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HaNSU’S 


Journey 


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• ••*«• • •• 

• ••*«•••• * * - 
•• • o« • * 


A Korean'Story - - - 


By 

N. H. OS1A 


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Hansu’s Journey 


A Korean Story 


By 

N. H. OSIA 

h 



Copyrighted By 
PHILIP JAISOHN & CO. 
1537 Chestnut Street 
Philadelphia 


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HANSU’S JOURNEY 


BY N. H. OSIA 

% #* 


chapter' r. 




This is the true story of Hansir Pwk/ only :«6h 
of Gilmin Park, a well-to-do farmer 1 df J\ickpo*,*a 
province of northwestern Korea. Sitting by the 
south window, newly covered with transparent 
paper, he was poring over a large volume of 
Confucian classics on moral philosophy. He had 
just celebrated his eighteenth birthday and in a 
few months would have to go to Seoul, the Mecca 
of all Korean literati, to pass an examination for 
entrance to the government high school. His father 
was an ambitious man and desired his son to be¬ 
come a scholar rather than follow the toilsome 
work of the farm. With that in view Gilmin saved 
and scraped together his meagre earnings and de¬ 
voted them entirely to the education of his only 
son, for whose natural intellect he secretly enter¬ 
tained a profound admiration. 

Hansu was the best looking boy in the village. 
At least that was the private opinion of his 
parents. He was nearly a head taller than most 
of his boy friends and the high forehead and 
clean-cut oval face denoted intellectuality. The 
most noticeable features of his physiognomy were 
his liquid brown eyes, larger and deeper set them 
those of the average Korean. They gave him an 
expression of kindness and sympathy, but when¬ 
ever he was stirred by emotion or interest his eyes 
shone with a glow akin to warm light. His blue 
black hair was closely cropped and his habiliment 
was a mixture of European and Oriental fashions. 
The blue cotton shirt beneath the black sack coat 
of ancient vintage indicated the invasion of the 

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Western mode of dress into that far-off Korean 
village, and his baggy trousers and white Korean 
stockings covering the lower half of his body 
clearly reminded one that he was still a son of 
the ancient regime. 

The*.creakj6f the door leading to the hall caused 
Hahsu to turn his* Head and he saw his toil-worn 
-father just’ tettirniiig.fr om the fields. He immedi- 
“ ateiy arose from His’Seat and bowed to his father, 
having been trained from childhood in the rigid 
ethics of filial piety. 

“Father, I hope you are not tired after such 
arduous work all the morning,’* Hansu remarked. 

“Yes, my son, 1 am fatigued and the cold damp 
air seems to have aggravated my rheumatic pains 
in the shoulders,” Gilman answered with a sigh. 

“Father, 1 desire you to stay home this after¬ 
noon and nurse your rheumatism. I will go to 
the field and finish the work you were obliged to 
leave undone,” the boy replied. 

“No, my son. It is my wish that you devote 
your entire time to your studies from now until 
your departure for Seoul. I will be better satis¬ 
fied with the thought that you are making proper 
preparation for the coming examinations than if 
you waste valuable time doing farm work. 1 have 
promised you, your mother and myself that I am 
going to give you every opportunity to pursue 
your studies and I am going to keep that promise. 
Even the pain in my shoulders cannot make me 
break it.” 

“I have already read through fifty pages of this 
book during this morning and finished the review 
of arithmetic last evening. It will not hamper my 
plans even if I do spend the afternoon in the 
field,” the boy answered. 

*'Farming is my work and studying is yours. I 
will not let you do my work at the sacrifice of 
your own. I command you to carry out your 
plan and 1 will mine.” 

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With this last stern admonition the old manure- 
treated to his own room on the other side of 
the house. 

Hansu sat there with a mingled sense of regret 
and gratitude for his father's obstinacy and un¬ 
selfishness. Finally he said to himself: "1 must 
carry out my part of the bargain, as that will, in 
a measure, compensate my father's sacrifices. 
When 1 become rich and famous 1 will make his 
and mother’s life more happy.” 

The time for the trip to Seoul soon arrived and 
Hansu packed his scanty belongings. After an 
affectionate adieu to his parents he walked to the 
railroad station, nearly fifteen miles away. He 
was sorry to leave the home where he had lived 
all his life, and his affection for his parents was 
imbedded deeply in his heart. His eyes became 
moist at the vision of the two bent figures stand¬ 
ing by the rough pine gate, waving their work- 
hardened hands to him until he turned the bend 
in the road. He reused his eyes to heaven and 
murmured a prayer to some unknown deity that 
he would be successful in his quest for fame and 
fortune for the sake of his parents. 

When he arrived at the station he was hot and 
dusty and his feet were sore from tramping over 
the rough country roads. He entered and pur¬ 
chased a ticket as far as Penyan, the capital 
of the province, where he intended to visit a 
few boy friends who were studying in one of 
the Christian schools managed by American mis¬ 
sionaries. The Japanese employee in the station 
spoke crossly to him in a tongue he did not un¬ 
derstand. He answered that he did not know the 
Japanese language. Thereupon the Japanese 
struck him in the face and spoke rudely in a most 
aggressive manner. Hansu had heard that the 
Japanese were an outlandish people and that they 
were fond of fighting the Koreans, but he never 
thought they would strike a person for not under- 

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standing their language. There was no other 
reason he could assign for this unexpected and 
uncalled-for outrage. 

For a moment he forgot all the warnings his 
parents gave him before leaving home not to have 
anything to do with the Japanese and, above all, 
never to quarrel with them. He quickly and al¬ 
most automatically struck back, hitting the Jap¬ 
anese full in the face. The force of the blow 
knocked the Jap down, whereupon Hansu, indig¬ 
nant at the treatment he had received, kicked the 
astonished and prostrate alien in a manner un¬ 
mistakable. A swarm of Japanese police immedi¬ 
ately attacked him, and the last thing he could 
recall afterward was that one small black-mus- 
tached Japanese hit his head with a sword while 
he was lying on the platform semi-conscious. 

About two days later, when he recovered his 
senses, he found himself lying on the floor of a 
small, dingy cell of the local police station. His 
clothes were soaked in blood. He slowly picked 
himself up and tried to open the door, but it was 
locked. He attempted to scream, but had no 
strength to make a sound. Desperately he knocked 
repeatedly at the door. Finally the Japanese 
keeper appeared and opened it. With much dif¬ 
ficulty Hansu made known his urgent desire for 
water, which the keeper grudgingly brought him, 
together with some coarse food. 

The next day he was taken before the Japanese 
judge for trial. Hie proceedings are worthy of 
mention because they are a judicial joke. With¬ 
out a question, without a plea, the judge handed 
down the decision in the following words: 

“The accused is a Korean, therefore he should 
understand the language of the Imperial Japanese 
Empire. He does not, or at least appears not to 
understand. The evidence of this was adduced 
by the fact that when the railroad employees 


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asked him a question he failed to reply in the 
proper language and form. This proves that he 
did not understand the language which he ought 
to know. if f however, he did understand, but 
pretended that he did not, then he is guilty of de¬ 
ception. Further, he audaciously struck the rail¬ 
road employee and caused bodily injury to a 
servant of the State. That means an offense to 
the Imperial Government, and there is ample pro¬ 
vision in the criminal code for such a crime; there¬ 
fore it is incumbent upon me to pronounce 
sentence upon the accused, Hansu Park, accord¬ 
ing to the law. He is hereby sentenced to ninety 
blows by flogging and one month's imprisonment 
with hard labor.” 

On the first day Hansu was administered thirty 
blows with a bamboo cudgel, six feet in length 
and about five inches in width, tightly wrapped 
around with a hempen cord. The Japanese exe¬ 
cutioner could deliver only ten blows at a time, 
for his driving power was nearly exhausted when 
the tenth blow was struck on the bare flesh of the 
victim's back. Another executioner then relieved 
him and administered ten more, while the remain¬ 
ing ten were delivered by a third man. After the 
first ten blows the skin broke; then the sharp 
edges of the cudgel cut into the flesh, and fin¬ 
ally bits of muscle and skin flew about the scene 
of torture. He could not move, for his hands 
and legs were securely tied to a heavy plank, 
upon which he lay motionless and apparently 
unconscious. He was dragged into a filthy nar¬ 
row cell, which had no windows and no ade¬ 
quate means of ventilation. The keeper sprinkled 
some cold water on his face, which in a few 
moments revived him. He could not lie any 
other way than on his stomach and the pain and 
nausea which followed the flogging were more 
than he could endure. He groaned and mumbled 
supplications that his agony be ended. 

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CHAPTER II. 

i 

The horrors of the night in that cell were an 
experience which Hansu will never forget. The 
restorative power of nature was even greater than 
the destruction wrought upon him by fiendish 
hands. Towards dawn he slept some and felt a 
trifle better. The streaks of gray light penetrat¬ 
ing into the cell through the iron bars awakened 
him from his stupor-like Blumber. He tried to j 
turn on his back, but could not, for the touch of 
the bare floor against the lacerated flesh caused 
him excruciating pain, and he had to remain lying 
on his stomach, with his face buried in his hands. 

Then, while the moments seemed most hope¬ 
less, he heard some one singing in the cell across 
the passageway. He raised his head and listened 
to the words sung in a clear baritone: 

“What a friend we have in Jesus, 

All our sins and griefs to bear. 

What a privilege to carry 
Everything to God in prayer. 

Oh, what peace we often forfeit, 

Oh, what needless pain we bear, 

All because we do not carry 
Everything to God in prayer.’* 

Hansu*s eyes grew misty; tenderness and sad¬ 
ness gripped his heart. A few minutes before 
hatred for the railroad employee, the judge and 
the keeper of the jail was surging through His 
brain, but now he was experiencing an entirely 
different sensation. He did not know the reason 
for this sudden change in himself, but vaguely 
attributed it to the singing across the way. He 
had heard of the religion of Jesus and he knew 

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some friends who had joined this sect, but had 
never had the opportunity to inquire about it. In 
some unaccountable manner he had been soothed 
and comforted by the voice, and wondered for a 
while whether he, too, could have a friend in 
Jesus. 

The singing had ceased, but he now heard the 
same voice talking. He could not catch all that 
was said, but by turning his head toward the door 
could distinguish some of the words: 

“Oh, God, I am weak and helpless, but my 
heart is strengthened by Thy care and love— 
Have pity upon those ignorant, sinful men— 
Comfort the sick and distressed—their hearts may 
open to Thee.” The words became more indis¬ 
tinct, but he heard heartrending sobs mingled with 
an incoherent murmuring: “In Jesus’ Name, 
Amen.” 

Hansu was very much moved and, without real¬ 
izing, he, too, cried out in loud voice: “Jesus, 
save me, too!” 

It was too early for the keeper to make his ap¬ 
pearance and the passageway was still perfectly 
quiet. Hansu heard the inmate of the cell across 
the way call out: “Who are you and why are you 
there?” 

Hansu was afraid to reply at first, but he knew 
the voice to be that of the singer, and this gave 
him confidence that it would be safe to answer. 

“I am Hansu Park, of Juckpo. I was beaten, 
arrested and flogged because 1 did not understand 
what the Japanese said to me. Who are you, and 
for what offense are you imprisoned?” 

“I am the pastor of the Sunju Presbyterian 
Church. My name is Sangsul Kimm. 1 was ar¬ 
rested two weeks ago because 1 preached in my 
church that Jesus died to free mankind. Do you 
believe in Jesus?” 

“No, I have not been able to learn much about 
Him, although 1 have heard that His religion is 

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being taught in some placet in Korea," answered 
Hantu. 

"1 heard you cry out a few minutes ago, ‘Jesus, 
save me, too/ If you do not believe in Him, why 
did you say that?" asked Kimm. 

"1 do not know why I said it. I heard you 
singing and talking and 1 was deeply stirred. 
When 1 heard you asking something in Jesus' 
Name, 1 also involuntarily asked Him to save roe 
from further agony. It was the impulse of the 
moment, and I hope I did not commit any of* 
fense." 

"No, it was not an offense to ask Him to save 
you; on the contrary, He wants every one to ask 
God for salvation in His Name. However, no 
prayer will be answered unless you have faitH is 
its efficacy and, further, you must believe in Jesus 
Christ as the Son of God and Saviour of man* 
kind." 

"How can 1 believe these things when I have no 
proof?" asked the boy. 

"Proof I The Holy Bible is the proof. Haven't 
you read the Bible?" 

"No, 1 never saw the Bible, much less read it 

Then, said Sangsul Kimm, "1 will see that you 
get a copy of it. It is about the time the Jap* 
anese keeper comes around, so we had better not 
talk so loudly. You can talk to me after twelve 
o'clock at night and before six o'clock in the 
morning." 

