big  88  Shoe  Store, 
Toronto,  is  back  in  harness  after  a  lengthy  vacation  in  Cali- 
fornia and  the  West.  Going  down,  Mr.  Fegan  took  the  mid- 
dle western  route  and  returned  through  Vancouver  and  the 
Canadian  West,  the  journey  covering  in  all  about  8,000  miles. 
Mr.  Fegan  enjoyed  perfect  health  at  all  times  and  had  a  most 
enjoyable  trip. 

James  Waddington,  formerly  manager  of  No.  1  store  of 
Rannard  Shoe  Limited,  Winnipeg,  has  opened  under  the  name 
of  The  Waddington  Shoe  Company,  at  340  Portage  Avenue. 
He  will  handle  high-class  goods  for  men,  women  and  child- 
ren. Mr.  Waddington  has  been  14  years  in  the  shoe  business 
and  is  well  known  to  the  trade. 

The  assets  of  Roderique  &  Alain,  shoe  retailers,  Montre- 
;;1,  have  been  sold. 

The  factory  of  J.  M.  Stobo,  Ltd.,  Quebec,  which  was 
seriously  damaged  by  fire,  has  now  been  rebuilt,  and  the 
firm  are  again  manufacturing  their  lines  of  men's  welts  and 
McKays,  women's  McKays,  and  boys'  and  youths'.  The 
company  have  decided  to  brand  their  lines,  which  will  be 
known  as  "The  Windsor  Shoe."  For  fall  a  number  of  new 
lasts  and  patterns  have  been  added  to  the  firm's  samples. 
The  intention  is  to  extend  the  operations  of  the  company 
which  will  be  represented  from  coast  to  coast.    The  lines 


April,  1919 


F  O  0 1^  VV  E  A  R    IN  CANADA 


53 


SALE  OF 

Surplus  Military 
and  Naval  Stores 

Dry  Goods,  Camp  Supplies, 
Food,  Hardware,  Scrap 
Metal  and  Junk 

Cloth ;  new  and  second-hand  clothing,  equip- 
ment, hardware,  tents,  blankets,  camp  sup- 
plies, 'etc.  :  :  Flour,  jam,  canned  evaporated 
milk,  tea,  coffee,  etc.  :  :  Condemned  clothing, 
junk,  old  brass,  metals,  leather,  rubl)er,  etc. 


Sales  will  be  made  by  Sealed  Tender 

Persons  desiring  to  tender  are  requested  to 
communicate  with  THE  SECRETARY  OF 
THE  WAR  PURCHASING  COMMISSION, 
BOOTH  BUILDING,  OTTAWA,  stating  the 
items  in  which  they  are  interested,  whether 
new  or  second-hand  or  both. 

Arrangements  will  be  made  to  have  samples 
on  exhibition  at  places  throughout  Canada ; 
specifications,  full  details,  and  tender  forms 
will  be  mailed  when  ready  to  those  who  have 
registered  as  suggested  above. 

If  Interested  Please  Apply  Now 


Institutions  May  Make  Direct  Purchase 
Without  Tender 

Dominion,  Provincial,  and  Municipal 
departments,  hospitals,  charitable,  philan- 
thropic, and  similar  institutions  which  are 
conducted  for  the  benefit  of  the  public  and 
not  for  profit  may  purchase  goods  without 
tender  at  prices  established  by  the  War 
Purchasing-  Commission. 


All  communications  should  be  addressed  to 
the  Secretary,  War  Purchasing  Commission, 
Booth  Building,  Ottawa,  who  will  be  glad  to 
supply  lists  and  further  details  to  those  inter- 
ested. 


Jobbers  Should  Note! 
New  Castle 


Quality 


Kid 


Supplies  either  glazed  or  natural 
surface,  black  or  colored,  this 
famous  product  is  always  reliable 
and  uniform  in  quality. 

Quantities   shipped  promptly. 
Samples  supplied. 

Canadian  Agents  for 

FRED  RUEPING  LEATHER  CO. 

Calf  affd  Side  Leathers,  Ooze  Splits  and 
Barrett  &  Co.  Skivers. 

New  Castle  Leather  Co. 

NEW  YORK 

Canadian  Branch: — 335  Craig  St.  W.,  Montreal 
Factory: — Wilmington,  Del.,  U.S.A. 


7oTtuna 

Skiving  Machine 


For  Manufacturers  who  Skive  Leather,  Felt, 
Cork,  Rubber  or  Paper 

Used  extensively  by  Manufacturers  of 
Shoes,  Box  Toes,  Trimmings.  Insoles,  Ankle 
Supporters,  Welting,  Arch  Supporters 

Sole  Agents  for  Canada 

Fortuna   Machine  Co. 

