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January   3,    1920 


HARDWARE  AND  MET  Al^— Advertising  Section 


ft 


\ 


NO  NEED  TO  EXPERIMENT 

The  reputation  of  the  Samson  Axe 
is  your  guarantee. 


It  is  made  with  one  idea  only — the  maximum  of  sat- 
isfactory service. 

It  is  produced  without  reference  to  the  price  sit- 
uation. 

We  aim  simply  to  offer  an  axe  that  will  give  the 
longest  and  most  satisfactory  service. 


H.  HOWLAND,  SONS  &  CO.,  LIMITED 

TORONTO 


SAMSON 


m- 


AXES 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


January   3,    1920 


UNIVERSAL 

ELECTRIC  HEATING  PAD 


The     Trade    Mark  known       ^ 


UNIVERSAL 


i  n.      E*v  erg       H 


FOR 

THE  PATIENT 

AT  HOME 

FOR 
SEVERE 
ILLNESS 


Universal 

Electric  Heating   Pad 

No.  9940 


In  the  Race  for  Business  Don't  Get  Left 

at  the  Post 

Scmebody  in  your  territory  is  going  to  sell  many  UNIVERSAL  Heating  Pads  during 
'the  next  few  months.  Will  you  be  that  Somebody?'  There  is  more  sickness  in  winter 
thrn  at  any  other  time.  There  is  greater  need  of  UNIVERSAL  Heating  Pads.  Every 
Ik  me  needs  one — every  hospital  and  public  institution  needs  many.  Don't  let  a  com- 
peficor  who  handles  an  inferior  line  breeze  by  you  and  get  the  orders.  Sell  UNIVERSAL 
1  ads  and  you'll  set  a  pace  in  the  business  race  that  he  cannot  follow. 

Canadian  Represen  ta  tive  : 

A.  MACFARLANE   &   CO.,  LTD.,  Montreal,  Quebec 

LANDERS,  FRARY  &  CLARK 


New  Britain 


Connecticut 


January  3,   1920 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


<i 


National" 


Distinguished  by  its  Rapid  Sale 


Flexibility 

An  important  fea- 
ture of  a  good  hang- 
er. Only  in  this  way 
can  the  door  give 
when  bumped  and 
not  damage  the 
trolley  or  rail. 


Braced  Rail 

1%  x  3/16  inches.  Made  in 
lengths  of  4,  6,  8  and  10  feet. 
Weight  per  100  feet— 100  lbs. 


Handsome  Appearance 


A  Flexible  Door  Hanger 
With  a  Braced  Rail 

The  "National"  Flexible  Door  Hanger  pleases 
customers  at  once — "goes  right  to  the  spot"  be- 
cause it  was  designed  to  meet  the  findings  of  a 
careful  investigation  into  dealer's  and  consum- 
ers' needs.  It  cannot  jump  the  track,  is  easily 
attached,  and  far  more  than  satisfactory  in  use. 

,  Packed  one  pair  in  a  box  with  all  bolts.     Weight, 
per  dozen  pairs,  88  pounds. 


Showing   Axle   and   Bearings 

Anti-friction  steel  roller  bear- 
ings. Easy  running;  a  mini- 
mum of  wear. 


The  Canada  Steel  Goods  Co.,  Limited 

Hamilton,  Canada 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


January   3,   1920 


Accuracy 
And  Speed 
Have  Made 
Them  Lead 


Cutters  That  Have  Proved  Worthy 

For  more  than  35  years  the  Butterfield  Company  has 
searched,  experimented  and  "kept  tab"  on  tools  in  use  with 
the  sole  idea  of  improving  the  tools  if  possible. 

35  years'  contact  writh  the  mechanical  field  and  its  require- 
ments has  given  much  opportunity  to  meet  changed  condi- 
tions in  the  shops  and  plants.  Butterfield  tools  have  ever 
been  abreast  of  the  times  and  Butterfield  policies  to  the  trade 
are  likewise  in  keeping  with  highest  standards — generous 
and  helpful  to  the  dealer. 


Butterfield  &  Company,  Inc. 

Rock  Island 

Quebec 


January  3,   1920 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— A  dvertvnng  Section 


Efficient  GARAGE  Equipment 

Line  up  with  us  on —  Curtis  Garage 

Temco  Garage  Outfits  Air  Compressors 


They  mean  increased  efficiency 
and  satisfied  customers  who  stay 
with  you  and  recommend  you. 
Equipment  of  this  kind  disting- 
uishes your  plant  from  its  fellows 
with  all  discerning  motorists. 


TEMCO  outfits  do  away  with  hand  work. 
Hundreds  of  automobile  repair  men  declare 
them  the  most  essential  part  of  their  shop 
equipment.  Once  in  use  the  Temco  outfit 
is  indispensable. 


It  consists  of  the  Temco 
Model  B  Portable  Electric 
Drill  with  the  Emery 
Wheel  and  Valve  Grind- 
ing Attachments  and 
comes  with  cord  and  at- 
tachment plug,  ready  for 
use. 

A  single  control  switch, 
right  near  the  handle, 
starts,  stops  and  reverses 
the  motor  at  any  time. 


THE  MOTOR  RUNS  FORWARD  OR  RE- 
VERSES INSTANTLY. 
THE  VALVE  GRINDER  ATTACHMENT 
engages  in  the  drill  chuck  and  works  with 
an  oscillating  movement. 


"Curtis  Air---Free  from  Oil' 

The  Curtis  is  the  only  compressor  whose  design  and  con- 
struction gives  a  guarantee  for  pure  air — that  is,  air  free 
from  oil. 

Note  these  exclusive  Curtis  Features: 

1.  Controlled-splash,  self-oiling  system.  No  excess  oil  in 
cylinder,  no  external  leakage  nor  waste  of  oil,  no  oil 
gets  into  the  tires.  Enclosed  crank  case  keeps  out 
dust. 

2.  Uses  about  one-tenth  of  the  oil  used  by  any  competing 
machine;  saving  in  oil  alone  soon  pays  price  of 
machine. 

3.  High  and  low  level  oil-filling  gauge,  so  you  can  tell  at 
a  glance  the  amount  of  oil  in  the  crank-case. 

4.  Fan  flywheel  cools  cylinder;   increases  capacity. 

5.  Inspectable  valves,  light  weight,  large  area. 

6.  Valves  cannot  drop  into  cylinder  and  wreck  machine. 

7.  Hand  Unloader  permits  starting  compressor  against 
full  tank  pressure  without  burning  out  motor,  blowing 
fuses  or  burning  or  jumping  of  belt. 

8.  Drop  forged  crankshaft.  Adjustable,  renewable  non- 
cutting   die  cast  bearings. 

9.  Head  removable  without  breaking  or  bending  any  pipe 
connection  or  pipe  fittings;   only  one  gasket. 

THE  EMERY  WHEEL  attaches  on  the  side 
of  the  drill  and  requires  but  a  few  seconds 
to  adjust. 

THE  WEIGHT  of  the  Model  B  Drill  is 
equally  divided  between  the  two  handles, 
giving  perfect  balance. 


Write  our  nearest  house  for  prices  and  other  information. 

Northern  Electric  Company 


Montreal 

Halifax 

Quebec 


Ottawa 

Toronto 

London 


LIMITED 


Winnipeg 
Regina 


Edmonton 

Calgary 

Vancouver 


HARDWARE  AND  MET  Air- Advertising  Section 


January  3,   1920 


Souvenir  Ranges 
and   New   Idea   Furnaces 


With  Reservoir 

The  above  Souvenir  Range  is  of 
a  new  and  pleasing  pattern.  Is 
a  perfect  baker  —  has  a  glass 
oven  door  enabling  the  user  to 
see  the  baking  in  operation. 
Thermometer  tells  oven  heat  at 
all  times.  Finished  with  white 
enamel,  pipe  up  the  back.  Has 
a  water  reservoir. 
This  Range  can  had  with  or 
without   warming  closet. 


Without  Reservo  ir 

This  Souvenir  Range  will  give 
continuous  satisfactory  service 
to  its  owner.  A  range  that  can 
be  depended  on  all  the  time  for 
even  heating  and  consistent 
baking. 

This  range  is  a  popular  seller 
and  is  moderately  priced  so  as  to 
be  within  the  reach  of  all. 


Favorites  for  75  years  with  Dealer  and  Consumer. 

Merchants  handling  stoves  and  furnaces  select  their  stock 
with  certain  facts  in  view.  They  want  to  please  customers, 
to  sell  a  guaranteed  article  and  to  be  assured  a  good  profit  on 
the  transaction. 

Our  stoves  and  ranges  are  easy  to  sell.  They  are  the  result  of 
years  devoted  to  perfecting  them  scientifically.  You  can 
honestly  acclaim  their  superior  qualities  to  your  customers. 
Souvenir  Stoves  and  New  Idea  Furnaces  are  economical  with 
fuel  and  their  heating  qualities  fill  every  demand.  The  deep 
ash  pit  and  duplex  grates  of  the  furnace  make  it  easy  to 
operate  and  keep  clean.  The  stoves  are  compact  and  attrac- 
tive, with  nickel  trimmings,  daylight  ovens  with  thermometers 
attached,  and  are  perfect  cookers  and  bakers. 

Dealers  with  shrewd,  sound  judgment  appreciate  the  merits 
of  the  goods  we  make.  No  claims  are  made  for  them  which 
cannot  be  substantiated.  They  allow  you  a  generous  margin 
of  profit  and  every  sale  you  make  brings  increased  custom 
and  confidence  to  your  store. 

Prices  and  catalogue  will 
be  sent  on  request,  or  if 
you  prefer  one  of  our 
travellers  will  call. 


New  Idea 

Warm  Air 

Furnace 


This  furnace  is  a  perfect  heat- 
ing unit.  The  fire  pot,  made  in 
one  piece  with  deep  flanges,  adds 
one-third  more  heating  surface. 
Economy  in  fuel  consumption 
provided  for  by  New  Idea  Du- 
plex Grates  (patented)  which 
take  care  of  any  sized  clinkers. 
Extra  large  ash  pit  prevents 
ashes  banking  and  burning  out 
grates.  New  Idea  Furnaces  are 
guaranteed  for  five  years. 

Made  in  7  sizes  to  suit  every 
description  of  building. 


THE 

HAMILTON     STOVE     & 

HEATER     CO.,     L  1 

M 

1  T  E  D 

SUCCESSORS    TO 

GURNE 

TILDEN 

&  CO., 

Limited, 

HAMILTON,  ONT. 

VANCOUVER. 

WINNIPEG. 

MONTREAL. 

'SEVENTY-FIVE    YEARS  OF    SUCCESSFUL    MANUFACTURING' 


Mr.  F.  C.  Moore,  1433^  Higgins  Ave.,  Winnipeg 
Mr.  W.    G.   Chester,    Hamilton   St.,    Vancouver 


January  3,   1920 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


WILT 

High  Speed  and  Carbon 

Twist  Drills,  Reamers  and 

Milling  Cutters 

—THEY  ARE  TOOLS  OF  QUALITY 

made  by  especially  trained,  high-class 
workmen  skilled  in  the  art  and  science 
of  tool  manufacturing. 
—THEY  CONTAIN  ONLY  THE 
BEST  MATERIALS.  We  are  very 
particular  in  the  cho'ce  and  select;<-n 
of  raw  materials,  accepting  only  that 
which  passes  our  most  exacting  in- 
spection which  is  based  on  the  highest 
standards. 

—THEY  CREATE  CUSTOMERS' 
SATISFACTION  and  our  guarantee 
and  our  broad  policy  ol  interpreting 
that  guarantee  assures  complete  satis- 
faction and  meets  with  the  approval 
of  all  users. 

—THEY  ARE  PROFITABLE  TO 
SELL.  The  reasonable  profit  with 
which  we  are  content  allows  the 
dealer  a  splendid  margin  on  his  sale. 

SELL  WILT  PRODUCTS 


Where  there's 
a  W/LT- 

t 'here's  t/?e  l/Vay" 


HIGH  SPEED 
AND  CARBON 

TVYI5T  DRILLS 


WILT  TWIST  DRILL  CO. 

walkerville  OF  CANADA,  LIMITED  Ontario 

London  Office:  Wilt  Twist  Drill  Agency,  Moorgate  Hall,  Finsbury  Pavement,  London,  E.C.  2,  England 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— A dvertising  Section 


January   3,    1320 


No.    22 — Circular    Shear. 


Are  You 


using  up-to-date  tools  or  are  you 
losing  contracts  on  account  of  high 
labor  costs? 

The  solution  is  Install  BB  Tools, 

which  give  you  the  maximum  pro- 
duction at  the  Lowest  Cost. 


Steel    Brake. 


Tin    Folder 


Bending    Rolls 


The  Brown,  Boggs  Company,  Limited 

HAMILTON  ONTARIO 

manufacturers;^ 

Tinsmiths'  and  Heavy  Sheet  Metal  Working  Machinery 


Davidson 
Japanned  Ware 

Sells  Itself 

Flour  cans  made  in  three  sizes  to  hold  25 — . 
50 — and  100  pounds;  handsomely  decorated 
in  pleasing  designs;  attractively  finished  in 
French  gray  and  white. 

The  Thomas  Davidson  Mfg.  Co.,  Ltd. 

Toronto  Montreal  Winnipeg 


January  3,   1920 


ARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


WHEN  CARS  WERE  FIRST 
PROPELLED  BY  STEAM 

TO  Dick  Trevithick,  a  Cornish  miner,  belongs  the 
honor  of  inventing  the  first  successful  locomotive. 
But  because  George  Stephenson  of  Newcastle,  England,  was 
a  successful  builder  and  operator  of  a  railway,  as  well  as  an 
inventor  of  a  locomotive,  he  has  been  generally  credited 
with  the  original  invention. 

Railway  construction  always  requires  rope.  Thousands  of  tons  have 
entered  into  the  building  and  maintenance  of  the  railways  of  America. 

Six  years  before  the  first  railway  was  opened  in  England,  the  Plymouth 
Cordage  Company  began  making  rope,  and  because  the  world  needed  good 
rope,  rope  that  could  be  trusted,  every  additional  mile  of  trackage  opened 
up  new  markets,  new  demands  for  the  products  from  Plymouth.  Thus 
step  by  step  with  the  growth  of  the  world's  railways  the  Plymouth  Cord- 
age Company  has  grown  until  today  it  is  the  largest  manufacturer  of  good 
rope  in  the  world. 


PLYMOUTH  CORDAGE  COMPANY 

North  Plymouth,  Mass.      Welland,  Canada 


PLYMOUTH  ROPE 


No.5 


10 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


January   3,    1920 


Fire-place  Screens 

Wire  Cloth 

Wire  Counter  Guards 

Wire  Grilles 

Wire  Partitions 

for  tool-rooms  and  stock-rooms 

Heavy  Wire  Baskets 


C.  H.  JOHNSON  &  SONS,  LIMITED 

WIRE  WORKS:  St.  Henry,  MONTREAL 


It  Will  Pay  You  to  Order  To-day 

When  a  customer  decides  he  needs  a  set  of  harness,  he  usually  wants  it  in  a  hurry.  Have 
you  made  provision  for  the  heavy  demand  there  will  be  during  the  next  few  months? 
Remember  you  are  stocking  an  old  and  tried  line  when  you  buy  Imperial  Brand.  It  has 
been  known  by  farmers  and  horsemen  for  over  fifty  years.  Again  we  say,  "ORDER 
TO-DAY"  and  have  your  supply  when  you  require  it. 

Imperial  Brand  Harness 

is  guaranteed  free  from  all  defects  in  workmanship  and  materials  and  is  backed  by  a 
house  that  stands  behind  everything  it  sells.  You  can  sell  Imperial  Brand  Harness  with 
very  little  sales  talk  because  your  customers  already  know  about  it.  Make  1920  the  big- 
gest year  of  Harness  Sales  in  your  history  by  specializing  on  Imperial  Brand.  Remember 
your  store  is  judged  by  the  goods  you  sell — good  goods — good  reputation — success.  Take 
the  first  step  to-day.    Send  us  your  order. 

Display  it  Regularly— It  will  Pay  You. 

Samuel  Trees  and  Company,  Limited 

42  Wellington  St.  East,  Toronto 


January  3,   1920 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL—  Advertising  Section 


11 


Convenience  Means  Time  Saving 


Modern  shop  efficiency  demands  quality 
work  and  quantity  production.  Time  is  an  es- 
sential factor.  Ask  any  user  of  Jacobs  Chucks 
if  he  does  not  find  that  the  key  and  toothed  sleeve 
save  his  time  in  changing  drills. 


Mill  supplies  are  most  profitable  to  Canadian  hardware  dealers.  Start 
your  line  with  Jacobs  Chucks.  An  article  favored  by  mechanics  all  over 
the  world  is  a  safe  foundation  upon  which  to  build  your  business. 

Address  Department  H.M. 


THE  JACOBS  MFG.C0.  HARTFORD,  CONNE 


an 


12 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


January   3,   1920 


Time  to  Order 

FREEZERS 


All  of  the  three,  LIGHTNING,  GEM  or  BLIZ- 
ZARD, have  served  the  housewives  of  America 
for  thirty  years,  and,  like  the  cream  they  create, 
are  in  demand  in  all  seasons. 

They  are  built  of  the  very  best  material  and  workmanship  possible 

— their  ingenious  construction  makes  them  easy 
to  operate,  quick  freezing,  and  economical  to 
both  dealer  and  user. 


The  Blizzard,  being  simpler  in  construction 
and  cheaper  in  price,  makes  it  a  good  running- 
mate  with  either  the  Lightning  or  Gem.  They 
sell  themselves  and  stay  sold !  No  come-backs 
or  complaints. 

This  means  easy  net  profits  for  you. 
Your  Jobber  Can  Supply 

NORTH  BROS.  MFG.  CO. 

PHILADELPHIA,  PA. 


Wise  Buyers  Are  Ordering  Their 
Spring  Stock  of  Mowers— NOW 


With  labor  and  raw  material  conditions 
as  they  are  to-day,  it  looks  quite  safe  to 
assume  that  the  scarcity  of  the  past  will  be 
quite  as  marked  this  year  as  heretofore. 

With  this  knowledge  at  hand  it  is  quite  rea- 
sonable and  in  order  that  your  next  season's 
stock  in  lawn  mowers  should  be  decided  upon 
without  further  delay.  Therefore,  we  ask 
those  interested  in  the  best  that's  made  to 
place  their  order  with  us — now — so  that  we 
may  anticipate  and  fill  orders  to  the  satis- 
faction of  all  concerned. 

Write  us  for  prices  and  other  details. 


Taylor-Forbes    Company,    Limited 

The  Largest  Manufacturers  of  Hardware  in   Canada 


TAYLOR-FORBES    CO., 
246   Craig   St.   W.,    Montreal. 

H.  C.  ROGERS,  LTD. 
147   Prince  William  Street,  St.  John,  N.B. 


Head    Office    and    Works 

Guelph,  Ont. 


TAYLOR-FORBES  CO.,  LTD., 
1070  Homer  Street,  Vancouver. 

H.  F.  MOULDEN  &  SON, 
314   Confederation   Life   BIdg.,  Winnipeg. 


January  3,  1920  HARDWARE  AND  METAL— A  dvertising  Section  18 


MakeYourTire  Business 
Bigger  in  I92O 

Did  you  have  all  the  tire  business  you  could  handle  last  year? 

It  may  have  been  good we  hope  it  was,  but  why  not  make  it 

better  for  1920.    Good-will  is  the  foundation  stone  of  success. 

You  cannot  buy  "good-will" you  have  to  build  it  up  little 

by  little,  bit  by  bit.  There  is  one  sure  road  to  follow  in  estab- 
lishing "good-will"  in  the  tire  business sell  "The  Tires  that 

Give  Satisfaction." 

Sell  Gutta  Percha  Tires 

They  are  as  perfect  as  can  be  made.  Motorists  everywhere 
are  repeating  their  orders  for  Maltese  Cross  Tires  as 
occasion  demands.  They  KNOW  that  "The  Tires  that  Give 
Satisfaction"  are  dependable,  trustworthy  and  efficient.  The 
bulk  of  the  motoring  trade  in  your  locality  will  come  to  your 
store  if  you  feature  for  1920  these  "Creators  of  Good-Will" — 
Gutta  Percha  Tires. 


Gutta  Percha  &  Rubber,  Limited 

Head  Office  and  Factories,   Toronto 

Branches :     Halifax,     Montreal,     Ottawa,     Toronto,     Fort  William,     Winnipeg,     Regina, 
Saskatoon,     Edmonton,     Calgary,     Lethbridge,     Vancouver,     Victoria 


14 


HARDWARE  AND  METTAL— Advertising  Section 


January   3,   1920 


FIVE  WORKS — OVER  3,000  EMPLOYEES 

UNITED  BRASSFOUNDERS 
AND  ENGINEERS,  LIMITED 

EMPRESS  FOUNDRY,  CORNBROOK,  MANCHESTER,  ENG. 

Specialists  in  the  manufacture  of 

GUNMETAL  and  BRASS  VALVES  and  COCKS. 
STEAM,      WATER     and     COMPRESSED     AIR     FITTINGS 
GENERALLY. 

CAST  IRON  STOP  and  SLUICE  VALVES. 

SEMI-ROTARY    PUMPS. 

EXTRUDED  BRASS  and   BRONZE  BARS. 

BRASS  BOLTS  and  NUTS,  STUDS  and  GENERAL  TURN- 
ED WORK  FROM  THE  BAR. 

CAST  AND  MALLEABLE  IRON  COCKS  and  PIPE  FIT- 
TINGS. 

PRESSURE  and  VACUUM   GAUGES.  ■ 

INJECTORS  and   GENERAL  JET  APPLIANCES. 

ENGINE  GOVERNORS  (Picke.-^e.  Proell,  and  Other  Types). 

SPRAYING  MACHINES,  for  Insecuoides  and  Lime-washing. 

COPPERSMITHS'  WORK. 

"STELLA"  BRAND  ALLOYS:  MANGANESE  COPPER, 
SILICON  COPPER,  FERRO  ZINC,  PHOSPHOR  COP- 
PER and  TIN,  etc.    . 

"UBEL"  SERVICE 

If  you  are  interested  in  any  or  all  of  the  lines  mentioned,  and  are  in  a  position 
to  take  a  hand  in  the  energetic  distribution  of  the  same,  please  communicate  with 
us  NOW  to  our  Head  Office,  at  above  address. 

Representatives  for  Canada    (East  of  Alberta) 
W.  H.  CUNNINGHAM   &  CO.,   183   Church  St.,   Toronto 
For   British   Columbia   and    Alberta 
W.    MASON    ROOKE,    M.I.M.E.,    Dominion    Bank    Bldg.,    Vancouver, 


Williams'  Superior 
Drop-Forged  Wrenches 

WHEREVER  wrenches  are  used,  par- 
ticularly    in      exacting     production 
requiring  hard   and   continuous  ser- 
vice, Williams'  Wrenches  are  preferred. 

Through  constant  and  systematic  effort, 
during  nearly  half  a  century,  to  produce 
only  the  best,  Williams'  Drop-Forged 
Wrenches  have  been  so  developed  that  to- 
day their  superiority  is  generally  conceded. 
There's  a  strong,  dependable  Williams' 
Wrench,  standard  in  design  and  size,  for 
every  recognized  trade  need.  Every  one  of 
the  40  patterns  in  about  1000  sizes,  with 
openings  from  3/16  to  7%",  carries  the 
Williams'  guarantee  of  service. 

Specify  "Williams'  Wrenches"  and  get 
superior  quality.  Ask  for  a  copy  of  our 
Wrench  Booklet. 

J.'H.  Williams  &  Co. 

"The  Wrench  People" 
30   Richards   Street,    Brooklyn,   N.Y. 

The  A.  G.  Low  Co.,   Ltd.,  30  Pacific  Ave.,  Saskatoon,    Sask. 

Agents   for  Manitoba,    Saskatchewan,    Alberta  and 

British    Columbia. 


January  3,   1920 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


An  Injector  with  a  Splendid 
Reputation  for  Efficiency 

Morrison 

Injectors  that  offer  40  pounds  more  field.  A  reliable, 
trustworthy  injector  that  sells  as  well  as  it  operates. 
Morrison  High  Pressure  Injectors  operate  success- 
fully on  20  lbs.  low  to  220  lbs.  high  steam  pressure, 
from  4  to  300  horse-power,  and  are  made  in  sizes 
from  %  inch  to  2  inch. 

For  you  it  offers  one  of  a  line  of  products  that  are 
supreme  in  the  mechanical  field  and  sell  without 
time-consuming  argument. 

The  James  Morrison  Brass  Mfg.  Co. 

Limited 
93-97  Adelaide  St.  West,  Toronto,  Ontario 


Line  Up  with  the  Line  the  Women  Want 

THERE  is  no  question  about  the  popularity  of  Washing  Machines.  It's  growing ! 
The  scarcity  of  domestic  help  and  the  high  cost  of  laundering  combine  to  make 
the  Washing  Machine  practically  a  necessity  in  every  home  to-day.  But  women 
are  quick  to  learn  that  there  are  Washing  Machines  AND  washing  machines  —  they 
are  being  told  about  the  superior  features  of 

"1900"    WASHERS 

and  when  they  come  to  investigate  they  find  that  all  our  claims  as  to  their  supremacy 

are  true. 

Dealers  handling  even  an  inferior  line  may  get  some  business. 

Dealers  handling  a  mediocre  line  will  find  a  moderate  demand  for  it. 

But  to  cash  in  big  on  the  present-day  tendency  to  install  Washing  Machines,  you  need 

to  line  up  with  the  line  that  includes  every  type  of  Washer — each  giving  wonderful 

satisfaction — each  mechanically  perfect. 

We  make  the  "1900"  Cataract  Electric,  the    "1900"    Agitator  Electric,   the   "1900" 

Agitator  Water  Power  Washer  and  the  "1900"  Gravity. 

Our  Company  is  launching  a  continent-wide  publicity  campaign — this  will  bring  a 

vast  number  of  inquiries — and  these  inquiries  will  be  turned  over  to  "1900"  Dealers. 

A  liberal  profit  for  you  on  every  "1900"  Machine  you  sell. 

Write — whether  you  are  without  a  line  of  Washing  Machines — or  whether  you  are 

looking  for  something  better  than  the  line  you  now  handle. 

THE  NINETEEN  HUNDRED  WASHER  COMPANY  TJ*l°»7o 


16 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


January   3,   1920 


Made  from  Crucible 
Swedish  Bar  Steel. 


Every  piece 
guaranteed. 


Honest  Value 
Carefully  Inspected. 


Favored  by 
Barbers. 


As  perfect  as  human  skill  can  produce.     Tempered  by  our  own  process.     Perfectly  ground, 

honed  and  set  ready  for  use. 

GEO.  W.  KORN  RAZOR  MFG.  CO.,     -     -     -      LITTLE  VALLEY,  N.Y. 

Canada  Office  :  140  McGill  Street,  Montreal 


M  anuf acturers 

OF 

WIRE 

HEADQUARTERS  FOR 

WIRE  BALE  TIES 

Largest  Capacity  and  Stock  in 
Canada 

PROMPT  SHIPMENT 

LAIDLAW  BALE  TIE 
COMPANY,  Limited 

HAMILTON,  CANADA 

Winnipeg  Toronto  Montreal 

London,  England 


MADE  IN  CANADA 

Blacksmith's 
Boiler  Makers' 
Machinists' 

AND 

Pipe  Fitters' 

r  I  ^/""Vf"vl  O  Write  for 

A   KJVJ1.&  Catalogue 


A  B.  Jardine  &  Co. 

LIMITED 
HESPELER,  ONT. 


Fills  the  existing  demand  for  a 

Garage  and  Barn  Door  Latch 

that's  just  right  for  Dealer  and  Consumer 

A,  rapid,  profitable  seller.  Strong,  durable,  neat  and  convenient,  easily 
put  on  any  door.  Has  two  handles  to  open  or  close  from  either  side. 
Catches  will  hold  door  or  gate  open  or  closed.  Enamelled  finish  with  turned 
bolt.     Guaranteed. 

We  also  make  velocipedes,  express  wagons,  children's  autos,  toy  carts  and 
barrows,  bathroom  fittings  and  hardware.  Write  for  prices  and  information 
on  any  of  our  lines. 

The  Gendron  Manufacturing  Company,   Limited 

Duchess  and  Ontario  Streets,  Toronto,  Ontario 


January  3,   1920 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


17 


FOR  A  WET  COUNTRY 


SEMI-ROTARY  jREDWING  |PUMPS 

(A  Product  of  Proven  Worth 

See  Your  Jobber. 

PRODUCED  AT 

JAMES  SMART  PLANjT 

BROCKVILLE,    CANADA 


18 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


January   3,   1920 


TAPATCO 
STAl'LINO 
Device  for  at- 
taching hooks 
gives  a  firm  hold 
long  after  the 
fabric  itself  has 
become  weaken- 
ed   by    use. 


TAPATOO  GLOVES 

Our  varied  and  complete  line  includes 
styles  that  cover  all  your  customers'  re- 
quirements in  the  way  of  work  gloves. 

STYLES— Gauntlet,  Knit  Wrist,  and 
Band   Top. 

WEIGHTS— Heavy,  Medium  and  Light. 

MATERIALS  —  Leather  Tip,  Leather 
Faced,  Jersey.  Gloves  and  Mitts  in  Tan, 
Slate    oi    Oxford. 


A  Quality  Article  and 

Well  Advertised 

That's  Why  It  Sells  so  Well 

The  demand  for  stuffed  collar  pads  is  cer- 
tainly on  the  increase  and  is  destined  to  grow 
still  more  as  horse  owners  come  to  realize 
that  this  type  of  pad  is  the  best  safeguard 
against  bruised,  chafed  and  galled  shoulders. 

But  why  do  people  usually  ask  for  Tapatco 
Pads? 

Some,  because  they  read  our  advertise- 
ments that  tell  in  a  sincere  and  truthful  way, 
the  story  of  Tapatco  superiority. 

Others  are  led  to  try  Tapatco  Pads 
by  what  they  hear  of  them  from  neigh- 
bors and  friends  who  have  used  them 
on  their  horses  and  found  them  to  be 
all  we  claim — soft,  pliable,  cushion- 
like— the  best  of  all  protection  against 
the  rubbing  of  the  collar. 


BRANfr 

COLLAR  PADS 


American  Pad  &  Textile  Company,  Chatham,  Ont. 


EFFICIENCY-SAFETY-ECONOMY 

You  can  safely  recommend  our  spraying  materials  for  they  will  live  up  to  your  strongest  endorsation. 
Their   chemical    and   physical    qualities    are    scientifically  correct   and   they   are   most    economical. 


CAL-ARSENATE 

Paste  or  Powder.  More  efficient  than  Paris 
Green  and  at  half  the  cost.  Riches-Piver 
patent  process.  Very  popular  with  truck 
farmers. 

LEAD  ARSENATE 
For  use  against  leaf  and  fruit-eating  insects 
on  peaches  and  other  stone  fruits,  apples,  po- 
tatoes,  etc.     Paste  or  powder. 

BORDO  ARSENATE 

A  ready-mixed  preparation  in  paste  and  pow- 
der form.      Combines   Bordeaux   Mixture   and 


Cal-Arsenate.    Inexpensive, 
and  garden  truck. 


Ideal  for  potatoes 


BORDEAUX   MIXTURE 

Still  the  standard  fungicide.  Most  efficient 
because  so  finely  precipitated.  We  have  it  in 
paste  and  powdered  form. 

POISON   BORDO   DUST 

A  preparation  that  has  proved  remarkably 
efficient  for  dusting  apple  trees  in  Nova  Scotia. 
Also  effective  for  other  crops.  Government 
formula. 


Guaranteed  analysis  on  every  package.     Packages  vary  in  size  from  1-lb.  to  a  barrel. 
Order  at  once  to  be  sure  of  deliveries. 

Made  in  Canada  by 

JOHN    COWAN    CHEMICAL    CO.,    Limited 

1     Dalhousie    Street,    Montreal 


X 


January  3,   1920 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


QUAyj^ 

""""" ■  11  jji  iiiiiiu iiimihimimiimmimimii ihiimiu inn iiiiniiiiniTmmtli^B-  £g*OI  WAg  ^UTiiiiiiiiinjiiiiiniiMj iiiiiJiiii iiimili mi nmiiiiim  II Illllillluullllllllllu  11,1.1 , 1  Jim  iiiiinniiLii  l.t-ttt- 


PROGRESS 


\\7 E  have  always  endeavored  to  embody  in  our  firearms  the  late- 
*  *  est  modern  designs  and  improvements.  Following  this  policy, 
we  take  pleasure  in  announcing  that  all  our  automatic  pistols  will 
be  furnished  hereafter  with  an  improved  hammer  with  a  spur  cock- 
ing lever. 

The  experience  of  the  war  has  proved  conclusively  the  necessity  of  being 
able  to  readily  cock  and  uncock  a  pistol  with  the  thumb  of  the  hand  that 
holds  it.  The  United  States  navy,  in  seeking  a  new  pistol  to  adopt  as  its 
service  arm,  specified  as  one  of  its  most  important  requirements  that  it 
should  have  a  hammer  or  similar  device  to  permit  cocking  and  uncocking 
the  pistol  with  the  thumb  of  the  hand  that  holds  it. 

As  the  Savage  has  all  the  essential  features  of  the  best  military  pistols 
in  miniature  form,  it  has  been  decided  to  equip  all  pistols  hereafter  with 
an  improved  spur  cocking  lever. 

SAVAGE  ARMS  CORPORATION 

UTICA,  N.Y. 
Sharon,  Pa.  Detroit,  Mich. 

Executive' and  Export  Offices:  50  Church    St.,  New  York  City,  N.Y. 


.32   calibre,   3%   in.  barrel,  19 
ounces,  11  shots. 

.380  calibre,  4}4  *'«•   barrel,  21 
ounces,  10  shots. 


MINMIMIIII-l 


nri»lTnillimilTllliriliiuiTiii.iiijiiiiiiiiiiiin iimiin  ,11111  iiiimiiiiimiimumnmiiMi "■:).;. ntiuim.iiui uraH 


20 


1 1  A  K I )  WARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


January   3,   1920 


The  Crescent  Line 

Small  Tools  and  Hardware  Specialties 

l— I  ERE  is  a  widely  known  line  that  makes  good  sales  and  brings  good  profits.      There  is  good 
reason    for    their    popularity.       Made   from  carefully  selected  materials  under  the  most 
advantageous  manufacturing  conditions  and  rigidly  inspected,  they  satisfy  customers  and  bring 
good  trade. 

Ask   Your  Jobber 

The  Campbell  Agencies 


Toronto 


Canada 


The  Crescent  Company,  Meriden,  Conn. 


YALE" 

brings  your  customers  back  for  more 

HPHE  satisfaction  a  customer  obtains  from  the 
■*■  Yale  Door  Closer,  Night  Latch,  Padlock  or 
Builders'  Hardware  you  sell  him  brings  him  back 
to  you  for  all  his  hardware  needs. 

Stock  a .  line  that  is  known  and  advertised 
throughout  the  Dominion. 

The  trade-mark  "Yale"  on  the  product  is  our 
guarantee  of  satisfaction. 

"The  trade-mar^  'Yale'  helps 
make  the  sate." 

Canadian  Yale  &  Towne  Ltd. 


Maie  at 

\St.  Catharines 

Ontario 


B*  |tpadAX^    #\  L      mark    1=  «B 


Advertising  in  Hardware 
and  Metal  is  economical, 
because  the  advertiser 
reaches  only  a  class  of  busi- 
ness men  directly  interest- 
ed in  his  product.  The 
readers  of  Hardware  and 
Metal  are  big  buyers 
because  they  buy  for  busi- 
ness as  well  as  for  private 
consumption. 


MENDETS 

p»f    ■■■■!—■  hiTir~wi' 


Millions  of  Boxes 
Sold 

They  Sell  Themselves 

Collette  Mfg.  Company 

Collingwood,  Onti 
Your  jobber  has  them 


January   3,  1920 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


21 


- 
T^T   f~\  \7LT            T^    IT1      A     ¥~X   *\f        TO    QUOTE  on   your  early   1920   requirements  of 
lN    KJ    W             KLA  LJ     X                                            auto  supplies. 

We    invite   your  correspondence. 

^Sii 

^i^Ay©||@f@i^SyppLY  & 

MONTREAL,  CANADA 

tip. 
SIFTING  TRAY 

Banner 

Rocker 
Ash  Sifter 

MEAVy  STEEL  ROCKERS 


YOU  WILL  EVENTUALLY 


WHY  NOT  NOW? 


MR. 


HARDWARE  DEALER: 

Twelve  years'  study,  experimenting,  observation,  application  and  concentra- 
tion of  thought,  together  with  special  machinery  have  enabled  us  to  overcome 
every  obstacle  in  making  the  patented  Banner  Ash  Sifters,  the  most  efficient  ash 
sifters  for  household  use  yet  placed  on  the  market.  As  stated  above  that  you 
will  eventually  recommend  the  Banner  Sifters  there  is  no  reason  why  you  should 
not  recommend  them  now. 

•  Write  for  descriptive  matter  and  the  many  reasons  why  the  Banner  Sifters 
are  superior  to  others  and  judge  for  yourself.  Why  are  the  sales  increasing  so 
fast? 

The  Burrowes  Manufacturing  Company,    Toronto 


K  TRADEMARK  wy 

iddie-[(ar 


PATENTED   APRIL.  3RD. 1317 


Kiddie-Kar 

The  world's  largest  selling  child's  vehicle.     A 
year-round  staple  equally  popular  with  boys  or 
girls  and  suitable  for  use  in  or  out  of  doors. 
A  profit-maker  and  business-builder,  because  it 
wins  parents  and  leads  to  repeat  sales. 

Canadian  K-K  Company 

Limited 

ELORA,  ONTARIO,  CANADA 


GOLDEN  OPPORTUNITIES  EXIST 

Hundreds  of  hardware  merchants  throughout  the  provinces  of  the  Dominion,  and  located 
in  centres  of  greatly  varying  characteristics  have  made  huge  successes  of  selling  auto 
accessory  lines.  It  is  always  found  that  where  this  line  of  goods  is  not  carried,  it  is 
because  the  matter  has  received  no  detailed  consideration,  but  sufficient  investigation 
early  proved  to  the  merchants  who  are  now  carrying  this  line  with  profit  that  with  the 
general  favor  of  both  the  buying  public  and  the  manufacturer  there  was  little  reason  for 
expecting  anything  different  to  the  result  which  has  been  achieved.  The  present  rapid 
development  of  the  automobile  industry  is  providing  golden  opportunities  for  wide- 
awake merchants. 


22 


lAUDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


January   3,    1920 


This  is  a 

"Q" 

Foot  Valve 

And  it  Just  CAN'T  Leak 

There  are  more  pump  troubles  caused 
by  "leaky"  valves  than  from  all  the 
wear  and  tear  which  occurs  in  the 
average  life  of  a  pump. 
The  '"Q"  valve  will  overcome  all  prim- 
ing troubles,  and  water  once  raised 
above  it,  through  the  suction  line,  will 
not  leak  out. 

If  you  want  the  pumps  you  instal  to 
give  maximum,  you  will  require  to  use 
the  only  valve  on  the  market  that 
JUST  CAN'T  LEAK. 

Made  in  sizes  from  1  to  8-inch. 

R.  MACDOUGALL  CO.,  LTD. 

GALT.,  CANADA 


BIGGER  BUSINESS 


for 


1920 


Had  a  big  year  with  washing  machines  did  you  ?  You  can 
sell  more  Liberty  Washers  with  less  work  than  any  other 
high  grade  washer  on  the  market.  The  reasons  are  quite 
evident.  White  cedar  tub — with  no  metal  to  discolor  clothes  : 
wringer  swings  to  four  positions;  mechanism  on  opposite  side 
from  operator ;  the  Liberty  is  fool-proof  and  sells  from  $25  to 
$50  less  than  any  other  worth-while  washer.  Decide  to-day  to 
boost  the  LIBERTY  for  1920.  It  will  pay  you  and  pay  you 
well.      Write   us   for  our   dealer  proposition. 


A.  R.  LUNDY 


257  King  St.  W. 


TORONT 


O 


Stock  this  May  hew 
Bit   Extension 

Your  customers  need  this  Mayhew 
Bit  Extension — the  most  nearly  per- 
fect on  the  market. 

The  forged  steel  jaws  completely 
close  on  the  shank  of  the  bit.  A 
flexible  connection  between  jaws  and 
shank  of  the  extension  insures  cen- 
tering the  bit.  Sleeve  runs  on  a 
quick-acting  multiple  thread.  Ex- 
tension will  follow  a  %"  hole.  Made 
in  all  lengths  from  12"  to  36". 

Regular  Mayhew  quality.  Meets  a 
definite  demand.  It  should  be  in 
your  store. 

At  your  jobber's — or 
MAYHEW  STEEL  PRODUCTS,  INC. 


rejines   the  steel' 


291  Broadway,  New  York 


508  Mission  Street 
Satt  Francisco 


180  N.  Market  Street 
Chicago 


MAYHEW — TOOLS 

ARE   RIGHT 


The  Megantic  Broom  Mfg.  Co.,  Ltd. 

Manufacturers   of  Brooms  and   Clothes   Pins 


Lake  Megantic,  Que. 


Our  clothes  pins  are  made 
and  designed  to  stay  on 
the  line.  And  they  do. 
Dealers  know  that  by  the 
way  housewives  are  ask- 
ing for  them.  Made  of 
the  best  wood,  that  in- 
sures against  splitting. 
Splendid  profits  and  cus- 
tomers' satisfaction  as- 
sured to  the  dealer  selling 
them.  Write  our  nearest 
agent. 


AGENT8:  Boivin  &  Grenier. 
Quebec.  Delorme  Frere,  Mont- 
real. J.  Hunter  White,  St. 
John,  N.B.  H.  D.  Marshall, 
Ottawa.  Harry  Home  Co..  To- 
ronto. Tnmlinson  &  O'Brien. 
Winnipeg.  Oppenheimer  Bros., 
Vancouver;  McFarlane  &  Field, 
Hamilton,  Canada.  Pvke  Bros.. 
Halifax.  N.9 


January  3,  1920 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


HOSSBERG 

ALL    STEEL 
WRENCHES  AND  TOOLS 


In   these  days   when   dealers  are 
insistently  urged  to  "push"  certain 
tools    What    a    relief    to    stock    Moss- 
berg  Wrenches,   which  need  no  pushing  1 
Furthermore,   the  Mossberg    line   is  so   com 
plete    that   dealers    don't   have   to   devote   shelf 
room    to    several    makes ;    one    line — Mossberg— 
meets   a'l!    wrench   needs. 
Mossberg     Socket     Set     No.     14,     the     "completest," 
containing    an    assortment    of    tools    to    fit    every    job. 
No.    4   Garage    Set   of   Open-end   Wrenches ;   one  opening 
of  each   wrench  fitting  U.S.   Standard  bolts,  and  the  other 
opening   of   the   same   wrench   fitting    S.A.Ei    cap   screws 
of  the  same  dimensions. 

Send   for  complete   catalogue   and    particulars 


FRANK   M055BERG  CO. 

WRENCHSMITHS  FOR  20  YEARS 
ATTLEBORO.       MASS.      U.S.A. 


Files  with  a  Reputation 
that  promotes  Sales 

It  is  easy  to  sell  Famous 
Five  Files,  because  they 
are  known  to  mechanic 
and  employer  as  the  stan- 
dard tools   in  their  line. 

j 

Made  from  high  grade  steel, 
accurately  ground  and  cut,  and 
scientifically  hardened,  they  have 
stood  the  test  of  fifty  years  of 
leadership  in  market  and  work- 
shop. 

Over  60,000,000  Famous  Five 
Files  are  sold  each  year.  Share 
in  the  profits  of  this  trade,  on  this 
enormous  sale. 

Specify  Famous  Five  Files  when 
ordering.   They  are : 


21 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


January.  3,   1920 


"TALLMAN'S  SPECIAL" 
ARCTIC  METAL 

a  medium-priced  babbitt  speci- 
ally adapted  for  Saw  Mill  and 
Woodworking   machinery. 

Will  remain  cool  under  excep- 
tionally   high    speed. 


i— ixviviiLJ-rorM  , 


o 


We  manufacture  a  wide  range  of 
wrought  washers  of  every  description. 
Round  and  square  in  plain  and  gal- 
vanized. 

"Unimeco"  washers  possess  superior 
quality  and  unusual  finish. 
We  can  also  supply  you  with  An- 
nealed Rivet  Burrs  of  the  same  high 
quality.  The  "Unimeco"  line  is  a 
profitable  one  for  you  to  handle.  Write 
us  for  information  and  prices.  We 
ship  promptly. 

THE  UNION  IRON  &  METAL  CO. 

LIMITED 

1951  DUNDAS  ST.  W. 

TORONTO  CANADA 


Ash  Sifting 
Season 


Every  Part  a  Selling  Point 

sure  to  impress  customers.  The  iron  rod  re- 
inforcing the  top  of  can;  the  hinged  trap;  the 
convenient  hopper,  with  rod  for  loosening  ashes; 
braced  cylinder;  the  strengthening  corrugations 
of  the  body;  the  heavy  iron  band  round  bottom, 
and  general  superiority  of  design.  Convenient, 
clean  and  dustless. 


J.  Samuels 


275  Queen  St.,  W. 


Toronto 


Our  wide  and  varied  experience  in  suc- 
cessful manufacturing  enables  us  to  offer 
you  a  line  of  extraordinary  saleable  pro- 
ducts.   We  make — 

Emery  Paper  and   Cloth,   Garnet 
Paper    and    Cloth,     Flint    Paper 
and     Cloth,     Discs     and     Circles. 
A    complete    stock    of   these    lines    will 
enable  you  to  better  serve  your  custom- 
ers.   Send  us  a  postal  for  full  particulars 
and  prices. 


Canadian    Sales    Representatives : 

A.  E.  Hinds  &  Co.,  Gait  Bldg.,  Winnipeg.  Man. 

Mr.  Alexander  Gibb,  3  St.  Nicholas  St..  Montreal,  Can.  'Phone 
Main  2343. 

The  Triangle  Co.  of  Canada,  Ltd.,  Standard  Bank  Bldg.,  Van- 
couver,   B.C. 

United  States  Sand  Paper  Co. 

Williamsport,  Pennsylvania 


January  3,   1920 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


Kmswi 


Superior  Stable  Brushes 

Strength  and  durability  are  the 
chief  essentials  in  stable  brushes. 
In  the  manufacture  of 

"KeystoiV  Statle  Brushes 

these  essentials  are  given  first  con- 
sideration. Tough  material  is  used 
in  conjunction  with  backs  that 
won't  break.  A  trial  will  convince 
your  customers  of  the  superiority 
of  "Keystone"  Brushes  and  assure 
you  of  good  profits  and  future  busi- 
ness. 
For   prices,   etc.,   write 

Stevens-Hepner  Co.,    Ltd. 

[Port  Elgin,  Ontario 

Get  prices  and  information  about 
the  "Nugget"  Broom  and  the 
rest  of  the  famous  Keystone 
Brand  Brooms  and  Brushes. 


[KEYSTONE 


An  Axe  is  as  Strong  as  its  Handle 

STILL'S 


— will  give  you  a  stronger  working  tool, 
for  STILL'S  HANDLES  are  made  from 
the  best  of  Canadian  Woods. 

The  sale  of 

STILL'S  HANDLES 

far  exceeds  all  other  makes. 

There's  a  reason. 

Axe,  Pick,  Sledge  ■  and  Hammer 
Handles,  Cant  Hook  and  Peavie 
Handles. 

It  pays  to  sell  STILL'S. 

J.  H.  Still  Mfg.  Company 

ST.  THOMAS  -:-  ONTARIO 


ARROWHEAD 

SAWS 

Vanadium  Steel 


Are  called  "Standard  of 
Canada"  because  they 
have  been  the  choice  of 
skilled  workmen  since 
they  first  entered  the 
market. 

Arrowhead  Saws  are  per- 
fectly tempered,  hang 
right,  are  set  right  and 
sell       right.  Cross-cut 

Saws,  Hand  Saws,  Buck 
Saws,  and  Circular  Saws. 


Our    Catalog    is    a 

guide     to      profit ; 

your       name 

and      address 

will    bring    it. 


T.  F.    Shurly 
Company 

Limited 

St.  Catharines 

Ontario 


You  Will  Sell  More  Waffle  Irons 

If  You  Sell  the  Stover 


the   STOVER  makes  waffles. 


Look  at  this 
cr6ss-section  of 
Waffle  Iron 
Plates.  It  shows 
how       uniform 


You  will  satisfy  your  customers  and  increase  the 
popularity  of  waffle  taking  by  selling  this  iron. 
They  are  made  with  wood  or  wire  handles,  high  or 
low  bases,  and  round  or  square  shapes.  Send  for 
our  special  waffle  iron  circular. 

Then  you  need  our  R-19  catalog.  We  also  make 
windmills,  feedmills  and  gasoline  engines. 


Mop    Sticks 
Meat    Broilers 
Lamp    Brackets 
Quilt    Frame    Clamps 
Mincing    Knives 
Pulleys  of  all  kinds 
Store    Pipe   Dampers 


And    a  general   line  of   fireplace  fixtures. 


Door  Pulls  and  Latches 
Coat  and  Harness  Hooks 
Hammers  and  Hatchets 
Cast    Pliers 

Saw    Vises  / 

Screen    Door    Hinges  / 

Lifters   and    Pokers  _      <^' 


/ 


S  Ji 


.^ 


Stover  Mfg.  &  Eng.Co. 


709  East  St.  ^/  <v*V 

FREEPORT,  ILL.    &' fl?  s' 


Canadian    Representatives : 
Cadman   &    Co.,   322   Mcln- 
tyre     Block,     Winnipeg ; 
Mr.    G.    L..  Cohoon,    11        / 
St.     Sacrament    St.,         ,      .«> 
Montreal.  /aV°    (,<• 


4? 


26 


HARD  W  A  RE  AND  METAL— A  dvertiring  Sectioi 


January   3,    1920 


ROCK  ISLAND 

MM 


A  Type  and  Size 
for  Every  Service 


No.  241 — Autovise 

A  combination  Pipe  and  Anvil  Vise — particularly 
suitable  for  auto  repair  work.  Write  for  catalogue 
and   prices. 

Factory  and  Office:. 

Rock  Island  Mfg.  Co. 

Rock  Island,  111.,  U.S.A. 


NEW  YORK 
113  Chambers  St. 


CHICAGO 
180  North  Market  St. 


(VOLPEEK 


Cents 


60%  Profit  in  this  Line 

Vol-Peck  makes  big  profits  for  the  dealer.     No   expense— simply 

hand  over   the   counter.      Comes   to  you   in   an   attractive  display 

stand.      Individually    wrapped. 

Vol-Peek  appeals   to  the  housewife.     Mends  all  kinds  of  kitchen 

utensSls.    such    as    Pots,     Pans,    Tinware,    Graniteware,     Copper, 

Aluminum,  etc.,   at  half  cent  per  mend1 — easiily  applied   (no  tools 

required),    and    hardens   quickly. 

Order   a   display   stand   to-day   of   24  packages,    $2.25.      Vol-Peek 

is   guaranteed   and   backed  by  our   extensive  advertising. 

At  your  jobbers  or  direct. 

H.   NAGLE  &  CO.,  Box   2024,  MONTREAL 
(Owning   and   operating   Vol-Peek   Mfg.    Co.)    Canada 


REED'S 

ECONOMY    ROTARY 

ASH  SIFTER 

Made  Better  so  as  to  Sell  Better 


DEALERS — Your  customers  will  be  better  satisfied 
with  the  "Economy"  sifter  because  it  is  made  of 
heavier  material  than  other  makes.  Write  for 
descriptive  circular  and  prices. 

Geo.  W.  Reed  &  Co.,  Limited 

37  St.  Antoine  Street,  Montreal 


¥ 
T 
¥ 


More 

Profitable  Lines 

for  the  Hardware  Dealer 

Our  products  earn  maximum  profits  for 

the  dealer.     A  trial  order  will  convince 

you     of     their     great     sales-producing 

qualities. 

We  manufacture — 

Iron,  Copper  and  Brass  Rivets, 

Small   Washers   and   Burrs 

Wire  Nails 

Countersunk  Clout  Nails 

Escutcheon  Pin's    (Brass  and   Steel) 

Tubular  and   Bifurcated   Rivets 

Copper  and  Steel  Boat  and  Canoe 

Nails,  etc. 


IT 


The  Parmenter  &  Bulloch  Co.,  Limited 

GANANOQUE,  ONTARIO 

John  R.  Anderson,  36  Dizier  St.,  Montreal.  E.  Fielding  & 
Son,  9  Front  St.  East,  Toronto.  David  Philip,  138  Portage 
Ave.  East,  Winnipeg.  W.  O.  Webster,  1396  Granville  St., 
Vancouver- 


January  3,   1920 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


MAKE  A  GOOD  START 


Let -us  help  you  to  start 
1920  with  a  good,  profit- 
able line  of  sheet,  matting, 
stair-tread  and  nosing ; 
wire,  rivets,  screws,  nails, 
etc. 

Stock  up  now 


WITH  ALUMINIUM 

Write  for  prices  at  once 

THE  BRITISH  ALUMINIUM 
COMPANY,  LIMITED 

263-267  Adelaide  St.  W.,  TORONTO 
Eastern  Agents:  SPIELMAN  AGENCIES,  Montreal 


"Hercules"SashCord 

The  reputation  of  this 
brand  has  been  thor- 
.  oughly  established  in 
the  Canadian  market 
for  the  last  eighteen 
years.  It  compares  in 
quality  with  the  best 
imported  brands,  but 
is  sold  at  a  consider- 
ably lower  price  and 
can  be  safely  recom- 
mended  for   any  job. 

All  wholesale  hardware  dealers 
carry  "Hercules"  Sash  Cord 
and    can    fill    orders    promptly. 

Manufactured  in  Canada 


BRIDGEPORT 

Sure  Selling 
Nail    Pullers 


Sure  Grip  Nail  Puller 


Red   Bull   Nail   Puller 


;q»  -  -         ifc| 


Unbreakable  Nail  Puller 


Bridgeport   Hardware   Mfg. 
Corporation 

Bridgeport,  Conn.,  U.  S.  A. 

W.  J.  Latimer,   122  Hilton  Ave.,  Toronto 

Canadian  Sales  Representative 


SPONGES 

(British  and  West  Indian) 


Highest 
Quality       ( 
Unbleached 


/ 


^JEWWtf*^" .  .-• 


Bahama 
Cuban 

and 
Florida 
^kj?'  Bale  Goods 


We  make  prompt  deliveries  at  lowest  mar- 
ket prices  consistent  with  quality  and 
packing.  Write  for  our  prices,  and  keep 
them  before  you.  We  have  all  grades  and 
sizes  in  stock. 

Evans  &  Co.,  Limited 

(Importers  and  Exporters) 

Head   Office  and  Warehouse 

247  St.   Paul   St.   West,   Montreal. 

Toronto    Office  8-10   Wellington    St.    East,    Toronto,    Ont. 


28 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


January  3,   1920 


1 


Cooking 
Thermometers 


CANDY 


When  a  magazine  like  "  Good 
Housekeeping"  devotes  many  pages 
to  articles  on  Thermometer  Cooking 
there  must  be  something  in  it. 


"WS 


Accurate  Thermometers  for  home 
cooking  have  been  tested  and  ap- 
proved by  Good  Housekeeping 
Institute  and  are  an  inspiration  to 
housekeepers  everywhere. 

THE  WILDER-PIKE  THERMOMETER  CO.,  Inc. 

Fulton  Street  :  :  :  :  TROY,  N.Y.,  U.S.A. 


Wrouq ht  and  Steel  Plajt 

WASHER^ 


of  all  descriptions 


Round  &rSquare,. 

Plain  or 
Galvanized 


Annealed 

Rivet  Burrs, 

Felloe  Plates, 

Sheared   and 

Punched    Plates. 

Malleable  Washers 

and  Cast  Iron  Washers. 

Prompt  Shipment 


Wrought  Washer  Mfg. 
Company 

Milwaukee,  Wis. 


BROOMS 

Our 

Canada  No.  3 

fills  the  bill 
Not  too  heavy,  not  too  light 

Just  Right 

Polished  handle,  pink  strings,  vel- 
vet and  tin  lock  finish. 

The  Best  $9.00  Broom 

We  know  how  to  make. 
ORDER  NOW. 

WALTER  WOODS  &  CO. 

Hamilton  and  Winnipeg 


SIMONDS 

SAWS 


Simonds  Crescent  Ground  Cross- 
cut Saws  are  the  most  econ- 
omical saws  to  buy  in  the 
long  run.    They  stand 
hard  usage  and  wear 
exceptionally  well, 
hold   their   cut- 
ting edge  and 

temper  longer 

than  the  ordin- 
ary   saw    and    do 
not  hind  in  the  kerf. 
Lumbermen  prefer  the 
Simonds  Crescent  <  rround 
Cross-Cul  saw  because  they 
have  proven  that  it  will  cut  10 
percent,  more  timbei  than  other 
brands. 

Write  for  prices 

SIMONDS  CANADA  SAW  CO. ,  LIMITED 


^ 


Vancouver 


'The  Saw  Mkeras' 
St.   Remi   St.    and    Acorn    Ave. 

MONTREAL.  St.  John,   N.B. 


January  3,   1920 


HARDWARE  AND  MET  Al^- Advertising  Section 


29 


E.  Roy, 
t&Vt  St.  Andre  St.,  Montreal,  Que. 


A.    S.    Bntchart, 
26    Adelaide    St.    W.,    Toronto 


MADE 

IN 


C.  C.  CartmiKht, 
Union    Trust    Bids.,    Winnipeg 


CANADA 


4 


Good  Reasons 

-READ  'EM  ! 


THE  NORTHERN  BOLT,  SCREW  AND  WIRE  COMPANY,  LIMITED 


Why  you  should  sell  Rolled  Thread  Bolt* 
and   .Screws : 

BETTER  QUALITY— Rolled  Thread  Bolts 
can  only  be  made  from  first  quality  Basic 
Open-Hearth  Stock. 

STRONGER — Actual  tests  show  18  per 
cent,  greater  strength  than  Cut  Thread 
Bolts. 

NO  USELESS  WEIGHT  —  Shanks  are 
smaller  than  threads.  No  useless  weight 
to  pay  freight  on. 

BIG  FIRMS  ADOPTING  THEM— Some  of 
the  largest  users  on  the  continent  will  ac- 
cept nothing  else — and  they  always  in- 
vestigate before  icting. 

OWEN  SOUND,  ONT. 


r 


>. 


The  Wrench  of  25%  Greater  Efficiency 

TRIMO  WRENCH 


Two  new  features  have 
been  recently  added  to  the 
Trimo  Pipe  Wrench,  namely 
Nut-Guards,  in  all  sizes,  and 
unbreakable  steel  frames,  in 
leading   sizes. 

The  Nut-Guards  prevent 
the  accidental  rotation  of  the 
nut  while  in   use. 

These  improvements  add 
25%  to  the  usefulness  of  the 
tool. 

The  Trimo  Pipe  Wrench 
is  made  with  good  handles 
in  4  sizes,  6-in.,  8-in.,  10-in., 
14-in.  and  in  steel  handles 
in  all  sizes,  6-in.  to  48-in. 
inclusive. 

All  Trimo  Pipe  Wrench 
parts  are  interchangeable. 

The  inserted  jaw  in  the 
handle  can  be  readily  re- 
placed when  worn,  thus  add- 
ing   to    the    life    of   the   tool. 


Inquiries    from    Importers    and    Dealers 
Solicited.      Send    for    Catalogue   No.    55. 


V. 


TRIMONT    MANUFACTURING    CO 

Roxbury  (Boston)  Mass.,  U.S.A. 


Cabl  °  Address:  Triwrench 
Code:  Western  Union 


We  Want 


J 


to  link  up  with  you  and  the  opportunity  of 
offering  you  a  splendid  proposition. 

Never  was  there  such  an  efficient  piston  ring  as 
the  Pressure  Proof  and  never  was  there  a  better 
profit-making  opportunity  awaiting  you. 

Wejurge  that  you  write  us  to-day. 
Reserve  your  territory  now. 

Pressure  Proof  Rings  Limited 

SHERBROOKE,  QUE. 


PINK'S  LUMBERING  TOOLS  fL 


1 


The  Standard   Tools  in  every   province  of  the  Dominion, 
New  Zealand,  Australia,  etc. 


We    manufacture    all 


kinds  of    lumber   tools. 
Durable. 


Light  and 


LONG  DISTANCE  PHONE  No.  87 
Send  for  Catalogue  and  Price  List. 

Sold  throughout  the  Dominion  by  all  Wholesale  and  Retail 
Hardware  Merchants. 

THOS.  PINK  COMPANY,  LIMITED  I 

Manufacturers  of  Lumber  Tools 

% —     ■  i  ■ 


Pembroke 


Ontario 


30 


HARDWARE  AND  'METAL— Advertising  Section 


January  3,   1920 


Targets  like  these 
mean  business  for  you 

They  were  made  on  the  standard  25-yard  range  by  Dominion 
Marksmen  with  Dominion  .22's. 

Over  6,000  boys  in  Canada  are  shooting 

Dominion  .22's 

in  efforts  to  make  similar  scores. 

This  means  business  to  every  dealer  who  carries  this  ammunition. 

Dominion  ammunition  means  more  business — not  only  .22's 
but  all  the  larger  calibre  metallics  and  Dominion  Shot- 
gun Shells.    Order  from  your  jobber  to-day. 

Dominion   Cartridge  Co.,  Limited 

Montreal        -        -         Canada 


January  3,  1920  31 


"Member  Audit  Bureau  Circulation." 

HARDWARE  AND   METAL 

CANADA'S  NA T10NAL  HARDWARE  WEEKLY 

VOL.  XXXII.                  TORONTO,  JANUARY^  1920  No.  1 

CONTENTS 

Freight  Rates  May  be  Advanced  Again 33 

Price  Changes  Never  so  Numerous 34-35 

Says  Public  is  "Sold"  on  Electricity 36-39 

Prices  of  Varnish   May   be   Higher 40 

Just  a  Few  Suggestions  in  Passing 41 

Editorial  Comment 42-43 

Events  in  the  Trade 43-47 

The  Clerks'  Department 48-49 

New  Hardware  Goods j 50 

The  Markets  at  a  Glance 51-59 

AVeekly  Paint  and  Varnish  Department 60-66 

Paint  Delivery  Problem  For  1920 '. 60 

Weeklv  Paint  Markets 66 


THE  MACLEAN  PUBLISHING  COMPANY,  LIMITED 

JOHN  BAYNE  MACLEAN,  President.  H.  T.  HUNTER,  Vice-President. 

H.  V.  TYRRELL,  General  Manager. 

Publishers  of  Hardware  and  Meta!,  The  Financial  Post,  MacLean's  Magazine,  Farmers'  Magazine, 
Canadian  Grocer,  Dry  Goods  Review,  Men's  Wear  Review,  Printer  and  Publisher,  Bookseller  and 
Stationer,  Canadian  Machinery  and  Manufacturing  News,  Power  House,  Sanitary  Engineer, 
Canadian   Foundryman,   Marine   Engineering   of   Canada,    Canadian  Motor,   Tractor  and   Implement 

Trade  Journal. 

Cable    Address,    Macpubco,    Toronto ;    Atbek,    London,    Eng. 
ESTABLISHED    1887. 

HARDWARE  AND  METAL 

GEO.  D.  DAVIS,  Manager. 
CHIEF    OFFICES: 

CANADA-^Montreal,  Southam  Bldg.,  128  Bleury  St.;  Phone  Main  1004.  Toronto,  143-153  University  Ave.,  Tele- 
phone   Main    7324;    Winnipeg,    1103    Union    Trust    Building,  Telephone  Main  3449.     Vancouver,  39  Tenth  Ave.  W. 

GREAT  BRITAIN — London,  The  MacLean  Company  of  Great  Britain,  Limited,  88  Fleet  Street,  E.C.,  E.  J.  Dodd. 
Director;   Telephone,    Central    12960.      Cable    Address:   \tabek,    London,    England. 

UNITED  STATES — New  York.  A.  R.  Lowe,  Room  620.  Ill  Broadway;  Telephone,  Rector  8971;  Boston,  C.  L. 
Morton.  Room  734,  Old  South  Building,  Telephone,  Main  1024 ;  H.  A.  Maguire,  Room  1402,  Lytton  Bldg.,  14 
E.     Jackson     Street,     Chicago.     Phone,     Harrison     9133. 

SUBSCRIPTION  PRICE — Canada,  $3  a  year :  Great  Britain,  South  Africa  and  West  Indies,  12s.  6d.  a  year ; 
United    States,    $3.50    a    year ;    other    countries,    $4    a   year.     Invariably   in   advance. 


32 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


January   3,    1920 


"QUEEN'S      9  9\: 

HEAD" 

METALS 

We  carry  a  complete  stock 
of   all   lines    in   ingot   and 
sheet  form  and    are   in   a 
position  to  quote  to  advan- 
tage  for   shipment   from 
stock  or  direct  from  smelter. 

CANADA 

GALVANIZE 

Stands  alone,  and 
any  pri« 

,D  IRON 

is  cheap  at 
0.,  LIMITED 

its  for 

iHT,  Ltd. 

iLAND 

A.  C.  LESLIE  &  C 

MONTREA 
Canadian  Ager 

JOHN  LYSA( 

BRISTOL,  EN< 

A.  C.  LESLIE  &  CO.,  LIMITED 

560  St.  Paul  St.  West 

MONTREAL 

I 


Meakins  Brushes 

The  Bristles  Stay  In 

Meakins  guarantee  the  brushes  that  are  set  in  rub- 
ber; the  bristles  will  not  loosen.  Bristle-shedding 
brushes  are  more  than  a  nuisance  to  your  customers ; 
they  mean  actual  loss  of  money  in  lost  time  and 
imperfect  work.  For  you,  Meakins  means  ready 
sales,  good  margin  and  quick  turnover. 


Meakins  &  Sons  Limited,  Hamilton,  Ont. 

Warehouses:  Winnipeg,  London,  Toronto,  Montreal,  Vancouver.  Pilkington  Bros.,  Calgary,  Alta. 


H 


Canada's 
National 
Hardware 

Weekly 


□  C 


WE-MEfflL 


□  c 


Published 
Every 

Saturday 
Since 
1888 


1U 


Vol.    XXXI. 


TORONTO,    JANUARY  3,  1920 


No.  1 


Freight  Rates  May  Again  be  Increased 

Canadian  Railways,  it  is  Stated,  Will  Shortly  Ask  for  Permission  to  Advance  Present 
Schedule  20  Per  Cent. — Wage  Increases  to  Employees  a  Big  Factor 


ACCORDING  to  information  given  to  HARD- 
WARE AND  METAL,  application  will  be 
made  very  shortly  to  the  Dominion  Railway 
Commissioners  by  the  railways  of  Canada  to  raise 
their  freight  rates. 

It  is  stated  that  the  request  will  be  that  existing 
rates  be  advanced  by  twenty  per  cent. 

If  this  request  is  made  and  granted  it  will  have 
a  very  important  bearing  on  the  entire  price  situation 
and  on  all  commodities. 

PREVIOUS    ADVANCES 

It  will  be  remembered  that  in  November  of 
1916,  after  a  very  thorough  investigation  into  rail- 
way rates  in  Eastern  Canada,  the  roads  were  allowed 
to  raise  freight  rates  five  per  cent,  in  territory  east 
of  Port  Arthur. 

On  March  15,  1918,  an  increase  of  fifteen  per 
cent,  all  over  Canada  became  effective. 

On  August  1,  1918,  another  increase  of  25  per 
cent,   was  allowed  in  rates. 

EASIER   FOR  THE   WEST 

This  means  that  while  Eastern  shippers  have, 
since  1914,  had  rates  advanced  about  45  per  cent., 
firms  in  the  West  are  only  hit  to  the  extent  of  25 
per  cent,,  because  in  1914,  after  an  investigation  of 
Western   rates   a   considerable  reduction   was   made. 

NEED   THE   MONEY 

The  railway.-,  it  is  stated,  are  facing  a  situation 
where  something  must  be  done  and  done  soon  to 
meet  the  very  greatly  increased  cost  of  operation. 
The  recent  announcement  of  President  Wilson  that 
the  American  railways  are  to  be  returned  to  their 
original  owners  is  of  much  interest  in  railway  circles, 
not  alone  because  of  the  fact  that  Government  ad- 
ministration has  proved  unsuccessful,  but  because 
of  the  course  to  be  pursued  in  the  future. 

As  soon  as  the  railways  are  returned  an  advance 
in  rates  in  the  States  is  expected  in  order  that  the 
hiige  debts  incurred  may  be  met  and  the  railways 
put  on  a  basis  where  they  can  "carry  on." 

WILL  AFFECT  CANADA 
The  return  of  the  American  railways  is  to  take 
place  shortly  and  what  develops  after  their  former 
operators  are  again  in  charge  will  have  a  very  im- 
portant hearing  on  what  is  done  in  Canada.  Accord- 
ing to  a  man  in  very  close  touch  with  transportation 
matters;  an  advance  in  rates  in  the  near  future  is 
practically  inevitable. 


While  no  figures  are  available  showing  the  pro- 
portionate costs  of  operation  of  Canadian  railways, 
it  may  be  assumed  that  they  are  approximately 
reasonably  close  to  the  American  lines. 

A  report  just  issued  regarding  the  railway  situa- 
tion across  the  line  shows  that  as  a  result  of  wage 
increases  that  have  been  made  labor  is  now  receiving 
no  less  than  54.06  per  cent,  of  the  total  revenue. 

What  this  really  means  may  be  understood  better, 
perhaps,  when  it  is  stated  that  the  next  largest  item 
is  for  material.  This  is  usually  one  of  the  "heavy" 
costs,  as  new  cars  have  to  be  provided  for,  new 
bridges,  locomotives,  road  improvements,  etc.  The 
figures  show  that  this  only  takes  14.40  per  cent, 
of  the  money. 

FUEL  IS  SMALL  NOW 

In  spite  of  the  fact  that  millions  of  tons  of  coal 
are  consumed  annually,  this  expenditure  now  is  only 
about  one-fifth  of  the  amount  being  paid  to  labor. 
The  exact  figures  show  that  the  percentage  is  figured 
down  to  11.11  per  cent,  for  fuel. 

That  the  Canadian  railways  are  not  a  great  way 
behind  these  figures  is  shown  by  an  instance  of  how 
salaries  have  been  increased.  Before  the  war  the 
agent  at  a  point  in  Ontario  was  receiving  $45  a 
month.  At  the  present  time  his  income  is  more 
than  that  per  week.  It  is  stated  that  conductors 
are  in  some  cases  drawing  $350  a  month. 

TELEGRAPH    RATES,    TOO 

As  stated  in  previous  issues  of  HARDWARE 
\\D  METAL,  another  request  for  higher  rates  that 
affects  business  men  is  that  of  the  telegraph  com- 
panies for  increased  rates. 

This  matter  is  still  under  consideration  and  in- 
vestigations' are  being  made  with  a  view  of  arriving 
at  a  decision.  This,  it  is  understood,  will  be  given 
earlv  in  the  New  Year. 

In  case  an  increase  is  granted,  and  there  is  every 
reason  to  believe  that  it  may  be,  as  there  h  is  been 
real  opposition  to  the  request,  it  would  not  be 

erious  or  so  widely  felt  as  an  increase  in  railway 
rates.  Tts  effects  upon  retailers  in  general  would  be 
comparatively  light.  Some  manufacturers  have 
telegraph  bills  that  run  into  large  sums  annually. 
bul  these  are  spread  over  so  many  commodities,  as 
a  rule,  that  any  increase  in  rates  is  not  expected 
to  be  a  factor  entailing  any  price  advances. 

The  general  effect,  however,  of  an  advance  in 
railway  rates  particularly  is  the  increased  amount 
(Continued  on  page  49) 


34 


January    1,   1920 


Price  Changes  Never  So  Numerous 

Quotations  on  Many  Basic  Hardware  Lines  Lower  Now  Than  They.  Were  Twelve 

Months  Ago — The  Year  Just  Closed  Has  Presented  Many  Problems 

Both  to  Hardware  Merchants  and  Manufacturers 


IN  view  of  the  close  attention  that  is 
being  plaid  all  over  the  country  just 
now  to  prices,  it  is  interesting  to 
note  that  contrary  to  the  belief  of  many 
persons,  m'any  of  the  most  important 
basic  lines  of  hardware  are  quoted  con- 
siderably lower  than  they  were  at  the 
beginning  of  1919. 

A  year  ago,  for  instance,  common  bar 
iron  was  .quoted  ait  $5.25  per  hundred 
pounds,  as  against  the  present  basis  of 
$4.25  per  100.  Gopper  rivets  at  the  be- 
ginning of  1919  were  quoted  at  an  ad- 
dition to  list  of  30  per  cent.  The  pres- 
,enlt  figure  is  list  plus  5  per  cent. 

Reduction  in   Rope 

Pure  manila  rope  twelve  months  ago 
was  selling  at  thiirty-nine  cents  a  pound, 
Jbaue  price.  The  present  quotation  is 
'thirty-one  cents  a  pound. 

Wire  mails  at  the  commencement  of 
last  yelar  were  quoted  at  $5.30  base. 
Until  recently  they  were  down  to  $4.70 
base.  A  couple  of  weeks  ago  prices' 
jumped  to  $4.95,  and  the  present  quota- 
tion is  $5.20. 

Wire,  it  may  be  seen  from  the  ac- 
companying table,  is  also  considerably 
cheaper  now  thlan  a  year  ago. 

Black  and  galvanized  sheets,  while 
still  allmbst  three  times  as  Ihigh  as  in 
pre-wair  days,  are  still  lower  than  they 
were  a  year  ago,  and  that  in  spite  of 
the  American  steel  strike  and  other  con- 
ditions across  the  line. 

Many  Advances 

On  the  other  hand,  there  .has,  as  every 
hardware  merchant  knows,  been  a  great 
many  advances.  In  the  past  few  weeks 
a  great  many  prices  have  been  revised, 
and  in  the  majority  of  cases  to  higher 
quotations. 

In  spite  of  this,  however,  and  in  spite 
of  prices  generally,  the  hardware  mer- 
clhamts  of  Canada  have  enjoyed  one  of 
the  most  prosperous  years  in  their 
Whole  history.  Getting  enough  goods  to 
meet  the  requirements  of  their  trade 
has  been  the  great  problem  and  in  most 
cases  it  is  just  as  acute  to-day  as  ever. 

The  new  year  is  opening  with  stocks 
in  a  great  many  lines  lower  than  they 
have  ever  been,  and  chances  of  replen- 
ishing them  at  an  early  date  do  not 
seem  especially  bright. 

Have   Not  Arrived 

There  were  those  who  predicted  that 
with  the  termination  of  the  war  that 
whole  shiploads  of  German  merchandise 
was  going  to  be  dumped  on  the  world. 
Stories  were  in  circulation  about  vast 
quantities  of  German  goods  just  waiting 
for  boats  to  carry  it.  These  have  turned1 
out  to  be  a  pure  myth.  Reliable  reports 
indicate  that  Germany  is  as  bare  as  the 


rest  of  the  world  regarding  most  goods, 
and  has  little  to  export,  and  no  ships  in 
which  to  carry  anything  there  is  to 
offer.  So  with  Europe  generally.  The 
whole  country  is  not  onily  hungry  for 
products  of  all  kinds,  but  has  no  ready 
money  with  which  to  buy  the  things 
that  are  urgently  required.  This,  at  the 
present  time,  is  one  of  the  greatest 
problems  international  bankers  have  to 
solve.     Huge  credits  will  be  required. 

Canadian  Exports 
Large  credits  have  already  been  ar- 
ranged by  Canada  with  several  coun- 
tries and  heavy  shipments  of  merchan- 
dise are  constantly  going  forward.  This 
is  one  of  the  reasons  why  there  is  a 
scarcity  at  home.  Some  of  the  Canadian 
plants  are  literally  swamped  with  or- 
ders, and  to  make  matters  worse,  are 
having  difficulties  getting  the  raw  ma- 
terials they  require,  and  also  the  help 
they  need.  Some  other  firms  are  adopt- 
•  ing  the  policy  of  exporting  only  what 
merchandise  they  have  left  after  all  the 
home  demands  are  met.  It  is  needless 
to  add  that  in  most  cases  this  does  not 
leave  very  much  to  be  sent  overseas. 

From  an  industrial  standpoint,  the 
year  was  featured  by  some  of  the  most 
numerous  and  serious  series  of  indus- 
trial disturbances  that  have  ever  oc- 
curred in  America.  Canada  had  troubles 
of  her  own,  and  was  a  direct  sufferer 
also  from  the  very  serious  strikes 
which  occurred  in  the  United  States. 

A  Serious  Affair 

From  the  standpoint  of  the  country 
at  Large,  perhaps  the  most  far-reaching 
in  its  effects  was  the  coal  strike.  For- 
tunately, this  only  lasted  for  five  weeks, 
but  its  effects  were  feflt  by  every  man, 
woman  and  child  in  the  country.  Had1 
a  settlement  not  been  effected,  there  is  v 
no  telling  just  what  would  have  hap- 
pened, as,  with  the  cancellation  of 
scores  of  trains  because  there  was  no 
coal  to  haul  them,  the  entire  trade  of 
Canada  wouild  have  been  disrupted. 

From  the  standpoint  of  the  hardware 
mer/cbants,  the  steel  strike  in  the 
United  States  was  of  first  importance. 
It  at  once  affected  the  markets  and 
deliveries,  and  is  still  affecting  them, 
although  not  so  seriously  as  some 
weeks  ago. 

A  New  Problem 
Another  entirely  new  problem  has 
cropped  up  in  the  shape  of  the  rate  of 
exchange  against  Canada.  The  situa- 
tion, as  it  is  developing,  is  a  most,  im- 
portant factor  in  the  matter  of  affect- 
ing prices  and,  in  this  Way,  trade  all 
over  the  country. 

In  spite  of  all  these  troubles,  how- 
ever,   business    has    increased   all    along 


the  line.  People  in  general,  and  the 
farmers  and  the  working  men  and 
women  in  particular,  have  been  making 
higher  wages  than  they  ever  dreamed 
of,  and  they  have  been  spending  freely. 
One  very  noticeable  tendency  report- 
ed by  all  classes  of  merchants,  is  the 
insistent  demands  for  better  goods. 
Price  is  not  the  question,  as  a  rule. 
Quality  comes  first. 

Cannot  Keep  Up 

In  connection  ■  with  the  business  out- 
look for  19-20,  it  may  be  noted  that 
many  manufacturers  simply  cannot 
keep  up  with  orders.  This  is  noticeably 
the  case  with  firms  making  labor-saving 
devices,  automobiles,  and  lines  required 
in  the  building  trades. 

Never  has  there  been  such  a  demand 
for  automobiles.  This  in  turn  is  creat- 
ing .a  demand  for  plate  glass  that  is 
causing  an  acute  shortage.  This  short- 
age is  such  that  those  in  the  trade  see 
no  rellief  from  it  for  twelve  months  at 
least.  One  of  the  interesting  features 
in  connection  with  the  demands  for 
autos  is  the  call  from  the  farmers. 
They  are  buying  them  as  never  before. 

Because  of  acute  shortage  of  help, 
there  is  a  record  demand  for  labor- 
saving  equipment  of  all  kinds,  and  a 
bigger  business  is  being  done  in  elec- 
trically-operated utilities,  washing  ma- 
chines operated  by  hand,  water,  gaso- 
line and  electricity,  than  ever  before. 

Electrical  Situation 

All  over  the  country,  there  is  an  in- 
creasing demand  for  electricity.  More 
by-laws  for  power  extensions  are  being 
voted  on  at  the  January  elections  than 
ever  before.  More  existing  power 
plants  are  being  extended  than  ever 
before,  and  more  home  generating 
plants  are  being  sold  to  those  out  of 
reach  of  power  lines  than  ever  before. 

All  of  which  means  business,  still 
more  business,  and  still  better  business 
for  the  hardware  merchants  all  over 
Canada.  There  is  every  indication  that 
1920  is  going  to  see  new  trade  records 
made,  and  also  that  1920  is  merely  the 
start  of  a  period  of  wonderful  develop- 
ment for   Canada. 


WANTS   CANADIAN    MICA 

OTTAWA.— A  demand  for  Canadian 
mica  in  Britain  is  emphasized  by  Trade 
Commissioner  Normian  Johnson,  writing- 
in  the  current  issue  of  The  Weekly 
Bulletin  of  The  Trade  and  Commerce 
Bulletin.  British  manufacturers  have 
previously  been  using  Indian  miica,  but 
find  the  Canadian  product  more  suit- 
able. Several  Paris  houses  are  also 
asking  quotations  or.  Canadian  mica  in 
various   grades. 


January  3,   1920 


HARDWARE    AND    METAL 


Price  Tendencies  in  the  Past  Twelve 

Months 


The  Goods.  The  Prices. 

Jan.  4,  Jan.  3, 

1919  1920 

Bits- 
Auger,   Gilmour's,   discount   47%%  17%% 

Irwin's   auger,   discount    15%  net  list 

Belting,  Leather 

Extra    discount     30%  15-10% 

Standard,    discount    ., 30-10%  15-10-10% 

Lace,   Leather 

Sides,     10 $1.70  $2.00 

Cut,    lb 2.00  2.40 

Butts — 

840 6%  add  20% 

800      2%%  add  25% 

838 5%  add  15% 

808     5%  5% 

804     15%add7y2% 

810    net  list  add  10% 

814     net  list  add  25% 

Cement 

Per  barrel  2.80  3.25 

Chain,  Electric  Weld 

Proof,  per  100  lbs.,  3-16  in 18.00  17.25 

Do.,  %  in 14.95  15.85 

Do.,    5-16    in 12.55  13.30 

Do.,   %   in 11.35  10.50 

Churns,    discount 20%  10%Jiigher 

Cord,  Sash— Nos.  8,  9,  10,  per  lb .75  .88 

Fittings   (Wrought  Nipples) — 

4  in.   and  under    .45  .70 

4%   in.  and  larger    .40  .60 

4  in.  and  under,  running  thread    .25  .40 

Grindstones 

Over  40  lbs.  and  2  in.   thick,  per  100  lbs 3.00  3.50 

Hinges,    dozen   pairs — 

Heavy  T,   4   in 2.97  2.55 

Do.,    5    in 2.60  3.20 

Do..    6    in 2.92  3.60 

Do.,   8   in 3.33  4.10 

Heavy   Strap,   4   in 2.43  3.00 

Do.,    5   in 3.00  3.70 

Do..    6    in 3.24  4.00 

Do.,   8   in 4.38  5.40 

Iron   and   Steel   Bars 

Common  Bar  Iron,  per  100  lbs 5.23  4 .  85 

Refined  Iron,  per  100  lbs 5.65  4.50 

Mild  Steel,  per  100  lbs 5.50  4.50 

Sleigh    Sae   Steel,   per   100   lbs 5.50  4.50 

Tire  Steel,  per  100  lbs 5.70  4.70 

Irons,   Sad 

Potts  No.   55,  per  set    2.30  2.25 

Potts   No.    50,    per   set    2.40  2.25 

Potts   Handles,   japanned,   dozen 1.50  1.40 

Lanterns 

Short  Globes,   plain,   dozen    12.50  12.50 

Long   Globe,   plain,   dozen    12.50  12.50 

Lantern   Globes 

Short,    dozen    1.10  1.10 

Long,    dozen     1.10  1.10 

Nails 

Wire,  per  100  lbs.,  base   5.50  5.20 

Cut,  per  100  lbs.,  base 5.85  5.35 

Putty,   Standard 

Bulk,    in   casks,  per  100   lbs 5.90  5.95 

Bulk,    in    100   lb.    drums,    100   lbs 6.75  6.80 


The  Goods 
Sheets 

Black,  per  100  lbs. — 

10  gauge    

12  gauge    

14  gauge    

18-20   gauge    

26   gauge    

28  gauge   

Galvanized,    per    100    lbs. 

14  gauge    

18-20   gauge    , 

U.S.    26    gauge    

U.S.    28    gauge    

10%    oz 

Solder 

Strictly,    per   lb 

Guaranteed,   per  lb 


The  Goods.  The 
Jan.  4, 
.     1919 
Oakum 

Best    (American),   bale    $21.00 

Common  Bar  Iron,   per   100  lbs.    5.25 

Oil,    Coal,   per   gallon    21%' 

Gasoline,   per  gallon    .33 

Packing,    fine    jute,    lb .20 

Wrought    Iron    Pipe — 100   ft. — 

%  and  %  in.,  black   5.52 

%    in.,   black    7.06 

%    in.,   black    8.97 

1  in.,    black     .' 13.26 

1%  in.,  black  21.45 

2  in.,   black    28.86 

%  and   %   in.,  galvanized   7.65 

%    in.,    galvanized    8.71 

%    in.,    galvanized    11.09 

1  in.,   galvanized    16.41 

1%  in.,  galvanized   26.54 

2  in.,   galvanized    35.71 

Rivets,   Iron 

Black    and    tinned,    discount    25% 

Coper    (usual    amount,    burrs),    discount.  ..  .Add  30% 

Copper,    burrs,    discount    Add  50% 

Rope 

Pure    Manila,    base,    lb .28% 

British  Manila,   base,   lb .24 

Sisal,    base,    lb 25% 

Cotton,    %   in.   and  larger,   lb .74    • 

Sap   Spouts,   Eureka,    per  M 15.00 

Soldering  Coppers,  base,  lb .64% 

Sash   Weights 

Solid,    per    lb 4.25 

Sectional,  per  lb 5.50 

Tools,   Harvest,   discount    17%% 

Twine,  Cotton  Wrap 

3  ply,    lb 77 

4  ply,    lb 81% 

Wire 

Barb,    per    100   lbs 6.25 

Smooth   Steel,   Nos.    0-9,    100   lbs 6.25 

Colors  in  Oil,  Pure 

Venetian    Red,   per   lb .21 

Chrome   Yellow,    per   lb .53 

Golden   Ochre,  per  lb .30 

Signwriters'    Black,   per    lb .40 

Lead,  White 

Pure,     per   100   lbs 17.80 

Linseed  Oil 

Raw,    1    bbl.    lots,   gal 1.70 

Boiled,    1   bbl.    lots,   gal 1.73 

Paints 

Ready   mixed,    white,   gal 4.30 

Ready  mixed,   colors,   gal 4.05 

Ready  mixed,   floor,   gal 3.40 

Turpentine 

1  bbl.  lots,  gal 1.10 

Waste,  Cotton 

White,    per    lb .21 

Colored,    per    lb 10%-.  16'/ 


Prices. 
Jan.  3, 

1920 

$22.00 

4.85 

•  24% 

.32 

.20 

5.13 

6.84 

8.68 

12.84 

20.76 

27.94 

7.26 

8.42 

10.81 

15.98 

25.85 

34.78 

37%%. 

Add  5% 

Add  40% 

.31 
.26 

.22% 

.81 

16 .  5* 

.59% 

3.00 
3.75 

12%% 

.83 
■  87% 

5.90 
5.25 


.30 
.55 
.32 
.40 


17 .  85 

2.80 
2.83 

5.05 
4.80 
4.00 


.21 
.09-. 15 


The 

Prices. 

Aug.  1, 

Aug.  1, 

Nov.  9, 

Jan.  4, 

Jan.  3, 

1914 

1918 

1918 

1919 

1920 

$2 .  45 

$10.00 

$.... 

$7.50 

$.... 

2.50 

10.10 

9.60 

7.33 

2.25 

7.90 

8.40 

7.25 

6,r,o 

2.40 

7.55 

8.30 

7.30 

6.85 

2.55 

7.65 

8.40 

7.40 

<!.95 

2.70 

7.75 

8.50 

7.50 

7.05 

2.80 

8.35 

10.85 

8.15 

7.95 

3.20 

8.60 

11.10 

8.40 

8.25 

8.90 

11.40 

8.70 

8.55 

3.90 

9.20 

11.70 

9.00 

S.S5 

4.20 

9.50 

12.00 

9.30 

9.25 

•  21% 

.56% 

.47 

.38 

.34% 

.23 

.60 

.50 

.40 

.35% 

36 


January   3,   1920 


"There  is  a  steadily  increasing  dem  and  for  electrical  equipment  of  all  kinds,"  says  E.  I.  Torrens  of  Tillsonburg, 
Ont.  "We  keep  a  sewing  machine  thinning  ail  the  time  at  the  front  of  the  store  and  get  excellent  results.'"  The  gas 
heater  at  the  right  is  kept  burning  as  a  demonstrator.  In  a  few  seconds  Mr.  Torrens  can  show  a  prospective  buyer 
just  what  can  be  done  with  a  vacuum  sweeper.     The  electric  lamps  make  a  fin  e  showing,  especially  at  nights. 


Says  Public  are  "Sold 


» 


Labor-saving  Equipment  and  Utilities  That  Make  For  Comfort  and  Conven 
E.  I.  Torrens,  of  Tillsonburg,  Ont. — Finds  Steadily  Increasing  Call  For 

and  Advertising,  Help 


Based  on  an  interview  by  C.  E.  PARSONS,  of  Hardware 


THE  sale  of  electrical  equipment, 
especially  of  devices  that  will 
make  for  labor-saving  or  for  com- 
fort and  convenience  in  the  home,  in  the 
opinion  of  Edwin  I.  Torrens,  of  Tillson- 
burg, Ont.,  offers  a  big  future  for  hard- 
ware merchants. 

Tillsonburg,  it  might  be  mentioned,  is 
a  town  of  3,000  population,  located  right 
in  the  heart  of  a  prosperous  farming  ter- 
ritory, and  Mr.  Torrens  bases  his  opinion 
on  actual  developments  that  are  taking 
place  in  his  sales. 

The  only  thing  that  is  limiting  sales 
just  now  in  his  territory,  he  pays,  is  that 
new  hydro  lines  and  branch  lines  cannot 
be  constructed  quickly  enough  to  supply 
the  demands  pf  people  who  want  to  use 
power. 

"There  is  an  insistent  demand  for 
more  and  still  more  electric  power,"  said 
Mr.  Torrens,  in  discussing  the  outlook 
for  business  with  HARDWARE  AND 
METAL.  "There  are  several  basic  rea- 
sons for  this.  One  is  the  great  difficulty 
neople  have  been  experiencing  in  obtain- 
in0'  help,  especially  help  that  is  depend- 
able and  willing  to  do  anything  like  a 


fair  day's  work.  Another  reason  is  the 
efficiency  of  electricity.  It  is  true  that 
many  people  do  not  yet  fully  realize  the 
possibilities  of  electricity  but  they  are 
learning  fast.  I  believe  that  every  time 
I  sell  an  electric  washing  machine,  or  a 
vacuum  sweeper,  or  a  reading  lamp,  or 
a  toaster,  or  an  iron,  I  am  paving  the 
way  for  many  other  sales.  That  is  the 
way  I  find  it  is  working  out. 

"Suppose  I  sell  a  washing  machine  to  a 
farmer's  wife  and  she  is  the  only  woman 
in  her  vicinity  that  owns  one.  It  is  not 
very  lonar  before  we  begin  to  hear  about 
that  machine.  The  woman  herself  usual- 
ly becomes  a  booster  for  it.  She  tells 
her  friends  about  how  well  it  works  and 
about  the  time  it  saves  her  and  the  back- 
break  it  eliminates  and  the  little  money 
it  costs  to  operate,  and  how  well  the 
washing  is  done,  and  so  on.  Just  imagine 
what  you  would  do  yourself  if  you  were 
a  busy  farmer's  wife,  and  every  half 
hour  vou  could  save  meant  something  to 
you.  to  say  nothing  of  cuttine  out  the 
real  heavy  work.  You  would  want  a 
similar  machine  and  sooner  or  later 
you     would     get     it.     and     when     you 


had  become  the  owner  of  a  washing  ma- 
chine you  would  want  an  iron,  and  when 
you  had  both  a  washer  and  iron  you 
would  see  where  a  sweeper  would  save 
your  time  and  also  your  muscles,  and 
the  first  thing  you  know  you  would  be 
doing  half  your  work  electrically.  Well, 
that  is  the  way  it  is  working  out. 

"I  find  that  electrical  devices  sell  them- 
selves. Many  of  the  people  who  come  in 
to  inquire  about  them  are  already  about 
half  'sold.'  They  have  seen  or  owned 
something  electrical  and  know  what  it 
will  do.  They  have  heard  it  recommend- 
ed by  their  friends  or  they  know  a  good 
deal  about  it.  I  find  that  in  the  minds  of 
most  people  electricity  is  associated 
with  efficiency.  They  know  that  it  will 
do  whatever  is  to  be  done  quickly  and 
thoroughly.  They  are  not  always,  and 
this  applies  especially  to  women,  fami- 
liar with  the  cost  of  operation  or  the 
small  amount  of  attention  the  equipment 
requires.  Many  women  have  the  idea 
that  a  washing  machine,  for  instance, 
costs  a  great  deal  more  to  run  than  it 
really  does.  They  also  have  the  idea 
that  there  is  something  more  or  less  com- 


HARDWARE    AND    METAL 


37 


"Sell  stoves  away  in  a  department  where  no  one  can  interrupt  you,"  says  E.  I.Torrens  of  Tillsonburg.  "Keep  your 
stock  well  displayed  and  clean  and  bright  but  leave  plenty  of  room  for  prospective  buyers  to  open  the  doors  and  inspect 
the  stoves."  Mr.  Torrens'  stove  deparUnent  is  en  the  second  floor  and  the  illustration  shows  a  section  of  it.  Because 
gas  heaters  are  big  sellers  in  his  district  he  keeps  then',  displayed  right  up  at  the  front. 

on  Electrical  Devices 

ience  in  the  Home  Offer  Big  Opportunities  For  Hardware  Merchants,  Says 
Them  All  the  Year  Round — Window  Displays,  Backed  by  Store   Display 
"Pull"  Business 


and  Metal,  with   Edwin  I.   Torrens,  of  Tillsonburg,  Ont. 


plicated  about  it  that  may  get  out  of 
order  and  mean  a  big  bill  for  repairs. 
Once  they  are  enlightened  on  these 
points,  and  once  they  have  seen  the  work 
the  device  will  do.  and  the  smoothness 
with  which  it  is  done,  it  is  usually  a 
question  of  sending  the  goods  to  their 
home." 

Mr.  Torrens  states  that  electrical 
goods  is  an  unusually  nice  line  to  handle. 
It  offers  possibilities  for  sales  that  are 
not  affected  by  the  seasons.  Few  ar- 
ticles that  the  hardware  merchant  carries 
make  a  more  effective  store  or  window 
display.  And  there  are  very  few  lines 
which  carry  such  a  wide  appeal  to  the 
homemakers. 

"A  very,  very  large  nercentasre  of  the 
people  to-day,"  said  Mr.  Torrens,  "are 
keenly  interested  in  getting  more  work 
done.  The  farmers  are  especially  busy 
and  in  the  majority  of  cases  short  of 
help.  In  some  parts  of  this  district  now 
they  are  doin<r  their  milking  bv  electri- 
city. Electrically  lis-hted  stables  and 
homes  are  common,  while  there  are  ^ny 
number  of  places  where  the  electricity 
is  utilized  in  one  way  or  another  for  do- 
ing various  chores.  This  is  looking  at 
the   matter  from   a  labor-saving   stand- 


point. There  is  another  very  important 
side  to  the  question  and  that  is  comfort 
and  convenience.  All  through  this 
countryside  there  are  prosperous  farmers 
and  if  there  is  anything  to  be  purchased 
at  a  price  anywhere  in  reason  that  will 
make  their  homes  better  or  more  com- 
fortable, they  are  going  to  buy.  They 
want  electric  lights,  their  wives  want 
electric  labor-savers  and  conveniences, 
and  they  are  going  to  get  them.  The 
only  trouble  just  now  is  that  there  is 
not  sufficient  power  to  take  care  of  any- 
thing like  the  demands.  This,  however, 
is  a  situation  that  is  going  to  be  taken 
care  of  in  time  and  sooner  or  later  there 
will  be  extensions  and  new  lines  until 
the  whole  district  is  served.  It  will  not 
come  too  soon  for  many  of  them." 

Three  liig  Points 
There  are  three  things  in  connection 
with  his  hardware  business  of  which  Mr. 
Torrens  is  particularly  proud.  One  is 
the  store  itself,  another  is  his  stock  and 
the  third  is  the  service  he  gives.  Service 
he  maintains  covers  a  wide  field  when  it 
comes  to  merchandising  and  is  some- 
thing that  the  great  buying  public  has 
a  right  to  expect  of  the  merchant. 


The  great  majority  of  people,  he  says, 
are  interested  almost  continually  in  what 
the  merchants  have  to  offer. 

"People  read  the  newspapers  and  they 
watch  the  windows  and  show  a  real  in- 
terest in  what  we  have  to  offer,"  said 
Mr.  Torrens.  "This  store  has  no  better 
advertisement  than  its  window  displays 
and  the  displays  that  are  arranged  in- 
side. We  give  this  matter  careful  and 
constant  attention  and  that  is  one  rea- 
son perhaps  why  we  get  results. 

Carefully  Planned 

"Our  window  displays  are  always 
carefully  planned  It  is  most  import- 
ant that  a  display  should  be  seasonable. 
It  is  most  important  that  it  should  be 
attractively  arranged.  It  is  equally  im- 
portant that  people  who  are  attracted 
by  the  windows  should  know  the  prices  of 
the  goods  shown.  This  is  a  matter  that  is 
first  in  the  minds  of  most  buyers.  They 
want  to  know  exactly  what  a  thing  is 
going  to  cost.  It  is  a  peculiar  fact  but 
none  the  less  true  that  if  prices  are  not 
shown  nine  people  out  of  ten  will  eet 
the  impression  that  the  article  on  dis- 
play is  much  more  costly  than  it  really 
is.      There    is    no    doubt    about    the    in- 


HARDWARE    AND    METAL 


January   3,   1920 


terest  people  take  in  window  displays 
and  their  value  in  increasing  sales  and  in 
maintaining  interest  in  a  store.  Our  plan 
is  to  back  our  window  displays  by  equal- 
ly attractive  store  displays  and  to  back 
both  by  timely  advertising.  My  exper- 
ience is  that  this  is  a  combination  that 
never  fails  to  bring  results." 

People  Like  Action 

People  like  to  see  something  in  action, 
Mr.  Torrens  says,  and  because  of  this 
he  very  frequently  arranges  window  dis- 
plays with  this  idea  in  view.  In  the 
accompanying  illustration  is  shown  a 
window  display  with  an  electric  washer 
in  action.  Not  only  is  the  washer  kept 
moving  but  a  piece  of  colored  material 
is  put  through  the  wringer  and  goes 
round  and  round  many  hundreds  of  times 
a  day. 

"Displays  of  this  kind  are  easily  ar- 
ranged," said  Mr.  Torrens,  "and  they 
have  a  real  pulling  value.  I  find  that 
people  are  always  interested  in  them  and 
we  can  trace  the  sale  of  many  washing 
machines  to  them." 

In  The  Store,  Too 

As  may  be  seen  in  another  illustration 
just  inside  the  door,  Mr.  Torrens  has  a 
sewing  machine,  to  which  is  attached  an 
electric  motor.  The  silent,  easy  running, 
swiftly  moving  machine  is  a  salesman 
every  minute  it  is  running  and  holds  the 
interest  of  women  who  have  much  sew- 
ing to  do. 

Just  alongside  may  be  noticed  a  gas- 
heater.  Natural  gas  is  obtainable  at 
Tillsonburg  and  vicinity  and  a  big  trade 
is  done  in  heaters. 

"We  keep  one  burning  right  out  where 
everybody  who  comes  in  can  see  and  feel 
it,"  said  Mr.  Torrens,  "and  it  brings  re- 
sults. People  are  reminded  that  they 
needed  a  heater  or  they  see  this  one  in 
action  and  decide  they  want  one." 

So  with  the  electric  reading  lamps. 
They  are  at  this  season  of  the  year  kept 
right  up  at  the  front  on  the  displav 
table  as  shown.  At  nights  especially, 
they  make  a  very  fine  showing,  and 
many  of  them  are  taken  home  by  people 
who  see  their  value  as  an  ornamental, 
serviceable  and  altogether  useful  article 
for  the  house.  Others  are  bought  for 
wedding  or  other  gift  purposes  and  dur- 
ing the  past  few  weeks  many  went  out 
as  Christmas  presents. 

Continually  Changed 

"We  believe  that  it  is  good  business 
to  keep  our  stock  continually  changed 
around,"  said  Mr.  Torrens.  "People  like 
to  see  new  things  every  time  they  come 
into  a  store,  and  we  always  trv  to  have 
something  seasonable  and  different  to 
show  them." 

Auto  accessories  is  a  line  which  Mr. 
Torrens  says  has  been  showing  a  steady 
and  most  satisfactory  growth.  As  may 
be  seen  from  the  illustration,  he  keeps 
a  silent  salesman  filled  with  them  ritrht 
up  at  the  front  of  the  store.  The  dis- 
play is  a  most  attractive  one,  thorough- 
ly in  keeping  with  Mr.  Torrens'  ideas  of 
keeping  his  stock  looking  its  best  all 
the  time.  It  may  be  noted  that  in  the 
display  cases  as  well  as  in  his  windows. 


Mr.  Torrens  carries  out  the  idea  that 
everybody  is  interested  in  knowing  prices 
and  the  price  is  plainly  marked,  and  in- 
many  instances  is  shown  on  a  price  card. 
"It  is  astonishing,"  said  Mr.  Torrens, 
"the  amount  of  merchandise  that  is  sold 
as  a  result  of  keeping  it  out  where  people 
can  see  it.  Our  auto  accessories'  sales 
have  shown  a  steady  increase  and  the 
department  is  getting  bigger  and  bigger 
every  year.  There  is  a  steady  increase 
in  the  number  of'  cars  owned  by  the 
farmers  and  every  car  that  is  sold  re- 
quires  accessories    and   supplies."  , 

Brings  Them  In 

Out  in  front  of  the  store  is  a  gasoline 
pump  where  car  owners  may  refill  their 
tanks  and  they  come  regularly.  The 
main  street  of  Tillsonburg  rejoices  in  the 
imposing  name  of  "Broadway."  While 
it  is  only  two  blocks  long,  that  is  as  far 
as  the  business  section  is  concerned,  it  is 
a  busy  spot  on  market  days  and  on  Sat- 
urday nights.  The  street  is  an  unusual- 
ly wide  one,  and  it  is  stated  to  HARD- 
WARE AND  METAL  that  very  often  on 
Saturday  nights,  when  the  weather  is 
fine,  it  is  impossible,  owing  to  the  num- 
ber of  automobiles  on  the  street,  to  get 
through.  On  both  sides  of  the  street  for 
two  blocks,  there  will  be  no  available 
space  for  parking,  so  closely  are  the  cars 
lined  up.  Of  course,  this  means  a  lot 
of  business,  especially  as  the  farmers  ar^ 
well-to-do.  No  less  than  75  per  cent,  of 
them  now  own  cars. 

Sells  Many  Stoves 

Mr.  Torrens  states  that  his  stove  sales 
will  average  100  a  year.  He  has  found, 
he  says,  by  experience  that  it  pays  to 
ke'ep  the  stoves  in  a  department  by  them- 
selves where  the  salesman  selling  them 


will  not,  be  interrupted  in  his  sales  talk 
by  other  people  coming  in  or  by  other 
salesmen  asking  for  information.  The 
stove  department  is  located  on  the  sec- 
ond floor,  in  a  bright,  well-lighted  room, 
near  the  rear.  The  accompanying  illus- 
tration shows  a  section  of  it,  and  it  may 
be  noted  how  carefully  the  stoves  are 
looked  after.  No  dust  is  allowed  to 
gather  on  them  and  the  nickel-plating 
is  always  kept  shining.  In  short,  the 
stoves  are  kept  ready  for .  inspection  at 
any  time. 

The  Women   Decide 

"The  women  not  only  usually  decide 
the  matter  of  which  stove  it  is  to  be," 
said  Mr.  Torrens,  "but  they  generally 
come  first  to  see  about  it.  Very  often 
both  a  farmer  and  his  wife  will  come  to- 
gether. It  is  important  that  the  stove 
department  be  kept  clean.  Women  dis- 
like going  into  a  stove  department  that 
is  mussy,  and  they  dislike  trying  to 
handle  dusty  or  rusty  goods.  We  aim  to 
keep  our  stock  looking  its  best  always 
and  leave  plenty  of  room  for  people  to 
get  in  and  out  among  the  stoves  and 
open  the  ovens  or  doors  or  lift  the  lids. 
They  like  to  do  these  things  and  to  find 
out  all  about  how  the  stoves  work. 
Owing  to  the  general  situation  in  re- 
gard to  fuel  there  is  a  great  call  for 
stoves  that  will  burn  wood  or  coal.  Gen- 
erally speaking,  I  find  that  people  are 
willing  to  pay  a  good  price  for  a  good 
stove.  Very  often  it  is  possible  to  ar- 
range a  deal  for  a  new  stove  by  taking 
an  old  one  in  exchange.  It  is  not  hard  to 
dispose  of  an  old  stove  that  is  in  good 
shape  and  make  a  profit  on  the  deal." 

Part  of  Mr.  Torrens'  service  in  con- 
nection   with    stove    sales    is    to   fit   the 


In  arranging  displays  of  this  kind,  an 
Torrens  of  Tillsonburg  keeps  both  the 
The  piece  of  cloth  in  the  wringer  is  of 
and  round  has  a  distinct  value  in  itself 
ing  board  at  the  right,  the  electric  iron 
side,  the  clothes  pins  and  washboards, 
Torrens  finds  that  farmers'  wives  are 
devices. 


d  they  are  arranged  frequently,  E.  I. 
washer  and  the  wringer  in  action, 
a  striking  color  and  as  it  goes  round 
in  attracting  people.     Note  the  iron- 

s  on  the  floor  and  on  the  shelf  at  the 

everything  suggestive  of  washday.  Mr. 

keenly  interested  i)i   these  labor-saving 


January  3,  1920 


HARDWARE    AND    METAL 


39 


E.  I.  Tori-ens  of  Tillsonburg,  Ont.,  sa  s  that  one  of  the  reasons  why  his  auto     accessories     sales     are     growing 
is  because  he  keeps  the  display  case  \hown  above  so  prominently  before  people.     He  backs  this  up  by  frequent 
window  displays.     Note  the  attractive    wall    cabinet    of    bathroom   fixtures.     Keeping   them  displayed  up  at  the 
front  of  the  store  like  this  has  great  y   increased  sales.     See   also   the   ena melware  and  tinware  above. 


stove  up  in  the  home  it  is  going  to  and 
leave  it  in  perfect  running  order. 

He  does  a  big  business,  he  states,  over 
the  telephone,  and  in  order  that  no  time 
may  be  lost  and  no  customer  inconven- 
ienced by  having  to  wait  owing  to  a  busy 
line,  two  telephones  are  in  use. 

"The  plan  works  splendidly,"  said  Mr. 
Torrens.  "In  the  busy  seasons  many 
farmers  do  not  have  time  to  come  in  and 
get  what  they  want  and  order  over  the 
telephone.  In  order  that  they  may  not 
have  to  wait  as  a  result  of  the  line  be- 
ing busy,  we  keep  two  phones  and  this 
has  frequently  saved  considerable  de- 
lay. Our  customers  appreciate  this  ser- 
vice and  the  effort  we  make  to  take  their 
orders  promptly.  We  try  to  give  just 
as  prompt  delivery." 

As  might  be  expected  in  a  section 
where  dairying  is  carried  on  as  exten- 
sively as  in  the  vicinity  of  Tillsonburg, 
dairy  supplies  are  much  in  demand. 
Eight  gallon  milk  cans  are  very  popular 
with  the  farmers  and  sales  of  them  ex- 
ceed 200  each  year.  These  are  a  special- 
ly heavily-built  can. 

In  this  connection.  Mr.  Torrens  pointed 
out  that  the  whole  tendency  of  the  buy- 
ing public,  and  of  farmers  especially,  is 
to  demand  a  quality  article  regardless 
of  the  price. 

"It  doesn't  matter  whether  it  is  milk 
cans,  or  dairy  pails,  or  electrical  goods, 


or  what  it  is,"  said  Mr.  Torrens.  "People 
want  it  good.  It  seems  to  me  that  the 
day  has  gone  by  when  people  are  hag- 
gling over  prices.  It  is  a  question  now 
of  getitiing  a  good  article.  I  find  that  a 
greait  majority  of  people,  farmers  espe- 
cially, want  to  ibuy  for  cash.  It  is  an 
unusual  tlhing  mow  for  a  customer  to 
ask  w'hait  used  to  be  a  common  ques- 
tion, "Can't  you  do  a  little  better  on 
that?" 

As  a  further  evidence  of  the  tendency 
to  buy  more  expensive  goods,  Mr.  Tor- 
rens stated  that  there  is  a  steadily  grow- 
ing demand  for  aluminum  ware.  This, 
he  declared,  is  displacing  many  lines  of 
enamelware  slowly  but  surely. 

He  does,  however,  a  good  business  in 
both  tinware  and  enamelware  and  stated 
that  his  stock  is  turned  four  to  five  times 
a  year. 

Women,  he  says,  are  buying  more 
paint  every  season,  and  he  attributes  this 
to  the  fact  that  help  has  'been  so  scarce 
on  many  farms  that  much  of  the  paint- 
ing has  had  to  be  done  by  women.  As  a 
rule,  Mr.  Torrens  says,  the  women  know 
comparatively  little  about  the  paints  or 
how  to  apply  them  best  or  what  brushes 
to  use.  In  selling  paints  and  varnishes, 
he  alwavs  aims  to  tell  them  all  he  can 
that  will  enable  them  to  get  the  best  re- 
sults. 


"They  appreciate  any  information  of 
this  kind,"  he  said,  "and  it  means  more 
sales  in  the  future." 


British  Steel  and 

Iron  Output  Grows 

London,  Eng\,  Jan.  l.--The  National 
Federation  of  Iron  and  Steel  Manufactur- 
ers figures  the  production  of  pig  iron  in 
November  at  630,000  tons,  and  of  steel 
at  6P3,000.  For  11  months  of  1919 
the  figures  are  6,730,000  tons  of  pig 
iron  and  7,200,000  tons  of  steel,  indicat- 
ing for  November  a  slight  improvement 
on  the  year's  monthly  average.  This 
compares  also  with  9,072,000  tons  of 
pig  iron  and  9,591,000  tons  of  steel  for 
the  full  year  of  1918.  In  1913  the 
figures  were  10,260,000  tons  of  pig  iron 
and   7.664,000  tons  of  steel. 

Makers  of  iron  and  steel  are  unwilling 
sellers,  and  all  produces  are  exceedingly 
stron"',  with  husiness  frcuiontlv  only 
possible  at  an  advance  of  20  to  30  shil- 
lings on  open  quotations.  Steel  sheets 
orders  for  some  thousand  ton  lots  for 
the  Fnr  East  have  been  turned  down. 

Scotch  ship  plates  have  advanced  two 
pounds  sterling,  and  other  upward  moves 
were  noted  in  Midland  steel  ship  plates, 
steel  boiler  plates  and  steel  angles. 


40 


January   1,   1920 


Says  Varnishes  are  Bound  to  be  High 

Prices  of  Various  Gums  Double  What  They  Formerly  Were — All  Raw  Materials  Have 

Advanced — Labor  and  Packing  Big  Factors 


THE  varnish  market  is  not  only 
strong-,  but,  in  the  opinion  of  W. 
W.  Ingersoll,  vice-president  and 
secretary  of  the  Doug-all  Varnish  Com- 
pany, Ltd.,  Montreal,  prices  are  bound  to 
be  firmer,  and  probably  advances  may- 
come  in  the  near  future. 

"All  raw  materials  are  firm,"  said  Mr. 
Ingersoll  to  HARDWARE  AND, 
METAL,  "and  they  are  also  very  difficult 
to  obtain.  Prices  on  most  of  these  ma- 
terials are  higher  than  ever.  Gums,  for 
instance,  are  costing,  in  some  instances, 
twice  what  they  were,  and  this  applies 
to  most  of  the  gums  used  by  manufac- 
turers. Stronger  markets,  therefore,  are 
likely." 

Other  Materials 
Of  course  the  prices  obtaining  for  lin- 
seed oil  and  for  turpentine  are  decidedly 
higher  than  they  have  been  heretofore. 
"There  is  a  world  shortage  of  flax,"  con- 


tinued Mr.  Ingersoll,  "and  we  shail  have 
to  realize  that  we  cannot  get  all  we  need 
of  this  product.  Manufacturers  are  in 
a  more  difficult  position  every  day,  for 
they  cannot  gev  deliveries  on  many  raw 
materials. 

"The  public  will  have  to  realize  that 
high  prices  will  obtain  for  a  long  time. 
The  average  working  man  is  getting 
more  wages,  and  is  living  better.  Many 
are  putting  money  in  the  bank.  They  are, 
as  a  rule,  buying  better  clothes,  and  also 
other  things  which  they  need. 

50  Per  Cent.  More  for  Boxing 

"There  is  not  only  difficulty  in  obtain- 
ing supplies  of  -many  raw  matei'ials,  but 
the  manufacturer  is  confronted  with 
higher  prices  for  packages  of  all  kinds. 
Boxing  is  50  per  cent,  higher,  and  it  is 
difficult  to  obtain  supplies,"  said  Mr. 
Ingersoll 

When   it  comes  to  a  consideration  of 


Power  Resources  of  the  Dominion 

Capital  Invested  in"  Central   Stations   in   Canada  Now  Totals 

$356,004,168 — Enormous  Percentage  of  Available  Energy 

is  Being  Derived  From  Water  Power 


THE  hardware  merchants  of  Canada 
are  now  one  of  the  big  factors  in 
the  distribution  of  electrical  goods 
and  the  important  part  that  electricity 
is  playing,  and  its  steady  growth  is 
shown  in  figures  just  prepared  at  Ot- 
tawa. The  Cabinet  Committee  on  Power 
has  secured  data  which  constitutes  the 
first  adequate  Governmental  attempt  to 
systematically  compile  a  ready  reference 
to  the  central  electric  stations  of 
the  Dominion.  The  material  which  has 
now  been  compiled  is  much  more  exhaus- 
tive and  comprehensive  in  every  way 
than  that  contained  in  any  previous  re- 
ference on  the  subject.  It  permits  a 
bird's-eye  view  of  the  present  status  of 
the  industry  in  all  parts  of  the  Dominion, 
and  indicates  the  locations  where  expan- 
sion is  readily  feasible.  A  special  effort 
has  been  made  to  secure  from  the  var- 
ious corporations  and  municipalities  in- 
formation relative  to  blocks  of  electric 
power  available  for  sale;  the  prices  at 
which  such  power  can  be  provided;  the 
available  sites  for  industrv  in  the  vicinitv 
and  the  transportation  facilities    avail- 


able. The  corporations  and  municipali- 
ties have  co-operated  heartily  in  this 
connection.  It  is  intended  that,  in  so  far 
as  possible  this  information  shall  be 
kept  up-to-date. 

Census  of  Electric  Stations 

A  census  of  the  central  electric  power 
stations  in  Canada,  i.e.,  stations  engaged 
in  the  sale  of  electric  energy,  just  com- 
pleted by  the  Dominion  Power  Board  in 
co-operation  with  the  Dominion  Bureau 
of  Statistics,  disclosed  several  outstand- 
ing features  of  very  great  interest  at  the 
present  time. 

The  capital  invested  in  central  power 
stations  totals  $356,004,168,  of  which 
79.5  per  cent,  is  invested  in  commercial 
stations,  and  20.05  per  cent,  in  municipal 
or  publicly-owned  stations.  Total  em- 
ployees number  8,874,  receiving  wages 
and  salaries  totaling  $7,777,715  per  an- 
num. 

The  total  revenue  received  from  the 
sale  of  electrical  energy  is  $44,536,848,  of 
which  $29,135,399  was  secured  by  com- 
mercial and  $15,401,449  by  municipal 
plants.  , 


containers,  a  difficulty  has  arisen  which 
none  could  foresee,  and  which  is  directly 
traceable  to  the  unfortunate  strike  of 
steel  plate  workers  in  the  United  States. 
Caii  manufacturers  were  unable  to  ob- 
tain the  stocks  that  they  had  ordered, 
and  which,  ordinarily,  would  have  been 
delivered.  Mr.  Ingersoll  said  that  the 
manufacturers  had  done  their  best  to 
make  delivery  but  that  the  situation  had 
been  difficult,  with  costs  higher. 
Big  Business  Aheatf 

"There  is  bound  to  be  a  lot  of  construc- 
tion next  year  Dealers  would  be  well 
advised  to  anticipate  their  requirements 
early,  and  under  the  conditions  of  to- 
day it  ought  tc  be  good  business  to  order 
well  ahead  of  what  one  needs." 

Mr.  Ingersoll  concluded  by  saying  that 
there  has  been  for  some  time  a  continued 
healthy  tone  to  business,  and  the  outlook 
for  a  brisk  season  in  1920  is  excellent. 

The  primary  power  installation  in 
central  stations  total  1,884,571  horse- 
power, of  which  78.3  per  cent.,  or  1,444,- 
314  horsepower  is  installed  in  commer- 
cial stations  and  21.7  per  cent,  or  400,257 
horsepower  in  municipal  stations.  Of 
the  total  primary  horsepower  installed 
i.,uv^,obj  ..u.tepower  is  derived  from 
water/  180,800   from   steam,   and    11,. '10 

i     fell!      t.i.U      W.i. 

One  of  the  most  important  facts  dis- 
closed as  a  result  of  the  statistics  is  the 
outstanding  position  wnicn  water-power 
takes  in  the  central  station  field.  Out 
of  a  total  installed  primary  capacity  of 
1,844,571  horsepower,  1,561,661,  or  89.6 
per  cent.,  is  derived  from  water.  This 
figure  is  indicative  of  the  extent  and 
availability  of  water  pov/er  resources  of 
the  Dominion,  and  of  the  remarkable 
degree  to  which  their  adaptability  for 
central  electric  station  work  has  been 
utilised. 

A  census  of  the  total  developed  water- 
power  in  Canada,  including  several  elec- 
tric stations  just  completed,  discloses 
the  fact  that  a  total  of  2,305,310  horse- 
power is  at  present  installed  in  Hydro 
plants  throughout  the  Dominion.  This 
figure  indicates  that  Canada's  utilization 
of  Hydro  power  is  even  more  marked 
than  had  been  realized.  Of  the  total 
power  450,000  horsepower  are  utilized  in 
the  pulp  and  paper  industry. 


Keep  These  Dates  Clear 

February  17,  18,  19,  20 

Big    Convention    Ontario    Retail    Hardware    Association    at    Hamilton,    Canada — 

Programme  Announced  Shortly 


January  3,  1920 


HARDWARE    AND    METAL 


41 


JUST  A  FEW  SUGGESTIONS  IN  PASSING 

By  C.  C.  FALCONER,  of  Falconer's  Hardware,  Winnipeg 


WHAT  do  you  talk  to  your  customers  about 
during  the  intervening  moments  of  making 
a  sale? 
Are  those  precious  moments  taken  advantage 
of  in  calling  attention   to  some  seasonable   line. 
which,  nine  chances  out  of  ten,  your  customer  will 
be  interested  in,  or  is  that  time  wasted  to  both 
through    an    unprofitable    discussion    about    the 
weather,  politics,  strikes,  high  cost  of  living,  etc.? 
If  we  would  appreciate  more  fully  the  oppor- 
tunities before  us  in  the  person  of  a  buyer  who  has 
selected  our  store  out  of  others    thai  he  might 
have  gone  to,  we  would  take  greater  pains  to  m'o.ke 
every  minute  count. 

AVOID  ARGUMENTS 

If  we  would  but  realize  that  before  us  is  an 
actual  result  of  the  expenditure  of  much  effort  and 
m,oney  to  cdueate  the  public  to  the  advantage  of 
dealing  with  you- -you  in  turn  would  not  throw 
away  that  golden  opportunity  by  discussing  any 
of  the  social  or  economic  questions  that  might  too 
easily  result  in  an  argument,  which,  of  course, 
should  always  be  avoided. 

While  it  might  seem  appropriate  and  accep- 
table to  ask  about  the  family  and  discuss  the  early 
faU  of  snow  or  some  phase  of  the  weather,  they 


in-'-    nevertheless    unnecessary    and   certainly    aa- 
profitable. 

MAKING  MORE  SALES 

How  much  better  to  call  attention  to  some  u<  w 
line  just  received,  tvhich  you  might  ask  the  privi- 
lege  of  showing,  or  even  an  old  but  very  seasonable 
article  which  is  always  a  good  seller,  remembering 
that  more  sales  are  made  in  the  stores  that  make 
the  greater  number  of  suggestions,  either  by  dis- 
play or  word  of  mouth. 

Thousands  of  sales  are  made  by  utilizing  the 
time  of  wrapping  a  parcel,  by  calling  attention  to 
gome  specific  article. 

BRINGS    GOOD   RESULTS 

Our  plan  is  to  select  some  line  each  week,  gen- 
erally one  that  we  have  advertised,  also  displayed 
in  the  window.  After  the  customer  has  apparent- 
ly had  his  wants  satisfied,  we,  instead  of  saying  it 
is  a  cold  day  or  a  hot  one,  suggest  that  they  could 
possibly  use  so  and  so  to  advantage,  extolling  its 
ments  to  the  extent  of  your  selling  ability. 

You  will  find  your  efforts  surprisingly  re- 
wdrded  and  well  worth  the  efforts.  Try  it  next 
week  on  electric  bulbs  and  see  how  many  more 
sales  you  will  make,  a  few  more  dollars  and  what 
is  perhaps  more  important,  a  few  more  friends. 


There  are  many  suggestions  in  the  above  illustration  for  arranging  a  store  display  that  ivill  compel  the  atten- 
tion of  every  hornemaker.  A  showing  of  merchandise  like  this  is  effective  all  the  time,  perhaps  more  effective 
than  ever  at  night  when   the  lights  are   turned  on. 


42 


January   3,   1920 
IIIIIAIIIliiek 


EDITORIAL    COMMENT 


MAY  RAISE  RAILWAY  RATES 

ACCORDING  to  information  received  by  HARD- 
WAKE  AND  METAL  the  railways  of  Canada 
plan  at  an  early  date  to  make  application  to  the 
Dominion  Railway  Commissioners  for  permission 
to  increase  their  rates.  The  increase  to  be  asked 
for  will,  it  is  stated,  amount  to  twenty  per  cent. 
This  is  a  large  increase,  but  the  railways,  it  is  stated, 
claim  that  it  is  necessary,  if  they  are  to  pay  the 
wage  schedules  they  have  to  pay  now  and  meet 
generally  increased  costs  of  operating.  Figures  just 
made  public  in  the  United  States  in  connection  with 
the  railway  situation  there  throw  an  interesting 
sidelight  on  what  wage  increases  mean.  They  show 
that  no  less  than  54.06  per  cent,  of  the  revenue  is 
now  required  to  take  care  of  labor.  This  is  an  enor- 
mous percentage,  and  out  of  all  proportion  to  any- 
thing that  was  ever  experienced  in  pre-war  days. 
Aside  from  these  considerations,  though,  the  pro- 
posal for  any  increase  in  rates  in  Canada  lias  a  side 
that  is  of  keen  interest  to  every  merchant  in  the 
Dominion.  Instead  of  helping  the  move  to  get  prices 
back  to  a  normal  basis  it  will  increase  them.  More 
than  this,  it  will  increase  them  at  a  time  when  the 
public  is  in  an  unsettled  state  of  mind.  Obviously 
this  will  not  tend  to  allay  existing  unrest  but  rather 
to  cause  further  anxiety. 


OUTLOOK  IS  BRIGHT 

AFTEB  having  come  through  twelve  of  the  most 
trying  months,  in  many  respects,  in  the  history 
of  the  Dominion,  the  people  of  Canada  are  com- 
mencing a  New  Year  of  exceptional  promise.  When 
one  contrasts  the  busy,  prosperous,  happy  Canadian 
public,  and  conditions  that  exist  in  Canada,  with 
the  people  of  many  other  lands,  one  realizes  to  a 
small  extent  just  what  Canada  has  missed  in  the 
way  of  real  troubles.  With  resources  that  are.  per- 
haps, richer  than  those  of  any  country  on  the  globe, 
with  a  sturdy  and  hard-working  population,  and 
with  ample  money  to  finance  development  projects, 
Canada  seems  to  be  merely  at  the  commencement 
of  a  period  of  prosperity  that  may  extend  over  many 
years.  Leading  financiers,  not  only  of  this  country, 
but  of  others  also,  see  for  Canada  in  the  coming 
years,  development  that  will  mean  much.  The  mer- 
chants of  the  Dominion  will,  of  course,  share  in  this 


and  everywhere  one  sees  evidences  that  they  are 
preparing  for  larger  business.  No  merchants  are 
looking  forward  with  more  optimism  than  the  men 
in  the  hardware  trade.  In  1919  they  enjoyed  a  full 
measure  of  prosperity.  Many  of  them  have  just 
ended  the  most  prosperous  year  in  their  history,  and 
but  for  the  fact  that  they  could  not  get  the  mer- 
chandise they  needed  it  would  have  been  even  more 
so.  All  out  through  the  country  districts,  and  it 
should  be  remembered  that  Canada  is  essentially 
a  farming  country,  one  hears  the  same  story:  "We 
need  more  room.  We  know  we  can  do  more  business 
if  we  add  this  line  and  that  line.  We  hope  shortly 
to  build  a  larger  store."  This  has  been  repeated 
so  often  to  the  writer  in  the  past  few  months  that 
there  is  only  one  conclusion  and  that  is  that  1920 
is  .uoing  to  see  hardware  merchants  expanding  their 
trade  in  all  directions. 


Til E  OMAR  10   CONVENTION 

EVERYTHING  is  goiflg  along  nicely  in  connec- 
tion with  the  annual  convention  of  the  Ontario 
Retail  Hardware  Dealers'  Association  which  is  to  be 
held  at  Hamilton  next  month.  A  record  attendance 
from  all  sections  of  the  Province  is  expected.  This 
is  a  matter  in  which  every  hardware  merchant  can 
help.  If  he  comes  himself  and  makes  sure  that 
another  hardware  merchant  comes  with  him,  pre- 
ferably one  who  has  not  been  a  regular  attendant, 
he  is  doing  the  finest  kind  of  missionary  work  for 
a  good  cause.  The  program  this  year  will  be  one 
of  exceptional  interest,  and  will  include  many  items 
that  will  be  of  real  value  and  real  profit  to  the  men 
in  the  trade.  It  had  been  hoped  to  hold  this  year's 
convention  at  Niagara  Falls,  hut  owing  to  the  im- 
possibility of  securing  accommodation,  Hamilton 
was  again  chosen  because  it  Is  a  central  point  and 
easily  reached,  because  of  the  many  industries  closely 
allied  with  the  hardware  trade  that  are  centred  there, 
and  because  of  the  accommodation  that  is  procurable. 
From  an  attendance  standpoint,  the  convention  will 
lie  what  the  delegates  make  it.  If  they  turn  out 
as  they  should,  and  as  they  have  been  turning  out 
at  recent  conventions,  there  will  be  no  doubt  as  to 
the  success  of  the  meetings.  The  executive  has  done 
its  part  and  is  sparing  no  pains  to  make  the  program 
one  of  the  best  ever.  Now  it  is  up  to  the  merchants 
to  do  their  share. 


January  3,   1920 


II  A  R  D  W  A  R  E    A  ND    METAL 


43 


Chain  Store  Idea  Invades  Hardware  Field 

Plans  of  Winchester  Co.  Under  Discussion 


THAT  retail  distributive  methods  are  being 
rapidly  revolutionized  is  quite  apparent  to 
all  those  who  are  closely  following  activities  in 
the  retail  field. 

During  recent  years  obvious  rapid  strides 
have  been  made  by  chain  store  organizations 
selling  drugs,  tobacco,  groceries,  candies,  paints 
and  varnishes,  oils  and  gasoline,  meats,  and  in 
many  other  line*  where  it  has  been  possible  to 
specialize  to  more  or  less  extent, 

The  Canadian  hardware  trade  has  been  free 
from  this  competition  to  a  certain  extent  but 
the  recent  developments  in  connection  with  the 
sale  of  goods  now  manufactured  by  the  Win- 
chester Repeating  Arms  Company,  and  the 
many  new  lines  to  be  added,  is  causing  wide 
consternation  in  hardware  circles  in  the  United 
States,  and  rumors  are  floating  through  the 
Canadian  hardware  trade  regarding  the  pos- 
sible entry  of  this  company  into  the  Canadian 
field  on  a  different  basis  to  previous  operations. 

BEING    WATCHED    CLOSELY 

The  Winchester  Company  has  been  known 
previously  been  referred  to,  is  receiving  more 
attention  in  hardware  trade  circles  in  the  United 
States  than  any  question  that  has  come  up 
in  recent  years.  Practically  all  branches  of 
the  trade  are  undergoing  a  feeling  of  expectant 
uncertainty  regarding  future  operations  of  the 
company. 

The  Winchester  Company  has  been  known 
to  the  Canadian  hardware  trade  as  a  company 
manufacturing  firearms  and  ammunition,  etc. 
During  the  war  period  this  company  had  a 
force  of  22,000  workers,  with  a  tremendous 
plant,  and  it  is  understood  that  under  the  new 
plans  this  vast  organization  will  be  used  for 
the  manufacture  and  distribution  of  many 
hardware  lines  in  addition  to  the  sporting  goods 
lines  previously  made  by  the  Winchester  Com- 
pany. 

TO     .MAKE    MANY    LINES 

The  new  company  has  heen  chartered  with 
a  capital  of  $30,000,000,  and  it  is  understood 
will  enter  largely  into  the  manufacture  of 
pocket  and  table  cutlery,  razors,  fishing  tackle, 
bait,  edge  tools,  flashlights  and  batteries,  and 
many  other  lines  During  recent  months  the 
Winchester  Company  has  purchased  six  or  seven 
other  manufacturing  firms  who  in  the  past  have 
made  some  of  the  lines  previously  referred  to. 


The  association  of  Mr.  L.  K.  Liggett  as  an 
active  member  of  the  board  of  directors  of  the 
new  company  is  interesting  inasmuch  as 
Mr.  Liggett  is  well-known  through  his  associa- 
tion with  various  chain  drug  store  enterprises. 
It  is  intimated  that  the  American  Tobacco 
Company  is  also  interested  in  the  reorganized 
Winchester  Company  and  that  in  the  new  plans 
which  are  now  being  developed  some  of  the 
distribution  methods  in  tobacco  and  drug  chain 
store  systems  will  be  applied  to  the  merchan- 
dising of  Winchester  products. 

Mr.  Liggett  is  reported  to  have  said  that 
it  is  his  intention  to  make  the  hardware  men  as 
efficient  as  the  drug  men. 

OPEN    OWN    STORES 

While  HARDWARE  AND  METAL  is  not 
in  possession  of  an  official  outline  of  the  new 
plans  it  is  understood  that  the  Winchester  Com- 
pany will  open  their  own  stores  in  the  larger 
retail  centres  and  appoint  special  dealer  repre- 
sentatives in  all  the  smaller  towns  and  cities. 
It  is  stated  that  exclusive  agencies  will  be  given 
in  the  smaller  towns  and  cities  in  return  for  an 
undertaking  from  the  merchant  that  he  will 
sell  Winchester  products  to  the  exclusion  of 
other  competitive  lines,  that  he  will  take  a  cer- 
tain amount  of  stock  in  the  new  company,  and 
that  he  will  purchase  an  initial  stock  of  goods 
amounting  to  a  stated  amount.  It  is  under- 
stood that  each  of  these  stockholders,  who  are 
also  acting  as  special  renresentatives  of  the  Win- 
chester Company,  will  receive  an  advantage  of 
15  per  cent,  special  discount  on  the  products 
made  by  the  Winchester  Company.  These  mer- 
chants, it  is  stated,  will  purchase  their  goods 
direct  from  the  Winchester  Company  rather 
than  through  jobbers,  and  it  is  also. stated  that 
flic  retailers  owning  stock  in  the  new  company 
will,  on  some  lines  at  least,  purchase  the  goods 
on  equally  as  favorable  terms  as  the  jobbers. 
Plans  have  heen  made  for  a  merchandising 
service,  and  it  is  understood  that  various  adver- 
tising helps  will  be  supplied  to  dealer  represen- 
tatives of  the  Winchester  Company,  and  that 
the  dealers  will  pay  for  advertising  material 
thus  supplied. 

No  doubt  further  details  regarding  the  sales 
plans  of  the  company  will  be  made  known  in 
the  near  future  hut  at  the  present  time  Win- 
ehestel  store  plans  are  the  centre  of  a  big  dis- 
cission  in  hardware  trade  circles. 


44 


January   3,   1920 


EVENTS  IN   THE  TRADE 


Business  Changes 

Wapella,  Sask. — A.  M.  Nairn,  formerly 
of  the  Earl  Grey  Hardware  Ltd.,  Earl 
Grey,  Sask.,  has  purchased  the  hard- 
ware business  of  Kidd  and  Clement. 

Melbourne,  Ont. — Robert  Hardy,  of 
London,  Ont.,  and  A.  J.  Staples,  of  Mel- 
bourne, have  purchased  the  hardware 
business  of  Ramey  &  Pettit.  Possession 
March  1. 


New  Firms 

J.  Nicoll  has  opened  a  hardware  store 
at  Battleford,  Sask. 

The  Howden  Hardware  Co.  has  open- 
ed for  business  at  30-32  Macdonnell  St., 
Guelph,   Ont. 

John  R.  Yeomans  &  Son  have  leased 
premises  in  the  Tye  Block  ialt  Thames- 
ville,  Ont.,  and  plan  to  open  a  hardware 
store  and  tinsmithing  business  Febru- 
ary 1st. 


three  cars  of  paint  and  ten  oars  of  oil, 
and  badly  damaged  two  gasoline  tanks, 
at  an  estimated  loss  of  $75, 060. 


Obituary 


The  death  occurred  at  Cleveland,  Ohio, 
of  Ralph  B.  Hamilton,  for  the  past  20 
years  manager  of  the  Packard  Electric 
Company,  of  St.  Catharines,  Ont.  He 
was  also  president  of  the  Carey  Safe 
Company,  of  Buffalo;  the  Packard  Fuse 
Company,  the  Canadian  Standard  Pro- 
ducts Company  and  the  Precision  Manu- 
facturing Company,  all  of  St.  Cathar- 
ines. Three  months  ago  he  left  to  be- 
come production  manager  of  the  Nation- 
al Safe  Company  at  Cleveland. 


Personals 

Roderick  McAskill  has  been  appointed 
manager  of  the  implement  and  auto- 
mobile section  of  the  hardware  firm  of 
McAskill  Adamson,  Ltd.,  which  recently 
purchased  the  business  of  the  Williams 
Hardware  Co.,  Ltd.,  at  Gladstone,  Mani- 
toba. 


Fire  Losses 

In  the  recent  big  blaze  at  Chicoutimi, 
Quebec,  the  premises  of  Adelbert  Le- 
pine,  hardware  and  tinsmithing,  were 
badly  damaged. 

In  a  fire  which  swept  ipart  of  the 
biuisnesis  section  at  Athens,  Ont.,  the 
premises  of  George  Flood,  tinsmith, 
were  destroyed. 

Fire,  which  started  in  the  storage 
p'Jant  of  the  Canadian  Oil  Company,  at 
Fairview,  just  outside  of  Halifax,  de- 
stroyed     the      warehouses,      containing 


Trade  Notes 

The  Northern  Iron  and  Equipment 
Co.  has  been  registered  at  Montreal. 

R.  A.  McDade,  Parrsboro,  N*S., 
hardware,  has  assigned  to  A.  W. 
Mofflatt. 

The  Masurvey  Battery  Co.,  Brampton, 
Ont.,  has  awarded  contracts  for  a  $30,000 
extension  to  its  factory. 

The  Western  Gay  Double  Tread  Tire 
Co.,  Ltd.,  of  Saskatoon,  has  assigned  to 
the  Imperial  Canada  Trust  Co.,  Ltd. 

The  Canada  Pole  and  Shaft  Company, 
Ltd.,  has  been  granted  permission  to 
change  its  name  to  General  Forgings 
and  Stampings  Ltd. 

George  G.  Peck,  of  Cohocton,  N.Y., 
hardware  merchant,  is  one  of  the  in- 
corporators of  March  Gold,  Ltd.,  a  $1,- 
500,000  company,  which  has  just  been 
granted  a  provincial  charter. 

The  Canadian  National  Carbon  Com- 
pany, Ltd.,  and  the  Prest-O-Lite  Com- 
pany of  Canada,  Ltd.,  Toronto,  have 
jointly  purchased  a  site  on  which  large 
new  factories  are  to  be  erected  as  soon 
as  possible. 


Montreal  News 

Many  of  the  travelling  staffs  of  the 
various  wholesale  hardware  houses  spent 
the  holidays  in  Montreal. 

C.  A.  Thomas,  sales  manager  in  On- 
tario for  the  Sherwin-Williams  Company 
of  Canada,  Ltd.,  spent  the  holiday  season 
in  Montreal. 

Georjre  E.  Knr«-h,  Quebec  representa- 
tive for  Lewis  Bros.,  Ltd.,  spent  part  of 
the  holiday  in  Montreal,  his  family  ac- 
companying; him. 


Western  News 

Emlployees  of  the  wholesale  hardware 
firm  of  Merrick  Anderson  were  in  re- . 
ceipt,  during  the  week,  of  cheques,  as  a 
Christmas  remembrance  from  the  man- 
agement. Replies,  in  acknowledgment 
of  the  distribution,  were  received  by 
the  directors,  both  from  the  employees 
at  the  Bannatyne  Avenue  building  and 
from  the  paper  plant  in  Elm  wood. 


News  From  Regina 

Frederick  Ham,  of  Armstrong,  Smyth 
&  Dowswell,  Ltd.,  has  joined  the  travel- 
ling staff  of  the  Marshall  Wells  Co.,  Ltd., 
Winnipeg. 


J.  W.  Peart,  of  Peart  Bros.,  has  been 
elected  alderman  for  a  two-year  term. 

H.  Rothermil,  of  the  Wood  Hardware 
Co.,  is  city  traveller  for  Lynch,  Parker 
and  Plewes. 

W.  Parker,  of  the  Canadian  Steel  and 
Wire  Co.,  Winnipeg,  was  in  the  city  on 
business  recently. 

Thomas  Donald,  of  Peart  Bros.,  has 
accepted  a  position  as  traveller  with  the 
Marshall   Wells  Co.,  Winnipeg. 


Du  Ponts  Deny  Unfair 
Trade  Practise  Charge 

Wilmington,  Del.— The  Du  Pont  Com- 
pany denies  that  it  has  adopted  any 
practice  or  method  of  unfair  competition 
in  the  Springfield,  111.,  district,  as  has 
been  alleged  against  it  before  the 
Federal  Trade  Commission.  The  com- 
pany states  that  contracts  are  not  made 
upon  the  condition  that  coal  producers 
shall  not  use  powder  manufactured  by  a 
competitor,  but  are  simply  contracts 
to  supply  those  producers  with  powder 
required  for  their  needs. 


Will  Make  Cooking 

and  Heating  Devices 

On  January  1,  the  Manufacturing 
Departments  of  Heating  Devices  of  the 
Canadian  General  Electric  Co.,  Limited, 
and  the  organizations  of  the  Canadian 
Hotpoint  Electric  Heating  Co.,  Limited, 
and  .the  Hughes  Electric  Heating  Com- 
pany, all  of  Toronto,  Ontario,  were  con- 
solidated to  form  a  new  company, 
known  as  the  Canadian  Edison  Appli- 
ance Co.,  Limited, 

The  new  Canadian  enterprise  will 
continue  to  manufacture  the  complete 
line  of  heating  and1  cooking  devices  thait 
have  been  manufactured  in  the  past  by 
the  above-named  companies.  The  new 
company  states  that  its  purpose  is  to 
sell  all  the  complete  lines,  and  carry  on 
the  policies  of  the  above  companies,  in 
the  broadest  possible  manner. 

J.  R.  Richardson  is  the  managing 
director,  F.  M.  Dusenberry,  sales  man- 
ager, F.  R.  Goldsmith,  works  manager, 
R.  S.  Morgan,  secretary  and  treasurer, 
and  W.  P.  Young,  purchasing  agent — 
all  of  Toronto,  Ontario. 

Early  in  1920,  the  Canadian  Edison 
Appliance  Co.,  Limited,  will  open  up 
their  new  works  in  Stratford,  Ont.  The 
general  offices  are  now  situated  at  25 
Brant  Street,  Toronto,  Ont. 


January  3,  1920 


HARDWARE    AND    METAL 


45 


Message  From  the  President 


To  Member®  of  the  Ontario  Retail  Hardware 
.  Issocidtion 

With  the  advent  of  the  New  Year  I  desire 
to  congratulate  the  members  of  our  Association 
on  the  success  which  we,  as  an  Association  of 
retail  hardwaremen,  have  attained  during  the 
gear  1919  just  closed. 

During  the  fast  year  the  Association  has 
shown  the  greatest  gain  in  membership  in  the 
history  of  our  organization,  and  the  various 
service  branches  of  our  Association  have  been 
conducted  in  a  practical  and  able  manner. 

The  Executive  officers,  and  our  energetic 
Secretary  have  devoted  valuable  time  and 
thought  to  the  affairs  of  the  Association,  with 
highly  beneficial  results  to  the  Association  as 
a  whole. 

Our  coming  convention-  to  be  held  at  Hamil- 
ton. Feb.  Ki-20,  promises  to  excel  all  previous 
records.  The  plans  for  the  convention  are  pro- 
gressing favorably,  and  the  complete  program 
will  be  announced  in  the  near  future. 

