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1ADA 


6(X  THE 

LABOUR 
GAZETTE 


Published   Monthly  by  the 

DEPARTMENT    OF    LABOUR 

CANADA 


Vol.    LXV 


JULY  30, 


No.  7 


1965 


PU  PARTMENT  OF  LABOUR 


^ 


S;nd  order,    payable    to    the    Receiver-General    of 

Cana  ^S/TY  Q\  "V^  dent    of    Government    Publications,    Ottawa. 


\   .     F 


1^0    '14  (Covers  fiscal   year  ending    Catalogue  No. 

1   _..,.  Price  35  cents.  Ll-1964 

ECONOMICS  AND  RESEARCH  BRANCH 

Labour  Organizations  in  Canada  (annual).  Contains  a  brief  commentary,  the 
latest  statistical  data  on  union  membership,  and  a  directory  of  labour 
organizations  with  names  of  their  principal  officers,  publications,  and  the 
geographic  distribution  of  their  local  branches  in  Canada.  (English  or 
French).  Price  50  cents.       L2-2/1964 

Industrial  and   Geographic   Distribution   of    Union    Membership   in    Canada, 

196-1  (English  or  French).  Price  15  cents.  L3 1-764 

Strikes  and  Lockouts  in  Canada  (annual).  Furnishes  a  record  of  strikes  and 
lockouts  occurring  in  Canada  during  a  year.  Tables  and  related  texts 
showing  strikes  and  lockouts  by  years,  by  areas,  by  industries,  including 
time  lost,  number  of  workers  involved,  duration,  etc.         Price  35  cents.       L2-1/1963 

Wage  Rates.  Salaries  and  Hours  of  Labour.  An  annual  report  published  in 
loose-leaf  form  and  followed  later  by  a  paper-bound  volume.  Contains 
the  results  of  an  annual  survey  at  October  1  of  occupational  wage  rates 
and  standard  hours  of  work  in  most  industries.  Averages  and  predomi- 
nant ranges  of  wage  rates  for  selected  occupations  are  tabulated 
separately  on  a  regional  basis  for  some  90  industries  including  logging, 
mining,  manufacturing,  construction,  transportation,  trade  and  service 
groups.  Weekly  salaries  for  office  occupations  and  hourly  wage  rates  for 
maintenance  and  service  occupations  and  for  labourer  for  several  broad 
industry  groups  are  shown,  on  a  community  basis,  in  52  communities. 
Trends  in  wage  rates  are  included  in  tables  of  index  numbers  by 
industry.   (Bilingual).  L2-546 

First    year   service    includina    attractive    binder    with    index    tabs 
and  paper-bound  volume,  $9.50:  service  without  indexed  binder, 
$7.00;    individual  tables,   15   cents.   Paper-bound  volume,   $2.00. 
Working  Conditions  in  Canadian  Industry,  1963.  Price  35  cents.     L2-15/1963 

Labour  Management  Research  SERtES 

1.  Provisions  for  Income  Security   in   Canadian  Manufacturing  Industries.  L2-22/1 

2.  Shiftwork  and  Shift  Differentials  in  Canadian  Manufacturing  Industries.  L2-22/2 

3.  Sickness  and  Accident  Provisions  in  Canadian  Industry.  L2-22/3 

4.  Vacations  with  Pay,  1951-61:  An  Examination  of  Vacation  Practices  in 

Canadian  Industries   (English  or  French).  L2-22/4 

5.  Collective  Agreement  Provisions  in  Major  Manufacturing  Establishments, 

l964-  Price  35  cents.  L2-22/5 

Professional  Manpower  Reports 

1.  Trends  in   Professional  Manpower  Supplies   and   Requirements    (out   of 

print;  available  in  French).  L2-2001 

2.  Immigrants  in  Scientific  and  Technical  Professions  in  Canada.  L2-2002 

3.  Canadians    Studying    in    the    United    States    for    Degrees    in    Science, 
Engineering,  Agriculture,  Architecture  and  Veterinary  Medicine,  1955-56.  L2-2003 

4.  Recent  Changes  in  Engineering  Manpower  Requirements  and  Supplies  in 

Canada,   (out  of  print;  available  in  French).  L2-2004 

5.  Employment  Outlook  for  Professional  Personnel  in  Scientific  and  Tech- 
nical Fields,  1958-1960  (superseded  by  Bulletin  No.  8)  L2-2005 

6.  The  Early  Post-Graduate   Years  in  the  Technical  and  Scientific  Profes- 
sions in  Canada,   (out  of  print;  available  in  French)  L2-2006 

7.  Engineering    and    Scientific    Manpower    Resources    in    Canada:    Their 

Earnings,  Employment  and  Education,  1957.  L2-2007 

(Continued  on  page  three  of  cover) 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE 

Official  Journal  of  the  Department  of  Labour,  Canada 

Hon.  Allan  J.  MacEachen,  Minister  George  V.  Haythorne,  Deputy  Minister 


Published  Monthly  in 
English     and     French 


Editorial  Staff 


Edit   r-in-Chief 

W.  S.  Drinkwater 

Editor 

Jack  E.  Nugent 


Assistant  Editor 

Frank  L.  Dubervill 

Editor,  French  Edition 

Georges  D'Astous 

Circulation  Manager 


J.  E.  Abbey 


Cover  Photograph 
National  Film  Board 


Vol.  LXV,   No.   7  CONTENTS  July   1965 

Department  Today:    Labour   (Standards)    Code   Regulations  594 

50  Years  Ago  This  Month  595 

Notes  of  Current  Interest  596 

94th   Meeting,   Canadian   Manufacturers'   Association    601 

B.C.  Conference  on  Industrial  Relations  606 

Changes  in  General  Assistance  Legislation  610 

British  Redundancy  Payments  Bill  616 

Industrial  Fatalities,  First  Quarter,  1965  617 

Latest   Labour  Statistics   619 

Employment   and   Unemployment,   June    620 

Rehabilitation:  21  Years  of  Service  to  Britain's  Disabled  ....  622 

Re-designing  Jobs  for  Older  Workers   623 

Women's  Bureau:  Quo  Vadis  School  of  Nursing  624 

Collective  Bargaining  Review: 

Collective  Bargaining  Scene  625 

International   Labour  Organization: 

49th  International  Labour  Conference  631 

Teamwork  in   Industry 637 

Certification    and    Conciliation: 

Certification    Proceedings    638 

Conciliation  Proceedings  639 

Labour  Law: 

Legal  Decisions  Affecting  Labour  641 

Recent  Regulations  under  Provincial  Legislation  645 

National    Employment   Service: 

Monthly   Report  of  Placement  Operations   648 

Unemployment    Insurance: 

Monthly  Report  on  Operation  of  the  Act  649 

Decisions  of  the  Umpire  650 

Wage  Schedules     652 

Price    Indexes    658 

Publications  Recently  Received  in  Department's  Library  ....  659 

Indexed  in  the  Canadian  Periodical  Index 


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91938—1 


Department  of  Labour  Today 


Regulations  under  Labour  (Standards)  Code 


Regulations  issued  June  18;  main  provisions  establish  rules 
concerning  calculation  of  hours  of  work  in  industries  where 
work  requires  irregular  distribution  of  worker's  work  hours 


Regulations  under  the  Canada  Labour 
(Standards)  Code  were  approved  on  June 
18.  The  Canada  Labour  (Standards)  Code 
applies  to  all  industries  under  federal  jurisdic- 
tion. 

The  main  provisions  of  the  regulations  are 
those  establishing  the  rules  under  which  hours 
of  work  may  be  calculated  in  industries  where 
the  nature  of  the  work  necessitates  irregular 
distribution  of  an  employee's  hours  of  work. 
The  general  rule  in  the  Code  is  that  hours 
in  excess  of  eight  in  a  day  and  40  in  a 
week  must  be  paid  for  at  the  rate  of  one  and 
one  half  times  the  regular  rate  of  pay.  Where 
averaging  is  allowed,  however,  in  accord- 
ance with  the  regulations,  the  hours  of  work 
for  which  an  overtime  rate  has  to  be  paid 
are  not  calculated  on  a  daily  or  weekly  basis, 
but  at  the  end  of  the  averaging  period. 

This  is  particularly  applicable  to  the  trans- 
portation  industries. 

The  hours  of  work  provisions  of  the  Code 
came  into  force  on  July  1. 

Averaging  is  permitted  for  any  class  of 
employees  who  have  no  regularly  scheduled 
daily  or  weekly  hours,  or  have  regularly 
scheduled  hours  but  the  number  of  hours 
scheduled  differs  from  time  to  time. 

Where  these  circumstances  prevail,  the 
regulations  provide  that  an  employer  can 
meet  the  standards  of  the  Code  if  he  selects 
an  averaging  period  of  a  certain  number  of 
weeks  and  at  the.  end  of  the  period  pays  the 
overtime  rate  required  by  the  Code  for  those 
hours  each  employee  has  worked  in  excess 
of  the  number  of  weeks  in  the  averaging 
period  multiplied  by  40.  For  example,  in  a 
13-week  averaging  period  he  would  have 
to  pay  overtime  for  hours  worked  in  excess 
of  520. 

The  regulations  further  provide  a  limit 
on  the  hours  that  may  be  worked  even  if 
the  overtime  rate  is  paid.  The  maximum  num- 
ber of  hours  an  employee  may  work  in  a 
13-week  period  is  624  hours,  that  is,  the 
number  of  weeks  in  the  averaging  period 
multiplied   by   48. 

To  adopt  an  averaging  period  of  13  weeks 
or  less,  an  employer  does  not  require  ap- 
proval, but  must  notify  the  Director  of  La- 
bour Standards,  Department  of  Labour, 
Ottawa,  of  the  averaging  period  he  has 
adopted.  If  he  requires  a  longer  period,  for 
example,  26  or  52  weeks,  he  has  to  obtain 
the  approval  of  the  Minister  of  Labour  for 
the  averaging  period. 


The  regulations  will  not  affect  more  favour- 
able conditions  respecting  the  payment  of 
overtime  under  any  arrangement  between 
employer  and  employee. 

The  regulations  also  cover  such  matters  as 
weekly  rest,  employees  under  17  years  of 
age,  general  holidays,  annual  vacations,  and 
board  and  lodging  and  other  remuneration. 

The  Code  sets  minimum  standards  that 
include: 

— a  standard  eight-hour  day  and  40-hour 
week,  with  overtime  limited  to  eight  hours  a 
week  and  paid  for  at  time-and-a-half. 

— a  minimum  wage  rate  of  $1.25  an  hour 
for  all  men  and  women  over  17  years  of 
age. 

— two  weeks  annual  vacation  with  pay  after 
one  year's  service,  or  4  per  cent  of  wages 
as  vacation  pay  for  those  with  from  30  days 
to  a  year's  service. 

— eight  statutory  holidays  with  pay  each 
year  for  each  employee,  or  another  full  day 
off  in  lieu  of  the  holiday. 

The  Code  will  apply  to  interprovincial  or 
international  rail  and  highway  transport, 
primary  fishing  where  fishermen  work  for 
wages,  air  transport,  radio  and  television, 
shipping  and  services  connected  with  ship- 
ping, banks,  uranium  mining,  grain  elevators, 
flour  and  feed  mills  and  warehousing,  seed 
cleaning  mills,  interprovincial  or  international 
pipelines  and  ferries,  interprovincial  or  inter- 
national telegraphs  and  telephones,  and  most 
Crown  corporations. 


A  draft  of  the  first  labour  standards  code 
for  the  Northwest  Territories  was  presented 
to  the  Territorial  Council  in  Yellowknife  in 
June. 

The  code  would  provide  for  an  eight-hour 
work  day  and  40-hour  week  for  all  employ- 
ees, with  a  provision  for  up  to  48  hours  a 
week  in  special  circumstances. 

Other  provisions  are: 

— a  minimum  wage  of  $1.20  an  hour; 

— at  least  two  weeks  annual  vacation  with 
pay; 

— time-and-a-half  for  work  in  excess  of 
standard   hours. 

A  survey  by  the  NWT  administration 
showed  that  about  45  per  cent  of  employees 
now  work  more  than  48  hours  a  week. 


594 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE     •     JULY  7965 


From  the  Labour  Gazette,  July  1915 


50  Years  Ago  This  Month 


Unemployment  heavy  in  Prairie  Provinces  and  British  Columbia 
in  June  1915,  despite  small  improvement  in  industrial  and 
labour  conditions.  Few  wage  cuts  but  some  reduction  in  hours 


Some  improvement  in  industrial  and  labour 
conditions  in  June  1915  compared  with  May, 
was  reported  in  the  Labour  Gazette  for  July 
of  that  year,  but  unemployment  continued 
to  be  heavy  in  the  Prairie  Provinces  and 
British  Columbia. 

Not  much  change  in  wages  or  hours  was 
reported  during  the  month.  There  was  little 
actual  cutting  of  wages,  but  reduced  working 
time  continued  in  many  establishments,  ex- 
cept in  those  "where  activity  was  marked 
owing  to  war  orders." 

In  a  few  cases,  increases  went  into  effect. 
"Workers  at  the  Granby  smelter,  Grand 
Forks,  B.C.,  received  a  voluntary  increase  of 
25  cents  per  day  owing  to  the  increased 
price  of  copper,  which  brought  the  minimum 
being  received  by  any  class  of  labour  up  to 
$3.25  per  day.  Increases  also  went  into  effect 
at  some  of  the  Rossland  mines  of  25  cents 
a  day  above  the  regular  scale. 

"At  Vancouver  some  2,000  labourers  em- 
ployed by  the  city  had  the  standard  rate  of 
$3  per  day  of  eight  hours  reduced  to  $2.25 
per  day.  Reductions  were  also  made  in  the 
salaries  of  policemen  and  other  civic  offi- 
cials." 

All  over  the  country,  but  especially  in  the 
West,  the  building  trades  were  especially 
hard  hit  by  the  depression.  Railway  con- 
struction was  going  on  at  a  much  slower 
pace  than  it  had  been.  Agriculture,  however, 
was  providing  a  good  demand  for  labour; 
and  large  numbers  of  men  were  being  drawn 
into  the  army.  Some  were  returning  to 
Europe  either  for  military  service  or  for 
work  in  factories  engaged  in  war  work;  a 
number  of  enemy  aliens  were  in  internment 
camps;  and  immigration  was  at  a  standstill. 

The  Montreal  correspondent  said,  "Four 
hundred  applicants  for  engagement  in  arma- 
ment and  shipyard  work  in  England  have 
registered  their  names  at  the  City  Hall.  Of 
this  number,  80  per  cent  are  natives  of 
Great  Britain  and  10  per  cent  Frenchmen  or 
French-Canadians,  the  rest  being  half  Bel- 
gians and  half  other  European  nationalities. 
By  trade,  200  are  machinists,  100  boiler- 
makers,  shipwrights  or  ship  carpenters,  and 
the  remainder  blacksmiths,  coppersmiths  or 
moulders.  They  will  be  examined  on  July  10." 

The  same  correspondent  said  that  there 
had  been  "a  continual  exodus  to  the  Spirit 
Lake  camp  of  alien  enemies,  chiefly  Austrians 


and  their  families  during  the  month.  Re- 
cruiting has  also  taken  a  very  large  number 
out  of  the  city,  French,  Belgian  and  Russian 
reservists  have  gone  in  great  numbers.  Five 
thousand  French-born  residents  have  left  since 
the  war  began.  .  .  . 

"From  the  Grand  Trunk  and  Canadian 
Pacific  Railway  offices  1,200  and  1,500  men 
respectively  have  gone,  and  the  Canadian 
Northern  has  contributed  its  quota.  .  .  . 
Italian  soldiers  have  been  called  to  the 
colours,  and  part  of  3,000  Montenegrins  have 
already  come  here  to  be  transported  to  Three 
Rivers  to  await  transportation  to  the  front." 

The  Hamilton  correspondent  said  that  the 
industrial  commissioner  had  received  appli- 
cations from  about  500  mechanics  who  were 
anxious  to  go  to  Britain  to  work  on  war 
munitions. 

The  correspondent  from  Fernie,  B.C.,  said, 
"A  peculiar  situation  developed  throughout 
the  mining  camps  of  the  Crow's  Nest  Pass 
during  June  when  the  miners  of  British  ex- 
traction assumed  a  hostile  attitude  towards 
their  Austrian  and  German  co-workers,  and 
positively  refused  to  continue  working  under 
ground  with  these  enemy  aliens." 

After  some  cessation  of  work  had  taken 
place  at  the  mines  in  consequence  of  this 
agitation,  "the  authorities  immediately  inter- 
vened and  interned  all  single  miners,  and  all 
married  miners  of  enemy  nationality  not 
having  families  in  Canada.  This  compromise 
was  accepted,  and  the  men  returned  to  work." 

A  similar  situation  occurred  at  the  mines 
at  Hillcrest  and  Coleman,  Alta.  At  Hillcrest, 
"an  arrangement  whereby  the  objectionable 
aliens  were  temporarily  excluded  to  the  bene- 
fiit  of  the  British  and  their  allied  co-workers, 
was  accepted  and  operations  resumed."  At 
Coleman,  a  mass  meeting  was  held,  "at  which 
a  resolution  was  passed  unanimously  that 
there  would  be  no  discrimination  against  the 
alien  enemies,  of  whom  it  is  estimated  there 
are  considerably  less  than  100  at  this  par- 
ticular camp." 

In  this  journal's  report  on  retail  prices  the 
following  items  occurred:  Bread  rose  at  Sorel, 
Que.,  from  3£  cents  per  pound  to  4  cents; 
tapioca  was  reported  lower  at  London,  Ont.; 
prunes  were  higher  in  price  at  Newcastle, 
N.B.,  and  lower  at  Vancouver;  coffee  rose  at 
New  Westminster;  vinegar  remained  steady; 
and  coal  oil  rose  at  Vancouver. 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE 
91938— 11 


•      JULY    7965 


595 


NOTES  OF  CURRENT  INTEREST 


Government  Plans  Payments  to  Laid-Off  Auto  Workers 


A  plan  under  which  the  federal  Govern- 
ment will  pay  up  to  $75  a  week  to  auto 
woikers  laid  off  as  a  result  of  the  re-organiza- 
tion following  on  the  Canada-United  States 
Automotive  Agreement  was  outlined  in  the 
Commons  on  June  28  by  Labour  Minister 
MacEachen.  He  named  the  plan  the  "Transi- 
tional Assistance  Benefit  Program." 

"These  workers  should  not  be  asked  to 
bear  the  entire  financial  burden  of  their 
unemployment,"  the  Minister  said.  "Because 
the  economy  as  a  whole  will  benefit  from 
the  Agreement,  it  is  reasonable  that  the 
people  of  Canada  and  the  automotive  com- 
-  assist  the  workers  in  meeting  their 
adjustment  problems." 

At  the  same  time,  Hon.  C.  M.  Drury, 
Minister  of  Industry,  announced  that  the 
Government  was  setting  up  a  $10,000,000 
loan  fund  to  help  finance  the  expansion  of 
small  auto  parts  companies  that  would  have 
to  increase  their  manufacturing  capacity  to 
take  advantage  of  the  Agreement. 

The  Minister  of  Labour  said  the  program 
would  provide  benefits  varying  between  62 
and  75  per  cent  of  the  worker's  weekly  pay, 
depending  on  the  number  of  his  dependants. 
The  benefits,  however,  would  not  exceed  65 
per  cent  of  the  average  weekly  wages  in  the 
industries  concerned — which  works  out  to 
about  $75. 

The  duration  of  benefit  will  be  based  on 
the  length  of  employment  in  the  industry, 
and  can  be  up  to  one  year  and  a  half. 

To  be  eligible  for  the  minimum  "transi- 
tional assistance  benefit" — or  TAB — the  Min- 
ister explained,  a  worker  must  have  had  at 
least  30  weeks  of  employment  during  the 
52  weeks  immediately  preceding  layoff,  and 
must  also  be  eligible  for  unemployment 
insurance  benefits. 

Some  of  the  workers  laid  off,  said  Mr. 
MacEachen,  would  normally  be  eligible  for 


supplementary  unemployment  benefits  (SUB) 
paid  out  of  funds  built  up  by  payments  from 
the  companies  under  collective  agreement 
provisions.  Under  these  plans,  SUB  payments 
would  not  be  made  if  the  TAB,  plus  unem- 
ployment insurance  benefits,  equalled  or  ex- 
ceeded 62  per  cent  of  the  worker's  pay,  plus 
a  maximum  of  $6  for  dependents. 

In  these  cases,  under  the  TAB  plan,  the 
companies  would  be  relieved  from  paying 
SUB  to  their  workers.  It  was  the  Govern- 
ment's view,  therefore,  that  since  the  com- 
panies would  also  be  receiving  direct  financial 
benefits  under  the  automotive  agreement, 
they  should  meet  part  of  the  financial  burden 
of   the   lay-offs. 

Accordingly,  the  companies  that  had  SUB 
plans  would  be  asked  to  contribute  to  the 
TAB  fund  an  amount  equivalent  to  what 
they  would  have  had  to  pay  to  workers  eli- 
gible for  SUB;  and  the  payment  of  TAB  to 
workers  eligible  for  SUB  would  be  conditional 
upon  such  payments  into  the  TAB  fund  by 
those  companies. 

The  loans  to  the  auto  parts  industry  will 
be  made  at  6  per  cent  interest,  repayable  in 
10  or  20  years  depending  on  the  type  of 
project. 

Both  the  Labour  and  Industry  Department 
programs  are  designed  to  mitigate  the  short- 
term  dislocations  expected  to  occur  while  the 
auto  companies  make  the  adjustments  neces- 
sary for  large  production  runs. 

Mr.  Drury  said  that,  under  the  Automotive 
Agreement,  production  in  Canada  would  in- 
crease by  several  hundred  million  dollars 
annually,  and  employment  in  the  industry 
would  grow  accordingly.  "Motor  vehicle  man- 
ufacturers and  many  parts  manufacturers 
have  already  announced  major  expansion 
plans,"  he  added. 


U.  of  T.  Industrial  Relations  Centre  Plans  Founding  Conference  in  Oct. 


A  three-day  founding  conference  of  the 
Centre  for  Industrial  Relations  at  the  Uni- 
versity of  Toronto,  with  the  theme  "Industrial 
Relations  in  the  Next  Decade — Challenges 
and  Responses,"  will  be  held  from  October 
13  to   15. 

A  wide  range  of  industrial  relations  prob- 
lems will  be  dealt  with  by  an  outstanding 
group  of  session  chairmen  and  speakers. 

The  keynote  speaker  at  the  opening  session 
will  be  David  A.  Morse,  Director-General  of 
the  International  Labour  Office.  He  will  be 
introduced  by  Hon.  Allan  J.  MacEachen, 
Minister   of   Labour.   The   chairman   of   the 


onening  session  will  be  Dr.  Claude  Bissell, 
President,  University  of  Toronto. 

H.  Carl  Goldenberg,  well-known  mediator, 
will  be  chairman  for  the  second  session, 
when  the  topic  will  be  "Collective  Bargain- 
ing Challenges  and  Responses."  The  speakers 
will  be  Professors  Frederick  H.  Harbison, 
Director,  Industrial  Relations  Society,  Prince- 
ton University,  and  Arnold  R.  Weber,  Gradu- 
ate School  of  Business,  University  of  Chicago. 

Two  afternoon  sessions  will  be  held  con- 
currently on  October  14.  One  deals  with 
"New  Concepts  in  Organization  Theory." 
Prof.   Sydney   Maxwell,  School  of   Business, 


596 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      JULY   7965 


University  of  Toronto,  will  be  chairman. 
The  speaker  will  be  Prof.  Wilbert  E.  Moore, 
Sociologist,  Russell  Sage  Foundation. 

The  other  session,  "Challenges  and  Re- 
sponses in  the  Law  of  Labour  Relations," 
will  be  under  the  chairmanship  of  Prof.  H.  D. 
Woods,  Dean  of  Arts  and  Science,  McGill 
University,  and  the  speaker  will  be  Prof. 
Bora  Laskin,  Faculty  of  Law,  University  of 
Toronto. 

At  a  session  in  the  evening  of  October  14, 
Dr.  W.  R.  Dymond,  Assistant  Deputy  Min- 
ister, Department  of  Labour,  will  be  chair- 
man. The  speaker  will  be  Prof.  James  R. 
Bright,  Graduate  School  of  Business  Adminis- 
tration, Harvard  University.  His  topic  will 
be  "Wage  Adjustments  to  Automation." 

The  final  session,  on  October  15,  on  "The 
Poverty  Challenge  and  Responses  to  It"  will 
be  under  the  chairmanship  of  Dr.  John 
Deutsch,  Chairman,  Economic  Council  of 
Canada.  The  speakers  will  be  Jack  T.  Con- 
way, Deputy-Director,  United  States  Office 
of  Economic  Opportunity,  and  Hon.  Maurice 
Sauve,  Minister  of  Forestry. 

USW  To  Study  Possibility 
Of  Federal  Safety  Act 

Canadian  members  of  the  United  Steel- 
workers  of  America  decided  at  their  policy 
conference  in  Toronto  in  May  (L.G.,  June, 
p.  492)  to  set  up  a  committee  to  study  the 
possibility  of  a  federal  safety  act  in  Canada. 
It  would  be  designed  to  provide  uniformity 
in  industrial  safety  measures. 

The  committee  will  study  also  the  possi- 
bility of  inserting  a  section  in  the  various 
Industrial  Safety  Acts  in  Canada,  providing 
protection  of  employment  for  those  unholding 
provisions  of  the  Act. 

A  further  resolution  urged  that  federal 
and  provincial  governments  accept  responsi- 
bility for  administering  retraining  programs 
to  maintain  the  present  standard  of  living. 
Another  urged  that  no  worker  be  forced  to 
accept  a  lower  income  because  of  automation. 

Resolutions  were  passed  to  expand  ap- 
prenticeship programs  with  a  sliding  scale  of 
educational  standards  applicable  to  each 
trade,  and  to  provide  greater  employment 
opportunities  for  youth  through  negotiation 
of  apprenticeship  programs  for  all  crafts. 

Other  resolutions  urged  that:  (1)  unions 
bargain  for  extended  vacations;  (2)  employ- 
ers pay  the  full  cost  of  health  services  for 
pensioners  and  dependents;  (3)  local  union 
bargaining  committees  negotiate  for  group 
dental  programs  in  collective  agreements; 
(4)  unions  have  the  right  to  investigate  min- 
ing fatalities,  submit  a  report  with  recom- 
mendations to  the  Minister  of  Mines,  and  be 
advised  when  action  has  been  completed  on 


the  recommendations;  and  (5)  it  be  made 
mandatory  that  employees  who  have  tempo- 
rary or  permanent  partial  disability,  and  are 
off  work  over  the  time  specified  by  the 
Workmen's  Compensation  Act,  either  be  taken 
back  or  compensated  at  100  per  cent  of 
their   regular   pay. 

The  conference  also  passed  a  resolution 
urging  that  any  hospital  bills  incurred  by 
an  employee  be  tax  deductible. 

House-Building  Incentive  Program 
Has  Altered  Seasonal  Pattern 

The  Winter  House-Building  Incentive  Pro- 
grams of  1963-64  and  1964-65  have  com- 
pletely altered  the  seasonal  pattern  of  activity 
in  house  construction. 

The  influences  these  programs  have  had  is 
clearly  stated  in  the  1964  edition  of  Canadian 
Housing  Statistics,  annual  publication  of 
Central  Mortgage  and  Housing  Corporation: 

"So  long  as  these  programs  continue,"  it 
reads,  "seasonal  adjustment  based  on  experi- 
ence prior  to  the  introduction  of  these  pro- 
grams is  not  valid." 

As  a  result,  the  Corporation  has  changed 
the  basis  for  the  seasonal  adjustment  of 
series  relating  to  house-building  activity  and 
to  applications  for  NHA  loans. 

One-Man  Tribunal  Replaces 
Railway  Board  of  Adjustment 

A  one-man  tribunal,  Magistrate  J.  A.  Han- 
rahan  of  Windsor,  Ont.,  will  replace  the  old 
Canadian  Railway  Board  of  Adjustment  No. 
1  that  was  abolished  in  1964  after  being  in 
operation  for  45  years  (L.G.,  May  1§64, 
p.  371).  Magistrate  Hanrahan  retired  in 
June  from  the  post  of  senior  magistrate  of 
Essex  County. 

The  two  main  Canadian  railways  and  four 
of  the  large  railway  unions  have  agreed  on 
the  formation  of  the  new  procedure  for  ob- 
taining final  and  binding  decisions  on  em- 
ployees' grievances. 

The  agreement  under  which  it  is  set  up  is 
the  result  of  18  months  of  private  negotia- 
tions involving  the  Canadian  National  Rail- 
ways, the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway,  the 
Brotherhood  of  Railroad  Trainmen  (CLC), 
the  Brotherhood  of  Locomotive  Engineers 
(Ind.),  the  Brotherhood  of  Maintenance  of 
Way  Employees  (CLC),  and  the  Transporta- 
tion Communications  Employees  Union 
(CLC). 

The  Minister  of  Labour,  Hon.  Allan  J. 
MacEachen,  was  the  intermediary  between 
the  parties  in  establishing  the  Canadian  Rail- 
way Office  of  Arbitration,  after  the  four  rail 
unions  had  made  representation  to  him. 


THE   LABOUR   GAZETTE      •      JULY    7965 


597 


Marcel  Pepin  Elected  President  of  CNTU 


Marcel  Pepin,  secretary-general  of  the  Con- 
federation of  National  Trade  Unions  since 
1961,  was  elected  president  on  June  12, 
succeeding  Jean  Marchand,  who  resigned  the 
post  at  the  age  of  46. 

Mr.  Marchand  had  been  president  since 
1961,  and  before  that  had  been  secretary- 
general  since  1947.  It  is  reported  that  he  will 
probably  remain  with  the  CNTU  as  an 
adviser. 

Robert  Sauve,  33  years  of  age,  was  elected 
to  succeed  Mr.  Pepin  as  secretary-general. 
Mr.  Sauve  has  spent  five  years  with  the 
CNTU,  after  three  years'  service  with  the 
combines  investigation  branch  of  the  federal 
Department  of  Justice. 

In  his  acceptance  speech,  Mr.  Pepin  an- 
nounced that  the  Confederation  would  start 
its  own  war  on  poverty,  and  that  a  first  step 
in  the  campaign  would  be  a  research  pro- 
gram into  "an  absolutely  deplorable  social 
reality."  The  second  step  would  be  the  prep- 
aration of  plans  for  an  energetic  and  sus- 
tained battle  against  the  causes  of  poverty 
in  Quebec. 

Marcel  Pepin 

Marcel  Pepin,  who  was  born  in  1926,  is 
the  son  of  a  leatherworker.  He  grew  up  in 
Rosemere  and  St.  Henri  in  Montreal,  and 
after  receiving  a  B.A.  degree  at  the  Montreal 
Seminary,  he  went  on  to  Laval  University's 
faculty  of  social  sciences,  where  he  received 
a  Master's  Degree  in  industrial  relations. 

He  first  served  the  labour  movement  in 
the  summer  of  1948  when  he  spent  his 
holidays  as  an  organizer  with  the  National 


Federation  of  Textile  Workers.  The  following 
January,  he  engaged  in  part-time  work  with 
the  National  Metal  Trades  Federation,  and 
after  his  graduation  in  1949  he  became  a  full- 
time  employee  of  the  organization. 

Mr.  Pepin  later  became  director  of  tech- 
nical services  and  secretary  of  the  Federation, 
and  in  1961  succeeded  Jean  Marchand  as 
secretary-general  of  the  CNTU. 

Jean  Marchand 

Jean  Marchand  was  born  in  Champlain, 
Que.,  on  December  20,  1918.  He  studied  at 
St.  Jean  Baptiste  Academy  and  at  the  Quebec 
Commercial  Academy,  and  is  a  graduate  of 
Laval  University. 

Mr.  Marchand's  active  association  with  the 
labour  movement  began  in  1942  when  he 
became  organizer  for  the  National  Federa- 
tion of  Pulp  and  Paper  Workers.  In  1943  he 
was  elected  secretary  of  the  union,  and  a 
year  later  became  organizer  for  the  CNTU. 
In  this  position,  he  was  engaged  in  reorganiz- 
ing asbestos  mine  workers.  In  1945,  he  took 
the  post  of  technical  adviser  to  the  Confeder- 
ation for  the  Montreal  region. 

Mr.  Marchand  was  recently  elected  vice- 
president  of  the  International  Confederation 
of  Christian  Labour  Unions.  He  has  served 
on  a  number  of  public  bodies,  and  is  now 
a  member  of  the  Royal  Commission  on  Bi- 
lingualism  and  Biculturalism,  and  of  the 
Quebec  Economic  Planning  Advisory  Council. 
It  has  been  rumoured  that  he  will  go  into 
politics,  but  he  recently  denied  that  he  had 
any  immediate  intention  of  doing  so. 


Marcel  Pepin 


598 


Jean  Marchand 

THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      JULY   7965 


Leadership  of  Three  Unions 
Changes  in  First  Half  of  1965 

Important  changes  are  taking  place  in  the 
leadership  of  American  labour  that  may  have 
widespread  effects  on  the  structure,  policies, 
and  behaviour  of  unions  whose  combined 
membership  is  in  the  millions. 

In  the  first  of  three  changes  in  the  leader- 
ship of  unions  that  have  taken  place  so  far 
this  year,  Paul  Jennings  succeeded  James  B. 
Carey  as  president  of  the  International 
Union  of  Electrical  Workers. 

On  June  1,  I.  W.  Abel  became  president 
of  the  United  Steelworkers,  succeeding  David 
J.  McDonald  whom  he  defeated  by  a  narrow 
margin  in  a  union  election  held  in  February. 

On  July  1,  P.  L.  Siemiller  succeeded 
Albert  J.  Hayes,  who  retired  as  head  of  the 
International  Association  of  Machinists  at 
the  age  of  65. 

Another  change  is  foreshadowed  in  the 
announcement  that  O.  A.  Knight,  President 
of  the  Oil,  Chemical  and  Atomic  Workers, 
will  not  seek  re-election  in  August. 

James  B.  Carey 

James  B.  Carey  resigned  the  IUE  presi- 
dency early  in  April,  24  hours  after  the 
U.S.  Department  of  Labor  had  issued  a 
statement  that  the  union's  five-man  board  of 
trustees  had  falsely  declared  him  to  have 
been  re-elected  to  the  office  last  December. 

Paul  Jennings,  a  member  of  the  union's 
executive  board  and  Mr.  Carey's  rival  in  the 
election,  became  president  the  next  day, 
and  will  serve  the  four-year  term  begun  by 
Mr.  Carey  on  January  1.  Mr.  Jennings  was 
shown  by  the  Department's  investigation  of 
the  election  to  have  won  by  23,316  votes  out 
of  more  than  130,000  cast;  the  trustees  had 
declared  Mr.  Carey  the  winner  by  2,193 
votes. 

In  announcing  his  resignation,  Mr.  Carey 
disclaimed  any  knowledge  of  a  miscount  of 
votes  by  union  trustees,  and  he  said  that  he 
was  "deeply  shocked"  by  the  charges  of 
irregularities. 

Mr.  Carey  had  been  president  of  the  In- 
ternational Union  of  Electrical  Workers  since 
he  helped  to  found  it  in  1949  when  the 
United  Electrical  Workers  was  ousted  from 
the  CIO  for  alleged  Communist  domination. 
Previously,  he  had  served  as  secretary- 
treasurer  of  the  CIO  under  Philip  Murray. 

David  J.  McDonald 

After  declaring  that  he  would  file  protests 
against  irregularities  that  he  alleged  had  oc- 
curred in  the  United  Steelworkers  election 
in  February,  irregularities  that  he  had  already 
asked  the  union's  executive  board  to  in- 
vestigate, David  J.  McDonald  announced  that 


he  would  not  proceed  with  this  action  nor 
lodge  any  protest  with  the  U.S.  Department 
of  Labor.  I.  W.  Abel,  declared  winner  of 
the  election  by  10,142  votes  (308,910  to 
298,768),  assumed  office  on  June  1. 

David  McDonald's  career  in  organized 
labour  began  42  years  ago.  When  Philip 
Murray,  then  vice-president  of  the  United 
Mine  Workers,  was  appointed  director  of  the 
Steel  Workers  Organizing  Committee,  David 
McDonald,  who  had  been  Mr.  Murray's  sec- 
retary in  the  UMW,  was  made  secretary- 
treasurer.  When  the  SWOC  was  formally 
organized  as  the  United  Steelworkers  in 
1942,  Mr.  Murray  was  elected  president  and 
Mr.  McDonald  secretary-treasurer.  When 
Philip  Murray  died  in  1952,  the  Steelworkers' 
executive  council  named  Mr.  McDonald  act- 
ing president,  and  his  appointment  was  later 
confirmed  by  a  referendum  vote  of  the  mem- 
bers of  the  union. 

Albert  J.  Hayes 

A.  J.  "Al"  Hayes  was  president  of  the 
International  Association  of  Machinists  since 
1949.  He  had  been  on  the  staff  of  the  Grand 
lodge  in  1935.  A  vice-president  of  the  AFL- 
CIO  and  of  its  Industrial  Union  Department, 
he  is  chairman  of  two  AFL-CIO  committees, 
the  Ethical  Practices  Committee,  and  the 
Internal  Disputes  Committee. 

It  was  the  Ethical  Practices  Committee 
that  drafted  the  AFL-CIO  Ethical  Practices 
Code,  which  has  brought  about  the  expulsion 
of  undesirable  elements  from  the  labour 
movement.  And  it  was  the  Internal  Disputes 
Committee  that  drafted  the  constitutional 
amendments  that  established  the  procedure  to 
settle  jurisdictional  disputes  between  affiliated 
unions. 

The  first  no-raiding  and  mutual  assistance 
pact  between  two  international  unions  was 
signed  in  1954  by  Mr.  Hayes  of  the  LAM 
and  Walter  Reuther  of  the  United  Auto 
Workers.  This  agreement  paved  the  way  for 
the  eventual  merger  of  the  AFL  and  the 
CIO. 

Postal  Workers  Form  Brotherhood 
To  Bargain  for  Letter  Carriers 

The  Canadian  Postal  Employees  Associa- 
tion, the  Federated  Association  of  Letter 
Carriers,  and  the  Canadian  Railway  Mail 
Clerks  Federation  have  banded  together  for 
purposes  of  collective  bargaining. 

Under  the  banner  of  the  Postal  Workers 
Brotherhood  of  Canada,  representing  most 
of  the  country's  22,000  postal  employees, 
they  will  act  as  bargaining  agent  for  all  mail- 
handling  employees  of  the  Government  when 
collective  bargaining  is  established  in  the 
federal  public  service. 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      JULY   7965 


599 


The  negotiating  committee,  which  will  bar- 
Aith  the  Government  on  pay  and  work- 
onditions,  will  consist  of  five  members 
ch  of  the  three  groups  in  the  Brother- 
Officials    elected    were:     Frank    Standring, 
FA!  C,    president;    Joe    Belland.    mail    clerks, 
vice-president;    and    Godfroy    Cote,    CPEA, 
;\ -treasurer. 

NES  Has  Already  Opened  Office 
To  Serve  Expo  67  Exhibitors 

Although  Expo  67 — the  Canadian  Univer- 
sal   and    International    Exhibition — does    not 


open  in  Montreal  until  1967,  a  National  Em- 
ployment Service  office  of  the  Department 
of  Labour  has  already  begun  operating  as  a 
free  service  to  all  exhibitors,  Canadian  or 
foreign. 

With  a  full-time  staff,  NES  is  prepared  to 
cope  with  the  demand  and  supply  of  person- 
nel of  every  type  that  will  be  created  by  the 
World  Exhibition. 

At  present  the  staff  is  in  temporary  quar- 
ters with  other  exhibition  personnel,  but  they 
will  be  located  in  a  permanent  office  in  the 
administration  building  in  the  near  future. 


In  Parliament  Last  Month 


(page  numbers  refer  to  Hansard) 

On  June  7  the  Prime  Minister  made  a 
statement  about  three  major  changes  that 
the  Government  proposed  to  make  in  the 
program  in  operation  under  the  Department 
of  Industry  Act  to  raise  employment  and 
income  and  to  widen  economic  opportunity 
in  designated  areas  of  Canada  (p.  2022). 

The  first  change,  the  Prime  Minister  said, 
would  provide  for  outright  grants  to  manu- 
facturing and  processing  enterprises  establish- 
ing or  expanding  in  these  areas.  These  grants 
would  be  based  on  the  size  of  the  capital 
investment,  and  the  maximum  grant  would  be 
$5,000,000  for  any  one  project. 

The  second  change  concerned  the  inclu- 
sion of  certain  manpower  measures,  includ- 
ing planning  to  meet  long-term  manpower 
needs,  and  assistance  by  the  Department  of 
Labour  to  the  provinces  in  devising  new 
training  methods  and.  expanding  existing  ones. 

The  third  change  proposed  by  the  Govern- 
ment would  be  an  extensive  revision  and 
broadening  of  the  areas  to  which  the  meas- 
ures applied. 

On  June  17  a  measure  to  amend  the 
Income  Tax  Act  was  introduced  in  the  Com- 
mittee of  Ways  and  Means  (p.  2528). 
Changes  proposed  would  provide,  among 
other  things: 

— For  1966  and  subsequent  taxation  years, 
reduction  of  the  income  tax  paid  by  an  indi- 
vidual by  10  per  cent  of  basic  tax  or  $600, 
whichever  is  less;  and  for  the  1965  taxation 
year,  by  the  lesser  of  5  per  cent  or  $300. 

— Deduction  from  taxable  income,  under 
certain  conditions,  of  the  amount  spent  for 
support  of  wholly  dependent  nephew  or 
niece. 


— Deduction  from  taxable  income,  for  1965 
and  later  taxation  years,  of  an  amount  not 
exceeding  $550  for  support  of  dependent 
aunt  or  uncle. 

— Abolition  of  the  deduction  of  $500  now 
allowed  to  a  taxpayer  who  has  reached  the 
age  of  70  for  those  below  that  age  who  be- 
come eligible   for  old  age  security  pension. 

— Deduction  from  taxable  income,  in  ad- 
dition to  the  standard  deduction  of  $100  for 
medical  expenses  and  charitable  donations,  of 
membership  dues  in  a  trade  union  or  profes- 
sional association. 

On  June  11,  the  Minister  of  Finance  tabled 
a  statement  relating  to  the  Canada  Student 
Loans  Plan,  which  showed  that  on  April  1, 
1965,  41,284  students  had  been  assisted,  and 
the  total  amount  of  loans  authorized  was 
$26,265,941   (p.  2251). 

On  June  18,  the  Minister  of  Fisheries 
moved  a  resolution  introducing  a  measure 
to  amend  the  Fisheries  Improvement  Loans 
Act  to  increase  the  maximum  loan  to  a 
fisherman  from  $4,000  to  $10,000  and  the 
maximum  repayment  period  from  eight  to 
ten  years  (p.  2626).  After  debate,  Bill  C-121, 
to  amend  the  Act  accordingly,  was  introduced 
and  given  first  and  second  readings  (p.  2645). 

On  June  4,  the  Minister  of  Labour  stated 
that  he  had  been  informed  by  the  Chairman 
of  the  Board  of  Trustees  of  the  Maritime 
Transportation  Unions  that  Harold  Banks  had 
been  removed  from  the  post  of  president  of 
the  Canadian  Seafarers  Building  Corporation 
Limited  at  the  same  time  as  he  had  been 
dismissed  from  the  post  of  president  of  the 
Seafarers'  International  Union  of  Canada  on 
March  18,  1964  (p.  1981). 


600 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      JULY    7965 


94th  Annual  General  Meeting  of 

the  Canadian  Manufacturers'  Association 

Labour-management  co-operation  increasing,  number  of  disputes 
decreasing,  export  sales  up  36  per  cent  over  1964,  Canada's 
economic  outlook  promising,  speakers  tell  1 ,600  CM  A  delegates 


"Priorities  for  Progress"  was  the  theme  of 
the  94th  annual  general  meeting  of  the  Cana- 
dian Manufacturers'  Association,  held  in  To- 
ronto on  June  6,  7  and  8,  and  attended  by 
more  than  1,600  delegates  from  across 
Canada. 

The  industrial  relations  conference  at  this 
year's  sessions  examined  collective  bargain- 
ing and  employee  training  and  growth,  under 
the  general  headings,  "Designs  for  Stability" 
and  "Motivation  and  Development." 

One  plenary  conference,  dealing  with  "The 
Critical  Path  of  Progress,"  was  addressed  by 
Hon.  C.  M.  Drury,  Minister  of  Industry  and 
Defence  Production,  Ottawa,  who  spoke  on 
technology  and  economic  growth. 

Hon.  Mitchell  Sharp,  Minister  of  Trade 
and  Commerce,  Ottawa,  was  one  of  the  prin- 
cipal speakers  at  a  conference  on  world 
trade.  Other  conferences  dealt  with  world 
affairs,  transportation  and  business  planning. 
Only  those  covering  industrial  relations  and 
economic  growth  are  reported  here  in  detail. 

The  new  CMA  president  elected  at  the 
meeting  for  the  1965-66  term  is  Humphrey 
B.  Style,  chairman  of  the  board,  John  Inglis 
Co.  Limited,  Toronto. 

President's  Address 

Another  500,000  Canadians  have  joined 
the  country's  work  force  since  the  current 
economic  upswing  got  underway  in  1961,  said 
A.  A.  Cumming,  retiring  CMA  president,  in 
his  address  to  the  meeting. 

Also  worth  noting,  he  said,  is  that  "the 
average  hourly-rated  employee  in  Canadian 
manufacturing  is  today  earning  over  44  per 
cent  more  than  he  did  10  years  ago,  although 
the  consumer  price  index  has  risen  by  only 
17  per  cent  in  the  same  period." 

Mr.  Cumming  said  he  found  it  significant 
that  this  increased  employment  occurred  in 
a  period  during  which  a  great  deal  has  been 
said  about  the  supposed  threat  to  men's  jobs 
posed  by  automation  and  swiftly-advancing 
technology. 

I  do  not  mean  to  discount  the  legitimate  con- 
cern expressed  in  some  quarters  that  we  have 
not  yet  done  all  we  need  to  do  to  prepare  our- 
selves for  the  more  automated  age  which  is  fast 
approaching.  However,  I  do  not  think  that  this 
kind  of  concern  has  anything  in  common  with 
the  alarmist  predictions  of  those  who,  for  the 
most  part,  appear  to  me  to  have  had  a  minimum 
of  practical  experience  of  industry  and  its  prob- 
lems. 


THE   LABOUR   GAZETTE 

91938-?, 


JULY    J965 


Referring  to  the  importance  of  equipping 
employees,  through  training  and  retraining, 
to  meet  the  changing  job  requirements  im- 
posed by  an  advancing  technology,  the 
speaker  emphasized  that  the  majority  of  dele- 
gates were  aware  that  industry,  no  less  than 
government,  will  have  to  play  a  major  role 
in  upgrading  the  skills,  or  otherwise  help  to 
adjust  those  whose  employment  has  been 
affected  in  one  way  or  another  by  the 
machine. 

Meanwhile,  let  us  not  neglect  to  reassure  em- 
ployees who  may  be  prey  to  unwarranted  fears. 
It  requires  no  great  knowledge  of  history  to 
drive  home  the  essential  truth,  which  is  that 
the  machine  is  a  liberator,  not  a  job-consuming 
monster. 

Mr.  Cumming  observed  that  although  the 
past  year  had  seen  its  share  of  local  labour- 
management  disputes,  there  had  been  no 
seriously-prolonged,  industry-wide  strikes  to 
blight  the  scene. 

For  the  most  part,  labour-management  rela- 
tions in  manufacturing  have,  I  think,  continued 
to  be  good,  and  we  can  note  with  some  satis- 
faction a  growing  realism  on  the  part  of  many 
of  those  responsible  for  the  leadership  of  or- 
ganized labour.  Since  labour  can  manifestly  be 
seen  to  be  sharing  in  the  gains  which  come 
from  rising  productivity  and  general  prosperity, 
it  would  be  strange  indeed  if  it  were  otherwise. 

Biggest  export  success  story  of  last  year, 
reported  Mr.  Cumming,  was  the  36-per-cent 
jump  in  the  value  of  our  foreign  sales  of 
fully-manufactured  goods  compared  with  the 
preceding  year.  "This  was  no  one-shot  affair," 
he  continued,  "for  our  1964  sales  of  such 
exports  were  no  less  than  double  what  they 
were  in   1961." 

One  of  the  main  reasons  why  sales  both 
at  home  and  abroad  have  been  so  good,  he 
said,  is  that  "our  costs  have  risen  less  steeply 
in  recent  years  than  those  of  many  of  our 
competitors." 

Canadians  are  "buying  Canadian,"  he 
added,  not  out  of  any  sense  of  obligation 
but  because  the  Canadian  product  is  the 
better  product. 

As  our  population  grows — and  we  are  rapidly 
approaching  the  20-million  mark  now — and  as 
incomes  rise,  we  have  every  reason  to  hope 
that  further  reductions  in  the  unit  cost  factor 
will  mean  even  bigger  sales  here  at  home. 

We  are  still  a  long  way  from  the  kind  of 
mass  market  advantages  enjoyed  by  some  other 
major    industrial    nations,    but    even    so    we    are 


601 


-  ncly  showing  our  competitive  mettle  not 
only  at  home  but  in  the  market-places  of  the 
world. 

Another  major  development  during  1964, 
said  Mr.  dimming,  was  the  appearance  of 
the  first  annual  report  of  the  Economic 
Council  of  Canada — "a  body  which  many 
people  expect  will  exercise  a  considerable 
influence  on  important  decisions  of  both  in- 
dustry and  eovernment  in  the  months  and 
-  ahead." 

The  Council's  report  has  been  widely  dis- 
cussed, he  noted,  and  had  served  to  make 
thoughtful  Canadians  more  fully  aware  of 
the  formidable  goals  which  must  be  achieved 
over  the  next  four  or  five  years  in  the  fields 
of  employment,  education,  productivity,  tech- 
nology and  international  salesmanship. 

The  Council  having  been  established  by  gov- 
ernment, we  must  certainly  hope  that  its  recom- 
mendations will  be  given  due  weight  by  Ottawa 
when  it  comes  to  formulating  policy.  It  would 
be  quite  ludicrous  if,  having  created  such  an 
expert  body,  the  federal  authorities  were  to 
be  either  at  cross  purposes  with  it  or  blithely 
proceed  to  disregard  some  of  its  more  essential 
thinking  altogether. 

On  the  subject  of  the  recent  automotive 
agreement,  Mr.  Cumming  expressed  the  hope 
that  the  U.S.  Congress  would  soon  ratify  it. 
At  the  moment,  he  pointed  out,  the  U.S.  is 
reaping  all  the  advantages. 

The  speaker  noted  also  that  both  labour 
and  the  general  public  were  developing  a 
better  understanding  of  the  role  capital  in- 


vestment plays  in  providing  jobs  and  better- 
ing the  lot  of  all  Canadians. 

Some  may  think  that  in  so  saying  I  am  being 
rather  optimistic,  but  it  seems  to  me  significant 
that  the  improvement  in  corporate  profits  since 
the  Sixties  really  got  rolling  has  not  drawn  the 
amount  of  abusive,  misinformed  fire  which  it 
might  have  done,  and  which  at  an  earlier  time 
I  am  sure  would  have  done.  I  take  this  as 
evidence  that  the  connection  between  improved 
corporate  profits,  more  jobs  and  higher  wages 
has  not  gone  unnoticed  by  the  man  in  the 
street. 

Mr.  Cumming  thought  that  the  CMA's  an- 
nual breakdown  of  the  manufacturers'  sales 
dollar,  and  the  widespread  publicity  given 
the  narrow  five-cent  profit  over  the  past  17 
years  had  contributed  to  this  growing  public 
enlightenment. 

At  any  rate,  it  is  something  that  not  quite 
so  many  Canadians  today  believe  that  the  manu- 
facturer averages  something  like  25  or  30  cents 
in   each   dollar   of   sales. 

Turning  to  the  subject  of  Canadian  unity 
and  nationalism,  Mr.  Cumming  said  he  be- 
lieved that  a  far  better  understanding  was 
developing  between  French-  and  English- 
speaking  Canadians,  despite  the  existence  of 
differences  and  controversy. 

In  my  opinion,  these  differences  will  eventu- 
ally be  bevelled  smooth  for  the  good  and  simple 
reason  that  both  parties  have  exhibited  a  genu- 
ine spirit  of  tolerance  and  a  willingness  to 
listen  to  reason. 

This  evidence  of  basic  patriotism,  this  dis- 
play of  common-sense  co-operation  between  our 
founding  races  will,  I  know,  result  in  a  stronger, 
freer  Canada  building  into  the  future  of  a  solid 
bedrock  of  mutual  respect. 


INDUSTRIAL  RELATIONS  CONFERENCE 


"Designs  for  Stability" 

Hon.  H„  L.  Rowntree 

Continuing  consultation  and  co-operation 
by  labour  and  management  on  the  major 
problems  they  face  in  common  will  not  do 
away  with  the  power  relationship,  but  does 
ensure  that  power  will  be  used  intelligently. 

As  for  collective  bargaining,  if  labour  and 
management  fail  to  keep  it  working  by  adapt- 
ing it  to  new  challenges  as  they  arise,  there 
will  be  a  greater  degree  of  government  inter- 
vention in  the  affairs  of  business  and  in- 
dustry. 

These  are  the  views  and  forecast  of  Hon. 
Leslie  Rowntree,  Ontario  Minister  of  Labour, 
as  he  expressed  them  in  the  opening  address 
of  a  session  titled  "Designs  for  Stability"  at 
the  Industrial  Relations  Conference  of  the 
CMA  annual  meeting. 

Despite  recent  criticism  that  collective 
bargaining  is  "obsolete,"  he  continued,  the 
many  new  approaches  that  are  being  devel- 
oped indicate  that  the  effectiveness  of  free 
collective  bargaining  will  be  improved. 


Mr.  Rowntree  said  that  where  public  in- 
terest is  clearly  involved  in  a  labour-manage- 
ment dispute,  this  fact  must  be  taken  into 
account  by  both  parties  at  the  bargaining 
table.  Where  public  interest  is  not  a  factor, 
he  added,  the  parties  are  free  to  pursue  their 
own  economic  objectives  as  they  see  fit. 

The  speaker  cautioned  that  it  would  be 
unrealistic  to  expect  major  economic  and 
social  problems  to  be  solved  entirely  by 
unions  and  management. 

While  I  believe  the  area  of  private  decision- 
making in  employment  relations  should  be  ex- 
ploited as  widely  as  possible,  I  do  not  wish  to 
see  an  effective  institution  such  as  collective 
bargaining  destroyed  by  requiring  it  to  deal  with 
matters  that  lie  beyond  its  scope. 

Mr.  Rowntree  cited  evidence  that,  in  the 
past  few  years,  bargaining  has  functioned 
better  than  during  any  period  since  World 
War  II: 

Time  lost  through  strikes  decreased  by 
33  per  cent  since  1960,  compared  with  the 
average  loss  between  1945  and  1949.  There 
is  increasing  consideration  by  both  parties  for 


602 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      JULY   7965 


the  economic  and  social  impact  of  their 
settlements.  And  there  have  been  some  out- 
standing examples  of  more  creative,  con- 
structive and  co-operative  bargaining  rela- 
tionships— notably  the  Domtar  labour-man- 
agement conferences. 

If  industry's  problems  were  worked  out  by 
means  of  the  joint  problem-solving  approach, 
said  the  Minister,  the  method  would  yield 
improvements  in  collective  bargaining  itself. 

Mr.  Rowntree  also  asked  employers  to 
re-examine  their  attitudes  toward  the  older 
worker.  "To  relegate  older  workers  to  a  posi- 
tion of  secondary  importance  is  to  ignore  a 
vast  storehouse  of  human  knowledge  at  a 
crucial  time  in  our  province's  development." 

Harold  J.  Clawson 

"The  recognition  of  unions  as  collective 
representatives  of  employees  (when  they  have 
been  freely  chosen  by  them)  is  now  not 
merely  a  matter  of  law  but  has  been  almost 
universally  accepted  by  management.  This 
relationship  is  now  an  indigenous  part  of  the 
industrial  scene — in  other  words,  unions  are 
not  only  here  to  say,  but  they  play  an  im- 
portant role  in  our  economy  as  a  whole  and 
in  employee  relations  at  the  plant  level." 

With  the  foregoing  as  his  premise,  Harold 
J.  Clawson,  Vice-President  of  Personnel  for 
the  Steel  Company  of  Canada,  Limited, 
Hamilton,  Ont.,  examined  the  industrial  rela- 
tions scene  in  Canada  during  an  address  on 
the  subject  of  "Collective  Bargaining — A 
Reappraisal." 

Management  sees  five  major  defects  in  la- 
bour's approach  to  bargaining,  according  to 
Mr.  Clawson: 

— The  first  of  these  is  the  "ritual  of  ex- 
horbitant  demands"  whereby  labour  makes 
300  demands  costing  perhaps  $1  per  hour. 

"Despite  the  fact  that  virtually  no  one 
believes  them,  and  that  sophisticated  bar- 
gainers, including  union  men  themselves,  re- 
gard them  as  a  bit  of  a  joke,  unions  persist 
in  maintaining  this  ritual." 

Some  argue  that  no  harm  is  done,  since 
the  demands  are  whittled  down  at  bargaining 
time.  However,  continued  Mr.  Clawson,  when 
the  union  membership  repudiates  the  settle- 
ment, union  leaders  lose  face,  and  a  "wholly 
needless"  strike  often  results,  even  though  a 
fair  and  reasonable  settlement  was  available." 

— A  second  fault  is  the  presence  among 
union  leaders  of  forceful  social  reformers 
who  zealously  long  to  remake  society  and 
establish  a  reputation  as  innovating  labour 
statesmen.  The  demands  made  by  such  people 
may  adversely  affect  the  entire  economy  of 
the  country,  Mr.  Clawson  said,  but  may  be 
imposed  despite  their  limitations,  through  the 
exercise  of  undue  bargaining  power. 


An  example  cited  by  the  speaker  was  the 
'extended  vacation  plan"  or  "sabbatical  leave 
plan"  designed  to  solve  unemployment  in 
the  U.S.  steel  industry. 

It  is  ironic  that  within  a  year  after  this  plan 
was  negotiated,  and  before  it  even  commenced 
to  operate,  industry  began  to  develop  a  labour 
shortage,  and  the  problem  thus  became  accentu- 
ated by  the  plan. 

The  point  is  that  in  delicate  areas  of  this 
type — for  example,  unemployment—  which  have 
ramifications  throughout  the  economy,  the  issues 
may  be  too  important  or  too  complicated  to  be 
left  to  private  decision-making  through  the  proc- 
ess  of  collective   bargaining. 

— The  third  defect  is  "pattern  bargaining," 
said  Mr.  Clawson.  Because  one  union  or  one 
local  is  successful  in  getting  a  particular 
benefit,  other  locals  and  other  unions  become 
intent  on  imposing  the  same  condition  on 
other  bargaining  units,  even  though  it  may 
be  entirely  inappropriate  either  on  financial 
grounds  or  in  terms  of  needs. 

This  is  compounded  in  industry-wide  bargain- 
ing where  every  company  and  all  employees  in 
the  industry  are  placed  into  the  strait-iacket  of 
settlements  designed  for  and  acceptable  to  a 
few  of  the  leading  firms. 

Unless  unions  become  more  inclined  to  take 
individual  company  circumstances  into  account, 
the  number  of  smaller  firms  forced  to  close  by 
unduly  harsh  union  demands  is  bound  to  increase. 

— The  fourth  defect  Mr.  Clawson  termed 
the  "revolt  of  the  rank  and  file  against  a 
developing  authoritarian  attitude  which  is 
probably  to  be  expected  as  a  result  of  growth 
and  present  bigness  of  unions." 

Responsible  Leadership 

Mr.  Clawson  added  that  he  thought  the 
majority  of  union  heads  were  giving  respon- 
sible leadership,  even,  at  times,  risking  their 
popularity  with  the  membership  to  do  so. 
The  membership  revolt,  he  said,  is  further 
manifested  in  frequent  failures  to  ratify  set- 
tlements, and  the  ousting  of  long-entrenched 
leaders  in  union  election  campaigns. 

— Defect  five,  the  biggest  threat  of  all, 
according  to  Mr.  Clawson,  is  "crisis  bargain- 
ing" toward  an  arbitrary  strike  deadline  under 
the  doctrine  of  "no  contract,  no  work."  This 
approach,  he  said,  particularly  in  relation  to 
some  of  the  difficult  and  important  issues 
which  are  now  facing  labour  and  manage- 
ment, cannot  result  in  sound,  well-thought- 
out  and  well-executed  solutions. 

While  the  strike,  including  the  right  to 
strike,  must  remain  the  final  arbiter,  the  use 
of  the  "automatic"  strike,  which  does  not 
require  a  specific  decision  to  engage  in  a 
strike,  amounts  to  a  form  of  coercion,  the 
speaker  said,  and  will  result  in  the  destruc- 
tion of  free  collective  bargaining.  The  prob- 
lem of  "crisis  bargaining"  is  bigger  in  the 
U.S.,  but  even  there,  government  is  pressing 
for  "cooling  off"  periods. 


THE  LABOUR   GAZETTE 

91938— 2  h 


•      JULY    1965 


603 


Referring  to  new  techniques  being  de- 
\  eloped  to  improve  the  bargaining  process — 
such  as  the  human  relations  committees  or 
"continuous  bargaining"  which  has  recently 
gained  popularity  in  the  U.S. — Mr.  Clawson 
said  he  thought  the  Canadian  system,  which 
gi\es  labour  and  management  more  time 
and  mediatory  assistance,  is  making  greater 
contributions  to  constructive  collective  bar- 
gaining. 

The  speaker  emphasized  that  labour  and 
management  must  together  find  cures  for  the 
many  defects  and  abuses  of  collective  bar- 
gaining, if  they  are  not  prepared  to  accept 
the  alternative  of  increasing  and  "decisive 
government  intervention." 

While  employers  must  retain  the  function  of 
management  (even  the  union  and  employees 
would  suffer  if  this  responsibility  were  given  up 
by  default),  there  are  many  areas  where  informa- 
tion sharing,  exchange  of  views,  and  even,  on 
some  subjects,  consultation  during  the  term 
of  the  agreement,  could  make  for  a  more  con- 
structive collective  bargaining  relationship. 

In  spite  of  its  inequities  and  problems,  the 
speaker  continued,  free  collective  bargaining 
has,  if  viewed  in  historical  perspective,  made 
substantial  social  and  economic  contributions 
to  our  free  enterprise  system.  "If  we  don't 
preserve  it,  we  may  find  imposed  on  us  sub- 
stitutes which  would  bring  far  more  inequi- 
ties and  problems." 

Solutions  to  some  of  the  more  undesirable 
characteristics  of  collective  bargaining  will 
require  a  high  degree  of  statesmanship  on  the 
part  of  organized  labour,  management  and 
governments,  said  Mr.  Clawson.  Govern- 
ment's role,  as  he  sees  it,  is  to  provide  the 
basic  rules  within  which  labour  and  manage- 
ment are  free  to  seek  their  own  solutions — 
and  exceptions  to  this  should  be  made  only 
sparingly. 

They  should  refrain  from  legislation  on  mat- 
ters that  are  properly  subject  to  collective  bar- 
gaining. They  should  try  to  abstain  from  be- 
coming unduly  involved  in  the  cult  of  tri- 
partitism.  Increased  labour-management  co-op- 
eration is  a  "must"  in  the  years  ahead,  but  if 
the  government  becomes  too  much  involved  in 
such  projects,  it  may  well  inhibit  true  co-opera- 
tion, and  in  any  event  might  well  lead  to  a 
type  of  compulsory  co-operation  which  is  a 
contradiction  in  terms. 

Resist  Temptation 

Mr.  Clawson  suggested  that  governments 
should  resist  the  temptation  to  enact  new 
legislation  every  time  a  union  delegation  pre- 
sents it  with  a  list  of  "militant  resolutions" 
passed  at  a  union  convention.  He  also  sug- 
gested that  governments  must  similarly  resist 
management  requests  for  legislative  remedies. 

The  speaker  next  examined  the  weaknesses 
and  deficiencies  of  management,  and  pro- 
posed ways  in  which  employers  could  assist 
in    making    improvements    in   the   machinery 


of  collective  bargaining.  "Employers  must 
relinquish  attitudes  and  postures  of  the  past 
and  recognize  and  respect  the  status  of 
unions." 

Management  also  has  a  duty  to  resist  un- 
reasonable demands,  Mr.  Clawson  continued, 
and  to  exercise  positive  and  realistic  leader- 
ship in  establishing  wage  and  benefit  policies. 
Management  is  at  a  slight  disadvantage  here 
owing  to  the  nature  of  collective  bargaining, 
he  said.  If  employers  take  too  much  initiative 
in  this  area,  and  attempt  to  put  on  the  table 
what  they  think  is  fair  and  reasonable,  the 
union  will  often  consider  this  a  floor  from 
which  to  bargain  further.  Or,  if  the  com- 
pany has  gone  all-out  and  sticks  to  its  offer, 
it  will  be  charged  with  failing  to  bargain  in 
good  faith. 

Management  can  also  contribute  to  the 
maturity  of  industrial  relations — and  serve 
the  public  interest — by  ensuring  that  collec- 
tive bargaining  is  a  two-way  street.  No  em- 
ployer can  either  survive  or  earn  respect, 
said  Mr.  Clawson,  if  he  is  supine  at  the 
bargaining  table  or  adopts  a  purely  defensive 
role. 

The  speaker  also  warned  management  to 
avoid  emotional  reactions  to  union  demands, 
and  to  take  positions  based  more  on  realistic 
objectives  than  on  political  or  emotional 
arguments. 

Concluded  Mr.  Clawson:  "In  short,  in- 
creased co-operation  between  management 
and  labour  in  certain  areas  can  contribute 
to  a  lessening  of  some  of  the  problems  of 
collective  bargaining.  But  steps  in  this  direc- 
tion will  fail  and  bring  disillusionment  if 
we  overlook  the  fact  that  conflict — or  the 
adversary  approach — is  inherent  in  the  col- 
lective bargaining  process.  If  we  get  rid  of 
this,  we  also  get  rid  of  collective  bargaining." 

Eliot  Janeway 

In  an  address  titled  "Economic  Objectives 
and  Collective  Bargaining,"  Eliot  Janeway, 
president  of  the  Janeway  Publishing  and  Re- 
search Corp.,  New  York,  and  director  of 
Gait  Malleable  Iron  Limited,  Gait,  Ont.,  pre- 
dicted that  the  next  steel  labour  contract  in 
the  U.S.  would  follow  the  pattern  of  the  auto 
labour  contract  of  1964  (L.G.,  Oct.  1964, 
p.  850). 

The  auto  settlement  was  reached  on  the 
national  level  with  "relative  ease",  said  Mr. 
Janeway.  The  trouble  that  arose  came  on  the 
local  level,  after  the  national  settlement  had 
been  reached. 

He  pointed  out  that  the  auto  labour  con- 
tract of  1964  has  exerted  a  beneficial  and 
"bullish"    influence    on    the    U.S.    economy. 


604 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      JULY   7965 


Despite  adverse  criticism,  it  has  neither  un- 
leashed inflationary  forces  nor  induced  a  new 
profit  squeeze  in  the  auto  industry. 

"The  prognosis  for  the  next  steel  labour 
contract,"  said  Mr.  Janeway,  "is  that  it  will 
provide  similar  results  and  provoke  less 
criticism." 

The  significant  aspect  of  last  year's  auto 
settlement  was  the  great  weight  it  gave  to 
"fringe  benefits" — particularly  increased  pen- 
sions. 

"Motivation  and  Development" 

Dr.  Howard  P.  Smith 

There  was  a  strong  suggestion  at  the  CMA 
meeting  that  management  might  not  be  mak- 
ing as  effective  an  effort  as  it  could  make 
to  establish  more  positive  relationships  with 
trade  unions. 

The  suggestion  came  from  Dr.  Howard  P. 
Smith,  a  psychologist  with  Rohrer,  Hibler 
and  Replogle  of  Montreal.  Dr.  Smith  partici- 
pated in  "Motivation  and  Development,"  the 
second  half  of  the  industrial  relations  con- 
ference. His  theme  was  "Man  in  the  Factory." 

The  speaker  admitted  that  anything  a  com- 
pany does  that  appears  to  weaken  the  au- 
thority of  the  union  in  the  eyes  of  its 
membership  is  going  to  be  greeted  with  great 
suspicion.  Despite  this  obstacle,  the  initiative 
for  more  effective  union-management  rela- 
tions must  come  from  management  itself. 

The  great  majority  of  the  communications 
that  go  on  between  management  and  the  union 
seem  to  centre  around  the  processing  of  griev- 
ances. This  is  hardly  a  conducive  atmosphere 
in  which  to  develop  a  more  positive  type  of 
relationship. 

But  why  could  not  the  union  and  the  man- 
agement together  focus  on  the  work  situation 
itself?  Is  it  not  in  the  self-interest  of  both  the 
union  and  the  management  that  the  employee 
find  the  opportunity  for  self-realization  and  self- 


fulfilment  through  his  work?  The  overwhelming 
weight  of  psychological  evidence  is  that  being  a 
productive  person  and  a  satisfied  person  go  hand 
in  hand. 

Dr.  Smith  demonstrated  little  patience  with 
the  theory  that  people  hate  work  and  must 
be  bribed  if  they  are  to  produce  at  all.  "You 
can  eliminate  all  the  sources  of  worker  dis- 
satisfaction without  at  the  same  time  creating 
satisfaction  in  the  work  group,"  he  said. 

He  told  the  CMA  delegates  that  too  many 
companies  think  they  can  raise  productivity 
by  offering  incentive  earnings,  bonuses,  paid 
vacations  and  recreational  services. 

"It  comes  down  to  being  a  kind  of  bribery 
if  these  activities  are  based  on  the  assumption 
that  they  motivate  people  to  work  effectively," 
he  said.  "They  just  do  not  do  so — and  I 
think  we  have  acted  too  often  as  if  work 
were  inherently  distasteful." 

Management  sometimes  acts  as  though  it 
thinks  of  a  business  organization  as  a  vast 
psychological  clinic,  Dr.  Smith  continued. 
Instead  of  being  preoccupied  with  happiness 
and  adjustment,  it  should  be  concentrating 
on  efficiency  and  productivity  as  the  goals  of 
management  with  respect  to  their  workers. 

It  is  only  from  the  performance  of  a  task  that 
the  individual  can  get  the  rewards  that  will  rein- 
force his  aspirations.  .  .  .  The  motivation  to 
achieve,  to  accomplish  something  constructive 
through  one's  work,  is  a  deep-seated  human 
drive  that  we  are  only  beginning  to  learn  how 
to  tap. 

Dr.  Smith  warned  that  positive  motivation, 
resourcefulness  and  initiative  can  be  stifled 
in  an  authoritarian  atmosphere  where  there 
are  rigid  controls  and  limited  opportunities 
for  two-way  communication.  He  also  sug- 
gested that  companies  might  get  off  on  the 
right  foot  if  they  permit  workers  to  follow 
a  production  operation  from  start  to  comple- 
tion, rather  than  confine  them  to  one  frag- 
mented part  of  a  job. 


BUSINESS  PLANNING  CONFERENCE 


"Business  Planning  for  National  Growth" 
Dr.  John  Deutsch 

Forward-looking  programs  and  longer- 
range  plans  must  be  continuously  developed 
by  both  business  managers  and  governments 
in  the  interests  of  a  secure  Canadian  economy. 
This  advice  was  contained  in  an  address  de- 
livered by  Dr.  John  Deutsch,  Chairman  of 
the  Economic  Council  of  Canada,  to  the 
business  planning  conference  of  the  CMA 
annual  meeting. 

Theme  of  the  conference  was  "Business 
Planning  for  National  Growth"  and  the 
speaker's  subject  was  "Business  Planning  and 
Our   1970  Potential." 


Consequences  of  neglect  to  plan  ahead  are 
written  in  the  histories  of  the  manufacturers 
of  declining  items  ranging  all  the  way  from 
ice-boxes  to  steam  locomotives,  said  Dr. 
Deutsch. 

He  urged  that  the  basic  short-  and  long- 
term  policies  and  programs  of  government  be 
communicated  to  businessmen  because  the 
Canadian  economy  can  no  longer  be  run  by 
improvisations  and  "seat-of-the-pants"  meth- 
ods. If  the  business  community  is  to  plan 
wisely,  he  added,  it  should  have  some  knowl- 
edge of  future  government  intentions  in  such 
fields  as  fiscal  and  monetary  policy;  tariffs 
and  foreign  trade;  education,  training  and 
manpower  programs;  the  tax  system;  social 


THE   LABOUR   GAZETTE      •      JULY    7965 


605 


and  public  works  expenditures;  and  the  na- 
ture and  extent  of  efforts  to  promote 
research,    development   and   the    increase   of 

knowledge. 

These  government  policies  and  programs, 
which  must  he  formulated  in  any  case,  will  play 
a  large  role  in  determining  the  general  economic 
climate  in  which  business,  labour  and  other 
prival  ->. ill  have  to  work. 

The  more  we  know  about  how  governments 
se  to  influence  that  climate,  not  just  for 
tomorrow  but  tor  some  years  ahead,  the  more 
feasible  it  will  be  for  private  business  and  other 
private  groups  to  plan  their  affairs  and  to  move 
ahead.  The  greater  the  certainty  in  this  vital 
area  of  basic  government  policy,  the  more  pos- 
sible it  will  be  for  business  to  meet  its  chal- 
lenges. 

Dr.  Deutsch  compared  planning  to  navi- 
gation: "The  navigator  lays  out  a  plan  and 
sets  a  course  toward  an  objective.  He  con- 
stantly rechecks  his  position  as  he  proceeds 
toward  his  goal."  He  pointed  out  that  modern 
developments  such  as  the  speed  of  techno- 
logical change,  the  increasing  complexity  and 
specialization  of  industrial  organizations,  and 
the  growing  importance  of  knowledge  and 
skill  had  made  long-range  forward  planning 
an  increasingly  important  aspect  of  business. 


Inherently,  the  operation  of  a  private  busi- 
ness in  a  market  economy  involves  the  com- 
mitment of  present  resources  to  future  expec- 
tations, said  Dr.  Deutsch.  "Whatever  is  al- 
ready in  existence  is  obsolescent."  Today's 
businessman  is  constantly  confronted  with 
the  situation  that  whatever  he  is  doing  now 
is  out-of-date,  and  that  already  new  and 
better  ways  are  in  existence  and  will  shortly 
be  put  into  operation.  Failure  to  plan  far 
enough  ahead  to  turn  new  possibilities  into 
new  opportunities  makes  it  less  and  less 
likely  that  his  business  will  survive. 

Dr.  Deutsch  emphasized  that  the  really 
significant  resources  of  business  today  are 
knowledge  and  skill,  and  that  development  of 
these  resources  requires  time,  long-range  in- 
vestment in  research,  purposeful  training  of 
manpower,  and  the  far-sighted  development 
of  managerial,  professional  and  other  highly 
skilled  manpower. 

More  carefully-planned  adjustments  to 
changing  technology  and  competitive  condi- 
tions should  be  worked  out  "in  co-operation 
with  labour." 


British  Columbia  Labour-Management 

Conference  on  Industrial  Relations 

Speakers  offer  various  opinions  on  means  to  enable  manpower 
to  adjust  to  technological  change.  Officer  of  the  Department 
explains   effects   on   manpower   to   be   expected   in    the   sixties 


Various  opinions  regarding  the  means  by 
which  manpower  should  be  enabled  to  ad- 
just to  technological  change  were  expressed 
by  speakers  at  the  British  Columbia  Labour- 
Management  Conference  on  Industrial  Rela- 
tions, held  in  Vancouver  on  May  19  and  20. 

Dr.  John  Crispo,  associate  professor  of  the 
University  of  Toronto's  school  of  business*, 
disagreed  with  the  view  that  collective  bar- 
gaining could  be  relied  upon  to  deal  with 
the  difficulties  of  adjustment  to  technological 
change.  For  one  thing,  he  said,  only  30  per 
cent  of  the  workers  in  Canada  were  or- 
ganized in  unions.  What  was  to  happen  to 
the  other  70  per  cent? 

Another  objection  was  that  collective  bar- 
gaining was  a  piecemeal  way  of  dealing  with 
the  question,  because  of  the  differences  be- 
tween the  labour  laws  of  the  various  prov- 
inces. "The  challenge  is  to  find  the  right 
mix  of  public  and  private  policies,"  he  said. 


*  Since  appointed  Director  of  the  University 
of  Toronto  Centre  for  Industrial  Relations. 


The  government  should  establish  a  full- 
employment  policy,  and  it  should  have  a 
labour  market  policy  that  provides  for  the 
training  and  education  of  workers,  and  for 
maintenance  of  income  for  workers  who  were 
willing  to  retrain  themselves  and  to  improve 
their  qualifications. 

Dr.  Crispo  said,  however,  that  care  must 
be  taken  to  prevent  the  labour  market  from 
being  disrupted  by  too  much  government 
interference.  Such  interference  might  be  con- 
sidered necessary  when  the  market  seemed 
unable  to  cope  with  effects  of  automation 
such  as  unemployment  among  workers  whose 
skills  had  been  made  obsolete  by  machines. 
"But  the  first  thing  we  should  ask,"  he  said, 
"is  why  isn't  the  market  taking  care  of  it?" 

Dr.  Crispo  said  that  no  one  who  lacked 
sufficient  skill  to  find  work  should  be  left 
to  the  mercies  of  the  market  alone.  He  sug- 
gested three  means  by  which  people  thrown 
out  of  work  by  technological  change  should 
be    helped    to   re-enter   the   labour   market. 


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THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      JULY   7965 


These  were:  provision  of  suitable  retraining 
facilities,  provision  of  funds  to  help  workers 
to  move  to  places  where  work  was  obtain- 
able, and  provision  of  incentives  to  displaced 
workers  to  seek  retraining. 

The  speaker  said  that  the  system  of  loans 
announced  in  mid-May  by  Prime  Minister 
Pearson  (L.G.,  June,  p.  486)  was  not  enough 
to  ensure  manpower  mobility.  Free  trans- 
portation should   be  provided. 

Dr.  Gil  Schonning 

The  effects  on  manpower  to  be  expected 
as  a  result  of  economic  and  technological 
change  in  the  1960's  were  described  by  Gil 
Schonning,  Assistant  Director  of  the  Eco- 
nomics and  Research  Branch  of  the  Depart- 
ment of  Labour,  in  his  address  to  the  con- 
ference. He  used  a  series  of  38  chart?  ac- 
companied by  verbal  comments  to  describe 
the  effects. 

The  matters  dealt  with  in  the  charts  in- 
cluded: Total  employment,  employment  by 
industries  and  industrial  groups,  changes  in 
output  in  relation  to  employment,  changes 
in  male  and  female  employment,  labour  force 
participation  rates,  labour  force  participation 
by  occupations,  and  distribution  in  the  labour 
force  of  groups  of  persons  with  various  de- 
grees of  education. 

Other  charts  illustrated  unemployment  by 
selected  industries  and  occupational  groups, 
by  sex  and  educational  level;  duration  of 
unemployment,  unemployment  rates  in  vari- 
ous regions,  gTowth  of  employment  in  se- 
lected urban  districts,  seasonal  employment 
by  regions;  and  changes  in  population,  scales 
of  income,  gross  national  product,  and  work- 
ing hours. 

In  the  preface  to  his  address,  Dr.  Schonning 
cited  certain  facts  as  evidence  that  the  Cana- 
dian economy  and  the  working  population 
of  the  country  were  subject  to  a  high  degree 
of  change.  These  facts  included: 

— Canada  not  only  has  the  fastest-growing 
work  force  of  any  industrial  nation,  but  its 
economy  is  undergoing  rapid  change  in  the 
variety  of  its  industries. 

— In  relation  to  the  size  of  the  country, 
Canada's  share  of  international  trade  is  one 
of  the  largest,  and  one  that  is  often  influenced 
by  changes  that  originate  abroad. 

— "We  live  next  door  to  an  efficient  and 
competitive  giant." 

— High  and  rising  personal  income,  to- 
gether with  few  restrictions  on  the  consumer's 
choice,  are  conducive  to  change  in  a  free 
market  economy. 

— The  effect  of  previous  changes  has  been 
unevenly  distributed  in  different  parts  of 
the  country. 

— The  sparseness  of  the  population  and 
the  concentration  of  the  working  force  in 
large,  widely  separated  centres  makes  the 
movement  of  labour  costly. 


— Unevenness  in  the  growth  of  industries 
and  occupations  in  one  centre  compared  with 
the  next,  and  in  urban  compared  with  non- 
urban  centres,  makes  large  demands  on  the 
adaptability  of  the  work  force  and  the  insti- 
tutions that  contribute  to  its  development  and 
welfare. 

Cost  Not  Inevitable 

In  his  summary,  he  pointed  out  that  eco- 
nomic and  technological  change  imposed  a 
high  cost  on  many  people,  but  this  should 
not  be  regarded  as  inevitable.  The  benefits 
of  being  able  to  produce  more  with  less 
effort  were  incontestable,  but  considerations 
of  these  benefits  should  not  blind  us  to  their 
unequal  distribution,  and  to  the  gain  to  be 
derived  from  enabling  the  greatest  possible 
number  of  people  to  make  full  use  of  their 
powers  during  their  whole  working  lives. 

Unevenness  in  the  growth  of  industries  still 
had  about  three  times  as  much  effect  as  tech- 
nological change  in  shifting  the  demand  for 
various  kinds  of  labour,  but  the  effect  of  the 
latter  was  increasing. 

At  any  rate,  "thousands  of  workers  and 
their  families  have  become  the  fall-out  casual- 
ties of  economic  and  technological  change." 
The  question  was:  how  far  should  the  cost  of 
making  the  necessary  adjustments  of  man- 
power be  borne  by  employers  and  the  public 
rather  than  by  the  workers  affected? 

Mr.  Schonning  suggested  that  so  far,  funds 
had  been  invested  in  physical  resources  at 
the  expense  of  investment  in  human  resources. 
This  had  resulted  in  inefficient  use  of  man- 
power and  a  great  deal  of  unnecessary  human 
suffering. 

He  thought  that  more  resources  should  be 
invested  to  find  out  what  sort  of  manpower 
our  economy  was  going  to  demand  during 
the  next  five  or  ten  years,  so  that  the  insti- 
tutions that  prepare  people  for  work  could 
adjust  themselves  accordingly. 

A  second  aspect  of  manpower  that  needed 
more  attention  was  that  of  the  adjustment 
of  adult  manpower  to  the  vicissitudes  of  tech- 
nological and  economic  change.  "This  simply 
means  keeping  the  members  of  the  labour 
force  active,  efficient  and  fully  utilized 
throughout  their  whole  lifetime,  and  thereby 
minimizing  the  number  of  fall-out  casualties." 

A  third  thing  that  needed  to  be  examined 
was  the  effectiveness  of  existing  industrial 
relations  and  collective  bargaining  arrange- 
ments in  dealing  with  the  adjustments  de- 
manded by  such  changes. 

"Fourthly,  there  is  the  whole  demand 
aspect  of  manpower  which  we  refer  to  as 
employment  policy." 

The  speaker  suggested  that  in  a  free  society 
the  achievement  of  the  goal  of  full  and 
effective  use  of  manpower  "must  be  a  joint 
effort."  First  of  all,  management  must  play 
a  greater  part  than  it  had  so  far  in  developing 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      JULY    7965 


607 


and  effectively  using  manpower.  Employers 
had  tended  to  devote  most  of  their  attention 
to  production,  selling,  engineering  and  finance, 
and  too  little  to  organizing  and  developing 
manpower  and  adjusting  it  to  change,  Dr. 
Schonning  thought. 

He  spoke  of  the  need  for  training  arrange- 
ments, either  within  the  firm  or  as  a  joint 
endeavour  with  the  community,  and  of  the 
need  for  a  "comprehensive  policy  of  upgrad- 
ing its  manpower  systematically  so  as  to  meet 
the  many  minor  changes  in  technology."  It 
small  ways,  he  pointed  out, 
that  changes  in  technology  usually  came 
about. 

"Thirdly,  management  must  have  a  policy 
of  retraining,  upgrading  or  otherwise  adjust- 
ing its  work  force  in  times  of  major  tech- 
nical changes.  .  .  .  This  means  that  the  effect 
on  manpower  should  be  known  well  in  ad- 
vance of  the  actual  change-over  so  that  the 
appropriate  training  programs  can  get  under 
way   before  the  actual  change  takes  place." 

Right  Attitude  Equally  Important 

Besides  these  actions  on  the  part  of  man- 
agement, however,  what  was  equally  impor- 
tant was  the  right  attitude  on  the  part  of 
unions  and  management  and  a  relationship 
between  them  that  allowed  such  actions  to  be 
carried  out  effectively.  But  parties  must  work 
together  "so  that  solutions  to  adjustment 
problems  can  be  found  in  an  atmosphere  of 
calm  and  as  a  matter  of  course.  In  general, 
problems  must  not  be  allowed  to  become 
issues  which  can  only  be  settled  by  bargain- 
ing. .  .  ." 

In  time  of  change,  the  worker  must  not 
only  be  regarded  as  a  factor  of  production, 
but  also  "must  be  viewed  as  a  human  being 
with  objectives,  plans  and  problems  of  his 
own."  He  must  be  fully  informed  about  what 
is  going  on,  what  is  going  to  happen  to  him 
and   what  choices  he  has. 

Even  if  management  played  its  full  part, 
however,  there  would  still  be  a  large  number 
of  "fall-out  casualties"  resulting  from  eco- 
nomic and  technological  changes. 

The  second  essential  program,  therefore,  for 
reducing  this  number  is  to  expand  our  capabili- 
ties for  getting  these  people  back  into  employ- 
ment as  quickly  and  effectively  as  possible.  This, 
I  would  suggest,  is  primarily  a  government  re- 
sponsibility. We  in  Canada  have  been  slow  in 
recocnizing  the  importance  of  this  function.  .  .  . 

Many  workers  who  lose  their  jobs  as  a  result 
of  change  are  unable  for  financial  reasons  to 
participate  in  work,  or  in  work  for  which  they 
are  best  suited.  This  is  a  by-product  of  change 
which  we  have  ignored  far  too  long. 

As  you  probably  know,  only  a  limited  provi- 
sion for  dealing  with  this  problem  has  existed 
in  the  Unemployment  Insurance  Act.  A  new 
capability  is  now  being  developed.  The  new 
fManpower  Mobility]  program  may  provide  loans 
for  transportation  and  resettlement  to  unem- 
ployed workers  for  whom  jobs  have  been  found 


in  another  labour  market,  and  who  desire  to 
make  use  of  this  provision  [L.G.,  June,  p. 
486].  .  .  . 

An  important  complementary  provision  to  this 
program,  which  already  exists,  is  that  any  un- 
employed worker  can  enrol  in  training  or 
retraining  courses.  The  geographic  mobility  pro- 
\  ision  ought  to  be  regarded  as  both  a  break- 
through and  an  experiment.  .  .  . 

Mr.  Schonning  pointed  out  that  there  was 
a  conflict  between  the  need  for  change  as 
"an  essential  ingredient  for  survival  and  prog- 
ress" and  the  need  of  the  individual  for  job 
security.  "It  is  in  response  to  this  that  various 
manpower  policies  and  programs  have  come 
about.  It  is  in  view  of  this  situation  that  we 
need  to  deveop  an  adaptable  work  force 
which  can  survive  more  effectively  in  the 
climate  of  change. 

"Moreover,  we  need  to  keep  the  work 
force  adaptable  and  competitive  throughout 
the  life  of  the  individual.  Similarly,  we  need 
to,  and  we  can  reduce  the  number  of  break- 
ages in  job  security.  Lastly,  for  those  whose 
job  security  must  be  broken  through  no  fault 
of  their  own,  everything  must  be  done  to 
shorten  the  breach  in  their  employment  and 
also  reduce  the  cost  they  have  incurred." 

Dr.  George  Shultz 

A  different  point  of  view  was  presented 
by  Dr.  George  Shultz,  dean  of  the  graduate 
school  of  business  of  the  University  of  Chi- 
cago, who  said  that  unions  and  management 
facing  each  other  at  the  bargaining  table 
were  in  a  better  position  than  an  outside 
party — such  as  government — to  find  solutions 
to  problems  of  employment  and  of  moving 
workers  to  new  jobs.  He  admitted,  however, 
that  there  were  matters  in  which  government 
should  take  a  hand,  such  as  in  retraining  and 
replacing  in  employment  some  workers  dis- 
placed by  changes. 

"At  the  same  time,  I  fear  we  are  going 
too  far  in  leaning  on  government.  There  is 
too  much  tendency  to  throw  up  our  hands 
and  say  nobody  can  do  anything  on  his  own, 
that  we  need  a  government  program." 

He  disagreed  with  those  who  say  that 
the  economy  is  getting  out  of  control  be- 
cause of  new  technology,  and  that  the  prob- 
lems arising  from  it  have  "got  everyone 
licked,"  saying:  "People  are  not  defeated. 
They  are  doing  a  whole  series  of  things  that 
may  be  small  in  themselves,  but  in  the  aggre- 
gate are   quite   important   and   constructive." 

Dr.  Shultz  also  expressed  the  opinion  that 
there  had  not  been  enough  strikes  in  the 
United  States  in  recent  years.  He  said  that 
he  thought  a  strike  was  a  good  thing,  because 
"it  lets  people  feel  their  oats  a  little."  When 
there  was  a  history  of  a  strike,  labour  and 
management  were  inclined  to  have  a  healthier 
respect  for  each  other,  and  negotiations  tended 
to  go  more  smoothly,  he  contended.  In  his 


608 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      JULY   7965 


opinion,  collective  bargaining  did  not  neces- 
sarily fail  when  one  side  or  the  other  forced 
a  showdown. 

Statistics  showed  that  strike  activity  in  the 
U.S.  had  been  averaging  less  than  a  fifth  of 
one  per  cent  in  recent  years.  "I  would  argue 
that  maybe  this  is  too  low,"  Dr.  Shultz  said. 

Dr.  Stuart  Jamieson 

Dr.  Stuart  Jamieson,  a  professor  of  eco- 
nomics at  the  University  of  British  Columbia, 
said  that  collective  bargaining  was  not  meet- 
ing the  challenges  and  problems  of  new 
technology.  There  was  widespread  hostility 
on  the  part  of  management  toward  unions. 
Management  did  not  want  to  give  advance 
notice  of  layoffs  for  fear  that  it  would  affect 
workers'  morale  or  production  levels.  It  also 
feared  that  the  union  would  fight  technologi- 
cal change. 

The  speaker  suggested  that  there  might  be 
a  place  for  paid  leaves  of  absence  to  give 
workers  the  chance  to  retrain  for  new  jobs. 

Referring  to  another  matter,  Dr.  Jamieson 
said  that  there  were  two  views  about  the 
relationship  between  skilled  and  unskilled 
labour,  and  about  its  effect  on  unemployment. 

One  school  of  thought  held  that  a  lack 
of  skilled  workers  created  an  obstacle  to 
economic  expansion  and  resulted  in  a  short- 
age of  jobs  for  unskilled  workers.  Another 
school  held  that  the  problem  regarding  un- 
skilled workers  was  that  they  were  increasing 
in  "number  while  job  opportunities  for  them 


were   decreasing,   or   at   least   remaining   sta- 
tionary. 

"We  must  determine  if  the  problem  is  a 
shortage  of  skilled  workers  or  a  surplus  of 
unskilled  people,"  he  said. 

Other  Views 

Joe  Morris,  Executive  Vice-President  of  the 
Canadian  Labour  Congress,  said  that  so  far 
government  had  not  lived  up  to  its  responsi- 
bilities in  the  manpower  adjustment  prob- 
lem. He  suggested  that  a  new  agency,  a 
national  manpower  service,  should  be  formed 
within  the  framework  of  the  National  Em- 
ployment Service. 

Canada  must  produce  knowledgeable  citi- 
zens if  it  wanted  to  compete  in  the  world 
today,  Dr.  Patrick  McTaggart-Cowan,  Presi- 
dent of  Simon  Fraser  University,  told  the 
conference.  "The  United  States  has  twice  as 
many  students  enrolled  in  universities  as 
Canada  has,  on  a  per-capita  basis,"  he  said. 
"And  in  B.C.,  one  out  of  every  16  persons 
has  only  a   Grade   4   education." 

Pat  O'Neal,  Secretary  of  the  British  Colum- 
bia Federation  of  Labour,  said  that  collective 
bargaining  had  a  place  in  dealing  with  the 
problems  of  technological  change,  but  that 
it  was  dangerous  and  unrealistic  to  rely  en- 
tirely on   it. 

John  Drew  of  the  Federal  Department  of 
Labour's  Manpower  Consultative  Service  said 
that  there  was  little  to  fear  from  technologi- 
cal change  if  proper  planning  were  carried 
out. 


1965  Canada  Year  Book  Is  Now  Available 


The  1965  edition  of  the  Canada  Year 
Book  contains  a  series  of  annual  publica- 
tions giving  official  statistical  and  other  in- 
formation on  almost  every  measurable  phase 
of  Canada's  development. 

As  the  economy  of  the  country  has  ex- 
panded, the  Dominion  Bureau  of  Statistics 
has  endeavoured  to  present  the  story  of  this 
development,  summarizing  a  great  mass  of 
detailed  statistical,  legislative  and  other  per- 
tinent information  concisely  within  the  covers 
of  one  volume,  and  supplementing  it  with 
data  from  other  departments  of  the  federal 
Government  and  from  the  provinces. 

Special  feature  articles  contained  in  the 
present  edition  include:  "Agriculture  in  the 
Canadian  Economy";  "Canadian  Forest  Prod- 
ucts   and    Changing    World    Markets";    and 


"Operational  and  Technological  Changes  in 
Rail  Transport." 

Changing  emphasis  has  made  necessary 
certain  revisions  in  chapter  content  and  the 
inclusion  of  additional  data,  both  of  which 
will  be  continuing  features  of  the  Year  Book. 
Scientific  and  industrial  research  is  covered 
in  a  separate  chapter  that  contains  a  selection 
of  Canadian  achievements  in  science  and 
technology  since   1800. 

All  chapters  include  the  latest  data  avail- 
able to  December  31,  1964.  A  political  map 
(scale  140  milestone  inch)  is  enclosed  in  the 
pocket  on  the  inside  back  cover  of  the 
volume.  Available  from  the  Queen's  Printer, 
Ottawa,  the  cloth-bound  edition  (&CS1 1-202/ 
1965)  costs  $5,  the  paper-bound  edition 
(ffCSl  1-205/1965)   costs  $3. 


THE   LABOUR   GAZETTE      •      JULY    7965 


Changes  in  General  Assistance  and 

Other  Welfare  Legislation  in  1964 

Jit  provinces  make  changes  in  general  assistance  programs, 
Manitoba,  Ontario,  Quebec  amend  laws  on  mothers'  allowances 
and  housing  act  changes  affect  accommodation  for  the  elderly 

GENERAL  ASSISTANCE 


During  1964  eight  provinces  made  changes 
in  their  general  assistance  programs,  includ- 
ing changes  in  rates  of  assistance,  permissible 
income,  and  eligibility  requirements. 

Legislation  passed  in  previous  years  was 
proclaimed  in  Ontario  and  Manitoba,  and 
in  Alberta,  legislation  was  passed  that  would, 
on  proclamation,  authorize  the  payment 
under  the  social  allowances  program  of  as- 
sistance for  the  blind,  disabled  and  older 
persons. 

NEWFOUNDLAND 

Three  amendments  to  the  Social  Assistance 
(Consolidated)  Regulations  of  1961  were 
gazetted  January  28,  February  25  and  May  12. 

The  first  amendment  authorized  social  as- 
sistance in  cash  for  the  months  of  July, 
August  and  September  for  a  child  who  at- 
tains his  16th  birthday  prior  to  the  first  day 
of  September,  and  who  has  been  in  regular 
attendance  at  school  during  the  school  year 
that  ends  in  June  of  that  year. 

The  second  amendment  effective  from 
April  1,  1964  raised  the  allowable  maximum 
annual  outside  income  for  families  receiving 
social  assistance.  The  maximum  for  families 
consisting  of  adults  only  was  raised  from 
$600  to  $720,  and  for  families  consisting  of 
adults  and  children,  from  $800  to  $900.  In 
either  case,  if  the  annual  outside  income  is 
in  excess  of  the  specified  maximum,  the 
amount  of  the  allowance  is  reduced  by  the 
amount  of  the  excess. 

Changes  in  rates  of  assistance  were  made 
by  the  third  amendment,  gazetted  May  12, 
1964  and  effective  April  1,  1964.  The  cloth- 
ing allowance  for  the  first  adult  in  the  family 
has  been  raised  from  $5  to  $10  a  month; 
rates  for  other  members  of  the  family  remain 
at  $5  each.  The  monthly  fuel  allowance  for 
each  adult  or  family  has  been  raised  from 
$10  to  $15,  and  the  rent  allowance  for  each 
adult  or  family  raised  from  $20  to  $25  in 
rural  communities,  and  from  $30  to  $50  in 
urban  communities. 

Amounts  which  may  be  granted  toward 
repairs  and  renovations  of  a  home  have  also 
been  raised.  The  maximum  amount  which 
may  be  granted  in  any  one  year  has  been 
raised  from  $240  to  $300.  The  aggregate  of 
all  such  grants  in  any  four-year  period  may 
not  exceed  $1,000,  an  increase  from  the 
former  $960. 


NOVA  SCOTIA 

An  amendment  to  the  Social  Assistance 
Act  (Statutes  of  Nova  Scotia,  1964,  c.  60) 
assented  to  March  4,  1964  affected  both 
Part  I  and  Part  II  of  the  Act. 

Under  Part  I,  provincial  allowances  may 
now  be  extended  on  behalf  of  any  child  who 
is  attending  school  beyond  the  level  of  Grade 
VIII  to  the  age  of  18  or  to  the  end  of  the 
school  year  in  which  he  becomes  18.  Effec- 
tive April  1,  1964  this  provision  was  formerly 
restricted  to  the  children  of  widows,  mothers 
with  disabled  husbands,  or  foster  children 
whose  parents  were  dead  or  permanently 
disabled. 

Under  Part  II,  the  section  dealing  with  the 
effect  on  residence  of  a  municipal  unit  mov- 
ing persons  to  certain  institutions  has  been 
amended  to  indicate  that  a  boarding  home  is 
one  licensed  under  The  Nursing  Homes  Act. 

An  amendment  to  the  regulations  under 
Part  I  of  the  Act  tabled  February  7,  1964 
and  effective  November  1,  1963  repealed  the 
clause  setting  the  maximum  monthly  allow- 
ance for  a  mother  who  is  deserted,  whose 
husband  is  imprisoned,  or  who  although  not 
married  to  him,  is  living  as  the  wife  of  a 
man  who  has  died.  This  change  permits  the 
maximum  monthly  allowance  for  these  cate- 
gories to  be  determined  on  the  same  basis 
as  for  widows,  and  mothers  with  disabled 
husbands. 

NEW  BRUNSWICK 

Regulation  64-24  under  the  Social  Assist- 
ance Act  gazetted  July  8,  1964  repealed  the 
clause  under  Part  II  in  Regulation  153  which 
defines  "necessaries"  as  including  payments 
for  medical,  hospital,  nursing,  dental  and 
optical  care,  drugs  and  dressings,  funeral  ex- 
penses and  travelling  expenses.  (This  removes 
the  contradiction  implicit  in  Section  24.  Sec- 
tion 24  (1)  provides  that  the  municipality's 
reimbursement  claim  shall  include  the  cost 
of  food,  shelter,  fuel,  clothing  and  other 
necessaries.  Section  24  (2)  provides  that  pay- 
ments for  medical,  hospital,  nursing,  dental 
and  optical  care,  drugs  and  dressings,  funeral 
expenses  and  travelling  expenses  shall  not  be 
included  in  the  reimbursement  claim.) 

Regulations  64-28  (O.C.  64-581)  and  64- 
36  (O.C.  64-670),  gazetted  August  5,  1964 
and  September  2,  1964  respectively,  prescribed 


610 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      JULY   1965 


the  forms  to  be  used  by  municipalities  for 
purposes  of  Part  II  of  the  Act. 

Regulation  64-28  added  six  new  forms 
(Forms  3  to  8  inclusive)  covering  order  for 
municipal  assistance,  application  for  municipal 
assistance,  and  forms  summarizing  the  cost 
of  social  assistance,  homes  for  special  care, 
travelling  expenses  and  administrative  ex- 
penses. 

Regulation  64-36  substituted  a  revised  Form 
4  (Application  for  Social  Assistance)  and 
added  Form  9  (Review  Record),  Form  10 
(Municipal  Social  Assistance  Case  Record) 
and  Form  11,  an  authorization  for  inspection 
of  bank  or  other  accounts.  The  application 
form  has  been  simplified,  and  information 
about  dependents,  assets,  liabilities,  income 
and  other  details  are  recorded  on  Form  10, 
which  is  signed  by  the  applicant. 

QUEBEC 

Under  an  amendment  to  regulations  (O.C. 
637,  March  30,  1964),  increases  in  monthly 
rates  for  certain  categories  of  recipients  be- 
came effective  April  1,  1964.  Maximum 
monthly  allowances  for  recipients  of  needy 
widows  and  spinsters  allowances,  old  age 
assistance,  blind  persons  allowances,  and  dis- 
abled persons  allowances  were  increased  from 
$65  to  $75.  The  allowable  monthly  income, 
including  the  allowance,  for  needy  widows 
and  spinsters  was  increased  from  $90  to 
$100.  The  monthly  rate  for  the  head  of  a 
family  with  one  dependent  child  was  increased 
from  $75  to  $85  and  the  allowable  income, 
including  the  allowance,  was  increased  from 
$100  to  $110.  Casual  or  part-time  earnings 
of  up  to  $25  may  be  excluded  from  the 
calculation  of  income. 

ONTARIO 

The  District  Welfare  Administration  Boards 
Act,  1962-63,  was  proclaimed  effective  May 
1,  1964  {Ontario  Gazette,  May  20,  1964) 
and  regulations  were  made  under  this  Act 
and  under  the  General  Welfare  Assistance 
Act. 

Ontario  Regulation  168/64  under  the  Dis- 
trict Welfare  Administration  Boards  Act  was 
gazetted  July  11,  1964  prescribing  the  form 
to  be  used  in  making  application  for  a  grant 
under  Section  7  of  the  Act,  and  the  length 
of  time  in  which  chairmen  of  the  board  are 
to  serve. 

The  board,  at  its  first  meeting  after  April  1 
in  each  year,  is  to  appoint  one  of  its  members 
as  chairman  for  the  fiscal  year.  No  member 
may  serve  more  than  three  consecutive  terms. 

Regulations  under  the  General  Welfare 
Assistance  Act  amended  regulations  govern- 
ing general  provisions,  supplementary  aid  and 
aid  to  dependent  fathers. 

General.  O/Reg.35/64  gazetted  February 
22,  1964  to  be  effective  April  1,  1964  made 
a  number  of  changes.  Shelter  allowances  for 


single  persons  were  raised  by  $10  a  month 
for  both  unfurnished  and  unheated  premises, 
and  furnished  and  heated  premises. 

The  differential  in  rental  allowances  pay- 
able to  heads  of  families  between  those  muni- 
cipalities of  over  100,000  population  and 
other  municipalities  was  eliminated,  thus  per- 
mitting the  payment  of  the  higher  allowances 
by  all  municipalities.  The  section  on  residence 
was  revised  to  change  the  date  of  calculation 
of  residence  from  April  1,  1959  to  April  1, 
1961,  and  the  section  authorizing  an  allow- 
ance for  vegetable  seeds  was  revoked. 

Supplementary  Aid.  The  section  of  the 
regulations  governing  supplementary  aid  was 
amended  by  O/Reg.  232/64  gazetted  Septem- 
ber 19,  1964  to  exclude  provincial  sharing 
in  the  costs  of  aid  to  persons  whose  means 
exceed  a  specified  amount. 

The  Province  will  not  share  in  the  cost 
of  supplementary  aid  given  by  a  municipality 
to  a  person  who  is  a  recipient  of  a  govern- 
ment benefit,  other  than  an  old  age  security 
pension,  whose  liquid  assets  exceed  $1,000 
if  unmarried,  or  $1,500  if  married.  The  Prov- 
ince will  not  share  in  aid  given  an  unmarried 
recipient  of  an  old  age  security  pension 
whose  annual  income,  including  pension,  ex- 
ceeds $1,260,  or  whose  liquid  assets  exceed 
$1,000.  Nor  will  the  Province  share  in  aid 
given  married  recipients  whose  annual  total 
income  exceeds  $2,220  or  whose  total  liquid 
assets  exceed  $1,500. 

Dependent  Fathers.  Under  O.  Reg.  154/64 
gazetted  July  4,  1964  changes  were  made  in 
the  regulations  governing  allowances  to  de- 
pendent fathers  to  correspond  with  those 
under  the  Mothers'  Allowances  Act.  A  new 
subsection  permits  an  allowance  to  be  ex- 
tended to  the  end  of  the  school  year  on  behalf 
of  a  child  who  becomes  18  years  of  age 
while  attending  an  educational  institution 
other  than  a  secondary  school. 

The  length  of  time  required  to  qualify  for 
an  allowance  after  desertion  by  the  wife  has 
been  reduced  from  six  to  three  months.  A 
dependent  father  whose  wife  is  imprisoned 
may  now  qualify  for  an  allowance  if,  at  the 
date  of  application,  the  term  remaining  to 
be  served  is  six  months  or  more.  Previously 
no  reference  was  made  to  the  length  of  term 
remaining;  application  could  be  made  if  the 
wife  were  imprisoned  for  a  continuous  period 
of  six  months  or  more. 

MANITOBA 

Under  proclamations  published  in  the 
Manitoba  Gazette  of  December  28,  1963  an 
Act  to  amend  the  Child  Welfare  Act,  1959 
(Second  Session),  and  clause  (b)  of  sub- 
section (1)  of  section  5  of  the  Social  Allow- 
ances Act  was  proclaimed  effective  January  1, 
1964.  These  proclamations  repealed  Part  m 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      JULY   7965 


611 


of  the  Child  Welfare  Act,  under  which  allow- 
ances were  paid  on  behalf  of  bereaved  and 
dependent  children,  and  proclaimed  that  sec- 
tion oi  the  Soda!  Allowances  Act  authorizing 
payment  of  allowances  to  widows  with  de- 
pendent children.  Thus  the  transfer  of  mothers 
allowances  to  the  social  allowances  program 
WHS  complete. 

Manitoba  Regulation  14/64  gazetted  Feb- 
ruary 29,  L964  effective  from  March  1,  1964 
repealed  former  regulations  under  the  Social 
Allowances  Act.  The  revised  regulation  in- 
cludes some  changes  in  rates. 

The  monthly  food  allowance  for  an  adult — 
formerly  $2"  for  a  single  adult  or  the  first 
adult  in  a  family  of  two,  and  $20  for  the 
second  adult  in  a  family  of  two  benefici- 
aries— is  now  $20  for  each  adult,  with  in- 
creases allowed  for  household  units  of  one, 
two  or  three  persons:  an  addition  of  $5  a 
month  for  a  single  person,  $3  a  month  for 
each  of  two  persons,  and  $1  a  month  for 
each  of  three  persons.  Clothing  allowances 
for  children  have  been  increased  by  $1  a 
month  for  all  age  groups.  It  is  now  provided 
that,  under  special  circumstances,  an  addi- 
tional amount  of  up  to  $7  a  month  may 
be  granted  for  utilities,  and  an  additional 
grant  up  to  $50  may  be  made  at  the  end  of 
the  winter  fuel  season. 

SASKATCHEWAN 

Social  Aid 

Saskatchewan  Regulation  432/64  under  the 
Social  Aid  Act  gazetted  July  24,  1964  made 
a  number  of  changes  in  Regulation  977/63 
dated    May   21,    1963. 

Section  1 1  has  been  revised  to  add  three 
new  conditions  under  which  the  amount  of 
assistance  given  may  be  less  than  the  total 
amount  specified  by  the  schedules  for  various 
items  of  need,  for  a  period  not  to  exceed  six 
months.  This  section  previously  provided  that 
lesser  amounts  could  be  given  to  the  recipi- 
ent who  wished  a  lesser  amount  than  that 
established,  and  to  the  recipient  who  re- 
quested assistance  for  a  specific  item  of  need 
or  for  a  specific  amount. 

Lesser  amounts  may  now  be  given  also  to 
a  recipient  who  has  unusually  high  seasonal 
earnings  and  who  has  been  advised  to  budget 
to  meet  living  expenses;  to  a  recipient  who, 
while  in  receipt  of  social  aid,  purchased  a 
home  that,  in  the  opinion  of  the  municipal 
welfare  official,  exceeds  the  reasonable  needs 
of  the  recipient;  or  to  a  recipient  who  has 
voluntarily  discontinued  gainful  employment, 
except  as  a  part  of  a  rehabilitation  plan  or 
on  the  advice  of  an  official. 

It  is  now  provided  that  certain  earnings  are 
to  be  excluded  in  determining  financial  re- 
sources. As  previously,  certain  casual  and 
part-time  earnings  of  the  family  members  up 
to  a  maximum  of  25  per  cent  of  the  recipi- 


ent's basic  budget  requirements  are  not  in- 
cluded in  the  calculation  of  resources.  Under 
these  regulations,  either  this  amount  or,  if 
larger,  wages  of  $5  a  month  for  a  single 
person,  $10  a  month  for  a  family  of  two 
persons,  or  $15  a  month  for  three  or  more 
persons,  may  be  excluded. 

An  addition  to  the  list  of  exclusions  in- 
cludes premiums  paid  by  or  deducted  from 
wages  of  the  recipient  to  cover  the  cost  of  a 
Medical  and  Hospital  Card.  "Reasonable" 
costs  of  transportation  to  and  from  work 
may  be  excluded  from  the  calculation  of 
income.  The  percentages  of  income  from 
roomers  and  boarders  that  may  be  excluded 
remains  unchanged,  but  a  municipality  may 
now  adopt  minimum  charges  more  suitable 
to  the  locality  than  those  specified  in  the 
regulations.  This  change  is  subject  to  the 
approval  of  the  municipal  council  and  of  the 
Director  of  Public  Assistance. 

A  new  clause  provides  that  maintenance 
payments  from  monies  held  in  trust  for  chil- 
dren and  available  for  distribution  be  con- 
sidered as  income.  Negotiations  must  be  con- 
ducted on  an  individual  basis  so  that  funds 
are  released  monthly,  and  the  monthly 
amount  is  neither  above  nor  below  the 
budget  requirements  of  the  child. 

Safeguards  relating  to  the  conversion  of 
liquid  assets  into  cash,  and  in  the  realization 
of  funds  on  real  property,  are  provided.  A 
period  not  to  exceed  60  days  is  allowed  for 
conversion  of  certain  assets  into  cash,  but 
conversion  must  not  be  at  a  discount  rate 
greater  than  35  per  cent  of  their  value.  A 
liquid  asset  or  real  property  need  not  be  con- 
sidered a  resource  if  the  Director  considers 
that  there  are  sound  social  or  economic 
reasons  for  not  converting  a  liquid  asset  into 
cash,  or  for  delaying  or  refraining  from  the 
use  of  real  property  as  a  security  for  borrow- 
ing or  outright  sale. 

A  period  of  60  days  is  also  allowed  for  the 
realization  of  funds  through  borrowing  on 
the  security  of  real  property  or  from  its  sale. 
The  sale  of  property  is  not  required  if  the 
potential  loss  is  greater  than  35  per  cent  of 
its  appraised  market  value. 

A  recipient  may  sell  real  property  to  pur- 
chase a  home,  but  the  purchase  must  be 
made  within  four  months  of  receiving  the 
proceeds,  and  the  home  must  be  "suitable  to 
his  needs  and  in  accordance  with  the  stand- 
ard of  living  he  can  reasonably  expect  to 
maintain."  Any  funds  remaining  after  the 
purchase  are  considered  as  available  for  cur- 
rent living  expenses.  If  a  recipient  purchases 
a  home  that  exceeds  his  needs  in  the  opinion 
of  the  muncipal  welfare  official,  he  may  be 
required  to  sell  the  property  and  use  the 
proceeds. 

A  municipal  official  who  reviews  the  cir- 
cumstances of  a  person  who  qualifies  for  aid 
as  a  result  of  disposing  of  his  assets  within 


612 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE     •     JULY   7965 


five  years  of  application  for  aid,  or  because 
of  his  failure  to  realize  on  an  agreement  for 
sale,  mortgage,  or  other  security,  must  refuse 
aid  to  the  applicant  until  he  is  satisfied  that 
no  income  can  be  obtained  from  the  assets, 
or  until  the  applicant's  budget  requirements, 
plus  15  per  cent,  are  equal  to  the  market 
value  of  the  asset  disposed  of. 

ALBERTA 

The  Welfare  Statutes  Amendment  Act 
(Statutes  of  Alberta,  1964,  c.106)  assented 
to  March  26,  1964  authorizes  the  Minister 
of  Public  Welfare  to  enter  into  agreements 
with  the  federal  Government  to  assist  per- 
sons under  the  social  allowances  program, 
rather  than  under  the  Blind  Persons  Act,  the 
Disabled  Persons  Act  and  the  Old  Age  Assist- 
ance Act.  (Social  allowances  are  payable 
under  Part  III  of  the  Public  Welfare  Act.) 
It  provides  for  the  discontinuance,  on  proc- 
lamation of  the  relevant  sections,  of  applica- 


tions under  these  three  programs,  but 
payment  of  assistance  to  persons  granted  aid 
under  any  of  these  programs  may  be  con- 
tinued in  accordance  with  the  Act  under 
which  it  was  granted. 

Regulations  under  Part  III  of  the  Public 
Welfare  Act  were  amended  by  Alberta  Regu- 
lation 106/64  gazetted  March  14,  1964.  Under 
these  regulations  effective  April  1,  1964  food 
and  clothing  rates  for  adults  and  children 
were  revised.  With  few  exceptions,  slight  in- 
creases were  made  in  rates.  Increases  of  15 
per  cent  in  the  food  allowance  for  a  family 
of  two,  and  of  10  per  cent  for  a  family  of 
three,  are  now  permitted  if  cooking  and 
refrigeration  facilities  are  inadequate.  Amounts 
of  $7  and  $3  a  month,  for  a  gluten-free  diet 
and  a  restricted  sodium  diet  respectively,  have 
been  added  to  the  list  of  special  diets  for 
which  allowances  may  be  granted  on  medical 
recommendation. 


MOTHERS'   ALLOWANCES 


Changes  were  made  in  Quebec  and  On- 
tario in  the  Acts  governing  allowances  to 
needy  mothers  with  dependent  children.  In 
addition,  Part  III  of  the  Child  Welfare  Act 
of  Manitoba  was  repealed,  thus  effecting  a 
transfer  of  mothers  allowances  to  the  social 
allowances  program.  In  Ontario  the  regulations 
affecting  dependent  fathers  were  amended, 
and  benefits  were  extended  in  Nova  Scotia  on 
behalf  of  children  attending  school  (see  sec- 
tion on  General  Assistance  above). 

QUEBEC 

An  amendment  to  the  Needy  Mothers'  As- 
sistance Act  (S.Q.  1964,  c.49)  effective  April 
1,  1964  raised  the  maximum  monthly  rate 
for  a  mother  and  one  child  from  $75  to  $85. 

ONTARIO 

An  amendment  to  the  Mothers'  Allowances 
Act  (S.O.  1964,  c.65)  assented  to  May  8, 
1964  broadened  eligibility  requirements  and 
made  administrative  changes. 

The  length  of  time  required  for  a  mother 
to  qualify  for  an  allowance  after  desertion, 
has  been  reduced  from  six  months  to  three 
months,  and  an  unmarried  mother  may  now 
qualify  for  an  allowance  when  her  child  is 


three  months  of  age,  a  reduction  from  the 
former  six  months. 

A  mother  whose  husband  is  imprisoned 
may  now  qualify  for  an  allowance  if  at  the 
date  of  application  there  are  six  months  or 
more  remaining  in  his  term.  An  added  sub- 
section permits  the  allowance  to  be  extended 
to  the  end  of  the  school  year  for  a  child  who 
becomes  18  years  of  age  while  attending  an 
educational  institution  other  than  a  secondary 
school.  (There  is  no  upper  age  limit  for  a 
child  attending  secondary  school.) 

A  number  of  the  former  responsibilities  of 
regional  administrators  have  been  assigned  to 
the  Director  of  the  Welfare  Allowances 
Branch.  The  Director  now  receives  all  appli- 
cations for  mothers'  allowances,  and  deter- 
mines the  eligibility  of  each  applicant  and 
the  amount  of  the  allowance.  He  continues 
to  act  as  chairman  of  the  board  of  review. 

Other  matters  now  referred  to  the  Director 
include:  approval  of  temporary  absences  from 
the  province,  permission  for  a  mother  to  be 
absent  from  the  province  for  compassionate 
or  other  reasons,  approval  of  an  applicant  as 
a  suitable  person  to  receive  an  allowance, 
and  approval  of  an  applicant  as  a  suitable 
foster  mother  to  her  dependent  foster  child. 


LIVING  ACCOMMODATION  FOR  THE   ELDERLY 


An  act  to  amend  the  National  Housing 
Act  1954  (S.C.  1964,  c.23)  assented  to  on 
June  18,  1964  contains  a  number  of  pro- 
visions affecting  accommodation  for  elderly 
persons. 

Under  a  new  section,  16A,  loans  may  be 
made  to  non-profit  corporations  for  the  con- 
struction or  purchase  of  a  housing  project, 
or  housing  accommodation  of  the  hostel  or 


dormitory  type,  for  use  as  low-rental  hous- 
ing. Terms  and  conditions  for  loans  under 
this  section  are  the  same  as  for  loans  made 
to  limited-dividend  corporations  under  section 
16  of  the  Act.  Formerly  loans  could  be  made 
only  for  hostels  that  were  an  adjunct  to  a 
project   of   self-contained    accommodation. 

Section    36    of    the    Act,    which    covered 
federal-provincial    public    housing    programs, 


THE   LABOUR   GAZETTE      •      JULY    7965 


613 


has  been  renumbered  as  section  35A.  A  new 
provision  under  section  35A  (1)  permits  the 
inclusion  of  hostel  or  dormitory-type  accom- 
modation in  federal-provincial  projects.  As 
formerly,  public  housing  projects  may  be 
made  up  wholly  or  in  part  of  existing  hous- 
ing purchased  for  the  purpose,  but  are  no 
longer  restricted  to  urban  renewal  areas. 
Under  this  section,  the  amount  of  the  capital 
profits,  and  losses  to  be  borne  by 
Central  Mortgage  and  Housing  Corporation 
is  not  to  exceed  75  per  cent,  thus  permitting 
the  Corporation's  share  to  be  less  than  was 
possible  formerly  when  the  amount  was  set 
at  75  per  cent  for  the  Corporation  and  25 
per  cent  for  the  provincial  government  or 
agency  thereof. 

A  new  section,  35C,  permits  the  Corpora- 
tion to  make  loans  to  assist  a  province,  munic- 
ipality, or  public  housing  agency  to  acquire 
land  for  public  housing  projects.  The  maxi- 
mum loan  may  amount  to  90  per  cent  of  the 
cost  of  acquiring  and  servicing  the  land. 

Section  35D  authorizes  the  Corporation  to 
make  loans  to  provinces,  municipalities  and 
public  housing  agencies  to  construct,  acquire 
and  operate  public  housing  projects.  Loans 
are  subject  to  conditions  applying  to  limited- 
dividend  housing  companies  and  non-profit 
corporations. 

Under  section  35E  the  Corporation  may 
contribute  to  operating  losses  incurred  by 
subsidized  public  housing  projects.  The  maxi- 
mum amount  that  may  be  contributed  is  50 
per  cent  of  the  annual  losses,  and  contribu- 
tions may  be  made  for  a  period  not  exceeding 
50  years.  The  Corporation  is  required  to 
ensure  that  accommodation  for  which  it  is 
sharing  operating  losses  is  needed  and  is 
being  rented  to  persons  of  low  income. 

New  or  amended  legislation  governing  liv- 
ing accommodation  for  elderly  persons  came 
into  effect  in  seven  provinces:  New  Bruns- 
wick, Quebec,  Ontario,  Manitoba,  Saskatche- 
wan, Alberta  and  British  Columbia. 

NEW  BRUNSWICK 

Regulation  64-20  under  the  Social  Services 
and  Education  Tax  Act  gazetted  June  10,  1964 
permits  the  Provincial  Secretary-Treasurer  to 
authorize  a  rebate  of  the  tax  paid  by  a  con- 
tractor on  materials  actually  used  in  the 
construction  or  alteration  of  places  of  wor- 
ship, homes  for  the  aged,  alms-houses  and 
orphanages,  as  well  as  on  materials  used  in 
operations  preparatory  to  the  construction  of 
any  such  building.  Rebates  amounting  to 
(a)  1.25  per  cent  of  the  total  contract  price 
are  to  be  made  to  the  governing  body  of  a 
religious,  charitable  or  benevolent  organiza- 
tion for  the  construction  of  a  building  or  for 
a  major  improvement  constituting  a  capital 
investment;  and  (b)   90  per  cent  of  the  tax 


paid  on  certain  furniture  and  fixtures  pur- 
chased by  such  religious,  charitable  or  benev- 
olent organizations. 

QUEBEC 

An  Act  to  amend  the  Act  to  Improve 
Housing  Conditions  was  assented  to  on  March 
19,  1964  (S.Q.  1964,  c.37)  and  provided 
for  the  appropriation  of  $180  million  for 
the  purposes  of  the  Act.  Although  it  does  not 
make  specific  provisions  for  living  accommo- 
dation for  elderly  persons,  they  may  benefit 
under  the  Act  which  enables  the  Province  to 
guarantee  loans  made  for  purchasing  homes 
and  to  pay  a  portion  of  the  interest  charged 
on  loans  made  for  new  dwellings. 

ONTARIO 

Legislation  passed  in  Ontario  during  1964 
included  an  Act  to  incorporate  the  Ontario 
Housing  Corporation  (S.O.  1964,  c.76) 
the  Homes  for  Special  Care  Act  (S.O.  1964, 
c.39)  and  Regulations,  and  Regulations  under 
the  Charitable  Institutions  Act,   1962-63. 

An  Act  to  incorporate  the  Ontario  Hous- 
ing Corporation  assented  to  on  May  8,  1964 
came  into  force  on  August  11,  1964.  The 
Corporation  has  the  power  to  enter  into 
agreements  for  the  Province  under  the  Hous- 
ing Development  Act,  make  loans,  grants  or 
advances  under  the  same  Act  and  acquire, 
hold  and  dispose  of  real  property. 

The  Homes  for  Special  Care  Act  1964 
assented  to  on  May  8,  1964  authorizes  the 
establishment  of  residential  facilities  for  per- 
sons requiring  nursing,  residential,  or  shel- 
tered care;  the  payment  of  capital  and  main- 
tenance grants  to  benevolent  organizations 
operating  such  homes  or  institutions;  the 
licensing  of  homes  for  special  care;  and  the 
payment  of  maintenance  costs  for  residents 
of  such  homes. 

The  Lieutenant-Governor-in-Council  may 
designate  provisions  of  the  Mental  Hospitals 
Act  1950  or  Regulations  as  being  applicable 
to  any  home  for  special  care.  He  may  also 
approve  all  or  any  part  of  an  institution, 
building  or  other  premises  as  a  home  for 
special  care. 

Ontario  Regulation  261/64  under  the 
Homes  for  Special  Care  Act  1964  gazetted 
October  17,  1964  classifies  homes  for  special 
care  as  approved  homes,  licensed  residential, 
and  licensed  nursing  homes.  Part  I  of  the 
Regulation  relates  to  approved  homes  and 
sets  out  staff  qualifications,  powers  and  duties 
of  administrators,  fire  protection  measures, 
and  procedures  for  the  administration  of 
trust  accounts  and  the  bonding  of  adminis- 
trators. 

Licensed  nursing  homes  must  meet  stand- 
ards contained  in  Part  II  of  the  Regulation. 
These  relate  mainly  to  fire  protection,  meals, 
sleeping  accommodation,  toilet  and  bathing 


614 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      JULY   1965 


facilities,  and  personal,  nursing  and  medical 
care.  Licensed  residential  homes  are  gov- 
erned by  Part  III  of  the  Regulation,  which 
sets  out  standards  for  sleeping  accommoda- 
tion and  outlines  inspection  procedures. 

Part  IV  of  the  Regulation  outlines  pro- 
cedures for: 

— admittance  of  persons  discharged  from 
an  institution  within  the  meaning  of  the 
Mental  Hospitals  Act; 

— keeping  of  records; 

— inspection  of  homes  by  an  officer  author- 
ized under  the  Fire  Marshals  Act,  and  by  a 
medical  officer  of  health; 

— assistance  from  charitable  organizations 
with  the  inspection  and  supervision  of  homes 
for  special  care; 

— granting  of  provincial  aid. 

Where  a  resident  in  an  approved  home 
cannot  pay  for  his  care  and  maintenance, 
the  Minister  of  Health  may  grant  to  the 
Board  of  the  home  up  to  a  maximum  of 
$6.50  per  day  for  each  day  the  resident  is 
in  the  home.  When  a  resident  does  not  re- 
quire nursing  care,  the  maximum  is  $21  a 
week. 

If  a  resident  is  able  to  pay  part  of  the  cost 
for  care,  the  grant  is  reduced  by  that  amount. 
The  amount  of  the  grant  payable  is  similar 
for  residents  of  licensed  nursing  homes  or 
licensed  residential  homes  but,  when  a  pro- 
vincial grant  is  paid,  the  resident  or  the  per- 
son responsible  for  his  care  and  maintenance 
is  liable  to  pay  at  least  $2  per  day. 

Ontario  Regulation  297/64  under  the 
Charitable  Institutions  Act  1962-63  was 
gazetted  on  November  14,  1964.  It  tightens 
fire  protection  measures  and  is  more  specific 
than  previous  legislation  about  duties  of 
attending  physicians,  appointment  of  staff 
nurses,  and  provision  of  nourishing  meals 
and  adequate,  comfortable  sleeping  accommo- 
dation. 

Also  under  this  Regulation,  homes  for  the 
aged  are  among  the  institutions  that  benefit 
from  the  increase  in  the  provincial  share  for 
maintenance  costs  of  residents.  This  has  been 
raised  from  $5  to  $6  daily  per  person  where 
the  institution  maintains  a  bed-care  unit  of 
twenty  beds  and  from  $3.40  to  $4  where 
there  is  no  such  unit. 

MANITOBA 

The  Elderly  and  Infirm  Persons'  Housing 
Act  (S.M.  1964,  c.17)  came  into  force  on 
April  16,  1964  repealing  the  Elderly  Per- 
sons' Housing  Act  1959.  The  new  Act  incor- 
porates the  terms  of  the  former  Act  and,  in 
addition,  enables  the  Province  to  assist  in 
the  establishment  of  personal-care  homes, 
and  to  increase  grants  for  the  construction 
of  accommodation  for  the  elderly. 


It  also  empowers  municipalities  to  sponsor 
elderly  persons'  housing,  hostels,  and  per- 
sonal-care homes.  Municipal  participation  in 
such  projects  was  formerly  authorized  under 
the  Municipal  Act.  Regulations  under  the 
Public  Health  Act  applicable  to  personal- 
care  homes  were  gazetted  on  August  8,  1964. 

As  in  the  former  legislation,  a  "hostel"  is 
defined  as  a  building  accommodating  three  or 
more  elderly  persons  who  share  bathroom  or 
bathroom  and  kitchen  facilities;  but  the  new 
Act  specifies  that  hostel  accommodation  is  in- 
tended for  persons  who  require  minimal  as- 
sistance or  supervision  in  their  daily  living. 
A  "personal-care  home"  is  defined  as  a  build- 
ing accommodating  persons  who,  in  the 
opinion  of  a  qualified  medical  practitioner, 
require  continual  or  intensive  assistance  and 
supervision  in  their  daily  living. 

A  municipal  council  may  pass  resolutions 
favouring  the  establishment  of  elderly  per- 
sons' housing,  ratepayers  may  petition  for  it, 
or  municipalities  may  enter  into  joint  agree- 
ments. An  organization  committee  must  es- 
tablish details  of  the  proposed  scheme,  which 
must  be  approved  by  the  municipality  or 
municipalities  concerned  and  the  necessary 
by-law  passed.  Letters  patent  of  incorpora- 
tion as  a  non-profit  corporation  under  the 
Companies  Act  must  then  be  obtained. 

The  municipality  appoints  the  board  of  di- 
rectors of  the  corporation  whose  powers  there- 
after include  the  right  to: 

— borrow  or  raise  money; 

— acquire,  administer  and  dispose  of  real 
or  personal  property; 

— invest  funds  and  employ  staff  necessary 
to  operate  and  manage  the  housing  provided. 

A  provincial  grant  will  not  be  made  for 
a  project  unless  the  municipality,  corpora- 
tion or  organization  applying  for  it  has  ob- 
tained money  equal  to  20  per  cent  of  the 
total  cost  (formerly  10  per  cent)  or,  for  new 
construction,  the  necessary  serviced  land  and 
10  per  cent  (formerly  5  per  cent)  of  the  cost. 