127  Duane  Street       -      NEW  YdRK 


54 


FOOTWEAR 


IN  CANADA 


April,  1910 


are  represented  in  Quebec  by  Mr.  C.  M.  Mills  and  in  On- 
tario by  Mr.  R.  H.  Mills. 

Beardniore  &  Company,  leather  manufacturers,  are  now 
going  ahead  with  the  erection  of  a  building  to  be  used  for 
skating,  hockey,  and  curling  and  the  laying  out  of  tennis 
courts  and  bowling  greens  for  their  employees  at  Acton. 
Ont.  The  company  have  for  a  long  time  had  this  idea  of 
recreation  for  their  employees  in  mind  and  the  plan  will  be 
put  into  operation  with  all  possible  speed.  » 

C.  F.  Rannard  of  Winnipeg  who  was  during  the  latter 
part  of  March  attending  the  annual  meeting  of  the  Domin- 
ion Executive  of  the  Retail  Merchants'  Association  of  Can- 
ada, spent  some  time  also  among  the  trade  in  Toronto  and 
elsewhere.  Mr.  Rannard  reports  that  his  present  rate  of 
turnover  is  the  greatest  in  the  history  of  his  business  and 
that  a  smaller  percentage  than  ever  is  in  imported  goods. 

The  Tetrault  Shoe  Manufacturing  Co.  Ltd.,  Montreal, 
are  building  a  solid  brick  addition  to  their  No.  1  factory  on 
Demontigny  Street.   The  site  is  28  x  60  feet. 

Geo.  G.  Gales,  the  well  known  Montreal  shoe  retailer, 
has  just  returned  from  a  business  visit  to  the  principal  Un- 
ited States  shoe  manufacturing  centres. 

A  local  branch  of  the  Boot  and  Shoe  Workers'  Union 
has  been  formed  at  Brampton,  Ont.,  with  a  membership  of 
fifty. 

Mr.  A.  C.  Carey,  has  sold  his  shoe  business  in  Edmon- 
ton, and  is  looking  for  another  site.  He  spent  t'he  winter 
in  California,  and  is  now  in  Toronto  with  his  father,  Mr.  J. 
Carey,  who  has  a  store  on  King  St.  East. 

Ed.  Laforte,  formerly  in  the  shoe  business  for  himself, 
at  742  \'alier  Street,  Quebec,  has  been  appointed  general 
manager  for  A.  W.  Bedard,  one  of  the  best  known  shoe 
retailers  in  Quebec.  Mr.  Bedard  has  opened  a  new  store 
in  St.  Sauveur  in  the  location  formerly  occupied  by  Mr.  La- 
forte. 

The  manufacturers  of  Kitchener  and  Waterloo,  Ont.,  have 
organized  and  have  decided  to  apply  for  a  charter  with  cap- 
ital stock  of  .$4,000.  The  new  organization  will  be  known 
at  the  Kitchener  and  Waterloo  Manufacturers'  Association, 
and  among  its  objects  will  be  promotion  of  housing  facili- 
ties for  working  men,  and  the  provision  of  a  sufficient  quan- 
tity of  fuel  for  householders  by  securing  the  advantage  of 
the  short  haulage  from  Port  Dover.  The  following  provisional 
directors  were  appointed:  Messrs.  H.  M.  Snyder,  Jas.  Valen- 
tine, A.  Bauer,  Waterloo;  G.  C.  H.  Lang,  Fred  Ahrens,  J. 
H.  Baetz,  A.  R.  Kaufman,  E.  C.  Kabel,  W.  E.  Woelfle,  Hen- 
ry Niberg  and  F.  Hodgins,  Kitchener.  Immediately  after  the 
association  has  l)een  incorporated  the  permanent  officers 
will  he  elected. 

A  delegation  of  retail  merchants  recently  waited  on  Hon. 
A.  K.  MacLean,  at  Ottawa,  and  preseneed  a  series  of  re- 
commendations for  consideration  of  the  Government.  Among 
them  was  a  suggestion  that  active  steps  be  taken  to  pre- 
vent dishonest  advertising. 

H.  Tremblay,  shoemaker.  Midland,  Ont.,  suffered  loss 
by  fire  recently. 

Herbert  A.  Bastock,  shoe  repairer,  Toronto,  has  sold 
out  to  Louis  Applebaum. 