Arrangements  for  the  accommodation  of 
visitors,  and,  provision  for  display  space  for  ex- 


hibitors will,  I  am  sure,  be  appreciated  by 
them,  and  will  meet  with  the  approval  of  the 
members  of  the  Association.  The  year  1920  will 
bring  many  new  problems  for  the  retail  hard- 
ware trade,  and  I  urge  each  member  of  the 
Association  to  do  his  part  in  making  our  Asso- 
ciation bigger  and  better,  and  a  source  of 
strength  for  the  retail  trade. 

In  conclusion,  I  urge  every  hardwareman 
to  attend  our  next  convention,  and  take  part  in 
the  discussions.  The  exhibits  will  prove  of  great 
interest  to  visitors,  and  the  bonds  of  friendship 
formed  at  the  convention  will  have  a  good  effect 
on  each  of  us  for  many  months  after  the  con- 
vention is  over. 

That  the  year  1920  will  bring  you  un- 
bounded health,  happiness  and  prosperity  is 
the  sincere  tvish   of 

ALF.  J.  WRIGHT, 

President  Ontario  Retail  Hardware 
Association 

Hamilton,  Can., 

December  31,  1919. 


Closer  Trade  Relations  Planned  Between 
Canada  and  France 


At  a  complimentary  dinner  given  him 
in  Montreal,  Lieut. -Col.  Hercule  Barre, 
and  who  was  recently  appointed  Can- 
adian Trade  Commissioner  to  Paris,  ex- 
pressed his  great  confidence  as  to  future 
developments  of  trade  between  Canada 
and  France. 

Lieut. -Col.  Barre,  in  addressing  his 
fellow  members  of  the  Chambre  de  Com- 
merce, referred  to  the  result  of  his  con- 
tact with  various  Canadian  cities  since 
his  appointment  and  whither  he  had 
cone  to  investigate  certain  conditions. 
He  has  also  been  in  contact  with  the 
Board  of  Trade  and  Commerce  at  Ot- 
tawa. One  of  the  important  things 
which  he  had  observed  was  that  the  De- 
partment of  Trade  and  Commerce  did 
not  seem  to  be  well  informed  on  the 
matter  of  Quebec  industries.  This  was 
due,  in  part,  through  the  lack  of  Quebec 


in  not  furnishing  Ottawa  with  sufficient 
data  and  reports,  and  with  Ontario  the 
case  was  different,  as  complete  data  and 
reports  were  supplied. 

Will   Investigate  Condition 

Col.  Barre  pointed  out  to  his  audience 
that  one  of  his  first  duties  when  he 
reached  France  would  be  that  of  visit- 
ing devastated  areas  to  find  out  at  first 
hand  what  Canada  might  be  in  a  position 
to  supply  to  that  country  in  the  work  of 
re-establishment.  Col.  Barre  added  that 
he  believed  that  the  .name  of  Canada  was 
most  popular  in  France  to-day,  and  that 
this  of  course  would  be  an  important 
point  in  connection  with  trade  develop- 
ment. Col.  Barre  appears  to  be  very 
enthusiastic  regarding  the  development 
of  trade  relations  in  the  immediate  fu- 
ture. 


Sees  Great  Trade  Possibilities  in  India 

Lieut.  H.  T.  Adams,  of  Edmonton,  Tells  of  Opportunities  for 

Canadian  Manufacturers — Says  Study  of  Export 

Needs  Would  be  Profitable 


LIEUT.  H.  T.  L.  ADAMS,  of  Ed- 
monton, who  has  been  for  some 
time  attached  to  the  Indian  Army, 
was  in  Montreal  on  his  way  home.  Mr. 
Adams,  while  overseas,  was  observant 
•as  to  the  possibility  of  developing  trade 


with  the  Indian  Empire.  He  believes 
there  is  a  great  opportunity  there  for 
Canadian  manufacturers  and  that  a  close 
study  of  the  needs  of  the  country  would 
reveal  these  possibilities.  Mr.  Adams 
made  the  observations  that  some  of  the 


attention  which  is  now  being  paid  ex- 
port to  the  other  European  countries 
might  well  ibe  diverted  to  India. 

Among  the  lines  for  which  there  would 
be  a  ready  sale  and  an  extensive  demand 
are  machinery  of  various  kinds,  parti- 
cularly for  the  extension  of  irrigation 
work,  and  for  railway,  electrical  and 
mining  purposes.  In  addition  to  these 
lines  there  also  would  be  a  big  demand 
for  textile  manufacturing  machinery  and 
for  automobiles  and  motorcycles. 
Prompt  Action  Needed 

Mr.  Adams  pointed  to  the  fact  that  the 
United  States  was  at  present  getting 
a  great  deal  of  trade  in  India.  In  this 
connection,  he  quoted  figures  to  show 
that  imports  from  United  States  had 
been  greater  than  those  from  Canada  in 
the  years  1917  and  1918. 

One  of  the  important  points  developed 
by  the  speaker  was  that  with  regard  to 
the  superficial  knowledge  possessed  by 
the  average  business  man  in  India  re- 
garding the  geosrraphical  size  of  the 
Dominion  of  Canada.  This  would  leave 
room  for  an  educational  campaign  re- 
garding1 the  size  of  this  country  and  its 
importance. 

♦ 

DEATH  OF  S.  C.  JOHNSTON 

The  death  occurred  at  his  home  in 
Racine,  Wisconsin,  of  Saimuel  C.  John- 
ston, president  of  the  S.  C.  Johnston 
&  Son  Co.,  manufacturers  of  floor  wax 
and  oiis.  He  was  86  years  old,  and, 
prior  to  becoming  o  manufacturer,  con- 
ducted a  bookstore. 


46 


HARDWARE    AND    METAL 


January  3,   1920 


Board  of  Commerce  May  Investigate  Any 
Abuses  of  the  Customs  Tariff 

Statement  Issued  Explains  Attitude  of  the  Board  in  Regard  to 

All  Merchandising  Probes — Cement  is  Cited  as  Example 

of  Customs  Tariff  Regulations 


REASONS  why  the  Board  of  Com- 
merce is  conducting  investigations 
into  various  commodity  prices  and 
its  powers  in  connection  with  any  such 
probes  are  set  forth  in  a  statement 
which  has  been  issued  by  the  Board  in 
connection  with  an  inquiry  which  may 
be  made  into  alleged  customs  abuses,  as 
follows: — 

The  following  statement  was  handed  out 
by  the  Board  of  Commerce  this  morn- 
ing: 

A  recent  pronouncement  by  this  board  of 
its  intention  to  investigate  and  discover 
whether  or  not  the  customs  tariff  was  be- 
ing taken  advantage  of  to  unfairly  en- 
hance prices  of  necessaries  of  life  seems 
to  have  been  so  misunderstood  as  to  cause 
some  wonder,  and  express  their  wonder 
whether  this  board's  investigation  would 
render  unnecessary  a  said  to  be  intend- 
ed investigation  of  the  tariff  by  a  Govern- 
ment appointed  tariff  commission. 

Investigate   Any   Abuse 

This  board  is  not  concerned  with  the 
excellence  or  propriety  of  any  form  of 
customs  tariff,  whether  one  for  protec- 
tion, for  revenue,  or  otherwise.  It  will 
take  the  tariff  as  it  finds  it,  presuming 
neither  to  criticize  nor  to  commend  the 
political  wisdom  of  those  who  framed  it. 
So  taking  it,  the  board  will  endeavor  to 
discover  whether  any  are  abusing  it  or 
perverting  it  to  a  non-intended  end — the 
exaction  under  its  cover  of  greater  pro- 
fits than,  without  it,  if  the  competing  par- 
ties were  on  even  terms,  the  abusing  or 
perverting  party  would  have  been  enabled 
to  exact. 

Provides   Machinery 

The  object  of  section  24  of  the  Com- 
bines and  Fair  Prices  Act,  1919,  is,  in  the 
judgment  of  this  board,  to  provide  a  ma- 
chinery wherehy  the  Governor-in-Council 
may  be  apprised  by  and  through  this  board 
whether  "the  making  or  taking  of  unfair 
profits  on  any  necessary  of  life  is  facili- 
tated by  the  duties  of  customs  imposed  on 
such  necessary  of  life,"  whereupon  "the 
Governor-in-Council  may  direct  either  that 
such  necessary  of  life  be  admitted  into 
Canada  free  of  duty,  or  that  the  duty 
thereon  be  reduced  to  such  amount  or 
rate  as  will,  in  the  opinion  of  the  Gov- 
ernor-in-Council, give  the  public  the 
benefit    of    reasonable     competition." 

The  Governor-in-Council  can  act  upon 
the  result  on  an  investigation  by  this 
board  only  in  cases  where  this  board  has 
investigated.  To  know  whether  unfair 
profits  have  or  have  not  been  taken  or 
facilitated,  this  board  must  first  investi- 
gate. To  ever  become  apprised  so  that 
he  may  act  under  Section,  this  board  must 
h'ave  (a)  investigated  and  (b)  reported  to 
the  Governor-General-in-Council.  The  rea- 
son for  a  report  at  all  is  so  that  the  Gov- 
ernor-General-in-Council, if  he  pleases,  may 
act.  This  board  reports  to  the  Governor- 
in-Council  as  to  tariff  effect  only,  because  it 
cannot  itself  act.  When  exercising  its  or- 
dinary jurisdiction  it  does  not  report  to 
him,  because,   by   statute,   it   can   act. 

Board's    Powers 

To  more  clearly  define  the  board's  pow- 
ers   and    intentions,    suppose    a    tariff    com- 


mission were  to  be  sent  out,  that  it  had 
reported,  and  Parliament  had  provided  a 
totally  new  tariff  based  upon  a  totally  dif- 
ferent principle,  whatever  it  may  be,  from 
that  of  the  present  tariff,  this  board's  po- 
sition is  that  Section  24  of  the  Combines 
and  Fair  Prices  Act  would  still  be  there, 
and  apart  from  all  other  powers  of  this 
board,  authorize  reinvestigation  ,as  to 
whether  the  newly  provided  tariff  was  be- 
ing utilized  for  the  purpose  of  unfairly 
enhancing   prices. 

Some  of  those  who  have  impugned  the 
board's  powers  have  thought  it  to  be  neces- 
sary as  well  to  impugn  the  capacity  and 
disposition  of  the  board's  personnel.  Such 
criticisms  as  a  matter  of  practice  the 
board    treats    as    self-answering. 

Abuse  of  Customs 

There  really  can  be  such  a  thing  as  the 
abuse  of  a  customs  tariff,  which  even  a 
protectionist   can    recognize. 

As  illustrating  the  increased  protec- 
tion enjoyed  by  certain  Canadian  manu- 
facturers during  and  since  the  war  owing 
to  (a)  their  competitors  ceasing  to  be  the 
manufacturers  of  Great  Britain,  and  com- 
petition being  with  the  manufacturers  of 
the  United  States,  and  (b)  the  imposition 
of  the  war  tax,  the  following  illustrations 
are   given : 

Effective  protection  prior  to  war,  chief 
competing  country,  Great  Britain — Page 
40,  Item  521  of  the  tariff,  gray  cotton  fab- 
rics, 15  per  cent.  Page  40,  Item  522  of  the 
tariff,  white  or  bleached  cotton  fabrics, 
17%  per  cent.  Page  114,  Item  290  of  the 
tariff,  Portland  Cement,  7c  per  100  lbs., 
24%c  per  bbl. 

Effective  protection  during  and  since 
the  war,  chief  competing  country,  United 
States— Page  40,  Item  521  of  the  tariff, 
gray  cotton  fabrics,  25%  +  7%%  =  32%%,  as 
against  15%.  Page  40,  Item  522  of  the 
tariff,  white  or  bleached  cotton  fabrics, 
25%  +  7%%  =  32%%,  as  against  17%%. 
Page  114,  Item  290  of  the  tariff,  Portland 
Cement,  50  lbs.  35c  +  7%%  on  value  of 
cement,  or  say  15c  total  =  50c,  as  against 
24%%. 

Note. — From  the  first  two  items  there 
has  to  be  deducted  something  (less  than 
2%%)  on  account  of  war  tax  levied  upon 
the  raw  material  used.  Nothing,  however, 
requires  to  be  deducted  from  the  Portland 
Cement,  all  the  raw  material  used  in  the 
manufacture  being  found  in  Canada.  The 
net  results  are  as  follows:  Item  521,  be- 
fore war  15%,  during  war  32%%,  loss 
2%%,  or  30%,  increase  100^.  Item  522, 
before  war  17%%,  during  war  32%%,  loss 
2%%  or  30'i.  increase  71%%.  Item  290,  be- 
fore war  24%%  per  350  lbs.,  50c  per  350 
lbs. 

What  this  board  proposes  to  do  is  to 
trace  and  report  the  effects  of  cases  like 
the  preceding.  If  no  impropriety  is  dis- 
closed it  will  be  well  to  know  that  the 
facts  are   so. 


Ltd.,  capital  $2,300,000,  head  office  To- 
ronto, plans  to  carry  on  a  general  iron 
and  steel  business. 

March  Gold,  Ltd.,  head  office  Toronto, 
capital  $1,500,000,  plans  to  carry  on  a 
general  business  in  treating  and  smelt- 
ing ores  and  metals. 

St.  Thomas  Boxes  Ltd.,  St.  Thomas, 
Ont.,  capital  $20,000,  plans  to  carry  on 
a  general  business  as  manufacturers  of 
paper  and  wooden  boxes. 

Aluminum  Steel  Products  Ltd.,  capital 
$250,000,  head  office  Owen  Sound,  Ont., 
plans  to  manufacture  and  deal  in 
aluminum,  steel  and  bronze  goods. 

The  Wilkins  Automatic  Regulator  Co., 
Ltd.,  capital  $100,000,  head  office  To- 
ronto, plans  to  manufacture  and  deal  in 
automatic  pressure  and  water  regulators, 
also  hardware  and  machine  supplies. 


THE  CARBORUNDUM  COMPANY 

The  Carborundum  Company,  of  Ni- 
agara Falls,  has  issued  a  most  'attrac- 
tive calendar  for  1020.  At  the  top  is 
shown,  in  rich  green,  a  view  of  the 
whirlpool  rapids  and  the  whirlpool  from 
the  De  Veaux  Woods.  As  the  calendar 
is  thirty-six  inches  in  width,  the  illus- 
tration is  an  exceptionally  fine  one,  and 
does  ample  justice  to  one  of  the  finest 
bits  of  natural  scenery  in  America. 
Below  is  the  calendar,  and  at  each  side 
views   of  the  company's   factories. 


J.  H.  WILLIAMS  &  CO. 

J.  H.  Williams  &  Co.,  makers  of 
Superior  Drop-Forgingis  and  Drop- 
Forged  Tool's,  with  works  at  Brooklyn 
and  Buffalo,  N.Y.,  have  jupt  issued  a 
catalogue,  4  by  6  in.,  160  pages,  fully  il- 
lustrating and  describing  their  standard 
stock  specialties.  These  include  several 
new  lines  of  goods,  viz.,  "Agrippa" 
Tuirning-Tool  Holders,  Set  Screw  Pat- 
tern, "Agrippa"  Boring  Tool  Posts, 
"Vulcan"  Forged  Cutter  Tool  Holders, 
and  several  new  assortments  or  sets  of 
Drop-Forged  Wrenche's.  The  book  con- 
tains, also,  a  description  of  the  dirop- 
forging  process,  in  very  simple,  non- 
technical style,  for  the  benefit  of  those 
not  conversant  with  its  detail's.  Readers 
of  HARDWARE  AND  METAL  who 
desire  copies  of  the  catalogue,  may  ob- 
tain same  upon  request. 


INCORPORATIONS 

Coulter  Wood  Products,  Ltd.,  capital 
$50,000,  head  office  Hamilton,  Ont.,  plans 
to  manufacture  and  deal  in  wood  pro- 
ducts  of  all  kinds. 

Baldwin's  Canadian  Steel  Corporation 


At  tlhe  annual  meeting  of  the  Com- 
mercial Travelers'  Association  of  Can- 
ada, held  in  Toronto,  E.  Fielding,  of  E. 
Fieldinlg  &  Son,  dealers  -in  linseed  oil 
and  tuirpenltine,  was  ire-elected  as 
treateurer. 


January  3,   1920 


HARDWARE    AND    METAL 


47 


Montreal  Court  Decides  Against  Metal 

Company 

Judge  Holds  That  Defendant  Did  Not  Act  in  Good  Faith  at  the 
Time  Bound  by  Contract  Made  With  Plaintiff 


AN  action  was  decided  in  the 
Superior  Court  of  Montreal  by 
Mr.  Justice  Guerin,  relative  to  a 
breach  of  contract  as  between  the  North 
America  Iron  &  Metal  Company  and 
Winter  G.  Garrett,  manufacturer  in  New 
York,  $2,000  damages  being-  awarded. 

The  action  of  Garrett  was  for  $5,250. 
He  claims  that  on  March  20,  1918,  the 
defendant  accepted  an  order  from  him, 
and  agreed  to  deliver  in  New  York, 
15,000  pounds  of  high-speed  steel  scrap, 
and  for  which  he  undertook  to  pay  35 
cents  a  pound  cash,  on  delivery.  When 
the  steel  arrived  in  New  York  it  was 
not  delivered  to  him,  but  plaintiff  claim- 
ed that  the  defendant  sold  it  to  the 
Crucible  Steel  Company  of  America  for 
$4,856.25.  He  needed  the  metal  prompt- 
ly, in  order  to  fill  a  war  contract  he  had 
with  the  United  States  Government, 
and  so,  through  defendant's  failure  to 
execute  her  agreement,  he  said  he  lost 
a  profit  of  at  least  100  per  cent,  on  the 
order.  His  claim  for  $4,250  was  based 
en  this  percentage. 

Denies  The  Charge 

The  defendant  denied  that  there  had 
been  any  breach  of  contract.  The  metal 
was  forwarded  to  New  York,  she  claims, 
for  acceptance  by  the  plaintiff,  subject 
to  his  inspection.  Having  neglected  to 
make  the  inspection,  when  notified  of 
the  arrival  of  the  steel,  she  sold  it  to 
another  party. 


The  Judge  Differs 

In  summing  up  the  case,  Mr.  Justice 
Guerin  said  that  the  evidence  establish- 
ed that  the  steel  was  sold  to  the  Cruci- 
ble Steel  Company  actually  before  it 
reached1  New  York.  The  circumstances 
convinced  him  that  defendant  had  not 
acted  in  good  faith  at  the  time  she  was 
bound1  by  the  contract  made  with  the 
plaintiff.  He,  therefore,  argued  that 
she  was  liable  to  plaintiff  in  damages. 
The  measure  of  damages,  according  to 
the  jurisprudence  of  this  province,  was 
the  difference  between  the  price  stipu- 
lated in  the  contract  and  the  market 
price  of  the  goods  at  the  place  of  deliv- 
ery, and  which  was,  in  this  case,  New 
York. 

In  this  case,  damages  could  not  be 
measured  by  this  standard,  as,  owing  to 
conditions  arising  out  of  the  war,  there 
was  no  market  at  the  time  in  New  York, 
and  plaintiff  had  to  come  to  Montreal  to 
get  his  steel  scrap.  Proceeding,  there- 
fore, to  assess  the  damages  in  accord- 
ance with  the  actual  circumstances  of 
the  case,  Mr.  Justice  Guerin  found  that 
defendant  was  liable  to  pay  to  plaintiff 
a  sum  of  $2,000,  to  indemnify  him  for 
the  loss  caused  through  her  failure  to 
execute  the  contract  sued  upon.  Judg- 
ment was  rendered  accordingly,  with 
costs  of  the  action  against  plaintiff  and 
the  interest  on  the  amount  of  the  judg- 
ment, as  from  July  12,  1918. 


Low  Tariff  Forces  in  Saskatchewan 

Not  To  Be  Divided  In  Coming  Battle 


REGINA,  SASK.— The  .low  tariff 
forces  are  not  to  be  divided.  This 
fs  assured  now,  because  the  Lib- 
eral executive  of  the  Federal  seat  of 
Maple  Creek,  which  is  now  represented 
by  J.  A.  Maharg,  president  of  the  Sas- 
katchewan Grain  Growers'  Association, 
has  decided  against  placing  a  Liberal 
candidate  in  the  field  at  the  next  gen- 
eral elections,  and  supports  a  policy  of 
giving  right  of  way  and  a  clear  field  to 
the  new  party  forming  under  the  au- 
spices of  the  farmeris  on  the  platform  of 
the  Canadian  Council  of  Agriculture. 
The  situation  has  been  watched  with 
keen  interest  by  business  men  all  over 
the  province. 

A  statement  which  has  been  issued 
emphasizes  that  the  entire  Liberal  ex- 
ecutive, which  was  elected  a  year  ago 
at  the  annual  convention,  has  decided 
on  this  course  because  they  believe  that 
the  platform  of  the  Liberal  party  and 
the  Canadian  Council  of  Agriculture  are 
identical  in  principle,  and,  as  Liberate, 
they  are  committed  to  principles  rather 


than  to  a  mere  party  name,  and  are 
most  concerned  in  securing  the  triumph 
of  these  principles.  Being  anxious 
that  the  low  tariff  forces  shall  not  be 
divided,  the  Liberal  executive  has,  con- 
sequently, favored  giving  the  right  of 
way  to  the  political  movement,  as  this, 
they  believe,  is  the  wisest  course  to 
follow  in  the  best  interests  of  the  coun- 
try. The  statement  concludes  as  fol- 
lows: 

"In  thus  vacating  the  field  for  the 
new  party,  this  executive  extends  to 
the  Grain  Growers'  committee  its  very 
best  wishes  for  their  full  and  perma- 
nent siuecens,  good  wishes  tempered 
with  no  jealousy,  and  no  regrets  that 
the  burden  of  keeping  up  the  fight  for 
the  principles  has  been  shifted  to  other 
shoulders.  If  the  new  party  can  -so 
awaken  publ'ic  sentiment  as  to  cause 
the  work  to  fall  on  the  many  instead 
of  the  few,  they  will  have  accomplished 
something  in  itself  very  much  worth 
while." 


Sheffield  Cutlers 

Form  New  Organization 

SHEFFIELD,      ENGLAND.— Half     a 

dozen  firms  in  the  Sheffield  cutlery  trade 
have  formed  an  association,  with  a  view 
to  joint  practical  action,  so  far  as  their 
interests  are  identical.  This  will  entail 
the  running  of  a  factory  for  the  making 
of  parts  needed  by  members  of  the  or- 
ganization. It  leaves  the  individual  firms 
free  to  proceed  on  their  own  lines  in 
the  competitive  markets,  but  renders 
them  the  aid.  of  co-operative  action  in 
the  manufacturing  stages. 


Sees  Record  Trade 

Coming  in  Automobiles 

Of  special  interest  to  every  hardware 
merchant  who  sells  automobile  acces- 
sories, are  the  remarks  of  A.  L.  Ormrod, 
chairman  of  the  Dunlop  Rubber  Com- 
pany, at  the  annual  meeting  held  in 
London,  England..  Discussing  the  out- 
look for  the  future  in  the  automobile 
business  in  America,  he  stated  that  the 
output  of  cars  for  1919  was,  approxim- 
ately, 6,250,000.  This  number,  he  said, 
would,  n'o  dciulbt,  be  very  greatly  in- 
creased in  1920,  as  everywhere  manu- 
facturers were  taking  steps  to  quicken 
and  increase  their  production,  and  were 
running  far  behind  with  orders.  For 
the  next  two  years  especially,  Mr.  Orm- 
rod predicted  enormous  business.  In 
order  to  meet  this,  he  stated  that  the 
firm  is  embarking  on  extensions  to  its 
holdings,  which  will  eventually  give  it 
100,000  acres  of  rubber  plantation.  Its 
holdings  at  present  produce  3,600,000 
pounds  of  rubber  annually.  By  1935,  it 
was  planned  to  have  a  production  of 
24,000,000  pounds.  The  shareholders 
decided  to  increase  the  company's 
capital  by  £1,000,000,  making  it  $7,500,- 
000. 


RECORD  SALES 

Regina,  Sask. — Skating  was  never  so 
popular  in  the  history  of  this  city,  and 
one  result  has  been  to  practically  clean 
hardware  merchants  out  of  their  stocks 
of  skates  and  hockey  sticks.  There  has 
been  a  record  sale  of  skating  coats  also. 

A  skating  club  has  been  formed  and 
a  great  many  of  the  members  have  pur- 
chased waltz  and  figure  skates  so  that 
they  can  waltz  on  the  ice  to  the  accom- 
paniment of  music.  The  opening  of  a 
large  stadium  has  also  been  a  factor  in 
increasing  the  sale  of  skates.  At  the 
present  time  it  is  difficult  to  obtain 
skates  here. 


Frederick  Moore,  of  the  Hamilton 
Stove  and  Heater  Co.,  Hamilton,  is  call- 
ing on  the  trade  in  this  district. 

Robert  Watt,  formerly  of  Cadillac, 
Sask.,  has  joined  the  sales  staff  of 
Armstrong,  Smyth  "and  Dowswell,  Ltd. 


January   3,   1920 


.1.1.1:1.1 1 1  i.f  1 1 1 1 1 1 !.: :  1 1 1 1 1.1  [.i  1:1  i:i:i;iL[iKiiiiiii!i;iLiii][;iiiiiii;i:iiLin:i:i:i:[:i;i:i;ni;Li:i:i:i;i:i:!ii!iii:iii:i!]iiiiiiii 


MANY  BARONS  OF  BUSINESS 

WERE  HUMBLE  PIONEERS 

Many  Men  Have  Won  Success  by  Leaving  the  Beaten 

Track — Career  of  C.  A.  Stone,  of  Stone  &  Webster, 

a  Striking  Example  of  Business  Courage 


FORTUNE  can  rarely  be  over- 
taken by  following  the  beaten 
track.  Most  of  the  notable  suc- 
cesses in  business  and  finance  have 
been  won  by  those  who  either  opened 
entirely  new  paths  or  greatly  broad- 
ened and  developed  old  ones. 

John  D.  Rockefeller  was  the  first 
to  grasp  and  carry  out  on  a  large 
scale  the  idea  of  combining  many 
small  concerns  into  one  powerful  cor- 
poration. E.  H.  Gary  did  the  same 
thing  on  a  smaller  scale  in  steel  in 
the  early  days,'  and  so  did  Charles 
M.  Schwab  later.  Henry  Ford,  John 
N.  Willys,  William  C.  Durant  and 
other  forward-looking  stalwarts  jump- 
ed into  the  automobile  arena  and  de- 
veloped it  from  an  infant  industry  to 
one  of  the  most  important  in  the 
country.  Thomas  A.  Edison,  Alexan- 
der Graham  Bell  and  Theodore  N.  Vail 
were  all  pioneers.  Frank  W.  Wool- 
worth  made  a  fortune  by  seizing  and 
holding  on  to  a  new  method  of  mer- 
chandizing. Julius  RosenwaM  did  the 
same  thing. 

Henry  C.  Frick  took  hold  of  the 
coke  business  when  it  was  in  its  swad- 
dling clothes  and  made  of  it  a  giant. 
George  Eastman  transformed  photo- 
graphy from  the  complicated  play- 
thing of  the  few,  so  simplified  and 
cheapened  it  that  he  brought  it  within 
the  reach  of  all.  John  N.  Patterson 
did  something  similar  with  the  cash 
register.  William  H.  Nichols  made 
un  his  mind  to  become  a  manufacturer 
of  chemicals  because  he  saw  that  the 
field  could  be  tilled  with  greater 
scientific  knowledge  and  to  more 
profitable  account  than  ever  before. 
E.  C.  Simons,  of  hardware  fame,  and 
James  B.  Duke,  the  tobacco  king,  took 
hold  of  existing  industries  but  de- 
veloped them  along  new  and  very 
much  broader  lines<  Minor  C.  Keith 
penetrated  Central  America  and 
achieved  fame  and  fortune  by  his  la- 
bors to  transform  it  from  a  fever- 
stricken  waste  to  a  tronical  fruit 
garden.  Frank  A.  Vanderlip  organiz- 
ed and  developed  a  new  phase  of  na- 
tional banking  and  more  recently  con- 
ceived  an    improved    method    of   con- 


ducting   international,    financial    and 
commercial   operations. 

Charles  A.  Stone  also  made  his 
mark  originally  by  venturing  into  a 
little-known  field,  according  to  B.  C. 
Forbes,  in  "Forbes'  Magazine." 

Born  of  quite  moderately  well-to-do 
parents  at  Newton,  Mass.,  on  January  16, 
1867,  Charles  Augustus  Stone,  after  his 
ordinary  schooling,  entered  the  Massa- 
chusetts Institute  of  Technology.  A 
class  was  being  founded  in  electricity, 
and  among  the  few  who  joined  it  were 
this  youth  and  another,  Edwin  S.  Web- 
ster, also  of  Massachusetts  parentage. 
The  two  became  pals  from  the  day  (in 
1884)  when  they  were  given  adjoining 
seats  at  the  entrance  examination.  They 
were  about  the  same  age,  both  had  had 
a  good  upbringing,  both  were  noted  for 
their  enthusiasm,  both  radiated  optim- 
ism. Both  saw  in  electricity  a  power 
that  would  revolutionize  industry,  and 
both  applied  themselves  to  studying 
every  phase  of  it  with  diligence,  deter- 
mination and  purpose. 

By  and  by  this  Damon  and  Pythias 
friendship  became  one  of  the  features 
of  "Tech."  life.  It  came  to  be  assumed 
by  others  that  they  would  join  forces 
on  entering  the  battle  of  life.  And 
Stone  and  Webster  also  sort  of  under- 
stood  they   would   keep   together. 

On  leaving  college  they  did  not  feel 
justified  in  launching  their  firm  right 
away.  Young  Stone  found  a  $5.80-a- 
week  job  with  an  electrical  welding 
concern  and  contrived,  by  careful  scrap- 
ing to  live  strictly  on  his  income — he 
did  not  want  to  appeal  to  papa  for  aid. 
The  managers  of  the  concern  had  not 
had  the  advantage  of  a  scientific  course 
in  electricity,  and  when  their  young  ap- 
prentice proved  conclusively  that  their 
process  could  not  accomplish  the  re- 
sults they  imagined,  instead  of  being  en- 
couraged to  set  to  work  to  improve  the 
process,  he  was  frowned  upon.  In  this 
instance  it  was  not  a  case  of  a  little 
knowledge  being  a  dangerous  thing,  but 
of  scientifiic  knowledge  being  adjudged 
a  dangerous  thing. 

However,  Stone  was  not  made  of  wob- 
bly, easily-repressed  stuff.  He  soon 
found  an  ideal  place  as  assistant  to  the 
famous  Elihu  Thomson,  chief  engineer 
of  the  General  Electric  Company,  a  man 
who  not  only  was  a  scientist,  but  had 
a  fine  business  brain.  In  this  atmos- 
phere the  young  engineer  found  vent 
for  his  talent  and  his  industry.  The  pri- 
'  vilege  of  working  with  a  master  elec- 
trician like  Thomson  proved  invaluable. 
Here  Stone  not  only  learned  to  apply 
in  practice  the  theories  he  had  learned 
in  school,  but  had  opportunity  to  grasp 
sound  business  principles  which  were  to 


be  applied  with  noteworthy  effectiveness 
throughout  the   young  engineer's   life. 

While  Stone  was  thus  getting  prac- 
tical experience,  young  Webster  was 
learning  the  ways  of  finance  as  a  clerk 
with  Kidder,  Peabody  &  Company,  the 
influential  Boston  banking  firm  of  which 
his  father  was  a  member.  Neither  had 
any  intention,  however,  of  continuing 
long  as  mere  employees.  They  were  am- 
bitious to  strike  out  for  themselves. 
And  presently  they  did. 

"We  both  had  confidence,"  Mr.  Stone 
told  me,  "that  although,  industrially, 
electricity  had  then  made  little  progress, 
it  was  to  become  a  factor  of  tremendous 
importance." 

In  my  heart-to-heart  talks  with 
successful  men  the  importance  of  mak- 
ing friends  is  repeatedly  emphasized. 
If  a  youth  has  made  no  particular  im- 
pression upon  his  fellow  students  or 
upon  his  teachers,  if  he  has  failed  to  be- 
come recognized  as  above  the  mediocre, 
either  as  a  scholar  or  an  athlete,  if  he 
has  not  been  honored  in  any  way  by 
his  classmates,  and  if  in  his  early  busi- 
ness or  professional  career  he  has  not 
been  singled  out  in  any  respect  what- 
ever to  fill  some  honorary  position  in 
the  gift  of  his  friends  or  associates, 
the  deduction  drawn  by  those  in  search 
for  the  right  stamp  of  young  man  is 
that  he  must  be  a  person  of  no  unusual 
personality,  no  conspicuous  force,  no 
ability  to  become  a  leader.  That  Stone 
and  Webster  had  inspired  the  confidence 
of  the  college  authorities  is  reflected  by 
the  fact  that  when  they  opened  their 
humble  office  the  president  of  the  In- 
stitute referred  to  them  all  inquiries 
received  regarding  the  application  of 
electricity   to    industry. 

The  two  young  men — they  had  just 
turned  twenty-one — took  a  step  which 
showed  their  business  acumen;  they  en- 
gaged the  Institute's  two  most  eminent 
professors  as  consulting  engineers.  They 
wisely  reasoned  that  any  important 
business  man  who  might  hesitate  to 
entrust  costly  contracts  to  two  beard- 
less boys  would  have  his  doubts  re- 
moved when  the  dignified  professors  ap- 
peared on  the  scene  as  the  firm's  con- 
sulting engineers.  Incidentally,  also, 
the  young  men  were  sensible  enough  to 
realize  that  they  themselves  did  not 
know  anything,  and  that  the  co-opera- 
tion of  older  heads  would  be  of  mater- 
ial  assistance. 

John  D.  Rockefeller  once  told  me  that 
he  never  had  enough  capital  to  do  all 
the  business  he  wanted  to  handle.  Like 
Rockefeller,  Stone  &  Webster  had  to 
depend  upon  their  gray  matter  rather 
than  upon  their  money,  for  they  had  no 
resources  to  speak  of.  Their  staff  con- 
sisted of  one  bright  office  boy  who,  la- 
menting that  the  office  could  not  boast 
of  a"  typewriter,  and  anxious  to  enhance 
the  standing  and  credit  of  the  firm, 
when  any  client  was  interviewing  the 
partner^  inside  the  partition,  manipulat- 
ed the  door  of  the  small  safe  so  that  it 
would  "click,  click"  a  la  Remington! 
Even  then,  apparently,  Stone  &  Webster 
had  learned  how  to  inspire  loyalty  in 
their  help! 

The  First  Big  Venture 

An  enterprising  paper  manufacturer 
asked     Stone     &     Webster     whether     it 


January  3,  1920 


HARDWARE    AND    METAL 


49 


would  be  possible  to  harness  the  wateis 
of  a  river  fifteen  miles  away,  -convey 
electrical  power  to  his  mills,  and  run  the 
plant  at  less  than  the  cost  for  steam. 
The  engineers  surveyed  the  field,  calcu- 
lated that  1,000  horsepower  would  be 
necessary  and,  although  it  was  a  big 
undertaking,  beset  with  novel  problems, 
they  would  undertake  it.  Like  Edison 
when  he  began  to  install  electric  light 
in  New  York,  the  firm  found  they  had 
to  invent  many  of  the  necessary  tools, 
much  of  the  requisite  machinery  and 
overcome  difficulties  new  to  engineering. 
Both  partners  devoted  their  whole- 
hearted energy  to  the  project,  for  they 
realized  that  Opportunity  had  knocked 
at   their  door. 

When  the  newspapers  and  the  tech- 
nical journals  announced  how  two  youth- 
ful engineers  had  transformed  falling 
waters  into  electric  current  and  set  this 
current  to  running  an  industrial  plant 
miles  away,  many  men  of  affairs  took 
notice.  Investigation  revealed  that  the 
experiment  was  a  complete  success.  The 
fame  of  Stone  &  Webster  spread,  and 
negotiations  for  other  contracts  were 
opened. 

Then  came  the  panic  of  1893.  It 
swept  away  numerous  concerns,  but  it 
was  the  means  of  enabling  Stone  & 
Webster  to  gain  a  sure  and  solid  foot- 
hold. Among  these  who  had  learned  of 
the  capabilities  of  the  two  young  men 
were  a  syndicate  of  bankers  headed  by 
J.  P.  Morgan  &  Company,  and  when  these 
bankers  were  called  upon  to  carry  out 
the  task  of  financing  the  General  Elec- 
tric Company  by  taking  over  all  its 
outside  properties,  including  railway 
and  lighting  plants  in  fifty  cities,  they 
requested  Stone  &  Webster  to  appraise 
the  -worth  of  each  property.  The 
bankers  also  indicated  that  they  would 
be  grateful  if  the  firm  could  help  to 
find  purchasers  for  some  of  the  pro- 
perties. Satisfactory  deals  were  ar- 
ranged in  most  cases,  but  nobody  could 
be  induced  to  buy  the  General  Electric's 
interests  in  Nashville,  Tenn.  Mr.  Stone 
was  the  only  person  who  had  faith  in 
its  potentialities,  and  he  told  the  bank- 
ers how  he  felt.  They  promptly  offered 
it   to    him    for   $60,000. 

Stone  &  Webster  had  no  such  sum 
at  their  command.  The  most  they  could 
corral  was  one-third  of  the  total.  First 
they  sought  to  interest  Boston  bankers 
and  financiers  to  either  join  them  in 
the  venture  or  lend  them  the  balance. 
On  every  side  deaf  ears  were  turned  to 
them.  Next  New  York  was  combed — 
with   the   same    disheartening   result. 

Succeeds  in  Raising  Capital 

Charles  A.  Stone,  however,  had  su- 
preme confidence  in  his  judgment.  He 
knew  the  property  was  a  bargain.  He 
knew  he  could  rehabilitate  it.  He  knew 
it  could  be  turned  into  a  money-maker 
with    skillful   management. 

He  felt  that  he  had  reached  a  turn- 
ing-point in  his  career.  Success  was 
beckoning  to  him  across  a  gulf,  but  to 
bridge  that  gulf  looked  impossible  since 
it  could  be  bridged  only  by  what  they 
didn't  possess,  capital. 

Off  he  went  to  Chicago  in  search  of  a 
sympathetic  capitalist.  At  last  he  pre- 
vailed upon  one,  J.  L.  Harvey,  to  visit 
and  examine  the  property.  Stone  exu- 
berantly pointed  out  its  merits  and  its 
possibilities,  but  do  what  he  might,  he 
could  not  inoculate  Mr.  Harvey  with  en- 
thusiasm. In  his  anxiety  to  attain  his 
end  Stone  was  willing  to  grant  a  large 
share  of  the  prospective  profits.  The 
capitalist  had  no  faith  in  profits  not  yet 
earned,  but  he  was  so  convinced  of  the 
engineer's  trustworthiness  and  ability 
that  he  agreed  to  lend  the  necessary 
$40,000  to  complete  the  purchase. 

Within  five  years  the  $60,000  property 
was  sold  for  more  than  ten  times  that 
amount!  Mr.  Harvey  had  received  his 
money  back,  with  interest,  in  less  than 
a  year,  paid  for  from  earnings. 


Always  Room  at  Top 

"We  want  every  young  fellow  in  our  or- 
ganization to  get  on,"  Mr.  Stone  told  me 
enthusiastically.  "We  believe  in  promo- 
tions. We  believe  in  giving  every  fellow  a 
chance  to  rise  to  the  highest  position  he  is 
capable  of  filling.  Many  of  our  men  draw 
large  salaries,  and  there  is  always  plenty 
of  room  towards  the  top.  We  also  share 
profits  with  those  who  help  us  to  earn 
them.  Each  man  feels  that  he  is  just  as 
much  a  part  of  the  organization  as  Mr. 
Webster   or   myself. 

"Where  corporations  complain  that  it 
is  difficult  to  get  and  keep  the  right  kind 
of  employees  you  will  find  that  the  fault 
usually  lies  with  the  employers  rather  than 
with  the  men  themselves.  The  system  of 
assigning  a  man  to  one  particular  job  and 
trying  to  keep  him  there  year  after  year  as 
if  he  were  an  inanimate  piece  of  machinery 
is  all  wrong.  In  a  democracy  every  man 
should  be  afforded  the  fullest  possible  op- 
portunity to  better  his  rank.  Because  an 
employee  fills  one  position  very  satisfac- 
torily he  should  not  be  penalized  by  being 
kept  there  for  the  rest  of  his  life;  he  should 
be  rewarded  by  being  given  an  Opportunity 
to  fill  some  higher  position  with  equal  sat- 
isfaction. 

Cannot  Steal  Them 

"Not  infrequently  other  concerns  offer 
men  in  our  organization  big  salaries  and 
we  make  it  a  rule  not  to  dissuade  a  man 
from  going  if  he  is  to  better  himself.  Were 
we  employees  instead  of  partners  we  would 
like  our  employers  to  take  a  similar  view. 

"Success  in  life,  to  my  mind,  depends 
very  largely  upon  putting  yourself  in  the 
place  of  those  with  whom  you  are  dealing 
and  trying  to  see  things  through  their 
eyes.  To  do  unto  others  as  you  would  have 
others  do  to  you  is  just  as  applicable  dur- 
ing the  week  as  it  is  on  Sunday.  It  is 
sound  business  sense.  Success  cannot  be 
built  on  ability  unless  it  carries  with  it 
reputation  and  to  gain  a  reputation  you 
have  to  win  it — you  have  to  deserve  it." 

Grew  Rapidly 

The  electrical  engineering  department  of 
their  business  also  grew  rapidly.     It  is  sig- 


nificant that  most  of  their  construction 
work  for  others  has  been  done  on  com- 
mission, their  remuneration  consisting  of  a 
percentage  of  the  total  cost.  The  industrial 
and  transportation  world  years  ago  learned 
that  Stone  &  Webster  could  be  entrusted 
to  carry  out  work  on  these  terms  just  as 
economically  as  if  they  were  doing  it  for  a 
stipulated  contract  price. 

"Every  employee  understands  that  he 
must  do  the  very  best  he  can  to  save  money 
and  achieve  the  right  results  whether  he  is 
working  solely  for  us  or  for  one  of  our 
clients,"  Mr.  Stone  explained  to  me.  "We 
impress  upon  our  men  that  they  can  ad- 
vance themselves  and  advance  the  firm  only 
by  rendering  satisfactory  service  to  those 
we  do  business  for.  No  distinction  is  drawn 
between  work  done  at  our  cost  and  that 
done  at  the  cost  of  clients.  We  urge  our 
employees  always  to  put  themselves  in  the 
other  fellow's  place  and  act  accordingly, 
just  as  we  ourselves  try  to  do  in  our  re- 
lations both  with  our  customers  and  our 
employees." 


FREIGHT    RATES    MAY    AGAIN    BE 
INCREASED 

(Continued  from  page  33) 

to  20  per  cent.,  in  conjunction  with  con- 
ditions such  as  retailers  have  been  face 
to  face  with  for  some  weeks,  shortage 
of  goods,  delays  in  deliveries,  and  so 
on,  might  be  to  further  unsettle  the 
public  as  higher  prices  would  result. 
This  is  not  what  merchants  want  as  it 
is  generally  recognized  that  the  sooner 
business  gets  back  to  somewhat  normal 
conditions  the  better  it  will  be  for  every- 


The  premises  of  W.  A.  Steiper, 
stoves,  tinware,  etc.,  St.  John,  N.B., 
were  damaged1  by  smoke  and  water. 


ONLY  A  QUESTION  OF  METHOD 


-Indianapolis  "News. 


50 

iiiBiiDimiiiiiiifiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 


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January  3,   1920 
[g 


NEW   HARDWARE    GOODS 

OFFERED    TO    CANADIAN    HARDWAREMEN 


WORKRITE  HYDROMETER 

The  Workrite  Manufacturing  Co., 
Cleveland,  Ohio,  are  putting  on  the  mar- 
ket a  hydrometer  outfit  which  they  claim 
is  an  article  that  has  been  needed  for  a 
long  time.  The  set  consists  of  a  one- 
gallon  v/ater  jar,  which  is  lined  around 
the  mouth  with  soft  rubber,  and  a  hydo- 
meter  syringe,  which  has  a  large  pear- 


Hydrometer 
Outfit 

shaped  bulb,  said  to  be  made  from  al- 
most pure  gum,  in  order  to  stand  hard 
vveiair.  The  glass  barrel  is  made  carrot- 
slhape,  in  order  .to  facilitate  its  floating, 
and  the  glass  iis  said  to  be  of  a  thick, 
tough  variety,  mlade  to  stand  bard 
bumps   and  knocks. 

The  manufacturers  claiim  they  have 
designed  tih«e  hydrometer  outfit  for  fast 
and  rough  usage,  necessary  in  battery 
service  stations  and  garages,  and  guar- 
antee their  standard  float. 

They  also  claim  that,  owing  to  the 
rubber-lined  mouth  of  the  water  jar, 
the  'Sytrimge  may  be  let  drop  in  the  jar 
without  doing  any  harm  to  either. 


FAMILY   MOP  WRINGER 

The  Family  Mop  Wringer,  'manufac- 
tured by  the  Bouquet-Brownson  Com- 
pany, Inc.,  St.  Paul,  Minn.,  is  claimed 
by  the  manufacturers  to  be  one  of  the 
most    useful     labor-sabers    around     the 


Mop   Wringer 


home.     Owing  to  the  convenient  size,  it 
is  readily  moved  to  suit  the  operator. 

The  manufacturers  state  that  the 
operation  is  very  'simple,  consisting  of 
one  stationary  roller  and  one  roller 
attached  to  a  spring  treadle,  which 
automatically  springs  open,  so  as  al- 
ways to  be  ready  to  receive  the  mop. 
By  a  pressure  of  the  foot  on  the  treadle, 
it  is  stated,  the  top  roller  binds  on  the 
stationary  roller,  according  to  the 
weight  put  on  the  treadle,  and  the  mop 
is  wrung  by  pulling  through  the  two 
rollers  when  compressed.  The  mop,  it 
is  stated,  is  very  strongly  made,  and  is 
built  for  service. 


CRESCENT  TINY    SCREWDRIVERS 

The  Crescent  Company,  Meriden, 
Conn.,  U.S.A.,  a>re  putting  on  the  mar- 
ket an  assortment  of  screwdrivers 
called  Crescent  Tiny  screwdrivers, 
which  they  claim  are  made  fr.om  high- 
grade  screwdriver  steel  wire,  hand 
forged,  hand  polihhed,  bai-dened  and 
temlpered.  They  also  olaim  that  the 
blade  will  not  turn  in  the  handle  otr  the 
points  of  blades  will  not  easiy  twist  or 
break,  and  that  they  were  designed  for 
use  on  the  following  in  mind:  Type- 
writing macihin'S's,  adding  machines, 
talking  machines,  hewing  machines, 
spct   lights,   door   knobs,   magnetos,  eye 


MynwjjiMBiiwg; 


& 


-UVV.VV-iVlltf 


Screwdrivers 
glasses,  clocks,  watches,  lockn,  guns. 

Thee  have  imitation  rosewood  han- 
dles, with  nickeled  ferrules,  and  are 
packed  in  an  attractive  counter  dispT.ay 
box  containing  one  dozen  assorted 
small,  medium,  and  large  screwdrivers 
in  each  display. 


UNIVERSAL    SAW    SET 

The  Marble  Arms  &  Manufacturing 
Co.,  of  Gladstone,  Michigan,  is  putting 
on  the  market  a  Universal  Saw  Set  for 
which  the  following  claims  are  made: 
This  device  accomplishes  accurate  work 
when  placed  on  any  smooth  surface  and 
the  saw  held  rigidly  in  perfect  line.  Its 
adaptability  to  all  work  makes  it  very 
valuable.     The  adjustable  and  reversible 


Ulllllllllllllla 

set  block  permits  setting  the  saw  for 
hard  or  soft  sawing.  A  combined  set 
and  gauge  makes  but  one  operation 
necessary  to  insure  a  perfect  cutting 
tool.  Two  plungers  are  included,  one 
for  large  and  one  for  small  saws  of 
every  description.  These  plungers  are 
quickly  changed  by  the  aid  of  a  screw 
driver. 

The  Universal  Saw  Set  is  practical  in 
design,  and  made  to  render  years  of 
service.  It  is  adaptable  for  use  in  lum- 
ber camps  and  mills,  as  well  as  by  con- 
tractors, carpenters,  and  anyone  who 
uses  a  saw. 


Thermometers 

Geo.  D.  Dahmer  Hardware,  Conistogo, 
Ont. —Where  could  we  procure  Govern- 
ment-tested  thermometers  ? 

These  may  be  procured  from  Wilder 
Pike  Thermometer  Co.,  Inc.,  Trov,  N.Y. 
— RdHor. 

Marvel  Heater 

Edwards  &  Rose,  Lindsay,  Ont.  — i 
Please  advise  us  who  manufactures  the 
Marvel  Heater? 

Several  firms  make  a  heated  called 
the  Marvel.  The  Gait  Stove  and  Furnace 
Co.,  Ltd.,  Gait.,  Ont..  can  supply  repairs 
for  the  Hnrvel  heater  made  by  them. 
This  heater  was  also  manufactured  by 
the  Canada  Foundries  and  Forgings, 
Lt4.,  Brockville,  Ont.,  who  have  discon- 
tinued its  manufacture  and  cannot  sup- 
ply repairs  for  same. — Editor. 

Imperial  Oak 

J.  M.  Adam,  St.  Marys,  Ont. — Please 

advise  who  makes  the  N>".   514   Imperial 
Oak  at  Merrickville,  Ont. 

The  name  of  the  firm  is:  The  Porci- 
val  Plow  and  Stove  Co.,  Ltd.,  Merrick- 
ville, Ont.— Editor. 


BUYS  CEMENT  PLANT 

Birmingham,  Ala. — The  Atlas  Cement 
Company,  said  to  be  the  second  largest 
concern  in  the  United  States,  has  ac- 
quired control  of  the  Standard  Portland 
Cement  Company  at  Leeds,  in  the 
northeastern  part  of  Jefferson  County, 
and  will  make  extensive  developments 
there,  practically  doubling  its  works. 

The  same  management  as  now  obtains 
at  Leeds  -will  be  continued.  More  than 
$],2-r>0,000  is  involved  in  the  transaction. 


January  Z,  1920 

^^:  i  -  r  i !  ( : : :  i : :  ;i .  ii  J ;  i .  i :  i  i  1 1 1  i  i ,  1 1 1 :  [ :  i  i  i  l  1 1 1  i  l  1 1  j  i  i  i ;  i :  1 1 1 1 1  l  1 1 1 1 1  r  i  <  i .  i .  i .  i ,  i :  i :  i ,  i  i  i ,  i  [  r,  x ,  t :  i :  i :  i :  i :  1 1 1 1  r  1 1 1 :  i :  i :  i ;  i .  i  i  i .  1 1 1 !  I !  i 


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WEEKLY  HARDWARE  MARKET  REPORTS 


STATEMENTS  FROM  BUYING  CENTRES 


51 


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THE  MARKETS  AT  A  GLANCE 


HIGHER  prices  continue  to  affect  many 
hardware  lines  and  very,  important 
changes  are  recorded  this  week.  The 
following  are  some  of  the  most  important: 
Wrought  washers,  clay  picks,  mattocks,  Disston 
saws  and  trowels,  also  some  of  North  Bros.' 
products.  Range  boilers,  cistern,  well  and 
cylinder  pumps,  cast  dampers,  whips,  wrecking 
bars,  wax,  black  and  galvanized  sheets,  pig  lead, 
spelter,  antimony,  tin,  copper,  tennis  racquets, 
lamp  wick,  Easy  bolt  clippers,  hockey  sticks, 
Tucker  alarm  tills;  also  some  lines  of  vises, 
planes,  hand  screws  and  bar  clamps  all  are 
quoted  at  advanced  prices. 


An  advance  in  boiler  tubes  of  from  1  to  3 
cents  is  expected  during  the  first  week  of  the 
New  Year  and  higher  prices  on  brooms,  belting, 
leather  goods,  shellac,  tools,  stoves,  wares, 
cement,  also  brass  hardware  of  various  kinds 
may  be  expected  in  the  near  future. 

Many  manufacturers,  jobbers  and  mer- 
chants are  taking  advantage  of  the  quiet  spell 
during  the  holiday  period  to  take  inventory. 
Jobbers  report  that  shipments  generally  are 
coming  very  slowly  and  some  lines  are  ex- 
hausted. This  is  attributed  to  the  great  scarcity 
of  materials  in  nearly  all  lines. 


MONTREAL  MARKETS 

MONTREAL,  Dec.  31 — Advances  of  importance  have  been 
made  during  the  week,  iron  and  steel  being  the  premier 
item,  and  various  sizes  being  marked  up  ten  cents  per 
100  pounds.  An  added  charge  also  is  made  for  sizes  smaller 
than  3/16  of  an  inch  in  thickness.  Wrought  and  cast  washers 
are  higher  in  price.  Cast  dampers  are  advanced.  Whips  are 
about  twenty  per  cent,  higher.  Crow  and  claw  and  also  wreck- 
ing bars  are  higher.  Plasterers',  brick  and  pointing  trowels 
are  marked  up.  Wax  is  higher  and  very  scarce,  while  black 
and  galvanized  sheets  are  higher.  Pig  lead,  ingot  tin,  copper, 
spelter,  antimony  are  all  marked  up  again.  Stoves  are  on  a 
very  firm  basis  and  may  soon  advance,  while  the  undertone  is 
likewise  strong  on  various  wares.  Chain  prices  may  be  higher 
at  any  time.  The  markets  in  general  are  very  strong.  Tools 
are  tending  higher  as  are  also  brass  hardware  of  various  kinds. 
Most  of  the  jobbers  are  engaged  in  stock-taking.  Holiday  lines 
have  sold  exceedingly  well. 


for  7-8  libs. 
$11.75. 


Claw  'bars   are   quoted    at 


Wrought  and  Cast 

Washers;  Tools  Up 

Montreal.  

WASHERS,  TOOLS.— Advances  are 
effective  for  wrought  washers,  the  dis- 
count being  reduced  from  50  to  45  per 
cent.  Cast  washers,  too,  are  higher  in 
price,  the  new  price  being  6%c  per 
pound.  North  Bros.'  line  of  tools  has 
also  been  advanced  in  price,  the  in- 
crease being  about  12*4  per  cent. 

Dampers  Are  Up; 

Whips  and  Glue 

Montreal. 

DAMPERS,  WHIPS,  GLUE.— Prices 
for  ca<  t  stove  pine  dampers  are  higher, 
with  $15  per  grors  applying  for  5  inch; 
$16.50  for  6  inch;  and  $21  per  gross  for 

7   in. 


Whips  'are  marked  higher,  too,  the 
extent  of  the  increase  averaging  20 
per  cent,  to  30  per  cent. 

Glue  is  higher.  The  makers  have 
issued  a  new  list,  wihich  is  materially 
higher,  and  the  discount,  too,  has  been 
altered  from  25  per  cent,  to  33  1-3  per 
cent.,  making  a  net  advance  to  the 
trade. 

Crowbars,  Picks, 

Trowels  Higher 

Montreal.  

BARS,  PICKS,  TROWELS.— Prices 
for  ercwbars  are  advanced  to  $10  per 
hundred  pound's.  All  kinds  of  clay  and 
rdck  picks,  grub  hoes  and  mattocks  are 
marked  higher.  The  new  prices  for 
c'ay  or  rock  picks  are  $11.50  per  doz. 
ifor  5-6  ]|bfl.;    $12.50   for  6-7,  and   $13.50 


Roofings  Marked 


Ten  Cents  Higher 


Montreal.  ■ 

ROOFINGS. — Prices  are  again  higher 
for  roofing  papers,  and  tthis  is  in  accord 
with  the  tendencies  recently  pointed  out 
in  HARDWARE  AND  METAL,  the  re- 
ports of  last  week  advising  how  strong 
the  market  has  been  for  all  material 
■U'3edl  in  their  manufacture.  The  in- 
crease amounts  to  ten  cents  per  roll. 

Refined  coal  tar  is  selling  at  $8.25 
per  'barrel,  and  crude  coal  tar  at  $7. 

Nails  Are  Steady 

At  Advanced  Rates 

Montreal.  

NAILS  AND  WIRE.— While  there 
has  'been  a  fair  movement  of  nails,  the 
very  cold  weather  conditions'  naturally 
retard  'building  operations  to  an  extent, 
and  still,  if  the  temperatures  are  not 
too  low/  much  building  will  he  done 
this  winter.  The  nail  market  is  firm 
at  $5.25  base,  for  standard  wire,  and 
$5.35  for  cut.  Wire  is  unchanged  at 
$5.25,  base,  for  smooth  steel. 

Little  Rope  Trade; 

Cottons,  Jutes  High 

Montreal.  

ROPE  AND  CORDAGE.— Prices  have 
remained  steadily  unchanged  on  all 
ical  and  manila  ropes,  but  the  under- 
tone is  firm,  and  the  tendencies  upward 
on  cottons  and  jutes.  Base  prices:  For 
pure  manila,  31c;  British  or  Beaver 
muni'.a,  26c,  and  sisal,  22y2c. 


52 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


January   3,    1920 


iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHtiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiifiitiitiinniiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiitifiiiHi^iiiifiiiiiiiiiitttfiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiifi 


O.P.W. 


Executive 


CHARLES     HICKMAN'. 


J.  M.  Young,  Secretary-Treasurer 
A.  C.  Cronk,  Accountant 


Charles  Hickman,  President  and  General  Manager 

R.  H.  Hickman,  General  Sales  Manager 
J.  D.  Robinson,  Toronto  Manager 
T.  H.  Price,  Advertising  Manager 


Ninety-Six  per  cent  of  the  Stock  of  Ottawa  Paint 

IVorfe,    Limited,  is   owned   and  controlled  by    Charles 

Hickman  and  J.  M.   Young. 

The  remaining  shares  are  divided  among  the  personnel  of 
the  Company  for  the  purpose  of  enabling  the  holders 
thereof  to  participate  in  formulating  all  executive  policies. 

The  report  has  been  widely  spread  that  Ottawa  Paint 
Works,  Limited,  has  been  absorbed  by  other  interests  and 
the  above  announcement  is  made  for  the  purpose  of  refut- 
ing such  rumours,  regardless  of  their  source  of  origin. 

Our  salesmen  are  ready  to  call  for  your  spring  order  and  at 
the  same  time  explain  to  you  our  1920  dealers'  sales  cam- 
paign.   Watch  the  columns  of  this  paper. 

Yours  truly, 


iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiifiiiiiN 


January  3,  1920 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


53 


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Watch  Us    Grow   in  Nineteen-Twenty 

WE  believe  that  our  clients  are  just  as  eager  for  our  com- 
mercial success  as  we  are.    On  every  side  it  is  conceded  that 
our  policy  in  treating  our  customers  squarely  is  the  funda- 
mental of  our  phenomenal  growth. 

By  continuing  to  offer  to  the  trade  goods  at  Highest  Quality 
Made  in  Canada,  the  merits  of  which  are  expounded  by  the 
most  aggressive  sales  force  on  the  map,  we  confidently  expect 
that  in  a  very  short  time  it  will  be  as  natural  to  ask  for  "O.P.W." 
as  it  is  to  say  "Good  Morning." 

Better  Service    -    Better  Paint    -    Better  Profits 


IMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIh 


54 

Oils,  Gasoline  Firm; 

Wax  High  and  Scarce 

Montreal.  

OIL,  GASOLINE,  WAX.— Coal  oil 
prices  are  steady  this  week,  but  un- 
dhanged,  the  various  grades  selling  at 
22-25c  per  gallon.  No  advance  has 
been  mad>e  for  gasoline,  and  the  de- 
mand, owing  to  limited  snowfall  here, 
has  been  seasonably  heavy.  Prices  are 
from  33  to  38c  per  gallon,  according  to 
grade. 

The  wax  situation  has  become  quite 
a  strained  one  in  Canada,  owing  to  the 
rate  of  exchange.  Supplies  are  limited 
and  prices  very  high. 

All  Wares  Are  Firm; 

Stoves  Soon  Higher? 

Montreal.  

WARES  AND  STOVES.— Never,  per- 
haps, in  the  hi'story  of  the  trade  have 
the  manufacturers  been  confronted  with 
'shortages-  of  raw  materials  entering 
'into  the  manufacture  of  various  wares 
'as  they  are  to-day.  It  is  most  difficult 
to  get  delivery,  and1  the  tendencies  of 
the  market  are  upward  as  a  result  of 
'higher  material  costs,  and  also  because 
labor  (has  been  receiving  frequent  in- 
creases  of  wagies. 

The  stove  situation  is  a  very  strong 
one,  and  advances  of  price  may  be  rea- 
sonably anticipated  within  a  snort  time 
— iprolbably  within  a  week  or  ten.  days, 
if  ncit   sooner. 

Ten-cent  Advance 

On  Iron  and  Steel 

Montreal  

IRON  AND  STEEL.— Prices  for  iron 
and'  steel  have  advanced  this  week  ten 
■  cents  per  100  lbs.  This  follows  the  gen- 
eral trend  of  the" market  for  iron  and 
steel  goods.  As  pointed  out  in  last 
week's  report,  the  undertone  has  been 
very  firm,  and  tlhe  increase  has  been 
more  or  less  anticipated. 

IRON     AND     STEEL 

Iron    finish    machinery    steel     4  20 

Norway   iron    12  00 

Single  reeled  machinery  steel    6   25 

Soring  steel    5  no 

Sleigh    shoe   steel    4  15 

Tire   steel    4   35 

Toe  calk  steel,  per  100  lbs 5   or, 

Band   steel    4  65 

Harrow     tooth     steel      4   30 

Mining   tool   steel,   per  lb 0  22 

Black   Diamond  tool   steel,  per  lb 0   22 

Black   Diamond  cast  steel,  per  lb 0  22 

Common   bar   iron,   per   100    lbs 4  00 

Refined   iron, »  per   100    lbs 5  00 

Mi'd    steel     4   15 

3-16   and   thinner   flats   in   iron   or  steel  take   extra 

5Cc    per    100    lbs.    over  base   and    regular  extra. 

Prices  Moved  Upward 

On  All  Kinds  Sheets 

Montreal.  

SHEETS —Prises  on  black  sheets, 
and  on  galvanized,  have  been  revised1 
upward.  In  facft  there  is  difficulty  in 
determining'  iunt  what  prices  should 
apiply  on  some  grades,  more  particu- 
larly olf  galvanized  sheets.  The  latter, 
on  English  grades,  are  marked  25c 
hilgher  this  week. 

BLACK— 

10  gauge  6  50 

12  gauge  5  95  ,  6  25 

14  gauge  6  00  6  80 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL 


16  gauge  6  10  6  4# 

18-20  gauge  6  55  6  70 

22-24  gauge  6  60  6  75 

26  gauge  6  70  6  80 

28  gauge  7  00  7  00 

GALVANIZED     SHEETS— 
U.S.    Standard— 

10%     gauge     9  00 

28    gauge    8  85 

26    gauge     g  75 

22   and    24  gauge    8  40 

20    gauge     8  25 

18    gauge     •       8  25 

16    gauge     8  00 

English  Standard — 

28    gauge    10  50 

26    gauge     10  25 

24    gauge     9   65 

22    gauge    9  30 

18  and   20  gauge 9  10 

NOTE — These  prices  are  for  full  bundles,  an  extra 
charge  of  25c  to  35c  per  100  lbs.  is  made  for 
broken   lots. 

Lead  Products  Are 

Still  Very  Firm 

Montreal.  

LEAD  PRODUCTS.— Firmness  char- 
acterizes the  market  in  all  lines,  and 
'particularly  so  as  <t*he  basis  is  still 
changing  upward  on  pig  lead.  Prices 
are  unlikely  to  be  any  lower,  and  with 
tin  also  higher,  solder  is  a  firm  com- 
modity. Demands  have  been  season- 
ably fair. 

Lead  pipe    0  13% 

Lead    waste    0  14% 

S    irr.    and    over    0  15% 

Note. — Lead   pipe  is  subject  to  a  discount  of  10',. 

Lead  traps  and  bends 5% 

Lead  wool,  lb 0  15 

Lead  sheets,   2%   lbs 0  12% 

Lend  sheets,  3  to  3%  lbs.,  sq.   ft.,  lb 0  12% 

Lead  sheets.   4  to  8  >bs.,  sq.   ft 0  11% 

Cut  sheets  V|C  lb  extra  and  cut  sheets  to  size, 
%c    lb.    extra. 

Solder,  guaranteed,  lb 0  40 

Solder,    strictly,    lb 0  38 

Strictly,    commercial,    lb 0  86% 

Solder,    wiping,    lb 0  32V2 

Solder   wire    (8   gauge) — 

40-60 0  37 

45-55      »  81% 

50-50      0  42% 

Zinc    sheets,    casks    '  0  16Vi 

Do.,    broken    lots     0  17 

Heavy  Steel  and 

Scrap  Are  Higher 

Montreal. 

OLD  MATERIAL.— The  past  week 
has   seen   a    stiffening  of  the  basis  for 


January  3,   1920 

various  heavy  metals,  and  heavy  melt- 
ing steel,  boiler  plate,  malleable  scrap, 
and  stove  plate  are  much  higher.  This 
is  a  direct  result  of  the  demands  by 
manufacturers1  for  these  materials. 
There  is  a  fair  tonnage  of  business. 

Dealers'   Buying   Prices — 

Old    rubbers,    boots   and  shoes ....      0  07  0  08 

Overshoes,      lumbermen's      rubber 

boots     . . ". o  05      ' 

Overshoes,    etc.    (trimmed)     0  05  0  06 

Bicycle    tires    o  03'A 

Automobile   tires    o  03%     0  04 

Yellow  brass    o  10        0  11 

Red  brass    0   15         0  16 

Light   brass    0  07%     0  08% 

Scrap    zinc    0  05%     0  06 

Light  copper    13  75  14  00 

Heavy   copper    0  17         0  18 

Wrought  iron,   No.   1.  per  gr.   ton      ....  16  50 

Malleable  scrap   (ton)    25  00 

Pipe  scrap,  ton 10    00 

Stove   plate,   ton    21  00  22  00 

Heavy   melting   steel    15  00  16  00 

No.    2   busheling    7   00         8  00 

Boiler  plate    15   00 

Machinery,   cast    (ton)    24  00  25  00 

Most  Ingot  Metals 

Are  Marked  Higher 

Montreal.  — ■ 

INGOT  METALS.— Strength  charac- 
terizes most  of  the  ingot  metals,  while 
several  of  them  are  marked  higher. 
There  appears  to  be  little  probability  of 
low  prices  at  present. 

COPPER.— This  is  somewhat  firmer, 
and  electrolytic  is  quoted  at  25c  per  lb., 
and  casting   at  24  %c. 

TIN. — An  advance  of  £8  in  London 
for  tin  was  made  on  Monday  of  this 
week.  This  is  but  one  of  a  series  of 
higher   prices.     Tlhe   local    price   is   66c. 

LEAD.— Still  trending  upward,  and  it 
looks  as  though  a  ten  cent  basis  will 
soon  be  reached.  Present  quotation 
9V2c  per  lb. 

ANTIMONY.— Steadily  firm  here  at 
11  %c  for  Chinese,  and  11  %c  for  Eng- 
lish. 

SPELTER.— This  has  been  creeping 
upward,  the  basis  locally  being  ll%c. 

ALUMINUM.— Little  trading,  and 
unic.hanlged  at   33c   per   lb. 


TORONTO  MARKETS 

TORONTO,  Dec.  31 — Higher  prices  continue  on  many 
hardware  lines  and  many  important  changes  have  been 
recorded  this  week.  Among  the  most  important  are: 
Boiler  tubes,  which  are  up  1  to  3  cents  per  foot.  Range  boilers, 
cistern,  well  and  cylinder  pumps,  wrought  washers,  liquid 
glue,  clothes  pins,  brushes,  crow  bars,  clay  picks,  mattocks, 
Disston  saws  and  trowels,  also  some  of  North  Bros.'  products. 
Advanced  prices  may  fee  expected  on  the  following: 
Brooms,  belting  and  leather  goods;  also  cement. 

The  important  factors  bearing  on  the  present  high  prices 
are  said  to  be  the  scarcity  of  commodities,  increased  demand 
based  on  expanding  needs,  greater  normal  requirements  than 
existed  before  the  war. 


Cistern*  Well  and  Cylinder 
Pumps  Advance  5  to  10 


1  ■ 


Toronto.  

PUMPS,  CISTERN,  well  and  cylin- 
der, have  advanced  approximately  5  to  10 
per  cent.  This  is  no  doubt  due  to  the 
higher  cost  of  rftw  material  and  lal  or, 
and  it  is  stated  tluir  t'e  new  price  is  no'. 


high  in  comparison  with  other  goods  of 
the  same  calibre. 

Wrought  Washers  Up; 
New  Discount  Now  45'  < 

Toronto.  

WASHERS. —  Wrought  washers     have 
advanced,     the    present     discount    being 


January.  3,  1920 

quoted   at  45  per  cent,   in  place  of  the 
former  50  per  cent. 

Liquid  Glue  Has  Been 
Advanced  About  33  1-3% 

Toronto.  \  

LIQUID  GLUE.— An  advance  in  Le 
Page's  liquid  glue  has  taken  effect.  The 
present  new  quotations  are  as  follows: 
No.  25,  per  doz.,  $1.60;  No.  26,  ner  doz., 
$2;  No.  27,  per  doz..  $1.60;  Nof  30,  per 
doz.,  $2.40;  No.  31,  per  doz.,  $4;  No.  "32. 
per  doz.,  $6.80;  No.  33,  per  doz.;  $12; 
No.  34,  per  doz.,  $18.70. 

Clothes  Pins  Advance; 
New  Prices  10%  Higher 

Toronto  

CLOTHES-  PINS.— An  advance  of  10 
per  cent,  has  taken  place  in  clothes  pins, 
and  the  new  prices  are  as  follows:  4-inch 
loose  packed,  5  gross  to  case,  $1.60  per 
case:  4-inch  packed  in  cartons,  4  gross 
to  case,  $1.85  per  case. 

Brushes  Have  Advanced 
Approximately  5  to  15% 

Toronto.  

BRUSHES.— As  forecasted  in  the  last 
issue  of  HARDWARE  AND  METAL 
brushes  have  advanced  approximately  5 
to  15  per  cent.,  and  new  prices  are  now 
being  quoted. 

Crowbars  Advanced;  Now 
Quoted  at  $10.25  Doz. 

Toronto.  . — 

CROWBARS  are  now  quoted  at  new 
and  higher  prices.  The  new  price  is 
$10.25  per  dozen. 

Clay  Picks,  Mattocks, 

Grub  Hoes  Advance 

Toronto.  

CLAY  PICKS,  Mattocks  and  grub 
iioes  have  advanced,  and  quotations  are 
as  follows:  Clay  picks,  5  to  6  lb.,  $11.80 
per  dozen;  6  to  7  lb.,  $12.80  per  dozen. 
Mattocks,  cutter  and  pick,  $14.25  per 
dozen. 

Some  Disston  Saws  Lines 
Advanced  About  IQ^c 

Toronto.  

SAWS,  TROWELS,  and  some  other 
lines  manufactured  by  Henry  Disston  & 
Sons,  Ltd.,  have  advanced  approximately 
10  per  cent.  The  list  includes  hand, 
panel,  rip,  compass,  bne-k  and  stair 
builders'  saws.  Saw  swages,  also  brick, 
plasterers'  and  pointing  trowels. 

Brooms  Firm;  May 

Be  a  Further  Advance 

Toronto.  

BROOMS  are  reported  10  be  holding 
at  a  firm  price,  and  new  and  hierhor 
nrices  in  the  very  near  future  would  he 
in  order  according  to  present  indications. 
The  crop  from  an  economical  standpoint 
was  a  failure  as  the  stock  grew  too  lone. 
Manufacturers  buv    stock    in    the    field 


HARDWARE   AND   METAL 

by  the  ton,  and  when  made  up  into 
brooms  the  extra  length  has  to  be  cut 
off.  This  naturally  makes  the  corn 
dearer  as  the  part  that  is  cut  off  is  of 
no  further  use. 

Belting  and  Leather  Goods 
Firm;  May  Soon  Advance 

Toronto.  

BELTING.— Present  indications  point 
to  higher  prices  in  belting  and  some 
lines  of  leather  goods.  Hides  are  said 
to  be  very  scarce,  and  any  that  are  pro- 
curable are  quoted  at  very  high  prices. 
The  demand  is  said  to  be  a  very  good 
one,  and  a  large  output  is  looked  for- 
ward to  by  manufacturers  during  the 
year  of  1920. 

Wire  Staples  Finn; 

Prices  Holding  Steady 

Toronto.  

WIRE  STAPLES  are  quoted  at  $5.60 
base  for  bright  wire,  and  $6.35  for  gal- 
vanized. Wire  staples  are  holding  at  a 
firm  prjee,  and  are  none  too  plentiful. 
The  present  demand  is  very  good  for 
the  season  of  the  year. 

Cement  Firm;  May 

Soon  Be  Advanced 

Toronto.  ■ 

CEMENT. — An  advance  in  price  in 
the  near  future  may  be  expected  in 
foment,  it  is  stated.  The  chief  cause  of 
this  may  be  owing  to  the  advanced  cost 
cf  the  sacks.  Manufacturers  state  that 
sacks  are  costing  them  16  cents  each — 
more  than  they  charoe  for  them — and 
ps  a  number  in  each  shipment  are  lost  or 
'^troved,  the  manufacturers  claim  they 
lose  the  difference  between  what  they 
"et  for  them  and  what  they  have  to  pav, 
'"'"ountinn-  to  >a  loss  of  16  cents  t>pt  sack. 
Tpe  present  price  is  quoted  at  $3. 25  per 
barrel  in  car  lots. 

Range  Boilers  Advance 

Approximately  7/^% 

Toronto.  

RANGE  BOILERS  have  advanced  ap- 
nT-oximatelv  7%  per  cent,  on  some  sizes. 
Pang-er  boilers  have  been  emoted  at  firm 
nrices  for  some  time  and  the  chanee  to 
^io-her  prices  is  not  at  all  surprising. 
The  followin<r  are  the  new  ciuotations: 

R  4  NGE  BOILERS-  Standard  Extra  H»avv 

30-gallon      $12  00  $14  00 

X'.-ETnl'on      14  00          lfi  00 

'0-^allon      lfi  00          18  00 

52-gal!on      22   00         2*   00 

fifi-gallon      35   00          38   00 

82-e-aIlon      40  00  47    00 

100-Kallon      SOnn          58   00 

120-galIon       60  00          67  00 

Sheets  and  Plates  Firm; 

Scarce;  Unchanged 

SHEETS  AND  PLATES.— The  scar- 
c;tv  of  sheets  continues  to  be  a  very 
serious  one.  While  it  is  believed  that 
the  situation  is  sliehtly  better  recently 
^nd  a  few  odd  cars  of  galvanized  sheets 
have  trickled  throiifh,  some  of  the  best 
informed  believe  there  will  be  no  defi- 
nite relief  for  at  lf>ast  six  months,  and 
while  it  may  be  expected  that  sheets  will 


55 


begin  to  come  in  in  larper  quantities,  the 
enormous  shortage  and  demands  that  are 
cropping  up  from  new  sources  continual- 
ly will  more  than  consume  what  stock 
does  come  to  hand,  it  is  stated.  It  is  also 
stated  that  production  is  not  being  in- 
creased in  accordance  with  the  tremend- 
ous demands.  The  following  are  the 
quotations: 

BLACK    SHEETS— 

14  gauge   6  30         6  50 

16  gauge    6  65         6  95 

18-20    gauge     6  30         6  85 

22-24   gauge    7  25  6  90 

26  gauge    ; 7  35  6  95 

28    gauge     7  50         7   05 

3-16   inch  plate    5  95  5  55 

^4-inch  boiler  plate    5  45         6   10 

Prices    shown     are    for    full     cases.       An     extra 

charge  of  from   25c  per   100   lbs,   is   made  for  less 

than    case   lots. 

GALVANIZED  SHEETS— 

Premier  Apollo 

:0%  oz $9  20       $9  80       $9  25       $9  55 

U.S.   28    8  60        10  20         8  85         8  85 

U.S.    26    8  20         8  80         8  55         8  50 

22  nad  24    8  00         8  20         8  40         7  30 

18  and  20    7  80         8  00         8  25         8   10 

16     7  55         7  80         8  10         7  90 

12  and  14    7  35         7  55         7  95         7  65 

An    extra   is   now   charged  on   galvanized   sheets, 

10%    oz.   and    28    ga.,    when    shipped   out   in   sheets 

3  feet  wide.     The  extra  charged  over  prices  shown 

above  is  20c  per  100  pounds.      Other  gauges  show 

no  change  for  different  widths. 

Prices     shown    are    for    full     cases.       An    extra 

charge   of '25c   per    100   lbs.    is  made   for  less  than 

case  lots. 

Some  North  Bros.'  Lines 
Have  Advanced  15% 

Toronto.  

RATCHET  DRILLS  and  other  lines 
manufactured  by  North  Bros.  Mfg.  Co., 
have  been  advanced.  Owing:  to  so  many 
different  articles  affected  by  this  new 
ruling  it  is  impossible  to  enumerate,  how- 
ever, it  is  stated,  the  advance  will  ap- 
proximate 15  per  cent. 

Iron  and  Steel  Bars  Are  Up 
25c  Per  100  at  the  Mills 

Toronto.  — 

IRON  AND  STEEL  BARS  still  hold 
at  present  prices.  A  distinct  advance 
has  again  been  maele  at  the  mills  and  ap- 
proximates 25  cents  ,per  100  pounds: 
Jobbers  locally  have  as  yet  made  no 
change.  It  is  stated  this  new  advance 
cannot  help  but  strengthen  prices,  and 
an  early  local  advance  would  be  in  ac- 
cordance with  actual  costs.  It  is  stated 
that  all  the  Canadian  mills  are  booked 
up  much  beyond  their  capacity,  and  as 
many  of  them  are  dependent  on  the 
United  States  for  a  great  proportion  of 
their  raw  materials,  conditions  are  bound 
to  remain  as  they  are,  or  even  a  little 
worse,  well  into  the  third  period  of  1920, 
it  is  stated.  The  following  are  the  pre- 
sent quotations; 

Common    bar    steel     4  26 

Common  bar  iron 4  25 

Angle    base    4  56 

Horseshoe  iron    4  75 

Tire   steel    4  70 

Mild    steel 4  50 

Norway   iron    11  50  15  00 

Toe    caulk    iron    6  45 

Sleigh  shoe  steel   4  25  4  59 

Band    steel    .• 4  25  4  50 

Spring    steel     9  50  11   60 

Mining    drill    steel     2100  30  00 

Sheet  cast  steel    0  42  0  45 

Corrugated  Sheets  Firm; 

Prices  Unchanged 

Toronto.  

CORRUGATED    SHEETS.— Although 

galvanized  sheets  are  reported  to  be  ex- 


56 


hausted  on  the  local  market,  no  change 
has  recently  been  made  in  corrugated 
sheet  prices.  In  some  instances  there  is 
no  stock  to  sell,  while  in  others  consider- 
able stocks  were  on  hand  and  the  manu- 
facturers have  been  selling  at  the  prices 
as  listed  below  for  some  time  back,  and 
are  as  follows- 

Per  100  square  feet 
Corrugated   Sheets—  Gal'zd.     Painted 

No.    28   gauge    $8  25       $7  00 

No.    26   gauge    9  00         8  00 

No.    24   gauge    13  50       10  00 

No.    22  gauge    16  00       12  50 

No.    20   gauge    19  00       16  00 

No.    18   gauge    24  00       19  50 

Discount,  7%  per  cent. 

On  shipments  of  300  lbs.  and  over,  freight  is 
allowed  south  and  east  of  and  including  North 
Bay :  also  several  Western  counties  in  Quebec 
Province.  Places  north  and  west  of  North  Bay, 
the  freight  is  equalized  on  North  Bay.  For 
Quebec  and  Maritime  Provinces,  freight  is  equal- 
lized  on  Montreal. 

Lead  and  Zinc  Products 

Remain  Unchanged 

Toronto.  

LEAD  AND  ZINC  PRODUCTS  show 
no  change  over  last  week's  prices,  and  it 
is  expected  these  will  hold  for  some 
little  time  unless  important  developments 
again  occur  to  the  basic  metals.  The  de- 
mand still  continues  to  be  a  good  one 
for  this  season  of  the  year.  The  follow- 
ing are  the  present  quotations: 

Lead  pipe,  list,  per  lb 0  13% 

Lead  waste  pipe,  list,  per  lb 0  14% 

Do.,  over  8  inches,  list,  per  lb 0  15% 

Above  subject  to  discount  of  10%. 

Lead  traps  and  bends   5% 

Lead   wool,   lb 0  16 

Lead   sheets,    4   to   6    lbs.,    sq.    ft., 

in    rolls,    lb 0  10% 

Cut   sheets    %    to   %c  lb.   extra   and  cut  sheets   to 

size  lc  lb.  extra. 

Solder,   guaranteed,    lb 0  35%     0  36 

Solder,    strictly,    lb 0  34%     0  34% 

Solder,  commercial,  lb 0  32%     0  33 

Solder,    wiping,    lb 0  31         0  31 

Solder,    wire,    lb 0  42% 

Zinc   sheets,    per   lb 0  17         0   19 

Scrap  Iron  and  Waste 

Materials  Unchanged 

Toronto.  

WASTE  MATERIALS.— Owing  to  the 
holiday  season,  stock  taking  and  other 
factors,  scrap  iron  and  waste  materials 
are  quiet.  The  price  tendencies,  how- 
ever, are  of  a  firm  nature,  and  one  large 
purchaser  stated  that  anything  may  de- 
velop as  soon  as  the  New  Year  has  been 
properly  ushered  in.  The  following  are 
the  present  quotations: 

DEALERS'    BUYING     PRICES 

Pipe    scrap     1100 

Stove    plate,    per    ton     18  50 

No.   2   busheling    13  00 

Yellow   brass    \\  0  10 

Red    brass     °°°°  q  ifiit 

Light  brass    0  07 

Scrap  zinc    0  06  '/> 

Heavy    copper    o  17 

No.    1   machinery   cast    24  00 

Heavy   melting  steel    15  00 

Wrought  iron,  No.   1,   per  gr.  ton      15  00 

Heavy    lead    pipe    0  06 

Old   rubbers,   boots  and  shoes 0  06 

Overseas,       lumbermen's       rubber 

boots   0  04 

Bicycle   tires    001% 

Automobile    tires    1 0  03 

Tea    lead     ; 0  04 

Heavy  lead   pipe 0  05% 

Boiler  Tubes  Have 

Advanced  I  to  3c  Per  Ft. 

Toronto.  

BOILER  TUBES.— An  advance  of 
from   1   to    3    cents    per     foot     is     ro- 


HARDWARE    AND    METAL 

ported  on  boiler  tubes  as  forecast 
in  last  week's  issue  of  HARD- 
WARE AND  METAL.  This  is  stated 
to  be  a  reaction  from  the  great  scarcity 
of  raw  material,  chiefly  caused  by  for; 
mer  strikes  and  the  recent  coal  crisis. 
The  congestion  at  the  mills  is  said  to  be 
causing  great  inconvenience.  Delayed 
shipments  due  to  the  coal  shortage,  also 
the  high  rate  of  exchange,  are  all  factors 
towards  higher  prices.  The  following 
are  the  quotations: 

Per  100  feet 
BOILER  TUBES—                     Seamless      LapweW 
1       inch    $27  00         


1%  inch    29  00 

1  %  inch      29  60 

D%  inch    3fl  00  $27  00 

Z  inch    81  00  26  00 

2%  inch    9600  2800 

2%  inch    43  00  3200 

8  inch    48  00  40  00 

S%  inch  47  00 

8%  inch    60  00  44  00 

4  inch    716001  6600 

Planes,  Vises,  Clamps, 
Hand  Screws,  Advanced 

Toronto.  

PLANES,  VISES,  HA.NDSCREWS 
AND  CLAMPS.— Some  makers  have  ad- 
vanced their  prices  on  these  lines.  This 
is  no  doubt  due  to  the  unsettled  condi- 
tions of  the  iron  and  steel  market,  and 
may  also  be  due  to  the  great  shortage  in 
raw  material. 

Wood  Handles,  Neckyokes, 
Doubletrees,  Advanced 

Toronto.  

WOODEN  HANDLES,  ETC  .  have  ad- 
vanced, and  new  and  higher  prices  are 
effective.     The  following  is  the  new  list: 

All    Hickory    Handles    Plus  2.V, 

Maple  Cant  Hook  and  Peavy  Handles.  .  Net  List 
All  Fork,   Hoe,   Rake,   Shovel  Handles  and 

Malleable    D     Less   10% 

Maple    and    Ash    Pike    Poles    Plus  20% 

All   Doubletrees   2%  x   4%   x   4   ft.   and 

under      Less   1 0f  i 


January  3,   1920 

All  Doubletrees  over  the  above  size.  .  Net  List 
All  Whiffletrees  3  in.  in  diameter  x  36 

ft.  long,  and  under   Less   10% 

All  Whiffletrees  over  the  above  size Net  List 

All   Neck  Yokes  3   in.  diameter  x  42  in. 

long,    and    under    Less    10% 

All  Neck  Yokes  over  the  above  size...  Net  List 
All    other   handles    and   goods Plus   10% 

All  goods  F.O.B.   Factory. 

Terms   2%   10  days.      Net  30  days. 

All  orders  are  accepted  subject  to  delivery  as 
soon   as  possible  after  receipt  of  order. 

Copper,  Lead,  Spelter, 

Y2 c  Higher;  Tin  2^2C 

Toronto.  

INGOT  METALS.  —  Wild  upward 
movements  are  reported  on  ingots  during 
the  past  week  and  still  higher  prices  are 
predicted.  Copper  has  recovered  all 
weakness,  and  a  big  demand  is  reported 
at  higher  prices.  The  London  Metal  Ex- 
change shows  advanced  prices  as  high 
as  2  cents  per  pound.  Locally  the  raise 
has  been  V2  cent.  Lead  and  spelter  also 
are  %  cent  higher,  while  tin  is  up  2% 
cents  per  pound. 

TIN. — An  advance  of  2*4  cents  per 
pound  is  reported  in  tin,  and  the  quota- 
tion now  reads  65%  cents  per  pound. 

COPPER  has  recovered  any  weakness 
previously  shown  and  has  advanced  Vz 
cent  per  pound,  making  the  new  quota- 
tion 24 M>   cents  per  pound. 

LEAD  has  advanced  %  cent  per  pound 
and  is  holding  at  a  firm  price.  Further 
advances  may  be  expected,  it  is  stated. 
The  new  quotation  is  9%  cents  per 
pound. 

SPELTER  has  recovered  from  a  weak 
tendency  and  an  advance  is  reported  this 
week  of  V2  cent  per  pound.  The  present 
price  is  now  11%  cents  per  pound. 

ALUMINUM  remains  unchanged.  Little 
showing-  better  local  demands.  The  pre- 
sent price  is  a  firm  one,  and  is  quoted 
at  12  cents  per  pound 

ALUMINUM  remain  unchanged.  Little 
business  is  offerine',  it  is  stated.  The 
price  is  quoted  at  34  cents  per  pound. 


LONDON  MARKETS 

LONDON,  Ont.,  Dec.  31 — While  the  markets  continue  very 
firm    price    changes    are    not    so    numerous    this    week. 
Advances,  however,  are  shown  in  hockey  sticks,  new  easy 
bolt  clippers  and  wood  screws. 

The  holiday  season  has  been  a  record-breaker  with  most 
merchants  and  they  are  finding  that  stock-taking,  which  is 
already  being  done  in  many  cases,  is  an  easier  job  than  usual 
because  stocks  are  so  low. 

It  is  generally  expected  that  1920  is  going  to  be  a  splendid 
year  for  business,  although  considerable  difficulty  is  looked 
for  in  securing  goods.  Indications  point  to  much  activity  in 
building  and  an  earlv  start  will  be  made  by  many  if  weather 
conditions  are  at  all  favorable. 


Hockey  Sticks  Higher; 

Supplies  Are  Limited 

London,   Ont.  

HOCKEY  STICKS.— There  has  been  a 
splendid  sale  of  hockey  sticks.  New  and 
higher  quotations  are  in  effect  and  sup- 
plies are  very  limited.  Figures  are  as 
follows: 

Boys'  Firsts,  white,  $2.20  per  doz.; 
Men's  Practice,  $3.75  per  doz.;   Varsity, 


$4  60  per  doz.;  Championship,  $6.50  per 
doz. 

Easy  Bolt  Clippers 

Register  an  Advance 

London,  Ont.  

EASY  BOLT  CLIPPERS.— New  prices 
on  easy  bolt  clippers  show  an  advance. 
The  quotations  are: 

No.  0,  $4.50  each;  No.  1,  $6  each;  No. 
2,  $8.50;  No.  3,  $10.75  each. 


V 


1 


January  3,  1920 


Skate  Straps  Are 

in  Brisk  Demand 


London,  Ont.  

SKATE  STRAPS.  —  Sales  of  skate 
straps  have  been  excellent.  Quotations 
are  on  the  following  basis: 

Russet  Leather — 20",  $1.45  per  dozen  pairs;  24" 
$1.75;   27",    $2. 

Web— 20",  $1.75  per  dozen  pairs  ;  24",  $2  ;  30", 
$2.50. 

Seasonable  Sales 

For  Ash  Sifters 

London,   Ont.  

ASH  SIFTERS.— There  has  been  an 
active  demand  for  ash  sifters.  Prices 
are  as  follows: 

Common  Wood  Sides,  $3  per  doz.; 
Banner,  $3.15  each:  Rocker  No.  1,  $4.75 
each. 

Wood  Screws  Advance 
10% ;  New  Prices  Firm 

London,   Ont.  

SCREWS  have  advanced  10  per 
cent.,  as  previously  reported  in  these 
columns.  The  discounts  applying  to  the 
list  is  as  follows: 

Flat  Head,  bright,  75  per  cent.;  Oval 
Head,  bright,  72%  per  cent.;  Round 
Head,  bright,  72%  per  cent.;  Flat  Head, 
brass,  55  per  cent.;  Oval  Head,  brass, 
52%  per  cent.;  Round  Head,  brass,  52% 
per  cent.;  Flat  Head,  bronze,  50  per  cent.; 
Oval  Head,  bronze,  47%  per  cent.;  Round 
Head,  bronze,  47%  per  cent. 

F.o.b.  Hamilton,  Toronto  and  Mont- 
real, with  freight  equalized  thereon. 

Terms. — 2  per  cent  cash,  30  days. 

Orders  will  only  be  accepted  with  spe- 
cifications and  for  prompt  shipment,  and 
these  discounts  are  subject  to  change 
without  notice. 

Rope  Ouiet,  Unchanged; 
Pure  Manila  May  Advance 

London.  Ont.  

ROPE. — The  sale  of  rope  has  grad- 
ually slackened  and  is  now  reported  to 
be  ouiet.  Msnila,  of  the  better  grade, 
is  said  to  be  firm,  and  higher  prices  may 
take  place,  it  is  stated.  The  following 
are  the  quotations: 

Pure  manila.  31  cents  base;  Beaver 
manila,  26  cents  base;  New  Zealand 
hemD,  26  cents  base:  sisal,  22%  cents 
base. 

Putty  Sales  Heavy: 
No  Change  in  Price  Noted 

London.  Ont.  

PUTTY. — Sales  have  been  werv  la~"-p 
and  continue  to  show  large  returns.  No 
change  in  price  is  at  present  expected. 
The  following  are  the  present  quota- 
tions: 

Standard,  100  lb.  drums,  $6.80  per 
100  Ik;  Standard.  25  lb.  drum,  $7  05  r>er 
100  lb.;  Pure,  100  lbs.  drum,  $9.30  per 
100  lb.;  Pure,  25  lb.  drum,  $9.55  per  100 
lb. 

Window  Glass  Advanced; 
New  List  For  Cut  Sizes 

London.    Ont. 

WINDOW  GLASS.— An  advance  has 
taken   place   in  window  glass.     This   is 


HARDWARE    AND    METAL 

not  unexpected  as  glass  has  ben  very 
scarce  for  some  time  and  the  enormous 
demand  far  exceeds  the  supply,  it  is 
stated.  Cut  Light  are  now  selling  under 
a  new  list  and  will  be  noted  in  these 
columns  at  a  later  date  with  the  discount. 
The  following  are  the  case  prices: 

Single  Dia.,  cases,  20  per  cent,  off  list; 
Double  Dia.,  cases,  20  per  cent,  off  list. 

Wire  and  Cut  Nails 
Hold  Firm  at  New  Prices 

London,  Ont.  ■ 


57 


NAILS  are  showing  a  very  strong 
demand  for  this  time  of  year,  and  many 
are  stocking  now  so  as  to  be  in  condition 
to  handle  the  large  demand  which  is  ex- 
pected when  building  opens  up  in  the 
spring.  The  scarcity  in  nails  is  still 
noticeable,  it  is  stated.  The  present 
price  quotations  are: 

Wire,  $5.20  base;  Cut,  $5.60,  base. 

White  Lead  in  Oil 

Remains  Unchanged 

London,  Ont.  

WHITE  LEAD  IN  OIL.— A  good  de- 
mand is  recorded  for  white  lead  in  oil 
and  booked  orders  for  spring  delivery 
are  still  coming.  The  price  remains  un- 
changed, but  it  is  hard  to  say  if  it  will 
remain  owing  to  increased  costs  in  raw 
materials.  The  following  are  the  pre- 
sent quotations: 

Pure,  tons,  $17.45  per  100  lbs.;  less 
tons,  $17.80.  Regular,  tons,  $17.95  per 
100  lbs.;   less  tons,  $18.30. 

Tire  Pumps  With  Gauge 
Has  Jumped  to  High  Levels 

London.   Ont.  

TIRE  PUMP  with  gauge  has  ad- 
vanced and  a  new  price  is  now  quoted 
at  $5.35  each. 

Turpentine  Scarce; 

No  Change  in  Price  Shown 

London,  Ont.  

TURPENTINE  remains  unchanged, 
but  has  a  tendency  to  be  scarce  owing 
to  the  great  demand.  The  following  are 
the  present  prices: 


1  barrel  lots,  $2.60  per  imp.  gal.;  2  to 
4  barrel  lots,  $2.59  imp.  gal.;  5  gal.  lots, 
$2.75  imp.  gal. 

Linseed  Oil  Firm; 

Remains  Unchanged 

London,  Ont.  

LINSEED  OIL  is  holding  unchanged, 
although  the  tendencies  is  rather  a  firm 
one.     The  following  are  the  quotations: 

1  to  2  barrels,  raw,  $2.67  gal.;  boiled, 
$2.70  gal.  3  to  5  barrels,  raw,  $2.66  gal.; 
boiled,  $2.69  gal.  6  to  9  barrels,  raw, 
$2.64  gal.;  boiled,  $2.67  gal.  Less  bar- 
rels, add  15  cents  gal. 

Cross  Cut  Saws  Firm; 
Prices  Remain  Unchanged 

London,  Ont.  

CROSS  CUT  SAWS  are  showing  a 
good  seasonable  demand.  Some  of  the 
prices  are: 

Philadelphia  Lance,  58  cents  foot;  Im- 
proved Champion,  58  cents  foot;  Premier, 
Pangburn,  Maple  Leaf  Lance,  Maple 
Leaf  Racer,  Simonds  No.  22,  Simonds 
No.  13—5  foot,  $4.95  each;  5%  foot, 
$5.85  each;  6  foot,  $6.60  each. 

Cross  Cut  Saw  Handles. — No.  3,  $5.30 
doz.;  No.  4,  $4.05  doz,;  No.  5,  $7.20  doz.; 
No.  6,  $4.05  doz.;  No.  6%,  $4.05  doz.;. 
Lion  One-Man,  $5  doz. 

Bull  Dog  Vises  Advance; 
Prices  About  10%  Higher 

London,   Ont.  

BULL  DOG  VISES.— An  advance  has 
taken  effect  in  bull  dog  vises.  New 
prices  are  as  follows: 

No.  52,  $15  each;  No.  53,  $18.25  each; 
No.  54,  $23.50  each. 

Tucker  Alarm  Tills 
Now  Quoted  at  $4.65  Each 

London.  Ont.  

TUCKER  ALARM  TILLS.  — An  ad- 
vance has  taken  effect  in  Tucker  Alarm 
Tills,  and  the  new  quotations  are  $4.65 
each.  This  is  in  accord  with  advances 
in  other  lines  where  wood  is  the  chief 
material  used. 


WINNIPEG  MARKETS    . 

WINNIPEG,  Dec.  31 — The  end  of  the  year  shows  marked 
activity  in  the  iron  and  steel  markets.  General  changes 
have  occurred  in  these  lines  for  the  week  that  are  sig- 
nificant indications  of  the  trend  of  these  commodities  during 
the  coming  year. 

Iron  and  steel  and  their  products  show  marked  higher 
price  tendencies  and  in  all  cases  substantial  advances  on  pre- 
ceding prices.  Seemingly  no  hope  whatever  is  entertained  for 
any  change  from  this  order  of  things.  Present  indications 
point  to  further  advances  not  only  on  these  lines,  but  on  a 
general  scale.  Some  state  it  can  be  safely  predicted  that  the 
beginning  of  the  New  Year  will  show  changes  of  an  advanced 
nature  on  many  important  lines.  The  only  soluble  reasons 
that  can  be  given  regarding  this  state  of  affairs  is  the  inability 
of  production  or  supply  to  meet  the  present  demand,  also  uni- 
versal labor  unrest  and  the  high  cost  of  labor. 

The  markets  for  the  present  show  important  changes.  The 
lines  affected  for  the  week  are  as  follows:  Iron  and  steel, 
sheets  and  bars,  wire,  staples,  tinplates  and  chain,  tennis 
racquets,  stepladders  and  lamp  wick. 


■ 


Lamp  Wicks  Advanced; 
New  Quotations  in  Force 

Winnipeg.  

LAMP  WICK  shows  changes  of  an 
upward  trend.  Very  little  activity  'has 
occurred  in  the  markets  on  tih|is  line  folr 
some  time,  although  when  changes  have 
occurred  they  have  shown  steady  ad- 
vance. Thds  week  is  no  exception;  the 
new  changes  again  show  advance  of 
moderate  proportions.  The  new  prices 
are:  Lamp  wicks,  cut  and  rolUs,  No.  1, 
84  cents;  A,  $1.05;  B,  $1.50;  D,  $2.40  per 
rolls  of  32  yards,  or  cut  lengths,  per 
gross.  Circulair — -No.  2,  $7.70;  No.  3, 
$26.00  per  gross. 

Common  Step  Ladders 
Quoted  at  Higher  Prices 

Winnipeg.  

COMMON  STEP  LADDERS  make  a 
move  of  an  advanced  character  after  a 
period  of  inactivity.  Although  this  class 
of  goods  has  in  the  past  been  generally 
on  the  advance,  nothing  of  an  important 
or  startling  nature  has  occurred  for 
some  time.  The  new  changes  for  the 
week  show  heavy  increase  in  prices,  no 
doubt  due  to  the  present  scarcity  of  cut 
lumber  and  the  recent  general  change  in 
prices  on  this  line.  The  new  prices  are: 
Common  Step  Ladders. — Length  3  feet, 
90  cents;  4  feet,  $1.15;  5  feet,  $1.45;  6 
feet,  $1.70;  7  feet,  $2.10;  8  feet,  $2.30,  10 
feet,  $2.70. 

Tennis  Rackets  Higher; 
Advance  Prices  Named 

Winnipeg:.  . 

TENNIS  RACKETS  AND  NETS 
showed  further  substantial  advances. 
Little  activity  has  occurred  for  some 
time  on  this  class  of  goods.  This  week, 
however,  shows  a  marked  change  on 
several  well-known  lines  in  the  nature 
of  a  somewhat  substantial  advance. 
Further  advances  in  this  particular  line 
are  not  necessarily  looked  for,  the  mar- 
ket at  present  being  firm. 

The  new  changes  are: 

Tennis  Rackets.  —  Sears'  Special,  $6 
each.  Campbell,  $6  each.  Challenge,  $6 
each.  Pirn,  $7.50  each.  Doherty,  $14 
each.  Garry,  $3.75.  Eclipse,  $4.75. 
Varsity,  $7.50. 

Tennis  Nets.— No.  142B,  $5.25  each. 
242B,  $5.25  each.  342B,  $7.  442BC, 
$11  each. 

Coil  Chain  Has  Advanced; 
New  Prices  Being  Quoted 

Winnipeg.  

CHAIN  shows  a  further  substantial 
advance  of  a  marked  degree.  Following 
the  iron  and  steel  changes  for  the  week, 
coil  chain  also  shows  a  new  and  heavy 
advance  on  previous  prices.  This,  how- 
ever, is  expected,  being  a  product  of  steel 
and  no  improvement  on  any  of  these 
lines  is  looked  for  until  general  existing 
conditions  change.    The  new  prices  are: 

Coil  Chain  Electric  Weld,  per  100  lbs., 
3/16  in.,  $18.50;  1/4  in.,  $17;  5/16,  $14.25; 
3/8  in.,  $11.25;  7/16,  $11;  1/2  in.,  $10.50; 
9/16  in.,  $10.50;  5/8  in.,  810.50;  3'4  in., 
$10. 


11  A  K  I)  W  A  It  E    A  i\  D    METAL 

American  Proof,  B  B  Short  Link,  per 
100  lbs.,  3/8  in.,  $13.35;  7/16  in.,  $13.15; 
1/2  in.,  $12.60;  9/16  in.,  $12.60;  5/8  in., 
$12.25;  3/4  in.,  $11.90;  7/8  in.,  $11.50; 
1  in.,  $11.30. 

Log  Chains.— 1/4  in.,  $18.50;  5/16  in., 
$15.75;  3/8  in.,  $12.75;  7/16  in.,  $12.50; 
1/2  in.,  $12. 

Tin  Plates  Advanced; 

New  Prices  Herewith 

Winnipeg. 


January  3,   1920 


TIN  PIATES  again  show  further 
advance  of  moderate  degree.  For  a 
short  time  this  line  showed  firmness,  with 
little  apparent  indications  of  change. 
The  week's  general  changes  in  the  metal 
market,  however,  include  this  line,  the 
new  prices  showing  moderate  advance  on 
previous  lists.  The  quotations  for  the 
week  are  as  follows: 

Tin  Plates,— I.  C.  Full  Boxes.  20  x  28, 
$24.25;  20  x  33,  $28.75.  I.  C.  half  boxes, 
20  x  28,  $12.75;  20  x  33,  $15;  20  x  39, 
$17.25.  I.  X.  full  boxes,  20  x  28,  $28; 
20  x  33,  $33.50.  I.  X.  half  boxes,  20  x  28, 
$14.50;  20  x  33,  $17.25. 

Canada  Plates. — Ordinary  or  Special 
Blued,  18  x  21,  $9.25;  18  x  24,  $9.25; 
20  x  28,  $9.25. 

Barbed  and  Plain  Wire 

Again  Advance 

Winnipeg. 


BARBED  AMD  PLAIN  WIRE  again 
take  an  upward  jump  with  a  showing  of 
medium  advance  on  previous  prices.  In 
the  past,  this  line  has  shown  steady  and 
marked  advance.  Shipments  of  any  ap- 
preciable quantity  were  difficult  to  pro- 
cure owing  to  scarcity,  and  the  ever  in- 
creasing demand  has  now  added  greater 
difficulties  in  the  satisfactory  filling  of 
orders  by  the  manufacturers  for  some 
considerable  time. 

Further  advances  are  anticipated.  The 
prices  now  ruling  are: 

Lyman  4  Pt.  Cattle,  $5.75;  Glidden  Cat- 
tle, $5.55;  Baker,  $5.45. 

Plain  Wire,  Galvanized.  —  8G,  $7.50; 
9G,  $6.25;  10G,  $7.55;  11G,  $7.60;  12G, 
$6.40;  13G,  $7;  14G,  $8;  15G,  $8.75;  16G, 
$9. 


Wire  Fence  Staples 

Have  Advanced  50% 

Winnipeg.  

FENCE  STAPLES  again  show  fur- 
ther advance,  as  might  be  expected 
v/ith  the  announcing  of  further  advances 
in  wire.  Fence  staples  also  follow  suit. 
The  week  shows  the  substantial  advance 
on  preceding  prices  of  approximately  50 
cents  per  100  lbs.  This  line  is  also  con- 
trolled by  the  wire  market  and  no  further 
change  is  expected  until  further  changes 
are  announced  in  wire.  The  latest  quo- 
tations are: 

Fence  Staples.  —  Bright,  $5.65;  Gal- 
vanized, $7.05. 

Iron  and  Steel  Sheets 

and  Bars  Have  Advanced 

Winnipeg.  


SHEET  AND  BAR  IRON  STEEL 
show  decided  advance  on  preceding 
prices.  Further  advances  of  a  decided 
nature  have  occurred  on  these  lines  of 
somewhat  marked  degree,  and  the  pre- 
sent state  of  the  market  points  to  further- 
advances  at  no  distant  date.  The  new 
quotations  show  an  approximate  advance 
on  both  iron  and  steel,  of  25  cents  per 
100  on  sheet  and  50  cents  per  100  on  bar, 
and  are  as  follows: 

Bar  Iron,  per  100  lbs.— $5  base.  Flat, 
1  in.  and  thicker  and  from  4  to  6  inches 
wide,  $5.75  base.  Round  and  square, 
sizes  3/16  in.,  1/4  in.  and  5/16  in.,  $5.50 
base. 

Steel,  per  100  lbs.— Soft  or  mild,  $5.50 
base.  Round  and  square,  sizes  3/16  in., 
1/4  in.  and  5/16  in.,  $5.50  base.  Flat,  1 
in.  and  thicker  and  from  4  to  6  inches 
wide,  $5.75  base.  Round,  size  2  to  6 
inches,  $5.75  base. 

Sheet  iron,  galvanized,  per  100  lbs. — 
16G,  $9.60;  18G,  $9.75;  20G,  $9.75;  22G, 
$9.90;  24G,  $9.90;  26G,  $10.05;  28  in.  x 
36  in.,  $10.55;  30  in.  x  10%,  $10.75;  36  x 
10%,  $10.95. 

Sheet  Steel,  black,  per  100  lbs.— 10G, 
$7.55;  12G,  $7.60;  14G,  $7.65;  16G,  $7.75; 
18G,  $8.35;  20G,  $8.35;  22G,  $8.40;  24G, 
$8.40,   26G,  $8.45;   28G.  $8.55. 


PITTSBURGH  MARKETS 


PITTSBURGH,  December  31.— The  pig 
iron  and  steel  markets  have  been 
very  quiet  the  past  week,  as  indeed  they 
have  been  for  a  fortnight,  thus  reflect- 
ing the  dullness  the  holiday  season  al- 
ways brings.  Pig  iron  prices  are  sta- 
tionary, while  small  lots  of  some  descrip- 
tions of  finished  steel  products  for  early 
deliveries  have  brought  larger  premiums 
than  were  ruling.  The  total  tonnage  sold 
at  fancy  prices  is  very  small  in  propor- 
tion to  the  large  tonnages  that  have 
been  sold  for  late  deliveries,  particular- 
ly the  second  quarter,  at  either  the 
March  21  prices — the  "stabilized"  prices 
— or  at  slight  advances  above  them. 

Indications  point  to  a  steadier  market 
in  both  pig  iron  and  steel  products  in 
future.  The  holiday  dullness  has  given 
buyers  an  opportunity  to  reflect,  and  in 
large  measure  they  have  gotten  over 
their  scare,  so  that  they  are  not  likely 


to  continue  the  process   of  bidding   the 
market  up   on  themselves. 

The  Year  1919 

The  quietness  in  the  market  leaves 
opportunity  for  a  brief  consideration  of 
the  year  now  ended.  It  was  a  year  of 
uncertainties  and  of  men  changing  their 
minds. 

The  thought  at  the  beginning  of  the 
year,  only  seven  weeks  after  the  armis- 
tice had  been  signed,  was  that  there  was 
a  great  deal  of  work  for  everybody  to 
do,  and  that  conditions  would  have  to 
be  developed  whereby  they  would  be  in 
a  position  to  do  the  work.  Necessarily, 
it  seemed,  the  work  left  undone  was 
chiefly  of  a  construction  character,  thus 
representing  investment,  and  for  an  in- 
vestment there  must  be  assurance  to 
the  investor  that  the  investment  will 
prove    profitable.      The    investor,  would 


January  3,  1920 


HARDWARE    AND    METAL 


not  put  up  a  building  or  factory  or 
power  plant  if  he  foresaw  that  a  year 
or  two  later  he  could  build  the  same 
thing   at   considerably   less   cost. 

As  prices  for  commodities   and  rates 
of  wages  were  vastly  higher  than  before 
the  war,  the  common  thought  was  that 
everything  would  have  to  be  "deflated," 
just  as  everything  had  previously  been 
"inflated''      before     business     in     large 
volume  could    proceed.      The    iron    and 
steel    industry,    fearing    that   eventually 
the  bottom  might  drop  out  of  the  mar- 
ket,  had   already   made   some   price   re- 
ductions, $3  a  ton  on  pig  iron  and  var- 
ious   reductions    on   finished    steel     pro- 
ducts,   which    represent    an    average    of 
a  trifle  over  $4  a  net  ton  on  the  whole 
list.     It  was  prepared  to  make  further 
slight    reductions    at    intervals.      There 
were  some  in  the  trade  who  advocated 
maintaining   the   full    Government  war- 
control  prices  on  the  theory  that  there 
would  not  be  much  buying  in  any  event. 
In  February  the  Government  took  up 
the   price    deflation   subject,   and    Secre- 
tary   Redfield,     of    the    Department    of 
Commerce,     appointed     the     "Industrial 
Board,"  which  would  deflate  and  stabil- 
ize   prices.     The    board    began  with  the 
iron   and   steel    industry,   arranging   for 
a  reduction   of  $4.25   a  ton  in  pig  iron 
and  reductions  in  finished  steel  averag- 
ing nearly  $7  a  net  ton.     The  new  prices 
became  effective  March  21  and  are  still 
referred  to  as  "March  21"  or  "stabilized" 
or  "regular"  prices,  in  the  case  of  un- 
finished  and   finished   steel,   but  in  pig 
iron  those  prices  are  forgotten  since  pig 
iron   declined   in   some  instances   during 
the  second  quarter,  while  in  all  districts 
it  advanced   sharply  in  the  second   half 
of  the  year,  being  now  nearly  $3  a  ton 
higher  than  the  war-control  prices. 

The  Industrial  Board  struck  a  collec- 
tion of  snags.  The  iron  and  steel  prices 
were  criticized  in  some  quarters  on  the 
ground  that  the  reductions  were  in- 
sufficient. The  controversy  waged  large- 
ly in  the  public  press  between  Chairman 
Peek  of  the  Industrial  Board  and  Direc- 
tor-General of  Railroads  Hines  as  to 
whether  or  not  the  deflated  prices  were 
low  enough,  may  be  passed  over  in  this 
review  for  the  reason  that  the  gentle- 
men were  simplv  trying-  a  moot  ca=e, 
because  after  all  the. railroad  adminis- 
tration had  no  occasion  to  make  anv  pur- 
chases of  steel,  at  Mr.  Peek's  prices  or 
any  other,  that  would  count  for  any- 
thing. 

Another  snag  the  Industrial  Board  en- 
countered was  that  other  industries 
would  not  reduce  prices  as  the  iron  and 
steel  industry  had  done.  Another,  which 
it  ienored  for  more  than  a  month,  was 
that  the  Attorney-General  had  rendered 
a  positive  oninion  that  the  whole  pro- 
cedure  was   illegal. 

The  Dearth  of  Orders 

Production  of  steel  decreased,  until, 
by  the  middle  of  May  the  iron  and  steel 
industry  was  oneratinp  at  only  about  50 
per  cent,  of  its  capacity,  this  comparing 
with  an  87  per  cent:  operation  in  Janu- 
ary. There  was  surprise,  not  that  the 
operating  rate  dropped  to  50  per  cent., 
but  that  it  was  so  high  early  in  the  year 


that  the  low  point  in  production  was 
not  found  until  six  months  after  the 
armistice  was  signed.  The  commo?i  view 
before  the  armistice  had  been  that  when 
hostilities  -ceased  everything  would  stop. 
Many  attempts  were  made  to  explain 
why  the  mills  operated  as  well  as  they 
did  in  the  early  months  of  the  year.  One 
was  that  at  the  time  of  the  armistice 
there  was  a  great  deal  of  work  in  pro- 
gress that  was  good  for  peace  times  as 
well  as  war  times,  even  though  in- 
augurated in  connection  with  the  war. 
Another  was  that  certain  large  steel  in- 
terests had  quietly  "reinstated"  a  large 
quantity  of  relatively  low-priced  busi- 
ness, this  being  regarded  as  quite  dif- 
ferent from  cutting  the  market  openly. 

Turn  in  the  Tide 

It  is  undesirable  to  attempt  to  an- 
alyze the  complicated  economic  influ- 
ences that  molded  affairs.  Suffice  it  to 
point  out  that  there  was  a  general  swing 
downwards  and  then  upwards,  and  the 
iron  and  steel  industry  had  to  be  carried 
with  it.  Commodity  prices  in  general,  as 
shown  by  Bradstreet's  index  number, 
declined  continuously  to  about  May  1, 
and  then  began  to  advance.  Wages  did 
much  the  same:  There  were  no  whole- 
sale Wage  reductions  in  the  early  months 
of  the  year,  but  there  were  some.  Be- 
ginning in  April  or  May,  wages  tended 
rather  to  rise  than  to  fall. 

'  Eventually  people  c£me  to  realize  that 
Whatever  theories  or  notions  they  had 
entertained,  prices  and  wages  were  not 
gjaing  to  fall.  Confidence  was  thereby 
established,  not  to  a  great  extent  if  one 
consider  carefully,  but  to  a  sufficient  ex- 
tent to  make  the  country  busy.  It  would 
have  been  very  unfortunate  if  "con- 
fidence" had  been  completely  restored, 
for  that  would  have  meant  the  country 
attempting  to  do  several  years  of  work 
in  a  few  months.  The  attempt  could  not 
succeed  and  confusion  ruinous  to  every- 
body would  have  resulted. 

At  the  annual  convention  of  the  Amer- 
ican Federation  of  Labor  held  in  St. 
Paul,  in  June,  1918,  it  was  recognized 
that  the  great  "open  shop"  iron  and 
steel  industry  stood  as  a  bar  to  any  fur- 
ther great  progress  of  the  union  move- 
ment. The  convention  did  not  put  it- 
self en  record  as  saying  so,  but  the  chief 
consideration,  doubtless,  was  the  spec- 
tacle presented  by  the  industry  of  its 
abilitv  to  get  along  on  the  open  shop 
principle,  and  if  so,  why  could  not  other 
industries?  Accordingly  steps  were 
taken  to  organize  the  industry.  By 
August.  1919,  after  some  14  months  of 
work,  the  organizers  found  they  had 
done  about  as  much  as  they  could  ex- 
pect. While  they  had  not  organized 
anything  like  the  majority  of  the  men, 
thev  had  gotten  to  a  point  where  they 
could  not  keen  up  the  excitement  ex- 
cept bv  a  strike,  for  they  stood  to  lose 
the  adherents  they  had  more  rapidly 
than  they  could  exnect  to  gather  fresh 
adherents.  Accordingly,  the  strike  was 
called  for  September  22  with  no  de- 
mands at  all  having  been  made  upon 
the  independents,  and  none  upon  the 
Steel  Corporation  except  a  request,  on 
the    part    of   the    strike    leaders,    for    a 


"conference"  with  the  chairman  of  the 
Steel  Corporation. 

The  strike  proved  to  be  chiefly  one.  of 
common  labor,  and  chiefly  the  ignorant 
foreign  born  labor.  It  did  not  touch  the 
ore  fields  or  the  Oonnellsville  coke  re- 
gion. As  to  the  remainder  of  the  in- 
dustry, it  rendered  idle  about  40  per 
cent,  of  the  men,  many  of  those  render- 
ed idle  being  intimidated  rather  than 
being  actual  strikers.  Production  was 
cut  about  50  per  cent.  After  the  first 
few  days  production  began  to  increase 
by  men  returning  to  work,  and  by  the 
first  week  in  December  the  strike  was 
practically  over  except  in  the  Wheeling 
district.  Then  came  closing  of  some 
mills  on  account  of  coal  shortage,  and 
when  coal  supplies  became  available 
again  even  the  Wheeling  district  was 
willing  to  work. 

On  the  basis  of  the  rate  of  production 
just  before  the  strike,  a  rate  of  about 
83  per  cent,  of  capacity  against  the  50 
per  cent,  rate  at  the  middle  of  May  and 
the  87  per  cent,  rate  in  January,  the 
strike  caused  a  curtailment  of  finished 
rolled  steel  output  of  nearly  3,000,000 
gross  tons,  and  a  curtailment  in  pig 
iron  of  2,500,000  tons  or  a  trifle  more. 

The  Year's  Production 

The  year's  production  of  finished  roll- 
ed steel  was  about  25,000,000  tons,  while 
capacity  is  about  37,000,000  tons.  Thus 
about  one-fourth  of  the  lack  of  produc- 
tion can  be  ascribed  to  the  steel  strike 
and  about  three-fourths  to  lack  of  or- 
ders. It  was  certainly  ironical  tftiat 
orders  should  be  scarce  up  to  the  time 
of  the  strike  and  be  all  too  plentiful, 
for  the  market's  stability,  when  the 
strike  was  about  over. 

The  "Transitionary"  Period 

During  the  war  and  for  some  months 
afterwards  there  was  a  great  deal  of 
talk  about  "the  transitionary  period" 
during  which  industry,  finance  and 
everything  would  adjust  itself  and 
change  for  war-time  to  regular  peace- 
time conditions.  The  idea  is  now  seen 
to  have  been  the  biggest  blunder  that 
could  possibly  be  made.  In  one  way 
there  is  no  transitionary  period  and  in 
another  way  the  world  will  not  be  done 
with  its  transition  in  five  years  or  ten 
years,  perhaps  not  in  15  years.  There 
have  been  remarkable  changes  in  1919, 
falling  prices  and  wages,  and  then  ad- 
vancing prices  and  wages,  and  there 
will  he  such  changes  in  1920  and  suc- 
ceeding years. 


Rumored  Purchase  of 

Four  Glass  Companies 

According  to  press  reports  it  is  ru- 
mored that  the  General  Motors  Com- 
panv  has  purchased  control  of  four  im- 
portant erlass  companies  in  the  United 
States,  the  Columbia,  Saginaw,  Federal 
and  Standard.  The  great  demand  for 
closed  ca^s  ha«  resulted,  it  is  said,  in  the 
General  Motors  finding  difficulty  in  ob- 
taining sufficient  glass  for  its  needs, 
and  it  has  been  deemed  advisable  that 
it  control  its  own  glass  manufactories. 


60 


January   3,   1920 


Paint  Delivery  Problem  for  1920 

But  Despite  Difficulties  Retail  Buyers  Will  be  Well  Looked  After — Prices  More  Likely 
to  Advance  Than  Not,  Says  Montreal  Manufacturer 


INTERVIEWED  regarding  the  pro- 
spective outlook  for  paint  deliver- 
ies in  1920,  John  Irwin,  managing 
director  of  McArthur,  Irwin,  Limited, 
Montreal,  stated  to  HARDWARE  AND 
METAL  that  he  believed  the  trade  in 
Canada  would  foe  well  looked*  after,  de- 
spite the  fact  that  greater  difficulties, 
probably,  than  ever  before,  confront  the 
manufacturer.  These  difficulties,  Mr. 
Irwin  pointed  out,  are  especially  severe 
when  the  obtaining  of  raw  materials  is 
taken  into  consideration.  On  a  great 
many  of  the  basic  materials,  for  in- 
stance, the  producers  are  sold  up  for 
three,  four,  and,  in  some  instances,  six 
or  even  seven  months,  and,  under  these 
unique  conditions,  tihey  are  quite  un- 
able to  entertain  new  business. 

Among  the  raw  materials  which  are 
difficult  to  buy  for  present  delivery  are 
pig  lead,  zinc,  lithopone,  turpentine,- 
etc.,  asi  well  as  many  commodities 
which  form  the  basis  for  a  number  off 
specialties  sold  by  the  trade  very  ex- 
tensively. It  is,  very  often,  most  diffi- 
cult to  get  even  a  partial  delivery  of 
stock. 

High-Priced   Oil 

Linseed  oil,  Mr.  Irwin  pointed  out, 
was  not  only  very  high  in  price,  but 
most  difficult  to  obtain  in  the  desired 
quantities.  This  is  the  manufacturer's 
heavy  season,  prepared  paints  and 
kindred  lines  having  to  be  made  up  in 
the  winter  months  for  early  spring  de- 
livery; therefore,  large  quantities  are 
consumed. 

There  is  a  world's  shortage  of  flax 
seed.  Business  is  extremely  good,  and 
there  is  not  enough  to  satisfy  the 
world's  requirements.  Slow  and  erratic 
deliveries  to  the  mills  have  accentu-i 
ated  the  shortage;  oil  is,  and  has  been, 
imported1  for  some  months  from  the 
English  crushers.  With  needs  heavy 
everywhere,  prices  have  remained  high, 
and  the  outlook  for  low-priced  oil  that 
was  manifest  several'  weeks  ago,  has 
now  disappeared,  and  the  market  is 
again  climbing.  Even  March  and  April 
prices  are  based  on  a  high  level. 

Lead  Demand  Large 

Probably  no  one  comimodity  has  en- 
joyed so  extensive  a  demand  from  the 
trade,  everywhere,  ais  white  lead,  both 
dry  and1  ground  in  oil.  The  export 
trade  in  this  has  not  only  been  a 
heavy  one,  but  Mr.  Irwin  states  that 
orders  have  been  declined  —  orders 
which  called  for  hundreds  of  tons.  In 
some  cases,  it  would  have  been  possible 
to  make  contracts  for  the  delivery  of 
white  lead  for  several  years  to  come, 
and  on  a  price  arrangement  that  would 
be  governed  by  the  ruling  market  prices 
of  pig  lead,  at  the  time  of  delivery. 
Realizing   that   the    domestic,    or   home 


trade  should  be  looked  after  first,  this 
business,  in  large  measure,  has  been 
turned'  down. 

Not  only  are  lead  prices  ruling  high, 
but  Mr.  Irwin  does  not  see  any  relief 
from  a  price  standpoint.  In  addition 
to  this,  the  whole  outlook  for  continued 


MR.   JOHN   IRWIN 
Managing  Director  of  McArthur  Irwin, 
Limited,  Montreal. 

supplies  is  so  involved  as  to  make  it 
very  uncertain,  indeed,  whether  deliver- 
ies in  1920  will  be  as  satisfactory  as 
they  have  been  this  year.  Political  en- 
tanglements might  seriously  retard 
shipments  from  countries  of  heavy  pro- 
duction, Mexico  and  Spain  being  large 
factors  in  lead  production,  from  a  world 
standpoint. 

Then,  again,  some  of  the  biggest  pro- 
ducers of  corroded  lead  in  the  world  are 
unable  to  meet  the  needs  of  their  home 
markets,  and  demands  have  been'  made 
upon  the  Canadian  production. 

Trade  To  Get  Needs 

Mr.  Irwin  believes  that,  in  spite  of 
the  difficulties  already  outlined,  the 
Canadian  trade  will  be  well  looked 
after.  There  is  not,  he  said,  enough 
supply  of  various  materials  to  accom- 
modate the  combined  home  and  export 
trade.  But  the  retailer  here  in  Canada 
will  be  looked  after,  and  his  require- 
ments filled. 

Under  the  present  conditions,  the 
trade  has  been  apparently  anticipat- 
ing it®  wants,  for  Mr.  Irwin  said  that 
they  were  booking  well  in  advance,  and 
this  is  quite  necessary  on  their  part. 

Answering  a  further  question  regard- 
ing the  likelihood    of  the   1920   demand 


being  even  heavier  than  the  record  de- 
mand of  1919,  Mr.  Irwin  expressed'  his 
belief  that,  with  a  heavy  prospective 
building  program  ahead,  ample  pro- 
vision would  be  possible  by  the  paint 
makers  to  supply  the  paint  trade  with 
requirements.  It  was  not  always  pos- 
sible to  buy  some  raw  materials  many 
months  in  advance,  but,  in  instances 
where  this  was  possible,  it  has  been 
done. 

Higher  Prices  Likely 

Of  one  thing  Mr.  Irwin  feels  quite 
certain,  that  prices  will  be  higher  than 
they  now  are.  All  tendencies  point  to 
this,  and  particularly  the  soaring  costs 
of  lead,  linseed  oil,  lithopone.  zinc,  tur- 
pentine, etc.  In  this  connection,  it 
transpires  that  the  markets  have 
changed  so  frequently  of  late,  that 
manufacturers,  when  requiring  a  quan- 
tity of  linseed  oil,  for  instance,  have 
'had  to  secure  this  at  prices  even  higher 
than  the  market  on  a  given  date,  and 
the  same  with  other  commodities.  And 
with  necessity  arising,  as  previously- 
bought  supplies  are  used  up,  of  going 
into  the  higher  markets  now  obtaining 
for  additional  supplies,  revision  of  costs 
on  the  manufactured  article  will  prob- 
ably have  to  be  made  at  an  early  date." 

Big  Insecticide  Trade 

There  will  be  a  very  heavy  demand 
this  year  for  insecticides,  states  Mr. 
Irwin.  The  outlook  is  not  only  good, 
but  bookings  for  these  are  heavy  at  the 
present  time,  and  there  will  be  a  big 
increase,  in  all  probability,  over  the 
sales  of  1919,  and  which  were  also 
quite  large.  This  is  very  true  of  Paris 
green,  and  for  which  product  the  sales 
are  steadily  increasing.  Retailers  are 
selling  more  and  more  of  these  pro- 
ducts every  season,  and,  with  educa- 
tional effort  furthered,  the  output  is 
bound  to  be  increasingly  large. 


Dougall  Varnish  Co. 

Is  Extending  Plant 

Additional  shipping  and  warehousing 
space  is  being  provided  by  +he  Dougall 
Varnish  Company,  Ltd.,  Montreal.  W. 
W.  Ingersoll.  vice-president  and  seere 
tary  of  the  company,  stated  to  HARD- 
WARE AND  METAL  that  the  new  pre- 
mises, which  are  of  three-storey  concrete 
and  brick  construction,  will  increase  the 
accommodation  of  the  company  fully 
two-thirds  above  the  present  warehouse 
and  storage  capacity.  He  pointed  out 
that,  in  all  probability,  there  would  be 
further  extensive  improvements  added  in 
the  not  distant  future. 


January  3,   1920 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


„- 


GUARANTEED  PAINTS 


/ 


* 


^ 


Save  the  surface  and" 
you  save  air^_£2£^ 


Sold  to  the  con- 
sumer with  this 
straightforward 
guarantee. 


Absolutely  Satisfactory  or  Money  Refunded 


One  of  the  many  features  that  make  an  agency  for  Moore's  Paints 

and  Varnishes  the  very  best. 


BETTER  PRICES  BIGGER  PROFITS 


Color  Cards  and  Prices  on  Request 


Benjamin  Moore  &  Co.,  Limited 

Toronto  and  Winnipeg 


62 


HARDWARE    AND    METAL 


January   3,   1920 


Higher  Prices  Looked  for  in  Both  Brushes  and 

Brooms 

Much  Difficulty  is  Being  Experienced  in  Obtaining  Many  of  the 

Raw  Materials  Required — World  Practically  Dependent 

on  China  Now  for  Bristles 


THERE  is  every  indication  that  an 
advance  will  be  made  shortly  in 
the  price  of  brooms  and  various 
kinds  of  brushes.  HARDWARE  AND 
METAL  has  pointed  out  of  late  that  there 
is  much  strength  in  the  market  for  broom 
corn,  and  the  conditions  before  referred 
to  still  obtain. 

It  is  understood  that  an  advance  will 
probably  be  made  on  a  great  many  lines 
early  in  the  year.  Difficulty  connected 
with  the  obtaining  of  material,  is  one  of 
the  greatest  at  the  present  time,  and  it 
would  seem  that  certain  classes  of 
bristles  will  be  unobtainable  within  a 
few  months  unless  something  in  the  na- 
ture of  a  miracle  occurs. 

Erench  bristles  are  very  hard  to  ob- 
tain, and  the  supply  of  these  is  said  to 
be  sufficient  to  last  only  for  a  portion  of 
the  coming  season.  This  will  throw  the 
demand  very  heavily  upon  Chinese  bris- 
tles, and  these  will  probably  have  to  take 
the  brunt  of  the  demand  of  manufactur- 
ers for  many  different  kinds  of  brushes. 

Not  Urging  Buyer?- 

A  noteworthy  fact  of  the  present  situ- 
ation is  that  manufacturers,  generally, 
are  not  urging  the  trade  to  buy  either 
bi-ushes  or  brooms.  The  available  stock 
of  raw  material,  as  already  pointed  out, 


are  not  large  on  most  grades  of  goods, 
and  this  means  that  the  makers  are  con- 
serving their  stocks  and  are  not  willing 
to  make  any  sacrifice.     Faced  with  the 


necessity  of  bearing  more  to  replace 
stock  already  in  hand,  there  is  no  anxiety 
manifest  in  the  matter  of  selling. 

♦ 

A  new  company  has  been  formed  un- 
der the  name  of  Baines  and  David,  which 
will  carry  on  without  interruption  the 
steel  and  iron  business  formerly  known 
as  Baines  and  Peckover,  steel  and  iron, 
at  98  Esplanade,  Toronto,  Ont.  W.  M. 
David,  the  new  partner  of  R.  A.  Baines, 
was  for  many  years  associated  with  the 
former  company  in  the  capacity  of  sales 
manager. 


Sales  Staff  of  Ottawa  Paint  Works,  Limited, 
Attend  Annual  Convention  in  Ottawa 

Plans  Made  for  Breaking  All  Past  Records  in  1920— Firm's  Gift 

to  Each  Salesman  an  Insurance  Policy — Staff  Guests 

of  President  at  Banquet 


T 


HE  greatest  enthusiasm  over  pros- 
pects for  business  in  1920  was 
evidenced  at  the  three-day  annual 
convention  of  the  salesmen  of  the  Ottawa 
Paint  Works,  Ltd.,  held  at  Ottawa. 
"Watch  Us  Grow  in  1920"  was  the  slogan 
adopted  by  the  force. 

Business  for  the  year  just  ended  was 
discussed,  and  reports  that  were  most 
satisfactory  were  received.  Plans  for 
increasing  sales  in  1920  were  discussed 
at  length,  and  many  suggestions  were 
made  which  will  be  put  into  effect.  A 
feature  of  the  discussion  on  these  mat- 
ters was  that  the  suggestions  were  voted 
on,  and  in  every  instance  the  p^cpcsn.k 
were  adopted  unanimously. 


Guests  at  Luncheon 

On  the  second  day  of  the  annual  con- 
vention the  entire  sales  organization 
were  the  guests  of  Mr.  Charles  Hickman, 
president  and  general  manager  of  the 
company  at  the  Kiwanis  lunhceon. 

Prior  to  the  adjournment  of  the  last  day 
of  the  sessions  a  pleasant  surprise  was 
provided  the  salesmen  by  the  announce- 
ment that  each  employee  of  the  company 
was  to  be  the  recipient  of  a  Christmas 
gift  in  the  form  of  an  insurance  policy 
that  would  cover  both  death  and  dis- 
ability. Keen  appreciation  of  the  gift 
was  expressed  by  each  and  every  one  of 
lie.   recipients. 


Rwre&enfatwea  of  the  Ottawa   faint     Works,  Limited,  u>ho  attended  the  recr  ■■/  ,t„,,r:,l  <■  MgnUon  at  the  I.  -ad  office 
in  Ottawa.     The  gathering  was  one  of  the  most  successful  in   the  history  of  the  company. 


January  3,  1920 


HAKDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section. 


Selling  Quality  to  the  Farmer 

Good  paint  is  even  more  economical  for  the  farmer  than  for 
the  city  man.  There  are  so  many  more  surfaces  about  the  farm 
that  need  protection — surfaces  exposed  to  weather  and  wear,  but 
the  opportunities  for  saving  are  correspondingly  greater. 

And  there  are  greater  profit  making  possibilities  too 


The  farmer  wants  quality  paint. 
He  has  come  to  realize  that  buying 
paint  is  really  buying  protection  for 
the  longest  possible  time.  Low  gal- 
lon price  doesn't  have  its  old  time 
appeal. 


Give  the  farmer  what  he  wants — 
Glidden  quality.  Let  us  tell  you 
more  about  the  completeness  of  the 
Glidden  Line — how  it  covers  every 
need  of  the  farm  and  meets  each  need 
perfectly.  Write  for  interesting  liter- 
ature to-day. 


THE  GLIDDEN  COMPANY,  Limited 

Toronto,  Ontario 
BRANCH  OFFICE  and  Warehouse  at  Montreal,  Que. 


ni."'"" 


fr¥W%l>n\ 

«■  I  "6  II L 


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PAINTS 


—     COLORS    -    INSECTICIDES 


64 


HARDWARE   AND   METAL 


January   3,   1920 


Big  Demand  is  Expected  for  Glass 

Orders  Received  Recently  for  Box  Glass  and  for  Plate  Have 

Absorbed  Most  of  the  Available  Stock — Active 

Trade  in  Prospect  for  1920 


THE  present  situation  on  all  kinds 
of  plate  and  sheet  glass  is  one  of 
considerable  interest.  As  pointed 
out  in  HARDWARE  AND  METAL  there 
has  been  much  difficulty  in  securing  ade- 
quate supplies  of  various  kinds  of  glass, 
and  this  applies  in  particular  to  what  is 
known  as  double  strength. 

Much  of  Canada's  supply  has  been 
coming  from  the  United  States,  and  as 
a  matter  of  fact  the  importations  for  a 
long  while  past  have  been  very  heavy 
from  that  country.  As  is  generally 
known  the  industry  was  much  curtailed 
in  that  country  owing  to  the  Federal 
Government  having  closed  down  many 
of  the  producing  plants.  From  the  ef- 
fect?, of  this  the  industry  has  not  yet  re- 
covered, and  stocks  suffered  very  severe- 
ly because  of  the  decreased  production, 
and  as  a  consequence  have  been  light, 
and  this,  despite  the  very  restricted  pro- 
gramme of  building. 

The  Jobber's  Position 

The  Canadian  jobber  has  had  his  hands 
full  of  late  to  supply  the  demand  for 
glass  to  be  used  in  a  domestic  way.  That 
is  to  say,  the  orders  received  from  the 
trade  for  box  glass  and  also  for  plate 
have  been  such  as  to  almost  entirely  ab- 
sorb available  stock.  It  has  been  neces- 
sary for  the  jobber  to  use  his  utmost 
endeavors  at  all  times  to  keep  his  trade 
supplied  with  requirements.  In  spite  of 
an  earnest  effort  on  his  part  there  has 
been  a  decided  scarcity  of  double 
strength  glass  within  recent  weeks,  and 
this  has  caused  a  temporary  shortage  to 
fil1  orders  in  hand. 


It  will  be  more  readily  understood  how 
difficult  the  position  has  been  made  for 
the  jobber  when  it  is  stated  that  orders 
placed  with  manufacturers  in  the  adjoin- 
ing republic  have,  in  some  cases,  been 
unfilled  for  the  past  seven  or  eight 
months.  In  spite  of  the  fact  that  jobbers 
order  many  months  ahead,  it  will  be  seen 
how  difficult  it  would  be  to  gauge  stock 
for  a  longer  period  ahead  than  the  above. 

Next  Year  Big  One 

For  .1920  a  very  active  building  pro- 
gramme is  looked  for,  and  this  will  mean 
that  the  trade  will  be  rushed  to  meet  the 
requirements.  There  is  some  hope  in 
the  news  which  has  recently  come  from 
Belgium  regarding  supplies  of  glass. 
Some  Belgium  glass  has  been  received  in 
this  country  and  has  already  gone  into 
trade  channels.  It  is  hoped  that  a  larger 
supply  will  be  available  from  time  to 
time,  and  if  this  is  the  case  the  situation 
should  show  some  improvement,  for  with 
any  increase  in  the  shipments  from  the 
United  States,  and  with  hopes  entertain- 
ed for  some  glass  from  England,  there 
should  be  a  change  for  the  better. 

In  any  case  it  would  seem  that  the 
trade  is  well  advised  to  anticipate  its 
needs  as  early  as  possible.  Glass  im- 
porters are  rot  urging  their  customers 
to  take  delivery  of  glass,  and  this  is.  an 
indication  that  to  defer  ordering  will 
serve  no  good  purpose.  The  situation  is 
particularly  strong,  and  with  labor  and 
production  costs  as  they  are,  and  with 
transportation  likely  to  be  taxed  for 
many  months  to  come,  the  dealers  will 
probably  anticipate  their  needs. 


Suggests  Basis  for  Arriving  at  the  Value  of 
Painting  Wood 


FC.  HARRIS,  assistant  to  the 
Construction  Engineer  of  the 
•  National  Lumber  Manufacturers' 
Association,  is  conducting  a  series  of 
experiments  with  a  view  of  ascertain- 
ing the  price  point  at  which  painting  of 
wood  becomes  an  economic  waste.  The 
experiments  are  incomplete,  but  Mr. 
Harris  says: 

"I  suggest  the  following  formulae  of 
a  mathematical  nature,  which  attempts 
to  give  the  cost  by  comparison  on  a 
yearly  basis  for  wood  protected  and 
wood  unprotected.  By  'protected,'  I 
could  mean  either  painted  or  treated 
with  a  preservative.  By  eliminating 
any  mathematical  terms,  the  formula 
for  the  annual  cost  of  untreated  wood 
would  be  as  follows: 

The  Annual  Cost 

"Take  the  original  cost  of  the  wood, 
plus  the  cost  of  replacement,  and 
divide    the    suim    by    the   life    of    wood 


untreated;  add  the  annual  cost  of  re- 
pairs for  untreated  wood  and  any 
value  which  could  be  placed  on  loss  of 
appearance,  utility,  etc.,  due  to  lack  of 
paint.  This  will  give  the  annual  cost 
of  untreated  wood. 

For  Unprotected  Wood 

"Similarly,  the  annual  cost  of  pro- 
tected wood  would  be:  Take  the  original 
cost  of  wood,  plus  the  cost  of  replace- 
ment, and  divide  the  sum  by  the  life  of 
protected  wood;  then  add  the  cost  of 
replacement  annually,  plus  the  annual 
cost  of  maintaining  the  wood  in  a 
painted  condition,  plus  the  annual-  in- 
terest on  the  additional  investment  in 
paint,  and  you  would  get  the  annual 
cost  of  painted  wood. 

Direct  Comparison 

"These  two  formulae  would  seem  to 
permit  a  direct  comparison,  if  the  data 
as  to  the  relative  length  of  life  of  wood 


which  is  painted  and  of  wood1  used  im  a 
similar  position  untainted,  could  be  ob- 
tained. 

"We  are  trying  to  obtain  data  as  to 
the  relative  length  of  life  of  unpainted, 
or  unprotected,  and  protected  wood, 
used  in  a  similar  capacity,  and  if  we 
can  get  this1  data  we  will  use  it  as  a 
basis  of  comparison. 

Figure  Overhead 

"It  is,  of  course,  necessary  to  make 
assumptions  when  we  make  a  formula 
of  this  kind.  In  this  formulae  we  have 
assumed  that  the  items-  of  cost  include 
overhead,  which  is  liable  to  be  over- 
looked when  figuring  cost,  and  also  that 
the  annual  cost  of  inspection,  for  in- 
stance, is  the  same  in  each  case." 


New  Postal  Law  Will 
.  .    Help  Sales  Managers 

WASHINGTON.— One  of  the  new 
federal  laws  which  will  lift  some  of  'the 
burden  from  the  sales  managers  of 
paint  companies,  has  do  with  the 
treatment  of  mail  matter,  catalogues, 
pamphlets,  etc.,  by  the  post  office  de- 
partment. The  new  law  authorizes  the 
return  to  the  sender  or  the  forwarding 
of  undelivered  second,  third  and  fourth- 
class  mail. 

Under  the  old  law,  mail  matter  other 
than  finst-cUasls,  which  cannot  be  de- 
livered at  the  post  office  to  which  it  is 
addressed,  may  not  be  forwarded  to  the 
addressee  or  returned  to  the  sender  at 
another  post  office  until  the  postage  for 
itis  forwarding  or  return  is  first  pre- 
paid. This  procedure  Was  necessitated 
the  holding  up  of  undeliveralble  mail 
pending  notification  and  the  receipt  of 
the  required  postage,  and,  as  many  sales 
managers  realize  all  too  well,  this  has 
resulted,  in  the  case  of  special  offers 
for  limited  time,  an  inconvenience,  loss 
and  hardship  to  both  seller  and  buyer. 

The  new  law  will  permit  the  prompt 
forwarding  or  return  of  undeliverable 
matter  and  the  collection  of  postage  at 
the  time  of  delivery. 


TO   A  FIVE-DOLLAR   BILL 

(Chicago  Tribune) 

Crinkle,  crinkle,  little  bill, 

Goodness  gracious,  you  look  ill! 

Are  you  losing  all  your  power? 

You  seem  weaker  every  hour. 

Now  that  prices  -are  so  high, 

I'm  so  tired  that  I  could  die, 

I  just  circulate   all  day, 

No  one  dare  put  me  away. 

When  the  evening  board  is  set 

With   the   fruits   of  father's   sweat, 

My  small  voice  is  hushed  and  still, 

I  am  in  the  butcher's  till. 

And  no   matter  where   I  go, 

People  disregard  me  so; 

I  don't  seem  to  count  for  much. 

Bill,  take  heart,  your  luck  may  change, 

I'll  admit  the  time  is  strange; 

Though  you're  weak  I  love  you  still — 

Crinkle,  crinkle,  little  bill. 


