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Ministry of Ministère de 1 se StClair Avenue VWast ISS. ■vwxwSt.ClMrouaat 



Suite 100 Bureau 100 

Toronto ON lyUVIPS Toronto ON M4V 1 P5 



Environment l'Environnement 

and Energy et de l'Énergie 



June 29, 1994 



Ladies and Gentlemen: 

Last year I reiterated Ontario's commitment to control substances that destroy the 
ozone layer, which protects us from the harmful effects of ultraviolet radiation. 

Guided by our commitment to the terms of the international agreement, the Montreal 
Protocol, Ontario has regulated ozone-depleting substances used in aerosols, foam 
manufacturing, refrigerators and air conditioners. We have also regulated halons used 
in fire-extinguishers. 

Today, I am pleased to release for public consultation two draft regulations that would 
lead to the control of solvents and sterilants containing ozone-depleting substances 
such as CFCs, HCFCs and methyl chloroform and others. 

Ontario was the first jurisdiction in Canada to control ozone-depleting substances and 
now has a comprehensive program limiting their release. The proposed solvents and 
sterilants regulations, combined with those already in place, will control 98 per cent 
of these harmful substances. 

I invite you and your associates to-fiQj^ide written comments based on your 
experience and knowledge of solvents. Your contributions are important to us, and 
will be used to refme the draft solvents regulation prior to its fmal release. 

I encourage you to read the enclosed material outlining details of the proposed 
solvents regulation. If you would like information on either regulation or have any 
questions, please call the ministry's Public Information Centre at 1-800-565-4923 or 
call (416) 323-4321 in Toronto. 

Yours sincerely, 

C.J. (Bud) Wildman 

Minister 

Enclosures 



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'^^^-^ News Release 



Ontario communiqué 

Ministry of Ministère de 

Environment l'Environnement 
and Energy et de l'Énergie 

June 29, 1994 

Ontario protects against ozone-damaging solvents and sterilants 

Ontario is setting a strict timetable to phase out ozone-depleting sterilants and solvents. 
When approved, these regulations and others implemented by the government will set controls on 98 
per cent of all ozone-depleting substances throughout the province. 

Two draft regulations were released today for a 30-day public comment period by 
Environment and Energy Minister Bud Wildman. 

Ontario was the first jurisdiction in Canada to regulate ozone-depleting substances and now 
has a comprehensive program to limit their release. Past regulations have dealt with the use of 
chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) in aerosols, foam manufacturing and refrigerants. The province has 
also regulated the use of halons in fire extinguishers. 

One of the new regulations would phase out the manufacture of solvents containing specific 
Class 1 ozone-depleting substances such as CFCs, carbon tetrachloride and methyl chloroform as of 
January 1, 1996. Their discharge, use or transfer will be phased out by July 1, 1996. After 1998, 
the regulation will prohibit storage of these materials. It also sets a January 2000 phaseout deadline 
for the less damaging Class 2 chemicals, hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), which some users are 
considering as transitional solvents until they are ready to change to alternate solvents which do not 
deplete the ozone layer in the upper atmosphere. 

The second regulation would prohibit the discharge, manufacture, use or transfer of specific 
Class 1, CFC-based ozone-depleting sterilants effective January 1, 1996. It would also prohibit 
storage of these materials after January 1, 1998. Like the solvents regulation, the sterilants 
regulation sets phaseout deadlines for the use of less damaging HCFCs. These HCFCs will be 
banned after January 1, 2000 and their storage prohibited by 2002. 



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"Ontario is living up to Canada's international commitment to eliminate the ozone-depleting 
chemicals that threaten our environment and human health," Mr. Wildman said. 



