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«  uLiicaiio;M 


a^ 


SESSIONAL  PAPEES. 


VOLUME  VIII.  PART  III. 

I 


FIEST  SESSION  OF  THE  THIRD  PARLIAMENT 


OF  THE 


PROVINCE  OF  ONTARIO. 


Session  1S75-6* 


Volume  VIII. 


% 


10  9l3't8 


TORONTO 

PRINTED  8Y  HUNTEB     ItOSB  &   CO. 


39  Victoria. 


List  of  Sessional  Papers. 


A.  1876-6 


LIST  OF  SESSIONAL  PAPEES, 


YOL.  VIII.  SESSION,  1875-6. 


ARKANGED  ALPHABETICALLY. 


Agriculture 

Agricultural  College 

Algoma 

Asylums 

Asylums  for  Lunatics  and  Idiots 

Benevolent  Societies 

Births,  Marriages  and  Deaths... 

Bonds  and  Securities  of  Office 

Boundary  Line .. 

Central  Prison 

Coroners ,     .    .. 

Crown  Lands 

Crown  Lands 

Departmental  Buildings 

Disallowance  of  Acts 

Division  Courts  

Division  Courts  .  - 

Drainage 

Drainage 

Durham  Registry  Office  

Education 

Education 

Elections 

Elections 

Elections  .  

Elections 

Estimates 

Eye  and  Ear  Infirmary 

French  Riverj^- 

Huron  and  Ontario  Ship  Canal.. .. 


1 
13 

38 

4 
26 
56 

6 
22 
14 
36 
40 

7 
24 
23 
34 
28 
31 
29 
32 
54 

5 
46 
35 
48 
49 
59 
12 
25 
52 
51 


Immigration 

Immigration 

Insurance  Policies 

Library 

London  Lunatic  Asylum  

McGillivray  and  Biddulph 

Municipal  Loan  Fund 

Municipal  Statistics  — 

Municipal  Statistics . 

Normal  and  Model  Schools  ...:.... 

Normal  Schools 

Ontario  Mutual  Life  Insurance  Co 

Practical  Science 

Public  Accounts 

Public  Accounts 

Public  Works 

Railway  Aid 

Railway  Aid 

Railway  Aid 

Railway  Aid 

Registrars 

Registrars 

Scott,  Thomas 

Sheriffs 

Statutes  

Statutes  

Toronto  Life  Assurance  Company. 

University  College 

Voters'  Lists 

Workman,  Doctor. 


3 

60 
50 
10 
57 
47 

9 
41 
42 
39 
45 
19 
27 

2 

11 
8 
15 
30 
33 
43 
17 
55 
58 
53 
21 
37 
20 
44 
16 
18 


39  Victoria. 


List  of  Sessional  Papers. 


A.  1875-6 


SESSIONAL    PAPERS. 


ARRANGED  NUMERICALLY. 


No.     1 
No.     2 

No.     3 


No. 

4 

No. 

5 

No. 

6 

No. 

7 

No. 

8 

No. 

9 

No.  10 

No.  11 

No.  12 

No.  13 

No.  U 


CONTENTS  or  PART  I. 

Report  of  the  Commissioner  of  Agriculture  and  Arts,  for  the  year  1875. 

Public  Accounts  of  the  Province  of  Ontario,  for  the  year  ending  31st  December, 
1874. 

CONTENTS  OF  PART  U. 

Report  of  the  Immigration  Department  for  the  Province  of  Ontario,  for  the 
year  1874. 

Report  of  the  Inspector  of  Asylums  and  Prisons,  for  the  year  1875. 

Report  of  the  Normal,  Model.  High  and  Public  Schools  of  Ontario,  for  the  year 
1875. 

CONTENTS  OF  PART  HI. 

Report  of  the  Registrar-General  of  Births,  Marriages  and  Deaths,  for  the  year 
ending  31st  December,  1874. 

Report  of  the  Commissioner  of  Crown  Lands  of  the  Province  of  Ontario,  for  the 
months  of  November  and  December,  1874,  and  the  ten  months  ending  31st 
October,  1875. 

Report  of  the  Commissioner  of  Public  Works  for  the  Province  of  Ontario,  for 
the  year  1875. 

Tables  being  statements  of  the  amounts  apportioned  to  the  various  municipa- 
lities of  the  Province  of  Ontario,  under  the  Municipal  Loan  Fund  Surplus 
Distribution  Scheme,  the  objects  to  which  such  amounts  have  been  appro- 
priated by  By-law,  and  the  payments  of  principal  and  interest  made  up  to 
the  1st  November,  1875. 

Report  from  the  Librarian  of  the  Legislative  Assembly,  on  the  state  of  the 
Library  of  Parliament. 

Statements  of  Receipts  and  Expenditures  of  the  Pr()\  iiice  of  Ontario,  during  the 
nine  months  ending  30th  September,  1875. 

Estimates  for  the  year  1876. 

Report  of  the  Ontario  School  of  Agriculture  and  Experimental  Farm,  for  the 
year  ending  30th  September,  1875. 

Return  of  all  papers  and  correspondenc*;  which  may  have  passed  between  the 
Provincial  Government,  or  any  of  its  Members  or  Departments,  on  the 
subject  of  the  Northerly  and  Westerly  Boundaries  of  the  Province,  and 
which  are  not  already  in  the  possession  of  the  House. 


39  Victoria. 


List  of  Sessional  Papers. 


A.  1875-6 


No.  15 


No.  16 


No.  17 

No.  18 

No.  19 
No.  20 
No.  21 
No.  22 

No.  23 

No.  24 

No.  25 
No.  26 


No.  27 
No.  28 
No,  29 


Return  showing  the  amount  of  aid  granted  by  way  of  Loan,  Bonus,  Stock,  or 
otherwise  by  the  several  Municipalities  of  Ontario,  to  Railway  enterprises 
since  July,  1867. 

Return  showing  the  Municipalities  in  the  different  Counties  in  Ontario  for  which 
Voters'  lists  have  been  certified  by  the  County  Court  Judges,  with  the 
dates  when  such  lists  were  respectively  so  certified,  and  showing  the  Muni- 
cipalities (if  any)  in  which  lists  have  not  been  certified,  with  a  statement  in 
any  such  case  of  the  reason  why  the  list  has  not  been  certified.  (Not 
Printed:) 

Returns  forwarded  to  the  oflBce  of  the  Provincial  Secretary,  of  all  Fees  and 
Emoluments  received  by  the  Registrars  of  Ontario,  for  the  year  1874, 
made  in  accordance  with  the  provisions  of  the  Statute  of  Ontario,  31  Vic, 
cap.  20,  sec.  74. 

Copies  of  all  Papers  and  Correspondence  under  the  control  of  the  Government, 
relating  to  the  resignation  of  Dr.  Workman,  late  Superintendent  of  the 
Toronto  Lunatic  Asylum,  and  the  Appointment  of  his  successor. 

Annual  Statement  of  the  Ontario  Mutual  Life  Assurance  Company.  {Not 
Printed.) 

Annual  Statement  of  the  Toronto  Life  Assurance  and  Tontine  Company.  {Not 
Printed.) 

Statement  from  the  Queen's  Printer  as  to  the  disposal  of  the  Ontario  Statutes, 
since  that  presented  at  the^last  Session.     {Not  Printed.) 

Detailed  Statement  of  all  Bonds  and  Securities  recorded  in  the  Provincial 
Secretary's  oflBce,  since  the  last  return  submitted  to  the  Legislative  Assem- 
bly upon  the  27th  November,  1874 ;  made  in  accordance  with  the  pro- 
visions of  the  Statute  of  Ontario,  32  Vic.,  cap.  29. 

Statement  of  amounts  paid  in  each  year  from  1867  to  1875,  for  repairs  and 
maintenance  of  the  Departmental  buildings,  viz.  :  Parliament  House,  and 
East  and  West  Wings. 

Retuin  showing  the  Receipts  of  the  Crown  Lands  Office  in  its  different  Depart- 
ments during  the  year  1875,  up  to  the  date  of  said  Return,  as  far  as  can 
be  ascertained. 

Return  of  all  Correspondence  between  the  Government  and  the  Board  of  Di- 
rectors of  the  Eye  and  Ear  Infirmary  of  Toronto. 

Return  showing  the  number  of  applications  for  admission  to  the  Lunatic  and 
Idiot  Asylums  during  the  years  1874  and  1875,  giving  the  number  of 
applications  from  each  County,  the  number  of  applications  granted  and 
those  refused  ;  also,  by  Counties ;  the  number  remaining  on  file  at  the 
present  time;  also,  by  Counties  ;  the  Orders  or  Rules  of  the  Department 
regulating  the  admission  of  patients  into  each  Asylum. 

Report  on  the  School  of  Practical  Science,  from  January,  1874,  to  June,  1875. 

Report  of  the  Inspector  of  Division  Courts. 

[Return  showing  the  amount  of  money  expended  in  drainage  by  several  muni- 
I        cipalities,  and  the  increase  in  value  of  the  land  so  drained.     {Not  Printed.) 


39  Victoria. 


List  of  Sessional  Papers. 


A.  1875-6 


No.  30 


No.  31 


No.  32 


No.  33 


No.  34 


No.  35 


No.  30 


No.  ;?7 
No.  38 


Return  respecting  the  amounts  granted  under  the  Acts  establishing  the  Rail- 
way Aid  and  Railway  Subsidy  Funds ;  also  showing  the  amounts  paid 
under  each  Act,  and  specifying  the  portions  of  Railways  so  aided,  and 
amounts  still  payable  according  to  the  terms  of  the  said  Resolutions  of 
1st  December,  1875. 

Return  showing  the  number  of  Division  Court  Clerks'  offices  inspected  in  the 
years  1873  and  1874,  and  the  nine  months  ending  30th  September,  1875, 
and  a  list  of  the  names  of  those  inspected  in  each  year. 

Return  in  detail  of  all  sums  of  money  paid  to  contractors  and  other  persons  on 
the  drainage  works  in  the  Townships  of  Raleigh  and  Tilbury  JEcist,  the 
Return  to  specify  the  date  of  such  payments,  and  to  whom  paid.  {Not 
Printed.) 

Return  of  Correspondence  and  Papers  relating  to  the  following  Railways : — 

Belleville  and  North  Hastings ;  Brockville  and  Ottawa ;  Colourg,  Peterhm-ough 
and  Marmora ;  Credit  Valley ;  Dresden  and  Oil  Springs ;  Grand  Junction  ; 
Great  Western ;  Hamilton  and  North  Western  ;  Huron  and  Quebec ;  Kingston 
and  Pembroke ;  London.  Huron  and  Bruce ;  Lake  Simcoe  Junction ;  L'Orignal 
and  Caledonia ;  Midland ;  Montreal  and  Ottawa  Junction ;  North  Simcoe 
Norfolk;  Northern;   Ontario  and  Pacific  Junction;    Ontario  and  Quebec 
Ontario  Mineral ;  Port  Dover  and  Lake  Huron  ;  Pm-t  Whitby  and  Port  Perry 
Prince  Edimrcl  County ;  Port  Stanley,  Strathroy  and  Port  Franks ;  Stratford 
and  Lake  Huron  ;  South  Western  ;  Trent  Valley ;   Toronto,  Gi-ey  and  Bruce  ; 
Toronto  and  Nipissing ;   Victoria  ;  Wellington,  Grey  and  Bruce. 

CONTENTS  OF  PART  IV. 

Copies  of  all  Correspondence  between  the  Lieutenant-Grovernor  of  this  Pro- 
vince and  the  Secretary  of  State,  or  the  Minister  of  Justice  for  the  Do- 
minion of  Canada,  respecting  the  Disallowance  of  any  Acts  of  the  Legis- 
lature of  this  Province,  and  any  correspondence  between  the  same  persons 
respecting  the  recent  legislation  of  the  Dominion  Parliament,  by  which 
police  magistrates  have  been  empowered  to  finally  try  certain  felonies  and 
misdemeanours,  and  any  correspondence  affecting  the  working  of  the  said 
Act. 

Return  showing  the  dates  of  the  receipt  by  the  Clerk  of  the  House,  of  the 
Reports  of  the  Judges  in  the  several  Contested  Election  cases  which  have 
been  tried  subsequent  to  the  last  General  Election,  in  which  the  elections 
were  voided,  and  the  dates  of  the  issue  by  the  Clerk  of  his  warrants, 
and  by  the  Clerk  of  the  Crown  in  Chancery  of  the  Writs  for  the  holding 
of  the  Elections  which  have  taken  place  since  the  last  General  Election, 
and  for  copies  of  all  instructions  given  to  the  Clerk  of  the  Crown  in  Chan- 
cery in  reference  to  the  issue  of  such  Writs,  or  any  of  them. 

Return  of  the  number  of  prisoners  received  in  each  month  at  the  Central 
Prison  from  its  opening,  and  the  respective  gaols  from  which  received  ;  the 
number  discharged  during  the  same  period,  and  the  numljer  now  there ; 
Also,  a  statement  as  to  whether  prisoners  have  been  kept  in  continuous 
employment  in  accordance  with  the  terms  of  the  contract,  and  the  nature 
of  such  employ  tnont. 

jSocoiid  Report  of  the  Commissioners  for  Consolidating  the  Statutes. 

j Return  showing  tht;  li(!V(auie  derived  from  the  District  of  Algoma,  from  the 
1st  January,  1808,  up  to  the  30th  September  last,  including  amount  re- 
alised from  sales  of  timber  berths  and  mineral  and  other  lands. 


39  Victoria. 


List  of  Sessional  Papers. 


A.  1875-6 


No.  39 


Return  showing  the  outlay  on  capital  account  expended  on  Normal  and  Model 
Schools  till  the  30th  September,  1875  ;  the  average  annual  cost  to  the 
Province  of  each  pupil  attending  these  schools  for  the  last  two  years  ;  the 
number  of  pupUs  in  each  year  for  the  last  ten  years,  with  the  county  they 
came  from,  distinguishing  between  male  and  female,  and  the  average 
length  of  time  they  remained  in  the  profession  ;  the  number  of  pupils 
taught  by  each  teacher  for  the  last  two  years,  distinguishing  each  year. 


No.  40 


No.  41 
No.  42 
No.  43 


No.  44 
No.  45 

No.  46 


No.  47 


No.  48 


No.  49 


Return  of  the  number  of  inquests  held  by  Coroners  throughout  the  Province 
of  Ontario  during  the  year  1874  ;  how  many  of  such  inquests  have  been 
certified  by  the  County  Attorney  in  each  County  in  which  such  inquests 
were  held,  as  cases  in  which,  in  his  opinion,  it  was  necessary  to  hold  inquests, 
and  also  how  many  of  such  inquests  the  said  official  in  such  county  did 
not  consider  it  necessary  that  an  investigation  should  be  held.  Also 
showing  the  whole  number  of  coroners  in  Onta.rio  at  present,  with  the 
amount  of  fees  paid  during  the  past  year. 

Municipal  Statistics  of  the  Province  of  Ontario  for  the  year  1873.  {Not  Printed.) 

Municipal  Statistics  of  the  Province  of  Ontario  for  the  year  1874.   [Not  Printed.) 

Return  of  all  moneys  paid  under  the  Railway  Aid  and  Subsidy  Acts,  and  re- 
spective roads  to  which  paid,  the  number  of  miles  constructed  and  under 
construction,  together  with  the  amount  of  bonuses,  contribution  of  munici- 
palities to  the  respective  roads  so  aided,  so  far  as  the  same  is  not  in  the 
possession  of  the  House. 

Report  of  the  Council  of  University  College,  Tm-onto.     [Not  Printed.) 

Return  of  all  Correspondence  and  other  documents  in  the  possession  of  the 
Government  relating  to  additional  Normal  Schools  in  the  western  parts  of 
the  Province. 

Return  showing  copies  of  all  reports,  recommendations  and  estimates,  for  the 
maintenance  and  improvement  of  the  Educational  Depository,  from  the 
Chief  Superintendent  of  Education  to  any  member  of  the  Government 
during  the  years  1872,  1873,  1874  and  1875,  with  any  correspondence 
thereon;  copies  of  all  proceedings  of  the  Council  of  Public  Instruction,  or 
any  of  its  Committees,  in  regard  to  the  Depository  during  1874  and  1875, 
with  all  correspondence  and  documents  connected  with  such  proceedings  ; 
copies  of  all  proceedings  of  the  same  Council  or  its  Committees,  with  any 
correspondence  therewith  in  regard  to  the  expenditure  of  one  thousand 
dollars  voted  by  this  House  in  1874  and  1875,  for  the  revision  of  school 
text-books,  except  such  as  is  already  in  possession  of  the  House. 

Copies  of  the  evidence,  and  all  Reports  made  by  the  Commissioners  appointed 
by  the  Government  to  inquire  into  the  matters  between  the  Townships  of 
McGillivray  and  Biddulph,  and  the  Counties  of  Huron  and  Bruce,  in  regard 
to  Municipal  Loan  Fund  indebtedness  ;  except  such  as  have  been  already 
brought  down.     {Not  Printed.)         * 

Copies  of  the  judgments  delivered  by  the  Judges  selected  for  the  trial  of  Elec- 
tion Petitions,  in  pursuance  of  the  Controverted  Elections  Act  of  1871, 
in  the  cases  decided  by  them,  and  the  judgments  in  appeal. 

Return  showing  the  amount  paid  to  each  Returning  Officer  and  his  Deputies 
for  their  services  at  the  last  general  election,  and  subsequent  election 
with  the  dates  of  such  payments.     {Not  Printed.) 


39  Victoria. 


List  of  Sessional  Papers. 


A.  1875-6 


No.  50  . 

No.  51  . 

No.  52  . 

No.  53  ., 

No.  54  .. 

No.  55  .. 

No.  56  .. 


No.  57  .. 

No.  58  .. 
No.  59  .. 


No.  60  .. 


Papers  relating  to  the  Commission  issued  for  the  purpose  of  determining  as  to 
the  conditions  to  be  inserted  in  Fire  Insurance  Policies.     {Not  Printed.) 

Correspondence  during  the  present  Session  with  the  Government  in  the  matter 
of  the  Huron  and  Ontario  Ship  Canal,  except  such  as  is  already  brought 
down. 

Copies  of  all  Correspondence  between  the  Grovernment  of  the  Dominion  and 
the  Government  of  the  Province  of  Ontario,  relating  to  a  grant  of  land  by 
the  Province  of  Ontario,  in  aid  of  the  construction  of  the  French  River 
Branch  of  the  Canculian  Pacific  Railway. 

Statement  showing  the  gross  receipts  of  each  Sheriflf  in  this  Province  for  the 
years  1871  and  1874  respectively  ;  and  the  expenses  of  the  offices  of  such 
Sheriff  for  such  years. 

Copy  of  that  portion  of  the  last  Report  of  the  Inspector  of  Registry  Offices  re- 
lating to  the  Registry  Office  of  the  West  Riding  of  Durham ;  also,  copies 
of  any  representations  made  by  the  County  Council  of  Northumberland 
and  Durham,  with  any  correspondence  with  respect  to  the  said  office. 

Returns  forwarded  to  the  office  of  the  Provincial  Secretary,  of  all  the  Fees  and 
Emoluments  received  by  the  Registrars  of  Ontario  for  the  year  1875, 
made  in  accordance  with  the  provisions  of  the  Statute  of  Ontario,  31  Vic., 
cap.  20,  sec.  74. 

Return  of  the  name  of  all  Societies  incorporated  under  an  Act  passed  by  this 
Legislature,  intituled  "  An  Act  to  incorporate  Benevolent,  Provident 
and  other  Societies  •"  also  all  correspondence  between  any  member  of  the 
Government,  or  any  judicial  or  other  officials  of  the  Province,  in  refer- 
ence to  the  carrying  out  of  the  Act. 

Copies  of  all  Correspondence  between  the  Government  or  any  member  thereof 
and  any  official  in  the  employment  of  the  Government  with  respect  to  the 
steps  that  have  been  taken  for  the  purpose  of  obtaining  a  supply  of  water 
for  the  use  of  the  London  Lunatic  Asylum.     {Not  Printed.) 

Report  of  Chief  Justice  Wood,  respecting  claims  made  to  the  reward  offered 
for  the  apprehension  of  the  murderers  of  Thomas  Scott. 

Return  from  the  Records  of  the  Elections,  showing  the  aggregate  number  of 
votes  polled  for  each  candidate  in  each  Electoral  Division  in  which  there 
has  been  a  contest,  the  total  number  polled  in  each  such  division,  and  the 
number  of  votes  on  the  Voters'  Lists  of  the  same  respectively,  and  the 
population  of  each  constituency,  as  shown  by  the  last  census. 

Report  on  Immigration  for  the  year  1875. 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  6.) 


A. 1875 


EEPOET 


OF  THE 


EEGISTEAE-GENEEAL 


OF  THE 


PROVINCE  OF  ONTARIO, 


FOE  THE  YEAE  ENDING  31st  DECEMBEE, 


1874. 


grltttfd  by  (Orrtcr  of  the  ^£t^Hhim  %mmU^. 


'(It  0  r  0  n  t  ti : 
PRINTED  BY  HUNTER,  ROSE  &  CO.,  25  WELLINGTON  ST.  Wb^ST. 

1876. 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  6.)  A.  1875 


EEPOET 


OF   THE 


EEaiSTEAE-QENEEAL 


OF  THE 


PROVINCE  OF  ONTARIO, 
FOR    THE    YEAR    ENDING    31st    DECEMBER, 

1874. 


Registrar-General's  Office, 
Toronto,  November  20th,  1875. 

To  His  Honour  the  Honourable  D.  A.  Macdonald,   Lieutenant- Giovernor  o)  the 
Province  of  Ontario. 

I  have  the  honour  to  present  the  sixth  Annual  Report  of  the  Births,  Marriages  and 
Deaths  registered  during  the  year  ending  31st  December,  1874,  in  this  Province. 

The  returns  shew  the   registration   of   28,273  births,  against  27,552  for  1873  ;  of 
10,925  marriages,  against  10,998  for  1873  ;  of  10,352  deaths,  against  11,069  for  1873. 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  6.) 


A.  1875 


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Sessional  Papers  (No.  6.) 


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Sessional  Papers  (No.  6.) 


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Sessional  Papers  (No.  6.) 


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Sessional  Papers  (No.  6.) 


A.  1875 




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Sessional  Papers  (No.  6.) 


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39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  6.) 


A.  1875 


This  Table  shews  the  number  of  births  registered  in  the  Province  during  the  year 
to  have  been  28,273— 14,635  males,  13,583  females,  and  35  sex  not  given — being  an 
increase  of  721  over  returns  for  1873. 

Dual  Births.  -255  dual  births  were  returned  in  1874,  shewing  an  increase  of  55  over 
the  returns  for  last  year  The  District  Registrar  of  the  County  of  York  returned  24 
occurrences,  being  the  greatest  numl^er  from  any  one  County. 

Triplets. — Two  cases  of  triplets  were  returned — one  from  the  County  of  Essex,  and  one 
from  the  County  of  Kent. 

niegitimaie  Children. — The  number  in  this  class  is  196,  a  decrease  of  33  compared 
with  last  year's  return,  being  one  illegitimate  birth  in  each  144  of  all  the  births  regis- 
tered in  the  Province  during  the  year  1874. 


Order  of  Births  by  Months. 


Months. 

Males. 

Females. 

Total. 

1 

March        .     .            

1520 
1330 
1210 
1236 
1231 
1208 
1229 
1169 
1180 
1128 
1124 
1090 

1415 
1189 
1187 
1141 
1128 
1122 
1087 
1102 
1080 
1071 
1026 
1035 

2935 

2 

April 

2519 

3 

August 

2397 

4 

September    

2377 

5 

February    ■. 

2359 

6 

May     .         .       . .       

2330 

7 

January                           

2316 

8 

October 

2271 

9 
10 

July 

June             .         

2260 
2199 

11 

2150 

12 

December 

2125 

The  greatest  number  of  births  in  any  one  month  occurred  in  March,  and  the  least 
number  in  December. 

1,520  males  and  1,415  females  were  born  in  the  former,  and  1,090  males  and  1,035 
females  in  the  latter  month. 


10 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  6.) 


A.   1875 


The  following  exhibits  the  births  by  quarterly  returns  : — 

Males.        Females.  Total. 

Quarter  ending' March  31st 3980         3G30  7610 

June  30th, 3666         3382  7048 

"  "        September  30th. .     3626         3408  7034 

Dec^ber  31st  . .     3383         3163  6546 


The  average  numljer  of  birtlp  within  the  several  specified  periods  of  time  is  as  fol 
lows  : — 

For   the   year,       14i73   males,  13,600  females,    28,273  Total. 

"       "      month,     lfe23       '•  1,133         "           2,356 

"       "      week,         p2       "  261         "              543 

"       "      day,          /  40       "  37         "                77 

The  difference  between  mae  and  female  births  in  1874  maintains  nearly  the  same 
ratio  as  in  previous  years. 


In  1872  the  di/erence  in  favour  of  the  males  was. .  . .      1027 

."    1873  /"  "  "  1037 

"    1874  /  "  "  "  ...      1073 


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39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  6.) 


A.   1875 


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39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  6.) 


A.  1875. 


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39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (]So.  6 


A.  1875 


The  following  Table  shews  the  number  of  Marriages  solemnized  each  month  during 
the  year  1874  :— 

Marriages   by    Months. 


COUNTIES. 

i 

i 

s 

1 

i 

^ 
§ 

a 

•-9 

1 

1 

13 
ft 
02 

§3 
1 

i 

> 

o 

Si 

i 

i 
> 
•a 

1 

o 

Total 

i 

2 
25 
26 

1 

15 
.37 

2 

17 
19 
26 
24 
13 
15 
40 
11 
16 
26 
42 
21 
13 

1 
11 

14 
28 
16 
21 
21 
15 
9 
9 
19 
26 
23 
24 
19 
13 
13 
14 
37 
4 

19 

40 

18 

24 

4 

5 

26 

10 

20 

6 

22 

31 

17 
3 
9 
24 
20 
16 
39 
91 

1 
17 
21 
30 
19 
14 
13 
16 
11 

8 
43 
19 
19 
16 
19 
22 
12 
20 
24 

3 
18 
31 
21 
26 

2 

6 
19 

7 
12 

5 
20 
32 

22 
2 
13 
13 
13 
27 
40 
93 

3 
11 

18 
16 
16 
18 
12 
14 

7 

10 
28 
13 
17 
iS 
12 
15 

9 
18 
25 

1 
24 
26 
13 
16 

"e' 

12 

6 

14 

19 
16 

11 

1 

1 

27 
17 
30 
20 
19 
25 

8 
10 

6 
40 
37 
21 
20 
21 
24 
23 
24 
59 

1 
16 
40 
25 
25 

4 
13 
25 
10 
16 
18 
15 
35 

25 
9 

3 
27 
31 
25 
19 
33 
23 
27 
23 
13 
34 
41 
30 
23 
19 
26 
20 
28 
49 

1 
22 
55 
26 
29 

4 

9 
28 
12 
10 
10 
16 
33 

23 
4 

17 

14 

18 
22 
19 
19 
22 
17 
16 
13 
9 
32 
24 
27 
17 

]9 
10 
25 
19 
27 
12 
18 

.5 
16 
18 
16 
23 
17 
13 
25 
10 
17, 
39* 

2 
16 
27 
18 
27 

"7* 
21 

4 

6 
10 
21 
26 

13 

30 
20 
22 
31 
34 
14 
27 
13 
10 
41 
35 
33 
11 
21 
21 
17 
12 
43 
2 
26 
41 
27 
25 

12* 
20 
19 
12 
8 
13 
33 

21 

3 

18 

34 
32 
24 
29 
32 
35 
49 
15 
21 
41 
46 
48 
46 
26 
35 
23 
35 
60 

4 
38 
82 
43 
45 

3 
17 
37 
33 

4 
14 
16 
44 

23 

"2 
"2 

7 

"i' 
1 

"2 

"i' 

'3' 

"2 
.... 
.... 

1 

"2 
4 

251 

269 

19  i  16 

280 

29 
26 
22 
43 
28 
14 
37 
34 
19 
34 
28 
30 
17 
21 
45 
6 
1!) 
46 
47 

16 
37 
19 
34 
16 

4 
33 
41 
13 

6 
12 
38 
14 
18 
46 

5 
19 

257 

298 

235 

;307 

161 

136 

Hastings  

392 

374 

Kent      

294 

246 

19  1  34 

244 

39 
18 
18 

27 

7 

94 

28 
17 
18 
47 

"ii" 

27 
25 
23 

1 

9  1 

316 

Lennox  and  Addington 

195 
243 

Middlesex  

502 
36 

Norfolk   

252 

Northumberland  and  Durham 
Ontario   

30   49 

28   28 

497 
319 

Oxford  

34  33 

38 

is' 

Ml 

1 
13 
36 
15 

7 
12 
24 
45 

41 

1 
15 
37 
19 
11 

5 
17 
39 

34 

20 

Peel  

130 

Perth  

33  21  1 

316 

Peterborough  

Prescott  and  Russell  

Prince  Edward  1 

30 
4 
18 
12 
33 

27 

18 
13 
9 
37 
46 

24 

183 
129 
124 

232 

415 

StornKjnt,  Dundas  and  Glen- 

285 

15 

18 
.36 
11 
47 

44 
80 

14 
33 
17 
30 
37 
70 

15 
29 
9 
35 
35 
64 

24 

27 
7 

40 
27 
89 

6 

26 
15 
21 
46 
84 

15  i  20 

30 
44 
18 
60 
44 
93 

"4' 

199 

10 

9 

17 

28 

40 
20 

27 
3() 

25  33 

340 

Welland 

27 

39 

49 

100 

16 

29 
48 
85 

182 

Wellington   

388 

473 

York     

62  jll4 

1029 

Totals  

1081  J910 

914 

877 

725 

781 

769 

595 

959 

1033 

926 

1323 

32 

10'.t25 

In  1874,  as  in  1873,  the  maximum  and  minimum  of  marriages  occurred  in  Decem- 
bi^r  iiiid  August. 

Tlie  average  numi)er  of  marriages  per  quarter  was  2,731 

"  "  month     "         910 

"  "  "  week       "         210 

"  "  «  day  "  30 


14 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  6.)  A.  1875 


MARRIAGES    BY    AGES. 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  6.) 


A.  1875 


MARRIAGES 

Table  exhibiting  the  respective  ages   of  the 


COUNTIES. 

Sex. 

No.  of 
Couples. 

Under  20. 

20  and 
under  25. 

25  and 
under  30 

30  and 
under  35 

35  and 
under  40 

40  and 
under  45 

M.... 
F.... 

Total.. 

M.... 
F.... 

Total.. 

M.... 
F.... 

Total.. 

M.... 
F.... 

Total.. 

M.... 
•  F.... 

Total.. 

M.... 
F  .... 

Total.. 

M.... 
F.... 

Total. . 

M.... 
F.... 

Total.. 

M... 

F.... 

Total.. 

M.... 

F.... 

Total.. 

M.... 
F  . . . . 

Total.. 

M.... 

F.... 

Total.. 

M.... 
F  . . . . 

Total . . 

M.... 
F.... 

Total.. 

1 
6 

6 
2 

3 
3 

6 

1 
1 

1 

2 

14 

7 

8 

2 

3 

5 
60 

108 
120 

72 
39 

30 
15 

8 
5 

11 

3 

251 

65 

228 

111 

45 

13 

14 

1 

68 

100 
132 

95 
42 

33 
12 

17 

8 

25 

9 

269 

69 

232 

91 
139 

137 

45 

9 

1 

46 

98 
.59 

46 
18 

22 
5 

7 

3 

280 

47 

230 

157 

64 

27 

10 

2 
64 

94 
115 

83 
42 

38 
15 

14 

7 

8 

6 

257 

66 

209 

125 

53 

21 

14 

4 
116 

144 
114 

81 
35 

30 
14 

19 

8 

10 

5 

298 

120 

258 

116 

44 

27 

15 

4 

55 

87 
105 

82 
46 

24 
12 

13 

1 

5 

5 

235 

59 

192 

128 

119 

41 

36 

14 

13 
6 

10 

130 
160 

30 
14 

3 

81 

1 

307 

81 

290 

160 

44 

19 

4 

2 

41 

77 
87 

47 
24 

18 
6 

4 

2 

4 

101 

43 

164 

71 

24 

6 

4 

Halton 

47 
69 

43 
28 

22 
6 

7 
3 

10 

6 

27 

130 

27 

116 

71 

28 

<; 

9 
96 

140 
149 

127 

68 

40 
24 

19 
4 

10 

6 

392 

105 

289 

195 

64 

23 

16 

Huron 

1 
79 

132 
198 

137 
68 

52 
14 

25 

7 

8 

2 

374 

80 

330 

205 

66 

32 

10 

2 

77 

114 
129 

119 

47 

166 

23 
25 

14 

5 

7 

6 

294 

79 

243 

48 

19 

13 

78 
114 

97 

29 

8 

18 
13 

7 

66 

3 

246 

66 

192 

1.33 

37 

31 

10 

16 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  G.) 


A.  1875 


BY  AGES 

parties   married   during  the  year  under  review 


45  and 
under  50. 

50  and 
under  55. 

55  and 
under  60. 

60  and 
under  65. 

65  and 
under  70. 

70  and 
under  75. 

75  and 
under  80. 

1 

Over  80. 

Ages 
not  given. 

Total 

1 

1 

34 

14 

1 

1 

1 

28 

5 

3 

2 

1 

4 
3 

1 

3 

251 

3 

1 

251 

8 

5 

1 

7 

1 

3 

1 

502 

6 

3 

2 

3 
1 

2 
2 

269 

2 

1 

269 



8 

5 

1              4 

4 

538 

1   " 



2 

1 
1 

4 

1 

2 

5 
7 

280 

2 

280 

1                   1               "  "1 

4 

2 

4 

1 

1 

1 

12 

560 

7 

2 

3 
1 

1 

4 

257 

6 

1 

257 

13 

2 

4 

1 

1 

4 

1 

514 

2 

3 
2 

2 
2 

1 

1 

1 

298 

2 

298 

4 

5 

4 

1 

1 

1 

596 

4 

7 

3 
1 

1 

5 
6 

2.35 

4 

235 

8 

7 

4 

1 

.' 

11 

470 

5 

2 

1 

1 

1 

2 

1 

1 

;i07 

o 

307 

7 

2 

2 

1 

3 

1 

614 

5 

4 

1 

161 

1 

i 

161 

6 

4 

322 

1 

3 

6 

2 

1.36 

1 

2 

136 





4 

6 

2 

2 

272 

8 

8 
2 

2 
1 

1 1 

1 

1 

28 
37 

392 

.            3 

1     1 

392 

11 

10 

3 

1 

2 

65 

784 

c 

4 

1 

4 

1 
2 

1 

1 
1 

1 

1 

374 

2 

374 

8 

5 

4 

3 

1 

2 

1 

1 

748 

5 

4 
1 

4 

1 

1 

1 

294 

3 

::::;:::::  ::::::::::i 

294 

1 

8 

5 

5 

1 

1 

588 

7 

1 

2 

4 

2 

1 

1 

1 

246 

3 

1 

246 

1 

10 

3 

4 

2 

1 

1 

1 

1 

492 

17 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  6.) 


A.  1875 


MARRIAGES 


COUNTIES. 

Sex, 

No.  of 
Couples. 

1 
Under  20. 

20  and 
under  25. 

25  and 
under  30 

1 

30  and      35  and 
under  35  under  40  i 

40  and 
jnder  45 

M.... 
F  .... 

Total.. 

M.... 
F.... 

Total. . 

M.... 
F.... 

Total.. 

M.... 
F  . . . . 

Total.. 

M.... 
F.... 

Total. . 

M.... 
F.... 

Total. . 

M.... 
F  . . . . 

Total.. 

M.... 
F  . . . . 

Total.. 

M.... 
F  . . . . 

Total.. 

M.... 
F  . . . . 

Total. . 

M.... 
F  . . . . 

Total.. 

M... 
F  . . . . 

Total. . 

M.-... 
F  . . . . 

Total. 

M... 
F... 

Total. 

1 
33 

77 
128 

99 
53 

31 
10 

15 
11 

8 

3 

244 

34 

205 

152 

41 

26 

11 

Leeds  and  Grenville  

3 
56 

116 
160 

117 
62 

34 
20 

20 
8 

12 

6 

316 

59 

276 

179 

54 

28 

18 

Lennox  and  Addington  .... 

6 

42 

66 
93 

72 
33 

18 
11 

11 
10 

9 
3 

195 

48 

1.59 

105 

29 

1 

21 

12 

4 
56 

106 
118 

81 
41 

26 
14 

11 

8 

4 

1 

243 

60 

224 

122 

40     1 

19 

5 

6 
102 

176 

226 

172 
94 

67 
33 

15 

14 

14 

502 

108 

402 

266 

100 

48 

28, 

14 
14 

18 

7 

3 

15 

36 

15 

5 
74 

28 

25 

3 

127 
111 

56 
32 

22 
11 

9 
7 

9 

7 

252 

79 

238 

88 

33 

16 

16 

Northumberland  &  Durham 

7 
101 

226 
264 

162 

87 

42 
19 

27 
11 

14 
5 

497 

108 

490 

249 

61 

38 

19 

4 
63 

121 
158 

106 
67 

47 
10 

15 
7 

8 

2 

319 

67 

279 

173 

57 

22 

10 

Oxford '. 

1              5 
1           77 

133 
167 

110 
65 

38 
19 

21 

7 

19 

5 

;i47 

82 

300 

175 

7 
4 

57 

4 
1 

28 

24 

8 
8 

1 

1 

7 

20 

7 

16 

11 

1          5 

1 

Peel         

1 

27 

36 
54 

48 
30 

78 

125 
53 

20 
9 

5 
5 

6 

130 

28 

90 

29 

27 
10 

10 

6 

Perth   

126 
164 

12 
4 

11 

76 

3 

316 

76 

290 

178 

;^ 

16 

14 

Peterburough 

mi 

2 
34 

73 
102 

62 
39 

101 

24 
4 

11 
1 

7 

1 

36 

1          175 

28 

1 

12 

i          ^ 

18 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  6.) 


A.  1875 


BY  AGES.— Co7 

itinued. 

• 

45  and 
under  50. 

.50  and 
under  55. 

55  and 
under  60. 

60  and 
under  65. 

65  and 
under  70. 

70  and 
under  75. 

75  and 
under  80. 

Over  80. 

Ages 
not  given. 

Total 

2 

2 

3 

1 

1 

4 
3 

244 

:i 

1     

244 

2                  3 

1 

1 

7 

488 

5 
1 

5 

2 

2 



316 

3 



316 

,3 

6 

.f^ 

2 

2 

632 



2 

6 

4 

1 

195 

2 

l" 

195 

, 

4 

« 

4 

1 

1 

390 

2 

2 

2 
3 

3 

1 

1 

243 

1 

1 

243 



3 

2 

5 

3 

1 

I 

1 

486 

19 

6 

4 

2 
2 

2 
2 

1 
2 

.502 

6 

502 

25 

y              7 

4 

4 

3 

1004 

1 

36 



36 

1 

1 

72 

10 

5 
3 

4 
2 

2 
3 

1 

2 

252 

2 

252 

12 

8              i; 

.5 

1 

2 

504 

5 

4     1               3 

3                    1 

5 

1 

2 

497 

2 

1 

2 

497 



7 

7     I 

(> 

1 

2 

1 

2 

994 

5 

0     i              '' 

2 
1 

2 

1 
1 

319 

« 

2 

2 

319 

1 

11 

8 

4 

3 

2 

1 

2 

638 

8 

3 
1 

3 

2 

3 

1 

1     1     347 

3 

1 



2 

:347 



1 

11 

4     1              4     i              2 

1 

3 

1 

3 

694 

20 



. 

20 

I.._ 

40 

5 

4 

1 

1 
1 

2 

1 
1 

i;iO 

2 

1 

i:V) 

7 

4 

1 

2 

2 

1 



2 

260 

7 

1 
2 

2 

2 

4 

1 

1 

316 

1 

1 

316 

8 

3 

4     1              4 

1 

1 

632 

2 

2 

i 

183 

1 

l&i 

1 

3 

3 

1 

;%6 

1 1 1 

1 1 

19 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  6.) 


A.   1875 


MARRIAGES 


COUNTIES. 

Sex. 

No.  of 
Couples. 

Under  20. 

20  and 
iinder  25. 

25  and 
under  30 

31 
18 

30  and 
under  35 

;35  and 
under  40 

40  and 
uuder  45 

Prescott  and  Russell  

M.... 
F.... 

Total.. 

M.... 
F  .... 

Total. . 

M.... 
F.... 

Total.. 

M.... 
F.... 

Total.. 

M.... 
F.... 

Total.. 

M.... 
F.... 

Total.. 

M.... 
F  . . . . 

Total.. 

M.... 
F  . . . . 

Total.. 

M.... 
F  . . . . 

Total. . 

M.... 

F  . . . . 

Total. . 

M.... 
F  . . . . 

Total.. 

M.... 
F  . . . . 

Total.. 

1 

8 
48 

57 
50 

18 
6 

6 
5 

2 

129 

56 

107 

49 

24 

11 

2 

1 

52 
61 

43 
24 

11 

5 

8 
4 

6 

27 

1 

248 

27 

113 

67 

16 

12 

7 

Renfrew 

1 

68 

93 
105 

82 
48 

33 
5 

10 
3 

5 

2 

232 

69 

198 

130 

38 

13 

7 

Simcoe 

1 

5 
130 

146 
179 

168 
65 

51 
15 

20 
13 

7 

3 

415 

135 

325 

233. 

66 

33 

10 

StormoDffc,  Dundas  and  Glen- 
trarrv  

4 
52 

90 
126 

85 
54 

45 
23 

22 

7 

10 

285 

56 

216 

139 

68 

29 

10 

Thunder  Bay 

5 
7 

5 
2 

2 
1 

1 

1 

3 

15 

3 

12 

7 

3 

2 

Victoria 

1 

62 

74 
92 

75 
27 

18 
7 

14 
4 

4 

1 

199 

63 

166 

102 

25 

18 

5 

170 
195 

101 
43 

23 
17 

19 

7 

15 

71 

2 

340 

71 

365 

144 

40 

26 

17 

Welland.... 

4 
41 

72 
83 

52 
32 

28 
5 

9 
13 

4 

5 

182 

45 

155 

84 

33 

22 

9 

W^llipjTt<"i 

4 

87 

173 
208 

119 
62 

51 
11 

17 
12 

10 

1 

388 

91 

381 

181 

62 

29 

11 

Wentworth  

8 
139 

209 
204 

1.^9 
75 

58 
22 

25 
15 

17 

9 

473 

147 

413 

214 

80 

40 

26 

York  

10 
173 

388 
492 

350 
233 

129 
65 

49 
23 

72 

38 

25 

1029 

183 

880 

583 

194 

63 

Total  Males   

Total  Feniak'H   

121 
2.546 

4282 
5202 

;^88 

1928 

1286 
.537 

585 
277 

334 
139 

Grand  T 

.tal 

2667 

9484 

5616 

1823 

862 

473 

20 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No  6.) 


A.  1875 


BY  AGES.— Concluded. 


45  and     i     50  and 
under  50.  j  under  55. 

•      1 

■55  and 
under  CO. 

GO  and 
under  65. 

1 

65  aud 
under  70. 

70  and 
under  75. 

75  and 
under  80. 

Over  80, 

1 

^S'^^     'total 
not  given. 

5 
1 

1                  1 

2 

1 

129 
129 

1 

1 

(i                  ] 

2 

1 

1 

258 

! 1 1 

1     1              2     1              1 

i                                       1 

124 

1             1 

I              1 

I                                       1 

1. . 

124 

1 

i                  1 

1                 1 

3 

1 

248 

3 

3                 1 

1 

232 

1 

9-A9 

' ; 1 

3 

3                 1 

1 

2 

464 

5  ;       3 

2 

1 

2 

1 
4 

415 

4 

2 

415 

■ 

1 

9 

5     i              3 

4 

1 

I 

1              9 

5 

830 

1                    1 

5 

2    1             1 

1 

20 

285 

2 

2 

19 

285 

r    

7 

4                   1                   1 

39 

570 



1 

1 

1 
1 

15 

1 

. 

15 

1 

' 

1 

1 

I 

1 

2 

30 

1 

4 

5 
2 

2 

2 
1 

1 

199 

2 

::::::::::  ::::::::::l::::::::: 

1 

199 

1                        ...... 

6 

7 

2 

3 

1. 

1 

398 



8 

1 
3 

2 

1 

340 

2 

340 

10 

4 

2 

1 

• 

680 

3 

4 

2 

2 

1                  1 

182 

3 

:.. 

182 

1 

6 

4 

2 

2 

1     1              1 
1 

364 

5                 3 

9 

2 

1 
1 

1     1 

.388 

4 

i          i 

388 



0 

3 

3                   3     1               •> 

1 

j 1 

776 

■                    1 

1 

6 

4 
4 

1     1               -2     1               2     1               2     ' 

473 

■1 

1 

1 

1 

473 



S                  8 

1     i              3 

2 

3 

1 

946 

2.? 

22                    8                    4     1               4     i 

2         1  ^' 

1     1  1029 

!} 

4 

3 

1 

1 

1 

. 

1     1  1029 

1 

32 

26 

11     1              4 

4 

2                  2 

2    1  2058 

202 
95 

!               1 
143                81               62 
46                26     1            21 

28 
8 

28 
3 

7 
2 

2 

76 

95 

10925 
10925 

1                   1 

297 

189 

107 

83 

36     j            31                  9 

2 

171 

21850 

21 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  6.) 


A.  1875 


The  percentage  of  the  whole  number  of  persons  married  according  to  ages  is  as 
follows  : — 


Under  20  years 
From  20  to  25 

"  25  to  30 

"  30  to  35 

"  35  to  40 

"  40  to  45 

"  45  to  50 

"  50  to  55 

"  55  to  60 

"  60  to  65 

"  65  to  70 

"  70  to  75 

"  75  to  80 
Over  80 


Males 


1.10 

39.19 

33.75 

11.77 

5.35 

3.05 

1.84 

1.30 

.74 

.56 

.25 

.25 

.06 

•01 


Females 

23.34 

ti 

47.61 

a 

17.64 

(( 

4.91 

(C 

2.53 

(( 

1.27 

« 

.86 

<( 

.42 

cc 

.23 

(( 

.19 

(( 

.07 

<( 

.02 

u 

.01 

« 

.0 

A  number  of  remarkable  instances  of  persons  marrying  at  advanced  periods  of  life 
and  dissimilarity  of  age  appear  in  the  returns  as  hereunder  : — 


In  the  County 

of  Grey        a  man  aged 

81 

Lambton 

(( 

81 

Lanark 

a 

78 

Essex 

(< 

77 

York 

(( 

77 

Welland 

C( 

75 

Huron 

C( 

75 

Lincoln 

a 

75 

Lennox 

a 

75 

Lambton 

((■ 

74 

Wentworth 

li 

74 

York 

a 

74 

li 

(< 

74 

Northumberl'd 

and  Durham  " 

74 

Norfolk 

(( 

74 

Simcoe 

(( 

73 

Brant 

(( 

72 

Huron 

(( 

71 

Oxford 

(( 

71 

Peel 

(( 

71 

Lincoln 

(( 

71 

married  a  woman 


46 
54 
48 
50 
79 
43 
61 
35 
35 
38 
72 
39 
60 

65 
59 
35 
62 
70 
50 
75 
58 


years. 


Great  difference  in  the  ages  tf  the  following  couples  also  appears,  as  follows : — 

years. 


In  the  County 

of  Grey        a  man  a 

ged 

81 

married 

a  woman 

46 

(( 

liincoln             " 

75 

(( 

(( 

85 

(( 

Simcoe              " 

73 

(( 

(< 

35 

<( 

Oxford 

68 

(( 

(( 

30 

(( 

Wentworth      " 

65 

u 

girl 

19 

(( 

Welland 

64 

(( 

woman 

28 

(( 

Leeds  &  Gren-  ( 

ville             ) 

61 

(( 

a 

25 

(( 

Stormont,    I).  ) 
and  (t.           f 

62 

(< 

u 

30 

(C 

Oxford 

63 

(( 

(( 

24 

(( 

Peel 

60 

<( 

<t 

30 

39  Victoria;  Sessional  Papers  (No.  0.)  A.  1875 


The  man  most  advanced  in  years,  81,  married  a  middle-aged  lady,  46. 

The  most  matronly  lady  was  79,  who  married  a  venerable  gentleman  of  77,  and  thus 
they  rank  as  the  oldest  couple  joined  in  matrimony  in  1874,  their  united  ages  being  156, 
or  an  average  of  78  years  each. 

Five  boys,  of  the  age  of  18,  united  their  fortunes  with  girls  of  the  relative  ages  of  15, 
16, 17,  18  and  19. 

One  child  of  1.3  years  married  a  man  of  2G  ;  five  girls  of  14  were  united  to  men  of 
the  ages  of  21,  21^,  24,  20  and  29  respectively. 

Twenty-seven  girls  married  at  the  age  of  15  years. 

2,546  girls  married  under  20  years  of  age,  and  only  121  males. 


DEATHS. 


23 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  6.) 


A.   1875 


DEATHS. 

This  Table,  and  the  two  following,  have  been  classified  to  shew  the  deaths  of  males 
and  females  separately. 

The  whole  number  of  deaths  returned  for  1874  was  10,352 — a  decrease  of  717  from 
last  year.  The  number  of  males  was  5,527,  and  of  females  4,825 — an  excess  of  male  de- 
cedents of  702. 

DEATHS  BY  MONTHS. 


COUNTIES. 

M. 

i 

i 

1 

'n. 

1 
1 

^ 
§ 

1-5 

1 

Si 
a 

a) 

ft 
<v 
W 

2 

1 

I 

o 
o 
O 

1 

> 

a 

o 

1 

CO 

0 

H 



4 

F 

■3 

5 

Total... 

M 

F 

Total... 

M 

F 

2 

3 

1 

3 

9 

Brant 

14 

10 

15 
16 

18 
10 

11 

13 

11 

13 

6 
6 

22 
9 

15 
11 

16 
13 

11 
14 

10 

7 

2 

161 

10     13 

135 

24     23 

I 

31 

8 
12 

28 

24 

24 

12 

31 

26 

29 

25 

17 

2 

296 

Bruce 

6 
11 

5 
6 

6 
3 

8 
7 

9 

12 

6 
8 

16 
10 

6 
6 

6 
6 

7 
7 

3 
2 

98 

4       1 

83 

Total... 

M 

F 

17 

'I 

11 

14 
12 

20 

17 
17 

9 

15 

13     13 

14 

26 

12 

12 

14 

5 

181 

Carleton    

15 
21 

10 

18 

7 
7 

11 

13 

14 
20 

11 

7 

8 
11 

10 
10 

16 
11 

1 

145 

152 

Total... 

M 

F 

16 

8 
8 

26 

9 
4 

34 

6 
9 

36 

3 
2 

28 

8 
2 

14 

4 
3 

24 

5 
4 

34 

4 
9 

18 

6 
4 

19 

1 

2 
6 

20 

3 
4 

27 

2 
1 

1 

1 

297 

Elgin  

61 

56 

Total... 

M 

F 

16 

13 

15 

5 

10 

7 

9 

13 

10 

8 

7 

3 

1 

117 

Essex 

9 

8 

21 
16 

15 
19 

9 
11 

13 

8 

10 
13 

9 

4 

12 
12 

13 

8 

6 

8 

5 
5 

2 

1 

1.32 

71     16 

1 

128 

Total... 

M 

F 

12 
4 

24 

6 
5 

37 

5 

8 

34 

13 
10 

20 
6 

21 
3 

23 

7 
3 

13 

7 

24 

6 

2 

21 

5 

4 

14 

3 
1 

10 

4 
3 

3 

"i 

260 

Frontenac     

72 

57 

Total... 

M 

F 

16 

11 

13 

23 

9 

61     10 

12 

8 

9 

4 

7 

1 

129 

Grey  

10 
11 

3 

8 

17 
9 

10 
11 

6 
4 

91     14 
61      9 

6 
6 

6 
9 

9 
6 

14 
6 

13 

117 

92 

Total... 

M 

F 

Total... 

M 

F 

21 

.5 
6 

11 

8 
3 

11 

11 
VI 

23 

8 
6 

26 

21 

10 

15 

23 

12 

15 

15 

20 

20 

j      209 

Haldimand    

15 
12 

27 

9 

7 

17 
12 

29 

9 
11 

20 

11 

8 

10 

7 

17 

12 

8 

20 

13 
6 

19 

6 
12 

18 

8 
7 

15 

3 
11 

14 



120 

112 
232 

Halton  

9 
12 

6 
8 

71      9 
7       2 

J 

16 
14 

11 

9 

4 
9 

3 

7 



97 

95 

Total  .. 

M 

F 

11      14 

1.5|      8 
11       6 

16 

18 
13 

21 

16 
18 

14 

6 
10 

14 

8 

11 

18 

30 

20 

13 

10 

192 

HaHtings    

13 

12 
21 

14 
11 

14 
13 

11 
14 

14 
11 

1 

160 

19 

10 

157 

Total... 

26 

14 

31 

■M 

16 

27 

23 

.33 

.,, 

27 

25 

25 

1 

307 

24 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  6.) 


A.  1875 


DEATHS 

BY  MON  THS  -  Continu 

ed. 

COUNTIES. 

t    i 
1 

1 

< 

>» 

a 

S 

a 
< 

>. 

^ 

0 

1 

a 

a.'' 

1 

0 

1 
> 

1) 

.a 

3 

a 

as 
1 

33 

Huron    

M 21 

20 
15 

I 

3o|     18 

23 
12 

14 

7 

16 
17 

26 
15 

20 
22 

15 

15 

1 
1 

15'      1 

234 

F 

20 

23 

23 

17|     12 

14 

1 

198 

Total... 

35     53 

41 

35 
18 

21 

10 
5 

33 

8 
12 

41 

8 
4 

42 

12 
13 

32     27 

1 

lOi    12 
12!    ^2 

29 

12 
10 

2 

7 
2 

9 

432 

Kent  

M 

F. ..:... 

11 
7 

11     11     23 

153 

11 

14|     14j     13 

129 

Total... 

M 

F 

18 

22 

25|     37:     31 

15 

20 

12 

25 

22|     24 

22 

282 

Lambton    

8 
8 

10 
5 

9     10'     17 

10       8       9 

1 

9 
11 

8 
13 

11 
9 

15 
6 

11 

8 

15 
5 

4 

7 

'"2 

127 

101 

Total... 

M 

F 

Total... 

M 

F 

16 

15 

19i     18|     26 

20 

21 

20 

21 

19 

20 

11 

2 

228 

Tja  nark  

3 
6 

9 

14 
7 

21 

13 

7 

10       9 
6     14 

13 

7 

20 

11 

5 

16 

5 
5 

10 

8 
3 

11 

5 
5 

10 

3 

8 

11 

6 
10 

16 

100 

83 

20I     16     23 

183 

Leeds  and  Granville  

14 
20 

18 
14 

17     21     14 
36     21     18 

13 
9 

10 
16 

24 
13 

13 
16 

12 
13 

16 
10 

8 

8 

....|  ,   180 
. . . .  j      194 

Total   . 

M 

F 

34 

5 
6 

32 

53l    421     32 

22 

26 

37 

29 

25 

26 

16 

374 

Lennox  and  Addington 

6 
5 

5 
4 

7 
1 

5 
4 

8 
6 

5 

7 

6 

7 

6 
8 

5 
2 

7 
2 

7 
7 

"i 

72 
60 

Total... 

n 

11 

9 

8 

9 

14 

12 

13 

14 

7 

9 

14J       1 

132 

Lincoln  

M 

F 

Total... 

M 

F 

15 
15 

24 
13 

16 

12 

28 

21 
14 

13 
14 

27 

21 
•Jo 

9 
10 

19 

26 
27 

15 
6 

21 

22 
15 

7 
8 



15 

18 
15 

5 
9 

14 

19 
18 

9 

7 

16 

29 
26 

16 
10 



26 

18 
23 

12 
13 

10 

8 

8 
8 

1 

1 

136 
121 

25 

20 
18 

18 

17 
8 

16 

2 

257 

Middlesex     

23       2 
17  ... . 

260 

219 

Total... 

M 

F 

37 

35 

46 

53 

37 

33 

37 

55 

41 

38 

25 

40       2 

479 

Mnskoka   

1 
3 

1 
1 

I 

6 

7 

3 
1 

2 

1 

5 
2 

4 
1 

2 

5 

1 

3 

2 

40 
22 

Total... 

M 

F 

Total... 

M 

F 

4 

5 
11 

16 

12 

7 

19 

13 

7 

2I     11 

6       7 

1 

4 

7 
10 

17 



10 
11 

21 

5 
12 

3 

5 
6 

11 

19 
20 

39 

; 

10 
12 

7 

6 
10 

16 

17 
15 

32 

17 
15 

15 
5 

20 

16 
16 

32 

15 
12 

7 

11 
14 

1 
17 

lu 

5 

6 
2 

8 

18 
8 

26 

9 
4 

i 
1 

62 

Norfolk 

11 
15 

26 

12'     14!     25 
10:      9     16 

1 

22j     23     41 

134 

118 

25     27 

13       7 
17|     14 

30     21 

252 

Northnmberland  and  Dur- 
ham      

I 
15     18!     18     23 

186 

18 
33 

19 

20 1 

20     14      18 

179 

Total... 

M 

F 

Total... 

M 

38!     32 

24'     15 

181     15 

1 

41 

10 
9 

365 

Ontario  

9 
6 

8 
8 

154 
138 

20 

39 

42     30 

19 

17 

22 

32 

27 

15 

16 

13 

292 

Oxford    

111 

10 
19 

29 

18     19 

17  i     20 

1 

35     39 

25 

27 
18 

45| 
1 

12 
10 

1 

22| 

12 
12 

15 
13 

16 
16 

19 

18 

22' ... . 

199 

F 2l| 

Total...      321 

1 

11       9 

15 

1 

182 

24' 

1 

28 

321 

30 

27 

37 

1 

381 

39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  6.) 


A. 1875 


DEATHS  BY  MONTHS— Continued. 


COUNTIES. 

t-5 

1 

1 
.    1 

1 

3J 

3 

1 

& 
^ 

g 

u 

0 
0 

1) 

S 
11 
> 
0 

H 

a>    • 
u 

Q 

1 

33 
■J 

0 

Parry  Sound    

*M 

F 

1 

2 

3 

3 

0 

3 

1 
1 

1 

13 

1        1 

2          i 

2, 

1 

1 

10 

Total... 

M 

F 

Total.. 

M 

F 

' 

4        1 

5 

2 

2 

1 

1 

3 

2 

23 

Peel    

7 
5 

9 

.5 

.5       4 

4 

7 

5 
3 

8 
2 

15 
5 

8 
4 

6 
8 

.     8 
4 

1 

4 
4 

83 

7 

14 

68 

12 

14 

12 

IS 

11-     8 

10 

20 

12 

14 

13 

8 

151 

Perth 

8 
5 

7 
6 

lo 
14 

11 
10 

11       9 
10     11 

15 

7 

9 

18 
12 

9 
5 

10 

8 

4 
11 

1 
1 

127 
111 

1 

Total  .. 

M 

F 

Total... 

M 

F 

13 

13 

29 

21 

21 

20 

22 

20] 

30 

14 

18 

1 

15 

2 

238 

Peterborough    ..  

5 

6 

5 
4 

3 
1 

8!      3 

11      5 

1 
2 

10 
6 

5 
5 

4 
6 

7 
4 

4 

3 

8 
3 

63 
46 

11 

10 

8 

9 

11 
12 

4        9 

S!      3 
1 

16 

10 

10 

11 

7 

11 

109 

Prescott  and  Russell 

14 1     16 
13;      9 

8 

7 

2 
3 

9 

7 

4 

6 

4 
2 

8 
4 

8 
7 

11 
6 

105 
84 

Total... 

M 

F 

18 

5 
5 

23 

a 

4 

27 

7 
.5 

25     15 

5 

16 

10 

6 

12 

15 

17 

189 

Prince  Edward    

11       6 
11     14 

6 
4 

6 
4 

4 

7 

8 
4 

6 

7 

3 
3 

5 
3 

.... 

72 
71 

Total.. 

M 

F 

Total  .. 

M 

F 

10 

9 

12 

22 

20 

10 

10 

11 

12 

13 

6 

8 

143 

Renfrew 

6 

8 

14 

6 
13 

19 

7 
12 

14 
14 

5       6 

8 
4 

16 
11 

9 

7 

9 
6 

3 
4 

9 
10 

2 

1 

100 

7 

6 

103 

19 

28      12 

12 

12 

27 

16 

15 

7 

19 

3 

203 

Simcoe   

10 

8 

10 

12 

20 
14 

16  22 

17  18 

15 
12 

10 
16 

23 
16 

14 
13 

11 

5 

16 
12 

I 

■■".3 

174 

154 

Total... 

M 

F 

Total... 

M 

F 

18 

14 

7 

21 

22 

21 
11 

32 

34 

17 
17 

34 

1 

33  j     40 

17     23 
16     13 

27 

10 
11 

21 

26 

6 
12 

18 

1 
2 

3 

7 
6 

13 

15 
20 

35 

8 

5 

39 

17 
18 

35 

2 

7 
4 

11 

16 
15 

31 

8 
10 

18 

27 

16 
9 

25 

16 

28 

15 

3 

328 

Stormont,      Dundas      and 
Glengarry 

12 
12 

24 

16 

8 

24 

13 
9 

22 

1"Z 

182 
143 

33 

36 

325 

Thunder  Bay  

1 

1 

4 

8 

2 

2 

5 
10 

6 

Total... 

1 

17 
5 

22 

23 
1.^ 

1 

8 
4 

1 

2 
0 

4 

1 

1         14 

M 

F 

Total... 

M 

F 

2 
4 

6 

16 

8 

24 

10 
7 

17 

.5 
3 

8 

14 
19 

33 

10 
1(J 

2C 

1 

Victoria     

7 
11 

18 

24 
20 

6 
8 

8 
7 

9 

7 

1 

84 
74 

14|    15 

12 

26 
20 

46 

14 

7 

21 

7 

29 
14 

43 

7 
8 

15 

15 

7 
16 

23 

7 
8 

1.^ 

16 

17 
10 

27 

8 
6 

14 

1 

1.58 

Waterloo   

13 
14 

1    12 

1      7 

212 

178 

Total... 

M 

F 

38     44 

271     19 

1     _ 

390 

W.lland     

17     191     14 
15l     10     14 

10 
4 

1.32 
104 

Total.. 