January  3,  1920 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL-- Advertizing  Section 


FOR  QUALITY  USE 
DOMINION 

Cotton  and  Wool  Waste,  Cotton 
Wipers,  Washed    and    Sterilized. 

Polishing  Waste — Cream. 
White  Wiping  Waste— XXX 
Extra,  XX  Grand,  XLCR,  X 
Empire,  X  Press. 
Washed     Cotton     Wipers  — 
White,   Light,   Dark. 
Colored     Wiping     Waste  — 
Fancy,    Lion,    Standard,    Po- 
pular, Keen. 

Wool  Packing  Waste — Arrow, 
Axle,  Anvil,  Anchor. 
Manufacturerers  also  of 
£,  "Scyco"  —  Bags,  Waterproof 
'  Covers  of  all  kinds,  Tents, 
Flags,  Life  Jackets,  Oiled 
Clothing. 

Jobbers  of 
Cotton     Duck,     Cordage, 
Twines,  Oakum,  Piths,  Fish- 
ermen's  Supplies. 

Prompt  deliveries  of  all  the  above  lines.     Samples 
and  prices  sent  on  request. 

Scythes  &  Company  Limited 


Manufacturers  and  Jobbers 


Montreal 


Toronto     [ 


Winnipeg 


Hardware  and  Metal  is  the  only 
paper  in  Canada  giving  a  week- 
ly market  service  on  hardware, 
metals,  paints,  varnishes  and 
other  lines  allied  with  the  hard- 
ware trade. 

Hardware  and  Metal  is  the  only 
hardware  publication  in  Can- 
ada with  circulation  audited  by 
the  Audit.  Bureau  of  Circula- 
tions. 

Hardware  and  Metal  is  the  only 
weekly  hardware  paper  in 
Canada. 


This  Label 

is  recognized  as  a  guarantee  of 
quality  by  even  the  smallest  varnish 
buyers.  It  has  earned  this  record  by 
upwards  of  60  years  of  varnish  mak- 
ing, during  which  the  consumers' 
needs  and  interests  were  given  the 
same  consideration  as  our  own. 

This  is  the  underlying  reason  for 
the  large  and  always-growing  de- 
mand for  Berry  Brothers'  Varnishes, 
Enamels  and  Stains. 

Partial  List  of  Distributors  of 
Berry  Brothers'  Products: 


Hunter-Henderson  Paint  Co.,  Ltd.,  Vancouver, 
Wood-Vallance  Hardware  Co.,  Ltd.,  Nelson, 
Frank  A.  Gillies  Co.  -  -  Halifax, 

Marks,  Clavett,  Dobie  Co.,  Ltd.,  Port  Arthur, 


Ltd. 


Whites,  Ltd 

Sanderson  Pearcy  &  Co. 

A.  M.  Bell  &  Co.,  Ltd. 

Lariviere,  Inc. 

L.  H.  Gaudry  &  Co., 

Wood,   Vallance,  Ltd. 

Wood,    Vallance    &    Adams,    Ltd.,    Calgary, 

RevHlon  Wholesale,  Ltd.         -         Edmonton. 

Townsend   Paint   Mfg.   Co.         -         Montreal, 


Collingwood, 

Toronto, 

Halifax, 

Montreal, 

Quebec, 

Winnipeg, 


B.C. 
B.C. 

N.S. 
Ont. 
Ont. 
Ont. 
N.S. 
Que. 
P.Q. 
Man. 
Alta. 
Alta. 
Que. 


World's      Largest     Makers 

^varnishes  and  Paint  Specialties* 
Walkerville,  Ont. 


66 


^iiuJ.ijiijiiiiiiEiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiasiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiii; 


January    3,    1920 

IllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllOlllllllllllllllllllllIilllili^ 


MONTREAL 

MONTREAL,  Dec.  31.  —  Lower 
linseed  oil  prices  are  announced 
this  week,  and  a  reduction  made, 
in  some  quarters,  of  18c.  This  is  a  re- 
flection of  the  brightening  prospects 
for  Argentine  seed  supplies,  and  tlhe 
market  has  'been  easier  for  a  few  days. 
■Some  are  dubious  as  t6  whether  this 
will  continue,  that  is,  they  feel  that 
the  basis  may  react  to  the  old  levels. 
■February  olil  is  quoted  by  one  or  two 
factors  at  $2.17  per  gallon.  Turpen- 
tine is  very  firm,  and  the  price  ad- 
vanced 10c  per  gallon.  Supplies  are 
actively  in  demand.  Shellacs  are  up 
50c  per  gallon,  and  there  is  likely  to 
be  a  continued  high  market  on  thiks 
product.  Varnislhes  are  very  firm,  and 
advances  are  not  improbable  in  the 
near  future  for  various  igrades.  Guns 
are  high  in  price,  and  very  scarce. 
Glass  is  scarce  and  high  in  price,  with 
demand  continuing  active.  Putty  and 
lead  in  oil  are  steadily  firm.  Bookings 
for  soring  shipment  are  reported  most 
satisfactory. 

News  Argentine  Seed 

Eases  Linseed  Oil 

Montreal.  

LINSEED  OIL.  —  News  from  the 
Argentine,  regarding  shipments  of  seed 
to  the  United  States  and  Canadian  mar- 
kets, has  helped,  in  part  at  least,  to 
ease  the  market,  and  .prices  are  reduced 
for  immediate  deliveries  to  $2.32  per 
gallon.  The  flax  market  has  been  off 
for  a  few  days,  but  some  expect  that 
this  is1  but  a  temporary  condition,  and 
are  not  expecting  low  oil  for  the  pres- 
ent. A  price  of  $2.17  is  being  quoted 
for  February  delivery.  Manufacturers' 
needs  are  heavy,  and  the .  sales  of  oil 
have  been  quite  large  to  them. 
Raw—  ImP-   G*1- 

Single    barrels     2  32 

5   to   9    barrels    

10    to    25    barrels     

Boiled—  ImP-    Gal- 

Single    barrels     2  34'.. 

5    to    9    barrels    

10    to    25    barrels     

NOTE. — Owing   to   fluctuations   seed   markets    job- 
bers,  generally,    are   not  quoting. 

Higher  Turpentine;     , 
A  Good  Demand  Here 

Montreal.  — 

TURPENTINE. — An  advance  to 
$2.45  per  gallon  for  single  barrel  Ms 
of  turpentine  makes  the  price  ten  cents 
abo-~  that  <of  last  week.  There  is,  at 
this,  a  very  strong  undertone  to  the 
market,  and  with  manufacturers  using 
a   great  deal   of  the   product,  consump- 


tion has    been    seasonably    heavy.      No 
reduction   of  price  is  looked  for. 

Turpentine —                                                  Imp.  gal. 

Single    barrels     2  45 

Small    lots     2  65  2  75 

I  Packages   extra.) 

Putty  Bookings  Are 

Arriving  For  Spring 

Montreal. 

PUTTY.— Prices  are  steadily  firm  f0r 
standard  putty.  No  changes  have  been 
mlade  during  the  week,  and  the  jobbers 
are  now  interested  in  the  spring  book- 
ings, and  which  are  arriving  in  large 
volume  from   week  to   week. 

5  ton  1  ton   Quanty 

Ku.k.    in    barrels     IB. 00  *S   25        .<=>   6fl 

Do.,    V&    barrels    5   15  5  40         6  SO 

uo.,     100     iOa 6  bo  0    10          (>  46 

Dc  ,    25    lbs 8   10  6  86         6  70 

Do..    12%    lbs 6  »6  6  60         6  95 

<    and    6     lb.    tins 8   10  8  86         8  70 

1    and   3    lb.   tins    8  60  8  85       10  20 

Do.,    in    100    lb.    oases..          7   16  7   40         7  76 

Pure  lineeed  oil  putty,  $2.60  per  1*0  lbs.  advance 
on    above    prices. 

Glaziers'  putty — J1.60  per  100  lbs.  advance  on 
above    prices. 

Terms — 2%.    16    days,    net   60. 

Seasonable  Sales  of  ' 

White  Lead  in  Oil 

Montreal.  

WHITE  LEAD  IN  OIL.— The  steadily 
firming  basis  for  pig  lead  is  such  as 
to  suggest  a  strong  undertone  for  cor- 
roded lead,  and  there  is,  naturally,  a 
strong  lead  in  oil  mlarkelt.  Prices  are 
without  change,  however,  and  there  is 
some  business  for  immediate  delivery, 
with  booking's  heavy. 

Prices  for  standard  grade  lead  are: 
Five  ton  lots,  per  100  lbs.,  $16.50;  ton 
lots,  $17,  and  smlaller  than  tons,  $17.35. 

Paint  and  Varnish 

Are  Both  Very  Firm 

Montreal. 

PAINTS,  VARNISHES.— The  under- 
tone of  the  paint  and  varnisih  markets 
is  decidedly  strong.  No  reductions  are 
probable  on  these  two  commodities, 
and,  as  a  matter  of  fact,  whisperings 
suggest  that  there  may,  in  the  near 
future,  be  increases  for  some  of  the 
products.  Varnisihes,  in  particular,  are 
strong,  and  this  is  due  to  the  continued 
high  prices  being  asked  for  all  raw  ma- 
terials entering  into  their  manufacture, 
and!  also  because  of  the  high  wages  be- 
ing paid,  and  the  cost  of  all  packages. 
Bookings  are  very  excellent,  the  trade 
reports. 

Shellacs  Are  Higher; 

All  Glass  Very  Firm 

Montreal.  

SHELLACS,  GLASS.— An  advance   is 


again  effective  for  shellacs,  both  orange 
and)  white  .grades  being  affected.  With 
the  50c  increase  now  added,  orange  basis, 
in  barrels,  is  $7.25  per  gallon,  and  white, 
in  barrells,  i$8.  This  makes  the  'basis 
for  one  gallon  lots  $7.55  for  orange, 
and  $8.30  for  white. 

The  glass  markets  are  ruling  firm, 
it  being  rather  difficult  to  secure 
needed  supplies  of  many  sizes,  espe- 
cially of  the  double   strength   qualities. 


TORONTO 

TORONTO,  December  31.  —  The 
paint  and  oil  markets  are  rather 
quiet  this  week  owing  to  the  holi- 
day season.  Many  manufacturers  and 
jobbers  are  taking  advantage  of  this  to 
take  their  yearly  inventory.  Linseed 
is  inclined  to  be  scarce,  although  the 
price  is  unchanged.  Turpentine  is  un- 
changed but  may  advance  in  sympathy 
with  the  Southern  markets.  Ready- 
prepared  paints  and  white  lead  in  oil  are 
at  present  quiet,  although  it  is  stated 
large  quantities  are  booked  for  spring 
and  will  soon  begin  to  be  shipped.  Shel- 
lac is  very  firm  and  prices  are  nominal. 
It  is  stated  that  shellac  gum  is  very  hard 
to  procure  owing  to  the  scarcity. 

Linseed  Oil  Quiet; 

Remains  Unchanged 

Toronto.  

LINSEED  OIL  continues  to  sell  at 
unchanged  prices,  fit  is  hard  to  state 
what  the  near  future  will  bring,  but 
muclh  lower  prices  are  not  at  present 
looked  for.  The  Argentine  crop  may 
ease  the  situation  somewhat,  but  much 
depends  on  'shipping  facilities.  The  fol- 
lowing  are    the   present   prices: 

Linseed    Oil—  Haw 

1    to   2    barrels,    gal 2  67  2   SO 

3    to   5    barrels,    gal 2  66  .... 

10   barrels  and   over    2  64  .... 

Boiled 

1    to    2    barrels,    gal 2  70         2  83 

3  to  5  barrels,  gal.   . , 2  69  .... 

10   barrels   and   over    2  67  .... 

Prices  shown  are  those  ruling  on  Thursday  of 
current  week  and  subject  to  daily  fluctuation  of 
the  market  :  less  than  barrel  lots  are  15c  per  gal. 
higher   than   single   barrel    price. 

Turpentine  Firm; 
Southern  Markets  Higher 

Toronto.  

TURPENTINE  prices  remain  un- 
changed, although  tfhey  are  a  little 
stiffer  on  the  Southern  markets.  The 
embargo,  owing  to  the  floods  affecting 
some  of  the  main  "shipping  points  has 
been  lifted  and  fair  quantities  are  ex- 
pected to  arrive.  The  following  are 
present    quotations : 


January  3,  1920 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section, 


Why  Don't  You  Save  Too! 


"We  figured  that  after  the  installation  had  been  in  three  or 
four  months  it  had  more  than  saved  its  entire  cost." 

So  writes  a  prominent  user  of  Bowser  Oil  Storage.     Their  equipment 
has  been  in  use  thirteen  years  with  no  operating  troubles  or  upkeep  cost. 

If  you  are  not  using  Bowser  Storage 
Systems  for  your  oils  you  are  losing  money 
every  day. 


rABUSHED   IQMJ 


Systems  Do  Save 

You  can  save  the  Bowser  Way.    Our 
literature  shows  how.     Write' for  it  at  once. 

S.  F.  BOWSER  COMPANY,  Limited 

66-68  Fraser  Avenue,   TORONTO,  Ontario,  Can. 

Sales  Offices  In  All  Centres.       Representatives  Everywhare 


LONDON 
32  Victoria  St.  S.W.  1 
HAVANA 
Lonja  del  Comercio  427 


PARIS 
5  Rue  Denis-Poisson 
SYDNEY 
6  Castlereagh  Street 


BABBITTS 
SOLDERS 
PHOSPHOR  TIN 
PHOSPHOR  COPPER 
ETC. 

LEAD.  COPPER,  TIN. 
SPELTER.  ALUMINUM. 
A  OTHER  METALS 


68 


HARDWARE   AND   METAL 


January  3,   1920 


Per    Imp.    gal. 

1  barrel   lots    2  60 

2  to  4  barrel  lots 2  59 

5   gal.    lots    2  75 

White  Lead  in  Oil  Firm; 
Shows  Good  Returns 

Toronto.  

WHITE  LEAD  IN  OIL  has  been 
rather  quiet  during  the  holiday  season. 
This,  however,  is  usual,  and,  manufac- 
turers state,  tihat  1919  was  one  of  the 
best  years  they  have  had  for  some 
time  back.  Spring  bookings  have  been 
very  satisfactory.  If  this  is  any  indi- 
cation, dt  points  to  a  large  turnover  for 
1920. 

Ready  Prepared  Paint 

Shows  Good  Prospects 

Toronto.  

READY  PREPARED  PAINT.  —  The 
end  of  Ithe  year  1919  dosed  (the  bookis 
on  one  of  .the  bets|t  years  recorded  for 
some  time  back.  Prospects  for  1920, 
it  is  stated,  were  hardly  ever  better. 
Present  business  is  samewbiat  quiet, 
owing  to  the  holiday.  However,  many 
are  (preparing  for  one  of  the  best  years 
in  their  history,  it  is  stated,  and,  pro- 
viding production  in  all  lines  steadies 
down,  there  will  be  enormous  business 
handled,  it  is  believed. 

Putty  Prices  Firm; 

Remain  Unchanged 

Toronto.  

PUTTY — Putty  prices  acre  unchanged, 
although  quoted  at  a   firm  price.     The 
following  are  (the  present  quotations: 
Standard   Putty —  5  ton         1  ton         Less 

Bulk,    in   barrels $6  86       $6  60       $5  96 

Do..    100    lb.    iron     ...     6  20        6  46         6  80 

Do.,    25    lb.    iron    6  46         6  70        7  06 

Do..     12%     lb.     irons..     6  70        6  96         7  30 
Bladder,   in   barrels    7   10         7  86         7  70 


Use  of  Fuel  Oil  is  Extending  Very  Rapidly  as  a  Result 
of  the  Acute  Shortage  of  Coal 


CANADA  is  not  likely  to  figure  as 
a  factor  in  production  of  oil  for 
fuel  purposes,  according  to  a  re- 
port just  published  in  England,  under 
the  title  of  "The  Coming  Age  of  Oil  in 
Great  Britain."  Apropos  of  the  rapidly 
developing  demand  for  fuel  oil  and  its 
possibilities  for  displacing  coal  for  many 
uses,  the  report  says: 

"Many  recent  circumstances,  which  are 
in  the  main  connected  with  the  abnormal 
conditions  resulting  from  a  great  war,  have 
led  to  a  considerable  discussion  of  the 
whole  question  of  fuel — its  high  cost,  its 
comparative  scarcity,  the  increased  demands 
on  all  available  supplies  to  meet  the  ex- 
panding industries  of  the  United  Kingdom. 
General  interest  in  this  matter  is  being  di- 
rected toward  the  possibilities  of  oil  as  a 
substitute  for  coal.  Leaders  of  industrial 
and  economic  life  in  Great  Britain,  with  the 
active  support  of  the  Government,  are  unit- 
ed to-day  in  considering  what  proportion 
of  oil  supplies  are  likely  to  be  forthcoming 
from  the  United  Kingdom  and  the  British 
overseas  dominions  and  possessions. 
Supplies  Small 

"It  is  agreed  that  so  far  British  territory 
has  proved  singularly  unproductive  in  oil, 
the  Empire's  output  being  about  2%  per 
cent,  of  the  world's  total.  In  1917,  for  in- 
stance, India  furnished  a  little  over  1,000,- 
000  tons,  Trinidad  20,000  tons,  Egypt  134,- 
500  and  Canada  25,100,  while  outside  of  the 
Scottish  shale  oil  industry  the  United  King- 


Shellac  Scarce; 

Prices 


Nominal 


Toronto. 


SHELLAC. — The  shellac  market  is  a 
very  firm  one,  owing  chiefly  to  the  diffi- 
culty in  securing  stock,  it  is  stated.  The 
basis  is  therefore  quite  nominal. 


dom  is  not  in  the  list  of  oil  producing  coun- 
tries. Trinidad  is  rapidly  attaining  an  im- 
portant position  as  an  oil  producing  coun- 
try; Egypt  is  a  similar  'Land  of  Promise'; 
but  the  results  hitherto  obtained  in  Canada 
and  New  Zealand  are  not  very  encourag- 
ing, while  neither  in  Australia  nor  in 
South  Africa  is  there  much  prospect  of  oil 
production. 

.  For   Railway  Use 

"As  a  natural  corollary  to  the  universally 
recognized  need  for  oil  fuel  as  a  substitute 
for  coal  a  great  deal  of  attention  has  re- 
cently been  devoted  to  the  adaptation, 
among  other  things,  of  the  internal  com- 
bustion engine  to  railway  locomotives.  Coal, 
however,  being  a  domestic  product,  it  is 
generally  believed  that 'oil  as  a  substitute 
for  railway  fuel  would  entail  a  tremendous 
expense  in  the  establishment  of  supply  de- 
pots and  that  its  use  would  not  balance 
the  outlay  which  a  general  change  from 
coal  to  oil  would  involve  in  British  rail- 
way systems. 

Oil   Supply   Depots 

"Oil  supply  depots  are  already  in  exist- 
ence on  the  Thames,  at  Avonmouth,  South- 
ampton, Manchester,  Liverpool,  Barrow, 
Hull,  Sunderland,  Grangemouth  and  Belfast. 
All  important  docks  and  harbors  in  Great 
Britain  and  Ireland  are  recognizing  that  if 
they  are  to  maintain  their  position  and  en- 
hance their  prosperity  provision  will  have 
to  be  made,  where  it  does  not  already  ex- 
ist, for  storing  petroleum  products.  The  ad- 
vent of  oil-driven  shipping  will  mean  the 
establishment  of  chains  of  oil-bunkering 
stations  throughout  the  world  to  enable 
steamers  to  replenish  'supplies,  and  great 
developments  are  reported  to  be  taking 
place  in  the  installation  of  oil-fuel  stations 
to  serve   such   purpose." 


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An  arrangement  of  stock  such  as  is  shown  above  not  only  makes  for  a  neat  and  attractive  store,  but  facilitates 
retting.!.  From  a  display  standpoint  alsy  it  has  a  real  value  in  dollars  and  c  vts. 


January  3,  1920  HARDWAKE    AND    METAL  69 


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TORONTO  JANUARY,  1920 


%»lliW^ 


NEWS  and  IDEAS 


There  was  a  saying,  "What  you  don't  know  won't 
hurt  you." 

Don't  believe  it.  Applied  to  business  it's  false. 
What  a  merchant  doesn't  know  may  hurt  him  seri- 
ously. 

His  profits  depend  upon  "turn-over."  His  turn- 
over depends  upon  his  buying  the  right  goods,  receiv- 
ing them  in  time,  displaying  them  effectively  and  sell- 
ing them  intelligently. 

Every  hardware  merchant's  business  is  vitally  af- 
fected now-a-days  by  the  NEWS  of  the  world.  The 
alert  merchant  makes  money  out  of  the  IDEAS  that 
such  news  suggests  to  him. 

Because  progressive  hardware  merchants 
throughout  Canada  find  all  the  live  news  of  the  trade 
and  many  business-getting  ideas  in  HARDWARE 
AND  METAL  they  read  every  issue  closely.  They  find 
money-making  ideas  in  both  the  advertising  and  read- 
ing matter  pages.  Ask  any  live  hardware  man  which 
paper  he  reads  and  almost  without  exception  he  will 
say  HARDWARE  AND  METAL. 


I    i  1 V-*   1    i  1  1 1%  l,  %  1  i  1-*  I      *  Ti   i  €   1  V£L t  -' 


%J?  1  x^J^X 


70 


HARDWARE    AND    METAL 


January  3,   1920 


CURRENT  MARKET  QUOTATIONS 

These  priees  are  for  such  quantities  as  are  usually  ordered  by  retail 
balers.  Large  buyers  can  frequently  make  pu/rchases  at  better  prices. 


AMMUNITION 

Dominion  Ammunition,  in  cases. 
Discount  30/10/20% ;  broken  cases 
subject   to   an   extra    charge   of   5%. 

Terms — Metallics  and  shot  shells, 
60  days  net,  2%  30  days.  All  goods 
f.o.b.  factory. 

AMERICAN  AMMUNITION 
List  of  Prices. 

Subject  to  15%  advance  on  list 

B.B.  caps,  $3.50  per  M. ;  B.B. 
caps  eoncave  ball,  $4.40 ;  22  short, 
$5;  22  long,  $6;  22  long  rifle,  $7: 
22  short  smokeless,  $5.35;  22  long 
smokeless,  $7.50;  22  long  rifle, 
smokeless,   $8.75   per  M. 

Sporting  Cartridge — Centre  Fire 
Smokeless  303  Winchester,  $72.25 
per  M. ;  303  Savage,  $72.25;  303 
British,  $98 ;  82  Winchester  special, 
$72^4;  88-55  Winchester,  $76;  401 
Winchester,  self-loading,  $76  per  M. 

Primers— Nos.  1,  1%  and  2%. 
$8.60;  Nos.  1  and  2  (100  in  box), 
$3.80;  Not.  1-W,  1%-W.  2%-W  and 
3-W  and  S,  and  &Mj.  100  In  box, 
$a.80:  Berdan  Nos.  1,  1%.  2  (250  in 
baa),  $3.60;  Berdan  Nos.  1,  1%.  2 
(109  in  box),  $3.80;  new  No.  4, 
$6.50:  U.M.C.,  38,  $5.50. 

Shot,  standard,  100  lbs.,  Toronto, 
$18. SO;  Montreal,  $18.00;  net  ex- 
tras, as  follows,  eubjeot  to  cash 
dtecounta  only:  Chilled,  $1.50;  buck 
and  seal,  80c;  No.  28  ball,  $1.20 
per  100  lbs. :  bags  less  than  26 
lbs.,  %e  Per  H>- :  '•»."».  Montreal, 
Toronto,  Hamilton,  London,  St. 
John  and  Halifax  freight  equalized. 

AXES 

Single  Bits,  doc $18  00  $22  00 

Hunters*  Axes 12  50  18  00 

Boys'   Axes    13  00  14  00 

Double  Bit    26  50  27  60 

On  weights  heavier  than  base  add 
to  list  as  follows: 

Group  2 $  .25  Group  3 $  .50 

Group  4 75  Group  6....   1.00 

Group  6 1.25  Group  7 1.76 

Group  8 2.25  Group  9 B.75 

Group  10. . .  8.26 

Bench— No.     2.     doz 20  00 

No.     3,     doz 22  50 

No.    4,    doz 24  60 

BABBITT 

Priees  on  babbitt  fluctuate  with 
the  metal  markets  and  prices  are 
quoted  on  amplication.  Prices  ran5?e 
from   8c  to  75c  a  lb. 

BELLS    (Farm) 

No.   1  x   40,  lb $4  00 

No.    2   x   50,    lb 5  00 

No.  3  x  60,  lb 7  50 

No.  4  x  100,  lb 10  00 

F.O.B     Montreal,   Toronto. 

BELTING    (Leather) 

Discounts  apply  to  Revised  List 
of  Feb.   14,    1907. 

Extra   Quality,    16,    10%. 
Standard  Quality,   16,   10.   10%. 
Side  Lace  Leather,   lb.,   $2.00. 
Cut  Lace  Leather,  lb..   $2.40. 
F.O.B.  Montreal,  Toronto. 

BITS,    AUGER 
Standard  List  Prices  per  dozen. 

3/16 $  6.00         18/16 $12.00 

4/16 6.00         19/16 14.00 

»/lt 6.00         20/16 14.00 

8/10 6.00         21/16 16.00 

7/16 6.00        22/16 16.00 

8/16 6.00        23/16 18.00 

9/18 6.00.        24/16 18.00 

10/19.....     6.00        26/16 21.00 

11/19 7.00        20/16 21.00 


12/16 7.00  27/16 24,00 

13/16 8.26  2»/16 24.00 

14/16 8.26  29/16 27.00 

15/16 9.60  30/16 27.00 

16/16 9.60  81/16 30.00 

17/16 12.00  32/16 80.00 

Discounts      from     Standard     List 
priees: 
Beaver,  35%. 
Ford's   Auger  Bits. 
Gilmour  Auger  Bits,    17%%. 
Gilmour   Car   Bits. 
Gilmour  Eye  Augers,  net  list. 
Gilmour    Ship     Auger. 
Roekford     Auger     Bits. 
Irwin  Auger  Bits,  net. 

Discounts     being    revised    and    job- 
bers' priees  now  higher. 

F.O.B.  Toronto,  Montreal,  London 
and  Hamilton. 

BOARDS,   BAKE 

%  Rim  %  Rim 

0—16    x    22 $8  10       $9  10 

lr-18  x   24 8  90         9  80 

2—18  x   28 10  00       11  60 

9— 20  X   80 11  46        12  50 

BOARDS,  IRONING  Dozen 

No.    1,   Daisy    $27  00 

No.    10,    Daisy    32  00 

No.     31 11  00 

No.    33    16  00 

No.    35    32  00 

No.    36    36  00 

Perfection     34  50 

BOARDS,   SKIRT— 

No.    11,    doz 12  60 

boards,  sleeve- 
no.   3  dozen $  6  00 

BOARDS    (Wash)    Zinc  Doz. 

Baby    Globe     2  35 

Pony   $2  36 

Royal     Globe     5  15 

Improved  Globe   6  15 

Neptune   6  15 

Standard   Globe   6  15 

Original  Globe 5  65 

Solid     Back     Globe     5  65 

Jubilee    6  80 

Newmarket   King    6  80 

Western  King   (enamel) 8  00 

Beaver    (brass)    7  35 

Diamond   Ring    (glass) 6  30 

Glass     Globe      6  30 

F.O.B.  Newmarket. 

BOILERS  (Range) 

30-gal.,  extra  heavy $12  50 

30-gal.,    Standard 1100 

BOLTS  AND  NUTS 

Discounts  apply  to  list  of  Sept.   27, 

1919. 
Carriage  Bolts    ($1  list),   %  in.   dia. 

and    smaller,    6    in.    and    shorter, 

15%. 
Carriage  Bolts   ($1   list),   %   in.  dia. 

and    smaller,    longer    lengths,    net 

list. 
Carriage    Bolts    ($1    list),    7-16    dia. 

and  larger,  net  list. 
Machine     Bolts,     %     in.     dia.     and 

smaller,    4    in.    and    shorter,    20%. 
Machine     Bolts,     %     in.     dia.     and 

smaller,    longer    lengths,    10%. 
Machine    Bolts,    7-16    in.    dia.    and 

larger.    10%. 
Sleigh  Shoe  Bolts,  all  sizes,  net  list. 
Coach    and    Lag    Screws,    30%. 
Square   Head    Blank    Bolts,    10%. 
Bolt  Ends,    10%. 
Plow   Bolts.    5%. 
Elevator  Bolts,    large  head,   6%. 

corrugated   head,    40%. 
Fancy   Head   Bolts,   6%. 
Shaft    Bolts    ($3    list).    5%. 
Step    Bolts,    large    head     {%t    list). 

5%. 


Whiffletree  Bolts,  5%. 

Nuts,     square,     blank,     add    to     list, 

$1.50. 
Nuts,    square,    tapped,    add    to    list 

$1.75. 
Nuts,    hexagon,    blank,    add    to    list 

$1.75. 
Nuts,   hexagon,   tapped,    add   to  list, 

$2.00. 
Stove  Bolts,  60%.     Tire  Bolts.  40%. 
Terms:    2%   off   30   days   from    date 

of  shipment. 
F.O.B.  Montreal,  Toronto,  Hamilton, 

London,  Ont. 

BORAX 

Lump  Crystal  Borax,  lb.. .  .llc-12c 
F.O.B.    Montreal,    London,   Toroiito. 

BRASS 

Sheets,  24  gauge  and  heavier, 

base      $0  37 

Rods,   base   %   to   1   in.,   round     0  35 

Tubing,   seamless,   base   0  43 

F.O.B.  Montreal  and  Toronto. 

BUTTS  Wrought  Steel:— 

No.   840    add   20% 

No.   800    add   25% 

No.   838    add  15% 

No.    808 5% 

No.    804    add   7%% 

Nos.    802.   842,    844 7%% 

No.   810    add  10% 

No.    814 add  26% 

No.    830    2%% 

F.O.B.    Toronto,    Montreal,    London, 
Hamilton. 

CANS 

For  discount  on  milk  and  cream 
cans,  etc.,  see  list  under  head  of 
wares,  etc 

CEMENT 

Cement,  per  bbl.,  $8.26  in  car 
lots ;  80c  per  bbl.,  or  20c  each  is 
allowed  for  sacks  returned  in  good 
condition,  freight  paid. 

Paris  plaster,  flve-barrel  lots,  $4 : 
single  barrel,  $4.60.    F.O.B.  Toronto. 

CHAIRS  Dozen 

Step  ladder   $38  00 

Step  ladder  stools   18  00 

CHOPPERS,  FOOD 

Universal— Dozen  :  No.  0,  $22.80  . 
No.  1,  $28;  No.  2,  $83.75;  No.  8. 
$44.76. 

Russwin — Dozen  :  No.  0,  $24.50  : 
No.  1,  $30.60;  No.  2,  $36.75;  No.  3. 
$49.00. 

Full  case  of  half  dozen. 

F.o.b.  Montreal,  Toronto. 

CHURNS 

List  price  hand  churns — No.  0, 
$9 :  No.  1.  $9 :  No.  2.  $10 :  No.  3, 
$11;   No.   4.   $13;  No.  5.   $16. 

List  prices  power  churns — No.  0. 
$11:  No.  1.  $11:  No.  2.  $12:  No.  8. 
$13:   No.    4,    $17;  No.  6,   $20. 

;nt     of     10%       f.o.b.       Toronto, 
Hamilton,    Fergus,    London,    St    M 

Discount  of  7%%  f.o.b.  Mont- 
real. Ottawa.  K'ngston. 

■mt     of     5%     f.o.b.        St.       John. 
N.B. 

'  nrm 

Big    Ben    $3  25 

F.O.B.  Montreal.  Toronto,  Hamilton. 

Good    Morning,    each 1  60 

Lookout    2  00 

Sleepmeter 2  15 

MRmilton 

CLOTHES  BARS   AND  DRIERS 

Per   Doz. 

Leader    Clothes    Dryers    $10  86 

Clothes   Bars,   Nos.    1    and   3..    11   00 

No.     2     13  80 

No.     1     12  00. 

Ncr.    5 '. 14  00 

No.    6    16  00 


CLOTHES  HORSES,   Etc. 

Folding      Extension 

4  ft $  9  75         $19  50 

5  ft.    12  25  24  50 

6  ft.    15  00  30  00 

CLOTHES    LINES    (Galvanized) 

No.  Per  1,000  ft, 

17— 7-strand,  100  ft.  lengths..  $6  84 
17— 7-strand,  60  ft.  lengths. .  7  00 
18 — 6-strand,  100  ft.  lengths. .  5  60 
1$— 6-strand.  50  ft.  lengths..  5  38 
19— 6-strand,  100  ft  lengths. .  4  50 
19— 6-strand,  50  ft.  lengths. .  5  00 
F.O.B.    Montreal,    Toronto,    London. 

COIL  CHAIN 

Fireweld  Proof  B.B.B. 

3-16     in.     ..   $17.60 

V4    in 13.26 

5-16  in $16.76 

%   in.    ...      11.40  14.05 

7-16    in.    .      11.15  13.80 

V»    in.    ...      10.70  13.60 

%  in.    ...      11.00  13.20 

%   in.    ...      10.20  12.60 

%  in.    ...        9.95  12.35 

1  in.    . . .        9.70  12.25 
F.o.b.    Montreal   and  Toronto. 

Electric  Welded 

Proof  B.B.B. 

%   in $18.95  

3-16    in 18.00  $22.75 

V4    in 16.50  19.50 

5-16    in.    ...      13.80  15.70 

%    m 10.80  

7-16    in 10.Z0  

%and%in.       9.95  

F.O.B.  Toronto,  Montreal. 
Cow  ties,  net  list;  trace  chains. 
list;  dog  chains,  12%%:  halter 
chains,  12%%;  tie-out  chains, 
20% ;  stall  fixtures.  No.  1,  or 
or  heavy,  $2  dozen ;  stamped,  No.  3 
or  Dominion,  $1.75  doz.  net;  breast 
chains,  No.  220,  $16  dozen  pairs. 
F.O.B.  Montreal,  Toronto,  Hamilton, 
London. 

COMBS 

List  plus   15  per  sent. 
F.O.B.    Montreal    Toronte,    Hamil- 
ton,   London. 

COPPER  Mont.  Toronto 

Casting    ingot,    see 

weekly    report. 

Rods,   %  to  2  in 0  41       0  39 

Soft    sheets,    base    16 

oz.   and  heavier    ....     0  42       0  46 
Tubing,      lb 0  46       0  45 

Above   prices   are   full   sheets   and 
bars.      Cut   sheets   and   bars   are    6c 
per  lb.  higher. 
COPPERS.    SOLDERING 

Base,  3  to  8  lbs.,  59%c,  f.o.b.  To- 
ronto and  Hamilton. 

CORD    (SASH) 

No.     6.     lb 90 

No.     7.     lb 89 

Nos.    8.   9,    10,    12    88 

F.O.B.    Montreal,    Toronto,    HamH- 
ton,   London. 

CROWBARS,   $10.25  per   100  lbs. 

DOORS,   SCREEN 

Kasement,   No.   2,   oak   stain,   var- 
nished: 

2  ft.    8    in.,    doz $84  80 

2  ft.    10  in.,  doz 35.40 

3  ft.   x  7,   doz M.90 

F.o.b.  Torento. 

DRILLS— 

Standard  Lists. 

Blacksmiths',  %  in.  x  2%  "».  shank. 

List  each. 

V. $0.46        19/82 $1.20 

5/82 46        % l.M 

V16 60        21/82 1.40 

7/82 56         11/16 1.60 

u    60       23/82 l.«0 

9/32 66        %, 1.70 

6/16 70        2./M Lit 

11/82 76        18/16 1.90 

% $0        27/82 2.00 

18/81 »        % 2.1* 


January  3,  1920 


HARDWARE  ANTf  METAL— Advertising  Section 


the  WHY  PHILOSOPHY  of 

W.  G.  HARRIS 

President  The  Canada  Metal  Company,  Limited 

Did  you  ever  get  up  against  the  question  WHY? 

In  building  up  a  huge  business  like  ours,  time  and  time  again 
WHY  is  the  great  question  we  get  rubbed  in. 

For  instance,  for  years  we  have  been  manufacturing  BAB- 
BITT METALS— SHEET  LEAD— LEAD  PIPE  and  SOLDER 
and  guarantee  everything  we  manufacture  to  be  of  the  high- 
est quality  and  to  give  excellent  service. 

WHY  can  we  give  this  guarantee? 

The  reply  is,  we  have  been  manufacturing  for  over  30  years 
and  our  factory  is  the  best  equipped  in  the  Dominion.  We 
use  nothing  but  the  purest  of  raw  materials. 

The  WHY  is  because  of  QUALITY  and  SERVICE. 
Let  us  have  your  enquiries. 

THE  CANADA  METAL  CO.,  LIMITED 


HAMILTON 
MONTREAL 


TORONTO 


WINNIPEG 
VANCOUVER 


Good  Men 

\~\0  you  need  the  services  of  a 
good  retail  salesman,  traveller, 
or  manager?  The  best  of  them  read 
HARDWARE  AND  METAL 
each  week  from  cover  to  cover.  Inci- 
dentally they  also  note  the  condensed 
ads.  in  the  "Wanted"  section.  You 
can  use  space  in  this  section  at  a 
cost  of  two  cents  per  word  for  the 
first  insertion,  and  one  cent  a  word 
for  subsequent  insertions.  Add  five 
cents  for  box  number  or  address. 


Busy  Dealers 

prefer   to    sell    the   line    that  needs   the 
least  talking  in  order  to  make  sales. 


'tw  Skate vi*  Aluminum  lops 


are  half  sold  not  only  on  ac-' 
count  of  their  Canada-wide 
quality  reputation  but  for  their 
splendid  appearance,  workman- 
ship and   finish. 

— chrome-nickel  blades  with 
hard-as-glass  surface  that  keeps 
keenest  edge. 


core      preventing 


— soft,    tough 
brittleness. 

— a   model   for  every  purpose. 

These  are  the  sure  sales-closers 
th;it  seldom  fail.  Write  for  par- 
ticulars and  see  if  this  is  nov 
the    line   you   need   for  this   year. 


Canada  Cycle  &  Motor  Co.,  Limited 

Montreal         Toronto         WESTON         Winnipeg         Vancouver 


HARDWARE    AND    METAL 


January   3,    1920 


DRILLS— Continued 

7/l« 9«        29/32 2.20 

16982 SB        15/16 2.30 

u, 1.00        31/82, 2.40 

17/82 1.05        1 2.50 

»/16 1.10  ,.  j.       , 

Intermediate    sizes     take     list    of 
next   larger. 
Bit   Stock,  list  per  down— 

3/32 $2  70         % $  8  » 

Vt       3  00         7/16....  10  60 

5/32 S60         % 1390 

3/16 4W         9/1*....  16  60 

7/32 4  60         % 18  00 

14     5  00         11/16...  21  00 

f/SS 600  % 2400 

6/16 700         % 3000 

Bit  Stock   Drills    «% 

Blacksmiths',    %-in.   shank...     85% 

Straight  Shank   »&% 

Straight  Shank,    wire 86% 

Taper  Shank    *B% 

EMERY   CLOTH 
See  under  Sandpaper. 

ENAMELWARE 
See  prices  under  heading  Wares. 

PILES   AND   RASPS 

Discounts  below  apply  to  list  of 
Nov.  1,  1899.  % 

Great   Western,   Amer 50 

Kearney  4  Foot,  Arcade....     50 

J.  Barton  Smith,  Eagle   50 

P.  H.  and  Imperial   50 

Dlsston    Brand    40 

Globe    2« 

Nicholson    •* 

Black    Diamond    «° 

Delta    Files    20 

Firth   Files    •     5° 

F.o.b.   Toronto,    Montreal,    Lon- 
don and  Hamilton. 
FITTINGS  _       „   „ 

Cast  Iron  fittings,  10% :  Malle- 
able bushings,  22%%:  cast  bush- 
ings, 22%%  :  unions,  37%%  :  plugs, 
20%  off  list.  »,",'-, 

Class—  Black     Galv. 

A  0  67         0  72 

B        " "      0  2*         0  86 

C     .'..'. 0  19         0  26 

Toronto    and    Montreal. 
NIPPLES,  WROUGHT 

Toronto  Mont. 

4"   and  under....         70%         75% 

4V>"    and    larger.         60%         65% 

4""  and   under,    running    thread, 

40%. 

Standard  couplings,  4"  and  un- 
der, 40%. 

4%"  and  larger,  20%. 

Terms,  2%  30  days.  Approved 
credit,  Ontario,  Quebec  and  Mari- 
time Provinces. 

GRILLS.  ELECTRIC 

Single   heat,   round    $7  60 

Three   heat,   round    8  20 

F.o.b.  Toronto. 
GRINDSTONES  Per  100  lbs. 

Over  40  lbs.  and  2  in.  thick.. $3  50 

Under   40   lbs *  £5 

Rl-Treadle.    each    7  00 

F.o.b.  Toronto. 

HALTERS  (SNAP  AND  RING) 

Doz. 

Russet  rope  shank,  l"-*11.25-$lf75 
Perfect,  No.  1%    ••••••13  20-13  80 

Russet  rope  shank,  1%  In..  IS  >» 
Black  rope  shank,  1  »>•••■  J*  ™ 
Black  rope  shank,  1%"  1250-13  85 
"3and  sewn,  no  shank,  1  In.  17  w 
Rand  sewn,  no  shank.  1%  .  18  70 
Halters  (Sisal) 
7-16  in.  gross,  $24;  9-16  In.,  $36 
F  o.b.  Toronto.  London — 7-16  In., 
$'.10  doz. :   %   in.,   $2.65  doz. 

HAMMERS,  SLEDGE 

Can,  5  lbs.  and  over,  cwt..$17  60 
Masons,  6  lbs.  and  over,  per 

CWf 20  00 

w*«ons.  5  lbs    and  under...  22  60 

Napping,  up  to  2  lbs 25  00 

F.o.b.   Montreal.   Toronto,    Hamil- 
ton,  London. 

HANDLES    (WOOD) 

All    hickory    handles,    list,    plus 

25%-  All  fork,  hoe.  rake,  shovel  ami 
mall.  D  handles,,  10%.  All  othel 
handler  phis  10%.  All  doubletrees. 
•3k  x  W-  x  4  ft.  and  under,  less  10%.  All 
whiffletrees  3  in.  x  36  In.  and  under, 
less  10%.  All  neckyokes  3  in.  x  42  in. 
and  under,  less  10%.  All  other  neck- 
yokes,  whiffletrees  and  double-trees,  net 
list  Wood  hay  rakes,  horse  pokes,  10%. 
Pike  poles,  ash  or  maple,  plus  10%. 
Terms,  all  goods  f.o.b.  factories,  2% 
10  days,   net  30  da; 


HANGERS.  BARN  AND  PARLOR 


List 

Atlas,  No.  0   $13  30 

Atlas,  No.  1  13  80 

Atlas,  No.  2   15  80 

Stearns,  4  in 9  75 

Stearns,   5  In 13  20 

Perfect,   No.  1   10  45 

Canada     12  50 

Hatch    12  75 

National      14  50 

America      16  50 

Great    West    30  00 

Morm  King  and  safety  hang- 
ers,   doz 10  90 

steel  track,  1»4  in 9  00-12  00 

F.o.b.   Montreal,   Toronto. 

HEATERS,   ELECTRIC 

Majestic,    1    Burner    

Majestic,    2    Burner    

F.o.b.  Toronto. 

HINGES,   TEE   AND   STRAP 

Heavy,  Net  Prices.  Figured  Net  list. 
Strap  Tee 

Doz.  Dairs. 

4-inch    $  3  00       $  2  56 

5-inch    3  70  8  20 

6-inch    4  00  3  60 

8-inch    5  40  4   10 

10-inch    9  60  7  30 

12-inch    11  90         11  60 

14-inch    13  60         11  80 

Light,  Net  1  rices.     Figured  net  list. 

3-inch  $1  00  $1  00 

4-inch  1  20  1  10 

5-inoh  1  40  1  30 

6-inch  .! 1  70  1   50 

8-inch  .... 

10-incn  .... 

Screw  Hook  and  Strap  Hinges — 
List  prices,  per  dozen  pairs — 6  in., 
$4.30;  8-ln.,  $4.80;  10-ln.,  $6.40; 
12-in.,  $7  ;  15-ln.,  $7.50  ;  18-ln.,  $11 ; 
21-ln.,  $12.40;  24-in.,  $16;  27-in., 
$17.20;  30-in.,  $18.50;  33-ln., 
$21  50:  36-in..  $24.50. 
Discount,    15%. 

F.o.b.  Toronto,  London,   Hamilton 
and    Montreal. 

HOES,     Grub     $10  00     10  60 


HOOKS,  GRASS  English 

Canadian     Fox 
No.    2.   per  doz... $4  40     $5  00-$5  50 
No.    3,    per  doz...    4  50       5  50-  6  40 
No.    4,    per   doz.  ..460       6   00-  7   40 

Little    Giant    6  25        - 

Barden     Patent. . .    6  25        - 

F.o.b.    Montreal,    Toronto. 

HORSESHOES  Price  per  keg 

No.  2      No.  1 
Sizes      and       and 
Patterns       made    larger  smaller 
Less   20c. 
Light    Iron    ...  0-7      $7  75      $8  00 
Long  heel  light 

iron    3-7        7  75         

Medium    iron..  1-8        7  75       8  00 

Heavy   iron    6-8  7  76        

Snow    1-6        8  00        8  26 

New-light  "XL" 

steel   1-6        8  20        8  45 

Featherweight 

"XL"   steel...  0-4        9  60        

Special-counter- 
sunk     0-4      10  10         

Toe-weight 

(front  only).  1-4      10  60        

Packing — Up  to  3  sizes  in  one 
keg,  10c  per  100  lbs.  extra.  More 
than  3  sizes,  25c  per  100  lbs.  ex- 
tra. 

F.o.b.    Montreal    and    Belleville. 
Terms— Cash   in   thirty  days,   less 

2%  discount. 
TOE   CAULKS 

Nos.   0,   1,   2   and   larger,    sharp 
nnri   hlunt.  $2.25  to  $2.90  box. 
HOSE,  LAIWN  Toronto 

Corrugated,   %   In.,   100  ft.. $17  60 
Corrugated,   %  in.,  100  't..  20  50 

Corrugate''     %    in 23  60 

Corrugated.   1  in.,  100  ft...  35  00 

Less  5%   for  full   reels.  500  ft. 

F.o.b.  Toronto  and  London. 

HAT   AND   COAT   HOOKS 

Coppered   wire.   3   in..    $1:15   gross. 
F.o.b.   Montreal,   Toronto,    Hamil- 
ton,   London. 

IRON    AND  STEEL 
See   weekly   report. 


IRON,  TINNED 

Lion   and  Crown   Brand,   Toronto, 

in  22  gauge,  24  gauge  and  26  gauge. 

36    x    96     25c  per  'lb. 

30    x    96     25c  per  lb. 

Less   than   case,   50c   per   100   lbs. 
extra.     F.o.b.   Toronto. 

IRONS,    (SAD) 

Mrs.    Potts,    No.    55,    polish- 
ed,  per  set    $2   05 

Mrs.   Potte,   No.   50,    nickel- 
plated,    set     2  25 

Mrs.   Potts,   handles,  japan- 
ned,   doz 1  40 

Sad    irons,    common,    plain, 
3,  4  and  5  lbs 9  20 

Sad  irons,  plain,  6  lbs.  up..     7  00 

Sad  irons,   common,   plated.     5  50 

Princess  Electric,  each.$4  00    4  10 

Canadian  Beauty  Electric  Irons — 

Style  A $4  71 

Sty.'e  B   5  08 

Uotpoint    Domestic   Electric 
Irons,  each   5  25 

Gasoline  Sad  Irons,  each    ...       4  25 

F.o.b.  Montreal,  Toronto,  London, 
Hamilton. 

KNIVES,    HAY 

Spear    Point    $14  75 

Lightning      16  25 

Heath's  ' 13  25 

LADDERS.    Etc. 

Step     Ladders  Per  ft. 

Standard      0  31 

Crescent    0  28 

Household      0  24 

Faultless,  4  to  10  ft.  only 0  35 

Ontario.  4  to  10  ft.  only 0  32 

Shelf  Lock.  4  to  8  ft.  only 0  27 

Gardner,    No.     1     0  23 

Do.,   No.    2,    bolted    0  25 

Dominion,    No.    3    0  26 

Do.,    No.    4,    bolted     0  29 

Single  and   Fruit   Picking 

10   ft.    to    16    ft 23c  ft. 

18    ft.    to    20    ft 24c  ft. 

F.o.b.  Toronto,  Hamilton,  London. 
Roped   and    Straight    Extension 

Ladders  Per  ft. 

20    to   32    ft $0  25        $0  27 

36   to    40    ft 0  27  0   30 

44     ft 0  29  0  33 

Over    44    ft 0  42  0  40 

Best    quality,    20    to    40    ft 0  35 

Three    section    extension     ....   0  35 

F.o.b.  Toronto,  London,  Montreal. 

Stratford. 

Fire  ladders  up  to  32  feet  are 
twice  the  price  of  ordinary  exten- 
sions. Over  32  ft.  are  supplied 
with  supporting  legs  at  three 
times   the  price. 

LANTERNS  Per  do* 

Short    Globe,    plain    $12  50 

Do.,  Japd 13  25 

Long   Globe,    plain    12  50 

Do.,  Japd 13  25 

Dash,    plain    16  50 

Do..   Japd 16  25 

Do..  Search   (r'nd  reflec.)     17  00 

Little    Bobs    2  10-4  20 

F.o.b.  Toronto,  Hamilton,  London. 

Montreal. 
LANTERN    GLOBES  Dozen 

Cold    blast,   short $0  95-$)   10 

Cold   blast   1  00-  1  10 

3  doz.  cases,  95c  doz. ;  6  doz.  cases, 
90c  doz. 

Cold   blast,  genuine  ruby $4  75 

F.o.b.  Toronto,  London.   Hamilton 

and   Montreal. 
LATCHES  Per  doz. 

Steel  Thumb,  No.   2 $1  80-$2  00 

Steel  Thumb.  No.   3 2  40-  2  70 

Steel  Thumb.   No.  4 4  75 

Barn  Door,   No.  5   2  75 

Barn   Door,  No.  9    5  10 

F.o.b.  Montreal,  Toronto,  London. 
LEAD 

For  pig  lead  and  lead  and  zinc 
products    see   weekly   report. 
MACHINES    (WASHING) 

List  each 

Canadian      $12  60 

Dowswell      12  50 

Noiseless 16  25 

Hamilton     13  50 

Peerless    13   00 

Snowball      1«  76 

Momentum    20  25 

New   Century,   style   A 18  00 

New    Century,    style   B 20  00 

Playtime,    engine    drive    ....      26  00 

Ideal   Power    30  00 

Seafom,    electric,    style    A    .  .    120  00 

Seafoam.    engine  drive    55  00 

New  Idea,   electric    118  60 

Sunshine      10  2<i 

Popular,     No.      1      13    00 

Popular.    No.   2    12    50 


Economic      15    00 

Champion      20    25 

Blue    Bell,    without    stand ■     16    00 

Puritan  Water  Motor  Wash- 
er,   complete    30   00 

Hydro,     1     Tub,     engine     drive       57    00 

Do.,    do.,    electric    116    50 

Low    pressure    water    motor 

washer,   each    31  00 

Connor     ball-bearing,     with 

rack     21  00 

Perfection,  engine  drive   ....      65  00 

Perfection,    electric    124  00 

Beaver    26  00 

Beaver,  power    27  00 

Connor   Vacuum    26  00 

Patriot      23  00 

Jubilee    11  25 

Canada   First    23  00 

Less  30  and  5%. 

Freight  equalized  with  Montreal, 
Ottawa,  Toronto,  Hamilton,  Kings- 
ton, London  and  St.  Mary's  on 
shipments  of  quarter  dozen  and  up- 
wards. 

MALLETS  Per  doz. 

Tinsmiths,    2%   x   5%    in $2.40 

Carpenters',   No.  3   6.86 

F.o.b.  Montreal,  Toronto, 
Hamilton. 

MATTOCKS 

Cutter,     doz $14    25 

Pick,     doz 14   26 

F.o.b.  Montreal,  Toronto,  London. 
Hamilton. 

MIXERS.    BREAD 

Canuck — 

No.    4,    dozen    $36  24 

No.   8,   dozen    40  92 

Universal — 

No.    4,    dozen    $40  75 

No.    8,    dozen    43  76 

MOPS 

O-Odar,   dox.  net   $12  60 

.^prusieX,    Wo.    2,   doz.  .$8  00     8  40 
S  W.  Mops,  complete,  dos.5  26  5  46 
Mop    Sticks,    doz.,   No.   S....JJJ 

Cast   Head  Mop,  «•»••••••"  *  J* 

Crescent,    doz.,   No.   M.  .1  0©  8  »6 

Crank  wringing,   do*. ••  $  » 

F.o.b.   Montreal,   Toronto,    Haaall- 
ton,  London. 

MOWERS.  LAWN 

Adanac    **"J°S 

Woodyatt    gj* 

(•Impress    gjj 

Mayflower    J** 

star,  Ontario,  Daisy   »>  »** 

F.o.b.  Toronto,  Qnelph,  London, 
Hamilton. 

NAILS 

List   adopted   July   10,   1912. 
Advance  over  base  on   common 
wire   nails  in  kegs. 

2*4  Inch 16c 

1  inch $1  S   Inch 10c 

1%  inch 1    3%    l»eh 10c 

1V4  inch.  ...65c    3%    men 10c 

1%  lnch....40e    4       Inch 5c 

1%  Inch.... 40c    4%    Inch V 

2  inch....30e    5-lnch  baa*. 
2%  inch.... 30c    6V4-lnch  ba#e. 
2%  Inch 15c    6-lneh  base. 

6%   to  12-lnch-2  Ga.  and  hoarier, 
25c  over  base.  _       ' 

Standard  Steel  Wire  Nail*,  f.o.b. 
Toron'o  TiOndon,  Hamilton,  Mil- 
ton,  $5.20  base. 

brelgnt  equalised  oa  above 
points. 

F.o.b.      Montreal,      Gananoque. 
CoiHnewood     and    Owe*     Sound. 
$5.25  base, 
rrelght      equalised      on      above 

P°Wlndsor,  Walkervllle,  Sandwich 
f.o.b.  factory  prices,  carload  freight 
allowed,   $5.30. 

Sault  Ste.  Marie.  Port  Arthur 
Fort  William,  $5.55  base,  f.o.b.  fac- 
tory :   no  freight  allowance 

Moulding.  Flooring,  Slating,  Box. 
fence.  Barrel  Nails.  25c  per  100 
lbs.  over  common  nail  prices.  Fin- 
ishing Nails,  60c  per  100  lbs.  ad- 
vance over  common  nail  price. 
Clinch  Nails  and  Sash  Pins,  76c  per 
100  Ids.  over  common  nail  price. 

Miscellaneous  wire  nails,  60%  off 
miscellaneous  list,  f.o.b.  Toronto. 
Montreal.  Hamilton,  London. 

Cut  Nails— $5.35  base,  f.o.b.  Mont- 
real.    No  equalization  of  freights. 

Roofing  Nails  —  American,  large 
head,  keg,  $10.76:  25-lb  boxes,  per 
100    lbs..    $11.76. 

London— Kegs,  $10.75:  26-lb.  box, 
Fo.b.  Montreal.  Toronto.  Hamilton 
$11.76. 


January  3,  1920 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


73 


BETTER 

BRUSHES  AND 

BETTER 

BROOMS 

You  should  handle  this 
line  not  only  because  it  is 
"Made  in  Canada,"  but  be- 
cause it  is  absolutely  the 
BEST  line  of  brushes  and 
brooms  made  anywhere. 

SIMMS  Brushes  and 
Brooms  are  perfectly  con- 
structed, and  beautifully  fin- 
ished. 

A  guarantee  of  quality 
goes  with  every  piece  bear- 
ing the  SIMMS  name. 

Stock  up  on  the  famous 
SIMMS  line  of 

Paint  Brushes 
Lather  Brushes 
Scrubbing  Brushes 
Shoe  Brushes 
Stove  Brushes 
Brooms 
Whisk   Brooms 

Every  one  a  profitable  sale 
and  a  sure  repeater.  For 
particulars  write  our  nearest 
branch. 

T.  S.  SIMMS  &  CO. 

LIMITED 

Maker*  of  Better  Brushes  and 
Brooms  for  S4  years 

Head  Office:  St.  John,  N.B. 

MONTREAL  TORONTO 
LONDON 


Mr.  A.  J.  SEILER 
One  of  our  special  washer  salesmen 

Our  Expert  Salesman 
Will  Help  You- 

We  help  our  dealers  to  make  large 
turnover  and  satisfactory  profits. 
We  not  only  furnish  material  for 
window  display  newspaper  ads  and 
moving  picture  slides,  but  also 
send  an  expert  salesman  to  assist 
in  putting  on  demonstrations.  He 
teaches  the  salesman  in  the  store 
the  right  line  of  talk  to  use.  He 
calls  on  the  best  prospects  at  their 
homes. 

We  want  one  Time-Saver  dealer  in 
every  town  and  should  like  to  hear 
from  dealers  in  the  territory  in 
which  our  representative  has  been 
appointed. 

BEATTY  BROS.,  LIMITED 

Winnipeg,  Man.  Fergus,  Ont.  Montreal,  Que. 
London,  Ont.  Edmonton,  Alta.  St.  John,  N.B. 
Vancouver,  B.C.  London,  Eng. 

Ifoeattyl    I  BrosjlLimited 
mile  tin 


HARDWARE    AND    METAL 


January   3,   1920 


NAILS     (HORSE) 

C    Brand 
BiM 

Cepewell—  Per  100  lbs. 

No.    t    $2*00 

i    No.  6 22  00 

No.  7    81  00 

No.  8    20  06 

No*.  »  to  12   10  00 

Discount,     10% 
"M.R.M."  BRAND 

Net  Prioa  List      Per  box 
No.  Lengths  of  to  lbs, 

8     6%"  $20  00 

4  ...      1%"  1*  " 

5      1    16-16"  5  0* 

•     »%"  *» 

7        2    16-16"  4  60 

$      *%•  4  «> 

»     2  11-16"  4  26 

10     2%"  *  26 

li        3    t-16"  4  26 

1«     $%"  4  26 

F.o.b.   London,  Hamilton,  Mont- 
real. Toronto 
NETTING,   POULTRY 

List  prioes  per  roll  of  60  lineal 
yards.     Adopted  March,   1909. 

2-ineh  mesh  and  19  ga.  wire. 
12  ineh...$l  80  48  1n«h...$  6  20 
18  inch...  2  «»  «0  inch...  7  70 
24  inoh...  3  40  72  inch...  9  20 
SO  inoh...  4  00  84  inoh...  10  60 
36  inch...  4  76  96  ineh...  12  00 
42  men...   (  60 

1%  ineh  mesh  and  19  ga.  wire. 
12  inch...  $3  60  42  ineh. .  .$10  60 
18  ineh....  6  09  48  ineh...  12  00 
24  ineh...  •  80  60  ineh...  16  00 
80  ineh...  7  76  72  ineh...  18  0V> 
36  ineh...  •  90 

1  Inch  meefc  and  20  ga.  wire. 
12  ineh...  84  00        42  Ineh. .  .$12  00 
18  Ineh...  6  60        48  ineh...   14  00 
24  ineh...  7  00        60  ineh...   17  00 
80  ineh...  8  CO        72  ineh...  20  00 

%  Ineh  mead  and  20  ga.  wire. 
24  ineh.. $10  60        86  inch... $16  00 
80  ineh..  12  76 

%  ineh  mess  and  22  ga.  wire. 
24  Inch...  $16  00      ."Winch...  $24  00 
30 Ineh...  20  10 

Discounts  at  present  quoted  ap- 
ply only  to  1  and  2  Inch  mesh 
netting.  Other  prices  hare  been 
withdrawn  and  are  quoted  only 
on  application. 

Toronto,  London,  Montreal, 
Canadian    netting,   2-in.    mesh,   net; 

lin.  mesh,  add  6%. 
American    netting,    1-in.    mesh,    add 

6%. 

Per  rod 

Invincible— 1040    $0  75 

1848    0  86 

2000   006 

Pot  up  in  10,  20  and  SO-rod  rolls. 

F.o.b.  Montreal. 
Bine    Ribbon — 

24-inch,    per    roll $4  86 

SG-tneh,   per  roll    6  86 

48-indh.  par  roll    7  26 

60-ineh,   per   roll   8  60 

74^iiK)h,   per  roll    9  86 

'lit    nn    in    10    rod   tr~z. 
NIPPLES 

See    Fittings. 

OAKUM 

Beat    (American)    $»1  00-124  00 

Clipper    (spun)    tl  ft 

Clipper   (unepun)    10  60 

U.S.  Navy  (spun)   tl  60 

U.S.  Navy   (ttnspun)    

Plumbers     (span)     10  26 

F.o.b.  Montreal.  Toronto. 

OILS  Montreal  Toronto 

RoyalRe,  gal 0  22%  0  21% 

Palaome,    gal 0  2*5%  0  24% 

Gasoline,    net,    gal. . .    0  88  0  32 

List  Gt-llon 

Black    of!     (Summer)   0  14%  0  13% 

Black  oH   (Wfrrter) . .    0  10  0  16 
Imperial    Kerosene 

Tractor     0  69 

Capital    cylinder    .  .      0  62  0  68 
Machine  oil,  regular 

gradee     0  36  0  36 

Standard  gas  engine 

oil     0  40%  0  37 

Paraflne      0  26  0  21 

List,    less   16%    on    above. 

Polarine  Oil.  list   0  90 

Polarine   Oil.   heavy,   list.  0  00 

Polarine   A.   lint 1   00 

Gargoyle  Mobiloil,   A  and   E  1  30 

Gargoyle  Mobile.   B   and   BB  1   40 
List,   less  25%   an   above. 

F'lel  oil.  bMs.  net 0  09 

Fuel   oil,   tank  cars,   net....  0  08 


Prices  shown  arc  barrel  basis 
unless  otherwise  specified.  Bar- 
rels charged  extra. 

OLD  MATERIALS 

See  weekly  report. 
PACKING  Per  lb. 

Fine   Jute    $0  20 

Coarse   Jute    •  0  IE 

Hemp 0  84 

Square    braided    hemp 0  38 

No.   1    Italian    0  44 

No.   2   Italian    0  36 

F.o.b.  Toronto,  Montreal. 

PAPER  Per  400-ft.  roll 

Montreal  Toronto 

Dry   Fibre,    No.    1,    Anchor $1  23 

Dry    Fibre,    No.    2,    Anchor 0  72 

Tarred  Fibre,  Anchor,  No.  1..  1  33 
Tarred  Fibre,  Anchor,  No.  2..  0  90 
Rosin     Sized     Sheeting,     red. .    1  05 

Do.,    blue    1  70 

Surprise    Fibre    0  80 

"Stag"    Sheathing    0  80 

Tarred  felt,  per  cwt. — 

7,    10,   and    16   oz 4  65 

Cyclone   (dry)    1  23 

Cyclone    (tarred)    1  33 

Joliette    (dry  fibre)    0  72 

Monarch      Sheathing      (per 

100    lbs.),    white 6  50     

Do.,    gray    5   50      .... 

Asbestos     sheeting     (per 

100   lbs.)    •  It     18% 

Carpet    Felt,    16.    SO,    24    ox., 

100    lbs 5  75 

Straw,    sheathing,    heavy,    dry. 

cwt 4   15 

Do.,  tarred,  per  cwt 4  30 

F.o.b.   Toronto   and    Montreal. 

PASTE 

Stick-Past 

1-lb.  pkgs..  gross  $22  00 

2-lb.    pkgs..    gross     42  00 

In   barrels   260   lbs.,    lb 0  12% 

Barrels    of    6     lbs.,    cotton 

bags,   H> 0  13% 

In  kegs   126   lbs.,   lb 0  14 

In   60-fb.   boxes,   lb 0  16 

In    25-Ib.   boxes,    lb 0  17 

PICKS 

Clay- 
Montreal  Toronto 

5  to  6   lbs.,   doz 11    50  11   80 

6  to   7   lbs.,   doz....      12   50  12  80 

Rock— 

7  lbs 13  50  13   50 

8  lbs 13   50  13   75 

F.o.b.   Montreal   and  Toronto. 

PINS.  CLOTHES 

Per  case 

5    gross,    4-in.     (loose)     1  50 

4   gross    (cartons).    4   in 1  76 

Spring,   2   grs.   box    1  00 

F.o.b.   Montreal   arid  Toronto. 
PIPE,   WROUGHT 

Price  List  No.   42,  Dec.  9,    1919 
Standard   Battweld 
Per  100  feet. 
Steel      Gen.  Wrot.  Iron 
Blk.      Gal.      Blk.      Gal. 

%    in.. $  6  00  $  8  00  $ 0 

Vi  in..  4  65  6  78  6  13  7  26 
%  ,n..  4  65  6  78  5  13  7  26 
%  in..  6  16  7  74  6  84  8  42 
%  in..   7  76   9  89   8  68  10  81 

1  ir...  11  48  14  62  12  84  15  98 
1H  in..  15  53  19  78  17  37  21  62 
1%  in..  18  56  23  65  20  76  25  85 

2  in..  24  98  31  82  27  94  34  78 
2' '■.    in..  39  49  50  31   

3  "  in..  51  64   65  79   

3%  in..  65  78  82  80   

4  in..  77  94  98  10   

Standard   Lap  weld 

Steel      Gen.  Wrot.  Iron 
Blk.      Gal.      Blk.      Gal. 

2  in.. $27  94  $34  78  $81  64  $38  11 
2%  in..  40  66  61  48  46  61  57  3S 

3  in..  68  17  67  82  60  82  74  97 
3%  in..  66  70  83  72  75  90  92  92 

4  in..  76  86  97  01   

4  in..  79  08  99  19  89  9*  110  09 
4%  in..  88  00  113  00  107  00  132  00 

5  in.. 103  00  132  00  126  00  164  00 

6  in.. 133  00  171  00  162  on   200  00 

7  in.. 175  00  224  00  211  00  259  00 
0  T,  in..  184  00  235  00  221  00  273  00 

8  in. .212  00  271  00  255  00  314  00 

9  in.. 254  00  324  00  305  00  376  00 

10  L  in. 236  00  301  00  283  00  349  00 
10   in.. 303  00  387  00  365  00  449  00 

Terms  2%  30  days,  approved 
credit. 
Freight   equalized   on   Chatham, 
nuelph,   Hamilton,  London.  Mont- 
real,  Toronto,    Welland. 


PIPE    (Conductor) 

Plain  List 

2  Id.,  in  10-ft.  lengths,  Ust.$  8  00 

3  in.,  in  10-ft.  lengths,  list.     9  70 

4  in.,  in  10-ft.  lengths,  list.  12  80 

5  in.,  in  10-ft.  lengths,  list.  17  00 

6  In.,  in  10-ft.  lengths,  list.  21  30 
List  less   10%. 

F.o.b.   Toronto,   Ottawa,    Oshawa. 

PIPE.    LEAD 

See   weekly   report. 

PIPE  (SOIL) 

Medium    and    extra    heavy    soil 
Pipe,   4  in 16% 

Medium    and    extra    heavy    pipe, 
2,  3,  6  and  6    10% 

Medium     and     extra     heavy     fit- 
tings, 2  to  6  ineh 26% 

8  ineh  pipe  and  fittings 6% 

F.o.b.    Toronto,    Montreal. 

PIPE  (8TOVE) 
See   prices   under   Wares,   etc. 

PITCH 

Pine,    black,    per  bbl 10  00 

Navy  pitch,  per  bbl 6  50 

Coal  tar  pitch,  per  cwt 1  20 

F.o.b.    Montreal,   Toronto. 

PLANTERS.  CORN 

King    of    Field,    dozen     $11  25 

Triumph,    doz.       9  40 

PLATES,    CANADA 

Prices  nominal,  Montreal.  Toronto 

Ordinary,   52   sheets... $7  85       $7  36 
Do.,   60  sheets    7  95         7  45 

PLATES,    COKE,    TIN 

Ter*to.  Mont 
Per  Box 

IC.  20x28  base $21  00  $21  00 

IX,  20x28  base 24  00   24  50 

IXX,  20x28  base 27  00   27  50 

IXXX,  20x28  base..  29  00   29  50 

"DOMINION   CEOWN   BEST"— 
DOUBLB   COATED  TISSUE 

Nominal 

IC,  14x20  base  $15  00 

IX,    14x20  base    17  00 

IXX,  14x20  base  19  00 

F.O.B.    Montreal. 

PLATES,    TERNE 

IC,    20x28,    112   sheets $20  50 

F.O.B.   Toronto   or   Montreal. 
POLISH     (O-Codar) 

4-oz.  bottles,  dos.,  list 3  00 

12-oz.  bottles,  dos.,  list 6  00 

1-qt.   can,  doz.,  list 15  00 

%-gal.   cans,  dos.,  list 24  00 

1  gal.    cans,    dot.,    list 36  00 

Discount,  80  per  cent. 
Liquid  Veneer — 

4  os.,  dos POO 

12  os.,  dos 4  00 

32  oz.,  doz 8  40 

64  oz.,  each  1  20 

128  oz.,  each   2  10 

F.o.b.  Toronto.   London. 

POLISH.   METAL 

Ben-Ton 

Sise           Case  Doz.  Case 

%   Pts.,  3  doz $1    16  $3  40 

%  pts.,  3  doz.   2  10  6  00 

Pints,    2    doz.    8   16  6  00 

Quarts,   2  doz 4  66  9  00 

%  gal.,   1  doz 8  40  8  40 

Gal.,    %   doz C  90 

PUMPS 

Pitcher  Closed 
Spout   Spout 

No.  1   $2  76    $2  95 

No.  2   3  05      3  SO 

No.  3  3  40      3  65 

F.o.b.   Montreal.   Toronto,    Hamil- 
ton, London. 

RIVETS    AND    BURRS 

Iron  rivets,  7-16  inch  and  smaller, 
blacked  and  tinned,  37%% ;  Iron 
Burrs,    8T%%. 

Copper  rivets,  usual  proportion 
of  burrs,   add  6%  ;  burrs,   add   40%. 

Extras  on  Copper  Rivets,   %-Ib. 
pkgs.,   lc  per  lb. ;   \-Ib.   pkgs.,  2c 
lbs.    Coppered   Rivets,   net  extras, 
3e  per  lb. 
F.o.b.  Montreal,  Toronto,  London. 

BOO  FIN  G  Per  square 

Montreal  Toronto 

Samson.    1-ply    roll    2  60 

Samson,   2-ply,   roll    2  96 


Samson.   *-ply.   roll    3  60 

R.  S.   Special,    1   ply 1  86 

R.   S.  Special,  2  ply    2  10 

R.  S.  Special,  8  ply    i  86 

Everlastic,    1-ply    1    95 

Everlastic,     2-ply      »...    2   30 

/Everlastic,     B-tply      j 2    B5 

Panamoid,     1-ply     1    85 

Panamoid,    2-ply     2    15 

Panamoid,    3-ply    2   50 

Red  Star  Ready  Roofing,  2-ply  1  76 

Do.,   3-ply    t  •* 

Liquid     roofing     coating,     per 

gal.,   in  barrels 0  60 

5  and  10  gal.  lots,  per  gal 0  60 

1.   2.    5   gal.   cans,  gallon 0  86 

Coal    Tar    (refined),    bbl 8    26 

Coal    Tar    (crude)     7    09 

F.o.b.    Toronto   and    Montreal 

ROPE  Lb 

Pure  Manila  basis 91 

Beaver    Manila    basis    1 .     26 

New   Zealand  hemp  basis    ...     26 

Sisal     basis     22% 

Above  quotations  are  baela  prices, 
\  in.  and  larger  diameter.  The 
following  advances  over  basis  are 
made  for  smaller  slses : — %  Is., 
%c ;  9-16  to  7-16  In.  Inclusive,  1« ; 
%  in.,  l%c;  %  and  $-16  In.,  2e; 
3-16  in..  2%c  extra. 

Single   lath  yarn  basis    22% 

Double   lathe   yarn 23 

Yacht  marline,  tarred  64 

Halyards    47 

Hemp,  deep  sea  line  basis  . .  47 
Hemp,  tarred  ratline  basis. .  40 
Elemp,  tarred  bolt  rope  basis  42 

Marline   and    Housellne    42 

Italian   rope  basis. On  sppllcatloe 

Cotton,   %   in 0  83 

5-32    in 0  82 

3-156    in 0  82 

%-in.  and  up   0  81 

F.o.b.    Toronto,    Montreal,    Brant- 
ford,   London,   Hamilton. 

RULES.    BOXWOOD    (LUFKIN)— 

651B  (68),  $2.20  dozen:  7*1  (61). 
$2.90:  861  (61).  $8.66;  771  (84). 
$7.00:  781  (62),  $8.76:  861A  (68%), 
$8.80;  852  (79).  $5.50:  762B  (7). 
$6.50:  386  (32).  $7.60;  88*1  (*8.%). 
$6.66:  466  (60).  $1.96;  171  (36). 
$6.00. 
F.o.b.  Montreal,  Toronto,  London. 

TAPES.  MEASURING  (LUFKIN)— 

Bach 

268.    .50   ft.    Challenge,    Steel    $4    90 

108,    30   ft.    Reliabli     Ii  *    95 

>    ft     Rival,    Steel     4    25 

1013,    SO   ft..    Rival    Jr.,    Steel    -..  3   95 

GIB,    50    ft,     Metallic     .) 3    46 

604,    G6    ft 3    86 

40B.    50   ft.,    Linen    2    40 

Dote" 

718.    50    ft...     Ass    Skin    G    60 

714.    66    Ft,    ASS   Skin    7    75 

148.    3    feet.    Steel    Pocket 7  60 

146.    5    ft..    Steel    Pockei 10  M 

175.    6    ft.,    Linen    Pocket 6  86 

166.   5   ft.,   Cotton   Pocket 1  60 

F.oJb.  Montreal,  Toronto,  London. 

SANDPAPER 
B.    4    A.    sandpaper,    12%%    off 

list. 
Star  sandpaper,   12%%  off   list. 
B.  4  A.  emery  cloth,  30%  on  Hst. 
F.o.b.  Montresl   and   Toronto. 

SCALES  Scale    Stamping 

Champion—  List       extra, 

4   lb $5  00      $0  80 

10   lb 7  60        •  30 

240    lb 12  60        0  60 

600   lb 28  00        1  00 

1200   lb 36  00        1  60 

2000    lib 60  00        1  00 

2000  lb.  Drop  lever  37  00  1  00 
10-Ib.  Household..  5  00  t  10 
26-lh.   Household..     6  00        0  80 

Champion  list  prices,  net:  stan- 
dard scales,  discount :  Weigh  Beams, 
5%  discount.  No  discount  allowed 
on  stamping  charge.  F.o.b.  Toronto, 
Montreal,  Hamilton. 

SCREWS 

Discounts    off    Standard    List 
adopted  Aug.   L   1003. 

Wood,   F.H.,   bright    76% 

Wood,    R.H.,    bright    72%% 

Wood,    O.H..  bright    72%% 

Wood,    F.£„    brass 66     % 

Wood.    R.H..   braes 62V4% 

Wood,   OH.,   braes 62%% 

Wood.   F.H.,  bronze 60     % 

Wood,   R.H.,  bronze 47%% 

Wood,  OH.,  bronze 47%% 

Square  cap    20 

Hexagon   cap    20 


January  3,   1920 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


75 


BLACK  DIAMOND  FILE  WORKS 


ESTABLISHED  1863 
Twelve  Medals  of 

Award  at 

INTERNATIONAL 

Expositions. 


INCORPORATED  1895 
Special  Grand 

Prize 

GOLD  MEDAL 

Atlanta,  1895 


Copy  of  Catalogue  will  be  sent  free  to  any   interested  File  User  upon  application. 


G.  &  H.  BARNETT  COMPANY 


PHILADELPHIA,  PA. 


Owned  and  Operated  by  Nicholson  File  Co. 


FISHING  TACKLE 


This  British- 
American  symbol 

is  the  Trade  Mark  of  the  best 
brand  of  fishing  tackle  made 
anywhere  in  the  world. 

This  is  a  claim  endorsed  by  fishers 
everywhere  because  of  Morrisca 
Tackle's  proved  reliability. 

Dealers  find  Morrisca  Tackle  the 
oustanding  order-getter.  It  makes 
new  customers  and  keeps  the  old 
ones. 

Our  new  General  Catalogue  tt  note  in 
preparation.  May  ue  pal  jreur  name 
on  our  register  ? 

Morris,  Carswell  &  Co. ,  Ltd. 

Craftsmen  In  Silkworm  Gut 

118  Howard  Street,  Glasgow 

Scotland  t:         (Wholesale  only) 


And  at  Murcta.  Spain 


EstaHlskeJ  I85S 


A  PROSPEROUS  NEW  YEAR 

is  often  wished      TO      us»  but  a  great 
dealof  the  prosperity  depends  upon  individual  efforts 

THE  CUSTOMERS  WHO  ORDER 

LONDON  BAR  IRON 

IN  1920 

will  start  the  work  with  the  right 

Quality 

to  assure  the  prosperity  that  comes  as  a 
natural  result  of  individual  efforts  to  make 

BUSINESS  BETTER  THAN  EVER 

London   Rolling   Mills  Co. 

LIMITED 

LONDON,  ONTARIO 

Sales  Agents:  Manitoba,  Bissett  &  Webb,  Ltd.,  Winnipeg;  British  Columbia, 
McPherson  &  Teetzell,  Vancouver. 


CANADIAN  ROLLING  MILLS  CO.,  LIMITED 

WORKS:     LACHINE  CANAL,  MONTREAL 

Manufacturers  of 

BAR  IRON  and  STEEL:     Rounds,   Squares   and   Flats 

Also  Twisted  Steel  Bars  for  Reinforcing 

SELLING  AGENTS: 

CANADIAN  TUBE  &  IRON  COMPANY,  Limited,  MONTREAL 


76 


HARDWARE    AND    METAL 


January   3,   1920 


SCREWS,   WOOD  BENCH 

Dozen    $7  »0 

9CTTHE8  Do* 

Cast  Steel    $16  76 

Golden    Clipper   16  76 

Little   Giant    17  76 

Bush      16  » 

F.O.B.   London,  Toronto.  Montreal. 
SNATHS  Doz. 

00  Patent $13  76 

*      1     13  20 

2     12  65 

8     11  So 

SHEETS,  BLACK 

See  Montreal  and  Toronto  report. 

SHEETS,    CORRUGATED 

See  weekly  report. 
SHEETS,   GALVANIZED 

Premier  Apollo 

U.S.  oz.  . .  8  90  9  75  9  25  9  50 
U.S.  28...  8  30  10  15  8  85  8  80 
U.S.  26...  7  90  8  75  8  55  8  45 
22  and  24.  7  70  8  15  8  40  8  25 
18  and    20.    7  50     7  95       8  25     8  05 

16     7  25     7  75       8  10     7  85 

12   and    14.   7  05     7  50       7  95     7   60 

An  extra  is  now  charged  on  gal- 
vanized sheets,  10%  oz.  and  28  ga., 
when  shipped  out  in  sheets  3  feet 
wide.  The  extra  charged  over  prices 
shown  above  is  20c  per  100  pounds. 
Other  gauges  show  no  change  for 
different  widths. 

Prices  shown  are  for  full  cases. 
An  extra  charge  of  25c  per  100 
lbs.   is  made  for  less  than  ease  lots. 

F.O.B.     Hamilton     and    Toronto. 

Queen's  Hd.  Fleur-de-lis 

28    ga $10  50  $10  00 

26  ga 10  25  9  75 

24    ga 9  65  9  70 

22    ga 9  30 

20  ga 9   10 

F.O.b.    Montreal. 
SHINGLES,  METAL 

Standard,  galvanized    $10  00 

Standard,    painted    8  00 

Discount  7%%. 

SWEEPERS,  CARPET  Bissell's 

Doz. 
American      Queen,      nickeled 

fittings,    Cyco  ball   bearing  $61   00 


On  shipments  of  300  lbs.  and 
over,  freight  is  allowed  south  and 
east  of  and  including  North  Bay : 
also  several  Western  counties  in 
Quebec  Province.  Places  north  and 
west  of  North  Bay,  the  freight  is 
equalized  on  North  Bay.  For  Que- 
bec and  Maritime  Provinces,  freight 
is  equalized  on  Montreal. 
SOLDERING    COPPERS 

See  Coppers. 
SOLDER,    BAR 

See  weekly  report 
SPOUTS,  BAP 

Eureka,    per    M $13  50     $16  60 

STANDS,  WASHTUB— 

Reversible  Drip,  each    $2.25 

STAPLES 

See    Wire    Products. 
STOVES 

Oil  Burning  Cooking  List  each 
Perfection  No.  32,  2-burner.  .$18  76 
Perfection  No.  38,  3~burner. .  24  26 
Perfection  No.  34,  4-hurner. .  30  76 
No.  22G  oven  for  above  stoves    7  25 

Discount,  26%  off  list. 

Freight   allowed   on    shipments   of 
12  stoves. 
MeClary     Glass     Front    Oven 

No.  70,   each,  net   4  50 

Detroit     Glass     Front     Oven, 

No.   85,  each,   net 4  60 

F.O.B.    Sarnia,    London,    Toronto, 
Ottawa. 
Oil  Burning  Heater*.         List 

No.   626,    each    $  7  00 

No.    690,   each    8  2o 

No.    680,   each    10  25 

Discount  26%  off  list. 

Freight   allowed    on    shipments    of 
24  heaters. 
STRETCHERS.    CURTAIN— 

Star,    No.    1,    doz 24  00 

Star,    No.    2,    doz 24  00 

Sun      18  60 

Adjustable  Pin,  No.  44,  doz..  84  60 
STRETCHERS,    WIRE 

Hercules,   doz $2  60 

Sampson,   doz 7  60 

Universal,  nick.,  Cyco  bearing  46  00 
Universal,  jap.,  Cyco  bearing  39  00 
SWEEPERS,  VACUUM  Bissell's 

Doz. 

Grand   Rapids,    nickeled $124  00 

Household,  japanned    110  00 


SPADES,  SHOVELS  AND  SCOOPS 


2nd  Grade 

% 
45  and     5 
45  and     6 


45  and     5 


4  th   Grade 

% 
45  and     5 


45  and 

5 

46  and 

5 

45  and 

5 

45  and 

5 

46  and 

5 

1st  Grade 
% 

Plain  iJack  Shovels  and  Spades 45  and  5 

Draining  Tools    45  and  5 

Hollow  Back   Scoops    45  and  5 

Sand    Shovels     45  and  6 

Hollow    Back    Shovels 45  and  5 

Hollow  Back   Coal  ShoTSSs   46  and  5 

Riveted  Back  Scoops   45  and  5 

Miners'   Spring   Point  Shovels 45  and  6 

Above  discounts    apply    whether   goods  are   sold   in   carload   or   less 
than  carloads. 

The  above  discounts  apply  only    to    Black    List ;    Black    List    prices 
being  as  fallows: 

BLACK   LIST  PRICES 

Plain  Back   Shovels  and   Spades.... 

Draining  Tools,  No.  2,  black 

Hollow  Back  Scoops,  No.  2,  black . . 
Coal    Shovels,    Hollow   Back,    No.    2, 

■black    

Sand  Shovels,  No.  2,  black 

Hollow  Back  Shovels,  No.  2,  black . . 
Riveted  Back  Scoops,  No.  2.  black.. 
Miners'  Spring  Point  Shovel,  No.  2, 

black   


$29.00 
29.00 
34.50 

$28.00 
27.50 

$25.00 
32.00 

32.00 
27.60 
27.50 
37.50 

35.60 

30.00 
24.00 
24.00 
84.00 

36.60 

NET  EXTRAS — 

For  each   size   larger  than    No.    2,   add   35c   dozen   net. 

F.O.B.  London,  Hamilton,  Toronto,  Gananoque,  Ottawa,  Montreal, 
Quebec.  Halifax,  St.  John,  Moncton,  and  freight  may  be  equalized 
thereon. 


OTub,    jap.    Cyco  bearing 108  00 

Champion,  nickeled  fittings . .  43  00 

Champion,  japanned  fittings.  36  00 

Grand,    nick.,    Cyco    B.B 6t  00 

Grand,   jap.,   Cyco   B.B 67  00 

Grand     Rapids,    nick.,    Cyco 

B.B 48  00 

Grand  Rapids,  jap.,  Cyco  B.B.  41  00 
Parlor    Queen,     nick.,     Cyco, 

B.B 64  00 

Princess,   nick.,   Cyco   B.B...  49  00 

Standard,   nickeled   fittings.  .  44  00 

Standard,   jap.   fifrbingw    97  00 

SIDING,  METAL 

Standard,   gal  van  zed    $8  50 

Standard,  painted   6  60 

Discount  7%%. 


Superba,   nickeled    140  00 

F.O.B.   factory,   Niagara   Falls,   Ont. 

SWEEPERS   (ELECTRIC) 

Steel    frame    $36  46 

Aluminum   frame    43  90 

Attachments,    set    8  25 

F.O.B.  Toronto,  Hamilton.  London. 

TACKS  Discount 

Wire   Tacks    60  and  10% 

Revised     Hardware    Tack 

List     adopted     Jan.     1, 

191«    60  and  15% 

Double  pointed   tacks 60  and  10% 

Shoe  findings  list  adopted 

July  6.  1917  Net  List 

List     of     Capped     Goods 


adopted  Jan.  1,  1916.  .602and  16% 
F.O.B.  Toronto,  Hamilton,  Montreal 

and    London. 
TINNERS'   TRIMMINGS 

See  prices  under  head  of  Wares. 
TOASTERS.  ELECTRIC 

Canadian   Beauty    $4  71 

Upright,  with  rack 6  40 

TOOLS,  HARVEST 

Waverly,  Wellandivale,  Rixford, 
Maple  Leaf,  Bedford,  12%%  dis- 
count. Samson,  7%i%  discount. 
F.OJB.  Montreal,  Toronto,  Hamilton, 

London. 
TRACK   BARN   DOOR 

Hatch   Trolley,   per  ft 0  19 

Brackets  for  above,  per  doz.  1  72 

National  Flat  Track,  1%  ta- 
per   ft 0  12 

TROUGH    (EAVE) 

O.   G.   Square  bead  and  half  round : 

Size  in  girth.  Per  100  ft. 

Sin $6  90     16  in $12  60 

10  in 7  70     18  in 16  00 

12  in 9  10     List   lees    10%. 

F.O.B.   Toronto,    Oshawa,    Ottawa. 
TRAPS    (GAME)  Doz.  with  chain 

Victor  Giant  No.  1  G,  doz...     2  70 

Jumip,    No.    1    2  95 

Hawley  &  Norton,  No.  1 3  45 

Newhouse,  No.  1  5  00 

F.O.B.   Toronto,    London,    Hamilton, 

Montreal. 
TUBS,  WOOD 

No.    0,    per   dozen    $20  80 

No.    1,    per   dozen    18  60 

No.    2.    per    dozen    16  20 

No.    3,    per    dozen    18  85 

F.O.B.   Newmarket. 
TWINE   (COTTON) 

5-lb.     sack.     3-ply,    lb 0  87* 

Cones,    3-ply,    lb     0  83 

Do.,    4-ply,    lb 0  87% 

VALVES   AND  COCKS 
Compression  work,  standard....     28 

High  grade   24 

Fuller  work,  standard 34 

Basin  cocks,  No.   0,  standard. . .     23 

Nos.   1  and  2   23 

Bath    cocks,    compression 30 

Flatwav    stop    nnd    waste    cocks, 

standard     82 

Ronndway     stop     and     waste 

cocks,   standard    32 

Brass  steam  cocks,  standard.  .Net  list 
Radiator  valves,   standard 15 

Do.,   removable  seat 10 

Globe,    angle    and    check    valves. 

standard     5-9% 

Gate   or   Straightway Net 

Jenkins  Gate  Valve 10% 

Jenkins    Globe    Net 

Standard   Gate    Net 

FOB.   Toronto. 
Penberthy  Brass  Valves 

Compodiek    Valves    6-2  %  % 

Gate   Valves    16% 

Regrinding     Valves     6<% 

Swing    Check    Valves    Net  List 

WARES.  ETC. 

Britannia,  50%. 

Scotch   Grey  Ware,   45  and  5%. 

Colonial,    20%. 

Imperial   Ware,   20%. 

Pearl,    20%. 

Premier,    list,    plus    10% 

Canada  Ware,   list,   plus  10%. 

Crescent,   40%  and  6%. 

Diamond,    plus    10%. 

White    Ware.    40%. 

Japanned   Ware,   list  plus  25%. 

Japd.    Ware,    White,   list,   plus    35% 

Plwin   »n<i  Japanned  Sprinklers,   list 

plus  26%. 
Stamped     Ware,     plain.     45%. 
Stamped  Ware,   retinned.   40%. 
Cnrrnpr    Bottoms,    plus    25%. 
Tinners'   Trimmings,   plain,  46%. 
Tinners'  Trimmings,    retinned.    40'r 
Tinners'     Trimmings,     general,     !ist. 

plus   20%. 
Fartorv   MiTk   Cans,   list  plus  BO*. 
Milk  Can  Trimmings.  list,  nlue  60% 
Cream    Cans.    list,    plus    25%. 
Railroad  Cans.  list,  plus  20*. 
Sheet  Iron  Ware,  list,  plus  33   1-3% 
Pi»eed     Ware,     ordinary,     list,     plui 

50%. 
Pi»c»d     Tinware,     C.B.,      list,     plus 

70%. 
Fry  pans.   Acme,  20%. 
Frv   pans.    Quick    Meal,   plus    16%. 
Spiders,    steel,    plus    16%. 
pi-o     Novels,     japanned',     list,     piun 

33    1-3%. 
Steel     Sinks,    galv'zed.    list    plus    26%. 
Steel    Sinks,   painted,    list  plus   25%. 
Lisht     Ga'Tv.     Pails     and    Tubs.     lis* 

plus  40%. 
Heavy    rja'rv.     Pails    and    Tubs.    list, 
plus    3(K;  . 


Hollow   ware,    add   25%. 
Garbage  Pails,  list,  plus  25%. 
Jap.    Coal   Hods,   list,   plus,    50%. 
Galv.  Coal  Hods,  list,  plus  65%. 
Paper  Lined  Boards,  30%. 
Wood-lined   Boards,    15%. 
Copper    Boilers,    list,    plus    25%. 
Copper  Tea   Kettles,   list,  plus   40% 
Copper    Tea    and    Coffee    Pots,    list 

plus   40%. 
Nickel-plated  Ware,   60%. 
Stove  and  other  Pipe,  list,  plus  60% 
Stove   Pipe  Thimbles,   40%. 
Stove  Pipe  Elbows,  black  and  galv., 

list,    plus    33    1-3%. 
F.O.B.    Montreal,    loronto,     London. 

Hamilton. 
WASHERS,  WROUGHT 

Round,  plain.  Sizes  given  are  size 
of  hole.  In  boxes  of  50  lbs.,  list 
prices  per  100  lbs.— 44  in.,  $28.00 
6-16  in.,  $24.40;  %  in.,  $22.80; 
7-16  in.,  $21.00;  %  in.,  $19.60;  9-16 
in.,  $18.80;  %  in.,  $18.60;  11-16 
in.,  $18.40;  %  in.,  $18.20;  13-16  in., 
$18.00;  11-16  in.,  1%  in-.  1%  to-. 
$18.00:  11-1%  in.,  1%  in,.,  1%  in. 
1  6-16  in.,  $18.00;  1<%  in.,  1%  in.. 
1%  in..  $18.40;  1%  in..  1%  in.,  2 
in.,  2H  in.,  $19.00.  Discount  46 
per  cent.  Net  extras,  2)6  to  49  lbs 
of  a  size,  $1.00 ;  25  lbs.  of  a  size  or 
less,  $2.00  per  100  libs.  Package 
allowances — if  taken  in  kegs  shout 
175  lbs.  each,  allowance  10c  pel 
100  lbs. ;  if  taken  in  bags  about  100 
lbs.,  allowance  l'5o  per  100  lbs. 
WEIGHTS,  SASH 

Tor.     Lon.    Mont. 
Section,  1  lb., 

per  100  lbs $3.78    $4.00     $4.00 

Section,  %lb., 

per  100  lbs 3.76       4.10       4.00 

Solid,  3  to  30  lbs., 

per  cwt 8.00  3.25  3.10-3.26 

WHEELBARROWS 

Navvy,   steel   wheel,   doz. $63  00 

Garden,    steel,    doz 64  25 

Light    garden,    doz 46  80 

F.O.B.  Montreal.  Toronto,  London. 
WIRE   PRODUCTS 

F.O.B.  Toronto,  London,  Hamil- 
ton, Montreal,  St.  John,  freight 
equalized. 

Cat  Hay  Wire.  Per  100  lh» 

No.      9     (6  10 

No.     10     6  »• 

No.    11     8  96 

No.     12     «  06 

No.     18     6  16 

No.     13%     «  *0 

No.    14     «  35 

No.     15     6  80 

No.     16 «  65 

Stovepipe   Wire 

No.    18    8  75 

No.    19    9  25 

Fine   wire,    list   plus  20%. 

Smooth  Steel  Wire. 
Nos.  0-9  gauge,  base  6  16 

Extras  over  base  sizes  on  smaller 
gauges  are  as  follows: 

No.  10,  «c  extra ;  No.  11,  lie  ;  No. 
12,    30c ;   No.    13.   30c :   No.    14,   40c 
No.  15.  66c;  No.  16,  70e  extra. 

Extra  net  per  100  lbs. — Oiled  wire 
10c;  spring  wire,  $2.50;  bright,  soft 
drawn,    15c;    charcoal    (extra    qual- 
ity), $1.25  ;  packed  in  casks  or  oases. 
lfic  :  bagging  and  papering*. 
WIRE    STAPLES 
Bright  Wire.  $5.60.  base. 
Galvanized    Wire.    $6.35,    base. 
WRENCHES,   STILLSON 

6     in.,     doz $12  00 

8     in.,     doz 18  50 

10     in.,     doz 16  00 

14     in.,     doz .2100 

18     in.,     doz 80  00 

24     in.,     doz 48  50 

86     ir...     doz. 81  HO 

WRINGERS,    CLOTHES 

Domestic,  No.   531E    $120  80 

Dom.   Bench,   No.   541EB 160  50 

Favorite,     No.     511E Ill  80 

Favorite.  No.  512    118  20 

Royal   Canadian,   No.    151...     92  80 

Favorite   No.    514    138  50 

Ottawa,  No.  331E 109  30 

Ottawa,  Bench,  No.  341EB.  149  00 
Challenge.   No.   311E    100  30 

Discounts  from  above  list  30  and 
5   per   cent. 

Terms — 30  days,  less  2  per  cent. 
Freight  equalized  on  quarter  dozen 
machines  and  up.wards  with  the 
nearest  of  the  following  places  to 
point  of  destination,  viz. :  Montreal, 
Kingston,  Ottawa,  Toronto,  Lon- 
don  and   St.   Marys. 


January  3,  1920 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section. 


78 


HARDWARE    AND    METAL 


January   3,   1920 


Paints,  Oils,  Varnishes,  Glass,  Etc. 


ALABASTINE 

Color*  and  white — 2%-lb.  pack- 
ages, $9.60  for  100  lbs. ;  5-lb.  pack- 
ages, $9.00  for  10  OP.s.  F.o.b. 
Montreal,     Toronto,     London. 


BLUE  STONE 
Per  lb 


Montreal  Toronto 
11  12 

COLORS    (DRYl  Per  lb. 

Raw  and  Burnt  Umber,  100 

lb.  kegs.   No.    1    08-09% 

Do.,   pure    1L-15 

Raw  and  Burnt  Sienna,  100 

lb.   kegs,   No.    1    08-09% 

Do.,  pure   15-17 

Imp.  green,   100-lb.  kegs 17-19 

Chrome  green,  pure 19-55 

Chrome  yellow 2'6-41 

Brunswick  green,  100-lb.  kg.  10-14% 
Indian    red.    100-lb.    keg...      16-20 
Indian  red,  No.  1,  100-lb.  kg.  06-17 

Lamp   black    23-27 

Venetian    red,    best   bright. .    07-09 

Venetian  red,  No.  1   03%-05% 

Drop  black,  pure  dry...  09%-15 
Golden  ochre,  10-lb.  kegs.  08-12 
White    ochre,     100-lb.     kegs.    05%-06 

White  ochre,   barrels    04-04% 

Yellow    ochre,    barrels...     03%-05% 

French    ochre,    barrels 08-10% 

Spruce  oel.re.   100-lb.  kegs..      0  07-8 
Canadian    red   oxide,   bbls.    02%-04% 

Super   magnetic    red    0  OS 

Vermilion    0  40 

English    vermilion     2  50 

F.o.b.  Montreal,  Toronto 

COLORS  IN  OIL,  PURE 

1    lb.    tins- 
Venetian    red    23-30 

Indian    red    80-36 

Chrome  yellow,   pure    63^55 

Golden    ochre,    pure    .......  80-82 

French  spruce  ochre,   pure.  25-20 

Greens,   pure    28-38 

Siennas   84-36 

Umbers     34-86 

Ultramarine    blue     45-60 

Prussian    blue    1  00-1  02 

Chinese    blue    1  00-1  02 

Drop   black    85-87 

Ivory    black     0  36 

Signwriters'  black,  pure. . . .  38-40 

Lampblack   38-40 

Marine  black.   5-lb.  irons...  0  20 
F.o.b.  Montreal,  Toronto 

ENAMELS  (white)  Gal. 

Duralite $7  47  >A 

B-H    "White"    Enamel 6  90  " 

C.P.C.    Albaglosa    5  75 

Moora  mel   7  00 

Sunshine,    white    5   10 

Jasperlac     4  15 

GLUE  Per  lb. 

Discount — 

French  medal   (prices  withdrawn). 

English    common    sheet    32-84 

English     prima     86-88 

White  pigsfoot 0  60 

Cake  bone,  112-lb.  bags 0  86 

Hide,     112-lb.    bags 0  45 

Gelatine,  112-lb.  bags  45-60 

Ground    glues,     112-lb.    bags, 

No.     1     28-30 

Ground    glue.    No.    2,    112-lb. 

bags 22-24 

Do.,   No.    2.    less  than   bags.      0  24 

GLASS                            Single  Double 

Per  100  ft.                   Thick  Thick 

Under    25     $18  95  $22    90 

26    to    34     19   60  24  85 

36    to    40    20  50  26   40 

41    to   60    23   50  30  00 

61    to    69    24  60  30  80 

«1    to   70    26  50  32  70 

71    to    80      29  70  35  40 

81    to   85      45  45 

86    to   90      48  85 

91    to   94      49  80 

»S    to    100      58  55 

101   to  105    65  85 

.0*  »n  110 73   10 

Discount      box      glass :      Toronto, 
20%  ;  London.  20%  :  Montreal.   15%. 

Cut    size    sheet    glass,    plus  5%    to 
10%  :  cash   2%. 

GLASS.   PLATE  Sq.ft. 

Plates    from —  Mont.  Tor'to 

1    to    15   feet 1  65  1  65' 

15   to  25    feet 1   95  1   85 


25  to   50   feet 2  15  1  95 

50  to  75   feeC 2  20         2  20 

75  to  90   feet 2  25         2  20 

90  to  100    feet 2  30         2  20 

Above    prices    are    net,    f.o.b.    To- 
ronto,       London        and        Montreal. 
Freight  charges  and  casing  extra. 
GLAZIERS'  POINTS 

Zinc   coated,   $1.44  per   doz.   pack- 
ages   6    lbs.    gross. 

Zinc,  pure,  prices  withdrawn. 
F.o.b.   Montreal.   Toronto. 
LEAD,    WHITE     (Ground    in    oil). 
Prices  are  per  100  lbs.   in  ton   lots. 
Less    than    ton    lots    are    36c    per 
100    lbs.    higher    than    quoted    be- 
low.     F.o.b.    Ottawa,    25c   advance 
per      100      lbs.        Brantford,      40c. 
F.o.b.    London    and    Windsor,    45c 
per    100    lbs.      F.o.b.    Toronto    and 
Hamilton,  35c  per  100  lbs.     F.o.b. 
Fort    William    and    Port    Arthur, 
45c  per   100   lbs. 
Maritime  differential  40c  per  100  lbs. 
over  Montreal 

Montreal  Toronto 

Anchor,    Pure    $17  00     $17  35 

Crown  Diamond,  pure  17   00       17  35 

Green    Seal    17  00       17  35 

Ramsay's    Pure    17  00        17  35 

Moore's    Pure    17   00       17  35 

Tiger,  Pure   17  00       17  35 

O.P.W.    Dec.    Pure...    17  00       17  60 

Red   Seal    17  00       17  85 

O.P.W.    English     17   00       17  35 

Elephant  Genuine  ...  17  50  17  85 
B.B.  Genuine  Lead,  less  than 
tons,  $19.60,  Toronto  ;  $18.90.  Mont- 
real. Ton  lots  5%  off ;  five-ton 
lots,  10%  off. 
LEAD  (RED  DRY) 
Genuine,      560-pound 

casks,     per    cwt $12  50     $14   50 

Genuine,      100-pound 

kegs,   per  cwt 13  50       15  50 

Less    quantity    14  75        17  00 

F.o.b.    Montreal,    Toronto. 

25s     0  84% 

10s     0  35 

5s      0  36 

2s     

Is      0  89% 

%s     0  48% 

F.o.b.    Toronto,    Montreal,    Hamilton 

and    I.n..don. 
LINS3ED   OIL 

For  prices   see   weekly    report. 
LITHARGE 

Tons  or  over  (cwt.) $10  75 

Smaller    '"ts     lent.)     11    75 

LIUIQD,    BRONZING 
Bronzing  liquid.  No.  1 .  .$1.55-52.15 

Banana    oil.    gal 3.50-  7.00 

F.o.b.  T'ontreal,  Toronto. 
MURESCO 

Tints.  5-lb.  packages,  per  100  lbs., 
$9.60:    white.    5-lb.    packages.    $8.40. 

F.o.b.   Toronto 
PAINTS.    PREPARED 
Price  per  gallon.   1  gallon  ean  basis 

Elephant,     white      $4  05 

Sanifcone.    white     3  60 

Sanitone,    colors    3  50 

C.P.    Co..   Pure,   white B   05 

C.P.    Co.,    Pure,    colors    4  80 

B.-H.     English,     colors     4  80 

B.-H.  English,    white    5  05 

B.-H.    Fresconetrte,    white 3   SO 

B.-H.    Fresconette,   colors 3  60 

R.-TT.  Floor      4  00 

B.-H.    Porch    Floor    4  80 

Crown    Diamond,    white    4  80 

Crown    Diamond,    colors    4   55 

Crown    Diamond,    floor    4  00 

Crown     Diamond,     Porch     and 

Gallery    Paint,    gal 4  60 

Moore's  House  Colors,  white.  .  5  00 
Moore's  House  Colors,  colors  ..480 
Moore's   Egyptian    Paint,    white  4   "ft 

Do.,     colors      3  RR 

Moore's    Floor   Paint    3  75 

Moore's  Sani-Flat   3  7fi 

Moore's  Porch  and  Deck  Paint  4  W) 
Jamieson's  Crown  Anchor  ...  4  55 
O.P.W.  Canada  Brand,  white.  4  80 
O.P.W.  Canatta  Brand,  colors  4  6ft 
O.P.W.    Canada   Brand,    floor. .   4  00 

O.P.W.    Flat    Wall,    white 3  60 

O.P.W.    Flat   Wall,    colors 3  50 

Ramsay's  Pure,  white    4  OO 

Ramsay's    Pure,    colors    4  65 

didder's     white     5   05 

Glidder.'s  colors    4   86 


Martin-Senour,  100%,  white..  6  05 
Martin-Senour,  100%,  colors. .  4  80 
Martin-Senour,  Porch  Paint. .  4  80 
Martin-Senour,  Neutone,  white  3  60 
Martin-Senour,  Neutone,   colors  3  50 

Senour's    Floor    Paint 4  00 

Sherwin-Williams,  white  ....  5  05 
Sherwin-Williams,    colors     ....    4  80 

Sherwin-Williams,    floor    4  00 

Sherwin-Williams,  porch  floor.  4  80 

Flat  Tone,    white    8  60 

Flat  Tone,    colors    3  50 

Lowe  Bros.,  H.S.,  white 5  05 

Lowe  Bros.,  H.S.,  colors   4  80 

Lowe  Bros.,  hard  drying  floor.   4  00 

Mellotone,     white     3  75 

Mellotone,    colors     3  60 

Maple  Leaf,    white    5  05 

Maple  Leaf,  colors    4  SO 

Maple    Leaf,    floor    4  25 

Pearcy's  Prepared,  colors  ....  4  1 5 
Pearcy's    Prepared..    White    ....    4  50 

Barrett's    Everjet    Products — 
Elastic   Carbon    Paint — 

Bbl.  lots,  per  gal.    ...      0  65     0  80 

%    bhls.,   gal 0  70     

5s    and    10s,   gal 0  80     0  95 

Is   (per  case  of  1  doz.)   9  50  10  55 
Everjet     Quack-drying     Metal 

Paint,   bbls.,   gal 0  70 

%   bbls.,   gal 0  75 

5s   and   10s.   gal 0  85 

Case    (12    l's)    10  50 

Everjet  Black  Enamel — 

Crates  of  2  doz.,  8-oz.,  doz..  1  35 
Crates  of  6  doz..  8-oz.,  doz...  1  25 
Crates  of  12  doz.,  8-oz.,  doz.  1  20 
Crates  of  2  doz.,  16-oz.,  doz.  2  25 
Crates  of  6  doz..  16-oz.,  doz.   2  10 

1-gal.    cans,   gallon 1   10 

5  and   10  gal   cans,  gal 1  00 

Barrels  and   %  bbls.,   gal....   0  90 
Carbosota    Liquid — 

Barrels    0  55 

Half  barrels    0  60 

5s  and   10s,  gal 0  70 

Is   (case  12  gallons)   .ease...   8  75 

Shingle    Varnish     8  75 

F.o.b.    Montreal.    Toronto. 
PARIS    GREEN  Per  lb. 

In  barrels,  about  600  lbs 

In    kegs,    about   250    lbs 

In  50   lb.  and  100  lb.  drums      .... 

In    25    lb.   drums    

In     1    lb.    packets.     100    lbs. 

in    case    

In    %    lb.    packets,    100    lbs. 


in    case 


F.o.b.  Montreal.  Quebec,  Moncton. 
St.  John  and  Halifax.  Toronto. 
Hamilton,  London  and  Ottawa. 
Terms  one  month  net  or  1%  in  15 
days. 
PITCH 

Cwt 1   20 

PUTTY  Montreal  Toronto 

Standard  Less  than  tons 

Bulk,   in  casks    $5  60       $6  95 

Bulk,  100-lb.  drums..  6  45  6  80 
Bulk.  25-lb.  drums..  6  70  7  05 
Bulk.    12'A-lb.    irons..      6  95         7  30 

Bladder,    in    bbls 7  85         7  70 

Ton  lots  standard  are  35  per 
hundred  pounds  less :  five-ton  lots 
60c  le.s  than  above  prices. 
Pure  Putty.  $2.50  cwt.  advance 
Ottawa  prices  are  26c ;  Hamilton 
35c;  Brantford,  40c:  London.  Wind- 
sor, Fort  Arthur  and  Fort  William. 
45c  per  100  lbs.  over  Montreal  quo- 
tations. 
ROSIN 

Barrels.    100   lbs $11    50 

Less,    per    lb. 0   14 

SHELLAC 

Pure  white     Pure  orange 

Gal.   jugs    8   30  7    55 

Shellac   gum —  Per  pound 

TN 150  2  00 

Finest     orange 1    75  2  25 

Bone  drv   white    2  00         2   50 

F.O.B.    Toronto,    London.    Montreal. 
NOTE -The   shellac    market    is    very 
firm    owing    to    difficulty    of    get- 
ting   stock.      The    basis    is,    there- 
fore,  quite  nominal. 
PAINT  AND  VARNISH 
REMOVER 

Tarite    1   gnl.  cam    $3   '" 

B.H.    Vanisher    *  "n 

Cumoff      3  cn 

Takoff       3  60 

O.P.W.   Presto    2  75 


Lingerwett    3  24 

SoTvo a   uu 

F.o.b.  Montreal,  Toronto. 
VARNISHES  Per  gal.  cans 

Stove    pipe,     %     pts. —  Per  doz. 

B.H $1  40 

O.P.W 1   50 

Anchor     1   40 

No.    1    Furniture,    extra,    Bar- 
rels.    $1.80-$1.90     gal. ;     gal     tins, 
$1.57-$2-15. 

Depend-on,    list     4  60 

B.-H.    Maritime    Spar,    list 8  26 

Elastic    4   00 

Spar  subject  to  discoum  oC   40%. 

Elastilite     S  64) 

Granitine    Floor   Finish    4  00 

Hydrox     Spar     4  15 

C.P.C.    Sun    Varnish 8  83 

C.P.C.    Sun    Spar 6  13 

C.P.C.    Sun    Waterproof    Floor     8  90 
Jasperite     Interior     and     Ex- 
terior      • 3  50 

Jasperite   Pale  Hard  Oil    . .».     2  60 
Jasoerite      Indestructo      Floor 

Varnish    3  50 

Jamieson's   Copaline    3  75 

M-S   Marble-Ite  Floor   8  »1 

M-S    Wood-Var    8  91 

M-S    Durable    Spar    5  11 

M-S    Finest    Interior    4  36 

r,  asiic    Interior    3    14 

Mar-not    3  9;i 

Onick     Action     House     2  65 

Rexspar    5   II 

Scar-Not    3  84 

Kyanize    Spar    4  !n 

Kyanize    Cabinet    Rubbing    ..     S  84 

ITvan'W  Interior 8   8' 

Luxeberry    light    4  72 

Luxeberry   granite    4  90 

Luxeberry    spar    5  62 

R-'msav'i     Universal     3  68 

Ramsay's     7-20      2  75 

Ramsay's    Agate   Floor    3  95 

Ramsay's     400    Hard    Oil     ...3   12% 

Crown    Diamond    Floor         3   6.- 

Fo.h.    Montreal.    Toronto. 
WATER   PAINTS 

Opallte,   300   lb.   bbls »   US 

Opalite.    100   lb.    kegs    0  14 

1  gal.  packages,  per  pkg. ..  0  76 
%  gal.  package,  per  pkg..  . .  S  40 
Coralite,  6-lb.  pkgs.,  white.  8  40 
Coraltte.  6-lb.  pkgs.,  colors.  8  40 
B.H.    Frescota.    6-lb.    pkge., 

white    7  8* 

B.H.    Frescota,    6-lb.    pkge.. 

colors    8   4* 

Perfecto    Wall    finish,    white, 

6-lb.    pkge..    lb 0  07% 

Tints,    5-lb.   pkge.,    lb 0  08 

Fob.   Montreal.  Toronto. 
WASTE 

Cream.    Polishing    $0  21 

WHITE 

XXX     ...   0  18        XXX     ...   0  19 

XX    0  16%     XX,  gra'd  0  17^ 

X       0  16%     XLOR    ..   0  16% 

XC     0  13%     X  Empire  0  15V4 

Japanese     0  13        X    Press .    0  14 

COLORED 

No.   5    ...  0  13%     Fancy     ..015 

No.   1    ...   0  12%     Lion    ....   0  18% 

No.   7    ...  0  11%     Standard.    0  12 

No.    1A    .   0  10%     Popular..    0  WA 

No.    IB    .   0  09%     Keeu     ...   0  09 

Above    lines    subject   to   trade    dis- 
count for  quantity. 
WAX  Per  " 

R  H.    Wax    0  4" 

Berry    Bros 0  70 

Imperial    Floor   Wax    0  40 

Anchor    »  >; 

O  P.W.    Linn    Brand    0  4F 

Oid    English    0  64-0  66 

Johnson's    0  61-0  66 

Jamieson's  liquid  wax.  gal.   ...    27. 

Gold    Medal    •  « 

Ramssv's  •  * 

Sherwin-Williams      0  54 

Crown    Diamond    0  4. 

F.o.b.    Montreal    and   Toronto. 
WHITING 

Plain,    in    bbls *: 

F.o.b.   Montreal,   Toronto,    London 

Gilders,    bolted,    in    bbls $3  00 

WOOD   ALCOHOL  Per  gal. 

Tn    fiv°    gallons    1   "S 

EJastullte     4   ro 

$4  extra  for  barrels. 
F.o.b.     Montreal.     Toronto.     London. 


January  3,  1920 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising-  Section 


79 


STOP 

- 

LOOK  and  LISTEN 

buying 

if  you  want  to   enjoy 

by  stocking  arid 

Cheap  Hardware 

Larger  Sales, 

talking 

and  stock 

Bigger  Profits 

SB 

and  Better 

Satisfied  Customers 

buy 

SB 

Quality  Hardware 

Quality  Hardware 

SB 

you  will  be 
making 

Door  Hangers, 

More  Money 

Hinges,  Etc. 

Quality  Hardware 

and  Better  Friends. 

Our  new  catalog 

ue  will  bt 

'.  ready  for  distribution  about  January  21st.     Ask  for  copy. 

SLATER 

& 

BARNARD,  Limited 

1 

HAMILTON,          -          ONTARIO 

FORMERLY   THE 

ALLITH 

MANUFACTURING   CO.    AND   SAFETY   DOOR   HANGER   CO. 

s 


GLASS 

BENDERS 

TO 

THE 

TRADE 


BRAND 
WINDOW 
GLASS 
THE  TORONTO  PLATE  GLASS  IMPORTING  CO.,  LIMITED 

PLATE,  WINDOW,  FIGURED,  STAINED,  WIRED,  BENT,  MIRROR 
DON  ROADWAY  and  ORNAMENTAL  GLASS  TORONTO 


MADE       IN     CANADA 


^Hfcwwai*^" 


OILS 


These  are  &  few  of  our  most  staple  lines,  so  well  and  favorably 
known  throughout  Western  Canada,  and  are  sold  only  through 
reliable     merchants. 


Special  Cylinder  Oil  for  team  Engines 

Harness   Oil.     Neatsfoot   Oil 

A  Gas  Engine  Oil 
(for  gasoline  en- 
gines). 

Tractorlene  Oil  (for 
oil  burning  engines). 
Ideal  Thresher's  Ma- 
chine Oil  (for  gen- 
eral use. 

Automobile  Oil 
and  Transmission 
Greases. 


0mm 

if/])-/?. 


PRAIRIE  CITY   OIL  COMPANY,  LIMITED,  WINNIPEG 


80 


HARDWARE   AND   METAL 


January   3,   1920 


Winnipeg  Hardware  Quotations 


AMMUNITION 

Powder,  per  keg.  $11.00. 

Shot,  soft,  per  cwt,  $1)7.20;  chili- 
ad; $18.70;  buckshot,  $18.00;  bail, 
$18.40. 

Dominion  MetalMas—  B.B.  Caps, 
$2.80;  C.B.  Cape,  $3.60;  22  Short 
Black  or  Lesmok,  $4;  22  Long 
Black  or  Lesmok,  $4.80;  22  Short 
Smokeless,  $4.30;  22  Long  Smoke- 
less. $6 ;  22  Long  Rifle  Black,  $5.60  : 
22  Long  Rifle  Smokeless,  $7  per  M. 
net  Center  Fire  Pistol,  22%  :  Cen- 
ter Fire  Sporting,  2&%  off  Ameri- 
can list. 

American  Metallics  —  B.B.  Caps, 
$4.10;    C.B.    Caps,    $5.20;   22   Short 

Black,  $5.90 ;  22  Long  Black,  $7.05  ; 
22  Long  Rifle  Black,  $8.25 ;  22  Short 
Smokeless,  $6.30;  22  Long  Smoke- 
less, $8.80;  22  Long  Rifle  Smoke, 
$10.30  per  M.  net.  Centre  Fira 
Piatoi,  17%%  on  list:  Centre  Fire 
Sporting,   17%%  on  list 

Loaded  Shells— Crown  Black  Pow- 
der, 12  ga.,  $31 :  Sovereign  Smoke- 
less, 12  ga.,  $33 ;  Regal  Smokeless, 
12  ga.,  $88 ;  CanucK  Smokeless,  12 
ga,,  $41  per  M.  net.  Empty  Paper 
Shot  Shell,  $14  per  M. ;  Empty 
Brass  Shot  Shells.  $6.66  per  100. 

ANVILS 

Peter  Wright.  80  lbs.  and  up,  25c 
per  lb. ;  clip  horn,  27c  lb. 
Norris.  80  lbs.  and  over.   16c. 


AUGER    BITS 

Standard   List 
S/l« $6  00 


..  5  00 
..  6  00 

..  6  00 
..  6  00 
..   5  00 

9 6  00 

1* 6  00 

11 7  00 

13 7  00 

18 8  25 

14 8  25 

16 9  60 

16 9  60 

17 12  00 

Discounts    from 

Irwin     

Gilmour    


Prices   per   Dozen 

18/16 $13  00 

1» 14  00 

20 14  00 

21 16  00 

22 16  00 

23 18  00 

24 18  00 

35 21  00 

2« '..  21  00 

27 24  00 

28 24  00 

29 27  00 

30 27  00 

31 80  00 

82 30  00 

standard   list  prices 

10% 

45% 


AXES 

Single  Bit    $15  50     $16  00 

Double    Bit    21  50 

Broad  Axes   65  00 

BAR  IRON 

Bar  Iron  —  $4.75  base ;  Swedish 
iron,  $8.00;  sleigh  shoe  steel,  $5.50; 
spring  steel,  $6.00 ;  machinery  steel, 
$8.00. 

BARS.   CROW.     $10.50  per   100   lbs. 

BELT    LACING 

In  sides,  tanned,  $2.50  per  lb. ; 
eat,  $2.66  per  lb. ;  rawhide,  sides, 
$2.60;  cut,   $2.65. 

Blue   Stone    (Vitriol),    ll%c. 

BELTING 

Rubber,  6  in.  and  under,  20-5% : 
over  6   in.,   10-2%%. 

Agricultural  or  No.  1  leather  belt- 
ing,  10-10-10%  off  list. 

Standard,  10-10%  off  list.  Extra 
10%. 

The  "double"  Hat  is  just  twice 
the  price  of  "single." 


BOLTS— 

Carriage,  %  and  smaller,  up  to  6 
inch,  22%% ;  over  6  inch,  6% ;  7-16 
inch  and  larger,  6%,  machine, 
%  and  under,  up  to  4  inch,  25%  ; 
over  4  inch,  15% ;  7-16  and  over, 
15% ;  machine  set  screws,  40% ; 
plough  bolts,  10%  ;  stove  bolts,  60%  ; 
shaft  bolts,  T%%  ;  tire  bolts.  40% ; 
sleigh  shoe  bolts  to  %  and  smaller, 
5%  on  list;  7-16  and  up,  6%  on 
list. 

BORAX.      Borax,    per    lb..    14c. 

BUTTS 

Plated — No.     241    Antique    Copper 
and    Dull    Brass    Finish. 

Per  pr. 

2%  x  2%   in 42 

3  x  3  in 44 

3%  x  3%   in 46 

4  x    4    in 57 

4%   x   4%   in 84 

5  x    5    in 104 

Wrought  Steel— 

No.  800    20%  on  list 

No.  804     Net  list 

No,  838    5%  on  list 

No.  840    15%  on  list 

CHAIN 

Coil.  3-1*  in.,  $17.25;  %,  $16.75; 
5-16  in..  $13.00:  %.  $10.26;  7-16, 
$10.00;  %,  $9.75;  9-16,  $9.75.  Log- 
ping,  5-16  in.,  $14.76;  %  in..  $12.00; 
%    in.,    $11.50:   tie-out.    47%%. 

CHIMNEYS.   LAMP 

A,  per  case,  8  doz.,  $9.10  per  doz.. 
$1.25;  B,  per  case  6  doz.,  $7.80;  per 
doz.,   $1.40. 

CHURNS 

Barrel,  No.  0,  $7.25 ;  No.  1,  $7.25 ; 
No.  2,  $8.05;  No.  3,  $8.90;  No.  4, 
$10.50  each. 

CLEVISES,   MALL.      16c   per   lb. 

CLOCKS— Alarm 

Each 

Big    Ben    $3  36 

Baby   Ben    8  86 

America     1  60 

Lookout    1  00 

Sleepmeter    2  00 

COPPER 

Sheet  and  planished  copper,  70c 
per  lb.     Tinned,   66c. 

CORD    SASH 

Coils  or  Hanks 

8,  9,   10   84c  lb. 

DRILLS 

Bit  stock,  45% :  Blacksmith,  % 
in.    round   shank.   32%%. 

EAVETROUGH 

Eavetrough,  per  100  ft.,  8  in.. 
$6.48;    10   in.,    $7.20;    12   in.,    $8.46. 

Conductor  pipe.  2  in.,  per  100  ft., 
$7.56;  3  in.,  $9.14;  4  in.,  $12.06. 

ENAMELWARE 

See  Wares. 

FILES 

Globe     Discount  50% 

Nicholson     Gen Discount  25% 

FITTINGS— Malleable. 

Class    A    60% 

Class  B  and  C,  off  new  list.  .60-10% 

Bushings    '10% 

Union*   80% 

Nipples    4"    and    under 70% 


FORMALDEHYDE 

400-lb.  bbls.,  32c  lb. ;  200-lb.  bbls., 
33c  lb.;  100-lb.  bbls..  34c  lb.;  10- 
lb.  jugs,  $8.76  each  ;  6-lb.  jugs,  $2.00 
each ;  2-lb.   jugs,  85e  eaah. 


GALVANIZED    WARE 

See  Wares. 

GLASS,   WINDOW      Single  Double 

Up   to   25    in $13  95  $19  80 

26  to  40   14  85  19  80 

41  to  50   17  55  22  50 

61  to  60    18  45  22  95 

61  to  70    19  35  24  30 

GLASS     (Plate) 

Net    list. 

GLOBES— LANTERN 

Doz. 

Short   Pattern    $1  15 

Cold  Blast,    regular    1  15 

GRINDSTONES 

Per   100   lbs.,   $3.75. 
Mounted    on    steel    frames,     $6    to 
$7.60. 

HARVEST  TOOLS.     17%%. 

HINGES 

Light  T  and  strap,   net  list. 

Corrugated  Strap  Hinges  —  4, 
$1.65;  5,  $2.30;  6,  $3.00;  8,  $4.85; 
10.    $7.40;    12,    $11.50. 

Corrugated  Tee  Hinges — 4,  $2.00  ; 
5,  $2.85;  6,  $3.50;  8,  $5.70;  10, 
$8.50;   12,   $ 

HORSESHOES 

Iron,  No.  0  to  1,  $8.85;  No.  2 
and  larger,  $8.60 ;  snowshoes,  No.  0 
to  No.    1,   $9.10;   No.   2   and   larger, 

$8.85;  steel,  No.  0  to  1,   $ ;  No. 

2   and  larger,   $....;   featherweight, 

$ 

Apollo  and 

IRON,   GALVANIZED  "Fleur 

Premier  de  Lis" 

10%  cz.  or  28  Eng $10  50 

28   Am.   or   26   Eng 10  30 

26  Am.  or  26  Eng 9  8"0 

24     9  65 

22     9  65 

18  and   20    9  50 

16     • 9  35 

IRONS.   SAD 

Common  Sad  Iron,  8  lbs.,  14 %c 
per   lb. ;    4    and    5    lbs.,    18c   per    lb. 

Mrs.    Pott's  No.   55,   set $2  00 

Mrs.   Pott's  No.    50,   set 2  15 

Mrs.  Pott's  common  and  iron 
handles,  $1.63  dozen.  Mrs.  Pott's 
improved,    $2.30    a    dozen. 

JACKSCREWS 

10%    off    list. 

KNIVES— HAY 

Heath** *13  26 

Lightning    18  2» 

LANTERNS 

No.  2.  plain   $18  00 

No.    25.    Dash-board    17  59 

Short   Globe,    doz 13  00 

LATCHES— THUMB,  STEEL 

Doz. 

2      $2  05 

3      2  90 

4     

Barn  Door 

5 3  00 

8      3  48 

9     4  88 

LEAD   PIPE,   $12.06. 
LEAD    WASTE,    $12.96. 

WHITE  LEAD 

Decorators'  pure,  ton   lots,   $18.25. 

LINSEED    OIL 

See   weekly   report. 

MACHINES— WASHING 

Each 

Dowswell    

New    Century    B    

New  Idea    

Snowball     

Prices  on  application. 

MATTOCKS 

Pick.   $l».76;  eutteir.   $18.76. 


MOPS 

Doz. 

O-Cedar   Polish,  No.    1 $12  60 

O-Cedar  Polish,   No.  8 12  60 

Self- Wringing     6  75 

MOWERS— LAWN 

14  in.  16  in. 

Woodyatt      $  8  64  $  9  00 

Empress     11  00  11  50 

Daisy     «  6*         

Star     7  50  $00 

NAILS 

Wire  f.o.b.  Fort  William.  $5.00 
base;  Winnipeg,  $5.50  base.  Cut 
f.o.b.   Winnipeg,   $7.05. 

NETTING— POULTRY 

Net    Prices    per    Roll. 

1  in.  mesh  x  24  in $6  65 

30   in 8  08 

36   in 9  50 

NUTS 

Square,  small  lots,  blank.  $4.00, 
tapped,  $4.25  advance  on  list;  Hexa- 
gon, small  lots,  blank.  $4.26,  tap- 
ped, $4.50  advance  on  list;  case  lots 
all    styles,    1c    less   than   above. 

OAKUM 

Clipper,  spun,  per  100  lb $24.00 

Clipper,  unspun,  per   100  lbs.     22.50 
Plumbers,  per  100  lbs 12  00 

OILS 

Wm.  Pen  motor  oil,  $1.23  ;  "Buf- 
folite,''  25c;  Ideal  Thresher,  60c: 
"B"  Castor  machine  oil,  41e ;  Buf- 
falo engine  gasoline,  37c ;  Buf- 
falo "A"  gaa  engine  oil,  66e  ;  Royal 
gasoline,  36c ;  Family  safety  coal 
oil,  26% ;  Summer  black  oil,  24c : 
Kelso  engine  oil,  60c ;  Electro  oil, 
46c ;  Royalite  oil,  23c ;  Standard 
gas  engine  oil,  46  %e ;  Prairie  Har- 
vester ofj,  58c. 
PAINTS 

Stephens'  Out  and  Inside  White, 
$5.20 ;  Stephens'  House,  ordinary 
shades.  $4.9i5;  Stephens'  Floor, 
$4.15;  SSkstone  colors,  $3.66;  Silk- 
stone  white,  $3.76 ;  Stephens,  Barn 
Paint.   $2.10  and  $2.80. 

PAPER,   BUILDING 

Dry  Fibre  Tarred 

Joliette   $0  90       $1  20 

Builders'  Special    1  10         1  20 

Cyclone  1  10         1  20 

Navy      1  26  1  45 

Triumph  1  35         1  60 

PIPE.   WROUGHT  IRON 

Per   100  ft.  Black.  Gaiv. 

%  inch  $  5  13  $  7  47 

%  inch   5  27  7  61 

%  inch  7  02  8  78 

%  inch   8  82  11   12 

1  inch  13  05  16  43 

1%  inch  17  64  22  23 

1%  inch   21  06  26  55 

2  inch   28  35  35  78 

2%  inch   45  99  58  01 

3  "  inch   60  12  75  87 

3%  inch 76  50  96  30 

4  inch   90  68  113  40 

4%  inch   102  60  130  50 

5  inch    119  70  152   10 

6  inch   155  70  197   10 

PLASTER,   Paris,   per  bbl.,  $5.25. 

PLATES.  CANADA 

18  x  21  per  box,  ordinary,  $3.76  : 
18  x  24.  ordinary.  $8.76 ;  20  x  28. 
ordinary,   $9. 


January  3,  1920 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— A dvertising  Section 


81 


One  Fact 

Sells 
Silkstone- 

Economy! 


^■^Hfc-^-^aJ^ 

^ZT — =*«■■■ ^Jj'ls^afl 

LKSTC 

W  VV4IX  C€ 

v     •    ARTISTIC     - 

Tell  Customers  the  Facts 

Silkstone  Flat  Wall  Colours  are  cheaper  than  wall  paper, 
more  sanitary  and  lasting ;  Silkstone  can  be  washed  often 
and  never  rubs  off  ;  it  gives  a  beautiful,  soft,  silky  finish  that 
will  outwear  any  other  wall  covering.  The  economy  of  this 
splendid  finish,  that  costs  so  little  to  apply  and  serves  so 
satisfactorily,  is  an  appeal  to  every  customer. 

While  economy  is  a  forceful  appeal  to  housewives  and  furnishes  a  motive 
for  an  enormous  purchase  of  Silkstone,  it  is  a  profitable  article  for  the 
dealer.    We  suggest  that  you  write  us  and  so  give  opportunity  for  us  to 
prove  two  things — that  Silkstone  sells,  and  that  it  is  profitable  to  you. 
Better  yet — write  us  about  the  benefit  to  you  in  an  agency. 


G.  F.  STEPHENS  &  CO.,  LIMITED 

PAINT  AND  VARNISH  MAKERS 

WINNIPEG  AND  CALGARY 


82 


HARDWARE    AND    METAL 


January  3,   1920 


Winnipeg  Hardware  Quotations-continued 


POLISH 

O-Cedar — 

Doz 

4   oz $  2  00 

12     oz 4  00 

1    quart    10  00 

%     gal 16  00 

1   gal 24  00 

Liquid   Veneer — 

4   oz *  2  00 

12    oz iW 

1    quart    8  ^° 

%    *al 14  4J 

Bon    Ton— 

%   pints   l  3B 

%    pints    *  10 

Pints     3  25 

Quarts     5   ,(l 

%   gal 9   °° 

Gal • I5  C0 

PUTTY 

IW-Ib.   irons   W  29 

25-lb.  irons,  per  cwt 7  80 

1%-ft.   tins    l+% 

RIVETS  AND   BURRS 

Iron  rivets.  30-10%;  copper,  No. 
7,  56c  lb. :  No.  8,  66c ;  No.  10,  60e . 
Nb.  12.  <Se- 

FHt*-*.  assorted  boxes.  No.  8. 
We;  No.   10,  07c  lb. 

Copper  Burrs,  No.  8,  56c :  No. 
10,   60c;   No.    12,   65c.  - 

ROOFING              lply  2  ply  3  ply 

Klingon     $2  20  $2  66  $3  10 

Winner     2  30  2  80  3  30 

Comfort    2  45  3  00  3  60 

Induroid      2  80  3  60  4  20 

ROPE 

Sisal,  25%c  base ;  pure  Manila, 
32i4c  base;  British  Manila, '  29%e 
base  ;  lath  yarn,  24%c  base ;  African 
hemp,  29%c  base ;  cotton  rope,  % 
and  over,  75c  lb. 


Tarred     Marline    Hanks 
50c. 


per     lb.. 


8ANDPAPER 

Star —  Quire.  Ream. 

M.    0     $0  33  $6  or. 

%      0  86  6   50 

1      0  40  7  30 

1% 0  415  8  25 

2      0  62  9  30 

2%     0  58  10  50 

8     0  66  11  90 

B.   4k  A.— 

00,   0    $0  38  $6  75 

%          0  40  7   16 

X     0  46  8   10 

1%      0  49  9  45 

2      0  64  10  90 

»%      0  70  12  S" 

3      0  80  14  30 


SASH   BALANCES   (Caldwell). 

20%    on    list. 

SAWS,   BUCK 

Happy  Medium,  $12.00 ;  Wat^-li 
Spring.  $12.50 ;  Lance  Tooth  or 
Lightning   Blades,    $16. 

SCREWS 

Bright  iron  round  head,  70%  ;  flat 
head.  72%%  :  round  head,  brass, 
47%% :  flat  head,  brass.  50% ; 
coach,    35%. 

Set   Screws.    40%. 

SCYTHES—  Doz. 

Bramble $ 

Bush      16  25 

Excelsior      

Cast     15  75 

SHOVELS    AND   SPADES— 

Pt.,  $13.75  per  doz. ;  D.H.  Rd.  Pt., 
$13.75 ;  per  doz. ;  L.H.  Sqr.  Pt., 
$13.7S :  L.H.  Rd.  Pt..  $13.75:  Bull- 
dog &  Jones,  D.H..  Rd.  Pt.,  $17.20: 
D.H.,  Sqr.  Pt..  $17.20;  L.H.  Rd. 
Pt.,  $17.20;  L.H.,  Sqr.  Pt.,  $17.20; 
Black  Cat  and  Crescent  Scoops — 
No.  4,  $18.60  doz.;  No.  6.  $19.10: 
No.  8,  $19.60:  No.  10,  $20.10:  Moose 
&  Jones  Scoops — No.  4,  $20.00;  No. 
6.  $20.50;  No.  8,  $21.00. 

SNATHS— 

No.    2    loop    13  25 

Bush      15   00 

STEEL  SHEETS.   BLACK 

10    gauge    $7  30 

12    gauge     7  35 

14    gauge     7   40 

16    gauge    7  50 

18-20    gauge     8  10 

22-24    gauge     8  15 

26    gauge     8  20 

28    gauge     8  30 

SWEEPERS.  CARPET— 

See  list  in  regular  "Current  Mar- 
ket Quotations"  Column,  f.o.b.  fac- 
tory, Niagara  Falls,  Ont. 


SWEEPERS.    VACUUM- 


Doz. 


Grand  Rapids,   nickeled    $127  20 

Household,     japannel     

Superba,   nickeled    | 

F.O.B.  Jobbers'  Warehouses.   Win-     j 
nipeg. 


SOLDER.      Per  pound.    37   to    38c. 


SPIKES,    BOAT 

Pressed.  %  in.,  $8.30;  5-16.  $7.65; 
%.   $7.40:   %,   $7.20. 


STAPLES 

BriK*ht  wire,  per  cwt.,  $5.15  at 
Fort  William.  JR.66  Winnipeg:  eal- 
vanized  staples,  $....  Fort  William, 
$....    Winnipeg. 


STEEL 

Sleiuhshoe.  $5.50  base  tier  cwt.  ; 
plow,  common,  $12 :  crucible  plow, 
$16.00 ;  angle,  $6.00 :  harrow,  $5.76 
base ;  cast,  octagon  tool  steel,  20c 
base  :  smiar"  ton].  20c  base  :  spring. 
$6.00;  machine,  $8.00  base;  tire. 
$5.65.  Mild,  3-16,  %,  5-16,  $5.00 
base ;  other  sizes,  $5.00  base.  Band 
steel,    $5.50  base. 


STEEL  HOOPS 

%  in.,  $8.35  ;  %   in..  $8.00  ;  %   in.. 

$7.40;    %     in..    $7.10;  1     in..    $7.00: 

1%   in.,   $6.90;   IV-   in..  $6.80. 


STEEL  SQUARES 

10%  on  list. 

TACKS.      Carpet.    65',     list 
TIES.      Cow 


TIN    AND    TERNE    PLATE— 

20  x   28  I.C.  box $23  50 

20  x  33  I.X.  box 32  90 

20  x   33  I.C.  box 28  00 

20  x  33  I.X.  box 32  90 

Terne    plates     24  00 


TRAPS.  GAME—  Doz. 

Victor  H.&  N.  Jump 

No.    0    $1  96       $ $ 

No.    1    2  30  3  60  3   10 

No.    1%     3  45  7  80  4  55 

No.    2     4  80  11  55  6   70 

No.    3    6  75  15  40  8  90 


TUBS— 


Wood        Fibre 


No.    0    $21  36  $26  40 

No.    1     18  80  22  65 

No.    2    1«  40  18  80 

No.    3    14  00  15  95 

TURPENTINE 

See  weekly  report. 


TWINE   (WRAPPING) 


Lb. 


Cotton,  3-ply,    cones    $0  86 

Cotton,  3-ply,   balls    0  90 

Cotton,  4-ply,    cones    0  90 

Cotton.  4-ply,   balls    0  95 


VARNISHES— 

Stephens'    Luminette,    gal ....    $3  50 
Stephens'   Exailite,   jral 4  25 

WARES,  ETC.— 

Scotch  Grey,  40-12%%  discount. 

Colonial    Imperial,    Pearl,     15-7%% 
discount. 

Premier,      Canada,      Diamond,     plus 
7%%. 

Whitewear,    30-15%. 

Japanned    Ware,    list,    plus    32%. 

Japanned     Ware,     white,     list,     plus 
42%. 

Japanned  Sprinklers,  list,  plus  32%. 

Stamped    Ware,    plain,    30-20-2%% 
discount. 

Stamped  Ware,  retinmed,  20-20-7%% 
discount. 

Pieced   Tinware,    ordinary,    list,    plus 
48%. 

Pieced  Tinware,  copper  bottoms,  list, 
plus   63%%. 

Sheet    Iron    Ware,    list,    plus.    32%. 

Light  Galvanized   Pails,  plus  42%%. 
Tubs,    list,    plus    42%%. 

Heavy    Galvanized    Pails    and    Tubs, 
plus    31%. 

Jap.   Coal  Hods,   list,  plus  46%%. 
Galvanized  Coal  Hods,  list,  plus  61% 


WASHERS— 

Iron,  small  lots,  50%  off  list  plu» 
$1.50  :  full  boxes,  iron,  50%  off  list. 
plus  $1.00. 

WASTE 

Cream,    Polishing    $0  22 

WHITE 

XXX    Extra     $0   gj 

XX,    grand    0    19% 

*L£R 0  18% 

A    Jumpitre    0  lfiyt 

X     Press 0  i6 

COLORED 

Fancy    q  1- 

;-io" 0  16% 

Standard     0  14 

Popular 0  12^ 

Keen    0  11 

..Above    lines   subject   So    trade    du> 
count   for   quantity. 


WIRE,   BARB 

Lyman,  4-point,  $5.25  Winnipeg  . 
Glidden  Cattle,  2-pt.,  $5.06  Winni- 
peg ;  Baker,  2-pt.,  $4.95  Winnipeg  ; 
plain  tw»t,,  cwt.,  Winnipeg,  $7  " 
100  lbs.  ;  galvanized,  Winnipeg,  No 
9.  $6.20;  No.  12,  $6.35;  coil  spring, 
plain,  Winnipeg,  No.  9,  $6.26 ;  No 
12,    $6.40. 

Patented  screen  in  106-ft  roll* 
$3.26  per  hundiredi  sq.  ft.  :  in  50-ft 
rolls  :   $3.26  per   100  sq.   ft. 


WIRE.  PLAIN 

Boles   ties,    14   gauge,   single   loop, 
$7    Winnipeg;    $6.60    Fort    William 
Brass   snare   wire,   per   lb.,    90c. 


WIRE,  ANNEALED 

No.  9,  $5.79;  10,  $5.81;  12,  $5.95: 
14,  $6.15;  15,  $6.30;  16,  $6.45  per 
100   lbs. 


WRENCHES   (NUT) 

Agricultural —  Doz    1 

6    inch    $6  00 

8    inch     7   20 

10    inch     8  40 

12    inch     10  80 

15    inch     14  40 

Perfect    Handle- 

6    inch    15  00 

8    inch     17  50 

10    inch     

12    inch     

15    inch    

18    inch     

WRENCHES    (PIPE) 

Stillson —  Each 

6  inch    $1  05 

8  inch    1  18 

10  inch     1  31 

14  inch    1  84 

18  inch     2  62 

24  inch     3  81 

36  inch     7  09 

Trimo — 

10    inch    $1  56 

14    inch 2  19 

18    inch    8  13 

24    inch    4  53 

Dozen. 
Always  Rea<fcy—  Black.     N.P 

No.    1    $4  20       $4  50 

No.    2    6  76         SO* 

WRINGERS 

Eze.     $62.65     per     dozen,       R*Hin« 


January  3,  1920 


HARDWARE  AND  MET  Ah— Advertising  Section 


83 


h  h     eg  ^  i^  ij-gr 


J=L 


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STEEL  IRON  METALS 

WINNIPEG  WAREHOUSE  STOCK 

REINFORCING  BARS  IN  ALL  SIZES,  IN  LENGTHS  UP  TO  60' 

BOLTS:  MACHINE,  CARRIAGE,  DRIFT,  SHIPBUILDING,  ELEVATOR 

BAR  IRON:    FLAT,    ROUND  AND  SQUARE,  SMALLEST  TO  THE  LARGEST 

HEXAGON  BARS  MACHINE  STEEL 

BOILER  TUBES  NUTS  RIVETS  SHAFTING 

ANGLES  CHANNELS  RAILS  TEES 

FORGING  BILLETS  CAP  SCREWS  WASHERS  SET  SCREWS 

GAUGE  SHEETS,  BLACK  AND  GALVANIZED,  IN  ALL  GAUG2S 

GET  OUR  MONTHLY  STOCK  LIST 

A  COMPLETE  LINE   FOR 
THE  MANUFACTURER  -  THE  WHOLESALER— THE  CONSUMER 

IF  IT'S  STEEL  OR  IRON  WE  HAVE  IT 


i.r ■'■'■'■,  ■'■■■' 


13 

I 

II 
I 

I 

1 

3 


TheMANITOBASTEEL&IRON  COMPANY. 


A  Frost-Proof  Radiator 


"Perfecto" 
Radiators 


are  built  on  scienti- 
fic principles,  with 
the  greatest  cooling 
surface    made.  N  o 

overheating  in  sum- 
mer. We  know  the 
capability  of  the 
"Perfecto"  Radiator 
thoroughly.  As  an 
evidence  of  our  con- 
fidence in  the  super- 
iority of  the  "Per- 
fecto"  we  offer  the  following   guarantee : 

"The  undersigned  hereby  guarantee  the  "Perfecto"  Frostproof 
Radiator,  numbered  1916-20,  against  frost  for  the  coming  winter 
ending  March  31st,  1.920,  by  replacing  same  with  our  new 
Perfecto  Radiator  if  same  has  been  burst  from  irost. 

