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WITH 


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DEEP RESPECTS 


TO 

HIS EXCELLENCY GENERAL 

SIR FREDERICK ROBERTS BART, V. C., Q. C. B., G. C. I. E„ R, A., 

Commander-in-Chiep off India 
as 

AN HUMBLE & SINCERE ACKNOWLEDGEMENT 

OF 

HIS SUBLIME MERITS AND VALUABLE SERVICES 

BY 

His Excellency's Most Humble Servant 


JODHPUR. 

25th December 189L 


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THE AUTHOR. 





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TESTIIlVCOIISrX-AJLiS 

OF 

Vidya-Bhasker Pandit Lalchandra M. R. A. S. ( London ) 
Honorary Vice-President Indian Author’s Society India, 
Inventor Pushtikar Hitaishini Sabha (Jodhpur) and Guru 
to Maharaja Kishore Singhji, Commander-in-Chief & bro¬ 
ther to H. H. the Maharaja Sahib of Jodhpur, G. C. S. I. 
GRANTED BY 

Their Royal Highnesses, Their Excellencies, Lords, High 
British Officers, Educational Authorities and Their High¬ 
nesses the Maharajas in recognition of Jubilee-Pramodika 
and Sanskrit learning. 


REGISTERED UNDER ACT XXV OF 1867. 



BENARES 

Bharat-jiwan Press, Chandni-chowk. 


1891. 


2nd Edition 1000 ] 


[ Price with Postage Ik- 2. 













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€#PiS§ #1 f fiST IMOMIiLSt 

GOLDEN AND SILVER MEDALS AWARDED IN RECOGNI¬ 
TION OF JUBILEE PRAMODIKA BY BENARES PANDITS 
AND BARI ELLY INSTITUTE &G. 

Translation From SANskRiT Into English. 

MAY VISHWANATti GRANT SUCCESS ! 
TESTIMONIALS 

GRANTED TO VIDYA-BHASKAR PANDIT LALCHANDRA, 
M. It. A. S. OF JODHPUR, BY THE PANDITS OF BENARES 
IN CONNECTION WITH HIS SANSKRIT POEMS, THE “JU¬ 
BILEE PRAMODIKA.” 

0 Vidya-Bhaskar Pandit Lalchandra, most learned oftlie 
Pandits ! We read your wonderful work the Jubilee Pra- 
modika, and our minds were plunged in the Ocean of Pleasure, 
as the partridge is swelled with joy at the sight of the autum¬ 
nal moon. 

0 Learned ! the composition of this sacred work evinces 
your great power as a poet, your staunch loyalty to the Fm- 
press of India, and your ready wit as a Pandit. 

0 Learned ! May you live hundreds of years composing 
such loyal poems and thereby giving pleasure to the minds 
of many good men, thus spreading your fame in the world. 

PANDITS OF THE QUEEN’S COLLEGE BENARES. 

1. Pandit Seetla Prasad Tripathy, Professor Hindu Law. 


Kailaschandra Sarma, Professor of Nyaya. 
nr:_ PrAfeoani* nf Sn.nkhva. 














( 2 ) 


4. 


Mahamahopadhyaya Sudhakar Dwi-vedi, Profes- 

5. 

jj 

sor of Astronomy. 

Mahamahopadhyaya Gandadhar Sastri, Professor 

6 . 

55 

of Rhetoric. 

Damodar Sastri, Professor of Philology. 

7. 

55 

Kesava Sastri, Assistant Professor, Astronomy. 

8 . 

55 

Ramkrishna Sastri Assistant Professor Sankhya. 

9. 

55 

Bhawanidutt Sarma „ » Grammar 

10 . 

11 

Ram Sastri Tailang „ » Sahitya. 

11. „ Bhagwata-charya „ »» N y a y a - 

PANDTTS OF THE ANGLO-SANSCRIT DEPARTMENT, 


QUEEN’S COLLEGE, BENARES. 

12. Pandit Madhoprasad Pathak, Professor. 

13. ,, Jaya Narain Sarma Assistant Professor. 

14 . „ Vindheshwaripersad Sarma, Librarian. 

PANDITS OF MAHARAJA DURBHANGA S SANSCRIT 

COLLEGE. 

15. Pandit Sangam Lai Sarma, Professor of Logic and Me¬ 

taphysics. 

16. „ Jayadeva Sarma, Professor of Grammar. 

17. „ Pramath Nath Sarma, Professor of Rhetoric. 

18. „ NityaNand Sarma, Head Pandit. 

MAHARAJA JAMBOO’S SANSCRIT COLLEGE. 

19. Pandit Vishwa Nath Sarma, Professor of Sanscrit, Lon¬ 

don Mission College. 

Surya Prasad Sarma Misra, Asst. Professor Lon¬ 
don Misson College. 

.NQWYIO. 


20 . 




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( 3 ) 


i 


22 


„ Babu Gopal Lai Mitra, B. A., B. L., Professor of 
Mathematics. 

,, Hariprasad Palodhi, B. A, B. L., Professor of 
Science. 

„ Apurwa Kumar Mukarji, B. A., Assistant Pro¬ 
fessor of Mathematics. 

Pandit Mahadeo Chaube. 

Babu Pramoda Das Mitra, Fellow of the Universities 
of Calcutta and Allahabad, Honorary Magistrate, 
Municipal Commissioner, &c. 

PANDITS OF BENARES. 

27. Pandit Jageswar Sarma. 


28. 


Bibhava Ram Sarma. 

29. 


Thakur Datt Sarma. 

30. 

5? 

Jaya Narain Tark-Ratna. 

31. 


Mohkam Ram Sarma. 

32. 


Preonath Sarma. 

33. 


Sama-Charan Sarma. 

34. 

J? 

Jugal-kishore Pathak. 

35. 

11 

Lakshmi Narain Kavi. 

36. 

11 

Gopinath Pathak. 

37. 

11 

Ishwari-Dut Sarma. 

38. 

11 

Bhagwant Persad Sarma. 

39. 

11 

Ganesh Sastri Bett-Gari. 

40. 

J) 

Kaliya Yaiakaran. 

41. 

11 

Parmeshwar Dut Sarma. 

42. 

11 

Jaladhar Sarma Niayayik. 

43. 

ii 

Jhagru Ram Sarma. 


WWWWWWWWW 















45. , § Ganesh Dut Sarma. 

The undermentioned Pandits of Benares have been pleased 
to award a gold medal to Vidya-Bhasker Sri Lalehandra, in 
recognition of his Sanskrit poems, the Jubilee-Pramodika, 
composed in honor of Her Imperial Majesty s Jubilee. 

Pandit Sitla Prasad Tripathi. 

5J Narain Sastri BMraduaj. 

Damedar Sastri Bfiraduaaj. 



,, Hariprasad Praliiladi, B. A. 


Jhagru Bam Misra. 
Bam Krishna Sastri. 



Mathura Prasad Sarma. 
Suryaprasad Sarma Misra. 


BENAABES. 

The 8th September 1890. 


► 



| EXTRACT FROM THE PROCEEDINGS OF A MEETING OF 

4 THE BAREILLY INSTITUTE HELD IN THE TOWN HALL 

| ON SATURDAY THE 28th SEPTEMBER, 1889. 

5 IV. Letter from Pandit Lalehandra Vidya-Bhaskar, Guru 
4 to Maharaja Kishore Singh, Commander-in-Chief and Brother 
3 to His Highness the Maharaja of Jodhpur G. C. S. I. dated 
JJ 5th Instant, together with his Certificates and a pamphlet 

styled the (Jubilee Pramodika) in Sanskrit. 


Resolved that the pamphlet be sent to the members for ►* 














■JkAA£. 




( 5 ) 


their opinion as to whether a medal or only a vote of thanks 
be given to the composer. 

True extract forwarded to Pandit Lalchandra for informa¬ 
tion. 

BAREILLY. | RAMNARALN 

1st October 1889. j Secretary. 


EXTRACT FROM THE PROCEEDINGS OF A MEETING OF 
THE BAREILLY INSTITUTE HELD IN THE TOWN HALL 
ON WEDNESDAY THE 1ST JANUARY 1890. 

Y. Report of Revd. T. J. Scott, Vice-President, regard¬ 
ing the award of a medal to Vidaya-Bhaskar Pt. Lalchandra. 
Resolved that the award proposed be sanctioned. 

Copy forwarded to Pandit Lalchandra Vidaya-Bhaskar, 
for information. 

RAMNARAIN. 

4th January 1890 


I 


Secretary. 


THE BAREILLY INSTITUTE. 
( Town HLL ), 


No. 11. 
To 


Bareilly 24th March 1890. 


PANDIT LAL CHANDRA, 

YIDYABH ASKAR. 

&c. &c. &c.., 

Dear Sir, 

The Institute in recognition of your Sanskrit Scholarship 








and expression of loyalty to the British Government shown 
throughout your composition, has by this day’s post sent a 
gold medal. Please acknowledge receipt. 

Yours frithfully 
RAM NARAIN, 
Member. 


MOHAN LAL, 
Secretary. 


Dear Sir, 

I feel much obliged to you for the present of a copy of (Ju¬ 
bilee Pramodika) which you so kindly sent with the Professor 
Babu Kamlakant Misra; I beg to send you a gold medal as 
appreciation of the book which I hope you will kindly accept 
as a token of permanent friendship. 

Yours ever faithfully 
Gopal Rao Hari, Deshmukh. 


P 0 ON A: 

9th November 1888. 


First class Sardar in Deccan , 
Justice of Peace , Fellow of Bombay 
University and Late Member of Council. 


Bombay 16th November 1887. 

My dear Sir, 

The more I read and study your Sanskrit compositions, 
whether in verse or prose, the more I am interested in and 
delighted by them. It is greatly to be wished that there were 
a good many Sanskrit Scholars and Pandits like you in this 
our country, but such unfortunately is not the case. In ap¬ 
preciation of your rare merits 1 take the liberty of present- 


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ing you with the accompanying Star which I hope you will 
kindly accept as a small token of my admiration |for your 
acquirements and profound learning. 

I remain 
very truly yours 

NARA MOROJI, 

Late Minister of H. H. Maharaja Holkar of Indore. 


No. 319 Fulhan Road 
South Keningston London s. w. 

3rd May 1889. 

My dear Sir, 

I have the pleasure to send you a Gold-medal in recogni¬ 
tion of your beautiful poem the (Jubilee Pramodika) which 
you composed in honor of the Jubilee of Her Majesty’s auspi¬ 
cious reign of fifty years. I presented your book to Lord Cross, 
Marquis of Salisbury, Lord Roseberry and the Lord Mayor 
who took much interest in it and desired me to send their 
thanks-letters which I sent you. I hope the Supreme Go¬ 
vernment will also create you a Mahamahopadhyaya at no dis¬ 
tant time. 


Your well-wisher 

SWAMI BHASKARA NAND SARAS WATT 
Veda-Dharmopdeshak to H. H. the Maharaja sahib 
of Jodhpur G. C. S. I. 


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3 


( 8 ) 


NANI TAL. 

1st. January 1890. 

Dear sir, 

It is with feelings of great pleasure that I make you a 
present of a silver-medal as a very small token of my appre¬ 
ciating your merits as a great Sanskrit scholar, and your spon¬ 
taneous mode of loyal expression to the British-Government 
as is clearly evident from your meritorious and valuable Sans¬ 
krit work the Jubilee-Pramodika. 

The production of the above book greatly reflects on the 
taste and patronage of H. H. the Maharaja Dhiraj & H. High¬ 
ness the Prime Minister to whom you will kindly convey my 
humble and grateful thanks. 

The real merits of the work referred to can only be duly 
appreciated and acknowledged by the B. Government. 

I am dear sir 
yours sincerely 
GANGA DUTT UPBAITI 
Junior Assistant Commissioner N. W. P. 


FARUKHABAD. 

7th March 1891. 

I present a silver-medal to you in token of admiration of 
the Jubilee-Pramodika, please aceept it. I am in receipt of 
your beautiful verses in honor of the Queen. 

Yours most truly 
BASDEO SAKAYA 
Head Master 

Govt. High School Farukhabad. 


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( 9 ) 


mmimmum 
mm mikh wmiu. 


Marlborough House. 

Pall Mall S. W. 

The Comptroller of the Household is directed to acknow¬ 
ledge the receipt of Pt. Lalchandra’s letter of the 15th instant 
to the address of the Prince of Wales sending two copies of 
his Sanskrit book entitled the Jubilee-Pramodika,and in reply 
to thank him for the same. 


June 


July 20th 1888. 

Clarence House. 

St. James’s S. W. 
Sir, 

I am desired by The Duke of Edinborough to offer to you 
his thanks for the copies of Sankrit verses composed by you 
upon the occasion of the visit of The Duke of Clarence and 
Avondale to Jodhpur which you have been so good as to send 
to His Royal Highness. 

I am Sir 

Your obedient servant 
W. J. COLVILLE. 


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( 10 ) 


Dated Poona, 20th March 1888. 

Sir, 

I am desired by Their Royal Highnesses the Duke and Du¬ 
chess of Connaught to acknowledge the receipt of your letter 
of the 30th of January, forwarded through your agent, Jee- 
wandas, and to convey Their Royal Highnesses’ pleasure in 
accepting the Sanskrit verses which you have no loyally com¬ 
posed in their honour. 

I remain 
Yours faithfully, 

A. W. R. BECHER. 

Colonel. 


TESTIMONIALS OF LORDS & HIGH OFFICERS 
OF BRITRISH GOVERNMENT. 

FOREIGN OFFICE, 

4th April 1889. 

Dear Sir, 

I am directed by the Marquis of Salisbury to acknowledge 
the receipt of your letter of the 1st instant. 

In reply His Lordship desires me to express his smcere 
thanks and to say that he will have much pleasure in accept¬ 
ing a copy of the (Jubilee-Pramodika) which you have kind- 
ly forwarded to him. 

I remain 
Faithfully yours 
SIDNEY GREYILLE. 

Sivamee Bhaslcaranand Sarswatee Esq. 




























( 11 ) 


INDIAN OFFICE. 
Whitehall s. w. 


April 2nd 1889. 


Sir, 

I am directed by Lord Cross to acknowledge the receipt 
of your letter of yesterday, and to request that you will con¬ 
vey his thanks to Pandit Lalchandra Vidya-Bhaskar for his 
work (Jubilee -Pramodika.) 

Yours faithfully 
A. W. WILLIAMS, Wynn. 
Swamee Bkaskaranand Sarsvmtee Esq . 


Vicekegal Lodge, 

Simla, 21st May 1890. 

My dear Sir, 

The Viceroy desires me to acknowledge the receipt of the 
Sanskrit verses which you have composed on the occasion of 
His Royal Highness Prince Albert Victor’s visit to Jodhpur 
and to thank you for them. Lord Lansdowne recognises the 
loyal spirit which prevades the composition. 

I remain, 

Yours faithfully^ 

J. C. ARDAGH, Colonel. 

Private Secretary. 