The  name  of  J.  R.  Barry  &  Freres,  leather  dealers,  Que- 
bec. Que.,  is  among  recent  registrations. 

Tlie  Cluff  .Shoe  Sonipany,  Vancouver,  has  been  incor- 
porated under  the  B.  C.  Comijanies'  ,\ct,  the  capital  stock 
l)eing  given  at  $30,000. 

Letters  patent  have  been  granted  to  William  Milton,  F. 
A.  Muir  and  Andrew  Smith,  of  Hamilton,  to  take  over  the 
boot  and  shoe  businesses  now  carried  on  under  the  names 
of  William  Milton  and  Frank  A.  Muir  through  a  company 


to  be  known  as  The  Wm.  Milton  Company,  Limited,  the 
capital  stock  of  which  is  given  as  $50,000. 

Telesphore  Auger,  manufacturer  of  shoe  findings,  etc., 
Montreal,  Que.,  was  burnt  out  recently.  The  loss  is  partially 
insured. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Charles  A.  Blachford  left  on  Saturday, 
April  5.  for  a  trip  to  the  Pacific  Coast,  stopping  off  at  Win- 
nipeg, Edmonton,  Calgary  and  other  western  points.  Mr. 
,  Blachford  is  combining  business  with  pleasure. 

E.  R.  Gavin  is  moving  his  Fort  William  store  across  the 
street  to  110  Simpson  Street,  in  his  Murphy  Block  and  has 
been  conducting  a  removal  sale.  The  old  store  was  at  105 
Simpson  Street. 

The  merchants  of  Perth,  Ont.,  have  re-organized  their 
branch  of  the  Retail  Merchants'  Association.  A  number  of 
reforms  are  in  mind,  including  a  half  holiday  and  shorter 
hours.    A  membership  of  thirty  is  anticipated. 

The  City  Hall  Shoe  Store,  36  James  Street,  North.  Ham- 
ilton, has  advertised  a  "giving  up  business"  sale. 

The  maintaining  of  restrictions  on  the  importation  of 
shoes  into  France  is  not  approved  of  by  the  French  press. 
Le  Matin  says  "In  order  to  bring  the  prices  of  boots  and 
shoes  down  to  a  decent  figure  large  quantities  of  boots  and 
shoes  from  the  United  States  and  Canada  must  be  imported 
without  hesitation." 

W.  J.  Thurston,  of  Stratford,  has  purchased  the  property 
at  180-182  Dundas  Street,  London,  having  a  frontage  of  39 
feet  and  a  depth  of  198  feet.  He  expects  to  open  up  a  shoe 
.store  on  -this  site  as  soon  as  the  leases  expire,  which  is  in 
September  1920. 

Ronald  S.  Edwards,  who  has  been  in  the  employ  of 
Waterbury  &  Rising,  St.  John,  N.  B.,  has  accepted  a  position 
in  Windsor,  Ontario,  in  the  same  line  of  business.  He  will  be 
succeeded  by  Mr.  Alex  R.  Cochrane,  of  Bridgetown,  N.  S. 
Mr.  Cochrane  only  recently  got  his  discharge  from  military 
service,  and  previously  had  been  employed  with  Waterbury 
&  Rising.  He  is  a  son  of  the  late  Wm.  Cochrane,  who  will 
be  remembered  by  the  older  men  of  this  city  as  having  been 
a  prominent  retail  shoe  dealer  on  King  Street. 


Making  Room  Foreman 

Factory  making  1,000  pair  per  day.  Mckay  and  nailed 
goods.  Must  be  capable  of  taking  charge  from  nailing  and 
stitching  to  finishing  bottoms.  Also  capable  of  •operating 
for  instructional  purposes,  Goodyear  outsole  stitcher,  Mc- 
Kay sewing  machines  and  other  bottoming  machinery.  We 
want  a  first-class  man  looking  for  advancement,  and  with 
organizing  and  co-operative  al^ilities.  To  take  charge  im- 
mediately. State  wages  expected. — The  T.  Sisman  Shoe  Co. 
l^imited,  Aurora,  Ontario,  Canada.  3-6 


Our  McKay  Sewed  and  Standard 
Screwed  Shoes 

will  sl.'ind  plenty  of  haid  wear.  Made  on  foot-tittiiig  lasts  that 
will  give  conifoit  to  the  wearer  and  are  durable.  The  range 
irchides — Men's,  Hoys',  Youths',  Little  Cicnts',  Children  and 
I'lfanls'  lilack  and  Heaver  Hrown  Tio.x  Kip.  Your  jobber  will 
(  I'ote  you  pi  ices,  or  wiite  us  direct. 