.32     29     28!     14 

2;J6 

26 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  6.) 


A,  1875 


DEATHS  BY  MONTHS.— Concluded 


COUNTIES. 

>< 

a 

a> 

1 

26 

18 

< 

^ 
§ 

c 

^-5 

1 

S 
I 

u 

01 

0 

1 

i> 

r* 
> 

o 

s 

CO 

1 

M 

F 

13 
9 

29 
14 

32 
21 

26 
17 

17 
11 

21 
13 

31 
19 

23 

28 

,  23 
17 

13 
22 

12 
14 

267 

203 

Total... 

M 

F 

22 

21 
16 

43 

44 

53 

43 

28 

34 

50 

51 

40 

35 

26 

470 

Wentworth  

21 
21 

29 
21 

.30 
31 

14 
14 

16 
17 

19 
25 

31 
16 

19 
15 

:m 

42 

38 

14 
14 

10 
17 

16 
11 

241 

218 

Total... 

M 

F 

Total... 

37 

31 
38 

69 

42 

52 
42 

94 

50 

44 
33 

77 

61 

62 
39 

101 

28 

37 
36 

73 

33 

47 
34 

81 

44 

60 
35 

95 

47 

45 
.37 

28 

27 

_2_7 

39 
29 

2 

459 

York   

43 

29 
35 

532 

436 

82 

80 

81 

64 

68 

3 

968 

Total  Males 

400 
356 

756 

459 
420 

879 

575 
514 

1089 

590 
512 

1102 

486 
428 

914 

374 
327 

701 

430 
382 

812 

506 
427 

933 

508 
407 

915 

423 
377 

800 

• 
364 
339 

703 

384 
316 

700 

28 
20 

48 

.5527 

"   Females 

4825 

Grand  Total  

10352 

27 


39  Victoria.  .       Sessional  Papers  (No.  6.)  A.  1875 


Order  op  Deaths  by  Months. 

Total. 

April 590  M 

March...  575 

August 506 

September  .  508 

May 486 

February     459 

July    4.30 

October  423 

January 400 

November 364 

June  374 

December 384 

April  appear?  to  have  been  the  most  fatal  month  of  the  year — 1,102  deaths,  or  10.64 
per  cent,  of  the  whole  number  returned. 

This  may  be  accounted  for  by  noticing  that  the  births  are  move  numerous  in  March 
than  at  any  other  time  of  the  year,  and  as  infancy  is  the  most  fatal  period  of  life,  April — 
the  foUoAving  month — might  naturally  be  expected  to  give  the  largest  return  of  deaths. 

Deaths  by  Quarters  of  the  Year, 


514 

a 

1,089 

427 

933 

407 

915 

428 

420 

914 

879 

382 

11 

812 

377 

800 

356 

.i 

756 

339 

a 

703 

327 

701 

316 

700 

* 

Total. 

Quarter  ending  March 

1,434 

Males, 

1,290 

Females 

2,724 

"             "       June 

1'450 

C( 

1,267 

(. 

2'717 

"             "        September 

1,444 

a 

1.216 

(C 

2,660 

"             "       December 

1,171 

(( 

1,032 

li 

2,203 

Date  of  death  not  given 

28 

It 

20 

IC 

48 

5,527  4,825  10,352 

By  this  Table  it  will  be  seen  that  the  first  quarter  of  the  year  shews  the  greatest  mor- 
tality, and  the  last  quarter  the  least. 


28 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  6.)  A.  1875 


DEATHS    BY    AGES. 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  6.) 


A.  1875 


DEATHS   BY   AGES. 


COUNTIES. 

Sex. 

1 

2 

o 

u 

i 

3 

§ 

CO 

3 

V 

1 
1 

o 
1-1 

4 

© 

§• 

.-4 

5 

! 

01 

§ 

1 

?  1 

1 

6 

D 
1 

7 

o 

■^ 

a 

8 

9 

o 

10 

1 

t 

a 

11 

B 

> 
•So 

t'OTAL 

I 

Algoma  

M 

F 

Total... 
1 

M 1 

F 

Total... 

M 

F 

Total.  . 

M 

F 

Total  .. 

M 

F 

Total... 

M 

F 

Total... 

M 

F  

Total... 

M 

F 

Total... 

M 

F 

Total.  . 

M 

F  

Total  . 

M 

F 

Total.. 

M 

F 

ToUl,. 

"i 

i!  "  i 

3       1 
1 

3       '^ 

4 

1 

1 

5 

1 

1 

1     1 

1     1 

9 

Brunt          

50      12 
40       6 

18 
19 

37 

11 
9 

20 

19 
30 

49 

20 
23 

43 

6 
9 

15 

—     1 
5 
8 

13 

14 
10 

24 

4 

1 

5 

17 

8 

25 

6 
3 

8 

17 
5 

22 

7 
2 

9 

6 
6 

12 

3 
3 

6 

1 
1 

2 
1 

1 

1 
1 

2 

2 
2 

161 

135 

90 

29 
25 

54 

18 

11 

7 

18 

296 
98 

83 

4 

181 

26 
34 

60 

28 
16 

44 

14 
11 

25 

19 
42 

61 

5 
12 

17 

15 
5 

15 
12 

181      4 

12]       6 

1 

2 

145 

152 

20 

27 

30 

10 

3 

297 

Elgin    

18 
9 

27 

45 
37 

82 

10 
15 

9 

2 

6 
16 

2 
6 

4 
5 

9 

2 

4 
4 

3 
4 

4 

61 

5       5 

.56 

14 

4 
17 

21 

4 

5 

7 

10 
10 

20 

7 
3 

22 

16 
28 

8 

11 

5 

9 

15 
8 

23 

3 
6 

11 

8 

7 

4 

117 

11 
11 

22 

10 
5 

14 
8 

3 
1 

■"""i 

3 
2 

i;i2 

128 

44     16 

22 

5 
6 

4 

7 
3 

1 
1 

5 

260 

Frontenac  

17 
11 

7 
2 

1 
1 

72 

57 

25 

17 
19 

36 

38 
24 

62 

2f- 
32 

6C 

44 

9 

11 

8 

19 

13 
10 

23 

8 
2 

IC 

1       4 

10 

20 
5 

25 

13 
10 

23 

5 

fl 

14 

U 
V 

>      3] 

i      V 

28 

22 
20 

42 

12 
22 

M 

13 
14 

27 

24 
►     29 

L     53 

)     28 
)     42 

)     7C 

1 

9J      9 

15 

11 

10 

1 

2 

129 

Grey  

12 
10 

22 

4 
6 

12 

7 

19 

8 
11 

6 

7 

"l3 

'     10 
9 

5 
4 

9 

12 

7 

6 
9 

15 

8 
6 

3 

3 
3 

117 

92 

3 

—•7 

6 
2 

209 

TTjkldimftnfl  ,,     

120 

112 

10 

1 

4 

11 

7 
i:^ 

2« 

14 
1( 

19 

7 
11 

18 

7 
10 

»     17 

17 
)       ? 

19 

7 

."5 

12 

17 
S 

2S 

2f 
1( 

19 

10 

9 

IS 

14 
K 

24 

>  21 

>  If 

14 

11 

7 

7 

2 

232 

Halton  

"  "1 

1 
1 

97- 

95 

Ifi 

IC 
IC 

2C 

L      14 

>       f 

1 

1 
»       2 

2 

f 
4 

192 

Hafltiingt , ,,,,..,,, , , , , 

1.50 

45      11 
89     1.' 

1.57 

1              i 

(     IC 

5       ] 
5         ; 

>     m7 

Huron 

T 
.5' 

13' 

^      If 

2U 

r    14"   :« 

I       198 

1     3( 

)      4< 

2^ 

[     2£ 

1 

3£ 

)     31 

'  ^ 

)       4j      . 

1 

I       432 

3 

0 

39  Victoria. 


vSessional  Papers  (No.  ^.) 


A.  1875 


DEATHS    BY   AGY.^.— Continued. 


\ 

1 

COUNTIES. 

Sex. 

1 
a 

3 

2 
d 

U 

en 

3 

a 

3 

i 
o 
i-i 

4 

3 

55 

5 

1 

© 

-r 

6 

§ 

<I> 

s 

3 
-O 

0 

7 

o' 
1 

8 

d 
00 

1 

3 
1 

9 

g 

1 

cS 

8 

10 

1 

3 

§ 

11 

i 
■5 

1 

03 

bo 

< 

Total 

Kent    

M 

F 

Total... 

M 

F 

Total... 

M 

F 

Total... 

M 

F 

Total... 

M 

F 

Total  .. 

M 

F 

Total... 

M 

F 

Total... 

M 

F 

Total... 

M 

F 

Total... 

M 

F 

Total... 

M 

F 

Total... 

M 

F 

Total... 

55 
41 

12 
9 

9 
17 

19 
29 

8 
9 

13 
5 

11 
10 

16 
6 

3 

3 

7 

153 
129 

> 

96     21 

26 

48 

17 

18 

21 

22 

6 

7 

282 

Lambton 

44 

3;} 

77 

13 
14 

27 

9 
3 

12 

22 
31 

53 

? 

14 

6 
5 

11 

11 

10 

3 
3 

2 

127 

2       3 

101 

13     13 

6 

2 

228 

Lanark    

33       3 

8 
5 

11 

18 

7 
4 

4 

7 

5      14 
5       6 

10 
12 

4 

1 

1 
1 

100 
83 

16 

8 

49 

11 

13 

29 

11 

11 

10 

20 

22 

5 

2 

183 

Leeda  and  Grenville    

39 
43 

82 

21 
15 

:i6 

28 
27 

55 

70 
70 

140 

15 
10 

25 

47 
37 

9 
9 

12 
19 

28 
40 

17 
16 

16 
14 

16 
12 

21 
21 

17 
15 

.5 
5 

180 
194 

18 

4 

7 

11 

6 
13 

19 

28 
27 



55 

4 
2 

~6 

9 

7 

31 

2 

4 

6 

68 

12 
12 

3;^ 

30 

28 

42 

32 

10 

374 

Lennox  and  Addin^on 

2 

91 

6 
3 

9 

16 
10 

26 

24 
9 

6 
2 

8 

7 
8 

15 

21 
14 

9 
10 

19 

21 
15 

36 

28 
12 

7 
5 

2 

1 

72 
60 

24|      4 

12 

10 
6 

16 

15 
6 

2 

1 
3 

4 

2 

1 

1 

2 
3 

5 

132 

Lincoln   

10     24I     11 

136 

11 

21 

19 
20 

19 

43 

34 
39 

6 

17 

13 
20 

121 
257 

Middlesex  

6 

1 

260 
219 

39 

5 
1 

73 

5 
6 

:J3 

3 
2 

33 

5 
1 

2 

40 
1 

21 

3 

7 

479 

Muskoka  

40 

22 

6 

10 
11 

21 

10 

20 

30 
16 

11 

5 

•6 

6 
8 

14 

2 

~18 
8 

26 

1 

13 

7 

20 

62 

1 

191        7 

4 
3 

Norfolk  

1 

m 

32 

51 

18 
29 

47 
14 

5 

12 

118 

84     16 

52     19 

49  i     15 

101 1     ;i4 

7 

1 

252 

Northumberland  and  Durham 

20 
16 

36 

10 
10 

20 

13 
13 

16 

17 

17 
12 

3 
3 

1 
2 

186 

7'     13 

179 

26 

8 
7 

15 

23 

17 

12 

29 

30 

7 
9 

16 

29 

6 
3 

9 

6 

"1 

1 

3 

365 

Ontario   

59 
41 

100 

69 

16 
13 

29 

IS 

1 
2 

3 

164 

181     22 
34^     36 

138 

292 

Oxford 

1     16 
21 

37 

16 
32 

10 
15 

16 
15 

31 

17 
9 

27 
14 

8 
9 

2 
2 

■■■■■2 

199 

441     19 

182 

113 

;  37 

48 

'     25 

41 

17 

4 

2 

381 

31 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  6.) 


A.  1875 


DEATHS    BY   AG^^.— Continued. 


COUNTIES. 

Sex. 

1 

w 
u 

I 

2 
6 

8 

2 

o 

u 

3 

u 
1 

4 



o 

V 
-§ 

§ 

5^ 

5 

g 

u 

0) 

a 
s 

© 

6 

s 

13 

P 

O 

7 

o 

en 
S 

1 

8 

o 

00 

u 
to 

p 
s 

© 

9 

s 
s 

1 

10 

X 

1 

1 

1 

11 

> 

■a 

1 

n 

<! 

Total 

M 

F 

Total... 

M 

F 

Total... 

M 

F 

Total... 

M 

F 

Total... 

M 

F 

Total... 

M 

F 

Total... 

M 

F 

Total... 

M 

F 

Total... 

M 

F 

Total... 

M 

F 

Total... 

M 

F 

Total... 

M 

F 

Total... 

4 
4 

""i 

1 

3 
2 

5 

1 
1 

2 

2 

1 

13 

10 

2 

1 

23 

Peel 

26 
15 

41 

45 
44 

89 

8 
9 

17 

45 
38 

4 
3 

7 

10 

7 

17 

5 
5 

10 

15 
11 

2 
8 

10 

9 
8 

17 

3 
4 

7 

9 
2 

9 
11 

20 

20 
21 

41 

11 

9 

20 

12 
16 

4 
4 

8 

9 
10 

19 

4 

7 

11 

4 
4 

10 
3 

13 

10 

7 

6 

7 

9 

7 

9 

7 

3 
3 

1 

83 

68 

13 

8 
5 

16 

16 

6 

1 

151 

Perth  

9 
5 

2 
3 

2 

1 

3 

127 

111 

17 

5 
1 

6 

5 

1 

13 

12 
3 

15 

6 
4 

14 

10 

5 

15 

3 
5 

5 

2 
2 

4 

4 

2 

3 

3 

238 

Peterborough 

1 

1 



1 

2 
1 

3 

63 

46 

109 

Prescott  and  Russell  

1 

1 

105 

84 

83 

13 
10 

23 

34 
37 

71 

68 
51 

119 

39 
34 

73 

3 

1 

4 

"30 
19 

49 

68 
45 

113 

26 

9 
3 

12 

5 
5 

10 

18 
11 

29 

11 

5 
7 

12 

8 
8 

16 

10 
1j6 

26 

28 

4 
18 

8 

6 

7 

6 

5 

5 

10 

4 
11 

8 

15 
6 

6 



9 
4 

1 

2 

189 

2 

72 

71 

22 

13 

10 

151    21 

13 

2 

143 

Renfrew     

14 

26 

"40 

23 
31 

54 

7 
4 

11 

8 
7 

15 

3 

5 

8 

9 
8 

17 

14 
5 

19 

6 
7 

13 

6 
4 

2 
1 

1 
1 

100 

103 

10 

3 

2 

203 

9 
4 

13 

13 
10 

23 

11 
9 

20 

3 

1 

2 

6 

174 

154 

4 

8 

328 

Stormont,  Dundas  and  Glengarry  ... 

23 
15 

38 

"i 

1 

4 
3 

7 

19 
12 

31 

24 
10 

2 
1 

20 
32 

52 

2 
1 

10 

4 

14 

1 

12 
12 

18 
8 

17 
10 

16 

8 

■■■■■5 

3 
5 

182 
143 

24 

26 

27 

24 

5 

8 

325 

Thunder  Bay 

8 

1 

1 

6 

3 

11 
12 

23 

18 
18 

36 

3 

12 
19 

31 

24 
41 

65 

1 

7 
7 

14 

1 

3 
1 

4 

1 

5 
2 

7 

14 

7 
6 

2 
2 

"' i 

3 

2 

84 

74 

13 

4 

1 

5 

158 

14 
12 

26 

10 
13 

2:i 

14 

21 
14 

12 

7 

2 
1 

1 
1 

212 

178 

23 

37 

35 

19 

3 

2 

390 

32 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  6.) 


A.  1875 


DEATHS   BY   AGES.— Concluded. 


COUNTIES. 

Sex. 



M 

F 

Total... 

M 

F  

Total... 

M 

F 

Total... 

M 

F 

Total... 

1 

38 

28 

2 

o" 
1 

i 

8 

7 

3 

a 

© 
1-1 

5 

7 

4 

o 

3 
i-i 

5 

g 

a 
rs 

1 

6 

o 

CO 

u 

a 

p 

1 

7 

©■ 

1 
s 

§ 

o 

8 

a 

s 

9 

1 

10 

to 

ft 

% 

o 

11 

a 

> 

1 

1 

< 

Total 

Welland  

19 
19 

8 
3 

17 
12 

11 

10 

14 

9 

8 
6 

....„ 

4 
2 

1.32 

104 

(56 

102 
61 

15 

22 
18 

12 

18 
15 

38 

30 
35 

11 

15 
9 

29 

22 
15 

21 

23 

14 

1 

6 

236 

20 
17 

22 
21 

11 
9 

1 

3 

267 

203 

163 

85 
70 

155 



177 
138 

315 

40 

16 
16 

32 

37 
27 

64 

33 

15 
22 

37 

35 

38 

73 

65 

24 

37 

37 

43 

20 

5 

3 

470 

"Wentworth  

31 
42 

18 
16 

15 
12 

27 
18 

17 
14 

5 
6 

2 
1 

10 

1 

241 

218 

73 

117 
99 

216 

34 

27 

45 

31 

11 

3 

11 

4.59 

York  

40 
33 

73 

39 
24 

63 

29 
33 

62 

31 
26 

57 

18 
13 

31 

3 
2 

6 
3 

532 

436 

5 

9 

968 

Total  Males 

1697 
1370 

3067 

460 
389 

849 

435 
454 

772 
1008 

352 
326 

404 
300 

473 
311 

505 
344 

291 
220 

59 
52 

79 
51 

5527 

"  Females  

4825 

Grand  Total  

1 
8891780 

678 

704 

784 

849 

511 

111 

130 

10352 

4 

a 

4 

o 
o 
CO 

"3 

i 

1 

o 
a 

c 

Total 

160 

135 

96 

12 

207 

267 

139 

37 

143 
148 
126 

18 

29 
32 
10 

4 

1 

65 
93 
70 
25 

165 

160 

59 

12 

14 

10 

10 

3 

784 

"         "    8   .  . 

4 
1 

849 

"          "    9    . 

511 

"         "   10 

111 

The  mortality  amongst  children  under  three  years  of  age  still  continues  to  largely 
predominate.  No  less  than  3,067  innocents  were  cut  off  in  infancy  in  the  year  under  re- 
view. 1,697  males,  and  1,370  females,  or  :^9.62  per  cent,  of  the  whole  number  of  de- 
cedents. 


33 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  6.) 


A.  1875 


CAUSES  OF  DEATH.— 
E^hibitinof  the  number  of  Deaths  from  ench  cause 


CAUSES  OF  DEATH. 

Sex. 

1 
< 

4 

5 

1 

161 
135 

ai 
o 

P5 

98 
83 

1 

1 

O 

145 

152 

■i 

■A 

0) 

c 
72 

O 
117 

i 
s 

"a 

w 

120 
112 

1 

M 

97 
95 

W 

150 
157 

£ 
2:34 

1 
1.53 

i 

127 
101 

i 

i 

100 
83 

s3 
*> 

i 

o 

05 

All  causes 

M... 
F  ... 

1 

61132 

180 

56  128 1  57   92 

198  129 

194 

Total. 

9 

296,181 

297 

117  260 [129  209 

1 

232 

192 

307 

432,282 

228 

183 

374 

M... 
F  ... 

4  1.57    89 

141 

147 

69122    65ill4 

50|122i  54|  89 

118 

97 

1471226  143 
154  190  123 

123 
100 

96 
80 

177 

5|134 

75 

llOi  94 

192 

Total. 

9  291 

164 

288  109  244ill9 

203 

2281191 

201  416  266 

223 

176 

369 

Classes. 

_, — 

— 

— 

— 



— 

— 

— 

I.  Zymotic  

M... 
F  ... 

3|  40 
11  49 

21 
14 

43 
46 

20 

8 

31      4 
44     7 

13 
18 

25 
20 

25 
24 

39 

38 

58|  49 
55   32 

40 
38 

13     32 
23     28 

1  _ 

Total. 

4 

89 

35 

89 

28 

75    11 

31 

45 

49    77 

113   81 

78 

36 

60 

'II.  Constitutional    

M... 
F  ... 

29 
24 

14 

10 

18 
32 

9 
14 

22    11 

21 
18 

15 

17l  31 

26    17 
37   27 

23 
17 

12 
13 

42 

27 

9 

32    17  i  41 

63 

Total. 

53 

24 

50 

23 

49 

20 

39 

47    341  72 

63    44 

40 

25 

105 

III.  Local  

M... 
F  ... 

1 

3 

63 
52 

36 
35 

56 
40 

24 
17 

37 

29 

39 

27 

45 
30 

59I  40!  43 
37    34  i  46 

86'  55 
62    .50 

47 
28 

40 
27 

72 
68 

Total. 

4 

115 

71 

96 

41 

66 

66 

75 

96l  74|  89  148ll05 

75 

67 

140 

IV.  Developmental  

M... 
F  ... 

10 

7 

9 
13 

15 
21 

4 
11 

16 

18 

7 
8 

12 
17 

11   10   22   31 
20    15    24    26 

12 
11 

8 
13 

19 1    20 

16 

29 

Total. 

17 

22 

36 

15 

34 

15 

29 

31 

25 

46  i  57 

23 

21 

35 

49 

V.  Violent    

M... 
F  ... 

i 

19 
3 

18    13 
11    13 

4 

?6 

11 
6 

26 
9 

10 
3 

5 
5 

151  33 
8   18 

20 
9 

9 
5 

16 
4 

14 

6    10 

6 

Orders. 

Total. 

li  22 

29 

26 

10    36 

17 

35 

13 

10 

23    51 

29 

14 

20 

20 

M... 
F  ... 

3 

1 

401  21 
49 1  14 

40 
45 

201  31 

3 

7 

11 
17 

23 
20 

23 
24 

38    56 
35    54 

48 
30 

38 
37 

13 
23 

31 

8 

44 

27 

Total. 

4 

89 

35 

85 

28 

75 

10 

28 

43 

47 

73 

110 

78 

75 

36 

58 

M... 
F  ... 

Total. 

_Z 

_11 

— 

_11 

1 

1 

... 

...1  ... 

•"!  ■■ 

.  1 

— 

1 

1 

— 

— 

— 

■ 













1 







M... 
F  ... 

1     1 

1 

1 

2'     1 

"i 

2 

1 

1 

Total 

M... 
F  . 

- 

— 

— 

1 

2 
1 

— 

— 

1 

1 

1 
1 

2 

1 
1 

1 

2 
1 

1 

V 

1 
1 

4  Parasitic     



1 

1 

Total. 

— 

— 

— 

3 

— 

— 

2 

— 

1 

2 

"l 

2 

1 



~  2 

Total^Order  I 

M... 
F  ... 

3    40 

21 1  43 

20 

8 

31 
44 

4 

7 

13 1  25 

9r> 

39 

58 

M 

40 
38 

13 
23 

3?! 

11  49|  14|  46 

18 

20|  24 

381  65 1  32 

28 

Total 

4|  89 

35    89 

28j  75 

11 

31 

45   49;  77  1131  81 

1              ( 

78 

3(5 

60 

34 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  6.) 


A.  1875 


CLASSIFIED  ARRANGEMENT. 

in  the  several  Counties,  statistically  classified. 


i 

d  a 

72 
60 

a' 

o 

.2 

136 
121 

257 

131 
115 

246 

33 

28 

61 

ii 

260 
219 

479 

252 
217 

469 

80 
146 

-^ 

40 
22 

62 

38 
19 

57 

5 
5 

10 

7 
3 

10 

¥1 
•5 

-a' 

0 

134 
118 

252 

130 
115 

245 

25 
35 

60 

"19 
24 

43 

58 
38 

13 

0  =s 

186 
179 

.2 

_l 

154 
138 

c 

199 
182 

a 

>. 

b 

ci 
Pi 

13 
10 

23 

10 

5 

15 
2 

2 

2 
2 

Ph 

83 

68 

151 

80 
66 

146 

18 
19 

37 

14 
14 

28 



31 
24 

-a 
t 

127 
111 

238 

121 

107 

228 

37 
26 

63 

18 
16 

34 

48 
45 

a 
2 

c 

•e 

V 
D 
Pi 

63 
46 

109 

62 
43 

105 

16 
14 

30 

11 
13 

24 

25 
8 

a 

h 

Pi 

105 
84 

189 

101 
81 

182 

13 
33 

76 

11 
11 

22 

21 
13 

i 

a 

72 
71 

143 

64 
61 

125 

10 
14 

"a 

'^ 

100 
103 

1  .• 
0 
u 

a 

174 
154 

1  . 

g5 
|i 

m 

182 
143 

P5 

u 
» 

13 

g 
1 

8 
6 

1 

> 

84 
74 

8  -^• 
1  1 

212  132 
178  104 

c 
'.J 

267 
203 

0 
a 

241 

218 

i 

532 
4.36 

0.-2 

a  2 
■>  a 

20 

5527 
4825 

132 

365  292  381 

203 

90 
92 

182 

15 
19 

328 

159 
145 

304 

38 
38 

76 

20 
21 

41 

63 
45 

325 

159 
123 

282 

45 
33 

78 

25 
30 

14 

7 
6 

13 

158 

81 
71 

152 

390  236 

203  123 
171 100 

374223 

470 

459 

968 

10352 

66 
57 

123 

177 
172 

349 

30 
55 

85 

28 
27 

55 

78 
53 

141 
130 

271 

53 
43 

96 

28 
18 

46 

46 
46 

192 

366 

45 
55 

100 

23 
37 

60 

86 
59 

250|  231 
1931  215 

443i  446 

1 

529 
433 

962 

5275 
4630 

9905 

13 
14 

3 
3 

6 

11:  51  22 
12:  42  25 

23  93,  47 

58 
52 

64  150 
60  J  128 

1309 
1278 

27 

24;  34 

110 

124  278  2587 

8 
14 

19'  34 
24  37 

16 
20 

36 

25 
19 

18 
21 

39 

31 
25 

1 

... 

15  30 
20  45 

17 

20 

37 
32 

45 1  91 1  844 
37'  82  949 

22 

32 
19 

43 

42 
44 

71 

101 
73 

55  1 

62  2 
35  1 

351  75 

•381  88 
24  63 

37 

55 
33 

69 

101 

71 

82 

82 
94 

173j  1793 

199  2079 
159  1581 

51 

80  174 

18  i  32 
15j  19 

33:  51 

24  27 
10  j  10 

k  37 

20!  63 
28!  76 

26 

"2 
2 



7 
7 

14 

5 

4 



9 

96 

11 
10 

21 

21 
11 

32 

25 
34 

59 

131 

25 
;30 

55 

25 
14 

39 

30 
54 

84 

92 

7 
19 

26 

20 
12 

32 

145 

14 
15 

29 

31 
16 

47 

15 
2 

— 

55 

10 

8 

18 

10 
3 

13 

18 
18 

36 

93 

9 
16 

25 

15 
8 

23 

36 
26 

62 

33 

6 
6 

12 

5 
5 

10 

15 
14 

29 

34 

15 
23 

_^ 

15 
4 

19 

41 
33 

74 

44 

6 
5 

11 

15 
13 

28 

10 
14 

24 

.56 

18 
19 

18 
19 

37 

108 

21 
30 

51 

32 
20 

52 

97 

19 
19 

38 

31 
26 

57 

3 

"2 
2 
2 

2 

62  151 

88 

172 

176 

358  j  mm 

6 
8 

14 

13 
5 

18 

5 
14 

19 

15 
4 

19 

17 
13 

20 
15 

41 

13 
16 

29 

25 
10 

35 

30 
20 

'56 

41 
22 

63 

20 
16 

36 

30 
11 

41 

53 
53 

106 

39 
14 

53 

.561 
634 

1195 

734 
383 

1117 

11 
14 

51'  44 
42'  55 

15 
17 

34 

38 

45 
33 

78 

3 
2 

10 
12 

49!  22 
41  24 

57 
52 

58  140 

56  123 

1 

1252 
1245 

25 

57 

139 
2 

2 

"9I 

99 



32 

72 
11— 

5 
"... 

22 



90  46 

109 



... 

114 1  263 

1  . 

1 

1   3 

2497 

6 
2 

8 

1 

4 

4 

33 
-28 

61 

1 
1 

~ 

"i 

1 

25 
35 

60 

"  "i 

1 

2 

1 

1 

... 

"i 

1 

1 

1! 

1 

2 

"^1 

3 

3 

1 

Z^ 

— 

1 
1 

2  ... 
1  ... 

"...   "i 
...  1 

11   4   7 

;;9 

1 

1 

4   2 

81   9 
1!   li 

11 
.■■>o 

1 

—  1 — 

1 





— , — 

12 

4i 

41  1 

1| 
1I 

1 

2 
2 

1 
1 

... 

1 

2   20 

1 

— 

— 



— 

1 

1  

11 



3|   .32 

1   1 

45 
55 

100 

2 
2 

1   1   i 

131 
14' 

66 
80 

146 

5 
5 

10 

30 
55 

53 
43 

18 
19 

."7 

37 

26 
63 

16 
14 

30 

43  10 
3:3  14 

15 
19 

3a 

38 
76 

45 
33 

78 

3 
3 

6 

11 
12 

23 

51  22 
42  25 

58 
52 

110 

64 
60 

124 

150|  1309 

128 1  1278 

27| 

85 

96 

76 

24 1 
i 

93 

47 

278:  2.187 

35 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  6.) 


A.  1875 


CAUSES  OF  DEATH.— 
Exhibiting  the  number  of  Deaths  fi'om  each  cause 


CAUSES  OF  DEATH. 


II.- -1  Diathetic. 


2  Tubercular 


Total  Order  II. 


III. — 1  Nervous  System. 


2  Organs  of  Circulation, 


.3  Respiratory  Or^^ans 


4  Digestive  Organs 


.5  Urinary  Organs 


6  Generative  Organs 


7  Organs  of  Locomotion 


8  Integumentary  System 


Total  Order  III. 


Sex. 


M... 
F  .  . 

Total. 


M... 
F  ... 

Total. 


M 

F  ...' 


Total. 


M... 
F  ... 

Total. 

M... 
F  ... 

Total. 

M  .. 
F  ... 

Total. 

M... 
F  ... 


4     4 

5:    6 


W 


51    71 
51  10 


9   lOj  10}  17i    3 


47   15 


53 


..    19 

I  14 

II  33 


■|_ 
1    20 
25 


24 


151  10 

171    7 


14 


13!  32   17   25 


221  11! 

27     91 


50    23    49    20 


Hi  18 

16   1.3 
271  31 

7 


45j  17 

14     9 
li    5     3 


Total.,  1    191  12 


15 


22 


M... 
F  ... 

Total. 

F  ... 


M.. 

F  .. 

Total 

M... 
F  ... 

Total. 

M.. 

¥  .. 


I 
sl    5 


14 


39 


16 


31 


47 


W 


11     5 
141  19    12 


10;  23|  19   12 
10]  301  32   22 

20    53|  51    34 


I    Hi 


191 

151 


10 
16 

26 


9     32 
9     47 


341    18l    79 


171  31'  26|  17i 

17    411  37    271 


34    72|  63 


10   25 


..  5 

..  2 

ii  1 
..1 1 


1 

ll  03!  ml  56 

3!  r.2i  s.'-j 


19l  10 


17 


34 


25    21 

12    14 
6 


18 


2|    3 


22 


14   17 
12|  13 

26    30 


4j     7 
5]     5 

9    12 


23, 

17 


121     42 
13     63 


44     40     25!  105 


39   35     16 


101 


5| 

lol 


34    181 
20i  10| 


23 

121 


54 


32 


10  21 

5  23 

15l  44 

I 

6J  8 

3!  6 

9|  14 

HI  22 

lOj  16 


28     35 


21  j  38 

7  11 

T),  20 

13J  31 

3i  10 

....  1 


ti- 


3     11 

2       1 

"i| 1 

3l 


Total!  4  115j  71 
i     I       I 

36 


24i«f37    31)    451  59   40    43l  861  55|    471 
171  29    27I  30|  37    34|  461  62]  50|     281 

41    6(11  661  75    96    74|  89|148il05     751 


4(.l     71' 
27     68 

67  ■■  140 
I 


39  Victoria. 


Sessiona'  Papers  (No.  6.) 


A.  1875 


CLASSIFIED  ARRANGmiENT.— Continued. 
in  the  several  Counties,  statistically  classified. 


'6 
< 

a 
8 

c 

9 
11 

lo 

10 
13 

Jt 

1!) 
24 

43 

12 
12 

24 

Ct) 

6 
9 

15 

28 

28 

56 

34 
37 

71 

29 
18 

47 

14 
11 

25 

37 
18 

55 

16 

20 

36 

3 

1 

4 

5 

1 

1 

1 

M 

3 

2 

5 

4 
1 

5 

7 
3 

10 



7 
3 

10 

5 

5 

7 
1 

1 

2 
1 

3 

- 

21 

5 

o 

2 
9 

11 

17 
15 

32 

19 
24 

43 

|i 

II 

!-§ 

C  t« 

6 

8 

14 

22 

19 

41 

28 

27 

55 

0 

6 

7 

13 

22 
11 

33 

28 
18 

u 

0 

X, 

0 

10 
9 

19 

13 

2S 

41 

2:5 
37 

13 

a 

a 
m 

r-l 

2 

i 
1 

2 
2 

"a; 
P-l 

4 

4 

8 

10 
10 

20 

14 
14 

i 

V 

6 
6 

12 

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18 
16 

To 
1 

1 

5 
6 

11 

6 

7 

13 

11 
13 

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Si 

4 
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7 
8 

15 

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Ph 

8 
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14 

8 
14 

22 

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12 
4 

16 

6 
17 

23 

18 
21 

0 
0 

S 

2 
5 

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34 

20 
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^^ 
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20 
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Ph 

3 

4 

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2 
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13 
17 

30 

G 
15 

21 

24 
30 

54 

7 
7 

14 

10 
13 

23 

13 

10 



23 

24 

22 

46 

9 
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22 
21 

231 
267 

7 

17 

43 

498 

5 
10 

36 
29 

69 
61 

613 

682 

15 

65 

130 

1295 

8 
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15 
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17 

20 

37 
32 

45 

37 

91 

82 

844 
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39 

41 

55 

35 

75 

371  69 

82 

173 

1793 

10 

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15 

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28 

3 
3 

15 
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lo 

8 

15 
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24 

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15 

27 

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11 

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2 

11 
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14 

1 
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10 

10 

20 
5 

14 

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26 

4 
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16 
12 



28 

7 
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13 

6 

19 

2 
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33 

29 

62 

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27 
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lo 

26  48 

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195 

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38 

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58 
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96 

18 

29 
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48 

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2 

78 
53 

131 

4 

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15 

31 

13 
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32 
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36 
31 

430 
313 

12 

32 

67 

743 

5 

1 

1 

8 

1 

9 

2 
2 

4 

5 

1 

C 
2 

4 
6 

7 
5 

118 

1 

1 
1 

1 

1 

2  ... 

42 

3 
1 

1 

2 



3 

1 

5 

8 

1 

- 

10 
1 

12 
10 

160 
55 

-- 

— 

... 

1 
1 

2 

— 

7 

1 
1 

1 
2 

— 

1 

1 

2 

■■■"2 





3 



2 

- 

5 
12 

1 

...   2 
1  1 

46  86 

46  59 

"i 

i 

1 

1 

j 

21 

3 

..J  1 

1|   ^ 

18 

4 

2 

31 

24 

2 

48 
45 



25 

8 



3 

31 

25 

1 

63 
45 

2 

1 

38 
24 

1 

88 
63 

1 

1 

ll   1 

1 

39 

32 
19 

42 
44 

8G 

101 
73 

174 

21   25 
13|  19 

62  2 
35  1 

55 
33 

101 
71 

82 
94 

199 
159 

2079 
1581 

M 

92 

145 

55 

93 

33 

34 

44 

56 

108 

97|  3 

62 

151 

88 

172 

176 



358 

3660 

37 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  6.) 


A. 1875 


CAUSES  OF  DEATH.— 
Exhibiting  the  number  of  Deaths  from  each  cause 


CAUSES  OF  DEATH. 

Sex. 

c3 

a 

o 
to 

< 

1 

1 

1 

9 
5 

14 

1 

2 

3 

10 

7 

17 

7 
1 

o 

2 
5 

7 

5 

6 
3 

9 

1 

1 

9 
13 

22 

7 

a 
o 

2 

4 

6 

7 

6 
6 

12 

7 
4 

11 

1.5 
21 

36 



7 
2 

9 

13 

3 

3 

5 

8 

1 
3 

4 

4 
11 

1.5 

2 
2 

X 

Oi 

w 

6 
6 

12 

_l 

.5 
4 

9 

5 
3 

8 

16 

18 

34 

12 
2 

14 

1 

-- 
1 

1 
1 

i 

c 

o 
"S 

2 

2 
2 

4 

4 
6 

9 

1 
1 

2 

7 
8 

15 

4 
2 

6 

!! 

o 
1 

3 

3 

5 

6 
5 

11 

3 

7 

10 

12 
17 

29 

14 
3 

17 

2 
2 

TJ 
§ 

1 

w 

o 

1 

12 

5 

17 

6 

8 
12 

20 

2 

1 

3 

22 
24 

46 

8 
2 

10 

1 

1 

i 
1 

7 
7 

It 

4 

12 

7 

19 

12 

8 

20 

31 
26 

57 

17 
5 

22 

1 

1 
1 

1 
1 

6 
5 

11 

2 

4 
2 

6 

2 

2 

4 

12 
11 

23 

10 
2 

12 

1 

S 

3 

4 

1 

7 

5 

.5 
3 

8 

"i 

1 

8 
13 

21 

3 

2 

5 

1 

4 

1 

5 

5 

13 

8 

21 

2 

2 

4 

19 
16 

35 

6 

1 

s 
2 

go 

X 

IV. — 1  Developmental  Diseases  of 
CMldren  

1 

M  .. 

F  .. 

Total. 

F  .. 

M.. 
F  .. 

Total. 

M  .. 
F  .. 

Total. 

M.. 
F  .. 

Total. 

M  .. 
F  .. 

Total. 

M  .. 
F  .. 

Total. 

M.. 
F  .. 

Total. 

M  .. 
F  .. 

Total 

M  .. 
F  .. 

Total. 

M  .. 
F  .. 

Total. 

3     2 

3 

2  Developmental  Diseases  of 

i 
3 

6 
9 

15 

2 
4 

6 

11 

20 

31 

6 

1 

7 

3 
5 

2 

1 
2 

3 

7 
8 

15 

10 
15 

25 

~~ 

4 
1 

5 

4 

7 

2 

.3  Developmental  Diseases  of 
Old  People    

11 
19 

4  Diseases  of  Nutrition 

Total  Order  IV 

30 

6 

4 

10 
20 

v.— I  Accident  or  Negligence  .... 

29 
49 

8 

2  Homicide  (Murder) 

8~7 
1    .. 
11 

6 

8 

.. 

. 

1 

1 

1 
1 

— 

— 

— 

4  Execution    

5  Violent  Deaths  (not  classed) 

Sudden  deaths 

-^ 

1 

2 

2 

1 

2 

i   ' 

38 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  6.) 


A.  1875 


CLASSIFIED  ARRANGEMENT.— Conimued 
iu  the  several  Counties,  statistically  classified. 


i 

o  bo 

*o 
a 

1 
2 

3 

2 

X 

M 

1 

9 
5 

14 
3 

1 

P 

i 

1 

0 

2 
2 

i  a 

iff 

11 

5 

7 

d 

•c 

3 
5 

t 

3 
1 

0 

PL, 

1 
4 

V 

Ph 
3 

1 

.a 
to 

3 
0 

1 

Ph 

1 

1 

Ph 

12 

7 

1^ 

1 

u 

e 

"i 

s 

6 
5 

0 

a 

8 
7 

p^ 
^•~  I' 

go 

6 
5 

p:i 

1 

c 

i 

s. 
> 

3 
3 

d 
0 

Is 

_CS 

0 
1 

i 
1 

c 

a; 

^ 

■>  s 

SO 

Ph 

2 

1 

5 

4 
2 

12 

6 

11 
5 

21 
15 

17-? 
141 

2 

4 
2 

12 
4 

8 
4 

4 

1 

1 

4 

8 
4 

2 

19 

1 

11 

15 

11 

1 

6 

6 

6 

18 

16 

36 

313 

1 

8 

7 

9 

4 

3 

2 

7 

1 

5 

122 

3 

6 

9 

14 
10 

24 

15 
6 

21 

- 

6 
4 

10 

18 
18 

36 

2 
7 

9 

9 
12 

21 

- 

6 

7 

13 

4 
5 

9 

4 
4 

8 

2 
5 

7 

5 
3 

8 

9 
5 

14 

9 
10 

19 

9 

7 

16 

•• 

2 
10 

15 
6 

21 

8 
4 

12 

12 
19 

31 

7 
7 

14 

14 
16 

30 

272 
264 

536 

1 
1 

3 

1 

4 

18 
15 

33 

16 
2 

18 

8 
5 

13 

32 
19 

51 

14 
3 

17 

1 

1 

'2 
2 

3 
3 

6 

3 
2 

5 

11 
10 

21 

12 
2 

14 

2 
2 

2 

1 

3 

25 
30 

55 

12 
2 

14 

"i 

1 

.... 

2 
3 

5 

7 
19 

26 

4 
3 

7 

2 

1 

3 

14 
15 

29 

13 

1 

14 

2 
3 

5 

" 

i 

1 

5 

2^ 

7 



1 

2 
2 

1 
1 

1 
3 

1 
1 

3 
2 

\ 

4 
3 

"i 

1 

1 
3 

6 
1 

2 

3 

18 
17 

117 
107 

2 

1 

10 

8 

18 

5 

1 

6 

4 

9 
16 

25 

6 
1 

7 

2 

6 
6 

12 

3 
3 

4 

15 
23 

38 

10 

1 

11 

2 

6 
5 

11 

5 

1 

6 

5 

18 
19 

37 

4 
2 

6 

8 

21 
30 

51 

8 
4 

12 

7 

19 
19 

38 

5 

8 

1 

'2 
2 

1 

1 

5 
14 

19 

9 

1 

10 

1 

17 
13 

30 

J 

13 

4 

13 
16 

7 

30 
26 

6 

35 

224 

6 
8 

20 
16 

63 
53 

561 
634 

14 

29 

56 

36 

106 1  1195 

6 
1 

7 

12 
6 

18 

5 
6 

11 

13 

7 

20 

26 
1 

27 

322 
80 

402 

1 

1 

6 

- 

— 

1 
1 
1 

4 

- 

-- 

— 

1 
3 

1 

10 

— 

1 

1 

1 
1 

2 

13 

2|    4 

— 

T 

- 

1 

1 

— 

— 

— '- 

3 

1 

2',   17 

1 

1 

I 

: 

I 

— 

I 

1 

- 

1 



— 

— 

— 

1 

2 

— 

1 

— 

— 

— 

- 

— 

— 

1 

2 

1 

1 

1 

1 
1 

1 

1 

2 

- 

1 

1 

2 
2 

4 

1 

1 
1 

Ki 

1 

1 

..1  .. 

7 

— 

1 

1 

— 

1 
.  .1  . . 

1 

2 

1  ■ 

1 

39 


$9  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  6.) 


A.  1875 


CAUSES  OF  DEATH.— 
Exhibitinii  the  number  of  Deaths  from  each  cause 


CAUSES  OF  DEATH. 

Sex. 

c3 

3 

O 

io 

< 

i 

? 

O 

To 

3 

1 

S 

>5 

C5 

g 

c 

io 

•J 

1    1 

s 

1-] 

2 

M... 
F  ... 

Total. 

M... 
F  ... 

Total. 

M... 
F  ... 

Total. 

M... 
F  ... 

Total. 

M... 
F  ... 

Total. 

M  ... 
F  .. 

Total. 

M... 
F  ... 

Total. 

M... 
F  ... 

Total. 

M... 
F  ... 

T(^tal. 

M... 
F  ... 

Total. 

M... 
F  ... 

Total. 

"l 

1 

4 

1 

5 

5 

1 

6 

19 
3 

22 
4 

9 

8 

17 

~2 
3 

5 

18 
11 

29 

2 
2 

i 
1 

2 

1 

3 

2 
2 

4 

4 
5 

9 

2 
6 

8 

13 
13 

26 

8 
5 

13 

1 
3 

4 

3 
5 

8 

2 

2 

5 
3 

8 

1 
1 

2 
6 

8 

4 
6 

10 

"i 

1 

4 
3 

7 

3 
1 

4 
1 

1 

10 
6 

16 

3 
1 

4 

26 
10 

36 

1 
5 

6 

"2 
2 

1 

4 

5 

.5 
7 

12 

7 
3 

10 

1 

1 

11 

6 

17 

"i 

1 

i 

1 

3 
3 

6 

7 
3 

10 

26 
9 

35 

1 

1 

"3 
3 

1 
1 

"i 

*i 

1 
4 

5 

2 
1 

3 

2 
2 

4 

2 

2 

10 
3 

13 

"i 

1 

6 
4 

10 

2 
2 

4 
1 
1 

"i 

1 

1 
3 

4 

5 

5 

10 

1 
1 

2 

"i 
1 

1 
5 

6 

i  ••• 

1  '■■ 

3 
3 

'~6| 

3! 
3 

~, 

15 

8 

23 

1 
1 

2 

1 

1 

2 

2 

3 
2 

5 

1 
5 

6 

8 
8 

16 

6 

10 
6 

16 

4 

1 

5 

1 
2 

3 

9 
5 

14 

4 
3 

7 

4 

1 

5 

16 
4 

20 

"  i 

1 

3 

2 
5 
1 

Total  Order  V 

4     1 
10     1 
33    20 

4 

5 

14 

Diseases. 
I.— 1.  Miasmatic. 
1  Small  Pox 

18 
51 

1 
1 

2 

1 
1 

2 

"i 

~i 

8 

8 

16 

2 
2 

4 

8 
4 

— 
12 

9 
29 

7 
5 

12 

"2 

2 

2 
3 

5 

1 

1 

2 
1 

3 

1 
1 

6 

20 



2 

... 

2 

4 

3  Scairlatina 

■■ 

10 

3 
2 

5 

1 

1 

2 
3 

5 

'""i 

1 

11 
12 

23 

4 

4  Diphtheria   

1 
2 

3 

5  Quinsv  

2 

2 

6  Croup 

2 
3 

5 

5 
3 

8 

1 
1 

1 
3 

4 

2 
2 

4 
1 

2 

7  Whooping  Cough    

1 
3 

5 

8  Infantile  Fever  

5 
10 

1 

jiz: 

40 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  6.) 


A.  1875 


CLASSIFIED  ARRANGEMENT.— Cou^mwecZ. 
in  the  several  Counties,  statistically  classified. 


< 

a 

"o 
o 

'S 

5 
6 

11 

^1 
2 

5 

24 
10 

34 

3 
1 

4 

2 

1 

3 

v 
J 

8 
2 

10 

.5 

10 

27 
10 

37 



3 
3 

6 

4 

5 

9 

10 
13 

23 

o 

r^ 

2 
3 

5 

1 

3 

7 
7 

14 

2 
2 

0 

4 
3 

7 

3 
6 

9 

21 
11 

¥ 

9 

71 

1 

16 

3 
4 

7 

25 
14 

0 

13 

8 

21 

2 
1 

3 

20 
12 

0 

7 
8 

15 

9 
4 

13 

31 
16 

'3 
0 

3 
n 

8 

8 
7 

1! 

3 
2 

5 

1 

1 

10 
3 

;^ 

a> 
Ph 

6 
4 

10 

3 
3 

6 

15 

8 

■i 

g 

0 

PL, 
1 

4 

.2 
5 

5 

m 

P 

0  . 
"3 

4 
3 

7 

1 

1 

15 

4 

0 

*n 

1^ 

8 
10 

18 

2 
2 

4 

15 
13 

2 

a 
P4 

10 
11 

21 

3 
4 

7 

18 
19 

8 

a 

•^  CI 

■SJi 

w 

a 
p 
jp 

.i 
0 

> 

d 
0 

1/ 

p 
0 

■a 

_p 

i 

p 

V 

.5-2 
>  p 
20 
Pk 

6 
3 

15 
9 

24 

8 
7 

15 

32 

20 

23 
20 

43 

2 
2 

4 

31 

26 

1 

1 

2 

3 
3 

9 

7 

9 
4 

17 
10 

10 
3 

3 
3 

252 
195 

9 

6 
2 

2 

16 

13 

27 

13 

6 

447 

1 
1 

5 
3 

17 
6 

5 

8 
7 

122 
93 

2 

8 

23 

5 

15 

215 

13 
5 

15 
4 

26 
15 

25 
10 

41 

22 

30 
11 

39 
14 

734 
383 

18 

32 

1 
3 

4 

1 

1 

39 

"i 

1 



1 

1 

""2 

32 

2 

2 

4 

4 
3 

47 

3 
4 

7 

3 

1 

4 

15 

13 



23 

3 
4 

7 

3 
2 

5 

10 

1 

1 

19 

1 
2 

3 

1 
2 

3 

28 

1 

i 

37 

2 

2 

52 

57 

2 

19 

41 

35 

63 

41 

53 

1117 

1 

2 

3 

6 

9 

6 
4 

10 

- 

1 

"4 

1 

2 

1 

28 
19 

61 
51 

3 

1 

4 

3 

1 

47 

112 

-- 

1 
2 

2 

1 

7 

48 

1 

2 
2 

4   GO 

1 

3 

3 

11 

108 

1 

9 

1 

... 

2 

1 

1 

i 

1 

5 
5 

34 

1 

2 

1 

1 

33 

1 

2 

6 
12 

18 

7 
2 

2 
1 

1 

2 
4 

1 
2 

1 

10 
4 

10 

- 

2 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1!  10 

67 

- 

2 
5 

8 
4 

1 
1 

9 
10 

2 
6 

5 
6 

102 

...i  .^ 

1 
1 

115 

2 

6 

6 

2 

14 

1 

2i  12 

2 

19 

8 

11 

217 

4 
2 

3 

2 

i 

2 
1 

I 
1 

1 

1 

1 

4 

— 

1 

I 

4 

— 

— 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

8 

2 

2 

2 

'""2 

3 
1 

1 
1 

1 

3 
3 

2 
•  4 

3 

1 

5 
2 

4 

3 

7 
4 

■■■4 

4 
3 

78 
66 

6 

"2 
2 

5 

3 
3 

2 
3 

5 

1 

3 

3 
5 

.8 

2 

'""2 
2 

"  "i 
1 

2 

4 

2 

4 

1   2 

1 

6 

6 

3 

1 

7 

7 

11 

4 

7 

144 

3 

4 
2 

6 

1 
6 

7 

- 

""i 

1 

1 

1 

2 

2 
1 

2 

6 
5 

3 
3 

1 
7I   64 

1 

1 

1 

4 

70 

1 

1 

4 

1 

1 

- 

2 

3 

2 

11 

6 

11 

1 

1 

1^ 
4 

— 

- 

-  -1 

4 

1 

•••! 

8 

41 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  6.) 


A.  1875 


CAUSES  OF  DEATH.— 
Exhibitinof  the  number  of  Deaths  from  each  cause 


CAUSES  OF  DEATH. 

Sex. 

S 

o 

< 

1 

e 

o 

HI 

1 

'Ed 

x' 

a; 

w 

CI 
0) 

0 

ci3 

S 

'■*3 

a 

p 
2 

a 

1 

1 

i 

13 

0) 

M.. 
F  .. 

Total. 

F  .. 

M.. 
F  .. 

Total. 

M.. 
F  .. 

Total. 

M.. 
F  .. 

Total. 

M.. 
F  .. 

Total. 

M.. 
F  .. 

Total. 

M  . . 
F 



3 

2 

5 
3 

1 
2 

3 

6 

7 

12 

6 

5 

11 

3 

2 

5 

9 
12 

21 

2 
4 

6 

1 
1 

2 

4 

1 

5 

1 
1 

2 

1 

C 
3 

9 

3 

3 

1 
1 

2 

"l 

1 
3 

1 

1 

"2 

2 

6 
3 

9 

i 

1 

1 

2 
3 

i 
1 

1 

2 

2 

1 

1 

3 

3 
3 

2 
3 

5 

.  1 
3 

4 

5 
3 

8 

2 

2 

1 

1 

— 

2 

1 
1 

2 

"3 
3 

1 

2 

1 

1 
1 

1 

"2 
2 

1 
1 

2 

■• 

1 
2 

3 

2 
3 

5 

1 

1 
1 

1 

1 

1 

7 
6 

13 

4 
4 

8 

1 

2 

3 

2 
1 

3 

5 

2 

2 

i 

1 

3 
4 

7 

2 
3 

5 

1 

7 

2 
1 

3 

6 

7 

13 

6 

9 

15 

1 

2 

3 

2 
1 

3 

2 
1 

3 

1 
1 

2 

13 

7 

20 
3 
3 

1 
1 

3 

1 

4 
5 

1 

8 
4 

12 

2 

2 

1 

1 

2 
5 

2 
3 

5 

7 
1 

8 

2 
2 

4 

2 

2 
1 

""1 
1 

6 
2 

2 

2 

10  Metria  (or  Puerperal  Fever)    .. 

11  Influenza  

1 
3 
1 

12  Dysentery   

4 

13  Diarrhoea 

4 

8 

6 
3 

9 

15  Cholera 

16  Ague 

i 

1       !  . 

Total.  ... 

M 

F 

1 

1 
1 

2 

4 
4 

8 

1 
2 

3 

1 

1 

2 

l___ 



!       1 

1 



1 

17  Remittent  Fever 

1 
1 

3 

2 

5 

"1 
1 

1 

1 

"2 
2 

5 
2 

7 

1 

1 
— 

1 
2 

3 

2 

2 

6 
1 

7 

"2 
2 

9 
5 

14 

1 
1 

2 

4 

1 

5 

~~ 

Total. 

M.. 
F  .. 

Total. 

M.. 
F  .. 

Total. 

M  .. 
F  .. 

Total. 

2 

1 

— 

3 

1 
1 

1 

7 
2 

9 

n 

7 
18 

18  Typhoid  Fever    

3 
3 

6 

"2 
2 

3 
4 

7 

~ 

3 



1 
4 

5 
1 
1 

2 

2 

1 

8 

19  RheumatiHm 

3 
11 

1 

20  Fever 

1 
2 

1 
2 

3 

42 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  6.) 


A.  1875 


CLAkSSIFIED    arrangement.— Con^mued 
in  the  several  Counties,  statistically  classified. 


'6 
< 

a  a 

d 

1 

a 

2 
2 

a 
i; 

2 

2 
5 

c3 

...    1 
1    1 

|i 

11 

2 
2 

d 

il 

a 

0 

S 
1 

0 
3 

1  Parrj'  Soimd. 
i           Peel. 

Pli 
3 

.a 

op 

2 
0 

"S 

pLi 

1 

1 

3 
P5 

a 

0   . 

11 

1 

i, 

0 

Ph 

a 
P^ 

ii5 

1  s 
a 

CO 

3  ^ 

q 

d 
c 

1 

a 

a' 

0 

1 
a 

1 

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S  a 

1 
1 

1 

"1 

1 

"  i ! 

■    1 

■1  1 

1 

1 

1 
2 

3 

1 

2 
2 

9 
2 

55 
32 

1 

? 

1  1     2 

4 

6 

1    6 

3 

2 

11      1 

1 . 

.      2 

2 

3 

4 

4 

11 

87 

1  4 

2  ... 

...      2 
...      1 

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5 
1 

1 

3 

7 

7     9 

2 

2 

1 

2 

1 

1 

2 

1 

2. 
2  . 

.      1 

2 

1 

2 

4 

3 

8 

101 

1 

- 

21 

3 

4 

2 
1 

1 

1 

7 
2 

9 

H    1 

1 

14 



1 

1 

1 

1 

4 
6 

2 . 

1 . 

1 

1 

1 

3 

1 

35 

i 

1 

7 
4 

11 

...       3 
4 

...        7 

2 

1 

3 

■■■■4 
4 

i  "... 

2 
3 

2 
1 

10 

10 

6 
10 

81 

1 

89 

1 

10     3 

1 

10 

2 

I  ... 

5 

3 

20 

16 

170 

1 
3 

3 
2 

5 

3 
3 

6 

8 

19 



9 

1 
1 

2 

i 

2     5 
...      5 

2    10 

...      1 

...1     1 

4 
3 

7 

14 
3 

17 

1 
0 

9 
6 

15 

2 
1 

3 

1 
1 

...       3 
...       3 

2 
6 

8 

1 
1 

4 
4 

8 

1 

1 

4 

6 

1 
3 

1.. 
3.. 

;  i 

7 
6 

2 
5 

11 
10 

16 
12 

27 
17 

182 
152 

4 

4 

1 
4  .. 

.    1 

13 

7 

21 

28 

44 

334 

5 
...       3 

— 1 

8 

7 
2 

9 

2 

1 
1 

2 

1 

4 

3 .. 
4  . 

.    1 

1 

5 

1 

3 
4 

3 

2 

9 
6 

11 

8 

83 
66 

2 

5 

3 

1 
2 

2 

5 

7  .. 

2 

6 

7 

5 

15 

19 

149 

1 .. 

] 

1 

L    ... 

1 

1 

"i 

1 

'  1 
3 

19 

13 

'.".    i 

3 

2 

2 



1  ] 

L      1     1 

1 

1 

1 

4 

32 



... 

5 

1 

4 

1 
1 

2 

9 
10 

19 

1 
1 

2 
2 

1 

7 
4 

11 

1 

2 

3 

i 
1 

...    1 
...    1 

1 

"2 

9 

11   i; 

1  

1 

■'■  4 

1 
1 

...1 

"i 

1 

1 
1 

2 

20 

1 

1 

11  ...1 

19 

...    1 

...      5 
...      8 

..    13 

i 

2 

1 

1 

2 

7 
10 

17 

"3 

1 

1 

1 

4 

1 

2 

1 

1 

1 

2 

2 

39 

3 

1 

3I    6 
3     4| 

1       4 
5 

1 
1 

11 

8 

2 
1 

2 

I 
1 

1 

5 
1 

3  3 
3  .. 

1 
1 

13 
10 

5 
2 

6 
5 

81 
6 

18 
23 

207 
162 

6 

1 
1 

10 

1       9 

,  1 

19 

3 

1 

2 

1 

2 

..  .. 
1 

0 

1 
1 

1 

1 
1 

6 

'  "i 

6    3 

4  ... 

2  ... 

2 

23 

7 

11 

14 

41 

369- 

i 

1 
2 

i 

4 

2 

""i 

3 
3 

29 
34 

.    1 

..      2 
4 

2 

1 
4 

— 

3 

2 
2 

1 

..  .....^ 

1 

3 

1 
■■■■2 

1 

15 
11 

2 

2 

1 
5 

1 

1 
4 

6  .. 
1  ... 

1 
1 

3 

1 

6 

.  1 

6 

63 

1 
2 

1 
5 

1 

1 
1 

1 
1 

3 
4 

62 

75 

2 

..      6 

1 

5 

4 

1 

1 

2 

26 

1 

6 

5 

1    .. 

3 

6 

1 

2 

2 

7 

137 

43 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Pjipers  (No.  6.) 


A.  1875 


CAUSES  OF  DEATH.— 
Exhibiting  the  number  of  Deaths  from  each  cause 


CAUSES  OF  DEATH. 

Sex. 

6 
g 

o 
a; 

1 

To 

X 

d 

1 
t 

S 

_c 

1 

O 

1 

S 

CD 

a) 

21  Scarlet  Fever  

M..  . 
F  ..  . 

Total.  . 

M.. 
F  .. 

Total. 

i- 

M  ..  . 
F  ..  . 

Total.  . 

M..  . 
F  ..  . 

Total. 

M  ..  . 
F  ..  . 

Total.  . 

M..  . 
F  .,  . 

Total.  . 

M  ..  . 
F  ..  . 

Total.  . 

M..  . 
F  ..   . 

Total.  . 

M  ..  . 
y  •• 

Total.  . 

M..  . 
F  ..  . 

Total.  . 

M..  . 
F  ..  . 

Total.  . 

.     1 
.     1 

.      2 

3  40 
1    49 

4  89 

.    ... 

•    ••■ 

21 
14 

35 

7 
7 

14 

40 

45 

85 

1 

1 
1 

1 

3 

3 

20 

8 

28 

4 
5 

9 

31 
44 

75 

... 
... 

"" 

3 

7 

10 

... 

1 
1 

1 

1 

11 

17 

28 

••• 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

11   1 

6 
6 

12 

38 
35 

73 

1 

1 

56 
54 

110 

... 

2 

"" 
2 

48 
30 

78 

"" 

1 

3 



4 

38 
37 

75 





1 

"i 
1 

Total  Miasmatic 

1 

23 

20 

43 

2 
2 

2 

2 

1 

2 

23 

24 

47 

1 
1 

1 



13 
23 

36 


2 

2 

31 

I.— 2.  Enthetit. 
1  Syphilis 

27 
58 

2  Stricture  of  Urethra 

4 

3  Hydrophohia'  

Total  Enthetic    

1    ... 

1 

... 

i 
1 

i 



1 
1 

1 
1 

2 

2 

I.— 3.  Bietie. 
1  Privation  

2  Purpura  and  Scurvy     

-- 

1 


1 

^^ 

3  Delirium  Trethens 

•2 
1 

— 

.^^ 

4  Intemperance  

1 

1 
1 

1 

Tot.al  Dietic 

1 

1 

# 

44 

t 

39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  6.) 


A.  1875 


CLASSIFIED  ARRANGEMENT.— Conimueci. 
in  the  several  Counties,  statistically  classified. 


< 

c 

8 

c 

2 
2 

4 

29 
28 

57 

2 

2 
2 

2 
4 

4 

V 

m 

12 
12 

03 

C 

3 
15 

1 

1 

25 
34 

59 

is 
s-S 

|g 

li 

4 
6 

10 

30 
54 

84 


d 

•s 

s 

6 
12 

18 

51 
42 

93 

. 

S 
y, 

O 

2 

2 

4 

44 

.55 

99 

r-l 

1 

V 

V 

i 

o 
o 

2 

i 

i 

c    . 

10 
4 

1 

« 
u 

a 

PL| 

1    a 

P4 

3 

o 
o 

S 

3 
1 

1 

34 

38 

72 

4f 
II 
§^ 

S'O 
|§ 
02 

13 
10 

23 

45 
33 

78 

w 

« 

3 

3 
2 

5 

1 

> 

1 

c 

0 

Is 

1 
"a 

0 
.a 

i 

0 

i 

1= 

1 
1 

1 
1 

'2 
2 

4 

1   3 

1 

93 

81 

- 

i_.   .. 