To Vidya-Bhaskar 

Pt. Lalchandra M. R. A. S. Jodhpur 


















Viceeegal Lodge Simla. 

4th September 1891, 

Sir, , ' 

I beg to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 
15th instant, forwarding printed copies of some Sanskrit 
Shlokes composed by you in praise of the Viceroy. As reques¬ 
ted I have submitted them to His Excellency who desires me 
to convey his thanks to you. 

Pray also accept my thanks for the copies which you have 
been so good as to send me. 

I am Sir. 

Yours faithfully 
J. C. ARDAGH COLL. 
Private Secretary to the Viceroy. 


SIMLA—18th September 1891 

My dear Sir, 

Pray accept my thanks for the copies of your Sanskrit 
Shlokes in honor of His Excellency the Viceroy and Governor- 
General of India. I have been much interested in reading 
them & fully appriciate the feelings of admiration for His Ex¬ 
cellency’^ many noble qualities which prompted you to write 
them. 

With my best wishes I am dear sir, 

Yours Sincerely 
FRED. ROBERTS. 
Commander-m- Chief of India. 
To 

Vidya-Bhaskar Pt. Lalchandra. 







( 13 ) 


Severn Oakes 27th September 1891. 

Mussoorie. 

Dear Sir, 

I have to thank yon for the five copies of Sanskrit Shlokes 
composed by you in honor of Lord Lansdowne. All that yon 
say of him, and every one in India of all races and religions 
must share yonr feelings of deep respect and admirations for 
the wise and upright Viceroy under whose rule we are pri- 
veledged to live. 

Yours truly 

A. R. D. MACKENZIE COL. 


Bengal Cavalry 

And Honorary A. D. C. to H. E. The Viceroy. 


CARLTON GARDENS, S. W., 

19th September 1888. 

Dear Sir, 

The Marquis of Ripon directs me to acknowledge your 
letter of 7th August. He returns his best thanks for your 
books, as well as your letter, and the kind wishes expressed 
in it. His Lordship and family are doing well and they hope 
that His Highness the Maharaja and the Royal Family are so, 
and that you are yourself in good health. 


I have the honor to be, 
Sir, 

Your faithful servant 


JOHN HUNGERFORD POLLEN, 
Private Secretary to Lord Ripon. 











.^g^^d^-..-^T-^?^. ^^lL„T*?aL ^iL .^?%r..-^r,.dlb. ■ 

( 14 j) 

g ea l. Simla, 23rd May 1890. 

Dear Sir, 

I am much obliged for the copies of the Sanskrit 'verses 
composed by you in commemoration of the visit to India of 
His Royal Highness Prince Albert Victor of Wales, and ful¬ 
ly appreciate the loyal motives which have prompted you to 
write them. Please accept my best thanks for sendmg them 
to me. 

I remain, 

Yours very truly, 
FREDERICK ROBERTS, 
(Commander-in Chief of the Forces in India.) 


4 % 

4 % 

4& 

4 


Government House, 

Poona, 14th June. 

Sir, 

I am desired by His Excellency the Governor to acknow¬ 
ledge the receipt of your book, the ( Jubilee-Pramodika, ) 
which you have so kindly sent him. 

His Excellency is very much obliged to you for it, and 
was very pleased & interested to read the English translation. 

I remain, 

Yours faithfully, 

B. HAMILTON, 

A. D. C. to H. E. the Governor of Bombay. 
























( ) 


4, Hamilton Palace Piccadilly 
July 20th 1888. 

Lord Northbrook is much obliged to Pandit Lalchandra 
for having been so kind as to send him the copy of the Jubi- 
lee-Pramodika, which he has read with much interest and 
pleasure. 


The Mansion House 

London E. C. 

The Lord Mayor presents his complements to Pt. Lal¬ 
chandra & is much obliged to him for so kindly sending him 
a copy of his Jubilee-Pramodika. 

April 20th 1889. 


British Embassy Rome 

June 12th 1890. 

Sir, 

I am directed by the Marquis of Dufferin and Ava to ac¬ 
knowledge the receipt of your note to him of the 5th of May 
and to thank you on his behalf for the copy of your Sanskrit 
poem which you have been kind enough to send him and for 
which he is much obliged. 

Your obedient Servant 

J. M. TERRAR. 












2 CONNAUGHT PALACE W. 

November 9tb 1888. 



Sir, 

I beg to acknowledge with many thanks the receipt of your 
letter of 7th August with the enclosures. I must also express 
my regret that owing to a prolonged absence from London I 
have been unable to send an earlier acknowledgement. 

I am Sir, 

Yours faithfully 

RANDOLPH S. CHURCHILL. 



INDIA OFFICE 
Whitehall S. W. 
5th April 1889. 


Dear Sir, 

I am desired by Sir John Gorst to acknowledge the receipt 
of your letter of the 1st. and to thank you for sending him 
Mr. Yidya-Bhaskar’s Jubilee-Pramodika. 

I am yours faithfully 
RICHMOND RITCHIE. 

S. B. N. Saraswatee Esqr. 


Sir, 


40 Princes Gardens S. W. 

April 2nd. 1889. 

I am directed by Mr. Chamberlain to acknowledge with 




























thanks the receipt of the Jubilee-Pramodika. Kindly convey 
his thanks to the author. 

Yours obediently 
JOHN WILSON. 

Swami Bhaskara Nand Saraswatee. 


GOVERNMENT HOUSE 
Ottawa, Canada 
24. 7. 1891, 

Dear Sir, 

I am directed by His Excellency, The Governor-General 
to acknowledge the receipt of a copy of your Sanskrit Poem, 
the Jubilee-Pramodika. 

Lord Stanley of Preston further desires me to express to 
you his thanks for your kindness in sending him the same. 

I remain 
Yours faithfully 

CHARLES COLVILLE MAJOR 

Governor-General’s Secretary 
Vidya-Bhaskar Pandit Lalchandra 
Jodhpur, Marwar India. 


QUEEN’S HOUSE, 
Colombo, 1st. August 1890. 

Sir, 

Two copies of the “Jubilee-Pramodika,” referred to in 
your letter to Hi's Excellency the Governor of Ceylon in your 
letter of the 15th ultimo, reached him yesterday. 


Tf s f 8 f 8 f s f a f ! ^ s f 8 











( 18 ) 


I am desired by His Excellency to convey to you bis best 
thanks for sending bim a work so bigbly spoken of by com¬ 
petent judges. 

I have tbe honor to be, 

Sir, 

Your most obedient servant, 

F. F. LIDDELL, 

P. S. to H. E. Governor, Ceylon. 


Government House. 
Rangoon, 3rd July 1890. 

My Dear Sir, 

Tbe Chief Commissioner desires me to acknowledge with 
tbanks, tbe receipt of tbe verses composed by you in honor 
of tbe visit of His Royal Highness Prince Albert Victor of 
Wales to Jodhpur. 

Sir Charles Crostbwaite fully appreciates tbe sentiments 
therein expressed. 

Yours faithfully, 

S. COX WAY, Personal Assistant. 


Simla 23rd June 1888. 

Dear Sir, 

Thank you very much for the copy of the (Jubilee-Pra- 
modika) you have so kindly sent me. The sentiments of loy¬ 
alty to which it gives expression cannot fail to be appreciated. 

Yours truly 
C. U. AITCHISOH, 

Member of the Viceregal Council. 




Er^TEr'j 









( 19 ) 


VICEREGAL LODGE. SIMLA 

29th September 1891. 
Sir, 

I am much obliged to you for your courtesy in sending 
me a few copies of your Sanskrit Shlokes composed in praise 
of the Viceroy. Pray accept my thanks for them. 

I am Sir, 

Yours faithfully 
D. PONIOTY. 

Asst. Private Secretary to the Viceroy. 


Dear Sir, 

Sir Robert Sandeman, has asked me to write thanking 
you for the copy of the (Jubilee-Pramodika) you so kindly 

sent him. 

No one who had the book could fail to appreciate the loyal 
sentiments you express. 

QUETTA BALUCHISTAN, 1 ^ ours t ru ly? 

28th March 1890. ( p - MACDONALD. 


Almora, 7th September 1888. 

Dear Sir, 

It was very kind of you to send me a copy of your (Ju¬ 
bilee-Pramodika. ) I am sorry my ignorance of Sanskrit pre¬ 
vents me having the pleasure of reading it. I have presented 
it to the Sanskrit School here, and shall get some one there 
to tell me about it. 


•> 

#>- 


#*• 


> 









( 20 ) 


Your certificates from good scholars, qualified to form a 
correct judgment on the merits of your work in Sanskrit, 
show that you are a Sanskrit scholar deserving of the highest 
credit. 

Yours faithfully 

H. RAMSAY, (C. B., K. C. S. I.) 

Late Commissioner of Kumaun , N. W. P . 


KARYI BAND A 1ST. W. P. 

5th April 1890. 

Dear Sir, 

Please accept my best thanks for the copy of your excel¬ 
lent Sanskrit poem the “Jubilee-Pramodika.” It does credit 
to your Sanskrit scholarship and shaws your loyalty and de¬ 
votion to our Gracious Sovereign. I have always held that 
the only Eastern Language in which modern ideas can be 

faithfully rendered is Sanskrit* your book is an illustration 

of it. You have admirably succeeded in describing the events 
of Her Majesty’s reign in simple and flowing Shlokes. I am 

sure the book will be very acceptable even to Pandits unfa¬ 
miliar with western thoughts. Your description of the Dehh 
Imperial Assemblage as Indraprasth Rajsuya is a happy com¬ 
bination of two events in the ancient and modern history of 
our country. I sincerely hope you will continue your literary 
labors under the distinguished patronage of Maharaja Dhiraj 
Colonel Sir Partap Singh Ji. K. C. S. I. and wjll favour me 
with copies of any books you may bring out. I am deeply in- 





















( 21 ) 


terested in the revival of Sanskrit learning and will be very 
happy to hear from you now and then. 

Wishing on you every success. 

I am, 

Yours truly, 

KUNWAR JWALAPRASAD. 

B. A., C. S. Assistant Collector Banda . 


Simla, 7th April 1890. 

Dear Sir, 

I have to thank you for your kindness in sending me a 
copy of your Sanskrit poems. They no doubt deserve the 
praise which has been bestowed upon them by the eminent 
Sanskrit scholars to whose notice they have been brought. 

Yours faithfully 
W. C. BENETT, C. S., 
Secretary to Government N.- W. Oudh. 


Dear Sir, 

I am extremely obliged to you for your kindness in having 
sent me a copy of your Jubilee Volume. “The Pramodika,” 
It gives an extremely interesting sketch of the past and 
the present history of India, and I hope if you publish any¬ 
thing more you will be so kind as to send me a copy of it. 

Yours truly 

NEVILLE CHAMBERLAIN, Lieut. Col. 

P. I. to Commander-in-Chief. 













( 22 ) 


fy 


Hoshangabad 23rd March 1889. 

Dear Sir, 

Pray accept my best thanks for the copy of the (Jubilee- 
Pramodika ) which yon have been kind enough to send me. 
I shall value it much. It has reached me safely having been 
forwarded from Bhopal. I resigned the appointment there 
and am now Officiating Commissioner, Hoshangabad, Cen¬ 
tral Provinces. 

Yours truly 

_H. WARD. 

Campanir, Dated 14th May 1888. 


My Dear Sir, 

I am obliged to you for your kindness in sending the Sans¬ 
krit poems in honor of the Duke of Connaught and of Lord 
Dufferin. 

I regret to say that as I do not know Sanskrit I miss much 
of the merit of the poems. Still I can understand from the 
translation that the poems are worthy of the occasion for 
which they were written, and this I think is a high praise. 

Believe me, 

Yours faithfully. 

J. M. CAMPBELL, 
Political Agent Bewah-Kantha. 

SIMLA , 29th June. 


¥ 

#»■' 




& 

I* 


Dear Sir, 

I have to thank you for the copy of your book which you 
were kind enough to send me. 


>• 











( 23 ) 


I regret that my knowledge of Sanskrit does not enable 
me to appreciate the original, but from the translation I can 
judge that the sentiments expressed to you the utmost credit. 

Yours faithfully, 

g. R. IRWIN, 

Asst. Secretary , Foreign Department . 


RAMPUR. 

10th February 1889. 

Dear Sir, 

Many thanks for your letter of the 6th instant your book 
(Jubilee-Pramodika) I have read its English translation with 
great interest. As I am gorry I do not know Sanskrit enough 
to understand it, your ideas are genuine and your language 
sweet and stylish, you will ere long receive from the Supreme 
Government some good and substantial recognition for your 
literary merits. 


Yours truly 

AZIMUDDEEY, General, 
Vice President of State Council. 


Ajmere the 9th August 1889. 

Dear Sir, 

I have to thank you for the two copies of your “ Jubilee- 
Pramodika” which you have been kind enough to send me. 
I wish I were qualified to do justice to the merits of this com¬ 
position. The English translation of it however enables me 










( 24 ) 


to appreciate its expressions of loyalty towards Her Majesty 
the Queen Empress and his Excellency the Viceroy. 

I am, 

Yours faithfully, 

G. H. TREVOR, Colonel 
Officiating Commissioner. 


Dated Abu, 19th March 1888. 

Dear Sir, 

I thank you for sending me the Sanskrit Shlokes, com] 
by you in honor of the opening of the Dufferin bridge by 
His Excellency the Viceroy, and the inspection of the Volun¬ 
teer Artillery Corps by H. Royal Highness the Duke of Con¬ 
naught. These compositions, which reflect great credit on 
you as a poet, have been read with pleasure, and are much 
appreciated, particularly they desplay genius and loyalty. 

Believe me, 

Dear Sir, 

Yours faithfully, 

E. A. ROUSSAC, 

Deputy Post Master ' 'General Pajputana. 


Dear Sir, 

I beg so thank you very much for your letter of the 28th De¬ 
cember last and the copies of Sanskrit Shlokes (poems) com¬ 
posed by you on the occasion of the Dufferin Bridge opened 
by His Excellency the Viceroy, which I appreciate much. 

Yours faithfully 
W. BERESFORD, {Lord.) 













fTmwfWffTmwft 


EDUCATIONAL BRANCH. 


No. 7, NORHAM GARDENS, 
Oxford, 28th October 1890. 

Dear Sir, 

I read your Sanskrit poem on the (Jubilee) with great in¬ 
terest. I admire your power of wielding the Sanskrit language 
to an art to which we poor Melachhas cannot aspire. We are 
satisfied with reading Sanskrit, we do not attempt to write it 
except on rare occasion. We are students of History, and 
want to learn what your great ancestors thought and wrote 
on the great problems of life. But we are pleased to see that 
the spirit of the ancient Rishis is not quite extinct, and look 
forward to a great future for the gifted sons of Aryavartta. I 
have deposited one copy of the testimonials of the Benares 
Pandits in the Library of our University. 

I remain, with best thanks, 

Yours faithfully, 

F. MAX MULLER. 

Dear Sir, 

I have to thank you for your note of the 18th and copies 
of address. Dr. Peterson informs me that the Sanskrit is cor¬ 
rect and classical; and His Excellency must have been grati¬ 
fied to receive a cordial greeting in the most ancient of the 
languages of the land, where he has come with such respon¬ 
sible duties as his lot for the next few years. 