About five minutes later the keeper came to 
the cell and pushed some cooked millet balls and 
a can of water through the cell doors. He exam' 
ined the lock to see if it was secure and then 
walked to the other cells along the corridor. 

Hansu was somewhat refreshed after eating the 
coarse, frugal breakfast and drinking the cold 
water, and began to wonder what would happen 
next. He became drowsy again and dozed off. 
He did not know how long he slept, but was awak* 

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ened by a gruff voice ordering him in broken 
Korean to stand up. He slowly and painfully 
rose, for his muscles were stiff and the movement 
of his legs caused intense pain in his back. The 
keeper motioned him to follow him, which he did 
with limping steps. He was brought before the 
Japanese police captain, a bullet'headed indi¬ 
vidual with a receding forehead and protruding 
chin and teeth. His small, beady-black eyes 
peered at Hansu with half mockery and contempt. 

“You have a taste of the mighty power of the 
Imperial Japanese Government," he said in 
broken Korean. "I presume you liked it. We are 
going to give you another taste of it today in the 
way of thirty more blows on your impudent 
body." 

"I am not anxious to taste any more of the 
power of which you speak. Thirty more blows 
will mean death to me," said Hansu. 

"If thirty more blows will bring about your 
death the country will get rid of one more insub¬ 
ordinate and it will save us some trouble for the 
future. But the trouble is that I am not so sure of 
your death. You pesky Koreans seem to live even 
after ninety blows have been administered," was 
the brutal reply. 

"1 am almost dead now. 1 believe one more 
blow will be the end of me." 

"Are you a Christian?" suddenly asked the 
police captain. 

"No, I do not belong to that sect," answered 
Hansu. 

"If 1 let you off will you be good? " asked the 
officer. 

"I have always tried to be good. I can safely 
give the promise that I will try to be good in the 
future." 

"On your promise of good behavior in the 
future 1 will not administer the thirty blows to 
you, which are a part of the original sentence. 

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But you must serve out the rest of the sentence 
of thirty days* imprisonment with hard labor.*' 

Thereupon Hansu was led out by a policeman 
and turned over to the foreman of the road-re¬ 
pairing gang of the prison. He was chained to 
another prisoner and was told to work with pick 
and shovel. His heart rebelled against this cruelty 
and injustice, and the wounds on his back did not 
permit him to exert himself. He told the fore¬ 
man that he did not deserve the punishment, be¬ 
sides he was not used to such work. Hansu could 
not contain himself and he was about to run away, 
but one of the men to whom he was chained 
whispered to him not to do so. If he pretended 
to do the work he would be all right. Hansu felt 
that he had heard the voice of this fellow-pris¬ 
oner somewhere, but could not place it for a 
moment. The man was a perfect stranger to him 
and he was sure he had never seen his face be¬ 
fore. However, there was something about him 
and his voice that impelled Hansu to accept his 
counsel. So he picked up a shovel and moved 
away with the rest of the gang to some distance 
from the Japanese foreman. 

Hansu finally asked the man who he was, and 
by what right the Japanese exerted such arbitrary 
power over the Korean people. 

The man replied, "My name is Sangsul Kimm, 
pastor of the Sunju Presbyterian Church, now 
serving a six months* term of imprisonment for 
the crime of offering a prayer to God to save 
Korea from Japanese domination.’* 

Hansu then recognized the voice as that of the 
man's in the cell opposite his in the prison. He 
was glad to meet him and talk to him face to 
face. He told the pastor that he was the person 
who spoke to him in the morning across the 
passageway in the prison. The sympathetic face 
of the pastor, who was much older than Hansu, 
lighted up and he smiled and said that it was 

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quite providential that they were chained to¬ 
gether. They could now talk in whispers instead 
of in a loud voice over the iron-barred transom in 
the early morning hours. 

Pastor Kimm was a hard worker and diligently 
filled the uneven places in the road with broken 
stones, but ail the time he talked to Hansu in 
gentle whispers and his sympathetic glance fre¬ 
quently swept the face of the young man beside 
him. 

“You see the stars, sun and moon which are 
parts of the universe,“ said Kimm. “This earth 
is only a small unit in the scheme of God’s crea¬ 
tion. His power and His wisdom direct the 
myriads of worlds to revolve in orderly courses 
and His omnipotent sight sees through all things, 
in darkness as well as light. Man is one of His 
creations and made for His certain purpose, which 
our limited intellect cannot comprehend. Many 
things in human beings are akin to those of the 
creatures we call animals in disposition and in 
anatomical construction and its physiological 
functions. But in addition He has endowed man 
with the spiritual instinct which is lacking in ani¬ 
mals. 1 believe it is His intention to have man 
understand Him and work for His Kingdom on 
this earth. He chose the people of Judea, in the 
early dawn of human history, to reveal many of 
His secrets and intentions to mankind, but nine¬ 
teen hundred and eleven years ago He sent H’s 
Son to this world in the form of man, and through 
this Divine Man He revealed His love and mercy 
for sinful man. The Jewish people named this 
Divine Man Jesus and His advent was in accord¬ 
ance with God’s promise given in the Old Testa¬ 
ment. But the Jews disbelieved that Jesus was the 
Messiah of the Old Testament and persecuted 
Him for preaching the Gospel of the New Testa¬ 
ment, and finally crucified Him. This crucifixion 
thus fulfilled the revelations of the prophets of the 

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Old Testament that in His infinite love and com¬ 
passion God would sacrifice His own Son to save 
mankind from perdition. 'Whosoever believeth 
this, he shall be saved/ 

"It is my sincere desire that you should study 
this wonderful religion, and when you have faith 
in it, as 1 have, you must tell it to other Koreans 
so that all our people may believe it and be saved. 
Beside their individual salvation, the fate of our 
race depends upon this glorious faith. If our faith 
is strong in our hearts we will live cleaner and 
better lives in this world. We will love our coun¬ 
try more and we will be more willing to make 
sacrifices for the good of our nation. Therefore, 
for your own sake and for the sake of your coun¬ 
try, you should have faith in Jesus Christ and imi¬ 
tate Him in your daily life." 

"I am very much impressed with what you said 
and I want to read the Holy Bible of which you 
spoke this morning," said Hansu, the glow in his 
eyes shining warmly. 


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CHAPTER III. 

As the twilight faded behind the pine-clad hills 
and as the vesper song of the birds became fainter 
and slowly died away, the prison toilers were 
herded together, and the Japanese policemen 
made their daily count by tapping the heads of 
the prisoners with sharp and glistening swords. 
At the end of the count they were marched ti 
the iron gate of the prison yard and turned over 
to the jailkeeper for the night. 

The prisoners were sore in body and sick at 
heart. Slowly they entered their respective cells, 
only to live through another night of torture and 
anguish. Hansu prostrated himself on the stone 
floor to dream of his old thatched-roof home, 
nestling among the pine trees in the valley of 
Juckpo. He saw his mother sitting in the candle¬ 
light and mending the family clothes. His father 
sat opposite her, with a pipe in his hand, but he 
wasn’t smoking. He also noticed his pet dog 
Norangi curled up in the corner of the kitchen 
dozing. He could see his pet goose standing on 
one leg by the old bam door, with its head tucked 
under its wing. Suddenly he was awakened and 
heard Pastor Kimm's gentle voice singing: 

"Softly and tenderly Jesus is calling 
For you and for me. 

See, at the portals He is waiting, and waiting 
For you and for me. 

Come home, come home, ye who are weary, 
come home I 

Earnestly, tenderly, Jesus is calling: 

O Sinner, come home!" 

Hansu wanted to sing also, but the weariness 
of his body was too great for him to rouse him- 

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self, nor was he familiar with the hymn. He only 
mumbled a few incoherent words before dropping 
off to sleep again. 

Hansu's life in prison never varied from day to 
day. The same coarse food was served him, the 
same hard work on the road, the same stony floor 
for a bed. However, he was learning something 
new each day from his comrade on the chain. 
During the long hours of toil. Pastor Kimm told 
him of many things. The Bible, which was secret¬ 
ly slipped to him by Pastor Kimm, was his con¬ 
stant companion and its contents were avidiously 
absorbed whenever the light in the cell and the 
watchful eyes of the foreman permitted. 

One day Hansu told Pastor Kimm that he was 
convinced of the truth of Jesus* doctrine and de¬ 
sired to join the church to show his faith in God. 
Pastor Kimm advised him to enter one of the 
Christian schools in Penyan as soon as he was re¬ 
leased. It would be better for him to learn more 
of the Bible and build up a stronger faith in Jesus 
before joining the church. He would give Hansu 
a note to the American teacher who had charge of 
one of these schools. 

“What are the duties of believers of Christian¬ 
ity?** asked Hansu 

“The duties of followers of Jesus are to imitate 
Him in heart and deed,** answered the pastor. 

“Is it right for a Christian to work and die for 
the cause of his country? ’* pursued the boy. 

“If any one does not work or die for the cause 
of his country he is not a Christian. If one be¬ 
trays his country he will betray his family, his 
friends and his God. God will never have mercy 
upon such a creature.*’ 

“Then is it right for a Christian to fight for a 
good cause?** 

“Some of the greatest Christians of the world 
were the greatest fighters for righteousness. God 
commands peace among men, but He never 

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countenances peace at the sacrifice of His princi¬ 
ples/' said Pastor Kimm. 

"1 have promised my parents and 1 have taken 
a vow to devote my life to the cause of our coun¬ 
try's freedom. 1 know 1 cannot render very val¬ 
uable service to the country unless 1 am mentally 
and physically fit. For that reason 1 was going to 
a school in Seoul, where higher branches of sci¬ 
ence are taught. For this purpose my poor aged 
parents have made many sacrifices for my educa¬ 
tion. Therefore, 1 am duty-bound to obtain the 
knowledge which will fit me for the task. If this 
plan does not conflict with the duties of a Chris¬ 
tian believer 1 will be glad to join the church. 1 
have found so much comfort in all that you have 
told and what 1 have read in the Bible. 1 would 
like to have my parents know of it, as they also 
may find the same solace and hope that 1 have 
found," answered Hansu. 

"Your plan does not conflict with Christian 
duties in the least; on the contrary, it is a Chris¬ 
tian ideal. However, you cannot be of real serv¬ 
ice to your country unless you have spiritual train¬ 
ing as well as intellectual and physical develop¬ 
ment. Therefore, go to the Christian institution 
and prepare yourself for the service you wish to 
render to your nation." With these remarks he 
slipped into Hansu’s hand a paper containing the 
address of Dr. Joseph B. Manley, of the American 
Mission School for Training Boys in Penyan. 

Hansu had been in jail over thirty days, but as 
yet there was no order for his release. He asked 
the jailer one day when he was to be freed. The 
jailer said he did not know, but would find out 
for him if he could keep the five yen which was 
taken from him when he was arrested. To this 
Hansu readily agreed, and inside of ten minutes 
the keeper handed him the paper of release, which 
had evidently been in his hand for several days 

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but was not delivered because of the intention of 
making the bargain just consummated. 

Hansu walked through the gate, once more a 
free man, but on his way he stopped at the place 
where the prisoners were working and bade Pas¬ 
tor Kimm an affectionate farewell. Hansu was 
glad to get away from this detestable scene of his 
thirty days of horror and nightmare, but he was 
sorry to leave his new friend. He briefly ex¬ 
pressed his feelings of gratitude to Pastor Kimm 
and started for the station, but discovered that 
he had no money to purchase a ticket to Penyan, 
2 ts the five yen he had given the jailer was the 
only money he had left. 

He inquired the distance to Penyan and found 
it was some fifty miles from the station. There 
was nothing to do but walk. He stopped at a 
nearby Korean farm house and obtained some 
food from a kindly Korean woman, and then 
spent the night under a roadside tree, with a pro¬ 
jecting rock as an awning over his damp and 
mossy bed. His youth and healthy physical 
fatigue triumphed over all discomforts and the 
chilly night air and he was soon sound asleep. 
He was awakened by the joyous songs of meadow 
larks in duet with the cooing of the mountain 
doves on the tree above his bed. His eyes greeted 
a wonderful landscape bathed in the sunlight. The 
tops of the distant hills were enveloped in rose- 
colored mists, and the rice paddies in the valley 
below appeared to him a vast carpet of green 
velvet, with fringes of rose and gold. Hansu sat 
up and rubbed his eyes, and unconsciously he be¬ 
gan to sing the hymn he had learned from his 
friend. Pastor Kimm: 

“New every morning is the love 
Our wakening and uprising prove 
Through sleep and darkness safely brought. 
Restored to life and power and thought." 