Written comments on the draft regulations must be mailed by August 2, 1994, to 

The Honourable C.J. Wildman 
Minister of Environment and Energy 
135 St. Clair Ave. W. 
Toronto, Ontario 
M4V 1P5 



30- 



For further information: Minister's office (416) 323-4360 

Gerry Merchant (416) 323-4333 

Public Affairs and Communications Branch 



2/2... 15094.NR 



BACKGROUNDER 

Regulation phasing out ozone-depleting solvents 

A draft regulation was released June 29, 1994 for a 30-day public comment f>eriod by 
Environment and Energy Minister Bud Wildman. The regulation would phase out the 
discharge, manufacture, use or transfer of specific Class 1 ozone-depleting solvents (ODS) 
such as chlorofluorocarbons (CFC), carbon tetrachloride and methyl chloroform. It will 
ultimately prohibit storage of these materials. 

The regulation also sets a phaseout deadline for the less damaging Class 2 chemicals, 
hydrochlorofluorocartx)ns (HCFC), which some users are considering as transitional solvents 
until they are ready to change to solvents which do not deplete ozone. 

The draft regulation: 

• Prohibits the discharge, use or transfer of specific Class 1 and Class 2 ozone- 
depleting solvents (ODS) after July 1, 1996 and Jan. 1, 2000, respectively. 

• Prohibits making Class 1 and Class 2 ODS solvents as of Jan. 1, 1996 and 2000 
respectively. 

• Prohibits the storage of Class 1 and Class 2 ODS solvents after July 1, 1998 and Jan. 
1, 2002, respectively. 

• Requires a report for Class 1 ODS solvents stored after July 1, 1996, and Class 2 
ops solvents stored after Jan. 1, 2000, to be available on request by the Ministry of 
Environment and Energy. 

• Exempts ODS Class 1 and 2 solvents used for research purposes related to the study 
of the ozone layer. 

• Exempts use where the ODS Class 1 and 2 solvents used in a process are converted to 
another substance which is not an ODS Class 1 or 2 solvent. 

• Exempts use where the ODS Class 1 or 2 solvents are created and then converted to 
another substance which is not a Class 1 or 2 solvent. 

This regulation overrides conditions included in existing certificates of approval for 
Class 1 and 2 solvents. 



1/3... 01094. FYI 



Background 

Ozone-dq)leting substances cause serious environmental and health problems. They 
destroy the ozone layer that protects us from ultraviolet (UV-B) radiation and they contribute 
to the greenhouse effect. 

UV-B radiation causes skin cancer, cataracts, crop and material damage. 

Canada signed the Montreal Protocol and its Copenhagen amendments which ban the 
production and import of: CFCs, methyl chloroform and carbon tetrachloride by 1996; 
halons in 1994; and HCFCs by 2030. 

Unlike the federal regulations, the Ontario legislation will regulate the use of specified 
Class 1 and 2 ozone-depleting substances used in solvent formulations. The new regulation 
sets a phaseout schedule for ODS that complements the Montreal Protocol. 

Discharge/emissions of ODS into the environment and limitations of their storage will 
be prohibited, making the Ontario regulation the most comprehensive legislation in Canada. 

Industry Information 

In Canada, about 4.5 per cent of total CFC consumption, 100 per cent of methyl 
chloroform produced and sold and about 3 per cent of carbon tetrachloride consumed were 
used as solvents in 1992. 

In Ontario, an estimated 160 tonnes (4.5 per cent) of a total of 3,521.6 tonnes of 
CFCs and a total of 5,000 tonnes of methyl chloroform were used as solvent in 1992. In 
1990, a total of 216 tonnes of carbon tetrachloride was used primarily as feedstock for the 
production of CFCs, with a small portion used in some solvent applications. 

Solvents are used for cleaning purposes in a variety of manufacturing processes and 
are also used in adhesives, in paints and inks and in dry-cleaning. Aboiit 85 per cent of 
methyl chloroform and 97 per cent of CFC-113 are used in electronics, precision, metal and 
general cleaning. 

CFC-113 and Methyl chloroform are no longer produced in Canada. Cornwall 
Chemicals Co. still produces small quantities of carbon tetrachloride in Canada. 

Alternative cleaning chemical and technologies exist for these chemicals. Many of 
the larger companies in particular have already adopted non-ODS solvent alternatives. 
Examples include IBM, Northern Telecom and Litton Systems. Others who have not, 
should realize long-term cost-savings as the price of ODS solvents increases and availability 
decreases. 