"Guarantee  Sheet  Metal  &  Roofing  Oo." 

A   MONEY-MAKING    AGENCY. 

A  splendid  opportunity  to  increase  your  turnover  lies  in  "Per- 
fecto" Radiators.  Write  to-day — a  post  card  will  bring  the 
proposition.     Ford  size,   $50.     Estitmates  free  on  other  sizes. 


The  way  others  do  it. 


The  way  we  do  it. 


Radiator  Repairs 

If  it's  repairs,  we  have  the  most  up-to-date 
Radiator  Repair  Department  in  Western 
Canada.  Give  us  an  opportunity  to  demon- 
strate for  you  the  right  kind  of  repairs — 
the  kind  that  satisfy. 


Guarantee  Sheet  Metal  &  Roofing  Company 

490  Portage  Avenue,  Winnipeg 


84 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


January   3,   192G 


HAVE  A 

Forwarding    Agent  in    Winnipeg 

We  have  a  good  warehouse  here  and  are  in  a 
position  to  help  you  give  Al  service  to  your  trade 
in  the  West. 

We  will  re-pack,  sort  and  re-ship  from  your  stock 
here,  guaranteeing  prompt  service,  or  if  desired 
we  will  solicit  and  sell  your  Western  customers. 

If  you  are  interested,  write  for  particulars. 
Bank  references  furnished. 

W.  R.  JAMES  &  CO. 

74  Henry  Avenue  East  -  WINNIPEG 


O-Rib-O 

Sanitary  Closets 

Domestic  size,  fitted  as  fol- 
lows: Galvanized  iron  body; 
hardwood  seat  and  cover; 
^^  body  and  seat  mahogany 
finished;  galvanized  iron  buc- 
ket of  65  lbs.  Capacity,  fit- 
ted with  cover;  9-ft.  black 
enamel  vent  pipe  and  elbow 
included.  Weight,  crated, 
about  30  lbs. 

O-Rib-O  Manufacturing   Co. 

WINNIPEG,  MANITOBA 


EUREKA 


Tough  and  strong   as 
Gauge  Glass  can  be  made 

There   is    only   one    best   and   that   is   the    "Eureka"    mamufaotuTed    by 

Joseph   Tomey  &  Sons,    Birmingham,   used  wish   utmost  satisfaction  by 

railways  and  larger  plants  throughout  Canada  and  United  States. 

We   are   'Canadian   representatives    and   carry   a   stock   in   Winnipeg   for 

sorting  orders  and  shorts.   .  Let  us  quote  you  either  F.O.B.  Winnipeg  or 

Liverpool. 

The   great   shortage   of   Gauge    Glasses  makes    it  to   your   advantage   to 

place  import  orders  as  early  as  possible. 

Moncrief f  and  Endress,  Limited 

GALT    BUILDING,    WINNIPEG 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL'S 
electro  catalog  shows  upwards  of 
400  hardware  electros.  These  are 
supplied,  mounted  on  wood  blocks, 
at  25c  each.  Write  for  free  book- 
let showing  assortment. 

HARDWARE  AND  METAL 

Electro  Service  Dept. 
143  University  Ave.         Toronto,  Can. 


mtitii/%' 


Blackhawk 
Socket  Wrenches 


Made  in  Parker  Rust  Proof  Fin- 
ish. A  complete  line  used  by  the 
Auto    Motive    Trade    in    general. 

In  addition  to  full  line  of  Socket 
Sets  we  have  in  stock  very  attrac- 
tive  Dealers'   Display   Boards  in 
nicely  blending  colors.     The  No. 
400  Board  is  a  special  Ford  Set 
of   tools    peculiar    to    the    Ford 
users.     The  No.  600  Board  has 
an   assortment   of  one   hundred 
Speeders;  and  the  360  Board  has 
an   assortment   of   one   hundred 
and     eighty     Tee     and     Offset 
Wrenches  of  use  on  all  the  dif- 
ferent cars. 

Every  Wrench  guaranteed 


Merchants!  Hardware  Specialties,  urrTited 

Calgary 


"Dazee  Brand"  Woodenware 

Buy  Western-made  Washboards,  Step  Ladders, 
Bake  Boards,  Ironing  Boards,  Clothes  Horses, 
Tub  Stands,  etc.  For  sale  by  all  jobbers.  We 
guarantee  the  quality  will  pleaie  you.  If  jobber 
does  not  supply  you  write  us  direct 

The  Brett  Mfg.,  Co.,  Limited 

Winnipeg,  Man. 


Winnipeg         Regina         Calgary         Vancouver 

Narracott  &  Tynan,  Ltd. 

MANUFACTURERS'  AGENTS 
Head  Office:    Princess  St.,    Winnipeg,   Canada 


Hardware  and  Metal's 
unique  circulation  as 
proven  by  the  A. B.C. 
audit  is  due  to  31  years 
of  honest  effort  to  give 
the  retail  trade  the  best 
possible  service. 


January  3,   1920 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


85 


KApTOGI 

T*to  lumish  < 


Ashdown  Offers  New  Trade  Winners 
To  Exclusive  ^ijgnize  Agents 

A  bigger  and  better  advertising  campaign,  including  strong,  powerful  advertisements  in 

the  leading  magazines,  backed  by  the  most  effective  lithographed  display  material  for 

dealers'  stores  and  windows,  is  only  part  of  the  Kyanize  Exclusive  Agency  Proposition 

this  year. 

In  addition  to  this,  all  established  Kyanize  Agents   are   offered  new  business-building 

lines  that  will  be  highly  advertised. 

Do  not  place  your  paint  and  varnish  orde  s,  Kyanize  Agents,  until  you  have  had  an 

opportunity  to  see  the  new  plans  on 


VARNISHES  and  ENAMELS 

THE    BUSINESS-BUILDING    LINE    FOR    EXCLUSIVE    AGENTS 

This  is  a  high  quality  line  that  positively  assures  Kyanize  Agents  of  a  constant  and  steadily 
increasing  business.    This  year  new  products  of  the  usual  Kyanize  high  quality  standard  have 
been  added.    The  new  advertising  campaign  is  the  best  that  this  firm  has  ever  devised. 
Kyanize   Agents,  wait  for  the   Ashdown  salesman  before  placing  your  orders.     If  you  can't 
wait,  write  us  to-day. 

LIVE    DEALERS    IN    UNREPRESENTED    TERRITORY 

The  Kyanize  Exclusive  Agency  will  positively  bring  you  greatly  increased  business.  It  has 
doubled  the  varnish  and  enamel  business  for  other  dealers  and  it  can  do  the  same  for  you.  If 
there  is  now  no  Kyanize  Agent  in  your  town,  write  us  to-day.  We  have  a  proposition  that  can- 
not fail  to  interest  you.  A  postal  will  do — but  send  it  to-day.  Just  say  "Give  us  particulars  on 
the  Kyanize  Exclusive  Agency." 

J.  H.  Ashdown  Hardware  Company,  Limited 

Wholesale  Distributors 
Calgary  WINNIPEG  Saskatoon 


86  HARDWARE     AND     METAL  January   3,   1920 

pHiiwiwiiypiiiiiiiiiw 

|  THE   BUYERS'   GUIDE  [ 

//  what  you  want  is  not  here,  write  us,  and  we  will  tell  you  where  to  get  it.    Let  us  suggest  that  you  consult  also 
the  advertisers,  under  facing  the  inside  back  cover,  after  having  secured  advertisers'  names ,  from  this  directory.  g 

Tlie  information  you  may  desire  may    >e  f  und  in  the  advertising  pages.      This  department  is  maintained  for  the 
benefit  and  convenience  of  our  readers.     The  insertion  of  advertisers'  headings  is  gladly  undertaken,  but  does  not 
H  become  part  of  any  advertising    contract.  S 


ll.lll!ll.ll:l!llll! 


|.|i|:l.: 


Abrasives 

The   Carborundum   Oo,,    Niagara   Falls,   N.Y. 
Dunlop  Tire  &  Rubber  Goods  Oo.,  Ltd.,  Toronto. 
Plewes    Ltd.,    Winnipeg,    Man. 
Air  Cocks 
The  Penberthy'  Injector  Co.,   Ltd.,   Windsor,   Ont 

Agricultural   Products 

Dunlop  Tire  &   Rubber  Goods  Co.,  Ltd.,  Toronto. 
Alabastine 

The    Alabastine    Co.,    Paris,    Oat 
Aluminum 

British  Aluminum  Co.,  Toronto. 

Canada    Metal    Co.,    Toronto. 

The    Great     Western     Smelting   &    Refining     Co., 
Vancouver. 

A.    C.    Leslie   &   Co.,   Montreal. 
Aluminum  Ware 

The  Aluminum  Goods  Mfg.  Co.,  Manitowoc,   Wis. 

Thos.    Davidson    Mfg.    Oo.,   Ltd.,    Montreal. 

Merchants'    Hardware    Specialties,    Ltd.,    Oalgary, 
Alta. 

The   Aluminum    Ware    Mfg.    Oo.,    Oakrille,   Ont. 
Ammonia 

-    The    Engineers'    Supply   Oo. ,    Winnipeg,    Man. 
Ammunition 

CaverhM,    Learmont   &   Co.,    Montreal. 

Dominion  Cartridge   Co.,    Montreal. 

Lewis    Bros.,    Ltd.,    Montreal. 

Remington    Arms-Union    Metallic    Cartridge    Oo. , 
Windsor. 
Anchor  Bolts 

Steel  Co.  of  Canada,   Ltd.,   The,   Hamilton,   Ont. 
Arbors 

Whitman  &  Barnes  Mfg.  Co.,  St.  Catharines,  Ont. 
Arms 

The  Eraser  Co.,   Agents  B.8.A.,   Montreal,  Que. 
Art  Glass 

Hobbs    Mfg.    Co.,    Montreal,    Que. 
\    The   Ontario  Plate   Glass,   Ltd.,   Hamilton,   Ont 
Asbestos 

Canadian   Asbestos   Co.,   Montreal,    Que. 

The  Engineers'   Supply  Co.,   Winnipeg,   Man. 
Arms,   Small 

The  Eraser  Co.,   Agents  B.S.A.,  Montreal,   Que. 
Asbestos  Pipe  Specialties 

Canadian    Asbestos   Co.,    Montreal,    Que. 
Asbestos  Pipe  Coverings 

Canadian    Asbestos   Co.,    Montreal,    Que. 
Ash  Pit  Doors 

The     Economy    Foundry    Co.,     Ltd.,     Portage    la 
Prairie,    Man. 
Ash   Sifters 

Burrowes  Mfg.   Co.,  Toronto. 

J.    Samuels  &  Co..  Toronto. 
A"Ter   Rings 

Tlie    Crescent    Co.,    Meriden,    Conn. 
Auto  Accessories,  Equipment  and  Supplies 
(Jobbers) 

J.   E.    Beauchamp  &  Co.,   Montreal,  Que. 

Evans  &   Co.,   Ltd.,   Montreal,   Que. 

E.    G.    Gooderham,    Toronto. 

Northern    Electric   Co.,    Ltd.,   Montreal. 

Great    West    Electric   Co.,    Ltd.,    Winnipeg,    Man. 

Homer   &   Wilson,    Hamilton,   Ont. 

Hyslop    Bros.,    Toronto. 

North    American    Hardware    Co.,    Ltd.,    Montreal. 

The    Renaud    Motor   Supply    Co.,    Ltd.,    Montreal 
Que. 

The  Royal  Canadian  Specialties,  Hamilton,   Ont. 

Samuel    Trees    &    Co.,    Limited,    Toronto. 

Walker  Vallance,  Ltd.,   Hamilton,  Ont. 
Auto  Accessories,  Equipment  and  Supplies 
<  M  anu  f  actu  rers ) 

The   All-Way    Mfg.    Co..   Toronto,    Ont 

Auto   Specialties   Oo.,    Buffalo,   N.Y. 

W.    H.    Banfield   &   Sons,    Ltd.,    Toronto. 

Barcalo    Mfg.    Co.,    Buffalo.    N.Y. 

Benjamin    Eletric   Co.,   Toronto. 

Boston    Varnish    Co.,     Everett     Station,     Boston, 
Mass. 

Burrowes  Mfg.   Oo.,  Toronto. 

Burgess-Norton  Mfg.    Co.,   Geneva,   111. 

Burlington-Windsor    Blanket    Co.,    Ltd.,    Toronto. 

Canada  Cycle   &    Motor   Co.,    Ltd.,    Weston,   Ont 

Canadian    General    Electric    Co.,    Ltd.,    Toronto. 

Canadian    National    Carbon    Co.,    Toronto. 

Canadian  Winckley  Co.,   Ltd.,  Windsor,   Ont. 

Cannon    Oiler   Co.,    Keithslburg,    111. 

The   Carborundum   Oo„    Niagara   Falls,   N.Y. 

Northern    Electric   Co..    Ltd.,    Montreal. 

Canada    Dry   Cells,    Ltd.,    Winnipeg. 

The   Chapman   Ball   Bearing  Co.,   Toronto. 

Dunlop  Tire  &  Rubber  Goods  Co.,  Ltd.,   Toronto. 

Guelph  Spring  &  Axle  Co.,  Limited,  Guelph,  Ont. 

Gutta   Percha   &   Rubber   Ltd.,   Toronto. 

The  Imperial   Bit  &  Snap  Co.,  Racine,   Wis. 

Kinzinger,    Bruce   &   Co.,   Niagara   Falls,    Ont 

IW111.   B.    Lane,   Chicago,   111. 


Line,   Kimball   Co.,   Moose  Jaw,   Sask. 

The     Marquette     Manufacturing     Co.,     Inc.,     St. 

Paul,   Minn. 
M.   H.   Merchant  Corporation,  Syracuse,  N.Y. 
The   Locktite  Mfg.    Co.,   Windsor.   Ont. 
Frank  Mossberg  Co.,  Attleboro,  Mass. 
McKinnon  Industries,   Ltd.,  St.  Catharines,  Ont. 
Northern    Electric   Co.,    Ltd.,    Montreal. 
Presto    Patch    Oo.,    Toronto. 

The    F.    E.    Partridge   Rubber   Co.,    Guelph,    Ont. 
Rock    Island    Mfg.    Co.,    Chicago,    111. 
C.    A.    Shaler   Co.,    Waupun,    Wis. 
Smith    &   Hemenway   Co.,    Irvington,    N.J. 
The  Star  Specialty  Mfg.   Co.,   Chicago,   111. 
The   Steel   Trough   &   Machine   Co.,    Ltd.,   Tweed, 

Ont. 
Thermoid   Rubber  Co.,   Trenton,   N.J. 
Trimont   Mfg.   Co.,   Roxbury,   Mass. 
Van   ("leef   Bros.,    Chicago,    111. 
The   Van  der   Linde  Rubber  Co.,   Toronto. 
WilkinioT,    &    Kompass,    Hamilton, 
Williams  &   Co.,  J.  H.   Brooklyn,  N.Y. 
Wilson     Auto    Specialties,    Ltd.,    Hamilton,    Ont. 
Whitman  &  Barnes  Mfg.  Co.,  St.  Catharines,  Ont. 
Automatic  Screw  Machine  Products 
Burgess-Norton   Mfg.    Co.,    Geneva,    111. 
Caron    Bros.,    Montreal,    Que. 

Automobile   Hoods    (Ford) 

Burrowes  Mfg.    Co.,   Toronto. 
Automobile   Parts 

Canada  Foundries  &  Forgings,  Ltd.,  Welland,  Oat 

Northern   Electric   Co.,   Ltd.,   Montreal. 

Kinzinger,    Bruce   &   Co.,   Niagara   Falls,    Ont 

McKinnon    Industries,    Ltd.,    St.    Catharines,    Ont. 
Automobile   Parts,   Ford,   Overland,  Buick 

Burgess-Norton    Mfg.    Co.,    Geneva,   111. 
Automobile  Signals 

Northern    Electric    Co.,    Ltd.,    Montreal. 
Automobile    Specialties 

Northern    _iectric   Co..    Ltd.,   Montreal. 

Evans  &  Co.,   Ltd.,   Montreal,   Que. 
Awnings 

Grant,    Holden    &    Graham,    Ltd.,    Ottawa,    Ont. 

.!     .1.    Turner   &   Co.,    Peterboro,   Ont. 
Awls,    Sewing 

C.    A.    Myers   Co.,   Chicago,    111. 
Axes 

Burgess-Norton    Mfg.    Co.,    Geneva.    111. 

Canada    Foundries  &    Forgings,    Brockville,   Ont 

Cavcrhill,    Learmont    &    Co.,    Montreal. 

Sburly-Dietrich   Co.,    Ltd.,   Gait,    Ont. 
Axles 

Guelph    Spring    &    Axle    Co.,    Ltd.,    Guelph,    Ont 
Axles,  Car 

Steel   Co.   of  Canada,   Ltd.,   The,   Hamilton,   Ont. 
Babbitt  Metal 

Canada    Metal    Co.,    Toronto. 

Cavei-hill.    Learmont   &   Co..    Montreal. 

The  Dominion  Metal   Co.,   Ltd.,   Sherbrooke,   Que. 

The    Great    Western    Smelting    A    Refining    Co., 
Vancouver,    B.C. 

Hoyt    Metal    Co.,    Toronto. 

Owl    Metal    Co.,    Winnipeg. 

Lewis    Bros.,    Ltd.,    Montreal. 

Plewes    Ltd.,    Winnipeg,    Man. 

Tallman    Brass  &   Metal   Co.,    Hamilton. 
Barb    Wire 

The  Frost  Steel  &  Wire  Co.,  Ltd.,  Hamilton,  Ont. 

The   Steel   Co.    of  Canada,   Ltd.,   Hamilton,   Ont 

Bars   and    Racks,   Clothes 

OMerrille    Mfg.    Co.,    Ltd.,    Otterville,    Ont. 

Barrel    Covers 

E.    B.    Eddy    Co.,    Hull,    Que. 

Barrels,    Steel 

The    Smart-Turner    Machine    Co.,    Ltd.,    Hamilton, 
Ont. 

Batteries,  Dry 

Canadian    National    Carbon   Co.,    Ltd.,    Toronto. 
Canada    Dry    Cells    Ltd.,    Winnipeg. 
Great  West  Electric  Co.,  Ltd.,  Winnipeg,  Man. 
Canadian    General    Electric  Oo.,   Toronto. 
Northern    Electric  Mfg.    Co.,    Ltd.,    Montreal. 
Dominion    Battery    Co.,    Ltd.,    Toronto,    Ont. 
Xnrth    American    Hardware    Co.,    Ltd.,    Montreal. 
Northern    Electric   Co.,    Ltd.,    Montreal. 

Batteries,  Flashlight 

Canadian    National    Carbon    Co.,    Ltd.,    Toronto. 
Dominion    Battery    Co.,    Ltd.,    Toronto,    Ont, 
Baths,  Enamelled  and  Copper 
Canada    Metal    Co.,    Toronto. 

Bath    Room   Fixtures 

The   Gendron    Mfg.    Co.,    Ltd.,    Toronto. 

Kinzinger,    Bruce   &   Co„,   Niagara   Falls,    Ont 


Bends,   Brass,  Iron  and   Lead 

J  as.    Morrison    Brass    Mfg.    Co.,    Toronto. 

Bibbs,  Basin  and  Bath  Cocks,  Compression 

Jas.    Morrison    Brass    Mfg.    Co.,    Toronto. 
The   United   Brassfounders  Ltd.,  Manchester,   Eng. 
Wentworth    Mfg.    Co.,    Hamilton,    Ont 
Bibbs,   Basin  and  Bath  Cocks,  Fuller 
Jas.    Morrison    Brass    Mfg.    Co.,    Toronto. 
The  United  Brassfounders,   Ltd.,  Manchester,  Eng 

Brake  Lining 

The    Renaud    Motor   Supply    Co.,    Ltd..    Montreal 

Que. 
Thermoid    Rubber    Co.,    Trenton,    N.J. 

Brass    Goods 
The   Penberthy   Injector  Co.,   Ltd.,   Windsor,   Ont 
Dunlop  Tire  &   Rubber  Goods  Co.,  Ltd.,   Toronto 
Stratford    Brass   Co.,    Ltd.,    Stratford,    Out. 

Brass  Castings  and  Goods 
Canada    Metal    Co.,    Toronto. 
Jas.    Cartland   &   Sons,   Ltd.,   Birmingham,    Eog 
Jas.    Morrison   Brass    Mfg.,    Co.,    Toronto. 
Tallman    Brass   &   Metal  Co.,   Hamilton. 
The   Penberthy   Injector  Co.,   Ltd.,   Windsor,   Out 
The  United  Brassfounders,  Ltd.,  Manchester,  Eng 

Brass,  Sheets  and  Rods 

Canada    Metal    Co.,    Toronto. 
A.    C.    Leslie  &   Co.,    Montreal. 
Tallman  Brass  &  Metal  Co.,  Hamilton. 

Bevels 

Stanley   Rule  &   Level   Co.,   New   Britain,   Conn. 
Goodell-Pratt    Co.,    Greenfield,    Mass. 
L.    S.    Starrest   Co.,    Athol,    Mass. 

Belting,   Transmission,   Elevator  and   Conveyor 

Dunlop  Tire  &  Rubber  Goods  Co..  Ltd.,  Toronto 
Manitoba  Steel  &  Iron  Co.,  Ltd.,  Winnipeg,  Man 

Belting,   Rubber 

Can.   Consolidated   Rubber  Co.,   Montreal,   Que. 
Dunlop  Tire  &  Rubber  Goods  Co.,  Ltd.,  Toronto 
Gutta    Percha   &   Rubber  Ltd.,   Toronto. 
Plewes    Ltd.,    Winnipeg,    Man. 

Belting,  Cotton 

Dominion   Belting   Co.,   Hamilton,    Ont. 
Plewes    Ltd.,    Winnipeg,    Man. 

Billet.  Blooms  and  Slabs 

Steel  Oo.   of  Canada,    Ltd.,  The.   Hamilton.   Ont 

Blacksmiths'   Supplies 

D.    Acltland    &    Son.    Winnipeg. 

Blankets,  Saddle 

Burlington    Windsor   Blanket    Co.,    Ltd.,    Toronto 
Gait   Robe    Co.,    Gait,    Ont. 

Blankets,  Horse 

J.   J.  Turner  &  Co.,   Peterboro,   Ont 

Boilers 

The   Gurney   Foundry   Co.,   Ltd.,   Toronto. 

Boats 

Peterboro    Canoe   Co.,    Ltd.,    Peterboro,    Ont. 

Bolts  and  Nuts 

Canadian   Tube   &    Iron    Co.,    Ltd.,    Montreal. 
Caverhill,    Learmont   &   Co.,    Montreal. 
Lewi?    Bros.,    Ltd.,    Montreal. 

Northern    Bolt,   Screw  &   Wire  Co.,   Owen   Sound. 
London    Bolt   &   Hinge   Works,    London,    Ont. 
The  Steel  Oo.   of  Oanada,  Ltd.,   Hamilton,   Ont. 
The    Stanley   Works.    New    Britain,    Oonn. 
Manitoba  Steel  &  Iron  Oo.,  Ltd.,  Winnipeg,  Man. 
Wilkinson    &    Kompass,    Hamilton. 

Baits,  Cant  Hook  and  Peavy 

Steel   Co.   of  Canada,   Ltd.,   The,   Hamilton,  Ont 

Bolts,  Eye 

Manitoba  Steel  &  Iron  Co.,  Ltd.,  Winnipeg,  Man. 
The  Steel  Co.   of  Oanada.   Ltd.,   Hamilton,   Ont 
Williams  &  Co.,  J.  H.   Brooklyn,  N.Y. 

Bolts,  Hanger  Screw 

Steel   Oo.    of  Canada,    Ltd.,   The,    Hamilton,   Ont 

Bolts,   Railway 

Steel   Oo.   of  Canada.   Ltd.,  The,   Hamilton,  Ont 

Boring  Bars 

Williams    A    Co.,    J.    H.,    Brooklyn,    N.Y. 

Pratt  &   Whitney   Co.,   of   Canada,   Ltd.,    Dundaa. 

Boxes,  Tin 

A.    P..    Whittall   Can   Co..   Ltd.,    Montreal. 

Boots,    Rubber 

Dunlop  Tire  &  Rubber  Goods  Co.,  Ltd.,  Toronto. 

Boot  Calks  and  Tools 

Steel    Co.    of    Canada,    Ltd..    Hamilton. 

Box  Opening  Tools 

Bridgeport    Edflre.    Mfg.    Corp.,    Bridgeport,    Oonn. 

Bale  Ties 

The  FrBrt  Steel  &  Wire  Co.,  Ltd..  Hamilton,  Ont. 


January  3,  1920 


J  I. \R  DAY  ARK  AND.  META3&— Advertising  Section 


87 


!!!!!!!!!!S!:SSS!»SS:». 


The  entirely  new  application  of  the  principle  of  burner  construction — elim- 
inating all  ratchets  and  gears — and  the  introduction  of  anon-burnable  wick  that 
is  carried  stationary  in  the  movable  burner,  one  of  the  greatest  shortcomings  of 
the  ordinary  oil  stove,  is  completely  overcome  in  the 


Prove  it  by  investigating  a  Nesco  Perfect 
Stove ;  look  at  the  cutaway  view  shown  above. 

The  Toggle  joint  swings  on  its  pivot  and 
raises  or  lowers  the  burner  bowl.  This  motion 
regulates  the  level  of  the  oil  in  the  bowl  in  its 
relation  to  the  flame. 

The  Rockweave  Wick  is  stationary  in  the 
burner  bowl.  It  never  moves  from  this  posi- 
tion. When  the  burner  is  raised  or  lowered  it 
carries  the  wick  with  it.  The  wick  is  nor 
burnable  and  woven  with  long  fibres,  making 
it  strong,  durable  and  absorbent  for  conduct- 
ing oil  from  feed  to  flame.     There  is  not  a 


single  gear  to  rust  or  stick  or  wear  out.  No 
teeth  to  catch  in  the  wick  and  tear,  or  fail  to 
catch  when  they  should  work.  Only  positive 
action — sure  raising  and  lowering  with  ease, 
and  staying  where  put. .  That  is  character- 
istic of  the  burning  with  the  Rockweave 
Wick. 

The^ Nesco  Perfect  will  please  your  customers 
as  no  other  oil  cook  stove  ever  has.  It  is  the  last  word 
in  satisfaction — a  stove  that  will  back  up  with  per- 
formance your  heartiest  recommendation. 

Investigate  it.    Write  us  to-day  for  descrip- 
tive circular. 


Address   Your  Nearest  Branch   Office 


National  Enameling  &  Stamping  Company 


St.  Louis 
Baltimore 


Granite  City,  111. 
Chicago 


New  York 
New  Orleans 


Milwaukee 
Philadelphia 


BACK 


IS  TURN  ED" 

ffifffiiinnilT 


88 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL 
THE      BUYERS'     GUIDE 


January  3,   192a 


The    Graham    Nail    Works,    Toronto. 

Laidlaw    Bale   Tie    Co,    Hamilton. 

Steel    Co.    of   Canada,    Ltd.,    Hamilton. 

The   Stanley    Works,    Now    Britain,    Conn. 
Barbed   Wire 

Banwell,    Hoxie  Wire  Fence  Co.,    Ltd.,   Hamilton. 
Basket* 

Walter    Woods    &    Co.,    Hamilton. 
Barn  Door  Hangers 

Allith    Mfg.    Co.,    Ltd.,    Hamilton,    Ont. 

Canada    Steel    Goods    Co.,    Hamilton. 

National    .Mfg.    Co.,    Sterling,    111. 

Safety    Door    Hanger    Co.,    Hamilton,    Ont 

The    Stanley    Worte,    New   Britain,    Conn. 

Taylor-Forbes    Co.,    Guelph,    Ont. 
Barrels,  Steel 

The   Steel    Trough    &    Machine    Co.,    Ltd.,   Tweed, 
Ont. 

Balers,  Steel 

Climax    Baler    Co.,    Hamilton. 

Spielman    Agencies,    Montreal. 
Bit,    Braces 

Caverhill,    Learmont   &   Co.,    Montreal. 
Bits,   Auger 

Smith    &    Hemenway    Co.,    Irrington,    N.    J. 

Goodell-Pratt    Co..    Greenfield,    Mass. 

Stanley  Rule  &   Level   Co.,    New   Britain,    Conn. 

Whitman  &  Bames  Mfg.  Co.,  St.   Catharines,  Ont. 
Bearings 

Burgess-Norton  Mfg.    Co..    Geneva.    111. 
Black   Sheets 

The  Steel    Co.    of  Canada.    Ltd.,   Hamilton,   Ont. 
Brackets,   Shelf 

Canada   Steel  Goods   Co.,   Hamilton. 

Can.    Foundries  &  Forgings,   Ltd.,   Brockville,   Ont. 

The    Stanley    Works,    New    Britain,    Conn. 
Braces 

Vaughn   &   Bushnell.    Chicago,    111. 
Brake  Shoes  for  Ford  Cars,  Lined  and 
Unlined 

Adamson    Mfg.    Co.,    Hamilton,    Ont 
Boilers,  Range 

The  Canadian  John  Wood  Mfg.  Co.,  Ltd.,  Toronto. 
Boot  Blacking 

The     Army     and     Navy     Mfg.      Products,      Reg'd., 
Montreal,   Que. 

Box   Strapping 

The   Stanley   Works,    New   Britain,    Conn. 
Blasting    Supplies 

Dupont  Powder  Co.,    Wilmington,   Del. 
Bnilding   Papers 

Alex.   McArthur  &   Co.,   Montreal   Que. 
Batter   Tubs    (Covered) 

E.    B.    Eddy  Co.,   Ltd.,    Hull,   Que. 
Batter   Molds 

Wm.    Cane  &  Sons  Co.,   Ltd..  Newmarket,  Ont 

Walter  Woods  &   Co.,   Hamilton,    Can. 
Batter  Workers  / 

Beatty  Bros..   Ltr.,   Fergus,  Ont. 
Butts    and    Hinges 

Canada  Foundries  &   Forgings,   Brockville.   Ont. 

Canada   Steel   Goods   Co.,   Hamilton. 

Caverhill,    Learmont    &    Co..    Montreal. 

Chicago  Spring   Butt   Co..    Chicago,    111. 

National  'Mfg.   Co.,  Sterling,    111. 

The  Stanley   Works.    New   Britain,    Conn. 

The   Steel   Co.   of  Canada.   Ltd.,   Hamilton.   Ont. 
Burrs 

The  Stanley   Works,    New   Britain,   Conn. 

Steel  Co.  of  Canada.  Ltd..  Hamilton. 

Parmenter  &    Bulloch,    Gananoque. 
Bread  and  Cake  Makers 

Thos.    Davidson    Mfg.    Co..    Ltd.,    Montreal. 

Landers.    Frary    &    Clark,    New    Britain,    Conn. 
Breast  Drills 

Stanley  Rule  &  Level  Co.,  New  Britain,  Conn. 

Goodell-Pratt    Co.,    Greenfield.    Mass. 
Brashes   and   Brooms   Manufacturers 

The   Boeckh    Company.    Ltd..    Toronto. 

Meakins   &   Sons.    Ltd.,    Hamilton. 

T.  S.  Slmms  &  Co.,  Ltd.,  Fairville,  St.  John,  N.B. 

Walter  Woods   &   Co..   Hamilton. 
Bits,   Auger 

Caverhill.    Learmont   &    Co.,    Montreal 

The    Orescent    Co.,    Meriden,    Conn. 

North    Bros.    Mfg.    Co.,    Philadelphia,    Pa. 

Wilkinson    &    Kompass,    Hamilton. 

Soythes.    Ltd.,   Toronto. 
Bits,    Forstner 

Progressive   Mfg.    Co.,   Torrington.    Conn. 
Bi's,    Extension 

The    Orescent    Co..    Meriden.    Conn. 
B:,s,  Expansive 

The    Crescent    Co.,    Meriden.    Conn. 
B"'".    FIrctrician 
The    Crescent    Co.,    Meriden,    Conn. 
Bicycles 

Canada  Cycle  &  Motor  Co.,   Toronto. 

Hyslop  Bros.,    Ltd.,   Toronto. 

Iver  Johnson   Arms  &   Cycle   Works,    Ltd.,    Fitch- 
burg,    Mass. 
Bicycle  Parts 

Bnrgess-.vorton   Mfg.    Co..   Geneva,   111. 
Birch  Seats 

Canadian    Veneering  Co.,,   Montreal,   Que. 
Brake    Lining 

Northern  Electric  Co.,  Ltd.,  Montreal. 
Brooms 

The  Megantic  Broom  Co.,  Lake  Megantic,  Que. 

T.  S.  Simms  &  Co..  Ltd.,  Fairville,  St.  John,  N.B. 

Stevens-Hepner   Co..    Ltd.,    Port    Elgin,    Ont 

Walter  Woods   &   Co..    Ltd.,   Hamilton. 
Brashes,  Shaving,  Manufacturers 

Tlie   Boeckh    Company.    Li-i  .    Toronto. 

Rubberset  Co..    Limited.    Toronto. 

T.  S.  Simms  &  Co.,   Ltd.,  Fairville.  St.  John,  N.B. 

•n«vens-Hepner    Co.,    Ltd..    Port   Elgin,    Ont. 
Brushes,  Scrub,  Shoe  and  Stove,  Manufacturers 


The  Boeckh    Company.   Ltd..    Toronto. 

T.  S.  Simms  &  Co.,  Ltd.,  Fairville,  St.  John,  N.B. 

Stevens-Hepner   Co.,    Ltd..    Prrt    Elgin,   Ont. 
Brushes,    Floor,    Manufacturers 

The   Boeckh   Company,    Ltd.,    Toronto. 

Meakins  &  Sons.   Ltd..   Hamilton.  Ont 

T.  S.  Simms  &  Co.,  Ltd.,  Fairville,  St.  John,  N.B. 

Stevens-Hepner   Co.,    Ltd.,    Port    Elgin.    Ont 
Brashes,    General,    Manufacturers 

The   Boeckh    Company,    Ltd  .    Toronto. 

T.  S.  Simms  &  Co.,  Ltd.,  Fairville,  St.  John,  N.B. 

Stevens-Hepner    Co..    Ltd.,    Port    Elgin,    Ont 
Brake    Lining    for   Ford    Cars 

Adamson  Mfg.  Co.,  Hamilton,  Ont. 
Buckles,  Harness  and  Trunks 

McKinnon    Industries,    Ltd..    St.    Catharines,    Ont 
Builders'   Hardware 

Allith    Mfg.    Co.,    Ltd.,    Hamilton,    Ont 

Can.   Foundries  &   Forgings,    Ltd,   Brockville,   Ont 

Canada   Steel   Goods   Co.,   Hamilton. 

Jas.   Cartland   &  Son,    Ltd.,   Birmingham,   Eng. 

Caverhill,    Learmont   &   Co.,    Montreal. 

The     Economy     Foundry     Co.,     Ltd.,     Portage     la 
Prairie,    Man. 

National   Hardware   Co.,   Orillia,    Ont. 

National    Mfg.    Co.,    Stering,    111. 

The   Stanley   Works,    New   Britain,    Conn. 

Stratford    Brass    Co.,    Ltd..    Stratford,    Ont. 

White    &    Colquhoun,    Glasgow,    Scotland. 

Bumpers,  Rubber 

Dnnlop  Tire  &    Rubber  Goods  Co.,   Ltd..  Toronto. 
Cabinet    Hardware 

Stratford    Brass    Co.,    Ltd..    Stratford,    Ont 
Canoes   and    Boats 

Peterborough    Canoe    Co.,    Lt. ,    Peterborough,    Ont. 
Calks,    Boot 

The    Lnfkin    Rule    Co.    of   Canada,    Ltd.,    Windsor, 
Ont 
Calipers  and   Dividers 

Caverhill.   Learmont  &   Co..   Montreal. 

Goodell-Pratt    Co.,     Greenfield,     Mass. 

L.    .*.    Starrett   Co.,    AMiol.    .Mil's. 
Caliper   Gauges 

Williams    &    Co..    J.    H.    Brooklyn,    N.T. 
Camp    Furniture    and    Goods 

J.    J.    Turner   &   Sons,    Ltd..    Peterboro.    Ont. 

The    Otterville    Mfg.    Co.,    Ltd.,    Otterville.    Ont. 

Cans,  Milk 

The  A.    R.  Whittal  Can.   Co.,   Ltd.,  Montreal. 
Cans,    Paint 

The  A.   U.    Whittal  Can.   Co.,  Ltd.,   Montreal. 
Cans 

The   A.    R.    Whittal    Can.    Co.,    Ltd.,    Montreal. 
Cans,    Oil 

The  A.    It    Whiltall  Can    Co..   Ltd.,    Montreal. 

Cannon  Oiler  Co.,  Keithsburg,  111. 
Cnn    Openers 

The  Orescent  Co.,  Meriden,  Conn. 
Caps  for  Hubs 

McKinnon    Industries,    Ltd..    St.    Catharines,   Ont. 
Carriage  Hardware 

Stratford    Brass    Co.,    Ltd.,    Stratford,    Ont. 

The  Steel   Co.   of  Canada,   Ltd..  Hamilton.  Ont 
Carriage  Top  Materials 

Steel    On.    of  Canada.    Ltd..   The.    Hamilton.   Out. 

Carbon    Reducers 

Evans  &  Co..  Ltd..  Montreal.  Que. 
Carbon    Removers 

Evans  &  Co..  Ltd..  Montreal,  Que. 
Cartridges 

Dominion    Cartridge    Co.,    Ltd..    Montreal. 
Remington     Arms-Union     Metallic     Cartridge     Co., 
Windsor. 

Castings,   Braes,   Bronze   and    Aluminum 

Wentworth    Mfg.    Co.,    Ltd.,    Hamilton,    Ont 
Cash    Carriers 

Ciipe-Hazard    Store    Service    Co.,   Toronto. 
Cash    Registers 

The  National    Cash   Register  Co.    of  Canada,   Ltd., 
Toronto. 
Casters 

''nna'a    Foundries   &    Forgings.    Ltd..    Brockville. 

The  Faultless   Caster  Co.,   Evansrille,    Ind. 
Castor  Oil 

B.    &    S.    H.    Thompson    &    Co..    Ltd.    Montreal. 
Que. 
Carpet     Sweepers 

Bissell    Carpet    Sweeper     Co.,     of     Canada,      Ltd., 
Niaua-a    Falls.    Out. 

Caverhill.    Learmont    &    Co..    Montreal. 

Walter    Woods    &    Co.,    Hamilton. 

Carriage    Castings 

McKinnon    Industries.    Ltd..    St.    Catharines,    Ont. 
C&sscrolos 

Wentworth     Mfg.     Co..    Ltd.,    Hamilton,    Ont 
Catches,  Screen   Door 

Rnigess-Nnrton    Mfg.    Co..    Geneva.    111. 
Chains,  Coil,  Boom,  Hammock,  Tether,  Dog, 
Halter,   Cow,   Breast,  Trace,   Tire 

The   Imperial    Bit   &    Snap   Co..    Racine,    Wis. 

McKinnon    Chain    Co..    St.    Catharines,   Ont. 

Cable   Carriers 

Cipe-Hazard    Store    Service    Co.,    Toronto. 
Cellar   Drainers 

The    Penberthy    Injector  Co.,    Ltd.,    Windsor.    Ont. 

Cement,    Asbestos 

Canadian    Asbestos   Co.,    Montreal.    Que. 
Cement,   Merailic 

The  Dominion  Metal  Co.,   Ltd..  Sherbrooke,  Que. 

Cement,    Rubber 

Dunlop  Tire  &  Rubber  Goods  Co..    Ltd..  Toronto. 
Van    Oleef    Bros.,    Chicago.    111. 


Cement,    Roofing 

Geo.    W.    Reed    &    Co..    Ltd..   Montreal,    Que. 
Centre    Keys   or   Drifts 

Whitman    &    Barnes  Mfg.    Co,,   St    C&Uiarines. 
Chains,   Cut-Link 

The  Niagara  Falls  Metal   Stamp's  Works,   Niagar* 
Falls,    N.Y. 

Chains    (Tire) 

Northern  Electric  Co.,  Ltd.,  Montreal. 
Chain    Pipe   Wrenches 

J.  H.   Williams  &  Co.,    Brooklyn,  N.Y. 
Chair  Seats 

Canadian  Veneering  Co.,  Acton  Vale,  Que. 
Chairs  for  Automobile,  Camp  and  Boat 

McKinnon   Industries  Ltd.,   St.    Catharines,   On/t 

The  Otterville  Mfg.    Co.,    Ltd.,   Otterville,   Ont 
Chamois  Skins 

Evans   &   Co.,   Ltd.,    Montreal,    Que. 
Choppers,   Ice 

L.    &   I.   J.    White   Co.,    Buffafrio.   N.Y. 
Chisels,   Cape,  Cold,  etc. 

Brown-Boggs   Co.,    Ltd.,    Hamilton. 

Caverhill,    Leaimont   &    Co.,    Montreal. 

The   Ci-escent   Co.,    Meriden,    Conn. 

bfoodell-Prait    Co.,    Greenfield,    Mass. 

Stanley  Rule  &  Level  Co.,  New  Britain,  Conn. 

Whitman  &  Barnes  Mfg.  Co.,  St  Catharines,  Oat 

Check  Protectors 

W.   O.    Patrick  &  Co..   Ltd.,  Toronto. 
Checking   Floor  Binges 

Chicago    Spring    Butt    Co.,    Chicago,    HI. 
Chemical   Closets 

Wakyte  Mfg.    Co.,   Winnipeg.   Man. 
Chemical  Specialties 

B.  &  S.  H.  Thompson  &  Co..  Ltd.,  Montreal,  Que. 

Van   Cleef   Bros..    Chicago,    111. 

Vol-Peek    Mfg.    Co.,    Montreal. 
Choppers,  Food 

Landers,    Frary   &  Clark,  New   Britain,   Conn. 
Choppers.  Ice 

Burgess-Norton  Mfg.    Co.,    Geneva,   111. 

Chucks 

E.    Bdelmann  &   Co.,    Chicago.    111. 

Jacobs  Mfg.    Co,   Hartford,   Conn 
Chucks,  Tap 

Wells    Bros,    of   Canada.    Gait 
Churns,   Hand  and   Power 

Beatty   Bros.,    Ltd.,    Fergus. 

Caverhill.    Learmont    &    Co..    Montreal. 

Dowswell,    Lees    Co.,    Hamilton. 

Globe    Engineering   Co.,   Ltd.,    Hamilton,    Ont 

Landers,    Fiary   &   Clark,    New    Britain,    Cenn. 

Merchants     Hardware     Specialties.     Ltd.,     Calgary. 

Walter   Woods    &    Co..   Hamilton. 

Clamps  "C" 

J.    H.    Williams    &    Co..    Brooklyn,   N.Y. 

Clamps,   Mitre   and   Draw 

Buiyess-Norton  Mfg.    Co.,    Geneva,    111. 

Clothes    Bars   and   Racks 

Otterville    Mfg.    Co.,    Ltd..   Otterville,   Oat. 

Clothes   Racks 

Walter   Woods  &   Co..   Hamilton. 

Clamps 

Can.    Foundries  &  Forgings.    Ltd.,   Brockrille.   Ont. 
Williams   &   Co.,   J.    H.    Brooklyn,    N.Y. 
Cleaners,  Wall 
The  Satinette  Products  Mfg.    Co.,  Toronto. 

Climbers 

Smith    &    Hemenway   Co.,    Inc.,    Irrington,    N.J. 

Cleavers 

Burgess-Norton   Mfg.    Co..   Geneva,   111. 

Clippers 

Chicago    Flexible   Shaft   Co..    Chicago,    TJ1. 

Closet   Seats 
Can   Foundries  &  Foigings,    Ltd.,    Broclrrille,  Ont. 

Clothes    Dryers 

The   Coleman   Fare  Box  Co.,   Ltd..    Toronto. 
Dowswell,    Lees  Co.,   Ltd.,   Hamilton.   Can. 

Clothes   Lines 

The    Coleman    Fare    Box    Co.,    Ltd.,    Toronto. 

Clothes    Line    (Wire) 
The  Steel  Co.   of  Canada.  Ltd.,  Hamilton,  Ont 

Clothes   Pins 

Wm.    Cane  &   Sons.   Ltd..    Newmarket,   Ont 
Megantic    Broom    Co.,    Lake  Megantic;   Que. 

Coffee    Percolators   and   Urns 

Canadian    General    Eleotric  Co.,   Toronto 

(■rent    West    Electric    Co..    Ltd.,    Winnipeg.    Man. 

Landers    Frary   &    Clark,    New   Britain,   Conn. 

Corrugated  Fasteners 

Steel    Co.    of   Canada,    Ltd.,    Hamilton. 
The    Stanley    Works,    New    Britain,    Conn. 

Collar  Balls 

Wentworth   Mfg.    Co.,    Ltd.,    Hamilton,    Ont 

Collar   Pads 

American    Pad  &  Textile   Co.,    Chatham. 
Burlington   Windsor   Blanket    Co..    Toronto,    Ont. 

Cotton  Duck 

Scythes    &    Co..    Ltd.,    Toronto,    Ont 

Cotton  Gloves 

American    Pad   &   Textile   Co.,    Chatham. 
Coal    Chutes 

The  Ecorromy  Foundry  Co.,  Ltd.,  Winnipeg.  Man. 
Coal   Hods 

Thos.    Davidson   Mfg.    Co.,    Ltd..    Montreal,   Que. 
Cobblers'   Sets 

Can.   Foundries  Sc  Forgings.   Ltd.,  Brockville,  Ont 

Taylor-Forbes    Co.,    Ltd.,    Guelph,    Ont 
Coke,    Furnace,    Foundry    and    Domestic 

Steel  Co.  of  Canada,    Ltd..   Tlie.    Hamilton    Ont. 


January  3,   1920 


HARDWARE    AND    METAL 
THE     BUYERS'     GUIDE 


89 


Conductor  Pipe,   Hooks,   Heads,  etc 

Thos.    Davidson    Mfg.    Co..    Ltd.,    Montreal,    Que. 
Wheeler  &   Bain,  Toronto. 
Connecting   Rode 
The  Steel   Co.   of  Canada,   Ltd.,   Hamilton,   Ont 
Williams    &    Co.,    J.    H.,    Brooklyn,   N.Y. 

Containers 

Containers    Limited.    Toronto. 
The  A.   R.    Whittall  Can.   Co.,   Ltd.,   Montreal 
Cotter    Pins 

Steel  Co.   of  Canada.    Ltd.,  The,   Hamilton.  Ont. 
Cookers,  Feed 

Anrh.es    Foundry    Co.,    Ltd.,    Winnipeg,    Man. 

Coopers 

Whitman  &  Barnes  Mfg.  Oo..  St.  Catharines,  Ont. 
Coping-  Saws 

Bridgeport    Hdwe.    Mfg.    Corp.,    Bridgeport,    Conn. 
Cordage 

Brantford    Cordage    Co.,    Ltd.,    Brantford,    Ont 

Consumers    Cordage    Co..    Montreal. 

Doon  Twines   Ltd.,    Kitchener,    Ont. 

Plymouth  Cordage  Co.,   Welland,  Ont,   and    North 
Plymouth,    Mass. 

Scythes  &  Co..    Ltd.,   Toronto,    Ont 
Corners,   Chest 

The    Brainerd  Mfg.    Co.,    East    Rochester,    N.Y. 
Counter-sinks 

Whitman  &  Barnes  Mfg.  Co.,  St.  Catharines,  Ont 

The    Crescent   Co.,    Meriden,    Conn. 

Couplers,   Belt 

Strong  Machinery     &  Supply  Co.,  New  York,  N.Y. 
Couplings,    Pipe 

Steel   Co.   of  Canada,    Ltd.,   The.    Hamil'tou,   Ont 
Crank    Pulls    (Wire) 

The  Steel  Co.  of  Canada.  Ltd.,  Hamilton,  Ont. 
Crank    Shafts 

Williams  &  Co.,  J.   H.   Brooklyn.   N.Y. 
Creepers,  Ice 

Churchill    Mfg.    Co.,    Inc..   Lowell,    Mass. 
Oeasers 

Whitman  &  Barnes  Mfg.  Co.,  St.  Catharines.  Ont 
Crowbars 

B.  J.  Coghlin  &  Co.,  Montreal. 
Crucibles 

Canadian    Asbestos    Co.,  Montreal,    Que. 
Cultivators 

J.    E.    Gilson   Co.,    Port  Washington.   Wto. 

C.  S.    Norcross  &  Sons,  BushneU,   111. 

Cutlery 

The    Acme    Shear    Co.,    Bridgeport,    Conn. 
Bridgeport    Hdwe.     Mfg.,    Co.,    Bridgeport,    Conn. 
The    Burrow,    Stewart   &   Milne    Co.,   Ltd.,    (Ham- 
ilton, Ont 
Burgess-Norton  Mfg.    Co.,    Geneva,   111. 
Geo.    Butler  &  On.,    Ltd.,   Sheffield,    Eng. 
The  Canadian  Wm.   A.  Rogers  Co.,  Ltd.,  Toronto 
Caverhill,    Leannont    &   Co..    Montreal, 
Geneva   Cutlery   Co..    Geneva.    N.Y. 
Goodell-Pratt    Co.,    Greenfield.    Mass. 
James    Hutton    &    Co.,    Montreal. 
Jonathan   Crookes  &   Son,   Ltd..    Sheffield,    Bug. 
Lewis    Bros..    Ltd.   ■  Montreal. 
Landers,   Frary  &  Clark,  New  Britain.  Conn. 
Oneida  Community,  Ltd.,  Oneida,  N.Y. 
Henry  Rogers,  Son  &  Co.,   Ltd.,   Sheffield,    Eng. 
Wm.    Rogers  Mfg.    Co.,   Niagara  Falls.   Ont 
Wiebusch  &  Hflger.   New  York. 

Cutters 

Botterfleld  &  Oo.,   Inc.,   Rock  Island,  Que 

Toe   Rapid   Tool   &   Machine  Co.,    Ltd..    Montreal. 

Trimont  Mfg.   Co..    Rorbury   (Boston,   Mass). 

Cutter.    Adjustable 
The    Lianidless    Doorcheok    Co.,    Chicago,    TIL 

Curry  Combs 
Burrow,    Stewart    &    Milne    Co.,    Ltd.,    Hamilton. 

Cut-outs   for  Ford   Cars 

A  damson  Mfg.   Co.,  Hamilton.  Ont 

Cuspidors 
Taos.    Davidson  Mfg.    Co..   Ltd.,   Montreal. 

Cuspidors   (Fibreware) 
E.    B    Eddy  Co.,  Ltd.,  Hull,  Que. 

Brake-lining   for   Ford   Cars 

Adameon   Mfg.    Co.,    Hamilton,    Ont. 

Dairy    Pails 
Thos-    Davidson  Mfg.   Co.,    Ltd.,    Montreal 

Dampers,    Stove    Pipe 
Canada  Foundries  &  Forgings,    BrockvUle.    Ont. 

Dashes,    Buggy    and    Carriage 
McKmnon    Industries.    Ltd.,   St    Catharines,    Ont 

Desks,    School 
Can.   Foundries  &  Forgings,  Ltd.,  Brockville,  Ont. 

Diaphragms.    Rubber 
Dunlop  Tire  &  Rubber  Goods  Co.,    Ltd..   Toronto. 

Dies,   Stocks,    etc. 
The    Borden    Canadian    Co.,    Toronto. 
Butter-field   &  Co.,   Rock  Island.  Que. 
Canada  Foundries  &  Forgings,  Ltd.,  Welland,  Ont. 
Praitt  &  Whitney  Oo.   of  Canada,    Ltd.,   Dundas. 
The  Rapid  Tool  ft  Machine  Co.,  Ltd..  Montreal 
Wells  Bros.    Co.   of  Canada,    Gait 

Display  Racks  and  Stands 
Cameron  ft  Campbell,   Toronto. 
National  Mfg.  Co..  Sterling,    UL 

Doors 

Kasement    Skene  Dore  Co.,   Toronto. 
Sanderson-Harold  Co.,    Ltd.,   Paris,    Ont 


Door   Bolts 

Canada  Steel  Goods  Co.,  Hamilton,  Can. 

National  Mfg.   Co..    Sterling,    111 

The  Stanley  Works.   New   Britain,   Conn. 

Door  Knobs 

CarUand   &  Son,   Ltd.,   James,    Birmingham,    Eng. 

Door  Checks 
Canadian   Yale   ft  Towne,   St.   Catharines. 
The    Liq-uidless    Doarcheck    Co.,    Chicago,    IE. 

Door  Hangers 
Allien  Mfg.  Co.,   Ltd.,  Hamilton,  Ont 
Canada  Foundries  *  Forgings,  Ltd.,  Welland,  Ont 
Canada   Steel  Goods  Co.,   Hamilton,   Ont 
National   Mfg.    Co.,   Sterling,    111. 
Taylor-Forbes  Ce..  Ltd.,  Guelph,  Oat. 

Door  Springs 

Jas.    Cartland   ft   Son,    Ltd.,    Birmingham,    Eng. 

The   Kasement  SkTene  Dore   Co.,   Toronto. 
Door   Pulls 

Can.   Foundries  ft  Forgings,  Ltd.,    Brockrille,   Ont 
The   Kasememt   Skrene   Dore  Co.,    Toronto. 

Stratford  Brass  Co.,  Ltd..  Stratford,  Ont. 

Doubletrees 
MoKinnon    Industries,    Ltd.,   St    Catharines,    Ont 
West-Woods,    Ltd.,    Winnipeg,    Man. 

Dressings 

Army  &  Navy  Mfg.  Products  Regd. ,  The,  Montreal. 

Draining  Tools 
Canadian  Shovel  ft  Tool  Co.,  Hamilton,   Ont 

Drills,    Breast 
Goodell-Prat*  Oo.,   Greenfield,    Mass. 
Stanley  Rule  &  Level  Co.,  New  Britain,  Conn. 
North    Bros.,    Mfg.    Co.,    Philadelphia,    Pa. 

Drill   Chucks 
Goodell-Pratt    Co.,    Greenfield,    Mass. 

Drills.    Blacksmiths' 

Canada    Foundries   ft    Forgings,    BrockvUle. 

Drills 
Butterfield  ft  Co.,   Inc.,   Rock   Island,  Que. 
Goodeffl-Pratt   Co.,   Greenfield,    Mass. 
Jones  &    Shipman,    Ltd.,    Leicester,    Eng. 
North    Bros.    Mfg.    Co.,    Philadelphia,    Pa. 
Plewes,   Ltd.,   Winnipeg,   Man. 
Smith    ft    Hemenway    Co.,    Inc.,    Irvington.    N.J. 
Stanley  Rule  ft  Level  Co.,   New  Britain,  Conn. 
Wilkinson   &    Kompass,    Hamilton,    Ont 
Whitman  &  Barnes  Mfg.  Co.,  St   Catharines,  Ont 
Pratt   &   Whitney  Oo.    of   Oanada,    Ltd.,    Dundas, 

Ont 
Wilt   Twist    Drill    Co.    of    Oanada,    Ltd.,    Walfcer- 

vflle,  Ont 
Williams  &   Wilson,    Ltd.,  Montreal,   Que. 

Drills,    Twist 
Wilt   Twist    Drill    Co.    of   Canada,    Ltd.,    Walker- 

vflle. 
Whitman  &  Barnes  Mfg.   Co..  St.  .Catharines,  Ont 

Drop    Forgings 
Oanada  Foundries  ft  Forgings,  Ltd.,  Welland,  Ont. 
McFranon    Industries,    Ltd.,    St    Catharines,    Ont 
Williams  &  Co.,   J.    H.,    Brooklyn,    N.Y. 
Spielmann     Agencies.     Montreal 
The    Steel    Co.    of    Canada.    Ltd..    Hamilton,    Ont 
Whitman  ft  Barnes  Mfg.   Co..  St   Catharines,  Ont, 

Dry  Colors 

Brand  ram-Henderson.    Montreal. 

Canada   Paint  Co..    Ltd.,    Montreal. 

R.   C   Jamieson   ft  Co.,    Ltd.,    Montreal. 

Sherwin-Williams    Co.,    Ltd.,    Montreal. 

Ottawa   Paint   Works,   Ottawa 

A.   Ramsay  &  Son  Co..   Montreal. 

G.    F.    Stephens   ft   Co..    Ltd.,   Winipeg. 

Martin-Senour   Co..    Ltd.,    Montreal. 

McArthuT    Irwin.    Montreal. 

Stewart    ft    Wood.    Toronto. 

Dusters 

Channel]    Chemical    Co., 


Toronto. 


Dynamite 
Du   Pont  American    Industries,    Wilmington,    Del. 

Dry    Cells 

Canada  Dry  Cells.    Ltd.,    Winnipeg. 
Canadian  National   Carbon   Co.,   Toronto. 
Northern   Electric  Co.,    Ltd.,    Montreal. 
Canadian   General    Electric  Co.,    Ltd.,    Toronto 
Dominion  Battery  Co..  Toronto. 
Great  West  Electric  Co..   LM..  Winnipeg.  Man. 
Spielmann    Agencies,    Ltd.,    Montreal,    Que. 

Eavet  rough 

Pedlar  People,  Limited,  Oshawa. 

Thos.    Davidson    Mfg.    Co..    Ltd.,   Montreal 

Metal    Shingle  *  Siding  Co.,    Ltd.,    Preston,    Ont. 

Wheeler  &   Bain.  Toronto 

Winnipeg  Ceiling  &  Roofing  Co.,   Winnipeg. 

Egg    Beaters 

Collette   Mfg.    Co.,    CVollingwood. 

Egg    Cases 

Walter  Woods  ft  Co.,    Hamilton. 
Egg    Case    Fillers 

Walter  Woods  ft   Co.,   Hamflton.   Oan. 

Ejectors   and   Syphons 
The   Penberthy    Injector  Co.,    Ltd.,   Windsor,    Ont 
Jas.    Morrison    Brass    Mfg.    Co.,    Toronto. 

Elbows 
Thos.    Davidson  Mfg.   Co.,   Ltd.,   Montreal 
Pedlar  People,   Ltd.,    OChaira,   Ont 
Wheeler    ft    Bain, 


Electric    Bells 

Canadian  General    Electric  Co.,    Ltd.,   Toronto. 

Northern   Eleotric  Co.,   Ltd.,   Montreal. 

Great   West    Eleotric   Co.,    Ltd.,   Winnipeg,   Man. 

Electric   Fans 
Canadian    General   Eleotric   Co.,    Ltd.,    Toronto. 
Great  West  Eleotric  Co.,   Ltd.,  Winnipeg,  Man, 
Northern   Electric   Oo.,    Ltd.,    Montreal 

Electric   Fixtures 
Canadian   General   Electric  Co.,    Ltd.,   Toronto. 
Great  West  Electric  Co.,  Ltd.,  Winnipeg,  Man. 
Northern  Electric  Co.,   LrxL,   Montreal 
Tallmun  Brass  &  Metal  Co.,  Hamilton. 

Electric   Grates 
Barton-Netting  Co.,    Ltd.,    Windsor,   Ont 
Great  West  Electric  Co.,  Ltd.,   Winnipeg,   Man. 

Electric   Plates 

Louis    McLadn   Co.,    Ltd..   Winnipeg,    Man. 

Electric   Lighting   Supplies 

Northern   Electric  Co.,   Ltd.,    Montreal. 

The   Barton   Netting  Co.,    Ltd.,    Windsor.   Ont. 

Electric  Specialties 

Canadian   General    Electric  Co.,    Ltd.,    Toronto. 

Canadian   National  Carbon  Co.,   Toronto. 

The  Clemens   Electrical  Corporation,   Hamilton. 

Dominion  Battery  Co.,    Ltd.,    Toronto,    Ont 

Great  West  Eleotric  Co.,  Ltd.,   Winnipeg,  Man. 

Landers,    Frary  &  Clark,   New   Britain,   Conn. 

National  Electric  Heating  Co.,  Toronto. 

North    American    Hardware    Co.,    Ltd.,    Montreal, 

Que. 
The  Renaud   Motor  Supply  Co.,  Ltd.,   Montreal. 
Northern   Electric  Co.,    Ltd.,  Montreal 
Smith   ft   Hemeniway   Ox,    Inc.,    Irviagton,    N.J. 
Spielmann    Agencies,    Ltd.,    Montreal,    Que. 

Electric  Supplies 

The  Can.   General   Eleotric  Co.,    Ltd.,  Toronto. 
Munderloh  &  Co.,   Ltd.,   Montreal,  Que. 
The   Northern    Electrlo  Co.,    Ltd.,    Montreal,    Qua, 

Enamels 

Boston  Varnish  Co.,  Everett  Station,  Boston,  Ma«. 
British    America    Paint    Co.,    Ltd.,    Victoria,    B.C. 
Wm.   Holland   ft  Sons,  Toronto. 
Sturgeons,   Ltd.,    Toronto. 

Enamelled    Ware 
Thos.    Davidson   Mfg.    Co.,    Ltd.,   Montreal 
E.  T.   Wright  ft  Co.,  Hamilton,  Ont 
Sheet  Metal  Products  Co.   of  Canada,   Ltd., 
Toronto. 

Emery    Glass    and    Papers 
John  Oakey  ft  Sons,   London,    Eng. 

Emery    (Grain   and   Sheets) 
James    Hutton   ft   Co.,    Montreal,    Qua 

Emery  Wheel  Dressers 

Burgess-Norton  Mfg.    Co.,    Geneva,  El 

Eveners  for  2,  3,  4,   6  and  8  Horses 

Gregg   Mfg.    Co.,  Ltd.,   Winnipeg,    Man. 
D.    Ackland   &  Son,    Ltd.,    Winnipeg,    Man. 
McKinnon    Industries,    Ltd.,    St    Catharines,    Ont* 
West- Woods,  Ltd.,  Winnipeg,  Man. 

Evaporators 

Steel  Trough   ft    Machine  Co.,    Ltd.,   Tweed,    Ont. 

Excelsior 

Rankin  &  Co.,   Ltd.,  Toronto. 

Explosives 

Du   Pont   Powder  Co.,    Wilmington,    Del 
Hercules   Powder  Co.,    Wilmington,    Del 

Escutcheon  Pins 
Parmenter  &  Bulloch  Co.,  Ltd.,   Gananoque,   Ont 
The  Steel   Co.,   of  Canada,   Ltd.,   Hamilton,   Ont 

Extinguishers,    Fire 
Dunlop  Tire  &  Rubber  Goods  Co.,   Ltd.,  Toronto. 
Great .  West    Eleotric   Co.,    Ltd.,    Winnipeg.    Man. 

Northern   Electric  Co-     Montreal 

Fanlight  Openers 

Jas  Cartland  &  Sons,   Ltd.,   Birmingham,   Eng. 

Farriers 

Whitman  &  Barnes  Mfg.  Co..  St  Caithairimes,  Out. 

Fasteners,  Storm,  Sash  and  Screen 

Burgess-Norton   Mfg.    Co.,    Geneva,   111. 
National  Mfg.  Co.,  Sterling,   111 
Startford    Brass  Co.,   Ltd.,   Stratford,    Ont  i 

The  Stanley  Works,  New   Britain,  Conn.  L 

Farm    Implements 

The    Christiansen    Implement    Ltd.,    Winnipeg, 
Farm    Lighting   Outfits    (Systems) 
Canadian   General   Electric   Co.,    Ltd.,    Toronto. 
Northern  Electric  Co.,   Montreal 

Faucets,    Petroleum 
Can.  Foundries  &  Forgings,   Ltd.,   Brockrille,  Oat 

Feed   Boxes 
Can.  Foundries  &  Forgings.   Ltd.,  Brockvale,   Oat 

Feed  Cookers 
Wheeler  ft  Bain,  Toronto. 

Felts   (Tarred  and  Carpet) 
Alex.   MoArthur  &  Co.,  Montreal,  Que. 
J.    H.    McOomb,   Ltd.,   Montreal,    Que. 

Fencing   and   Gates 

Banwell-Hoxie  Wire  Fence  Co..   Hamilton. 

Dominion    Iron   &  Steel  Co..   Ltd.,    Sydney,    N.fl. 

The  Frost  Steel  &  Wire  Co.,  Ltd..  Hamflton,  Ont 

B.   Greening  Wire  Co.,   Hamilton,  Ont 

Standard  Tube  ft  Fence  Co..   Woodstock. 

Steel  Co.   of  Canada,   Ltd.,   Hamilton,  Ont 
Fences,   Woven    Wire.   Farm   and   Ornamental 

The  Frost  Steel  ft  Wire  Oo.,  Ltd.,  Hamilton,  Ont 


90 


HARDWARE    AND    METAL 
THE    BUYERS'    GUIDE 


January  3,   1920 


Fenders  for  Buggy  and  Carriage 

McKinnon  Industries,  Ltd.,  St  Catharines,  Out 

The  Steel  Co.  of  Canada,    Ltd.,   Hamilton.    Oat- 
Fire   Anns 

CoKs  Patent  Fire  Arms  Mfg.  Co.,  Hartford,  Coon. 

Johnson     Iver    Anns    &    Cycle    Works,     Fitohburg. 
Mess. 

Files 

E    C.    Atkins  Co.,    Hamilton,    Can. 

G.    &  H.    Barnett  Co.,   Philadelphia. 

Delta    File    Works,    PhHadeiphia. 

Henry   Dlsston   ft  Sons,   Ltd.,    Philadelphia,    Pa. 

The   Ingersoll    File  Co.,    IngeraoU.  Out 

Nicholson    FBe   Co.,    Port   Hope,    Ont. 

Plewes,    Ltd.,    Winnipeg. 

Staondo  Canada  Saw  Co.,    Montreal. 

Wilkinson  &    Kompass,    Hamilton. 

Williams  &   Wilson,   Ltd.,  Montreal,   Que. 

Whitman  &  Barnes  Mfg.  Co.,  St  Catharines.  Out 

Fillers 

Boston  Varnish  Co.,  Everett  Station,  Boston,  Mass. 
Fire  Door  Fittings 

Allith   Mfg.    Ox,   Ltd.,   Hamilton,  Ont 

Taylor-Forbes  Co.,    Guelph,    Ont. 
Fire   Extinguishers 

Northern   Electric  Co.,   Ltd.,   Montreal. 

Dunlop  Tire  &  Rubber  Goods  Co.,   Ltd.,   Toronto. 
Fire   Department   Supplies 

Dunlop  Tire  &  Rubber  Goods  Co.,   Ltd.,  Toronto. 

Gotta  Percha  &  Rubber,  Ltd.,   Toronto. 

Jas.  Morrison  Brass  Mfg.   Co.,   Toronto. 

Northern   Electric  Co..   Montreal. 

Fire  Escapes 

The  iDennlS'Wire  ft  Iron  Works  Co.,  Ltd.,  London 
Fire   Pails 

B.  B.  Eddy  Co.,  Ltd.,  Hull,  Que. 
Fireplace  Fixtures,  Open  Gates.  Basket  Grates. 
Dampers   and   Dumps 

The   Barton   Netting  Co.,   Ltd.,    Wtadsor,    Out 

The    Enterprise   Foundry   Co,    SackvtBe,    N.B. 

Stover   Mfg.    ft    Engine   Co.,    F.eepoxt.    U. 

Fireplace  Screens 

Canada   Wire  ft   Iron  Goods  Co.,    Hamilton,    Ont 

Fishing   Tackle   and    Accessories 
Marble  Arms  ft  Mfg.   Co.,   Gladstone.  Mich. 

Flags 

Scythes  ft  Co.,   Ltd.,   Toronto,    Ont 

Grant,  Holden  ft  Graham,  Ltd.,  Ottawa.   Ont 

J.  J.  Turner  ft  Sons,  Ltd.,   Petarboro,   Out 

Flashlights,  Electric 

Canadian    General    Electric   Co.,    Ltd.,    Toronto 
Canadian  National  Carbon  Co.,   Toronto, 
Canada    Dry   Cells,    Ltd.,    Winnipeg. 
Crown    Cycle   ft    Motor   Co.,    Montreal 
Dominion    Battery  Co,    Ltd.,    Toronto,    Ont 
Great  West   Electric  Co.,  Ltd..    Winnipeg,   Man. 
Munderloh   &    Co.,    Ltd.,    Montreal,   Que. 
Merchants    Hardware    Specialties.     Ltd.,     Calgary, 

Alberta. 
Northern    Electric   Co.,    Montreal 

Flatter* 

Whitman  ft  Barnes  Mtg.  Co,  St  Catharines,  Ont 
Flatware 

Canadian   Wm.    A.    Rogers,   Toronto. 

Oneida  Community,   Ltd.,  Oneida,   NT. 
Flower   Pots 

E.  B.    Eddy  Co.,    Ltd..   Hull.   Que. 
Fly  Swatters 

Dunlop  Tire  &  Rubber  Goods  Co.,    Ltd.,   Toronto. 
Food   Choppers 

F.  W.    Lamplough   ft   Co.,    Montreal 
Landers,    Frary   &  Clark,    New   Britain,   Conn. 
Merchants  Hardware  Specialties,  Ltd.,  Calgary. 

Foot    Valve* 
The  Hamilton  Motor  Works,  Ltd.,  Hamilton,  Ont 

Force  Cups 

Dunlop  Tire  ft  Rubber  Goods  Co.,   Ltd.,  Toronto 
Gotta  Percha   &  Rubber,    Ltd.,   Toronto. 

Ford    Car   Specialties 
Benjamin    Electric   Co..    Toronto. 
Royal   Canadian    Specialties.   Hamilton.   Ont 
The    Star    Specialty    Mfg.    Co..    Chicago,    111 
Northern    Electric   Co.,    Ltd.,   Montreal. 

Forgings  

Canada  Foundries  ft  Forgings,  Ltd.,  Welland,  Ont 
McKinnon     Industries.    Ltd..    St.    Catharines.    Ont 
Steel  Co.  of  Canada,   Ltd.,   The,   Hamilton,   OnL 
Whitman  &  Barnes  Mfg.  Co.,  St.   Catharines,  Ont 

Forgings,   Drop 

Canada  Foundries  ft  Forgings,  Ltd.,  Welland,  Out 

McKinnon    Industries,    Ltd.,    St    Catharines.    Ont 

Fullers 
Whitman  ft  Barnes  Mfg.  Co.,  St   Catharines,  Ont 

funnels 

Thoa.    Davidson    Mfg.    Co..    Ltd..    Montreal. 
Wentworth    Mfg.    Co..    Ltd..    Hamilton,    Ont. 
Furnaces 
The    Burrow,    Stewart    &    Milne    Co.,    Ltd.,    Ham- 
ilton.   Ont.  „       -      t 
Canada    Foundries   &    Forging!).    Brockvill*. 
noterpriae   Foundry   Co.,    Snea-rfne,    N.B. 
The    Gumev    Foundry    Co..    Ltd.,    Toronto. 
The  Hall-Zyrd   Foundry  Co.,   Ltd  ,  Hespeler,   Ont. 
Jas.    Stewart    Mfg.    Co..    Ltd..    Woodstock.    Ont 
Merchants    Hardware    Specialities.    Ltd.,    Calgary. 
Record  Fdry-  ft  Machine  Co..  Ltd.,  Moncton.  N.B 
Fruit   Jars 
Walter    Weeds    ft    Co..    Hamilton. 

Furniture    Polish 

Army  &  Navy  Mfg.  Products  Regd.,  The,  Montreal. 
Buffalo    Specialty    Co.,    Buffalo,    N.T. 
Canada    Paint    Co.,    Montreal 


Ohannell    Chemieal    Co.,    Toronto. 

Imperial   Oil  Co.,  Ltd.,  Toronto. 

Sattnette  Products  Mfg.     Co.,   The,    Toronto,   Out. 

Saunders  &  Co.,   Montreal,   Que. 

Sherwin-Williams    Co.,    Montreal. 


Fuses.  Electric 

Northern   Electric   Co., 


Ltd.,   Montreal. 


Fuses.    Electric,    Refillable 

Northern   Electric   Co.,    Ltd.,   Montreal. 
The    Clemens    Electrical    Corporation,    Ha 


ail  ton. 


Fuse   Wire 

Northern    Electric   Co.,    Ltd.,  Montreal. 

Canada    Metal    Co.,    Ltd.,    Toronto. 

Great    West    Eleotrie   Co.,    Ltd.,    Winnipeg.    Mas 

Floor   Stands 
Jenkins    Bros.,    Ltd.,    Montreal. 

Floor  Checks,  Single  or  Double 

Chicago    Spring    Butt    Co..    Chicago.     Ill 

Flanges  for  Wheels 

McKinnon    Industries,    Ltd..    St.    Catharines.    Ont 

Flint    Cloths 
John   Oakey  ft  Sons,    London,    Eng. 

Floor   Dressing 

Army  &  Navy  Mfg.  Products  Regd. .  The,  Montreal. 
Imperial    Oil    Co.,    Ltd.,    Toronto,    Ont 

Galvanizers 

McKinnon    Industries,    Ltd..    St    Catharines,    Ont 

Galvanized    Steel    Sheets 
Dominion    Sheet  Metal   Co.,   Ltd.,    Hamilton. 

A.  C.    Leslie    ft    Co,    Montreal 
Pedlar    People   Ltd.,    Osh&wa,    Ont 

B.  ft  S.  H.  Thompson  ft  Oo.,  Ltd.,  Montreal,  vra« 

Galvanized    Ware 
Thos.    Davidson   Mfg.    Co.,    Ltd.,    Montreal. 

Galvanizing 
Thos.    Davidson   Mfg.    Co.,    Ltd.,    Montreal. 
The   Steel    Co.    of   Canada.    Ltd..    Hamilton,    Ont 

Galvanized  Iron  Cornices 

Pedlar    People,    Ltd.,    Oahawa,    Ont 

Galvanized  Iron  Bars 

Steel  Oo.   of  Canada.    Ltd..   The.   Hamilton,   Ont 

Galvanized    Pipe 
Canada  Metal  Co..   Ltd.,  Toronto. 

Galvanized  Steel  Sheets 
Metal   Shingle   ft  Siding  Co..    Ltd..    Preston.    Ont 
Manitoba  Steel  ft   Iron  Co..  Ltd.,  Winnipeg,  Man. 

Garden    Cultivators    and   Weeders 
C.   8.  Noreross  ft  Sons.   Bnshnell,  m. 
Eureka  Planter  Co.,  Woodstock. 

Garage   Hardware 
AIM*   Mfg.    Co..    Ltd.,    Hamilton.    Ont 
Canada   Steel   Goods  Co..    Hamilton,   Can. 
National   Mfg.   Co..   Sterling,    m. 
Rlchards-Wflcox    Canadian    Co.,    London.    Otrt 
Smith    ft    Hemenwuy    Oo,,    Inc.    Lvuigton,    N.J. 
The  Stanley  Works,  New  Britain,   Conn. 

Garages 

Metal  Shingle  ft  Siding  Oo..  Ltd..  Preston,  Ont 
Pedlar    People,    Ltd.,    Oahawa.    Ont 

Garbage    Cans 
Thos.    Davidson   Mfg.    Co.,    Ltd.,    Montreal. 
J.    Samuels.   Toronto. 

General   Rubber   Specialties 
Dunlop  Tire  &  Rubber  Goods  Oo.,   Ltd.,   Toronto. 

Generators 

Northern    Electric   Co..    Ltd..    Montreal. 
Canadian   General    Electric   Co.,    Toronto. 
Great  West  Electric  Co..  Ltd.,  Winnipeg,   Man. 

Gas  Water  Heaters 
Jas.    Morrison  Brass  Mfg.   Co.,  Toronto. 

Gs>«ke*s    Co"D»f 
The  Renatid    Motor  Supply    Co.,   Ltd.,   Montreal. 

Ga,"..ets.    Rubber 
Dunlop  Tire  ft  Rubber  Goods  Co.,   Ltd.,   Tomato. 

Gasoline 

Imperial   Oil   Co.,    Toronto. 
Prairie    City    Oil    Co.,    Winnipeg. 

Gauges 
L.    S.   Starrett  Co.,   Athol,   Mass. 
Stanley   Rule   ft  Level    Co..   New    Britain,   Conn. 
Well*   Bros.    Co.-  of  Canada.    Gait 
J.    H.    Williams  ft  Co..   Brooklyn.  N.T. 

Gates,  Galvanized 

The  Frost  Steel  ft  Wire  Co.,  Ltd.,  Hamilton,  Ont. 

Gates.  Steel  and  Wire  _ 

Steel   Co.    of  Canada.    Ltd.,   The.    Hamilton,   Ont. 

Gauge  Cocks.   Standard   and    Extra   Heavy 

The   Penberthy   Injector  Co.,    Ltd.,    Windsor,    Ont. 

Gauge   Glasses.   High   Pressure 

The   Strong  Machinery   ft   Supply  Co.,   New   York, 
N.T. 
Gauges,    Watei     (Standard    Extra    Heavy 
Automatic  I  

The   Penlberthy    Injector  Co..    Ltd.,    Windsor.    Ont 
Glass,    Window,    Plate,    Ornamental 

Hobbs  Mfg.   Co.,   Montreal,  Que. 

Ontario    Plate    Glass,    Ltd.,    Hamilton.    Ont 


A   Ramsay,  Sob  ft  Co..  Montreal. 
The    Saskatchewan    Glass    ft    Supply    Co.,     Ltd.. 
Moose    Jaw,    Sask. 

iSanderaomPearey      Co. ,     Tenon  bo. 

Stewart    &    Wood,    Toronto. 

B.  &  8.  H.  Thompson  &  Co.,  Ltd.,  Montreal.  Que 

Toronto   Plate   Glass   Importing  Co..   Toronto. 

G.     F.     Stephens     &     Co.,     Ltd.,     Winnipeg. 

Glue,  Flake 
W.    Harris  ft  Co.,  Toronto. 

Glue,   White 
W.   Harris  ft  Co.,   Toronto. 

Glue,  Sheet  ana  uromd 

DesRochers   Ltd.,    Montreal,   Que. 
W.    Harris   ft   Co.,   Toronto. 
R.    C.    Jamieson   &  Co.,    Montreal. 
A.    Ramsay   &   Son    Co.,   Montreal. 

Glass,    Art 
Hobbs   Mfg.    Co.,    Montreal,   Que. 

Glass  Cutters 

The    Crescent   Co.,    Meriden,    Conn. 

Goodell-Pratt    Co.,    Greenneld,    Mass. 

Smith   ft   Hemenmay   Co.,    Inc.,    Irrington,    N.J. 

Glass  Cutting  Boards 

The    Lufkin   Rule  Co.    of  Canada,    Ltd.,    Windsor, 
Ont 

Glass  Benders 

Toronto   Plate    Glass    Importing   Co..    Toronto. 

Glass,  Carriage 
Hobbs  Mfg.    Co.,    Montreal,   Que. 

Glass,  Door 
Hobbs  Mfg.    Co.,    Montreal,   Que. 

Glass,    Fancy 
Hobbs  Mfg.    Co.,    Montreal,   Que. 

Glaziers'  Diamonds 

A.   Ramsay,   Son  &  Co.,    Montreal,   Que. 
Sharratt  &  Newth,    London,    Eng. 
A.    Shaw   &   Son,    London,    Eng. 

Gloves  and  Mitts 
American  Pad  &  Textile  Co.,  Ltd.,  Chatham,  Ont 
The   Hamilton   Carhartt  Co.,   Ltd.,   Toronto. 

Golf  Balls 

Dunlop  Tire  ft   Rubber  Goods  Co.,   Ltd.,  Toronto. 
Gopher  Poison 

Prairie  Chemical    Co.    of  Canada.   Ltd..    Wiaaipe* 
Governor,   Speed   and    Line  Shafts 

Cedar    Rapids    Foundry    ft    Machine    Co.,    Osaar 
Rapids,     Iowa. 
Granaries,    Portable,   Metallic 

Winnipeg  Ceiling   &    Roofing  Co.,   Winnipeg. 
Graphites 

Canada    Asbestos   Co.,    Montreal,    Que. 
Grates 

The   Barton   Netting  Co.,   Ltd.,    Windsor,   Out 
Grease  and   Oil   Cups 

The   Penberthy    Injector  Co.,    Ltd.,    Windsor,    Ont 
Greases 

Prairie    City    Oil    Co..    Ltd..    Winnipeg,    Man 

The    Renaud    Motor    Supply    Co.    Ltd.,    Montreal, 
Que. 

Grease    Guns 

E.    Edelmann  &   Co.,   Chicago.    111. 

Grinders,   Hand  and  Power 
The  Carborundum  Co.,   Niagara  Falls,   N.T. 
Merchants     Hardware    Specialties,     Ltd.,     Calgary . 

Alt*. 
Plewes    Ltd.,    Winnipeg,    Man. 
Taylor-Forbes  Co.,   Ltd.,  Guelph.  Ont 
Western  Hardware  Mfg.   Oa,   Milwaukee.    Wis. 

Grinders,   Bench,  Tool   and  Sickle 

The    Star    Specialty    Mfg.    Co.,    Chicago,    BL 

Grindstones 

The    Carborundum    Co.,    Niagara    Falls,    N.T. 

Grindstone   Fixtures 
Can.   Foundries  ft  Forgings,  Ltd.,   Brockrille.  Oat 

Grinding    Wheels 
The    Carborundum    Co.,    Niagara    Falls,    N.T. 

Guards,   Wire 
C.    H.    Johnson    ft  Sons.   Montreal,    Que. 

Gum,  Repair 

Adamson    Mfg.    Co.,    Hamilton.    Ont. 

Guns 

Birmingham   Small   Arm*  Co..    Ltd.,    Bli  mulsh— . 
B>r>gi«ffid 

OaverhUl,    Learmont    &    Co..    Montreal. 

The  Fiaser  Co.,   Agents  B.S.A.,  Montreal,  Que. 

Lewis    Bros..     Ltd.,    Montreal. 

Iver  Johnson's    Arms   &    Cycle    Works,    Mtohburg 
Mass. 
Gun  Parts  ,    _ 

The  Fraser  Co.,   Agents  B.S.A.,  Montreal,  Que. 
Gunsights 

Marble   Arms  4    Mfg.    Co..   Gladstone.   Mien. 
Hack  Saws  , 

Diamond    Saw    &   Stamping    Works,    Buffalo.    N.T 

Fry's    (London),    Limited,    London,    Eng. 

Goodell-Pratt  Co.,    Greenfield,    Mass. 

Miller  Falls  Co..  Miller  Falls,  Mass. 

Plewes  Ltd.     Winnipeg.   Man. 

L.    8.  Starrett  Co..   Athol.   Mass. 

Victor   Saw   Works.   Ltd..    Hamilton.   Ont 

Williams   &    Wilson,    Ltd.,    Montreal,    Que. 
Hack  Saw  Blades 

Diamond    Saw  ft  Stamping    Works,    Buffalo.    N.i 

Goodell-Pratt  Co..    Greenfield,    Masa. 

Henry  Disston  ft  Sons.  Ltd..  Toronto. 

Smith    ft    Hemensray   Co.,    Inc..    Irrtnftosv,    H.J. 

Victor  Saw   Works.   Ltd..   Hamilton.   0«t 


January   3,   1920 


HARDWARE    AND    METAL 


91 


THE     BUYERS'    GUIDE 


Hack    Saw   Frames 

Bridgeport    Hdwe.    Mfg.    Corp.,    Bridgeport,    Conn 
Henry  Disston  &  Sons.   Ltd.,  Toronto. 
Goodell-Pratt  Co.,    Greenfield,    Mass. 
nmtth   ft    HemenwBj    Co..    Inc.,    Irvington,    N.J. 
L.   8.  Starrett  Co..   A  tool,  Mass. 

Hack   Saw   Machines 

Diamond  Saw  ft  Stamping  Works,  Buffalo,   N.Y. 

(Joodell-Pratt  Co.,    Greenfield,   Mass. 

Victor  Saw   Works.   Ltd.,   Hamilton,   Ont. 
Haines,  Steel   and   Iron 

MoKinnon    Industries,    Ltd.,    St.    Catharines,    Ont 
Home  Chains 

The  Niagara  Falls  Metal  Stamping  Works,  Niagara 
Falls,    N.T. 
Hammocks 

Qalt    Robe    Co.,    Gait.    Ont 
Hammers 

Canada   Foundries   &    Forgings,    Broekville. 

Stanley   Rule  &  Level  Co.,  New  Britain,  Conn. 

Vaughn  ft   BuahneH,  Chicago,    ELL 

Whitman  ft  Barnes  AITg.  Co.,  at.  Catharines,  Ont. 

Hammers,    Box    Openers 

Whitman  ft  Barnes  Mfg.  Co.,  St  Catharines,  Ont 
Hand   Drills 

Goodell-Pratt  Co.,  Qreenfleld,  Mass. 
Handles,   Canthooks   and    Peevies 

West-Woods,    Ltd.,    Winnipeg,   Man. 
Handles,  Chest  and   Drawer 

Burgess-Norton  Mfg.    Co.,    Geneva,  111. 

The   Brainerd   Mfg.    Co.,    Bast   Rochester,    N.T. 

Handles 

J.  H.  Still   Mfg.   Co.,   St  Thomas,  Ont 

Handles,  Crank,  Balance,  Machine 

J.  H.    Williams  ft  Ob.,    Brooklyn,  N.T. 
Hand    Pulls 

North    Bros.    Mfg.    Co.,    Philadelphia,    Pa. 
Hangers,    Door 

Allith    Mfg.    Co.,   Hamilton,   Ont 

Beatty   Bros.,   Ltd.,    Fergus,   Ont 

Can.   Foundries  ft  Forgings,  Ltd.,  Broekville,  Ont 

Canada  Steel   Goods  Co.,   Hamilton,   Can. 

Merchants    Hardware    Specialties,     Ltd.,     Calgary. 
Alia. 

National  Mfg.   Co.,  Sterling,   HI. 

F.  S.    Myers  ft    Bro.,    Ashland,   Ohio. 

Safety  Door  Hanger  Co.,   Hamilton,  Ont 

Taylor-Forbes    Co.,    Guelph.    Ont 

The   Stanley   Works,   New   Britain,    Conn. 
Hangers,    Barn   Door 

AJlith    Mfg.    Co.,   Hamilton,   Ont. 

Can.    Foundries  4V  Fuiglugs,   Ltd.,   BnKkvQte,   Ont 
Hangers,  Door  and  Track 

Army  &  Navy  Mfg.  Products  Regd.,  The,  Montreal 

AUith   Mfg.    Co.,    Hamilton,   Ont 

Beatty   Bros.,    Ltd.,    Fergus,   Ont 

Canada   Steel   Goods  Co.,   Hamilton,   Can. 

National  Mfg.   Co.,  Sterling,    111. 

Hooks.    Hat  and   Coat 

Can.    Foundries  ft  Forgings,  Ltd.,  Brockrille.  Ont 

The  Steel  Co.   of  Canada,  Ltd.,  Hamilton,   Ont 
Hangers,  Storm,  Sash  and  Screen 

National  Mfg.   Co.,  Sterling,    HI. 

The  Stanley  Works.   New   Britain,  Conn. 

Hand    Oil    Pumps 

The  Hamilton  MouOT  Works,  Ltd.,  Hamilton,  Ont 

Hand    Taps 

Walls   Bras,    of   Canada.    Oast 
Hardies 

Whitman  ft  Barnes  Mfg.  Co.,  St  Catharines,  Ont 
Hardware,    Carriage    and    Automobile 

Steel  Co.  of  Canada,   Ltd.,   The,   Hamilton,  Out 
Hardware,    Door 

Th»  Hamilton  Stove  &  Heater  Oa„  Hamilton.  Ont 
Hardware   Specialties 

Allith  Mfg.   Co..  Ltd.,   Hamilton,   Out 

The  Brainerd  Mfg.    Co.,    Bast   Rochester,    N.Y. 

Burgess-Norton   Mfg.    Co.,   Geneva,  111. 

Bridgeport  Hdwe,    Mfg.    Corp.,    Bridgeport,   Conn. 

Oaa.   Foundries  &  Forgings,   Ltd.,   Brookville,   Ont 

Coleman     Fare    Box    Co.,    Toronto. 

National  Mfg.    Co..   Sterling,   111. 

Niagara    Falls   Metal    Stamping    Works,    Niagara, 
Falls,    N.Y. 

North  American  Hardware  Co.,  Ltd.,  Montreal 

Smith    ft    Hemenway   Co.,    Inc.,    Irrinsrton,    N.J. 

Stratford   Brass  Co..    Ltd.,   Stratford,  Ont 

Taylor-Forbes  Co.,   Guelph.  Ont 
Hardware  Store  Fittings 

Stratford  Brass  Co.,   Ltd.,   Stratford,  Ont 
Harness  Hardware 

MoKinnou    Industries,   Ltd..    St    Catharines,    Ont 

Samuel   Trees   &    Co.,    Ltd.,    Toronto. 
Hatchets 

Burgess-Norton   Mfg.    Co.,    Geneva,   111. 

Can.    Foundries  ft  Forgings,  Ltd.,   Broekville,   Ont 

Marble  Anns  &  Mfg.   Co.,  Gladstone,  Mich. 

Stover   Mfg.    &    Engine   Co.,    Freeport.    111. 

Whitman  ft  Barnes  Mfg.  Co.,  St  Catharines,  Ont 
Hasps 

Can.    Foundries  ft  Forgrngs,  ltd.,   Broekville,  Ont 

The  Brainerd   Mfg.    Co.,    East   Rochester,   N.l. 

Canada  Steel  Goods  Co.,  Hamilton. 

National    Mfg.    Co.,    Sterling.    I1L 
Headlights,  Auto 

Northern    Electric   Co.,    Ltd.,   Montreal. 

Canadian   Lamp  ft  Stamping  Co.,   Ford,    Ont. 

North    American  Hardware   Co.,    Ltd.,   Montreal. 
Headlight,  Glass 

Hobbs    Mfg.    Co.,    Montreal.   Que. 
Heaters 

Anthes   Foundry,   Ltd.,    Winnipeg,   Man. 
Can.    Foundries  ft  Forgings,  Ltd.,    Broekville,    Omv 


Enterprise  Foundry  Co.,  Sackville,  N.B. 
O-RIb-O    Mfg.    Co.,    Winnipeg.    Man. 
Thos.    Davidson  Mfg.   Co.,    Ltd.,   Montreal 
Jas.  Morrison  Brass  Mfg.   Co.,  Ltd.,  Toronto, 
Jas.    Stewart    Mfg    Co.,    Ltd.,    Woodstock,    Oat 

Heaters,    Electric 

Northern   Electric  Co.,   Ltd.,   Montreal. 
Chicago  Flexible  Shaft  Co.,  Chicago,  DL 

Heavy  Hardware  Specialties 

Burgess-Norton  Mfg.    Co.,   Geneva,   111. 
Williams  &  Wilson,   Ltd.,  Montreal,  Que. 

Heels  and   Soles,   Rubber 
Dunlop  Tire  ft   Rubber  Goods  Co..    Ltd.,   Toronto, 
Goodyear   Tire  ft  Rubber  Co..   Ltd.,    Toronto. 

Hinges,  Box  and  Refrigerator 

The   Brainerd    Mfg.    Co.,    East  Rochester,    N.Y. 

Hir.ffes,  Ornamental 

The  Stanley  Works,  New  Britain.  ,Conn. 

Hinges,  Spring 

Stover   Mfg.    &    Engine   Co.,    Freeport,    111. 
Taylor- Forbes  Co.,   Guelph.  Ont 

Hinges,  Strap  and  Tee 

Canada  Steel  Goods  Co..  Hamilton.  Can. 

Can.   Foundries  ft  Forgings,  Ltd.,   Broekville,  Ont 

National    Mfg.    Co.,    Sterling,    m. 

Hockey  Sticks 
The  Hilborn  Co.,  Ltd.,  Ayr,  Ont 
J.    H.    SMll    Mfg.    Co.,    St    Thomas 
St   Mary's  Wood   Specialty  Co.,   Ltd..  St    Mary's 
Ont 

Hoes 

Ward   ft   Payne,   Sheffield,    Eng. 

Hoists 

Manitoba   3ridge  ft  Iron  Works,  Ltd.,   Winnipeg 
Plewes  Ltd.,  Winnipeg,  Man. 

Horse  Blankets   and  Horse  Covers 

J.  J.   Turner  &  Sons,   Ltd..   Toronto. 

Horse  Slineers 
Collins  Mfg.   Co.,  Toronto. 

Hones.    Razor 

The  Cerobrundum  Co.,  Niagara  Falls,  N.Y. 

Hooks.  Coat  and  Hat  • 

The  Brainerd  Mfg.    Co..   East  Rochester,  N.Y. 

The  Steel  Co.  of  Canada,  Ltd.,  Hamilton.  Ont 
Hooks  for  Logging  Chains 

McHinnon   Industries.  Ltd.,  St  Catharines,   Ont 
Horse  Covers,  Rubber 

Canadian   Consolidated   Rubber   Co..    Montreal. 

J.  J.  Turner  ft  Sons,   Ltd..   Peterboro,  Ont. 

Horse  Shoes 
O.    Ackland  &  Son,   Winnipeg. 
Steel  Co.    of   Canada.,    Ltd.,    Hamilton. 
Wilkinson    ft    Kompass,    Hamilton. 

Horse  Shoe  Pads 
Dunlop  Tire  &  Rubber  Goods  Co.,  Ltd.,  Toronto. 

Hose.    Fittings   and    Supplies 
Can.   Foundries  ft  Forgings,  Ltd..  Broekville,  Ont 
Caverhill.    Learmont   ft    Co.,    Montreal 
Dunlop  Tire  ft   Rubber  Goods  Co.,   Ltd.,  Toronto. 
K.   &  S.   Tire  &  Rubber  Co..   Ltd.,  Toronto,   Ont. 
Lewis    Bros.,    Ltd.,    Montreal. 
Jas.    Morrison   Brass  Mfg.   Co..   Toronto. 
Gutta    Percha   ft    Rubber,   Ltd.,   Toronto. 

Hollow   Ware  .   ■„.      „   . 

Can.   Foundries  ft  Forgings.  Ltd.,  Broekville,  Ont. 

Hoist  Hooks  „  _ 

Williams  ft   Co.,   J.    H„    Brooklyn,   N.Y. 

Hot   Air  Rejrhrters 

(Barton  Netting  Co.,   limited.   Wfosaor.  Ont. 

Canada   Foundries  ft   Fotntogs,    Ltd..    Broekville, 

Enterprise    Mfg.    Co.,    Ssckvffle.    N.B. 

Jas  Stewart  Mfg.   Co..   Woodstock,  On*. 
Household    Pails 

E.   B.   Eddy  Co.,  Hull.  Que. 
Hubs  for  Ford  Cars  __ 

McKinnon   Industries,  Ltd.,  St  Catharines.  Ont 

McKinnon  Industries,   Ltd.,   St  Catharines.  Ont 

Ice  Cream   Freezers  _ 

Wm.    Cane    &    Sons    Co..    Ltd..    Newmarket.    Ont 
Thoa.    Davidson    Mfg.    Co..    Ltd.     Montreal 
North    Bros.     Mfg.    Co.,    Philadelphia,    Pa. 

Ice   Picks 
The   Crescent   Co.,    Menden,    Conn. 

Implement  Repairs 

D.  Ackland   &    Son,    Ltd.,    Winnipeg. 

Incubators 

Collins    Mfg.    Co.,    Toronto. 

Indicators,   Speed 

H.    Disston    &    Son,    Ltd.,    Toronto. 
L.    S.    Starrett   Co,,    Athol,    Mass. 
Indurated  Ware 

E.  B.  Eddy  Co.,  Ltd.,  Hull,  Que. 
Injectors,    Automatic 

Jas.    Morrison    Brass    Mfg.    Co..    Toronto 
Th     Penberthy    Injector  Co.    Ltd.,    Windsor,  .Ont 
Injectors,    Auto-Positive 
The    Penberthy    Injecto-  Co..    Ltd.,    Windsor.    Ont. 

Instruments  of   Precision 

L.    S.    Starrett   Co.,    athol,    Mass. 
Ironing   Boards   and   Tables 

Otterville    Mfg.    Co..    Ltd.,    Otterville,    Ont 
Iron,  Merchants  Bar 

Steel   Co.  of  Canada,    Ltd.,   The,   Hamilton,   '<r.t. 


Iran,   Corrugated 

Canada    Metal    Co.,    Toronto. 
Iron   Handles 

Can.   Foundries  ft   Forgings,    Ltd.,   Broekville,   Ont. 
Iron,  Horse  Shoe 

Steel  Co.  of  Canada,   Ltd.,  The,    Hamilton,  Ont 
Iron  and  Steel  Bars 

Caverhill,    Learmont   ft   Co.,    Montreal. 

Dominion    Iron    &    Steel    Co.,    Sydney,    N.S. 

A.    C.    Leslie    ft    Co.,    Ltd.,    Montreal. 

Steel    Co.    of    Canada,     Ltd.,    Hamilton. 

Lewis    Bros.,    Ltd.,    Montreal. 

London    Rolling   Mills.   London,    Ont 

Manitoba  Steel  &  Iron  Co.,  Ltd.,  Winnipeg,  Man. 

Nova    Scotia     Steel    Co.,     New    Glasgow,     N.S. 
Irons 

(Jan.   Foundries  ft   Forgings,    Ltd.,    Broekville,   Ont 

Taylor-Forbes    Co..    Ltd..    Guelph,    Ont 
Irons,  Gas  and   Gasoline 

Merchants    Hardware    Specialties,     Ltd.,    Calgary. 

National    Stamping   &    Electric    Works,    Chicago. 
Jack    Planes 

Stanley    Rule   &    Level    Co..    New   Britain.   Oonn. 
Jack  Screws 

Canada     Foundries    &     Forgings.     BrockvHle,    Ont 
Jardinieres 

Wentworth   Mfg.   Co.,    Ltd.,    Hamilton,   Ont 
Japans 

Boston  Varnish  Co..  Everett  Station,  Boston,  Mass. 
Kalsomine 

British    America    Paint   Co..    Ltd.,    Victoria,    BO. 
Kalsomine   Cleaner 

Saitahette  Products  Mfg.     Co.,   The,.  Toronto,   Ont. 
Kettles 

Can.  Foundries  ft  Forgings.   Ltd..  Brockviile,  Ont 

Thos.     Davidson    Mfg.    Co.,     Ltd..     Montreal. 

Wentworth    Mfg.   Co..    Ltd..    Hamilton.    Ont 
Keyhole   Saws 

Bridgeport    Hardware    Co..     Bridgeport,    Conn. 
Kiddie  Kara 

Canadian    K.K.    Co.,    Ltd.,    Elora,    Ont 
Kitchen    Ware 

Thos.    Davidson    Mfg.    Co..    Ltd..    Montreal 
Knives.    Pocket  and   Table 

Geo.    Butler   A    Co.,    Ltd..    Sheffield      FCna 

Jonathan    Crookes   ft    Son,    Ltd..    Sheffield.    Eng 

James    Hutton    ft   Co.,    Montreal.  ' 

Landers.    Fnirv    *    OlerV     Vow    Br=»«in.    ^nn. 

Merchants   Hardware    Specialties,    'Ltd.,    Calgary. 

Wtebusca   ft    Hfigar.    Toronto, 
Knives.   Drawing 

The  Crescent   Co.,    Meriden,    Conn. 
Knives,   Sportsmen's 

Marble    Arms    &    Mfg.    Co..    Gladstone,    Mich. 
Knives,,   Putty 

Bridgeport    Hardware    Co.,    Bridgeport,    Conn. 
Knobs,  Drawer 

The   Brainerd    Mfg.    Co.,    East    Rochester,   N.Y. 
Ladders.    Step.    Extension.    Store,    etc. 

Allith  Mfg.    Co.,   Ltd.,    Hamilton,    Ont. 
Beatty    Bros.,     Ltd.,     Vergus.     out. 

John    Calender    Mfg.    Co.,    St.     Paul,    Mian. 

Otterville    Mfg.    Co.,    Ltd.,    Otterville,    Ont. 

Lamps,    Nitrogen    ana    Tungsten 

The  Canadian  Laco-Philips  Co..  Toronto. 
Northern   Electric  Co.,    Ltd.,    Montreal 
Great    West    Electric   Co.,    Ltd.,    Winnipeg,    Man 
North    American    Hardware    Co.,    Ltd.,    Montreal, 

Lamp   Black 

L.  Martin  Co.,  New  York,  N.Y. 
A.  Ramsay  ft  Son  Co.,  Montreal, 
Wilkes-Martin-Wllcfces    Co.,    New    York. 

Lamp  Burners 

Schultz    Mfg.    Co.,   Ltd.,    Hamilton,    Ont 

Lamp    Chiameys 
Walter  Woods  ft  Co.,   Hamilton, 

Lamp    Coloring    and   Frosting 

Great    West    Electric   Co.,    Ltd.,    Winnipeg,    Man. 
spielmann    Agencies,    Ltd.,    Montreal. 

Lamps,    Acetylene 

The  Brilliant  Search  Light  Mfg.   Co.,  Chicago.   IH. 

Lamps,   Bicycle  and  Aatomhobile 

Dominion     Battery    Co.,    Ltd.,    Toronto,    Qnt, 

Northern   Electric   Co.,    Ltd.,   Montreal 

North    American    Hardware    Co.,    Ltd.,    Montreal 

Lamps   and   Lanterns,    Gasoline 
Hamilton  Gss  Mantis  Co.,  Ltd.,  Hamfliton.  Out. 

r<auuuai  Stamping  <*  Electric   Worts,  Uaicago,   UL 

Lame>,    Lanterns,    Electric,    Hand 

Northern   Electric   Co.,   Ltd.,   Montreal 
v.iuijiau     yeucial     erectile    Co.,     X  omnia, 
i^uiMUiaii    Xsatiouai    oaruoii   Co.,    Toronto. 
i>„uimion    nailery    Co.,    Toronto, 
Ureal    West    Electric    Co.,    Ltd.,    Winnipeg,    Man. 
National  stamping  &  Ellectnc  Woris,  Chicago,   111 
dpieluiann    Agencies,    Montreal. 
Van   Cleef   Bros.,    Chicago,    111 

Lamps,  Portable,  Electric 
McDonald  ft  WlUsna,  Ltd.,  Toronto. 

Lamps,   Electric 

Mundertah  ft  Co.,  Ltd.,  Montreal,  Que. 

Northern   Electrio   Co.,    Ltd.,   Montreal 
Lamps,   Tungsten 

Canadian    Laco-Philips    Co.,    Toronto. 

North    American    Hardware    Co.,    Ltd.,    Montreal 


92 


HARDWARE    AND    METAL 


January   3,   1920 


THE     BUYERS'     GUIDE 


Lamps,  Nitrogen 
-North  American   Hardware  Co..   Ltd.,   Montreal,  Q. 
Northern    Electric  Co.,    Ltd.,    Montreal. 

Lamps  and   Lanterns,  uaaoiine  and  Kerosene 

National    Stamping    *    Electric    Works,    Chicago, 
North    American    Hardware    Co..     Ltd.,    Montreal. 

Lanterns,    Oil 

fhos.    Davidson    Mfg.    Co.,    Montreal. 
Schultz  Mfg.   Co.,  Hamilton,  Can. 
E.  T.  Wright  Co.,  Hamilton,  Ont. 

Latches 

Can.  Foundries  A  Forgings,  Ltd.,  Brockville,  Ont 
Gendron    Mfg.    Co.,   Ltd.,   Toronto. 
Stover  Mfg.    A   Engine  Co.,    Fre — -t,    HL 

Lath 
Whitman  A  Barnes  Mfg.  Co.,  St.  Catharines,  Ont 

Lathes 

Williams  &   Wilson,   Ltd.,  Montreal,   Que. 

Lathe  Dogs,  Drop-forged 

Williams   &  Co.,  J.   H.,    Brooklju,   N.Y. 
Lathe    Dugs 
The    Steel    Co.    of    Canada.    Ltd.,    Hamilton,    Ont. 
J.   H.    Williams  A  Co..    Brooklyn,   N.T. 

t-awn    Mowers 

Cttnaus     r  uundneb    &     Forging*,    Lwi  ,     Brucavirle. 
Taylor-Forbes   Co.,    Ltd.,    Quelph,    Ont 
Whitman  A  Barnes  Mfg.  Co.,  St.  Catharines,  Qnrt. 
I  a»n    Sprinklers 
Can.   Foundries  ft  Forgings.   Ltd.,   Brockrille,   Ont. 

Lawn   Trimmers 
Imperial    Bit   ft   Snap   Co.,    Racine,    Wis. 

uead,    Black 
Juan    uhkc>     A     Sous.    LundoD.     £nf 

Lead,    Calking    and    P:- 
The     Qreat     Western     Smelting    A     Refining    Co., 

Vancouver,    B.C. 

Lead,    Sheets   and    Pipe 

Canada    Metal   Co.,    Toronto. 

fcloyt    Metal   Co.,    Toronto. 

\.   kj.    Leslie  &   Co.,   Montreal 

Lead   Trass  and   Bends 

Canada     Metal    Co..     Toronto. 
Uoyi    Metal    Co.,    Toronto. 
Plewea    L'd.,     Winnipe-.    Man. 

Leather    Belting   and   Soles 
Plewes    Lid.,    Winnipeg,    Man. 

Leather    Dressing's 

The     Army     and     Navy     Mfg.     Produots,     Reg'd., 
Montreal,   Que. 

Lead  Irons 
The  A.    R.    Whittal  Can.    Go.,    Ltd.,   Montreal. 

Lead    Washers 

Canada    Metal    Co.,    Ltd.,    Toronto. 

Leather 
Plewes    Ltd.,    Winnipeg,    Man. 

Leather   Dashes  and   Fenders 

McKinnon    Industries,    Ltd.,    St.    Catharines,    Out 
Letters   and    Figures,    Embossed 
The  Niagara  Falls  Metal  Stamp'g  Works,  Nissan 
Falls.   N.Y. 

Levels 

H.    Disston    &    Sons,   Toronto. 

Goodell-Pratt    Co.,    Greenfield.    Mass. 

J.    Sand    *    Sons.    Detroit.    Midi. 

Stanley    Rule   At    Level    Co.,    New    Britain.    Conn 

L.    S.    StaiTett   Co.,    Athol.    Mass. 
Level   Glasses 

Stanley    Rule  A    Level    Co.,    New    Britain.    Conn 
Lines,   Wire,   Clothes 

Walter    Woods    &    Co.,    Hamilton. 

Western    Wire   &  Nail   Co..    London. 
Linoleum    Finishes 

Boston  Varnish   Co..  Everett  Station.  Boston.  Mw 
Linseed   Oil 

Brandram-Henderson,    Montreal. 

Dominion    Linseed    Oil    Co.,    Baden    and   Toronto 

R.    C.    Jamieson    A   Co.,    Ltd..    Montreal. 

Ontario  Oil  &   Tumentine  Co..   Ltd.,  Toronto.  Ont 

Prairie    City    Oil    Co.,    Winnipeg,    Man. 

A.    Ramsay   &    Son    Co..    Montreal. 

Hherwin-Willinms    Co..    Ltd.,    Montreal. 

Stewart  &   Wood,   Toronto. 
Locks 

Can.     Tale    *    Towne.    Ltd..    St.    Catharines.    Ont 

The  Hamilton  Stove  &  Heater  Co.,  Hamilton,  Ont 

National    Hardware   Co..    Ltd..   OrtHia.    Out 

White     A     Colajiihoun,     Glasgow,     Scotland. 

Lock  Washers 

H    Panlin    &    Co..    Toronto,   Out. 
Smith    &    Hemenway    Co.,    Inc.,    Irvington,    N.J. 
Lockers 
Canada  Wire  and  Iron  Goods  Co.,   Hamilton,  Ont. 
Dennis  Wire  and  Iron  Works  Co.,   Ltd.,   London 

Logging   Chain   Hooks 

McKinnon    Industries,    Ltd..    St.    Catharines,    Ont 
Lu«s    for    Silos 

McKinnon    Industries,    Ltd.,    St.    Catharines.    Ont 
Lubricants 

Canadian  Asbestos  Co.,   Montreal,  Que. 
Lubricators    (Sight-feed   and   Plain    Engine) 

The    Penbenhy    Injector  Co.,    Ltd.,    Windsor,    Ont 
Locomotiv*    Tools 

Williams  &   "!o.,  J.   H.,    Brooklvu,    M  T 


Lumber    Tools 

Canadian    Warren    Axe    &    Tool    Co.,    St.    Oathai 

ines,   Ont 
Thos.    Pink  ft  Co.,   Pembroke,   ont. 

T.    F.    a  hurls    Co..    Ltd..    St.   Catharines.    Ont 
Machinists 

Whitman  ft  Barnes  Mfg.  Co.,  St  Catharines,  Ont 
Machinery    Supplies 

Williams  &   Wilson,   Ltd.,  Montreal,   Que. 
Machinists'  Tools 

Can.    Foundries  ft   Forgings.    Ltd.,   Brock-rule,   Ont 

J      H.    Williams    ft    Co.,    rtroonlvu.    .\.i 

Whitman  &  Barnes  Mfg.  Co.,  St   Catharines.  Ont 
Magnesia  Pipe  Coverings 

The    Canadian    Asbestos    Co.,    Montreal,    Que. 
Mandrils 

Whitman  A  Barnes  Mfg.  Co.,  St   Catharines,  Ont 
Manufacturers'    Agents 

Cadman   &  Co.,    Winnipeg,    Man. 

A.   H.   Fraser,  Vancouver,   B.C. 

F.    W.    Lamplough    ft    Co.,    Montreal 

Marricott  A.  Tynan,    Ltd..    Winnipeg.    Man. 
G.    T.    Mumford.    Winnipeg.    Man. 

David  Philip,   Winnipeg,   Man. 
Mantles 

The   Barton   Netting    Co..    Ltd.,    Windsor,    Ont 
Mantles,    Gas 

R.    M.    Moore    ft    Co.,    Ltd.,    Vancouver,    B.O. 
Hamilton   Gas  Mantle  Co..    Hamilton.    Can 
Malleable    Iron    Castings 

The   Gumey    Foundry    Co.,    Ltd.,    Toronto. 

McKinuun    Industries,    Ltd.,    St.    Catharines.    On 
Malleable   for   Carriages 

McKinnon    Industries.    Ltd.,    St.    Catharines.    Oi. 
Marine    Hardware 

Scythes  ,v    Co..    Ltd.     Toronto.   Ont. 
Marine    Supplies 

Northern    Klcctric   Co.,    Ltd.,    Montreal. 

Ontario  Oil  A  Xunpentine  Co.,  Lui.,  Toronto,  Ont 
Matches 

E.    B.    Eddy   Co.,    Hull.    Que 

Mats,    Rubber 
Dunlop    lire   &    Rubber  Goods   Co..    Ltd..   To:onr 

Mats,    Flexible 
The  Port  Hope  Mat  ft  Mfg.  Co.,   Port  Hope,  Ont 

Mauls 

fan     Foundries  ft   Fonrin(r«     Ltd      rtr.w«viU- 
Whitman  ft  Barnes  Mfg.  Co.,  St   Catherine.   Ont 

Measures,  Copper  Plated 

Wentworth    Mfg.    Co.,    Ltd..    Hamilton,    Ont. 

Meat  Choppers 

Landers,    Frary    &    Clark,    New    Britain,    Conn. 

Mechanical    Rubber   Products 

Dunlop  Tire  &   Rubber  Goods  Co.,   Ltd.,  Toronto. 

Metal  Boxes  and  Drawers 

Cameron   &    Campbell,    Toronto. 

Metals,  Heavy  and  Shelf 

Henry   Rogers,   Sons  &  Co.,   Ltd.,   Wolverhampton, 
Eng 
Metal  Stamping 

Containers    Limited,    Toronto. 

The  Niagara  Falls  Metal  Stamp'g  Works,  Niagara 
Falls,    N.Y. 
Metals,  Expanded,  Ingot,  Sheet,  Tubes,  etc. 

Canada    Metal    Co.,    Toronto. 

The    Great    Western     Smelting    &     Refining    Do., 
Vancouver,    B.C. 

Hoyt    Metal    Co.,    Toronto. 

Tillman    Brass   ft    Metal    Co.,    Hamilton,    Can. 

A.    C.   Leslie  ft  Co..   Montreal. 
Metallic    Ceilings,    Walla,    Roofing.    Skylights. 
Siding,  Cornices,  Ventilators,  Valley  Windows, 
Doors,  etc. 

Pedlar    People,    Oshawa.    Ont. 

Winnipeg    Ceiling    &    Roofing    Co..    Winnipeg. 

Metal   Specialties 

Burgess-Norton    Mfg.    Co..    Geneva,    111. 

Hamilton  Stamp  A  Stencil  Works,  Hamilton,  Ont. 

Niagara    Falls    Metal   Stamping    Works.    Niagau, 

Falls.    N.Y. 
O^Rib-O    Mfg.    Co.,    Winnipeg,    Man. 

Mica 

Mica   Co.   of  Canada,    Ltd.,   Hull,  Que. 

Meters 

Northern   Electric  Co.,    Ltd.,    Montreal. 
Canadian   General    Electric  Co.,   Toronto. 
Menders,    Granlteware,   Pot   and   Pan 
Collette    Mfg.     Co.,    Collingwood. 
H.     Nagle     Co.,     Montreal. 

North   American   Hardware  Co.,    Ltd.,    Montreal. 
Vol-Peek    Mfg.    Co.,    Montreal. 

Micrometers 

Goodell-Pratt   Co.,    Greenfield,    Mass. 
L.    S.    Starrett   Co.,    Athol,  Mass. 

Milling  Cutters 

Pratt   A   Whitney    Co.    of   Canada,    Ltd.,    Dundas. 

Millboard 

E.   B.  Eddy  Co.,    Ltd.,   Hull,   Que. 

Milk  Cans 

Thus.    Davidson   Mfg.    Co.,   Ltd.,   Montreal. 

Milk  Pails 

ES.    B.   Eddy  Co.,    Ltd.,   Hull,   Que. 
Mirrors 

Hubhs    Mfg.     Co..     Montreal,    Que. 

Saskatchewan    Glass    &    Supply    Co.,    Ltd.,    Moose 

Jaw,    Saskatchewan. 
Toronto    Plate    Glass    Importing    Co.,    Toronto. 
Ontario    Plato    Glass.     LUI..    Hamilton.    Ont. 


Mitre  Boxes 

Uoodell-Pratt    Co.,     Greenfield,     Mass. 

Smith  &    Hemenway  Co..    Inc.,    Irvington,   N.J. 

Stanley   Rule   &    Level   Co.,   New   Britain,   Conn. 
Mitre    Box    Saws 

H.    Disston   A    Sons,    Ltd.,    Toronto. 
Molasses   Gates 

Can.   Foundries  &   Forgings,   Ltd.,   Brockville,  Ont. 
Mops 

Can.   Foundries  &  Forgings,   Ltd.,   Brockville,  Ont. 
Mop  Sticks 

Stover   Mfg.    &    Engine   Co.,    Freeport,    111. 
Motors 

Canadian    General    Electric  Co.,   Toronto. 
Northern    Electric  Co.,    Ltd.,    Montreal. 
Motor  Cars 

Ford    Motor   Co.    of   Canada,    Ltd.,    Ford,    Ont. 

Motorcycles 

Iver    Johnson's    Anns    &    Cycle    Works,    Fitohburg, 

Mass. 
North  American  Hardware  Co.,   Ltd.,   Montreal,  Q 

Motor  Generators 

Canadian    General    Electric   Co.,    Toronto. 

Great    West    Electric    Co.,    Ltd..    Winnipeg,    Man. 

Northern    Electric    Co.,    Ltd.,    Montreal. 
Mullboard,    Asbestos 

Canadian    Asbestos    Co.,    Montreal,    Que. 
Nails,   Wire  and   Cut 

Canadian    Tube    A    Iron    Co.,    Ltd.,    Montreal. 

Carerhill.    Learmont    &    Co..    Montreal. 

Canada    Metal   Co..    Ltd.,    Toronto. 

Dominion    Iron    &    Steel    Co.,    Ltd.,    Sydney,    N.S 

The    Graham    Nail    Works,    Toronto. 

Laidlaw     Bale-Tie    Co.,     Ltd.,     Hamilton. 

Lewis    Bros.,     Ltd.,     Montreal. 
VMtman  ft  Barnes  Mfg.  Co  ,  St  Catharines,  Ont. 

Name  Plate  Transfers 

Canada    Decalcomania    Co.,    Ltd.,    Toronto. 
Steel    Co.    of   Canada,    Ltd.,    Hamilton,   Ont. 
Parmenter    &    Bulloch,    Gananoque,    Ont. 
Western   Wire  &  Nut  Co.,   London. 

Nail   Pullers 

Bridgeport  Hdwe.   Mfg.    Corp.,   Bridgeport,   Conn. 
Smith    &    Hemenway    Co.,    Inc.,    irvington,    N.J. 
Nails,   Horse  Shoe 
Steel    Co.    of    Canada,    Ltd.,    Hamilton. 

Neatsfoot  Oil 

W.    Harris    &    Co.,    Toronto. 

Neckyoks 
McKinnon    Industries.    Ltd.,    St.    Catharines,    Ont 
Gregg     Mfg.     Co.,    Ltd.,    Winnipeg,    Man. 

Nipples 

Steel    Co.    of   Canada,    Ltd.,    Hamilton. 

Nipples  for  Radiators 

McKinnon    industries,    Ltd.,   St.    Catharines,    Ont. 

Newsprint  Paper 

E.   B.    Eddy  Co.,  Ltd.,  Hull,  Que. 

Nuts,  Hot  Pressed 

Steel  Co.   of  Canada,    Ltd.,  The,   Hamilton,   Ont. 

Nuts,  Thumb 

J.    H.    Williams    A    Co.,    Brooklyn,    N.Y. 

Oakum 

Canadian    Asbestos    Co.,    Montreal,    Que. 
Scythes   A    Co.,    Ltd.,    Toronto,    Ont 

Oil    Cans 

n    Oiler    Co..    Keithsburg,    HL 

Oil,  Coal 

Imperial    Oil    Co.,    Ltd.,    Toronto. 

Oils,  Cylinder 

Imperial    Oil   Co.,    Ltd.,    Toronto. 

I'r.i ii  ie    City    Oil    Co.,    Winnipeg,    Man. 

Oil    Cake   and    Meal 

Canada   Linseed  Oil   Co. 

Dominion    Linseed    Oil    Co.,    Toronto. 

Oarlocks 

McKinnon    Industries,   Ltd.,   St    Catharines,   Ont 

Oil  Hole  Covers 

Canadian    Winkley    Co.,    Windsor. 
Oil,    Motor,    Road,    Harness,    Neatsfoot,    Sepa- 
rator and  Gas  Engine 

The  Continental   Oil   Co..   Ltd.,   Winnipeg,    Man. 
Imperial  Oil  Co.,   Ltd.,   Toronto. 
Prairie   City  Oil   Co.,    Winnipeg,    Man. 

Oil,  Neatsfoot 

W.    Harris  &   Co.,   Toronto. 

Oil  Stoves 

Thos.  Davidson  Mfg.  Co.,  Ltd.,  Montreal. 
Tho    McClary    Mfg.    Co.,    London,    Ont 

Oil  Tanks  and  Pumps 

S.  F.  Bowser  A  Co.,  Ltd.,  Toronto,  Can. 
Thos.  Davidson  Mfg.  Co.,  Ltd.,  Montreal. 
The  Gilbert  A  Barker  Mfg.  Oo.,  Springfield,  Mass. 

Oiled  Clothing 

Scythes  A   Co.,    Ltd.,   Toronto,    Ont 

Oil  Stains 

British   America  Paint   Co.,   Ltd.,   Victoria,   B.C. 

Oil  Storage  and  Distributing  Systems 

s.    !■'.     Bowsei    Company,    Ltd.,    Toronto,    Can 
Oil   Storage   Systems  _^ 

Gilbert    A    Barker    Mfg.    Co.,    Springfield,    Mass. 
Oilers 
The    All-Way    Mfg.     Co.,    Toronto. 
Cannon    Oiler   Co.,    Keithsburg,    111. 
TlioM.    Davidson   Mfg.    Co.,   Ltd.,    Montreal. 
Sheet   Metal   Products  Co.  of  Can.,   Ltd.,  Toronto. 
IS.    T.    Wright   A    Co.,    Ltd.,    Hamilton,    Ont 


January  3,   1920 


HARDWARE  AND  MET  AJ  ^-Advertising  Section 


93 


Alex.  Mc Arthur  &  Co.,  Ltd. 


TRADE 


MARK 


82  McGill  Street         Montreal,  Canada 

BLACK  DIAMOND 

TARRED  FELTS 

and  SHEATHINGS 

Made  at  our  own 
Paper  Mills. 

SAVE  COAL 

BY  USING 

BUILDING  PAPER 


NAILS 


BRIGHT-BLUED-COATED 
"SPECIALS"  OUR  SPECIALTY 


WIRE 

COPPERED,  TIN,  BRIGHT 

ANNEALED,  OILED  &  ANNEALED 

HAY  BALING  WIRE 

BALE  TIES 


STRAIGHTENED  RODS 

THE  GRAHAM  NAIL  WORKS 

Operated  by  the  CANADA  METAL  CO.,  Ltd. 

HAMILTON  TAD  AWTH  WINNIPEG 

MONTREAL  I   UKUIN    1  U  VANCOUVER 


Just  a  few  words  about  Hardware  and  Metal 

HARDWARE  AND  METAL  is  Canada's  national  hardware 
weekly  and  has  been  published  every  Saturday  since  1888  by  the 
MacLean  Publishing  Co.,  Toronto,  who  publish  fifteen  papers. 

HARDWARE  AND  METAL'S  circulation  is  national,  and  has 
been  audited  by  the  Audit  Bureau  of  Circulations. 

HARDWARE  AND  METAL  is  edited  by  a  staff  of  editors  who 
have  had  practical  hardware  experience. 

HARDWARE  AND  METAL'S  weekly  market  service  is  one  of 
its  strongest  features.  .  Our  reports  are  used  as  a  basis  for  Cana- 
dian Government's  annual  report  on  wholesale  prices. 

Write  to  any  100  retail  hardware  dealers  in  Canada,  asking  them 
"Do  you  subscribe  to  HARDWARE  AND  METAL?" 

If  you  will  do  this,  you  will  use  HARDWARE  AND  METAL  too, 
for  it  is  better  than  any  other  medium  in  Canada,  gets  your  pro- 
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HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Montreal,  Toronto,  Winnipeg 


94 


HARDWARE    AND    METAL 
THE     BUYERS'     GUIDE 


January   3,   1920 


Ornamental   Fence  ,..        '      ... 

Banwell   Hoxie    Wire   Fence   Co.,    Ltd.,   Hamilton. 

Ornamental  Iron  and  Wire  Work 

Canada   Wire  &   Iron   Goods  Co.,   Hamilton,   On*. 
Dennis    Wire   &    Iron    Works,    London,    Ont 

racking* 
Consumers    Cordage    Co.,    Montreal. 
Canadian    Asbestos   Co.,    Montreal,   Que. 
Dunlop  Tire  &   Rubber  Goods  Co.,   Ltd.,  Toronto. 
The    Engineers'    Supply   Co.,    Winnipeg.    Man. 
Jenkins    Bros.,    Ltd..    Montreal. 
Scythes,   Ltd.,   Toronto. 

Paint,  Ready  Mixed,  House,  Barn,  Roof,  Flat 
Wall,  Concrete,  "  Floor,  Cement,  Aluminum 
Marine  and  Deck 

Brandram-Henderson,    Ltd.,    Montreal. 

British  America  Paint  Co.,  Ltd.,  Victoria,   B.C. 

Canada    Paint    Co.,    Montreal. 

The   Glidden   Co,    Ltd.,    Toronto. 

R.    C.    Jamieson    &    Co.,    Montreal. 

Imperial    Varnish   ft    Color    Co.,   Toronto. 

Lowe    Bros.,    Ltd.,    Toronto. 

Martin-Senour    Co.,    Ltd.,    Montreal. 

McArthur-Irwin,    Ltd. 

Benjamin    Moore    ft   Co.,    Toronto. 

The  Ottawa   Paint  Works,  Ltd.,   Ottawa. 

E.  I.   du    Pont  de   Nemours   ft   Co.,    Wilmington, 
Del. 

A.    Ramsay    ft    Son    Co.,    Montreal. 
Sanderson    Pearcy    Co.,    Ltd.,    Toronto. 
Standard    Paint    ft    Varnish    Co.,    Ltd.,    Windsor. 
Stewart    &    Wood,    Toronto. 
Sherwin-Williams   Co.,    Montreal. 
G.    F.    Stephens  &  Co.,   Ltd.,    Winnipeg. 

Paint  Brushes 

The  Boeckh   Company.   Ltd..   Toronto. 
Meakins    ft    Sons,    Hamilton. 
Rubberset    Co.,    Limited,    Toronto. 
T.  S.  Simms  ft  Co.,  Ltd.,  FairrfUe,  St  John,  N.B. 

Paint,  Copper 

British   America   Paint  Co.,   Ltd,,   Victoria,    B.C. 

Paint  and  Varnish  Remover 

Brandram-Henderson,    Ltd.,    Montreal,    Que. 
Canada    Paint   Co..    Ltd.,    Montreal. 
Dougall    Varnish    Co.,    Ltd.,    Montreal. 
R.     C.    Jamieson    ft    Co.,    Montreal. 
Martin-Senour    Co.,    Ltd..    Montreal. 
Sherwin-Williams    Co..    Montreal. 

A.  Ramsay    ft    Son    Co.,    Montreal. 

Paper   Balers 

Climax    BaleT   Co.,    Hamilton. 
Spielmann    Agencies,    Montreal. 

Paint  Oil  Storage  and  Handling;  Systems 

S.    F.    Bowser    Company,    Ltd.,    Toronto,    Can 

Parcel  Carriers 

Gipe-Hazard   Store  Service   Co.,    Montreal. 

Paris   Green 

Canada    Paint    Co.,    Montreal. 
McArthur-Irwin,    Ltd.,    Montreal. 
,  Sherwin-Williams    Co.,    Montreal. 

Paper  Bags 

F.  B.    Eddy    Co.,    Ltd.,    Hull.    Que. 
Walter   Woods    ft    Co.,    Hamilton. 

Paper  Napkins 

E.    B.    Eddy   Co.,    Ltd,,   Hull,   Que. 

Packing   Rubber 

Dun  lop  Tire  &  Rubber  Goods  Co.,   Ltd.,  Toronto. 
Gutta    Percha   *    Rubber    Co..    Ltd.,    Toronto. 

Packings 

The  Canadian  Asbestos  Co.,   Montreal,   Que. 

Pads 

D.  Aekland    ft    Sons,    Winnipeg. 

E.  B.    Eddy   Co.,    Ltd..   Hull,   Que. 

Pads  for  Horses 

American    Pad    ft    Textile    Co.,    Chatham. 
Burlington    Windsor    Blanket  Co.,    Toronto. 

Patches 

The  Loektdte  Patch   Co.,    Windsor,    On*. 

Presto    Patch    Co.,   Ltd.,    Toronto. 

W.    C.    Wood   Co.,    Minneapolis,   Minn. 
Palis 

E.    B.    Eddy   Co.,    Ltd..   Hull,   Que.        ( 

Thos.    Davidson    Mfg.    Co.,    Ltd.,    Montreal. 
Palls,  Honsehold 

E.    B.    Eddy    Co.,    Ltd.,    Hull,    Que. 
Pails,   Wooden 

Wm.    Cane  ft  Sons  Co.,  Ltd.,  Newmarket,  On*. 

Perforated  Sheet  Metals 

Canada   Wire  ft   Iron   Goods  Co.,   Hamilton,    On*. 

B.  Greening   Wire    Co.,   Ltd.,    Hamilton. 
Percolators,  Coffee 

Canadian    General   Electric   Co.,    Toronto. 
Great  West  Electric  Co.,    Ltd.,   Winnipeg,    Man. 
Landers,    Frary   &    Clark,    New    Britain,    Conn. 
Northern    Electric    Co.,    Ltd.,    Montreal. 

Phosphor  Tin  and  Copper 

The    Great    Western    Smelting    ft    Refining    Co., 
Vancouver,     B.C. 

Phonographs 

Jas.    H.    Cummings,   190  North  State   St.,   Chicago, 
Illinois. 

The   Musical    Merchandise   Sales   Co.,   Toronto. 
Pick    Handles 

J.    H.    Still   Mfg.    Co.,   St   Thomas,    Oat 
Pis-eon  Nests 

E.    B.    Eddy   Co.,    Ltd.,    Hull,    Que. 


Piston  Pins 

Burgess-Norton  Mfg.    Co.,   Geneva,   111. 
Piston  Rod  Packing 

Dunlop    Tire   &    Rubber   Co..    Ltd.,    Toronto. 
Piston  and  Valve  Packings 

Canadian    Asbestos    Co.,    Montreal,    Que. 
Pitch 

Scythes    &    Co.,    Ltd.,    Toronto,    Ont. 
Pistols 

Iver   Johnson's    Anns    &    Cycle    Works,    Fitohtourg, 
Mass. 

Pic  Iron 

A.    C.    Leslie    &    Co.,    Ltd.,    Montreal. 

Nova   Scotia   Steel   Co.,    New   Glasgow,    N.S. 

Steel    Co.    of   Canada,    Ltd.,    Hamilton. 
Pins,    Escutcheon 

Parmenter    &    Bulloch,    Gananoque. 
Pipe    Cutters    (Stand) 

Trimont   Mfg.    Co.,    Roxbury    (Boston,    Mass.) 
Pipe  Cleaners 

The    Chamberlain    Desolvo    Co.,    Toronto. 
Pipe  Cotters 

The    Borden    Canadian    Co.,    Toronto. 
Pipe  Stocks  and  Dies 

Rapid  Tool  &  Machine  Co.,  Ltd.,   Lacbine    Que. 

Wells    Bros.    Co.    of    Canada,    Ltd.,    Gait 
Pipe,   Black   and   Galvanized 

American    Rolling    Mills,    Middletown,    Ohio. 

Canada    Metal    Co.,    Toronto. 

Canadian   Tube   &    Iron    Co.,    Ltd.,    Montreal. 

Caverhill,    Learmont   &   Co.,    Montreal. 

Steel    Co.    of   Canada,    Ltd.,    Hamilton. 

Thos.    Davidson   Mfg.   Co.,   Ltd.,   Montreal. 

Lewis   Bros.,    Ltd.,    Montreal. 
Pipe,  Galvanized,  Conductor 

Pedlar    People,    Ltd.,    Oshawa. 

Thos.    Davidson   Mfg.   Co.,  Ltd.,    Montreal. 

Wheeler   &    Bain,    Toronto. 
Pipe,   Lead 

Canada   Metal    Co.,   Toronto. 

Hcyt    Metal    Co.,    Toronto. 

The  Steel  Co.    of  Canada,   Ltd.,   Hamilton,    Ont. 
Pipe,  Stove  and  Furnace 

Collins    Mfg.    Co.,    Toronto. 
Pipe,  Rain  Water  Conductor 

Canada    Metal    Co.,     Toronto. 
Pipe,  Wrought,   Black  and  Galvanized 

Steel  Co.   of  Canada,   Ltd.,  The,   Hamilton.   Out. 
Planters,  Corn 

Otterville    Mfg.    Co.,    Otterville,    Ont 
Pliers,   Cutting 

Bridgeport    Hdwe.    Mfg.    Corp.,    Bridgeport,    Conn. 

Smith    &    Hemenway    Co.,    Inc.,    Irvington,    N.J. 
Pliers,  Combination 

Bridgeport    Hdwe.   Mfg.   Corp.,   Bridgeport,  Oonn. 

Barcalo   Mfg.    Co.,    Buffalo,    N.T. 

Cau    Foundries  ft  Forgings.   Ltd.,  Brockrille,  Ont 

Goodell-Pratt   Co.,    Greenfield,    Mass. 

Smith   ft   TTemenway  Co.,   Inc.,   Irrington,   N.J. 

Whitman  ft  Barnes  Mfg.  Co.,  St  Catharines,  Oat 
Plowshares 

D.    Ackland    ft    Son,    Winnipeg. 
Plugs,  Robber 

Can.    Consolidated    Rubber  Co.,   Montreal,   Que. 

Dunlop  Tire  ft  Rubber  Goods  Co.,   Ltd.,   Toronto 
Plumbers'    Supplies,    Rubber 

Dunlop  Tire  ft  Rubber  Goods  Co.,   Ltd.,   Toronto 

Gutta   Percha   ft   Rubber,   Ltd.,  Toronto. 
Plumbers'  Tools 

Barcalo    Mfg.    Co.,    Buffalo,    N.T. 

J.    H.    Williams    ft    Co.,    Brooklyn,    N.T. 

Whitman  ft  Barnes  Mfg.  Co.,  St  Catharines,  Ont 
Plyers 

F.    W.    Lamplough   ft    Co.,    Montreal. 

Vaughan   ft   Bushnell.  Chicago,   111. 

Whitman  ft  Barnes  Mfg.  Co.,  St  Catharines,  Ont 
Planes 

CaverhiD.    Learmont   ft   Co..    Montreal. 

Stanley    Rule    ft    Level    Co.,    New    Britain.    Conn. 
Plow     Rings 

International    Malleable    Iron    Co.,    Ltd.,    Gvelpb. 
Polishes,    Auto    and    Furniture 

The     Army     and     Navy     Mfg.     Products,     Reg'd. 
Montreal,   Que. 

D.    Actdand  ft   Son,    Ltd.,    Winnipeg.    Man. 

Buffalo  Specialty  Cos    Buffalo,   N.T. 

Charmell    Chemical    Co..    Ltd.,    Toronto. 

Imperial    OO   Co.,    Ltd.,    Toronto. 

flounders  ft  Co.,   Montreal,    Que. 

Satinette  Products  Mfg.     Co.,  The.    Toronto,    Ont. 
Polishing    Heads 

Goodell-Pratt  Co.,  Greenfield.  Mass. 
Polishes,    Floor 

The     Army     and     Navy     Mfg.     Products,     Reg'd., 
Montreal,   Que. 

Polishes,    Knife 

Joo.   Oakey  ft  Sons,   London,    Bug. 
Poles,    Electric    Light 

Northern    Electric   On.,    Montreal. 
Pole    Line    Material 

Canadian  General   Eleebrie  Co.,    Ltd.,  Toronto. 

Great  West   Electric  Co.,   Ltd.,  Winnipeg,   Man. 

Northern    Electric    Co..    Montreal. 

Pedlar    People    Ltd.,    Oetumra. 

The  Steel  Co.  of  Canada,  Ltd.,  Hamilton,  Ont 
Post    Hole    Diggers 

Can.   Foundries  ft  lorglnse,  Ltd.,  BwcniBst,  Ont 

Ottorvffl*  Mff.   Co..   OtoarvBJe,   Ont 


Taylor-Forbes  Co.,   Ltd.,   Guerph,  Ont 
Pots,  Flower 

The   Foster  Pottery  Co.,    Hamilton,    Ont 
Pottery 

The   Foster   Pottery  Oo.,    Hamilton,    Ont. 
Poultry    Netting 

BanweU-Hoxie  Wire  Fence  Co.,  Ltd.,   Hamiliou 

A.  C.    Leslie  ft  Co..   Ltd.,  Montreal. 

B.  Greening  Wire  Co.,  Ltd.,  Hamilton. 
Powder,    Gun 

Hercules  Powder  Co.,   Delaware. 
Poultry    Leg    Bands 

Rideau    Specialty    Co.,    Smith's    Falls,    Ont. 
Price  Cards 

The    Weaver-Beach    Co.,    Rochester,    N.T 
Prisms,  Sidewalk 

Hobbs    Mfg.    Co.,    Montreal,   Que. 
Pulls 

Can.   Foundries  &  Forgings,   Ltd.,  Brockville     i>m 

Stover   Mfg.    &    Engine   Co.,    Freeport,    111. 
Pumps 

Beatty    Bros.,    Ltd.,    Fergus. 

Can.   Foundries  &   Forgings,   Ltd.,   Brockville    Out- 

R.    McDougall  Co.,  Ltd.,  Gait 

F.  E.   Myers  ft  Bro.,  Ashland,   Ohio. 

Steel   Trough    ft   Machine   Co..    Ltd.,    Tweed,    Ont 
The    Smart-Turner    Machine    Co.,    Ltd.,    Hamilton 
Ont 

Pump,     Hand     and     Power,     for     Paints,     Oils. 
Oil    and    Gasoline 

S.    F.    Bowser    Company,    Ltd.,    Toronto,    Can 
The    Smart-Turner    Machine   Co.,    Ltd.,    Hamilton 

Ont 
The  Hamilton  Motor  Works,  Ltd.,  Hamilton,  Oni 

Pumps,    Curb,    for    Oil    and    Gasoline 

8.     F.     Bowser    Company,    Ltd..    Toronto,    Can 
Gilbert   ft   Barker   Mrg.   Co.,    Springfield,    Mass. 

Pumps     (Electric) 
Hurley  Machine  Co.,  Ltd.,  Toronto. 

Pumps,  Self-measuring 
S.    W.    Bowser   Company,    Ltd.,    Toronto,    Can 
Gilbert  ft    Barker   Mfg.   Co.,    Springfield,   Mass. 

Pumps,  Semi-rotary 
The  Hamilton  Motor  Works,  Ltd.,  Hamilton,  Ont 

Pumps,   Gasoline 
S.    F.    Bowser    Company,    Ltd.,    Toronto,    Can 
Gilbert  ft   Barker    Mfg.    Co.,    Springfield.    Mass. 

Pump    Oilers 
Cannon  Oiler  Co.,    Kedthsburg,    111. 

Punches,    Centre    Drive,    etc. 
Goodell-Pratt  Co.,  Greenfield,   Mass. 
North    Bros.    Mfg.    Co.,   Philadelphia,    Pa 
Mayhew    Steel    Products,    Inc.,    New  York- 
Stanley    Rnle  ft    Level  Co.,   New   Britain,   Conn 
Whitman  ft  Barnes  Mfg.  Co..  St  Catharines,  Onu 

Punches,     Ticket 
Bridgeport    Hdwe.    Mfg.    Corp.,    Bridgeport.    Conn 

Putty 

Brandram-Henderson,    Montreal. 

R.   C.  Jamieson  ft  Co.,  Ltd.,  Montreal. 

Canada    Paint    Co.,    Montreal. 

The  Dominion  Metal  Co.,  Ltd.,  Sherbrooke,  Que. 

Benjamin   Moore   ft   Co.,  Ltd.,  Toronto. 

A.    Ramsay  ft    Son  Co.,    Montreal. 

Steel  Oo.   of   Canada,    Ltd.,   Hamilton. 

G.  F.    Stephens  &   Co.,    Ltd.,    Winnipeg. 
'Stewart  &  Wood,   Toronto. 

Sherwin- Williams  Co.,   Montreal. 

Pneumatic    Tubes 
Glpe-Hazard  Store  Service  Co.,  Toronto. 

Putty     Irons 
The  A   R.   Whittal  Can.    Co.,  Ltd..   Montreal 

Pulleys 

Canada    Foundries  ft   Forgings,   Ltd.,    Brockville 
Stover  Mfg.   ft   Engine  Oo.,   Freeport,    111. 

Quoits 
Can.   Foundries  ft  Forgings.  Ltd.,  Brockville.   Ont 

Racks,    Har 

Can.   Foundries  ft  Foreman,  Ltd.,  Brockville.    Ont 

Radiators 
The  Guraey  Foundry  Co.,    Ltd.,  Toronto. 
Sapid    Radiators,    Limited,   Toronto,    Oat 

Radiator    Valves 

Jenkins    Bros.,    Ltd..    Montreal. 
Railway   Tie    Plates 

Steel  Co.  of  Canada,    Ltd.,  The,   Hamilton,   Onu 
Railroad    Supplies.    Rubber 

Dunlop  Tire  ft  Rubber  Goods  Co.,  Ltd.,  Toronto. 

Jas.    Morrison  Brass  Mfg.   Co.,   Toronto. 

Rakes 

Coleman    Fare   Box   Co.,    Toronto. 

Shurly-Dietrich   Co.,    Ltd.,    Gait,   Ont 

Ward  ft  Payne,  Sheffield,    En*. 
Razors 

Geo     Butler  ft  Co.,  Ltd.,   Sheffield,    En* 

Dorken   Bros.    &  Co.,    Montreal,   Que. 

Caverhill.    Learmont    ft   Co.,    Montreal. 

Geneva  Cutlery  Co.,    Geneva.    N.T. 

James    Hutton    ft    Co.,    Montreal. 

Gillette   Safety   Raror  Co.,    Ltd.,   Montreal. 

F.    W.    Lamplough    ft   Co.,    Montreal. 

Landers,    Frary   ft   Clark,    New    Britain,    Oonn. 

Wlebusch  ft  Hllger,  Now  Tors. 
Reamers 

Pratt   ft    Whitney  Co.   of  Canada,    Ltd.,    Dundee 

Butterfleld  ft   Co.,    Rock   Island,    Qua 

Whitman  ft  Barnes  Mfg.  Co.,  St  Catharines,  Ont 
Ratchet    Drills 

Goodell-Pratt  Co..    Greenfield,    Mass. 

Whitman  ft  Barnes  Mfg.  Co.,  St  CaoWtaes,  Ont. 


January  3,   1920 


HARDWARE    AND    METAL 
THE    BUYERS'    GUIDE 


95 


Reciprocating    Drills 

Goodell-Pratt  Oo.,    Greenfield,    Mas*. 
Records,  Talking  Machine 

The  Musical  Merchandise  Sales  Co.,  Toronto,    Ont 

Refrigerators 

"Hies.    Davidson  Mfg.   Co.,   Ltd.,   Montreal. 

Sanderson-Harold  Oo.,   Ltd.,   Paris,   Ont. 