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CHAPTER IV. 

Hansu was in a more hopeful and cheerful 
mood that morning than he had been for some 
days. He walked down to the brook below the 
road and made his early morning toilet as best he 
could before resuming his journey. To his sur¬ 
prise he saw a vehicle coming toward him from 
the opposite direction, which was not drawn by 
either man or beast, but which made rapid prog¬ 
ress, and in a few minutes was in front of him, 
where it stopped. Hansu quickly stepped aside, 
and in doing so caught his foot in a stone and fell 
flat on his face. He was somewhat angry with 
himself for making such an awkward move and 
was very much ashamed to see a foreign lady 
emerge from the horseless carriage and speak to 
him in Korean. 

“I am very sorry my automobile caused you to 
fall; 1 hope you did not hurt yourself," she said 
in a friendly voice. 

"It was not your fault; 1 fell before you even 
reached the spot where I was standing. Will you 
tell me what makes the carriage go so rapidly 
without some one pulling it?" 

"This is called an automobile and it is made in 
my country, America. Its propelling power is de¬ 
rived from the combustion of an agent known as 
gasoline. The machinery is inside of the carriage," 
was the answer. 

"I have heard of the spirit of stone oil. Is it 
the same as gasoline? " 

"Yes, it is extracted from coal oil." 

"May I look at the inside and see the oil 
spirit?" 

"Certainly." 

She unhooked the hood over the engine and 

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explained the working and principle of the mech' 
an ism as she had learned it from the salesman of 
the machine when she received it in America. The 
car had been bought for her by relatives during 
her furlough home the previous year. She knew 
she had to learn everything about it in order to 
take care of it in Korea, where the automobile re¬ 
pairers are rather scarce. She could therefore tell 
him many things the usual owner could not. The 
gasoline tank was opened and the mysterious fluid 
was shown to him. 

Hansu had never met a foreign woman before 
and greatly appreciated her kindness and gener¬ 
osity in showing him all these things. He also 
admired her soft white skin, with its delicate tint¬ 
ing of faint rose, and the soft light wavy hair that 
framed the charming face. Her large hazel eyes, 
with their thick fringe of silky lashes, were full of 
sympathy and understanding. To Hansu she was 
like some goddess who had stepped from her 
chariot for a few moments to enjoy the warm 
morning sunlight. Finally his curiosity overcame 
his timidity and awe, and he asked her who she 
was, what she was doing and where she was going. 

“I am a teacher in the American Mission 
School, and my name is Miss Mira Norman. 1 
have a Bible class in a village not far away, and 
I go there three days every month to teach the 
Bible to the women in that district. I am now on 
my way to that village, and I am to be the guest 
of Mrs. Kang, wife of Pastor llhan Kang, of 
Senchu. My assistant, a young Korean woman by 
the name of Miss Marcella Jurng, has already 
gone ahead to make all the necessary arrange¬ 
ments for the class." 

"Do you know Dr. Manley?" asked Hansu. 

"I know him very well," assured Miss Norman. 

Hansu handed her Pastor Kimm’s letter to Dr. 
Manley and asked her to read it, as it was a letter 
of introduction written in English. Miss Norman 

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read the badly scribbled letter, which was short 
but intelligent. 

“My dear Dr. Manley: 

“The bearer is a boy 1 found in this jail. 1 am 
sure he will work for God and for his people. 
Help him to obtain his mental and spiritual train¬ 
ing if you can. 

“Yours in Christ, 

SANGSUL KIMM “ 

“1 know Sangsul Kimm. He was at one time a 
student in the Boys’ Academy in Senchen. Later 
he graduated from the Penyan Theological Sem¬ 
inary. But, tell me, who are you and why are you 
tramping along the road instead of going by the 
railroad?’* 

Hansu told her his name and explained his rea¬ 
son for walking, hastily adding that he did not 
mind walking as the surrounding country was 
beautiful to the eye and the fresh air was invig¬ 
orating. 

Miss Norman reached for a leather bag in the 
back of the car, and opening it gave him several 
large bars of chocolate to stay his hunger, and 
also gave him some money, as a loan, telling him 
he could pay it back when he had become settled 
in Penyan. 

Hansu was more than grateful and in his heart 
he wondered why the strange foreigner was so 
kind and seemed to understand his needs. He 
did not like to accept the money from her, for to 
his way of thinking it made him cheap in her esti¬ 
mation. But then he remembered she had said it 
was only to be a loan and to be paid back later; 
therefore, it would be all right to accept it. 

Miss Norman seemed to know his thoughts, for 
she said: “Hansu, before our Heavenly Father 
we are all brothers and sisters; therefore, we 
must help one another, even though we are of 
different races and of different nationalities. If 
you believe in my religion I am sure you will also 
feel that it is your duty to be helpful to others. 

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Please do not try to thank me, but go to the rail¬ 
road station on the other side of the valley and 
take the train for Penyan. If you walk rapidly 
you will catch the morning Shinwiju express at 
that station.*' 

Without further ado she got into her car and 
drove away. 

Hansu walked rapidly in the direction she had 
indicated, and when he had climbed the steep 
hill he could see the station below. He hurried 
into it and purchased his ticket, just as the Shin¬ 
wiju express pulled in. In a few minutes he was 
experiencing the joy and thrill of his first ride in 
a railroad coach. The rapidly moving panoramic 
views from the car window of hills, fields, and 
small villages gave him peculiar sensations, and 
he came to the conclusion that the world was a 
wonderful place to live in. 

Before he could make any definite plana of 
what he would do when he reached the city, he 
heard the guards calling that all passengers for 
Penyan should get off. He left the train, and 
very much bewildered followed the crowd passing 
through one of the exits. He inquired the way to 
the American School and was glad to learn that 
it was near the station. 

He reached the school without difficulty, and 
entering the gate he asked for the principal. The 
gateman showed him Dr. Manley’s office. Just 
as he was about to enter the door, a man stepped 
out. He was of massive build, over six feet in 
height. He wore tortoise-shell glasses perched 
on the bridge of an aquiline nose, and his slightly 
bald head glistened in the sun. Hansu was some¬ 
what abashed at the sight of this big man, but 
the kindly smile and clear blue eyes encouraged 
him. Hansu bowed and asked if Dr. Manley was 
in. The big man laughed good-naturedly and 
told Hansu that Dr. Manley was standing right 
in front of him, whereupon Hansu handed him 
the letter from Pastor Kimm. 

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CHAPTER V. 

In two days Hansu was installed in the school 
as a regular student and he was assigned to work 
in the garden three hours a day for his board. 
Hansu accomplished much during his three 
years* sojourn in the school. First, he gave his 
heart to God and confessed Christ as his Saviour. 
Second, he learned English sufficiently so that he 
could read and converse in that tongue. He wrote 
to his parents quite often and had his parents 
come to Pyeng Yang several times to visit him. 
Third, as his education broadened, his usefulness 
became greater and his earning capacity increased 
considerably. 

He met Miss Norman, whose kindness he 
never forgot, and he returned to her the money 
she had loaned him. She asked him what his 
plans were, and he told her he wanted to go 
to America and obtain a higher education before 
he would settle down to some life work. What 
he desired most was to be in a position to be of 
service to his people. Miss Nonnan promised if 
he should make up his mind to go to America 
she would give him some letters of introduction 
to her relatives and friends in America. He 
thanked her and went back to his quarters, where 
he prayed long and earnestly to God to direct 
him. 

One day Dr. Manley asked him to go to Seoul 
with him as he needed his assistance in that city 
in connection with the school work. For the first 
time in his life Hansu visited the ancient capital 
of his country. He saw many new sights and 
many strange people, but his heart was sad and 
at times his spirit revolted to see the contemptible 
Wainom, or Japanese pigmies, lording it over 
everything everywhere. The sacred palaces and 

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ancient government buildings were occupied by 
these despised people, and their spies followed 
him daily, while their policemen commanded him 
to do this and that, all of which seemed unneces¬ 
sary to him. If he asked them any questions 
they generally replied with slaps in the face or 
kicks on the abdomen. In short, he instinctively 
perceived that there was nothing in common be¬ 
tween himself and the Japanese, and he seriously 
doubted that the Japanese were of the human 
race. Before he was in Seoul two days his hatred 
toward the Japanese was more intense than he 
thought himself capable of entertaining toward 
any one. Besides, the lordly airs and attempted 
superiority of the hateful little foreigners galled 
him beyond his self-control. 

Walking up the path one day, leading to the 
top of Namsan (South Mountain), he met a Jap¬ 
anese coolie among the pines. He quickened his 
steps with a view to avoiding the coolie in that 
lonely spot, but the coolie called to him and asked 
him to come over to him. Hansu did not answer 
and walked on. The Jap then ran after him. 

“What do you want?” asked Hansu. 

“1 have a heavy load to carry up to the tea 
house on the top of the hill,*’ replied the coolie, 
“but I cut my foot on a jagged stone and it is 
very sore. If you would be so kind as to help me 
carry this bundle, I will give you half the money 
I receive from the proprietor of the tea house.” 

“No,** answered Hansu with contempt, “I do 
not want to have anything to do with a wainom.” 

Hansu felt pretty safe in saying that as he saw 
no other Japanese around. The coolie clenched 
his fist and lurched forward to strike Hansu in 
the face, but Hansu’s pent up resentment got the 
better of him, and he quickly stepped to one side. 
As the fist of the coolie came in contact with the 
empty air Hansu grabbed him around the neck 
and threw him to the ground. With his foot on the 
coolie’s back to hold him down, he took some 

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stems of a thick tough vine beside him and 
trussed him up like a fowl ready for the oven. 
He tore a piece of cloth from the Jap's coat and 
stuffed it into his mouth, and then eyed his work 
with a feeling of satisfaction and started back to 
the city. On the way he passed severed Japanese 
policemen, but they made no attempt to hinder 
him. When he reached his room he breathed 
freely once more, and immediately knelt down 
and asked God's forgiveness for his unchristian- 
like action. "Oh, Father," he earnestly prayed, 
"1 could not help it Oh, Father, I could not 
help it!" 

In the evening he went to Dr. Manley’s hotel 
for his usual chat with the good man. 

As soon as Hansu entered Dr. Manley said: 
"My boy, war has been declared in Europe, be¬ 
tween Germany and the other European nations, 
including Russia." 

"What has caused this war, doctor?" asked 
Hansu. 

Dr. Manley explained to him in detail all the 
fundamental and immediate causes of this great 
conflict, and told him the story of German mili¬ 
taristic ambition of world domination through 
brute force. 

"Germany is like Japan then, isn't she?" asked 
Hansu when Dr. Manley had finished. 

"Well," replied Dr. Manley smiling, "you 
should say Japan is more like Germany in her 
aim, because the Japanese militarists have learned 
their aggressive tactics from Germany." 

"I want to fight militarism wherever it exists, 
for its ascendency means perpetual bondage for 
all weak and small nations," said Hansu, his eyes 
flashing. 

"Germany has not done anything wrong to 
Korea, besides Japan will not let you get into 
the fight. I would advise you to enter the 
Hospital College in Seoul and study medicine," 

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answered Dr. Manley in his gentle voice, for he 
saw the boy was nervous and his eyes burned 
with unusual brilliancy. 

‘*1 am restless, besides I ought to do something 
to help crush this militarism that is rearing its 
ugly head all over the world, even if it is Ger¬ 
many in this case. If militarism is done away 
with in Europe, it may fall in Asia too,** he re¬ 
plied, ignoring the doctor's advice. 

"You do not appear well tonight. I have 
never seen you act so. You had better go to 
bed and get a good night's rest," patiently an¬ 
swered the doctor. 

Hansu returned to his room but not to sleep or 
rest, He wrote a brief note of farewell to his 
kind friend and teacher. Dr. Manley, and then 
packing his meagre belongings in a small reed 
satchel he started for the northwest. After four 
days of travel he reached the port of Wonsan. 
Here he met Koreans who had connections with 
the Koreans in Vladivostok, and through them 
he obtained the necessary information as to how 
to enter Siberia. After much difficulty and pri¬ 
vation he finally boarded a coast steamer that 
sailed to Vladivostok. 