Grants  for  constructing,  acquiring,  recon- 
structing or  equipping  elderly  persons'  hous- 
ing units  are  set  at  the  lesser  of  one-third  of 
the  cost,  or  $2,150  (formerly  $1,667)  for 
two-person  units  and  $1,700  (formerly 
$1,400)   for  one-person  units. 

The  amount  of  a  grant  made  for  construc- 
tion of  hostel  accommodation  is  to  be  the 
lesser  of  one-third  of  the  cost,  or  an  amount 
calculated  by  multiplying  $1,700  (formerly 
$1,200)  by  the  number  of  beds  provided  in 
the  hostel.  For  the  purpose  of  assisting  in 
the  renovation,  repair  or  acquisition  and  re- 
construction, furnishing  or  equipping  of  a 
hostel,  the  grant  is  to  equal  one-third  of 
the  cost  or  an  amount  calculated  by  multi- 
plying $825  (formerly  $700)  by  the  number 
of  beds  provided. 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      JULY    7965 


615 


Fof  the  construction  of  a  personal-care 
home,  the  grant  is  to  be  the  lesser  of  one- 
third  of  construction  costs,  or  an  amount 
calculated  by  multiplying  $2,000  by  the 
number  of  beds  provided.  Grants  to  assist  in 
the  renovation,  repair,  acquisition,  furnish- 
quipping  or  reconstruction  of  a  home 
may  amount  to  the  lesser  of  one-third  of 
the  cost,  or  an  amount  calculated  by  multiply- 
ing $1,000  by  the  number  of  beds  provided. 

As  previously,  the  provincial  Government 
may  guarantee  the  payment  of  principal  and 
interest  on  loans  from  the  federal  Govern- 
ment or  its  agencies  to  corporations  or  or- 
ganizations which  have  received  a  loan  under 
the  Elderly  and  Infirm  Persons'  Housing  Act. 
Also,  licensing  provisions  have  been  extended 
to  cover  personal-care  homes. 

Manitoba  Regulation  52/64  under  the  Pub- 
lic Health  Act  defines  personal-care  homes, 
outlines  conditions  under  which  they  may 
operate,  and  sets  out  standards  they  are 
required  to  meet. 

"Personal  care"  is  defined  as  the  care  of 
aged  and  infirm  persons  who,  in  their  daily 
living,  require  the  care  of  another  person 
or  persons,  but  who  do  not  require  the  serv- 
ices of  a  hospital  within  the  meaning  of  the 
Hospital  Services  Insurance  Act.  A  personal- 
care  home  is  a  place  used  for  the  accommo- 
dation of  three  or  more  persons  who,  in  the 
opinion  of  a  medical  practitioner,  require 
personal  care.  Admission  is  to  be  governed 
solely  by  the  need  for  care  and  assistance. 

Effective  August  1,  1964  any  personal-care 
home  must  meet  certain  specifications  set 
out  in  the  Regulation.  These  govern  the 
amount  of  space  allotted  per  resident,  and 
facilities,  equipment  and  furnishings  con- 
sidered necessary  by  the  Minister  of  Health. 
They  require  also  that  recreational  and  social 
activities  be  made  available  for  the  construc- 
tive use  of  leisure  time,  and  to  maintain  the 


residents'  contact  with  the  community.  The 
operator  of  a  home  must  have  a  valid  license 
issued   by   the    Minister. 

SASKATCHEWAN 

Saskatchewan  Regulation  574/64  under  the 
Housing  Act  (O.C.  1876/64)  gazetted  De- 
cember 4,  1964  adds  definitions  of  "care" 
and  "supervisory  care"  to  the  regulations. 

For  the  purposes  of  the  Housing  Act, 
"care"  includes  skilled  nursing  care,  personal 
services  or  supervisory  care  given  to  needy, 
aged,  infirm  or  blind  persons  living  in  licensed 
sheltered  accommodation  where  the  charge 
exceeds  $75  per  month.  This  definition  ap- 
plies to  boarding  and  nursing  homes,  self- 
contained  housing,  and  other  forms  of 
sheltered  accommodation  for  four  or  more 
persons  not  related  to  the  operator  or  any 
member  of  the  management  of  such  accom- 
modation. Supervisory  care  is  defined  as  the 
giving  of  guidance  or  the  supervision  of  ac- 
tivities of  daily  living. 

ALBERTA 

Alberta  Regulation  113/64  gazetted  March 
31,  1964  deleted  from  the  regulations  under 
the  Homes  for  the  Aged  Act  the  subsection 
providing  that  persons  whose  only  income  is 
derived  from  the  old  age  security  pension 
plus  the  supplementary  allowance  from  the 
Province  shall  not  be  charged  maintenance 
of  more  than  $60  per  month. 

BRITISH  COLUMBIA 

Order  in  Council  No.  663  gazetted  March 
19,  1964  amended  the  Welfare  Institutions 
Licensing  Regulations  to  permit  the  use,  for 
sleeping  accommodation,  of  a  room  more 
than  two  stories  above  the  ground  when  the 
Welfare  Institutions  Licensing  Board  gives 
its  approval. 


British  Redundancy  Payments  Bill 

Sets  up  scheme  whereby  workers  whose  jobs  disappear  will  get 
compensation  as  legal  right.  Employers  responsible  for  the 
payments  but  will  be  aided  by  Bill's  proposed  Redundancy  Fund 


A  scheme  under  which  men  and  women 
whose  jobs  disappear  will  get  compensation 
as  a  legal  right  is  set  out  in  the  Redundancy 
Payments  Bill  presented  to  the  British  Parlia- 
ment by  the  Minister  of  Labour.  It  is  hoped 
to  bring  the  scheme  into  operation  before 
the  end  of  the  year. 

Redundancy  payments  will  be  made  to  men 
and  women  who  lose  their  employment  be- 
cause the  work  they  are  doing  comes  to  an 
end,  or  is  reduced,  or  they  lose  their  job 
because  of  the  death  of  their  employer. 


Employers  will  be  responsible  for  making 
the  payments.  But  a  fund  will  be  set  up  to 
spread  the  cost  over  all  industry.  This  Re- 
dundancy Fund  will  be  financed  by  a  levy 
added  to  the  employer's  weekly  National 
Insurance  contribution.  Employers  will  be 
able  to  claim  rebates  from  the  Fund,  averag- 
ing about  60  per  cent  of  the  payments  due 
their  redundant  employees. 

With  certain  exceptions,  the  scheme  will 
apply  to  employees  between  the  ages  of  18 
and  65  (60  for  women)  who  normally  work 


616 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      JULY    7965 


21  hours  a  week  or  more.  They  must  have 
a  minimum  of  two  years  service  with  their 
employer  and,  if  they  are  made  redundant, 
they  will  be  entitled  to  payments  as  follows, 
for  each  year  of  service:  Age  from  18  to 
21,  half  a  week's  pay;  age  22  to  40,  one 
week's  pay,  and  age  41  to  65  (60  for 
women),  one  and  a  half  week's  pay. 

There  was  wide  support  for  the  bill  on  both 
sides  of  industry.  The  main  structure  of  the 
scheme  was  broadly  acceptable  to  both  the 
British  Employers'  Confederation  and  the 
Trades   Union   Congress. 

Reckonable  service  under  the  measure  is 
to  be  limited  to  the  last  20  years  before  re- 
dundancy. Earnings  above  £40  a  week  will 
not  be  taken  into  account,  and  years  of  serv- 
ice below  the  age  of  18  will  not  be  con- 
sidered. 

The  maximum  to  which  any  worker  would 
be  entitled  would  be  30  weeks  pay,  which 
he  would  get  if  he  had  20  years  of  service, 
all  over  the  age  of  40. 

Disputes  arising  on  all  questions  will  be 
referred  to  tribunals  with  legally  qualified 
chairman  and  employers'  and  workers'  repre- 
sentatives. 

Certain  groups  of  workers  are  excluded 
from  or  not  covered  by  the  Bill,  and  where 
there  is  an  agreement  between  employers  and 
unions  for  redundancy  payments  to  workers, 
the  Minister  may,  on  application  by  the 
parties,  exempt  employers  from  liability  to 
make  payments  to  employees  covered  by  the 
agreement. 

This  provision  will  make  it  possible  for 
industries  in  which  workers  do  not  work  for 
long  periods  with  one  employer  to  agree  on 
special  schemes  more  suited  to  their  condi- 
tions. 

Industrial  disputes  are  not  to  affect  entitle- 
ment   to    payment,    though    time    spent    on 


Strike  will  not  count  as  reckonable  service. 
The  Contracts  of  Employment  Act  1963  will 
be  brought  into  line  so  that  strikes  will  not 
break  continuity  of  employment  for  purposes 
of  accumulating  rights  to  notice. 

Minister  of  Labour  Ray  Gunter  said  the 
measure  was  an  important  step  in  the  British 
Government's  program  to  push  forward  the 
modernization  of  industry  as  fast  as  possible 
and  to  enlist  the  co-operation  of  workers  as 
well    as    management    in   this    process. 

Mr.  Gunter,  in  moving  second  reading  to 
the  bill,  said  one  of  the  most  urgent  needs 
was  to  use  manpower  more  efficiently.  There 
were  too  many  restrictive  practices,  too  much 
overmanning  and  underemployment  of  labour. 

It  was  no  good  attributing  them  entirely 
to  unions  and  workers.  They  were  the  legacy 
of  years  of  economic  insecurity  and  fears 
for  the  future  of  job  or  craft.  That  insecurity 
had  to  be  removed  if  the  problem  was  to  be 
tackled.  The  Bill  would  not  achieve  this  in 
itself  but  it  had  an  important  part  to  play 
in  allaying  fears  of  redundancy  and  resistance 
to   new   methods   and   economic    changes. 

It  cannot  be  said  too  often,  Mr.  Gunter 
continued,  that  manpower  is  our  most  pre- 
cious resource.  Yet  far  less  attention  is  given 
by  management  today  to  the  budgeting  of 
manpower  needs  than  to  the  forward  planning 
of  other  aspects,  such  as  investment  and 
marketing. 

From  this  point  of  view,  Mr.  Gunter  be- 
lieved that  the  redundancy  payments  scheme 
will  have  a  salutary  effect.  It  will  make  em- 
ployers more  careful  in  planning  their  for- 
ward recruitment  of  labour,  and  create  the 
conditions  in  which  those  employers  who  are 
now  carrying  surplus  labour  can  face  up  to 
the  job  of  getting  their  labour  requirements 
on  a  more  realistic  basis. 


ndustrial  Fatalities  in  Canada 

during  First  Quarter  of  1965 

Deaths  from  industrial  accidents  in  first  quarter  totalled 
268 — down  18  from  number  in  same  quarter  of  1964  but  up  93 
from     total     fatalities     in     the     previous     three-month     period 


Up  to  the  end  of  May,  the  Department  of 
Labour  had  received  reports  on  268*  indus- 
trial fatalities  that  occurred  in  Canada  during 
the  first  quarter  of  1965.  During  the  previous 
quarter,  361  fatalities  were  recorded.  This 
is  38  more  than  the  previously  published 
preliminary  total  of  323  (L.G.,  April,  p. 
328). 


In  the  first  quarter  of  last  year,  286  fatali- 
ties were  recorded — 46  more  than  the  pre- 
liminary figure  of  240  (L.G.,  July  1964, 
p.    510). 

Industrial  fatalities  in  Canada  that  occurred 
during  the  first  quarter  of  1965  were  distrib- 
uted in  the  age  groups  as  follows  (figures 
for  women  in  parentheses): 


THE  LABOUR   GAZETTE      •      JULY    7965 


617 


Age  Group         Fatalities       Workers  Employed 


('000) 

15-19 

6  (-) 

291   (263) 

20-24 

20  (1) 

498  (333) 

25-44 

137  (-) 

2,150  (741) 

45-64 

84  (1) 

1,450  (529) 

65+ 

19  (-) 

161   (  44) 

Total 

266  (2) 

4,550  (1,910) 

In  three  occupations — transport  and  com- 
munication; miners,  quarrymen  and  related 
workers;  craftsmen,  production  process  and 
related  workers — in  which  32  per  cent  of  the 
workers  were  employed,  65  per  cent  of  the 
total   fatalities  occurred. 

During  the  quarter  under  review,  there 
were  four  multi-fatality  accidents,  each  of 
which  brought  death  to  three  or  more  work- 
men, and  together  resulted  in  53  fatalities. 
Twenty-six  workers  died  on  February  18 
near  Stewart,  B.C.,  when  an  avalanche  buried 
them.  Fifteen  crew  members  and  a  scientific 
consultant  were  killed  when  an  RCAF  Argus 
aircraft  crashed  on  March  23  near  San  Juan, 
Puerto  Rico.  Seven  fishermen  drowned  on 
March  10  when  the  seiner  Combat  sank  while 
crossing  Hectate  Strait  between  the  Queen 
Charlotte  Islands  and  the  mainland  of  British 
Columbia.  Four  miners  were  drowned  on 
January  22  after  a  mine  shaft  explosion  at 
Little  Bay,  Nfld. 

During  the  quarter,  the  greatest  number 
of  fatalities,  61,  occurred  in  the  mines,  quar- 
ries and  oil  wells  industry.  Of  the  61  fatali- 
ties, 38  were  in  metal  mining,  10  in  petroleum 
and  oil  wells,  8  in  non-metal  mining,  and  5 
in  coal  mining. 

The  47  fatalities  recorded  in  the  manufac- 
turing industry  were  distributed  as  follows: 
8  in  non-metallic  mineral  products;  7  each 
in  food  and  beverages,  and  metal  fabricating; 
5  each  in  wood  products  and  primary  metal 
products;  3  each  in  chemical  products  and 
miscellaneous  products;  2  each  in  paper  prod- 
ucts, machinery,  and  electrical  products;  1 
each  in  clothing  products,  transportation 
equipment  and  petroleum  and  coal  products. 


•  See   Tables   H-l    and   H-2   at   back   of   this 
issue. 


Of  the  43  fatalities  that  occurred  in  trans- 
portation, communication  and  other  utilities 
industries,  12  were  in  local  and  highway 
transportation;  9  each  in  railway  transporta- 
tion, and  electric  power,  gas  and  water  utili- 
ties; 5  in  communication;  3  each  in  air 
transportation  and  water  transportation;  and 
2  in  storage. 

In  the  construction  industry,  14  of  the 
33  fatalities  were  in  buildings,  11  in  other 
construction,  and  8  in  highways.  In  the 
forestry  industry,  25  fatalities  were  recorded. 

The  remaining  59  fatalities  that  occurred 
during  the  quarter  were  distributed  as  follows: 
24  in  public  administration  and  defence;  14 
in  fishing  and  trapping;  9  in  trade;  6  in  com- 
munity, business  and  personal  service;  4  in 
agriculture;  and  2  in  finance,  insurance  and 
real  estate. 

Analysis  by  Cause 

An  analysis  of  the  268  fatalities  during  the 
first  quarter  of  1965  shows  that  82  (30  per 
cent)  were  in  the  accident-type  group  of 
"being  struck  by  different  objects."  Of  these, 
72  were  in  the  category  of  such  objects  as 
falling  trees  and  limbs,  and  landslides  or 
cave-ins;  6  were  caused  by  moving  vehicles, 
and  4  were  the  result  of  being  struck  by 
tools,  machinery  and  cranes. 

Collisions,  derailments  and  wrecks  caused 
54  fatalities.  Automobiles  and  trucks  were 
involved  in  28  accidents,  aircraft  in  20, 
railway  trains  in  5,  and  water  craft  in  1. 

Of  the  46  fatalities  resulting  from  "falls 
and  slips,"  all  but  five  were  falls  from  dif- 
ferent levels,  such  as  buildings,  roofs,  trees, 
scaffolds  and  bridges,  into  harbours,  rivers, 
lakes,  seas,  shafts  and  excavations. 

Twenty-five  fatalities  were  caused  by  in- 
halations, contact,  absorptions,  ingestions  and 
industrial  diseases. 

Of  the  remaining  61  fatalities,  20  each 
were  the  result  of  conflagrations,  temperature 
extremes  and  explosions,  or  were  in  the  cate- 
gory of  being  caught  in,  on  or  between.  Most 
of  them  involved  tractors,  loadmobiles, 
(Continued  on  page  664) 


The  fatalities  covered  in  this  review  are  those  that  involved  persons  gainfully  employed 
and  that  occurred  during  the  course  of,  or  arose  out  of  their  employment,  including  deaths 
resulting  from  industrial  diseases. 

Statistics  on  industrial  fatalities  are  compiled  by  the  Economics  and  Research  Branch 
from  reports  received  from  the  provincial  Workmen's  Compensation  Boards,  the  Board  of 
Transport  Commissioners  and  certain  other  official  sources.  Newspaper  reports  are  used  to 
supplement  these.  For  industries  not  covered  by  workmen's  compensation  legislation,  news- 
paper reports  are  the  Department's  only  source  of  information.  It  is  possible,  therefore  that 
coverage  in  such  industries  as  agriculture,  fishing  and  trapping,  and  certain  of  the  service 
groups,  is  not  as  complete  as  in  industries  covered  by  wokmen's  compensation  legislation. 
Similarly,  a  small  number  of  traffic  accidents  that  are  in  fact  industrial  may  be  omitted  from 
the  Department's  records  because  of  lack  of  information  in  press  reports. 

The  number  of  fatalities  that  occur  during  the  period  under  review  is  usually  greater 
than  indicated  in  the  article  and  tables.  However,  fatalities  that  were  not  reported  in  time  for 
inclusion  are  recorded  in  supplementary  lists  and  the  statistics  revised  accordingly  in  the 
next  annual  review. 


618 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      JULY   1965 


Latest  Labour  Statistics 


Principal  Items 


Total  civilian  labour  forced (000) 

Employed (000) 

Agriculture (000) 

Non-agriculture (000) 

Paid  workers (000) 


At  work  35  hours  or  more . . 
At  work  less  than  35  hours. 
Employed  but  not  at  work 


(000) 
(000) 
(000) 


Unemployed (000) 

Atlantic (000) 

Quebec (000) 

Ontario (000) 

Prairie (000) 

Pacific (000) 


Without  work  and  seeking  work 

On  temporary  layoff  up  to  30  days . 


(000) 
(000) 


Industrial  employment  (1949  =  100) 

Manufacturing  employment  (1949  =  100). 


Immigration 

Destined  to  the  labour  force . 


Strikes  and  Lockouts 

Strikes  and  lockouts 

No.  of  workers  involved . 
Duration  in  man-days . . . 


Earnings  and  Income 

Average  weekly  wages  and  salaries  (ind.  comp.) 

Average  hourly  earnings  (mfg.) 

Average  hours  worked  per  week  (mfg.) 

Average  weekly  wages  (mfg.) 

Consumer  price  index  (1949  =  100) 

Index  numbers  of  weekly  wages  in  1949  dollars  (1949 

100) 

Total  labour  income $000,000. 


Industrial  Production 
Total  (average  1949  = 
Manufacturing. . . . 

Durables 

Non-durables.  . 


100). 


New  Residential  Construction^ 

Starts 

Completions 


June 
June 
Under  construction June 


Date 


June  19 
June  19 
June  19 
June  19 
June  19 

June  19 
June  19 
June  19 

June  19 
June  19 
June  19 
June  19 
June  19 
June  19 

June  19 
June  19 

April 
April 

1st  Qtr.  1965 
1st  Qtr.  1965 


June 
June 
June 


April 
April 
April 
April 
June 

April 
April 


May 
May 
May 
May 


Amount 


7,306 
7,049 
649 
6,400 
5,910 

5,955 
587 
218 

257 
31 

100 
74 
23 
29 

241 
16 

131.8 
124.4 

22,279 
11,297 


109 

43,310 

275,530 


$90.53 

$2.12 

41.1 

$86.98 
139.0 

151.1 
2,068 


228.8 
204.4 
219.0 
192.0 


15,984 

8,021 

80,436 


Percentage  Change 
Irom 


Previous     Previous 
Month  Year 


+2.6 
+2.8 
-0.9 
+3.2 
+3.3 

+2.7 

-1.0 

+24.6 

-3.0 
-31.1 

-4.8 
+25.4 
-23.3 
+11.5 

-3.6 

+6.7 

+0.7 
+0.1 


+94.6 
+  154.5 

+77.2 


+0.3 
+0.5 
-0.5 
-0.1 

+0.7 

-0.3 

+1.6 


+2.1 
+3.5 
+3.7 
+  3.3 


+  17 

-7.6 
+  10.8 


+3.6 
+4.1 
-4.4 
+5.0 
+5.8 

+3.4 
+9.1 
+2.8 

-8.9 
+3.3 
-5.7 

-15.9 
-8.0 

-12.1 

-10.4 

+23.1 

+5.8 
+4.9 

+27.0 

+27.6 


+  65.2 

+  185.9 

+40.8 


+4.9 

+5.5 

0.0 

+5.1 

+0.9 

+2.8 
+10.6 


+  7.5 
+7.6 
+9.2 
+6.0 


+26 
+7.7 
+  19.3 


(a)  Estimates  of  the  labour  force,  the  employed  and  the  unemployed,  are  from  The  Labour  Force,  a 
monthly  publication  of  the  Dominion  Bureau  of  Statistics  which  also  contains  additional  details  of  the 
characteristics  of  the  labour  force,  together  with  definitions  and  explanatory  notes. 

(b)  Centres  of  5,000  population  or  more. 


THE  LABOUR   GAZETTE      •      JULY    7965 


619 


EMPLOYMENT  REVIEW 


Employment  and  Unemployment,  June 


Employment  increased  seasonally  by  an 
estimated  191,000  to  7,049,000  between  May 
and  June. 

Unemployment,  estimated  at  257,000  in 
June,  showed  little  change  from  the  May 
estimate  of  265,000.  In  previous  years,  un- 
employment has  usually  registered  a  sizable 
decline   during   this  period. 

The  unemployment  rate  in  June  represented 
3.5  per  cent  of  the  labour  force,  compared 
with  4.0  per  cent  in  June  1964  and  4.5  per 
cent  in  June  1963.  In  May  this  year  the 
rate  was  3.7  per  cent  of  the  labour  force. 

Seasonally  adjusted,  the  June  1965  unem- 
ployment rate  was  4.5  per  cent. 

Between  May  and  June,  the  labour  force 
increased  by  183,000,  an  above-average  in- 
crease for  the  month.  As  in  the  previous 
three  years,  there  was  a  heavy  influx  of 
teen-agers  into  the  labour  market:  an  esti- 
mated 118,000  teen-agers  entered  the  labour 
force  during  the  month.  Some  79,000  persons 
in  this  age  group  found  jobs,  but  39,000  were 
unable  to  obtain  immediate  employment, 
thereby  slowing  down  the  decline  in  total 
unemployment. 

Employment  in  June  was  276,000  higher 
and  unemployment  25,000  lower  than  a  year 
earlier.  The  labour  force,  at  7,306,000,  was 
251,000,  or  3.6  per  cent  higher  than  in 
June  1964. 

Employment 

Farm  employment  remained  virtually  un- 
changed between  May  and  June.  In  non- 
farm  industries,  seasonal  employment  gains 
were  fairly  general.  The  construction  industry 
was  especially  active  during  the  month. 

Employment  of  persons  20  years  of  age 
and  over  increased  by  112,000  between  May 


and  June,  a  normal  increase  for  this  age 
group.  The  employment  advance  of  79,000 
among  teen-agers  was  in  line  with  the  ex- 
perience of  the  past  three  years. 

Prior  to  1962,  the  May-June  influx  of  stu- 
dents into  the  labour  market  had  been  rela- 
tively small  and  the  increases  in  employment 
in  this  age  group  similarly  had  been  small. 

Total  employment  in  June  was  substantially 
higher  than  a  year  ago.  At  7,049,000,  the 
June  estimate  represented  an  advance  of 
276,000,  or  4.1  per  cent,  from  June  1964. 
The  largest  part  of  the  advance  was  in  serv- 
ice, trade  and  construction.  All  regions  con- 
tributed to  the  increase. 

Unemployment 

The  decline  in  unemployment  between 
May  and  June  was  less  than  usual,  reflecting 
in  part  the  large  influx  of  students  into  the 
labour  market.  Unemployment  among  per- 
sons 14  to  19  years  of  age  increased  by 
39,000  during  the  month.  Among  those  20 
years  of  age  and  over,  unemployment  de- 
clined by  47,000,  which  decline  is  about 
normal  for  this  time  of  year. 

Compared  with  a  year  earlier,  unemploy- 
ment was  down  25,000.  In  recent  years, 
teen-agers  have  been  accounting  for  an  in- 
creasing portion  of  the  unemployment  total. 
In  June  1965,  persons  in  this  age  group  ac- 
counted for  39  per  cent  of  the  total  compared 
with  21   per  cent  in  June   1961. 

Of  the  257,000  unemployed  in  June, 
191,000  had  been  unemployed  for  three 
months  or  less.  The  remaining  66,000,  or 
26  per  cent  of  the  total,  had  been  seeking 
work  for  four  months  or  more.  This  group 
accounted  for  a  smaller  proportion  of  the 
total  than  a  year  earlier. 


LABOUR  MARKET  CONDITIONS 


Labour  Surplus 

Approximate 
Balance 

Labour  Shortage 

Labour  Market  Areas 

1 

2 

3 

4 

June 
1965 

June 
19G4 

June 
1965 

June 
1964 

June 
1965 

June 
1964 

June 
1965 

June 
1964 

Metropolitan 

1 

1 
2 

4 

18 

2 

26 

7 
20 

3 
30 

8 

7 

12 

31 

4 

4 

11 

27 

1 

Major  Industrial 

Major  Agricultural 

Minor 

Total 

1 

3 

50 

60 

58 

46 

1 

Nora:  Before  Grande  Prairie  w 

is  added  in 

January  1965,  109  areas  were  sur 

veyed. 

The   review   is   prepared   by   the   Employment    and   Labour   Market   Division   of   the 
Economics   and  Research   Branch. 


620 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      JULY   7965 


CLASSIFICATION  OF  LABOUR  MARKET  AREAS-JUNE 


Substantial 

Moderate 

Labour 

Labour 

Labour 

Approximate 

Shortage 



Surplus 

Surplus 

Balance 

Group   1 

Group  2 

Group  3 

Group  4 

Quebec-Levis 
->ST.  JOHN'S 
Vancouver- 

Calgary 

METROPOLITAN  AREAS 

Edmonton 
>HALIFAX 

(labour  force 

New  Westminster- 

Hamilton 

75.000  or  more) 

Mission  City 
WINDSOR                    -<- 

Montreal 
Ottawa-Hull 
Toronto 
-^WINNIPEG 

Lac  St.  Jean 

BRANTFORD              «<- 
>CORNER  BRROOK 
Cornwall 

Fort  William-Port  Arthur 
Granby-Farnham- 

Cowansville 
Joliette 
New  Glasgow 

Guelph 
Kingston 
Kitchener 
London 
>MONCTON 
Sudbury 
Victoria 

MAJOR   INDUSTRIAL  AREAS 

(labour  force  25.000- 

NIAGARA 

75.000;  60  per  cent 

PENINSULA             ■<- 

or  more  in  non- 

OSHAWA                      -<- 

agricultural  activity) 

Peterborough 
->ROUYN-VAL  d'OR 

Saint  John 

SARNIA                         «<- 
>SHAWINIGAN 

Sherbrooke 

Sydney-Sydney  Mines 

Timmins-New  Liskeard- 
Kirkland  Lake 

Trois  Ri  ieres 

>RIVIERE  DU  LOUP 

Barrie 

->THETFORD-LAC 

Brandon 

MEGANTIC-ST. 

>CHARLOTTETOWN 

MAJOR  AGRICULTURAL 
AREAS 

GEORGES 

Chatham 
-H-ETHBRIDGE 

(labour  force  25.000- 

Moose  Jaw 
>NORTH  BATTLEFORD 

75.000:  40  per  cent  or 

->PRINCE  ALBERT 

more  in  agriculture) 

Red  Deer 
Regina 
Saskatoon 
Yorkton 

Bathurst 

Bracebridge 

Listowel 

BEAL'HARNOIS           ■<- 

Brampton 

Belleville-Trenton 

-^BRIDGE  WATER 

Campbellton 

Central  Vancouver 

CHILLIWACK              <- 

Island 

>DAWSON  CREEK 

Cranbrook 

Drummondville 

>DAUPHIN 

>GASPE 

Drumheller 

Grande  Prairie 

>EDMUNDSTON 

Kamloops 

Fredericton 

Newcastle 

Gait 

>OKANAGAN  VALLEY 

Goderich 

OWEN  SOUND            < 

->GRAND  FALLS 

MINOR  AREAS 

Portage  la  Prairie 

>KENTVILLF 

(labour  force 

Prince  George-Quesnel 

Lachute-Ste.  Therese 

10.000  to  25.000) 

Prince  Rupert 
-^QUEBEC  NORTH 

SHORE 
>RIMOUSKI 

Sault  Ste.  Marie 

Ste.  Agathe-St.  Jerome 

St.  Jean 

St.  Stephen 

Sorel 

Summerside 

Valleyfield 

Victoriaville 

Lindsay 
Medicine  Hat 
>MONTMAGNY 
North  Bay 
Pembroke 
St.  Hyacinthe 
St.  Thomas 
Simcoe 

STRATFORD               -<- 
Swift  Current 
Trail-Nelson 

>TRURO 

Walkerton 

Weyburn 

Woodstock.  N.B. 

Woodstock-Tillsonburg 
-^YARMOUTH 

-^-The  areas  shown  in  capital  letters  are  those  that  have  been  reclassified  during  the  month;  an  arrow  indicates  the   group  from  which 
they  moved.     For  an  explanation  of  the  classification  used  see  page  590.  June  issue. 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      JULY   1965 


621 


Civilian  Rehabilitation 


21  Years  of  Service  to  Britain's  Disabled 

Britain  has  organized  series  of  functions  to  mark  the\  21st 
anniversary  of  enactment  of  Disabled  Persons  (Employment) 
Act,  1944,  under  which  hundreds  of  thousands  have  benefited 


In  the  21  years  since  the  passing  of  the 
Disabled  Persons  (Employment)  Act,  1944, 
many  hundreds  of  thousands  of  handicapped 
men  and  women  in  Great  Britain  have  bene- 
fited from  the  disablement  resettlement  serv- 
ices provided  by  the  Ministry  of  Labour. 

The  first  of  a  series  of  commemorative 
functions  throughout  the  country  marking  the 
coming  of  age  of  this  major  piece  of  social 
legislation,  organized  by  Disablement  Ad- 
visory Committees,  took  place  at  the  Indus- 
trial Rehabilitation  Unit  and  Government 
Training  Centre  at  Waddon  (Croydon).  Ray 
Gunter,  Minister  of  Labour,  was  special 
speaker. 

Mr.  Gunter  said  that  the  provisions  of  the 
1944  Act  were  founded  on  the  belief  that  if 
care  were  taken  in  assessing  what  individuals 
could  do  and  in  selecting  employment,  and 
if  special  aids  were  provided  whenever  neces- 
sary, the  great  majority  of  disabled  people 
could  take  their  place  in  industry  on  equal 
terms  with  the  able-bodied,  and  many  of  the 
remainder  could  do  useful  work  under  shel- 
tered conditions. 

Reviewing  progress,  the  Minister  recalled 
that  in  1944  there  was  only  one  industrial 
rehabilitation  unit  in  the  whole  country.  Now 
there  are  17  units  in  different  parts  of  the 
country,  and  just  under  134,000  persons  have 
completed  the  courses  provided. 

The  Industrial  Rehabilitation  Unit  at  Wad- 
don had  not  opened  until  1954  but  since  then, 
5,500  persons  had  been  through  it  and  many 
had  gone  on  to  the  Government  Training 
Centre  next  door,  which,  since  it  first  opened 
in  1931,  had  been  training  disabled  men  and 
women  as  well  as  the  abled-bodied  for  em- 
ployment in  a  variety  of  skilled  trades.  Since 
the  passing  of  the  Act,  well  over  two  mil- 
lion jobs  have  been  found  for  disabled  people 
in  open  industry  through  the  agency  of  the 
Ministry. 

Remploy  Services — For  the  more  severely 
disabled  who  needed  some  form  of  sheltered 
employment,  the  first  Remploy  factory  was 
set  up  in  1946.  Today,  there  are  88  factories, 
and  Remploy  has  a  turn-over  of  nearly 
£7,000,000.  Altogether  over  the  ten  years, 
more  than  21,000  severely  disabled  persons 
have  been  employed  in  them.  At  present, 
there  are  nearly  7,000 — the  highest  figure  in 
the  company's  history. 

In  addition,  many  men  and  women  are 
employed  in  sheltered  workshops  provided  by 


voluntary  organizations  and  local  authorities 
with  financial  help  from  the  Ministry. 

Placement  Services — The  Minister  spoke 
highly  of  the  special  placement  service  pro- 
vided at  every  employment  exchange  in  the 
country,  through  the  Disablement  Resettle- 
ment Officer  (DRO). 

Describing  the  place  of  the  Industrial  Re- 
habilitation Unit  in  preparing  people  for 
working  full-time  under  industrial  conditions, 
after  long  absences  from  work  through  injury 
or  illness,  the  Minister  observed  that  rehabili- 
tation— and  resettlement  generally — was  much 
more  effective  where  there  was  close  co- 
operation with  the  hospitals  and  other  medical 
services  so  that  the  Ministry  services  could 
follow  on  as  soon  as  possible  after  medical 
treatment  had  ended. 

Training  Methods — The  Minister  outlined 
several  ways  in  which  training  could  be  ar- 
ranged: in  a  government  training  centre,  at 
technical  or  commercial  colleges,  or  with  an 
employer.  A  more  severely  disabled  person 
could  be  trained  at  a  residential  training  col- 
lege run  by  voluntary  organizations  with  the 
Ministry's  financial  support. 

Co-operation  of  Employers — The  Minister 
said  he  was  very  conscious  that  much  of  the 
success  achieved  by  his  department's  resettle- 
ment services  was  due  to  the  sympathy  and 
co-operation  of  employers.  "Without  their 
support  and  goodwill  and  their  willingness  to 
give  disabled  people  a  chance,  many  fewer 
would  have  been  able  to  prove  they  can 
make  an  effective  contribution  to  the  economic 
life  of  the  country  and  in  so  doing  live 
independent  lives. 

"I  should,  however,  like  to  take  this  op- 
portunity of  appealing  to  all  employers  to 
make  a  special  effort  to  employ  more  dis- 
abled persons  this  year,  and  to  suggest  that 
those  smaller  employers,  who  have  not  pre- 
viously employed  disabled  persons,  consider 
afresh  whether  they  could  not  do  so  now.'* 

Sheltered  Employment  Aids  Industrialists — 
The  Minister  said  that  one  of  the  biggest 
contributions  to  Remploy's  success  in  recent 
years  had  been  the  sponsorship  of  indus- 
trialists. Under  this  plan,  the  sponsoring  firm 
provides  the  work  load,  the  plant  and  equip- 
ment, the  materials  and  the  know-how; 
Remploy  provides  the  production  space,  the 
labour  force,  technical  supervision  and  man- 
agement, all  services  and  inspection  and  con- 
trol facilities. 


622 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •     JULY   1965 


Older  Workers 


Re-designing  Jobs  for  Older  Workers 


"Job  re-design  for  older  workers"  has  two  interpretations: 
modify  jobs  on  which  older  workers  appear  to  have  difficulty 
or  design  jobs  from  outset  to  avoid  difficulty  as  worker  ages 


One  of  the  technical  papers  delivered  at 
the  International  Management  Seminar  on 
Job  Re-design  and  Occupational  Training  in 
London,  England,  in  October  1964  was  by 
K.  F.  H.  Murrell  of  the  Welsh  College  of 
Advanced  Technology.  The  seminar  was  spon- 
sored by  the  Organisation  for  Economic  Co- 
operation and  Development  (OECD). 

In  his  paper,  "Re-designing  Jobs  for  Older 
Workers,"  Mr.  Murrell  explained  that  there 
were  two  alternative  interpretations  of  the 
phrase  'job  re-design  for  older  workers'.  One 
could  be  the  modification  of  jobs  on  which 
older  workers  appeared  to  be  having  diffi- 
culty, so  as  to  reduce  those  difficulties.  An 
alternative  interpretation  would  be  the  de- 
sign of  jobs  from  the  outset  so  that  workers 
as  they  became  older  did  not  experience 
difficulty. 

Job  design  should  always  follow  good 
ergonomic  principles  and  this  in  itself  might 
very  well  enable  men  to  continue  to  carry 
on  their  jobs  without  difficulty  longer  than 
they  might  otherwise  do,  Mr.  Murrell  said. 
Many  of  the  features  resulting  from  good 
ergonomic  design  will  not  by  any  means  be 
specific  to  older  workers,  however.  They  will 
benefit  the  young  equally,  so  that  if  there 
is  already  a  differential  between  older  and 
younger  people,  this  is  likely  to  be  maintained 
or  even  increased  on  the  re-designed  jobs. 

The  report  describes  an  experiment  on  a 
component  of  the  job  of  drilling,  the  aiming 
of  the  drill  at  a  mark.  The  experiment  showed 
that  there  was  no  difference  between  older 
and  younger  men  regularly  employed  as 
drillers.  But  when  men  unaccustomed  to 
handling  a  drill  were  tested,  the  older  were 
worse  than  the  young.  If  only  the  results 
from  the  inexperienced  subjects  had  been 
taken  into  account,  an  impairment  in  what- 
ever faculties  are  employed  in  drill-aiming 
might  have  been  predicted  and  it  would  have 
been  completely  wrong. 

Mr.  Murrell  suggested  that  the  maintenance 
of  unimpaired  faculties  could  be  one  im- 
portant determinant  of  what  is  called  'experi- 
ence'. He  pointed  out  that  experience  has  been 
suggested    as    the    factor    that    compensates 


for  age  but,  as  with  many  terms  of  this 
kind,  it  is  not  easy  to  define  clearly  exactly 
what  it  is.  In  addition,  it  would  seem  that 
the  'experienced'  man  has  been  able  to  learn 
probabilities  associated  with  his  task  so  that 
he  can  carry  it  out  with  a  minimum  of 
decisions  and  this  'experience'  enables  him 
to  continue  doing  the  job  with  which  he  is 
familiar  until  quite  an  advanced  age. 

Mr.  Murrell's  paper  stressed  the  impor- 
tance of  retraining  in  ameliorating  the  effect 
of  changes  of  job.  He  stated  that  job  re- 
design should  not  proceed  without  retraining. 
He  suggested  that  pushing  ahead  with  altera- 
tions and  leaving  the  operator  to  get  on  as 
best  he  could  was  asking  for  trouble.  It 
was  his  opinion  that  changes  should  be  made 
in  the  light  of  knowledge  of  those  changes 
which  can  be  made  tolerable  by  a  carefully 
planned  program   of  retraining. 

The  paper  deals  in  some  detail  with  factors 
that  militate  against  older  workers,  but  ex- 
plains that  if  the  knowledge  of  such  factors 
is  applied  to  job  design,  the  results  can  only 
be  validated  by  long-term  studies  to  show 
whether  the  survival  rate  on  the  jobs  has 
been  increased. 

Experiments  are  described  that  provided 
useful  knowledge  about  the  effects  of  aging 
on  workers.  Organizational  and  environmental 
factors  are  discussed,  such  as  pacing,  experi- 
ence, shift  work  and  the  "natural  selection" 
process. 

The  report  draws  attention  to  the  difficulty 
of  obtaining  evidence  of  the  effects  of  age  on 
continued  profitable  employment  because  of 
the  process  of  natural  selection,  which  leaves 
available  for  study  only  those  whose  perform- 
ance has  shown  little  deterioration.  The 
generally  accepted  cause  of  this  was  believed 
to  be  increasing  ability  to  cope  with  a  familiar 
job.  It  points  out  that  making  changes  in 
jobs,  even  with  the  best  of  intentions,  could 
cause  more  difficulties  than  they  cure,  if  not 
carefully  done. 

Copies  of  Mr.  Murrell's  report  are  avail- 
able free  from  the  Division  on  Older  Work- 
ers, Civilian  Rehabilitation,  Department  of 
Labour,  Ottawa. 


DON'T  JUDGE  A  MAN'S  WORTH  BY  HIS  DATE  OF  BIRTH 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      JULY   7965 


623 


Women's  Bureau 


Quo  Vadis  School  of  Nursing 


Experience  with  first  applicants  indicates  pressing  need  to 
develop  more  accurate  means  of  testing  academic  and  emotional 
development  in  prospective  candidates  applying  for  admission 


The  Quo  Vadis  School  of  Nursing  in 
Toronto  differs  from  traditional  schools  of 
nursing  in  Canada,  in  that  its  student  body 
consists  of  women  from  30  to  50  years  of 
age.  The  first  class  of  32  women  began  a 
two-year  course  of  studies  in  September  1964. 
Once  graduated,  they  will  be  eligible  to  write 
the  regular  examination  set  by  the  Ontario 
College  of  Nurses,  and  may  subsequently 
practise   as   professional   registered   nurses. 

The  idea  for  such  a  school  grew  out  of  in- 
tensive study  of  nursing  education  by  mem- 
bers of  the  Catholic  Hospital  Conference  of 
Ontario  during  1962-63.  Announcement  of 
its  proposed  establishment  elicited  inquiries 
from  616  women. 

A  program  was  set  up  to  review  qualifica- 
tions and  to  examine  and  select  candidates 
for  the  first  class,  which  was  limited  to  35 
students.  A  fee  of  $10,  not  refundable,  was 
required  from  each  candidate  in  order  to 
attract  only  those  with  sincere  intentions. 
Final  selection,  under  the  supervision  of  a 
psychologist,  consisted  of  four  written  tests 
followed  by  personal  interviews  with  the 
psychologist  and  the  school's  director  and 
counsellor.  Ultimately  students  were  chosen 
on  the  basis  of  test  results  and  personal 
interviews. 

A  progress  report,  dated  February  1965, 
covers  the  research  and  counselling  aspects 
of  the  school  and  includes  a  detailed  statis- 
tical breakdown  of  the  results  of  this  selection 
procedure. 

Out  of  the  77  applicants  who  had  registered 
and  paid  their  fee,  45  were  found  to  be 
unacceptable  for  various  reasons.  In  many 
instances  prospective  students  were  unable  to 
meet  the  formal  requirements  of  the  College 
of  Nurses  of  Ontario,  the  most  frequent  lack 
being  high  school  courses  in  physics  and 
chemistry  or  suitable  options.  This  drawback 
accounted  for  29  per  cent  of  the  rejects. 

Quo  Vadis  officials  think  that  the  majority 
of  applicants  who  were  unable  to  meet  the 
academic  requirements  of  the  College  of 
Nurses  were  capable  of  undertaking  the 
school  course.  In  contrast,  seven  applicants 
who  met  the  academic  requirements  lacked 
emotional  stability.  This  evidence  revealed 
the  inappropriateness  of  applying  current  test- 
ing criteria  to  mature  applicants. 

Detailed  data  on  the  candidates  were  re- 
corded in  a  systematic  manner,  and  a  staff 
member  of  the  University  of  Toronto  acted 


as  consultant  in  the  assembly  and  analysis  of 
this  information. 

Basic  assumptions  about  adult  students, 
plus  assumptions  explored  in  the  curriculum- 
planning  seminar  held  before  the  beginning 
of  classes,  led  to  the  establishment  of  the 
School  in  the  first  place,  and  formed  the 
framework  of  its  program. 

Because  of  the  family  responsibilities  of 
married  students,  and  of  students  who  are 
living  at  home  rather  than  in  residence,  as 
is  the  case  in  most  of  the  regular  diploma 
schools,  it  became  obvious  that  the  Quo  Vadis 
program  should  allow  for  maximum  flexibility 
in  hours  for  classes  and  in  the  distribution 
of  practical  assignments. 

At  the  outset  the  planning  committee  real- 
ized the  importance  of  setting  aside  sufficient 
time  for  individual  counselling  and  group 
discussion  in  order  to  accomplish  four  objec- 
tives: 

— help  students  to  overcome  discourage- 
ment; 

— determine  what  outside  pressures  may 
be  causing  tensions  and  impeding  the  progress 
of  the  student; 

— consider  fixed  opinions  and  attitudes; 

— share  with  students  the  goals  of  the 
program. 

Although  each  student  was  assigned  a  staff 
member  as  adviser  and  was  interviewed  once 
a  month  for  the  first  four  months  of  the 
program,  the  consensus  was  that  sufficient 
time  had  not  been  given  to  counselling  and 
that  trainees  wanted  and  needed  more  indi- 
vidual help  with  classroom  work,  clinical 
practice  and  personal  problems.  Many  prac- 
tical difficulties  stand  in  the  way  of  improve- 
ment along  these  lines,  but  it  is  the  intention 
of  the  faculty  to  overcome  them. 

Characteristics  peculiar  to  adult  students — 
such  as  a  tendency  to  ask  more  questions 
during  lectures,  and  to  relate  personal  ex- 
periences while  subject  matter  is  being  taught 
— presented  serious  threats  to  the  schedule 
for  prescribed  lectures,  and  posed  the  question 
of  a  possibly  lightened  work-load. 

The  School  has  concluded  that  classroom 
techniques  must  leave  room  for  students  to 
trade  experiences  about  life  and  for  useful 
contributions  from  students  with  nursing  ex- 
perience. Allowances  will  have  to  be  made 
for  students  who  may  have  forgottent  how  to 
go  to  school,  and  consideration  should  be 
given  to  more  refresher  courses. 


624 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      JULY    7965 


COLLECTIVE   BARGAINING   REVIEW 

Collective  Bargaining  Scene 

Agreements  covering   500  or   more   employees, 
excluding  those  in  the  construction   industry 

Part  I — Agreements  Expiring  During  July,  August  and  September 

(except  those  under  negotiation   in   June) 

Company   and   Location  Union 

Air    Canada,    system-wide    Air   Line   Pilots   (Ind.) 

Copper  Rand  Chibougamau  Mines,  Chibougamau, 

Que Steelworkers    (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Dominion  Glass,  Montreal,  Que Glass  &  Ceramic  Wkrs.    (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Dominion  Steel  &  Coal   Corp.    (Wabana   Mines), 

Bell    Island,    Nfld Steelworkers    (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Dominion  Stores,  Montreal  &  vicinity,  Que Retail  Clerks   (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Domtar    Newsprint     (Woodlands     Div.),     Riviere 

Jacques   Cartier,   Que Pulp  &  Paper  Wkrs.  Federation  (CNTU) 

Edmonton   City,  Alta IBEW    (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Fraser  Companies,  Atholville,  Edmundston  &  New- 
castle,    N.B Pulp  &  Paper  Mill  Wkrs.   (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Hotel   Dieu   St.   Vallier,   Chicoutimi,   Que Service  Empl.  Federation    (CNTU) 

Hotels  &  Taverns   (various),  Toronto,  Ont Hotel    Empl.    (AFL-CIO/CLC)     (beverage    dis- 
pensers) 

Kingsway   Transport,    Smith   Transport   &   others, 

Montreal  &  other  centres,  Que Teamsters   (Ind.) 

Motor  Transport  Industrial  Relations  Bureau,  Ont.  Teamsters   (Ind.)    (drivers) 

Noranda    Mines,    Noranda,    Que Steelworkers    (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Saskatchewan    Government    Sask.     Govt.     Empl.     Assn.     (Ind.)     (classified 

services) 

Saskatchewan    Government    Telephones    Communications  Wkrs.   (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Winnipeg   Metro.,   Man Public   Empl.    (CLC) 

Part  II — Negotiations  in  Progress  During  June 

(except  those  concluded  in  June) 

Bargaining 

Company    and   Location  Union 

Anglo-Nfld.   Development,   Grand  Falls,  Nfld Papermakers    (AFL-CIO/CLC),    Pulp    &   Paper 

Mill   Wkrs.    (AFL-CIO/CLC),   IBEW    (AFL- 
CIO/CLC)    &   Machinists    (AFL-CIO/CLC) 
Assn.  Patronale  des  Services  Hospitaliers   (5  hos- 
pitals), Arthabaska,  Drummondville  &  Nicolet, 

Que Service  Empl.  Federation   (CNTU) 

Assn.  Patronale  des  Services  Hospitaliers,  Quebec, 

Que Service     Empl.     Federation     (CNTU)     (female 

empl.) 
Assn.  Patronale  des  Services  Hospitaliers,  Quebec, 

Que.     Service  Empl.  Federation  (CNTU)   (male  empl.) 

Babcock-Wilcox   &   Goldie-McCulloch,   Gait,   Ont.    Steelworkers    (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Bathurst   Power   &   Paper,   Bathurst,   N.B Papermakers    (AFL-CIO/CLC),    Pulp    &    Paper 

Mill  Wkrs.  (AFL-CIO/CLC),  IBEW  (AFL- 
CIO/CLC),  Machinists  (AFL-CIO/CLC), 
Plumbers  (AFL-CIO/CLC)  &  International 
Operating  Engineers  (AFL-CIO) 
Bowaters  Mersey  Paper,  Anglo-Cdn.  Pulp  &  Paper,  Papermakers  (AFL-CIO/CLC),  Pulp  &  Paper 
Domtar    Newsprint    &    James    MacLaren    Co.,        Mill  Wkrs.  (AFL-CIO/CLC)  &  IBEW  (AFL- 

N.S.   &   Que CIO/CLC) 

B.C.   Hydro   &   Power  Authority   IBEW   (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Building    maintenance    &    window    cleaning    con- 
tractors,   Vancouver,    B.C Bldg.  Service  Empl.   (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Calgary    City,    Alta Public  Empl.    (CLC)    (inside  empl.) 

Calgary    City,    Alta Public    Empl.    (CLC)     (outside    empl.) 

Calgary   General   Hospital,   Calgary,   Alta Public    Empl.    (CLC) 

Calgary  Power  &  Farm  Electric  Services,  Alta Calgary  Power  Empl.  Assn.  (Ind.) 

Canada  &  Dominion  Sugar,  Montreal,  Que Bakery  Wkrs.    (CLC) 

CNR,  North  Sydney,  N.S ILA    (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

CPA,     system-wide     Machinists    (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Commission    des    Ecoles    Catholiques,    Montreal, 

Que Public  Service  Empl.  Federation  (CNTU)  main- 
tenance empl.) 

This   review   is   prepared   by  the   Collective   Bargaining   Section,   Labour-Management 
Division  of  the  Economics  and  Research  Branch. 

THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      JULY    7965  625 

91938—3 


Company  and  Location  Union 

Commission    des    Ecoles    Catholiques,    Montreal, 

Que Public  Service  Empl.  Federation   (CNTU)    (of- 
fice empl.) 
Consolidated  Paper,  Cap  de  la  Madeleine  &  Three 

Rivers,    Que Papermakers  (AFL-CIO/CLC)  &  Pulp  &  Paper 

Mill  Wkrs.  (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Consolidated    Paper,    Grand'Mere,    Que Papermakers  (AFL-CIO/CLC)  &  Pulp  &  Paper 

Mill  Wkrs.  (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Consolidated  Paper,  Port  Alfred,  Que Pulp  &  Paper  Wkrs.  Federation  (CNTU) 

Consolidated  Paper,  Shawinigan,  Que Papermakers  (AFL-CIO/CLC)  &  Pulp  &  Paper 

Mill  Wkrs.   (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Consumers'  Gas  Co.,  Toronto  &  other  centres,  Ont.  Chemical  Wkrs.   (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Council   of  Printing  Industries,  Toronto,  Ont Typographical  Union  (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

David    &    Frere,    Montreal,   Que Commerce  &  Office  Empl.   (CNTU) 

Denison    Mines,   Elliot    Lake,    Ont Steelworkers    (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Dominion    Coal,    Glace    Bay,    N.S Mine  Wkrs.   (Ind.) 

Dominion  Steel  &  Coal  Corp.,  Sydney,  N.S Steelworkers    (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Dominion    Steel    &    Coal    Corp.    (Cdn.    Bridge), 

Walkerville,    Ont Steelworkers    (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Domtar    Newsprint  &   Domtar   Construction   Ma- 
terials,   Donnacona,    Que Pulp  &  Paper  Wkrs.  Federation  (CNTU) 

Donohue  Brothers  Limited,  Clermont,  Que Carpenters    (Lumber  &  Sawmill  Wkrs.)    (AFL- 
CIO/CLC) 

Duplate  Canada  Ltd.,  Oshawa,  Ont Auto  Wkrs.   (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

E.S.   &   A.   Robinson   (Can.),   Leaside,  Ont Printing   Pressmen    (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Edmonton   City,  Alta Fire  Fighters   (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Employing  Printers'  Assn.  of  Montreal,  Montreal, 

Que Bookbinders    (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Employing  Printers'  Assn.  of  Montreal,  Montreal, 

Que Printing  Pressmen    (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Fur  Mfrs.  Guild,  Montreal,  Que Butcher  Workmen  (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Fur    Trade    Assn.    of    Canada,    Montreal,    Que., 

Toronto,  Ont.  &  Winnipeg,  Man Butcher  Workmen   (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

B.F.  Goodrich,  Kitchener,  Ont Rubber  Wkrs.  (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Hollinger  Consolidated  Gold  Mines,  Timmins,  Ont.  Steelworkers    (AFL-CIO/CLC) 
Hospitals  (9),  Hull,  Buckingham  &  other  centres, 

Que Service  Empl.  Federation   (CNTU) 

Hotel  Chateau  Frontenac  (CPR),  Quebec,  Que Railway,  Transport  &  General  Wkrs.  (CLC) 

Hotel    Royal    York    (CPR),    Toronto,    Ont Hotel  Empl.  (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Imperial  Tobacco  &  subsids.,  Ont.  &  Que Tobacco  Wkrs.   (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

International  Harvester  Co.  of  Canada,  Chatham, 

Ont Auto  Wkrs.    (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Manitoba  Telephone  System   Man.  Telephone  Assn.  (Ind.)    (clerical  &  main- 
tenance empl.) 
Men's  Clothing  Mfrs.  Assn.  of  Ontario,  Toronto, 

Ont Amalgamated  Clothing  Wkrs.   (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Motor  Transport  Industrial  Relations  Bureau,  Ont.  Teamsters  (Ind.)   (mechanics) 

Northern  Electric,  Belleville,  Ont Northern   Electric   Empl.  Assn.    (Ind.) 

Old   Sydney   Collieries,   Sydney  Mines,   N.S Mine  Wkrs.   (Ind.) 

Price  Bros.,  Dolbeau,  Kenogami  &  Shipshaw,  Que.  Bush  Wkrs.,  Farmers'  Union   (Ind.) 

Price   Bros.,   Kenogami  &  Riverbend,  Que Pulp  &  Papers  Wkrs.  Federation  (CNTU) 

Quebec    Hydro-Electric   Commission,   Montreal   & 

other  centres   Quebec  Hydro-Electric  Commission  Office  Empl. 

Syndicate  (Ind.) 

Quebec  Iron  &  Titanium,  Sorel,  Que Metal  Trades  Federation  (CNTU) 

Saskatchewan    Power    Corp Oil  Wkrs.   (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Sask.     Provincial    Hospitals,    Moose    Jaw,    North 

Battleford,  Prince  Albert  &  Weyburn,  Sask CLC-chartered  local  &  Public  Empl.   (CLC) 

Saskatoon    City,    Sask Public  Empl.   (CLC)   (inside  &  outside  empl.) 

Shell   Oil,   Montreal,   Que Shell  Empl.   Council    (Ind.) 

University  of  Saskatchewan,  Saskatoon,  Sask CLC-chartered   local 

Winnipeg   City,    Man Public   Empl.    (CLC) 

Conciliation  Officer 

Abitibi  Power  &  Paper  &  subsids.,  Que.,  Ont.,  Man.    Panermakers  (AFL-CTO/CLC),  Pulp  and  Paper 

Mill     Wkrs.      (AFL-CIO/CLC),     Machinists 
(AFL-CIO/CLC),  IBEW  (AFL-CIO/CLC)  & 
International  Operating  Engineers  (AFL-CIO) 
Cdn.   International   Paper  &  New   Brunswick  In- 
ternational  Paper,   N.B.  &  Que Papermakers  (AFL-CIO/CLC),  Pulp  and  Paper 

Mill  Wkrs.  (AFL-CIO/CLC),  International 
Operating  Engineers  (AFL-CIO),  IBEW  (AFL- 
CIO/CLC),  Machinists  (AFL-CIO/CLC)  & 
Plumbers   (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Cdn.    Marconi,    Montreal,   Que Marconi  Empl.  Council   (Ind.) 

Chrysler    Canada    Ltd.,    Windsor,    Ont Auto  Wkrs.  (AFL-CIO/CLC)   (office  empl.) 

Consolidated   Paper,  Nicauba,  Que Bush  Wkrs.,  Farmers'  Union   (Ind.) 

Consolidated   Paper,   Trenche   Dist.,  Que Bush  Wkrs.,  Farmers'  Union   (Ind.) 

DeHavilland  Aircraft,  Malton  &  Toronto,  Ont Auto  Wkrs.    (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

626  THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      JULY   1965 


Company  and  Location  Union 

Dominion  Rubber  (Tire  Div.),  Kitchener,  Ont Rubber  Wkrs.    (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Domtar   Newsprint,   Red    Rock,   Ont Papermakcrs  (AFL-CIO/CLC),  Pulp  and  Paper 

Mill  Wkrs.  (AFL-CIO/CLC),  IBEW  (AFL- 
CIO/CLC)  &  International  Operating  Engi- 
neers   (AFL-CIO) 

Dow  Brewery,  Montreal  &  Quebec,  Que Brewery    Wkrs.    (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

E.B.    Eddy,    Hull,    Que Papermakers  (AFL-CIO/CLC),  Pulp  and  Paper 

Mill  Wkrs.  (AFL-CIO/CLC)  &  Machinists 
(AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Eldorado  Mining  &  Refining,  Eldorado,  Sask Mine,   Mill   &   Smelter  Wkrs.    (Ind.) 

Fisheries  Assn.   of  B.C United  Fishermen  (Ind.)    (canning  &  cold  stor- 
age em  pi.) 

Fisheries   Assn.   of   B.C United   Fishermen    (Ind.)    (tendermen) 

Fittings   Limited,   Oshawa,   Ont Steelworkers    (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Hamilton    City,    Ont Public  Empl.    (CLC)    (inside  empl.) 

Hamilton    City,    Ont Public  Empl.   (CLC)    (outside  empl.) 

H.J.  Heinz  Co.  of  Canada,  Leamington,  Ont Packinghouse   Wkrs.    (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Hudson  Bay  Mining  &  Smelting,  Flin  Flon,  Man.    CLC-chartered     local,     Machinists     (AFL-CIO/ 

CLC),  IBEW  (AFL-CIO/CLC),  Boilermak- 
ers (AFL-CIO/CLC),  Carpenters  (AFL-CIO/ 
CLC,  Painters  (AFL-CIO/CLC)  &  Inter- 
national Operating  Engineers  (AFL-CIO) 

KVP  Company,  Espanola,  Ont Papermakers  (AFL-CIO/CLC),  Pulp  and  Paper 

Mill  Wkrs.  (AFL-CIO/CLC)  &  IBEW  (AFL- 
CIO/CLC) 

Kimberly-Clark  Paper,  Terrace  Bay,  Ont Pulp  &  Paper  Mill  Wkrs.    (AFL-CIO/CLC)    & 

IBEW    (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Marathon  Corp.,  Marathon,  Ont Pulp  &  Paper  Mill  Wkrs.   (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Manitoba  Hydro  IBEW   (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Molson's  Brewery  Quebec  Ltd.,  Montreal,  Que.  ..    Molson's   Empl.    Assn.    (Ind.) 
New  Brunswick  Power  Commission,  province-wide    IBEW    (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Northern    Electric,    Montreal,   Que Northern  Electric  Empl.  Assn.  (Ind.)   (Unit  #1) 

Northern    Electric,    Montreal,   Que Northern  Electric  Office  Empl.  Assn.   (Ind.) 

Ontario-Minnesota  Paper,  Fort  Frances  &  Kenora, 

Ont Papermakers  (AFL-CIO/CLC),  Pulp  and  Paper 

Mill  Wkrs.  (AFL-CIO/CLC),  IBEW  (AFL- 
CIO/CLC),  Machinists  (AFL-CIO/CLC), 
Firemen  &  Oilers  (AFL-CIO/CLC),  Carpen- 
ters (AFL-CIO/CLC)  &  International  Oper- 
ating Engineers    (AFL-CIO) 

Silverwood  Dairies,  Toronto,  Ont Retail,  Wholesale  Empl.  (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Spruce  Falls  Power  &  Paper  &  Kimberly-Clark  of 

Canada,  Kapuskasing,  Ont Papermakers  (AFL-CIO/CLC),  Pulp  and  Paper 

Mill  Wkrs.  (AFL-CIO/CLC)  &  IBEW  (AFL- 
CIO/CLC) 

Conciliation  Board 

Atomic  Energy  of  Canada,  Chalk  River  &  Deep 

River,  Ont Atomic  Energy  Allied  Council  (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Brewers  Warehousing,  province-wide,  Ont Brewery   Wkrs.    (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Cdn.  Canners,  Vancouver  &  Penticton,  B.C Packinghouse  Wkrs.    (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Great  Lakes  Paper,  Fort  William,  Ont Papermakers  (AFL-CIO/CLC),  Pulp  and  Paper 

Mill  Wkrs.  (AFL-CIO/CLC),  IBEW  (AFL- 
CIO/CLC)  &  International  Operating  En- 
gineers  (AFL-CIO) 

Hotel  Chateau  Laurier  (CNR),  Ottawa,  Ont Railway,  Transport  &  General  Wkrs.  (CLC) 

Provincial    Paper,   Thorold,   Ont Pulp  &  Paper  Mill  Wkrs.   (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Rio  Algom  Mines  (Nordic  Mine),  Algoma  Mills, 

Ont Steelworkers    (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Union  Carbide  (Metals  &  Carbon  Div.),  Welland, 

Ont UE    (Ind.) 

Victoria  Hospital,  London,  Ont Building  Service  Empl.  (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Post-Conciliation  Bargaining 

American  Motors  Canada  Ltd.,  Brampton,  Ont Auto    Wkrs.    (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

CBC,    company-wide    Moving  Picture  Machine  Operators   (AFL-CIO/ 

CLC) 
Phillips  Cables  Ltd.,  Brockville,  Ont IUE   (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Arbitration 

Toronto  Electric  Commissioners,  Toronto,  Ont Public  Empl.   (CLC) 

Work  Stoppage 

Anaconda  American  Brass,  New  Toronto,  Ont Auto  Wkrs.    (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Cdn.  Johns-Manville,  Port  Union,  Ont Chemical  Wkrs.   (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

National   Harbours   Board,    Montreal,    Que CNTU-chartered   local 

THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      JULY   1965  627 

91938— 3J 


Company  and  Location  Union 

Ontario  Paper,  Thorold,  Ont Papermakers    (AFL-CIO/CLC),    Pulp    &    Paper 

Mill  Wkrs.  (AFL-CIO/CLC),  IBEW  (AFL- 
CIO/CLC),  Machinists  (AFL-CIO/CLC), 
Firemen  &  Oilers  (AFL-CIO/CLC),  Plumbers 
(AFL-CIO/CLC),  Carpenters  (AFL-CIO/ 
CLC),  1LA  (AFL-CIO/CLC)  &  International 
Operating  Engineers  (AFL-CIO) 
Quebec  North  Shore  Paper  &  Manicouagan  Power 

Co.,    Baie   Comeau,   Que Papermakers  (AFL-CIO/CLC)   &  Pulp  &  Paper 

Mill  Wkrs.  (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Part  III — Settlements  Reached  During  June 

(A  summary  of  major  terms  on  the  basis  of  information   immediately   available.  Figures   on  the 
number  of  employees  covered   are  approximate.) 

Assn.  dcs  Marchands  Detaillants  (Produits  Alimentaires) .  Quebec,  Que. — Commerce  &  Office 
Empl.  (CNTU):  2-yr.  agreement  covering  1,60©  empl. — wage  increase  of  $5  a  wk.  eff.  Aug.  1965; 
provision  for  wage  reopener  Feb.  28,  1966;  agreement  to  expire  Feb.  28,  1967. 

Assn.  Patronale  du  Commerce,  Quebec,  Que. — Commerce  &  Office  Empl.  (CNTU):  3-yr. 
agreement  covering  600  empl. — wage  increases  of  $6  a  wk.  retroactive  to  Jan.  1,  1965,  $5  a  wk. 
eff.  Jan.  1,  1966  and  $6  a  wk.  eff.  Jan.  1,  1967  for  drivers;  wage  increases  of  $5  a  wk.  retroactive 
to  Jan.  1,  1965,  $4  a  wk.  eff.  Jan.  1,  1966  and  $6  a  wk.  eff.  Jan.  1,  1967  for  other  empl.;  work 
wk.  reduced  to  4H  hrs.  (formerly  42i  hrs.)  for  day  wkrs.  eff.  June  1965  and  to  40  hrs.  eff.  Jan. 
1,  1966;  Hi  paid  holidays  (formerly  10);  2  wks.  vacation  with  3  wks.  pay  for  empl.  with  15 
yrs.  of  service;  employer  to  pay  50%  of  premiums  for  life,  medical  and  hospital  insurance;  agree- 
ment  to   expire   Dec.    31,    1967. 

Asbestos  Corp.  &  Flintkote  Mines,  Thetford  Mines,  Que. — Mining  Empl.  Federation  (CNTU): 
3-yr.  agreement  covering  1,630  empl. — wage  increases  of  40  to  80  an  hr.  retroactive  to  Jan.  1965, 
40  to  80  an  hr.  eff.  Jan.  1966  and  50  to  100  an  hr.  eff.  Jan.  1967;  4  wks.  vacation  after  20  yrs. 
of  service  (formerly  after  25  yrs.)  and  new  provision  for  5  wks.  vacation  after  25  yrs.  of  service; 
employer  to  pay  70%  (formerly  65%)  of  sickness  and  accident  insurance  premiums;  weekly 
indemnity  increased  to  $50  (formerly  $40);  rate  for  labourer  becomes  $2.22  an  hr.  Jan.  1967; 
agreement  to  expire  Dec.  31,   1967. 

Associated  Fur  Industries,  Toronto,  Ont. — Butcher  Workmen  (AFL-CIO/CLC):  3-yr.  agree- 
ment covering  800  empl. — wage  increases  of  $6  a  wk.  retroactive  to  May  2,  1965,  $4  a  wk.  eff. 
May  1,  1966  and  $2  a  wk.  eff.  May  1,  1967;  work  wk.  to  be  35  hrs.  eff.  May  1967  (at  present  36 
hrs.);  pension  benefits  to  be  $50  a  mo.;  fund  for  sick  benefits  to  be  3%  (formerly  2%)  of  total 
payroll;  rate  for  lining  makers  becomes  $74  a  wk.  May  1,  1967;  agreement  to  expire  April  30,  1968. 

B.C.  Hydro  &  Power  Authority — Office  Empl.  (AFL-CIO/CLC):  27-mo.  agreement  covering 
1,800  empl. — wage  increases  of  5%  retroactive  to  Jan.  1,  1965  and  5%  eff.  Jan.  1,  1966;  4  wks. 
vacation  after   17  yrs.  of  service  (formerly  after  20  yrs.);  agreement  to  expire  March  31,   1967. 

British  Columbia  Forest  Products,  Crofton,  Celgar  Ltd.,  Watson  Island  &  Rayonier  Canada 
(B.C.)  Ltd.,  Woodfibre,  B.C. — Pulp  &  Paper  Wkrs.  of  Canada  (Ind.):  1-yr.  agreement  covering 
1,400  empl. — general  wage  increase  of  150  an  hr.  eff.  July  1,  1965;  in  addition  to  6  statutory  holi- 
days and  3  floating  holidays,  1  additional  floating  holiday  to  be  granted  after  5  yrs.  of  service  and 
2  additional  floating  holidays  to  be  granted  after  10  yrs.  of  service;  new  pension  arrangement, 
superseding  existing  pension  plan,  to  provide  benefits  at  normal  retirement  at  least  equal  to  benefits 
under  existing  plan  and  not  less  than  benefits  under  Canada  Pension  Plan;  pension  to  be  f%  per 
calendar  yr.  of  participation  on  earnings  below  Canada  Pension  Plan  maximum  and  \\%  per 
calendar  yr.  on  earnings  above  Canada  Pension  Plan  maximum;  empl.  contributions  toward  new 
pension  arrangement  to  be  2%  of  annual  earnings  up  to  maximum  pensionable  earnings  of  Canada 
Pension  Plan  and  4%  of  annual  earnings  in  excess  of  maximum  pensionable  earnings  under  Canada 
Pension  Plan;  northern  differential  for  empl.  at  Watson  Island  increased  by  3i0  an  hr.;  ferry  trans- 
portation charges  for  empl.  at  Woodfibre  reduced  by  40%;  rate  for  labourer  becomes  $2.44  an  hr.; 
agreement   to    expire   June    30,    1966. 

Canada  Cement,  N.B.,  Que.,  Ont.,  Man.  &  Alta— Cement  Wkrs.  (AFL-CIO/CLC):  2-yr. 
agreement  covering  1,290  empl. — general  wage  increases  of  80  an  hr.  eff.  July  1,  1965  and  80 
an  hr.  eff.  July  1,  1966;  increment  between  job  classes  to  be  increased  by  10  eff.  July  1,  1965  and 
10  eff.  July  1,  1966;  10  paid  holidays  (formerly  9);  pay  for  scheduled  work  on  holidays  to  be 
2i  times  regular  rate  and  for  non-scheduled  work  3  times  regular  rate;  3  wks.  vacation  after  10 
yrs.  of  service  (formerly  after  12  yrs.),  4  wks.  vacation  after  20  yrs.  of  service  (formerly  after 
25  yrs).  and  new  provision  for  5  wks.  vacation  after  25  yrs.  of  service;  new  provision  for  jury 
duty  supplement;  employer  and  empl.  contributions  toward  group  life  insurance,  sickness  and 
disability  plan  to  be  90  an  hr.  and  30  an  hr.  respectively  eff.  July  1,  1965  (formerly  80  and  40 
an  hr.)  and  100  an  hr.  and  20  an  hr.  respectively  eff.  July  1,  1966;  agreement  to  expire  July  1,  1967. 

Domtar  Pulp  &  Paper  (Howard  Smith  Paper  Div.),  Cornwall,  Ont. — Papermakers  (AFL-CIO/ 
CLC)  &  Pulp  &  Paper  Mill  Wkrs.  (AFL-CIO/CLC):  2-yr.  agreement  covering  1,340  empl. — wage 
increases  of  110  an  hr.  retroactive  to  May  1,  1965  and  100  an  hr.  eff.  May  1,  1966;  evening  and 
night  shift  premiums  become  90  an  hr.  and  150  an  hr.  respectively  eff.  May  1,  1965  (formerly  80 
and  130  an  hr.)  and  100  an  hr.  and  170  an  hr.  eff.  May  1,  1966;  new  provision  for  5  wks.  vacation 
after  30  yrs.  of  service  eff.  May  1,  1965;  rate  for  labourer  becomes  $2.28  an  hr.  May  1,  1966;  agree- 
ment to  expire  April  30,  1967. 

Dunlop  Canada  Limited,  Toronto,  Ont. — Rubber  Wkrs.  (AFL-CIO/CLC):  3-yr.  agreement 
covering  600  empl. — wage  increases  of  140  an  hr.  retroactive  to  May  1,  1965,  70  an  hr.  eff.  May 
1,  1966  and  70  an  hr.  eff.  May  1,  1967  for  hourly  rated  empl.;  wage  increases  of  220  an  hr. 
retroactive  to  May  1,  1965,  70  an  hr.  eff.  May  1,  1966  and  70  an  hr.  eff.  May  1,  1967  for  main- 
tenance  empl.;   wage   increases   averaging   100   an   hr.   retroactive   to   May   1,    1965,   70   an  hr.   eff. 

628  THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      JULY    7965 


May  1,  1966  and  70  an  hr.  eff.  May  1,  1967  for  incentive  wkrs.;  10  paid  holidays  (formerly  9); 
2  wks.  vacation  after  1  yr.  of  service,  3  wks  vacation  after  5  yrs  of  service,  4  wks  vacation  alter 
15  yrs.  of  service  and  5  wks.  vacation  alter  2S  yrs.  of  service;  late  for  sweeper  becomes  $2.29  an 
hr.   May   1,   1967;   agreement   to  expire  Apiil   30,    1968. 

Edmonton  Public  School  Hoard,  Edmonton,  Alta.  Public  Empl.  (CLC)  (caretakers):  1-yr. 
agreement  covering  550  empl. — wage  increases  of  50  an  hr.  for  male  junior  caretakers,  l\t  an  hr. 
for  male  senior  caretakers  and  of  2i0  to  40  an  hr.  for  women  assistants;  rate  for  male  junior 
caretakers  becomes  $3,550  a  yr.;   agreement  to  expire  June  30,   1966. 

Fairey  Aviation  Co.  of  Canada,  Eastern  Passage,  N.S. — Machinists  (AFL-CIO/CLC):  2-yr. 
agreement  covering  940  empl. — wage  increases  of  80  to  150  an  hr.  retroactive  to  April  1,  1965  and 
V  ail  hr.  e(T.  April  1,  1%6;  9  paid  holidays  (formerly  8);  2  wks.  vacation  (alter  2  yrs.  of  service) 
to  be  extended  by  1  to  5  days  for  empl.  with  10  to  14  yrs.  of  service;  employer  to  pay  35% 
of  empl.  contribution  toward  Canada  Pension  Plan;  rate  for  labourer  becomes  $1.84  an  hr. 
April   1,  1966;   agreement  to  expire  March  31,   1967. 

Fraser  Valley  Milk  Producers'  Assn.  <£  other  dairies,  Vancouver  &  New  Westminster,  B.C. — 
Teamsters  (Ind.):  3-vr.  agreement  covering  800  empl. — wage  increases  of  200  an  hr.  retroactive  to 
April  1,  1965,  20?  an  hr.  eff.  April  1,  1966  and  20?  an  hr.  eff.  April  1,  1967  for  dairy  wkrs;  wage 
increases  of  100  an  hr.  retroactive  to  April  1,  1965,  100  an  hr.  eff.  April  1,  1966  and  5?  an  hr. 
eff.  April   1,   1967  for  coffee  shop   and  ice  cream  girls;   3   wks.  vacation  after  5   yrs.   of  service  in 

1966  (at  present  after  8  yrs.);  rate  for  dairy  worker  becomes  $2.86  an  hr.  April  1,  1967;  agreement 
to  expire  March  31,   1968. 

Hawker  Siddeley  (Cdn.  Car  Div.).  Fort  William,  Out.— Auto  Wkrs.  (AFL-CIO/CLC):  3-yr. 
agreement  covering  800  empl. — wage  increases  of  10?  an  hr.  in  first  yr.,  40  an  hr.  in  second  yr.  and 
50  an  hr.  in  third  yr.  of  agreement  for  production  empl.;  wage  increases  of  130  an  hr.  in  first 
yr.,  60  an  hr.  in  second  yr.  and  60  an  hr.  in  third  yr.  of  agreement  for  skilled  trades;  3  wks. 
vacation  after  12  yrs.  of  service  eff.  April  1966;  employer  to  pay  75%  of  premiums  toward 
hospital,  medical  and  life  insurance  eff.  April  1,  1966  (at  present  70%);  pension  benefits  to  be 
$2.25  a  mo.  per  yr.  of  service   (formerly  $2);  agreement  to  expire  March  31,   1968. 

Hayes  Steel  Products,  St.  Catharines  &  Thorold,  Ont.—Auto  Wkrs  (AFL-CIO/CLC):  3-yr. 
agreement  covering  600  empl. — wage  increases  of  100  an  hr.  eff.  June  12,  1965,  60  an  hr.  eff.  June 
1,  1966  and  60  an  hr.  eff.  June  1,  1967  for  unskilled  empl.;  wage  increases  of  130  an  hr.  eff.  June 
12,  1965,  60  an  hr.  eff.  June  1,  1966  and  60  an  hr.  eff.  June  1,  1967  for  skilled  trades;  wage 
increases  of  50  an  hr.  eff.  June   12,   1965,  50   an  hr.  eff.  June   1,  1966  and  60   an  hr.  eff.  June  1, 

1967  for  incentive  wkrs.;  evening  and  night  shift  premiums  increased  to  120  an  hr.  and  150  an  hr. 
respectively  (formerly  90  and  120);  10  paid  holidays  (formerly  equivalent  of  8  days  time  off); 
2  wks.  vacation  after  3  yrs.  of  service  (formerly  after  5  yrs.),  2\  wks.  vacation  after  7  yrs.  of 
service  (formerly  after  10  yrs.),  3  wks.  vacation  after  10  yrs.  of  service  (formerly  after  15  yrs.), 
3i  wks.  vacation  after  15  yrs.  of  service  and  4  wks.  vacation  after  20  yrs.  of  service;  basic  pension 
benefit  to  be  $4.25  a  mo.  per  yr.  of  service  (formerly  $2.80);  life  insurance  to  be  $5,000  (formerly 
$3,000);  weekly  indemnity  increased  to  $60  (formerly  $40);  benefits  under  SUB  plan  to  be  $45  a 
wk.  plus  $1.50  per  dependant  up  to  4  dependants;  Blue  Cross  Drug  Prescription  Plan,  company 
paid,  adopted;  new  provision  for  3  days  bereavement  leave;  new  provision  for  jury  duty  supple- 
ment; rate  for  sweeper  becomes  $2.34  an  hr.  June  1,  1967;  agreement  to  expire  May  31,  1968. 

Hiram  Walker  &  Sons,  Walkerville,  Ont.— Distillery  Wkrs.  (AFL-CIO/CLC):  3-yr.  agreement 
covering  600  empl. — general  wage  increases  of  100  an  hr.  retroactive  to  Jan.  1,  1965,  100  an  hr. 
eff.  Jan.  1,  1966  and  100  an  hr.  eff.  Jan.  1,  1967;  additional  wage  increase  of  70  an  hr.  for  skilled 
trades  retroactive  to  Jan.  1,  1965;  10  paid  holidays  (formerly  8i);  1  wk.  vacation  after  1  yr. 
of  service,  2  wks.  vacation  after  2  yrs.  of  service,  3  wks.  vacation  after  8  yrs.  of  service  (formerly 
after  10  yrs.),  4  wks.  vacation  after  15  yrs.  of  service  (formerly  after  20  yrs.)  and  new  provision 
for  5  wks.  vacation  after  25  yrs.  of  service;  cost  of  living  allowance  of  10  an  hr.  for  each  .6  point 
change  in  Consumer  Price  Index  adopted;  company-paid  hospital  and  medical  insurance  to  be 
available  to  pensioners;  rate  for  labourer  becomes  $2.68  an  hr.  Jan.  1,  1967;  agreement  to  expire 
Dec.    31,    1967. 

International  Harvester  Co.  of  Canada,  Hamilton,  Ont. — Steelworkers  (AFL-CIO/CLC):  3-yr. 
agreement  covering  2,500  empl. — general  wage  increases  of  100  an  hr.  in  first  yr.,  60  an  hr.  in 
second  yr.  and  80  an  hr.  in  third  yr.  of  agreement;  increases  of  i0  in  increment  between  labour 
grades  in  first  and  second  yrs.  of  agreement;  9  paid  holidays  (formerly  8)  in  1965  and  10  paid 
holidays  in  1967;  2  wks.  vacation  after  1  yr.  of  service  (formerly  after  3  yrs.),  3  wks.  vacation 
after  5  yrs.  of  service  (formerly  after  15  yrs.),  4  wks.  vacation  after  15  yrs.  of  service  (formerly 
after  25  yrs.)  and  new  provision  for  5  wks.  vacation  after  25  yrs.  of  service;  evening  and  night 
shift  premiums  to  be  120  an  hr.  and  150  an  hr.  respectively  (formerly  80  and  100  an  hr.);  em- 
ployer to  pay  full  cost  of  health  plan  including  Blue  Cross  Drug  Prescription  Plan;  SUB  increased 
to  $30  a  wk.  (formerly  $24);  new  non-contributory  pension  plan  to  provide  benefits  of  $4.25  a 
mo.  per  yr.  of  service;  vesting  after  10  yrs.  of  service;  rate  for  labour  grade  303  becomes  $2.26i 
an  hr.  in  third  yr.  of  agreement;  agreement  to  expire  April  21,   1968. 

Kellogg  Co.  of  Canada,  London,  Ont. — Millers  (AFL-CIO/CLC):  1-yr.  agreement  covering 
650  empl.— wage  increase  of  100  an  hr.  retroactive  to  April  15,  1965;  evening  and  night  shift 
premiums  to  be  90  an  hr.  and  130  an  hr.  respectively  (formerly  80  and  120  an  hr.);  5  wks. 
vacation  in  25th  yr.  of  service  (previous  maximum  was  4  wks.  after  20  yrs.  of  service);  employer 
to  pay  full  premiums  for  group  life  insurance  and  sickness  and  accident  plan  (formerly  50%); 
rates  become  $2.08  an  hr.  for  female  empl.  in  plant  service  and  $2.27  an  hr.  for  male  empl.  in 
plant  service;  agreement  to  expire  April    1966. 

London  City,  Ont. — Public  Empl.  (CLC)  (outside  empl.):  2-yr.  agreement  covering  550  empl. — 
wage  increase  of  5%  plus  40  an  hr.  retroactive  to  Jan.  1,  1965,  3%  dIus  2e  an  hr.  eff.  Jan.  1, 
1966  and  2%  eff.  July  1,  1966;  11  paid  holidays  (formerly  10);  shift  premium  to  be  130  an  hr. 
(formerly  100  an  hr.);  4  wks.  vacation  after  20  yrs.  of  service  (formerly  after  25  yrs.);  agreement 
to  expire  Dec.   31,   1966. 

THE  LABOUR   GAZETTE      •      JULY    7965  629 


MacDonald  Tobacco,  Montreal,  Que.— Tobacco  Wkrs.  (AFL-CIO/CLC):  3-yr.  agreement 
covering  1,300  empl. — wage  increases  of  100  an  hr.  retroactive  to  May  1,  1965,  80  an  hr.  eff.  May 
1,  1966,  8<f  an  hr.  eff.  May  1,  1967  and  70  to  110  an  hr.  eff.  Sept.  4,  1967;  work  wk.  to  be  reduced 
from  37i  to  36$  hrs.  eff.  Sept.  4,  1967;  4  wks.  vacation  after  20  yrs.  of  service  (formerly  after 
25  yrs.):  S  wks,  vacation  after  29  yrs.  of  service  in  1965,  after  27  yrs.  of  service  in  1966  and 
after  25  yrs.  of  service  in  1967;  weekly  sickness  and  accident  benefits,  payable  up  to  26  wks.  after 
1  yr.  of  service  and  up  to  52  wks.  after  10  yrs.  of  service,  to  be  $50  a  wk.  for  female  empl. 
(formerly  $40)  and  $65  a  wk.  for  male  empl.  (formerly  $50);  agreement  to  expire  April  30,  1968. 

Manitoba  Telephone  System — IBEW  (AFL-CIO/CLC)  (electrical  craft  empl.):  18-mo.  agree- 
ment covering  1,000  empl. — wage  increase  of  5%  retroactive  to  April  1,  1965;  4  wks.  vacation  after 
25  yrs.  of  service  (formerly  after  30  yrs.);  rate  for  journeyman  becomes  $2.77  an  hr.;  agreement 
to  expire   Sept.  30,   1966. 

Mclntyre  Porcupine  Mines,  Schumacher,  Ont. — Steelworkers  (AFL-CIO/CLC):  3-yr.  agreement 
agreement  covering  900  empl. — wage  increases  ranging  from  2%  to  5i%  eff.  June  1,  1965,  and 
2%  eff.  June  1,  1967;  work  wk.  to  be  reduced  from  44  hrs.  to  40  hrs.  with  maintenance  of  pay 
eff.  June  1,  1966;  employer  to  pay  40%  of  premiums  for  life  insurance;  voluntary  revocable 
check-off  introduced;  rate  for  miner  becomes  $2.01  an  hr.  June  1,  1967;  agreement  to  expire 
May  31,   1968. 

Montreal  Transportation  Commission,  Montreal,  Que. — Public  Service  Empl.  Federation 
(CNTU):  3-yr.  agreement  covering  4,050  empl. — wage  increases  of  300  an  hr.  retroactive  to  July 
12,  1964,  150  an  hr.  eff.  July  12,  1965,  150  an  hr.  eff.  July  12,  1966  and  5*  an  hr.  eff.  July  11,  1967 
for  bus  drivers;  wage  increases  of  30^  an  hr.  retroactive  to  July  12,  1964,  100  an  hr.  eff.  July  12, 

1965  and  80  an  hr.  eff.  July  12,  1966  for  mechanics  and  empl.  in  building  maintenance;  salary 
increases  ranging  from  $15.10  a  mo.  to  $54.63  a  mo.  retroactive  to  July  12,  1964,  $10  a  mo.  to 
$40  a  mo.  eff.  July  12,  1965  and  $14  a  mo.  to  $32  a  mo.  eff.  July  12,  1966  for  office  empl.  and 
cashiers;  work  wk.  for  mechanics  and  empl.  in  building  maintenance  to  be  reduced  from  4H  hrs. 
to  40  hrs.  with  maintenance  of  pay;  night  shift  premium  to  be  150  an  hr.  for  mechanics  and  empl. 
in  building  maintenance  and  100  an  hr.  for  office  personnel;  Sunday  premium  to  be  time  and  one 
quarter;  3  wks.  vacation  after  8  yrs.  of  service  (formerly  after  10  yrs.)  and  4  wks.  vacation  after 
20  yrs.  of  service  (formerly  after  25  yrs.);  new  cumulative  sick  leave  arrangements — 15  days  per 
yr.  of  service  up  to  200  days,  payable  after  2  days  absence  (formerly  10  days  per  yr.  of  service 
up  to  180  days,  payable  after  6  days  absence);  100%  of  sick  leave  credits  to  be  payable  to  empl. 
who  retire  or  resign  or  are  discharged  (formerly  one  third  of  sick  leave  credits,  payable  to  empl. 
retiring  or  resigning);  life  insurance  increased  from  maximum  of  $7,500  to  H  times  annual  salary 
and  employer  to  pay  50%  of  premiums;  life  insurance  for  retired  empl.  to  be  $3,000  (formerly 
$1,000);  basic  rate  for  bus  driver  becomes  $2.77  an  hr.  eff.  July  11,  1967;  agreement  to  expire 
July  12,   1967. 

Northern  Electric,  Montreal,  Que. — Northern  Electric  Empl.  Assn.  (Ind.)  (Units  2  &  3):  3-yr. 
agreement  covering  600  empl. — wage  increases  averaging  80  an  hr.  in  first  yr.,  80  an  hr.  in  second 
yr.  and  80  an  hr.  in  third  yr.  of  agreement;  10  paid  holidays  (formerly  9);  4  wks.  vacation  after 
25  yrs.  of  service  (formerly  after  28  yrs.);  rate  for  installer  becomes  $1.86  an  hr.  in  third  yr.  of 
agreement;  agreement  to  expire  Feb.  25,   1968. 

Ocean  Cement  Limited,  Greater  Vancouver,  Fraser  Valley  &  Vancouver  Island,  B.C. — 
Teamsters  (Ind.):  3-yr.  agreement  covering  1,200  empl. — wage  increases  of  200  an  hr.  retroactive 
to  Jan.  1,  1965,  200  an  hr.  eff.  Jan.  1,  1966  and  200  an  hr.  eff.  Jan.  1,  1967;  4  wks.  vacation  after 
15  yrs.  of  service  introduced;  rate  for  yardman  becomes  $3.06  an  hr.  Jan.  1,  1967;  agreement  to 
expire  Dec.   31,   1967. 

Provincial  Transport,  Montreal,  Que. — Public  Service  Empl.  Federation  (CNTU):  2i-yr.  agree- 
ment covering  850  empl. — wage  increases  of  $15  a  wk.  eff.  July  1,  1965  and  $5  a  wk.  eff.  July  1, 

1966  for  drivers;  mileage  rate  to  be  increased  to  5£0  per  mile  eff.  July  1,  1967  (at  present  50  a 
mile);  agreement  to  expire  Dec.  31,  1967. 

Quebec  Hydro  (Shawinigan  Water  &  Power),  Que. — Public  Service  Empl.  Federation  (CNTU): 
arbitration  award  establishing  2-yr.  agreement  covering  1,200  empl. — settlement  pay  of  $350  for 
period  Nov.  1,  1963  to  Dec.  31,  1964;  wage  increases  averaging  200  an  hr.  retroactive  to  Jan.  1, 
1965  and  70  an  hr.  across  the  board  eff.  Jan.  1,  1966;  Thanksgiving  Day  to  be  11th  paid  holiday; 
3  wks  vacation  after  10  yrs.  of  service  (formerly  after  12  yrs.);  rate  for  labourer  becomes  $2.07 
an  hr.  Jan.   1,  1966;  agreement  to  expire  Dec.  31,  1966. 

RCA  Victor,  Montreal,  Que. — RCA  Salaried  Empl.  Assn.  (Ind.):  1-yr.  agreement  covering 
700  empl. — wage  increase  of  3%;  agreement  to  expire  May  15,  1966. 

Saskatchewan  Government — Sask.  Govt.  Empl.  Assn.  (Ind.)  (labour  service  empl.):  1-yr. 
agreement  covering  1,500  empl. — wage  increase  of  3%;  rate  for  labourer  becomes  $1.63  an  hr.; 
agreement  to  expire  March  31,   1966. 

Steinberg's  Ltd.,  Montreal,  Que. — Steinberg's  Empl.  Protective  Assn.  (Ind.):  2£-yr.  agreement 
covering  3,000  empl. — wage  increases  of  $6  a  wk.  retroactive  to  March  21,  1965,  $5  a  wk.  eff. 
March  21,  1966  and  $5  a  wk.  eff.  March  21,  1967;  3  wks.  vacation  after  10  yrs.  of  service  (form- 
erly after  12  yrs.)  and  4  wks.  vacation  after  15  yrs.  of  service  (formerly  after  20  yrs.);  Christmas 
bonus  of  1  day's  pay  to  be  granted  to  empl.  with  1  or  more  yrs.  of  service  eff.  Dec.  1966;  rate  for 
cashier  becomes  $75  a  wk.  March  21,  1967;  agreement  to  expire  Sept.  20,  1967. 

Steinberg's  Ltd.,  Montreal,  Que. — Steinberg's  Warehouse  &  Transport  Empl.  Assn.  (Ind.):  2i-yr. 
agreement  covering  1,000  empl. — wage  increases  of  $4  to  $6.50  a  wk.,  depending  on  classification, 
retroactive  to  March  15,  1965,  $2  a  wk.  eff.  June  15,  1965  and  $5.50  to  $7  a  wk.,  depending  on 
classification  eff.  Sept.  15,  1966;  8  paid  holidays  (formerly  7);  3  wks.  vacation  after  10  yrs.  of 
service  ( formerly  after  12  yrs.)  and  4  wks.  vacation  after  15  yrs.  of  service  (formerly  after  20 
yrs.);  afternoon  and  night  shift  premiums  to  be  $3  a  wk.  and  $6  a  wk.  respectively  (formerly  $2.50 
a  wk.  and  $5  a  wk.);  rate  for  labourer  becomes  $77.50  a  wk.  Sept.  15,  1966;  agreement  to  expire 
Sept.  14,  1967. 


630  THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      JULY    7965 


INTERNATIONAL   LABOUR   ORGANIZATION 

49th  International  Labour  Conference 

Canada's  Deputy  Minister  of  Labour,   Employer  Delegate 

rker    Delegate    speak    in    discussion    c  :or-Generafz 

Report.     Special    Government    Adviser    also    delivers    address 


The  role  of  the  International  Labour  Or- 
ganization needs  to  be  redefined,  with  r 

se   in   its   new   role    it  mot 
seek   to  help   r  ites  to  speed  their 

economic     growth,     Gecge    V. 
Deputy    Minister    of   Labour,   told   the 
International    Labour    Conference,    held    in 
Geneva  from  June  2  tc    2- 

Mr.  Haythorne,  who  is  Chairman  of  the 
ILO  Governing  Boay.  was  addressing  the 
openir-  s  Chairman  of  the 

ILO   v  the    Program    and 

Structure  of  the  ILO,  he  introduced  its  first 
report 

Three  other  Canadian  delegates  also  took 

part  in  the  rort  of  the 

.--General.     They     were:     Employers' 

gate    Kenneth    Hallsworth.    Director    of 

Industrial   Rei: 

Execol  -President.    Canadian   Labour 

Congress ;  and  G  .  - :  A  a  ■• !  5  e 

ford,  M.P.  for  Vaneoaver-Burrard. 

Opening  Session 

A:   the   G  n,  Mr.    Hi  thorne  told 

the  delegates  the  ILO's  work  s  torma- 

tion  was  a  matter   o 

D  plishments   .:  - e   :;      B :    :  D  BOpU . ; 
what  we  can  hope  to 

come,   if  we   nsi  iy  the 

opportunities  our  organization  ofle 

The  world  of   1965.   with    its   far-reaching 

s,    and 

true   and    i 

ment   acco  g    the   emergence   of  vig- 

orous  new  national  >  Cerent 

place  from  the  world  of  1919  when  the  ILO 

:..  he  asserted. 

Some 
■lay  say  that  this  new  direction  of  ILO 

~.g-developed  work  in 
promoting  stand- 

ards. But  the  ILO.   '. 

ture.  can  bring  to  n  economic 

dc   it  has   gathered  in 
of  half  century  in  improving  working  stand- 
anfa 

Thus  it  can  ensure  that  economic  growth,  and 
full   re;  of  sharing  in  the 

fruits  of  such  ;  hand-in- r. 

The  ILO  in  stressing  the  nee 

^pment  does  so  bee  the  human 

\  their  welfare,  and  the 


rewards,  as  well  as  because  of  the  ke 
portar  human  contribution  to  such 

growth  in  the  first  place,  he  said. 

7-  -  -e--  ::'.=  :':-  the  11'"  -;  i;-:e-  in:—.:-; 
rrrrr'jr.c  tr.ir.  i~-~.r.-.z  :_r  ::_~:  ~;  ti"~.er> 
dreamed  of.  It  means  that  the  role  of  the  ILO 
needs  to  be  redefined  with  greater  precision — 
in  relation  to  other  international  organizations 
concerned    with   economic    and    social    deveJop- 

t:  r-Ir.e-ii  r:;rirr_;  :-;  -  relat  :r.  ::  the 
neeii  :-.:  -.sites  ::"  -titer;  e~r  .  es  ir; 
governments. 

We  are  still  seeking  the  proper  balance  be- 
tween the  ILO's  traditional  anilities  and  its 
:.:'••  e _  ;  e ;  :  _ :  s  ^ ".  _  i  e  5  r  e  >e  i  r :  h  r  1 : t  r  ■ :  e ;  t  ? 
it.z  z-ii.i:::-  ire  ie:e  — j\^-;  re  t;-fi  :: 
crer2-_:-il   r::;::~s   -.hit    :in    re   rr_:«t   erte;_   e 

• 
ratifications  of  Conventions.  That  many 
of  the  Conventions  ratified  deal  with  dis- 
;:i~.n:::r.  arti  hurr.ar:  rchti  sr.ctii  re  ett- 
couraging  to  members  of  the  conference,  he 
>a:a 

The  ::e~e-.i;_5  ne-ei?  ;:'  ;>  ~:  re-  at:  a 
women  in  the  world  have  loos  been  recog- 

of  confidence  that  oar  organization  can  make 
a  real  and  vital  contribution  in  helping  to 

thorne  declared  that  the  ILO  was 
ategk  position  "to  give 

of  the  men  and  women  throughout 

and  to  the  establishment  of 
ad  programs  designed  to  meet 


Report  of  the  Working  Party 


fa  it 


ecu:  r.c   tae    rerc 


W-V   -.z 


ILO.    ! 

the     II 

The-e"  is.   I   flunk,   Ode   doubt 
about  the  aims  and  objectiv 

Mr.  Ha. theme  pointed  out 

?e  determined  i 
to  the  tasks  that  face  mankir. 

was  conscious  that  in  deveJ 

■ 
;;■;-;.".::;:    .irrroach.    .irJ     ••  -.5    * 
avoid  any  isola  ordinated 

ful  eft 


..  ^ . 


^ .    _- 
e>    oi 

s  (ke 

■  s   ~  C 


Wo 


ma   •  Hte- 


THE  LABOUR   GAZETTE      •      JULY    7965 


631 


The  committee  believed  that  by  determin- 
ing broad  program  areas  before  turning  to 
the  instrumentalities  required,  there  was  less 
danger  of  perpetuating  outworn  methods.  If 
emphasis  had  first  been  placed  on  particular 
techniques,  this  approach  could  easily  have 
resulted  either  in  maintaining  the  status  quo 
for  its  own  sake  or  in  developing  new  types 
of  machinery  before  an  agreement  had  been 
reached  on  what  the  essential  tasks  of  the 
ILO  are  in  today's  increasingly  complex 
world,  Mr.  Haythorne  said. 

The  committee  began  its  work  with  an 
examination  of  the  development  and  utiliza- 
tion of  human  resources  as  a  major  program 
area.  It  was  recognized  (in  paragraph  18  of 
the  report)  that  the  development  and  utiliza- 
tion of  "human  resources"  are  decisive  fac- 
tors in  economic  expansion  and  in  social 
progress. 

The  committee  realized  that  if  people  do 
not  have  the  skills  to  use  natural  resources, 
and  the  capital  and  equipment  that  must 
accompany  them,  and  if  they  are  not  pro- 
ductively employed  or  do  not  participate 
actively,  freely  and  in  a  responsible  manner 
in  development,  it  will  be  difficult  to  achieve 
economic  and  social  progress. 

He  said  that  was  true  of  all  countries  but, 
as  the  report  noted,  it  applied  particularly 
in  the  case  of  those  with  developing  econ- 
omies. 

Mr.  Haythorne  quoted  paragraph  19  of 
the  Working  Party's  report: 

19.  The  role  which  human  beings  can  play  in 
the  process  of  development  will  be  enhanced  if 
livine  and  working  conditions  are  improved,  if 
standards  of  living  are  made  more  satisfactory, 
and  if  a  greater  degree  of  social  justice  is 
attained.  This  makes  it  necessary  to  stress  the 
other  fundamental  aspect  of  human  resources 
policy,  namely  that  the  ultimate  objective  of 
development  is  human  fulfilment.  A  policy  for 
the  development  and  utilization  of  human  re- 
sources, therefore,  implies  recognition  of  the 
right  of  each  person  to  obtain  employment,  to 
enjoy  the  fruits  of  the  production  to  which  he 
has  contributed,  and  to  develop  his  faculties  to 
the  fullest  extent. 

"I  am  sure  you  will  agree  that  this  means 
that  adequate  attention  must  be  paid  to 
leisure  as  well  as  to  working  hours." 

In  five  consecutive  paragraphs  the  com- 
mittee then  turned  to  consideration  of  objec- 
tives in  the  human  resources  field,  and  ex- 
amined those  which  the  ILO  proposed  to  the 
Secretary-General  of  the  United  Nations  as 
appropriate  for  the  United  Nations  Develop- 
ment Decade,  as  well  as  the  specific  ILO 
objectives  in  the  development  and  utilization 
of  human  resources. 

Paragraph  23  said:  "The  ILO  should  con- 
tinue to  define  principles  of  universal  appli- 
cation and  develop  policies  which  are  suited 
to  the  situation  in  countries  at  various  stages 
of  development.  It  must  then  develop  pro- 
grams and  techniques  which  enable  effect  to 


be  given  to  the  principles  and  policies  thus 
defined,  .  .  ." 

In  order  to  carry  out  these  tasks,  the  re- 
port said  in  Paragraph  24,  "the  ILO  must 
continue  to  accumulate  technical  knowledge 
which  will  serve  as  a  basis  for  the  assistance 
and  the  advice  which  it  will  be  called  upon 
to  give  to  governments,  employers'  and  work- 
ers' organizations,  and  other  bodies  compe- 
tent in  the  field  of  human  resources." 

In  the  next  paragraph  it  said  the  ILO  must 
seek  the  co-operation  of  the  international 
organizations  active  in  some  particular  field 
of  human  resources  development,  naming  as 
examples  the  United  Nations  Educational, 
Scientific  and  Cultural  Organizations,  the 
Food  and  Agriculture  Organization  and  the 
World  Health  Organization,  and  the  Inter- 
national Bank  for  Reconstruction  and  De- 
velopment and  other  similar  organizations. 

"The  participation  of  the  three  constituent 
groups  of  the  ILO  in  the  human  resources 
programs  undertaken  by  the  Organization  at 
the  national  and  international  levels  is  an 
essential  factor  in  the  success  of  these  pro- 
grams," the  committee  said  in  Paragraph  26. 

In  Paragraph  27  it  said  that  the  Working 
Party  considered  that  the  Organization  should 
act  as  the  focal  point  in  world-wide  efforts 
for  the  development  and  utilization  of  human 
resources,  and  expressed  the  view  that  the 
member  States  should  be  invited  to  provide 
the  ILO  with  relevant  information  on  the 
technical  co-operation  activities  that  they  are 
carrying  out  in  the  field  of  human  resources. 
"The  ILO  should  disseminate  information  on 
its  pilot  projects,  research  and  other  activities, 
so  as  to  make  generally  available  the  expert 
knowledge  it  acquires,"  it  said. 

In  concluding,  Mr.  Haythorne  said  that  in 
a  world  of  rapid  changes  the  ILO  cannot  and 
must  not  allow  itself  to  be  out  of  step  or 
left  behind  in  the  march  of  history. 

"Rather  our  organization  must  be  out  in 
front  grappling  with  the  difficult  and  complex 
problems  of  our  day  in  the  labour  and  social 
fields.  The  Working  Party  is  determined  to 
help  in  this  task  to  the  best  of  its  ability." 

The  Committee  consisted  of  eight  govern- 
ment members,  six  employers'  members,  and 
six  workers'  members.  They  were  selected  to 
give  representation  to  different  regions  of  the 
world,  different  stages  in  economic  develop- 
ment and  different  forms  of  social  organiza- 
tion. 

Canadian  Employer  Delegate 

Kenneth  Hallsworth,  Canadian  Employer 
Delegate,  said  Canadian  employers  recog- 
nized the  importance  of  the  role  the  ILO 
had  played  in  industrial  society. 

He  said  many  changes  had  occurred  in 
the  world  since  the  ILO  was  formed  and 
greater  emphasis  was  now  being  placed  on 


632 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      JULY    7965 


investment  in  human  resources  in  the  formula- 
tion of  development  programs. 

"New  concepts,  philosophies,  institutions 
and  ideologies  have  emerged,'1  he  said.  "Tech- 
nological changes  arc  confronting  many  of 
us  today  with  difficult  social  and  economic 
problems  that  have  yet  to  be  thoroughly 
identified  or  completely  analyzed." 

In  the  light  of  these  changes,  Mr.  Halls- 
worth  said,  "we  agree  with  the  ILO's  decision 
to  re-examine  and  reappraise  its  part  in  the 
scheme  of  our  society  to  determine  what 
must  be  done  to  ensure  that  it  continues  to 
occupy   the    role   of   a   responsible   agency." 

Mr.  Hallsworth  pointed  out  that  new  and 
fresh  ideas  had  emerged  as  a  result  of  the 
Director-General's  report,  which  focused  at- 
tention on  the  program  and  structure  of  the 
ILO  for  future  years. 

Although  there  had  been  a  consensus  of 
approval  on  many  of  the  proposals,  he  said, 
there  was  some  divergence  of  views  on  the 
relative  importance  and  priority  that  certain 
aspects  of  future  programming  should  have. 

Mr.  Hallsworth  said  that  although  the 
Working  Party's  first  report  represented  only 
the  beginning  of  a  much  larger  job,  it  defined 
some  specific  guidelines  in  very  important 
areas.  The  Canadian  Employers'  delegation 
commended  members  of  the  Working  Party 
for  their  report  and  particularly  for  their 
decision  to  focus  attention  on  the  proposed 
major  programs  relating  to  human  resources. 

He  then  quoted  paragraph  18  of  the  report: 

National  development  does  not  depend  only 
on  the  existence  of  natural  resources  and  on  an 
ample  supply  of  capital  and  equipment.  If  people 
do  not  have  the  skills  needed  to  exploit  these 
resources  fully,  if  they  are  not  productively  em- 
ployed, if  they  do  not  participate  actively,  freely 
and  in  a  responsible  manner  in  the  various 
tasks  of  development,  it  will  be  very  difficult 
to  achieve  significant  economic  and  social  prog- 
ress. This  is  particularly  true  of  the  developing 
countries  in  which  human  resources  are  abun- 
dant, but  where  the  skill  potential  of  such 
resources  is  inadequately  developed  and  the 
opportunities  for  productive  employment  are 
insufficient.  In  short,  it  is  increasingly  recog- 
nized in  the  theory  and  practice  of  development 
that  the  development  and  utilization  of  "human 
resources"  are  decisive  factors  in  economic  ex- 
pansion and,  in  consequence,  in  social  progress. 

Mr.  Hallsworth  said  these  words  clearly 
indicated  where  most  of  the  time  and 
resources  of  the  Organization  should  be  de- 
voted if  the  standards  of  living  in  the  de- 
veloping countries  are  to  be  raised  to  a 
tolerable  level. 

In  recent  years  a  growing  proportion  of  the 
ILO's  time  and  resources  had  been  spent  in 
the  area  of  technical  assistance,  he  asserted. 
"If  this  conference  does,  as  I  hope  it  will, 
make  it  unmistakably  clear  to  the  Govern- 
ing Body  and  to  the  Office  that  even  greater 
efforts  should  be  made  in  this  direction,  it 
is   essential    that    the    amount   and    kind    of 


technical  assistance  meet  the  needs  of  the 
particular  nations  being  aided.  Research,  in- 
cluding analyses  of  results  and  the  exchange 
Of  information,  are  prerequisites  if  a  program 
of  this  kind  is  to  be  sound  of  structure  and 
purpose. " 

Priority  of  this  kind,  the  speaker  declared, 
once  again  raises  questions  about  the  ILO's 
traditional  standard  setting  task.  The  Director- 
General  declared  in  his  report  that  inter- 
national instruments  are  the  backbone  of  the 
Organization.  "I  suggest  that  they  are  not. 
However  relevant  they  may  have  been  in 
the  past,  conditions  today  have  changed  to 
such  an  extent  that  this  aspect  of  the  ILO's 
work  requires  the  most  careful   scrutiny." 

He  said  delegates  of  the  newer  nations 
have  said  they  are  nations  with  relatively 
undeveloped  economies.  They  are  essentially 
non-industrial,  with  a  social  and  economic 
life  quite  different  from  that  in  the  more 
highly  industrialized  countries.  With  the  best 
intentions,  these  developing  states  very  often 
cannot  at  present  expect  to  meet  the  inter- 
national labour  standards  that  were  adopted 
by  the  ILO  when  most  members  of  the 
Organization  were  industrial  countries. 

"There  is  a  real  danger  that  the  adoption  of 
instruments  of  this  kind  may  serve  to  hinder 
rather  than  to  help  developing  countries,"  he 
warned. 

Continuing,  he  said:  "If  standard-setting  is 
to  be  continued  as  an  important  feature  of 
the  ILO  program,  then  it  should,  as  far  as 
possible,  be  done  with  a  maximum  of  flexi- 
bility through  the  development  of  Recom- 
mendations or  Resolutions  rather  than  Con- 
ventions. These  should  be  broadly  based  and 
concerned  with  statements  of  principle  on 
matters  to  which  all  member  states  can  give 
expression  appropriate  to  their  circumstances. 

"Future  instruments  should  avoid  substan- 
tive details,  the  implementation  of  which  re- 
quires a  level  of  economic  development  which 
a  large  number  of  member  states  have  yet 
to  attain.  In  the  same  vein,  consideration 
should  also  be  given  to  the  revision  or  elimi- 
nation of  existing  standards  that  are  no 
longer  meaningful  or  applicable." 

Turning  to  the  Director-General's  outline 
of  re-organization  and  changes  that  have  been 
made  in  the  Office  to  afford  greater  flexibility 
in  ILO  programming,  Mr.  Hallsworth  said 
there  had  been  considerable  examination  and 
debate  on  the  relevance  of  certain  features 
of  the  ILO  structure. 

"In  our  opinion  there  is  no  need  for  drastic 
changes  in  the  present  relationship  between 
the  Conference,  the  Governing  Body  and  the 
Office.  Canadian  employers  believe  that  ways 
and  means  can  be  found  within  the  existing 
framework  to  make  these  bodies  more  effec- 
tive and  more  efficient. 


THE  LABOUR   GAZETTE 

91938—4 


JULY    7965 


633 


"In  particular,  we  believe  that  changes  in 
the  role  of  the  Governing  Body,  as  suggested 
by  certain  delegates,  would  be  most  unwise. 
We  acree  with  the  Director-General  when  he 
said  that  only  a  strong  and  effective  Govern- 
ing Body  can  show  the  Conference  ways  of 
overcoming  disputes  which  otherwise  might 
persistently  divide  it." 

He  said  that  paramount  in  the  structure 
of  the  ILO  is  its  tripartite  character,  which 
gives  it  its  unique  status  and  power.  "It  is 
imperative  that  this  tripartite  feature  be  pre- 
served and  not  allowed  to  be  weakened  or 
undermined  by  those  who  d j  not  accept  that 
this  is  the  very  essence  and  foundation  of  the 
ILO. 

"The  tripartite  structure  is  an  acknowledg- 
ment of  the  existence  of  mutual  interests  and 
its  successful  operation  is  positive  proof  that 
the  aims  of  employers  and  workers  are  recon- 
cilable. Tripartism  loses  all  force  and  pur- 
pose if  employers  and  workers  are  not  abso- 
lutely free  and  unhampered  in  the  selection 
of  their  representatives  and  in  the  degree  of 
their  participation  in  the  affairs  of  the  ILO. 

"Sound  industrial  relations  can  only  de- 
velop in  a  harmonious  manner  between  re- 
sponsible organizations  which  are  independent 
of  each  other  and  of  their  governments.  If 
we  are  to  preserve  this  tripartism,  it  is  essen- 
tial that  workers  and  employers  constantly 
examine  the  role  of  governments  in  their 
affairs,"  Mr.  Hallsworth  concluded. 

Canadian  Worker  Delegate 

Speaking  on  the  Director-General's  report, 
Joseph  Morris,  Canadian  Worker  Delegate, 
said  discussions  this  year  should  prove  par- 
ticularly interesting  because  they  were  being 
held  during  the  International  Co-operation 
Year  (see  page  000)  and  "in  the  shadow  of 
a  serious  crises  in  the  United  Nations." 

The  International  Co-operation  Year  should 
represent  for  the  nations  of  the  world  an 
opportunity  "to  see  and  to  emphasize  that 
which  unites  rather  than  that  which  divides 
them,"  Mr.  Morris  said.  The  challenge  is 
clear  and  is  in  the  best  traditions  of  the 
ILO  "to  embark  on  a  mission  of  international 
solidarity  to  combat  the  common  enemies  of 
all  mankind." 

Mr.  Morris  continued:  "The  member  states 
should  take  serious  cognizance  of  the  appeal 
issued  by  the  Governing  Body  to  ratify, 
during  this  year,  the  international  labour 
Conventions  dealing  with  human  rights,  and 
especially  the  Conventions  that  are  aimed  at 
the  abolition  of  forced  labour,  discrimination 
in  employment  and  the  obstacles  to  the  free 
exercise  of  freedom  of  association  and  the 
right  to  organize." 

Neither  is  it  too  much  to  hope,  he  said, 
that  the  industrial  countries,  the  nations  that 
have  achieved  a  greater  degree  of  well-being 


and  development,  will  make  during  this  year 
greater  efforts  for  overseas  assistance  and 
co-operation,  and  will  devote  a  large  share  of 
their  national  income  to  further  and  enhance 
the  economic  development  of  those  parts  in 
the  world  where  hunger  and  want  are  still 
prevalent. 

We  should  also  remember  during  this  debate 
the  serious  political  and  financial  crisis  in  the 
United  Nations  itself.  Regardless  of  what  we 
may  think  of  the  constitutional  relationship 
governing  the  United  Nations,  the  ILO  and  the 
other  agencies,  it  is  quite  clear  that  the  under- 
mining of  the  prestige  and  authority  of  the 
United  Nations  is  bound  to  have  a  depressing 
effect  on  the  whole  United  Nations  family  of 
organizations,  including  the  International  La- 
bour Organization.   .  .   . 

It  is  important,  therefore,  more  than  ever 
at  this  time,  because  of  the  crisis  in  the  inter- 
national community,  to  safeguard  the  future 
of  the  International  Labour  Organization  so  that 
it,  too,  does  not  become  a  victim  of  misguided 
polices  and  intergovernmental  rivalries. 

For  the  millions  of  workers  throughout  the 
world,  Mr.  Morris  said,  there  is  too  much  at 
stake  in  the  continuing  existence  and  growth 
of  this  Organization  for  them  to  remain  in- 
different to  the  dangers  with  which  it  is  faced. 

Mr.  Morris  said  the  Canadian  trade  union 
movement  was  in  full  agreement  with  the 
Director-General  that  the  ILO  should  concen- 
trate on  the  elements  of  its  responsibilities 
that  are  central  to  its  mandate  and  should 
avoid  dispersion  of  energy  in  peripheral  ac- 
tivities. 

It  was  obvious,  he  said,  that  none  of  the 
ILO  objectives  can  be  fully  realized  in  a 
world  of  tension  and  international  conflict 
because  their  full  implementation  depended 
on  peace  and  disarmament  and  on  freedom 
for  all  people. 

Pointing  out  that  this  was  the  third  year 
of  debate  on  the  program  and  structure  of 
the  ILO,  Mr.  Morris  said  it  might  still  be 
important  to  stress  the  need  for  the  ILO  to 
have  a  clear  definition  of  its  own  field  of 
competency,  and  to  avoid  undertaking  action 
that  is  clearly  the  function  of  another  or- 
ganization. 

Turning  to  the  new  administrative  struc- 
ture introduced  by  the  Director-General,  Mr. 
Morris  said  it  should  be  given  a  chance  to 
prove  itself  in  practice. 

Because  the  ILO  is  the  only  tripartite  inter- 
governmental organization,  it  is  essential  that  it 
makes  full  use  of  this  unique  arrangement — 
something  which  may  not  have  been  fully  ex- 
ploited in  the  past. 

This  structure  is  undoubtedly  a  source  of  added 
administrative  difficulty  to  the  Director-General, 
but  it  could  also  become  a  tower  of  great 
strength  in  enhancing  the  authority  and  prestige 
of  the  Organization,  in  obtaining  support  and 
understanding  for  larger  financial  contributions, 
and  in  developing  a  pool  of  readily  available 
technical  experts. 


634 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      JULY   7965 


This  could  only  be  achieved,  he  continued, 
with  the  aid  of  more  adequate  administrative 
machinery,  and  by  giving  greater  standing 
and  prominence  within  the  ILO  structure  to 
internal  and  external  relations  with  the  work- 
ers' and  employers'  organizations. 

Some  think,  he  said,  that  manpower  and 
social  policy  in  industrialized  countries  should 
be  left  to  their  own  regional  agencies,  to 
organizations  like  the  European  Economic 
Community  or  the  Organization  for  Economic 
Co-operation  and  Development. 

We  disagree  with  this,  and  disagree  most  em- 
phatically. These  regional  organizations  are  not 
tripartite  in  structure,  are  not  based  on  uni- 
versal considerations,  have  no  direct  voice  of 
workers'  and  employers'  organizations — in  short 
they  are  strictly  governmental  agencies. 

It  would  be  a  mistake  for  the  ILO  to  abdicate 
its  traditional  role  in  the  industrialized  coun- 
tries and  become  a  mere  co-ordinator  of,  or 
adviser  to  regional  agencies.  It  would  be  a 
mistake  to  reduce  its  activities  in  the  indus- 
trialized countries  at  a  time  when  these  are 
faced  with  some  very  grave  problems  of  unem- 
ployment, adjustment  to  technological  change, 
determination  of  the  role  of  workers'  and  em- 
ployers' organizations  in  the  process  of  decision- 
making for  planned  economic  growth,  the  proper 
utilization  of  leisure  time,  and  the  problems  of 
the  young  and  of  the  old. 

Mr.  Morris  said  it  might  be  advisable  to 
find  room  within  the  new  structure  for  a 
special  branch  dealing  with  industrial  coun- 
tries, in  addition  to  the  three  regional 
branches,  for  Africa,  Asia  and  the  Middle 
East,  and  Latin  America.  The  word  "regional" 
should  not  become  synonymous  in  ILO  lan- 
guage with  "underdeveloped"  or  "developing". 

One  could  readily  understand  the  feeling 
of  frustration  resulting  from  the  lack  of  capi- 
tal for  investment  and  economic  growth, 
arising  in  many  countries  that  are  faced  with 
the  need  to  develop  their  resources  and  to 
industrialize,  he  said. 

We  cannot,  however,  accept  the  notion  that 
national  wealth  can  only  be  accumulated  as  a 
result  of  the  exploitation  of  those  who  work. 
Neither  can  we  agree  with  those  who  claim  that 
only  the  industrialized  countries  can  afford 
freedom  of  association,  the  right  to  organize  and 
to  form  free  trade  unions.  .  .  . 

It  would  run  counter  to  all  basic  human  con- 
siderations that  only  the  rich  nations  can  afford 
human  rights  while  the  poor  and  dispossessed 
are  denied  dignity  and  freedom. 

Mr.  Morris  said  he  was  disappointed  that 
in  the  chapter  of  the  Director-General's  re- 
port dealing  with  major  program  areas  hardly 
any  mention  was  made  of  the  need  for  an 
intensified  program  in  the  field  of  co-opera- 
tives. The  ILO,  he  asserted,  has  made  an 
unparalleled  contribution  to  the  world  co- 
operative movement.  It  was  largely  due  to 
its  initiative  and  efforts  from  the  earliest 
days  that  the  social  significance  of  the  special 
economic  role  of  co-operatives  had  been 
recognized  on  a  world  scale. 

It  is  the  opinion  of  our  people  in  Canada 
that  the  performance   of  the  ILO   in   this  field 


has  declined  in  the  past  several  years.  Wc  should 
aim  to  specialize  in  the  types  of  co-operatives 
that  are  especially  valuable  for  trade  union  mem- 
ben  and  urban  workers:  the  organizations  for 
consumer  goods,  housing,  consumer  credit,  in- 
surance and  small  industries.  This  should  remain 
the  sole  responsibility  of  the  ILO. 

It  is  essential  to  augment  and  strengthen 
the  ILO  staff  that  deals  with  co-operatives, 
and  to  bring  together  more  often  the  Panel 
of  Consultants  on  Co-operatives.  "The  ILO 
should  try  to  retain  its  reputation  of  relia- 
bility and  high  standards  of  performance, 
so  that  co-operatives  throughout  the  world 
would  look  toward  the  organization  for 
leadership  and  guidance  as  they  did  in  the 
early  days." 

Mr.  Morris  emphasized  that  the  ILO  must 
continue  in  its  historic  task  of  developing 
new  international  labour  standards  and  of 
modernizing  existing  ones.  The  time  was  now 
ripe,  he  thought,  for  the  Organization  to 
begin  paying  more  serious  attention  to  the 
protection  of  the  rights  of  civil  servants  and 
government  employees. 

"An  ever-growing  section  of  the  labour 
force  in  all  countries  now  works  for  govern- 
ments. Still,  no  meaningful  code  of  behaviour, 
no  recognized  national  standards  to  guide 
relations,  between  employers  and  employees 
in  this  field  have  yet  been  developed  by 
this  Organization,"  Mr.  Morris  said. 

Adviser  to   Government  Delegation 

"We  in  Canada  are  both  impressed  and 
encouraged  by  the  'new  look'  of  the  ILO," 
said  Ron  Basford,  M.P.,  Special  Adviser  to 
the  Government  delegation.  "It  is  essential 
for  this,  as  for  any  other  organization,  to 
examine  periodically  its  basic  objectives  and 
the  way  these  are  expressed  through  current 
policies  and  programs.  In  today's  rapidly 
changing  world  we  must  not  be  afraid  to  think 
along  new  lines.  New  programs  can  encourage 
us  to  be  more  creative  and  productive  in 
our  tasks." 

Mr.  Basford  was  substituting  in  the  debate 
for  Hon.  Allan  MacEachen,  Minister  of  La- 
bour, who  had  planned  to  attend  the  confer- 
ence but  was  unable  to  do  so. 

The  speaker  declared  that  one  evidence  of 
this  new  vitality  was  the  decision  to  start 
a  new  International  Centre  for  Advanced 
Technical  and  Vocational  Training  at  Turin, 
Italy.  It  was  Canada's  hope,  he  said,  that 
the  Centre  would  help  to  meet  the  need  for 
increased  technical  competence  in  the  work- 
ing force,  a  need  that  had  become  critical  in 
many  countries  facing  a  shortage  of  skilled 
manpower. 

Canada  was  attempting  to  meet  this  need 
by  substantially  expanding  technical  training 
facilities,  he  said,  but  had  found  it  difficult 
to  develop  training  programs  fast  enough  to 
match  the  expanding  demand  for  skilled 
workers. 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE 

91938— 41 


•      JULY   7965 


635 


The  shortage  of  skilled  manpower  brought 
on  by  rapid  advanees  in  technology  and 
economic  growth  had  become  a  major  inter- 
national problem-  affecting  most  industrialized 
or  developed  countries  as  well  as  developing 
countries,  he  continued. 

The  need  for  increasingly  complicated  skills 
and  the  effect  on  job  displacement  of  techno- 
logical change  were  problems  to  which  the 
ILO  must  devote  more  time  as  it  develops  its 
program  in  the  human  resources  field,  Mr. 
Basford    told    the   conference. 

The  key  role  which  manpower  policies  play 
in  the  whole  life  of  a  nation  cannot  be  over- 
d.  We  must  acknowledge  this  key  role 
and  become  more  and  more  imaginative  in 
developing  and  pursuing  active  manpower 
policies. 

As  people  vitally  concerned  with  this  whole 
problem,  we  must  realize  and  clearly  under- 
stand that  economic  growth  can  best  be  advanced 
by  a  working  force  which,  on  the  one  hand,  is 
fully  qualified  and.  on  the  other  hand,  benefits 
from  safe  and  agreeable  working  conditions  as 
well  as  from  a  fair  and  equitable  return  for  its 
labour. 

In  this  connection,  he  said,  Canada  had 
enacted  a  Canada  Labour  Standards  Act  and 
a  Canada  Pension  Plan.  "We  have  drawn 
heavily  on  the  collective  bargaining  experi- 
ence in  Canada  and  other  countries  in  de- 
veloping what  in  fact  is  a  comprehensive 
labour  standards  code." 

On  the  Canada  Pension  Plan  he  said: 
"We  regard  this  as  a  most  progressive  piece 
of  social  legislation  and  we  acknowledge  the 
helpfulness  of  the  experience  and  advice  of 
other  nations  and  of  the  ILO  itself  in  work- 
ing out  this  important  program." 

Turning  to  the  role  of  co-operatives,  Mr. 
Basford  said  Canada  had  profited  from  the 


co-operative  movement.  He  offered  some  prac- 
tical examples  and  lessons  where  co-operatives 
played  an  important  part:  in  agriculture, 
where  the  movement  had  reached  its  greatest 
development,  and  in  fisheries,  where  co- 
operatives are  making  important  contributions. 

The  co-operative  movement  in  Canada  is 
"essentially  a  movement  beginning  at  the 
grass  roots  among  groups  of  people,  with 
only  limited  government  participation.  .  .  . 
One  of  the  basic  co-operative  tenets  is  self- 
help.  State  assistance,  if  not  very  carefully 
controlled  and  administered,  can  easily  under- 
mine this  foundation  and  infringe  upon  the 
autonomy  of  the  movement.  .  .  . 

"As  a  supplement,  or  even  alternative, 
to  state  aid,  the  proposal  made  at  the  1961 
F.A.O.  Conference  to  provide  assistance 
through  the  facilities  of  a  world  co-operative 
bank  is,  I  think,  a  sound  consideration. 

"Through  an  organization  of  this  type  many 
of  the  special  needs  of  co-operatives  in  de- 
veloping countries  could  be  met.  Loans  made 
under  favourable  conditions  could  assist  in 
strengthening  the  agricultural  economy  gen- 
erally and  help  to  increase  food  production." 

These  are  basic  problems  facing  many 
countries  in  developing  their  primary  re- 
sources, he  pointed  out,  and  must  be  solved 
if  there  is  to  be  a  sound  economic  and  social 
structure. 

"It  is  this  challenge,  the  challenge  to 
increase  the  worth  of  a  people  or  a  nation, 
that  the  co-operative  movement  in  Canada 
and  across  the  world  must  meet.  I  hope  that 
our  Canadian  experience  will  provide  en- 
couragement and  provide  some  useful  lessons 
to  other  countries,"  he  concluded. 


162nd  Session,  ILO  Governing  Body 


Oumar  Baba  Diarra,  Secretary  of  State  for 
the  Civil  Service  and  Labour,  Mali,  has  been 
unanimously  elected  Chairman  of  the  Gov- 
erning Body  of  the  International  Labour 
Office  for  the  year  1965-1966.  Mr.  Diarra, 
the  first  African  to  preside  over  the  Govern- 
ing Body,  succeeds  George  V.  Haythorne, 
Canadian  Deputy  Minister  of  Labour. 

Employers'  Vice-President,  Pierre  Waline 
(France)  and  Workers'  Vice-President,  Jean 
Mori  (Switzerland)  were  both  re-elected. 

The  elections  took  place  in  June  during 
the  1 62nd  Session  of  the  Governing  Body,  the 
first  part  of  which  was  held  in  May  before 
the  49th  Session  of  the  International  Con- 
ference. 


During  the  earlier  part  of  its  session,  the 
Governing  Body  decided  that  the  Interna- 
tional Centre  for  Advanced  Technical  and 
Vocational  Training  established  by  the  ILO 
in  Turin  would  begin  operating  this  autumn. 
The  Governing  Body  had  authorized  the  ILO 
Director-General  to  start  the  work  of  the 
Centre  one  month  after  the  ratification  by  the 
Italian  Parliament  of  the  agreement  between 
the  ILO  and  the  Italian  Government  and  the 
receipt  of  the  voluntary  contribution  of  the 
Italian  Government  for  1965;  and  to  open 
the  Centre  at  least  three  months  after  the 
receipt  of  this  contribution.  The  agreement, 
which  had  already  been  approved  by  the 
Italian  Chamber  of  Deputies,  was  ratified 
by  the  Italian  Senate  on  June  22. 


636 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      JULY    7965 


TEAMWORK 
in   INDUSTRY 


The  responsibilities  and  goals  of  manage- 
ment and  labour  are  similar,  said  J.  W. 
Dodds,  general  manager  of  Alberta  Govern- 
ment Telephones,  speaking  to  some  100  dele- 
gates at  the  AGT  fourth  annual  labour- 
management  meeting  at  Banff,  Alta. 

Mr.  Dodds  said  that  labour  and  manage- 
ment not  only  had  many  similar  goals  but 
also  faced  many  similar  problems  in  attain- 
ing those  goals. 

He  noted  that  management's  three  main 
responsibilities  were  to  the  shareholders,  sub- 
scribers and  labour. 

The  company  could  give  its  employees  the 
best  possible  equipment  and  working  environ- 
ment for  top  efficiency,  but  "...  a  smooth 
working  relationship  .  .  .  must  function  be- 
tween .  .  .  management  and  the  mobilizing 
force  of  labour." 

Mr.  Dodds  stressed  that  the  employees' 
voice  was  their  union,  and  through  that  voice 
"management  should  be  able  to  get  the  feel- 
ings and  opinions  of  the  employees  and  act 
accordingly." 

He  described  labour's  goals  as  a  decent 
standard  of  living,  security  and  good  work- 
ing conditions. 

Looking  then  at  labour's  responsibilities, 
he  added  that  the  employees  were  the  ones 
responsible  for  good  relations  with  the  pub- 
lic— shareholders    and    subscribers. 

"Management  can  spend  thousands  of  dol- 
lars on  advertising  and  promotion  .  .  .  only 
to  see  it  all  nullified  by  a  repairman  walking 
across  a  newly-waxed  floor  in  nailed  boots. 

"You  are  the  ones  to  meet  the  customer 
face-to-face  .  .  .  and  it  is  your  attitude  that 
leaves  the  final  impression  of  the  system  on 
the  minds  of  the  public." 

He  added  that  though  management  shared 
many  of  labour's  goals,  it  must  also  accept 
the  added  responsibilities  of  planning  ahead, 
making  the  right  decisions,  accurately  pro- 
jecting growth  and  equipment  patterns. 

For  both  sides,  he  commented,  "our  pride 

in  our  work  is  one  of  the  main  factors  in 

establishing   what   is    commonly   called    'job 

satisfaction'." 

*  *  * 


When  Alex  Muscovitch  recently  retired 
from  the  CNR's  Transcona  shop  near  Winni- 
peg, Man.,  he  reversed  the  usual  order  and 
presented  the  company  with  a  certificate  of 
merit  for  the  CN's  high  standard  of  employer- 
employee  relations.  The  framed  award  was 
accompanied  by  a  special  book  to  be  signed 
by  all  retiring  shop  personnel  who  agree  with 
the  citation. 

*  *  * 

Dr.  John  Weinrich,  head  of  the  University 
of  Alberta's  department  of  economics,  has 
told  the  Alberta  Branch  of  the  Chartered 
Institute  of  Secretaries  that  employee  par- 
ticipation is  necessary  if  Canada's  economy 
is  to  grow. 