St.  Hyacinthe  Soft  Sole  Shoe  Co. 

St.  Hyacinthe,  Quebec  Limited 


April.  1010 


F  O  O  'J-  W  1  <:  A  R    IN    C  A  N  A  D  A 


55 


FOOTWEAR  SPECIALTIES 

Order  Now  for  Early  Delivery 


SPIRAL  PUTTEES— Wool  Knit  Fabric. 


SIESTA  FELT  SLIPPER— Style  917. 


SPATS— Felt  and  Kersey. 


I 


Price  95c  per  pair  Wos.  3-8. 
"UNO"— Style  534-XXX. 


Puce,  Wos.  .$10.25  doz.  Size  3-S.  Men's 
:>1S.I|()  per  doz. ;  size  6-12.  Misses'  .$1.5.00 
jier  doz.  ;  sizes  11-2.  Child's  iflo.'o  per 
doz. ;   sizes  5-10. 


Price  from  .$12.50  to  .$24.00  per  doz. 
Women's  (i  and  9  button.  Men's  5,  C,  7, 
S,  10  buttons.  White,  Gray,  Chamois, 
Fawn,  Taupe. 


Price  $.35.00  per  doz. 
$8.00  per  pr. 

Send  for  prices  and  samples  on  our  full  lines  of  "SIESTA"    SLIPPERS,    FELT.    CRETONNES,    KID    AND  OOZE 
MATERIAL.     Also  Machine  Knit  and   Crocheted  Slippers,   "Capitol"  Lamb's  Wool  and  Quilted  Satin  Soles,  Puttees,  Leggins,  etc. 

Watch  for  our  salesman,  Mr.  A.  L.  Kenney,  who  expects  to  call  on  the  trade  between  Montreal  and  Toronto  at 
about  this  time. 

The  Wiley-Bickford^Sweet  Company 

HARTFORD,  Conn.  (Address  either  Office)  WORCESTER,  Mass. 


for 

Men  and  Women 

Attention  to  the  smallest  details, 
creation  of  features  of  merit  and 
styles  that  are  attractive  and  cor- 
rect, impart  to  these  shoes  the 
values  that  give  them  precedence. 


EAST  WEYMOUTH,  MASS,  U.  S.  A. 


5C  FOOTWEAR    IN   CANADA  April,  191!> 


ALPHABETICAL  LIST  OF  ADVERTISERS 


Aircl  &  Son   ]8 

Ames-Holden-McCready   1~ 

Armstrong.  W.  D   IkJ 

Beadle  Sales  Service   06 

Beckwith  Box  Toe  Company   14 

Bennett  Limited   ■') 

Boston  Blacking  Company    1<> 

Borne,  Lucien   (i.') 

Boot  and  Shoe  Union   li? 

Brodie  &  Harvie   72 

Canadian  Adxertising  Service  

Canadian  Consolidated  Ruliber  Co.  '.'>-2('i 

Champion  Shoe  Machinery  Company  (il 

Children's  Shoe  Mfg.  Co   Hi 

Clapp,  Edwin   :)5 

Clarke  &  Company,  A.  i'J   76 

Cleland,  Regd.  James   OG 

Commonwealth  Felt  Co   22 

Copeland  Shoepack  Co   08 

Cote,  J,  A.  &  M   .56 

Daoust-Lalonde  &  Company   11 

Duchaine  &  Perkins   'K! 

Duclos  &  Payan   TjR 

Dunlop  Tire  &  Rubber  Goods  Co.  . .  .  .')!) 

Eastern  Shoe  Mfg.  Company   69 

Edwards  &  Edwards   08 

Eureka  Shoe  Company    57 

Evans'  Son  Company,  L.  B   69 

Flynn  Leather  Co.,  C.  G   24 


Fortuna  Machine  Company    53 

Frank  &  Bryce   57 

Franklin  Machine  Co   63 

Friedman,  S.  J   66 

Gagnon,  Lachapelle  &  Hebert   63 

Gait  Shoe  Company   30 

Globe  Shoe  Company   63 

Goodyear  Tire  &  Rubber  Co   60 

Henwood  &  Nowak   34 

Hinde  &  Dauch  Paper  Company  ...  69 

Home  Shoe  Company   72 

Hydro  City  Shoe  Manufacturers   . .  7:! 