Three days of stormy travel brought him into 
the harbor of the Siberian city, and here he found 
large numbers of Koreans, as well as others in 
the surrounding towns. To his delight he found 
the Russian government w as recruiting young men 
of all races in Siberia to serve in the army. They 
had already organized a division largely com¬ 
posed of the Korean residents of Siberia, so he 
immediately enlisted in this army and went into 
a training camp, where he was taught the various 
duties of a soldier under Russian and Korean 
officers. He was assigned to a machine-gun 
squad and soon mastered the handling of this 
modem weapon. The work was irksome and the 
climate more rigorous them he had been accus- 

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tomed to, but the anticipation of taking part in 
great battles gave him the courage to bear minor 
difficulties and annoyances. 

In the spring of 1915 his division was ordered 
to entrain for duty in Europe. The six weeks of 
travel over the Trans-Siberian Railroad was an 
experience which he never forgot. The frequent 
breaking down of the engines, the lack of a suf¬ 
ficient number of cars, and all sorts of trouble, 
delayed his journey. Quite often he slept in a 
box car with horses and other animals for room¬ 
mates. The food was almost uneatable, and at 
times even water was scarce. However, the day 
came when Hansu was filled with great joy, for 
the huge train with its human cargo rolled into 
the city of Moscow. The wonderful buildings 
and broad smooth avenues made a deep impres¬ 
sion upon him, and the sight of the endless num¬ 
bers of soldiers that daily tramped the streets 
added new fuel to the fires of his adventurous 
spirit. 

But watching marching soldiers and admiring 
beautiful buildings and avenues soon grew tire¬ 
some, and he began to rebel at the delay. He 
yearned for the sound of the great guns and the 
rank odor of burned powder. He wanted to be 
up and onward. Finally the order came to en¬ 
train for Poland, and Hansu was so happy he 
sang for sheer joy. 


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CHAPTER VI. 

Those two years were one great experience 
and revelation to the boy from the quiet Korean 
village. Many were the hardships he endured 
and often at night his heart cried out for the 
peace of his childhood*s home, but his spirit sti¬ 
fled the cry and the next day found his deter¬ 
mination unshaken. A lifetime of events 
happened during that time, events with which 
the whole world is familiar, their full share fall¬ 
ing to Hansu and baptizing him with fire. 

Through lack of supplies, food and equipment, 
Hansu’s division suffered much during the latter 
part of 1916 and the early part of 1917. In 
the battle of Warsaw and during the Hindenburg 
campaign in the Brest Litovsk region, the casual¬ 
ties in the division were appalling. The rem¬ 
nant of his and several other units were ordered 
to fall back, and gradually but constantly were 
driven to Smolensk, where most of them were 
disbanded. Hansu, together with a few others, 
was ordered to return to Siberia. Without food, 
clothing or money, this little band of Russian 
soldiers of Korean origin started back to Siberia; 
and the world has never even heard of these 
brave men who served the cause of the Allies 
so heroically and with so much sacrifice. 

The collapse of the Russian government, the 
subsequent revolution, the counter-revolution and 
the terrors of the Bolshevist regime which fol¬ 
lowed it gave no recognition of the services ren¬ 
dered by the Korean soldiers who fought under 
the Russian flag. The Koreans were heartsore 
and broken in body and spirit. They lived like 
wild animals most of the time after their return 
to frozen and inhospitable Siberia. 

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It was the latter part of 1918 before Hansu 
finally reached Vladivostock, and he was in 
hopes of returning to Korea to resume his studies 
and see his aged parents once more. He was 
also anxious to see his friend Dr. Manley and 
explain his sudden disappearance. He tried in 
every way to get a boat for Korea but the Jap¬ 
anese prevented him. Some days later when 
hope was almost gone, he succeeded in getting 
work as stoker on a train running from Vladivos¬ 
tok to Harbin, Manchuria. Hansu* 8 service in 
the Russian army had given him a knowledge of 
the Russian language, and his somewhat battered 
and tom Russian uniform gave him easy access 
to the Russian institutions. When he reached 
Harbin he applied for the same kind of work on 
the train running from Harbin to Mukden. 
Through his Russian friends he succeeded in 
getting the transfer, and the next day was on his 
way to Mukden. 

At Mukden he exchanged his old uniform for 
the costume of a Chinaman. He then went to 
the office of the Chinese Governor and asked 
for a passport to Korea. The Chinese clerks 
thought he was from Southern China because he 
did not speak the local colloquialisms, and issued 
him a passport duly signed and sealed. Armed 
with this document he boarded a train for Pen- 
yan. He encountered another difficulty when he 
tried to exchange Russian rubles for Japanese 
yen, but some Russian shopkeepers in Mukden 
helped him in the transaction. When the train 
had traversed the long steel bridge over the blue 
waters of the Yalu River, and reached the Ko¬ 
rean side of the bank, Hansu wanted to get down 
on his knees and in thankfulness that once more 
he was back in his native land, after five adven¬ 
turous years in foreign countries. 

As soon as he reached Penyan he went to the 
Boys’ Academy and asked for Dr. Manley. To 

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hit intense regret he found that Dr. Manley had 
gone to America on furlough, but found some 
other American friends who were very glad to 
see him. He then went to the pastor of the 
Korean Church, Mr. Gill, who received him with 
open arms and asked him numerous questions 
concerning his experiences in Siberia and 
Europe. 

Mr. Gill gave him a new suit of clothes and 
a respectable looking cap, which Hansu grate¬ 
fully accepted. He expressed his wish to visit 
his parents, but Mr. Gill persuaded him to wait 
for a few days, as he wanted him to accompany 
him to Seoul on very urgent business. He would 
leave for Seoul the next day and would be grate¬ 
ful if Hansu would go with him. 

“When will you return?*' asked Hansu, not 
wishing to refuse the pastor's request, still un- 
desirous to wait too long before seeing his 
parents. 

“I do not know just when I will return," re¬ 
plied Mr. Gill, “but you can return at once if 
you wish.’’ 

“Very well, I will be glad to accompany you," 
said Hansu, greatly relieved. 

Early next morning Mr. Gill met Hansu at 
the station and they boarded the train for Seoul. 
During the trip, Mr. Gill said very little but 
seemed to be praying silently all the time. 
Hansu was also in a prayerful mood, not know¬ 
ing exactly why. Half an hour before reaching 
Seoul, Mr. Gill handed him a piece of paper 
closely written in a fine hand, and told him to 
read it but not to show it to the other passengers. 
Hansu read it and to his great joy and conster¬ 
nation discovered it to be the Declaration of 
Independence from Japan’s yoke. However, he 
was at a loss to understand who wrote it and 
what it all meant. Mr. Gill seemed to know the 
question he had in mind, but dared not answer. 

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“It will be signed by thirty-four representa¬ 
tives of the people of the thirteen provinces and 
will be formally declared simultaneously in 300 
different districts this afternoon at two o'clock. 
All has been arranged and today, March 1st, is 
THE DAY," hurriedly whispered Mr. Gill, his 
eyes keeping constant watch for any possible lis¬ 
tener. 

“What will the enemy do? “ asked Hansu. 

“We do not know and we do not care," 
bravely replied the pastor. 

“What can I do?" eagerly asked Hansu. 

“In case 1 should meet with death, I want you 
to carry the news to the people of our province 
that one life was all 1 had to give for my country 
and I gave it cheerfully,** replied Mr. Gill, and 
as he said these words his face was filled with an 
almost heavenly radiance. 

“I want to die with you if my life will help 
the cause,** exclaimed Hansu, the spirit of the 
soldier asserting itself. 

“No. We must not all die at one time. You 
can give your life later if necessary, but just now 
we must have the younger generation to step into 
the gap we older ones make," calmly advised the 
pastor. 

Hansu was thrilled at this new development 
for which he had not looked. Already the 
thought was forming in his mind that now he 
could avenge the insults and injuries he had re¬ 
ceived at the hands of the Japanese. Then he 
saw Mr. Gill pointing to a sentence at the bottom 
of the document, which said: “Commit No Vio¬ 
lence.*’ 

“We must obey this order,” said Gill in a 
firm voice. 

Hansu’s enthusiasm was somewhat dampened 
but he said nothing. Suddenly the train stopped. 
Hansu glanced out of the window and saw that 
nothing unusual was happening, so settled him- 

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self to wait for the train to resume its journey. 

Presently he turned to Mr. Gill, and asked, 
“No weapons?’* 

“None, if we had them we wouldn't use them.” 

“Why?” persisted Hansu. 

“Our people, that is the Christian element of 
Korea, do not sanction any kind of violence and 
it was so adopted by all parties. Therefore, it 
is incumbent upon us to follow that plan, no 
matter whether we like it or not.” 

Again Hansu lapsed into silence, and gazed 
with unseeing eyes out of the window. 




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CHAPTER VII. 

When the train finally arrived at the South 
Gate Station it was two hours behind its sched¬ 
ule. The minister and Hansu walked rapidly to 
a certain restaurant in the center of the city. 

Gill said a few words to the Deoole in the 
restaurant and then turning to Hansu said, ‘*1 
was to meet certain representatives of the people 
here to sign the Declaration of Independence with 
them, but owing to the delay of the train the 
others have signed and have informed the police 
of their act. The police have arrested them and 
taken them to police headquarters. I must join 
them and share their fate, whatever it may be. 
1 request you to return home as soon as you can 
and tell the people the news.** 

With these words Mr. Gill walked out, leaving 
Hansu somewhat dazed at the turn of events. 

The pastor walked to police headquarters and 
quietly gave himself up. 

“What do you want to be arrested for?" 
sneered the police captain. 

Standing very straight, with shoulders thrown 
back, and head held high. Pastor Gill answered 
him in a calm clear voice: “1 am one of the 
thirty-four men who were to sign the Declaration 
of Independence, but owing to the train being 
late, I could not get here in time. However, if 
it is a crime to sign such a document, then I am 
equally as guilty as those men that have already 
been arrested, for it was my intention to sign 
with them.** 

The police were somewhat surprised that a 
man should surrender himself to them when they 
did not even suspect that he was one of the 
guilty parties. 

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The captain said to him, “Are you a Chris¬ 
tian? ## 

“I am Rev. Gill, pastor of the First Presby¬ 
terian Church in Penyan.*' 

“In that case you are undeT arrest, for it is 
our intention to arrest all Christians, and let them 
feel the power of the Imperial Japanese Govern¬ 
ment/* he said in a hard voice, and his little 
black eyes glittered in anticipation of the cruel 
torments that would be meted out to the Chris¬ 
tians. 

Mr. Gill was then stripped of his clothes, 
forced to don the prison garb and thrust into a 
cell in the West Gate prison. 

Hansu wandered aimlessly along to Chongo 
(Bell Street) and found the main thoroughfare 
thronged with people, on whose faces was a look 
of suppressed excitement. He stopped one of 
the men and inquired the reason for all this 
crowd. 

“Go to Pagoda Park and find out/* answered 
the man hurrying on his way. 

Hansu immediately turned his steps toward 
the park to find thousands of people already 
there, and more coming from all directions. 

He entered the gate of Pagoda Park and went 
over to where a man stood addressing the multi¬ 
tude from an improvised platform. At first he 
was too far away from the speaker to hear 
what he was saying but finally managed to force 
his way through the throng and reached a place 
where he could hear and see. The speaker was 
a man nearly six feet tall, with the clean-shaven, 
rugged face of the North Korean type. His voice 
was deep and resonant, and his manner betrayed 
the intense feeling that surged through his whole 
body. In part Hansu heard him say: “Liberty 
is the most precious blessing to a human being, 
therefore, every self-respecting and God-fearing 
person must strive for it. Like all good things, 

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we must work for it and die for it if necessary. 
Your death will close your earthly career, but if 
through your death your children and your race 
can be freed from an alien yoke you should not 
hesitate for a moment to court that death. The 
cause is worth more than the sacrifice. Jesus 
of Nazareth gave his life to save the souls of 
men, so must we give our lives to save our nation. 
No man deserves to be free unless he is ready to 
defend his freedom even at the cost of his life. 
For four thousand years our forefathers defended 
their liberty at enormous sacrifice and through 
their deeds we were able to maintain our national 
life, until the year nineteen hundred and ten. 