He  listed  three  phases  through  which  man- 
agement's philosophies  concerning  employee 
relations  have  travelled,  then  the  fourth  phase 
management  must  develop  to  stay  competitive. 

Dr.  Weinrich  said  these  three  concepts 
were:  man  was  another  machine;  man  and 
machines  were  alike  but  man  had  to  adapt 
to  machines;  man  was  considered  human  but 
needed  constant  motivation  because  he  was 
passive    and   dependent. 

He  maintained  that  these  three  concepts 
promoted  only  vertical  management  structure 
with  directive  management,  instead  of  a  more 
horizontal  structure  with  active  employee 
participation. 

"The  response  (of  the  workers)  is  best 
when  they  are  able  to  participate  in  decision- 
making on  matters  which  directly  affect 
them,"  he  noted. 

He  added  that  to  achieve  this,  manage- 
ment must  rearrange  its  thinking  to  encourage 
employees  to  develop  their  capacities  for  in- 
dependence and  decision-making,  and  to  in- 
crease their  knowledge  and  ability  to  perform. 


Against  a  13-year  background  of  on-the- 
job  harmony,  members  of  the  Allied  Con- 
struction Council  and  Ontario  Hydro  met 
earlier  this  year  to  extend  those  relations 
into  the  construction  of  a  $220,000,000  gen- 
erating station  at  Courtright. 

During  their  13-year  association  on  such 
projects  as  the  Niagara  River  Development 
and  St.  Lawrence  Power  project  there  has 
never  been  a  work  stoppage  on  the  job. 

"We  hope  to  bring  the  same  spirit  of  har- 
mony into  the  Sarnia  undertaking,"  said 
W.  H.  Barnes,  Hydro's  labour  relations 
director. 


Establishment  of  Labour-Management  Committees  is  encouraged  and  assisted  by  the 
Labour-Management  Co-operation  Service,  Industrial  Relations  Branch,  Department  of 
Labour.   In   addition   to   field   representatives   located   in   key   industrial    centres,    who   are 


available  to  help  both  managements  and  trade  unions, 
the  form  of  booklets,  posters  and  films. 


the  Service  provides  various  aids  in 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      JULY    7965 


637 


CERTIFICATION   AND  CONCILIATION 


Certification  and  Other  Proceedings  before 

the  Canada  Labour  Relations  Board 


The  Canada  Labour  Relations  Board  held 
two  one-day  meetings  during  May.  During 
the  month  the  Board  received  twelve  applica- 
tions for  certification,  two  applications  for 
revocation  of  certification,  and  one  request 
under  Section  61(2)  of  the  Act  for  review 
of  an  earlier  decision,  and  allowed  the  with- 
drawal of  one  application  for  certification. 

Applications  for  Certification  Received 

1.  General  Truck  Drivers  Union  Local  938 
of  the  International  Brotherhood  of  Team- 
sters, Chauffeurs,  Warehousemen  and  Helpers 
of  America,  on  behalf  of  a  unit  of  drivers 
employed  at  the  Rexdale  Ontario  terminal  of 
Lewis  Motorways  (Investigating  Officer: 
S.   Emmerson). 

2.  Seafarers'  International  Union  of 
Canada,  on  behalf  of  a  unit  of  unlicensed 
personnel  employed  aboard  SS  M.  J.  Boylen 
by  Canadian  General  Electric  Co.  Ltd.,  To- 
ronto, Ont.,  or  Engineering  Consultants  Lim- 
ited, Saint  John,  N.B.,  or  Brunswick  Mining 
and  Smelting  Corporation  Ltd.,  Dalhousie, 
N.B.  (Investigating  Officer:  H.  R.  Pettigrove). 

3.  Brotherhood  of  Railway  and  Steamship 
Clerks,  Freight  Handlers,  Express  and  Station 
Employees,  on  behalf  of  a  unit  of  foremen 
employed  by  the  National  Harbours  Board 
at  the  Port  of  Quebec  (Investigating  Officer: 
R.  L.  Fournier). 

4.  Seafarers'  International  Union  of  Can- 
ada, on  behalf  of  a  unit  of  unlicensed  per- 
sonnel employed  aboard  the  SS  Irving  Ours 
Polaire  by  Engineering  Consultants  Limited, 
or  Kent  Line  Limited,  or  Irving  Steamships 
Ltd.,  Saint  John,  N.B.  (Investigating  Officer: 
H.  R.  Pettigrove). 

5.  Transport  Drivers,  Warehousemen  and 
Helpers  Union  Local  106  of  the  International 
Brotherhood  of  Teamsters,  Chauffeurs,  Ware- 
housemen and  Helpers  of  America,  on  behalf 
of  a  unit  of  drivers,  helpers  and  warehouse- 
men, employed  by  Hubert  Transport  Inc., 
Ste.  Therese  de  Blainville,  Que.  (Investigat- 
ing Officer:   R.  L.  Fournier). 

6.  National  Association  of  Broadcast  Em- 
ployees and  Technicians,  on  behalf  of  a  unit 
of  employees  of  Tribune  Incorporated, 
CHLT-AM,  CHLT-FM,  CHLT-TV,  Sher- 
brooke  Telegram  Printing  and  Publishing 
Company  CKTS  Station,  Sherbrooke,  Que. 
(Investigating  Officer:   R.  L.  Fournier). 


7.  International  Union  of  District  50, 
United  Mine  Workers  of  America  Local 
Union  13946,  on  behalf  of  a  unit  of  long- 
shoremen employed  by  Clarke  Traffic  Serv- 
ices Ltd.  (Newfoundland  Steamships  (1965) 
Limited  (Terra  Nova  Steamship  Co.  Ltd.), 
St.  John's  Nfld.  (Investigating  Officer:  R.  L. 
Fournier). 

8.  Canadian  Maritime  Union,  on  behalf  of 
a  unit  of  unlicensed  personnel  employed 
aboard  the  SS  Texaco  Warrior  by  SS  Texaco 
Warrior  Ltd.,  Montreal,  Que.  (Investigating 
Officer:  S.  Emmerson). 

9.  Transportation-Communication  Employ- 
ees Union,  System  Division  No.  7,  on  behalf 
of  a  unit  of  employees  of  Canadian  Pacific 
Air  Lines,  Limited,  Vancouver,  B.C.  (Investi- 
gating Officer:  J.  D.  Meredith). 

10.  Association  of  the  Employees  of  Ver- 
reault  Navigation  C.F.I.A.,  on  behalf  of  a 
unit  of  unlicensed  personnel  employed  by 
Verreault  Navigation  Inc.,  Les  Mechins,  Que. 
(Investigating  Officer:  R.  L.  Fournier). 

11.  National  Association  of  Broadcast  Em- 
ployees and  Technicians,  on  behalf  of  a  unit 
of  employees  of  La  Tribune  Inc.,  Sherbrooke, 
Que.  (Investigating  Officer:  R.  L.  Fournier). 

12.  National  Association  of  Broadcast  Em- 
ployees and  Technicians,  on  behalf  of  a  unit 
of  employees  of  Telegram  Printing  and  Pub- 
lishing Co.  Ltd.,  Sherbrooke,  Que.  (Investi- 
gating Officer:   R.  L.  Fournier). 

Applications  for  Revocation  Received 

1.  Colonial  Broadcasting  System  Limited, 
St.  John's,  Nfld.,  applicant,  and  the  National 
Association  of  Broadcast  Employees  and 
Technicians,  respondent.  The  application  was 
for  the  revocation  of  the  certification  issued 
by  the  Board  on  January  30,  1964,  to  the 
respondent  union  in  respect  of  a  unit  of 
employees  of  the  applicant  company  (L.G., 
Mar.   1964,  p.  213). 

2.  Alfred  J.  K.  Penz,  et  al,  applicants, 
British  Columbia  Television  Broadcasting 
System  Ltd.  (formerly  Vantel  Broadcasting 
Co.  Ltd.),  respondent,  and  International  Al- 
liance of  Theatrical  Stage  Employees  and 
Moving  Picture  Machine  Operators  of  the 
United  States  and  Canada,  respondent.  The 
application  was  for  the  revocation  of  the 
certification  issued  by  the  Board  on  June  8, 


This  section  covers  proceedings  under  the  Industrial  Relations  and  Disputes  Investi- 
gation Act,  involving  the  administrative  services  of  the  Minister  of  Labour,  the  Canada 
Labour  Relations  Board,  and  the  Industrial  Relations  Branch  of  the  Department. 


638 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      JULY   1965 


1961,  to  the  respondent  union  in  respect  of 
a  unit  of  program  and  production  employees 
of  the  respondent  company  (L.G.  1961,  p. 
794). 

Request  for  Review  under  Section  61(2) 

Request  by  the  National  Syndicate  of  Long- 
shoremen of  Ha!  Ha!  Bay,  for  review  of  the 
certificate  issued  to  it  by  the  Board  on  June 


23,  1955,  in  respect  of  a  unit  of  longshoremen 
employed  by  Saguenay  Terminals  Limited, 
Port  Alfred,  Que.  (L.G.  1955,  p.  946). 

Application   for   Certification  Withdrawn 

Seafarers'  International  Union  of  Canada, 
applicant,  and  Engineering  Consultant  Lim- 
ited, Saint  John,  N.B.,  respondent  (L.G., 
May,  p.  423). 


Conciliation  and  Other  Proceedings 

before  the  Minister  of  Labour 


Conciliation  Officers  Appointed 

During  May,  the  Minister  of  Labour  ap- 
pointed conciliation  officers  to  deal  with  the 
following  disputes: 

1.  Hamilton  Terminal  Operators  Limited, 
Hamilton,  Ont.,  and  Local  1879  of  the  Inter- 
national Longshoremen's  Association  (Concili- 
ation Officer:  T.  B.  McRae). 

2.  National  Harbours  Board,  Prescott,  Ont, 
and  the  Civil  Service  Association  of  Canada 
(Conciliation  Officer:  T.  B.  McRae). 

3.  Atomic  Energy  of  Canada  Limited 
(Whiteshell  Nuclear  Research  Establishment) 
Pinawa,  Man.,  and  the  International  Asso- 
ciation of   Machinists   (Conciliation  Officer: 

C.  Arthur  Frey). 

4.  Zenith  Transport  Ltd.,  North  Burnaby, 
B.C.,  and  Local  31  of  the  International 
Brotherhood  of  Teamsters,  Chauffeurs,  Ware- 
housemen and  Helpers  of  America  (Concili- 
ation Officer:  J.  D.  Meredith). 

5.  The  British  Yukon  Navigation  Com- 
pany Limited,  North  Vancouver,  B.C.,  and 
Local  400  of  the  Canadian  Brotherhood  of 
Railway,  Transport  and  General  Workers 
(unlicensed  personnel)   (Conciliation  Officer: 

D.  S.  Tysoe). 

6.  Westward  Shipping  Ltd.,  Vancouver, 
B.C.,  and  Local  400  of  the  Canadian  Brother- 
hood of  Railway,  Transport  and  General 
Workers  (unlicensed  personnel)  (Conciliation 
Officer:  D.  S.  Tysoe). 

7.  The  British  Yukon  Navigation  Company 
Limited,  North  Vancouver,  B.C.,  and  Cana- 
dian Merchant  Service  Guild,  Inc.  and  Local 
425  of  the  Canadian  Brotherhood  of  Railway, 
Transport  and  General  Workers  (licensed 
personnel)  (Conciliation  Officer:  D.  S. 
Tysoe). 

8.  Westward  Shipping  Ltd.,  Vancouver, 
B.C.,  and  Canadian  Merchant  Service  Guild, 
Inc.,  and  Local  425  of  the  Canadian  Brother- 
hood of  Railway,  Transport  and  General 
Workers  (licensed  personnel)  (Conciliation 
Officer:  D.  S.  Tysoe). 


Settlements  by  Conciliation  Officers 

1.  Boyles  Bros.  Drilling  (Alberta)  Limited, 
Edmonton  (Yellowknife  Branch),  and  West- 
ern District  Diamond  Driller's  Union,  Local 
1005  of  the  International  Union  of  Mine, 
Mill  and  Smelter  Workers  (Canada)  (Con- 
ciliation Officer:  D.  S.  Tysoe)  (L.G.,  June, 
p.  525). 

2.  Cargill  Grain  Company  Limited,  Baie 
Comeau,  Que.,  and  Local  977,  International 
Brotherhood  of  Pulp,  Sulphite  and  Paper 
Mill  Workers  (Conciliation  Officer:  R.  L. 
Fournier)    (L.G.,  May,  p.  425). 

3.  Canadian  Arsenals  Limited  (Small  Arms 
Division)  Long  Branch,  Ont.,  and  Canadian 
Guards  Association  (Conciliation  Officer: 
T.  B.  McRae)   (L.G.,  May,  p.  425). 

4.  Los  Angeles-Seattle  Motor  Express  Inc., 
Burnaby,  B.C.  Terminal,  and  Local  31  of  the 
International  Brotherhood  of  Teamsters, 
Chauffeurs,  Warehousemen  and  Helpers  of 
America  (Conciliation  Officer:  D.  S.  Tysoe) 
(L.G.,  March,  p.  251). 

5.  Soo-Security  Motorways  Ltd.,  North 
Burnaby,  B.C.,  and  Local  31  of  the  Inter- 
national Brotherhood  of  Teamsters,  Chauf- 
feurs, Warehousemen  and  Helpers  of  America 
(Conciliation  Officer:  D.  S.  Tysoe)  (L.G., 
March,  p.  251). 

6.  Gill  Interprovincial  Lines  Ltd.,  North 
Burnaby,  B.C.  Terminal,  and  Local  31  of  the 
International  Brotherhood  of  Teamsters, 
Chauffeurs,  Warehousemen  and  Helpers  of 
America  (Conciliation  Officer:  D.  S.  Tysoe) 
(L.G.,  March,  p.  251). 

7.  Reid's  Moving  and  Storage  Co.  Ltd., 
Vancouver,  B.C.,  and  Local  31  of  the  Inter- 
national Brotherhood  of  Teamsters,  Chauf- 
feurs, Warehousemen  and  Helpers  of  America 
(Conciliation  Officer:  D.  S.  Tysoe)  (L.G., 
March,  p.  251). 

8.  The  Bell  Telephone  Company  of  Can- 
ada, Directory  Sales  Department,  Eastern 
Region,  Montreal,  and  Local  57  of  the  Office 
Employees'  International  Union  (Conciliation 
Officer:  C.  E.  Poirier)   (L.G.,  June,  p.  525). 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      JULY   1965 


639 


Conciliation  Boards  Appointed  the  other  two  members  of  the  Board,  David 

1.  TransAir  Limited,  Winnipeg  Interna-  h  G'  J°"es>  Q-c-  of  Hamilton  and  Murray 
tional  Airport,  and  Canadian  Air  Line  Flight  Tate  °f  Toronto,  who  were  previously  ap- 
pendants' Association  (L.G.,  April,  p.  342).  Pomted.  on  the  nomination  of  the  company 

-    ^        i           v,  ,■       ,      tt  .  i       t  •    •♦  a  antl  union,  respectively. 

2.  Canadian      National      Hotels      Limited 

(Chateau  Laurier  Hotel,  Ottawa)  and  Cana-  2-  The  Board  of  Conciliation  and  Investi- 

dian  Brotherhood  of  Railway,  Transport  and  Ration   established   m  April  to   deal   with   a 

General  Workers  (L.G.,  May,  p.  425).  dlsPute   between   National   Harbours   Board, 

Port  of  Montreal,  and  National  Syndicate  of 

Conciliation   Boards   Fully   Constituted  Employees  of  the  Port  of  Montreal  (CNTU) 

1.  The  Board  of  Conciliation  and  Investi-  £-°-  June   p.  526)  was  fully  constituted  in 

gation   established   in   April   to   deal   with   a  ^ay   with    he   appointment  of  His  Honour 

dispute  between  Liquid  Cargo  Lines  Limited,  Jl,d8e    Paul    Hurteau    of    Montreal.    Judge 

Clarkson.  Ont,  and  Local  938  of  the  Inter-  Hurteau  was   appointed  by   the  Minister  in 

national   Brotherhood   of  Teamsters,   Chauf-  the  absence  of  a  joint  recommendation  from 

feurs,  Warehousemen  and  Helpers  of  America  the  other  two  members  of  the  Board,  M.  A. 

(L.G.,   June,   p.    526)    was  fully   constituted  Harrison   of   Ottawa    and   Robert   Sauve   of 

in    May    with    the    appointment    of    T.    C.  Montreal,  who  were  previously  appointed  on 

O'Connor    of    Toronto    as    Chairman.    Mr.  the  nomination  of  the  company  and  union, 

O'Connor  was  appointed  by  the  Minister  in  respectively. 

the  absence  of  a  joint  recommendation  from  (Continued  on  page  664) 


Scope  and  Administration  of  Industrial  Relations  and  Disputes  Investigation  Act 

Conciliation  services  under  the  Industrial  Relations  and  Disputes  Investigation  Act 
are  provided  by  the  Minister  of  Labour  through  the  Industrial  Relations  Branch.  The 
branch  also  acts  as  the  administrative  arm  of  the  Canada  Labour  Relations  Board  in 
matters  under  the  Act  involving  the  board. 

The  Industrial  Relations  and  Disputes  Investigation  Act  came  into  force  on  September 
1,  1948.  It  revoked  the  Wartime  Labour  Relations  Regulations,  P.C.  1003,  which  became 
effective  in  March,  1944,  and  repealed  the  Industrial  Disputes  Investigation  Act,  which 
had  been  in  force  from  1907  until  superseded  by  the  Wartime  Regulations  in  1944. 
Decisions,  orders  and  certificates  given  under  the  Wartime  Regulations  by  the  Minister 
of  Labour  and  the  Wartime  Labour  Relations  Board  are  continued  in  force  and  effect  by 
the  Act. 

The  Act  applies  to  industries  within  federal  jurisdiction,  i.e.,  navigation,  shipping, 
interprovincial  railways,  canals,  telegraphs,  interprovincial  and  international  steamship  lines 
and  ferries,  aerodromes  and  air  transportation,  radio  broadcasting  stations  and  works 
declared  by  Parliament  to  be  for  the  general  advantage  of  Canada  or  two  or  more  of 
its  provinces.  Additionally,  the  Act  provides  that  provincial  authorities,  if  they  so  desire,  may 
enact  similar  legislation  for  application  to  industries  within  provincial  jurisdiction  and 
make  mutually  satisfactory  arrangements  with  the  federal  Government  for  the  administra- 
tion of  such  legislation. 

The  Minister  of  Labour  is  charged  with  the  administration  of  the  Act  and  is  directly 
responsible  for  the  appointment  of  conciliation  officers,  conciliation  boards,  and  Industrial 
Inquiry  Commissions  concerning  complaints  that  the  Act  has  been  violated  or  that  a  party 
has  failed  to  bargain  collectively,  and  for  controlling  applications  for  consent  to  prosecute. 

The  Canada  Labour  Relations  Board  is  established  under  the  Act  as  successor  to 
the  Wartime  Labour  Relations  Board  to  administer  provisions  concerning  the  certification 
of  bargaining  agents;  the  writing  of  provisions — for  incorporation  into  collective  agree- 
ments— that  fix  a  procedure  for  the  final  settlement  of  disputes  concerning  the  meaning 
or  violation  of  such  agreements;  and  the  investigation  of  complaints  referred  to  it  by  the 
minister  that  a  party  has  failed  to  bargain  collectively  and  to  make  every  reasonable  effort 
to  conclude  a  collective  agreement. 

Copies  of  the  Industrial  Relations  and  Disputes  Investigation  Act,  the  Regulations 
made  under  the  Act,  and  the  Rules  of  Procedure  of  the  Canada  Labour  Relations  Board 
are  available  upon  request  to  the  Department  of  Labour,  Ottawa. 

Proceedings  under  the  Industrial  Relations  and  Disputes  Investigation  Act  are 
reported  here  under  two  headings:  (1)  Certification  and  other  Proceedings  before  the 
Canada  Labour  Relations  Board  and  (2)  Conciliation  and  other  Proceedings  before  the 
Minister  of  Labour. 

Industrial  Relations  Officers  of  the  Department  of  Labour  are  stationed  at  Vancouver, 
Winnipeg,  Toronto,  Ottawa,  Montreal,  Fredericton,  Halifax  and  St.  John's,  Newfoundland. 
The  territory  of  four  officers  resident  in  Vancouver  comprises  British  Columbia,  Alberta 
and  the  Yukon  and  Northwest  Territories;  two  officers  stationed  in  Winnipeg  cover  the 
provinces  of  Saskatchewan  and  Manitoba  and  Northwestern  Ontario;  four  officers  resident 
in  Toronto  confine  their  activities  to  Ontario;  five  officers  in  Montreal  are  assigned  to  the 
province  of  Quebec,  and  a  total  of  three  officers  resident  in  Fredericton,  Halifax  and  St. 
John's  represent  the  Department  in  the  Maritime  Provinces  and  Newfoundland.  The 
headquarters  of  the  Industrial  Relations  Branch  and  the  Director  of  Industrial  Relations 
and  staff  are  situated  in  Ottawa. 

640  THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      JULY    1965 


LABOUR   LAW 


Legal  Decisions  Affecting  Labour 


Supreme  Court  of  Canada  refuses  leave  to  appeal  ruling  that 
provincial  labour  legislation  covers  Dorval  Airport  porters 
Saskatchewan  appeal  court  dismisses  application  for  mandamus 
and   upholds   order   of   the   provincial   Labour   Relations   Board 


The  Supreme  Court  of  Canada,  by  refus- 
ing leave  to  appeal  to  the  Supreme  Court  of 
Canada  from  the  judgment  of  the  Quebec 
Court  of  Queen's  Bench  (Appeal  Side),  up- 
held the  decision  of  that  Court  that  porters 
at  the  Dorval  Airport,  being  employees  of 
a  Montreal  limousine  service,  are  under  pro- 
vincial jurisdiction  and  subject  to  the  Que- 
bec Minimum  Wage  Act. 

In  Saskatchewan,  the  Court  of  Appeal  held 
that  the  Labour  Relations  Board,  in  ordering 
a  representation  vote  under  S.  6(1)  of  the 
Saskatchewan  Trade  Union  Act,  acted  within 
its  discretionary  powers  and  therefore  such 
order  could  not  be  questioned  in  mandamus 
proceedings. 

Supreme  Court  of  Canada  .  .  . 

.  .  .  upholds  ruling  that  porters  at  Dorval  Air- 
port are  under  Quebec  Minimum  Wage  Act 

On  May  18,  1965,  the  Supreme  Court 
of  Canada,  in  rejecting  a  motion  presented 
by  Murray  Hill  Limousine  Service  Ltd.  to 
grant  leave  to  appeal  to  the  Supreme  Court 
of  Canada,  upheld  the  judgment  of  the  Court 
of  Queen's  Bench  (Appeal  Side)  to  the  effect 
that  the  porters  at  the  Dorval  Airport  are 
under  provincial  jurisdiction  and  subject  to 
the  Quebec  Minimum  Wage  Act. 

Murray  Hill  Limousine  Service  Ltd.  has 
been  operating  a  transportation  service  for 
the  passengers  between  Dorval  Airport  and 
Montreal.  The  company  provided  also,  as  a 
distinctive  and  separate  service  under  a  con- 
tract signed  with  the  airlines  operating  from 
Dorval  Airport,  the  services  of  porters.  The 
company  was  sued  by  17  porters  under  the 
Quebec  Minimum  Wage  Act  for  differences 
in  wages  allegedly  due  to  them  under  the 
Minimum  Wage  Commission  Ordinance  No. 
4  as  amended.  The  individual  claims 
amounted  to  a  total  of  $11,046.83. 

The  company  contested  the  action  on  the 
ground  that  there  was  lack  of  evidence  re- 
garding an  estimate  of  hours  of  work  per- 
formed by  the  porters;  the  porters  were  ex- 
empted from  the  application  of  Ordinance 
No.  4  because  the  company  exercised  no 
control  over  their  work  and  their  time  and 


because  they  worked  outside  the  company's 
establishment;  and  finally,  the  porters,  being 
exclusively  engaged  in  giving  porter  service  to 
airline  passengers  and  personnel  at  the  Mont- 
real International  Airport,  were  all  engaged 
in  an  undertaking  or  work  forming  an  inte- 
gral part  of  and  necessarily  incidental  to 
the  effective  operations  of  aerodromes  and 
air  transportation,  and  thus  were  under  ex- 
clusive federal  jurisdiction  and  not  subject 
in  the  performance  of  their  duties  to  the 
provisions  of  the  Minimum  Wage  Act  of  the 
Province  of  Quebec  or  to  the  Ordinances 
enacted  thereunder. 

The  action  was  maintained  on  December 
13,  1962  by  Mr.  Justice  St.  Germain  of  the 
Quebec  Superior  Court,  who  upheld  the  por- 
ters' claims  under  the  Quebec  legislation  to 
the  amount  of  $10,243.69.  The  trial  judge 
rejected  the  first  two  grounds  of  the  com- 
pany's defence.  But  he  did  not  consider  the 
company's  defence  based  on  the  contention 
that  the  porters  were  under  exclusive  federal 
jurisdiction,  because,  contrary  to  Article  114 
of  the  Code  of  Civil  Procedure,  the  company 
pleaded  the  unconstitutionality  of  the  Mini- 
mum Wage  Act  before  sending  notice  to  the 
Attorney  General  of  the  Province  of  Quebec. 

On  appeal,  the  judgment  of  the  Superior 
Court  was  affirmed  on  February  9,  1965  by 
a  majority  decision  of  the  Quebec  Court  of 
Queen's  Bench  (Appeal  Side).  The  Appeal 
Court  did  consider  the  company's  contention 
that  the  porters  were  under  federal  jurisdic- 
tion and  that  the  Quebec  Minimum  Wage 
Act  did  not  apply.  This  contention  was  re- 
jected by  the  majority  of  judges  (with  Mr. 
Justice  Rinfret  dissenting). 

Mr.  Justice  Taschereau,  in  his  reasons  for 
judgment,  stated  that  air  transportation  is 
under  exclusive  federal  jurisdiction,  as  it  was 
decided  by  the  Privy  Council  in  the  Aero- 
nautics case  (1932)  A.C.  54  and  by  the 
Supreme  Court  of  Canada  in  Johannesson  et 
al  v.  West  St.  Paul  (1932),  1  S.C.R.  292. 

The  question  before  the  Court  of  Appeal 
to  decide  was  whether  the  work  of  the  porters 
and  the  air  transportation  constituted  one  and 
the  same  operation  or  two  distinct  enterprises. 


This  section,  prepared  by  the  Legislation  Branch,  reviews  labour  laws  as  they  are 
enacted  by  Parliament  and  the  provincial  legislatures,  regulations  under  these  laws,  and 
selected  court  decisions  affecting  labour. 


THE  LABOUR   GAZETTE      •      JULY    7965 


641 


After  examining  the  evidence  with  reference 
to  the  nature  of  service  rendered  by  the 
porters,  Mr.  Justice  Taschereau  concluded 
that  the  porters  neither  embarked  the  planes 
to  deposit  the  luggage  inside  the  planes  nor 
embarked  the  planes  to  bring  the  luggage  out 
of  the  planes.  That  work  was  done  by  other 
persons. 

Further,  Mr.  Justice  Taschereau  noted  that 
the  passenger,  when  buying  his  aircraft  ticket, 
has  the  right  to  require  the  air  transport 
company  to  place  his  luggage  in  the  airplane 
and  bring  it  out  of  the  plane  on  arrival  at 
a  destination.  The  obligations  of  the  air  trans- 
port company  stop,  on  arrival,  at  the  moment 
when  the  luggage  has  been  deposited  in  the 
custom  office  or  the  cloak-room.  The  pas- 
senger has  to  claim  his  luggage  at  the  custom 
office  or  at  the  cloak-room  and  carry  it  him- 
self or  obtain,  for  this  purpose,  the  services 
of  a  porter. 

The  Privy  Council  gave  an  opinion  on  this 
matter  in  a  case  very  similar  to  the  situation 
at  bar,  namely,  Canadian  Pacific  Railway 
Company  and  A.G.  for  British  Columbia 
and  A.G.  for  Canada  (1950)  A.C.  122, 
(L.G.  1950,  p.  217)  where  the  following  facts 
were  related: 

The  appellant,  the  Canadian  Pacific  Ry.  Co., 
which  owned  and  managed  the  Empress  Hotel 
in  Victoria,  British  Columbia,  while  not  denying 
that  the  regulation  of  hours  of  work  was  ordi- 
narily a  matter  of  "property  and  civil  rights 
in  the  province"  under  head  13  of  S.  92  of  the 
British  North  America  Act,  1867,  and  accord- 
ingly within  the  legislative  competence  of  the 
provincial  legislature,  contended,  inter  alia,  that 
the  company's  activities  had  become  such  an 
extensive  and  important  element  in  the  national 
economy  of  Canada  that  the  Dominion  Parlia- 
ment was  entitled  "under  the  general  powers 
conferred  by  the  first  part  of  s.  91  of  the  Act 
of  1867  to  regulate  all  the  affairs  of  the  com- 
pany, even  where  that  involved  legislating  in 
relation  to  matters  exclusively  reserved  to  the 
provincial  legislatures  by  s.  92. 

Lord  Reid,  who  rendered  the  judgment  of 
the  Privy  Council,  stated  (p.  144):  ".  .  .  It 
may  be  that  the  appellant's  railway  business 
and  hotel  business  help  each  other,  but  that 
does  not  prevent  them  from  being  separate 
businesses  or  undertakings."  And  (p.  148): 

As  their  Lordships  hold  that  the  general  power 
conferred  on  the  Parliament  of  Canada  by  the 
first  part  of  S.  91  does  not  apply  in  this  case 
and  that  this  hotel  does  not  come  within  the 
scope  of  either  head  10(a)  or  head  10  (c)  of 
s.  92  it  follows  that  regulation  of  the  hours  of 
work  of  those  employed  in  this  hotel  is  within 
the  exclusive  legislative  authority  of  the  legis- 
lature of  the  province  of  British  Columbia  and 
that  the  question  in  the  order  of  reference 
was  rightly  answered  in  the  affirmative  by  the 
Canadian   courts. 

In  the  case  at  bar,  Mr.  Justice  Taschereau, 
following  the  reasons  stated  by  Lord  Reid, 
concluded  that  the  services  performed  by 
the  employees  (porters)  of  Murray  Hill  Co., 


however  useful  these  services  might  be  for 
the  air  lines  and  passengers,  do  not  form  an 
integral  part  of  aerial  transportation  any 
more  than  the  restaurants,  newspaper  kiosks, 
hairdressers  and  the  bars  installed  in  all 
big  airports  for  the  comfort  and  advantage 
of  the  passengers.  Consequently,  in  his  opin- 
ion, the  work  of  the  porters  comes  under 
provincial  jurisdiction  and  under  the  Ordi- 
nances issued  by  the  Minimum  Wage  Com- 
mission. 

Mr.  Justice  Montgomery,  in  his  reasons 
for  judgment,  noted  that  the  only  question 
that  gave  him  any  difficulty  was  whether 
the  work  performed  by  the  porters  was  re- 
lated closely  enough  to  aeronautics  to  bring 
them  outside  the  scope  of  the  labour  legisla- 
tion of  the  Province  of  Quebec,  particularly 
the  Minimum  Wage  Act. 

He  stated  that  it  was  conceded  that  the 
men  who  actually  load  and  unload  Travel- 
lers' baggage  in  the  aircraft  are  performing 
work  outside  provincial  jurisdiction,  their 
position  being  analogous  to  that  of  the  steve- 
dores considered  by  the  Supreme  Court  in  the 
reference  re  Validity  and  Applicability  of  the 
Industrial  Relations  and  Disputes  Investiga- 
tion Act,  1955  S.C.R.  529  (L.G.  1955,  p. 
952). 

Also,  it  seemed  to  be  conceded  that  the 
company's  employees  who  drive  buses  and 
taxis  between  the  airport  and  the  city  are 
subject  to  provincial  legislation. 

The  porters  in  question  form  a  connecting 
link  between  these  two  groups  of  employees, 
and  it  is  a  matter  of  some  difficulty  to  de- 
termine on  which  side  of  the  line  their  work 
falls. 

Further,  Mr.  Justice  Montgomery  noted 
that  the  porters  were  not  employed  by  the 
airlines  but  by  Murray  Hill  Limousine  Serv- 
ice Ltd.,  the  principal  business  of  which  is 
the  operation  of  buses  and  taxis.  In  the  course 
of  their  duties,  the  porters  had  no  direct 
contact  with  aircraft.  Their  services  were  not 
provided  for  the  passengers  by  the  airlines 
as  one  of  the  services  incidental  to  the 
purchase  of  a  ticket;  the  passenger  engaged 
these  services  at  his  own  discretion,  being 
free  to  carry  his  baggage  himself  if  he  wished 
or  have  it  carried  by  a  friend.  Mr.  Justice 
Montgomery  did  not  regard  any  of  these 
factors  as  being,  in  themselves,  conclusive; 
but  taken  together  they  satisfied  him  that  the 
services  rendered  by  the  porters  did  not  relate 
to  aeronautics  sufficiently  closely  to  bring 
them    outside    provincial   jurisdiction. 

Following  the  judgment  of  the  Court  of 
Appeal,  Murray  Hill  Limousine  Service  Ltd. 
applied  to  the  Supreme  Court  of  Canada  for 
leave  to  appeal  to  the  Supreme  Court  of 
Canada.  On  May  18,   1965,  the  application 


642 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE     •      JULY   7965 


for  leave  was  dismissed  by  the  Supreme 
Court  of  Canada.  Murray  Hill  Limousine 
Service  Limited  and  Sinclair  Batson  et  al., 
Supreme  Court  of  Canada,  May  18,  1965 
(unreported). 

Saskatchewan  Court  of  Appeal  .  .  . 

.  .  .  rules  that  Labour  Relations  Board's  order 
for  vote  cannot  be  challenged  on  mandamus 

On  April  22,  1965,  the  Saskatchewan  Court 
of  Appeal  dismissed  an  appeal  from  the  rul- 
ing of  Mr.  Justice  MacPherson  of  the  Sas- 
katchewan Queen's  Bench  Court  and  held 
that,  in  ordering  a  representation  vote,  the 
Labour  Relations  Board  had  exercised  its  dis- 
cretionary power  under  Section  6(1)  of  the 
Saskatchewan  Trade  Union  Act  and  therefore 
such  decision  is  not  the  subject  of  mandamus. 

Construction  and  General  Labourers'  Local 
Union  No.  890  applied  to  the  Saskatchewan 
Labour  Relations  Board  for  an  order  deter- 
mining that  the  unit  of  employees  of  Cavill 
Cartage  described  in  the  application  was  an 
appropriate  unit  of  employees  for  the  pur- 
pose of  bargaining  collectively;  and  that  the 
applicant  trade  union  represented  a  majority 
of  the  employees  in  the  said  unit;  and  requir- 
ing the  employer  to  bargain  collectively.  In 
support  of  the  application,  the  union  filed  the 
statement  of  employment  showing  four  per- 
sons to  be  employed  by  the  employer,  and 
applications  for  membership  in  the  union 
and  dues  deduction  authorizations  by  four 
employees. 

After  hearing  oral  representations  on  Aug- 
ust 24,  1964,  made  by  the  representatives 
of  the  union  and  of  the  employer,  and  hav- 
ing examined  the  applications  for  member- 
ship and  dues  deduction  authorizations  and 
a  statement  of  employment,  the  Board  issued 
the  order,  the  relevant  parts  of  which  read 
as  follows: 

.  .  .  The  Labour  Relations  Board  hereby 
finds  and  determines  that  all  employees  em- 
ployed by  Stanley  Cavill,  carrying  on  a  business 
under  the  firm  name  and  style  of  Cavill  Cartage 
in  the  City  of  Saskatoon,  Saskatchewan,  and 
the  said  Cavill  Cartage,  except  the  office  staff 
and  those  regularly  employed  in  a  confidential 
capacity,  constitute  an  appropriate  unit  of  em- 
ployees for  the  purpose  of  bargaining  collec- 
tively; .  .  . 

The  Labour  Relations  Board  hereby  directs 
that  a  vote  by  secret  ballot  be  conducted 
among  all  employees  who  are  within  the  bargain- 
ing unit  herein  determined  to  be  appropriate 
for  the  purpose  of  bargaining  collectively,  and 
who  were  employed  within  the  said  unit  as  of 
August  11,  1964,  and  who  are  still  employed 
within  the  said  unit  as  of  the  date  of  voting, 
to  determine  whether  or  not  the  said  employees 
wish  to  be  represented  by  the  Construction  and 
General  Laborers'  Local  Union  No.  890,  for  the 
purpose  of  bargaining  collectively  with  their 
Employer;   .   .    . 


The  union  then  made  application  to  the 
Court  of  Queen's  Bench  for  a  writ  of  manda- 
mus, contending  that  Section  5  of  the  Trade 
Union  Act  puts  upon  the  Board  a  duty  to 
exercise  the  powers  therein  granted  when 
called  upon  to  do  so.  The  union  claimed  that 
it  produced  before  the  Board  evidence  that 
it  represented  a  majority  of  the  employees 
in  the  appropriate  bargaining  unit  and  there- 
fore the  Board  declined  jurisdiction  by  fail- 
ing to  exercise  the  duty  imposed  upon  it  by 
subsections  (b)  and  (c)  of  Section  5  of  the 
Act  in  respect  of  an  application  for  certifica- 
tion. 

Further,  the  union  asked  for  a  writ  of 
certiorari  to  quash  the  order  of  the  Labour 
Relations  Board  directing  a  representation 
vote  pursuant  to  Section  6(1)  of  the  Trade 
Union  Act.  The  union  argued  that  the 
Board  could  not  in  law  avoid  the  duty  under 
S.  5(b)  and  (c)  of  determining  the  bargain- 
ing agent  and  requiring  an  employer  to 
bargaining  collectively  by  ordering  a  represen- 
tation vote  under  S.  6(1). 

Further,  the  union  contended  that,  in  direct- 
ing a  representation  vote,  the  Board  acted 
upon  extraneous  considerations.  In  support 
of  this  position,  the  union  relied  upon  the 
judgment  of  the  Saskatchewan  Court  of  Ap- 
peal in  Simpson-Sears  Limited  v.  Department 
Store  Organizing  Committee,  19  W.W.R. 
(MS)  439,  and  the  judgment  of  the  Supreme 
Court  of  Canada  in  Re  F.  W.  Woolworth 
Company  Limited,  1956  S.C.R.  82  (L.G. 
1956,  p.  419). 

On  October  23,  1964,  Mr.  Justice  Mac- 
Pherson of  the  Court  of  Queen's  Bench 
(Chambers)  dismissed  the  application  and 
held  that  the  decision  of  the  Board  to  order 
a  representation  vote  was  not  an  act  of  a 
judicial  nature.  The  order  in  question  imposed 
no  legal  duty  or  obligations  on  anyone  who 
was  party  to  the  proceedings,  nor  did  it 
create  or  remove  any  rights  of  anyone.  Con- 
sequently, mandamus  was  not  applicable.  (Re~ 
gina  ex  rel  Construction  and  General  La- 
bourers' Local  Union  No.  890  and  Neumann 
v.  Labour  Relations  Board  et  al  (1965),  50 
W.W.R.,  Part  5,  p.  318;  (1965)  48  D.L.R. 
(2d),  Part  8,  p.  770). 

The  ruling  of  Mr.  Justice  MacPherson  was 
appealed  by  the  union.  The  judgment  of  the 
Court  of  Appeal  was  rendered  by  Chief 
Justice  Culliton.  In  his  view,  the  basic  issue 
before  the  Court  of  Appeal  was  whether 
mandamus  was  applicable  in  the  situation 
at  bar. 

The  powers  of  the  Board  to  make  orders 

are  provided  for  in  Section   5   of  the  Act, 

the  pertinent  portions  of  which  are: 

S.  5.  The  board  shall  have  power  to  make 
orders: 


THE  LABOUR   GAZETTE      •      JULY   7965 


643 


(a)  determining  whether  the  appropriate  unit 
of  employees  for  the  purpose  of  bargaining  col- 
lectively shall  be  an  employer  unit,  craft  unit, 
plant  unit  or  a  subdivision  thereof  or  some 
other   unit; 

(b)  determining  what  trade  union,  if  any,  rep- 
resents a  majority  of  employees  in  an  appro- 
priate unit  oi  employees; 

(c)  requiring  an  employer  to  bargain  collec- 
ts e'.y;    .   .   . 

The  power  of  the  Board  to  accept  and 
receive  evidence  is  given  by  Section  15  of 
the  Act,  which  reads  as  follows: 

S.  15.  The  board  and  each  member  thereof 
and  its  duly  appointed  agents  shall  have  the 
power  of  a  commissioner  under  The  Public 
Inquiries  Act  and  may  receive  and  accept  such 
evidence  and  information  on  oath,  affidavit  or 
otherwise  as  in  its  discretion  it  may  deem  fit 
and  proper  whether  admissible  as  evidence  in  a 
court  of  law  or  not. 

Section  6  of  the  Act  provides  for  a  repre- 
sentation vote.  Subsection  (1)  relevant  to 
the  appeal  reads: 

S.  6(1)  In  determining  what  trade  union,  if 
any.  represents  a  majority  of  employees  in  an 
appropriate  unit  of  employees,  in  addition  to 
the  exercise  of  any  powers  conferred  upon  it 
by  section  15,  the  board  may,  in  its  discretion 
subject  to  subsection  (2),  direct  a  vote  to  be 
taken  by  secret  ballot  of  all  employees  eligible 
to  vote  to  determine  the  question. 

In  the  opinion  of  Chief  Justice  Culliton, 
the  language  of  S.  6(1)  makes  it  abundantly 
clear  that  the  Board,  in  the  exercise  of  its 
powers  under  S.  5(b),  subject  to  the  pro- 
vision of  subsection  (2)  of  Section  6  (which 
was  not  relevant  to  the  situation  at  bar), 
has  an  unfettered  discretion  to  direct  a  repre- 
sentation vote.  The  right  to  do  so  is  clearly 
in  addition  to  any  powers  conferred  upon 
the  Board  by  Section  15.  That  being  so,  the 
Chief  Justice  continued,  the  Board  in  order- 
ing a  vote,  exercised  its  discretion  on  a  matter 
within  its  jurisdiction  and  therefore  such  de- 
cision is  not  the  subject  of  mandamus  (Re 
Ault;  Ault  v.  Read,  18  W.W.R.   (MS)  438.) 

Counsel  for  the  union  argued  that  al- 
though this  may  appear  to  be  the  proper 
interpretation  of  the  sections  under  review,  it 
was  not  the  view  taken  by  the  Saskatchewan 
Court  of  Appeal  in  Re  Simpson-Sears  Lim- 
ited v.  Department  Store  Organizing  Com- 
mittee, supra.  He  contended  that  in  the 
Simpson-Sears  case  the  Court  held  that  resort 
could  not  be  taken  to  Section  6  to  obtain 
information  that  could  be  obtained  by  the 
Board  pursuant  to  the  powers  granted  to  it 
by  Section  15.  In  support  of  this  position, 
he  relied  upon  the  statement  of  Gordon, 
J.A.  at  p.  441: 

With  every  deference  to  the  argument  of  Mr. 
Carter  that  such  vote  could  be  directed  for  the 
information  of  the  board,  I  do  not  think  that 
the  board  can  direct  a  vote  under  sec.  6  to  get 
any  information  which  it  should  get  under  sec. 
15  of  the  Act,  which  gives  the  board  and  its 
agents  the  power  of  a  commissioner  under 
The  Public  Inquiries  Act,  R.S.S.,  1953,  ch.  15. 


Chief  Justice  Culliton  did  not  think  that 
the  foregoing  statement  could  be  interpreted 
as  restricting  the  discretionary  power  granted 
to  the  Board  by  section  6(1).  In  his  view, 
this  statement  must  be  construed  in  relation 
to  the  problem  to  which  Mr.  Justice  Gordon 
had  directed  his  mind.  In  that  case,  the 
Board  ordered  a  vote  pursuant  to  Section  6 
without  first  having  found  and  determined 
an  appropriate  unit  of  employees  for  the 
purpose  of  bargaining  collectively.  Counsel 
argued  that  the  Board  had  a  right  to  direct 
such  vote  for  its  own  information,  notwith- 
standing the  failure  to  find  and  determine 
an  appropriate  unit.  In  disposing  of  this  argu- 
ment, Mr.  Justice  Gordon,  at  page  441,  said: 

I  have  read  this  order  many  times  and  can 
say  definitely  that  there  is  no  direct  determina- 
tion of  any  appropriate  unit  of  the  company's 
employees  for  the  purpose  of  bargaining  col- 
lectively. Nor  can  I  see  that  such  determina- 
tion was  made  inferentially.  We  have  nothing 
but  an  order  directing  a  vote  to  be  taken  and 
the  only  power  of  the  board  to  direct  a  vote 
is  contained  in  sec.  6  of  the  Trade  Unions  Act 
and  I  am  perfectly  certain  that  under  this  section 
no  vote  can  be  directed  until  an  appropriate 
unit  of  employees  has  been  determined  under 
sec.  5(2)  of  the  Act.  With  every  deference  to 
the  argument  of  Mr.  Carter  that  such  vote  could 
be  directed  for  the  information  of  the  board,  I 
do  not  think  that  the  board  can  direct  a  vote 
under  sec.  6  to  get  any  information  which  it 
should  get  under  sec.  15  of  the  Act,  which  gives 
the  board  and  its  agents  the  power  of  a  com- 
missioner under  The  Public  Inquiries  Act,  RSS 
1953,  ch.  15. 

According  to  Chief  Justice  Culliton,  it 
is  evident  from  this  quotation  that  Mr. 
Justice  Gordon,  having  found  that  under 
Section  6(1)  there  is  no  power  to  direct  a 
vote  until  an  appropriate  unit  had  been  de- 
termined, meant  no  more  than  that  the  Board 
was  restricted  to  the  powers  to  be  found  in 
Section  15  in  determining  whether  or  not 
there  was  an  appropriate  unit.  Consequently, 
in  the  view  of  Chief  Justice  Culliton,  the 
Simpson-Sears  decision  could  not  be  con- 
strued as  a  pronouncement  by  the  Court 
restricting  the  Board's  discretion  to  direct  a 
vote  once  an  appropriate  bargaining  unit  had 
been  determined. 

Referring  to  the  decision  of  the  Supreme 
Court  of  Canada  in  F.  W.  Woolworth  Com- 
pany Limited,  supra,  Chief  Justice  Culliton 
did  not  think  that  that  decision  would  help 
in  any  way  the  position  of  the  union  in  the 
appeal  under  review.  In  that  case,  the  Su- 
preme Court  held  that,  although  the  language 
in  Section  5  is  permissive  in  form,  it  imposes 
a  duty  upon  the  Board  to  exercise  the  power 
or  powers  therein  conferred  when  called  upon 
to  do  so  by  a  party  interested  and  having 
the  right  to  make  an  application  thereunder. 
The  Court  there  held  that,  when  the  right 
of  the  applicant  to  make  the  application  was 


644 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      JULY   7965 


conclusively  established,  dismissal  of  the  ap- 
plication upon  extraneous  or  irrelevant  con- 
siderations was  a  refusal  by  the  Board  to 
perform  its  statutory  duty. 

Chief  Justice  Culliton  was  satisfied  that, 
had  the  Board  in  the  Woolworth  case  directed 
a  vote  pursuant  to  Section  6(1)  instead  of 
dismissing  the  application  on  extraneous  and 
irrelevant  considerations,  the  application  for 
mandamus  would  not  have  been  entertained. 

In  conclusion,  Chief  Justice  Culliton  stated 
that,  in  the  case  at  bar,  the  application  for 
certification  was  not  dismissed.  In  ordering 
a  representation  vote,  the  Board  exercised  a 


Statutory  right  which  it  had  in  discharging 
the  duty  imposed  upon  it  by  Section  5(b) 
of  the  Act.  He  was  also  satisfied  that  the 
Board  had  the  right  to  order  such  a  vote, 
notwithstanding  the  nature  of  the  evidence 
before  it.  It  was  for  the  Board,  and  the 
Board  alone,  to  determine  whether  a  vote 
should  be  directed  and  that  decision  could 
not  be  questioned  in  mandamus  proceedings. 
The  appeal  was  dismissed.  Regina  ex  rel  Con- 
struction and  General  Laborers'  Local  Union 
No.  890  and  Neumann  v.  The  Labour  Rela- 
tions Board  of  Sask.  et  al.,  the  Appeal  Court 
of  Saskatchewan,  April  22,  1965  (unreported). 


Recent  Regulations  under  Provincial  Legislation 

Two  wage  and  hours  schedules  for  construction  industry  issued 
in  Manitoba.  Nova  Scotia  sets  minimum  rates  for  employees 
in    road    building,    heavy    construction,    logging    and    forestry 


In  Manitoba,  new  wage  and  hours  sched- 
ules were  issued,  fixing  minimum  rates  and 
maximum  hours  at  regular  rates  for  employ- 
ees in  the  construction  industry,  other  than 
those  in  heavy  construction.  Rates  for  em- 
ployees in  Greater  Winnipeg,  Brandon,  Flin 
Flon  and  Portage  la  Prairie  are  set  on  an 
occupational  basis  with  some  higher  than 
those  in  last  year's  fair  wage  schedule.  Only 
three  rates  are  set  for  employees  in  rural 
areas — a  minimum  of  $1.75  for  journeymen, 
$1.45  for  helpers,  and  $1.25  for  labourers. 

New  minimum  wage  orders  issued  in  Nova 
Scotia  set  a  minimum  of  $1.05  an  hour  for 
employees  in  road  building  and  heavy  con- 
struction, and  $1  an  hour  for  time  workers 
in  logging  and  forest  operations. 

In  Alberta,  the  regulations  under  the  Boil- 
ers and  Pressure  Vessels  Act  respecting  sta- 
tionary engineers  and  firemen  were  amended, 
and  the  rules  for  pressure  vessel  welders 
revised.  The  trades  of  ironworker  and  parts- 
man  were  designated  as  apprenticeable 
trades. 

Newfoundland  issued  an  industrial  stand- 
ards schedule  for  the  construction  carpentry 
industry. 

Alberta  Apprenticeship  Act 

The  trades  of  ironworker  and  partsman 
were  designated  as  apprenticeable  trades  by 
Alta.  Reg.  124/65,  gazetted  on  March  31. 

Alberta  Boilers  and  Pressure  Vessels  Act 

In  Alberta,  the  regulations  under  the  Boil- 
ers and  Pressure  Vessels  Act  respecting  sta- 
tionary engineers  and  firemen  have  been 
amended,  and  regulations  governing  pressure 
vessel   welders   have   been   re-issued   with    a 


few  changes.  The  new  regulations  were 
gazetted  as  Alta.  Reg.  177/65  and  Alta.  Reg. 
178/65  on  April  15  and  went  into  force 
on  April  1. 

Engineers  and  Firemen 

The  regulations  governing  engineers  and 
firemen  were  amended  with  respect  to  the 
classification  of  certificates  and  the  qualifica- 
tions of  applicants  for  engineers'  certificates. 

The  regulations  continue  to  provide  for 
four  classes  of  engineers'  certificates,  for  fire- 
men's certificates  and  for  temporary  certifi- 
cates, but  the  limitations  on  second,  third, 
and  fourth  class  engineers'  certificates  have 
been  changed.  The  new  regulations  have 
raised  the  horsepower  rating  of  steam  plants 
that  the  holders  of  second,  third  and  fourth 
class  engineers'  certificates  are  qualified  to 
operate. 

The  amended  regulations  also  provide  for 
a  new  type  of  certificate,  to  be  known  as  a 
special  oil-well  certificate.  This  certificate 
qualifies  the  holder  to  be  in  charge  of  boilers 
on  a  drilling  site,  with  an  aggregate  capacity 
not  exceeding  100  horsepower.  A  candidate 
for  such  a  certificate  must  have  at  least  six 
months'  experience  with  oil-well  equipment 
to  which  the  Act  applies,  and  must  obtain 
at  least  50  per  cent  on  the  examination. 

The  qualifications  of  candidates  for  engi- 
neers' certificates  have  been  changed.  A  mini- 
mum age  is  no  longer  set,  and  the  service 
requirements  have  been  amended. 

Pressure  Vessel  Welders 

Under  the  revised  regulations  for  pressure 
vessel  welders,  coverage  has  been  extended 
to  pressure  fittings.  This  means  that  welding 


THE   LABOUR   GAZETTE      •      JULY    7965 


645 


on  a  fitting  on  a  boiler,  or  pressure  vessel, 
must  now  be  done  by  a  qualified  welder,  and 
any  repairs  and  alterations  must  be  approved 
by    an    inspector. 

The  regulations  again  provide  for  four 
classes  of  pressure  vessel  welders'  certifi- 
cates— Grade  A,  Grade  B,  machine  welding 
operator's,  and  provisional.  The  qualifications 
for  applicants  are  similar  to  those  in  pre- 
vious regulations,  except  that  only  candidates 
for  Grade  B  certificates  are  now  required 
to  pass  an  initial  performance  qualification 
test.  Previously  all  manual  welders  had  to 
take  the  prescribed  test. 

There  have  been  some  changes  in  the 
rules  with  respect  to  the  re-examination  of 
candidates  who  failed  to  pass  an  examination. 
A  waiting  period  is  again  prescribed,  but 
candidates  for  a  Grade  A  or  Grade  B  certifi- 
cate are  no  longer  required  to  have  additional 
experience    before   being   re-examined. 

Manitoba  Construction  Industry  Wages  Act 

Two  schedules  fixing  minimum  wages  and 
maximum  hours  at  straight-time  rates  for 
construction  workers  in  Manitoba  were 
gazetted  as  Man.  Reg.  37/65  and  Man.  Reg. 
38/65  on  May  15,  and  went  into  force  on 
June  1. 

The  new  schedules,  which  replace  the  fair 
wage  schedule  1964-65,  were  issued  under 
the  Construction  Industry  Wages  Act.  En- 
acted in  1964,  and  proclaimed  in  force  on 
October  15,  1964,  this  Act  continued  the 
principle  of  establishing  basic  wages  and 
maximum  standard  hours  in  the  construction 
industry  through  recommendations  made  by 
boards  composed  of  representatives  of  em- 
ployers and  workers  in  the  industry.  In  recog- 
nition that  different  sectors  of  the  industry 
have  different  problems,  the  Act  provided  for 
three  boards  instead  of  one — the  Heavy 
Construction  Wages  Board,  the  Greater  Win- 
nipeg Building  Construction  Wages  Board, 
and  the  Rural  Building  Construction  Wages 
Board. 

The  new  schedules  set  out  minimum  rates 
payable  to  employees  in  the  construction  in- 
dustry, other  than  heavy  construction  em- 
ployees, and  maximum  standard  weekly 
hours.  One  schedule  applies  in  rural  Mani- 
toba, and  the  other  in  Greater  Winnipeg. 

Rural  Manitoba 

The  schedules  for  rural  Manitoba  (Man. 
Reg.  37/65)  is  in  two  parts.  Part  I,  which 
applies  in  all  sections  of  rural  Manitoba, 
except  in  Brandon,  Flin  Flon  and  Portage  la 
Prairie,  provides  for  only  three  rates  for  all 
crafts  or  occupations — $1.75  an  hour  for 
journeymen,  $1.45  an  hour  for  helpers  and 
$1.25  an  hour  for  labourers. 

Part  II  applies  in  Brandon,  Flin  Flon  and 
Portage  la  Prairie,  and  has  the  same  policy 


as  the  earlier  fair  wage  schedules,  and  fixes 
rates  on  an  occupational  basis.  Wages  are 
set  for  20  occupational  categories,  nine  of 
them  with  sub-divisions.  Rates,  which  gener- 
ally are  similar  to  those  set  for  places  out- 
side Winnipeg  in  last  year's  schedule  (the 
"Zone  B"  rates),  range  from  $2.90  an  hour 
for  bridge  and  structural  iron  workers,  to 
$1.05  an  hour  for  watchmen  and  flagmen. 
The  minimum  for  journeymen  in  the  plumb- 
ing, pipefitting  and  steamfitting  industry  is 
$2.75  an  hour,  and  for  marble  and  tile  set- 
ters $2.20  an  hour.  Bricklayers,  stone  masons 
and  plasterers  in  the  three  cities  must  be 
paid  at  least  $2.45  an  hour.  A  minimum  of 
$2.50  an  hour  is  set  for  journeymen  electri- 
cians, and  $2.25  an  hour  for  carpenters. 
Building  labourers  and  men  working  on  build- 
ing construction  sites,  not  included  in  a 
special  category,  must  be  paid  at  least  $1.45 
an  hour. 

With  two  exceptions,  all  rates  in  this  sched- 
ule are  based  on  a  standard  work  week  of 
48  hours.  Time  and  one-half  the  regular 
rate  must  be  paid  for  all  hours  worked  in 
excess  of  the  standard  weekly  hours.  An 
exception  is  made  for  bridge  and  structural 
iron  workers,  and  ornamental  iron  workers, 
whose  regular  work  week  is  40  hours.  Watch- 
men and  flagmen  are  deemed  to  have  no  reg- 
ular work  week  and  are,  therefore,  not  en- 
titled to  overtime. 

Greater  Winnipeg 

The  schedule  for  Greater  Winnipeg  fol- 
lows the  same  pattern  as  Part  II  of  the 
schedule  for  rural  Manitoba,  and  sets  rates 
for  20  occupational  categories,  some  with 
sub-divisions.  Rates,  however,  are  higher  than 
those  set  for  Brandon,  Flin  Flon,  and  Portage 
la  Prairie,  and  the  regular  work  week  is  40 
hours,  except  for  three  categories. 

Rates  for  some  occupations  are  higher 
than  those  previously  set  for  the  Greater 
Winnipeg  area.  The  minimum  for  journey- 
men in  the  plumbing  and  pipefitting  trades 
is  $3.25  an  hour  from  June  1  to  November 
1,  after  which  it  is  to  be  increased  to  $3.30 
an  hour.  The  rate  for  bricklayers  and  stone 
masons  has  been  increased  from  $2.80  to 
$3.05  an  hour.  The  minimum  for  bridge  and 
structural  iron  workers,  and  journeymen  elec- 
tricians, has  been  increased  by  10  cents  to 
$3  an  hour.  Rates  for  journeymen  lathers, 
plasterers,  and  carpenters  are  now  $2.95, 
$2.90  and  $2.80  an  hour,  respectively. 

Rates  for  construction  labourers  in  Greater 
Winnipeg,  based  on  a  regular  work  week  of  421 
hours,  range  from  a  minimum  of  $1.85  an 
hour  for  general  labourers,  to  $2.15  an  hour 
for  those  employed  as  cement  finishers.  The 
rates  are  to  be  increased  by  10  cents  an 
hour  on  September  1. 


646 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      JULY    7965 


Men  in  Greater  Winnipeg  who  are  em- 
ployed in  building  construction,  and  whose 
jobs  are  not  classified,  must  be  paid  at  least 
$1.65  an  hour.  These  employees  may  be  re- 
quired to  work  up  to  42i  hours  a  week  at 
regular  rates. 

New    Brunswick    Tradesmen's    Qualifications 
Act 

In  New  Brunswick,  a  new  regulation 
gazetted  on  May  19  (65-22)  provided  that 
the  sheet  metal  trade  is  to  come  under  the 
Tradesmen's  Qualifications  Act  on  March  1, 
1968. 

Newfoundland    Industrial   Standards   Act 

In  Newfoundland,  an  industrial  standards 
schedule  for  the  construction  carpentry  in- 
dustry, the  first  schedule  to  be  issued  in  that 
province,  was  gazetted  on  May  4  to  take 
effect  from  the  date  of  publication. 

The  schedule  applies  in  Grand  Falls, 
Badger,  Windsor  and  Bishop's  Falls.  It  pro- 
vides for  a  minimum  wage  of  $2.11  an  hour 
for  carpenters  and  $2.26  an  hour  for  car- 
penter foremen. 

The  regular  working  week  for  carpenters 
in  these  places  is  to  be  40  hours,  divided 
into  five  days  of  eight  hours  each.  If  a  car- 
penter is  required  to  work  on  a  shift  basis, 
his  regular  working  week  will  be  37£  hours, 
divided  into  five  periods  of  7i  hours  each. 
An  employee  on  shift  work  is  to  receive 
eight  hours  pay  for  7i  hours  of  work. 

The  schedule  also  sets  a  premium  rate  for 
overtime  (time  and  one-half  the  minimum 
for  some  hours,  double  time  for  others),  and 
stipulates  that  Christmas  Day  and  Labour 
Day  are  to  be  observed  as  holidays  with 
pay  for  carpenters. 

Nova  Scoria  Minimum  Wage  Act 

In  Nova  Scotia,  a  new  minimum  wage 
order,  gazetted  on  April  28,  sets  a  minimum 
of  $1.05  an  hour  for  employees  in  road 
building  and  heavy  construction.  Another 
new  order,  published  the  same  day,  estab- 
lished a  minimum  wage  of  $1  an  hour  for 
time  workers  in  logging  and  forest  opera- 
tions, and  a  minimum  of  $210  a  month  for 
employees  without  a  regular  work  week. 

Road  Building,   Heavy   Construction 

The  order  for  the  road  building  and  heavy 
construction  applies  to  employees  engaged  in 
the  construction  of  streets,  sidewalks,  struc- 
tures, other  than  buildings,  paving  of  all 
sorts,  bridges,  water  and  sewer  installations, 
and  earth  and  rock  moving  operations.  It 
does  not  apply  to: 

(a)  municipal  employees  engaged  in  street 
maintenance   and   construction; 

(b)  workers  employed  in  the  construction  of 
buildings; 

(c)  employees  in  enterprises  that  supply  or 
manufacture    construction   materials; 


(d)  persons  receiving  training  under  govern- 
ment sponsored  and  government  approved  plans; 

(e)  apprentices  working  under  an  agreement 
under     the     Apprenticeship     and     Tradesmen's 

Qualifications    Act. 

The  $1.05-an-hour  rate  is  the  minimum 
payable  to  employees  in  road  building  and 
heavy  construction,  who  work  up  to  96  hours 
in  a  two-week  period.  For  work  in  excess  of 
this  limit,  an  employee  must  be  paid  time 
and  one-half  the  minimum,  that  is,  $1.57* 
an  hour. 

If  an  employee  works  on  a  holiday  that 
does  not  fall  on  a  regular  working  day,  he 
must  be  paid  the  overtime  rate  or  granted 
time  off,  equivalent  to  time  and  one-half  the 
number  of  hours  worked  on  the  holiday. 

Wages  are  to  be  paid  promptly  at  regular 
intervals  in  accordance  with  the  practice  of 
the  employment,  but  in  no  case  less  fre- 
quently than  once  a  month. 

Logging  and  Forest  Operations 

The  order  for  logging  and  forestry  covers 
not  only  cutting  operations,  but  incidental 
or  auxiliary  work  such  as  the  hauling  or 
driving  of  logs,  the  construction  and  main- 
tenance of  access  roads,  forest  improvement 
work,  reforestation,  forest  fire  protection, 
catering  services,  and  the  opertaion  of  port- 
able mills. 

All  employees  engaged  in  logging  or  forest 
operations  are  covered  except: 

(a)  employees  whose  remuneration  is  based  on 
board  feet,  cords,  or  other  method  of  measure- 
ment, in  accordance  with  a  written   agreement; 

(b)  persons  employed  by  a  farmer  carrying 
on  operations  on  his  own  wood  lot  with  the  help 
of   not   more   than   two   employees; 

(c)  emergency  fire  fighters,  or  fire  fighters, 
employed  under  the  Lands  and  Forests  Act; 

(d)  employees  transporting  wood  outside  the 
forest; 

(e)  persons  employed  in  wood  processing  mills 
located  outside  the  forest. 

The  order  sets  a  minimum  wage  of  $1 
an  hour  for  all  employees  hired  on  time 
basis.  Persons  without  a  fixed  work  week 
whose  hours  of  work  cannot  be  verified,  are 
to  be  paid  a  minimum  of  $210  a  month. 
These  include  guards,  cooks  and  kitchen  em- 
ployees, stablemen,  watchmen,  fire  rangers, 
and  wardens. 

If  an  employer  furnishes  an  employee  with 
board  and  lodging,  the  maximum  amount 
that  may  be  deducted  from  the  minimum 
wage  for  such  services  is  $2  per  day. 

Unlike  other  recent  minimum  wage  orders 
issued  in  Nova  Scotia,  this  order  does  not 
limit  the  number  of  hours  that  may  be 
worked  at  straight-time  rates,  nor  does  it 
require  the  payment  of  a  premium  rate  for 
work  on  a  holiday. 

The  provision  respecting  method  of  pay- 
ment is  similar  to  that  in  the  construction 
order. 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      JULY    7965 


647 


NATIONAL   EMPLOYMENT  SERVICE 


Monthly  Report  of  Placement  Operations 

of  the  National  Employment  Service 

Number  of  placements  in  May  was  3.8  per  cent  larger  than  the 
number  in  May  last  year.  The  number  of  vacancies  notified 
to  NES   offices  substantially   above  five-year  average  for  May 

Local  offices  of  the  National  Employment  Regional  distribution  of  the  monthly  and 

Service   reported    113,900  placements  during  cumulative    male    placements    and    the    per- 

May,  3.8  per  cent  more  than  in  May   1964.  centage  change  from  1964  were: 

Although  this  May's  total  was  3.1  per  cent  May  1965           January-May  1965 

below  the  average  for  May  during  the  pre-  AUantic      65Q0     _  6  g         nm          1Q 

vious  five  years,  the  decrease  was  not  due  to  _     ,         ..  ___           _  ,         ft/.  .„_           .  ft 

a  reduction  in  employers'  demands  for  work-  Quebec     21'900     ~  21         96'600     "  L9 

ers   but  rather   because   May   this   year  had  Ontario    28,600     +  7.4       106,300     +  8.9 

onlv  20  working  days  compared  with  an  aver-  Prairie      16,800     +  1.1         55,900     +  5.5 

age  of  21.4  between  1960  and  1964.  In  fact,  Pacific        8,100     +37.6         33,500     +32.0 

the    number    of   vacancies   notified    to    local  Canada  81,800*  +  4.3       315,200*  +  6.1 
offices   in    May    this   year   was   substantially 

above  the  previous  five-year  average.  Female  placements  in  May  1965  amounted 

The    regional    distribution   of   May   place-  to  32,100,  an  increase  of  2.5  per  cent  over 

ments  and  percentage  changes  from  May  1964  the  number  in  the  same  month  in  1964  de- 

were:  spite  small  decreases  in  the  Atlantic,  Quebec 

Atlantic   9,900         -  5.2  and  Prairie  regions' 

Quebec                    29,300         —  2.8  The  distribution  of  female  placements  and 

Ontario    40^400         +  8.0  percentage  change  from   1964  were: 

Pacific                      11*800         +266  May  1965           January-May  1965 

^anadi inW)*       t  3R  Atlantic      3,400     -1.9         10,200     +4.2 

Canada              113'90°         +  3-8  Quebec       7,400     -  4.7         34,800     -  3.4 

Regular  placements  (those  with  an  antici-  Ontario     11,800     +  9.6         48,300     +  0.9 

pated    duration    of   more   than    six   working  Prairie        5,800     —   1.3         24,700     +  1.1 

days)    totalled    82,400,    an    increase    of   5.9  pacific        3/700     +  7.7         14^900     +  8.7 

per  cent  over  the  total  reported  in  May  last  ,     ,'An      .    0  c       m  ^aa*    i    aq 

year.   The  proportion  of  regular  placements  Canada  32'100     +  2'5       133'000*  +  °'8 

to  all  placements'  increased  to  72.4  per  cent  placements    involving    the    movement    of 

from  71.0  per  cent  in  May  1964.  workers  from  one   area  to   another  totalled 

The  cumulative  total  of  all  placements  for  5>200.  This  is  a  decrease  of  almost  500  from 

the  first  fiive  months  of  1965  was  448,200,  ,the  total  in  May  1964j   anc|  the  proportion 

an  increase  of  4.5  per  cent  over  the  total  for  of   such    transfers   to   total   placements   was 

the  corresponding  period  in   1964.  This  was  fractionally  lower  than  in  May  1964. 

the  second  highest  figure  for  this  period  in  During  May  ^  employers  notified  NES 

postwar  years  local  offices  of  150,500  vacancies,  an  increase 

The  regional  distribution  of  the  cumulative  of    ?  8            cent    over   the    number    during 

totals  and  the  percentage  change  from  1964  May   1964  and  an  increaSe  of  7.3  per  cent 

were:  over  the   average  for   May  during  the  pre- 

Atlantic    33,100         +1.9  vious  five  years. 

Quebec  Icl'4™         "  I'l  Vacancies   for  male  workers,   at    103,300, 

154,700         +  6.3  increased  by  8.6  per  cent;  female  vacancies, 

J7an;ie                     80,600         +4.1  at  47,200,  by  6.1  per  cent  over  the  May  1964 

Pacific                      48,400         +23.8  totals 

Canada 448,200         +4.5  '              i  *•        *  *  i       «                        * 

The   cumulative    total    of    vacancies    for 

Male  placements  totalled  81,800,  an  in-  January-May  1965  was  600,700.  This  was  an 
crease  of  4.3  per  cent  over  the  May  1964  increase  of  6.5  per  cent  over  the  total  for 
total.  Regular  placements  of  men  increased  the  corresponding  period  in  1964  and  was 
in  all  regions,  but  in  the  Atlantic  and  Quebec  the  highest  number  recorded  for  any  corn- 
regions,  fewer  casual  placements  and  trans-  parable  period  since   1947. 

fers-out   brought   about   a   decrease   in   total       

male  placements.  *  Imbalances  are  due  to  rounding. 

648  THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      JULY   7965 


UNEMPLOYMENT    INSURANCE 


Monthly  Report  on  Operation  of 

the  Unemployment  Insurance  Act 

At  end  of  April,  claimants  for  benefit  were  fewer  by  14  per 
cent  than  at  end  of  March  and  by  34,800  than  at  end  of  April 
1964.  Estimate  is  that  170,000  ceased  to  claim  during  month 


Claimants  for  unemployment  insurance 
benefit  on  April  30  numbered  462,900,  which 
was  76,000,  or  14  per  cent  fewer,  than  the 
total  of  539,000  on  March  31.  Ninety  per  cent 
of  the  decline  occurred  among  males.  On 
April  30,  1964,  there  were  497,700  claimants. 

The  reduction  in  the  number  of  both  regu- 
lar and  seasonal  benefit  claimants  is  due  to 
the  exhaustion  of  seasonal  benefit  and  to  the 
seasonal  improvement  in  the  demand  for 
workers.  It  is  estimated  that  about  170,000 
ceased  to  claim  benefit  during  the  month. 

About  a  third  of  this  number  may  be 
estimated  to  have  exhausted  seasonal  benefit, 
but  most  of  the  rest  are  assumed  to  have  re- 
turned to  work.  The  exhaustion  of  regular 
benefit  would  not  have  reduced  the  total  num- 
ber of  claimants,  since  such  persons  would 
become  eligible  for  seasonal  benefit. 

Initial  and  Renewal  Claims 

There  were  150,800  initial  and  renewal 
claims  during  April,  compared  with  175,400 
a  year  earlier.  In  March,  the  total  was 
183,200. 

About  70  per  cent  of  the  April  total  rep- 
resented separations  from  employment  dur- 
ing the  month,  in  comparison  with  75  per 
cent  in  March. 

Beneficiaries  and  Benefit  Payments 

The  average  weekly  number  of  beneficiaries 
was  estimated  at  435,300  for  April,  470,700 
for  March  and  484,600  for  April  1964. 

Benefit  payments  amounted  to  $43,300,000 
in  April,  $55,600,000  in  March  and  $52,- 
600,000  in  April  1964. 

The  average  weekly  payment  was  $24.87  in 
April,  $24.86  in  March  and  $24.66  in  April 
1964. 

Insurance  Registrations 

This  year  the  annual  renewal  of  insurance 
books  took  place  during  May,  and  as  a  result 


the  usual  statistics  on  the  number  of  insur- 
ance books  and  contribution  cards  issued  to 
employees  for  the  month  ending  April  30  are 
not  available.  As  the  figures  are  cumulative, 
they  will  be  included  in  the  next  report. 

On  April  30,  registered  employers  num- 
bered 340,971,  an  increase  of  83  since 
March  31. 

Enforcement  Statistics 

During  April,  9,413  investigations  were 
conducted  by  enforcement  officers  across 
Canada.  Of  these  6,541  were  spot  checks  of 
claims  to  verify  the  fulfilment  of  statutory 
conditions,  and  482  were  miscellaneous  in- 
vestigations. The  remaining  2,390  were  in- 
vestigations in  connection  with  claimants 
suspected  of  making  false  statements  to  ob- 
tain benefits. 

Prosecutions  were  begun  in  290  cases,  120 
against  employers  and  170  against  claimants.* 
Punitive  disqualifications  as  a  result  of  false 
statements  or  misrepresentations  by  claim- 
ants numbered  859.* 

Unemployment   Insurance   Fund 

Revenue  received  by  the  Unemployment 
Insurance  Fund  in  April  totalled  $26,493,- 
308.44,t  compared  with  $29,627,699.19  in 
March,!   and  $25,528,830.77  in  April   1964. 

Benefits  paid  in  April  totalled  $43,320,- 
042.62,t  compared  with  $55,585,596.67  in 
March,t   and  $52,592,485.93   in  April   1964. 

The  balance  in  the  Fund  on  April  30  was 
$22,037,288.40,*  on  March  31  it  was  $34,- 
593,288.88,*  and  on  April  30,  1964,  there 
was  a  debit  balance  of  $26,188,755.05. 


*  These  do  not  necessarily  relate  to  the  inves- 
tigations conducted  during  this  period. 

t  All  figures  for  April  and  March  1965  are 
taken  from  interim  statements,  and  are  subject 
to  amendment. 


A  claimant's  unemployment  register  is  placed  in  the  "live  file"  at  the  local  office  as 
soon  as  the  claim  is  made.  As  a  result,  the  court  of  claimants  at  any  given  time  inevitably 
includes  some  whose  claims  are  in  process.  Claimants  should  not  be  interpreted  either 
as  "total  number  of  beneficiaries"  or  "total  job  applicants." 


THE  LABOUR   GAZETTE      •      JULY    7965 


649 


Decisions  of  the  Umpire  under 

the  Unemployment  Insurance  Act 


Decision  CUB  2463,  Jan.  8,  1965 

Summary  of  the  Main  Facts:  The  claimant 
filed  a  renewal  claim  on  May  26,  1964.  He 
was  last  employed  as  an  assembler  from 
August  1963  to  May  22,  1964.  He  was  laid 
off  owing  to  a  temporary  shortage  of  work, 
and  his  claim  was  allowed,  effective  May  24, 
1964. 

On  June  1,  the  claimant  requested  that 
his  claim  be  antedated  to  May  17.  He  gave 
as  his  reasons  that  he  was  on  a  temporary 
layoff  and  had  been  expecting  a  recall  any 
day.  In  support  of  his  request  to  have  his 
claim  antedated,  the  claimant  submitted  a 
letter  from  his  employer,  dated  June  1,  1964, 
in  which  the  employer  stated  that  owing  to 
production  difficulties,  the  claimant's  employ- 
ment had  been  terminated  on  Friday,  May 
15,  at  which  time  he  had  been  instructed 
to  report  back  to  work  on  Wednesday, 
May  20. 

The  employer  explained  that  Monday  was 
a  paid  holiday  (Victoria  Day)  and  Tuesday 
was  a  day  of  layoff.  The  employer  further 
explained  that  on  Tuesday,  May  19,  it  was 
realized  that  the  production  problem  had  not 
been  solved  and  the  claimant  was,  therefore, 
told  that  there  would  be  no  work  for  him 
until  Thursday,  May  21.  The  claimant  sub- 
sequently worked  eight  hours  on  Thursday 
and  four  hours  on  Friday,  May  22,  when  it 
was  again  found  necessary  to  lay  him  off. 

The  insurance  officer  did  not  approve  the 
claimant's  application  to  have  his  claim  ante- 
dated, as  in  his  opinion  the  claimant  had  not 
established  good  cause  for  delay  in  making 
his  claim.  The  insurance  officer  reasoned 
that  the  claimant  was  not  prevented  from 
filing  his  claim  on  either  Tuesday,  May  19, 
or  Wednesday,  May  20.  Moreover,  the  claim- 
ant worked  only  four  hours  on  Friday,  May 
22,  and  would  have  had  an  opportunity  to 
report  to  the  local  office  to  file  a  claim  on 
that  date  also. 

The  board  of  referees  was  of  the  opinion 
that  there  had  apparently  been  some  con- 
fusion at  the  time  of  the  claimant's  layoff 
on  Friday,  May  15,  regarding  the  duration 
of  the  temporary  layoff.  The  board  decided 
that  the  claimant  was  entitled  to  have  his 
claim  antedated  to  May  17  on  the  grounds 
that  he  had  established  good  cause  for  delay 
in  making  his  claim  and  that  he  had  proved 
that  he  fulfilled  in  all  respects  the  conditions 
of  entitlement  for  the  period  concerned. 

On  September  15  the  insurance  officer  ap- 
pealed to  the  Umpire  and  said: 

It  is  submitted  that  the  board  of  referees 
erred  in  allowing  the  claimant's  appeal.  Regula- 


tion 150  requires  that  a  claimant  prove  that  he 
has  fulfilled  in  all  respects  the  conditions  of 
entitlement  to  benefit  for  the  period  for  which 
antedate  is  requested  and  that  throughout  the 
whole  period  between  such  date  and  the  date  on 
which  he  actually  made  his  claim  he  had  good 
cause  for  delay  in  making  such  claim. 

According  to  the  established  jurisprudence,  a 
claimant,  in  order  to  show  that  he  had  good 
cause  for  delay  in  applying  for  unemployment 
insurance  benefit,  must  prove  that  he  was  pre- 
vented from  attending  at  the  local  office  to  file 
his  claim  by  circumstances  over  which  he  had 
no  control  (CUB  116  and  CUB  395),  or  that 
under  the  circumstances  existing  at  the  time  it 
was  reasonable  that  he  should  not  so  attend 
(CUB  1454). 

It  is  submitted  that  the  grounds  put  forth  by 
the  claimant,  and  by  the  employer  on  his  behalf, 
as  justification  for  the  delay  in  filing  his  claim 
on  a  date  earlier  than  May  26,  1964  do  not  show 
that  on  May  19,  20  and  22  there  was  at  least 
one  circumstance  of  a  compelling  nature  that 
might  reasonably  be  accepted  as  a  valid  reason 
for  not  attending  at  the  local  office  during  the 
usual  working  hours  of  the  said  office  (CUB 
1593).  In  several  previous  decisions  the  Umpire 
held  that  good  cause  for  his  delay  in  making  a 
claim  was  not  shown  by  a  claimant,  on  the 
ground  that  he  was  expecting  an  early  recall 
to  work  (CUBs  130,  591,  1134,  1357,  1454 
and  1593). 

On  November  22,  the  United  Automobile 
Workers,  Local  303,  requested  an  oral  hear- 
ing, which  was  held  on  December  17.  The 
union  was  represented  by  the  president  of 
Local  303,  and  the  Commission  by  one  of 
its  solicitors. 

Considerations  and  Conclusions:  The  juris- 
prudence established  by  the  Umpire  on  the 
point  at  issue  is  as  stated  by  the  insurance 
officer  in  his  grounds  of  appeal,  which  also 
make  it  obvious  that  the  findings  of  fact  of 
the  board  of  referees  are  not  such  as  to  sus- 
tain its  conclusion  of  law. 

In  view  of  the  foregoing,  I  decide  to  re- 
verse the  decision  of  the  board  of  referees 
and  allow  the  insurance  officer's  appeal. 

Decision  CUB  2469,  Feb.  2,  1965 

Summary  of  the  Main  Facts:  The  claimant 
filed  a  renewal  application  for  benefit  on 
August  18,  1964.  According  to  the  applica- 
tion, she  had  worked  as  a  skiving  machine 
operator  for  a  shoe  company  from  April  26 
to  May  22,  1964.  She  explained  that  she  had 
been  on  sick  leave  since  May  22,  and  that 
when  she  was  ready  to  go  back  to  her  em- 
ployment on  August  17,  1964,  there  was  no 
work  for  her. 

The  claimant  did  not  lodge  her  insurance 
book  at  the  local  office  when  she  filed  her 
renewal  claim.  She  stated  (form  UIC  417A) 
that  the  book  was  held  by  the  employer,  and 


650 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE     •      JULY   7965 


that  she  was  aware  that  if  she  did  not  deposit 
it,  her  claim  might  be  delayed  or  she  might 
be  disqualified  from  receiving  benefit. 

She  stated  also  that  she  would  take  the 
necessary  steps  to  obtain  her  book  and  would 
deposit  it  immediately  and  that  if  she  was 
unable  to  obtain  her  book,  she  would  advise 
the  local  office  not  later  than  August  25 
and  explain  why  she  was  unable  to  deposit  it. 

As  the  insurance  book  had  not  been  de- 
posited, the  insurance  officer  notified  the 
claimant  by  letter  dated  September  3,  1964 
that  she  was  disqualified  and  that  benefit  was 
suspended  from  August  16,  1964,  on  the 
ground  that  she  had  failed  to  make  her 
claim  for  benefit  in  the  prescribed  manner, 
as  required  by  Regulations  146  and  148,  in 
that  she  had  failed  to  lodge  her  contribution 
records  (her  current  insurance  book)  and 
had  failed  to  prove  by  the  date  specified 
that  her  efforts  to  obtain  them  were  unsuc- 
cessful. 

The  insurance  book  was  subsequently  de- 
posited on  September  9,  1964,  and  the  dis- 
qualification was  terminated  on  September  5, 
the  Saturday  preceding  the  date  of  deposit. 

The  claimant  appealed  to  a  board  of 
referees  on  September  11.  It  appears  from 
the  appeal  that  the  claimant  was  under  the 
impression  that  her  foreman  would  advise 
the  company  office  to  forward  her  insurance 
book  to  the  UIC  local  office  which,  it  seems, 
he  failed  to  do. 

She  stated  that  upon  receipt  of  the  in- 
surance officer's  letter  of  September  3,  1964, 
she  called  at  the  office  of  the  company  for  her 
book  and  mailed  it  to  the  local  office. 

In  a  memorandum  to  the  board  of  referees, 
the  insurance  officer  said  she  had  decided  to 
make  no  change  in  her  decision.  "Although 
the  claimant,  prior  to  filing  her  claim,  had 
requested  her  employer  to  send  her  book  to 
the  local  office,  she  did  not  carry  out  the 
instructions  given  by  the  local  office  to  obtain 
her  book  from  the  employer  and  report  to 
the  local  office  by  the  25th  of  August  1964," 
the  insurance  officer  wrote. 

In  a  subsequent  letter  to  the  local  office, 
the  claimant  said: 

I  .  .  .  would  like  to  clarify  some  misunder- 
standings. 

I  have  been  employed  by  Tthe  shoe  company] 
since  1959  with  9  months'  leave  of  absence  in 
1961  and  have  worked  there  since  Nov.  1962.  .  .  . 
I  took  sick  on  May  22,  1964,  and  was  on  sick 
benefit  until  August  17.  .  .  . 

I  did  not  know  my  book  had  not  been  sent 
by  my  foreman  until  I  received  your  letter, 
Sept.  8,  and  went  to  factory  to  claim  the  book 
and  mail  it  to  your  office.  I  was  unaware  of  the 
date  Aug.  25th  that  my  book  was  not  at  your 
office  or  that  I  was  to  report  to  the  office  on 
that  date,  trusting  it  had  been  sent.  I  don't  feel 
I  am  to  blame  for  this  and  sorry  for  all  the 
trouble  it  has  caused  .  .  . 


A  board  of  referees  heard  the  case  on 
October  14,  1964.  The  claimant  was  neither 
present  nor  represented  at  the  hearing. 
The  board,  in  a  brief  decision,  unani- 
mously disallowed  the  claimant's  appeal  and 
upheld  the  insurance  officer's  decision. 

The  union  of  which  the  claimant  is  a  mem- 
ber appealed  to  the  Umpire.  The  appeal 
reads: 

The  claimant  was  on  sick  leave  from  May  22 
to  Aug.  17,  1964.  When  her  doctor  said  she 
could  return  to  work,  Aug.  17,  she  called  her 
foreman  ...  on  Aug.  12  to  say  she  was  able 
to  return  to  work  Aug.  17.  He  informed  her 
there  was  no  work  on  the  machine  she  operated 
and  told  her  she  was  unemployed  until  work 
was  available.  She  asked  a  representative  of  the 
Company  to  have  her  book  sent  to  the  unem- 
ployment office  and  was  assured  he  would. 
She  was  not  aware  until  Sept.  8  that  her  book 
was  not  sent.  Because  of  this  error,  three  weeks 
were  lost.  We  feel  the  claimant  is  eligible  to 
receive  back  pay  to  compensate  for  this  loss. 

In  a  statement  of  observations  for  con- 
sideration by  the  Umpire,  the  Chief  of  the 
Adjudication  Division  of  the  Unemployment 
Insurance   Commission  said: 

.  .  .  The  instructions  given  to  a  claimant  when 
he  files  a  claim  for  benefit  are  those  contained 
in  the  Notification  of  Non-deposit  of  Insurance 
Book,  form  417A,  and  are  to  the  effect  that  he 
must  obtain  and  deposit  his  insurance  book 
immediately  and,  if  he  does  not  do  so,  he  may 
be  disqualified  from  receiving  benefit.  The  claim- 
ant further  undertakes  to  advise  the  local  office 
by  a  specified  date  if  he  is  unable  to  deposit 
his  insurance  book,  giving  the  reason  therefor. 
The  lower  portion  "Direction  to  Claimants"  of 
this  form  (below  the  perforation)  is  completed, 
detached  and  given  to  the  claimant  as  a  re- 
minder of  his  obligation  to  obtain  and  deposit 
his  insurance  book  with  the  local  office  as  soon 
as  possible  and,  if  he  is  unable  to  obtain  his 
book,  to  advise  the  local  office  by  a  specified 
date  of  the  reason  for  delay. 

In  accordance  with  the  requirements  of  Regu- 
lation 146(1)  (c),  a  claimant  who  desires  to 
make  a  renewal  claim  for  benefit  shall,  in  the 
prescribed  manner,  lodge,  make  arrangements  to 
lodge  or  produce  as  and  when  directed  his 
contribution  records  (insurance  book)  at  the 
local  office.  In  accordance  with  Regulation 
146(3),  a  claimant  who  fails  to  lodge  his  con- 
tribution records  at  the  time  he  applies  for 
benefit  is  not  entitled  to  receive  benefit  until 
his  contribution  records  have  been  lodged  at  the 
local  office  unless,  not  later  than  a  date  specified 
by  an  officer  of  the  Commission,  he  reports  to 
the  local  office  and  proves  that  he  (a)  has  made 
every  effort  to  obtain  his  contribution  records 
from  his  employer  and  has  not  been  able  to 
obtain  them;  or  (b)  has  been  prevented  from 
lodging  his  contribution  records  by  other  circum- 
stances beyond  his  control. 

The  claimant  alleges  that  she  asked  her  em- 
ployer to  send  her  insurance  book  to  the  local 
office  and  she  was  not  aware  until  September  8 
that  her  book  had  not  been  sent.  However,  it 
was  incumbent  on  the  claimant  to  follow-up  with 
her  employer  to  ensure  that  her  book  had  in 
fact  been  sent  to  the  local  office. 

Moreover,    this    does    not    relieve    her    of   her 

responsibility,  nor  does  it  justify  her  failure  to 

notify    the    local    office    by   the    specified    date, 

August  25,   1964,  to  explain   the  steps  she  had 

(Continued  on  page   664) 


THE  LABOUR   GAZETTE      •      JULY    7965 


651 


WAGE  SCHEDULES 

Wage  Schedules  Prepared  and  Contracts  Awarded  in  May 

Works  of  Construction,  Remodelling,  Repair  or  Demolition 

During  May  the  Department  of  Labour  prepared  356  wage  schedules  for  inclusion  in 
contracts  proposed  to  be  undertaken  by  departments  of  the  federal  Government  and  its 
Crown  corporations  in  various  areas  of  Canada,  for  works  of  construction,  remodelling, 
repair  or  demolition,  and  certain  services.  In  the  same  period,  a  total  of  245  contracts  in 
these  categories  was  awarded.  Particulars  of  these  contracts  appear  below. 

In  addition,  198  contracts,  not  listed  in  this  report  which  contained  the  General  Fair 
Wage  Clause,  were  awarded  by  Central  Mortgage  and  Housing  Corporation.  The  St. 
Lawrence  Seaway  Authority  and  the  Departments  of  Defence  Production,  Northern  Affairs 
and  National  Resources,  Post  Office,  Public  Works  and  Transport. 

A  copy  of  the  wage  schedule  issued  for  each  contract  is  available  on  request  to  trade 
unions  concerned,  or  to  others  who  have  a  bona  fide  interest  in  the  execution  of  the 
contract. 

(The  labour  conditions  included  in  each  of  the  contracts  listed  under  this  heading  provide  that: 

(a)  the  wage  rate  for  each  classification  of  labour  shown  in  the  wage  schedule  included  in  the 
contract  is  a  minimum  rate  only  and  contractors  and  subcontractors  are  not  exempted  from  the  pay- 
ment of  higher  wages  in  any  instance  where,  during  the  continuation  of  the  work,  wage  rates  in  excess 
of  those  shown  in  the  wage  schedule  have  been  fixed  by  provincial  legislation,  by  collective  agree- 
ments in  the  district,  or  by  current  practice; 

(b)  hours  of  work  shall  not  exceed  eight  in  the  day  and  44  in  the  week,  except  in  emergency 
conditions  conditions  approved  by  the  Minister  of  Labour; 

(c)  overtime  rates  of  pay  may  be  established  by  the  Minister  of  Labour  for  all  hours  worked 
in  excess  of  eight  per  day  and  44  per  week; 

(d)  no  person  shall  be  discriminated  against  in  regard  to  employment  because  of  his  race, 
national  origin,  colour  or  religion,  nor  because  he  has  made  a  complaint  with  respect  to  alleged 
discrimination.) 

Contracts  for  the  Manufacture  of  Supplies  and  Equipment 

Contracts  awarded  in  May  for  the  manufacture  of  supplies  and  equipment  were  as 
follows: 

Department  No.  of  Contracts  Aggregate  Amount 

Defence  Production  142  $463,448.00 

Post  Office  15  140,031.75 

Royal  Canadian  Mounted  Police  6  40,069.50 

Transport  5  56,597.79 

(The  labour  conditions  included  in  contracts  for  the  manufacture  of  supplies  and  equipment 
provide  that: 

(a)  all  persons  who  perform  labour  on  such  contracts  shall  be  paid  such  wages  as  are  currently 
paid  in  the  district  to  competent  workmen;  and  if  there  is  no  current  rate,  then  a  fair  and  reasonable 
rate;  but  in  no  event  shall  the  wages  paid  be  less  than  those  established  by  the  laws  of  the  province 
in   which   the   work   is   being   performed; 

(b)  The  working  hours  shall  be  those  fixed  by  the  custom  of  the  trade  in  the  district,  or  if  there 
be  no  such  custom,  "then  they  shall  be  fair  and  reasonable  hours; 

The  Fair  Wages  and  Hours  of  Labour  legislation  of  the  federal  Government  has  the 
purpose  of  insuring  that  all  Government  contracts  for  works  of  construction  and  for 
the  manufacture  of  supplies  and  equipment  contain  provisions  to  secure  the  payment  of 
wages  generally  accepted  as  fair  and  reasonable  in  each  trade  or  classification  employed 
in  the  district  where  the  work  is  being  performed. 

The  practice  of  Government  departments  and  those  Crown  corporations  to  which  the 
legislation  applies,  before  entering  into  contracts  for  any  work  of  construction,  remodelling, 
repair  or  demolition,  is  to  obtain  wage  schedules  from  the  Department  of  Labour  showing 
the  applicable  wage  deemed  to  be  required  in  the  execution  of  the  work.  These  wage 
schedules  are  thereupon  included  with  other  relevant  labour  conditions  as  terms  of  such 
contracts  to  be  observed  by  the  contractors. 

Wage  schedules  are  not  included  in  contracts  for  the  manufacture  of  supplies  and 
equipment  because  it  is  not  possible  to  determine  in  advance  the  classification  to  be 
employed  in  the  execution  of  a  contract.  A  statement  of  the  labour  conditions  which 
must  be  observed  in  every  such  contract  is,  however,  included  therein  and  is  of  the  same 
nature  and  effect  as  those  which  apply  in  works  of  construction. 

Copies  of  the  federal  Government's  Fair  Wages  and  Hours  of  Labour  legislation 
may  be  had  upon  request  to  the  Labour  Standards  Branch  of  the  Department  of 
Labour,  Ottawa. 

652  THE  LABOUR   GAZETTE      •      JULY    7965 


(c)  overtime  rates  of  pay  may  be  established  by  the  Minister  of  Labour  for  all  hours  worked 
in  excess  of  those  fixed  by  custom  of  the  trade  in  the  district,  or  in  excess  of  fair  and  reasonable 
hours; 

(d)  no  person  shall  be  discriminated  against  in  regard  to  employment  because  of  his  race, 
national  origin,  colour  or  religion,  nor  because  he  has  made  a  complaint  with  respect  to  alleged 
discrimination.) 

Wage  Claims  Received  and  Payments  Made  in  May 

During  May,  the  sum  of  $6,796.73  was  collected  from  seven  contractors  for  wage  arrears 
due  their  employees  as  a  result  of  the  failure  of  the  contractors,  or  their  subcontractors,  to 
apply  the  wage  rates  and  other  conditions  of  employment  required  by  the  schedule  of  labour 
conditions  forming  part  of  their  contract.  This  amount  is  for  distribution  to  the  240  workers 
concerned. 

Contracts  Containing  Fair  Wage  Schedules  Awarded  in  May 

ATOMIC  ENERGY  OF  CANADA  LIMITED 

Chalk  River  Ont:  J  C  Sulpher  Construction  Ltd,  completion  of  masonry  work,  computer 
bldg  508;  T  Wojdacki,  interior  painting  of  bldg  513.  Pinawa  Man:  Imperial  Construction 
Ltd,  construction  of  apt  bldg  2;  Imperial  Construction  Ltd,  construction  of  houses. 

CENTRAL   MORTGAGE  AND   HOUSING   CORPORATION 

Gander  Nfld:  Benson  Builders  Ltd,  exterior  painting,  DOT  2/53,  3/54  &  6/57.  St 
John's  Nfld:  Benson  Builders  Ltd,  exterior  painting,  Vets  1/49.  City  Provence  Que:  Lemay 
Construction  Ltee,  construction  of  sewers  &  water  supply  main  &  lift  station.  Montreal  area 
Que:  Alsco  Montreal  Inc,  supply  &  installation  of  metal  storm  windows.  New  Westminster 
B  C:  Magnum  Floors  Ltd,  laying  of  lino  tile,  Glenview  apts.  Vancouver  B  C:  Magnum  Floors 
Ltd,  laying  of  lino  tile,  Broadway  apts;  Magnum  Floors  Ltd,  laying  of  lino  tile,  Vancouver 
Terraces. 

In  addition,  this  Corporation  awarded  32  contracts  containing  the  General  Fair  Wages 

DEPARTMENT  OF  CITIZENSHIP  AND  IMMIGRATION 

Restigouche  Indian  Agency  Que:  Sarto  Cote  Construction  Ltd,  trenching  for  installation 
of  six  inch  water  pipe,  Restigouche  reserve.  Six  Nations  Indian  Agency  Ont:  Cromar  Con- 
struction Ltd,  alterations  &  additions  (phase  2),  Mohawk  residential  school.  Kwawkewlth 
Indian  Agency  B  C:  Ocean  Park  Plumbing  &  heating  Ltd,  renovation  of  mechanical  services 
(phase  2),  &  replacement  of  heating  system,  Alert  Bay  residential  school. 

DEFENCE  CONSTRUCTION  (1951)  LIMITED 

Summerside  P  E  I:  Boudreau  Sheet  Metal  Works  Ltd,  reroofing  leantos  of  hangars  1, 
3  &  4,  RCAF  Station.  Greenwood  N  S:  Planned  Renovators  Ltd,  exterior  painting  of  married 
quarters,  RCAF  Station;  Cameron  Contracting  Ltd,  construction  of  fire  hall,  RCAF  Station. 
Camp  Gagetown  N  B:  Combustion  Engineering-Superheater  Ltd,  replacement  or  retubing 
HT  water  generating  unit.  Chatham  N  B:  A  N  Clarke  &  Son  Ltd,  exterior  painting  of 
married  quarters,  RCAF  Station.  Moncton  N  B:  A  N  Clarke  &  Son  Ltd,  exterior  painting  of 
married  quarters  &  garages,  RCAF  Station.  Bouchard  Que:  E  M  Construction  Ltee,  construc- 
tion of  ammunition  repair  bldg,  camp. 

Camp  Borden  Ont:  Walker  Painting  &  Decorating  Co  Ltd,  exterior  painting  of  married 
quarters,  RCAF  Station.  Centralia  Ont:  Malach  Roofing  &  Flooring  Ltd,  reroofing  hangar  7, 
RCAF  Station.  Kingston  Ont:  M  Sullivan  &  Son  Ltd,  renovations  to  stone  frigate,  Royal 
Military  College.  Rockcliffe  Ont:  Art  Gaudreau  Ltd,  exterior  painting  of  married  quarters. 
Shirley  Bay  Ont:  Andrews  Bros  Construction  Ottawa  Ltd,  construction  of  incinerator  bldg, 
DRB.  Trenton  Ont:  Cardinal  Painting  &  Decorating  Co  Ltd,  exterior  painting  of  married 
quarters,  RCAF  Station.  Uplands  Ont:  Presley  Painting  &  Decorating  Co  Ltd,  exterior 
painting   of  married  quarters,   RCAF   Station. 

Portage  la  Prairie  Man:  Claydon  Co  Ltd,  replacement  of  concrete  apron,  RCAF  Station. 
Winnipeg  Man:  Donco  Enterprises  Ltd,  joint  seal  replacement  in  concrete  aprons,  etc,  RCAF 
Station;  Bird  Construction  Co  Ltd,  addition  to  dining  hall,  Fort  Osborne  Barracks;  Halls 
Associates   (Western)   Ltd,  reroofing  bldgs,  Fort  Osborne  Barracks. 

Namao  Aha:  Ernest  Painting  &  Decorating  Ltd,  exterior  painting  of  married  quarters, 
RCAF  Station.  Chilliwack  B  C:  Hay  Decorating  Co  Ltd,  interior  painting  of  married  quarters 
&  bldgs,  camp.  Comox  B  C:  Beaver  Construction  Co  Ltd,  rebuilding  concrete  apron,  hangar 

THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      JULY    7965  653 


1,  RCAF  Station;  J  W  Kokkelink,  exterior  painting  of  row-type  apt,  RCAF  Station;  J  W 
Kokkelink,  exterior  painting  of  camp  bldgs  &  married  quarters,  Work  Point  Barracks. 

DEPARTMENT  OF  DEFENCE  PRODUCTION 

Goose  Bay  (Labr)  Nfld:  H  A  Krauspe  Reg'd,  interior  painting  of  married  quarters,  RCAF 
Station.  Gander  Nfld:  McNamara  Construction  of  Nfld  Ltd,  repairs  to  roadbed  &  application 
of  surface  treatment,  RCAF  Station.  Summerside  P  E  I:  Curran  &  Briggs  Ltd,  asphalt  repairs, 
RCAF  Station;  Curran  &  Briggs  Ltd,  repairs  to  roads,  etc,  RCAF  Station;  Bernard  Painters 
Ltd,  interior  painting  of  married  quarters,  RCAF  Station. 

Dartmouth  N  S:  Dean's  Nursery  Ltd,  repairing  &  sodding  of  grass  areas,  Shannon  Park 
married  quarters.  Halifax  N  S:  Webb  Engineering  Ltd,  renewal  of  steam,  air  &  condensate 
piping  from  bldg  D64  to  jetty  1,  HMC  Dockyard.  Shearwater  N  S:  Bryant  Flooring  Ltd, 
replacement  of  floor  coverings  in  bldgs,  RCN  Air  Station. 

Chatham  N  B:  Byron  MacDonald  Ltd,  exterior  painting  of  trims  on  bldgs,  RCAF 
Station.  McGivney  N  B:  Flintkote  Co  of  Canada  Ltd,  road  repairs  in  married  quarters  area, 
32  OAD,  camp.  St  Margarets  N  B:  Byron  MacDonald  Ltd,  interior  painting  of  bldgs,  RCAF 
Station. 

Bagotville  Que:  Laurent  Bedard,  exterior  painting  of  married  quarters,  RCAF  Station. 
Montreal  Que:  Gauthier  &  Frere  Inc,  installation  of  oil  tank  &  burners,  armoury,  2067 
Bleury  St.  St  Hubert  Que:  St  Lawrence  Steeplejacks  Co  Ltd,  interior  painting  of  barrack 
block  55,  RCAF  Station;  Laurentian  Steeplejacks  Ltd,  interior  painting  of  barrack  block  56, 
RCAF  Station;  St  Lawrence  Steeplejacks  Co  Ltd,  interior  painting  of  barrack  block  65, 
RCAF  Station;  St  Lawrence  Steeplejacks  Co  Ltd,  painting  barrack  block  60,  RCAF  Station. 

Angus  Ont:  Ferri  Contracting  Ltd,  application  of  asbestos  shingles  on  walls  of  bldgs, 
depot  13  "X",  RCAF.  Brockville  Ont:  Glen  Smith  Building  Services,  replacement  of  roof, 
armoury.  Centralia  Ont:  Ken  Douglas  Painting  &  Decorating,  interior  painting  of  barrack 
blocks  3  &  10,  RCAF  Station;  Western  Painting  &  Decorating  Services,  exterior  painting  of 
married  quarters,  RCAF  Station;  Western  Painting  &  Decorating  Services,  exterior  painting 
of  bldgs,  RCAF  Station;  Stebbins  Paving  Contractors,  cutting  &  sealing  cracks  on  airfield 
runways  &  taxi  strips,  RCAF  Station;  Towland  Construction  Ltd,  repairing  driveways  of 
married  quarters,  RCAF  Station. 

Falconbridge  Ont:  Denis  Biro  Painting  &  Gyproc  Joint  Filling  Contractor,  interior  paint- 
ing of  married  quarters,  RCAF  Station.  Kingston  Ont:  Kingston  Roofing  &  Flooring  Co  Ltd, 
replacement  of  tiles  in  married  quarters.  Oakville  Ont:  Professional  Painting  &  Decorating, 
interior  painting  &  washing  walls  of  married  quarters,  Surrey  Park.  Petawawa  Ont:  Irving 
Harding  Ltd,  replacement  of  sheet  metal  roof  surface,  camp.  Uplands  Ont:  Ottawa  Valley 
Tank  Lines  Ltd,  sealing  asphalt  pavement  on  station  roads.  Weston  Ont:  Black  &  McDonald 
Ltd,  replacement  of  fire  alarm  panel,  stations  &  bells,  etc. 

Shilo  Man:  Wheat  City  Roofing  Co,  repairing  &  gravelling  roofs  of  duplex  housing  units, 
camp;  G  T  Smith  &  Sons  Ltd,  installation  of  fire  detection,  warning  &  alarm  system  in 
bldgs,  camp.  Wasagaming  Man:  Arnason  Construction  Co  Ltd,  construction  of  sewage 
stabilization  pond,  Clear  Lake  cadet  camp;  Dixon  Painting  &  Flooring,  interior  &  exterior 
painting  of  bldg,  Clear  Lake  cadet  camp.  Winnipeg  Man:  Oswald  Decorating  Co,  exterior 
painting  of  bldgs,  Fort  Osborne  barracks. 

Grande  Prairie  Aha:  D  &  B  Contractors  Ltd,  repair  of  truss  members,  armouries. 
Namao  Alta:  Bob  Elliot  Painting  &  Decorating  Ltd,  interior  painting  of  married  quarters, 
RCAF  Station.  Esquimalt  (Victoria)  B  C:  Laing  &  Clements  Construction,  alterations  to 
windows  &  locker  rooms  in  bldg  88,  HMCS  Naden.  Extension  B  C:  Futcher  &  Helgesen  Ltd, 
erection  of  perimeter  security  fence.  Matsqui  B  C:  Columbia  Bitulithic  Ltd,  road  paving  & 
grading,  HMCS  Aldergrove.  Victoria  B  C:  Plaza  Paint  Pot,  interior  painting  of  married 
quarters,  Work  Point  Barracks. 

In  addition,  this  Department  awarded  69  contracts  containing  the  General  Fair  Wages 
Clause. 

(Catering  Services) 

Hamilton  Ont:  Canada  Catering  Co  Ltd,  food  &  food  services,  HMCS  Patriot.  Clear 
Lake  Man:  Dominion  Catering  Co  Ltd,  food  services,  Clear  Lake  cadet  camp.  Shilo  Man: 
Dominion  Catering  Co  Ltd,  food  services,  camp.  Wainwright  Alta:  Canada  Catering  Co  Ltd, 
food  services,  camp.  Comox  B  C:  Canada  Catering  Co  Ltd,  food  &  food  services,  HMCS 
Quadra. 

NATIONAL  HARBOURS  BOARD 

Halifax  N  S:  J  G  Fitzpatrick  Ltd,  construction  of  transit  shed  9A  on  pier  9.  Saint  John 
N  B:  Westeel  Products  Ltd,  replacement  of  dockside  doors,  sheds  1  &  11.  Quebec  Que: 
F  F  Sprinklers  Ltd,  installation  of  sprinkler  system,  shed  "A". 

654  THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE     •     JULY  1965 


DEPARTMENT  OF  NORTHERN  AFFAIRS  AND  NATIONAL  RESOURCES 

Prince  Edward  Island  National  Park  P  E  I:  Maritime  Electric  Co  Ltd,  installation  of 
submarine  cable  to  service  Rustico  Island.  Jasper  National  Park  Alta:  Crawley  &  Mohr  Ltd, 
installation  of  prefabricated  kitchen  shelter  &  toilet  bldg,  Whistler  Mountain  campground. 

In  addition,  this  Department  awarded  one  contract  containing  the  General  Fair  Wages 
Clause. 

POST  OFFICE  DEPARTMENT 

This  Department  awarded  seven  contracts  containing  the  General  Fair  Wages  Clause 
PROJECTS  ASSISTED  BY  FEDERAL  LOAN  OR  GRANT 

Windsor  Ont:  D'Amore  Construction  (Windsor)  Ltd,  construction  of  sewers,  sewage 
force  mains,  bldgs,  pumping  stations,  etc,  (contract  1);  Keystone  Contractors  Ltd,  construc- 
tion of  sewers,  sewage  force  mains,  bldgs,  pumping  stations,  etc,  (contract  2). 

DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  WORKS 

Bay  de  Verde  Nfld:  Babb  Construction  Ltd,  breakwater  repairs.  Bell  Island  Nfld:  M  A 
Rose  &  Son  Ltd,  construction  of  access  road  to  light  station.  Bonavista  (O'Dea's  Pond)  Nfld: 
Benson  Builders  Ltd,  reconstruction  of  walls.  Conche  Nfld:  Glen  Construction  Co  Ltd,  wharf 
reconstruction.  Harbour  Breton  Nfld:  Cameron  Contracting  Ltd,  wharf  improvements. 
Newton  Nfld:  Beaton  Abbott,  wharf  replacement.  Norris  Point  Nfld:  Gid  Sacrey  Ltd,  wharf 
reconstruction.  Pass  Island  Nfld:  Power  Construction  Ltd,  construction  of  community  stage 
wharf.  Red  Head  Cove  Nfld:  Quinlan  Bros  Ltd,  wharf  repairs.  Roddickton  Nfld:  Avalon 
Construction  &  Engineering  Ltd,  wharf  extension. 

Fishing  Cove  P  E  I:  H  J  Phillips  &  Son,  construction  of  protection  wall.  Little  Sands 
P  E  I:  Colin  R  MacDonald  Ltd,  breakwater  repairs.  Miminegash  P  E  I:  Morrison  &  McRae 
Ltd,  harbour  improvements. 

Arisaig  N  S:  A  E  Whidden,  breakwater — wharf  repairs.  Bear  Point  N  S:  Leonard  W 
Shaw,  wharf  repairs.  Cheticamp  Point  N  S:  Allan  J  MacDonald,  repairs  to  harbour  works. 
Dartmouth  N  S:  Cooke  Sales  Ltd,  installation  of  reversible  belt  conveyor,  federal  bldg. 
Fall's  Point  N  S:  Continental  Construction  Co  Ltd,  harbour  improvements.  Grand  Etang  N  S: 
Universal  Pipe  Line  Welding  Ltd,  installation  of  water  supply.  L'Archeveque  N  S:  Colin  R 
MacDonald  Ltd,  west  breakwater  repairs. 

Lower  East  Pubnico  N  S:  Seaport  Contractors  &  Landscape  Ltd,  site  preparation. 
Margaree  Harbour  N  S:  Arthur  A  Cormier,  west  breakwater  repairs.  Pinkney's  Point  N  S: 
Clare  Construction  Co  Ltd,  approach  repairs.  Pleasant  Bay  (The  Ponds)  N  S:  Nova  Construc- 
tion Co  Ltd,  harbour  improvements.  Port  Hood  Island  (Smith's  Cove)  N  S:  Colin  R  Mac- 
Donald Ltd,  harbour  improvements.  Port  Latour  N  S:  Shelburne  Contracting  Ltd,  wharf 
repairs.  Port  Morien  N  S:  R  A  Douglas  Ltd,  harbour  improvements.  Wallace  N  S:  Stanley 
Reid,  wharf  reconstruction.  Weymouth  North  N  S:  Stanley  Reid,  construction  of  wharf 
mooring. 

Cape  Bald  N  B:  Scott  Wheaton  Ltd,  breakwater  repairs.  Grand  Anse  N  B:  Comeau  & 
Savoie  Construction  Ltd,  wharf  repairs.  Newcastle  N  B:  M  F  Esson  &  Sons  Ltd,  wharf  repairs. 
Petit  Rocher  N  B:  Comeau  &  Savoie  Construction  Ltd,  breakwater  repairs.  Ste  Marie-sur-Mer 
N  B:  Comeau  &  Savoie  Construction  Ltd,  breakwater  repairs.  Shippegan  Gully  N  B:  Diamond 
Construction  (1961)  Ltd,  east  breakwater  reconstruction. 

Anse-aux-Basques  Que:  Jean  Charles  Tremblay,  construction  &  installation  of  gaugeway. 
Baie  Ste-Catherine  (Anse-au-Portage)  Que:  Georges  Cauchon,  wharf  repairs.  Brion  Island 
(M  I)  Que:  Adrien  Arseneau,  breakwater  repairs.  Cap  Bon  Desir  Que:  Philias  Savard,  con- 
struction of  access  road  to  light  station.  Cap  Chat  Que:  Les  Entreprises  Mont  Sterling, 
wharf  repairs.  Chute-aux-Outardes  Que:  Landry  Construction  Inc,  construction  of  post  office 
bldg.  Entty  Island  (M  I)  Que:  Adrien  Arseneau,  harbour  improvements.  Havre  Aubert 
(M  I)  Que:  Turbide  &  Jomphe  Enrg,  wharf  extension. 

Hull  Que:  Stanley  G  Brookes  Ltd,  lighting  causeway  bridge;  Beaudoin  Construction  Ltd, 
installation  for  computing  devices,  National  Printing  Bureau.  Les  Eboulements  Que:  La 
Fonderie  de  Lauzon  Ltee,  improvements  to  hoisting  apparatus.  Montreal  Que:  Allied  Bldg 
Services  (1962)  Ltd,  repointing  &  cleaning  of  masonry,  international  civil  aviation  bldg,  1080 
University  Ave.  Pointe  Claire  Que:  Ron  Engineering  &  Construction  (Quebec)  Ltd,  con- 
struction of  bldg  for  pulp  &  paper  research  institute  of  Canada.  Quebec  Que:  Sanitation  & 
Industrial  Maintenance  Co  Ltd,  interior  cleaning,  UIC  bldg,   155  Dorchester  St  South. 

Riviere-au-Tonnerre  Que:  Lang  Construction  Co  Ltd,  landing  pier  improvements. 
Riviere  Madeleine  Que:  Wilbrod  LeTourneau,  construction  of  slipway  &  hauling  plant 
Sacre-Cceur  Que:  Girard  &  Frere  Enr,  construction  of  post  office  bldg.  Ste  Henedine  Que: 

THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE     •     JULY  1965  655 


Roger  Turgeon.  construction  of  post  office  bldg.  St  Laurent  Que:  Prieur  Entreprises  Inc, 
modifications  &  alterations  to  former  stills  area,  National  Film  Board,  3255  Cote  de  Liesse 
Rd;  Prieur  Entreprises  Inc,  installation  of  refrigeration  units,  National  Film  Board,  3255 
Cote  de  Liesse  Rd. 

St  Roch  de  Belle  Combe  (Lac  Caron)  Que:  Gilles  Mercier  Enrg,  construction  of  launch- 
ing ramp  &  approach  improvements.  St  Vincent  de  Paul  Que:  The  Highway  Paving  Co  Ltd, 
grading,  base  course  &  paving  of  access  roads,  Leclerc  institution;  Les  Entreprises  Alpha  Co 
1  tee.  alterations  to  administration  bldg,  federal  training  centre.  Verdun  Que:  Nation-Wide 
Interior   Maintenance    Co    Ltd,    interior   cleaning   of   UIC   bldg. 

Burlington  Channel  Ont:  Bermingham  Construction  Ltd,  harbour  repairs  &  improvements, 
east  part  of  south  pier  (stage  1).  Cornwall  Island  Ont:  Arthur  Bros  Window  &  Floor  Clean- 
ing Service,  interior  cleaning,  etc,  customs  hwy  office.  Don  Mills  Ont:  Harry  S  Denning 
Service  Ltd,  interior  cleaning  &  maintenance  of  post  office.  Elmira  Ont:  Gorsline  Construc- 
tion Ltd,  construction  of  post  office  bldg.  Etobicoke  Ont:  Scollard  Maintenance  Ltd,  interior 
cleaning  of  post  office.  Fort  Erie  Ont:  B  Zaitz  Construction  &  Marine  Ltd,  construction  of 
customs  wharf  &  office. 

Fort  William  Ont:  Claydon  Co  Ltd  alterations  to  post  office  bldg,  Syndicate  Ave. 
Goderich  Ont:  Nadeco  Ltd,  construction  of  water  gauge  station.  Hamilton  Ont:  RulifT  Grass 
Construction  Co  Ltd,  harbour  &  wharf  improvements,  Wellington  St;  Canadian  Dredge  & 
Dock  Co  Ltd,  improvements  to  Catherine  St  wharf  extension  (stage  4).  New  Toronto  Ont: 
Harry  S  Denning  Cleaning  Service,  interior  cleaning  &  maintenance  of  postal  station  "U", 
935  The  Queensway.  Ottawa  Ont:  Professor  Antonio  Maranzi,  renovations  of  ceilings,  House 
of  Commons  &  Senate,  Parliament  Bldgs;  Beaudoin  Construction  Ltd,  construction  of  cafeteria 
canopy  &  alterations,  8th  floor,  Lome  Bldg;  Murphy  &  Morrow  Ltd,  application  of  acoustical 
tile,  DBS,  Tunney's  Pasture;  Leslie  Morgan  Furniture  Finishers,  renovation  of  desks,  chairs, 
etc,  House  of  Commons  Chamber;  Normand-Farquharson  Ltd,  application  of  acoustical  tile 
in  various  rooms,  Brooke  Claxton  Bldg;  Beaudoin  Construction  Ltd,  painting  &  pointing  of 
UIC  Bldg,  385  Slater  St;  R  &  R  Construction,  alterations  to  basement,  first  &  second  floors, 
temporary  bldg  2;  Goldstein  Bros  Ltd,  installation  of  exit  &  emergency  lighting,  RCMP 
HQ  Bldg,  Alta  Vista  Dr;  J  R  Statham  Construction  Ltd,  alterations  to  third  &  fourth  floors, 
Ogilvy  Bldg,  Rideau  St;  Maurice  Savard,  exterior  painting  of  "C"  Bldg,  Cartier  Square. 

Perth  Ont:  Burprom  Ltd,  wharf  construction.  Portland  Ont:  Latulippe  Bros,  wharf 
repairs.  Port  Weller  Ont:  Art  Ellis  Construction  (St  Catharines)  Ltd,  construction  of  pilotage 
office  for  Dept  of  Transport.  Richmond  Hill  Ont:  Ross  Anderson,  interior  cleaning  of  federal 
bldg.  St  Elmo  Ont:  Owen  J  Walbridge,  wharf  reconstruction.  Scarborough  Ont:  ABM 
Construction,  alterations  to  bldg  for  Public  Archives  of  Canada,  651  Warden  Ave.  Silverwater 
Ont:  G  F  Coles  Construction,  wharf  repairs. 

Toronto  Ont:  Black  &  McDonald  Ltd,  supply  &  installation  of  air  conditioning  equip- 
ment, William  Lyon  MacKenzie  Bldg;  Anglo-Canadian  Bldg  Maintenance,  interior  cleaning, 
Sir  William  Mulock  Bldg,  241  Jarvis  St.  Wellington  Ont:  Burprom  Ltd,  wharf  repairs. 
White  River  Ont:  J  Anderson  Construction,  construction  of  post  office  bldg.  Wikwemikong 
Ont:  G  F  Coles  Construction  Ltd,  wharf  reconstruction. 

Killarney  Man:  Wm  L  McArter,  interior  &  exterior  cleaning,  federal  bldg.  Saskatoon 
Sask:  Boychuck  Construction  (Sask)  Ltd,  construction  of  office  &  laboratory  bldg,  Canadian 
Wildlife  Services,  University  of  Saskatchewan,  Dept  of  Northern  Affairs  &  National  Resources. 
Calgary  Alta:  Universal  Construction  Co  Ltd,  construction  of  UIC/DVA  bldg;  Parkins 
Construction  Ltd,  spandrel  recladding  to  postal  terminal  bldg;  Walter  McKenzie  Decorating 
Ltd,  interior  painting  of  federal  bldg.  Fort  Fitzgerald  Alta:  Yukon  Construction  Co  Ltd, 
wharf  repairs.  Manning  Alta:  MacCalder  Construction  Co  Ltd,  construction  of  post  office 
bldg. 

Hope  Bay  B  C:  Harbour  Piledriving  Co,  wharf  repairs.  Manson's  Landing  B  C:  Ed 
Sawchuck  Contracting  Co  Ltd,  float  extension.  New  Westminster  B  C:  Walker  Construction, 
alterations  for  water  resources  branch,  Indian  Affairs  &  Fisheries  Bldg;  Fraser  River  Pile 
Driving  Co  Ltd,  installation  of  railway  bridge  trestle  ties.  Oliver  B  C:  Alexander  Faulds, 
interior  cleaning  of  federal  oldg.  Port  Clements  B  C:  Holland  Construction  &  Logging  Ltd, 
wharf  improvements. 

Port  Hardy  B  C:  Basarab  Construction  Co  Ltd,  construction  of  post  office  bldg.  Port 
Washington  B  C:  Harbour  Piledriving  Co,  wharf  repairs.  Queen  Charlotte  City  B  C:  Pacific 
Piledriving  Co  Ltd,  wharf  renewal  &  extension.  Sidney  B  C:  Pacific  Piledriving  Co  Ltd, 
wharf  &  float  repairs,  Beacon  Ave.  Tofino  B  C:  Tom  Gibson  &  Sons  Contracting  Ltd,  break- 
water repairs.  Victoria  B  C:  Farmer  Construction  Ltd,  construction  of  federal  bldg  for  Dept 
of  National  Revenue  &  UIC. 

656  THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      JULY   1965 


Fort  Smith  N  W  7.  Bert  Johnson  Painting,  painting  &  redecorating  federal  housing. 
Whitehorse  Y  T:  Frank  Lang  Painting  &  Decorating,  exterior  painting  of  housing  units  & 
garages,  Valleyview,  Riverdale  &  Takhini  subdivisions;  General  Enterprises  Ltd,  replacement 
of  pipe  line  on  Normandy  Rd. 

In  addition,  this  Department  awarded  63  contracts  containing  the  General  Fair  Wages 
Clause. 

THE  ST   LAWRENCE  SEAWAY  AUTHORITY 

St  Lambert  Que:  R  E  Stewart  Construction  Corp,  construction  of  administration  bldg. 
St  Lambert,  Cote  Ste  Catherine  &  Beauharnois  Que  &  Iroquois  Ont:  Standish  Bros  Regd, 
grass  control  &  fertilizing.  Port  Colborne  Ont:  Bridge  &  Tank  Co  of  Canada  Ltd,  construction 
of  safety  cage  &  platforms  on  tower  ladders,  bridge  20,  Welland  canal.  Port  Weller  &  St 
Catharines  Ont:  Bridge  &  Tank  Co  of  Canada  Ltd,  supply  &  installation  of  mitre  gate  operat- 
ing machines  for  lower  end  of  locks  1  &  3,  Welland  canal.  Port  Weller,  St  Catharines  & 
Thorold  Ont:  Bridge  &  Tank  Co  of  Canada  Ltd,  supply  &  installation  of  valve  operating 
machines  for  lower  end  of  locks  1,  3  &  7,  Welland  Canal. 

St  Catharines  Ont:  Antici  Construction  Co  Ltd,  restabilization  of  portion  of  weir  bank 
on  east  side  of  waste  weir,  lock  2,  Welland  Canal;  Bridge  &  Tank  Co  of  Canada  Ltd,  struc- 
tural &  mechanical  repairs  &  restoration  of  vertical  lift  bridge  5,  Welland  Canal.  Thorold 
Ont:  Peacock  Contracting  Ltd,  pondage  enlargement,  lock  4  (stage  1),  Welland  Canal. 

In  addition,  The  St  Lawrence  Seaway  Authority  awarded  two  contracts  containing  the 
General  Fair  Wages  Clause. 

DEPARTMENT  OF  TRANSPORT 

St  Anthony  Nfld:  Pinsent  Construction  Co  Ltd,  construction  of  LORAN  "C"  monitor 
bldg,  power  house,  dwellings,  etc.  Brier  Island  N  S:  E  K  Potter  Ltd,  construction  of  dwelling 
&  storage  shed.  Cape  D'Or  N  S:  Cameron  Contracting  Ltd,  demolition  of  various  bldgs  & 
construction  of  dwelling,  fog  alarm  bldg,  light  tower  &  shed.  Cape  St  Mary  N  S:  Meteghan 
Home  Furnishings,  demolition  of  various  bldgs  &  construction  of  dwellings,  fog  alarm  bldg, 
light  tower  &  shed.  Sydney  N  S:  Stephens  Construction  Ltd,  construction  of  field  electrical 
centre. 

Charlo  N  B:  North  Shore  Construction  Ltd,  paving  of  runway,  airport.  Grand  Manan 
Island  N  B:  Cameron  Contracting  Ltd,  demolition  of  various  bldgs  &  construction  of  shed, 
fog  alarm  bldg  &  light  tower,  Big  Duck  Island;  Cameron  Contracting  Ltd,  demolition  of 
various  bldgs  &  construction  of  fog  alarm  bldg  &  light  tower,  Long  Point.  Musquash  N  B: 
W  G  Usher  Co  Ltd,  demolition  of  various  bldgs  &  construction  of  dwelling,  fog  alarm  bldg 
&  light  tower. 

Dorval  Que:  Sestock  Construction  Ltd,  construction  of  field  electrical  centre,  Montreal 
International  Airport.  Quebec  Que:  Sanitation  &  Industrielle  Mtce  Co  Ltee,  cleaning  of  air 
terminal  bldg.  Sept  lies  Que:  Nordbec  Construction  Inc,  alterations  &  additions  to  air  terminal 
bldg. 

Fort  William  Ont:  B  A  Construction  Ltd,  strengthening  of  runway  12-30  &  taxiway 
"A",  Lakehead  Airport.  Sault  Ste  Marie  Ont:  J  M  Fuller  Ltd,  construction  of  sand  storage 
bldg,  etc. 

Winnipeg  Man:  McEwen  Bros  Ltd,  maintenance  of  landscaped  grounds  &  interior  plant- 
ings, international  airport;  Kraft  Construction  Co  Ltd,  construction  of  ASR-5  radar  equip- 
ment bldg,  pile  foundations,  power  supply,  access  road,  etc,  international  airport.  Regina 
Sask:  Huber  Electric  Co,  installation  of  condenser  discharge  threshold  identification  lights, 
runway  07,  airport.  Yorkton  Sask:  Matheson  Bros  Ltd,  reconstruction  of  circulating  taxiway, 
airport. 

Edmonton  Alta:  Alther  Construction  Ltd,  modifications  to  maintenance  garage,  fire  hall, 
international  airport.  Grande  Prairie  Alta:  Standard  General  Construction  (Int)  Ltd,  recon- 
struction of  runway  06-24  &  taxiways;  Cookshaw  Electric  Ltd,  installation  of  condenser  dis- 
charge threshold  identification  lights,  runway  29,  etc,  airport.  Lethbridge  Alta:  E  Lobe  Con- 
tracting Ltd,  surface  treatment  of  runways  12-30,  05-23,  etc,  airport. 

Kamloops  B  C:  Roy  &  Pauline  Franson,  cleaning  of  air  terminal  bldg,  airport.  Penticton 
B  C:  Norman  D  &  Angeline  M  Jacobs,  cleaning  of  air  terminal  &  aeradio  bldgs,  airport. 
Triple  Island  B  C:  D  Robinson  Construction  Ltd,  repairs,  alterations  &  demolition  work, 
combined  dwelling  &  light  tower.  Vancouver  B  C:  Beaver  Construction  Co  Ltd,  construction 
of  taxiways  for  runway  08-26,  access  road  &  drainage  improvements,  airport;  National  Bldg 
Mtce  Ltd,  cleaning  of  air  terminal  bldg,  etc,  international  airport.  Williams  Lake  B  C:  P  H 
Parent,  cleaning  of  air  terminal  bldg,  airport. 

(Continued  on  page  664) 

THE   LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      JULY    7965  657 

91938—5 


PRICE    INDEX 


(Oiisunier  Price  Index,  June   1965 

The  consumer  price  index  (1949=100) 
rose  0.7  per  cent  to  139.0  at  the  beginning 
of  June,  from  138.0  in  May.  The  June  index 
was  2.7  per  cent  higher  than  the  June  1964 
index  of    135.3. 

The  increase  resulted  mainly  from  a  2.3 
per  cent  increase  in  the  food  index  during 
the  month,  although  indexes  for  housing, 
clothing,  transportation,  and  recreation  and 
reading  were  slightly  higher  than  in  May. 
The  health  and  personal  care  index  declined 
fractionally,  while  the  tobacco  and  alcohol 
index  was  unchanged. 

The  food  index  increased  2.3  per  cent  to 
137.6  from  134.5.  Prices  were  substantially 
higher  for  beef  and  pork,  most  fresh  vege- 
tables and  grapefruit.  Other  price  increases 
were  reported  for  a  variety  of  items  includ- 
ing veal,  chicken,  butter,  cheese,  peanut 
butter,  infants'  food,  tea,  apples  and  grapes. 
Prices  were  lower  for  eggs,  fresh  tomatoes, 
oranges  and  orange  juice,  and  coffee. 

The  housing  index  rose  fractionally  to 
140.6,  up  0.1  per  cent  from  140.5.  The  shelter 
component  was  slightly  higher  as  a  result  of 
increased  rent  and  home-ownership  prices. 
The  household  operation  component  was  un- 
changed, as  scattered  price  increases  in 
furniture,  textiles,  and  utensils  and  equip- 
ment were  offset  by  lower  prices  for  coal, 
carpets  and  some  household  supplies. 

The  clothing  index  moved  up  0.1  per  cent 
to  121.1  from  121.0.  Higher  prices  were  re- 
ported for  laundry,  dry-cleaning  and  shoe- 
repair  services,  as  well  as  some  items  of 
men's  and  children's  wear,  piece  goods,  and 
women's  and  children's  footwear. 

The  transportation  index  advanced  0.1  per 
cent  to  147.0  from  146.8  reflecting  a  seasonal 
increase  in  train  fares,  and  higher  taxi  fares 
in  Winnipeg.  The  automobile  operation  com- 
ponent declined  as  increased  prices  for  motor 
oil  and  lubrication  were  outweighed  by  lower 
prices  for  some  new  cars. 

The  health  and  personal  care  index  de- 
clined 0.1  per  cent  to  175.4  from  175.6 
owing  to  price  decreases  in  some  personal 
care  items. 

The  recreation  and  reading  index  increased 
0.3  per  cent  to  155.0  from  154.6.  In  the 
recreation  component,  prices  were  higher  for 
bicycles  and  sports  equipment,  while  price 
increases  for  newspapers  in  Montreal  moved 
the  reading  component. 

The  tobacco  and  alcohol  index  was  un- 
changed at  122.5. 

Group  indexes  one  year  earlier  (June  1964) 
were:  food  132.5,  housing  138.4,  clothing 
119.0,  transportation  142.0,  health  and  per- 
sonal care  167.3,  recreation  and  reading 
151.4,  tobacco  and  alcohol  120.2. 