10 
14 



24 

1 

3 

15 
17 

32 

24... 

6.3   5 
76    4 

7 

15 
14 

29 



14 

41 
33 

74 

7 

174 

2 

2 

18 
18 

36 

36 
26 

62 

1 

1 

11 
14 

10 
12 

22 

49 
41 

22 
24 

57 
52 

58 
56 

140 
123 

1252 
1245 

25 

139 

1 

1 

1 

1 

2 
2 

1 

1 

"i 

1 

9 

... 

90 

46 

109 

114 

263 

2497 

1 

2 

1 

4 

1 

— 

... 

1 

3 

5 

— 

-- 

2 

-- 

- 



:;■ 

-- 

— 

...     1          9. 

— 

— 



— 



i 

— 

- 

...... 

1 

...jf. 



... 

1 



1 

— 

... 

1       2 
1 

6 
2 

1       3 

8 

1 

1 

4 
2 

1    ... 

... 

1 

1 

1 
1 

6 
6 

2 

— 

— 

- 

1 

1|  ... 
1    ... 

— 

2 

2 
2 

8 

— 

— 

1 
1 

2 

2 
1 

1 

12 

-- 

- 

—1 

...| 

1 

1 
1 

1 

2 

1 

3 

1 

... 

2       2 

12 

2 

1 

... 

■■■! 

"i 
1 

2'    1 

...' 

1 

1        3 
4        1 

17 

2 
2 

2 

5 

1 
1 

1 

— 



2 

2 

31 

- 

1 

1 

5       4 

22 

...1 
...1 
-1 

""i 

1 
1 



1 

1 

4 
4 

7 
2 

39 

1 

11 

... 

2 

3I 
1 

-: 

1 

ii     il 

1 

8 

9 

50 

1 

1 

46 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  6.) 


A.  1875 


CAUSES  OF  DEATH.— 
Exhibitinc:  the  number  of  Deaths  from  each  cause 


CAUSES  OF  DExVTH. 

Sex. 

c3 

a 

5 

< 

1 
2 

3 

1 
2 

3 

2 

4 

6 

0) 

o 

? 

K 
-- 

2 

2 

2 
3 

.5 

... 

i 
1 

i 
1 

4 
5 

— 

9 

1 
1 

d 
o 

a> 
1 

o 

2 

] 

3 

2 
1 

3 

2 
2 

4 

1 
2 

3 

"i 

1 
1 

1 

i 
1 

4 
6 

10 

■a 
-- 

2 
4 

6 

2 

-2 

... 

1 

... 

1 

"i 

1 

.5 
5 

10 

:;: 

5 
6 

11 

1 
2 

3 

1 
1 

2 

i 
1 

7 
10 

17 

o 

« 

£ 

1 
1 

"i 

1 

... 

"i 
1 
1 

2 
3 

1 

1 

o 
... 

1 

1 

2 

1 
1 

2 

4 
5 

9 

~2 
1 

3 

1 
1 

... 

"i 

1 

7 
7 

14 

1 

1 

'6 

i 
s 

iC 

'43 

w 

i 
1 

1 
1 

a 
g 

i 

1 

1 

S 
S 

cS 

1 

h-5 

> 
a 

V 

O 

an 
-? 

1-:; 

I. — 4.  Parasitic. 
1  Thrush         

M.. 

r  .. 

Total. 

M.. 
F  .. 

Total. 

M  .. 

1 

...1  ... 

...1   ... 

1 
1 

'i 

1 

2 
2 

5 
2 

7 

2 
2 

i 

1 

1 

2  Worms  

3 
2 

5 

1 
5 

6 

2 

3 

5 
11 

16 

1 
1 

1 

3 
3 

2 
2 

4 

... 
"^1 

1 

1 
2 

3 

7 
7 

14 

1 

1 
1 

1 

1 

Total  Parasitic   

1 
1 

1 

1 

F      1..- 

2      1 

1 

II.— 1.  Diathetic. 
1  Dropsy  and  Ancemia     .  . 

Total. 

M.. 
F  .. 

Total. 

M.. 
F  .. 

Total. 

M.. 
F  .. 

Total. 

M.. 
F  .. 

'i'otal. 

M  .. 
F  .. 

Total. 

M.. 
F  .. 

Total. 

M.. 
F  .. 

Total. 

M.. 
F  .. 

Total 

— 

2 

3 
5 

8 



2 
4 

6 

i 

1 

1 
1 

2 

2 

2 

8 
11 

19 

_ 

1 

3 

1 

4 

3 
2 

5 

1 
1 

2 

i 
1 

7 
5 

12 

1 

2 

1 

3 

2 
1 

3 





1 

1 

1 

1 

2 

"i 
1 

2 

2 

2 

5 

8 

13 
1 

5 
6 

4  Abscess  

5  Mortification  

1 

1 
1 

— 

1 

6  Hemorrhage    

Total  Diathetic   

5 
5 

10 

1 

1 

4 
2 

R 

2 
2 

"    1 

1 

3 
4 

7 

2 

3 

5 
10 

II.— 2.  Tvherculai: 
1  Scrofula    

16 

26 

1 
1 

46 

39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  6.) 


A.    1875 


CLASSIFIED  ARRANGEMENT.— Cortimued 
in  the  several  Counties,  statistically  classified. 


xS 
o  tc 

o 

8 
8 

16 

ai 
"2 

2 

1 
1 

2 

1 
3 

"i 
1 

i 

"i 

i  a 

0  ^ 





J 

0 
"1 

0 

0 

a 
0 

CO 

'v 

V 



-a 

2 

0 

a; 

D 

(1h 

3 
0  . 

a; 

— 



1 

w 

u 

8 
a 

^  s 

73 

pq 

> 

d 

1 

V 

i 

4 

a 
... 

0 
1 

1^ 

'0   . 

'>  a 

Oh 

1 

1 

2 

10 



— 

— 

1 

1 

3 

13 

— 

— 

1 

1 

1 

"i 

1 

i 

1 

— 

— 

"i 
1 

1 

9 

2 
2 

10 
19 

1  , 



— 



^ 

_11 
1 

1 

111- 

1 
1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

"5 
5 

...  .. 

4 
3 

7 

i 

1 

1 
4 

5 

~~ 

E 

E 

-r- 

1 
2 

3 

12 

2 

2 

20 

1 

^il 

1 



32 

2 
5 

7 

1 
2 

2 

1 

3 

5 
6 

11 

] 

1 

2 

4 
2 

6 



1 
2 

3 

3 

1 
4 

6 
3 

9 

1   4 
3   9 

4!  13 

1 

2 
3 

6 
9 

15 

4  7 

4  ... 

8j  7 

3 
3 

6 

n 

•  6 
17 

115 
124 

239 

...   1 
2  2 

1 
2 

1 
4 

1 
2 

4 
3 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

2 
5 

5 
1 

■■■■l.^ 

"i 

... 

2 

... 

3 
5 

3 
2 

11 

7 

65 
79 

2 

i 

1 

3 

2 
2 
"l 

3 

1 

1 
1 

1 

3 

2 

5 

3 

2 
2 

7 

1 

2 

2 

2 

2 

7 

6 

2:   l|... 

f    1 

1 

3;   2 

8j   5 

18 

144 

— 

...1  ... 

1 

1 
1 

2 

i 
1 

2 
4 

1  - 

1 

... 

1 



6 

2 

3 

2 
1 

3 

2 
2 

1 
1 

1 
1 

1 

1 



- 

:" 

1 
1 

■'6 
6 

23 
24 

47 

...  .....^ 

1 



.... 

1 



5 
4 

... 





1 

1 

1 
1 

...!  1 
1  1 

... 

2 
1 

1 

- 

1 

1 

1 
1 

- 

1 

... 

9 

1 

3 

'3 

2 
3 

2 
3 

'""2 

21 

1 

32 

9: 

1 

2 

1 

1 

3 

1 

1 

1 

1 

3 

3 

5 

5 

2 

53 

3 
4 

9 
11 

20 

1 
1 

6 
9 

15 

... 
... 

3 
2 

5 

2 
9 

11 

6 

8 

14 

6  10 

7  9 

2 
1 

3 

4 
4 

8 

6 
6 

12 

5 
6 

11 

4 
3 

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1 

1 

8 
6 

14 

1 
1 

12 
4 

16 

2 
5 

7 

5 
9 

14 

2 
3 

6 
15 

7 
7 

13 
10 

9 

8 

22 
21 

231 
267 

7 

13 

19 

5 

i 

1 

21 

14 

23 

17 

43 

498 

1 
1 

'i 

1 

1 

10 

— 

- 

...1  ... 
1 

1  6 

2  16 

.. 

47 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  6.) 


A.  1875 


CAUSES  OF  DEATH.— 
Exhibitinir  the  number  of  Deaths  from  each  cause 


CAUSES  OF  DEATH. 

Sex. 

i 

o 

40 
< 

eq 

i 

23 

o 

To 

a) 

0 
a 

2 
Pa 

r 
0 

1 

0 

■-3 

a 

0 

1 

a 

CO 

2  Tabes  Mesenterica    

3  Phthisis,  Consumption  of  Lungs 

4  Hydrocephalus  

M.. 
F  .. 

Total. 

M.. 

F  .. 

Total. 

M.. 
F  .. 

Total. 

M.. 
F  .. 

Total. 
M.. 

- 

26 
20 

46 

1 

1 

27 
20 

47 

3 

2 

5 

.5 
2 

7 
1 
1 
1 
1 

2 
2 

7 
5 

12 

2 

2 

lo 

5 

15 

3 
4 

7 

2 

1 

,3 

1 
1 

:: 

2 
2 

1 
1 

10 
23 

33 

3 
3 

6 

14 
26 

40 

2 
3 

5 

3 

1 

4 

7 
3 

lo 

i 

1 

3 

8 

11 

1 
1 

2 

4 

9 

13 

1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
2 

1 

1 

1 
1 

2 

12 
16 

28 

2 

.. 

2 

1.5 
17 

32 

1 

1 

1 
1 

2 

'2 
2 

9 

7 

16 

10 

7 

17 

1 
1 

3 

1 

4 

3 
2 

5 

i 

1 

13 
9 

22 

1 

1 

2 

11 
25 

1 
1 



2 
1 
1 

9 
20 

29 

1 
1 

2 

10 
21 

31 

9 
7 

16 

'3 

3 

10 
10 

20 

21 
29 

50 

2 
1 

3 

23 
30 

53 

16 
32 

48 

3 

3 

19 
32 

51 

i 

1 

4 
3 

7 

1 
2 

3 

(i 
2 

8 

i 
1 

10 

19 
29 

2 

2 

4 

12 
22 

34 

.. 

1 
1 

13 
13 

26 

3 
2 

5 

19 
15 

34 
1 

1 

1 

5 

7 

12 

3 
2 

5 

9 
9 

18 

"'  i 

1 

29 
43 

72 

3 

Total  Tubercular    

2 

5 

3? 

III. — 1.  Nervous  System. 
1  Cephalitis 

47 

79 

F      !-. 

..    ..i  .. 

Total. 

M.. 
F  .. 

Total. 

M.. 
F  .. 

Total. 

M.. 
F  .. 

Total. 

M  .. 
F   .. 

Total. 

M  .. 
F  .. 

Total. 

M  .. 
F  .. 

Total. 

- 

1 
2 

3 

1 
1 

2 

2 
1 

3 

4 
2 

6 
2 

i 
3 

1 

1 

4 
1 

5 

4 

5 

9 

1 

I 

2  Cerebro-Spinal  Meningitis 

2 

2 

1 

3 
2 

5 

2 
3 

5 

4 

3  Apoplexy 

1 

3 

5 

4  Paralysis    

5  Insanity   

1 
2 
2 

"i 

1 

3 

2 
3 

5 

5 

1 
2 

"3 



6  Chorea   

^ — 

I     1 

7  Epilepsy 

2 

2 

1 

i 

1 

— 

i 

1 

1 

1 

2 

2 

-11 



— 

— 

1 

1 

48 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  6.) 


A.   1875 


CLASSIFIED  ARRANGEMENT.— CoHiwme^. 
in  the  several  Counties,  statistically  classified. 


d 

1 
a 

'2 

2 

8 
10 

18 

1 
1 

2 

10 
13 

23 

26 

28 

54 

2 

2 

28 
28 

56 

1 

C3 
-^ 

i2 
- 

4 
1 

5 

4 
1 

5 

0 

1 

1 

16 
12 

28 

'3 

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49 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  6.^ 


A.  1875 


CAUSES  OF  DEATH.— 
Exhibiting  the  number  of  Deaths  from  each  cause 


CAUSES  OF  DEATH. 

Sex. 

c3 

B 
C 
SO 

< 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

2 
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5 

2 
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7 

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14 

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8 
1 

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7 

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8 
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s 

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5 
3 

8 

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3 

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w 

2 
2 

4 

3 

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4 
3 

7 

1 
1 

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i 

1 

2 

2 

4 

2 

1 

3 
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17 
39 

8 
11 

19 

8 
11 

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6 

12 

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1 

i 

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2 

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1 

0) 

8  Tetanus 

M... 
F  ... 

Total. 

M... 
F  ... 

Total. 

M... 
F  ... 

Total. 

M... 
F  ... 

Total. 

M... 
F  ... 

Total. 

M... 
F  ... 

Total. 

M... 
F  ... 

Total. 

M  ... 
F  ... 

Total. 

M... 
F  ... 

Total. 

M... 
F  ... 

Total. 

M  .. 
F  ... 

Total. 

9  Convulsions 

10  Brain  Disease  

4 

11 

15 
1 

1 

11  Spinal  Disease 

5 

2 

1 

2 
8 

9 

5 

12  Meningitis    ...    

13  Congestion  of  Brain 

Total  Nervous  SyBte4ii 

III. — 2.   Or<jans  of  Circuhitinii. 

1  Pericarditis   

2  Aneurism 

'6  Heart  Disease 

Totul  Organs  of_  Circulation.. 

1 

i 
1 

14 
12 

26 

4 
5 

9 

4 
5 

9 

1 
1 

2 

2 

2 

4 

17 
13 

30 

1 

1 

6 

5 

11 

7 
5 

12 

2 
2 

2 

2 

1 

3 

18 
17 

m 

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1 

6 
3 

9 

6 

4 

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1 
4 

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2 

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5 
4 

9 

5 
5 

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1 

1 

1 

2 

1 

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15 

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1 

1 
1 

2 

5 
1 

6 

6 
3 

9 

13 

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2 

21 
23 

44 

1 
1 

7 
6 

13 

8 
6 

14 

50 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  6.) 


A.  1875 


CLASSIFIED  ARRANGEMENT. 

in  the  several  Counties,  statistically  classified. — Contmued. 


< 

1 

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o 

o 

1 

6 

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26 

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3 
10 

17 
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133 
134 

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2 

12 

6 
5 

13 

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3 

31 

10 
6 

267 

97 
76 

1 

2 

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2 

1 

11 

8 

16 

173 

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1 

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50 
34 

3   5 

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11  9 

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5 

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13 

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29 
62 

21 
5 

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23 

27 
35 

80 

57 

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14 

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62 

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2 
5 

7 

2 
5 

7 

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1 

1 

1 

1 
2 

3 

2 
2 

4 

1 
4 

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1 
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7 

5 

5 

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5 

4 
10 

14 

4 
12 

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1 

1 

1 

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5 
3 

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9 

3 
C 

9 

11 
11 

22 

14 
11 

25 

5  .. 

3.. 

t 

2 
3 

5 

3 

ft 

4  5 
8  12 

6 
5 

11 

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1 

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181 

8 

61  18 

8 

7 
3 

1(1 

7 

12 

4 
8 

17 

11'  28 

:351 

5 
3 

i 
3 

1 
10 
8 

2 

3 

'3 
4 

5 
12 

6 

6 

12 
19 

185 
195 

8 

6 

18 

4 

5 

7 

12 

1 

17 

12 

31 

380 

51 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  6.) 


A.  1875 


CAUSES  OF  DEATH.— 
Exhibiting  the  number  of  Deaths  from  each  cause 


— r 

^ — - 

— •- 



dj 

> 

S3 

' 

CAUSES  OF  DEATH. 

Sex. 

1 

1 

1 

0/ 

1 

^ 

S 

1= 

c 

CO 

.S 

ci 

£ 

*3 

© 

i 

C5 

09 

< 

M 

PQ 

O 

6^!   M 

^ 

O 



w 

w 

W 

M 

A 

1^ 

1-:] 

III. — 3.  Bespiratory  Organs. 

1  Laryngitis        

M... 

1 

3 

F  ... 

Total. 

- 

2 
2 

-- 

« 

1 

— 

— 

— 

..j  .. 

r 

-- 

3 







M... 
F  ... 

3 
6 

1 
2 

5 
3 

3 

2 

'fi 

1 

2 

i 

2 
2 

4 
1 

3 

2 

3 
2 

5 

2 

? 

4 

Total. 

9 

3 

8     3 

2 

6 

1 

2 

1 

4 

5 

^ 

5 

7 

6 

M... 

1 

<■>, 

1 

*> 

1 

1 

F  ... 

1    .. 

1 











Total. 

1 

1|.. 

2l   .. 

.1 

3 

1 

1 

4  Pneumonia    

M... 

1 

13 

7 

1 

9 

Ill     5 

13 

5     4 

6 

25 

10 

IS 

2 

11 

F  ... 

12 

4     7 

4 

9 

2 

6 

7     5 

8 

16 

7 

8 

4 

7 

Total. 

1 

2.5 

11 

8 

13 

20 

7 

19 

12     9 

14 

41 

17 

26 

6 

18 

5  Asthma 

M... 
F  ... 

1 

1 
2 

1 

1 

1 

i 

"in 

7... 

1 

2 

2 

2 

Total. 

ll     3 

2 

1 

1 

"l~l 

3 

4 

fi  Jyimg  Disease    

M... 
F  .. 

2 
5 

9 

i 

1 

4 

1 

2 
1 

4i     2 
2'    2 

5 
6 

5 
3 

2 
1 

1 

2 

2 
2 

7 

3 

Total. 

7 

•^ 

1 

5 

3 

ej  4 

11 

8 

3 

3 

4 

10 

Total  Respiratory  Organs    . . 

M... 

1 

20l    9 

9 

13 

10 

10 

171  121     9 

13 

34 

18 

23 

11 

22 

F  ... 
Total. 

1 

25 

8 

13 
22 

4 
"l7 

9 
25 

9j    8 

9 

9 

If. 

20 

10 

121     10 

1 

16 

45|  17 

19 

25 

21 

18 

29 

54 

28 

35 

21 

38 

III. — 4.  Digestive  Organs. 

~\~~ 

1  Gastritis   

M... 
F  ... 

Total. 

..      3    .. 

2 
2 

-'- 

..|    2 

i 
1 

i 

1 

i 
1 

1    1 
1 

1 

1 

-aJT 

1 

1 

1 

2  Enteritis    

M... 
F  .. 

G      5 
2     1 

f;    1 

11     2 

31     2 
2     1 

51  in 

2 
2 

6 
1 

6 
5 

2 

8 

3 
1 

4 
1 

2 

3 

5 

11 

Total. 

"•■ 

8 

6 

7 

3 

5     3 

_i 

8 

15 



4 

ti 

11 



10 

4 

5 

13 

-3  Peritonitis    

M  .. 

1 

1 
1'   .. 

2     1 

1 

2 

3 

1 

1 

F  ... 

1 

2 

i 

1    .. 

1 

2 

3 

3 

3 

1 

3 

Total. 

1 

2 

2 

1 

3     1 

2 

4 

3 

6 

3 

2 



4 

4  Ascites    

M... 

, 

F 

.. 

1 
1 

.. 

..|.. 

■  ■; 

Total.  .. 

1 

1 

■■l  "1 

1 

Hj 

52 


39  X'ictoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  6.) 


A.   1875 


CLASSIFIED  ARRANGEMENT.— Con^mued 
in  the  several  Counties,  statistically  classified. 


'6 

h 

o  "& 

1 

1 

1 

a/ 

1 
1 

o 

15 

II 

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4 
4 

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1 

1 

1 
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c 

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1 

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8 

1 
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0 

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4 

2 

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1 

22 

1 

14 

1 

3 
2 

5 

2 

9 
3 

12 

— 

3 
3 

6 

S 

3 
2 

5 

2 

2 
2 

4 

3 

1 

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2 

2 
2 

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1 
1 

1 

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2 

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1 

36 

2 

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1 

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9 

4 

4 
3 

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7 

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8 

18 
8 

114 

85 

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2 

2 

3 

13 

7 

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12 

6 

6 

10 

26 

199 

2 

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1 

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2 

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3 
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23 

4 

13 
10 

23 

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16 
10 

26 

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4 

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16 

8 

24 

2 

15 
10 

25 

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11 
10 

21 

1 

22 
23 

45 

— 

1 

1 

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4 

2 

16 
6 

22 

1 

7 

12 

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8 
6 

14 

14 
9 

23 

4 

1 
11. ... 

27 

9 
8 

17 

10 
2 

12 

4 
3 

7 

2 
3 

5 

2 
2 

3 

1 

4 

7 
3 

10 

19 
11 

30 

11 
10 

21 

26 
18 

44 

379 
263 

642 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

2 

2 
2 

iL 
...... 

— 

1 

1 

1 

11.... 

18 

2 

3 

15 

2 
3 

1 

8 
4 

1 

5 
2 

5 
3 

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6 
4 

- 

6 
1 

1 

2 

1 

1 

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1 
1 

1 

1 

3 

3 

33 

1 
2 

3 

1 

2 
2 

3 
1 

6 
1 

2 

5 

2 

10 
5 

10 
6 

9 

7 

19 

7 

146 
85 

3 

5 

19 
15 

34 

2 
2 



4 
3 

12    1 

37    5 
18  .. 

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7 

24 
14 

38 

3 
3 

6 

3 
3 

6 

8 

29 
19 

48 

4 
5 

9 
1 
1 

3 

16 
15 

31 

4 
5 

9 
4 

10 

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3 

1 

2 

4 

4 

4 

7 

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2 

7 

15 

16 

16j     26 

231 

3 
3 

32 

28 

60 

1 
1 

2 

7 
5 

12 

o 

- 

12 
2 

14 

15 
12 

27 

11 

3 
14 

8 
3 

11 

9 

13 



7 
7 

14 

32 
11 

43 

19 
10 

29 

- 

11 

7 

18 

28 
19 

47 

21 
13 

34 

361     27 
201     29 

64     702 
36     466 

6 

56 

56 

100   1168 

2 
2 

4 

4 
9 

2 
1 

3 

1 

2 
1 

3 

2 
4 

1 

2 
3 

5 

6 
3 

2 
1 

3 

10 
3 

1 

20 

3 

1 

19 

— 

• 



1 

3 

1       39 

1 
1 
2 

'"3 
3 

9 
3 

12 

1 

2 

3 

1,      2 
3  

2 
4 

8 
1 

3l      2 

21      1 

..!l4 
..1    7 

8 
5 

8|     1.58 
11     125 

4 

31  13 

4 

2 

5 

3 

6 

6    1 

... 

....    1 

9 

13 

21 

13     19J    283 

. 

3 
3 

3 

1 

'2 

3 
2 

4 

2 

4 
6 

40 

4      "^ 

2 

1      1 

56 

8 

4 





1 

2 

4 

1    1 

1 

1     2 

5 

fi 

10 

96 

1 

"••i 

0 

2 

3 

! 

2 

1 

T 

- 

■' 

1 

... 
1 

1 

4 

5 

53 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  6.) 


A.  1875 


CAUSES  OF  DEATH.— 
Exhibiting  the  number  of  Deaths  from  each  cause 


CAUSES  OF  DEATH. 

Sex. 

1 

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i 

1 

.. 

7. 

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1 

1 
1 

1 

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3 

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3 

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to 

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1 
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c 
2 

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3 
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4 

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0 

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i 

Hi 

i 

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da 

1-1 

5  Ulceration  of  Intestines 

M  .. 
F  .. 

Total. 

M.. 

F  .. 

Total. 

M.. 
F  .. 

Total. 

M  .. 
F  .. 

Total. 

M  .. 
F  .. 

Total. 

M.. 

F  .. 

Total. 

M.. 
F  .. 

Total. 

M.. 
F  .. 

Total. 

M.. 
F  .. 

Total. 

M  .. 
F  .. 

Total. 

M.. 
F  .. 

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— 

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1 

1 

1 
2 



3 

2 

2 
1 

1 



.... 

"i 
1 

"i 
1 

— 

7  Hens    

1 

8  Intussusception   

1 

9  Stricture  of  Intestines  

10  Fistula  

-— 

11  Stomach  Disease 

;;;;i;;;; 

^i"; 

12  Hepatitis 

1 

1 

3 

5 

1'?  .Tanndice    

i 

4 
4 

i 
1 

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2 

— 
3 

~- 



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— 

1 
li     4 

3 

2 

2 

— 

14  I>iver  Di«ease  

2 
3 

1 

1       1 

15  Spleen  Disease   

1 
2 



!  '* 

1 

1  1 
2 

ti 

-— 

1 

1       1 

64 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  6.) 


A.  1875 


CLASSIFIED    ARRANGEMENT.— CoTfcimued 
in  the  several  Counties,  statistically  classified. 


< 

i 

1 

0) 

to 
1< 

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and  Glengarry. 
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1 

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55 


o9  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  6.) 


A.  1875 


CAUSES  OF  DEATH.— 

Exhibiting  the  number  of  Deaths  from  each  cause 


CAUSES  OF  DEATH. 

Sex. 

S 

o 

*3 

P3 

O 

1 

cS 

o 

a 

•a 

2 
5 

7 

•• 
2 
2 

11 

8 
19 

1 
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1 
1 

.. 

2 
2 

2 
2 

o 
a 

1 
1 

2 

7 
3 

10 

3 
3 

1 
1 

12 
•  6 

18 

1 
2 

3 

.. 
2 

1 

1 

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1 

4 
3 

7 

4 
4 

i 

.3 

W 

1 

1 

14 

8 

22 

a 

Is 

9 

7 

16 

1 

8 
13 

3 

,21 
11 

32 

c 

til 

i 
1 

7 
17 

24 

a 
o 

s 

^^ 

.... 

9 

2 

11 

c 

1 
1 

2 

7 
6 

13 

3^ 

da 

16  Exhaustion   

Total  Digestive  (Organs .... 

III. — 6.   Urinary  O.gana. 
1    N^p.phrit.is                                      .     . 

M... 

F  .  . 

Total. 

M  ... 
F... 

Total. 

M... 
F... 

Total. 

M... 
F  ... 

Total. 

M... 
F  ... 

Total. 

M... 
F  ... 

Total. 

M... 
F  ... 

Total. 

M.. 

F  ... 

Total. 

M  ... 
F  ... 

Total. 

F  ... 

F  ... 

1 

.. 

1 

1  1 

14 
5 

19 

2 
2 

1 

2 

2 

__ 

5 
2 

7 
1 

9 
3 

12 

•• 

2 

1 



3 

1 

1 

3 

_1 

4 

15 
4 

19 

1 

1 



2 

2 

3 
1 

4 

6 

1 

7 

1 
1 

11 

20 
31 

— 

— 

— 

2  Nephria  (Bright 's  D  -sease) 

1 

1 
1 

_1 
2 
2 
2 
2 

6 
6 

1 

1 

2 
1 

3 

3 
1 

4 

1 
1 

1 

1 

2 
2 

1 

1 

1 
I 

1 
1 

2 

2 

2 



1 

— 

1 

3  Diabetes    

3 
3 
1 

1 

4 
4 

1 
1 
2 

1 

'— 
1 

nil 

"i 

1 

1 

1 

2 

1 
1 

1 
1 

2 
2 

3 
3 

1 

1 
2 

2 

4  Calculus  (Stone,  Gravel,  &c.). . 

5  Cystitis 

2 
3 
3 

6  Kidney  Disease 

5 

Total  Urinary  <  organs  .... 

III.— 6.   Generative  organs. 
1  Ovarian  DropHy 

5 

10 
1 

11 

2  Disease  of  UteruH 

1 

Tiital  (Jeiierativi-  Organs 

1 

,     1 

56 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  6.) 


A.  1875 


CLASSIFIED  ARRANGEMENT.— Cou^muetZ. 
in  the  several  Counties,  statistically  classified. 


1 
< 

if 

a 

1 

a 

;3 

c 

1  1 

c  . 

d 

i 

13 

O  Ph 

1 

1 

1 
1 

2 

19 
9 

28 

Peterborough. 

Prescott  and  Rus- 
sell. 

1 
1 

o 

a 

"a 

Simcoe. 

Stoi-mont,  Dundas 
and  Glengan-y. 
Thunder  Bay. 

1 

> 

d 
o 

1 

1 

i 
i 

t 
o 

a 

4. 

o 

H 

Ph 

1 

1 

12 

7 

19 

12  1 

7  ] 

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-- 

-- 

i 

..1 
1 

.... 

4   10 

1 

1 

6 
5 



11 

1    8 

1 

16  ' 
20  ] 

1 

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L  8 

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19 
10 

29 

13 

12 

25 

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15  . 
11  . 

26  . 

2 
5 

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4 

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1 

4 

— 1 

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4 

7 

8 
4 

5 
10 

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16 
9 

6 
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29 
13 

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15  31 

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1 

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10 

46 



— 

— 

55 

Oi 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  6.) 


A.  1875 


CAUSES  OF  DEATH.— 
Exhibiting  the  number  of  Deaths  from  each  cause 


CAUSES  OF  DEATH. 

Sex. 

c8 
i 

< 

1 
1 
1 

1 

__ 

aJ 
o 

g 

.. 
1 

1 

i 
1 

2 

2 

5 
5 

S 

1 

O 

.. 

1 

1 



1 
1 

_ 

1 
3 

4 

■a 



H 



6 
4 

10 

o 

C3 

c 

a; 

1 
1 

1 
1 

1 
1 

i 
1 

1 

1 

2 

2 
2 

4 

;- 

_:_ 
1 

1 

2 
2 

.a 

1 

Ml 

0 

1 

i 

1 

a" 
1 

.... 

Hi 

"i 
1 

►3 

III. — 7.  Organs  of  Locomotion 
1  Arthritis    

M.. 

F  .. 

Total. 

M      .. 
F      .. 

Total. 

M.. 
F  .. 

Total. 

M.. 
F  .. 

Total. 

M.. 
F  .. 

Total. 

M.. 
F  .. 

Total. 

M.. 
F  .. 

•i'otal. 

M.. 
F  .. 

Total. 

M.. 
F  .. 

Total. 

M.. 
F  .. 

Total. 

Total  Organs  of  Locomotion. 
III.— 8.  Integumentary  System. 

— 

— 

— 

_]__]_ 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

3 

4 

_1 
.. 

1 
1 

1 
1 

i 
1 

'2 
2 

2 

2 

2 
2 

3 
1 

4 

5 
4 

9 

1 
1 
1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

2  Ulcer 

1 

1 

2 

3  Skin  Disease    



.... 

4  Tumour  (part  not  stated) 

Total  Intepfumentary  System . . 

IV. — 1.  Developmental  Diseases  of 
Children. 
1  Stillborn 

2 
2 

2 

3 

... 

m: 

•— 

— 

2  Infantile,  Premature,  &c 

6 
6 

12 

5 
5 

10 

3 
3 

6 

4 
1 

5 

58 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  6.) 


A  1875 


CLASSIFIED  ARRANGEM,ENT.— Cow^mwed 
in  the  several  Counties,  statistically  classified. 


< 

H 

a  a 
t-3 

'a 
3 

3 

"I 

3  H 
5 

■s 

o 

1 
1 

2 

'6 

.1 

O  Pi 

13 
Ph 

1 

Ph 

1 

01 
PL, 

1 

Simcoe. 

Stormont,  Duiidas 
and  Glengarry. 

Thunder  Bav. 

1 
o 

■8 
> 

6 

! 

'6 

c 

c 

•& 

a 

o 

o 

II 

1 

2 

i 

1 

3 



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1 

1 

1 

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5 



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1 

5 



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5 



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12 

1 

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1 

3 

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1 

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1 

3 

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— 



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1 

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5 

1 





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6 

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1 . 
1 . 

1 

1 

3 

1  . 

1 

8 

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2 

— 

1 
1 

2 

2 
1 

3 

1 

1 

7 

2 

1 

3 



1 

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— 

1 

15 



2 

1 

5 



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1 
1 

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1 

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1 

7 

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1 

1 

1 

12 

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2 

3 

2 

1 

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2 

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1 

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1 

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2 

2 

3 

2 

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1 

1 

1 

1 

39 

] 

L      1 

1 

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■  -1  • 
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1 

1 

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1 

1 

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1 

1 
2 

17 

..      2 

11 

L     1 

L    . 
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L     2 

-1— 

5 

L      4 

L     9 

i   '. 
1   . 

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L     ] 

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>    ' 

L    .. 

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1 

4 

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L       1 

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1 

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5 

28 

2 
1 

1    3 

J       ] 

2 
t       2 

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5 

4 

7 
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67 

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1    . 
1    . 

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[       61 

i       ] 

1 

L       1 

L       r 

] 

L     ] 

L     J 

)       7 

^     1] 

L     128 

59 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  6.) 


A    1875 


CAUSES  OF  DEATH.-^ 
Exhibiting  the  number  of  Deaths  from  each  cause 


CAUSES  OFIDEATH. 

Sex. 

j 

a 

o 

g 

2 
5 

7 

5 
5 

6 
3 

9 

1 
1 

c 

o 

o. 

'S 

o 

1 
1 

2 

2 
4 

6 

1 
6 

7 

6 
6 

12 

7 
4 

11 

a 

• 

3 
3 

3 
5 

8 

M 

1 

3 
4 

■A 
1 

2 

2 

6 
6 

12 

'  1 
4 

5 

5 
4 

9 

5 
3 

8 

i 

a 

t 

o 

2 
2 

4 

4 
.5 

9 

1 
1 

2 

>> 

1 
1 

3 
3 

5 
5 

6 
5 

11 

3 

7 

10 

5 

a 
w 

1 
1 

2 

3 

4 

7 

3 

— 

3 

6 
9 

15 

2 
4 

6 

o 

".0 

1 

i 

1 
i 

1-1 

1 

.2 
1 

M.. 
F  .. 

TotaL 

M.. 
F  .. 

Total. 

M.. 
F  .. 

Total. 

M.. 
F  .. 

Total. 

M.. 

F  .. 

Total. 

M.. 
F  . 

Total. 

F  ... 
F  ... 

;; 

T 

I 

— 

1 
1 

1 

1 
1 

1 

2 

3 

5 

2 
2 

J 

3 

7 
8 

15 





-- 

— 



6  Teething              

4 

4 

12 

5 

17 

6 
6 

8 
12 

20 

2 
1 

.  3 

1 
1 

2 

1 

14 

4 
4 

12 

7 

19 

12 

8 

20 

1 

1 

6 
5 

11 

2 

2 

4 
2 

6 

2 
2 

4 



7  Infantile  Debility 

3 
4 

7 

■ 
1 

4 

5 

5 
3 

8 

"i 
1 

.... 
.... 

4 

1 

5 

3 

Total   Developmental  Diseases 
of  Children 

4 

7 

3 
4 

IV.— 2.  Developmental  Diseases  of 
Women. 

7 

2  Childbirth     

0 

■5 

13 

8 

21 

2 
2 

4 

2 

Total  Developmental  Diseases 
of  Women     

2 

xV. — 3.  Developmental  Diseases  of 
Old  People. 

1  Old  Age 

M  .. 
F  .. 

9 

0 

14 

1 
2 

3 

n 

Total  Developmental  Diseases 
of  Old  People 

19 
30 

TV.— 4.  Diseases  of  Nutrition. 
1  Atrophy  and  Debility   

Total  Diseases  of  Nutrition . . 

M.. 
F  .. 

; 

6 
4 

10 

60 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  6.) 


A.  1875 


CLASSIFIED  ARRANGEMENT.— Couimued 
in  the  several  Counties,  statistically  classified. 


c  . 

y.  -2 

c  s 

k1 

2 
2 

e3 

o 

1 

s 

1 
1 

2 

B 

:::: 

2 

2 

.2 

s 

O 

1 
1 

2 

1 

X 

O 

Pi 

"3 

1 

1 

i 

Hi 

-a 

o 

1 

s 

PM 

s 

Pi 

1 

1 

1 . . . . 

a 

m 

§  . 

3  2 

§5 

CO 

P5 
S 

3 

> 

6 
1 

'6 
1 

o 
t 

43 
1 

Pi 

2 

3 

1 
1 

1 

1 

— 

— 





— 

— 

2 

4 

; 

— 

-- 

— 

— 

1 

— 

1 

1    9 

1 

1 
1 

1 

- 

— 

— 

1 

1   11 

— 

— 

1 

1 

1 

1 

2   20 

1 

ll 

3 

6 

1 

1 



— 

— 

— 

— 



— 





1 

1 

1 

3 

7 

....,  .. 

1 
1 

9 
5 

14 

3 
3 

15 
6 

21 

8 
5 

13 

i 

1 

i 
1 

1 
1 

2 

.v. 

2 
2 

4 

2 
2 

6 
4 

— 

— 

— 

1 

i 

2 
2 

....i   2-   4 

1 
1 

1 
1 

1 
1 

4 
2 

1 

"3 

27 

3 
3 

5 

7 

12 

^  4 
4 

18 
18 

1 

1 

2 
2 

4 

3 
.5 

8 

2 
2 

4 

2 

7 

2 

1 

11   2 

25 

— 

— 

2 

1 
1 

2 

3 
5 

8 

1 
3 

4 

4 
5 

1 

1 

1 

2 

4 

9 
4 

13 

12 

7 

19 

..  .i   3 

6 

1 

5 

8 
7 

15 

1 

8 

9 

1 

9 
10 

4 
4 

8 

6 
5 

11 

4 
4 

9 

7 

i 
1 

.. 

2 
1 

2 

2 

6 

1 

3 

52 

1 

— 

1 

.... 
..... 

1 

4 
3 

7 

6 
5 

11 

2 

4 

1 

2 
1 

9 
5 

43 
31 

1 

3 

1 

4 

1 
4 

4 

....   1 

1 

2 

5 

3 

14 

74 

2 

1 
2 

3 

2 
2 

14 
10 

24 

3 

1 

4 

3 
3 

6 

1 

5 

6 

4 

2 

6 

12 
6 

18 

11 

5 

21 
15 

172 
141 

2 

16 

36 

313 

1 

3 
3 

2 
8 

2 
2 

15 
6 

1 
6 

7 

8 
4 

— 

.... 
1 

1 
4 

10 

.... 

1 
1 

9 
12 

1 
1 

6 

7 

4 
4 

8 
8 

2 
5 

a 
3 

7 
7 

9 

5 

112 

1 

1 

5 

122 

3 

6 

12 
19 

7 
7 

14 
16, 

272 
264 

9 

10 

3 
2 

5 

1   1 
36:  9 

1   1 

21 

2 
1 

- 

13 

'  i 

1 
1 

9 

2 
2 

4 

8 

1 
1 

2 

7 

1 
3 

4 

8 

1 
1 

2 

14 

3 
2 

1 

5 

19  16 

i 

1 

10 

21 

12 

31 

14 

30  536 

1 

1 

2 
1 

3 

2 
3, 

4| 
4 

8 

4 
3 

7 

1 

1 
3 

6 
1 

i 

18 
17 

117 
107 

1 
2 

1 
5i 

1 

i 

1 

4 

7 

5 

35 

224 

61 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  6.) 


A.  1875 


CAUSES  OF  DEATH.— 
Exhibiting  the  number  of  Deaths  from  each  cause 


CAUSES  OF  DEATH. 

1 
Sex. 

a 

o 

1 

1 
<v  1 

1 

o 

o 

a 
•So 

m 

1 

6 

d 
1 

a 
p 

1 

1 

Is 

1 
1 

3 

1 

4 

a 

Is 
W 

1 
1 

"i 
1 

... 

2 
2 

"" 
1 

1 

4 
I 

5 

ll 

1 

1 

1 

1 
1 

2 

3 
1 

4 

1 

2 

1 

1 

8 
2 

IC 

2 

4i 
1 

j 

1 
J 

j 

-> 

s 

D 

V. — 1.  Accident  or  Negligence. 

M..  .. 

F  ..    ] 

Total.    ] 

M.. 
F  ..  .. 

Total.  .. 

M..  . 
F  ..  . 

Total.  . 

M..  . 
F  ..  . 

Total,  . 

M..~. 
F  ..  . 

Total.  . 

M.. 
F  ..  . 

Total.  . 
- 
M  .. 
F  ..  . 

Total.  . 

M  .. 
F  .. 

Total. 

M.. 
F  .. 

Total. 

M  .. 
F  . 

Total. 

M  .. 
F  .. 

Total. 

[1 

L    ... 

"i 

.    1 

.      2 

1 

.      2 

i    1 

1      8 

2 
2 
1 

1 

1 
1 

3 

7 

7 

1 — 

•:> 

1 

4 

1 
1 

2 

2 
2 

1 

1 

7 
2 

g 

1  .. 

1 

2 

I? 

1 

2 
2 

i   •■ 
1 

1 

1 
1 

1 
1 

-2 

...j    ... 
"1 

1 

2     1 

1      11 

1 

2  Wounds                     

1 

1 

2 

2 

4 

3 
3 

3 

1 
1 

2 

i 
1 

2 

2 

1 
1 

2 

1 
1 

1 

3  Bum.s  and  Scalds 

1 

2 
2 

4 

1 

1 

2 
1 

3 

i  ... 
1 

1 

9 

1 

10 

17 

5 

22 

1 

1 

1 
1 

1 

1 

3 

1 

4 

— 

...     3 

3|    3 

1 

3     3 

1 
1 

5  Drowning 

1 

2 

6  Suffocation    

~1 

2 

...|  ...|  ... 

7  Otherwise 

7     1 
1' 

4 

"1 

fi 

3    ... 
41 

8  Killed  by  Cars   

8 

14 

17 

1 

2 
2 

1 
1 

1 

() 
1 

1    7 
1 

4 

10 
2 

12 



3 

2 

1 

1      .5 

i 

3 

!•■•■•• 
— 

1 

6 
6 

6 

Total  Deaths  from  Accident  or 

4 

12 

2 

14 

4 

2 

6 

» 

v.— 2.  Homicide  (Murder)  

i 

..  1    , 

.: 

v.— ,3.  Suicide 

— 

1 

1 

1 

--  — 

— 

I-- 

^^ 

i 

62 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  6.) 


A.  1875 


CLASSIFIED  ARRANGEMENT.— Coxi^mued 
in  the  several  Counties,  statistically  classified. 


< 
Hi 

"o 
o 
IS 

1 
1 

1 

2 
3 

1 

1 
7 

7 

1 

1 
4 

1 

1 

IC 
2 

>< 

1/ 

o 

1 

2 

2 

2 

2 

1 
1 

"^ 
2 

2 

1 
1 

2 
3 

1 
1 

2 

1 
1 

1 
... 

2 

1 

3 

6 
1 

7 

4 

4 

12 

2 

M 

la 
11 

1 
1 





— 

2 
2 

2 

7 

12 

2 

14 

.2 

« 

O 

3 
2 

5 

1 
1 

2 

.. 

4 
3 

7 

X 

O 

1 
o 

Pm 

4 

1 
1 

1 

Ph 

1 

S 

u 

i 

8 

CO 

32 

pq 

a) 

g 

c3 

1 

> 

6 

0) 

i 
1 

a> 

"i 

1 

0 

■& 

a 

3 

1 
1 

2 

i 

1 

3 

1 

1 

0   . 
a,  .2 

•?■§ 

(1| 

1 

13 



5 

1 

1 

4 

18 

... 

1 



1 

1 
1 

1 

1 
1 
2 

1 
1 

"2 

2 

1 

1 

^2 

i:z 

6 

1 

1 

1 

2 

1 

... 

" 

1 

i>8 

1 

9. 

3     1 

"2 
2 

1 
3 

4 

'""2 

5 

:i3 

2 
2 

1 

1 

— 

1 
4 

1 
2 

31 

1 
1 



1 

1 

9 

2 

n 

H4 

1 
1 

2 

1 

i 

1 

1       4 

1  

21 

■■■"2.:::::: 

8 

2   1 

...    1 
1... 

2 

2 

1 

1 

1 

2 

1 

1        4 

29 

1 

1 
1 

1 

1 

7 

7 

2 

2 

1 
1 

1 

1 

2 

ZZ 

- 

1 
1 

3 
3 

7 

1 

8 

1 

4 

71 

8 

- 

1 

1 
2 

2 
8 

8 

13 
1 

14 

1 

1 

4'       79 

1 

1 

"i 

1 

— 

""2 
2 

2 

9 

:— 

.   1 

- 

5 

1 

...1     1 

2 

14 

14 

3 

3 

3 

2 
2 

5 
2 

7 

2 

2 
1 

1 

5 
1 

6 

4 

1 

5 

I 
1 

1       2 
1        1 

1 

6 

4 
2 

6 

1 
1 

2 
1 

5 
5 

9 
1 

10 

5 

3 
1 

3 
0 

5 
1 

7 

127 



1 

6 

1 

3 

2 

3 

5 

4    5 

6 

7 

143 

2 

3 

4 

1 

2« 
1 

2 

3 

5 

W 

6 
1 

7 

3 
3 

10 
1 

11 



5 
1 

6 



. 

4 
2 

6 

""  i 

1 
1 

1 

8 
4 

12 

5 
3 

8 

1 

1 

C 
1 

10 
3 

13 

12 

6 

5 
6 

13 

7 

26 
1 

322 

80 

7 

w!  17 

6    14 

18 

11 

20 

27 

402 

... 

2 

— 

— 

1 

1 
3 

3 

1 



6 

4 

2 

1 

1 

5 

1 

10 

- 

1 
1 

Jl 

" 

.  .1 

1 
1 

1 
1 

13 

2         4 

2 

1 

...i  ... 

2 

2       17 

m 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  6.) 


A.  1875 


•  CAUSES  OF  DEATH.— 

Exhibiting  the  number  of  Deaths  from  each  cause 


CAUSES  OF  DEATH. 

Sex. 

i 
< 

i 

6 

2 

pq 

1 

i 

o 

'T5 

i 
is 

o 

a 
1 

S3 

2 

i 
1 

8 
8 

16 

6 
4 

10 

' 

10 
6 

16 

i 

1 

j 

1 
1 

4 

1 

5 

1 
2 

3 

1 
i 

Hi 

2 

2 

4 
3 

.     7 

4 

1 

5 

c 
2 

V. — 4.  Execution    

M.. 
F  .. 

Total. 

M.. 
F  .. 

Total. 

M.. 
F  .. 

Total 

M  .. 
F  .. 

Total 

M  .. 
F  .. 

Total 

'Z. 

1 

1 

4 
1 

5 

5 
1 

6 

9 
8 

17 

2 
3 

5 

4 
5 

9 

2 
6 

8 

2 
6 

8 

1 
1 

i 
1 

10 

6 

16 

3 

1 

4 

7 
3 

10 

i 
1 

... 

3 
3 

« 

J 

10 

2 
2 

4 

2 

2 

"i 
1 

1 

3 

4 



1 

1 

3 
3 

6 

3 
3 

6 

v.— 5.  Violent  Deaths  (not  classed). 
Sudden,  cause  not  known 



Cause  not  specified 

2 

Erroneously  specified 

2 

5 

1 

4 
5 

64 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  0.) 


A.  1875 


CLASSIFIED  ARRANGEMENT.— CWc^wcZed 
in  the  several  Counties,  statistically  classified. 


'6 
< 

if 
§^ 

s 

5 
6 

11 

3 
2 

5 

>< 

I' 

8 
2 

10 

5 
.5 

"lO 

P 

2 

3 

5 

2 

1 

3 

4 
3 

7 

3 
6 

9 

"2  2 

O  C3 


1 


1 

9 

7 

16 

3 
4 

7 

i 

o 

... 

1 
1 

13 

8 

21 

2 
1 

3 

O 

c 

i 

4 

1 

D 

1 



1 

1 
1 

D 

a 

i 
1 

6 
0 
0 

a 
— 

S  £: 


1 
> 

c 

1 

a 

1 

t; 

0 

! 

0 

"^6 
SI 

Pm 

- 



!   , 

— 

- 

1  



1 

1 

2 

1 

1 
1 

1 

1 

3 
3 

2 
2 

4 

9 
7 

9 
4 

1 

2 



- 

1 
1 

15 
9 

1 
1 

2 

23 
20 

1 

■-- 

1    1 

Ki 

-- 

- 



1 
1 

10 
11 

1 

7 

1 

2 

2;^ 

7 
8 

15 

9 
4 

13 

3 
5 

8 

... 

3 
2 

6 
4 

1 

3 

4 
3 

8 
10 

6 
3 

17 
10 

10 
3 

3 
3 

252 
195 

9 

5 

1 
1 

10 

3 
3 

6 

4 

■  "2 



2 

7 

1 
1 

18 



2 
2 

4 

21 

7 

24 

8 

7 

15 

43 

2 

2 

4 

1 

6 

16 

13 

27 

17 

6 

13 

6 

447 

1 
1 

2  5 

...  3 

1 

5 

8 
7 

122 
93 

2 

2 

« 

23 

5 

15 

215 

65 


'39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  6.)  A.  1875 

The  ten  principal  causes  of  death  for  the  years  1873  and  1874  are  as  follows  : — 

1873. 

Rithisis , 1,217 

Old  age       .  , 778 

Lung  disease 533 

Typhoid  fever '  401 

Heartdisease 399 

Cerebro  Spinal  Meningitis  324 

Stomach  disease 321 

Brain  disease  278 

Pneumonia 276 

Cholera  Infantum    276 

1874. 

Phthisis    .. 1,143 

Pneumonia -  -  642 

Old  age 536 

Typhoid  fever 369 

Heart  disease  351 

Diarrhoea   334 

Enteritis    ... 283 

Convulsions 267 

Dropsy 239 

Lung  disease 231 

Phthisis  or  Consumption  returns  a  somewhat  smaller  number,  being  520  males,  and 
623  females,  making  a  total  of  1,143  against  1,217  in  1873,  being  a  decrease  of  74.  It 
will  appear  that  more  females  are  victims  to  this  disease  than  males. 

Fneumonia. — This  disease  has  largely  increased  during  1874,  ranking  second  on  the 
list  :  the  deaths  from  this  cause  being  366  more  than  last  year.  The  males  in  this  order 
predominate,  being  379  males  to  263  females. 

Old  Age  is  the  third  on  the  list.  There  is  no  doubt  that  if  the  number  of  old  people 
who  are  classified  as  having  died  from  general  debility — which  is  the  effect  of  longevity — 
were  returned  under  tlieir  proper  cause  of  death,  viz.,  old  age,  this  order  would  still  main- 
tain its  place  as  second  on  the  list. 

Tyjj/wid  Fever  keeps  the  same  position  in  the  list  as  it  occupied  in  last  year's  return, 
though  with  a  diminished  number  of  deaths  ;  and  the  same  can  be  said  of  Heart  Disease. 

Gerehro-Spincd  Meningitis,  Stomach  disease,  and  Cholera  Infantum  have  so  far  decreased 
in  numbers  as  to  rank  below  theten  highest  causes  of  death  given  above  ;  their  places  ar« 
taken  by  deaths  from  Convulsions,  Dropsy,  and  Lung  disease. 


60 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  6.)  A.  1875 


DEATHS   BY   OCCUPATIONS. 


89  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  6.) 


A.  1875 


DEATHS  BY 


• 
COUNTIES. 

Agents. 

t-i 

< 

Brickmakers. 

1 
1 

'  s 

Si 
-% 

pq 

No. 

Total 

Ages. 

No. 

Total 

Ages. 

No. 

Total 

Ages. 

No. 

Total 
Ages. 

No. 

Total 

Ages. 

No. 

Total 

Ages. 

Algoma 

Brant 

Bruce 

3!          78 

Oarleton  

.  

1 

Elgin 

1 
1 

66 
.52 

Essex 

1 

Frontenac 

1 

65 

11         .51 

Grey   

2 
1 

91 
36 

Haldimand  • 

J 

Halton   

Hastings    ^ 

41      103 
2         62 
1         58 

Huron    

1 
1 
1 

46 
71 
33 

Kent  



Lambton  

Lanark  ,. 



1 

1 

Leeds  and  Grenville    

1 
1 
1 
4 

45 

52 

24 

154 

Lennox  and  Addington 

Lincobi  

Middlesex 

1 

32 

Musk  oka  

Norfolk 

2 

KR 

Northumberland  and  Durham    

1 
1 

46 
60 

5;      238 
2i        89 
2l     ins 

Ontario 

1 

54 

Oxford 

Parry  Sound  

Peel    

1 
1 



28 

Perth 

"■; 

Peterborough  

..  ..  1 

Prescott  and  Russell 

Prince  Edward    

ii        80 
2i      109 

Renfrew   

1 

59 

2 

64 

Simcoe    

Stormont,  Dundas  and  Glengarry... 

3       210 

Thunder  Bay  

1 

Victoria 

Waterloo   

1 
1 
1 

24 
60 

Welland  

1 
2 
1 
5 

55 

94 

62 

194 



Wellington    

3:3 

Wentworth    

York  

2 

82 

' 

! 

Totals 

12 

552 

1 

59 

3 

118 

51       5«.fin 

68 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  6.) 


A.  1875 


OCCUPATIONS 


Bricklayei-s. 

Barbers. 

?2 

Bookkeepers  and  Clerks. 

Bankers. 

1 
Bakers  and  Confectioners. 

1 

No. 

Total 
Ages. 

1 
No. 

1 

Total 
Ages. 

No. 

Total 

Ages. 

No. 

Total 

Ages. 

No, 

Total 

Ages. 

No. 

Total 
Ages. 

No. 

Total 

Ages. 

1 

3 
1 
3 

35 

2 

ioo 



1 

25 

147 

1 

.34 

54 

1 

:35 

3 

112 

155 

ll     59 

1 

68 

2 

127 

1 

1 
1 

1 
4 
1 
2 

1 

24 
49 
30 

68 
98 
77 
46 
29 

1 

74 

i 

1 

29 

1 

63 

.32 

1  ■■  ■■ 

ii     57 
11     45 

ll     23 

1 



1 

35 

2 
1 
1 
1 

1 
1 

I 

111 

24 

30 

1 

1 

38 

31 

43 



4 

1.50 



48 

123 

2 
4 

45 
15 

305 

1 

51 

5     272 

; 

- 



1 

37 

1 
3 
3 

'  51 

1 

175 

119 

1 

.57 

1|     61 

1 

2 
1 
3 

85 

32 

121 

1 
1 

57 
33 

1 

51 

1 
1 
3 
2 

85 

24 

5 

157 

1 

21 

92 

21     57 

157 

1 

1 

3 
3 
3 
2 
3 
10 

134 

147 

2 

1 

2 

10 

50 

57 

47 

1     70 

363 

137 

54 

1 

1 

43 

68 

463 

180 

1 

21 

4 

126 

1 

363 

1 

21 

9 

1 
17211    1 

25 

13 

.526 

78 

3642 

1 

69 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  6.) 


A.  1875 


DEATHS   BY 


COUNTIES. 

a 

1 

ft 

U 

Cooks. 

Chemists  and  Druggists. 

S 

o 

i 

No. 

Total 

Ages. 

No. 

Total 

Ages. 

No. 

Total 

Ages. 

No, 

Total 

Ages. 

No. 

1 

Total 

Ages. 

No. 

Total 

Ages. 

1 

55 

3 

129 

1 

65 

"Kloin                                

Essex 

1 

1 

55 
23 

1 

48 



f'rpv                                          

33 
57 

TTalton                                                   

1 

48 


1 

1 

36 

68 

Kent                    

1 

23 

1 

75 

142 
63 

1 

41 

2 

141 

64 

1 

47 

1 

22 

60 
125 

1 

52 

28 

1 
1 
1 

78 

54 

Oxford 

2 

90 

70 

41 

Peel 

1 

52 

Perth                                

1 

84 

3 

195 

2 

111 

1 

62 

Thunder  Bay 

1 

24 

1 

89 

2 
2 

75 
114 

2 
1 
2 

95 

66 

125 

1 

72 

1 

1 
? 

22 

1 

40 

27 

1      1 

44 
138 

York      .                  

•   62 

2 

2 

82 

2 

68 

3 

124 

Totals 

1 

15 

670 

13 

1 

677 

7 

344 

4 

176 

22 

1291 

9 

446 

70 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  6.) 


A.   1875 


OCCJJ'PATIO'NS.— Continued. 


Carriage  andWaggonmakers. 

^  Dentists. 

1 

so 

a; 

a 

•a 

Editors. 

Farmers. 

i 

> 

Gentlemen. 

No. 

Total 

Ages. 

1 

No.  I^>^^ 
1  Ages. 

No. 

Total 

Ages. 

No. 

Total 

Ages. 

No. 

Total 
Ages. 

No. 

Total 
Ages. 

No. 

Total 
Ages. 

1 

1 

i 

i 

. 

39 
21 
44 
21 
43 
25 
53 

2549'    18 
1089;    12 
27071    8 

1051     4 

292 

576     11     66 

i 

409 
974 

1 
1 
1 

24 
52 

, 

1400 
2450 
1553 
2688 
1809 
1976 
2248 
.5393 
2302 
1963 
2493 

16 

i 

16     898 



23 

14 
33 
16 
33 
31 
33 
16 
17 
28 

878 
1812 

30 

1050 



31 
3(i 
88 
41 
35 
36 
74 
30 
35 
73 
11 
51 
47 
30 
58 

2075 

1 

54 
36 

1899 

1524 

788 

827 

1765 

3316 

854 

1423 

1732 

101 

612 

1115 

2 

2 

164 

1 



135 

1 

33 

85 

1 
1 

1 

37 
37 
44 

1 

21 

1 

»    1 

54 

45.581    44 
1986    13 
2291    21 
4633    29 

5451    2 
2846    13 
3117    18 
1736    12 
3726    33 

163 

1815    16 
1.544    27 
1794     7 
1295    22 
1486    11 

1 
3 

i 

6 

29 

2 

112 
42 

218 

1 

62 

399 

1 

651 
2022 

1 

79 

1 

1 

52 

5 

395 

.  ...1 

3 

28 
28 
31 
24 
23 
30 
47 
60 

2 

80 

11211    2 
1554     2 

171 

178 



403 

1041 
616 
1096 
1262 
2183 

2 

119 

2 
1 

148 

i 

47 

1829 
2955 
3704 

18 
23 
38 

85 

1 

45 

22 

22 

47 
41 
69 
37 
49 

1216 
2903 
2547 
4057 
1993 
2894 

14 
3S 
11 
26 
15 
33 

788 
2217 

719 
1391 

947 

3 
4 
3 

179 

i 

... 

*   287 

169 

8 

577 

4 

155 

4 

121 

18881    8 

456 

15 

719 

j  - 

15 

589 

1491 

90253 

'  775 

45578 

60 

4076 

71 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  6.) 


A.  1875 


DEATHS  BY 


COUNTIES. 

Gardeners. 

Hackmen. 

Hunters  and  Fishermen. 

Housewives. 

o 

^.^  ... 

Lumbermen. 

No. 

Total 

Ages. 

No. 

Total 

Ages. 

No. 

Total 
Ages. 

No. 

Total 

Ages. 

No. 

Total 

Ages. 

^"^   Ages. 

1 
28 

51 
1481 

2 
9 
2 
4 
3 
7 
2 
1 
7 

16 
6 
8 

11 
7 
4 

13 
1 

14 

22 

'     43 
461 

46 
198 
162 
359 
116 

66 
441 
792 
355 
421 
619 

Brant         

1 

10       531 

41     2309 

10       475 

.35;     1782 

71      407 

9       482 

40     2280 

8       455 

33     1734 

1     ^ 

EMn         

1 

75 



(rrev                           

Haldimand      

::::.:::. ':::::i::::::. 

Halton  

1         59 

1 

Hastings    

2 
1 
1 

107 

Huron      



! 

30 
26 
18 
19 
53 
14 

1753 
1394 

743 

898 

2619 

733 

21 

Kent  

43 

Lambton 

425 

205 

644 

34 

637 

1232 

1 

42 

1 

76 

Lermox  and  Addington   

Lincoln     

271     1668 

47     2101 

4       135 

26     1388 

1 

82 

Muskoka   

Norfolk    

i         .39 

13 

507 

'  766 

381 

226 

Northumberland  and  Durham     

1 

80 

461     25891     1.5 

361     20.52 

7 
4 

Oxford    

29      1647 

1 
1 

57 

1 

86 

3 
15 

6 

8 

3 

16 

18 

30 

14 

2 

9 

48 

20 

42 

63 

90 

96 

924 

216 

466 

166 

842 

783 

1611 

874 

112 

436 

2248 

1120 

2609 

3355 

4658 

22 

Peel  

5I       2.55 

Perth   

1         80 

li        57 

1 

1 ... 

6 
7 
6 
5 

257 
350 
309 
S.^3 

Prescott  and  Russell 

1 

Prince  Edward 

l\        64 

.....  1 

Renfrew 

1 

3]    i4i 

6i      280 

1 

28 

Simcoe 

Stormont,  Dundas  and  Glengarry... 
Thimder  Bay    



5 

320 

1 

63 

Victoria 

1 

9 

9 

11 

15 

41 

34 

553 
481 
675 
915 
1941 

1 

36 

Waterl6o 

1 
1 

41 

57 

Welland 

Wellington  

York  ; 

'"6 

'"342 

"  1 

39 

'  i 

m 

2 
3 

129 
80 

! 

Totals 

13 

839 

5 

218 

3!       228 

984 

52223 

307 

15980 

14 1       .58o 

72 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  6.) 


A.  1875 


OCCVFATIO'SS.— Continued. 


f' 
Lawyers. 

Milliners  aud  Dressmakers. 

a 
0 

1 

Machiuists. 

■ 
Moulders. 

2 

4^ 
-a 

3 

No. 

Total 

Ages. 

No. 

Total 

Ages. 

No. 

Total 

Ages. 

No. 

Total 

Ages. 

No. 

Total 
Ages. 

No. 

Total 

Ages. 

No. 

Total 
Ages. 