Elphinston College. ) Yours faithfully 

June 23rd 1891. j (Sd.) R. G. Oxenham ( Principal .) 

To, Yidya Bhaskar Pandit 

Lalchandra M. R. A. S. 
















( 26 ) 


To 


From, 


Sir, 


No. 469. 

Vidya-Bhaskar Pandit Lalchandra, &c. &c. 

( General. ) 

The Director of Public Instruction. 

Colombo, 30th April 1889. 


x have the honor to acknowledge, with thanks, the receipt 
of the two copied “Jubilee-Pramodika.” Referring to your 
letter of 25th ultimo, and to inform yon that I am given to 
understand by competent judges that the hook is a Sanskrit 
work which reflects great credit on the author. 

I am, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 
GREEN ( Director. ) 


Naini Tal, 16th August 1890. 

Dear Sir, 

I delayed acknowledging the receipt of the “Jubilee-Pra- 
modika,” which you so kindly sent me, as I was anxious to 
peruse a portion of it before answering your letter. There is 
no Indian tongue in the study of which I have found as much 
pleasure as in Sanskrit, and so far as I am able to judge, the 
verses you have composed are excellent. I hope they will be 
read by many, both on account of their excellence and on ac¬ 
count of the spirit of loyalty which prevades them. 

I am, Sir, 

Yours faithfully, 

D. E. EDWARDS, 

Asst. Anglo-Yernacular School of Boys. 















( 27 ) 


Mission High School. 

Earukhabad, N. W. P., 31st March 1890. 
Sir, 

Kindly accept my sincerest thanks for the present of a 
copy of your Sanskrit poems, the “Jubilee-Pramodika,” with 
an English translation, duly received. The beauty of the 
poems and the loyalty of the sentiments reflect on you, and 
entitle you to some recognition at the hands of Government. 

Wishing you long life and happiness. 

I remain, 

Your sincerely, 

G. B. RXJLACH, Revemed, 
Head Master (Church of Scotland.) 


21 Russell Street, 
Calcutta, 10th April 1890. 

Dear Sir, 

I beg to acknowledge, with many thanks, the copy of your 
(Jubilee-Pramodika) that you have so kindly sent me. It ap¬ 
pears to me to be a highly loyal & praiseworthy production. 

Yours faithfully, 

W. T. WEBB, M. A., 
Professor Presidency College, Calcutta. 


1 October 1891. 

Dear Sir, 

Permit me to thank you very cordially for the Sanskrit 
Shlokes which you were so kind as to send me. 

Yours truly 
C. H. TAWKEY. 














_ ( 38.) _ 

Sanskrit College Calcutta. 

24th February 1890. 

To 

Yidya Bhaskar Pandit Lalchandra Jodhpur, Marwar. 
Sir, 


I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter 
No. 1269 dated the 8th Instant and have much pleasure in 
thanking you for the copy which you have presented me of 
your work entitled “ Jubilee-Pramodika.” I am glad to say 
that a spirit of true loyalty pervade your poem. 

I have the honor to be 
Sir, 

Your most obedient servant 

Mahamahopadhyaya, Maheshchandra Nyayaratn, C. I. E. 

Principal Sanskrit College.—Calcutta. 


No. 167 of 1888. 

Educational Department. 

Dated 10th July 1888. 

From 

The Principal, Ajmere Govt. College, 

and Inspector of Schools, Ajmere. 

Sir, 

I have the pleasure to acknowledge, with many thanks the 
receipt of your “Jubilee Pramodika.” The writing of such a 
work evinces high learning, & reflects the utmost credit onyou. 

I have the honour to be, 

Sh, 

Your most obedient servant, 

F. L. REID, 

Principal, Ajmere College. 




















( 29 ) 


Mayo College Ajmere. 
January , 24th 1889 . 

Dear Sir, 

I beg to acknowledge with many thanks the receipt of the 
“Jubilee-Pramodika” with its English translation which you 
were so good as to tender me. Wishing you every succes. 

Believe me, 

Yours faithfully, 

WILLIAM LOCH, Lieut. Colonel, 
A. D. C. to Vicehoy, 
Principal Mayo College Ajmere. 


Ajmere 31st May 1889. 

Dear Sir, 

Accept my sincere thanks for a copy of your (Jubilee-Pra¬ 
modika) which you were pleased to favour me with. No doubt 
it is an out-burst of your loyal feelings for the British Govt, 
and I strongly hope that Government, will not fail to appre¬ 
ciate it sooner or later. 

Believe me yours truly, 

Pt. BISHUMBHAR NATH B. A. 

Head N. E. M . Govt. College , Ajmere 


Dear Sir, 

Thanking you for your kindness in having sent us a copy 



















( 30 ) 


of your ( Jubilee-Pramodika ) the undersigned Library is 
much obliged to you for this important gift. 

T. R. Library of the University of Vicune 20th July 1889. 

Your most obedient servant 
Dr. T. FUCHSHOFER, CUSTOS. 


University Library Cambridge, 

April 29th 1889. 

Sir, 

I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of the works 
mentioned within, which you have been good enough to send 
as a present to the Library, and to convey to you on behalf 
of the Library Syndicate the best thanks of the University for 
this addition to our collection. 

Your most obedient servant, 
WILLIAM ROBERTSON SMITH, 
Librarian. 


No. 317 of 1889-99. 


From, 


PANDIT BUDHI BALLABH PANT, 

Asst. Inspector of Schools, Kumaon Division. 

Dated, Almora, the 21st October, 1889. 

( Jubilee Pramodiela. ) 

Has the honour to acknowledge with thanks the receipt 















( 31 ) 


of two copies of abpve book which no doubt is very interest¬ 
ing, and reflects credit on the author. 

BUDHI BALLABH PANT, 

Asst. Inspector of Schools. 

Kumaon Division. 


Benares, 9th April 1890, 

Dear Sir, 

I have received with thanks your ( Jubilee-Pramodika. ) 
I have read your excellent poems with much interest. The 
poems are written in truly poetic style and reflect great cre¬ 
dit on the author. The sentiments of loyalty expressed in 
the poems are praiseworthy. 

Yours truly 

LAKSHMI SHANKAR MISRA, M. A. 
Rai-Bahaduk, 

Inspector of Schools, Benares Division, 
(Fellow of the “University” of Calcutta and 
Allahabad, and member of Anthropological 
Society of Bombay &c. ) 


Sir, 


Calcutta, Dated 6th March 1890. 


I have much pleasure in acknowledging with thanks the 
receipt of a copy of your work entitled “Pramodika” I have 












read portions of it & am glad to bear testimony to the spirit 
of true loyalty which breathes throughout the poem. 

I have the honor to be, 

Sir, 

Your most obedient Servant, 
SHIB CHADRA GUI, 

Lecturer Sanskrit College. 


Rajputana 

State Oodeypur 1st January 1890. 

Dear Sir, 

1 have very carefully read your little book entitled the 
“Jubilee Pramodika” two copies of which you have kindly 
presented me, and found that its language is plain and simple 
Sanskrit, versification undefective and the different subjects 
treated therein are also of considerable interest to the general 
Sanskrit readers as well as to the students of the schools and 
colleges in this country. It also indicates your loyal feelings 
towards our Sovereign the Queen-Empress of India. 

I remain 
Dear Sir, 

Yours ever Sincerely, 

MOHAN LALL VISHNULALL, PANDIA, 
Member and Secretary, 

The State Council of Meywar 




















( 33 ) 


JODHPUR, MARWAR 

Berlin, Den 26th Januar 1891. 


Im Auftrage der Koniglichen Akademie der Wissenschaften 
beehre ich mich den Empfang des ilir gefalligst mitgetheilten 
Werkes. 

Jubilee Pramodika. 
ergebenst dankened anzuzeigen. 


To 


Der vorsitzende Secretar 
der Koniglichen Akademie der Wissenschaften 
A. AMBUR. 

[ TRANSLATION. ] 


Vidya Bhaskar Pandit Lalchandra. 
at 

Jodhpur, Mar war 
Berlin the 26th January 1891. 

I have been ordered by the Royal Academy of Science to 
acknowledge the receipt of the “ Jubilee-Pramodika” kindly 
sent by you to the Society and to express their best thanks 
for the same. 

The Secretary of the R. Academy of Science, 
A. AMBUR. 


fWWWfTWf'ff'ffWWfffffWi'ffWfK 

















( 34 ) 


TESTIMONIALS FROM THEIR HIGHNESSES THE MAHARAJAS. 

Udaipur, 31st March 1889. 

To, 

VlDYA-BHAskAR Pt. LaLCHANDRAJI, &C. &C., 
Jodhpur. 


Dear Panditji, 

A few months ago you had sent five copies of the “J ubilee 
Pramodika,” as a present to His Highness the Maharana Sa- 
heb. No sooner had the books arrived here than they were 
placed before His Highness. 

I was on leave and thus could not reply to your letter. In 
obedience to the command of His Highness the Maharana Sa- 
heb Bahadur, a money order is sent you by to-day’s post in 
recognition of your “Jubilee Pramodika.” Please acknowledge 
the receipt. 

The book shows your learning, wisdom and pains that you 
have taken in its composition. 


Your well-wisher, 

JANI M UK AND BALL 

Private Secretary to H. H. the Maharana Saheb of 
UDAIPUR G. C. S. I. 


Udaipur, 7th November 1889. 

Dear Sir, 

I am directed by His Highness the Maharana Saheb to 
acknowledge receipt of your book, the “Jubilee-Pramodika” 
which you sent to His Highness. 


TTfWfwrfwrrfvrwrfWfWfWfT 













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( 35 ) 

The writing of such a work evinces high learning and 
loyalty. 

yours truly. 

J. MUKAND LALL, 

P. Secretary to His Highness. 


Jamnagar, 4th August, 1889. 

Respected Sir, 

Many thanks for your favour dated 11th July No. 588, 
and in reply I beg to say that I received the three copies of 
the U J ubilee-Pramodika,” and presented them at the same 
time to His Highness the Jam Saheb with your testimonials. 
His Highness the J am Saheb has been much pleased to see 
the book and has ordered me to send a money order for Rs- 
150 (one hundred and fifty), as a reward of your deep learning. 

Though I have a very little knowledge of Sanskrit, but 
however, by the aid of English translation, I found your work 
excellent and praiseworthy one. I boast of my native country 
which gives birth to such eminent scholar like Kalidas, who 
is a gem in the court of Jodhpure, 


With profound respects, 
I have the honor to be, 
Sir, 

Yours obediently, 


RAI MOHAN LALL 

Spiritual Guardian to the Prince of 
H. H. the Jam Saheb K. C. S. /. 













Jodhpore, 20th November 1888. 
My dear Guru Pandit Lalchandraji Vidya-Bhaskar. 

In appreciation of your book “Jubilee-Pramodika” com¬ 
posed by you in honour of Her Majesty’s Jubilee at my desire 
I thank you very much and present you a gold watch with 
two thousand Rupees and a dress of honour for your Sanskrit 
merits. I hope that you will kindly accept them. 

Yours obediently, 
MAHARAJ KISHORE SINGH, 
Commander-in-Chief of Jodhpore. 


No. 484. 


Rutlam, 12th October 1888. 

My Dear Sir, 

I have been desired by His Highness the Maharaja to 
thank you for the opy of your Sanskrit pamphlet entiled the 
Jubilee-Pramodika which you were kind enough to send to 
His Highness. It is an excellent composition. In recognition 


of your meritorious services in giving in Sanskrit on such an 
auspicious occasion as the Queen’s Jubilee some beautiful illu- 
trations of the benefits that have occured to the people during 
the glorious reign of Her Most Gracious Majesty the Empress 
of India, His Highness has been pleased to present you a shi- 
ropao which has this day been despatched to your address per 
bangy post. An acknowledgement of the present is requested. 

yours truly, 

N. C. RAI 


















( 37 ) 


My Dear Panditji, 

Kindly be so good as to accept my hearty thanks for the 
valuable present of two copies of your “Judilee-Pramodika.” 
Your high merit and deep learning is by all most praiseworthy 
and I boast of my country which gives birth to such scholars 
and congratulate the State in which competent men like you 
are seen. A money order for -Ris- K>1 (one hundred and one 
Rupees only) was sent to you yesterday & to-day I have des¬ 
patched a than of Ramkhwab under insured parcel in recogni¬ 
tion of your good work. Please accept them and acknowledge 
the receipt together with a despatch of your testimonials. 

I am, dear sir, 

Yours very truly, 

The 22nd May 1890. 1. BALDEO SINGH, 

Raja of Awagarh. 


Bhavnagar, 26th November, 1888. 

Dear Sir, 

Your kind letter to His Highness of the 1st instant toge¬ 
ther with the six copies of the “Jubilee-Pramodika” have 
been duly received, and I am instructed to remit to you the 
sum of Hs- 100, which His Highness begs you will accept as 
a small return for the copies sent. 

His Highness desires me to add that he has been much 
interested in your publication. 

Believe me, 

Yours faithfully, 

RATI LAL MAN1K LAL, 
Hazur secretary to h. h. the Maharaja saheb 


of Bhavnagar 


HnFTfTfTfTTfTfTfT 











( 38 ) 


No. 11 

Palanpur, 2nd July, 1889, 

My Dear Sir, 

Please accept my best respects. By the favour of Grod I 
am quite happy and request that you will continue to write 
to me of your good health. Your letter of the 19th June came 
to hand and it pleased me very much. A short time ago you 
had sent a copy of the “jubilee-pramodika” to the Durbar of 
Palanpur and in obedience to the command of His Highness 
a hundi is despacthed to your address by to-day’s post. Please 
acknowledge the receipt of it. 

I am, 

My dear Sir, 
your obedient servant, 
VELIJ DOALJI, (Dewan of Palanpur.) 


Idar, 13th February 1889. 

My Dear Sir, 

In reply to your letters dated 3rd September and 7th 
October, 1888 I am directed to inform you that His Highness 
the Maharaja Saheb has read your letter & work with interest 
and is pleased to command me to send to you a money-order 
which please accept as a mark of His Highness’s appreciation 
of your labours. You will get the money from the Post Office 
at Jodhpur. 

Yours faithfully, 

Mool singhiji pratap singhji, 
for 

Chief Secretary to H. H. the Maharaja Sahib of Idar. 












( 39 ) 


Khetri. 

28th October 1890 
Sir, 

I am desired by His Highness the Raja Sahib Bahadur to 
acknowledge the receipt of a copy of your “Jubilee Pramo- 
dika” which you have sent here through Pt. Gopi Nathji, 
and to state that His Highness has much pleasure in accepting 
the present. A sum of Rs- 50 (Rupees fifty only )is herewith 
sent to you by money-order for the same. 

Yours truly, 

Munshi jagmohanlal, 

Mir Munshi to h. h. the Raja sahib Bahadur, of Khetri. 


Hear Panditji. 