2/3... 01094.FYI 



Substitute cleaning chemicals include: 

Other chlorinated solvents; 
Organic solvents; 
Hydrocarbons; 
Perfluorocarbons; and 
HCFCs. 

Alternative cleaning systems include: 

• Semi-aqueous cleaning; 

• Aqueous cleaning; 

• Non-solvent cleaning technologies; and 

• No-clean production systems. 

Substitute solvent chemicals and technologies also exist for: adhesives; coatings and inks; and 
dry cleaning. The alternatives for adhesive solvents include: water-based and high-solid 
formulations; hot-melt adhesives; and radiation curing. Similarly, alternatives for coatings 
and inks include: water-based; high-solids; and powder formulations. Dry-cleaning 
alternatives include: perchloroethylene, petroleum products and HCFCs. The latter are 
considered transitional substances which are also destined for phaseout. 

Public comment on the proposed regulation must be mailed or delivered by August 2, 1994 
to: 

Solvents and Sterilants 

Industrial Emissions Section 

Program Development Branch 

Ontario Ministry of Environment and Energy 

40 St. Clair Ave. W., 11th floor 

Toronto, Ontario 

M4V 1M2 



3/3... 01094. FYI 

"Z!'''" ©Ontario 







Ontario 



DRAFT 

REGULATION MADE UNDER THE ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT 

SOLVENTS 

1. In this regulation: 

"Class 1 Ozone Depleting Substance" means 

-Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), liniited to 

-CFC-11 , also known as fluorotrichloromethane, chlorofluorocarbon-ll, (CFCI3) 

-CFC-12 , also known as dichlorodifluoromethane, chlorofluorocarbon-12, (CFjClj 

-CFC-13 , also known as chlorotrifluoromethane, chlorofluororarbon-13, (CF3CI) 

-CFG- 111, also known as pentachlorofluoroethane, chlorofluorocarbon-ll IXC^FClj) 

-CFC-112, also known as tetrachlorodifluoroethane, chlorofluorocarbon-112, (C^F^Cl^) 

-CFG- 11 3, also known as trichlorotrifluoroethane, chlorofluorocarbon-1 13, (G^FjClj) 

-GFG-114, also known as dichlorotetrafluoroethane, chlorofluorocarbon-114, (C^F^Clj) 

-GFG- 1 15, also known as monochloropentafluoroethane, chlorofluorocarbon- 115, (G^FjCl) 

-GFG-211, also known as fluoroheptachloropropane, G3FGI, . 

-GFG-212, also known as difluorohexachloropropane, CjFjCl^ 

-CFC-213, also known as trifluoropentachloropropane, C3F3CI5 

-CFC-214, also known as tetrafluorotetrachloropropane, CjF^Cl^ 

-CFC-215, also known as pentafluorotrichloropropane, C3F5CI3 

-CFC-216, also known as hexafluorodichloropropane, CjF^Cl^ 

-CFC-217, also known as heptafluorochloropropane, CjF^Cl 

-Halons, limited to: 

-Halon-1211, also known as bromochlorodifluoromethane, (CFjClBr) 

-Halon-1301, also known as bromotrifluoromethane, (CF3Br) 

-Halon-2402, also known as dibromotetrafluoroethane, (C^F^Br^) 

-Carbon tetrachloride (CCIJ 

-Methyl chloroform, also known as 1,1,1 trichloroethane, (C^HjClj) 

-All hydrobromofluorocarbons (HBFCs) 

-All isomers of any of the above 

"Class 2 Ozone Depleting Substance" means 
-All Hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) 
-All isomers of any of the above 



Prohibitions 

2.(l)Effective January 1, 1996, no person shall make a solvent which is or contains a Class 1 
ozone depleting substance. 

2.(2)Effective January 1, 1996, no person shall use or transfer a solvent which is or contains 
a Class 1 ozone depleting substance that is made after 1995. 

2.(3)Effective July 1, 1996, no person shall discharge into the natural environment a Class 1 
ozone depleting substance which is used as or intended for use as a solvent. 