1 

55 

i 

21 

1 

86 

1 

59 

1 



1     

1 

1 

22 

1 

50 

[ 

1 

42 

1 

1 

1 

28 

3 

120 

i 
3 

69 
183 

1 

40 

2 

58 

;■■■::" 

1 

29 

1 

47 

1 

22 

1 

1 

32 

1 

28 

1 

1 

43 

84 

341 

i 



i 

25 

i 

28 

i 

ii 

i 

26 

i 

1 

1 

84 

73 
22 

1 

48 



1;            35 

1 

35 

2 

92 

2 
2 

129 
112 

1 

30 

1 

54 
46 

1 

■ 

1 

63 

1 

1 

90 
45 

1 

34 

2 

1 

8^5 
66 

'2 

97 

. ... 
1 

27 



1 
1 

1 

47 
25 

2 

154 

76 
203 
109 

22           •>■ 

■ 

3 
2 

1 

.52 

1 

80 

1 

60 

1 

41 
94 

1 

29 

.3I      i^9 

1 

39 

12 

484 

12 

384 

20 

1193 

7 

241 

6 

233 

16 

964 

6 

29 

73 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  6.) 


A.  1875 


DEATHS  BY 


COUNIIES. 

Miners, 

Musicians. 

Manufacturers. 

Merchants. 

Other  Occupations. 

Painters. 

No. 

Total 
Ages. 

No. 

Total 

Ages. 

No. 

Total 
Ages. 

No. 

Total 

Ages. 

No. 

Total 

Ages. 

No. 

Total 

Ages. 

Algoma 

1 

1 
3 
1 

48 

145 

.3.n 

Brant 

1 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 

62 
67 
106 
G8 
44 
26 

1 

57 

Bruce 

Carleton 

1 

64 

61       .307 

Elgin    

1 

Essex  

1 
1 

62 
24 
45 

Frontenac  

Grey 

67i      1 

HalflinnanH 

32 

78 

200 

128 

60 

Halton 

1 

Hastings 

1 

68 

2 

122 

Huron  

2 
1 
5 
2 
1 

Kent 

48 

204 

87 

30 

3 

1 

'"i 

132 
45 

93 

Lambton    

Lanark    





Leeds  and  Grenville 

1 

65 

Lennox  and  Addington    

Lincoln  

3 

98 
107 

3 

175 

3 
4 

86 

Middlesex 

2 
1 
2 

144 

Muskoka    

27 
69 

Norfolk  

Northumberland  and  Durham  

2'      107 

Ontario  

2I        .53 

Oxford 



1 

41 

3|      145 

2 

109 

2 

120 

Parry  Sound  

Peel 

1 

1 

Peith  

21          88 

1 

id 

Peterborough    ..  

1 

65 

3 

1.37 

1. 

Prescott  and  Russell 

Prince  Edward    

2 

113 

'         1 

Renfrew 

1 i 

Simcoe    

2 

2 

88       i 
115       3 

45 
128 

Stormont,  Dimdas  and  Glengarry... 



Thunder  Bay 

1 

42 

Victoria 

1 

1 

:::::::.;  ::::::i 

Waterloo    

.:  1... 

2 

60 

.^i^i        4 

151 
35 
59 

WeUand 

3        123 

1 

1 

2 

12 

2 
6 
8 

122 

286 
:J63 

.    .    1 

Wentworth 

1 

62 

2 
2 

87 
114 

72 

York   

4<»fl        4         170 

Totals 

3 

169 

1 

64 

1 

9 

435 

74 

3340 

51 

2;i68     15       637 

1 

74 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No., 6.) 


A.  1875 


OCCUPATIONS.— CoTiimued 


£ 

Pump  Makers. 

t 

0^ 

Plasterers. 

£ 

Physicians. 

i 

0 

No. 

Total 
Ages. 

No. 

1 

Total 
Ages. 

No. 

Total 

Ages. 

No. 

Total 

•Ages. 

No. 

Total 
Ages. 

No. 

Total 

Ages. 

No. 

Total 

Ages. 

1 

22 

1 

24 

1 

36 

1 

::::::: 

1 

1 

80 

4 

1 

233 

:.::.'.::i..:."... 

j 



27 

1 

::::::::::"i:::'::::: 

1 

87 



1 

90 



... 

1 

77 

1 

82 

1 

22 

1 

1 

47 

2 

89 

1 

"i 

35 

1 

1 

i 

.59 

1            69 

1 

1              40 



1 



74 

2i          159 

1 4- 

11            67 
ll            46 

1 

66 

j 

1 

55 

2 

2 

109 
128 

1 
2 
1 

1 

68 

2            92 

97 

i 

20 

1 



70 

1 

1            33 

1 

35 

1 

23 

1 

38 

1 



86 

2 

163 

1 





1 

78 





i 

21 



1 

35 

11 
1 

6S 

( 

1 
3 

37 
125 

2 

105 

:::::.:': :"" 

11 

775 



2i 
l' 

127 

1 

1 

57           1 

60 

1 
3 

7 

48 

70 

1 

32 
106 

1 

53 

55 



185           1 

52 

3 

10 

763 

Wl 

6 

329 

1 

9 

260 

1 

53           6 

1 

287 

4 

1 
208, 

29) 

1 
2113| 

1 

27         I355I 

1 

30 

1750 

75 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  6.) 


A.  1875 


DEATHS   BY 


COUNTIES.' 

1 
t 

CO 

a 

'S 
s 

'> 

c 

u 

1 

"3. 

S 

Sawyers. 

Stonecutters. 

i 

s 

c 

t 
OS 

No. 

Total 

Ages. 

No. 

Total 

Ages. 

No. 

Total 

Ages. 

No. 

Total 

Ages. 

No. 

Total 
Ages. 

No.  Total 
Ages. 

1 

73 

2 

67 

1 

60 

1 
2 

24 
63 

2 

127 

Elgin 



1 
1 

53 

35       1 



45 

82 

1 
2 



1 

82 

104 

Halton 

:::::::::  ■"::: 

1 

30 

2,        87 

Kent 

1 
1 
1 

21 
54 
39 



1 

67 



39 ; 

209 
25 

... 

2         83 

i         44 



33 

1 

TVnrfnllf 

1 

1         61 

67 

"i  77i        ll           fifi 

2 
1 

54 

29 



1 

82 
215 

Oxford 

Peel 

183 
67 
70 

Perth 

1 



o 

104 

Stormont,  Dundas  and  Glengarr}' . . . 
ThundtT  Bay 

1 

22 

1 



1 

51 



i         44 

2         91 

Welland 

3 
1 
2 
3 

92 

63 

103 

93 

1 

35 



i         27 
2        92 

..:.::;::!...... 

York    .                    

4       148 

6       364 

1 

TotalB             .                    

2 

160 

19 

7071      5 

2261     101      480 

43 

2283 

76 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  6.) 


A.  1875 


OCCUPATIONS.— Co/iimued 


t 

c 

S 
5 

xn 

i 

w 

i 

1 

1 
xn 

11' 

OS 

Servants. 

1 
1 
■I 

t 

1> 
X 

1 

No. 

Total 
Ages. 

No. 

Total 

Ages. 

No. 

Total 
Ages. 

No. 

Total 

Ages. 

No. 

Total 

Ages. 

No. 

Total 

Ages. 

No. 

Total 
Ages. 



1 
1 

1 

38 
41 
40 

1            22 

.   .  \ 



1 

46 

3          101 



1 

1 

1 

44 

'Hi 

67 
32 

It        54 

"i 

27 

2|           60 

2l        74 

.  .. 

1        ' 

::::::::::::::::::.:; 

1         76 

1 

35 



: .:..... 

■ 

2 
2 
1 

69 
44 
75 



2 

102 

1 

37 

^ 1 







1 

60 

i  94 



2 

60 
73 

1 

21 

1 

61 

2 



■ 

4           154 



1 

•M 

1 

82 
31 
65 

■ 

1 

.^5 

1 



1    

2 
1 

85 

1 

1 

1 

25 

28 



%          «.'» 

i 

1 

21 



1 

1 

46 

25 

1 

1 

1 

1          4 

274 

1  :; 

1 

62 



ii            2!3 
101           441 

1 

89 

1         1 

42 

1 

1 

48 

*! 

1      \ 

52 
127 
170 

, 

11            21 

• 

i 

2 

\ 

1 

65 

1 

60 
134 

82 
198 

1 

53 

2 

1 



i 

1 

66 

4 ieo 

1  

4           117 
18           711 

1 

3 
1 

1 

78 

117 

44 

52 
71 

4 

351          3i          129 

41 

19 

1 

24 

1291 

3 

162 

12 

573 

823 

.57 

2222 

1         7 

325 

10 

;H95 

77 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  6.) 


A.  1875 


I 


DEA.THS   BY 


COUNTIES. 

Tavern  Keepers. 

Tobacconists. 

Teachers. 

Telegraph  Operators. 

Tailors. 

Tanners. 

No. 

Total 
Ages. 

No. 

Total 

Ages. 

No. 

Total 

Ages. 

No. 

Total 

Ages. 

No. 

Total 

Ages. 

No. 

Total 

Ages. 

Algoma 

Brant 

4 

163 

2 

1 
2 
1 

92 
93 

Bruce 

Carleton 

j 

83 
23 

Elgin  

Essex 2!        85 

Frontenac |       2i         86 



1 

79 

1 
1 

30 
22 

Grey   '• i 

1 

50 

Haldimand   i      1 

76 

Halton  •. 

1 

22 

] 
1 

41 
71 

Hastings    

Huron  

1 
2 

73 

98 

Kent   



1 
1 

21 
60 

Lambton   

1 

68 



Lanark  

1 

45 

Leeds  and  Grrenville 

1 

27       1 

23 

1 

34 

1 

78 

Lennox  and  Addington    

Lincoln  



2 
1 
1 

124 

1 

78 
60 

1 

22 

Middlesex 

38 

471 

9 

1         31 
1         .54 

I  72 
li        40 
1:        62 

II  66 

Muskoka  

Norfolk 



1 

22 

1 

69 

3       ifti! 

1          67 

Ontario 

1 

65; 
.1 

... 

Oxford    

Parry  Sound    

..:"""■■ 

. 

...... 

Peel    

2i      1051 
1         63| 

1 

82 

3 

60 
169 

Perth 

Peterborough  

Prescott  and  Russell 

1 

69 

Prince  Edward     

1 1 

1 

24 

Renfrew   

2,      129; 

21        881 
11        281 

Simcoe   

1 

23 

1 

1 

23 

Stormnnt,  Dundas  and  Glengarry... 
Thunder  Bay  ... 

1         76l 

Victoria 

1         491 

. 

Waterloo  

2 
1 

971 
56 
58' 
42: 

1 

22 

1 

57 

2 

111 

Welland   

Wellington    

1 

1 
1 

1 
2 
4 

28 

45 
122 
189 

.. 



48 

2 

1 

1031 

York  

28       1 

61 1 

2 

79 

Totals 

37 

1884       2 

71 

23 

"          1 
1010       2 

79 

1 
1520, 

4 

193 

1 

1 

/ 

78 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  6.) 


A.  1875 


OCCUPATIONS.— Couc^^ifZed 


■3 

1 

2 
% 

Total  Number 
of  Deaths. 

Age. 

2 

D 
> 

Watchmakers  an 

X. 

V 

Aggregate. 

Average. 

No. 

Total 

Ages. 

No. 

Total 

Ages. 

No. 

Total 

Ages. 

No. 

Total 
Ages. 

5 
127 

65 
131 

57 
115 

64 
115 
108 

99 
147 
189 
113 

98 
102 
215 

70 
140 
213 

21 
122 
170 

im 

160 

10 

86 

88 

62 

60 

79 

89 

129 

150 

5 

64 

177 
7103 
.3200 
7299 
3353 
6258 
3587 
5886 
6397 
5891 
8143 

10500 
6025 
4903 
6196 

12743 
41.57 
8062 

11.579 

960 

6370 

10021 
5939 
9568 
452 
.5419 
4678 
3.5.57 
3068 
4819 
4939 
6916 
8765 
220 
3376 

10628 
6389 

35.40 

1 
1 



26 
82 

1 

.5.5.92 

2 



148 

49.23 

.5.5.71 

.      

.58.82 

!.__ 

1 

.54.41 

1 

.56.04 

1 

.51.18 

2|.         136 

59.23 

59.50 

1 
2 

67 
139 

::;:■■■:■■■  ::::":::"i:;:;:".;:::: 

55.32 

V        i^\       il         61 

55.55 

l|           70 

53.31 

50.03 

2 
1 

150 
70 

60.74 

1 

4 
1 

73 

289 
73 



1 

39 

59.26 
59.30 

1 

.58 

.57.58 

1 

33 

54.36 

45.71 

1 
3 

88 
203 

::::::::;■:  :::;::::: 

.52.21 

1 

58.94 

1 

63 

.54.48 

■..;;;::.;.■.: 

59.80 
4.5.20 

63.01 

.     . 

li             74 

.5.3.16 



1 

1 

92 
45 

.57.37 



.51.13 

2 

157 

61.00 

1 

66 

. 

55.50 

1 

% 

.53.61 



.58.43 

1 

44.00 

1 

52.75 

1 



193 

115        ' 
185 
196            1 

55.06 
.55..55     • 

1 

3|      186 

1 

1             73            5! 

160 

10834                   58.56 

1           39 
1           35 

1 

1 

10519        1 

53.66 

51       .3091 

1 

398            1          198:^5 

49.83 

1 
1 

1 

26 

1828 

7          iitI        If; 

1084 

4664                     2.58731 

79 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  6.) 


A.  1875 


The  information  to  be  derived  from  this  Table  would  be  more  valuable  and  interest- 
ing were  the  returns  complete. 

Eliminating  all  under  the  age  of  21,  and  also  the  number  of  those  persons  whose  ages 
were  not  given,  and  there  is  left  5,417.  Of  that  number  this  Table  gives  the  occupation 
of  4,664,  leaving  753,  to  whom  no  calling  has  been  given  by  those  who  registered  the 
death. 

The  remarks  explanatory  of  this  Table  given  in  last  year's  report  apply  with  equal 
force  to  this  return,  viz  : — 

"  To  understand  the  correct  bearing  of  this  Table,  it  will  be  necessary  to  remember 
the  comparative  number  of  the  population  engaged  in  each  occupation  ;  where  the  number 
engaged  in  any  particular  calling  is  very  small  the  per  centage  of  deaths  to  the  whole 
number  will  be  correspondingly  small." 

The  following  tabulated  Statement  shows  the  occupations  and  average  ages  of  the 
rleaths  returned,  over  and  under  the  age  of  55,  that  being  the  average  age  of  all  the  de- 
cedents of  twenty-one  and  over. 


Over  the  Aoerage  Age. 


Occupations. 
Hunters  and  Fishermen 


No.  Average 

Age. 


76 
75 

72 

7-7 


....  3 

Provincial  Land  Surveyors ....  2 

Paupers 29 

Weavers 15 

Volunteers  and  Soldiers  26     70 

Gentlemen     60     67 

Gardeners 13     64 

Musicians *. 1     64 


Occupations.  No.  Average 

Age. 

Farmers 1491     60 

Millers   16     60 

Masons 20     60 

Artists  ...,       1     59 

Clergymen...... 22     58 

Faimers' wives 775     58 

Public  Officials 30     58 

Miners 3     56 


Under  the  Average  Age. 


Occupations. 


No.  Average 
Age. 

28     54 


Tailors    

Speculators 3  54 

Sailors  ..  24  53 

Shoemakers 43  53 

Pumpmakers 1  53 

Housewives  984  53 

Coopers 13  52 

Labourers  — 307  52 

Plasterers 4  52 

Butchers      9  -'51 

Tavern  keejiers 37  50 

Physicians 

Millwrights 

Cooks .' 

Contractors 9  49 

Carriage  and  waggon  makers  ...  15  48 

Manufacturers 9  48 

Taniiers 4  48 

Stonecutters 10  48 

Sad<llers  and  harness  makers...  12  47 

Pedlars 6  47 

Tinsmiths 7  46 

Agents  12  46 

Sawyers ...  5  45 

Watchmakers  and  jewellers 7  45 

Merchants   74  45 


27     50 

6  49 

7  49 


Occupations. 


No,  Average 
Age. 


Blacksmiths 51  44 

Cabinetmakers 15  44 

Chemists  and  druggists    4  44 

Teachers     23  43 

Seamstresses 19  43 

Hackmen 5  43 

Painters    15  42 

Lumbermen    14  41 

Bakers 13  40 

Carpenters    78  40 

Lawyers  12  40 

Servants 57  39 

Brickmakers 3  39 

Teamsters 10  39 

Moulders     ....  6  39 

Telegraph  operators      . 2  39 

Railroad  emyloyees  19  37 

Tobacconists    2  35 

Bookkeepers 50  34 

Machinists 7  34 

Milliners   12  32 

Engineers  15  32 

Printers 9  28 

Bankers 1  25 

Barbers 1  21 


80 


b9  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  6.)  A.  1875 


It  is  desirable  that  during  the  coming  Session  an  Act  should  be  introduced  respecting 
the  registration  of  Births,  Marriages  and  Deaths,  retaining  most  of  the  sections  contained 
in  the  Act  now  in  force,  with  the  addition  of  certain  provisions  which  the  experienceof  the  last 
six  years  has  suggested.  Among  the  most  important  of  these  may  be  mentioned  the  com- 
pelling payment  to  the  Division  Registrars  by  the  respective  municipalities  of  a  fee  of  ten 
cents  for  each  birth,  marriage  and  death  registered.  Under  the  present  Act  the  amount 
of  remuneration  to  be  paid  to  Division  Registrars  for  services  rendered  in  this  particular 
is  left  to  the  discretion  of  the  Municipal  Councils.  From  a  return  made  to  this  Depart- 
ment of  the  sums  paid  by  way  of  remuneration  in  the  different  municipalities,  it  appears 
that  in  the  majority  of  cases  the  Councils  have  dealt  in  a  most  illiberal  spirit  with  their 
clerks — nearly  150  of  them  not  receiving  anything  for  their  services.  Of  the  remainder, 
a  very  great  number  are  paid  in  amounts  vaiying  from  the  small  sum  of  two  dollars  to 
forty  dollars  each,  while  others  are  paid  a  fee  of  ten  cents  for  each  entry 

The  appointment  of  an  Inspector  is  also  desirable,  whose  duties,  in  part,  will  be  to 
inspect  the  dilierent  Registration  Offices  throughout  the  Province,  with  power  to  prose- 
cute Division  Registrars,  medical  men  and  others,  who  fail  to  comply  with  the  require- 
ments of  the  Act. 

A  clause  compelling  the  registration  of  the  particulars  of  deaths  before  interment 
should  also  be  inserted  in  the  proposed  Act.  In  most  countries  where  the  registration 
law  is  in  force,  the  production  of  a  certificate  to  the  effect  that  registration  has  been  made 
is  imperative  before  burial  is  allowed,  and  it  would  seem  to  be  the  only  mode  of  insuring 
complete  returns  of  deaths. 


All  of  which  is  respectfully  submitted. 


S.  C.  WOOD, 

Registrar-General 


81 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  7.) 


A.  1875 


REPORT 


OF   THE 


COMMISSIONER  OF  CROWN  LANDS 


OF  THE 


PROVINCE  OF  ONTARIO, 


FOR  THE  MONTHS  OF  NOVEMBER  AND  DECEMBER,  1874 ;  AND  FOR 
THE  TEN  MONTHS  ENDING  31st  OCTOBER,  1875. 


f  rinlfib  hj  ^xhn  of  tl)c  f  cgtslatibc  ^Issembli). 


i  0  f  0  tt  1 0  : 

PRI^TLD  liY  HUNTER  ROSE  &  CO.,  25  WELLINGTON  STREEl  WEST. 

1875. 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  7.)  A.  1875 


CONTENTS. 


Commissioner's  Report  : — 

Crmvii  Land  Sales v 

Clergy      "        "     V 

C<jmmon  School  -lo ^ v 

Grammar  Scliool    1) vi 

Patents vi 

Collections  and  Iv-' venue vi 

Disbursements vi 

Free  Grants vi 

Woods  and  Forests vii 

Crown  Snryeys viu 

Municipal  Surveys vui 

Mineral  Lands viii 

Colonization  Roads viii 


Appendices  : — 

Return  of  Officers  and  Clerks  in  the  Department 1 

List  of  Crown  Land  Agents  for  sale  of  Lands 3 

"  "  "  "      for  disposal  of  Free  Grants 4 

Mining  Inspector 5 

List  of  Crown  Timber  Agents 6 

Statement  of  gross  collections  for  1874  and  1875 ' 

Statements  of  acres  sold,  amounts  of  sales  and  collections  f  )r  1874 8 

"  «'  '<  "  "  "  1875 9 

Receipts  of  the  Department  considered  as  Special  Funds  for  1874 10 

«  «  "  "  "  "     for  1875 12 

"  "  "  considered  as  Revenue  for  1874 13 

"  "  "  "  "       for    1875 14 

Statement  of  Gross  Disbursment  of  the  1  epartiiieiit  for  1874 15 

"  "  "  "  '•  f..r  ]S:i 18 

Return  of  Locations,  Sales,  &c.,  under  the  Free  Grants  -\ct  for  l;-)74 21 

«  <'  '<  •'  "  •'         "    U75 24 

Return  of  Patents  issued  1874  and  1875 •  •••  27 

Statement  of  Revenue  collected  by  Woods  ;nid  Fortsia  branch,  1874 28 

<«  '<  "  "  '•  "        1875 29 

Statement  of  Timber,  and  amounts  accrued  from  diu^,,  ito. ,  1874 30 

«  «  <<  "  1875 32 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Paper*  (No.  7.)  A.  1875 


Appendices — Continued.  pagb. 

Statement  of  drown  Land  Surveys  in  progress  in  1874 34 

"  "  "  "  1875 35 

"  "  "        completed  in  1875 36 

Municipal  Surveys  for  which  instructions  were  issued  in  1874 „  37 

"  "  "  "  1875 38 

"  confirmed  in  1874 39 

"  "  inl875 40 

Mineral  Lands  Patented  in  Unsurveyed  Territory  during  1874 41 

«  "  "  "  "       1875 42 

Statement  of  Work  performed  Ln  Survey  branch  in  1874 43 

"  "  "  "  1875 44 

Return  of  Candidates  who  have  passed  before  Board  of  Examiners  of  Land  Surveyors 

during  1875 45 

Return  of  Letters  Registered  for  1874  and  1875 46 

Report  on  Colonization  Roads  for  November  and  December  1 874 48 

"  "  "  1875 49 

North  Division 50 

West  Division 50 

East  Division 55 

Summary  of  Expenditure 60 

Summary  of  Work  done 62 

Report  from  Mining  Inspector 63 


IV 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  7.)  A.  1875 

R  E  I^  O  R  T 

* 

OF  THE 

COMMISSIOWEH  OF  CROWN  LANDS 

OF   THE 

PROVINCE  OF  ONTARIO. 

FOE,  THE  TEN  MONTHS  ENDING  31st  OCTOBER,  1875. 


To  His    Honour  the   Honourahle  Donald   ^Vlexander  Macdonald, 
Lieutenant-GoternoT  oj  the  Province  of  Ontario. 

May  it  Please  Your  Honour: 

I  have  the  honour  to  submit  to  your  Honour  the  following  Keport  of  the  proceedings, 
transactions  and  affairs  of  the  Department  of  Crowij  Lands,  for  the  months  of  November  and 
December,  1874,  and  for  the  ten  months  ending  31st  October,  1875. 

CROWN  LANDS. 

There  were  sold  of  the  Crown  Lands  during  the  months  of  November  and  December, 
1874,  13,496  acres.  The  sales  amount  to  $15,552,  and  the  collections  to  $21,377,  which, 
added  to  the  operations  of  the  preceding  ten  months,  as  previously  reported,  muke  a  total  for 
the  year  1874  of  96,995  acres  sold  for  $113,171,  and  of  collections  $159,417.  (See  Ap- 
pendix No.  7.) 

There  were  sold  during  the  ten  months  ending  31st  October,  1875,  43,819  acres.  The 
sales  amount  to  $43,110,  and  the  collections  to  $73,Q57.     (See  Appendix  No.  8.) 

CLERGY  LANDS. 

There  were  sold  of  the  Clergy  Lands  during  the  months  of  November  and  December, 
1874,  2,843  acres.  The  sales  amount  to  $4,456,  and  the  collections  to  $14,836,  which,  added 
to  the  operations  of  the  preceding  ten  months  as  previously  reported,  make  a  total  for  the 
year,  1874  of  20,532  acres  sold  for  $40,489,  and  of  collections  $91,572.  (See  Appendix 
No.  7.) 

There  were  sold  during  the  ten  months  ending  31st  October,  1875,  5,084  acres.  The 
sales  amount  to  $iO,22G,  and  the  collections  to  $34,C8G.     (See  Appendix  No.  8.) 

COMMON  SCHOOL  LANDS. 

There  were  sold  of  the  Common  Fchool  Lands  during  the  months  of  November  and 
December,  1874,  260  acres.     The  sales  amount  to  $834,   and    the  collections  to  $11,274, 

1^ 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  7.)  A.  1875 


which,  added  to  the  operations  of  the  preceding  ten  months,  as  previously  reported,  make  a 
total  for  the  year  1874  of  3,583  acres  sold  for  $10,618,  and  of  collections  $101,267.  (See 
Appendix  No.  7.) 

There  were  sold  during  the  ten  months  ending  31st  October,  •  1875,  1,595  acres.  The 
sales  amount  to  ^5,043,  and  the  collections  to  $46,205.     (See  Appendix  No.  8.) 

GRAMMAR  SCHOOL  LANDS. 

There  were  sold  of  the  Grammar  School  Lands  during  the  months  of  November  and 
December,  1874,  1,413  acres.  The  sales  amount  to  $1,606,  and  the  collections  to  $3,211, 
which,  added  to  the  operations  of  the  preceding  ten  months,  as  previously  reported,  make'  a 
total  for  the  year  1874  of  11,652  acres  sold  for  $16,596,  and  of  collections  $18,617.  (See 
Appendix  No.  7.) 

There  were  sold  during  the  ten  months  ending  31st  October,  1875,  4,340  acres.  The 
sales  amount  to  $5,906,  and  the  collections  to  $8,056.     (See  Appendix  No.  8.) 

CROWN  PATENTS. 

The  number  of  Crown  Patents  issued  during  the  year  1874  is  3,575,  and  for  the  ten 
months  ending  31st  October,  1875,  l,7rM3.     (See  Appendix  No.  18,) 

COLLECTIONS  AND  REVENUE. 

The  total  collections  in  the  Department  during  the  months  of  November  and  December, 

1874,  amount  to  $136,028,  which,  added  to  the  collections  during  the  preceding  ten  months, 
as  previously  reported,  make  the  total  collections  for  the  year  1874  amount  to  $890,676,  of 
which  $679,169  may  be  considered  as  Revenue.     (Sec  Appendices  Nos.  7  and  9.) 

The  total  collections  in  the  Department  during  the  ten  months  ending  31st  October, 

1875,  amount  to  $424,584,  of  which  $336,275  jmay  be  considered  as  Revenue.  (See  Ap- 
pendices Nos.  8  and  11.) 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

The  gross  disbursements  of  the  Department  for   the  year  1874  amount  to  $225,217- 

ti    ;  that  for  the  ten   months  ending  Slst  October,   1875,  amount  to  $156,651.     (See  Ap, 

jj'   dices  Nos.  14  and  15. 

FREE  GRANTS. 

There  were  seventy-eight  townships  open  for  location  under  "  The  Free  Grants  and 
'  omestead  Act  of  1868,"  on  the  31st  October,  1874 — the  date  of  my  last  Report — and  since 
I  at  date  lands  have  been  opened  for  location  in  ten  other  townships,  viz.  :  North  Algona, 
utterworth.  Chapman,  Croft,  Spcnce,  Oliver,  Paipoonge,  Blake  and  Crooks,  and  four  tiers 
of  lots  on  the  Dawson  Road,  north-west  of  Oliver.  There  are  also  four  townships  appro- 
priated under  the  Act,  but  not  yet  open,  viz.  :  Franklin,  Montcith,  McMurrich  andNipissing 
— the  last  named  township  having  been  appropriated  since  the  1st  January,  1875.  The  tota 
number  of  townships  now  open  is  therefore  eighty-eight,  and  of  those  appropriated,  but  not 
yet  open,  four,  making  in  all  ninety-two. 

During  the  whole  of  the  year  1874,  910  locations  were  made  on  119,072  acres  of  land 
and  2,144  acres  were  sold  to  fifty-seven  locatccs.  During  this  period,  also,  453  locations  made 
in  ibrmer  years  were  cancelled  for  non-performance  of  the  settlement  duties,  and  755  patents 

vi  "f 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  7.)  A.  1875 


were  issued  to  Free  Grant  settlers,  and  to  purchasers  in  Frea  Grant  townships  who  were  en- 
titled to  a  remission  of  the  arrears  due  on  their  lots  under  the  Act  35  Vic.  cap.  21.  (See 
Appendix  No.  16.) 

During  the  ten  months  ending  the  31st  October,  1875,  1,111  locations  were  made  on 
149,897  acres  of  land,  and  3,791  acres  were  sold  to  seventy-seven  locatees.  290  locations 
made  in  former  years  were  cancelled,  and  477  patents  were  issued.     (See  Appendix  No.  17.) 

By  comparing  the  returns  of  the  whole  year  1874  with  those  of  the  ten  months  ending 
31st  October,  1875,  it  will  appear  that  the  latter,  although  covering  a  shorter  period  by  two 
months,  have  an  increase  over  the  former  in  locations  to  the  extent  of  192,  in  acres  located 
to  the  extent  of  30,825,  in  purchasers  to  the  number  of  twenty,  and  in  acres  purchased  by 
locatees  to  the  number  of  1,G47,  while  a  decrease  is  apparent  in  the  number  of  locations  can- 
celled and  of  patents  issued.  The  latter  decrease  is  explained  by  the  f;ict  that  a  large  propor- 
tion of  the  number  of  patents  returned  for  1874  were  issued  to  settlers  who  had  purchased 
their  lands  before  the  townships  in  which  they  were  settled  had  been  brought  within  the  opera- 
tion of  "The  Free  Grants  and  Homestead  Act  of  1868,"  and  who  by  the  Act  of  1874  (37 
Vic.  cap.  22)  were  entitled  to  get  their  patents  without  further  payment. 

WOODS  AND  FORESTS. 

The  accrual  for  timber  dues,  ground  rents,  &c.,  during  the  ten  months  to  31st  October, 
1875,  is  $377,503  76. 

The  amount  collected  as  timber  dues,  ground  rents,  &c.,  during  the  ten  months  is 
$257,051  19,  and  $770  15  on  timber  cut  under  settlers'  licenses  applicable  towards  payment 
of  their  lands  ;  total,  $257,821  34. 

The  estimated  accrual  for  the  year  was  $305,000,  the  actual  accrual  being  in  excess  of 
estimate  $72,503  76.     {See  Ajjpendices  Nos.  19,  20,  21  and  22.) 

The  great  depression  in  the  square  timber  and  sawn  lumber  trade  during  1873  and  1874, 
referred  to  in  my  last  Report,  was  not  expected  to  continue  to  the  same  extent  in  1875,  but 
instead  of  the  expected  partial  improvement  in  business  during  the  present  year,  the  trade 
fell  into  a  complete  state  of  stagnation — so  much  so  that  cash  sales  became  unknown,  and 
from  doubts  as  to  the  solvency  of  buyers  on  time,  holders  of  stocks  hesitated  to  seli  to  pur- 
chasers who  on  ordinary  occasions  would  have  been  welcomed  into  the  market  and  credited 
to  any  amount.  The  result  of  this  state  of  thiug^  has  been  that  the  collections  for  Woods  and 
Forests  have  largely  fallen  off  as  compared  with  previous  years — even  those  of  1873  and 
1874,  during  which  the  trade  was  supposed  to  have  reached  its  worst.  It  was  found,  under 
the  circumstances,  that  to  resort  to  extreme  measures  in  order  to  force  collections  would  be 
ruinous  to  those  indebted.  I  therefore  felt  constrained,  in  view  of  the  importance  of  the 
trade  to  the  country,  and  the  large  interests  involved,  to  allow  the  amounts  due  by  parties 
unable  to  pay  their  accounts  to  lie  over. 

The  general  impression  is  now,  that  an  improvement  in  the  lumber  business  will  take 
place  in  1876;  in  fact,  in  square  and  wany  white  pine  the  prospects  for  next  year  arc  re- 
ported to  be  excellent,  owing  to  a  revival  in  business  in  England,  and  also  to  a  restricted  ex- 
port of  the  article  from  European  ports  ^from  which  pine  timber  has  hitherto  been  freely  im- 
ported into  Britain. 

Fall  sales  of  timber  at  Quebeo»closed  with  much  more  buoyancy  in  the  market  than  had 

been  felt  throughout  the  season 

vii 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  7.)  A.  1875 


CROWN  SURVEYS. 

The  Surveys  for  which  instructions  have  issued  during  the  year  1875  arc  the  Town- 
ships of  Pringle,  Armour,  Gurd,  Laird,  Machar,  part  of  Stisted  and  Island  A,  in  the  town- 
plot  of  Maganetawan,  all  in  the  Huron  and  Ottawa  Territory ;  the  townplot  of  Coponaning,  at 
the  mouth  of  the  French  River,  and  the  Exploratory  Survey  to  the  North  and  East  of  that 
river  ;  he  Township  of  Moss,  at  Jackfish  Lake,  in  the  District  of  Thunder  Bay ;  and  islands 
at  the  mouth  of  Kamistiqui  River,  and  lots  in  the  Reserve  Block  at  Southampton.  (See 
Appendix  Nos.  23,  24,  25). 

The  Surveys  completed  and  closed  during  the  year  1875  are  the  the  townships  of 
Lount,  Perry,  Machar,  part  of  Stisted  ;  a  tier  of  lots  on  each  side  of  the  Dawson  Road,  west 
of  Thunder  Bay ;  part  of  the  townplot  of  Grosport,  in  the  Township  of  Murray  and  the 
Boundary  Line  between  the  Provinces  of  Ontario  and  Quebec. 

MUNICIPAL  SURVEYS. 

The  Municipal  Surveys  for  which  Instructions  were  issued  during  the  months  of  Novem- 
ber and  December,  in  1874,  were  five.  This  number  added  to  nineteen  issued  during 
the  ten  months  ending  the  31st  October,  1874  (as  shown  by  my  Report  of  1874,  page 
36),  makes  twenty-four  instructions  issued  during  tlie  whole  year  of  1874. 

The  Municipal  Surveys  for  which  Instructions  weie  issued  during  the  ten  months,  end- 
ing the  3 1st  October,  1875,  were  twenty-five,  and  the  Municipal  Surve^'^s  confirmed  during 
the  same  period  were  twenty-five. 

These  Surveys  were  performed  under  the  authority  of  Act  22  Vic.  cap.  93,  of  the  Con- 
solidated Statutes  of  Upper  Canada,  and  are  enumerated  in  Appendix  Nos.  26,  27,  28,  29. 

MINERAL  LANDS. 

There  were  8old  on  the  North  Shore  of  Lakes  Superior  and  Huron,  in  the  Districts  of 
Thunder  Bay  aud  Algoma,  in  the  months  of  November  and  December,  1874,  1,319-^  acres. 
This  quantity,  added  to  14,294 ^^^^  sold  during  the  ten  months  ending  the  31st  October, 
1874  (as  shown  by  my  Report  of  1874),  makes  the  total  quantity  15,614  ^r  acres  sold  during 
the  whole  year  of  1874. 

The  quantity  of  Mineral  Lands  sold  on  the  Nortli  Shore  of  Lakes  Superior  and  Huron 
during  the  ten  months  ending  the  31st  October,  1875,  amounts  to  6,044^?^^  acres;  the 
applicants  furnishing  plans,  field  notes,  and  descriptions  of  each  location  by  a  Provincial  Land 
Surveyor,  in  accordance  with  the  provisions  of  the  Act  relative  to  Minin;^-,  32  Vic.  cap.  34, 
sec.  9,  and  sub-sections  1  and  2,  and  sections  10  and  11.    (See  Appendices  Nos.  30  and  31). 

COLONIZATION  ROADS. 

The  total  expenditure  on  the  Colonization  Roads  during  the  ten  months  ending  31st 

October,  1875,  is  $87,455,  the  particulars  of  which  will  be  found  in  Appendix  No.  38. 

Respectfully  submitted. 

T.B.PARDEE, 

Commissioner. 
Department  of  Crown  Lauds,  • 

Toronto,  31  St  October,  187;'). 
iviii 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  7.) 


A.  1875 


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Sessional  Papers  (No.  7.) 


A.  1875 


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39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  7.) 


A.  1875 


APPENDIX  No.  6. 

Statement  of  Gross  Collections  of  the  Department  of  Crown  Lands  for  the  year 

ending  31st  Decembei-,  1874. 


November 

and 
December. 

Receipts  to  31st 

October,  1874,  as  per 

previous  Report. 

Total. 

Cro-mi  Lands    

Clerg\'  Lands    

Common  School  Lands       

21,377  57 

14,886  36 

11,274  08 

3,211  02 

84,921  25 

320  00 

38  00 

S 

138,040  47 

76,736  18 

89,993  01 

15,406  28 

418,083  17 

15,784  09 

309  35 

295  60 

S 
159,418  04 

91,622  54 
101,267  09 

18,617  30 

Grammar  School  Lands 

Woods  and  Forests 

503.004  42 

Mines  . .    .         

16,104  09 
347  35 

Casual  Fees 

Surveyor's  Fee  Fund 

295  60 

Total  

890,676  43 

•  APPENDIX  No.  6. 

State^ient  of  Gross  Collections  of  the  Department  of  Crown  Lands   for  the  ten 
months  ending  31st  October,  1875. 


CrowTi  Lands 

Clergy-  Lands 

Common  School  Lands . . 
(rrammar  School  Lands 

Woods  and  Forests   

Mines    

Casual  Fees 

Surveyor's  Fee  Fund    . . 

Total 


8    cts. 


73,057  45 

34,692  57 

46,205  88 

8,056  52 

257,051  19 

4,995  46 

266  49 

258  43 

424,583  99 


William  Ford, 

Accountant. 

Department  of  Crown  Lands, 

Toronto,  3Lst  October  1875. 


THOS.  n.  JOHNSON, 

Assistant  Commissioner. 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  7.) 


A.  1875 


APPENDIX  No.  7. 

Statement  of  Acres  of  land  sold,  Amount  of  Sales,  and  Amount  of  Collections, 
for  the  year  ending  31st  December,  1874. 


SERVICE. 

Acres  sold. 

Amount  of 

Sales. 

Amount  of 
Collections. 

$     cts. 

S     cts. 

Crown  Lands,  November  and  December,  1874 

13,496i 

15,551  94 

21,377  57 

Clergy  Lands,                   do                   do            

2,843 

4,455  84 

14,836  36 

Common  School  Lands,  do                   do            

2601 

834  50 

11,274  08 

Grammar  School  Lands,  do                   do            

1,413 

1,606  .50 

3.211  02 

18,0121 

22,448  78 

50,699  03 

Amonnt  for  the  ten  months,  ending  31st  October,  1874, 
as  previously  reported    

114,7501 

148,046  55 

320,175  94 

Total  

132,763i 

170,495  33 

370,874  97 

THOS.  H.  JOHNSON, 

Assistard  Commissioner. 


William  Ford, 

Accountant. 


Department  of  Crown  Lands, 

Toronto,  31st  December,  1874. 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  7.) 


A.  1875 


APPENDIX  No.  8. 

Statement  of  Acres  of  Land  sold,  Amount  of   Sales,  and  Amount  of  Collections 
for  the  ten  months  ending  31st  October,  1875. 


William  Ford, 

Acr.ov.nf.ant. 


SERVICE. 

Acres  Sold. 

Amount  of 
Sales. 

Amount  of 
Collections. 

CVown  Lands    

43,819 
5,084 
1,595  J 
4,340 

8    cts. 

43,110  55 

10,226  .59 

5,043  40 

5,90G  40 

^    ct^. 

73,057  45 

34,686  57 

46,205  88 

8,056  52 

Clergy  Lands    

Common  School  Lands 

Grammar  School  Lands 

54,838^ 

64,286  94 

162,006  42 

THOS.  H,  JOHNSON, 

Assistant  Commissioner. 


Department  of  Crown  Lands, 

Toronto,  31st  October,  1875. 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  7.) 


A.  1875 


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39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  7.) 


A.   1875 


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39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  7.) 


A.  1875 


APPENDIX  No.  11. 

Statement  of  Receipts  of  the  Department  of  Crown  Lands,  which  are  considered 
•      as  Special  Funds,  for  ten  months  ending  31st  October,  1875. 


S      cts. 

8      cts. 

Clergy  Lands  : 

Principal    

24,851  63 

9,834  94 

6  00 

Interest 

Rent    

34.692  57 

Common  School  Lands  : 

Principal    

27,014  59 
19,191  29 

Interest 

Rent    

46,205  §8 

Gh-ammar  School  Lands  : 

Principal    

6,475  03 
1,581  49 

Interest 

8,056  52 

110  00 

518  30 

18  20 

Refunds  on  above  Services: 

Clergy  Lands 

88,954  97 

Common  School  Lands     

Grammar  School  Lands   

646  50 

WILLIAM  Ford, 

Accountant. 


THOS.  H.  JOHNSON, 

Assistant  ConiTmssioner. 


Department  of  Crown  Lands, 

Toronto,  31st  October,  1875. 


12 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  7.) 


A.  1875 


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39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  7.) 


A.   1875 


APPENDIX  No.  13. 

Statement  of  Receipts  of  the  Department  of  Crown  Lands  for  the  ten  months 
ending  31st  October,  1875,  considered  as  Revenue. 


S      cts. 

Woods  and  Forests 

2.57,051  19 
73,057  45 

Crown  Lands    

Mines 

4,995  46 
266  49 

Casual  Fees  

Surveyor's  Fee  Fund 

258  43 

4 

335,029  02 

William  Ford, 

Accountant 

THOS.  H.  JOHNSON, 

Assistant  Commissioner. 

Department  of  Crown  Lands, 

Toronto,  31st  October,  1875. 


14 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  7.) 


A.  1875 


APPENDIX  No.  14. 

Statement  of  Gross  Disbursements  of  the  Department  of  Crown  Lands  for  the 
year  ending  31st  December,  1874. 


November 

and 
December. 

Commissions. 

S     cts. 

208  43 

120  09 

202  45 

484  61 

77  04 

4,53  45 

134  24 

40  81 

48  89 

14  20 

S     cts. 

1,784  21 
(5,184  78 

S     cts. 

W.  Halpenny 

H.  Haiiiilt(  >n    

W.  .Tackson  

J.  McKibbon    

A.  McXabb 

R.  McPherson    

E.  Perry  

.J.  Sharman  

Jos.  Wilson 

Commissions  for  the  previous  ten  months  ending  3l8t  October, 
1874,  already  reported  

125  00 
125  00 
125  00 
125  00 
125  00 
250  00 
250  00 
125  00 
125  00 
125  00 
125  00 
125  00 
125  00 
333  34 
240  00 
1.33  34 
83  34 
25  00 

7,968  99 

Salari£s  of  A<j  nts. 
C.  P.  Browne 

2,690  02 
9,780  32 

J.  Reeves 

.J.  K.  Tait    

D.  Ajiderson    

J.  L).  Beatty  

A.  A.  Campbell 

C.  W.  Loimt 

J.  Graham   

E.  Playfair  

A.  Kennedy •. 

J.  Reid  

C.  F.  Holterman   

J.  Bowker    

J.  B.  McWilliams 

.T.  F.  Way  

J.  A.  Macinnes 

J.  A.  C  Crozier    

J.  McDonald  

Salaries  of  Agents  for  the  previous  ten  months  ending  Slst 
October,  already  reported  

1  14 

3  17 

4  84 
8  73 

12,470  34 

Agents'  Postage. 
D.  Anderson    

17  88 

282  74 

E.  Perry   

.T.  R.  Tait     

H.  Hamilton  

Agents'  postage  for  the  previous  ten  months  ending  Slst  Oc- 
tober, already  reported 

3  00 

10  75 
6  00 
24  00 
15  00 
53  50 
135  00 

300  62 

Miscellane(yus. 
J.  R.  Tait,  stationery  

y 

W.  .Jackson,  inspecting  

A.  McNabb,         do          

.J.  Shaw,                do          

.T.  Green,               do          

Wadsworth  &  Un\vin,  do    .  . 

J.  F.  Way,  Disbursements , 

15 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  7.) 


A.  1875 


APPENDIX  No.  U.— Continued. 

Statement  of  Gross  Disbursements  of  the  Department  of  Crown  Lands  for  the 
year  ending  31st  December,  1874. 


November 

and 
December. 

Brought  forivard 

$     cts. 

$     cts. 

S     cts. 

Miscellaneous, — Continued. 

79  00 

25  72 

35197 

1,924  42 

Amount  of  miscellaneous  items  for  the  previous  ten  months 

265  50 
825  66 
120  15 
708  02 
61  45 
100  00 

2,276  39 

Wood  Rawjing, 
J.  Shaw  

2,080  78 
18,165  49 

W.  Russell  

T.  E.  Johnson    

W.  McKay   

A.  G.  Judd     

Wood  Ranging  for  the   previous    ten    months   ending  31st 
October,  already  reported    

150  00 
110  00 
302  00 

20,246  27 

Expenses  of  Inspectors  Vahting  Lands. 
W.  Hartle 

562  00 
1,368  10 

G.Bolton       

J.  Shaw  

Expenses  of  Inspectors   valuing  lands   for  the  jjrevious  ten 
months  ending  3l8t  October,  1874,  already  reported 

50  00 

92  10 

260  85 

59  00 

60  00 
45  00 

1,930  10 

Local  Saio  Mill  InsiKctions. 

W.  Russell  

T.  E.  Johnson..  

566  95 
570  00 

J.  Shaw 

J.  B.  McWilliams 

S.  L.  Soper  

Local  Saw  Mill  Inspections  for  the  previous  ten  months  end- 
ing 31st  October,  already  re]3orted 

1,136  95 
154  22 

Agents''  Receipts 

For  monies  paid  them  but  not  returned  to  Department,  say 
for  ten  months  to  31st  October,  1874,  as  previously  re- 
ported  

1 

Grant,  for  deficiency  in  certain  lots  in  Colchester 

2,462  00 

375  00 
40  00 

Do                November  and  December,  1874  

40  00 

415  00 

7,764  11 

16 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  7.) 


A.  1875 


APPENDIX  No.  U.— Concluded. 

Statement  of  Gross  Disbursements  of  the  Department  of  Ci'own  Lands  for  the 
year  ending  31st  December,  1874. 


November 

and 
December. 

1 

1 

1 

5!      cts.   j 
Brought  forward , 1 

*     cts. 

$     cts. 

Refunds 

3,011  06 
—  tv- 

12,537  89 

23,034  84 

Do    for  prev-ioua  ten  months  ending  31  st  October,  1874 

26,0*5  90 

Colonization  Roads    

87,462  11 

Do                                          do                                 

657  82 

100,000  00 

Surveys 

33,812  31 

Do                                                     do                                 

129  95 

:34,470  13 

Advertising 

1,237  42 

Do                                                 do 

50  00 

1,367  47 

Office  Postage , 

300  00 

Do                                               do                                 

23  00 

350  00 

Subscriptions   

124  90 

Do                                               do                                 

113  85 

147  90 

Contingencies  

1,846  61 

Do                                              do                                 

1.960  46 
3,750  69 

Two  per  cent,  of  the  duties  collected  on  timl)er  cut  on  Road 
Allowances,  and  paid  to  Municipalities  for  the  ten  months 
ended  31st  October,  1874,  as  previously  reported 

1 

Total 

225,217  54 

1 

William  Ford, 

Accov.ntant 


THOS.  H.  JOHNSON, 

Assistant  Commissioner. 


Department  of  Crown  Lands, 


Toronto,  31st  December,  1874. 


17 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  7.) 


A.  1875 


APPENDIX  No.  15. 

Statement  of  Gross  Disbursements  of  the  Department  of  Crown  Lands  for  ten 
months  ending  31st  October,  1875. 


§     cts. 


$     cts. 


Commissions. 

Cadenhead,  A.  S 

Day,  .J.  F 

Halpenny,  W 

Hamilton,  H 

Jackson.  W 

McKibbon,  J 

McNabb,  A. 

Macpherson,  R 

Perry,  E , 

Sharman ,  J 

Wilson,  J 


Anderson,  D 

Beatty,  J.  D.    . . 

Bowker,  J 

Brown,  C.  P.  . . 
Cadenhead,  A.  S. 

Grraham,  J 

Halpenny,  W.  . . . 
Hamilton,  H.  . . . 
Holtennan,  C.  F. 

Jackson,  W 

Kennedy,  A 

Lount,  f.  W.  ... 
McKibbon,  .T.  . . . 
ATcMuiTay,  J.    . . . 

McNabb,  A, 

Macpherson,  R.  . 
Perry,  E 


Anderson,  D 

Beatty,  J.  D.    . . . 

Best,  S.  G 

Bowker,  J 

Brown,  C   P 

Campbell,  A.  A.  . 

(jraham,  .T 

Holterman,  C.  F. 

Mahon,  J 

Kennedy,  A , 

Lount,  ('.  W.    ... 

McMurrav.  J.  

Pkyfair,  ^ 

Reeves,  J 

P>*id,  M 

Tait,  J.  R 

Wright,  A.     .... . 

Crozier,  .J.  A.  G. 
MacinncH,  .J.  A.   . 
VcDoiiald,  J.    ... 

McWiUiams,  J.  B. 
Way,  J.  F 


Agents'  Postage. 


Salaries  of  Agents. 


Carried  foinoard 


348  84 

19  40 

67  72 

350  82 

513  62 

135  72 

514  .35 

173  44 

64  70 

143  (i7 

183  37 

6  10 
13  81 

2  35 
11  23 

6  85 
36  35 

62 

8  65 

8  78 

24  15 

7  24 
49  01 

8  19 

9  55 
28  87 

4  56 
1  62 


375  00 
250  00 
262  33 
375  00 
375  00 
7.50  00 
375  00 
125  00 
250  00 
375  00 
750  00 
125  00 
375  00 
375  00 
375  00 
375  00 
203  00 
41(5  66 
66(5  m 
125  00 
,666  (i6 
,200  00 


2,515  65 


227  93 


10.165  31 


18 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  7.) 


A.  1875 


APPENDIX  No.  15.— Continued. 

Statement  of  Gross  Disbursements  of  the  Department  of  Crown  Lands  for  ten 
months  ending  31st  October,  1875. 


$     cts. 


cts. 


Brought  forward 


Wood  Ranging. 


Russell,  W 

Freeman,  P.  W.  . . 
Johnson,  Thos.  E. 
Turgeon,  J.  B. . . 

Lee.  T.  W.     

Boland,  C.  B 

Johnson,  S.  M.     . . 

Boucher,  W 

Kennedy,  J 

Bick,  Cieorge 

Rose,  D 

Soper,  S.  L 

McKay,  W 

Gunn,  A , 

Shaw,  J 

Judd,  A.  G 


Expenses  of  Inspectors  valuing  Lands. 


Denault,  W.  H, 

Hartle,  W 

Shaw,  A 

Smith,  A 


Miscellaneous. 


Macinnes,  J.  A.,  allowance  for  board. . . . 

Wilson,  J. ,  timber  services    

Belle.  C.  E.,  do  

Johnson,  E.  P.,     do  

C'owper,  G.  B.,  travelling  expenses 

Cashman,  J.,  do  

Kennedy,  Geo.,  do  

Tarbutt",  J.  f'.,  do  

Johnson.  T.  H.  do  

Green,    John,    inspecting 

Shaw,  A. ,  do         

McGeorge,  W.  G. ,  do         

Foley,  J.  P.,  do        

Shaw,  J.,  do         

Graham,  J. ,  do         

Halterman,  C.  F.,  do        

Mahon,  J. ,  do         

Jackson,  VV.  do         

Beatty,  W. ,  stationery 

Mc  Williams,  J.  B. ,  stationery 

Do  travelling  expenses 

Way,  J.  F.,  disbursements    


Board  of  Examiners 

Local  saw  mill  inspections. 


Scrip  Issued. 


James  Fof)tt 

Calvin  &  Charles  Davis 
A.  Johnson 


800  00 

1,400  00 

1,310  00 

.530  00 

.527  2.5 

540  00 

1,23.)  ;»7 

473  (X> 

1,111  36 

693  .50 

682  6;} 

789  12 

l.OttO  00 

768  00 

961  03 

688  25 


170  00 
190  00 
200  00 
100  00 


320  00 
285  75 
100  00 
417  39 
60  00 

12  00 

4  75 
60  00 
40  00 
20  00 
40  85 
19  89 

6  00 

113  51 

18  00 

13  00 
3  75 

3:5  70 

5  48 
17  36 

6  20 
367  00 


1,965  70 
925  63 
100  00 


13,600  11 


660  00 


1,964  63 
410  00 
184  25 


2,991  33 


Carried  forward 


19 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  7.) 


A.  1875 


APPENDIX  No.  lb.— Concluded. 

Statement  of  Gross  Disbursements  of  the  Department  of  Crown  Lands  for  ten 
months  ending  3lst  October,  1875. 


Brought  forward 


Refunds   

I 

Colonization  Roads  

Surveys    

Advertising 

Ofl&ce  postage 

Subscriptions     

Petty  contingencies 

Two  per  cent,  of  duties  collected  on  timber  cut  on  road  allowances  paid  to 
Municipalities    


Total 


$     cts. 


$     ets. 


11,030  25 

87,455  80 

22,076  07 

1,215  36 

250  00 

158  65 

763  25 

982  70 

156,651  29 

William  Ford, 

Accountant. 


THOS.  H.  JOHNSON, 

Assistant  Commissioner. 


Crown  Lands  Department, 

Toronto,  31st  October,  1875. 


20 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  7.) 


A.  1875 


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39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  7.) 


A.  1875 


APPENDIX  No  18. 


PATENT  BRANCH. 


Statement  showing  the  number  of  Crown  Patents  issued  by  the  Patent  Branch 

during  the  year  1874. 


Number  of  Patents  issued  during  the  ten  months  ending  31st  October,  1874,  as 
previously  reported     


^  Number  of  Patents  issued  during  the  months  of  November  and  December,  1874  478 


Total  for  the  year  1874 

Number  of  Patents  issued  during  the  ten  months  ending  .Slst  October,  1875 . 


17% 


3.575 


Thomas  Devine, 

Deputy  Survey or-Oeneral. 

Department  of  Crown  Lands, 

Toronto,  :]lst  October,  1875. 


TITOS.  IT.  JOHNSON, 

A ssi.^tant  Commissioner. 


27 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  7.) 


A.  1875 


APPENDIX  No.  19. 

WoodsandForests. 

CcMPLETE  Statement  of  Revenue  collected    during  the   year  ending  31st  De- 
cember, 1874. 


S      cts. 

$      cts. 

Amount  of  Ottawa  Collections,  by  A.  .7.  Russell     

160,960  47 
119,168  49 

Do                        do                   M'L.  Stewart    

280,128  96 

Amount  of  Belleville  Collections,  by  Jos.  F.  Way 

102,532  .34 
3,030  76 

Do                        do                     M'L.  Stewart 

105,563  10 
102,599  14 

Amount  of  Western  Timber  District  Collections  at  Department    

Do                                   do                             by  M'L.  Stewart.. 

80,903  94 
21,695  20 

' 

Amount  collected  in  1874  on  account  of  sale  of  Lake  Huron  Timber 
Berths  of  October,  1872 

488,291  20 
14,713  22 

503,004  42 

G.    B.    COWPER, 

Chief  Clerk  in  Charge. 


THOS.  H.  JOHNSON, 

Assistant  Commissioner, 


Dep.-rtment  of  Crown  Lands, 

Toronto,  31st  December,  1874. 


28 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  7.) 


A.  1875 


APPENDIX  No.  20. 

Woods    and    Forests. 

Statement  of  Revenue  collected  during  the  ten   months  ending  31st   October, 

1875. 


Amount  of  Belleville  Collections,  by  Jos.  F.  Way  . . . . 
Do  do  M'Lean  Stewart 


Amount  of  Ottawa  Collections,  by  A.  J.  Russell 

Do  do  McLean  Stewart 


Amount  of  Western  Timber  Collections  at  Department 

Do  do  by  McLean  Stewart . . 


Total  collections  for  the  ten  months. 


$      cts. 


120,875  02 
61,785  53 


41,038  54 
445  10 


29,702  74 
3,204  26 


$      cts. 


182,660  55 
41,48:3  64 

32,907  00 


257,051  19 


Note.— In  addition  to  the  above,  the  sum  of  S770  15  was  collected  on  timber  cut  under  settlers  licenses 
applicable  towards  payment  of  lands. 


G.    B.    COWPER, 

Chief  Clerk  in  CJuirge. 

Department  of  Crown  Lands, 

Toronto,  31st  October,  1875. 


THOS.  H.  JOHNSON, 

Assistant  Commissioner. 


29 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  7.) 


A.  1875 


APPENDIX 

WOODS    AND 

Statement  of  Timber  and  Amounts  accrued  from  Timber  Dues,  Ground 


QUANTITIES  AND  DESCRIP 


Area 

under 

License. 

Saw  Logs. 

Oar 

White  Pine. 

TERRITORIES  AND 

White  Pine. 

Other. 

Logs. 

NAMES  OF  AGENTS. 

Square 
miles. 

Pieces. 

Stand- 
ards. 

Pieces. 

Stand- 
ards. 

Pieces. 

Pieces. 

Feet. 

Ottawa  Territory. 
A.  J   Russell  Agent    

7388 

934103 

797154 
460132 
324376 

2499 

13578 

418 

1252 

7435 

366 

9275 

88883 
4945 
9659 

4933439 

Belleville  Agency. 
J.  F  Way,  Agent    

1 
1999|     754990 

1 

6872     397387 

308281 

Western  Timber  District    

554003 

Total                       

16259    2086480'  1581662 

16495 

9053 

9275 

103487 

5795723 

GENERAL    STATEMENT 


QUANTITIES  AND  DESCRIP 


TERRITORIES  AND 

Basswood. 

Maple  and 
Butternut. 

Railway 
Ties. 

Pieces. 

Posts. 
Cords. 

Round 
Cedar. 

Fence 
Rails. 

NAMES  OF  AGENTS. 

Pieces. 

Feet. 

Pieces. 

Feet. 

Feet. 

Pieces. 

Ottawa  Territory. 

283 

139 

34 

9908 
5258 
1934 

20 

2 
26 

863 

89 

831 

1038 

Belleville  Agency. 

64474 
12003 

268 

119696 

8124 

Total 

mi 

17100 

48 

1783 

77515 

268      119696 

8124 

G.    B.   COWPER, 

Cliief  Clerk  in  Charge. 

Department  of  Crown  Lands, 

Toronto,  31st  December,  l.s7t. 


30 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  7.) 


A.  1875 


No.  21. 

F  O  KE  S  T  S. 

Rent  and  Bonuses,  during  the  year  ending  31st  December,  1874. 


TIONS  OF  TIMBER. 


Red  Pine. 

Boom  Timber. 

Oak. 

Elm  and  Ash. 

Tamarac. 

Birch,  Hemlock, 
and  Spruce. 

Pieces. 

Feet. 

Pees. 

Feet. 

r-  'S- 

Pees. 

Feet. 

Pieces. 

Feet. 

Pees.  Feet. 

Pieces. 

Feet. 

68600 

2491266 
4151 

892 

1 

268Q9I  32726 

14 

154 

1033 

472 

3805 

;i8151 

A.  1205 
E.   43 

A.  240 
E.   249 

A.  323 
E.  4845 

42656 
1313 

8729 
8943 

11088 
215442 

862 

77 
8 

26578 

2653 

312 

375 

73 

723 

1171 

22914 

98 
19 

115 

1920 

7014 
3068 

6757 
4414 

2762 
13061 

68617 

2496309 

115 

1920 

36891  43897 

1201 

42428 

A.  1768 
E.  .5137 

62473 
225698 

947 

29543 

38737 

OF    TIMBER,    kc— Continued. 


TIONS  OF  TIMBER. . 


Bolts.  1  Cordwood. 

1 

Other  Wood. 

Accounts  Accrued. 

Cords. 

Hard. 
Cords. 

Soft. 
Cords. 

Pieces. 

Feet. 

Trespass, 
&c. 

Timber 
Dues. 

Ground 
Rent. 

Bonus. 

Total. 

■ 
162 

54 

191 
2496  j 

5 

W.  W.  113 
Cherry  110 
Tel.  P.  293 

277 

11762 
4607 

16646 

•5  cts. 
1787  21 

5794  06 

12301  18 

S   cts. 
220900  17 

77550  94 

73509  76 

•S  cts. 
1.5002  00 

4645  50 

13998  00 

8  cts. 
8  00 

4  00 

4  00 

S   cts. 
237697  38 

87994  50 

99812  94 



162 

54 

2687 

22« 
Tel.  P.  293 

19882  45 

371960  87 

33645  50 

16  00 

425504  82 

THOS.  H.  JOHNSON, 

Assistant  C(mi7niss loner. 


31 


'39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  7.) 


A.   1875 


APPENDIX 

WOODS    A^•D 

Statement  of  Timber  and  Amounts  accrued  from  Timber  Dues.  Ground 


QUANTITIES  AND  DESCRIP 


Area 

under 

License. 

Square 
miles. 

Saw  Logs. 

Oar 

White  Pine. 

TERRITORIES  AND 

White  Pine. 

Other. 

Logs. 

NAMES  OF  AGENTS. 

Pieces. 

Stand- 
ards. 

Pieces. 

Stand- 
ards. 

Pieces. 

Pieces. 

Feet. 

Ottawa  Territory. 
A.  J.  Russell,  Agent   

BeUeville  Agency. 
J,  r.  Way,  Agent    

7406 
1829 
6534 

850399 
700456 
405223 

766512 
517008 
331227 

1136 

5714 

94 

517 

2072 

83 

5777 

99664 
1740 

5314426 

Western  Timber  District    

1846       99187 

Total 

15769 

1956078 

1614747 

6944 

2672 

5777 

103250    5535896 

GENERAL    STATEMENT 


QUANTITIES  AND  DESCRIP 


TERRITORIES  AND 

Birch,  Hemlock, 
and  Spruce. 

Basswood. 

Maple  and 
Butternut. 

Railway 
Ties. 

Posts. 

NAMES  OF  AGENTS. 

Pieces. 

Feet. 

Pieces. 

Feet. 

Pieces.       Feet. 

Pieces. 

Cords. 