658 


City  Consumer  Price  Indexes,  May  1965 

Consumer  price  indexes  (1949=100)  were 
higher  in  nine  of  the  10  regional  cities  and 
unchanged  in  the  tenth  between  April  and 
May.  Increases  ranged  from  0.1  per  cent  in 
St.  John's  to  0.6  per  cent  in  Saskatoon- 
Regina  and  Edmonton-Calgary. 

Food  indexes  were  higher  in  all  cities,  the 
movements  ranging  from  0.1  per  cent  in  St. 
John's  to  2.1  per  cent  in  Edmonton-Calgary. 
Housing  indexes  moved  up  slightly  in  five 
cities,  down  in  one,  and  were  unchanged  in 
four.  Clothing  indexes  edged  downward  in 
six  cities,  moved  up  slightly  in  one,  and  were 
constant  in  three.  Transportation  indexes 
were  lower  in  five  cities,  higher  in  three  cities 
and  unchanged  in  two. 

Health  and  personal  care  indexes  moved  up 
in  five  cities,  down  in  three  cities,  and  re- 
mained unchanged  in  two.  Recreation  and 
reading  indexes  rose  in  six  cities,  fell  in  one, 
and  remained  steady  in  three.  Tobacco  and 
alcohol  indexes  were  constant  in  eight  cities 
and  higher  in  two. 

Regional  consumer  price  index  point 
changes  between  April  and  May  were:  Sas- 
katoon-Regina  +0.8  to  131.9;  Edmonton- 
Calgary  +0.8  to  129.7;  Montreal  +0.6  to 
137.4;  Toronto  +0.5  to  139.4;  Halifax  +0.4 
to  133.9;  Ottawa  +0.4  to  137.7;  Winnipeg 
+0.4  to  135.2;  Saint  John  +0.3  to  136.4; 
St.  John's  +0.1  to  122.8*.  Vancouver  re- 
mained unchanged  at  134.5. 

Wholesale  Price  Index,  May  1965 

Canada's  general  wholesale  index  (1935- 
39=100)  rose  to  249.2  in  May,  up  0.6  per 
cent  from  the  April  index  of  247.6  and  1.3 
per  cent  above  the  May  1964  index  of  245.9. 

Six  of  the  eight  major  group  indexes  ad- 
vanced in  May  while  one  declined.  The 
remaining  one  was  unchanged. 

The  non-ferrous  metals  products  group  in- 
dex moved  up  3  per  cent  to  219.5  in  May 
from  the  April  index  of  213.2,  the  animal 
products  group  index  advanced  1.4  per  cent 
to  260.1  from  256.5,  and  the  iron  products 
group  index  advanced  0.7  per  cent  to  265.6 
from  263.8.  There  was  a  0.3  per  cent  rise 
to  201.3  from  200.6  in  the  chemical  prod- 
ucts group  index,  the  textile  products  group 
index  also  advanced  0.3  per  cent  to  247.1 
from  246.4,  and  the  vegetable  products  group 
index  edged  upward  to  219.4  from  219.2. 

The  wood  products  group  index,  the  only 
group  which  declined  in  May,  eased  to  333.1 
from  the  April  index  of  333.3. 

The  non-metallic  minerals  products  group 
index  was  unchanged  at  190.8. 


On   base   June   1951=100. 

THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      JULY    7965 


The  index  of  Canadian  farm  product  prices 
at  terminal  markets  (1935-39  100)  ad- 
vanced 5.1  per  eent  from  229.2  to  241.0  in 
the  four-week  period  ending  May  28.  The 
animal  products  index  rose  6.4  per  cent  from 
270.6  to  288.0,  and  the  field  products  index 
advanced  3.3  per  cent  from   187.8  to   194.0. 

The  price  index  of  residential  building 
materials  (1935-39=100)  declined  0.1  per 
cent  in  May  to  341.3  from  341.7  in  April. 
On  the  1949  basis,  it  was  down  to  149.7 
from    149.9. 

The  price  index  of  non-residential  building 
materials  (1949=100)  rose  0.3  per  cent  to 
148.0  from  147.6. 

U.S.  Consumer  Price  Index,  May  1965 

The  United  States  consumer  price  index 
(1957-59=100)  rose  three-tenths  of  1  per 
cent  to  a  record  109.6  in  May  from  109.3  in 
April.  A  year  ago  in  May  the  index  was 
107.8. 

The  April-May  price  increase  of  six- 
tenths  of  1  per  cent  was  the  largest  since 
June-July  1963,  when  prices  rose  eight-tenths 
of  1   per  cent. 


Ih-'  increase  was  caused  by  bad  weather 
that  drove  up  the  prices  of  potatoes,  lettuce, 
cabbage  and  tomatoes.  Rising  demand  and 
short  supplies  pushed  up  the  prices  of  beef, 
Veal,    poik    and    lamb. 

Advances  were  also  registered  in  transpor- 
tation costs,  clothing,  cigarettes,  medical  and 
personal  care,  housekeeping  services,  main- 
tenance and  repairs,  and  property  taxes. 

British  Index  of  Retail  Prices,  April   1965 

The  British  index  of  retail  prices  (Jan.  16, 
1962=100)  rose  to  112.0  at  mid-April  from 
109.9  at  mid-March,  and  106.1  at  mid-April, 
1964. 

The  increase  was  caused  mainly  by  higher 
prices  of  cigarettes,  tobacco  and  alcoholic 
beverages,  higher  local  rates  and  water 
charges,  increases  in  the  cost  of  motor  ve- 
hicle licenses,  and  increases — largely  seasonal 
— in  the  prices  of  tomatoes,  partly  offset  by 
seasonal  reductions  in  the  price  of  household 
coal. 

The  fcod  index  rose  to  111.6  from  110.4 
in  March. 


Publications  Recently  Received 


in  Department  of  Labour  Library 


The  publications  listed  below  are  not  for 
sale  by  the  Department  of  Labour.  Persons 
wishing  to  purchase  them  should  communi- 
cate with  the  publishers.  Publications  listed 
may  be  borrowed  by  making  application  to 
the  Librarian,  Department  of  Labour,  Ottawa. 
Students  must  apply  through  the  library  of 
of  their  institution.  Applications  for  loans 
should  give  the  number  (numeral)  of  the 
publication  desired  and  the  month  in  which 
it  was  listed  in  the  Labour  Gazette. 

List  No.  201. 

Adult  Education 

1.  CANADA.  BUREAU  OF  STATISTICS. 

Survey  of  Adult  Education.  L' education  des 
adultes,  1961-62.  Ottawa,  Queen's  Printer, 
1964.  Pp.  55.  Text  in  English  and  French. 

2.  WORKERS'  EDUCATIONAL  ASSO- 
CIATION (GREAT  BRITAIN).  CENTRAL 
COUNCIL.  The  Widening  Horizon;  Social 
Education  in  a  Specialist  Age.  London,  1964. 
Pp.    [64] 

Report  of  the  WEA  for  the  period  between 
the  Association's  biennial  conferences  in  March 
1962  and  April   1964. 


Annual  Reports 

3.  BRITISH  COLUMBIA.  DEPARTMENT 
OF  LABOUR.  Annual  Report  for  the  Year 
ended  December  31,  1964.  [Victoria?]  Queen's 
Printer,  1965.  Pp.  101. 

4.  BRITISH  PRODUCTIVITY  COUNCIL. 

Annual  Review,  1963/64.  London  [1965] 
Pp.  20. 

5.  CANADA.  BUREAU  OF  STATISTICS. 

[Twenty-second]  Annual  Report  on  Benefit 
Periods  established  and  terminated  under  the 
Unemployment  Insurance  Act,  Calendar 
Year,  1963.  Ottawa,  Queen's  Printer,  1965. 
Pp.   112. 

6.  EUROPEAN  ECONOMIC  COMMU- 
NITY. COMMISSION.  Seventh  General  Re- 
port on  the  Activities  of  the  Community, 
1  April,  1963-31  March,  1964.  Brussels, 
1964.  Pp.   366. 

7.  INTERNATIONAL  INSTITUTE  FOR 
LABOUR  STUDIES.  Report  for  1964. 
Geneva,  1965.  Pp.  [16]. 

8.  NEW  BRUNSWICK.  WORKMEN'S 
COMPENSATION  BOARD.  Forty -sixth  An- 
nual Report,  1964.  St.  John,  1965.  Pp.  29. 


THE   LABOUR   GAZETTE      •      JULY    J965 


659 


9.  NOVA  SCOTIA.  WORKMEN'S  COM- 
PENSAllON  BOARD.  Report  for  1964. 
Halifax,  Queen's  Printer,   1965.   Pp.   35. 

10.  PRINCE  EDWARD  ISLAND.  DE- 
PARTMENT OF  WELFARE  AND  LA- 
BOl  R.  Ninth  Annual  Report  for  the  Fiscal 
Year  ended  March  31st,  1964.  Charlottetown 
[1965   ].  Pp.  40. 

11.  U.S.    DEPARTMENT    OF    LABOR. 

Fiftx-second    Annual    Report,    Fiscal    Year, 

1964.  Washington,  GPO,  1965.  Pp.  221. 

12.  U.S.  OFFICE  OF  MANPOWER, 
AUTOMATION  AND  TRAINING.  Man- 
power and  Automation  Research  sponsored 
by  the  Office  of  Manpower,  Automation  and 
Training,  July  1,  1963-June  30,  1964.  Wash- 
ington, GPO,  1964.  Pp.  126. 

13.  U.S.  PRESIDENT,  1963-  (LYN- 
DON B.  JOHNSON).  Manpower  Report  of 
the  President  and  a  Report  on  Manpower 
Requirements,  Resources,  Utilization,  and 
Training  by  the  United  States  Department  of 
Labor   transmitted   to   the    Congress,   March 

1965.  [Washington,  GPO,  1965].  Pp.  276. 

Automation 

14.  INTERNATIONAL  LABOUR  OF- 
FICE. Automation:  a  Discussion  of  Research 
Methods.  Geneva,  1964.  Pp.  276. 

In  March  1964  the  International  Labour  Of- 
fice sponsored  a  Meeting  of  Experts  on  Auto- 
mation with  representatives  from  12  countries. 
The  purpose  of  the  meeting  was  to  examine  the 
impact  of  automation  and  advanced  technology 
on  the  labour  force  and  the  programs  which 
have  been  developed  for  dealing  with  adverse 
consequences  for  the  individual  worker.  This 
volume  contains  background  papers  prepared  for 
the  meeting,  as  well  as  the  text  of  the  conclusions 
and  recommendations  adopted  by  the  meeting. 
The  report  was  prepared  for  publication  by 
Phillip  Cohen  of  the  Economics  and  Research 
Branch,  Canada  Department  of  Labour,  then 
on   loan   to  ILO. 

15.  QUINET,  FELIX.  Technological  change 
and  collective  agreements.  Remarks  presented 
at  the  32nd  Conference  of  ACFAS  {Asso- 
ciation canadienne-frangaise  pour  Vavance- 
ment  des  Sciences),  University  of  Ottawa, 
November  1964.  [Ottawa?  Canada  Dept.  of 
Labour?   1964?]  Pp.    11. 

Business 

16.  COMMITTEE  FOR  ECONOMIC  DE- 
VELOPMENT. Educating  Tomorrow's  Man- 
agers: the  Business  Schools  and  the  Business 
Community.  A  Statement  on  National  Policy 
by  the  Research  and  Policy  Committee  of 
the  Committee  for  Economic  Development. 
New  York,  1964.  Pp.  47. 

Contains  an  appraisal,  along  with  conclusions 
and  recommendations,  of  the  functions  of  busi- 
ness schools  and  departments  of  business  edu- 
cation  in  American   colleges   and   universities. 


17.  IMMER,  JOHN  R.  Profitable  Small 
Plant  Layout.  2d  ed.  Washington,  GPO, 
1964.  Pp.  [48] 

Contents:  Why  be  concerned  about  layout? 
Who  does  the  work?  Estimating  costs  and  sav- 
ings. Planning  the  layout.  List  requirements  and 
functions  of  your  plant.  Major  areas  required. 
How  to  show  the  flow  of  materials.  Layout  of 
the  workplace.  Making  the  layout.  Planning  the 
move.  Sources   of  information. 

Economic  Council  of  Canada 

The  following  eleven  studies  were  prepared 
as  background  papers  for  the  First  Annual  Re- 
view of  the  Economic  Council  of  Canada.  They 
were  published  in  Ottawa  in  1965  by  the 
Queen's  Printer. 

18.  DALY,  DONALD  JAMES.  Federal 
Tax  Revenues  at  Potential  Output,  1960  and 
1970.  Pp.  9,   325-336.   Staff  study  No.  9. 

19.  DAWSON,     JOHN     ADDINGTON. 

Changes  in  Agriculture  to  1970.  Pp.  26. 
Staff  study  No.   11. 

20  DENTON,  FRANK  T.  An  Analysis  of 
Post-war  Unemployment,  by  Frank  T.  Denton 
and  Sylvia  Ostry.  Pp.  47.  Staff  study  No.  3. 

21.  DENTON,  FRANK  T.  Population  and 
Labour  Force  Projections  to  1970,  by  Frank 
T.  Denton,  Yoshiko  Kasahara  [and]  Sylvia 
Ostry.  Pp.  43.  Staff  study  No.   1. 

22.  DOWNS,  JOHN  RICHARD.  Export 
Projections  to  1970.  Pp.  38.  Staff  study  No.  8. 

23.  DRABBLE,  BERNARD  J.  Potential 
Output,   1946  to   1970.   Pp.   81.   Staff  study 

No.  2. 

24.  HORNE,    GILBERT    RICHARD.    A 

Survey  of  Labour  Market  Conditions,  Wind- 
sor, Ontario,  1964:  a  Case  Study,  by  G.  R. 
Home,  W.  J.  Gillen  [and]  R.  A.  Helling. 
Pp.  34.  Special  study  No.  2. 

25.  ILLING,  WOLFGANG  M.  Housing 
Demand  to  1970.  Pp.  51.  Staff  study  No.  4. 

26.  KEYS,  B.  ALLAN.  Special  Survey  of 
Longer  Range  Investment  Outlook  and  Plan- 
ning in  Business.  Pp.   10.  Staff  study  No.  6. 

27.  WHITE,  DEREK  A.  Business  Invest- 
ment to  1970.  Pp.  95.  Staff  study  No.  5. 

28.  WILDGEN,  FRANK.  National  Saving 
at  Potential  Output  to  1970.  Pp.  43.  Staff 
study  No.   10. 

Employment  Management 

29.  INSTITUTE  OF  PERSONNEL  MAN- 
AGEMENT. Personnel  Management  in  De- 
veloping Countries.  Edited  by  J.  E.  Genders. 
London,    1964.  Pp.   60. 

The  contributors  to  this  booklet  come  from 
Kenya,  British  Guiana,  India,  Malaya  and  Ni- 
geria. They  discuss  such  matters  as  collective 
bargaining,  industrial  relations,  joint  consulta- 
tion, job  evaluation,  and  supervisory  training. 


660 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      JULY   1965 


30.  NATIONAL  INDUSTRIAL  CON- 
FERENCE BOARD.  Personnel  Practices  in 

Factory     and     Office:    Manufacturing.     New 
York,   1964.  Pp.    152. 

About  1800  manufacturers  with  250  employees 
or  more  each  are  represented  in  this  survey. 
There  are  174  tables  providing  information 
about  company  practices  in  connection  with 
employment  procedures,  hours  of  work  and  pay 
practices,  communications,  training  and  educa- 
tion, company  services,  time  oil'  with  pay,  em- 
ployee benefit  plans,  health  and  safety,  and 
miscellaneous    work    rules. 

31.  THORNE  GROUP  LTD.  Fringe  Bene- 
fit Costs  in  Canada,  1963.  Toronto,  1964. 
1   volume   (various  pagings). 

This  report,  covering  the  calendar  year  1963, 
is  based  on  data  received  from  77  companies 
with  a  total  working  force  of  318,310.  Informa- 
tion is  given  concerning  paid  time  off  (vacation 
pay,  holidays  with  pay)  payments  required  by 
law  (unemployment  insurance,  workmen's  com- 
pensation, and  old  age  security),  pension  and 
welfare  plans,  severance  and  termination  pay, 
savings  and  thrift  plans,  year-end  and  special 
bonuses,  and  non-cash  benefits  (e.g.  free  meals, 
free  lodging  or  housing,  Christmas  gifts  and 
safety    clothing.) 

Industrial    Relations 

32.  OWEN,  WILLIAM  VERN.  Industrial 
Relations:  Management,  Labor,  and  Society 
[by]  W.  Y.  Owen  [and]  Howard  V.  Finston. 
New  York,  Appleton-Century-Crofts,  1964. 
Pp.  339. 

Contents:  Pt.  1.  The  Nature  of  Industrial 
Relations.  Pt.  2.  The  Parties.  Pt.  3.  Some  Eco- 
nomic Issues.  Pt.  4.  Organization  and  Theoretical 
Analyses.  Pt.  5.  Operations. 

33.  VOLLMER,  HOWARD  M.  Employee 
Righis  and  the  Employment  Relationship. 
Berkeley,  University  of  California  Press, 
1960.   Pp.    175. 

"A  publication  of  the  Institute  of  Industrial 
Relations,  University  of  California."  This  mono- 
graph is  concerned  with  employees'  attitudes 
toward  their  job  rights. 

Internationa]    Labour   Conference,    1965 

The  following  four  reports  were  prepared  by 
the  International  Labour  Office  and  published 
in  Geneva  in  1964  and  1965. 

34.  Agrarian  Reform,  with  Particular  Ref- 
erence to  Employment  and  Social  Aspects. 
Sixth  item  on  the  agenda.  Pp.  128. 

At  head  of  title:  Report  6.  International 
Labour  Conference.  Forty-ninth  session,  Geneva, 
1965. 

35.  The  Employment  of  Women  with 
Family  Responsibilities.  Fifth  item  on  the 
agenda.  2  volumes. 

At  head  of  title:  Report  5(l)-(2).  Interna- 
tional Labour  Conference.  49th  session,  Geneva, 
1965.  Part  1  contains  a  proposed  Recommenda- 
tion for  consideration  by  member  countries. 
Part  2  contains  comments  from  member  coun- 
tries as  well  as  English  and  French  texts  of  the 
amended   Recommendation. 


36.  The  Employment  of  Young  Persons  in 
Underground  Work  in  Mines  of  All  Kinds-. 
Fourth    item    on   the   agenda.    2   volumes. 

At  head  of  title:  Report  4(1  )-(2).  Interna- 
tional Labour  Conference.  49th  Session,  (ieneva, 
1965.  Pari  1  contains  proposed  Conventions  and 
Recommendations  for  consideration  by  member 
count  lies.  Part  2  contains  comments  by  the  gov- 
ernment and  English  and  French  texts  of  the 
revised    Conventions    and    Recommendations. 

37.  The  Role  of  Co-operatives  in  the  Eco- 
nomic and  Social  Development  of  Develop- 
ing Countries.  Seventh  item  on  the  agenda. 
2  volumes. 

At  head  of  title:  Report  7(1  )-(2).  Interna- 
tional Labour  Conference.  49th  session,  Geneva, 
1965.  Part  1  contains  a  report  for  consideration 
by  member  governments.  Part  2  contains  com- 
ments and  Proposed  Conclusions  based  on  the 
replies    from    member    governments. 

Queen's   University    Commerce    Club 

The  following  two  publications  were  issued  by 
Queen's  University  Commerce  Club. 

38.  The  Commerceman,  1963.  Kingston 
[1963]  Pp.  72. 

"Feature:  Marketing."  This  issue  of  "The 
Commerceman"  contains  a  number  of  articles 
on   marketing. 

39.  The  Commerceman,  1964.  Kingston 
[1964]   Pp.    67. 

"Feature:  Finance."  Partial  Contents:  The 
Development  and  Management  of  Mutual  Funds, 
by  T.  O.  Peterson.  Women  in  Executive  and 
Administrative  Positions  in  Canada,  by  Elaine 
Knox.  The  Use  of  Psychological  Tests  in  Cana- 
dian  Industry,   by  D.   W.   Garth. 

Labour   Supply 

40.  INTERNATIONAL  LABOUR  OF- 
FICE. The  Quality  of  Labour  and  Economic 
Development  in  Certain  Countries,  a  Pre- 
liminary Study,  by  Walter  Galenson  and 
Graham  Pyatt.  Geneva,   1964.  Pp.    116. 

Examines  the  relationship  between  labour  and 
economic  growth  based  on  a  study  of  52  coun- 
tries. 

41.  U.S.  OFFICE  OF  MANPOWER, 
AUTOMATION  AND  TRAINING.  Man- 
power for  Technical  Information  Work:  a 
Pilot  Study.  Washington,  GPO,  1964.  Pp.  23. 

Presents  the  findings  and  conclusions  of  a 
pilot  study,  "A  study  of  manpower  requirements 
for  technical  information  support  personnel", 
prepared  by  the  Auerbach  Corporation  for  the 
U.S.   Dept.   of   Labor   in   January    1964. 

Labouring  Classes 

42.  ONTARIO.  ROYAL  COMMISSION 
ON  COMPULSORY  ARBITRATION  IN 
DISPUTES  AFFECTING  HOSPITALS  AND 
THEIR  EMPLOYEES.  Report.  Toronto, 
1964.  Pp.  62. 

The  Royal  Commission,  Judge  C.  E.  Bennett, 
chairman,  was  appointed  in  October  1963,  "to 
inquire  into  and  report  upon  the  feasibility  and 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      JULY    7965 


661 


desirability  of  applying  compulsory  arbitration 
in  the  settlement  of  disputes  between  Labour 
and  Management  over  the  negotiation  and  set- 
tlement of  terms  of  collective  agreements  affect- 
ing hospitals  and  their  employees  and,  in 
particular,  to  the  settlement  of  a  dispute  con- 
cerning the  Trenton  Memorial  Hospital  and  its 
employees  .  .  ."  The  report  was  submitted  to 
the  1  ieutenant-Governor  of  Ontario  on  June  22, 
1964. 

43.  SEABORNE,  A.  E.  M.  Subjective 
Standards  in  Industrial  Inspection,  by  A.  E.  M. 
Seaborne  and  L.  F.  Thomas.  London,  HMSO, 
1964.  Pp.  28. 

By  means  of  case  studies,  this  research  study 
shows  how  factory  inspectors  develop  skill  in 
making  subjective  judgment  of  quality,  how  their 
standards  of  judgment  are  liable  to  be  influenced, 
and  how  inspectors  can  acquire  this  skill  and 
maintain  consistent  standards. 

44.  U.S.  BUREAU  OF  LABOR  STAND- 
ARDS. State  Workmen's  Compensation  Laws. 
Rev.  September  1964.  Washington,  GPO, 
1964.   Pp.   83. 

45.  U.S.  BUREAU  OF  LABOR  STATIS- 
TICS. Brief  History  of  the  American  Labor 
Movement.  [Rev.  ed.]  Washington,  GPO, 
1964.  Pp.  100. 

As  well  as  relating  the  story  of  labour  organ- 
ization in  the  U.S.A.  this  pamphlet  contains  a 
chronology  of  important  events  in  American 
labour  history  from  1778  to  the  end  of  1963. 

46.  U.S.  OFFICE  OF  MANPOWER,  AU- 
TOMATION AND  TRAINING.  Formal  Oc- 
cupational Training  of  Adult  Workers;  its 
Extent,  Nature,  and  Use.  Washington,  GPO, 
1964.  Pp.  48. 

Based  on  a  study  prepared  by  the  U.S.  Bureau 
of  Labor  Statistics  for  the  Office  of  Manpower, 
Automation    and   Training. 

Older   Workers 

47.  CANADA.  DEPARTMENT  OF  LA- 
BOUR. ECONOMICS  AND  RESEARCH 
BRANCH.  The  Aging  Worker  in  the  Cana- 
dian Economy.  Ottawa,  Queen's  Printer, 
1964.  Pp.  60. 

Provides  information  about  workers  aged  65 
and  over,  as  well  as  about  workers  aged  be- 
tween 45  and  64.  Discusses  age  and  composition 
of  the  Canadian  labour  force,  the  industries  in 
which  older  men  and  women  are  employed,  the 
unemployment  of  older  workers,  and  the  income 
picture   of   older  people. 

48.  ORGANIZATION  FOR  ECONOMIC 
COOPERATION    AND    DEVELOPMENT. 

Job  Re-design;  the  Application  of  Biological 
Data  on  Aging  to  the  Design  of  Equipment 
and  the  Organization  of  Work,  by  Stephen 
Griew.  Paris,  1964.  Pp.  86. 

This  report  "attempts  to  show  that  the  job 
adjustment  and  productivity  of  older  workers 
can  be  improved  dramatically  if  their  work  is 
designed  systematically  to  allow  for  the  biologi- 
cal  changes  which   occur   with   advancing   age." 


Organization  for  Economic  Co-operation  and 
Development 

49.  INTERNATIONAL  JOINT  SEMINAR 
ON  GEOGRAPHICAL  AND  OCCUPA- 
TIONAL MOBILITY  OF  MANPOWER, 
CASTELFUSANO,  ITALY,  1963.  Final  Re- 
port. Paris,  Manpower  and  Social  Affairs 
Directorate,  Social  Affairs  Division,  OECD, 
1964.  Pp.  213. 

At  head  of  title:  International  Seminars, 
1963-4. 

Supplement  to  the  Final  Report.  [Paris, 
1964]  Pp.   109. 

At  this  Seminar,  representatives  of  employers' 
and  workers'  organizations  from  16  member 
countries  of  OECD  met  to  analyze  the  problems 
of  facilitating  adjustment  to  geographical  and 
occupational  changes,  to  discuss  their  experi- 
ence, and  to  suggest  an  over-all  programme 
needed  in  this  field.  The  final  report  contains  a 
summary  of  the  discussions  and  four  reports 
prepared  for  the  Seminar  giving  background 
material.  The  supplement  contains  case  studies 
prepared  for  the  Seminar. 

50.  INTERNATIONAL  TRADE  UNION 
SEMINAR  ON  ECONOMIC  AND  SOCIAL 
PROGRAMMING,  PARIS,  1963.  Final  Re- 
port. Paris,  Manpower  and  Social  Affairs 
Directorate,  Social  Affairs  Division,  OECD, 
1964.   Pp.   145. 

At  head  of  title:  International  Seminars, 
1963-4. 

Supplement  to  Final  Report.  [Paris,  1964] 
Pp.  126. 

At  this  Seminar,  trade  unionists  from  OECD 
countries  met  "to  review  and  compare  their 
experience  of  economic  and  social  programming 
in  furthering  national  economic  growth  and  the 
realisation  of  their  social  objectives."  There  is 
a  review  of  reports  and  discussion  in  the  Final 
Report  while  the  Supplement  contains  reports 
prepared  for  the  Seminar  and  country  reports 
prepared  by  the  participants. 

51.  ORGANIZATION  FOR  ECONOMIC 
COOPERATION  AND  DEVELOPMENT. 
The  OECD  at  Work.  September  1964.  Paris, 
1964.  Pp.   137. 

Tells  what  the  OECD  does  in  the  field  of  eco- 
nomics, international  trade,  manpower  and  social 
affairs,  industry  and  energy,  agriculture,  fish- 
eries,   science    and    education. 

Public   Welfare 

52.  CANADIAN  CONFERENCE  ON 
SOCIAL  WELFARE.  Interest  Group  Papers, 
1964.  Ottawa,  1964.  Pp.  220. 

Some  of  the  topics  discussed  at  this  con- 
ference were  social  and  public  welfare  services, 
services  for  the  aged  and  homemaker  services. 

53.  CANADIAN  CONFERENCE  ON  SO- 
CIAL WELFARE.  Seminar  Papers,  1964. 
Ottawa,   1964.  Pp.  351. 

Some  of  the  topics  discussed  at  this  Seminar 
were  the  working  environment,  leisure,  man- 
power implications  of  technological  change,  the 
problems  of  the  disabled  in  an  industrial  so- 
ciety,  and  poverty  in  Canada. 


662 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      JULY    7965 


Redundancy 

54.  COOK,  P.  LESLEY.  Railway  Work- 
shops: the  Problems  of  Contraction.  Cam- 
bridge [Eng.]  University  Press,  1964.  Pp.  92. 

In  September  1962  the  British  Government 
announced  a  plan  to  close  down  some  of  the 
main  workshops  of  British  railways,  reduce  the 
staff  by  over  20,000  workers,  and  reorganize 
the  remaining  shops.  This  is  an  examination  of 
the  plan. 

55.  FOX,  ALAN.  The  Milton  Plan;  an 
Exercise  in  Manpower  Planning  and  the 
Transfer  of  Production.  London,  Institute  of 
Personnel   Management,   1965.   Pp.  66. 

A  case  history  of  the  closure  of  an  aluminium 
rolling  mill  belonging  to  British  Aluminium 
Company  Limited,  and  of  the  company's  plans 
for  transferring  many  of  the  workers  to  another 
mill  in  South  Wales.  This  study  tells  of  the 
company's  success  in  closing  the  mill  without 
a  strike  or  disruption  of  any  kind,  but  also  of 
its  failure  to  persuade  employees  to  move  from 
the   old   mill   to   the   new   one. 

Wages  and  Hours 

56.  INTERNATIONAL  LABOUR  OF- 
FICE. Methods  and  Principles  of  Wage  Regu- 
lation. Third  item  on  the  agenda.  Geneva, 
1964.  Pp.  76. 

At  head  of  title:  Report  3.  International  La- 
bour Organization.  Second  African  Regional  Con- 
ference, Addis  Ababa,  1964. 

57.  UNIVERSITE  LAVAL.  DEPART- 
EMENT  DES  RELATIONS  INDUSTRIEL- 
LES.  Politiques  de  salaires:  exigencies  nou- 
velles  [par]  Jacques  St.  Laurent  [et  al.] 
Quebec,  Les  Presses  de  l'Universite  Laval, 
1964.  Pp.  171. 

Report  of  the  19th  Congres  des  relations  in- 
dustrielles  de  l'Universite  Laval  held  in  Quebec 
City,  April  13  and  14,  1964.  The  papers  presented 


at  this  conference  examine  wage  policy  and  the 
part  played  by  the  provincial  government  in 
determining   wage   policy   in   Quebec. 

Women — Employment 

58.  NATIONAL  CORPORATION  FOR 
THE  CARE  OF  OLD   PEOPLE.   Not   Too 

Old  at  Sixty;  an  Experiment  in  the  Employ- 
ment of  Women  of  Pensionable  Age  by  the 
Over  Forty  Association  for  Women.  London, 
cl963.    Pp.   20. 

The  National  Corporation  for  the  Care  of 
Old  People,  London,  Eng.,  made  a  grant  to  the 
Over  Forty  Association  for  Women  enabling 
the  Association  to  find  employment  for  many 
women  over  pensionable  age. 

59.  U.S.  WOMEN'S  BUREAU.  Clerical 
Occupations  for  Women,  Today  and  Tomor- 
row. Washington  [GPO]   1964.  Pp.  69. 

Describes  trends  in  clerical  jobs,  various  types 
of  clerical  occupations,  and  provides  a  general 
survey   of   the   clerical  field. 

Miscellaneous 

60.  CANADIAN    TAX    FOUNDATION. 

Inter-government  Fiscal  Relationships.  To- 
ronto,   1964.    Pp.    77. 

Contents:  Fiscal  Adjustment  in  a  Federal 
Country,  by  John  F.  Graham.  The  Basis  and 
Effects  of  Provincial-Municipal  Fiscal  Decisions, 
by  A.  W.  Johnson  and  J.  M.  Andrews. 

61.  SOCIAL  PLANNING  COUNCIL  OF 
METROPOLITAN  TORONTO.  Guides  for 
Family  Budgeting,  prepared  for  the  Use  of 
Social  and  Health  Agencies  of  Metropolitan 
Toronto.   Toronto,    1964.   Pp.    64. 

Contains  "a  statement  of  expenditures  neces- 
sary for  any  Toronto  family  to  maintain  an 
acceptable  level  of  living."  some  of  the  cate- 
gories are  food,  clothing,  housing  and  utilities, 
homefurnishings  and  equipment,  health  and  medi- 
cal  care   and   supplies,   etc. 


THE  LABOUR   GAZETTE      •      JULY    7965 


663 


Conciliation  Proceedings 

(Continued  from  page  640) 

Dispute  Settled  after  Strike  Action 

Newfoundland  Employers'  Association  Lim- 
ited. St.  John's,  Nfld.,  and  The  Longshore- 
men's Protective  Union  (L.G.,  December 
1964,  p.  1109).  The  parties  signed  the  col- 
lects e  agreement  on  May  21  and  the  long- 
shoremen returned  to  work  on  May  24. 

Industrial  Fatalities 

(Continued  from  page  618) 

machinery,  automobiles,  trucks,  mine  and 
quarry  cars,  belts,  pulleys,  chains,  lines  and 
hoisting  or  conveying  apparatus.  Electric 
current  and  over-exertion  each  caused  seven 
fatalities,  and  seven  were  under  the  heading 
of  miscellaneous  accidents. 

By  province  of  occurrence,  there  were  76 
fatalities  in  Ontario,  70  in  British  Columbia, 
38  in  Alberta,  and  36  in  Quebec. 

During  the  quarter,  there  were  81  fatalities 
in  January,  103  in  February,  and  84  in 
March. 


Decisions  of  the  Umpire 

(Continued  from  page  651) 

taken  to  lodge  her  insurance  book  and  the 
reason  she  was  unable  to  deposit  it,  as  she  had 
agreed  to  do  when  she  filed  her  renewal  claim. 

Considerations  and  Conclusions:  As  stated 
in  the  above  statement  of  observations,  "it 
was  incumbent  on  the  claimant  to  follow  up 
with  her  employer  to  ensure  that  her  insur- 
ance book  had  in  fact  been  sent  to  the 
local  office";  it  was  also  her  responsibility 
to  inform  the  local  office  by  August  25, 
1964,  of  the  steps  she  had  taken  to  lodge 
her  insurance  book  and  of  the  reasons  that 
prevented  her  from  depositing  it  at  her  local 
office. 

As  the  claimant  did  not  comply  with  those 
requirements,  she  was  rightly  disqualified  for 
having  failed  to  make  her  claim  for  benefit 
in  the  prescribed  manner. 

I  consequently  decide  to  confirm  the 
unanimous  decision  of  the  board  of  referees. 

The  union's  appeal  is  dismissed. 


Wage  Schedules 


(Continued  from  page  657) 


Coppermine  N  W  T:  Yukon  Construction  Co  Ltd,  construction  of  storage  warehouse,  etc. 
Yellowknife  N  W  T:  O  I  Johnson  Construction  Ltd,  construction  of  storage  bldg,  etc. 
Mayo  Y  T:  General  Enterprises  Ltd,  construction  of  access  road  to  transmitter  site  & 
related  work.  Watson  Lake  Y  T:  Yukon  Construction  Co  Ltd,  construction  of  NDB  bldgs 
&  related  work,  airport.  Whitehorse  Y  7V  Huber  Electric  Ltd,  installation  of  threshold  identi- 
fication lights,  relocation  of  controls,  approach  &  runway  lighting  for  runway  31L,  etc,  airport. 

In  addition,. this  Department  awarded  24  contracts  containing  the  General  Fair  Wages 
Clause. 


664 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      JULY   7965 


LABOUR   STATISTICS 

PAG! 

Tables  A-l  to  A-3 — Labour  Force 665 

Table  B-l— Labour  Income 667 

Tables  C-l  to  C-6 — Employment,  Hours  and  Earnings 668 

Tables  D-l  to  D-5— Employment  Service  Statistics 674 

Tables  E-l  to  E-4 — Unemployment  Insurance 679 

Tables  F-l  and  F-2— Prices 681 

Tables  G-l  to  G-4— Strikes  and  Lockouts 682 

Tables  H-l  and  H-2— Industrial  Accidents 684 

A — Labour  Force 

TABLE  A-l— REGIONAL  DISTRIBUTION  WEEK  ENDED  JUNE  19,  1965 

(estimates  in  thousands) 
Source:  DBS  Labour  Force  Survey 


Canada 


Atlantic 


Quebec 


Ontario 


Prairies 


British 
Columbia 


The  Labour  Force 

Men 

Women 

14-19  vears 

20-24  years 

25-44  years 

45-64  years 

65  years  and  over 

Employed 

Men 

Women 

Agriculture 

Non-agriculture 

Paid  workers 

Men 

Women 

Unemployed 

Men 

Women 

Persons  not  in  labour  force 

Men 

Women 

•Less  than  10,000. 


7,306 


5,185 
2,121 


978 
3,144 
2,150 

226 

7,049 

4,993 
2,056 


6,400 
5,910 


4,081 
1,829 


257 


192 
65 


5,807 


1,313 
4,494 


630 

462 
168 

75 

100 

241 

191 

23 

599 

435 
164 

33 


506 

359 
147 

31 

27 

638 

167 
471 


2,055 

1,485 
570 

248 
327 
896 
536 

48 

1,955 

1,408 
547 

127 

1,828 

1,672 

1,183 
489 

100 

77 
23 

1,741 

385 
1,356 


2,683 

1,858 

825 

280 

311 

1,190 

808 

94 

2,609 

1,808 
801 

170 
2,439 

2,276 

1,541 
735 


1,921 


409 
1.512 


1,255 

897 
358 

137 
156 
526 
396 
40 

1,232 

879 
353 

296 
936 

884 

598 


23 

18 

* 

955 

222 
733 


683 

483 
200 

68 

84 

291 

219 

21 

654 

463 
191 

23 
631 

572 

400 
172 

29 

20 


552 


130 
422 


THE   LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      JULY    1965 


665 


TABLE  A-2—  AGE,  SEX  AND  MARITAL  STATUS,  WEEK  ENDED 
JUNE  19,  1965,  CANADA 

(estimates  in  thousands) 
Source:  DBS  Labour  Force  Survey 


Total 


14-19 
years 

all 
persons 


20-64  years 


Men 


Married        Other 


Women 


Married       Other 


65  years 
and  over 

all 
persons 


Population  14  years  of  age  and  over*1). 


Labour  Force. . 
Employed . . . 
Unemployed. 


Not  in  the  labour  force. 

Participation  rate<*) 

1965,  June  19 

May  22 


Unemployment  rate(') 

1965.  June  19 

May  22 


13,113 

7,306 

7,049 

257 


55.7 
54.4 


3.5 

3.7 


136 


708 
100 


1,328 


37.8 
32.4 


12.4 


3,734 

3,623 

3,553 

70 


97.0 
96.7 


905 

854 

51 

103 


5.6 
6.8 


3,865 

1,069 

1,054 

15 

2,796 


27.7 
27.5 


1.4 
1.4 


952 

675 

662 

13 

277 


1.9 
2.4 


1,418 

226 
218 

* 

1,192 


15.9 
16.2 


W  Excludes  inmates  of  institutions,  members  of  the  armed  forces,  Indians  living  on  reserves  and  residents  of  the  Yukon 
and  Northwest  Territories. 

(-)  The  Labour  Force  as  a  percentage  of  the  population  14  years  of  age  and  over. 
(J>  The  unemployed  as  a  percentage  of  the  labour  force. 
•  Less  than  10,000. 


TABLE  A-3— UNEMPLOYED,  WEEK  ENDED  JUNE  19,  1965 

(estimates  in  thousands) 
Source:  DBS  Labour  Force  Survey 


June 
1965 

May 
1965 

June 
19640) 

257 

16 
241 

222 
19 

111 
64 
30 
36 

265 

15 
250 

235 
15 

75 
79 
52 
44 

282 

13 

269 

246 

23 

115 

73 

38 

43 

W  Due  to  the  introduction  of  revised  weighting  factors  in  March  1965,  small  adjustments  have  been  made  to  estimates 
published  before  that  time.  See  D.B.S.  report  "The  Labour  Force,  March  1965",  page  8. 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      JULY   1965 


B — Labour  Income 
TABLE  «-l -ESTIMATES  OF  LABOUR  INCOME,  BY  INDUSTRY 

Mote:  Monthly  and  quarterly  figures  may  not  add  to  annual  totals  because  of  rounding. 

($  Millions) 
Soukck:   Dominion  Bureau  of  Statistics 


Monthly  Totals 

Quarterly  Totals*') 

Year  and 

Month 

Mining 

Manu- 
facturing 

Trans- 
portation, 
Storage 
and 
Communi- 
cation^) 

Forestry 

Construc- 
tion 

Public 

utilities 

Trade 

Finance 
Services 
(including 
( rovern- 
ment) 

Supple- 
men- 
tary 
Labour 
income 

Totals 

(3) 

1960— Total 

1961— Total 

1962— Total 

1963— Total 

1964— Total 

1964— 

563 
542 
559 
572 
600 

47.3 
49.1 
51.2 
52.4 
50.1 
50.1 
51.5 
51.7 
51.4 

52.4 
53.3 
54.2 
52.9 

5,246 
5,306 
5.699 
6,045 
6,579 

532.0 

547.4 
557.7 
546.0 
567.2 
575.6 
565.4 
565.9 
551.5 

566.1 
564.4 
583.2 
586.7 

1,809 
1,862 
1,909 
2,008 
2,129 

170.7 

175.5 
179.8 
182.5 
185.5 
188.8 
185.7 
181.3 
178.4 

181.9 
180.4 

178.7 
184.1 

323 
283 
300 
308 
344 

1,214 
1,252 
1,357 
1,419 
1,584 

343 
357 
378 
397 
421 

2,640 
2,740 
2,881 
3,089 
3,358 

5,100 
5,616 
6,080 
6,601 

7,247 

794 
820 
843 
872 
910 

18,245 
18,996 
20,233 
21,546 

23,416 

1,869.6 

74.1 

381.2 

104.6 

827.2 

1,817.5 

226.1 

1,940.3 

1,994.5 

July    . . 

1,981.2 

104.0 

461.9 

109.1 

850.9 

1,826.1 

230.5 

2,016.6 
2,072.1 
2,051.8 

September 

November 

96.4 

426.8 

108.4 

887.2 

1,876.5 

232.6 

2,033.6 
1,978.6 

1965— 

1,991.0 

February 

77.5 

374.3 

107.6 

869.0 

1,907.1 

233.7 

1,997.8 
2  035.1 

Aprilf 

2,067.9 

Seasonally  Adjusted 


1960— Total 

1961— Total 

1962— Total 

1963— Total 

1964— Total 

1964— 
April 

563 
542 
559 
572 
600 

49.2 
49.4 
50.0 
50.3 
49.8 
49.8 
51.0 
51.5 
51.8 

53.0 
53.8 
55.0 
55.0 

5,246 
5,306 
5,699 
6,045 
6,579 

536.8 
541.9 
544.9 
549.7 
558.0 
561.7 
557.7 
564.0 
563.3 

578.5 
575.3 
591.5 
592.0 

1,809 
1,862 
1,909 
2,008 
2,129 

174.8 
174.9 
175.4 
177.1 
177.3 
183.8 
182.2 
179.8 
183.7 

185.9 

187.3 
187.7 
188.5 

323 
283 
300 
308 
344 

1,214 
1,252 
1,357 
1,419 
1,584 

343 
357 
378 
397 
421 

2,640 
2,740 
2,881 
3,089 
3,358 

5,100 
5,616 
6,080 
6,601 
7,247 

794 
820 
843 
872 
910 

18,245 
18,996 
20,233 
21,546 
23,416 

1,914.0 

86.7 

382.3 

104.1 

829.0 

1,787.9 

226.1 

1  925  9 

June 

1,934.5 

July 

1,955  4 

90.4 

390.3 

106.3 

850.3 

1,841.8 

228.9 

1  972  3 

September 

1,998.6 

October 

1  999  5 

November 

December 

85.1 

422.4 

108.4 

866.4 

1,873.9 

230.9 

2,014.0 
2,020.2 

2,063.0 
2,077.1 
2,109.6 

1965— 
January 

February 

March* 

91.4 

462.6 

111.1 

889.9 

1,925.8 

237.2 

Aprilt 

2  118  7 

(''Quarterly  figures  are  entered  opposite  the  middle  month  of  the  quarter  but  represent  quarterly  totals. 
(^Includes  post  office  wages  and  salaries. 

(''Figures  in  this  column  are  for  total  labour  income,  Canada,  but  are  not  totals  of  the  figures  in  the  remaining  columns 
of  this  table,  as  figures  for  labour  income  in  Agriculture,  Fishing  and  Trapping  are  not  shown. 
*  Revised. 
tPreliminary. 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      JULY    7965 


667 


C — Employment,  Hours  and  Earnings 

Tables  C-l  to  C-3  are  based  on  reports  from  employers  having  15  or  more  employees; 
it  March.  1965  employers  in  the  principal  non-agricultural  industries  reported  a  total  employ- 
ment of  3,128,590.  Tables  C-4  and  C-5  are  based  on  reports  from  a  somewhat  smaller  number 
of  firms  than  Tables  C-l  to  C-3.  They  relate  only  to  wage  earners  for  whom  statistics  of  hours 
of  work  are  also  available  whereas  Tables  C-l  to  C-3  relate  to  salaried  employees  as  well  as 
to  all  wage-earners  in  the  reporting  firms. 

TABLE  C-1-EMPLOYMENT,  PAYROLLS  AND  WEEKLY  WAGES  AND  SALARIES 

Source:  Employment  and  Payrolls,  DBS 


Year  and  Month 


Industrial  Composite!1 


Index  Numbers 
(1949-100) 


Employ- 
ment 


Average 
Weekly 
Wages 

and 
Salaries 


Average 
Weekly 
Wages 

and 
Salaries 


Manufacturing 


Index  Numbers 
(1949-100) 


Employ- 
ment 


Average 
Weekly 
Wages 

and 
Salaries 


Average 

Weekly 

Wages 

and 


Averages 

1959 

I960 

1961 

1962 

1963 

1964— 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 
October . . . 
November 
December. 

1965— 
January.... 
February*. 
March?.... 


119.7 
118.7 
118.1 
121.5 
124.6 


123.5 
124.6 
129.1 
133.4 
134.0 
136.4 
136.2 
134.7 
134.7 
131.2 


129.4 
129.5 
130.6 


171.0 
176.5 
182.0 
187.6 
194.2 


198.5 
201.0 
202.0 
201.6 
202.0 
203.0 
204.8 
205.9 
204.7 
199.1 


207.7 
207.9 
209.9 


73.47 
75.83 
78.17 
80.59 
83.43 


85.27 
87.33 
86.80 
86.62 
86.76 
87.19 
88.00 
88.47 
87.94 
85.53 


89.21 
89.30 
90.17 


111.1 
109.5 


113.3 
116.4 


118.4 
118.6 
121.4 
124.2 
122.6 
126.4 
126.3 
123.6 
124.4 
121.8 


122.5 
122.6 
124.2 


172.5 

177.8 
183.6 
189.2 
196.1 


202.0 
203.9 
204.8 
204.1 
202.7 
203.9 
207.0 
207.3 
206.8 
201.6 


201.3 
209.4 
213.9 


75.84 
78.19 
80.73 
83.17 
86.24 


88.82 
89.66 
90.05 
89.73 
89.11 
89.65 
91.01 
91.15 
90.91 
88.66 


92.46 
92.07 
94.06 


^Includes  (1)  Forestry  (chiefly  logging),  (2)  Mining  (including  milling),  quarrying  and  oil  wells,  (3)  Manufacturing, 
(4)  Construction,  (o)  Transportation,  storage  and  communication,  (6)  Public  utility  operation,  (7)  Trade,  (8)  Finance, 
insurance  and  real  estate  and  (9)  Service  (mainly  hotels,  restaurants,  laundries,  dry  cleaning  plants,  business  and  recrea- 
tional service). 

•Revised. 

tPreliminary. 


668 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      JULY    7965 


TABLE  C-2— AREA  SUMMARY  OF  EMPLOYMENT  AND  AVERAGE  WEEKLY  WAGES 

AND  SALARIES 

(1949  =  100)  (The  latest  figures  are  subject  to  revision) 
Source:  Employment  and  Payrolls,  DBS 


Area 


Provinces 

Atlantic  Region 

Newfoundland 

Prince  Edward  Island 

Nova  Scotia 

New  Brunswick 

Quebec 

Ontario 

Prairie  Region 

Manitoba 

Saskatchewan 

Alberta  (Includes  Northwest  Territories) 
British  Columbia  (includes  Yukon) 

Canada 


Urban  areas 

St.  John's 

Sydney 

Halifax 

Moncton 

Saint  John 

Chicoutimi  —  Jonquiere 

Quebec 

Sherbrooke 

Shawinigan 

Three  Rivers 

Drummondville 

Montreal 

Ottawa  —  Hull 

Kingston 

Peterborough 

Oshawa 

Toronto 

Hamilton 

St.  Catharines 

Niagara  Falls 

Brantford 

Guelph 

Gait 

Kitchener 

Sudbury 

Timmins 

London 

Sarnia 

Windsor 

Sault  Ste.  Marie 

Fort  William  —  Port  Arthur 

Winnipeg 

Regina 

Saskatoon 

Edmonton 

Calgary 

Vancouver 

Victoria 


Employment  Index  Numbers 


Mar. 
1965 


106.6 
131.0 

115.6 
98.1 
105.7 
129.4 
135.2 
136.6 
113.2 
126.5 
169.6 
127.2 

130.6 


147. 

76. 
135. 
108. 
118. 
110. 
130. 
118. 
107. 
119. 

98. 
138. 
142. 
137. 
109. 
249. 
151. 
128. 
132. 

99. 
104. 
141. 
131. 
153. 
143. 

83. 
148. 
136. 

91. 
153. 
113. 
116. 
150. 
153. 
217. 
199. 
129. 
127. 


F«b. 

1965 


106.1 
131.9 
117.0 
96.6 
105.6 
128.6 
133.6 
136.4 
113.2 
125.6 
169.3 
124.6 

129.5 


144.2 

77.0 
133.6 
107.3 
116.5 
111.6 
128.5 
118.9 
107.5 
117.4 

98.4 
137.1 
141.0 
137.8 
109.6 
248.8 
150.0 
127.0 
131.7 
100.7 
102.8 
141.7 
129.3 
152.2 
140.9 

84.2 
147.1 
133.7 

75.3 
152.7 
111.3 
116.1 
149.7 
151.4 
215.3 
198.6 
127.1 
127.1 


Mar. 

1964 


99.5 
123.7 
111.0 

89.1 
101.1 
122.6 
128.0 
130.0 
110.3 
121.6 
157.7 
118.7 

123.5 


138.3 
52.6 
129.5 
101.7 
113.0 
111.5 
123.1 
115.5 
101.8 
117.3 
92.0 
131.0 
136.1 
130.6 
103.4 
226.9 
144.1 
120.4 
121.4 
95.1 
91.2 
131.5 
128.6 
142.4 
130.0 
84.0 
142.3 
131.4 
81.9 
146.6 
101.8 
113.2 
145.8 
139.1 
204.9 
179.0 
121.8 
110.9 


Average  Weekly  Wages 
and  Salaries 


Mar. 
1966 


76.50 
80.97 
64.14 
75.21 
76.42 
87.29 
93.85 
85.37 
80.89 
82.70 
89.92 
98.33 

90.17 


67.42 
87.77 
76.63 
70.36 
77.94 

102.96 
77.00 
77.18 
92.64 
78.32 
72.32 
89.00 
83.11 
87.97 
97.33 

122.89 
92.75 
98.32 

109.35 
92.36 
90.91 
86.61 
82.41 
82.68 

100.93 
79.86 
84.32 

115.67 

114.73 

113.37 
86.42 
77.78 
80.85 
77.77 
82.55 
88.55 
96.00 
85.93 


Feb. 

1965 


76.50 
82.07 
64.86 
74.27 
76.85 
86.70 
91.85 
86.25 
81.20 
84.22 
91.03 
99.10 

89.30 


67.84 
85.61 
76.48 
69.75 
80.17 

102.10 
75.73 
75.44 
92.10 
79.54 
71.70 
88.38 
82.84 
82.85 
95.39 

116.33 
91.25 
97.88 

107.56 
92.81 
88.87 
83.39 
80.95 
81.05 

100.71 
76.51 
82.94 

110.17 
92.97 

108.72 
87.62 
77.96 
81.39 
79.21 
83.39 
89.62 
96.26 
88.48 


Mar. 


72.05 
79.06 
63.16 
70.21 
70.79 
82.58 
88.48 
81.82 
77.97 
80.26 
85.64 
92.88 

85.27 


64.91 
87.40 
72.41 
66.63 
71.53 

101.52 
71.57 
71.56 
89.77 
77.49 
69.86 
84.20 
78.78 
86.16 
92.15 

104.41 
89.25 
93.95 
99.41 
86.94 
81.60 
78.45 
77.52 
78.74 
99.90 
75.98 
80.37 

108.91 
96.99 

102.38 
82.47 
75.28 
79.55 
74.35 
79.07 
85.10 
91.77 
80.47 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE 

91938—6 


•      JULY    7965 


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670 


THE   LABOUR   GAZETTE      •      JULY    7965 


TABLE  t-3    INI>1  STRV  SUMMARY  OF  EMPLOYMENT  AND  AYBBAGE  WEEKLY 

WAGES  AND  SALARIES 

(1049=100)  (The  latest   figures  aie  suhieet   to  h-vi.M'.h 

Boi  mi::  Employment  and  Payrolls,  DBS 

NFon:  Information  for  other  industries  is  given  in  Kmployment  and  Payrolls 


Industry 


Mining 

Metal  mining         

Gold 

Other  metal 

Fuels 

Coal 

Oil  and  natural  gas 

Non-metal 

Manufacturing 

Durable  goods 

Non-durable  goods 

Food  and  beverages 

Meat  products 

Canned  and  preserved  fruits  and  vegetables 

( 5  rain  mill  products 

Bread  and  bakery  products 

Distilled  and  malt  liquors 

Tobacco  and  tobacco  products 

Rubber  products 

Leather  products 

Boots  and  shoes  (except  rubber) 

Other  leather  products 

Textile  products  (except  clothing) 

Cotton  yarn  and  broad  woven  goods 

Woollen  goods 

Synthetic  textiles  and  silk 

Clothing  (textile  and  fur) 

Men's  clothing 

Women's  clothing 

Knit  goods 

Wood  products 

Saw  and  planing  mills 

Furniture 

Other  wood  products 

Paper  products 

Pulp  and  paper  mills 

Other  paper  products 

Printing,  publishing  and  allied  industries 

Iron  and  steel  products 

Agricultural  implements 

Fabricated  and  structural  steel 

Hardware  and  tools 

Heating  and  cooking  appliances 

Iron  castings 

Machinery,  industrial  machinery 

Primary  iron  and  steel 

Sheet  metal  products 

Wire  and  wire  products 

Transportation  equipment 

Aircraft  and  parts 

Motor  vehicles 

Motor  vehicle  parts  and  accessories 

Railroad  and  rolling  stock  equipment 

Shipbuilding  and  repairing 

Non-ferrous  metal  products 

Aluminum  products 

Brass  and  copper  products 

Smelting  and  refining 

Electrical  apparatus  and  supplies 

Heavy  electrical  machinery 

Telecommunication  equipment 

Non-metallic  mineral  products 

Clay  products 

Glass  and  glass  products 

Products  of  petroleum  and  coal 

Petroleum  refining  and  products 

Chemical  products 

Medicinal  and  pharmaceutical  preparations. 

Acids,  alkalis  and  salts 

Miscellaneous  manufacturing  industries 

Construction 

Building  and  general  engineering 

Highways,  bridges  and  streets 

Electric  and  motor  transportation 

Service 

Hotels  and  restaurants 

Laundries  and  dry  cleaning  plants 

Industrial  composite 


Employment 

Mar. 

Feb. 

Mar. 

1965 

1965 

1964 

120.1 

118.9 

109.1 

135.1 

134.1 

125.5 

59.9 

60.0 

63.3 

204,9 

202.9 

183.3 

90.5 

90.2 

73.9 

38.0 

37.7 

21.9 

303.7 

303.0 

284.8 

138.9 

134.7 

138.7 

124.2 

122.6 

118.4 

135.3 

132.2 

125.9 

114.8 

114.5 

112.1 

110.0 

109.3 

107.0 

135.4 

133.4 

130.8 

89.0 

89.1 

83.6 

90.3 

91.0 

95.8 

113.0 

111.9 

111.5 

93.0 

93.9 

91.8 

87.9 

105.5 

95.2 

120.8 

120.5 

116.6 

89.9 

90.0 

89.9 

91.6 

92.0 

93.8 

86.8 

86.3 

82.7 

91.4 

91.0 

89.4 

76.5 

77.4 

76.9 

62.8 

62.8 

65.9 

118.6 

118.1 

106.5 

103.1 

102.9 

100.9 

110.0 

109.0 

105.3 

116.5 

116.7 

114.9 

78.9 

79.0 

74.9 

115.7 

114.7 

112.4 

116,6 

116,0 

115.2 

130.7 

129.4 

121.9 

81.5 

79.3 

79.3 

132.2 

131.4 

127.4 

130.3 

129.8 

126.9 

136.6 

135.3 

128.7 

128.9 

128.3 

126.4 

129.0 

126.7 

118.5 

84.8 

83.3 

73.6 

171.3 

168.7 

145.5 

134.6 

133.0 

123.9 

113.6 

111.8 

111.7 

116.2 

108.4 

108.5 

157.2 

154.9 

139.5 

148.0 

147.4 

137.5 

123.6 

121.0 

118.9 

137.5 

136.5 

124.1 

139.4 

131.6 

126.1 

252.8 

252.8 

253.1 

165.1 

140.9 

144.9 

171.6 

171.1 

153.9 

64.3 

62.3 

57.4 

154.3 

147.5 

133.6 

134.4 

133.9 

130.1 

134.6 

133.6 

142.1 

120.6 

119.9 

116.0 

145.3 

144.8 

140.0 

168.5 

167.0 

156.9 

122.7 

123.5 

117.9 

288.9 

288.4 

276.9 

159.7 

155.7 

147.4 

92.0 

90.2 

83.9 

187.2 

181.2 

171.7 

139.0 

138.0 

137.9 

142.2 

141.0 

141.1 

143.2 

141.9 

137.9 

133.3 

132.2 

127.9 

162.3 

161.4 

154.5 

162.9 

161.5 

158.6 

119.9 

116.0 

107.7 

126.2 

123.6 

110.2 

109.4 

103.5 

103.5 

154.4 

154.0 

145.6 

190.0 

187.9 

172.4 

159.0 

157.4 

146.7 

164.6 

163.2 

149.9 

130.6 

129.5 

123.5 

Average  Weekly  Wages 
and  Salaries 


Mar. 
1965 


I 

110.88 

110.63 

89.86 

116.27 

117.43 

86.32 

133.21 

99.43 

94.06 

102.49 

85.75 

82.41 

89.27 

75.38 

89.95 

76.50 

113.85 

87.07 

94.05 

63.15 

61.36 

66.58 

74.30 

72.09 

68.84 

81.04 

58.14 

56.98 

58.78 

58.54 

80.29 

83.14 

76.99 

69.78 

106.37 

114.33 

88.41 

101.00 

105.87 

114.21 

104.68 

92.68 

88.76 

104.46 

102.95 

119.85 

101.86 

103.67 

116.38 

111.03 

141.19 

114.30 

96.62 

101.63 

103.44 

101.16 

99.23 

113.08 

99.07 

104.99 

94.46 

97.33 

86.90 

91.65 

131.92 

132.59 

107.33 

96.81 

119.41 

81.55 

100.06 

107.71 

85.41 

93.38 

63.65 

47.63 

55.45 

90.17 


Feb 
1966 


$ 

110.50 

109.69 

88.44 

115.51 

116.66 

80.17 

135.06 

102.00 

92.07 

99.37 

85.03 

81.71 

87.96 

73.63 

91.25 

76.11 

112.55 

81.19 

94.08 

62.73 

61.06 

65.96 

73.07 

71.67 

67.28 

78.07 

57.85 

56.57 

59.52 

58.07 

81.13 

84.81 

76.06 

69.81 

105.92 

114.48 

86.53 

100.05 

103.24 

110.01 

103.17 

90.44 

88.13 

100.25 

100.51 

117.63 

98.15 

100.53 

107.96 

108.59 

11-3.27 

108.32 

95.53 

96.26 

102.51 

99.33 

96.67 

112.90 

97.16 

103.04 

94.08 

97.15 

86.97 

92.96 

131.93 

132.75 

107.08 

97.03 

119.08 

80.30 

98.88 

105.28 

86.22 

93.52 

63.90 

48.08 

55.72 

89.30 


Mar. 
1964 


$ 
107.50 
106.24 

86.47 
112.59 
118.29 
80.73 
129.99 
95.70 
88.82 
95.28 
82.76 
80.32 
88.27 
71.05 
88.29 
75.56 
111.07 
81.12 
90.28 
58.97 
56.89 
63.27 
71.00 
67.83 
64.77 
79.38 
55.01 
54.03 
56.39 
54.57 
75.87 
78.59 
72.55 
65.56 
103.22 
111.54 
83.53 
97.56 
100.08 
111.63 
100.88 
87.76 
86.87 
94.90 
96.42 
113.43 
95.76 
99.85 
102.74 
104.83 
117.59 
97.80 
91.37 
92.18 
101.24 
96.37 
96.86 
112.15 
93.35 
KM).  17 
89.98 
92.83 
84.34 
90.26 
128.75 
129.42 
105.40 
92.98 
119.91 
78.66 
88.65 
93.84 
79.52 
92.10 
60.67 
46.31 
53.26 
85.27 


THE    LABOUR    GAZETTE 

91938— 6  i 


JULY    7965 


671 


TABLE  C-4—  HOURS  AND  EARNINGS  IN  MANUFACTURING,  BY  PROVINCE 

(Hourly  Rated  Wage-Earners) 

Source:  Man-Hours  and  Hourly  Earnings  DBS 

Note:  Information  on  hours  and  earnings  by  cities  is  obtainable  from  Man-Hours  and  Hourly  Earnings,  DBS 

(The  latest  figures  are  subject  to  revision) 


Average  Hours  Worked 

Average  Hourly  Earnings* 

March 
1965 

Feb. 
1965 

March 
1964 

March 
1965 

Feb. 
1965 

March 
1964 

40.3 
41.6 
42.7 
42.0 
41.5 
40.3 
38.8 
40.0 
38.1 

40.7 
40.7 
41.9 
41.7 
40.2 
40.3 
39.0 
40.5 
38.7 

42.4 
40.8 
40.3 
41.2 
40.9 
40.0 
39.3 
39.8 
38.2 

s 

1.82 
1.85 
1.81 
1.86 
2.24 
1.88 
2.14 
2.11 
2.58 

$ 
1.80 
1.83 
1.80 
1.85 
2.20 
1.87 
2.13 
2.10 
2.57 

s 

1.80 

1.80 

1.69 

1.80 

2.12 

1.83 

2.08 

2.06 

2.43 

•Includes  shift  differential,  premium  pay  for  overtime,  pay  for  paid  holidays,  pay  for  paid  sick  leave  if  paid  through  pay- 
roll but  not  if  paid  under  insurance  plan,  incentive  bonus  but  not  annual  bonus. 


TABLE  C-6— EARNINGS  AND  HOURS  OF  HOURLY-RATED 
WAGE  EARNERS  IN  MANUFACTURING 

Source:  Man-Hours  and  Hourly  Earnings,  DBS 


Period 


Hours 
Worked 
Per  Week 


Average 
Hourly 
Earnings 


Average 
Weekly 
Wages 


Index  Number  of 
Average  Weekly 
Wages  (1949  =  100) 


Current 
Dollars 


1949 
DoUars 


Monthly  Average  1959. 
Monthly  Average  1960. 
Monthly  Average  1961. 
Monthly  Average  1962. 
Monthly  Average  1963. 

Last  Pay  Period  in: 
1964— March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

1965 — January 

February* 

Marcht 


40.7 
40.4 
40.6 
40.7 
40.8 


1.72 
1.78 
1.83 
1.88 
1.95 


2.01 
2.01 
2.02 
2.02 
2.01 
2.02 
2.03 
2.03 
2.04 
2.08 
2.08 
2.08 
2.11 


70.16 
71.96 
74.27 
76.55 
79.40 


81.84 
82.67 
83.55 
83.22 
82.10 
83.31 
84.78 
84.35 
84.04 
80.65 
85.34 
84.48 
87.15 


168.1 
172.4 
177.9 
183.4 
190.2 


196.1 
198.1 
200.2 
199.4 
196.7 
199.6 
203.1 


202. 
201. 
193. 
204. 
202. 
208. 


132.8 
134.5 
137.7 
140.1 
142.8 


145.2 
146.7 
147.9 
146.5 
144.5 
147.2 
149.8 
148.7 
147.2 
141.1 
149.0 
147.4 
151.6 


Note:  The  index  of  average  weekly  wages  in  1949  dollars  is  computed  by  dividing  the  index  of  average  weekly  wages 
in  current  dollars  by  the  Consumer  Price  Index.  For  a  more  complete  statement  of  uses  and  limitations  of  the  adjusted  figures 
see  Man-Hours  and  Hourly  Earnings. 

•Revised. 

t  Preliminary. 


672 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      JULY   7965 


TABLE  C-5—  HOUKS  AND  EARNINGS,  BY  INDUSTRY 

(Hourly-Rated  Wage  Earners) 

Source:  Man-Houra  and  Hourly  Earnings,  DBS 

(The  latest  figures  are  subject  to  revision) 


Industry 


Mining 

Metal  mining 

Gold 

Other  metal 

Fuels 

Coal 

Oil  and  natural  gas 

Non-metal 

Manufacturing 

Durable  goods 

Non-durable  goods 

Food  and  beverages 

Meat  products 

Canned  and  preserved  fruits  and  vegetables . 

Grain  mill  products 

Bread  and  other  bakery  products 

Distilled  liquors 

Malt  liquors 

Tobacco  and  tobacco  products 

Rubber  products 

Leather  products 

Boots  and  shoes  (except  rubber) 

Other  leather  products 

Textile  products  (except  clothing) 

Cotton  yarn  and  broad  woven  goods 

Woollen  goods 

Synthetic  textiles  and  silk 

Clothing  (textile  and  fur) 

Men's  clothing 

Women's  clothing 

Knit  goods 

•Wood  products 

Saw  and  planing  mills 

Furniture 

Other  wood  products 

Paper  products 

Pulp  and  paper  mills 

Other  paper  products 

Printing,  publishing  and  allied  industries 

*Iron  and  steel  products 

Agricultural  implements 

Fabricated  and  structural  steel , 

Hardware  and  tools 

Heating  and  cooking  appliances , 

Iron  castings 

Machinery,  industrial 

Primary  iron  and  steel 

Sheet  metal  products 

Wire  and  wire  products 

'Transportation  equipment 

Aircraft  and  parts 

Motor  vehicles 

Motor  vehicle  parts  and  accessories 

Railroad  and  rolling  stock  equipment 

Shipbuilding  and  repairing 

*Non-ferrous  metal  products 

Aluminum  products 

Brass  and  copper  products 

Smelting  and  refining 

'Electrical  apparatus  and  supplies 

Heavy  electrical  machinery  and  equipment1 

Telecommunication  equipment 

*Non-metallic  mineral  products 

Clay  products 

Glass  and  glass  products 

Products  of  petroleum  and  coal 

Petroleum  refining  and  products 

Chemical  products 

Medicinal  and  pharmaceutical  preparations. 

Acids,  alkalis  and  salts 

Miscellaneous  manufacturing  industries 

Construction 

Building  and  general  engineering 

Highways,  bridges  and  streets 

Electric  and  motor  transportation 

Service 

Hotels  and  restaurants 

Laundries  and  dry  cleaning  plants 


Average  Weekly 
Hours 


Mar.      Feb.      Mar. 
1965        1965        1964 


43.0 

42.7 
43.2 
42.5 
44.3 
43.4 
45.4 
42.5 
41.3 
42.2 
40.5 
40.5 
40.1 
39.6 
42.2 
40.9 
40.4 
39.5 
36.6 
41.8 
40.4 
40.4 
40.6 
41.7 


41 

43 

41 

38 

39 

37 

41.9 

41.4 

40.6 

42.9 

42.1 

41.5 

41.5 

41.4 

39.2 

42.0 

41.9 

41.6 

43.2 

40.2 

43.2 

43.0 

41.1 

41.4 

43.0 

43.4 

41.6 

47.1 

43.6 

40.2 

41.3 

41.2 

41.6 

42.3 

40.6 

41.5 

41.4 

39.8 

42.5 

41.1 

40.3 

41.1 

41.1 

40.8 

39.6 

40.4 

41.5 

40.6 

40.6 

40.6 

44.0 

36.2 

35.7 

39.2 


42.3 

42.1 
41.4 
42.3 
42.4 
39.9 
45.5 
43.2 
40.6 
41.0 
40.2 
40.2 
39.2 
39.0 
43.0 
40.3 
40.8 
39.3 
37.8 
41.8 
40.5 
40.5 
40.4 
41.2 
40.9 
42.0 
40.4 
38.8 
38.9 
37.2 
41.8 
41.8 
41.4 
42.7 
41.9 
41.3 
41.6 
40.7 
38.7 
41.3 
41.0 
40.8 
42.3 
39.3 
42.1 


42. 


41.4 
39.7 
39.3 
40.8 
40.3 
41.1 
40.7 
40.4 
40.6 
39.1 
42.2 
41.4 
40.8 
41.3 
41.3 
40.5 
39.5 
40.2 
40.9 
40.2 
39.6 
41.7 
44.0 
36.6 
36.1 
39.0 


42.4 

42.2 
43.2 
41.8 
43.5 
41.0 
45.2 
42.2 
40.7 
41.2 
40.3 
40.8 
41.0 
40.1 
43.3 
41.5 
40.7 
39.4 
37.1 
41.3 
39.2 
38.8 
40.2 
42.1 
41.3 
42.0 
43.3 
38.1 
38.4 
36.3 
40.6 
40.8 
40.3 
41.5 
41.8 
41.4 
41.7 
40.8 
39.0 
41.4 
43.0 
41.6 
42.8 
41.1 
41.5 
42.3 
40.0 
40.9 
42.3 
41.4 
41.1 
42.4 
41.1 
40.7 
40.9 
40.9 
41.3 
42.1 
40.4 
40.6 
40.9 
39.8 
42.1 
42.2 
41.2 
40.7 
40.7 
41.3 
39.7 
41.2 
41.0 
37.5 
36.6 
39.5 
44.3 
37.1 
36.4 
40.5 


Average  Hourly 
Earnings 


Mar. 
1965 


2.39 

2.46 
1.92 
2.61 
2.30 
1.95 
2.72 
2.20 
2.11 
2.30 
1.90 
1.85 
2.09 
1.62 
2.01 
1.74 
2.42 
2.60 
2.19 
2.11 
1.43 
1.40 
1.50 
1.61 
1.65 
1.47 
1.71 
1.37 
1.35 
1.47 
1.27 
1.84 
1.97 
1.67 
1.53 
2.40 
2.59 
1.94 
2.55 
2.40 
2.61 
2.31 
2.00 
2.02 
2.36 
2.26 
2.81 
2.32 
2.29 
2.58 


2.08 
2.31 
1.88 


14 

95 

14 

34 

86 

28 

81 

63 

1.69 

2.41 

2.59 

1.96 

2.11 

1.26 

1.21 

1.20 


Feb. 

1965 


2.40 

2.46 

1.96 

2.61 

2.32 

1.94 

2.74 

2.23 

2.08 

2.26 

1.89 

1.85 

2.09 

1.62 

2.02 

1.75 

2.41 

2.59 

1.98 

2.10 

1.42 

1.38 

1.49 

1.60 

1.65 

1.46 

1.69 

1.36 

1.34 

1.48 

1.26 

1.85 

1.98 

1.65 

1.54 

2.40 

2.59 

1.92 

2.54 

2.37 

2.52 

2.31 

1.99 

2.01 

2.29 

2.22 

2.76 

2.26 

2.29 

2.51 

2.37 

2. 

2. 

2. 

2. 

2. 

2. 

2. 


.51 
.  36 
.38 
.  33 
.09 
.20 
2.60 
2.08 
2.29 
1.88 
2.16 
1.92 
2.16 
2.83 
2.85 
2.27 
1.80 
2.64 
1.68 
2.39 
2.58 
1.93 
2.11 
1.26 
1.21 
1.18 


Mar. 
1964 


2.34 

2.39 
1.85 
2.57 
2.31 
1.92 
2.55 
2.16 
2.01 
2.17 
1.85 
1.79 
2.03 
1.55 
1.94 
1.70 
2.36 
2.56 
2.00 
2.03 
1.37 
1.34 
1.43 
1.52 
1.52 
1.40 
1.66 
1.31 
1.30 
1.42 
1.22 
1.77 
1.89 
1.59 
1.43 
2.34 


2. 

1.86 

2.49 

2.30 

2.48 

2.22 

1.90 

1.97 


.  53 


2.34 
2.28 


.21 

78 

.05 
1.85 
2.06 
2.81 
2.83 
2.27 
1.74 
2.66 
1.67 
2.24 
2.43 
1.86 
2.09 
1.19 
1.16 
1.12 


Average  Weekly 
Wages 


Mar. 

1965 


MM 

104.75 
82.74 

111.15 

101.99 
84.37 

123.49 
93.74 
87.15 
96.75 
77.03 
74.91 
83.83 
64.30 
84.71 
71.15 
97.79 

102.63 
80.10 
88.11 
57.91 
56.44 
60.77 
66.98 
67.85 
63.00 
71.07 
53.18 
52.50 
54.49 
53.17 
76.21 
79.90 
71.61 
64,54 
99.63 

107.47 
80.24 
99.89 

101.08 

109.10 
96.19 
86.46 
81.11 

101.82 
96.99 

115.30 
96.17 
98.38 

112.05 
99.69 

138.14 

111.38 
94.60 
99.86 
95.73 
87.26 
93.26 

105.57 
86.29 
95.54 
74.67 
91.18 
80.14 
86.39 

116.76 

117.67 
92.99 
71.57 

106.30 
70.22 
97.81 

105.22 
79.67 
92.83 
45.69 
43.22 
46.90 


Feb. 
1965 


101.51 

103.59 
81.04 

110.19 
98.33 
77.14 

124.43 
96.28 
84.48 
92.57 
76.16 
74.19 
81.86 
63.08 
86.82 
70.64 
98.39 

102.02 
74.90 
88.01 
57.50 
56.22 
60.03 
65.65 
67.56 
61.29 
68.17 
52.83 
52.16 
55.07 
52.68 
77.20 
81.92 
70.54 
64.36 
99.22 

107.63 
78.11 
98.28 
97.74 

103.29 
94.13 
84.25 
79.14 
96.44 
94.94 

112.73 
90.83 
94.43 

100.81 
96.01 

112.79 

104.13 
93.41 
93.65 
94.90 
84.29 
90.14 

105.79 
83.88 
92.94 
73.62 
91.00 
79.47 
87.87 

116.58 

117.76 
92.12 
71.03 

105.92 
68.72 
95.94 

102.23 
80.67 
92.85 
46.13 
43.80 
46.04 


Mr.r. 

1904 


99.07 

100.00 
79.92 

107.73 

100.30 
78.59 

115.45 
91.28 
81.84 
89.26 
74.49 
73.16 
82.96 
62.05 
83.77 
70.55 
95.93 

101.01 
74.31 
83.79 
53.70 
51.83 
57.63 
64.07 
62.95 
58.67 
71.90 
50.06 
49.93 
51.64 
49.42 
72.01 
76.14 
66.20 
59.88 
97.15 

105.28 
75.89 
97.15 
95.05 

106.49 
91.81 
81.42 
80.94 
91.46 
90.61 

108.84 
89.43 
95.02 
96.73 
93.62 

111.10 
92.94 
89.43 
89.57 
94.84 
85.43 
91.93 

105.63 
80.63 
90.40 
70.14 
86.16 
78.08 
84.94 

114.55 

115.32 
93.57 
69.06 

109.55 
68.39 
84.05 
88.82 
73.42 
92.63 
44.06 
42.21 
45.47 


'Durable  manufactured  goods  industries. 
THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      JULY   7965 


673 


D — National  Employment  Service  Statistics 

Statistics  presented  in  the  following  tables  relate  to  registrations  for  employment  and 
vacancies  notified  by  employers  at  NES  offices.  These  data  are  derived  from  reports  prepared 
in  National  Employment  Service  offices  and  processed  in  the  Unemployment  Insurance 
Section,  DBS.  See  also  Technical  Note,  page   199,  February  1965  issue. 

TABLE  D-1-UNFILLED  VACANCIES  AND  REGISTRATIONS  ON  HAND 

Source:  National  Employment  Service,  Department  of  Labour 


Period 


End  of: 

June  1900 

June  1961 

June  1962 

June  1963 

June  1964 

July  1964 

August  1964 

September  1964 
October  1964  .  . 
November  1964 
December  1964 

lanoary  1965 

February  1965 . 
March  1965.... 

April  1965 

Mav  1965(i)..., 
June  1965">  .... 


Unfilled  Vacancies' 


Male 


17,227 
15,103 
22,436 
23,271 


29,445 
30,171 
33,617 
29,159 
38,620 
25,171 

22,509 
23,167 
27,436 
35,094 
38,765 
36,285 


Female 


15,875 
16,445 
20,672 
21,726 

21,359 

19,458 
24,058 
23,611 
19,727 
22,704 
14,758 

15,141 
16,364 
19,898 
24,548 
26,560 
24, 739 


Total 


33,102 
31,548 
43,108 
44,997 

50,052 

48,903 
54,229 
57,228 
48,886 
61,324 
39,929 

37,650 
39,531 
47,334 
59,642 
65,325 
61,024 


Registrations  on  hand 


Male 


258,719 
268,284 
237,747 
261,541 

266,490 

233,564 
197,724 
173,988 
203,340 
254,346 
378,125 

447, 847 
453,555 
447,673 
397,193 
277,216 
238,646 


Female 


131,936 
125,447 
119,561 
127,631 

140,069 

128,799 
109,554 
104,907 
110,611 
118,294 
130,721 

152,195 
153,426 
149,274 
142,760 
124,123 
144,684 


Total 


390,655 
393,731 
357,308 
389,172 

406,559 


307,278 
278,895 
313,951 
372,640 
508,846 

600,042 
606,981 
596,947 
539,953 
401,339 
383,330 


^'Latest  figures  subject  to  revision. 

"Current  Vacancies  onlv.  Deferred  Vacancies  are  excluded. 


TARLED-2— REGISTRATIONS  RECEIVED,  VACANCIES  NOTIFIED  AND 
PLACEMENTS  EFFECTED  DURING  YEAR,  1961-1964,  AND  DURING 
MONTH,  MAY  1964— MAY  1965 

Source:  National  Employment  Service,  Department  of  Labour 


Year  and  Month 


1961  —  Year 

1962- Year 

1963— Year 

1964— Year 

1964- May 

1964— June 

July 

August.  .  . . 
tember 
October 

'irnber 
December. 

■  Hilary.  .  . 
I  ebntary. . 

March 

April 

May  [»].... 


Registrations  Received 


Male 


3,125,195 
3,177,423 
2,912,511 
2,894,099 

207,806 

234,674 
237,632 
198,847 
209,609 
228,509 
277,052 
341,413 

272,107 
207,415 
236,435 
212,743 
191,819 


Female 


1,106,790 
1,171,111 
1,130,539 
1,170,889 

88,218 

109,636 
111,717 

97,928 
107,109 

99,357 
104,803 
103,065 

100,622 
79,029 
87,317 
84,512 
86,629 


Vacancies  Notified 


Male 


836,534 
1,010,365 

938,052 
1,030,199 

95,076 

87,592 
97,585 
86,901 

108,719 
88,832 

109,323 
77,455 

65,179 
62,727 
81,598 
89,202 
103,280 


Female 


469,119 
544,795 
507,910 
530,575 

44,484 

47,201 
53,022 
56,448 
55,219 
41,509 
45,645 
41,458 

34,426 

32,744 
41,971 
42,378 
47,189 


Placements  Effected 


Male 


748,790 
897,285 
790,381 
845,696 

78,405 


Female 


371,072 
438,471 
387,728 
395,380 

31,264 


74,485 

34,649 

81,610 

42,217 

69,893 

41,514 

90,230 

43,051 

72,982 

30,636 

82,945 

30,749 

76,480 

40,686 

53,989 

23,938 

49,152 

22,308 

62,519 

27,678 

67,731 

26,976 

81,804 

32,057 

Jj  Preliminary. 


674 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      JULY    1965 


TABLE  D-S— PLACEMENTS  EFFECTED,  BY  INDUSTRY  AM)  BY  SEX, 
l>im\C;  MAY    19850^ 

-..'  it.  b:  National  Employment  Bervioe,  Departmenl  of  Labour 


Industry  Croup 


Agriculture,  Fishing,  Trapping 

Forestry 

Mining,  Quarrying  and  Oil  WtQs 

Metal  Mining 

Fuels 

Non-Metal  M  ining 

Quarrying.  Clay  and  Sand  Pits 

Prospecting 

Manufacturing 

Poods  and  Beverages 

Tobacco  and  Tobacco  Products 

Rubber  Products 

Leather  Products 

Textile  Products  (except  clothing  > 

Clothing  (textile  and  fur) 

Wood  Products 

Paper  Products 

Printing,  Publishing  and  Allied  Industries.  . . 

Iron  and  Steel  Products 

Transportation  Equipment 

Non- Ferrous  Metal  Products 

Electrical  Apparatus  and  Supplies 

Non-Metallic  Mineral  Products 

Products  of  Petroleum  and  Coal 

Chemical  Products 

Miscellaneous  Manufacturing  Industries 

Construction 

General  Contractors 

Special  Trade  Contractors 

Transportation,  Storage  and  Communication 

Transportation 

Storage 

Communication 

PubUc  Utility  Operation 

Trade 

Wholesale 

Retail 

Finance,  Insurance  and  Real  Estate 

Service 

Community  or  Public  Service 

Government  Service 

Recreation  Service 

Business  Service 

Personal  Service 

Grand  Total 


Male 


1,885 
5,788 

1,195 
893 

211 
83 

10<) 

99 

19,888 

2,744 

37 

184 

324 

706 

581 

2,682 

1,283 

1,029 

3,693 

2,414 

755 

680 

1,004 

117 

942 

713 

15,480 

10,523 
4,957 

6,732 

6,059 

538 

135 

519 

10,853 

4,713 
6,140 

632 

16,784 

1,233 
6,240 
656 
1,662 
6,993 


81,804 


Female 


763 
95 

63 

13 

27 

2 

4 

17 

8,959 

2,838 

22 

111 

236 

421 

1,683 

267 

326 

564 

465 

284 

189 

548 

96 

13 

354 

542 

226 

128 


458 
267 
52 
139 


5,076 

1,293 
3,783 

1,223 

15,143 

1,627 

1,322 

251 

634 

11,309 


32,057 


Total 


4,748 

8,881 

1,258 
708 

238 
85 
LIS 

116 

28,847 

5,582 

59 

295 

560 
1,127 
2,264 
2,949 
1,609 
1,593 
4,158 
2,698 

944 
1,228 
1,100 

130 
1,296 
1,255 

15,706 

10,651 
5,055 

7,190 

6,326 

590 

274 

570 

15,929 

6,006 
9,923 

1,855 

31,927 

2,860 
7,562 
907 
2,296 
18,302 


113,861 


Change 

from 
May  1984 


-  1,881 

-  772 

+        75 

+  HI 

•+-  65 

-  108 
+  « 

-  11 

+  2,675 

+      223 

70 

+        61 

28 

36 

83 

171 

305 

505 

541 

143 

-f-       123 

+        90 

+      237 

+  8 

+      402 

+      128 

+  2,593 
+  1,907 
+      686 

+  51 

+  13 

+  20 

+  18 


30 

465 

127 
338 

125 

341 

662 
320 
266 
422 
157 


+  4,192 


Preliminary. 


THE  LABOUR   GAZETTE      •      JULY    7965 


675 


TABLE  D-4—  REGISTRATIONS  ON  HAND,  BY  OCCUPATION  AND  BY  SEX, 

AS  AT  MAY  31,  1965' 

Source:  National  Employment  Service,  Department  of  Labour 


Occupational  Group 


Registrations  on  Hand 


Male 


Female 


Total 


Professional  <fc  Managerial  Workers 

Clerical  Workers 

Sales  Workers 

Personal  &  Domestic  Service  Workers 

Seamen 

Agriculture,  Fishing,  Forestry  (Ex.  log.) 

Skilled  and  Semi-skilled  Workers 

Food  and  kindred  products  (incl.  tobacco) 

Textiles,  clothing,  etc 

Lumber  and  lumber  products , 

Pulp,  paper  (incl.  printing) 

Leather  and  leather  products 

Stone,  clay  &  glass  products 

Metalworking 

Electrical 

Transportation  equipment 

Mining , 

Construction 

Transportation  (except  seamen) 

Communications  &  public  utility , 

Trade  and  service 

Other  skilled  and  semi-skilled , 

Foremen 

Apprentices 

Unskilled  Workers , 

Food  and  tobacco , 

Lumber  &  lumber  products 

Metalworking 

Construction 

Other  unskilled  workers 

GRAND  TOTAL 


8,241 
17.700 

7,022 
33,805 

1,241 

5,089 

114,452 

930 

2,392 

18,798 

1,164 

883 

232 

8,024 

1,592 

396 

1,209 

26,580 

23,541 

498 

3,734 

16,463 

2,631 

5,385 


3,017 
11,411 

2,828 
46,218 
26,192 

277,216 


42,257 

15,271 

22,476 

25 

748 

16,550 
482 

10,261 
122 
482 
994 
30 
823 
866 
45 

10 

98 

1 

1,311 

743 

273 

9 

24,467 

6,205 

446 

557 

2 

17,257 

124.123 


10,570 

59,957 

22,293 

56,281 

1,266 

5,837 

131,002 

1,412 

12,653 

18,920 

1,646 

1,877 

262 

8,847 

2,458 

441 

1.209 

26,590 

23,639 

499 

5,045 

17,206 

2,904 

5,394 

114,133 

9,222 

11,857 

3,385 

46,220 

43,449 

401,339 


(^Preliminary  -  subject  to  revision. 


676 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      JULY    7965 


TABLE  D-5— REGISTRATIONS  ON  HAND,  BY  LOCAL  OFFICE  AREAS, 

AT  MAY  31,  1965 

Source:  National  Employment  Service,  Department  of  Labour 


Registrations 
on  Hand 

Office 

Registrations 
on  Hand 

Office 

(0 

May  31, 
1965 

Previous 
Year 

May  29, 
1964 

May  31, 
1965 

Previous 
Year 

May  29, 
1964 

Newfou  iidland 

17,683 

3,102 

1,813 

12,768 

2,367 

1,645 
722 

17,928 

664 

732 
4,993 

607 
1,648 

342 
1,777 

459 
3,317 
1,098 
1,018 
1,273 

14,723 

1,358 

1,492 

1,452 

1,117 

289 

2,798 

1,425 

3,196 

909 

262 

425 

134,778 

2,137 

508 

817 

953 

927 

2,162 

1,727 

1,951 

292 

2,116 

1,532 

314 

734 

1,294 

1,603 

2,298 

2,624 

2,766 

433 

1,056 

1,757 

904 

2.835 

872 

682 

954 

1,769 

807 

1,153 

39,170 

1,046 

1.021 

10,202 

3,136 

3,552 

1,783 

3,462 

655 

719 

1,657 

1,539 

1,667 

1,166 

1,508 

3,954 

18,690 

3,503 
2,214 
12,973 

2,413 

1,566 
847 

22,549 

681 

793 
6,216 

721 
2,125 

331 
2,051 

777 
4,790 
1,109 
1,302 
1,653 

19,897 

3,244 

1,740 

1,632 

1,605 

284 

4,410 

1.734 

3,088 

1,291 

311 

558 

147,286 

2,098 

581 

790 

1,235 

973 

2,257 

1,390 

2,176 

397 

1,761 

1,655 

393 

1,070 

1,539 

1,790 

2,384 

3,020 

2,737 

567 

1,068 

1,904 

824 

2,772 

812 

476 

811 

1,480 

808 

1,792 

47,237 

2,053 

1,022 

12,282 

3,145 

3,836 

1,798 

3,704 

589 

780 

1,691 

1,284 

1,683 

1,413 

1,505 

3.986 

Quebec— Concluded 

4,385 
1,764 
1,497 
2,998 
1,462 
1,905 
1,420 
3,133 

112,845 

246 
850 

1,443 
483 
939 

1,533 
192 
215 

1,074 
471 
479 

1,694 
297 
206 
477 

1,450 
929 
125 
215 
816 

8,899 
528 

1,000 
970 

1,686 
672 

1,586 
378 
362 
105 

3,433 

2,725 
308 
280 
226 
611 
933 
896 
961 
463 

2,475 

5,060 
711 
141 

1,085 
248 

1,990 
194 

2,619 
445 
392 
310 

2,662 
489 

1,582 

2,150 
626 
328 
264 
242 

2,672 
264 

1,354 

34,554 

660 

273 

274 

1,540 

2,103 

3,711 
271 

3,425 

Grand  Falls 

Sorel 

1,514 

Thetford  Mines 

1,431 

3,523 

Prince  Edward  Island 

Val-d'Or 

1,762 

Valleyfield 

1,372 

1,372 

Ville  St.  Georges... 

3,319 

Nova  Scotia 

Ontario 

119,839 

249 

Halifax 

964 

Belleville 

1,363 

618 

824 

New  Glasgow 

1,413 

478 

170 

1,394 

Truro 

527 

Collingwood 

Cornwall > 

Elliot  Lake 

389 

New  Brunswick 

1,781 
315 

Fort  Erie 

327 

458 

Fort  William 

1,484 

Gait 

717 

145 

Moncton^) 

Goderich 

281 

898 

9,649 

St.  Stephen 

723 

1,110 

Kenora 

575 

1,588 

Quebec 

529 

1,920 

442 

514 

164 

3,263 

2,498 

Midland 

320 

301 

301 

838 

1,366 

1,088 

548 

Orillia... 

407 

Oshawa 

3,900 

Hull 

4,954 

Joliette 

758 

296 

1,103 

Perth 

420 

2,056 

La  Tuque 

187 

2,653 

435 

541 

Maniwaki 

409 

2,840 

Mont-Laurier 

St.  Thomas 

519 

Montmagny 

1,907 

Montreal 

Sault  Ste.  Marie 

2,188 

New  Richmond 

673 

Port  Alfred 

Smiths  Falls 

360 

353 

568 

Riviere-du-Loup 

3,312 

Roberval 

264 

1,525 

Ste.  Agathe  des  Monts 

34,494 

Ste.  Anne  de  Bellevue 

529 

Ste.  Therese 

405 

277 

St.  Jean 

Welland 

1,543 

St.  Jerome 

2,147 

Sept-lles 

4,795 

Shawinigan 

Woodstock 

489 

THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      JULY    7965 


677 


TABLE  D-5     REGISTRATIONS  ON  HAND,  BY  LOCAL  OFFICE  AREAS. 

AT  MAY  31,  1965 

m  e:  National  Employment  Service,  Department  of  Labour 


Office 


Manitoba 

Hrainlon 

D:iuphin 

Flin  Flon 

Portage  la  Prairie 

The  Pas 

Winnipeg 

Saskatchewan 

Estevan 

Lloydminster 

M  oae  Jaw 

North  Battleford. 

Prince  Albert 

Regina 

ttoon 

Swift  Current 

\\<-vburn 

Yorkton 

Alberta 

Blairmore 

Calgary 

Drumheller 

Edmonton 

Edson 

Grande  Prairie.... 

Lethbridge 

Medicine  Hat 

Red  Deer 


Registrations 

on  Hand 


May  31, 
1965 


18,379 

1,079 
768 
157 
795 
322 
15,258 

10,665 

118 

125 

804 

788 

1,277 

3,105 

2,765 

434 

154 

1,095 

22,883 

453 
6,698 

305 
10,299 

278 
1,257 
1,703 

727 
1,163 


Previous 
Year 

May  29, 
1964 


24,292 

1,636 

1,204 

166 

863 

478 

19,945 

11,318 

159 

164 

739 

686 

1,566 

3,490 

2,757 

318 

116 

1,323 

27,849 

567 
8,309 

395 
13,106 

304 
1,346 
1,751 

776 
1,295 


Office 


British  Columbia 

Chilliwack 

Courtenay 

Cranbrook 

Dawson  Creek 

Duncan 

Kamloops 

Kelowna 

Mission  City 

Nanaimo 

Nelson 

New  Westminster 

Penticton 

Port  Alberni 

Prince  George 

Prince  Rupert 

Quesnel 

Trail 

Vancouver 

Vernon 

Victoria 

Whitehorse 

CANADA 

Males 

Females 


Registrations 
on  Hand 


May  31, 

1965 


49,088 

873 

532 

683 

1,281 

412 

1,514 

1,683 

499 

547 

731 

6,434 

1,787 

446 

2,020 

1,257 

1,069 

696 

21,843 

1,671 

2,767 

343 


401,339 

277,216 
124,123 


Previous 
Year 

May  29, 
1964 


51,644 

1,259 

642 

766 

1,439 

353 

1,790 

1,385 

821 

702 

869 

6,904 

1,458 

462 

2,561 

1,493 

1,187 

639 

22,062 

1,241 

3,208 

403 


445,777 

319,268 
126,509 


(^Preliminary. 

--Includes  101  registrations  reported  by  the  iles-de-la-Madeleine,  Que.  local  office. 


678 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      JULY   7965 


E — Unemployment  Insurance 

Unemployment  insurance  statistics  are  concerned  with  numbers  of  persons  covered  by 
insurance  and  claimants  for  benefit  at  Unemployment  Insurance  Commission  local  offices. 
The  data  are  compiled  in  the  Unemployment  Insurance  Section,  DBS,  from  information 
supplied  by  the  UIC.  For  further  information  regarding  the  nature  of  the  data  see  Technical 
Note,  page  592,  June  issue. 

TABLE  E-l     ESTIMATES  OP  THE  INSURED  POPULATION   UNDER  THE 
UNEMPLOYMENT  INSURANCE  ACT 

Source:  Statistical  Report  on  the  Operation  of  the  Unemployment  Insurance  Art,  I)H,^ 


End  of: 


1965-March 

February. . 
January. . . . 

1964— December. 
November 
October. . . 
September 

August 

July 

June 

May 

April 

March 


Total 


4,513,000 
4,499,000 
4,487,000 


475,000 
369,000 
298,000 
304,000 
330,000 
271,000 
241,000 
173,000 
280,000 


4,348,000 


Employed 


3,974,000 
3,939,800 
3,939,200 

3,996,800 
4,094,500 
4,083,500 
4,130,400 
4,148,000 
4,065,700 
4,039,100 
3,922,900 
3,782,300 
3,750,700 


Claimants 


539,000 
559,200 
547,800 

478,200 
274,500 
214,500 
173,600 
182,000 
205,300 
201,900 
250,100 
497,700 
597,300 


TABLE  E-3— INITIAL  AND  RENEWAL  CLAIMS  FOR  BENEFIT,  BY  PROVINCE, 

APRIL  1965 

Source:  Statistical  Report  on  the  Operation  of  the  Unemployment  Insurance  Act,  DBS 


Claims  filed  at 
Local  Offices 

Disposal  of  Claims  and  Claims 
Pending  at  End  of  Month 

Province 

Total* 

Initial 

Renewal 

Total 
Disposed 

oft 

Entitled 

to 
Benefit 

Not 
Entitled 
to  Benefit 

Pending 

4,973 

963 

6,917 

8,638 

51,028 

42,295 

6,539 

4,268 

9,252 

15,962 

4,337 

817 

5,107 

6,489 

36,785 

31,087 

5,146 

3,491 

7,094 

10,979 

637 

146 

1,810 

2,149 

14,243 

11,208 

1,393 

777 

2,158 

4,983 

5,337 
1,075 
7,703 
8,819 
57,868 
47,192 
6,941 
4,445 
9,586 

15,645 

4,566 

980 

6,655 

7,731 

48,321 

37,149 

5,778 

3,713 

7,601 

12,204 

771 

95 

1,048 

1,088 

1,720 

277 

1,552 

2.336 

9,547     !       16,450 

10,043           12,851 

1,163             1.772 

732 
1,985 

3,441 

1,299 

Alberta 

British    Columbia    (including    Yukon 

3,350 
5,532 

Total,  Canada,  April  1965 

150,836 
183,166 
175,430 

111,332 
135,353 
127,282 

39,504 
47,813 
48,148 

164,611 
180,583 
197,150 

134,698 
149,015 
164,891 

29,913 
31,568 
32,259 

47,139 

Total,  Canada,  March  1965 

60,914 

Total,  Canada,  April  1964 

43,627 

*In  addition,  revised  claims  received  numbered  34,751. 

tin  addition,  36,390  revised  claims  were  disposed  of.  Of  these,  3,249  were  special  requests  not  granted  and  1,982  appeals 
by  claimants.  There  were  8,710  revised  claims  pending  at  the  end  of  the  month. 


THE  LABOUR   GAZETTE      •      JULY    7965 


679 


TABLE  E-'-CLAIMANTS  CURRENTLY  REPORTING  TO  LOCAL  OFFICES 

BY  NUMBER  OF  WEEKS  ON  CLAIM,  PROVINCE  AND  SEX, 

APRIL  30,  1965 

(Counted  on  last  working  day  of  the  month) 

Source:  Statistical  Report  on  the  Operation  of  the  Unemployment  Insurance  Act,  DBS 


Province  and  Sex 


Total 
claimants 


Number  of  weeks  on  claim 
(based  on  20  per  cent  sample) 


1-4 


5-13 


14-26 


27  or 
more* 


Total 
claimants 


March 
31,  1965 


April 
30,  1964 


CANADA 

Male 

Female 

Newfoundland 

Male 

Female 

Prince  Edward  Island 

Male 

Female 

Nova  Scotia 

Male 

Female 

New  Brunswick 

Male 

Female 

Quebec 

Male 

Female 

Ontario 

Male 

Female 

Manitoba , 

Male , 

Female , 

Saskatchewan 

Male 

Female 

Alberta 

Male 

Female 

British  Columbia 

Male 

Female 


462,929 
345,050 
117,879 


130,773 
101,283 
29,490 


150,286 
114,302 
35,984 


146,322 
109,989 
36,424 


35,548 
19,567 
15,981 


538,978 
413,131 
125,847 


497,745 
380, 643 
117,102 


24,208 

22,414 

1,794 

4,573 
3,713 


27,180 

22,368 

4,812 

29,916 

25,013 

4,903 

154,516 
123,541 
30,975 

119,340 

74,783 
44,557 

21,649 
15,872 
5,777 

14,939 
11,334 
3,605 

25,098 
18,895 
6,203 

41,510 
27,117 
14,393 


5,001 
4,607 


577 
460 
117 

5,802 

4,951 

851 

6,583 
5,804 

779 

44,517 

36,305 

8,212 

36,729 
24,609 
12,120 

5,060 
3,783 
1,277 


2,725 
643 


7,213 
1,455 

14,468 
10,826 
3,642 


7,878 

7,397 

481 


799 
181 

8,529 
6,782 
1.747 

9,061 
7,803 
1,258 

57,460 

48,325 

9,135 

35,335 
21,956 
13,379 

7,095 
5,011 
2,084 

4,270 
3,165 
1,105 

7,212 
5,398 
1,814 

12,466 
7,666 
4.800 


10,393 

9,941 

452 

2,848 

2,350 

498 

11,053 
9,418 
1,635 

12,552 
10,482 
2,070 

41,719 

32,822 

8,897 

34,955 
21,533 
13,422 


6,275 
1,764 

6,212 
4,904 
1,308 

7,322 
5,277 
2,045 

11,229 
6,896 
4,333 


936 
469 
467 

168 
104 


1,796 

1,217 

579 

1,720 
924 
796 

10,820 
6,089 
4,731 

12,321 
6,685 
5,636 

1,455 
803 
652 

1,089 
540 
549 

1,896 
1,007 


3,347 
1,729 
1,618 


31,825 

29,952 

1,873 

6,402 
5,223 
1,179 

33,606 
28,048 
5,558 

34,143 
28,337 
5,806 

178,791 
146,304 
32,487 

134,385 
88,012 
46,373 

26,512 
20,516 


18,779 
14,662 
4,117 

27,185 

20,495 

6,690 

47,350 
31,582 
15.768 


27,229 

25,120 

2,109 

4,624 

3,863 

761 

32,109 
27,105 
5,004 

32,197 

27,073 

5,124 

158,861 
126,956 
31,905 

129,831 
87,131 
42,700 

23,533 
18,226 
5,307 

14,178 
10,884 
3,294 

29,502 

23,428 

6,074 

45,681 
30,857 
14,824 


•  The  bulk  of  the  cases  in  this  group  were  on  claim  from  27-39  weeks. 
Note:  Values  less  than  50  subject  to  relatively  large  sampling  variability. 


TABLE  E-4-BENEFIT  PAYMENTS,  BY  PROVINCE,  APRIL  1965 

Source:  Statistical  Report  on  the  Operation  of  the  Unemployment  Insurance  Act,  DBS 


Province 

Weeks 
Paid* 

Amount  of 

Benefit 

Paid 

$ 

Newfoundland 

95,370 

18,393 

89,966 

97,232 

603,923 

462,693 

82,145 

62,144 

88,781 

140,559 

2,421,764 

Prince  Edward  Island 

421,662 

Nova  Scotia 

2,034,905 

New  Brunswick 

2,291,334 

Quebec 

15,422,415 

Ontario 

11,317,108 

2,058,021 

Saskatchewan 

1,541,441 

Alberta 

2,248,786 

3,551,428 

Total,  Canada,  April  1965 

1,741,206 
2,235,905 
2,132,051 

43,308,864 

Total,  Canada,  March  1965 

55,589,404 

Total,  Canada,  April  1964 

52,582,772 

•"Weeks  paid"  represents  the  total  of  complete  and  partial  weeks  of  benefit  paid  during  the  month. 


680 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      JULY   J965 


F — Prices 

TABLE  F-l— TOTAL  AND  MAIN  COMPONENTS  OF  THE  CONSUMER  PRICE  INDEX 

(1949  =  100) 
Calculated  by  the  Dominion  Bureau  of  Statistics 


— 

Total 

Food 

Housing 

Clothing 

Trans- 
portation 

Health 

and 

Personal 

Care 

Recre- 
ation 
and 
Reading 

Tobacco 
and 

Alcohol 

1960— Year 

129.0 

129.2 

130.7 

133.0 

135.4 

135.3 
136.2 
136.1 
135.6 
135.6 
135.9 
136.8 

136.9 

137.2 

137.3 

137.7 

138.0 

139.0 

122.2 

124.0 

126.2 

130.3 

132.4 

132.5 
135.4 
135.1 
132.7 
131.0 
132.0 
133.2 

132.5 

133.1 

133.3 

133.4 

134.5 

137.6 

132.7 

133.2 

134.8 

136.2 

138.4 

138.4 
138.7 
138.7 
138.9 
139.2 
139.3 
139.6 

139.8 

140.1 

140.2 

140.3 

140.0 

140.6 

110.9 

112.5 

113.5 

116.3 

119.2 

119.0 
119.0 
118.9 
119.4 
120.7 
120.9 
121.0 

119.2 

119.5 

120.4 

121.2 

121.0 

121.1 

140.3 

140.6 

140.4 

140.4 

142.0 

142.0 
141.6 
141.4 
141.6 
141.4 
141.4 
142.7 

146.3 

146.3 

145.6 

145.9 

146.8 

147.0 

154.5 

155.3 

158.3 

162.4 

167.8* 

167.3 

167.3 

167.5 

167.7 

170.0* 

170.7* 

173.2* 

173.3* 

173.5* 

173.5* 

175.0* 

175.6 

175.4 

144.3 

146.1 

147.3 

149.3 

151.8 

151.4 
151.5 
151.5 
150.9 
151.1 
152.3 
153.5 

154.0 

153.4 

153.4 

153.5 

154.6 

155.0 

115.8 

1961— Year 

116.3 

1962— Year 

117.8 

1963— Year 

118.1 

1964— Year 

120.2 

1964 — June 

120.2 

July 

120.2 

120.2 

120.2 

121.4 

121.6 

121.6 

121.6 

121.8 

121.9 

121.9 

122.5 

122.5 

Note:  1960  figures  are  1947-48  weighted;  figures  for  1961  et  seq  are  1957  weighted. 

♦Revised.  Revision  based  on  an  adjustment  from  October  1964  in  the  prepaid  medical  care  component,  resulting  from 
revised  weights  for  group  and  non-group  rates  in  Quebec  and  Ontario. 


TABLE  F-2— CONSUMER  PRICE  INDEXES  FOR  REGIONAL  CITIES  OF  CANADA 
AT  THE  BEGINNING  OF  MAY  1965 

(1949  =  100) 


All-Items 

Food 

Housing 

Clothing 

Trans- 
porta- 
tion 

Health 

and 
personal 

care 

Recrea- 
tion 
and 

reading 

Tobacco 

— 

May 
1964 

April 
1965 

May 
1965 

and 
alcohol 

St.  John's,  Nfld.d) 

Halifax 

121.0 
131.8 
134.4 
134.3 
135.5 
136,4 
132.1 
129.3 
127.8 
132.7 

122.7 
133.5 
136.1 
136.8 
137.3 
138.9 
134.8 
131.1 
128.9 
134.5 

122.8 
133.9 
136.4 
137.4 
137.7 
139.4 
135.2 
131.9 
129.7 
134.5 

119.1 
129.8 
134.0 
139.2 
135.4 
132.8 
134.2 
132.1 
126.4 
133.2 

116.3 
134.3 
134.0 
136.0 
137.4 
141.7 
130.1 
128.8 
127.5 
134.8 

116.7 
131.2 
129.0 
113.1 
125.1 
127.8 
126.7 
133.5 
129.4 
124.1 

121.2 
138.8 
145.3 
166.8 
158.7 
144.8 
138.3 
137.2 
132.4 
147.3 

165.4 
169.6 
191.9 
183.0 
182.5 
174.1 
188.8 
150.5 
173.7 
157.0 

149.6 
171.9 
156.5 
157.1 
150.9 
192.8 
143.1 
149.9 
145.4 
150.7 

115.9 
125.9 

125.7 

127.1 

126.7 

Toronto 

123.9 

138.3 

Saskatoon-Regina 

Edmonton-Calgary 

124.4 
120.6 
123.3 

N.B.  Indexes  above  measure  percentage  changes  in  prices  over  time  in  each  city  and  should  not  be  used  to  compare 
actual  levels  of  prices  as  between  cities. 

(D  St.  John's  index  on  the  base  June  1951  =  100. 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      JULY   7965 


681 


G — Strikes  and  Lockouts 

Statistical  information  on  work  stoppages  in  Canada  as  compiled  by  the  Economics  and 
Research  Branch  of  the  Department  of  Labour  on  the  basis  of  reports  from  the  Unemploy- 
ment Insurance  Commission.  The  first  three  tables  in  this  section  cover  strikes  and  lockouts 
which  amount  to  ten  or  more  man-days.  The  number  of  workers  involved  includes  all  workers 
reported  on  strike  or  locked  out,  whether  or  not  they  all  belonged  to  the  union  directly 
involved  in  the  disputes  leading  to  the  work  stoppages.  Workers  indirectly  affected,  such  as 
those  laid  off  as  a  result  of  a  work  stoppage,  are  not  included.  For  further  notes  on  the  series, 
see  page  590,  June  issue. 

TABLE  G-l—  STRIKES  AND  LOCKOUTS,  1960-1965 


Month  or  Year 


Strikes  and 

Lockouts 

Beginning 

During  Month 

or  Year 


Strikes  and  Lockouts  in  Existence  During  Month  or  Year 


Strikes  and 
Lockouts 


Workers 
Involved 


Duration  in  Man-Days 


Man- Days 


Per  Cent  of 

Estimated 

Working  Time 


1960 

1961 

1962 

1963 

'1964 

•1964:  May 

June 

July 

August. . . . 
September 
October. . . 
November 
December 

•1965:  January.   .. 
February. . 

March 

April 

May 


268 
272 
290 
318 
313 

15 


274 

287 
311 
332 
329 

35 

66 
72 
68 
63 
60 
57 
48 

47 
50 
55 

66 
56 


49,408 
97,959 
74,332 
83,428 
100,214 

7,488 
15,148 
18,183 
11,418 

9,039 
10,593 
15,080 
33,689 

29,768 
29,596 
14,262 
11,612 
17.018 


738,700 
1,335,080 
1,417,900 

917,410 
1,572,220 

63,700 
195,680 
147,710 
108,200 
104,010 
101,580 
105,590 


220,380 
294,100 
115,260 
121,510 
155,490 


0.19 
0.11 
0.11 
0.07 
0.13 

0.06 
0.16 
0.12 
0.10 
0.09 
0.09 
0.09 
0.38 

0.21 
0.27 
0.09 
0.11 
0.14 


'Preliminary. 


TABLE  G-2— STRIKES  AND  LOCKOUTS, 
MAY  1965,  BY  INDUSTRY 

(Preliminary) 


TABLE  G-3—  STRIKES  AND  LOCKOUTS, 
MAY  1965,  BY  JURISDICTION 

(Preliminary) 


Industry 

Strikes 

and 
Lockouts 

Workers 
Involved 

Man- 
Days 

Mines 

4 

32 
6 
2 

8 

1,544 

12,962 

1,368 

790 

193 

8,710 

125,360 

6,920 

Transpn.  &  utilities 

Trade 

11,480 
1,730 

Service 4 

Public  administration 

161 

1,290 

All  industries 

56 

17,018 

155,490 

Jurisdiction 

Strikes 

and 
Lockouts 

Workers 
Involved 

Man- 
Days 

1 

1 

10 

29 

2 

1,200 

65 

4,632 

8,789 

733 

7,200 

780 

72,440 

62,730 

1,450 

1 
11 
1 

35 

1,044 
520 

450 

3,010 

7,430 

All  jurisdictions 

56 

17,018 

155,490 

682 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      JULY   1965 


TABLE  0-4    STRIKES  AM)  LOCKOUTS  INVOLVING  100  OR  MORE  WORKERS, 

MAY  1965 
Preliminary 


Industry 

I  titration  in 

Btai '  iiit- 

Man-Days 

Date 

Major  l    m 

Union 

Workers 
Involved 

Termi- 

I Employer 

Accu- 
mulated 

Result 

Location 

May 

nation 
Date 

Mines 

Metal 

Quebec  Iron  «fe  Titanium, 
Havre  Saint-Pierre,  Que. 

Steelworkers  Loc.  4466 

190 

1,330 

1,330 

May 

10 

New  policy  in  security   de- 

(AFL-CIO/CLC) 

May 

19 

partment  ~   Acceptance     of 

new  policy  when  amended. 

Dominion  Coal  No.  26 

Mineworkera  Loc.  4529 

1,200 

7,200 

7,200 

Mav 

17 

Removal  of  extra   man   for 

Colliery, 

(Ind.) 

May 

25 

duration    of    poor    roof    con- 

Glace  Bay,  N.S. 

ditions~ Return  of  workers 
pending  negotiations. 

Manufacturing 

Food  and  Beverage  a 

Hiram  Walker  &  Sons, 

Brewerv  Workers  Loc.  61 

430 

7,310 

7,310 

May 

6 

Wages,   statutory    holidays, 

Windsor,  Ont. 

(AFL-CIO/CLC) 

vacations,   medical  services 

Rubber 

Firestone  Tire  «fc  Rubber, 

Rubber  Workers  Loc.  113 

1,275 

2,550 

2,550 

May 

6 

Wages,  hours,  increased  pen- 

Hamilton, Ont. 

(AFL-CIO/CLC) 

May 

10 

sions  and  group  insurance 
benefits~  Return  of  workers 
when  settlement  reached. 

Clothing 

Fur  Manufacturers'  Guild, 

Butcher  Workmen 

731 

370 

370 

May 

27 

Wages,  contracting  out~Re- 

Montreal,  Que. 

(AFL-CIO/CLC) 

May 

27 

turn  of  workers. 

Associated  Fur 

Butcher  Workmen 

780 

780 

780 

May 

27 

Wages,  hours    ~    Return  of 

Industries. 

Loc.  82 

May 

28 

workers. 

Toronto,  Ont. 

(AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Wood 

B.C.  Forest  Products, 

Woodworkers  Loc.  1-118 

851 

1,700 

1,700 

May 

9 

Withdrawal  of  first  aid  at- 

Victoria, B.C. 

(AFL-CIO/CLC) 

May 

12 

tendant  on  midnight  shift — 
Return  of  workers  pending 
referral  to  the  grievance  com- 
mittee. 

Printing  and  Publishing 

The  Star,  Telegram  and 

Typographical  Union 

769 

16,080 

87,240 

July 

9 

Working  conditions  as  affect- 

Globe and  Mail, 

Loc.  91 

ed  by   computers,  job  secu- 

Toronto, Ont. 

(AFL-CIO/CLC) 

rity,  union  membership  of 
foremen  ~ 

Primary  Metal 

Anaconda  American 

Auto  Workers  Loc.  399 

1,100 

22,000 

32,200 

Apr. 

20 

Wages,  vacations,  statutory 

Brass, 

(AFL-CIO/CLC) 

holidays~ 

New  Toronto,  Ont. 

Manitoba  Rolling  Mill, 

Steelworkers  Loc.  5442 

700 

1,400 

1,400 

May 

10 

Interpretation    of    incentive 

Selkirk,  Man. 

(AFL-CIO/CLC) 

May 

12 

clause  in  existing  agreement 
~ Return  of  workers. 

Machinery 

International  Harvester, 

Steelworkers  Loc.  2868 

2,100 

700 

700 

Mav 

14 

Dissatisfied  with    delay   in 

Hamilton,  Ont. 

(AFL-CIO/CLC) 

May 

17 

contract  negotiations'^  Re- 
turn of  workers. 

Transportation  Equipment 

Canadair, 

Machinists  Loc.  712 

3,200 

12,800 

118,400 

Apr. 

12 

Wages,  union  security,  short- 

Montreal,  Que. 

(AFL-CIO/CLC) 

term  contract~ 

Long  Manufacturing, 

Auto  Workers  Loc.  1256 

301 

1,200 

1,200 

May 

19 

Piece-work  rates  in  new  con- 

Oakville, Ont. 

(AFL-CIO/CLC) 

May 

26 

tract  Return  of  workers 
negotiating  committee  to 
meet  to  discuss  problem. 

Electrical  Products 

Federal  Wire  and  Cable, 

Steelworkers  Loc.  3021 

273 

1,230 

1,230 

May 

17 

Wages     ~     Wage    increases 

Guelph,  Ont. 

(AFL-CIO/CLC) 

May 

25 

amounting  to  25c  over  a  3-yr. 
period. 

Construction 

Sarnia  Contractors' 

Plumbers  Loc.  663 

1,200 

6,000 

6,000 

May 

21 

Wages,  term  of  contract ~  15c 

Association, 

(AFL-CIO/CLC) 

May 

31 

an  hr.  increase  immediateh  , 

Sarnia,  Ont. 

25c  May  1,  1966,  20c  May  1. 
1967,  3-yr.  contract;  in- 
creased vacation  pay. 

Transpn.  &  Utilities 

Transportation 

Nfld.  Employers' 

Longshoremen's 

520 

7,430 

80,380 

Oct. 

26 

Union  refusal  to  accept  terms 

Association 

Protective  Union  (Ind.) 

May 

21 

of  Industrial  Enquiry  Com- 

St.  John's,  Nfld. 

mission~4c  an  hr.  increase, 
improved  overtime  rates  in 

Power,  Gas  and  Water 

a  3-year  agreement. 

Quebec  Hydro, 
Various  locations,  Que, 

Engineers'  Syndicate 

270 

4,050 

4,050 

May 

10 

Classes   of  engineers  to   be 

(CNTU) 

included  in  bargaining  unit~ 

THE  LABOUR   GAZETTE      •      JULY    7965 


683 


H — Industrial  Accidents 

TABLE  H-l— INDUSTRIAL  FATALITIES  IN  CANADA,  BY  INDUSTRY  AND 
OCCUPATION  DURING  THE  FIRST  QUARTER  OF  1965 

(Preliminary) 


Occupation 

u 

3 

3 

o 
< 

>> 

S 

o 

fa 

~60 
J 
CO 

"so 
.5 

c 

.5 

3 

O 

*3 

§ 

a 

c 
o 

o 

3 
(-i 

1 

u 

1 
C 

1 

B 

H 

0) 

^4) 
O 

.2 
fa 

8 
| 

S3 

02 

§ 

1 

u 

2 

«;3 

^3 

3T3 

fa<! 

3 

o 
H 

3 
"o 
H 
"o 
c 

0> 

O 

u 

fa 

i 

2 

3 

i 

2 

1 

1 

1 

5 

1 

8 
9 
2 
7 
24 
40 
4 
17 

7 

45 

90 

15 

3.0 

3.4 

0.7 

2 

4 

1 

1 

2.6 

3 
20 

4 
1 

16 

9.0 

Transport  and  communication 

•"4" 

6 

7 

2 

3 

1 

14.9 
1.5 

17 

6.3 

Fishermen,  trappers  and  nun- 

7 

2.6 

Miners,    quarrymen    and    re- 

43 
13 

2 
32 

4 

16.8 

Craftsmen,  production  process 

2 

24 
6 

15 
2 

3 
2 

1 

33.6 

Labourers  and  unskilled  work- 
ers   (not  agricultural,   fish- 

! 

5.6 

Total 

4 

25 

14 

61 

47 

33 

43 

9 

2 

6 

24 

268* 

100.0 

Per  Cent  of  Total 

1.5 

9.3 

5.2 

22.8 

17.5 

12.3 

16.1 

3.4 

0.7 

2.2 

9.0 

100.0 

(^Includes  trapping  and  hunting.  <2>Includes  quarrying  and  oil  wells.  <3>Includes  storage,  communication,  electric 
power,  gas  and  water  utilities.  (^Includes  insurance  and  real  estate.  (^Includes  community,  business  and  personal 
service.       <6)Includes  defence. 

*Of  this  total,  202  fatalities  were  reported  by  the  various  provincial  Workmen's  Compensation  Boards  and  the  Board  of 
Transport  Commissioners;  details  of  the  remaining  66  were  obtained  from  the  other  sources.  The  number  of  fatalities  that 
occur  during  a  quarter  is  usually  greater  than  shown,  as  not  all  fatalities  are  reported  in  time  for  inclusion  in  the  quarterly 
tables.  Fatalities  not  recorded  in  the  quarterly  tables  are  included  in  the  annual  tables  appearing  in  the  May  issue. 


TABLE  H-2— INDUSTRIAL  FATALITIES  IN  CANADA,  BY  INDUSTRY  AND  TYPE 
OF  ACCIDENT,  DURING  THE  FIRST  QUARTER  OF  1965* 


(Preliminary) 


Type  of  Accident 

4) 

3 
*3 

< 

>> 

(-1 

o 

fa 

M 

2 
fa 

b0 

a 
2 

.s 

3 
1 

J 
"-5 

V 

3 

«-c 

I 

3 

#o 

"03 

t* 
O 
D. 

I 

0 

T3 

2 

2 

§ 
.5 
fa 

0 

"g 

a 
0 

'■§ 
g 

o'l 

3| 

3TJ 
fa«J 

I 

Striking  against  or  stepping  on  objects 
Struck  by: 

1 

2 

i 

4 

2 
8 
5 
4 

3 
4 

1 

6 

21 
3 

.... 

34 
4 
1 

5 
5 
4 

3 

8 

7 

12 

1 

1 

72 

2 

1 
4 

20 

1 

1 

22 
1 

54 

Falls  and  slips: 

fa)  on  same  level 

5 

1 

11 

3 

7 
9 

1 

9 

1 

"2 

7 
2 
2 
3 
4 

1 

2 

1 

41 

1 

20 

2 

25 

7 

Over-exertion 

"i* 

1 

"3' 

7 

Miscellaneous  accidents 

1 

7 

Total 

4 

25 

14 

61 

47 

33 

43 

9 

2 

6 

24 

268 

•See  footnote  to  Table  H-l. 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      JULY   7965 


THE 


Sl  :£ LABOUR 

*i  •■  GAZETTE 


FKRinnicAtJi  reading  *<*>*• 

lUuiu»uitie»  i»ud  JhkwU  fewiK*t) 


ition  Program  to  Help  Economic  Growth  (p.  700) 


Published  Monthly  by  the 

iPARTMENT    OF    LABOUR 

CANADA 


Vol.  LXV 


No.  8 


AUGUST  31,        1965 


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(Continued  on  page  three  of  cover) 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE 

Official  Journal  of  the  Department  of  Labour,  Canada 

Hon.  Allan  J.  MacEachen,  Minister  George  V.  Haythorne,  Deputy  Minister 


Published  Monthly  in 
English     and     French 


Editorial  Staff 

Editor-in-Chief 

W.  S.  Drinkwater 

Editor 

Jack  E.  Nugent 

Assistant  Editor 

Frank  L.  Dubervill 

Editor,  French  Edition 

Georges  D'Astous 

Circulation  Manager 

J.  E.  Abbey 


Cover  Photograph 
Courtesy  Holland- 
American  Line 


Vol.  LXV,  No.  8  CONTENTS  August  1965 

Department  Today:  Winter  Works  Programs  Continuing  ....  686 

50  Years  Ago  This  Month  687 

Labour  Day  Messages  688 

Notes  of  Current   Interest   691 

Canada  Labour  (Standards)  Code  Effective  697 

Manpower   Assessment   Incentive   Agreement    698 

Immigration  Program  to  Help  Economic  Growth  700 

Plant   Relocation   and   its   Consequences    702 

Accehrated   Vocational  Training   for   Adults   704 

British  National  Incomes  Commission  706 

Latest   Labour   Statistics   707 

Employment  and  Unemployment,  July  708 

Collective  Bargaining  Review: 

Major  Settlements  in  First  Half,  1965  710 

Collective  Bargaining  Scene  712 

Women's  Bureau:   Continuing  Education  of  Women  716 

Growing  Number  Reach  "Rehabilitation  Status"  717 

Growth  in  Older  Segment  of  Labour  Force  718 

International  Labour  Organization: 

49th  International  Labour  Conference  719 

Certification  and  Conciliation: 

Certification    Proceedings,    733;    Conciliation    Proceedings  735 

Labour  Law: 

Legal  Decisions  Affecting  Labour  737 

Recent   Regulations,   Federal   and   Provincial   740 

National    Employment   Service: 

Monthly  Report  of  Placement  Operations  744 

Unemployment  Insurance: 

Monthly  Report  on  Operation  of  the  Act  745 

Decisions  of  the  Umpire  746 

Wage   Schedules   751 

Price  Indexes  758 

Publications  Recently  Received  in  Department's  Library  ....  759 

LABOUR  STATISTICS   763 

Indexed  in  the  Canadian  Periodical  Index 


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91939—1 


Department  of  Labour  Today 


Winter  Works  Programs  Continuing 


Minister  announces  that  Winter  Works  Incentive  Program  and 
Winter  House-Building  Incentive  Program  will  be  continued 
during  winter  of  1965-66  to  avoid  seasonal  employment  drop 


The  Municipal  Winter  Works  Incentive 
Program  and  the  Winter  House-Building  In- 
centive Program  will  both  be  continued  dur- 
ing the  coming  winter,  the  Minister  of  La- 
bour announced  last  month. 

The  Minister  stated  that  he  had  sent  tele- 
grams to  the  provincial  Premiers  informing 
them  of  the  Government's  decision  to  con- 
tinue the  Municipal  Winter  Works  Incentive 
Program  so  that  municipalities  may  plan 
projects  for  next  winter  well  in  advance. 

Under  this  program  the  federal  Govern- 
ment contributes  50  per  cent  of  the  direct 
payroll  costs  of  municipal  public  works  proj- 
ects carried  out  during  the  winter.  In  certain 
designated  areas,  the  federal  Government's 
contribution  is  60  per  cent  of  direct  payroll 
costs. 

The  Minister  said  that  the  Municipal  Win- 
ter Works  Incentive  Program  of  last  winter 
had  provided  more  employment  than  the  pro- 
grams of  any  previous  year. 

An  estimated  eight  million  man-days  of 
work  were  provided  for  166,674  men  hired 
during  the  Program.  This  was  an  increase  in 
the  man-days  of  15  per  cent  over  the  pre- 
vious winter. 

The  estimated  direct  payroll  cost  of  proj- 
ects approved  under  last  winter's  Program 
was  $114  million,  of  which  the  estimated 
federal  contribution  is  $61  million. 

A  total  of  2,581  municipalities  carried  out 
projects  under  the  program.  There  were  6,445 
applications  received,  with  6,318  being  ac- 
cepted. 

Quebec  had  the  greatest  number  of  proj- 
ects, with  2,475  applications  being  accepted 
that  produced  4,917,350  man-days  of  work 
for  105,002  men. 

Ontario  came  next  with  1,125  accepted 
applications  that  produced  1,124,562  man- 
days  of  work  for  17,857  men. 

Although  Alberta  had  only  650  applica- 
tions accepted  as  against  914  for  Saskatche- 
wan, the  projects  produced  433,936  man-days 
of  work,  compared  with  378,956  for  Sas- 
katchewan. 

The  number  of  men  hired  in  Alberta  for 
the  work  was  10,334,  compared  with  13,892 
in  Saskatchewan.  The  estimated  cost  of  the 
Alberta  projects  was  $22,040,000  and  of  the 
Saskatchewan    projects,    $15,384,000. 

In  commenting  on  the  Winter  House- 
Building  Incentive  Program,  the  Minister  said 


that  33,500  units  had  qualified  for  the  fed- 
eral incentive  of  $500,  which  is  paid  to  the 
first  purchaser  of  a  winter-built  house.  This 
is  an  increase  of  5,500  dwelling  units  from 
the  previous  winter. 

Under  last  winter's  program,  33,913  appli- 
cations were  received  for  39,862  units.  Of 
these,  299  were  cancelled,  707  rejected  on 
first  inspection,  and  5,328  rejected  on  final 
inspection  because  they  did  not  meet  the  con- 
ditions of  the  Program. 

A  total  of  28,455  applications  was  ap- 
proved, covering  33,528  units  valued  at 
$443,650,551. 

Single-dwelling  units  headed  the  list  of  the 
various  types  of  construction.  They  numbered 
24,570;  with  duplex  units  next  at  3,131;  tri- 
plex units,  320;  and  quadruplex  units  at  434. 

Of  the  total  construction,  19,840  units  were 
built  for  sale;  7,643  for  occupancy;  and  972 
for  rental  purposes.  Financing  of  18,485  units 
was  through  the  National  Housing  Act,  while 
9,970  were  financed  by  other  means. 

The  largest  number  of  applications  came 
from  Quebec,  with  Ontario  in  second  place. 
There  were  11,464  applications  from  Quebec 
for  15,098  units,  while  10,233  applications 
were  received  from  Ontario  for  11,532  units. 

In  Quebec,  139  cancellations  were  received, 
261  were  rejected  at  first  inspection  and 
1,329  units  on  final  inspection,  and  13,369 
units  were  approved  on  final  inspection. 

Unit  cancellations  in  Ontario  numbered  73. 
In  addition,  183  were  rejected  at  first  inspec- 
tion and  1,634  rejected  on  final  inspection, 
and  9,642  were  approved  on  final  inspection. 

Both  of  these  Programs,  the  Minister  said, 
had  been  effective  in  stabilizing  employment 
in  the  construction  industry  over  the  year  by 
shifting  much  construction  from  the  summer 
to  the  winter  months. 

It  is,  he  added,  all  the  more  important  that 
projects  be  shifted  to  the  winter  wherever  this 
can  be  done,  in  view  of  the  strong  demand 
for  construction  workers  in  many  areas 
across  Canada  in  the  summer. 

The  next  program  will  be  in  effect  from 
November  15,  1965  to  April  15,  1966. 

The  conditions  of  eligibility  for  the  winter 
house-building  incentive  were  given  in  the 
Labour  Gazette  for  October  1963,  page  862. 

The  number  of  jobs  created  by  new  con- 
struction expenditures  in  the  U.S.  is  noted  in 
the  Labour  Gazette  for  May,  p.  397. 


686 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      AUGUST    7965 


From  the  Labour  Gazette,  August  1915 

50  Years  Ago  This  Month 


I  nemployment  of  young  people  after  leaving  school  object  of 
concern  to  Ontario  Commission  on  Unemployment.  Difficulties 
experienced  by  older  men  seeking  employment  also  dealt   with 


The  unemployment  of  young  people  in  the 
period  immediately  after  leaving  school  was 
the  object  of  concern  in  an  interim  report  of 
the  Ontario  Commission  on  Unemployment, 
published  in  the  Labour  Gazette  of  August 
1915.  The  Commission  also  dealt  with  the 
difficulties  experienced  by  older  men  seeking 
employment. 

The  most  effective  method  recommended 
by  the  Commission  for  dealing  with  general 
unemployment  was  establishment  of  a  "pro- 
vincial system  of  employment  offices."  It  said 
that  "ultimately,  perhaps,"  such  a  system 
might  develop  into  "a  federal  system  cover- 
ing the  whole  country,  exercising  an  intelli- 
gent judgment  upon  problems  of  immigra- 
tion, and  wisely  assisting  to  distribute  labour 
as  changing  industrial  conditions  demand. 
Moreover,  wisely  officered,  such  an  organiza- 
tion might  gradually  take  on  new  duties  and 
obligations  and  become  an  invaluable  social, 
benevolent  and  educational  influence  in  every 
community." 

The  report  advised  that  provincial  employ- 
ment offices  be  set  up  first  in  seven  specified 
urban  centres  and  later  in  other  important 
industrial  centres. 