2.(4)Effective July 1 , 1996, no person shall use or transfer a solvent which is or contains a Class 

1 ozone depleting substance. 

2.(5)Effective July 1, 1998, no person shall store a solvent which is or contains a Class 1 ozone 
depleting substance. 

2.(6)A person who, after July 1, 1996, stores a solvent which is a Class 1 ozone depleting 
substance, shall prepare, by August 15th of each year, a report detailing the solvents stored 
which are Class 1 ozone depleting substances, the containers used, the place and manner of 
storage, the safety and security measures in place, and the intentions of the person with respect 
to the disposal or ultimate fate of the solvents. 

2.(7)Effective January 1, 2000, no person shall discharge into the natural environment a Class 

2 ozone depleting substance which is used as or intended for use as a solvent. 

2.(8)Effective January 1, 2000, no person shall make, use or transfer a solvent which is or 
contains a Class 2 ozone depleting substance. 

2.(9)Effective January 1, 2002, no person shall store a solvent which is or contains a Class 2 
ozone depleting substance. 

2.(10)A person who, after January 1,2000, stores a solvent which is a Class 2 ozone depleting 
substance, shall prepare, by February 15th of each year, a report detailing the solvents stored 
which are Class 2 ozone depleting substances, the containers used, the place and manner of 
storage, the safety and security measures in place, and the intentions of the person with respect 
to the disposal or ultimate fate of the solvents. 

2.(1 1)A person required by subsection (6) or (10) to prepare a report, shall retain a copy of the 
report at the site where the storage takes place for at least two years. 

2. (12) A person required by subsection (6) or (10) to prepare a report, shall submit a copy of 
the report to the Director within five business days of the Director requesting it. 



Exception 

3. Section 2, other than subsections 2(3) and 2(7), does not apply in relation to: 

a)usage of a Class 1 ozone depleting substance or a Class 2 ozone depleting substance 
in an experimental or research laboratory for purposes related to the study of ozone 
depleting substances, replacements therefor, or the characteristics or performance of 
the ozone layer in the st^^atosphere; 

b)usage in a process in which a Class 1 ozone depleting substance or a Class 2 ozone 
depleting substance is convened to another substance that is not a Class 1 ozone 
depleting substance or a Class 2 ozone depleting substance; 

c)usage in a process in which a Class 1 ozone depleting substance or a Class 2 ozone 
depleting substance is generated and then converted to another substance that is not a 
Class 1 ozone depleting substance or a Class 2 ozone depleting substance. 

Hazardous Waste 

4. Where a solvent which is or contains a Class 1 ozone depleting substance or a Class 2 ozone 
depleting substance is to be managed as waste, it shall be managed as a hazardous waste in 
accordance with Part V of the Act and Regulation 347 and it may be transferred for such 
purpose. 

Certificate of Approval 

5. A prohibition in this regulation overrides any conflicting provision in a certificate of 
approval issued under the Act which is in force when this regulation takes effect. 



Note: There will be an additional brief regulation amending the point of impingement numbers 
in Schedule 1 of Regulation 346 (Air) for methyl chloroform and trifluoro trichloro ethane 
(CFC-1 13). These numbers will be reduced to zero, effective January 1, 1996, to coincide with 
the ban on emissions unless there are other uses, in addition to use as solvents and 
sterilants, which can continue and can legally discharge after that date. 







Ministry of 

Environment 

and Energy PIBS3169E 




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For no-charge participation, please complete the attached form and fax it to: 

FAX (416) 314-4160 

Program Development Branch, Ministry of Environment and Energy, 

40 St. Clair Ave. West, 11th fl., Toronto, Ontario M4V 1M2 

Phone (416) 314-7921 



I I 



ONTARIO 


BOOSTS ITS PROTECTION OF THE OZONE LAYER 


NAME 


SOLVENTS INFORMATION SEMINAR - JULY 19,1994 
REGISTRATION FORM 


AFFILIATION 




ADDRESS 






PHONE ( ) 


FAX( ) 



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