Ottawa  Territory. 
A.  J.  Russell,  Agent    

Belleville  Agency. 
J.  F.  Way,  Agent    

H.       12 

S.          8 

462 

281 

113 

4993 

B.          61          200 

467 

30 

! 

B       132         4995 

i:^ 

1112 

M.       14 
B.        14 

521 

438 

Total 

H.       12           462           126 
S.          8           281 
B.      132'        49951 

6105 

M.       14 
B.        20 

521 

638 

467 

30 

G.    B.    COWPER, 

Chief  Clerk  in  Charge, 

Department  vf  Crown  Lands, 

Toronto,  3Lst  October,  1875. 


32 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  7.) 


A.  1875 


\     No.  19. 

FORESTS. 

Rent  and  Bonuses,  during  the  ten  months  ending  31st  October,  1875. 


TIONS  OF  TIMBER. 


Red  Pine. 

Boom  Timber. 

Round  Cedar. 

Oak. 

Elm  and  Ash. 

Tamarac. 

Pieces. 

Feet. 

Pieces. 

Stand- 
ards. 

Feet. 

Pees. 

Inches 

Pieces. 

Feet. 

Pieces. 

Feet. 

Pees. 

Feet. 

28430 

4 

64 

1081073 

147 

3017 

44904 
5819 
3017 

63990 
7043 
4840 

23704 

3778 
33166 

.35734 
252612 

43 

44 

594 

967 

1181 

17307 

E.        23 
A.      489 

E.      249 
A.        55 

E.    2129 
A.      289 

788 
17337 

95<34 
1876 

66901 
10965 

240 

51 

3 

6321 

1816 

126 

28498 

1084237 

53740 

75873 

23704 

36944 

288:^46 

681 

19455 

E.    2401 
A.      833 

77253 
30178 

294 

8263 

OF    TIMBER,    &  c  .—Continued. 


TIONS  OF  TIMBER. 


Bolts." 

Cord  Wood. 

Other  Wood. 

Amounts  Accrued. 

Cords. 

Hard. 

Cords. 

Soft. 
Cords. 

Pieces. 

Feet. 

Trespass, 
&c. 

Timber 
Dues. 

Ground 
Rent. 

Bonus. 

Total. 

676 

Spars  15 

1037 

$    cts. 
532  21 

1742  69 

5101  72 

S    cts. 
208444  47 

69706  87 

59249  61 

S    cts. 
15016  19 

4304  00 

13004  00 

$  cts. 
16  00 

4  00 

382  00 

8     cts. 
224008  87 

59 

75757  56 

Ch'y   3/ 

1359 

77737  Xi 

59 

676 

Spars  15 
Ch'y   37 

1037 
13.59 

7376  62 

337400  95 

32324  19 

402  00 

377503  76 

THOkS.  H   JOHNSON, 

Assistant  Coynmissioner. 


33 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  7.) 


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39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  7.) 


A.  1870 


APPENDIX  No.  32. 

Complete  Statement  of  Work    performed  in    the   Survey  Branch  during  the 

3'^ear  1874. 


For  work  performed  in  the  Survey  Branch  during  the  ten  months  ending  olst 
October,  1874,  see  the  Commissioner's  Report  issued  in  1874,  page  38. 

Work  Performed  during  the  Months  op  November  and  December,  1874. 

Reports  to  Council  relative  to  Municipal  Surveys  drawn  up  and  entered. 

Instructions  for  Municipal  Surveys  prepared  and  entered. 

Municipal  Surveys  e.xamined  and  confirmed. 

Plans  of  mining  locations  examined. 

Plans  of  Private  Surveys  examined. 

Plans  compiled  and  copied,  besides  Plans  of  Township  reduced  and  added  to  the 
engraved  maps. 

Letters  relative  to  Surveys  prepared,  written  and  entered. 

Mining  I^etters  prepared,  ^vritten  and  entered. 

Pages  of  Field  Notes  copied. 

Railway  Plans  and  Books  of  Reference  examined  and  certified  to. 


THOS.  H.  JOHNSON, 

Assistant  Comonissioner. 


Thos.  Devine, 

Deputy  Surveyor-General. 

Department  of  Crown  Lands, 

Toronto,  31st  October,  1875. 


43 


■39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  7.) 


A.  1875 


APPENDIX  No.  33. 

Statement  of  Work  performed  in  the  Survey  Branch,  during  the  10  months 

ending  31st  October,  1875. 


No. 


No.  of 
Description, 


1 

16 

2 

7 

3 

10 

4 

26 

5 

25 

6 

2.5 

7 

21 

8 

90 

9 

36 

10 

11 

126 

12 

24 

13 

2321 

14 

104 

Instructions  and  letters  of  instruction  for  Crown  surveys  prepared. 

Ci'own  survej'^s  examined,  completed  and  closed. 

Surveyor's  accounts  for  surveys  audited  and  closed. 

Reports  to  Council  relative  to  municipal  surveys  draAvn  up  and  entered. 

Instructions  for  municipal  surveys  prepared  and  entered. 

Municipal  surveys  examined  and  confirmed. 

Plans  of  mining  locations  examined. 

Plans  of  pr'ivate  surveys  examined. 

Plans  to  accompany  instructions  prepared. 

Plans   compiled   and   copied,  besides   plans  of  townships   reduced   and  added  to   the 

engi-aved  maps. 
Letters  relative  to  surveys  prepared,  written  and  entered. 
Mining  letters  prejjared,  written  and  entered. 
Pages  of  field  notes  copied. 
Railway  plans  and  books  of  reference  examined  and  certified. 


Note. — The  foregoing  statement  does  not  account  for  the  time  spent  in  furnishing  information  to  parties 
applying  personally  at  the  Surveyor's  Branch,  who  are  unable  to  gain  the  information  they  require  without 
the  assistance  of  the  head  of  this_ Branch,  and  then  much  careful  research  into  the  old  con'espondence,  plans, 
field  notes  and  other  documents  is  necessary  in  order  to  insure  reliability  in  the  information  given,  which  is 
frequently  used  as  legal  evidence  in  courts  of  law  in  disputed  cases. 


THOS.  H.  JOHNSON, 


Thos.  Devine, 

Deputy  Surveyor-General. 

Department  of  Crown  Lands, 

Toronto,  31.st  October,  lb75. 


Assistant  Commissioner. 


44 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  7.) 


A.   1S75 


APPENDIX  NO.  34. 

Statement  of  the  names  of  candidates  who  have  passed  their  examinations  before  the 
Board  of  Examiners  of  Land  Surveyors  for  Ontario,  during  the  year  1875. 


Harry  S.  Scatcherd. 
William  R.  Burke. 
Ernest  G.   Barrow. 
Thomas  Turnbull. 
John  Davis. 
Richard  B.  Rogers. 
Alexander  W.  Kipperr. 
Henry  J.   Gattermole, 
James  A.  Paterson. 
Josiah  G.  Sing. 
Charles  E.  Fitton. 


PRELIMTNAEY   CANDIDATES    PASSED. 

Sidney  J.  Sandford. 
John  Loring. 
(Jlemans  D.  Bowman. 
Arthur  Burnet. 
William  0.  Johnston. 
Thomas  A.  Lang. 
W.  J.  Sproule. 
C.  A.  Bigger. 
Thomas  Bolton. 
John  D.  McNab. 


FINAL    CANDIDATES    PASSED. 


William  T.  Thompson. 
Josiah  J.  Burrows. 
Frank  Purvis. 
George  M.  Kingston. 
John  Galbraith. 
Frank  L.  Blake. 


Robert  T.  Pope. 
John   Fair. 
Charles  Balstone. 
Joseph  Cozens. 
Henry  R.  McEvoy. 
James  A.  Bell. 


The  Board  of  Examiner*  of  Land  Surveyors  for  Ontario  meets  at  the  office  of  the  Com- 
missioner of  Crown  Lands,  on  the  first  Monday  in  each  of  the  months  of  January,  April, 
July,  and  October  in  every  year,  unless  such  Monday  be  a  holiday  (in  which  case  it  meets 
on  the  day  next  thereafter  not  being  a  holiday),  22  Vic.  cap.  77,  Consolidated  Statutes  of 
Canada.  j^ 

PRELIMINARY   EXAMINATION. 

All  persons,  before  they  can  be  apprenticed  to  a  Provincial  Land  Surveyor,  must  pass  u 
satisfactory  examination  before  the  Board  of  Examiners  in  the  following  subjects,  viz. :  Vul- 
gar and  Decimal  Fractions,  the  Extraction  of  Square  and  Cube  Root,  Practical  Geometry, 
Euclid,  Plane  Trigonometry,  Mensuration  of  Superficies,  and  the  use  of  Logarithms ;  good 
writing  and  spelling  required. 

FINAL    EXAMINATION. 

Final  candidates  before  obtaining  a  license  to  practise,  undergo  a  strict  and  searching 
examination  by  the  Board  of  Examiners,  as  to  their  proficiency  in  Euclid,  Plane  and  Spheri- 
cal Trigonometry,  Calculations  of  Areas  by  means  of  the  traverse  tables,  &c.,  laying  out 
and  dividing  up  of  land,  the  adjustment  and  use  of  the  transit  or  thcolite,  Astronomy, 
including  the  calculations  necessary  to  determine  the  latitude  by  meridian  altitudes  of  the 
sun,  moon  or  stars,  or  by  double  altitudes,  finding  the  time  when  any  star  passes  the  merid- 
ian, with  the  time  of  its  elongation,  azimuth  angle,  and  variation  of  the  con. pass,  the 
method  of  keeping  field  notes,  drawing  up  de.'^criptious  by  metes  and  bounds  for  insertion 
in  deeds,  taking  atfidavits  in  the  matter  of  disputed  boundaries,  the  law  regulating  Surveys, 
Geology,  and  also  as  to  their  proficiency  as  Draughtsmen. 

THOS.  H.  JOHNSON, 


A  ssistant  Commission  er. 


Thob.  Devine, 

Di'puiy  Surveyor- General, 

Department  of  Crown  Lands, 

Toronto,  31st  October,  1875. 
45 


By  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  7.) 


A.  1875 


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39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  7.)  A.  1875 


REPOJIT 


ON 


•    COLONIZATION  ROADS  WORKS 


IN 


ONTARIO, 


FOR    THE    MONTHS   OF    NOVEMBER   AND  DECEMBER,    1874,  AND  ALSO 
FOR  THE  TEN  MONTHS  ENDING  31st  OCTOBER,  1875. 


APPENDIX  37. 
Supplementary  Report  on  Colonization  Roads  and  Bridges,  for  the  Year  1874. 

Hon.  T.  B.  Pardee, 

Commissioner  of  Crown  Lands. 

Sir, — I  have  the  honour  to  report  to  you  the  remaiader  of  the  operations  and  expen- 
diture upon  Colonization  Roads  and  Bridges  during  the  months  of  November  and  December, 
in  the  year  1874,  not  contained  in  your  last  Report,  in  order  to  complete  the  same  for  the 
above  year. 

NORTH  DIVISION. 

Pigeon  River  Road. 

On  this  road  no  further  operations  in  the  field  were  carried  on  durinjr  the  year. 
A  further  sum  on  account  was  paid  to  the  contractor  of  |500. 

WEST  DIVISION. 

Rousseau  and  Nipissing  Road  (Sec.  1). 
No  work  was  done  since  the  date  of  last  Report.     Balance  of  account  paid,  $300. 

Rousseau  and  Nipissing  Road  (Sec   3). 

No  further  work  done  since  last  Report      Balance  of  account  paid,  $200. 

Cakdwef.l  Koad. 

No  final  Report  of  the  work  done  on  this  road  had  been  received  at  date  ot  ymii-  last 
Report. 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  7.)  A.  1875 


A  Report  of  the  work  has  been  since  received. 
Six  miles  of  line  were  constructed  as  a  winter  road. 

The  above  distance,  thus  opened,  reaches  fr^m  llousseau  Village  to  the  iatersectioa  of  the 
Rousseau  River. 

Balance  of  account  paid,  $200. 

EAST    DIVISION. 
BucKHORN  Road. 

The  northerly  end  of  this  road  was  let  by  contract,  as  stated  in  your  Report  of  last  sea- 
son, but  the  Inspector's  final  Report  on  the  works  had  not  beea  received  at  that  date. 

Seven  and  a  half  miles  and  two  chains  of  the  road  were  completed  for  $50()  per  mile. 

In  addition  to  the  amount  paid  previous  to  the  3 1st  October,  187-1:,  a  further  sum  of 
.$2,602  .50  was  paid  in  November  to  the  contractor  ;  S200  having  been  retained  on  accoout 
of  deficiencies. 

Cameron  Road. 

On  the  contract  work  of  this  road  an  additional  amount  has  been  paid  of  $200. 

Kingston  and  Perth  Road. 

The  Report  of  the  repairs  done  on  this  road  was  not  received  until  the  16th  of  December, 
1874.  The  road  has  been  repaired  from  Lot  19  in  the  .5th  Concession  of  Loboro'  as  far  as 
Lot  18  in  the  8th  C©ncession  of  the  same  Township,  a  distance  of  three  and  a  half  miles. 

There  has  been  paid  on  account,  since  the  date  of  the  last  Report  in  1874,  the  sum  of 
f200. 

Pembroke  and  Mattawa  Road. 

The  Report  of  the  completion  of  the  West  Section  of  this  road  came  in  on  the  25  th  of 
November,  1874. 

The  overseer  completed  six  miles  of  road,  extending  from  the  three  miles  conatructed 
last  year  eastward  from  Mattawa. 

The  road  has  been  well  ftiade  under  Specification  No.  1. 

A  further  sum  has  been  paid  on  account,  since  the  date  of  your  last  Report,  of  S400., 

Inspection. 

Paid  on  account  to  C.  F.  Aylesworth,  Inspector,  November  PJth,  1874,  $200. 

Paid  S.  G.  Best  for  same  (casual  service),  ."BIG. 

Total  amount  paid  in  mouths  of  November  and  December,  1874,  .$4,844  23^ 


APPENDIX  38. 


Hon.  T.  B.  Pardee, 

Commissioner  of  Crown  Lands. 

Sir, — 1  have  the  honour  to  report  to  you  the  operations  and  expenditure   of  th.,  Cola*- 
nization  Roads  Branch  of  your  Department  during  ten  months  of  the  present  year,  viz.,  from 
the  Ist  of  January  down  to  the  31st  of  October,  1875. 
4  49 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  7.)  A.  1875 


I. 
NORTH  DIVISION 

Pigeon  River  RoAr>. 

No  further  work  was  performed  on  this  Road  during  the  above  period. 

A  balance  of  account  in  full  was  paid  the  contractor,  amounting  to  $3,078   25. 

11. 
WEST  DIVISION. 

Rousseau  Road,  Section  No.  1. 

The  first  section  of  this  Road  embraces  what  we  call  the  "  permanent  works." 

That  part  of  line  operated  upon  this  year  was  of  an  exceedingly  rocky  and  broken  cha- 
racter, and  was,  consequently,  very  difficult  and  expensive  to  bring  into  any  regular  form 
of  road. 

The  almost  entire  absence,  in  places,  of  any  kind  of  soil,  the  prevalence  of  marshes,  and 
the  unusual  hard  character  of  the  rock,  where  blasting  was  indispensable,  rendered  the  work 
extremely  laborious  and  tedious. 

About  four  miles  of  line  is  reported  ro  have  been  worked  over,  although  in  parts  not 
finished. 

There  has  been  paid  on  account  $4,678  45. 

Rousseau  Road,  Section  No.  2. 

The  work  done  on  this  Section  was  commenced  at  the  Maganetewan  River,  and  has 
extended  as  far  as  the  projected  intersection  of  the  Georgian  Bay  Branch  of  the  Pacific 
Railway,  a  distance  of  about  eighteen  miles. 

The  final  Report  of  this  work  is  not  yet  received. 

In  connection  with  the  above  work,  certain  repairs  have  also  been  eflfected  to  the  south- 
ward of  the  Maganetewan  River,  where  the  road  had  become,  in  places,  impassable  for 
oaded  teams. 

There  has  been  paid  on  account  $3,028  98. 

Rousseau  Road,  Section  No.  3. 

This  Section  lies  from  the  projected  intersection  of  the  Georgian  Bay  Branch  of  the 
Pacific  Railway,  to  Lake  Nipissing,  a  distance  of  about  eighteen  miles. 

In  the  month  of  July  the  Inspector  visited  this  part  of  the  road,  and  found  at 
that  date  abont  five  miles  of  the  line  improved  in  a  limited  degree. 

As  no  final  Report  has  yet  been  received  of  the  nature  and  extent  of  the  repairs,  I  am 
unable  to  give  any  further  information  relative  to  them. 

There  has  been  paid  on  account  $869  05. 

Northern  Road. 

The  permanent  works  begun  last  year  were  continued  this  season  in  the  same  style  of 
improvements. 

About  three  and  a  half  miles  of  road  have  been  completed,  and  there  has  been  paid  on 
account  $2,895  25. 

Northern  Roau  Repairs. 

From  McKellar  Falls  southward  to  j)ermanent  works,  about  four  and  a  half  miles. 
No  final  Report  of  the  works  has  been  yd  received.    At  the  date  of  the  Inspector's  Re- 
port, in  July  last,  about  three  and  a  half  miles  had  been  worked  over. 
The  expenditure  on  account  is  $1,046  76. 

50 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  7.)  A.  1875 


Parry  Sound  Road. 

Permanent  works  have  been  continued  upon  this  road  five  and  a  quarter  miles  farther 
from  the  termination  of  last  year's  operations. 

The  works  are  of  the  same  character  and  style  as  those  of  last  year. 

These  works  now  extend  from  Parry  Sound  Village,  eastward,  a  distance  of  ten  and  a 
quarter  miles  ;  expenditure,  §4,598  38. 

Parry  Sound  Repairs,  Section  2. 

This  portion  of  the  road,  lyins:  between  Rousseau  and  the  terminus  of  this  year's  per- 
manent works,  a  distance  of  thirteen  miles,  was  worke  I  over  to  render  it  passable  for  freight 
teams  and  mail  carriage  between  Rousseau  and  Parry  Sound. 

All  places  within  the  said  distance  where  bad  mud-holes,  low  and  wet  ground,  or  broken 
bridges  existed,  were  repaired  accordingly. 

The  total  expenditure  thereon  is  81,012. 

Parry  Sound  Road,  Section  3. 

Fr^m  Rousseau  to  Muskoka  Junction,  distance  twenty-three  miles. 

This  Section  has  been  generally  repaired  throughout.  Some  very  important  deviations 
to  avoid  rocky  and  bad  hills,  have  been  made. 

The  two  principal  ones  are  the  Six-mile  Creek  and  the  Skeleton  Hill  deviations. 

These  deviations  have  necessitated  the  construction  of  some  four  or  five  miles  of  new 
road,  materially,  of  course,  increasing  the  expenditure. 

The  improvements,  however,  thus  made,  are  so  great,  and  decided,  that  I  consider  the 
outlay  for  the  public  benefit  has  been  amply  warranted.  An  important  bridge  over  Skeleton 
River,  on  the  latter  deviation,  is  still  in  course  of  construction. 

A  final  Report  of  the  works  has  not  yet  been  received. 

The  expenditure  on  account  is  $3,323  82. 

Cardwell  Road. 

This  road,  begun  last  year,  has  been  extended  and  improved  this  season  over  a  distance 
of  nine  and  a  half  miles. 

About  three  miles  were  completed  last  year,  and  eight  miles  in  addition  were  chopped 
and  cleared  of  timber. 

This  latter  portion  has  been  completed  as  a  good  winter  road,  and  the  road  has  been 
further  extended  to  the  1  2th  Concession  of  the  Township  of  (.'ardwell. 

A  good  substantial  bridge  has  also  been  built  across  the  Rousseau  River,  which  intersects 
this  road. 

There  has  been  paid  on  account .?  1,977   19. 

Distress  River  Koad. 

This  is  a  short  settlement  road,  uniting  from  the  eastward  with  the  Rousseau  Road, 
about  two  miles  north  of  the  Mayanetewnn  River. 

Three  miles  of  I'oad  have  been  built  as  a  good  class  winter  road,  on  which  distance  there 
are  three  small  pier  bridges,  some  large  culverts  and  crossways,  and  bome  heavy  ditching.  The 
expenditure  thereon  is  §771   15. 

Junction  Road,  No.  1. 

This  road  has  been  repaired  upon  its  westerly  end  from  the  northern  road,  eastward,  a 
distance  of  eight  miles. 

Several  small  bridges  were  embraced  in  the  above  repairs. 
Expenditure  on  account,  ^897  3U. 

51 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  7.)  A.  1875 


McDouQALL  Road. 

This  is  a  new  road  leading  from  the  Seguin  River  Bridge,  at  Parry  Sound  Village,  dia- 
gonally through  the  Township  of  McDougall. 

The  road  has  been  opened  and  completed  a  distance  of  two  and  a  quarter  miles. 

The  overseer  complains  that  the  country  was  extremely  rocky  and  the  road  difficult 
to  make — accounting  for  the  shortness  of  the  distance  constructed. 

Expenditure  on  account,  $1,107  35. 

Christie  Road. 

This  road,  begun  last  yoar,  is  now  completed  to  the  intersection  of  the  Rousseau  and 
Nipissing,  where  it  forms  a  junction  with  the  Monteith  and  Perry  Road,  which  latter  ex- 
tends eastward  to  the  Muskoka  Road. 

The  length  of  road  constructed  this  season  is  eight  and  a  quarter  miles. 

The  work  has  been  done  under  contract. 

It  has  been  satisfactorily  completed  under  an  improved  Specification,  No.  2. 

Total  cost  of  the  works,  $1,938  75. 

Doe  Lake  Road. 

This  is  a  Settlement  road,  leading  from  the  Monteith  and  Perry  Road,  past  Begg's  Mills, 
in  McMurrich,  and  thence  north-eastward  through  a  part  of  Ryerson  to  the  Maganetewan 
River,  a  total  distance  of  six  miles  and  twenty -two  chains. 

The  whole  roail  has  been  completed  as  a  superior  winter  road,  affijrding  access,  and 
transport  convenience,  to  three  settlements. 

The  expenditure  on  account  is  .$1,696  65. 

Monteith  and  Perry  Road. 

A  short  distance  of  two  miles  and  eleven  chains  remained  of  this  road  since  last  season 
to  effect  a  connection  with  the  Muskoka  Road,  in  the  Township  of  Perry. 

The  work  has  been  satisfactorily  completed  under  contract  for  the  sum  of  ^513. 

Lakk  Joseph,  North. 

This  road  is  a  prolongation  of  the  road  made  in  1870,  westward,  to  its  union  with  Lake 
.Toseph  Road,  South.  Its  length  is  three  miles  and  eleven  chains.  It  has  been  built  as  a 
winter  road,  under  Specification  No.  2. 

Total  cost  of  the  work,  .*|604  40. 

Stisted   Road. 

A  change  has  been  made- in  the  location  of  this  road  this  season,  in  that  part  contiguous 
to  th<i  Muskoka  Road,  in  order  to  make  the  connections  therewith  more  direct  and  convenient 
to  settlers. 

To  efi'ect  this  one  mile  of  new  road  has  been  made. 

The  remainder  of  the  road  northward,  to  the  point  where  this  season's  contract  work 
commenced,  has  been  also  carefully  repaired  a  distance  of  between  two  and  three  miles  further. 

Paid  on  account,  $398  50. 

Stisted  Road. 

Cov  tract  Work. 

Tliis  road,  from  the  end  of  the  work  last  described,  was  prolonged  northward  under 
contract,  a  distance  of  seven  miles. 

Tlie  work  has  been  satisfactorily  completed  at  a  total  cost  of  $1,386. 

52 


I 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  7.)  A.  1875 


Three  Mile  Lake  Road. 

This  is  a  new  road  to  afford  access  for  the  settlement  adjacent  to  Dee  Bank,  in  Watt,  to 
the  Parry  Sound  Road. 

Five  miles  of  the  located  line,  commencing  at  Dee  Bank  P.O.,  were  let  by  contract  and 
satisfactorily  completed  at  a  total  cost  of  $890. 

Lake  Joseph  Road,  South. 

The  repairs  commenced  last  year  on  this  road  have  been  this  season  completed  to  the 
intersection  of  the  Muskoka  Road,  a  distance  often  miles. 

These  improvements  are  reported  by  the  Inspector  to  have  been  well  made,  and  the  road 
throughout  to  the  Village  of  Port  Carling  is  now  in  a  fair  condition  for  travel. 

There  has  been  expended  on  account  $1,455  31. 

Muskoka  Road. 
{From  \Uh  mile  to  Huntsville.) 

This  road  has  been  repaired  from  the  sixteenth  mile  to  the  Village  of  Huntsville,  a  dis- 
tance of  between  ten  and  eleven  miles. 

There  has  been  paid  on  account  $936  83. 

Muskoka  Road. 

(North  of  Huntmlk.) 

Late  in  the  season,  urgent  representations  were  made  by  the  settlers  in  Chaffey  of  the 
impassable  condition  of  this  road.  Also,  that  the  bridge  over  the  East  River  was  in  a  highly 
dangerous  condition.  Upon  examination  it  was  decided  to  repair  the  bridge,  and  make  what 
temporary  improvements  could  be  effected  on  the  road  line  before  the  season  would  completely 
close.  No  final  Report  of  the  work  has  been  received  yet.  There  has  been  paid  on  account 
$801  13. 

East  River  Road. 

The  first  section  of  this  road  has  been  built  this  year,  reaching  from  the  Village  of  Hunts, 
ville  to  the  intersection  of  the  East  River,  about  two  and  a  half  miles. 

This  road  has  been  formed  as  a  superior  second  class  road.  The  work  includes  a  con- 
siderable excavation  of  the  river  bank,  in  order  properly  to  approach  the  bridge  spanning 
what  is  called  East  River. 

There  has  been  paid  on  account  $695  72. 

Muskoka  and  Bobcaygeon  Road. 

This  road  has  been  completed  as  a  winter  road  to  the  intersection  of  Bobcaygeon  Road, 
close  to  the  bridge  built  in  1863,  across  the  North  Branch  of  the  Muskoka  River,  about  three 
miles. 

Some  eight  miles  also  of  the  road  between  the  above  terminus  and  Huntsville  were  re- 
paired.    Amount  paid  on  account  $851  06. 

'  Brunel  Road. 

This  road  has  been  prolonged  to  its  intersection  with  the  Muskoka  and  Bobcaygeon 
Road,  where  it  terminates. 

The  distance  constructed  this  season  is  about  two  and  a  half  miles. 
Paid  on  account  $747  42. 

53 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  7.)  A.  1875 


Baysville  Road. 

This  is  a  very  important  road,  and  will  afford,  when  completed,  easy  communication 
from  Baysville  through  the  township  of  Brunei  to  Huntsville. 

An  excellent  line  has  been  located  for  the  road,  and  five  and  one-fourth  miles  have  been 
constructed  this  season  of  a  very  superior  second-class  road,  reaching  from  Baysville  north- 
ward. 

Throughout  this  distance  the  line  is  comparatively  level.  There  has  been  paid  on  account 
$971  04. 

Macaulay  Road. 

The  work  on  this  road  has  been  confined  to  the  easterly  half  of  the  road,  a  distance  of 
about  eight  miles. 

Owing  to  the  wretched  location  of  this  line  in  the  first  instance,  the  road  in  its  original 
construction  passed  over  some  of  the  very  worst  portions  of  the  country. 

A  careful  exploration  was  made  in  the  early  part  of  the  summer  for  the  purpose  of  deviat- 
ing from  those  impracticable  sections  which  could  not  be  rendered  passable  for  loaded  teams 
with  any  reasonable  amount  of  expenditure. 

As  many  as  twelve  deviations  from  the  original  location  have  been  made,  the  effect  of 
which  is  to  avoid  some  twenty  of  the  worst  hills  upon  the  road. 

When  all  the  improvements  are  completed  which  have  been  begun  this  season,  this  road, 
from  having  been  one  of  the  worst  in  this  district,  will  have  become  probably  the  best. 

One  or  two  places  which  it  was  impossible  to  avoid — such  as  the  Devil's  Gap  and  the 
Outlet  Lake — have  been  rendered  substantial  and  of  easy  passage  by  well  constructed  bridges, 
guarded  with  braced  hand-rails. 

Eight  miles  of  road  have  thus  been  passed  over  ;  and  as  the  deviations  have  been  so 
numerous  as  to  include  a  good  part  of  the  distance,  and  the  improvements  upon  the  parts  of  the 
line  retained  are  thorough  and  substantial,  I  consider  the  whole  work  done  upon  this  road 
this  season  to  be  equal  to  six  miles  of  first-class  road. 

Thei'e  has  been  expended  on  account  !|2,428  43. 

Macaulay  Road,  South. 

The  repairs  upon  this  road  commenced  on  Lot  No.  9,  and  ended  on  Lot  No.  21,  the 
total  distance  being  three  miles  and  a  half. 

The  work  on  this  road  has  been  carefully  and  well  done,  including  the  renewal  of  a  high 
pier  bridge  to  overcome  a  bad  rocky  and  abrupt  hill,  which  could  not  otherwise  be  avoided. 

The  expenditure  has  been  $838  30. 

MusKOKA  Road,  South, 

This  road  has  been  repaired  from  Gravenhurst  to  within  about  one  mile  of  the  South 
Falls. 

From  this  point  a  deviation  has  been  made  to  avoid  the  very  long  and  difficult  hills 
lying  on  the  old  route  between  the  South  and  North  Falls. 

The  hills  alluded  to  have  been  the  great  dread  of  all  travellers  passing  between  the  above 
points;  and  as  in  the  winter  season — when  the  navigation  on  the  lakes  is  closed — there  has 
been  no  other  access  to  the  Village  of  Braccbridge  from  the  south  but  by  this  roid,  its  passage 
was  a  necessity. 

A  line  has  been  located  this  season,  turning  to  the  left  from  the  ])oint  above  named, 
where  the  repairs  ended,  passing  on  and  near  the  easterly  boundary  of  .Muskoka  Township, 
and  from  thence,  at  the  intersection  of  the  said  boundary  with  the  Muskoka  River,  along  the 
southerly  maririn  of  the  river  to  the  village. 

The  road  has  not  been  thoroughly  completed  at  its  northerly  terminus,  but  suflBciently 
so  to  be  available  for  winter  use.  This  improvement  is  acknowledged  to  be  of  incalculable 
benefit  to  the  interests  of  Bracebridge. 

There  has  been  expended  on  account  of  the  above  repairs  and  new  road  $2,228  95. 

54 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  7.)  A.  1875 

^^ —  —  —  *^ 

Rtde  Road. 

This  settlement  road  leads  from  a  point  on  the  Muskoka  Road,  about  midway  between 
Severn  Bridge  and  Gravenhurst,  eastward  into  the  Township  of  Ryde. 
There  have  been  about  five  miles  of  road  opened  as  a  winter  road. 
Expenditure  on  account,  $1,072  44. 

Dalton  and  Washago  Road. 

This  road  leads  from  the  bridge  on  Orillia  Island,  whicli  spans  the  west  branch  of  the 
Severn,  across  tho  said  Island  eastward. 

It  passes  the  main  stream  by  a  bridge  erected  by  the  settlers,  thence  along  the  town 
line  of  Morrison  and  Rama,  and  eastward  to  the  Township  of  Dulton. 

About  two  miles  and  a  quarter  have  been  opened  and  improved. 

There  has  been  paid  on  account  $347  93. 

Garden  Road 

*rhis  road  runs  from  the  southerly  boundary  of  Garden  northward  along  the  line  between 
the  seventh  and  eighth  Goncessions,  to  the  north  boundary  of  the  same  township,  and  thence 
to  the  intersection  of  the  Monck  Road.  There  have  been  about  ten  miles  of  the  road  were 
repaired. 

Paid  from  departmental  appropriation,  on  account,  $330 ;  and  from  municipal  contri- 
bution, $300. 

Cameron    Road. 

Some  necessary  improvements  have  been  made  f)n  this  road  this  season,  reaching  from  a 
point  a  little  north  of  the  Village  of  Norland  to  the  Village  of  Coboconk,  a  distance  of  about 
six  miles. 

Expenditure  on  account,  $569  02.; 

MoNCK  Road. 

This  road  has  been  completed  from  the  intersection  of  the  Fenelon  Falls  Road  with  the 
Monck  Road  to  the  Village  of  Kinmount. 

The  road  has  been  ditcheJ  throughout  that  distance  (two  miles),  and  further  repairs 
have  been  made  in  brushing  and  off-take  drains. 

The  Grego's  Creek  Bridge,  on  this  road,  has  also  been  built.  It  is  a  substantial  and 
well- finished  structure. 

There  has  been  paid  on  account  of  both  roud  and  bridge  the  sum  of  $1,480  10. 

III. 
EAST   DIVISION. 

Bobcaygeon  Road. 

The  work  done  upon  this  road  this  season  has  been  :— 
1st.   Repairs  between  the  Village  of  Kinmount  and  the  Village  o   Mindeo. 
2nd.   Reconstruction    of  a   bridge   lying   between    Minden    and   the    Peterson     Road 
intersection. 

These  improvements  have  been  carefully  and  well  done. 

The  length  of  road  repaired,  exclusive  of  the  bridg.',  is  eleven  miles. 

The  amount  paid  on  account  is  $1,485  80. 

BucKHORN  Road. 

Two  distinct  contracts  were  let  on  this  road  in  order  to  effect  the  satisfactory  completion 
of  the  same  to  the  intersection  of  the  Monck  Road. 

55 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  7.)  A.  1875 


1st.  The  completion  of  seven  and  a  half  miles  of  the  line  as  a  summer  road,  which  had 
only  been  constructed  as  a  cheap  winter  road. 

2nd.  The  consfruetion  of  that  part  of  the  line  in  the  Township  of  Cavendish  which  had 
not  been  opened  in  any  manner,  a  distance  of  one  mile  and  three-quarters. 

Both  contracts  have  been  satisfactorily  completed. 

There  has  been  expended  on  account  of  the  first  work  $1,721,  and  on  account  of  the 
second  work  ^864. 

MoNCK  Road. 

{East  of  Kinmount.) 

The  Monck  Eoad,  between  the  Village  of  Kinmount  all  through  to  the  Hastings  Road 
intersecticn,  has  received  some  necessary  general  repairs,  consisting  of  renewal  of  burnt  cross- 
ways  and  small  bridges,  and  removal  of  stumps  and  stones. 

The  whole  distance  gone  over  between  the  above  described  points  is  fifty-six  miles. 

Of  course  there  is  a  large  amount  of  this  distance  upon  which  no  repairs  were  specially 
needed,  and  the  actual  work  has  only  been  where  positive  breaches  or  obstructions  existed. 

The  amount  expended  on  account  is  $1,209  70. 

Burleigh  Road. 

General  repairs  have  been  made  on  the  Burleigh  Road,  commencing   at  the  Burleigh 
Bridge,  and  extending  northwards  towards  the  Monck  Eoad  intersection. 
No  final  Report  of  the  extent  of  the  work  has  yet  been  received. 
There  has  been  expended  on  account  $600. 

Hastings  Road. 

The  repairs  on  this  road  commenced  at  the  Jordan  Creek,  and  extended  in  the  first  place 
from  thence  through  the  Township  of  Tudor  to  McKilligan's,  fifteen  miles  ;  the  second 
line  of  repairs  commenced  at  Robinson's  farm,  and  extended  northward  about  ten  miles 
further,  reaching  to  L'Amable  Lake  deviation,  and  comprising  altogether,  a  distance  of 
twenty  five  miles. 

The  repairs  consist  of  the  reconstruction  of  several  bridgss,  renewal  of  crossways,  and 
the  usual  works  necessary  to  improve  the  surface. 

The  load  is  now  reported  to  be  in  a  very  passable  condition  for  travel  as  far  as  the 
Peterson  Road. 

The  expenditure  on  account  is  $1,627  06. 

Peterson  Road. 
{JVest  of  Hastings.) 

The  bridge  crossing  McGarry's  Creek  has  been  renewed,  and  five  and  one-half  miles  of 
the  road  repaired  from  Doyle's  Corners  westward. 

The  road  line  through  disuse  had  become  almost  obliterated,  being  choked  with  second 
growth  underwood. 

The  road  has  been  well  formed  and  completed  as  a  second-class  road. 

Expenditure  on  account,  $856  28. 

Peterson  Road. 

(Between  Minden  and  Stanhope.) 

Nine  miles  of  this  road,  from  the  Bobcaygcon  intersection  eastward,  have  been  repaired. 
The  work  has  been  satisfactorily  done  at  moderate  cost. 
There  has  been  paid  on  account  $499  tJ7. 

56 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  7.)  A.  1875 


Carlow  Road. 

This  road,  built  in  the  year  1869  as  a  winter  road,  has  been  this  season  repaired  through- 
out its  first  section,  reaching  from  the  Mississippi  Road  to  York  River,  a  distance  of  twelve 
miles. 

The  repairs  have  been  carefully  done,  and  a  considerable  amount  of  earth-work  covering 
and  ditching  performed. 

The  expenditure  on  account  is  $687  6i. 

L'Amable  Road. 

This  short  road  connects  the  Mississippi  Road  with  the  Hastings  Road  from  the  valley 
of  the  L'Amable  Creek,  in  a  north-easterly  direction  across  the  York  River. 

The  whole  distance  is  two  and  three-quarters  miles.  Two  miles  of  this  distance  was 
opened  and  partly  completed  last  year,  reaching  to  the  York  River. 

This  year  that  portion  has  been  graded  and  completed,  and  the  remaining  portion  opened 
and  also  finished. 

The  bridge  across  the  York  River  has  likewise  been  constructed  and  the  connection 
eflPected — so  desirable  for  the  convenience  of  the  settlers  passing  to  and  from  that  vicinity. 

The  expenditure  on  account  is 


Addington  Road. 

Operations  were  commenced  on  this  road  this  year  at  Clare  River  Bridge,  and  proceeded 
northward  eleven    and  a  half  miles. 

The  whole  distance  has  been  tolerably  repaired. 
Amount  paid  on  account,  $947   16. 

Frontevac  Road. 

Twenty  miles  of  this  road,  between  Doniston  P.  0.  and  the  Mississippi  Road,  have  been 
examined  and  repaired  wherever  points  impassable  for  loaded  teams  existed. 
There  has  been  spent  on  account  $887  88. 

Mississippi  Road  (New). 

The  appropriation  made  for  this  road  in  the  Estimates  for  1875  was  $1,500,  which  sum 
it  was  supposed  would  be  sufficient.  Owing,  however,  to  the  facts  of  an  unusually  rough 
and  rocky  tract  of  1  md  necessary  to  be  passed  over,  and  the  line  proving  somewhat  longer 
than  had  been  anticipated,  the  above  amount  will  not  be  adequate  to  fully  complete  the  work. 
The  overseer  was  instructed,  however,  to  carry  the  road  work  through,  to  meet  the 
end  of  the  completed  road  from  Hastings  Road,  po  that  a  winter  connection  might  at  least  be 
formed.  These  instiuctions  have  been  carricH  out.  The  length  of  road  made  this  year  is 
five  miles  and  forty-five  rods,  and  there  has  been  paid  on  account  $1,401   37. 

Mississippi  Road  (Repairs.) 

This  road  has  been  repaired  this  season  from  the  twenty-second  mile  for  a  distance  west 
ward  of  sixteen  and  a  half  miles,  within  about  two  miles  of  the  intersection  of  the  Adding- 
ton Road. 

The  road  is  reported  to  have  been  well  improved,  and  to  be,  over  the  above  distance,  in 
a  good  travellable  condition. 

Expenditure   on    account,  $975  57. 

Bridgwater  Road. 

Two  hundred  and  fifty  dollars  were  approjjriated  for  the  repair  of  some  bad  hills  upon 
this  road,  on  condition  that  the  Municipality  of  Elziver  should  contribute  an  equal  amount 
for  the  same  object. 

57 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  7.)  A.  1875 


The  whole  amount  ($500)  has  been  expended,  and  the  work  satisfactorily  accomplished 
Expenditure  by  the  Department,  $250. 

Oso  AND  Olden  Road. 

Five  hundred  dollars  were   appropriated  for  additional   repairs  on  this  road.     N  >  final 
Report  has  yet  been  received  from  the  overseer. 
There  has  been  paid  on  account  $300. 

Kingston  and  Perth  Road. 

An  appropriation  was  made  to  continue  nine  miles  of  necessary  repairs  upon  this  road, 
so  as  to  render  the  same  passable  for  loaded  teams. 
Total  expenditure,  $501  29. 

Hyde  Chute  and  Sampson's  Road. 

The  repairs  on  this  road  have  been  completed  this  season,  over  eighteen  miles. 

A  good  portion  of  this  distance  received  but  little  attention,  not  requiring  much  im- 
provement. 

The  labour  was  concentrated  mainly  upon  those  parts  rendered  impassable  through  burnt 
crossways  and  bad  mud-holes. 

There  has  been  paid  on  account  $1,.394  04. 

Opeongo  Road. 

The  first  work  on  this  road  this  season  commenced  where  that  of  last  year  closed,  viz., 
at  Clontarf  P.O. 

No  final  Report  of  the  work  done  on  this  section  has  been  yet  received. 

There  has  been  paid  on  account  $3,163  53. 

In  the  latter  end  of  the  season  urgent  representations  were  made  to  the  Department  of 
the  necessity  for  repairs  being  done  on  an  upper  portion  of  this  road,  called  the  "  Prussian 
Hills."  As  very  little  of  the  working  period  of  the  year  remained  when  the  Department  de- 
cided to  comply  with  the  above  request,  two  labourers'  gangs  were  organized  in  order  to  com- 
plete the  work  alluded  to.  One  of  the  overseers  has  reported  his  section  finished,  a  distance  of 
six  miles.     From  the  other  no  Report  has  yet  been  received. 

Paid  on  account  of  both  gmgs,  S600. 

Eo.VNVILLE   and   FoY    RoAD. 

This  road  leads  from  Eganville  Village  to  Foy's  settlement  on  the   Opeongo  Road,  west 
of  Clear  Lake.    There  has  been  five  miles  of  the  same  repaired. 
Paid  on  account  thereof,  $973  88. 

Eganville  and  Opeongo  Road. 

This  road  leads  from  the  above  village  in  an  almost  south  course  to  Opeongo  Road. 
There  lias  been  four  miles  of  this  road  repaired  this  season. 
Expenditure  on  account,  $870  G3. 

Pembroke  and  Mattawa  Road. 

The  works  of  construction  on  this  road  have  been  this  year  completed,  and  the  whole 
distance  between  the  Petewawa  River  and  the  Mattiiwa  River  are  now  opened  for  summer 
travel,  a  distance  of  abodt  ninety  miles.  The  portion  made  this  year  commenced  at  a  point 
eastward  from  the  Village  of  Mattawa,  nine  miles  ;  thence  eastward  six  miles  and  forty  rods 
to  a  junction  with  the  finished-work  of  last  year. 

The  distance  made  this  season  has  been  carefully  and  well  constru'^tcd. 

Expenditure  on  account,  $2,938  47. 

58 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  7.)  A.  1875 


Stephenson  BRrocE. 

This  structure  spans  the  North  Branch  of  the  Muskoka  Eiver  on'  the  Town  line  between 
Stephenson  and  Macaulay.  ^  .,««,.,       m,     r 

The  entire  length  of  this  bridge  is  215  feet.  The  main  span  is  100  feet.  The  form  is 
a  combination  of  built  stringers  or  chords  strengthened  by  a  queen  post  truss. 

The  main  piers  are  shielded  with  boiler  plate-iron,  and  loaded  with  about  forty  hve 
cords  of  stone. 

There  has  been  paid  on  account  $2,043  18. 

East  Eiver  Bridge. 

{In  cmrse  of  Construction.) 

This  bridtre  is  across  the  above-named  river  on  Lot  No,  9,  in  the  4th  Con.  of  Chaffey. 
The  bridire,  when  completed,  will  be   similar  in   character  and   construction  with  Ste- 
phenson Bridge,  above  described. 

There  has  been  expended  on  account  $419  78. 


BALANCES  OF  1873-4  PAID  OUT  OF  THE    APPROPRIATION  OF  1S75, 
AND  NOTED  IN  THE  RECAPITULATION. 


I'cmbroke  and  Mattaw 
Northern 

a  noaa 

(1 

300  00 

(( 

66  44 

Rousseau  and  Nipissing 
Cameron 

(f 

160  08 

Brido'C                   

92  50 

39  52 

2,000  00 

Parry  Sound 
Mississippi 
Inspection 
Kingston  and  Perth 
Northern 

Road               

100  00 

{i 

95  42 

a 

(I 

20  00 

101  23 

80  00 

000  00 

Glamorgan 
Parry  Sound 
Northern 
Inspection 
Lake  Joseph 
Burleigh  Extension 
Hastings 
Inspection 

Bridge  

Road        ....                 

10  00 

377  01 

I 

268  95 

295  00 

20  00 

(<                                    _^          ^^ 

(I 

500  00 

7  17 

113  00 

200  00 

Pembroke  and  Mattawa     "      , 

Musquosh  Road    and  Bridge  

5  00 

100  00 

$6,150  33 
59 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  7.)  A.  1875 


SUMMARY  OF  EXPENDITURE  ON  COLONIZATION  ROADS  AND  BRIDGES 
FROM  1st  JANUARY  TO  1st  OF  NOVEMBER,  1875. 

I. 

NORTH    DIVISION. 

Pigeon  River  Road $3,078  25 

II. 

WEST  DIVISION. 

$       cts. 

Rosseau  Road,  Section  1 4,678  45 

"             "           "        2 3,028  98 

«             "           "       3 869  05 

Northern     "         2,895  25 

''             "         (Repairs)    1,046  76 

Parry  Sound  Road  (Permanent) 4,598  38 

"   (Repairs  No.  1) 1,012  00 

"   ("             "      2) 3,323  82 

Cardwell           "         1,977  19 

Distress  River  " 771   15 

Junction           "     No.  1 897.30 

Macdougall       " 1,107  35 

Christie            "     1,938  75 

Doe  Lake         "     1,696  65 

Monteith  and  Perry  Road  513  00 

Lake  Joseph  Road  (North) 604  40 

Stisted               "      (Repairs) 398  50 

"    (Contract) 1,386  00 

Three  Mile  Lake  Road  "         890  00 

Lake  Joseph  Road  (South)   1,455  31 

Muskoka          "       (South  of  Huntsville) 936  83 

"                 "      (North   "         "         ) 801   13 

East  River       "          695  72 

"      Bridge   419  78 

StepheDSOn's  " 2,043  18 

Muskoka  and  Bobcaygeon  Road    851  06 

Brunei                                    "        747  42 

Baysville                                  "        .,  97104 

Macaulay                                "        2,428  43 

"        (South) 838  80 

Muskoka                               "        (South)     2,228  95 

Ryde                                     "        1,072  40 

Dalton  and  Washago            "         347  93 

Carden                                    "         3-10  00 

Cameron                                 "         569  02 

Monck                                   "        1,480  10 

$51,149  09 
60 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  7.) 


A.  1875^ 


(No.  1) 
(  "    2) 


III. 

EAST  DIVISION. 

$ 

Bobcayg-eon   Road 1,485 

"     2,585 

"     (East  of  Kinmount)     1,209 

«      600 

" 1,627 

856 

499 

687 

500 

947 

m87 

(iwr'"'"/Vy.".!^!^^'"^.!^"!!^!^!' "...^'  "^..!!!.  1,401 

(Repairs)  975 

250 

300 

Kin2;ston  and  Perth  Road  501 

Hyde,  Chute  and  Sampson's  Road 1,394 

Opeongo  Road 3,163 

"  "  (Repairs)  600 

Eganville  and  Foy's  Road 973 

"      Opeongo"    870 

Pembroke  and  Mattawa  "    2,938 


Buckhorn 

Monck 

Burleigh 

Hastings 

Peterson 

a 

Carlow 

L'Amable 

Addington 

Frotitenac 

Mississippi 


Bridgwater  .      " 
Oso  and  Olden  " 


cts. 
80 
00 
70 
00 
06 
28 
67 
64 
00 
16 
88 
37 
57 
00 
00 
29 
04 
53 
00 
88 
03 
47 


,254  97 


IV. 

$     cts. 

Inspection 1,569   16 

Locations 255  00 

Balances  of  1873  and  1874    ■ 6,150  33 


RECAPITULATION. 

$      cts. 

North  Division  3,078  25 

West  Division 51,149  09 

East  Division 25,254  97 

Inspection 1,569  10 

Location 255  00 

Baknces  of  1873  and  1874 6,150  33 

Balance  on  hand 10,844  29 


Total  amount  of  Appropriations $98,300  00 


61 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  7.)  A.  1875 


Summary  of  All  the  Works  up  to  November  1st,  1875. 

Miles  of  New  Roads  made 99 

"         "         Roads  repaired 343 

"         "            "       permanently  repaired..  13 

No.  of  New  Bridges  made 23 

"         "       Bridges  repaired 6 

The  final  Reports  of  some  of  the  works  not  having  been  received  at  the  above  date,  there 
will  be  a  small  addition  of  works  and  expenditure  to  complete  the  season's  0])erations  added 
to  next  year's  Departmental  Report,  similar  to  the  supplementary  one  preceding  this. 

Respectfully  submitted 

By  your  obedient  servant, 

J,  W.  Bridgland, 

Supt.  of  Col.  Eoctds. 
Department  of  Crown  Lands. 

Toronto,  1st  November,  1875. 


62 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  7.)  A.  1875 


APPENDIX  NO.  39. 
Mining  Inspector's  Report — Madoc  Division. 

Crown  Land  Office, 

Belleville,  31st  October,  1875. 

Sir, — I  have  the  honour  to  submit  for  your  consideration  the  following  Report  : — 

The  operations  in  mining  for  gold  in  this  agency  during  the  past  year  consist  chiefly  in 
prospecting  and  preparing  the  necessary  machinery  to  work  with  success  the  few  mines  that 
have  already  been  opened.  The  Toronto  Gold  Mining  Company,  having  completed  their  pre- 
leminary  and  tentative  operations  on  lot  number  six,  in  the  ninth  concession  of  Marmora,  are 
making  preparations  for  regular  and  systematic  mining  and  reducing  work,  and  it  is  hoped 
they  will  secure  a  steady  and  remunerative  return  for  the  large  amount  of  money  they  have 
expended. 

Mr.  Gatling  hiis  not  yet  succeeded  in  getting  his  machinery  into  motion,  but  iu  the 
meantime  has  persevered  in  the  developmenjt  of  the  several  veins  which  intersect  his  property, 
and  has  not  only  confirmed  the  extent  and  richness  of  those  previously  discovered,  but  has 
found  additional  ones  that  promise  to  be  of  similar  value  with  the  former. 

Mr.  Walker,  whose  mining  area  is  on  the  road  allowance  between  lot  number  eight,  in 
the  eighth,  and  eight  in  the  ninth  concessions  of  Marmora,  is  endeavouring  to  make  arrange- 
ments for  shipping  the  ore  of  his  mine  to  Swansea. 

That  persevering  and  experienced  miner,  Mr.  W.  II.  Palmer,  is  still  pursuing  his  re- 
searches on  the  llichardson  Mill.  He  is  not  very  comii  unicative,  but  seems  to  find  sufficient 
encouragement  to  induce  and  enable  him  to  persist  in  his  operations. 

In  lead,  several  discoveries  have  been  made,  but  the  tinders,  as  usual,  do  not  talk  much 
or  loudly  about  them.  Messrs.  Maas  it  Co.  are  developing  a  vein  of  great  promise  in  tlie 
Township  of  Limerick,  and  two  samples  from  another  locality  iu  Hastings  County,  assayed 
by  Profes.sor  Lell,  of  Albert  University,  yielded,  the  one  at  the  rate  of  1,120  pounds  of  lead 
and  six  ounces  of  silver,  and  the  other  of  1,600  pounds  of  lead  and  thirty -five  ounces  of  silver 
I  er  ton  (2,000  pounds  of  ore). 

A  deposit  of  the  rare  metal,  molybuenum,  has  also  been  found  in  one  of  the  northern 
townships  of  Hastings.  It  is  disseminated  in  nodules  and  scales  in  a  highly  ferruginous 
matrix,  and  from  the  specimens  brought  in,  and  the  description  of  the  ext<nt  of  the  deposit' 
given  by  the  finder,  appears  to  exist  in  considerable  abundance.  « 

The  greatest  interest  as  well  as  the  gre;itest  success  has  attended  the  development  of  the 
iron  deposits,  which  far  surpass,  both  in  number  and  in  extent,  all  the  others  put  together.  The 
parties  who  are  most  actively  engaszed  in  this  work  are  Messrs.  Pardee  &  Lloyd,  and  Messrs. 
J.  B.  Maas  &  Co.  The  former  firm  own.  besides  the  well-known  Seymour  Mine,  (which  I 
may  mention  yields  the  highest  percentage  of  metallic  iron  of  any  known  iron  ore  in  the  world), 
four  other  valuable  mines  in  the  Township  of  Madoc,  two  in  Marmora,  and  several  more  in 
the  adjacent  Townships  of  Lake  and  Methuen,  including  the  Mclnroy  Mine— the  largest  de- 
posit hitherto  discovered  in  the  Province,  extending  over  eight  acres  iu  an  apparently  un- 
broken mass. 

These  gentlemen  are  also  at  present  engaged  in  constructing  a  railway,  under  the  name 
of  "  The  Belleville  and  North  Hastings  Railw:.y."  from  a  convenient  point  on  the  Graml 
Junction  Railway  to  the  Moore  Mine  in  Madoc,  and  have  it  in  contemplation  to  extend  it 
to  their  more  remote  mines  at  as  early  a  date  as  possible.  As  this  will  not  merely  be  a  min- 
eral tramway,  but  a  railway  for  passenger  and  general  traffic,  it  will  be  a  great  ac<  ommoda- 
tion  to  the  inhabitants  of  North  Hastings,  and  will  also  greatly  facilitate  the  settlement  of 
the  northern  townships  of  this  and  the  adjoining  counties.  Work  is  now  progressing  at  sev- 
eral points  of  the  line,  portions  of  which  are  already  cut  out  and  graded,  although  the  late- 
ness of  the  season  and  the  unfavourable  state  of  the  weather  have  interrupted  and  delayed 
tiie  work. 

The  Corporation  of  thu  Town  of  Belleville  and  the  Municipality  of  Madoc  have  granted 

63 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  7.)  A.  1875 


aid  to  this  line,  and  it  is  likely  that  now,  when  the  work  is  actually  progressing  upo^  it,  the 
other  municipalities  along  its  course  will  contribute  their  quota  to  its  construction  fund,  and 
as  it  Will  fulfil  the  required  conditions,  it  may  receive  the  favourable  consideration  of  the  On- 
tario Government. 

Messrs.  JE'ardee  &  Lloyd  also  contemplate  the  erection  of  smelting  works  upon  a  large 
scale  within  the  limits  of  the  Town  of  Belleville,  being  convinced  that  they  can  not  only  manu- 
facture iron  of  first-rate  quality  for  home  consumption  much  cheaper  than  it  can  be  imported, 
but  that  they  will  be  able  to  export  their  surplus  product  advantageously. 

The  complete  success  attending  the  experiment  of  smelting  iron  ore  with  crude  petroleum, 
lately  performed  at  the  Marmora  Iron  Works,  promises  to  diminish  the  cost  of  reducing  our 
ores,  and  at  the  same  time  to  improve  the  quality  of  the  resulting  metal  in  a  very  appreci- 
able degree, 

Messrs.  Maaa  &  Co.  also  intend  to  build  a  railway  from  a  point  on  the  Grand  Junction, 
near  the  Village  of  Stirling,  to  the  DuiFerin  Mine,  on  lot  nunber  eighteen,  in  the  first  conces- 
sion of  Madoc.  A  survey  has  already  been  made,  and  plans  are  now  being  prepared  by 
Messrs.  Evans  &  Bolger,  P.L.S.  and  C.E.,  Belleville. 

The  sale  of  mineral  lands  within  my  district  has  been  largely  increased  in  consequence 
of  these  iron  discoveries.  Mesi-rs.  Maas  &  Co.  have  purchased  13,074  acres,  and  Messrs.  Par- 
dee &  Lloyd  have  already  bought  17,000  acres,  and  are  now  in  treaty  for  4,000  acres 
more. 

The  number  of  workmen  employed  at  the  Blairton  Mine,  in  Belmont,  is  at  present  ma- 
terially reduced,  in  consequence  of  the  depressed  state  of  the  iron  trade, 

I  should  again  venture  to  suggest  the  great  convenience  it  would  be  to  persons  wishing 
to  purchase  mineral  lands  in  the  Townships  of  Belmont,  Methuen,  and  Chandos,  on  the  west, 
and  Kaladar,  Anglesea  and  Effingham  on  the  east  of  Hastings  County,  if  these  townships 
were  annexed  to  this  district,  when  intending  purchasers  would  be  able  to  complete  their  pur- 
chases in  Belleville,  instead  of  having  to  go  to  Toronto  for  that  purpose,  after  having  made 
their  selection — an  expense  of  time  and  money  of  which  many  of  them  loudly  complain.  I 
believe  that  much  more  land  would  be  bought  for  mining  purposes  if  this  slight  additional 
facility  were  affijrded  to  prospectors. 

I  have  the  honour  to  be,  Sir, 

Your  most  obedient  servant, 
(Signed)  Alfred  Campbell. 


64 


S9  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  8.) 


A.  1875 


REPORT 


OF  THE 


dt0mmissi0ner  d  luMic  Wiuh 


FOR  THE 


PROVINCE    OF    ONTARIO, 

FDR   THE    TEAR 

1875. 


gtiuuul  by  mAix  oi  tUt  '§ti^x$htm  %mmn^. 


%oxantu: 

PRINTED  BY  HUNTER,  ROSE  &  CO.,  25  WELLINGTON  ST.  WEST. 

1875. 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  8.)  A.  1876 


CONTENTS. 


Commissioner's  Report v 

Report  of  the  Architect,  &c 1 

Report  of  the  Engineer 5 

Statements  of  Accountant  and  Law  Clerk    17 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  8.)  A.  1875 


REPORT 


OF  THE 


COMMISSIONER  OF  PUBLK]  WORKS 

FOR  THE  PROVINCE  OF  ONTARIO, 
FOR  THE  YEAR  1875. 


To  His  Honour,   the  Honourable  Donald  Alexander  Macdonald, 
Lieutenant-Governor  oj  the  Fromncxi  of  Ontario,  &^('.,  &^c. 

In  compliance  with  the  "  Act  respecting  the  Public  Works  of  Ontario,"  I  beg  to  sub- 
mit the  following  Report  of  the  Works  under  the  control  of  the  Department. 

The  details  of  the  operations  connected  with  the  construction,  improvements,  and  re- 
pairs of  Public  Buildings,  the  maintenance  of  and  improvements  to  Public  Works,  the 
Free  Grant  Settlements,  the  drainage  of  lands,  the  extension  of  railways,  &c.,  are  fully 
explained  in  the  accompanying  reports  from  the  respective  officers  of  the  Department. 

PUBLIC  BUILDINGS. 

In  addition  to  the  ordinary  repairs  for  which  provision  was  made,  sundry  improve- 
ments were  found  to  be  necessary  for  the  Government  House  and  Piirliament  Buildings, 

as  detailed  in  the  report  of  the  Architect,  &c. 

The  removal  of  the  Library  from  the  frame  structure  in  the  rear  of  the  centre  building, 
to  the  large  room  formerly  occupied  as  a  Legislative  Council  Chamber,  and  the  consequent 
re-arrangement  of  the  Post  Office,  News  Room,  Wardrobe,  and  Telegraph  Offices,  as  ex- 
plained in  the  report,  will,  it  is  trusted,  be  found  more  convenient  by  Members,  besides 
affording  greater  security  for  the  valuable  books  belonging  to  the  Province. 

The  works  connected  with  the  construction  of   the  Asylum  at  Hamilton,  have 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  8.)  A.  1875 


been  continued  during  this  year,  and  the  building  will  be  ready  for  occupation  next 
month.  Arrangements  have  been  made  with  the  City  Water  Works  for  the  supply  of 
water,  and  with  the  Hamilton  Gas  Light  Company  for  supplying  gas  to  this  building. 

The  Normal  School  building  at  Ottawa  has  been  completed,  and  the  School  was 
opened  in  September  last.  The  fences  and  out-buildings  were  finished  shortly  afterwards, 
with  the  exception  of  the  boundary  fence  between  Cartier  Square  and  the  Normal  School 
grounds,  which  is  now  being  altered  to  the  proper  line. 

The  exchange  of  certain  triangular  portions  of  land  with  the  Ordnance  lands  branch 
of  the  Dominion  Government,  as  explained  in  the  Architect's  report,  will  be  found  more 
convenient  for  the  purposes  of  the  Normal  School,  whilst  affording  an  additional  public 
entrance  to  Cartier  Square  from  Biddy  Street,  and  extending  the  front  on  Elgin  Street. 

By  the  construction  of  a  Mansard  story  to  the  School  of  Agriculture  at  Guelph,  ad- 
ditional accommodation  for  twenty  pupils  has  been  afforded  at  a  moderate  expenditure. 

The  details  of  the  repairs  to  other  public  buildings  under  the  control  of  the  Depart- 
ment are  fully  explained  in  the  accompanying  report  of  the  Architect,  &c. 

Herewith  also  I  have  the  honour  to  submit  the  usual  statements,  giving  details  of 
expenditure,  lists  of  contracts,  &c.,  for  the  year  ending  -Slst  December,  1874.  The 
statements  gi'sang  details  of  expenditure,  e^c,  for  the  present  year  of  1875  is  necessarily 
delayed  until  the  close  of  the  fiscal  year. 

PUBLIC  WORKS. 

The  construction  of  locks  and  other  improvements  to  the  navigable  inland  waters  of 
the  ProAdnce  is  reported  to  have  materially  aided  in  the  development  of  the  neighbouring 
settlements,  and  will  no  doubt  lead  to  still  further  development  in  the  future. 

The  improvements  in  the  Gull  and  Burnt  Eivers,  by  the  construction  of  slides  and 
dams,  have  facilitated  the  transit  of  logs  and  square  timber  from  the  country  lying  to  the 
north  of  the  chain  of  lakes,  known  as  the  Trent  navigation,  to  the  termini  of  the  various 
Railways  on  these  waters,  thereby  aflfordinga  more  expeditious  and  convenient  outlet  from 
the  timber  limits  in  that  section  to  Lake  Ontario. 

