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A NEW CHRONOLOGICAL CLASSIFICATION OF 
PALESTINIAN ARCHAEOLOGY 

(The following scheme has been drawn up by the representatives of the 
three archaeological Schools in Jerusalem.) 

I. STONE AGE 

i. Paleolithic 





ii. Neolithic 




II. 


BRONZE AGE 






i. Early Canaanite 


to 2000 B. C. 




ii. Middle Canaanite 


2000—1600 B. C. 




iii. Late Canaanite 


1600—1200 B. C. 


III. 


IRON AGE 

i. Early Palestinian 


im-600B.C.{*;™ 




ii. Middle Palestinian * 


600-lOOB.O.I-S^ 




iii. Late Palestinian * 


n.o.K»-eieA.D.{tJ£3ta 


IV. 


MODERN 






i. Early Arab 


636—1100 A.D. 




ii. Middle Arab 


1100—1500 A.D. 




iii. Late Arab 


1500— 




Adopted Jerusalem, July 14, 


1922 

(Signed) John Garstang 
Louis Vincent 
W. P. Albright 
W. J. Phythian-Adams 



* This nomenclature is adopted only for convenience and consistency. In prac- 
tise, following Professor Fisher's suggestion, the terms "Hellenistic, 300-100 B. C; 
Roman, 100 B. C.-350 A. D.; Byzantine, 350-636 A. D." will naturally be employed 

(W. F. A.). 

ARCHAEOLOGICAL PROGRESS IN PALESTINE 

Director Albright reports as follows: 

At a meeting of the Archaeological Advisory Board July 29, a number 
of very interesting archaeological items were reported by the Director of 
Antiquities. A permit has been granted to a group of Danish scholars, 
headed by Aage Schmidt, to excavate at Seilun, ancient Shiloh. It is 
understood that these scholars are now on their way to Palestine. The 
Department of Antiquities will carry on excavations during September 
and October in a group of tombs on Carmel, at Caesarea, and especially 
at the site of ancient Dor, modern Tanturah. The money for these trial 
operations is given by a wealthy antiquity dealer in Haifa, Aziz Hayyat. 
The British School will further conduct work, under Phythian-Adams, at 
a number of mounds in the Plain of Akka, including the supposed site of 
Harosheth of the Gentiles, and at Gaza. All these undertakings are in the 



nature of soundings both for the determination of future sites for work 
and for the recovery of pottery series. 

With the approval of the High Commissioner of Palestine "an organ- 
ized effort is to be made to excavate and lay open to the world the historic 
City of David on Mount Ophel." An invitation to take the lead in this 
undertaking was addressed to our School in Jerusalem. Unfortunately, 
for obvious financial reasons, we were not able to embrace the opportunity. 
The offer reveals one of the many brilliant opportunities that lie before 
American archaeology, if only American money is forthcoming. 

NOTES 

Prof. A. V. Williams Jackson represented the Schools at the Cen- 
tenary of the Societe Asiatique, celebrated in Paris in July. 

Professor Dalman has been succeeded as head of the German School 
in Jerusalem by Professor Alt. 

The Secretary-Treasurer of the Schools, Professor George A. .Barton, 
having become Professor at the University of Pennsylvania, is now to be 
addressed at 3725 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. 

A letter from Professor Hatch reports that he has reached Jerusalem 
and expected to join Prof. Eendel Harris in Egypt about November 1st. 



AMERICAN SCHOOLS OF ORIENTAL RESEARCH 

Founded 1900, incorporated under the Laws of the District of Columbia, 1921. 

TRUSTEES 

JAMES A. MONTGOMERY, President CHARLES C. TORREY, Vice-President 

6806 Greene Street. Germantown, Philadelphia 

GEORGE A. BARTON, Sec'y and Treas. WILFRED H. SCHOFF, Associate Secretary 

3725 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia Commercial Museum, Philadelphia 

CYRUS ADLER R. V. D MAGOFFIN 

BENJAMIN W. BACON JULIAN MORGENSTERN 

tHOWARD C. BUTLER WARREN J. MOULTON 

ALBERT T. CLAY EDWARD T. NEWELL 

A. V. WILLIAMS JACKSON tJAMES B. NIES 

JAMES H. ROPES 



THE PROVIDENT TRUST COMPANY OF PHILADELPHIA, 
Assistant Treasurer 



Prof. MARY I. HUSSEY, Field Secretary, Mount Holyoke College, South Hadley, Mats. 

STAFF OF THE SCHOOL AT JERUSALEM FOR 1922-23 

Dr. W. F. ALBRIGHT, Director Prof. W. H. P. HATCH, Annual Professor 

Pbeb. JAMES A. KELSO, Lecturer EDWIN E. VOIGT, Thayer Fellow 

PUBLICATIONS 

Annual Reports, published by the Archaeological Institute of America. 

The Bulletin, issued quarterly and sent gratis to all who are interested. 

The Annual of the American School in Jerusalem, sent to all subscribers of $10.00 and upwards; 

Vol. I, edited by C. C. Torrey, 1920, published by the Yale University Press, New Haven, 

Conn., price, $3.50. Vol. II— III in press. 

10 



BULLETIN 



OF THE 



American Schools of Oriental 
Research 

Number 7 October, 1922 

Published Quarterly — February, April, October, December, at South Hadley, Mass. 

(Application for entry as second-class matter at the post office at South Hadley, Mass., pending.) 




A View of the Excavations at Tell el-Ful. 



IN MEMORIAM JAMES BUCHANAN NIES 

In the death of the Eev. James Buchanan Nies, Ph.D., the American 
Schools of Oriental Besearch have sustained a great loss. He was not only 
one of their chief patrons, but his activities in their interests were of the 
greatest importance. 

Dr. Nies was born in Newark, New Jersey, November 22, 1856. He 
received the degree of B.A. from Columbia in 1882, M.A. in 1887, and 
Ph.D. in 1888. He was graduated from the General Theological Seminary