Soren  Bros.,  Toronto. 
Refrigerator    Drip    Pans 

B.    B.    Eddy  Co.,   Ltd.,  Hull,    Que. 

Registers    (Hot   Air) 
Canada   Foundries   &    Forgings,    Broclrrille. 
Enterprise   Mfg.    Co.,   SackvHle,   N.B. 
A.    H.    Power    Furnaoe   Co.,    Toronto. 
Jas    Stewart   Mfg.   Co.,   Woodstock,   Ont. 
Tattle    ft    Bailey,    Bridgeburg,    Ont. 

Rifles 

The  Fraser  Co.,  Agents  B.S.A.,  Montreal,  Que. 

Manitoba  Steel  ft  Iron  Co.,  Ltd.,   Winnipeg,  Man. 

Parmenter-Bullooh    Co.,    Gananoque,    Ont. 

The  Steel  Co.  of  Canada.   Ltd.,  Hamilton,  Ont. 
Rivet     Burrs 

Hie  Union  Iron  ft  Metal  Co.,  Ltd.,  Toronto. 
Rod  ends 

J.  H.   Williams  ft  Co..   Brooklyn.   N.Y. 
Rods,   Piston   and    Pomp 

Steel  Co.   of  Canada,   Ltd.,   The,   Hamilton,   Ont. 

Rods,   Radios   Ford 

Burgess-Norton  Mfg.    Co.,   Geneva,   111. 

Rods,     Straightened 

The  Graham   Nafl   Works,    Toronto. 
Roofing     Cement     and     Paint 

The  Alpine  Chemical  Co.,  Ltd.,   Toronto. 

Geo.    W.    Reed  ft  Co.,   Ltd.,   Montreal,   Que. 

Roofing,     Ready 
Barrett  Co..   Ltd..   Toronto,   Ont 
Bishopric   Wall    Board  Co.,   Ltd.,   Ottawa,  Ont. 
Brantford  Roofing  Co.,  Ltd.,  Brantford,  On^. 
Geo.   W.   Reed  ft  Co.;  Ltd.,  Montreal,  Que. 
Standard  Paint  Oo.  of  Canada.   Ltd.,   Montreal. 
Alex.   McArthur  ft  Co.,  Montreal,  Que. 

Roofing,     Robber 

Canadian    Asbestos   Co.,    Montreal,    Que. 
Geo.    W.   Reed  ft  Co.,   Ltd.,   Montreal,  Que. 

Rope    Grips 
Coleman   Fare  Box  Co.,  Toronto. 

Rope 

Doon    Twines,    Ltd.,    Kitchener,    Out 
Plymouth    Cordage    Co..    Welland.    Ont,    and    Ply- 
mouth,   Mass. 
Consumers   Cordage   Co..    Montreal,    Que. 
Independent  Cordage  Co.,  Toronto.  Ont 
Brantford    Cordage  Co.,    Brantford,    Ont. 

Rosin 

Ontario  Oil  &  Turpentine  Co.,  Ltd.,  Toronto.  Ont 
Robber     Products 

Dunlop  Tire  ft  Rubber  Goods  Co.,   Ltd.,   Toronto. 

Gotta  Percha   ft   Rubber.   Ltd.,   Toronto. 
Robber,    Vulcanizing 

Adamson    Mfg.    Co.,    Hamilton,    Ont- 

Roles 

J  as.    Chester-man  ft  Co.,  Sheffield,  Eng. 

L.   S.   Starrett   Co.,    Athol,   Mass. 
Rules,     Steel.     Straight     and     Folding     Roles, 
Folding    Boxwood 

Lufkin  Rule  Co.    of  Canada,  Ltd.,    Windsor,   Ont 
Roles.    Spring    Joint 

Lufkin   Rule  Co.    of  Canada.  Ltd..    Windsor,   Ont 
Roles.    Board    and    Log 

Lufkin   Rule  Co.    of  Canada,  Ltd.,   Windsor,   Ont 
Sand     Paper 

Umited  States  Sand   Paper  Co.,   Williamsport,    Pa. 
Saddlery    Hardware 

McKirinon  Industries.  Ltd.,  St  Catharines. 

Niagara    Falls    Metal     Stamping    Works,     Niagara 
Falls.   N.Y. 
Sap   Pans 

Steel   Trough   ft    Machine  Co.,    Ltd.,   Tweed 
Saws.   Crosscut     and    Band 

Henry   Disston  ft  Sons,    Inc.,   Philadelphia,   Pa. 

T.    F.    Shurly  Co.,   Ltd.,   St   Catharines,    it 

Shurly-Dietrich  Co.,   Ltd.,  Gait,  Ont 

Williams  ft   Wilson.    Ltd.,   Montreal,   Que. 
Sawset 

Henry   Disston  4  Sons,    Inc.,    Philadelphia,    Pa. 

Taylor-Forbes   Co.,    Limited,    Guelph,    Ont 
Saws,  Back 

The  Crescent  Co.,   Meriden,   Conn. 
Saws,    Compass 

The    Crescent    Co.,    Meriden,    Conn. 
Saw.,    Coping 

The    Crescent   Co.,    Meriden.    Conn. 
Saws,    Butchers',  and   Kitchen 

Biirgpss-Xortnn    Mfg     Co..    Geneva,    111. 

The  Crescent  Co..   Meriden,   Conn. 

Snurly-Dietrich  Co..    Ltd..  Gait.  Ont. 
Saws.    Hand    and    Circular 

E.  C.   Atkins  Co.,  Hamilton,  Can. 

The    Crescent    Co..    Meriden,    Conn. 

Henry   Dlaston    ft    Sons,    Toronto. 

Fry's  (London).    Limited,  London.    Eng. 

T.    F.   Sourly  Co..    Ltd..   9t   Catharines,   0»t 

Simonda  Canada   Saw  Co.,    Montreal. 

Shurly-Dietrich  Co..   Ltd..  Gait.  Ont 

Victor  Saw   Works.    Hamilton.   Ont. 

Williams  ft  Wilson,   Ltd.,   Montreal,   Qu& 
Saws,    Hack 

The    Crescent   Co.,    Meriden,    Conn. 

Henry  Disston  ft  Sons,    Inc.,   Philadelphia,    Pa. 

The  Millers  Falls  Co..   Millers  Falls.   Mass. 

Williams  ft   Wilson.   Ltd.,  Montreal,   Que. 


Scissors 
The    Acme   Shear   Co..    Bridgeport,    Oonn. 
Wlebosoh  ft   Hilger,   New  York. 
J.   Wis»  ft  Sons.   Newark.   M.J. 

Scales 
Burrow,    Stewart    ft    Milne    Co.,    Ltd.,    Hamilton 
Renfrew   Scale  Co.,    Ltd.,   Renfrew,   Ont 
The   Northern    Electric   Co..    Montreal. 

Scales,    Machinists' 
Lufkin  Rule  Co.   of  Canada.   Ltd.,    Windsor,    Ont 

Scrapers,    Drag    and    Wheel 

Bateman- Wilkinson  Co.,   Ltd.,  Toronto. 

Scoops 
n»Ti«Hi«n   Shovel  ft  Tool  Co.,   Hamilton,   Can. 

Screws 
Can.   Foundries  ft  Forgings,   Ltd.,  Brockvttle,  Ont. 
Manitoba  Steel  ft  Iron  Co..  Ltd.,  Winnipeg,  Man. 

Screw   Drivers 

Whitman  ft  Barnes  Mfg.  Co.,  St   Oa/HiarinieB,  Ont 
Screws,    Thumb 

J.   H    Williams  ft  Co.,    Brooklyn,   N.Y. 

Screws.    Wood 
The   Steel    Co.    of   Canada,    Ltd..    Hamilton      Y 

Screens 
Canada  Wire  ft  Iron  Goods  Co..  Hamilton,  Ont 

Screen    Doors 
The  Kasement  Skrene  Dore  Co.,  Toronto. 
J.    H.    Williams   ft   Co.,    Brooklyn,    N.Y. 
Sanderson-Harold  Co.,   Ltd.,   Paris,   Ont 

Screen    Widows 
The   Kasement   Skrene    Dore   Co.,    Toronto. 
Sanderson  Harold  Oo.,   Ltd.,   Paris,   Ont. 

Screw  Drivers 

Burgess-Norton  Mfg.   Co..    Geneva,   111. 
The    Crescent   Co.,    Meriden,    Conn. 
E.    Edelmann  &  Co.,   Chicago,    111. 

Screw    Machines 
Stratford   Brass  Co..   Ltd.,   Stratford,    Ont. 

Screws  of   all   Kinds 

Steel   Co.   of  Canada,   Ltd..  The,   Hamilton,   Ont. 

Searchlights 

The  Brilliant  Search  Light  Mfg.   Co.,  Chicago,   111 

Seats 
Canadian  Veneering  Co..   Acton  Vale,  Que. 

Separators 

Sharpies    Separator   Co.,    West   Chester,    Pa 
Sewing    Machines 

Northern   Electric  Co.,    Ltd.,   Montreal,   Que. 

Shades.    Electric 
Canadian    General   Electric  Co.,   Toronto. 
Great    West    Electric    Co.,    Ltd.,    Winnipeg.    Man 

Shears 

The  Acme  Shear  Co..   Bridgeport,  Conn. 
Wiebusch  ft  Hflger,  New  York. 
J.   Wiss  ft  Sons,   Newark,   N.J. 

Sheeting 

Alex.    McArthur  ft   Co..    Montreal,    Que. 

Sheets.    Galvanized    and    Black 

American  Rolling   Mills.    Middleton,   Ohio. 

A.  O.    LesBe  ft  Co..    Montreal.   Que. 
Dominion   Sheet  Metal  Co.,  Hamilton. 
Manitoba  Steel  ft  Iron  Co.,  Ltd..  Winnipeg,  Man 

B.  ft  S.   H.  Thompson,   Montreal,  Que. 

Sheets,    Black   Steel 
Steel  Co.   of  Canada,   Ltd.,  The,  Hamilton,  Ont. 

Shingle 
Whitman  ft  Barnes  Mfg.  Co.,  St  Catharines,  Ont 

Ships'    Bottom     Composition 

British    America    Paint   Co.,    Ltd..    Victoria,    B.C 

Shock  Absorbers 

The  Star  Specialty  Mfg.   Co.,   Chicago,   IB. 

Shot 

Steel   Co.   of  Canada,   Ltd.,  The,  Hamilton,   Ont. 

Shovels 

Canadian    Shovel    ft   Tool    Co.,    Hamilton,    Can. 

Shovels.     Snow 
Coleman    Fare   Boot  Co.,    Toronto. 

Show   Cases 
Cameron    ft    Campbell,    Toronto. 
The   Duluth    Show   Case  Co..    Duluth,    Minn 

Shingle     Stains 

The    Alpine   Chemical    Co.,    Ltd.,    Toronto. 
Sturgeons,    Ltd.,   Toronto. 

Sifters.    Ash 

The    Bnrrowes    Mfg.    Co..    Toronto. 

Fumival    ft    Co.,    Toronto. 

J.   Samuels  ft  Co..  Toronto. 
Sights.  Gon  and  Rifle 

Marble    Arms    ft   Mfg.    Co.,    Gladstone,    Mich. 
Signs,    Street 

The      Niagara      Falls     Metal      Stamping      Works 
Niagara    Falls,    NY. 
Silo    i.utrs 

Otterville    Mfg.    Co.,   OtterrOle,   Ont 
Silverware 

Caverhfll.   Leannont  ft   Co.,   Montreal,   Que. 

Can.   Wm.    A.  Rogers  Oo.,  Ltd..  Toronto. 

Oneida    Community.     Ltd.,     Niagara     Falls,    Ont 

Messrs.    Wm.    Rogers  and  His  Son,   Niagara  Falls. 
Out 
Sifters,  Ash 

Collins  Mfg.   Co.,  Toronto,   Ont 
Silver-plated  Ware 

Oneida   Community.    Ltd.,    Niagira    Falls,    Ont 


Sinks 

Can.   Foundries  ft  Forgings.  Ltd..   Brockville,  Ont 
Ski 

The  Northland  Ski   Mfg.   Co.,   St    Paul,   Minn 
Ski   Accessories,   Bindings,   Wax   and   Poles 

The  Northland   Ski. Mfg.    Co.,    St    Paul,   Minn. 
Skates 

Tba  Canada  Cycle  ft  Motor  Co..  Ltd..  Weston,  Ont 
Sledges,  Blacksmith,  Coal,  Stone 

Whitman  ft  Barnes  Mfg.  Co.,  St   Catharines,  Ont 
Snips    (Tinner) 

Wiesbuach    ft   Hilger,   New   York. 

Smith    ft    Hemenway   Co.,    Inc.,    IrvingboD,    N.J. 
Snow  Shoes 

The  Northland   Ski   Mfg.    Oo.,    St.    Paul,   Minn.- 

Snow  Shoe  Harness 

The  Northland   Ski  Mfg.   Co..    St    Paul,   Minn. 

Sockets,  Wire  Rope 
J.   H    Williams  ft  Co.,    Brooklyn.    N.Y. 

Solder 

Canada  Metal  Co.,  Toronto. 
Hoyt  Metal  Co.,  Toronto. 
The    Great     Western    Smeldng    ft     Refining     Oo., 

Vancouver.    B.C. 
Northern    Electric   Co.,    Montreal. 
Owl    Metal   Co.,    Ltd.,    Winnipeg. 
Geo.    W.    Reed,    Montreal. 
Tallman   Brass  ft  Metal  Co.,   Hamilton.   Out 

Soldering   Paste 

Canada    Metal    Co.,    Toronto. 
The  Hoyt   Metal   Co.,   Toronto. 
Great   West  Electric  Co.,   Ltd..   Winnipeg,    Man- 
Soldering    Irons    (Electric) 
The  Clemens   Electrical  Corporation,    Hamilton 

Solderall 
Thos.   Davidson   Mfg.    Co., 


Ltd.,    Montreal. 


Soles.    Half 

Dunlop  Tire  ft  Rubber  Goods  Co.,   Ltd.,  Toronto. 
Goodyear    Tire    &    Rubber    Co.    of    Canada,    Ltd.. 

Toronto,    Ont 
Plewes   Ltd.,    Winnipeg,    Man. 

Soap  Dishes 

Kinzinger,    Bruce   ft   Co..    Niagara   Falls,    Ont. 

Spades 

Canadian  Shovel  ft  Tool  Oo..   Hamilton,  Oat. 

Spark    Plugs 
Bethlehem    Products.     Bethlehem,     Pa. 
The  Canadian  National  Carbon  Oo.,  Ltd.,  Toronto. 
Canada  Cycle  ft  Motor  Co.,  Ltd.,   Weston,   Ont 
Great    West    Electric   Co.,    Ltd.,    Winnipeg,    Man. 
Champion  Spark   Ping  Co.,    Windsor,   Ont 
Dominion    Battery    Co.,    Ltd.,    Toronto,    Ont 
W.    T.    Evans,   1684   St    Drbain   St..   Montreal. 
Hyelop   Bros.,   Toronto. 
Northern    Electric  Co.,    Ltd.,   Toronto. 
The  Royal  Canadian  Specialties,   Hamilton. 
Walker,    Vallance,    Limited,    Hamilton,    Ont. 

Spanners 

Williams  ft  Oo.,   J.   H„   Brooklyn.    N.Y. 

Spice   Tobs 
B.   B.   Eddy  Co.,   Ltd.,  Hull.   Que. 

Spiders 

Can.   Foundries  ft  ForglngB,   Ltd.,   BrookvUle,   Ont 
Spikes,   Eavetrough 

Steel  Co.   of  Canada,   Ltd.,  The,   Hamilton,  Ont. 
Spinnings 

Wentworth  Mfg.   Co.,   Ltd.,    Hamilton,    Ont 
Spoke   Shaves 

Stanley   Rule  ft   Level  Co.,   New   Britain,    Oonn. 
Sponges 

Evans  ft  Co.,    Ltd.,   Montreal.   Que. 
Sponge   Baskets 

Kinzinger,    Bruce  ft   Co.,   Niagara   Falls,    Ont 
Sportsmen's   Specialties 

The    Marble   Arms  ft  Mfg.    Co.,    Gladstone,    Mich. 
Sprayers 

Itateman-Wilkinson  Co.,   Ltd.,  Ti/ronto. 

C»Llins    Mfg.     Co..    Toronto. 

Thos.    Davidson   Mfg.   Co..   Ltd.,    Montreal 

Eureka    Planter  Co.,   Woodstock. 

Springs 

B.    J.    Coghlin  Co.,    Ltd.,  Montreal,   Que. 

•  JiielDh    Spring    ft    Axle  Co..    Ltd.,    Guelph,    Ont 
Springs,   Windmill 

Bui-gess-Norton  Mfg.    Co.,   Geneva,   111. 
Spring    Dies 

Wells    Bros.    CVv    of  Canada,    Gait 

The    Crescent    Co.,    Meriden,    Conn. 
Sauares 

The    Crescent   Co.,    Meriden,    Conn. 
Stable    Fittings 

Beatty    Bros.,    Fergus,    Ont 

Canada   Foundries  ft   Forgings,    Brockville. 
Stains 

Brandram-Henderson,    Montreal. 

Canada   Paint  Co..    Ltd.,    Montreal. 

Dougall    Varnish   Co.,    Ltd..    Montreal. 

The   Lowe    Bros.    Co.,   Toronto. 

R.    C.    Jamleson    ft   Co..    Ltd..    Montreal. 

Martin-Senour   Co..    Ltd..    Montreal. 

McArthnr-Irwin.    Ltd..    Montreal. 

rvnjamln    Moore  ft    Co.,    Ltd.,   Toronto, 


96 


HARDWARE    AND    METAL 
THE    BUYERS'    GUIDE 


January   3,    1920 


A.    Ramsay   A    Sons   Co.,    Montreal. 
The  Ottawa  Patnt  Works,  Limited.  Ottawa, 
Sanderson   Pearey   A  Co.,  Toronto. 
Sher-win -Willi  tuns  Co.,    Montreal. 
Suleiman    Agencies   Ltd.,    Montreal. 
Q.   F.   Stephens  A  Co..    Winnipeg. 
Stewart   &    Woods,   Toronto. 
Sturgeons,    Ltd. ,    Toronto. 

Stains   (Wood  Preservatives) 
Caron    Brothers.    Montreal,    Que. 
Sturgeons.    Ltd. ,    Toronto. 

Stampings 
Ooleman    Fare   Box  Co.,   Toronto. 
Niagara    Falls   Metal   Stamping   Works,    Niagara 

Falls,   N.Y. 
Wentworth   Mfg.    Co.,    Ltd.,   Hamilton.    Omt 

Staples 
Canada    Steel    Goods  Co.,    Hamilton. 
Domuiion   Iron   A   Steel   Co.,    Ltd.,    Sydney,    N.8. 
Laidlaw    Bale-Tie   Oo.,    Ltd.,   Hamilton. 
National    Mfg.    Co.,    Sterling,    111. 
Steel   Co.   of  Canada,    Ltd.,   Hamilton. 
Western    Wire  A   Nail   Co.,    London. 

Staples,  Bed 

Steel  Co.   of  Canada,    Ltd.,  The,   Hamilton,  Ont. 

Store    Fixtures 

Cameron    A    Campbell,    Toronto. 

The  Duluth  Show  Case  Co.,   Dutoth,  Minn. 

Store   Front    Construction,   Metal 
Hobbe    Mfg.    Co.,    Montreal,   Que. 

Stoves   and   Ranges 

Beach    Foundry  Co.,   Ltd..   Ottawa,   Ont. 
Burrow,    Stewart    &    Milne    Oo.,    Ltd..    Hamilton. 
Canada    Foundries    &    Forging*,    Brockrille. 
Canada  8  tore  &   Foundry  Co.,   Ltd.,  St.    Lament, 

Montreal,  Que. 
Clare    Bros..    Ltd..    Preston,    Omt 
Thos.    Davidson  Mfg..  Co..    Ltd.,   Montreal. 
Enterprise  Foundry  So.,   SaekviUe,  N.B. 
Findlay   Bros.    &   Co.,    Ltd.,   Oarleton  Place,    Ont. 
The  Gait  Stove  A   Furnace  Co.,   Ltd..   Gait,  Ont. 
The  Qivmey  Foundry  Co.,   Ltd.,  Toronto. 
Hall,  Zryd   Foundry  Co.,   Ltd.,  Hespeler,  Ont 
The  Hamilton  Stove  A  Heater  Co.,  Hamilton,  Ont. 
The   MoClary    Mfg.    Co..   London,   Ont. 
Merchants   Hardware  Specialties.    Ltd.,  Calgary. 
The    National     Enameling    &    Stamping    Co.,     St 

Louis,    Mo. 
Record   Foundry  A  Maohlne  Co.,  Moncton,  N.B. 
Jas.    Stewart    Mfg.    Co.,    Ltd.,   Woodstock. 

Stoves,   Vapor  OH 

The   Detroit    Vapor  Stove  Co..    Detroit,    Mich. 
The    National    Enameling    A    Stamping    Co.,    Chi- 
cago,   III. 

Stoves,   Gas  and  Coal 

Burrow.    Stewart    A    Mflne    Co.,    Ltd..    Hamilton. 
Clare    Bros..    Ltd..    Preston,    Ont 
The    G/umey    Foundry   Co.,    Ltd.,    Toronto. 
The    MoClary   Mfg.    Co.,   London,   Ont 

Stoves,    Gasoline 

National    Stamping  A    Electric  Works.    Chicago. 

Stove   Lining" 
Geo.    W.    Reed,  Montreal. 

Stove   Pipe 

OoMtas    Mfg.    Co.,    Toronto. 

O-Rfb-O  Mfg.  Oo..  Winnipeg,  Man. 

Thos.    Davidson  Mfg.    Co..   Ltd..    Montreal. 

Steel  Bands 

Manitoba  8teel  *  Iron  Co.,  Ltd.,  Winnipeg,  Man. 

Steel,  Merchant  Bars 

Steel  Co.  of  Canada.    Ltd.,  The.   Hamilton,  Ont. 

Strapping,  Box 
The    Acme   Steel    Goods   Co..    Ltd.,    Montreal. 

Stretchers,  Cnrtain 
Otterrffle   Mfg.    Oo..    Ottervflle.    Ont 

Stretchers,   Wire 

BanweU-Hoxle  Wire  Fence  Co.,  Ltd..  Hamilton. 
Burgess-Norton   Mfg.    Co.,   Geneva,  111. 
Merchants    Hardware    Specialties.    Ltd.,    Calgary. 
Otterville    Mfg.    Oo.,    Ottorville,   Ont. 

Steel,   Reinforcing 

Canadian  Tube  A   Iron  Co.,   Ltd.,   Montreal. 
London    Rolling  Mffl   Co.,    London.    Ont. 
Manitoba  Steel  &  Iron  Co.,  Ltd..  Winnipeg.  Man. 
The    Steel   Oo.    of   Canada.    Ltd..    Hamilton,    Ont. 
Steel   Bars    for    Reinforcement 
Steel   Co.  of  Canada,    Ltd.,  The.   Hamilton,  Ont. 

Steel    Barrels 
The    Smart-Turner   Machine   Co.,    Ltd.,    Hamilton, 
Omt 

Steel,  Strip  J~ 

Dominion   Sheet  Metal  Co.,  Ltd..   Hamilton 

Steel   Lockers  and   Shelving 

Dennis  Wire  A   Iron   Works,    London.   Ont 

Stencils  and  Ink  _ 

Hamilton  Stamp  A  Stencil  Co.,  Hamilton. 

Steamers  and  Boilers 

Thos.    Davidson    Mfg.  Co..   Ltd..    Montre»l. 
Steel  Ingots,  Open  Hearth 

Steel  Co.  of  Canada.    Ltd.,  The,   Hamilton,  Ont 
Steel,  Mild,  Sleigh  Shoe,  Tire 

Canadian    Rolling   Mills  Co.,    Ltd..    Montreal. 

Qantrtl.n    Tube    A    Iron    Co.,    Ltd..    Montreal. 

London   Rolling   Mill   Co.,    London,  Omt 

Manitoba   Steel    A    Iron   Co..    Winnipeg,    Man. 

Steel    Oo.    of    Canada.    Hamilton. 
Steel    Wagon    Hardware 

MeKinnon    Industries,    Ltd..    St   Catharines,    Ont. 
Stucco   Beard 

Bishoprki  Wall  Board  Co..  Ltd..  Ottawa,  Ont 

Sulphate   of   Ammonia 

Steel  Co.  of  Canada,  Ltd.,  The,   Hamilton,  Ont 


Sweat  Pads 

American   Pad  A  Textile  Co.,   Chatham. 
Burlington   Windsor  Blanket  Co..   Toronto. 

Swivels,    Hook 
J.   H.    Williams  A  Co.,    Brooklyn.   N.Y. 

Switches,  Switchboards 
Canadian    General    Electric    Co.,    Ltd.,    Toronto 
Great    West    Electric   Co.,    Ltd.,    Winnipeg,    Man. 
Northern   Electric  Co.,   Montreal. 

Tacks 

The   Canada  Tack  and  Nail  Co..    Ltd.,   Hamilton, 

Ont 
Steel  Oo.  of  Canada.  Ltd.,  Hamilton,  Ont 

Tacks,   Shoe 

Steel  Co.  of  Canada,   Ltd.,  The,  Hamilton,  Ont 

Tanks,    Cisterns 

Beatty    Bros.,    Ltd.,    Fergus,    Ont 

Can.  Foundries  A  Forcings,  Ltd.,  Brockville.  Ont 

Tanks,   Galvanized  Steel 
Steel  Trough   A   Machine  Co.,    Ltd.,   Tweed,    Ont. 

Tanks,    for    Paint    Oils,    Oil,    Gasoline,    Kero- 
sene, etc. 
The  S.  F.  Bowser  Oo.  of  Can.,  Ltd.,  Inc.,  Toronto. 

Tanks    and    Pnmps,    Lubricating    Oil    Storage 

The  S.  F.  Bowser  Co.  of  Can..  Ltd..  Inc.,  Toronto. 

Tanks.    Storage 
Gilbert   A   Barker  Mfg.   Co.,    Springfield.    Mam 

Taps 
ButterSeld   A  Co..    Rock    Island.   Que. 
Wells  Bros.   Co.  of  Canada,  Gait.  Ont. 

Tap    Holders 
Goodell-Pratt  Oo.,    Greenfield.    Mass. 
North    Bros.    Mfg.    Oo.,    Philadelphia,    Pa. 

Tapping    Attachments 
Wells  Bros,   of  Canada,   Gait 

Tape,    Rubber   Friction 
Dunlop  Tire  A   Rubber  Goods  Co..  Ltd.,  Toronto 

Tapes,  Measuring,  Steel  and  Woven 

Lufkin    Rule  Co.   of  Canada.    Ltd..   Windsor,    Ont 

Tapes,    Measuring 
Oaverhill.    Leannout   A    Oo..    Montreal. 
Jas.    Chesterman   A   Co..   Ltd..    Sheffield,    Bng 
L.   8.  SUrrett  Co.,   Athol.   Mass. 

Tapes.   Pocket 

Lufkin   Rule  Co.   of  Canada.   Ltd.,   Windsor.   Ont 

Tarpaulin 
Scythes  A  Co.,   Ltd..  Toronto,   Ont 

Tea   Pots   and  Urns,  Tea   Ball 

Landers,    Frary   A   Clark.    New    Britain.    Conn. 
Wentworth   Mfg.    Co.,   Ltd.,    Hamilton.   Ont 

Tents 

Grant,   H olden  A  Graham.  Ltd.,  Ottawa,  Ont 

Scythes   A   Oo.,    Ltd..   Toronto.    Ont. 

J.  3.  Turner  A  Sons,  Ltd.,  Peterboro.  Ont. 

Terne    Plates 

A.  C.   Leslie  A  Co..    Ltd..  Montreal. 

Thermometers 
Wilder-Pike    Themometor    Co.,    Inc.,    Troy,    N.T. 

Thermae   Bottles 
Thermos    bottle   Co.,    Ltd..    Toronto.    Ont 

Thimbles.   Smoke    Pipe 
Can.   Foundries  A  Forgings,  Ltd.,  BrockvUle,  Ont 

Tie  Plates 

Steel  Oo.  of  Canada.    Ltd.,  The,   Hamilton,   Ont. 

Tiling.  Walls  and  Floor 

Barton    Netting   Co.,    Windsor. 

Tiling,    Rubber 
Dimlop  Tire  A   Rubber  Goods  Oo..   Ltd..  Toronto 
Gotta   Pereha    A    Rubber   Co..    Ltd..    Toronto. 

Tinners  .    . 

Whitman  A  Barnes  Mfg.  Co..  St  Catharines.  Ont 

Tinsmiths'    Machinery 

Brown,    Boggs    Co..    Hamilton.    Ont 

Tinware 

The  MoClary   Mfg.    Co.,   London,   Ont 

Soren  Bros.,    Toronto,    Ont 
Tin  Plate 

O-Rib-0  Mfg.  Oo.,  Winnipeg.  Mam. 

B.  A  8.  H.  Thompson  A  Co..  Ltd..  Montreal,  Q 

Tire  Carriers,   Automobile 

Klmdnger,    Bruce  A  Oo.,    Niagara    Falls.   On*. 
The  Marquette  Mfg.  Oo..  St  Pant,  Minn. 
North   American  Hardware  Co..    Ltd..   Montrea 
Tires  and  Tubes.  Automobile  and  Motor  Tn 
Northern  Electric  Co.,   Ltd.,  Montreal. 
Dunlop  Tire  A   Rubber  Goods  Co.,  Ltd..  Totoj 
Gutta    Pereha    A    Rubber,    Ltd.,    Toronto. 
HysJop    Bros..    Toronto,    Ont 
K.    A    S.    Canadian    Tire    A    Rubber    Co.,    L 

Toronto.   Ont 
North    American   Hardware  Oo.,    Ltd.,  Montrea 
The   Oak    Tire    A    Rubber   Co.,    Ltd..    Toronto. 
The   F.   E    Partridge  Rubber  Oo.,   Ltd..   Guelpl 
The  Van    Der   Linde  Robber  Co..   Toronto. 

Ties,  Wall  and  Veneer 

The  Niagara  Falls  Metal  Stamping  Works,  Niagara 
Falls,    N.Y. 

Tire  Patch 

Dunlop  Tire  A   Rubber  Goods  Oo.,   Ltd.,   Toronto 
E.     G.     Gooderham,    Toronto. 
Northern  Electric  Co.,  Ltd.,  Montreal. 
Presto    Patch    Co.,    Toronto,    Ont 
The   Locktite   Mfg.    Co.,    Windsor,   Ont 
W.    C.    Wood    Co..    Minneapolis.    Minn. 


Tires  and  Tubes, 

Automobile,    Aeroplane,    Bicycle,    Carriage, 
Motorcycle  and  Motor  Trucks 

Dunlop  Tire  &   Rubber  Goods  Co.,    Ltd.,   Toronto 
Northern  Electric  Co.,  Ltd.,  Montreal. 

Tire  .Accessories 
Dunlop  Tire  &   Rubber  Goods  Co.,    Ltd.,  Toronto 
Gaitta   Pereha   &   Rubber,    Ltd.,    Toronto. 
Northern  Electric  Co.,  Ltd.,  Montreal. 
W.    C.    Wood   Co.,    Minneapolis,    Minn. 

Tire  Repairs 

W.    C.    Wood   Co.,    Minneapolis,    Minn. 

Toboggans 

Peterborough    Canoe    Co.,    Peterborough,    Ont 
The   Northland    Ski    Mfg.    Co.,    St    Paul,    Minn. 

Toboggan   Cushions  and   Accessories 

The    Northland    Ski    Mtg.    Co.,    St.    Paul,    Minn. 

Toilet  Paper 

E.  B.    Eddy   Co.,    Ltd.,    Hull,    Que. 

Tools 

Jas.    Chesterman  A  Co.,  Ltd.,  Sheffield,   Eng. 

B.   J.    Coghlin   Co.,    Ltd.,    Montreal,    Que. 

J.    J.    Turner   A   Sons,   Ltd..    Peterborough,    Ont 

Jardine  &   Co.,    Ltd.,    A.    B.,   Hespeler,   Ont 

Jones    &    Shipman,    Leicester,    Eng. 

The  Millers  Falls   Co.,    Millers  Falls,    Mass. 

Northern    Eleotric   Co.,    Ltd.,    Montreal. 

North    Bros.    Mfg.    Co.,    Philadelphia,    Pa. 

The   Rapid   Tool   &   Machine  Co.,    Ltd.,   Montreal. 

Smith    &    Hemenway,    Inc.,    Irvington,    N.Y. 

Ward   &    Payne,    Sheffield,    Eng.   . 

Tools,  Blacksmiths' 

D.    Ackland   &   Son,    Winnipeg. 

Jardine   &    Co.,    Ltd.,    A.    B.,   Hespeler,    Ont 

Tools,   Garden 

Coleman    Fare    Box    Co.,    Toronto,    Ont. 
Ward   &    Payne.    Sheffield,    Eng. 

Tools,  Harvest 

Beatty    Bros.,    Ltd.,    Fergus,    Ont 

F.  E.    Meyers    &    Bro.,    Ashland,    O. 

Tools,    Logging   and   Lumbering 

Thos.    Pink    Co.,    Ltd.,    Pembroke,    Ont 

Tool  Holders   (Cutters) 

Jones    &    Shipman,    Leicester,    Eng. 
Williams   A   Co.,   J.    H.,    Brooklyn,   N.Y. 

American    Flyer    Mfg.     Co..    Chicago,    Dl 
Canadian    K.K.    Co..    Ltd..    Elora.    Ont. 
Coleman    Fare    Box    Co.,    Toronto. 
Thos.    Davidson    Mfg.    Co..    Montreal,    Que. 
James    H.    Cummings,    Chicago,    111. 
Gendron    Mfg.    Co.,    Ltd.,    Toronto. 

Tools,  Machinists*  _w^«.    rw  ,t 

Can.   Foundries  A  Forgings,  Ltd.,  Brockvdle^Oi  •'• 
Jas.    Chesterman    &    Co.,    Ltd.,    Sheffield.    Eng. 
Goodell-Pratt   Co.,    Greenfield     Mass. 
L.    S.    Starrett   Co.,    Athol,    Mass 

Tools,  Small  _  •  v 

J.    H.    Williams   A   Co.,    Brooklyn,   N.Y. 

"rTinzinger,    Brace   A   Co.,   Niagara   Falls,    Ont 

J.    H.    Butcher  A   Co.,    Birmingham,    Eng. 

Transfer  Deealcomania  

Canada    Deealcomania    Co.,    Ltd..    Toronto 

Traps,  Brass,  Iron,  Lead 

Canada    Metal    Co..    Toronto. 

TThe*'  Ni*™™      Falls     Metal     Stamping     Works. 
oK'communi^Ltd..  Niagara  Falls.  Ont 

Troughs 

Beatty     Bros.,     Fergus,    Ont. 

*3KK?  RttU*    Level   Co.,    New   Britain.    Conn 

Trowels  _ 

H     Disston   A   Sons,   Toronto.  

Bridgeport   Hdwe.    Mfg.    Corp.    Bndegport,    Conn. 
Ward    A    Payne,    Sheffield,    Eng. 

^h?FoM0U°ortor  Co.  of  Canada.   Ltd..   Ford.  Out. 

^a^'F^n^&'Forgings,  Ltd.,  Brockville,  Ont. 
Kribs    Ltd.,    Wm.    A.,    Hespeler,    Ont. 

Try  Squares  _       _ 

H     Disston    A   Sons   Co.,   Toronto, 
"t'anlw    Rule   *    Level   Co.,    New    Britain.    Conn. 

T^?i aKtore   Co..    Cleveland,   Ohio. 

TK.e&RSbbCarnadian  Tires,   Ltd..  Toronto,    Ont 

^T?  W  Wectric   Co.,    Ltd.,  Winnipeg.    Man. 

^V™!d*ATPa*e,    Sheffield.    ft* 

T%    rane   A    Sons   lc    Ltd..   Newmarket.    Ont 


January  3,   1920 


HARDWARE    AND    METAL 


97 


Tubs,  Batter   (Covered) 
E.   B.   Eddy  Co.,   Ltd.,  Hull,  Que. 

Tab  Stands,  Folding 
Otterville    Mfg.    Co.,    Otterville.    Ont 

Tube,   Robber 

K.    &   S.    Canadian   Tire   and    Rubber   Co.,   Ltd., 
Toronto,    Ont 

Tumbler  Holders 
Kinzinger,   Bruce   &   Co.,   Niagara   Fells,   Ont 

Tubing.  Brass 
B.    &    S.    H.    Thompson    &   Co.,    Ltd.,    Montreal, 
Que. 

Tubing,  Flexible 
E.    U.    Gooderham,    Toronto. 

Tubing;,  Bobber 

Duniop  Tire  &  Rubber  Goods  Co.,  Ltd.,  Toronto. 
K.    &   S.    Canadian  Tire   and   Rubber   Co.,    Ltd., 
Toronto,    Ont. 

Tubing,   Steel 
Standard   Tube   &   Fence   Co.,    Woodstock. 

Turpentine 

Ontario  Oil  &  Turpentine  Co.,  Ltd.,  Toronto,  Ont. 
Stewart    &    Wood,    Toronto. 

Twines 

Consumers'    Cordage    Co.,    Montreal. 
Doon    Twines,    Ltd.,    Kitchener,    Ont. 
Scythes    &    Co.,    Ltd.,    Toronto. 
Walter   Woods   &   Co.,   Hamilton. 

Vacuum  Cleaners  and  Sweepers 

Bisseli     Carpet    Sweeper    Co.,    of    Canada,     Ltd. 
Niagara   Falls,    N.Y. 

The   Huney   Machine   Co.,   Ltd.,   Toronto. 

McDonald    &    Will6on,    Ltd.,    Toronto. 

Munderloh    &    Co.,    Ltd.,    Montreal,    Que. 

Northern   Electric   Co.,    Ltd.,    Montreal,    Que. 
Valve,  Air 

The  Penberthy  Injector  Co.,  Ltd.,  Windsor,  Ont 
Valve*,    Brass 

The  Penberthy  Injector  Co.,  Ltd.,   Windsor,   Ont 

United    Brassfoundere   Ltd.,   'Manchester,    Eng. 
Valves,  Foot 

The  Hamilton  Motor  Works.  Ltd.,  Hamilton,  Ont 

Valves,  Standard,  Globe,  Ancle  and  Cheek 

Jenkins    Bros.,    Montreal,    Que. 

The  Pemberthy   Injector  Co.,   Ltd.,   Windsor,   Out 

Jas.    Morrison    Brass    Mfg.     Co.,    Toronto 
Valves,  Radiator  and  Air,  Iron  Body, 
Composition,   Globe,  Ancle,  Check 

Can.   Foundries  &  Forcings,  Ltd.,  Brockville,  Ont 

Jenkins    Bros.,    Ltd.    Montreal,    Que. 

Duniop  Tire  &  Rubber  Goods  Co.,  Ltd.,  Toronto. 

Jas.    Morrison    Brass   Mfg.    Co.,    Toronto. 

United    Bras3founders    Ltd.,     Manchester,     Eng. 
Varnishes,  Auto,  Coach,  House,  Marine 

Berry      Brothers,      YValkerville. 

Boston   Varnish   Co.,   Everett  Station,    Boston. 

Brandram-Heuderson,    Ltd.,    Montreal. 

British  America  Paint  Co.,  Ltd.,  Viotoria,  B.C. 

Canada   Paint   Co.,    Ltd.,   Montreal. 

Dongall   Varnish  Co..  Ltd.,  Montreal. 

Glidden   Co.,   Ltd.,   Toronto,   Ont 

Wm.     Harland    &    Sons,    Toronto,    Ont 

Imperial    Varnish  &  Color  Co.,   Ltd.,   Toronto. 

International    Varnish    Co.,    Ltd.,    Montreal. 

McArthur   Irwin,    Montreal. 

Martin-Senour   Co.,    Ltd.,    Montreal 

Benjamin   Moore  &   Co.,   Ltd.,   Toronto. 

A.    Ramsay    &    Son,    Montreal. 

R.   C.    Jamieson   &    Co.,    Montreal. 

Pratt    &   Lambert,    Bridgeburg,    Ont 

Sanderson    Pearcy    &    Co.,    Toronto. 

Sherwin-Williams    Co.,    Montreal. 

O.    F.    Stephens   &   Co.,   Ltd.,    Winnipeg. 

Standard    Paint   &    Varnish    Co.,    Ltd.,    Windsor. 

Stewart  *   Wood,   Toronto. 

The    Ottawa    Paint    Works,    Limited,    Ottawa. 

W.    Walker    &    Son,    Ltd.,    Toronto. 

Wilkinson   Sc    Kompass,    Hamilton, 

Vehicles,   Children 

The  Canadian  K.  K.  Co.,  Ltd.,  Elora,  Ont 
Veneer  Seats 

Canadian    Veneering    Co.,    Acton    Vale,    Que. 

Vises 

Can.  Foundries  &  Forgings,  Ltd.,  Brockville,  Ont 

Caverhill,    Learmont   &    Co.,   Montreal. 

Qoodell-Pratt    Co.,    Greenfield,    Mass. 

Lewis   Bros.,    Ltd.,    Montreal. 

National    Machinery   &   Supply   Co.,   Hamilton. 

North   Bros.    Mfg.    Co.,    Philadelphia,    Pa. 

Plewes,    Ltd.,    Winnipeg,    Man. 

The   Rock   Island   Mfg.    Co.,    Rock   Island,    111. 

The  Rapid  Tool  and  Machine  Co.,  Ltd.,   Montreal. 

Stanley   Rule  &   Level   Co.,    New   Britain,    Conn. 

Stover   Mfg.    &    Engine    Co.,    Freeport,    HI. 

Vises,  Chain  Pipe,  Clamp,   Mount 
Williams  &  Co.,  J.  H.   Brooklyn,  N.T. 

Vulcan  izera 

Adamson    Mfg.    Co.,    Hamilton. 
Northern    Electric    Co.,    Montreal. 
The  Presto  Patch   Co.,   Toronto,   Ont 
C.    A.    Shaler   Co.,    Waupun.    Wis. 

Wagons 

Woodstock    Wagon    Co.,    Woodstock,    Ont 

Wagon,  Coasters 

Canadian   Buffalo   Sled   Co.,    Ltd.,    Preston,    Ont 


THE    BUYERS'    GUIDE 

Wagon  Hardware 

Buigess-Norton  Mfg.   Co.,   Geneva,  HL 
Gregg   Mfg.    Co.,    Ltd.,    Winnipeg,   Man. 
The   Steel   Co.   of  Canada,    Ltd.,   Hamilton,   Ont 
Wagon  Woodwork 

WesVWoods,    Ltd.,    Winnipeg,    Man, 

WaUboaxd 

Bishopric   Wall   'Board    Co.,    Ltd.,    Ottawa,   Ont. 

Wall  Finish 

British   America   Paint  Co.,   Ltd.,   Victoria,    B.C. 
Walnut    Seats 

Canadian     Veneering    Co.,    Acton    Vale,    Que. 
Manitoba  Steel  &  Iron  Co.,  Ltd.,  Winnipeg,  Man. 
The  Staney  Works,   New   Britain,   Conn. 

Warmers,  Foot 

Chicago   Flexible   Shaft    Co.,    Chicago,    HL 
Washers 
The   Steel   Co.   of   Canada,   Ltd.,   Hamilton,    Ont 
Otterville   Mfg.    Co.,    Otterville,    Ont 
The   Union   Iron  &   Metal   Co.,    Ltd.,   Toronto. 
Wilkinson   &    Kompass.    Hamilton. 

Washers,  Robber 

Duniop  Tire  &  Rubber  Goods  Co.,  Ltd.,  Toronto. 
Washing;  Machines,  Electric,  Hand  and  Power 

Beany    Bros.,    Fergus,    Ont. 

J.    H.    Connor   &  Son,   Ltd.,    Ottawa. 

Dowswell,   Lees   &   Co.,   Hamilton. 

The   Gurney   Foundry   Co.,   Ltd.,    Toronto. 

Great   West   Electric   Co.,    Ltd.,    Winnipeg,    Man. 

The  Hurley  Machine   Co.,   Ltd.,   Toronto. 

Kribs   Ltd.,    Wm.    A.,    Hespeler,   Ont 

A.    R.    Lundy,   Toronto. 

Maytag    Co.,    Ltd.,    Winnipeg,    Man. 

Merchants'    Hardware    Specialties,    Ltd.,    Calgary, 

Alfa. 
'McDonald    &    Willson,    Ltd.,    Toronto. 
Nineteen  Hundred  Washer  Co.,   Toronto,   Ont. 

Waste,  Cotton 

Aome    Waste   Mfg.    Co.,    Toronto. 

Scythes    &    Co.,    Ltd.,    Toronto. 

The    Canadian    Asbestos    Co.,    Montreal,    Que. 

Wilkinson    &     Kompas3,     Hamilton. 
Wash  Boards 

Wm.   Cane  &  Sons  Co.,   Ltd.,   Newmarket,   Ont 

E.    B.    Eddy   Co.,    Ltd.,   Hull,    Que. 
Wash  Tabs 

E.    B.    Eddy  Co.,   Ltd.,   Hull,    Que 

Wm.   Cane  &  Sons  Co.,   Ltd.,   Newmarket,  Ont. 
Waterproof  Clothing 

The   Tower   Canadian    Ltd.,    Toronto,    Ont. 
Weaners,  Calf  and  Cow 

Imperial    Bit   &   Snap   Co.,    Racine,    Wis. 
Weather  Stripping 

Best    Weatiheistrip   Co.,    Ltd.,    Hamilton,    Ont 

Coleman    Fare   Box   Co.,   Ltd.,    Toronto. 

Duniop  Tire  &  Rubber  Goods  Co.,  Ltd,,  Toronto. 

Wedges 

Can.   Foundries  <&  Forgdngs,  Ltd.,  Brockville,  Ont. 
Whitman  &  Barnes  Mfg.  Co.,  St  Catharines,  Ont. 

Whitewash  Outfits 

Collins    Mfg.    Co.,    Toronto. 

Waterproof  Goods 

J.    J.    Turner   &   Sons,    Ltd.,    Peterboro,    Ont 
Weeders,  Garden  (hand) 

J.   E.   Gilson   Co.,    Port  Washington,   Wis. 
C.   S.   Norcross  &  Sons.    Bushnell,   Ul. 

Weights 

Can.  Foundries  &  Forgings,  Ltd.,  Brockville,  Ont 
Wentworth    Mfg.    Co.,    Ltd.,    Hamilton,    Ont 

Wheels,  Well 

Can.  Foundries  &  Forgings,  Ltd.,  Brockville,  Ont 
Vhlstles 
The   Penberthy  Injector  Co.,   Ltd.,   Windsor,   Ont. 

Wholesale  Hardware 

J.    H.    Ashdown    Hardware   Co.,    Ltd.,    Winnipeg. 

Caverhill,    Learmont    &    Co.,    Montreal. 

Frothingham    &    Workman,    Montreal, 

Hobbs   Hardware  Co.,   Ltd.,   London,  Ont 

H.  8.   Howland  Sons  &  Co.,   Toronto. 

Lewis   Bros.,    Ltd.,    Montreal. 

Rice    Lewis    &    Sons,    Ltd.,    Toronto. 

White's    Ltd.,    Collingwood,    Ont 

White  Lead 

Brandiam-Henderson,     Montreal. 
Canada    Paint    Co.,    Ltd.,    Montreal. 
Carter   White   Lead   Co.,    Montreal. 
The  Dominion  Metal  Co.,  Ltd.,  Sherbrooke,  Que. 
Steel    Co.   of   Canada   Ltd.,   Hamilton. 
MoArthur    Irwin.    Montreal. 
Stewart  &   Wood.   Toronto. 
Wind  Shield  Glass 

Hobbs  Mfg.   Co.,   Montreal,  Que. 

Window  Guards,  Wire 

Canada   Wire  &  Iron  Goods  Co.,   Hamilton,   Ont. 
C.    H     Johnson   &   Sons,    Montreal,    Que. 

Wipers 

Pcjthes   &   Co.,   Toronto,   Ont 

Wire 

Canadian   Tube   &   Iron   Co.,    Ltd.,    Montreal. 
Canada  Wire  &  Iron,  Goods  Co.,  Hamilton,  Ont. 
Caverhill,    Learmont    &    Co.,    Montreal. 
Dominion   Iron  &   Steel   Co.,   Ltd.,   Sydney,   N.S. 
The  Frost  Steel  &  Wire  Co.,  Ltd.,  Hamilton,  Ont. 
B.    Greening    Wire    Cloth    Co.,    Ltd.,    Hamilton 
Laddlay   Bale-Tie  Co.,    Ltd.,    Hamilton. 
Kasement  Skrene   Dore   Co.,   Toronto. 
Lewis   Bros.,    Ltd.,    Montreal. 


Northern    Electric   Co.,    Montreal. 
Northern   Bolt  Screw  &    Wire  Co.,   Owen   Sound. 
The  Steel   Co.  of  Canada,   Ltd.,   Hamilton,   Ont 
Western    Wire   &   Nail    Co.,    London. 

Wire,  Annealed 

Domiuion  lion  &  Steel  Co.,  Ltd.,  Sydney,  N.S. 
The  Frost  Steel  &  Wire  Co.,  Ltd.,  Hamilton,  Ont 
The    Graham    Nail    Works,    Toronto. 

Wire,   Bright 
The  Frost  Steel  &  Wire  Co.,  Ltd.,  Hamilton,  Ont. 
The    Graham    Nail    Works,    Toronto. 

Wire  Baskets.  Heavy 

C.    H.    Johnson   &   Sons,   Montreal,    Que. 

Wire  Cloth 

Canada   Wire  &  Iron  Goods  Co.,  Hamilton,  Ont 
B.   Greening  Wire  Cloth  Co.,  Ltd.,  Hamilton. 
Kasement  Skrene  Dore   Co.,   Toronto. 

Wire,  Coppered 

The    Graham    Nail    Works,    Toronto. 

Wire  Cotters 

Bridgeport   Hardware    Co.,    Bridgeport,    Conn. 
Northern  Electric  Co.,  Montreal,  Que. 

Wire,  Hay 

Dominion  Iron  &  Steel  Co.,  Ltd.,  Sydney,  N.S. 
The  Frost  Steel  &  Wire  Co.,  Ltd.,  Hamilton,  Ont 
The    Graham    Nail    Works,    Toronto. 

Wire  Hoops 

Laidlaw    Bale-Tie    Co.,    Ltd.,    Hamilton. 
Steel   Co.   of   Canada,    Ltd.,   Hamilton. 

Wire,  Oiled  and  Annealed 

Dominion  Iron  &  Steel  Co.,  Ltd.,  Sydney,  N.S. 
The    Graham    Nail    Works,    Toronto. 

Wire  Mats 

B.  Greening  Wire  Cloth  Co..  Ltd.,  Hamilton. 

Wire  Rods 

1       Steel  Co.  of  Canada,   Ltd.,  The,   Hamilton,  Ont. 

Wire,  Tinned 

The    Graham    Nail    Works,    Toronto. 

Wireworks  of  all  kinds 

Dennis  Wire  &  Iron  Works  Co.,  Ltd.,  London, 
Ont 

C.  H.    Johnson   &   Sons,   Montreal,    Que. 

Wire  Wheels 

Duniop  Tire  &  Rubber  Goods  Co.,  Ltd.,  Toronto. 

Wire  Window  Guards 

C.    H.    Johnson   &   Sons,   Montreal,    Que. 

Wrapping-    Paper 

E.    B.    Eddy   Co.,    Ltd.,   Hull,   Que. 
Alex    MoArthur   &    Co.,    Montreal,    Que. 
Walter    Woods    &    Co.,    Hamilton. 

Wrenches  and  Accessories 

Baioalo  Mtg.   Co.,   Buffalo,  N.T. 

Bemis    &    Call   Hardware   and   Tool   Co.,    Spring 

fiield,,    Mass. 
Can.  Foundries  &  Forgings,  Ltd.,  Brockville,  Ont 
Caverhill,   Learmont  &   Co.,  Montreal. 
E.    Edelmann  &  Co.,   Chicago,   111. 
Goodell-Pratt     Co.,     Greenfiield,     Mass. 
International    Malleable    Iron    Co.,    Ltd.,    Guelph, 

Ont. 
Keystone    Mfg.     Co.,    Buffalo,    N.Y. 
Will.     B.     Lane,    Chicago,    111. 
Lewis   Bros,    Ltd.,    Montreal. 
Merchants'    Hardware    Specialties,    Ltd.,    Calgary. 

Alta. 
Smith    &    Hemenway    Co.,    Inc.,    Irvington,    N.J. 
The    Star   Mfg.    Co.,    Carpentersrille,    111. 
Trimont   Mfg.    Co.,    Roxbury,    Mass. 
Whitman  &  Bames  Mfg.  Cr>..  St  Catharines,  Ont 
Williams  &  Wilson,   Ltd.,  Montreal,  Que. 

Wrought  Nipples 

J.   H.    Williams  &  Co.,  Brooklyn,  N.T. 

The  Union   Iron  &   Metal  Co.,  Ltd.,  Toronto. 

Wrought  Washers 

Plewes,     Ltd.,     Winnipeg,     Man. 

J.  H.  Williams  &  Co.,  Brooklyn,  N.T. 

Wringers,  Hand  and  Power 

Spieknan     Agencies,    Montreal 

Wrought   Couplings 

Canadian   Tube   &    Iron   Co.,    Ltd.,   Montreal. 

Wrenches,  Alligator 

Bridgeport    Hardware    Co.,    Bridgeport,    Conn. 

Wrenches,   Ratchet 

L.    S.    Starret   Co.,    Athol.   Mass. 

J.  H.   Wiiliam3  &  Co.,   Brooklyn,  N.Y. 

Yoke  Ends 

J.   H.   Williams  &  Co.,  Brooklyn.  N.Y. 

Zinc,  Bar 

Canada    Metal    Co.,    Ltd.,    Toronto. 
Beatty    Bros.,    Fergus,    Ont 

Vancouver,     B.C. 
The     Great     West     Smelting     &     Refining     Co. 
The  Hoyt  Metal  Co.,  Toronto. 
Whitman  &  Bames  Mfg.  Co..  St  Catharines,  Ont. 

Zinc,  Sheet 

B.  &  S.  H.  Thompson  tc  Co.,  Ltd.,  Montreal,  O 


Subscription  price  of  HARDWARE  AND  METAL  is  $3 
per  year  or  less  than  six  cents  per 


issue. 


98 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


January   3,   1920 


OUR 

OUR 

f   fiiaM!           ' 

COLORED 

►Wlr©G«l     i 

WHITE 

GRADES 

>  m®     \ 

GRADES 

IB,  1A,  7,  1,  5, 

We  can  supply  you 
than  any   others  fc 
your'needs  to-day. 

Jap,  XC,  X,XX,  XXX 

/aste  at  prices  lower 
y.     Better  write  us 

with    cotton  v 
>r  equal    qualit 

ACME  WASTE  MFG. 

CO.,  LIMITED 

492  WELLINGTON  ST.  W 

.,  TORONTO 

ELEY  BROTH  ERS,  LTD. 

Specialize   in   the   manufacture   of  the   following   articles 
at  the  lowest  prices: 

SHAVING   STICK   CASES 

OVAL   AND    ROUND    TOPS 

for  Powder  Tins,  Cruets,  Dredgers,  etc. 

METAL    BOXES 

Round,   Rectangular  and   Oval,  with   hinged   on   push    on 

lids,  for  Dentifrice,   Soap  Tablets,  etc. 

FERRULES 
for    Walking    Sticks,    Shaving    Brushes,    Whips,    Bamboo 
Fittings,  etc. 
PENCIL  FITTINGS 
in  any  of  the  following  metals:  Brass,  Copper,  or  White- 
Metal  (nickel  or  silver  plated),  Aluminium  and  Jewellers' 
Metal    (Tombac). 
Eley  Bros-,  Ltd.   (Dept.  21),  Edmonton,  London,  N. 


FENCES 

We  are  now  in  a  position  to 
quote  you  on  fencing,  lawn 
posts,  and  ornamental  railings, 
for  immediate  or  spring  de- 
livery. 
It's  a  pleasure  to  quote  prices. 

EXCELSIOR  WIRE  CO.,  Limited 

22  Victoria  Sq.,  Montreal 


Wilkinson  &Kompass 

TORONTO     HAMILTON     WINNIPEG 

IRON  and  STEEL 

HEAVY  HARDWARE 

.MILL    SUPPLIES 

AUTOMOBILE    ACCESSORIES 


WE     SHIP     PROMPTLY 


CRANE  MALLEABLE  FITTINGS 


CRANE 

LIMITED 

HEAD  OFFICE  X  WORKS 
1280  ST  PATRICK  ST 

MONTREAL 
BRANCHES:       Vancouver,      Calgary,      Winnipeg.      Toronto. 


Chair  Seats— In  Three  Ply  Veneer 
Staple    Patterns 


Every  C.V.C.  chair  seat  is  made 
of  best  material,  well  glued, 
nicely  formed  and  carefully 
bored;  corners  of  seats  well 
rounded,  edges  smoothed,  sand- 
papered and  finished  with  real 
church    pew    varnish. 


Ask  for  samples,  and  compare  with  any  other  make. 

Canadian  Veneering  Co.,  Inc. 

Acton  Vale,  Quebec 

Distributors:   Richardson  &  Bureau,  55  St.  Francois- 
Xavier  St.,  Montreal. 


Imperial  Lawn  Edge  Trimmer 


THEY  BUY  IT  AS  SOON  AS  SEEN 

Easy  working;  leaves  «  clean,  straight  edge.  Dur- 
able, profitable,  rightly  priced.  Most  jobbers  will 
supply  you. 

Imperial  Bit  and  Snap  Co.,  Racine,  Wis. 


NOTICE  TO   THE  TRAD  J 

FOR  6  MOS. 


MAY 
AUG. 


JUNE     JULY 
SEPT.    OCT. 


You  can  make  quick  sales 
and    big    profits    selling    the 

"COMFORT"  IRON 

Seasonnble.  Enables  women 
to  take  liheir  ironing  any- 
where. Two-pointed,  self- 
heating,  self-cleaning.  Oper- 
etes  easily  at  low  cost.  Saves 
time,  labor,  money.  Guaran- 
teed. Get  samples  and  see 
them  sell. 

Big  Demand,  Good  Profit 
We  aid  you  with  sales  helps. 
Yout  jobber  will  supply  vou. 
Made  by  Ask     for    the    "COMFORT." 

NATIONAL    STAMPING    &    ELECTRIC   WORKS 

CHICAGO,  U.S.A. 


January  3,  1920 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


99 


We  Carry  a  Complete  Stock  of 
Thomas   Goldsworthy  &  Sons 

"GENUINE"  Naxos  Emery 

All  numbers  from  No.  8  to  140,  alio  FF, 
and  F,  Flour  Emery,  English  Blue  Twill 
Emery  Cloth,  and  English  White  Back 
Emery  Cloth.     All  numbers. 


Prices  on  Application. 


Immediate  Shipment. 


JAMES  HUTTON  &  CO. 

706  Shaughnessy  Building     -     MONTREAL 


OAKEY'S 

"WELLINGTON" 
KNIFE  POLISH 

The  original  and  only  reliable  prepara- 
tion for  Cleaning  and  Polishing  Cut- 
lery,  etc. 

John  Oakey  &  Sons,  Ltd. 

Manufacturers  of 

Emery,    Black    Lead,    Emery    Glass    and 

Flint  Cloths  and  Papers,  etc. 

Wellington   Mills,   London,  S.E.I .,   Eng. 
Agents: 

F.     Manley,    33C    Empress     Offices, 

354    Main    Street,    Winnipeg. 

Sankey    &    Manson,    839    Beatty    Street, 

Vancouver. 


Our  Step-Ladder  Chairs  are  Winners 


Also       Step-ladders, 
Ironing     Boards, 
Ournain      Stretchers, 
Hercules     Win 
Stretchers,         Rever- 
sible      Drip       Tub- 
stands,  Ototb.ee- 
bars.     Eureka 
Post    Hole    Dig- 
gers,     Malleable 
Iran      Tank      or 
S2o     Lugs     said 
Well    Pointa 

Prompt  atten- 
tion giren  your 
enquiries. 


Otterville  Mfg.  Co.,  Limited 


OTTERVILLE,  ONT. 


Wood   Cold   Air  Faces 


and  Stronger 
ron  ones. 


Neat  and  Sanitary. 


Made  with  oblong  mesh. 


Write  for  new  price  list  and 
order  some   samples. 


A.  H.  Power  Furnace  Co.,  1-3  Hayden  St.,  Toronto 


GERMANTOWN 

LAMPBLACK 


THE  L.  MARTIN  CO. 

HEADQUARTERS     FOR 

LAMPBLACK 

IN     ENGLAND     AND    AMERICA 

Originators  of  Eagle,  Old  Standard,  Globe  and 
Pyramid     Germantown     Brands. 
Suppliers   of   Bulk    Blacks  to  the   highest   elaaa 
Grinding     Trade. 

THE     L,     MARTIN     CO. 

Montreal.       Toronto,       Winnipee.       New   York, 

Philadelphia,    London,    Eng. 


For  sale  by 
Leading 
Wholesale 
Houses. 


Corporate  Mark 


Granted  1780, 


Jonathan  Crookes   &    Son 

Sheffield,    England 

SUPREME  CUTLERY 


The  Real  Ankle  Support  That 

Makes  Others  Look  Like  Imitations 

Sell  Perfection  Ankle  Supports — the  only 
sure  and  comfortable  ankle  support  on  the 
market. 

Made  from  the  best  quality  of  steel,  and  is 
so  devised  that  by  means  of  a  hinge  and 
sliding  attachment  the  ankles  may  bend  for- 
ward or  backward,  but  simply  can  not  bend 
sideways. 

You'll  sell  more  skates  this  winter  as  well 
as  supports  if  you  handle  this  line. 

Write  us  for  prices. 

Owen  Sound  Steel  Press  Works,    -     Owen  Sound,  Ont. 


No.  1  Fire  Pot. 
List  price,  $27.20. 
■  Ask    for    discount. 


Supreme  in 
Heat  Efficiency 

50%    less  consumption   of 
fuel. 

A  popular  T-pint  fire  pot,  exception- 
ally well  made  and  giving  efficient 
service    in     any     weather.  No.     1 

heats  the  heaviest  irons  ;  the  flame 
being  directed  on  the  heel  of  the 
iron.  A  swivelled  burner  is  a  great 
selling  feature;  heats  two  12-lb 
irons  and  melts  a  kettle  of  metal 
simultaneously.  The  C.  &  L.  pro- 
ducts are  business  getters.  Jobbers 
supply   at  factory   price. 


Clayton  &  Lambert  Mfg.  Co. 

Detroit,  Mich.,  U.S.A. 


100 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


January  3,   1920 


ESTABLISHED    1849 

BRADSTREET'S 

OfflcM    Throughout    the    Civilized    World 
OFFICES    IN    CANADA: 


Calgary.   Alta. 
Edmonton,  Alta. 
Halifax,   N.S. 
London,    Ont. 
Ottawa,  Ont. 
St.  John,   N.B. 
Victoria.    B.C. 
Reputation      grained 


vigorous. 


conscientious 
work. 


Vancouver,    B.C. 
Hamilton,  Ont. 
Montreal,   Que. 
Quebec,  Que 
Toronto,   Out. 
Winnipeg:,   Man. 
Sydney.    N.S. 
by     long- 


years     of 
and      successful 


Thomas  C.  Irving  ,SES£*cS3£ 


TORONTO 


GET  , 
YOTJR 
COPY 
NOW 


We  offer  free  „<> 
any  Retail  Hard- 
ware or  Imple- 
ment Dealer  a 
little  booklet 
illustrated  in 
this  ad. 
Its  pages  show 
many  interesting 
features  about  power 
houses  for  farms;  the 
latest — the  most  modern — the  most 
economical  methods  of  installing 
Line  Shaft  Outfits  with  Speed  Governing  Pul- 
leys are  fully  covered  in  this  booklet. 

At  this  time  we  are  offering  a  similar  book- 
let free  to  farmers  through  farm  papers  of 
more  than  4.000,000  circulation.  The  inquir- 
ies are  pouring  in  in  large  numbers. 

>Do  you  want  to   get  the  benefit  of  this  ad- 
vertising campaign?      If  go,  write  for  the   free 
booklet  and  special  information. 
CEDAR  RAPIDS  FOUNDRY  A  MACHINE  CO. 
Dept.  Cedar  Rapids,   Iowa 


Convenient,  Efficient 

Price  Card*  for  Hardware- 
man.    Stationer,    Druggist 
or  any  retailer. 
The  "ONLY"  Price  Card 
Both  sides   ruled.     Special 
stock,  can  be  erased  many 
times     Write  for  priesa. 
WEAVER-BEACH    CO.. 
Central  Bid*.,  Rochester ,N.T. 


Order  Your 

FROSUKING 
WEATHER  STRIP 

NOW 

Ask  Your  Jobber 


SHEET  METAL  STAMPINGS  and 

AUTOMATIC  SCREW  MACHINE 

PRODUCTS 

We  will  be  pleated  to  give  you  our    estimate   on  you 
next  order. 

CAR  ON   BROTHERS 

Caron  Bldg.,  233-239  Bleury  St.,  Montreal 


F.  E.  LIN  DSTROM 

SWEDEN 

PLYERS 

Agents:  F.  W.  LAMPLOUGH  &  CO. 

46  St.  Alexander  St.,  Montreal 


There's  a  good  amount  of  business  in  your  town  in  Babbitt 
Metals  that  you  could  capture  by  stocking  Owl  Babbitt 
Owl  Traction  Babbitt  for  Tractors  \'-t 

Owl  Babbitt  Metal  for  Thrashers 


Made  by  The  Owl  M«tal  Co..  Ltd..  Winnipeg) 


BAB;B,ljTgT> 

M.ETAl!s 


Nail  Bin  Counters,  Screw  Cases — all  kinds 
of  Store  Fittings. 


rrwnrrr    

^rr\rrrrff\    cameron  &  Campbell 

. —  Toronto.   Canada 


notch.   I'riLo  rii»hr. 


We  hove  in   stock-SUPERIOR  QUALITY 

LOCK  WASHERS 

A.L.A.M.  and  U.S.S.  Cop  Screws 

Set  Screws,  and  Plain,  Semi-Fin.  and 

Castellated  Hex.     Nuts,  etc. 

Send  your  inquiries  to 
H.  PAULIN  &  CO.     -     TORONTO,  ONT. 


Look   for  the  full   name 

RUSSELL  JENNINGS 

stamped  on  the  round  of  our 

AUGER   BITS 

The  original  double  twist  auge  r  bit, 
patented  by  Mr.   Russell  Jennings  in  18S5. 

RUSSELL  JENNINGS  MFG.  CO. 

Chester,  Conn.,  U.S.A. 


The   INFALLIBLE    GLAZIER'S    DIAMOND 

Just  the  Tool  for  Inexperienced  Glass  Cutters 


MADE  BY 

A.   SHAW    &   SON,   London,   England. 

Hale'  Brothers,  Canadian  Agents,  3  St.  Nicholas  St.,  MONTREAL 


CLIMAX  PAPER  BALERS 


ALL  STEEL— FIREPROOF 

"Turns  Waste 

into  Profit" 
12  SIZES 

Climax  Baler  Co. 

Hamilton,   Ont. 


SAYS  THE  MASTER  MECH- 
ANIC: The  Greb  Automatic  Grip 
Puller  is  a  One-Man  Puller  — 
Quick -acting,  strong  and  simple  in 
the  extreme.  May  be  locked  in 
any  desired  position.  A  combina- 
_.  tion  of  two  or  three  arms.     Heary 

J/  IIS  m  Duty  Sire  capacity  1"  to  18"— 
■b  ^LYVv  ™  Junior  size  capacity  1"  to  T.  Two 
W#     M  sets   of   Jaws   furnished   with   each 

v  m  size. 

TEN  DAYS"  TRIAL.— If  your 
dealer  or  jobber  does  not  hare 
them  we  will  send  you  one.  Try 
it  ten  days.  If  not  satisfactory, 
return  to  us  and  we  will  refund  your  money.  We  also 
make   the   GBEB    RIM   TOOL. 

THE  GREB  CO.,  318  State  St.,  BOSTON 


THE  PROGRESSIVE  MANUFACTURING  CO. 

Toning****,  Oman*.  U.S.A. 


FORSTNER    BITS 

bore  their  way  right  through  toufch,  hard,  knotty,  cross-trained  wood  and  tears 
a  smooth  hole  and  clean  surface.  That's  performance.  THEY  DIFFER 
FROM  ALL  OTHER  BITS,  BEING  GUIDED  BY  THE  RIM  INSTEAD 
OF  THE  OENTER.  That's  scientific  construction.  They  bore  any  arc  of 
a  circle  and  can  be  guided  in  any  direction.  That's  adaptability. 
Made  for  Brace-made  Machines.  Packed  singly;  packed  in  sets.  That's 
convenience.  And  they  sell  to  Wood  Workers,  Carpenters,  Cabinet  Makers  and 
others.     That's  why  you  should  sell  them.     Order  through  your  jobber  to-day. 


January  3,  1920 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


101 


iaaiCT 


Any  trademark  shown  on  this  page,  when  stamped  on 
an  article  of  hardware,  is  the  manufacturer  s  personal 
O.K.,"  guaranteeing  the  quality  of  the  product. 

lllll'K 


METAL  STAMPINGS 

Droa>  a    eard  for  prices  and    particular*' 

HAMILTON  STAMP  &  STEHCII  WORKS.  LTD. 
HAMILTON.  ONT. 


Decalcomania  Transfer 

NAME  PLATES     ' 
Made  in  Canada  by 

Canada    Decalcomania    Co.,  Limited 

364-370  Richmond    St.   W..  Toronto.  Can. 


Swedish    Steel    Forging    Co. 

SWEDEN 

RAZORS 

Agents:   F.  W.  LAMPLOUGH  &  CO. 

46  St.  Alexander  St.,  Montreal 


Stores- 
■\    for    Halls 
•\     r      Homes 
b»  Farms 

I  v™r  ml    if,??/, 

'    \    STYLES.       *  Building 

SIX  TIMESTHE  LIGHT  •  OME  THIRD  THE  COST 

MAWOFACTURERS  -^->  ^~\T.rlC0UV£R 

R-MAIoor-e.  6  C0-LTD.ViU  6C- 


,S^  ohsovwt  i    iHsioe 

f?<?  A\tW\TO    (L~\       ar>i~.         ( 

/jmk  y<5AWi  L.L  ounioE  Li 

~  iii ill  "*       m^-  licht5  sal 

WiWvWS     '^    ST  VIES.      i 


FOR  ALL  PURPOSES 

INCOLDorCOLORS —  w 

[  SUITABLE  FOR  ANY  SMOOTH  SURFACE 


J.H.BUTCHER&C?  BIRMINGHAM 


Monarch"  &  "Safe-Lock"   Fencing, 

We  make  Farm,  Lawn  and  Poultry 
Fencing,  Gates,  etc.,  and  sell  exclus- 
ively to  the  Hardware  Trade.  Write 
for  Agency. 

Owen   Sound   Wire  Fence  Co.,  Ltd. 

OWEN  SOUND,  ONT 


^  LAMPBLACKS 


4  Gcrm/tfo*/}  of  y</d//ty 
//>df  gets  b/g  £///s//7css 


.k^*^*-^-^8*    WILCKIS  MARTIN  WIICKESCO 


Handle  Specialists 

Our  handles  are  made  out  of  the  best  grade 
Second  Growth  air-seasoned  timber  for 
Pick,  Axe,  Sledge  and  Hammer.  Quality, 
Shape  and  Finish  unexcelled.  They  look 
Well,  Sell  Well  and  Last  Well. 

St.  Marys  Wood  Specialty  Co.,  Ltd. 

St.  Marys,  Ont.,  Canada 


STOVE  MICA 

All  sizes  of  Clear  Mica  in  stock  for 

immediate  shipment 

Price  List  on  Application 

Mica  Company  of  Canada,  Limited 
P.O.  Box  156,  Hull,  Que. 


Springs  and  Axles 

We  manufacture  the  celebrated 
"Anchor  Brand"  Carnage  and 
Wagon  Springs  and  Axles. 

Automobile,  Trolley,  Railway  and   Heavy  Coil  Springs. 
The  Guelph  Spring  &  Axle  Company,  Limited 

GUELPH,   ONTARIO 


SMALL  TURN  BUCKLES 


Send  for  Catalog  No.  4 

GEORGE   H.  WILKINS  CO. 

180  No.  Market  St.  Chicago 


We  make  Canvas  Covered  and    All  Wood    Canoea 
Skiffs.  Motor  Boat*  and  Toboggans 

The  Peterborough  Canoe  Co.,  Limited 

Peterborough,  Canada 


Postpi 

MYERS     WONDERFUL     SPEEDY     HAND 
STITCHER 
Repair   shop    in    Itself,    mends   harness,    shoes,    auto 
tops,  belts,  etc. 

Send  for  wholesale  price  and  catalog. 

C.    A.    MYERS    COMPANY, 

63T4    Woodlawn    Ave.. Chicago,    111,    U.S. A. 


STERLING 

Hack  Saw  Blades  and   Machines 

Manufactured  by 

Diamond  Saw  &  Stamping  Works 

BUFFALO,  N.Y. 


BATH  ROOM  FITTINGS 


~  KINZINGER,  BRUC& 

sKa   &  co.,  limited 


'NIAGARA\        NIAGARA  FALLS,"  CANADA 

WHAT  W£UAtX  WE  CUARANTSS ':>-'' 


AUTO  ACCESSORIES 


D00N  TWINES,  LIMITED 

KITCHENER,  ONT< 

Manufacturers  of  all  kinds  of  Twines  and 
Cordage,  Plow  Lines,  Clothes  Lines,  Ropes, 
etc.      Write    for    samples    and    prices. 

MILLS  AT  D00N,  and  KITCHENER,  ONT. 
I 


DOMEKO  BABBITTS 

The  Hardware  Dealer's  Friend,  a  brand  to 
meet  every  need,   and  every  competitor. 
Prices   and    catalogue   on    request. 

THE  DOMINION  METAL  CO.,  Limited 

N.  B.  PRITCHARD 

Sherbrooke,  Que. 


To  The  Trade 

Reed  &  Coomlbs   (successors  to  Copp  Stove  Co.) 
Empire  Ave.,  Fort  William,  Ont. 

Having  taken  over  all  the  patterns  of  the  Copp 
Stove  Co.  we  are  making  all  repairs  for  the 
stoves  made  by  the  Copp  Co.  Orders  for  tihe 
same  will  be  filled  promptly.  General  Foundry 
Jobbing  and  Nickle-plating. 


CROWLEY'S 


^  Registered  V 


RAINPROOF 
GOLOR 


for  use  on  Cotton  or  Mat  Board 

C.  R.  Crowley 


Manufactured 
by 


667  St.  Catherine  W. 
MONTREAL 


If    you 

want     to    get     better 

sodering    results    with    less    time 

and    labor,    use      Allen      Non-Acid 

Sudering    Flux. 

It  soders   any   metal  to   any   metal 
easily,    quickly  and   smoofihly. 
Order   it   from   your  supply  house. 
Write    for    free    samples. 
Bissett  &  Webb,  Ltd.,  126  Lombard  St..    Winnipeg,  Canada 


London  Address: 
Finsbury  Pavement  House 

Dinghy  Brothers  Export  Limited 
Lindsay  Bldg.,  Montreal 

W.  T.  Evans,  Can.  Manager 
Your  Enquiries  Promptly  Ansioatd 


102 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


January   3,   1920 


HARDWARE  &  METAL'S  unique  circulation  as  proven  by 
the  A. B.C.  audit  is  due  to  31  years     f  honest  effort  to  give  the 

retail  trade  the  best  possible  service. 


CROWBARS 


HUD* 


No.  102-A-CHISEL  POINT 

B.  J.  COGHLIN  CO.,  LIMITED,  Office  and  Factory 


We  offer  you  bars  of  High  Carbon  Steel  at  the  same  price  as  you  are  buying  the 
Mild  Steel  Bar  elsewhere.     Write  for  price  list  and  catalogue. 


Ontario  Street  East,  MONTREAL. 


The 
Shingle  Stain 


Made  by 
Major  &  Co. 
Hull,  Eng. 


Prices  on  application 

StnJ  For  A/aib'   Ttrtru 
Distributor,  : 

STURGEONS  LIMITED 

TORONTO 


We  extend  to  our  friends  and  cus- 
tomers the  Season's  Greetings,  ex- 
pressing the  wish  that  they  may 
be  cheerful  without  regret  for  the 
past,  with  contentment  in  the  pres- 
ent, and  with  strong  hope  for  the 
future. 

J.  J.  Turner  &  Sons.  Ltd. 

PETERBOROUGH,  ONT. 


No.    90 

Kerosene  Torch 

List    price,    $17.60. 

Ask  for  discount. 


Strong  Selling    Features 

An  Improved 

Burner  with 

Needle 

The  No.  90  is  designed  for  practical 
use  and  is  popular  with  the  trade. 
Uses  kerosene  as  fuel  and  produces 
a  steady  blue  flame  of  intense  heat. 
The  burner  is  made  of  special  gen- 
erator metal  fitted  with  the  needle. 
Tank  of  heavy  gauge  seamless 
drawn  brass,  reinforced  and  fitted 
with  automatic  brass  pump  which 
keeps  up  required  air  pressure. 
Jobbers  supply  at  factory  price. 

Clayton  &   Lambert  Mfg.  Co. 

Detroit,  Mich.,  U.S.A. 


Give  them 

PHENIX  QUALITY 

in  Storm  Sash  and  Screen 

Hangers  and  Fasteners 

Showyourcustomers  the  line  of  Storm 
Window  and  Screen  hardware  that 
saves  trouble  and  mishaps.  Phenix 
Hangers  and  Fasteners 
are  simplest,  handiest, 
easiest  applied,  most 
efficient  —  that's  why 
they  sell  best.  New 
improvements  put 
them  in  a  class  of  their  own.     Samples  Free. 

Phenix  Mfg.  Co.  MiiwaX'c,  wfs. 


.pm-    ■»»'HIMJA   I 


MYERS 

"HONOR-BILT" 

Hand   and  Power 
PUMPS 


We  have  built 
thing  more  than  ordin- 
ary goodness  into  every 
Myers  "Honor-Bilt" 
Hand  or  Power  Pump. 
We  have  endowed  them 
all  wvbh  sound  pump 
knowledge  put  to  prac- 
tical use  through  many 
Individual  features  which 
make  their  installation 
easier,  reduce  pumping 
Labor  and  insure  de- 
pendable service. 
The  aggressive  dealer 
handles  the  MTER8  — 
Ask  your  jobber  or 
write    us. 


F.  E.  MYERS  &  BRO. 

No.  65  Orange  St.  ASHLAND,  OHIO 


NOVA   SCOTIA  STEEL 

&    COAL    CO.,    Limited 

NEW  GLASGOW,  N.S. 

Manufacturer*  of 

FERRONA 
PIG  IRON 

and  SIEMENS-MARTIN 

OPEN  HEARTH  STEEL 


HAR  DWARE 
AND     M  ETA  L 

is  now  the  only  weekly  hardware 
paper  in  Canada,  and  is  read  hy 
practically  every  worth-while 
buyer,  both  wholesale  and  retail 
in  Canada.  HARDWARE  AND 
METAL  is  the  logical  medium 
to  use  if  you  have  a  message 
for  the  Canadian  hardware 
trade. 


January  3,  1920 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


103 


WANT  ADS 


IF  you  want  a  buyer,  clerk,  salesman,  traveller,  posi- 
tion, you  can  reach  the  best  men  in  the  trade  through 
these  columns. 
If  you  wish  to  buy  or  sell  a  business,  or  dispose  of 
overstocks,  you  can  reach  a  larger  number  of  hard- 
ware men  through  this  page  than  in  any  other  way. 


Rates  (payable  in  advance)  2  cents  per  word  first 
insertion,  1  cent  per  word  for  subsequent  insertion.  An 
additional  charge  of  5  cents  for  each  insertion  is  made 
when  Box  Number  is  required-  Each  figure  counts  as 
one  word.  When  panels  are  desired  a  charge  of  $1.50 
is  made  for  a  panel  1  inch  deep  by  2%   inches  wide. 


Address  all  advertisements  for  this  section  to  HARDWARE  AND  METAL,  143-153  University  Ave.,  Toronto,  Can.        m 

!lllllllllll!l!lllllllllil!lll!lllllllll!l 


HELP  WANTED 


A      SIDE    LINE    OF    FINE    QUALITY    HEAVY 
gloves    open     for    a    live    hardware    specialty 
salesman.      Apply   Box   654,   Hardware  and   Metal. 
143  University  Ave.,  Toronto. 

RANTED  --  MALE  STENOGRAPHER  WHO 
has  had  hardware  experience,  duties  to  assist 
in  correspondence,  keep  aD  price  books  and  assist 
as  secretary  to  a  general  manager  of  a  Northern 
Ontario  company.  Apply  in  own  handwriting,  stat- 
ing age,  past  experience  and  salary  required,  to 
Box    636,    Hardware   and   Metal. 


UfANTED  —  A  BUILDERS'  HARDWARE 
salesman  to  call  on  architects  and  contractors 
in  Toronto.  Must  be  able  to  interpret  plans  and 
specifications.  Must  be  a  high-class  man  and  be 
well  recommended.  Box  641,  Hardware  and 
Metal. 


V\fANTED  —  FOR  EARLY  ENGAGEMENT 
thoroughly  experienced  hardware  man,  must 
be  energetic,  good  appearance  and  possess  execu- 
tive ability.  State  age,  experience,  married  or 
single,  and  salary.  George  Taylor  Hardware 
Limited,   Cobalt   Branch. 


SITUATIONS  WANTED 

pXPERIENCED  HARDWARE  MAN  OPEN  FOR 

immediate   engagement;   wholesale     or     retail. 

First   class    references.      Box    625,    Hardware   and 

Metal. 

FOR  SALE 

T70R  SALE— HARDWARE  BUSINESS  IN  ONE 
of  the  best  towns  in  Alberta  ;  this  is  a  splendid 
opportunity  to  buy  a  first-class  hardware  business 
well  established  and  showing  a  nice  profit : 
owner's  health  poor  reason  for  selling.  Box  659. 
Hardware  and  Metal,  143  University  Ave..  To- 
ronto. 

WANTED 

VXT  ANTED   —   HARDWARE       STOCK      ABOUT 
$10,000   in   Ontario   town,    not  less   than    5,000 
population.      Box   650,   Hardware   and   Metal. 

HAVE  YOU  RECEIVED  HARDWARE 

AND  METAL  STOCK  ELECTRO 

CATALOG   YET? 


The  subscribers  to  HARD- 
WARE AND  METAL  include 
the  largest  buyers  of  hardware 
in  Canada,  The  circulation  of 
our  paper  is  national,  and  covers 
Canada  from  coast  to  coast. 


Extra  Copies 
for  Store 
Salesmen 

Several  of  the 
largest  and  most 
successful  hard- 
w  a  r  e  firms  i  n 
Canada  subscribe 
for  extra  copies  of 
HARDWARE 
AND  METAL 
for  their  retail 
salesmen.  This 
plan  has  proven  a 
profitable  invest- 
ment for  them. 
Write  us  for  de- 
tails of  how  the 
plan  has  worked 
out    in    practice. 


i 


104 


HARDWARE  AND  MEW  AIj— Advertising  Section 

INDEX  TO  ADVERTISERS 


January  3,   1920 


Aome   Waste   Mfg.    Co.,   Ltd 98 

Alien  &  Co.,  Ltd.,  L.   B 1M1 

.American    Pad    &    Textile    Co    18 

Ashdown  Hardware   Co.   J.    H 85 

8 

Barnett   Co.,    G.    &   H 75 

Beatty    Bros.,    Ltd 73 

Berry    Bros 95 

Blssett    &    Webb,    Ltd 101 

Bradstreet's    MO 

Bridgeport  Hardware  (Mfg.    Corp.    ..    27 

Brett     Co.,     The     81 

British  Aluminium  Co 27 

Brown,    Boggs    Co.     8 

Burgess-Norton   Mfg.    Co 67 

Burrowes  Mfg.    Co 21 

Butcher  &   Co.,   J.   H 101 

Butterfield    &    Co.     * 

o 

Cameron    &    Campbell    100 

Canada  Cycle  &  Motor  Co 71 

Canada  Decaleomania  Co.,  Ltd Ml 

Canada   Metal    Co.,   Ltd 71 

Canada    Steel    Co.,    The    3 

Can.   Foundries  &  Forgings  Co.,  Ltd    17 

Canadian  -K.    K.    Co 21 

Canadian  Tube  &   Iron   Co 75 

Canadian   Veneering   Co 96 

Canadian  Yale  &  Towne   Co 20 

Carborundum    Back   Cover 

Caron     Bros.     100 

CarsweK    &    Co.,    Morris    75 

Oedar  Rapids  Foundry  &  Mche.   Co.  100 

Clayton    &    Lambert    99-102 

Climax   Baler   Co WO 

Coghlin    Co.,   Ltd.,    B.    J 102 

Oollette    Mfg.    Co 20 

John   Cowan   Chemical   Co 18 

Crane   Limited    98 

Orescent    Co.,    The    20 

Crookes  &  Son.  Jonathan  99 

Crowley,    C.    R 101 

D 

Davidson   Mfg.    Co.,   Ltd.,   Thos.    ...    IB 

Diamond   Saw  &  Stamping  Wks 101 

Dominion    Cartridge    Co 31 

Dominion  Metal   Co.,   Limited    101 

Dominion   Sheet   Metal    Corp 77 

Doon    Twines,    Ltd 101 

Darken     Bros.,     Ltd IB 


E 


Eley     Bros.,     Ltd 98 

Evans,    <W.    T 101 

Excelsior   Wire   Co.,    Ltd 96 

Evans    &    Co 27 

F 

Frost  King   Weather  Strip   Co MO 

G 

Gendron     Mfg.     Co 16 

Glidden  Co.,  The  63 

Graham  Nail  Works   93 

Greb   Co.,    The    100 

Greenfield   Tap  &   Die  Corp 

Inside    Front    Corel 

Guarantee   Sheet  Metal   Co.'  83 

Guelph   Spring   &   Axle   Co 101 

Gutta  Percha   &   Rubber   Co 13 

H 

Hamilton    Cotton    Co 27 

Hamilton    Stamp    &    Stencil    Works. 

Ltd 101 

Hamilton  Stove  &  Heater  Co 6 

Howland,  Sons  &  Co.,  H  IS 1 

Huther  Bros. ,  Saw  Mfg.  Co 11 

Hutton  &  Co. ,   James   99 

I 

Imperial  Bit  &  Snap  Co 98 

J 

Jacobs  Mfg.    Co.,   The    11 

James  &  Co.,  W.   R 84 

Jardine   &   Co.,   A.    B 16 

Jennings   Mfg.   Co.,    Russell    100 

Johnson  &  Sons,  C.  H 10 

K 

Kinzinger,    Bruce  &   Co.,   Ltd 301 

Korn  Razor  Mfg.   Co.,  Geo.  V 16 

L 

Laidlaw   Bale   &   Tie   Co    1£ 

Lamplough,    F.    W 100-101 

Landers,    Frary   &   Clark    2 

Leslie  &  Co..  Ltd.,    A.   C 32 

London    Rolling    Mills    Co 75 

Lufkin  Rule  Co.   of  Canada.  Ltd.    ..  104 
Lundy,    A.    R 22 


M 


Manitoba   Steel    &    Iron    Corp 83 

Martin    Co.,     The    L 99 

Mayhew   Steel  Products  Co 22 

MoArthur   &    Co.,    Alex 93 

R.     MeDougall    Co 22 

Meakins    &     Sons     32 

Megantie     Broom     Co. 22 

Merchant        Hardware        Specialties, 

Ltd 84 

Mica   Co.,   of  Canada,   Ltd 101 

Moncmeff   &    Endress    84 

Moore    &    Co.,    R.    M 101 

Moore   &   Co. ,    Ltd. ,   Benjamin    61 

Morrison    Brass    Co.,    James    16 

Mossberg,   Co. ,    Frank   23 

Myers   &    Bro.,    F.    E 102 

Myers    Co.,     C.     A 101 

N 

Nagle  &  Co.,  H 27 

Narracott   &    Tynan    84 

National      Enameling     &     Stamping 

Co m 

National  Stamping  &  Electric  Wks..  98 

Nineteen   Hundred  Washer   Co 15 

Nicholson    File    Co J..  23 

North  Bros.     Mfg.    Co IE 

Northern    Bolt,    Screw   &    Wire    Co.. 

Ltd 29 

Northern    Electric    Co 5 

Nova    Scotia   Steel   Co Me 

o 

Oakey  &  Sons,  John   99 

O-Rib-0   Mfg.    Co 84 

Ottawa    Paint   Works,    Ltd 52-5S 

Ofcterville   Mfg.    Co ..    99 

'Owen    Sound    Steel    Press    Wm*    ...    99 

'Owen   Sound  Wire  Feno.    i  '<> 101 

Owl   Metal    Co.,    Ltd 100 

P 

H.     Paulin    &    Co 100 

Parmenter.    Bulloch    &    Co 27 

Peterborough   Canoe   Co Ifll 

Phenix  Mfg.  Co 102 

Pink   &   Co.,    Thos 29 

Plymouth    Cordage   Co.    9 

Power  Furnace   Co.,   A.   H 99 

Prairie   City   Oil    Co 79 

Pressure  Proof  Piston  Ring  Co 29 

Progressive    Mfg.    Co.     100 


B 

Ramsay  &  Son,   A.   Front  Cover 

Reed    &   Co.,    Geo.    W 26 

Reed    &    Coombs    M 

Renaud  Motor   Supply  Co 21 

Rock   Island  Mfg.    Co 26 


St   Mary's  Wood  Specialty   Co. 

Samuels,    J 

Savage    Arms    Mfg.    Co 

Scythes    &    Co.     

A.   Shaw  &  Son   

Shurly  Co.,  T.   F 

Simims   &   Co.,   T.    S. 


19 

65 

1D0 

25 

73 

Simonds,  Canada  Saw  Co.,   Montreal    28 

Slater   &   Barnard   Co 79 

Stephens    Co.,    G.    F 81 

Still    Mfg.    Co.,    J.    H 26 

Starrett  Co  ,L.  S Inside  back  cover 

Steel    Co.    of    Canada,    Ltd 9 

Stevens-Hepner    Co 25 

Stover  Mfg.   &   Engine  Co 25 

Sturgeon's     Limited     I*2 


Tallman  Brass  &  Metal  Co 

Taylor-Forbes    Co. ,    Ltd 

Toronto  Plate  Glass  Importing  Co. 

Trimont    Mfg.    Co 

Samuel   Trees   &   Co 

Turner    &   Sons,    J.    J.     . 


24 
.  12 
79 
29 
10 
102 


» 


Union   Iron    &  Metal   Co 24 

United  S'-'tes  Sand   Paper  Co 24 

United  Brass  Founders  &  Engineers, 

ivtd 14 


VoliPeek    Mfg.    Co. 


w 


100 


Weaver   Beach   Co. 

Wells  Bros.,  Co.  of  Canada 

Inside  front   cover 

Western    Wire    &    Nail    Co 100 

Wilckes-MartinAVilckes    Co 101 

Wilder  Pike  Thermometer  Co 28 

Wilkins  Co..   Geo.   H 101 

Wilkinson    &    Kompass    98 

Williams  &   Co.,   J.    H 14 

Wilt      Twist   Drill   Co.,   of  Oar 

Ltd 7 

Woods    &    Co..    Walter  ' 28 

Wrought  Washer  Co 28 


I 


UnCiM         RELIABLE 
**milT  BOXWOOD  RULES 

Will  meet  your  customers'  every 
requirement  well. 

Made  from  Genuine  Boxwood,  thoroughly  seasoned,  sections  secure- 
ly assembled.  Graduated  by  methods  that  insure  Accuracy;  Well 
Finished  and  Closely  Inspected. 


A  STRICTLY  HIGH-GRADE  LINE,  EMBRACING  SEVERAL  EXCLUSIVE  NEW 
PATTERNS  THAT  HAVE  MADE  FRIENDS  EVERYWHERE,  SUCH  AS  COM- 
MON RULE  NO.  651 B. 

ASK  FOR  CATALOGUE 

7HE/!/FKINftULEJ?0.  OF@ANADA*£n>. 
W/NDSOKONT. 


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SATURDAY     SINCE    1888 


Vol.  XXXII 
No.  2 





THE  MACLEAN   PUBLISHING   COMPANY,    LIMITED  »;  JANUARY   10 

PUBLICATION  OFFICE  :    TORONTO,  CANADA^  1920 

; 


The  Business  of  Getting  Results 

It's  a  keen  issue  on  both  sides  of  the  counter  in  the  ammunition 
business.  The  dealer  wants  a  fire-arm  and  ammunition  line  that 
makes  friends  for  him  amongst  his  customers.  Remington  U.M.C. 
is  that  line — moreover,  it's  big  and  complete.       


The  shooter  wants  results — in  the  field — and  he 
kicks  when  he  doesn't  get  them.  The  firmest 
friends  Remington  U.M.C.  has  are  amongst  old 
sportsmen  who  make  a  business  of  getting 
results. 

ALL   JOBBERS*  STOCK  [REMINGTON]  U.M.C. 


^SPORTSMEN'S^ 

1EADC 


i  REMINGTON W 
I     UMC    M 


FIREA 
|AMML 


Hlk 


FIREARMS  & 
AMMUNITlONj 


Remington  U.M.C.  of  Canada,  Limited,  Windsor,  Ont. 


HARDWARE    AND    METAL 


; ;'    '  % 


PRODUCTS  WORTHY  OF  YOUR  CONFIDENCE 

This  Tells  You  Why 


A  SPLENDID  turn-over, 
with  satisfactory  profit, 
is  possible  to  every 
dealer  who  stocks  O-Cedar 
Products.  A  still  better  turn- 
over —  with  correspondingly 
greater  profits — may  be  en- 
sured by  recommending 
O-Cedar  to  the  housewife  and 
the  motorist. 

Those  dealers  who  are 
careful  to  recommend  only 
"Quality  Products"  are  asked 
to  test  O-Cedar  Polish  for 
their  own  satisfaction  before 
they  recommend  it  to  their 
customers. 

First  examine  the  polish — 
let  the  bottle  stand  as  long 
as    you    please  —  you'll    note 


there  is  no  sediment.  This 
means  that  it  is  not  necessary 
to  "shake  the  bottle"  in  order 
to  mix  it — which  means  that 
the  polish  cannot  harm  the 
surface  through  forgetfulness 
of  the  user. 

Now  put  O-Cedar  to  the 
acid  test — pour  a  drop  on  a 
varnished  surface  and  let  it 
stand  over  night.  This  test 
proves  that  O-Cedar,  with 
continued  application,  cannot 
damage  a  painted,  varnished 
or  lacquered  surface.  The 
reason  is  that  it  contains  no 
vinegar,  acid,  alcohol  or  other 
injurious  substance. 

Neither  has  it  any  gum  or 
grease.  You  can  prove  this 
by  cleaning  a  window  or  mir- 
ror with  it. 


Nor  does  it  contain  any 
"quick  dryer."  That  is  why 
water  is  used  in  conjunction 
with  O-Cedar — also  to  form 
the  soft  soapy  lather  which 
cleans  the  surface,  leaving 
just  enough  O-Cedar  to  re- 
vive the  varnish  and  bring 
out  the  grain-beauty  of  the 
wood. 

O-Cedar  Polish  Mops,  O- 
Cedar  Dusting  Mops,  and  O- 
Cedar  Dusters  are  treated 
with  O-Cedar  Polish — that  is 
why  they  give  such  great 
satisfaction  to  all  who  use 
them. 

Prove  the  worthiness  of 
these  articles — as  suggested 
above — then  tell  your  cus- 
tomers the  result  of  your  in- 
vestigation. 


Sdar 

Polish 


CHANNELL    CHEMICAL    CO.,    LIMITED,   TORONTO,    CANADA 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL,  January  10,  1920.  Volume  XXXII.,  No.  2.  Published  every  Saturday  at  Toronto.  Yearly  subscription  price,  $3.00.  Entered 
as  second-class  matter  July  1st,  1912,  at  the  Post  Office  at  Buffalo,  under  Act  of  March  3rd,  1879.  Entered  as  second-class  matter  at  the  Po:t  Office 
Department,   Ottawa. 


January    10,    1920 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


Poor  transportation  facilities 
make  winder  driving  necessary 

— and  driving  comforts  big  sellers 

There   is   more  winter  driving  to-day  than  there        ^  d^  BM  ^^T 

has  e1  er  been  in  the  history  of  motoring'.    This  I  ~£^^  fr^^  I  ^^^W. 

is  not  caused  alone  by  the  growing  popularity        r^^f^*w*^*r  itr»Z^I  C  ¥> 
of  the  automobile,  but  is  the  result  of  neces-        FCJCJT     1nri^K/ft^  t  li 

sity   owing  to  the  very  poor  transportation 
facilities  prevailing  throughout  the  country. 
Winter    motoring    demands    driving    com- 
forts   such    as    Taplex     Foot     Warmers. 
These    are    neat,    convenient,    smokeless 
fuel    stoves    which    may    be    used    in 
safety  with 


TAPLEX 
FUEL 


The  comfort  of  winter  driving  not  only  depends  on 
being  warm,  but  it  depends  on  the  knowledge  that 
your  car  will  withstand  the  rigid  temperature — that  the 
radiator  will  not  freeze  and.  that  your  car  will  stop 
when  the  brakes  are  applied. 

We  carry  a  stock  of 

Johnson's  Freeze  Proof 

— the  preparation  which  positively  prevents 
freezing  of  the  radiator  and  which  DOES  not 
evaporate  as  alcohol  mixtures  do. 

How  is  your  stock  of 

Weed  and  Rid-0-Skid 
Tire  Chains 

These  are  all-year-round  necessities, 
popular  alike  for  city  and  country 
driving.  We  carry  a  complete  stock 
of  sizes. 

Place  your  order  for  spring  auto- 
necessities — Johnson's  Carbon  Re- 
mover, Johnson's  Stop  Squeak  Oil, 
Johnson's  Prepared  Wax,  Johnson's 
Black-Lak,  Johnson's  Auto-Lak,  John- 
son's   Radiator    Cement. 

Ask  the  "Rice  Lewis" 
man,  or  write  direct  for 
immediate  needs. 

RICE  LEWIS  &  SON 

LIMITED 

Victoria  Street,  Toronto 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— A dvertmng  Section 


January  10,  1920 


UNIVERSAL 

ELECTRIC  HEATING  PAD 


The     Trade    Mark  known       ^ 


UNIVERSAL 


i  n.      Ev  er>\j    'Home 


FOR 

THE  PATIENT 

AT  HOME 

FOR 
SEVERE 
ILLNESS 


Universal 

Electric  Heating   Pad 

No.  9940 


In  the  Race  for  Business  Don't  Get  Left 

at  the  Post 

Somebody  in  your  territory  is  going  to  sell  many  UNIVERSAL  Heating  Pads  during 
the  next  few  months.  Will  you  be  that  Somebody?  There  is  more  sickness  in  winter 
than  at  any  other  time.  There  is  greater  need  of  UNIVERSAL  Heating  Pads.  Every 
home  needs  one — every  hospital  and  public  institution  needs  many.  Don't  let  a  com- 
petitor who  handles  an  inferior  line  breeze  by  you  and  get  the  orders.  Sell  UNIVERSAL 
Pads  and  you'll  set  a  pace  in  the  business  race  that  he  cannot  follow. 

Canadian  Representative : 

A.  MACFARLANE  &  CO.,  LTD.,  Montreal,  Quebec 

LANDERS,  FRARY  &  CLARK 


New  Britain 


Connecticut 


January   10,    1920 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


D/SSTON  TOOLS 


III1!      I   I'll  I    li   4  11  I  1   I  !        li|lt*tri.'*I>»LpW  tf.,U.8-A,l| 


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WELL  MADE       SERVICE  GIVING 
That  Last  for  GENERA  TIONS 


Quality  can  be  determined  only  by 
practical   use. 

Satisfactory  use  over  a  long  period 
of  time  causes  an  ever-increasing 
demand. 

Continued  demand  conclusively 
demonstrates  real  worth  and  re- 
liability. 


HEADQUARTERS 

LEWIS  BROS.,  LIMITED 

MONTREAL 


T 
O 
O 

L 
S 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


January  10,  1920 


Wringers  for  Stationary  Tubs 

Are  Rapidly  Increasing  in  Demand 


Fitted  with  reversible  drip  board,  the 
water  may  be  shed  either  way,  so  that 
clothes  are  wrung  into  either  tub  without 
changing  the  position  of  the  wringer. 

4  ARROW 
The  "MELROSE"  carries  the  ^  BRAND 

and  is  our  best  grade.     It  has  11-in.  rolls 

guaranteed   for  5  years   in   family   use, 

covered  cogs  and  ball  bearings. 

With  reasonable  care  it  will  last  much 
longer  than  the  period  of  warranty. 


DOWSWELL,  LEES  &  CO.,  LIMITED 

HAMILTON,  CANADA 


Makers  of  every  type  of  Hand  or  Power  Washing  Machines 
of  merit.     Also  ARROW  BRAND  Clothes  Wringers 


Western  Representative: 

HARRY  F.  MOULDEN  &  SON 

WINNIPEG,  MAN. 


Eastern  Representative: 

JOHN  R.  ANDERSON 

MONTREAL,  QUE. 


January    10,   1920 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL—  Advertising  Section 


< 


■  ■ .-. 


&  Message  to  Hardwaremen 


FROST  STEEL  and  WIRE  CO. 


LIMITED 

Hamilton,  Ont. 

Mr.  Hardwareman : — 

The  spring  fence  drive  will  soon  be  on. 
Are  you  in  shape  to  meet  it  and  make  the 
most  of  it?  FROST  FENCE  and  other 
products  show  a  steady  percentage  of 
increase  in  sales  each  year.  Are  you  pre- 
pared to  share  in  this  strong  and  substan- 
tial business  that  is  assured?  Mention 
fence  when  a  customer  comes  into  your 
store  to  buy  something  else.  Make  defi- 
nite arrangements  to  take  care  of  his 
spring  fence  requirements  while  you  are 
talking  with  him.  If  you  neglect  to  do 
this  you  may  be  annoyed  later  on  to  learn 
that  he  has  bought  elsewhere.  Be  100% 
alive  to  all  of  this  fence  business.  Write 
us  if  you  want  the  co-operation  of  one  of 
our  salesmen.  Sell  FROST  FENCE  and 
make  this  your  banner  fence  year. 


Yours  very  truly, 

Frost  Steel  and  Wire  Co.,  Limited 


tmana 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


January  10,  1920 


Sell  Your  Customers 

A  "Souvenir"  Range  or 

A  New  Idea  Furnace 


SOUVENIR  Ranges  and  New  Idea  Furnaces 
have  stood  the  test  of  75  years.  They  have 
every  modern  improvement  and  they  carry  a 
guarantee. 

By  giving  satisfaction  to  the  customer,  they 
bring  increased  trade  to  the  dealer. 

You  can  honestly  claim  superiority  for  the 
Souvenir  Range  and  New  Idea  Furnaces.  Their 
quality  merits  it  and  the  manufacturers  stand 
behind  the  dealer  in  making  his  claim  good.  It 
will  pay  you  to  push  their  sale.  By  advertising 
we  create  a  demand  for  them. 

The  Souvenir  Range  with  its  attractive  appear- 
ance and  modern  appliances  and  perfect  cook- 
ing and  baking  qualities  please  the  housekeeper. 

The  patented  duplex  grates,  the  fire-pot,  one 
piece  with  deep  flanges,  the  deep  ash  pit  and 
other  improvements,  make  the  New  Idea  Fur- 
nace a  perfect  heating  unit,  economical  in  the 
consumption  of  fuel,  easy  to  manage  and  fully 
guaranteed. 

Build  up  a  profitable  stove  and  furnace  business 
by  handling  our  lines. 

Let  us  prove  our  statements  by  sending  you 
prices  and  catalogue,  or  by  sending  one  of  our 
travellers  to  call  on  you. 


THE 

HAMILTON     STOVE     & 

HEATER     CO.,     LIMITED 

SUCCESSORS    TO 

GURNEY, 

TILDEN 

&  CO., 

Limited, 

HAMILTON, 

ONT. 

VANCOUVER. 

WINNIPEG. 

MONTREAL. 

'SEVENTY-FBVE    YEARS  OF    SUCCESSFUL   HANUFAGTUBBNG " 

Western  Representatives: 
Mr.  F.  C.  Moore,  143 '  •_.  Higgins  Ave.,  Winnipeg 
Mr.  W.  G.  Chester,   Hamilton  St.,  Vancouver 


January    10,    1920 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


W/rere  there's 
a      W/LT  — 
Mere's  the  Way 


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WILT 

High  Speed  and  Carbon  Twist  Drills 
^Reamers  and  Milling  Cutters 

The  name  of  WILT  stands  for  the  best 
in  cutting  tools. 

To  the  mechanic  it's  the  welcome  sign  of 
great  efficiency  and  unusual  service — to  the 

dealer,  it's  the  substance  of  merchandising 
profits  and  customers'  good-will. 

Not  only  do  we  endeavor  to  maintain  the 
highest  possible  standard  both  in  material 
and  workmanship,  but  we  educate  the  user 
up  to  the  point  of  getting  the  best  out  of 
our  Drills,  Reamers  and  Milling  Cutters, 
and  demonstrate  to  the  Retailer  the  certain 
profits  for  him. 

It's  a  service  you  can't  afford  to  ignore. 
Wilt  Twist  Drill  Co.,  of  Canada,  Limited 

WALKERVILLE,  Ont. 
London  Office,!; Wilt jTwist  Drill  Agency 

MoorSate].Hall,  Finsbury£Pavement     London  E.C.  2.    England 


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HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


January  10,  1920 


JStanlrb  1%n)t 


s 


Bailey  Iron  Planes 


The  Standard  For  More  Than  Fifty  Years 

No  matter  what  other  makes  of  Planes  a  Hardware 
Dealer  ordinarily  carries,  his  stock  should  include  a 
full  line  of  BAILEY  PLANES. 

Their  great  reputation  among  all  users  of  wood- 
working tools  and  the  exceptional  quality  of  the 
material  and  labor  that  enters  into  their  manufacture, 
has  created  a  demand  that  insures  quick  sales  and 
customer-satisfaction. 

Made  in  the  Canadian  Works  of  the 


Stanley  Uule  &  Level  Co 

New  Britain,  Conn.  U.S.A. 


Canadian  Representatives — A.   Macfarlane  &  Co..  Ltd.,  Montreal,  Canada. 


January   10,   1920 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— A dve rtising  Section 


gBig  Sales  This  Spring  for 

Gait 
Couch  Hammocks 

This  well-liked  line  of  exclusive  and  hand- 
some designs  sells  at  prices  your  competi- 
tors cannot  touch.  Popular  Couch  and  Plain 
Hammocks  that  create  an  atmosphere  of 
summer  luxury  wherever  they  are  dis- 
played. 

The  increase  of  150%  in  sales  last  year 
augurs  well  for  the  coming  season. 

BE  IN  ON  IT  THIS  YEAR 

Stauffer-Dobbie,  Limited 

Successors  to 

Gait  Robe  Company 
Gait,  Ontario 


10 


HARDWARE  AND  METAI^-Advertiting  Section 


January  10,  1920 


When  We  Get  Together 

NEW  ideas  gathered  from  a  wealth  of  experience  are  moulded  into  practical 
form  when  we  get  together.  Annually,  Branch  Managers,  Salesmen  and 
Home  Office  men  who  include  Factory  Managers,  Superintendents  and 
skilled  artisans,  gather  round  the  big  sales  office  table  to  give  the  acid  test  of 
results  to  old  selling  campaigns.  The  close  of  1919  saw  no  exception  to  this  rule 
and  from  the  heat  of  the  discussions  new  selling  schemes  and  dealer  co-opera- 
tive plans  have  been  condensed  into  hard  matter  of  fact  shape  for  use  during  1920. 

0 

*~pHUS,  two  recent  additions  to  McClary's  famous  line  demonstrate  the  effective 
result  of  co-ordination  between  a  highly    trained    selling    staff  and  skilled 
artisans. 

McClar/s 

Bon-accord  Range 

Mission  style,  handled  by  our  experienced  designers,  has 
brought  into  effect  a  strikingly  handsome  and  distinguish- 
ed looking  range.  The  "Bon-accord,"  however,  has  been 
constructed  with  four  clear  and  distinct  objects  in  view, 
which  provide — 

1.  A  large  reservoir. 

2.  A  big,  roomy  oven. 

3.  A  capacious  wood  firebox. 

4.  An  unusually  large  open  cooking  surface. 


Sof  co  Sunshine 
Pipeless  Furnace 

Heats  the  home  through  one  large  register.  An 
all-cast  construction  to  take  care  of  the  use  of 
soft  coal.  Thoroughly  modernized,  absorbs  the  cool 
air  from  the  room  sucking  it  down  a  cool  air  shaft 
to  be  warmed,  clarified  and  humidified  fit  for  human 
inhalation.  A  furnace  that  will  meet  special  con- 
ditions. Get  in  touch  with  our  nearest  branch  office 
for  further  particulars. 

Write  us  so  that  you  can  use  us. 


McCIary& 


London      Toronto       Montreal       Winnipeg       Vancouver 
St.John,N.B.    Hamilton    Calgary    Saskatoon    Edmonton 


January   10,   1920 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


11 


An  Extra 
Salesman 
For  You— 


Retails 


One  of  the 
Edelmann  Products 


*$$MSfiii       in  Canada 


ACTUAL    SIZE 


An  Extra  Boost  for  Your  Turnover 
Without  Additional  Selling  Cost 

This  handsomely  lithographed  display  stand  sells  the  goods  all  the  time. 
A  complete  sample  is  mounted  on  top. 

Every  owner  of  an  auto,  a  motor-cycle,  bicycle,  sewing  machine  or  other 
machinery  is  attracted  by  the  Four-in-One  Screw  Driver.  It's  a  great 
seller. 

They  can't  resist  this  clever  tool  comprising  four  handsome  screw  drivers, 
all  practical,  useful  sizes  in  one  compact  tool.  The  large  blade  is  pro- 
tected by  a  shield  so  that  is  can  be  carried  in  the  pocket. 
The  4  in  1  screw  driver  is  6  inches  long,  less  than  %  inches  thick  and 
weighs  3  ounces  complete.  All  parts  are  handsomely  polished  and  nickel- 
plated  all  over.  The  screw  driver  blades  are  made  of  best  quality  steel, 
carefully  hardened  and  ground  and  properly  tempered. 

E.  Edelmaim  &  Co. 


Chicago 


U.  S.  A. 


BreaJtnot    Hydrometer 

Jumbo    and    Gem    Grease    Guns 

3-in-l    Screw   Drivers 


Manufacturers  oj 

Sexto    Wrench    Set 
Han-d    Hammer 
Han-d    Wrench    Set 

Ask  Your  Jobber 


Perfect    Coupling    Assortment 
No.   312   Muffler  Cut   Outs. 
Leaknot    Air   Chuck,    etc. 


12 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


January  10,  1920 


What  Your  Fellow  Shoeman 
Thinks  of  Neolin  Soles 


LOUIS  CUVELIER 

No.  12  Dresden  Row 

Halifax 

Up-to-date  Shoe  Repairing 

Halifax,  N.S.,  Feb.  25th,  1919. 
Messrs.   Goodyear  Tire   &   Rubber  Co. 
of  Canada,  Limited, 
Toronto,  Ont. 

Dear   Sirs: — 

It  might  be  of  interest  to  you  to  know  a  little  of  my  experience 

in  the  use  of  Neolin  Soles. 

For  about  three  years  I  have  been  using  Neolin  Soles,  applying 

them  both  by  Goodyear  Welt  Stitcher  and  nailing.     For  some  time 

past  more  than  90%  of  the  soles  I  have  applied  have  been  Neolin. 

I  have  very  little  demand  for  leather.     My  customers  recognize 

that  Neolin  has  the  wearing  qualities,  is  waterproof,  also  flexible, 

and  they  readily  accept  Neolin  when  offered  them. 

Wingfoot  Rubber  Heels  are  the  only  rubber  heels  that  I  am  now 

using.     They  will  outwear  any  other  heel  that  I  know  of,  and  give 

the  customers   great  satisfaction.     I   remain, 

Yours  very  truly, 

LOUIS  CUVELIER. 

(Signed) 


Let  Neolin  Soles 

Build  Your  Business 


The  possibilities  of  Neolin  Soles  are  by 
no  means  limited  to  the  demand  alone. 
To  one  customer  who  demands  Neolin, 
you  have  ten  who  will  accept  Neolin 
upon  your  suggestion. 

Bigger  business  must  be  built  on  better 
satisfaction.  There  is  no  surer  means 
of  satisfying  your  trade  than  by  offering 


waterproof,       flexible,       long-wearing, 
Neolin  Soles. 

Start  now  to  make  your  shop  a  Neolin 
Repair  Shop. 

THE  GOODYEAR  TIRE  &  RUBBER 

COMPANY  OF  CANADA,  LIMITED 


TORONTO,  Ontario 


©lift 


January   10,   1920 


HARDWARE:  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


13 


UNIVERSAL 

Garage  Door  Sets 


Enormous  Sales 
of  Autos 

are  attracting  the  attention  of 
everyone.  When  you  consider 
selling  the  Universal  Garage 
Door  Set  you  will  realize  the 
effect  of  the  enormous  increase 
in  Canada's  automobiles. 

A  Garage  for 
Every  Auto 

is  essential.  Every  auto  must  be 
housed,  therefore,  in  these  days 
when  autos  cannot  be  produced 
fast  enough  to  fill  the  orders.  A 
Garage  Door  Set  like  "Univer- 
sal" is  a  swiftly  moving  line  of 
much  profit  to  the  dealer. 


Good  Packing  Saves  Time 

3 — Pair  8-inch  Extra  Heavy  Tee  Hinges. 
l_No.  1056x6-inch  Wrought  Steel  Chain 

Bolt. 
1— No.  1056x6-inch  Wrought  Steel  Foot 

Bolt. 
l_No.  1240  Wrought  Steel  Door  Latch. 
When  you  have  to  hunt  up  several  parts, 
unwrap  them,  count  the  screws,  etc.,  you 
consume  your  own  selling  time  as  well 
as  trying  your  customers'  patience. 
This  neat  style  of  packing — the  C.S.G. 
Co.'s  style — saves  your  time  and  the  cus- 
tomers', and  prevents  mistakes  in  select- 
ing parts. 

The  set  weighs  10  lbs.,  packed  6  sets  to 
a  case. 


Canada  Steel  Goods  Co.,  Limited 

Hamilton,  Canada 


14 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


January  10,  1920 


# 


You  Know  that 

— Your  Christmas  sales  were  the  best  ever. 

— To-day  your  shelves  are  empty  of  the  best  sellers. 

—You  could  have  doubled  your  sales  if  you  had  had  the  stock. 

Moral — Order  early  for  1920. 

All  indications  point  to  another  big  year  for  1920 — Be  pre- 
pared— Order  early. 

'HEIRLOOM'  PLATE 

will  give  your  customers  lasting  satisfaction — It  is  the  last 
word  in  Silverware — Made  in  Canada. 

570  King  Street  West,  TORONTO 


4 


January   10,   1920 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 

_- . 


15 





<p  a  w  a  ry  a 


FGUNDRrES&FO 


f-  [  f\H  T  E  P 


*Ny 


THE  ULTIMATE  IN  FORGING  CRAFT— DIAMOND  G  HAMMERS 

PRODUCED  AT 

JAMES  SMART  PLANT 

BROCKVILLE,  CANADA 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


January  10,  1920 


w/p  your  customers 
cut  their  cuttMeosts 


by  themselves  will  go  far  toward 
establishing  economy  in  cutting-off 
work — but  unless  they  are  used  in- 
telligently, the  purchaser  gets  but  a 
fraction  of  the  service  we  put  into 
every  Starrett  Saw.  Keep  your 
customers  supplied  with  Starrett 
Hack  Saw  Charts  "MA"  as  well  as 
with  Starrett  Blades,  and.  you're 
doing  your  part  in  helping  them  get 
lower  cutting  costs. 


The  L.  S.  Starrett  Co. 

The  World's  Greatest    Toolmakers 
Manufacturers  of  Hack  Saws  Unexcelled 

Athol,  Mass. 

New  York  London  Chicago 


42-11 


January   10,   1920 


HARDWARE  AND  'METAL— Advertising  Section 


17 


iskedl865 


nil 


'  r — 1 


IMPERIAL.        OIL. 


GASOLINE       SERVICE       STATION 


n 


Ifl-.C 


v  e  ■ 


,■' ' 


rr 


U  *9>. 


This  filling  Station  at  Winnipeg  is  a  splendid " 
example   of   real   efficiency   and  of  course  it's 
equipped  with 

Gilbert  &  Barker 

Pumps  for  Gasoline  and  Motor  Oils 

Trade  is  handled  with  accuracy  and  dispatch — 
There  is  no  lost  motion — no  delay  and  no  waste 
— a  square  deal  for  both  the  motorist  and  the 
owner. 

Get  your  share  of  this  profitable 
business.     Send  for  Bulletin  52. 

w  Imperial  Oil  Limited 

Canadian  Distributors : 
Branches  All  Cities. 

Gilbert  &  Barker  Mfg.  Company 

23  Union  Street,  Springfield,  Mass.,  U.S.A. 


18 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— A dvertvting  Section 


January  10,  1920 


An  up-to-date  National  Cash  Register  gives 
a  merchant  control  of  his  business 


TT  forces  each  clerk,  or  the  merchant 
A  himself,  to  make  a  record  of  every 
sale  he  handles.  The  record  must  be 
complete  before  change  can  be  made 
or  the  transaction  finished. 
• 

The  record  of  each  transaction  is 
brought  to  the  attention  of  the  cus- 
tomer in  two  ways:  by  the  electric- 
ally lighted  figures  at  the  top  of  the 
register  and  by  the  printed  receipt 
which  she  receives. 

The  record  is  also  printed  and  added 
automatically  at  the  time  the  trans- 
action takes  place.  These  accurate 
records  are  the  foundation  of  good 
storekeeping. 


A  merchant  must  have  such  records  to  control  his  business  and 
to  make  up  his  income  tax  report.  An  up-to-date  National  Cash 
Register  gives  them  to  him  cheaply,  accurately,  and  quickly. 

The  National  Cash  Register  Company  of  Canada,  Limited 

BRANCH   OFFICES: 


Calgary 714  Second  Street  W. 

Edmonton 5    McLeod    BIdg. 

Halifax 63  Granville  St. 

Hamilton 14  Main  Street  E. 

London 350    Dundas    Street 

Montreal 122  St.  Catherine  Street,  W. 

Ottawa 306  Bank  Street 


Quebec 133  St.  Paul  Street 

Kegina 1820  Cornwall  Street 

Saskatoon 265  Third  Avenue,  S. 

St.  John 50  St.  Germain  Street 

Toronto 40  Adelaide  Street 

Vancouver 524   Pender  Street,  W. 

Winnipeg 213  McDermot  Avenue 


FACTORY:  TORONTO,  ONTARIO 


January   10,   1920 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


19 


Quick  Selling 
Enamel  Products 

Bathroom,  Hospital  and 
Restaurant  Appliances 


B52— Double    Tumbler    Holder 


B57— Soap    Dish 


Towel  Bars  and  Grab  Rail,  %  in.  square. 

"Sno-Wite"  Fixtures 

Genuine  Vitreous  Enamel — Not  Baked  Paint,  Celluloid 
But  White  Porcelain  Enamel  on  Special  Iron. 

American  Enameled  Products  Co 

Chicago     -      Illinois 

Canadian  Representative: 
L.  C.  FELDSTEIN,  43  Scott  Street,  Toronto 

Ask   Your  Jobber 


20 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL—  Ad vertising  Sectio>t 


January  10,  1920 


SHOW  THEM  A  BETTER  WAY 


Showing  your  customers  a  better  way  to  do  their 
work  is  the  surest  way  to  their  confidence. 

Hundreds  of  dealers  throughout  the  world  have 
learned  that  to  sell  a  Jacobs  Chuck  to  a  drill  user 
never  fails  to  make  him  a  steady  customer. 

If  you  deal  in  mill  supplies  order  a  stock  of  these  reliable,  firm-gripping 
chucks  to-day.  If  you  do  not  handle  mill  supplies  this  is  an  opportunity  to  start 
a  department  that  Canadian  hardware  dealers  have  found  a  most  profitable  line. 


if 


'T'HIS  is  a  'ine  t1181  knows  no  selling 
season — they  sell  all  the  year  'round 
and  make  both  friends  and  profit  for  every 
merchant  who  stocks  them.  We  make 
Gloves  for  all  out-door  and  indoor  work — 
Gloves  that  are  widely  recognized  as  pos- 
sessing extreme  quality — Gloves  that  en- 
sure satisfaction  to  the  wearer  and  "re- 
peats"   for   the   Dealer. 

Made  by  The 

American    Pad    &   Textile 

Company 

CHATHAM,  ONTARIO 


They  Stand  the 

"Wear"  Test 

Once  Tried —Always  Worn 

IN    1920   there   will   be   a   stronger  demand   than   ever  for 
Canadian  goods.     "TAPATCO"  Gloves  are  Canadian.     No 
need  to  sell  imported  goods,  when  you  can  get  a  Canadian 
article  so  good  as  this. 

"TAPATCO"  Gloves  are  made  for  the  hardest  wear. 
Farmers — Engineers — Mechanics — Lumbermen  and  Railway- 
men,  all  appreciate  TAPATCO  Gloves. 

Order  from  your  jobber  now. 


BRANEr 
GLOVES  &  MITTS 

STYLES— Gauntlet,  Knit  Wrist  and  Band  Top. 

WEIGHTS— Heavy,  Medium  or  Light. 

MATERIALS— Leather  Tip,  Leather  Faced,  Jersey 
Gloves  and  Mitts  in  Tan,  Slate  or  Oxford. 


January    10,   1920 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


21 


Brown 

& 
Sharpe 
Tools 

Meeting  the  Demands  of 

The  Shop 


HP  HE  tools  that  have  met  the 
demands  of  the  shop  and  of  the 
machinist  for  the  last  three  generations 
are  the  tools  that  meet  the  demands  of 
the  dealer  who  desires  a  reliable  all 
year  product  offering  more  than  profit. 
The  accurate,  reliable  service  that  these 
tools  give  have  gained  for  them  a  repu- 


tation that  brings  prestige  and  goodwill 

to  the  dealer  with  every  sale. 

The  influence  that  these  well  known 
tools  carry  is  a  point  that  should  receive 
consideration  when  stocking  new  tools. 

Send  for  Catalog  27  and  learn  about 
the  1000  tools  with  a  million  u^es. 


Brown  &  Sharpe  Mfg.  Co. 

PROVIDENCE,    R.  I.,    U.  S.  A. 


22 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


January  10,  1920 


y 


EDDY'S- 

For  Prestige  and  Profit 


EDDY'S  SILENT-FIVE.  One  of  the  many  famous 
lines  of  Eddy  Matches.  Non-poisonous  and  silent 
striking.  Tell  your  customers  about  the  No-Afterglow 
feature  that  makes  this  the  safest  match  on  the  market 
to-day.    You'll  find  it  a  lively  seller. 

EDDY'S  INDURATED  FIBREWARE.  Something  new  in 
household  utensils  that  every  woman  will  appreciate.  Wash 
Tubs,  Wash  Boards,  Water  Pails,  etc.,  that  are  light,  durable 
and  cannot  leak,  dent  or  become  water-sogged. 

Eddy  consumer  publicity  is  building  big 
sales  for  Eddy  dealers.  It  will  do  the  same 
for  you.     Get  connected. 


The  E.  B.  Eddy  Co.,  Limited,     Hull,  Canada 


ATKINS 

Sterling  Quality  Cross-Cut  Saws 


The  Saw  that  brings  a  higher  price — a  bigger  profit.  Their  Service  makes 
them  worth  it. 

Sterling  quality  steel  backed  by  sixty  years'  experience  has  produced  these 
popular  Saws.  Get  quotations  and  resale  prices  immediately.  Ask  for  catalog 
"HM" 

Made  in  Canada. 

E.  C.  ATKINS  &  CO. 

Makers  of  Sterling  Saw 


Factory — Hamilt'n,  Ont. 


Vancouver  Branch— 109  Powell  St. 


January    10,   1920 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


23 


WASHKOSH  1920  plans  include  extensive 
advertising  in  magazines,  farm  papers  and 
newspapers.  We  have  made  a  large  ap- 
propriation because  analysis  of  industrial 
conditions  indicate  an  unprecedented  de- 
mand  for  washing  machines  this   year. 


The  Washer  That's 
Gentler  Than 
Human  Hands 


The  first  question  a  careful 
housewife  asks  about  a  wash- 
ing machine  is  "Will  it  harm 
the  clothes?" 

Think  how  easy  it  will  be  for 
you  to  make  sales  when  you 
can  prove  to  her  that  the 
WASHKOSH  is  easier  on 
clothes  than  the  old,  laborious 
hand  method.  It's  the  WASH- 
KOSH vacuum  principle  that 
does  this — that  means  spotless 
clothes  without  so  much  as  a 
broken  thread. 

This  is  the  biggest  talking  fea- 
ture ever  found  on  any  wash- 
ing machine.  It  is  a  point  that 
will  interest  any  woman  be- 
cause it  appeals  to  her  inborn 
sense  of  economy. 

A  Washing  Machine  with 

a  Sales  Point  Women 

Can  Actually  See 

You  don't  have  to  talk  theory  when  you're  selling  the 
WASHKOSH  to  your  women  customers.  Just  lift  the 
lid  and  show  her  the  conical  dasher  that  touches  the 
clothes  as  gently  as  human  hands  and  forces  suds  through. 
They'll  get  the  point  instantly. 

Here's  a  washing  machine  that  will  wash  fine  lace  cur- 
tains and  dainty  lingerie.  A  machine  with  convenient 
three-way  wringer,  a  noiseless  motor.  Do  you  doubt  that 
you  can  sell  this  masterpiece? 

Territory  Allotments  Now  Being  Made 
Write  for  Details 

JAMES  H.  CUMMING,  Sales  Manager 

Washkosh   Sales   Company 

State-Lake  Bldg.  -  Chicago,  U.S.A. 

JOBBERS: 

D.  H.  Howden  Co.,  Ltd.,  Toronto,  Ont.  Rice  Lewis  &  Sons  Co..  Toronto.  Ont. 

Rogers  Electric  Co.,  Ltd.,  Toronto,  Ont. 


24 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL- Advertising  Section 


January  10,  1920 


Davidson's 
Coal  Hods 


Standard  Shapes  and  Sizes 

These  quick-moving  coal  hods  are  either  japanned 
black  with  gold  bands  or  galvanized. 
The  galvanized  hods  are  made  from  black  sheets 
and  are  hot  galvanized  after  being  made  up.  This 
insures  the  greatest  strength.  A  special  feature  is 
that  the  ears  are  welded  on  electrically  instead  of 
being  riveted  in  the  old  way.     Ready  for  shipment. 

The  Thos.  Davidson  Mfg.  Co. 


Toronto 


Limited 
Montreal 


Winnipeg 


FIG.  141 

JENKINS  BROS. 

Standard  Pattern  Iron 

Body  Globe  Valve 

Screwed   with   Yoke. 


For  use  under  steam  service  there  are  no  valves 
quite  as  satisfactory  as 

JENKINS  BROS. 

Globe  and  Angle  Valves 

Fitted  with  Jenkins'  No.  119  Discs 

The  composition  of  the  disc  is  very  hard,  but  becomes  tough 
and  flexible  in  service  when  under  steam  pressure. 

It  shows  remark- 
able freedom  from 
cracking  and  flak- 
ing and  unrivalled 
durability  in  work- 
ing steam  pressures 
up  to  150  pounds. 


Write  for  Catalogue  No.  8 

JENKINS  BROS.,  Limited 

103  St.  Remi  St.  MONTREAL 

6  Great  Queen  Street,  Kingsway,  London,  W.C.  2,  E  i  jl  1 1  d 


Factory  and  H  ;a  J  O  Bee  of 
JENKINS    BROS.,  LIMITED, 
Montreal,  Canada 


January   10,   1920 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


25 


BEGIN 

1920 

RIGHT 


By  making  the  KRIBS  your  wash- 
ing machine  leader. 
These  machines  have  come  in  a  very 
short  time  to  the  very  front  rank, 
and  dealers  handling  them  are 
proud  to  show  Made-in-Canada 
washers  equal  to  the  best  produced 
anywhere. 

The  demand  for  Electric  Washers 
is  on  the  increase. 

KRIBS  Electric  is  simple,  yet  absolutely  efficient  in  operation,  does 
equally  good  work  as  the  fancy,  expensive  machines  and  sells  for  from 
one-third  to  half  their  price.  \  \ 

This  machine  has  so  many  strong  points  of  excellence  that  selling  it 
is  a  real  pleasure.  Any  dealer  who  has  not  stocked  the  KRIBS  should 
get  into  touch  with  us  at  once  and  let  us  put  him  on  the  way  to  big- 
ger and  better  washing  machine  business. 

Hundreds  of  Other  Dealers  have  Done   ft.      You  Can  Share  the  Pleasure  end  Profit. 

Send  your  name  to-day  saying  you  are  interested,  and  let  us  do  the 

rest. 

In  addition  to  the  beautiful  Electric,  we  have  an  unsurpassed  line  of 

Hand-Power,  Water-Motor  and  Gasoline-Motor  machines  to  suit  the 

convenience  and  purse  of  every  household  —  Your   Jobber   has   the 

KRIBS  machines. 

i         —BEGIN  1920  Right— 

WILLIAM  A.  KRIBS   COMPANY 

LIMITED 
HESPELER    -    ONTARIO 

MAKERS  OF  FREIGHT-HANDLING  TRUCKS  OF  ALL  KINDS. 


26 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— A  dvert ising  Section 


January  10,  1920 


n 


t-JL 


Spark  Guards  and  Fire-place  Screens. 

Special  sizes  and  shapes  made  to  order. 

Wire  Works  of  all  kinds. 

C.  H.  JOHNSON  &  SONS,  LIMITED 

WIRE  WORKS,  ST.  HENRY,  MONTREAL 


¥ 
¥ 


More 

Profitable  Lines 

for  the  Hardware  Dealer 

Our  products  earn  maximum  profits  for 

the  dealer.     A  trial  order  will  convince 

you     of     their     great     sales-producing 

qualities. 

We  manufacture — 

Iron,  Copper  and  Brass  Rivets, 

Small   Washers   and   Burrs 

Wire  Nails 

Countersunk  Clout  Nails 

Escutcheon  Pins   (Brass  and  Steel) 

Tubular  and  Bifurcated  Rivets 

Copper  and  Steel  Boat  and  Canoe 

Nails,  etc. 


IT 

it 


The  Parmenter  &  Bulloch  Co.,  Limited 

GANANOQUE,  ONTARIO 

John  R.  Anderson,  36  Dizier  St.,  Montreal.  E.  Fielding  & 
Son,  9  Front  St.  East,  Toronto.  David  Philip.  138  Portage 
Ave.  East,  Winnipeg.  W.  0.  Webster,  1396  Granville  St., 
Vancouver- 


n:H£:H:::H::HUH::&:H»EH:::":!;!!!;!;H:& 


/■JRST  AID  /N    THE,    KITCHEN  - 
IN  EVERY  HOUSEHOLD 

Vol-Peek  finds  a  place.  Mends  pots,  pans,  tinware, 
graniteware,  copper,  aluminum,  etc.  Easily  ap- 
plied, sanitary,  hardens  quickly  and  costs  only 
Vi  cent  per  mend. 

Send  a  sample  order  to-day.  A  bright  colored  dis- 
play stand  of  24  packages  for  $2.25.  Vol-Peek  sells 
on  sight  and  is  guaranteed;  60%  profit  for  the 
dealer. 

At  your  jobber  or 

H.  NAGLE  &  CO.,  Box  2024,  MONTREAL 


January    10,    1920 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


27 


Morrison 

Gauges 

comprise  a  line  that  covers  every  require- 
ment. You  always  have  the  right  goods  to 
close  a  sale  with  Morrison  Products. 

They  include  gauges  for  every  conceivable 
purpose — for  indicating,  or  indicating  and 
recording — pressure,  temperature,  altitude, 
revolutions,  etc. 

The  trade  find  them  good  sellers  and  mechani- 
cal" men  everywhere  look  upon  them  as  a 
standard. 

The  Morrison  name  helps  your  business  and  the 
salability  of  Morrison  Products  helps  your 
pocket-book.     A  full  guarantee  of  satisfaction. 

The  James  Morrison  Brass  Mfg.  Co. 

Limited 

93-97  Adelaide  St.  W.,  Toronto,  Ontario 


A  and  B  Size  Correct  Lamp  Burner 


Photo  Reproduction  Illustrating 

Flame  of  B  or  No.  2  Correct 

Lamp  Burner 


Correct  Lamp  and 
Lantern  Burners 

(Flame  Spreader  Type) 

25%  to  50%  More  Light  Than 
Any  Other  Burner 

Give  your  Wholesaler  a  sample 
order.     You  will  like  them. 

We    also    make    the    "Queen 
Mary"    and   "Dominion" 

Burners. 

The  Schultz  Manufacturing  Company 

LIMITED 

HAMILTON,  CANADA 

Give  us  your    Wholesaler's  name   and  we 
will  send  you  a  sample 


No.  2  Cold  Blast  [Correct  Lamp 
■   Burner 


Photo  Reproduction 

Illustrating  Flame  of  No.  2 

Cold  Blast  Correct 

Lantern  Burner 


•\ 


28 


HARDWARE  AND  MET  Al^— Advertising  Section 


January  10,  1920 


MONEY  MAKERS  FOR  YOU 


Quality  Hardware  made  STAPLE  by  Years  of  Satisfaction  to  the  User. 

Jobbers,  have  you  catalogued?  Retailers,  have  you  ordered? 

Premax,  Dodson,  Zenith  and  Looplever  Hame  Chains,  Wrought  Steel  Harness  Snaps 

Premax  Jockey,  Stallion,  Spreader  and  Coil  Chains,  Sports  Goods,  Key  Chains,  Traps,  Sheet  Metal 
Letters  and  Figures,  Seven  Sizes,  Seven  Finishes.  Builders'  Supplies,  Signs,  Checks,  Badges,  Medals, 
Dog  Tags,  .License  Plates,  Name  Plates,  Miscellaneous  Goods. 

Our    line    of    Wrenches    are    admirably    adapted    for    premium    purposes — we    imprint    them,    too. 
ASK   FOR  CATALOG  NO.  25HM. 


Niagara  Falls  Metal  StampingWorks 

237-239  Tenth  Street  Niagara  Falls,  N.Y. 


^A 


Dubl-End    Pokitrenchiz 

MAR  K 


V  &  B  TOOLS 

Individually  Tempered  and  Tested 


Write  for  catalogue. 

Nail  Set  Cold   Chisel 

VAUGHAN  &  BUSHNELL  MFG.  CO. 

Makers  of  Fine  Tools 

2114  Carroll  Ave.,  Chicago 

Represented    by 
ALEXANDER  GIBB,  3  St.  Nicholas  Bldg  ,  Montreal. 


We  manufacture  a  wide  range  of 
wrought  washers  of  every  description. 
Round  and  square  in  plain  and  gal- 
vanized. 

"Unimeco"  washers  possess  superior 
quality  and  unusual  finish. 
We  can  also  supply  you  with  An- 
nealed Rivet  Burrs  of  the  same  high 
quality.  The  "Unimeco"  line  is  a 
profitable  one  for  you  to  handle.  Write 
us  for  information  and  prices.  We 
ship  promptly. 

THE  UNION  IRON  &  METAL  CO. 

LIMITED 

1951  DUNDAS  ST.  W. 
TORONTO  CANADA 


THE  manufacturing  plants  in  your  district  present 
an  opportunity  for  sales  in  these  high  quality  lines. 

Emery  Paper  and  Cloth,  Garnet  Paper  and  Cloth, 
Flint  Paper  and  Cloth,  Discs  and  Circles. 

Their  well-known  reputation  for  quality  is  a  valuable 
asset  to  the  dealer  selling  them.  A  complete  stock  on 
hand,  together  with  an  attention-creating  display,  will 
attract  your  local  buyers. 

May  we  send  you  catalogue  and  prices? 
Canadian    Sales    Representatives : 
A.  E.  Hinds  &  Company,  Gait  Bldjr.,  Winnipeg,  Man. 

Mr.  Alexander  Gibbs,  3  St.  Nicholas  St.,  Montreal,  Canada  'Phone  Main  2343. 
The  Triangle  Co  of  Canada,  Ltd.,  Standard  Bank  Bldg.,  Vancouver,  B.C. 


UNITED  STATES  SAND  PAPER  CO.  WILLIAMSPORT,  PENN 


January    10,   1920 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


29 


They'll  Sell  Well 
and  They'll  Pay 
a  Good  Profit 


We  offer  the  Hardware 
Trade  an  opportunity  of 
adding  a  new  line  on 
which  good  money  may 
be  made — our  Steel  Fence 
Posts  have  many  evident 
advantages — and  our  list 
prices  for  them  are  in  most 
localities  such  that  they 
can  easily  be  sold  in  com- 
petition with  Cedar  Posts. 

Besides,  we  can  furnish  you 
with  plenty  of  arguments 
whereby  it  may  be  shown 
conclusively  that  the  Cedar 
Post  is  as  much  of  a  "back 
number"  as  a  snake-fence. 

There's  a  good  dealer  dis- 
count on 

PRESTON 
Steel  Posts 

you  can  make  satisfactory 
profit  on  every  sale — and 
the  sales  will  be  easily  made 
and  numerous. 

Your  customers  will  not  be 
able  to  resist  these  features: 


1.  Easy  to  drive — which  means 
a  great  saving  over  cedar 
posts,    in   cost  of   installation. 

2.  Never  rot,  break,  barn  or 
buckle — therefore,  economical 
as  to  co  t.  of  upkeep  — cheap- 
est of  all  posts  in  the  long 
run. 


3.  Lightning  proof — because  the 
steel  "grounds"  the  wire  — 
therefore,  safest  for  stock. 

4.  Neat  in  appearance  —  and 
never  out  of  alignment — add- 
ing greatly  to  the  value  of 
property. 


Write  for  particulars  and  prices;  and  we  will  explain 
how  this  can  be  made  one  of  the  most  profitable  lines  in 
your  store. 


Metal  Shingle  &  Siding  Co. 


PRESTON 
WINNIPEG 


LIMITED 

TORONTO 
MONTREAL 


SASKATOON 
CALGARY 


Customers  Witt  Buy 

Famous  Five 

Files 

because  all  skilled 
mechanics  and  all 
employers  of  labor 
recognize  them  as 
standard  tools. 

Carry  a  stock  and 
you  can't  help  but 
make  sales. 

KEARNEY  &  FOOT 

GREAT  WESTERN 

AMERICAN 

ARCADE 

GLOBE 


Made  in  Canada  by 


IW 


'•  l"\ 


» v» 


>ORT   HOPE 
ONTARIO 


30 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


January  10,  1920 


WJ1UMM*M!\ 


Mendets  are  selling  wonder- 
fully. Orders  pour  in  as  fast  as 
we  can  fill  them.  Millions  of 
boxes  have  been  sold.     Placed 


in  sight  in  your  window  or  on  your  counter,  this  display  case  sells 
them  on  sight.     Mendets  occupy  little  space. 

The  effective  results  given  by  Mendets  have  created  an  enormous 
natural  demand.  An  extensive  advertising  investment  has  main- 
tained and  stimulated  this  demand  everywhere.  The  easiest  sales 
you  ever  made.     Write  your  jobber. 

Collette  Mfg.  Company,         Collingwood,  Ontario 


Combination  Funnel 
and  Filler 


/^ 


Saves  50% 
on  Oil  Bills 


Self- Cleaning  Spout 

Your  customers  are  attracted  and  sold, 
not  only  by  the  economy  feature,  the 
flexible,  self-cleaning  spout  that  can 
be  bent  to  reach  difficult  places,  but 
also  by  the  general  handiness  and 
utility  of  this  useful  combination 
Funnel  and  Filler. 

See  the  All-Way  Oiler,  R.  R.  Oiler, 
Oil  Gun 

The   All-Way  Oiler   Mfg.   Company 
196  King  St.  West  Toronto,  Ont. 


CANE'S 

Clothes 

Pins 


NOT 
"Just  Clothes  Pins" 

Cane's  Star  Brand  Clothes 
Pins  are  better — they  cost 
no  more  than  "just  clothes 
pins" — but  there's  a  dif- 
ference. 

Star  Brand  are  always  right  in  shape, 
right  in  length  and  correct  in  count. 
They  will  not  injure  the  clothes. 

Your  Jobber  wiU  be  pleased  to  supply 
Star  Brand  Superior  Clothes  Pins  at 
no  extra  cost. 

The  Wm.  CANE  &  SONS  Co.,  Limited 

MANUFACTURERS 
Newmarket  Ontario 


QUALITY  SERVICE  ...    aA 

THE 

Barton-Netting  Co. 

LIMITED 
9-11-13  East  Pitt  St.  Windsor,  Ont.  ^^^AT^ 

Lighting  Fixtures  and  Electric  Appliances 
Mantels,  Coal,   Gas  and  Electric  Grates 
Floor  and  Wall  Tile  for  Bathrooms,  etc. 