The  exjjenditure  under  the  Settlers'  Homestead  Fund,  comprising  the  construction  of 
roads,  farm  buildingS;  and  clearances  in  the  Townships  of  Ryerson  and  Spence,  may  be 
considered  as  closed,  with  the  exception  of  some  further  improvement  to  the  road  in  the 
Township  of  Ryerson.  Thirty-eight  houses  and  clearances  have  been  completed,  thirty-six 
of  which  are  occupied.  Clearances  have  also  been  made  on  twenty-one  lots  on  which 
the  settlers  preferred  to  build  their  own  houses.  This  settlement  is  reported  to  be  a 
success,  and  will  no  doubt  induce  further  settlement. 

The  drainage  of  marsh  lands  is  still  being  carried  out  with  the  most  favourable 
results.  The  necessary  works  in  several  Townships  have  been  completed,  and  a  large 
sura  is  now  re-payable  to  the  Province  by  a  rent-charge  on  the  lands  drained  and 
otherwise  improved. 

The  water  supply  to  the  Asylums  for  the  Insane  and  Idiots  at  London  having  been 
reported  as  insufficient,  the  experiment  of  sinking  an  Artesian  well  has  been  tried,  but  so 
far  without  finding  water. 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  8.)  A.  1875 


The  extension  of  liaihvays  during  the  present  year  comprises  the  construction  of 

those  termed  Local  Hues,  forming  connecting  links  between  the  through  East  and  West 

lines.      These  Railway  extensions  cannot  fail  to  largely  dev elope  the  resources  of  the 

back  country. 

Respectfully  submitted, 

C.  F.  FKASER, 

CwimUssioner. 

Department  ol   Public  Works,  Outuno, 
Toronto,  November,  1875. 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  8.)  A.  1875 


REPORT 


OF    THE 


ARCHITECT   AND    CHIEF   OFFICER. 


Department  of  Public  Works,  Ontario, 

Toronto,  November  15th,  1875. 

Sir, — I  have  the  houour  to  submit  the  following  Annual  Report : — 

GOVERNMENT  HOUSE. 

The  necessary  repairs,  furnishings  and  planting,  provided  for  in  the  estimates,  have 
been  attended  to,  and  some  improvements  made  which  were  much  required.  As  the  in- 
terior portion  of  the  building  has  not  been  painted  nor  papered  since  occupation,  now  more 
than  five  years,  it  will  be  necessary  to  make  provision  in  the  estimates  next  year  for  this 
purpose. 

Further  appropriations  for  furniture,  furnishings  and  improvements  on  the  grounds, 
will  be  required  in  addition  to  the  ordinary  repairs. 

PARLIAMENT  AND  DEPARTMENTAL  BUILDINGS. 

The  large  frame  building  on  the  north  side  of  the  centre  building  having  be^n  found, 
on  examination,  to  be  in  an  insecure  condition,  on  account  of  the  decay  of  the  timber 
foundations,  I  recommended  that  the  Library  should  be  removed.  This  change  has  been 
effected,  the  old  Council  Chamber  having  been  converted  into  a  Library,  and  the  News- 
room removed  to  the  room  in  the  brick  wing,  formerly  occupied  as  a  Library.  The 
Post-office  has  been  fitted  up  in  the  room  formerly  used  as  a  Lavatory,  off  the  main  corri- 
dor in  the  centre  building,  and  the  Telegraph  Offices  have  been  placed  in  the  News-room, 
and  at  the  top  of  the  main  staircase,  centre  building,  as  requested  by  the  Telegraph  Com- 
panies. 

The  Wardrobe  has  been  changed  from  the  old  Council  Chamber  to  the  passage  on 
the  outside,  so  that  the  whole  space  of  the  Chamber  has  been  fitted  up  for  Library  pur- 
poses, an  arrangement  which  no  doubt  will  be  found  to  be  an  improvement,  and  more  con- 
venient for  the  purposes  of  reference,  &c. 

Provision  will  have  to  be  made  in  next  year's  estimates  for  repairing  the  frame 
building  to  which  reference  has  been  made  ;  also  for  fencing  to  the  yards  in  the  rear  of  the 
east  and  west  wings,  and  for  sidewalks. 

There  has  been  no  expenditure  for  the  building  on  the  corner  of  Simcoe  and  Welling- 
ton Streets,  occupied  as  offices  for  the  Hon.  Attorney-General,  Public  Works  and  Immi- 
gration Departments,  except  for  ordinary  repairs  and  furniture,  for  which  provision  was 
made  in  the  contingencies  for  these  Departments.  The  usual  appropriations  for  ordinary 
repairs,  furniture,  &c.,  for  these  buildings  will  have  to  be  included  in  next  year's 
estimates. 


89  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  8.)  A.  1875 


CENTRAL  PRISON,  TORONTO. 

The  prison  buildings  have  been  fully  completed,  as  reported  last  year.  There  has  been 
no  expenditure  for  work  done  during  the  present  year,  except  for  some  repairs  which  were 
made  at  the  engine-house,  when  the  water  supply  pipes  were  frozen  during  the  unusually 
severe  weather  in  January  last,  owing  to  the  lowness  ot  the  water  in  Lake  Ontario.  As  there 
is  a  double  supply  at  the  engine-house,  the  smaller  pipes,  being  better  protected  from  the 
frost,  were  not  frozen,  so  that  the  water  supply  to  the  Prison  or  Lunatic  Asylum  was  not 
interrupted  from  this  cause ;  but,  as  the  low  water  in  the  lake  still  continues,  some  provision 
will  have  to  be  made  for  lowering  the  supply  pipe  near  the  Lake  shore,  to  prevent  any 
accident  from  this  cause  for  the  future.  The  engine  house  being  now  in  the  charge  of  the 
officials  of  the  Lunatic  Asylum,  an  appropriation  will  have  tu  be  included  in  the  estimates 
for  this  purpose. 

INEBRLVTE  ASYLUM,  HAMILTON. 

The  interior  portion  of  the  work  connected  with  this  building  was  continued  througii- 
out  the  wintei-,  and  the  carpenter  work  was  sufficiently  advanced  to  permit  the  plastering 
being  proceeded  with  in  the  spring.  As  recommended  by  me,  the  method  of  heating  has 
been  changed  from  hot  air  to  steam,  without  addmg  to  the  expense,  careful  comparisons 
and  calculations  having  been  first  made.  This  change,  and  the  work  connected  therewith, 
having  been  satisfactorily  accomplished,  according  to  instructions,  directions  were  given 
for  the  completion  of  the  fourth  stoiey  and  sundry  changes  in  the  building,  which  have 
also  been  satisfactorily  completed.  During  the  progress  of  the  work  it  was  found  necessary 
to  make  some  changes  in  the  arrangement  of  the  tanks  for  holding  water,  outside  the 
building,  and  in  the  construction  of  the  drains,  accordingly  certain  alterations  were 
recommended,  which  were  approved  of  and  made  as  suggested.  In  accordance  with  your 
directions,  arrangements  have  been  made  with  the  Hamilton  City  "Waterworks,  and  the 
Hamilton  Gas  Light  Company,  for  the  supply  of  water  and  gas  from  the  City  mains,  the 
pipes  having  been  extended  to  the  lot  purchased  for  an  engine-house,  on  the  corner  of 
Queen  and  Markland  Streets,  from  which  pipes  will  be  extended  to  the  Inebriate  Asylum 
building,  along  Queen  Street,  crossing  the  lands  belonging  to  A.  Miller  and  J.  Brown, 
Esquires.  A  contract  was  entered  into  with  the  Dundas  Tool  and  Machine  Company,  for 
the  supply  of  a  Cameron  pumping  engine  and  steam  boiler,  to  be  placed  in  the  engine 
house  now  being  built  on  the  corner  of  Queen  and  Markland  Streets,  and  contracts  were 
entered  into  with  Messrs.  Russell  &  Co.  and  Messrs.  Cowie  &  Co.  for  the  supply  of  water 
and  gas  pipes.  Advertisements  for  tenders  for  the  water  pipes,  were  inserted  in  the 
Toronto  and  Hamilton  papers,  and  the  tender  of  Messrs.  Russell  &  Co.,  Toronto,  being 
the  lowest,  was  accepted.  The  tender  of  Messrs.  Cowie  &  Co.  was  accepted  through  the 
Hamilton  Gas  Light  Company,  who  kindly  procured  tenders  from  firms  with  whom  the 
Company  did  business,  and  that  of  Messrs.  Cowie  &  Co.,  being  the  lowest,  was  recom- 
mended. The  gas  pipes  will  be  laid  under  the  direction  of  the  Hamilton  Gas  Light 
Company,  by  days'  work,  the  pipes  to  be  tested  in  a  similar  manner  to  those  laid  by  the 
Company.  The  excavation  for  the  pipes  and  the  work  at  the  engine-house  will  be  done 
by  the  day,  under  the  superintendence  of  the  Clerk  of  the  Works,  except  the  carpenters', 
slaters',  painters'  and  galvanized  iron  work,  for  which  tenders  will  be  received  after  due 
advertisement.  It  is  expected  that  the  works  connected  with  the  water  and  gas  supply, 
will  be  completed  and  in  operation  in  one  month,  so  that  the  building  may  be  occupied 
in  January  next,  at  which  time  the  several  works  now  in  progress  at  the  Asylum  will  be 
fully  completed.  Provision  will  have  to  be  made  in  the  estimates  for  1876  for  fencing, 
out-buildings  and  other  improvements,  which  will  be  required  when  the  building  is 
occupied. 

SCHOOL  OF  AGRICULTURE,  GUELPH. 

Plans  and  specifications  for  constructing  a  mansard  roof  on  the  front  portion  of  the 
school  building  weie  prepared,  and  tenders  having  been  received  after  due  advertisement 
in  the  Toronto  and  Guelph   newspapers,  that  of  Mr.  John  Hall,  being  the  lowest,  was 

2 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  8.)  A.  1875 


accepted,  and  the  work  is  now  iiearlv  completed,     Accommodation,  for  twenty  additional 
pupils  will  thus  be  afforded  at  a  moderate  expenditure. 

NORMAL  AND  MODEI^  SCHOOLS,  TORONTO. 

Sundry  repairs  to  the  buildings  and  drains  were  made  during  the  year,  and  the 
alterations  in  the  heating  pipes,  as  previously  reported,  were  finished.  Further  improve- 
ments will,  however,  be  required  in  order  to  complete  the  alterations  as  originally  intended. 
Provision  will  have  to  be  made  in  the  estimates  for  planking  the  Boys'  yard,  sundry  im- 
provements as  previously  reported,  and  ordinary  repairs. 

NORMAL  SCHOOL,  OTTAWA. 

The  carpenter  work  of  this  building  was  continued  during  the  winter,  to  enable  the 
plasterers  to  resume  their  work  early  in  the  spring,  in  order  to  complete  the  building,  so 
that  the  school  might  be  opened  on  the  15th  of  September  last. 

Plans  and  specifications  for  the  gas  and  water  supply,  and  steam  heating,  also  for  the 
fences  and  out-buildings,  were  prepared  in  the  early  part  of  tliis  year,  and  after  due  adver- 
tisement in  the  Toronto  and  Ottawa  newspapers,  the  tenders  of  Messrs.  Keith  &,  Co.,  To- 
ronto, and  Mr.  James  O'Connor,  Ottawa,  being  the  lowest  for  the  steam-heating,  and 
fences  respectively,  were  accepted.  The  works  have  progressed  in  a  satisfactory  manner, 
and  on  recent  inspection  I  found  that  the  Contractors  have  completed  their  agreements, 
in  accordance  with  the  plans  and  specifications.  Negotiations  were  entered  into  with  the 
Dominion  Government,  for  the  exchange  of  certain  portions  of  the  land  purchased  from  the 
By  Estate  for  the  School  site,  so  as  to  extend  the  line  of  the  northern  side  of  Nepean  Street, 
and  to  provide  for  an  entrance  to  Cartier  Square  from  Biddy  Street,  at  the  eastern  end  of  the 
Normal  School  site.  The  proposition  having  been  favourably  entertained  by  the  Dominion 
Government,  two  triangular  pieces  of  land,  one  having  a  frontage  of  sixty-four  feet  on 
Elgin  Street,  and  the  other  a  frontage  of  fifty-five  two  inches  on  Biddy  Street,  were 
transferred  to  the  Dominion  Government,  in  exchange  for  a  large  triangular  piece  in  the  rear, 
deeded  to  the  Ontario  Government,  leaving  the  Normal  School  site,  with  a  frontage  of  257 
feet  4  inches  on  Elgin  Street,  and  914  feet  on  Biddy  Street,  in  the  shape  of  a  parallelogram. 

Arrangements  have  been  made  for  the  removal  of  the  fence  between  Cartier  Square 
and  the  Normal  School  site,  to  the  new  line,  being  the  extension  of  the  north  side  of 
Nepean  Street  as  before  described.  A  revote  of  the  unexpended  balance  will  be  required, 
to  complete  the  work  connected  with  this  building. 

LOCK-UP,  NIPISSING  DISTRICT. 

The  village  of  Mattawa,at  the  junction  of  the  Ottawa  and  Mattawa  Rivers,  having  been 
selected  as  the  site  for  the  Lock-up,  the  Crown  Lands  Department  having  reserved  a  lot  on  the 
Pembroke  and  Mattawa  Road  for  the  purpose,  plans  and  specification  for  a  log  building  were 
prepared,  and  tenders  invited  from  contractors  by  advertisement  in  the  Pembroke  and 
Ottawa  papers,  and  the  tender  of  Mr.  B.  Little,  being  the  lowest,  was  accepted.  The 
work  was  completed  in  June,  and  inspected  by  an  officer  of  the  Department,  who  reported 
that  the  work  had  been  done  in  a  satisfactory  and  workmanlike  manner. 

Provision  will  have  to  be  ma^le  in  the  estimates  for  a  fence  to  be  constructed  round 
the  building,  so  as  to  form  a  yard  for  the  prisoners,  and  to  prevent  outside  interference 
with  the  Lock-up. 

There  has  been  no  expenditure  during  this  year  for  the  Lock-ups  for  the  Thunder 
Bay,  or  Parry  Sound  Districts. 

OSGOODE  HALL. 

There  has  been  no  expenditure  on  this  building,  except  for  ordinary  repairs  and 
furniture. 

Two  new  steam  boilers  having  been  placed  in  the  building  for  heating  purposes,  the 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  8.) 


A.  1875. 


old  boilers  haviag  been  condemned,  I  made  an  inspection  of  the  work,  as  requested,  and 
found  that  it  had  been  done  in  a  satisfactory  and  workmanlike  manner. 

An  appropriation  will  have  to  be  made  for  the  general  repairs  of  the  building,  both 
internally  and  externally. 

The  cut  stone  work  of  the  front,  and  steps,  should  be  repaired  and  carefully  pointed, 
the  gravel  roof  of  the  west  portico  renewed,  and  the  interior  of  the  building  coloured 
and  painted,  and  the  plastering  repaired,  Some  improvements  were  made  in  the  heating 
and  ventilation  of  the  Court  rooms,  which  have  proved  satisfactory.  Ventilators  have 
also  been  placed  in  other  ro(jms,  where  required.  ' 

SCHOOL  OF  PRACTICAL  SCIENCE. 

It  having  been  found  on  examiuatiou,  that  sundry  repairs  were  required  to  render  the 
boiler  of  the  steam-heating  apparatus,  which  has  been  in  use  for  about  fourteen  years,  safe 
and  that  the  repairs  would,  in  comparison  with  the  value  of  the  boiler,  be  considerable — 
the  cost  of  repairs  being  estimated  at  $200,  which  when  done  would  only  leave  the  old 
boiler  serviceable  for  a  couple  of  years,  it  was  thought  advisable  to  procure  tenders  for  a 
new  boiler,  and  the  tender  of  Messrs.  Dickey,  Neili  cfe  Co.,  at  $485,  being  the  lowest  was 
accepted.  This  new  boilci,  under  ordinary  circumstances  will  be  serviceable  for  twelve 
or  fifteen  years.  The  work  has  been  done  in  a  satisfactory  manner,  and  the  boiler  is  now 
available  for  heating  purposes.  As  a  new  sewer  has  recently  been  constructed  on  Adelaide 
Street,  at  a  lower  level  than  the  former  one,  which  was  insufficient  to  drain  the  basement, 
notice  was  given  to  the  City  Board  of  Works,  to  construct  a  tile  drain  from  the  sewer 
to  the  building,  which  has  been  done,  and  the  drains  in  the  basement  will  have  to  ha 
lowered. 

GENERAL  REMARKS. 


The  expenditure  on  account  of  the  appropriations  for  the  Asylums  for  the  Insane,  at 
Toronto,  and  London,  the  Provincial  Reformatory,  Penetanguishene,  the  Deaf  and  Dumb 
Institute,  Belleville,  and  the  Blind  Institute,  Brantford,  being  principally  in  connection 
with  furniture  and  furnishing,  and  ordinary  repairs,  which  are  under  the  control  of  the 
Inspector  of  Asylums,  Prisons,  &c.,  will,  no  doubt,  be  fully  reporteil  on  by  that  officer. 

There  has  been  no  expenditure  on  account  of  the  appropriations  for  the  Sault  Ste. 
Marie  Gaol,  or  Wie  Registry  Offices  for  the  Thunder  Bay  or  Parry  Sound  Districts, 
except  a  small  amount  for  furniture.  The  usual  appropriations  for  repairs,  &c.,  will  have 
to  be  included  in  the  estimates  for  1876.  I  cannot  conclude  this  Report  without  thanking 
you  and  the  Government,  for  granting  me  three  months'  leave  on  private  business  in  Ire- 
land, an  J  I  trust  you  have  found  that  the  business  of  the  Department  has  not  been  in  any 
way  retarded  during  my  absence. 

I  have  the  honour  to  remain, 

Your  obedient  servant, 


Hon.  C.  F.  Eraser, 

Commissioner  of  Public  Works, 

Ontario. 


KIVAS  TULLY, 

Aichilecl,  die,  dec. 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  8.)  A.  1875 


REPORT 


OF 


THE   ElSTGIlsrEEI? 


OF 


PUBLIC    WORKS. 


DepartiMent  of  Public  Works,  Ontario, 

Toronto,  24t-l)  November,  1875. 
Hon.  C.  F.  Fraser, 

Cunimissioner  of  Public  Works. 

Sir, — I  have  the  honour  to  report  as  folliAvs  with  reference  to  the  Public  Works  of  the 
Province  :  -  • 

Lock  BET\yEEN  Mary's  and  Faiky  Lakes. 

The  works  embraced  in  the  contract  for  the  lock  and  channel  are  completed,  but  in 
order  to  make  the  navigation  serviceal)le  to  the  chain  of  lakes  comprising  Maiy's,  Fairy, 
Vernon  and  Peninsula,  the  rennMal  of  several  obstrnctittns  will  be  necessary,  amongst 
which  it  will  be  requisite  to  provide  in  the  estimates  for  187()  for  the  following : — 

A  small  stop  log  dam  at  the  foot  of  Mary's  lake  in  place  of  one  carried  away  by  the 
flood  in  June  of  the  present  year,  to  be  built  so  as  to  enable  the  .stop  logs  to  be  taken  out 
during  high-water. 

The  removal  of  a  shoal  below  the  lock  by  hand  dredging. 

The  removal  of  some  shoals  of  loose  stones  above  the  lock  in  the  channel  leading  do 
Fairy  lake. 

The  removal  of  a  shoal  at  the  bridge  at  Huntaville,  and  the  raising  of  that  bridge  so  as 
to  allow  of  the  passage  of  boats  underneath.  ^^^_^ 

I  have  been  inforn^ed  that  arrangements  will  be  made  to  construct  a  small  steamboat 
for  service  on  these  waters  so  soon  as  the  works  can  be  completed. 

The  road  from  Bracebridge  to  the  lower  end  of  Mary's  lake,  13  miles  in  length,  is 
now  so  much  improved  as  to  form  a  good  summer  route  ;  and  now  that  the  railway  is 
opened  for  traffic  to  Gravenhurst,  and  when  a  steamboat  shall  have  been  placed  on  these 
waters,  the  settlements  round  Vernon  and  Fairy  lakes  will  be  accessible  in  summer  by 
rail  and  steamboats  with  a  break  of  only  1 3  miles  of  staging,  as  follows  : — 

Toronto  to  Gravenhurst,  by  rail . 

Gravenhurst  to  Bracebridge,  by  boat  

Bracebridge  to  Mary's  Lake,  by  stage  - 

Mary's  Lake  to  Huntsville,  by  boat 


115 

miles. 

16 

a 

13 

(1 

15 

11 

Total 159 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  8.)  A.   1875 


The  lakes  forming  this  chain  of  waters  are  very  picturesqiie.  The  lands  around 
their  shores  contain  a  fair  proportion  of  good  soil.  The  settlements  are  rapidly  improving, 
and  therefore  the  completion  of  these  improvements  will  be  of  much  public  utility. 

I  have  not  yet  examined  the  channel  connecting  Fairy  with  Peninsula  lake,  which, 
it  is  probable,  wdll  require  some  improvements,  but  which  may  be  deferred  for  another 
year. 

Settlers'  Homestead  Fund; 

These  works  have  been  carried  out  in  the  Townships  of  Ryerson  and  Spence,  undei' 
the  authority  of  the  Acts  34th  Victoria,  chapter  5,  and  37th  Victoria,  chapter  21,  and  dur- 
ing the  current  year  were  confined  to  the  completion  of  contracts  for  houses  and  clearings, 
on  which  part  of  the  work  had  been  done  the  previous  year. 

In  the  Township  of  Spence  there  are  13  houses  and  clearings  completed  on  the  follow 
ing  lots  : — 

Concession  A,  lots  47,48,  54,  68,  69  and  71. 

Concession  B,  lots  46,  47,  48,  52  and  64. 

Concession  10,  lot  2,  and  concessions  11  and  12,  lots  8  and  9. 

On  concessions  A  and  B,  the  lots  selected  all  front  on  the  main  road  leading  from  the 
head  of  Lake  Rousseau  to  Lake  Nipissing. 

In  the  Township  of  Ryerson,  improvements  as  under  have  been  completed  on  the  fol- 
lowing lots  : — 

Clearings  and  Hoioses. 

Second  concession,  lots  6,  10  and  11. 
Third  concession,  lots  5,  9,  10  and  11. 
Fourth  concession,  lots  24  and  25. 
Fifth  concession,  lots  13,  14,  16,  17,  25  and  20. 
Sixth  concession,  lots  25  and  26. 
Seventh  concession,  lots  25  and  20.       p 
Eighth  concession,  lots  25  and  20. 

Tenth  concession,  lots  25,  26,  27,  28,  29.  30,  31  and  32. 
Eleventh  concession,  lots  25,  26,  27,  28,  29,  30,  31  and  32. 
Twelfth  concession,  lot  25. 

In  all,  38  houses,  with  clearings  of  4  and  5  acres  each,  all  of  M'hich,  with  two  excep- 
tions, are  occupied  by  families  settled  in  the  township. 

Clearings  tvithout  liuuses. 

Second  concession,  lots  7,  8,  9  and  12. 

Third  concession,  lots  6  and  8. 

Fourth  concession,  lots  H    13,  14,  15,  16,  17  and  23. 

Fifth  concession,  lots  9,  11,  12,  15  and  23. 

Eleventh  concession,  lot  18. 

Twelfth  concessio.i,  lot  10. 

Concession  A,  lot  75. 

Making  21  lots  having  clearings  thereon  of  4  acres  each,  the  people  occupying  these 
lots  having  preferred  to   build  their  own  houses. 

The  settlement  of  Ryerson  is  now  a  thriving  one,  and  is  undoubtedly  a  success,  so  far 
as  the  establishment  of  an  outpost  colony  is  concerned.  It  will  undoubtedly  aid  in  hast- 
ening the  settlement  of  the  townships  around  the  Maganetewan,  and  between  that  river 
and  Lake  Nipissing  ;  but  I  think  it  may  be  a  question  whether  the  Government  should  not 
leave  the  extension  of  these  settlements  to  individu^d  and  private  enterprise,  especially  as 
tending  more  to  develope  self-reliance  and  manly  independence  amongst  the  settlers  them 
selves. 

Otonabee  River  AVorks. 

An  appropriation  ma<le  the  previous  year,  was  re-voted,  but  not  expended  ;  it  was 
intended  for  the  construction  of  cribs  and  booms  to  aid  the  navigation  at  Young's  Lock, 
on  the  Otonabee  River. 

6 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  8.)  A.  1875 


Gull  and  Burnt  River  Waters. 


A  re-vote  of  $5,930  was  made  for  1875  from  the  unexpended  balance  of  a  vote  for 
service  in  1874:.     The  expenditure  this  year  has  been  made  on  the  following  works  : — 

Reconstruction  of  p^enelon  Falls'  slide. 
do  Hall's  Lake  <lara. 

Additional  works  at  Horse  Shoe  Lake  dam,  required  in  consequence  of  damage  by 
June  Hoods. 

Repairs  to  Minden  dam,  required  on  account  of  injuries  from  the  same  cause. 

Reconstruction  of  Elliott's  Falls,  dam  and  slide. 

In  addition  to  the  facilities  given  to  the  transit  of  logs  and  square  timber  from  the 
remote  limits  on  the  head  waters  of  these  streams,  the  reserve  waters  held  by  the  system 
of  dams  have  had  a  most  beneficial  effect  on  the  navigation  of  the  lakes  on  the  chain  of 
waters  below  Fenelon  Falls.  The  probability  of  a  steamboat  navigating  Balsam  and 
Cameron  Lakes  next  year,  between  Fenelon  Falls  and  Coboconk,  will  render  it  undesirable 
to  take  any  large  quantity  of  water  from  the  reserve  in  Balsam  Lake,  and  it  will  there- 
fore become  an  object  of  advantage  to  secure  some  additional  storage  for  water  in  lieu  of 
that  lake.  Those  waters  most  suitable  from  their  positions  for  that  service  are  Mountain 
and  Twelve  Mile  Lakes  on  the  Gull  River,  and  Cushog  Lake  on  the  Burnt  River.  The 
latter  already  has  a  dam  at  its  outlet,  and  this  work  should  be  preserved  and  kept  so  as 
to  regulate  the  water  of  that  lake. 

The  estimates  for  service  in  1876  on  these  Avaters  are  required  chiefly  for  the  follow- 
ing works  : — 

The  reconstruction  of  a  d  im  .vnd  slide  at  Xorland,  where  the  old  works  have  gon<' 
to  decay. 

Additional  pierwork  at  Minden  dam,  where  a  portion  of  the  bank  was  washed  away 
by  the  freshet  in  June  last. 

The  construction  of  a  stop  log  dam  at  the  outlet  of  either  Mountain  or  Twelve  Mil  a 
Lake. 

Bridges  at  Port  Carling. 

In  187  4  an  appropriation  of  $.3,000  was  matle  for  the  bridges  at  Port  Carling.  One,  a 
fixed  bridge  across  the  river,  was  built  in  1874,  and  consists  of  two  spans  having  a  centre 
pier  built  of  crib- work  and  abutments  of  dry  stone  masonry,  the  whole  eighty-eight  feet  in 
length.  The  other  bridge  is  a  swing  bridge  crossing  the  lock,  built  this  year,  and  intended 
for  opening  or  closing  across  the  lock  as  the  cynveniences  of  navigation  or  travel  may 
require.  The  structures  form  a  connecting  link  in  an  important  highway  leading  through 
the  Townships  of  Monck  and  Medora. 

Timber  Slides,  Muskoka  River. 

The  appropriation  for  this  work  has*  not  been  touched  except  for  preliminary  survey, 
and  any  improvements  deemed  necessary  cannot  be  proceeded  with  before  1876. 

Wye  River  Dredging, 

The  re-vote  for  this  service  has  not  yet  been  expended,  and  it  will  be  necessary 
before  doing  so  to  make  some  additional  surveys  at  the  entrance  to  the  river. 

The  dredging  is  required  for  the  opening  of  a  channel  through  the  bar  at  the  entrance 
to  the  river,  and  when  completed  will  afford  facilities  for  the  shipment  of  lumber  and  grain 
from  a  number  of  mills  in  the  vicinity. 

Balsam  River  Works. 

An  appropriation  of  $1,000  was  granted  for  service  in  1875,  chiefly  for  the  removal 
of  stones  and  boulders,  from  the  channel  of  Balsam  River  between  th6  lock  and  Balsam 
Lake.     This  work  will  be  completed  by  the  close  of  the  year,  and  the  channel  will  then 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  8.)  A.  1875 


be  navigable  throughout.     A  steamboat  is  now  in  construction  at  Fenelon  Falls  which  is 
intended  to  traverse  the  waters  between  Fenelon  Falls  and  the  Railway  at  Coboconk. 

Eyerson  Eoad  Works. 

A  sum  of  $1,000  was  granted  at  the  last  session  for  service  in  1875,  for  the  cost  of 
repairs  required  on  the  main  lines  of  road  opened  through  the  settlements  in  the  Town- 
ship of  Eyerson  ;  a  part  only  of  the  amount  has  been  expended,  and  the  balance  v/ill  be 
required  as  a  re-vote  for  service  in  1876. 

ScuGOG  EiVER,  Dredging,  &c. 

The  sum  voted  for  this  service  in  1875  was  chiefly  expended  in  improving  the  navi- 
gation of  the  Scugog  Eiver  from  the  lock  at  Lindsay  to  near  Lake  Scugog. 

The  bed  of  the  river  Avas  cleaned  by  dredging  below  and  above  the  lock  entrances, 
in  the  lock  chamber,  above  and  below  the  swing  bridge  south  of  Lindsaj'',  in  the  cut  at 
the  point  known  as  the  Devil's  Elbow,  and  a  new  channel  was  cut  at  the  Cross  Creeks, 
having  a  width  of  sixty  feet,  depth  of  eight  feet,  and  a  length  of  1,500  feet,  making  a 
material  improvement  in  a  crooked  and  somewhat  difficult  part  of  the  navigation  of  the 
river. 

The  lockmaster  reports  the  following  transits  through  the  lock  during  the  season  of 
navigation  of  1875  : — .394  steamboats,  704  scows,  and  325  cribs  of  various  classes,  of  tim- 
ber. These  returns  show  a  decrease  from  1874  in  the  passage  of  steamboats  and  cribs, 
but  an  increase  in  the  passages  of  scows. 

Bridge  and  Approaches,  Muskoka  Falls. 

A  sum  of  SI, 500  was  appropriated  at  the  last  Session  for  this  work.  Two  years 
ago  a  bridge  was  built  by  the  Crown  Lands  Department  across  the  river  forming  the 
outlet  to  Lake  Muskoka  at  this  place,  about  200  feet  above  the  Falls,  but  since  its  con- 
struction, works  were  carried  out  at  the  same  place  for  regulating  the  watersof  Lake  Mus- 
koka for  navigation  and  other  purposes.  These  works  consisted  of  a  dam  and  stop  log  sluices 
across  the  river,  about  thirty  feet  below  the  bridge,  and  also  of  a  large  excavation  about 
150  yards  south  of  the  river  channel,  for  the  purpose  of  making  an  outlet  for  the  high 
water  of  the  lake  to  act  as  an  auxiliary  in  aiding  its  discharge.  The  width  of  the 
excavated  channel  at  its  upper  end  is  160  feet,  and  the  main  portion  of  its  surface  is  two 
feet  above  the  floor  of  the  dam  ;  there  is  also  a  channel  30  feet  in  width,  cut  through  at  a 
lower  level ;  having  its  bed  al)out  or  near  the  level  of  the  floor  of  the  dam.  During  high 
water  there  is  a  discharge  liaving  a  volume  of  four  feet  in  depth,  passing  over  the  entii'e 
width  of  the  excavated  channel,  and  hence  the  necessity  of  a  second  bridge  to  complete 
the  communication  of  the  road  passing  the  locality. 

It  was  originally  proposed  to  construct  a  brif|ge  having  a  length  of  100  feet  at  the 
lower  end  of  the  channel,  where  the  water  falls  into  a  bay  of  the  river  at  a  lower  level, 
and  the  channel  is  more  contracted,  but  from  the  danger  which  might  arise  from  jams  of 
logs  at  the  first  proposed  site,  the  position  was  taken  higher  up,  making  a  better  site  but 
entailing  longer  approaches. 

The  work  is  now  finished,  and  is  a  well-built,  durable  structure  of  three  spans,  the 
centre  one  a  truss  82  feet  in  length,  the  entire  length  being  180  feet,  with  two  approaches 
70  feet  in  length,  or  250  feet  overall.  The  centre  pier  and  abutments  are  built  of  stone 
quarried  on  the  spot,  and  well  laid.  The  piers  will  therefore  be  permanent,  and  the 
superstructure  only  will  at  any  time  require  renewal.  The  extended  length  of  the  bridge 
has  made  its  cost  somewhat  in  excess  of  the  appropriation. 

Wastiago  and  Gravenhurst  Road. 

A  sum  of  S800  was  granted  for  service  on  maintenance  of  this  road  in  1876,  and 
M-ould  have  been  amply  sufficient  but  tor  the  burning  of  bridges  and  crossways  by  bush 
fires.     Two  of  the  bridges  were  at  Gibraltar,  and  as  their  loss  cut  off"  all  travel  on  the  road 

8 


I 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  8.)  A.  1875^- 


to  Lake  Muskoka,  they  had  to  be  replaced  rapidly.  One  of  the  structures  burnt  was  a 
high  crossway  at  Beaver  Creek,  1,000  feet  in  length,  and  this  had  to  be  replaced  by  an 
embankment  850  feet  in  length,  a  large  culvert,  and  a  trestle  bridge  150  feet  in  length. 

These  works  were  not  anticipated  as  forming  a  part  of  the  year's  maintenance,  and 
therefore  an  extra  expenditure  became  necessary  in  remedying  the  unforeseen  contingency. 

A  considerable  portion  of  the  first  planking  laid  down  is  worn  out,  and  other  parts 
of  the  road  injured  by  the  excessive  rains  of  the  fall ;  it  is  therefore  desirable  to  have  about 
i$500  to  put  the  road  in  order,  after  which  it  should  be  handed  over  to  the  Township 
through  which  it  passes,  as  it  ceases  to  become  a  leading  highway  since  the  opening  of  the 
railway  to  Gravenhurst. 

Maintenance  of  Locks,  Dams,  and  Swing  Bridges. 

The  works  maintained  by  expenditures  under  this  appropriation  are  the  following  : 

1st.  Young's  lock,  dam,  slide,  and  swing  bridge  at  Young's  Point,  on  the  Otonabee 
River,  in  the  Township  of  Smith,  County  of  Peterboro'.  The  slide  was  rebuilt  in  1874. 
The  dam  being  old,  leaked  badly,  and  was  repaired  this  year  by  constructing  a  new  crib- 
work  apron  in  front  along  its  entire  length.  * 

The  lock  and  swing  bridge  required  no  repairs  during  the  season. 

2nd.  Lindsay  lock,  dam,  and  three  swing  bridges.  All  the  bridges  required  minor 
repairs  to  their  working  gearing  in  the  spring,  and  were  then  placed  in  good  order  during 
the  season.  The  lock  was  put  in  order  for  repairs  by  cotFer  damming  and  pumping  out 
before  the  opening  of  navigation,  and  some  repairs  were  done  at  the  upper  mitre  sill,  but 
since  that  time  the  foundations  of  both  mitre  sills  have  become  leaky ,and  it  will  be  neces- 
sary to  do  extensive  repairs  to  the  foundations  of  the  lock  before  the  opening  of  naviga- 
tion in  1876.  When  the  lock  was  rebuilt  the  walls  were  reconstructed,  but  not  the  foun- 
dations of  the  mitre  sills,  and  hence  the  necessity  for  repairs  now.  While  the  work  is  in 
hand  at  the  lock,  it  will  be  necessary  to  make  some  repairs  on  the  dam  also. 

3rd.  Port  Carling  lock  and  bridges.  The  only  repairs  made  at  these  works  during 
the  year  were  in  replacing  broken  keys  of  the  valve  gearing,  and  on  the  gates. 

4th.  Balsam  river  lock,  dam,  slide,  and  swing  bridge.  These  works  have  as  yet 
only  been  used  for  storing  water,  and  facilitating  lumbering  operations,  and  any  repairs 
have  been  chiefly  replacing  planking  on  the  dam,  when  injured  by  the  drives  of  logs. 

In  1876  it  is  expected  that  the  lock  will  be  used  for  purposes  of  navigation,  and  a 
permanent  lock-master  will  then  he  required. 

The  expenditure  will  be  found  in  the  statement  of  receipts  and  expenditures  submit- 
ted to  the  House  of  Assembly,  under  the  head  of  "  Maintenance  of  Locks,"  &c.  which 
also  covers  the  expenditure  for  salaries  of  lock-masters  and  bridge-tenders. 

DRAINAGE  WORKS. 

When  the  "  Ontario  Drainage  Act,"  33  Vic.  cap.  2,  was  repealed  by  the  "Ontario 
Drainage  Act  of  1873,"  36  Vic.  cap.  38,  the  sura  of  $163,362.34,  had  been  expended  on 
drainage  works  and  surveys  under  its  provisions,  as  follows  : — 

On  Drainage  Works, $137,573  18 

"  Drainage  Surveys,  25,789  16 

And  therefore  adding  the  $200,000  provided  by  the  36th  Vic.  cap.  38,  a  total  sum 
of  $363,362  34  has  been  made  available  for  service  in  the  execution  of  these  works. 

The  expenditure  on  drainage  works  completed  in  Townships  where  the  cost  has  been 
put  in  the  way  of  assessment  on  the  lands,  is  shown  by  the  following  statement : — 


W  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  8.) 


A.  1875 


Townships.           Counties, 

Length  of 
Drains. 

Approximate 
areas  unwatered. 

Excavations,  in 
cubic  yai'ds. 

Cost  of  Works. 

Russell  

Mesa 

Russell  

Middlesex ... 

Elgin  

Middlesex .. 

Hiuon  

Lambton    ... 
Kent    

Miles. 
8 

m 

6| 
26i 
17| 
25i 

61 

h 

Acres. 

8,800 

8,300 

7,500 

8,100 

4,300 

28,000 

19,000 

23,000 

6,000 

2,500 

400 

50,700 

72,200 

57,781 

80,870 

36,000 

156,800 

186,000 

168,000 

47,000 

37,600 

.^.08.^ 

S      cts. 

11,543  77 
12,714  75 

Dun\vich    

Ekfrid  and  Caradoc. 
Grev  

10,105  86 

12,903  86 

8,175  47 

Brooke   

EaJeigh  

32,978  93 
36,409  64 
35,297  62 

East  Tilbury    

West  Nissouri 

Middlesex . . . 
do        ... 
do        ... 

8,178  .50 

Delaware  

Metcalfe    

5,728  68 
650  65 

Totals 

142 

114,900                        896  0:5(1 

174,687  73 

This  expenditure  is  now  rejjayable  to  the  Province  by  a  rent-charge  on  the  lands  un- 
watered, at  the  rate  of  .$7.  61  per  annum  for  22  years,  for  each  .$100  expended,  as  pro- 
vided by  the  Act  36  Vic.  cap.  38. 

Drainage  Works  in  the  following  Townships  are  still  in  hand,  but  will  be  completed 
and  ready  for  assessment  early  in  1876  : —  » 

Township  of  Moore,  County  of  Lambton. 

13}  miles  of  drains,  containing  83,000  cubic  yards,  are  completed.  An  extension 
of  No.  5  drain,  containing  7,711  cubic  yards  of  excavations,  recently  put  under  contract, 
will  be  finished  in  the  spring  of  1876. 

Township  of  Sombra,  County  of  Lambton. 

In  July,  1873,  contracts  for  drains  were  let  in  this  Township  having  a  total  length 
of  26  miles,  and  containing  159,000  cubic  yards  of  excavations.  These  drains  are  about 
at  completion. 

Extensions  of  No.  1  drain  have  also  been  let,  one  of  which  is  finished  ;  the  other, 
containing  8,665  cubic  yards  of  excavation,  is  in  hand. 

In  addition  to  the  works,  which  all  comprise  outlet  or  discharge  drains,  three 
cross  drains  have  been  recently  put  under  contract  on  the  lines  of  the  8th,  10th  and 
12th  Concession  roads.  In  the  construction  the  roads  will  be  formed  alongside  from 
the  material  taken  out  of  the  ditches  the  total  length  will  be  1^  miles,  having  39,678 
cubic  yards  of  excavations. 

TowsHiP  of  Sarnia,  County  of  Lambton. 

The  construction  of  the  Wawanosh  drain,  containing  63,841  cubic  yards  of  exacvation, 
was  completed  in  May  last,  having  a  length  of  over  four  miles. 

The  works  on  the  Pulse  Creek  drain  were  put  under  contract  in  February,  and  will  be 
finished  this  year,  the  length  of  the  drain  is  3.35  miles,  and  the  excavations  amount  to 
45,500  cubic  yards. 

The  Waddell  and  Perche  Creek  drains  are  about  being  put  under  contract,  the  works 
to  be  finished  in  May,  1876.  They  will  have  a  total  length  of  13  miles,  and  contain 
111,000  cubic  yards  of  excavation.  When  the.^e  drains  are  completed  the  system  of 
drainage  in  Sarnia  Township  will  be  very  effective.  The  Township  in  the  past  has  suf- 
fered much  from  the  drainage  discharges  of  other  townships  for  which  there  were  not 
sufficient  outlets  through  the  low  lying-lands  forming  its  surface. 


10 


39  Victoria, 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  8.) 


A.  1875 


TowN.sHip  OF  East  Williams,  County  of  Middlesex. 

A  drain  in  this  township  was  put  under  contract  in  February,  and  will  be  completed 
at  the  close  of  the  year.  Its  length  is  two  miles,  containing  14,000  cubic  yards  of  excava- 
tions. 

Township  of  Aldborough,  County  of  Elgin. 

Two  drains  in  this  township  were  put  under  contract  in  August.  They  will  be 
finished  in  1876.  One  of  the  drains  will  have  part  of  its  cour.se  along  the  town  line  be- 
tween Aldborough  and  Dunwich,  and  a  road  will  be  formed  with  the  material  along  that 
portion  of  the  work. 

The  length  of  the  drains  is  6f  miles,  and  they  contain  46,264.  cubic  yards  of  ex- 
cavations. 

,  Township  of  Wf.st  Tilbury,  County  of  Essex. 

The  township  of  West  Tilbury,  in  its  general  formation,  is  like  that  of  East  Tilbury 
or  Kaleigh,  though  with  less  inclination  of  surface.  From  its  southerly  boundary  to  Lake 
St  Clair  there  is  a  gentle  and  even  descent,  the  inclination  upwards  continuing  for  some 
distance  southerly  in  the  lands  forming  the  adjacent  townships  along  Lake  Erie,  and  therefore 
the  municipal  drainage  works  of  the  townships  of  Eomnev  and  Mersea  discharge  their 
waters  into  the  scarcely  defined  water  runs  of  its  surfac?  These  being  ill-defined,  tor- 
uous,  overgrown  with  brush,  and  otherwise  obstructed,  the  surplus  rainfall  spread  over, 
and  flooded  much  of  tha  valuable  lands  of  the  tf»wnship.  and  resulted  in  a  general  desire 
of  the  landowners  for  a  systematic  drainage  scheme  for  the  whole.  On  application, 
surveys  were  made  by  the  Departmental  engineering  staft",  the  results  were  laid  before 
the  township  authorities,  and  resolutions  passed  by  them  asking  the  Government  to  under- 
take the  works. 

In  compliance  with  these  resolutions,  contract.s  have  been  let  for  the  excavation  of 
30  miles  of  main  discharge,  and  branch  drains  coutaining  196,56!)  cubic  yards  of  excava- 
tions, and  embracing  a  complete  system  of  drainage  works  for  the  township. 

The  estimated  cost  of  drainage  works  now  in  construction,  and  under  contract,  is 
shown  in  the  following  tabular  .statement : — 


TOWNSIIII'H. 

Counties. 

Length  of 
Drains. 

Ai)proxiuiate 
area.s  unwatered. 

Excavations. 

Estimated  co.st  of 
works  when  finished. 

Moore   

Sombra 

Samia  

Aldborough 

Ijambton  ... 

do 

do 
Elgin  

Miles. 

Hi. 
;«.50 
20.50 
6.75 
.$0. 
2. 

Acres. 

13,000 
29,000 
20,000 

3,200 
20,000 

1,000 

C'ubic  yards. - 

03,200 
213,840 
220,.341 

46,204 

iO(;,.')(;'.t 

14,000 

S       cts. 

1(J,200  00 

52,000  00 

40,200  00 

6  .300  00 

West  TObury 

Essex 

Middlesex  . . . 

30  500  00 

East  Williams    

2,2.50  00 

Totals 

108.75 

86,200                               784  91-1 

147,450  00 

The  total  expenditure  on  drainage  works,  surveys, 
therefore  stand  as  follows  : — 


and  obligations  on  contracts  will 


Expenditure  on  works  completed  and  given  to  Assesssors.  $174,687  73 

Do.     on  works  in  hand,  including  obligations  on  contracts.  147,450  00 

Cost  of  drainage  surveys  under  33rd  Vic.  cap.  2,        .         .  25,789  16 
Cos  of  drainage  surveys  under  36th  Vic.  cap.  38,  to  close  of     . 

1875 5,300  00 


Total  expenditure  and  obligations, 
Available  for  additions  or  contingencies. 


•1353,226  89 
10,135  45 


Totalavailableunder33rdVic.cap.  2ndan(136  Vio  cap.  38,  $363,362.  34 

11 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  8.)  A.  1875 


I  desire  again  to  call  the  attention  of  the  municipal  authorities  of  the  various  town- 
ships in  which  drainage  works  have  been  carried  out,  to  the  necessity  of  taking  steps  to 
have  the  drains  kept  in  order,  and  freed  as  much  as  possible  from  obstructions  of  every 
kind.  Amongst  these  I  have  noticed  falling  trees,  fences  placed  across  the  bottoms  of  the 
ditches,  dams  built  across  them  to  secure  water  for  cattle,  roots  thrown  into  the  drains, 
and  other  obstructions,  all  tending  to  obstruct  the  flow  of  the  water,  and  to  deposit  sedi- 
ment, and  so  shallow  the  drains. 

The  future  maintenance  of  all  the  drainage  works  will  have  to  be  provided  for  by  the 
several  municipalities  as  a  charge  upon  the  lands  affected  by  their  excavation,  and  there- 
fore such  rules  and  by-laws  should  be  prepared  as  may  be  necessary  to  meet  each  par- 
ticular case. 

ARTESIAN  WELL,  LONDON  ASYLUM. 

In  the  early  part  of  the  year,  it  having  been  found  that  the  supply  of  water  at  the 
Asylum  for  the  Insane  at  London  had  become  seriously  inadecpiate  for  the  wants  of  that 
Institution,  I  was  instructed  to  make  an  examination  and  report  on  what  I  might  con- 
sider the  best  means  to  be  adopted  for  remedying  the  evil. 

I  found  the  water  supply  of  the  Asylum  to  be  obtained  from  two  wells  in  the  rear 
of  the  buildings,  one  of  which  has  a  depth  of  85  feet,  sunk  through  drift  and  blue  clay, 
the  water  in  which  is  most  probably  supplied  through  sand  cracks  in  the  clay,  and  is  not 
apparently  in  large  quantity.  This,  however,  is  aided  by  a  series  of  pipe  drains  converg- 
ing on  the  wells  from  the  higlier  grounds  in  the  rear  of  tlie  Asylum.  These  convey  and 
utilize  all  the  water  that  can  be  obtained  from  the  surface  springs  of  that  area  within  the 
limits  of  the  Government  lands. 

In  ordinary  seasons  the  supply  of  water  so  obtauied  has  been  barely  sufficient,  and. 
when  a  lengthened  period  ol  dry  weather  occurs,  the  surface  springs  become  reduced,  and 
the  supply  falls  short ;  in  addition  to  which,  the  under  draining  of  the  high  grounds  and 
cutting-off  of  the  surface  springs  by  means  of  the  pipe  drains  will  have  the  effect  of  gra- 
dually and  permanently  reducing  the  quantity  of  water  to  be  obtained  from  that  source. 

The  other  sources  from  which  water  might  be  obtained  were  the  following  :  — 

1st.  The  north  or  south  branches  of  the  Thames  River,  distant  about  two  and  three- 
quarter  miles  from  the  Asylum  buildings  ;  the  water  of  the  north  brancli  being  sixty-five 
feet  and  that  of  the  south  branch  eighty-seven  feet  lower  than  the  base  of  the  buildings. 

In  the  event  of  using  the  water  from  either  branch,  a  filtering  basin  would  be  requi- 
site, as  the  north  branch  receives  the  sewage  of  St.  Mary's  and  Stratford,  and  the  south 
branch  of  Ingersoll  and  Woodstock  ;  in  each  case  at  higher  levels  than  where  either 
branch  could  be  tappetl  for  the  service  of  tlie  Asylum.  The  objections  to  using  tlie  water 
from  either  branch  of  the  Thames  would  be  the  large  first  cost  of  the  works,  the  an- 
nual cost  of  maintaining  a  pumping  establishment  so  far  from  the  Asylum,  and  the  proba- 
bility of  litigation  in  dry  seasons,  when  the  supply  of  water  in  the  river  becomes  very 
small. 

2nd.  Another  source  from  which  a  supply  of  water  could  be  obtained  is  in  a  tract  of 
wooded  swamp  having  an  area  of  about  fourteen  acres,  and  situated  about  one  mile 
north-east  from  the  main  buildings  of  the  Asylum. 

The  swamp  contains  what  at  present  appear  to  be  some  good  springs,  which  might 
be  collected  in  pipes  and  brought,  by  means  of  gravitation,  to  the  wells  now  in  use  at  the 
Asylum. 

The  objection  to  obtaining  a  supply  from  this  source  consists  in  the  doubts  as  to 
its  permanency.  The  springs  are  most  probably  surface  ones  only,  and  the  tapping  of 
the  swamp  in  which  they  occur,  by  the  laying  of  a  series  of  under-ground  pipes,  would 
have  i)ractically  the  effect  of  under-draining,  and  would,  after  some  time  had  elapsed, 
most  probably  effect  a  permanent  reduction  in  the  sui)ply. 

3rd.  The  sinking  of  an  Artesian  well  in  the  rear  of  the  Asylum  buildings,  so  located 
that  in  the  event  of  steam  pumping  being  required,  the  steam  from  the  boilers  in  the 
western  wing  could  be  used  for  working  the  pumping  engine. 

In  the  City  of  London  and  neighbourhood  there  are  several  wells  of  this  description 
now  in  use,  having  been  sunk  to  deptlis  varying  from  800  to  1,200  feet.  All  have  suc- 
ceeded in  obtaining  water  in  abundance,  although  only  two  are  flowing  wells.  The  waters 

12 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  8.)  A.  1875 


in  the  others  rise  to  about  forty  feet  below  the  surface  of  the  ground,  and  have  to  be 
pumped  from  that  depth.  The  water  in  these  wells  has  more  or  less  of  sulphates  in 
solution. 

At  St.  Mary's,  wliere  the  corniferous  limestone  appears  on  the  surface,  a  flowin<'well 
of  good  water  was  obtained  at  a  depth  of  700  feet. 

At  Tilsonburgli,  a  well  sunk  to  a  depth  of  890  feet  yields  a  water  impregnated  with 
salt. 

The  dip  of  the  various  strata  of  the  Silurian  and  Devonian  rocks  west  of  Lake  On- 
tario has  a  descending  inclination  to  the  west.  The  height  of  the  surface  in  some  places 
where  the  Upper  Silurian  rocks  crop  out  in  the  neighbourhood  of  Rockwood  is  1  200 
feet  above  the  sea.  The  surface  at  London  is  400  teet  lower,  although  it  is  underlaid  by 
the  lowest  strata  of  the  Devonian  system  which  overlies  the  L^pper  Silurian  ■  and  west  of 
London,  the  lowest  strata  of  the  Devonian,  the  corniferous  limestone  is  overlaid  by  the 
Hamilton  shales,  the  surface  being  at  no  higher  elevation  above  the  sea  than  that  at 
London. 

The  Gneissoid  formation  of  the  Laurentian  system  ap])ear.s  on  the  surface  on  both 
sides  of  the  St.  Lawrence  between  Kingston  and  Brockville,  and  thence  northerly  and 
iK^rth-westerly  to  the  shores  of  the  Georgian  Bay,  which  it  follows  to  a  point  opposite  tiie 
easterly  end  of  the  Manitoulin  Island.  Tliere  is  a  great  basin  or  depression  in  this  forma- 
tion extending  to  the  west  and  south  of  the  out-crops  mentioned.  This  embraces  the 
areas  of  Lakes  Ontario,  Erie,  Huron,  and  Michigan,  as  well  as  that  part  of  Ontario  wesi 
of  Kingston  and  south  of  the  Muskoka  district  and  the  Georgian  Ray.  In  this  basin  have 
been  deposited  the  Silurian  and  Devonian  formations  of  Ontario.  The  height  of  the  surface 
of  the  drift  overlying  the  lower  strata  of  the  Devonian  at  London  is  about  SOO  feet  above 
the  sea,  the  thickness  of  the  various  strata  down  to  the  Chazy  may  be  2,500  feet  or  more. 
The  surface  of  the  Gneissoid  crossing  the  St.  Lawrence  below  Kingston  is  about  200  feet 
above  the  sea,  and  therefore  the  depression  of  the  basin  in  the  neighbourhood  of  Loudon 
should  be  about  1,900  feet  or  more  below  its  surface.  In  the  country  immediately  north 
of  Kingston  the  Chazy  appears  to  overlie  the  Gneissoid,  the  Potsdam  bein^  wanting;,  and 
I  therefore  I  think  that  in  Western  Ontario  the  Chazy  will  immediately  overlie  the  Gneis- 
soid. 

My  object  in  mentioning  these  details  of  formation  is,  that  I  think  the  sinkin^^  of 
the  Artesian  well  should  be  continued  tiirough  the  permeable  rocks  of  the  Silurian  for- 
mations until  it  reaches  the  impermeable  Gneissoid  of  the  Laurentian,  unless  a  f'ood 
supply  of  water  is  obtained  in  the  overlying  strata  of  the  Hudson  River  or  Trenton  group, 
and  also  in  stating  that  the  same  details  guided  my  choice  in  recommendin<--  the  sink- 
ing of  an  Artesian  well  at  London,  believing  that  if  water  was  not  struck  m  the  up- 
per strata  of  the  Silurian,  it  would  certainly  be  obtained  between  the  Silurian  and  the 
Laurentian,  and  in  the  latter  caae  free  from  the  injurious  solutions  of  salts  or  sulphurs. 

I  may  state  that  the  boring  has  so  far  progressed  without  any  accident.  It  is  now 
between  1,800  and  1,900  feet  in  depth,  and  is,  1  believe,  in  the  Hiadson  River  formation. 
One  of  the  difficulties  with  legard  to  the  water  supply  at  London  is,  that  city  itself 
has  no  water-works,  and  the  municipal  authorities  there  are  at  a  loss  from  whence  to  ob- 
tain the  necessary  supply.  If  the  Artesian  well  now  being  sunk  by  the  Government  at  the 
Asylum  is  a  success,  London  will  avail  itself  of  the  same  means  of  supply,  and  I  may  say 
that  all  the  larger  villages  and  towns  west  of  London  are  in  the  same  position,  and  await 
the  results  of  the  expermient  for  the  :  ame  reasons. 

EXTENSION  OF  RAILWAYS  IN  1875. 

Construction  works  on  new  lines  within  the  boundaries  of  the  Province  were  con- 
fined to  eleven  railways.     Of  these,  seven  are  lines  on  which  works  have  been  reported  as 
in  construction  in  1874  or  preceding  years,  and  four  are  lines,  or  extensions  of  lines,  on 
'  which  works  have  been  commenced  in  1875. 

On  the  Toronto,  Grey  and  Bruce  Railway  a  length  of  8.55  miles  has  been  constructed 
on  the  3  feet  6-inch  gauge  ;    all  other  works   have  been  constructed  for  lines  of  railway 
.  having  the  4  feet  8|-inch  gauge,  which  has  now  become  the  standard  gauge  of  the  Domin- 
ion of  Canada   as  well  as  the  United   States.     The  advantages  of  the  latter  L^au'^e    as 

13  ^    "" 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  8.)  A.   1875 


compared  with  the  difference  of  cost  in  a  level  country  like  Ontario,  are  so  manifest, 
that  it  is  not  likely  any  future  Railways  will  be  built  on  any  other  gauge. 

All  the  lines  in  construction  this  year  are  "local  lines,"  some  of  them  "crosscoun- 
try "  lines,  forming  important  connecting  links  between  the  great  "  through  "  east  and 
west  lines  ;  while  others,  penetrating  the  newer  and  northerly  settlements,  tend  largely  to 
develope  the  resources  of  the  back  country,  and  at  the  same  time  become  feeders  to  the 
main  trunk  lines. 

Details  of  the  works  on  the  lines  in  construction  in  1875,  so  far  as  known,  are  as 
follows  : — 

Midland  Railway — Extension  to  Midland  City.  • 

Thirty-four  miles  in  length  fromOrilliato  Midland  City  ;  20  miles  have  been  completed 
to  Wabashene,  where  the  Railway  reaches  the  waters  of  the  Georgian  Bay  and  connects 
with  the  mills  of  some  of  the  large  lumbering  firms  whose  head-quarters  are  established 
on  those  waters.  •» 

Port  Dover  and  Lake  Huron  Railway. 

This  Railway  has  been  completed,  excepting  some  minor  details,  from  Port  Dover 
to  Woodstock,  a  length  of  40  mdes,  and  is  in  construction  from  thence  to  Stratford,  27 
miles.  On  the  latter  part  of  the  road  the  greater  portion  of  the  formation  is  finished  and 
the  iron  is  being  laid. 

At  Port  Dover  there  is  a  good  harbour,  owned  by  the  Railway  Company.  Neat 
Stations  are  built  along  the  line  as  far  as  Woodstock,  at  Port  Dover,  Simcoe,  Hawtrey, 
Otterville,  Norwich  and  Burgessville,  that  at  Woodstock  being  in  construction.  The  road 
will  form  a  very  convenient  "  cross  country  "  route  between  Port  Dover,  Simcoe,  Nor- 
wich, Woodstock  and  Stratford,  and  will  tend  materially  to  cheapen  the  supply  of  coal  to 
those  towns.  At  the  present  time  the  engines  of  the  Railway  are  burning  coal  which 
they  receive  at  Port  Dover,  and  which  is  found  to  be  cheaper  than  wood  for  use  as  fuel 
for  the  Railway  service. 

Toronto,  Grey  and  Bruce  Railway. 

The  construction  on  this  line  was  confined  to  the  completion  of  an  independent  line 
of  8.55  miles  from  the  former  terminus  of  the  Toronto,  Grey  and  Bruce  Railway,  to  the 
general  freight  yards  and  workshops  of  the  Company  at  the  Queen's  Wharf  in  Toronto. 
Previous  to  the  construction  of  this  link,  the  traffic  of  the  road  passed  over  the  Grand 
Trunk  Railway  between  Weston  and  Toronto,  but  now  the  freight  traffic  of  the  Railway 
enters  Toronto  entirely  independently  of  the  Grand  Trunk,  the  passenger  trains  only 
using  the  Grand  Trunk  track  in  the  city  to  enable  them  to  enter  the  Union  Station — an 
arrangement  very  conducive  to  the  convenience  of  the  travelling  public. 

Northern  Extension  Railway. 

In  1874,  the  Muskoka  branch  of  the  Northern  Extension  Railway  was  opened  to 
Severn  Station,  14  miles  from  Orillia.  This  year  the  work  has  been  pushed  with  great 
energy,  and  the  line  is  now  opened  to  its  terminus  at  Gravenhurst,  on  Lake  Muskoka. 
The  opening  has  been  too  late  to  facilitate  the  summer  travel  of  1875,  but  in  time  for  the 
conveyance  of  a  large  quantity  of  freight  moving  into  the  new  settlements  around  and 
beyond  the  navigable  chain  of  the  Muskoka  waters.  With  the  exception  jjerhaps  of  the 
route  on  the  Upper  Ottawa  leading  to  Pembroke,  I  know  of  no  other  in  the  back  coun- 
tries of  Ontario  with  so  large  and  important  a  traffic  in  passengers  and  freight,  and  there- 
fore the  connection  of  this  Railway  with  the  navigable  lakes  north  of  Gravenhurst  is  a 
matter  of  much  importance  to  the  prosperity  of  the  back  country  in  that  region. 

14 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  8.)  A.   1875 


London,  Huron  and  Bruce  Railway. 

The  construction  of  this  line,  69  miles  in  length,  was  commenced  and  will  be  nearly 
completed  in  1875.  It  is  laid  throughout  with  steel  rails,  and  is  ready  for  traffic  for  a 
length  of  48  miles — between  London  and  Blyth. 

The  road  is  a  cross  country  one  ; — starting  from  the  Great  Western  Railway  at  Lou- 
don, it  crosses  the  Grand  Trunk  main  line,  and  branch,  at  Lucan  and  Clinton,  and  con- 
nects with  the  Kincardine  branch  of  the  Wellington  Grey  and  Bruce  Railway  at  Wing- 
ham.  It  will  therefore  open  a  new  and  short  route  between  Kincardine,  Wiugham, 
Clinton,  Exeter,  London,  St  Thomas  and  Port  Stanley. 

Norfolk  Railway. 

I  am  informed  that  the  formation  of  this  line  is  completed  between  Brantford  and 
Tilsonburg,  a  length  of  32  miles.  It  was  originally  intended  to  extend  the  line  to  Port 
Burwell,  but  I  am  not  sure  whether  it  is  now  intended  to  construct  beyond  the  Canada 
Southern  Railway  at  Tilsonburg.  At  Norwich  the  line  crosses  the  Port  Dover  and  Lake 
Huron  Railway,  and  iron  is  laid  to  that  point  over  about  12  miles  of  the  road  bed. 

By  means  of  the  Canada  Southeiii  and  Port  Dover  and  Lake  Huron  Railways,  the 
line  will  open  connections  between  Brantford,  Norwich,  Simcoe,  Port  Dover,  Tilsonburg 
and  St  Thomas. 

Kingston  and  Pembroke  Railway. 

As  a  projected  Railway,  this  line  was  intended  to  connect  with  the  Canada  Central 
at  a  point  about  20  miles  south  of  Pembroke.  At  the  present  time,  however,  construction 
has  been  confined  to  that  part  of  the  line  between  Kingston  and  a  little  beyond  Sharbot 
Lake,  about  50  miles  in  length,  on  which  46.5  miles  have  the  iron  laid  and  the  road  bed 
ballasted.  The  first  30  miles  of  the  Railway  passes  through  a  fair  agricultural  country, 
after  which  the  gneissoid  formation  is  entered.  The  surface  becomes  rugged  and  the 
population  scattered,  but  I  am  informed  that  the  iron  ore  of  this  region  will  give  a  con- 
siderable traffic  over  the  line. 