“It is true that for the last two generations our 
rulers and our people lost some of their vigor 
and patriotism and made our country corrupt and 
weak. But we must remember that disgraceful 
periods in national history have happened in 
many other countries. We maintain, however, 
that no matter how much our recent rulers have 
erred, or how much our people have neglected 
in protecting our rights, they do not deserve the 
ignominious status to which they have been re¬ 
duced. Japan did not conquer us in the field of 
battle; she has only occupied our territory with 
her military forces by virtue of the so-called 
Treaty of Alliance, in which she solemnly pledged 
her word of honor that she would guarantee our 
independence and territorial integrity. Her troops 
and her warships were allowed to enter our terri¬ 
tory as our guests and our allies. After having 
thus entered our premises the guest and ally 
turned on U9 and assumed the role of dictator 
and, later, master. Japan has thus become an 
usurper of our country and a violator of the 
treaty which she signed. It is not the time, how¬ 
ever, for us to find fault with Japan or with our¬ 
selves, but we must strive to right the wrongs 
that have already been done and return to the 

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family of nations of the world as a free people. 
It is not only our just right but a sacred duty that 
we owe to our forefathers, ourselves and our 
children's children. With this object in view our 
people have authorized their chosen leaders to 
declare our independence from Japan from this 
hour as a step in restoring our nation's proper 
status in the world. 1 will read the declaration: 

THE DECLARATION OF KOREAN INDEPENDENCE 

** ‘We, the representatives of 20,000,000 united people 
of Korea, hereby proclaim the independence of Korea 
and the liberty of the Korean people. This proclama¬ 
tion stands in witness of the equality of all nations, and 
we pass it on to our posterity as our inalienable right. 

With 4000 years of history behind us, we take this 
step to insure to our children forever life, liberty and 
pursuit of happiness in accord with the awakening con¬ 
sciousness of this new era. This is the clear leading of 
God and the right of every nation. Our desire for liberty 
cannot be crushed or destroyed. 

After an independent civilization of several thousand 
years we have experienced the agony for fourteen years 
of foreign oppression, which has denied to us freedom of 
thought and made it impossible for us to share in the 
intelligent advance of the age in which we live. 

To assure us and our children freedom from future 
oppression, and to be able to give full scope to our na¬ 
tional aspirations, as well as to secure blessing and hap¬ 
piness for all time, we regard as the first imperative the 
regaining of our national independence. 

We entertain no spirit of vengeance toward Japan, but 
our urgent need today is to redeem and rebuild our 
xuined nation, and not to discuss who has caused Korea's 
downfall. 

Our part is to influence the Japanese Government, 
which is now dominated by the old idea of brute force, 
so that it will change and act in accordance with the 
principles of justice and truth. 

The result of the enfored annexation of Korea by 
Japan is that every possible discrimination in education, 
commerce and other spheres of life has been practiced 
against us most cruelly. Unless remedied, the continued 
wrong will but intensify the resentment of the 20,000,- 
000 Korean people and make the Far East a constant 
menace to the peace of the world. 

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We are conscious that Korea's independence will mean 
not only well being and happiness for our race, but also 
happiness and integrity for the 400,000,000 people of 
China and make Japan the leader of the Orient instead 
of the oppressor she is at the present time. 

A new era awakes before our eyes, for the old world 
of force has gone and out of the travail of the past a 
new world of righteousness and truth has been born. 

We desire a full measure of satisfaction in liberty and 
the pursuit of happiness. In this hope we go forward. 

We pledge the following: 

1. This work of ours is in behalf of truth, justice and 
life and is undertaken at the request of our people to 
make known their desire for liberty. Let there be no 
violence. 

2. Let those who follow us show every hour with 
gladness this same spirit. 

3. Let all things be done with singleness of purpose, 
so that our behavior to the end may be honorable and 
upright. 

The 4252d year of the Kingdom of Korea, 3d month, 
1st day. 

Signed by thirty-three representatives of the people.' " 

As soon as the document was finished the 
enthusiasm and joy of the assembly knew no 
bounds. Like magic thousands of Korean flags 
were held aloft and thousands of throats shouted 
in unison, “Manseil Manseil Manseil" 


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CHAPTER VIII. 

Hansu was one of the few in that vast crowd 
who did not have previous information as to what 
was happening that day, but the whole scene 
thrilled him through and through. With tears 
of joy rolling down his cheeks he, too, shouted 
"Mansei!” through trembling lips, and threw his 
cap high in the air. The crowd was now march¬ 
ing out of the park, with almost everyone wav¬ 
ing a Korean flag, some singing their national 
anthem, which for ten years they had been for¬ 
bidden to sing in public. Others kept up their 
national cheer. The whole crowd seemed to have 
been transformed into new beings. They were 
not at all like the silent Koreans, with down¬ 
cast faces, hesitant steps and furtive glances. 
They laughed, talked and shouted. Their steps 
were quick and their faces shone with the new 
joy of becoming once more free Koreans. As 
they reached the street the crowd formed into 
lines of four abreast and marched toward Lega¬ 
tion Street, where already there were thousands 
in line, the crowd increasing as they marched 
along. The majority of the gathering were men, 
but a few women and children were interspersed 
through it. A wonderful sight it was to Hansu 
to see Korean flags fluttering everywhere. They 
were strung along the telegraph and telephone 
lines overhead as though some magic hand had 
placed them there. The roofs of the buildings 
along the street were covered with people, and 
mighty shouts of “Mansei!” rose in every direc¬ 
tion. 

The Japanese policemen and gendarmes 
seemed to be paralyzed or stunned at the sud¬ 
den change in the demeanor of the people whom 
they thought were made of putty without a soul. 

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The Japanese guardians of law and ordeT stood 
motionless with open mouths and for about three 
hours they offered no interference with the joy¬ 
ous marchers. But it was only temporary. The 
Japanese authorities immediately issued orders to 
disperse the crowd and arrest the leaders with 
the order that in doing so no one should be 
spared or no quarter given. To shoot, cut, stab 
and kill were the order of the day. The hordes 
of Japanese soldiers, police and firemen began 
their work of destruction of life and property, 
shooting down everybody and anybody within 
their sight, slashing and stabbing all men, women 
and children who came within their reach. In 
this display of fiendish fury on the part of the 
Japanese soldiers and police a large number of 
Japanese civilians took an active part, armed with 
clubs and daggers, inflicting numerous fatal in¬ 
juries to the unarmed and unresisting victims. 
Within an hour the whole city became a literal 
slaughter-house where thousands of non-resisting 
victims shed their blood. 

Once Hansu came within reach of a long iron 
hook, which the Japanese firemen were using to 
try to catch the Koreans. Fortunavely, he escaped 
without injury, the only damage being the loss of 
the sleeve of his coat, which was tom away by 
the sharp hook. He turned quickly into a side 
street, where he took off his coat and threw it 
away, then walked rapidly toward the West and 
safely reached the street leading to the old Mul¬ 
berry Palace. 

Just as he entered this street a trolley car 
stopped near him, and in it were some twenty 
Korean girls. They were students of one of the 
American Mission Schools and were on their way 
to the park to celebrate the declaration of inde¬ 
pendence. They were all in jubilant spirits and 
carried small Korean flags which they constantly 
waved. A squad of Japanese mounted gendarmes 

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rushed up to the car platform and fired a shot 
and then told the girls to throw their flags away. 
They merely laughed and waved the flags more 
vigorously, while their high young voices shouted, 
"Manseil Mansei! Toknip Manseil*' (Long 
live, long live, independence long live). 

The Japanese soldiers immediately entered, 
closed the car door and tied the girls together 
with heavy cord, like so many bunches of celery. 
There were four girls in a bunch, and each group 
was turned over to a soldier, who tied the end of 
the cord to the saddle of his horse. The resisting 
girls were mercilessly beaten by sabres and gun 
barrels, and in a few minutes the gay and laugh¬ 
ing girls in clean white dresses became a sullen 
and blood-stained crowd. 

From the struggling mass one young woman 
of about twenty-five, and evidently the leader, 
who had not yet been tied, sprang upon the car 
seat and addressed the soldiers in Japanese: 

“Men, don’t you know that you are no longer 
our rulers and oppressors? We are free today I 
We have declared our independence, so you have 
no right to beat us I If you don't believe me, I 
will read to you the declaration of our inde¬ 
pendence. Go back to your own country and 
take care of your own families. We do not 
want you here! 

She held a copy of the declaration of inde¬ 
pendence in her right hand, and a Korean flag 
in her left and began to read the document. The 
Japanese sergeant commanded her to throw 
down the flag, but she simply smiled and 
answered, “No, Sergeant; it is my flag and 1 am 
going to die with it.” 

At this the Japanese struck her wrist viciously 
with his sabre, cutting her hand from her arm. 
The severed hand fell to the floor, still clutching 
the national emblem, which was rapidly turning 
crimson from the warm blood of the girl, Marcella 

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Jumg, assistant to Miss Norman, of the American 
Mission. Marcella fell from the seat, and for a 
few minutes lay unconscious, but presently, open¬ 
ing her eyes, with her right hand she feebly 
reached for the blood-soaked emblem of her 
country. By this time the other girls were re¬ 
moved from the car and were securely fastened 
to saddles and were dragged behind galloping 
horses. The wounded Marcella was pulled 
roughly along by two Japanese and taken to 
the nearby barracks. 

The horrible brutality of the Japs made 
Hansu*s blood boil. He thought several times that 
he would rush into the car and kill the brutes, but 
he had no weapon. The best he could find was 
a loose stone on the street. He picked it up and 
hurled it at the Japanese, but it only broke a 
window of the car. Then he was suddenly 
thrilled and amazed at the heroic demeanor of 
Marcella Jumg. With her drawn white face, 
her big brown eyes shining with a light he thought 
was holy, her tall graceful body swaying gently 
to and fro as her patriotic emotion agitated her 
whole being, she appeared to him an angel, defy¬ 
ing the very imps of hell. When he saw her fall 
from the seat, it was like a swordcut in his own 
breast, but he thrilled anew when he saw her 
feebly reach for the flag with her remaining hand. 
He breathed a prayer of thanks to God that she 
was a Korean. 

When the Japs began to drag her away, Hansu 
determined to follow the captive heroine to her 
destination, wherever it might be, even if it would 
put him in the clutches of the Japanese police. 
He had walked for some distance behind them 
\^ien he was suddenly seized by a Japanese 
policeman who struck him a sickening blow on 
the head with his sword. Upon searching him 
neither a Korean flag nor a copy of the declara¬ 
tion of independence was discovered. He was 

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asked whether he was a member of the Inde* 
pendence League, to which he answered very 
truthfully, "No." After one more kick the police- 
man ordered him from the streets. Sitting on the 
curb and holding his throbbing head between his 
hands, he watched the tall form of Marcella 
dragged along the dusty streets by the short, 
stocky Japanese, and saw them disappear into 
the gendarme station on the opposite side of 
the street 


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CHAPTER IX. 

Hansu slowly rose and walked down the street 
to the barracks. He entered and asked the Japan¬ 
ese guard whether they needed any more men, 
as he was looking for employment. The Jap 
told him they did not employ any Korean who did 
not speak Japanese, but said he could clean the 
yard, as the man who usually did that part of the 
work was out killing the cursed Korean independ¬ 
ents. 

He accepted the proffered employment with¬ 
out even asking the amount of compensation for 
his work, but told the guard that he wanted 
a pass in order to go out for a little while and 
return again without being stopped by the guard 
who would relieve him within the next hour 
Hansu received his pass but with the admonition 
that he must return at once and get to work. 
He was very happy to receive this pass, as now 
he would not be molested by the gendarmes on 
the street, and although he was stopped several 
times by the soldiers and police on his way to 
the American Mission School near the East Gate, 
he was allowed to go on as soon as he showed 
the strip of official pasteboard. 

In his haste he almost ran to the compound of 
the American Mission, where he asked to see 
the principal. To his surprise aitd joy the prin- 
cipal was none other than his old friend, Miss 
Mira Norman, whom he met first on the road to 
Penyan. Without any preliminaries, Hansu asked 
Miss Norman whether any of her students had 
been arrested. 

“Yes,” she told him, “some of my girls have 
been arrested. The police have just informed 
me of the fact. 1 am very much worried about 

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Marcella Jumg, for the police have no record of 
her and do not know where the is.” 

Hansu told her about the young woman whose 
hand had been cut off by the soldiers, and who 
had been taken to the soldiers* barracks on Mul¬ 
berry Street. 

"She was tall and fair," he continued, "and 
acted most heroically under the terrible perse¬ 
cution.'* 

Miss Norman’s eyes filled with tears, and she 
clenched her trembling hands tightly together. 
"That must be my Marcella," she said in a low 
voice, “1 must go to her, and rescue her if 1 can." 

"I would be very glad to escort you to the 
barracks, Miss Norman," said Hansu, "but if the 
Japanese saw me with an American they would 
surely kill me. It will be best for me to return 
to the barracks and wait for you there." 

Hansu hurriedly returned to the gendarmes’ 
station and gained admittance without any diffi¬ 
culty. He busied himself with a broom in the 
yard and later went into the rooms where the 
officers were quartered. In one of these rooms 
he found a dozen or more Japanese officers sit¬ 
ting around, and in a heap in the middle of the 
floor was the wounded and half-conscious 
Marcella. 