The  Commission  considered  also  the  ques- 
tion of  unemployment  insurance.  It  said  that 
its  inquiries  had  led  to  the  conclusion  that 
"the  extent  of  industrial  unemployment  (in 
Ontario)  during  1914  equalled  the  full  work- 
ing time  of  at  least  20,000  persons."  This 
number  was  not  continuously  out  of  work, 
the  report  explained,  but  "it  would  appear 
that  the  average  period  of  unemployment 
(1914)  for  not  less  than  70,000  industrial 
operatives  was  about   15  weeks. 

"Working  men  engaged  in  strictly  seasonfal] 
employment  are  not  included  in  these  figures. 
The  number  of  these  is  not  available,  but  is 
known  to  be  large.  Their  period  of  unem- 
ployment in  1914  is  indicated  by  returns 
from  the  building  trades,  secured  by  the  On- 
tario Bureau  of  Labour,  in  which  the  average 
number  of  'days  idle'  is  estimated  at  83. 
While  in  these  trades  a  considerable  period 
of  idleness  is,  to  some  extent,  provided  for 
in  the  rate  of  wages,  this  is  not  generally  the 
case  in  the  manufacturing  occupations  in  the 
province." 

To  meet  these  conditions,  the  Commission 
said  that  some  form  of  unemployment  insur- 
ance was  desirable.  It  had  considered  the 
method  of  compulsory  government  insurance 
that  was  in  effect  in  Great  Britain;  but  it  said 


that  such  a  system  would  not  be  possible  in 
Ontario  for  some  years  because  "there  are 
no  reliable  statistics  upon  which  to  calculate 
the  risks  of  unemployment."  In  England,  such 
statistics  had  been  furnished  by  labour  unions 
from  records  going  back  for  60  years. 

The  Commission  recommended  that  the 
Ontario  Government  establish  a  system  of 
financial  assistance  similar  to  those  provided 
in  France  and  Denmark,  to  help  "those  vol- 
untary associations  of  workingmen  which  un- 
dertake to  provide  unemployment  benefits  for 
their  members."  The  Commission  suggested 
that  the  Government  should  give  assistance 
equal  to  20  per  cent  of  the  sums  paid  out  by 
such  associations  in  unemployment  benefits. 

The  report  also  recommended  "that  the 
collection  of  statistics  relating  to  the  causes 
and  risks  of  unemployment  be  entrusted  to 
the  Department  of  Labour." 

The  Commission  dealt  at  some  length  with 
the  question  of  unemployment  among  young 
people.  It  was  satisfied  that  "much  unemploy- 
ment occurs  in  the  transition  from  the  school 
to  paid  employment."  Lacking  supervision, 
boys  and  girls  "drift  in  and  out  of  occupa- 
tions for  which  they  find  themselves  unsuited. 
Nor  does  this  ill  effect  terminate  with  ado- 
lescence. After  several  years  of  work,  without 
educative  value,  or  prospect  of  permanent 
employment,  numbers  are  left  untrained  and 
unemployed.  They  drift  into  the  ranks  of 
unskilled  labour,  and  at  best  have  a  precari- 
ous livelihood." 

The  Commission  recommended  that  all  pri- 
mary schools  supported  by  public  funds  be 
required  to  provide  "facilities  for  domestic 
and  manual  or  agricultural  instruction,"  and 
that  the  school  age  be  raised  to  provide  par- 
ents with  three  choices:  (1)  to  leave  the 
child  in  school  until  his  15th  birthday;  (2) 
to  place  the  child  in  an  industrial,  agricultural 
or  domestic  school  from  the  age  of  14  to  15 
years:  or  (3)  to  remove  the  child  from 
school  at  the  present  school  age  "for  an  in- 
dustrial, agricultural  or  domestic  pursuit,  to 
be  combined  with  part-time  industrial,  agri- 
cultural or  domestic  instruction  until  the  16th 
birthday." 

The  Commission  recommended  also  that, 
"in  order  that  parents  and  children  may  fully 
realize  the  need  of  additional  training,  and 
lest  the  drifting  of  children  from  job  to  job 
destroy  the  result  of  this  extended  educa- 
tion .  . .  vocational  guidance  should  be  made 
a  part  of  the  school  system  of  Ontario  .  .  .  ." 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE 
91939— 11 


AUGUST    J965 


687 


LABOUR  DAY  MESSAGES 


HON.  ALLAN  J.  MacEACHEN 

Minister  of  Labour 

"Poverty  anywhere  is  a  threat  to  prosperity  everywhere" — this  is  a  guiding 
principle  of  the  International  Labour  Organization,  and  one  that  Canada  accepts 
as  a  member  of  the  ILO. 

If  this  principle  holds  true  internationally  it  holds  true  just  as  surely  in  every 
country.  It  certainly  holds  true  in  Canada. 

No  matter  how  well  most  Canadians  are  doing,  we  cannot  honestly  call  this 

a  prosperous  country  as  long  as  we  have  poverty  within  our  borders.  And  we 

do  have  poverty.  There  are  people  in  Canada  who  have  been  left  behind  by 

progress  and  will  never  catch  up  without  help. 

This  spring  the  Government  announced  the       employed  workers  for  whom  there  is  steady, 


new  "Work  and  Opportunity"  program,  and 
committed  itself  to  do  everything  possible  to 
eliminate  poverty  in  this  country,  and  the 
economic  and  social  waste  it  causes. 

We  are  treating  this  as  a  major  policy. 
The  program  will  be  guided  directly  by  the 
Prime  Minister  as  chairman  of  a  cabinet 
committee,  of  which  I  am  vice-chairman. 

It  includes  several  distinct  measures.  Among 
the  most  important  is  an  expansion  of  the 
Area  Development  Program.  This  has  been 
designed  to  create  more  and  better  job  op- 
portunities in  areas  where,  for  one  reason 
or  another,  economic  activity  has  lagged,  by 
offering  tax  concessions  and  other  incen- 
tives to  industries  that  locate  there. 

Up  to  now,  the  areas  helped  in  this  way 
have  been  those  that  suffered  heavy,  long- 
term  unemployment.  Now  we  are  including 
areas  where  income  levels  are  generally  low 
and  underemployment  is  a  widespread  prob- 
lem. And,  since  July  1,  we  have  been  offering 
an  even  stronger  incentive — outright  grants  of 
up  to  five  million  dollars  to  industries  that 
set  up  in  these  low-growth  areas. 

It  is  obvious  that  if  the  people  in  these 
areas  are  not  qualified  for  the  jobs  that  are 
going  to  be  created  they  are  not  going  to 
benefit.  The  jobs  will  go  to  trained  workers 
who  come  in  from  outside. 

Therefore,  we  intend  to  make  sure  that 
federal-provincial  training  is  available  to 
these  local  people,  and  that  the  training  is 
co-ordinated  with  industrial  expansion. 

Workers  unable  to  find  suitable  jobs  in 
their  present  locations  often  wish  to  take 
jobs  elsewhere  for  which  they  are  fitted  by 
training  or  experience.  We  have  introduced 
a  new  Manpower  Mobility  Program  in  the 
Department  of  Labour  to  help  them. 

The  Program  will  provide  financial  help, 
either  as  loans  or  as  outright  grants,  to  un- 


full-time  employment  in  another  area,  beyond 
commuting  distances  from  their  homes. 

This  assistance  will  cover  the  cost  of 
moving  the  worker,  his  dependents  and  his 
household  effects,  plus  a  resettlement  allow- 
ance. 

There  are  many  other  ways  in  which  our 
new  work  and  opportunity  program  is  taking 
shape.  I  can  mention  only  one  or  two  more 
here.  The  Agricultural  Rehabilitation  and  De- 
velopment Agency  has  undertaken  a  stepped- 
up  program  to  help  eliminate  poverty  in 
rural  areas.  The  new  Canada  Assistance  Plan 
is  designed  to  provide  improved  services  to 
those  who  need  specialized  individual  help — 
and  more  money  has  been  made  available 
for   urban   renewal    and   slum   clearance. 

The  past  year  has  seen  another  important 
move  to  help  raise  standards  of  living  for 
low-income  groups.  The  new  Canada  Labour 
(Standards)  Code,  establishes  for  the  first 
time  a  set  of  minimum  standards  in  employ- 
ment under  federal  jurisdiction.  These  include 
a  minimum  wage  of  $1.25  an  hour,  a  work 
week  of  40  hours  with  a  maximum  of  eight 
hours  overtime  at  time  and  a  half,  two  weeks 
annual  paid  vacation  and  eight  paid  general 
holidays  a  year.  Taken  together,  they  com- 
prise one  of  the  most  comprehensive  sets  of 
standards  of  their  kind  anywhere. 

We  won't  banish  poverty  overnight — this 
will  be  a  long  battle.  These  measures  we 
have  introduced  in  the  past  year  are,  how- 
ever, practical  ones,  and  we  intend  to  pursue 
them  vigorously. 

We  are  committed  to  the  idea  that  all 
Canadians,  wherever  they  live,  are  entitled 
to  equal  opportunities  and  their  rightful  share 
of  the  good  things  that  most  of  us  already 
enjoy,  in  a  Canada  that  is  more  prosperous 
today  than  it  has  ever  been. 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      AUGUST   7965 


CLAUDE  JODOIN 

President,  Canadian  Labour  Congress 


One  of  the  major  roles  of  the  labour 
movement  has  been  to  strive  for  a  fair  shar- 
ing of  production.  Now  that  our  productive 
capacity  is  expanding  at  such  a  rapid  rate,  this 
task   takes  on   new   and  greater   importance. 

Those  who  look  on  organized  labour  as  a 
body  which,  in  the  past,  simply  contributed 
to  alleviating  inequalities,  fail  to  grasp  the 
significance  of  today's  events.  The  future  re- 
sponsibilities of  unions  are  likely  to  be  far 
greater  than  those  of  the  past. 

Since  we  last  celebrated  Labour  Day,  there 
have  been  several  significant  developments  in 
the  Canadian  economy.  With  all  Canadians, 
we  welcome  the  reduction  in  the  rate  of  un- 
employment; but,  at  the  same  time,  there  is 
a  need  to  recognize  that  the  situation  is  still 
far  from  satisfactory.  Unusually  high  rates  of 
unemployment  continue  among  young  people, 
and  among  those  who  lack  specialized  train- 
ing. There  are  also  too  many  workers  in  the 
so-called  "hard  core"  who  have  been  without 
work  for  considerable  periods. 

The  seriousness  of  the  situation  we  face 
has  been  pointed  up  by  the  report  of  the 
Economic  Council  of  Canada,  which  empha- 
sizes the  need  for  a  million  and  a  half  new 
jobs  by  1970.  This  is  required  to  reduce  our 
unemployment  rate  to  three  per  cent  and  to 
provide  work  for  the  record  number  of  young 
people  who  are  completing  their  education 
prior  to  entering  the  labour  force. 

These  conditions  have  to  be  met  at  a  time 
when  automation  and  other  technological  ad- 
vances are  reducing  the  manpower  require- 
ments in  many  areas.  This  obviously  makes 
our  task  of  finding  sufficient  jobs  far  more  dif- 
ficult and  complex  than  it  would  otherwise  be. 

The  plain  fact  is  that  unless  we  meet  this 
challenge,  we  may  well  be  confronted  with 
a  situation  in  which  one  half  of  the  popula- 
tion has  to  support  the  other  half.  This  is  not 
an  enticing  prospect.  Labour  Day  was  con- 
ceived as  an  occasion  to  honour  the  nobility 
of  labour.  Quite  properly,  the  overwhelming 
majority  of  Canadian  people  consider  the 
opportunity  to  earn  a  living  one  of  their 
democratic  rights. 

Only  through  major  adjustments  in  many 
areas  are  we  going  to  be  able  to  meet  the 
needs  of  the  future.  So  far,  our  thinking  in 
terms  of  social  requirements  has  lagged  far 
behind  mechanical  and  scientific  develop- 
ments. There  is  far  too  great  a  tendency  to 
ponder  on  the  improvements  we  have 
achieved  in  social  welfare,  and  to  regard  our 
present   position    as    a   comfortable    plateau. 

Despite  evidence  of  affluence  in  Canada, 
there  is  still  a  great  deal  of  poverty.  Regard- 
less of  the  progress  we  have  made  in  social 


services,  the  pattern  is  a  patch-work  combina- 
tion and  suffers  from  very  serious  shortages. 

The  Canadian  Labour  Congress  has  been 
urging  the  adoption  of  a  health  charter  for 
Canadians  as  the  major  centennial  objective 
for  1967.  It  is  regrettable  that,  despite  a 
Royal  Commission  report,  based  on  a  most 
exhaustive  and  comprehensive  study,  there 
has  been  hesitation  and  considerable  outright 
opposition  to  adoption  of  a  health  plan  which 
would  provide  facilities  for  all  Canadians  on 
an  equal  basis. 

The  determination  of  some  people  to  pre- 
serve the  position  of  certain  vested  interests 
that  profit  from  their  participation  in  the 
health  field  is  indicative  of  a  failure  to  meet 
modern  conditions  and  to  think  forward. 
Health  services  for  all  Canadians  are  within 
our  reach.  We  should  delay  no  further  in 
implementing  them. 

We  are  also  failing  to  meet  the  country's 
needs  with  regard  to  housing.  It  is  quite  true 
that  there  has  been  a  great  deal  of  construc- 
tion. Since  1946  more  than  2,000,000  new 
homes  have  been  built  in  Canada;  but  barely 
20,000  of  these  come  under  the  category  of 
low-rental  public  housing  designed  for  older 
people    and   others   with    restricted   incomes. 

There  is  a  danger  that  with  the  adoption 
of  the  Canada  Pension  Plan  and  the  exten- 
sion of  old  age  security,  some  may  think  that 
we  are  fulfilling  our  responsibilities  to  our 
senior  citizens.  This  is  far  from  true. 

There  is  a  need  for  a  far  more  generous 
and  dramatic  approach  to  education.  Our 
educational  requirements  for  the  future  are 
obviously  going  to  far  exceed  the  present 
capacity.  There  must  be  a  readiness  on  the 
part  of  both  governments  and  taxpayers  to  give 
high  priority  to  educational  needs,  and  these 
must  be  geared  to  manpower  requirements. 

The  necessity  for  an  extended  and  co- 
ordinated manpower  policy  for  Canada  is  one 
of  the  greatest  essentials  in  meeting  our 
changing  economic  conditions.  Regardless  of 
the  optimistic  statements  of  some  Govern- 
ment spokesmen,  we  are  still  far  short  of 
such  a  program. 

These  are  only  some  of  the  items  in  the 
long  list  of  social  requirements  that  still  con- 
front us  in  Canada.  Beyond  this  is  our  obli- 
gation to  other  countries. 

World  tensions  reached  serious  proportions 
in  recent  months.  The  Canadian  Labour  Con- 
gress has  always  regarded  international  affairs 
as  a  matter  which  should  concern  every  citi- 
zen. Our  failure  to  narrow  the  gap  between 
the  highly  industrialized  and  the  developing 
nations  has  undoubtedly  been  a  factor  in 
continuing  world  conflict.  It  has  been  the 
position    of    our    organization    that    Canada 


THE  LABOUR   GAZETTE      •      AUGUST    7965 


689 


should  extend  its  present  efforts  by  appro- 
priating a  minimum  of  1  per  cent  of  our 
Gross  National  Product  for  an  assistance  pro- 
gram. The  matters  which  concern  us  within 
our  own  borders  will  have  little  or  no  sig- 
nificance if  we  fail  to  maintain  world  peace. 


It  seems  obvious  that,  as  organized  labour 
again  observes  its  particular  day,  there  are 
many  tasks  to  which  we  should  rededicate 
ourselves  for  the  good  of  our  members  and 
their  families,  and  for  the  benefit  of  all 
people  throughout  the  world. 


MARCEL  PEPIN 

President,  Confederation  of  National  Trade  Unions 


It  gives  me  pleasure  to  greet  all  the  work- 
ers in  the  country  on  the  occasion  of  Labour 
Day.  the  day  when  the  workers,  who  are  the 
nation's  wealth,  are  honoured. 

We  do  not  often  give  special  attention  to 
the  workers,  public  recognition  of  the  all- 
important  role  played  by  the  millions,  both 
men  and  women — including  those  who  bring 
up  our  children — who  toil  every  day  to  pro- 
duce what  man  can  create  from  his  material 
resources  and  his  intelligence.  In  our  society, 
the  workers,  their  wives  and  their  children 
play  an  obscure,  and  often  very  difficult, 
role. 

Thanks  to  trade  unionism,  which  has  been 
making  considerable  progress  over  the  last 
few  years,  and  more  particularly  to  the 
workers  belonging  to  the  Confederation  of 
National  Trade  Unions,  thousands  of  workers 
benefit  from  better  working  conditions,  after 
important  struggles  in  which  solidarity  was 
the  main  factor. 

But  on  this  day,  we  think  also  of  the  very 
great  majority  of  salaried  employees  who 
have  not  yet  had  the  chance  to  join  those 
who  are  members  of  the  labour  movement. 

We  have  a  thought  also  for  those  who  are 
unemployed  or  who  are  constantly  facing  the 
risk  of  the  social  evil  called  unemployment. 

CNTU  members  do  not  wish  only  to  im- 
prove their  wages  and  working  conditions. 
They  are  interested  also  in  their  role  and 
place  in  society.  How  can  we  expect  the 
laws,  and  the  social  and  economic  institutions 
to  reflect  the  needs  and  yearnings  of  workers 


and  salaried  employees  in  all  fields  of  activity 
if  these  same  workers  are  not  part  of  the 
decision-making  bodies  that  shape  the  policies 
concerning  them  directly? 

The  working  class  represent  the  majority 
of  the  country's  citizens.  Despite  this,  we  try 
to  assign  to  them  an  obscure  role;  we  ask 
them  to  work  whenever  there  is  work  avail- 
able, to  be  quiet  or  not  to  protest  too  much 
when  we  treat  them  unjustly  or  condemn 
them  to  unemployment  or  low  wages. 

One  need  only  look  around  him,  in  his 
neighbourhood,  to  find  that  too  many  work- 
ers, too  many  men,  women  and  children  are 
doomed  to  suffer  insecurity  and  need. 

Poverty,  as  well  as  the  outrageous  preju- 
dices held  about  it,  must  be  stamped  out 
in  order  that  strong  and  consistent  measures 
may  be  taken  against  social  and  economic 
injustice. 

Our  country  has  human  and  material  re- 
sources to  achieve  this  end;  although  it  is 
undoubtedly  a  difficult  one,  we  cannot  remain 
idle  or  somehow  or  other  try  to  soothe  our 
conscience  in  the  face  of  the  scandal  of 
poverty. 

Workers  and  salaried  employees  can  no 
longer  expect  that  we  shall  fight  for  them 
without  their  active  participation. 

This  is  one  of  the  main  objectives  of  the 
CNTU  members. 

I  wish  all  workers  a  good  Labour  Day 
holiday  and  extend  my  best  wishes  of  suc- 
cess to  the  CNTU. 


CHARLES  SMITH 

Chairman,  Canadian  Railway  Labour  Executives  Association 


It  seems  highly  appropriate  that  this  initial 
message  from  the  Canadian  Railway  Labour 
Executives  Association  should  be  published 
in  connection  with  Labour  Day,  the  tradi- 
tional holiday  honouring  those  workers  whose 
productive  efforts  reflect  the  economic  prog- 
ress of  the  country. 

Each  succeeding  year,  organized  labour 
continues  to  expand  its  activities  in  new  areas 
affecting  the  welfare  of  membership.  In  the 
society  we  live  in  today,  adequate  wages, 
although  still  of  paramount  importance,  rep- 


resents only  one  factor  in  providing  an  ac- 
ceptable standard  of  living  for  all. 

The  Railway  Brotherhoods,  in  joint  asso- 
ciation, have  consistently  advocated  the  ut- 
most co-operation  and  consultation  between 
government,  management  and  labour  in  meet- 
ing conditions  in  a  changing  world.  Automa- 
tion still  remains  the  major  problem  affecting 
all  workers.  Surely  we  cannot  accept  the  fact 
that  science,  which  removes  drudgery  from 
work,  merely  replaces  it  with  the  hardship 
and  misery  of  unemployment. 

(Continued  on  page  743) 


690 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      AUGUST    7965 


NOTES  OF  CURRENT  INTEREST 


Announce  Department  of  Labour-University  Research  Grants 


Fourteen  grants  with  a  total  value  of 
$27,712.50  have  been  made  under  the  De- 
partment of  Labour-University  Research  Pro- 
gram for  1965-66.  Last  year,  13  grants  with 
a  total  value  of  $22,900  were  made. 

Since  the  Program  began  in  1951,  includ- 
ing the  latest  awards,  109  grants  have  been 
made  with   a  total  value  of  $132,257. 

These  grants  are  made  annually  by  the 
Department  of  Labour,  on  the  recommenda- 
tion of  a  joint  Labour  Department-University 
Research  Advisory  Committee,  to  encourage 
research  by  qualified  graduate  students  and 
professors  that  will  bring  about  a  greater  un- 
derstanding of  the  characterics  and  role  of 
labour-management  relations,  and  of  man- 
power development  and  use  in  the  Canadian 
economy. 

Applications  for  these  grants  are  accepted 
up  to  March  1  each  year  from  postgraduate 
students,  members  of  university  faculties,  and 
others  who  possess  qualifications  for  research, 
if  they  are  Canadian  citizens  or  have  a  de- 
gree from  a  Canadian  university.  The  post- 
graduate training  of  applicants  must  have 
been  in  a  field  of  social  science. 

A  report  and  summary  of  findings  of  each 
research  project  must  be  submitted  to  the 
Labour  Department-University  Research  Com- 
mittee, but  the  studies  remain  the  property 
of  the  authors,  who  in  many  cases  have  had 
them  published  later. 

1965  Grants 

The  following  are  the  studies  for  which 
the  1965  grants  were  made  and  the  names 
of  those  to  whom  they  were  awarded: 

— "The  Behaviour  of  Industrial  Conflicts 
(strikes)  in  Canada,  Quebec,  Ontario  and 
British  Columbia;  1937-64"— Bernard  Brody. 

— "Industrial  Relations  Implications  of  Ca- 
nadian-U.S.  Economic  Integration:  The  Auto- 
mobile Industry  as  a  Case  Study" — Norman 
Coates. 

— "Sociologie  du  Travail  des  Organisations" 
— Pierre  E.  Coulombe. 

— "A  Theoretical  Framework  for  Analys- 
ing the  Operation  of  the  Labour  Market" — 
J.  H.  G.  Crispo,  Arthur  M.  Kruger  and  Noah 
M.  Meltz. 

— "An  Economic  Profile  of  a  Skilled  Occu- 
pation in  a  Developed  Country" — Andrew  C. 
Gross. 

— "Voluntary  Pension  Plan  by  the  Provin- 
cial Government  as  a  Partial  Solution  to  the 
Closure  of  Three  Coal  Mines  in  the  Sydney, 
Cape  Breton  Area,  1960-61"— (Rev.)  An- 
drew Hogan. 

— "History  of  the  Catholic  Labour  Move- 
ment in  Quebec" — A.  Fraser  Isbester. 


— "The  Labour-Management  Climate  in 
Large  Canadian  Hospitals" — Theodore  I. 
Jongerius. 

— "Canadian  Political  Science  Association 
on  Occupational  Classifications" — Noah  M. 
Meltz. 

— "The  Public  Evaluation  of  Occupations" 
— John  Porter  and   Peter  Pineo. 

— "Labour  Force  Participation  and  Unem- 
ployment"— Pierre-Paul   Proulx. 

— "Post-War  Immigrants  in  the  Changing 
Metropolis  with  Special  Reference  to  To- 
ronto's Italian  Population" — Samuel  Sidlofsky. 

— "Journey  to  Work  Study  by  National 
Employment  Service  Areas" — Richard  S. 
Thoman. 

— "The  Existing  Law  in  the  Common  Law 
Provinces  of  Canada  Relating  to  the  Lawful- 
ness of  'Peaceful'  Secondary  Boycotts  and 
Secondary  Picketing" — Edwin  W.  Wahn. 

In  co-operation  with  the  International  La- 
bour Organization,  the  Department  of  Labour 
also  awards  annual  fellowships  for  research 
on  labour  problems  at  the  International  Insti- 
tute of  Labour  Studies  in  Geneva.  These  are 
open  to  senior  Canadian  scholars  who  must 
submit  their  applications  before  December  31. 

This  year  two  fellowships — of  $5,000  each, 
plus  travel  expenses  for  the  recipient  and  his 
dependants — were  awarded  to  Stuart  M. 
Jamieson  and  William  B.  Cunningham. 

Prof.  Jamieson's  subject  of  research  will  be 
"Changing  Patterns  of  Industrial  Conflict," 
and  Prof.  Cunningham's  will  be  "Municipal 
Labour  Relations,"  with  special  reference  to 
France,  Switzerland  and  Italy. 

Requests  for  information  about  the  Pro- 
gram or  the  grants  should  be  sent  to  the 
Secretary,  Labour  Department-University  Re- 
search Committee,  Economics  and  Research 
Branch,  Department  of  Labour,  Ottawa. 

Labour  Code  Drafted 
For  Northwest  Territories 

The  first  step  has  been  taken  to  establish 
a  labour  code  for  the  Northwest  Territories. 
A  draft  code  based  on  the  Canada  Labour 
(Standards)  Code  was  presented  to  a  session 
of  the  Territorial  Council  at  Yellowknife.  It 
would  provide  for  an  eight-hour  day  and  a 
40-hour  week.  A  48-hour  week  would  be  per- 
mitted in  special  circumstances. 

Public  hearings  are  being  held  on  the  new- 
draft  code,  and  a  bill  will  be  presented  to 
the  Territorial  Council  sometime  next  year. 

The  draft  code  is  the  result  of  a  survey 
of  area  employers  that  revealed  45  per  cent 
of  Northwest  Territories  workers  spend  more 
than  48  hours  a  week  at  their  work.  Only  10 
per  cent  work  40  hours  or  less. 


THE   LABOUR   GAZETTE      •      AUGUST    7965 


691 


Canada's  Role  For 
International  Co-operation  Year 

The  General  Assembly  of  the  United  Na- 
tions, at  its  18th  session  in  1963  decided  to 
declare  1965  "International  Co-operation 
Yew,*'  and  Canada  has  played  a  leading  part 
on  the  UN  committee  established  to  devise 
plans  and  programs  for  the  ICY. 

A  program  of  activities  to  be  carried  on  in 
Canada  has  been  drawn  up,  with  the  object 
of  arousing  people  to  a  realization  of  the 
opportunities  that  exist  for  co-operation  be- 
tween the  various  countries  of  the  world,  and 
encouraging  expansion  of  programs  of  indi- 
vidual co-operation  already  in  being.  In 
Canada,  the  Government  has  encouraged  the 
establishment  of  a  non-governmental  organi- 
zation known  as  International  Co-operation 
Year  (Canada). 

Purpose  of  Year 

The  purpose  of  International  Co-operation 
Year  is  to  draw  attention  to,  and  emphasize 
the  ways  in  which  international  co-operation 
is  now  being  carried  on;  and  in  instituting 
the  ICY,  the  UN  had  in  mind  the  words  of 
the  late  Prime  Minister  Nehru  of  India;  "The 
world  depends  on  co-operation,  and  not  on 
conflict.  . .  ." 

In  Canada,  a  series  of  conferences  is  plan- 
ned to  bring  ICY  to  the  attention  of  organi- 
zations and  the  public.  A  massive  public  in- 
formation and  education  program  has  been 
launched,  and  special  ICY  medallions  have 
been  struck  and  are  being  sold. 

Hon.  Paul  Martin,  Secretary  of  State  for 
External  Affairs,  in  a  statement  on  the  sub- 
ject, said  in  part:  "A  host  of  projects  in  the 
scientific,  cultural,  and  social  fields  have  been 
suggested  by  Canadians  in  all  parts  of  our 
nation,  and  many  of  these  activities,  includ- 
ing book  donations  by  Canadian  schools  to 
their  counterparts  in  less-developed  countries, 
town-twinning  projects,  food  shipments,  adop- 
tion of  a  universal  ICY  postage  stamp,  and 
educational  seminars  are  being  implemented. 

"I  hope  the  primary  impetus  in  Interna- 
tional Co-operation  Year  will  come  from  non- 
governmental organizations  and  individual 
Canadians  whose  increased  awareness  of 
world  affairs  must  be  the  basis  for  inter- 
national co-operation  and  the  quest  for 
peace. .  .  ." 

ICY  is  being  promoted  in  Canada  by  more 
than  50  national  and  provincial  organizations, 
and  similar  programs  are  being  carried  out 
in  more  than  40  countries  throughout  the 
world.  Complete  information  on  the  Cana- 
dian program  may  be  obtained  by  writing  to: 
International  Co-operation  Year,  517  Daly 
Building,  Ottawa  2. 


In-Service  Training 
In  Canadian  Industry 

Almost  17  per  cent  of  Canadian  industrial 
establishments  in  four  major  groups  of  indus- 
tries reported  some  form  of  organized  train- 
ing for  employees  in  the  year  ended  May  31, 
1963. 

About  25  per  cent  of  companies  employing 
50  or  more  employees  reported  in-service 
training,  and  the  percentage  rose  to  close  to 
100  per  cent  among  the  very  large  establish- 
ments. 

These  figures  are  some  of  the  findings  from 
a  survey  conducted  jointly  by  the  Department 
of  Labour  and  Dominion  Bureau  of  Statistics 
among  four  large  industrial  groups:  manufac- 
turing, public  utilities,  mining  and  transpor- 
tation-communication. 

Employing  a  total  of  more  than  300,000 
employees  in  the  categories  of  skilled  trades- 
men, first-line  supervisors,  technicians  and 
apprentices,  some  12,000  companies  reported 
during  the  survey. 

Bonus  for  Retraining 

A  novel  retraining  clause  was  included  in 
the  terms  negotiated  in  a  new  contract  signed 
by  Dow  Chemical  Company  in  the  United 
States  and  District  50  of  the  United  Mine 
Workers. 

The  terms  include  a  bonus  pay  of  3  cents 
an  hour  for  workers  who  complete  a  first 
retraining  course,  2  cents  to  10  cents  an  hour 
more  for  those  who  are  "graduated"  from 
another. 

The  idea  is  to  encourage  employee  retrain- 
ing for  changing  job  requirements. 

CCA  Will  Survey 
Labour  Relations 

A  comprehensive  inquiry  into  the  conduct 
of  construction  labour  relations  in  Canada 
will  be  sponsored  by  the  Canadian  Construc- 
tion Association  as  a  Centennial  project. 

In  announcing  the  project,  CCA  President 
Neville  R.  Williams,  Winnipeg,  said  that  la- 
bour authority  H.  Carl  Goldenberg,  Q.C., 
Montreal,  (L.G.  1962,  p.  775)  has  tentatively 
agreed  to  act  as  chairman  of  a  steering  com- 
mittee of  top-level  construction  executives  to 
guide  the  studies. 

Hon.  Allan  J.  MacEachen,  Minister  of  La- 
bour, has  commended  the  Association  on  its 
action  in  starting  this  project.  He  said  that 
it  should  fit  in  with  the  Government's  own 
efforts,  through  its  Manpower  Consultative 
Service,  to  encourage  industry  and  labour  to 
examine  critically  their  positions. 


692 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      AUGUST   7965 


Health  Minister  Predicts 
Rosy  Retirement 

"Perhaps  in  time  you'll  be  able  to  work 
for  individual  companies  and  receive  100  per 
cent  of  your  salary  when  you  retire,"  Hon. 
Judy  LaMarsh,  Minister  of  Health  and  Wel- 
fare, said  in  addressing  the  British  Columbia 
Federation  of  Labour  in  June. 

Miss  LaMarsh  was  speaking  on  the  Canada 
Pension  Plan,  which  she  described  as  "not 
perfect,"  but  "the  most  generous ...  in  the 
Western  World  today."  She  said  that  the  plan 
offered  "more  than  plans  in  the  United  States, 
the  United  Kingdom,  France,  Germany  or 
Scandanavia." 

The  speaker  described  in  some  detail  the 
benefits  that  would  be  paid  under  the  plan, 
and  then  touched  on  the  relation  between  it 
and  the  various  private  pension  plans  now  in 
existence.  The  Canada  Pension  Plan,  she  said, 
would  not  force  any  changes  in  private  pen- 
sion arrangements;  but  she  implied  that  such 
changes  were  likely  to  occur  when  the  public 
plan  went  into  effect. 

She  said  that  there  were  three  possible 
ways  in  which  the  Canada  Pension  Plan  and 
private  plans  could  be  fitted  together.  One 
was  to  "stack  the  Canada  Pension  Plan  on 
top  of  your  present  pension  plan."  Another 
way  would  be  to  "combine  your  own  pension 
plan  and  the  Canada  Pension  Plan  by  making 
adjustments".  A  third  way  would  be  to  aban- 
don the  present  plan  in  favour  of  the  Canada 
Pension  Plan.  The  latter  solution,  however, 
would  be  subject  to  provincial  laws  regulating 
pension  plans. 

The  Minister  pointed  out,  however,  that 
only  30  per  cent  of  those  in  the  labour  force 
were  eligible  for  pensions  under  private  plans. 
"The  workers  making  up  the  remaining  70 
per  cent  of  the  labour  force  do  not  have  pen- 
sions, and  therefore  obviously  do  not  have 
integration  problems." 

Many  Auto  Workers  Expected 
To  Choose  Early  Retirement 

As  a  result  of  special  pension  arrangements 
negotiated  last  fall  between  the  "Big  Three" 
auto  manufacturers  and  the  United  Automo- 
bile Workers,  between  a  third  and  a  half  of 
the  30,000  employees  of  Ford,  Chrysler  and 
General  Motors  in  the  United  States  who  are 
eligible,  are  expected  to  choose  early  retire- 
ment after  September  1,  asserts  an  article  in 
Business  Week  of  May  22. 

As  a  result  of  the  predicted  "smashing  suc- 
cess" of  the  plan,  some  company  officials  are 
concerned  about  a  possible  shortage  of  skilled 
workers.  Union  officials,  however,  discount 
this  possibility,  saying  that  skilled  workers 
have  more  to  lose  by  early  retirement  than 
production  workers. 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE 

91939—2 


•      AUGUST    7965 


The  plan  was  originally  designed  to  en- 
courage workers  with  long  service  to  retire 
early,  thus  opening  up  jobs  to  younger  work- 
ers. I  he  supplemental  pay  provision  of  the 
plan,  which  may  bring  monthly  benefits  up 
to  as  much  as  $400,  does  not  come  into  effect 
until  September. 

Although  not  all  the  workers  who  retire 
will  be  replaced,  and  because  some  jobs  will 
be  abolished  as  they  become  vacant,  the  great 
majority  of  assembly  line  workers  will  need 
to  be  replaced.  Thus  it  is  expected  that  thou- 
sands of  new  jobs  will  open  for  the  unem- 
ployed and  for  the  increasing  number  of  high 
school  graduates  who  are  not  going  on  to 
university  or  technical  school. 

New  Name  Adopted 

By  Office  Employees  Union 

According  to  Business  Week,  delegates  to 
the  20th  anniversary  convention  of  the  Office 
Employees  International  Union  voted  to 
change  their  name  to  the  Office  &  Profes- 
sional Employees  International  Union. 

The  60,000-member  union  hopes  that  this 
action  will  help  to  attract  technical  and  pro- 
fessional employees,  whose  interest  in  collec- 
tive bargaining  has  been  shown  by  the  activi- 
ties of  some  professional  associations.  The 
new  name  also  reflects  changes  in  the  nature 
of  work  done  by  present  members  as  a  result 
of  increased  automation. 

Another  move  by  the  convention  was  the 
setting  as  a  goal  of  a  four-day,  32-hour  week 
with  a  three-shift  arrangement  that  would 
keep  an  office  operating  on  Monday  to  Satur- 
day inclusive. 

New  Career  Publication  Issued 
By  Department  of  Labour 

Looking  Ahead  to  the  World  of  Work,  a 
50-page  illustrated  booklet  written  for  young 
people  in  the  upper  elementary  and  junior 
high  school  grades,  was  published  last  month 
by  the  Department  of  Labour. 

Young  readers  are  told  it  is  not  necessary 
to  make  a  career  decision  right  away — "plan- 
ning a  career  is  not  done  overnight" — but 
are  encouraged  to  take  full  advantage  of  the 
guidance  and  training  facilities  that  are  now 
developing  at  an  increasing  rate. 

Looking  Ahead  to  the  World  of  Work  is 
another  of  the  career  publications  prepared 
by  the  Economics  and  Research  Branch  of 
the  Department  of  Labour,  and  is  available 
at  a  cost,  prepaid,  of  25  cents  a  copy  from 
the  Queen's  Printer,  Ottawa,  Canada,  or  from 
Canadian  Government  bookshops  in  Ottawa, 
Toronto,  Montreal,  Winnipeg  and  Vancouver. 


693 


Seven- Year  Agreement  Signed 
On  Seaway  "Twinning"  Project 

A  seven-year  master  collective  agreement 
thai  is  expected  to  ensure  construction  of  the 
Welland  Canal  "twinning'*  project  and  high- 
wax  works  related  to  it,  without  interruption 
by  labour  disputes,  was  signed  in  mid-June 
by  a  council  of  12  building  trades  unions  and 
an  association  of  contractors.  The  project  will 
employ  5,000  workers  when  maximum  ac- 
tivity is  reached  in  1967. 

The  agreement  was  reached  after  months 
of  negotiations  between  the  unions  concerned, 
the  contractors,  and  representatives  of  the  St. 
Lawrence  Seaway  Authority.  Under  its  terms, 
which  are  similar  in  this  respect  to  those  of 
the  agreement  under  which  the  Seaway  was 
built  (L.G.  1956,  p.  1498),  the  unions  have 
promised  that  there  will  be  no  strikes,  even 
if  there  are  disputes,  and  no  interference  with 
the  supply  of  men  and  materials. 

The  parties  agreed  that  because  of  the  rig- 
orous nature  of  the  timetable  under  which 
the  work  must  be  done  during  the  short  sea- 
son when  navigation  is  closed,  it  was  neces- 
sary to  establish  smooth-working  labour  rela- 
tions for  the  length  of  the  project,  in  order 
to  prevent  interruptions  that  might  delay  re- 
opening of  navigation  each  spring. 

The  agreement  will  also  cover  contracts 
that  are  to  be  awarded  by  the  Ontario  De- 
partment of  Highways  for  construction  of 
crossings  over  the  canal. 

It  is  part  of  the  agreement  that  all  work 
on  the  canal  shall  be  performed  by  contrac- 
tors who  have  signed  agreements  with  unions. 
Contractors  who  are  successful  in  tendering 
for  the  canal  project  or  highway  works  re- 
lated to  it  will  have  to  become  members  of 
the  Welland  Canal  Twinning  Project  Con- 
tractors Association  and  to  abide  by  the  terms 
of  the  master  agreement. 

Wages  and  working  conditions  will,  as  far 
as  possible,  be  based  on  the  terms  that  pre- 
vail in  the  area  for  each  union,  and  will  be 
revised  to  conform  to  local  changes. 

Manitoba  Government  Employees 
Negotiate  First  Agreement 

The  Manitoba  Government  and  the  Mani- 
toba Government  Employees  Association  last 
month  signed  a  collective  agreement  that  for- 
mally recognizes  the  Association  as  sole  bar- 
gaining agent  for  provincial  civil  servants, 
and  confirms  their  right  to  enter  into  a  col- 
lective agreement. 

The  agreement  covers  about  6,000  provin- 
cial employees,  and  excludes  those  in  mana- 
gerial and  security  positions,  and  employees 
of  the  Manitoba  Telephone  System  and  the 
Manitoba  Hydro  who  have  their  own  unions. 


The  agreement  stipulates  that  the  MGEA 
will  continue  as  bargaining  agent  as  long  as 
its  membership  includes  a  majority  of  all 
Government  employees  other  than  those  with 
their  own  unions. 

Employer  and  employees  now  have  the 
machinery  for  interim  discussions  between 
formal  collective  agreements  respecting  com- 
pensation, adjustment  of  pay  ranges  and 
working  conditions. 

The  agreement  provides  for  negotiation, 
bargaining  and,  in  the  event  of  disagreement, 
mediation  and  appeal.  It  springs  from  recent 
changes  in  the  Civil  Service  Act,  amended 
after  a  year  and  a  half  of  discussions  by  a 
joint  council  representing  the  province  and 
civil  servants. 

Saskatchewan  has  had  collective  bargaining 
for  many  years,  but  it  was  introduced  by  gov- 
ernment legislation.  Alberta  is  currently  com- 
pleting similar  legislation,  and  Ontario  has 
only  partial  agreements  with  various  branches 
of  the  civil  service. 

Federal  Government  employees  are  cur- 
rently awaiting  the  drafting  of  legislation 
which  will  give  them  the  right  to  bargain  col- 
lectively over  wages  and  working  conditions. 

Board  Chairman  Receives 
Tribute  From  IAM 

John  I.  Snyder,  Jr.,  Board  Chairman  of 
United  States  Industries,  Inc.,  who  died  sud- 
denly this  spring  at  the  age  of  56,  was  paid 
a  sterling  tribute  by  the  International  Asso- 
ciation of  Machinists. 

Mr.  Snyder  was  termed  a  "friend  and  an 
ally"  by  an  editorial  in  the  IAM  "Machinist" 
which  referred  to  him  as  "one  of  the  new 
breed  of  industrial  magnates"  . . .  who  "never 
used  his  agreement  with  labour's  cause  as  an 
excuse  for  substandard  wages  or  conditions" 
.  . .  who  "had  courage  to  say  what  he  felt 
was  right  despite  the  heaviest  pressures  from 
some  of  his  biggest  customers." 

Mr.  Snyder  was  the  only  corporation  presi- 
dent to  address  an  IAM  convention  and,  as 
far  as  is  known,  the  only  one  to  speak  to  an 
AFL-CIO  conference  (L.G.,  Jan.  1964,  p.  26). 

At  the  IAM  convention  last  September  he 
said:  "In  my  opinion,  the  continued  elimina- 
tion of  jobs  by  machines  and  the  greatly 
increased  amounts  of  leisure  time  for  those 
who  continue  to  work,  will  probably  be  the 
two  primary  problems  that  our  society  faces 
between   now  and  the  turn  of  the   century. 

"If  we  are  to  grapple  effectively  with  these 
and  other  crucial  problems  that  automation 
and  technological  changes  are  spawning,  there 
will  have  to  be  a  far  greater  degree  of  whole- 
hearted co-operation  between  labour,  manage- 
ment, and  government  than  mankind  has  ever 
known  before." 


694 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      AUGUST    7965 


Profit-Sharing  Champion 
Dead  at  76 

Harold  V.  Lush,  a  former  Toronto  indus- 
trialist who  went  to  work  as  a  delivery  boy 
at  the  age  of  14,  and  who  was  President  of 
the  Canadian  Manufacturers'  Association  in 
1957-58  (L.G.,  1957,  p.  812),  died  last  month 
at  the  age  of  76. 

Mr.  Lush  championed  profit-sharing  and 
advocated  compulsory  arbitration  of  labour 
disputes.  He  contended  that  strikes  were  an 
outmoded  way  of  settling  differences  between 
employers  and   employees. 

While  chairman  of  the  board  of  Supreme 
Aluminum  Industries  Ltd,  and  Supreme  An- 
odizing Ltd.,  he  said  that  the  profit-sharing 
plan  in  his  own  company  would  enable  work- 
ers to  accumulate  an  equity  of  as  much  as 
$50,000  in  25  years. 

Discrimination  Forbidden 
By  U.S.  Civil  Rights  Act 

The  fair  employment  practices  provisions 
of  the  United  States  Civil  Rights  Act  of  1964 
(L.G.,  Nov.  1964,  p.  944)  went  into  effect 
on  July  2.  They  are,  however,  being  applied 
by  stages.  Other  sections  of  the  Act  went 
into  effect  on  July  2,  1964. 

The  provisions  forbid  discrimination  by 
employers,  trade  unions  and  employment 
agencies  on  the  basis  of  race,  colour,  religion, 
sex  or  national  origin.  Employers  are  forbid- 
den to  discriminate  on  these  grounds  in  the 
hiring,  firing  or  promotion  of  employees;  and 
trade  unions  are  forbidden  to  discriminate  in 
admission  to  membership  or  in  the  segrega- 
tion of  membership. 

For  the  first  year,  the  provisions  will  apply 
to  employers  of  100  or  more  employees  and 
to  trade  unions  with  100  or  more  members. 
In  July  1966,  coverage  will  be  extended  to 
employers  and  unions  with  75  or  more  em- 
ployees or  members  respectively.  In  the  fol- 
lowing year,  the  provisions  will  apply  where 
there  are  50  or  more  employees  or  members; 
and  finally,  in  1968,  where  there  are  25  or 
more  employees  or  members. 

Agricultural  Labour  Program 
To  Serve  All  Interests 

An  "encouraging  lesson"  has  given  rise  to 
a  three-point  plan  to  develop  a  National 
Agricultural  Labor  Program  in  the  United 
States  that  is  intended  to  serve  the  interests 
of  the  growers,  the  workers,  and  the  public. 
The  three  points  of  this  program  announced 
by  Secretary  of  Labor  W.  Willard  Wirtz  in- 
clude: (1)  the  recognition  that  agricultural 
employment  is  "essentially  like  other  kinds  of 
employment,"  and  that  agricultural  workers, 


like  other  workers,  should  be  paid  fair  wages 
and  be  protected  by  state  and  federal  laws 
regarding  minimum  wages,  health  and  sani- 
tation, unemployment  insurance,  workmen's 
compensation,  and  collective  bargaining;  (2) 
the  development  of  mainly  year-round  em- 
ployment opportunity  for  agricultural  workers 
— to  bring  "decency"  into  their  lives  and  sta- 
bility into  the  farm  labor  supply  situation; 
and  (3)  more  effective  stimulation  of  public 
opinion  regarding  the  farm  labour  situation. 

The  encouraging  lesson  of  which  the  Secre- 
tary spoke  was  that  learned  in  the  past  year 
in  making  the  transition  from  the  use  of 
foreign  agricultural  labour  to  domestic  labour. 
At  this  time  last  year,  there  were  65,218 
foreign  farm  workers  in  the  U.S.;  this  year 
there  are  only  2,587  as  a  result  of  federal 
legislative  action  which  ended  the  wholesale 
importation  of  seasonal  foreign  farm  la- 
bourers, or  "braceros." 

Last  year,  foreign  farm  workers  were  em- 
ployed in  thirteen  states;  now  they  are  being 
employed  in  only  three.  Mr.  Wirtz  said  that, 
while  there  had  been  some  "temporary  crises 
in  the  labour  supply  situation"  as  the  result 
of  the  government's  letting  Public  Laws  78 
and  414  lapse,  there  had  been  "no  serious 
shortages."  He  added  that  the  situation  has 
proved  that  the  laws  of  "supply  and  demand, 
supplemented  by  special  recruitment  efforts, 
do  work  in  agricultural  industry  just  as  in 
any  other." 

U.S.  Monthly  Labor  Review 
Marks  50th  Anniversary 

The  Monthly  Labor  Review  of  the  United 
States  Department  of  Labor,  the  Govern- 
ment's oldest  magazine,  in  July  published  an 
anniversary  issue  marking  its  50th  year  of 
publication. 

The  number  includes,  in  addition  to  the 
regular  issue,  a  64-page  special  section  con- 
taining articles  by  13  prominent  experts  in 
the  labour  field,  a  selection  of  reprints  from 
past  issues  covering  the  period  from  the  Taft 
Administration  to  the  present,  a  history  of 
the  journal,  and  samples  of  how  the  Review's 
methods  of  dealing  with  a  variety  of  topics 
have  changed  during  the  years. 

Two  Divisions  Merge  Into 
Management  Development  Division 

The  Management  Training  Division  of  the 
Department's  Technical  and  Vocational  Train- 
ing Branch  has  merged  with  the  Small  Busi- 
ness Management  Training  Division  to  form 
the  Management  Development  Division. 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE 

91939—2J 


•      AUGUST    7965 


695 


U.S.  Votes  Fund  for  Public  Works 
And  Regional  Development 

Three  billion  dollars  has  been  allocated  by 
the  U.S.  Government  for  local  public  works 
and  regional  economic  development. 

1  egislation  making  the  assistance  a  reality 
combines  features  of  the  older  U.S.  area  re- 
development program  (L.G.  1961,  p.  658) 
and  an  accelerated  public  works  program. 
The  combination  makes  possible  Appalachia- 
type  regional  planning  for  depressed  areas 
throughout  the  country. 

Among  the  program's  main  features  are 
five  that: 

— provide  for  federal  subsidies  to  new  pub- 
lic works; 

— allow  the  federal  government  to  contrib- 
ute greater  financial  aid  to  existing  programs 
such  as  airport  and  hospital  construction; 

— provide  loans  for  public  works  and  for 
the  establishment  of  facilities  for  industrial 
and  commercial  use; 

— allow  loan  guarantees  of  up  to  90  per 
cent  of  the  working  capital  businesses  borrow 
from  private  lenders  to  build  facilities  in  de- 
pressed areas; 

— provide  a  new  government  subsidy  that 
would  pay  part  of  the  cost  of  financing  that 
a  businessman  needs  to  build  or  expand  facil- 
ities in  a  depressed  area. 

About  1,000  counties  in  the  U.S. — roughly 
one-third  of  the  total — will  be  eligible  for 
public-works  benefits.  Included  among  the 
provisions  are: 

— grants  for  public  works  totalling  $400 
million  a  year; 

— loans  up  to  $170  million  a  year; 

— $5  million  a  year  in  interest  subsidies, 
which  will  be  enough  to  pay  for  another  $250 
million  of  new  plant  or  equipment; 

— $25  million  for  research  and  planning 
grants; 

— $50  million  in  loans  for  development 
centres; 

— $15  million  for  technical  assistance  to 
depressed  areas  and  to  defray  the  cost  of  pro- 
fessional staff  needed  to  promote  regional 
development  organizations. 

Domestic  Exports 
Rise  8  Per  Cent 

Canada's  commodity  exports  in  April  were 
valued  at  $387,806,000,  a  rise  of  8  per  cent 
from  last  year's  April  total  of  $359,082,000. 
This  brought  the  value  in  the  January-April 
period  to  $1,424,634,000,  greater  by  10  per 
cent  than  the  corresponding  1964  total  of 
$1,285,385,000. 


"Czar"  Suggested  As  Solution 
To  Labour  Turbulence 

Appointment  of  an  all-powerful  "czar"  has 
been  suggested  as  the  solution  to  labour  tur- 
bulence in  the  United  States  Maritime  Indus- 
try, and  it  is  said  that  it  would  probably  be 
acceptable  to  both  the  shipowner  groups  and 
the  unions.  The  idea  of  creating  the  position 
of  an  industry-wide  super-umpire  arose  in  the 
midst  of  the  walkout  and  bargaining  dead- 
lock between  sea-going  unions  and  shippers 
on  the  East  and  Gulf  Coasts. 

One  of  the  central  issues  in  the  dispute 
involves  the  present  arbitrator  in  MEBA- 
industry  disputes,  Prof.  Donald  F.  Shaugnessy 
of  Columbia  University.  The  American  Mer- 
chant Marine  Institute  companies  insist  on 
his  replacement,  saying,  according  to  The 
New  York  Times,  that  they  no  longer  have 
faith  in  him. 

The  proposal  for  a  czar  also  suggests  am- 
plifying the  duties  of  the  arbitrator  (which 
currently  consist  of  the  mere  making  of  bind- 
ing decisions  on  stalemated  issues  between 
unions  and  management)  to  include  an  over- 
haul of  the  entire  labour  relations  situation 
in  the  maritime  industry.  Management  groups 
and  union  representatives  both  seem  to  fa- 
vour the  idea  of  such  an  all-powerful  arbiter. 

In  Parliament  Last  Month 
(page  numbers  refer  to  Hansard) 

The  Minister  of  Labour,  in  accordance 
with  Article  19  of  the  constitution  of  the 
International  Labour  Organization,  on  June 
29  tabled  the  English  and  French  texts  of  the 
instruments  adopted  at  the  48th  International 
Labour  Convention  in  Geneva  in  June  and 
July  1964  (p.  2993). 

The  instruments  consisted  of  three  inter- 
national labour  conventions  and  three  recom- 
mendations. They  included  a  convention  and 
a  recommendation  on  hygiene  in  commerce 
and  offices,  a  convention  and  a  recommenda- 
tion on  benefits  in  the  case  of  employment 
injury,  and  a  convention  and  a  recommenda- 
tion on  employment  policy. 

The  Minister  said  that  the  Government  was 
taking  steps  to  consult  the  provinces  with  a 
view  to  acting  on  the  conventions. 

Bill  C-118  to  amend  the  Income  Tax  Act 
and  the  Federal-Provincial  Fiscal  Arrange- 
ments Act  was  given  second  reading  on  June 
22  (p.  2799),  and  was  given  third  reading 
and  passed  on  June  28  (p.  2950).  It  was 
given  the  Royal  Assent  on  June  30  (p.  3133). 
The  measure  had  been  introduced  on  June  17 
(L.G.,  July,  p.  600)  and  the  bill  was  given 
first  reading  on  the  same  date. 


696 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      AUGUST   1965 


Canada  Labour  (Standards)  Code  Effective 

Minimum  standards  set  under  new  rules  that  came  into  force  on 
July  1  for  employees  under  federal  jurisdiction  respecting 
hours  of  work,  minimum  wages,  annual  vacations  and  holidays 


Parts  I  to  IV  of  the  Canada  Labour 
(Standards)  Code  (L.G.,  Dec.  1964,  p.  1058) 
came  into  force  on  July  1,  establishing  mini- 
mum standards  for  employees  in  employment 
within  federal  jurisdiction  with  respect  to 
hours  of  work,  minimum  wages,  annual  vaca- 
tions, and  general  holidays. 

The  standards  are  a  minimum  wage  of 
$1.25  an  hour;  hours  of  work  not  longer  than 
eight  in  a  day  and  40  in  a  week  unless  an 
overtime  rate  is  paid;  an  overtime  rate  of  one 
and  one-half  times  the  regular  rate  of  pay, 
and  maximum  hours  not  in  excess  of  48  in 
a  week;  at  least  two  weeks  annual  vacation 
with  pay;  and  at  least  eight  paid  general  holi- 
days in  a  year. 

Changes  Made 

The  Bill  was  introduced  by  the  Minister  of 
Labour  on  October  1,  1964.  Several  changes 
were  made  in  the  Bill,  before  it  received 
Royal  Assent  on  March  18. 

Three  of  the  changes  were  with  respect 
to  general  holidays.  The  number  of  general 
holidays  with  pay  was  increased  from  seven 
to  eight;  the  provision  stating  that  an  em- 
ployee would  not  be  entitled  to  a  holiday 
with  pay  when  the  holiday  falls  in  a  week 
in  which  he  is  not  entitled  to  wages  for  any 
other  day  was  deleted,  and  provisions  were 
added  stating  that  an  employee  is  not  entitled 
to  be  paid  for  a  general  holiday  on  which  he 
does  not  work  when  he  is  not  entitled  to 
wages  for  at  least  15  days  during  the  30 
calendar  days  immediately  preceding  the  gen- 
eral holiday;  and  that  an  employee  who  is 
employed  in  a  "continuous  operation"  is  not 
entitled  to  be  paid  for  a  general  holiday  on 
which  he  did  not  report  for  work  after  hav- 
ing been  called  to  work.  In  the  case  of  a 
person  employed  in  a  "continuous  operation" 
who  is  required  to  work  on  a  general  holi- 
day, the  employer  may  either  grant  a  holiday 
with  pay  at  some  other  time,  or  pay  for  the 
hours  worked  at  one  and  one-half  times  the 


employee's  regular  rate.  In  the  Bill  as  intro- 
duced there  was  no  alternative  to  granting  a 
holiday  with  pay  at  another  time. 

Other    Changes 

Other  changes  related  to  the  hours  of  work 
provisions.  The  rule  that  hours  of  work  in  a 
week  should  be  scheduled  so  that  each  em- 
ployee will  have  at  least  one  full  day's  rest 
in  a  week  was  amended  to  provide  that  ex- 
ceptions to  the  rule  may  be  prescribed  by 
regulation. 

The  most  important  change  concerned  the 
provisions  permitting  deferment  of  the  appli- 
cation of  the  hours  of  work  standards.  As  in 
the  Bill  as  introduced,  the  Minister  of  Labour 
may  make  a  temporary  order  deferring  or 
suspending  the  operation  of  Part  I  for  a 
period  of  not  more  than  18  months.  The  Act 
as  passed  also  provides  that  the  Governor  in 
Council,  on  the  recommendation  of  the  Min- 
ister of  Labour,  may  defer  or  suspend  the 
operation  of  Part  I  for  a  longer  period. 

Before  such  an  order  is  made  by  the  Gov- 
ernor in  Council  an  inquiry  must  be  held  at 
which  the  employers  and  employees  affected 
have  an  opportunity  to  be  heard.  The  tem- 
porary ministerial  order  may  set  hours  of 
work  standards  or  may  simply  remove  the 
obligation  to  comply  with  Part  I  pending  fur- 
ther investigation,  but  an  order  of  the  Gov- 
ernor in  Council  must  contain  hours  of  work 
standards.  Submissions  requesting  deferment 
pending  on  July  1,  1965  are  to  be  listed  in 
the  Canada  Gazette  as  soon  after  July  1  as 
possible,  and  the  operation  of  Part  I  with  re- 
spect to  the  employees  covered  by  the  sub- 
missions is  stayed  pending  rejection  of  the 
submission  or  the  making  of  an  order. 

Regulations 

Regulations  under  the  Code  were  approved 
on  June  18  and  are  reported  in  this  issue  on 
p.  740. 


THE  LABOUR   GAZETTE      •      AUGUST    7965 


697 


Manpower  Assessment  Incentive  Agreement 

Another  step  in  continuing  development  of  Government  programs 
for  orderly  adaptation  of  manpower  to  technological  changes 
taken   under  agreement  with  graphic  arts  industry  in   Toronto 


A  Manpower  Assessment  Incentive  Agree- 
ment between  the  Government  of  Canada 
and  the  Joint  Consultative  Committee  of  the 
Graphic  Arts  Industry  of  Metropolitan  Tor- 
onto was  announced  by  Hon.  Allan  J.  Mac- 
Eachen,  Minister  of  Labour,  last  month. 

The  Agreement,  the  fifth  to  be  developed 
by  the  Department  of  Labour's  Manpower 
Consultative  Service,  provides  financial  and 
technical  assistance  for  investigation  and 
research  into  the  manpower  implications  of 
technological  and  economic  change  that  is 
expected  to  take  place  in  the  industry  in  the 
foreseeable  future. 

The  Joint  Consultative  Committee,  repre- 
senting management  and  employees,  is  com- 
posed of  four  member  organizations.  They 
are  the  Toronto  Typographical  Union,  Local 
91;  the  Toronto  Printing  Pressmen  and  As- 
sistants Union,  No.  10;  the  International 
Brotherhood  of  Bookbinders,  No.  28;  and 
the  Council  of  Printing  Industries  of  On- 
tario, an  employer  association  representing 
115  employers.  Deryck  Adamson  of  the  Man- 
power Consultative   Service  is  chairman. 

The  Committee  has  established  a  Research 
Sub-Committee  consisting  of  one  represen- 
tative from  each  of  the  three  unions,  and 
three  representatives  of  the  employers  under 
Prof.  G.  V.  Doxey,  York  University,  as 
Chairman-Research   Director. 

The  Research  Sub-Committee  will  direct  a 
program  of  research  assessment  to  identify 
the  manpower  adjustment  problems  arising 
out  of  technological  developments  in  the 
industry,  and  to  make  recommendations  to 
the  Joint  Consultative  Committee. 

Projects  Costs  Shared 

The  project  is  estimated  to  cost  $10,000, 
shared  50  per  cent  by  the  federal  Depart- 
ment of  Labour  and  50  per  cent  by  the 
Committee.  The  Council  of  Printing  Indus- 
tries of  Ontario  will  pay  half  of  the  cost,  the 
three  unions  will  share  the  balance  equally. 

The  decision  of  the  parties  to  study  their 
problems  has  not  been  brought  about  by 
any  crisis  situation  in  the  graphic  arts  indus- 
tries, but  by  a  desire  to  seek  solutions  to  the 
problems  of  manpower  adjustment  and  de- 
velopment associated  with  anticipated  changes 
in  these  industries. 

In  Toronto,  R.  J.  McCormack,  President 
of  the  Toronto  Typographical  Union,  Local 
91,  said:  "Our  union  has  worked  hard  over 
the  years   and  spent  a  considerable  amount 


of  money  to  keep  our  skills  up  to  date,  but 
technology  is  developing  so  rapidly  that  there 
is  a  definite  need  for  advance  planning.  We 
are  happy  to  join  with  other  printing  craft 
unions  and  the  employer  members  of  the 
Council  in  a  scientific  study  of  a  rapidly 
changing  situation  in  the  graphic  arts  in- 
dustry. We  feel  that  it  will  give  us  the  facts 
to   meet   future   training   needs." 

Purdy  Churchill,  President,  Toronto  Press- 
men and  Assistants  Union  No.  10,  had  this 
comment:  "For  some  time  our  members  have 
been  requesting  improved  training  facilities, 
but  with  new  developments  occurring  almost 
daily  in  the  printing  field,  it  has  been  diffi- 
cult to  determine  the  extent  of  the  retraining 
required  and  the  facilities  necessary  to  pro- 
vide it.  We  have  confidence  that  this  pro- 
ject will  produce  some  guidelines  and  solve 
many  of  the  problems  we  face  in  this  area." 

Charles  Rose,  Secretary-Treasurer  of  Local 
28,  International  Brotherhood  of  Bookbind- 
ers, viewed  the  proposed  study  as  follows: 
"Many  changes  have  taken  place  in  the  bind- 
ery over  the  past  few  years.  So  far,  we  have 
been  able  to  cope  with  them.  But  it  appears 
that  future  developments  may  create  situa- 
tions that  we  may  not  be  able  to  solve  at  the 
bargaining  table  unless  we  and  the  employ- 
ers have  all  the  facts." 

E.  C.  Caldwell,  Manager,  Council  of  Print- 
ing Industries  of  Ontario,  said,  "Employers 
in  this  industry,  faced  with  continually  ris- 
ing costs  and  severe  competition,  must  make 
full  use  of  the  latest  technological  develop- 
ments if  they  are  to  survive.  This  presents 
major  problems  in  the  adjustment  and  re- 
training of  present  employees  and  in  the 
adequate  preparation  of  young  persons  en- 
tering the  field.  In  some  cases,  the  need  for 
older  skills  is  disappearing  while  the  need  for 
other  newer  skills  is  developing.  There  is 
really  no  clear  picture  today  of  the  retrain- 
ing necessary  to  allow  a  tradesman  to  main- 
tain his  competence,  nor  any  indication  of 
the  type  of  training  a  young  person  should 
receive  to  make  him  a  competent  tradesman 
in  the  future.  We  are  pleased  to  participate 
with  the  printing  craft  unions  in  this  project 
and  have  every  confidence  that  it  will  be 
of  much  value  to  all  concerned  in  the 
industry." 


698 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      AUGUST   7965 


— Feature  Four  Ltd.,  Toronto. 
Pictured  at  the  signing  of  the  manpower  assessment  incentive  agreement  between  the  Govern- 
ment of  Canada  and  the  Joint  Consultative  Committee  of  the  Graphic  Arts  Industry  of 
Metropolitan  Toronto  are  (from  left):  Mark  Thomas,  Toronto  Typographical  Union;  Hon. 
Allan  J.  MacEachen,  Minister  of  Labour;  and  Sidney  Cole,  Chairman,  Council  of  Printing 
Industries  of  Ontario. 


Hope  Labour-Management  Group  to  Avert  Newspaper  Strikes 


In  an  effort  to  avert  newspaper  strikes,  the 
American  Newspaper  Publishers  Association 
has  formed  a  joint  union-management  com- 
mittee. It  consists  of  four  members  from 
newspaper  production  unions  and  four  mem- 
bers from  management. 

The  committee  plans  to  discuss  approaches 
to  the  preservation  of  labour  peace  in  the 
newspaper  business  and  to  investigate  pos- 
sible courses  of  action  to  follow  in  an  "early 
warning  system"  to  head  off  possible  strikes. 

Union  members  are:  Elmer  Brown,  Presi- 
dent, International  Typographical  Union; 
Alexander  J.  Rohan,  Secretary-Treasurer,  In- 
ternational Printing  Pressmen  and  Assistants' 

OECD  Publishes  Study  of  Effects 

A  new  publication  in  its  "Economic  Stud- 
ies" series  was  recently  issued  by  the  Organ- 
ization for  Economic  Co-operation  and  De- 
velopment under  the  title,  Wages  and  Labour 
Mobility.  The  250-page  report  was  written 
by  a  group  of  independent  experts,  and  is  a 
study  of  the  extent  to  which  changes  in  wage 
differentials  appear  in  practice  to  have  pro- 
moted changes  in  the  pattern  of  employment. 


Union  of  North  America;  Frank  G.  Creamer, 
Secretary-Treasurer,  International  Stereotypers 
and  Electrotypers  Union  of  North  America; 
and  William  J.  Hall,  Executive  Vice-President, 
Lithographers  and  Photo  Engravers  Interna- 
tional Union. 

Management  members  are:  William  A. 
Dyer,  Jr.,  Vice-President,  Indianapolis  Star 
and  News;  Harold  F.  Grumhaus,  Vice-Presi- 
dent, Chicago  Tribune;  Bernard  H.  Ridder, 
Jr.,  Publisher,  St.  Paul  Dispatch  and  Pioneer 
Press;  and  Miles  P.  Patrone,  Chairman, 
American  Newspaper  Publishers  Association's 
Labor  Relations  Committee. 

of  Wages  on  Labour  Mobility 

The  report  traces  the  developments  of 
earnings  structures,  and  tests  the  extent  to 
which  these  movements  have  been  associated 
with  changes  in  the  distribution  of  employ- 
ment between  various  industries,  occupations 
and  regions.  It  also  examines  the  reasons  un- 
derlying decisions  to  change  jobs,  and  the 
factors  determining  choices  by  those  who 
change  jobs — the  unemployed  and  new  en- 
trants to  the  labour  force. 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      AUGUST    7965 


699 


Intensified  Immigration  Program 

Aimed  At  Helping  Economic  Growth 

Greater  flow  of  professional,  skilled  and  technical  immigrants 
to  Canada  sought  by  government  to  fill  serious  and  critical 
shortage  of  trained  workers  for  further  expansion  of  economy 


An  intensified  program  to  bring  about  a 
greater  flow  of  professional,  skilled  and  tech- 
nical immigrants  to  Canada  has  been 
launched    by    the    Immigration    Department. 

Hon.  John  R.  Nicholson,  Minister  of  Citi- 
zenship and  Immigration,  told  a  meeting  of 
the  Ontario  Economic  Council  in  Toronto 
last  month  that  Canadian  manpower  devel- 
opment is  the  most  important  single  factor 
in  the  country's  economic  growth. 

He  said  that  Canada  has  the  tools  and  the 
raw  materials  to  assure  economic  well-being, 
but  that  the  country  was  facing  a  serious  and 
critical  shortage  of  professional  and  trained 
workers  that  "may  well  retard  our  develop- 
ment. 

"If  we  ignore  this  problem,  we  court  disas- 
ter," he  said.  "If  we  meet  its  challenge  and, 
through  intelligent  planning,  develop  and  sup- 
plement our  manpower  resources  to  meet  our 
needs,  I  believe  that  we  can  create  the  spring- 
board required  for  further  economic  growth 
and  development. 

"Throughout  Canada,  and  particularly  in 
Ontario,"  he  said,  "industry  is  experiencing 
rapid  and  significant  changes  in  the  nature 
of  its  labour  requirements.  Everyone  knows 
that  new  techniques  and  methods  are  creat- 
ing demands  for  higher  levels  of  skill  and 
knowledge,  and  that  our  rapid  expansion  is 
creating  jobs  in  the  skilled  and  professional 
categories  faster  than  we  can  produce  quali- 
fied workers  through  Canadian  sources. 

Affects  Everyone 

"This  is  a  problem  that  cuts  across  the 
whole  field  of  manpower  development  and 
affects  each  and  every  one  of  us.  Whether 
we  be  in  industry,  in  organized  labour  or  in 
government,  we  share  a  common  responsi- 
bility to  Canada  for  ensuring  that  positive 
and  constructive  action  is  taken,  and  taken 
at  once  to  meet  the  situation,"  he  said. 

Saying  that  immigration  is  only  one  seg- 
ment of  Canada's  manpower  development, 
the  Minister  declared  that  immigrant  workers 
should  be  brought  in  to  supplement  the  exist- 
ing labour  force — not  to  enter  into  competi- 
tion with  Canadians  for  existing  jobs. 

"This  means  that  we  must  decide  on  the 
number  of  workers  who  can  be  provided 
through  Canadian  sources,  either  directly  or 
through  some  form  of  skill  upgrading  or  re- 
training. Only  after  this  has  been  done  and 


first  preferences  have  been  given  to  Cana- 
dians should  we  then  decide  on  the  exact 
nature  and  extent  of  our  immigration  intake. 
I  am  convinced,  however,  that  the  urgent  de- 
mands of  the  present  situation  are  so  great 
that  even  a  maximum  effort  by  all  agencies 
is  unlikely  to  produce  the  numbers  needed 
in  all  categories,"  he  said. 

He  referred  to  the  manpower  study  by  the 
Ontario  Economic  Council,  saying  the  report 
pointed  to  the  urgent  and  growing  need  for 
a  steady  flow  of  skilled  people  into  the  indus- 
trial complex  of  the  province,  and  urged 
more  vigorous  immigration  activity  as  a 
means  to  help  achieve  this  flow. 

Facing  Serious  Shortage 

Although  in  substantial  agreement  with  the 
report,  he  said  that  a  study  carried  out  by 
his  department  in  co-operation  with  the  On- 
tario Departments  of  Labour  and  Economic 
Development,  confirmed  that  the  province 
and  most  parts  of  Canada  are  facing  a  se- 
rious shortage  of  professional  and  skilled  la- 
bour. He  said  it  is  likely  to  be  worse  by  the 
end  of  the  year — and  there  was  every  indi- 
cation that  the  demand  will  increase  in  the 
foreseeable  future. 

There  is  also  an  ever-lessening  demand  for 
unskilled  and  semi-skilled  workers,  and  this 
means  "that  we  have  an  urgent  need  to  create 
employment  opportunities  for  these  people. 
No  one  disagrees  with  that,  but  some  differ- 
ences of  opinion  do  exist  as  to  how  we  are 
to  find  the  trained  and  skilled  people  to  fill 
the  gaps  in  our  industrial  development." 

Some  leaders  of  organized  labour  believe 
that  the  solution  lies  in  the  training  of  people 
already  in  Canada,  and  the  retraining  of 
people  whose  skills  are  now  obsolete,  said 
Mr.  Nicholson.  He  added  that  CLC  President 
Claude  Jodoin  recently  put  forward  this  point 
of  view,  while  drawing  attention  to  the  fact 
that  there  were  265,000  unemployed  in 
Canada  in  mid-May. 

Must  Equip  People  With  Skills 

"It  is  obvious  that  every  effort  must  be 
made  to  equip  as  many  as  possible  of  these 
people  with  skills  that  will  make  them  able 
to  fit  into  the  changing  economy  of  our 
country,"  continued  Mr.  Nicholson.  He  sug- 
gested  that  the   only   sensible   and  practical 


700 


THE   LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      AUGUST   7965 


approach  to  the  problem  is  through  a  three- 
pronged  attack  via  education,  retraining  and 
immigration.  "No  one  will  work  without  the 
others,  and  no  single  approach  or  possible 
solution  can  be  overlooked  if  we  are  to  come 
close  to  realizing  our  economic  potential  in 
the  immediate  future." 

Referring  to  a  survey  in  British  Columbia 
and  Ontario,  which  showed  the  need  for 
90,000  skilled  and  professional  workers,  the 
Minister  said  that  only  some  2  per  cent  of 
the  positions  could  be  met  during  the  next 
year  by  the  present  school  system.  "Obvi- 
ously we  are  going  to  have  to  do  a  £reat 
deal  more  to  channel  young  people  into  the 
type  of  training  and  education  that  will  fit 
them  for  the  great  opportunities  that  lie 
ahead,"  he  said. 

More  concentration  on  the  training  of 
workers  who  now  lack  skills,  and  on  the  re- 
training of  workers  whose  skills  have  become 
obsolete.  "It  is  in  this  area,  I  believe,  that 
organized  labour  can  make  its  greatest  single 
contribution  to  the  continued  economic  devel- 
opment of  this  country  and  to  the  economic 
health  of  the  thousands  of  union  members  in 
Ontario  and  the  rest  of  Canada.  Here  too,  I 
believe  that  industry  itself  can  do  a  major  job 
in  reclaiming  skills  for  useful  employment." 

Cannot  Meet  the  Demand 

Mr.  Nicholson  said  the  best  efforts  directed 
toward  the  training  of  unskilled  people  and 
the  retraining  of  those  whose  skills  are  no 
longer  useful  to  them,  can  meet  the  demand 
for  skilled  and  professional  people  that  we 
are  facing  today,  and  in  the  immediate  fu- 
ture. "There  is  a  large  and  vital  area  that 
can  only  be  met  by  the  introduction  of  skilled 
workers  from  abroad  . .  .  through  greater  im- 
migration to  this  country." 

The  speaker  was  convinced  that  the  flow 
of  immigrant  workers  to  Canada  must  be 
consistent  with  the  manpower  requirements. 
"Obviously  we  cannot  permit  unrestricted  im- 
migration of  unskilled  people,  which  would 
help  create  areas  of  unemployment.  But  it 
is  equally  important  that  Canada's  industrial 
and  economic  expansion  should  not  be  slowed 
down  through  lack  of  the  professional  and 
trained  manpower  needed  to  make  it  function 
at   ever  increasing  levels." 

Pointing  out  that  immigration  was  not  a 
tap  that  can  be  turned  off  and  on  to  meet 
short-term  labour  shortages,  the  Minister  said 


that,  to  be  effective,  "an  immigration  pro- 
gram must  be  a  thoughtful,  carefully  organ- 
ized operation,  based  on  sound  policies  and 
oriented  to  the  long-term  approach.  You  can- 
not decide  you  need  possibly  150,000  profes- 
sional and  skilled  people  within  a  year,  and 
expect  to  pluck  them  out  of  the  hat  in  a  few 
weeks. 

"It  is  not  a  problem  that  immigration  can 
solve  itself,  although  immigration  can  and 
must  play  an  important  role.  The  other  roles 
must  be  played  by  education,  by  industry, 
by  organized  labour,  if  we  are  to  keep  our 
economy  on  the  move  and  realize  the  vast 
potential  that  lies  before  this  nation  at  the 
end  of  her  first  century,"  the  Minister  said. 

Mr.  Nicholson  emphasized  that  his  depart- 
ment has  not  initiated  a  "crash"  program  of 
immigration,  because  "a  problem  of  this  mag- 
nitude cannot  be  dealt  with  adequately  on  a 
crash  basis." 

Steps  to  Aid  Immigration 

During  his  address,  the  Minister  announced 
that  the  following  steps  were  being  taken  to 
increase  the  flow  of  immigrants: 

— Increasing  the  immigration  staff  and  fa- 
cilities in  Milan,  Italy. 

— Sending  several  skilled  immigration  offi- 
cers overseas  to  assist  the  staffs  in  their  re- 
cruiting problems. 

— Hiring  additional  staffs  at  a  number  of 
overseas  posts. 

— Recruiting  a  number  of  experienced  offi- 
cers in  Canada  for  temporary  assignment 
abroad. 

— Moving  experienced  officers  from  certain 
posts  in  Europe  to  busier  points. 

— Stepping  up  promotional  and  advertising 
programs   in   Britain   and   elsewhere. 

— Starting  a  series  of  advertisements  in 
newspapers   in  France   and  the  Netherlands. 

— Working  toward  a  similar  advertising 
program  this  summer  in  Belgium  and  Den- 
mark. 

— Arranging  tours  of  Canada  for  foreign 
journalists,  radio  and  television  people. 

— Sending  motion  pictures  to  Britain  and 
arranging  speaking  engagements. 

— Considering  opening  one.  and  possibly 
two,  more  offices  in  Britain. 

— Studying  possibilities  in  Japan  and  in  the 
Philippines. 


THE  LABOUR   GAZETTE      •      AUGUST    7965 


701 


Plant  Relocation  and  Its  Consequences 


Review  of  a  study  of  the  social  and  political  consequences 
of  job  displacement  undertaken  by  officials  of  the  United 
Steelworkers  and  the  Religion-Labour  Council  of  Canada 


The  main  problem  connected  with  eco- 
nomic change  in  an  industrial  community 
seems  to  be  the  conflict  between  the  flexi- 
bility and  mobility  in  the  work  force  that  is 
demanded  by  economic  efficiency,  and  the 
economic  stability  that  is  favourable  to  social 
orderliness  and  participation  in  political  life. 
This  is  the  conclusion  of  a  case  study  of  eco- 
nomic change  as  it  affected  the  employees 
of  one  company  that  moved  its  plant  to  a 
new  location. 

The  author  of  the  study,  titled  Social  Ef- 
fects of  a  Factory  Relocation — A  Case  Study 
of  Social  and  Political  Consequences  of  Job 
Displacement,  is  Rev.  Stewart  Crysdale,  As- 
sistant Secretary  of  the  Board  of  Evangelism 
and  Social  Service  of  the  United  Church  of 
Canada.  The  survey  on  which  the  study  was 
based  was  undertaken  at  the  request  of  the 
Religion-Labour  Council  of  Canada,  with  the 
help  of  officials  of  the  United  Steelworkers. 

The  move  was  made  by  an  electrical  equip- 
ment factory  in  St.  Catharines,  Ont.,  that 
employed  500  persons;  the  new  location  was 
in  Scarborough,  70  miles  away.  The  sample 
on  which  the  survey  was  based  consisted  of 
102  employees  of  the  company,  chosen  by 
taking  every  fourth  name  on  the  staff  roster 
and  seniority  list  in  September  1960.  Mem- 
bers of  the  sample  were  interviewed  three 
times  in  the  course  of  four  years.  The  first 
interview  was  conducted  in  September  1960 
— before  the  event,  the  second  in  September 
1961 — six  months  after  the  move,  and  the 
third  in  February  and  March   1964. 

The  company  undertook  the  move  in  the 
hope  of  bettering  its  financial  position,  which 
had  become  difficult.  But  after  the  move, 
"unfortunately,  deteriorating  conditions  con- 
tinued to  plague  the  company  and  one  de- 
partment after  another  was  closed.  When  In- 
terview III  was  held  .  . .  only  the  small  motors 
department  remained  in  operation  in  Toronto, 
and  the  work  force  was  reduced  to  100  em- 
ployees." 

Between  100  and  150  of  the  500  employees 
were  invited  to  move  to  Scarborough  and 
were  offered  help  with  moving  expenses.  For 
those  who  moved,  the  company  also  offered 
to  pay  10  per  cent  of  the  selling  price  of  a 
house  in  St.  Catharines  to  help  toward  buy- 
ing another  house  in  Scarborough,  where 
prices  of  real  estate  were  higher. 

The  company  rejected  attempts  to  persuade 
it  to  stay  in  St.  Catharines.  "It  did,  however, 
agree   to   help   displaced   workers   find   other 


jobs,  and  assigned  a  personnel  man  to  under- 
take this  task.  It  also  attempted  to  attract 
other  firms  to  St.  Catharines  to  lease  or  buy 
its  buildings  and  provide  new  jobs.  The  prop- 
erty was  finally  sold,  but  only  one  small  em- 
ployer had  moved  in  by  the  spring  of  1964." 

Men  over  60  years  of  age  and  women  over 
55  were  paid  partial  pensions.  For  others, 
the  company  paid  severance  allowances  on  a 
sliding  scale  according  to  length  of  service. 

"Some  of  those  who  had  moved  with  the 
company  secured  other  jobs  in  the  metro- 
politan area,  but  a  larger  number  moved 
back  to  St.  Catharines  or  to  other  regions. 
The  number  of  completed  interviews  dropped 
from  102  in  the  first  round  to  94  in  the 
second,  and  76  in  the  third." 

For  the  purposes  of  the  study,  the  em- 
ployees in  the  sample  were  divided  into 
white-collar  workers  and  blue-collar  workers; 
and  the  fortunes  of  the  two  groups  were  fol- 
lowed through  the  period  of  the  survey.  Cer- 
tain differences  were  noted  in  the  way  in 
which  members  of  the  two  groups  were  af- 
fected by  the  change.  On  the  whole,  the 
white-collar  workers  were  found  to  fare  bet- 
ter than  the  blue-collar. 

Three  years  after  the  move,  67  per  cent  of 
the  white-collar  group,  and  65  per  cent  of 
the  blue-collar  group  had  obtained  other  em- 
ployment at  the  company's  new  plant  in  Scar- 
borough, or  elsewhere  in  St.  Catharines  or 
Toronto.  Of  the  white-collar  workers,  47  per 
cent  were  earning  more  in  1964  than  in  1961, 
compared  with  32  per  cent  of  the  blue-collar 
workers;  and  33  per  cent  of  the  former  were 
earning  the  same  in  both  years,  compared 
with  24  per  cent  of  the  blue-collar  workers. 
Of  the  white-collar  workers,  70  per  cent  said 
that  in  1964  they  felt  as  much  or  more  satis- 
faction in  their  present  jobs  than  they  had 
felt  in  their  old  jobs  in  1960.  But  only  56 
per  cent  of  the  blue-collar  workers  had  had 
that  experience.  The  survey  found  that 
church-goers  were  more  satisfied  with  their 
jobs  than  non-church-goers. 

"Job  displacement  affects  not  only  those  as- 
pects of  social  behaviour  which  are  based 
primarily  on  economic  activity,  but  also 
wider  social  relations  and  attitudes,"  the  re- 
port says.  But  this  effect  was  more  marked 
among  blue-collar,  than  among  white-collar 
workers.  Active  membership  in  non-church 
and  non-occupational  voluntary  associations 
was  affected  by  the  uprooting  of  the  workers, 
but    more    among    blue-collar    than    among 


702 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      AUGUST   7965 


white-collar  ones.  The  proportion  of  white- 
collar  workers  who  belonged  to  such  organi- 
zations dropped  from  53  per  cent  in  1960  to 
50  per  cent  in  1964,  but  the  proportion  of 
blue-collar  workers  dropped  from  53  per  cent 
to  41   per  cent  in  the  same  period. 

Regular  church  attendance  among  white- 
collar  workers  increased  during  the  period, 
with  57  per  cent  attending  at  the  beginning 
and  63  per  cent  at  the  end.  But  among  blue- 
collar  workers,  the  proportion  of  regular 
church-goers  was  the  same — 56  per  cent — at 
the  end  as  at  the  beginning.  In  the  middle 
of  the  period,  however,  it  had  dropped  to  44 
per  cent,  while  among  white-collar  workers 
it  had  dropped  only  to  52  per  cent. 

The  survey  found  also  that  the  upset 
caused  by  the  plant  relocation  seemed  to 
colour  the  political  outlook  of  the  workers. 

"In  the  1964  interviews,  27  per  cent  of 
blue-collar  workers  took  a  'conservative'  view 
of  government's  role  [in  the  matter  of  the 
plant  move],  39  per  cent  took  a  'moderate' 
position,  24  per  cent  had  more  'radical'  ideas 
of  what  government's  should  do.  Ten  per 
cent  had  no  opinion,  an  indication  of  politi- 
cal apathy. 

"In  1960,  the  same  panel  of  blue-collar 
workers  had  been  more  in  favour  of  direct 
governmental  intervention  (33  per  cent)  and 
correspondingly  less  conservative  (18  per 
cent).  Time,  and  a  slight  improvement  in 
employment  conditions,  modified  their  views 
a  little.  However,  the  proportion  of  those 
who  showed  signs  of  apathy  increased  from 
6  to  10  per  cent  in  the  period  from  1960 
to  1964. 

"White-collar  workers  in  the  1964  inter- 
view were  more  conservative  (38  per  cent) 
than  blue-collar  workers  (27  per  cent)  in 
their  prescription  for  the  role  of  government. 
Their  situation  was  relatively  more  secure. 
But  it  is  noteworthy  that  a  majority  of  them 
(57  per  cent)  felt,  like  the  majority  of  blue- 
collar  workers  (63  per  cent),  that  govern- 
ment should  take  further  action  to  meet  the 
problems  of  hard-pressed  industry.  In  1960, 
staff  workers,  like  their  shop  colleagues,  were 
more  insistent  that  government  should  inter- 
vene in  the  situation,  63  per  cent  favouring 
further  action 

"While  age,  race,  religion  and  family  status 
showed  no  signs  of  influencing  political  incli- 
nations, education  did.  Generally,  the  more 
education  a  person  had,  the  less  he  was  pre- 
pared to  entrust  to  the  state  such  critical 
decisions  as  where  an  industry  should  be  lo- 
cated. . . . 

"Home  ownership  was  also  related  to  pre- 
scription for  the  role  of  the  state.  ...  In  both 
groups,  home  owners  took  a  moderate  view 
of  what  the  state  should  do. .  . .  Participation 
in  secondary  groups,  secular  and  religious, 
was  also  associated  with  moderation  in  opin- 
ion as  to  what  government  should  do " 


The  report  had  a  number  of  suggestions 
for  remedial  action  in  moves  of  this  kind. 
The   points   mentioned    included: 

"A  provincial  industrial  commission,  estab- 
lished by  government,  business  and  labour  to 
provide  consultative  services  where  major 
changes  are  contemplated."  The  establish- 
ment of  the  Manpower  Consultative  Service 
by  the  Department  of  Labour,  Ottawa,  was 
noted  (L.G.,  1963,  p.  999  and  June  1964, 
p.  460). 

"A  strong  moral  obligation  rests  upon  a 
company  which  proposes  to  withdraw  opera- 
tions and  capital  from  a  community  where 
it  has  been  established  for  a  considerable 
time,  to  discharge  certain  minimal  obligations 
to  its  older  employees.  A  small  portion  of 
profits  . . .  might  be  placed  in  a  reserve  fund 
for  this  purpose,  and  .  . .  might  be  augmented 
by  public  funds  to  provide  severance  pay, 
pensions  and  retraining,  and  possibly  moving 
and  relocation  expenses  for  workers  and  their 
families. 

"Industrial  unions  might  bargain  for  the 
inclusion  in  contracts  of  an  option  for  quali- 
fied employees  to  move  with  the  company  if 
it  should  relocate,  with  a  portion  of  expenses 
paid  and  seniority  preserved.  . . .  Unions 
should  give  more  attention  to  programs  of 
adult  education. . . . 

"Governments,  probably  through  the  Na- 
tional Employment  Service,  should  improve 
facilities  for  the  gathering  and  communica- 
tion of  information  regarding  job  openings 
and  shortages,  and  extend  services  for  coun- 
selling, retraining,  relocation  and  placement. 
Retrainees  should  be  related  wherever  pos- 
sible to  job  openings  before  beginning  courses, 
and  living  allowances  during  training  should 
be  increased. . . . 

"Legislation  is  urgently  required  in  all 
provinces  to  bring  industrial  pensions  up  to 
a  higher  standard  and  make  them  fully  port- 
able everywhere  in  Canada.  This  would  im- 
prove the  prospects  for  useful,  efficient  re- 
employment for  the  increasing  numbers  of 
job  seekers  over  the  age  of  40. 

"Under  the  highly  fluid  conditions  of  mod- 
ern industry,  workers  are  not  able  on  their 
own  to  fend  off  job  down-grading.  So  sweep- 
ing are  shifts  in  markets,  business  organiza- 
tion, and  technology  that  not  even  large  com- 
panies and  industrial  unions  are  capable  of 
providing  adequately  for  the  relocation  and 
employment  of  displaced  workers.  Only  so- 
ciety as  a  whole,  through  governmental  ac- 
tion, is  able  to  ensure  the  basic  necessities  of 
a  decent  life  for  families  which  carry  the 
heaviest  burdens  of  structural  change. . . . 

"Municipal  governments,  with  the  help  of 
provincial  agencies,  should  be  prepared  to 
make  tax  and  other  concessions  to  attract 
new  enterprises  and  to  encourage  industries 
to  remain  open  through  periods  of  recession. 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      AUGUST   7965 


703 


"Private  bodies  should  join  public  authori- 
ties in  the  study  of  the  social,  political  and 
economic  aspects  of  industrial  change.  Edu- 
cational, cultural  and  religious  organizations, 
along  with  management,  labour  and  govern- 
ment, have  an  obligation  to  help  workers  and 
their  families  meet  drastic  alterations  in  their 
way  of  life  under  stress  of  rapid  industrial 
change. 

"Finally,  when  a  factory  moves,  taking 
some  workers  with  it,  scattering  others  to 
seek  new  jobs,  and  leaving  behind  older, 
downgraded  employees,  churches  and  other 
community  groups  can  contribute  to  creative 


adaptation  by  welcoming  newcomers,  at- 
tempting to  understand  their  problems,  and 
helping  them  to  meet  their  social,  cultural 
and  moral  needs.  In  these  ways,  displaced 
workers  may  be  encouraged  to  re-establish 
themselves  as  esteemed  and  useful  members 
of  the  community." 

The  report  asks  the  question:  "Is  it  pos- 
sible for  technological  society  to  have  the 
best  of  two  possible  worlds?  Can  we  have 
both  greater  economic  efficiency  through  a 
highly  adaptive  work  force,  and,  at  the  same 
time,  a  well  educated,  socially  stable  and 
politically  responsible  work  force?" 


Accelerated  Vocational  Training  for  Adults 

Directed  toward  problems  of  short-  and  medium-term  employment 
AVT  has  won  international  acceptance  jor  its  great  success  in 
helping    adults   adapt    to   structural    and    technological    change 


Accelerated  vocational  training  for  adults, 
or  AVT  as  it  is  known,  has  now  given  ample 
proof  of  its  adaptability  and  efficiency. 

Set  up  in  France  in  1936  when  unemploy- 
ment was  severe,  AVT  recently  won  accept- 
ance as  a  legitimate  form  of  training  in  a 
number  of  industrialized  countries.  It  is  en- 
abling a  growing  number  of  adults  to  adapt 
themselves  to  structural  and  technological 
changes. 

A  report  in  the  OECD  Observer  on  an  in- 
ternational survey  emphasizes  that  the  AVT 
system  "may  be  extended  and  no  longer  be 
limited  to  the  acquisition  of  the  more  humble 
occupational  skills."  It  states  that  France, 
with  its  advanced  training  courses,  has  ini- 
tiated a  new  phase  through  organizing  AVT 
preparatory  courses  for  a  number  of  inter- 
mediate management  posts. 

"AVT  principles  and  methods  may  be 
adapted — with  some  difficulty  perhaps — to 
education  at  a  wide  range  of  levels.  But 
specialist  skills  or  new  techniques  can  only 
be  mastered  if  the  basic  theoretical  training 
has  been  sufficiently  all-embracing  and  thor- 
ough, whatever  the  level,  and  this  is  a  re- 
quirement which  in-plant  apprenticeship 
cannot  easily  meet,"  the  report  states. 

After  being  established,  AVT  went  beyond 
its  original  idea  and  became  a  means  of 
training  workers  for  better  opportunities,  and 
providing  industry  with  a  source  of  labour 
exactly  suited  to  its  immediate  or  foresee- 
able requirements. 

Originally,  the  Government  wanted  to  set 
up  machinery  to  enable  the  unemployed,  who 
were  mostly  unskilled  labourers,  to  acquire 
enough  proficiency  in  their  particular  occupa- 
tions to  find  employment  easily,  or  to  learn 
another  trade  likely  to  offer  better  prospects. 


Since  its  inception,  AVT  has  normally  been 
open  to  all  applicants  over  17  who  wish  to 
improve  their  vocational  prospects  and  are 
able  to  pass  the  entrance  examinations. 

Growth  has  been  continuous.  At  the  end 
of  1963,  training  had  been  given  to  344,570 
workers  in  over  160  occupations.  Early  in 
1964,  a  plan  for  expansion  was  drawn  up  to 
increase  training  capacity  by  50  per  cent. 

The  nature  of  its  aims  gives  AVT  a  nu- 
merically modest  place  that  excludes  any 
possibility  of  competition  with  the  established 
technical  education  system.  The  latter  caters 
to  all  young  people  wishing  to  learn  a  trade. 

The  work  of  AVT  is  closely  connected  with 
the  problem  of  short-  and  medium-term 
employment.  Its  principal  aim  is  to  find  a 
solution  for  specific  labour  problems.  But  the 
range  of  these  problems  has  increased. 

Besides  retraining  unemployed  workers, 
AVT  has  been  called  upon  to  deal  with  the 
rapid  conversion  of  armament  workers,  pro- 
vide vocational  training  for  immigrants,  en- 
sure the  rehabilitation  of  disabled  people, 
improve  the  opportunities  of  workers  in  cer- 
tain sectors,  and  organize  refresher  courses 
to  enable  specialists  to  keep  pace  with  techno- 
logical trends. 

But  all  of  these  problems  are  similar;  they 
relate  to  the  short  term,  and  concern  only  a 
limited  proportion  of  the  labour  force.  They 
are  specifically  problems  of  employment,  and 
this  explains  why  AVT  comes  under  the 
Ministry  of  Labour  although  its  task  is  really 
educational. 

AVT  courses  are  on  a  full-time  basis  and 
are  spread  over  a  period  averaging  six 
months.  They  are  primarily,  but  not  exclu- 
sively, designed  for  manual  labourers  in  the 
building  and  metal  industries,  to  give  them 


704 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      AUGUST    7965 


a  "trade"  that  can  be  exercised  immediately 
at  a  certain  level  of  skill,  and  which  is 
comparable,  if  not  equivalent,  to  trade  school 
or  apprenticeship  standards. 

AVT  is  reserved  for  adults  purely  as  a 
supplement  to  the  conventional  machinery 
for  the  vocational  training  of  adolescents, 
except  in  the  case  of  France,  where  about 
50  per  cent  of  AVT  trainees  are  between  17 
and  21  years  of  age.  In  the  first  half  of  1964, 
this  represented  8,000  out  of  16,000  trainees. 

Co-operation  in  AVT  among  the  countries 
of  Western  Europe  is  comparatively  limited. 
The  French  have  helped  a  number  of  Euro- 
pean countries — Belgium,  Italy,  Portugal, 
Spain,  and  Yugoslavia — to  set  up  or  improve 
their  AVT  system,  either  by  direct  co-opera- 
tion under  a  bilateral  assistance  agreement 
or,  indirectly,  through  the  agency  of  inter- 
national organizations  (ILO  and  OECD). 

AVT  has  not  developed  to  the  same  extent 
in  Britain,  and  the  number  of  workers  re- 
ceiving training  each  year  is  only  4,000  to 
5,000.  This  is  because  of  a  limitation  on  the 
number  of  types  of  workers  eligible  for  the 
training  courses.  These  are  normally  reserved 
for  demobilized  members  of  the  armed 
forces,  unemployed  persons  in  need  of  re- 
training by  AVT,  and  handicapped  and  dis- 
abled persons  who  are  officially  registered 
as  such. 

Many  developing  countries  are  following 
the  progress  of  AVT  with  interest,  and  some 
of  them  have  already  made  use  of  the  staff 
and  documentation  of  the  institutions  that 
exist  in  industrialized  countries.  Special  ar- 
rangements must  be  made  when  methods  used 
in  industrialized  countries  are  applied  to 
developing  countries. 

It  has  become  clear  that  when  a  develop- 
ing country  has  been  visited  by  an  inter- 
national team  sent  to  study  its  requirements, 
it  is  also  profitable  to  send  its  trainees  to 
countries  that  have  considerable  experience. 
But,  because  of  its  special  approach  and 
speed  of  working,  AVT  is  a  direct  answer 
to  certain  needs  of  the  infant  industries  in 
those  countries. 

The  principles  and  methods  employed  in 
the  AVT  program  are  extensive.  From  85 
to  90  per  cent  of  accelerated  vocational 
training  for  adults  is  devoted  to  practical 
work,   such   as   the   performance   of  manual 


exercises  relating  to  the  particular  trade. 
Teaching  proceeds  from  the  concrete  to  the 
abstract.  Only  after  the  job  is  done  are 
the  rules  which  govern  it  introduced,  while 
explanations  are  given  only  when  difficulties 
are    encountered. 

Theory  is  taught  as  a  supplement  to  prac- 
tice, and  instruction  is  focused  on  a  centre  of 
interest  such  as  the  component  being  made 
by  the  trainee  or  the  job  he  is  being  asked 
to  do. 

The  difference  between  conventional  voca- 
tional training  and  AVT  is  that  the  latter 
does  not  consist  of  separate  courses  in  tech- 
nical subjects  such  as  mathematics.  These 
subjects  are  related  to  a  particular  problem. 
AVT  training  does  not  consist  of  finding 
solutions  to  theoretical  problems.  Lengths, 
areas,  volumes  or  weights  are  calculated  on 
the  basis  of  components  that  have  already 
been  manufactured  by  the  trainees,  or  jobs 
they  have  already  done.  The  value  of  this 
integrated   method   is   universally   accepted. 

The  training  is  assigned  to  a  single  in- 
structor, with  the  number  of  trainees  per 
instructor  from  8  to  12,  according  to  the 
trade.  This  enables  the  instructor  to  help 
each  of  his  trainees  to  carry  out  his  particu- 
lar task  and  check  each  stage  of  the  perform- 
ance. 

Trainees  are  asked  to  take  an  active  share 
in  discovering  both  theoretical  concepts  and 
the  successive  stages  into  which  the  execu- 
tion of  a  technical  operation  must  be  divided. 
This  is  done  by  group  discussions  in  which 
the  pupil  is  encouraged  to  ask  "why"  as 
well   as   "how". 

Its  syllabuses  distinguish  AVT  from  tra- 
ditional education  at  least  as  much  as  its 
methods.  Although  they  tend  to  vary,  they 
generally  are  divided  into  four  phases.  The 
pre-training  period  equips  the  trainee  to  cope 
with  the  instruction  he  will  receive  during  the 
course. 

The  training  proper  covers  a  whole  range 
of  exercises  of  increasing  difficulty.  The 
integration  exercises,  like  those  done  dur- 
ing training,  are  carried  out  under  condi- 
tions that  resemble  as  nearly  as  possible 
those  prevailing  on  a  site  or  in  the  works. 
The  final  stage  consists  of  practical  exer- 
cises designed  to  bridge  the  gap  between 
training  conditions  and  actual  employment 
in  industry. 


THE   LABOUR   GAZETTE      m      AUGUST    7965 


705 


British  National  Incomes  Commission 


Pay   increases   in   engineering   and   shipbuilding   industries 
were  contrary  to  the  national  interest,  claims  Commission 


Agreements  made  in  November-December 
1963  for  pay  increases  in  the  engineering  in- 
dustries, and  for  increases  in  pay  and  re- 
duction in  hours  in  the  shipbuilding  industry, 
were  contrary  to  the  national  interest,  the 
National  Incomes  Commission  in  Britain 
has  stated  in  its  Report  No.  4  (Final),  re- 
cently published. 

The  Commission  said  that  the  nationally 
negotiated  wage  increases  in  these  industries 
did  not  adequately,  if  at  all,  take  account  of 
increases  arising  from  other  causes  (i.e. 
"wage  drift");  and  that  these  settlements, 
superimposed  on  increases  in  other  elements 
in  earnings,  gave  employees  in  the  industries 
concerned  more  than  their  fair  share  of  the 
increase  in  national  productivity,  and  more 
than  3i  per  cent  per  annum. 

The  Commission  gave  their  reasons  for 
adhering  to  a  rate  of  growth  in  productivity 
of  3  to  3  i  per  cent  per  year,  resulting  from 
a  rate  of  growth  in  national  production  aver- 
aging 4  per  cent  per  annum,  as  the  practical 
test  of  the  effectiveness  of  an  incomes  policy 
— although  it  is  now  evident  that  such  an 
average  rate  of  growth  will  not  be  reached  in 
the  period   1961-66. 

In  its  report,  the  Commission  discusses 
the  significance  of  wage  drift  for  an  incomes 
policy.  Wage  drift- is  defined  as  the  variation 
in  the  gap  between  nationally  determined 
rates  of  wages  and  actual  earnings,  this  gap 
being  due  to  overtime  earnings.  The  Com- 
mission points  out  that  the  gap,  for  the  pur- 
poses of  incomes  policy,  is  just  as  important 
as  increases  in  nationally  negotiated  wage 
increases. 

The  Commission  mentions  a  number  of 
ways  in  which,  as  a  result  of  "domestic  bar- 
gaining" between  management  and  shop 
stewards,  a  timeworker  may  receive  pay- 
ments over  and  above  the  national  minimum 
time  rates. 

Increased  earnings  for  pieceworkers  that 
do  not  necessarily  go  with  increased  output 
can  also  be  negotiated  at  the  domestic  level, 
commonly  by  means  of  deliberately  loose 
fixing  of  piecework  prices  and  times.  Both 
time  and  pieceworkers  may  have  their  earn- 
ings increased  by  arrangements  for  increasing 
overtime  pay  in  excess  of  the  real  need  for 
working  overtime. 

In  considering  the  repercussions  of  the 
engineering  and  shipbuilding  agreements,  the 
Commission  says  that  the  introduction  of  a 
40-hour  week  in  shipbuilding  by  stages,  to 
be  completed  by  July  1965,  had  obvious  re- 


percussions on  engineering  negotiations.  The 
same  reduction  in  hours  as  in  shipbuilding 
was  given  by  the  unions  as  a  reason  why  it 
should  be  agreed  to  in  the  other  industry. 

The  Commission  said,  however,  that  the 
repercussions  of  the  engineering  agreement 
in  some  industries  where  engineering  workers 
were  employed  were  not  as  wide  as  the  Gov- 
ernment feared  they  would  be. 

Turning  to  the  subject  of  productivity  and 
restrictive  practices,  the  Commission  said  that 
income  per  head,  which  is  the  average  stand- 
ard of  living,  depended  more  upon  output 
per  worker  than  upon  any  other  single  fac- 
tor, and  that  this  left  no  doubt  of  the  vital 
importance  of  productivity  to  the  national 
economic  well-being. 

Summarizing  the  position  after  eight  years 
of  efforts  to  secure  improved  productivity 
and  the  abandonment  of  restrictive  practices, 
the  Commission  said  that  instances  of  these 
practices  were  still  to  be  found  in  engineer- 
ing, although  there  was  machinery  for  deal- 
ing with  these  problems. 

In  shipbuilding,  the  evidence  showed 
clearly  that  the  state  of  affairs  in  this  regard 
was  still  what  it  had  been  in  1956.  Produc- 
tivity seemed  still  to  be  hampered  by  out-of- 
date  practices  to  a  very  large  extent  in  ship- 
building and  to  a  less  extent  in  engineering. 

The  report  stated  that  a  rapid  change  in 
the  attitude  and  outlook  of  management  and 
trade  unions  was  imperative. 

In  a  long  chapter  on  prices,  costs  and 
profits,  the  Commission  concludes  that  in 
engineering,  prices  have  risen  in  spite  of 
increased  productivity,  and  that  the  rises  are 
due  mainly  to  increases  in  wages.  In  no  case 
were  price  rises  attributable  to  excessive  in- 
creases in  profits. 

Referring  to  the  increase  in  labour  costs 
that  will  be  the  result  of  the  latest  increase 
in  wages,  the  Commission  says  that  in  the 
engineering  industries  these  will,  in  spite  of 
increases  in  productivity,  contribute  to  an 
increase  in  prices.  The  shipbuilding  industry, 
although  in  no  position  to  bear  the  increased 
costs,  owing  to  its  weak  competitive  position, 
will  be  unable  to  pass  them  on  in  higher 
prices. 

Of  both  settlements,  the  Commission  says 
that  the  negotiating  parties  had,  or  ought  to 
have  had,  enough  knowledge  of  the  facts 
about  wage  drift  in  their  industries  to  have 
taken  adequate  account  of  it.  They  conclude, 
however,  that  there  is  much  force  in  the 
(Continued  on  page  743) 


706 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      AUGUST   7965 


Latest  Labour  Statistics 


Principal  Items 


Date 


Amount 


Percentage  Change 

I     'Kill 


Previous     Previous 

Mkhi  h  ^  ear 


Total  civilian  labour  force*-0* (000) 

Employed (000) 

Agriculture (000) 

Non-agriculture (000) 

Paid  workers (000) 

At  work  35  hours  or  more (000) 

At  work  less  than  35  hours (000) 

Employed  but  not  at  work (000) 

Unemployed (000) 

Atlantic (000) 

Quebec (000) 

Ontario (000) 

Prairie (000) 

Pacific (000) 

Without  work  and  seeking  work (000) 

On  temporary  layoff  up  to  30  days (000) 

Industrial  employment  (1949  =  100) 

Manufacturing  employment  (1949  =  100) 

Immigration 

Destined  to  the  labour  force 

Strikes  and  Lockouts 

Strikes  and  lockouts 

No.  cf  workers  involved 

Duration  in  man  days 

Earnings  and  Income 

Average  weekly  wages  and  salaries  (ind.  comp.) 

Average  hourly  earnings  (mfg.) 

Average  hours  worked  per  week  (mfg.) 

Average  weekly  wages  (mfg.) 

Consumer  price  index  (1949  =  100) 

Index  numbers  of  weekly  wages  in  1949  dollars  (1949  = 

100) 

Total  labour  income $000,000. 

Industrial  Production 

Total  (average  1949  =  100) 

Manufacturing 

Durables 

Non-durables 

New  Residential  Construction^ 

Starts 

Completions 

Under  construction 


July  24 
July  24 
July  24 
July  24 
July  24 

July  24 
July  24 
July  24 

July  24 
July  24 
July  24 
July  24 
July  24 
July  24 

July  24 
July  24 

May 
May 

1st  Qtr.  1965 
1st  Qtr.  1965 


July 
July 
July 


May 
May 
May 
May 
July 

May 

May 


June 
June 
June 
June 


July 
July 
July 


7,495 

7,251 

706 

6,545 

6,078 

5,351 

730 

1,170 

244 
30 
98 
65 
25 
26 

231 
13 

136.6 
127.3 

22,279 
11,297 


33,691 
326,070 


$90.56 

$  2.11 

41.0 

$86.58 

139.5 

149.2 
2,144 


234.9 
211.4 

228.4 
196.9 


13,700 

7,564 

84,411 


+ 


2.0 

-    2.9 

+    8.8 

+    2.3 

+    2.8 


-  10.2 

-  16.7 
+436.7 


-  5. 

-  3. 

-  2. 

-  12. 
+    8. 

-  10. 


4.: 

18.1 


3.4 
2.2 


-  9.2 

-  22.2 
+  18.3 


0.0 
0.0 
0.3 
0.4 
0.4 


1.2 
3.6 


2.9 
3.5 
4.3 

9.  « 


-  14.3 

-  5.7 
+    0.1 


+  3.5 

+  3.9 

-  3.4 

+  4.7 

+  5.4 

-  1.1 
+  5.5 
+33.0 

-  7.9 
0.0 

-  4.9 
-13.3 
-10.7 
-10.4 

-  7.2 
-18.8 

+  5.8 
+  4.9 

+27.0 
+27.6 


+37.5 

+85.3 

+  120.8 


4.3 
4.5 
1.0 
3.6 
2.4 


+  0.9 
+10.5 


+  6.7 
+  7.3 
+10.8 
+  4.1 


-  3.5 
-20.0 
+  19.9 


<a) Estimates  of  the  labour  force,  the  employed  and  the  unemployed,  are  from  The  Labour  Force,  a 
monthly  publication  of  the  Dominion  Bureau  of  Statistics  which  also  contains  additional  detail*  of  the 
characteristics  of  the  labour  force,  together  with  definitions  and  explanatory  notes. 

(b)Centres  of  5,000  population  or  more. 


THE  LABOUR   GAZETTE      •      AUGUST    1965 


707 


EMPLOYMENT  REVIEW 


Employment  and  Unemployment,  July 


Employment  increased  seasonally  between 
June  and  July,  rising  by  an  estimated  202,000 
to  7,251,000. 

Unemployment  declined  by  13,000  to 
244.000,  a  normal  decline  for  this  time  of 
year.  The  unemployment  rate  in  July  repre- 
sented 3.3  per  cent  of  the  labour  force, 
compared  with  3.7  per  cent  in  July  1964 
and  4.2  per  cent  in  July  1963.  In  June  this 
year  the  rate  was  3.5. 

Seasonally  adjusted,  the  July  1965  unem- 
ployment rate  was  4.3  per  cent. 

The  labour  force,  at  7,495,000  in  July, 
was   189,000  higher  than  in  June. 

The  increase  during  the  month  in  the 
labour  force  and  in  the  number  employed 
was  largely  associated  with  the  entrance  of 
students  into  the  labour  market  for  the  sum- 
mer months.  An  estimated  260,000  teen- 
agers found  jobs  between  June  and  July. 

As  usual  at  this  time  of  year,  a  substantial 
number  of  married  women  withdraw  from 
the  labour  force. 

Employment  in  July  was  higher  by  271,000 
than  it  was  a  year  earlier  and  unemployment 
was  21,000  lower.  The  labour  force  was 
250,000  higher  than  in  July  1964. 

Employment 

Between  June  and  July,  employment  gains 
were  fairly  general.  Almost  three  quarters 
of  the  advance  was  in  non-farm  employ- 
ment. As  usual,  the  largest  increases  occurred 
in  construction  and  in  service-producing  in- 
dustries. 


In  July,  employment  was  up  271,000,  or 
3.9  per  cent  over  the  total  a  year  earlier. 
The  increase  was  widely  distributed,  almost 
all  non-farm  industries  sharing  in  the  im- 
provement. 

Especially  large  increases  were  recorded 
in  construction  and  services.  The  year-to- 
year  employment  advance  in  construction — 
17  per  cent — was  one  of  the  largest  on 
record. 

Farm  employment  was  25,000  lower  than 
in  July   1964. 

Employment  was  substantially  higher  than 
a  year  earlier  in  all  regions.  The  largest 
relative  increase,  6.4  per  cent,  occurred  in 
British  Columbia. 

Unemployment 

Unemployment  declined  by  an  estimated 
13,000  between  June  and  July.  Over  the 
past  five  years,  the  changes  in  unemploy- 
ment during  this  period  have  varied  from 
an  increase  of  15,000  to  a  decrease  of 
17,000. 

The  July  unemployment  estimated  was 
21,000  lower  than  in  July  a  year  earlier. 
Teen-agers  accounted  for  38  per  cent  of  the 
total,  compared  with  36  per  cent  in  July  last 
year  and  only  26  per  cent  in  July  1961. 

Of  the  244,000  unemployed  in  July,  181,000 
had  been  unemployed  for  three  months  or 
less.  The  remaining  63,000,  or  26  per  cent  of 
the  total,  had  been  seeking  work  for  four 
months  or  more. 


LABOUR  MARKET  CONDITIONS 


Labour  Surplus 

Approximate 
Balance 

Labour 
Shortage 

Labour  Market  Areas 

1 

2 

3 

4 

July 
1965 

July 
1964 

July 
1965 

July 
1964 

July 
1965 

July 
1964 

July 
1965 

July 
1964 

Metropolitan 

- 

3 

4 
14 

2 
16 

8 
13 

2 
18 

8 
12 
12 
40 

4 
10 
12 
39 

2 

Minor 

Total 

- 

3 

36 

41 

72 

65 

2 

Note:  Before  January  1965,  when  Grande  Prairie  was  added,  109  areas  were  surveyed. 


The   review   is   prepared   by   the   Employment   and   Labour   Market   Division  of  the 
Economics  and  Research  Branch. 


708 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      AUGUST   7965 


CLASSIFICATION  OF  LABOUR  MARKET  AREAS-JULY 


Substantial 

Moderate 

Approximate 

Labour 

— 

Labour 
Surplus 

Labour 
Surplus 

Balance 

Shortage 

Group  1 

Group  2 

Group  3 

Group  4 

Quebec-Levis 

Calgary 

METROPOLITAN  AREAS 

St.  John's 
Vancouver-New 

Edmonton 
Halifax 

(labour  force 

Westminster- 

Hamilton 

75.000  or  more) 

Mission  City 
Windsor 

Montreal 
Ottawa-Hull 
Toronto 
Winnipeg 

Bran'Jord 

>CORNER  BROOK 

Cornwall 

->FT.  WILLIAM-PT. 

Granby-Farnham- 

ARTHUR 

Cowansville 

Guelph 

MAJOR  INDUSTRIAL  AREAS 

Joliette 
>LAC  ST.  JEAN 

Kingston 
Kitchener 

(labour  force  25.000- 

New  Glasgow 

London 

75.000;  60  per  cent 

Niagara  Peninsula 

>MONCTON 

or  more  in  non- 

Oshawa 

-^PETERBOROUGH 

agricultural  activity) 

Rouyn-Val  d'Or 

Sarnia 

Shawinigan 

Sherbrooke 

Sydney 

Trois  Rivieres 

->SAINT  JOHN 

Sudbury 
->TIMMINS-NEW 
LISKEARD- 
KIRKLAND  LAKE 
Victoria 

CHATHAM                   «<- 

Barrie 

Thetford-Megantic- 

Brandon 

St.  Georges 

Charlottetown 

MAJOR  AGRICULTURAL 
AREAS 

Lethbridge 
Moose  Jaw 

(labour  force  25.000- 

North  Battleford 
Prince  Albert 

75.000;  40  per  cent  or 

Red  Deer 

more  in  agricultural) 

Regina 
->RIVIERE  DU  LOUP 

Saskatoon 

York  ton 

Beauharnois 

>BATHURST 

Listowel 

Campbellton 

-^BELLEVILLE- 

>STRATFORD 

Dawson  Creek 

TRENTON 

Drummondville 

Bracebridge 

Gaspe 

Bridgewater 

Kamloops 

Brampton 

LINDSAY                      «<- 

Central  Vancouver  Island 

Newcastle 

>CHILLIWACK 

Okanagan  Valley 

Cranbrook 

Quebec  North  Shore 

Dauphin 

Rimouski 

Drumheller 

Ste.  Agathe- 

Edmundston 

St.  Jerome 

Fredericton 

St.  Jean 

Gait 

Sorel 

Goderich 

Valleyfield 

Grand  Falls 

Victoriaville 

>GRANDE  PRAIRIE 

MINOR  AREAS 

Kentville 
Lachute-St.  Therese 

(labour  force 

Medicine  Hat 

10.000  to  25.000) 

Montmagny 
North  Bay 
->OWEN  SOUND 

Pembroke 
>PORTAGE  LA 

PRAIRIE 
>PRINCE  GEORGE- 

QUESNEL 
->PRINCE  RUPERT 

->SAULT  STE.  MARIE 

St.  Hyacinthe 

>ST.  STEPHEN 

St.  Thomas 

Simcoe 

>SUMMERSIDE 

Swift  Current 

Trail-Nelson 

Truro 

Walkerton 

Weyburn 

Woodstock.  N.B. 

Woodstock-Tillsonburg 

Yarmouth 

-^-The  areas  shown  in  capital  letters  are  those  that  have  been  reclassified  during  the  month;  an  arrow  indicates  the  group  from  which  they 
moved.  For  an  explanation  of  the  classification  used  see  page  591,  January  issue. 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      AUGUST    7965 


COLLECTIVE  BARGAINING  REVIEW 


Major  Settlements  in  First  Half,  1965 


During  the  first  six  months  of  1965,  em- 
ployers  and  labour  organizations  across 
Canada  in  industries  other  than  construction 
negotiated  124  major  collective  agreements. 
These  contracts  applied  to  approximately 
185,000  workers  in  bargaining  units  compris- 
ing 500  or  more  employees. 

Most  of  these  agreements  were  long-term 
contracts.  More  than  30  per  cent  were  of 
two  years  duration,  44  per  cent  were  to  run 
for  about  three  years,  and  only  13  per  cent 
of  the  agreements  were  for  a  term  of  one 
year. 

Two  agreements  were  concluded  for  terms 
of  43  and  48  months.  They  were  signed  by 
the  Newfoundland  Employers'  Association 
and  the  Longshoremen's  Protective  Union, 
and  by  the  Automotive  Transport  Labour  Re- 
lations Association  and  the  Teamsters  Union 
in  British  Columbia. 

Unlike  in  previous  years,  all  major  agree- 
ments concluded  in  1965  gave  general  wage 
increases. 


Of  the  16  one-year  contracts  signed  during 
the  period,  50  per  cent  provided  for  wage 
increases  on  labour  rates  of  10  to  15  cents 
an  hour.  Other  agreements  gave  smaller  wage 
increases,  mostly  in  the  range  of  3  to  5  cents 
an  hour. 

Of  the  37  two-year  agreements,  50  per  cent 
provided  for  labour  rate  increases  of  11  to 
15  cents  an  hour,  the  most  common  wage 
increase  in  this  range  being  15  cents  an  hour. 
Eight  of  the  37  agreements  provided  for  wage 
increases  in  the  range  of  16  to  20  cents  an 
hour,  and  seven  others  included  wage  in- 
creases of  21  to  25  cents  an  hour. 

During  the  period,  55  contracts  with  a 
term  of  about  three  years  were  signed  in  the 
course  of  collective  bargaining.  The  most 
common  labour  rate  increases,  embodied  in 
21  agreements,  ranged  from  20  to  25  cents 
an  hour.  Eight  contracts  provided  for  wage 
increases  of  15  to  19  cents  an  hour,  and  six 
agreements  included  wage  increases  in  the 
range  of  26  to  30  cents  an  hour.  Thirteen 
major  three-year  agreements  provided  for 
wage  increases  exceeding  30  cents  an  hour. 


WAGE  SETTLEMENTS  DURING  THE  FIRST  HALF  OF  1965,  BY  INDUSTRY 

Collective  agreements  covering  500  or  more  employees  concluded  between  January  1  and  June  30,  1965,  excluding 
agreements  in  the  construction  industry  and  agreement  with  wage  terms  in  piece  or  mileage  rates  only.  The  data  are 
based  on  preliminary  reports  where  copies  of  new  collective  agreements  had  not  been  received  before  compilation. 


Industry  and 

Term  of  Agreement  in  Months 

Total  Wage 
Increase  in  Cents 

Under  15 

15-20 

21-26 

27-32 

33  and  over 

per  Hour* 

Agts. 

Empls. 

Agts. 

Empls. 

Agts. 

Empls. 

Agts. 

Empls. 

Agts. 

Empls. 

Forestry 

5  

1 
1 
1 
2 
1 

1,600 
500 
700 

1,400 
750 

15     . 

19. . . 

20... 

22 

Milling 

13 

2 

1 

2,130 

14 

1,800 

15     . 

1 

730 

21 

1 

2 

800 

24 

1,100 

30 

1 

570 

33 

1 

900 

Manufacturing 

4 

1 
1 

700 
600 

5.  .  . 

1 

2,000 

9 

1 

1,010 

10 

1 

650 

11 

1 

1 

1,800 

12 

1,700 

13 

3 

2 
4 
2 

2,840 

1,800 

16,700 

2,160 

14 

15   .. 

3 

7,440 

1 
1 

2 
1 

1 

930 

16 

750 

17 

2,500 

18 

1 

1,100 

800 

19 

800 

20 

1 

3,000 

This    review    is    prepared    by    the    Collective    Bargaining    Section,    Labour-Management 
Division  of  the  Economics  and  Research  Branch. 


710 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      AUGUST    1965 


WAGE  SETTLEMENTS  DURING  THE  FIRST  HALF  OF  1965,  BY  INDUSTRY 

Collective  agreements  covering  500  or  more  employees  oonoluded  between  January  1  and  June  80,  1965,  excluding 
agreement*  in  t  in*  oonatrnotion  industry  and  agreement  with  wage  term*  in  pieoe  oi  mileage  rates  only.  The  data  are 
based  on  preliminary  reports  where  copies  of  new  collective  agreements  bad  Dot  been  reoeived  before  compilation. 


Industry  and 

Term  of  Agreement  in  Months 

Total  Wage 
Increase  in  Cents 

Under  15 

15-20 

21-26 

27-32 

33  and  over 

l»r  Hour* 

Agts. 

Em  pis. 

Agts. 

Empls. 

Agts. 

Empls. 

Empls. 

fcgta. 

Empls. 

Manufacturing 

(Continued) 
21 

2 

1 

1,940 

500 

l 
l 

1,400 

22               

600 

28        

1 

550 

24               

10 

l 
l 

26,880 

25                 

500 

26                      

500 

27           

2 

2,600 

28 

2 

1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 

1 ,  600 

30 

600 

31 

2,000 

34 

800 

35   

2,300 

37 

650 

60 

800 

Transportation, 
Storage  and 
Communication 

3 

1 

8,500 

4 

1 

550 

5 

1 

1,800 

6 

12 

1 

1,000 

1 

550** 

15 

1 

520 

1 
1 

1 

1,200 

22                 

3,000 

550 

30                     

1 

700 

1 

700 

58     

1 
1 

4,050 

80 

2,200*** 

Public  Utility 

14 

1 

1,800 

1 

1,600 

11    

2 

1,850 

29    

1 

1,000 

1 

3,500 

40 

1 

3,000 

1 

1 

2,900 

60   . 

1,200 

Service 

3   

1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

1,000 

2,050 

1,250 

740 

750 

1,400 

600 

5 

8   

11 

12.  . 

2 
2 

1,060 
6,050 

13 

14 

15. 

2 

1,850 

18 

1 
2 
1 

650 

20... 

1 
1 
2 

5,000 
2,400 
1,300 

1,130 

800 

25 

28 

1 
1 

1,000 

32 

850 

34 

1 

1,000 

40 

1 

900 

16 

27,480 

Total 

4 

4,850 

37 

55,410 

10 

14,070 

57       82,970 

*  The  wage  increases  shown  relate  only  to  base  rates,  i.e.,  labour  rates  or  their  equivalent.  Fractions  of  a  cent  are 
rounded  to  nearest  cent.  The  data  on  the  number  of  employees  covered  are  approximate  and  include  all  classifications 
covered  by  the  agreement. 

**  43-month  agreement. 
***  48-month  agreement. 


THE  LABOUR   GAZETTE      •      AUGUST    7965 


711 


Collective  Bargaining  Scene 

Agreements   covering  500    or   more   employees, 
excluding  those  in  the  construction  industry 

Part  I — Agreements  Expiring  During  August,  September  and  October 

(except  those  under  negotiation  in  July) 

Company  and  Location  Union 

Air    Canada,    system-wide    Air  Line  Pilots  (Ind.) 

Cdn.  Steel  Foundries,  Montreal,  Que Steel  &  Foundry  Wkrs.   (Ind.) 

Dominion  Electrohome  Industries,  Kitchener,  Ont.  National   Council  of  Cdn.   Labour   (Ind.) 
Dominion   Steel  &  Coal  Corp.    (Wabana  Mines), 

Bell   Island,  Nfld Steelworkers    (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Dominion  Stores,  Toronto  &  other  centres,  Ont Retail,  Wholesale  Empl.   (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Edmonton  City,   Alta IBEW    (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Great  Western  Garment  Co.,  Edmonton,  Alta United   Garment   Wkrs.    (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Hotel  Sheraton-Mt.  Royal,  Montreal,  Que Hotel   Empl.   (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Iron  Ore  Company  of  Canada,  Nfld.  &  Que Steelworkers   (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Kingsway   Transport,    Smith   Transport    &   others, 

Montreal,  Que.  &  other  centres  Teamsters  (Ind.) 

Montreal  Locomotive  Works,  Longue  Pointe,  Que.  Steelworkers    (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Motor  Transport  Industrial  Relations  Bureau,  Ont.  Teamsters    (Ind.)    (drivers) 

Normetal  Mining,  Normetal,  Que Steelworkers   (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Northern  Electric,  Bramalea,  Ont UE  (Ind.) 

Page-Hersey  Tubes,  Welland,  Ont UE  (Ind.) 

Quebec  Cartier  Mining,  Port  Cartier  &  Lac  Jean- 
nine,    Que Steelworkers   (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Saskatchewan  Government   Sask.  Govt.  Empl.  Assn.   (classified  services) 

Saskatchewan  Government  Telephones  Communication  Wkrs.  (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Winnipeg   Metro.,   Man Public  Empl.    (CLC) 

Part  II — Negotiations  in  Progress  During  July 

(except  those  concluded  in  July) 

Bargaining 

Company  and  Location  Union 

Anglo-Nfld.  Development,  Grand  Falls,  Nfld Papermakers    (AFL-CIO/CLC),    Pulp    &   Paper 

Mill    Wkrs.    (AFL-CIO/CLC),    IBEW    (AFL- 
CIO/CLC)   &  Machinists   (AFL-CIO/CLC) 
Babcock-Wilcox   &   Goldie-McCulloch,   Gait,   Ont.    Steelworkers   (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Bathurst  Power  &  Paper,  Bathurst,  N.B Papermakers    (AFL-CIO/CLC),   Pulp    &    Paper 

Mill    Wkrs.    (AFL-CIO/CLC),    IBEW    (AFL- 
CIO/CLC),      Machinists      (AFL-CIO/CLC), 
Plumbers     (AFL-CIO/CLC)     &    International 
Operating  Engineers  (AFL-CIO) 
Bowaters  Mersey  Paper,  Anglo-Cdn.  Pulp  &  Paper, 
Domtar  Newsprint  &  James  MacLaren  Co.,  N.S. 

&   Que Papermakers    (AFL-CIO/CLC),    Pulp    &    Paper 

Mill  Wkrs.  (AFL-CIO/CLC)  &  IBEW  (AFL- 
CIO/CLC) 
Bowater's  Nfld.  Pulp  &  Paper,  Corner  Brook,  Nfld.    Papermakers    (AFL-CIO/CLC),    Pulp    &    Paper 

Mill   Wkrs.    (AFL-CIO/CLC),    IBEW    (AFL- 
CIO/CLC)    &    Machinists    (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

B.C.  Hydro  &  Power  Authority  IBEW  (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Building    maintenance    &    window    cleaning    con- 
tractors,   Vancouver,    B.C Bldg.   Service  Empl.    (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Calgary   City,    Alta Public  Empl.    (CLC)    (inside  empl.) 

Calgary   City,   Alta Public  Empl.  (CLC)   (outside  empl.) 

Calgary  General  Hospital,  Calgary,  Alta Public  Empl.    (CLC) 

Calgary  Power  &  Farm  Electric  Services,  Alta Calgary  Power  Empl.  Assn.  (Ind.) 

Canada  &  Dominion  Sugar,  Montreal,  Que Bakery  Wkrs.   (CLC) 

Canada  Iron  Foundries,  Three  Rivers,  Que Moulders    (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

CNR,  North  Sydney,  N.S ILA    (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

CPA,    system-wide    Machinists   (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Consolidated  Paper,  Cap  de  la  Madeleine  &  Three 

Rivers,    Que Papermakers  (AFL-CIO/CLC)   &  Pulp  &  Paper 

Mill  Wkrs.   (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Consolidated   Paper,   Grand'Mere,   Que Papermakers  (AFL-CIO/CLC)  &  Pulp  &  Paper 

Mill  Wkrs.   (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Consolidated  Paper,  Shawinigan,  Que Papermakers   (AFL-CIO/CLC)  &  Pulp  &  Paper 

Mill  Wkrs.   (AFL-CIO/CLC) 
Consumers'  Gas  Co.,  Toronto  &  other  centres,  Ont.    Chemical  Wkrs.  (AFL-CIO/CLC) 
Copper  Rand  Chibougamau  Mines,  Chibougamau, 

Que.  Steelworkers    (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Council  of  Printing  Industries,  Toronto,  Ont Typographical    Union    (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

David  &  Frere,  Montreal,  Que Commerce  &  Office  Empl.  (CNTU) 

Denison  Mines,  Elliot  Lake,  Ont Steelworkers    (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

712  THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE     •      AUGUST   1965 


Company  and  Location  Union 

Dominion  Glass,   Montreal,  Que Glass  &  Ceramic  Wkrs.   (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Dominion  Steel  &  Coal  Corp.,  Sydney,  N.S Steelworkers    (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Dominion    Steel    &    Coal    Corp.     (Cdn.    Bridge), 

Walkerville,  Ont.  Steelworkers    (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Dominion  Stores,  Montreal  &  vicinity,  Que Retail  Clerks  (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Domtar     Newsprint     (Woodlands     Div.),     Riviere 

Jacques   Cartier,   Que.  Pulp  and   Paper  Wkrs.   Federation    (CNTU) 

Donohue  Brothers  Limited,  Clermont,  Que Carpenters    (Lumber  &   Sawmill    Wkrs.)    (AFL- 
CIO/CLC) 

Duplate  Canada  Ltd.,  Oshawa,  Ont Auto   Wkrs.    (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

E.S.  &  A.  Robinson  (Can.),  Leaside,  Ont Printing   Pressmen    (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Edmonton   City,   Alta Fire  Fighters   (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Employing  Printers'  Assn.  of  Montreal,  Montreal, 

Que.  Printing  Pressmen    (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Fraser  Companies,  Atholville,  Edmundston  &  New- 
castle, N.B.  Pulp  &  Paper  Mill  Wkrs.    (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Fur  Mfrs.  Guild,  Montreal,  Que Butcher  Workmen   (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Fur    Trade    Assn.    of    Canada,    Montreal,    Que., 

Toronto,  Ont.  &  Winnipeg,  Man Butcher  Workmen   (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

B.F.  Goodrich,  Kitchener,  Ont.  Rubber   Wkrs.    (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Hotel  Dieu  St.  Vallier,  Chicoutimi,  Que Service  Empl.  Federation   (CNTU) 

Hotel  Royal  York  (CPR),  Toronto,  Ont Hotel   Empl.    (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Hotels  &  taverns  (various),  Toronto,  Ont Hotel    Empl.    (AFL-CIO/CLC)     (beverage    dis- 
pensers) 

Imperial  Tobacco  &  subsids.,  Ont.  &  Que Tobacco  Wkrs.   (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

International  Harvester  Co.  of  Canada,  Chatham, 

Ont.  Auto  Wkrs.    (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Manitoba   Telephone   System   Man.  Telephone  Assn.   (Ind.)    (clerical  &  main- 
tenance empl.) 
Men's  Clothing  Mfrs.  Assn.  of  Ontario,  Toronto, 

Ont.  Amalgamated  Clothing  Wkrs.   (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Motor  Transport  Industrial  Relations  Bureau,  Ont.  Teamsters    (Ind.)    (mechanics) 

Noranda  Mines,  Noranda,  Que.      Steelworkers    (AFL-CIO  CLC) 

Price  Bros.,  Dilbeau,  Kenogami  &  Shipshaw,  Que.  Bush  Wkrs.,   Farmers'   Union    (Ind.) 

