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528 THE JEWISH QUARTERLY REVIEW 

HVK313X ntPD, occurs here. This Moses Abarbalia, or, as he is styled 
in the MS., rT9N3"> T\u7&, or perhaps both names, if they do not refer 
to the same person, are to be added to the names quoted above, 
p. 222, notes. I have further specially noticed the following varia- 
tions ? — 

Above, page 229, line 7, CJTIO in the copy D^ID 

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Halbekstam l . 



MS. OF HAFTARAS OF THE TRIENNIAL CYCLE. 

Among a large mass of Hebrew and Arabic MS. fragments which, 
by the courtesy of the Cairene Hebrew community, I have just been 
permitted to bring away from the geniza at Fostat, is one consisting 
of four quarto pages of what appears to have been a collection of 
Haftaras of the Triennial Cycle. 

From the state of the paper and style of writing, and by comparison 
with dated MSS. found by me in the same place, this fragment would 
appear to be of the eleventh or twelfth century. It is written in 
a bold, square character, with a few vowel-points added by a later hand. 
The fragment is interesting, not only for adding five late Haftaras to 
the seventy early ones in the MS. of the Bodleian Library, described 
by Dr. Btichler in the Jewish Quartekly Review, vol. VI, p. 39 sqq., 

1 Heir Halberstam also calls attention to the fact that the MegiBath 
Mizraim has already been printed. See p. 511, above. 



MISCELLANEA 529 

but also for giving the popular names of some of the triennial Sedrahs. 
Each verse of the Haftara is followed by its Targum Jonathan, the 
text of which presents few important variants from that of the 
Targum in the Amsterdam TIWH mtOpD. 

The fragment begins with npM IT ">3*1 f\]T> (Isaiah 1. 4) down 
to (sic) pi nil niD?3D (I. 6), concluded by the consolatory verse li. 3. 
This is evidently part of the Haftara for a medial portion of p/3. 
Then comes a Haftara headed 

na lao* Ninn Dva rem 'vy nro ^vrw^ sen 
.n^ao spD iy ornvpi -non 

This is the Haftara for the portion Numbers xxv. 1-10, consisting of 
the last four verses of the last chapter of Joel, followed by the first 
five verses of Amos i, and concluded by the seventh verse of Amos iii. 
Next comes a Haftara headed 

and beginning with the first verse of Malachi ii. 5. The page ends 
with the second word of the next verse, HDX. This very appropriate 
sacerdotal Haftara is one of those suggested by Dr. Buchler (Jewish 

QUAKTEKLY REVIEW, Vol. VI, p. 37). 

Another page of the fragment begins VlfVa D3? DlVlpm (Numbers 
xxxv. n), and consists of Joshua xx. i to xxi. 3. The Haftara is 
followed by the remark, 'l jm?N "12D7K Dn ; after which the heading 

'e>j/ nri3 dnmn rbx 

and the first verse of its Haftara, Zachariah viii. 16, which begins 
with the same words as the Sedrah. This is a different Sedrah from 
that suggested by Dr. Buchler (ib.). The fragment ends in the middle 
of the Targum of such verse, "03 NOnp Md. 

The Haftara of JfOB^ 2B*1 is remarkable for consisting of ten 
verses, while the Sedrah itself has only nine. It is also worthy of 
remark that Joshua and Isaiah supply Haftaras, though the Minor 
Prophets in point of numbers remain the favourites. 

E. N. Adler. 



WOMAN IN THE MIDRASH. 

"And Isaac brought her into his mother Sarah's tent 1 ." 

All the days of the life of Sarah, a pillar of cloud rested over the 

door of her tent. She died ; the pillar of cloud vanished. Rebecca 

came, the pillar of cloud returned. 

1 Gen. xxiv. 67.