Your letter No. 889, dated 31st July last together with 
two copies of the (Jubilee-Pramodika) and also a leaflet con¬ 
taining the copies of the many letters received by you have 
been duly received and in reply I am directed to say that 
H. Highness the Maharaja has perused your works with at¬ 
tention & found most interesting. They express your loyalty 
and devotion to the Paramount Power, which is highly credit- 
- able to you. 

I remain, 

Hear Panditji, 

Yours faithfully, 
AKSHAYA KUMAR MITRA, 
Private Secretary to Ii. H. the Maharaja. 

of Benares. 


Fort Ram-Nagar 
30th August 1889. 










( 40 ) 


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Lunawada, 30th May 1889. 

My'Dear Guruji 

I was very much pleased by the perusal of your Sanskrit 
book (The Jubilee-Pramodika) which you were good enough 
to send me as a present. The book is interesting in itself in 
as much as it deals with almost all the benefits conferred on 
the Natives of India, during the fifty years of Her Most Gra¬ 
cious Majesty the Queen Empress’s auspicious reign. Some 
mention is also made of the members of the Royal Family & 
of the famous English Victories and Durbars held in India. 
I can safely say that the book reflects great credit on your li¬ 
terary attainments in Sanskrit, and proclaims your genuine 
loyalty & thorough devotion to Her Majesty. Although the 
work is a very difficult task, yet it is nothing before you who 
learnt Sanskrit at Benares for a very long time. I send many 
thanks to H. H. the Maharaja Sahib of Jodhpur, G. C. S. I. 
who in appreciation of the learning of men like you, has con¬ 
ferred on you a distinction of honor in the shape of foot gold 
ring. For your loyalty and for your being a well-wisher of 
our British Government you will, I hope, obtain a still greater 
title of honor. 


Yours faithfully, 
WAKAT SINGH, 
Baja of Luna wada. 



















( 41 ) 



Nepal 5th April, 1889. 

Dear Sir, 

1 am directed by H. Excellency Maharaja Bir Shamsher 
Jung, Rana Bahadur, Prime Minister of Nepal to acknow¬ 
ledge with thanks the receipt of your letters of the 21st and 
27th ultimo and copies of “Jubilee-Pramodika,” &c., and to 
state in reply that His Excellency has much pleasure in re¬ 
ceiving them. 

Y ours faithfully 
BULBUN SINGH, (Secretary.) 

AWAGARH. 

Dated 9th March, 1890. 

My Dear Panditji, 

Be kind enough to accept my hearty thanks for the valu¬ 
able present of two copies of your “Jubilee-Pramodika” which 
were sent to me in the last week. Your high merit and deep 
learning can better be imagined by the perusal of those books 
than described. 

I remain, 

Yours very truly, 

BALDEO SINGH, 

Maharaja of Awagarh : Dt. Etah. 


1* 

|t* 

ft* 

t* 

ft* 

► 

*t* 

* 

jt* 


The Palace, Moorshedabad, 13th April 1889. 

Dear Sir, 

His Highness the Nawab of Moorshedabad, K. C. I. E. 
desires me to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 











4 

4 

4 


4 


I 

4 

4 


8th instant as also of the 5 copies of your ( Jubilee-Pramo- 
dika ) advised of therein and to thank yon for your kind pre¬ 
sent, adding that the perusal of your (Pramodika) has given 
His Highness great pleasure. 

Yours truly, 

FAZAL RABBEE, ( Dewan s ) 


My Dear Sir, 

I cordially thank for your favour of the Sanskrit hook 
entitled the (Jubilee-Pramodika.) I congratulate you much 
for the ShloJces in which how delicately you have described 
the Jubilee of Her Most Gracious Majesty the Empress of In¬ 
dia. I find also much pleasure to read the composition of one, 
whose heart is pure and loyal to the British Crown. I;wish 
Supreme Government appreciate your]high learning and re¬ 
ward your labour. I see Jodhpur is proud enough, to have 
such a wise and learned man. My dear Guruji, I hold you in 
the same position with His Highness the Maharaja, your dis¬ 
ciple. 

Yours truly 

SHERJANG BAHADUR SINGH, 
Raja of Sohawal. 

Sohawal via Sutna, E. I. R., 


29th February, 1889. 


Hutwa September 23rd 1889. 


Sir, 


I am directed by His Highness the Maharaja Bahadur of 
Hutwa to acknowledge with thanks the receipt of your book, 


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TWTTfTTTfTrrTTTTTTWTTTTTTrWTWTfTTTTWTTWTf 
















. ->—•- ! -——i- : ------'—~- ; -^ 7 ^ ■■ :"•■ ■ “l U* 


JbjybibJybiLiLJAJttiLl^^^ 

( 43 ) 

the “Jubilee-Pramodika,” which you have so kindly sent him. 

His Highness read the book with interest and was very 
much pleased to find the loyal sentiments expressed in it. 

I remain, 

Yours faithfully, 
DAVENDRANATH DUTT, 

Private Secretary to II. II. the Maharaja of Hutiva 


Bikaner, 8th February, 1890. 

My Dear Panditji, 

I acknowledge with thanks the receipt of two copies of the 
“Jubilee-Pramodika” composed by you in honor of the fifty 
years peaceful reign of Her Most Gracious Majesty the Queen 
Empress of India. I perused the Verses of the original book 
and also the English translation with attention and found 
them the most interesting. I have a high opinion of the work 
and hope that Supreme Government will some day recognize 
your talents of profound learning and be good enough to con¬ 
fer upon you title of Maha Maho-padhyaya. 

I conclude this with only saying that you have spared no 
pains for the work which shows well your wisdom and high 
attainments of the sacred language of Sanskrit. I am most 
anxions to see you together with Maharaj Kishore Singhji on 
the occasion when it suits me. 

Yours most Sincerely 
Maharaja Sri Megh Singh. 













( J4 ) 

No. 266. 


From 


His Highness the Maharajah Bahadur of Durbhanga. 

Durbhanga, Dated the 15th November, 1888. 


Sir, 


Your letter of the 1st instant reached me in due course. I 
am much pleased with your “Jubilee-Pramodika,” and my 
thanks are due to you for your presenting me a copy of it. 

1 have the honor to be, 

Sir, 

Your most obedient servant, 
Lackhmishwar Singh, 
Maharajah Bahadur. 


Mandi, 24th July, 1888. 
My Dear Guruji, Pandit Lai Chandraji, 

Receive my best thanks for the “Jubilee-Pramodika” 
which you composed in honour of Her Majesty’s Jubilee and 
were good enough-to send me. The work shows your ability 
in Sanskrit as is evident from the letters you have received 
from high officials of Government. 

Blessed is the State where such'able Pandits are. I hope 
our Government will appreciate your loyal expressions by con¬ 
ferring any title of learning upon-you. 

I shall be glad to see you, if you will kindly come here. I 
sent a telegram to His Highness Maharaja Kishore Singhji, 
Commander in-chief, asking him kindly to send you here. As 








( 45 ) 


you are the Guru of the said Maharaja so I also hold you in 
the same position. 

Believe me. 

Yours truly, 

BIJAI SEIY, 

Raja of Mandi. 


Mdndd, 19th January, 1889. 

Dear Sir, 

Please accept my best thanks for the kind present of a 
copy of your (Jubilee-Pramodika) forwarded with your letter 
of the 14th instant. Men who are regarded as authorities on 
Oriental Classics have unanimously testified to the high merits 
of your book, and it would be superfluous for me to add any¬ 
thing more to their verdict. I may, however, remark that 
your thorough mastery of Sanskrit has enabled you to express 
even modern ideas in that ancient language in a manner 
highly creditable both to you and the State you belong to. 
The numerous blessings which the British Govt- has conferred 
on India & its people, though appreciated by many, could not 
have been so well and lucidly described, but by a man of 
your parts. As a Sanskrit poet & Astrologer you are too well 
known to need any comment from me. I have read your 
book with more than usual interest, not simply, because it is 
a work of merit but, because it breathes a spirit of thorough 
loyalty and devotion to our August Sovereign. You well 
deserve recognition at the hands of our Government, who, I 
doubt not will appreciate your merit and loyal sentiments. 












( 46 ) 


As you are the Spiritual Guide of the Jodhpur Royal Fa¬ 
mily, I too hold you in the same light, for both the houses of 
Jodhpur and Manda are from one and the same stock. 

With Pranms, 

I remain, 

Yours sincerely, 
RAMPRATAP SINHA, 
Maharaja of Manner, District Allahabad. 


Dear Sir, 

In reply to your letter of the 15th September last, I am 
directed to write to you to say that His Highness the Nawab 
Sahib has been much pleased to receive a copy of your (Jubi- 
lee-Pramodika) with opinions of the press and copy of letters 
sent by you, as a present to His Highness. 

I am further directed to say that the book is a good com¬ 
pilation of a brief account of the progress of civilization, arts, 
and prosperity of the country under the long and happy reign 
of Her Most Gracious Majesty the Queen-Empress, and that 
much credit is due to you for placing it before the public. 

With goods wishes, 

By order, 

I am,—Yours truly, 
AMORJI, ANAHDJI, 

Private Karbhary to His Highness Bahadur Khanji , 
Nawab Sahib of Junagarh. 


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JLJL 


( 47 ) 


JEYPUR STATE. 

Private Secretary’s Office, the 6th September, 1888. 
Sir, 

I am directed by H. H. the Maharaja to acknowledge the 
receipt of your letter, dated the 30th ultimo, and a copy of the 
1 ‘Jubilee-Pramodika,” and to state in reply that H. Highness 
has much pleasure in accepting the present. 

I remain, 

Yours obediently, 
SANSAR CHANDRA SEN, 
Private Secretary to the Maharaja. 


► 








Maharaja’s Office, 

Ulwar, 19th September, 1888. 

My Dear Pandit Sahib, 

I am desired by His Highness the Maharaja of Ulwar to 
acknowledge the receipt of a copy of your (Jubilee-pramodika) 
and to thank you on his behalf for the same. 

Yours sincerely, 
CHUNNI LAL, 






& 


Private Secretary to II. II. the Maharaja of Alwar. 


Dated Karauli, 3rd October, 1888. 

Sir, 

I duly placed before His Highness your Sanskrit book 
the (Jubilee-Pramodika) with two letters which you address¬ 
ed to His Highness. His Highness the Maharaja has com¬ 
manded me to convey his thanks to you for the book,—a Sans- 






















( 48 ) 


krit poem of exquisite beauty, every line of which breathes 
loyalty to the August Sovereign and to the British Govt. 

Yours faithfully, 

BHOLANATH CHATTERJEE. 
Private Secretary to H. H. the Maharaja of Karauli, 

( RAJPUTANA. ) 


Mysore Palace, 29th June, 1888. 

Dear Sir, 

His Highness the Maharaja of Mysore has commanded me 
to convey His Highness’s thanks to you for the “Jubilee Pra- 
modika” and your other Sanskrit composition. His Highness 
had much pleasure to hear them read. 

I remain, 

Yours truly, 

A. NARTENVINIAN ENGR, 


Darbar Baksy. 


Limbdi ( Kathiawar ), 9th November, 1888. 
Sir, 

I feel much pleasure in accepting a copy of the “Jubilee- 
Pramodika,” you have been good enough to send to the add¬ 
ress of His Highness the Thakur Saheb of Limbdi. It is truly 
a scholarly composition and reflects great credits on the 
author. 

I have the honor to be, 

Sir, 

Your most obedient servant, 
MOTI LAL, M. 

Chief Karbhari, Limbdi State. 


















iLAAJLAJkAJkJUkJUkAJLJUkJLAJLAJLAJLAJL A JLAJLM. 


( 49 ) 

No. 244. 

Mahableshwar, 16th February, 1889, 

Dear Sir, 

In reply to yours of the 12th instant, H. H. the Maharaja 
Saheb Gaikwar is pleased to ask for 25 copies from you of the 
“Jubilee-Pramodika.” You will please send these copies on 
your receipt of this, to the care of His Highness the Maharaja 
Saheb together with a bill of the price and packing and postal 
expenses thereof so that the same be remitted to you on our 
receipt of the books. 


Yours faithfully, 
SHUNKER YITTOL, 

Personal Manager to H. H. the Gaikwar of Baroda. 


Baroda, 15th February, 1889. 
Sir, 

His Highness the Maharaja of Sheopore has ordered me 
to convey His Highness’s thanks to you for sending him a 
printed copy of the Sanskrit S hloJces, composed by you in 
honor of the Jubilee of our Most Gracious Majesty the Em¬ 
press of India. 

His Highness is very much pleased and interested to read 
the Sanskrit and English translation. 

Yours faithfully, 

T. S. WILLIAMS, 

Photographer, to H. H. the Maharaja Bahadur, of Sheopore. 
















( 50 ) 


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Benares, 15th July, 1889. 
BHELUPUR. 

Sir, 

I placed your “Jubilee-Pramodika” before His Highness 
the Baja of Kama with two letters which you addressed to 
His Highness. The Raja Saheb read your book wholly and 
listened its English translation also, and became very glad and 
ordered me to convey his thanks to you for the book. Every 
line of the hook shows loyalty to the Queen Empress. Baja 
Saheb regrets for the delay in acknowledgement. His High¬ 
ness said that “in 9 kotees of Marwar there is not such a lear¬ 
ned Pandit as you are”. As you are Guru of His Highness 
Maharaja Kishore Singhji so he also holds you in the same 
position. 

We hope His Excellency the Governor-General of India will 
confer on you the title of “Mahamahopadhyaya” as His Exce¬ 
llency has done here in the favour of three Pandits. 

Accordidgly I have herewith sent a money-order in appre¬ 
ciation of your book. 

Yours truly, 

JAGESHWAB DUTTA PANDE, 
Pandit, of His Highness the Baja of Kama. 


Palace, Trivandram, 24th September, 1888. 
Sir, 

I am commanded by His Highness the Maharaja to ack¬ 
nowledge the receipt of your book entitled the “Jubilee-Pra- 














JLiLiLikJ;iLiL4jyLiyyiyi!yiL^ 



modika” received with your letter of 15th instant, and to con- 
vey to you His Highness’s best thanks. 

His Highness read the work with great interest. 

I am, 

Yours faithfully, 

M. 0. NEELACANDA QULLAI, 
Piivate Secretary to H. H. the Maharaja of Travancore. 


> 




From 


No. 771 of 1889. 


► 

► 

► 


PANDIT GANPAT RAO. 


Diwan op Bastar. 

Dated Bastar 3rd November 1889. 

Sir, 

With reference to your letter No. 998 dated 19th Sep¬ 
tember 1889 to the address of His Highness the Maharaja of 
Bastar I have the honor to infrom you that I have been 
directed by His Highness to acknowledge with many thanks 
the receipt of a copy of the “Jubilee-Pramodika” kindly sent 
by you. 

I have the honor to be, 

Sir, 

Your most obedient servant, 
GANPAT RAO, 

Diwan of Bastar. 










No. 755 


52 


RUTLAM. 

17th September, 1889. 