Price  Bros.,   Kenoqami  &  Riverbend,  Que Pulp  &  Paper  Wkrs.  Federation    (CNTU) 

Quebec   Iron  &  Titanium,  Sorel,  Que Metal   Trades'    Federation    (CNTU) 

Saskatchewan  Power  Corp.  Oil  Wkrs.    (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Sask.     Provincial     Hospitals,    Moose    Jaw,    North 

Battleford,    Prince  Albert  &  Weyburn,  Sask CLC-chartered  local  &  Public  Empl.   (CLC) 

Shell  Oil,  Montreal,  Que Shell  Empl.  Council   (Ind.) 

University  of  Saskatchewan,  Saskatoon,  Sask CLC-chartered  local 

Winnipeg    City,    Man Public  Empl.   (CLC) 

Conciliation    Officer 

Abitibi  Power  &  Paper  &  subsids.,  Que.,  Ont.  & 

Man.  Papermakers    (AFL-CIO/CLC),    Pulp    &    Paper 

Mill      Wkrs.      (AFL-CIO/CLC),      Machinists 
(AFL-CIO/CLC),  IBEW  (AFL-CIO/CLC)  & 
International  Operating  Engineers  (AFL-CIO) 
Assn.  Patronale  des  Services  Hospitaliers  (5  hospi- 
tals),   Arthabaska,    Drummondville    &    Nicolet, 

Que.  Service  Empl.  Federation  (CNTU) 

Assn.  Patronale  des  Services  Hospitaliers,  Quebec, 

Que.  Service     Empl.     Federation     (CNTU)     (female 

empl.) 
Assn.  Patronale  des  Services  Hospitaliers,  Quebec, 

Que.  Service  Empl.  Federation  (CNTU)   (male  empl.) 

Cdn.   Marconi,  Montreal,  Que Marconi   Empl.  Council   (Ind.) 

Commission  des  Ecoles  Catholiques,  Montreal,  Que.    Public    Service    Empl.    Federation    (CNTU) 

(maintenance  empl.) 
Commission  des  Ecoles  Catholiques,  Montreal,  Que.    Public   Service   Empl.   Federation    (CNTU) 

(office  empl.) 

Consolidated   Paper,  Port  Alfred,  Que Pulp  &  Paper  Wkrs.  Federation   (CNTU) 

Dominion  Rubber  (Tire  Div.),  Kitchener,  Ont Rubber  Wkrs.    (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Dow  Brewery,  Montreal  &  Quebec,  Que Brewery   Wkrs.    (AFL-CIO  CLC) 

E.B.    Eddy,   Hull,   Que Papermakers    (AFL-CIO/CLC),    Pulp    &    Paper 

Mill    Wkrs.     (AFL-CIO/CLC)    &    Machinists 
(AFL-CIO/CLC) 
Employing  Printers'  Assn.  of  Montreal,  Montreal, 

Que.  Bookbinders    (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Fittings  Limited,  Oshawa,  Ont Steelworkers  (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Hotel  Chateau  Frontenac  (CPR),  Quebec,  Que Railway,  Transport  &  General  Wlcrs.   (CLC) 

KVP  Company,   Espanola,   Ont Papermakers    (AFL-CIO/CLC),    Pulp    &    Paper 

Mill  Wkrs.  (AFL-CIO/CLC)  &  IBEW  (AFL- 
CIO/CLC) 

Kimberly-Clark  Paper,  Terrace  Bay,  Ont Pulp  &   Paper  Mill   Wkrs.    (AFL-CIO/CLC)    & 

IBEW  (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Marathon  Corp.,  Marathon,  Ont Pulp  &  Paper  Mill   Wkrs.   (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Molson's  Brewery  Quebec  Ltd.,  Montreal,  Que Molson's  Empl.  Assn.   (Ind.) 

THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      AUGUST    7965  713 


Company  and  Location  Union 

Now    Brunswick  Power  Commission,  province-wide    IBEW  (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Northern   Electric,  Montreal,  Que Northern  Electric  Office  Empl.  Assn.   (Ind.) 

Northern  Electric,  Montreal,  Que Northern  Electric  Office  Empl.  Assn.   (Ind.) 

(Unit  #1) 
Ontario-Minnesota  Paper,  Fort  Frances  &  Kenora, 

Ont.  Papermakers    (AFL-CIO/CLC),    Pulp    &   Paper 

Mill  Wkrs.  (AFL-CIO/CLC),  IBEW  (AFL- 
CIO/CLC),  Machinists  (AFL-CIO/CLC), 
Firemen  &  Oilers  (AFL-CIO/CLC),  Carpen- 
ters (AFL-CIO/CLC)  &  International  Operat- 
ing Engineers  (AFL-CIO) 
Quebec    Hydro-Electric    Commission,   Montreal   & 

other  centres   Quebec  Hydro-Electric  Commission  Office  Empl. 

Syndicate   (Ind.) 
Spruce  Falls  Power  &  Paper  &  Kimberly-Clark  of 

Canada,  Kapuskasing,  Ont Papermakers    (AFL-CIO/CLC),    Pulp    &    Paper 

Mill  Wkrs.  (AFL-CIO/CLC)  &  IBEW  (AFL- 
CIO/CLC) 

Conciliation  Board 

Atomic  Energy  of  Canada,  Chalk  River  &  Deep 

River,  Ont Atomic  Energy  Allied  Council  (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

DeHavilland  Aircraft,  Malton  &  Toronto,  Ont Auto    Workers    (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Eldorado  Mining  &  Refining,  Eldorado,  Sask Mine,   Mill  &  Smelter  Wkrs.   (Ind.) 

Great  Lakes  Paper,  Fort  William,  Ont Papermakers    (AFL-CIO/CLC),    Pulp    &    Paper 

Mill  Wkrs.  (AFL-CIO/CLC),  IBEW  (AFL- 
CIO/CLC)  &  International  Operating  Engi- 
neers   (AFL-CIO) 

Hamilton   City,    Ont Public  Empl.    (CLC)    (inside  empl.) 

Hamilton   City,   Ont Public  Empl.  (CLC)   (outside  empl.) 

Hotel  Chateau  Laurier  (CNR),  Ottawa,  Ont Railway,  Transport  &  General  Wkrs.  (CLC) 

Hudson  Bay  Mining  &  Smelting,  Flin  Flon,  Man.    CLC-chartered     local,     Machinists     (AFL-CIO/ 

CLC),  IBEW  (AFL-CIO/CLC),  Boilermakers 
(AFL-CIO/CLC),  Carpenters  (AFL-CIO/ 
CLC),  Painters  (AFL-CIO/CLC)  &  Interna- 
tional Operating  Engineers  (AFL-CIO) 

Provincial  Paper,  Thorold,  Ont Pulp  &  Paper  Mill  Wkrs.,   (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Rio  Algom  Mines  (Nordic  Mine),  Algoma  Mills, 

Ont Steelworkers   (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Victoria  Hospital,   London,   Ont Building  Service  Empl.   (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Post-Conciliation  Bargaining 

American  Motors  Canada  Ltd.,  Brampton,  Ont Auto  Wkrs.    (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

CBC,  company-wide  Moving    Picture    Machine    Operators    (AFL- 
CIO/CLC) 
Chrysler  Canada  Ltd.,  Windsor,  Ont Auto  Wkrs.  (AFL-CIO/CLC)    (office  empl.) 

Arbitration 

Toronto  Electric  Commissioners,  Toronto,  Ont Public  Empl.  (CLC) 

Work  Stoppage 

Anaconda  American  Brass,  New  Toronto,  Ont.  ....     Auto  Wkrs.  (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

H.J.  Heinz  Co.  of  Canada,  Leamington,  Ont Packinghouse  Wkrs.    (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Ontario  Paper,  Thorold,  Ont Papermakers    (AFL-CIO/CLC),    Pulp    &   Paper 

Mill  Wkrs.  (AFL-CIO/CLC),  IBEW  (AFL- 
CIO/CLC),  Machinists  (AFL-CIO/CLC), 
Firemen  &  Oilers  (AFL-CIO/CLC),  Plumbers 
(AFL-CIO/CLC),  Carpenters  (AFL-CIO/ 
CLC),  ILA  (AFL-CIO/CLC)  &  International 
Operating  Engineers  (AFL-CIO) 

Part  III — Settlements  Reached  During  July 

(A  summary  of  major  terms  on  the  basis  of  information  immediately  available.  Figures  on  the 
number  of  employees  covered  are  approximate.) 
Brewers  Warehousing,  Carling,  Dow,  Labatt,  Molson  &  O'Keefe  Breweries  &  Cdn.  Breweries 
Transport,  Ont. — Brewery  Wkrs.  (AFL-CIO/CLC):  3-yr.  agreement  covering  3,600  empl. — general 
wage  increases  of  1 0<*  an  hr.  retroactive  to  Jan.  1,  1965,  120  an  hr.  eff.  Jan.  1,  1966  and  140  an 
hr.  eff.  Jan.  1,  1967;  evening  and  night  shift  premiums  increased  to  100  an  hr.  and  150  an  hr. 
respectively  (formerly  70  an  hr.  and  100  an  hr.);  Remembrance  Day  to  be  ninth  paid  holiday  in  1965 
and  Easter  Monday  to  be  ninth  paid  holiday  in  1966;  vacation  bonus  of  20%  of  vacation  pay  to 
be  granted  in  1965  to  empl.  after  20  yrs.  of  service,  in  1966  after  10  yrs.  of  service,  and  in  1967 
after  3  yrs.  of  service;  benefits  under  SUB  plan  (formerly  $47  a  wk.  for  single  empl.  and  $57  a 
wk.  for  married  empl.,  payable  up  to  52  wks.)  to  be  60%  of  wages  for  empl.  with  less  than  7  yrs. 
of  service  and  65%  of  wages  for  empl.  with  more  than  7  yrs.  of  service  and  to  be  payable  up  to 
78  wks.;  weekly  indemnity  to  be  60%  of  wages  payable  up  to  104  wks.;  group  life  insurance 
increased  to  $7,000    (formerly  $5,000);   agreement  to  expire  Dec.   31,   1967. 

714  THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      AUGUST   7965 


Cdn.  Comers,  Vancouver  »t  Peniicton,  B.C.-  Packinghouse  Wkrs.  (AFL-CIO/CLC):  2-yr. 
agreement  covering  500  empl. — wage  increases  of  80  an  hr.  in  1965  and  80  an  hr.  in  1966  for 
base  rates  and  seasonal  empl.  and  of  .V  an  hr.  in  1965  and  50  an  hr.  in  1966  for  classified  posi- 
tions; rates  for  seasonal  empl.  become  $1.47  an  hr.  for  females  and  $1.71  an  hr.  for  males  in  1966; 
agreement  to  expire  Dec.   31,   1966. 

Cdn.  International  Paper  &  New  Brunswick   International  Paper,  N.H.   &    (jar.    Papermakers 

(AFL-CIO/CLC),  Pulp  A  Paper  Mill  Wkrs.  (AFL-CIO  CLC),  International  Operating  Engim 
(AFL-CiO).  UiEW  (AFL-CIO  I  CLC),  Machinists  (AFL-CIO/CLC)  &  Plumbers  (AFL-CIO  <  EC): 
3-yr.  agreement  covering  6,800  empl. — wage  increases  of  15f  an  hr.  retroactive  to  May  1,  1965, 
4%  (minimum  of  10<4  an  hr.)  ell.  Feb.  1,  1966,  100  an  hr.  eff.  Nov.  1,  1966;  wage  increase  of 
3i%  (minimum  of  10(4  an  hr.)  ell.  Aug.  1,  1967  for  mills  on  6-day  operations;  evening  and  night 
shift  premiums  to  be  90  an  hr.  and  1>  an  hr.  respectively  ell.  Feb.  1,  1966  (at  present  He  an  hr. 
and  Me  an  hr.)  and  to  be  104  ;m  hr.  and  13^  an  hr.  respectively  ell".  Nov.  1,  1966;  2  wks.  vacation 
alter  3  yrs.  of  service  (at  present  after  5  yrs.)  and  3  wks.  vacation  after  8  yrs.  of  service  (at 
present  after  10  yrs.)  elf.  Jan.  1,  1966;  5  wks.  vacation  after  25  yrs.  of  service  eff.  Jan.  1,  1967; 
pre-retirement  vacation  plan  to  provide  for  1  to  5  additional  wks.  vacation  after  25  yrs.  of  service 
for  empl.  60  to  64  yrs.  of  age  eff.  Jan.  1,  1968;  post-retirement  life  insurance  to  be  $500  for 
empl.  with  10  yrs.  of  service,  $1,000  for  empl.  with  11  yrs.  of  service,  $1,500  for  empl.  with 
12  yrs.  of  service,  and  $2,000  for  empl.  with  13  yrs.  of  service;  severance  pay  plan  to  provide  1% 
of  total  earnings  received  by  empl.  during  employment,  payable  in  2  steps — 6  wks.  after  layoff  and 
3  mos.  after  layoff;  joint  committees  on  automation  established  to  review  problems  of  technological 
change;   agreement  to  expire  April  30,   1968. 

Cdn.  Johns-Mativille,  Port  Union,  Ont. — Chemical  Wkrs.  (AFL-CIO/CLC):  2-yr.  agreement 
covering  500  empl. — wage  increases  of  30  an  hr.,  and  60  an  hr.  additional  for  skilled  trades  retro- 
active to  April  9,  1965,  and  of  3%  eff.  April  9,  1966;  9  paid  holidays  (formerly  8);  4  wks. 
vacation  after  20  yrs.  of  service  (formerly  after  25  yrs.)  and  5  wks.  vacation  after  25  yrs.  of 
service;  weekly  indemnity  to  be  $60  a  wk.  (formerly  $40);  major  medical  plan  added  to  health 
arrangements;  rate  for  general  worker  becomes  $2.10  an  hr.  eff.  April  9,  1966;  agreement  to  expire 
April  8,  1967. 

Consolidated  Paper,  Nicauba,  Que. — Bush  Wkrs.,  Farmers'  Union  (Ind.):  3-yr.  agreement 
covering  500  empl. — wage  increases  of  100  an  hr.  retroactive  to  Feb.  26,  1965,  110  an  hr.  eff. 
July  19,  1965,  140  an  hr.  eff.  Feb.  26,  1966  and  120  an  hr.  eff.  Feb.  26,  1967;  wage  increases  of 
300  per  cunit  in  first  yr.  of  agreement,  200  per  cunit  in  second  yr.  and  200  per  cunit  in  third 
yr.  for  cutters — standard  operations  and  350  per  cunit  in  first  yr.,  250  per  cunit  in  second  yr.  and 
250  per  cunit  in  third  yr.  for  cutters — wheel  skidders;  work  wk.  (formerly  54  hrs.)  to  be  50  hrs. 
eff.  July  29,  1965  and  45  hrs.  eff.  Feb.  26,  1966;  4  paid  holidays;  vacation  pay  to  be  2%  for 
empl.  with  less  than  50  days  employment,  3%  after  50  days,  5%  after  three  seasons  (one 
seasons  175  days)   and  8%  after  eight  seasons;  agreement  to  expire  Feb.  25,  1968. 

Consolidated  Paper,  Trenche  Dist.,  Que. — Bush  Wkrs.,  Farmers'  Union  (Ind.):  3-yr.  agreement 
covering  500  empl. — terms  similar  to  Consolidated  Paper,  Nicauba  settlement  above;  agreement  to 
expire  Feb.  25,  1968. 

Dominion  Coal,  Glace  Bay,  N.S. — Mine  Wkrs.  (Ind.):  18-mo.  agreement  covering  5,500 
empl. — production  bonus  of  $1  per  shift  incorporated  into  wage  rates;  3  wks.  vacation  (formerly 
2  wks.)  after  1  yr.  of  service;  life  insurance  to  be  $3,000;  weekly  indemnity  to  be  $35;  employer 
and  empl.  each  to  contribute  50  an  hr.  toward  pension  plan;  pension  of  $104  a  mo.  to  be  guaranteed 
from  Jan.  1966  to  Jan.  1976;  rate  for  labourer  becomes  $1.76  an  hr.;  agreement  to  expire  Aug.  1966. 

Domtar  Newsprint  &  Domtar  Construction  Materials,  Donnacona,  Que. — Pulp  &  Paper  Wkrs. 
Federation  (CNTU):  2-yr.  agreement  covering  520  empl. — general  wage  increases  of  100  an  hr. 
retroactive  to  May  1,  1965,  100  an  hr.  eff.  Feb.  1,  1966  and  100  an  hr.  eff.  Dec.  1,  1966;  additional 
wage  adjustments  of  30  to  50  an  hr.  in  1965;  5  wks.  vacation  after  30  yrs.  of  service  eff.  Sept.  1, 
1965;  2  wks.  vacation  after  3  yrs.  of  service  (formerly  after  5  yrs.)  eff.  May  1,  1966;  pre- 
retirement vacation  plan  to  provide  for  1  to  5  additional  wks.  vacation  after  25  yrs.  of  service  for 
empl.  60  to  64  years  of  age;  rate  for  labourer  becomes  $2.33  an  hr.  eff.  Dec.  1,  1966;  agreement 
to  expire  April  30,   1967. 

Domtar  Newsprint,  Red  Rock,  Ont.— Papermakers  (AFL-CIO/CLC)  &  Pulp  &  Paper  Mill 
Wkrs.  (AFL-CIO/CLC):  3-yr.  agreement  covering  600  empl. — general  wage  increases  of  150  an  hr. 
retroactive  to  May  1,  1965,  4%  (minimum  of  100  an  hr.)  eff.  Feb.  1,  1966,  100  an  hr.  eff.  Nov.  1, 
1966  and  3i%  (minimum  of  100  an  hr.)  eff.  Aug.  1,  1967;  additional  wage  adjustments  for  certain 
wage  rates  of  50  an  hr.  eff.  Nov.  1,  1965  and  May  1,  1967;  3  wks.  vacation  after  8  yrs.  of  service 
(at  present  after  10  yrs.  )eff.  Jan.  1,  1966  and  5  wks.  vacation  after  25  yrs.  of  service  eff.  Jan.  1, 
1967;  pre-retirement  plan  to  provide  for  1  to  5  additional  wks.  vacation  after  25  yrs.  of  service  for 
empl.  60  to  64  years  of  age  eff.  Jan.  1,  1968;  rate  for  labourer  on  7-day  operations  becomes 
$2.65  an  hr.  Aug.  1,  1967;  agreement  to  expire  April  30,  1968. 

Hollinger  Consolidated  Gold  Mines,  Timmins,  Ont. — Steelworkers  (AFL-CIO/CLC):  1-yr.  agree- 
ment covering  600  empl. — wage  increase  of  6i0  an  hr.  eff.  July  2,  1965;  employer  to  pay  40% 
(formerly  35%)  of  medical  insurance  premiums;  new  provision  for  check-off  of  union  dues;  rate 
for  labourer  becomes  $1.42  an  hr.;   agreement  to  expire  July   1,   1966. 

Hospitals  (9),  Hull,  Buckingham  &  other  centres,  Que. — Service  Empl.  Federation  (CNTU): 
new  agreement  covering  1,200  empl. — terms  of  settlement  not  immediately  available. 

Manitoba  Hydro — IBEW  (AFL-CIO/CLC):  2-yr.  agreement  covering  1,500  empl. — wage 
increases  of  80  an  hr.  retroactive  to  April  1,  1965  and  40  an  hr.  eff.  April  1,  1966;  rates  become 
$1.52  an  hr.  for  rural  labourers  and  $1.74  an  hr.  for  suburban  labourers  April  1,  1966;  agreement 
to  expire  March  31,  1967. 

National  Harbours  Board,  Montreal,  Que. — CNTU -chartered  local:  2-yr.  agreement  covering 
990  empl. — wage  increases  of  300  an  hr.  retroactive  to  Jan.  1,  1965,  50  an  hr.  "eff.  Aug.  9,  1965 
and  150  an  hr.  eff.  Jan.  1,  1966;  agreement  to  expire  Dec.  31,  1966. 

(Continued  on  page  774) 
THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      AUGUST    7965  715 


Women's  Bureau 


Continuing  Education  of  Women 


Learning  beyond  normal  school  leaving  age  has  become  pattern 
for  women  in  many  parts  of  today's  world.  Equality  granted 
women  in  Japan  led  to  greater  participation  by  women  than  men 


Learning  beyond  the  normal  school  leaving 
age  has  become  a  pattern  for  women  in  many 
parts  of  today's  world. 

In  Japan  the  1947  Constitution,  granting 
equality  to  women,  opened  wide  the  gates 
to  adult  education  and  led  to  greater  parti- 
cipation by  women  than  by  men. 

In  1961  the  Ministry  of  Education  estab- 
lished a  Women's  Social  Education  Section 
to  promote  and  co-ordinate  educational  ac- 
tivities at  the  national  level. 

Women's  classes  provide  the  most  popular 
form  of  educational  activity,  especially  for 
rural  women,  who  account  for  60  percent  of 
the  participants.  Subjects  pursued  include 
home  life,  social  life,  vocational  life,  physical 
education,  recreation  and  general  education. 

Sweden,  where  adult  education  dates  back 
100  years,  is  discovering  mature  educated 
women  as  a  valuable  source  of  manpower 
to  meet  current  shortages  in  many  fields. 

A  woman  may  take  advantage  of  continu- 
ing education  in  the  form  of  studenten,  com- 
parable to  two  years  of  American  college, 
either  for  personal  enrichment  or  to  improve 
vocational  qualifications.  She  can  get  valu- 
able assistance  through  the  National  Labour 
Market  Board.  Aptitude  tests,  on-the-job 
training,  subsistence  payments  during  study, 
transportation  and  physical  relocation  where 
necessary,  are  among  the  services  at  her 
disposal. 

The  national  training  program  for  unem- 
ploved  persons  has  been  extended  to  include 
middle-aged  housewives,  mothers  supporting 
children  and  others  experiencing  difficulty  in 
obtaining  employment.  There  is  no  charge  for 
tuition.  Subject  to  a  means  test,  trainees  may 
receive  living,  rent  and  family  allowances,  with 
75  percent  of  the  cost  being  borne  by  the  Gov- 
ernment and  25  percent  by  the  municipality 
where  the  trainee  permanently  resides. 

During  1960-61,  76  percent  of  the  total 
number  were  trained  as  office  workers;  the 
remainder  as  retail  clerks,  practical  home 
nurses,  mothers'  helpers  and  curtain  seam- 
stresses. 

In  India  an  experimental  project  pat- 
terned on  the  Canadian  Farm  Radio  Forum, 
involving  145  villages,  has  been  organized 
by  UNESCO  and  the  All-India  Radio.  Listen- 
ers' clubs  for  programs  broadcast  specially 
for  women,  have  been  established  in  urban 
and  rural  areas.  Discussion  follows  the  broad- 
casts, and  enquiries  or  suggestions  are  re- 
ferred to  All-India  Radio  to  be  dealt  with 


in  subsequent  programs.  Subjects  vary  from 
domestic  science,  social  welfare,  child  psy- 
chology, child  education  to  India's  political 
and   social   life. 

In  Holland  the  association  for  women's 
interests  Vrouwenbelangen,  Amsterdam  sec- 
tion, sponsors  an  annual  non-party  course 
in  six  evenings  to  train  women  desirous  of 
entering  political  life.  Mock  elections,  in- 
volving the  entire  audience  help  to  interest 
women  in  the  intricate  workings  of  a  demo- 
cratic political  system. 

In  Gambia  the  newly  organized  Women's 
Federation  includes  women's  organizations 
from  all  sections  of  the  country,  regardless 
of  tribal,  political  or  religious  affiliation. 
Parents  and  husbands  encourage  their  wives 
and  daughters  to  take  advantage  of  educa- 
tional programs  offered.  Since  the  extent  of 
illiteracy  is  substantial,  informal  education 
is  desirable.  Girls  are  taught  hygiene,  child 
care  and  domestic  science.  Those  who  are 
literate  are  taught  to  give  weekly  radio 
lectures  on   health    in   the   vernacular. 

In  Italy  the  Italian  Television  Service  has 
developed  Telescuola,  a  system  to  help  com- 
bat illiteracy.  Numerous  communal  viewing 
posts  have  been  set  up  where  three  weekly 
lessons  give  thousands  of  persons  the  chance 
to  become  literate.  In  1962,  language  certi- 
ficates were  awarded  to  46,000  persons  who 
took  the  courses. 

In  Senegal,  under  government  sponsorship, 
residential  centres  have  been  established  for 
training  women  from  rural  areas.  Courses 
last  17  days  and  women  may  bring  their 
children.  The  aim  is  to  improve  homemaking 
skills,  learn  the  geography  of  the  country, 
become  aware  of  citizenship  responsibilities, 
first  aid,  hygiene,  child  care,  budgeting,  farm- 
ing and  gardening.  Teaching  methods  and 
course  content  are  adapted  to  the  conditions 
of  rural  life. 

In  Britain  the  National  Institute  of  Edu- 
cation publishes  a  six-month  calendar  listing 
dates  and  location  of  residential  short  courses, 
usually  lasting  a  week  or  weekend.  Topics 
include  subjects  from  the  arts  and  sciences, 
language  study,  industrial  relations,  prepara- 
tion for  retirement,  and  industrial  psychology. 

Many  courses  are  provided  through  uni- 
versity extension  departments.  Other  residen- 
tial college  courses  of  from  one  or  two 
years'  duration,  offer  university  studies  to 
students  who  missed  this  educational  oppor- 
tunity earlier  in  life. 


716 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      AUGUST   1965 


Civilian  Rehabilitation 

Growing  Number  Reach  "Rehabilitation  Status" 

Almost  70  per  cent  of  the  2,179  individuals  rehabilitated  in 
the  year  1964-65  who  were  dependent  on  relatives  or  public 
assistance  now  have  annual  income  of  approximately  $4,600,000 

The  year  1964-65  saw  another  2,179  in-  A  study  of  the  educational  qualifications 
dividuals  added  to  the  growing  number  of  of  the  group  shows  that  1,207  had  not  gone 
persons  that  have  been  reported  by  provin-  beyond  elementary  school,  and  320  had  not 
rial  rehabilitation  authorities  as  having  gone  beyond  Grade  4.  Only  60  had  con- 
reached  "rehabilitation  status"  since  the  in-  tinued  their  education  beyond  high  school, 
stitution  of  the  Federal-Provincial  Rehabili-  but  516  had  received  some  form  of  voca- 
tation  Program  in  1957.  Such  reports  are  tional  training.  In  carrying  out  their  rehabil- 
made  only  on  cases  for  which  full  details  itation,  1,120  undertook  vocational  training 
are  available.  They  are  submitted  when  re-  for  a  wide  variety  of  occupations, 
habilitation  services  have  terminated  and  a  in  addition  to  vocational  training  many 
suitable  period  of  follow-up  has  elapsed.  received   medical,   social   and   vocational   as- 

Of  the  2,179  rehabilitated  persons  in  1964-  sessment  and  counselling.  A  variety  of  treat- 
65,  almost  70  per  cent  were  dependent  on  ment  services  were  provided  to  well  over 
relatives  or  public  assistance.  There  were  half  the  total  number  rehabilitated.  Four 
1,786  dependants  involved.  The  cost  of  their  hundred  and  twelve  were  fitted  with  pros- 
annual  maintenance  was  estimated  to  be  thetic  appliances  and  devices, 
approximately  $1,527,000. 

After    rehabilitation,    the    estimated    total  From  Youth  to  Old  Age 
annual    income    for   this    group    is    approxi-  The            distribution   of   the   disabled   in- 
nately $4,600,000.  The  contribution  of   177  dividuals    extends    from          th    to    old 
housewives,    or    family    homemakers,    is    in  Almost  50  per  cent  are  under  30  years  of 
addition  to  this. age>  many  of  them  new  entrants  t0  the  labour 

After   their   rehabilitation,    1,675   of  those  market    It   fa   interesting   to   note>   howeverj 

rehabilitated  in   1964-65  were  regularly  em-  that  more  than  3Q  per  cent  of  those  rehabili. 

ployed    in    business   or   industry    76   set   up  tated  are  Qver  4Q  years  of          Women  form 

in     business     for    themselves,     112    entered  just  under  two.fifths  of  the  total> 
sheltered  employment,   54  were  carrying  on 

some  form  of  homebound  employment,  and  .  These  2'!7f9  rehabilitated  persons  suffered 

177  were  able  to  resume  their  responsibilities  fron\  a  7anfety  °f  disabling  conditions.  Over 

as  wives  and  homemakers.  Eighty-five  of  the  one-third    of    them    suffered    from    amputa- 

severely  disabled   were   helped  to   the   place  tlons  or  other  orthopaedic  handicaps, 

where  they  could  undertake  their  own  care.  Number  in   Major  Disability  Groups 

656  Had  No  Work  Record  Amputations  201 

Before  their   acceptance  for  rehabilitation  Neuro-Muscular  Skeletal  Impairments  ..  564 

service,   656  of  these  persons  had  no  work       Deaf  and  Heari       impairments   236 

record,  341  had  been  employed  as  unbilled         u  d  and  yisual  Impairments  240 

workers,  184  in  semi-skilled  occupations,  and  VT             .                 m*                                   aexA 

180  in  skilled  work.  Ninety-one  were  engaged       Neurological   Impairments   194 

in    agriculture,    fishing    or    forestry.    Service  Tuberculosis  and   Respiratory  Disorders  171 

occupations   gave   employment   to    194   with       Cardio-Vascular  Diseases  71 

261  engaged  in  sales  and  clerical  work,  and       Neuro-Psychiatric   Disorders    435 

83   in   the   professional   or   managerial  field,       Other   Disabling   Conditions    67 

and    189  were   wives  or  homemakers. 

With   rehabilitation    complete,   the   reports  This  brings  to  14,102  the  number  of  such 

indicate   152  are  now  employed  in  the  pro-  cases    reported    since    the    beginning    of   the 

fessional   or   managerial   field,   511    in   sales  program.    It    is    estimated    that    without   re- 

and    clerical   work,    354    in    service    occupa-  habilitation    assistance,    these    persons    with 

tions,  73  remained  in  agriculture,  fishing  or  their    10,905    dependants    were    costing    ap- 

forestry,  274  as   skilled  workers,  252  semi-  proximately  $9,420,000  annually  for  support, 

skilled,    and    301    in    unskilled    work.    One  Now    they   earn    approximately    $26,690,000 

hundred    and    seventy-seven    are    housewives  a  year  and  have  collectively  earned  a  total  of 

or  homemakers.   The   remainder    (85)    were  $112,017,000   since   they   became   employed, 

not    able    to    undertake    employment,    but  This  compares  to  the  cost  of  their  support 

were   able   to   dispense   with  help   and   look  for  the  same  period,  which  would  have  been 

after    themselves.  almost    $41,799,000. 


THE  LABOUR   GAZETTE 

9193&— 3 


•      AUGUST    7965 


717 


Older  Workers 


Growth  in  Older  Segment  of  Labour  Force 

Canada's  labour  force  increased  by  20  per  cent  in  nine-year 
period  from  1956  to  1964,  with  those  aged  45  and  over  showing 
substantial  increases  both  in  actual  numbers  and  in  proportion 


Interesting  information  concerning  the 
growth  of  the  older  segment  of  the  labour 
force  can  be  obtained  from  estimates  derived 
from  the  monthly  labour  force  survey.  The 
survey  is  conducted  by  the  Special  Surveys 
Division  of  the  Dominion  Bureau  of  Statis- 
tics. Available  from  the  Special  Surveys  Divi- 
sion are  special  tables,  on  an  annual  average 
containing  data  on  age,  sex,  adult  popu- 
lation, labour  force,  employment,  unemploy- 
ment and  participation  rates  for  the  years 
1956-1964  inclusive. 

Canada's  labour  force  has  grown  from 
5,782,000  in  1956  to  6,933,000  in  1964,  an 
increase  of  about  20  per  cent.  During  the 
same  nine-year  period,  the  older  segment  of 
the  labour  force — those  aged  45  and  over — 
grew  from  1,792,000  to  2,292,000,  an  in- 
crease of  500,000,  or  27.9  per  cent.  In  1956, 
the  45-plus  group  in  the  labour  force  con- 
stituted 31.0  per  cent  of  the  labour  force. 
By  1964  this  proportion  had  increased  to  33.1 
per  cent. 

The  increase  in  the  45-and-over  segment 
of  the  labour  force  occurred  despite  a  de- 
crease in  the  65-and-over  section  of  the  older 
group.  The  number  of  those  in  the  labour 
force  aged  65-plus,  dropped  from  231,000  in 
1956  to  224,000  .in  1964,  a  decrease  of  3.0 
per  cent.  Workers  aged  65  and  over  made 
up  4.0  per  cent  of  the  total  labour  force  in 
1956,  but  by  1964  this  proportion  had  drop- 
ped to  3.2  per  cent. 

The  middle-aged  segment  of  the  older  age 
group  in  the  labour  force,  those  workers 
aged  45  to  64,  increased  by  507,000  from 
1,561,000  in  1956  to  2,068,000  in  1964,  a 
growth  of  32.5  per  cent.  In  1956,  the  45-64 
age  group  made  up  27.0  per  cent  of  the  la- 
bour force.  By  1964  this  proportion  had 
grown  to  29.8  per  cent. 

The  substantial  increase  in  the  45-64  age 
group  in  the  labour  force,  both  in  actual 
numbers  and  in  proportion,  suggests  that  the 
labour  market  problem  associated  with  the 
hiring  and  retention  of  older  workers  could 
worsen.  However,  if  the  current  strong  de- 
mand for  skilled  and  experienced  workers 
continues,  the  problem  should  not  increase 
despite  the  larger  group  involved.  Moreover, 
the   unemployment  rates   for  the  45-64   age 


group  have  been  consistently  lower  than  the 
unemployment  rates  for  all  age  groups  as  a 
whole.  The  45-64  group  made  up  22.8  per 
cent  of  the  unemployed  in  1956.  In  1964  this 
proportion  was  25  per  cent. 

An  examination  of  the  adult  population 
(age  14  and  over),  although  showing  some 
similarities,  presents  a  somewhat  different 
picture.  Canada's  adult  population  grew  from 
10,807,000  in  1956  to  12,817,000  in  1964, 
an  increase  of  18.6  per  cent.  During  the  same 
nine-year  period  the  segment  of  the  popula- 
tion aged  45  and  over  grew  from  3,922,000 
to  4,738,000,  an  increase  of  816,000  or  20.8 
per  cent.  This  slightly  more  rapid  growth  of 
the  45-plus  age  group,  as  compared  with  the 
adult  population  as  a  whole,  occurred  despite 
the  rather  phenomenal  growth  of  the  younger 
age  group,  those  aged  14-24  years.  This 
younger  age  group  increased  from  2,456,000 
in  1956  to  3,313,000  in  1964,  a  growth  of 
857,000  or  34.9  per  cent. 

The  middle-aged  segment  of  the  older 
population,  those  aged  45-64,  grew  from 
2,722,000  in  1956  to  3,344,000  in  1964,  an 
increase  of  622,000  or  22.9  per  cent.  When 
this  growth  of  22.9  per  cent  for  the  45-64 
age  group  in  the  adult  population  is  com- 
pared with  the  growth  of  32.5  per  cent  of 
the  same  age  group  in  the  labour  force,  the 
different  picture  presented  by  the  total  adult 
population  as  compared  with  an  examination 
of  the  labour  force  figures,  becomes  apparent. 

The  more  elderly  segment  of  the  older 
population,  those  aged  65  and  over  also  in- 
creased numerically  during  the  nine-year  pe- 
riod from  1,200,000  in  1956  to  1,394,000  in 
1964,  a  growth  of  194,000  or  16.2  per  cent, 
but  proportionately  there  was  a  slight  de- 
crease. This  group  constituted  11.1  per  cent 
of  the  adult  population  in  1956  as  compared 
with  10.9  per  cent  in  1964. 

While  the  younger  adult  age  group,  those 
from  14-24  years  of  age  showed  the  most 
spectacular  increase  in  the  adult  population 
figures,  a  different  situation  prevailed  in  con- 
nection with  the  labour  force  figures.  The 
14-24  age  group  in  the  labour  force  increased 
from  1,304,000  in  1956  to  1,578,000  in  1964, 
a  growth  of  274,000  or  approximately  21 
per  cent,  as  compared  to  the  34.9  per  cent 
growth  for  this  group  in  the  adult  population. 


718 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      AUGUST   7965 


INTERNATIONAL   LABOUR  ORGANIZATION 


49th  International  Labour  Conference 


Delegates  adopt  five  new  instruments.  Report  examines  major 
areas  of  future  action:  development  of  economic  and  human 
resources,    social    institutions,    conditions    of    life    and    work 


The  49th  Session  of  the  International  La- 
bour Conference,  held  in  Geneva  from  June 
2    to    24,    adopted    five    international    instru- 
ments— two  Conventions   and   three    Recom- 
mendations.   The    new    standards    bring    the 
total  number  of  Conventions  to  124,  and  the 
number  of   Recommendations  to    125. 
The  five  new  instruments  are: 
— a    Convention    and    a    Recommendation 
on   the    minimum   age   of   admission   to 
employment; 
— a    Convention   on   medical   examination 

for  fitness  for  employment; 
— a    Recommendation    on    conditions    of 

work; 
— a  Recommendation  on  the  employment 
of  women  with  family  responsibilities. 

In  addition,  the  achievements  of  the  49th 
Session    included: 

— adoption  of  conclusions  to  serve  as  the 
basis  for  a  Recommendation  on  the 
role  of  co-operatives  in  the  economic 
and  social  development  of  developing 
countries. 

— adoption  of  a  resolution  in  agrarian  re- 
form, with  particular  reference  to  em- 
ployment and  social  aspects. 

— adoption  of  the  ILO  budget  for  1966, 
amounting  to  $20,337,871. 

— examination  of  the  application  by  mem- 
ber countries  of  Conventions  and  Rec- 
ommendations; ratifications  of  Conven- 
tions registered  during  the  session  brought 
to  3,061  the  number  of  ratifications  of 
ILO  Conventions. 

— adoption  of  a  number  of  resolutions 
on  subjects  other  than  the  technical 
questions  included  in  the  agenda. 

The  Conference  also  debated  a  report  sub- 
mitted by  David  A.  Morse,  Director-General 
of  the  ILO.  In  it,  Mr.  Morse  closely  exam- 
ined the  three  major  areas  of  future  ILO 
action  on  which  agreement  was  reached 
during  the  Conference  debates  in  1963  and 
1964.  They  are:  human  resources  and  eco- 
nomic development;  the  development  of 
social  institutions;  and  conditions  of  life  and 
work.  In  a  plenary  sitting  of  the  Conference, 
Mr.  Morse  replied  to  the  201  speakers  who 
took  part  in  the  discussions  on  his  report. 

Charles  R.  McCord,  Director  of  Annuities 
of  the  Department  of  Labour  at  Ottawa,  was 
reappointed  as   one   of  the   substitute  mem- 


THE   LABOUR   GAZETTE 

91939— 3£ 


AUGUST    7965 


bers  on  the  Administrative  Board  of  the  ILO 
Staff  Pensions  Fund  for  three  years  until 
October  8,  1968,  and  to  the  ILO  Staff  Pen- 
sion Committee  (United  Nations  Joint  Staff 
Pension  Fund)  for  three  years  until  July  10, 
1968. 

Of  the  114  State  Members  of  the  Inter- 
national Labour  Organization,  104  were  rep- 
resented at  the  49th  Session,  nearly  all  by 
complete  tripartite  delegations.  The  number 
of  delegates  and  technical  advisers  was  1,130, 
including  204  government  delegates  and  365 
advisers;  100  employers'  delegates  and  163 
advisers;  and  99  workers'  delegates  and  199 
advisers.  The  Canadian  delegation  was  listed 
in  the  June  issue,  p.  519. 

Canadian  Participation 

Government  delegates  served  on  confer- 
ence committees  as  follows:  George  V.  Hay- 
thorne,  Deputy  Minister  of  Labour — working 
party  on  the  program  and  structure  of  the 
ILO  (chairman);  Miss  M.  V.  Royce,  Director, 
Women's  Bureau — committee  on  women 
workers  (drafting  committee);  John  Main- 
waring,  Director,  International  Labour  Af- 
fairs Branch,  Department  of  Labour,  and 
Charles  Marshall,  First  Secretary,  Canadian 
Permanent  Mission,  Geneva — resolutions; 
Miss  Evelyn  Woolner,  Legislation  Branch, 
Department  of  Labour — Application  of  Con- 
ventions and  Recommendations;  W.  H.  Sands, 
Deputy  Minister  of  Labour  of  British  Colum- 
bia— Employment  of  Young  Miners;  R.  M. 
Adams,  Labour  Counsellor,  Canadian  Em- 
bassy, Brussels — Agrarian  Reform;  B.  N. 
Arnason,  Deputy  Minister  of  Co-operatives 
and  Development  of  Saskatchewan — Co- 
operatives. 

Worker  delegates  on  committees  were: 
Kalmen  Kaplansky — working  party  on  the 
program  and  structure  of  the  ILO,  selection 
committee,  resolutions  committee  (vice-chair- 
man), member  of  the  bureau  of  the  workers 
group;  James  MacDonald — committee  on  co- 
operation; Miss  Huguette  Plamondon — com- 
mittee on  women  workers;  Miss  Georgette 
Lachaine — committee  on  the  women  workers 
(deputy  member);  Joseph  Morris — commit- 
tee on  the  application  of  conventions  and 
recommendations,  resolutions  committee. 

Employer  delegates  on  committees  were: 
Kenneth  Hallsworth — selection  committee 
(deputy  member),  resolutions  committee 
(substitute    W.    J.    Whittaker,    Q.C.),    com- 


719 


— J.  G.   Cadoux,  Geneva 
George   V.    Haythorne,    Deputy    Minister   of   Labour,    who   has    completed    a   year   as 
Chairman  of  the  ILO  Governing  Body,  is  shown  (inset)  as  he  opened  the  49th  International 
Labour  Conference  at  Geneva  in  June. 


mittee  on  employment  of  young  miners  (sub- 
stitute J.  P.  Despres),  committee  on  women 
workers  (deputy  member)  substitute  (P.  L. 
Schmidt),  committee  on  agrarian  reform 
(substitute  George  Lach),  committee  on  co- 
operatives (substitute  J.  R.  Davidson);  J. 
P.  Despres — committee  on  employment  of 
young  miners  (vice-chairman). 

Director-General's  Reply  to  the  Debate 

In  his  reply,  Mr.  Morse  stated  that  the 
selection  of  a  limited  number  of  broad  areas 
of  action  on  which  the  ILO  should  focus  its 
attention  would  have  some  significant  and 
far-reaching  implications  concerning  the 
nature  of  its  action  in  the  years  to  come.  He 
raised   two  points  in   this  regard. 

"The  first  is  that  to  agree  on  the  objectives 
of  our  programs  is  not  the  same  thing  as  to 
be  in  a  position  to  put  all  these  programs 
into  practical  effect  at  once.  The  resources 
which  are  at  the  disposal  of  the  ILO  and 
of  its  member  States  are  rather  limited  in 
relation  to  what  are  ambitious  objectives  on 
a  national  and  a  world-wide  scale." 


Consequently,  added  Mr.  Morse,  "it  is 
all  the  more  urgent  that  we  should  have  a 
set  of  clearly  defined  priorities  based  on  a 
careful  examination  of  the  situation  in  each 
region  of  the  world,  to  ensure  that  our  efforts 
are  directed  to  those  problems  that  are  most 
urgently  in  need  of  solution." 

The  opinion  of  the  Director-General  was 
that  "In  the  contemporary  world,  where 
there  are  so  many  problems  of  human 
misery,  poverty  and  degradation  crying  out 
for  solution,  the  ILO  will  be  judged  by  the 
measure  of  the  practical  contribution  that 
it  makes  to  the  total  effort  to  relieve  suffer- 
ing wherever  such  suffering  exists." 

The  second  point  raised  by  Mr.  Morse 
concerned  collaboration  between  the  ILO  and 
other  organizations  in  the  UN  family.  He 
said  it  was  necessary  to  ensure  "that  we  do 
not  stray  beyond  the  limits  that  we  have 
ourselves   set    to    our   competence." 

As  a  result  of  the  Conference  debates,  the 
fields  of  competence  as  now  defined  are: 
the  development  and  full  utilization  of 
human  resources;  the  development  of  insti- 


720 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      AUGUST   7965 


tutions  through  which  all  sections  of  the 
Working  population  can  fully  participate  in 
and  benefit  from  the  economic  growth  of 
their  countries;  and  the  improvement  of  the 
working  and  living  conditions  of  all  workers. 

Mr.  Morse  also  pointed  out  that  the  II  0 
had  an  additional  responsibility  as  a  member 
of  the  UN  family.  "It  can  and  it  should 
co-operate  with  other  organizations  in  pro- 
jects and  programs  in  which  it  has  an  in- 
terest.  to  which  it  has  a  contribution  to 
make,  but  in  which  other  organizations  have 
the  primary  responsibility." 

One  of  the  programs,  Mr.  Morse  said,  was 
disarmament.  Of  course,  the  ILO  has  no 
competence  with  respect  to  the  political  as- 
pects of  disarmament,  "but  it  should  be  able 
to  facilitate  progress  toward  disarmament 
by  helping,  along  with  other  agencies,  to 
determine  the  precise  economic  and  social 
implications  of  disarmament." 

On  the  question  of  ILO's  co-operation  with 
the  United  Nations  in  the  field  of  trade  and 
development,  Mr.  Morse  declared  that  one 
of  the  major  tasks  was  to  assist  the  develop- 
ing countries  in  the  creation  and  maintenance 
of  high  levels  of  productive  employment. 
But,  he  added,  "our  efforts  in  this  direction 
will  be  nullified  unless  there  are  outlets  for 
the  products  of  developing  countries  on  the 
world  market. 

"At  the  same  time,  the  ILO  is  concerned 
that  increased  exports  of  manufactures  from 
developing  countries  should  not  lead  to  hard- 
ship for  workers  in  the  industrialized  coun- 
tries. These  anticipated  difficulties  should  be 
met  not  by  protective  measures,  but  by  help 
in  facilitating  adjustments  so  that  individual 
workers  and  their  families  find  security 
rather  than  insecurity  in  the  changes  which 
will  come  about  in  their  occupational  life." 

Referring  to  industrialization,  Mr.  Morse 
said  it  seemed  to  him  that  "the  time  has  come 
for  us  to  consider  whether  the  ILO  cannot, 
through  the  progressive  application  of  its 
principles  and  through  its  practical  action, 
particularly  in  the  field  of  human  resources, 
make  an  even  greater  contribution  than  it 
has  in  the  past  to  this  vast  and  difficult  en- 
terprise of  industrialization." 

He  indicated  that  he  proposed  to  make 
industrialization  the  central  theme  of  his  re- 
port to  the  Conference  next  year. 

With  regard  to  standard-setting  activities, 
the  Director-General  expressed  the  opinion 
that  emphasis  should  be  placed  on  broadly 
conceived  instruments,  sufficiently  flexible  to 
be  applicable  to  conditions  in  all  member 
States,  yet  setting  goals,  targets  and  principles 
which  should  be  pursued  by  all  members. 

Concerning  decentralization  of  the  ILO's 
activities,  Mr.  Morse  said.  "One  of  the  most 
significant  trends  in  the  world  of  the  1960s  is 
towards    regional    groupings.    The    States    in 


each  "region"  have  become  increasingly  in- 
terested in  finding  solutions  to  common  prob- 
lems, and  in  developing  common  methods  of 
action.  And  it  is  only  natural  that  the  II. () 
should    be   responsive    to   this   ti end." 

He  added  that  this  could  be  done  in  three 
ways:  by  decentralizing  a  certain  number  of 
the  functions  of  the  Office,  assigning  new 
roles  and  new  responsibilities  to  regional  con- 
ferences and  regional  advisory  committees, 
and  establishing  close  working  relationships 
with  the  many  regional  bodies  and  organiza- 
tions which  have  come  into  existence  in 
different  parts  of  the  world. 

Mr.  Morse  paid  special  tribute  to  the  Prin- 
cipal Deputy  Director-General,  Jef  Rens,  who 
had  decided  to  resign  after  more  than  20 
years  of  service  with  the  ILO. 

"Mr.  Rens,"  he  said,  "has  served  the  ILO 
faithfully  during  two  of  the  most  important 
decades  in  the  Organization's  history.  His 
contribution  to  the  work  of  the  ILO  during 
this  long  span  of  time  is  appreciated  as 
much  by  his  colleagues  in  the  Office  as  by 
those  delegates  at  the  Conference  and  mem- 
bers of  the  Governing  Body  who  have  had 
the  opportunity  of  being  associated  with  him 
in  some  of  his  manifold  endeavours." 

Employment  of  Young  Persons  in  Mines 

Convention 

The  Convention  on  the  minimum  age  of 
admission  to  underground  work  in  mines 
(full  text  on  page  725)  was  adopted  by  234 
votes  in  favour,  none  against  and  20  absten- 
tions. 

The  Convention  provides  that  persons  un- 
der a  specified  minimum  age  shall  not  be 
employed  for  work  underground  in  mines 
and  specifies  that  the  minimum  age  shall  in 
no  case  be  less  than  16  years. 

It  also  calls  on  each  member  country 
which  ratifies  this  Convention  to  undertake 
either  to  maintain  an  appropriate  inspection 
service  for  the  purpose  of  supervising  the 
application  of  the  Convention,  or  to  satisfy 
itself  that  appropriate  inspection  is  being 
carried  out. 

It  further  adds  that  the  determination  of 
the  minimum  age  shall  be  made  after  con- 
sultation with  the  most  representative  organi- 
zations of  employers  and  workers  concerned. 

Recommendation 
The  Recommendation  (full  text  on  page 
726)  which  was  adopted  by  321  votes  in 
favour,  none  against  and  nine  abstentions, 
makes  reference  to  the  Convention  and  pro- 
poses that  where  the  minimum  age  for  ad- 
mission to  underground  work  in  mines  is 
less  than  16  years,  measures  should  be  taken 
as  speedily  as  possible  to  raise  it  to  that 
level.  It  also  suggests  that  the  minimum  age 
should  be  progressively  raised,  with  a  view 
to  attaining  a  minimum   age  of   18  years. 


THE   LABOUR   GAZETTE      •      AUGUST    1965 


721 


Persons  between  the  ages  of  16  and  18 
should  be  employed  underground  in  mines 
only  for  purposes  of  apprenticeship  or  other 
systematic  vocational  training  under  condi- 
tions determined  by  the  competent  authority 
relating  to  the  places  of  work  and  occupa- 
tions permitted,  and  the  measures  of  syste- 
matic medical  and  safety  supervision  to  be 
applied. 

The  Recommendation  emphasizes  that 
there  should  be  special  provisions  concern- 
ing the  minimum  age  for  employment  or 
work  underground  in  mines  on  certain  speci- 
fied jobs  or  under  certain  specified  condi- 
tions that  are  harmful  to  health  and  that  may 
endanger  the  safety  of  the  worker  and  that 
of  other  persons. 

Finally,  the  text  suggests  that  these  pro- 
visions should  include  employment  in  surface 
work  with  appropriate  training,  vocational 
training  on  the  surface,  further  education  and 
vocational  guidance,  and  raising  the  mini- 
mum school-leaving  age. 

Medical  Examination 

Convention 

The  Convention  concerning  medical  ex- 
amination of  young  persons  for  fitness  for 
employment  underground  (full  text  on  page 
727)  adopted  by  331  votes  in  favour,  none 
against  and  13  abstentions,  declares  that  a 
thorough  medical  examination  and  periodic 
re-examination,  at  intervals  of  not  more  than 
one  year,  for  fitness  for  employment  shall 
be  required  for  the  employment  or  work 
underground  in  mines  of  persons  under  21 
years  of  age. 

These  medical  examinations  shall  be  car- 
ried out  under  the  responsibility  and  super- 
vision of  a  qualified  physician  approved  by 
the  competent  authority  and  shall  be  certified 
in  an  appropriate  manner.  They  shall  not  in- 
volve the  young  person,  or  his  parents  or 
guardians,  in  any  expense. 

Alternative  arrangements  for  medical  su- 
pervision of  young  persons  aged  between  18 
and  21  shall  be  permitted  where  the  com- 
petent authority  is  satisfied  that  they  are 
equivalent  to  or  more  effective  than  those 
stated   above. 

All  necessary  measures  shall  be  taken  by 
the  competent  authority  to  ensure  the  effec- 
tive enforcement  of  these  provisions,  states 
the   Convention. 

The  competent  authority  in  each  country 
is  required  by  the  proposed  instrument  to 
consult  the  most  representative  organizations 
of  employers  and  workers  concerned  before 
determining  general  policies  of  implementa- 
tion, and  before  adopting  regulations  in  pur- 
suance of  the  terms  of  the  Convention. 


Conditions  of  Employment 

Recommendation 

Adopted  by  298  votes  in  favour,  none 
against  and  51  abstentions,  the  Recommen- 
dation concerning  the  conditions  of  employ- 
ment of  young  persons  for  underground 
work  in  mines  (full  text  on  page  729)  deals 
mainly  with  health,  safety  and  welfare; 
weekly  rest  and  annual  holidays  with  pay; 
and    training. 

With  regard  to  health,  safety  and  welfare, 
the  Recommendation  states  that  the  em- 
ployer should  be  required  to  inform  a  young 
person,  both  when  engaging  him  and  when 
giving  him  a  specific  job  underground,  of  the 
risks  of  accident  and  hazards  to  health  in- 
volved in  the  work,  of  protective  measures 
and  equipment,  of  regulations  regarding 
safety,  and  of  first-aid  methods. 

The  text  adds  that  officials  in  charge  of 
safety,  safety  delegates,  safety  and  health 
committees,  and  all  other  internal  bodies 
concerned  with  safety  and  health,  as  well  as 
the  national  inspection  service,  should  give 
particular  attention  to  measures  designed  to 
safeguard  the  life  and  health  of  young  per- 
sons employed  or  working  underground  in 
mines. 

The  Recommendation  points  out  that  to 
keep  young  persons  employed  or  working 
underground  in  mines  in  good  health,  and 
to  promote  their  normal  physical  develop- 
ment, measures  should  be  taken  that  (1)  aim 
at  encouraging  recreational  activities,  includ- 
ing sports;  (2)  ensure  that  changing-rooms 
and  showers  of  approved  hygienic  standards 
are  made  available;  and  (3)  ensure  that  young 
persons  are  provided  sufficient  food  to  secure 
a  diet  suitable  to  their  stage  of  development. 

The  Recommendation  states  that  persons 
under  18  years  of  age  employed  or  working 
underground  in  mines  should  be  entitled  to 
an  uninterrupted  weekly  rest  which  should 
not  be  less  than  36  hours  in  the  course  of 
each  period  of  seven  days.  The  weekly  rest 
period  should  be  progressively  extended,  with 
a  view  to  attaining  at  least  48  hours,  and 
they  should  receive  an  annual  holiday  with 
pay  of  not  less  than  24  working  days  (cor- 
responding to  four  working  weeks)  for  12 
months  of  service. 

The  competent  authorities  should  take  the 
necessary  measures  to  ensure  that  young  per- 
sons employed  underground  in  mines  receive 
systematic  vocational  training,  enjoy  suitable 
opportunities  for  further  technical  training, 
and  are  provided  with  suitable  opportunities 
for  further  education  and  training  above 
ground. 

The  competent  authority  in  each  country 
should  consult  the  most  representative  or- 
ganizations of  employers  and  workers  con- 
cerned   before    determining    general    policies 


722 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      AUGUST   7965 


of  implementation,  and  before  adopting  regu- 
lations in  pursuance  of  the  terms  of  this 
Recommendation. 

Women  with  Family  Responsibilities 

Recommendation 

The  Conference  adopted  by  346  votes, 
without  opposition  or  abstention,  the  Recom- 
mendation concerning  the  employment  of 
women  with  family  responsibilities,  (full  text 
on  page  730  and  reprinted  in  Bulletin  XV  of 
the  Women's  Bureau,  Department  of  Labour). 

The  Recommendation  seeks  to  ensure  that 
women  with  family  responsibilities  can  ex- 
ercise the  right  to  work  outside  their  homes 
without  being  subject  to  discrimination.  It 
urges  the  development  of  services  to  enable 
women  to  fulfil  their  responsibilities  at  home 
and  at  work  harmoniously.  These  general 
principles  are  to  be  pursued  by  competent 
authorities  in  co-operation  with  the  public 
and  private  organizations  concerned,  and  in 
accordance  with  national  and  local  needs  and 
possibilities. 

In  the  field  of  public  information  and  ed- 
ucation, authorities  are  recommended  to  en- 
courage consideration  of  the  problems  of 
women  workers  in  order  to  help  these  work- 
ers to  become  integrated  effectively  in  the 
labour  force  on  the  basis  of  equal  rights;  to 
undertake  or  promote  research  into  various 
aspects  of  their  employment;  and  to  engen- 
der broader  public  understanding  of  their 
problems. 

The  Recommendation  seeks  the  establish- 
ment, particularly  in  local  communities,  of 
plans  for  the  systematic  development  of 
child-care  services  and  facilities  to  meet 
known  needs  and  preferences. 

With  a  view  to  facilitating  entry  of  women 
into  employment  or  their  re-entry  after  a 
period  of  absence,  the  Recommendation 
states  that  authorities  should  ensure  pro- 
vision of  general  education,  vocational  guid- 
ance and  vocational  training  free  from  any 
form  of  discrimination  on  the  ground  of  sex, 
and  should  encourage  girls  to  obtain  a  sound 
vocational  preparation  as  a  basis  for  their 
future   working   lives. 

In  the  case  of  women  who,  because  of 
maternity,  are  not  able  to  return  to  work 
immediately  after  termination  of  the  normal 
period  of  maternity  leave,  the  proposed  Rec- 
ommendation urges  that  appropriate  meas- 
ures be  provided  to  allow  them  to  take  a 
reasonable  further  period  of  leave  of  ab- 
sence without  having  to  relinquish  their  em- 
ployment or  other  rights. 

Other  provisions  relate  to  matters  of  sig- 
nificance to  women  workers  with  family 
responsibilities — the  organization  of  public 
transport,  harmonization  of  working  hours 
and  hours  of  schools  and  child-care  facilities, 
and  development  of  home-aid  services. 


The  Conference  also  adopted  a  resolution 
concerning  regular  periodic  review,  by  the 
Director-General  of  the  ILO,  of  the  effects  of 
the    Recommendation. 

Kmployment  of  Women 

Miss  Marion  Royce,  Director  of  the  Wo- 
men's Bureau,  Department  of  Labour,  Ot- 
tawa, spoke  on  the  report  of  the  Committee 
on  Women  Workers,  of  which  she  was  a 
member. 

"An  impressive  increase  in  the  economic 
activity  of  Canadian  women  in  recent  years 
make  an  international  labour  Recommenda- 
tion concerning  the  employment  of  women 
with  family  responsibilities  particularly  rele- 
vant to  our  situation,"  said  Miss  Royce. 

The  committee  was  grateful  to  the  Office 
for  the  comprehensive  report  that  opened  up 
the  subject  of  women's  work  in  a  changing 
world,  and  for  the  "initiative  of  the  ILO  in 
proposing  the  adoption  of  a  Recommendation 
on  this  hitherto  almost  wholly  neglected  as- 
pect of  women's  employment." 

The  text  submitted  to  the  Conference,  she 
said,  "will,  we  believe,  provide  a  useful  guide 
for  policies  and  services  that  will  facilitate 
the  constructive  development  and  utilization 
of  woman-power  in  the  member  countries  of 
the  ILO. 

"Since  occupational  competence  is  the  key 
to  effective  participation  in  the  labour  force, 
we  attach  much  importance  to  those  pro- 
visions of  the  instrument  that  underline  the 
need  for  appropriate  counselling,  education 
and  training  for  women  who  are  entering  or 
re-entering  the  employment  market  in  middle 
life,  and  the  importance  of  a  realistic  ap- 
proach to  the  vocational  future  of  the  girls 
still  in  school,"  she  said. 

"We  welcome  the  emphasis  on  public  in- 
formation and  education,  based  upon  reliable 
research  into  essential  aspects  of  women's 
employment.  This  type  of  work  is  a  major 
preoccupation  of  the  Women's  Bureau  of  our 
Federal  Department  of  Labour,"  Miss  Royce 
told  the  Conference. 

With  respect  to  the  development  of  child- 
care  services  and  facilities,  the  speaker  con- 
tinued, "We  should  greatly  have  preferred 
a  wording  of  the  text  that  would  have  given 
the  competent  authorities  freedom  to  choose 
themselves  between  the  organizing  of  appro- 
priate services  and  the  alternative  of  facili- 
tating and  encouraging  their  establishment. 

"We  have,  however,  a  more  significant — 
from  our  point  of  view — reservation  with  re- 
spect to  the  proposed  Recommendation  that 
results  from  the  omission  of  any  reference 
to  part-time  work. 

"The  recent  increase  in  the  employment 
of  women  in  Canada,  as  in  a  number  of 
other  industrialized  countries,  has  been  ac- 
companied by  an  exceptional  increase  in  the 


THE  LABOUR   GAZETTE      •      AUGUST    7965 


723 


number  of  part-time  workers.  This  we  find 
not  surprising,  since  schedules  of  hours  en- 
able women  with  family  responsibilities, 
who  would  be  unavailable  for  full-time  work, 
to  enter  the  labour  force." 

Continuing,  she  said:  "We  fully  realize 
that  the  subject  of  part-time  work  presents 
special  problems  from  the  point  of  view  both 
of  employers  and  workers  and  that  at  the 
present  time  it  may  be  relevant  to  the  em- 
ployment situation  in  most  or  even  perhaps 
all  of  the  developing  countries." 

"Moreover,  we  recognize  that  part-time 
employment  may  be  of  interest  to  other 
workers  besides  those  under  consideration  in 
this  instrument — for  instance,  older  people, 
students  and  handicapped  persons. 

"Nevertheless,  since  experience  has  proven 
that  it  may  hold  particular  advantages  in 
relation  to  the  employment  of  women  with 
family  responsibilities,  it  is  with  some  reluc- 
tance that  we  bow  to  the  majority  decision 
of  the  Committee  on  Women  Workers  that 
reference  to  the  subject  should  be  omitted 
from  this  instrument. 


"Our  chief  concern  is  that  since  the  phe- 
nomenon exists  and  tends  to  increase,  recog- 
nition should  be  given  to  the  need  to  ensure 
that  the  terms  of  conditions  of  part-time 
employment  be  such  as  to  safeguard  the 
position  of  both  full-time  and  part-time 
workers." 

It  was  noted  with  satisfaction,  she  said, 
that  the  whole  subject  of  part-time  employ- 
ment is  to  receive  further  consideration,  in 
line  with  the  resolution  adopted  by  the  Con- 
ference last  year.  It  was  also  hoped  that 
the  review  of  the  effects  of  the  Recommen- 
dation 10  years  hence  "may  help  to  clarify 
aspects  of  this  question,  as  of  others  and  have 
particular  relevance  to  working  women  with 
family    responsibilities." 

Because  of  the  dynamic  nature  of  the  de- 
velopment of  women's  work  in  a  continually 
changing  world,  "we  support  wholeheartedly 
the  proposal  for  periodic  review  of  the  effects 
of  the   Recommendation,"  she  concluded. 


PREPARATION   OF   NEW   INTERNATIONAL   LABOUR  STANDARDS 


The  Conference  first  examined  the  role  of 
co-operatives  in  the  economic  and  social  de- 
velopment of  developing  countries,  with  a 
view  to  the  preparation  of  new  international 
labour  standards. 

The  conclusions  adopted  by  the  Confer- 
ence will  serve  as  the  basis  for  prepara- 
tion, after  consultations  with  governments, 
of  a  draft  instrument  to  be  submitted  to 
next  year's  session  of  the  conference  for 
final  decision. 

The   Role   of   Co-operatives 

The  Conference  adopted  conclusions  to 
serve  as  the  basis  of  a  proposed  Recom- 
mendation concerning  the  role  of  co-opera- 
tives in  the  economic  and  social  development 
of  developing  countries. 

The  Conclusions  of  the  Committee  em- 
phasize that  the  establishment  and  growth 
of  co-operatives  should  be  regarded  as  one 
cf  the  important  instruments  for  economic, 
social  and  cultural  development  as  well  as 
for  human  advancement  in  developing  coun- 
tries. 

In  particular,  the  conclusions  stress  that 
co-operatives  should  be  established  and  de- 
veloped as  a  means  of: 

— improving  the  economic,  social  and  cul- 
tural situation  of  persons  of  limited  re- 
sources and  opportunities; 

— increasing  personal  and  national  capital 
resources  by  the  encouragement  of  thrift 
and  the  sound  use  of  credit; 


— increasing  national  income,  export  reve- 
nues and  employment  by  a  fuller  utili- 
zation of  resources; 

— improving  social  conditions  and  supple- 
menting  social   services;   and 

— helping  to  raise  the  level  of  general  and 
technical  knowledge  of  their  members. 

Resolution  on  Agrarian  Reform 

The  question  of  agrarian  reform,  with 
particular  reference  to  its  employment  and 
social  aspects,  was  discussed  in  detail  by  a 
special  Committee  appointed  by  the  Con- 
ference. On  the  report  of  the  Committee,  the 
Conference  unanimously  adopted  a  resolution 
containing  a  wide  range  of  objectives  in  the 
field  of  agrarian  reform,  with  particular  ref- 
erence to  employment  and  social  aspects  and 
measures  to  achieve  them. 

The  text  states  that  agrarian  reform  should 
be  considered  as  denoting  comprehensive 
measures  for  the  improvement  of  the  agra- 
rian structure,  including  changes  in  land 
tenure — reforms  that,  within  the  framework 
of  broad  programs,  tend  to  give  land  to  those 
who  work  it,  improve  the  position  of  tenants, 
hired  workers  and  other  categories  of  agricul- 
tural workers,  or  enlarge  the  units  of  culti- 
vation or  operation  and  consolidate  frag- 
mented holdings. 

It  also  includes  the  establishment  or 
strengthening  of  essential  governmental  or 
other  agencies  or  services  relating  to  agricul- 
tural credit,  supply,  marketing,  training  and 
extension,  and  research. 


724 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      AUGUST   7965 


The  resolution  suggests  that  the  ILO 
should  increase  its  activities  in  matters  related 
to  agrarian  reform  as  regards  study  and 
research,  technical  co-operation,  and  stand- 
ard-setting in  appropriate  collaboration  with 
other  agencies  concerned,  especially  the 
United  Nations  and  the  Food  and  Agricul- 
ture Organization. 

Application  of  Conventions  and 
Recommendations 

The  Conference  adopted  the  report  of  the 
tripartite   Committee  which   it   sets  up  each 


year  to  consider  how  member  States  apply 
Conventions  they  have  ratified  and  how  they 
comply  with  other  obligations  under  the  ILO 
Constitution. 

The  Committee  noted  that  there  had  been 
a  further  increase  in  the  number  of  ratifica- 
tions since  last  year,  so  that  these  now  ex- 
ceeded 3,000.  Recalling  its  previous  appeals 
for  the  ratification  and  application  of  the 
Conventions  dealing  with  fundamental  human 
rights,  however,  the  Committee  found  that 
many  States  had  not  yet  responded  to  these 
appeals. 


Text   of    Convention    Concerning   Minimum   Age   for   Admission   to    Employment 

Underground  in  Mines 


The  General  Conference  of  the  International 
Labour  Organization, 

Having  been  convened  at  Geneva  by  the 
Governing  Body  of  the  International  La- 
bour Office,  and  having  met  in  its  Forty- 
ninth  Session  on  2  June   1965,  and 

Having  decided  upon  the  adoption  of  certain 
proposals  with  regard  to  minimum  age  for 
admission  to  employment  underground  in 
mines,  which  is  included  in  the  fourth  item 
on  the  agenda  of  the  session,  and 

Noting,  that  the  Underground  Work  (Women) 
Convention,  1935,  prohibits  in  principle  the 
employment  of  any  female,  whatever  her  age, 
on  underground  work  in  any  mine,  and 

Noting  that  the  Minimum  Age  (Industry) 
Convention  (Revised),  1937,  which  is  ap- 
plicable to  mines,  provides  that  children 
under  the  age  of  15  years  shall  not  be 
employed  or  work  in  any  public  or  private 
undertaking,  or  in  any  branch  thereof,  and 

Noting  that  the  Convention  further  specifies 
that,  in  respect  of  employments  which  by 
their  nature  or  the  circumstances  in  which 
they  are  carried  on,  are  dangerous  to  the 
life,  health  or  morals  of  the  persons  em- 
ployed therein,  national  laws  shall  either 
prescribe  or  empower  an  appropriate  author- 
ity to  prescribe  a  higher  age  or  ages  than 
15  years  for  the  admission  thereto  of  young 
persons  or  adolescents,  and 

Considering  that,  in  view  of  the  nature  of 
employment  underground  in  mines,  interna- 
tional standards  establishing  a  higher  age 
than  15  years  for  admission  to  such  em- 
ployment are  desirable,  and 

Having  determined  that  these  standards  shall 
take  the  form  of  an  international  Conven- 
tion, 

adopts  this  22nd  day  of  June  of  the  year  one 
thousand  nine  hundred  and  sixty-five  the  fol- 
lowing Convention,  which  may  be  cited  as  the 
Minimum  Age  (Underground  Work)  Conven- 
tion,   1965: 

Article    1 

1.  For  the  purpose  of  this  Convention,  the 
term  "mine"  means  any  undertaking,  whether 
public  or  private,  for  the  extraction  of  any 
Substance  from  under  the  surface  of  the  earth 
by  means  involving  the  employment  of  persons 
underground. 


2.  The  provisions  of  this  Convention  concern- 
ing employment  or  work  underground  in  mines 
include  employment  or  work  underground  in 
quarries. 

Article  2 

1.  Persons  under  a  specified  minimum  age 
shall  not  be  employed  or  work  underground 
in  mines. 

2.  Each  Member  which  ratifies  this  Convention 
shall  specify  the  minimum  age  in  a  declaration 
appended  to  its  ratification. 

3.  The  minimum  age  shall  in  no  case  be  less 
than  16  years. 

Article  3 
Each  Member  which  has  ratified  this  Conven- 
tion may  subsequently  notify  the  Director-Gen- 
eral of  the  International  Labour  Office,  by  a 
further  declaration,  that  it  specifies  a  minimum 
age  higher  than  that  specified  at  the  time  of 
ratification. 

Article  4 

1.  All  necessary  measures,  including  the  pro- 
vision of  appropriate  penalties,  shall  be  taken 
by  the  competent  authority  to  ensure  the  effec- 
tive enforcement  of  the  provisions  of  this  Con- 
vention. 

2.  Each  Member  which  ratifies  this  Conven- 
tion undertakes  either  to  maintain  an  appropriate 
inspection  service  for  the  purpose  of  super- 
vising the  application  of  the  provisions  of  the 
Convention  or  to  satisfy  itself  that  appropriate 
inspection  is  carried  out. 

3.  National  laws  or  regulations  shall  define  the 
persons  responsible  for  compliance  with  the 
provisions  of  this   Convention. 

4.  The  employer  shall  keep,  and  make  avail- 
able to  inspectors,  records  indicating,  in  respect 
of  persons  who  are  employed  or  work  under- 
ground and  who  are  less  than  two  years  older 
than  the  specified  minimum  age — 

(a)  the  date  of  birth,  duly  certified  wherever 
possible;   and 

(b)  the  date  at  which  the  person  was  employed 
or  worked  underground  in  the  undertaking 
for  the  first  time. 

5.  The  employer  shall  make  available  to  the 
workers'  representatives,  at  their  request,  lists 
of  the  persons  who  are  employed  or  work  under- 
ground and  who  are  less  than  two  years  older 
than  the  specified  minimum  ace;  such  lists  shall 
contain   the   dates  of   birth   of  such  persons  and 


THE  LABOUR   GAZETTE 

91939—4 


AUGUST    7965 


725 


the  dates  .it  which  they  were  employed  or 
worked  underground  in  the  undertaking  for  the 
first  time. 

Article  5 
I  he  determination  Of  the  minimum  age  to  be 
specified  in  pursuance  of  Articles  2  and  3  of 
this  Convention  Shall  be  made  after  consultation 
with  the  most  representative  organizations  of 
employers   and   workers  concerned. 

Article  6 
The    formal    ratifications    of    this    Convention 
shall   be   communicated   to  the  Director-General 
of    the    International    Labour    Office    for    regis- 
tration. 

Article  7 

1.  This  Convention  shall  be  binding  only  upon 
those  Members  of  the  International  Labour  Or- 
ganization whose  ratifications  have  been  regis- 
tered with  the  Director-General. 

2.  It  shall  come  into  force  twelve  months 
after  the  date  on  which  the  ratifications  of  two 
Members  have  been  registered  with  the  Director- 
General. 

3.  Thereafter,  this  Convention  shall  come  into 
force  for  any  Member  twelve  months  after  the 
date  on  which  its  ratification  has  been  registered. 

Article  8 

1.  A  Member  which  has  ratified  this  Conven- 
tion may  denounce  it  after  the  expiration  of  ten 
yean  from  the  date  on  which  the  Convention 
first  comes  into  force,  by  an  act  communicated 
to  the  Director-General  of  the  International 
Labour  Office  for  registration.  Such  denunciation 
shall  not  take  effect  until  one  year  after  the 
date  on  which  it  is  registered. 

2.  Each  Member  which  has  ratified  this  Con- 
vention  and  which  does  not,  within  the  year 
following  the  expiration  of  the  period  of  ten 
years  mentioned  in  the  preceding  paragraph, 
exercise  the  right  of  denunciation  provided  for 
in  this  Article,  will  be  bound  for  another  period 
of  ten  years  and,  thereafter,  may  denounce  this 
Convention  at  the  expiration  of  each  period  of 
ten  years  under  the  terms  provided  for  in  this 
Article. 

Article  9 
1.  The    Director-General    of  the    International 
Labour   Office   shall   notify   all   Members  of  the 
International    Labour   Organization   of  the   regis- 


tration of  all  ratifications  and  denunciations 
communicated  to  him  by  the  Members  of  the 
Organization. 

2.  When  notifying  the  Members  of  the  Organ- 
ization of  the  registration  of  the  second  ratifica- 
tion communicated  to  him,  the  Director-General 
shall  draw  the  attention  of  the  Members  of  the 
Organization  to  the  date  upon  which  the  Con- 
vention will  come  into  force. 

Article  10 
The  Director-General  of  the  International  La- 
bour Office  shall  communicate  to  the  Secretary- 
General  of  the  United  Nations  for  registration 
in  accordance  with  Article  102  of  the  Charter  of 
the  United  Nations  full  particulars  of  all  ratifi- 
cations and  acts  of  denunciation  registered  by 
him  in  accordance  with  the  provisions  of  the 
preceding   Articles. 

Article  11 
At  such  times  as  it  may  consider  necessary 
the  Governing  Body  of  the  International  Labour 
Office  shall  present  to  the  General  Conference 
a  report  on  the  working  of  this  Convention  and 
shall  examine  the  desirability  of  placing  on  the 
agenda  of  the  Conference  the  question  of  its 
revision  in  whole  or  in  part. 

Article  12 

1.  Should  the  Conference  adopt  a  new  Con- 
vention revising  this  Convention  in  whole  or  in 
part,  then,  unless  the  new  Convention  otherwise 
provides, 

(a)  the  ratification  by  a  Member  of  the  new 
revising  Convention  shall  ipso  jure  involve 
the  immediate  denunciation  of  this  Conven- 
tion, notwithstanding  the  provisions  of 
Article  8  above,  if  and  when  the  new 
revising  Convention  shall  have  come  into 
force; 

(b)  as  from  the  date  when  the  new  revising 
Convention  comes  into  force  this  Conven- 
tion shall  cease  to  be  open  to  ratification 
by  the  Members. 

2.  This  Convention  shall  in  any  case  remain 
in  force  in  its  actual  form  and  content  for  those 
Members  which  have  ratified  it  but  have  not 
ratified  the  revising  Convention. 

Article  13 
The  English  and  French  versions  of  the  text 
of  this  Convention  are  equally  authoritative. 


Text  of  Recommendation  Concerning  Minimum  Age  for  Admission  to  Employment 

Underground  in  Mines 


The  General  Conference  of  the  International 
I  sbour  Organization, 

Having  been  convened  at  Geneva  by  the  Gov- 
erning Body  of  the  International  Labour 
( mice,  and  having  met  in  its  Forty-ninth 
Session  on  2  June  1965,  and 

Having  adopted  the  Minimum  Age  (Under- 
ground Work)    Convention,   1965   and 

Having  decided  upon  the  adoption  of  certain 
further  proposals  with  regard  to  the  mini- 
mum age  for  admission  to  employment 
Underground  in  mines,  which  is  included  in 
the  fourth  iiem  on  the  agenda  of  the  ses- 
sion,  and 


Having  determined  that  these  proposals  shall 
take  the  form  of  a  Recommendation, 
adopts  this  22nd  day  of  June  of  the  year  one 
thousand  nine  hundred  and  sixty-five  the  fol- 
lowing Recommendation,  which  may  be  cited 
as  the  Minimum  Age  (Underground  Work) 
Recommendation,   1965: 

1.  (1)  For  the  purpose  of  this  Recommenda- 
tion, the  term  "mine"  means  any  undertaking, 
whether  public  or  private,  for  the  extraction  of 
any  substance  from  under  the  surface  of  the 
earth  by  means  involving  the  employment  of 
persons  underground. 


726 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      AUGUST    7965 


(2)  The  provisions  of  this  Recommendation 
concerning  employment  or  work  underground 
in  mines  include  employment  or  work  undcr- 
i'numd   in   quarries. 

2.  Where  the  minimum  age  for  admission  to 
employment  or  work  underground  in  mines  is 
loss  than  16  years,  measures  should  be  taken 
as  speedily  as  possible  to  raise  it  to  that  level. 

3.  (1)  The  minimum  age  for  admission  to 
employment  for  work  underground  in  mines 
should  be  progressively  raised,  with  a  view  to 
Attaining  a  minimum  age  of  18  years. 

(2)  Each  Member  should  work  towards  the 
objective  set  forth  in  subparagraph  (1)  of  this 
Paragraph  within  the  limits  of  its  possibilities, 
taking  into  account  especially  the  dangers  in- 
herent in  employment  underground  in  mines, 
and  also  the  development  of  educational  facili- 
ties, including  those  for  the  vocational  prepara- 
tion of  future  miners,  the  minimum  school- 
leaving  age,  the  minimum  age  for  admission  to 
other  industrial  occupations  and  other  relevant 
factors. 

4.  Persons  between  the  age  specified  for  the 
purpose  of  the  Minimum  Age  (Underground 
Work)  Convention,  1965,  and  a  higher  age  to 
be  laid  down  in  each  country  and  not  to  be 
less  than  18  years  should  be  employed  or  work 
underground    in   mines   only — 

(a)  for  purposes  of  apprenticeship  or  other 
systematic  vocational  training  provided  under 
adequate  supervision  by  competent  persons 
with  technical  knowledge  and  practical  ex- 
perience of  the  work;  and 

(b)  under  conditions  determined  by  the  compe- 
tent authority  relating  to  the  places  of 
work  and  occupations  permitted  and  the 
measures  of  systematic  medical  and  safety 
supervision  to  be  applied: 

Provided  that  if  a  young  person  to  whom  this 
Paragraph  applies  has  completed  apprenticeship 
or  other  systematic  vocational  training,  he  may, 


Under  the  conditions  provided   for  in  clause   (b), 

be   employed    underground   for   purpose!   other 

than   such   training. 

5.  (1)  There  should  be  special  provisions  con- 
cerning the  minimum  age  for  employment  or 
work   underground  in  mines — 

(a)  on  certain  specified  jobs  which  are  harmful 
to  health; 

(b)  under  certain  specified  conditions  which  are 
harmful   to  health;   and 

(c)  on  certain  specified  jobs  which  may  en- 
danger the  safety  of  the  worker  and  that 
of   other   persons. 

(2)  The  competent  authority  in  each  country 
should  determine  the  jobs  and  conditions  in 
question  and  should  specify  a  sufficiently  high 
minimum  age  appropriate  to  each  which  in  no 
case  should  be  less  than  18  years. 

6.  (1)  Measures  should  be  taken  to  meet  the 
problems  of  persons  who  wish  to  work  in  mines 
but  are  too  young  for  employment  or  work 
underground  because  the  minimum  age  for  ad- 
mission to  such  employment  or  work  is  higher 
than  the  minimum  school-leaving  age.  These 
measures  should  be  related  to  or  integrated  with 
measures  to  educate,  train  and  utilize  all  youth 
in  the  country. 

(2)  The  measures  to  be  taken  in  accordance 
with  subparagraph  (1)  of  this  Paragraph  might 
include  one  or  more  of  the  following: 

(a)  employment  in  surface  work  with  appropriate 
training; 

(b)  vocational  training  on  the  surface  designed 
to  prepare  the  persons  concerned  for  their 
future   occupations; 

(c)  further  education   and   vocational   guidance; 

(d)  raising   the   minimum    school-leaving   age. 

7.  The  competent  authority  in  each  country 
should  consult  the  most  representative  organiza- 
tions of  employers  and  workers  concerned  be- 
fore determining  general  policies  of  implementa- 
tion and  before  adopting  regulations  in  pursuance 
of  the  terms  of  this  Recommendation. 


Text  of  Convention  Concerning  Medical  Examination  of  Young  Persons  for  Fitness  for 
Employment  Underground  in  Mines 


The  General  Conference  of  the  International 
Labour  Organization, 

Having  been  convened  at  Geneva  by  the  Gov- 
erning Body  of  the  International  Labour 
Office,  and  having  met  in  its  Forty-ninth 
Session  on  2  June  1965,  and 

Having  decided  upon  the  adoption  of  certain 
proposals  with  regard  to  medical  examina- 
tion of  young  persons  for  fitness  for  em- 
ployment underground  in  mines,  which  is 
included  in  the  fourth  item  on  the  agenda 
of  the  session,   and 

Noting  that  the  Medical  Examination  of 
Young  Persons  (Industry)  Convention,  1946, 
which  is  applicable  to  mines,  provides  that 
children  and  young  persons  under  18  years 
of  age  shall  not  be  admitted  to  employment 
by  an  industrial  undertaking  unless  they 
have  been  found  fit  for  the  work  on  which 
they  are  to  be  employed  by  a  thorough 
medical  examination,  that  the  continued  em- 
ployment of  a  child  or  young  person  under 
18  years  of  age  shall  be  subject  to  the 
repetition  of  a  medical  examination  at  inter- 
vals of  not  more  than   one  year,   and   that 


national  laws  or  regulations  shall  make 
provision  concerning  additional  re-examina- 
tions, and 

Noting  that  the  Convention  further  provides 
that  in  occupations  which  involve  high 
health  risks  medical  examination  and  re- 
examinations for  fitness  for  employment 
shall  be  required  until  at  least  the  age  of 
21  years,  and  that  national  laws  or  regula- 
tions shall  either  specify  or  empower  an 
appropriate  authority  to  specify  the  occu- 
pations or  categories  of  occupations  to 
which  this  requirement  applies,  and 

Considering  that,  in  view  of  the  health  risks 
inherent  in  employment  underground  in 
mines,  international  standards  requiring 
medical  examination  and  periodic  re-exami- 
nation for  fitness  for  employment  under- 
ground in  mines  until  the  age  of  21  years, 
and  specifying  the  nature  of  these  examina- 
tions,  are   desirable,   and 

Having  determined  that  these  standards  shall 
take  the  form  of  an  international  Conven- 
tion, 


THE   LABOUR   GAZETTE 

91939— 4£ 


AUGUST    7965 


727 


adopts  this  23rd  day  of  June  of  the  year  one 
thousand  nine  hundred  and  sixty-five  the  fol- 
low ing  Convention,  which  may  be  cited  as  the 
Medical  Examination  of  Young  Persons  (Under- 
ground  Work)    Convention,    1965: 

Article    1 

1.  For  the  purpose  of  this  Convention,  the 
term  "mine*"  means  any  undertaking,  whether 
public  or  private,  for  the  extraction  of  any  sub- 
stance from  under  the  surface  of  the  earth  by 
means  involving  the  employment  of  persons 
underground. 

2.  I  he  provisions  of  this  Convention  concern- 
ing employment  or  work  underground  in  mines 
include  employment  or  work  underground  in 
quarries. 

Article  2 

1.  A  thorough  medical  examination,  and  peri- 
odic re-examinations  at  intervals  of  not  more 
than  one  year,  for  fitness  for  employment  shall 
be  required  for  the  employment  or  work  under- 
ground in  mines  of  persons  under  21  years  of 
age. 

2.  Alternative  arrangements  for  medical  super- 
vision of  young  persons  aged  between  18  and 
21  years  shall  be  permitted  where  the  competent 
authority  is  satisfied  on  medical  advice  that  such 
arrangements  are  equivalent  to  or  more  effective 
than  those  required  under  paragraph  1  of  this 
Article  and  has  consulted  and  reached  agree- 
ment with  the  most  representative  organzations 
of  employers  and  workers  concerned. 

Article  3 

1.  The  medical  examinations  provided  for  in 
Article  2 — 

(a)  shall  be  carried  out  under  the  responsibility 
and  supervision  of  a  qualified  physician  ap- 
proved by  the  competent  authority;  and 

(b)  shall  be  certified  in  an  appropriate  manner. 

2.  An  X-ray  film- of  the  lungs  shall  be  required 
on  the  occasion  of  the  initial  medical  examina- 
tion and,  when  regarded  as  medically  necessary, 
on   the   occasion   of  subsequent   re-examinations. 

3.  The  medical  examinations  required  by  this 
Convention  shall  not  involve  the  young  person, 
or  his  parents  or  guardians,   in   any  expense. 

Article  4 

1.  All  necessary  measures,  including  the  pro- 
vision of  appropriate  penalties,  shall  be  taken 
by  the  competent  authority  to  ensure  the  effec- 
tive enforcement  of  the  provisions  of  this  Con- 
vention. 

2.  Each  Member  which  ratifies  this  Convention 
undertakes  either  to  maintain  an  appropriate 
inspection  service  for  the  purpose  of  supervising 
the  application  of  the  provisions  of  this  Con- 
vention or  to  satisfy  itself  that  appropriate  in- 
spection is  carried  out. 

3.  National  laws  or  regulations  shall  define  the 
persons  responsibje  for  compliance  with  the 
provisions   of  this   Convention. 

4.  The  employer  shall  keep,  and  make  avail- 
able to  inspectors,  records  containing,  in  respect 
of  persons  under  21  years  of  age  who  are  em- 
ployed or  work  underground — 

(a)  the  date  of  birth,  duly  certified  wherever 
possible; 

(b)  an  indication  of  the  nature  of  their  occupa- 
tion; and 


(c)   a  certificate  which  attests  fitness  for  employ- 
ment but  does  not  contain  medical  data. 

5.  The  employer  shall  make  available  to  the 
workers'  representatives,  at  their  request,  the 
information  mentioned  in  paragraph  4  of  this 
Article. 

Article  5 

The  competent  authority  in  each  country  shall 
consult  the  most  representative  organizations  of 
employers  and  workers  concerned  before  deter- 
mining general  policies  of  implementation  and 
before  adopting  regulations  in  pursuance  of  the 
terms  of  this  Convention. 

Article  6 
The    formal    ratifications    of    this    Convention 
shall  be  communicated  to  the  Director-General 
of  the  International  Labour  Office  for  registra- 
tion. 

Article  7 

1.  This  Convention  shall  be  binding  only  upon 
those  Members  of  the  International  Labour  Or- 
ganization whose  ratifications  have  been  regis- 
tered with  the  Director-General. 

2.  It  shall  come  into  force  12  months  after 
the  date  on  which  the  ratifications  of  two  Mem- 
bers have  been  registered  with  the  Director- 
General. 

3.  Thereafter,  this  Convention  shall  come  into 
force  for  any  Member  12  months  after  the  date 
on   which   its  ratification  has  been  registered. 

Article  8 

1.  A  Member  which  has  ratified  this  Conven- 
tion may  denounce  it  after  the  expiration  of 
ten  years  from  the  date  on  which  the  Conven- 
tion first  comes  into  force,  by  an  act  communi- 
cated to  the  Director-General  of  the  International 
Labour  Office  for  registration.  Such  denuncia- 
tion shall  not  take  effect  until  one  year  after 
the   date   on   which   it  is  registered. 

2.  Each  Member  which  has  ratified  this  Con- 
vention and  which  does  not,  within  the  year 
following  the  expiration  of  the  period  of  ten 
years  mentioned  in  the  preceding  paragraph, 
exercise  the  right  of  denunciation  provided  for 
in  this  Article,  will  be  bound  for  another  period 
of  ten  years  and,  thereafter,  may  denounce  this 
Convention  at  the  expiration  of  each  period  of 
ten  years  under  the  terms  provided  for  in  this 
Article. 

Article  9 
1.  The  Director-General  of  the  International 
Labour  Office  shall  notify  all  Members  of  the 
International  Labour  Organization  of  the  regis- 
tration of  all  ratifications  and  denunciations 
communicated  to  him  by  the  Members  of  the 
Organization. 

2.  When  notifying  the  Members  of  the  Or- 
ganization of  the  registration  of  the  second 
ratification  communicated  to  him,  the  Director- 
General  shall  draw  the  attention  of  the  Members 
of  the  Organization  to  the  date  upon  which  the 
Convention  will  come  into  force. 

Article  10 
The  Director-General  of  the  International  La- 
bour Office  shall  communicate  to  the  Secretary- 
General  of  the  United  Nations  for  registration 
in  accordance  with  Article  102  of  the  Charter  of 
the  United  Nations  full  particulars  of  all  ratifica- 
tions and  acts  of  denunciation  registered  by  him 


728 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      AUGUST   7965 


in    accordance    with    the    provisions    of    the    pre- 
ceding Articles. 

Article  11 
At  such  times  as  it  may  consider  necessary 
the  Governing  Body  of  the  International  Labour 
Office  shall  present  to  the  General  Conference 
a  report  on  the  working  of  this  Convention  and 
shall  examine  the  desirability  of  placing  on  the 
agenda  of  the  Conference  the  question  of  its 
revision  in  whole  or  in  part. 

Article  12 

1.  Should  the  Conference  adopt  a  new  Con- 
vention revising  this  Convention  in  whole  or  in 
part,  then,  unless  the  new  Convention  otherwise 
provides, 

(a)  the    ratification   by   a   Member   of   the   new 
revising  Convention  shall   ipso  jure  involve 


the  immediate  denunciation  of  this  Conven- 
tion, notwithstanding  the  provisions  of 
Article  8  above,  if  and  when  the  new  re- 
vising Convention  shall  have  come  into 
force; 

( h )   as    from    the    date    when    the    new    revising 

Convention  comes  into  force  this  Convention 

shall    cease    to    be    open    to    ratification    by 

the  Members. 

2.  This  Convention  shall  in  any  case  remain  in 

force  in  its  actual  form  and   content  for  those 

Members   which    have    ratified    it   but    have   not 

ratified   the   revising   Convention. 

Article  13 
The  English  and   French  versions  of  the  text 
of   this   Convention   are   equally    authoritative. 


Text  of  Recommendation   Concerning  Conditions  of  Employment  of  Young  Persons 

Underground  in  Mines 


The  General  Conference  of  the  International 
Labour  Organization, 

Having  been  convened  at  Geneva  by  the  Gov- 
erning Body  of  the  International  Labour 
Office,  and  having  met  in  its  Forty-ninth 
Session  on  2  June  1965,  and 
Noting  the  terms  of  existing  international 
labour  Conventions  and  Recommendations, 
applicable  to  mines,  which  contain  pro- 
visions on  conditions  of  employment  of 
young  persons,  and 
Considering     that     additional     standards     are 

called  for  in  certain  respects,  and 
Having  decided  upon  the  adoption  of  certain 
proposals    regarding   the   conditions   of   em- 
ployment of  young  persons  underground  in 
mines,  which  is  included  in  the  fourth  item 
on  the  agenda  of  the  session,  and 
Having  determined   that  these  proposals  shall 
take  the  form  of  a  Recommendation, 
adopts  this  23rd  day  of  June  of  the  year  one 
thousand    nine    hundred    and    sixty-five    the    fol- 
lowing Recommendation,  which  may  be  cited  as 
the   Conditions  of  Employment   of  Young   Per- 
sons    (Underground     Work)     Recommendation, 
1965. 

I.   DEFINITION 

1.  (1)  For  the  purpose  of  this  Recommenda- 
tion, the  term  "mine"  means  any  undertaking, 
whether  public  or  private,  for  the  extraction  of 
any  substance  from  under  the  surface  of  the 
earth  by  involving  the  employment  of  persons 
underground. 

(2)  The  provisions  of  this  Recommendation 
concerning  employment  or  work  underground 
in  mines  include  employment  or  work  under- 
ground in  quarries. 

II.  METHODS  OF  IMPLEMENTATION 

2.  Effect  may  be  given  to  this  Recommenda- 
tion through  national  laws  or  regulations,  col- 
lective agreements,  arbitration  awards,  or  court 
decisions  or  in  such  other  manner  consistent 
with  national  practice  as  may  be  appropriate 
under    national    conditions. 

III.  HEALTH,  SAFETY  AND  WELFARE 

3.  Training  programs  for  young  persons  em- 
ployed or  to  be  employed  underground  in  mines 


should  include  practical  and  theoretical  instruc- 
tion in  the  health  and  safety  hazards  to  which 
workers  in  mines  are  exposed,  in  hygiene  and 
first  aid,  and  in  the  precautions  to  be  taken  to 
safeguard  health  and  safety.  Such  instruction 
should  be  provided  by  persons  who  are  qualified 
in  these  fields. 

4.  The  employer  should  be  required  to  in- 
form a  young  person,  both  when  engaging  him 
and  when  giving  him  a  specific  job  underground, 
of  the  risks  of  accident  and  hazards  to  health 
involved  in  the  work,  of  protective  measures 
and  equipment,  of  regulations  regarding  safety, 
and  of  first-aid  methods.  The  directions  should 
be   repeated    at   appropriate   intervals. 

5.  (1)  Officials  in  charge  of  safety,  safety 
delegates,  safety  and  health  committees  and  all 
other  internal  bodies  concerned  with  safety  and 
health,  as  well  as  the  national  inspection  serv- 
ice, should  give  particular  attention  to  measures 
designed  to  safeguard  the  life  and  health  of 
young  persons  employed  or  working  under- 
ground  in  mines. 

(2)  Such  measures  should  include  provision 
for  the  development  of  a  practical  safety  pro- 
gram for  each  mine  including — 

(a)  action  to  ensure  prevention  and  correction 
of  hazardous  environmental  and  physical 
conditions; 

(b)  appropriate  means  and  facilities  for  training, 
inspection  and  accident  investigation  and 
prevention; 

(c)  the  initial  supply  and  replacement  after  nor- 
mal wear  and  tear,  at  the  employers'  expense, 
of  such  protective  clothing  and  equipment 
as  are  necessary  in  view  of  the  nature  of 
the  work  and  the  conditions  in  which  it 
is  performed,  the  young  persons  being  re- 
quired to  use  the  clothing  and  equipment 
supplied;  and 

(d)  any  other  measures  for  the  safety  and  health 
of  young  persons. 

6.  With  a  view  to  keeping  young  persons 
employed  or  working  underground  in  mines  in 
good  health  and  to  promoting  their  normal 
physical  development,  measures  should  be  taken 
which  aim,  in  particular,   at — 


THE  LABOUR   GAZETTE      •      AUGUST    7965 


729 


{m)  encouraging  recreational  activities,  includ- 
ing sports; 

i  b  >  ensuring  that  changing-rooms  and  showers 
meeting  approved  hygiene  standards  are 
made  available,  changing-rooms  and  showers 
separate  from  those  for  adults  being,  where 
possible,  reserved  for  persons  under  18 
years  of  age;  and 

(c)  ensuring  that,  if  circumstances  so  require, 
young  persons  have  at  their  disposal  such 
additional  food  and  such  feeding  facilities 
as  would  enable  them  to  secure  a  diet  suit- 
able to  their  stage  of  development. 
IV.  WEEKLY  REST  AND  ANNUAL 
HOLIDAYS    WITH    PAY 

7.  Persons  under  18  years  of  age  employed  or 
working  underground  in  mines  should  be  en- 
titled to  an  uninterrupted  weekly  rest  which 
should  not  be  less  than  36  hours  in  the  course 
of  each  period  of  seven  days. 

8.  The  weekly  rest  period  should  be  pro- 
gressively extended,  with  a  view  to  attaining  at 
least  48  hours. 

9.  The  weekly  rest  period  should  include  the 
day  of  the  week  established  as  a  day  of  rest  by 
the  traditions  or  customs  of  the  country  or 
district. 

10.  Persons  under  18  years  of  age  employed 
or  working  underground  in  mines  should  not 
be  employed  on  any  work  during  the  weekly 
rest   period. 

11.  (1)  Persons  under  18  years  of  age  em- 
ployed or  working  underground  in  mines  should 
receive  an  annual  holiday  with  pay  of  not  less 
than  24  working  days  (corresponding  to  four 
working  weeks)   for  12  months  of  service. 

(2)  Public  and  customary  holidays  and  inter- 
ruptions of  attendance  at  work  due  to  sickness 
should  not  be  included  in  the  annual  holiday 
with  pay. 

12.  (1)  The  employer  should  be  required  to 
keep,  and  make  available  to  inspectors,  records 


indicating  in  respect  of  persons  under  18  years 
of   age   employed    or   working   underground — 
{a)   the    date    of   birth,   duly   certified    wherever 

possible; 
(/;)   the    periods    of   weekly    rest;    and 
(c)   the   periods   of  holidays  with  pay. 

(2)  The  employer  should  make  available  to 
the  workers'  representatives,  at  their  request, 
the  information  mentioned  in  subparagraph  (1) 
of  this  Paragraph. 

V.    TRAINING 

13.  In  line  with  the  principles  set  forth  in 
the  Vocational  Training  Recommendation,  1962, 
the  competent  authorities  should  take  necessary 
measures  to  ensure  that  young  persons  employed 
or   to   be   employed   underground   in   mines — 

(a)  receive  systematic  vocational  training, 
through  apprenticeship  or  other  forms  of 
training  appropriate  in  the  national  circum- 
stances, in  order  to  ensure  adequate  prepara- 
tion for  the  particular  type  of  work  in  which 
they  are  to  be  engaged; 

(b)  enjoy  suitable  opportunities  for  further  tech- 
nical training  enabling  them  to  develop 
their  occupational  capacities  without  detri- 
ment to  their  health  and  welfare,  account 
being  taken  of  national  circumstances;   and 

(c)  are  provided  with  suitable  opportunities  for 
further  education  and  training  above  ground 
with  a  view  to  ensuring  their  future  adapta- 
tion to  technological  change  in  the  mining 
industry  and  to  developing  their  human 
capacities. 

VI.    CONSULTATION 

14.  The  competent  authority  in  each  country 
should  consult  the  most  representative  organiza- 
tions of  employers  and  workers  concerned 
before  determining  general  policies  of  imple- 
mentation and  before  adopting  regulations  in 
pursuance  of  the  terms  of  this  Recommendation. 


Text  of  Recommendation  Concerning  Employment  of  Women  with  Family  Responsibilities 


The  General  Conference  of  the  International 
Labour    Organization, 

Having  been  convened  at  Geneva  by  the  Gov- 
erning Body  of  the  International  Labour 
Office,  and  having  met  in  its  Forty-ninth 
Session   on  2  June   1965,   and 

Noting  the  fact  that  in  many  countries  women 
are  working  outside  their  homes  in  increas- 
ing numbers  as  an  integral  and  essential 
part  of  the  labour  force,  and 

Noting  further  that  many  such  women  have 
special  problems  arising  out  of  the  need  to 
reconcile  their  dual  family  and  work  re- 
sponsibilities, and 

Noting  that  many  of  these  problems,  though 
they  have  particular  relevance  to  the  oppor- 
tunities for  employment  of  women  workers 
with  family  responsibilities,  also  confront 
other  workers  and  can  be  substantially  al- 
leviated by  measures  affecting  all  workers, 
such  as  the  progressive  reduction  of  daily 
and  weekly  hours  of  work,  and 

Noting  further  that  many  of  the  special  prob- 
lems faced  by  women  with  family  respon- 


sibilities are  not  problems  peculiar  to 
women  workers  but  are  problems  of  the 
family  and  of  society  as  a  whole,  and 
Recognizing  that  continuous  social  adaptation 
is  required  to  meet  these  problems  in  a 
manner  consistent  with  the  best  interests  of 
all  concerned,  and 

Aware  of  the  need  for  governments  and  for 
all    public    and    private    organizations    con- 
cerned to  give  consideration  to  these  prob- 
lems in  a  broad  social,  economic  and  legal 
context,  and 
Having  decided  upon  the  adoption  of  certain 
proposals  with  regard  to  the  employment  of 
women    with    family    responsibilities,    which 
is    the    fifth    item    on    the    agenda    of    the 
session,   and 
Having  determined  that  these  proposals  shall 
take  the  form  of  a  Recommendation, 
adopts  this  22nd  day  of  June  of  the  year  one 
thousand   nine   hundred    and    sixty-five   the   fol- 
lowing Recommendation,  which  may  be  cited  as 
the  Employment   (Women  with  Family  Respon- 
sibilities)   Recommendation,   1965: 


730 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE     •      AUGUST   1965 


The  Conference  recommends  that  each  Mem- 
ber should  apply  the  following  provisions  as 
fully  and  as  rapidly  as  national  conditions  allow: 

I.  GENERAL  PRINCIPLE 

1.  The  competent  authorities  should,  in  co- 
operation with  the  public  and  private  organiza- 
tions concerned,  in  particular  employers'  and 
workers'  organizations,  and  in  accordance  with 
national  and  local  needs  and  possibilities — 
(ci)   pursue    an   appropriate   policy   with    a    view 

to  enabling  women  with  family  responsi- 
bilities who  work  outside  their  homes  to 
exercise  their  right  to  do  so  without  being 
subject  to  discrimination  and  in  accordance 
with  the  principles  laid  down  in  the  Dis- 
crimination (Employment  and  Occupation) 
Convention,  1958,  as  well  as  in  other  stand- 
ards relating  to  women  adopted  by  the 
International  Labour  Conference,  and 
(b)  encourage,  facilitate  or  themselves  under- 
take the  development  of  services  to  enable 
women  to  fulfil  their  various  responsibilities 
at    home    and    at    work    harmoniously. 

II.  PUBLIC  INFORMATION  AND 
EDUCATION 

2.  The  competent  authorities  should,  in  co- 
operation with  the  public  and  private  organiza- 
tions concerned,  in  particular  employers'  and 
workers'  organizations,  take  appropriate  steps — 

(a)  to  encourage  such  consideration  of  the  prob- 
lems of  women  workers  with  family  respon- 
sibilities as  may  be  necessary  to  help  these 
workers  to  become  effectively  integrated  in 
the  labour  force  on  the  basis  of  equal 
rights; 

(b)  to  undertake  or  promote  such  research  as 
may  be  necessary  and  feasible  into  the 
various  aspects  of  the  employment  of 
women  workers  with  family  responsibilities 
with  a  view  to  presenting  objective  informa- 
tion on  which  sound  policies  and  measures 
may  be  based;   and 

(c)  to  engender  broader  public  understanding  of 
the  problems  of  these  workers  with  a  view 
to  developing  community  policies  and  a 
climate  of  opinion  conducive  to  helping 
them  to  meet  their  family  and  employment 
responsibilities. 

III.   CHILD-CARE   SERVICES   AND 
FACILITIES 

3.  With  a  view  to  determining  the  scope  and 
character  of  the  child-care  services  and  facilities 
needed  to  assist  women  workers  to  meet  their 
employment  and  family  responsibilities,  the  com- 
petent authorities  should,  in  co-operation  with 
the  public  and  private  organizations  concerned, 
in  particular  employers'  and  workers'  organiza- 
tions, and  within  the  scope  of  their  resources 
for  collecting  information,  take  such  measures 
as  may  be  necessary  and  appropriate — 

(a)  to  collect  and  publish  adequate  statistics 
on  the  number  of  mothers  engaged  in  or 
seeking  employment  and  on  the  number  and 
age  of  their  children;  and 

(b)  to  ascertain,  through  systematic  surveys 
conducted  more  particularly  in  local  com- 
munities, the  needs  and  preferences  for 
child-care  arrangements  organized  outside 
the  family. 


4.  The  competent  authorities  should,  in  co- 
operation with  the  public  and  private  organiza- 
tions concerned,  take  appropriate  steps  to  ensure 
that  child-care  services  and  facilities  meet  the 
needs  and  preferences  so  revealed;  to  this  end 
they  should,  taking  account  of  national  and  local 
circumstances   and    possibilities,    in    particular — 

(a)  encourage  and  facilitate  the  establishment, 
particularly  in  local  communities,  of  plans 
for  the  systematic  development  of  child-care 
services  and  facilities;   and 

(b)  themselves  organize  as  well  as  encourage 
and  facilitate  the  provision  of  adequate  and 
appropriate  child-care  services  and  facilities, 
at  reasonable  charge  or  free  in  case  of  need, 
developed  along  flexible  lines  and  meeting 
the  needs  of  children  of  different  ages  and 
of  their  working  parents. 

5.  With  a  view  to  safeguarding  the  health  and 
welfare  of  the  child — 

(a)  child-care  services  and  facilities  of  all  types 
should  comply  with  standards  laid  down 
and  supervised  by  the  competent  authorities; 

(b)  such  standards  should  prescribe  in  particu- 
lar the  equipment  and  hygienic  require- 
ments of  the  services  and  facilities  provided 
and  the  number  and  qualifications  of  the 
staff;  and 

(c)  the  competent  authorities  should  provide  or 
help  to  ensure  the  provision  of  adequate 
training  at  various  levels  for  the  personnel 
needed  to  staff  child-care  services  and  facili- 
ties. 

6.  The  competent  authorities  should,  with  the 
co-operation  and  participation  of  the  public  and 
private  organizations  concerned,  in  particular 
employers'  and  workers'  organizations,  help  to 
ensure  public  understanding  and  support  for 
efforts  made  to  meet  the  special  needs  of  work- 
ing parents  in  respect  of  child-care  services  and 
facilities. 

IV.   ENTRY  AND  RE-ENTRY  INTO 
EMPLOYMENT 

7.  The  competent  authorities  should  take  all 
measures  in  accordance  with  the  Employment 
Policy  Convention,  1964,  and  the  Employment 
Policy  Recommendation,  1964,  to  enable  women 
with  family  responsibilities  to  become  or  to 
remain  integrated  in  the  labour  force  as  well  as 
to   re-enter   the  labour   force. 

8.  With  a  view  to  enabling  women  with  family 
responsibilities  to  become  integrated  in  the  la- 
bour force  on  a  footing  of  equality,  and  with 
a  view  to  facilitating  their  entry  into  employment 
or  their  re-entry  after  a  comparatively  long 
period  of  absence,  the  competent  authorities 
should,  in  co-operation  with  the  public  and 
private  organizations  concerned,  in  particular 
employers'  and  workers'  organizations,  take  all 
measures  that  may  be  necessary  in  the  national 
circumstances — 

(a)  to  ensure  the  provision  for  girls  of  general 
education,  vocational  guidance  and  voca- 
tional training  free  from  any  form  of  dis- 
crimination  on   the  ground   of  sex; 

(b)  to  encourage  girls  to  obtain  a  sound  voca- 
tional preparation  as  a  basis  for  their  future 
work  lives;  and 

(c)  to  convince  parents  and  educators  of  the 
need  to  give  girls  a  sound  vocational  prep- 
aration. 

(Continued  on  page  757) 


THE  LABOUR   GAZETTE      •      AUGUST    7965 


731 


CERTIFICATION   AND  CONCILIATION 


Certification  and  Other  Proceedings  before 

the  Canada  Labour  Relations  Board 


The  Canada  Labour  Relations  Board  met 
for  six  days  during  June.  The  Board  granted 
eight  applications  for  certification,  ordered 
one  representation  vote,  and  granted  one  re- 
quest under  Section  61(2)  of  the  Act  for 
review  of  an  earlier  decision.  The  Board  also 
rejected  three  applications  for  certification, 
refused  one  application  for  revocation  of 
certification,  and  denied  three  requests  under 
Section  61(2)  of  the  Act  for  review  of 
earlier  decisions.  During  the  month  the  Board 
received  12  applications  for  certification,  one 
request  under  Section  61(2)  of  the  Act  for 
review  of  an  earlier  decision,  and  allowed 
the  withdrawal  of  four  applications  for 
certification. 

Applications  for  Certification  Granted 

1.  The  Brotherhood  of  Railway  and  Steam- 
ship Clerks,  Freight  Handlers,  Express  and 
Station  Employees,  on  behalf  of  a  unit  of 
employees  of  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway 
Company  employed  throughout  Canada  com- 
prising clerical,  non-clerical  and  manual  em- 
ployees in  various  offices  of  the  Company's 
Accounting  Department;  Motive  Power  and 
Rolling  Stock  Department;  Bureau  of  Safety, 
Loss  and  Damage  Prevention;  Purchasing 
and  Stores  Department;  Transportation  Car 
Accounting  Department;  Real  Estate  Depart- 
ment; General  Paymaster's  Office;  Traffic 
Department;  Piggyback  Department;  Mer- 
chandise Services  Department  as  presently 
constituted  on  the  Company's  Prairie  and 
Pacific  Regions  westward  from  the  Lake- 
head;  Sleeping,  Dining  and  Parlour  Car  and 
News  Services  Department;  and  various  offi- 
ces and  work  places  of  the  Operating  Depart- 
ment such  as  freight  offices,  freight  sheds, 
station  and  baggage  staffs,  yard  offices,  wharf 
sheds  and  offices,  ticket  offices,  and  divisional 
superintendents'  offices  (L.G.   1963,  p.  694). 

2.  Transport  Drivers,  Warehousemen  and 
Helpers  Union,  Local  106  of  the  Interna- 
tional Brotherhood  of  Teamsters,  Chauffeurs, 
Warehousemen  and  Helpers  of  America,  on 
behalf  of  a  unit  of  truck  drivers  employed 
by  Transport  Frontenac  Ltee,  Quebec,  Que., 
engaged  in  the  performance  of  the  company's 
contract  with  the  Post  Office  Department 
for  the  pickup  and  delivery  of  Her  Majesty's 
Mail    (T.G.,    May,   p.   424). 


3.  Canadian  Maritime  Union  on  behalf  of 
a  unit  of  unlicensed  employees  employed  by 
Island  Shipping  Limited  aboard  the  M.V. 
Wheat  King  and  S.S.  Northern  Venture  (L.G., 
June,  p.   524). 

4.  Canadian  Union  of  Public  Employees, 
on  behalf  of  a  unit  of  operations  and  main- 
tenance employees  employed  by  The  Hamil- 
ton Harbour  Commissioners  at  the  Port  of 
Hamilton,  Ont.    (L.G.,  June,  p.   524). 

5.  National  Association  of  Broadcast  Em- 
ployees and  Technicians,  on  behalf  of  a  gen- 
eral unit  of  employees  employed  by  CHEK- 
T.V.  Limited  (a  subsidiary  of  the  British 
Columbia  Television  Broadcasting  System 
Ltd.),  Saanich,  B.C.   (L.G.,  June,  p.  524). 

6.  Transportation-Communication  Employ- 
ees Union,  System  Division  No.  7  (formerly 
The  Order  of  Railroad  Telegraphers),  on  be- 
half of  a  unit  of  dispatchers,  reservations 
agents,  passenger  agents,  payload  control 
agents,  and  teletypists,  employed  across  Can- 
ada by  the  Canadian  Pacific  Air  Lines,  Lim- 
ited  (L.G.,  July,  p.  638). 

7.  National  Association  of  Broadcast  Em- 
ployees and  Technicians,  on  behalf  of  a 
general  unit  of  employees  employed  at  Radio 
Stations  CHLT-AM  and  CHLT-FM  and  Tele- 
vision Station  CHLT-TV  by  La  Tribune  Inc., 
Sherbrooke,  Que.  (L.G.,  July,  p.  638).  (See 
also  Item  3.  "Applications  for  Certification 
Withdrawn,"  below). 

8.  National  Association  of  Broadcast  Em- 
ployees and  Technicians,  on  behalf  of  a  gen- 
eral unit  of  employees  employed  at  Radio 
Station  CKTS-AM  by  the  Telegram  Printing 
and  Publishing  Co.  Ltd.,  Sherbrooke,  Que. 
(L.G.  July,  p.  638).  (See  also  Item  3,  "Ap- 
plications for  Certification  Withdrawn,"  be- 
low). 

Representation   Vote   Ordered 

Chauffeurs,  Teamsters,  and  Helpers,  Local 
Union  No.  395,  of  the  International  Brother- 
hood of  Teamsters,  Chauffeurs,  Warehouse- 
men and  Helpers  of  America,  applicant,  and 
Comet  Transport  Limited,  Winnipeg,  Man., 
respondent  (L.G.,  April,  p.  341).  The  voting 
unit  comprised  switch  tractor  drivers,  trailer 
mechanics,  dockmen  and  yardmen.  (Return- 
ing Officer:  C.  Arthur  Frey). 


This  section  covers  proceedings  under  the  Industrial  Relations  and  Disputes  Investigation 
Act,  involving  the  administrative  services  of  the  Minister  of  Labour,  the  Canada  Labour  Relations 
Board,  and  the  Industrial  Relations  Branch  of  the  Department. 


732 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      AUGUST   7965 


Applications  for  Certification  Rejected  to  have  been  witnessed  by  an  organizer  for 
1.  Transport  Drivers,  Warehousemen  and  tne  Brotherhood  when,  in  fact,  it  was  ad- 
Helpers  Union,  Local  106,  General  Truck  mittcd  in  evidence  that  the  said  organizer  had 
Drivers  Union,  Local  879,  and  General  not  bccn  present  at  the  time  of  the  signing  of 
Truck  Drivers  Union,  Local  938,  of  the  the  cards  and  had  not  becn  a  witness  to  their 
International     Brotherhood     of     Teamsters,  signing. 

Chauffeurs,  Warehousemen  and  Helpers  of  2.  and  3.  The  Association  of  Quebec  Em- 
America,  applicants,  Overnite  Express  Lim-  ployees  of  Overnite  Express  Limited,  appli- 
ited,  Hull,  Que.,  respondent,  The  Associa-  cant,  and  The  Association  of  Ontario  Em- 
tion  of  Ontario  Employees  of  Overnite  Ex-  ployees  of  Overnite  Express  Limited,  appli- 
press  Limited,  intervener,  and  The  Associa-  cant,  and  Overnite  Express  Limited,  Hull, 
tion  of  Quebec  Employees  of  Overnite  Ex-  Que.,  respondent  (L.G.,  May,  p.  424  and 
press  Limited,  intervener  (L.G.,  May,  p.  June,  p.  524).  These  two  applications  af- 
423).  The  application  was  rejected  for  the  fected  units  of  employees  of  the  company 
reason  that  the  Board  was  not  satisfied  from  in  Quebec  and  Ontario  respectively.  They 
the  evidence  produced  that  the  applicants  were  rejected  for  the  reason  that  the  Board 
had  a  majority  of  the  employees  in  the  pro-  is  of  opinion  that  the  administration,  man- 
posed  bargaining  unit  as  members  in  good  agement  and  policy  of  each  Association  is 
standing.  In  this  connection  the  Board  re-  influenced  by  the  employer,  Overnite  Ex- 
garded  it  as  a  matter  of  very  grave  concern  press  Limited,  so  that  the  fitness  of  each 
that  the  applicants  had  submitted  application  Association  to  represent  employees  for  the 
cards  for  membership  in  the  union  to  the  purpose  of  collective  bargaining  is  impaired, 
Investigating  Officer  in  support  of  their  mem-  and  that  accordingly  the  said  Associations 
bership  claims  which  cards  were  purported  may  not  be  certified  as  bargaining  agents  of 

Scope  and  Administration  of  Industrial  Relations  and  Disputes  Investigation  Act 

Conciliation  services  under  the  Industrial  Relations  and  Disputes  Investigation  Act 
are  provided  by  the  Minister  of  Labour  through  the  Industrial  Relations  Branch.  The 
branch  also  acts  as  the  administrative  arm  of  the  Canada  Labour  Relations  Board  in 
matters  under  the  Act  involving  the  board. 

The  Industrial  Relations  and  Disputes  Investigation  Act  came  into  force  on  September 
1,  1948.  It  revoked  the  Wartime  Labour  Relations  Regulations,  P.C.  1003,  which  became 
effective  in  March,  1944,  and  repealed  the  Industrial  Disputes  Investigation  Act,  which 
had  been  in  force  from  1907  until  superseded  by  the  Wartime  Regulations  in  1944. 
Decisions,  orders  and  certificates  given  under  the  Wartime  Regulations  by  the  Minister 
of  Labour  and  the  Wartime  Labour  Relations  Board  are  continued  in  force  and  effect  by 
the  Act. 

The  Act  applies  to  industries  within  federal  jurisdiction,  i.e.,  navigation,  shipping, 
interprovincial  railways,  canals,  telegraphs,  interprovincial  and  international  steamship  lines 
and  ferries,  aerodromes  and  air  transportation,  radio  broadcasting  stations  and  works 
declared  by  Parliament  to  be  for  the  general  advantage  of  Canada  or  two  or  more  of 
its  provinces.  Additionally,  the  Act  provides  that  provincial  authorities,  if  they  so  desire,  may 
enact  similar  legislation  for  application  to  industries  within  provincial  jurisdiction  and 
make  mutually  satisfactory  arrangements  with  the  federal  Government  for  the  administra- 
tion of  such  legislation. 

The  Minister  of  Labour  is  charged  with  the  administration  of  the  Act  and  is  directly 
responsible  for  the  appointment  of  conciliation  officers,  conciliation  boards,  and  Industrial 
Inquiry  Commissions  concerning  complaints  that  the  Act  has  been  violated  or  that  a  party 
has  failed  to  bargain  collectively,  and  for  controlling  applications  for  consent  to  prosecute. 

The  Canada  Labour  Relations  Board  is  established  under  the  Act  as  successor  to 
the  Wartime  Labour  Relations  Board  to  administer  provisions  concerning  the  certification 
of  bargaining  agents;  the  writing  of  provisions — for  incorporation  into  collective  agree- 
ments— that  fix  a  procedure  for  the  final  settlement  of  disputes  concerning  the  meaning 
or  violation  of  such  agreements;  and  the  investigation  of  complaints  referred  to  it  by  the 
minister  that  a  party  has  failed  to  bargain  collectively  and  to  make  every  reasonable  effort 
to   conclude    a   collective   agreement. 

Copies  of  the  Industrial  Relations  and  Disputes  Investigation  Act,  the  Regulations 
made  under  the  Act,  and  the  Rules  of  Procedure  of  the  Canada  Labour  Relations  Board 
are  available  upon  request  to  the  Department  of  Labour,  Ottawa. 

Proceedings  under  the  Industrial  Relations  and  Disputes  Investigation  Act  are 
reported  here  under  two  headings:  (1)  Certification  and  other  Proceedings  before  the 
Canada  Labour  Relations  Board  and  (2)  Conciliation  and  other  Proceedings  before  the 
Minister  of  Labour. 

Industrial  Relations  Officers  of  the  Department  of  Labour  are  stationed  at  Vancouver, 
Winnipeg,  Toronto,  Ottawa,  Montreal,  Fredericton,  Halifax  and  St.  John's,  Newfoundland. 
The  territory  of  four  officers  resident  in  Vancouver  comprises  British  Columbia,  Alberta 
and  the  Yukon  and  Northwest  Territories;  two  officers  stationed  in  Winnipeg  cover  the 
provinces  of  Saskatchewan  and  Manitoba  and  Northwestern  Ontario;  four  officers  resident 
in  Toronto  confine  their  activities  to  Ontario;  five  officers  in  Montreal  are  assigned  to  the 
province  of  Quebec,  and  a  total  of  three  officers  resident  in  Fredericton,  Halifax  and  St. 
John's  represent  the  Department  in  the  Maritime  Provinces  and  Newfoundland.  The 
headquarters  of  the  Industrial  Relations  Branch  and  the  Director  of  Industrial  Relations 
and  staff  are  situated  in  Ottawa. 

THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      AUGUST    7965  733 


employees  under  the  provisions  of  Section 
S>(5)  of  the  Act,  which  prohibits  the  certifi- 
cation of  a  trade  union  that  is  influenced  or 
dominated  by  an  employer. 

Applications  for  Certification  Received 

1.  Canadian  Air  Line  Dispatchers  Associ- 
ation, on  behalf  of  a  unit  of  dispatchers  em- 
ployed by  Nordair  Ltd.,  Montreal  Interna- 
tional Airport,  Dorval,  Que.  (Investigating 
Officer:  R.  L.  Fournier). 

2.  Brotherhood  of  Locomotive  Engineers, 
on  behalf  of  a  unit  of  locomotive  engineers 
employed  by  the  Canadian  National  Rail- 
ways in  Newfoundland  (Investigating  Officer: 
R.   L.   Fournier). 

3.  Teamsters,  Chauffeurs,  Warehousemen, 
Helpers  and  Miscellaneous  Workers,  Local 
76  of  the  International  Brotherhood  of  Team- 
sters, Chauffeurs,  Warehousemen  and  Helpers 
of  America,  on  behalf  of  a  unit  of  employees 
of  Auto  Haulaway  Limited,  Moncton,  N.B. 
(Investigating  Officer:   H.  R.   Pettigrove). 

4.  Local  955,  International  Union  of  Op- 
erating Engineers,  on  behalf  of  a  unit  of 
strip  miners  employed  by  The  Consolidated 
Mining  and  Smelting  Company  of  Canada 
Limited,  at  Pine  Point,  N.W.T.  (Investigating 
Officer:  J.  D.  Meredith). 

5.  Carmacks  &  District,  Mine  &  Mill  Work- 
ers of  the  International  Union  of  Mine,  Mill 
&  Smelter  Workers  (Canada),  Local  1044, 
on  behalf  of  a  unit  of  employees  of  Dis- 
covery Mines  Limited  employed  at  its  La 
Forma  Mine  at  Carmacks,  Y.T.  (Investi- 
gating Officer:  J.'D.  Meredith). 

6.  National  Association  of  Broadcast  Em- 
ployees and  Technicians,  on  behalf  of  a  unit 
of  satellite  tracking  station  employees  em- 
ployed by  E.M.I.  Cossor  Electronics  Limited 
at  St.  John's,  Nfld.  (Investigating  Officer: 
R.  L.  Fournier). 

7.  National  Association  of  Broadcast  Em- 
ployees and  Technicians,  on  behalf  of  a  gen- 
eral unit  of  employees  of  the  Ottawa  Valley 
Television  Company  Limited  employed  at 
CHOV-TV,  Pembroke,  Ont.  (Investigating 
Officer:    S.   Emmerson). 

8.  Canadian  Marine  Officers  Union,  on 
behalf  of  a  unit  of  marine  engineers  em- 
ployed by  Porter  Shipping  Limited,  Toronto, 
Ont.,  aboard  its  vessel  (Investigating  Officer: 
S.    Emmerson). 

9.  Canadian  Marine  Officers  Union,  on 
behalf  of  a  unit  of  marine  engineers  em- 
ployed by  Levis  Ferry  Limited,  Quebec, 
Que.,  aboard  its  ferries  (Investigating  Officer: 
R.  L.  Fournier). 

10.  Western  District  Diamond  Drillers' 
Union,  Local  1005  of  the  International 
Union  of  Mine,  Mill  and  Smelter  Workers 


(Canada),  on  behalf  of  a  unit  of  drillers 
employed  by  A.  Arsenault  Diamond  Drilling 
Co.  Ltd.,  in  the  Yukon  Territory  (Investi- 
gating Officer:  J.  D.  Meredith). 

11.  Ready  Mix,  Building  Supply,  Hydro 
and  Construction  Drivers,  Warehousemen 
and  Helpers,  Local  Union  No.  230,  of  the 
International  Brotherhood  of  Teamsters, 
Chauffeurs,  Warehousemen  and  Helpers  of 
America,  on  behalf  of  a  unit  of  employees 
employed  by  Amyot  Ready  Mix  Co.  Ltd., 
Hull,  Que.  (Investigating  Officer:  G.  A. 
Lane). 

1 2.  Local  504,  International  Longshoremen's 
and  Warehousemen's  Union,  Canadian  Area, 
on  behalf  of  a  unit  of  longshoremen  em- 
ployed by  Island  Tug  &  Barge  Limited,  Vic- 
toria, B.C.  (Investigating  Officer:  J.  D. 
Meredith). 

Applications  for  Certification  Withdrawn 

1.  National  Association  of  Broadcast  Em- 
ployees and  Technicians,  applicant,  with  re- 
spect to  a  unit  of  technical  employees  of 
British  Columbia  Television  Broadcasting 
Limited  employed  at  Station  CHEK-TV, 
Saanich,  B.C.  The  application  was  super- 
seded by  an  application  covering  a  more 
comprehensive  unit  (L.G.,  May,  p.  424)  (see 
Item  5,  "Applications  for  Certification 
Granted,"    above). 

2.  General  Truck  Drivers  Union  Local 
938  of  the  International  Brotherhood  of 
Teamsters,  Chauffeurs,  Warehousemen  and 
Helpers  of  America,  applicant,  and  Lewis 
Motorways,  Rexdale,  Ont.,  respondent  (L.G., 
July,  p.   638). 

3.  National  Association  of  Broadcast  Em- 
ployees and  Technicians,  applicant,  and  La 
Tribune  Incorporated,  CHLT-AM,  CHLT- 
FM,  CHLT-TV,  Sherbrooke  Telegram  Print- 
ing and  Publishing  Company  CKTS  Sta- 
tion, Sherbrooke,  Que.,  respondent  (L.G., 
July,  p.  638).  (Separate  applications  sub- 
mitted, see  Items  7  and  8,  "Applications  for 
Certification  Granted,"  above). 

4.  International  Union  of  District  50, 
United  Mine  Workers  of  America,  Local 
Union  13946,  applicant,  and  Clarke  Traffic 
Services  Ltd.  (Newfoundland  Steamships  | 
(1965)  Limited)  (Terra  Nova  Steamship  Co. 
Ltd.),  St.  John's  Newfoundland,  respondent 
(longshoremen)    (L.G.,    July,    p.    638). 

Application  for  Revocation  Rejected 

The  Board  rejected  an  application  for 
revocation  of  certification  affecting  Colonial 
Broadcasting  System  Ltd.,  St.  John's  Nfld., 
applicant,  and  the  National  Association  of 
Broadcast  Employees  and  Technicians,  re- 
spondent (Radio  Station  VOCM)  (L.G.  Mar. 
1964,  p.  213). 


734 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      AUGUST   7965 


Requests   for   Review   under   Section  61(2) 

1.  The  Board  granted  a  request  by  the 
Canadian  Brotherhood  of  Railway,  Transport 
and  General  Workers,  for  the  review  of  the 
certificate  issued  on  June  30,  1952,  to  it  in 
respect  of  a  unit  of  employees  of  the  Cana- 
dian National  Railways  in  the  offices  of  the 
General  Freight  Claims  Agent  and  District 
Freight  Claims  Agent,  Montreal,  Que.  (L.G., 
May,  p.  424). 

2.  The  Board  refused  a  request  by  the 
National  Syndicate  of  Longshoremen  of  Ha| 
Ha!  Bay  Inc.  for  review  of  the  Board's  Order 
issued  on  June  23,  1955,  to  it  in  respect  of 
a  unit  of  longshoremen  employed  by  Sag- 
uenay  Terminals  Limited  at  Port  Alfred, 
Que.    (L.G.,   July,  p.   639). 

3.  The  Board  refused  a  request  by  The 
Order  of  Railroad  Telegraphers,  System  Di- 


vision No.  7  for  review  of  the  Board's  de- 
cision on  January  28,  1965,  rejecting  an 
application  for  certification  made  by  The 
Order  of  Railroad  Telegraphers,  System  Di- 
vision No.  7  in  respect  of  a  unit  of  em- 
ployees employed  by  the  Canadian  Pacific 
Railway  Company   (L.G.,  May,  p.  424). 