Hansu did not understand all the men were 
saying to her because of his limited knowledge of 
the Japanese language, but could catch a word 
here and there, and he knew they were trying to 
make her say the independence movement had 
been instigated by the American missionaries, and 
that it was solely supported by the Korean Chris¬ 
tians. 

"It is a spontaneous movement of the Korean 
people of all creeds and religious beliefs," 
answered Marcella with all her former spirit and 
courage. "It is purely patriotic in its inception 

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and is an outburst of long-suppressed national 
feeling." 

"You are not telling the truth," said one of the 
soldiers, "therefore, you will be tortured." 

They tore off her clothes and touched her bare 
skin with lighted cigars and cigarettes. Still it 
did not bring the confession they wanted. Then 
they inserted the blade of a penknife under the 
finger nails of her hand and pushed it in deeper 
and deeper. Even this agonizing ordeal did not 
wring from her lips a false confession. 

"Confess and we will let you go," laughed 
one of the soldiers. 

But her only answer was, "Kill me if you like, 
but there is no more truth to tell." She said this 
in Korean, then in Japanese and finally in Eng¬ 
lish, and then fell back unconscious on the floor. 

The brutes in uniform of the Imperial Japanese 
Army were unmoved and untouched at the sight 
of this dying girl, whose white garment was 
stained with darkened and coagulated blood, but 
whose soul was beyond the defilement of these 
devils in human flesh. She was motionless for 
several minutes, but presently her eyelids quiv¬ 
ered and slowly opened. Her great eyes held no 
anger or fear as she gazed into the faces above 
her; instead, her look was full of pity and com¬ 
passion for these degenerated men who knew 
not what they were doing. Beasts that they were, 
they seemed to feel some strange influence, and 
involuntarily quailed before her calm, steady gaze 
and for a few minutes were silent. 

Presently one of the senior officers spoke: "She 
is surely a genuine witch. She has no fear, and 
does not seem to feel pain. It would be better 
not to sit in the same room with her, as she may 
use her power of witchery on us. Let us take her 
outside and leave her on the street to die." 

Four men lifted her up and carried her limp 
and pain-racked body outside and left her lying 

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under the shrubbery near the side entrance of 
the barracks. 

Hansu quietly slipped out of the main entrance 
and anxiously waited for Miss Norman to come. 
But Miss Norman and her escort were having great 
difficulty in getting to the barracks. The Jap¬ 
anese policemen stopped her on every street and 
asked her numerous questions as to where she 
was going, what she wanted to do at the barracks, 
who she was and so forth. It took her just four 
hours to reach her destination, yet her home was 
less than a mile away. It was nearly midnight 
when she succeeded in reaching the barracks and 
was just about to enter the gate where a sentry 
was standing when she heard someone whisper in 
English, “Come this way, you will find her here." 

Miss Norman and Dr. Wells cautiously moved 
to the spot whence came the voice. There under 
the rhododendron bushes they found the uncon¬ 
scious form of Marcella, while a few feet away 
stood Hansu, making brave efforts to suppress his 
indignation. Dr. Wells felt her pulse, but it was 
imperceptible. He sent Hansu for some water, 
in which he dissolved a small tablet taken from 
his medicine case. He injected it into her arm 
hypodermically, and then bathed her face with 
cold water. In a few minutes Marcella opened 
her eyes and recognized the anxious faces of her 
dearest American friends. 

“Where am I, Miss Norman?" she asked in a 
quiet voice while a wan little smile came to her 
lips. 

"It is all right, my child. You are now in safe 
hands," answered Miss Norman in a choked 
voice. 

With Dr. Wells* assistance Marcella slowly 
raised herself to a sitting position and carefully 
scrutinized the face of Miss Norman, as if to assure 
herself that it was really she. The faint moon¬ 
light fell full on Miss Norman's face, and Marcella 

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gave a little sigh of relief when she realized that 
she was not dreaming, but was really in the hands 
of her friends. 

She began to feel the pain in her left wrist 
where the hand had been cut away; the stump 
was covered with coagulated blood clots. She 
saw that her clothing was tom and soiled. 

“Oh, Miss Norman,“ she cried, “will 1 be of 
any use to you now that 1 have lost my left hand, 
1 can no longer give the girls piano lessons.** 

*''Marcella, child,** hastily answered Miss Nor¬ 
man, “there are many other ways in which you 
can be useful that do not need the use of your 
left hand. But first of all, we must go back to 
the school and dress the wound.** 

Hie four knelt in the shadow of the rhododen¬ 
dron bushes, and it was Marcella* s weak voice 
that fervently voiced the thought in the hearts of 
those with her. 

Four weary, heavy - hearted people slowly 
wended their way to the Mission School, the two 
men supporting Marcella, who was too feeble to 
walk. In the early hours of the chilly morning 
they finally reached the compound. The proper 
dressing of her wound, the comfort and warmth 
of her little white bed, the strengthening food, the 
clean fresh clothes, aided by her indomitable will, 
had a wonderful effect on poor Marcella. For 
an hour or so she was delirious, but merciful and 
lO-heaKng sleep soon brought her the peace and 
quiet she needed. Seeing her at rest at last the 
others noiselessly left the room, and silently 
prayed that her life would be spared. 

Hansu was at a loss to know how he could go 
back to Penyan and deliver the message entrusted 
to him by Pastor Gill. He was sick in heart and 
body, and the impulse to do some desperate thing 
to end all his misery surged through him time 
and again. But the calmness of Miss Norman 
and the cheerfulness of Dr. Wells under such 

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trying conditions had a restraining effect upon 
him. He felt that no matter what happened to 
him he had to return to Penyan and discharge 
his mission. He told this to Miss Norman, who 
at first advised him to remain at the mission for 
a few days, at least until the terrors were over, 
but finally consented to his going with the under- 
standing that he must get out of Korea just as 
soon as possible. She feared he would surely 
fall into the clutches of the Japanese on account 
of his association with the Americans. 

The following morning Hansu boarded the 
train bound for the province where he was boro 
and raised. 


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CHAPTER X. 

After experiencing many hardships on the road 
through the interference of the inquisitory Jap¬ 
anese spies at every station, Hansu finally arrived 
in his native town. At first his aged parents 
could hardly believe that it was really their son. 
He briefly told them what had happened in 
Seoul, Penyan and other centres and what awfuj 
havoc had been caused by the Japanese soldiers 
and police. 

Fearing that his movements had been watched 
by the Japanese spies Hansu did not remain with 
his parents very long, but hurriedly left the vil¬ 
lage and traveled westward with the intention 
of crossing the Yalu and hiding himself in Man¬ 
churia for a little while. At Sunchen he found 
a great crowd gathered before police headquar¬ 
ters. He inquired the cause and learned that the 
Koreans were making the Japanese police officials 
salute the Korean flag, which was flying over the 
building in place of the Japanese emblem. As 
there were only a few Japanese in that town they 
thought discretion was die better part of valor, 
and obeyed the command of the populace by 
making obeisance before the Korean flag and 
shouting Mansei with the Koreans. 

This seemed to please the crowd immensely, 
any many slapped the Japanese on their backs 
and called them good sports. Hansu enjoyed the 
scene and joined the crowd in cheering and sing¬ 
ing the Korean national anthem. But this harm¬ 
less celebration did not last long. In about an 
hour a company of Japanese gendarmes arrived 
in motor trucks and charged the laughing, singing 
crowd with fixed bayonets. Scores of people were 
cut and slashed, and several women and children 

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were trampled upon by the infuriated soldiers. 
The captain of the gendarmes shouted orders to 
his men to chase the people into the church, which 
was a short distance away. When some forty 
people had been forced into the building he or¬ 
dered several volleys fired into the auditorium, 
massacring the people in their house of worship, 
like so many sheep. 

During the commotion Hansu found a pistol 
that had fallen from the hand of a Japanese sol¬ 
dier, who had tumbled into the creek in his mad 
rush to the church. Hansu hid himself behind 
an old tree on the opposite side of the church, 
and examined the pistol. To his delight it con¬ 
tained four unused cartridges. Hansu*s sharp 
eyes found the figure of the captain, and taking 
careful aim, he pulled the trigger. The captain 
dropped, a hellish command half finished on his 
lips. Thus the principal perpetrator of the Sun- 
chen massacre paid for the crime with his life. 

Hansu crawled to a stack of millet in the field, 
determined to use the three remaining shots to the 
best advantage. 

When the soldiers saw their captain drop, one 
of them ran to him, but the shot had been fatal. 
Had a stray bullet from their guns found its way 
to the captain's black heart? That was the ques¬ 
tion in the mind of each man there. There was 
a hurried consultation, which ended by the sol¬ 
diers climbing into their trucks and driving away, 
with many a frightened backward glance. 

In their hurry they forgot their comrade still 
struggling in the creek. But Hansu did not forget 
him, and after the trucks were out of sight he 
crept from his hiding place and used his second 
bullet to good advantage on the mud-covered 
Japanese. He then hurried to the woods, where 
he spent some time in prayer and meditation. 

When the shadows of evening darkened the 
trails leading to the main road, Hansu cautiously 

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came out of the thicket, and walked toward a 
farm house in the valley beyond. He was cold 
and hungry but the hospitable farmer soon made 
him comfortable. His host told him the way to 
the Yalu River district, and after he had rested 
he started for the frontier. During the nights he 
traveled toward his destination and in the day¬ 
time he slept. He often had to work at the dif¬ 
ferent farmhouses for his food and shelter. 

After nights of weary travel and little sleep 
Hansu was becoming exhausted and felt that 
he would have to give up. He prayed for strength 
to go on. As he pushed forward he noticed a 
bright spot not far distant. Was that a glint of 
water in the moonlight, or was it imagination? He 
hurried on as fast as his tired and blistered feet 
would carry him, his eyes fastened on that hope¬ 
giving sign. A sail drifted past, ghostly in the 
pale light of the moon another followed it. When 
he reached the top of the hill he was in full 
signt of the river. The broad silver pathway of 
the moons reflection on the water was to Hansu’8 
eyes as a ray of hope from heaven, and perhaps 
one of the silent, white-sailed boats, drifting phan¬ 
tom-like across the water, would take him to lands 
unknown. Weariness fell from him, and a desire 
to shout welled up in him; instead, he dropped 
to his knees in the dusty road and sent a prayer 
of thankfulness for this help in his hour of need. 

There was a village at the foot of the hill but 
he was afraid Japanese soldiers would be there 
and as he did not care to be questioned by them 
he walked down the other side and followed the 
river, hoping to find some fisherman’s shanty. 
Presently he saw smoke rising from a tumble- 
down chimney, and a light faintly visible through 
the murky window-pane of a lone cabin near the 
bank. Hansu quickened his steps and knocked 
at the door. It opened almost immediately in re¬ 
sponse to his knock, but the patch of yellow light 

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in the doorway did not outline the figure of a 
Korean fisherman, instead a trim and neatly uni¬ 
formed Japanese policeman stood there, asking 
what was wanted. 

1 have just come down from the lumber camp 
up the river, and have lost my way. Can you 
direct me to the village?** inquired Hansu. 

“It will not be safe for you to go into the 
village at night, because the place is under a mili¬ 
tary guard owing to the disturbance everywhere 
caused by the Independence Movement. If you 
wish, you can stay here for the night and go into 
the village in the morning,'* said the Japanese. 

“You are very kind," answered Hansu. “I must 
compliment you for the excellent Korean you 
speak.*' 

The Japanese policeman grinned, “I ought to 
speak it well. 1 was bom and raised here, and 
although I am compelled to wear this cursed uni¬ 
form of our enemy my heart is still Korean.** 

Hansu was very relieved when he found that 
the supposed Japanese policeman was really a 
Korean in Japanese service. However, he was 
careful not to reveal his mission or his identity. 
He accepted the invitation and entered the cabin. 
The host was very kind and hospitable, and both 
men were soon consuming great quantities of hot 
tea, rice cakes and cigarettes, while their con¬ 
versation covered a wide range of topics. The 
policeman informed Hansu that almost the entire 
river coast was covered by police guards; one 
policeman in every three miles at night, and every 
five miles during the day. The day shift was 
mounted and all were Japanese, but on the night 
shift half were Koreans and the other half Japan¬ 
ese. The principal duty was to watch the river so 
that no Korean should go over to the Manchurian 
side without a permit. 