<- 

4 

* 

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* 

<- 

4 


Dear Sir, 

In acknowledging the receipt of your letter No. 732 dated 
15th Instant advising the despatch of 5 copies of “Neeti-Dur- 
pan” to His Highness I am desired to thank you for the cour¬ 
tesy you have thus shown in submitting the work to His High¬ 
ness for his acceptance. 

Yours faithfully, 
JOGENDRA NATH GHOSH, 
Private Secretary to His Highness. 





From 


4 

4 


4 




4 


His Highness the Maharaja of Mandah, 

Respected Sir, 

With many thanks I have the pleasure to acknowledge 
the receipt of your letter of the 11th instant and of two co¬ 
pies of “Neeti-Durpan.” 

The little book contains many useful instructions which 
can be generally easily understood by the Public who has even 
a smattering knowledge of Hindi. It will be a valuable and 
great help equally both to the learned and ignorant to steer 
the vessel of life in this world, the ocean of miseries and 
temptation. 

Trusting that the people for whose benefit the book has 


^WWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWW’WWWWW 












( 53 ) 


been specially published, shall appreciate its intrinsic merit at 
no distant date. 

I remain, 

Mandah. ) Yours obediently, 

24th August, 1889. ( Rampratap Singh. 


Bombay, 16th December, 1888. 

My Dear Sir, 

The more I read and study your Sanskrit compositions 
whether in verse or prose, the more I am interested in and 
delighted by them. It is greatly to be wished that there were 
a good many Sanskrit scholars and Pandits like you in this 
country, but there are a few ones. In appreciation of your 
rare merits I take the liberty of presenting you with the ac¬ 
companying Star which I hope you will kindly accept as a 
small token of my admiration for your acquirements and pro¬ 
found learning. 

I remain, 

Very truly yours, 

NANA MOROJI, R. B., 
Late Minister of His Highness Maharaja Holkar 
of Indore and Honorary Magistrate , Bombay. 


PETIT HALL, 
Malabar Hill, 

Friday, Bombay, 18th April 1890. 

My dear Sir, 

I beg to tender you my most cordial thanks for your letter 




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( 54 ) 


of the 13 th congratulating me on the honor of Baronetcy 
conferred on me by our beloved Sovereign the Queen Empress 
and also for your kind wishes. 

I am much obliged to you for your kind present of the two 
copies of the Sanskrit verses composed by you in honor of 
His Royal Highness Prince Albert Victor of Wales, the Eng¬ 
lish version of which I have read and found very interesting. 

Yours faithfully, 

DINS AW MANICKJEE PETIT, 
Kt. Sir, 

Member of the Governor General’s Council 


PETIT HALL 
Malabak Hill, 
Bombay 28th September 1889. 

My dear Sir, 

I have the pleasure in acknowledging receipt of your letter 
of the 20th instant and to thank you very much for the pre¬ 
sent of two copies of your Sanskrit poem (Jubilee-Pramodika) 
composed by you in honor of the Jubilee of Her Most Gra¬ 
cious Majesty the Queen Empress and also for a copy of the 
testimonials and opinions of the press in reference thereto. 

As I have a very little knowledge of Sanskrit, I am sorry 
I have not been able enough to make myself acquainted with 
the real beauty of the original but however from its English 
translation which I have read, I have found your work inte¬ 
resting. I have also perused the testimonials with great in- 




















( 55 ) 


terest and am pleased to find that you prove yourself to be 
one of the best Sanskrit scholars. 

Yours faithfully, 

Sir Dinshaw Manickjee Petit, 

Kt. Member of Governor-General's Council. 


PETIT HALL, 
Malabar Hill, 
Bombay, 28th October 1889. 

Dear Sir, 

I have duly received your letter of the 17th instant and 
thank you for the present of 5 copies of your work in Hindi 
entitled “Niti Darpan” sent by book-post. 

I am sorry that I am unacquainted with Balbodh charac¬ 
ter in which the work is published. However from the opinions 
of the Jubilee Herald and other newspapers which you kindly 
sent me it appears that the production really does credit to its 
author, in as much as it is full of moral instructions & ought 
to be very useful to schools where Hindee is taught and you 
certainly deserve all that is said in the Herald about you and 
your work. 

Yours faithfully, 

SIR DINSHAW MANICKJEE PETIT, 

Kt. Member of Governor-General's Council. 














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OODEYPUR, 

6th December 1889. 

Dear Panditji Sahib, 

I beg to thank you very much for the kind present of the 
two copies of the “Jubilee-Pramodika” sent by you. I also 
saw your testimonials which speak very highly of your work 
and in my opinion the book is very well got up, and great 
credit due for its composition and for expressing the modern 
ideas in the Sanskrit language. The sentiments expressed 
therein are very loyal. 

I thank you again for sending the hooks. 

Yours sincerely, 

RAI MEHTA PANNA LAL. C. I. E. 

Prime Minister Oodeypur. 

No. 756. 

RUTLAM 

17th September 1889. 

Dear Sir, 

Please accept my best thanks for the copy of your “Niti- 
Darpan” which you so kindly sent in to me, 1 will read it 
with the interest it deserves. 

With reference to your request for furnishing you with a 
copy of the letter sent to you from this office Anent your 
“Jubilee-Pramodika” I have much pleasure to enclose a copy 
of the same. 

Yours faithfully, 
JOGENDRANATH GHOSH, 
Private Secretary to His Highness. 










A ,^lr,,iL^ iL A, JLiL^ JL^-dL M- 


( 57 ) 


From 


Tonk 18th November 1889. 

S. M. OBAID-ULLAH KHAN C. S. I., 

Prime Minister oe Tone. 


To 


YIDYA BHASKAR PANDIT LALCHANDBAJEE, 

JODHPUR. 

My Dear Panditjee, 

I thank you very much for the copy of the “Jubilee-Pra- 
modika” which you kindkly sent me. Its composition reflects 
great credit on you as a first class poet and is a fair testimony 
of your high erudition in Sanskrit. The Slokes contained in 
the book abound in sentiments of loyalty and can not but 
extort admiration from the most fastidious. It is quite a novel 
thing to express modern ideas in a language which claims to 
be the oldest in the world. In short, you have established your 
claim to the title of Mahamahopadhyaya which the Govern¬ 
ment should confer at no distant date. 

His Highness the Nawab of Tonk also read certain por¬ 
tions and expressed himself quite pleased with your perfor¬ 
mance. He is also going to send you a certificate in recog¬ 
nition of your merits. 

Believe me, 

Yours sincerely, 
M^OBAID-ULLAH KHAN, 
Prime Minister of Tonk. 

















4 



4 


( 58 ) 

HULDOUR RIYASAT. 

The 11th October 1889. 

My Dear Sir, 

I am much obliged to your second letter of the 18th Sep¬ 
tember, and the printed letters from the several Maharajas 
addressed to you containing praises in respect to your “Jubilee 
Pramodika” two copies of which you were so pleased to send 
to my master. There was delay in replying to your letter 
which I have said on the 14th Ultimo that my- master is ill. 
Very lately he has recovered though not yet fit for walking. 
He heard with pleasure your laudable work and was greatly 
pleased with the composition and the subjects you have treated 
we all are indebted to our August Sovereign for the several 
innumerable blessings and he is much more pleased to find in 
you a Sanskrit Classical scholar who can speak these subjects 
in our ancient language. Your compostion reflects great cre¬ 
dit to your talents. A money-order is sent in acknowlegement 
to your talents. Please acknowledge its receipt. 


I am, 

My dear Sir, 

Your most obedient servant, 
LALLA MOHAN LAL, 
Dewan to the Huldur Riyasat. 


I have received with many thanks your kind note and 5 

printed copies of your valuable work “Neeti-Durpan” in 
Hindi so kindly sent to me. 



► 


► 
















( 59 ) ** 


The compilation is beyond doubt replete with the wisdom 
of ayes and amply redounds to the credit of your highly cul¬ 
tured judgement and masterly erudition. 

Yours truly, 

T , PANDIT SHIVNARAIN, 

Jodhpur, / ’ 

Private Secretary to His Highness. 
the Maharaja. 


12th September 1889. 


My Dear Pandit Saheb. 

I am very much pleased to receive your Sanskrit books 
which you have sent me. I was not at home at that time. 
Many thanks of your kindness. The hook shows your learning 
and pains that you have taken in composition. 

I have the honor to_be, 
Sir, 

Madlikak, ) Tours obediently, 

Dated 18th November 1889, 


RAJNARAIN SINGH. 


THAKN DWARA, 

14th October 1889. 

My dear Sir, 

I very thankfully acknowledge the receipt of your letter 
No. 1128 dated 18th October 1889 with two copies of “Jubi- 
lee-Pramodika” which you so kindly took the trouble to send 
me. The certificates confered upon you by the Native States 
and Government officers show that you are thoroughly versed 
in Sanskrit. The book itself speaks of your deep learning. May 























( 60 ) 


yon receive a great title of honor from our Gracious Govern¬ 
ment, is my sincere wish. 


I am sir, 

Yours ever sincerely, 
SAHOO RAM RATTAN. 


Respected Sir, 

Pardon for the delay in answering your favour of the 
16th October 1888 No. 1115, I have been so busy that I have 
been unable to attend to my private letter writing. Accept my 
best thanks for the kind present of 4 copies of the “Jubilee- 
Pramodika” forwarded with the above. I have despatched them 
as follows (1) Mr. T.S. Grouse C.S. Collector 1 copy (2) Babu 
Durgaprasad Ram, Honorary Special Magistrate 1 copy ( 3 ) 
forsely 1 copy (4) spare (which will shortly be disposed off.) 

The reading of the work afforded me very great pleasure 
and I must not omit to say here that the author is too well- 
known as a Sanskrit scholar. 

The Sanskrit poems ( composed by you ) in honor of the 
Jubilee of Her Most Gracious Majesty the Queen Empress 
is highly creditable and you well deserve recognization. I beg 
most respectfully to forward a set of Diamond buttons in re¬ 
cognization of your merits and loyal sentiments the kind ac¬ 
ceptance of which will highly oblige. 




With due Respect 



I remain, 
Respected sir, 


Farukhabad, 


Yours obediently, 
JAGANNATH PRASHAD, 


^ The 13th December 1889. 
^___ 


Rayis and Banker, 
and Honorary Magistrate. 










4 

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Dear Sir, 

I beg to present my due respects to you and to thank you 
r°m the bottom of my heart for your kind letter of the 16th 
instant and your book named (Jubilee-Pramodika) which you 
so kindly sent me. Indeed the composition of the work is 
very excellent and it is gratifying to see that up to this time 
our able Pandits have kept up the knowledge of Sanskrit Li- 
terature (Deobani ). Even the English scholars of the present 
day confess that there is no language on the face of the world 
w ch can boast itself to acquire the same perfection which 
banskrit does. 

Most sincerely yours, 
NTHAL CHAND, 
Honorary Magistrate. 


Dear Sir, 

I am in receipt of your kind note through Lalla Damodar 
Dassjee, Law Teacher who presented 4 four copies of your 
excellent work Niti Durpan in Hindi and Urdu. <4 

The composition bespeaks your versatile genius and high 
attainments, and I do delieve the work is an important acqui 
sition to Indian Literature. 

Yours Sincerely, 

Jodhpue, \ HARDIAL SINGH, 

The 29th October 1889. | Secretary to Musahib AlaMarwar. 


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<C ~ _ 


iiiiiiis mmmmk. 


I offer my prayers to tlae Almighty God, who created this 
Universe from his own will. His canopy is the heaven and 
carpet is the earth, his torch-bearers are the Sun and the Moon 
and all the animals are his dancers. He sees this dancing with 
pleasure; being gratified, He supplies them with rain, fruits, 
clothes, and corn in reward. 

I, again, bend my head to Him who made the human being 
the king of His creatures and endowed him with His know¬ 
ledge, protected him while in womb, produced milk for him 
in the breast of the mother. When a child he ( the human 
being ) played carelessly: the parents supplied him with fine 
ornaments and clothes, they showed him every consideration. 
When full-grown and still neglectful ot his Creator, he wast¬ 
ed his life, as if he lost a precious stone. Every body, there¬ 
fore, should be thankful to the Almighty Father, who created 
beings of great variety and made sovereigns to protect them, 
such as Her most Gracious Majesty the Queen Empress Kai- 
sar Hind whose benevolent rule and impartial Justice impar¬ 
ted, have made the people of India happy an^ free from fear. 

When the sun of the prosperity of the British Government 
rose up in the East, the darkness of injustice and plunder dis¬ 
appeared from this country. We cannot fully express our 
heart-felt gratitude to Her Majesty for the benefits which our 
Indian people have derived within the last fifty years of Her 
Majesty’s reign. The completion of the fifty years’ successful 


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reign of an English sovereign is called the Jubilee. At the 
celebration of this Jubilee the sovereign with his subjects en¬ 
joys great festivities and rejoicing, as was the case with the 
Jubilee of Her Majesty’s reign, which was celebrated, in In¬ 
dia on the 16th and 17th February 1887, and in England on 
the 21st June 1887. There was a general holiday in all the 
offices. Forces were paraded, the school boys were fed, pri¬ 
soners were released from the Jails, salute guns were fired, 
congratulatory speeches and addresses were made and present¬ 
ed, Darbars were held, cities and towns were illuminated, and 
fire-works were shown. All the merchants and tradesmen and 
shop-keepers decorated their premises, houses and shops with 
ever-green, flowers & buntings, and thus expressed their loyal 
feelings, in honor of the celebration of the Jubilee, through¬ 
out the length and breatdh of Her Majesty’s dominion. 

So did the rulers of Native States of India, especially, His 
Highness the Maharaja of Jodhpur, who got public offices 
built of stone at the cost of Rs. 350000 between the Raikabag 
and the city of Jodhpur, in memory of this gracious occasion; 
and sent his wise and able brother Sir Col. Pratap Singhji Sa¬ 
hib Musahib-Ala Raj Marwar, to London to be present at the 
celebration of Her Majesty’s Jubilee there and to congratu¬ 
late Her Majesty on his part for the same. 