OUR    DOME   DAMPER    HAS    ALL    OTHERS   BEATEN   EVERY    WAY 


January   10,   1920 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


31 


TRADE 


Type 
No.  3005 


Adjustable 
Tension 


CHICACft 
MARK  ■____■ 

SPRING  HINGES  *■* 

The  "Chicago"  Screen  Door  Hinge  (Type  3005)  is  made  of  heavy  wrought 
metal   and  has   an  adjustable  tension. 

The  spring  is  entirely  enclosed  and  made  of  oil  tempered  steel  wire. 
Nothing  better  in  workmanship  or  finish.  Packed  one  pair  in  an  individual 
box  with  screws  to  match. 

Chicago  Spring 'Butt  (Tompmjg. 

CHICAGO  NEW  YORK  ** 

Send  for  Catalogue  M-J6 


W.  HARRIS  &  CO.,  Limited 


MANUFACTURERS    OF 

GiLUES 

Flake,  Ground   or   Sheet 
Importers  of 

POTATO    STARCH 
CORN     DEXTRINE 

Your  inquires  solicited,  giving 
name  of  your  wholesale  dealer 

W.  HARRIS  &  CO.,  Limited 

994  Danforth  Ave.     TORONTO,  Can. 


HIstiJiK&Him 


Many 

People 

Awaited 

the 

Liberty 


The  women  of  Canada  have  been  waiting  for  a  reliable  washer 
that  was  free  from  intricacies,  one  that  would  do  the  work 
well  and  nbt  cost  too  much.  The  LIBERTY  WASHER  was 
especially    created   to   meet   this    demand. 

The  white  cedar  tub — without  any  metal  to  stain  the  clothes  ; 
the  wringer  moveable  to  four  positions  ;  the  mechanism  on  the 
opposite  side  from  the  operator  and  a  price  from  $25  to  $50 
less  than  any  other  High  Grade  Washer  on  the  market. 
Give  your  customers  the  best — sell  them  a  LIBERTY  and  they 
will  always  be  grateful.  You'd  be  surprised  how  many  good 
prospects  there  are  among  your  everyday  customers.  Display 
and   talk   the   LIBERTY— it   will   pay  you. 

A.  R.  LUNDY 

257  King  St.  W.  TORONTO 


BLACK  and  GALVANIZED 
SIZES,    Vs    IN.    TO    4    IN. 


WROUGHT  PIPE 

All  our  pipe  thoroughly  inspected,  tested  to  600    lbs.  hydraulic  pressure  and  branded. 

All  Sizes  of  NIPPLES  (Black  and  Galvanized) 


/jfT  \  Brand  of 


Ask  your  jobber  for  ((  |        }  Brand  of  WroughtPipe 

CANADIAN  TUBE  &  IRON  CO.,  LIMITED,  wrS». 


32 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


January  10,  1920 


Fills  the  existing  demand  for  a 

Garage  and  Barn  Door  Latch 

that's  just  right  for  Dealer  and  Consumer 

A  rapid,  profitable  seller.  Strong,  durable,  neat  and  convenient,  easily 
put  on  any  door.  Has  two  handles  to  open  or  close  from  either  side. 
Catches  will  hold  door  or  gate  open  or  closed.  Enamelled  finish  with  turned 
bolt.     Guaranteed. 

We  also  make  velocipedes,  express  wagons,  children's  autos,  toy  carts  and 
barrows,  bathroom  fittings  and  hardware.  Write  for  prices  and  information 
on  any  of  our  lines. 

The  Gendron  Manufacturing  Company,   Limited 

Duchess  and  Ontario  Streets,  Toronto,  Ontario 


MADE  IN  CANADA 

Blacksmith's 
Boiler  Makers' 
Machinists' 

AND 

Pipe  Fitters' 

I     f"\/"vl  O  Write  for 

A   VJ\J±&  Catalogue 


A  B.  Jardine  &  Co. 

LIMITED 
HESPELER,  ONT. 


Manufacturers 

OF 

WIRE 

HEADQUARTERS  FOR 

WIRE  BALE  TIES 

Largest  Capacity  and  Stock  in 
Canada 

PROMPT  SHIPMENT 

LAIDLAW  BALE  TIE 
COMPANY,  Limited 

HAMILTON,  CANADA 

Winnipeg  Toronto  Montreal 

London,  England 


A  Reliable 

Razor 
for  the  User 


Guarantee 

for 

Every  Razor 


Made  from  the  finest  Crucible  Swedish   Bar-Steel.       Carefully     tempered     and 

concaved.     Set  ready  for  use. 

GEO.  W.  KORN   RAZOR   MFG.  CO.,  Little  Valley,  N.Y. 

Canada  Office:     140  McGill  Street,  Montreal 


January    10,    1920 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


33 


BbTHRFIELD 


Tools  That 


Create  Good  Will 
With  Dealers, 
Buyers  and  Users 


Butterfield  Tools 

are  liked  and  respected  by  the  dealer  for  their  popularity  and 
ready  sales — for  the  absence  of  complaints  and  returned  goods. 
The  purchasing  agent  or  the  individual  mechanic  finds  them  a 
"good  buy"  and  far  more  than  satisfactory.  Skilled  labor  and 
responsible  executives  have  confidence  in  them  inspired  by 
agreeable  experience. 

Give  Service  That  Multiplies  Sales 

These  reliable  tools  are  known  to  dealers  for  their  business- 
building  qualities.  Most  dealers  handle  them,  but  if  by  chance 
you  don't  at  present,  you  will  find  in  them  a  new  source  of 
revenue  and  sales  that  bring  "repeat"  business  and  hold  the 
customers — multiplying  your  sales. 

Get  a  Catalog 

Butterfield  &  Company,  Inc. 

Rock  Island,  Que. 


34  HARDWARE     AND     METAL  January  10,  1920 


7  he  Value  of  the  Business  Press 

to  Business  Men 


"Business  men  do  not  realize  the  value  which  trade  journals  and 
technical  magazines  may  have  for  them  in  increasing  the  effici- 
ency of  their  factories  and  in  giving  them  a  broad  and  compre- 
hensive view  of  their  business. 

"Our  foreign  competitors  read  almost  every  article  published 
upon  their  business  with  great  care  and  thoroughness.  Many  of 
them  have  duplicate  copies  of  their  favorite  trade  paper  sent  to 
their  homes  so  that  they  may  read  them  away  from  the  business 
without  being  disturbed.  Many  foreign  manufacturers  contribute 
articles  to  these  journals  on  phases  of  the  business  with  which  they 
are  most  familiar.  Such  articles  are  bound  to  be  helpful  and 
have  a  constructive  effect. 

"Our  trade  journals  and  technical  papers  are  the  best  in  the 
world,  and  they  should  be  supported  and  encouraged  by  our  busi- 
ness men.   . 

"Copies  should  be  placed  where  employees  can  see  them  and  they 
should  be  urged  to  read  and  study  them. 

"These  papers  are  preaching  the  gospel  of  sound  business  on 
practical  lines  and  are  helpful  not  only  to  business  but  to  the 
country  as  a  whole. 

"//  the  suggestions  made  by  them  in  the  past  had  been  followed 
by  our  business  men  it  would  not  be  necessary  at  this  time  to 
point  out  some  of  the  fundamental  weaknesses  in  American 
business." 


— Edward  N.  Hurley,  formerly  Chair- 
man of  the  Federal  Trade  Commission, 
in    "The    Awakening   of    Business." 


The  following  is  list  of  the  MacLean  publications.  Every  publi- 
cation is  a  leader  in  its  field.  Write  us  for  any  information  you 
may  desire  with  regard  to  the  field  covered,  advertising  rates,  etc. 

TRADE  NEWSPAPERS 

Hardware  and  Metal  Canadian  Grocer  Dry  Goods  Review 

Men's  Wear  Review  Bookseller  and  Stationer        Sanitary  Engineer 

TECHNICAL  PAPERS 

Canadian  Machinery  Canadian  Foundryman  Marine  Engineering 

Power  House  Printer  and  Publisher  Can.  Motor,  Tractor  and 

MAGAZINES  Implement  Trade  Journal 

MACLEAN'S  MAGAZINE  FARMERS'  MAGAZINE 

Financial  Post — Weekly  Commercial  Newspaper 

The  MacLean  Publishing  Company,  Limited 

153  University  Avenue,  Toronto  Southam  Bldg.,  128  Bleury  Street,  Montreal 

1207  Union  Trust  Bldg.,  Winnipeg,  Man. 


January   10,   1920 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


35 


Coleman  Quick-Lite 


^hi  iii  ii  mi  hi  i  m  i  Miipj 


L 


amps 


Can  be  lighted  with  a  match,  no  other 
generating  required. 

Brilliant  White  Light 


300  Candle  power,  makes    and  burns    its   own   gas 
from  common  gasoline. 

Costs  1-3  of  a  cent  per  hour  to  operate. 


^Sj.j.'j.j.'.yj.j - 


Coleman  Quick-Lite 

Lanterns 


Just  as  brilliant  a  light  as  the  lamp. 
Mica  chimney,  burns  15  hours  on  one 
filling. 


Coleman's  Quick-Lite  Chandeliers 

for  Stores,  Churches,  etc. 
Write  for  prices  and  particulars 

Caverhill,    Learmont    &    Co. 

Montreal 


36 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


January  10,  1920 


Write  for 

prices  and 

details 

NOW 


We 
anticipate 

a  big 
demand 


It's  a  wise  precaution  to  order  mowers — Now 

and  when  you  stock  up  with  T.-F.  quality  you  can  anticipate  quick  sales  —  always 
dependable.  They  have  stood  the  test  for  40  years — none  but  the  highest  grade  of 
workmanship  and  quality  of  material  used.  We  make  a  specialty  of  this  line  and 
guarantee  our  product.  Identify  yourself  with  quality  by  stocking  the  line  of  mowers 
that  are  well  and  favorably  known  as — 

"ADANAC"     "WOODYATT"     "STAR"     "EMPRESS"    FAMOUS  NAMES. 

Taylor-Forbes    Company,    Limited 

The  Largest  Manufacturers  of  Hardware  in  Canada 


TAYLOR-FORBES    CO., 
246   Craig:   St.   W.,   Montreal. 

H.  C.  ROGERS,  LTD. 
147  Prince  William  Street,  St.  John,  N.B. 


Head    Office   and    Works 

Guelph,  Ont. 


TAYLOR-FORBES  CO.,  LTD., 
1070  Homer  Street,  Vancouver. 

H.  F.  MOULDEN  &  SON, 
314  Confederation   Life   BIdg:.,  Winnipeg. 


QUALITY  FIRST  IN 

Still's  Handles 


We  are  specialists  in  the  manufacture  of 
wood  handles. 

Quality  First  has  always  been  our  policy  in 
all  our  products. 

STILL'S  HANDLES  enjoy  a  reputation 
throughout  the  Dominion  that  has  put  them 
in  the  front  rank  of  rapid  sellers  for  the 
retailer. 

Wherever  the  best  is  in  demand  there 
STILL'S  are  sold. 

More  sold  in  Canada  than  any  other  make. 
STILL'S  HANDLES  are  made  with  exact- 
ing care  from  high  quality  Canadian 
woods,  durable  and  lasting  to  an  unusual 
degree.  Axe,  Pick,  Sledge  and  Hammer 
Handles,  Cant,  Hook  and  Peavie  Handles. 
There  are  good  profits  for  the  dealer  and 
an  abundance  of  customers'  satisfaction  in 
all  STILL'S  HANDLES. 

J.    H.    STILL    MFG.    COMPANY 


ST.  THOMAS 


■V    "DtbADE .  I         *TV   MARK    .    0  T-1  1 

\j\ed  oUcaHJ/   lools 


Increase  Your  Sales 

The  more  "Red  Devil"  Tools  you  buy  the  more 
tools  you  will  sell  Experts  know  their  true  super- 
iority— everyone  knows  their  reputation. 

"RED  DEVIL"  Glass  Cutters 


ONTARIO 


No.  363,  Circular  Glass  Cutter,  indispensable  in  all 
garages  for  cutting  head-light  glass,  has  a  metal 
.  base,  a  non-slipping  rubber  cloth  mat,  a  steel  rod 
graduating  into  16ths  inches  to  cut  circles  2  to  12^ 
inches,  and  a  renewable  hand-made,  hand-honed 
steel  wheel  that  will  not  flake  nor  break  glass. 

Remember  "Red  Datl"  Glass  Cutters  art  the  iititst  sellers 

tn  the  World.     Write  to-day  for  proces  and 

Complete  Catalogues. 

Smith  &  Hemenway  Co.,  Inc.  S£$£H5: 


- 


January   10,   1920 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— A dv ert mng  Section 


37 


Safe  as  a  Gold  Dollar  to  Use  or  to  Sell 


Auto  Kamp  Kook  Kits 


No.  2  or  3  Open 

Showing  Equipment,  Featuring  New 
Model  Tank  with  Pressure  Gauge 


Same  Closed 

Showing  the  neat,  handy  way  it  packs. 
Equipment  stored  inside. 


Show  Your  Customers  These 
Selling  Points 

Here  is  an  article  that  sells  well  because  it  fills  a 
much  needed  want.  A  good,  compact  gasoline  stove 
with  a  special  forced  feed  that  insures  perfect  burn- 
ing under  all  weather  conditions. 

Burns  in  a  30-mile  Wind 

This  forced  feed,  somewhat  similar  to  the  principle 
of  a  mechanic's  torch,  will  give  perfect  service  un- 
protected in  fresh  winds.  Notice  the  two  cuts 
showing  how  compactly  it  folds  away  and  how  con- 
venient and  generous  a  cooking  outfit  it  is  when 
open. 

Made  in  Convenient  Sizes 

Three  handy,  convenient  sizes  to  fit  almost  any 
needs. 

The  Number  2  is  a  two-burner  stove  with  two 
six-inch  grates. 

The  Number  3  is  also  a  two-burner  stove  with  eight- 
inch  grates. 

Both  are  provided  with  a  die-made  gasoline  tank 
with  a  nickel  pressure  gauge.  Both  are  sold  with 
or  without  equipment,  but  pump  aim  tunnel  are 
sold  with  all  stoves.  The  illustration  shows  the 
number  2  and  3  with  equipment. 
No.  4,  single  burner — six-inch  grate — Hunters'  Spe- 
cial. 

Suitcase  Outfit 

A  specially  "pulling"  layout  is  the  Suitcase  Outfit. 
We  specialize  on  a  four-party  suit  case  outfit  which, 
besides  a  number  2  stove  fully  equipped,  contains 
knives,  forks,  spoons,  salt  and  pepper  shakers,  can- 
opener,  plates  and  cups  for  four  people.  Plates  and 
cups  are   Swedish  ware. 


Prentiss- Wabers  Stove  Co. 

GRAND  RAPIDS,  WISCONSIN,  U.S.A 
Canadian  Distributors:    Murdock    &   Hunter,  34  Church  St.,  Toronto 


38 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


January  10,  1920 


E.   Roy.  A.    S.    Batchart,  C.  C.  Cartwriffht, 

«5H  St.  Andr*  St..  Montreal,   Que.     26    Adelaide    St.    W.,    Toronto      Union   Trust    Bid*..    Winnipeg 


4 


Good  Reasons 

-READ  'EM  ! 


* 


MADE 

IN 


CANADA 


THE  NORTHERN  BOLT,  SCREW  AND  WIRE  COMPANY,  LIMITED 


Why  you  should  sell  Rolled  Thread  Bolts 
and   Screws : 

BETTER  QUALITY— Rolled  Thread  Bolts 
can  only  be  made  from  first  quality  Basic 
Open-Hearth  Stock. 

STRONGER — Actua.  tests  show  18  per 
cent,  greater  strensrth  than  Cut  Thread 
Bolts. 

NO  USELESS  WEIGHT  —  Shanks  are 
smaller  than  threads.  No  useless  weight 
to  pay   freight  on. 

BIG  FIRMS  ADOPTING  THEM— Some  of 
the  largest  users  on  the  continent  will  ac- 
cept nothing  else — and  they  always  in- 
vestigate before  veting. 

■      OWEN  SOUND,  ONT. 


REED'S 

ECONOMY    ROTARY 

ASH  SIFTER 

Made  Better  so  as  to  Sell  Better 


DEALERS — Your  customers  will  be  better  satisfied 
with  the  "Economy"  sifter  because  it  is  made  of 
heavier  material  than  other  makes.  Write  for 
descriptive  circular  and  prices. 

Geo.  W.  Reed  &  Co.,  Limited 

37  St.  Antoine  Street,  Montreal 


Rock  Island   Combination 
Forge,  Anvil  and  Vise 

FRAME— is  steel 
angles. 

FORGE  —  Pan  is 
oval,  12  x  15  inches. 

FAN  —  is 
driven    by    an 
accurately  cut 
gear   and  pin- 
ion. 
VISE  —  jaws  ars 
31/2  inches  wide  and 
open  11  inches. 

PIPE  JAWS  — 
take  pipe  and  round 
rods  up  to  2  inches 
in  diameter. 

DRILL — takes  %- 
inch     round     shank 
drills;  chuck  is  steel. 
The   machine   weighs   about   135   pounds.     Order   a 
sample.     This  tool  will  sell  on  sight. 
Factory  and  Office: 

Rock  Island  Manufacturing  Company 

ROCK  ISLAND,  ILL. 


NEW  YORK— 113  Chambers  St. 


CHICAGO— 180  N.  Market  St. 


WE& 


A  Type  and  Size 
for  Every  Service 


PINK'S  LUMBERING  TOOLS 

The  Standard   Tools  in  every  province  of  the  Dominion, 
New  Zealand,  Australia,  etc. 

We    manufacture    all    kinds  of    lumber   tools.     Light  and 

Durable. 

LONG  DISTANCE  PHONE  No.  87 

Send  for  Catalogue  and  Price  List. 

Sold  throughout  the  Dominion  by  all  Wholesale  and  Retail 
Hardware  Merchants.  • 

THOS.  PINK  COMPANY,  LIMITED 

Manufacturers  of  Lumber  Tools 

Pembroke  Ontario 


January   10,   1920 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


39 


N 


The  cost 


More -Profit  Pumps 
—Real  Profit 

No  use  to  sell  a  pump  that  makes  trouble 
for  a  dealer  with  his  customer. 

The  trouble  is  remembered 
of  repairs  is  dead  loss 
of  time  and  temper. 
The  dealer  suffers. 

"Aremacdee"  hand 
and  motor  metal 
pumps  for  force  or 
lift  use,  every  kind, 
are  shown  in  the  big 
catalogue. 

Dealers,  ask  for  prices  and  terms.   Get 
real  profits  on  your  metal  pump  sales. 

WRITE 

The  R.  McDougall  Co. 

LIMITED 

GALT,  CANADA 


The  L.  Martin  Co.  ^cr 


GERMANTOWN 

LAMPBLACKS 


ENGLAND  and  AMERICA 

Originators  of  Eagle,  Old 
Standard,  Globe  and  Pyramid 
Germantown  Brands. 

Suppliers  of  Bulk  Blacks  to 
the  highest  class  Grinding 
Trade. 


THE  L.  MARTIN  CO. 


Montreal        Toronto 

Philadelphia      New  York 

Winnipeg 

London,  Eng. 


MYERS 

"HONOR-BILT" 

Hand   and  Power 
PUMPS 

We  have  bmlt  some- 
thing more  than  ordin- 
ary goodness  into  every 
Myers  "  Honor- Bilt" 
Hand  or  Power  Pump. 
We  have  endowed  tbem 
all  with  sound  pump 
knowledge  put  to  prac- 
tical use  through  many 
indd vidu al  flea/tUTes  wfoacih 
moke  their  installation 
easier,  reduce  pumping 
labor  and  insure  dJe- 
pendaible  service. 
The  aggressive  dealer 
handles  the  MYERS  — 
Ask  your  jobber  or 
write    us. 


F.  E.  MYERS  &  BRO. 

No.  65  Orange  St.  ASHLAND,  OHIO 


NOVA   SCOTIA  STEEL 

&    COAL    CO.,    Limited 

NEW  GLASGOW,  N.S. 

Manufacturers  of 

FERRONA 
PIG  IRON 

and  SIEMENS-MARTIN 

OPEN  HEARTH  STEEL 


Ask  The  Man  Who  Uses 

our  goods,  why  he  always  prefers 

London  Bar  Iron 


and  he  will  tell  youthat 
it  is  built  with 


QUALITY  RIGHT  THROUGH 


FOR  QUALITY 

is  the  chief  aim  of  each  department  through  which  it  goes 
Ask  for  it  by  name  from  the  wholesaler 

London  Rolling  Mills  Co. 


LIMITED 
LONDON,  CANADA 


535-. 


40 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


January  10,  1920 


CoolKutter  Grinders 

Fill  a  Special  Want 

They  were  placed  on  the  market  to  supply  the  demand  for  a  cheap 

grinder  that's  good,  and  they  do.    Best  value  ever  offered  to  the 

trade.    Wheels  specially  selected  for  cool,  quick-cutting  qualities. 

Get  Catalog  No.  1.  Write  your  jobber. 

Western  Hardware  Mfg.  Co.,  Limited 

Milwaukee,  Wisconsin 


Wroughtand  Steel  Plate 


■  i  j  ".w.'.'jy  "A'-y.i,^..1. 

•:-iuft  •  1  ii  ■  T   i-  ■  V  rt..; 


ROUND 

AND 
SQUARE 


OF  ALL 

DESCRSPTIQ 


PLAIN 
OR 
GALVAN- 
IZED 


Annealed  Rivet  Burrs;  Felloe 

Plates;  Sheared  and  Punched 

Plates;     Malleable     Washers 

and  Cast  Iron  Washers. 

PROMPT  SHIPMENTS 

We  Guarantee  Quality  and  Service. 

Wrought    Washer   Mfg.    Co. 

Milwaukee,  Wis. 


£'A>   '.■'.  ■  '    '  '    '  "~~"~ 


BROOMS 

Our 

Canada  No.  3 

fills  the  bill 
Not  too  heavy,  not  too  light 

Just  Right 

Polished  handle,  pink  strings,  vel- 
vet and  tin  lock  finish. 

The  Best  $9.00  Broom 

We  know  how  to  make. 
ORDER  NOW. 

WALTER  WOODS  &  CO 

Hamilton  and  Winnipeg 


LOCKS,  BOLTS  AND  BARS 

These  and  all  articles  pertaining  to  the  Builders',    loiners'   and   Carpenters'   requirements   are 
our  specialty. 

We  are  in  touch  with  the  most  noted  and  remote  manufacturers  in  the  trade. 
Do  not  stand  and  wonder  where  you  can  procure  any  particular  line  in  hardware.    That's  ours! 
We  shall  assemble  all  your  requirements  and  dispatch  in  one  consignment. 
Let  us  have  your  enquiries  at  once.     Delays  are  dangerous  on  a  rising  market. 

Address  your  envelopes  B  Dept. 

White  &  Colquhoun 

Hardware  Exporters  45,  47  and  49  Mains  St.,  off  Waterloo  St.,  Glasgow 


January   10,   1920 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


N 


41 


(ALLOYED   UNDER  THE  STANLEY  PROCESS) 

LIONROYAL 

BABBITT 


itfL^ 


?■*>, 


BABBITTS 
SOLDERS 
PHOSPHOR  TIN 
PHOSPHOR  COPPER 
ETC. 

LEAD.  COPPER.  TIN. 
SPELTER,  ALUMINUM. 
&  OTHER  METALS 


Standardized  in 
quality  and  price— 
with  protection 
to  the  Jobber. 


BRITISH  SMELTING  &  REFINING  Co. LIMITED 


DRUMMOND    BUILDING 


MOMTRE AL 


Announcement 

There  will  be  no  change 

in  our  policy  during  1920. 

As  in  by-gone  years  we  will 

direct   all   our  efforts   to   a 

large  volume  of  business  at 

small  margins  and  a  square 

deal  to  our  patrons. 

Hoyt     Metal    Company 

Montreal       Toronto       Winnipeg 

THE  WORD 

TRIMO 

Indicates  Good  Goods  Made  by  the 
Trimont  ManufacturingVCompany 

The  TRIMO  PIPE  WRENCH 
has  several  distinctive  fea- 
tures that  make  it  a  very 
desirable  wrench  to  use — 
The  STEEL  FRAMES  that 
do  not  break  save  buying 
frames,  save  loss  of  time 
while  on  a  job — worth  many 
wrenches,  saves  waiting, 
which  costs  a  heap  of 
money. 

The  NUT  GUARDS  save 
time  becau:e  they  keep  the 
wrench  in  adjustment  when 
you  lay  it  down  and  pick  it 
up,  also  when  working  in 
close  quarters  they  prevent 
accidental  turning  of  the  ad- 
justment   nut. 

The  INSERTED  FIXED 
JAW  in  the  handle  cm  be 
removed  when  worn,  saving 
the  handle.  A  new  insert 
jaw  costs  considerable  less 
than  a  handle  to  r?place. 
This  is  one  of  the  TRIMO 
LONG-LIFE  FEATURES. 
The  TRIMO  WRENCH  hss 
other  good  point;  —  it  is 
strong  and  well  made  and 
mrnu'Vc'ursd  cut  of  miter- 
ials  suits b!e  for  the  use  thrt 
is  made  of  them. 

TRIMONT    MFG.     COMPANY 

ROXBURY,  MASS 


42  HARDWARE     AND     METAL  January  10,  1920 


TORONTO  JANUARY,  1920 


"We  may  not  know  as  much  about  your  goods 
as  you  do,  but  we  do  know  how  to  tell  the  hard- 
ware trade  of  Canada  what  you  would  like  the 
trade  to  know." 


Your  knowledge  of  your  products  and  their  uses,  plus  the  excellent 
facilities  of  our  Ad  Service  Department,  plus  the  services  of  a  hard- 
ware paper  that  goes  each  week,  by  paid  invitation,  to  practically 
every  worthwhile  hardware  buyer  in  Canada,  would,  if  properly 
combined,  produce  mutually  beneficial  results. 

The  hardware  trade  is  undergoing  rapid  changes.  With  each  suc- 
ceeding year  come  new  developments.  It  is  our  business  to  keep  in 
close  touch  with  the  trade.  We  have  a  vast  amount  of  information 
on  almost  every  imaginable  phase  of  the  hardware  trade.  You  may 
think  your  line  is  one  that  cannot  be  advertised.  We  may  think 
differently.  It  will  cost  you  nothing  to  secure  our  views.  Drop  us 
a  line  and  our  representative  will  call,  or  if  you  prefer  it,  we  will,  after 
making  an  investigation  of  the  possibilities  of  advertising  your 
lines,  submit  our  proposition  in  writing. 

HARDWARE  AND  METAL 

"Canada's  National  Hardware  Weekly" 
143-153  University  Avenue  TORONTO,  CANADA 

The  only  weekly  hardware  paper  in  Canada,  and  the  only  hardware  paper  in  Canada 
that  will  supply  you  with  a  circulation  statement  audited  by  the  Audit  Bureau  of  Circu- 
lation?. 


January   10,   1920 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


43 


gjilililii 

|        Wt       \ 

S  REGISTERED  = 

TRADE    MARK.  § 

The  Incomparable  Brand 
of  Fishing  Tackle 

Has  been  made  expressly  to  the  order  §| 

and   requirements    of   Canadian   buy-  jj 

ers  for  very  many  years.     The  ever-  J 

increasing  demand  proves  the  satisfac-  jj 

tion  it  has  given.  § 
Very  soon  we  expect  to  exceed  our  pre- 
war output,  meet  all  demands  and  make 

prompt   shipments  of: —  1 

Rods,  Reels,  Lines,  Hooks, 

Flies,  Leaders,  Baits,  Nets, 

Gaffs,  Fly  Books  and  Boxes, 

Bags  and  Baskets,  etc.  E 

Our  representative  makes  a  trip  throughout 

the   Dominion   annually.  s 

Mail    orders    and    correspondence    solicited.  §j 

~  Goods  sold  to  the  trade  only.  = 

Ludgate,  Ryder,  Thomas  &  Co.    | 

'-  Clive  Road  = 

Redditch  -         England  §| 


ARROWHEAD 

SAWS 

Vanadium  Steel 


Are  called  "Standard  of 
Canada"  because  they 
have  been  the  choice  of 
skilled  workmen  since 
they  first  entered  the 
market. 

Arrowhead  Saws  are  per- 
fectly tempered,  hang 
right,  are  set  right  and 
sell       right.  Cross-cut 

Saws,  Hand  Saws,  Buck 
Saws,  and  Circular  Saws. 

Our   Catalog:   is   a 

guide     to      profit; 

your       name 

and      address 

will    bring    it. 


T.  F.    Shurly 
Company 

Limited 

St.  Catharines 
Ontario 


The  Crescent  Line 

For  Quality  that  satisfies  customers 

The  Crescent  Company's  line  of  small  tools  and  hardware 
specialties  is  a  reliable,  salable  line  of  consistent  high 
quality  that  sells  well,  satisfies  customers  and  shows  a 
good  margin  of  profit  to  the  dealer. 

At  All  Leading  Jobbers. 

The  Campbell  Agencies 

Toronto,  Canada 

The  Crescent  Company,  Meridan,  Conn. 


BLACK  DIAMOND  FILE  WORKS 


ESTABLISHED  1863 
Twelve  Medals  of 

Award  at 

INTERNATIONAL 

Expositions. 


INCORPORATED  1895 
Special  Grand 

Prize 

GOLD  MEDAL 

Atlanta,  1895 


Copy  of  Catalogue  will  be  sent  free  to  any   interested  File  User  upon  application. 


G.  &  H.  BARNETT  COMPANY 


PHILADELPHIA,  PA. 


Owned  and  Operated  by  Nicholson  File  Co. 


44 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


January  10,  1920 


Targets  like  these 
mean  business  for  you 

They   were  made  on  the  standard  25-yard  range  by  Dominion 
Marksmen  with  Dominion  .22's. 

Over  6,000  boys  in  Canada  are  shooting 

Dominion  .22's 

in  efforts  to  make  similar  scores. 

This  means  business  to  every  dealer  who  carries  this  ammunition. 

Dominion  ammunition  means  more  business— not  only  .22's 
but  all  the  larger  calibre  metallics  and  Dominion  Shot- 
gun Shells.     Order  from  your  jobber  to-day. 

Dominion   Cartridge   Co.,   Limited 


Montreal 


Canada 


"Member  Audit  Bureau  Circulation." 

HARDWARE  AND   METAL 

CANADA'S  NATIONAL  HARDWARE  WEEKLY 

VOL.  XXXII.  TORONTO,  JANUARY  10,  1920  ~  No.  2 


CONTENTS 

Opportunities  For  Paint  Association 47-48 

Seasonable   Window   Suggestions    49 

Higher  Prices  For  Oils  and  Gasoline 50 

Standardizing  the  Retail  Trade   51 

Probability  of  Higher  Paint  Prices  .  .  .  1 52 

Autos,  Tractors  and  Electricity 53-54 

Fixing  the  Value  of  Your  Stock 55 

Interesting  Situation  in  Building 56 

President  of  Montreal  Firm  Honored  by   King    57 

Editorial  Comment .' .  '. 58-59 

Events  in  the  Trade 60-63 

The  Clerks'   Department 64-65 

New   Hardware   Goods    68 

The  Markets  at  a  Glance   69 

Weekly  Hardware  Markets   70-75 

Looking  For  Banner  Paint  Year  .  .  ., 76 

The   Brush    Department    ' , 78 

Higher  Prices  Likely  For  Glass 80 

Weekly  Paint  Markets  82-84 


THE  MACLEAN  PUBLISHING  COMPANY,  LIMITED 

JOHN  BAYNE  MACLEAN,  President.  H.  T.  HUNTER,  Vice-President. 

H.  V.  TYRRELL,  General  Manager. 

Publishers  of  Hardware  and  Metal,  The  Financial  Post,  MacLean's  Magazine,  Fanners'  Magazine, 
Canadian  Grocer,  Dry  Goods  Review,  Men's  Wear  Review,  Printer  and  Publisher,  Bookseller  and 
Stationer,  Canadian  Machinery  and  Manufacturing:  News,  Power  House,  Sanitary  Engineer, 
Canadian   Foundryman,    Marine   Engineering   of   Canada,   Canadian   Motor,   Tractor  and   Implement 

Trade  Journal. 

Cable    Address,    Macpubco,    Toronto ;    Atabek,    London.    Eng. 
ESTABLISHED   1887. 

HARDWARE  AND  METAL 

GEO.  D.  DAVIS,  Manager. 
CHIEF    OFFICES: 

CANADA— Montreal.  Southam  Bldg..  128  Bleury  St.,  Phone  Main  1004.  Toronto,  143-153  University  Ave..  Tele- 
phone   Main    7324;    Winnipeg,    1103    Union   Trust    Building,   Telephone  Main   3449.     Vancouver,  39  Tenth  Ave.   W. 

GREAT  BRITAIN— London,  The  MacLean  Company  of  Great  Britain,  Limited,  88  Fleet  Street,  B.C.,  E.  J.  Dodd. 
Director.    Telephone,    Central     12960.       Cable    Address:    Atabek.    London,   England. 

UNITED  STATES— New  York,  A.  R.  Lowe.  Room  1606.  St.  James  Building,  1133  Broadway  (corner  26th  St.); 
Telephone.  Rector,  8971:  Boston,  C.  L.  Morton,  Room  734.  Old  South  Building,  Telephone,  Main  1024;  H.  A. 
Maguire,    Room    1402,    Lytton  Bldg.,    14    E.   Jackson    Street,    Chicago,    Phone,    Harrison    9133. 

SUBSCRIPTION  PRICE— Canada,  $3  a  year;  Great  Britain,  South  Africa  and  West  Indies,  12;.  6d.  a  year; 
United    States,    $3.50    a    year;    other    countries,    $4    a       year.      Invariably    in    advance. 


46 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


January  10,  1920 


Mr.  Stanley  Worker  Says : 

"Here's  wishing  you  a  great  big  share  of  the  prosperity  that  1920  has 
in  store  for  every  dealer  in  Wrought  Steel  Hardware  made  by  The  Stanley 
Works. 

The  Door  of  Opportunity  swings  open,  easily,  smoothly  and  noiselessly 
when  hung  on  three  Stanley  Ball  Bearing  Butts." 

Keep  your  eye  on  the  car-owner  in  your  vicinity — more  garages  than 
ever  before  will  be  built  this  year.  Have  a  copy  of  our  little  booklet  "8 
GARAGES"  handy  to  show  him  when  he  calls. 

THE  STANLEY  WORKS 

NEW  BRITAIN,  CONN. 

Canadian  Representative:  A.  MACFARLANE,  LTD.,  MONTREAL 


Canada's 
National 
Hardware 
Weekly 

Vol.  XXXI. 


TORONTO,   JANUARY   10,    1920 


Id    Published 

Every 

Saturday 

Since 

1888 

No.  2 


Opportunities  for  Paint  Association 

Some  Interesting  Sidelights  on  Methods  of  Few  Members  of  Association— Retail  Trade 

Would  Appreciate  More  Co-operation 


AFTER  an  investigation  which  included  visits  to 
many  leading  retail  hardware  merchants  in  various 
parts  of  Canada  and  also  calls  on  prominent  paint 
manufacturers,  HARD  WAR  AND  METAL  is  of  the  opin- 
ion that  despite  the  good  which  has  been  accomplished 
through  some  of  the  worthy  undertakings  of  the  Can- 
adian Paint,  Oil  and  Varnish  Association,  a  good  many 
splendid  opportunities  have  been  overlooked  largely 
through  lack  of  vision  on  the  part  of  a  few  members  of 
the  Association. 

During  the  war  period  several  important  questions, 
of  vital  interest  to  paint  manufacturers  and  to  retailers, 
were  solved  through  co-operation  of  members  of  the  Paint 
and  Varnish  Association.  Considerable  good  was  un- 
questionably accomplished  in  this  way,  although  it  is 
felt  in  retail  circles  that  too  much  secrecy  prevails  re- 
garding the  activities  of  the  Association. 

Agitators  to  Blame 

That  this  secrecy  has  prevailed  is  due  largely  to  the 
effort  of  a  very  few  members  of  the  Paint  and  Varnish 
Association  who  are  evidently  under  the  impression  that 
they  can  ride  roughshod  over  the  retail  trade,  the  trade 
papers  and  any  others  who  happen  to  come  within  their 
path.  Fortunately  for  the  Paint  and  Varnish  Association 
the  majority  of  the  members  have  a  much  wider  vision 
and  are  not  at  all  in  accord  with  some  of  the  policies  of 
two  or  three  agitators  in  the  Association. 

The  Wrong  Methods 

These  men  undoubtedly  have  the  welfare  of  the  As- 
sociation at  heart  and  we  believe  they  are  sincere  in 
their  efforts  to  assist  the  Association  in  becoming  a  power 
for  good.  Unfortunately  the  men  are  adopting  methods 
which  were  out  of  date  many  years  ago  and  which  have 
proven  impractical  in  modern  business.  Their  chief  ar- 
gument on  most  occasions  when  they  wish  to  put  a  matter 
through  is,  "Are  you  going  to  fall  in  line?"- 

They  are  of  the  opinion  that  they  should  censor  all 
trade  information  which  goes  out  to  the  retail  hardware 
trade.  They  believe  that  the  hardware  trade  should  not 
secure  so  much  information  regarding  market  prices,  the 
trend  of  the  markets,  etc.,  or  in  case  this  cannot  be 
prevented  they  are  of  the  opinion  that  all  information 
should  come  through  some  authorized  representative  of  the 
paint  and  varnish  trade  as  a  whole  and  that  the  publish- 
ers of  trade  information  should  be  bound  by  information 
secured  from  one  or  two  sources  rather  than  to  continue 
on  an  independent  basis,  securing  information  from  the 
best  authorities  in  their  respective  fields  and  publishing 
this  information  without  dictation  from  interested  parties. 

No  Star  Chamber 

These  few  men,  apparently  not  realizing  that  the  days 
of  secret  diplomacy  are  rapidly  disappearing,  would 
clothe  all  activities  of  the  Paint  and  Varnish  Association 
in  secrecy,  and  they  would  be  the  Lord  High  Dictators  of 


all  activities  in  manufacturing,  advertising,  wholesale 
retail  distribution  of  paints  and  varnishes. 

Two  members  of  the  Association,  one  living  in  To- 
ronto and  the  other  in  Montreal,  have  been  particularly 
active  in  their  efforts  to  do  what  they  think  is  in  the 
best  interest  of  the  Association.  These  men,  in  their 
efforts  to  do  good,  have  even  gone  so  far  as  to  furnish 
what  might  be  fodder  for  a  board  of  investigation,  through 
getting  in  touch  with  the  smaller  firms  for  the  purpose  of 
"getting  them  in  line." 

This  might  be  illustrated  in  the  case  of  one  of  the 
smaller  distributors  of  paints  and  varnishes,  etc.,  who 
received  a  letter  asking  him  to  boost  his  prices  20  per 
cent,  up  to  the  Association  levels,  in  order  that  another 
firm  could  also  be  swung  into  line. 

Was  Not  Effective 

The  letter  from  Montreal  not  being  effective,  a  follow- 
up  from  the  Toronto  member  was  made  in  the  form  of  a 
personal  call.  Following  a  discussion,  the  details  of  which 
need  not  be  recorded  here,  a  flat  refusal  was  made  by  the 
man  approached,  because,  as  he  stated,  he  was  securing  a 
legitimate  profit  on  the  goods  at  the  price  he  was  then 
quoting  and  he  did  not  feel  disposed  to  make  an  advance 
equal  to  that  suggested  to  him. 

It  is  a  question  whether  all  members  of  the  Paint  and 
Varnish  Association  are  acquainted  with  this  method  of 
procedure,  but  we  know  from  inquiries  which  have  been 
made  that  this  is  not  in  accordance  with  the  wishes  of 
some  of  the  members  of  the  Paint  and  Varnish  Asso- 
ciation. 

On  Thin  Ice 

This  instance  is  merely  quoted  as  an  example  to  show 
how  these  two  members  in  their  anxiety  to  further  the 
interests  of  the  Association  are  skating  on  thin  ice,  and 
in  their  efforts  to  do  good  are  liable  to  do  considerable 
harm  to  the  paint  industry  as  a  whole.  HARDWARE 
AND  METAL  is  in  favor  of  the  elimination  of  cut-throat 
competition  which  demoralizes  business,  and  we  know  that 
the  majority  of  right-thinking  wholesalers  and  retailers 
are  also  of  the  same  opinion. 

We  do  not,  however,  believe  in  overstepping  the  mark, 
and  after  consultation  with  many  members  of  the  Paint 
and  Varnish  Association  we  are  of  the  opinion  that  the 
majority  of  the  members  of  the  Association  are  in  favor 
of  running  the  Association  on  straightly  legitimate  lines 
without  coercion  or  attempt  to  secure  undue  profits,  and 
to  suppress  information  which  should  be  in  the  hands  of 
the  trade. 

A  Narrow  View 

The  two  members  of  the  Association  previously  re- 
ferred to  would  even  go  so  far  as  to  standardize,  if  pos- 
sible, the  individual  efforts  of  paint  manufacturers  in 
their  dealing  with  the  retail  trade.  They  would  attempt 
to  penalize  the  trade  press  if  the  latter  did  not  meet  their 
wishes  regarding  certain  forms  of  publicity. 


48 


HARDWARE    AND    METAL 


January  10,  1920 


Unfortunately  for  the  Association  these  men  are  not 
in  sufficiently  close  touch  with  the  pulse  of  the  retail 
trade,  on  whom  the  paint  manufacturers  depend  for  the 
distribution  of  their  goods.  If  they  were  in  close  touch 
with  the  pulse  of  the  hardware  trade  they  would  realize 
that  at  the  present  time  there  is  a  great  deal  of  work  for 
the  Paint  Association,  and  that  a  great  deal  of  good  could 
be  accomplished  through  the  proper  kind  of  co-operation 
and  the  dissemination  of  information  which  the  retail 
trade  vitally  needs  at  the  present  time. 
Work  in  Harmony 

These  members  still  have  to  learn  that  they  cannot 
ride  roughshod  over  the  retail  trade  or  over  the  trade 
newspapers  or  over  other  members  of  the  Association, 
and  that  in  order  to  secure  the  best  results  from  their 
efforts  they  must  work  in  harmony  with  other  members 
of  the  Association  and  with  the  men  who  are  called  upon 
to  ultimately  sell  the  goods  to  the  general  public. 

The  Paint  and  Varnish  Association  did  good  work  in 
the  standardization  of  packages,  color  cards,  etc.,  during 
the  war  period,  but  in  some  cases  fell  short  of  the  mark 
through  leaving  many  retailers  with  "left  overs  on  their 
hands." 

The  Paint  and  Varnish  Association  could  have  given 
same  valuable  advice  regarding  the  disposal  of  these 
left  overs,  many  of  which  are  still  in  retail  hardware 
stores.  The  Paint  and  Varnish  Association  did  splendid 
work  through  one  prominent  member  and  his  committee 
in  extending  Canada's  trade  into  foreign  countries.  This 
was  no  doubt  a  splendid  piece  of  work  and  meant  the  ac- 
complishment of  something  worth  while.  If  other  ac- 
tivities of  the  Association  had  all  been  directed  along 
worthy  lines  such  as  this,  and  particularly  with  a  view 
to  co-operating  with  the  retail  trade  during  a  most  trying 
period,  the  Paint  and  Varnish  Association  would  to-day 
have  been  looked  upon  as  one  of  the  best  friends  of  the 
hardware  trade.  Unfortunately  such  an  opinion  does  not 
exist  at  the  present  time. 

Want  Better  Conditions 

It  is  rather  unfortunate  that  such  an  opinion  does  not 
«  exist,  because  with  only  a  very  few  exceptions  the  mem- 
bers of  the  Paint  and  Varnish  Association  are  heartily 
in  sympathy  with  any  movement  towards  creating  better 
conditions  in  the  retail  hardware  trade  and  in  assisting 
the  retailers  in  any  possible  way  to  make  their  paint  de- 
partments more  attractive,  more  profitable  and  a  more  im- 
portant part  of  the  business. 

There  are  many  ways  in  which  the  Association  could 
co-operate  to  a  greater  extent  with  the  retail  trade.  We 
will  dwell  on  only  a  few  of  them  in  this  article,  others 
will  be  taken  up  in  later  issues.  These  observations  are 
based  on  interviews  by  members  of  HARDWARE  AND 
METAL'S  staff  with  prominent  retail  distributors  of 
paints  and  varnishes,  and  also  with  members  of  the 
Paint  and  Varnish  Association. 

Have  Good  Effect 

We  believe  that  regular  messages  coming  from  the 
paint  and  varnish  manufacturers  as  an  association  would 
have  a  splendid  effect  on  the  trade  generally.  We  do  not 
care  what  form  these  messages  may  take  so  long  as 
they  are  delivered  into  the  hands  of  the  retail  hard- 
ware men  and  clerks  who  are  most  interested  in  what  the 
paint   manufacturers   have   to   say. 

For  instance,  a  message  from  the  Paint  and  Varnish 
Association  at  the  present  time,  giving  the  retail  hard- 
ware trade  information  regarding  conditions  which  pre- 
vail in  the  paint  trade  at  present.  The  retailers  could  use 
this  information  to  splendid  advantage  in  over  the 
counter  sales  talks.  There  is  no  doubt  a  great  deal 
of  splendid  information  on  this  subject  in  the  possession 
of  the  paint  and  varnish  manufacturers,  and  this  infor- 
mation would  prove  of  great  value  to  retail  hardware 
merchants  and  their  clerks  at  the  present  time. 

Information  of  this  kind  will  prove  of  even  greater 
value  during  the  coming   spring  months.     It  would   have 


proved  of  great  value  had  it  been  placed  in  the  hands  of 
the  trade  on  various  occasions  during  the  war  period. 

Question  of  Analysis 

There  is  another  matter  that  is  receiving  some  atten- 
tion in  retail  circles  at  the  present  time,  and  we  believe 
it  is  a  matter  which  is  to  come  up  at  the  retail  hardware 
convention  to  be  held  in  February  next.  It  is  a  ques- 
tion of  whether  or  not  a  law  requiring  an  analysis 
or  other  description  of  the  contents  of  paint  packages 
would  be  of  any  benefit  to  the  retail  hardware  trade  in 
order  to  assist  the  latter  in  meeting  the  competition  of 
the  department  stores  who  sell  ready-mixed  paints  at 
very  low  prices  and  make  rather  strong  claims  regarding 
the  quality  of  the  low  price  paints.  The  Paint  and  Var- 
nish Association  no  doubt  has  some  splendid  information 
along  these  lines  and  should  pass  this  information  along 
to  the  retail  hardware  trade  and  let  the  latter  have  some 
light  on  the  subject. 

Enacted  Legislation 

The  question  of  the  analysis  of  ready-mixed  paints  is 
one  that  has  been  taken  up  on  a  great  many  occasions  in 
the  United  States  and  at  least  12  States  in  the  United 
States  have  enacted  paint  legislation.  There  is  in  the 
United  States  what  some  of  the  paint  men  refer  to  as 
the  Model  Bill,  but  the  legislation  in  these  States  is  not  all 
in  accordance  with  the  Model  Bill.  There  is  a  vast 
r  mount  of  most  important  information  which  would  be 
of  great  value  if  in  possession  of  the  retail  hardware 
trade  during  these  uncertain  times. 

Soya  Bean  Oil 

There  is  another  matter  which  has  been  discussed  to 
a  considerable  extent  and  one  which  could  have  been 
cleared  up  in  a  message  from  the  Paint  and  Varnish 
Association.  During  the  period  when  linseed  oil  prices 
were  so  very  high  and  a  number  of  paint  manufacturers 
were  attributing  the  increased  cost  of  paints,  etc.,  to  the 
high  prices  of  linseed  oil,  etc.,  rumors  were  floating 
throughout  the  trade  that  the  manufacturers  in  a  number 
of  cases  were  not  using  linseed  oil,  but  were  using  soya 
bean  oil,  which  in  the  opinion  of  many  members  of  the 
retail  trade  is  a  rather  inexpensive  product  compared  with 
linseed  oil. 

The  fact  of  the  matter  is,  according  to  some  manu- 
facturers' that  this  latter  oil  was  costing  practically  as 
much  as  linseed  oil  and  there  were  no  good  grounds  for 
any  suspicion  that  manufacturers  were  using  a  low-priced 
p  oduct  in  the  manufacture  of  their  ready-mixed  paints. 

We  could  dwell  at  great  length  on  this  matter,  but 
the  point  we  have  in  mind  is  that  the  Paint  and  Varnish 
Association,  as  an  Association,  could  enlighten  the  hard- 
ware trade  on  this  subject  and  in  our  opinion  it  is  the 
duty  of  the  Association  to  do  so.  If  a  substitute  oil  is 
being  used  there  is  no  harm  in  telling  the  trade  about 
it. 

Beneficial  Results 

We  have  referred  to  only  a  few  of  the  many  questions 
which  could  be  handled  by  the  Paint  and  Varnish  Asso- 
ciation in  a  broad  way  and  in  a  way  that  would  produce 
mutually  beneficial  results.  The  state  of  expectant  un- 
certainty which  prevails  in  retail  circles  and  which  has 
prevailed  for  a  long  time  is  not  a  good  one  either  for  the 
etailer  or  for  the  paint  and  varnish  manufacturers. 
Business  has  been  good,  it  is  true,  but  why  not  have 
'-ood  business  with  less  dissatisfaction  ?  Competition  in 
the  paint  and  varnish  business  is  becoming  keener  each 
year  in  Canada.  The  retail  hardware  merchants  of  Can- 
ada are  not  dependent  upon  paints  and  varnishes,  but 
under  favorable  conditions  it  is  in  their  interest  to  carry 
a  good  stock  and  devote  a  certain  amount  of  store  dis- 
play space,  window  displays,  local  newspaper  advertising, 
personal  effort,  etc.,  to  pushing  the  sale  of  paints  and 
varnishes. 

Co-operation    Essential 

Without  the   proper  co-operation  from  the  paint  and 
Cotninued  on  page  84 


January   10,   1920 


HARDWARE    AND    METAL 


49 


Seasonable  Window  Suggestions 


Window  displays  of  shaving  materials  always  carry  interest  to  men.  The  illustration  offers  suggestions  for  ar- 
ranging a  display  along  these  lines.  Men  also  are  always  interested  in  an  assortment  of  tools  and  just  now 
with  so  much   building  in  prospect  a     xvindcu-  display  of  this  kind  is  timely. 


Homemaker-i  are  quick  to  note  window  displays  containing  devices  that  will  make  for  labor-saving  or  help 
them  in  their  work.  A  display  of  these  goods  lends  itself  readily  to  mak;ng  an  attractive  showing.  Galvan- 
ized ware  is  in  demand  more  or  less  all  the  year  and  a  window  dressed  with  liuex  such  as  are  shown  is  sure  to 
start  them   moving.  ' 


50 


January  10,  1920 


Higher  Prices  for  Oils  and  Gasoline 

Advance  Already  Made  and  It  is  Expected  That  Further  Increases  May  Go  Into  Effect 
at  Any  Time — Record  Demands  From  All  Parts  of  the  Country 

and  for  Export  Business 


DUE  to  a  recent  advance  of  75  cents 
per  barrel  in  the  price  of  crude 
oil,  and  due  also  in  part  to  the 
present  high  exchange  rate  against  Can- 
ada, prices  of  gasoline,  kerosene,  and  all 
lubricating  oils  have  been  increased. 

The  wholesale  price  of  gasoline  has 
been  advanced  2  cents  per  gallon,  of 
kerosene  3  cents  per  gallon,  and  the  in- 
crease in  lubricating  oils  ranges  from  3 
to  fifteen  cents  per  gallon. 

It  was  stated  to  HARDWARE  AND 
METAL  by  oil  company  officials  that 
still  further  advances  are  likely  to  be 
made  very  shortly.  The  demand  for  oil 
products  has  been  unprecedented  and  it 
is  with  difficulty  that  many  of  the  larger 
orders  are  being  filled  as  every  effort  is 
being  made  to  distribute  the  available 
supplies  so  that  there  will  be  no  interfer- 
ence with  domestic  demands. 

Prices  Kept  Down 

"It  has  been  our  policy  to  keep  the 
prices  on  our  products  as  steady  as  pos- 
sible during  the  past  few  years,  and 
especially  during  the  year  1919  when 
prices  on  so  many  commodities  got  be- 
yond control  of  manufacturers  in  so 
many  other  lines  owing  to  strikes,  lock- 
outs, scarcity  of  raw  materials,  and  many 
other  trade  disruptions,  said  G.  W. 
Mayer,  vice-president  of  the  Imperial  Oil 
Company,  to  HARDWARE  AND 
METAL.  f 

"According  to  our  figures,  gasoline  is 
cheaper  now  than  it  was  a  year  ago. 
For  instance,  our  quotation  for  January 
1,  1919,  was  33  cents  per  gallon,  and  on 
January  1,  1920,  the  quotation  was  32 
cents  ner  gallon.  Last  June  the  Govern- 
ment lifted  the  war  tax  which  naturally 
enabled  us  to  sell  cheaper. 
Production  Costs 

"However  the  costs  of  producing  can- 
not continually  increase  without  reflect- 
ing in  the  finished  product.  Crude  oil 
has  advanced  at  a  very  steady  rate  and 
is  quoted  at  considerably  higher  figures. 
For  example,  mid-continent  crude  oil  on 
January  1,  191.9,  was  quoted  at  $2.25  ner 
barrel,  while  January  1,  1920,  quotation 
was  $2.75  per  barrel.  Pcnsylvania  crude 
oil  on  January  1,  1919,  was  quoted  at  $4 
per  barrel,  while  the  January  1,  1920 
ouctation  was  $5  per  barrel.  It  would 
be  impossible  to  state  any  particular  fac- 
tors that  directly  cause  these  advances 
in  the  crude  oil.  The  high  cost  of  labor 
is  undoubtedly  one  feature.  The  high 
cost  of  exchange  between  the  United 
States  and  Canada,  also  the  increased 
price  of  handling  and  hauling,  is  another, 
and  v/hen  one  stops  to  consider  that  prac- 
tically everyone  is  netting  more  money 
for  a  dav's  work  than  formerly  and  then 
try  and  imagine  how  many  hands  that 
handle  oil  directly  or  indirectly,  whether 
it  be  in  the  process  of  refining,  in  tran- 


sit, or  in  handling  the  finished  product,  it 
is  only  natural  to  conclude  that  if  these, 
costs  keep  compounding  all  the  way  up 
to  the  finished  product  that  the  finished 
product  must  of  necessity  be  increased. 

Better  for  Business 

As  a  matter  of  fact  we  do  not  like 
to  see  high  figures  for  any  of  our  pro- 
ducts, and  would  much  prefer  to  be  able 
to  sell  gasoline  for  15  cents  per  gallon 
than  to  sell  for  high  prices.  As  in  the 
case  of  the  cheaper  price  the  use  is  free 
and  unrestricted,  whereas  the  higher 
price  restricts  sales  and  decreases  the 
aggregate  turnover.  This  may  be  one 
of  the  reasons  we  have  not  previously 
advanced  our  selling  price  with  our  cost 
as  well  as  the  fact  that  we  expected  to 
hold  out  till  the  peak  had  been  reached 
so  as  to  be  in  a  position  to  gradually  re- 
cede to  lower  levels  without  causing  any 
disruptions. 

Although  there  are  many  trucks  and 
automobiles  in  Canada,  our  biggest  de- 
mand comes  from  the  backbone  of  the 
country,  that  is  to  say,  the  farmer,  and 
while  we  expect  one  of  the  largest  year's 
business  it  really  remains  up  to  the  far- 
mer and  his  crops. 

Farmers  Big  Buyers 

The  process    of    modern     farming     is 


gradually  changing  to  more  scientific  and 
labor-saving   methods.        Many    farmers 
:ame  to  town  now  several  times  a  week 
instead  of  leaving  their  visits  until  Sat- 
urday  afternoon   or  perhaps   every   two 
weeks.    This  is  made  possible  by  the  use 
of   automobiles,    and   where   formerly   a 
trip   to   town   was   more   or    less    of   an 
event,  owing  to  the  length  of  time   re- 
quired  for  feeding   stock   and   finishing 
chores  owing  to  the  prolonged  length  of 
the  trip,  now  it  is  only  a  matter  of  an 
hour  or  so  to  run  into  town  and  back, 
without  materially  disturbing  the  day's 
routine.     This  naturally  keeps  the   far- 
mer in  better  touch  with  the  times,  and 
owing  to  the  increased  convenience  de- 
rived from  satisfactory  use  of  *he  motor 
for   transportation,    he    is    already    well 
sold  on  any  mechanical   appliance    that 
will  further  help  him  in  production,  with 
the   final  result   that   most   of  the   best 
farms   are   equipped   with   tractors    and 
many   other    gasoline    or    oil-driven    de- 
vices    Every  year  the  number  is  increas- 
ing.   The  fact  that  we  have  on  order  two 
steel  tankers  at    a    cost     approximately 
$6,000,000,  and  when  you  stop  to  figure 
that  these  will  not  be   delivered  for  at 
least   two  years,  it  will  give  some  idea 
of  how  we  expect  increased  consumption 
during  the  coming  vears. 


Proposed  Amendment  Would  Restrict 
Shipping  Conditions 

Railways  Asking  Dominion  Board  to  Change  Laws  Regarding 

Iron  and  Steel  Consignments — The  Proposed 

Amendments 


THE  railways  of  Canada  have  sub- 
mitted to  the  Board  of  Railway 
Commissioners  at  Ottawa  for 
their  approval  an  amendment  which,  if 
put  into  effect,  will  provide  for  certain 
restrictive  shipping  conditions,  affecting 
especially  iron  and  steel. 

This  is  outlined  below.  In  the  mean- 
time the  Board  of  Trade  of  the  City  of 
Toronto  is  securing  from  the  men  in  the 
trade  directly  interested  their  views  on 
the  matter  with  a  view,  if  it  is  deemed 
advisable,  of  taking  the  matter  up  at 
Ottawa. 

The  Regulations 
Canadian    Freight    Classification    No. 
16,  on  page   101,  item   34,  provides  the 
following : 

Iron  and  Steel 

LCL     CL 

Bar    4         5  class. 

In  proposed  Supplement  No.  13  to  the 
Classification,  recently  submitted  to  the 
Board  of  Railway  Commissioners  for  ap- 
proval, the  railways  have  inserted  the 
following  amendment  of  this  item,  which, 


while  not  directly  changing  the  ratings, 
provides  for  certain  restrictive  shipping 
conditions,  as  follows: 

Iron  and  Steel 

LCL     CL 
Bars,    not    otherwise 
indexed    by    name 
(see  Notes) : 
Loose   or   in   pack- 
ages       4         5 

Note. — Ratings  apply  on  drawn  or 
rolled  iron  or  steel  bars,  either  square, 
round  or  otherwise  shaped  in  the  draw- 
ing or  rolling  process,  also  on  such  bars 
when  bent,  twisted,  or  otherwise  de- 
formed, galvanized,  ground,  hammered, 
punched  or  sheared,  but  ratings  will  not 
apply  if  further  work  has   been  done. — 

Shipping  Regulations 

Note  2. — (a)  Iron  or  Steel  bars  having 

value   of   25   cents   or   more   per   pound, 

when  shipped  in  less  than  carloads,  must 

be  in  barrels,  boxes  or  crates,  or  if  not 

Continued   on  page  75 


January    10,   1920 


51 


Standardizing  the  Retail  Trade 

Interesting  Answers  of  Hardware  Merchants  Regarding  Proposals  Made    by    Presi- 
dent of  the  Manitoba  Board  of  the  Retail  Merchants'  Association 

of  Canada 


SOME  interesting  comments  were  made  by  hardware  merchants 
in  reference  to  the  following  which  was  sent  to  HARDWARE 
AND  METAL  by  A.  G.  Box,  President,  of  the  Manitoba  Board 
of  the  Retail  Merchants'  Association  of  Canada: — 

'Standardizing  the  Retail  Trade 

I  have  been  requested  to  express  my  opinion  on  how  the  retail 
trade  could  be  improved  to  meet  the  service  now  demanded  by  the 
public.  In  my  travels  throughout  the  West  during  the  past  number 
of  years,  I  have  more  and  more  realized  the  fact  that  many  of  our 
merchants  are  not  giving  adequate  service  owing  to  lack  of  know- 
ledge of  the  lines  they  are  carrying.  Too  many  enter  the  field 
with  the  idea  that  merchandising  is  something  that  anyone  can  go 
into  by  merely  buying  goods  with  the  idea  of  selling  them  again. 
It  takes  the  average  man  about  two  years  to  realize  that  he  should 
have  had  previous  experience  to  qualify  to  become  a  merchant. 
Times  have  changed.  A  man  cannot  go  into  business  now  the  same 
as  he  could  twenty  years  ago  and  make  a  success  of  it.  The  public 
knows  as  much  about  retail  prices  as  the  merchants  themselves, 
consequently  a  merchant  must  continuously  watch  the  markets  to 
see  that  his  purchases  are  right. 

Business,  if  properly  conducted,  requires  knowledge,  experience 
and  continuous  training.  Merchandising  involves  study  and  prac- 
tical application.  Retailing  requires  men  qualified  to  serve  the 
public  in  the  various  linas  represented.  It  is  not,  enough  that  a 
man  have  a  little  money.  He  should  be  a  trained  man  in  the  line 
which  he  proposes  to  carry. 

I  am  convinced  that  standards  should  be  established  for  each 
line  of  the  retail  trade.  What  I  mean  is,  that  a  man  should  have 
certain  qualifications  before  he  is  allowed  to  enter  the  retail  field. 
He  should  be  required  to  have  a  knowledge  of  the  merchandise 
he  proposes  to  sell.  He  should  know  how  to  keep  a  record  of  his 
business.  He  should  be  required  to  paas  a  simple  examination 
set  by  a  Trade  Commissioner  assisted  by  an  Advisory  Committee 
in  each  line.— A.  G.  BOX. 


"I  differ  entirely  with  Mr.  Box  when 
he  says  that  certain  standards  should  be 
established  for  each  line  of  the  retail 
trade,"  said  Ed.  Wanless,  of  Chatham, 
Ont.,  vice-president  of  the  Ontario  Re- 
tail Hardware  Association.  "I  tell  you 
why  I  say  this.  I  do  not  claim  that  our 
business  has  been  a  wonderful  success 
but  it  has  made  very  satisfactory  pro- 
gress and  I  can  tell  you  that  it  would  not 
have  been  started  had  an  examination 
been  necessary,  as  the  writer  was  abso- 
lutely ignorant  of  the  hardware  business 
at  that  time.  If  Mr.  Box  were  to  say 
that  it  would  be  necessary  to  have  cer- 
tain business  ability  then  I  heartily  agree 
with  him." 

Would  Protect  Trade 

"It  strikes  me  the  idea  is  a  mighty 
good  one,"  said  F.  W.  Silvester,  of  Sil- 
vester Bros.,  StoufTville,  Ont.  "It  should 
eliminate  considerable  demoralization 
caused  by  ignorance  and  inexperience. 
It  would  protect  the  retail  trade  first  of 
all,  but  also,  I  am  sure,  the  wholesaler, 
the  manufacturer,  and  the  public.  Be- 
cause   someone   always   has   to   pay   for 


mistakes.  The  professions  all  ha^e  set 
standards  and  strict  regulations.  Re- 
tailers should  aspire  to  something  simi- 
lar. This  would  be  a  live  subject  for 
discussion  at  the  hardware  convention 
next  month." 

"My  opinion  is  that  the  statement  made 
by  Mr.  Box  was  made  for  a  purpose 
other  than  to  be  carried  out  as  it  seems 
to  me  this  is  not  practical,"  said  Wm. 
Pow,  of  the  firm  of  Pow  &  Wilcox,  Till- 
sonburg,  Ont.  "For  instance,  if  cer- 
tain qualifications  and  an  examination 
before  some  advisory  committee  were 
necessary  it  would  put  at  least  twenty- 
five  per  cent,  of  the  merchants  out  of 
the  retail  trade. 

"Let  this  man  travel  the  rural  districts 
where  a  man  should  have  a  better  knowl- 
edge of  merchandise  in  general  and  a 
better  method  of  keening  a  record  of  his 
business,  and  he  will  find  in  a  big  per 
centage  of  these  stores,  the  poorest  kept 
dingy  stores,  with  no  system  of  keeping 
a  oroper  record  of  his  business,  vet,  you 
try  and  force  these  same  merchants  to 
a   standard   of   doing   business    and   you 


will  have  on  your  hands  some  of  the 
same  trouble  they  are  having  in  Rus- 
sia tc-day.  This  used  to  be  a  free  coun- 
try but  it  is  just  such  things  as  these 
that  cause  the  unrest  in  this  country. 
Trade   Papers   Help 

"The  way  to  educate  this  class  of  the 
retail  trade  is  through  trade  papers  or 
representatives  of  trade  papers  coming 
in  personal  contact,  where  they  could 
give  them  pointers  on  System,  for  with- 
out System  no  business  can  be  run  prop- 
erly. 

"The  proposition  as  outlined  by  Mr. 
Box  looks  good  on  paper  but  will  never 
be  carried  out." 

A  Broad  Question 

"This  is  rather  a  difficult  question  to 
answer  off-hand,"  said  D.  A.  Macnab,  of 
Brockville,  Ont.,  ex-president  of  the  On- 
tario Retail  Hardware  Association.  "It 
has,  no  doubt,  some  good  points  about  it. 
On  the  other  hand,  it  would  appear  to 
be.  some  'red  tape.'  It  seems  to  me  this 
would  be  a  good  question  for  the  Hard- 
ware Association  to  take  up  and  discuss 
at  the  next  meeting.  If  retailers  could 
only  get  together,  with  real  organization, 
I  believe  it  would  make  it  better  for 
everyone." 

Food  For  Thought 

"The  president  of  the  Board  of  Mani- 
toba Retail  Merchants'  Association  brings 
forward  in  his  letter  to  HARDWARE 
AND  METAL  some  food  for  thought," 
said  Alf.  J.  Wright,  of. Hamilton,  presi- 
dent of  the  Ontario  Retail  Hardware 
Association. 

"Have  you  a  knowledge  of  the  line 
you  propose  to  buy? 

"Do  you  know  how  to  keep  a  record  of 
your  business,  and  he  suggests  the  pass- 
ing of  an  examination  before  entering 
the  retail  field. 

"I  am  of  the  opinion  that  manufac- 
turers, jobbers  and  others  in  Ontario,  at 
least  do  satisfy  themselves  of  the  above, 
in  order  to  protect  themselves  and  the 
retail  trade. 

Cannot  Be  Forced 

"As  to  the  examinations  proposed,  suc- 
cessful merchants  cannot  be  made  by  an 
Act  of  Parliament.  A  simple  examina- 
tion would  not  eliminate  the  foolish,  the 
extravagant  or  dishonest  men  who  desire 
to  enter  the  retail  trade.  It  is  the  duty 
of  the  jobber  and  manufacturer  to  apply 
the  brakes  to  the  ambitious,  who  do  not 
measure  up  to  the  job. 

"The  Government  require  a  return,  each 
year,  for  income  purposes,  consequently 
a  retailer  must  keep  books.  My  observa- 
tion is  that  manv  men  have  made  a  suc- 
cess of  the  retail  business  without  hav- 
ing had  one  week's  apnrenticeship  in 
the  line  they  are  engaged  in." 

In   Favor  of  It 

"I    am    of   the    same    opinion    as    Mr. 
Continued  on  page  56 


52 


January  10,  1920 


Probabilities  of  Higher  Paint  Prices 

Higher  Pig  Lead  Markets  a  Big  Factor — While  Freer  Supplies  Oil  Soon  Demand  Will 
Fully  Absorb — Specialties  and  Varnishes  Firming 


A  DECIDED  firmness  character- 
izes the  paint  markets.  Tendencies 
point  to  an  upward  revision  of 
prices  for  various  prepared  paints,  and 
manufacturers  state  that,  were  it  not 
for  the  heavy  volume  of  business  that 
is  being  booked,  they  could  not  possibly 
continue  to  sell  at  present  schedules. 
With  a  continued  upward  trend  for 
various  raw  materials,  and  with  no 
single  raw  materials  showing  easing 
tendencies,  it  is  felt  by  many  manufac- 
turers that  present  pi-ices  will  soon  have 
to  be  altered. 

Pig  Lead  Factor 

Advances  have  been  numerous  in  the 
basic  schedules  for  pig  lead.  These  ad- 
vances- have  been  continuing  much 
longer  than  heavy  buyers  expected  they 
would,  and  the  peak  does  not  seem  to 
have  yet  been  reached.  It  will  be 
understood  that,  while  the  manufactur- 
ers of  prepared  paints  buy  their  ma- 
terials several  months  ahead,  if  they  are 
to  be  had,  that  supplies  will  run  out,  and 
this  condition  seems  to  be  nearing,  that 
is,  supplies  are  now  running  low. 

The  advance  of  price  noted  elsewhere 
for  white  lead  in  oil  bears  very  specially 
on  the  trend  of  the  market  •  for  manu- 
factured lines  containing  pig  lead  in  any 
form.  An  advance  of  75c  per  100  lbs. 
for  dry  white  lead  a  few  days  ago  made 
the  advance  necessary  for  the  product 
ground  in  oil. 


Oil  and  Turps 

As  pointed  out  in  the  market  report 
on  linseed  oil  to-day,  the  supply  will 
probably  be  larger  from  .  now  on,  or 
within  a  few  weeks.  But,  in  spite  of 
this,  heavy  users  of  the  product  state 
that  the  demands  for  the  coming  season 
will  be  so  insistent  as  to  use  all  the  oil 
that  will,  and  can  be  produced.  Then, 
in  addition  to  this,  Europe  is  to  be  a 
much  heavier  buyer,  it  is  believed,  and 
she  will  pay  good  prices  for  her  require- 
ments. 

Turpentine  is  very  firm  and  likely  to 
be  in  active  demand  by  the  trade  here, 
and  in  all  other  countries,  and,  conse- 
quently, prices  will  be  high. 

25  to  50c  Advance 

"I  think  it  will  be  safe  to  predict  an 
early  advance  for  mixed  paints  of  25 
to  50c  per  gallon,"  said  a  prominent 
paint  man  to  HARDWARE  AND 
METAL  this  week.  "And  the  same  ten- 
dencies that  apply  to  prepared  paint  are 
applicable,  as  well,  to  specialties,  and 
particularly  to  varnishes.  Gums  are 
very  high,  and  are  difficult  to  procure. 
Varnish  makers  will  certainly  have  to 
advance  their  prices  at  an  early  date." 

In  addition  to  the  higher  prices  out- 
lined for  other  raw  materials,  zinc,  and 
which  is  so  extensively  used  in  paints, 
has  been  reaching  higher  levels  of  late, 
and  is  still  advancing. 


Continued  Advance  in  Prices  is  Causing 

Some  Anxiety  in  Business  Circles 


WASHINGTON.— General  anxiety 
prevails  throughout  American 
business  at  the  continued  advance 
in  prices,  and  a  readjustment  appears  im- 
minent, the  federal  Reserve  Board  re- 
ported in  its  review  of  business  condi- 
tions. Through  the  board's  statement 
inference  was  strongly  given  that  a  re- 
duction in  prices  is  due  because  of  a 
recognized  curtailment  of  buying  power 
coupled  with  a  lack  of  unanimity  of 
opinion  as  to  what  the  future  holds. 

While  retail  trade  shows  general  ac- 
tivity, and  wholesalers  and  manufactur- 
ers were  represented  as  unable  to  supply 
the  demand,  the  arrest  growth  in  busi- 
ness was-  shown  to  have  been  in  terms  of 
dollars  and  not  in  units  of  production. 
High  wages  for  labor  further  complicated 
the  situation,  according  to  the  board's 
view.  Practicallv  everv  federal  reserve 
district  reports  that  "skilled  labor  was 
working  only,  sufficient  days  to  keep  p-o- 
ing,"  resulting  in  a  consequent  falling 
off  in  production. 

Credits   Shortened 
In  face  of    heavy    demands,     cautious 
manufacturers   were    described    as     dis- 


inclined to  commit  themselves  far  in  ad- 
vance. Credits  have  been  shortened  and 
uncertainty  as  to  changes  which  may 
come  within  the  next  three  months  is 
forestalling  the  expansion  in  trade  natur- 
ally to  be  expected  as  the  nation  gets 
back  more  nearly  to  its  peace-time  ac- 
tivity. The  high  cost  of  living  was  re- 
ferred to  as  ar  "unquestionable  menace." 

Labor  Unrest 

Labor  unrest,  the  review  said,  showed 
some  abatement  during  the  month,  but 
the  greatly  reduced  production  of  the 
preceding  .month  was  not  by  any  means 
fully  restored.  The  termination  of  the 
coal  strike  and  the  cessation  of  activity 
in  the  steel  strike,  as  well  as  the  greatly 
increased  number  of  men  employed  in 
those  lines  in  many  districts,  accounted 
for  a  lower  figure  representing  un- 
f^nployment,  the  board  said. 

"From  many  sections,"  the  board  as- 
serted, "it  is  reported  that  the  chief  dif- 
ficulty does  not  lie  in  svstematic  strikes 
but  in  the  indisposition  of  workers  to  in- 
crease production  and  keep  steadily  at 
work.      The    reduced   output   as    a    result 


of  very  short  hours  or  the  suspension 
of  work  a  given  number  of  days  a  week 
has  proved  a  national  problem.  The  in- 
disposition of  labor  to  pursue  such  a 
policy  is  ascribed  by  many  to  high  wages 
and  the  desire  to  employ  the  increased 
purchasing  power  thus  obtained  in  the 
purchase  of  leisure  rather  than  goods." 


Tin  Plates  and  Copper 

Show  Steady  Advance 

LONDON,  Eng.,  Jan.  8.— As  high  as 
£2  lis.  6d.  was  paid  to-day  for  April- 
June  delivery  of  Welsh  tin  plates. 

The  London  Iron  and  Steel  Exchange 
business  is  restricted,  manufacturers 
mostly  declining  to  quote  pending  the 
price  adjustment  made  necessary  by  the 
advance  in  railway  rates. 

A  heavy  accumulation  of  cabled  orders 
is  noted. 

The  strength  and  activity  in  copper, 
tin  and  other  metals  is  unabated.  Cop- 
per is  quoted  at  a  t'5  and  tin  at  a  £4 
advance. 


New  Bankruptcy  Act 

Effective  on  July  I 

Ottawa. — An  order-in-council  has  been 
passed  setting  July  1,  1920,  as  the  date 
on  which  the  Bankruptcy  Act  passed  at 
the  1919  spring  session  is  to  go  into 
force.  A  full  outline  of  the  provisions 
of  the  Act  appeared  in  a  previous  issue 
of  HARDWARE  AND  METAL.  The 
Bill  was  not  allowed  to  go  into  effect  at 
once  as  it  was  desired  to  give  the  busi- 
ness community  a  year  or  more  to  adjust 
itself  to  the  new  situation. 

There  are  several  important  features 
in  the  new  Bankruptcy  Act  which  has 
been  declared  by  merchants  and  others 
to  be  the  most  advanced  piece  of  in- 
solvency legislation  on  the  continent. 

It  provides  that  all  assignees  must  be 
appointed  by  the  various  provincial  Gov- 
ernments and  that  they  must  be  capable 
men,  who  will  be  bonded  for  the  work 
they  are  to  perform. 

Another  provision  is  that  the  benefits 
of  the  Act  are  open  to  men  in  business 
or  private  citizens,  if  the  latter  so  desire 
to  make  an  assignment.  They  may  be 
declared  insolvent  if  it  is  found  that,  the 
circumstances  warrant  such  action. 

When  a  merchant  has  filed  a  statement 
showing  his  financial  condition,  his  cre- 
ditors can  take  action  to  have  him  de- 
clared insolvent  if  his  statement  justi- 
fies this  being  done. 

Another  important  feature  of  the  new 
Act  is  that  all  persons  carrying  on  busi- 
ness must  keep  books  showing  the  record 
of  all  their  transactions. 


January    10,   1920 


53 


Autos,  Tractors  and  Electricity 

"These  Three/'  Says  Foster  Bauslaugh  of  Waterford,  Ont.,    "Are    Offering   Steadily 
Increasing  Possibilities  for  Sales  to  Hardware  Merchants" — Farmers  Big 
Buyers  of  Any  Labor-Saving  Equipment — Window  and  Store 

Displays  Important 

Based  on  an  Interview  by  C.  E.  PARSONS,  of  Hardware  and  Metal,  With  Foster  Bauslaugh,  of  Waterford,  Ont. 


BEING  the  only  hardware  merchant 
in  a  hustling  town  of  1,000  has 
many  distinct  advantages.  It  also 
has  many  responsibilities,  especially 
when  back  of  the  town  is  a  prosperous 
farming  community,  with  a  big  annual 
buying  power. 

This  situation  is  one  of  the  reasons 
why  the  hardware  business  of  Foster 
Bauslaugh,  at  Waterford,  Ont.,  has  grow- 
ing pains.  Every  succeeding  month  for 
some  months  past,  the  growing  pains 
have  been  getting  more  and  more  acute. 

Needs   Larger  Store 

"I  have  realized  for  some  time,"  said 
Mr.  Bauslaugh,  in  discussing  business 
with  HARDWARE  AND  METAL,  "that 
I  need  more  room.  Business  has  been 
excellent  and  it  is  growing  steadily.  The 
people  are  buying  as  they  have  never 
bought  before  and  if  I  have  the  room  to 
put  in  more  lines  I  know  I  would  have 
no  difficulty  in  selling  them." 

With  this  end  in  view  Mr.  Bauslaugh 
plans  to  occupy  larger  premises  during 
the  spring. 

While  there  are  at  the  present  time 
only  ten  tractors  in  his  territory,  this 
is  ten  more  than  there  were  a  year  ago 
and  Mr.  Bauslaugh,  who  has  been  keep- 
ing a  close  line  on  developments,  sees 
a  big  future  for  them. 

Will  All  Need  Supplies 
"I  am  expecting  that  the  sale  of  trac- 
tors is  going  to  grow  rapidly,"  he  said. 
"Scarcity  of  help  on  the  farms  is  a  fac- 
tor in  creating  the  demand  but  aside 
from  that  the  tractor  is  making  good  and 


farmers  are  realizing  that  they  can  do 
more  work  and  do  it  quicker  and  more 
economically.  They  are  finding  the  ma- 
chines easy  to  handle  and  that  they  get 
results  they  never  could  in  other  ways. 
"Probably  seventy-five  per  cent,  of  the 
farmers  in  this  district  own  their  own 
automobiles.  They  have  learned  that  the 
auto  is  a  real  help  to  them  and  from 
what  they  know  about  autos  they  are 
the  more  ready  to  buy  tractors. 

Opportunity   For   Business 

"Every  time  a  tractor  is  sold  and  every 
time  an  auto  is  taken  home  it  means  an 
opportunity  for  selling  oils,  spark  plugs, 
and  other  things.  My  business  in  auto 
accessories  has  shown  a  steady  growth. 
T  am  looking  for  it  to  grow  more  and 
more  every  year.  Farmers  who  have 
automobiles  would  not  be  without  them 
and  I  believe  the  same  thing  is  going  to 
be  true  of  tractors.  Both  the  auto  and 
the  tractor  are  here  to  stay  because  they 
are  making  good.  The  auto  accessory 
business  has  proved  a  most  satisfactory 
department  in  my  store  and  I  expect  to 
.  be  able  to  handle  auto  and  tractor  acces- 
sories  and  supplies  together." 

Another    Development 

Another  big  development  which  Mr. 
Bauslaugh  sees  coming  is  in  electricity. 

"We  only  have  one  power  line  through 
this  section,"  he  said,  "but  unless  I  miss 
my  guess  it  will  not  be  very  long  be- 
fore there  will  be  a  great  many.  The 
farmers  who  are  on  the  one-power  line 
are  the  envy  of  their  neighbors  for  miles 
arcund  because  they  can  have  electrical 


conveniences  and  do  things  electrically 
that  the  others  cannot.  There  is  no 
question  about  the  demand  for  more 
power.  It  is  only  a  natural  development. 
People  everywhere  are  the  same.  They 
want  to  get  away  from  all  the  hard 
work  and  drudgery  they  can.  Every- 
one, farmer  and  city  man,  has  for  some 
time  past  been  up  against  the  problem 
of  getting  dependable  help.  In  many 
cases,  electricity  has  been  a  real  boon 
and  those  who  were  fortunate  enough 
to  be  able  to  lighten  their  work  by  using 
power  equipment  of  one  kind  and  an- 
other, have  been  the  best  advertisements 
it  could  have. 

"They  have  been  so  well  pleased  with 
it  that  they  buy  more  and  hore  equip- 
.  ment  themselves  and  tell  their  friends 
about  it.  Just  now  the  trouble  seems  to 
be  that  power  lines  cannot  be  built  fast 
enough,  and  that  there  is  not  enough 
power  to  go  round.  These  conditions 
will  be  rectified  sooner  or  later,  and  the 
day  is  coming  when  electricity  wil  be 
available  for  everyone,  and  that  is  going 
to  mean  big  opportunities  for  selling  all 
kinds  of  electrical  goods." 

Mr.  Bauslaugh  says  that  he  finds  a 
steady  demand  for  labor-saving  equip- 
ment for  women  and  instanced  his  sales 
of  washing  machines.  While  these  aver- 
age 25  yearly,  it  must  be  remembered 
that  Waterford  is  only  a  town  of  1,000 
population  and  that  the  demand  is  neces- 
sarily limited.  The  point  that  Mr.  Baus- 
laugh makes  is  that  every  year  there  is 
a  sale  of  at  least  25  machines  and  he  ex- 
pects the  demand  for  electrical  washers 


Keeping  stock  in  which  people  are  interested  for  their  immediate  requirements  out  where  they 
can  see  it  is  one  of  the  best  ways  of  speeding  turnover,  nays  Foster  Bauslaugh,  of  Waterford, 
Ont.  Read  in  the  accompanying  article  ivhat  he  thinks  about  the  future  of  auto  and  tractor 
accexzories    for    hardware    merchants. 


54 


HARDWARE    AND    METAL 


January  10,  1920 


to  develop  just  as  rapidly  as   power  is 
available. 

Does  Credit  Business 

Mr.  Bauslaugh  believes  that  the  cut- 
ting out  of  unnecessary  credit  is  a  move 
in  the  right  direction,  but  he  says  that 
the  merchants  generally  have  allowed 
credit  for  so  long  that  the  farmers  have 
come  to  look  upon  it  as  a  natural  thing. 
In  his  own  case  he  has  about  $4,000  on 
his  books  all  the  time. 

"We  lose  very,  very  little,"  said  Mr. 
Bauslaugh,  "but,  of  course,  we  have  to 
wait  sometimes.  A  great  many  of  the 
farmers  come  in  to  town  in  their  autos 
on  Saturday  nights  and  every  Saturday 
evening  sees  some  one  in  to  settle  up. 
Some  nights  there  will  be  a  good  many 
of  them,  all  depending  upon  the  season 
of  the  year  and  whether  they  are  busy 
or  not.  The  farmers,  generally  speaking, 
are  good  buyers  and  they  are  honest. 
They  have  been  making  money  now  for 
some  time  as  they  never  made  it  before 
and  they  are  buying  more  and  more  all 
the  time." 

Want  Good  Goods 

Speaking  generally,  Mr.  Bauslaugh  says 
there  is  a  noticeable  demand  on  the  part 
of  the  buying  public  for  better  goods 
than  were  purchased  before.  In  pre-war 
days  very  often  it  was  a  question  of 
price  and  a  few  cents  one  way  or  an- 
other would  be  a  deciding  factor  in  mak- 
ing a  purchase.  Now,  however,  he  says 
people  know  that  they  have  to  pay  more 
anyway  and  as  they  have  the  money 
they  are  in  most  cases  willing  to  pay  a 
little  extra  and  get  an  article  about 
which  there  is  no  question  as  to  quality. 
"Take  stoves,  for  instance,"  he  said. 
"People  who  come  in  to  look  at  stoves 
invariably  want  a  nicely  finished  stove. 
It  is  not  a  question  of  what  it  is  going 
to  cost.  When  they  are  satisfied  that 
the  stove  is  a  good  heater,  or  a  good 
cooker,  and  easily  operated  and  that  it 
will  do  other  things  they  want  it  to  do 
they  will  take  the  good  stove  every  time." 

Delivers  All  Stoves 

When  a  sale  is  made  the  stove  is  de- 
livered at  the  buyer's  home  and  care  is 
taken  to  see  that  everything  is  in  good 
running  order.  Mr.  Bauslaugh  says  that 
people  appreciate  this  service  and  that 
it  gives  him  a  big  opportunity  often  to 
size  up  other  needs. 

He  keeps  a  close  watch,  for  instance, 
on  roofing  sales.  If  when  he  is  out  at  a 
farm  he  sees  a  roof  that  is  coming  in 
for  repairs  he  gets  busy  immediately  and 
very  often  closes  up  a  deal  rigrht  there. 
By  going  after  this  trade  persistently 
he  has  brought  his  sales  of  roofing  up  to 
carloads  per  annum. 

Or  it  may  be  wire  fencing  that  he  sees 
will  be  needed  or  some  other  commodity. 
There  are  liable  to  be  openings  for  sales 
at  anv  time  and  at  any  place,  he  says. 
and  the  thing  is  to  take  advantage  of 
them  and  close  the  business.  Sales  of 
wire  fencing  now  average  a  car  a  year 
with  Mr.  Bauslaugh. 

Small  Ones,  Too 

Tt  -nay  be  only  the  sale  of  some  coal 
oil  for  house  Purposes  or  for  tractor  or 


other  use  but  it  is  all  business.  And  there 
are  ways  and  ways  of  selling.  In  sell- 
ing oil,  for  instance,  "  Mr.  Bauslaugh 
points  out  to  the  farmer  the  advantage 
of  buying  in  the  larger  quantities  and 
he  has  urged  this  so  successfully  that 
now  the  great  bulk  of  his  customers  buy 
in  barrel  lots. 

Particular  attention  is  paid  by  Mr. 
Bauslaugh  to  window  displays  and  to 
store  displays. 

"We  aim  to  keep  seasonable  goods  out 
where  people  can  see  them,"  he  said. 
"We  get  splendid  results  from  window 
displays  and  find  that  people  are  keen- 
ly interested  in  them.  In  a  town  like 
this  where  so  many  farmers  are  motor- 
ing in  at  nights,  we  get  excellent  results. 
People  will  often  come  in  and  ask  us  for 
this  or  that  that  they  saw  in  our  win- 
dow." 

Store  Displays,  Too 

Store  displays  are  a  big  factor  in  boost- 


ing sales,  Mr.  Bauslaugh  says,  but  they 
must  be  seasonable  if  the  best  business 
is  to  be  done.  Working  on  this  prin- 
ciple, his  merchandise  is  constantly 
changed  around.  As  the  illustration 
shows  stoves  have  a  place  of  honor  just 
at  present  as  everyone  is  interested  in 
heating  equipment.  A  little  later  these 
will  be  replaced  by  a  showing  of  goods 
required  at  the  end  of  winter  and  early 
spring. 

Mr,  Bauslaugh  states  his  paint  sales 
have  been  most  satisfactory  and  that 
they  have  been  showing  a  steady  in- 
crease. He  attributes  this  partly  to  the 
fact  that  people  are  beginning  to  realize 
the  value  of  preserving  their  buildings 
and  other  property.  His  paint  depart- 
ment, as  may  be  seen  from  the  illustra- 
tion, is  located  in  one  of  the  best  spots 
in  the  store  and  is  well  lighted.  Keeping 
his  stock  thus  well  displayed,  Mr.  Baus- 
laugh believes,  is  a  big  point  in  connec- 
tion with  its  steady  turnover. 


Manitoba  Grain  Growers  Asking  That  Board 
of  Commerce  be  Abolished 

Delegates  Are  Also  Against  Tariff  Commission  —  Resolution 
Passed  Asking  the  Union  Government  to  Resign 


BRANDON,  Man.,  January  8.— 
Important  resolutions,  which  will 
affect  business  interests,  are  be- 
ing considered  at  the  annual  convention 
of  the  Manitoba  Grain  Growers  now  in 
session  here  and  attended  by  more  than 
600  delegates.  Premier  Norris  reiter- 
ated the  stand  he  has  taken  at  various 
meetings  throughout  the  province  in 
reference  to  the  tariff. 

Among  the  resolutions  being  consid- 
ered are  the  following:  "Whereas  the 
Union  Government  holds  the  reins  of 
power  and  has  lost  the  confidence  of 
the  people,  therefore  be  it  resolved  that 
we  ask  it  to  resign. 

"That    the    Federal      Government     re- 
nounce  its   intention     of     appointing    a 
permanent   tariff   commission." 
Want  Lumber  Probe 

"That  the  Boai-d  of  Commerce  investi- 
gate the  prices  being  charged  for  lum- 
ber." 

"That  the  Dominion  Government  be 
urged  to  expend  each  year  on  educa- 
tional improvement  as  much  as  is  spent 
on  military  and  naval  preparations." 

"Whereas  the  actions  of  the  Board  of 
Commerce,  ever  since  its  appointment, 
have  assumed  the  form  of  superficial 
and  fallacious  regulations  directed 
against  the  interests  of  the  farmers  and 
retail  distributors  in  cities  and  towns, 
while  manufacturers  of  textiles,  flour, 
meats,  boots  and  shoes  and  other  neces- 
saries of  life,  whose  evidence  before  the 
special  committee  of  the  House  of  Com- 
mons invited  immediate  investigation, 
have  been  completely  ignored; 
Disturb   Production 

"And  whereas  the  net  effect  of  the 
work  of  the  Board  of  Commerce  to  date 
has  been  to  disturb  seriously  the  vital 
sources    of      production,      to    discourage 


rather  than  encourage  an  increased  sup- 
ply of  foodstuffs  from  Canadian  farms, 
to  increase  rather  than  decrease  the 
cost  of  living,  and  generally  to  weaken 
the  economic  position  of  the  Dominion 
as  a  whole; 

"Therefore,  be  it  resolved,  that  the 
Manitoba  Grain  Growers'  Association 
urge  upon  the  Dominion  Government 
the  immediate  abolition  of  the  Board  of 
Commerce  as  a  menace  to  the  welfare 
of  the  Canadian  people." 

J.  C.  Brown,  who  succeeded  Mr. 
Henders  as  president,  in  his  report 
spoke  of  "the  people's  movement  rather 
than  the  Farmers'  movement."  He 
urged  that  "Canada  at  once  stop  tem- 
porizing, discard  all  methods  of  war 
expediency  and  adopt  a  national  policy 
based  on  sound  and  righteous  princi- 
ples. He  attacked  the  customs  tariff, 
declaring  that  by  it  privileged  interests 
may  extort  blood  money  from  those  less 
privileged. 

Winnipeg  Strike 

Referring  to  the  Winnipeg  strike  he 
said: 

"The  lesson  that  we  have  been  most 
emphatically  taught,  if  we  have  the 
wisdom  to  learn  it,  is  that  no  section 
of  the  community  can  suffer  without 
all  suffering  together." 

The  report  of  the  directors  quoted 
a  resolution  adopted  on  July  23  accept 
ing  the  resignation  of  R.  C.  Henders, 
former  president  of  the  association. 
"After  careful  consideration,"  it  says, 
"we  cannot  in  any  degree  accept  his 
attitude  on  the  tariff  in  the  recent 
Budget  and  vote,  and  therefore  we  re- 
pudiate his  stand,  accept  his  resignation 
and  reaffirm  our  adherence  to  the  prin- 
ciples of  the  Farmers'  platform." 


January   10,   1920 


55 


Fixing  the  Value  of  Merchandise 

Further  Pointers  in  Connection  With  Closing  of  the  Books  and  Taking  of  Inventory- 
Shifting  the  Burden  of  Growing  Capital — Cost  of  Handling  Credit  Accounts 


I  AM  asked  to  write  something  on 
closing  the  books.  Maybe  it  will 
seem  late  in  the  season;  tout  if  you 
still  are  figuring  your  inventory,  there 
is  plenty  of  time,  and  if  you  have 
figured  it  and  closed  your  own1  books, 
maybe  there  will  be  profit  in  a  review 
along  the  lines  I  shall  suggest. 

The  admonition  in  a  previous  issue  of 
HARDWARE  &  METAL,  to  be  honest  in 
placing  values  on  your  inventory  may 
have  led  tc  your  being  fairly  conserva- 
tive, and  that  is  well.  But  there  is  another 
chance  for  sidestepping  facts  in  the  pro- 
cess of  closing  the  books;  and  I  want 
to  help  you  continue  straight  while  you 
do  this  work.  So  I  hope  you  will  read 
this  brief  talk  rather  carefully. 

Let  me  say  that  I  have  little  know- 
ledge of  bookkeepers'  ways  of  closing.  I 
believe  they  have  a  system  of  transfer- 
ring all  totals  to  some  intermediate  ac- 
count, and  thence  to  the  ledger.  I  never 
could  see  the  use  of  the  intermediate 
step,  so  followed  thei  plan  of  carrying 
results  when  ascertained  from  any  ac- 
count in  the  ledger  directly  to  loss  and 
gain  for  final  reckoning. 

Depreciation   Must    Be    Reckoned 

There  is  no  safeguard  in  any  'business 
so  reliable  as  liberal  allowance  for  depre- 
ciation. My  word  on  this  point  is  not 
unsupported.  The  very  best  business 
houses  operate  this  to  the  limit.  Here  is 
the  rule  for  arriving  at  inventory  values 
by  one  of  the  most  successful  jobbers  on 
the  continent: 

"If  the  market  has  advanced,  'take'  at 
our  cost;  if  the  market  has  declined, 
'take'  at  market." 

I  always  like  to  copy  the  men  who  suc- 
ceed, and  this  idea  hit  me  as  pretty 
sound,  so  I  adopted  it — mostly.  My  plan 
was  to  fix  value  on  merchandise  as 
far  inside  the  facts  as  possible.  Prices 
and  totals  were  very  conservative,  in- 
deed. If  there  was  any  doubt  that  a 
thing  would  sell  readily,  it  was  priced  at 
from  half  value  down  to  nothing  at  all. 
Similarly,  items  were  made  to  stand  the 
test  for  value  all  the  way  through.  I  of- 
ten was  tempted  to  let  up  a  bit,  fearing 
(what  sometimes  did  happen)  that  I 
would  make  a  bad  showing.  Then  I  used 
to  buck  up  with  the  thought  that  I  was 
not  altering  real  values  at  all,  only  ac- 
counting values;  and  I  knew  that  I  was 
after  a  conservative  showing,  for  the 
la«t  man  I  wanted  to  deceive  was  myself. 

My  rules  for  other  resource-accounts 
were: 

Bills  outstanding:  to  be  figured  individ- 
uallv  down  the  basis  certain  to  make 
porvd:  then  from  that  total  a  blanket  10 
p»r  cent,  to  be  deducted. 

Furniture  and  fixtures  in  the  store 
were  handled  on  another  pet  theory  of 
nvne.     Any  item     bought  was  regarded 


By  HENRY  JOHNSON,  Jr. 

from  two  angles;  1st,  if  it  required  any- 
thing, it  either  was  charged  directly  in- 
to expense,  or  a  part  of  it  was  so  charg- 
ed and  the  remainder — in  case  of  an  im- 
proved appliance — was  (2)  considered 
as  having  value  for  use,  and  for  ap- 
pearance. As  appearance  is  advertis- 
ing, the  part  not  charged  to  expense  was 
divided  between  advertising  and  F.  and 
F. 

Illustration:  I  bought  a  gasoline  pump 
for  $500.  It  was  erected  in  front  of 
the  store  to  be  seen  and  attract  attention 
to  the  entire  store.  So  50  per  cent,  of  the 
payments  as  made  were  charged  to  F. 
and  F.  and  50  per  cent,  to  advertising.  At 
inventory  time,  the  entire  F.  and  F.  ac- 
count was  subjected  to  a  10  per  cent,  dis- 
count fqr  depreciation. 

Delivery  equipment  was  discounted 
20  per  cent. 

Ask  your  jobber  to  read  this  andi  then 
tell  you  whether  it  was  fairly  safe  figur- 
ing. 

Transferring  Totals 
When  my  figures  were  all  made  up  I 
never   permitted  myself     to  make     any 
skeletons    or    triaills,  tout   finished      with 
each  account  as  I  went  along. 

Merchandise  per  inventory,  pins  cus- 
tomers' bills,  scaled  as  indicated,  less 
what  I  owed,  was  credited  "by  stock, 
etc.,"  to  mdse.  account.  The  balance  then 
struck  was  transferred  to  credit  of  loss 
and  gain,  then  carried  down  for  next 
period. 

Expense,  advertising  and  barn  (deliv- 
ery) accounts  were  totalled  and  the  to- 
tals transferred  to  the  debit  of  loss  and 
pain.  My  own  account,  if  there  was  one 
(sometimes  there  was,  to  cover  things 
paid  out  for  special  purposes  in  excess 
of  mv  salary)  also  went  to  detoit  of  L. 
and  G. 

Discount  was  transferred  bodily  to 
credit  of  L.  and  G. 

I  never  quite  scraped  bottom,  though 
once  or  twice  I  came  near  it.  The  worst 
I  ever  did,  on  casting  up  the  two  sides 
of  L.  and  G..  ^-as  to  have  only  $185  to 
transfer  to  credit  capital. 

Shifting  Burden  of  Growing  Capital 

I  nearly  forgot  one  thing.  That  is, 
that  6  per  cent,  on  the  capital  employed 
was  always  added  to  expense  before  that 
account  was  transferred,  balanced  by 
credit  to  my  own  account.  It  followed 
that,  as  net  annual  earnings  were  car- 
ried to  the  credit  of  capital  from  loss 
and  <rain.  my  capital  kept  growing  and 
th-  f>  per  cent,  interest  charge  became 
1ar"-er  every  year.  And,  as  money  ac- 
cumulations were  constantly  beino"  witfr- 
''•-Tivn.  invested  in  seasoned  stocks  and 
bonds  under  a  special  investment  as- 
fount.  the  transference  of  annual  earn- 
ings to  caoital  operated  to  swell  expense 
rather  unduly. 


When  I  realized  this  condition,  I  open- 
ed a  surplus  account,  let  the  capital 
stand,  and  thereafter  all  earnings  were 
credited  to  surplus. 

I  do  not  know  whether  this  will  be 
helpful  to  anybody.  It  is  not  much  of  a 
story.  It  really  can  only  .be  useful  to 
one  who  knows  something  of  toooks.  The 
object  was  to  cut  corners,  and  I  liked 
my  system  very  much.  One  thing  I  liked 
about  it  especially  was  that  its  state- 
ments were  inside  the  facts.  In  1914  my 
capital  stood  at  a  figure  more  than  $6,- 
000  less  than  the  tangible  property  of 
the  .business.  1  liked  that,  too;  for  thus 
my  "capital  stoiik,"  supposing  it  was  re- 
garded that  way,  was  worth  more  than 
40  per  cent,  premium. 

Outside  Investments 

In  closing,  let  me  say  that  I  started 
in  business  in  1877,  more  than  40 
years  ago.  I  mention  that  fact  only  to 
lend  some  authority  to  my  favorite  dic- 
tum: That  No  Man  Makes  Real  Money 
Out  of  A  Business  Until  He  Learns  to 
Take  Money  Out  Of  It.  Get  me?  Think 
it  over. 

A  time  ago  I  stated  that  the  cost  of 
extending  and  handling  credit  is  about 
5  per  cent. — fully  5  per  cant.  I  say 
now.  A  correspondent  asks  me  how  I 
compute  that  charge.  He  himself  car- 
ries an  average  of  $500  on  his  .books  and 
his  credit  sales  run,  perhaps,  $3,500 
annually.     Here  is  the  computation: 

Direct  losses  from  unpaidl  bills,  prob- 
ably 1  per  cent.,  but  not  less  than  %  per 
cent.,  on  sales,  or,  per  year,  $17.50. 

Safe  depreciation  charge  on  the  out- 
standing balance  at  inventory  time,  10 
per  cent.,  or  $50.00. 

This  leaves  $107.50  to  cover  his  labor, 
his  postage,  stationery,  and  all  other 
collection  expenses,  to  make  the  total  of 
$175  that  I  feel  it  costs  Mm  to  extend 
credit  on  $3,500  of  sales  during  the  year. 

Moreover,  I  think  this  conservative, 
and  that  no  matter  how  he  may  shuffle 
the  figures  about,  he  will  not  honestly 
and  tangibly  arrive  at  any  lower  total — 
it  probably  costs  more. 

I  do  not  say  that  if  he  did  not  work 
on  his  books  and  do  other  work  in  con- 
nection with  handling  those  accounts,  he 
could  do  something  else  equally  profit- 
able with  his  time.  I  do  think  that  it 
pays  him  to  give  credit.  I  know  it  paid 
me.  Just  the  same,  he  does  that  work 
and  must  be  paid  for  it,  the  same  as  he 
is  paid  for  any  other  work  or  service  he 
performs  in  his  business.  I  am  satisfied 
that  it  costs  more  to  extend  credit  than 
most  merchants  think  it  does.  I  am 
sure  that  most  of  us  do  not  charge 
enough,  on  the  average,  into  our  prices 
to  cover  credit  exoenses  along  with  our 
Continued   on  page  56 


56 


HARDWARE    AND    METAL 


Interesting  Situation  at  Hamilton  As  Result  of 
Contractor  Having  Made  An  Assignment 

Mavor  Says  Housing  Commission  Will  Not  Lose,  But  Intimates 
MayThat  if  Any  Loss  is  Sustained  It  Will  Be  by  Firms 
Who  Supplied  Various  Materials. 


January  10,  1920 

ley  towns  this  week,  being'  assured  they 
were  not  wanted  in  the  mills  again. 
Some  return  to  Europe,  and  others  went 
West.  Nails  and  plain  wires  are  moving 
within  the  jobbing  and  warehouse  limits. 


AN  exceedingly  interesting  situation 
which  affects  hardware  merchants 
as  well  as  electrical  contractors, 
heating  and  saniatry  engineers  and 
other  business  men  has  arisen  at  Hamil- 
ton, Ont.,  as  a  result  of  Contractor  R. 
Bryson,  who  has  had  many  of  the  con- 
tracts for  houses  under  the  Housing 
Commission,  having  made  an  assignment 
It  was  at  first  stated  that  as  a  result 
of  the  assignment  the  city  would  lose 
manv  thousands  of  dollars. 

Now,  according  to  Mayor  Booker  and 
William  Campbell,  secretary  of  the  Hous- 
ing Commission,  the  city  will  not  lose  a 
cent,  neither  will  those  for  whom  the 
houses  were  being  built. 

Merchants  May  Lose 
If  anyone  loses  they  state  it  will  be 
those  firms  who  supplied  various  mater- 
ials and  failed  to  obtain  payment.  The 
contractor,  it  is  stated,  had  received 
his  percentage  of  payment  of  the  money 
advanced  by  the  Housing  Commission. 
Every  house  under  construction,  it  is 
stated,  will  be  finished. 

Hardware  and  other  merchants  to 
whom  money  is  owing  may  take  action 
if  it  is  necessary  to  collect  the  various 
'  amounts.  If  this  is  done  the  case  will 
establish  a  precedent  which  may  form  the 
basis  for  any  similar  actions  that  may 
be  necessary  under  the  Housing  Com- 
mission's scheme  all  over  the  Dominion. 

Are    Carrying    On 

With  Bryson's  assignment  work  ceased 
on  15  excavations,  and  10  buildings  with 
the  roofs  just  finished,  and  nine  others 
nearly  finished.  Bryson,  it  is  reported, 
had  fully  completed  only  two  houses.  The 
assignment  was  made  last  week  and  a 
meeting  of  Brvson's  creditors  was  held 
at  once  in  the  office  of  the  Housing  Com- 
mission. The  commissioners  contend  that 
the  claims  of  the  creditors  will  not  total 
more  than  five  or  six  thousand  dollars. 
The  total  cost  of  the  houses  for  which 
Bryson  had  received  contracts  would  be 
•-iround  $80,000,  and  he  has  received  to 
date  about  $23,000.  The  commission  de- 
cided to  "0  ahead  with  the  buildings  it- 
pelf  and  Mr.  Cassidv.  who  is  a  carpenter 
contractor,  has  taken  over  the  work  and 
hired  construction  gangs  to  finish  the 
houses. 

Cut  Down  Cost 
Secretary  Campbell  stated  that  the 
creditors  bad  agreed  not  to  file  liens 
a«ainst  the  properties  and  that  action  of 
any  kind  would"  not  be  taken  until  after 
all  the  buildings  are  completed.  The 
commission  contends  that  by  finishing 
these  houses  the  contractor's  profit  will 
be  saved  and  that  it  will  be  more  than 
•  -I'fficient  to  make  up  for  any  advance  in 
rhe  price  of  materials  that  has  occurred 
since  the  contracts  were  let. 


Commission  Criticized 

Bryson,  it  is  alleged,  sub-let  contracts 
and  it  is  alleged  that  the  sub-contrac- 
tors did  not  receive  their  money  as  Bry- 
son receivel  his.  Considerable  criticism 
has  been  levelled  at  the  commission  for 
not  seeing  that  claims  of  sub-contractors 
were  satisfied. 

A  Hold  Back 
In  connection  with  those  supplying 
Bryson  with  building  materials  they  al- 
ways have  30  days  from  the  time  of 
delivery  of  materials  in  which  to  file  a 
lien  against  a  house  in  order  to  get  their 
money. 

In  each  instance  payment  for  construc- 
tion of  the  house  has  been  made  as  con- 
struction proceeded,  which  is  t]ie  usual 
course.  As  the  cellar  is  excavated  the 
contractor  is  entitled  to  80  per  cent,  of 
the  cost  of  the  cellar  under  the  contract 
price.  The  other  20  per  cent,  is  held 
back  in  case  of  liens  being  filed.  If  the 
creditors  filed  liens  the  buildings  then, 
n.ccording  to  W.  Campbell,  secretary,  the 
commission  and  applicant  could  be  held 
liable  for  the  money  up  to  the  20  per 
cent,  held  back,  which  would  not  mean 
,->  loss  to  either  the  commission  or  the 
applicant. 

No  Liens  Secured 
Secretary  Campbell  stated  that  with 
the  commision  finishing  the  houses  the 
nrofit  of  the  contractor  would  be  saved, 
and  if  it  was  not  required  to  meet  in- 
creasing cost  of  building  material,  it 
night  be  devoted  to  paying  off  some 
<^f  the  creditors  who  sold  materials  to 
Bryson.  It  was  this  pcs-sibiHtv  that 
caused  the  creditors  to  decide  not  to 
~p-t"-e  liens  against  any  of  the  buildings 
•it  the  present  time. 

Bryson  assigned  to  his  sister.  He  is  a 
vouno-  man  who.  it  is  stated  had  done 
<-e-v  litle  contracting-  work."  His  first  bitr 
r-p^tflre  '"to  the  contracting  business,  it 
is   stated,  was   with   these   houses. 


Lyons  Fair  to  Be  Held 

From  March  I  to  15 

Writing  from  Paris  in  reference  to  the 
Lyons    Fair,    Capt.    P.   W.   Ross,   of  the 
Canadian  Trade  Department,  says:  "The 
authorities  are  assured  of  an  extraordin- 
ary success  for  the  next  fair,  which  will 
be  held  from  March  1  to  March  15,  1920. 
About    3,000    stands   comprises   the   full 
accommodation,   and   of  this   1,500   have 
already  been  allocated.     It  is,  therefore, 
incumbent  upon  Canadian  manufacturers 
who  desire  to  participate  in  Pdarch,  1920, 
to  arrange  at  once  and  advise  the  fair 
authorities  as  soon  as  possible.    Address: 
Mr.  J.  A.  Victor,  London  office,  the  Lyons 
Fair,  31  Budge  Row,  London,  E.C.  4.     At 
the   fair  in  March  the  following  classes 
of    articles    will    be    exhibited:    Rubber 
goods  of  all  kinds.    Heating  and  lighting 
apparatus   other  than   that   operated  by 
electricity,  chimney  building.     Electrical 
machinery,   electric   lighting   accessories, 
telephony,   electric    wiring   cable.     Elec- 
tric   heating,    electric   bells    and    electric 
accessories.     Leather  and  leather  goods. 
Morocco  leather,  leather  harness,  leather 
articles    for    travelling.      Ceramic    ware, 
glass  manufactures,  earthenware,  porce- 
'lainware,  stoneware,  pottery.      Brushes, 
Toys,  nick-knacks,  pocket  electric  lamps, 
frames,  articles  of  carved  wood.     Motor 
cars,  cycles  and  accessories.    Sewing  ma- 
chines, sporting  articles. 


Wire  Mill  Operating 

Far  Below  Normal 

PITTSBURGH.— Wire  mills  are  not 
accepting  new  business  for  any  but  old 
customers,  and  the  market  has  rather 
."  barren  look  for  consumers.  There  is 
also  a  severe  pressure  for  wire  rods, 
which  are  ranging  all  the  way  from  $52, 
the  nominal  market,  to  $60  on  large  ton- 
nages, and  as  high  as  $63  on  smaller 
?ales.  Wire  mills  are  operating  far  un- 
der normal,  and.  in  some  cases,  the 
labor  shortage  is  still  severe,  owing  in 
nart  to  the  attitude  taken  by  manufac- 
turers against  re-employment  of  alien 
-adicals  m  their  plants.  Several  car- 
loads of  these  left  the  Monongahela  Val- 


STANDARDIZING   THE  TRADE 

Continued  from  page  51 
Box,  correspondent,  and  think  it  would 
be  good  for  retailers  in  general,"  said 
George  A.  McMurtry  of  George  A.  Mc- 
Murtry  &  Co.,  St.  Thomas.  "It  would 
also  save  many  from  business  troubles 
and  tend  for  a  better  and  more  success- 
ful career." 

Another  hardware  merchant,  who  did 
not  wish  his  name  to  appear,  said:  "This 
suggestion  is  not  worthy  of  any  con- 
sideration. The  Government  interferes 
too  much  in  business  now.  When  people 
abuse  their  privileges,  throw  down  the 
bar  and  subject  them  to  plenty  of  com- 
petition. If  a  man  is  without  training 
or  brains  he  will  not  last  long. 

VALUE  OF  MERCHANDISE 

Continued  from  page  55 

other  costs.     It  might  be  profitable  for 
us  to  discuss  this  more  in  detail. 

The  immediate  question  which  led  to 
his  query  was  whether  5  ipeir  cent,  dis- 
count to  cash  customers  was  fair. 
1  thought  it  was,  and  said  so.  I 
think  it  is  quite  fair;  provided  he  finds 
it  advantageous  to  encourage  caslnand- 
carry  trade,  or  is  compelled  by  compe- 
tition to  recognize  two  classes  of  cus- 
tomers. This  is  a  live  phase  of  busi- 
ness to-day. 


January   10,   i920 


HARDWARE    AND    METAL 


57 


President  of  Lewis  Brothers,  Limited,  is 
Honored  by  the  King 


IN  the  New  Year's  list  of  honors,  the 
name   of  Frederick    Orr  Lewis   is   of 
interest    to     the     trade.      Mr.    Lewis, 
who   is     president     of     Lewis   Brothers, 
Limited,   wholesale    hardware,    Montreal, 
has  been  created  a  Baronet. 

Born  in  the  city  of  Hamilton,  on  Feb- 
ruary 11,  1862,  Mr.  Lewis  is  the  second 
son  of  the  late  William  Thomas  Lewis,  a 
native  of  Swansea,  Wales,  and  Mary 
Graham.  Mr.  Lewis,  Sr.,  operated  a  line 
of  boats  on  the  Great  Lakes  many  years 
ago,  between  Chicago,  Illinois,  and 
Kingston,  Ontario,  and  retired  from 
active  business  in  1890,  moving  to 
Montreal,  where   he  died   in  1908. 

Mr.  F.  O.  Lewis  received  his  educa- 
tion at  Kingston,  Ontario,  and  also  em- 
barked in  the  hardware  business  in  that 
city.  Joining  the  wholesale  hardware 
firm  of  J.  Muckleston  and  Company  of 
Kingston,  he  applied  himself  diligently 
to  mastering  all  details  of  the  wholesale 
hardware  business,  and  on  retiring  from 
that  firm  he  decided  to  enter  business 
on  his  own  account. 

Starts  on  Own  Account 

In  the  year  1887  Mr.  Lewis  opened  a 
business  of  his  own  in  the  city  of  King- 
ston, and  continued  there  for  a  year. 
Realizing  the  advantages  of  being- 
located  in  a  growing  city,  he  moved  his 
business  to  Montreal  in  1888,  where  the 
firm  of  Lewis  Brothers  was  begun, 
James  Graham  Lewis,  the  present  vice- 
president  of  the  company,  being  asso- 
ciated with  him.  For  several  years  the 
firm  was  known  as  Lewis  Brothers,  and 
later  was  formed  into  the  present  com- 
pany of  Lewis  Brothers,  Limited.  Of 
this  company,  Mr.  F.  0.  Lewis  became 
president,  and  which  position  he  holds 
to-day. 

While  the  varied  business  interests  of 
Mr.  Lewis  call  him  away  from  time  to 
time,  he  still  looks  upon  and  calls  Mont- 
real his  home.  This  summer  he  spent 
several  months  in  Montreal,  and  is 
always  greatly  interested  in  the  pro- 
gress of  his.  initial  venture,  the  firm  of 
Lewis  Brothers,  Limited,  and  still  takes 
real  interest  in  the  business  of  his  early 
choice. 

Other  Activities 

In  the  year  1907,  Mr.  Lewis  trans- 
ferred his  activities  vei-y  largely  to  Can- 
adian Vickers,  Limited,  and  of  which  he 
became,  and  is  at  the  present  time  the 
president.  In  addition  to  being  asso- 
ciated with  the  Canadian  interests  of 
this  large  company,  he  also  is  exten- 
sively associated,  in  a  large  way,  with 
the  parent  company  interests  in  various 
parts  of  England,  and  where  the  works 
are  very  extensive. 

Mr.  Lewis  is  a  director  of  the  Mer- 
chants Bank  of  Canada,  a  director  of  the 
Montreal  Cotton  Company,  and  a  mem- 
ber of  the  following  clubs:  Mount 
Royal,  St.  James,  Forest  &  Stream, 
Canadian,  Montreal  Hunt,  Royal  Mont- 
real Golf,  Royal  St.  Lawrence  Yacht, 
while  outside  of  Montreal  he  is  a  mem- 
ber of  the  Rideau  Club   of  Ottawa,  and 


also    Wellington    Club    of    London,    Eng- 
land. 

Had   Narrow   Escape 
It   was   the    experience    of    Mr.    Lewis 
to    be    aboard      the      ill-fated    Lusitania 
when  that  large  boat  was  torpedoed  off 


the  Irish  coast  on  May  8,  1915,  by  a 
German  submarine.  After  an  exciting 
experience,  he  had  the  good  fortune  to 
be  rescued. 

Mr.  Lewis  was  married  in  June,  1896, 
to  Miss  Maud  Helen  Booth,  cousin  of 
the  late  John  Duncan,  and  the  family 
consists  of  three  children,  John  Duncan 
Orr  Lewis,  Helen  Mary  Ida  Lewis,  and 
Mary  Graham  Lewi?. 


FREDERICK  ORR-LEWIS 

President   of  Lewis   Brothers,   Limited,    Montreal,    who    has 
been  wade  a  baronet. 


Steel  Plates  Sell 

at  New  High  Records 

PITTSBURGH.  —  Some  new  high 
prices  for  substantial  tonnages  of  steel 
plates  were  named  in  transaction  dur- 
ing the  current  week.  The  sale  of  some- 
thing over  2,000  tons  was  made  on  the 
basis  of  3.25c,  the  highest  for  this  size 
business  yet  recorded.  The  pressure  for 
plates  has  been  steadily  increasing  each 
day.  The  most  severe  demand  comes 
from  the  oil  fields  whose  call  for  storage 
tank  construction  is  very  loud,  owing  to 
the  inability  of  the  oil  transportation  in- 
terests to  meet  the  amazing  demand  for 
pipe  line  construction.  Plate  mills  are 
rapidly  becoming  clogged  with  new  busi- 
ness and  manufacturers  say  that  the  new 
year  starts  with  one  of  the  largest  book- 
ings of  plates  ever  known. 

On  other  lines  the  plate  trade  is  mod- 
erately quiet.  It  is,  however,  practically 
impossible  to  place  new  business  on  the 
nominal  market,  and  independent  mak- 
ers are  disposed  to  ask  on  the  limited 
capacity  they  can  spare  nothing  less  than 
three  cents.    There  has  been  a  good  de- 


mand for  plates  in  smaller  tonnages  and 
the  market  has  a  robust  appearance  as 
a  whole. 


Guns  Are  Issued  to 

Toronto  Policemen 

As  a  result  of  the  activities  of  motor 
bandits  and  hold-up  men  in  Toronto,  the 
members  of  the  police  force  are  being 
armed  so  that  in  case  of  necessity  they 
will  not  be  at  a  disadvantage.  The  police 
are  making  a  determined  effort  to  rid 
the  city  of  the  robbers. 

Detectives  and  plainclothesmen  and 
uniformed  reserves  are  on  duty  at  every 
station  in  the  city.  They  are  equipped 
with  the  department  cars,  also  with  high- 
powered  cars  hired  for  fehe  occasion. 

TO  MAKE  CEMENT  AT  LAKEFIELD 

The  Canada  Cement  Company's  plant 
at  Lakefield  will  be  operated  again  at  an 
early  date,  according  to  recently  an- 
nounced plans.  Manufacture  of  cement 
at  Lakefield  was  suspended  soon  after 
the  outbreak  of  war. 


58 


January  10,  1920 


EDITORIAL    COMMENT 


POSTMEN   THREATEN  STRIKE 

LETTER  carriers  in  Toronto  and  other  Canadian 
cities  are  again  threatening  to  strike.  They 
say  that  this  is  apparently  the  only  way  in  which  ; 
they  are  likely  to  obtain  any  recognition  of  the-' 
claims  they  have  been  making  for  increased  wages. 
The  matter,  they  state,  will  very  soon  come  to  a  show-* 
down.  It  has  very  frequently  been  pointed  out  in 
HARDWARE  AND  METAL  that  matters  in  con- 
nection with  the  management  at  Ottawa  of  the 
Post  Office  Department  might  be  greatly  improved. 
The  business  men  of  Ontario  have  been  through  one 
post  office  strike  and-  know  just  how  much  incon- 
venience was  involved.  Inaction  in  investigating 
the  claims  of  the  letter  carriers  may  cause  another 
walk-out.  The. men  would  not  be  so  dissatisfied  ap- 
parently if  they  knew  that  something  was  being 
done,  and  that  there  was  some  hope  of  their  case 
being  considered.  It  is  the  everlasting"  inefficiency 
and  red  tape  that  exasperates  them.  It  would  seem- 
ingly be  a  simple  matter  for  representatives  of  the 
department  to  consider  the  men's  side  of  (lie  matter. 
This  would  save  a  good  deal  of  trouble  and  time  and 
possibly  avert  a  strike.  Why  not  get  busy  and 
show  some  signs  of  life? 


CO-OPERATION  IS  NEEDED 

ONE  of  the  clouds  that  overhang  the  building 
outlook  for  1920,  is  lack  of  co-operation  among 
the  various  sections  in  the  building  trades.  This 
has  an  effect  which,  while  indirect,  is  none  the  less 
serious  on  hardware  merchants  and  all  those  inter- 
ested in  the  construction  work  that  is  planned.  As 
far  as  work  planned  is  concerned  there  was  never 
a  year  in  the  history  of  the  Dominion  when  there 
was  so  much  in  sight.  How  much  of  it  will  pro- 
ceed is  what  interests  business  men.  One  of  the 
things  which  held  back  many  important  project- 
in  1919.  was  the  impossibility  of  getting  a  working 
arrangement  between  the  men  in  the  various  trades. 
In  some  places  it  was  the  carpenters  whose  demands 
were  too  great.  In  others  it  was  the  bricklayers. 
Efforts  have  been  made  to  effect  a  working  arrange- 
ment that  will  help  along  work  instead  of  imped- 
ing it.  So  far  in  some  of  the  larger  centres  these 
efforts  have  been  only  partially  successful.  Unless 
all  'work  together  the  results  will  be  serious,  because 
it  has  been  strikingly  demonstrated  that  builders, 
especially  those  who  are  planning  large  projects  will 
not  go  ahead  unless  they  know  that  there  is  every 


chance  of  the  construction  proceeding  without  in- 
terruptions. A  meeting  of  the  Canadian  Associa- 
tion of  Building  Enterprises  will  be  held  at  Ottawa 
shortly  and  it  is  planned  to  straighten  out  this  diffi- 
culty if  possible  and  perfect  a  working  agreement 
that  will  make  for  settled  conditions  from  coast  to 
coast. 


EXTENDING  ELECTRIC  LINES 

A  Monday  in  various  Ontario  municipalities  was 
FEATURE  of  the  voting  that  took  place  on 
the  large  number  of  Hydro  by-laws  that  carried. 
It  is  significant  that  almost  without  exception  there 
was  no  opposition  worth  speaking  about.  The  ma- 
jorities range  from  ten  to  twenty  to  one  and  even 
higher  in  favor  of  constructing  systems  for  the  dis- 
tribution of  light  and  power.  All  this  means  op- 
portunities for  the  hardware  merchant  in  the  sale 
of  electrical  goods  of  all  kinds.  The  passing  of 
these  by-laws  shows  unmistakably  the  drift  in  re- 
gard to  electricity  and  it  is  well  worthy  of  the  most 
careful  watching.  Each  year  sees  more  and  more 
by-laws  being  passed  and  more  and  more  power 
lines  being  built  and  existing  lines  extended.  Out 
into  the  rural  districts  all  over  the  rich  Province  of 
Ontario  the  Hydro  lines  are  extending  and  even 
new  power  user  means  a  buyer  for  electrical  mer- 
chandise of  one  kind  or  another. 


KILLING  PA  T  RON  AGE  AGAIN 

Till'",  farmers'  party  'in  Ontario  is  reported  as 
having  a  bit  of  a  flare-up  over  a  $§,500  per 
annum  job  in  London. 

The  patronage  system,  of  course,  lias  been  killed. 
It's  been  killed 'before,  hut  generally  keeps  in  pretty 
fair  shape  in  spite  of  all  the  assassinations. 

Will  the  politicians  from  lot  10,  concession  four, 
he  any  less  keen  to  run  in  and  take  the  Government 
jobs  than   the  city  and  town   type?     We  shall  see. 

Of  course  we  are  all  ready  to  hoot  and  shout  at 
the  funeral  of  friend  Patronage.  We  will  walk 
through  tlie  moral  cemetery  and  smile  approval  at 
the  slabs  they  may  weave  to  decorate  his  resting 
place. 

And  after  all  this  lias  been  accomplished,  we  burn 
home  only  to  find  old  man  Patronage  standing  -on 
the  main  corner  of  the  town,  right  across  from  the 
post  office. 

It  has  yet  to  he  demonstrated  that  any  political 
party  can  survive  without  the  patronage  system  be- 
ing on  hand  to  haul  grist  to  the  mill. 


- 

January   10,   1920 


HARDWARE 


A   VETERAN  TRAVELLER 

FIFTY-FIVE  years  is  a  long  time,  yet  that  is  the 
length  of  the  period  of  service  which  has  just' 
been  completed  by  William  H.  Dean,,  of  Wood, 
Alexander  and  James.  Hamilton.  He  has  just  re- 
tired from  his  position  as  hardware  traveller  at  the 
age  of  seventy-six.  The  life  of  a  traveller  is  one 
that  makes  many  demands  upon  a  man's  constitu- 
tion as  he  has  to  cover  this  territory  in  all  sorts 
of  weather.  That  Mr.  Dean  has  seen  such  a  long- 
period  of  continuous  service  means  in  itself  that  he 
is  a  strong  man.  In  55  years  he  has  seen  many, 
many  changes  and  not  the  least  of  these  in  the 
bardware  business  of  Canada.  Merchandising  half 
a  century  ago  and  merchandising  to-day  are  two 
entirely  different  propositions.  Fifty-five  years  ago 
the  railway  as  it  exists  to-day  was  an  unknown  pro- 
position. In  those  days  the  ox  team  was  not  a  un- 
common means  of  transporting  goods.  The  auto- 
mobile had  never  even  been  thought  of,  nor  the 
telephone.  Just  what  it  means  to  live  without 
these  things  very,  very  few  people  at  the  present  time 
can  imagine.  Neither  can  they  imagine  being  with- 
out such  things  as  electric  lights,  a  water  supply  and 
other  conveniences  which  are  a  part  of  modern  life. 
Not  the  least  interesting  development  in  the  last, 
fifty-five  years  is  that  of  Ontario  and  Canada  and 
right  in  the  territory  that  has  been  his  stamping 
ground  for  so  long,  100  miles  around  Hamilton, 
there  have  been  some  really  wonderful  changes.  No 
doubt  the  veteran  traveller  could  write  an  interesting 
volume  of  reminiscences.  His  many  friends  will 
wish  for  him  that  the  coming  years  may  be  as  full 
of  happiness  and  contentment  as  a  busy  life  has 
merited. 


BOOST  THE  CONVENTION 

TO  hardware  merchants  throughout  Ontario  the 
dates  February  17,  18,  19  and  20  are  of  special 
importance  in  that  they  mark  the  sessions  of  the 
Annual  Convention  of  the  Ontario  Retail  Hard- 
ware Association.  Recent  meetings  of  the  Ontario 
Association  have  not  only  been  a  surprise,  but  a 
delight  to  those  who  attended,  as  many  matters  of 
real  interest  to  hardware  merchants  have  been  under 
discussion.  It  is  the  aim  of  the  executive  commit- 
tee to  make  this  year's  annual  gathering  one  of  the 


AND    METAL  !     f_  59 

best  on  record.  Efforts  of  this  kind  deserve  the 
heartiest  support  of  the  hardware  merchants.  In  a 
case  of  this  kind  individual  supports  is  invaluable. 
If  every  merchant  will  not  only  make  it  a  point  to 
attend  himself,  but  to  make  sure  that  someone  else 
who  is  interested  comes  too,  all  records  will  be 
smashed  this  year.  Boost  the  convention  in  every 
way  you  can.  Talk  about  it  and  about  the  good 
work  that  is  being  done.  Don't  think  because  you 
are  only  one  merchant  that  your  effort  will  not 
count.  It  is  by  getting  every  ONE  to  work  that  the 
greatest  results  will  be  obtained.  Each  year  during 
the  past  three  or  four  years  a  gratifying  growth  in 
the  membership  has  been  noted  and  the  stronger 
the  association  is  the  more  it  can  accomplish  for  it- 
self and  for  every  merchant.  Co-operation  is  the 
secret  of  success  and  by  working  closely  together  the 
hardware  merchants  can  obtain  results  that  will  be 
surprising. 


RESEARCH   WORK  TO  HELP  TRADE 

REALIZING  that  in  the  battle  .that  is  now  being- 
waged  for  the  commercial  markets  of  the  world, 
that  research  is  a  most  important  factor,  the  British 
Government  has  set  aside  a  large  sum  for  this  work. 
The  work  is  to  be  carried  on  in  the  iron,  motor  and 
allied  manufactures,  Portland  cement,  India  rub- 
ber and  tires,  in  glass  making  and  in  electrical 
goods.  The  work  is  to  be  clone  in  close  co-opera- 
tion with  the  Government  and  association  in  the 
specific  trades  mentioned.  Before  any  association 
can  come  under  the  Government  scheme,  the  ap- 
proval of  the  scientific  and  industrial  research  de- 
partment must  be  obtained,  and  subsequently  a 
license  must  be  secured  from  the  Board  of  Trade. 
The  associations  must  be  national  in  character  and 
include  the  bulk  of  the  manufacturers  in  any  spe- 
cified industry.  A  legal  status  is  obtained  through 
registration  as  a  company  under  section  20  of  the 
Companies'  Consolidation  Act,  1918.  The  associa- 
tions are  limited  by  guarantee  of  a  nominal  sum  and 
may  not  divide  profits ;  but  the  contributions  of 
firms,  being  regarded  as  business  costs,  are  exempted 
from  income  tax.  The  general  scheme  is  to  pro- 
vide £1  from  the  department  for  every  £1  subscribed 
by  members  up  to  five  years  after  organization ;  but 
should  an  association's  expenditure  exceed  £6  000  a 
special  arrangement  may  be  agreed  to.' 


Keep  These  Dates  Clear 

February  17,  18,  19,  20 

Big    Convention    Ontario    Retail    Hardware    Association    at    Hamilton,    Canada  - 

Programme  Announced  Shortly 


60 


January  10,  1920 


Business  Changes 

Pembroke,  Ont. — The  hardware  firm 
of  Stewart  and  Bowden  has  been  dis- 
solved. 

Blyth,  Ont.— J.  G.  McLaughlin  has 
purchased  the  tinsmith  and  plumbing 
business  which  J.  H.  Leith  conducted  in 
connection  with  the  hardware  of  Moore 
&  Son,  whose  store  was  recently  burned. 

Ryley,  Alberta.— O.  H.  Hunter,  of 
Botha,  Alberta,  has  purchased  the  hard- 
ware business  of  the  Richards,  Mc- 
Naughton  Co. 


Hardware,  Limited,  the  retail  firm.  For 
many  years  he  was  actively  identified 
with  the  London  Foundry  Co.,  manufac- 
turers of  washing  machines  and  other 
lines. 

Mr.  Cowan  was  a  son  of  the  late  ex- 
Mayor  James  Cowan  of  London.  Be- 
sides his  wife  he  is  survived  by  one  son, 
James,  who  holds  the  position  of  treas- 
urer in  the  Cowan  companies. 

The  funeral  was  held  on  Tuesday  af- 
ternoon and  was  very  largely  attended. 


Fire  Losses 

Fire  caused  a  loss  of  $4,000  in  the 
premises  of  the  Katie  Foundry  Company, 
at  Gait,  Ont. 

Fire,  which  may  have  been  caused  by 
friction  in  pulleys,  caused  a  loss  of  $20,- 
000  in  the  plant  of  the  Welland  Iron  and 
Brass  Foundry  at  Welland,  Ont. 

A  blaze,  which  started  when  oil  vats 
in  which  men  were  tempering  springs, 
caused  a  loss  of  $65,000  and  destroyed 
the  power  plant  and  machine  shop  of  the 
Record  Foundry  and  Machine  Co.  of 
Moncton,  N.  B.  The  stove  factory  was 
not  damaged. 

Two  men  were  killed  and  twelve 
others  severely  burned  in  a  fire  Wed- 
nesday at  the  plant  of  the  Imperial  Oil 
Co.  in  Montreal.  The  blaze  started  from 
the  explosion  of  an  oil  pipe.  The  loss 
is    $10,000. 


New  Firms 

Hurtubise,  Limited,  Montreal,  have 
succeeded  North  American  Hardware 
Supply,  Limited.  This  will  be  con- 
ducted by  the  former  manager  of  the 
last-named  firm,  Jean  Hurtubise.  The 
company  is  engaged  in  the  wholesaling 
of  auto  accessories  and  various  other 
electrical    and   hardware   specialties. 


Obituary 


William  McKenzie 

Victim  of  Stroke 

William  McKenzie,  who  has  represent- 
ed the  Collins  Manufacturing  Co.  of  To- 
ronto, manufacturers  of  hardware 
specialties,  in  Ontario  and  the  East  for 
many  years,  died  in  the  Western  Hos- 
pital following  a  paralytic  stroke.  He 
was  77  years  old  and  had  a  very  wide 
circle  of  friends  in  the  trade.  The  fun- 
eral was  held  on  Monday  to  Mount  Pleas- 
ant Cemetery. 


The  death  occurred  at  Amherstburg, 
Ont.,  following  a  long  illness  with  heart 
trouble,  of  Richard  F.  Lalonge,  aged  71. 
He  had  been  engaged  in  the  hardware 
business  for  33   years. 

Following  an  illness  of  more  than  six 
months  the  death  occurred  at  his  home 
in  London,  Ont.,  of  David  J.  Cowan.  He 
was  sixty-seven  years  old  and  had  been 
engaged  in  the  hardware  business  from 
the  time  he  entered  his  father's  store  af- 
ter leaving  school.  He  was  president  of 
the  wholesale  hardware  firm  of  James 
Cowan    &    Co.,   and   also   of   the    Cowan 


tive  in  Eastern  Ontario  and  the  Niagara 
Peninsula  He  will  succeed  R.  L.  Dun- 
can, who  has  resigned.  Mr.  Ramsay  has 
been  connected  with  the  Hobbs  Mfg.  Co., 
of  Toronto,  for  eight  years. 

P.  M.  Baker,  Toronto  representative 
of  T.  S.  Simms  &  Co.,  Limited,  St.  John, 
N.B.,  and  of  William  Cane  &  Sons,  Lim- 
ited, Newmarket,  Ont.,  was  re-elected  as 
alderman  for  Ward  8  in  the  recent  elec- 
tions. 


Quebec 

Morris  Wheeler,  representative  of 
Sergeant  and  Co.,  New  Haven,  Conn.,  is 
in  Montreal  on  business. 

J.  Walker  Andrews,  of  the  Remington 
Arms  Company,  is  on  a  business  trip  to 
Montreal. 

William  W.  Anderson,  of  the  Nichol- 
son File  Company,  is  visiting  Montreal. 

S.  M.  Ward,  trade  sales  manager  of 
the  Canada  Paint  Co.,  Limited,  left  for 
the  Maritime  Provinces,  where  he  will 
spend  ten  days  in  the  interest  of  his 
firm. 


Personals 

John  Smith,  of  Regina,  formerly  with 
the  J.  R.  Chalmers  hardware  at  St. 
Marys,  Ont.,  has  gone  to  Pasadena  to 
spend  the  winter. 

H.  F.  Mack,  representative  of  the 
American  Flynn  Mfg.  Co.,  Chicago, 
manufacturers  of  miniature  railways,  is 
calling  on  jobbers  in  Ontario  and  Que- 
bec. 

Gordon  Houlden,  formerly  with  the 
hardware  firm  of  A.  Glenn  Henry  & 
Co.,  Oshawa,  has  joined  the  sales  staff 
of  the  1900  Washer  Co.  and  will  travel 
in  Eastern  Ontario. 

A.  A.  Neiman,  Vancouver  manager  for 
the  Great  Western  Smelting  &  Refining 
Comnanv,  who  attended  the  firm's  con- 
vention in  Chicago  and  is  visiting  West- 
ern Canadian  business  centres  on  his 
way  back. 

John  Doun-las,'  hardware  merchant  at 
Wroxeter.  Ont.,  was  honored  in  the  re- 
cent municipal  elections  by  being  return- 
ed as  Peeve.  He  was  given  an  acclama- 
tion. This  amkes  Mr.  Douglas'  third 
term. 

Major  Hines,  of  Brandon,  Manitoba, 
was  in  Montreal  re^pntlv  on  his  wav  to 
South  America.  While  here,  the  Major 
grave  an  informal  talk  on  Western  im- 
nressions.  before  the  sales  and  execu- 
tive staffs  of  Starke.  Sevbold,  Ltd. 

The  Consolidated  Plate  Glass  Com- 
pany, of  Canada.  Limited,  Toronto,  has 
appointed  G.   C.  Ramsay  as  representa- 


Trade  Notes 

D.  Champagne,  tinsmith,  has  been  re- 
gistered at  Montreal. 

The  Dalhousie  Foundry  &  Metal  Works 
of  Ottawa,  is  succeeded  by  Foundries, 
Limited. 

McLarty  &  Atkinson,  dealers  in 
twines,  etc.,  at  Ottawa,  have  discon- 
tinued   business. 

The  Canadian  Casting  Co.  and  the 
Canada  Bed  Manufacturing  Co.  have  been 
registered  at  Toronto. 

Russell  H.  Beattie  this  week  opened  a 
new  hardware  store  on  Richmond  St. 
North,  London,  Ont. 

Consumers  Gasoline  Supply  Co.,  Ltd., 
Toronto,  has  been  granted  permission  to 
increase  its  capital  from  $50,000  to 
$500,000. 

The  Provincial  Secretary  has  accepted 
the  surrender  of  the  charters  of  the 
Orpen  Conduit  Co.,  Limited,  and  of  the 
Canadian  Bridge  Company,  Limited. 

The  Canada  Stove  &  Foundry  Com- 
pany, Limited,  St.  Laurent,  Quebec, 
which,  as  stated  in  a  former  issue  of 
HARDWARE  &  METAL,  went  into 
liquidation,  is  still  continuing  business. 

W.  U.  Carnegie,  of  Carnegie  Brothers, 
hardware  and  plumbing,  Port  Perry, 
Ont..  has  taken  into  partnership  his 
brother,  David  Carnegie,  formerly  of  the 
Carnegie  Milling  Company.  The  firm 
nlans  to  enlarge  their  field  of  activities 
by  engaging  in  housing  construction. 


January   10,   1920 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL 


61 


The  MacDonald  Wire  Goods  Co.  has 
been  registered  at  Drummondville,  Que., 
by  S.  and  Joseph  S.  MacDonald. 

J.  D.  Chasse  &  Co.,  tinsmiths,  has  been 
registered  at  Drummondville,  Que.,  by 
Dame   R.   Vilaudre. 

The  North  American  Hardware  Sup- 
ply Ltd.,  of  Montreal,  has  changed  its 
firm  name  to  Hurtutise  Ltd. 

It  is  understood  that  the  Baltimore 
Rolling  Mills  Co.,  of  Baltimore,  Md.,  is 
considering  the  establishment  of  a  Can- 
adian branch  plant. 

A  new  company  has  been  formed  un- 
der the  name  of  Baines  &  David  which 
will  carry  on  without  interruption  the 
steel  and  iron  business,  formerly  known 
as  Barnes  &  Peckover  at  98  Esplanade, 
Toronto.  W.  M.  David,  the  new  partner 
of  R.  A.  Baines,  was  for  many  years 
closely  associated  with  the  former  com- 
pany in  the  capacity  of  sales  manager. 

The  business  of  the  Gait  Robe  Com- 
pany, Gait,  Ont.,  has  been  taken  over 
by  Stauffer-Dobbie,  Limited.  There  will 
be  no  change  of  ownership  or  of  manage- 
ment, the  officers  being:  George  A.  Dob- 
bie,  president;  Joseph  Stauffer,  vice- 
president  and  secretary-treasurer,  and 
James  H.  Bennet,  managing  director. 

According  to  press  reports  the  Henry 
MilleT  Foundry  Company,  Limited,  of 
Cleveland,  Ohio,  will  locate  a  Canadian 
branch  plant  at  Guelph,  Ont. 

The  annual  meeting  of  the  Montreal 
branch  of  the  Canadian  Association  of 
British  Manufacturers  and  their  repre- 
sentatives is  scheduled  for  January  21. 
The  annual  meeting  of  the  Toronto 
branch  will  be  held  on  January  28. 

James  and  William  McNaughton  of 
the  Richards,  McNaughton  Hardware 
Co.,  Ryley,  Alberta,  are  removing  short- 
ly to  Sexsmith,  Alberta,  where  they  have 
purchased  a  general  store. 

The  Norton  Co.,  having  factories  at 
Chippawa,  Niagara  Falls,  N.Y.,  and  oth- 
er points  is  erecting  a  wheel  factory  at 
Hamilton  to  cost  $74,000. 


Annual  Banquet  of 

Andrews  Wire  Works 

The  annual  banquet  and  entertainment 
of  the  employees  of  the  factories  of  the 
Andrews  Wire  Works  at  Strathroy  and 
Watford,  Ont.,  was  held  at  Strathroy  and 
proved  a  most  successful  and  enjoyable 
affair.  J.  Warren  Bate,  secretary-treas- 
urer of  the  Canadian  branches,  was  toast 
master.  The  toast  to  "The  Watford 
Shop,"  was  responded  to  by  W.  L.  Mil- 
lar, and  G.  M.  Haldane  responded 
for  the  Strathroy  plant.  Before  conclud- 
ing his  remarks  Mr.  Haldane  on  behalf 
of  the  assembled  employees  presented 
Mr.  Bate  with  a  cane.  Amongst  those 
who  attended  the  gathering  were  J.  F. 
Burnett,  the  firm's  representative,  and 
E.  W.  Scott,  the  Eastern  representative. 


Presentation  Made 

to  Abraham  Day 

St.  John,  N.B. — Abraham  Day,  of 
the  sales  staff  of  W.  H.  Thorne  &  Co., 
Ltd.,  for  sixteen  years,  has  left  to  take 
another  position.     He  was  pleasantly  re- 


membered by  his  associates  upon  leav- 
ing, a  presentation  being  made  to  him 
by  C.  O.  Morris  in  their  behalf. 

Commercial  men  representative  of  all 
branches  of  mercantile  life  and  from  all 
parts  of  New  Brunswick  attended  a  ban- 
quet presided  over  by  R.  S.  Sime.  Mat- 
ters of  interest  to  travellers  were  dis- 
cussed in  speeches  by  J.  H.  Prichard,  L. 
C.  Armstrong  and  L.  M.  Owens.  E.  J. 
Fleetwood  was  secretary.  Among  those 
present  were  D.  A.  Walker,  of  the  Lon- 
don Travellers'  Association;  Andrew 
Burns,  of  the  Toronto  Association,  and 
W.  A.  Stewart,  of  the  Dominion  Asso- 
ciation. 


Norman  A.  Wylie 

Stricken  Suddenly 

Stricken  with  heart  failure  while  he 
was  shaving  at  his  home  in  Toronto,  Nor- 
man   A.    Wylie,    sales    manager    of    the 


LATE    NORMAN    WYLIE 

Consolidated  Stamping  &  Enamelling 
Company,  Ltd.,  died  a  few  moments 
later.  He  was  43  years  old  and  for  some 
years  was  with  Rice  Lewis'  &  Son,  Limit- 
ed, of  Toronto.  Later  he  went  with  the 
Sheet  Metal  Products  Company,  of  Can- 
ada, Limited.  He  was  with  this  firm  for 
fifteen  years  and  left  to  become  sales 
manager  of  the  Consolidated  Stamping 
and  Enamelling  Company,  Ltd.  Mr. 
Wylie  was  of  a  most  genial  disposition 
and  had  a  very  wide  circle  of  friends. 
He  was  a  member  of  Zetland  Masonic 
Lodge  and  of  the  National  and  Canadian 
Clubs.  The  funeral,  which  was  held  to 
Mount  Pleasant  cemetery,  was  attended 
by  many  business  men. 