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Hansu listened to the story with a heavy heart, 
for he knew he would never get the required per¬ 
mit to go across the border. While apparently 
listening attentively to the garrulous policeman, 
he was formulating a plan in his mind. He ob¬ 
served a telephone on the wall, and through 
casual inquiry learned that it was connected with 
local headquarters in the village some three miles 
away. He also learned that a boat was tied to 
the bank for the use of the guard in case of neces¬ 
sity. He further noted that the policeman carried 
two loaded revolvers besides his sword. 

“What do you know about the Independence 
Movement and what do you think of it?*' asked 
Hansu in a careless, disinterested tone. 

‘“Well,” replied the policeman, “I hate the 
Japanese as much as any of the Koreans but 1 
think the Independence Movement is very fool¬ 
ish, because the Japs will not leave Korea on 
account of it. The only way we can move them 
is by force, and we Koreans do not have that. 
Under the circumstances, it is better to get along 
with them the best we can, and in the meantime 
we can secretly train the Koreans in the art of war¬ 
fare. Then when we have had sufficient training 
we can rise and drive them out by force.” 

“Would you join such a body of trained men if 
there was one?” 

“Yes, 1 would instantly join an organized force, 
but 1 would never join the peaceful demonstra¬ 
tion, for it is ineffective and impractical. The 
only thing the Japanese are afraid of is something 
that will kill them, and the demonstration will 
not kill the Japs.” With this last remark the police¬ 
man yawned and stretched his legs. 

“In ten minutes,” he continued, “I will have to 
go out and cover my beat, and 1 will have to take 
you with me, because it is against the rules to 
leave a stranger alone in the cabin.” 

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“I have traveled many days," said Hansu, 
"and I am weary. Can’t you let me sleep here 
until you return? " 

"I cannot grant your request," he answered. 

While Hansu was glad his host was not a Jap¬ 
anese, he was sorry he was not a sympathizer of 
the Independence Movement. He had been kind 
and hospitable, but he would not give his guest 
any help in getting across the river. 

Hansu reluctantly followed his host out of the 
house and along the dark road beside the river 
bank. When they reached the tiny boat landing, 
where the police boat was tied, Hansu noticed 
several feet of loose rope lying on the ground. 
He picked it up, made a slip knot, quickly passed 
it over the head of the man, giving it a quick 
jerk. The unsuspecting policeman lost his bal¬ 
ance and fell to the ground. Hansu tore the shirt 
off his victim and used it for a gag. Whenever 
the policeman struggled and showed signs of fight 
the tightening of the rope produced silence. 
Hansu leisurely bound his hands and feet, and 
relieved him of his revolvers. He then retraced 
his steps to the cabin and cut the telephone wires. 
He made a small bundle of food and then went 
back to the boat landing. He unfastened the skiff 
from its moorings, stepped into it and with several 
vigorous strokes brought it into midstream. 

He rested the oars and breathed a sigh of relief. 
The sky was clear, the moon rode high in the 
heavens, and the stars were unusually brilliant. 
There was no sound except for the occasional 
ringing of the bells on the sail boats anchored 
near either side of the bank, and the faint, scarcely 
audible lapping of the water against the side of 
the boat. Hansu dipped his hand into the water 
and passed it over his burning face. He sat 
quietly in his boat and thought over all that had 
occurred during the evening. He regretted his 
unprovoked attack on the unsuspecting man. He 

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also felt that he was guilty of taking human lives, 
contrary to the teachings of his faith. As he sat 
in the bow of the boat he murmured a prayer of 
forgiveness. 

But suddenly the silence was broken. Without 
a sound a boat had crept close to Hansu's skiff, 
and a strange voice asked, "Where are you go¬ 
ing?" It was spoken in Korean, but the peculiar 
accent indicated that the speaker was a Japanese. 
For the moment Hansu was startled, but now 
every nerve was taut He decided not to answer, 
but firmly grasping his oars rowed rapidly away 
from the other boat. 

"Stop! stop!" shouted the voice in anger. But 
Hansu only redoubled his efforts to get away. 
For nearly fifteen minutes he rowed as fast as he 
could, and presently saw the dark shores of Man¬ 
churia looming up on the other side of the river. 
The other boat had not given up the chase, for he 
could still hear the angry shouts of "Stop! stop!" 
floating across the water. Whenever he heard 
the voice it seemed as though new strength flowed 
through his body, and he pulled harder on the 
oars. Then several shots were fired, but he paid 
no attention to them. After fifteen minutes he 
could see the pine trees projecting over the water*s 
edge. He directed his boat toward the nearest 
tree, and as he felt the branch gently touch his 
cheek he reached up and grasped it, and climbed 
along the trunk. He flattened himself against the 
trunk and clung there, just as a bullet cut a twig 
below his feet. 


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CHAPTER XI. 

Hansu was still some fifteen feet from land. He 
glanced around and saw that the boat of his pur¬ 
suers had almost reached the tree. In the stem 
stood a Japanese water-policeman with a drawn 
pistol in his hand; another Japanese worked the 
oars and Hansu could see the glitter of the nick¬ 
eled scabbard on his side and the badge on the 
breast of the policeman. He took one of the three 
pistols he carried and aiming at the faintly visible 
insignia of the man in the stem, fired. A splash 
told him that his bullet had found its mark. He 
was about to aim at the other man, when to his 
surprise he saw the boat moving away, while a 
rather terrified voice called to him, “Please don't 
shoot; I will go away.” 

Shooting human beings was not a delightful 
task to Hansu, and he was satisfied with the turn 
of events. He slid out of the tree and found him¬ 
self on the soil of Manchuria. He did not know 
where to go or what would befall him, so wan¬ 
dered about for a little while, trying to find some 
path, finally striking one leading to the level coun¬ 
try toward the South. For the rest of the night 
he tramped, and with the coming of the dawn he 
discovered smoke rising from a clump of trees in 
the distance. He walked slowly in that direction, 
always keeping a sharp lookout for possible Jap¬ 
anese lurking along the road. 

When he reached the clump of trees he found 
it was only a way station of the Chinese trading 
post. There were several Chinamen in the yard, 
with wheelbarrows loaded with various merchan¬ 
dise. Hansu walked over to one and asked for 
directions, but the man did not understand him. 
He spoke to him in Russian and Japanese but they 

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were equally unintelligible to the man with the 
wheelbarrow. He was about to give up, when 
a happy thought struck him. He picked up a 
small stick and wrote on the ground his message 
in Chinese characters. The Chinaman could un¬ 
derstand that and grinned happily at Hansu. He 
took the stick and answered him in the same 
manner. This attracted the attention of the other 
men in the yard and presently half a dozen China¬ 
men were squatting nearby, silently talking to 
Hansu by writing the characters on the ground. 
Hansu soon learned that these Chinamen hated 
the Japanese almost as fiercely as he' did, but 
they were afraid of them because most of the 
Chinese officials in that country were in the pay 
of the Japanese and the Chinese had no chance 
even before their own officials when they were 
involved in any dispute with the Japanese. From 
them Hansu learned that there was a Korean vil¬ 
lage about ten miles north and if he would join 
the wheelbarrow caravan they would take him to 
the place. He gladly accepted their invitation, 
but first had to get some Chinese clothes in order 
that no Japanese would know that he was a Ko¬ 
rean. The keeper of the post gave him an old 
Chinese suit in exchange for a pistol. 

After some five hours of slow travel Hansu 
arrived at the village of Chantong where several 
hundred Korean refugees had settled in order to 
escape Japanese oppression in Korea. He made 
himself known to his compatriots and was re¬ 
ceived with open arms. He told them of the In¬ 
dependence Movement in Korea and some of his 
own experiences in Soul and elsewhere. He was 
at once proclaimed a hero by the expatriated Ko¬ 
reans and they offered him all sorts of assistance. 

“The first thing we must do," said Hansu to the 
assembled Koreans, “is to acquaint all our fellow- 
nien in Manchuria and Siberia of the news of the 
Independence Movement and help them organize 

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for the purpose of co-operating with the folks at 
home. In this work I want to devote my entire 
time and energy.** 

The next Sunday the Koreans of Chantong held 
a mass meeting in their church, which had been 
built some years ago by the Canadian Mission in 
Manchuria. At this meeting by popular vote the 
pastor of the church was elected president of the 
Independence League with several coadjutors. 
The members raised sufficient money to enable 
Hansu to go through Manchuria, organizing 
bodies similar to their own among all the Korean 
colonies in that territory. 

Nearly fourteen months passed while Hansu 
did this work of organization, and as he traveled 
from town to town he found that the zeal and 
devotion of his people to the cause was greater 
than he had ever dreamed. Old and young, men 
and women, were willing to sacrifice everything 
to regain liberty for their native country. 

Hansu found many devout Christians among 
them and as a rule they were the leaders of their 
communities. He impressed upon them the ne¬ 
cessity of educating the younger people who would 
eventually follow the footsteps of their elders in 
the work. For this purpose many people gave all 
their surplus grains and live stock to be converted 
into cash with which to build schools and employ 
teachers. In fourteen months several schools had 
been built through that part of Manchuria and as 
many churches. 

Hansu found that he needed more education 
in order to enlighten the others, so he confided to 
his friends his wish to go to America to study for 
some years, thus preparing himself for larger and 
broader work. A few Christians agreed with him 
and told him to go with the understanding that 
he would return to them as soon as he finished 
his studies in America. Hansu bid farewell to 

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these faithful friends and in the summer of 1920 
went to Shanghai, via Mukden. 

Soon after his arrival in the city, Hansu called 
at the headquarters of the Korean Provisional 
Government and made a detailed report of the 
work and conditions in Manchuria. He told of 
his intention to go to America to further his studies 
and asked the officials to give him a permit or 
passport to enter the United States. 

"America has not recognized our Provisional 
Government," one of the officials explained to 
him, "so a passport issued by us would not be 
of any use. The only way you can travel is on a 
Japanese or Chinese passport. But the Japanese 
will not issue a passport for a Korean student." 

"Even if they did," answered Hansu, "I would 
never use it. I might possibly obtain one from 
the Chinese, but 1 do not care to use it, because 
1 am a Korean citizen and have no connection 
with China." 

Hansu then went to the American Consulate in 

Shanghai and laid his case before the consul, a 

kindly and sympathetic man. After listening to 

his story the consul said to him, "While 1 am in 

full sympathy with you, under the rulings of the 

Washington authorities 1 could not issue any per- 

mit to a Korean unless he had a Japanese pass- 
. ** 
port. 

"1 am not a Japanese subject," determinedly 
answered Hansu, "and 1 do not want to travel 
with a Japanese passport. The United States 
cannot make me a Japanese even if she wishes. 
By your ruling 1 cannot go to your country to 
study unless 1 become a Japanese subject. This 
appears to be a discrimination against the Ko¬ 
reans, besides this ruling tends to compel Koreans 
to submit to the Japanese rule. 1 do not think 
your government knows how we feel on the sub¬ 
ject, otherwise it would not have issued such or¬ 
ders. Of course, if you do not issue a permit I 

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cannot go, and cannot obtain an American edu¬ 
cation. But I will never declare myself a Japanese 
subject for all the education your country can evsr 
give me.” 

His face glowed and his eyes were brilliant as 
he continued: “You are denying us, the Koreans, 
the privilege that you give to the Japanese and 
Chinese unless we acknowledge that we are sub¬ 
jects of the Mikado. Mr. Consul, 1 want you to 
read the treaty between America and Korea in 
which your government pledged its word to per¬ 
mit the Koreans who may visit the United States 
to reside and to rent premises, purchase land or 
to construct residences or warehouses in all parts 
of the country. They shall be freely permitted to 
pursue their various calling and avocations, and 
to traffic in all merchandise, raw and manufac¬ 
tured, that is not declared contraband by law. 
This treaty has never been abrogated by the par¬ 
ties who made it, but it ceases to function because 
a third party desires it. Is this just to us and con¬ 
sistent with the traditions of America? 1 appeal 
to your American sense of justice and 1 appeal to 
your love of liberty. Let me go and study in your 
colleges without making me violate my vow to 
live and die a Korean.” 

There was no sound in the room when Hansu’s 
vibrant voice had ceased. The eyes of the Amer¬ 
ican consul were moist, and he caressingly patted 
Hansu’s arm for several minutes without speaking. 
Presently he cleared his throat and in a gentle 
voice said to him, ”My boy, your splendid appeal 
has touched my heart, and 1 will take the matter 
up with Washington and see what can be done in 
your case. 1 will let you know if a favorable de¬ 
cision is received.*’ 


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CHAPTER XII. 