As I have special connection with Maharajah Kishore 
Singhji Sahib, the commander-in-chief and brother to H. H. 
the Maharajah of Jodhpur, he earnestly desired me to write 
a book to commemorate the Jubilee. At this desire of his, 
my ambition was hightened as according to our sacred writ- 


SPflK 



















ings, although the Moon is bright, hut being placed in the 
forehead of Shiva she has got still brighter lustre and hence 
greater superiority for being worshipped by the Hindus. Now 
I lay my request before the able and learned persons that the 
Sanskrit language is very difficult one, and is not easily un¬ 
derstood, specially its prosody such as “Naikdbhed” Alank&r, 
Dhun, Yyanjand, Aunyokti, Prustar, Nasht, Uddisht, Meru, 
Paffikd Chittra Kdvya, and different kinds of its verses are 
most difficult, but by the grace of God, and by the kindness of 
my teachers and by my studies also, I would have written 
some thing on those subjects, but as I have to produce this 
book before the European officers of H. Majesty’s Government 
who like plain and simple compositions, as is evident from the 
style of their eminent authors. Besides this I also wish that 
those who have limited knowledge of Sanskrit, as well as the 
students of the schools and colleges, whose second language 
is Sanskrit may be benefitted by this little book. Owing to 
these reasons, this work has been composed in the simple 
Sanskrit poems. I have sanguine hopes that Her Majesty, 
the Kaisar Hind, His Excellency the Governor General Lord 
Dufferin, Col. Waltar the Agent Governor-General for Raj- 
putana, Col. Powlett the Resident of Jodhpur, His Highness, 
the Maharajah of Jodhpur and all brothers of His Highness, 
especially Col. Sir Pratap Singhji Sahib Musahib-Ala Raj 
Marwar and Shri M. Kishore Singhji Sahib the Commander- 
inchief of the Marwar forces, will be pleased with my humble 
exertion. I have written this book with tolerable accuracy 
and still I solicit the favour of my kind readers to correct the 


¥ 

¥ 

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( 4 ) 


mistakes (if any,) or to inform me of them so that I may be 
able to correct them in the next edition. 


RAILWAYS. 

Railway carriages are drawn by steam power, on the rails 
made of iron, with great speed. The steam is shut up and 
accumulated in an iron carriage called the engine. It has a 
machine by which, a man can move it speedily or slowly. This 
engine is kept foremost in the train and all the remaining 
carriages are connected behind it to each other fastened by 
iron chains in a row. The train can run a mile in a minute 
but to avoid breakage it is carried at the rate of a mile in two 
minutes. By means of Railways, the trade and commerce, 
are carried on easily. Because, the products of a country 
where they are abundant, and thus cheap and in a poor state, 
are carried easily to another country, where they are not pro¬ 
duced, and thus sold at a higher rate. The progress in com¬ 
merce and trade is the cause of the union of countries. 

In former times the commercial men and tradesmen had 
but a limited profit, as they had to pay higher hires and to 
sustain terrible losses on the disturbed roads. Now they enjoy 
double profit comparatively, with little labour. The journey 
of months is now reduced to days and that of days to hours. 
Besides this the earnings of the workmen have been increased. 
This system is the excellent invention of Wat. We should be 
thankful to Her Majesty, the Queen Empress of India under 
whose reign, this system was introduced. 


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rj &iykiuiuiuiyiuL^ 


( ^ ) 


STEAMER 

As the Railway train is carried* by the steam, so is the 
steamer drawn by it. It has two wheels moved by various 
machines and often it is kept in motion through the screw 
which placed near the helm and under water, both of them 
work by means of steam power. To move the steamer, slow¬ 
ly or speedily rests in the hand of a man. No seaward wind is 
required for it, besides this, there is but very little fear from 
the storm. By the assistance of the steamer, the communica¬ 
tions to and from London, Bengal, Ceylone, Madras, Aden, 
Jidda, Egypt, Arabia, Sind, China, Persia Bushire, Karachi 
&c. have been increased. Merchandise, letters, & news-papers 
are received very soon. The travellers and passengers, who 
have to go, under the trouble, on the disturbed roads, now 
have to travel without difficulty. 

TELEGRAPH. 

Before the establishment of the British rule in India the 
people of this country used to receive messages in months, 
and days, but at present under the auspicies of Her Majesty’s 
Govt, we receive our messages through the telegraph in hours 
and minutes, even from distant countries, whatever message 
be despatched the same is received without slightest mistake, 
at once. 

By the Grace of Almighty God, the telegraphic communi¬ 
cation has been introduced into this country. Innumerable 
thanks are due to Her Majesty for the convenience of the peo¬ 
ple of India. 




► 


P* 

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ffTTTTTTTTTTTTTfTF 







POST-OFFICES. 

There are three kinds-of post-offices:-the first is that, the 
mails of which are carried by mail-carts &c. and these officeses 
are situated in the cities, towns and large villages. Second is 
the travelling post-office which works in a red-coloured car¬ 
riage and travels with the train, delivering and receiving mails 
on various stations. 

The 3rd. is that which works, into the steamers, receiving 
and delivering mails at the different sea-ports, by means of 
which the communications between different countries sepa¬ 
rated by a large portion of Ocean or which have no Railway¬ 
lines by land, are carried on, without difficulty. 

By means of registered article system, Money Order, post¬ 
card, different sorts of postage stamps, paid and unpaid let¬ 
ters and insurance, the pepole of this country are highly be¬ 
nefited, receiving letters, news-papers, and many things by 
by parcels. We must thank Her Majesty also for this good 
of the country. 

COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS. 

In large towns, there are Universities, where the students 
of that as well as of other provinces go to acquire the degrees. 
Next to the University is the College, where the students 
from the Zilla Schools go up to continue their higher studies. 
There is a Zilla School in every district and besides this there 
are numerous Vernacular public .village Schools nearly in 
every large village, where the boys and children of the Pat- 
warees and cultivators of all castes go to learn their lessons. 
There are also many Girl-schools where female teachers are 














( 7 ) 


► 

► 

► 


appointed to teach the girls who attend the schools. Every 
branch of science art and industry, is taught in these Colleges 
and Schools by competent and able teachers. Inspectors 
of Schools visit the Schools while on their tours, they exa¬ 
mine the students, & give them books, watches, hand-kerchiefs 
cash amount and sweatmeats in rewards and prizes. The 
knowledge, which our Benares Pandits used to acquire with 
great trouble, doing menial services to their teachers &c., is 
given gratis without trouble, to the sons of Patwaries and 
cultivators, under the auspicious rule of Her Majesty. 

ROAD ETC. 

Under Her Majesty’s benign rule the roads have been made 
both in land and water (for carriages and ships) so that the 
travellers who are not acquainted with the road, can reach 
their destinations, without any fear from wild animals; be¬ 
sides this, bridges, Sarai ( inns ) and public Offices have 
been built for the good of the people. Impartial laws have 
been framed, trees have been planted on both * sides of the 
roads, to shadow the travellers. Cannals, tanks, Bands and 
wells have been built. Lucifer matches, electric & gas-lights 
have been introduced, Police has been appointed for the pro¬ 
tection of the subjects. Ice machine and many other inven¬ 
tions have been brought into use. Dispensaries and Markets 
have been opened; the people are enjoying the benefits from 
minf mills, silver and gold mines, telescope spectacles of a 
varieties of watches, clocks and observatories &c. The people 
were never in such a place, even in the times of our well 
known Kings Vikram-Adittya and Yudhistir, as they are free 










( 8 ) 


from all fears, at present,, under tlie auspicious rule of Her 
Majesty. For these public goods, Pandit Lalcband gives his 
best thanks to Her Majesty’s Government. 

THE EMPERIAL ASSEMBLAGE DELHI. 

The important assemblage took place on the 1st of Ja¬ 
nuary 1877 at Delhi. Her Majesty took the title of Kaisar 
Hind or the Empress of India. All the Rajas and Mahara¬ 
jas, Nawabs, Chiefs Sardars, the editors and correspondents 
of News-papers, the Civil and Military officers and the trad¬ 
ing Merchants were invited to join it. The seats for the Na¬ 
tive chiefs were arranged in a semi-circular form. The num¬ 
ber of salute guns of the chiefs in general, was increased, 
and, they received high honors, such as, the banners and titles 
, on this gracious occasion. 

THE RAWALPINDI DARBAR. 

This gathering was held to witness the Camp of exercise 
which took place here. The army was divided into two di¬ 
visions, the one attacking the other and this defending itself. 

They were stationed from Umbala to Dehli. Both the 
attack and defence were pretty well. This was the spe- 
.<4| cimen of a real fight, only the balls, shots or any kind of wea- 
-«#; pons were not used. The cavalry, the artillery and the in- 
*4 fantry were equally on command. Many of the Native chiefs 
4| and tlieir generals attended it. The Amir ot Cabul named 
Abdur Rahiman Ilhaii also was invited and he attended the 
Darbar, 

His Excellency the Viceroy and-Governor-General treated 
the Amir kindly and warmly. Money, Guns and Rifles &c. 


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( 9 ) 


were given to him as present. Then the Amir left for Cabul. 
THE CALCUTTA EXHIBITION. 

This Exhibition was held in 1884. The important pro¬ 
ducts, arts &c. and industry of the country were exhibited. 
There were different courts for the goods of different pro¬ 
vinces and countries. 

Nearly all the Maharajas and Chiefs of India visited it and 
they purchased various valuable things from the Exhibition. 

The courts were beautifully decorated and many persons 
came out to visit them from distant countries. 

THE PESHAWAR DARBAR 

This Darbar was held in November 1887 when His Excel¬ 
lency the Viceroy and Governor General returned from his 
frontier tour. A large elephant procession with a grand dis¬ 
play passed through the city which was magnificiently deco¬ 
rated. 

In this Darbar, all the frontier Chiefs and tribes were pre¬ 
sent. His Excellency read out his Persian speech, the con¬ 
tents of which were as follows. 

Where-ever His Excellency went on his frontier tour he 
found the chiefs and tribesmen loyal and their conduct was 
satisfactory. 

His Excellency was highly pleased to see the chiefs and 
tribesmen maintaining peace througout the country, where 
His Excellency paid a flying visit. 

BATTLE OF CRECY. 

This battle was fought between the French and the Eng¬ 
lish on the 26th August 1346. Tbe French far out-numbered 










the English, but they were undisciplined and ill-led and their 
Genoese cross-bowmen, whose bow-strings had just been so 
wetted by a shower as to be almost useless, gave way before 
the terrible volleys of the English archers, still there was 
sharp-fighting, and at one time Edward, Prince of Wales, a 
lad of 16 on his first campaign was sorely pressed that a 
knight was sent to bis father to beg for reinforcements. The 
king, on learning that his son was neither slained nor wounded 
refused. “Let the boy win bis spurs,” be said “that is, prove 
himself worthy of knight-hood”: & gallantly they were won. 
“Fair son” said the king at the end of the day, embracing the 
young Prince, “God give you perseverance ! you are my son 
for loyally you have acquitted yourself this day; you are wor¬ 
thy to hold land.” 

From E. Thomson’s History of England. 
BATTLE OF ASSAYE. 

Assaye a small village in Hindustan Berar Province situ¬ 
ated 28 miles North of Jaulna, and two hundred and twenty 
North-East from Bombay, is chiefly remarkable as to the spot 
where the battle was fought, on September 23rd 1803 bet¬ 
ween the British and Native forces under Wellington, then 
General Wellesley and the combined armies of Daulat Rao 
Sindhia and the Raja of Bergir. The forces under Wallesley 
amounted to 14300 of which 4500 were brought into action. 
The combined Indian army is variously stated at 30000 to 
50000, and of these about 10000 were regularly disciplined 
infantry commanded by the French officer. Notwithstanding 
this desperity of numbers, the enemy was completely routed, 














and British supremacy established in India. Ninety-eight 
pieces of cannon, 7 standards, the camp aquipage and a large 
quantity of ammunition, fell into the hands of Victors. The 
slain on the side of the British Indian army, amounted tol566 
men killed and wounded, on that of the confederates to 1200. 

From Imperial Gazetteer. 

BATTLF OF WATERLOO. 

Not a year had passed when Bonaparte returned to France 
where he was again received as a Ruler. His old soldiers ral¬ 
lied round him, while the Allied powers whose representatives 
were then sitting at Viena to settle the affairs of Europe, de¬ 
clared him an outlaw and made ready for war, Great Britain 
granted large subsidies, to her allies, whose finances were so 
exhausted that without such an assistance they would have 
been unable to move. The English Commander-in-chief, now 
Duke of Wellington, and the Prussian General Blucher ga¬ 
thered their forces together in the Netherlands. Bonaparte 
designing to interpose between the British and the Prussian 
armies, and to overthrow them separately, crossed the frontier 
to attack them on their own ground. After severe engage¬ 
ments between the English and the French at Quartre Bras, 
and the French and the Prussians at Signy, 16th June 1815 
Wellington and Buonaparte joined battle near Waterloo, 
June 18. The day was stubbornly contested, the British 
standing with the utmost firmness for more than 5 hours un¬ 
til the Prussians as they had promised, came up to their sup¬ 
port. The Imperial guard, the flower of the Buonaparte’s 
army, then advancing to the charge against the British was 

















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( 12 ) 


driven back; upon this Buonaparte seeing that all was lost, 
fled and the victory was complete. The British and the 
Prussians entered Paris; while Buonaparte, finding it impos¬ 
sible to carry out his design of escaping to the United-States 
surrendered himself on board the British Man-of-war Bellero- 
phon, and was sent by the allied sovereigns captive to the 
Island of St. Helena, a British possession where he ended 
his days, May 5, 1821. 

From E. Thomson’s;History of England. 

THE CELEBRATION OF JUBILEE IN INDIA. 

Her Majesty’s Jubilee celebration in India was an uncom¬ 
mon instance, with great pomp & grandeur on the 16th & 17th 
June 1887. A great rejoicing and festival was kept up for 2 
days in all the Native States as well as in British India. There 
was a general holiday in all the offices and schools, large 
Darbars were held in cities and towns, salute guns were fired, 
cities were illuminated, fireworks displayed, speeches and ad¬ 
dresses were delivered. The Native chiefs showed their loyalty 
warmly to the Government. Dancing and singing parties 
were given, schools boys were fed, prisioners were released 
from the jails. Many schools, offices, & bridges were built in 
the memory to the Jubilee. Societies, Institutions and News¬ 
papers were set up and called after the J ubilee. Most hearty 
congratulations with thanks should be given to Her Majesty. 

JUBILEE CELEBRATION IN LONDON. 

I have been favored with this account by Chaubay Khub 

Chand one of the followers of His Highness Maharaja Holkar, 
(in his London trip.) The population of London was about 














( 13 ) 


5 Millions and is equal to a territory 12 miles long & 8 miles 
broad i. e. nearly 125 square miles. 

London is the Capital of England, and is situated on both 
the banks of the River Thames. 

Her Majesty’s Jubilee was celebrated here on the 21st of 
June 1887. Almost all the ruling princes of India, Members 
of the foreign Royal families, Merchants and correspondents 
of the newspapers, Ambassadors, Agents and Representatives 
of Native Princes of India, Military and Civil officers and the 
representatives of nearly all the Nations in the World attended 
the ceremony, that is to say, there was no country, religion 
or community in the world whose members were absent on 
this gracious occasion. 

HER GRACIOUS MAJESTY VICTORIA ALEXANDRIA 
THE QUEEN EMPRESS OF INDIA 
Victoria means, Victorious and Alexandrina means Majes¬ 
tic, like Alexander the Great, because Her Majesty is Victo¬ 
rious, prosperous, and Majestic like the said Greek King. Her 
Majesty’s Dominions are far larger than those of the renown¬ 
ed Greek King; Viz—India with its adjacent Islands, and 
England with its neighbouring Isles, that is Ceylon, Singha- 
pur Malacca, Australia, New-zealand, Southern Africa, Ame¬ 
rica, Canada and the Islands about it. 