Canada  Central  Railway. 

This  Railway  has  been  open  for  traflic  for  some  years  as  far  as  Renfrew.  Its  exten- 
sion to  Pembroke,  a  distance  of  34  miles,  is  now  in  progress,  and  I  have  been  infoimed 
will  be  opened  for  traffic  early  in  the  ensuing  year. 

It  is  proposed  that  a  branch  of  this  line  will  form  a  connection  with  the  Georgian 
Bay  branch  of  the  Canada  Pacific  Railway. 

Credit  Valley  Railway. 

A  total  length  of  116.5  miles  has  been  graded  on  this  railway  and  its  branches.  On 
the  main  line,  works  have  been  in  progress  between  Toronto  and  IngersoU,  and  on  the 
branches  from  Streetsville  towards  Orangeville  and  Elora. 

North  Hastings  Railway. 

This  is  a  branch  of  the  Grand  Junction  Railway,  leading  into  that  line  about  1 7  miles 
from  Belleville,  and  having  a  direction  thence  northerly  into  the  mineral  district  of  the 
Madoc  country.  Its  length  will  be  about  22  miles,  on  which  construction  has  been  com- 
menced this  year. 

The  line  in  the  main  will  be  a  mineral  one,  for  the  supply  of  iron  ore  to  smelting 
works  about  to  be  built  at  Belleville. 

15 


'^^  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  8.)  A.  1875 


North  Simcoe  Railway. 

A  line  has  been  projected  from  Barrie  to  Penetanguishene,  having  a  length  of  35 
miles.  A  part  of  the  work,  extending  southerly  from  Penetanguishene,  is  now  under  con- 
struction, and  the  road  may  possibly  become  a  link  of  the  projected  Hamilton  and  North- 
Western  Railway. 

The  multiplication  of  Railway  communications  in  the  western  portion  of  the  Pro- 
vince of  Ontario  has  tended  largely  to  develope  the  country,  extend  its  resources,  and  in- 
■crease  its  prosperity. 

I  have  the  honour  to  remain, 

Your  obedient  servant, 

Thos.  Nepean  Molesworth, 

Engineer  of  Public  Works,  Ontario. 


16 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  8.)  A.  1875 


STATEMENTS 


OF 


ACCOUNTANT    AND    LAW    CLERK 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  8.) 


A.  1875 


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Sessional  Pajjers  (No.  8.) 


A.  1875 


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39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  8.) 


A.  1875 


No.  2. — Expenditure  for  Repairs,  Fuel,  Water,  Gas,  &c.,  by  the  Department 
of  Public  Works,  during  1874  (Part  of  Maintenance  Accounts). 


Name  of  Work. 


Expenditure 
for  1874. 


Government  House 

Executive  Council's  and  Attorney-General's  Oificea 

Treasury  Department 

Secretary  and  Registrar's  Olfice  

Department  of  Public  Works  

Crown  Lands  Department    

Parliament  Building  (Centre)   

Osgoode  Hall,  Toronto   

School  of  Practical  Science  

Maintenance  of  Locks  and  Dams  

Total 


«  cts. 

,849  90 
168  67 
5.S4  O.'S 
5M  95 
(i04  55 
996  07 
280  1() 
009  00 
545  17 
009  o8 


29,032  89 


F.  T.  JONES, 

Accoiiiitant. 


Department  of  Public  Work 

Toronto,  31st  December,  1874. 


20 


89  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  8.) 


A.  1875 


No.  3. — Statement  of  Expenditure  from  1st  January,  1870,  to  31st  December, 
1874,  under  the  Ontario  Drainage  Act,  33  Vic,  c.  2 ;  34  Vic,  c  22  ;  and  36 
Vic,  c  38,  on  Drainajj^e  Works  ;  chargeable  to  Municipalities.  Also,  Total 
Expenditure  under  said  Act  up  to  31st  December,  1874. 


Township. 


Brooke    

Delaware  

Dunwich    

Ekfrid,  Caradoc,  and  Metcalfe. 
Grey 


Moore 

Mosa  

Niasouri,  West. 

llaleigh 

Russell  

Samia 

Sombra  

Tilbury,  East  . 


Total  Expendi- 
ture from  1st 
lanuary,  1870,  to 
3l8t  Dec,  1873.  | 


Expenditure, 
1874. 


Total  chargeable  against  Municipalities 


Preliminary  Surveys  and  Sundries,  chargeable  against 
Province    


Total. 


$       cts. 
34,747  73 


10,105 

12,903 

8,175 

9,042 

12,714 

631 

29,579 

11,543 


4,128 
26,340 


159,913  97 


27,195  04 


187,109  01 


S       cts. 


4,435  9S 


633  15 


4,355  10 


7,547  00 
5,915  88 


2,177  26 

17,802  61 

7,418  91 


50,285  89 


2,842  42 


Total  to  .31  Bt 
December,  1874. 


.?  cts. 
34,747  73 

4,435  98 
10,105  86 
13,537  01 

8,175  47 
13,397  40 
12,714  75 

8,178  50 
35,495  84 
11,543  77 

2,177  26 
21,930  82 
.33,759  47 


.5.3,128  31 


210,199  86 


30.037  46 


240,237  3 


Department  of  Public  Works, 

Toronto,  31st  December,  1874. 


F.  T.  JONES, 

AccovMtanf,. 


21 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  8.) 


A.  1875 


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Sessional  Papers  (No.  8.) 


A.  1875 


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Sessional  Papers  (No.  8.) 


A.  1875 


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o9  Victoria. 


Sessional  l^apers  (No.  9.) 


A.  1875 


MUNICIPAL  LOAN  FUND. 


SURPLUS    DISTRIBUTION. 


SCHEDULES    SHOWING   THE    OBJECTS   TO   WHICH    THE    SAID    FUND 

HAS  BEEN  APPKOPRIATED  BY  BY-LAW,  AND  THE  PAYMENTS 

MADE  UPON  THE  SAME,  TO  THE  1st  NOVEMBER,  1875. 


^£mUt\  by  (Wcr  et  the  '£sqUUim  ^$smUxj, 


ioiottta: 

PHINTED  BY  HUNTER,  ROSIj:  &  CO.,  25  WELLINGTON  STREET  WEST, 

loV'o. 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  9.)  A.  1875 


To  His  Honor  the  LieutenanlrGovernor  of  the  Province  of  Ontario. 

The  undersigned  has  the  honour  to  present  the  within  tables,  being  statements  of  the 
amount  apportioned  to  the  various  Municipalities  of  the  Province  of  Ontario  under  the 
Municipal  Loan  Fund  Surplus  Distribution  Scheme,  the  objects  to  which  such  amounts  have 
been  appropriated  by  By-law  and  the  payment  of  principal  and  interest  made  up  to  the 
1st  of  November,  1875. 


November  29th,  1875 


ADAM   CROOKS, 

Traaattrer. 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  9.)  A.  1875 


CONTENTS. 


PAGE 

Municipalities  in  the  County  of  A  ddington 8 

"                         "                 Brant  8 

"                         "                Bruce  8 

"                        "                Carleton 9 

•'                        "                Dundas  10 

<'                Elgin  10 

"                        "                Essex    JO 

"                        "                Frontenac H 

"                        "                Grenville H 

"                       "                Glengarry  H 

Grey    12 

"                        "                 Haldimand 12 

"                        «                Halton  13 

"                        "                Hastings 13 

"                        "                Huron   14 

"                       "                Kent 15 

"                        "                Lambton   15 

"                       "               Leeds 10 

"                        "                Lennox 16 

"                        "                Lincoln  16 

'<                         "                 Middlesex 17 

"                      ♦"                Norfolk 17 

'<                        "                Ontario  18 

"                         "                Oxford 18 

<<                        «'                Peel    19 

"                        "                Perth 19 

"                        "                Peterborough  19 

"                        "                Prescott 20 

"                        "                Prince  Edward 20 

"                        "                 Russell   21 

"                        "                Simcoe  21 

'«                        «'                Stormont  21 

"                        "                Victoria 21 

"                        "                 Waterloo  22 

•'                        "                 Wellington 23 

"                        *«                 Welland 23 

"                        "                 Wentworth  24 

"                York   24 

City  of  Hamilton 25 

"       Kingston  25 

"       Toronto 25 

District  of  Algoma 2 

"          Muskoka    25 

"          Manitoulin 25 

"          Parry  Sound  25 

Surplus  Distribution  Scheme 27 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  9.)  A.  1875 


MUNICIPAL    LOAN    FUND, 


SURPLUS    DISTRIBUTION. 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  9. 


A.  1875 


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a9  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  9.) 


A.  1875 


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Sessional  Papers  (No.  9.) 


A.  1875 


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26 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  9.) 


A.  1875 


SURPLUS   DISTRIBUTION    SCHEME. 
Summing  up  of  statement  of  payments,  &c.,  to  1st  November/ 1875. 


Total  amount  of  Principal  paid 

Do  Interest 

Total  payment  Principal  and  Interest 

Total  amoimt  appropriated  under  the  Act    . 
Less  payment  of  principal  as  above 

Balance  of  unpaid  Principal  


S      cts. 


2,178,045  59 
51,902  54 


2,229,948  13 


3,115,736  66 
2,178,045  59 


937,091  07 


27 


S8  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  10.)  A.  1875 


REPORT 


OF  THE 


LIBRARIAN  OF  THE  LEGISLATIVE  ASSEMBLY 


OF  THE 


PROVINCE  OF  ONTARIO. 


To  tJie.  Hnnourahk  the  Legislative  Assembly  of  t/ie  Province  of  Ontario. 

The  Report  of  the  Librarian,  on  the  state  of  the  Library,  respectfully  represents  : — 

That,  since  the  last  meeting  of  Parliament,  it  lias  been  found  necessary  to  make 
important  changes  in  the  Library. 

To  provide  still  further  for  the  convenience  of  Members,  and  to  ensure  the  greater 
security  of  the  collection,  the  books  have  been  removed  to  another  part  of  the  building. 
It  is  to  be  hoped  that  the  advantages  of  the  change  will  be  experienced  by  all  who  may 
have  occasion  to  consult  the  works  in  the  Library.  The  books  will  be  found  more  easy 
of  access ;  while  the  new  system  adopted  in  the  arrangement  of  the  alcoves  will  enable 
the  reader  to  enjoy  more  comfort  and  seclusion  than  were  possible  under  the  architectural 
condition  of  the  old  Library  building. 

A  new  Catalogue  has  been  prepared  as  a  necessity  of  the  new  Library.  In  this 
Catalogue  will  be  found  a  novel  feature,  namely,  a  system  of  analysis  which  will  enable  a 
person  in  search  of  information  on  any  question  to  ascertain  at  once  every  work  in  the 
Library  which  may  illustrate  that  question.  To  accomplish  this  end,  an  Alphabetical 
Index  of  Subjects  has  been  prepared  for  and  incorporated  in  the  new  Catalogue.  It  is 
hoped  that  this  Index,  in  connection  with  the  Alphabetical  Index  of  Authors,  already  a 
feature  of  the  Catalogue,  will  prove  of  much  convenience  and  practical  utility. 

The  additions  matle  to  the  Library  during  the  past  year,  both  by  way  of  purchase  and 
donation,  have  been  considerable.  The  purchases  have  comprised  many  valuable  works 
bearing  on  the  history  of  Great  Britain  and  Ireland  ;  works  on  general  history,  political 
and  social  science,  law,  travels,  physical  science,  biography  and  statistics. 

A  valuable  addition  to  the  Library  has  also  been  made  in  the  purchase  of  a  complete 
set  of  "  Eraser's  Magazine,"  from  the  first ;  and  of  the  "  Dublin  University  Magazine," 
also  from  its  commencement. 

The  donations  to  the  Library  during  the  past  year  have  been  large  and  varied,  and 
have  added  materially  to  the  value  and  the  number  of  the  collection.  First  in  magnitude 
and  importance  are  the  donations  from  the  Federal  Government  of  the  United  States, 
through  the  Smithsonian  Institution. 

Tlie  coiitril)uti()us  by  the  United  States  Government  to  this  Library,  during  (lui 
year  1875,  are  as  follow  : — 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (Vn.  10.)  A.  1875 


The  Medical  and  Surgical   History  of  the  War  of  the  Rebellion,  1861-65.     Prepared 
under  the  direction  of  Surgeon -General  Joseph  K.  Barnes,  U.  S.  Army.     2  vols. 
Surgical  Cases  Treated  in  the  Army  of  the  U.  S.     From  1865  to  1871.     Report  on. 
Sun.     Total  Eclipse  of,  August  7,  1869.     Reports  on  Observations  of     Conducted  under 

the  direction  of  Commodore  B.  F.  Sands,  U.  S.  N. 
Astronomical  and  Meteorological  Observations  made  at  the  United  States  Naval  Observa- 
tory during  the  year  1868.     Rear-Admiral  B.  F.  Sands,  Sui)erintendent. 
Washington  Astronomical  and  Meteorological  Observations,  made  at  tlie  United  States 
Naval  Observatory  during  the  years  1869,  1870,  and   I!-'"!.     Rear-Admiral  B. 
F.  Sands,  Superintendent.     3  vols. 
DoUen,  Wm.     The  Portable  Transit  Instrument  in  the  verticn;  <■.    tlie  Pole  Star. 
Tables  showing  the  Lengths  of  Nights,  from  Sunset  to    Sum  .>c,  during  the  year,  for 

thirteen  Light-house  Districts  of   the  LTnited  Stat<-.     (No.  9  wanting.) 
United  States  Scientific  Pamphlets.     Meteorology.     Vol.  1. 
Meteorological  Reports  and  Weather  Maps.     Practical  L^se  of 
Weather  Reports.     Signal  Service,  V.  S.  Army.     Daily  BuUeiin  of. 
United  States  Geological  Exploration  of  the  Fortieth  Parallel. 

Vol.  3.  Mining  Lidustry.     ^^  ith  Geological  Contributions. 
Vol.  5.  Botany. 
United  States  Geological  Survey  of  Wyoming,  and  portions  of  contiguous  TeriiLories. 
Labrosse,  F.     The  Navigation  of  the  Atlantic  Ocean. 

Kerhallet,  Capt.  C.  P.     Atlantic  Ocean,  General  Examination  of     With  Nautical  Direc- 
tions for  avoiding  Hurricanes,  and  a  Memoir  on  the  Currents  of  the  Atlantic. 
Peterman,  Dr.  A.,  Von  Feeden,  Dr.  W.,  and  Muhry,  Dr.  A.     Papers  on  the  Eastern  and 

Northern  Extensions  of  the  Gulf  Stream. 
Garringe,  Lieut. -Com.  H.  H.     The  Coast  of  Brazil  from  Cape  Orange  to   Rio  Janeiro. 

Illustrated.     Vol.  1. 
Reported  Dangers  to  Navigation  in  the  Pacific  Ocean,  inclusive  of  the  China  and  Japan 
Seas,  and  the  East  India  Archipelago. 
Part  1.  North  of  the  Equator. 
Bowdich,  Nathaniel.     The  New  American  Practical  Navigator. 

Reynaud,  L^once.     Memoir  upon  the  Light-house  Illumination  of  the  Coast  of  France. 
Reynaud,  Leonce.     Plates  to  Illustrate  the  above  Memoir. 
Light-house  Establishment,  V.  S.  Compilation  of  Public  Documents  and  Extracts  from 

Reports  and  Papers  relating  to.     From  1789  to  1871. 
Wyman,  Captain  R.  H.,  V.  S.  Navy.     Winds,  Currents  and  Navigation  of  the  Gulf  of 
Cadiz,  the  Western  Coast  of  the  Spanish  Peninsula,  and  the  Strait  of  Gibraltar. 
Le  Gras,  Capt.  A.,  French  Navy.     General  Examination  of  the  Mediterranean  Sea.     A 

Summary  of  its  Winds,  Currents  and  Navigation. 
Light-house  Reports,  British.     Extracts  from  the  Report  of  II.  B.  M.  S.  Commissioners, 
submitted   March   .5th,   18G1.     Republished  for  Use   of  the   U.  S.  Light-house 
Establishment. 
Light-house  Establishment.    U.  S.  Instructions  for  Light-house  Keepers,  etc.    2  vols.   Sixth 

Edition.     Washington,  1871. 
Light-house    Board.     U.  S.  Organization   and   Duties   of     With    the    Regulations  aiul 

General  Orders  of  the  Light-house  Establishment  of  tiie  U.  S. 
Light-houses.     Laws  of  States  Ceding  Jurisdiction  Over,  and   Relinquishing  Titles  to 

Light-house  Sites. 
Light-house  Board  of  the  LTnited  States.     Annual  Report  of     For  June  30,  1872. 
Lite-Saving  Service  of  the  United  States.     Regulations  for  the  Government  of 
Catalogue  of  Charts,  Plans  and  Views,  published  by  the   United   States   Hydrograi)hic 

Office,  1873. 
Navy  of  the  LTnited  States,  Regulations  for  the  Government  of 

Sailing  Directions  for  the  English  Channel.     Part  1.     South  Coast  of  England.     8vo. 
Barracks  and  Hospitals,  U.  S.  Report  on.     With  Descriptions  of  Military  Posts. 
Outline  Description  of  U.  S.  Military  Posts  and  Stations  in  the  year  1871. 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  10.)  A.  1875 


I 


Outline  Descriptions  of  the  Posts  and  Stations  of  Troops  in  the  Geographical  Divisions 

and  Departments  of  the  United  States. 
A  Manual  of  Military  Telegraphy  for  the  Signal  Service,  U.  S.  Army,  iinliracing   Perma- 
nent and  Field  Lines. 
Extracts  from  the  Manual  of  Signals.     Signal  Service  Drill.s. 
Bernard  (Maj.-Gen.)     A  Report  on  the  Defences  of  Washington. 
Iron,   Fabrication  of    for  I)efensive   Purposes,  and    its  uses    in    Modern    Fortifications, 

especially  in  Works  of  Coast  Defence.     Report  on.     Also,  Supplement. 
Reports  and  Tables  of  Experiments  on   Ib-mp  and  Wire  Rope.     Made  by  Order  of  the 

Bureau  of  Equipment  and  Recruiting. 
Kiernan,  John.     Hints  on  Horse-Shoeing.     An  Exposition  of  the  Dunbar  System,  taught 

to  the  Farriers  of  the  U.  S.  Army. 
Bridge  Equipage  of  the  U.  S.  Army.     Organization  of.     With  Directions  for  the  Con- 
struction of  Military  Bindges. 
Ordnance,  Heavy.     Report  of   Board   of  Officers — conveneil   1873 — on  Depressing,  and 

other  carriages  for. 
Yards  and  Docks  of  the  U.  S.  Navy,     Report  of  the  Board  on. 

Stotherd  (Major),  R.  H.,  Royal  Engineers.     Notes  on  Toi-pedoes,  Offensive  and  Di-ft-iisive. 
United  States  Military  and  Naval  Pamphlets. 
King  (Major),  W.  R.     Report  on  certain  Experimental  and  Theoretical  investigations 

relative   to  the  Quality,  Form    and    Combination    of   Materials  for  Defensive 

Armour,  etc. 
Levy-Montefiore,  C,  and  Kunkel,  C.      Essay  on  the  use  of  various  Alloys,  especially  of 

Phosphorus  Bronze,  for  the  Founding  of  Cannon. 
Regulations  for  the  Uniform  and  Dress  of  the  Army  of  the  United  States,  1872. 
Thomas,  Cyrus.     Synoi)sis  of  the  Acrididtv  of  Noith  America,  U.  S.  Geological  Survey. 

Vol.  5.     Zoology  and  Botany. 
Navy  of  the  United  States.     Pay  Tables  for  the  use  of  Paymasters  and  others. 
Navy  of  the  United  States.     Orders,  Regulations  and  Instructions  for  the  Administration 

of  Law  and  Justice  in. 
The  Army  Paymaster's  Manual.     For  tlie  information  of  Officers  of  the  Pay  Department 

of  the  United  States  Army. 
List  of  Post-offices  in  the  United  Kingdom  of  Great  Britain  and  Ireland. 
Consular  Service,  United  States.     Regulations  for  the  use  of. 
Register  of  the  Department  of  Justice,  and  the  Judicial  Officers  of  the  L^nited  States. 

Third  Edition.     1873. 
Register  of  the  Department  of  State.     Containing  a  list  of  persons  employed  in   the 

Department,  and   in   tlie  Diplomatic,   Consular  and  Territorial  Service  of  the 

United  States.     1872. 
Government  Salary  Tables,  adopted  by  the  ComptroUing  Officers  of  the  Treasury  Depart- 
ment, for   use   in   the   payment  of  persons  in  Civil  Employment,   who  receive 

Annual  or  Quarterly  Salaries. 
United  States  Treasury  Register.      Containing  a  List  of  all  Persons  employed    in   the 

Treasury  Department. 
Chissified  Index  of  Subjects  of  Invention,  adopted  in  the  Ignited  States  Pateiit  Office, 

March  1st,  1872. 
The  Postal  Laws  and  Regulations,  Issued  by  the  Postmaster-General,  United  States.   1873. 
Revised  List  of  Claims,  filed  with  the  Department  of  State,  United  States,  growing  out 

of  the  Acts  of  the  Alabama,  etc. 
Merchant  Vessels  of  the  LTnited  States,  for  1872.     List  of,  with  the  Official  Numbers  aad 

Signal  Letters.     Also,  List  of  Vessels  belonging  to  United  States  Navy  and 

Revenue  Marine. 
Steam  Vessels,  Inspection  of     Laws,  Rules  and  Regulations  relating  to.     1873. 
Light-house  Board  of  the  U.  S.,  Report  of     1873. 
Navy  Register  of  the  United  States.     To  January  1st,  1874. 
Army  Register,  United  States.     For  January,  1874. 
Ports  of  the  United  States,  Alphabetical  List  of.     Pamphlet.      1872. 

3 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  10.)  A.  1875 


Agricultural  Colleges,  Farmers'  Clubs,  etc.,  of  the  United  States,  List  of.  Pamphlet.  1872. 
Pensions,  U.  S.     Abstracts  of  Rulings  and  Orders  of  the  U.  S.  Commissioner  of. 
Pension  and  Bounty  Land.  U.  S.     Decisions  of  the  Secretary  of  the  Interior  concerning. 

1861  to  1871. 
Patents.    Decisions  of  the  U.  S.  Commissioner  of.    For  the  years  1869  and  1870.     2  vols. 
Rapp,  S.  A.     A  Complete  Digest  of  the  U.  S.  Laws  in  Relation  to  Bounty,  etc. 
Monthly  Reports  of  the  Department  of  Agriculture,  for  1873. 
Reports  of  the  Commissioner  of  Agriculture,  for  1872  and  1873.     2  vols. 
A.lmanac  for  the  Use  of    Navigators.      From   the  American   Ephemeris   and  Nautical 

Almanac  for  1875  and  1876.     2  vols. 
American  Ephemeris  and  Nautical  Almanac.     1875  and  1876.     2  vols. 
Catalogue  of  the  Library  of  the  Surgeon-General's  Office,  United  States  Army.     With 

Alphabetical  List  of  Subjects.     1872. 
Alphabetical  Catalogue  of  the  Library  of  the  Department  of  the  Interior.      1873. 
Catalogue  of  the  Library,  Office  Chief  Signal  Officer,  United  States  Army.      1872. 

From  the  several  States  of  the  American  Union,  the  names  of  which  are  subjoined, 
the  following  books  have  been  contributed  during  the  past  year. 

From  the  State  of  New  York  :— 

Laws  of  New  York.     1874-75.     2  vols. 

Senate  and  Assembly  Journals.      1874.     3  vols. 

Senate  Document.     1873.     Vol.  5. 

Senate  Documents.     Nos.  5,  6.     1874.     2  vols. 

Assembly  Documents.     Nos.  4,  5,  6,  7-9,  10,  11,  12,  13.     1874.     9  vols. 

Report  on  Boundaries.     1  vol. 

Regents'  Report.     1874.     1  vol. 

Trial  of  Judge  Prindle.     2  vols. 

Trial  of  Judge  Curtis.     1  vol. 

Trial  of  Judge  M'Cunn.     1  vol. 

New  Hampshire.     Reports  to  the  Legislature  of.     June  Session,  1873. 

Reports  to  the  Legislature  of     June  Session,  1874. 

Journals  of  the  Senate  and  House  of  Representatives  of.     June  Session, 

1874. 

From  the  State  of  Ohio  :— 

Ohio  State  Reports.     Yol.  24. 

Laws  of  Ohio.     1875. 

Geological  Survey  and  Maps.     1874.     Vol.  2,  Part  1. 

Debates  of  the  Ohio  Constitutional  Convention.     187.3-1874.     Four  volumes. 

From  the  State  of  Tennessee  : — 
The  Acts  of  Tennessee.     1875. 

The  following  donations  were  received  from  the  Cobden  Club,  England : — 
Bastiat's  Essays  on  Political  Economy. 
Report  of  the  Proceedings  at  the  Dinner,  July,  1874. 
The  Cobden  Club  Essays  on  Local  Government  and  Taxation. 

From  the  Literary  and  Historical  Society  of  Quebec  were  received  "  M6moires  sur  le 
Canada,  depuis  1749  jusqu'a  1769.  " 

The  iollowing  donations  were  received  from  individuals  : — 
From  His  Highness  the  Maharajah  of  Travancore  :  — 
Magnetic  Declination.     Observations  of     Made  at  Trevandrum  and  Agustia  Malley,  in 
tlie  Observatories  of  the  Maharajah  of  Travancore,  in  the  years  1852  to  1869. 
Discussed  and  Edited  by  John  Allan   Brown.     Vol.  1.      4to.      Ltmdon,  1874. 

From  Tliomas  Hodgins,  Esq.,  Q.  C,  M.  P.  P.  :— 
The  Key  to  Parliament.     Two  volumes. 

4 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  10.)  A.  1875 


From  Arthur  Sydere,  Esq. : — 

The  British  Critic.     1802-1810.     Seven  volumes. 
The  Anti-Jacobin  Review,  1809-1811.     Two  volumes. 

From  Kivas  Tully,  Esq.  : — 

Journal  Assembly,  Upper  Canada,  1837-8.     Third  Session. 

Appendix  to  Journals,  U.  C,    1839,  1839-40.       Also  certain  official  documents  of  the 
Imperial  Parliament. 
The  number  of  Books  now  in  the  Library,  exclusive  of  the  official  documents  of  the 
late  Province  of  Canada,  the  Confederation  and  its  various  Provinces,  is  8,782.     The 
total  number  of  volumes  is  10,554. 

Respectfully  submitted. 

SAMUEL  JAMES  WATSON, 

Liharian. 


I 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  11.)  A.  1875 


STA-TEMEISTTS 


RECEIPTS  m)  EXPENDITURES 


ON   ACCOUNT   OF   THE 


PROVINCE  OF  ONTARIO, 


DURING  THE  NINE  MONTHS  ENDING  30th  SEPTEMBER, 


1875, 


PRINTED  BY  HUNTER,  ROSE  &  CO.,  25  WELLINGTON  STREET  WEST. 

1875. 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  11.)  A.  1875 


To  His  Honor  the   Honorable    Donald    Alexander    Macdonald 
Lieutenant-Governor  of  the  Province  of  Ontario. 

May  it  Please  Your  Honor  : 

The  undersigned  has  the  honor  to  present  to  Your  Honor  Statement  of  the 
Keceipts  and  Expenditures  on  account  of  the  Province  of  Ontario,  during  the  Nine 
Months  ending  this  day. 


Respectfully  submitted. 


Treasury  Department,  Ontario, 

Toronto,  30th  September,  1875. 


ADAM  CROOKS, 

Treamrcr' 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  11.) 


A.  1875 


CONTENTS. 


Page 

Statement  OF  Cash 1 

Do        OF  Invhstments 2 

Do        OF  Receipts 4 

Do        OF  Expenditure 6 

Civil  Government:  — 

Government  House 6 

Lieutenant-Governor's  Office — Salaries..  6 

Executive  Council  Office                 "       "  6 

Attorney-General's  Office                "       "  6 

Treasury  Department                      "       ■'  6 

Secretary  and  Registrar's  Office  "  "'  6 
Eegistrar-General's  Branch  "  "5 
Department  of  Agriculture  and  Public 

Works — Salaries 6 

Crown  Lands  Department — Salaries 7 

RowN  Lands  Expenditure: —  f 

Board  of  Surveyors 11 

Salaries,  &c.,  of  Agents 11 

Refunds 11 

Surveys 11 

Colonization  Roads 10 

Legislation:— 

Salaries 7 

Sessional     Messengers.      Writers     and 

Pages 7 

Postages  and  cost  of  House  Post  Office..  7 

Stationery,  including  Printing  Paper,  &c.  7 
Printing,  Binding   a,nd  Circulating  the 

Statutes 7 

Expenses  of  Elections 7 

Parliamentary  Library 7 

Indemnity  to  Members 7 

Repairs  to  Buildings 7 

Administration  of  Justice: — 

Court  of  Chancery — Salaries 7 

Do    of  Queen's  Bench  "      8 

Do    of  Common  Pleas  8 

Deputy  Clerks  of  the  Crown  and  Pleas. .  8 

Criminal  .Justice,  Criminal  Prosecutions  8 

Do                 Administration  of 8 

Do                 Special  Services 8 

Miscellaneous  .Justice 8 

Public  Works  and  Buildings: — 

London  Lunatic  Asylum 10 

Toronto  Lunatic  Asylum 10 

Inebriate  Asylum 10 

Osgoode  Hall 10 

Government  House 10 


Page 
Public  Works  and  Buildings — Continued.    ■ 

Deaf  and  Dumb  Institute 10 

Blind  Asylum 10 

Reformatory,  Penetanguishene 10 

Court  House  and  Gaol,  Sault  Ste.  Marie  10 

Loch  Mary  and  Fairy's  Lades 10 

Bridges,  Port  Carling 10 

Locks  up  Nipissing  District 10 

Import,  of  Navigation,  Scugog  River. ...   10 
Road  between    Washago   and   Graven- 
hurst 10 

Surveys  and  Drainage  of  Swamp  Lands.  1 1 

Agricultural  College  and  Farm 10 

Technical  College 10 

Central  Prison 10 

Normal  and  Model  Schools 10 

Miscellaneous 10 

PuBUc  Institutions'  Maintenance 9 

Reformatory  Maintenance 9 

Agriculture  and  Arts 9 

Immigration 9 

Miscellaneous  , 9 

Hospitals  AND  Charities 9 

Literarv  and  Scientific  In.stitutions 9 

Education 8 

Municipalities'  Fund 11 

Land  Improvement  Fund  ..  10 

Accountable  Warrants 11 

Statement  of  Contingencies: — 

Lieutenant-Governor's  Office 10 

Executive  Council  Office 11 

Attorney -General's  Office 11 

Treasury  Department 11 

Secretary  and  Registrar's  Office 12 

Department  of  Agriculture  and  Public 

Works 12 

Crown  Lands  Department 14 

Auditor's  Office 14 

Queen's  Printer 14 

Legislation 15 

Court  of  Chancery 15 

Court  of  Queen's  Bench 16 

Court  of  Common  Pleas 16 

Normal  and  Model  Schools 17 

Education 18 

Statement  of  Balances  of  Appropriations,.  19 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  11.) 


A.  1875 


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39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  11.) 


A.  1875 


No.   3. 

STATEMENT  of  Receipts  of  the  Province  of  Ontario,  for  the  nine  months  ended 

oOth  September,  1875. 


$     cts. 

$     cts. 

$     cts. 

Dominion  of  Canada. 
On  account  of  Subsidy  and  General  Account 

1,333,569  42 

Public  Institutions  Berenue- 
Reformatory  Pi-ison,  Penetan^juishene. 

3,349  46 

Asylum  for  the  Insane,  Tor<into    

9,940  73 

3,574  43 

570  42 

1^0  00 

150  00 

Do                 '  Loudon     

Do                    Rf)ckwood    

Blind  Institute,  Brantford   

Deaf  and  Dumb  lustitute.  Belleville    

« 

14,.385  5S 

Education. 
Account  of  Education    

41,192  38 

Municipal  Loan  Fund. 

On  account  of  Municipal  Loan  Fund— Orijrinal  debt 

Do                        do                   "New  debt 

108  29 
593,286  95 

593,395  24 

Investmenti. 
Interest  on  account  of  Investments   

175,405  89 

Casual  Revenue. 
Fines,  Fees  and  Forfeitures 

10,616  18 

Tavern  and  other  Licenses. 
Tavern,  Shop  and  Pawnbrokers'  Licenses  

103,302  34 

Algoma  Taxes. 
On  .iccount  of  Patented  Lands  in  Algoma 

2,983  54 

Laiu  Stamps. 
On  account  f)f  Law  Stamps 

42,736  68 

Ont'irio  Statutes. 
'On  account  of  Statutes 

142  30 

Carried  forward 

2,321,079  01 

10 


:39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  11.) 


A.   1875 


STATlfiMENT  of  Receipts  of  the  Province  of  Ontario,  for  the  nine  months  ended 
30th  September,  1875. — Continued. 


S     cts. 

S     cts. 

$     cts. 

Brought  foi'ward 

2,321,079  01 

Territorial  Seven  ue. 
Special  Kunds-   Clergy  Lands . .    , 

31,901  55 
43,.541  40 

7,286  87 

71,689  70 

120.201  61 

7,056  49 

Do              Common  School  Lands  

L)o               Grammar          do             

Cro\vii  Lands  Revenue 

Casual  Fees,  Mines,  &c .    ...       

281,677  62 
686  28 

Agricultural  Farm,  Mimico. 
On  account  of  Agricultural  Farm 

Di-ainaye  Debentures. 
On  account  of  Drainage    

7,017  91 

2,610,460  82 

W.  R.  Harris, 

Accountant. 

Treasury  Department,  Ontario, 

Toronto,  30th  September,  1875. 


ADAM  CROOKS, 

Treasurer. 


11 


39  Victoria. 


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39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  12.)      .  A.  1875 


ESTIMATES 


OF   THE 


PROVINCE  OF  ONTARIO, 


FOR  THE 


FINANCIAL   YEAR   ENDING   31st   OECEMBER, 


1876. 


i!  0  r  0  U  t  U  : 

PRINTED  BY  HUNTER    ROSE  &  CO.,  25  WELLINGTON  STREET  WEST. 

1876. 


39  Victoria, 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  12.) 


A.  1875 


SUMMAET 


Of  the  estimated  expenditures  of  the  Province  of  Ontario  for  the  Financial  year 

ending  31st  December,  1876. 


No. 


T. 

II. 

HI. 

IV. 

V. 

VI. 

VII. 

VIII. 

IX. 

X. 

XI. 


XII, 


XIII. 

XIV. 

XV 

XVI. 


SERVICES. 


Civil  Government 

Legislation 

Administration  of  Justice  

Education 

Public  Institutions,  Maintenance , . . 

Immigration 

Agriculture,  Arts,  Literary  and  Sci- 
entific Institutions 


Hospitals  and  Charities  

Miscellaneous  Expenditure. 
Unforeseen  and  Unprovided 
Public  Buildings — 

(1)  Repairs 

(2)  Capital  account    

Public  Works — 

(1)  Repairs 

(2)  Capital  account   

Colonization  Roads 

Charges  on  Crown  Lands  . . . . 

Refund  Account  

Services  in  1874  (balance)  . . . 


Ph 


Total. 


1.  Current  expenditure  for  1876  .... 

2 .  On  capital  account 

3.  Other  purposes  

Amount  of  estimates. 


1 

7 

8 

10 

14 

21 

22 
23 
23 
23 
24 


26 


27 
29 
30 
31 


TO    BE   VOTED. 


For  current 
expenditure. 


$      cts. 
149,501  50 

110,600  00 

233,420  00 

529,530  00 

373,199  00 

79,000  00 

98,150  00 
56,696  46 
40,005  00 
50,000  00 

21,100  00 


3,900  00 


70,100  00 


16,622  23 


1,831,824  19 


On  capital 
account. 


$       cts. 


111,530  00 


38,190  00 
85,800  00 


For  other 
purposes. 


$      cts. 


67,901  00 


235,520  00   67,901  00 


1,831,824  19 

235,520  00 

67,901  00 


2,135,245  19 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  12.) 


A.  1875 


ESTIMATES 


OF   THE 


PROVINCE  OF  ONTARIO, 


FOR  THE  YEAR  1876. 


I.-CIVIL   GOVERNMENT. 
To  be  voted  per  Statement  (A) S149,o01  50. 


No.  of 
Vote. 


1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 

8 

9 

10 


To  Salaries   and   Contingencies  of  the  several  Departments  at 
Toronto  : — 


Government  House 

Lieutenant -Grovernor's  Office. 

Executive  Council  and  Attorney-Generel's  Department 

Treasury  Department 

Secretary  and  Registrai-'s  Office^^ 

Department  of  Pul>lic  Works 

Do  Agriculture   

Do  Immigration  

Public  Institutions  

Crown  Lands  Department 

Miscellaneous 


UetailB. 


faj 
CbJ 
(cj 
(d) 
(e) 
(f) 
(9) 


(h) 
(i) 
(i) 


To  be  voted 
for  1876. 


1$      cts. 


.5,512  00 
1,900  00 
12,870  00 
17,100  00 
19,857  .50 
18,872  00 
1,100  00 


6,5.50  00 
.50,590  00 
15,150  00 


149,501  50 


Voted  for 
1875. 


S      eta. 


5,412  00 

1,700  00 

12,236  00 

16,500  00 

22,420  00 

18,.-)72  00 

1,100  00 

2,194  00 

5,700  00 

51,1:30  00 

15,090  00 


152,054  00 


SERVICE 


To  be  voted 
for  1870. 


Voted  in 
1875, 


CIVIL  GOVERNMENT. 
(a)  Government  Hodse. 


Water 
Gas  ... 
Fuel  ... 


Repairs 

Furnishings 

Planting  and  Plants    .' 

Gardener,  with  house  and  fuel 

Caretaker 

Assistant  G.ardener  ..( ._ 

Incidentals  (clearing  away  snow,  carting  ashes,  sweeping  flues,  &c.) 


cts. 


265  00 
900  00 
2,000  00 
700  00 
200  00 
100  00 
432  00 
365  00 
350  00 
200  00 

5,512  00 


$  ots. 


265  00 
80a  00 
2,000  00 
700  00 
20O  00 
100  00 
4:!2  00 
305  00 
350  00 
200  00 

5,412  00 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  12.) 


A.  1875 


L_CIV1L  GO VERNMENJ.— Co n,imuec?. 


SERVICE. 


(b)  LlEDTENANT-GOVKBNOR'S   OFFICE. 


Private  Secretary's  salary . 

Messenger  

Contingencies 


(c)  Executive  Council  and  Attorney-General's  Office. 


Attomev-General  and  Premier,   salary 

Clerk,  Executive  Council  and  Attorney-General's  Department 

Secretary 

Assistant  Clerk,  Attorney-General's  Department 

Second  do  do  do  

Asi'istant  Messenger    

Towards  establisluiig  a  Law  Library    ._ 

Contingencies,  including  stationery  and  repairs 

Fuel,  Gas  and  Water 

Rent 

Housekeeper 

Fireman 


!    580  00 

1,550  00 

450  00 

360  00 


(1)  5-lOths  of  $2,940  00 

(l)  The   difference    arises  from   1-lOth  formerly  charged  Department  of  Immigration 
for  office,  and  proposed  to  be  no  longer  used. 

(d)  Treasurer's  Office. 


To  be  voted 
for  1876. 


.$     cts. 


1,200  00 
400  00 
300  00 

1.900  00 


Treasurer,  salary 

Accountant 

do 

Clerk, 

do 

Do 

do 

Do 

do 

Do 

do 

Auditor, 

do 

Book-keeper,  do 

Messenger  aad  Clerk,  salary    

Contingencies • 

Cost  of  maintenance  of  East  Wing,  including  repairs,  one-third  formerly  charged 

each  Department   

Housekeeper,  with  hnuse,  fuel  and  light 

Fireman   


(e)  Secretary  and  Registrar's  Office. 


Secretary  and  Registrar's  salary 

Assistant  Secretary,  do     

Clerk,  do      

Do  do     

Do  do    (transferred  from  Registrar-General's  Branch). 

Deputy  Registrar  do     

Clerk,  do     

Do  do     

Messenger    

Contingencies 


Regiatra/r-GeneraVs  Branch. 

First  Clerk 

Clerk 

Tliree  Clerks,  S700  each  (instead  of  4)  

Clerk  (transferred  from  Secretary  s  Office)     

Booki 

Indices 

V  4 


4,000  00 

2,800  00 

1,000  00 

900  00 

600  00 

200  00 

400  00 

1,500  00 


1,470  00 


12,870  00 


3,200  00 
1,800  00 
1,400  00 
1,000  00 
1,000  00 

800  00 
2,000  00 
1,100  00 

500  00 
1,500  00 

2,000  00 
400  00 
400  00 


Voted  for 
1875, 


$     ctt. 


1.000  00 
400  00 
300  00 

1,700  00 


4,000  OO 

2,800  00 

1,000  00 

700  00 

500  00 

160  00 

400  00 

1.500  00 


1.176  00 


12,236  00 


17,100  00 


3,200  00 

1,600  00 
900  00 
700  00 
700  00 

1,200  00 
750  00 
600  00 
400  00 

1,050  00 


3,200  00 

1,800  00 

1,200  00 

1,000  00 

900  00 

800  00 

2.000  00 

1,100  00 

600  00 

1,200  00 

2,000  00 
400  00 
400  00 


11,700  00 


16,500  00 

I  3,200  00 
I  1.600  00 
I  900  00 
700  00 
350  00 
1,200  00 
750  00 
600  00 
400  00 
1,6.50  00 


1,000  00 
700  00 

2,100  00 
.500  00 


200  00 


11,.350  00 


1,000  00 

700  00 

2.800  00 

500  6b 
200  00 


I 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  12.) 


A.  1875 


I._CIVIL  GOVERNMENT.— Co>i^iiiwed 


SERVICE. 


Begistrar-Oeneral— Branch — Continued. 


Schedules,  slips  and  circulars  

Payments  to  District  Registrars  (for  half-year  only)  . 

Books  for  District  Registrars 

Disbursements  of  do        

Stationery  and  Printing 

Postages   

Express  charges 

Travelling  expenses  in  inspecting  District  Registrars. 
Oontiugencies  and  incidentals  for  this  Branch  


To  be  voted 
for  1876. 


(f)  Department  op  Public  Works. 

Commissioner 

Aichitect 

Engineer 

Secretary  of  Public  Works 

Accountant  and   Law  Clerk 

Architectural  Draughtsman  

Engineering  do  

Assistant  do  

First  Clerk  

Second  do    .,. 

Carpenter  engaged  on  public  buildings  generally 

Messenger    

Contingencies 

.^lOths  of  cost  of  office  maintenance  (see  details  under  Executive  Council  Ofl5ce) 


(g)  Department  of  Agriculture. 


Secretary 
Contingencies 


(h)  Public  Institutions. 

Inspector 

Deputy-Inspector 

Do    arrears  for  187.5    

Clerk 

Messenger— Boy    

Travelling  expenses 

Contingencies     

• 

(i)  Crown  Lands  Department, 

Commissioner,  salary  

Assistant  Commissioner 

^fLaw  Clerk  

Shorthand  Writer  and  Clerk    


Lands  Sales  and  Free  Grants  :- 

Chief  Clerk,  salary 

Clerk,  do      

Do  do      

Do  do       

Do  do      


$     cts, 

1,000  00 
1,862  50 


300  00 
150  00 
75  00 
100  00 
170  00 


8,157  50 


3,200  00 

2,200  00 

2,000  00 

1,600  00 

1,200  00 

939  00 

939  00 

800  00 

800  00 

700  00 

624  00 

400  00 

2,000  00 

1,470  00 


18,872  00 


800  00 
300  00 


1,100  00 


3,000  00 
1,400  00 
200  00 
600  00 
250  00 
700  00 
400  00 

6,.550  00 


Voted  for 
1875. 


$     cts. 

1,000  00 
3,725  00 
200  00 
250  00 
300  00 
150  00 
75  00 

170  00 

11,070  00 


3,200  00 
2,800  00 
1,600  00 
1,000  00 


2,000  00 
1,700  00 
1,250  00 
1,000  00 
850  00 


3,200  00 

2,200  00 

1,800  00 

1,600  00 

1,200  00 

939  00 

939  00 

800  00 

800  00 

600  00 

624  00 

400  00 

2,000  00 

1,470  00 

18,572  00 


800  00 
300  00 

1,100  00 


3,000  00 
1,200  00 

600  00 

'600  bo" 

300  00 
5,700  00 


3,200  00 
2.800  00 
1,600  00 
1,000  00 


2,000  00 

1,700  00 

1,250  00 

850  00 

860  00 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  12.) 


A.  1875 


L_CIVILjGOVEKNMENT.- 


-Continued. 


SERVICE 


To  be  voted  |   Voted  for 
for  1876.      I       1875. 


Crown  Lands  Department.— Coniintted. 
Surveps,  Patents  and^  Roads  : — 


Deputy  Siirveyor-General,  salary  

Clerk,  do     

Do  do     

Chief  Clerk  Patents,  do  (1) 

Clerk,  do     

Do  do     

Clerk — dispensed  with  

Superintendent  of  Colonization  Roads,  salary 

Clerk  do  salary 

(1)  Transferred  from  Woods  and  Forests  Branch,  at  reduced  salary. 

Woods  and  Forests  : — 


Chief  Clerk,  salary 

Clerk,  do      {Transferred  to  Sm-vei/s  Branch.) 

Do  do  (2) 

Do  do      

Do  do 

(2)  Formerly  charged  Crown  Timber  OJlce,  Belleville. 


Accounts  .- 


Accountant  salary 

Bookkeeper,    do    . 

Clerk,  do    ., 

Do  do    . 


Registrar,  salary  , 

Housekeeper,  with  house,  fuel  and  light  

Me.ssenger,  do  do  

Contingencies,  including  repairs,  west  wing. 


(kj  Miscellaneous. 

To  cover  gratuities  to  oflBcers  whose  services  may  be  dispensed  with . 

Cost  of  Official  Gazette  

Queen's  Printer,  salary  

Clerk 


Contingencies    

Inspector  of  Registry  Offices  (including  travelling  expenses)  

Inspector  of  Division  Courts    

Oo  Travelling  expenses 

Inspection  of  Offices  of  Deputy  Clerks  of  the  Crown,  Deputy  Master  and  Regis 

trars  in  Chancery  and  County  Courts,  travelling  expenses  


$  cts. 


2,000  00 
1,250  00 
730  00 
1,380  00 
1,200  00 
1,100  00 


1,800  00 
1,000  00 


2,000  00 


1,200  00 
850  00 
700  00 


2,000  00 

1,2.50  00 

1,250  00 

850  00 

1,600  00 

500  00 

500  00 

12.000  00 


50,560  00 


5,000  00 

4,200  00 

1.200  00 

300  00 

100  00 

2,000  00 

1,400  00 

650  00 

300  00 

15,150  00 


$  cts. 


2,000  00 
1,380  00 
1,250  00 
1,800  00 

1,100  00 

800  00 

1,800  00 

1,000  00 


2,000  00 
1,400  00 

850  00 
550  00 


2,000  00 

1,250  00 

1,250  00 

850  00 

1,600  00 

500  OO 

500  00 

12.000  00 

51,130  00 


5,000  00 

4,200  00 

1,200  00 

240  00 

100  00 

2,000  00 

1,400  00 

650  00 

.300  00 

15,090  00 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  12.) 


A.  1875 


IT.— LEGISLATION. 


To  be  voted  per  Statement  (A)  .?110,(300  00. 


No.  of 
Vote. 


Details. 


To  be  voted 
for  present 
Session,  and 
for  Salaries, 
&c.,  in  1876. 


Voted  for 
1875. 


1      Legislation 


(a) 


SERVICE. 


%     cts. 
110,600  00 


$     cts. 
105,200  00 


To  be  now 
voted. 


Voted  in 
1875. 


(a)  LEGISLATION. 
Details. 


Mr.  Speaker's  salary  

Clerk  of  the  House,  salary 

Clerk  of  Private  Bills  

Law  Clerk  

(^lerk  of  Routine  and  Records 
Clerk 


Libr.arian 

Clerk  of  the  Crown  in  Chancery 

Do  do  allowance  for  increased  duties  owing  to  General 

and  Special  Elections  in  1875 

Accountant  of  the  House  and  Stationery  Clerk  (also  Queen's  Printer)  

Sen,'eant-at-Arms _ 

Housekeeper  and  Chief  Messenger,  with  house,  fuel  and  light 

Three  Messengers 

Fireman  


Night  Watchmap   

Sessional  Writers,  Messengers  and  Pages 

Postages  and  Cost  of  House  Post  Office 

Stationery,  including  Printing  Paper,  Printing  and  Binding 

Printing  Rills  and  distributing  Statutes 

Increa-st;  of  Library  

Indemnity  to  Members,  including  Mileage  

(.'ontingoucies    (including   say    S1,000    for   subscriptions   to    newspapers    and 

periodicals) 

Repairs  and  furniture 

Fuel  


Gas  and  other  lighting. 

Water  

Incidentals " 


$  cts. 


1,.500  00 
1,800  00 
1,200  00 
1,000  00 
1,000  00 

600  00 
1,200  00 

400  00 


300 

400 

600 

600 

1,350 

400 

400 

5,000 

4,000 

20,000 

3,000 

2,000 

55,000 


4,000  60 
2,350  00 
1,000  00 
1,000  00 
300  00 
200  00 

110,600  00 


$  cts. 


1,.500  00 

1,800  00 

1,200  00 

1,000  00 

900  00 

600  00 

1,200  00 

400  00 


400  00 

600  00 

600  00 

1,3.50  00 

400  00 

400  00 

5,000  00 

4,000  00 

20,000  00 

3,000  00 

2,000  00 

50,000  00 

4,000  00 
2,3.50  00 
1,000  00 
1,000  00 
300  00 
200  00 

105,200  00 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No,  12.) 


A.  1875 


III.— ADMINISTRATION  OF  JUSTICE. 


To  be  voted  per  Statement  (A) S238,42()  00. 


No.  of 
vote. 


Court  of  Ohancery    

Court  of  Queen's  Bench 

Court  of  Common  Pleas 

Superior  Judges  and  Court  of  Appeal 

Criminal  Justice    

Miscellaneous  Justice   


Details. 


(a) 
(b) 
(c) 
(d) 
(e) 
(f) 


1 

To  be  voted 

for  1876. 

$     cts. 

21,920  00 

9,020  00 

5.110  00 

16,410  00 

132,000  00 

48,960  00  1 

233,420  00 

Voted  for 
1875. 


6     cte. 

21,630  00 

8,520  GO 

5,110  00 

14,410  00 

121,000  00 

48,795  00 


219,465  00 


SERVICE. 


To  be  voted 
for  1876. 


Details. 

(a)  Court  of  Chancery. 

Master's  salary 

Taxing  Officer,  salary 

Clerk,  do      

Junior  Clerk,       do 

Accountant,  do      

Clerk,  do     

Registrar,  do      

Clerk  Registrar's  Office,  salary   

Do  do       

Do  do       

Do    of.  Records,  do        

Do    Records  Office  do       

Referee  in  Chambers,         do       

Clerk  do  do       

Usher  of  Court,  do 

Clerk  of  Surrogate  Court,  do        

Messenger  and  Housekeeper,  with  house,  fuel  and  light 

Contingencies,  including  §200  for  Judges'  Library 

(bj  Court  of  Queen's  Bench. 

fJlerk  of  Crown  and  Pleas,  including  duties  in  Judges'  Chambers,  assigned  to 

him  under  Act  33  Vic,  cap.  11,  Ontario  Statutes..  

Senior  Clerk,  salary 

Clerk,  do     

Junior      do       do     

Clerk  of  Process,  do  

Assistant  to  do  

Housekeeper  and  Messenger,  with  house,  fuel  and  light ■ 

Usher  and  C!rier,  do    

Assistant  Messenger    

Contingencies,  including  -SlOO  for  Judges'  Library 

Cc)  Court  of  Common  Pleas. 

Clerk  of  Crown  and  Pleas,  including  duty  as  Inspector  of  Deputy-Clerk  of  thei 

Crown,  &c  

Senior  Clerk,  salary    

Junior     do         do        

Usher  and  Crier,  do       "l.......!|l 

Contingencies,  including  $100  for  Judges'  Library 


$  cts. 


3,000  00 
1,200  00 
1,200  00 

600  00 
2,240  00 

800  00 
1,840  00 
1,200  00 
1,000  00 

800  00 
1,000  00 

500  00 
2,000  00 

600  00 

.540  00 
1,600  00 

400  00 
1,400  00 


21,920  00 


3,000  00 

1,200  00 

1,000  00 

600  00 

1,400  00 

500  00 

500  00 

1(50  00 

160  00 

500  00 


Voted  for 
1875. 


$  cts. 


3,000  00 
1,200  00 
1,200  00 

600  00 
2,240  00 

800  00 
1.840  00 
1,200  00 
1,000  00 

600  00 
1,000  00 

500  00 
2,000  00 

600  00 

450  00 
1,600  00 

400  00 
1,400  00 


9,020  00 


2,.500  00 

1,200  00 

1,000  00 

160  00 

250  00 

5.110  00 


21,630  00 


3,000  00 
1,200  00 
1,000  00 
600  00 
1,400  00 

500  00 
160  00 
160  00 
500  00 


8,520  00 


2,, 500  00 

1,200  00 

1,000  00 

160  00 

2.50  00 

5,110  00 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  12.) 


A.  1875 


TIT.— ADMINISTRATION  OF  JUSTICE.— Conimued 


SERVICE. 


id)  Superior  Judges  and  Court  of  Appeal. 


Allowances  granted  by  33  Vic,  cap.  5,  Ont.  Statutes 

Re;;ri«trar  of  Court  of  Appeal 

Clerk 


Usher  and  Crier   

Assistant  Messenger    

Law  Library   

C-oDtingencies  (included  formerly  in  ("'ourt  of  Ch  nuery) 


(e)  <.'RiMiNAL  Justice. 


Crown  Counsel  Proseoutions 

Administration  of  Criminal  Justice   

Special  Services s. 


(/)   MiSCELLANKODS  JUSTICE. 

Deputy  Clerks  of  the  Crown  and  Pleas,  salaries 


District  of  Algoma. 


SheriflF's  salary 

Reipstrar,  do      

Clerk  of  the  Peace  and  District  Attorney . 

<!lerk  of  the  District  Court  

Administration  of  .Justice 


District  of  Thunder  Bay. 


Stipendiary  Magistrate,  salary. 
AdJministration  of  -Justice 


District  of  Nipissing. 


Stipendiary  Magistrate,  salary. 
Administration  of  .Justice 


District  of  Parry  Sound. 


Stipendiai->'  Magistrate,  salary. 
Adininistration  of  Justice 


District  of  Muskoka. 


Stipendiary  Magistrate,  salary. 
Administration  of  Justice 


Provisional  County  of  Halihurton. 


Stipendiary  Magistrate,  salary 

Do                 do            arrears  for  1874  (half-year) 
Administration  of  Justice 


To  be  voted 
for  1876. 


%     cts. 


13,000  00 
2,000  00 
600  00 
50  00 
160  00 
200  00 
400  00 


16,410  00 


10,000  00 

120,000  00 

2,000  00 


132,000  00 


16,000  00 


1,400  00 
800  00 
800  00 
500  00 

3.000  00 


6,500  00 

1,200  00 
3,000  00 

4,200  00 

1,400  00 
500  00 

1,900  00 

1,400  00 
500  00 

1,900  CO 

ifooo  00 

500  00 

1,.500  00 

1,000  00 
500  00 
500  00 

2,000  00 


Voted  for 
187.5. 


$!   cts. 


13,000  00 

600  00 
50  00 
160  00 
200  00 
400  00 

14,410  00 


0.000  00 

110,000  00 

2,000  00 

121,000  00 


16,000  00 


1,400  00 
800  00 
800  00 
500  00 

3,000  00 


6,500  00 


1,200  00 
3,000  00 

4,200  00 


1,400  00 
800  00 


2,200  00 

1,200  00 
500  00 

1,700  00 

1,000  00 
500  00 

1,500  00 

1,000  00 

500  00 

1,.500  00 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (JNo.  12.) 


A.  1876 


III.— ADMINISTRATION  OF  JUSTICI&.—Concluded. 


SERVICE. 


Provincial  Police. 

Clifton  and  Fort  Erie  -Salary  of  Police  Magistrate 
"  "  Administration  of  Justice  ... 


Other  Services. 

To  pay  Sheriffs,  Criers  and  Constables  in  attending  Courts  of  Chancery  and 
County  Courts,  Deputy  Clerks  of  the  Crown  and  Pleas  attending  Assizes, 
and  their  Postages,  &c 

Seals  and  other  contingencies  

Registration  Books  for  Muskoka,  Parry  Sound  and  Thunder  Bay  

Lighting  and  heating,  Osgoode  Hall 

Furniture,  matting,  &c.        do  


To  be  voted 
for  1876. 


f     cts. 


1,000  00 
3,760  00 


4,760  00 


Voted  for 
1875. 


I     cts. 


1,000  00 
3,760  00 


6,000  00 
500  00 
200  00 

3,000  GO 
500  00 


10,200  00 


4,760  00 


5,000  00 
500  00 
200  00 

3,000  00 
500  00 


I       9,200  00 


IV.— EDUCATION. 


To  be  voted  per  Statement  (A)  $529,5.^0  00. 


No.  of 
Vote. 


1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 

10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
16 
16 
17 
18 
19 


Public  and  Separate  Schools 

Inspection  of  Public  and  Separate  Schools 

Schools  in  New  and  Poor  Townships    

Collegiate  Institutes  and  High  Schools 

Inspection  of  (lollegiate  Institutes  and  High  Scliools 

County  Examination  of  Teachers 

County  Teachers'  Institutes   

Superannuated  Teachers 

Vormal  and  Model  Schools  (Toronto)  salaries 

do  contingencies  and  repairs 

Educational  Museum  and  Library  

•Tournal  of  Kctecation    

Maps,  Apparatus  and  Library  Books    

Educational  Depository,  salaries  

do  contingencies 

Education  Office,  salaries    

do  contingencies  and  repairs 

Council  of  Public  Instniction    

Normal  School,  Ottawa,  salaries  and  contingencies  ... 


Details. 


(a) 
(h) 
(c) 
(d) 
(e) 
(f) 
(0) 
(h) 
(i) 

a ) 

(k) 
(I  ) 
(m) 
(n) 

(0) 

(P) 

(q) 

(r) 
(s) 


To  be  voted 
for  1876. 


$     cts. 

240,000  00 

28,3.50  00 

10,000  00 

80,500  00 

8.080  00 

2,.550  00 

2,800  00 

33,000  00 

18,300  00 

7,150  00 

2,500  00 

2,360  00 

50,000  00 

5,105  00 

3,110  00 

14,700  00 

4,775  00 

2,800  00 

13,4.50  00 

529,630  00 


Voted  for 
1875. 


$     cts. 

240,000  00 

27,:?50  00 

8,000  00 

80,500  00 

7,180  00 

2,035  00 

2,800  00 

29,000  00 

16,900  00 

7,065  00 

2,6.50  00 

2,400  00 

50.000  00 

4,855  00 

3,110  00 

14,040  00 

.5,490  00 

2,600  00 

5,000  00 

510,876  00 


10 


39   Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  12.) 


A.  1875 


JY.—EDVCATIO'N.— Continued. 


SERVICE. 


Details. 

(a)  Public  and  Separate  Schools 

Cb)  Inspection  of  Public  and  Separate  Schools. 

.5,000  schools  and  departments  at  $5 ._ 

Additional  cost  of  inspecting  and  organizing  schools  in  the  Algoma,  Nipissing 

and  other  remote  settlements  

Printing  inspectors'  annual  and  special  reports,  including  paper    

Postages,  stationery  and  contingencies 

(cj  Schools  in  New  and  Poor  Townships 

(dj  Collegiate  Institutes  and  High  Schools. 

Existing  High  Schools    

New  do 

Collegiate  Institutes 

(ej  Inspection  or  Collegiate  Institutes  and  High  Schools. 

Three  Inspectors'  salaries 

Travelling  allowances  (1)    

Six  Sub-Examiners  of  "Intermediate"  Examination  Papers  (2)    

Office   and   Inspectors'  stationery,  printing    examination    papers,   postage  and 
contingencies  

(1)  Recommended  by  Cmincil  of  Public  Instruction. 

(2)  do  do 

(f)  County  Examinations  of  Public  School  Teachers. 

Central  Committee  of  Examiners  (3) 

Two  additional  E.\aminers     

Printing  examiHation  papers,  forms  of  certificates,  &c 

Postages,  stationery  and  contingencies  

Medals  for  competition.  Teachers'  examination  (4)  

(3)  Recommended  by  Council  of  Public  Ingtruction. 

(4)  do  do 

(g)  County  Teachers'  Institutes  (Re-vote) 

Printing,  stationery  and  contingencies  (Re-vote)  

(h)  Superannuated  High  and  Public  School  Teachers. 

Annual  retiring  allowance  to  old  Teachers  (250)  ;  in  187.5  (200)  (5)  

Do      for  1st  and  2nd  class  Teachers  and  High  School  blasters 

Do      to  worn-out  Teachers,  non-contributors     

(5)  Teacher^  Contributions  to  this  fund  amounted  to  »12,976  in  1874. 

do  do  9,570  to  Ist  Octtber,  1875, 

('ij  Normal  and  Model  Schools,  Toronto. 
Salaries  : 

The  Principal 

Science  Master 

Mathematical  Master 

Writing  and  Bookkeeping  Master 

Drawing  M aster    

Music  Master    

Gymnastic  Master  

Head  Master  of  Boys'  Model  School  (6) 

First  Assistant  do  

Second    do  do  

Third       do  do  

Head  Mistress  of  Girk'  Model  School 

First  Assistant  do  

11 


To  be  voted 

for  1876. 

$  cts. 

