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PUBLISHED QUARTERLY 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



BULLETIN OF 
THE ART INSTITUTE OF CHICAGO 



VOLUME II 



OCTOBER, 1908 



NUMBER II 



IN thj middle pages of this Bulletin 
(pa~*s 23 to 26) will be found the pro- 
gramme of successive exhibitions, lec- 
tures, etc., to be held at the Art Institute 
this season. This portion of the Bulletin may 
easily be detached and preserved separately. 



TWO INROS OR JAPANESE MEDICINE CASES. 
From the Collection presented by Mrs. George T. Smith. 1 907 

At the right hand of the cut is a priest's inrd 
of red and gold lacquer in the form of a 
Mokgyo. The top is of heads of dragons, 
and on the sides are scales of fish and an impe- 
rial crest. Ojime, a carved silver bead show- 
ing the various articles used by the Buddhist 
priests in their ceremonies. Netsuke, an 
ivory button inlaid with jade, coral, and 
tortoise shell. Signed Akiharu. 

At the left hand an inro of Gyobu lac- 
quer inlaid with gold. Design of rats pul- 
ling a treasure bag. The coats on the rats 
are inlaid with Somada and Tuishu lacquer. 
By ToyO. Ojime, a carved brass monkey 
with gold coat. Netsuke, open work carved 
ivory with silver and Shibuichi inlay. 
Signed, but names too worn to decipher. 




Arrangements have been made with Mrs. 
J. B. Sherwood to conduct visitors through 
the galleries and explain the collections, with- 
out charge, at regular intervals. These classes 
or gallery tours will be held every Thursday 
at 3 p. m., beginning Oct. 8. Members and 
visitors of all kinds will be welcome. 



THE COMING THREE MONTHS 
The most active season of the year is at 
hand. Upon Tuesday, October 20, the 
Annual Exhibition of American Oil Paintings 
and Sculpture will be opened by an afternoon 
Reception, at which the ladies of the Fort- 
nightly and Woman's Clubs, the Antiquarian 
Society, and the Municipal Art League will 
assist. This exhibition is made up as follows: 
About 50 pictures of American painters in 
Europe are selected by Miss Sara Hallowell, 
the representative of the Art Institute, from