All men know that the Sun does not rise and set at the 
one and the same time in every country: besides this, the Do¬ 
minions of Her Majesty are very large therefore it is a well 
known fact that the Sun never sets in the Dominions of Her 
Majesty, that is the sun is always shining in one of the parts 
of Her Majesty’s Dominions. 









( 14 ) 


Whatever praise may be said of Her Majesty still much of 
it remains, which is beyond expression. In short whatever 
good qualities the parents wish to be in their children and 
children wish them to be in their parents, all of them are found 
in Her Majesty. Owing to the lamentable death of Her Ma¬ 
jesty’s husband and mother, Her Majesty always likes to live 
in lone-liness. At the same time there is no difference in the 
discharge of the sovereign free and impartial justice to the 
subjects. All of the subjects should pray for her long life and 
happiness, who is so kind and just and under whose reign the 
people of this country enjoy undisturbed peace. 

THE JUBILEE CELEBRATION AT JODHPUR. 

The Jubilee marks the most important event of the year. 
It was observed with great eclat in February 1887, in Mar- 


war. 


( I ) There was a Grand Darbar of the Nobles, Sirdars 
and high officials of the State, held on the evening 
of the 17th February at Rai-ka-bag. 

( 2 ) An Imperial salute of 101 guns was fired. 

( 3 ) A review of the Marwar forces was held. 

( 4 ) A permanent Jubilee memorial was adopted, 

( 5 ) A dinner and BALL was provided. 

( 6 ) 50 prisioners were released. 

( 7 ) A general holiday was observed. 

( 8 ) There were illuminations and pyrotechinc works. 
On the 17th February 1887, the grand Darbar was held 
at Rai-ka-bag at 5 O’ clock in the evening. 

All the ladies and gentlemen having taken their respective 









( 15 ) 


seats, His Highness the Maharaja arrived in due course, and 
was received with a few sepoys of the cavalry and infantry, 
who were arranged in review order, the bands playing, “God 
save the Queen” The formal business of the Darbar being 
over, Major E. A. Fraser, Additional Political Agent and 
Guardian to the Heir-Apparent of Jodhpur in the absence of 
Col. Powlett the Resident, who was unavoidably prevented 
by some important Boundry works, in the Sirohi Border, rose 
and read the following address on behalf of His Highness the 
Maharaja, the Vernacular translation of the same being read 
by Munshi Hardayal Sinha Secretary to the Musahib-Ald. 

ADDRESS. 

“Ladies, gentlemen and Sardars, I rise by desire of H. H. 
the Maharaja of Jodhpur and in the unavoidable absence of 
Col. Powlett, the Resident, on other duty, to adress a few 
words to this assembly. In the first place H. H. wishes me 
to state briefly what has been done in Jodhpur to commemo¬ 
rate Her Majesty’s Jubilee, as possibly some of those present 
are not fully acquainted with the arrangements that have been 
-made. A sum of Rs. 15000 has been granted in aid of the Ins¬ 
titute in London. The public offices which are in course of 
construction at an esimate of over 3^ lacks of Rupees will be 
considered as permanent memorials of this occasion. 

A portrait in oils of His Highness’s son and heir Sardar- 
Sinh is to be presented t:> the Queen Empress. 

Further a grand Darbar of the Nobles and the officisls 
of the State is held this day, with the review of the troops, to 
be followed by illumination and fire-works. The release of 











il 

4 


( 16 ) 






50 prisioners from the jail, Royal salute, school feasts, chant* 
able gifts and alms to the poor and banquets. 

Similar holidays, illuminations and festivities have also 
been arranged in the districts away from the Capital. 

His Highness has tried in every way to make the occasion 
as much as possible one of the public and general rejoicings. 

It affords the Maharaja great pleasure to see you around 
him to day and to feel that the hearts of all present are stirred 
by a true spirit of loyalty & devotion to our wise, noble, and 
gracious Sovereign, the Queen Empress, whose love and sym¬ 
pathy towards all classes in her Eastern Dominions has been 
so freely given during her long and prosperous reign. 

Ruling chiefs in the position of the Maharaja are well 
aware how intimately the security of their States is connected 
with the permanence and stability of the great Empire which 
the event of the past half century, have served to develope 
and consolidate. 

May long live H. H. the Maharaja of Jodhpur, who is 
glorious and loyal to the British Crown. May he enjoy hap¬ 
piness, with all his brothers and family. This is the prayer 
of Pandit Lai Chand. 

H. R H. THE PRINCE OF WALES. 

His Royal Highness, the Prince of Wales, visited India in 
1876. Rajahs Maharajahs, chiefs and people of India, who 
cannot go to England were satisfied to see H. R. H. the son 
of their Empress here. H. R H. made many Native Princes, 
his honourary Aide-de-camp and bestowed the medal thereof 
on them especially ou Maharaja Ivishore Sinhji Sahib, the 












Commander-in-Chief of the Mar war Forces and brother to 
His Highness, the Maharaja of Jodhpur received both of the 
above mentioned honours, at the hands of His Royal High- 
nees with great pleasure. Besides this, His Royal Highness 
appointed Maharajadhiraj Col. Sir Pratap Sinh, the brother 
of the above-mentioned Maharaja of Jodhpur, his Aide-de- 
camp and gave him the medal thereof and showed him special 
kindness bestowing upon him, these honours for his life, pay¬ 
ing the price of the medal from this Royal Bighness’ own 
pocket. At the present Silver Wedding of their Royal High¬ 
nesses Her Majesty the Queen Empress, in person paid a vi¬ 
sit of congratulation at their R. Highnesses, at Marlborough 
House, and remained at the banquet which was held there in 
the evening, at which the Royal Princes, and other members 
of the Foreign Royalties, were also present. In celebration 
of the event, London was gorgeously illuminated. 

Pandit Lalchand, gives his best congratulation, on this 
Wedding to their Royal Highnesses. May long live, their R. 
Highnesses, the Prince and Princess of Wales, under the 
protection, of Her Majesty. 

His Royal Highness, the Duke of Edenborough. 

H. R. H. the Duke of Edenborough also, visited -this 
country and thus, the chiefs, and the people, had an opportu¬ 
nity, fo seeing the son of their sovereign in their own country. 
General rejoicing was kept up throughout the country. Great 
enthusiasm was shown in giving H. R. H. entertainments, 
with dancing and singing, fireworks, and illumination. By 
the grace, of the Almighty God, H. R. Highness, returned to 



















Lis native land, safely, after visiting the important places in 
India. May long live the Duke, the son of our Gracious Em¬ 
press in sound health. 

To be presented to H. R. H. the Duke of Connought, 
Commander-in-Chief of Bombay. 

1. Her Majesty the Queen Empress of India, has been 
very gracious to send your R. H., with Her Royal H. the 
Duchess of Connought, to India. 

2. We the people of India, who cannot go to England, 
owing to certain causes, and cannot see Her Majesty have the 
good fortune, to see your Royal Highness here. 

3. But, we are so much pleased to see your R. H. as if 
we see Her Majesty; according to our sacred writing “a son 
is the image of the parent’.’ 

4. Your Royal Highness’s appointment as the Comman¬ 
der-in-Chief of the Bombay Presidency is our good luck. 

We offer our congratulations on your Highness’s this ap¬ 
pointment. 

5. May your R. H. with your family and brothers en¬ 
joy happy and glorious life for ever, under the protection of 
Her Majesty. 

6. We shall be highly pleased to see your R. Highness 
appointed as the Commander-in-Chief of India & afterwards 
the Yiceroy and Governor-General of this country. This is 
prayer of Pandit Lalchand. 


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SPEECH BY HIS ROYAL HIGHNESS THE DUKE OF 
CONNOUGHT OF THE VOLUNTEER ARTILLERY CORPS 
Bombay 14th February 1888. 

This morning the Duke of Connought inspected the Ar¬ 
tillery Corps addressing the men H. R. H. said:-“when your 
corps was first raised it was considered questionable whether 
Volunteer Artillery here would be a success; but the few 
months you have been in existence has removed all doubts, 
and Major Roughton is to be congratulated upon the grati¬ 
fying results which;his great care and attention have achieved. 
I am convinced the movement was one in the right direction 
and that each member of the corps has devoted due and proper 
attention to his duty, you have done a great deal of useful 
work; but remember that there is much to be done. I know 
you have laboured under difficulties, but hope here may be 
some means by which you will be enabled to drill under more 
favourable circumstances and to have head-quarters of your 
own, with dummy gens and stores close at hand. In your 
past drills you have had all the disadvantages of makeshift 
arrangement which I trust will be speedily improved upon. 

I am very glad you have come forward to form this corps for 
both here and in Calcutta, Volunteer A. tillery corps were 
much needed. Owing to the many calls for artillery in all 
parts of India some auxiliary assistance in these garrisons was 
necessary. I am therefore very much pleased to find that so 
great an interest is being taken by you in your work, and to 
see you have attained such proficiency.” 

May God keep such a Duke safe and healthy and pro¬ 
long his life for ever. This is the prayer of Pandit Lalchand. 












( 20 ) 


ROYALTY AT A NATIVE WEDDNIG 
On Wednesday, at the invitation of Mr. Vurjeevandas 
Madhavadas, the head of well-known & ancient Madhavadas 
Rnnchhordas family, and of Mr. Herkissandas. Narotamdas 
Mr. Vurjeevandas’s nephew, their Royal Highnesses the Duke 
and Duchess of Connought were pleased to honour by their 
presence the performance of the marriage ceremonies at Bom¬ 
bay of Mr. Harkissunda’s daughter. 

This is the first joyous occasion, when the member of 
the English Royalty, the son of our Most Gracious Queen 
Empress, joined in the marriage ceremony of a principal na¬ 
tive gentleman (the subject of Her Majesty. ) Owing to this 
cause the whole of the Indian subjects are extremely loyal to 
1 Her majesty, such as the people were faithful and loyal to the 
Emperor Akbar and many Rajputes sacrificed their lives in 
his cause, in many battles against his formidable enemies. 
May God protect Her majesty for ever, this is the prayer of 
Pandit Lalchand. 


HIS EXCELLENCY LOBD DUFFERIN THE VICEROY AND 
GOVERNOR GENERAL OF INDIA. 


The people of India generally are praising Lord Dufferin 
who tried his best to make the Indian population happy and 
appreciated the loyalty and knowledge thereof bestowed upon 
^ them the honors and the titles with the medals such as H. Ex 
cellency did upon three Pandits at Benares, at the opening of 
the Dufferin Bridge there. AHso Pandit Lalchand wishes to 
rceeive similar honors at His Excellency’s hands, as the re- 












( 21 ) _ 

ward for his work [“The Jubilee Pramodika” H. Excellency’s 
sweet speeches filled the hearts of Aryans with pleasure, and 
the eloquent speeches were agreeable to their ears. His Ex¬ 
cellency always has extreme consideration to obey the Views 
of H. Majesty’s orders. He gave at all times, advice knowledge 
and ease to the subjects and made the chiefs and tribesmen 
happy while on his frontier tour and opened a bridge across 
the Ganges at Benares in his name. 

I write an address as a congratulation at the opening of 
the Bridge. 

ADDRESS 

0 Lord Dufferin ! thou, by openinglthe comfortable bridge 
hast removed the troubles which the inhabitants of Kashi had 
to suffer from rtin, cold, air, Bailway and Sun when they had 
no bridge over the River. These troubles could not be re¬ 
moved by any one except God. 

Thou hast opened the Dufferin Bridge for the comfort of 
the people. May this act of benevolence prolong thy life. 
Thou with thy family mayst ever enjoy happy and glorious 
life. 

By thy justice lion and goat, having forsaken their natu¬ 
ral enmity drink water at one spot. As thou art the hero of 
heroes, so thou mayst live with glory. The opening of the 
bridge may be welcome to thee. This is the prayer of Pan¬ 
dit Lalchand. Yours well-wisher 

V. B. P. Lalchand M. R. A. S. (London) Guru to 
Maharaja Ivishore Sinhji Sahib 
Commander-in-chief Mar war forces Jodhpur. 


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( 22 ) 


GOVERNMENT SECRETARIES. 

I have to thank the Govt. Secretaries and other European 
high Officials of Her Majesty’s Government who have been 
kind enough to favor me, with the letters of thanks, as men¬ 
tioned below. I have written more than one Shlokes (stanza) 
in honor of each of them. 

Foreign, Military and Private Secretaries to the Govern - 
nors of Bombay and Madras, His Excellency, the Comman¬ 
der-in-chief of India the Commissioners of Delhi & Benares. 

Col. Waltar, the Agent Governor General for Rajputana. 

Col. Waltar has tried his best to benefit the people and 
treated the ruling chiefs with great kindness and honoured 
them with titles and medals by visiting the capitals of their 
states such as he did to H. H. the Maharana of Udeypur, as 
follows:— 

INVESTITURE AT UDEYPUR 
The Mah&rfin&a of Udeypur, on the 10th December, Satur¬ 
day afternoon was invested with the insignia of Grand Com¬ 
mander of the Star of India by Col. Walter, in brilliant Dar- 
bar, held in outer Court of the palace. 

In investing H. H. CM. WalteUsaid the pleasure of being 
a few days in Udeypur again enhanced the pleasure he felt in 
presenting the Maharana with the insignia of an Order insti¬ 
tuted as the highest mark of Royal favour for important ser¬ 
vices. Mew&r had been ever faithful to the British Crown & 
he only hoped the Star of the house would ever shine bright. 
The Star about the Maharana’s breast and the collar might to 
regarded as symbols of the links in the chain of loyalty and 


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( 23 ) 


friendship which always bound Mewar to the British Empire. 

I beg to offer my heart feft congratulations to H. H. the 
Maharana upon this mark of Imperial appreciation, which 
have been bestowed on him. Long may he live and the admir¬ 
ing affection gratitude, and loyalty of his people and in the 
enjoyments of the confidence of our beloved Queen Empress. 

Col. P. W. Powlett the Resident of Jodhpur. 

Since his appointment in the Jodhpur Residency, he has 
made the people happy and the Native States have received 
innumerable benefits at his hands. May God, keep him in 
Rajputana with continued promotion. Such as a kind-hearted 
Official can be found by good luck, for this reason we Mar- 
waries are very fortunate to have him as our Resident May 
God keep him in sound health and give prolonged life. 

THANKS TO GO!) THIO ALMIGHTY CRKATOR. 

I write seven Shlokes ( stanzas) in ce ebration, as thanks 
to the Almighty Creator, who has been kind enough to make 
me finish the book, without any obstacle. 

Chaubey Raghnath Prasad the translator of the book. 

In conclusion, I have to thank my worthy friend, Chaubey 
Raghunath Prasad, the late Head Master of the Rampur Ro- 
helkhand School and the late Naib Vakil, Indore Darbar in 
the Residency Indore who has assisted me in my composition 
furnishing me with important matters as well as translating 
the book for me. I have found Raghnath Prasad by the 
PRASAD (favor) of Raghunath (Ram) Vishnu (the supreme 
being of the Hindus.) 





