4.  The  Board  refused  a  request  by  the 
British  Columbia  Television  Broadcasting 
System,  Ltd.,  for  review  of  the  Board's  Order 
of  June  3,  1965,  certifying  the  National  As- 
sociation of  Broadcast  Employees  and  Tech- 
nicians as  the  bargaining  agent  for  a  general 
unit  of  employees  of  CHEK-T.V.  Limited, 
a  subsidiary  of  the  British  Columbia  Tele- 
vision Broadcasting  System  Ltd.  (see  item 
5,  "Applications  for  Certification  Granted" 
above).   Request  received  during  month. 


Conciliation  and  Other  Proceedings 

before  the  Minister  of  Labour 


Conciliation  Officers  Appointed 

During  June,  the  Minister  of  Labour  ap- 
pointed Conciliation  Officers  to  deal  with 
the  following  disputes: 

1.  Compagnie  Nationale  Air  France,  Mont- 
real International  Airport,  and  International 
Union,  United  Automobile,  Aerospace  and 
Agricultural  Implement  Workers  of  America 
(Conciliation  Officer:   C.  E.  Poirier). 

2.  Rio  Algom  Mines  Limited  (Nordic 
Mine)  Elliot  Lake,  Ont.,  and  Local  796  of 
the  International  Union  of  Operating  Engi- 
neers (Conciliation  Officer:  T.  B.  McRae). 

3.  Hull  City  Transport  Limited  and  Hull 
Metropolitan  Transport  Limited,  and  Local 
591,  Amalgamated  Association  of  Street, 
Electric,  Railway  and  Motor  Coach  Em- 
ployees of  America  (Conciliation  Officer: 
C.  E.  Poirier). 

4.  Canadian  Pacific  Air  Lines,  Limited, 
Vancouver,  B.C.,  and  Canadian  Air  Line 
Flight  Attendants  Association  (Conciliation 
Officer:  D.  S.  Tysoe). 

5.  Atomic  Energy  of  Canada  Limited, 
Chalk  River,  Ont.,  and  Chalk  River  Atomic 
Energy  Draftsmen,  Local  1569  (CLC)  (Con- 
ciliation Officer:   T.  B.  McRae). 

6.  Rio  Algom  Minies  Limited  (Nordic 
Mine)  Elliot  Lake,  Ont.,  and  Local  5980  of 
the  United  Steelworkers  of  America  (Office 
and  Technical  Workers)  (Conciliation  Offi- 
cer:  T.   B.   McRae). 

Settlements  Reported  by  Conciliation  Officers 

1.  Hamilton  Terminal  Operators  Limited, 
Hamilton,  Ont.,  and  Local  1879  of  the  In- 
ternational Longshoremen's  Association  (Con- 


ciliation Officer:  T.  B.  McRae)    (L.G.,  July, 
p.  639). 

2.  National  Harbours  Board,  Prescott, 
Ont.,  and  the  Civil  Service  Association  of 
Canada  (Conciliation  Officer:  T.  B.  McRae) 
(L.G.,  July,   p.   639). 

3.  Pacific  Inland  Express  Limited,  Van- 
couver, and  Locals  362,  31,  979  and  938  of 
the  International  Brotherhood  of  Teamsters, 
Chauffeurs,  Warehousemen  and  Helpers  of 
America  (Conciliation  Officer:  D.  S.  Tysoe) 
(L.G.,  June,  p.  525). 

4.  Miller  &  Brown  Ltd.,  Cranbrook,  B.C., 
and  Local  15  of  the  Office  Employees  In- 
ternational Union  (Conciliation  Officer:  D. 
S.  Tysoe)    (L.G.,  June,  p.  526). 

5.  Radio  Nord  Inc.  (Station  CKRN-TV) 
Rouyn,  Que.,  and  National  Association  of 
Broadcast  Employees  and  Technicians  (Con- 
ciliation Officer:  C.  E.  Poirier)  (L.G.,  May, 
p.  425). 

Conciliation   Boards  Appointed 

1.  British  Yukon  Navigation  Company  and 
British  Yukon  Railway  Company  (White 
Pass  and  Yukon  Route)  and  Local  31  of  the 
International  Brotherhood  of  Teamsters, 
Chauffeurs,  Warehousemen  and  Helpers  of 
America  (L.G.,  May,  p.  425). 

2.  Rio  Algom  Mines  Limited  (Nordic 
Mine)  Elliot  Lake,  Ont.,  and  United  Steel- 
workers  of  America  (L.G.,  June,  p.  526). 

3.  CKCV  (Quebec)  Limitee,  Quebec  City, 
and  National  Association  of  Broadcast  Em- 
ployees and  Technicians  (L.G.,  June,  p. 
526). 


THE   LABOUR   GAZETTE      •      AUGUST    1965 


735 


4.  Atomic  Energy  of  Canada  Limited, 
Chalk  River,  Ont.,  and  The  Atomic  Energy 
Allied  Council   (L.G.,  May,  p.  425). 

Conciliation  Boards  fully  Constituted 

1.  The  Board  of  Conciliation  and  Investi- 
gation established  in  May  to  deal  with  a  dis- 
pute between  Canadian  National  Hotels 
Limited  (Chateau  Laurier  Hotel,  Ottawa) 
and  Canadian  Brotherhood  of  Railway, 
Transport  and  General  Workers  (L.G.,  July, 
p.  640)  was  fully  constituted  in  June  with 
the  appointment  of  W.  H.  Dickie  of  Toronto, 
as  Chairman.  Mr.  Dickie  was  appointed  by 
the  Minister  on  the  joint  recommendation  of 
the  other  two  members  of  the  Board,  J.  W. 
Healy,  Q.C.,  of  Toronto,  and  F.  K.  Eady  of 
Ottawa,  who  were  previously  appointed  on 
the  nomination  of  the  company  and  union, 
respectively. 

2.  The  Board  of  Conciliation  and  Investi- 
gation established  in  May  to  deal  with  a  dis- 
pute between  TransAir  Limited,  Winnipeg 
International  Airport,  and  Canadian  Air  Line 
Flight  Attendants  Association  (L.G.,  July, 
p.  640)  was  fully  constituted  in  June  with 
the  appointment  of  A.  S.  Dewar,  Q.C.,  of 
Winnipeg,  as  Chairman.  Mr.  Dewar  was  ap- 
pointed by  the  Minister  on  the  joint  recom- 
mendation of  the  other  two  members  of  the 
Board,  H.  B.  Monk,  Q.C.,  and  Art  Coulter, 
both  of  Winnipeg,  who  were  previously  ap- 
pointed on  the  nomination  of  the  company 
and   union  respectively. 


Board  Report  Received 

National  Harbours  Board,  Port  of  Mont- 
real, and  National  Syndicate  of  Employees 
of  the  Port  of  Montreal  (CNTU)  (L.G.,  July, 
p.  640).  The  text  of  the  report  is  reproduced 
below. 

Industrial  Inquiry  Commission  Appointed 

United  Grain  Growers  Ltd.;  Pacific  Ele- 
vators Limited;  Alberta  Wheat  Pool;  Saskatch- 
ewan Wheat  Pool;  and  Burrard  Terminals 
Limited,  Vancouver,  and  Local  333,  Grain 
Workers  Union,  International  Union  of 
United  Brewery,  Flour,  Cereal,  Soft  Drink 
and  Distillery  Workers  of  America  (L.G., 
June,  p.  526).  The  union  struck  the  opera- 
tions of  Alberta  Wheat  Pool  at  12  noon  on 
June  2  and  Dr.  G.  Neil  Perry  of  Vancouver 
was  appointed  as  Industrial  Inquiry  Com- 
mission by  the  Minister  on  June  7. 

Work  Stoppage 

National  Harbours  Board,  Port  of  Mont- 
real, and  National  Syndicate  of  Employees 
of  the  Port  of  Montreal  (CNTU)  (see 
above).  Employees  walked  out  on  June  16 
during  Conciliation  Board  hearings  and  the 
Board  report  was  received  by  the  Minister 
on  June  21.  C.  E.  Poirier,  Montreal  Chief 
Conciliation  Officer,  is  continuing  mediation 
of  dispute. 


Report  of  Board  in  Dispute  between 

National  Harbours  Board,  Montreal 

and 

National  Syndicate  of  Employees  of  the  Port  of  Montreal 


{Translation) 
The  first  sitting  of  the  Board  of  Concilia- 
tion and  Investigation  established  on  April  7 
was  held  in  Montreal  on  June  1.  A  second 
sitting  was  held  on  June  7.  At  the  latter 
sitting,  one  of  the  main  points  at  issue  be- 
tween the  parties  was  discussed — should 
there  be  three  agreements  for  three  units 
(1)  general  operation;  (2)  grain  elevators; 
(3)  cold  storage  warehouse,  for  which  the 
Syndicate  had  obtained  from  the  Canada 
Labour  Relations  Board  three  certification 
certificates  as  bargaining  agent  of  the  employ- 
ees in  the  unit. 


The  Syndicate  asked  that  only  one  agree- 
ment be  made  for  the  three  certified  units. 

That,  we  learned  then,  was  one  of  the 
most  important  basic  issues,  and  both  parties 
held  their  respective  position. 

We  understood  that  the  employer  was  using 
a  legal  argument  to  have  three  agreements 
since  there  were  three  certificates  for  three 
units. 

We  also  understood  that  seniority  and  its 
effect  on  promotions,  layoffs,  etc.  .  .  .  be- 
tween the  three  units,  is  also  a  basic  issue. 

{Continued  on  page  757) 


During  June,  the  Minister  of  Labour  received  the  unanimous  report  of  the  Board  of 
Conciliation  and  Investigation  established  to  deal  with  a  dispute  between  National  Syndicate 
of  Employees  of  the  Port  of  Montreal  (CNTU)   and  National  Harbours  Board,  Montreal. 

The  Board  was  under  the  chairmanship  of  His  Honour  Judge  Paul  Hurteau  of  Montreal. 
He  was  appointed  by  the  Minister  in  the  absence  of  a  joint  recommendation  from  the  other 
two  members  of  the  Board,  M.  A.  Harrison  of  Ottawa,  and  Robert  Sauve  of  Montreal, 
nominees   of  the  company  and   union,   respectively. 

The  text  of  the  report  is  reproduced  here. 


736 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      AUGUST   7965 


LABOUR  LAW 


Legal  Decisions  Affecting  Labour 


British  Columbia  Supreme  Court  rules  that  an  ex-employee  is 
bound   by    the   restrictive   covenant   in   a   collective   agreement 


In  British  Columbia,  the  Supreme  Court 
(in  Chambers)  restrained  the  business  activi- 
ties of  an  ex-employee  of  a  dry-cleaning  firm 
on  the  grounds  that  he  was  bound  by  a  re- 
strictive covenant  of  the  collective  agreement 
incorporated  by  implication  in  his  contract 
of  service. 

On  February  5,  1965,  Mr.  Justice  Dryer 
of  the  British  Columbia  Supreme  Court 
(in  Chambers)  ordered  an  ex-employee  of 
Nelsons  Laundries  Limited  to  comply  with 
the  restrictive  covenant  in  a  collective  agree- 
ment between  the  company  and  the  union  of 
which  the  ex-employee  was  a  member. 

Mr.  Justice  Dryer  held  that,  where  it  is 
evident  that  a  contract  of  service  incorpo- 
rates by  implication  the  terms  of  a  collective 
agreement,  the  employer  and  employee  are 
bound  by  it.  He  stated  that  a  restrictive  cove- 
nant is  enforceable  if  it  does  not  offend 
against  reasonableness  and  public  policy. 

Nelsons  Laundries  Limited  operates  a  laun- 
dry and  dry-cleaning  business  in  Vancouver, 
B.C.  Manning,  the  defendant,  was  employed 
by  the  company  from  October  11,  1955,  to 
December  16,  1964,  when  he  was  discharged 
for  cause  from  his  job  as  a  retail  driver- 
salesman. 

While  employed  by  Nelsons,  Manning  was 
a  member  of  the  Vancouver  and  District 
Laundry  and  Dry  Cleaning  Salesmen's  Union 
No.  334  (CLC),  which  was  the  certified 
bargaining  agent  for  the  retail  driver-salesmen, 
among  others.  At  the  time  Manning  was 
discharged,  there  was  a  collective  agreement 
in  force  between  the  union  and  the  company 
dated  May  1,  1964,  and  to  continue  in  effect 
until  April   30,   1967. 

The  collective  agreement  contained  the 
following  clause  (Section  5  of  Art.  9): 

The  union  and  each  employee  covenant  and 
agree  with  the  company  that  for  a  period  of 
six  (6)  months  after  the  termination  of  the  said 
relationship  of  Employer  and  Employee  for  any 
cause  or  reason  whatsoever,  the  Employee  will 
not  either  himself  or  for  any  other  person,  firm, 
corporation  or  association,  either  directly  or 
indirectly,  wait  on,  call  on  or  solicit  patronage, 
trade  or  custom  for  laundry,  dry-cleaning  work 
or  any  services  rendered  by  the  Company,  from 
any  one  of  the  patrons,  customers  or  agents  of 
the  Company  with  whom  the  employee  may 
have  dealt  during  his  service  with  the  Company. 

Following  his  discharge,  Manning  solicited 
business  from  some  of  the  customers  whom 
he  had  served  during  his  employment  with 


Nelsons — and  he  asserted  his  right  and  inten- 
tion to  continue  to  do  so.  The  company  ap- 
plied to  the  Court  for  an  injunction  to  restrain 
Manning  from  soliciting  these  "patrons,  cus- 
tomers or  agents"  until  trial  of  the  action. 

Manning  contended  that  he  was  not  a 
party  to  the  collective  agreement  between 
the  union  and  the  company,  and  was  not 
bound  by  its  terms.  To  support  his  conten- 
tion, he  cited,  among  others,  the  case  of 
Young  v.  Can  Nor.  Railway  (1931)  1  WWR 
41,  (1931)  AC  3,  100  LJPC  51,  37  CRC 
421,  affirming  (1930)  1  WWR  446,  38  Man 
R  485,  36  CRC  3399. 

Mr.  Justice  Dryer  noted  that  in  the  Young 
case,  the  appellant,  who  had  been  employed 
as  a  machinist  by  the  railway  company,  sued 
his  former  employer  in  an  effort  to  enforce  a 
provision  of  a  document  called  "Wage  Agree- 
ment No.  4,"  the  parties  to  which  were  the 
Canadian  railway  war  board,  and  division 
No.  4,  railway  employees  department,  Ameri- 
can Federation  of  Labour,  of  which  union 
Young  was  not  a  member.  This  Wage  Agree- 
ment No.  4  was  evidently  somewhat  similar 
to  what  is  now  termed  a  collective  agreement. 
The  Judicial  Committee  of  the  Privy  Council 
(at  p.  52)  held  that: 

(a)  the  true  question  was  "whether .  . .  the 
contract  for  service  which  existed  between 
himself  and  the  railway  company  included 
terms  by  which  the  railway  company  either 
bound  itself  to  the  appellant  to  observe  the 
provisions  of  Wage  Agreement  No.  4,  or 
bound  itself  to  the  appellant  to  observe  pro- 
visions similar  to  those  contained  therein," 
and 

(b)  the  fact  that  the  railway  company  had 
applied  the  provisions  of  Wage  Agreement 
No.  4  to  all  its  employees  did  not  necessarily 
indicate  that  it  was  contractually  bound  to 
the  plaintiff  because  it  may  have  done  so  sim- 
ply as  a  matter  of  policy;  and  (at  pp.  53-4) 

(c)  "When  Wage  Agreement  No.  4  is  ex- 
amined, it  does  not  appear  to  their  Lordships 
to  be  a  document  adapted  for  conversion  into 
or  incorporation  with  a  service  agreement,  so 
as  to  entitle  master  and  servant  to  enforce 
inter  se  the  terms  thereof.  It  consists  of  some 
188  'Rules',  which  the  railway  companies 
contract  with  Division  No.  4  to  observe.  It 
appears  to  their  Lordships  to  be  intended 
merely  to  operate  as  an  agreement  between 


This  section,  prepared  by  the  Legislation  Branch,  reviews  labour  laws  as  they  are  enacted 
by  Parliament  and  the  provincial  legislatures,  regulations  under  these  laws,  and  selected  court 
decisions  affecting  labour. 


THE  LABOUR   GAZETTE      •      AUGUST    7965 


737 


a  body  of  employers  and  a  labour  organiza- 
tion by  which  the  employers  undertake  that 
as  regards  their  workmen,  certain  rules  bene- 
ficial to  the  workmen  shall  be  observed.  By 
itself  it  constitutes  no  contract  between  any 
individual  employee  and  the  company  which 
employs  him.  If  an  employer  refused  to  ob- 
serve the  rules,  the  effective  sequel  would  be, 
not  an  action  by  any  employee,  not  even  an 
action  by  Division  No.  4  against  the  em- 
ployer for  specific  performance  or  damages, 
but  the  calling  of  a  strike  until  the  grievance 
was  remedied." 

In  the  opinion  of  Mr.  Justice  Dryer,  the 
passage  last  quoted  contains  two  ideas:  (1) 
that  Wage  Agreement  No.  4  was  not  "adapted 
for  conversion  into  or  incorporation  with  a 
service  agreement;"  and  (2)  that  "if  an  em- 
ployer refused  to  observe  the  rules  the  effec- 
tive sequel  would  be,  not  an  action  .  .  .  but 
the  calling  of  a  strike  .  .  ." 

In  Mr.  Justice  Dryer's  view,  it  is  difficult 
to  determine  whether  these  two  ideas  are 
intended  to  be  dependent  one  upon  the  other, 
i.e.,  whether  their  Lordships  held  that  Wage 
Agreement  No.  4  was  not  adapted  for  con- 
version into  or  incorporation  with  a  service 
agreement  because  of  its  form  and  content, 
or  whether  they  so  found  because  of  the  prin- 
ciple embodied  in  the  later  statement  that 
the  agreement  was  not  enforceable  in  the 
courts. 

If  their  finding,  Mr.  Justice  Dryer  con- 
tinued, was  based  upon  the  form  and  content 
of  Wage  Agreement  No.  4,  it  would  have  no 
application  to  the  case  at  bar,  since,  in  his 
opinion,  the  form  and  content  of  the  collec- 
tive agreement  in  the  case  at  bar  was  such 
that  it  could  be  adapted  for  incorporation 
with  a  service  agreement.  In  fact,  very  few 
of  its  provisions  were  unsuitable  for  that 
purpose. 

If,  on  the  other  hand,  the  finding  of  the 
Judicial  Committee  of  the  Privy  Council  in 
the  Young  case  that  Wage  Agreement  No.  4 
was  not  "adapted  for  conversion  into  or 
incorporation  with  a  service  agreement"  was 
based  upon  something  outside  Wage  Agree- 
ment No.  4,  which  lead  them  to  say  "if  an 
employer  refused  to  observe  the  rules  the 
effective  sequel  would  be  not  an  action  .  .  . 
but  the  calling  of  a  strike  .  .  .,"  its  applica- 
tion to  the  case  at  bar  needs  to  be  further 
considered.  The  principle  there  stated  was 
then  current  and  had  been  stated  earlier  by 
Fullerton,  J. A.  of  the  Manitoba  Court  of 
Appeal  in  dealing  with  the  same  case  when 
he  said  at  p.  451: 

I  am  satisfied  that  so-called  wage  agreements 
entered  into  between  workmen's  unions  and 
employers  are  never  intended  by  the  parties  to 
be  legally  enforceable  agreements.  If  employers 
do  not  live  up  to  the  terms  of  their  agreements, 
their  workmen  may  apply  for  a  Board  of  In- 
vestigation under  the  Industrial  Disputes  Investi- 
gation   Act,     RSC,     1927,     ch.     112     (now    the 


Industrial  Relations  and  Disputes  Investigation 
Act,  RSC,  1952,  ch.  152)  and  failing  a  satis- 
factory adjustment  may  go  on  strike,  but  in  my 
opinion  they  cannot  enforce  the  terms  of  such 
agreements   through   the   Courts. 

It  is  to  be  noted,  Mr.  Justice  Dryer  added, 
that  this  principle  is  based  upon  the  proposi- 
tion that  the  parties  to  "wage  agreements"  did 
not  intend  them  to  be  enforced  "through  the 
courts."  This  is  not  the  case  today.  Since  en- 
actment of  legislation  providing  machinery  for 
negotiation  and  filing  of  collective  agreements, 
and  penalties  for  failure  to  observe  them, 
and  the  development  of  industrial  relations 
practices  thereunder,  collective  agreements 
have  become  and  are  accepted  as  agreements 
which  do  create  obligations  enforceable  at 
law.  (Hume  and  Rumble  Ltd.  and  Peterson 
Elec.  Const.  Co.  v.  Local  213  of  Int.  Brother- 
hood of  Elec.  Workers  (A.F.  of  L.)  (L.G. 
1954,  p.   1300). 

The  concept  that  the  parties  to  collective 
agreements  did  not  intend  them  to  be  en- 
forced in  the  courts  is  more  readily  under- 
stood when  one  realizes  that  at  that  time, 
before  the  enactment  of  labour  relations 
legislation  had  provided  a  new  statement  of 
public  policy,  a  trade  union  might  still  be 
considered  to  be,  at  law,  an  illegal  society 
incapable  because  of  its  illegality  of  main- 
taining an  action  in  court,  and  a  collective 
agreement  might  still  be  considered  to  be,  at 
law,  an  unreasonable  restraint  of  trade  and 
hence  unenforceable:  Polakoff  v.  Winters 
Garment  Co.  (1928)  62  OLR  40. 

Mr.  Justice  Dryer  stated  further  that  he 
was  by  no  means  satisfied  that  collective 
agreements  cannot  be  enforced,  in  the  absence 
of  an  express  agreement  to  the  contrary,  by 
and  against  the  employees  covered  by  them. 

The  legislation  referred  to  provides  for 
certification  of  trade  unions  upon  proof  of 
representation  by  them  of  a  majority  of  the 
employees  concerned,  and  it  empowers  trade 
unions  so  certified  to  bargain  on  behalf  of 
employees  in  the  bargaining  unit,  whether 
they  are  members  of  the  union  or  not.  This 
was  not  the  case  in  1931.  It  may  have  been 
appropriate  then  to  leave  a  non-member  with 
no  remedy,  as  is  suggested  by  the  Judicial 
Committee  of  the  Privy  Council  at  p.  54  of 
their  judgment,  but  it  would  not  be  so  today. 

Since  the  enactment  of  such  legislation,  it 
has  come  to  be  accepted  that  a  collective 
agreement  is  entered  into  by  a  union  on  be- 
half, not  only  of  itself,  but  also  of  the  em- 
ployees it  represents.  This  community  of  obli- 
gations is  recognized  in  sees.  20  and  21  of 
the  Labour  Relations  Act,  RSBC,  1960,  ch. 
205,  but  also  exists  quite  independently  of 
specific  legislative  provisions,  and  if,  as  agent 
for  employees  represented  by  it,  a  union 
commits  them  to  do  or  refrain  from  doing 
any  act  after  their  employment  is  terminated, 
the  law  should  enforce  performance. 


738 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE     •      AUGUST   1965 


Mr.  Justice  Dryer  concluded  that  in  view 
of  the  wording  of  Sec.  5  of  Art.  9  of  the 
collective  agreement  (already  quoted),  it 
would  be  difficult  to  argue  successfully  that 
the  parties  did  not  intend  this  agreement  to 
impose  obligations  and  rights  on  the  em- 
ployees concerned. 

The  company  contended  that,  apart  from 
other  considerations,  Manning  was  bound 
by  the  restrictive  covenant  in  question  by 
reason  of  the  provisions  of  Sec.  20  of  the 
Labour  Relations  Act. 

As  to  Manning's  contention  that  he  was  no 
longer  an  employee,  the  company  claimed 
that  the  obligation  to  perform  this  restrictive 
covenant  was  taken  on  by  Manning  while  he 
was  an  employee,  and  if  rights  or  obligations 
attach  to  an  individual  while  he  is  an  em- 
ployee, they  continue  after  employment  ceases 
to  the  extent  required  by  the  exercise  of  per- 
formance of  such  rights  or  obligations. 

In  Mr.  Justice  Dryer's  view,  there  is  much 
to  be  said  for  this  point  of  view.  To  arrive 
at  a  decision  in  this  case,  however,  it  was 
not  necessary  to  decide  whether  a  collective 
agreement  as  such  is  enforceable  against  the 
employees  as  distinguished  from  the  union. 
The  question  before  the  court  was  rather 
whether  the  contract  of  service  between  the 
company  and  Manning  contained  the  term 
of  Sec.  5  of  Art.  11  of  the  collective  agree- 
ment. In  Mr.  Justice  Dryer's  view,  it  did,  at 
least  by  implication.  In  Scammell  and 
Nephew  Ltd.  v.  Ouston  (1941)  AC  251  it 
was  stated: 

The  object  of  the  Court  is  to  do  justice  be- 
tween the  parties,  and  the  Court  will  do  its 
best,  if  satisfied  that  there  was  an  ascertainable 
and  determinate  intention  to  contract,  to  give 
effect  to  that  intention,  looking  at  substance  and 
not  mere  form. 

In  the  case  at  bar  there  was  a  contract  of 
service  between  the  company  and  Manning. 
The  question  was,  What  were  its  terms?  In 
the  absence  of  some  evidence  to  indicate  a 
contrary  stipulation,  Mr.  Justice  Dryer  found 
that  the  terms  were  those  of  the  collective 
agreement  that  dealt  with  the  rights  and 
obligations  that  were  to  subsist  between  the 
employer  and  the  employee. 

The  defendant,  Manning,  contended  that 
the   restrictive   covenant   was   void   because: 


(a)  it  was  unreasonable;  and  (b)  it  was  too 
vague. 

In  the  opinion  of  Mr.  Justice  Dryer,  good 
consideration  for  the  restrictive  covenant  can 
be  found  in  the  employment  and  in  the  in- 
terest of  each  employee  in  his  right  to  succeed 
to  other  routes. 

The  restrictive  covenant  prohibits  the  de- 
fendant from  soliciting  the  patronge  of  the 
patrons,  customers  or  agents  of  the  employer 
with  whom  he  "may  have  dealt  during  his 
service  with  the  company."  This,  in  Mr. 
Justice  Dryer's  view,  was  not  a  vague  pro- 
vision and  it  did  not  contain  the  element  of 
ambiguity;  further,  the  covenant  in  the  case 
at  bar  was  not  unreasonable.  The  provision 
was  limited  to  the  customers  of  the  company 
with  whom  Manning  did  business  during  his 
term  of  employment;  and  the  covenant  was 
limited  to  a  period  of  six  months. 

There  can  be  no  doubt,  Mr.  Justice  Dryer 
continued,  that  the  personal  relationship 
existing  between  a  driver-salesman  and  the 
persons  on  whom  he  calls  can  effect  the 
transfer  of  business  to  a  new  employer  if 
the  driver-salesman  changes  his  place  of  em- 
ployment. If  other  factors,  such  as  quality  of 
laundering,  are  equal,  the  personal  relation- 
ship could  be  decisive.  Such  a  transfer  would 
be  damaging  not  only  to  the  employer  but 
also  to  the  remaining  employees  who  have 
a  right  under  their  collective  agreement  to 
transfer  to  the  route  in  question. 

Regarding  the  question  of  public  interest, 
Mr.  Justice  Dryer  could  not  see  how  it 
could  be  injuriously  affected  by  this  restric- 
tive covenant.  There  was  no  suggestion  that 
there  was  a  shortage  of  persons  ready,  willing 
and  able  to  be  employed  by  the  company 
to  service  the  customers  in  question. 

Mr.  Justice  Dryer,  in  allowing  the  com- 
pany's motion  to  enforce  against  an  ex- 
employee  of  the  company  a  restrictive  cov- 
enant in  the  collective  agreement  made  be- 
tween the  company  and  the  union  of  which 
the  employee  was  a  member,  ordered  the 
defendant,  Manning,  to  restrain  from  solicit- 
ing "patrons,  customers  or  agents"  as  pro- 
vided in  the  collective  agreement.  Nelsons 
Laundries  Ltd.  v.  Manning  (1965)  51  WWR, 
Part  8,  p.  493. 


Industrial  training  boards  set  up  in  Britain 
under  the  Industrial  Training  Act  1964  (L.G., 
1963,  p.  238)  are  empowered  to  raise  a  levy 
from  employers  in  their  respective  industries 
to  provide  the  means  to  meet  their  adminis- 
trative costs,  relieve  the  cost  of  training  for 
employers  by  paying  grants  to  those  whose 
training  conforms  to  the  standards  laid  down 
by  the  boards,  and  to  further  education  of 
which  they  approve. 


The  Act,  however,  gives  anyone  on  whom 
an  assessment  levy  has  been  made  the  right 
to  appeal  to  special  tribunals  set  up  for  that 
purpose. 

Hearings  before  the  tribunals  are  in  private 
unless  the  tribunal  decides,  at  the  request  of 
the  appellant,  to  hold  a  public  hearing.  Both 
the  appellant  and  the  board  against  which  the 
appeal  is  made  may  attend  the  appeal  and 
be  represented  by  a  lawyer  or  other  person. 


THE  LABOUR   GAZETTE      •      AUGUST    7965 


739 


Recent  Regulations,  Federal  and  Provincial 

First  regulations  under  new  Canada  Labour  {Standards)  Code 
issued  by  the  federal  Government.  Nova  Scotia  revises  new 
general  minimum  wage  order  concerning  standards  of  overtime 


The  first  general  regulations  to  be  issued 
under  the  Canada  Labour  (Standards)  Code, 
established  a  minimum  wage  of  $1  an  hour 
for  employees  under  17,  and  prescribed  the 
conditions  for  averaging  hours  of  work  in  the 
federal  industries.  They  also  set  out  require- 
ments with  respect  to  deductions  for  board 
and  lodging,  annual  vacations,  and  general 
holidays. 

A  new  general  minimum  wage  order  in 
Nova  Scotia  made  no  change  in  rates,  but 
permits  employers  to  pay  one  and  one-half 
the  minimum  rate,  rather  than  one  and  one- 
half  the  regular  rate,  for  hours  in  excess  of 
48  in  a  week  until  a  further  order  of  the 
Minimum  Wage  Board. 

Other  new  regulations  increased  minimum 
wage  rates  for  employees  in  industrial  camps 
in  Alberta,  and  for  taxicab  drivers  in  Mani- 
toba. 

Canada  Labour  (Standards)  Code 

General  regulations  under  the  Canada  La- 
bour (Standards)  Code,  the  labour  standards 
law  applying  to  employment  in  industries  un- 
der federal  jurisdiction  that  became  effective 
July  1,  prescribe  the  conditions  for  averaging 
hours  of  work,  and  deal  with  a  number  of 
other  matters  relating  to  the  minimum  wage 
and  the  requirements  regarding  annual  vaca- 
tions and  general  holidays. 

They  also  name  the  medical,  dental,  archi- 
tectural, engineering  and  legal  professions  as 
professions  to  which  the  Act  will  not  apply. 
The  regulations,  the  first  to  be  issued  under 
the  new  Code,  were  approved  June  18  and 
gazetted  June  25. 

Hours  of  Work 

The  general  rule  in  the  Code  is  that  hours 
of  work  in  excess  of  eight  in  a  day,  and  40 
in  a  week,  must  be  paid  for  at  the  rate  of 
one  and  one-half  times  the  regular  rate  of 
pay.  Where  the  nature  of  the  work  necessi- 
tates irregular  distribution  of  an  employee's 
hours  of  work,  and  averaging  is  allowed  in 
accordance  with  the  regulations,  the  hours  of 
work  for  which  an  overtime  rate  has  to  be 
paid  are  not  calculated  on  a  daily  or  weekly 
basis,  but  at  the  end  of  the  averaging  period. 

Averaging  is  permitted  for  (1)  employees 
who  do  not  work  regularly  scheduled  daily 
or  weekly  hours  and  (2)  employees  who 
work  regularly  scheduled  hours  that  vary  in 
number  from  time  to  time. 


Where  these  circumstances  prevail,  an  em- 
ployer may  select  an  averaging  period  of  13 
weeks  or  less,  and  the  standard  hours  of 
work  (being  the  hours  for  which  the  regular 
rate  of  pay  may  be  paid)  are  the  number  of 
weeks  so  selected,  multiplied  by  40  (520  for 
a  13 -week  period). 

An  overtime  rate  of  one  and  one-half  times 
the  regular  rate  must  be  paid  at  the  end  of 
the  averaging  period  for  all  hours  worked  in 
excess  of  standard  hours.  Any  hours  for 
which  an  employer  has  already  paid  a  pre- 
mium rate  of  at  least  one  and  one-half  times 
the  regular  rate,  by  virtue  of  custom  or  agree- 
ment, may  be  deducted  from  the  hours  for 
which  he  is  required  to  pay  the  overtime  rate 
under  these  regulations. 

The  total  hours  that  may  be  worked  by  an 
employee  in  an  averaging  period  are  the 
product  of  the  number  of  weeks  in  the  period 
multiplied  by  48  (624  for  a  13-week  period). 
Under  Section  9  of  the  Act,  the  Minister  of 
Labour  may,  by  permit,  authorize  longer 
hours  to  be  worked  than  the  maximum  for 
the  period,  and  under  Section  10,  the  maxi- 
mum may  be  exceeded  for  emergency  work. 

In  calculating  the  number  of  hours  an  em- 
ployee has  worked  in  the  averaging  period, 
if  he  has  been  granted  a  general  or  other 
holiday  with  pay  or  a  day  of  annual  vacation 
in  the  period,  these  are  considered  as  days 
worked.  The  number  of  standard  hours  and 
the  number  of  total  hours  in  the  averaging 
period  are  reduced  by  eight  hours  for  every 
such  day  (by  not  more  than  40  hours  for  a 
full  week  of  annual  vacation). 

When  termination  of  employment  takes 
place  during  an  averaging  period,  an  em- 
ployee is  not  entitled  to  overtime  pay  if  he 
has  terminated  his  employment  of  his  own 
accord.  If  his  employment  has  been  termi- 
nated by  the  employer,  he  is  entitled  to  over- 
time pay  for  any  hours  worked  in  excess  of 
an  average  40-hour  week  over  the  period  he 
has  worked.  Thus  the  averaging  period  be- 
comes, for  the  purpose  of  calculating  over- 
time in  these  circumstances,  that  part  of  the 
averaging  period  he  has  worked. 

To  adopt  an  averaging  period  of  13  weeks 
or  less,  an  employer  does  not  require  ap- 
proval, but  must  notify  the  Director  of  La- 
bour Standards,  Department  of  Labour,  Ot- 
tawa, of  the  averaging  period  he  has  adopted. 
If  he  requires  a  longer  period  than  13  weeks 
to  provide  for  the  period  in  which  fluctua- 
tions take  place — for  example,  26  or  52 
weeks — he  has  to  obtain  the  approval  of  the 


740 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      AUGUST   7965 


Minister   of   Labour   for  the   length  of  the 

averaging  period.  I  he  same  conditions  will 
apply  as  to  a  period  of  13  weeks  or  less. 

Where  an  employer  has  adopted  an  aver- 
aging plan  for  the  pin  puses  of  meeting  the 
requirements  of  Part  I  of  the  Act,  he  is  re- 
quired to  post  clear  information  concerning 
the  plan  in  effect  in  a  place  where  it  may  be 
seen  by  the  employees  affected. 

The  one-day's-rest-in-seven  rule  laid  down 
in  the  Code  need  not  be  applied  during  an 
averaging  period.  The  regulations  further  pro- 
vide that  when  hours  in  excess  of  48  in  a 
week  are  permitted  under  Section  9  of  the 
Act,  the  permit  may  allow  an  exception  from 
the  rule  and  may  prescribe  alternative  periods 
of  rest. 

Employment  of  Persons  Under  17  Years 

The  Code  provides  that  boys  and  girls  un- 
der 17  years  of  age  may  be  employed  in 
federal  industries  only  as  permitted  by  regu- 
lations. The  regulations  authorize  the  employ- 
ment of  persons  under  the  age  of  17  years 
as  long  as  such  a  person  is  not  required  to 
be  in  attendance  at  school  under  the  laws  of 
his  province,  and  the  work  in  which  he  is  to 
be  employed  is  not  carried  on  underground 
in  a  mine,  or  in  contravention  of  the  Explo- 
sives Regulations,  the  Atomic  Energy  Control 
Regulations,  or  the  Canada  Shipping  Act,  re- 
lating to  persons  of  his  age,  or  is  not  work 
that  is  likely  to  be  injurious  to  his  health  or 
to  endanger  his  safety. 

Night  work  (that  is,  work  between  11  p.m. 
and  6  a.m.)  is  not  permitted  for  employees 
under  17. 

The  minimum  wage  rate  that  must  be  paid 
to  an  employee  under  17  is  $1  an  hour,  un- 
less a  lower  rate  is  authorized  because  he  is 
being  trained  on  the  job. 

Employees  Being  Trained  on  the  Job 

The  minimum  wage  of  $1.25  an  hour  re- 
quired by  the  Act,  or  $1  an  hour  required 
by  the  regulations  for  persons  under  17,  will 
not  apply  to  registered  apprentices  who  are 
being  paid  in  accordance  with  a  schedule  of 
rates  established  under  a  provincial  appren- 
ticeship Act. 

In  the  case  of  other  training  plans,  if  the 
employer  establishes  to  the  Minister's  satis- 
faction that  the  employees  are  being  given 
training  by  a  qualified  person  in  preparation 
for  employment  at  a  higher  rate  than  the 
minimum  established  by  the  Act,  a  rate  less 
than  the  minimum  rate  may  be  paid,  so  long 
as  the  rate  being  paid  is  considered  appro- 
priate by  the  Minister. 

Value  of  Board  and  Lodging 

The  monetary  value  to  be  placed  on  any 
board,  lodging  or  other  remuneration,  except- 
ing money  received  by  an  employee  in  re- 


spect of  his  employment,  is  to  be  the  amount 
agreed  upon  between  the  employer  and  the 
employee;  but  where  there  is  no  agreement, 
the  Minister  may  determine  the  amount,  and 
he  ma\  also  determine  the  amount  where  he 
finds  that  the  amount  agreed  upon  unduly 
affects  the  wages  of  the  employee. 

Where  board  or  lodging,  or  both,  are  pro- 
sided  by  or  on  behalf  of  an  employer,  and 
the  arrangement  is  accepted  by  the  employee, 
the  amount  by  which  the  minimum  wage 
may  be  reduced  for  any  pay  period  is  not  to 
exceed  50  cents  for  each  meal,  and  60  cents 
for  each  day's  lodging. 

Method  of  Calculating  Normal  Pay 

The  general  principle  is  laid  down  in  the 
Code  that,  for  a  general  holiday,  an  em- 
ployee is  to  receive  his  normal  pay.  In  the 
case  of  an  employee  whose  wages  are  calcu- 
lated on  a  daily  or  hourly  basis,  it  is  to  be 
at  least  the  equivalent  of  his  regular  rate  of 
wages  for  his  normal  hours  of  work  and,  in 
the  case  of  an  employee  not  paid  on  a  time 
basis,  at  least  the  equivalent  of  the  wages  he 
would  have  earned  at  his  regular  rate  of 
wages  for  his  normal  working  day. 

The  regulations  lay  down  two  rules,  either 
of  which  may  be  applied,  for  determining 
what  is  normal  pay  where  there  is  difficulty 
in  making  the  determination:  (1)  it  may  be 
either  the  average  of  an  employee's  daily 
earnings,  exclusive  of  overtime  for  the  days 
he  has  worked  in  the  four-week  period  imme- 
diately preceding  the  general  holiday;  or  (2) 
an  amount  calculated  by  a  method  agreed 
upon  under,  or  pursuant  to,  a  collective 
agreement. 

Annual  Vacations 

The  regulations  respecting  annual  vacations 
are  substantially  the  same  as  those  in  effect 
under  the  Annual  Vacations  Act  that  was  re- 
pealed when  Part  III  of  the  Code  came  into 
force  (L.G.  1958,  p.  1159). 

A  new  provision  modifies  the  general  rule 
in  the  Code  that  an  employee  is  to  receive 
his  vacation  pay  at  least  one  day  before  the 
beginning  of  his  vacation.  The  regulations 
now  provide  that  where  it  is  the  custom  to 
pay  vacation  pay  on  the  regular  pay  day  dur- 
ing or  immediately  following  the  vacation, 
the  employer  may  continue  to  do  so. 

Alberta  Labour  Act 

A  new  order  governing  hours  of  work  and 
minimum  wages  for  workers  in  the  lumber 
and  logging  industry,  highway  construction, 
and  day  labourers'  camps  in  rural  districts, 
has  been  issued  by  the  Alberta  Board  of  In- 
dustrial Relations.  The  order  was  gazetted  on 
June  15  as  Alta.  Reg.  288/65  and  came  into 
force  July   1.  It  replaces  Alta.  Reg.  531/62. 


THE   LABOUR   GAZETTE      •      AUGUST    7965 


741 


Under  the  new  order,  the  minimum  hourly 
rate  has  been  increased  from  75  cents  to  85 
cents,  effective  July  1,  with  provision  for  fur- 
ther increases  to  95  cents  on  January  1,  1966, 
and  to  SI  on  July  1,  1966  to  bring  rates  up 
to  those  set  in  the  General  Order  (180/65). 

In  line  with  previous  practices,  employees 
in  camps  are  permitted  to  work  longer  hours 
at  straight-time  rates  than  employees  in  urban 
centres,  but  the  monthly  maximum  is  to  be 
reduced  from  208  hours  to  191,  effective 
January  1,  1966  when  the  44-hour  standard 
week  goes  into  effect  throughout  the  province. 
The  maximum  daily  limit  at  straight-time 
rates  remains  at   10  hours. 

The  maximum  amounts  that  may  be  de- 
ducted from  the  minimum  wage  for  board 
and  lodging,  furnished  as  part  payment  of 
wages,  have  also  been  increased  to  those  set 
in  the  General  Order  and  are  as  follows:  $6 
for  21  meals  in  a  seven-day  week;  $5.25  for 
18  meals  in  a  six-day  week;  35  cents  for 
single  meals;  $3  for  a  full  week's  lodging; 
and  50  cents  per  day  for  lodging  for  less 
than  one   week. 

Manitoba  Construction  Industry  Wages  Act 

In  Manitoba,  a  schedule  setting  minimum 
wages  and  maximum  hours  at  regular  rates 
for  employees  in  the  heavy  construction  in- 
dustry was  gazetted  as  Man.  Reg.  47/65  on 
June  12  and  went  into  force  on  July  1. 

The  minimum  now  payable  throughout 
Manitoba  for  crane  operators  hoisting  on 
building  construction  and  demolition  is  $2.25 
an  hour.  Mechanics  and  welders  on  heavy 
equipment  and  dragline,  shovel,  backhoe, 
clamshell,  grade-all  and  piledriver  operators 
must  be  paid  at  least  $1.80  an  hour.  Truck 
drivers  and  operators  of  equipment  and  trac- 
tors with  attachments  not  otherwise  specified 
are  to  receive  at  least  $1.50  an  hour.  A  mini- 
mum of  $1.40  an  hour  is  set  for  labourers 
and  other  persons  working  in  unclassified 
jobs.  The  minimum  for  watchmen  and  flag- 
men is  $1.05  an  hour. 

The  above  minimum  rates  are  based  on  a 
regular  work  week  of  60  hours  and  time-and- 
one-half  the  regular  rate  must  be  paid  for  all 
hours  worked  in  excess  of  the  standard 
weekly  hours.  After  November  1,  1965  em- 
ployees in  Metropolitan  Winnipeg  will  be  en- 
titled to  the  overtime  rate  after  48  hours  in 
a  week. 

Manitoba  Taxicab  Act 

A  regulation  under  the  Manitoba  Taxicab 
Act,  increasing  the  minimum  wages  of  taxi- 
cab  drivers,  was  gazetted  on  June  5  as  Man. 
Reg.  45/65. 

Under  the  new  provisions,  a  driver  hired 
by  the  week,  who  regularly  works  at  least 
nine  hours  a  day  for  six  days  in  a  week, 
must  now  be  paid  a  minimum  wage  of  $45 


a  week,  plus  80  cents  an  hour  for  each  hour 
on  duty  in  excess  of  54,  or  40  per  cent  of 
his  gross  intake  for  the  week,  whichever  is 
greater.  Previously,  the  minimum  was  $40 
a  week,  plus  75  cents  an  hour  for  hours  in 
excess  of  54  in  a  week,  or  40  per  cent  of 
the  gross  receipts,  whichever  was  greater. 

A  driver  hired  other  than  on  a  weekly 
basis  must  now  receive  a  minimum  of  $2.40 
for  each  day  on  duty,  with  an  additional  80 
cents  for  each  hour  in  excess  of  three  hours. 
Formerly,  the  minimum  for  drivers  in  this 
category  was  $2.10  a  day,  plus  70  cents  for 
each  hour  in  excess  of  three. 

New  Brunswick  Minimum  Wage  Act 

The  New  Brunswick  Minimum  Wage 
Board  has  issued  another  deferment  order  for 
employees  in  nursing  homes  and  homes  for 
the  aged,  postponing  the  application  of  the 
minimum  wage  order  for  the  service  indus- 
tries to  these  employees  until  December  31, 
1965  pending  further  study  and  research. 

The  minimum  wage  order  for  the  service 
industries  (No.  5)  set  a  minimum  wage  of 
65  cents  an  hour,  effective  January  1,  1965 
with  provision  for  an  increase  to  70  cents  an 
hour  on  July  1,  1965. 

Nova  Scotia  Minimum  Wage  Act 

A  new  General  Minimum  Wage  Order  is- 
sued by  the  Nova  Scotia  Minimum  Wage 
Board  was  gazetted  on  June  9  and  came  into 
effect  on  June  19.  This  Order  replaces  the 
General  Order  gazetted  February  10  (L.G. 
April  p.  348). 

There  has  been  no  change  in  minimum 
rates,  but  the  provision  requiring  the  payment 
of  time  and  one-half  the  regular  rate  for 
hours  in  excess  of  48  in  a  week  has  been 
suspended  until  further  order  of  the  Board. 
In  the  meantime,  employers  are  permitted  to 
pay  one  and  one-half  the  minimum  rate  for 
overtime  work. 

There  are  also  more  exemptions  from  the 
requirement  to  pay  the  overtime  rate.  Service 
station  operators  who,  under  the  Gasoline 
Licensing  Act,  must  remain  open  on  Satur- 
days, Sundays,  holidays  and  evenings,  are  not 
required  to  pay  the  overtime  rate  for  the 
weeks  they  are  so  required  to  remain  open. 

Also,  watchmen,  janitors  or  building  super- 
intendents, and  ambulance  drivers  may  be 
paid  at  the  minimum  rate  for  hours  worked 
in  excess  of  48  in  a  week.  The  overtime  rate 
for  transport  industry  employees  required  to 
be  away  from  their  home  base  overnight,  is 
changed  from  time  and  one-half  the  regular 
rate  to  time  and  one-half  the  minimum  rate 
for  hours  in  excess  of  96  in  any  two  con- 
secutive weeks. 


742 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      AUGUST   7965 


The  rate  for  work  on  a  holiday  has  also 
been  changed  to  time  and  one-half  the  mini- 
muni  rate  rather  than  time  and  one-half  the 
regular  rate,  with  the  added  alternative  of 
time  oil  equivalent  to  one  and  one-half  times 
the  hours  worked  on  the  holiday.  Hospital 
workers,  as  well  as  employees  in  a  motel, 
hotel,  restaurant,  or  tourist  industry,  may 
now  be  paid  the  straight-time  rate  for  work 
on  a  holiday. 

The  new  Order  removes  the  exemption 
previously  granted  forest  firefighters  subject 
to  the  Lands  and  Forests  Act,  and  persons 
covered  by  collective  agreements,  or  on 
whose  behalf  collective  agreements  are  being 
negotiated  or  have  been  concluded  as  a  re- 
sult of  negotiations  conducted  in  1965.  A 
new  provision  specifically  excepts  salesmen 
whose  hours  are  not  controlled  by  the  em- 
ployer, and  persons  employed  at  a  public 
playground  or  summer  camp  operated  on  a 
non-profit  basis. 


The  call-in  provision  has  been  reworded 
to  provide  that  the  rate  payable  is  the  mini- 
mum straight-time  rate,  and  to  exempt  from 
application  of  the  provision  ambulance  driv- 
ers, firemen,  policemen  and  hospital  em- 
ployees  required   to  work  in   an  emergency. 

Under  the  new  Order  the  ceiling  on  the 
maximum  number  of  inexperienced  employees 
in  a  working  force  has  been  raised  from  25 
per  cent  to  60  per  cent  for  hotel,  motel,  res- 
taurant, or  tourist  resort  operators  during  the 
summer  months.  The  prohibition  against 
charging  employees  for  the  purchase  and  up- 
keep of  uniforms  has  been  relaxed  to  permit 
employers  to  make  charges  or  deductions 
from  the  minimum  wage  for  the  cost  of  dry 
cleaning  uniforms,  made  of  woollen  or  simi- 
lar heavy  material. 

Instead  of  semi-monthly  payment  of  wages, 
the  new  Order  provides  that  wages  are  to  be 
paid  in  accordance  with  the  practice  of  the 
employment  at  regular  intervals,  not  exceed- 
ing monthly. 


Labour  Day  Messages 

(Continued  from  page  690) 

It  becomes  increasingly  evident  that  the 
most  essential  legislation  required  by  all 
Canadian  labour  in  this  period  of  time — char- 
acterized by  economists  as  days  of  industrial 
revolution — is  a  constructive,  positive  man- 
power policy  directed  to  selective  training 
and  placement  not  only  of  displaced  workers, 
but  also  of  those  new  recruits  coming  to  the 
labour  field  from  our  schools  and  colleges. 

Organized  labour  welcomes  the  introduc- 
tion of  the  Canada  Labour  (Standards)  Code 
as  a  positive  approach  to  the  challenge  of 
automated  industry,  and  stands  prepared  to 
co-operate  to  the  fullest  extent  in  implement- 
ing the  intent  of  this  legislation. 

We  also  appreciate  the  long  overdue 
Canada  Pension  Plan,  and  look  forward  to 
the  day  when  the  health  of  all  workers  and 
their  dependants  will  be  protected  by  ade- 
quate medicare  coverage. 

Let  us  then,  on  this  Labour  Day,  dedicate 
ourselves  to  continue  to  work  together, 
through  joint  discussions  and  consultations  at 
all  levels,  to  obtain  for  our  people  those 
things  they  most  earnestly  desire — security  of 
employment  and  an  adequate  standard  of  liv- 
ing above  all. 


National  Incomes  Commission 

(Continued  from  page  706) 

arguments  against  an  attempt  to  break  up  the 
existing  national  negotiating  machinery,  which 
effectively  determines  increases  for  some 
3,000,000  workers. 

The  Commission  thinks  that  the  Engineer- 
ing Employers'  Federation  was  probably  right 
in  claiming  that  the  alternative  to  the  settle- 
ment was  an  industrial  dispute  of  major  pro- 
portions leading  to  a  Court  of  Inquiry  and 
a  compromise,  and  that  this  might  have  been 
even  less  satisfactory  in  the  national  interest 
than  the  settlement  that  was  actually  made. 

The  Commission  says  that  it  wishes  to 
remove  misunderstanding  about  its  attitude 
to  a  reduction  in  the  hours  of  the  standard 
work  week.  It  points  out  that  such  a  reduc- 
tion is  undoubtedly  one  of  the  ways  in  which 
the  workers  can  claim  their  rightful  share  in 
the  growth  of  national  productivity,  but  it 
is  in  itself  a  claim  for  higher  wages  per 
hour  worked.  As  such  it  should  follow  the 
incomes  policy  rules  that  are  applicable  to 
all  claims  for  wage  increases. 

(Two  earlier  reports  released  by  the  British 
National  Incomes  Commission  were  reviewed 
in  the  July  and  October  1963  issues  of  the 
Labour   Gazette. — ED) 


THE   LABOUR    GAZETTE      •       AUGUST    1965 


743 


Monthly  Report  of  Placement  Operations 

of  the  National  Employment  Service 

Number  of  placements  in  June  was  113,900,  an  increase  of  4.4 
per  cent  over  June  1964,  and  4.8  per  cent  above  June  averages 
in  past  five  years.  Second  highest  total  for  June  since  1945 


Placements  of  workers  by  local  offices  of 
the  National  Employment  Service  in  June 
numbered  113,900,  an  increase  of  4.4  per 
cent  over  June,  1964.  This  was  the  second 
highest  June  total  since  1945,  and  4.8  per 
cent  above  the  average  for  June  in  the  pre- 
vious five  years. 

While  the  total  of  placements  reported  was 
the  same  as  in  the  previous  month,  June  this 
year  contained  two  more  working  days  than 
May.  When  allowance  is  made  for  this,  there 
has  been  no  change  in  the  usual  pattern  of 
placements  in  June  over  May. 

The  regional  distribution  of  June  place- 
ments, and  the  percentage  change  from  June 
1964  were: 

Atlantic 8,000     +  0.8 

Quebec  26,000     —  6.2 

Ontario 38,400     +  5.5 

Prairie  24,100     +  6.7 

Pacific 17,300     +20.0 

CANADA  113,900*  +  4.4 

The  large  percentage  increase  in  the  Paci- 
fic region  reflected  a  high  level  of  placement 
activity  in  the  manufacturing,  construction 
and  agricultural  sectors. 

Regular  placements  (those  with  an  antici- 
pated duration  of  more  than  six  working 
days)  totalled  81,000,  an  increase  of  6.5  per 
cent  over  the  June  1964  figure.  The  propor- 
tion of  regular  placements  to  all  placements 
increased  to  71.0  per  cent  from  69.6  per  cent 
in  June  1964. 

The  cumulative  total  of  all  placements  for 
the  first  half  of  1965  totalled  562,000,  an 
increase  of  4.5  per  cent  over  the  same  period 
in  1964.  This  is  the  second  highest  figure  for 
the  period  since  1945. 

The  regional  distribution  of  cumulative 
totals,  and  the  percentage  change  from  1964 
were: 

Atlantic  41,000     +   1.7 

Quebec  157,400     —  3.0 

Ontario  193,100     +  6.1 

Prairie       104,700     +  4.7 

Pacific   65,700     +22.8 

CANADA  562,000     +  4.5 

Male  placements  at  79,300,  increased  by 
6.5  per  cent  over  June  1964.  Regular  place- 
ments of  men  increased  by  9.7  per  cent  and 
accounted  for  almost  the  entire  gain  in  total 
placements. 


Regional  distribution  of  male  placements, 
and  the  percentage  change  from  1964  were: 


January-June 

June  19( 

1965 

Atlantic  ..     5,700 

+  3.2 

28,500     +  1.4 

Quebec  ..   19,000 

-  4.8 

115,600     -  2.4 

Ontario  ..  25,900 

+  7.4 

132,200     +  8.6 

Prairie  ....   17,600 

+  8.7 

73,500     +  6.2 

Pacific  ....   11,200 

+28.1 

44,700     +31.0 

Canada  79,300* 

+  6.5 

394,500    +  6.2 

Female  placements  amounted  to  34,500, 
virtually  unchanged  from  June  1964.  In- 
creases were  recorded  in  Ontario,  Prairie  and 
Pacific  regions,  but  offsetting  decreases  in  the 
Atlantic  and  Quebec  regions  produced  a  re- 
duction of  0.3  per  cent. 

The  regional  distribution  of  female  place- 
ments, and  the  percentage  change  from  1964 
were: 

January-June 
June  1965  1965 

Atlantic 2,300     -4.6         12,600     +2.4 

Quebec  7,000     —9.6         41,900     —4.5 

Ontario  12,600     +1.8         60,900     +1.1 

Prairie 6,600     +1.7         31,200     +1.2 

Pacific  6,100     +7.5         20,900     +8.3 

Canada  ..  34,500*  -0.3       167,500     +0.6 

Placements  involving  the  movement  of 
workers  from  one  area  to  another  totalled 
5,100,  unchanged  from  June  1964. 

Employers  notified  the  local  offices  of  the 
National  Employment  Service  of  145,000  va- 
cancies in  June.  This  was  an  increase  of  7.5 
per  cent  over  June  1964,  and  14.7  per  cent 
over  the  average  for  the  month  during  the 
previous  five  years. 

The  increase  in  demand  was  common  to 
all  regions  except  Quebec,  and  applied  to 
jobs  for  both  male  and  female  workers.  The 
96,400  vacancies  for  men  was  an  increase  of 
10.1  per  cent  over  the  total  for  June  last 
year,  and  the  48,600  female  vacancies  was 
an  increase  of  2.9  per  cent.  The  cumulative 
total  for  January-June  1965  was  745,600. 
This  was  an  increase  of  6.7  per  cent  over  the 
corresponding  period  in  1964,  and  the  highest 
number  recorded  for  any  comparable  period 
since  1947. 


*Imbalances  are  the  result  of  rounding. 


744 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      AUGUST   7965 


UNEMPLOYMENT   INSURANCE 


Monthly  Report  on  Operation  of 

the  Unemployment  Insurance  Act 

At  end  of  May,  total  of  claimants  for  benefits  was  8  per  cent 
smaller  than  total  year  earlier.  Number  of  initial,  renewal 
claims  during  month  was  11,900  below  total  in  May  last  year 


Claimants  for  unemployment  insurance 
benefit  on  May  31  numbered  229,500,  a 
figure  about  20,000,  or  approximately  8  per 
cent,  below  the  total  a  year  earlier.  The 
total  on  April  30  was  462,900,  of  whom 
145,100  were  seasonal  benefit  claimants.  The 
May  31  figure  represents  regular  claimants 
only,  since  seasonal  benefit  was  not  payable 
to  persons  who  became  unemployed  after 
May  15. 

Both  this  year  and  last  year,  women  made 
up  a  third  of  the  May  31  total.  This  is  a 
marked  change  from  the  end  of  April,  when 
a  quarter  of  the  claimants  were  women.  The 
decline  in  the  proportion  of  male  claimants 
during  May  is  associated  with  the  seasonal 
increase  in  activity  in  sections  of  the  econ- 
omy, such  as  construction,  where  employees 
are  almost  all  men. 

Initial  and  Renewal  Claims 

There  were  93,300  initial  and  renewal 
claims  during  May,  compared  with  105,200 
a  year  earlier.  In  April  the  total  was  150,800. 
The  decline  during  May  is  partly  attributable 
to  the  cutting-off  of  seasonal  benefit  pay- 
ments in  the  middle  of  the  month. 

About  75  per  cent  of  the  new  claimants 
during  May,  compared  with  70  per  cent  in 
April,  were  persons  who  had  become  unem- 
ployed during  the  month. 

Beneficiaries  and  Benefit  Payments 

The  average  weekly  number  of  beneficiaries 
was  estimated  at  324,300  for  May,  435,300 
for  April  and  340,300  for  May  1964. 

Benefit  payments  amounted  to  $31,700,000 
in  May,  $43,300,000  in  April  and  $33,100,000 
in  May  1964.  Part  of  the  decline  in  May 
was  due  to  the  termination  of  seasonal  bene- 
fit payments  on  May  15. 

The  average  weekly  payment  was  $24.40 
in  May,  $24.87  in  April  and  $24.33  in  May 
1964. 


Insurance  Registrations 

On  May  31,  insurance  books  or  contribu- 
tion cards  had  been  issued  to  3,241,645  em- 
ployees who  had  made  contributions  to  the 
Unemployment  Insurance  Fund  since  April 
1,  1965. 

On  the  same  date,  registered  employers 
numbered  342,297,  an  increase  of  1,326  since 
April  30. 

Enforcement  Statistics 

During  May,  9,703  investigations  were  con- 
ducted by  enforcement  officers  across  Canada. 
Of  these,  6,594  were  spot  checks  of  claims 
to  verify  the  fulfilment  of  statutory  condi- 
tions, and  583  were  miscellaneous  investiga- 
tions. The  remaining  2,526  were  investiga- 
tions in  connection  with  claimants  suspected 
of  making  false  statements  to  obtain  bene- 
fits. 

Prosecutions  were  begun  in  244  cases,  78 
against  employers  and  166  against  claimants.* 

Punitive  disqualifications  as  a  result  of  false 
statements  or  misrepresentations  by  claim- 
ants numbered   1,005.* 

Unemployment   Insurance   Fund 

Revenue  received  by  the  Unemployment 
Insurance  Fund  in  May  totalled  $30,743,- 
561.80,t  compared  with  $26,498, 308.44 1  in 
April,  and  $28,647,547.72  in  May   1964. 

Benefits  paid  in  May  totalled  $31,697,- 
100.37, t  compared  with  $43,320,042,621  in 
April,  and  $33,117,216.60  in  May  1964. 

The  balance  in  the  Fund  on  May  31  was 
$22,721,490.23, t  on  April  30  it  was  $22,037,- 
228.40, t  and  on  May  31,  1964,  there  was 
a  debit  balance  of  $30,658,443.93. 


*  These  do  not  necessarily  relate  to  the 
investigations   conducted  during  this  period. 

t  All  figures  for  May  and  April  1965  are  taken 
from  an  interim  statement,  and  are  subject  to 
amendment. 


A  claimant's  unemployment  register  is  placed  in  the  "live  file"  at  the  local  office  as  soon 
as  the  claim  is  made.  As  a  result,  the  court  of  claimants  at  any  given  time  inevitably  includes 
some  whose  claims  are  in  process.  Claimants  should  not  be  interpreted  either  as  "total  number 
of  beneficiaries"  or  "total  job  applicants." 


THE  LABOUR   GAZETTE      •      AUGUST    7965 


745 


Decisions  of  the  Umpire  under 

the  Unemployment  Insurance  Act 


Decision  CI  B  2472,  March  11,  1965 

[Translation) 

Seminary  of  the  Main  Facts — A  claim  for 
benefits  was  filed  by  the  claimant  on  August 
28.  1964.  He  had  last  worked  as  a  labourer 
from  March  1964  to  August  19,  1964.  He 
stated  that  he  had  stopped  working  because 
of  the  strike,  had  unsuccessfully  tried  to  cross 
the  picket  line,  had  stopped  paying  his  union 
dues,  and  now  belonged  to  the  Comite  de 
bonne  entente,  or  goodwill  committee. 

There  was  no  collective  agreement  in  effect 
between  employer  and  union  when,  on  Jan- 
uary 2?.  1964,  the  union  was  recognized  by 
the  Labour  Relations  Board  (Commission 
des  Relations  Ouvrieres)  of  the  Province  of 
Quebec  as  the  negotiating  agent  for  all  wage- 
earning  employees  of  the  company  except 
office  employees,  foremen  and  employees  of 
higher  standing.  Negotiations  were  started, 
but  when  they  failed  to  achieve  results,  the 
trade  union  requested  and  was  granted  the 
help  of  a  Department  of  Labour  conciliator. 

On  August  18,  1964,  the  employer  notified 
the  union  that  he  would  not  be  present  at 
the  meeting  slated  for  August  20,  1964  be- 
cause the  union  no  longer  represented  the 
majority  of  employees.  The  employer  said  he 
had  discovered  that  88  out  of  the  106  em- 
ployees concerned  were  no  longer  trade  union 
members,  but  belonged  to  the  Comite  de 
bonne  entente,  or  goodwill  committee,  and 
that  it  would  therefore  be  unrealistic  to  pur- 
sue negotiations.  The  union  accused  the  em- 
ployer of  having  set  up  this  goodwill  com- 
mittee with  the  help  of  his  foremen. 

On  August  20,  1964  a  picket  line  was 
formed  in  front  of  the  employer's  plant  by 
local  union  members  who  were  joined  by 
unionists  from  outside.  The  picket  line  was 
eventually  supported  by  all  employees  of  the 
company  except  the  night  watchman  and  the 
owner,  and  there  was  a  complete  stoppage 
of  work. 

The  insurance  officer  disqualified  the  claim- 
ant as  of  August  23,  1964,  under  Section  63 
of  the  Act,  ruling  that  he  had  lost  his  em- 
ployment by  reason  of  a  stoppage  of  work 
attributable  to  a  labour  dispute  at  the  factory 
where  he  was  employed,  and  that  conse- 
quently he  did  not  meet  the  exception  re- 
quirements. 

The  claimant  appealed  to  a  board  of  referees 
on  the  ground  that  he  had  in  no  way  taken  part 
in  the  labour  dispute,  and  that  he,  as  well  as 
most  of  his  fellow  workers,  were  not  interested 
in  the  labour  dispute  and  its  results,  because 
only  16  of  the  106  employees  concerned  could 
be  held  responsible  for  the  work  stoppage. 


The  insurance  officer  considered  that  since 
work  had  been  substantially  resumed  on  Sep- 
tember  16,  1964,  the  claimant's  disqualification 
ended  on  September  15,   1964. 

The  board  of  referees  ruled  that  the  work  stop- 
page in  this  matter  could  be  ascribed  to  a  labour 
dispute,  since  it  was  owing  to  a  breakdown  in 
collective  bargaining,  and  that  the  claimant  had 
lost  his  employment  because  of  a  stoppage  of 
work  caused  by  a  labour  dispute.  However,  the 
board  of  referees  reached  the  conclusion  that  the 
claimant  had  fulfilled  the  conditions  of  Section 
63(2)    and   therefore   could   not   be   disqualified. 

The  board  of  referees'  decision  reads  partly 
as  follows: 

".  .  .  Concerning  the  first  point  at  issue,  the 
board  of  referees  confirms  the  officer's  decision, 
and  states  that  the  claimant  lost  his  employment 
because  of  a  stoppage  of  work  resulting  from  a 
labour  dispute. 

"As  the  aforementioned  point  at  issue  was  de- 
cided in  the  affirmative,  the  board  of  referees 
must  now  determine  whether  or  not  the  insured 
person  can  be  exempted  from  disqualification  as 
provided  in  Section  63(2)    of  the  Act. 

"In  order  to  be  entitled  to  benefit,  the  claim- 
ant must  establish  that  he  is  not  participating  in, 
or  financing,  or  directly  interested  in  the  labour 
dispute  that  caused  the  stoppage  of  work,  and 
moreover,  that  he  does  not  belong  to  a  grade  or 
class  of  workers  that,  immediately  before  the 
commencement  of  the  stoppage,  included  mem- 
bers who  were  employed  at  the  premises  at  which 
the  stoppage  took  place. 

"The  claimant  and  all  those  listed  in  the 
schedule  submitted  that  they  in  no  way  partici- 
pated in  the  labour  dispute,  since  they  never 
voted  in  favour  of  the  strike,  and,  indeed,  never 
put  down  their  names  on  a  strike  voting  list,  and, 
since  they  had  never  even  been  called  upon  to 
vote  on  the  strike  issue  they  had  stopped  paying 
their  contributions  for  three  months  and  had 
broken  with  the  Union  by  handing  in  their  res- 
ignation to  the  Union  as  well  as  to  the  Labour 
Relations  Board. 

"It  is  clear  that  the  claimant . . .  did  in  no  way 
finance  the  labour  dispute  and  was  not  directly 
interested  in  it,  as  they  did  not  consider  them- 
selves union  members. 

"The  board  of  referees  has  no  wish  to  impair 
the  decision  which  will  probably  be  rendered  by 
the  Labour  Relations  Board,  but  the  board  must 
consider  the  mass  resignation  of  80  per  cent  of 
the  members  of  the  negotiating  agent,  i.e.  the 
trade  union,  in  order  that  the  claimant's  assump- 
tion to  the  effect  that  he  was  not  interested  in 
the  labour  dispute  be  proved  by  such  a  mass 
resignation. 

"The  attorney  has  produced  a  series  of  docu- 
ments which  have  been  examined  by  the  board 
of  referees,  and  he  has  specifically  referred  to 
a  photostated  document  which  was  sent  to  the 
Labour  Relations  Board  bearing  written  testi- 
mony to  the  resignation  of  80  per  cent  of  the 
union  members  in  May,  1964.  Moreover,  the 
claimant . .  .  tried  on  different  occasions  to  break 
through  the  picket  line  and  go  back  to  work, 
but  all  these  efforts  resulted  in  clashes  which 
prevented  the  claimant . . .  from  going  back  to 
work. 


746 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      AUGUST    7965 


"Moreover,  the  employees  tried  u>  return  to 
work  ever>  day,  but  could  .net  ao  furthei  than 
the  picket  line  which,  according  to  the  claimant's 
assertion,  numbered  approximately  125  men;  out 
of  mem  about  15  or  i(>  were  former  employees 
of  the  plant  concerned. 

"The  board  of  referees  does  nol  have  to  de- 
cide whethei  an)  pressure  was  exercised  on  the 
union  regarding  the  resignation  of  members,  as 
tins  comes  under  tin-  jurisdiction  of  the  Labour 
Relations  Board  which  will  take  me  required 
action,  but  has  to  examine  onl)  the  hare  facts, 
as  to  whether  or  not  there  were  actual  re 
dons.  As  these  occurred  and  served  as  basis  for 
the  injunctions  which  were  allowed  in  order  to 
break  the  picket  line,  according  to  the  exhibits 
produced,  the  board  of  referees  concludes  that 
the  claimant  et  a! . . .  are  not  members  of  the 
union  involved  and  that,  consequently,  those  15 
Of  10  people  who  participated  in  the  picketing 
and  the  labour  dispute  are  not  fellow  workers  of 
the  s.une  class  or  category  as  that  of  the  claim- 
ant et  al  .  .  .  Besides,  the  massive  resignation  of 
union  members  creates,  in  fact,  a  dissolution  re- 
garding which  the  Labour  Relations  Board  of 
Quebec  will  have  to  make  a  decision  .  .  . 

An  appeal  to  the  Umpire  was  made  by  the 
insurance  officer  on  October  20,  1964,  in  the 
following  terms: 

The  board  of  referees  made  a  mistake  in  de- 
ciding that  disqualification  under  section  63 
should  not  be  imposed  since  section  63(2)  of  the 
Act   applied. 

The  provisions  of  section  80(2)  (a)  of  the  Act 
applied  to  the  present  case  as  the  present  appeal 
was  made  within  21  days  following  the  date  on 
which  the  hoard  of  referees  rendered  its  decision 
on  the  grounds  that  the  claimant  should  be  dis- 
qualified under  section  63  of  the  Act .  .  . 

The  reasons  given  by  the  insurance  officer 
for  the  appeal  are  as  follows: 

.  .  .  The  board  of  referees  has  wrongly  decided 
that  the  claimant  met  the  requirements  of  section 
63(2)   of  the  Act. 

The  questions  involved  regarding  the  signature 
of  a  first  collective  agreement  and  the  right  of 
the  union  ...  to  negotiate  were  liable  to  affect 
the  employment  of  the  claimants  and  their  work- 
ing conditions,  since  the  union  . .  .  was  the  nego- 
tiating body  recognized  by  the  Labour  Relations 
Board  to  represent  the  claimants  for  the  period 
concerned. 

The  Umpire  has  often  maintained  that  a  claim- 
ant was  directly  interested  in  a  labour  dispute 
whenever  his  working  conditions  were  liable  to 
be  affected  by  the  settlement  of  the  dispute 
(CUBs  1514,  1521A,  2032),  whether  or  not  he 
is  a  union  member,  in  favour  or  against  the  pos- 
sible changes,  or  just  indifferent  (CUB  2032). 
Also,  the  choice  of  a  particular  labour  union  as 
a  negotiating  agent  and  representative  constitutes 
a  working  condition  and  an  element  liable  to 
affect    working   conditions    (CUBs    1136,    1448). 

Under  these  circumstances,  the  board  of  ref- 
erees erroneously  concluded  that  the  claimant 
had  proved  a  lack  of  direct  interest  in  the  labour 
dispute  on  his  part  and  on  that  of  his  fellow 
workers  of  the  same  grade  or  class  who  were 
employed  at  the  same  place  immediately  before 
the  work  stoppage. 

With  regard  to  the  participation  in  the  labour 
dispute,  it  must  be  pointed  out  that  the  only  evi- 
dence of  disorder  or  violence  was  in  connection 
with  the  incidents  which  occurred  on  September 
3,  1964,  i.e.  two  weeks  after  the  beginning  of  the 
work  stoppage  which  meant  a  complete  standstill 
of  activity  for  all  employees. 


Moreover,  the  evidence  on  file  indicates  that 
the  employees  were  split  in  two  groups  with 
opposite  views.  The  claimants  concerned  were 
the  majority  group,  which  had  formed  the  so- 
called  goodwill  committee"  which  was  trying  to 
take    awa>    from    the    union...   its  right    to 

tiate,  which  the  latter  had  obtained  and  was  de- 
fending. 

The  dispute  thus  affected  relations,  not  only 
between  employer  and  employees,  but  also  be- 
tween the  two  groups  o[  employees,  and  under 
these  circumstances,  it  would  seem  that  the 
hoard  o\'  referees  erroneously  concluded  that  the 
claimant  had  proved  non-invol\ ement  in  the  dis- 
pute on  his  part  and  that  of  his  co-workers  of 
the  same  grade  or  class  who  were  employed  on 
the  same  premises  immediately  before  the  com- 
mencement  oi  the  Stoppage  of  work. 

As  the  claimant  has  not  proved  that  he  met 
with  all  the  requirements  of  section  63(2)  of  the 
Act  .  .  .  the  decision  of  the  hoard  of  referees 
should  be  revoked  and  the  decision  of  the  insur- 
ance officer  reinstated. 

In  a  submission  dated  1  December,  1964, 
the  attorney  representing  the  claimants  re- 
quested a  hearing  and  made  the  following 
observations,  among  others. 

In  his  appeal  to  the  Umpire,  the  insurance  offi- 
cer puts  forth  motives  regarding  which  we  feel 
it  is  our  duty  to  point  out  certain  errors  or  inac- 
curacies liable  to  confuse  the  present  issue,  e.g.: 

Towards  the  end  of  paragraph  2  of  his  motives 
for  appeal,  the  insurance  officer  states  that  "The 
union  has  accused  the  employer  of  having  set 
up  the  goodwill  committee  together  with  his 
foremen." 

The  Union  may  have  brought  up  this  accusa- 
tion, which  is,  however,  entirely  unfounded. 
Moreover,  in  the  request  presented  by  the  work- 
ers and  asking  for  the  decertification  of  the 
Union,  it  is  clearly  mentioned  and  proved  that 
the  employees  had  resigned  from  the  Union  of 
their  own  free  will  as  they  had  not  been  repre- 
sented according  to  their  wishes  and  disapproved 
of  the  violent  tactics  of  the  union  organizers, 
and  that  the  company  had  not  influenced  them 
in  any  way.  Besides,  the  company  had  twice  met 
with  union  representatives  after  three-quarters  of 
the  employees  had  left  the  union,  which  proves 
that  the  company  had  no  hand  in  the  paid  res- 
ignation. 

At  the  end  of  paragraph  2  of  his  motives 
for  appeal,  the  insurance  officer  also  states:  'And 
the  picket  line  was  observed  by  all  the  employees 
of  the  company,  except  by  the  night  watchman 
and  the  owner." 

This  allegation  is  utterly  wrong.  In  fact,  nei- 
ther the  directors  of  the  company,  nor  the  office 
Staff,  the  foremen,  all  the  employees  of  the  com- 
pany, the  customers  or  the  delivery-men  observed 
the  picket  line.  However,  it  was  impossible  to 
pass  the  picket  line  which  resorted  to  physical 
means  of  coercion,  if  necessary.  This  was  clearly 
proved  to  the  Unemployment  Insurance  Commis- 
sion in  Shawinigan  as  well  as  the  board  of  ref- 
erees. 

All  the  employees  mentioned  on  this  list  of 
appeal  are,  without  exception,  ready  to  give  evi- 
dence before  the  Umpire  in  Ottawa,  and  to  tes- 
tify that  they  neither  wanted  nor  acknowledged 
the  picketing  in  any  form,  that  they  attempted 
to  return  to  work,  but  were  restrained  by  brute 
force  and  most  serious  threats. 

At  the  beginning  of  paragraph  9  of  his  motives 
for  appeal,  the  insurance  officer  states  that  the 
workers  had  attempted  to  return  to  work  only 
on  September  3,  1964.  This  again  is  quite  erro- 
neous. The  employees  involved  in  the  present 
appeal  had   tried   to   return  to  work  every  day, 


THE  LABOUR   GAZETTE      •      AUGUST    1965 


747 


and  one  da)  even  several  times.  Supporting  evi- 
dence to  this  effect  was  given  to  the  Unemploy- 
ment Insurance  Commission.  Regarding  3  Sep- 
tember. N64.  there  is  evidence  of  another  kind, 
as  the  employees  were  filmed  when  attempting 
to  return  to  work,  some  picketers  being  clubbed 
on  that  occasion. 

(The  claimants)  hereby  wish  to  make  a  re- 
quest for  a  hearing  before  the  Umpire  in  Ottawa, 
while  further  asking  that  the  Umpire  uphold  the 
decision  of  the  board  of  referees  of  the  Unem- 
ployment Insurance  Commission  of  Shawinigan, 
and  that  unemployment  insurance  benefits  be 
granted. 

The  claimants'  lawyer  concluded  as  fol- 
lows: 

It  is  respectfully  submitted  that  this  concerns 
not  so  much  a  labour  dispute  as  picketing  that 
was  meant  as  a  coercive  means  to  force  the  em- 
ployees to  join  the  union.  Therefore,  this  is  a 
dispute  between  the  union  and  the  employees  of 
a  plant.  Now,  according  to  the  Act,  a  labour 
dispute  is  any  dispute  between  employers  and 
employees,  or  between  employees  and  employees, 
that  is  connected  with  terms  or  conditions  of 
employment.  We  respectfully  submit  that  this  is 
not  the  case.  Therefore,  this  is  not  a  labour  dis- 
pute. The  employees  involved  are  entitled  to 
benefit. 

If,  as  the  Umpire  concludes,  the  matter  is  to 
be  considered  a  labour  dispute,  then  the  workers 
involved  have  the  right  to  receive  their  insurance 
benefits  for  the  following  reasons: 

a)  (The  claimants)  were  never  the  cause  of 
the  work  stoppage,  but  rather  its  victims.  So  if 
they  are  victimized  by  the  work  stoppage,  they 
have  the  right  to  receive  unemployment  insur- 
ance benefits.  In  our  humble  opinion,  this  argu- 
ment alone  is  sufficient  to  allow  their  receiving 
unemployment  insurance  benefits. 

b)  According  to  the  provisions  contained  in 
paragraph  2  of  section  63  of  the  Unemployment 
Insurance  Act,  these  employees  have  the  right  to 
draw  their  unemployment  insurance  benefits  since 
they  have  in  no  way  either  voted  in  favor  of  the 
strike,  nor  approved  the  picketing,  nor  partici- 
pated in  it,  nor  financed  it  directly  or  indirectly 
through  an  intermediary  or  otherwise.  They  have, 
on  the  contrary,  disapproved  of  the  strike  and 
the  picketing  and  have  tried  every  day  to  return 
to  work,  but  were  prevented  from  doing  so. 

c)  The  picket  line  was  formed  by  a  group  of 
125  to  150  picketers  who  were  all  strangers  ex- 
cept a  dozen  from  the  company. 

d)  Serious  threats  were  made  with  regard  to  all 
those  who  went  to  work  or  wanted  to  go  to  work. 

e)  At  the  start  of  the  picketing,  all  the  em- 
ployees sent  a  telegram,  which  everyone  had 
signed,  to  the  Labour  Relations  Board,  stating 
that  they  wanted  to  go  back  to  their  jobs  but 
were  stopped  from  doing  so  by  strangers  who 
formed  a  picket  line.  They  then  asked  the  Board 
to  break  up  the  picket  line  immediately  and  to 
decertify  the  union. 

f)  At  the  request  of  the  employees,  the  town 
council  .  .  .  requested  through  a  sheriff  that  the 
headquarters  of  the  Provincial  Police  . . .  send  a 
police  detachment  as  soon  as  possible,  in  order 
to  enforce  the  right  of  the  employees  to  return 
to  work,  as  it  was  their  wish  to  do. 

g)  This  was  in  no  way  an  employees'  strike 
against  the  company,  nor  a  labour  dispute,  nor 
a  work  stoppage  willed  by  the  employees. 

There  may  be  very  few  precedents  where  the 
Unemployment  Insurance  Commission  has  al- 
lowed or  refused  benefit  in  similar  cases,  because 
no  identical  cases  ever  occurred  before. 


Therefore  it  is  recommended  that  (the  claim- 
ants) be  granted  their  unemployment  insurance 
benefit  and  that  the  unanimous  decision  rendered 
by  the  board  of  referees ...  be  upheld. 

The  case  was  heard  by  the  Umpire  at  Que- 
bec City,  on  March  3,  1965. 

Considerations  and  Conclusions:  The  ver- 
bal or  written  representations  submitted  at 
the  hearing  by  the  claimants'  lawyer  are 
based  on  a  feeling  of  sympathy,  which  we 
can  only  share  for  those  who  were  deprived 
by  brutal  force  of  their  unquestionable  right 
to  continue  working  for  an  employer  and 
under  conditions  of  their  choice.  However, 
the  attempt,  legal  or  not,  of  a  small  minor- 
ity of  workers  to  force  the  hand  of  their 
employer  or  of  their  co-workers  is  directly 
related  to  the  securement  of  new  working 
conditions,  which  would  consist  in  the  recog- 
nition of  that  minority  by  the  union  or  in 
the  signature  of  an  agreement  with  the  latter. 

According  to  the  evidence  filed — and  as 
the  board  of  referees  unanimously  agreed — ■ 
this  is  a  labour  dispute  as  mentioned  in  sec- 
tion 2(j)  of  the  Act,  which  dispute  caused 
a  work  stoppage  from  August  20  to  Septem- 
ber 15,   1964,  inclusive. 

Moreover,  according  to  the  evidence,  the 
point  upon  which  the  insistence  and  the  re- 
sistance of  the  parties  are  mainly,  if  not  ex- 
clusively, focussed  in  respect  of  the  dispute 
was  the  recognition  of  the  union  as  the  nego- 
tiating agent  for  all  the  employees  of  the 
company,  "with  the  exception  of  the  office 
staff,  the  foremen  and  the  administrative 
staff." 

Now,  it  is  proved  that  the  claimant  did 
not  belong  to  the  class  of  employees  men- 
tioned in  the  above  exceptions.  He  was,  as 
were  all  the  employees  of  his  class,  therefore 
"directly  interested"  in  the  labour  dispute  ac- 
cording to  the  interpretation  given  to  that 
expression  in  the  numerous  precedents  in- 
volving decisions  of  the  Umpire  on  similar 
cases.  The  insurance  officer  having  referred 
to  some  of  these  decisions  in  his  motives  for 
appeal,  there  is  no  need  to  elaborate  further. 

I  therefore  rule  that  the  claimant  has  not 
proved  that  he  was  not  directly  interested  in 
the  labour  dispute  as  required  under  section 
63(2)  of  the  Act.  Consequently,  he  was 
rightly  disqualified  by  the  insurance  officer, 
and  it  is  not  necessary  to  decide  whether  he 
participated  in,  or  financed  the  dispute,  be- 
cause, according  to  the  established  jurispru- 
dence, a  claimant  who  is  directly  interested 
in  a  labour  dispute,  or  belongs  to  a  grade 
or  class  of  workers  of  which  one  member  is 
directly  interested,  should,  according  to  sec- 
tion 63  of  the  Act,  be  disqualified,  even  if 
he,  or  any  member  of  his  grade  or  class  of 
workers,  has  not  participated  in  the  dispute 
or  financed  it. 


748 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE     •      AUGUST   7965 


For  these  reasons.  I  decide  to  reject  the 
decision  of  the  board  of  referees  and  to  allow 
the  appeal  of  the  insurance  officer. 

Decision  CUB  2474,  March  11,  1965 

Summary  of  the  Main  Facts:  The  claimant, 
filed  an  initial  application  for  benefit  on 
August  25.  1964,  and  stated  that  he  had 
worked  as  a  spot  welder  at  a  wage  of  $100 
a  week  from  May  11,  1964  to  August  14, 
1964  when  he  was  laid  off.  The  claim  was 
allowed. 

He  filed  a  claim  as  a  continuing  claimant 
on  October  21.  1964,  and  stated  that  he  had 
worked  as  a  labourer  for  a  different  Com- 
pany at  a  wage  of  $1.65  an  hour  from  Octo- 
ber 2,  1964,  to  October  20,  1964.  In  regard 
to   his   separation   therefrom,   he   explained: 

I  was  temporarily  laid  off  from  [Company  Al 
in  September  1964.  While  I  worked  there  I  had 
to  wear  gloves  at  all  times  during  working  hours. 
In  fact  I  was  told  by  the  foreman  there,  a  per- 
son would  be  released  from  their  job  if  they 
were  caught  without  their  gloves  on. 

I  was  hired  by  [Company  B]  to  work  on  a 
temporary  job  in  the  shipping  department.  I  was 
not  told  exactly  how  long  the  job  would  last, 
but  I  believe  it  would  have  been  for  another 
two  weeks  from  judging  the  amount  of  work 
that  has  yet  to  be  done. 

One  day  last  week  the  foreman  said  to  me  I 
would  probably  be  able  to  work  easier  if  I  took 
my  gloves  off  when  I  was  working  on  smaller 
materials.  Most  of  the  pipe  fittings  I  had  to  move 
around  were  unfinished — therefore  the  metal  was 
rough  and  dirty.  Because  I  was  used  to  working 
with  gloves  on  I  just  kept  on  wearing  them  all 
the  time.  The  wooden  boxes  I  put  the  pipe  fit- 
tings into  were  also  quite  rough  and  one  day  I 
did  get  a  splinter  in  my  hand,  which  had  gone 
through  the  glove.  I  did  not  feel  working  with 
gloves  on  slowed  me  down  at  all,  but  I  think  the 
foreman  thought  it  did.  It  was  much  safer  work- 
ing with  gloves  on  at  all  times. 

Yesterday,  20  October  1964,  the  foreman  told 
me  to  take  the  gloves  off,  and  that  he  had  told 
me  two  or  three  times  before  to  work  without 
them  on  smaller  fittings;  and  that  if  he  saw  them 
on  me  again,  he  would  ask  me  to  leave  the  job. 

This  was  only  the  second  time  he  mentioned 
the  gloves,  and  because  of  the  way  he  spoke,  I 
told  him  if  he  didn't  like  me  to  wear  the  gloves, 
I  would  leave  the  job.  He  just  walked  away  from 
me,  so  I  went  home  and  I  do  not  intend  to  re- 
turn to  the  job. 

In  the  confirmation  of  separation  (form 
UIC  479)  the  employer  stated  on  October 
22,  1964  as  follows: 

Quit — insisted  on  wearing  gloves  when  super- 
visor considered  them  detrimental  to  job  effi- 
ciency. 

The  local  office  obtained  information  from 
the  employer  that  the  job  would  have  ended 
in  the  week  commencing  October  25,   1964. 

The  insurance  officer  disqualified  the  claim- 
ant and  suspended  benefit  from  October  18, 
1964  to  October  31.  1964  inclusive,  on  the 
ground  that  the  claimant  had  voluntarily  left 
his  employment  on  October  20,  1964  without 
just  cause  (section  60(1)  of  the  Act). 


The  claimant  appealed  to  a  board  of  ref- 
erees on  November  2,   1964,  and  said: 
...While  I  was  employed  with  [Company  Bl 

I  was  working  in  the  shipping  area.  In  order  to 
carry  out  my  duties,  it  was  necessary  for  me  to 
handle  all  types  and  weights  of  castings  and 
fittings. 

In  the  interests  of  safety  and  the  protection  of 
my  hands,  from  cuts,  steel  slivers,  and  wood 
slivers,  I  wore  gloves  provided  by  the  company. 
|The  foreman]  requested  that  I  not  wear  gloves. 
This  was  difficult  to  understand  because  I  was 
handling  metal  parts,  and  he  issued  me  the  gloves 
in    the   first  place. 

Finally,  [the  foreman]  stated  that  I  either  take 
the  gloves  off  or  he  would  send  me  home. 

I  quit  rather  than  being  fired  because  I  have 
never  been  fired  in  my  life  . . . 

The  local  office  wrote  to  Company  B  on 
November  3,  1964,  and  requested  comments 
on  the  statements  contained  in  the  above- 
mentioned  appeal  of  the  claimant.  The  em- 
ployer's reply  of  November  4,  1964  included 
a  signed  statement  by  [the  foreman],  super- 
visor of  shipping,  which  statement  reads: 

...  It  is  true  gloves  are  issued  to  shipping  dept. 
employees  for  handling  large  and  rough  fittings. 

In  the  case  in  question  [claimant]  was  han- 
dling small  finished  fittings  where  there  was  no 
danger  requiring  gloves.  Actually  gloves  in  this 
case  adversely  affect  efficiency  and  for  this  rea- 
son the  man  was  ordered  to  remove  the  gloves. 
[Claimant]  had  been  warned  of  this  on  previous 
occasions . . . 

A  board  of  referees  heard  the  case  on 
November  27,  1964.  The  majority  decision 
of  the  board  reads: 

Claimant  appeared  along  with  Mr. — ,  U.A.W., 
and  in  addition,  Mr. — ,  who  was  the  claimant's 
supervisor  in  his  employment  at  [Company  B]. 
[Supervisor]  brought  with  him  3  different  sizes 
of  parts  which  were  handled  by  the  claimant  in 
his  employment.  The  handling  consisted  of  plac- 
ing the  parts  in  a  bin  from  a  drum  of  parts 
after  they  had  been  finished.  These  parts  were 
examined  by  the  members  of  the  board  and  it 
is  the  opinion  of  the  majority  that  they  did  not 
constitute  a  hazard  with  regard  to  the  safety 
angle.  It  is  possible  for  one's  hands  to  become 
roughened,  etc.,  by  handling  them  for  a  period 
of  time,  but  the  same  thing  might  be  said  of 
work  around  one's  home  or  in  one's  garden. 
[UAW  representative]  very  ably  contended  that 
the  whole  issue  in  this  case  was  that  of  safety 
regulations  as  opposed  to  operating  efficiency  and 
his  thesis  was  that  the  Company  was  putting 
efficiency  above  safety.  However,  the  majority 
of  the  board  do  not  feel  that  the  safety  regula- 
tions in  effect  at  Company  [B]  are  at  issue  be- 
fore this  board,  but  whether  the  man  left  volun- 
tarily without  just  cause. 

.  .  .  The  majority  of  the  board  feel  that  on  the 
evidence  in  the  submission  and  the  statements  of 
those  appearing  before  the  board,  it  must  be 
accepted  that  the  claimant  left  his  job  with 
[Company  B]  on  20  October  1964,  without  just 
cause. 

.  .  .  The  claimant's  appeal  is  disallowed  and  the 
decision  of  the  insurance  officer  is  upheld. 


THE   LABOUR    GAZETTE 

91939—5 


•      AUGUST    1965 


749 


The  dissenting  member  of  the  board  of 
referees  stated: 

The  facts  are  in  the  submission  and  [U.A.W. 
representative]  appeared  and  presented  the  claim 
for  the  claimant  . .  .  The  supervisor  of  shipping 
for  [Company  B]  appeared  before  the  board. 
[U.A.W.  representative]  brought  out  the  follow- 
ing information  during  the  session  of  the  board. 
[Foreman]  admitted  that  other  employees  wore 
gloves  while  handling  the  same  items  and  were 
not  requested  not  to  use  gloves.  [Foreman]  ad- 
mitted that  when  he  saw  [claimant]  wearing 
gloves,  he  blew  his  top  and  told  [him]  to  work 
without  gloves  or  be  fired.  [Claimant]  left  his 
job  at   this  point. 

[Foreman]  brought  with  him  samples  of  the 
parts  that  the  claimant  was  handling.  These  parts 
which  were  made  of  steel  or  cast  iron  had  sharp 
edges  and  to  some  degrees  were  rough.  He  was 
required  to  handle  these  parts  for  hours  at  a 
time  and  be  handling  items  of  a  similar  type 
steadily  during  his  working  hours.  The  chances 
of  cuts,  abrasions,  and  receiving  slivers  from  the 
bins  where  these  items  were  placed  were  quite 
possible  and  for  a  safety  factor,  the  company 
had  issued  gloves  to  the  employees  to  wear  while 
handling  the  various  castings.  [Foreman]  stated 
the  only  reason  he  asked  the  claimant  not  to 
wear  gloves  was  that  he  could  handle  more  parts 
per  hour  with  the  gloves  off  and  he  was  defi- 
nitely interested  in  the  production  of  the  claimant. 

.  .  .  The  claimant  did  have  just  cause  in  leav- 
ing his  employment  with  Company  [B]  because 
[claimant]  was  discriminating  against  him  in  the 
area  of  safety. 

.  .  .  The  insurance  officer's  decision  should  be 
rescinded  and  the  appeal  allowed. 

Local  458,  United  Automobile,  Aerospace, 
Agricultural  Workers  of  America,  of  which 
the  claimant  is  a  member,  appealed  to  the 
Umpire  on  December  9,  1964.  The  appeal 
reads: 

We  are  appealing  on  the  grounds  that  in  our 
opinion  [claimant]  quit  his  job  for  just  cause 
and  not  in  violation  of  section  60(1)  of  the  Act 
and  the  majority  of  the  appeal  board  accepted 
statements  from  [foreman]  that  were  not  facts, 
which,  in  our  opinion,  influenced  their  finding. 

[Foreman]  appeared  at  the  hearing.  He  pro- 
duced three  sample  parts  which  he  stated  [claim- 
ant] was  handling  on  the  day  he  ordered  him  to 
remove  his  glove.  The  sample  parts  that  were 
exhibited  were  not  a  cross  section  portrayal  of 
the  smaller  parts  produced  by  the  company.  The 
parts  that  were  exhibited  by  [foreman]  were  se- 
lected, in  our  opinion,  to  strengthen  [his]  argu- 
ment that  gloves  should  not  be  worn. 

When  [foreman]  was  questioned  as  to  which 
of  the  three  samples  [claimant]  was  handling, 
he  stated  he  did  not  know.  When  it  was  pointed 
out  to  [foreman]  and  the  board  that  this  evi- 
•dence  should  be  disregarded  because  of  his  fail- 
ure to  identify  which  part  [claimant]  was  han- 
dling, [foreman]  then  stated  "I  will  say  he  was 
"handling  this  piece".  The  piece  he  arbitrarily 
selected   was  the  middle  sized  piece. 

[Foreman]  admitted  to  the  board,  when  ques- 
tioned, that  other  small  parts  handled  by  [claim- 


ant] and  other  employees,  were  rough,  had 
threaded  ends,  such  as  pipe  fittings,  etc. 

[Foreman]  informed  the  board  that  if  [claim- 
ant] had  removed  his  gloves  he  would  still  be 
working  at  [Company  B].  This  statement  is  con- 
trary to  the  last  paragraph  of  Exhibit  2  in  the 
submission  to  the  board  of  referees  which  states: 
"The  local  office  obtained  information  from  the 
employer  that  the  job  would  have  ended  in  the 
week  commencing  25  October  1965.   (sic). 

[Foreman]  admitted  that  other  employees  wore 
gloves   while   handling   the   same   type   of  parts. 

We  believe  the  majority  of  the  board  should 
have  considered  the  facts  as  outlined  above  more 
seriously. 

We  believe  that  [claimant]  quit  his  job  with 
just  cause.  Had  he  continued  to  wear  his  gloves 
and  been  dismissed  he  would  still  have  been  dis- 
qualified under  section  60(1)  of  the  Act  for 
losing  his  job  or  employment  by  reason  of  his 
own  misconduct. 

The  case  was  heard  by  the  Umpire  in 
Toronto,  Ontario,  on  February  12,  1965.  The 
claimant  was  represented  by  Mr.  L.  E. 
Jaques,  of  the  aforementioned  union,  and  the 
Commission  by  Mr.  P.  Bozowsky,  one  of  its 
solicitors. 

Considerations  and  Conclusions:  The  rele- 
vant part  of  section  60(1)  of  the  Act  reads: 

An  insured  person  is  disqualified  from  receiv- 
ing benefit ...  if  he  voluntarily  left  his  employ- 
ment without  just  cause. 

According  to  the  jurisprudence  established 
by  the  Umpire  in  several  decisions,  when  em- 
ployment is  relinquished  because  of  a  griev- 
ance, a  claimant,  in  order  to  prove  that  he 
had  "just  cause"  for  voluntarily  leaving  his 
employment,  must  prove  (a)  that  his  griev- 
ance is  genuine  and  (b)  that  he  has  taken 
all  reasonable  means  of  having  it  remedied. 

In  the  instant  case,  the  claimant  sought  to 
show  that  his  foreman's  demands  created  haz- 
ardous working  conditions,  but  the  evidence 
put  before  the  board  on  this  point  was  incon- 
clusive. Furthermore,  although  the  claimant 
believed  that  he  was  unfairly  treated,  he  did 
not  attempt  to  take  the  matter  up  with  the 
foreman's  superior  before  taking  the  initiative 
in  leaving. 

In  view  of  the  foregoing,  I  consider  that 
the  board  of  referees  rightly  found  that  the 
claimant  had  failed  to  discharge  the  onus  of 
proving  he  had  just  cause  for  voluntarily 
leaving  his  employment  and,  as  all  the  ex- 
tenuating circumstances  which  might  have 
existed  in  this  case  appear  to  have  been  taken 
into  account  when  the  period  of  disqualifi- 
cation was  reduced  from  six  to  two  weeks, 
I  decide  to  confirm  the  board's  decision. 

The  union's  appeal  is,  therefore,  dismissed. 


750 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      AUGUST    7965 


WAGE  SCHEDULES 

Wage  Schedules  Prepared  and  Contracts  Awarded  in  June 

Works  of  Construction,  Remodelling,  Repair  or  Demolition 

During  June  the  Department  of  Labour  prepared  345  wage  schedules  for  inclusion  in 
contracts  proposed  to  be  undertaken  by  departments  of  the  federal  Government  and  its 
Crown  corporations  in  various  areas  of  Canada,  for  works  of  construction,  remodelling, 
repair  or  demolition,  and  certain  services.  In  the  same  period,  a  total  of  236  contracts  in 
these  categories  was  awarded.  Particulars  of  these  contracts  appear  below. 

In  addition,  255  contracts  not  listed  in  this  report  and  which  contained  the  General  Fair 
Wages  Clause  were  awarded  by  Central  Mortgage  and  Housing  Corporation,  Defence  Con- 
struction (1951)  Limited,  the  St  Lawrence  Seaway  Authority  and  the  Departments  of  Defence 
Production,  Post  Office,  Public  Works  and  Transport. 

A  copy  of  the  wage  schedule  issued  for  each  contract  is  available  on  request  to  trade 
unions  concerned  or  to  others  who  have  a  bona  fide  interest  in  the  execution  of  the  contract. 

(The  labour  conditions  included  in  each  of  the  contracts  listed  under  this  heading  provide  that: 

(a)  the  wage  rate  for  each  classification  of  labour  shown  in  the  wage  schedule  included  in  the 
contract  is  a  minimum  rate  only  and  contractors  and  subcontractors  are  not  exempted  from  the  pay- 
ment of  higher  wages  in  any  instance  where,  during  the  continuation  of  the  work,  wage  rates  in  excess 
of  those  shown  in  the  wage  schedule  have  been  fixed  by  provincial  legislation,  by  collective  agree- 
ments in  the  district,  or  by  current  practice; 

(b)  hours  of  work  shall  not  exceed  eight  in  the  day  and  44  in  the  week,  except  in  emergency 
conditions  conditions  approved  by  the  Minister  of  Labour; 

(c)  overtime  rates  of  pay  may  be  established  by  the  Minister  of  Labour  for  all  hours  worked 
in  excess  of  eight  per  day  and  44  per  week; 

(d)  no  person  shall  be  discriminated  against  in  regard  to  employment  because  of  his  race, 
national  origin,  colour  or  religion,  nor  because  he  has  made  a  complaint  with  respect  to  alleged 
discrimination.) 

Contracts  for  the  Manufacture  of  Supplies  and  Equipment 

Contracts  awarded  in  June  for  the  manufacture  of  supplies  and  equipment  were  as  fol- 
lows: 

Department  No.  of  Contracts  Aggregate  Amount 

Defence   Production   127  $998,474.00 

Post  Office  8  91,782.22 

(The  labour  conditions  included  in  contracts  for  the  manufacture  of  supplies  and  equipment 
provide  that: 

(a)  all  persons  who  perform  labour  on  such  contracts  shall  be  paid  such  wages  as  are  currently 
paid  in  the  district  to  competent  workmen;  and  if  there  is  no  current  rate,  then  a  fair  and  reasonable 
rate;  but  in  no  event  shall  the  wages  paid  be  less  than  those  established  by  the  laws  of  the  province 
in  which   the   work  is   being   performed; 

(b)  The  working  hours  shall  be  those  fixed  by  the  custom  of  the  trade  in  the  district,  or  if  there 
be  no  such  custom,  then  they  shall  be  fair  and  reasonable  hours; 

The  Fair  Wage  and  Hours  of  Labour  legislation  of  the  federal  Government  has  the 
purpose  of  insuring  that  all  Government  contracts  for  works  of  construction  and  for 
the  manufacture  of  supplies  and  equipment  contain  provisions  to  secure  the  payment  of 
wages  generally  accepted  as  fair  and  reasonable  in  each  trade  or  classification  employed 
in  the  district  where  the  work  is  being  performed. 

The  practice  of  Government  departments  and  those  Crown  corporations  to  which  the 
legislation  applies,  before  entering  into  contracts  for  any  work  of  construction,  remodelling, 
repair  or  demolition,  is  to  obtain  wage  schedules  from  the  Department  of  Labour  showing 
the  applicable  wage  deemed  to  be  required  in  the  execution  of  the  work.  These  wage 
schedules  are  thereupon  included  with  other  relevant  labour  conditions  as  terms  of  such 
contracts  to  be  observed  by  the  contractors. 

Wage  schedules  are  not  included  in  contracts  for  the  manufacture  of  supplies  and 
equipment  because  it  is  not  possible  to  determine  in  advance  the  classification  to  be 
employed  in  the  execution  of  a  contract.  A  statement  of  the  labour  conditions  which 
must  be  observed  in  every  such  contract  is,  however,  included  therein  and  is  of  the  same 
nature  and  effect  as  those  which  apply  in  works  of  construction. 

Copies  of  the  federal  Government's  Fair  Wages  and  Hours  of  Labour  legislation 
may  be  had  upon  request  to  the  Labour  Standards  Branch  of  the  Department  of 
Labour,  Ottawa. 

THE  LABOUR   GAZETTE      •      AUGUST    J965  751 


(c)  overtime  rates  of  pay  may  be  established  by  the  Minister  of  Labour  for  all  hours  worked 
in  excess  of  those  fixed  by  custom  of  the  trade  in  the  district,  or  in  excess  of  fair  and  reasonable 
hours; 

(d)  no  person  shall  be  discriminated  against  in  regard  to  employment  because  of  his  race, 
national  origin,  colour  or  religion,  nor  because  he  has  made  a  complaint  with  respect  to  alleged 
discrimination.) 

Wage  Claims  Received  and  Payments  Made  In  June 

During  June  the  sum  of  $7,532.91  was  collected  from  ten  contractors  for  wage  arrears 
due  their  employees  as  a  result  of  the  failure  of  the  contractors,  or  their  subcontractors, 
to  apply  the  wage  rates  and  other  conditions  of  employment  required  by  the  schedule  of 
labour  conditions  forming  part  of  their  contract.  This  amount  is  for  distribution  to  the  150 
workers  concerned. 

Contracts  Containing  Fair  Wage  Schedules  Awarded  in  June 

DEPARTMENT  OF  AGRICULTURE 

Near  Melfort  Sask:  Matheson  Bros  Ltd,  construction  of  Melfort  Creek  project. 

ATOMIC  ENERGY  OF  CANADA  LIMITED 

Chalk  River  Ont:  John  Kovacs,  exterior  painting  of  bldgs  250,  456  &  457;  A  Beauclair, 
exterior  painting  of  metal  &  wood  on  bldg  150,  NRU  reactor;  J  G  Fitzgerald  &  Sons  Ltd, 
completion  of  roofing  &  sheet  metal  work,  computer  bldg  508,  nuclear  laboratories;  Murphy 
&  Morrow  Ltd,  installation  of  acoustical  ceiling  tile,  suspension  system  &  access  panels,  com- 
puter bldg  508,  nuclear  laboratories;  Ottawa  Iron  Works  Ltd,  design,  fabrication  &  erection 
of  metal  work,  computer  bldg  508,  nuclear  laboratories.  Deep  River  Ont:  John  Kovaks, 
interior  painting  of  houses  &  part  of  hospital;  T  Wojdacki,  exterior  painting  of  houses, 
garages  &  sheds,  etc. 

CENTRAL  MORTGAGE  AND  HOUSING  CORPORATION 

Halifax  N  S:  Banfield  &  Miles  Ltd,  exterior  painting  of  units,  Vets  19  &  19A.  New 
Glasgow,  Stellarton  &  Trenton  N  S:  Milligan  Bros  Ltd,  landscaping  for  houses,  Vets  2/48, 
1  &  2/48  &  1/48.  Pirrefonds  Que:  Mario  &  Don  Ltee,  completion  of  fire  damaged  bldg, 
Cloverdale  Park.  St  Vincent  de  Paul  Que:  Deschenes  &  Perrault,  replacement  of  doors  & 
soffit  repairs,  Terrasse  Belleville. 

Ville  Jacques-Car  tier  Que:  Atelier  de  Peinture  Inc,  exterior  painting  of  Bellerive  apts; 
Mauger  &  Perreault,  interior  painting  of  Belleville  apts;  North  State  Paving  Reg'd,  site  reno- 
vations for  Bellerive  apts.  Ville  St  Laurent  Que:  J  R  Langovisth,  interior  painting  of  suites 
&  public  areas,  Place  Benoit. 

Sault  Ste  Marie  Ont:  Downey  Building  Materials  Ltd,  supply  &  installation  of  porches, 
Vets  4  &  6.  Toronto  Ont:  Leslie  L  Solty  &  Sons  Ltd,  site  improvements  &  planting  for  high 
rise  apartment  bldg,  Warden  Avenue,  FP  9/59.  Windsor  &  Essex  Ont:  Windsor  Painting 
Contractors  Ltd,  exterior  painting  of  Vets  13/49  &  1/48. 

In  addition,  this  Corporation  awarded  26  contracts  containing  the  General  Fair  Wages 
Clause. 

DEPARTMENT  OF  CITIZENSHIP  AND  IMMIGRATION 

Point e  Bleue  Indian  Agency  Que:  Marcel  Vallee,  interior  &  exterior  painting,  Pointe 
Bleue  residential  school.  Portage  la  Prairie  Indian  Agency  Man:  H  J  Funk  &  Sons  Ltd,  con- 
struction of  Portage  la  Prairie  residential  school.  Carlton  Indian  Agency  Sask:  Piggott  Con- 
struction Ltd,  construction  of  cottage  dormitories  (phase  2),  Prince  Albert  residential  school. 

Touchwood  Indian  Agency  Sask:  Holterman  Construction,  construction  of  teacher's  resi- 
dence, Muscowequan  residential  school.  Kootenay  Indian  Agency  B  C:  A  E  Jones  Co  Ltd, 
renovations  to  bathroom,  Kootenay  residential  school.  Kwawkewlth  Indian  Agency  B  C: 
Basarab  Construction  Co  Ltd,  supply  &  erection  of  prefabricated  school  &  residence,  King- 
come  Inlet,  Quaee  reserve. 

DEFENCE  CONSTRUCTION  (1951)  LIMITED 

Goose  Bay  (Labr)  Nfld:  Delphis  Cote  Ltd,  reroofing  of  bldg  86,  RCAF  Station.  Sum- 
merside  P  E  I:  Morrison  &  McRae  Ltd,  construction  of  runway  12-30  &  taxitracks,  RCAF 
Station;  Morin  &  Plante  Cie  Ltee,  reroofing  of  hangar  8,  RCAF  Station.  Aldershot  N  S: 
Bernard  Painters  Ltd,  exterior  painting  of  bldgs,  camp.  Cornwallis  N  S:  Tasco  Sheet  Metal 
&  Roofing  Co  Ltd,  reroofing  of  bldg  6,  HMCS  Cornwallis.  East  Chezzetcook  N  S:  Roy 
Judge  Co  Ltd,  clearing  &  grubbing. 

752  THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      AUGUST   7965 


Greenwood  N  S:  Dona  Smith  Ltd,  supply  &  installation  of  metal  windows,  barrack 
block  11,  RCAF  Station;  Municipal  Spraying  &  Contracting  Ltd,  construction  of  asphaltic 
concrete  overlay  on  runway.  RCAF  Station.  Halifax  N  S:  Nova  Scotia  Waterproofers  Ltd, 
reroofing  of  apts,  Windsor  Park;  James  F  Lahey  Ltd,  interior  painting  of  bldg  S-21,  HMCS 
Sfadacona;  Malach  Roofing  &  Flooring  Ltd,  reroofing  of  bldg  S-14,  HMCS  Stadacona. 

Chatham  N  B:  A  C  Mallet  &  Fils  Cie  Ltee,  reroofing  of  leantos,  hangars  2  &  3  &  bldg 
84,  RCAF  Station;  William  J  Kerr  Ltd,  grading  &  seeding,  RCAF  Station;  Modern  Con- 
struction Ltd,  dismantling,  moving  &  re-erection  of  transportable  homes  from  RCAF  Station, 
St  Sylvestre,  Que  to  RCAF  Station,  Chatham. 

Moncton  N  B:  Boudreau  Sheet  Metal  Works  Ltd,  reroofing  of  bldg  38,  RCAF  Station; 
Boudreau  Sheet  Metal  Works  Ltd,  reroofing  of  bldg  31,  RCAF  Station.  Saint  John  N  B: 
Maritime  Waterproofing  &  Contracting  Co  Ltd,  exterior  renovations  to  bldg  37.  St  Margarets 
N  B:  Byron  MacDonald  Ltd,  interior  &  exterior  painting  of  married  quarters,  RCAF  Station. 

Bagotville  Que:  Ludger  Harvey  &  Fils  Ltee,  reroofing  of  bldgs,  RCAF  Station.  Longue 
Pointe  Que:  Charles  Duranceau  Ltee,  asphalt  surfacing  of  roads.  St  Jean  Que:  Planned  Reno- 
vators Ltd,  interior  painting  of  barrack  blocks,  RCAF  Station;  P  M  Enterprises  Inc,  replacing 
asphalt  shingles  on  bldgs,  RCAF  Station.  Valcartier  Que:  Planned  Renovators  Ltd,  exterior 
painting  of  married  quarters,  camp.  Val  d'Or  Que:  Evans  Contracting  Co  Ltd,  grading, 
seeding  &  chemical  brush  control,  RCAF  Station. 

Camp  Borden  Ont:  Windsor  Painting  Contractors  Ltd,  exterior  painting  of  bldgs;  E  S 
Fox  Ltd,  removal  of  watermains,  etc;  Moxon  Contracting  Ltd,  reroofing  of  bldg  142;  Walker 
Painting  &  Decorating  Co  Ltd,  exterior  painting  of  bldgs.  Kingston  Ont:  Romac  Components, 
construction  of  storage  bldgs.  Mountain  View  Ont:  H  J  Gascoigne  Ltd,  reroofing  of  hangar  6. 
North  Bay  Ont:  Semple  Gooder  &  Co  Ltd,  reroofing  of  leantos,  hangar  5,  RCAF  Station. 

Petawawa  Ont:  Burnley  Contracting  Co  Ltd,  exterior  repainting  of  bldgs,  camp.  Trenton 
Ont:  Evans  Contracting  Co  Ltd,  grading  &  seeding  adjacent  to  runway  06-24,  RCAF  Sta- 
tion; Malach  Roofing  &  Flooring  Ltd,  reroofing  of  hangars,  RCAF  Station.  Uplands  Ont: 
Morin  &  Plante  Cie  Ltee,  reroofing  of  hangars,  RCAF  Station;  Presley  Painting  &  Decorating 
Co  Ltd,  interior  painting  of  school  bldg  345,  RCAF  Station. 

Gimli  Man:  The  Dowse  Sash  &  Door  Co  Ltd,  supply  &  installation  of  metal  windows 
&  screens,  RCAF  Station;  Stan's  Painting  &  Decorating,  exterior  painting  of  steelox  married 
quarters,  RCAF  Station;  Peter  Leitch  Construction  Ltd,  construction  of  control  tower  bldg 
&  prefabricated  bldgs,  RCAF  Station;  B-A  Construction  Ltd,  development  of  airfield,  RCAF 
Station;  Keewatin  Electric  Ltd,  installation  of  runway  approach  lighting  &  electrical  distribu- 
tion system. 

Rivers  Man:  Fort  Rouge  Decorating  &  Sandblasting  Co,  repainting  of  roofs,  CJATC. 
Shilo  Man:  Semans  Plumbing  &  Heating  Ltd,  installation  of  additional  water  softener,  bldg 
M  28,  camp. 

Cold  Lake  Aha:  Park-Derochie  Ltd,  interior  &  exterior  painting  of  schools  &  married 
quarters,  RCAF  Station.  Edmonton  Alta:  Ernest  Painting  &  Decoratting  Ltd,  exterior  painting 
of  married  quarters,  Griesbach  barracks.  Namao  Alta:  Mannix  Co  Ltd,  reconstruction  of 
aircraft  parking  apron,  RCAF  Station. 

Comox  B  C:  Conniston  Construction  Co  Ltd,  seeding,  grading  &  fertilizing,  RCAF  Sta- 
tion. Victoria  B.  C:  Vector  Installation  Services  Ltd,  installation  of  heating  &  ventilating  sys- 
tem, Bay  Street  armoury. 

In  addition,  Defence  Construction  (1951)  Limited  awarded  one  contract  containing  the 
General  Fair  Wages  Clause. 

DEPARTMENT  OF  DEFENCE  PRODUCTION 

Cornwallis  N  S:  D  J  Lowe  Ltd,  exterior  painting  of  seven  bldgs,  HMCS  Cornwallis; 
D  J  Lowe  Ltd,  exterior  painting  of  various  bldgs,  HMCS  Cornwallis.  Dartmouth  N  S:  Dart- 
mouth Asphalt  Co  Ltd,  asphaltic  repairs  to  roadways,  Shannon  Park  married  quarters; 
Martin  &  Moore  Ltd,  painting  of  stairways,  Shannon  Park  married  quarters.  Great  Village 
N  S:  Currie  E  Geldart,  erection  of  safety  fence  &  supply  &  erection  of  warning  signs,  trans- 
mitter site. 

Greenwood  N  S:  Municipal  Spraying  &  Contracting  Ltd,  asphaltic  repairs  to  runways 
&  taxistrips,  RCAF  Station;  Municipal  Spraying  &  Contracting  Ltd,  repairs  to  concrete  ramps. 
RCAF  Station;  Municipal  Spraying  &  Contracting  Ltd,  repairs  to  parade  square,  RCAF 
Station;  Municipal  Spraying  &  Contracting  Ltd,  asphaltic  joint  &  random  crack  sealing. 
RCAF  Station;  S  G  Trask  &  Sons  Ltd,  repairs  to  wells  1  &  5,  RCAF  Station;  Municipal 
Spraying  &  Contracting  Ltd,  repairs  to  parking  lots,  RCAF  Station;  Fred  T  Cleveland,  paint- 
ing of  AVM  Morphee  school,  RCAF  Station;  D  J  Lowe  Ltd,  reshingling  of  roofs,  married 
quarters,  RCAF  Station;  Fred  T  Cleveland,  rewiring  &  repainting  of  library,  bldg  16,  RCAF 
Station;  Municipal  Spraying  &  Contracting  Ltd,  repairs  to  roads,  RCAF  Station. 

THE  LABOUR   GAZETTE      •      AUGUST    7965  753 

91939—6 


Halifax  N  S:  Maritime  Tile  Co  Ltd,  repairs  to  floors  &  walls  &  replacement  of  fixtures, 
P  A  RT  centre,  HMCS  Stadacona;  Webb  Engineering  Ltd,  renewal  of  main  steam  distribu- 
tion line,  jetty  3  tunnel,  HMC  Dockyard;  Maritime  Asphalt  Products  Ltd,  renewal  of  floor 
covering,  bklg  S-21,  HMCS  Stadacona. 

Mount  Uniakc  N  S:  Canada  Gunite  oC  Ltd,  replacement  of  reservoir,  RCAF  receiver 
site.  SheWurne  N  S:  Thompson's  Excavating  Ltd,  repairs  &  landscaping  of  dikes,  POL  facility, 
naval  support  base. 

Camp  Gagetown  N  B:  S  R  Shears  &  Sons  Ltd,  exterior  painting  of  campsite  bldgs. 
Moncton  N  B:  Cosman  &  Co  Ltd,  roof  repairs  to  bldgs  25,  26,  27  &  supply  depot  5,  RCAF. 
St  Margarets  N  B:  Byron  MacDonald  Ltd,  interior  repainting  of  operations  bldg,  RCAF 
Station. 

Sherbrooke  Que:  Franks  Piping  Co  Ltd,  removal  of  coal  burning  equipment  &  installa- 
tion of  oil  system,  William  Street  armoury.  Valcartier  Que:  Laurent  Bedard,  exterior  painting 
of  bldgs.  camp.  Camp  Borden  Ont:  Disher  Farrant  Ltd,  construction  of  tank  aprons,  bldg 
El 20.  RCE.  Centralia  Ont:  Towland  Construction  Ltd,  rebuilding  &  resurfacing  roadways, 
RCAF  Station;  W  Besterd  Plumbing-Heating  Ltd,  replacing  condensate  lines  in  various  bldgs, 
RCAF  Station. 

Downsview  Ont:  Frank  Ignagni,  interior  painting  of  two  bldgs,  RCAF  Station;  Lux 
Painting  Co,  interior  painting  of  bldg  101,  RCAF  Station.  Kingston  Ont:  R  E  Harding  Ltd, 
repairs  to  built-up  roofing  &  flashings  on  bldg  B4,  Vimy  Barracks;  R  E  Harding  Ltd,  repairs 
to  built-up  roofing  &  flashings  on  bldg  B15B,  Vimy  Barracks;  Kingston  Steeplejack  &  Build- 
ing Maintenance,  repointing  &  repairs  to  stone  cracks  in  exterior  walls  of  Yeo  hall,  RMC; 
Amherst  Painting  &  Decorating,  exterior  painting  of  bldgs;  Joseph  Downey  &  Son,  exterior 
repainting  of  bldgs. 

North  Bay  Ont:  Edward  M  Norrena,  installation  of  troughs  for  high  voltage  cable  in 
cc/dc  complex.  Petawawa  Ont:  John  Kovacks,  repairs  &  repainting  interior  of  schools,  camp. 
Picton  Ont:  Maxon  Contracting  Ltd,  repairs  to  steam  distribution  system,  camp.  Rockliffe 
Ont  Cameron  &  Turner  Reg'd,  repairs  to  roofs  on  various  bldgs,  RCAF  Station. 

Beausejour  Man:  Royal  Paving  Co  Ltd,  seal  coating  of  roadways,  RCAF  Station.  Gimli 
Man:  Aetna  Roofing  Co  Ltd,  repairs  to  hangar  lean-to  roofs,  RCAF  Station.  Shilo  Man: 
Nu-Way  Decorating  Co,  sanding  &  refinishing  of  floors  in  various  married  quarters,  military 
camp;  E  C  Higgens  &  Sons  Contractors  Ltd,  construction  of  concrete  block  bldgs.  Winnipeg 
Man  Fort  Garrie  Painting  &  Decorating,  interior  painting,  floor  sanding  &  refinishing,  RCAF 
Station.  Penhold  Aha:  Homme  Decorating  (Calgary)  Ltd,  exterior  painting  of  married 
quarters  &  garages,  RCAF  Station;  Border  Paving  Ltd,  sealing  &  sanding  asphalt  surface, 
RCAF  Station. 

Chilliwack  B  C:  McKenzie  Bros  Construction  Ltd,  construction  of  sidewalk,  camp; 
McKenzie  Bros  Construction  Ltd,  construction  of  vehicle  wash  rack,  etc,  camp.  Comox  B  C: 
Parry  Sheet  Metal  Ltd,  replacing  asphalt  shingles  on  various  bldgs,  RCAF  Station;  Parry 
Sheet  Metal  Ltd,  floodcoating  roof  of  hangar  3,  etc,  RCAF  Station;  Pacific  Sheet  Metal 
Ltd,  floodcoating  roof  of  hangar  1,  etc,  RCAF  Station;  Acme  Commercial  Painting,  interior 
painting  of  hangar  3,  RCAF  Station. 

Puntzi  Mountain  B  C:  Shamrock  Electric  Ltd,  rehabilitation  of  power  lines  &  poles, 
RCAF  Station.  Victoria  B  C:  K  J  Howe  Industrial  Painting  Ltd,  painting  exterior  trim  of 
bldg  1,  The  Castle,  Tri-Services  College,  Royal  Roads. 

In  addition,  this  Department  awarded  89  contracts  containing  the  General  Fair  Wages 
Clause. 

(Catering  Services) 

Connaught  Ranges  Ont:  Morrison-Lamothe  Bakery  Ltd,  food  &  service.  Dundurn  Sask: 
Canada  Catering  Co  Ltd,  food  services,  Dundurn  camp. 

DEPARTMENT  OF  FORESTRY 

Winnipeg  Man:  Roziere  Construction  Ltd,  renovations  to  room  22,  forest  research  labo- 
ratory wing  &  headerhouse,  Dept  of  Agriculture  research  station. 

NATIONAL  CAPITAL  COMMISSION 

Ottawa  Ont:  A  Lanctot  Construction  Co,  construction  of  premises  for  NCC  information 
&  historical  division,  531  Sussex  Drive;  L  J  Corkery  Ltd,  supply  &  delivery  of  earth  filling 
to  vicinity  of  Sussex  Drive. 

NATIONAL  HARBOURS  BOARD 

Montreal  Que:  J  G  Fitzpatrick  Ltd,  reconstruction  of  wharf  sections  5E  to  8E.  Quebec 

Que:  Quebec  Engineering  Ltd,  extension  of  St  Charles  River  estuary  wharf.  Prescott  Ont: 

Industrial  Electrical  Contractors  Ltd,  electrical  work  for  elevator.  Vancouver  B  C:  Canadian 

Ice  Machine  Co  Ltd,   installation   of  additional  ice   making  equipment,  fishermen's  wharf. 

754  THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      AUGUST   7965 


DEPARTMENT  OF  NORTHERN  AFFAIRS  AND  NATIONAL  RESOURCES 

Prince  Edward  Island  National  Park  P  E  I:  Univex  (Canada)  Ltd,  construction  of 
pumphouse  &  electrical  distribution  system,  Rustico  Island.  Grand  Pre  National  Historic  Park 
N  S:  Balsor  Construction  &.  Landscaping,  shrub  &  tree  planting. 

POST  OFFICE  DEPARTMENT 

This  Department  awarded  44  contracts  containing  the  General  Fair  Wages  Clause. 

PROJECTS  ASSISTED  BY  FEDERAL  LOAN  OR  GRANT 

Ashbridge's  Bay  Ont:  Simon  Carves  of  Canada  Ltd,  supply  &  installation  of  sewage 
sludge  incineration  equipment  for  main  treatment  plant.  Toronto  Ont:  Schwenger  Construc- 
tion Ltd,  construction  of  additional  digestion  tanks,  etc,  Highland  Creek  treatment  plant 
(stage  II);  Varamae  Construction  Ltd,  construction  of  extension  to  the  blower  bldg,  main 
treatment  plant;  Sam  Cosentino  Ltd,  extension  of  Humber  Thistletown  sanitary  trunk  sewer. 

DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  WORKS 

Pecquet  Nfld:  Gid  Sacrey  Ltd,  wharf  reconstruction.  Tilting  Nfld:  Guy  Eveleigh,  con- 
struction of  community  stage.  Graham's  Pond  P  E  1:  Colin  R  MacDonald  Ltd,  harbour 
improvements,  repairs  &  landing  extension.  Louisburg  N  S:  The  Foundation  Company  of 
Canada  Ltd,  wharf  extension.  Murphy's  Pond  N  S:  Albert  MacDonald  &  John  A  Campbell, 
harbour  improvements.  Sydney  &  area  N  S:  Sparky's  Cleaning  Services  Ltd,  cleaning  win- 
dows of  federal  bldgs. 

Black  River  N  B:  Fundy  Contractors  Ltd,  wharf  repairs.  Caissie's  Cape  N  B:  Roger 
Leblanc,  breakwater  &  roadway  repairs.  Malloch's  Beach  N  B:  Price  Construction  (1964) 
Ltd,  harbour  improvements.  Richibucto  N  B:  Leo  Leblanc,  construction  of  lobster  reef.  Seal 
Cove  N  B:  Modern  Enterprises  Ltd,  breakwater  extension. 

Dune  de  Sud  (M  I)  Que:  J  W  Delaney  Ltd,  breakwater  repairs.  Etang  du  Nord  (M  I) 
Que:  Wendell  Chiasson,  slipway  repairs.  Gatineau  Que:  Delphisse  Lafiamme,  exterior  &  inte- 
rior cleaning  of  post  office  bldg.  Lac  Osisko  (Rouyn)  Que:  Charest  Construction  Co  Ltd, 
reconstruction  of  public  wharf.  Montreal  Que:  Royalite  Metal  Furniture  Co  Ltd,  supply  & 
installation  of  metal  partitions  for  BYP  division,  6th  floor,  National  Revenue  Bldg;  Oscar 
Brault,  interior  cleaning  &  grounds  maintenance,  Postal  Station  "M".  Pointe  Basse  (M  I)  Que: 
Adrien  Arsenau,  breakwater  repairs.  St  Lambert  Que:  Coronation  Construction  Ltd,  con- 
struction of  post  office  bldg. 

Fort  William  Ont:  A  J  Wing  Construction  Ltd,  alterations  to  Customs  Bldg.  London 
Ont:  Martin-Dominion  Ltd,  conversion  of  heating  plant  to  fuel  oil,  Westminster  hospital. 
Meaford  Ont:  Lexington  Contracting  Ltd,  construction  of  Federal  Bldg.  Ottawa  Ont:  Belray 
Painting,  exterior  &  interior  painting  of  Justice  Annex  Bldg;  Universal  Painters,  exterior 
painting  of  "A"  Bldg;  R  R  Construction,  alterations  to  first  floor,  Plant  Products  Bldg;  Four- 
nier  Van  &  Storage  Ltd,  moving  office  furnishings  from  various  locations  to  the  Canadian 
Bldg;  Dixon  Van  Lines  Ltd,  moving  office  furnishings  from  various  locations  to  the  Centen- 
nial Towers;  The  Foundation  Co  of  Canada  Ltd,  construction  of  substructure  &  superstruc- 
ture, Canadian  Centre  for  the  Performing  Arts  (phases  2  &  3). 

Port  Stanley  Ont:  Con  Bridge  Ltd,  harbour  repairs  &  improvements  (repairs  to  east 
pier).  Quarry  Bay  (Geneva  Park)  Ont:  Bar- Way  Marine  Ltd,  wharf  repairs.  Rexdale  Ont: 
Renkay  Construction  Ltd,  conveyor  installation  &  lighting  alterations.  Rodney  Ont:  Leon 
VanNeck  &  Son,  construction  of  post  office  bldg.  Sault  Ste  Marie  Ont:  L  R  Brown  &  Co 
Ltd,  erection  of  prefabricated  office  bldg  for  Fisheries  Research  Board  of  Canada. 

Deloraine  Man:  Dauphin  Fixtures  Ltd,  construction  of  RCMP  detachment  quarters.  Fort 
Churchill  Man:  The  Carter  Construction  Co  Ltd,  general  building  repair  &  maintenance. 
Saskatoon  Sask:  Myers  Construction  Co  Ltd,  alterations  &  improvements  to  Federal  Bldg. 
Swift  Current  Sask:  Swift  Construction  Co  Ltd,  ventilation  of  revolver  range,  RCMP  sub- 
division garage  bldg. 

Hobbema  Alta:  P  W  Graham  &  Sons  Northern  Ltd,  gymnasium  addition  to  Ermineskin 
school.  Vauxliall  Alta:  Tom's  Construction,  construction  of  Post  Office  Bldg.  Banff  National 
Park  Alta  &  Glacier  National  Park  B  C:  Mallett  Contracting  Co  Ltd,  gravel  crushing  & 
stockpiling.  Alert  Bay  B  C:  S  R  Kirkland  Construction  Co  Ltd,  wharf  improvements.  Barn- 
field  East  B  C:  Victoria  Pile  Driving  Co  Ltd,  construction  of  wharf.  Cowichan  Bay  B  C: 
B  C  Pile  Drivers  Ltd,  float  renewal.  Kyuquot  B  C:  Victoria  Pile  Driving  Co  Ltd,  harbour 
improvements   (phase  "B" — wharf  construction). 

Port  Alberni  B  C:  Southern  Construction  Co  Ltd,  alterations  to  second  floor,  Federal 
Bldg.  Port  McNeill  B  C:  S  R  Kirkland  Construction  Co  Ltd,  wharf  repairs.  Skidegate  B  C.- 
Pacific Piledriving  Co  Ltd,  float  replacement. 