MAY  EXPORT  HIDES 

Ottawa. — In  view  of  the  termination 
of  several  of  the  orders-in-Council  pass- 
ed under  the  War  Measures  Act,  the  con- 
trol by  the  Canadian  Trade  Commission 


over  the  exportation  of  leather,  hides  and 
skins  will  be  no  longer  exercised.  Col- 
lectors of  customs  will  now  permit  of  the 
exportation  of  these  articles  as  in  pre- 
war times. 


R. 


H.  Monk  Has  Been 
Named  a  Director 

Announcement  is  made  by  John 
Irwin,  vice-president  McArthur,  Irwin, 
Ltd.,  Montreal,  of  the  election  to  the 
directorate  of  R.  H.  Monk,  chief  chemist 
and  manager  of  the  lead  corroding 
plant. 

Mr.  Monk  supervised  the  erection  of 
the  new  lead  plant,  and  the  actual  op- 
erations are  under  his  direction.  His 
education  was  received  at  King's  Col- 
lege, London,  Eng.,  and  his  research 
work  continued  in  the  laboratories  of 
Sherard  Cooper  Cole,  of  London,  Eng. 
Since  coming  to  Canada,  and  in  addition 
to  filling  other  positions,  of  a  technical 
character,  Mr.  Monk  has  continued  his 
specializing  in  the  technique  of  white 
lead  production. 


Alleges  Monopoly  in 

Wall  Paper  Sales 

Ottawa. — Unusual  features  attach  to 
a  complaint  made  to  the  Board  of  Com- 
merce by  Mr.  William  Charles  Routley 
of  Toronto,  retail  dealer  in  wall  paper, 
in  that  he  claims  that  the  T.  Eaton 
Company  has  entered  into  arrangements 
with  wall  paper  companies  outside  of 
Canada,  by  virtue  of  which  arrange- 
ments thev  have  obtained  a  practical 
monopoly  in  the  actual  sale  of  wall 
paper.  In  his  complaint  Mr.  Routley 
alleges  that  it  is  practically  impossible 
to  purchase  wall  paper  manufactured 
by  W.  H.  Berg  &  Son  of  Buffalo, 
Becker,  Smith  &  Page  of  Philadelphia, 
and  the  Robert  Graves  Company  ot 
New  York,  because  of  this  alleged  ar- 
rangement, which  he  claims  to  be  in  re- 
straint of  trade.  The  hearing  is  set 
for  January  16.  The  question  of  juris- 
diction  will    probably      enter     into    this 


New  Superintendent 

Of  Dry  Color  Plant 

W.  P.  Dickson  has  been  appointed 
superintendent  of  the  dry  color  works  of 
McArthur,  Irwin,  Ltd.,  Montreal. 

Mr.  Dickson  studied  chemistry  at  Dal- 
housie  University,  N.S.  In  1912  he  en- 
tered the  steel  foundry  at  Londonderry, 
N.S.  and  studied  shop  practice  for  a  year, 
leaving  here  to  enter  the  Customs  De- 
partment of  the  Canadian  Government  in 
1913.  From  1914  to  1918  he  was  attach- 
ed to  the  Marine  Department.  In  1918 
he  joined  the  staff  of  McArthur,  Irwin, 
Ltd.,  becoming  assistant  superintendent 
of  the  dry  color  works,  and  has  now  been 
appointed  to  the  above  position. 


62 


HARDWARE    AND    METAL 


January  10,  1920 


Veteran  Traveller  Retiring  After  55  Years  of 
Continuous  Service 

William  H.  Dean,  of  Hamilton,  Ont.,  Has  a  Record  That  is  Per- 
haps Unequalled  in  the  Dominion — Now  Retiring  to 
Enjoy  Life  at  Home. 


WILLIAM  H.  DEAN,  of  Hamilton, 
Ont.,  Canada's  oldest  commer- 
cial traveller  from  the  stand- 
point of  actual  years  of  continuous  serv- 
ice on  the  road,  discarded  his  grip  on 
the  last  day  of  the  year.  For  fifty-five 
years  he  has  travelled  the  territory  com- 
prised in  a  radius  of  one  hundred  miles 
around  Hamilton.  The  following  tri- 
bute to  Mr.  Dean  and  his  work  appeared 
in  the   Hamilton   "Spectator": 

William  H.  Dean,  the  oldest  com- 
mercial traveller  in  Canada  in  point  of 
years  of  active  service  on  the  road,  threw 
hio  gripsack  into  the  discard  on  the  last 
day  of  the  old  year,  and  for  the  remain- 
ing years  of  his  natural  life  intends  to 
live  at  home  with  his  wife  and  learn  the 
secrets  of  a  happy  home.  For  fifty-five 
years  he  has  been  a  wanderer  on  the 
face  of  Canada,  within  one  hundred  miles 
of  Hamilton,  always  managing  for  the 
past  forty  years  to  get  home  to  wife 
and  children  for  the  week-end,  so  as  to 
get  ready  for  an  early  start  on  Monday 
morning  with  his  gripsack  and  sample 
case  for  another  round  among  his  cus- 
tomers. The  life  of  a  commercial  travel- 
er is  not  always  one  of  sunshine  and 
flowers,  but  take  them  for  all  in  all  they 
are  a  jolly  lot  of  fellows. 

Mr.  Dean  is  virtually  the  dean  of  the 
knights  of  the  gripsack,  for  while  he  has 
only  spent  76  years  on  this  earthly 
sphere  he  is  reputed  to  be  the  oldest  com- 
mercial traveler  in  Canada.  He  is  a  na- 
tive of  Yorkshire,  Ens-land,  but  when  a 
lad  was  brought  to  this  glorious  land  by 
his  parents  and  settled  in  Stratford, 
where  he  spent  an  apprenticeship  in  a 
hardware  store  with  the  Fuller  Bros.  In 
1864,  while  in  the  employ  of  that  firm,  he 
beg-an  as  a  commercial  traveller  north  of 
Stratford. 

During  the  fifty-five  years  of  his  ac- 
tive travelling  life  he  always  substan- 
tially covered  the  same  territory.  From 
1867  to  1877  he  represented  the  whole- 
sale hardware  firm  of  Mulholland  and 
Baker,  and  of  Frothingham  and  Work- 
man, both  Montreal  houses,  being  with 
the  latter  firm  from  1877  to  1879.  Leav- 
ing Montreal  he  came  to  Hamilton,  and 
took  service  with  the  firm  of  Wood  & 
Lege-att  in  1879,  and  the  reconstruction 
of  the  firms  of  Wood,  Vallance  &  Co., 
now  Wood,  Alexander  &  James,  for  forty 
years,  beins:  a  working  part  of  the 
growth  of  the  Hamilton  house  from  a 
small  jobbing:  concern  to  the  largest 
wholesale  hardware  firm  in  Canada. 

He  has  an  active  travelling  record  of 
which  he  may  feel  justly  proud,  always 
on  the  job,  and  rarely  ever  missing  a 
customer  or  a  trip.  For  thirty-five  years 
he  has  spent  the  week-ends  in  his  home 
on  the  corner  of  Emerald  and  Main 
Streets,  and  has  always  taken  an  active 


WM.  H.  DEAN 

interest  in  the  welfare  of  the  city.  He 
has  been  prosperous  in  his  business  tran- 
sactions, and  through  his  careful  and 
saving  habits  can  retire  while  strong  in 
body  and  vigorous  in  mind  in  ease  and 
comfort.  He  was  one  of  the  charter 
members  of  the  Commercial  Travellers' 
Association  of  Canada,  and  for  many 
years  held  leading  offices  in  the  asso- 
ciation. 

His  only  surviving  son,  whose  home  is 
in  Seattle,  served  as  a  captain  in  the 
volunteer  army  of  the  United  States  dur- 
ing the  world  war,  and  was  tendered  a 
commission  in  the  regular  army  on  his 
being  mustered  out  of  active  service. 
Mr.  Dean's  hundreds  of  old  customers 
will  miss  his  jovial  face  in  the  future, 
for  he  has  always  had  a  pleasant  word 
for  them  on  his  regular  visits.  He  never 
persuaded  a  customer  to  overstock,  and 
was  always  of  great  assistance  in  help- 
ing young  merchants  to  select  the  class 
of  goods  that  would  find  ready  sales  in 
their  several   towns. 

As  a  mark  of  the  appreciation  of  his 
forty  years  of  faithful  service,  the  firm 
very  generously  handed  Mr.  Dean  a  check 
for  one  thousand  dollars  on  Wednesday 
night.  During  all  these  years  under  each 
management,  Mr.  Dean  can  feel  a  pride 
that  he  never  had  a  cross  word  or  a 
business  misunderstanding  with  any 
member  of  the  firm.  It  was  a  sad  but 
pleasant  parting  of  an  old  and  faithful 
employee  with  his  employers,  and  the 
doors  of  the  new  factory  will  swing  open 
for  him  at  any  time  should  he  feel  like 
again  taking  up  his  old  or  new  work. 


Incorporations 

Motor  Patents,  Limited,  head  office, 
Montreal,  capital  $100,000,  plans  to 
manufacture  and  deal  in  electrical  equip- 
ment. 

Ames  Holden  Tire  Company,  Limited, 
capital  $1,000,000,  head  office,  Kitchener, 
Ont.,  plans  to  manufacture  and  deal  in 
tires. 

Western  Clock  Company,  Limited, 
capital  $100,000,  head  office,  Peterboro, 
Ont.,  plans  to  manufacture  and  deal  in 
clocks. 

Clayton  Neil  &  Jones,  Limited,  capi- 
tal $50,000,  head  office,  Montreal,  plans 
to  manufacture  and  deal  in  machinery 
and  acessories. 

Allied  Motors,  Limited,  capital  $150,- 
000,  head  office,  Montreal,  plans  to  deal 
in  auto  accessories,  automobile  tops,  oils 
and  lubricants. 

Peerless  Phonographs,  Limited,  capital 
$40,000,  head  office  Toronto,  plans  to 
manufacture  and  deal  in  phonographs 
and    supplies. 

Provincial  Car  and  Truck  Company, 
Limited,  head  office,  Toronto,  capital 
$150,000,  plans  to  deal  in  automobiles 
and  auto  accessories. 

Automotive  Manufacturers,  Limited, 
head  office,  Montreal,  capital  $49,000, 
plans  to  manufacture  and  deal  in  auto 
accessories  and  bateries. 

British  Foundation  Ovens,  Limited, 
head  office,  Montreal,  capital  $10,500,- 
000,  plans  to  engage  in  the  manufacture 
of  steel,  tin  plate  and  iron. 

The  Brydges  Company,  Limited,  capi- 
tal $50,000,  head  office,  Montreal,  plans 
to  manufacture  and  deal  in  steel,  sheet 
metal  goods  and  in  wire  and  brass. 

The  Leslie  Tin  Ware  Company,  Limit- 
ed, head  office  Ottawa,  capital  $100,- 
000,  plans  to  take  over  and  carry  on  the 
busines  operated  by  P.  Leslie  &  Son. 

The  Murray  Stock  Food  and  Remedy 
Company,  Limited,  head  office,  Dublin, 
Ont.,  capital  $20,000,  plans  to  manufac- 
ture and  deal  in  stock  foods  and  prepara- 
tions. 

The  Harland  Engineering  Company, 
of  Canada,  Limited,  capital  $100,000, 
head  office,  Montreal,  plans  to  manu- 
facture and  deal  in  electrical  equipment, 
lamps,  etc. 

The  W.  F.  Vilas  Company,  Limited, 
head  office,  Cowansville,  Quebec,  capital 
$500,000,  plans  to  manufacture  and  deal 
in  furniture,  fittings,  wood  products  and 
accessories. 

Magicoal  Electric  Fires  (Canada), 
Limited,  capital  $50,000,  head  office, 
Montreal,  plans  to  manufacture  and  deal 
in  electric  heaters,  radiators,  cooking  and 
similar  equipment. 

The  Bonne  Entente  Co-operative  Asso- 
ciation, Limited,  head  office  St.  Charles, 
Ont.,  canital  $10,000,  plans  to  manufac- 
ture and  deal  in  machinery,  farm  sup- 
plies and  household  supplies. 

The  Ferranti  Meter  and  Transformer 
Manufacturing  Company,  Limited,  head 
office,  Toronto,  capital  $250,000,  plans 
to  manufacture  and  deal  in  electrical,  me- 
chanical and  sanitary  engineering  equip- 
ment. 


January   10,   1920 


HARDWARE    AND    METAL 


No  Price  Changes  Planned  By  U.  S.  Steel 
Corporation 

Schedule  of  March  21  Will  Stand,  Declares  Judge  Gary — Says 
Labor  Conditions  Are  Better. 


JUDGE  ELBERT  H.  GARY,  chairman 
of  the  U.  S.  Steel  Corporation,  is 
authority  for  the  statement  that  the 
present  policy  adopted  by  the  .corporation 
in  the  matter  of  prices  would  be  con- 
tinued, and  that  the  March  21  schedule 
would  still  be  quoted  to  purchasers  of 
supplies  from  the  corporation.  Judge 
Gary  stated  further  that,  judging-  by  pre- 
sent conditions,  the  corporation's  busi- 
ness prospects  are  good  and  satisfactory. 

Outlook  Bright 

In  answer  to  questions  regarding  con- 
ditions and  the  policy  of  the  Steel  Cor- 
poration regarding  higher  prices  for  steel 
products,  Judge  Gary  made  the  follow- 
ing statement: 

"Judging  by  present  conditions  our 
business  prospects  are  good  and  satisfac- 
tory. We  have  been  asked  many  times 
for  our  statement  of  policy  in  regard  to 
future  prices  of  our  steel  products.  Ob- 
viously no  one  can  state  with  a  feeling 
of  certainty  what  action  will  hereafter 
be  taken  or  decision  made  concerning 
business  matters.  However,  I  will  state 
it  is  our  present  policy  and  determination 


to  adhere  to  the  selling  prices  of  our 
commodities  which  were  agreed  upon  by 
the  Industrial  Board  at  Washington  on 
March  21,  1919. 

Time  for  Moderation 

"The  demand  is  such  that  prospective 
purchasers  would  be  willing  to  pay  ma- 
terially larger  prices,  and  indeed  we  are 
informed  they  are  actually  paying  them. 
But  we  think,  taking  everything  into 
consideration,  that  we  would  not  be  jus- 
tified in  insisting  upon  or  accepting  ad- 
vances at  this  time.  If  we  did  I  fear  it 
would  have  an  influence  in  further  in- 
creasing generally  the  high  cost  of  liv- 
ing. This  is  a  time  for  moderation,  even 
at  the  risk  of  some  sacrifice." 

Judge  Gary  gave  as  his  opinion  that 
labor  conditions  are  much  better  now 
than  many  people  think  them.  He  blam- 
ed most  of  the  trouble  in  the  past  on 
labor  leaders  acting  "on  their  own  initia- 
tive" rather  than  on  that  of  the  workers 
and  said  the  public  generally  must  know 
that  the  effect  of  labor  unions  in  the  past 
has  been  to  decrease  production,  raise 
costs,  and  thus  add  to  the  expense  of  liv- 
ing. 


Asking  $100,000  For  Alleged  Infringement  of 
Patents  and  Trade  Lost 

Many  Technical  Points  Involved  in  Action  Between  Manufac- 
turers of  Electrical  Washing  Machines — Canadian 
Dealers  Interested  in  Outcome  of  Suit. 


Two  patent  infringement  suits,  involv- 
ing the  recovery  of  $100,000  for  trade 
lost,  the  securing  of  federal  injunctions 
against  further  violations  and  the  pro- 
curing of  royalties  alleged  to  be  due  for 
the  sale  of  many  machines  bearing  the 
infringement  of  the  patents  in  question 
have  been  brought  by  the  1900  Washer 
Company,  of  Binghamton,  N.  Y.  One 
suit  has  been  filed  in  St.  Louis  against 
the  Blue  Bird  Appliance  Company,  and 
the  Blue  Bird  Manufacturing  Company, 
the  first  the  selling  company,  and  the 
second  the  manufacturing:  company,  and 
another  against  the  jobbing  company, 
the  Elliott-Lewis  Electrical  Company,  of 
Philadelphia. 

Technical  Points 

The  case,  it  is  stated,  is  filled  with 
technicalties  but  centres  around  certain 
patents  in  reference  to  design  of  the 
tank. 

The  Blue  Bird  Company  made  muni- 
tions during  the  war  and  with  the  com- 
ing of  peace  commenced  the  manufacture 
of  washing  machines. 

The  Canadian  headquarters  of  the  1900 
Washer    Co.    is    in    Toronto.      The    Blue 


Bird  Company,  it  is  stated,  had  been 
considering  Brantford  as  a  location  for 
its  Canadian  branch. 


May  Spend  $20,000,000 

on  New  Steel  Plant 

SARNIA,  Ont.— At  the  final  meeting 
of  the  City  Council  it  was  announced 
that  New  York,  Detroit  and  Pittsburgh 
capitalists  had  absorbed  the  Lake  Huron 
Steel  Corporation,  which  recently  pur- 
chased a  large  tract  of  land  on  the  local 
Indian  reservation,  and  this  company, 
under  a  Canadian  charter,  would  shortly 
commence  operations  here  in  building 
the  largest  alloy  steel  plant  in  America, 
at  an  outlay  of  over  $20,000,000. 

Solicitors  of  the  Lake  Huron  Steel 
Corporation  waiting  on  the  Council, 
stated  that  the  steel  corporation  un- 
der a  new  name  and  charter,  with  a  capi- 
tal of  $20,000,000,  would  assume  imme- 
diate control  of  the  Lake  Huron  Steel 
Corporation  and  carry  on  the  alloy  steel 
business. 


(j:'> 


A.  K.  Freborn  is 

Appointed  Manager 

Beatty  Bros.,  Limited,  of  Fergus,  Ont., 
announce  the  opening  of  a  new  sales  of- 
fice in  Vancouver,  B.C. 

A.  K.  Freeborn,  who  has  been  handling 
the   business    of   Beatty   Bros.,    Limited, 


A.  K.  FREEBORN 

Appointed      manager      of      Vancouver 
Branch   of  Beatty   Bros.,   Limited. 

in  British  Columbia  for  several  years, 
has  been  appointed  manager  of  the  new 
branch.  The  office  will  be  situated  at 
Block  900,  Granville  St.,  Vancouver,  B.C. 


WHITTALL   CAN  CO.   OPENS   AT 
TORONTO 

The  A.  R.  Whittall  Can  Company, 
Limited,  Montreal,  have  appointed  a 
representative  for  Toronto  in  the  per- 
son of  G.  A.  Willis.  Mr.  Willis  will  be 
located  at  202  Royal  Bank  Building. 


STOWE  MFG.  CO.,  INC. 

The  Stowe  Manufacturing  Co.,  Inc., 
Binghamton,  New  York,  U.S.A.,  has  is- 
sued two  Bulletins  Nos.  103  and  104. 
These  are  the  first  issues  since  before 
the  war  and  supersede  any  previous  bul- 
letins and  catalogues.  They  illustrate  a 
complete  line  of  motor-driven  tools  and 
show  a  complete  offering  of  Flexible 
Shaft  equipment  of  various  designs. 
Bulletin  No.  103  consists  of  27  pages,  is 
well  illustrated  and  shows  the  firm's  com- 
plete line  of  electrical  Hand  Drills  and 
also  Portable  Buffers  and  Grinders.  Bul- 
letin No.  104  contains  86  pages  and 
shows  a  line  of  Flexible  Shafts,  special 
universal  joint,  Portable  Screw  Speed 
Drill  Press,  Power  Screw  Driver,  Tapping 
and  Reaming  Machines,  Portable  Electric 
Emerv  Grinders,  Combination  Drilling 
and  Grinding  Plants,  etc.  Readers  of 
HARDWARE  AND  METAL  may  obtain^ 
copies  on  request. 


64 


January  10,  1920 


lllllllll 


THE   CLERKS    DEPARTMENT 


What  Would  You  Do  if  Somebody  Offered  You 
$130,000,000  to  Quit  Business? 

This  Huge  Sum  Was  Offered    to   J.    Ogden  Armour  and  He 

Refused  It  Because  He  Likes  His  Work — How  He 

Helps  Young  Men  to  Get  Along 


HOW  much  do  you  love  your  work?  If 
somebody  offered  you  $130,000,000 
to  quit  would  you  take  it  and  live  a 
life  of  ease  ? 

J.  Ogden  Armour,  the  Chicago  meat 
packer,  was  offered  this  huge  sum  to  give 
up  business.  He  did  not  take  it.  In  the 
"Forum"  John  Bruce  Mitchell  tells  some- 
thing about  Mr.  Armour  and  why  he  likes 
his   work   better  than   money. 

"Big  men  are  only  little  men,  given  a  fair 
chance  to  grow."  That  is  the  fundamental 
business  creed  of  J.  Ogden  Armour.  That 
is  the  thought  underlying  the  operation  of 
the  great  meat-packing  business  and  rami- 
fied manufactories  in  which  the  enormous 
Armour  fortune  is  invested.  Reputed  to  be 
the  largest  individual  manufacturer  and 
employer  of  labor  in  the  United  States,  the 
head  of  a  company  whose  business  last  year 
approached  a  billion  dollars,  J.  Ogden  Ar- 
mour really  loves  his  work  and  he  has  made 
the  men  who  work  for  him  love  it  too.  .  . 
"Bier  men  are  only  little  men,  given  a  fair 
chance  to  grow"— there  is  much  to  ponder 
over  in  that. 

Would  Not  Quit 

A  few  years  ago  Armour  was  offered 
S130.000.000  for  his  packing  business.  So 
huge  was  the  sum  that  the  men  who  wished 
to  acquire  the  industry  took  it  for  granted 
that  he  would  sell.  To  their  surprise  he  did 
not  think  about  their  offer  for  a  moment. 
Quickly  he  said,  "What  could  I  do  with 
$130,000,000?  I  would  rather  be  at  work." 
Now,  'it  is  not  in  the  nature  of  man  to 
toss  aside  lightly  so  staggering  a  sum  of 
money;  but  Armour  scarcely  gave  it  a 
thought.  Why?  Because,  idealize  it  as  one 
will,  the  first  love  of  man — and  of  women — 
is  the  love  of  self,  and  that  great  packing- 
plant  of  Chicago  with  its  bellowing  stock- 
pens,  its  chutes  ever  rumbling  with  the 
tread  of  cattle,  its  dripping  butchering 
places  and  its  chill  storehouses — that  im- 
mense plant  is  J.  Ogden  Armour.  It  has 
become  as  much  a  part  of  him  as  his 
memory  and  he  would  no  sooner  part  with 
it  than  he  would  part  with  his  memory. 
It  being  his  self,  Armour  loves  his  work, 
really  loves  it,  idealizes  it,  accredits  to 
it  a  beneficient  motivation  that  is  beyond 
mere  dollars.  Were  you  worth  millions 
would  you  care  about  amassing  more? 
What  could  you  do  with  more?  No  more 
often  than  not  the  Captains  of  our  Indus- 
try become  wealthier  in  spite  of  them- 
selves. It  is  the  joy  of  work  that  infatu- 
ates them,  the  thrill  of  power  which  comes 
from  work  done  well  on  a  vast  scale.  The 
zest  of  amassing  wealth  ,  early  stales;  but 
the  zest  of  carrying  on  big  work  never 
stales,  if  the  man  loves  that  which  he  is 
creating. 

Love  Their  Work 

•  You  and  I,  we  think,  would  have   grabbed 
at   that.  $130,000,000   which    was   offered  Ar- 


mour and  been  content  to  call  it  a  life's 
job  done.  Possibly.  And  we  would  have 
travelled  until  travel  bored  us;  we  would 
have  owned  stables  of  motors  and  horses, 
yachts,  gorgeous  town  and  country  places; 
we  would  have  indulged  our  hobbies,  be 
they  helping  the  poor  or  backing  musical 
comedies,  and  in  a  few  years  what  then  ? 
Life  would  have  become  quite  empty,  what 
Emerson  calls  a  "sucked  orange."  From 
time  to  time  meeting  the  Captains  of  our 
Industry  and  trying  to  bore  down  through 
the  crust  with  which  business  has  overlaid 
them,  seeking  the  real  man  beneath,  I  have 
found  that  they  do  not  love  their  wealth  so 
much  as  they  love  their  work  and  that  it  is 
not  for  greed  of  dollars  that  they  are 
adamant  in  their  dealings  with  government 
and  with  labor,  rather  they  cling  to  their 
seats  in  the  high  places  for  the  joy  of 
creation   which    comes   trom   being  there. 

The  Greatest  Thing 

One  sizzling  July  day  when  Chicago  was 
stifling,  not  a  breath  of  cooling  air  coming 
off  Lake  Michigan,  Armour  sat  in  his  office 
at  the  packing  plant  and  said:  "Do  you 
think  I  would  work  here  nine  hours  a  day 
and  carry  the  burden  of  this  business  the 
other  fifteen  for  the  sake  of  a  few  more 
<!ollars?  No.  I  do  it  because  I  have  to  do 
it — because  my  job  is  the  biggest  thing  I 
know." 

And  the  ideal  ?  Armour  sincerely  finds 
joy  in  his  work  because  he  believes  he  is 
helping  to  feed  the  world.  He  believes  he 
is  able  to  feed  the  world  only  because  he 
has  built  up  an  extremely  efficient  organi- 
zation. He  regards  this  organization — not 
consciously  perhaps — as  a  monument  to 
himself  and,  for  one  to  attempt  to  modify 
it  be  the  change  coming  from  the  heads  of 
labor  or  the  hands  of  government,  is  to  him 
little  short  of  vandalism.  An  exaggeration? 
No,  it  merely  tends  to  show  how  seriously 
our  Captains  of  Industry  regard  themselves 
and    their   achievements. 

How  Armour  Develops  Men 

Armour  has  extended  this  worship  of  his 
big  packing  plant  to  those  who  work  for 
him  and  he  has  done  so  by  carrying  into 
practice  the  Armour  theory — "Big  men  are 
only  little  men,  given  a  fair  chance  to 
grow."  When  the  nation  was  facing  a  seri- 
ous situation  because  of  a  threatened  rail- 
road strike  which  would  have  paralyzed  the 
transportation  of  food  to  all  parts  of  the 
United  States,  directly  menacing  the  Armour 
work  which  he  believes  to  help  feed  the 
world.  Armour  simply  sent  a  brief  telegra- 
phic message  to  men  in  his  four  hundred 
branch  houses  throughout  the  country.  It 
read:  "In  the  event  of  a  strike  we  expect 
every  man  to  use  his  own  judgment."  Just 
that,  nothing  more.  No  elaborate  list  of 
instructions  what  to  do  and  how  to  do  it, 
rather  a  simple  message  leaving  things  to 
the  man's  initiative.     All  of  which  indicates 


faith  in  the  way  he  had  .trained  his  em- 
ployees, faith  in  his  selection  of  men  and 
faith  in  the  loyalty  he  had  inspired  in  them. 

Gives  Them  a  Chance 

Armour  has  always  believed  in  letting  his 
men  grow  and  develop.  His  policy  is  to 
give  them  free  rope.  If  they  are  too  small 
for  their  jobs  they  will  get  tangled  up  in 
the  rope  and  fall.  If  they  are  too  big  for 
their  jobs  they  will  fashion  the  rope  into  a 
ladder  and  climb  higher.  And  many,  of 
course,  do,  for  all  any  man  with  brains 
and  smooth  inhibition  needs  is  opportunity. 
Armour  trusts  his  men  and  lets  them  think 
for  themselves.  Each  and  every  one  in  the 
executive  departments  of  his  plants  knows 
his  dictum,  "Come  to  me  with  a  decision, 
not  for  one." 

Like  so  many  of  our  Captains  of  Industry, 
Armour  has  that  Jovian  paternalism,  quite 
well  developed,  which  takes  secret  joy  in 
discerning  among  the  lowly  of  his  em- 
ployees one  whom  he  judges  will  make  good. 
He  is  never  so  happy  as  when  he  sees  the 
office  boy  of  yesterday  on  whom  he  had  his 
eye  develop  into  the  department  head  of  to- 
morrow. Which,  by  the  way,  is  one  of  the 
pleasant  things  of  industrial  power — one 
is  able  to  fulfill  one's  judgment — "I  knew 
he  would  make  good!"  Armour  is  quick  to 
Kive  the  right  youth  the  chance  to  make 
fjood.  There  is  no  charity  in  this;  it 
springs  from  the  same  motive  which  ever 
wants  to  see  a  larger  gross  business  done — 
a  gratification  to  be  derived  from  one's 
work,   a   gratification   of   self. 

Likes  College  Men 

Armour  is  decidedly  friendly  to  college 
men  and  is  disposed  to  give  them  every 
chance  in  his  employ.  This  is  especially 
true  of  those  men  who  come  to  him  with 
technical  and  manual  training  schooling; 
for  he  takes  a  deep  interest  in  the  Armour 
Institute  of  Technology,  founded  by  his 
father,  and  in  the  crop  of  men  it  produces. 
Armour  did  not  finish  college  himself.  After 
preparing  at  Harvard  School  in  Chicago, 
in  1881  he  entered  Yale.  He  had  only  com- 
pleted two  years  of  study  at  New  Haven 
when  his  father,  P.  D.  Armour,  wrote  and 
asked  him  to  sacrifice  the  remainder  of  his 
course  so  that  he  might  return  to  Chicago 
and  learn  meat-packing.  And  young  Armour 
did.  Also,  he  left  the  luxurious  college  life 
he  had  been  living  at  Yale  for  a  salary  in 
his  father's  plant  of  eight  dollars  a  week. 

His  Father's  View 

"A  man  who  never  licked  stamps  as  a 
clerk,"  his  father  told  him,  "is  not  fit  to 
write  letters  as  an  executive,"  and  with 
that  young  Armour  was  sent  to  the  very 
bottom  in  the  packing-plant.  Here  he  kept 
his  eyes  and  his  ears  open;  he  saw  about 
him  many  men  who  needed  only  the  op- 
portunity. That  is  why  to-day  the  respon- 
sible positions  in  his  company  are  held  by 
men  who  were  once  clerks  and  office-boys. 
It  was  in  those  early  formative  years  that 
Armour  took  unto  himself  his  creed  that 
big  men  are  only  little  men  given  the 
chance. 

Helping  to  Feed  thv  World 

When  his  father  died  in  1901  Armour  in- 
herited the  business;  then  its  turnover  was 
$180,000,000  a  year;  last  year  it  was  $861,- 
000,000  and  Armour  insists  with  satisfac- 
tion that  its  profit  per  dollar  of  sales  is  sur- 
prisingly   low.      His    father    in    his    lifetime 


January    10,    1920 


HARDWARE   AND   METAL 


65 


was  one  of  those  American  industrial  en- 
trepreneurs who  worked  wonders,  for  in 
those  days  the  business  of  fresh  meat  was 
undeveloped.  He  it  was  who  visualized  the 
packing  industry,  who,  foreseeing  its  great 
possibilities,  could  not  longer  resist  keeping 
his  son  away  from  it  and  so  called  J.  Ogden 
Armour  away  from  the  study  of  books  to 
the  study  of  meat.  Strikingly  like  his  father 
in  many  ways,  Armour  on  his  father's  death 
picked  up  the  reins  and  drove  the  industry 
to  extents  which  his  father  had  dreamed. 
Among  other  things  he  developed  the 
enormous  international  business  of  the 
company,  carved  out  for  himself  the  job 
which  he  now  characterizes  as  "helping  to 
feed  the  world." 

Morale  in  Plant 

This  conception  of  the  magnitude  of  the 
Armour  work  he  has  successfully  conveyed 
to  the  minds  of  his  subordinates.  The  re- 
sult is  that  there  is  what  our  Army  calls 
morale  in  the  Armour  plant.  One  certain 
test  of  the  morale  of  any  business  is — Do 
its  employees  voluntarily  work  overtime? 
Noon  is  quitting  time  in  the  Armour  plant 
on  Saturdays,  but  time  and  again  I  have 
seen  there,  hours  after  noon,  scores  of 
workers  at  their  desks — although  there  was 
nothing  to  have  prevented  them  from  being 
at  home  or  out  of  doors — nothing  but  a 
feeling  that  theirs  was  the  biggest  job, 
"helping  to  feed  the  world." 

Like  his  father,  Armour  has  the  faculty 
of  inspiring  loyalty  and  devotion  among 
his  men,  not  only  from  directors  and  man- 
agers, but  from  all  his  associates  and  work- 
men. He  has  the  gift  of  command.  He 
never  asks  the  impossible  and  when  he 
wants  a  thing  done  he  does  not  tell  the  per- 
son how  to  do  it.  All  of  which  inspires  self- 
confidence  and  initiative  among  his  men. 
He  has  found  the  secret  of  command,  Which 
is  to  trust  underlings  to  execute  details  of 
work  unhampered,  for  which  trust  the  aver- 
age man  is  deeply  grateful,  and,  because  of 
which,  his  loyalty  rises.  Often  you  hear 
his  employees  say,  "I  am  an  Armour  man" — 
which  takes  its  inspiration  in  a  personal 
loyalty  to  Armour  and  in  a  pride  in  the 
thought  that  theirs  is  the  biggest  job  they 
know  of,  "helping  to  feed  the  world." 
Democracy    in    Business 

Armour  has  found  the  value  of  a  demo- 
cratic administration  of  his  vast  business. 
The  new  employee  is  quickly  made  to  feel 
that  he  is  a  member  of  the  huge  Armour 
family  which  is  feeding  the  world.  An  im- 
mediate spirit  of  friendliness  is  shown  the 
newcomer;  Armour  will  not  brook  the  curse 
of  so  many  corporation  offices — "office  poli- 
tics"— which  is  thought  spent  upon  how  to 
intrigue  away  the  other  fellow's  job,  in- 
stead of  giving  unstinting  thought  to  your 
own  job.  No,  the  newcomer  is  not  given  the 
cold  shoulder;  rather  he  is  personally  in- 
troduced to  everyone  in  his  department 
from  the  manager  down  to  the  office  boy. 
Quickly  it  is  told  to  him  the  various  things 
that  Armour  has  done  to  make  him  con- 
tent and  comfortable.  He  goes  to  the  gym- 
nasium upon  which  Armour  spent  $75,000  to 
give  his  employees  health.  When  he  learns 
that  each  employee  is  given  every  week  two 
hours  of  the  company's  time  so  that  he  can 
spend  it  in  the  gymnasium,  he  sees  an- 
other advantage  in  becoming  a  member  of 
the  "big  family."  He  finds  with  delight  that 
once  an  Armour  man  his  nealth  is  taken 
care  of — free  medical  attention  for  him  if 
he    is    ill. 

The  Pension  System 

The  newcomer  is  gratified  by  the  pension 
system  in  vogue,  one  of  Armour's  pet  pro- 
jects. All  he  has  to  do  is  to  contribute 
every  year  three  per  cent,  of  his  wage  to  the 
fund,  and  because  of  this,  at  tr>°  a-it  of 
fifty-seven,  provided  he  has  worked  for  the 
company  at  least  tw?nty  years,  he  may 
retire  and  draw,  for  the  rest  of  his  life,  a 
percentage  of  his  salary  at  retirement  equal 
to  double  his  years  of  service.  In  other 
words,  were  a  man  who  had  workej  forty 
years  to  retire  ha  would  receive  every  yea- 
thereafter  eighty  per  cent,  of  the  salary 
he  was  receiving  at  retirement.  In  the  pen- 
sion   sy>tem    every    contingency    is    covered. 


physical  disability,  and  allowances  for 
widows  and  children  of  the  deal.  Also, 
Armour  provided  a  "Servicr  Roll"  system 
for  his  day  laborers  which  provides  for 
them  a  pension  without  their  making  annual 
payments.  It  is  because  of  those  things: 
opening  the  door  of  opportunity  to  "little 
men";  creating  in  them  pride  in  Armour 
work,  their  work,  looking  after  their  health, 
happiness  in  their  job,  financially  safe, 
guarding  their  future — these  things  have 
made  Armour  and  'his  men  love  their  in- 
dustry. 

Is  Quite  Modest. 
And  what  is  the  other  side  of  Armour? 
What  kind  of  a  man  is  he  away  from  his 
business?  We  picture  him  sitting  among 
his  great  stockyards  and  packing  houses  as 
"all  business."  Does  he  ever  get  away  from 
it?  While  he  is  not  averse  to  having  his 
views  upon  national  subjects  being  made 
known  he  shuns  personal  publicity.  He  is 
really  quite  modest,  plain  in  his  ways  and 
unassuming  on  things  which  do  not  con- 
cern packing.  He  is  not  one  of  those  who 
because  he  has  made  a  tremendous  success 
of  one  business  believes  he  knows  the  cure- 
all  of  all  business.  Society  does  not  at- 
tract him  any  more  than  it  attracts  most 
of  our  Captains  of  Industry,  men  whose 
brains  cannot  find  interest  in  superficiali- 
ties. His  chief  interests  are  his  business, 
his  family,  his  "men,"  as  he  calls  all  who 
work  for  him,  travel  and  motoring.  Golf 
and  other  active  sports  rather  bore  him;  he 
spends  a  great  deal  of  time  reading,  writing 
and  planning — always  thinking  of  that  busi- 
ness which  he  could  sell  for  $130,000,000, 
but  which  is  so  much  a  part  of  him  that 
were  he  to  sell  he  would  be  selling  himself. 
In  the  daily  business  life  Armour  is  demo- 
cratic and  easy  to  approach.  His  nature  is 
companionable. 


Pipe  Mills  Decline 

Premiums  For  Goods 

Pittsburgh. — Severe  weather  has  de- 
layed oil  field  operations  and  quieted  for 
the  moment  some  of  the  frantic  pipe 
seekers,  though  demand  is  enormous  and 
pipe  mills  are  generally  sold  far  into  the 
second  half  of  the  new  year,  if  volume  is 
based  on  present  producing  activity.  The 
chief  interest  in  the  oil  fields  for  the 
moment  has  been  tubing  and  casing  and 
drive  pipe,  which  are  extremely  scarce 
and  are  essential  for  the  new  operations 
developing  everywhere.  Notably  is  this 
the  case  in  the  newly-opened  McKeesport 
fields  near  Pittsburgh,  where  scores  of 
oil  and  gas  wells  are  being  drilled  in 
continually.  To  obtain  casing  for  these 
operations  round  premium  offers  have 
been  made,  and  in  spite  of  these,  many 
inquiries  have  gone  unattended  and  un- 
satisfied 

In  current  business  both  lap  and  butt- 
weld  pipe  are  confined  to  jobbers'  and 
warehouse  stocks  and  at  higher  prices 
than  the  usual  discount  lists.  The  ad- 
vances range  from  $5  to  $15  a  ton  on 
pipe,  especially  high,  being  the  smaller 
sizes,  which  are  generally  oversold. 
Wrought  iron  pipe  makers  are  sold 
through  the  first  quarter,  and  few  are 
able  to  consider  new  business  or  name 
prices  further  ahead  than  that  period. 


NO  REST  FOR    THE  WIZARD 


The  prime  minister   (weary  with  the  strain  of  the   strike) 

winks! 
The  mosquito:     Ping! 


From   "Flinch,"   London. 

Now  for  forty 


66 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL—Advertwng  Section 


January  10,  1920 


5HER  WILL-LAC 


FOR  FLOORS 

Sell  SHER-  WILL-LAC 

FOR  FURNITURE 

Sell  SHER- WILL-LAC 

FOR  WOODWORK 

Sell  SHER- WILL-LAC 

FOR  ALL  INSIDE 

Sell  SHER- WILL-LAC 


SherWillL^ 

THE  MODERN  FINISH      ■ 

^^inine  and  Varnishing  / 
*T  One  operation  Floors,/ 
V"mifure, Woodwork  ztcy 


LIGHT  OAK 

T»e  $he»wm-Wiluams  &> 


"f  Canacfa,  Limited 
UNNJtV^?N,SH  *  CO10*  E^J 


UMNJtVARN'SH  t>  coloq  make*!  > 

<W,_  SEtD     OIL      CRUSHERS 

•;^s*VARS>10OSES:    Montreal.  To^Er*. 


Widely  Advertised 
Easily  Sold. 

Made  In 
13  Different  Shades 


CHERRY,  ROSEWOOD,  LIGHT  OAK, 
DARK  OAK,  LIGHT  MAHOGANY, 
DARK  MAHOGANY,  GOLDEN 
OAK,  GREEN,  WALNUT,  GROUND, 
EBONY,   DULL  BLACK,   NATURAL, 

ALSO  SHER-WILL-LAC  GRAINING 
PREPARATION— LIGHT,  MEDIUM 
AND  DARK. 

SHER-WILL-LAC  IS  PUT  UP  IN  Vi 
PINTS,  y2  PINTS,  PINTS,  QUARTS, 
1/2  GALLONS  AND  GALLONS.  ALL 
FULL  IMPERIAL  MEASURE. 


January   10,   1920 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


67 


This 

Trade  Mark 
Stands  Behind 

5HERWILLLAC 


•I 


^ 
j&\-&* 
&$>** 

^ 


You  know  what  the  "Cover 
the  Earth"  Trade  Mark  means 
for  S.W.P.,  for  Family  Paint, 
or  for  S-W  Varnishes. 

It  means  exactly  the  same  for 
Sher- Will-Lac. 

It  means  Quality  Advertising 
and  Profit-producing  Sales  for 
you. 

Sher- Will-Lac  makes  the  Sherwin-Williams  Agency  a  complete, 
all-round  merchandising  proposition  for  every  Hardware  and 
Paint  Dealer. 

The  Sher-Will-Lac  Special  Selling  Plans  will  mean  a  largely 
increased  turnover  in  your  Paint  and  Varnish  Department  and  a 
worth-while  extra  profit  to  you  every  year. 

We  want  you  to  benefit  through  the  Sher-Will-Lac  Selling  Cam- 
paign. It  is  going  big.  Write  us  or  ask  our  representatives  for 
full  particulars. 

The  Sherwin-Williams  Co. 

of  Canada,  Limited 
Paint,  Varnish  and  Color  Makers,   Linseed  Oil  Crushers 

Factories.— Af  on  frea/,     Toronto,     Winnipeg,     London,  Eng. 
Offices  and  Warehouses:    Montreal,   Toronto,   Winnipeg,   Calgary,   Vancouver, 
Halifax,  N.S.,    London,    Eng. 


68 


January  10,  1920 


--iiiriimiiMiniiiiimiiuiiiiiiiiinuiiiiiiiii 


LlillliM 


NEW   HARDWARE    GOODS 

OFFERED    TO    CANADIAN    HARDWAREMEN 


iimiiii 


BICYCLE  LAMP 

Canada  Cycle  &  Motor  Co.,  Ltd., 
Weston,  Ont.,  are  marketing  a  new  Eng- 
lish type  acetylene  bicycle  lamp,  which 
they  claim  will  compare  favorably  with 
any  similar  lamp  on  the  market  and  is 
a    particularly    safe    and    easy    lamp    to 


Bicycle   Lamp 

operate.  The  height  is  six  inches,  and 
weighs  about  1%  pounds;  it  is  finished 
in  polished  nickel-plate.  The  makers 
state  that  they  can  furnish  this  with 
either  bracket  as  illustrated,  or  with 
English  spring  type  bracket  if  preferred. 


FOOT  ACCELERATOR 

Adamson  foot  accelerator,  which  is 
manufactured  by  Adamson  Manufactur- 
ing Co.,  Hamilton,  Ont.,  is  specially  de- 
signed for  use  on  Ford  cars.  The  manu- 
facturers claim  that  this  new  device  can 
easily  be  attached  in  a  few  minutes  by 
Ford  owners,  and  that  it  is  only  neces- 
sary to  remove  one  of  the  cylinder  head 
screws,  to  clamp  the  accelerator  in  posi- 
tion, a  wrench  being  the  only  tool  re- 
quired. 

Another  feature  claimed  for  this  ac- 
celerator is  that,  owing  to  the  simple  con- 
struction, no  fitting  or  altering  is  neces- 
sary, thus  making  it  an  easy  matter  for 
almost  any  one  to  instal. 


It  is  stated  that  this  attachment  can- 
not rattle,  and  consists  of  only  one  mov- 
ing part  suppcrted  by  a  spring  tension 
bearing  as  shown,  and  is  a  practical  de- 
vice, giving  the  operator  complete  con- 
trol of  the  throttle  with  the  foot.  It  is 
operated  entirely  independent  of  the 
hand  throttle,  similar  to  that  regularly 
used  on  all  other  cars,  and  is  of  equal 
convenience  to  the  Ford  driver. 


is  claimed  the  toy  is  a  safe  one  as  the 
cartridges  are  light  and  describe  a  semi- 
circle when  fired.  The  barrel  of  the 
cannon  is  adjustable  to  any  angle.  The 
whole  toy  is  made  of  wood.  Red  body, 
red  hardwood  wheels,  black  cannon  seat, 


COMPRESSION  RING 

Burd  High  Compression  Ring  Co., 
Rockford,  111.,  through  their  agents, 
Burd  Ring  Sales  Co.  of  Canada,  322  Mc- 
Intyre  Block,  Winnipeg,  Man.,  are  mar- 
keting what  they  term  a  quick-seating 
piston  ring,  which  they  claim  has  the 
following   advantages: 

Of  the  step-joint  type,  the  outer  sur- 
face, which  comes  in  contact  with  the 
cylinder  wall,  having  raised  edges  which 
wear  down  quickly,  seating  with  a  glass- 
like surface  in  harmony  with  the  cylinder 
wall,  in   about  45   minutes.     A   channel, 


Toy    Cannon 

rear  wheels  5^  inches  stencilled,  extreme 
length  36  mches.  Height  of  seat  9 
inches,  weight  8  pounds  net,  and  is  ship- 
ped with  steering  rod  detached.  Ten 
cartridges  of  various  colors  and  signal 
whistle  are  packed  with  each  outfit. 


BURD  Quick-Seating 
Piston  Ring 


Piston  Riiiy 


.002  of  an  inch  in  depth,  is  in  the  centre 
of  the  face  and  carries  an  oil  film  that 
prevents  cylinder  wear  during  the  seat- 
ing process. 

In  automobile  cylinders  that  have  been 
run  for  some  length  of  time,  the  inside 
cylinder  walls  attain  a  hard,  glass-like 
surface.  The  piston  rings  attain  a  simi- 
lar surface,  which  is  desirable  and  neces- 
sary for  obtaining  maximum  efficiency, 
it  is  claimed.  A  piston  ring  that  does 
not  obtain  such  a  surface  is  said  to  cause 
a  considerable  loss  of  power,  wastage  of 
gasoline  and  lubricating  oil.  They  are 
made  in  all  sizes  and  oversizes  for  prac- 
tically every  make  and  model  of  motor. 


Accelerator 


TOY  ARTILLERY 

G.  W.  Stock,  1326  Sycamore  St.,  Cin- 
cinnati, are  marketing  a  toy  called  the 
U.  S.  toy  artillery.  This  toy,  they  state, 
shoots  cartridges  1%  inches  long  as  far 
as  30  feet,  and  has  a  seat  that  swings 
to  one  side,  giving  ample  room  to  operate 
the  plunger.  The  plunger  is  made  of 
hardwood  rod  and  piano  wire  spring.    It 


Singing   Lamps 

W.  E.  Lord  Company,  Limited,  Red 
Deer,  Alta. — Kindly  inform  us  where 
we  can  purchase  coal  oil  hanging  lamps. 

These  may  be  procured  from  the  fol- 
lowing: Schultz  Mfg.  Company,  Ham- 
ilton, Ont.;  Ontario  Lantern  &  Lamp 
Company,  Limited,  Hamilton,  Ont.;  Na- 
tional Stamping  &  Electrical  Works, 
Chicago,  111.;  Rochester  Lamp  Company, 
120    Church   St.,   Toronto.— Editor. 

Alladdin  Lamps 

Cronk  &  Buchanan  Hardware  Com- 
pany, Guelph,  Ont. — Kindly  advise  us 
where  we  can  procure  Aladdin  lamps. 

These  may  be  procured  from  the 
Mantle  Lamp  Company  of  America,  Inc., 
246   Craig   St.   W.,    Montreal. — Editor. 

Twinplex   Stroppers 

Sumner  Company,  Moncton,  N.B. — 
Can  you  inform  us  who  are  the  Can- 
adian agents  for  Twinplex  Razor  Strop- 
pers? 

These  are  marketed  by  the  Twinplex 
Sales  Co.  of  Canada,  Montreal,  Que. — 
Editor. 


January   10,   1920 


69 


i:i!i:|]i!iiiii!i;i;iiii:i:i;i!i:i;iii:i:iira 


WEEKLY  HARDWARE  MARKET  REPORTS 

STATEMENTS  FROM  BUYING  CENTRES 


iii.iui.ii.il 


THE  MARKETS  AT  A  GLANCE 


PERSISTENT  advances  in  prices  continue  to 
dominate  the  present  hardware  markets 
and  many  important  hardware  commodi- 
ties have  advanced.  The  most  important  lines 
affected  are:  Gasoline,  up  2  cents  per  gallon 
and  nearly  all  other  by-products  of  crude  oil, 
which  has  recently  shown  such  marked  ad- 
vances. Iron  and  steel  bars,  sheets  and  plates, 
solder,  horseshoe  nails,  cross-cut  and  buck  saws, 
firearms,  beaver  board,  fibrewares,  brooms, 
hockey  pucks,  silver-plated  ware,  tin,  copper, 


lead  and  spelter  are  all  on  the  list  of  advances. 

Paint  markets  are  firm.  A  famine  in  glass 
is  reported.  Shellac  prices  are  up  and  may 
again  advance.    Putty  is  also  higher. 

This  season  of  the  year  is  usually  a  breath- 
ing period  in  the  race  for  business,  the  quiet 
spell  being  used  for  housecleaning,  stock-taking 
and  rearranging  campaigns,  etc.  This  unsea- 
sonable activity,  then,  is  very  significant  of  the 
general  market  conditions,  which,  it  is  stated, 
will  prevail  during  the  present  year. 


MONTREAL  MARKETS 

MONTREAL,  Jan.  8 — Rubber  goods  are  advanced,  on 
general  lines,  15  per  cent,  this  week,  the  increase  dat- 
ing, in  fact,  from  January  3rd.  Rope  markets  have 
suddenly  firmed  with  a  prospect  of  prices  advancing  for  sisals 
and  manilas,  the  primary  markets  for  hemp  being  two  to  three 
cents  a  pound  higher.  Stoves  and  wares  are  firm  and  un- 
changed. Coal  oil  has  advanced  three  cents  per  gallon  and 
gasoline  two  cents.  Fuel  oil  is  also  marked  up,  the  present 
price  being  $12.20  per  barrel.  Iron  and  steel  and  wire  nails 
are  all  firm.  Black  sheets  are  marked  up  50c  per  100  pounds 
and  galvanized  75c.  Pig  lead  has  had  one  or  two  stiff 
advances  since  last  report  and  the  price  basis  is  now  three- 
quarters  to  one  cent  higher.  Pig  tin  is  up  six  cents.  Many 
other  changes  are  pending,  but  most  of  the  jobbers  have  been 
engaged  in  conferences,  stock-taking  or  rearranging  and  have 
not  made  the  usual  changes  in  some  cases.  Markets  are 
strong  in  eviery  particular  and  business,  while  quiet,  is  season- 
ably active. 


Rubber  Goods  Are 

Advanced  15  Per  Cent. 

Montreal.  

RUBBER  GOODS.— A  general  ad- 
vance of  15  per  cent,  is  applicable  to 
general  rubber  goods,  as  from  January 
3.  This  will  include  many  varied  spe- 
cialties. 

Will  Be  Big  Sales 

For  Nails  and  Wire 

Montreal.  

NAILS  AND  WIRE.— Prices  are 
steadily  firm  for  wire  nails,  and  the 
base  for  standard  is  held  at  $5.25,  while 
cut  nails  are  $5.35.  There  will  be  a 
heavy  demand  for  these  in  the  near 
future,  as  building  operations  are  ex- 
pected to  be  active  at  an  early  date, 
and  especially  if  weather  conditions  are 
available.  There  is  a  fairly  heavy  out- 
turn now. 

Wire   products   are   seasonably   active, 


the  base  price  for  smooth  steel,  0-9  be- 
ing $5.25.  > 

Rope  May  Advance; 

Markets  Very  Firm 

Montreal.  

ROPE,  CORDAGE.— An  advance  at 
primary  points  for  hemp  of  2  to  3c  per 
lb.  suggests  a  firming,  of  the  market 
here,  and  manufacturers  state  that  there 
is  probability  of  prices  being  marked 
higher.  All  tendencies  are  decidedly 
firm,  and  the  market  may  soon  rule 
higher.  Present  base  prices  are:  Pure 
manila,  per  lb.,  31c;  British  and  Beaver 
manila,   26c;    and   sisal,   22%c   per  lb. 

Stoves  Very  Firm; 

Wares  Firm;  Quiet 

Montreal.  

STOVES,  WARES.— Prices  for  stoves 
and  ranges  are  still  unchanged,  but  the 
tendencies   are   strongly     of     a  firming 


nature.  Trade  has  quieted  down  con- 
siderably, but  any  change  made  would 
be  in  the  nature  of  an  advance. 

Various  wares  are  ruling  steadily 
firm,  but  for  these  there  is  a  decreased 
demand,  in  keeping  with  the  season. 

All  Oils  Advanced; 

Gasoline  Higher,  Too 

Montreal.  

OILS,  GASOLINE.  —  Prices  are 
marked  up  three  cents  per  gallon  on 
coal  oil,  making  the  range  now  25-28c 
per  gallon.  An  increase  is  also  effective 
for  gasoline,  motor  grade  selling  up  two 
cents  at  35c  per  Imperial  gallon.  Other 
grades  are  advanced  similarly  in  price. 
HARDWARE  AND  METAL  has  re- 
ferred very  definitely  to  the  strength  of 
these  two  lines,  and  suggested  advances 
would  be  made  soon. 

Fuel  oil  prices  have  been  tending  up- 
ward, with  several  increases  actually 
made  of  late,  and  the  present  price  in 
wood  barrels,  in  ordinary  lots,  is  given 
as  $12.20  per  barrel.  This,  HARDWARE 
AND  METAL  is  informed,  is  likely  to 
be  a  peak  price  for  the  present.  Crude 
oil  prices  have  been  responsible  for  the 
high  markets  that  have  been  ruling. 

Iron  and  Steel 

Are  Ruling  Firm 

Montreal.  

IRON  AND  STEEL.— No  actual 
changes  are  reported,  but  there  is  a  de- 
cidedly firm  tendency  to  this  market. 
Preparations  are  being  made  for  great 
future  business,  and  it  is  stated  that 
forward  bookings  are  much  heavier  than 
is  usual  at  this  time  of  year. 

IRON     AND    STEEL 

Iron    finish    machinery    steel     4  20 

Norway   iron    12  00 

Single  reeled  machinery  steel    5   25 

Spring  steel    5  00 

Sleigh   shoe   steel    4   18 

Tire  steel    4   35 

Toe  calk  steel,  per  100  lbs 5  05 


70 


HARDWARE    AND    METAL 


January  10,  1920 


Band   steel    4  65 

Harrow     tooth     steel 4  30 

Mining  tool  steel,   per  lb 0  22 

Black  Diamond  tool  steel,  per  lb 0  22 

Black  Diamond  cast  steel,  per  lb 0  22 

Common   bar   iron,  per   100    lbs 4  00 

Refined   iron,    per    100   lbs 5  00 

Mild    steel     „ 4  15 

i-16  and  thinner  flats  in  iron  or  steel  take  extra 
50c   per   100   lbs.   ever  base   and   regular  extra. 

Sheets  Prices 

Still  Higher 

Montreal.  

SHEETS. — Prices  have  again  been 
advanced  on  black  sheets  and  on  gal- 
vanized. Blacks  ranging  from  16  gauge 
to  28  are  all  marked  5'j  cents  higher, 
»nd  U.  S.  galvanized  sheets  all  ad- 
vanced 75  cents.  Trade  is  very  good 
For  time  of  year,  and  dealers  look  for- 
ward with  confidence  to  a  larger  busi- 
less   later  on. 

BLACK— 

10    gauge     6   50 

12    gauge     5  95  6  25 

1 4    gauge     6  00         6  30 

16  gauge    6  60 

18-20  gauge 7   05 

22-24    gauge     7   10 

!0  gauge    7  20 

28    gauge     7  50 

GALVANIZED     SHEETS— 
U.S.   Standard — 

10%    gauge     9  75 

28    gauge     9  60 

26    gauge     9   50 

22  and  24  gauge 9   15 

20    gauge     9  00 

18    gauge     9   00 

16  gauge    8  75 

English   Standard — 

28    gauge    10  50 

26    gauge     10  25 

24    gauge     9  65 

22    gauge    9  30 

1&  and   20  gauge    9  10 

*JOTE — These  prices  are  for  full  bundles,  an  extra 
charge  of  25c  to  35c  per  100  lbs.  is  made  for 
broken    lots. 

Old  Metals  Are 

Fairly  Active 

Montreal.  

OLD  MATERIAL.— Manufacturers  of 
ron  products  are  inclined  to  buy  more 
'reely,  and  the  tendencies  on  heavy  steel 
md  cast  scrap  are  still  firm,  consider- 
ible  of  this  scrap  selling.  Otherwise 
;here  has  been  little  movement  of  vari- 
es other  materials  and  the  usual  sea- 
sonable demand  obtains. 
Dealers'   Buying  Prices — 

31d    rubbers,    boots   and  shoes....     0  07  0  08 

Jvershoes,      lumbermen's      rubber 

boots      0  05 

Jversfooes.    etc.    (trimmed)     0  05'         0  06 

Sicyele    tires    0  03% 

Automobile    tires     0  03%     0  04 

fellow  brass    0  10        Oil 

Red  brass    0  15         0  16 

Light    brass    0  07%     SM^ 

*cran    zinc    0  06%     •  €• 

Light  copper    13  75       14  00 

Heavy    copper    0  17         0  18 

lYrought  iron,   No.    1,  per  gr.   ton      ....        16  50 

Malleable  scrap   (ton)    25   00 

Pipe  scrap,  ton 10   00 

Stove   plate,   ton    21   00       22   00 

Heavy  melting   steel    15  00        16  00 

No.   2   busheling    7   00  8  00 

Boiler  plate    15   00 

Machinery,    cast    (ton)    24  00       25  00 

Stiff  Advances  May 

Come  on  Lead  Products 


ploded  this  theory.  As  a  consequence, 
and  with  lead  likely  to  continue  high, 
because  of  the  excessive  demands  from 
all  users,  the  market  on  sheet  lead,  lead 
wool,  lead  pipe,  and  solders  is  very 
firm.  Increased  prices,  consequently, 
may  be  anticipated  in  the  early  future 
and   probably  before   the   week-end. 

Lead  pipe    0  13% 

Lead    waste    0  14% 

8    in.   and   over    0  15% 

Note. — Lead  pipe  is  subject  to  a  discount  of  10%. 

Ljad  traps  and  bends ....  5% 

Lead  wool,  lb 0  15 

Lead  sheets,  2%  lbs ....  0  12% 

Lead  sheets,  3  to  3%  lbs.,  sq.  ft.,  lb 0  12% 

Lead  sheets,  4  to  8  lbs.,  sq,  ft 0  11% 

Cut  sheets   %c  lb    extra  and  cut  sheets  to  size, 
%c   lb.   extra. 

Solder,  guaranteed,  lb 0  40 

Solder,    strictly,     lb ....  0  38 

Strictly,    commercial,   lb 0  35% 

Solder,    wiping,    lb '  0  32% 

Solder    wire    (8    gauge)  — 

40-60      0  37 

45-55      0  31% 

50-50      0  42% 

Zinc   sheets,   casks    0  16% 

Do.,    broken    lots     0  17 

Tin  is  Advanced  6c; 

Metals  Very  Firm 

Montreal.  

INGOT   METALS.— Tin  has  advanced 


to  6c  and  other  materials  are  selling  at 
prices  a  little  in  advance  to  those  of 
last  week.  The  market  is  very  firm 
and  it  is  stated  that  prices  will  be 
higher.  While  no  alteration  has  been 
made  in  copper,  which  remains  steady 
at  24%  cents  per  pound,  an  early  ad- 
vance is  probable. 

COPPER.— Copper  sells  steadily  at 
24c,  but  an  advance  is  to  be  expected. 

TIN. — Tin  is  very  strong  and  has 
advanced  to  72c.  London  cables  are 
higher,  almost  daily. 

ANTIMONY.— Antimony  has  also  ad- 
vanced. The  Chinese  variety  is  selling 
at  11%   cents,  and  English  at   12c. 

LEAD. — The  prevailing  price  for  lead 
is  now  10%  to  10 %c,  an  advance  of  %. 
to  lc  over  last  week's  selling  price. 

ALUMINUM. — Aluminum  prices  are 
tending  upward.  A  34c  per  pound  sell- 
ing basis  marks  an  advance  of  1  cent. 

SPELTER.— Spelter  is  advanced  to 
12%.  Supplies  in  all  these  metals  are 
stated  to  be  fairly  good,  and  the  market 
is  very  firm. 


TORONTO  MARKETS 

TORONTO,  Jan.  8 — Persistent  advances  continue  to  be 
the  order  on  the  local  market  and  important  changes  are 
again  reported  this  week.  Among  these  advances  some 
of  the  well-known  lines  are  noted  as  follows:  Gasoline  has 
jumped  2  cents  per  gallon.  Nearly  all  by-products  of  crude 
oil,  such  as  coal  oil,  benzine,  steam  and  gasoline  engine  lubri- 
cating oils,  also  fuel  oil,  are  higher,  owing  to  the  substantial 
advance  in  crude  oils. 

Horseshoe  nails,  solder,  iron  and  steel  bars,  cross-cut  and 
buck  saws,  Winchester  arms,  beaver  board,  fibrewares,  Oneida 
Community  flatware,  brooms,  are  all  higher. 

Tin  has  advanced  3  cents  per  pound;  copper  1/2  cent;  lead 
1  cent  and  spelter  %  cent  per  pound.  White  lead  is  up  $1.00 
per  100  pounds;  putty  50  cents  per  100  pounds;  white  turpen- 
tine has  advanced  10  cents  per  gallon.  Linseed  oil  shows  a 
decline  of  10  cents  per  gallon. 

Usually  this  season  of  the  year  is  a  breathing  period  in 
the  race  for  business,  the  quiet  speel  being  used  for  house- 
cleaning,  stock-taking  and  rearranging  campaigns,  etc.  This 
unseasonable  activity  then  is  very  significant  of  the  general 
1  market  conditions  which  it  is  stated  will  prevail  during  the 
present  year. 


Lubricating  Oil  Has 
Advanced  2  to  ioc  Per  Gal. 


Cross  Cut  and  Buck  Saws 
Have  Been  Advanced 


Montreal.  — 

LEAD  PRODUCTS.— Increases  have 
been  thought,  in  some  quarters,  to  have 
reached  their  peak  on  pig  lead,  but  a 
stiff  advance  of  nearly  three-quarters  of 
a  cent  on  Wednesday  of  this  week  ex- 


Toronto.  

LUBRICATING  OIL.— A  general  ad- 
vance of  from  2  to  10  cents  per  gallon 
tbroughout  the  oil  list  is  noted.  This  is 
attributed  to  the  recent  advances  in  fuel 
oil.  For  new  prices  refer  to  current  quo- 
tation pages. 

Hockey  Pucks  Advance; 
Number  30  Now  $3  Dozen 

Toronto.  ■ 

HOCKEY  PUCKS  have  advanced 
and  are  quoted  at:  Boys',  $1.20  per  doz.; 
No.  20,  $2.25  per  doz.;  No.  30,  $3  per  doz. 


Toronto.  

CROSS-CUT  AND  BUCK  SAWS  have 
advanced.  As  predicted  by  HARDWARE 
AND  METAL  for  some  time  many  goods 
whose  basic  material  is  iron  and  steel 
are  showing  strong  tendencies  towards 
higher  prices.  This  applies  to  saws  of 
many  kinds.  Buck  saws  are  quoted  at 
higher  prices  as  follows:  Sampson,  $18.50 
per  doz.;  Happy  Medium,  $13.70;  Happy 
Medium,  lance  tooth,  $14.85;  Prince 
Rupert,  $18.50:  crosscut  saws  are  quoted 
at:  5  ft.,  $5.30;  5%  ft.,  $6;  6  ft,  $6.90. 


January   10,  1920 


HARDWARE  AND    METAL 


71 


Winchester  Arms 

Advance  15  to  20% 

Toronto.  

WINCHESTER  ARMS.— An  advance 
has  been  proclaimed  in  Winchester  arms. 
This  is  in  harmony  with  advances  in 
nearly  every  line  whose  basic  material 
is  iron  or  steel.  The  new  advance  will 
approximate  from  15  to  20  per  cent. 

Beaver  Board  Advanced; 
Now  Quoted  $38.50  Per  M 

Toronto.  

BEAVER  BOARD  has  advanced  and 
is  selling  at  new  prices.  One  of  the  fac- 
tors bearing-  on  the  situation  is  that  raw 
material  is  very  hard  to  procure;  labor 
also  is  a  problem,  it  is  stated.  The  new 
price  is  quoted  at  $38.50  per  M. 

Fibre  Wash  Tubs,  Pails, 
Buckets  Advance  $  to  15% 

Toronto.  

FIBREWARE.— An  advance  has  taken 
place  in  fibre  wash  tubs,  pails,  buckets, 
etc.,  and  new  prices  are  being-  quoted. 
The  advance  is  varied  but  will  approxi- 
mate 5  to  15  per  cent. 

Par,  Reliance,  Community 
Plate  All  Up  10  to  25% 

Toronto.  

SILVER  FLATWARE.— The  lines  of 
this  commodity  manufactured  by  the 
Oneida  Community  Ltd.,  have  advanced 
and  Par.  Reliance  and  Community  plate 
are  all  quoted  at  new  higher  prices  rang- 
ing from  10  to  25  per  cent,  over  the  for- 
mer quotations. 

Yankee  Screwdrivers 

Advance  About  15% 

Toronto.  

YANKEE  BRAND  TOOLS  have  ad- 
vanced as  reported  in  last  week's  issue 
of  HARDWARE  AND  METAL.  Below 
are  some  of  the  best  sellers  and  are  now 
quoted  at:  Screwdrivers,  No.  20  x  1  in., 
$21.60  per  doz;  2  in.,  $28.60;  No.  12, 
$12;  spiral  ratchet  screwdrivers,  No.  30, 
$38.50:  No.  31,  $51.70;  No.  35,  $28.60; 
No.  130,  $44;   No.  131,  $59.40. 

Screwdrivers : 

No.ll      No.  15 
Per  doz  Per  doz. 

2  in $8.40  — 

8  in 10.30         $9.60 

4  in 11.00         10.00 

5  in 12.10         10.40 

f  in 13.60  — 

8  in lf.40  — 

Brooms  Have  Advanced 
Approximately  50c  Doz. 

Toronto.  

BROOMS.— As  predicted  in  HARD- 
WARE AND  METAL,  brooms  have 
again  advanced.  This  year's  crop  was  a 
failure  from  an  economical  standpoint,  as 
the  corn  grew  too  long  in  length,  and 
when  made  up  into  brooms  the  extra 
length  had  to  be  cut  off,  and  as  there 
is  no  other  purpose  that  this  extra 
length  can  be  used  for  this  is  consider- 
able waste.  This  reflects  in  the  price 
as  corn  is  bought  by  manufacturers  in 
the  field  by  the  ton.     The  high  cost  of 


labor  is  another  factor  in  the  advancing 
cost  of  production.  The  new  advance  ap- 
proximates 50  cents  per  dozen. 

Gasoline  and  Coal  Oil 
Advanced  2  and  3c  Gal. 

Toronto*  ■ 

GASOLINE  AND  COAL  OIL  have  ad- 
vanced. This  is  attributed  to  the  heavy 
advance  in  crude  oil.  It  is  stated  that 
crude  oil  has  advanced  from  50  cents  to 
$1  per  barrel,  and  that  by  the  time  this 
passes  through  the  many  operations 
necessary  for  refining,  and  nearly  all 
these  operations  are  at  a  higher  cost, 
that  this  advance  becomes  co?npounded 
and  is  bound  to  raise  the  price  of  the 
refined  product.  The  present  quotations 
are:  Coal  oil,  Royalite,  24 \ 2  cents  per 
gal. 1  Palacine,  27%  cents;  gasoline,  34% 
cents. 

Some  Capewell  Horse 
Shoe  Nails  Up  ioo  Lis 

Toronto.  

CAPEWELL  HORSE  SHOE  NAILS. 
— A  new  list  on  this  commodity  has  been 
issued,  effective  from  January  1,  1920. 
The  discount  remains  unchanged.  This 
advance  is  in  order  with  many  other  ad- 
vanced prices  on  products  whose  basic 
metal  is  iron  or  steel.  The  recent  steel 
strike    and   previous    other   strikes,   also 

Stove  Prices  Are 

Advanced  15  Per  Cent. 

As  HARDWARE  AND  METAL  goes 
to  press  it  is  learned  that  an  advance 
in  stove  prices  has  taken  place.  It  is 
stated  this  is  directly  due  to  the  recent 
advance  allowed  the  molders.  Another 
factor  is  said  to  be  the  high  rate  of  ex- 
change. The  scarcity  of  raw  material 
as  well  as  the  iron  and  steel  disruptions, 
coupled  with  the  coal  strike  during  the 
past  year  ha\e  also  materially  affected 
prices.  While  the  new  quotataions  have 
not  as  yet  been  officially  anounced,  it  is 
believed  they  will  approximate  15  per 
cent,  advance  over  the  present  quota- 
tions. 


the  coal  strike,  all  have  had  serious  ef- 
fects on  the  world's  markets,  and  it  is 
generally  believed  that  many  changes 
will  take  place  before  production  has  be- 
gun to  settle  back  to  the  old  pre-war 
stride.  The  new  list  is  as  follows:  No.  2, 
$3.04:  No.  3.  $1.54:  No.  4.  54c:  No.  4%, 
49c;  No.  5,  24c;  No.  6,  23c:  No.  7,  22c; 
No.  8,  21c;  Nos.  9  to  12,  20c. 

Rope  of  the  Better 

Grades  May  Advance 

Toronto.  

ROPE. — Higher  prices  mav  be  pro- 
claimed on  rope,  it  is  stated.  The  spread 
between  the  cheaper  and  higher  grades 
at  the  present  is  great;  this  leaves  an 
opening  for  some  imported  ropes  to  be 
nut.  on  the  Canadian  market  which  is 
judged  on  different  standards  to  that  of 
Canadian  manufacture.  This,  however, 
has  not  had  the  effect  to  lower  the  price 
as  might  be  exnected.     The  exchange  is 


a  factor  for  higher  prices,  but  the  main 
factor  is  the  scarcity  of  raw  material. 
While  an  advance  has  not  yet  taken  place 
developments  may  occur  at  any  time,  it 
is  stated. 

Solder  Has  Advanced; 

Other  Products  Firm 

Toronto.  

LEAD  AND  ZINC  PRODUCTS.— An 
advance  has  been  made  in  solder.  This 
is  no  doubt  due  to  the  increased  cost  of 
the  basic  metals  which  have  been  show- 
ing great  strength  of  late.  Other  pro- 
ducts are  holding  at  firm  prices  and  new 
higher  prices  would  not  surprise  some  of 
the  best-informed,  who  claim  that  the 
advancing  cost  of  basic  metals  is  bound 
to  reflect,  in  the  finished  products.  The 
following  are  the  present  quotations: 

Lead  pipe,  list,  per  lb 0  13% 

Lead  waste  pipe,  list,  per  lb 0  14% 

Do.,  over  8  inches,  list,  per  lb 0  15% 

Above  subject  to  discount  of  10%. 

Lead   traps   and  bends    5% 

Lead   wool,    lb 0  16 

Lead   sheets,    4   to   6    lbs.,   sq.    ft., 

in    rolls,    lb 0  10% 

Cut   sheets    %   to   %c   lb.   extra,  and   cut   sheets   to 

size  lc  lb.  extra. 

Solder,    guaranteed,    lb 0  35%  0  42 

Solder,    strictly,    lb 0  34%  0  40 

Solder,    commercial,    lb 0  32%  0  37 

Solder,    wiping,    lb 0  31  0  36% 

Solder,    wire,    lb 0  44% 

Zinc   sheets,   per  lb 0   17  0  19 

Iron  and  Steel  Bars 
Advance  50c  Per  100  Lbs. 

Toronto.  

IRON  AND  STEEL  BARS.— An  ad- 
vance of  50  cents  per  100  pounds  has 
taken  effect.  This  has  been  coming  for 
some  time.  It  is  stated  that  prices  locally 
should  have  been  advanced  some  time 
ago  as  there  has  been  numerous  ad- 
vances at  the  mills,  which  were  not  re- 
corded locally.  The  iron  and  steel  situ- 
ation continues  to  be  in  a  serious  condi- 
tion, and  it  is  believed  that  even  those 
in  control  of  the  mills  are  unable  to  pre- 
dict six  months  ahead.  However,  all  are 
looking  ahead  to  one  of  the  greatest 
years  of  expansion,  and  the  belief  is  that 
mills  will  come  through  with  better  pro- 
duction this  year  than  that  of  the  pre- 
vious, as  the  labor  unrest  is  settling 
down  and  all  are  trying  to  co-operate  for 
increased  production,  it  is  stated.  The 
following  are  the  new  quotations: 

Common    bar   steel     ...  4  75 

Common   bar   iron    4  75 

Angle     base     5  00 

Horseshoe   iron    5  26 

Tire    steel     5  20 

Mild   steel    5  00 

Norway   iron    15  50 

Toe  caulk   iron    5  95 

Sleigh   shoe   steel    5  00 

Band   steel    5  00' 

Spring     steel      12  00 

Mining   drill    steel    30  50 

Sheet   cast  steel    0  95 

Sheets  and  Plates  Firm; 

Scarcity  Pronounced 

Toronto.  

SHEETS  AND  PLATES.— The  scar- 
city of  this  commodity  continues  to  be 
very  pronounced.  Jobbers  state  there 
never  was  such  a  shortage  to  the  best  of 
their  recollections,  althouo-h  some  claim 
to  have  fair  quantities  of  black  sheets. 
It  is  very  hard  to  predict  just  what  will 
hanoen  in  the  sheet  situation.  The  year 
1919  was  characterized  commercially  ?nd 
industrially  by  the   ailments   that  were 


72 


HARDWARE  AND    METAL 


January  10,  1920 


bound  to  follow  in  the  wake  of  the  world- 
wide cataclysm  of  the  preceding  years. 
From  these,  after  all,  trivial  ills,  we  have 
come  forth  stronger  and  stouter,  perhaps 
a  bit  more  prudent,  but  also  none  the  less 
cheerful. 

.The  controversies  with  labor  have 
taught  us  as  much  as  they  have  those 
who  were  so  deluded  as  to  resort  to  the 
extreme  of  strikes,  that  true  industrial 
peace  is  predicated  upon  cordial  co-oper- 
ation between  employer  and  employee, 
whose  welfare  is,  after  all,  indissolubly 
linked. 

Owing  to  the  scarcity  and  unsettled 
conditions  of  the  markets  locally  it  is 
almost  impossible  to  quote  accurate 
prices,  as  nearly  all  who  have  stocks 
have  procured  them  under  unusual  con- 
ditions, and  sheets,  galvanized,  10  oz., 
for  instance,  are  quoted  anywhere  from 
$9.2^  to  *10  PC  per  100  nonnds. 

The  following  are  the  prices: 

BLACK    SHEETS— 

14  gauge    6  30         6  50 

16  gauge   6  65         6  95 

1 8-20    gauge     6  30         6  85 

22-24  gauge    7  25         6  90 

26  gauge   '. 7  35         6  95 

28    gauge     7   50  7   05 

3-16  inch  plate    5  95         5  '55 

14-inch  boiler  plate   5  45         6  10 

Prices    shown     are    for     full     cases.       An     extra 

charge  of  from   25c   per   100   lbs.   is  made   for  less 

than    case   lots. 

GALVANIZED  SHEETS— 

Premier  Apollo 

10%    oz $9   20        $9   80        $9  25      $10.45 

U.S.     28     8  60       10  20         8  85         9  75 

U.S.     26     8   20  8  80  8   55  9   40 

22   pud   '(    8   00  8   20  8   40  8  20 

18   and  20    7  80         8  00         8  25         9  00 

16     7   55  7   80  8  10  8   80 

12   and   14    7   35         7  55         7  9,5         8   55 

An   extra   is   now  charged   on   galvanized   sheets. 

10%   oz.   and    28   ga..    when   shipped   out   in   sheet' 

3  feet  wide.     The  extra  charged  over  prices  shown 

above   is  20c  per   100   pounds.     Other  gauges  show 

no  change  for  different  widths. 

Prices    shown     are    for    full    cases.       An    extra 

charge   of  25c   per    100   lbs.   is  made   for   less  than 

case  lots. 

Corrugated  Sheets  Scarce; 
May  Soon  Be  Advanced 

Toronto.  

CORRUGATED  SHEETS.  It  is  stated 
that  corrugated  sheets  are  practically 
off  the  market,  and  jobbers  state  they 
have  not  raised  their  prices  owing  to  not 
having:  anvthing:  of  any  account  to  sell. 
No  immediate  relief  is  looked  for.  and 
any  quantities  that  have  trickled  through 
have  been  so  small  that  the  situation  jren-. 
erally  was  not  affected.  The  following; 
are  the  quotations  current  for  any  job- 
bers that  have  stock  to  sell: 

Per  100  square  feet 
Corrugated    Sheets —  Gal'zd.     Painted 

No.   28   gauge    $8  25       $7  00 

No.    26    gauge    9  00         8  01 

No.    24   gauge    13  50       10  00 

No.    22   gauge    16  00       12   50 

No.    20   gauge    19  00       16  00 

No.    18   gauge    24  00       19  50 

Discount,  IV2  per  cent. 

On  shipment?  of  300  lbs.  and  ov»r.  freieM  is 
allowed  south  and  east  of  and  including  North 
Bay ;  also  several  Western  counties  in  Quebec 
Province.  Places  north  and  west  of  North  Bay, 
the  freight  is  equalized  on  North  Bay.  For 
Quebec  and  Maritime  Provinces,  freight  is  equal- 
lized   on    Montreal. 

Corrugated  Box  Fasts 

Have  Been  Advanced 

Toronto.  

BOX  FASTENERS,  corrugated  and 
plain  have  advanced.  The  new  quotation 
is:  Plain  edee.  discount  45  per  cent;  saw 
edge,  25  per  cent. 


Boiler  Tubes  Firm; 

New  Price  Holds  Steady 

Toronto.  

BOILER  TUBES  are  holding  firm  at 
the  new  prices.  No  change  in  price  is 
immediately  expected,  although  this  price 
is  firm  and  other  commodities  whose 
basic  metal  is  iron  or  steel  are  generally 
showing  higher  prices.  While  the  boiler 
tube  situation  is  not  so  serious  as  the 
wrought  pipe,  there  is  a  noticeable  scar- 
city. Jobbers,  however,  state  that  tubes 
are  coming  in  from  the  States  in  normal 
quantities  and  no  business  is  being  turn- 
ed down.  The  prices  are  quoting  as  fol- 
lows: 

Per  100  feet 

BOILER   TUBES—  Seamless  Lapweld 

1  inch     $28  00  

1%  inch     29  50  

IV,  inch    31   50  

1%  inch     32  00  $28  00 

2  inch      31   00  27   00 

2%  inch     35    00  29   00 

2%  inch     43  00  33  50 

3  inch     50  00         42  00 

3%  inch     '49   50 

3%  inch     63   00         46  50 

4  inch     80  00         59  00 

Scrap  Iron  and  Materials 
Firm;  Prices  Unchanged 


SCRAP  AND  WASTE  MATERIALS. 
— The  local  scrap  iron  market  has  not  as 
yet  emerged  from  its  quiet  stage.  Con- 
suming demand  has  held  aloof  as  far  as 
large  purchasing  goes,  both  because  of 
the  holidays  and  because  there  is  still 
considerable  improvement  to  be  made  as 
regards  fuel  before  manufacturers  feel 
free  in  stocking  up  further  on  scrap. 
Heavy  melting  steel  has  been  quiet,  but 
prices  have  been  strong.  While  few  deal- 
ers have  been  willing  to  oiler  more  than 
$15,  offerings  have  been  generally  with- 
held at  this  level.  However,  develop- 
ments may  occur  at  any  time  as  the 
whole  list  as  shown  below  is  being;  held 
at  firm  prices,  which  are  as  follows: 


"You  say,  young  man,  that  socks, 
Shirts,  underwear,  handkerchiefs,  and 
everythin'  made  of  cotton  hez  riz? 
Whad  d'ya  s'pose  is  makin'  cotton  so 
scarce?" 

"Epidemic    of    earache     among     the 
elephants  at  the  circus!" 

— Rehse    in    "Louisville   Times." 


DEALERS*    BUYING     PRICES 

Pipe     scrap     11  00 

Stove    plate,    per    ton     18  50 

No.    2    busheling 13  00 

Yellow   brass    0  10 

Red    brass     0  15% 

Light   brass    0  07 

Scrap   zinc    0  O6V2 

Heavy   copper    0  17 

No.    1    machinery   cast    ....  24  00 

Heavy   melting  steel    ' 15  00 

Wrought  iron.  No.   1,   per  gr.  ton      ....  15  00 

Heavy    lead    pipe    0  06 

Old    rubbers,   boots   and   shoes 0  06 

Overseas,       lumbermen's       rubber 

boots    0  04 

Bicyele   tires    0  01% 

Automobile   tires    0  03 

Tea     lead     0  04 

Heavy  lead  pipe   0  05% 

Tin  Up  3r,  Copper  Yzc, 
Lead  ic;  Spelter  Higher 

Toronto.  

INGOT  METALS.— Great  demands  for 
nearly  all  the  list  of  ingots  shown 
herewith  have  had  the  effect  of  boosting 
the  market  to  higher  levels  through  al- 
most the  entire  list.  It  is  stated  that 
there 'is  now  every  reason  to  believe  that 
the  copper  situation  has  changed  defi- 
nitely for  the  better.  Foreign  consum- 
ers are  buying  quite  freely  notwithstand- 
ing the  difficult  exchange  situation,  and 
domestic  consumers  are  making  substan- 
tial purchases  for  delivery  during  the 
second  quarter  of  this  vear.  Clearly  the 
general  industrial  outlook  is  believed  to 
be  greatly  improved  and  constructive 
operations  are  to  be  carried  forward  on 
a  considerable  scale  irrespective  of  the 
prevailing  costs. 

TIN. — A  further  advance  is  again  re- 
ported in  tin  this  week.  This  advance  is 
S  cents  per  pound  and  makes  the  new 
price  68%  cents  per  pound. 

COPPER  is  rapidly  recovering  from 
any  previous  weakness  and  has  changed 
definitely  for  the  better,  it  is  stated.  This 
week  records  a  further  advance  of  M: 
cent  per  pound,  the  new  quotation  be- 
ing; 25  cents  per  pound. 

LEAD  is  again  reported  at  a  higher 
■^isrure,  having:  advanced  1  cent  per  pound. 
The  new  quotation  is  now  10V2  cents  per 
pound. 

SPELTER  continues  to  show  advances 
and  this  week  the  price  is  %  cent  per 
pound  higher,  making:  the  new  quota- 
tion 12  cents  per  pound. 

ANTIMONY  shows  no  change  this 
week,  although  the  price  is  a  firm  one 
with  little  stocks  on  hand.  The  present 
quotation  is  12  cents  per  pound. 

ALUMINUM  is  still  quoted  at  34  cents 
per  pound.  This  is  a  firm  price,  it  is 
stated. 


ELECTRIC  STEEL  PLANT 

Pittsburgh. — Interests  associated  close- 
ly with  the  Youngstown  Sheet  &  Tube 
Company  have  formed  a  new  corporation 
at  Youngstown,  with  a  capital  of  $1,500,- 
000,  and  will  at  once  commence  the  con- 
struction of  the  largest  exclusive  electric 
steel-producing  plant  in  the  world.  L.  J. 
Campbell,  vice-president  of  the  Youngs- 
town Sheet  <%  Tube  Company,  has  re- 
signed to  become  executive  of  the  new 
company. 


January   10,   1920 


HARDWARE  AND    METAL 


73 


LONDON  MARKETS 

LONDON,  Jan.  8 — Many  important  price  changes  have 
taken  effect  this  week.  This  is  significant  of  the  approach- 
ing season.  Among  the  many  changes  are :  Wood  handles, 
Le  Page's  glue,  Yankee  tools,  clay  picks,  edge  and  pick  mat- 
tocks, grub  hoes,  crow  bars,  goose  neck  wrecking  bars,  staples, 
asbestos  sad  irons,  XLCR  window  rubbers,  Half  and  Half 
solder,  corn  brooms,  food  choppers,  bung  borers,  floor  hooks, 
track  hanger,  hooks,  Capewell  horseshoe  nails  and  barrel 
churns. 

Business  in  London  and  district  is  seasonably  good.  Pros- 
pects are  very  bright  for  big  doings  in  the  hardware  trade 
this  year. 

Most  retail  stores  are  stock-taking  at  present,  but  are  buy- 
ing freely  to  fill  in  the  holes  caused  by  good  winter  and  Xmas 
trade. 

Prices  are  very  firm  and,  as  noted  above,  there  is  a  big 
budget  of  changes  for  this  week.  Collections  are  coming  in 
good. 


Horseshoe  Nails 

Have  Advanced  ic 


London.  Ont.  

CAPEWELL  HORSESHOE  NAILS 
have  advanced  1c  per  lb.  This  is  caused 
by  the  recent  advances  in  iron  and  steel 
due  to  the  previous  strikes  and  disrup- 
tions, it  is  stated.  The  following:  is  the 
new  list  which  is  subject  to  a  discount 
of  10  per  cent.:  No.  3.  $1.54  per  pound; 
No.  4,  54  cents;  No.  5,  24  cents;  No.  6, 
23  cents;  No.  7,  22  cents;  No.  8,  21  cents; 
Nos.  9,  10,  11,  12,  20  cents.  Discount  10 
per  cent,  off  list. 

Eureka  Sprayers  Have 

Advanced;  Price  Firm 

London.   Ont.  


EUREKA  SPRAYERS  are  quoted  at 
new  higher  prices  which  are  as  follows: 
No.  112,  $6  per  dozen;  No.  114.  $9;  No. 
115,  $10.50;  No.  116,  $11. 

Floor  and  Track  Hanger 
Hooks  Have  Advanced 

London.  Ont.  


FLOOR  HOOKS  AND  TRACK 
HANGER  HOOKS  are  quoted  at  new 
prices.  This  is  a  reflection  from  the 
recent  advance  made  in  wire,  it  is  stated. 
The  following  are  the  new  nrices:  Floor 
hooks,  V2  in.  x  5  in.,  11  cents  per  pound; 
%  in.  x  6  in.,  10%  cents  per  pound;  % 
in.  x  7  inch,  10  cents  per  pound.  Track 
hanger  hooks,  V2  in.  x  10  in.,  95  cents 
per  dozen;  V2  in.  x  12  in.,  $1.05  per  doz. 

Barrel  Churns  Advance 
io^r  ;  Discount  10^   Oft 

London,   Ont.  


BARREL  CHURNS  have  advanced. 
This  may  be  on  account  of  the  shortage 
of  cut  lumber.  Tt  is  stated  it  is  very 
hard  to  get  the  class  of  labor  required 
for  cutting  lumber,  and  if  successful  the 
men  require  a  bic-her  rate  of  wages,  it 
is  stated.  This  all  reflects  in  the  prices 
of  the  finished  products.  The  following 
are  the  present  new  net  prices:  No.  0, 
$8.10  each;  No.  1,  $8.10:  No.  2.  $9;  No. 
3,  $9.P0;  No.  4,  $11.70-  No.  5,  $14.40. 


Gasoline  and  Coal  Oil 
Advanced  2  to  3c  Gallon 

London,  Ont.  

GASOLINE  AND  COAL  OIL  have  ad- 
vanced from  2  to  3  cents  per  gallon. 
This,  it  is  stated,  is  due  to  the  advanced 
cost  of  crude  oil.  Refiners,  it  is  stated, 
have  not  advanced  their  selling  price  in 
unison  with  the  higher  cost  of  the  crude 
oil,  and  January  1,  1920,  finds  the  price 
of  gasoline  1  cent  cheaper  than  that  of 
January  1,  1919.  However,  this  differ- 
ence may  be  due  to  the  fact  that  the 
Canadian  Government  lifted  the  7%  per 
cent,  war  tax  durinc  the  past  year.  The 
present  new  quotation  on  gasoline  is  34, 
cents  oer  gallon.  Coal  oil  is  quoted  at: 
Royalite,  24  cents  per  gallon,  and  Pala- 
cine  27l/o  cents  per  gallon. 

Corn  House  Brooms 
Have  Advanced  50c  Doz. 

London.   Ont.  ■ 

CORN  HOUSE  BROOMS  have  ad- 
vanced 50  cents  per  dozen.  This  has 
been  predicted  in  previous  issues  of 
HARDWARE  AND  METAL,  and  is 
caused,  it  is  stated,  by  the  poor  crop  of 
the  past  year,  which,  owing  to  Ihe  ex- 
treme length  of  the  straw,  entails  con- 
siderable waste,  which  can  only  be  ac- 
counted for  in  higher  prices.  The  new 
quotations  are  as  follows:  No.  8.  with 
hardwood  handle,  $12  per  dozen  net  cash; 
No.  7,  $10.50;  Parlor.  $9.25;  Four-string 
with  hardwood  handle.  $8;  XX,  $7.25. 

Bung  Borers  Have 

Been  Advanced 

London,   Ont.  

BUNG  BORERS  are  quoted  at  new  and 
higher  prices  as  follows:  No.  1,  $2.35 
each;  No.  2,  $3.35  each. 

Half  and  Half  Solder 

Now  Quoted  35^c  Lb. 

London,   Ont.  — 

HALF  AND  HALF  SOLDER— Owing 
to  the  many  advances  in  the  basic  metals 
solder  has  advanced  in  harmonv  and  the 
new  quotation  is  Half  and  Half,  35% 
cents  per  pound 


Asbestos  Sad  Irons 

Have  Advanced 

London,  Ont.  

ASBESTOS  SAD  IRONS.— New  prices 
are  now  available  on  asbestos  sad  irons. 
The  No.  70  is  quoted  at  $3.15  per  set. 

Enterprise  Food  Choppers 
Have  Advanced 

London,  Ont.  

"ENTERPRISE"  FOOD  CHOPPERS. 
— New  prices  are  quoted  on  food  chop- 
pers this  week.  The  "Fnterprise"  line 
is  quoted  as  follows:  No.  12,  $5.35  each; 
No.  22,  $9.15;  No.  32,  $11.50. 

Window  Cleaners  and 
Rubbers  Have  Advanced 

London,   Ont.  

WINDOW  CLEANERS  are  quoted  at 
higher  prices  which  are  as  follows:  XLCR 
10  in.,  $3.50  per  dozen;  12  in..  ?4;  14  in., 
$4.35;  Peerless.  10  in.,  $4.25;  12  in., 
$4.85;  14  in.,  $5.50. 

Fence  Staples  and  Hooks; 
Firm  Demand  Beginning 

London,   Ont.  

FENCE  STAPLES  AND  FENCE 
HOOKS  are  beginning  to  show  mtre  de- 
mand, and  are  at  present  quoted  at  the 
following  prices:  Fence  staples,  bright, 
100  lb.  kegs,  $5.60  per  100  lbs:  25  lb. 
boxes,  $6.10.  Galvanized.  100  lb.  kegs, 
S6.35;  25  lb.  boxes,  $6.85.  Galvanized 
fence    hooks,    keos,    $6.35    per    100   lbs.; 

25  lb.  boxes,  $6.85. 

Glass  Continues  Scarce; 

No  Relief  at  Hand 

London,   Ont.  

GLASS,  both  plate  and  window,  is  very 
scarce,  and  some  stocks  are  almost  ex- 
hausted. Some  claim  that  manufacturers 
are  temporarily  refusing  shipments  and 
say  that  they  have  no  glass  to  ship.  The 
following  is  a  list  of  net  prices  at  pre- 
sent current   in  this  district: 

Single  Double 

Up  to   25   in 15   92  18  32 

26  to    34    in 16  64  19  88 

35  to    40    in 17  44  21   12 

41    to    50    in 18   80  24  00 

51    to    60    in 19  68  24  64 

61   to    70   in 21   20  26   16 

71    to   80    in 28  32 

81    to    84    in 36  36 

85    to   90    in 39  08 

91    to    94    in 39  84 

95    to    100    in 46  84 

These    prices    are    net    f.o.b.    London. 

Wrecking  Bars.  Goose 
Neck,  Crow  Up  50c  Doz. 

London,   Ont.  

WRECKING  BARS,  GOOSE  NECK 
CROWBARS  have  advanced.  This  is  due 
to  the  present  scarcity  of  iron  and  steel, 
it  is  stated.  The  advance  is  -50  cents  per 
dozen.  Prices  are  as  follows*  Crowbars, 
10  cents  per  pound;  p;oose  neck  wrecking 
bars,   %   x  24  inch.  $6  50  per  dozen. 

Clay  Picks,  Mattocks, 

Grub  Hoes  Advance 

London,  Ont.  ■ 

CLAY  PICKS,  MATTOCKS  AND 
GRUB  HOES  have  advanced,  and  are 
quoted  at  new  prices   as  follows:     Clay 


.74 


HARDWARE  AND    METAL 


January  10,  1920 


picks,  5-6  lb.,  $11.50  per  dozen;  6-7  lb., 
$12.50;  %  lb.,  $13.50;  edge  and  pick  mat- 
tocks, $13.50;  grub  hoes,   $11. 

Yankee  Automatic  Drills 
Have  Advanced  15% 

London,  Ont. 

YANKEE  AUTOMATIC  DRILLS 
have  shown  an  advance  approximating 
15  per  cent.  This  is  in  line  with  advances 
in  many  other  products  made  of  steel  or 
iron.  The  following  are  the  prices  on 
some  of  the  bettor  known:  No.  40,  $37.40 
per  dozen;  No.  41,  $33.40;  No.  42,  $26,40; 
No.  43,  $16.70;  No.  44,  $40.20. 

Yankee  Screw  Drivers 

London,  Ont.  . 

YANKEE  SCREWDRIVERS  of  var- 
ious kinds  have  advanced  approximately 
15  per  cent.  Some  of  the  most  popular 
lines  are  quoted  as  follows: 

«i£«e„W  P"vers-— U  *  2  in.,  $8.40  doz.  ;  3  in., 
510.80;  4  in.,  $11;  5  in.,  12.10;  6  in.,  $13.60: 
a    m.,    $15.40. 

Screw  Drivers— No.  15  x  3  in.,  $9.60  doz  ■ 
4  in.,  $10;  5   in.,  $10.40. 

.Screw  Drivers— No.  20  x  1  in.,  $24.60  doz  • 
2    in.,    $28.60   doz. 

Screw  Drivers.— No.  12,  $12  dozen. 

Spiral  Screw  Drivers. — No.  30,  $38  50  doz  ■ 
No.  31,  $51.70;  No.  35,  $28.60;  No.  130  $44-  No' 
131,   $59.40. 

Liquid  Glue  Has  Been' 
Advanced  About  ^  \-\% 

London,  Ont.  °  '  ' 

LE  PAGE'S  GLUE.— An  advance  has 
taken  place  in  Le  Page's  glue.  The  new 
prices  are  subject  to  a  discount  of  33  1-3 
per  cent,  and  are  as  follows: 

List  Net 

XT      „.         ,  ,  Gross  Doz. 

No.  2fr  or  1  oz.  bottles 28  80  1   60 

No.  27  or  1  oz.  tubes    28  80  1   60 

No.  26  or  2  oz.  bottles 36  00  2  00 

N»    3n  °r'i/2  %f   °OZ°'0         2   °0 

No.   30  or  1  gill    3  60         2   40 

No.  31   or   V2   pint    6  00  4  00 

No.  32  or  1  pint 10  20  6  80 

No.  33    or    1    quart    18  00  12   00 

No.  34  or   V2   gallon    28   00  18  67 

No-  35   or   1   gallon    54   00  36   00 

Linseed  Oil  Quiet; 

Remains  Unchanged 

London,  Ont.  

LINSEED  OIL  continues  to  sel  lat  un- 
changed prices.  It  is  hard  to  state  what 
the  near  future  will  bring,  but  much 
lower  prices  are  not  at  present  looked 
for.  The  Argentine  crop  may  ease  the 
situation  somewhat,  but  much  depends 
on  shipping  facilities.  The  following-  are 
the  present  prices:  1  to  2  bbl.,  raw,  $2.67, 
boiled,  $2.70  per  gal.;  3  to  5  bbls,  raw, 
$2.66,  boiled,  $2.69;  6  to  9  bbls.,  raw 
$2.64,  boiled,  $2.67.  Less  bbls  add  15 
cents  per  gallon. 

Wood  Handles  Advance; 
New  Prices  10%  Higher 

London,  Ont.  

WOOD  HANDLES.— Higher  prices  are 
recorded  on  wood  handles  this  week.  It 
is  bard  to  state  the  direct  factors  as  they 
are  of  such  a  varied  nature.  However, 
one  of  the  chief  factors  is  the  shortage 
of  cut  lumber  and  the  short* "-e  and  high 
price  of  labor  to  cut  it.  The  following 
are  the  new  quotations: 

All   hickory  handles    List  plus  25% 

Fork,   hoe,   rake,   shovel,   spade  and  manure 
fork  handles  List  10r,    off 


All  oak,  maple  and  ash  handles   . . .  .List  plus   10% 

Maple  cant  hooks  and  peevie  handle List  Net 

Maple  and  ash  pike  poles List  plus   20% 

All    doubletrees    2%    x    4V2    x    4    ft. 

and  under   List  10%  off 

All   doubletrees   over   that   size    List   Net 

All    whiffletrees   3    in.   diameter  x   36 

in.   long  and  under   List  10%   off 

All  whiffletrees  over  the  above  size List  Net 

All    Neckyokes    3    in.    diameter   x    42 

in.  long  and  under    List  10%   off 

All  neckyokes  over  the  above  size List  Net 

All   good   f.o.b.   factory,    London. 

Terms— 2%    10    days.      30    days   net. 

All  orders  are  accepted  subject  to  delivery  as 
son   as  possible   after  receipt  of  order. 


Turpentine  Firm; 
Southern  Markets  Higher 


London.  Ont.  

TURPENTINE  prices  remain  un- 
changed, although  they  are  a  little  stif- 
fer  on  the  Southern  markets.  The  em- 
bargo, owing  to  the  floods  affecting  some 
of  the  main  shipping  points  has  been 
lifted  and  fair  quantities  are  expected 
to  arrive.  The  following  are  present 
quotations:  1  bbl.  lots,  $2.60  Imp.  gal.; 
2  to  4  bbl.  lots,  $2.59;  5  gal.  lots,  $2.75. 


WINNIPEG  MARKETS 

WINNIPEG,  Jan.  8 — After  the  somewhat  heavy  and  num- 
erous changes  of  the  past  week,  a  quiet  market  would 
have  been  in  order.  However,  this  is  not  the  case  and 
further  important  changes  are  recorded.  Whatever  changes 
have  occurred,  however,  are  as  might  be  expected  of  an 
advanced  nature  and  in  some  cases  the  advances  show  a  heavy 
margin  on  previous  prices.  The  comparative  quietness  after 
the  previous  activities  of  the  markets  is,  it  is  expected,  only  of 
a  temporary  nature  as  further  general  changes  are  anticipated 
at  no  distant  date.  One  of  the  chief  lines  on  which  changes 
are  expected  is  ammunition.  Every  indication  points  to  gen- 
eral activity  in  this  class  of  goods  and  new  quotations  are 
looked  for  at  practically  any  moment.  Needless  to  mention, 
should  this  anticipated  change  materialize,  the  new  quotations; 
will  be  an  advance  on  previous  prices. 

Some  of  the  most  important  changes  are  as  follows:  May- 
dole,  hammers,  lead  ingots,  wood  alcohol,  coal  tar,  steel  tapes, 
and  Fox  guns. 


Maydole  Hammers  Show 
a  General  Advance 


Winnipeg.  

MAYDOLE  HAMMERS  show  a  gen- 
eral and  substantial  advance.  No  start- 
ling or  unusual  changes  have  occurred  in 
this  line  for  some  time  and  although  they 
have  shown  steady  advance  in  the  past, 
the  advances  generally  speaking  have 
been  slight  and  nothing  out  of  the  ordin- 
ary for  this  class  of  goods. 

This  week,  however,  shows  heavy  ad- 
vance on  previous  prices  on  a  general 
scale. 

The  new  listings  are  as  follows:  May- 
dole  Hammers,  per  dozen,  No.  1,  $21.15; 
No.  11,  $21.15;  No.  12,  $18.50;  No.  13, 
$16.20;  No.  611R,  $32.40;  No.  612R, 
$28.50;  No.  711,  $21.15;  No.  71,  $22.05; 
No.  72,  $20.90;  No.  42,  $15.35;  No.  43, 
$13.15;  No.  44,  $12.40;  No.  74,  $17.80; 
No.  76,  $15. 

Lead  Again  Advances 
and  May  Continue  Higher 

Winnipeg.  

LEAD  again  advances.  This  line 
has  for  some  time  shown  marked  activity 
and  has  in  recent  weeks  shown  continual 
advance  on  preceding  prices.  No  change 
from  this  order  of  things  is  to  be  ex- 
pected, however,  in  fact  further  advances 
are  looked  for  in  the  near  future. 
The  new  prices  for  the  week  are: 
Pig  Lead. — 10  cents  per  lb.  Trail  or 
Bar  Lead. — 10^4  cents  per  lb.  Block 
Lead.— 10 V\   cents  per  lb.     Sheet  Lead, 


full  rolls— 2 %    and    3  lbs.,  15%    cents; 
4  to  8  lbs.,  14%  cents  per  lb. 

Wood  Alcohol  or  Spirits 

Methylated  Advance 


Winnipeg.  

WOOD  ALCOHOL  OR  METHYLAT- 
ED SPIRITS.— A  substantial,  general 
and  somewhat  heavy  advance  has  again 
occurred  in  this  line.  For  some  time  past 
prices  have  been  of  an  unsettled  nature 
with  several  erratic  and  heavy  advances. 
The  week's  latest  changes  show  an  ap- 
proximate advance  of  60  cents  per  gal- 
lon, with  no  settled  outlook  for  definite 
prices  for  the  future. 

The  latest  quotations  are:  Wood  Al- 
cohol, barrel  lots,  $2.40  per  gal.;  kegs, 
$2.45  per  gal.:  5  and  10-gal.  cans,  $2.50 
per  gal.;  1-gal.  cans,  $2.50  per  gal.,  extra 
for  containers. 

Steel  Measuring  Tapes 
Are  Considerably  Higher 

Winnipeg.  

STEEL  MEASURING  TAPES  are 
higher.  A  fairly  substantial  advance 
has  occurred  on  this  line,  shewing  an  ap- 
proximate advance  of  10  per  cent,  on 
previous  prices. 

The  new  listings  are.  Steel  Measuring 
Tapes,  No.  100,  $3.60  each;  No.  103,  $5.15 
each;  No.  104,  $6.80  each;  No.  26?,  $5.10 
each;  No.  265,  $6.60  each;  No.  266,  $8.25 
each.  All  tapes  are  approximately  50  to- 
60  ft.  in  length. 


January   10,  1920 


HARDWARE  AND    METAL 


75 


Fox  Guns  Again  Show 
Changes  of  Upward  Trend 

Winnipeg.  

FOX  GUNS  again  show  changes  of 
an  upward  trend  following  other  makes, 
changes  of  which  occurred  previously, 
show  a  further  advance  on  list  prices. 
Jt  is  not  expected  that  further  changes 
will  occur  on  this  class  of  goods  of  any 
marked  nature,  although  owing  to  the 
unsettled  state  of  the  steel  market,  noth- 
ing of  a  definite  nature  can  be  foretold 
regarding  future  prices. 

The  prices  now  ruling  are:  Fox  Guns, 
No.  F.B.,  $92.50  each;   No.  F.A.,  $81.70 


each;  No.  F.A.E.,  $97.30  each;  No.  F.S.S., 
$G7.45  each;  No.  F.S.S  E.,  $83  each. 

Coal  Tar  Takes  Turn 

of  an  Upward  Nature 

Winnipeg,  — — — 

COAL  TAR  takes  turn  of  an  up- 
ward nature.  Little  change  of  import- 
ance has  occurred  in  this  line  for  some 
time,  although  what  changes  have  taken 
place  have  been  of  an  advanced  nature. 

This  week,  however,  shows  marked  ad- 
vance on  previous  prices,  the  new  quo- 
tations ruling  being:  Coal  Tar,  barrel 
lots,  $9.50  per  gal.;  quarts,  $3  per  qt.; 
pints,  $2  per  pt.;  V2  pints,  $1.25  each. 


PITTSBURGH  MARKETS 


PITTSBURGH,  Jan.  8.— Activity  in 
the  search  for  prompt  lots  of  steel 
products  is  increased,  as  compared  with 
conditions  prior  to  the  holidays,  while 
•on  the  other  hand  there  is  little  busi- 
ness being  done  for  extended  deliveries. 
The  decline  in  the  volume  of  contract 
business  is  a  necessity  of  the  situation, 
since  the  mills  that  were  willing  to  ac- 
cept contracts  are  filled  for  such  periods 
as  they  were  willing  to  consider,  the 
half  year  in  some  cases,  and  the  first 
quarter  only  in  other  cases.  Thus  there 
is  practically  no  opportunity  to  place 
open  contracts. 

The  shortage  in  steel  is  not  relieved, 
nor  is  there  any  prospect  that  it  will  be 
relieved  in  the  near  future.  There  is 
even  a  question  whether  it  ever  will  be 
relieved  as  long  as  the  period  of  indus- 
trial prosperity  continues.  The  com- 
mon view  is  that  conditions  will  be  ap- 
proximately back  to  normal  in  a  period 
of  months,  six  months  being  the  longest 
term   usually   mentioned. 

While  this  six-months-to-normal  is  a 
common  view  in  the  trade,  there  is  some 
ground  for  disputing  it.  There  are  two 
considerations:  First,  that  production 
is  likely  to  increase  sharply  in  the  next 
few  weeks,  and,  indeed,  if  production 
does  not,  the  steel  industry  will  be  in  a 
bad  way,  for  it  has  always  made  its 
good  profits  when  it  was  operating  on 
practically  full  tonnages.  Second,  rail- 
road buying  on  a  fair-sized  scale  at 
least  is  expected  almost  as  soon  as  the 
railroads  are  returned  to  their  owners, 
the  date  for  that  operation  being  March 
1,  while  the  approach  or  advent  of 
spring  is  likely  to  bring  heavy  demands 
for  steel  for  construction  purposes. 
Hence,  it  would  seem  that  if  the  steel 
mills  do  not  catch  up  with  their  cus- 
tomers' l-equirements  in  the  first  three 
or  four  months  of  the  year,  they  will 
have  little  opportunity  to  do  so  later. 

It  is  easy  to  over-rate  the  so-called 
■"shortage"  in  steel  by  comparison  with 
capacity.  While  tha  market  demand  for 
spot  and  prompt  lots  is  insistent,  it  is 
generally  for  carloads  to  1,000  tons,  and 
thus  a  few  hundred  thousand  tons  would 
be  a  large  aggregate.  That,  however, 
is  not  much  when  viewed  in  the  light 
of  production   or  capacity   figures.     At 


the  time  the  iron  and  steel  strike 
started,  September  22,  there  were  at 
least  normal  stocks  of  steel  in  the  hands 
of  jobbers  and  manufacturing  con- 
sumers, and  probably  somewhat  greater 
stocks  than  usual,  as  the  strike  certainly 
had  been  expected  by  many,  both  sellers 
and  buyers.  Production  of  finished 
rolled  steel  just  before  the  strike  was 
at  the  rate  of  about  600,000  gross  tons 
a  week.  In  the  15  weeks  intervening, 
production  has  averaged  about  400,000 
tons  a  week.  The  present  rate  is  prob- 
ably 550,000  or  575,000  tons  a  week, 
while  capacity  is  about  725,000  tons  a 
week.  Buyers  got  along  somehow  when 
they  were  restricted  for  15  weeks  to  an 
average  of  400,000  tons  a  week,  and 
a  shortage  of  a  few  hundred  thousand 
tons  if  the  mills,  during  the  next  two 
or  three  months,  work  up  to  650,000  or 
725,000  tons  a  week. 

The  lowest  price  on  wire  nails  for 
quick  shipment  seems  to  be  $4.50,  base, 
per  keg.  Just  before  the  strike  the 
independents  were  on  their  $3.50  basis, 
while  the  American  Steel  &  Wire  Com- 
pany has  continued  its  price  at  the 
March  21  level  of  $3.25.  The  $4.50  price 
is  made  by  some  large  mills,  rather 
than  by  small  producers  or  by  middle 
interests.  Nails  purchased  from  stock 
may  bring  dollars  per  keg  more.  Mer- 
chant steel  bars  show  a  great  range. 
The  March  21  price,  adhered  to  by  the 
Steel  Corporation  and  some  independ- 
ents, is  2.35c,  while  some  large  mills 
quote  2.50c  and  can  make  delivery  in 
two  or  three  months,  and  some  rolling 
mills,  including  iron  mills,  producing 
from  purchased  billets,  ask  and  secure 
3.00c  and  higher,  for  delivery,  say,  in 
30  days.  In  limited  tonnages  one  can 
frequently  buy  at  3.25c  from  warehouse, 
particularly  warehouses  maintained  by 
mills  that  have  a  price  of  2.35c  to  2.50c 
for  mill  delivery,  time  uncertain.  In 
sheets,  which,  by  the  March  21  schedule, 
are  set  at  3.55c  for  blue  annealed,  4.35c 
for  black,  and  5.70c  for  galvanized;  pre- 
miums on  deliveries  over  the  first  quar- 
ter are  usually  about  $10  a  ton,  but 
black  sheets  from  stock  command  from 
5c  to  6c. 

The  United  States  Steel  Cc'tioration's 
adherence  to  the  March  21  price,  schedule 


has  been  reaffirmed  and  thus  is  booked 
for  indefinite  continuance.  There  was 
possibly  a  little  room  for  doubt  recently 
whether  the  policy  would  be  contained 
after  1919,  for  the  basis  was  the  March 
21  arrangement  between  the  Industrial 
Board  and  the  steel  producers,  and  all 
that  was  settled  upon  at  the  time  (irre- 
spective of  the  fact  that  not  long  after- 
wards the  Industrial  Board  disappeared) 
was  that  prices  were  to  be  "stabilized" 
for  the  remainder  of  1919. 

Pig  iron  advanced  an  average  of 
about  $11  a  ton  from  June  1  to  just  be- 
fore Christmas,  when  advances  practi- 
cally ceased,  the  market  having  been 
relatively  dull  since  then.  Some  fur- 
nace interests  now  talk  as  if  the  ad- 
vancing movement  is  to  be  renewed. 
Undoubtedly  pig  consumers  have  it  in 
their  power  to  put  the  market  up  further 
on  themselves  if  they  desire,  and  per- 
haps they  will  do  so.  There  does  not 
seem  to  be  altogether  good  ground  for 
an  additional  advance  at  this  time,  if, 
indeed,  the  previous  advance  was  en- 
tirely justified.  The  furnaces  are  either 
back  into  blast  or  are  scheduled  to  get 
into  blast.  On  the  March  21  prices 
some  furnaces  claimed  they  could  not 
make  a  profit,  but  prices  $10  a  ton 
higher  are  a  different  matter.  A  $10 
clear  profit  would  easily  pay  in  one  year 
for  the  best  furnace  built.  There  is 
much  talk  of  labor  shortage  and  labor 
inefficiency,  but  if  such  conditions  con- 
tinue, the  influence  will  be  to  make  pig 
iron  plentiful,  rather  than  scarce.  About 
80  per  cent,  of  the  pig  iron  made  is 
used  by  steel  works,  nearly  all  the  bal- 
ance going  to  iron  foundries.  Labor 
shortage  and  labor  inefficiency  would 
restrict  the  operation  of  steel  mills,  and 
hence  their  consumption  of  pig  iron. 
With  a  blast  furnace,  however,  it  is 
chiefly  a  question  of  the  raw  materials 
being  dumped  in  and  of  the  superin- 
tendent having  the  requisite  ability  to 
operate  the  furnace. 


PROPOSED    AMENDMENT 

Continued  from  page  57 

greased  or  freshly  painted,  each  bar  in- 
dividually and  securely  wired  to  a  board 
with  annealed  wire,  gauge  No.  12  or 
thicker,  or  bars  wrapped  in  burlap  and 
wired  as  required  by  paragraph   (c). 

(b)  Iron  or  Steel  Bars  greased  orx 
freshly  painted,  when  shipped  in  less 
than  carloads,  must  be  in  barrels,  boxes 
or  crates,  or  wrapped  in  burlap  and 
wired  as  required  in  paragraph   (c). 

(c)  Burlap  wrapping  provided  for  in 
paragraphs  (a)  and  (b)  must  complete- 
ly enclose  the  bars  of  each  end  and  cen- 
tre of  the  bundle  must  be  securely 
wound  with  burlap  eight  inches  wide  or 
over.  Bundles  must  be  wired  and  bur- 
lap secured  in  three  or  more  places  by 
annealed  wire,  gauge  No.  12  or  thicker. 
Two  metal  tags  or  tags  with  eyelets 
reinforced  by  metal  and  addressed  in  in- 
delible ink  must  be  wired  to  each  bundle, 
one  attached  as  usual  and  the  other 
placed  within  the  burlap  and  secured  by 
the  wire. 


76 


January  10,  1920 


Looking  for  Banner  Paint  Year 

Western  Manufacturer  Is  Optimistic  Regarding  the  Business  Outlook — Acute  Short- 
age of  Homes  Means  Much  Building — Many  Farmers  Going  on  Western 

Land. 


GF.  STEPHENS  &  COMPANY,  of  Winnipeg, 
m  are  very  optimistic  concerning  the  business 
outlook  for  1920.     This  optimism  is  based  on 
the  development  of  the  paint  business  in  the  West 
during  the  past  eighteen  months  under  difficulties 
which  are  gradually  being  overcome. 

"We  are  looking  for  a  banner  year  in  1920," 
said  Mr.  M.  F.  Christie  to  HARDWARE  AND 
METAL,  "Building  operations  must  of  necessity 
be  started  in  order  to  relieve  the  situation  which  ex- 
ists as  a  result  of  several  years  of  idleness  in  that 
industry." 

SEE   NO   DISTURBANCES 

Western  manufacturers  have  not  forgotten  the 
effect  which  the  general  strike  of  last  summer  had 
upon  business.  Labor  conditions  are  hard  to  pre- 
dict, but  it  is  significant  that  the  general  feeling  of 
Western  manufacturers  is  that  the  coming  year  will 
witness  no  such  outstanding  disturbances  as  those 
which  tied  up  business  and  industry  during  the 
summer  of  1919. 

STEADILY    INCREASING 

Mr.  Christie  stated  (bat  since  1917,  business  from 
the  agricultural  districts  of  the  West  had  been 
steadily  increasing.  This  has  tended  to  offset  the 
situation  as  regards  Western  cities  and  larger  towns 
where  business  lias  fallen  off  in  recent  years,  owing 
to  lack  (if  building  and  the  so-called  economizing  in 


expenditure  for  paint.  These  centres  now  require 
many  improvements  and  in  most  cases  steps  are  be- 
ing taken  to  do  this  work. 

HOUSES  ARE  NEEDED 

The  price  of  lumber  has  been  one  of  the  chief 
factors  in  deterring  building  operations,  but  the  sit- 
uation has  become  so  acute  that  building  will  be  a 
very  important  industry  in  the  spring.  The  action 
of  the  city  of  Winnipeg  in  proceeding  with  the  con- 
struction of  homes  to  relieve  the  situation  will  likely 
1h;>  followed  by  other  municipalities  where  housing 
congestion  exists. 

GOING    ON    THE    LAND 

While  there  will  likely  be  a  considerable  boom 
in  paint  business  from  cities  and  towns  where  con- 
struction and  improvements  will  be  in  order,  there 
is  also  expected  to  l>e  a  further  increase  in  the 
amount  of  business  from  agricultural  district-  owing 
to  the  increased  number  of  farmers  going  on  West- 
ern land.  These  new  farmers  are  to  some  consider- 
able extent  ex-soldiers  who  are  being  placed  by  the 
Government. 

The  grounds  for  the  optimistic  outlook  as  ex- 
pressed by  Mr.  Christie,  seem  sound,  and  with  a 
minimum  of  labor  (rouble  the  year  is  expected  to 
show  a  big  increase  in  the  consumption  of  paints 
and  varnishes  in  all  departments  of  Western  activity. 


This  paint  department  is  especially  arranged  with  a  view  of  allowing  those  who  are  building  new 
homes  or  renovating  their  homes  to  see  as  wide  a  selection  as  possible  of  paints  and  varnishes.  Many 
women  accompany  their  husbands  to  this  store  and  do  a  great  deal  of  the  selecting.  The  firm  insists 
that  everything  must  be  kept  spotless  and  properly  arranged  and  finds  that  this  pays  well.  This 
year  there  will  be  thousands  of  homes  built  and  opportunities  for  selling  paint  promise  to  be  the  best 
ever. 


January    10,   1920 


IARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


77 


Retailers'  Electro  Service 


A   GOOD  ILLUSTRATION  is  worth  1000  words.    Over  400 
hardware  electros  are  shown  in  a  booklet  which  Hardware 
and  Metal  supplies  free  to  its  readers.    Following  electros  have 
been  selected  at  random.    Send  for  complete  catalogue. 


y/\^ 


370 


175 


372 


67 


HP  HE  above  are  a  few  of  Hardware  and   Metal's   electro  assortment, 
comprising  412  electros  of  hardware  and  motor  accessory  articles,  which 
are  available  to  subscribers  at  a  cost  of  25c.  each,  cash  with  order.     Booklet 
showing  complete  assortment  will  be  mailed  free  upon  request. 


HARDWARE  &  METAL 

Electro  Department 

143-153    University  Avenue 
TORONTO,  CAN. 


78 


HARDWARE  AND    METAL 


January  10,  1920 


Annual  Meeting  of 

Stewart  &  Wood,  Ltd. 

Optimism  of  the  highest  order  regard- 
ing the  business  outlook  for  1920  was 
the  view  expressed  by  every  shareholder 
at  the  annual  meeting  of  Stewart  & 
Wood,  Limited,  Toronto,  wholesale  deal- 
ers in  paints,  oils  and  glass.  The  annual 
statement  showed  a  large  increase  in 
business  during  1919  and  was  most  satis- 
factory in  every  way. 

Officers  for  the  year  were  elected  as 
follows:  President,  E.  T.  Dean;  vice- 
president,  H.  T.  White;  secretary-trea- 
surer, W.  W.  Schoales;  managing  direc- 
tor, A.  W.  Poole. 

Following  the  annual  meeting  a  con- 
vention of  the  sales  staff  opened  and 
lasted  for  two  days.  The  year's  business 
was  gone  over  and  plans  considered  for 
an  aggressive  campaign  in  1920.  A.  W. 
Poole,  the  sales  manager,  presided.  The 
session  was  brought  to  a  close  by  a  ban- 
quet at  the  Prince  George  Hotel,  at 
which  the  salesmen  were  the  guests  of 
the  firm.  A.  W.  Poole  was  in  the  chair, 
and  fololwing  the  supper  a  social  evening 
was  spent. 

H.  S.  Brown  Appointed 
Toronto   Representative 

H.  S.  Brown,  who  has  been  travelling 
representative  in  the  Maritime  provinces 
for  several  years  for  Berry  Brothers,  has 
been  transferred  to  Toronto  and  will 
look  after  the  business  in  that  territory. 
He  takes  the  place  of  Mr.  Rose  who  has 
resigned.  Mr.  Home  will  continue  to  rep- 
resent the  firm  to  the  manufacturing 
trade. 

The  firm's  factory  at  Walkerville  is 
being  enlarged,  more  mills  are  being  add- 
ed and   a   large   increase   in  business  is 

anticipated. 

♦ 

Warehouse  at  Edmonton 
For  G.  F.  Stephens  &  Co. 

G.  F.  Stephens  &  Company,  of  Win- 
nipeg and  Calgary,  (manufacturers  of 
paints  and  varnishes,  announce  the  es- 
tablishment of  a  warehouse  at  Edmon- 
ton, thus  facilitating  business  dealings 
with  the  trade  in  Northern  Alberta.  A 
full  stock  of  all  commodities  manufac- 
tured by  the  firm  will  be  carried  at  Ed- 
monton. Premises  have  been  leased  and 
a  site  has  been  acauired  with  a  view  to 
later  erecting  the  firm's  own  warehouse. 

The  company  has  been  located  in  Cal- 
"•r"-v  for  manv  vears,  and  it  is  felt  that 
with  two  distributing  sources  in  Alberta 
the  company  will  be  in  a  good  position 
to  take  care  of  the  Alberta  and  British 
Columbia  territory. 

ACME  COLOR  WORKS  PROPOSES  TO 
SELL 

Stockholder?  of  the  Acme  White  Lead 
&  Color  Works,  of  Detroit,  are  receiving 
notification  that,  at  their  annual  meeting, 
thev  will  be  asked  to  vote  on  a  recom- 
mendation by  the  directors  providing  for 
sale  of  f'^e  '""^ioh"'1'  — "p*"  to  a  row 
corporation  to  be  organized  for  its  pur- 
r-Tinse.  The  sale  involves  approximately 
?6.000,000. 


r->min  !■  n  ■■  in  — rTiimrrritiTnnmiiiT 


1— 


Tfie  Brush 
Department 

n  1 1 ii i ■■  i 'I I p  iiiii  mi  m  win  mill  in  illinium  ——————— 

How  to  Sell  More  Brushes 


Keep  Your  Stock  Constantly  on  Display  —  Window  Displays 

and  Store  Arrangement  Are  Important — Don't  Forget 

to  Advertise  Them  Also 


TO  sell  more  brushes,  let  the 
people  all  over  your  district  see 
your  stock.  Let  them  know  what 
you  have  to  offer  and  the  business  will 
come.  Window  displays,  store  displays 
and  snappily-directed  advertising  mes- 
sages will  all  help  in  bringing  in  more 
people  to  buy  brushes. 

Brushes  are  an  all-year  line,  and  as 
such  should  be  given  the  attention  they 
deserve.  Both  women  and  men  are  in- 
terested in  them,  and  if  you  keep  your 
stock  out  where  they  can  see  it  every 
time  they  come  in,  and  if  you  put 
brushes  in  the  windows  occasionally,  and 
in  your  newspaper  copy  direct  attention 
to  them,  you  will  note  an  increase  in 
sales. 

Keep  Them  Advised 
There  is  nothing  like  window  and 
store  display,  backed  by  consistent  ad- 
vertising, for  speeding  turnover  in  any 
line  of  merchandise,  and  this  holds  just 
as  true  of  brushes  as  it  does  of  any 
other  lines.     Some  of  the  hardware  mer- 


chants who  have  developed  their  brush 
sales  work  on  the  principle  that 
brushes  constantly  displayed  are  already 
partially  sold.  This  is  very  true,  be- 
cause any  number  of  persons  coming 
into  a  store  and  seeing  the  brush  they 
know  they  either  require  at  the  time  or 
will   require  shortly,  buy  right  there. 

An  occasional  reminder  in  your  news- 
paper copy  will  direct  the  attention  ot 
others  to  their  needs  and  bring  them 
in  as  buyers. 

Men  Are  Interested 

Men  are  always  interested  in  displays 
of  shaving  brushes.  No  merchants  have- 
realized  this  more  thoroughly  than  the 
druggists,  with  the  result  that  shaving 
brushes  are  constantly  displayed  where 
the  men  can  see  them.  The  druggists 
are  getting  results  in  increased  sales 
and  there  is  nothing  in  the  world  to 
prevent  the  hardware  merchant  from 
applying  the  same  formula  and  getting 
the   same  results. 


Staff  of  McArthur,  Irwin  Make  Merry 

Salesmen  and  Department   Heads    Guests  at  Banquet — Plans 
for  the  Year  Are  Discussed 


SINGING  lustily  "The  Gang's  All 
Here,"  the  executives,  salesmen 
and  department  managers  of  the 
white  lead,  paint  and  color  firm  of  Mc- 
Arthur-Irwin,  Ltd.,  Montreal,  after  a 
round  or  two  about  the  laden  tables, 
sat  down  to  one  of  the  most  enjoyable 
banquets  yet  held,  on  Wednesday  even- 
ing, at  the  Place  Viger  Hotel.  Both 
in  point  of  attendance  and  in  manifest 
interest,  the  function  was  particularly 
lively. 

John  Irwin,  the  vice-president  of  the 
firm,  was  toast-master.  After  the  din- 
ner he  read  two  telegrams  of  regret,  one 
from  Mr.  Geo.  Y.  Chown,  president  of 
the  firm,  and  another  from  Mr  A.  W. 
Poole,  former  manager  of  the  paint  and 
color  works  of  the  company,  expressing 
their  best  wishes  for  a  successful  ban- 
quet and  a  prosperous  new  year.  These 
were  received  with  applause. 

Following  two  excellent  songs  bv  Mr. 
Bens'O'ifrh.  secretarv-treasurer  of  the 
company.  Mr.  Irwin  delivered  the  address 
of  the  evening  in  reply  to  a  toast  to  the 
firm. 


Tracing  the  history  of  the  past  year, 
from  its  beginning  right  to  the  close  of 
December,  the  salesmen  were  given  a 
vivid  inside  view  of  the  difficulties  which 
had  been  encountered  in  securing  ma- 
terials for  the  manufacture  of  the  var- 
ious products  sold  by  this  firm,  hundreds 
of  tons  of  which  materials  entered  into 
the  manufacture  of  the  company's  main 
lines. 

Mr.  Irwin  concluded  by  saying  that  the 
year  about  to  close  had  been  the  most 
successful  since  the  inception  of  the  com- 
pany. 

In  reply  to  the  toast  "Our  Extensions,"" 
Mr.  Monk,  manager  of  the  lead  works, 
and  recently  elected  a  director  of  the 
company,  referred  to  the  completion  and 
present  operation  of  the  new  lead-corrod- 
ing plant.  The  full  capacity  of  this  plant 
has  been  booked  ahead  for  some  time. 

A  Forward  Look 

Among  the  toasts  of  the  evening,  re- 
ferring to  the  policies  and  plans  mapped 
out  for  the  various  departments,  that  of 


January   10,  1920 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 
7 


79 


Every  Brush  Guaranteed  Perfect 


Suggest  to  your  customers  that  now,  while  they 

have  their  fires  going,   is   an   ideal  time  for 

interior  painting. 

Those    dirty   window   frames,    wainscotings, 

floors,  mouldings,  etc.,  can  be  freshened  by  a 

coat  of  paint  and  made  to  greatly  brighten  the 

appearance  of  their  rooms. 

If  they  paint  now — there  are  no  flies  to  stick, 

nor  dust  to  collect  on  the  fresh  paint  surfaces 

and  the  consistent  heat  from  furnace  or  stove 

dries  the  paint  quickly. 

Recommend  painting  now !    And  recommend 

Boeckh's 

Rubber  Set 

Paint  Brushes 

Boeckh's  are  the  ideal  brushes  for  all  paint 
and  varnish  jobs.  Their  reputation  is  so  well 
known  to  you  and  all  other  Canadians  that  we 
do  not  have  to  say  more. 
With  the  very  best  selected  bristles  which  can- 
not possibly  come  out,  Boeckh's  are  the  most 
satisfactory  paint  brushes  on  the  market 
to-day. 

If  you  should  be  one  of  the  few  dealers  who 
are  not  handling  Boeckh's  brushes,  don't  wait 
any  longer.  Write  for  particulars.  We  co- 
operate with  all  our  dealers  in  the  most  prac- 
tical ways. 


The  Boeckh  Company,  Ltd, 


Toronto,  Canada 

Established  1856 


J  I 


80 


HARDWARE    AND    METAL 


January  10,  1920 


"Our  Salesmen,"  proposed  by  Mr.  Ken- 
dall, manager  of  the  paint  and  color 
works,  was  of  particular  interest. 

Stressing-  the  importance  of  entire  co- 
operation, the  speaker  made  it  clear  that 
the  executive  would,  at  all  times,  give 
of  their  best  that  the  work  of  the  sales- 
men might  be  increasingly  successful. 
Honest  criticism  was  always  welcome. 
The  sales-director  has  many  difficulties, 
but  this  could  be  made  easier,  Mr.  Ken- 
dall assured  the  men,  through  real  team 
work,  ancl  in  this  way  the  satisfaction  of 
the  dealer  and  consumer  would  be  assur- 
ed. 


Other  speakers,  including  Mr.  Rey- 
nolds, of  Toronto,  and  Mr.  Marier,  of 
Quebec  City,  representatives  of  the  com- 
pany for  a  number  of  years,  handled  var- 
ious toasts  in  able  manner. 

Choruses,  vocal  and  piano  solos, 
several  musical  numbers  from  a  special 
Jazz  band,  all  contributed  to  making  the 
evening  enjoyable. 

The  National  Anthem  brought  to  a 
close  the  banquet,  and  a  most  successful 
convention. 


White  Lead  and  Putty  Advanced 

Increase  of  One  Dollar  for  White  Lead  in  Oil  and  Fifty  Cents 

for  Putty — Further  Increase  for  Pig  Lead  May 

Presage  Further  Change 


Effective  on  Wednesday,  January  7, 
prices  for  standard  and  special  grades 
of  white  lead  in  oil  are  one  dollar  per 
100  lbs.  higher. 

For  the  past  two  weeks,  HARD- 
WARE AND  METAL  has  consistently 
drawn  attention  of  the  trade  to  the  high 
markets  for  pig  lead,  and  has  suggested 
the  possibility  of  higher  prices  becom- 
ing effective  for  corroded  lead.  The 
change  was  made  on  Wednesday  of  this 
week,  and  all  proprietary  and  standard 
grades  take  on  the  same  advance. 

Frequent  Advances 

Pig  lead  prices  have  been  advancing 
continuously  for  many  weeks.  This  has 
been  reported  almost  weekly,  and  the 
trade  was  surprised  to  learn  late  Wed- 
nesday of  this  week  (and  after  the  ad- 
vance had  been  made  in  the  basis  for 
white  lead  in  oil),  that  a.  further  ad- 
vance of  sixty-five  cents  per  100  lbs. 
had  been  made  for  pig  lead.  This  makes 
the  outlook  quite  different,  for  it  sug- 
gests, not  only  a  firm  market  for  lead  in 
oil  at  the  increase,  but  a  possibility  that 


the      new     basis     will     not     hold     for 
lengthy  period. 

It  is  less  than  two  months  since  lead 
in  oil  advanced,  the  last  increase  having 
been  made  on  November  18,  1919.  Since 
then,  several  increases  have  been  made 
by  the  producers  of  pig  lead,  and  the 
new  levels  of  to-day  are  back,  practi- 
cally, to  the  levels  obtaining  some  time 
ago.  A  basis  of  around  10c,  f.o.b.  Mont- 
real, is  being  quoted  on  pig  lead. 

Prior  to  the  change  for  lead  in  oil, 
above  recorded,  and  about  a  week  ago, 
prices  for  dry  white  lead  were  marked 
up. 

Putty  Up  50  Cents 

Effective  from ,  January  7,  prices  for 
putty  are  advanced  fifty  cents.  This, 
say  the  jobbers,  is  due  to  the  high  pre- 
vailing prices  for  linseed  oil,  added  to 
the  high  basis  prevailing  for  whiting, 
and  which  commodity,  they  state,  is  dif- 
ficult to   obtain. 

The  new  price  for  standard  putty,  per 
100  lbs.,  is  now  $5.50  on  five  ton  lots, 
while  25  lb.  drums,  per  100  lbs.,  are 
quoted  at  $7.20. 


High  Glass  Prices  for  Twelve  Months 

Europe's  Hunger  for  Glass  Will  Absorb  Big  Portion,  if  Not  All, 

Production  There — Coal,  Labor  and  Demand 

Factors  in  Price  Control 


T 


i*r~  r^  HERE  will  be  no  decline  in  the 
price  of  glass,  not  for  six 
months,  that  is,  unless  some 
factors  which  we  cannot  now  foresee 
develop." 

Such  was  the  statement  of  F.  J.  Kerr, 
Montreal  manager  of  Pilkington  Bros., 
Ltd.,  to  HARDWARE  AND  METAL  in 
discussing  the  glass  outlook.  Mr.  Kerr 
bases  his  summing  up  of  the  situation 
upon  facts  which  have  developed  of  late, 
and  a  recital  of  which  will  serve  to  out- 
line the  present  tendencies  regarding 
supplies  and  also  prices. 


"The  trade  in  Europe  is  crying  for 
glass  almost  as  they  do  for  bread. 
There  was  more  destruction  of  glass 
there  than  of  any  other  kind  of  pro- 
perty, and  the  country  needs  immense 
quantities  of  it.  It  will  be  difficult  to 
get  much  glass  from  there,  perhaps,  for 
several  months,  and  we  do  not  expect 
much  improvement  in  the  imports  for 
three  or  four  months  at  least.  It  was 
a  case  of  win  the  war  there,  first,  and 
glass  production  was  a  secondary 
thing,"  said  Mr.  Kerr. 

In   the   matter   of   glass   consumption, 


Mr.  Kerr  stated  that  the  increased  de- 
mand of  late  has  been  simply  enor- 
mous. In  fact,  the  change  from  a  year 
ago  has  been  revolutionary. 

"We  sometimes  wonder  where  the 
glass  goes,  and  there  must  be  a  lot  of 
building.  In  fact,  in  driving  around  the 
city  of  Montreal,"  Mr.  Kerr  continued, 
"I  have  been  surprised  at  the  amount 
of  building  which  has  been  undertaken. 
This  is  a  very  great  change  from  a  year 
ago,  when  there  was  little  or  no  build- 
ing at  all." 

At  the  present  time,  glass  firms  are 
exceptionally  busy,  and  Mr.  Kerr  states 
that  orders  are  coming  to  hand  in  large- 
numbers.  The  outlook  for  this  brisk 
business  continuing  is  excellent,  for, 
with  the  coming  of  spring  building, 
operations  will  be  largely  inci-eased. 
Under  these  conditions,  Mr.  Kerr  says 
that  the  best  advice  he  can  impart  to 
the  trade  is  to  anticipate  wants  as  early 
as  possible,  for  even  now,  bookings  have 
been  received  for  several  months  ahead. 

As  far  as  the  firm  of  which  Mr.  Kerr 
is  resident  manager  is  concerned,  it  was 
pointed  out  that  the  Canadian  plant  for 
the  manufacture  of  sheet  glass  is  at 
present  working  to  capacity.  This,  Mr. 
Kerr  thinks,  will  afford  the  trade  some 
relief  in  the  matter  of  sheet  glass  sup- 
plies. United  States  factories  are  again 
operating,  resumption  having  been  in- 
augurated on  the  second  of  January. 
This  ought  to  provide  some  relief  in 
time. 

In  the  matter  of  production,  the  pro- 
curing of  coal  has  been  a  serious  ques- 
tion. "We  use  immense  quantities  of 
coal,  and  it  has  been  difficult  to  get. 
Then  labor  has  been  another  big  factor, 
wages  being  high.  Of  late,  exchange 
has  been  a  factor  in  the  effect  it  has 
had  on  importation  of  glass  from  the 
States."- 


Travellers  Guests 

At  Informal  Dinner 

On  Tuesday  evening,  December  30, 
the  wholesale  hardware  firm  of  Starke, 
Seybold,  Limited,  Montreal,  tendered 
their  travelling  staff  and  the  heads  of 
various  departments  an  informal  dinner 
at  the  Engineers'  Club.  In  addition  to 
the  executive  staff  there  were  also  pres- 
ent representatives  of  the  Steel  Com- 
pany of  Canada;  Major  Hines,  a  hard- 
ware merchant  of  Brandon,  Manitoba, 
and  Gordon  Seybold,  of  Sudbury. 

The  function  was  very  informal,  and 
following  the  same  plan,  addresses  were 
delivered  by  Col.  Starke,  Mr.  Herbert 
Seybold,  Mr.  H.  T.  Diplock,  the  latter  of 
whom  gave  a  very  interesting  talk  on 
the  steel  outlook. 

On  the  morning  of  the  same  day  the 
travelling  staff  was  shown  through  the 
plant  of  the  Steel  Company  of  Canada 
on  Notre  Dame  street,  and  this  visit 
proved  to  be  not  only  interesting,  but 
very  informing  to  the  men,  who  much 
appreciated  the  kindness  of  this  com- 
pany. 


January   10,   3920 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


81 


Ifnalisine 
Life  of  a  O 
lainlDrusk. 


Generally  it  depends  on  the  usage 
it  gets  and  the  preparations  in 
which  it  is  used. 

Paint  Brushes 

can  be  used  in  any  paint,  oil  or  var- 
nish preparation,  kalsomine,  glue, 
paint  removers,  etc.,  and  yet  live 
longer  than  the  ordinary  brush  that 
is  used  in  only  one  kind  of  paint. 

The  SIMMS  brush  lives  until  its 
bristles  are  worn  down  to  the 
handle,  and  it  gives  excellent  ser- 
vice all  the  time,  under  all  condi- 
tions. 

The  painter's  trade  will  come 
your  way  if  you  handle  SIMMS  Set- 
In-Rubber  Paint  Brushes. 

Our  other  lines  are  also  winners. 

Brooms  Stove  Brushes 

Whisk  Brooms      Lather  Brushes 
Shoe   Brushes       Scrubbing    Brushes 

For  prices,  etc.,  write  our  nearest 
branch. 


T.  S.  SIMMS  &  CO. 

Makers  of  Better  Brushes  and  Better  Broom* 
for  54  Years 

Head  Office:  St.  John,  N.  B. 

MONTREAL     LONDON    TORONTO 


This   Trademark 

bears  the  same  relation  to  varnish  as 
the  Sterling  mark  to  Silver. 

Among  home  builders,  house 
owners,  architects,  painters  and 
others  who  use  or  direct  the  use  of 
varnish,  this  fact  is  so  generally 
known  that  no  selling  arguments  by 
the  dealer  are  necessary  for  any 
products  bearing  Berry  Brothers' 
name.  Their  label  is  equivalent 
to  a  guarantee  of  quality  and  is  ac- 
cepted as  such  without  question. 

^Partial  List  of  Distributors  of 
Berry  Brothers'  Products 


A.  M.  Bell  &  Co.,  Ltd. 
Lariviere,    Inc.  ... 

L.  H.  Gaudry  &  Co. 
Wood,  Vallance,  Ltd. 
Wood,  Vallance  &  Adams,  Ltd. 
Revillon   Wholesale,    Ltd. 
Hunter-Henderson  Paint  Co.,  Ltd 
Wood-Vallance  Hardware  Co.,  Ltd 
Frank  A.  Gillies  Co. 
Marks,  Clavett,  Dobie  Co.,  Ltd., 
Whites,  Ltd.        -        - 
Sanderson   Pearcy  &  Co.,   Ltd. 
Townsend   Paint   Mfg.   Co. 


Halifax,  N.S. 

Montreal,    Que- 

Quebec,  P.Q. 

Winnipeg,  Man. 

Calgary,  Alta. 

Edmonton,   Alta. 

,  Vancouver,  B.C. 

,     -     Nelson,  B.C. 

Halifax,  N.S. 

Port  Arthur,  Ont. 

Collingwood,  Ont. 

Toronto,  Ont. 

Montreal,   Que. 


L0THI 


1RY3B 

Wo  rids      Largest     Makers 

Garnishes  and  Paint  Specialties^ 
Walkerville,  Ont. 


82  January  10,  1920 

l!liIIIII!llilll!l!llllll!]i;illlllllll!!l!lllll!lllllllllll!!llllll!IIIIIIM 


WEEKLY    PAINT    MARKETS 


MONTREAL 

MONTREAL,  January  7.  —  Very 
important  changes  are  made  this 
week  in  the  paint  markets.  Fol- 
lowing an  advance  of  75  cents  per  100 
pounds  a  few  days  ago  for  dry  white 
lead,  the  market  on  white  lead  in  oil 
advanced  on  Wednesday  $1  per  100 
pounds.  Putty  prices  advanced  50  cents, 
and  mixed  paints  and  varnishes,  and 
various  specialties  are  likely  to  be  in- 
creased at  an  early  date,  according  to 
advice  received  by'  HARDWARE  AND 
METAL.  The  glass  market,  too,  is  very 
firm  and  prices  are  bound  to  rule  high, 
and  probably  higher  than  they  now  are. 
Linseed  oil  is  ruling  without  change,  and 
while  one  reliable  source  reports  an 
easier  outlook  as  far  as  supplies  of  seed 
are  concerned,  others  state  that  the 
movement  is,  and  will  continue  to  be  re- 
tarded by  the  congestion  of  wheat-laden 
trains,  which  have  the  preference  over 
various  roads.  Turpentine  is  high  and 
likely  to'  go  higher.  Bookings  are  very 
heavy. 

Oil  Prices  Firm 

But  No  Advance 

Montreal.  