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V9C 




SANSKRIT SHLOIvAS addressed to His Excellency the 
Right Honourable George Robert Canning Harris, Baron 
Harris Governor of Bombay, by the Author of the “ Jubili 
Pramodika,” Yidya Bhaskar Pt. Lalchandra M. R. A. S. 
(London) Guru to Maharaja Kishore Singh ji Commander- 
in-chief, and brother to his Highness the Maharaja Saheb 
of Jodhpur G. C. S. L 




^ ii sfr- 



^,nr. 

Oh Lord Harris ! Thou by accepting the Post of under 
Secretary ( in London ) obtained high honors through (thy) 
just and brave actions. ( 1. ) 




r\ ^ 


Tv ^ 


II 





























^fa’TOrll JT^WT- 

irii 

Thy extreme cleverness] in the manly game of Cricket 
( which is played only by brave persons ) has given thee the 
first place (amongst best cricketeers. ) ( 2. ) 

'w 

3=4 II ■Mii 'i.'t I nt-^insf 

11311 

The inhabitants of Kent showered their blessings at thy 
departure, on ( thy ) accepting the Governorship of Bombay 
( which is obtained by meritorious persons alone ) since thou 
fully deserved all such praise. ( 3. ) 

%#RTT frwr: PPrar 
R^frT spr SRTtfa- 

II f'npPTfWT- 


► 
























As a p^oof of their sincere love towards thee for [ thy ] 
ever w r onted kindness & endearing' desposition the inhabitants 
of Kent expressed their sorrow same like the people of Vraj 


T*®- 

r> 

& 


testified at the departure of Krishna [an incarnation of God] 
to Mathura. [ 4 ] 

Trt ii mz mn 

jt- 

iPTR’TH II v, II 




[ Consequent to thy appointment to this exalted new; 
Post ] the members of the Association gave (thee) an address 
at the Conservative Club Hall, in reply to which thou ex¬ 
pressed (thy) hereditary love of Indian people and stated that 
the compliments given (thee) in the Address would be more 
pleasing on (thy ) return ( Home ) full of good wishes of the 
people of India. ( 5. ) 





















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* 


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^RT Wt II MrR Rg l 'H PT- 
tR#Ji <jr tr^fr r g^- 
§*tr II $ || 

( Before thy departure to India ) thou hadst a long and 
happy interview with H. Majesty the Queen Empress of India 
at Windsor Castle, as also with H. Royal Highness the Prince 
of Wales; and (thy ) departure was also greatly honoured by 
the presence (on the shore) of Righf Hon’ble Mr. Stanhope as 
well as Sir James Ferguson Baronet. ( 6.) 

faf=R H- 
o5ff: RfH ff- 

fR firr : r n ^Rrsrfii^ijr 

5 THR TTRTI 
R’JR J^Tir II \3 II 

The grand Banquet that was given (thee ) at the North 
Brook Club was graced by the presence of several noble Lords 









on which occasion Lord Randolph Churchill in a speech paid 
a fitting complement to {thy) many virtues and philanthropic 
views. ( 7. ) 

stress^: 

septic ^ j^pt pftpr ’Tfr- 

I! c II 

( On the above occasion ) Lord Randolph Churchill also 
expressed “that it reflects very creditable on the wise policy 
of Government in selecting thee ( as the future Governor of 
Bombay ) who had long connection with the India office and 
consequent intimate knowledge of the Indian subjects” ( 8 ) 

?Tf % II qpTtw gspRRrRT- 
II 5.11 

^ _ 




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p* 

p* 

► 

p* 

p* 


«► 


W - _____:-—J 















At the Farewell Entertainment (given thee) at Redwitch 
thou kindly expressed (thy) desire to do good to Indian sub¬ 
jects during the tenure of ( thy ) office since thou hast gr§at 
regard for their welfare. ( 9. ) 




— _r*\_♦ r\ r 

stT^T ^TF-T??TT- 




r\ rs r\ 


an ?r- 

Tff^r^Tsr^ II?o|| 

Thou who art graced with all such noble virtues. Thou 
being first amongst the just, art also a good Donor; may thou 
ever rise in thy present exalted Post and may (thou) live long 
with ( thy illustrious ) family with ever-increasing fame. 

These are the benedictions of Pandit Lalchandra. 






_ ^ss- 


mwv&n ^mr^r <r- 

^rHrw^rrftr- 


r\ ♦ 


















<N ♦ 

*T3w 


^^isnilR+i i 

WFTfT3- 


Snr^sRm: tun 


0 Imperial Majesty ! Since the Almighty having been 
displeased with the late transgressing rulers of India appointed 
thee to be our Sovereign. We cannot be full well thankful ior 
the ease and comfort and several benefits conferred upon us 
during thy rule. 1. 


rs 


V 1 

rx 



1 O 1 ^*1 1 



FflTR^TRT^rr 
Rf^TT IRII 

Our country is called “Aryavarta” whose main connection 
was with scientfic knowledge, but of which we were unfortu¬ 
nately deprived by our late great tyranical masters. 2. 


^rwr f^r^fwr 3^- 
Fwr wr $r 

r%FrRr%FT 1 rwrjmrrww- 























sjftiiiWHinHl I c\ 

fS T^rsnrrcT *rr nmrR- 
^rr f^r flwnri ir^u 

If a wise man went to Benares for study, he received his 
education though a little befitting him through innumerable 
difficulties such as the hard service of his teacher, his birth 
from a noble family, and his long student-ship—but to day 
such education is being imparted, as the fruit of Thy kind 
virtues, to the children of patwarees and cultivators. 3. 

spr- 



fa i 3R<T^r3r%- 




ht: iivii 


What we never dreamt a dream of—such as the Tele¬ 
graphs, Rails, Post-office, Canals, Bundhs, Bridges, Hospi- 
als, Water-pumps, Steam-boats and others—a common man 
now enjoys, by the fortune of Thee, these blessings with con¬ 
tentment. 4. 

*r- 


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?nrr nr wrraRre- 

JTmrr i ft- 

wft ^pt: ^rpiI fttr- 
?rr«i <RTf t^ph u ’■*, u 

The most wonderful rope of Law which Thou hast twined 
for us lets loose to the bound of it, but confiues him who is 
unbound. 5. 


frHfsnrFTT 

:rt $ 1*pnt- 
*rcn ttvv ^rrf^r ^F’pr- 

The brilliant fire of Thy military circles, blazes violently 
and is wondertul because the bold but enimical characters who 
fall into it are burnt to ashes, but grass-eaters (i. e. whpyield 
submission ) escape its devouring flames. 6. 

qiFrT *T- 






















R R *T>J»Rr: I 

RRT: TR'flmRR 5BR- 

^ RJTFT spRT im 

We the natives of India, are gratified in our wishes only 
under the shade of thy Royal duties. 0 Raj-Rajeshwari ! 
Thou yieldest an ambitious man whatever is desired of Thee 
and hence Thou art like the fabulous tree of Indra’s heaven. 

RfRRfR 5>R# SRqfcr 
*PRT :TR> ; W RRirW- 

forcft ^RT: SIP^T si- 

ikii 

Many a Queen has brought forth fortunate girls, but the 
giving birth to a fortunate and virtuous girl like Thee is at¬ 
tributed only to Thy mother, as there are many quarters 
which produce the lights of the stars, but the East is the only 
quarter which produces the innumerable rays of sun. 

_^s_r\ ^ 

W" 





























jkJLMJUk^. 


r\ 


ce ^fa<Siw4lR$( i 

ircmr *T»nrar fr- 
ctpt^fr i frcrfT sRR*r- 
f^wsPTRfr^rt ^Tr- 

f^SrRFR^ IIS.II 


We people oilerj up prayers with exquisite delight and 
pleasure that God grant Thee immortality, exalt Thy glory, 
and mayest Thou live in perpetual happiness with the mem¬ 
bers of Royal Family and English gentry. These are the be¬ 
nedictions of Pandit Lalchandra V. B. 9. 


r 


»2S« 


i^TT ^rr +iM^ r.—rt i 


^rnrf^nwf ii^ii 

Her most Gracious Majesty the Queen Empress has been 
most kind to the Indian people in sending Her Grandson 
(Long live;) to India. 10. 



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%5TrsnF^ s r ^s n stm: i 



Although very remotely anxious, we, the natives of India, 


$ 

■•$ 

W- 

■•Sji 


cannot go, as the fruit of our sins, to England to have an in¬ 
terview with Her Imperial Majesty. 2. 




3 

■4 

i 


ir^nrit % i 

ll^H 

We have seen Her Majesty through the person of Her 
Grandson, Your Royal Highness, the gem-head of heroes, 




most glorious and master politician. 3. 



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m’TiT i t’-diPwKgfepr- 


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We feel most gratified by tbe sight of your R. Highness, 
who is the most respectable master of the brave, conversant 
with the most brilliant virtues, most learned, and well-versed 
in the arts of war and game. 4. 

"5- 


7t 

I ^TT: *FTT^T 

jnrr 

oratimf ii'j.ii 

Oh ! Prince Albert Victor I thou full moon begetted from 
the Ocean womb of Her Imperial Majesty, thou hast dispelled 
the darkness of our troubles and gratified our wishes by the 
touch of thy lotus feet upon our ground; hence the sight is 
to us the natural out-come of our past virtues. 5. 



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_ sjRrsSiMHite+i i <*,1 

*r^r i tRc^jfirarat *hr- 
*i^it ^ra^rfr^TTf^nr- 
f^wrsr: ii ^ii 

Possessed of very great energy as thou art, we wish thee 
making progress in the unparalleled courage of heroes, which 
gives great delight in a battle, and that thy love of devotion 
to Her Majesty may continue to be ever on the increase. 6. 






*^3 7- 

ii^ii 


May thou Hve in uninterrupted happiness, with the Royal 
family. May thy feet ever shine splendidly as the gem-crest 
of kings, may thou conquer the 4 quarters by virtue of thy 
prowess. These are the benedictions of Vidya-Bhasker Pt. 
Lalchandra who is filled with utmost gladness by thine ap¬ 
pearance. 7. 















-^jg, 4^- .-^r. ,^r:n?^r. .^l^i^rJ^L: ,T^r. r.*?^. r'gfer,.^^ 


Vi 


^hkhMfin%r i 


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«fhT5feS 5 K+«Jdi'K^ 

II# 



■)fi%Fi'+. Pt^r^vTspvt *rr 
d i sm arcr-jrarnn: '< 

0 Colonel Trevar ! the best of the brave, yon, having 
filled the seat of Justice as Commissioner of Aj mere, made 
the people of Marwara comfortable and happy. 1. 

^f^nfiwfV^ir^.Tr- 
?st: II vn^igw^TT?: 

^tshtr: irii 

You are the pervader, among the virtue-loving people of 
Marwara, of the sweet fragrance of cordial reception;—Nay 
the light of the true renown of glory in the shape of the bril¬ 
liant group of the rays of the full Moon. 2. 

♦ r\ ^ 






















y MMMMMMMMMMMM * * A m 







ii «fr*r^Tnri^TT%- 

If^^T^nT'TOiTt^R3I^5%- 
fopft ll^ll 

We the natives of Rajputana, think ourselves very fortu¬ 
nate that a politician like yourself has been appointed Agent 
to the Govern or-General by the British Government which 
appointment you so rightly deserved. 8. 

^stlfa RjT^lRlHdHR- 

5 : i 


mi 

May God keep you, the patron and friend of learning, on 
this seat along with your family, with uninterrupted happi¬ 
ness and daily advancement, to our great comfort; may you 
progress in the exercise of your power and virtue ! These are 
the benedictions of Pandit Lalchandra Y. B. 4. 

























JLjyLjyyyLi^jyLiyyyyyfeiLiyb^^ 


^f%3r5PTrT^Er i 


Vi 


SANSKRIT SHLORES addressed to His Excellency the 
Most Honourable Henry Charles Keith Petty Fitzmaurice, 
Marquis of Lansdowne, G. M. S. G, C. M. G., G. M. I. E., 
Viceroy and Govenor-General of India, by the Author of the 
“Jubilee Pramodika” V. Bhaskar P. Lai Chandra M.R. A.S- 
“London” Honorary Vice-President of the Indian Authors’ 
Society “Cawnpur” Inventor of Pushtikar Hitaisini Sabha 
“Jodhpur” and Guru to Maharaja Kishore Sinha ji, Com- 
mander-in-Chief, and brother to His Highness the 
Maharaja of Jodhpur, G. C. S. I. 


sft ji- 

^PR s TI II ? II 

0 Lord Lansdowne ! Thou removed all the distress of the 
people of Canada, when Governor there, and thou established 
justice and order as far as possible, which have spread thy 
good name and fame throughout that country. 1 

*r- 














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stht 

^ri^raf^r: 
srra^r 

II R II 


Her Majesty the Queen Empress, who is famous for hav¬ 
ing all good qualities and virtues, conferred a high boon in¬ 
deed on the people ot India by having been graciously pleased 
to depute thee, who is so wise and experienced, to the post of 
the Viceroy aud Governor-General of India; and this we all 


look as the greatest good fortuue of ours, 2 . 


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JRTRT II \ II 


Whenever thou made a tour in India for the benefit and 
prosperity of its subjects, thou always gave in public Darbars 
and Assemblies such excellent speeches full of advice as en- 


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liven the hearts of the audience and imparted great advan¬ 
tage to the wise, to the Native! Chiefs, and to the people in ge¬ 
neral. ( 3) 

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j%?TC II V II 

Lately the people ( Hindus ) of India set aside their old 
rules of marriage and began to marry girls under 12 years of 
age, which resulted in the death of many a girl and the insti¬ 
tution of a great number of cases f in Courts.!) 4. 

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On this thou being very kind & taking pity on the people 
( the Hindus) re-established the old rules laid down by our 
ancestors in |our religious books for marriage, in consequence 
of which all of them will now fearlessly follow their religions 
on this point; and the poor girls shall le ever happy to get 
rid of the ill-treatment by the cruel. 5. 

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They who follow their old religion consider thee as their 
( Dharmaraj ) ( a deity who confers joy and happiness.) while 
those who are unjust and cruel regard thee like “ Jamraj ” 
( a deity who deals punishment) just as the sky appears in 
different colours ^possessed by the glasses through which it is 
seen. 6. 



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The fame and fear have destroyed the wicked and the bad 
characters in the same way as rising of the sun melts down 
large snow-hills into water and sweeps them off. 7. 

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People are rewarded or punished by the Almighty accord¬ 
ing to their actions in this world; and thou treatest the 
Chiefs and and the subjects of India in the like manner. 8. 

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ii a. II 


May thou together with thy family live ever in good health, 
may the jewels, adorning the heads of the Native| Princes, al¬ 
ways shine at thy feet “they may continue to bow their heads 
at thy feet t, e. to be feudatory;” and may thou be ever fa¬ 
mous and glorious by fully conquering the countries of the 
unjust through thy excellent policy. These are the benedic¬ 
tions of Pandit Lalchandra. 9. 



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JUL -2 4; 131*5