THE  LABOUR   GAZETTE      •      AUGUST    7965  755 

91939— 6 1 


Fort  McPherson  N  W  T:  Kenaston  Drilling  (Arctic)  Ltd,  drilling  &  placing  of  wooden 
piles  for  various  bldgs.  Fort  Smith  &  Pine  Point  N  W  T:  R  R  Dales  Construction  Co  Ltd, 
crushed  gravel  surfacing  of  highways.  Pine  Point  N  W  T:  Byrnes  &  Hall  Construction  Ltd, 
construction  of  school.  Pond  Inlet  &  Pangnirtung  N  W  T:  Ron  Engineering  &  Construction 
I  td.  addition  to  schools,  warehouses,  hostels,  etc.  Yellowknije  N  W  T:  Intex  Painters  & 
Decorators,  painting  &  redecorating  federal  housing. 

In  addition,  this  Department  awarded  70  contracts  containing  the  General  Fair  Wages 
Clause. 

THE  ST  LAWRENCE  SEAWAY  AUTHORITY 

Cornwall  Ont:  Panzini  Ltee,  demolition  &  removal  of  old  North  Channel  Bridge.  St 
Catharines,  Thorold  &  Port  Robinson  Ont:  Frederick  Grodde  Ltd,  painting  of  vertical  lift 
bridges  1,  5,  11  &  12,  Welland  Canal.  Welland  Ont:  Moir  Construction  Co  Ltd,  replace- 
ment of  Kottmeier  road  bridge,  Welland  Canal.  Welland  Junction  &  Port  Colborne  Ont: 
Frederick  Grodde  Ltd,  painting  of  vertical  lift  bridges  18  &  21,  Welland  Canal. 

In  addition,  the  St  Lawrence  Seaway  Authority  awarded  two  contracts  containing  the 
General  Fair  Wages  Clause. 

DEPARTMENT  OF  TRANSPORT 

St  John's  Nfld:  C  C  M  Construction  Ltd,  paving  &  installation  of  power  supply  outlets 
on  marine  agency  wharf.  Baccaro  N  S:  Liverpool  Lumber  Co  Ltd,  construction  of  dwelling. 
Halifax  N  S:  Municipal  Spraying  &  Contracting  Ltd,  repairs  to  runway,  taxiway  &  road  sur- 
faces, International  Airport;  Capital  Window  Cleaners  (1964)  Ltd,  exterior  cleaning  of  bldg. 
International  Airport.  Sydney  NS:  Chappells  Ltd,  renovations  to  bldgs,  Canadian  Coast  Guard 
College,  Point  Edward  Naval  Base.  Wedgeport  N  S:  George  Purdy,  construction  of  pile 
dolphins.  Yarmouth  N  S:  Kenny  Construction  Co  Ltd,  construction  of  field  electrical  centre 
bldg  &  related  work. 

Fredericton  N  B:  Roseboro  Construction  &  Equipment  Ltd,  landscaping  development  of 
air  terminal  area,  airport.  Flat  Island  Que:  Fernand  Belanger  &  Etienne  Gagnon,  construc- 
tion of  dwelling  &  demolition  of  existing  dwelling. 

He  au  Marteau  Que:  Gauthier  &  Gagne,  construction  of  dwelling  &  demolition  of  exist- 
ing dwelling  near  Havre  St-Pierre.  Red  Islet  Que:  Georges  Cauchon,  construction  of  dwellings 
&  demolition  of  existing  dwelling.  Sept  lies  Que:  Nordbec  Construction  Inc,  construction  of 
VOR  bldgs  &  related  work,  airport.  Fort  William  Ont:  R  J  Ball  Electric  Ltd,  installation  of 
visual  approach  slope  indicator  system,  Lakehead  Airport. 

Kapuskasing.  Ont:  Miller  Paving  Ltd,  rebuilding  runway  17-35,  etc.  Kenora  Ont:  Slurry 
Seal  Contractors,  surface  treatment  of  runway  07-25,  etc,  airport.  Malton  Ont:  King  Plastics 
Ltd,  erection  of  signs,  air  terminal  bldg,  Toronto  International  Airport.  Sarnia  Ont:  F  A 
Stonehouse  &  Son  Ltd,  construction  of  runway,  airport.  Timmins  Ont:  Roy  Construction 
&  Supply  Co  Ltd,  construction  of  sand  storage  bldg.  Uplands  Ont:  Dibblee  Construction  Co 
Ltd,  overlaying  of  taxiways  &  portion  of  runway  07-25,  Ottawa  International  Airport.  Wind- 
sor Ont:  W  S  Fullerton  Construction  Co  Ltd,  paving  access  road  to  maintenance  garage, 
airport. 

Wynyard  Sask:  Plains  City  Electric,  development  of  meteorological  station  site,  side- 
walks, fencing  &  related  work.  Calgary  Alta:  McCormick  Electric  Ltd,  installation  of  lights, 
runway  &  related  work,  Municipal  Airport;  D  L  Guthrie  Construction,  replacement  of 
localizer,  runway  28  &  related  work,  Municipal  Airport.  Fort  McMurray  Alta:  Poole  Engi- 
neering Co  Ltd,  seal  coating  of  runway  06-24  &  related  work,  airport. 

Abbotsford  B  C:  Scotland  &  Adamson  Paving  Ltd,  repaving  of  north  taxiway  "E",  air- 
port. Castlegar  B  C:  Columbia  Builders  Ltd,  extension  to  terminal  bldg;  Columbia  Builders 
Ltd,  construction  of  fan  marker  bldg  &  related  work.  Dawson  Creek  B  C:  Standard-General 
Construction  (Int)  Ltd,  additional  development  of  airport.  Fort  Nelson  B  C:  Grande  Prairie 
Trans-Mix  Ltd,  construction  of  garage  &  related  work,  airport.  Pitt  Meadows  B  C:  Caledonia 
Electric  Ltd,  installation  of  runway  lighting.  Sandspit  B  C:  Caledonia  Electric  Ltd,  installa- 
tion of  visual  approach  slope  indicator  system.  Victoria  B  C:  R  &  W  Estates  Ltd,  construc- 
tion of  VOR  bldg;  National  Building  Maintenance  Ltd,  cleaning  air  terminal  &  control  tower 
bldg,  International  Airport. 

Cambridge  Bay  N  W  T:  Solar  Construction  Co  Ltd,  construction  of  taxiway  &  parking 
apron,  airport.  Coppermine  N  W  T:  Yukon  Construction  Co  Ltd,  improvements  to  water 
supply,  sanitation  facilities  &  related  work.  Fort  Smith  N  W  T:  Yukon  Construction  Co  Ltd, 
construction  of  rawin  site  heating  plant  &  related  work. 

In  addition,  this  Department  awarded  23  contracts  containing  the  General  Fair  Wages 
Clause. 

756  THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      AUGUST   1965 


DEPARTMENT  OF  VETERANS  AFFAIRS 

Montreal  Que:  Leonard  J  Weber  Construction  Co,  alterations  to  X-Ray  department, 
Queen  Mary  Hospital.  London  Out:  Western  Painting  &  Decorating  Service,  exterior  painting 
of  various  bldgs,  Westminster  Hospital. 


49th  International  Labour  Conference 

(Continued  from  page  731) 

9.  (1)  The  competent  authorities  should,  in 
co-operation  with  the  public  and  private  or- 
ganizations concerned  and  taking  account  of 
national  needs  and  possibilities,  provide  or  help 
to  ensure  the  provision  of  the  services  that  may 
be  necessary  to  facilitate  the  entry  into  employ- 
ment of  women  who  have  not  yet  worked,  or 
the  re-entry  into  employment  of  women  who 
have  been  out  of  the  employment  market  for 
a  comparatively  long  time,  owing,  in  particular, 
to    family    responsibilities. 

(2)  Such  services  should  be  organized  within 
the  framework  of  existing  services  for  all  work- 
ers or,  in  default  thereof,  along  lines  appropriate 
to  national  conditions;  they  should  include  ade- 
quate counselling,  information  and  placement 
services  and  provide  adequate  vocational  train- 
ing and  retraining  facilities  appropriate  to  the 
needs  of  the  women  concerned  and  available 
without  distinction  as  regards  age. 

(3)  The  services  and  facilities  should  be  kept 
under  review  in  order  to  ensure  that  they  are 
properly  adapted  to  the  special  needs  of  these 
women  workers  and  to  the  changing  needs  and 
tendencies  of  economic  and  technological  de- 
velopment. 

10.  (1)  In  the  case  of  women  who,  on  account 
of  their  family  responsibilities  arising  out  of 
maternity,  do  not  find  themselves  in  a  position 
to  return  to  their  employment  immediately  fol- 
lowing exhaustion  of  the  normal  period  of 
maternity  leave  established  by  law  or  practice, 
appropriate  measures  should  be  taken  to  the 
extent  possible  to  allow  them  a  reasonable 
further  period   of  leave  of  absence  without  re- 


linquishing their  employment,  all  rights  resulting 
from  their  employment  being  fully  safeguarded. 
(2)  In  case  of  termination  of  employment  fol- 
lowing maternity,  the  women  concerned  should 
be  considered  for  re-employment  in  accordance 
with  the  provisions  applicable  under  the  Ter- 
mination of  Employment  Recommendation,  1963, 
to  workers  whose  employment  has  been  termi- 
nated owing  to  a   reduction  of  the  work  force. 

V.   MISCELLANEOUS   PROVISIONS 

11.  (1)  To  the  extent  necessary  the  public 
and  private  organizations  concerned,  in  particu- 
lar employers'  and  workers'  organizations, 
should  co-operate  with  the  competent  authorities 
and  collaborate  with  each  other  to  take  other 
measures  and  promote  other  action  to  assist 
women  workers  to  meet  their  employment  and 
family  responsibilities  without  detriment  to  their 
opportunities  for  employment  and  promotion. 

(2)  In  this  connection  attention  should  be 
given,  as  local  needs  require  and  possibilities 
permit,  to  matters  which  have  particular  rele- 
vance for  women  workers  with  family  responsi- 
bilities, such  as  the  organization  of  public  trans- 
port, the  harmonization  of  working  hours  and 
hours  of  schools  and  child-care  services  or  facili- 
ties, and  the  provision  at  low  cost  of  the  facili- 
ties required  to  simplify  and  lighten  household 
tasks. 

12.  Particular  efforts  should  be  made  to  de- 
velop home-aid  services  operating  under  public 
authority  or  supervision  and  providing  women 
workers  with  family  responsibilities,  in  the  event 
of  family  need,  with  qualified  assistance  at 
reasonable  charge. 


Conciliation  Board  Report 

(Continued  from  page  736) 
With  a  view  to  conciliating  the  two  parties, 
we  adjourned  to  June  14,  the  next  meeting 
of  the  Conciliation  Board,  recommending  the 
examination  of  all  clauses  found  in  the  three 
agreements  and  the  submissions  made  by  the 
Syndicate  concerning  the  special  sections  to 
be  applied  to  each  unit. 

The  day  before  the  third  sitting,  on  June 
14,  about  100  grain  elevator  employees 
stopped  working. 

Since  this  day,  the  relations  between 
employer  and  the  Syndicate  have  so  deterio- 
rated that  all  the  employees  covered  by  the 
agreements   have  stopped   working. 


In  spite  of  the  attempts  made  by  my  col- 
leagues and  myself,  we  have  been  unsuccess- 
ful in  having  the  parties  reach  an  agreement. 
Under  the  circumstances,  we  must  inform 
you  that  the  dispute  is  continuing.  We  recom- 
mend the  appointment  as  soon  as  possible 
of  a  special  mediator  having  the  necessary 
power  to  settle  the  dispute. 

In    witness    whereof,    we    have    signed    at 
Montreal,  this   18th  day  of  June,   1965. 
(Signed)     Paul  Hurteau, 

Chairman. 
(Signed)     Robert  Sauve, 

Member. 
(Signed)     Michael  Harrison, 
Member. 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      AUGUST    7965 


757 


PRICE  INDEXES 


Consumer  Price  Index,  July  1965 

The  consumer  price  index  (1949=100) 
rose  0.4  per  cent  to  139.5  at  the  beginning 
of  July,  from  139.0  in  June.  The  July  index 
was  2.4  per  cent  higher  than  the  July  1964 
index  of  136.2. 

The  indexes  for  food  and  housing  increased 
by  1.0  per  cent  and  0.4  per  cent,  respec- 
tively, the  recreation  and  reading  index  de- 
clined slightly,  and  the  other  four  main 
components  of  the  index  were  unchanged. 

The  food  index  increased  1.0  per  cent  to 

139.0  from  137.6,  reflecting  further  price 
increases  for  beef,  pork,  and  potatoes.  Prices 
were  higher  also  for  a  variety  of  other  items, 
including  lamb,  veal,  celery,  onions,  turnips, 
tomatoes,  grapefruit,  bananas,  apples,  tea, 
eggs,  margarine,  butter  and  several  other 
dairy  products.  Prices  were  lower  for  lettuce, 
cabbage,  strawberries,  grapes,  sugar,  oranges 
and  orange  juice,  and  ice  cream. 

The   housing  index   rose   0.4   per  cent  to 

141.1  from  140.6  as  a  result  of  increases  in 
both  the  shelter  and  household  operation 
components.  Within  shelter,  increases  were 
reported  for  rents  and  for  home-ownership 
costs,  including  mortgages  and  repairs.  In 
household  operation,  increased  prices  for 
household  help,  furniture,  textiles,  and  uten- 
sils and  equipment  outweighed  decreases  in 
floor  coverings,  household  supplies,  and  elec- 
tricity rates  in  Saskatchewan. 

The  clothing  index  was  unchanged  from 
its  June  level  of  121.1.  An  increase  in  the 
children's  clothing  index  was  offset  by  a 
decrease  in  footwear  prices. 

The  transportation  index  was  unchanged  at 
147.0.  Higher  prices  for  tires  were  offset 
by  scattered  lower  prices  for  gasoline  and 
some  new  cars. 

The  health  and  personal  care  index  was 
unchanged  at  175.4  despite  a  slight  increase 
in  the  personal  care  component. 

The  recreation  and  reading  index  declined 
0.3  per  cent  to  154.6  from  155.0.  Lower 
prices  for  phonograph  records,  radio  and  tele- 
vision sets  moved  the  recreation  component 
down  0.4  per  cent.  The  reading  component, 
however,  moved  up  fractionally  as  a  result 
of  price  increases  for  newspapers  in  four 
cities. 

The  tobacco  and  alcohol  index  was  un- 
changed at  122.5. 

Group  indexes  one  year  earlier  (July  1964) 
were:  food  135.4,  housing  138.7,  clothing 
119.0,  transportation  141.6,  health  and  per- 
sonal care  167.3,  recreation  and  reading 
151.5,  tobacco  and  alcohol  120.2. 


City  Consumer  Price  Indexes,  June  1965 

Consumer  price  indexes  rose  in  all  10  re- 
gional cities  between  May  and  June  1965. 
Increases  ranged  from  0.2  per  cent  in  Sas- 
katoon-Regina   to    1.0  per  cent  in  Toronto. 

Food  indexes  were  higher  in  all  cities,  the 
movements  ranging  from  1.3  per  cent  in  St. 
John's  and  Saskatoon-Regina  to  3.7  per  cent 
in  Toronto.  Housing  indexes  moved  up 
slightly  in  five  cities,  edged  down  in  one,  and 
were  constant  in  four.  Clothing  indexes  were 
lower  in  six  cities,  higher  in  two,  and  un- 
changed in  two.  Transportation  indexes  in- 
creased in  five  cities,  decreased  in  two,  and 
held  steady  in  three. 

Health  and  personal  care  indexes  rose  in 
three  cities,  fell  in  four,  and  remained  un- 
changed in  three.  Recreation  and  reading  in- 
dexes were  higher  in  six  cities,  constant  in 
three  and  lower  in  one.  Tobacco  and  alcohol 
indexes  were  unchanged. 

Regional  consumer  price  index  point 
changes  between  May  and  June  were:  To- 
ronto +  1.4  to  140.8;  Halifax  +1.2  to  135.1; 
Saint  John  +1.2  to  137.6;  Montreal  +1.0  to 
138.4;  Ottawa  +0.8  to  138.5;  Edmonton- 
Calgary  +0.8  to  130.5;  Winnipeg  +0.7  to 
135.9;  Vancouver  +0.7  to  135.2;  St.  John's 
+0.4  to  123.2;  Saskatoon-Regina  +0.3  to 
132.2.* 

Wholesale  Price  Index,  June  1965 

Canada's  general  wholesale  index  (1935-39 
=  100)  rose  to  252.0  in  June,  up  1.1  per  cent 
from  the  May  index  of  249.2  and  2.7  per 
cent  above  the  June  1964  index  of  245.4. 

Six  of  the  eight  major  group  indexes  were 
higher  in  June,  while  one  declined. 

The  animal  products  group  index  rose  5.3 
per  cent  to  274.0  from  260.1,  the  vegetable 
products  group  index  moved  up  0.7  per  cent 
to  221.0  from  219.4,  and  the  iron  products 
group  index  advanced  to  266.6  from  265.6. 
Increases  of  0.1  per  cent  or  less  occurred  in 
non-ferrous  metals  products,  to  219.7  from 
219.5,  chemical  products,  to  201.4  from 
201.3,  and  textile  products,  to  247.2  from 
247.1. 

The  non-metallic  minerals  products  group 
index  eased  to  190.7  from  190.8. 

The  wood  products  group  index  was  un- 
changed at  333.1. 

The  index  of  Canadian  farm  product  prices 
at  terminal  markets  (1935-39=100)  advanced 
2.2  per  cent  to  246.4  from  241.0  in  the  four- 
week  period  ended  June  25.  The  animal 
products  index  rose  4.1  per  cent  to  299.9 
from  288.0.  The  field  products  index  eased 
0.6  per  cent  to  192.9  from  194.0. 


>On  base  June  1951=100. 


753 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE     •      AUGUST   1965 


The  price  index  of  residential  building 
materials  (1935-39=100)  rose  0.1  per  cent 
in  June  to  341.3  from  341.2  in  May.  On  the 
base  1949=100,  it  rose  to  149.7  from  149.6. 

The  price  index  of  non-residential  building 
materials  (1949=100)  rose  0.1  per  cent  to 
148.1   from   148.0. 

U.S.  Consumer  Price  Index,  June  1965 

The  United  States  consumer  price  index 
(1957-59=100)  rose  by  0.5  per  cent  in  June 
to  110.1  from  109.6  in  May.  A  year  ago  in 
June   the  index  was   108.0. 

The  increase  was  the  largest  for  a  month 
in  two  years  and  was  heavily  influenced  by 
a  reduced  supply  of  meat  and  vegetables; 
meat  prices  rose  6  per  cent.  The  increase 
would  have  been  greater  but  for  lower  auto- 
mobile and  air-conditioner  prices  brought 
about  by  the  cut  in  federal  excise  taxes. 

The  entire  increase  was  accounted  for  by 
food,   for   which   the   index   went  up   2  per 


cent.  For  all  items  other  than  food,  including 
both  goods  and  services,  the  index  was  un- 
changed  from   the   May   level. 

British  Index  of  Retail  Prices,  May  1965 

The  British  index  of  retail  prices  (Jan.  16, 
1962=100)  rose  to  112.4  at  mid-May  from 
112.0  at  mid-April.  The  index  was  107.0  at 
mid-May    1964. 

The  index  for  the  food  group  was  111.9, 
compared  with  111.6  in  April.  Increases  in 
the  average  prices  of  potatoes,  mutton,  lamb 
and  apples  were  partly  offset  by  reductions 
in  the  average  prices  of  eggs,  tomatoes,  but- 
ter and  sugar. 

Increases  of  about  one-half  of  1  per  cent 
were  registered  in  fuel  and  light,  and  trans- 
port and  vehicles.  Miscellaneous  goods  rose 
slightly  less  than  one-half  of  1  per  cent.  The 
index  for  the  services  group  as  a  whole  rose 
by  about  H  per  cent. 


Publications  Recently  Received 


in  Department  of  Labour  Library 


The  publications  listed  below  are  not  for 
sale  by  the  Department  of  Labour.  Persons 
wishing  to  purchase  them  should  communi- 
cate with  the  publishers.  Publications  listed 
may  be  borrowed  by  making  application  to 
the  Librarian,  Department  of  Labour,  Ottawa. 
Students  must  apply  through  the  library  of 
their  institution.  Applications  for  loans  should 
give  the  number  (numeral)  of  the  publica- 
tion desired  and  the  month  in  which  it  was 
listed  in  the  Labour  Gazette. 

List  No.  202 
Annual  Reports 

1.  ALBERTA.  BUREAU  OF  STATIS- 
TICS. Annual  Review  of  Business  Conditions, 
Alberta,  1964.  Edmonton,  Dept.  of  Industry 
and  Development,   1965.  Pp.  26. 

2.  CANADA.  UNEMPLOYMENT  IN- 
SURANCE COMMISSION.  Twenty-third 
Annual  Report,  Fiscal  Year  ending  March 
31,  1964.  Ottawa,  Queen's  Printer,  1964. 
Pp.  93. 

3.  MANITOBA.  CIVIL  SERVICE  SUPER- 
ANNUATION BOARD.  The  Manitoba  Civil 
Service  Superannuation  Fund;  the  Twenty- 
fifth  Annual  Report  for  the  Fiscal  Year  end- 
ing March  31st,  1964.  Winnipeg,  1965. 
Pp.   14. 

4.  MANITOBA.  WORKMEN'S  COMPEN- 
SATION BOARD.  Annual  Report,  1964. 
[Winnipeg,  1965].  Pp.  33. 

5.  U.S.  CONGRESS.  JOINT  ECONOMIC 
COMMITTEE.  January  1965  Economic  Re- 
port  of   the   President.   Hearings   before   the 


Joint  Economic  Committee,  Congress  of  the 
United  States,  Eighty-ninth  Congress,  First 
Session.  Washington,  GPO,  1965.  4  volumes. 

Hearings  held  February  19th  to  27th,  1965. 
Volume  4  contains  invited  comments  from  eleven 
organizations  including  AFL-CIO,  U.S.  Chamber 
of  Commerce,  Committee  for  Economic  Develop- 
ment, National  Association  of  Manufacturers, 
and   United   Mine  Workers  of  America. 

6.  U.S.  CONGRESS.  JOINT  ECONOMIC 
COMMITTEE.  1965  Joint  Economic  Report; 
Report  of  the  Joint  Economic  Committee, 
Congress  of  the  United  States  on  the  Janu- 
ary 1965  Economic  Report  of  the  President, 
with  Minority  and  Additional  Views.  Wash- 
ington, GPO,  1965.  Pp.  114. 

At  head  of  title:  89th  Congress,  1st  Session. 
House  Report  No.  175.  Union  Calendar  No.  68. 

Disabled — Rehabilitation 

7.  INTERNATIONAL  LABOUR  OF- 
FICE. Report  to  Participating  Governments 
on  the  I.L.O.  Training  Course  in  Vocational 
Rehabilitation  for  Countries  of  the  Near  and 
Middle  East  and  North  Africa  held  in  Athens, 
Greece  from  14  October  to  2  November 
1963.  Geneva,   1963.  Pp.   312. 

At  head  of  title:  Regular  Programme  of 
Technical  Assistance. 

8.  UNITED  NATIONS.  DEPARTMENT 
OF  ECONOMIC  AND  SOCIAL  AFFAIRS. 

Study  on  Legislative  and  Administrative  As- 
pects of  Rehabilitation  of  the  Disabled  in 
Selected  Countries.  New  York,  United  Na- 
tions,  1964.  Pp.    175. 


THE  LABOUR   GAZETTE      •      AUGUST    7965 


759 


9.  U.S.  OFFICE  OF  MANPOWER, 
AUTOMATION  AND  TRAINING.  Auto- 
mation and  Some  Implications  for  the  Handi- 
capped: Summaries  of  Reading  Materials  and 
Training  Projects.  Washington,  GPO,  1964. 
Pp.    54. 

10.  WORLD  FEDERATION  OF  OCCU- 
PATIONAL THERAPISTS.  Study  Course 
7 [-6].    Third    International    Congress,    World 

ation  of  Occupational  Therapists,  1962. 
Dubuque,  Iowa,  W.  C.  Brown  Book  Co. 
[1964].    6    volumes. 

'Courses  were  sponsored  by  the  American 
Occupational  Therapy  Association."  Contents: 
1.  Rehabilitation  of  the  injured  workman.  2. 
Transitional  programs  in  psychiatric  occupational 
therapy.  3.  Dynamic  living  for  the  long  term 
patient.  4.  Approaches  to  independent  living. 
5.  Work  adjustment  as  a  function  of  occupa- 
tional therapy.  6.  Approaches  to  the  treatment 
of  patients   with  neuromuscular   dysfunction. 

Dropouts 

11.  NEW  YORK  (STATE).  UNIVER- 
SITY.    BUREAU    OF    GUIDANCE.    How 

High    Schools    can    Reduce    Their    Dropout 
Rate;  an  Action  Guide.  Albany,  1964.  Pp.  22. 

This  pamphlet,  prepared  for  New  York  State 
school  teachers,  suggests  some  procedures  that 
a  teacher  might  follow  to  persuade  potential 
dropouts   to  remain  in  school. 

12.  SCHREIBER,  DANIEL.  Holding 
Power,  Large  City  School  Systems;  a  Study 
of  the  Holding  Power  Rates  of  School  Sys- 
tems in  128  Large  Cities,  Population  over 
90,000,  Based  on  the  Graduating  Classes  of 
1960-1963,  Inclusive.  Project:  School  Drop- 
outs. Washington;  National  Education  Asso- 
ciation [cl964].  Pp.  78. 

Information  based  on  a  questionnaire  sur- 
vey, gives  selected  statistics  of  pupil  enrollment, 
number  of  graduates,  percentage  of  students 
graduating  based  on  Grade  10  enrollment,  and 
other  data.  "Holding  power"  is  indicated  by 
noting  the  number  of  pupils  who  entered  Grade 
10  in  a  given  year  and  the  number  who  gradu- 
ated three  years  later. 

Economic  Conditions 

13.  ORGANIZATION  FOR  ECONOMIC 
COOPERATION    AND    DEVELOPMENT. 

Economic  Surveys:  Denmark.  [February  1965. 
Paris,    1965].   Pp.   31. 

Review  of  the  main  economic  trends  and 
economic  policy. 

14.  ORGANIZATION  FOR  ECONOMIC 
COOPERATION    AND    DEVELOPMENT. 

Economic     Surveys:     Germany.     [December 
1964.   Paris,    1964?].    Pp.    38. 

Examines  Germany's  balance  of  payments  ex- 
perience  in    1960-61    and    1963-64. 

15.  ORGANIZATION  FOR  ECONOMIC 
COOPERATION    AND    DEVELOPMENT. 

Economic  Surveys:  Iceland.  [November  1964. 
Paris,   1964].  Pp.  28. 


Review  of  current  trends  in  output  and  de- 
mand, prices  and  wages,  and  balance  of  pay- 
ments and  a  brief  examination  of  incomes 
policy,  monetary  policy  and  fiscal  policy. 

16.  ORGANIZATION  FOR  ECONOMIC 
COOPERATION    AND    DEVELOPMENT. 

Economic  Surveys:  Switzerland.  [February 
1965.  Paris,   1965].  Pp.  33. 

Reviews  recent  trends  in  output  and  demand, 
prices  and  wages,  and  the  balance  of  payments; 
discusses  policy  measures  adopted  by  the  Swiss 
government;  and  discusses  the  adequacy  of  these 
policies. 

17.  UNITED  NATIONS.  DEPARTMENT 
OF  ECONOMIC  AND  SOCIAL  AFFAIRS. 

Studies  in  Long-term  Economic  Projections 
for  the  World  Economy;  Aggregative  Models. 
New  York,  1964.  Pp.  90. 

Contents:  Pt.  1.  Studies  by  consultants  sub- 
mitted to  the  Committee  of  Experts  on  Long- 
term  Economic  Projections  (1962).  Pt.  2.  Study 
by  the  Economic  Projections  and  Programming 
Centre  of  the  Bureau  of  General  Economic 
Research  and  Policies. 

Education 

18.  COMMONWEALTH  EDUCATION 
CONFERENCE.  3rd,  Ottawa,  1964.  Report. 
London,  HMSO,   1964.  Pp.   107. 

At  head  of  title:  Department  of  Education 
and  Science.  The  Conference  was  held  in  Ottawa 
from  August  21  to  September  4,  1964.  Its  pur- 
pose was  to  review  the  progress  in  co-operation 
in  education  made  since  the  previous  conferences, 
to  determine  improvements  in  co-operation  in 
the  light  of  experience  gained,  and  to  consider 
specific  proposals  for  educational  co-operation 
in  other  fields. 

19.  JOHNSON,     GEORGE     ORVILLE. 

Education  for  the  Slow  Learners.  Englewoods 
Cliffs,  N.J.,  Prentice-Hall,   1963.  Pp.   330. 

20.  SEMINAR  ON  POLICY  FOR 
SCHOOL     SCIENCE,     ISTANBUL,     1961. 

Science  and  Education  for  the  Future;  Policy 
for  School  Science.  Report  on  the  Seminar 
organised  by  the  Office  for  Scientific  and 
Technical  Personnel  of  O.E.E.C.,  Istanbul, 
1961.  Project  STP-13.  [Paris]  Organization 
for  Economic  Cooperation  and  Development 
[1962?].  Pp.  93. 

21.  U.S.  PRESIDENT'S  SCIENCE  AD- 
VISORY COMMITTEE.  PANEL  ON  EDU- 
CATIONAL RESEARCH  AND  DEVELOP- 
MENT. Innovation  and  Experiment  in 
Education;  a  Progress  Report  .  .  .  to  the 
U.S.  Commissioner  of  Education,  the  Director 
of  the  National  Science  Foundation,  and  the 
Special  Assistant  to  the  President  for  Science 
and  Technology.  Washington,  GPO,  1964. 
Pp.  79. 

Education,  Vocational 

22.  U.S.  OFFICE  OF  EDUCATION.  DI- 
VISION OF  VOCATIONAL  AND  TECH- 
NICAL EDUCATION.  Chemical  Tech- 
nology; a  Suggested  2-year  Post  High  School 
Curriculum.  Washington,  GPO,  1964.  Pp.  119. 


760 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      AUGUST   7965 


23.  U.S.  OFFICE  OF  EDUCATION. 
DIVISION  OF  VOCATIONAL  AND  TECH- 
NICAL EDUCATION.  Electronic  Business 
Data  Processing  Peripheral  Equipment  Oc- 
cupations; Suggested  Curricula.  Washington, 
GPO,   1964.  Pp.    113. 

At  head  of  title:  Manpower  development  and 
training  program.  "Developed  and  first  pub- 
lished, pursuant  to  a  contract  with  the  U.S. 
Office  of  Education,  by  McGraw-Hill,  Inc.  Re- 
issued with  revisions  by  the  Office  of  Education." 

24.  U.S.  OFFICE  OF  EDUCATION. 
DIVISION  OF  VOCATIONAL  AND  TECH- 
NICAL EDUCATION.  Family  Dinner  Serv- 
ice Specialist;  a  Suggested  Training  Program. 
Washington,  GPO,   1964.  Pp.  13. 

At  head  of  title:  Manpower  development  and 
training  program. 

25.  U.S.  OFFICE  OF  EDUCATION. 
DIVISION  OF  VOCATIONAL  AND  TECH- 
NICAL EDUCATION.  The  Forestry  Aide;  A 
Suggested  Training  Program.  Washington, 
GPO,  1964.  Pp.  21. 

At  head  of  title:  Manpower  development  and 
training    program. 

26.  U.S.  OFFICE  OF  EDUCATION. 
DIVISION  OF  VOCATIONAL  EDUCA- 
TION. Instruction  in  Farm  Mechanics;  Sug- 
gestions for  Developing  Training  Programs 
in  Farm  Mechanics  in  Vocational  Agriculture, 
by  A.  H.  Hollenberg  and  E.  J.  Johnson. 
[Rev.  ed.  Washington,  GPO,  1964].  Pp.  128. 

27.  WILLIAMS,  H.  S.  Technical  Educa- 
tion in  Australia;  Collected  Papers.  Perth, 
Technical  Publications  Trust  [n.d.,  1964?]. 
Pp.  88. 

The  author  is  Director  of  Technical  Education 
in   Western   Australia. 

Employees — Training 

28.  INDUSTRIAL  WELFARE  SOCIETY. 

Training    your    Supervisors.    London,    1963. 
Pp.  21. 

29.  KING,  S.  DAVID  M.  Training  within 
the  Organization;  a  Study  of  Company  Policy 
and  Procedures  for  the  Systematic  Training 
of  Operators  and  Supervisors.  London,  Tavi- 
stock Publications,  1964.  Pp.  274. 

A  management  consultant  discusses  case  stud- 
ies concerning  the  establishment  of  systematic 
training  schemes  for  workers  in  factories  and 
suggests  procedures  for  establishing  a  company 
training  policy. 

30.  U.S.  OFFICE  OF  MANPOWER, 
AUTOMATION  AND  TRAINING.  MDTA 

Training  Program;  Comparison  of  1963  and 
1964.  Washington,  GPO,  1964.  Pp.   12. 

"Compares  institutional  training  programs 
under  the  Manpower  Development  and  Training 
Act  for  fiscal  year  1964  with  those  for  fiscal 
year  1963,  and  evaluates  program  changes  and 
developments." 


31.  VIRGINIA.  STATE  COLLEGE, 
PETERSBURGH.     NORFOLK     DIVISION. 

Training  the  Hard-Core  Unemployed:  a  Dem- 
onstration-Research Project  at  Virginia  State 
College,  Norfolk  Division;  an  Interim  Report. 
Washington,   GPO,    1964.   Pp.    101. 

".  .  .  The  material  in  this  publication  was 
prepared  under  a  contract  with  the  United 
States  Office  of  Education,  as  authorized  under 
the  Cooperative  Research  Program."  The  experi- 
mental training  program  for  the  hard-core  un- 
employed described  in  this  book,  commenced 
operation  on  October  1,  1962  and  was  designed 
"(1)  to  study,  develop,  and  use  materials  and 
techniques  for  training  hard-core  unemployed, 
unskilled  workers,  and  (2)  to  demonstrate  the 
effectiveness  of  vocational-technical  education, 
general  education,  and  counseling  in  training 
these  workers  for  selected  occupations." 

International  Labour  Organization 

32.  GREAT  BRITAIN.  MINISTRY  OF 
LABOUR.  International  Labour  Conference. 
Proposed  Action  by  H.M.  Government  in 
the  United  Kingdom  of  Great  Britain  and 
Northern  Ireland  on  a  Convention  and  Two 
Recommendations  adopted  at  the  47th  (1963) 
Session  and  on  an  Instrument  of  Amendment 
to  the  Constitution  of  the  International  La- 
bour Organisation  adopted  at  the  48th  (1964) 
Session  of  the  International  Labour  Con- 
ference. London,  HMSO,   1964.  Pp.   11. 

33.  INTERNATIONAL  LABOUR  OR- 
GANIZATION. Constitution  of  the  Interna- 
tional Labour  Organization  and  Standing 
Orders  of  the  International  Labour  Confer- 
ence. 1963  ed.  Geneva,  International  Labour 
Office,  1963.  Pp.  82.  English  and  French  on 
opposite  pages.  Paged  in  duplicate. 

Management 

34.  NATIONAL  INDUSTRIAL  CONFER- 
ENCE BOARD.  Top  Executive  Compensa- 
tion, by  Harland  Fox.  New  York,  1964. 
Pp.  77. 

".  .  .  An  analysis  of  the  1963  compensation 
of  the  three  highest-paid  executives  in  each  of 
1,224  corporations.  For  each  business  and  in- 
dustry studied,  the  1963  total  compensation 
(salary  plus  bonus  award)  of  each  of  the  three 
top-paid  executives  is  related  to  company  size. 
In  addition,  the  1963  bonus  award  is  ana- 
lyzed .  .  ." 

35.  NATIONAL  INDUSTRIAL  CON- 
FERENCE BOARD.  Top  Management  Or- 
ganization in  Divisionalized  Companies,  by 
Harold  Stieglitz  and  Allen  R.  Janger.  New 
York,   1965.  Pp.   198. 

Divisionalization  occurs  when  a  large  business 
is  broken  up  with  separate  smaller  ones.  Each 
division  is  considered  as  a  distinct  business 
capable  of  producing  its  own  goods  or  services 
that  its  customers  will  buy.  Contents:  The 
divisionalized  company.  General  executives.  Op- 
erating executives.  Staff  executives.  Position 
guides  for  top  management.  Executive  titles  and 
unit  designations  in  76  divisionalized  companies. 


THE  LABOUR   GAZETTE 

91939—7 


AUGUST    7965 


761 


36.  WINGATE,  JOHN  W.  Management 
Audit  for  Small  Retailers.  Washington,  GPO, 
1964.  Pp.  51. 

Contains  a  series  of  questions  that  a  small 
retailer  can  ask.  himself  (along  with  comments) 
to  help  him  determine  if  he  is  running  his  busi- 
ness well  and  to  point  out  areas  where  he  might 
do  better. 

Occupations 

37.  HOPPOCK,  ROBERT.  Occupational 
Information:  Where  to  Get  it  and  How  to 
Use  it  in  Counseling  and  in  Teaching.  [2nd 
ed.]  New  York,  McGraw-Hill,  1963.  Pp.  546. 

Intended  as  a  textbook  for  use  in  the  educa- 
tion of  counselors  and  others. 

38.  WALKER,  JAMES  FRANCIS.  Foreign 
Jobs;  the  truth  about  Job  Opportunities  by 
a  Noted  Specialist  in  the  Field.  [1st  ed.] 
New  York,  Vantage  Press,  1964.  Pp.   137. 

The  author,  head  of  a  private  employment 
agency  specializing  in  the  overseas  employment 
field,  writes  about  the  advantages  and  disad- 
vantages of  foreign  employment. 

Wages  and  Hours 

39.  ILLINOIS.  BUREAU  OF  EMPLOY- 
MENT SECURITY.  Estimates  of  Employ- 
ment, Hours,  and  Earnings  in  the  Non- 
agricultural  Establishments,  Chicago  Standard 
Metropolitan  Statistical  Area  .  .  .  1952-1963. 
Chicago,  Illinois  Department  of  Labor,  1964. 
Pp.  33,  12. 

40.  U.S.  BUREAU  OF  LABOR  STATIS- 
TICS. Industry  Wage  Survey;  Communica- 
tions, 1963.  Washington,  GPO,  1964.  Pp.  16. 

41.  WEINTRAUB,  SIDNEY.  Some  As- 
pects of  Wage  Theory  and  Policy.  [1st  ed.] 
Philadelphia,  Chilton  Brooks  [1963].  Pp.  254. 

Contents:  Wages  and  consumption  outlay.  A 
model  of  the  price  level.  The  constancy  in  the 
wage  share.  Wage  share  and  capital  ratio  esti- 
mates. A  decade  of  wage  inflation.  Toward  a 
national  wage  policy.  Real  versus  price  theories 
of   distribution. 

Miscellaneous 

42.  ANDREWS,  KENNETH  RICH- 
MOND, Ed.  The  Case  Method  of  Teaching 
Human  Relations  and  Administration;  an 
Interim  Statement.  Cambridge,  Harvard  Uni- 
versity Press,  1960  [cl951]  Pp.  271. 

"...  A  collection  of  papers  by  those  who  teach 
and  do  research  in  human  relations  at  the 
Harvard  Business  School." 

43.  CANADA.  UNEMPLOYMENT  IN- 
SURANCE COMMISSION.  Employer's 
Handbook  on  Unemployment  Insurance. 
18th  ed.  Ottawa,  Queen's  Printer,  1965.  Pp. 
46. 


44.  CHARLES,    SEARLE    FRANKLIN. 

Minister  of  Relief;  Harry  Hopkins  and  the 
Depression.  Syracuse,  N.Y.,  Syracuse  Uni- 
versity Press,  1963.  Pp.  286. 

An  account  of  the  American  federal  relief 
programs  administered  by  Harry  Hopkins  during 
early  years  of  President  Franklin  D.  Roosevelt's 
administration.  Harry  Hopkins,  chief  adminis- 
trator of  federal  relief  agencies,  had  been  head 
of  New  York  State  relief  program  when  Presi- 
dent Roosevelt  was  Governor  of  the  State. 

45.  CONFERENCE  DES  MINISTRES 
DU  TRAVAIL  DE  TOUTE  L'AFRIQUE. 
2e,  LE  CAIRE,  1963.  [Rapport.  Cairo? 
United  Arab  Republic,  Ministry  of  Labour? 
1964?].  Pp.  68. 

46.  D.S.I.R.-ASLIB  DELEGATION  TO 
MOSCOW  AND  LENINGRAD,  JUNE  1963. 
Scientific  and  Technical  Information  in  the 
Soviet  Union;  Report  of  the  D.S.I.R.-Aslib 
Delegation  to  Moscow  and  Leningrad,  7th- 
24th  June,  1963.  [London,  Great  Britain]  De- 
partment of  Scientific  and  Industrial  Research, 
1964.  Pp.  [44]. 

DSIR  is  the  British  Department  of  Scien- 
tific and  Industrial  Research.  ASLIB  is  Asso- 
ciation of  Special  Libraries  and  Information 
Bureaux. 

47.  HANEY,    WILLIAM    VALENTINE. 

Communication:  Patterns  and  Incidents. 
Homewood,  111.,  R.  D.  Irwin,  1960.  Pp.  321. 
The  author  writes  about  the  processes  involved 
in  communication  and  illustrates  his  text  with 
factual   material. 

48.  JOHNSON.  CARL  GUNNARD.  Met- 
allurgy, Chapter  XVII.  "Titanium,  Zirconium, 
Indium,  and  Vanadium,"  by  William  R. 
Weeks.  4th  ed.  Chicago,  American  Technical 
Society,  1956.  Pp.  454. 

49.  LABOUR  PARTY  (GREAT  BRIT- 
AIN). Report  of  the  63rd  Annual  Confer- 
ence held  in  .  .  .  Brighton,  December  12  and 
13,  1964.  London  [1965?],  Pp.  221. 

50.  U.S.  OFFICE  OF  LABOR-MANAGE- 
MENT AND  WELFARE-PENSION  RE- 
PORTS. Requirements  for  electing  Union 
Officers,  as  prescribed  in  Title  IV  and  Re- 
lated Provisions  of  the  Labor-Management 
Reporting  and  Disclosure  Act.  Rev.  ed.  Wash- 
ington, GPO,  1964.  Pp.  57. 

51.  WACHNER,  CLARENCE  W.  English 
for  Adults.  New  York,  Holt,  Rinehart  and 
Winston  [1964].  Pp.  243. 

Contents:  The  sentence  and  its  parts.  Punctua- 
tion. Spelling.  Words:  symbols  for  ideas.  Para- 
graphs for  understanding.  Good  usage.  Oral 
communication.  Listening  and  mass  media.  Read- 
ing for   information   and  pleasure. 


762 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      AUGUST   7965 


LABOUR  STATISTICS 

Paqb 

Tables  A-l  to  A-3 — Labour  Force 763 

Table  B-l— Labour  Income 765 

Tables  G-l  to  C-6 — Employment,  Hours  and  Earnings 766 

Tables  D-l  to  D-5— Employment  Service  Statistics 772 

Tables  E-l  to  E-4 — Unemployment  Insurance 777 

Tables  F-I  and  F-2— Prices 779 

Tables  G-l  to  G-4— Strikes  and  Lockouts 780 

A — Labour  Force 

TABLE  A-l— REGIONAL  DISTRIBUTION,  WEEK  ENDED  JULY  34,  1965 

(estimates  in  thousands) 


Canada 


Atlantic 


Quebec 


Ontario 


Prairies 


British 
Columbia 


The  Labour  Force 

Men 

Women 

14-19  years 

20-24  years 

25-44  years 

45-64  years 

65  years  and  over 

Employed 

Men 

Women 

Agriculture 

Non-agriculture 

Paid  workers 

Men 

Women 

Unemployed 

Men 

Women 

Persons  not  in  labour  force 

Men 

Women 

♦Less  than  10,000. 


7,495 

5,353 
2,142 

1,060 

983 

3,107 

2,128 

217 

7,251 

5,171 
2,080 

706 
6,545 

6,078 

4,232 
1,846 

244 

182 
62 

5,651 

1.162 
4,489 


654 

479 
175 

106 
100 
238 
190 
20 

624 

455 
169 

42 

582 

527 

375 
152 

30 

24 


152 
464 


2,101 

1,536 
565 

312 
327 
887 
527 
48 

2,003 

1,459 
544 

146 
1,857 

1,707 

1,227 


1,705 


339 

1,366 


2,734 

1,910 
824 

356 

316 

1,169 

804 

89 

2,669 

1,864 
805 

179 

2,490 

2,332 

1,594 
738 

65 


1,884 


363 
1,521 


1,299 

933 
366 

192 
156 
522 

388 
41 

1,274 

914 
360 

307 
967 

912 

619 
293 

25 

19 


913 


187 
726 


495 
212 


291 

219 

19 


479 
202 

32 
649 

600 

417 
183 

26 

16 
10 

533 

121 
412 


THE  LABOUR   GAZETTE 

91939— lh 


AUGUST    79S5 


763 


TABLE  A-»     4GB,  SEX  AND  MARITAL  STATUS,  WEEK  ENDED 
JULY  24,  1965,  CANADA 

(estimates  in  thousands) 


Total 


14-19 
years 

all 
persons 


20-64  years 


Men 


Married        Other 


Women 


Married        Other 


65  years 
and  over 

all 
persons 


Population  14  years  of  age  and  over<l> 


Labour  1 

Employed  . 

Unemployed. 


Not  in  the  labour  force. 

Participation  rate(!) 

1965.  July  24 

June  19 


Unemployment  rate(-> 

1965,'July  24 

June  19 


13,146 

7,495 

7,251 

244 

5,651 


57.0 
55.7 


3.3 
3.5 


2.145 

1,060 

968 

92 

1,085 


49.4 

37.8 


8.7 
12.4 


3,757 


3,636 
3,567 


121 


96.8 
97.0 


1.9 
1.9 


996 

901 
853 

48 

95 


90.5 
89.8 


5.3 
5.6 


3,885 


1,022 

1,008 

14 


2,863 


26.3 
27.7 


1.4 
1.4 


659 

646 

13 

283 


70.0 
70.9 


2.0 
1.9 


217 
209 


1,204 


15.3 
15.9 


("  Excludes  inmates  of  institutions,  members  of  the  armed  forces.  Indians  living  on  reserves  and  residents  of  the  Yukon 
and  Northwest  Territories. 

'*>  The  Labour  Force  as  a  percentage  of  the  population  14  years  of  age  and  over. 
<3>  The  unemployed  as  a  percentage  of  the  labour  force. 
*  Less  than  10,000. 


TABLE  A-3— UNEMPLOYED,  WEEK  ENDED  JULY  24,  1965 

(estimates  in  thousands) 


July 
1965 


June 
1965 


July 
19640) 


Total     unemployed. 


On  temporary  layoff  up  to  30  days. 
Without  work  and  seeking  work 


Seeking  full-time  work. . 
Seeking  part-time  work 


Seeking  under  1  month 

Seeking  1-3  months 

Seeking  4-6  months 

Seeking  more  than  6  months. 


244 

13 
231 

208 
23 

87 
81 
30 
33 


257 

16 
241 

222 
19 

111 
64 
30 
36 


265 


249 


227 
22 


(1>  Due  to  the  introduction  of  revised  weighting  factors  in  March  1965,  small  adjustments  have  been  made  to  estimates 
published  before  that  time.  See  D.I5.S.  report  "The  Labour  Force,  March  1965",  page  8. 


764 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      AUGUST    7965 


B — Labour  Income 

TABLE  B-l  -ESTIMATES  OF  LABOUR  INCOME,  BY  INDUSTRY 

Note:  Monthly  and  quarterly  figures  may  not  add  to  annual  totals  because  of  rounding. 

($  MilUons) 
Source:  Dominion  Bureau  of  Statistics 


Monthly  Totals 

Quarterly  Totals(') 

Year  and 
Month 

Mining 

Manu- 
facturing 

Trans- 
portation, 
Storage 
and 
Communi- 
cation^) 

Forestry 

Consruct- 
tion 

Public 
utilities 

Trade 

Finance 
Services 
(including 
Govern- 
ment) 

Supple- 
men- 
tary 
Labour 
income 

Totals 

1960— Total 

1961— Total 

1962— Total 

1963— Total 

1964— Total 

1964 — 

563 
542 
559 
572 
600 

49.1 
51.2 
52.4 
50.1 
50.1 
51.5 
51.7 
51.4 

52.4 
53.3 
54.2 
53.1 
55.4 

5.246 
5,306 
5,899 
6,045 
6,579 

547.4 
557.7 
546.0 
587,2 
575.6 
565.4 
565.9 
551.5 

566.1 
564.4 
583.2 
587.3 
601.0 

1.809 
1,862 
1,909 
2,008 
2,129 

175.5 

179.8 
182.5 
185.5 
188.8 
185.7 
181.3 
178.4 

181.9 
180.4 
178.7 
185.1 
191.1 

323 
283 
300 
308 
344 

74.1 

1.214 

1,252 
1,357 
1,419 
1,584 

381.2 

343 
357 
378 
397 
421 

104.6 

2,640 
2,740 
2,881 
3,089 
3,358 

827.2 

5,100 
5,616 
6,080 
6,601 
7,247 

1,817.5 

794 
820 
843 
872 
910 

226.1 

18,245 
18,996 
20,233 
21,546 
23,416 

1,940.3 

1,994.5 

July 

1,981.2 

104.0 

461.9 

109.1 

850.9 

1,826.1 

230.5 

2,016.6 

September 

October 

2,072.1 

2,051.8 
2,033.6 
1  978.6 

November 

96.4 

426.8 

108.4 

887.2 

1,876.5 

232.6 

1965— 

1,991.0 

February 

77.5 

374.3 

107.6 

869.0 

1,907.1 

233.7 

1,997.8 
2,035.1 

2,070.6 

Mayt 

27.6 

155.6 

37.6 

305.4 

668.8 

80.0 

2,144.3 

Seasonally  Adjusted 


1960— Total  . 
1961— Total.. 
1962— Total.. 
1963— Total.. 
1964— Total.. 

1964— 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 
October.. . 
November 
December. 

1965 — 

January 

February . . 

March 

Apiil* 

Mayt 


563 

5,246 

542 

5,306 

559 

5,699 

572 

6,045 

600 

6,579 

49.4 

541.9 

50.0 

544.9 

50.3 

549.7 

49.8 

558.0 

49.8 

561.7 

51.0 

557.7 

51.5 

561.0 

51.8 

563.3 

53.0 

578.5 

53.8 

575.3 

55.0 

591.5 

55.1 

592.6 

56.0 

595.0 

1,809 
1,862 
1,909 
2,008 
2,129 

174.9 
175.4 

323 

283 
300 
308 
344 

86.7 

1,214 
1,252 
1,357 
1,419 
1,584 

382.3 

343 
357 
378 
397 
421 

104.1 

2,640 
2,740 
2,881 
3,089 
3,358 

829.0 

5,100 
5,616 
6,080 
6,601 
7,247 

1,787.9 

794 
820 
843 
872 
910 

226.1 

177.1 

177.3 
183.8 

90.4 

390.3 

106.3 

850.3 

1,841.8 

228.9 

182.2 

179.8 
183.7 

85.1 

422.4 

108.4 

866.4 

1,873.9 

230.9 

185.9 

187.3 
187.7 

91.4 

462.6 

111.1 

889.9 

1,925.8 

237.2 

189.4 

190.8 

32.7 

151.5 

37.5 

306.6 

657.4 

80.0 

18,245 
18,996 
20,233 
21,546 
23,416 


1,925.9 
1.934.5 
1,955.4 
1,972.3 
1,998.6 
1,999.5 
2,014.0 
2,020.2 


2,063.0 
2,077.1 
2,109.6 
2,121.4 
2,128.4 


(')Quarterly  figures  are  entered  opposite  the  middle  month  of  the  quarter  but  represent  quarterly  totals.  Beginning  with 
May  1965,  figures  in  the  six  columns  under  "Quarterly  Totals"  will  be  published  monthly. 

(2) Includes  post  office  wages  and  salaries. 

(3)Figures  in  this  column  are  for  total  labour  income,  Canada,  but  are  not  totals  of  the  figures  in  the  remaining  columns 
of  this  table,  as  figures  for  labour  income  in  Agriculture,  Fishing  and  Trapping  are  not  shown. 

'Revised. 

+Preliminary. 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      AUGUST   7965 


765 


C — Employment,  Hours  and  Earnings 

Tables  C-l  to  C3  are  based  on  reports  from  employers  having  15  or  more  employees; 
at  April  employers  in  the  principal  non-agricultural  industries  reported  a  total  employment 
of  3,156,545.  Tables  C-4  and  C-5  are  based  on  reports  from  a  somewhat  smaller  number 
of  firms  than  Tables  C-l  to  C-3.  They  relate  only  to  wage  earners  for  whom  statistics  or 
hours  of  work  are  also  available  whereas  Tables  C-l  to  C-3  relate  to  salaried  employees  as 
well  as  to  all  wage-earners  in  the  reporting  firms. 

TABLE  C-l— EMPLOYMENT,  PAYROLLS  AND  WEEKLY  WAGES  AND  SALARIES 

Source:  Employment  and  Payrolls,  DBS 


Year  and  Month 


Averages 

1960 

1961 

1962 

1963 

1964 

1964— 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October. . . 

November 

December. 

1965— 

January 

February.. 

March* 

April! 


Industrial  Composite!1] 


Index  Numbers 
(1949-100) 


Employ- 
ment 


118.7 
118.1 
121.5 
124.6 
130.4 

124.6 
129.1 
133.4 
134.0 
136.4 
136.2 
134.7 
134.7 
131.2 


129.4 
129.5 
130.9 
131.8 


Average 
Weekly 
Wages 

and 
Salaries 


176.5 
182.0 
187.6 
194.2 
201.8 

201.0 
202.0 
201.6 
202.0 
203.0 
204.8 
205.9 
204.7 
199.1 


207.7 
207.9 
210.0 
210.7 


Average 
Weekly 
Wages 

and 
Salaries 


75.83 
78.17 
80.59 
83.43 


86.33 
86.80 
86.62 
86.76 
87.19 
88.00 
88.47 
87.94 
85.53 


89.21 
89.30 
90.22 
90.53 


Manufacturing 


Index  Numbers 
(1949-100) 


Employ- 
ment 


109.5 
109.9 
113.3 
116.4 
121.9 

118.6 
121.4 
124.2 
122.6 
126.4 
126.3 
123.6 
124.4 
121.9 


122.5 
122.6 
124.3 
124.4 


Average 
Weekly 
Wages 

and 
Salaries 


177.8 
183.6 
189.2 
196.1 
204.1 

203.9 
204.8 
204.1 
202.7 
203.9 
207.0 
207.3 
206.8 
201.6 


201.3 
209.4 
214.0 
214.2 


Average 
Weekly 
Wages 

and 
Salaries 


78.19 
80.73 
83.17 
86.24 
89.73 

89.66 
90.05 
89.73 
89.11 
89.65 
91.01 
91.15 
90.91 
88.66 


92.46 
92.07 
94.10 
94.20 


[^Includes  (1)  Forestry  (chiefly  logging),  (2)  Mining  (including  milling),  quarrying  and  oil  wells,  (3)  Manufacturing, 
(4)  Construction,  (5)  Transportation,  storage  and  communication,  (6)  Public  utility  operation,  (7)  Trade,  (8)  Finance, 
insurance  and  real  estate  and  (9)  Service  (mainly  hotels,  restaurants,  laundries,  dry  cleaning  plants,  business  and  recrea- 
tional service). 

•Revised. 

tPreliminary. 


766 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE     •     AUGUST  1965 


TABLE  C-2— AREA  SUMMARY  OF  EMPLOYMENT  AND  AVERAGE  WEEKLY  WAGES 

AND  SALARIES 

(1949  =  100)    (The  latest  figures  arc  subject  to  revision) 
Source:  Employment  and  Payrolls,  DBS 


Area 


Employment  Index  Numbers 


April 

1965 


March 
1905 


April 
1964 


Average  Weekly  Wages 
and  Salaries 


April 
1965 


Ma  id  i 
1965 


April 
1964 


Provinces 

Atlantic  Region 

Newfoundland 

Prince  Edward  Island 

Nova  Scotia 

New  Brunswick 

Quebec 

Ontario 

Prairie  Region 

Manitoba 

Saskatchewan 

Alberta  (including  Northwest  Territories) 
British  Columbia  (including  Yukon) 

Canada 

Urban  areas 

St.  John's 

Sydney 

Halifax 

Moncton 

Saint  John 

Chicoutimi — Jonquiere 

Quebec 

Sherbrooke 

Shawinigan 

Three  Rivers 

Drummondville 

Montreal 

Ottawa— Hull 

Kingston 

Peterborough 

Oshawa 

Toronto 

Hamilton 

St.  Catharines 

Niagara  Falls 

Brantford 

Guelph 

Gait 

Kitchener 

Sudbury 

Timmins 

London 

Sarnia 

Windsor 

Sault  Ste.  Marie 

Fort  William— Port  Arthur 

Winnipeg 

Regina 

Saskatoon 

Edmonton 

Calgary 

Vancouver 

Victoria 


105.8 
135.1 
122.3 
97.6 
101.6 
130.6 
136.6 
137.5 
114.8 
129.7 
168.4 
129.4 

131.8 


153.1 

77.4 
127.3 
111.3 
106.6 
114.6 
132.9 
119.0 
109.4 
122.5 

99.0 
139.8 
143.8 
140.2 
111.2 
248.3 
152.1 
131.3 
134.3 
109.9 
104.8 
145.8 
133.7 
153.8 
144.1 

82.7 
15J.2 
134.7 

98.2 
159.2 
122.2 
118.9 
154.6 
157.4 
221.6 
201.7 
132.5 
128.9 


106.8 
131.1 
115.6 
98.2 
106.1 
129.6 
135.3 
137.0 
113.5 
126.7 
170.1 
127.5 

139.9 


146. 
76. 
135. 


118.6 
111.5 
130.3 
118.3 
107.9 
119.6 

98.8 
138.3 
142.7 
137.7 
109.7 
249.2 
151.4 
128.8 
132.8 
102.6 
104.5 
142.7 
132.9 
153.6 
143.8 

83.8 
148.4 
137.3 

91.8 
154.8 
113.8 
116.8 
150.8 
153.7 
218.6 
199.3 
130.3 
127.7 


100.8 
127.8 
118.2 
93.0 
97.1 
123.9 
129.0 
130.7 
111.3 
125.4 
156.4 
119.6 

124.6 


144.7 
77.0 
123.2 
104.3 
101.8 
113.4 
126.6 
114.6 
103.1 
123.3 
93.3 
132.8 
137.8 
132.0 
104.5 
226.2 
144.9 


122 

122 


90.4 
130.8 
129.4 
143.5 
130.5 

84.5 
144.4 
132.1 

83.7 
151.4 
110.3 
114.0 
147.7 
144.7 
207.8 
178.6 
121.7 
113.3 


75.60 
81.43 
64.38 
73.92 
74.98 
87.59 
94.39 
85.56 
81.61 
81.04 
89.37 
98.93 

90.53 


67.07 
85.78 
76.47 
69.30 
75.08 
103.14 
77.40 
77.30 
92.84 
79.94 
72.47 
89.58 
83.08 
89.76 
96.46 
122.23 
93.44 
99.84 
109.48 
93.89 
90.69 
84.25 
8').  82 
83.03 
99.61 
8  J.  63 
85.30 
113.02 
113.05 
114.73 
86.79 
78.47 
82.03 
79.02 
82.88 
88.70 
96.81 
87.38 


76.51 
81.06 
64.14 
75.13 
76.49 
87.30 
93.96 
85.35 
81.01 
82.76 
89.77 
98.33 

99.22 


67.73 
87.74 
76.70 
70.37 
77.86 

102.98 
77.17 
76.98 
92.64 
78.27 
72.29 
89.03 
83.19 
88.20 
97.33 

123.33 
92.84 
98.46 

109.24 
94.41 
90.88 
86.77 
81.97 
82.58 

100.82 
79.85 
84.21 

115.59 

114.76 

113.95 
86.42 
77.76 
80.95 
77.88 
82.20 
88.56 
95.91 
85.81 


72.29 
78.98 
62.67 
70.41 
71.30 
84.23 
89.51 
82.06 
78.62 
80.37 
85.64 
93.95 

86.33 


66.20 
83.31 
72.15 
67.54 
70.88 
105.56 
73.81 
73.67 
92.00 
80.63 
68.91 
85.69 
79.64 
86.84 
93.86 
106.96 
89.92 
94.52 
101.60 
87.93 
83.93 
80.11 
77.42 
79.76 
94.48 
77.47 
82.38 
110.53 
101.10 
104.45 
84.21 
75.81 
8  J.  07 
74.68 
79.78 
85.74 
92.72 
81.57 


THE  LABOUR   GAZETTE      •      AUGUST    1965 


767 


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THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE     •      AUGUST   7965 


TABLE  OS— INDUSTRY  SUMMARY  OF  EMPLOYMENT  AND  AVERAGE  WEEKLY 

WAGES  AND  SALARIES 

(1949=100)     (The  latest  figures  are  subject  to  revision) 

Source:  Employment  and  Payrolls,  DBS 

Note:  Information  for  other  industries  is  given  in  Employment  and  Payrolls 


Industry 


Mining 

Metal  mining 

Gold 

Other  metal 

Fuels 

Coal 

Oil  and  natural  gas 

Non-metal 

Manufacturing 

Durable  goods 

Non-durable  goods 

Food  and  beverages 

Meat  products 

Canned  and  preserved  fruits  and  vegetables . 

Grain  mill  products 

Bread  and  other  bakery  products 

Distilled  and  malt  liquors 

Tobacco  and  tobacco  products 

Rubber  products 

Leather  products 

Boots  and  shoes  (except  rubber) 

Other  leather  products 

Textile  products  (except  clothing) 

Cotton  yarn  and  broad  woven  goods 

Woollen  goods 

Synthetic  textiles  and  silk 

Clothing  (textile  and  fur) 

Men's  clothing 

Women's  clothing 

Knit  goods 

Wood  products 

Saw  and  planing  mills 

Furniture 

Other  wood  products 

Paper  products 

Pulp  and  paper  mills 

Other  paper  products 

Printing,  publishing  and  allied  industries 

Iron  and  steel  products 

Agricultural  implement? 

Fabricated  and  structural  steel 

Hardware  and  tools 

Heating  and  cooking  appliances 

Iron  castings 

Machinery,  Industrial  machinery 

Primary  iron  and  steel 

Sheet  metal  products 

Wire  and  wire  products 

Transportation  equipment 

Aircraft  and  parts 

Motor  vehicles 

Motor  vehicle  parts  and  accessories 

Railroad  and  rolling  stock  equipment   

Shipbuilding  and  repairing 

Non-ferrous  metal  products 

Aluminum  products 

Brass  and  copper  products 

Smelting  and  refining 

Electrical  apparatus  and  supplies 

Heavy  electrical  machinery 

Telecommunication  equipment 

Non-metallic  mineral  products 

Clay  products 

Glass  and  glass  products 

Products  of  petroleum  and  coal 

Petroleum  refining  and  products 

Chemical  products 

Medicinal  and  pharmaceutical  preparations 

Acids,  alkalis  and  salts 

M lsivllaneous  manufacturing  industries 

Construction 

Building  and  general  engineering 

Highways,  bridges  and  streets   .  

Electric  and  motor  transportation 

Service 

Hotels  and  restaurants 

Laundries  and  dry  cleaning  plants 

Industrial  composite 


Employment 


April 
1965 


117.8 

135.7 

59.3 

206.2 

80.9 

38.1 

254.5 

145.1 

124.4 

135.4 

115.3 

112.8 

137.6 

92.7 

91.2 

112.8 

93.8 

81.5 

120.6 

86.9 

88.9 

83.3 

92.1 

76.5 

64.4 

119.3 

101.1 

108.8 

112.7 

78.0 

114.3 

113.0 

133.2 

83.0 

133.6 

131.8 

137.8 

129.0 

130.0 

85.6 

176.2 

133.6 

108.0 

117.9 

158.4 

148.7 

126.0 

138.6 

139.0 

226.3 

171.0 

177.7 

64.2 

153.3 

132.7 

135.8 

106.8 

146.1 

169.0 

125.1 

290.3 

163.3 

96.0 

189.7 

140.1 

143.5 

144.5 

134.7 

162.9 

163.3 

124.9 

133.7 

110.3 

156.9 

195.3 

162.0 

168.5 

131.8 


March 
1965 


120.3 

135.4 

60.0 

205.4 

90.7 

38.0 

304.7 

139.0 

124.3 

135.4 

115.0 

110.3 

136.2 

88.6 

90.1 

112.3 

93.2 

87.9 

120.3 


91.4 

87.1 

91.7 

76.5 

64.0 

119.0 

103.5 

110.6 

117.2 

78.9 

116.0 

116.6 

131.8 

81.4 

132.2 

130.3 

136.6 

129.1 

129.2 

85.2 

171.5 

134.9 

113.9 

116.5 

156.5 

148.0 

124.2 

137.7 

139.4 

252.8 

165.3 

171.8 

64.3 

154.3 

134.3 

133.6 

120.1 

145.3 

168.4 

124.5 


159.3 
94.3 
186.3 
141.0 
144.3 
143.4 
135.2 
162.3 
162.7 
120.2 
126.6 
109.5 
155.1 
191.1 
159.8 
165.2 
130.9 


April 
1964 


111.7 

127.4 

63.5 

186.8 

77.0 

37.7 

236.6 

142.7 

118.6 

126.1 

112.4 

109.3 

131.2 

86.1 

94.4 

110.8 

93.4 

97.2 

115.6 

88.7 

92.3 

82.1 

89.0 

76.9 

66.1 

106.8 

98.8 

104.3 

108.7 

75.4 

109.8 

111.2 

122.0 

78.8 

128.5 

128.0 

129.7 

126.8 

119.2 

74.2 

149.6 

124.7 

109.3 

107.6 

141.2 

139.8 

117.2 

126.8 

127.3 

250.1 

146.1 

156.9 

57.7 

136.9 

130.8 

145.0 

115.9 

140.4 

156.4 

117.9 

274.7 

151.1 


173. 

139. 

142. 

138. 

127. 

154. 

158. 

114.4 

118.3 

108.0 

147.0 

175.7 

148.4 

154.3 

124.6 


Average  Weekly  Wages 
and  Salanea 


April 
1965 


S 

110.00 

110.27 
91.87 
115.22 
114.83 
87.18 
131.63 
100.96 
94.20 
102.54 
86.02 
82.47 
89.78 
74.07 
89.12 
77.22 
113/90 
92.87 
94.73 
61.57 
59.45 
65.68 
74.60 
70.32 
68.24 
82.64 
57.31 
55.99 
58.13 
58.32 
80.46 
83.42 
77.32 
69.56 
106.39 
114.12 
88.93 
101.76 
106.19 
113.20 
105.33 
92.66 
89.48 
104.08 
102.33 
122.32 
102.23 
102.09 
115.62 
111.97 
137.92 
113.43 
95.60 
101.88 
104.33 
100.87 
99.58 
114.33 
98.63 
107.07 
94.46 
98.04 
90.12 
98.85 
135.50 
136.  lit 
108.18 
97.40 
120.59 
80.76 
100.42 
107.51 
86.17 
94.26 
61.21 
47.93 
56.78 
90.53 


March 
1965 


S 

110.92 

110.97 
89.88 
116.69 
116.76 
86.32 
132.16 
99.49 
94.10 
102.56 
85.77 
82.33 
88.99 
75.47 
90.02 
76.38 
113.79 
87.07 
94.47 
63.13 
61.37 
66.46 
74.52 
72.09 
69.08 
81.38 
58.13 
56.85 
58.95 
58.55 
80.50 
83.33 
77.14 
70.25 
106.36 
114.29 
88.50 
101.15 
105.99 
114.12 
105.30 
92.85 
88.87 
104.55 
103.16 
119.85 
101.51 
103.75 
116.41 
111.03 
141.14 
114.44 
96.62 
101.63 
103.45 
101.32 
99.18 
112.98 
99.03 
106.47 
94.46 
97.36 
87.60 
91.65 
131.89 
132.55 
107.32 
%.71 
119.41 
81.46 
100.28 
108.06 
85.37 
93.45 
63.65 
47.67 
55.42 
90.22 


April 
1964 


* 
105.08 

105.53 
87.12 
111.34 
109.29 
79.83 
128.35 
96.55 
89.66 
96.56 
83.19 
79.61 
86.57 
72.15 
86.22 
74.55 
110.36 
83.28 
91.73 
60.08 
57.93 
64.47 
71.91 
68.81 
65.23 
79.19 
55.46 
54.04 
56.67 
55.78 
76.96 
79.56 
73.98 
67.23 
104.17 
112.52 
84.41 
97.44 
100.77 
107.03 
101.38 
89.08 
87.60 
97.32 
98.42 
113.29 
96.74 
101.50 
105.93 
106.47 
124.09 
103.11 
91.13 
92.22 
100.05 
96.62 
97.34 
109.42 
94.35 
102.05 
89.40 
93.19 
84.61 
90.21 
130.64 
131.89 
104.94 
92.  S2 
116.98 
78.92 
93.62 
100.18 
81.78 
90.47 
61.08 
46.40 
54.30 
86.33 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      AUGUST    1965 


769 


TABLE  C-i— HOURS  AND  EARNINGS  IN  MANUFACTURING,  BY  PROVINCE 

(Hourly  Rated  Wage-Earners) 

Source:  Man-Hours  and  Hourly  Earnings  DBS 

Note:  Information  on  hours  and  earnings  by  cities  is  obtainable  from  Man-Hours  and  Hourly  Earnings,  DBS 

(The  latest  figures  are  subject  to  revision) 


Average  Hours  Worked 

Average  Hourly  Earnings* 

— 

April 
1965 

March 
1965 

April 
1964 

April 
1965 

March 
1965 

Apiil 
1964 

42.2 
40.8 
41.7 
41.6 
41.5 
40.0 
39.4 
40.0 
37.9 

40.3 
41.5 
42.8 
42.0 
41.6 
40.2 
38.8 
40.0 
38.1 

41.8 
41.4 
41.6 
41.8 
41.3 
40.1 
39.3 
40.1 
38.0 

$ 

2.42 
1.82 
1.81 
1.86 
2.25 
1.89 
2.15 
2.14 
2.59 

% 

2.41 
1.85 
1.80 
1.86 
2.24 
1.88 
2.13 
2.11 
2.58 

$ 

2.34 

1.74 

i.72 

1.81 

2.12 

1.82 

2.09 

2.08 

2.43 

*  Includes  shift  differential,  premium  pay  for  overtime,  pay  for  paid  holidays,  pay  for  paid  sick  leave  if  paid  through 
payroll  but  not  if  paid  under  insurance  plan,  incentive  bonus  but  not  annual  bonus. 


TABLE  C-6— EARNINGS  AND  HOURS  OF  HOURLY-RATED 
WAGE  EARNERS  IN  MANUFACTURING 


Source:  Man-Hours  and  Hourly  Earnings,  DBS 


Period 


Monthly  Average  1960. 
Monthly  Average  1961. 
Monthly  Average  1962. 
Monthly  Average  1963. 
Monthly  Average  1964. 

Last  Pay  Period  in: 
1964— April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 


1965— January. . 
February. 
March*.. . 
April  t.... 


Hours 

Worked 

Per  Week 


40.4 
40.6 
40.7 
40.8 
41.0 


41.1 
41.4 
41.2 
40.9 
41.3 
41.7 
41.6 
41.2 
38.8 

41.0 
40.6 
41.3 
41.1 


Average 
Hourly 
Earnings 


1.78 
1.83 
1.88 
1.95 
2.02 


2.01 
2.02 
2.02 
2.01 
2.02 
2.03 
2.03 
2.04 
2.08 

2.08 
2.08 
2.11 
2.12 


Average 
Weekly 
Wages 


71.96 
74.27 
76.55 
79.40 
82.90 


82.67 
83.55 
83.22 
82.10 
83.31 
84.78 
84.35 
84.04 
80.65 

85.34 
84.48 
87.07 
86.98 


Index  Number  of 
Average  Weekly 
Wages  (1949  =  100) 


Current 
Dollars 


172.4 
177.9 
183.4 
190.2 
198.6 


198.3 
200.2 
199.4 
196.7 
199.6 
203.1 
202.1 
201.3 
193.2 

204.5 
202.4 
208.6 
208.4 


1949 
Dollars 


134.5 
137.7 
140.1 
142.8 
146.5 


146.9 
147.9 
146.4 
144.4 
147.2 
149.8 
148.7 
147.2 
141.1 

149.0 
147.4 
151.5 
151.0 


Notl:  The  index  of  average  weekly  wages  in  1949  dollars  is  computed  by  dividing  the  index  of  average  weekly  wages 
in  current  dollars  by  the  Consumer  Price  Index.  For  a  more  complete  statement  of  uses  and  limitations  of  the  adjusted  figures 
see  Man-Hours  and  Hourly  Earnings. 

•Revised. 

tPreliminary. 


770 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE     •      AUGUST   7965 


TABLE  C-5— HOURS  AND  EARNINGS,  BY  INDUSTRY 

(Hourly-Rated  Wage  Earners) 

Source:  Man- Hours  and  Hourly  Earnings,  DBS 

(The  latest  figures  are  subject  to  revision) 


Industry 


Mining 

Metal  mining 

Gold 

Other  metal 

Fuels 

Coal 

Oil  and  natural  gas 

Non-metal  (d) 

Manufacturing 

Durable  goods 

Non-durable  goods 

Food  and  beverages 

Meat  products 

Canned  and  preserved  fruits  and  vegetables .  . 

Grain  mill  products 

Bread  and  other  bakery  products 

Distilled  liquors 

Malt  liquors 

Tobacco  and  tobacco  products 

Rubber  products 

Leather  products 

Boots  and  shoes  (except  rubber) 

Other  leather  products 

Textile  products  (except  clothing) 

Cotton  yarn  and  broad  woven  goods 

Woollen  goods 

Synthetic  textiles  and  silk 

Clothing  (textile  and  fur) 

Men's  clothing 

Women's  clothing 

Knit  goods 

*Wood  products 

Saw  and  planing  mills 

Furniture 

Other  wood  products 

Paper  products 

Pulp  and  paper  mills 

Other  paper  products 

Printing,  publishing  and  allied  industries 

•Iron  and  steel  products 

Agricultural  implements 

Fabricated  and  structural  steel 

Hardware  and  tools 

Heating  and  cooking  appliances 

Iron  castings 

Machinery,  industrial 

Primary  iron  and  steel 

Sheet  metal  products 

Wire  and  wire  products 

•Transportation  equipment 

Aircraft  and  parts 

Motor  vehicles 

Motor  vehicle  parts  and  accessories 

Railroad  and  rolling  stock  equipment 

Shipbuilding  and  repairing 

•Non-ferrous  metal  products 

Aluminum  products 

Brass  and  copper  products 

Smelting  and  refining 

•Electrical  apparatus  and  supplies 

Heavy  electrical  machinery  and  equipment.  . 

Telecommunication  equipment 

*Non-metallic  mineral  products 

Clay  products 

Glass  and  glass  products 

Products  of  petroleum  and  coal 

Petroleum  refining  and  products 

Chemical  products 

Medicinal  and  pharmaceutical  preparations. . . 

Acids,  alkalis  and  salts 

Miscellaneous  manufacturing  industries 

Construction 

Building  and  general  engineering 

Highways,  bridges  and  streets 

Electric  and  motor  transportation 

Service 

Hotels  and  restaurants 

Laundries  and  dry  cleaning  plants 


Average  Weekly 
Hours 


Apr.       Mar.       Apr. 
1965        1965        1964 


42.2 

42.1 
42.9 
41.9 
41.9 
43.5 
38.8 
43.3 
41.1 
42.0 
40.2 
40.4 
40.1 
38.9 
41.8 
40.5 
40.5 
39.8 
37.5 
41.5 
38.9 
38.4 
39.7 
41.7 
40.0 
42.9 
42.2 
37.9 
37.9 
36.3 
41.3 
41.2 
4!). 4 
42.7 
41.6 
41.5 
41.5 
41.4 
39.2 
42.1 
41.6 
42.1 
42.8 
40.8 
43.0 
42.9 
41.6 
41.7 
42.2 
43.1 
41.6 
46.3 
43.1 
39.9 
41.1 
41.3 
41.4 
42.7 
41.0 
40.8 
41.3 
39.5 
42.7 
41.8 
41.2 
42.2 
42.2 
41.1 
39.8 
40.7 
40.9 
40.0 
40.0 
40.0 
44.2 
36.5 
36.0 
40.4 


43.1 

42.8 
43.2 
42.8 
44.3 
43.4 
45.3 
42.6 
41.3 
42.2 
40.4 
40.4 
40.0 
39.6 
42.1 
40.5 
40.0 
39.5 
36.6 
41.8 
40.4 
40.4 
40.6 
41.8 
41.1 
43.0 
41.4 
38.8 
38.9 
36.9 
41.9 
41.4 
40.7 
42.9 
42.1 
41.5 
41.6 
41.4 
39.3 
42.1 
42.0 
41.8 
43.2 
40.2 
43.2 
43.0 
41.1 
41.3 
43.0 
43.4 
41.6 
47.1 
43.6 
40.2 
41.3 
41.1 
41.5 
42.3 
40.5 


41 

41 

3D, 

42 

41 

•lu 

41 

41.1 

40.8 

39.5 

40.4 

41.5 

40.6 

40.6 

40.7 

44.0 

36.1 

36.0 

39.1 


42.0 

42.0 
43.3 
41.6 
40.3 
40.7 
39.4 
43.3 
41.1 
41.7 
40.6 
40.5 
40.2 
39.7 
41.8 
40.5 
40.7 
38.8 
38.8 
41.7 
40.0 


40.9 

42.7 

42.2 

42.9 

43.3 

38.5 

38.3 

36.6 

41.6 

41.4 

41.8 

42.6 

42.6 

41.8 

42.1 

41.1 

38.7 

41.7 

41.4 

41.2 

43.6 

41.0 

42.6 

42.9 

40 

41 

43 

42 

41 

41 

12 

40 

40 

40, 

41 
42 

to 
11 
41 

30, 

12 

42 

41, 

41.8 

41.9 

41.4 

39.4 

41.1 

41.2 


40.0 
40.4 
43.8 
37.1 

36.5 

40.0 


•    Hourly 
I    linings 


Apr.       Mar. 

1905        1905 


$ 

2.39 
2.48 

1.97 

2.62 
2.21 
1.96 
2.77 
2.21 
2.12 
2.30 
1.92 
1.85 
2.11 
1.61 
1.99 
1.76 
2.44 
2.59 
2.31 
2.12 
1.44 
1.41 
1.49 
1.61 
1.64 
1.46 
1.74 
1.37 
1.35 
1.47 
1.28 
1.85 
1.97 
1.69 
1.53 
2.40 
2.59 
1.96 
2.57 
2.41 
2.58 
2.30 
2.02 
2.01 
2.30 
2.27 
2.84 
2.31 
2.28 
2.57 
2.39 
2.87 
2.54 
2.34 
2.44 


2. 

2. 

2. 

2. 

2. 

2. 

1.86 

2.15 

1.99 

2.16 


93 


2.28 
1.81 
2.65 
1.69 
2.45 
2.62 
2.00 
2.13 
1.27 
1 .  22 
1.21 


I 

2.39 

2.46 
1.92 
2.61 
2.31 
1.95 
2.73 
2.20 
2.11 
2.29 
1.90 
1.85 
2.09 
1.62 
2.00 
1.75 
2.44 
2.59 
2.19 
2.11 
1.43 
1.40 
1.50 
1.61 
1.65 
1.47 
1.72 
1.37 
1.35 
1.48 
1.27 
1.84 
1.97 
1.68 
1.53 
2.40 
2.59 
1.94 
2.55 
2.40 
2.59 
2.31 
2.00 
2.02 
2.36 
2.26 
2.81 
2.32 
2.29 
2.58 
2.39 
2.93 
2.55 
2.35 
2.42 
2.33 
2.10 
2.21 
2.60 
2.08 
2.31 
1.88 
2.14 
1.97 
2.15 
2.84 
2.86 
2.28 
1.80 
2.63 
1.68 
2.11 
2.60 
1.96 
2.11 
1.26 
1.21 
1.19 


Apr. 
1964 


* 
2.29 

2.37 
1.86 
2.55 
2.12 
1.91 
2.57 
2.13 
2.01 
2.17 
1.85 
1.78 
2.01 
1.55 
1.93 
1.70 
2.35 
2.56 
1.98 
2.05 
1.37 
1.33 
1.46 
1.53 
1.53 
1.41 
1.65 
1.31 
1.30 
1.40 
1.22 
1.76 
1.89 
1.59 
1.44 
2.35 
2.53 
1.87 
2.48 
2.30 
2.42 
2.24 
1.91 
1.98 
2.22 
2.17 
2.68 
2.20 
2.26 
2.38 
2.31 
2.68 
2.32 


.21 

21 

,2i) 

,06 

17 

.51 

.no 

2.25 

1.75 

2.04 

1.83 

2.05 

2.84 

2.88 

2.23 

1.74 

2.55 

1.65 

?.  2.-. 

2.44 

1.85 

2.06 

1.20 

1.16 

1.14 


Weekly 


Apr.        Mar.        Apr. 

L965       L966       1961 


I 

100.96 

101.21 
84.73 

109.82 
92.68 
85.24 

107.47 
95.62 
86.98 
96.45 
77.04 
74.80 
81.65 
62.83 
83.23 
71.27 
99.05 

103.23 
86.64 
87.92 
55.83 
54.11 
59.32 
67.22 
65.73 
62.59 
73.27 
51.86 
51.15 
53.21 
52,67 
76.03 
79.67 
72.02 
63.90 
99.73 

107.33 
80.94 

100.94 

101.57 

107.18 
96.83 
86.23 
81.85 

101.49 
97.44 

118.17 
96.23 
96.41 

110.48 
99.50 

132.76 

109.50 
93.63 

100.37 
96.82 
86.35 
92.52 

107.35 
85.10 
96.19 
73.49 
91.75 
83.06 
89.03 

123.53 

124.60 
93.80 
71.97 

107.88 
68.87 
97.85 

104.92 
80.04 
91.03 
46.16 

4S.77 


$ 
103.03 

105.21 
82.74 

111.72 

102.18 
84.37 

123.53 
93.87 
87.07 
96.75 
76.89 
74.68 
83.59 
64.26 
84.35 
70.71 
97.50 

102.43 
80.10 
88.33 
57.88 
56.41 
60.77 
07.14 
67.85 
63.07 
71.11 
5i.U4 
52.31 
51.45 
53.24 
76.31 
80.01 
71.84 
64.32 
99.61 

107.45 
80.24 

100.11 

101.16 

108.95 
96.65 
86.64 
81.14 

I01.h7 
97.17 

115.30 
95.80 
98.48 

112.03 
99.70 

138.06 

111.36 
94.60 
99.86 
95.69 
87.12 
93.26 

105.41 
86.30 
95.54 
74.67 
91.02 
81.08 
86.34 

116.76 

117.67 

71.08 
106.30 
69.74 
98.01 
105.44 
7!'. 77 
93.01 
45.73 
43.39 
46.74 


S 
96.05 

99.58 
80.77 

105.97 
85.21 
77.77 

101.39 
92.21 
82.75 
90.69 
74.86 
72.04 
81.06 
61.47 
80.67 
68.67 
95.55 
99.44 
76.78 
85.38 
55.05 
52.88 
59.53 
65.25 
64.53 
60.32 
71.63 
50.29 
49.64 
51.47 
50.78 
73.10 
76.99 
67.88 
61.30 
98.19 

106.32 
76.77 
96.15 
95.85 

100.21 
92.28 
83.26 
81.39 
94.43 
93.00 

108.44 
90.32 
97.59 

100.69 
96.28 

110.63 
98.48 
89.25 
89.93 
92.31 
85.61 
91.53 

100.85 
82.19 
93.22 
69.77 
86.32 
77.50 
84.33 

120.68 
92.14 
88.77 

104.94 
68.16 
90.42 
97. 3S 
74.81 
90.25 
I4.S8 
42.53 
46.07 


•Durable  manufactured  goods  industries. 
THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE     •      AUGUST    7965 


771 


D — National  Employment  Service  Statistics 

Statistics  presented  in  the  following  tables  relate  to  registrations  for  employment  and 
vacancies  notified  by  employers  at  NES  offices.  These  data  are  derived  from  reports  prepared 
in  National  Employment  Service  offices  and  processed  in  the  Unemployment  Insurance 
Section,  DBS.  See  also  Technical  Note,  page   199,  February  1965  issue. 

TABLE  D-l— UNFILLED  VACANCIES  AND  REGISTRATIONS  ON  HAND 

Source:  National  Employment  Service,  Department  of  Labour 


Period 


Unfilled  Vacancies  * 


Male 


Female 


Total 


Registrations  on  Hand 


Male 


Female 


Total 


End  of: 

Julv  1960 

July  1961 

Julv  1962 

July  1963  

July  1964 

August  1964 

September  1964 
October  1964.  . 
November  1964 
December  1964 

January  1965 

February  1965 

March  1965 

April  1965 

May  1965 

June  19650 

July  1965<» 


14,673 
15,880 
22,872 
22,720 

29,445 

30,171 
33,617 
29,159 
38,620 
25,171 
22,509 
23,167 
27,436 
35,094 
38,765 
36,285 
36,995 


12,594 
14,732 
17,895 
19,096 

19,458 

24,058 
23,611 
19,727 
22,704 
14,758 
15,141 
16,364 
19,898 
24,548 
26,560 
24,739 
23,608 


27,267 
30,612 
40,767 
41,816 

48,903 

54,229 
57,228 
48,886 
61,324 
39,929 
37,650 
39,531 
47,334 
59,642 
65,325 
61,024 
60,603 


242,582 
246,016 
224,452 
241,035 

233,564 

197,724 
173,988 
203,340 
254,346 
378,125 
447,847 
453,555 
447,673 
397, 193 
277,216 
238,646 
207,721 


128,062 
117,993 
113,407 
122,350 

128,799 

109,554 
104,907 
110,611 
118,294 
130,721 
152,195 
153,426 
149,274 
142,760 
124,123 
144,684 
132,254 


370,644 
364,009 
337,859 
363,385 

362,363 

307,278 
278,895 
313,951 
372,640 
508,846 
600,042 
606,981 
596,947 
539,953 
401,339 
383,330 
339,975 


<"  Latest  figures  subject  to  revision. 

•  Current  Vacancies  only.  Deferred  Vacancies  are  excluded. 


TABLE  D-£-REGISTRATIONS  RECEIVED,  VACANCIES  NOTIFIED  AND 

PLACEMENTS  EFFECTED  DURING  YEAR,  1961-1964,  AND  DURING 

MONTH  JUNE  1964-JUNE  1965 

Source:  National  Employment  Service,  Department  of  Labour. 


Year  and  Month 


Registrations  Received 


Male 


Female 


Vacancies  Notified 


Male 


Female 


Placements  Effected 


Male 


Female 


1961-Year 

1962— Year 

1963— Year 

1964— Year 

1964—  June 

1964— July 

August 

September 
October. . . 
November 
December. 

1965 — January 

February. . 

March 

April 

May 
Juned; 


3,125,195 

3,177,423 

2,912,511 

2,894,099 

234,674 

237,632 
198,847 
209,609 
228,509 
277,052 
341,413 

272,107 
207,415 
236,435 
212,743 
191.819 
227,386 


1,106,790 
1,171,111 
1,130,539 
1,170,889 
109,636 

111,717 
97,928 

107, 109 
99,357 

104,803 

103,065 

100,622 
79,029 
87,317 
84,512 
86,629 

112,387 


836,534 
1,010,365 

938,052 

1,030,199 

87,592 

97,585 

86,901 
108.719 

88,832 
109,323 

77,455 

65,179 
62,727 
81,598 
89,202 
103,280 
96,397 


469,119 

544,795 

597,910 

530,575 

47,201 

53,022 
56,448 
55,219 
41,509 
45,645 
41,458 

34,426 
32,744 
41,971 
42,378 
47,189 
48,555 


748,790 

897,285 

790,381 

845,696 

74,485 

81,610 
69,893 
90,230 
72,982 
82,945 
76,480 

53,989 
49,152 
62,519 
67,731 
81,804 
79,344 


371,072 

438,471 

387,728 

395,380 

34,649 

42,217 
41,514 
43,051 
30,636 
30,749 
40,686 

23,938 
22,308 
27,678 
26,976 
32,057 
34,544 


^Preliminary. 


772 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE     •      AUGUST   7965 


TABLE  D-t— PLACEMENTS  EFFECTED,  BY  INDUSTRY  AND  BY  BEX, 
DURING  JUNK  1965 W 

Source:  National  Employment  Service,  Department  of  Labour. 


Industry  Group 


Agriculture,  Fishing,  Trapping 
Forestry 


Mining,  Quarrying  and  Oil  Wells 

Metal  Mining 

Fuels 

Non-Metal  Mining 

Quarrying,  Clay  and  Sand  Pits. 
Prospecting 


Manufacturing 

Foods  and  Beverages 

Tobacco  and  Tobacco  Products 

Rubber  Products 

Leather  Products 

Textile  Products  (except  clothing) 

Clothing  (textile  and  fur) 

Wood  Products 

Paper  Products 

Printing,  Publishing  and  Allied  Industries. 

Iron  and  Steel  Products 

Transportation  Equipment 

Non-Ferrous  Metal  Products 

Electrical  Apparatus  and  Supplies 

Non-Metallic  Mineral  Products 

Products  of  Petroleum  and  Coal 

Chemical  Products 

Miscellaneous  Manufacturing  Industries 


Construction 

General  Contractors 

Special  Trade  Contractors. 


Transportation,  Storage  and  Communication. 

Transportation 

Storage 

Communication 


Public  Utility  Operation 


Trade 

Wholesale. 
Retail 


Finance,  Insurance  and  Real  Estate. 


Ser?ice 

Community  or  Public  Service. 

Government  Service 

Recreation  Service 

Business  Service 

Personal  Service 


Grand  Total 


Male 


8,406 
3,778 

1,384 

686 
188 
209 
182 
119 

18,990 

2,253 

23 

170 

307 

743 

503 

2,803 

1,477 

819 

3,710 

2,290 


751 

876 

76 

849 

679 

14,461 

9,735 
4,726 

6,586 

5,827 
594 
165 

541 

10,053 

4,720 
5,333 

797 

14,348 

1,145 
4,824 
1,012 
1,844 
5,523 

79,344 


Female 


4,225 


75 

17 

34 

3 

1 
20 

7,849 

1,753 

20 

93 

255 

405 

1,572 
272 
319 
582 
513 
296 
200 
647 
102 
14 
337 


94 

480 

239 
48 
193 

70 

4,840 

1,199 
3,641 

1,468 

15,230 

1,631 

1,394 

221 

781 

11.203 

34,544 


Total 


12,631 
3,822 

1,459 

703 
222 
212 

183 
139 

26,839 

4,0lifj 
43 

263 

562 
1,148 
2,075 
3,075 
1,796 
1,401 
4,223 
2,586 

861 
1,398 

978 

90 

1.186 

1,148 

14,724 

9,904 
4,820 

7,066 

6,066 
642 
358 

611 

14,893 

5,919 
8,974 

2,265 

29,578 

2,776 
6.218 
1 ,  233 

2,625 
16.726 

113,888 


Change 

from 

June,  1961 


1,457 
472 

303 

134 
71 
14 
73 
39 


4  2,265 

+  353 

25 

+  53 

-  103 
+  137 

-  228 
+  417 
+  37 
4-  305 
4-  651 

-  153 
+  25 
4-  176 
+  231 
4-  28 
4-  268 
4-  93 


4  2,079 

+  1,406 
+      673 


81 
130 

94 
117 

193 

391 

892 
501 


4      307 


,064 

165 

796 

1 

245 

143 


4  4,754 


"'Preliminary, 


THE   LABOUR    GAZETTE      •       AUGUST    7965 


773 


TABLE  D-4— REGISTRATIONS  ON  HAND,  BY  OCCUPATION  AND  BY  SEX, 

AS  AT  JUNE  30,  1965 

Source:  National  Employment  Service,  Department  of  Labour. 


Occupational  Group 


Registrations  on  Hand 


Female 


Total 


Professional  A.  Managerial  Workers 

Ueri.al  Workers  

Sales  Workers 

Personal  &  Domestic  Service  Workers 

Seamen 

Agriculture,  Fishing,  Forestry  (Ex.  log.) 

Skilled  and  s«- mi-Ski  lied  Workers 

Food  and  kindred  products  (incl.  tobacco) 

Textiles,  clothing,  etc 

Lumber  and  lumber  products 

Pulp,  paper  (incl.  printing) 

Leather  and  leather  products 

Stone,  clay  &  glass  products 

Metalworking 

Electrical 

Transportation  equipment 

Mining , 

Construction 

Transportation  (except  seamen) 

Communications  &  public  utility 

Trade  and  service , 

Other  skilled  and  semi-skilled 

Foremen 

Apprentices 

Unskilled  Workers 

Food  and  tobacco 

Lumber  &  lumber  products 

Metalworking 

Construction 

Other  unskilled  workers 

GRAND  TOTAL 


8,5S9 
20,649 

7,783 

29,298 

759 

5,360 

71,752 

733 

1,863 

6,874 

985 

613 

138 

6,572 

1,304 

399 

760 

14,547 

14,078 

337 

3,836 

12,339 

1,468 

4,906 

94,456 

3,522 

6,199 

2,772 

38,991 

42,972 


2,640 

54,090 

19,214 

26,184 

10 

1,136 

13,950 

363 
8,540 
121 
397 
712 

22 
754 
839 

40 

21 

76 

3 

1,138 

683 

238 

3 

27,460 

5,216 

429 

500 

1 

21,314 


11,229 
74,739 
26,997 
55,482 
769 
6,496 

85,702 

1,096 

10,403 

6,995 

1,382 

1,325 

160 

7,326 

2,143 

439 

760 

14,568 

14,154 

340 

4,974 

13,022 

1,706 

4,909 

121,916 

8,738 

6,628 

3,272 

38,992 

64,286 


238,646 


144,684 


383,330 


("Preliminary — subject  to  revision. 


Settlements  in  July 


(Continued  from  page  715) 


Northern  Electric,  Belleville,  Ont. — Northern  Electric  Empl.  Assn.  (Ind.):  2-yr.  agreement 
covering  500  empl. — general  wage  increases  of  80  an  hr.  retroactive  to  Feb.  26,  1965  and  80  an  hr. 
eff.  Feb.  26,  1966;  wage  increases  of  110  an  hr.  retroactive  to  Feb.  26,  1965  and  110  an  hr.  eff. 
Feb.  26,  1966  for  skilled  trades;  2  wks.  vacation  after  12  mos.  of  service  (formerly  after  14  mos.) 
and  4  wks.  vacation  after  25  yrs.  of  service  (formerly  after  28  yrs.);  employer  to  pay  50%  of 
health  insurance  premiums;  agreement  to  expire  Feb.  25,  1967. 

Northern  Electric,  Montreal,  Que. — Northern  Electric  Empl.  Assn.  (Ind.)  (Unit  No.  2):  3-yr. 
agreement  covering  500  empl. — wage  increases  ranging  from  60  to  100  an  hr.  retroactive  to  Feb.  26, 
1965,  60  to  100  an  hr.  eff.  Feb.  26,  1966  and  60  to  100  an  hr.  eff.  Feb.  26,  1967;  2  wks.  vacation 
after  12  mos.  of  service  (formerly  after  14  mos.)  and  4  wks.  vacation  after  25  yrs.  of  service 
(formerly  after  28  yrs.);  employer  to  pay  50%  of  health  insurance  premiums;  agreement  to  expire 
Feb.  25,  1968. 

Old  Sydney  Collieries,  Sydney  Mines,  N.S.—Mine  Wkrs.  (Ind.):  18-mo.  agreement  covering 
1,000  empl. — terms  similar  to  Dominion  Coal  settlement  above;   agreement  to  expire  Aug.  1966. 

Phillips  Cables  Ltd.,  Brockville,  Ont.— WE  (AFL-CIO/CLC):  2-yr.  agreement  covering  550 
empl. — settlement  pay  of  $120;  general  wage  increases  of  100  an  hr.  eff.  July  1965  and  90  an  hr. 
eff.  Dec.  23,  1965;  additional  classification  adjustments  amounting  to  50  an  hr.  in  first  yr.  of 
agreement;  3  wks.  vacation  after  10  yrs.  of  service  (formerly  after  13  yrs.);  4  wks.  vacation  after 
20  yrs.  of  service  in  1966  (at  present  after  25  yrs.);  rate  for  labourer  becomes  $1.98  an  hr.  Dec. 
23,   1965;   agreement  to  expire  Dec.  22,   1966. 

(Continued  on  page  776) 


774 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      AUGUST   7965 


TABLE  D-5  -REGISTRATIONS  ON   HAND,  BY 

AT  JUNK  30,  19G.> 


OCAL  OFFICE  AREAS, 

Source:  National  Employment  Service,  Department  of  Labour 


Registrations 
on  Sand 

Office 

ma 
on  Band 

Office 

(i) 

June  30, 

1905 

Previous 
'^  ear 

June  30. 
L964 

en 

June  30, 

1965 

Previous 

")  ear 

June  30, 

1964 

Newfoundland 

8,451 

2,031 

s77 

5-543 

1,507 

Sll 
696 

14,204 

677 
569 

4.499 
178 
942 
356 

1,717 
328 

2,885 
569 
815 
669 

12,078 

1,204 

1,120 

862 

1,179 

186 

2,380 

1,122 

2,827 

601 

244 

353 

123,190 

1,469 

305 

783 

1,380 

453 

943 

1,049 

1,806 

321 

983 

1,854 

341 

404 

686 

1,254 

2,365 

3,330 

2,456 

393 

531 

1.047 

709 

2,308 

518 

517 

484 

1,158 

441 

736 

45,904 

772 

846 

1 1 . 358 

1 .  564 

1,616 

1,211 

2,187 

333 

77.; 

1 ,  763 

1.215 

2.129 

1 .  326 

1.107 

2.599 

10,160 

2.271 

Mill 

7,329 

1,431 
767 

667 

14,726 

735 
618 

4,594 
180 

1,02  J 
348 

1,150 
356 

3,515 
584 
808 
818 

14,139 

1,528 

1,254 

872 

1,411 

241 

3,157 

1,256 

2,970 

767 

208 

475 

135,830 

1,628 

356 

570 

1,421 

533 

954 

1,048 

1,953 

367 

1,323 

1,468 

293 

365 

869 

1,530 

2,434 

6,920 

2,783 

432 

540 

840 

551 

2,603 

483 

435 

449 

775 

617 

913 

53,590 

874 

556 

10,382 

1,691 

2.166 

1.386 

2.273 

366 

808 

1,645 

1.171 

2.376 

i  a  17 

1,240 

2,921   : 

Quebec— Concluded 

3,658 

1,317 

! ,  ,r)sr, 
2,868 
1,248 

1,082 
1 .  360 
1,950 

134,002 

842 

1,807 

488 

1,  160 

2,330 

371 

327 

1.  (40 

966 

621 

2.267 

277 

406 

331 

1,059 

745 

214 

274 

1.085 

8,636 

309 

662 

525 

1.847 

764 

1.528 

567 

464 

107 

2,965 

3,337 

294 

346 

465 

843 

1,954 

1.323 

1,077 

571 

4,118 

7,160 

1,079 

99 

1,134 

293 

2,428 

207 

2,191 

536 

517 

435 

2,858 

742 

1.963 

3,107 

409 

365 

358 

2,928 

1,431 

39.172 

1,230 

348 
1,906 

2,7511 

6.064 

657 

1.139 

1 ,  (127 

3 ,  1 86 

Val-d'Or 

1,252 

Vallnyfield 

1.186 

1 ,  599 

1,841 

Nova  Scotia 

Ontario 

130,131 

217 

1,029 

1,523 

302 

1,264 

1,977 

400 

300 

2,799 

Truro 

932 

479 

2,525 

New  Brunswick 

Elliot.  Lake 

321 

361 

316 

1,096 

Gait 

727 

244 

310 

Guelph 

1,154 

8,127 

392 

522 

302 

1,935 

Quebec 

524 

2.110 

668 

560 

188 

3.690 

3,909 

262 

Chicoutimi 

312 

478 

858 

1,536 

1,135 

Oakville 

502 

Gaspe 

Orillia 

590 

4,563 

Hull 

4,820 

Joliette 

1,037 

206 

732 

Pertli 

350 

2,238 

187 

Levis 

2.006 

516 

554 

278 

3,903 

792 

2.709 

il 

2.019 

New  Richmond 

855 

Port  Alfred 

561 

Kimouski 

372 

icre-du-Loup 

3.423 

Roberval 

497 

Rouyn 

1 .  356 

\c:ithe  des  Monts 

33,739 

Trenton 

W.ilkcrton 

Wallaceburg 

Welland 

822 

Ste.  Therese 

426 

265 

St.  Je:in 

2,317 

St.  Jcr6me 

3,308 

Sept-Iles 

7.458 

Woodstock 

570 

THE  LABOUR   GAZETTE      •      AUGUST    7965 


775 


TABLE  D-5— REGISTRATIONS  ON  HAND,  BY  LOCAL  OFFICE  AREAS, 

AT  JUNE  30,  1965 

Source:  National  Employment  Service,  Department  of  Labour 


Registrations 
on  Hand 

Office 

Registrations 
on  Hand 

Office 

June  30. 
1965 

Previous 
Year 

June  30. 
1964 

0) 

June  30, 

1965 

Previous 
Year 

June  30, 
1964 

Manitoba 

11,928 

1,096 
541 

206 
703 
204 

12.178 

9,998 

144 

105 

842 

568 

1,103 

2.486 

3,057 

473 

254 

966 

19,486 

320 
6.884 

177 
7,822 

199 

814 
1.464 

796 
1,010 

18,950 

1,190 
627 
176 
515 
302 
16.140 

9,598 

123 

135 

935 

571 

1,111 

2,455 

2.982 

284 

201 

801 

23,547 

396 

7.166 

218 

11,506 

255 

856 

1,327 

856 

967 

British  Columbia 

45,486 

1.447 

486 

569 

841 

547 

1,646 

1,410 

779 

611 

687 

6.072 

1,391 

600 

1,607 

1,086 

488 

735 

19,792 

1,360 

2,993 

339 

383,330 

238,646 
144,684 

47,741 

Chilliwack 

1,666 

517 

617 

909 

The  Pm 

538 

1,756 

1,129 

Saskatchewan 

717 

727 

633 

6,120 

North  Battleford 

1,029 

1,139 

1,881 

1,143 

735 

Wevburn 

Trail 

727 

Yorkton 

21,573 

995 

Alberta     

2,749 

444 

Calgary 

CANADA 

406,559 

Edson 

266,490 

Red  Deer 

140,069 

(>)  Preliminary. 

M  Includes  58  registrations  reported  by  the  lles-de-la-Madeleine.  Que.  local  office. 


Settlements  in  July 


(Continued  from  page  774) 


Quebec  North  Siicne  Paper  &  Manicouagan  Power  Co.,  Bate  Comeau,  Que. — Papermakers 
(AFL-CIO/CLC)  &  Pulp  &  Paper  Mill  Wkrs.  (AFL-CIO/CLC):  3-yr.  agreement  covering  850 
empl. — general  wage  increases  of  150  an  hr.  retroactive  to  May  1,  1965,  4%  (minimum  of  100  an 
hr.)  eff.  Feb.  1,  1966,  100  an  hr.  eff.  Nov.  1,  1966  and  3±%  (minimum  of  100  an  hr.)  eff.  Aug.  1, 
1967;  additional  wage  increases  of  100  an  hr.  upon  commencement  of  continuous  operations  and 
50  an  hr.  additional  eff.  May  1,  1967;  2  wks.  vacation  after  3  yrs.  of  service  (at  present  after  5 
yrs.)  and  3  wks.  vacation  after  8  yrs.  of  service  (at  present  after  10  yrs.)  eff.  Jan.  1,  1966;  5  wks. 
vacation  after  25  yrs.  of  service  eff.  Jan.  1,  1967;  pre-retirement  vacation  plan  to  provide  for  1  to 
5  wks.  additional  vacation  after  25  yrs.  of  service  for  empl.  60  to  64  years  of  age  eff.  Jan.  1, 
1968;  employer  to  pay  50%  of  sickness,  disability  and  life  insurance  premiums;  new  provision  for 
jury  duty  supplement;   agreement  to  expire  April  30,   1968. 

Saskatoon  City,  Sask. — Public  Empl.  (CLC)  (inside  &  outside  empl.):  1-yr.  agreement  covering 
500  empl. — wage  increases  ranging  from  3%  to  5%;  3  wks.  vacation  after  3  yrs.  of  service  (formerly 
after  5  yrs.)  and  4  wks.  vacation  after  20  yrs.  of  service  (formerly  after  25  yrs.);  agreement  to 
expire  Dec.   31,   1965. 

Siherwood  Dairies,  Toronto,  Ont.— Retail,  Wholesale  Empl.  (AFL-CIO/CLC):  2-yr.  agreement 
covering  600  empl. — wage  increases  of  $3  a  wk.  retroactive  to  April  1,  1965,  and  $3  a  wk.  eff.  April 
1,  1966;  3  wks.  vacation  after  10  yrs.  of  service  and  4  wks.  vacation  after  20  yrs.  of  service;  rate 
for  general  labourer  becomes  $92.50  a  wk.  April  1,  1966;  agreement  to  expire  March  31,  1967. 

Union  Carbide  (Metals  &  Carbon  Div.),  Welland,  Ont. — HE  (Ind.):  2-yr.  agreement  covering 
700  empl. — wage  increases  of  110  an  hr.  eff.  July  12,  1965  and  110  an  hr.  eff.  April  1,  1966; 
additional  wage  increases  of  50  an  hr.  eff.  July  12,  1965  and  April  1,  1966  for  skilled  trades; 
3  wks.  vacation  after  5  yrs.  of  service  (formerly  after  10  yrs.),  4  wks.  vacation  after  15  yrs.  of 
service  (formerly  after  25  yrs.)  and  5  wks.  vacation  after  25  yrs.  of  service;  rate  for  labourer 
becomes  $2.44  an  hr.  April  1,  1966;  agreement  to  expire  April  1,  1967. 


776 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      AUGUST   7965 


E — Unemployment  Insurance 

Unemployment  insurance  statistics  are  concerned  with  numbers  of  persons  covered  by 
insurance  and  claimants  for  benefit  at  Unemployment  Insurance  Commission  local  offices. 
The  data  are  compiled  in  the  Unemployment  Insurance  Section,  DBS,  from  information 
supplied  by  the  UIC.  For  further  information  regarding  the  nature  of  the  data  see  Technical 
Note,  page  592,  June  issue. 

TABLE  K-l— ESTIMATES  OF  THE  INSURED  POPULATION  UNDER  THE 
UNEMPLOYMENT  INSURANCE  ACT 

Source:  Statistical  Report  on  the  Operation  of  the  Unemployment  Insurance  Act,  DBS 


End  of: 

Total 

Employed 

Claimants 

1965— April 

4,476,000 
4,521,000 
4,499,000 
4,487,000 

4,475,000 
4,369,000 
4,298,000 
4,304,000 
4,330,000 
4,271,000 
4,241,000 
4,173,000 
4,280,000 

4,013,100 
3,982,000 
3,939,800 
3,939,200 

3,996,800 
4,094,500 
4,083,500 
4,130,400 
4,148,000 
4,065,700 
4,039,100 
3,922,900 
3,782,300 

462,900 

539,000 

559,200 

547,800 

478,200 

274,500 

214,500 

173,600 

182,000 

July 

205,300 

201,900 

May 

250,100 

497,700 

TABLE  E-3— INITIAL  AND  RENEWAL  CLAIMS  FOR  BENEFIT,  BY  PROVINCE, 

MAY  1965 

Source:  Statistical  Report  on  the  Operation  of  the  Unemployment  Insurance  Act,  DBS 


Claims  filed  at 
Local  Offices 

Disposal  of  Cla 
Pending  at  E 

ms  and  Claims 
nd  of  Month 

Province 

Total* 

Initial 

Renewal 

Total 

Disposed 

oft 

Entitled 

to 
Benefit 

Not 
Entitled 
to  Benefit 

Pending 

Newfoundland 

3,111 

396 

4,358 

4,042 

35,648 

24,970 

3,100 

1,762 

4,442 

11,513 

2,707 

304 

3,097 

3,289 

24,517 

18,244 

2,456 

1,492 

3,488 

8,166 

404 

92 

1,261 

753 

11,131 

6,726 

644 

270 

954 

3,347 

3,900 

545 

4,818 

4,972 

40,275 

29,321 

4,072 

2,636 

6,441 

13,332 

3,105 

460 

3,700 

3,950 

31,210 

21,061 

3,142 

1,986 

4,532 

9,029 

795 

85 

1,118 

1,022 

9,065 

8,260 

930 

650 

1,909 

4,303 

931 
128 

1,092 

New  Brunswick  

1,406 
1 1 , 823 

8,500 

800 

Saskatchewan 

425 

1,351 

British   Columbia    (incl.    Yukon    Ter- 
ritory)   

3,713 

Total,  Canada,  Mav  1965 

Total,  Canada,  April  1965 

Total,  Canada,  May  1964 

93,342 
150,836 
105,182 

67,760 
111,332 
73,249 

25,582 
39,504 
31,933 

110,312 
164,611 

116, 07S 

82,175 
134,698 
88,458 

28,137 
29,913 
27,620 

30,169 
47,139 
32,731 

*  In  addition,  revised  claims  received  numbered  31,992. 

t  In  addition,  32,709  revised  claims  wore  disposed  of.  Of  those,  2,675  wore  special  requests  not  granted  and  1 ,608  appeals 
by  claimants.  There  were  7,993  revised  claims  pending  at  the  end  of  the  month. 


THE  LABOUR   GAZETTE      •      AUGUST    7965 


777 


TABLE  K-?— CLAIMANTS  CURRENTLY  REPORTING  TO  LOCAL  OFFICES 
BY  NUMBER  OF  WEEKS  ON  CLAIM,  PROVINCE  AND  SEX, 

MAY  31,  1965 

(Counted  on  last  working  day  of  the  month) 
Source:  Statistical  Report  on  the  Operation  of  the  Unemployment  Insurance  Act,  DBS 


Province  and  Sex 

Total 
claimants 

Number  of  weeks  on  claim 
(based  on  20  per  cent  sample) 

Total 
Claimants 

1-4 

5-13 

14-26 

27  or 
more* 

April 
30 
1965 

May 
29 
1964 

CANADA 

229,467 
151,162 
78,305 

75,265 
50,854 
24,411 

73,823 
52,043 
21,780 

56,140 
35,261 
20,879 

24,239 
13,004 
11,235 

497,745 
380,643 
117,102 

250,054 

Male      

171,311 

78,743 

Newfoundland 

9,140 
7,953 
1,187 

1,206 
862 
344 

11,598 
8,750 

2,848 

11,541 
8,715 
2,826 

79,378 
58,118 
21,260 

62,432 
32,960 
29,472 

10,068 
6,140 
3,928 

5,619 
3,389 
2,230 

13,386 
8,892 
4,494 

25,099 
15,383 
9,716 

2,542 

2,221 

321 

266 

201 

65 

3,531 

2,870 

661 

2,759 

2,133 

625 

27,622 

20,208 

7,414 

20,381 
10,836 
9,545 

2,169 

1,549 

620 

1,503 
867 
636 

4,467 
3,054 
1,413 

10,025 
6,915 
3,110 

2,949 

2,714 

235 

345 

270 

75 

3,474 

2,652 

822 

4,091 

3,437 

654 

27,420 
21,582 
5,838 

18,966 
10,434 
8,532 

3,153 

1,877 
1,276 

1,418 
933 
485 

4,835 
3,566 
1,269 

7,172 
4,578 
2,594 

2,993 

2,597 

396 

478 
328 
150 

3,284 

2,415 

869 

3,307 

2,415 

892 

17,504 
12,593 
4,911 

15,134 
7,518 
7,616 

3,432 
2,043 
1,389 

1,948 

1,193 

755 

2,856 
1,630 
1,226 

5,204 
2,529 
2,675 

656 
421 
235 

117 
63 
54 

1,309 
813 
496 

1,384 
730 
654 

6,832 
3,735 
3,097 

7,951 
4,172 
3,779 

1,314 
671 
643 

750 
396 
354 

1,228 
642 

586 

2,698 
1,361 
1,337 

27,229 
25,120 
2,109 

4,624 

3,863 

761 

32,109 
27,105 
5,004 

32,197 
27,073 
5,124 

158,861 
126,956 
31,905 

129,831 
87,131 
42,700 

23,533 

18,226 
5,307 

14,178 
10,884 
3,294 

29,502 

23,428 

6,074 

45,681 
30,857 
14,824 

8,568 

Male 

7,289 

1,279 

Prince  Edward  Island 

916 

639 



277 

Nova  Scotia 

13,660 

10,600 

Female 

3,060 

New  Brunswick 

11,790 

Male 

9,247 

Female 

2,543 

Quebec 

80,794 

Male 

58,640 

Female 

22,154 

Ontario 

70,727 

Male 

41,287 

29,440 

11,434 

Male 

7,650 

3,784 

5,468 

Male 

3,522 

Female 

1,946 

Alberta .- 

17,197 

Male 

12,797 

4,400 

29,500 

Male 

19,640 

9,860 

•  The  bulk  of  the  cases  in  this  group  were  on  claim  from  27-39  weeks. 
Note:  Values  lass  than  50  subject  to  relatively  large  sampling  variability. 


TABLE  E-4— BENEFIT  PAYMENTS,  BY  PROVINCE,  MAY  1965 

Source:  Statistical  Report  on  the  Operation  of  the  Unemployment  Insurance  Act,  DBS 


Province 

Weeks 
Paid* 

Amount  of 

Benefit 

Paid 

$ 

83,416 

13,814 

77,756 

84,492 

432,700 

331,454 

56,261 

35,693 

63,115 

118,697 

2,101,273 

306,507 

1,723,444 

1,989,051 

10,903,768 

7,884,235 

1,366,408 

862,293 

ta 

1,583,391 

2,939,899 

Total,  Canada  May  1965 

1,297,398 
1,741,206 
1,361,151 

31,660,269 

al,  Canada,  April  1965         

43,308,864 

■A,  Canada,  May  1964 

33,117,274 

*  "Weeks  paid"  represents  the  total  of  complete  and  partial  weeks  of  benefit  paid  during  the  month. 
778  THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE     •      AUGUST   7965 


F — Prices 

TABLE  M— TOTAL  AND  MAIN  COMPONENTS  OF  THE  CONSUMER  PUCE  INDEX 

(1949  =  100) 
Calculated  by  the  Dominion  Bureau  of  Statistics 


Total 

Food 

Housing 

Clothing 

Trans- 
portation 

Health 

and 

Personal 

Care 

Recre- 
ation 

and 

Reading 

Tobacco 
and 

Alcohol 

1960—  Year 

129.0 

129.2 

130.7 

133.0 

135.4 

136.2 
136.1 
•      135.6 
135.6 
135.9 
136.8 

136.9 

137.2 

137.3 

137.7 

138.0 

139.0 

139.5 

122.2 

124.0 

126.2 

130.3 

132.4 

135.4 
135.1 
132.7 
131.0 
132.0 
133.2 

132.5 

133.1 

133.3 

133.4 

134.5 

137.6 

139.0 

132.7 
133.2 
134.8 
136.2 

138.4 

138.7 
138.7 
138.9 
139.2 
139.3 
139.6 

139.8 

140.1 

140.2 

140.3 

140.0 

140.6 

141.1 

110.9 

112.5 

113.5 

116.3 

119.2 

119.0 
118.9 
119.4 
120.7 
120.9 
121.0 

119.2 

119.5 

120.4 

121.2 

121.0 

121.1 

121.1 

140.3 

140.6 

140.4 

140.4 

142.0 

141.6 
141.4 
141.6 
141.4 
141.4 
142.7 

146.3 

146.3 

145.6 

145.9 

146.8 

147.0 

147.0 

154.5 

155.3 

158.3 

162.4 

167.8* 

167.3 

167.5 

167.7 

170.0* 

170.7* 

173.2* 

173.3* 

173.5* 

173.5* 

175.0* 

175.6 

175.4 

175.4 

144.3 
146.1 
147.3 
149.3 

151.8 

151.5 
151.5 
150.9 
151.1 
152.3 
153.5 

154.0 

153.4 

153.4 

153.5 

154.6 

155.0 

154.6 

115.8 

1961— Year 

1962— Year 

116.3 
117.8 

1963— Year 

118.1 

1964— Year 

120.2 

1964— Julv  

120.2 

120.2 

120.2 

121.4 

121.6 

121.6 

121.6 

121.8 

March 

121.9 

121.9 

May 

122.5 

122.5 

July 

122.5 

Note:  1960  figures  are  1947-48  weighted;  figures  for  1961  et  seq  are  1957  weighted. 

•Revised.  Revision  based  on  an  adjustment  from  October  1964  in  the  prepaid  medical  care  component,  resulting  from 
revised  weights  for  group  and  non-group  rates  in  Quebec  and  Ontario. 


TABLE  F-2— CONSUMER  PRICE  INDEXES  FOR  REGIONAL  CITIES  OF  CANADA 
AT  THE  BEGINNING  OF  JUNE  1965 

(1949  =  100) 


All-Items 

Food 

Housing 

Clothing 

Trans- 
porta- 

Health 

and 
personal 

Recrea- 
tion 
and 

June 

May 

June 

1964 

1965 

1965 

care 

reading 

121.0 

122.8 

123.2 

120.7 

116.3 

116.6 

121.3 

165.1 

149.6 

132.2 

133.9 

135.1 

133.9 

134.3 

131.6 

138.9 

170.2 

171.9 

134.8 

136.4 

137.6 

137.9 

134.3 

128.9 

146.3 

192.4 

156.5 

135.2 

137.4 

138.4 

142.1 

136.2 

113.4 

166.7 

182.8 

159.5 

135.9 

137.7 

138.5 

139.0 

137.4 

124.6 

159.0 

182.2 

150.7 

137.1 

139.4 

140.8 

137.7 

141.8 

127.7 

145.4 

173.  G 

193.0 

132.4 

135.2 

135.9 

136.7 

130.2 

126.7 

138.6 

188.8 

143. 2 

129.8 

131.9 

132.2 

133.8 

128.7 

133.3 

137.0 

150.5 

150.0 

128.1 

129.7 

130.5 

129.0 

127.6 

129.4 

132.4 

173.7 

145.5 

132.7 

134.5 

135.2 

135.4 

134.8 

124.0 

147.3 

157.2 

150.8 

Tobacco 

and 
alcohol 


St.  John's,  Nfld.d).. 

Halifax 

Saint  John 

Montreal 

Ottawa 

Toronto 

Winnipeg 

Saskatoon-Regina. . . 
Edmonton-Calgary . 
Vancouver 


115.9 
125.9 


125.7 
127.1 
12^.7 
123.9 
138.3 
124.4 
120.6 
123.3 


n.b.  Indexes  above  measure  percentage  changes  in  prices  over  time  in  each  city  and  should  not  be  used  to  compare  actual 

levels  of  prices  as  between  cities. 

<»>St.  John's  index  on  the  base  June  1951  =  100. 


THE  LABOUR   GAZETTE      •      AUGUST    7965 


779 


G — Strikes  and  Lockouts 

Statistical  information  on  work  stoppages  in  Canada  as  compiled  by  the  Economics  and 
Research  Branch  of  the  Department  of  Labour  on  the  basis  of  reports  from  the  Unemploy- 
ment Insurance  Commission.  The  first  three  tables  in  this  section  cover  strikes  and  lockouts 
which  amount  to  ten  or  more  man-days.  The  number  of  workers  involved  includes  all  workers 
reported  on  strike  or  locked  out,  whether  or  not  they  all  belonged  to  the  union  directly 
involved  in  the  disputes  leading  to  the  work  stoppages.  Workers  indirectly  affected,  such  as 
those  laid  off  as  a  result  of  a  work  stoppage,  are  not  included.  For  further  notes  on  the  series, 
see  page  590,  June  issue. 

TABLE  G-l— STRIKES  AND  LOCKOUTS,  1960-1965 


Month  or  Year 


Strikes  and 

Lockouts 

Beginning 

During  Month 

or  Year 


Strikes  and  Lockouts  in  Existence  During  Month  or  Year 


Strikes  and 
Lockouts 


Workers 
Involved 


Duration  in  Man-Days 


Man-Days 


Per  Cent  of 

Estimated 

Working  Time 


1960 

1961 

1962 

1963 

•1964 

*1964:  June 

July 

August 

September 
October. . . 
November 
December. 

•1965:  January... 
February. . 

March 

April 

May 

June 


268 
272 
290 
318 
313 

46 
38 
36 
26 
30 
25 


274 
287 
311 
332 
329 


72 
68 
63 
60 
57 
48 

47 
50 
55 
66 
56 
109 


49,408 
97,959 
74,332 
83,428 
100,214 

15,148 
18,183 
11,418 
9,039 
10,593 
15,080 
33,689 

29,768 
29,596 
14,262 
11,612 
17,018 
43,310 


738,700 
1,335,080 
1,417,900 

917,410 
1,572,220 

195,680 
147.710 
108,200 
104,010 
101,580 
105,590 
460,260 

220,380 
294,100 
115,260 
121,510 
155,490 
275,530 


0.19 
0.11 
0.11 
0.07 
0.13 

0.16 
0.12 
0.10 
0.09 
0.09 
0.09 
0.38 

0.21 

0.27 
0.09 
0.11 
0.14 
0.22 


Preliminary. 


TABLE  G-2— STRIKES  AND  LOCKOUTS, 
JUNE  1965,  BY  INDUSTRY 

(Preliminary) 


TABLE  G-3— STRIKES  AND  LOCKOUTS, 
JUNE  1965,  BY  JURISDICTION 

(Preliminary) 


Industry 

Strikes 

and 
Lockouts 

Workers 
Involved 

Man- 
Days 

5 

53 
26 
11 
11 

2,480 
8,642 
6,273 
8,386 
7,384 

3,340 

143,040 

37,390 

Transpn.  &  utilities 

Trade 

77,140 
14,170 

3 

145 

450 

109 

4:;,:;  10 

275,530 

Jurisdiction 

Strikes 

and 
Lockouts 

Workers 
Involved 

Man- 
Days 

1 
1 
26 
66 
2 
1 

30 

12 

20,687 

19,156 

335 

60 

60 

90 

102,780 

146,930 

730 

120 

8 
4 

189 
2,841 

1,880 

22,940 

All  .uirisdictions 

109 

43,310 

275,530 

780 


THE  LABOUR  GAZETTE      •      AUGUST   7965 


TABUS  O-l  -STRIKES  AM)  LOCKOUTS  INVOLVING  100  OR  MORE  WORK KRS, 

JUNK  1965 

(Preliminary) 


Industry 
Employer 
Location 


Mines 

Metal 

Quebec  Carticr  Mining 

Co., 
Gagnon,  Que. 

Iron  Ore  Co.  of  Canada, 
SchefTerville,  Que. 


Noranda  Mines  Ltd. 
Noranda,  Que. 


Wabush  Minos  Ltd. 
Pointe  Noire,  Que. 


Manufacturing 

Food  and  Beverages 
Hiram  Walker  &  Sons, 
Windsor,  Ont. 


St.  Lawrence  Sugar 

Refineries  Ltd., 
Montreal,  Que. 

Rubber 

Goodyear  Tire  and 

Rubber  Co., 
Toronto,  Ont. 


Dunlop  Canada  Ltd., 
Port  Whitby,  Ont. 


Dunlop  Canada  Ltd., 
Port  Whitby,  Ont. 


Clothing 

Fur  Manufacturers  Guild, 

Montreal  and  area,  Que. 


Wood 

Cochrane  Enterprises 

Ltd., 
Cochrane,  Ont. 


Paper 

Kimberley-Clark  Ltd. 
St.  Catharines,  Ont. 


Provincial  Paper  Ltd. 
Thorold,  Ont. 


Ontario  Paper  Co.  Ltd., 
Thorold  South,  Ont. 


I  nion 


Stoelw 'orkera  Loc.  5778 
(AFL-CIO/CLC) 


Steelworkers  Loc.  5567 
(AFL-CIO/CLC) 


Steehvorkers  Loc.  4278 
(AFL-CIO/CLC) 


Steele  nrkers  Loc.  6254 
(AFL-CIO/CLC) 


Brewery  Workers  Loc.  61 
(AFL-CIO/CLC) 


Bakery  Workers  Loc.  333 

(CLC) 


Rubber  Workers, 
Loc.  232 
(AFL-CIO/CLC) 


Rubber  Workers 
Loc.  494,  743 
(AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Rubber  Workers, 
Loc.  494,  743 
(AFL-CIO/CLC) 


Butcher  Workmen 
(AFL-CIO/CLC) 


Carpenters  Loc.  2995 
(AFL-CIO/CLC) 


Pulp  and  Paper  Mill 
Workers  Loc.  289 
(AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Pulp  and  Paper  Mill 
Workers  Loc.  290 
(AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Papermakers  Loc.  101 
(AFL-CIO/CLC) 


Workers 
Involved 


150 


600 


1,450 


250 


430 


275 


2,100 


480 


480 


113 


Ml 


773 


991 


Duration  in 
Man- Days 


June 


230 


600 


1,690 


500 


3,010 


3,580 


21,000 


80 


2,560 


550 


570 


200 


4,510 


10,320 


230 


600 


1,690 


500 


10,320 


3,580 


21,000 


so 


2,560 


550 


570 


200 


4,510 


10,320 


Starting 
Date 

Termi- 
nation 
Date 


June 
June 

9 
10 

June 
June 

17 
18 

June 
June 

18 
19 

June 
June 

23 

25 

May     6 
June    10 


June 

12 

June 
June 

14 
28 

June    22 
June    22 


June    23 


June      8 
June     9 


June     7 
June    14 


June 
June 

10 
11 

June 
June 

15 

2;; 

June 

15 

Result 


In  sympathy  with  a  member 
of  the  union  laid  off ~  Return 
of  workers. 

Discharge  of  one  employee 
following  disagreement  with 

foreman~Return  of  workers. 

Uncertainty  about  the  pro- 
vincial pension  plan~Return 
of  workers. 

Wages~  Return  of  workers. 


Wages,  statutory  holidays, 
vacations,  medical  services 
~18C  an  hr.  increase,  im- 
proved statutory  holidays, 
vacations  and  medical  ser- 
vices. 
Wages,  fringe  benefits~ 


Re-scheduling  of  weekend 
shifts~  Return  of  workers 
on  the  new  seven  day  sched- 
ule, pending  further  nego- 
tiation. 

New  policy  of  the  shipping 
department—Return  of 
workers. 

Wages  ~ 


Wages,  hours~$6.  weekly 
increase  from  June  1,  1965, 
$4.  May  1,  1966,  $2.  May  1, 
1967;  reduction  in  weekly 
hours  from  37$  to  35;  im- 
proved pension  and  insurance 
plans. 


Wages,  hours,  fringe  bene- 
fits, union  recognition~20c. 
an  hr.  increase  immediately, 
lOji  an  hr.  on  anniversary 
date  56  an  hr.  at  18  mos.  plus, 
lor  an  hr.  at  24  mos.;  statu- 
tory holidays  increased  from 
4  to  7;  closed  shop  and  check- 
off after  30  days. 


Wages,  delay  in  negotiations 
-'Return  of  workers  pending 
conciliation  report. 

Delay  in  negotiations  -Re- 
turn of  workers  pending  ar- 
bitration procedure. 

Delay  in  negotiations  — 


THE  LABOUR   GAZETTE      •      AUGUST    7965 


781 


TABLE  (i-4  -STRIKES  AND  LOCKOUTS  INVOLVING  100  OR  MORE  WORKERS, 

JUNE  1965 

(Preliminary) 


Industry 

Union 

Workers 
Involved 

Duration  in 
Man- Days 

Starting 
Date 

Termi- 
nation 
Date 

Major  Issues 

Employer 
Locution 

June 

Accu- 
mulated 

Result 

Quebec  North  Shore 

Paper, 
Baie  Comeau,  Que. 

Pulp  and  Paper  Mill 
Workers  Loc.  352  &  375 
(AFL-CIO/CLC) 

1,100 
(330) 

8,800 

8,800 

June 

21 

Wages  ~ 

Printing  and  Publishing 
The  Star,  Telegram  and 

Globe  and  Mail, 
Toronto,  Ont. 

Typographical  Union 
Loc.  91 
(AFL-CIO/CLC) 

689 

15,490 

102,730 

July 

9 

Working  conditions  as  af- 
fected by  computers,  job 
security,  union  membership 
of  foremen~ 

Primary  Metals 
Anaconda  American  Brass, 
New  Toronto,  Ont. 

Auto  Workers  Loc.  399 
(AFL-CIO/CLC) 

1,100 

24,200 

56,400 

Apr. 

20 

Wages,  vacations,  statutory 
holidays~ 

Canadian  Unicast  Steel, 
Sherbrooke,  Que. 

CNTU-directly  chartered 

162 

3,560 

3,560 

June 

1 

Wages,  insurance  plan,  holi- 
days~ 

Canadian  Mouldings, 
Chatham,  Ont. 

Teamsters  Loc.  880  (Ind.) 

100 

2,100 

2,100 

June 

2 

Delay  in  negotiations  ~ 

Fittings  Ltd., 
Oshawa,  Ont. 

Steelworkers  Loc.  1817 
(AFL-CIO/CLC) 

500 

170 

170