LINSEED  OIL.— Prices  for  linseed  oil 
have  not  advanced  this  week,  but  the 
tendencies  art  considered  quite  firm. 
Were  it  not  for  the  fact  that  all  users 
in  all  parts  of  the  world  are  wanting  oil 
in  large  quantities,  it  is  probable  that 
hope  could  be  held  out  for  an  easier  basis 
soon.  As  it  is,  even  though  Argentine 
seed  is  on  tbe  way  and  expected  to  ar- 
rive at  New  York  in  increased  quanti- 
ties from  this  time  forward,  crushers 
and  jobbers  express  their  belief  that  oil 
will  rule  high  for  some  time.  Transpor- 
tation of  wheat  is  taking  precedence  on 
the  railroads,  and  this  means  that  for 
the  time  being,  and  probably  for  some 
weeks,  there  will  be  little  imnrovement 
in  delivery  from  the  South.  Little  hope 
is  entertained  of  Western  flax  arrivals 
soon. 

Raw—                                                          Imp-  0»1- 

Single    barrels     2  32 

5    to   9    barrels    —  • 

10    to    25    barrels ••■• 

Boiled—                                                          ImP-  Gal- 

Single    barrels     2  34V2 

5   to   9   barrels    

10    to    25    barrels     

NOTE. — Owing   to   fluctuations   seed   markets   job- 
bers,   generally,    are    not   quoting. 

Firm  Market  For 

Turpentine  Here 

Montreal.  

TTTRPENTINE. — Markets  are  steadily 
high,  and  in  fact  tendencies  are  some- 


what stronger  than  they  were  last  week, 
but  no  actual  change  has  been  made.  The 
probabilities  are,  however,  that  a  higher 
price  will  obtain  in  this  market  within  a 
short  time. 

Turpentine —                                               Imp.  gal. 

Single    barrels     2   45 

Small     lots      2   45  2  95 

(Packages   extra.) 

Putty  Up  50  Cents; 

Glass  Prices  Firm 

Montreal.  

PUTTY,  GLASS.— An  advance  of  50 
cents  per  100  pounds  is  made  for  putty 
as  from  January  6.  This  is  for  standard 
grade,  but  with  the  usual  differential  of 
$2.50  per  100  pounds,  extra,  for  pure 
putty;  the  advance  is  general.  This  has 
been  necessitated,  say  the  jobbers,  ow- 
ing to  continued  high  prices  for  oil  and 
whiting,  and  supplies  of  both  of  which 
have  been  difficult  to  procure.  The  basis 
for  various  quantities  is  as  under. 

The  glass  situation  is  very  strong  and 
likely  to  so  continue.  Prices  cannot, 
think  many  of  the  jobbers,  but  be  high 
for  a  long  time,  for  the  demands  are 
heavy  and  stocks  very  low.  Labor,  too, 
is  continuing  high. 

5  ton  1  ton  Quanty. 

Bulk,    in    barrels    5   50  $5  75       $6   10 

Do.,   V>   barrels    5  65  5  90         6   80 

Do..    100    lbs 6  30  6   60          6  95 

Do.,    25     lbs 6   60  6   85          7   30 

Do.,    121/2    lbs 6   85  7   10          7   45 

3   and  5   lb.   tins    8  60         8  85         9  30 

1    and    3    lb.    tins 9   10  9  35       10  70 

Do.,    in    100    lb.   cases 7  65  7  90         8  25 

Pure  lineeed  oil  putty,  $2.50  per  1*0  lbe.  advance 

on   above   prices. 

Glaziers'    putty — $1.60    per    100  lbs.    advanee    •■ 

above    prices. 

Terms— 2%.    15   days,    net    «». 

One  Dollar  Advance 

On  White  Lead  in  Oil 

Montreal.  

WHITE  LEAD  IN  OIL— A  straight 
advance  of  $1  per  100  pounds  for  white 
lead  in  oil  has  been  made  effective,  and 
the  new  prices  will  date  from  January  7. 

For  some  time  HARDWARE  AND 
METAL  has  pointed  to  the  strong  mar- 
kets obtaining  for  pig  lead,  and  there 
have  been  frequent  increases  over  the 
past  two  months.  Only  on  Wednesday  of 
this  week  the  base  price  of  pig  advanced 
another  65  cents  per  100  pounds.  The 
supplies  have  been  quite  large  but  de- 
mands from  all  users  are  such  as  to  make 
the  outeo  an  extremely  heavy  one  as  the 
commodity  is  produced. 

New  prices  for  standard  lead  are:  5- 
ton  lots,  per  100  pounds,  $17.50;  1-ton 
lots,  $18  per  100  pounds,  and  smaller 
quantities.  $18.35.  New  prices  on  special 
grades  will  be  found  elsewhere. 


Paint  and  Varnish 

May  Soon  Advance 


Montreal. 

PAINTS,  VARNISHES.— Prices  are 
very  firm  for  all  prepared  paints,  and  the 
tendencies  are  decidedly  of  a  firming 
nature.  Advices  to  HARDWARE  AND 
METAL  suggest  that  manufacturers  are 
very  likely  to  entertain  an  early  con- 
sideration of  price  revision,  and  that, 
when  changes  are  made,  which  may  be 
any  time  within  the  next  week  or  two, 
they  will  be  in  the  nature  of  a  25  to  50 
cent,  increase  per  gallon.  What  is  true 
of  prepared  paints  is  applicable  to  var- 
nishes and  specialties.  Gums,  as  point- 
ed out  in  HARDWARE  AND  METAL 
last  week,  are  very  high  in  price,  as  well 
as  being  scarce.  The  markets  will  doubt- 
less rule  higher,  and  the  increases  may 
come  in  a  comparatively  short  time. 


TORONTO 

TORONTO,  January  8.— Very  im- 
portant advances  have  occurred 
throughout  the  paint  line  this 
week.  An  important  advance  in  white 
lead  of  $1  per  100  pounds  has  taken  ef- 
fect. Put;ty  is  also  up  50  cents  per  100 
pounds.  Turpentine  has  advanced  5 
cents  per  gallon,  while  a  decline  of  10 
cents  per  gallon  is  reported  in  linseed 
oil. 

The  glass  situation  is  serious,  and  a 
famine  is  reported  on  both  window  and 
plate.  Shellac  has  shown  a  further  ad- 
vance, and  higher  prices  are  being  look- 
ed for  by  the  varnish  and  paint  manu- 
facturers. 

Paint  is  quoted  at  a  very  firm  price 
and  early  advices  may  be  expected  in 
the  near  future,  it  is  stated. 

Putty  Advanced 

50  Cents  Per  IOO  Lbs. 

Toronto.  

PUTTY.— An  advance  is  noted  in 
putty  this  week.  This  is  no  doubt  due 
to  the  advancing  cost  of  raw  material, 
labor  and  unsettled  conditions.  The  fol- 
lowing are  the   quotations: 

Standard    Putty—                      5  ton  1  ton  Less 

Bulk,   in   barrels    $5  85  $6   10  $6  45 

Do.,    100    lb.    iron    6  70  6  95  7   30 

Do.,     25-lb.     iron 6  95  7  20  7  55 

Do..   12>/2-lb.   irons    6  70  7   45  7  80 

Bladder,   in   barrels    7  60  7  85  8  20 

Glass  Famine  Prevails; 
Higher  Prices  Expected 

Toronto.  

GLASS. — Both  window  and  plate  is 
reported  very  scarce.    One  importer  stat- 


January   10,   1920 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


SUPREME  PRE-EMINENCE  OF 

Mi\dstonBrai\d 


Linseed  Oil  was  not  achieved  in  a  day  or  in  a  year.  It  is  the 
result  of  over  50  years'  persistent  effort  and  honest  service. 
During  all  these  years  there  has  never  been  a  time  when 
Livingston  Brand  was  not  what  it  claimed  to  be — 

SIMPLY  THE  BEST 

The  Science  of  Expressing  like  every  other  branch  of  learn- 
ing moves  forward.  Better  constructed  warehouses,  steam- 
heating,  cleaning  and  drying  machinery  make  possible  to 
create  ideal  conditions  for  the  ageing  of  Livingston  Oils. 
This  is  technical  talk  and  may  not  interest  you.  After  all, 
what  you  want  to  know  is,  which  is  the  best?  There  should 
be  but  one  answer  to  that  question. 

LIVINGSTON  BRAND 

BEST  IN  QUALITY,  MOST  RELIABLE.  GUARANTEED  ALWAYS. 


j>    LINSEED  Oil 


OIL 


■VV0NTP& 


&*1 


BE  SATISFIED  WITH  NOTHING  SHORT 
OF  THE  BEST 


The  DOMINION  LINSEED  OIL  CO. 


M 


Boiled 


^ 


Mi         mm  UNSEE°  QMS  UNSEED 


OIL 


Jht 


M 


OIL 


I.0& 


BADEN 

MONTREAL 

TORONTO 

WINNIPEG 


LIMITED 


84 


HARDWARE    AND    METAL 


January  10,  1920 


ed  to  HARDWARE  AND  METAL  that 
the  manufacturers  he  represented  were 
temporarily  refusing  to  accept  orders  for 
glass  owing  to  the  depleted  condition  of 
their  stocks,  and  were  discouraging 
booked  orders.  The  prices  listed  in  cur- 
rent quotation  pages  are  those  going  at 
present,  although  no  one  is  strictly  fol- 
lowing this  schedule  owing  to  the  famine 
in  sheets  and  the  premiums  demandsd 
generally,  it  is  stated.  However,  these 
prices  may  be  used  as  a  guide  as  they 
are  as  nearly  correct  as  it  is  possible 
under  the  present  conditions  to  make 
them. 

Shellac  Has  Advanced; 

be  a  Famine 


May 


Toronto.  

SHELLAC  has  again  been  advanced. 
Many  have  withdrawn  prices  on  the 
primary  market.  There  are  many  fac- 
tors bearing  on  the  situation,  it  is  stat- 
ed. The  position  of  the  Indian  rupee 
may  have  a  bearing  on  the  question,  but 
the  main  reason  is  said  to  be  the  fact 
.that  nearly  all  available  supplies  have 
been  absorbed  and  a  great  scarcity  is 
noted  at  the  source  of  supplies.  It  is 
predicted  that  shellac  will  reach  the 
highest  price  yet  recorded  in  Calcutta. 
Paint  and  varnish  manufacturers  state 
that  the  demand  for  this  commodity  is 
tremendous,  and  as  new  industries  spring 
up  further  demands  are  created.  Pre- 
sent quotations  are:  Orange,  $7.75  per 
gallon;  white,  $8.50  per  gallon. 

Prepared  Paint  Firm; 

Sales  Seasonally  Quiet 

Toronto.  

PREPARED  PAINT.— The  market  on 
this  .commodity  is  at  present  compara- 
tively quiet.  This  is  seasonable,  how- 
ever, and  manufacturers  believe  the  com- 
ing year  will  show  huge  demands  if  pre- 
sent booked  orders  are  any  guide.  An 
early  advance  would  not  surprise  some 
of  the  best  informed.  This  would  be  in 
order  with  the  recent  advance  in  white 
lead  and  other  ingredients,  it  is  stated. 

White  Lead  Advanced; 
New  Price  $i  Higher 

WHiTE  LEAD  has  advanced  approxi- 
mately $1  per  100  lbs.  The  recent  ad- 
vances in  the  price  of  pig  lead  has  ma- 
terially affected  the  prices  on  this  com- 
modity, it  is  stated.  Corroders  and 
manufacturers  state  that,  regardless  of 
high  prices  they  expect  the  present  year 
to  be  one  of  the  largest  in  their  recollec- 
tion. 

Deliveries  Slow  on 

Methylated  Spirits 

Toronto.  

WOOD  ALCOHOL  AND  METHY- 
LATED SPIRITS  are  reported  to  be 
temporarily  scarce.  To  quote  the  gen- 
eral sales  manager  of  one  of  Toronto's 
best  known  chemical  companies:  "Auto- 
ists  have  been  using  up  considerably 
more  wood  alcohol  this  year  than  in 
years  past.  It  is  true  the  stocks  are  de- 
pleted in  Toronto  for  a  few  days  as  we 


are  behind  with  deliveries,  but  there  is 
no  real  shortage.  The  weather  has  been 
very  changeable  and  this  has  been  di- 
rectly responsible  for  the  'run.'  It  has 
been  simply  a  question  of  getting  the 
supplies  to  the  spot  where  they  are  re- 
quired. A  good  many  retailers  did  not 
anticipate  their  demands,  and,  as  a  re- 
sult, all  sent  in  their  orders  at  the  one 
time." 

The  whole  truth  of  the  matter  is  that 
there  has  been  an  unusually  big  demand 
this  year,  climatic  conditions  being  be- 
hind it  all.  For,  with  every  exception- 
ally cold  day  there  is  a  big  rush  on  the 
part  of  autoists  to  the  hardware  store. 
The  present  quotation  is  $2.70  per  gal. 
in  5-gal.  containers. 

Turpentine  Scarce;  Has 
Advanced  5c  Per  Gallon 

Toronto.  

TURPENTINE  has  advanced  5  cents 
per  gallon.  The  tendency  to  move  to 
higher  values  which  became  noticeable 
last  week,  assumed  fresh  strength  this 
week,  and  as  a  result  there  were  very 
substantial  gains  reported  in  turpentine 
values,  with  rosins  also  showing  an  im- 
provement in  quotations  that  was  en- 
couraging as  indicative  of  the  probable 
course  of  the  market  for  some  time  to 
come.  The  advice  that  some  of  the  most 
conservative  importers,  after  a  careful, 
unbiassed  study  of  the  naval  stores'  situ- 
ation, gave  to  the  consuming  trades,  to 
provide  for  their  wants  for  the  winter 
months,  is  now  seen  to  have  been  well 
based.  Demand  is  on  from  all  quarters, 
with  fresh  supplies  diminishing  and  the 
old  stocks  showing  the  effects  of  the 
drafts  that  have  been  made  upon  them, 
and  the  near  future  seems  to  hold  in 
store  pressing  requirements  considerably 
in  excess  of  the  output  that  can  be  ex- 
Dected  from  the  stills. 

Per    Imp.    its''. 

1  barrel    lots    2  65 

2  to  4  barrel  lots    2  64 

5   gal.    lots    2  80 

Linseed  Oil  Quiet; 

Has  Declined  ioc  Gal. 

Toronto.  

LINSEED  OIL  shows  a  decline  this 
week  of  10  cents  per  gallon.  However, 
this  is  no  indication  that  there  will  be 
lower  prices  on  this  commodity,  it  is 
stated.  The  demand  from  Europe  and 
also  the  United  States  for  Argentine 
flax  is  reported  to  be  huge.  This  will 
reflect  in  a  scarcity  of  Canadian  oil 
later  on,  it  is  stated,  although  some  are 
quoting  lower  prices  on  future  oil.  Many 
are  of  the  opinion  that  declines  will  not 
take  place  in  the  future  to  any  large 
extent.  The  following  are  the  present 
lower  quotations: 

Linseed    Oil —  Raw 

1   to  2  barrels,  gal 2  57         2   75 

3  to  5  barrels,   gal 2  56  .... 

10  barrels   and   over    2  54  .... 

Boiled 

1  to  2  barrels,  gal 2  60         2  78 

3   to  5  barrels,  gal 2  59  

10  barrels   and   over    2  67  .... 

Prices   shown    are   those   ruling   on   Thursday   of 

current    week    and   subject   to   daily   fluctuation    of 

the  market;   less  than  barrel  lots  are   15c   per  gal. 

higher   than   single   barrel   price. 


OPPORTUNITIES    FOR    PAINT 
ASSOCIATION 

Continued  from  page  48 

varnish  manufacturers  as  a  body  the 
best  results  cannot  be  secured.  During 
the  year  1919  the  retail  hardware  trade, 
as  a  whole,  undoubtedly  put  forth  splen- 
did efforts  to  develop  the  use  and  the 
sale  of  paints  and  varnishes.  .HARD- 
WARE AND  METAL  tried  to  do  its 
part  for  the  retailers  by  printing  and 
placing  in  the  hands  of  the  trade 
through  HARDWARE  AND  METAL 
upwards  of  \xk  million  pages  of  in- 
formation on  the  paint  markets,  sales 
plans,  advertising  plans,  an  da  wide 
range  of  other  subjects  pertaining  to 
paint  and  varnishes.  The  majority  of 
paint  and  varnish  manufacturer  un- 
doubtedly worked  hard  to  extend  their 
best  co-operation,  under  trying  circum- 
stances at  times,  to  assist  their  retail 
customers  in  all  parts  of  Canada.  The 
Paint  and  Varnish  Association  as  a 
body  did  some  effective  work  and  in- 
dicated a  willingness  through  the  Save 
the  Surface  Campaign  to  contribute 
liberally  to  any  movement  that  would 
create  better  business  for  paint  manu- 
facturers, wholesalers  and  retailers.  The 
activities  of  the  Association,  however, 
did  not  extend  far  enough  along  certain 
lines,  due  largely  to  the  efforts  of  a  very 
small  number  of  the  members.  HARD- 
WARE AND  METAL  knows  that  it  is 
the  desire  of  the  majority  of  the  mem- 
bers of  the  Association  that  secrecy  be 
thrown  aside,  and  that  the  aims  and 
objects  of  the  Association  be  made 
known  to  the  trade.  In  a  later  issue, 
HARDWARE  AND  METAL  will  take 
up  some  other  phases  of  the  paint  situ- 
ation. 


Says  Binder  Twine 

Famine  is  Likely 

WASHINGTON.— Conditions  in  the 
hemp-producing  section  of  Yucatan, 
Mexico,  resulting  from  the  action  of 
Mexican  Government  officials,  are 
alarming,  Michael  J.  Smith,  of  New 
■York,  a  hemp  merchant,  testified  at  a 
hearing  conducted  by  Francis  J.  Kear- 
ful,  counsel  for  the  Senate  sub-commit- 
tee investigating  Mexican  affairs. 

"Unless  something  is  done  to  relieve 
the  situation,"  said  Mr.  Smith,  "it  is 
practically  certain  that  within  a  few 
years  the  farmers  of  the  country  will  be 
without  binder  twine  for  their  crops." 

Mr.  Smith  said  the  planters  had  been 
robbed  by  the  Mexican  authorities,  and 
were  on  the  verge  of  bankruptcy.  Be- 
cause of  the  monopolistic  practices  ex- 
ercised by  Mexican  authorities  for  the 
purpose  of  controlling  hemp  production 
and  prices,  farmers,  Smith  testified, 
paid  an  excess  of  $112,500,000  from 
1916  to  1919. 


January    10,    1920 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


85 


As  Good  As  Sold 


To  be  labeled  Glidden  is  as  good 
as  sold. 

On  Famish  it  means  "Green 
Label  Varnish,"  a  finish  that  is 
known  and  used  by  painters  from 
coast  to  coast. 

On  Jap-a-lac  this  name  signifies 
a  sure  result  for  your  customer 
and  a  sure  profit  for  you. 

On  Paint  it  is  rapidly  winning 

Write  for  prices  and 


this  same  high  quality  reputation. 
With  the  first  announcement  that 
"Glidden  now  makes  paint,"  the 
Glidden  reputation  for  quality  was 
immediately  attached  to  this  new 
product.  It  is  this  Glidden  reputa- 
tion that  will  bring  the  demand. 
Your  paint  order  will  be  as  good  as 
sold  when  you  open  the  case.  Glid- 
den quality  will  keep  the  orders 
coming. 

interesting   literature. 


THE  GLIDDEN  COMPANY,  LIMITED 

Toronto,  Ontario 

Branch''office'and  warehouse  at  Montreal,  Que. 


PAINTS    ~    VARNISHES    *-    COLORS    *-    INSECTICIDES 


86 


HARDWARE  AND    METAL 


January  10,  1920 


CURRENT  MARKET  QUOTATIONS 

These  prices  are  for  such  quantities  as  are  usually  ordered  by  retail 
J*nler&.  Large  buyers  can  frequently  make  purchases  at  better  prices. 


AMMUNITION 

Dominion  Ammunition,  in  cases. 
Discount  30/10/20% ;  broken  cases 
subject  to   an   extra   charge  of  5%. 

Terms — Metallics  and  shot  shells, 
60  days  net,  2%  30  days.  All  goods 
f.o.b.  factory. 

AMERICAN  AMMUNITION 
List  of  Prices. 

Subject  to  16%  advance  on  list. 

B.B.  caps,  $8.50  per  M. ;  B.B. 
caps  concave  ball,  $4.40;  22  •hort, 
$6 ;  22  Ions;,  $6 ;  22  lone  rifle,  $7 ; 
22  abort  smokeless,  $5.35 ;  22  Ions 
smokeless,  $7.50;  22  long  rifle, 
smokeless,  $8.75  per  M. 

Sporting  Cartridge — Centre  Fire 
Smokeless,  $72.25  per  M;  303  Sav- 
age, $72.25 ;  303  British,  $95 :  32 
Winchester  special,  $72.25  ;  38-55 
Winchester,  $76 ;  401  Winchester, 
self-loading,    $76   per  M. 

Primers— Nos.  1,  1%  and  2%. 
88.SO;  Nos.  1  and  2  (100  in  box), 
$8.80 ;  Nos.  1-W,  1%-W,  2%-W  and 
8-W  and  8,  and  6%,  100  in  box, 
$4.80;  Berdan  Nos.  1,  1%,  2  (250  in 
box).  18.80;  Berdan  Nos.  1,  1V4.  2 
(100  In  box),  $3.80;  new  No.  4. 
$5.50;  U.M.C.,  38,  $5.50. 

Shot,  standard.  100  lbs.,  Toronto. 
I16.J0;  Montreal,  $18.00;  net  ex- 
tras, as  follows,  subject  to  cash 
discount*  only:  Chilled,  $1.60;  buck 
and  seal,  80c;  No.  28  ball,  $1.20 
per  100  lbs. ;  bags  less  than  25 
*••.  Vie  per  lb. ;  f.o.b.  Montreal, 
Toronto,  Hamilton,  London,  St. 
John  and  Halifax   freight  equalized. 


Single  Bits,  doe, $18  00  $22  00 

Hunters'  Axes 12  50  18  00 

Boys'  Axas   18  00  14  00 

Double  BK    26  50  27  60 

On  weights  heavier  than  base  add 
to  list  aa  fallows : 

Group  2....$  .26  Group  3....$  .50 

Group  4 76  Group  6. . . .    1.00 

Group  6....    1.26  Group  7....    1.76 

Group  8. . . .  2.26  Group  9 2.76 

Group  10. . .   8.25 

Bench— No.     2,     doz 20  00 

No.    8,    doz 22  60 

No.    4,    doz 24  50 

BABBITT 

Prices  on  babbitt  fluctuate  with 
the  metal  markets  and  prices  are 
quoted  on  application.  Prices  range 
from  8c  to  T6c  a  lb. 

BELLS   (Farm) 

No.   1  x  40,  lb $4  00 

No.  2  x  60,  lb 6  00 

No.  8  x  60,  lb 7  50 

No.  4  x  100,  lb 10  00 

F.O.B.    Montreal,   Toronto. 

BELTING    (Leather) 

Discounts  apply  to  Revised  List 
of  Feb.   14,   1907. 

Extra   Quality.    16,    10%. 
Standard  Quality,   16,   10,  10%. 
Side  Lace  Leather,   lb.,   $2.00. 
Cut  Lace  Leather,  lb.,   $2.40. 
F.O.B.  Montreal,  Toronto. 

BITS,    AUGER 
Standard  List  Prices  per  dozen. 

3/18 $  6.00        18/16 $12.00 

4/16 6.00        19/16 14.00 

8/16 6.00        20/16 14.00 

6/16 6.00        21/16 16.00 

7/16 6.00        22/16 16.00 

8/16 6.00        83/16 18.00 

9/16 6.00        24/16 18.00 

10/16 6.00        26/16 21.00 

11/16 7  00        16/16 21.00 


12/16 7.00        27/16 24.00 

13/16 8.25        28/16 24.00 

14/16 8.26        29/16 27.00 

16/16 9.60        30/16 27.00 

16/16 9.60        31/16 30.00 

17/16 12.00        32/16 30.00 

Discounts      from     Standard     List 
prises: 
Beaver,  35%. 
Ford's    Auger  Bits. 
Gilmour  Auger  Bits,   17%%. 
Gilmour  Car  Bits. 
Qilmour  Eye  Augers,  net  list. 
Gilmour    Ship     Auger. 
Roekford    Auger    Bite. 
Irwin  Auger  Bits,  net. 

Discounts    being    revised    and    job- 
bers' prices  now  higher. 

F.O.B.  Toronto,  Montreal,  London 
and  Hamilton. 

BOARDS,   BAKE 

%  Rim  %  Rim 

0—16    x    22 $8  10       $9   10 

1—18   x    24 8  90         9  80 

2— 18  x   28... 10  00       11  60 

S— 20  x  80 11  46       12  50 

BOARDS,  IRONING  Dozen 

No.  1,  Daisy  $27  00 

No.  10,  Daisy  32  00 

No.  31 11  00 

No.  33  16  00 

No.  35  32  00 

No.  36  36  00 

Perfection  34  50 

BOARDS.   SKIRT— 

No.    11,    doz 12  60 

boards.  sleeve- 
No.  3  dozen $  6  00 

BOARDS    (Wash)    Zinc  Doz. 

Baby    Globe    2  85 

Pony   $2  86 

Royal     Globe     5  16 

Improved  Globe  6  16 

Neptune   6  15 

Standard   Globe   5  15 

Original  Globe   6  65 

Solid     Back     Globe     5  65 

Jubilee    5  80 

Newmarket   King    6  80 

Western  King   (enamel) 8  00 

Beaver    (brass)    7  86 

Diamond   Ring    (glass) 6  30 

Glass     Globe     6  30 

F.O.B.  Newmarket. 


BOILERS  (Range) 

30-gaI..  extra  heavy $12  50 

30-gaI.,    Standard 11  00 

BOLTS  AND  NUTS 

Discounts  apply  to   list  of  Sept.   27, 

1919. 
Carriage  Bolts   ($1   list),   %   in.   dia. 

and    smaller,    6    in.    and    shorter. 

15%. 
Carriage  Bolts  ($1   list),   %   In.  dia. 

and    smaller,    longer    lengths,    net 

list. 
Carriage   Bolts    ($1    list),    7-16    dia. 

and  larger,  net  list. 
Machine     Bolts,     %     in.     dia.     and 

smaller,    4    in.    and    shorter.    20%. 
Machine     Bolts,     %     in-     dia.     and' 

smaller,    longer    lengths,    10%. 
Machine    Bolts,    7-16    in.    dia.    and 

larger,    10%. 
Sleigh  Shoe  Bolts,  all  sizes,  net  list.  • 
Coach    and    Lag    Screws,    30%. 
Square  Head   Blank   Bolts,    10%. 
Bolt  Ends,    10%. 
Plow   Bolts,    5%. 
Elevator  Bolts,   large  head,   5%. 

corrugated   head,    40%. 
Fancy   Head   Bolts,    6%. 
Shaft    Bolts    ($3    list),    5%. 
Step    Bolts,    large    head     \V     list), 

6%. 


Whiffletree  Bolts,  5%. 

Nuts,    square,    blank,    add    to    list, 

$1.50. 
Nuts,    square,    tapped,    add    to    list 

$1.75. 
Nuts,    hexagon,    blank,    add    to    list 

$1.75. 
Nuts,   hexagon,   tapped,   add   to  list, 

$2.00. 
Stove  Bolts,  60%.     Tire  Bolts,  40%. 
Terms:    2%    off   30   days   from    date 

of  shipment. 
F.O.B.  Montreal,  Toronto,  Hamilton, 

London,  Ont. 

BORAX 

Lump  Crystal  Borax,  lb. . .  .llc-12c 
F.O.B.   Montreal,   London,  Toroiito. 

BRASS 

Sheets,  24  gauge  and  heavier. 

base     *»  37 

Rods,   base   %   to    1   in.,   round     0  35 

Tubing,  seamless,  base   0  43 

F.O.B.  Montreal  and  Toronto. 

BUTTS  Wrought  Steel:— 

No.   840    add  20% 

No.   800    add  25% 

No.    838     add  12%% 

No.    £08    add  5% 

No.    804    add   7%% 

Nos.    802,    842,    844 add  7%% 

No.   810    add  10% 

No.    814    tdd    62',', 

F.O.B.    Toronto,    Montreal,    London, 
Hamilton. 


CANS 

For  discount  on  milk  and  eream 
cans,  etc..  see  list  under  head  of 
wares,  etc. 

CEMENT 

Cement,  per  bbl.,  $3.26  in  car 
lots;  80e  per  bbl.,  or  20e  each  is 
allowed  for  saeks  returned  in  good 
condition,  freight  paid. 

Parts  plaster,  flve-barrel  lota,  $4: 
single  barrel,  $4.60.    F.O.B.  Toronto. 

CHAIRS  Do"11 

Step  ladder   *"  00 

Step  ladder  stools   18  00 

CHOPPERS.  POOD 

Universal— Dosen :  No.  0,  $22.80. 
No.    1.   $2«:   No.   2,   $88.76;   No.   8. 

Russwin— <Dozen :  No.  0.  $24.50: 
No.  1,  $30.60:  No.  2.  $36.75:  No.  3 
$49.00. 

Full  case  of  half  dozen. 

F.o.b.  Montreal,  Toronto. 

CHURNS 

List  prlee  hand  ehurns— No.  0. 
*<>•  No.  1.  $9:  No.  2.  $10:  No.  3. 
$11:  No.  4.  $13;  No.  5.  $16. 

List  prices   power  ehurns — No.    0 

*11  :  No.  1.  $11  :  No.  2.  $12:  No.  3. 
$1S:  No.   4.   $17:  No.  5.   $20 

Discount  of  10%  fob  Toronto. 
Hamilton,  Fergus,  London.  St  Mnry  s. 
Discount  of  7%%  f.o.b.  Mont- 
re»l.   Ottawa.   K-'ngston. 

Discount  of  5%  f.o.b.  St.  John. 
N.B. 

RM     He"     M'W 

TVO.B.   Montreal.  Toronto.  Hamilton. 

Hood    Morning,    each 1   fi0 

Lookout    *  nn 

Sleepmeter •  •  •  •   2  *B 

Mowiiltrn 

CLOTHES   BARS   AND  DRIERS 

Per   Doz 

Leader    Clothes    Dryers    $10  85 

Cloth"S   Bars.   Nos.    1    and   3..    11   00 

No.     2     13  80 

No.     4     12  00 

No.    5    14   00 

No.    6    16  00 


CLOTHES  HORSES,   Etc. 

Folding  Extension 

4  ft.   " $  9  76  $19  50 

5  ft    12  25  24  50 

6  ft.    15  00  30  00 

CLOTHES    LINES    (Galvanized) 

No.  Per  1,000  ft. 

17— 7-strand,  100  ft.  lengths..  $6  86 
17— 7-strand,  60  ft.  lengths. .  7  00 
18 — 6-strand,  100  ft.  lengths. .  5  60 
18— 6-strand.  50  ft.  lengths..  6  3$ 
19— 6-strand.  100  ft.  lengths..  4  60 
19— 6-strand.  60  ft.  lengths. .  5  00 
F.O.B.    Montreal,    Toronto,    London. 

COIL  CHAIN 

Fireweld  Proof  B.B.B 

3-16     in.     ..   $17.60 

%    in 18.25 

6-16  in $16.76 

%  in.    ...      11.40  14.05 

7-16    in.    .      11.15  13.80 

%    in.    ...      10.70  13.60 

%  in.    ...      11.00  13.20 

%   in.    ...      10.20  12.60 

%  in.    ...        9.95  12.35 

1       in.    ...        9.70  12.25 

F.o.b.    Montreal   and   Toronto. 

Electric  Welded 

Proof  B.B.B. 

%  in $18.96  

3-16    in 18.00  $22.75 

%  in 16.50  19.50 

5-16    in.    ...      13.80  15.70 

%    in 10.80  

7-16    in 10.20  

%and%in.       9.96  

F.O.B.  Toronto,  Montreal. 
Cow  ties,  net  list ;  trace  chains, 
list;  dog  chains.  12%%:  halter 
chains,  12%% ;  tie-out  chains, 
20% ;  stall  fixtures.  No.  1,  or 
or  heavy,  $2  dozen ;  stamped.  No.  3 
or  Dominion,  $1.75  doz.  net ;  breast 
chains.  No.  220,  $16  dozen  pairs. 
F.O.B.  Montreal,  Toronto.  Hamilton. 
London. 

COMBS 

List  plus  16  per  sent. 
F.O.B.    Montreal.    Toronto,     Hamil- 
ton,   London. 

COPPER  Mont.  Toronto- 

Casting    ingot,    see 

weekly   report. 

Rods,  %  to  2  in 0  41       0  39 

Soft   sheets,    base    16 

oz.  and  heavier   0  42       0  40 

Tubing,     lb 0  46       0  46 

Above  prices  are  full  sheets  and 
bars.  Cut  sheets  and  bars  are  6c 
per  lb.  higher. 

COPPERS,   SOLDERING 

Base,  3  to  8  lbs.,  59%c,  f.o.b.  To- 
ronto and  Hamilton. 

CORD    (SASH) 

No.     6,     lb 90 

No.     7,     lb 89 

Nos.    8,    9,    10,    12    88 

F.O.B.    Montreal,    Toronto,    Hamil- 
ton, London. 

CROWBARS,   $10.25  per   100  lbs. 
DOORS,  SCREEN 

Kasement,   No.   2,   oak   stain,   var- 
nished: 
2   ft.   8   in.,   doc $84  80 

2  ft.   10  in.,  doc 36.40 

3  ft.  x  7,  dox M.64> 

F.e.b.  Toronto. 

DRILLS— 

Standard   Lists. 

Blacksmiths'.  %  in.  x  2%  in.  shank 

List   each. 

% $0.46         19/82 $1.20 

6/32 46        % 1.30 

11/16 60        21/82 1.40 

7/32 66         U/16 1.50 

% 60        23/82 l.«' 

»/32 66        K 17' 

6/16 70        25/32 1  *'> 

11/32 75        18/16 1  .»* 

% 80        27/32 2  n" 

18/82 85        % 2  I* 


January   10,   1920 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


87 


LATEST    NEWS 

WE  NOW  MAKE 

THE    ORIGINAL 

IDEAL 

Centrifugal  Lead  Trap 

Having  purchased  the  complete 
plant   for    the    manufacture   of 

CENTRIFUGAL  TRAPS 

FROM 

The  Ideal  Manufacturing  Co. 

WINDSOR 

WE  CAN  MAKE  PROMPT  DELIVERY 


Sole  Manufacturers 


The  Canada  Metal  Company,  Ltd. 

Hamilton    THDHMTn   Winnipeg 

M.  WIV\_/rN  1  KJ    VANCOUVER 


MONTREAL 


Hardware  and  Metal  is  the  only 
paper  in  Canada  giving  a  week- 
ly market  service  on  hardware, 
metals,  paints,  varnishes  and 
other  lines  allied  with  the  hard- 
ware trade. 

Hardware  and  Metal  is  the  only 
hardware  publication  in  Can- 
ada with  circulation  audited  by 
the  Audit  Bureau  of  Circula- 
tions. 

Hardware  and  Metal  is  the  only 
weekly  hardware  paper  in 
Canada. 


Be  Sure  to  See  Him 

— we  mean   our  traveller — before  you  decide  on   your 
line    of  skates. 

Next  season's  successful  skate  business  hangs  upon 
your   present   decision. 


'Skates 

tw  Skate  with  Aluminum  lops 


have  a  Canada-wide  reputa- 
tion and  unequalled  volume 
of  sales  built  up  upon  the 
foundation  of  unequalled 
Quality    and    Service. 

For  instance — there  is  a 
popular  model  for  every  pur- 
pose. They  are  unapproach- 
able in  good  appearance — a 
telling  feature  in  women's 
trade.  Keen  edge  is  assured 
by  hard-as-glass  surface  on  blades.  Practical  un- 
breakability   is   made   certain   by  soft,  tough   core. 

Write  us  for  particulars. 

Canada  Cycle  &  Motor  Co.,  Limited 

Montreal        Toronto       J  WESTON        Winni  eg       ^Vancouver 


HARDWARE    AND    METAL 


January  10,  1920 


-DRILLS— Continued 

29/82 2.20 

16/16 2.30 

31/32   ......  2.40 

K...  ,..,:.  2.50 


•  7/16 9« 

16932 95 

i7^2:::-::fe 

Intermediate,  -sizes 
f  next    larger. 
Bit  Stock,  list  per  dozen 


... 
ike 


list     ct 


3/32 $2  70 

■  %■•• 
5/32. 
3/16. 
7/32. 
hi--- 
9/32. 
5/16 


3  00 

3  SO 

4  00 

4  90 

5  00 

6  00 

7  00 


% 
7/16. 

%... 
9/16. 
%... 
11A6 


.$  8  50 
.  10  60 
.  13  00 
.  15  50 
.  18  00 
21  00 


•4 24  00 

% 30  00 

Bit.  Stock    Drills  .••••••••••••  "# 

Blacksmiths',    %-in.    shank...  »&% 

Straight  Shank *&% 

Straight  Shank,    wire 86% 

Taper  Shank    85% 

EMERY  CLOTH 
See  under  Sandpaper. 

ENAMELWARE 

See  prices  under  heading  Wares. 

FILES    AND    KASP8 

Discount*  below  apply  to  list  of 
Nov.  1,   1898.  % 

Great   Western,   Amer 60 

Kearney  &  Foot,  Arcade. ...     SO 

J.  Barton  Smith,  Eagle   50 

P.   H.  and  Imperial   50 

Dlsston    Brand    *J» 

Globe    £ 

Nicholson    rr 

Black    Diamond    ?? 

Delta    File*    £> 

Firth   Files    ■    T°° 

F.o.b.   Toronto,    Montreal,    Lon- 
don and  Hamilton. 
FITTINGS  _       „  „ 

Oast  Iron  nttlnirs,  10%;  Malle- 
able bushings,  22%%:  cast  bush- 
ings, 22%%;  unions,  37%%;  plugs, 
20%  off  Hat 

dags Black    Galv. 

AClB8S  0  67         0  72 

£  .     0  26         0  85 

C     .'.'.'.  V.V.V.*. 0  1®         °  M 

Toronto   and   Montreal. 
NIPPLES.  WROUGHT 

Toronto  Mont. 

4"  and  under....  70%         75% 

4V>"    and    larger.  60%  65% 

4""  and   under,   running   thread, 

40% 

Standard  couplings,  4"  and  un- 
der.  40%.  ,  _ 
4%"  and  larger.  20%. 
Terms,  2%   30  days.     Approved 
credit.  Ontario,  Quebec  and  Marl- 
time  Provinces. 

DRILLS,   ELECTRIC 

Single   heat,    round    

Three  heat,   round    

F.o.b.  Torouto. 

GRINDSTONES  "  Per  10°  lbs- 

Over  40  lbs.   and  2  in.  thick.. $3  60 

Under   40   lbs *  % 

m-Treadle,    each    7  to 

F.o.b.  Toronto. 

HALTERS   (S>*AP   AND   RING) 

Doz. 
Russet  rope  shank,  ^$U.25-$12.75 
Perfect,  No.  1%    ... . .  .13  20-13  80 

Russet  rope  shank,  1%  In . .  13  so 
Black  rope  shank,  1  in. .  ■■  13  76 
Black  rope  shank,  1HM2.50-13  85 
land  sewn,  no  shank,  1  In.  17  40 
Hand  sewn,  no  shank,  1%".  18  75 
Halters  (Sisal) 
7-16  In.  gross,  $24;  9-16  In.,  $36 
F  o.b.  Toronto.  London — 7-16  in., 
f.10  doz. ;  %  in.,  $2.65  doz. 

BAMMERS.   SLEDGE 

Can,  5  lbs.  and  aver,  cwt..$17  50 

Masons,  S  lbs.  and  over,  per 

cwt 20  00 

viosons.  5  lhd    and  under...  Ti  50 

Napping,  up  to  2  lbs 25  00 

F.o.b.   Montreal.   Toronto,    Hamil- 
ton,  London. 

HANDLES    (WOOD) 

All    hickorv    bandies,    list,    plus 

25%.  All  foTk.  hoe,  rake,  shovel  and 
mall.  D  handles,,  10%.  All  other 
handles  plus  10%.  All  doubletrees. 
2%  x  4%  x  4  ft.  and  under,  les3  10%.  All 
whiffletrees  3  in.  x  36  m.  and  under, 
less  10%.  All  neckyokes  3  in.  x  42  in. 
and  under,  less  10%.  All  other  neck- 
vnkes  -whiffletrees  and  double-trees,  net 
1  '  Wood  hay  rakes,  horse  pokes,  10%. 
Kike  poles,  ash  or  maple,  plus  10%. 
Tenns,  all  goods  f.o.b.  factories,  2% 
10  days,   net  30  days. 


HANGERS,  BARN  AND  PARLOR 

List 

Atlas,  No.  0  $13  30 

Atlas,  No.  1 13  80 

Atlas,  No.  2   15  80 

Stearns,  4  in 9  75 

Stearns,  5  in. 13  20 

Perfect,  No.  1   10  45 

Canada     12  60 

Hatch    12  75 

National     14  50 

America 16  50 

Great    West    30  00 

Storm  King  and  safety  hang- 
ers,   doz 10  60 

Steel  track,  1^4  In 9  00-12  00 

F.o.b.    Montreal,    Toronto. 

HEATERS.   ELECTRIC 

Majestic,  1  Burner   $10  00 

Majestic,  2  Burner     15   00 

Discount   27%%.     ■ 

F.o.b.  Toronto. 

HINGES,   TEE    AND    STRAP 

Heavy,  Net  Prices.  Figured  Net  list. 
Strap  Tee 

Doz.  pairs. 

4-ineh    $  3  00       $  2  66 

6-inch    3  70  8  20 

6-inch    4  00  3  60 

8-ineh    6  40  4  i0 

10-inch    9  60  7  30 

12-inch    11  90         11  60 

14-inch    13  60         11  60 

Light,  Net  1  rices.     Figured  net  list. 

3-inch  $1  00  $1  00 

4-inch  1  20.  1  10 

5-inoh  1  40  1  30 

6-ineh  1  70  150 

8-inch  

10-incn  .... 

Screw  Hook  and  Strap  Hinges- 
List  prices,  per  dozen  pairs — 6  In., 
S4.30;  8-ln..  $4.80:  10-ln.,  $6.40: 
12-ln.,  $7;  15-in..  $7.50;  18-ln.,  $11; 
21-in..  $12.40;  24-in..  $16;  27-tn.. 
$17.20:  30-ln.,  $18.50;  33-ln.. 
$21.50:  .}fi-in..  $24.50. 
Discount,    15%. 

F.o.b.  Toronto,  London,  Hamilton 
and   Montreal. 

HOES.     Grub     $10  00     10  50 

HOOKS.  GRASS  English 

Canadian     Fox 

No.    2,    per  doz. .  .  $4  40  $5  0O-$5  50 

No.    3,    per   doz...    4  50  5  50-  6  40 

No.    4.    ner   doz...    4  60  6  00-  7  40 

Little    Giant    6  25        -    

Barrlen     Patont...    6  25  ......... 

F.o.b.    Montreal.    Toronto. 

HORSESHOES  Price  per  keg 

No.  2      No.  1 
Sizes      and       and 
Patterns       made    larger  smaller 
Less  20c. 
Light    iron    ...  0-7      $7  75      $8  00 
Long  heel  light 

Iron    3-7        7  75 

Medium    iron..  1-8        7  75        8  00 

Heavy   iron    ....  6-8  775        

Snow    1-6        8  00        8  25 

New-light  "XL" 

steel    1-6        8  20        8  45 

Featherweight 

"XL"   steel...  0-4        9  60 
Special-counter- 
sunk     0-4      10  10         

Toe-weight 

(front  only).  1-4      10  60        

Packing — Up  to  3  sizes  in  one 
keg,  10c  per  100  lbs.  extra.  More 
than  3  sizes,  25c  per  100  lbs.  ex- 
tra. 

F.ojb.    Montreal    and    Belleville. 
Terms — Cash   In   thirty  days,   less 

2%   discount. 
TOE    CAULKS 

Nos.   0,   1,   2   and   larger,    sharp 
nnd   hlunt.  S2.25  to  $2.90  box. 
HOSE.  LAWN  Toronto 

Corrugated.   %   in.,   100  ft.. $17  50 
Corrugated,   %  in.,  100  't..  20  50 

Corrugate''     %,    in 23  50 

Corrugated.   1  in..   100  ft...   35  00 

Less   5%   for  full   reel*.   500   ft. 

F.o.b.  Toronto  and  London. 

HAT  AND   COAT   HOOKS 

'■    Coppered   wire.    3   in.,    $1.15   gross. 
F.o.b.   Montreal,   Toronto,    Hamil- 
ton,   London. 

IRON   AND  STEEL 

See   weekly   report. 


IRON.  TINNED 

Lion   and  Crown   Brand,   Toronto, 

in  22  gauge,  24  gauge  and  26  gauge. 

36    x    96     25c  per  'lb. 

30    x    96     25c  per  lb. 

Less   than   case,   50c   per   100   lbs. 
extra.      F.o.b.   Toronto. 

IRONS.    (SAD) 

Mrs.    Potts,    No.    55,    polish- 
ed,  per  set    $2  05 

Mrs.    Potts,    No.    50,    nickel- 
plated,     set     2  25 

Mrs.   Potts,   handles,   japan- 
ned,   doz i  4o 

Sad    irons,    common,    plain, 
3,  4  and  5  lbs 9  20 

Sad  irons,  plain,  6  lbs.  up..     7  00 

Sad  irons,  common,   plated.     5  50 

Princess  Electric,  each.$4  00    4  10 

Canadian  Beauty  Electric  Irons — 

Style  A $4  71 

Style  B  5  08 

Hotpoint   Domestic   Electric 
Irons,  each    5  25 

Gasoline  Sad  Irons,  each    ...       4  25 

F.o.b.  Montreal,  Toronto,  London, 
Hamilton. 

KNIVES,    HAY 

Spear    Point    $14  75 

Lightning      .18  25 

Heath's     13  25 

LADDERS.     Etc. 

Step    Ladders  Per  ft. 

Standard      0  31 

Crescent     0  28 

Household      0  24 

Faultless,  4  to  10  ft.  only 0  36 

Ontario,  4  to  10  ft.  only 9  32 

Shelf  Lock,  4  to  8  ft.  only 0  27 

Gardner.    No.    1     0  23 

Do.,   No.    2.    bolted    0  25 

Dominion,    No.    3    0  26 

Do..    No.    4.    bolted    0  29 

Single  and   Fruit   Picking 

10   ft.    to    16    ft 23c  ft. 

18    ft.    to    20    ft 24c  ft. 

F.o.b.  Toronto,  Hamilton.  London. 
Roped    and   Straight   Extension 

Ladders  Per  ft. 

20   to   32    ft $0  25        $0  27 

36   to   40    ft 0  27  0  30 

44     ft 0  29  0  33 

Over    44    ft 0  42  0  40 

Best    quality,    20    to    40    ft 0  35 

Three    section     extension     ....   0  35 

F.o.b.  Toronto,  London,  Montreal, 

Stratford. 

Fire  ladders  up  to  32  feet  are 
twice  the  price  of  ordinary  exten- 
sions. Over  32  ft.  are  supplied 
with  supporting  legs  at  three 
times   the   price. 

LANTERNS  Per  doz. 

Short    Globe,    plain    $12  50 

Do.,  Japd 13  25 

Long    Globe,    plain    12  50 

Do.,  Japd 13  25 

Dash,    plain    15  50 

Do..   Japd 16  25 

Do.,  Search   (r'nd  reflec.)     17  00 

Little    Bobs    2  10-4  20 

F.o.b.  Toronto,  Hamilton,  London. 

Montreal. 
LANTERN    GLOBES  Dozen 

Cold   blast,   short $0  95-$l  10 

Cold   blast    1  00-  1  10 

3  doz.  cases,  95c  doz. ;  6  doz.  cases, 
90c  doz. 

Cold  blast,  genuine  rohy $4  75 

F.o.b.  Toronto,  London,  Hamilton 

and   Montreal. 
LATCHES  Per  doz. 

Steel  Thumb,   No.   2 $1  80-$2  00 

Steel  Thumb,  No.  3 2  40-  2  70 

Steel  Thumb.   No.  4 4  75 

Barn  Door,  No.  5   275 

Barn  Door,  No.  9   5  10 

F.o.b.  Montreal,  Toronto,  London. 
LEAD 

For  pig  lead  and  lead  and  zinc 
products    see    weekly    report. 
MACHINES    (WASHING) 

List  each 

Canadian      $12  60 

Dowswell     12  50 

Noiseless    16  25 

Hamilton      13  50 

Peerless    13  00 

Snowball      18  75 

Momentum    20  25 

New    Century,   style    A 18  00 

New   Century,    style   B 20  00 

Playtime,    engine    drive    ....      26  00 

Ideal   Power    30  00 

Seafom,    electric,    style    A    .  .    120  00 

Seafoam,   engine  drive    55  00 

New   Idea,   electric    118  60 

Sunshine        . .      10  3" 

Popular,     No.     1     13    00 

Popular,   No.   2    12    50 


Economic     jj    jq 

Champion 20   25 

Blue    Bell,    without    stand IB    00 

Puritan  Water  Motor  Wash- 
er,   complete    30  ©o 

Hydro,     1     Tub,     engine     drive       57    CO 

Do.,    do.,    electric    iifi    50 

Low    pressure    water    motor 

washer,    each    31   00 

Connor     ball-bearing,     with 

rack 21  00 

Perfection,  engine  drive 65  00 

Perfection,    electric     124  00 

Beaver    26  00 

Beaver,  power    27   00 

Connor   Vacuum    26  00 

Patriot      23   00 

Jubilee    u   |[rj 

Canada  First    23  00 

(Less  30  and  5%. 

Freight  equalized  with  Montreal. 
Ottawa,  Toronto,  Hamilton,  Kings- 
ton, London  and  St.  Mary's  on 
shipments  of  quarter  dozen  and  up- 
wards. 

MALLETS  Per  doz 

Tinsmiths,   2%   x  5%    in $2.40 

Carpenters',  No.  3   6.80 

F.ovb.   Montreal,  Toronto, 
Hamilton. 

MATTOCKS 

Cutter,     doz $14    26 

Pick,     doz 14    26 

F.o.b.  Montreal,   Toruiilu,   uiadon 
Hamilton. 

MIXERS.    BREAD 

Canuck — 

No.    4,   dozen    $36   24 

No.    8,    dozen    40  92 

Universal — 

No.    4.    dozen    $40  75 

No.    8,    dozen     49  76 

MOPS 

O-Cedar,  do*,  net  $12  60 

Sprustex,   No.   2,  doz.. $8  00    8  40 
S.W.  Mops,  complete,  doi.5  26  5  40 

Mop   Sticks,    doz.,    No.   8 2  00 

Cast   Head  Mop,   do* 2  00 

Crescent,    doz.,    No.    10.  .2  00  3  35 

Crank   wringing,    doz 8  25 

F.o.b.   Montreal,    Toronto.    Hamll 
ton,  London. 

MOWERS.  LAWN 

Adanac    40-10% 

Woodyatt     85% 

Empress    36% 

Mayflower   86% 

Star,   Ontario,   Daisy    36% 

F.o.b.  Toronto,  Qnsla-h,  London, 
Hamlltoa. 

NAILS 

List   adopted   July   10,    1912. 
Advance  over   base  on   common 
wire   nails  In   kegs. 

2%    Inch 16c 

1  inch $1    3       Inch 10c 

1%  Inch 1    3K    lock 10c 

1%  inch. ...65c    3%    Inch 10c 

1%  inch 40c    4       inch......  5c 

1%  inch.... 40c    4%    Inch 5- 

2  inch 30c    5-lnch   base. 

2%  Inch.... 30c    5%-tnch   baa*. 
2%  inch.... 15c    6-lnch  base. 

6%   to  12-lnch-2  Ga.  and  heavier, 

25c  over  base. 

Standard  Steel  Wire  NaUa,  f.o.b. 
Toronto,  London,  Hamilton,  Mil- 
ton,   $5.20   base. 

Freight  equalized  oa  above 
points. 

F.o.b.  Montreal,  Gananoque, 
Collingwood  and  Owen  Sound. 
$5.25  base. 

Freight  equalised  on  above 
points. 

Windsor,  WalkervHle,  Sandwich 
f.o.b.  factory  prices,  carload  freighi 
allowed,   $5.30. 

Sault  Ste.  Marie,  Port  Arthur, 
Fort  William,  $5.55  base,  f.o.b.  fac- 
tory ;   no  freight  allowance 

Moulding.  Flooring.  Slating,  Box. 
fence.  Barrel  Nails.  25c  per  100 
lbs.  over  common  nail  prices.  Fin- 
ishing Nails.  60c  per  100  lbs.  ad- 
vance over  common  nail  price. 
Clinch  Nails  and  Sash  Pins,  76c  per 
100  lbs.  over  common   nail  price. 

Miscellaneous  wire  nails,  60%  off 
miscellaneous  list,  f.o.b.  Toronto. 
Montreal.  Hamilton,  London. 

Cut  Nails — $5.35  base,  f.o.b.  Mont- 
real.    No  equalization  of  freights. 

Roofing  Nails  —  American,  large 
head,  keg,  $10.76 :  26-lb  boxes,  per 
100    lbs..    $11.75. 

London — Kegs,  $10.75  ;  26-lb.  box, 
F.o.h.  Montreal.  Toronto.  Hamilton. 
$11.76. 


January   10,   1920 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


illlllllllllSIIIIIIIIIIIllllllllil 


'Save  the  surface  and" 
you  save  aU"^^^ 


Ramsay's 
Enamels 

Invincible 
White  Enamel 


Perfection 
Gold  Enamel 

Aluminum  Paint 

Bath  Enamel 


A.  Ramsay  &  Son  Company 


Makers  of  Property  Preserving  Paints  and  Varnishes  for  J  J  years 


Toronto 


MONTREAL 


Vancouver 


Distributors 


EDMONTON  DISTRICT 
Revillon  Wholesale  Limited,  Edmonton 

NOVA  SCOTIA 
Jas.  Simmonds,  Limited,  Halifax,  N.S. 


CALGARY  DISTRICT 

The  Macdohald-Baker  Co.,  818  8th  Ave.  W.,  Calgary 

WINNIPEG,  MANITOBA  AND  SASKATCHEWAN  DISTRICT 
H.  L.  Perry,  Co.,  Limited,  214  Princess  St. 


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90 


HARDWARE    AND    METAL 


January  10,  192a 


NAILS    (HORSE) 

C    Brand 
Siie 
Capewell  Per  100  lbs. 

■   No.     5     $24  00 

No.     6     23  00 

No.     7     22  00 

No.    S     21  00 

Nos.  9  to  12   20   00 

Discount,      10% 
"M.R.M."  BRAND 

Net  Price  List      Per  box 
No.  Length*  of  26  lb». 

J     5%"  $20  00 

4     1%"  10  00 

5     1   16-16"  6  00 

«     a%-  *  76 

7  2    1)6-16"  4  60 

8  " 2%"  *  " 

9  2  11-16"  *  * 

W     i 2%"  *  26 

n        ...'..    3  l-ur  **f 

It     ........     8Vi"  *26 

F.o.b.  London,  Hamilton,  Mont- 
real. Toronto 

NETTING,   POULTRY 

List  prices  per  roll  of  60  lineal 
yards.     Adopted  March,  1909. 

2-inch  mesh  and  19  ga.  wire. 
12  inch... $1  80  48  nch...$6  20 
18  inch...  2  66  60  inch...  7  70 
24  inch...  8  40  72  inch...  »  20 
SO  inch...  4  00  84  inch...  10  60 
36  inch...  4  76  96  inch...  12  00 
42  inch...   6  60 

1%  inch  mesh  and  19  ga.  wire. 
12  inch... $3  60  42  inch... $10  50 
18  inch...  6  00  48  inch...  12  00 
24  inch ...  6  80  60  inch ...  15  00 
$0  inch...  7  76  72  inch...  18  00 
86  inch...  •  90 

1  inch  me*  and  20  (a.  wire. 
12  inch... $4  00        42  inch. .  .$12  00 
18  inch...   6  60        48  inch...   14  00 
24  inch...   7  00        60  inch...   17  00 
80  ineh...   8  60        72  inch...  20  00 

%  inch  mesh  and  20  ga.  wire. 
24  inch.. $10  60        86  inch... $15  00 
»0  inch..   12  76 

%  Inch  mess  and  22  ga.  wire. 
241nch...$l«  B0      38  Inch...  $24  00 
30 inch...  20  10 

Discounts  at  present  quoted  ap- 
ply only  to  1  and  2  Inch  mesh 
netting.  Other  prices  hare  been 
withdrawn  and  are  quoted  only 
on  application. 

Toronto,  London,  Montreal, 
Canadian   netting,   2-in.    mesh,   net; 

lin.  mesh,  add  6%. 
American    netting,    1-in.    mesh,    add 

5%-  «.    -~, 

Per  rod 

Invincible— 1640   $0  75 

1848   0  85 

2060   096 

Put  up  In  10,  20  and  30-rod  rolls. 

F.o.*>.  Montreal. 

Blue   Ribbon — 

24Wneh,    per    roll $4  86 

S*-4neh,  per  roll    6  26 

4S-indh,  per  roll    7  26 

60-inoh,   per   roll    8  *• 

72-ineh,  per  roll    9  86 

Put  up  in   10  rod  rolls. 

NIPPLES 

See    Fittings. 

OAKUM 

Best   (American)    $*l  00-128  00 

Clipper    (spun)    Bl  00 

Clapper  (unepun)    10  SO 

U.S.  Nary  (aputi)   $1  60 

U.S.  Navy   (unaptin)    

Plumbers     (spun)     1*  66 

F.o.b.  Montreal,  Toronto. 

OILS  Toronto 

Royalite,    gal 0  24% 

Palacine,    gal 0  27% 

Gasoline,   net,   gal 0  34 

Gallon 

Black  oil    (summer)    0  14% 

Black  oil    (winter)    0   15 

Imperial   Kerosene 

Tractor     0  69 

Capital    cylinder    0     64% 

Machine  oil.    regular  grades     0  40 
Standard    gas    engine   oil .  . .      0  42 

Tarafine     0  23% 

List,    less    15%    on    above. 

Polarine  Oil.    list    1   00 

Polarine    Oil,    heavy,    list..      1  00 

Polarine   A,   list    1   10 

Gargoyle  Mobiloil,   A  and  E     1  30 
Gargoyle  Mobile,  B   and   BB     1   45 
List,    less    25%    on    above. 

Fu->1    oil,   bbls.    net 0   11% 

Fuel   oil,  tank  cars,   net 0  09% 


Prices  shown  are  barrel  basis 
uuless  otherwise  specified.  Bar- 
rels charged  extra. 

OLD  MATERIALS 

See  weekly  report. 
PACKING  Per  lb. 

Fine    Jute    $0  20 

Coarse   Jute    0  IE 

Hemp   0  34 

Square   braided   hemp 0  38 

No.   1    Italian    .....0  44 

No.   2    Italian    0  36 

F.o.b.  Toronto,  Montreal. 

PAPER  Per  400-ft.  roll 

Montreal  Toronto 

Dry   Fibre,   No.    1,   Anchor $1  23 

Dry   Fibre,    No.    2,    Anchor 0  72 

Tarred  Fibre,  Anchor,  No.  1 : .  133 
Tarred  Fibre,  Anchor,  No.  2 .  .  0  90 
Rosin     Sized     Sheeting,     red.  .    1  05 

Do.,    blue     1   70 

Surprise    Fibre    0  80 

"Stag"    Sheathing    0  80 

Tarred  felt,  per  cwt. — 

7,    10,   and    16   oz 4  65 

Cyclone   (dry)    1  23 

Cyclone    (tarred)    133 

Joliette    (dry   fibre)     0  72 

Monarch      Sbea  thing      (per 

100    lbs.),    white 6  50      

Do.,    gray    5  50      .... 

Asbestos     sheeting     (per 

100   lbs.)    0  12     18% 

Carpet    Felt,    16,    20,    24    oz.. 

100   lbs 5  75 

Straw,    sheathing,    heavy,    dry, 

cwt 4   15 

Do.,  tarred,  per  cwt 4  30 

F.o.b.   Toronto    and    Montreal. 

PASTE 

Stick-Fast 

1-lb.  pkgs.,  gross  $22  00 

2-lb.    pkgs.,    gross    42  00 

In   barrels   250   lbs.,    lb 0  12% 

Barrels    of    6     lbs.,    cotton 

bags,    lb 0  13% 

In  kegs   125   lbs.,   lb 0  14 

In   60-lb.   boxes,   lb 0  16 

In   25-lb.  boxes,   lb 0  17 

PICKS 

Clay- 
Montreal  Toronto 

5  to  6    lbs.,   doz 11    50  11   80 

6  to  7   lbs.,   doz 12  50  12  80 

Rock— 

7  lbs 13   50  13   50 

8  lbs 13   50  13  75 

F.o.b.   Montreal   and  Toronto. 

PINS.  CLOTHES 

Per  case 

6    gross,    4-in.    (loose)     1  50 

4   gross    (cartons),    4   in 1  75 

Spring,   2   grs.   box 1  00 

F.o.b.   Montreal   and  Toronto. 
PIPE,   WROUGHT 

Price  List  No.   42,  Dec.   9,    1919 
Standard   Butt  weld 
Per  100  feet. 
Steel      Gen.  Wrot.  Iron 
Blk.      Gal.      BIk.      Gal. 

"s    in. .$  6  00  $  8  00  $ 0 

%  in..  4  65  6  78  5  13  7  26 
%  ,n..  4  65  6  78  5  13  7  26 
%  in..  €  16  7  74  6  84  8  42 
%  in..  7  76   9  89   8  68  10  81 

1  in.,  11  4-8  14  62  12  84  16  98 
1%  in..  15  53  19  78  17  37  21  62 
1%  in..  18  56  23  65  20  76  25  85 

2  in..  24  98  31  82  27  94  34  78 
2%  in..  39  49  50  31   

3  in..  51  64  65  79   

3%  in..  65  78  82  80  

4  in..  77  94  98  10   

Standard  Lapweld 

Steel   Gen.  Wrot.  Iron 

Blk.  Gal.  Blk.  Gal. 
2  in.. $27  94  $34  78  $31  64  $38  11 
2%  in..  40  66  61  48  46  51  67  SS 
t  in..  63  17  67  82  60  82  74  97 
$%  in..  66  70  83  72  76  90  92  92 
4   in..  76  86  97  01   

4  in..  79  08  99  19  89  9$  110  09 
4%  in..  88  00  113  00  107  00  132  00 

5  in.. 103  00  132  00  125  00  154  00 

6  in.. 183  00  171  00  162  nn  200  00 

7  in.. 176  00  224  00  211  00  259  00 
0  lj  in..  184  00  235  00  221  00  273  00 

8  in.. 212  00  271  00  255  00  314  00 

9  in.. 254  00  324  00  305  00  376  00 

10  L  in. 235  00  301  00  283  00  349  00 
10   in.. 303  00  387  00  365  00  449  00 

Terms  2%  30  daya,  approved 
credit. 
Freight   equalized   on   Chatham. 
Ouelph,  Hamilton,  London,  Mont- 
real,  Toronto.   Welland. 


PIPE     (Conductor) 

Plata  List 

2  In.,  in  10-ft.  lengths.  list*  8  00 

3  in.,  in  10-ft.  lengths.  Hat.    9  70 

4  in.,  In  10-ft.  lengths,  list.  12  80 

5  in.,  in  10-ft.  lengtba,  list.  17  50 

6  in.,  In  10-ft.  lengths,  Hat.  21  30 
List   less    10%. 

F.o.b.   Toronto,   Ottawa,    Oahawa. 

PIPE.  LEAD 

See  weekly   report. 

PIPE  (SOIL) 

Medium    and    extra    heavy    soil 
pipe,  4  in 16% 

Medium    and    extra    heavy    pipe, 
2,  3,  6  and  6   10% 

Medium     and    extra     heavy     fit- 
tings, 2  to  6  inch 26% 

8  inch  pipe  and  fittings 5% 

F.o.b.    Toronto,    Montreal. 

PIPE  (STOVE) 
See   prices   under   Wares,   etc. 

PITCH 

Pine,    black,    per   bbl 10  00 

Navy  pitch,  per  bbl 6  50 

Coal  tar  pitch,  per  cwt 1  20 

Fo.b.   Montreal,   Toronto. 

PLANTERS.  CORN 

King    of    Field,    dozen    $11  2j 

Triumph,    doz 9  40 

PLATES,    CANADA 

Prices  nominal,  Montreal,  Toronto 

Ordinary,   52   sheets... $7  85       $7  36 

Do.,   60  sheets    7  95         7  45 

PLATES,   COKE,   TTN 

Tor'to.  Mont. 
Per  Box 

IC,  20x28  base $21  00  $21  00 

IX,  20x28  base 24  00   24  50 

IXX,  20x28  base 27  00   27  50 

IXXX,  20x28  base..  29  00   29  50 

"DOMINION   CROWN   BEST"— 
DOUBLE   COATED   TISSUE 

Nominal 

IC,  14x20  base $15  00 

IX,  14x20  base  17  00 

IXX,  14x20  base  19  00 

F.O.B.  Montreal. 

PLATES,    TERNE 

IC,    20x28,    112   sheets $20  50 

F.O.B.  Toronto  or  Montreal. 
POLISH     (O-Cedar) 

4-oz.  bottles,  doz.,  list 3  00 

12-oz.  bottles,  doz.,  list 6  00 

1-qt.  can,  doz.,  Hat 15  00 

%-gal.   cans,   doz.,   list 24  00 

1  gal.    cans,    doz.,    list 36  00 

Discount,  80  per  cent. 
Liquid  Veneer — 

4  oz„  doz $2  00 

12  oz„  doz 4  00 

32  oz„  doz 8  40 

64  oz.,  each   1  20 

128  oz.,  each   2  10 

F.o.b.  Toronto.   London. 

POLISH,  METAL 

Bon-Ton 

Size           Case  Doz.  Case 

%   pts..  3  doz $1   15  $3   40 

%  pts.,   3  doz 2   10  6  00 

Pints,    2   doz S   16  6  00 

Quarts,   2  doz 4  65  9  00 

%  gal.,  1  doz 8  40  8  40 

Gal.,    %   doz 6  90 

PUMPS 

Pitcher  Closed 
Spout   Spout 

No.  1   $2  75    $2  95 

No.  2   3  05      3  30 

No.  3  3  40      8  65 

F.o.b.   Montreal,   Toronto,    Hamil- 
ton, London. 

RIVETS    AND    BURRS 

Iron  rivets,  7-16  inch  and  smaller, 
blacked  and  tinned,  37%% :  Iron 
Burrs,    ST%%. 

Copper  rivets,  usual  proportion 
of  burrs,   add  6%  ;  burrs,   add  40%. 

Extras  on  Copper  Rivets,  %-lto. 
pkgs..   lc  per  R>. ;   %-lb.  pkga..  2e 
lbs.    Coppered  Rivets,  net  extras, 
3c  per  lb. 
F.o.b.  Montreal.  Toronto,  London. 

ROOFING  Per  squar* 

Montreal 

.     Samson,    1-pfcy   roll    2  60 

I     Samson,   2-<pIy,   roll    2  96 


Samson,    3-ply.    roll    S  60 

R.  S.  Special,    1  ply 1  86 

R.  S.  Special,  2  ply   2  10 

R.   S.   Special,  3  ply    2  35 

Everlastic,    1-ply    1    96 

Everlastic,     2-ply     2   30 

(Everlastic,     S-piy     2  66 

Panamoid,     1-ply     1   66 

Panamoid,    2-ply    2    16 

Panamoid,   3-ply    2   60 

Red  Star  Ready  Roofing,  2-ply  1  75 

Do.,   3-ply    2  06 

Liquid     roofing     coating,     per 

gal.,  in  barrels 0  60 

5  and  10  gal.  lots,  per  gal 0  60 

1,   2,   3  gal.  cans,  gallon 0  8& 

Coal    Tar    (refined),    bbL    6    26 

Coal   Tar    (crude)    7    00 

F.o.b.   Toronto  and   Montreal. 

ROPE  Lb 

Pure  Manila  'basis. .- SI 

Beaver    Manila    basis    26 

New   Zealand   hemp  basis    ...     26 

Sisal     basis     22% 

Above  quotations  are  basis  price*. 
*4  in.  and  larger  diameter.  The 
following  advances  over  bauds  are 
made  for  smaller  alaea: — %  In., 
%c ;  9-16  to  7-16  In.  Inclusive,  lc : 
%  in.,  l%c;  %  and  6-16  in.,  2c; 
3  16  ln„  2%c  extra. 

Single  lath  yarn  basis    22  % 

Double    lathe   yarn 23 

lacnt  marline,  tarred  54 

Halyards    47 

Hemp,  deep  sea  line  baste  . .  47 
Hemp,  tarred  ratline  bacaa. .  40 
Hemp,  tarred  bolt  rope  basis  43 
Marline  and  HouseMne  ....  42 
Italian   rope   basis. On   amplication 

Cotton,    %    in 0  83 

5-32     in 0  82 

3-156    in 0  82 

%-in.  and  up   0  81 

F.o.b.   Toronto,    Montreal,    Brant- 
ford,   London,   Hamilton. 

RULES,    BOXWOOD    (LUFKIN)— 

651B  (68),  $2.20  dozen;  7©1  («1). 
$2.90;  851  (611),  $3.6* ;  771  (84). 
$7.00;  781  (62),  $8.76;  861A  (68%). 
$8.80:  852  (73).  $5.50;  764B  (7). 
$6.50;  386  (32).  $7.60;  385.1  («*%). 
$6.65:  465  (69).  $1.06;  171  (36). 
$6.00. 
F.o.b.  Montreal,  Toronto,  London. 

TAPES,  MEASURING  (LUFKIN)— 

Bach 

268,    50   ft    Challenge,    Steel    $4    90 

108,    50  ft    Reliable  Jr.,    Steel    ....  4    95 

243.    50   ft     Rival,    Steel    4    25 

1213,    50    ft,    Rival    Jr.,    Steel    ....  3    95 

606,    50    ft,     Metallic     3    46 

£94,    66    ft    3    85 

403.  50  ft,    Linen   2    40 

Dozen 

713,  50   ft,    Ass   Skin    6    60 

714,  66  ft,   Ass  Skin   7    75 

143,    3    feet,    Steel    Pocket 7   50 

14)5.    5    ft..    Steel    PockeS 10  20 

175,    5    ft..    Linen    Pocket 5  86 

165,    6    ft.,    Cotton    Pocket 1   60 

F.ojb.  Montreal,  Toronto,  London. 

SANDPAPER 

B.  &  A.  sandpaper,  12%%  off 
list. 

Star   sandpaper,   12%%   off  Hat. 

B.  &  A.  emery  cloth,  30%  on  Oat. 

F.o.b.  Montreal   and  Toronto. 

SCALES  Scale    Stamping 

Champion —  List       extra 

4   lb $500      $080 

10   lb 7  00        0  30 

240    lb 12  00        0  80 

600   lb 28  00        1  00 

1200   lb 36  00        1  60 

2000    lb 50  00        1  00 

2000  lb.  Drop  lever  ST  00  1  00 
10-lb.  Household..  5W  •  M 
25-lb.    Household..     6  Off        •  $• 

Champion  list  prices,  net:  stan- 
dard scales,  discount ;  Weigh  Beams, 
5%  discount.  No  discount  allowed 
on  stamping  charge.  F.o.b.  Toronto, 
Montreal,  Hamilton. 

8CREWS 

Discounts    off    Standard    List 
adopted  Aug.   1<,    1903. 

Wood,   F.H.,   bright   76% 

Wood,    R.H.,    bright    72%% 

Wood,   O.H.,  bright   72%% 

Wood.    F.E.,    oraas 66     % 

Wood.   R.H..   brass 62%* 

Wood,   O.H.,  braae 68%% 

Wood.   F.H..  bronze 60     % 

Wood,  R.H.,  bronza 47%% 

Wood,  O.H.,   bronze 47%% 

Square  cap   20 

Hexagon   cap    t» 


January  10,  1920 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


91 


Bigger  Sales 
for  1920 

You  can  boost  your  harness  sales 
for  1920  by  selling  the  old  reliable 
IMPERIAL  Brand  — the  brand 
your  customers  know  about.  Im- 
perial Brand  is  so  well  known  it  sells 
on  sight  and  saves  the  long-winded 
arguments  necessary  to  sell  other 
harness.  More  customers  are  being 
created  for  you  every  day  by  our 
consumers  advertising  which  ap- 
pears in  all  the  leading  farm  papers 
of  Canada.  You  really  can't  afford 
to  stock  up  with  any  harness  other 
than  Imperial  Brand. 

IMPERIAL 
BRAND 
HARNESS 

is  guaranteed  free  from  all  defects 
in  materials  and  workmanship.  This 
ensures  satisfaction  for  all  your  cus- 
tomers. Send  your  order  along  to- 
day and  ensure  early  delivery. 

Samuel  Trees  &  Co.,  Limited 

Mfrs.  Harness  and  Saddlery 
42  Wellington  St.,  E.  Toronto 


Customer 
Will 


BT  Pumps 


BT  pumps  have 
many  patent 
features  that 
make  them  fav- 
orites with  far- 
mers. This  il- 
lustration 
shows  one  of  these 
features.  It  shows 
the  handle  socket 
used  on  BT  Pumps. 
The  handle  will  not 
loosen  in  this 
socket.  It  is  a  box- 
shaped  casting  that 
encases  the  handle 
on  both  sides  and 
both  run  through 
from  top  to  bottom. 
You  will  remember  that  the  old-fashioned 
handle  was  attached  to  the  pump  by  two 
strips  and  bolts. that  went  through  from 
side  to  side.  The  bolts  wore  holes  in  the 
handle  and  it  loosened  and  wobbled  and  in 
course  of  time  broke  off. 
This  is  one  of  the  big  things  that  make  a 
customer  boost  a  BT  pump  and  send  his 
neighbour  to  you  for  their  pump  supplies. 
We  have  sold  this  fall  three  times  as  many 
pumps  as  we  ever  sold  in  the  fall  season  of 
any  year. 

BEATTY  BROS.,  LIMITED 

Winnipeg,  Man.  Fergus,  Ont. 

Montreal,  Que.  London,  Ont. 

St.  John,  N.B.  Vancouver,  B.C. 

London,  Eng.,  16  Holborn  Viaduct 

11  et 


u 


in 


92 


HARDWARE    AND    METAL 


January  10,  1920 


►SCREWS,  WOOD   BENCH 

•  Dozen    $7   30 

8CTTHES  Doz 

!  Cast  Steel    $16  76 

1  Golden    Clipper    16  76 

I  LiMJe   Giant    17  76 

';  Bush 16  26 

<    F.O.B.  London,  Toronto.  Montreal. 
:■  SNATHS  Doz. 

00  Patent $13    .5 

1      13  20 

2     12  &5 

«       3     11  &i 

I  SHEETS,  BLACK 

See  Montreal  and  Toronto  report. 

I  SHEETS,   CORRUGATED 

I      See  weekly  report. 

I  SHEETS,   GALVANIZED 

Premier  Apollo 

|  U.S.  oz.  .  .  8  90  9  75  9  25  9  50 
U.S.     28...    8  30   10  15       8  85     8  80 

I  U.S.  26.. .  7  90  8  75  ,  8  55  8  45 
22  and  24.  7  70  8  15  8  40  8  25 
18  and  20.  7  50  7  95  .•'.  8  25  8  05 
16     7  25     7  76    *  8   10     7  85 

I  12   and    14.    7   05     7   50      -7  95     7   60 
An  extra  is  now  charged  .on  gal- 

'  vanized  sheets,   10%  oz.  aad  28  ga., 

I  when   shipped   out   in   sheets   3   feet 

I  wide.  The  extra  charged  over  prices 
shown  above  is  20c  per  100  pounds. 
Other  gauges  show  no  change  for 
different  widths. 

Prices  shown  are  for  full  cases. 
jAn  extra  charge  of  25c  per  100 
;lbs.  is  made  for  less  than  case  lots, 
i     F.O.B.     Hamilton    and    Toronto. 

Queen's  Hd.  Fleur-de-lis 

!28    ga $10  50  $10  00 

26  ga 10  25  9  75 

44    ga 9  65  9  70 

i22    ga 9  30 

.  £0  ga 9   10 

; ;  F.O.b.    Montreal. 

SHINGLES,  METAL 

.  I    Standard,  galvanized    $10  00 

!     Standard,    painted     8  00 

Discount  7%%. 

.  SWEEPERS,   CARPET  Bissell's 

i  Doz. 

I  American      Queen,      nickeled 
i  i    fittings,    Cyco  ball   bearing  $51  00 


On  shipments  of  300  lbs.  and 
ove*.  freight  is  allowed  south  and 
east  of  and  including  North  Bay : 
also  several  Western  counties  in 
Quebec  Province.  Places  north  and 
west  of  North  Bay,  the  freight  is 
equalized  on  North  Bay.  For  Que- 
bec and  Maritime  Provinces,  freight 
is  equalized  on  Montreal. 
SOLDERING    COPPERS 

See  Coppers. 
SOLDER,    BAR 

See   weekly  report 
SPOUTS,  SAP 

Eureka,    per    M $13  50     $16  50 

STANDS,  WASHTUB— 

Reversible  Drip,  each $2.25 

STAPLES 

See    Wire    Products. 
STOVES 

Oil    Burning  Cooking  List  each 

Perfection  No.  32,  2-burner.  .$18  75 
Perfection  No.  33,  3-burner. .  24  26 
Perfection  No.  34,  4-burner. .  30  76 
No.  22G  oven  for  above  stoves     7  2o 

Discount,  26%  off  list. 

Freight    allowed   on    shipments    of 
12  stoves. 
McClary     Glass     Front     Oven 

No.   70,   each,  net   4  50 

Detroit     Glass     Front     Oven, 

No.   85,  each,   net 4  60 

F.O.B.    Sarnia,    London,    Toronto, 
Ottawa. 
Oil   Burning  Heaters.         List 

No.   &25,    each    $  7  00 

No.    530,   each    8  25 

No.    630,    each    10  25 

Discount  25%  off  list. 

Freight    allowed    on    shipments    of 
24  heaters. 
STRETCHERS.    CURTAIN— 

Star,   No.    1,    doz 24  00 

Star,    No.    2,    doz 24  00 

Sun      18  60 

Adjustable  Pin,  No.  44,  doz..  34  50 
STRETCHERS,    WIRE 

Hercules,    doz $2  60 

Sampson,   doz 7  60 

Universal,  nick.,  Cyco  bearing  46  00 
Universal,  jap.,  Cyco  bearing  39  00 
SWEEPERS,   VACUUM  Bissell's 

Doz. 

Grand    Rapids,    nickeled $124  00 

Household,   japanned    110  00 


SPADES,  SHOVELS  AND  SCOOPS 


2nd   Grade 

% 
45  and     5 
45  and     6 


45  and     5 


4tih    Grade 


46  and 

45  and 
45  and 
45  and 
45  and 
45  and 


1st  Grade 
% 
flain  riack  Shovels  and  Spades....    45  and     5 

Draining  Tools    45  and     5 

-Hollow   Back   Scoops    45  and     5 

Sand    Shovels     45  and     5 

Hollow    Back    Shovels 45  and     5 

Hollow   Back   Coal  flbuisfc   .45  and    6 

',  Riveted  Baek  Scoop*   46  and     & 

Minere'   Spring   Point  Shovels 45  and     5        

Above  discounts  apply  whether  goods  are  sold  in  carload  or  less 
Mian  carloads. 

The  above  discounts  apply  only  to  Black  List ;  Black  List  prices 
being  as  fallows: 

BLACK   LIST  PRICES 

Plain  Baek   Shovels  end   Spades .... 

Draining  Tools,  No.  2,  black 

Hollow  Baek  Scoops,  No.  2,  black.. 
Coal    Shovels,   Hollow    Baek.    No.    2, 

blade   

Sand  Shovels,  No.  2,  black 

Hollow  Baek  Shovels,  No.  2,  black . . 
Riveted  Baek  Scoops,  No.  2,  black . . 
Miners'  Spring  Point  Shovel,  No.  2, 

black   

NET  EXTRAS — 

For  each   size   larger  than    No.   2,   add   35c  dozen   net. 

F.O.B.  London,  Hamilton,  Toronto,  Gananoque,  Ottawa,  Montreal, 
Quebec.  Halifax,  St.  John,  Moneton.  and  freight  may  be  equalized 
thereon. 


.29.00 
29.00 
34.50 

$28.00 
27.60 

$26.00 
32.00 

32.00 
27.50 
27.60 
87.50 

35.50 

30.00 
24.00 
24.00 
84.00 

36.60 

OJub,    Jap.    Cyco  bearing 108  00 

Champion,  nickeled  fittings . .  43  00 

Champion,  japanned  fittings.  86  00. 

Grand,    nick.,    Cyco    B.B 64  00 

Grand,   jap.,   Cyco  B.B 67  00 

Grand     Rapids,     nick.,    Cyco 

B.B.     48  00 

Grand  Rapids,  jap.,  Cyco  B.B.  411  00 
Parlor    Queen,     nicV,     Cyco, 

J  B.B 64  00 

Princess,    nick.,   Cyco   B.B. . .  49  00 

Standard,   nickeled   fittings. .  44  00 

Standard,   jap.   fitting!)    87  00 

8HMNC.  METAL 

!  Standard,   galvanzed    $8  50 

i  Standard,  painted   6  50 

Discount  7%%. 


Superba,  nickeled    140  00 

F.O.B.   factory,   Niagara   Falls,   Ont. 

SWEEPERS   (ELECTRIC) 

Steel    frame    $36  46 

Aluminum   frame    43  90 

Attachments,    set    8  26 

F.O.B.  Toronto,  Hamilton.  London. 

TACKS  Discount 

Wire  Tacks    60  and  10% 

Revised     Hardware     Tack 

List     adopted     Jan.     1, 

1916    60  and  15% 

Double  pointed  tacks. . .  .60  and  10% 
Shoe  findings  Hot  adopted 

JuUy  6,   1917    Net  List 

List     of     Capped     Goods 


adopted  Jan.   1.  1916.  .602and  15 
F.O.B.   Toronto,'  Hamilton,   Montreal 

and    London. 
TINNERS'   TRIMMINGS 

See  prices  under  head  of  Wares 
TOASTERS,   ELECTRIC 

Canadian    Beauty    $4  71 

Upright,  with  rack 6  40 

TOOLS,  HARVEST 

Waverly,  Wellandivale,  Rixford, 
Maple  Leaf,  Bedford,  12%%  dis- 
count. Samson,  7%i%  discount. 
F.O.B.  Montreal,  Toronto,  Hamilton, 

London. 
TRACK  BARN   DOOR 

Hatch   Trolley,   per  ft 0  19 

1    Brackets  for  above,  per  doz.  1  72 

National  Flat  Track,  1%  in. 

per    ft.  " 0  12 

TROUGH    (EAVE) 

O.    G.   Square  bead  and  half   round : 

Size  in   girth.  Per  100  ft. 

.  8  in $6  90     16   in $12  60 

.10  in 7  70     18   in 16  00 

12  in 9   10     List   less    10%. 

F.O.B.   Toronto.    Oshawa,    Ottawa. 
TRAPS    (GAME)  Doz.  with  chain 

Victor  Giant  No.   1   G,   doz...     2  70 

Jump,     No.     1     2  95 

Hawley  &  Norton,  No.  1 3  45 

Newhouse,  No.  1   5  00 

F.O.B.    Toronto,    London,    Hamilton. 

Montreal. 
TUBS,  WOOD 

No.    0,    per   dozen    $20  80 

No.    1,    per    dozen    18  60 

No.    2.    per   dozen    16  20 

No.    3,    per    dozen    13  85 

F.O.B.   Newmarket. 
TWINE   (COTTON) 

5-lb.    sack,     3-ply,    lb 0  87 

Cones,     3-ply.     lb     0  83 

Do.,   4-ply,    lb 0  87% 

VALVES   AND  COCKS 
Compression  work,  standard 28 

High  grade    24 

Fuller  work,  standard 34 

Basin  cocks,  No.   0,  standard...     23 

Nos.   1  and  2   23 

Bath    cocks,    compression 80 

Flatway    stop    and    waste    cocks, 

standard    82 

Roundway     stop     and     waste 

cocks,  standard    82 

Fti-ass  steam  cocks,  standard.  .Net  list 
Radiator   valves,   standard 15 

Do.,   removable  seat 10 

Globe,    angle    and    check    valves, 

standard     6-9% 

Gate    or    Straightway Net 

Jenkins  Gate  Valve 10% 

Jenkins    Globe    Net 

Standard   Gate    Net 

F.O.B.    Toronto. 
Penberthy  Brass  Valves 

Compodisk    Valves     6-2%% 

Gate    Valves    16% 

Regrinding     Valves     6% 

Swing    Check    Valves    Net  List 

WARES.  ETC. 
Britannia,  50%. 

Scotch   Grey  Ware,   43  and  5%. 
Colonial,    20%. 
Imperial    Ware,    20%. 
Pearl,    20%. 

Premier,   list,   plus   10%  | 

Canada  Ware,  list,   plus  10%. 
.  Crescent,   40%  and  6%. 
Diamond,    plus    10%. 
White   Ware.   40%. 
Japanned  Ware,   list  plus  25%. 
Japd.   Ware,   White,   list,   plus   35% 
Plain  and  Japanned  Sprinklers,   list 

plus  25%. 
Stamped     Ware,     plain,     45%. 
Stamped  Ware,  retinned,  40%. 
Copper    Bottoms,    plus    25%. 
Tinners'  Trimmings,   plain,   46%. 
Tinners'  Trimmings,   retinned.   40% 
Tinners'     Trimmings,     general,     list. 

plus   20%. 
Factory  Milk  Cans,   list  plhis  60*. 
Milk  Can  Trimmings.  Kst.  plus  60% 
Cream   Cans,   list,    plus   25%. 
Railroad  Cans.  list,  plus  20%. 
Sheet  Iron  Ware,  list,  plus  33  1-3% 
Pieced    Ware,    ordinary,     list,    plus 

60%. 
Pieced     Tinware,     C.B.,     list,     plus 

70%. 
Fry  pans,   Acme,  20%. 
Fry  pans.   Quick   Meal,  plus   15%. 
Spiders,    steel,    plus    16%. 
Fire     Shovels,     japanned,     list,     piua 

33   1-3%. 
Steel    Sinks,    galv'zed,    list    plus    26%. 
Steel    Sinks,   painted,    list  plus   25%. 
Light     GalTv.     Pails     and    Tubs,     lis* 

plus   40%. 
Heavy    Galv.    Pails    and    Tubs,    list. 

plus   30%. 


add  25%..  -   ..  . —  . 

Cjarbage~~Pafls,  list,  plus  25%". 
Jap.   Coal   Hods,   list,   plus,    50%. 
Galv.  Coal  Hods,  list,  plus  65%. 
Paper  Lined  Boards,  30%. 
Wood-lined    Boards,    15%. 
Copper    Boilers,    list,    plus    25%. 
Copper  Tea   Kettles,   list,   plus    40% 
Copper    Tea    and    Coffee     Pots,    list 

plus    40%. 
Nickel-plated  Ware,   50%. 
Stove  and  other  Pipe,  list,  plus  60% 
Stove   Pipe  Thimbles,   40%. 
Stove  Pipe  Elbows,  black  and  galv., 

list,    plus    33    1-3%. 
F.O.B.    Montreall,    Toronto,     London, 

Hamilton. 
WASHERS,  WROUGHT 

Round,  plain.  Sizes  given  are  size 
of  hole.  In  boxes  of  50  lbs.,  list 
prices  per  100  lbs.— -%  in.,  $28.00  . 
6-16  in..  $24.40;  %  in..  $22.80. 
7- 16  in.,  $21.00 .  V"  in.,  $19.60  ;  9-16 
in.,  $18.80;  %  in.,  $18.60;  11-16 
in.,  $18.40;  %  in.,  $18.20;  13-16  in., 
$18.00;  11-16  in.,  1%  in..  1%  in.. 
$18.00;  11-1%  in.,  1V8  in,,  1%  in. 
1  6-16  in.,  $18.00;  !■%  in.,  1%  in., 
1%  in..  $18.40;  1%  in..  1%  in.,  2 
in.,  2%  in.,  $19.00.  Discount  46 
per  cent.  Net  extras,  26  to  M  lb» 
of  a  size,  $1.00  ;  25  lbs.  of  a  size  or 
less,  $2.00  per  100  lbe.  Package 
allowances — if  taken  in  kegs  about 
175  lbs.  each,  allowance  10c  pel 
100  lbs. ;  if  taken  in  bags  about  lutl 
lbs.,  allowance  16c  per  100  lbs. 
WEIGHTS,  SASH 

Tor.     Lon.    Mont. 
Section.  1  lb.. 

per  100  lbs $3.76     $4.04     $4.00 

Section,  %lb., 

per  100  lbs 8.76       4.60      4.00 

Solid,  3  to  30  lbs., 

per  cwt 3.00  3.25  8.10-3.25 

WHEELBARROWS 

Navvy,    steel    wheel,    doz $63  00 

Garden,    steel,     doz 64  25 

Light    garden,    doz 46  80 

F.O.B.  Montreal,  Toronto.   London. 
WIRE    PRODUCTS 

F.O.B.  Toronto,  London,  Hamil- 
ton, Montreal,  St.  John,  freight 
equalized. 

Cut  Hay   Wire.  Per  100  lbs 

No.      8     W  SO 

No.     10     6  90 

No.    11     6  96 

No.    12     6  06 

No.     13     «  16 

No.     18%     •  10 

No.     14     •  85 

No.     18     8  60 

No.     16     «  «6 

Stovepipe    Wire 

No.    18    8  75 

No.    19    9  25 

Fine    wire,    list   plus   80%. 
Smooth  Steel  Wire. 
Nos.  0-9  gauge,  base i  H 

Extras  over  base  sizes  on  smaller 
gauges  are  as  foils ws: 

No.  10,  6c  extra :  No.  11,  lie ;  No. 
12.    30c;   No.    13,   30c;   No.    14,   40c 
No.  15.  65c:  No.  16,  70c  extra. 

Extra  net  per  100  His. — Oiled  win 
10c;  spring  wire,  $2.60;  bright,  soft 
drawn,    16c ;    charcoal    (extra    qual- 
ity), $1.25  ;  packed  in  casks  or  eases. 
l<fic :  hageincr  and  papering*. 
WIRE    STAPLES 
Bright  Wire,  $5.60,  base. 
Galvanized    Wire,    $6.96,    base. 
WRENCHES,   STILLSON 

6    in.,    doz. fit  00 

8    in.,    doz. 18  10 

10    in.,     doz II  H 

14    in.,    doz. 21  10 

18    in.,    doz M  00 

24     in.,     doz 48  60 

M     in.,     doz. 81  Mv 

WRINGERS,    CLOTHES 

Domestic,  No.  531E  $120  80 

Dom.    Bench,   No.   541EB 160  50 

Favorite,    No.     511E 11180 

Favorite.  No.  512    118  20 

Royal   Canadian,   No.    161...     92  80 

Favorite  No.   614    138  60 

Ottawa,  No.  331E 109  30 

Ottawa,  Bench,  No.  341EB.  149  00 
Challenge,   No.  311E   100  30 

Discounts  from  above  list  30  and 
5   per  cent. 

Terms — 30  days,  less  2  per  cent. 
Freight  equalized  on  quarter  dozen 
machines  and  upwards  with  the 
nearest  of  the  following  places  to 
point  of  destination,  viz. :  Montreal, 
Kingston,  Ottawa,  Toronto,  Lon- 
don  and   St.   Marys. 


January  10,   1920 


HARDWARE  AND  M^rlll— Advertising  Secti 


ion 


95 


Now  is  the  Time  to  Sort  up  on 

WINDOW    GLASS 

ALL  WEIGHTS 

i6-ounce,  2i-ounce,  26-ounce,  29-ounce,  34-ounce,  39-ounce. 

WE  CAN  TAKE  CARE  OF  YOUR  REQUIREMENTS  FROM  ANY  OF  OUR  WAREHOUSES,  AND  MAKE  PROMPT  SHIPMENTS- 

WE  CAN  SUPPLY  ANYTHING  IN  PLATE,  BEVELLED    PLATE,  MIRRORS,   FIGURED,  WIRED,  LEADED  AND  WIN 

DOW  GLASS. 

CATALOGUES  AND  PRICE  LISTS  FREE  ON  APPLICATION.    WRITE,  PHONE  OR  WIRE  YOUR  WANTS. 


HOBBS 


MANUFACTURING 
COMPANY,  LIMITED 


MONTREAL 


TORONTO 


LONDON 


WINNIPEG 


S 


GLASS 

BENDERS 

TO 

THE 

TRADE 


BRAND 
WINDOW 
GLASS 
THE  TORONTO  PLATE  GLASS  IMPORTING  CO.,  LIMITED 

PLATE,  WINDOW,  FIGURED,  STAINED,  WIRED,  BENT,  MIRROR 
DON  ROADWAY  and  ORNAMENTAL  GLASS  TORONTO 


HAVE  A 

Forwarding   Agent  in   Winnipeg 

We  have  a  good  warehouse  here  and  are  in  a 
position  to  help  you  give  Al  service  to  your  trade 
in  the  West. 

We  will  re-pack,  sort  and  re-ship  from  your  stock 
here,  guaranteeing  prompt  service,  or  if  desired 
we  will  solicit  and  sell  your  Western  customers. 

If  you  are  interested,  write  for  particulars. 
Bank  references  furnished. 

W.  R.  JAMES  &  CO. 

47  Henry  Avenue  East  -  WINNIPEG 


Plow  Attached  Packers  and  Harrows 

WE  MAKE  THE  BEST 

LARGE  PACKERS  SOLD 


LEADERS 
IN  OUR 
LINES 

Write  for 
Price  Lift 
and  Ca  tatog 


MULCHER 


ft 
PLOW  HARROW 


Surface  and  subsoil  also  supplied  when  called  for. 

CHRISTIANSEN  IMPLEMENTS  LTD.,  WINNIPEG 


96 


HARD  WAKE   AND    METAL 


January  10,  1920 


Winnipeg  Hardware  Quotations 


AMMUNITION 

Powder,  per  keg,  $11.00. 

Shot,  soft,  per  cwt,  $17.20;  chill- 
ed. $18.78;  buckshot,  $18.00;  bail, 
$18.44. 

Dominion  Metattios — B.'B.  Caps, 
$2.80;  C.B.  Caps,  $3.60;  22  Short 
Black  or  Lesmok,  $4;  22  Long 
Black  or  Lesmok,  $4.80;  22  Short 
Smokeless,  $4.30;  22  Long  Smoke- 
less, $6;  22  Long  Rifle  Black,  $5.60; 
22  Long  Rifle  Smokeless,  $7  per  M. 
net.  Center  Fire  Pistol,  22%  ;  Cen- 
ter Fire  Sporting,  26<%  off  Ameri- 
can list. 

American  Metallics  —  B.B.  Caps, 
$4.10;  C.B.  Cap*,  $5.20;  22  Short 
Black,  $5.90 ;  22  Long  Black,  $7.05  ; 
22  Long  Rifle  Black,  $8.25 ;  22  Short 
Smokeless,  $6.30;  22  Long  Smoke- 
less, $8.84;  22  Long  Rifle  Smoke, 
$14.30  per  M.  net.  Centre  Fire 
Pistol,  17%%  on  list;  Centre  Fire 
Sporting,   17%%  on  list 

Loaded  Shells — Crown  Black  Pow- 
der, 12  ga.,  $31 ;  Sovereign  Smoke- 
less, 12  ga.,  $33  ;  Regal  Smokeless, 
12  ga.,  $38 ;  Canucx  Smokeless,  12 
ga.,  $41  per  M.  net.  Empty  Paper 
Shot  Shell,  $14  per  M. ;  Empty 
Brass  Shot  Shells.   $6.65  per  1*0. 

ANVILS 

Peter  Wrigflit.  80  lbs.  and  up.  25c 
per  lb. ;  clip  horn,  27c  lb. 

Norris.   $0  lbs.  and  over.   16c. 


AUGER    BITS 

Standard   List 

3/16 $6  00 

4 6  00 

5 6  00 

« *  00 

7 6  00 

8 6  00 

9; 6  00 


..  «  40 

..  7  04 

..  7  00 

..  8  25 

..  8  as 

..960 

..   9  60 

'.17 12  00 

Discounts    from 

Irwin     

Gilmour    


14. 
11. 
13. 
IS. 

14. 
16. 
16. 


Priees   per    Dozen 

18/16 $12  00 

19 14  00 

20 14  00 

21 16  00 

22 16  00 

28 18  04 

24 18  00 

86 21  00 

26 21  04 

27 24  00 

28 24  00 

29 27  00 

30 27  00 

31 30  00 

82 30  00 

standard   list  prices 

10% 

45% 


AXES 

Single  Bit   $15  50     $16  00 

Double    Bit    21  50 

Broad  Axes   66  00 

BAR  IRON 

Bar  Iron  —  $5.00  base ;  Swedish 
iron,  $8.00;  sleigh  shoe  steel,  $5.50; 
spring  steel,  $6.00 ;  machinery  steel, 
$8.00. 

BARS,   CROW.     $10.60  per    100    lbs. 

BELT    LACING 

In  sides,  tanned,  $2.60  per  lb. ; 
oat,  $2.66  per  lb. ;  rawhide,  sides, 
$2.60;  eat,   $2.65. 

Blue   Stone    (Vitriol),    ll%c. 

BELTING 

Rubber,  6  in.  and  under,  20-5% ; 
over  6   in.,    10-2%%. 

Agricultural  or  No.  1  leather  belt- 
ing,  10-10-10%  off  list. 

Standard,  10-10%  off  list.  Extra 
10%. 

Che  "double"  list  is  just  twice 
she  price  of  "single." 


BOLTS— 

Carriage,  %  and  smaller,  up  to  6 
inch,  10%  ;  over  6  inch,  7%%  ;  7-16 
inch  and  larger,  ?%%;  machine, 
%  and  under,  up  to  4  inch,  12%%  ; 
over  4  inch,  net  list ;  7-16  and  over, 
net  list;  machine  set  screws,  40%; 
plough  bolts,  5%  on ;  stove  bolts, 
50%  ;  shaft  bolts,  6%  on  ;  tire  bolts, 
34% ;  sleigh  shoe  bolts  to  %  and 
smaller,  10%  on  list;  7-16  and  up, 
10%   on   list. 

BORAX.      Borax,    per    lb..    14c. 

BUTTS 

Plated — No.    241    Antique    Copper 
and    Dull    Brass    Finish. 

Per  pr. 

2%  x  2%  in 42 

3  x  3  in 44 

3%  x  3%   in 46 

4  x   4   in 57 

4%  x  4%  in 84 

5  x    5    in 104 

Wrought  Steel— 

No.  800  20%  on  list 

No.  804  Net  list 

No,  838  ' 5%  on  list 

No.  840  15%  on  list 

CHAIN 

Coil,  3-16  in.,  $18,50;  %,  $17.00; 
5-16  in.,  $14.25;  %  In.,  .{11.25:  7-16 
in.  $11.44;  %  in.,  $10.50;  9-16  in., 
$10.50  Logging,  5-16  in.,  $15.75 ; 
%  in.,  $12.76;  %  in.,  $12.00:  tie- 
out,    25% 

CHIMNEYS.  LAMP 

A,  per  case,  8  doz.,  $9.10  per  doz., 
$1.25;  B,  per  case  6  doz..  $7.80;  per 
doz..    $1.40. 

CHURNS 

Barrel,  No.  0,  $9.60  ;  No.  1.  $9.60  : 
No.  2,  $10.50;  No.  3,  $11.40;  No.  4. 
$13.20   each. 

CLEVISES,   MALL.      15c    per   lb. 

CLOCKS — Alarm 

Each 

Big    Ben     .  .* $3  35 

Baby   Ben    3  86 

America     1  60 

Lookout    1  00 

Sleepmeter    2  00 

COPPER 

Sheet  and  planished  copper,  70c 
per  lb.     Tinned,   65c. 

CORD    SASH 

Coils  or  Hanks 
8,  9,   10   84c  lb. 

DRILLS 

Bit  stock.  46% ;  Blacksmith,  % 
in.    round   shank. .  82%%. 

EAVETROUGH 

Eavetrough,  per  140  ft.,  8  in., 
$6.48;    10    in.,    $7.20;    12   in.,    $8.46. 

Conductor  pipe.  2  in.,  per  100  ft., 
$7.56  ;  3  in.,  $9.14  ;  4  in.,  $12.06. 

ENAMELWARE 

See  Wares. 

FILES 

Globe     Discount  54% 

Nicholson     Gen Discount  25% 

FITTINGS— Malleable. 

Ctaee    A    64% 

Class  B  and  C,  off  new  flist.  .64>-10% 

Bushings    10% 

Unions    84% 

Nipples    4"    and   under 74% 

FORMALDEHYDE 

400-lb.  bbls..  32c  lb. ;  200-lb.  bbls., 
33c  lb.;  100-lb.  bbls.,  34c  lb.:  10- 
1b.  jugs,  $8.76  each  ;  6-lb.  jugs,  $2.00 
each ;   2-lb.   jugs,   85c  each. 


GALVANIZED    WARE 

See  Wares. 

GLASS,   WINDOW      Single  Double 

Up   to   25    in $13  95  $19  80 

26  to  40   14  86  19  80 

41  to  50    17  55  22  50 

51  to  60    18  45  22  95 

61  to  70   19  35  24  30 

GLASS     (Plate) 

Net    list, 

GLO  BES— LANTERN 

Doz. 

Short    Pattern    $1  15 

Cold   Blast,   regular    1  16 

GRINDSTONES 

Per   100   lbs.,   $3.75. 
Mounted    on    6teel    frames,     $6    to 
$7.50. 

HARVEST  TOOLS.      17%%. 

HINGES 

Light  T  and  strap,   net  list. 

Corrugated  Strap  Hinges  —  4, 
$1.65;  5,  $2.30;  6,  $3.44;  8,  $4.85; 
10,    $7.40;    12,    $11.50. 

Corrugated  Tee  Hinges — 4,  $2.00  ; 
5,  $2.85;  6,  $3.50;  8,  $5.70;  10, 
$8.50;   12,   $ 

HORSESHOES 

Iron,  No.  0  to  1,  $8.85;  No.  2 
and  larger,  $8.60 ;  snowshoes,  No.  0 
to  No.    1,    $9.10;   No.   2   and   larger, 

$8.85;  steel,  No.  0  to  1,   $ ;   No. 

2   and   larger,   $....;   featherweight. 


Apollo  and 

IRON,    GALVANIZED  "Fleur 

Premier  de  Lis" 

10%    oz.    or   28    Eng $10  95 

28    Am.    or  26   Eng 10  55 

26    Am.   or   26  Eng 10  05 

24     9  90 

22    9  90 

18  and   20    9  75 

16     9  60 

IRONS.   SAD 

Common  Sad  Iron,  8  lbs.,  14%c 
per    lb. ;    4    and    5    lbs.,    18c    per    lb. 

Mrs.    Pott's  No.   55,   set $2  00 

Mrs.   Pott's  No.   50,   set 2  15 

Mrs.  Pott's  common  and  iron 
handles,  $1.63  dozen.  Mrs.  Pott's 
improved,    $2.30    a    dozen. 

JACKSCREWS 

10%    off    list. 

KNIVES— HAY 

Heath's J13  25 

Lfghtning    1«  25 

LANTERNS 

No.  2.   plain    $13  00 

No.    25.    Dash-board     17   50 

Short   Globe,   doz 18   00 

LATCHES— THUMB.  STEEL 

Doz. 

2     $2  05 

3     2  94 

4     

Barn   Door 

5     3  00 

8     3  43 

9     4  88 

LEAD   PIPE,   $12.06. 
LEAD   WASTE,   $12.96. 

WHITE  LEAD 

Decorators'  pure,   ton   lots,    $18.25. 

LINSEED    OIL 

See  weekly   report. 

MACHINES— WASHING 


Each 


Dowswell    

New    Century    B     

New    Idea    

Snowball     

Prices   on    application. 


MATTOCKS 

Pick.    $1*76;   cutter.    $13.76. 


MOPS 

Doz. 

O-Cedar   Polish,  No.    1 $12  60 

O-Cedar   Polish,   No.   3 12  60 

Self- Wringing     6  Tfi 

MOWERS— LAWN 

14  in.  16  in. 

Woodyatt      $  8  50  $  9  00 

Empress     11  00  1130 

Daisy 6  64         

Star     7  54  8  00 

NAILS 

Wire  f.o.b.  Fort  William,  $5.40 
base ;  Winnipeg,  $5.90  base.  Cut 
f.o.b.  Winnipeg,  $7.40. 

NETTING— POULTRY 

Net    Prices    per    RolL 

1   in.  mesh  x  24  in $6  66 

30   in 8  08 

36  in 9  50 

NUTS 

Square,  small  lots,  blank.  $4.00, 
tapped,  $4.26  advance  on  list ;  Hexa- 
gon, small  lots,  blank,  $4.2*6,  tap- 
ped, $4.60  advance  on  list;  ease  lots 
all    styles,    lc    less    than    above. 

OAKUM 

Clipper,  spun,  per  104  lb $24.04 

Clipper,  unspun,  per   144  lbs.     212.64 
Plumbers,  per   100  lbs 12  00 

OILS 

Wm.  Pen  motor  oil,  $1.23  ;  "Buf- 
folite,'*  25c;  Ideal  Thresher,  60c; 
'IB"  Castor  machine  oil,  41c;  Buf- 
falo engine  gasoline,  37c ;  Buf- 
falo "A"  gas  engine  oil,  66c  ;  Roye! 
gasoline,  36c ;  Family  safety  coal 
oil,  26% ;  Summer  black  oil,  24c ; 
Kelso  engine  oil,  64c ;  Electro  oil. 
45c ;  Royalite  oil,  23c ;  Standard 
gas  engine  oil,  46  %c ;  Prairie  Har- 
vester oil.  53c. 
PAINTS 

Stephens'  Out  and  Inside  White, 
$6j20;  Stephens'  House,  ordinary 
shades,  $4.96 ;  Stephens'  Floor. 
$4.15;  Silkstone  colors,  $3.66;  Silk- 
stone  white,  $3.76 ;  Stephens,  Bam 
Paint,  $2.10  and  $2.30. 

PAPER,   BUILDING 

Dry  Fibre  Tarred 

Joliette   $0  90       $1  20 

Builders'  Special 1  10         1  20 

Cyclone  1  10         1  20 

Navy     1  26         1  46 

Triumph   1  36         1   60 

PIPE.   WROUGHT  IRON 

Per   100  ft.  Black.  Gaiv. 

%  inch   $  5   13  $  7   47 

%  inch   6  27  7  61 

%  inch   7  02  8  73 

%  inch   8  82  11   12 

1  inch   13  05  16  43 

IV*  inch   17  64  22  23 

1%  inch   21  06  26  55 

2  inch   28  35  35  78 

2%  inch   45  99  58  01 

3  inch    60  12  76  87 

3%  inch   76  60  96  80 

4  inch    90  68  113  40 

4%  inch   102  60  130  60 

5  inch   119  70  162  10 

6  inch   155  70  197   10 

PLASTER,   Paris,   per  bbl.,  $6.25. 

PLATES,  CANADA 

18  x  21  per  box,  ordinary,  $8.76  ; 
18  x  24,  ordinary,  $8.76;  20  x  21, 
ordinary,   $9. 


January  10,  1920 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


97 


They  See  The  Can 
Recall  The  Brand 

And  You  Record  a  Sale 


SjDEWHTg 

^Stephens  a  C-uhUSLL   , 


has  already  impress- 
i^iiniii  iiiim^^  e  d  many  minds 
favorably.  An  average  display  is  all  that's 
necessary  to  start  a  train  of  thought  in  the 
customer's  mind  that  leads  from  your  store  to  an  unpainted 
home.  Your  cash  register  becomes  the  closing  link  in  the 
series  of  events  suggested  by  your  display  of  oS^^g^' 
Paints.  This  doesn't  happen  once — it  happens  many  times. 
Are  you  making  the  most  of  such  opportunities?  Have  you 
the  right  brand  of  paint?  If  not,  your  paint  turnover  is  not 
all  it  might  be. 

Suppose  you  write  us  about  an 
agency.      There'* s  money  in  it. 

G.  F.  STEPHENS  &  CO.,  LIMITED 

PAINT  AND  VARNISH  MAKERS 
WINNIPEG  AND  CALGARY 


98 


HARDWARE  AND    METAL 


January  10,  1920 


Winnipeg  Hardware  Quotations-continued 


POLISH 

O-Cedar— 

Doz. 

4   oz $  2  00 

12     oz 4  00 

1    quart    10  00 

%     gal 16  00 

1   gal 24  00 

Liquid   Veneer — 

4  oz.    J  2  00 

12    oz 4  00 

1    quart    8  40 

%     gal 14    4J 

Bon    Ton— 

%   pints    1  36 

%    pints     2   10 

Pints     3  25 

Quarts    5  10 

%   gal 9  00 

Gal IS  00 

PUTTY 

100-lb.   irons    $7  20 

25-lb.  irons,  per  cwt 7  80 

1%-lb.   tins    ? 14% 


RIVETS  AND   BURRS 

Iron  rivets,  30-10% ;  copper,  No. 
7,  66e  lb.;  No.  8,  66c;  No.  10,  60c. 
No.   12,  66c. 

^iv«-n>.  assorted  boxes.  No.  8. 
«e;   No.    10,  67e  lb. 

Copper  Burrs,  No.  8,  66c ;  No. 
10,    60c;   No.    12,   65c. 

ROOFING               lply  2  ply  3  ply 

Klingon     J2  20  $2  65  $3  10 

Winner     2  30  2  80  3  30 

Comfort    2  45  3  00  3  60 

Induroid      2  80  3  60  4  20 

ROPE 

Sisal,  25%c  base;  pure  Manila, 
32%c  base;  British  Manila,  29%c 
base  ;  lath  yarn,  24%c  base  ;  African 
hemp,  29%c  base ;  cotton  rope,  % 
and  over,  75c  lb. 

Tarred  Marline  Hanks,  per  lb.. 
50c. 


SANDPAPER 


Star- 
00, 

% 

1  . 
1% 

2  . 
2% 
8      . 


Quire. 

•    $0  33 

0  86 

0  40 

0  45 

0  52 

0  58 

0  66 


Ream. 
$6  OS 

6  60 

7  30 

8  25 

9  30 

10  50 

11  90 


B.    &   A.— 


00,    0    $0  38  $6  75 

%          0  40  7   16 

1     0  46  lit 

1%     0  49  9  45 

2      ,  0  64  10  90 

»%      0  7*  12  59 

3     #80  14  30 


SASH  BALANCES   (Caldwell). 

30>7;    on  list. 

SAWS,   BUCK 

Happy  Medium,  $12.00 :  WaUli 
Spring.  $12.50 :  Lance  Tooth  or 
Lightning   Blades,    $16. 

SCREWS 

Bright  iron  round  head,  70%  ;  flat 
head,  72%% ;  round  head,  brass, 
47%% ;  flat  head,  brass,  50% ; 
coach,    35%. 

Set   Screws,    40%. 

SCYTHES—  Doz. 

Bramble     $ 

Bush      16  25 

Excelsior     

Cast     15  75 

SHOVELS   AND  SPADES— 

Pt.,  $13.76  per  doz. ;  D.H.  Rd.  Pt., 
$13.76;  per  doz.;  L.H.  Sqr.  Pt.. 
$13.76 ;  L.H.  Rd.  Pt..  $13.75  :  Bull- 
dog &  Jones,  D.H.,  Rd.  Pt..  $17.20  ; 
D.H.,  Sqr.  Pt,  $17.20;  L.H.  Rd. 
Pt.,  $17.20;  L.H.,  Sqr.  Pt.,  $17.20; 
Black  Cat  and  Crescent  Scoops — 
No.  4,  $16.60  duz.  ;  No.  6.  $19.10; 
No.  8,  $19.60:  No.  10,  $20.10;  Moose 
&  Jones  Scoops — No.  4,  $20.00 ;  No. 
6.  $20.60;  No.  8,  $21.00. 

SNATHS— 

No.    2    loop    13  25 

Bush      15  00 

STEEL  SHEETS.    BLACK 

10  gauge    $7   55 

12    gauge    7   60 

14    !?auge    7  65 

16    gfiuge     7  75 

18-20    gauge    8  55 

22-24     gauge     8  40 

26    gauge    8  45 

28    gauge     8  55 

SWEEPERS,  CARPET— 

See  list  in  regular  "Current  Mar- 
ket Quotations"  Column,  f.o.b.  fac- 
tory, Niagara  Falls,  Ont. 


SWEEPERS,   VACUUM— 


Doz. 
.$127  20 


Grand   Rapids,   nickeled 

Household,     japannel      

Superba,   nickeled    

F.O.B.  Jobbers'  Warehouses,   Win- 
nipeg. 

SOLDER.      Per  pound,   37  to   38c. 


SPIKES.    BOAT 


Pressed,  % 
i.   $7.40:    %, 


STAPLES 


in.,  $8.30;  5-16,  $7.65: 
$7.20. 


Bright  wire,  per  cwt.,  $5.65  at 
Fort  William.  $6.15  Winnipeg  ;  gal- 
vanized staples,  $6.55  Fort  William, 
$7.05    Winnipeg. 


STEEL 

Sleighshoe.  $5.50  base  per  cwt.  . 
plow,  common,  $12;  crucible  plow, 
$16.00;  angle,  $6.00;  harrow,  $5.75 
base ;  cast,  octagon  tool  steel,  20c 
base ;  square  tool.  20c  base ;  spring, 
$6.00;  machine,  $8.00  base;  tire, 
$5.65.  Mild,  3-16,  %,  5-16,  $5.50 
base ;  ether  sizes,  $5.50  base.  Band 
steel,   »5.75  base. 


STEEL  HOOPS 

%  in..  $8.35;  %  in.,  $8.00;  %  in.. 
$7.40 :  %  in.,  $7-10 ;  1  in.,  $7.00 ; 
1%   in..  $6.90;  1%  in.,  $6.80. 


STEEL  SQUARES 

10%  on  list. 

TACKS.      Carpet.   66%    list. 


TIES.      Cow, 


TIN    AND   TERNE   PLATE— 

20   x    28    I.C.   box $24  26 

20  x    33   I.X.   box 33  50 

20  x    33    I.C.    box 28  75 

20   x    33    I.X.    box 33  50 

Terne    plates     24  00 


TRAPS.  GAME—  Doz. 

Victor  H.&  N.  Jur.ip 

No.    0    $1  %  $ $ 

No.    1    2  30         3  60  3   11 

No.    1%    3  46         7  80  4  55 

No.    2    4  80  11  55  6   70 

No.    3     6  75  15  40  8  90 


TUBS— 


Wood       Fibre 


No.  0  $21  36  $26  40 

No.  1  18  80  22  65 

No.  2  16  40  18  80 

No.  3  14  00  15  95 

TURPENTINE 

See  weekly  report. 

TWINE  (WRAPPING)  Lb. 

Cotton,  3-ply,    cones    $0  86 

Cotton,  3-ply,   balls    0  90 

Cotton,  4-ply,    cones    0  90 

Cotton,  4-ply,   balls    0  95 


VARNISHES— 

Stephens'    Luminette,    gal....    $3  60 
Stephens'    Exailite.    gal 4  25 

WARES,  ETC.— 

Scotch  Grey,  40-12%%  discount. 

Colonial    Imperial,    Pearl,     15-7%% 
discount. 

Premier,     Canada,      Diamond,     plus 
7%%. 

Whitewear,    80-16%. 

Japanned    Ware,    Hat,    plus    32%. 

Japanned     Ware,     white,     list,     plus 
42%. 

Japanned  Sprinklers,  list,  plus  32%. 

Stamped    Ware,    plain,    30-20-2%% 
discount. 

Stamped  Ware,  rationed,  20-20-7%% 
discount. 

Pieced   Tinware,    ordinary,    list,    pluj 
4»%. 

Pieced  Tinware,  copper  bottoms,  list, 
plus    63%%. 

Sheet    Iron    Ware,    list,    plus,    32%. 

Light  Galvanized  Pails,  plus  42%%. 
Tubs,   list,   plus   42%%. 

Heavy    Galvanized     Pails    and    Tubs. 
plus    81%. 

Jap.   Coal   Hods,    list,   plus   46%%. 
Galvanized  Coal  Hods,  list,  plus  61% 


WASHERS— 

Iron,  small  lots,  50%  off  list  plus 
$1.50:  full  boxes,  iron,  50%  off  list- 
plus  $1.00. 

WASTE 

Cream,   Polishing $0  22 

WHITE 

XXX    Extra    $0  21 

XX,    grand    0   W\ 

X^ ' 0  l8% 

A    Empire    0  1714 

X     Press     0   16 

COLORED 

Fancy   0  17 

L*on    ..'..'.   0  15% 

Standard    0  14 

Popular    0  12^, 

Keen    0  1,1 

Above  'Dines  subject  So  trade  dis- 
count  for   quantity. 


WIRE,    BARB 

Lyman,  4-point.  $6.75  Winnipeg. 
Glidden  Cattle,  2-pt.,  $5.55  Winni- 
peg ;  Baker,  2-pt.,  $5.46  Winnipeg: 
plain  twist,  cwt..  Winnipeg.  $7  ■«> 
100  lbs. ;  galvanized,  Winnipeg,  No. 
9,  $6.25:  No.  12,  $6.40;  coil  spring, 
plain,  Winnipeg,  No.  9,  $6.30 :  No. 
12,   $6.45. 

Patented  screen  in  100-ft.  rolls 
$3.26  per  hundred  sq.  ft.  :  in  50-ft 
rolls  ;   $3.25  per   100  sq.    ft. 


WIRE.   PLAIN 

Boles   ties,    14   gauge,   single   loop, 
$7    Winnipeg;    $6.60    Fort    William. 
Brass   snare   wire,    per   lb.,    90c. 


WIRE,  ANNEALED 

No.  9,  $5.79;  10.  $6.81;  12,  $5.95: 
14,  $6.16;  15,  $6.80;  16,  $4.46  per 
100   lbs. 


WRENCHES    (NUT) 

Agricultural —  Doz 

6    inch    $6  0© 

8    inch     7  20 

10    inch    8  40 

12    inch     10  80 

15    inch    14  40 

Perfect  Handle— 

6    inch    16  00 

8    inch    17  50 

10    inch    

12    inch    

15    inch    

18    inch    

WRENCHES    (PIPE) 

Stillson —  Each 

6  inch  $1  05 

8  inch  1  18 

10  inch  1  31 

14  inch  1  84 

18  inch  2  62 

24  inch  3  81 

36  inch  7  09 

Trimo— 

10    inch    $1  56 

14    inch     2   19 

18    inch    8   1» 

24    inch    4  53 

Dozen. 
Always  Ready—  Black.     N.P. 

No.    1    $4  20       $4  50 

No.    2    6  76         6  Oft 

WRINGERS 

Eze.     $62.55     per     dozen.        Reliant*. 


January   10,   1920 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


99 


CRESCENT  SHARES 


OVER  1,000  PATTERNS. 


PERFECT  IN  FIT  AND  FINISH 


Sandoval  Rolling  Coulter 
Harrow  Teeth 


Every  Hardware  Merchant  in 
Western  Canada  should  have 
these  in  stock. 


The  demand  is  assured.  How 
is  your  supply?  Better  send 
us  your  order  to-day. 


D.  ACKLAND  &  SON,  Limited 

WINNIPEG  .\  CALGARY 


MADE        IN     CANADA 


-"•^wss*8*'" 


OILS 


These  are  a  few  of  our  most  staple  lines,  so  well  and  favorably 
known  throughout  Western  Canada,  and  are  sold  only  through 
reliable    merchants. 


Special  Cylinder  Oil  for  Steam  Engines 

Harness   Oil.     Neatsfoot   Oil 

A  Gas  Engine  Oil 
(for      gasoline      en- 

I  gines). 

f  Tractorlene  Oil  (for 
oil  burning  engines). 
Ideal  Thresher's  Ma- 
chine Oil  (for  gen- 
eral use. 

Automobile  Oil 
and  Transmission 
Greases. 


PRAIRIE  CITY   OIL  COMPANY,  LIMITED,  WINNIPEG 


O-Rib-0 

Sanitary  Closets 

Domestic  size,  fitted  as  fol- 
lows: Galvanized  iron  body; 
hardwood  seat  and  cover; 
body  and  seat  mahogany 
finished;  galvanized  iron  buc- 
ket of  65  lbs.  Capacity,  fit- 
ted with  cover;  9-ft.  black 
enamel  vent  pipe  and  elbow 
included.  Weight,  crated, 
about  30  lbs. 

O-Rib-O  Manufacturing   Co. 

WINNIPEG,  MANITOBA 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL'S 
electro  catalog  shows  upwards  of 
400  hardware  electros.  These  are 
supplied,  mounted  on  wood  blocks, 
at  25c  each.  Write  for  free  book- 
let showing  assortment. 

HARDWARE  AND  METAL 

Electro  Service  Dept. 
143  University  Ave.  Toronto,  Can. 


100 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


January  10,  1920 


the  perfect 
washer 


THOUSANDS  of  women  throughout  the  country  have  learned 
to  appreciate  the  many  advantages  and  economies  of  wash- 
ing clothes  the  Eden  way.  The  Eden  Electric  Clothes  Washer 
is  a  time-proved  success  because  it  washes  everything  from  the 
heaviest  blanket  to  the  most  delicate  bit  of  silk  or  lace  by  dipping 
them  up  or  down  through  hot  suds — without  wear  or  tear  or 
rubbing  or  scrubbing. 

The  Eden  makes  clothes  last  five  or  six  times  as  long  because  it 
washes  them  without  rubbing.  It  saves  time,  trouble,  money  and 
hard  work,  and  has  done  so  in  many  homes  for  many  years. 

Many  dealers  have  taken  advantage  of  the  many  superior  points 
of  the  Eden,  and  are  handling  it  to  the  exclusion  of  all  other  makes. 
They  have  found  it  the  most  profitable  machine  to  handle  because 
it  is  the  one  machine  that,  once  sold,  stays  sold.  The  Eden  has  no 
comebacks. 

Full  Line  of  Literature  on  Request. 

The  Great  West  Electric  Company,  Limited 


ALBERT  STREET 


WINNIPEG 


Distributors  of  LACO  TUNGSTEN  and  NITRO  LAMPS 


January    10,   1920 


HARDWARE  AND  METAL— Advertising  Section 


101 


1869     ^m 

1919 

Golden     ^Mff* 

The  Trademark                ^^^fijl§St 

y     Jubilee 

Behind  Canada's 

Largest  Wholesale           ^^^ 

^          Hardware  House 

Ashdowns  have  grown  to  be  the  largest  Wholesale  Hardware  Dealers  in  Canada.  There  must 
be  a  reason. 

Early  in  the  history  of  the  West  we  realized  that  the  Hardware  Dealer  of  the  Western  pro- 
vinces had  problems  to  contend  with  not  met  with  elsewhere. 

His  problems  have  been  ours,  too.  We  know  his  needs,  and  with  our  warehouses  situated  in 
Winnipeg,  Saskatoon  and  Calgary  as  to  be  handy  to  any  Western  dealer,  we  are  in  a  position 
to-day  to  render  him  a  very  valuable  service. 

Courteous  treatment,  quick  service  and  quality  in  the  lines  we  sell  has  ever  been  our  aim. 
The  fact  that  we  are  sole  distributors  for  some  of  the  most  famous  Hardware  lines  bespeaks 
something  of  the  confidence  manufacturers  are  putting  in  us. 
Here  is  one  of  them — 


Buckeye  Incubators  and  Brooders 


Buckeye  Incubators  are  unquestionably  the  most  successful  hatch- 
ing devices  that  have  ever  been  placed  on  the  market.  Each  and 
every  machine  is  sold  under  an  absolute  guarantee  to  hatch  more 
chicks  than  any  other  incubator  manufactured. 


Buckeye  Incubators  made  in  seven  capaci- 
ties. 65,  120,  175,  200,  250,  350  and  600 
eegs. 

The  Buckeye  Incubators  and  Brooders  need 
no  introduction  to  the  trade.  They  are  un- 
questionably the  most  dependable  and  most 
widely  advertised  lines  on  the  market.  We 
consider  ourselves  most  fortunate  in  secur- 
ing these  machines  for  our  trade. 


'S  EC'U  RITY 

O  I  L  -  B  U  RNI  NO 

BROODERS 


The  Buckeye  Oil  Burning  Brood- 
ers are  simple  in  construction 
and  the  most  inexperienced  per- 
son can  operate  them  with  ab- 
solutely satisfactory  results. 


STAN  DARO 

COAL-BU  RNIN& 
BROOD  E  RS 


The  Buckeye  Coal  Burning 
Brooder  grows  three  chicks 
where  one  grew  before  and 
saves  one-tenth  the  expense  and 
nine-tenths  of  the  trouble. 


There  is  nothing  to  know  about  incubators  in  order  to  sell  them.     We  furnish  com- 
plete operating   instructions  with   each  incubator,   and   guarantee  results. 

SEND  US  AN  ORDER  NOW  FOR  A  SAMPLE  TO  PUT  ON  YOUR  FLOOR  TO  ENABLE 
YOU  TO  INTRODUCE  THE  LINE  TO  YOUR  CUSTOMERS  FOR  THE  COMING  SPRING'S 
BUSINESS. 


The  J,  H.  Ashdown  Hardware  Co.,  Limited 

Calgary  Winnipeg  Saskatoon 


102 


HARDWARE    AND    METAL 


January  10,  1920 


minium 


iiiiiihi' 


THE   BUYERS'   GUIDE 

//  what  you  want  is  not  here,  write  us,  and  we  will  tell  you  where  to  get  it.  Let  us  suggest  that  you  consult  also 
the  advertisers,  under  facing  the  inside  back  cover,  after  having  secured  advertisers'  names  from  this  directory. 
The  information  you  may  desire  may  be  found  in  the  advertising  pages.  This  department  is  maintained  for  the 
benefit  and  convenience  of  our  readers.     The  insertion  of  advertisers'  headings  is  gladly  undertaken,  but  does  not 

become  part  of  any  advertising    rcntract. 


Abrasives 

The  Carborundum    Oo„    Niagara   Falls,   N.T. 
Dunlop  Tire  ft  Rubber  Goods  Oo.,  Ltd.,  Toronto. 
Plewes    Ltd.,    Winnipeg,    Man. 
Air  Cocks 
The   Penberthy   Injector  Co.,    Ltd.,    Windsor,   Oat 

Agricultural   Product* 
Dunlop  Tire  ft  Rubber  Goods  Co.,  Ltd.,  Toronto. 

Alabaetine 

The    Alabastine    Co.,    Paris,    Ont 
Aluminum 

British  Aluminum  Co.,  Toronto. 

Canada    Metal    Co.,    Toronto. 

The     Great     Western     Smelting   *    Refining     Co., 

Vancouver. 
A.    C.    Leslie   &   Co.,    Montreal. 

Aluminum  Ware 

The  Aluminum  Goods  Mfg.  Co.,  Manitowoc,    Wis. 

Thos.    Davidson    Mfg.    Co.,    Ltd.,    Montreal. 

Merchants'    Hardware    Specialties,    Ltd.,    Calgary, 
Alita. 

The    Aluminum   Ware    Mfg.    Co.,    Oafcville,    Ont 
Ammonia 

The    Engineers'    Supply    Co.,    Winnipeg,    Man. 
Ammunition 

Caverhill,    Learmont   ft   Co.,    Montreal. 

Dominion  Cartridge  Co.,   Montreal, 

Lewis    Bros.,    Ltd.,    Montreal. 

Remington    Arms-Union    Metallic    Cartridge    Co., 
Windsor. 
Anchor  Bolts 

Steel  Oo.  of  Canada,  Ltd.,  The,   Hamilton,   Ont 
Arbors 

Whitman  &  Bames  Mfg.  Co.,  St  Catharines,  Ont. 
Arms 

The  Fraser  Co.,   Agents  B.S.A.,   Montreal,   Que. 

Art  Glass 

Hobbs    Mfg.    Co..    Montreal,    Que. 

The  Ontario  Plate  Glass,   Ltd,    Hamilton,   Ont 

Asbestos 

Canadian    Asbestos   Co.,    Montreal,    Que. 

The  Engineers'  Supply  Oo. ,   Winnipeg,   Man. 
Arms,    Small 

The  Fraser  Co..   Agents  B.S.A.,  Montreal,  Que. 
Asbestos  Pipe  Specialties 

Canadian    Asbestos   Co.,    Montreal,    Que. 
Asbestos  Pipe  Coverings 

Canadian    Asbestos    Co.,    Montreal,    Que. 
Ash  Pit  Doors 

The     Economy     Foundry    Co. ,     Ltd. .     Portage    U 
Prairie,    Man. 
Ash   Sifters 

Burrowes  Mfg.   Co.,  Toronto. 

J.    Samuels  &  Co.,  Toronto. 
Aueer  Rings 
The    Crescent    Co. ,    (Meriden,    Conn. 

Auto   Accessories,   Equipment  and  Supplies 
(Jobbers) 

J.   E.    Beauchamp  ft  Co.,  Montreal,  Que. 

Evans  &   Co.,    Ltd.,  Montreal,   Que. 

E.    G.    Gooderham,    Torsnto. 

Northern    Electric   Co.,    Ltd.,    Montreal. 

Great    West    Electric   Co.,    Ltd.,    Winnipeg,    Man. 

Homer   &   Wilson,    Hamilton,   Ont 

Hyslop    Bros. .    Toronto. 

North    American    Hardware    Co.,    Ltd.,    Montreal 

The    Renaud    Motor   Supply    Co.,    Ltd.,    Montreal 
Que. 

The  Royal  Canadian  Specialties,  Hamilton,   Ont. 

Samuel   Trees    ft    Co.,    Limited,    Toronto. 

Walker  Vallance,  Ltd.,  Hamilton,  Ont. 
Auto  Accessories,  Equipment  and  Supplies 
(Manufacturers) 

The  AH-Way    Mfg.    Co.,    Toronto.    Ont 

Auto   Specialties   Co.,    Buffalo,   NT. 

W.    H.    Banfleld    ft   Sons,    Ltd.,    Toronto. 

Baroalo   Mfg.    Co.,    Buffalo,    N.Y. 

Benjamin    Eletric   Co.,    Toronto. 

Boston     Varnish    Co.,     Everett     Station,     Boston. 
Mass. 

Burrowes  Mfg.   Co.,  Toronto. 

Burgess-Norton   Mfg.    Co.,    Geneva,   111. 

Burlington-Windsor    Blanket    Co.,    Ltd.,    Toronto. 

Canada  Cycle   &    Motor   Co.,    Ltd.,    Weston,   Ont. 

Canadian    General    Electric    Co.,    Ltd.,    Toronto. 

Canadian    National    Carbon    Co..    Toronto. 

Canadian  Winckley  Co.,   Ltd.,  Windsor,   Ont 

Cannon   Oiler  Co.,    Keithsburg,    111. 

The   Carborundum    Co,,    Niagara   Falls.   N.T. 

Northern    Electric   Co..    Ltd..   Montreal. 

Canada    Dry    Cells.    Ltd.,    Winnipeg. 

The   Chapman   Ball   Bearing  Co.,   Toronto. 

Dunlop  Tire  &  Rubber  Goods  Co.,  Ltd.,  Toronto. 

Guelph  Spring  &  Axle  Co.,  Limited,  Guelph,  Ont. 
.  Gutta   Percha   &   Rubber  Ltd.,   Toronto. 

The  Imperial  Bit  &  Snap  Co.,  Racine,   Wis. 

Kinzinger,    Bruce  &   Co.,    Niagara   Falls,    Ont 

Will.    B.    Lane,   Chicago,   IB. 


Line,   Kimball   Co.,    Moose  Jaw,   Sask. 

The     Marquette     Manufacturing     Co.,      Inc.,     St 

Paul,   Minn. 
M.   H.   Merchant  Corporation,  Syracuse,  N.T. 
The  Locktite  Mfg.    Co.,    Windsor,   Ont. 
Frank  Mossberg  Co.,  Attleboro,  Mass. 
McKinnon  Industries,  Ltd.,  St   Catharines,  Ont. 
Northern    Electric    Co.,    Ltd.,    Montreal. 
Presto    Patch    Co.,    Toronto. 

The    F.     E.    Partridge    Rubber   Co.,    Guelph,    Ont. 
Rock   Island   Mfg.    Co.,   Chicago,    III. 
C.    A.    Shaler  Co.,    Waupun,    Wis. 
Smith    &   Hemenway  Co.,    Irvington,    N.J. 
The  Star  Specialty  Mfg.   Co.,  Chicago,   111. 
The   Steel   Trough   &    Machine   Co.,    Ltd.,    Tweed, 

Ont. 
Thermoid  Rubber  Co.,   Trenton,   N.J. 
Trimont  Mfg.    Co.,    Rorbury.   Mass. 
Van  Cleef    Bros.,    Chicagv,    111. 
The  Van  der   Linde  Rubber  Co.,   Toronto. 
Wilkinson    ft    Kompass,    Hamilton, 
Williams  *  Co.,  J.  H.   Brooklyn,  N.T. 
Wilson    Auto    Specialties,     Ltd.,    Hamilton,    Ont. 
Whitman  &  Barnes  Mfg.  Co.,  St.  Catharines,  Ont. 

Automatic  Screw  Machine  Products 

Burgess-Norton    Mfg.    Co..    Geneva.    111. 
Caron    Bros.,    Montreal,    Que. 

Automobile   Hoods    (Ford) 
Burrowes  Mfg.   Co.,  Toronto. 

Automobile   Parts 
Canada  Foundries  &  Forgings,  Ltd.,  Welland,  Out 
Northern   Electric   Co..    Ltd..   Montreal. 
Kinzinger,    Bruce   &   Co.,    Niagara    Falls,    Ont 
McKinnon    Industries,    Ltd.,    St.    Catharines,    Ont 

Automobile  Parts,   Ford,  Overland,  Buick 

Uurgess-Norton   Mfg.    Co.,    Geneva,    111. 

Automobile  Signals 

Northern    Electric   Co.,    Ltd.,   Montreal. 
Automobile    Specialties 

Northern    ~iectric   Co.,    Ltd.,   Montreal. 

Evans  &  Co.,   Ltd.,   Montreal,   Que. 
Awnings 

Grant,    Holden    &    Graham,    Ltd.,    Ottawa.    Ont 

.1.    J.    Turner  ft    Co.,    Peterboro,   Ont 

Awls,    Sewing 
C.   A.    Myers   Co.,   Chicago,   01. 

Axes 

Burgess-Norton   Mfg.    Co.,    Geneva,    111. 
Canada    Foundries  &    Forgings,    Brockrille,   Ont 
Caverhill,    Learmont   &    Co.,    Montreal. 
Shiirly-Dietrich   Co.,    Ltd.,    Gait,    Ont. 

Axles 

Guelph    Spring    &    Axle    Co..    Ltd.,    Guelph,    Ont 

Axles,  Car 

Steel  Co.  of  Canada,   Ltd.,  The.   Hamilton.   Ont 

Babbitt  Metal 

Canada    Metal    Co.,    Toronto. 

Caverhill.    Learmont    &    Co.,    Montreal. 

The  Dominion  Metal  Co.,    Ltd.,   Sherbrooke,   Que. 

The    Great    Western     Smelting    ft    Refining    Co., 

Vancouver,    B.C. 
Hoyt    Metal   Co.,    Toronto. 
Owl    Metal    Co.,    Winnipeg. 
Lewis  Bros.,   Ltd.,   Montreal. 
Plewes    Ltd.,    Winnipeg.     Man. 
Tallman    Brass  &   Metal   Co.,    Hamilton. 

Barb    Wire 

The  Frost  Steel  &  Wire  Co.,  Ltd.,  Hamilton,  Ont. 
The  Steel  Oo.    of  Canada,   Ltd.,   Hamilton,   Ont 

Bars  and   Racks,   Clothes 

Otterville    Mfg.    Co.,    Ltd.,    Otterville.    Ont 

Barrel   Covers 

E.    B.    Eddy   Co.,    Hull,    Que. 

Barrels,    Steel 

The    Smart-Turner    Machine    Co..    Ltd.,    Hamilton, 
Ont. 

Batteries,   Dry 

Canadian    National    Carbon   Co.,    Ltd,    Toronto. 
Canada    Dry    Cells    Ltd.,    Winnipeg. 
Great  West  Electric  Co.,  Ltd.,  Winnipeg,  Man. 
Canadian    General   Electric  Co.,   Toronto. 
Northern   Electric  Mfg.    Co.,   Ltd.,   Montreal. 
Dominion   Battery   Co.,    Ltd.,    Toronto,    Ont. 
North   American   Hardware   Co.,    Ltd.,   Montreal. 
Northern    Electric   Co.,    Ltd.,    Montreal. 

Batteries,   Flashlight 
Canadian     National     Carbon    Co..    Ltd.,     Toronto. 
Dominion   Battery   Co.,    Ltd..    Toronto,    Ont 

Baths,  Enamelled  and  Copper 

Canada    Metal    Co.,    Toronto. 
Bath    Room   Fixtures 
The    Gendron    Mfg.    Co.,    Ltd.,    Toronto. 
Kinzinger.    Brace   &   Co.,    Niagara   Falls,    Ont 


Bends,   Brass,  Iron  and   Lead 

Jas.    Morrison   Brass    Mfg.    Co.,   Toronto. 

Bibbs,  Basin  and  Bath  Cocks,  Compression 

Jas.    Morrison    Brass    Mfg.    Co.,    Toronto. 
The   United   Brassfounders  Ltd.,    Manchester,    Bug. 
Wentwoi'th    Mfg.     Co.,    Hamilton,    Ont 
Bibbs,   Basin  and  Bath  Cocks,  Fuller 
.las.    Morrison    Brass    Mfg.    Co.,    Toronto. 
The  United  Bras3foundera,  Ltd.,   Manchester,    Ens 

Brake  Lining 

The    Renaad    Motor    Supply    Co.,    Ltd.,    Montreal 

Que. 
Thei-moid    Rubber    Co.,    Trenton,    N.J. 
Brass    Goods 
The   Penberthy   Injector  Co..   Ltd.,   Windsor,   Out. 
Dunlop  Tire  ft  Rubber  Goods  Co.,  Ltd.,  Toronto. 
Stratford    Brass    Co.,    Ltd.,    Stratford,    Ont. 

Brass  Castings  and  Goods 

Canada    Metal    Co.,    Toronto, 

.las.    Cartland   ft   Sons,    Ltd.,    Birmingham,    lian 

.Tas.    Morrison    Brass    Mfg.,    Co.,    Toronto. 

Tallman    Brass  &    Metal   Co.,   Hamilton. 

The   Penberthy   Injector  Co.,   Ltd.,   Windsor,    Ont. 

The  United  Brassfounders,  Ltd.,  Manchester,  Bog 
Brass,  Sheets  and  Rods 

Canada    Metal    Co.,    Toronto. 

A.    C.    Leslie  ft    Co..    Montreal. 

Tallman   Brass  &  Metal  Co.,  Hamilton 
Bevels 

Browne   ft   Sharpe   Mfg.    Co.,    Providence,    H.I. 

Gootlell-Piait    Co..     Greenfield,     Mass. 

'Stanley   Rirle  &   Level    Co.,   New   Britain,  Conn. 

L.    8.    Stsirrett   Co.,    Athol,    Mass. 

Belting,    Transmission,    Elevator   and   Conveyor 

Dunlop  Tire  &   Rubber  Goods  Co.,  Ltd.,  Toronto 
Manitoba  Steel  ft  Iron  Co.,  Ltd.,  Winnipeg,  Man 
Belting.   Rubber 
Can.    Consolidated   Rubber  Co.,   Montreal,   Que. 
Dunlop  Tire  &  Rubber  Goods  Co.,  Ltd.,   Toronto 
Gutta    Peroha   &    Rubber  Ltd.,   Toronto. 
Plewes    Ltd.,    Winnipeg.    Man. 

Belting,   Cotton 

Dominion   Belting   Co.,   Hamilton,    Ont. 
Plewes    Ltd.,    Winnipeg,    Man. 

Billet,  Blooms  and  Slabs 

Steel  Oo.  of  Canada,    Ltd..   The,   Hamilton.    Ont 
Blacksmiths'   Supplies 

D.    Ackland    &    Son,    Winnipeg. 
Blankets,  Saddle 

BurlinKton    Windsor    Blanket    Co.,    Ltd..    Toronto 
i  Gait    Robe    Co.,    Gait,    Ont. 
Blankets,  Horse 

J.   J.  Turner  &  Co.,    Peterboro,   Ont 
Boilers 

The   Oumey    Foundry    Co.,    Ltd.,    Toronto 
Boats 

Peterboro    Canoe   Co.,    Ltd.,    Peterboro,    Ont. 
Bolts  and   Nuts 

Canadian    Tube    &    Iron    Co.,    Ltd.,    Montreal. 

Caverhill,    Learmont   ft    Co.,    Montreal. 

Lewi?    Bros.,    Ltd..    Montreal. 

Northern    Bolt,    Screw  ft   Wire  Co.,   Owen   Sound 

London    Bolt    &    Hinge    Works,    London,    Ont. 

The  Steel  Co.    of  Canada,   Ltd.,   Hamilton.   Ont 

The    Stanley    Works.    New    Britain,    Conn. 

Manitoba  Steel  ft  Iron  Co.,  Ltd.,  Winnipeg,   Man 

Wilkinson    &    Kompass,    Hamilton. 

Baits,   Cant  Hook  and   Peavy 

Steel   Co.   of  Canada,    Ltd..  The,   Hamilton.   Ont 

Bolts,  Eye 

Manitoba  Steel  ft  Iron  Co..  Ltd.,  Winnipeg,  Man 

The  Steel  Co.