About a week after this interview Hansu had 
a caller at his lodging. The caller was an Amer¬ 
ican sailor who told Hansu if he wanted to work 
on a ship sailing for America he could obtain a 
position as waiter. He eagerly accepted the offer 
and entered the employ of the Great Pacific 
Transportation Company as a waiter at the table 
of the cabin passengers. The second day the 
great steamer weighed anchor, and sailed from 
the murky yellow waters of the Woosung into the 
blue Pacific. 

At the Captain's table Hansu was duly installed 
in his new work as assistant to the steward. The 
duties were simple and the treatment he received 
from the officers was very considerate. The Cap¬ 
tain seemed to take a special interest in him and 
intimated to him that a gentleman in Shanghai 
had requested him to look after him during the 
voyage and help him to land in America. Hansu 
was grateful and resolved to repay the kindness of 
the captain and his unnamed friend in Shanghai 
by performing his assigned duties diligently and 
cheerfully. 

In two days the boat reached the harbor of 
Nagasaki, Japan. For the first time Hansu saw 
the land of his enemy. The green hills, blue sky 
and sparkling water in the land-locked harbor ap¬ 
peared very picturesque. The next day the ship 
leisurely plowed the waters of the inland sea and 
made a stop at the harbor of Kobe. This city did 
not appear quite as beautiful as Nagaski, but the 
scenery through the Shimonoseki Straits filled 
Hansu with delight. 

Several passengers of various nationalities came 
aboard at Kobe. Hansu was busy assisting the 
steward at these stops. He helped to move the 

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baggage of the passengers into their cabins, and 
did several other tasks incidental to the work of 
taking on passengers. Hansu noticed that two 
women, wearing heavy veils, had boarded the ves¬ 
sel at Kobe, and the labels on their bags showed 
that they were from Seoul, Korea. He was de¬ 
lighted to see the name of his beloved country on 
their baggage and was curious to know who the 
owners were. But indulging in curiosity was not 
a part of his work, so he went about his business, 
with an occasional glance in the direction of the 
two veiled women. He finally came to the con¬ 
clusion tftat they were tourists, and contented him¬ 
self with the thought that he would be able to see 
them in the dining-room. 

Disappointment was in store for Hansu as a 
hasty glance around the dining-room convinced 
him that the mysterious passengers were not pres¬ 
ent. Nor did they appear on deck the next day 
as the boat steadily plowed her way to Yokohama, 
the last stop in Japan. They stayed in Yokohama 
for nearly two days, but during that time he did 
not catch even a glimpse of the objects of his 
interest. When the boat left Yokohama and the 
owners of the baggage with the Seoul label did 
not put in an appearance, vague fears assailed 
Hansu, and he thought perhaps they were ill. 
Finally he managed to get enough courage to go 
to their cabin door, and after debating with him¬ 
self for a few minutes, timidly knocked. He was 
immediately filled with fear that they would scold 
him for this bold intrusion. 

The door opened and Hansu's polite inquiry 
remained unsaid, for standing before him was 
Marcella Jumg, and through the open doorway 
he saw Miss Norman sitting at a table. He could 
not find words to express his delight; all he could 
do was to stand there in wide-eyed surprise. 

Miss Norman spoke first. *1 am glad to see you 
safe and sound, Hansu, but tell me are we out of 
Yokohama harbor?" 

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“Oh, Miss Norman 1 " he exclaimed, tears of joy 

filling his eyes, "1 can scarcely believe it is really 

you and that I sun not dreaming. Oh, yes, we are 

rapidly leaving all traces of Yokohama behind 

us." He turned to Marcella, and continued, "1 

am glad to see that you have recovered from your 
. . . »• 
m juries. 

Her answer was a sweet smile, and a delicate 
blush suffused her face. 

“1 want to talk," said Miss Norman, “and since 
we are leaving Yokohama behind us, let us go up 
on the promenade deck where we can enjoy the 
fresh air." 

The trio found a secluded spot near the bow of 
the ship, and Hansu brought chairs for them. 

“Hansu," began Miss Norman, "why didn’t 
you speak to us at Kobe when we boarded the 
ship?" 

“I did not recognize you on account of your 
heavy veils. May 1 ask why you did not speak 
to me?" 

“We were greatly surprised to see you," she 
continued, “but we were afraid to speak, fearing 
our recognition might harm you. The Japanese 
spies were watching us everywhere and if they 
knew we were acquainted they might suspect you 
and take you off the ship. For that reason we 
kept silent and avoided meeting you. But now," 
and she smiled happily, “they cannot touch you 
even of they wished. And poor Marcella is 
just breathing freely once more. Her sufferings 
from the wound and the shock were intense, and 
it was only through the careful and tender nursing 
of the American ladies that she recovered. It 
was through the influence of the wife of a Japan¬ 
ese official that 1 obtained a passport to bring her 
to America with me to study in a normal school 
for a year. And now Hansu, tell us what has 
happened to you since last we met." 

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Han8u briefly told them of his experiences from 
the time he had left them that terrible night in 
Seoul; his thrilling escape to Manchuria, his work 
among his countrymen in that country; and finally 
the offer of work as waiter on the vessel, through 
the kindnes of an unknown American friend in 
Shanghai. Although Hansu suspected the identity 
of his friend, he did not divulge it to the two 
young women. 

“And now 1 am extremely happy, “ he said 
concluding his story, “for 1 will realize my dream 
of studying in the great land of America, and 1 
have again met my good friends.’* 

“1 will give you all the assistance 1 can to enter 
a good educational institution in America,*' prom¬ 
ised Miss Norman, “and I hope that some day 
both you and Marcella will be able to return to 
your native land and help your own people.’* 

Marcella seemed even paler than usual, and her 
dark eyes restlessly wandered over the waters of 
the blue Pacific to where it met the sky. She had 
nothing to say, but occasionally smiled and when 
the sufferings of her people were mentioned al¬ 
most inaudible sighs escaped from her lips and 
the dark eyes were filled with pain. 

“Miss Marcella,** timidly asked Hansu, “what 
branch of study are you going to take up?" 

“1 want to study the best method of teaching 
children and also household economics," she re¬ 
plied. “If 1 can arrange it, I am also anxious to 
study singing. I always loved to play the piano, 
but 1 cannot do that any longer," and she looked 
down in her lap, where the long sleeve of her 
dress covered the mutilated arm. 

There was no regret in her voice, no tears in her 
eyes for the lost hand. There was a proud look 
on her face as she glanced at the other two; she 
was glad she had been able to sacrifice something 
for her beloved land. 

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After that day Hansu often met his friends, 
and when the evening meal was over he had op¬ 
portunities to talk to them on the deck. Once 
when he was hurrying toward their cabin for an 
evening chat, an elderly gentleman stopped him 
and asked, “Are you a Japanese?” 

Hansu’s eyes blazed as he vehemently an¬ 
swered “No!” 

“What are you then?" said the gentleman, 
greatly surprised. 

“I am a Korean,” returned Hansu very proudly. 

“Oh I excuse me young man,” laughed the el¬ 
derly gentleman, “1 did not intend to hurt your 
feelings by that question. I was just curious be¬ 
cause you do not act or speak like a Chinaman, 
yet you are too tall to be a Jap. 1 never saw a 
Korean before, so naturally 1 was somewhat 
puzzled. My name is Hugheston, president of 
the Northern University in America, and 1 would 
like to hear something about your country if you 
have a few minutes to spare.” 

Hansu eagerly told him all he knew about his 
country, its history, the present conditions under 
Japanese rule, the Independence Movement, the 
persecution of the Christians, the exclusion of 
American influence and trade in Korea, the Jap¬ 
anese encroachment of China and Siberia. Dr. 
Hugheston was intensely interested in all Hansu 
told him, and in the days that followed when he 
was not talking to Hansu he was reading all the 
books on the subject he could find in the ship's 
library. 

One day Dr. Hugheston said to Hansu, “1 feel 
that America owes Korea a moral as well as legal 
obligation to see that she is freed from the mili¬ 
taristic yoke of Japan. It will not only be re¬ 
deeming our treaty obligations to Korea but in the 
end it will protect American interests and Chris¬ 
tian civilization in Asia. I am too old to fight but 
I can help Korea by helping you to acquire an 

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education in my university. You can come to me 
as soon as you leave the company's employ." 

Hansu was grateful beyond expression, and he 
simply murmured, "Thank you. Dr. Hugheston,*' 
but his heart spoke with those few words, and 
Dr. Hugheston left him a very happy man. 


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CHAPTER XIII. 

After several days' sailing the ship reached 
Honolulu, and Hansu was one of the lucky ones 
to be granted shore leave. The tropical flowers in 
the trim gardens, the neat and attractive houses 
along the palm lined avenues, the queer costumes 
of the native women, and the varied sights excited 
Hansu* s interest and filled him with delight. He 
found a large Korean colony in Honolulu and met 
several of his compatriots along the wharves and 
streets. It was a pleasure to meet the people with 
whom he could converse in his native tongue. He 
attended a Korean meeting in the Christian Insti¬ 
tute where some three hundred Korean children 
were educated under the direction of Dr. Rhee, 
the founder of the school. Altogether Hansu 
had a very happy afternoon in Honolulu, and was 
glad that the Korean colony on that far away 
island was so rapidly assimilating American life. 
He bade farewell to his newly made friends and 
resumed his work on the ship during the last days 
of her journey toward the Golden Gate. 

In one more day the boat would reach San 
Francisco. Hansu was standing on deck enjoy¬ 
ing the beauty and glory of his last night at 
sea. The moon was just rising, filling the sky 
with light and making a shimmering silver path¬ 
way on the placid water. The air was gentle, and 
the peace and joy of life seemed to prevail every¬ 
where. Farther down the deck chattering, laugh¬ 
ing groups of passengers were seated, trustful that 
the great ship rapidly cutting her way through 
the almost motionless sea, would bring them 
safely to their destination. 

Hansu was happy in anticipation of seeing on 
the morrow the land of which he had dreamed 

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so frequently. He was grateful to those Amer¬ 
icans who had done so much to help and encour¬ 
age him. 

His meditations were interrupted by a sweet 
voice inquiring if the boat would reach San Fran¬ 
cisco the next day. Hansu turned and saw Mar¬ 
cella standing beside him. In the soft light of the 
moon her pale face was as beautiful and delicate 
as a flower and the gentle breeze scarcely ruffled 
the blue black hair, combed low on her round, 
bare neck. She wore a plain little dress of some 
so ft white material, the only ornament a small 
gold cross hanging on a narrow blue ribbon. 

Hansu thrilled at the sight of her standing there 
in the moonlight, and her soft Southern accent 
was music to his ears. 

“If all goes well,** he replied his voice very 
low, “we will reach the Golden Gate by eleven 
o'clock tomorrow morning.** 

He was very happy to have her there, and 
wanted her to remain, but his tongue was suddenly 
dumb and he could find nothing more to say. 
She too gazed at the splendor of the night, and 
presently turned to go. 

“1 must say good-night now, and return to Miss 
Norman.** 

“No, no, do not go now, I have something to 
say to you,** he blurted out and then stopped. 

Marcella smiled in her slow, gentle way, and 
said, “It must be short and quick, because Miss 
Norman will worry if 1 am away much longer.'* 

“I am afraid you will be angry if 1 tell you all 
that is in my thoughts," began Hansu very 
meekly. 

“I do not get angry with people that do no 
wrong,'* answered Marcella, “and I am sure you 
have no wrong thoughts. Tell me what is in 
your mind.*' 

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Hansu was silent for a few minutes, then he 
reached over and took the girl*s hand in his. "I 
realize that this is not the place nor the time to 
express such a thought as mine, but 1 want you to 
know before we go our separate ways tomorrow, 
that 1 admire your courage; 1 adore your patriot¬ 
ism; 1 honor your purity; 1 respect your Christian 
devotion and 1 love you. We both have im¬ 
portant work before us, but when we have accom¬ 
plished our tasks, if there is time left for other 
matters will you accept my humble but devoted 
love for yourself?** 

Hansu could feel her fingers tremble in his 
hand, and he saw that she was shaken by her 
emotions. And when she raised her glorious eyes 
to his there was no mistaking their message, but 
her voice was firm as she gave her answer. 

“Hansu, 1 will accept your love on one condi¬ 
tion. If ever it should interfere with your sacred 
duty of freeing our native land, or with my plan 
of educating the people, we must sacrifice our 
happiness for the cause that is holier. With that 
understanding I pledge my love to you.'* 

Hansu*s cup of happiness was full to overflow¬ 
ing and his voice trembled when he said, “It is 
the custom in America to sign and seal all con¬ 
tracts, therefore, let us seal ours.** 

He held her face gently but firmly between his 
hands, and reverently kissed her trembling lips. 


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