Independent  Rubber  Company  . .   . .  35 

International  Supply  Co   <> 

Kelly,  Thomas  A   04 

Kenworthy  Bros   '75 

Landis  Machine  Company   64 

Lamontagne  Racine  &  Co   64 

La  Duchesse  Shoe  Company   73 

Legace  &  Lepinay   66 

Marsh  Company,  Wm.  A   31 

Midland  Shoe  Company  19 

Mooney  Company,  A.  G   62 

Narrow  Fabric  Company   63 

National  Cash  Register  Company  . .  71 


New  Castle  Leather  Company   53 

Oscar  Onken  Company   69 

Panther  Ruliber  Company  Cover 

Perfection  Counter  Co   72 

Perkins  &  McNeely   66 

Perth  Shoe  Co   13 

Pickering,  Jos   51 

Regal  Shoe  Company   1 

Ritchie,  John   7 

Robinson,  James   8-9 

Samson  Enr.,  J.  E   65 

•  Scott,  J.  A  .*    23 

Slater  Shoe  Company   10 

Sisman  Shoe  Company  

Spaulding  &  Sons,  J   17 

Standard  Kid  Mfg.  Company   4 

St.  Hyacinthe  Soft  Sole  Company  . .  54 

Tetrault  Shoe  Company   15 

Textile  Mfg.  Company    68 

Thompson  Shoe  Company   14 

Toronto  Heel  Company   69 

United  Shoe  Machinery  Co.,  Ltd.  70-74 

United  States  Hotel,  Boston   65 

Wiley,  Bickford  &  Sweet   55 

Whittemore  Bros   (,8 


There's  No  Uncertainty  About 

YAMASKA 

IT'S  ALL  LEATHER 


THE 

MAN'S  SHOE 


The  genuine  material  .seasoned  to  wear  and  shaped 
to  fit.  No  haphazard  methods  are  permitted  in  the 
production  of  YAMASKA.  We  find  it  is  the  best 
policy  to  stick  to  thoroughness  in  every  particular. 

You  will  recognize  this  adherence  to  quality,  in 
YAMASKA  shoes.  Your  customers,  from  the  big- 
footed  man  down  to  the  little  chap  will  obtain  the  full- 
est value  from  their  wear — a  factor  in  creating  more 
sales. 

Give  YAMASKA  the  chance  to  create  more  sale.s 
for  you. 

La  Compagnie 


J.  A.  &  M.  COTE 

St.  Hyacinthe,  Quebec 


April,  191!) 


FOOTWEAR 


IN  CANADA 


57 


The  Well  Known  Brands  of 

Barbour^s,  Finlayson's,  Knox's 

 LINEN  THREADS- — 


For  Lockstitch,  Welt,  McKay  and  Turn 


These  threads  are  known  throughout  the  world  for  their  reHability  and  durabiHty.  Our 
threads  have  stood  the  test,  their  quahty  is  proven.    Let  us  send  you 
prices  and  samples  by  return  mail. 


Frank  &  Bryce,  Limited 

Toronto  «  MONTREAL  «  Quebec 


Jobbers— Increase  Your  Turnover 

with 

EUREKA 
SHOES 

They  are  the  product  of  specialists  in  Women's 
^IcKays  and  McKay  Welts,  and  are  made  in  one 
of  the  most  up-to-date  factories  in  the  countr}'. 

The  EUREKA  SHOES  have  the  appeal  to  taste  for  style 
and  to  common  sense  for  quality. 

There  is  a  big  field  for  these  fine  shoes  and  an  inspection  of 
our  samples  will  convince  vou.    Write  us  to-day. 

EUREKA  SHOE  CO.,  LIMITED 

THREE  RIVERS,  QUE. 


58 


FOOTWEAR    IN  CANADA 


April,  191!) 


Buy  D  &  P  Counters 


Every  counter  turned  out  of  the 
D.  &  P.  Factory  is  guaranteed  to 
give  lasting  satisfaction. 


You  Run  No  Risk 


Our  Canadian-made  fibre  board  counters 
outlast  leather.  ]\lade  from  selected  fibre 
compressed  by  the  special  D.  &  P.  process. 
Write  for  samples.  We  also  solicit  your 
orders  for  upper  and  sole  leather,  and  shall 
be  glad  to  quote  on  your  requirements. 


Ed.  R.  Lewis,  45  Front  St.  East 
Toronto 
Ontario  Selling  Agent 


DUCLOS  &  PAYAN 


Richard  Freres,  Quebec 
Selling  Agents  for 
Quebec  City 


Tannery  and  Factory:  ST.  HYACINTHE,  P.Q. 
Sales  Offices  and  Warehouses:  224  Lemoine  Street,  MONTREAL 


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