240,000  00 

25,000  00 

2,.500  00 

450  00 

400  00 

28,350  09 

10,000  00  ; 

72,000  00 

2,.500  00 

6,000  00 

80,.500  00 

6,000  00 

600  00 

300  00 

1,180  00 

8,080  00 

1 
1,000  00 

400  00 

7.50  00 

400  00 

400  00 

2,950  00 

2,.50O  00 

300  00 

.  2,800  00 

30,000  00 

2,000  00 

1,000  00 

33,000  00 

2,000  00 

1,800  00 

1,.500  00 

900  00 

1     600  00 

1     .500  00 

1     300  00 

1    1,200  00 

1,000  00 

800  00 

700  00 

1,000  00 

800  00 

Voted  for 
1875. 


S     cts. 


240,000  00 

24,000  00 

2,500  00 

4.50  00 

400  00 

27,350  00 

8,000  00 

72,000  00 

2,500  00 

6,000  00 

80,500  00 

6,000  00 

1,180  00 

7,180  00 

800  00 

750  00 

.385  00 

100  00 

2,035  00 

2,-500  00 

300  00 

2,800  00 

26,000  00 

2,000  00 

1,000  00 

29,000  00 

2,000  00 

1,500  00 

1,500  00 

900  00 

400  00 

400  00 

300  00 

1.100  00 

900  00 

700  00 

600  00 

900  00 

700  00 

39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  12.) 


A.  1875 


IV.— EDUCATION.— Co^imw^rf. 


SERVICE. 


(i)  Normal  and  Model  Schools — Continued. 

Second  Assistant  of  Girls'  Model  School 

Third      do  do  

Clerk  of  the  Normal  and  Model  School 

Head  Gardener  and  Keeper  of  Grounds,  with  house  and  fuel  

First  Engineer,  with  fuel  and  rooms    

Second    do 

Third      do  

Janitor  of  Normal  School,  including  scrubbing,  washing,  &c 

Do  Boys'  Model  School 

Do  Girls'  do  

Assistant  Gardener 

(6)  The  -immber  of  pupils  in  the  Model  School  is  about  460,  and  the  anmuil 
revenue  about  19,000. 


(jj  Normal  and  Model  Schools,  Toronto. 
'Contingencies  : 

Half  cost  of  stationerj'  and  text-books  (other  half  paid  by  the  students) . . . 
Half  cost  of  maps,  apparatus  and  library  books  (other  half  paid  out  of 

library,  map  and  apparatus  grant) 

Half  cost  of  prize  books  for  Model  School  pupils  (other  half  paid  out  of 

library,  map  and  apparatus  grant) 

Text  and  referenre  books  for  master  and  reading  room  for  students 

Printing  and  stationery,  chemicals  and  supplies 

Expenses  of  grounds,  plants  and  plant-house    

Fuel  and  light  

Water  : 

Contingencies 

(k)  Provincial  Educational  Museum  and  Library. 

Specimens  of  school  furniture  and  fittings,  apparatus  and  maps,  text-books  and 

works  on  education 

Various  models •. 

Books  and  illustrations  of  Canadian  history  

Casts,  photographs  and  engravings 

Frames,  glass,  painting  and  fittings 

Binding  Canadian  books  and  pamphlets 

Restoring  casts,  pictures  and  colouring  rooms  

Fuel,  water  and  light 

Printing,  furnishings  and  contingencies 

Caretaker , 


(I)  Journal  of  Education. 

Printing,  folding  and  mailing  6,.500  copies  (formerly  6,250)   

Postages  on  6,500  copies    

Plans  for  schoolhouses  and  grounds   

Engraving  plans  of  new  schoolhouses  in  Ontario,  and  other  lUustrationB 
Periodicals  and  contingencies  


CmJ  Maps,  Apparatus,  Library  and  Prize  Books 

Including  paymentB  for  purchases  from  booksellere 

(nj  Educational  Depository. 
Salariex  . 

f'lerk  of  Libraries    

Ca«hier  and  Assistant  Clerk , 

D«^Hpatch  Clerk 

Clerk  of  Sales    

Do        Stores  

Do        Stock   

Do        TnvoictiH 

12 


To  be  voted  I 
for  1876.     I 


S     cts. 

700  00 
650  00 
600  00 
410  00 
410  00 
400  00 
360  00 
450  00 
420  00 
400  00 
400  00 


18,300  00 


2,500  00 

550  00 

2.50  00 

150  00 

500  00 

600  00 

1,650  00 

400  00 

550  00 


7,150  00 


.500  00 
200  00 
200  00 
200  00 
400  00 
100  00 
20u  00 
400  00 
100  00 
200  00 


2,500  00 


1,860  00 
200  00 
100  00 
100  00 
100  00 


2,:J60  00 


50,000  00 


1,400  00 
900  00 
500  00 
400  00 
400  00 
400  00 

:}00  00 


Voted  for 
1876. 


$      cts. 

600  00 
550  00 
600  00 
410  00 
410  OO 
400  00 
360  00 
450  00 
420  00 
400  00 
400  00 


16,900  00 


2,500  00 

550  00 

250  00 
150  00 
500  00 
600  00 
1,585  00 
380  00 
550  00 

7,065  00 


500  00 
200  00 
200  00 
200  00 
200  00 
500  00 
200  00 
350  00 
100  00 
200  00 

2,650  00 


1,800  00 
300  00 
100  00 
100  00 
100  00 

2,400  00 


50,000  00 


1,400  00 
800  00 
500  00 
365  00 
400  00 
365  00 
.■WO  00 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  12.) 


A.  1875 


IV.— EDUCATION.— Co?!^^^^^ 


SERVICE. 


(n)  Educational  Depository— Cc/ntmM€d. 

Cop^nng  Clerk    

Junior  Assistant  Clerk  

Furnaceman  and  Messenger 


(oj  Educational  Depositoey. 

Contingencies  : 

Postages 

Stationery    

Fuel,  water  and  li^ht 

Printing  forms  and  circulars    

Printiutr  catalogues 

Packing  paper,  twine,  nail.'^,  &c 

Shelving,  fixtures  and  painting    ..  

Furnishings  and  contingencies 


To  be  voted 
for  1876. 


5,10.5  00 


(pj  Education  Office. 
Satarxei  : 

Chief  Superintendent 

Deputy  Superintendent  and  Editor  of  Journal  of  Education  

Chief  Clerk  and  Accountiint,  also  Clerk  to  Council  of  Public  Instruction. 
Clerk  of  Statistics    

Do  Records 

Do  Correspondence     

Do  Reference  

Assistant  Clerk  of  Correspondence 

Second  do  do  

Clerk  of  Reports  and  Returns     

General  Assistant  Clerk 

Junior  do  ._ _. _ 

Caretaker,  including  all  allowances  for  cleaning,  washing  and  scrubbing. 


(qj  Eddcation  Office. 
Contingencies  : 

Postages   

Printing  circulars,  blanks  and  paper 

Fuel  and  light   

Office  stationery  and  account  books 

Books,  newspapers,  law  and  other  reports 

Public  School  Law  

15,000  yearly  and  h.alf-yearly  blank  forma  for  trustees,  &c 

Law  appeal  cases  (ro-vote)    

Office  furniture  and  fixtures,  petty  repair<»  and  various  incidentals 
6,000  Chief  Superintendent's  report  for  1876 


("r)  Council  op  Public  Instruction 

Travelling  expenses  of  members 

Expenses  of  elections  

Revising  text-books  (re-votei    

Assintaut  Clerk 

Contingencies 

(sj  Nor-mal  School,  Ottawa. 
Salarxts . 

The  Principal 

Mathematical  Master 

Science  Master  

Writing  and  Bookkeeping  Master 

Drawing  M  aster    

Music  Master 

13 


450  00 
485  00 
525  00 
400  00 
300  00 
350  00 
300  00 
300  00 

3,110  00 


4,000  00 

2,800  00 

1,800  00 

1,200  00 

1,000  00 

900  00 

500  00 

500  00 

450  00 

400  00 

400  00 

2.50  00 

500  00 


14,700  00 


mO  GO 
tiOO  00 
500  00 
40Q00 
200  00 
3.50  00 
275  00 
250  00 
450  00 
1,200  00 


Voted  for 
1875. 


$  ots. 

200  00 
160  00 
365  CO 


4,855  00 


4,775  00 


600  00 
300  00 
1,000  00 
600  00 
300  00 


2,300  00 


2,000  00 

1..5U0  00 

1,500  00 

2(!0  00 

1.50  00 

150  00 


450  00 
485  00 
525  00 
375  00 
300  00 
350  00 
325  00 
300  00 


3,110  00 


4,000  00 

2,800  00 

1,800  00 

1,200  00 

1,000  00 

900  00 

4.50  00 

440  00 

400  00 
350  00 
200  00 
500  00 


14,040  00 

550  00 

600  00 

480  00 

350  00 

185  00 

3,50  00 

275  00 

250  00 

4.50  00 

2,000  00 

5,490  00 

600  00 

'    100  00 

1,000  00 

550  00 

250  00 

2,500  00 

39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  12.) 


A.  1875 


IV.— E  DVCATIO^.— Concluded. 


SERVICE. 


To  be  voted 
for  1876. 


(^s)  Normal  School,  Ottawa— Cmitinued 

Clerk 

First  Engineer  and  Gardener  

Second    do        and  Assistant  Gardener    

Two  Labourers  on  grounds  in  summer,  at  $240   .... 

Janitor 

Do     to  pay  for  scrubbing  and  cleaning 


Contingencies  : 

Half  cost  of  stationery  and  text  books  (other  half  paid  by  the  students)  . . 
Half  cost  of  maps,  apparatus  and  library  books  (other  half  paid  out  of 

library,  map  and  apparatus  grant) , 

Text  and  reference  books  for  masters,  and  reading-room  for  students.. 

Printing  and  stationery,  chemicals  and  supplies   

Expenses  of  grounds  (including  plants,  shrubs,  &c.)    

Fuel  and  light   

Water    

Contingencies 


$     cts.  I 

800  00 
600  00 
360  00  I 
480  00 
360  00 
150  00 


8,250  00 

1,800  00 

400  00 

200  00 

400  00 

400  00 

1,200  00 

300  00 

500  00 

5,200  00 


Voted  for 
1875. 


$     cts. 


v.— PUBLIC  INSTITUTIONS,  MAINTENANCE. 


To  be  voted  per  Statement  (A) $373,099  00. 


No.  of 
Vote. 


Asylum  for  the  Insane,  Toronto 

Do  London,  and  Idiot  Asylum  Branch  of  same 

Do  Kingston 

Provincial  Reformatory,  Penetanguishene 

Central  Prison  

Institution  for  the  Deaf  and  Dumb,  Belleville   

Do  lilind,  Brantford    „ 

School  of  Agriculture    

Do  Practical  Science 


To  be  voted 
for  1876. 


$     cts. 

85,446  00  i 
85.030  00 
52,195  00 
21,930  00 
45,230  00 
33,759  00 
25,169  00 
18,240  00 
6,200  00 

373,199  00 


Voted  for 
1875. 


$     ct*i. 

85,448  00 
84,042  00 
52,195  00 
21,794  00 
46.340  00 
32,939  00 
22,.539  00 
18,388  00 
5,800  00 

369,485  00 


L4 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  12.) 


A.  1875 


v.— PUBLIC  INSTITUTIONS,  MAINTENANCE.— CoiifwuecZ. 


SERVICE. 


Details. 


To  be  voted 
for  1876. 


I.  Asylum  foe  the  Insane,  Toronto. 
For  660  Patients. 


Medicine  and  medical  comforts 

Fuel 

Butchers'  meat 

Flour 

Butter 

Beer,  wine  and  spirits    

Gas  and  oil 

(xroceries  

Fruit  and  vegetables   

Bedding,  clothing  and  shoes 

Furniture  and  furnishings 

Laundiy  and  soap    

Farm 

Miscellaneous 

Repairs  and  alterations 


Salaries  and   Wages. 


Medical  Superintendent 
Assistant  do 

Clinical  Assistants 

Bursar     

Storekeeper   

Steward   

Matron   

Assistant  Matron    

Engineer    

Assistant  Engineer., 

Stokers 

Carpenters 

Gardener    

Assistant  Gardener    

Porter  or  Messenger 

Baker 

Tailor 

Farmer  and  Assistant     . 

Night  Watchers    

Chief  Attendants . 


No.  of  officers 

and  employees. 

1 


Ordinaiy  Male  Attendants   21 


Females. 

Ordinary  Female  Attendants  23 

Night  Attendants    3 

Cooks 8 

Laundresses  7 

Housemaids  6 

Seamstress 1 

Elxtra  assistance 

99 


J?  cts. 


350  00 

12,000  00 
12,000  00 
8,000  00 
4,7ri0  00 
1,850  00 
2,300  00 
7,750  00 
750  00 
6,000  00 
1,000  00 
1,200  00 
2,000  00 
1,800  00 
2,000  00 


Voted  for 
1875. 


63,750  00 


2,000  00 

1,000  00 
700  00 

1,400  OO 
400  00 
600  00 
400  00 
192  00 
740  00 
432  00 
480  00 

1,050  00 
216  00 
216  00 
240  00 
350  00 
400  00 
456  00 
720  00 
792  00 

4,464  00 


1,968  00 
360  00 
732  00 
612  00 
468  00 
108  00 
200  00 

85,446  00 


9     cts. 

;J50  00 

12,000  00 

12,000  00 

9,250  00 

4,750  00 

1,850  00 

2,300  00 

7,500  00 

750  00 

5,000  00 

1,000  00 

1.200  00 

2,(J00  00 

1,800  00 

2,000  00 

63,750  00 

2,000  (X) 

1,000  00 

700  00 

1,400  00 

300  00 

600  00 

400  00 

192  00 

740  00 

432  00 

480  00 

1,050  00 

216  00 

216  00 

240  00 

288  00 

264  00 

45()  00 

720  00 

792  00 

4,464  00 

1 

1,968  00 

360  00 

732  00 

612  00 

468  00 

108  00 

500  00 

85,448  00 

15 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  12.) 


A.  1875 


v.— PUBLIC   INSTITUTIONS,  MAINTENANCE.— CoTi^inued 


SERVICE. 


2.  Asylum  for  the  Insane,  London. 

For  650  Patients. 

Medicine  and  medical  comforts 

Pnel  (including  Idiot  Asylum)  

Butchers'  meat   

Flour     

Butter  

Beer,  wine  and  spirits    

Gas  and  oil 

Groceries 

Fruit  and  vegetables    

Bedding,  clothing  and  shoes 

Furniture  and  furnishings 

Laundry  and  soap 

Farm,  feed  and  fodder    

Miscellaneous 

Repairs  and  alterations  


To  be  voted 
for  1876. 


Salaries  and  Wages, 


No.  of  officers 
and  employees. 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 


Medical  Superintendent 

Assistant  do  

Clinical  Assistant   

Bursar     

Steward 

Matron   

Engineer    

Assistant  Engineer  ^ 

Stokers  (1  for  Idiot  Asylum) 

Carpenters 

Gardener    

Assistant  Gardener    

Butcher 

Porter  or  Messenger 

Baker 

Tail.)r '.'.'.'.'.['.['.'.'.'. 

Farmer   

Ploughmen    

Night  Watchers ' . 

Chief  Attendants    

Ordinary  Male  Attendants 16 

Cowman  .'....'..'....    ' . .         1 


cts. 


350  00 
11,500  00 
12,500  00 
7,000  00 
4,250  00 
1,8.50  00 
2,300  00 
7,500  00 
1,000  00 
6,500  00 
l,.50O  00 
1,.5()0  00 
2,G00  00 
1,800  00 
2,000  00 


63,550  00 


2,000  00 
1,000  00 
400  00 
1,200  00 
000  00 
400  00 
740  00 


Females. 

Chief  Attendants 3 

Ordin.ii-y  F^emale  Attendants !!...!!        19        ...i.... 

Night  Attendants  ."!.!.!!.!..!!..!.!!!".!         2        .!...!!!! 

Cooks !.....!.""."."!!!!.!.      7      !!!!!!!!! 

Laundresses 4 

Housemaids  "  5  ...!!!" 

Dairym.'iid     '.'.'...  ..  1  .',  ' 

SeamstresH     '    ' ^  j  .■•■•••• 

Kxtra  Awistance !..!"!!......!!!!!!  1  ......... 

89 

3,  Ahylvv  for  the  Inrane,  Rockwood,  Kingston. 

MAiut^ri/mce  of  rjntario    Patients    at   Rockwood    Asvlum,   for  food,  clothing, 
medical  attendance,  &c.,  &c.,  for  365  patients,  at  $143  per  annum  each  

16 


960  00 

1,000  00 

400  00 

240  00 

192  00 

192  00 

360  00 

264  00 

400  00 

672  00 

480  00 

1,356  00 

3,384  00 

216  00 


.540  00 

2,040  00 

240  00 

828  no 

4.50  00 
504  00 
96  00 
120  00 
200  00 

85,030  00 


Voted  for 
1875. 


$     cts. 


350  00 
12,000  00 
12,000  00 
7,500  00 
3.750  00 
1,850  00 
2,500  00 
7,000  00 
1,500  00 
6,500  00 
1,500  00 
1,200  00 
2,000  00 
1,800  00 
1,500  00 


62,950  00 


2,000  00 

1,000  00 
400  00 

1,20(»  00 
600  00 
400  00 
740  00 
400  00 
480  00 

1,000  00 
400  00 
240  00 
192  00 
192  00 
360  00 
2(i4  00 
400  00 
672  00 

480  oa 

1,356  00 

3,408  00 

216  00 


540  00 

1,740  00 

240  00 

420  00 

4.V2  00 
504  00 
96  00 
120  00 
600  00 

84,042  00 


52,195  00  I  52.195  00 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  12.) 


A.  1875 


v.— PUBLIC  INSTITUTIONS,  MAINTENANCE.— Co7iimued 


SERVICE. 


Salaries  and  Wages. 


Warden 

Bursar  and  Deputy  Warden  

Surgeon  

Steward 

Chaplains  

Teachers 

Keepers  and  Trade  Instnictors 

Do        Ordinary     

Farmer  

Stable-keeper    

Day  Guard  and  Drill  Instructor 

Night  Guard    

Gatekeeper    

Engineer     

Temporary  assistance    


No.  of  officers 
and  employees. 

1 

1 


22 


4.  Provincial  Refobmatoky,  Penetangdishene, 

For  175  Offenders    (150  in  1875). 

Rations 

Clothing  

Bedding 

Farm,  farm  stock  and  stables 

Hospital  

IjiVjrary  and  schools 

Fuel  .'. 

Cleanine,  light  and  laundry 

Furniture,  tools  and  shop  fixtures 

Repairs,  ordinary 

Incidentals  

Postage  and  stationery  


Salaries  and  Wages. 


Warden : 

Bursar 

Physician   

Chief  Guard 

Steward  and  Storekeeper 

Prison  Bailiff    

Day  Guards  and  Shop  Supervisors,  with  board 16 

Deputy  Chief  Guard 1 

Engineer    1 

17 


No.  of  officers 
and  employees. 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 


To  be  voted 
for  1876. 


§    cts. 


5,000  00 
2,.500  00 
500  00 
.500  00 
100  00 
500  00 
350  00 
450  00 
500  00 
500  00 
600  00 


Voted  for 
1875. 


5.  Central  Prison  (300  Prisoners) 

Medicine,  medical  comforts  and  a^jpliancea    

Butchers'  meat  and  fish 

Flour,  bread  and  meal    

Groceries  and  other  provisions 

Bedding,  clothing  and  shoes 

Fuel  

Gas  and  oil 

Laundry,  soap  and  cleaning 

Stationery,  advertising,  printing  and  postage 

Library,  schools  and  lectures  

Furniture  and  furnishing   

Stable  forage,  &c 

Repairs,  &c 

Unenumerated    


11, .500  00 


1,600  00 
850  00 
.500  00 
600  00 
800  00 
800  00 
1,600  00 
1.440  00 
400  00 
260  00 
260  00 
260  00 
260  00 
600  00 
200  00 


$  cts. 


5,000  00 
2,800  00 
500  00 
500  00 
100  00 
200  00 
250  00 
350  00 
500  00 
.500  00 
614  00 
250  00 


11,564  00 


1,600  00 
850  00 
400  00 
500  00 
800  00 
800  00 
1.000  00 
1,440  00 
400  00 
260  00 
260  00 
260  00 
260  00 
000  00 
200  00 


21,930  00  1 1  21,794  00 


200  00  i 

7,000  00 

5,000  00 

5,000  00 

4,500  00 

3,500  00 

1,200  00 

600  00 

400  00 

.500  00 

500  00 

500  00 

500  00  I 

500  00 


29,900  00 


2,000  00 

1,200  00 

1,000  00 

800  00 

600  00 

800  00 

6,.500  00 

600  00 

740  00 


300  00 

7,2.50  00 

5,500  00 

5,500  00 

4,500  00 

4,000  00 

1,000  00 

500  00 

300  00 

500  00 

500  00 

500  00 

.500  00 

.500  00 


31,350  00 


2,000  OO 

1,200  00 

1,000  00 

800  00 

600  00 

800  00 

6,500  00 

.500  00 

740  00 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (JSTo.  12.) 


A.  1875 


v.— PUBLIC  INSTITUTIONS,  MAINTENANCE.— Cowim^^ed 


SERVICE. 

To  be  voted 
for  1876. 

Voted  for 

1875. 

5.  Central  Pbison. — Continued 
Salaries  and  Wages. — Continued. 
Stoker 

No. 
and 

of  officers, 
employees. 

1       

27 

LLE. 

$     cts. 

240  00 
600  00 
250  00 

$     cts. 

1 

Baker  and  Cook 

Messenger 

Bellevi 

600  00 
250  00 

45,230  00 

46,340  00 

6.  Institution  for  the  Deaf  and  Dumb, 

For  220  pupils  (200  in  1875). 

Medicine 

1       125  00 

1       4,000  00 

2,500  00 

1,500  00 

2,300  00 

500  00 

500  00 

2,500  00 

1,100  00 

500  00 

500  00 

.     600  00 

500  00 

400  00 

500  00 

750  00 

Medical  comforts  and  appliances    

125  00 

Butchers'  meat,  fish  and  fowl 

3,750  00 
2.000  00 

Flour 

Butter   

1,500  00 
2,300  00 

Greneral  j^roceries 

Fruit  and  vegetables   

500  00 

Bedding,  clothing  and  shoes 

500  00 

Fuel ; 

2  500  00 

Gas,  oil,  &c 

1,000  00 
500  00 

Laundry,  soap  and  cleaning 

Furniture  and  furnishing 

500  00 

Farm,  feed  and  fodder    

600  00 

Eepairs  and  alterations 

500  00 

500  00 

Books,  apparatus  and  appliances    

.500  00 

1,000  00 

No. 
and 

i 

of  officers 
employees. 

11         '.'.'.'.'.'. 

Salai-ies  and  Wages. 

Principal    

Physician   

18,775  00 

],800  00  1 
500  00 
800  00 
300  00 

6,250  00 
180  00 
200  00 
600  00 
228  00 
400  00 
102  00 
240  00 
400  00 
240  00 
650  00  1 
500  00 
84  00 
120  00 

1,100  00 

dis]>nsd  with 

200  00 

18,275  00 

1,800  00 
500  00 

Bookkeeper  and  Steward 

800  00 

Matron    

Teachers 

300  00 
5  500  00 

Visitors'  attendant 

Housekeeper 

Engitif^t^r            

180  00 
200  00 
600  00 

Fireman 

Fanner    

228  00 
480  00 

Farm-hand     

Gardener    

102  00 
240  00 

Baker  and  Cook 

Night  Watchman    

450  00 
240  00 

Caq»enter  and  AHsistant 

650  00 

Shoemaker    

MesHenger 

500  00 
84  00 

Cook    

120  00 

11 

828  00 

Gatekt-eper    

72  00 

Extra  assintance  

200  00 

40 

33,750  00 

32,430  00 

18 


)9  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  12.) 


A.  1875 


V.  PUBLIC  INSTITUTIONS,  MAINTENA'NCE.— Continued. 


SERVICE. 


7.  Institution  fok  the  Blind,  Brantfokd. 


For  140  Pupih  ^120  in  1875) 

Medicines,  medical  comforts  and  appliances  

lUitchers'  meat,  fish  and  fowl 

Flour 

Butter 

General  groceries  

Fruit  and  vegetables  

Bedding,  clothing  and  shoes 

Fuel  

Gas,  oil,  &c 

Laundry,  soap  and  cleaning 

Furniture  and  furnishing 

Farm,  feed  and  fodder   

Repairs  and  alterations  

Advertising,  printing,  stationery  and  postage    

Books,  apparatus  and  appliances   

Unenumerated   


Salaries  and  Wa{/es. 


No.  of  officers 
and  employees. 


j'rincipal    

Physician  

I^ursar 

Matron   

Teachers 

Ti-ade  Instructor 

Visitoi-s'  Attendant    

Engineer    

•  Fireman 

Gardener    

Teamster    

Porter 

Cook  and  Baker  

Kitchen  and  Dining  Room  Maids 

Laundress 

Laundress'  Assistants    

Boys'  Attendant      

Nurses    

Housemaids  

Night  Watchman    

Temporary  Assistance   


9.  School  of  Agriculture. 


34 


Maintenanee. 

Medicines  and  medical  comforts 

Meat,  fish  and  fowl 

Bread  and  biscuit 

General  groceries  

Fuel   

Light 


To  be  voted ' 

for  1876. 

$     cts. 

75  00 

2,.500  00 

1,150  00 

800  00 

1,800  00 

250  00 

400  00 

2,500  00 

800  00 

.300  00 

400  00 

600  00 

400  00 

450  00 

400  00 

5.50  00 

13,375  00 

1,000  00 

300  00 

800  00 

300  00 

3,500  00 

1,000  00 

120  00 

600  00 

;i60  00 

400  00 

240  00 

216  00 

400  00 

612  00 

144  00 

228  00 

192  00 

240  00 

192  00 

250  00 

100  00 

25,169  00  1 

1 
50  00 

1,600  00 

COO  00 

1,600  00 

1,000  00 

250  00 

Voted  for 
1875. 


$     cts. 


75  00 
2,000  00 
900  00 
700  00 
1,300  00 
250  00 
400  00 
2,500  00 
600  00 
300  00 
400  00 
600  00 
400  00 
400  00 
400  00 
.500  00 


11,725  00 


],600  00 
300  00 
800  00 
300  00 
3,3.50  00 
1,000  00 
120  00 
600  00 
360  00 
400  00 
240  00 
216  00 
144  00 
96  00 
120  00 
192  00 

240  00 
336  00 

100  00 

22,2.39  00 


50  00 

1,600  00 

600  00 

1,600  00 

900  00 

250  00 


19 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  1*2.) 


A.  1875 


v.— PUBLIC  INSTITUTIONS,  MAINTENANCE.— Continued. 


SERVICE. 

1 

1 

To  be  voted 
for  1876. 

Voted  for 
1875. 

8.  School  op  Ageicvltvre.— Continued. 

Maintenance.                                                      \ 

1 

S     cts. 

150  00 
250  00 
400  00 
600  00 
1,000  00 
200  00 

$      cts 
100  00 

Furniture    furnishing  and  bedding 

300  00 

400  00 

Advertising,  postage  and  stationery 
Experiments  .         

400  00 

1 

200  00 

Plants    

2,1.50  00 

Contingencies     , 

400  00 

400  00 

9  and  Wages. 

No. 

and 
ence  

of  officers 
employees. 

1        ." .' .' ." .' '. 

1        

1        

1        

1        

1        

1         

1        

2    ;;;;;;i 

19 

.__ 1 

Sahtrie 
Rector  and  Lecturer  on  Natural  Sc 

8,100  00 

1,.500  00 
2,000  00 
1,000  00 
600  00 
200  00 
600  00 
600  00 
600  00 
600  00 

36666 

144  00 
120  00 
120  00 
96  00 
180  00 
360  00 
100  00 
120  00 

1          900  00 

1 

8,9.50  00 
1,000  00 

Professor  of  Agriculture  and  Farm 

Lecturer  on  Chemistry 

Lecturer  on  Veterinary  Surgery  . . 

Manager 

2,000  00 

Physician  

Farm  Foreman    

200  00 
■  600  00 

Live  stock  do  

600  00 

Gardener    

Carpenter 

600  00 
000  00 

Ploughmen 

750  00 

Do           

200  00 

Yardman    

Matron   

360  00 
200  00 

Cook    

144  00 

Laundress 

Dairsmaaid 

General  servant   

Housemaids  

Engineer    

96  00 
84  00 

360  00 

Assistant  do  for  5  months 

Messenger,  &c 

100  00 
144  00 

Bonus  to  pupils  

Practical  Science. 

1,400  00 

18,240  00 

4,000  00 
400  00 
300  00 
500  00 
200  00 
200  00 
600  00 

18,.388  00 

9.  School  op 
Salaries 

4  000  00 

Apparatus  and  chemiraUi  

Gras    

300  00 

Fuel 

500  00 

Water   

200  00 

Onlinary  repairs  and  incidentals 

200  00 

Housekeeper    

600  00 

6,200  00 

■5,800  00 

20 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  12.) 


A.  1875 


VI.— IMMIGRATION. 


To  be  voted  per  Statement  (A) $79,000  00. 


No.  of 
Vote. 


A. 


1  'Agencies  in  Europe  (a) 

2  [Agencies  in  Canada  {b) 

3  j  Dominion  Government,  to  meet  proportion   of  charges  for  forwarding 
'■        Immigrants  to  Ontario 

4  Carriage  of  Immigrants  in  Ontario,  including  maintenance    

i)      Provisions  for  same,  including  medical  attendance 

6     I  Assistance  by  way  of    payments  in  reduction  of  passage  money  to  se- 

I        lected  Emigrants,  and  specially  consigned  to  Ontario    \ 

Amount  required  to  meet  Bonus  CertiHcates  for  arrivals  in  1874,  and  yet 

to  corns  in   

Commissions  to  shipping  and  other  occasional  Agents  forwarding  Emi- 

f rants  to  Ontario 
entals 


To  be  voted 
for  1876. 


7,800  00 
2,400  00 

25,000  00 
8,000  00 
8,000  00 

25,000  00 


2,000  00 
800  00 


79,000  00 


SERVICE. 


(o)  Details. 

Agent  in  London,  including  all  his  expenses i 

Dominion  Government,  proportion  payable  to  it  for  rent,  taxes,  jjrinting  and 
advertising,  and  for  services  by  its  Agents,  and  for  general  office  work 
and  contingencies,  under  agreement  with  the  Provinces,  approved  by  Reso-j 

lution  of  the  Legislative  Assembly,  20th  Novsmber,  1874 , 

Incidental  expenses 


(h)  Details. 

Agent  forwarding  Immigrants  from  Quebec  to  Agencies  in  Ontario 

Allowance  for  Interpreter  and  Police  at  Toronto 

In  Muskoka  and  outlying  Districts,  4  Local  Agents  at  ?100  each 
Travelling  expenses  of  Agent 


2,000  00 


5,-500  00 
300  00 


1,000  00 
600  00 
400  00 
400  00 


Voted  for 
1875. 


§     cts. 

13,410  00 
7,100  00 

25,000  00 
10,000  00 
10,000  00 

45,000  00 

5,000  00 

5,000  00 
1,300  00 


121,810  00 


7,800  00 


2,400  00 


21 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  12.) 


A.  1875 


VII.— AGRICULTURE,  ARTS,  LITERARY  AND  SCIENTIFIC 

INSTITUTIONS. 


To  be  voted  per  Statement  (A) $98,150  00. 


No.  of 
Vote 


1 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 


11 
12 


13 
14 
1.5 


10 


Agricdltuee. 

Electoral  Division  Societies,  81  at  $700 

Do  1  at    .550 

Do  6  at     350 

Outlying  Districts    

Fruit  Growers'  Association 

Entomological  Society    

Dairyman's  Association     

Agricultural  Association   

^Ontario  Poultry  Association    

For  sundry  services  in  connection  with  Agriculture  and  Arts — such  as 
investigations  of  disease  in  animals  and  crops,  and  of  ravages  of 
insects  ;  and  for  agricultural  instruction,  dairy  products,  and  other 
charges  not  otherwise  iJrovided  for  


Arts. 


Mechanics'  Institutes 
Art  Union 


Aid  to  Canadian  Institute,  Toronto. 
Do  Institut  Canadien,  Ottawa. . . 
Do        Athenaeum,  Ottawa 


Literary. 


Scientific. 


To  promote  scientific  research    . . 
Totelfl 


To  be  voted 
for  1876. 


$     cts. 


56,700  00 

550  00 

2,100  00 

300  00 

1,000  00 

7.50  00 

2,000  00 

10,000  00 

400  00 


2,000  00 


75,800  00 


20,000  00 
500  00 


20,500  00 


7.50  00 
300  00 
300  00 


1,350  00 


.500  00 


898,150  00 


Voted  for 
1875. 


$     cts. 


54,600  00 

550  00 

2,450  00 

700  00 

1.000  00 

750  00 

700  00 

10,000  00 


2,000  00 


72,750  00 


20,000  00 
500  00 


20,500  00 


7.50  00 
300  00 
300  00 


1,350  00 


.500  00 


95,100  00 


22 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  12.) 


A.  1875 


Vni.— HOSPITALS  AND  CHARITIES. 


To  be  voted  per  Statement  (A) .S56,696  46. 


No.  of 
Vote. 

A. 

To  be  voted 
for  1876. 

Voted  for 
1875. 

1 
2 

(Upon  the  terms  and  conditions  of  Statute  37  Vic,  ch.  33.) 

Details. 

For  Hospitals  and  Institutions  mentioned  in  Schedide  "A"  of  Statute. . 

$     cts. 

41,506  93 
7,526  63 
7,662  90 

$     cts. 

33,000  00 
9,000  00 

,3 

"            l)o         in  Schedule  "  C  "  of  Statute 

8,000  00 

Additional  required  to  make  up  deficiency  in  allowances  to  certain  Institu- 

50,000  00 
2,;i46  00 

56,696  46 

52,346  00 

IX.— MISCELLANEOUS  EXPENDITURE. 


To  be  voted  per  Statement  (A) $40,005  00. 


No.  ofi 
Vote, 


6 
7 
8 
9 

10 
11 

12 
13 
14 
15 
16 


To  cover  expenses  of  collection  of  revenue  for  law  stamps  and  licenses . . 
To  cover  expenses  in  connection  with  municipalities  and  other  funds . . 
To  provide  for  e.xpenses  attendinj,'  the  settlement  of  the  Municipal  Loan 

Fund  debt  and  surplus  scheiues 

To  provide  f<jr  expenses  re  Ontario  and  Quebec  Settlement  (re-vote). . 
To  provide  for  expenses  re  Northern  and  Western  boundaries  (re-vote) 

Marriage  Licenses,  printing  and  incidentals 

Inspection  of  railways    

Ontario  Rifle  Association 

Orillia  Asylum  ( lare-taker,  and  for  services  from  Ist  June,  1872,  to  Ist 

April,  1873  (8165  .50) 

In-surance  on  public  buUdings  and  fiimiture 

Consolidation  of  Statute  Law  (re-vote  in  part)    

"  "  for  printing  

Expenses  of  elections 

"  contested  elections 

To  cover  unpaid   Election  accounts  

Unpaid  accounts  for  lilection  Trials  in  1875    

County  Court  Judges,  for  expenses  of  revision  of  voters'  lists  for  1876 . . 


To  be  voted 
for  1876. 


$     cts. 

1,000  00 

100  00 

1,000  00 

4,000  00 

4000  00 

400  00 

.500  00 

600  00 

405  .50 
1,000  00 
4,000  00 
4,000  00 
5,000  00 
2,000  00 
7,000  00 
2,000  00 
3,000  00 

40,005  00 


Voted  for 
1875. 


$     cts. 
2,.500  00 
100  00 

2,000  00 

4,000  00 

4,000  00 

400  00 

500  00 

600  00 

200  00 
7,000  00 
5,000  00 

37,600  00 
5,000  00 


3,000  00 
71,900  00 


X.— UNFORESEEN  AND  UNPROVIDED. 


To  be  voted  per  Statement  (A) $50,000  00. 


No.  of 
Vote, 


To  meet  unforeseen  and  unprovided  expenses  . . , 


23 


To  be  voted 
for  1876. 


$     cts. 
.50,000  00 


Voted  for 
1875. 


$     cts. 
50  000  00 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  12.) 


A.  1875 


XL— PUBLIC  BUILDINGS. 


To  be  voted  per  Statement  (A) $132,630' 00. 


No.  of 
Vote, 


1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 

10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 


Asylum  for  the  Insane,  Toronto 

Do  London    

Asylum  at  Hamilton    

Provincial  lleformatory,  Penetanguishene 

'  Central  Prison 

IDeaf  and  Dumb  Institute 

Blind  Institute    

School  of  Agriculture    

Do       Practical  Science 

Noi-mal  School  and  Education  Office 

Normal  School,  Ottawa  

Osgoode  Hall   

Government  House    

Parliament  and  Departmental  Buildings   . 

Court  House  and  Gaol,  Sault  Ste.  Marie 

Lock-up  do  Thunder  Bay  . . . 
Do  do  Nipissing  District 
Do        Muskoka  District 

Registry  Office,  Parry  Sound  District   . . . 

Asylum,  Orillia 


SUMMARY. 


1  Re- votes,  included  in  above    

2  Expenditure  on  Capital  Account  (new). 

3  Do  for  repairs   


SERVICE. 


VTO. 


Details. 


a) 
b) 
c) 
d) 
e) 
f) 
ff) 
h) 

i) 
J) 
Ic) 

;  I 


(o) 

i? 

(s) 
{t) 


To  be  voted 
for  1876. 


$  cts, 
1,000  00 
.5,000  00 

a5,330  00 

.5,000  00 

800  00 

2,.500  00 

3,.500  00 

13,900  00 
1,000  00 
4.000  00 
6,000  00 
3,000  00 

10,000  00 
2,000  00 
1,000  00 
6,000  00 
500  00 
3,000  00 
100  00 

29,000  00 


132,630  00 


22,000  00 
89,630  00 
21,100  00 


Voted  for 
1875. 


S     cts. 

1,200  00 

4,200  00 

45,000  00 

6,000  00 

800  00 

4.500  00 

2,600  GO 

12,5.30  00 

200  00 

1,.500  00 

34,000  00 

3,600  00 

1,000  00 


1,200  00 
6,000  00 


132,630  00 


2,000  00 
100  00 


126,430  00 


Details, 
(a)  Asylum  for  Insane,  Toroni 
Lowering  water  supply  pipe,  and  repairs  to  crib-work  at  engine  house 


(b)  Astldm  fob  Insane,  London. 
Filtering  vault  to  main  drainage  and  connections    


(r)  Asylum,  Hamilton. 

f^ompleting   4th    story,   gas   and  water  supply  pipes,  finishing   new   work  ii 

baKcmeiit,  fi-iiciiij',  &,c 

Furniture  and  furnishings 


To  be  voted 
for  1876. 


$     cts. 
1,000  00 


5,000  00 


18,.580  00 
16,7.50  00 

35,3.30  00 


$     cts. 


24 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  12.) 


A.  1875 


XI.— PUBLIC  BVlLBmGS.— Continued. 


SERVICE. 

To  be  voted 
for  1876. 

{(i)  Provincial  Reformatory,  Penetangcishene. 
Re-vote,  unexpended  balance  (estimated)      

$     cts. 
5,000  00 

(e)  Central  Prison,  Toronto. 
To  complete  hospital   

2.50  00 
100  00 
450  00 

For  fitting  engine  for  laundry 

{f)  Deaf  and  Dumb  Institute,  Belleville. 
Re-vote,  unexpended  balance  (estimated) 

800  00 

2,500  00 

(g)  Blind  In.stitute,  Brantford. 
Re-vote,  unexpended  balance  (estimated) , 

1,500  00 
2,000  00 

Improvements  to  grounfla  and  planting    

(A)  School  of  Agriculture. 
Finishing  and  furnishing  Mansard  story 

3,500  00 

500  00 
1,500  00 

600  00 

1,000  00 

10,000  09 

300  00 

Do                       Veterinary  rooms    

Addition  to  greenhouse 

Library  and  apparatus    

Ijive  stock    

Implements 

13,900  00 

1,000  00 

C;')  Normal  School  and  Education  Office. 
General  repairs  to  building  and  premises    

4,000  00 

{k)  Normal  School,  Ottawa. 
Re-vote,  unexpended  balance  (estimated) 

6,000  00 

(/]  Osgoode  Hall. 
General  repairs  to  building,  including  furnishings    ... 

3,000  00 

1 

- 

(m)  Government  House. 

General  repairs  to  building,  painting,  furniture,  furnishings  and  improvements 
to  grounds    

10,000  00 

(n)  Parliament  Buildings. 
General  repairs,  fencing,  planting,  &c 

2.000  00 

(o)  Algoma  District. 

1,000  00 

(p)  Thunder  Bay  District. 
Gaol  and  Lock-up  (re-vote)  

4,000  00 
2,000  00 

6,000  00 

- 

25 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  12.) 


A.  1875 


XL— PUBLIC  BVILBmGS.— Continued. 


SERVICE. 


(q)  NiPissiNG  District. 

Lock-up  at  Matawan — furniture,  fencing,  &c 

(r)  MusKOKA  District. 

Lock-up — furniture  and  fencing    

(s)  Parry  Sound  District. 

Registry  Office— repairs,  &c 

(t)  Asylum  at  Orillia. 

Fitting  up  building  for  150  patients     , 

Furniture     


To  be  voted 
for  1876. 

'      S     cts. 
500  00 

3,000  00 

100  00 

20,000  00 
9,000  00 

29,000  00 

$     cts 


XII.— PUBLIC  WORKS. 


To  be  voted  per  Statement  (A) S42,090  00 


No.  of 
Vote. 


A. 


j  Public  Works. 

1  Otonabee  River  Works — cribs  and  booms,  Young's  Lock    

2  pluskoka  River — timber  slides 

3  Wye  River— dredging  bar 

4  jMary  and  Fairy  Lakes— channel  above  Lock 

5  ]Mary  and  Fairy  Lakes — deepening   channels,   alteration  of  Bridge  at 
j         Huntsville,  and  dam  at  foot  of  Mary's  Lake   

6  JRyerson  Road  Works    

7  jMaskiki  L:ikes  Works— extension  of  pier  at  Port  Carling  Lock  and  rock 
I        excavation  at  Jowiph  River 

8  Muskoka  Falls  Works — excavation,  &c 

9  Lindsay   Lf)ck —reconstruction  of  foundation   and  tightening  leaks   in 
dam    

10  Gull  and  Burnt  River  Works— dams  and  slides 

11  Surveys,  inspections,  arbitrations  and  awards,  and  charges  not  otherwise 
provided  for    

12  Washago  and  Gravenhurst  road—  maintenance  

13  Maintenance  of  locks,  dams,  and  swing-bridges 

14  Lockmasters',  caretakers',  and  bridgetenders'  salaries 


SUMMARY. 

1  Re-vote,  included  in  above    

2  Expt^nditure  on  capital  account  (new)    . . 

3  Do  fur  repairs  and  maintenance 


To  be  voted  for  1876. 


Re-vote. 
(Estimated.)  ' 


$      cts. 

2,000  00 
3,940  00 
8,000  00 

mo  00 


2.50  00 


New  vote. 


14,690  00 


14,690  00 

23,.500  00 

3,900  00 

42,090  00 


cts. 


3,000  00 


1,500  00 
5,000  00 

4,000  00 
5,000  00 

5,000  00 

500  00 

2,000  00 

1,400  00 


27,400  00 


Voted  for 
1875. 


.55,870  00 


2G 


89  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  12.) 


A.  1875 


XIIL— COLONIZATION  ROADS. 


To  be  voted  as  per  Statement  (A)  $85,800  00. 


No.  of 
Vote 


Construction  and  repairs 


To  be  voted 
for  1876. 


$     cts. 
85,800  00 


Voted  for 
1875. 


$     cts. 
98,300  00 


SERVICE. 


Details. 
I. — North   Division. 

1.  Base  Line  and  Korah  Roads 

2.  Rose  and  Lefroy  Roads 

3.  Kaministiquia  Road 

4.  Great  Northern  Road,  repairs  and  bridges  .... 


II.— West  Division. 

1.  Rousseau  and  Nipissing  Road — 
To  improve  throughout  to  Pacific  R.  R.  .Junction 

2.  Parry  Sound  Road—                                                               * 
Permanent  Works  between  Rousseau  Village  and  Parry  Sound 

3.  Parry  Sound  Road- 
East    of    Rousseau  Village— to    complete    repairs,    including    "  Skeleton 

Deviation  " 


4.  Northern  Road  — 

To  open  from  present  terminus  in  the  Township  of  Ferrie  to  .Junction  near 
Commondus  Lake 


5.  Maganatawan  (New  R<jad) — 

To    open  5  miles  from  Rousseau  Road,   North  of    River,  Eastward  in 
Chapman 


6.  Cardwell  Road — 

To    continue    North-eastward,   to  the    intersection   of    Stisted    Road,   in 
McMurrich 


7.  Stisted  Road- 

To  continue  North  towards  McMurrich . 


8.  Muskoka  Road  — 

To  complete  repairs  to  Huntsville,  and  prolong  the  road  through  Perry  . . . 

9.  Baysville  Road — 

To  prolong  towards  Huntsville 


10.  Macaulay  Road- 

To  complete  repairs  to  Baysville,  and  extend  through  McLean 

11  Muskoka  Road  — 

To  complete  "  Bracebridge  Deviation  " 

12.  Macaulay  "  South  "  Road — 

To  complete  repairs  to  "  Draper  Bridge  " 


To  be  voted 
for  1876. 

$  cts. 

1.500  00 

2,000  00 

1,500  00 

1,500  00 

\    6,000  00 

5,000  00 

1,000  00 

4,000  00 

1,000  00 

1,200  00 

1,000  00 

3,000  00 

2,000  00 

2,000  00 

1,000  00 

1,000  00 

$     cts. 


0,500  00 


27 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  12.) 


A.  1875 


XIIL— COLONIZATION  B^OADS.— Continued. 


SERVICE. 


II.— West  Drvisiou.  —Continued. 
1.3.  Dalton  Road— 

To  complete  to  Washago  Village 

14.  Ryde  Road — 

To  complete  to  Washago  Road 

1.5.  Brunei  Road— 

To  repair  beyond  Brunei  Bridge    

16.   Peterson  Road — 

To  repair  in  Township  of  Draper 

III.— E.iST  Division. 

1.  Bobcaygeon  Road — 

To  repair  North  of  Minden  Village 

2.  Pembroke  and  Mattawan  Road — 

To  repair  Bridges  on  Southerly  end 

3.  Opeongo  Road— 

To  repair  West  of  "  Prussian  HiUs  " 

4.  Addington  Road — 

To  repair  North  of  Madawaska  River 

5.  Frontenac  Road— 

To  repair  from  Mississippi  Road  Southward  -10  miles  .... 

6.  Mississippi  Road  -  ' 

To  repair  through  Abinger 

7.  Hastings  Road- 

To  repair  from  Doyle's  Comers,  Northward 

8.  Victoria  Road — 

To  improve  in  Longford  and  Oakley    

9.  Methuen  Road  — 

To  complete  to  "  Sandy  Lake  "  Settlement 

10.  Mississippi  and  Frontenac  Junction  Roads — 

To  construct  through  Palmerston  and  Clarendon— 12  miles 

BRIDGES. 

1.  Draper  Bridge— 8th  Concession  (Renewal) 

2.  Madawaska  do  (do) 

3.  Seguin  do        (on  Junction  Road  2) 

4.  Mattawa      do    

.5.  Cardwell  lioad  Bridge  (in  Stisted) 

6.  Stisted  Rojul        do  (do) 

GENERAL  PURPOSES. 

Ijocations  and  Inspection     

.Short  Ne\v   li(.a<lH  and  repairs  of  like  nature     


To  be  voted 
for  1876. 


$     cts, 
2,000  00 

1,000  00 

1,000  00 

1,000  00 


1,.500  00 

1,000  00 

2,000  00 

1.000  00 

1,000  00 

1,000  00 

l,.50O  00 

1,500  00 

1,000  00 

3,000  00 

2,000  00 

3,000  00 

600  00 

3,000  00 

500  00 

500  00 

2,000  00 
20,000  00 


$     cts. 


33,200  00 


14,500  00 


9,600  00 


22,000  00 


28 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  12.) 


A,  1875 


XIII.- 

-COLONIZATION  ROADS.- 

—Continued. 

SERVICE. 

To  be  voted 
for  1876.     ! 

North  Division 

Recapitulation. 

$     cts,  j 

6,500  00  ' 
33,200  00  ! 
14,500  00 

9,600  00  ' 
22,000  00 

85,800  00  ; 

West        do          

East          do                              

Bridges     

General  Purposes       .         

XIV.— CHARGES  ON  CROWN  LANDS. 


No.  of 
Vote. 


1      Expenditure  on  account  of  Crown  Lands 


To  be  voted 
for  1876. 


$     cts. 
70,100  00  i 


Voted  for 
1875. 


$     cts. 
86,700  00 


SERVICE. 


To  be  voted 
for  1876. 


Details. 

Board  of  Surveys 

Ageuts'  siilaries,  commissions  and  disbursements 

Forest  ranging,'  and  inspection  of  timber  lands 

Surveys  as  follow : 

Townships  in   Huron  and   Ottawa   Territory,    in  vicinity  of  proposed 

Pacific  Railroad 

Survey,  residue  of  Bedford  

Do  do  Wood 

Do        a  township  W.  of  Lake  Rousseau    

Do        residue  of  Sunnidale 

Maps 


$     cts. 

400  00 
18,000  00 
14,000  00 


28,000  00 
1,600  00 
1,.500  00 
4,000  00 
1,600  00 
1,000  00 

70,100  00 


.$     cts. 


28,000  00 


29 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  12.) 


A.  1875 


XV.— REFUND  ACCOUNT. 


To  be  voted  as  per  Statement  (A) $67,901  40. 


No.  of  I 
Vote,  i 


1  Education    

2  Crown  Lands 

3  Municipalities  Fund    .... 

4  Land  Improvement  Fund 


To  be  voted 
for  1876.  1 

Voted  for 
1875. 

$   cts. 

750  00 

23,000  00 

25,521  24  ! 

18,630  16  ! 

$       cts. 

750  00 

23,000  00 

58,213  40 

28,099  74 

67,901  40 

110,063  14 

No.  of  I 
Vote. 


SERVICE. 


Education. 

1  I  Account  of  contributions  to  Superannuation  Fund,  withdrawn    

I  Crown  Lands. 

i 

2  For  payments  made  to  the  credit  of  the  Department  on  account  of  un- 
I  comijleted  purchases,  and  afterwards  returned  to  proposed  purchasers 
I     on  purchases  not  being  carried  out 

For  two  per  cent,  of  timber  dues  payable  to  Municipalities  for  timber  cut 
1     on  road  allowances    


j  Municipalities  Fund. 

jTo  pay  over  to  Municipalities  the  amount  collected  in  1875 

Less  20  j)er  cent,  commission,  &c • . . 

I  Vide  Stat.  Can.  18  V.,  c.  2,  and  19  V.,  c.  16. 


Land  Improvement  Fund. 

Moneys  collected   from   sale   of  Crown  Lands,   subject  to 
the  Land  Improvement  Fund,  for  the  year  ending  .'iOth 

June,  1875  30,964  90 

Lens    4-5,  leaving  1-5  to  the  Land  Improvement 

Fund 24,771  92 

Vide  Stat.  Can.  16  V.,  c.  159,  and  Con.  Stat. 

Can.  c.  26.  6,192  98 

Less  6    per  cent,  for  cost  of  collection  and  man- 
agement     371  .57 

Mrmeys  collected  from  the  sale  of  Common  School  Lands, 
Hubject  to  the  Land  Improvement    Kund,   for  the  year 

ending  :mh  June,  1875    48,.342  84 

Le88  0  Iter  cent,  for  collection  and  management      . .        2,900  57 

45,442  27 

30 


S       cts. 


20,000  00 
3,000  00 


31,901  65 
6,380  31 


.5,821  41 


cts. 


750  00 


23,000  00 


25,.521  24 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  12.) 


A.  1875 


XV.— REFUND  ACCOUNT.— Continued. 


No.  of 
Vote. 

SERVICE. 

To  be  distributed  as  follows : 

^  to  the  Land  Improvement  Fund 11,360  56 

$       cts. 
11,360  56 

1,448  19 

$       cts. 

(J  to  be  added  to  the  Common  School  Fund ^M,08^  70) 

Moneys  collected  from  the  sale  of  Grammar  School  Lands, 
subject  to  the  Land  Improvement  Fund,  from  the  .30th 

June,  1875,  to  30th  June,  1876 6.162  50 

Less  6  per  cent,  for  collection  and  management  ....          369  75  | 

5,792  75 
Less  1,  leaving  i  to  the  Land  Improvement  Fund . .       4,344  56 

18,6;^0  16 

XVI. — BALANCE  to  bo  provided  tor  to  complete  the   Services  of  1874,  as  per 
Statement  No.  37,  in  the  Public  Accounts. 


To  be  voted  per  Statement  (A)  $16,622  23. 


Expenditure 

in  excess  of 

Appropriation. 


Amount  of  Appropriation 


Civil  Government. 

Executive  Council  and  Attorney-General's  Office- 
Treasury  Department — (contingencies 

Do  East  Wing  repairs 

Inspector  of  Prisons— Contingencies 

Immigration  Branch — Salaries    

Do  Contingencies    

Secretary  and  Registrar's  Office — Contingencies 

Public  Works  Department  -  Contingencies 

Crown  Lands  Department    

Otficiai  Gazette 

Queen's  Printer — Contingencies 


Contingencies. 


Legislation. 


Salaries 

Sessional  Writers,  Messengers  and  Pages 

Stationery,  &c 

Contingencies  and  repairs 


Carried  forward 


31 


$     cts. 


$  cts. 


$     cts. 
.50,000  00 


75  -,'.) 
961  86 
783  56 
549  98 
400  00 
776  98 
681  46 
240  41 
7,579  60 
469  99 
138  72 


0  02 

2,061  30 

6,838  13 

.536  77 


12,658  15 


9,436  22 


22,094  37  I  50,000  00 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  12.) 


A.   1875 


XVI. — BALANCE  to  be  provided  for  to  complete   the   Service  of  1874,  over- 
expended,  as  per  Statement  No.  37,  in  the  Public  Accounts. — Continued. 


A. 


Brought  forward 


Administration  of  Justice. 


Court  of  Chancery — Contingencies  .... 
Court  of  Queen's  Bench — Contingencies 
Co  art  of  Conunon  Pleas — Contingencies 

Practice  Court 

Criminal  Justice 

Miscellaneous  Justice    


Public  Institutions— Maintenance. 


Deaf  and  Dumb  Asylum 
Blind  Institute    


Miscellaneous. 

Municipal  Loan  Fund  debt  and  Surplus  Schemes 

Orillia  A.sylum,  Caretaker    

Unprovided  items   


Expenditure 

in  excess  of 

iVppropriation. 


Public  Buildings  and  Works. 

Central  Prison,  in  finishing  Elliot's  contract,  and  other  necessary 

work.\, 

Agricultural  Farm,  Guelph 

School  of  Practical  Science 

Normal  and  Model  Schools,  Toronto    

Parliament  Buildings 

Kaministiquia  River  Works    


Crown  Lands  Expenditure. 
Forest  ranging  and  inspection  of  timber  lands  . , 


(1)  Balancti  to  be  now  provided  for 


S     cts. 


248  88 
172  25 
14  89 
923  44 
391  58 
438  88 


20  05 
34  47 


2,742  69 
40  00 
35  94 


35,021  04 

1,126  49 

2,008  11 

2  73 

95.T  24 

9  00 

S     cts, 
22,094  37 


2,189  92 


54  52 


2,818  63 


I     cts. 
50,000  00 


39,122  61 


342  18 


66,622  23 


16,622  2;j 


(1)  A  mount  of  ai>proprialiom  for  1874 |2,C84,176  40 

f)o  do  expended 2,342,339  00 


(fnexpended  amount  9341,887  40 


32 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  12.)  A.  1875-6 


SUPPLEMENTARY  ESTIMi  TES 

Of  certain  sums  required  to  complete  the  service  of  the  Province  for  1876,  and  to 
make  good  certain  expenditure  for  tiie  year  1875. 

35.  To  defray  the  expenses  of  the  Lieutenant-Governor's  Office,  as  follow  :— 

Private  Secretary's  salary $  800  00 

Private  Secretary  to  pay  salary  from  26th  October, 

1875 144  43 

Contingencies,  additional  500  00 

Office  Furniture 100  00 

Total   $1,544  43 

86.  To  defray  the  expenses  of  the  Secretary  and  Registrar's  Office,  as  follow : — 

To  bind  up  Schedules  of  former  years $  200  00 

Travelling  expenses  of  Inspector 300  00 

Total ^  500  00 

87.  To  defray  the  expenses  of  the  Court  of  Queen's  Bench,  as  follow  : — 

Clerk,  to  discharge  duties  at  Assizes,  and  also  at  sit- 
tings of  Superior  Courts  of  Law,  or  Judges 
thereof $1,200  00 

Expense  of  copies  of  Judges'  notes,  for  arguments  in 

Term    300  00 

For  employment  of  Short-hand  Reporters  of  evidence 

on  Trials  at  the  Assizes  and  in  Election  Courts.    5,000  00 

Additions  of  $200  each  to  salaries  of  the  following  offi- 
cers :  First  clerk.  Master's  Office,  Court  of  Chan- 
cery, and  Taxing  officers  in  Chancery,  Queen's 
Bench  and  Common  Pleas  800  00 

Total   $7,300  ©0 

88.  To  defray  the  expenses  of  Criminal  Justice,  as  follow : — 

To  meet  balance  of  unpaid  accounts  for  Administra- 
tion of  Justice  during  1875 $23,000  00 

89.  To  defray  certain  expenses  connected  with  the  Education  Department,  as  follow  : — 

Allowance  for  two  additional  Collegiate  Institutes...  $1500  00 
Ottawa  Normal  School,  balance  of  accounts  for  fuel 

and  supplies  in  1875  670  00 

"  "  "  Apparatus,  Models  and  appli- 
ances for  Lectures  in^  'Sci- 
ence and  Mathematical  de- 
partments     2,000  00 

"  "  "       Instrument    for  Vocal  Music 

department 300  00 

"  "  "       Sundry  fittings  and  furniture.       500  00 

To  pay  retiring  allowance  for  the  year  1876  to   the 

Revd.  Dr.  Ry«r«on 4,000  00 

Total $8,970  00 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  12.)  A.  1876-6 


90.  To  defray  the  expenses  of  the  maintenance  of  the  Asylum,  Hamilton,  as  follow 

Medicine  and  medical  comforts $  200  00 

Beer,  wine  and  spirits  600  00 

Fuel 3000  00 

Butchers' meat,  fish  and  fowl 4500  00 

Flour   2500  00 

Butter 1500  00 

Lighting 800  00 

Groceries 3000  00 

Fruit  and  vegetables  850  00 

Bedding,  clothing  and  shoes 2000  00 

Laundry,  soap  and  cleaning 600  00 

Furniture  and  furnishings 750  00 

Farm,  feed  and  fodder  600  00 

Repairs  and  alterations  500  00 

Miscellaneous  500  00 

Water  supply 500  00 

Total  $22,400  00 

Salaries  and  Wages  : 

No.  of  Officers 
and  Employees. 

Medical  superintendent 1      1600  00 

Assistant         do.             1      600  00 

Accountant  and  storekeeper 1      800  00 

Matron    1     300  00 

Engineer 1     600  00 

Assistant  engineer  (pumping  engine)     1     360  00 

Carpenter 1     500  00 

Gardener  and  farmer 1     400  00 

M  essenger  and  porter 1       200  00 

Baker  1     300  00 

Chief  male  attendant 1     300  00 

Chief  female       "        1      200  00 

Cook  and  assistant 2     264  00 

Kitchen  and  dining-room  maids  ...     4     432  00 

Laundress  and  assistants    3     372  00 

Night  watch  (male)  1      240  00 

"     (female) 1     120  00 

Attendants  (mal«)  4     960  00 

(female) ...     9     1080  00 


Total    36        $32,028  00 

91.  To  defray  the  expenses  of  the  maintenance  of  the  Asylum,  Orillia,  as  follow  : — 

Medicines  and  medical  comforts $  200  00 

Fuel 2000  00 

Butchers' meat,  fish  and  fowl  2500  00 

Flour 150©  00 

Butter    1000  00 

Lighting 250  00 

Groceries  1750  00 

Fruit  and  vegetables  500  00 

Bedding,  clothing  and  shoes    1500  00 

Laundry,  soap  and  cleaning     300  00 

Furniture  and  furnishings 400  00 

Farm,  feed  and  fodder 400  00 

2 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  12.)  A.  1875-6 


Repairs  and  alterations 400  00 

Miscellaneous    400  00 

Milk  300  00 


Total $13,400  00 

Salaries  and  Wages  : 

No.  of  Officers  and 
Employees. 

Medical  superintendent   1  1,600  00 

A-Ccountant  and  storekeeper 1  800  00 

Matron 1  300  00 

Engineer   1  600  00 

Stoker    1  240  00 

Gardener    1  300  00 

Chief  male  attendant 1  300  00 

Chief  female  attendant    1  180  00 

Cook  and  assistant 2  252  00 

Kitchen  and  dining-room  maids...  4  384  00 

Laundress  and  assistant  2  2.52  00 

Night  watch  (male) 1  240  00 

Night  watch  (female)  1  120  00 

Attendants  (male)    4  960  00 

Attendants  (female) 4  480  00 

Messenger  and  porter 1  200  00 

Baker 1  300  00 


Total 28  $20,908  00 

92.  To  defray  the  expanses  of  the  Provincial  Reformatory,  Penetanguishene,  as  follow  : — 

Postage  and  stationery  (omitted  by  error) $200  00 

93.  To  defray  the  expenses  of  the  Central  Prison,  as  follow  : — 

For  the  purchase  of    material  in  order  to  employ 

temporarily,  prisoners  during  1876  $5,000 

94.  To  defray  the  Expenses  of  the  School  of  Agriculture,  as  follow  : — 

Allowance  to  W.  Johnston,  as  acting  Principal  and 

Lecturer  during  vacancy  of  the  office $700  00 

95.  To  defray  the  expenses  of  the  maintenance  of  the  Institution 

for  the  Blind,  Brantford,  as  follow  : — 

To  cover  insufficient  appropriation  for  1865,  arising  from  in- 
crease in  the  number  of  pupils  from  50  to  101,  in  the 
latter  part  of  the  year  1874    $1,878  23 

96.  To  defray  the  expenses  of  a  grant  in  aid  of  Agriculture,  Lit- 

erary and  Scientific  Institutions,  as  follow  : — 

Grant  in  aid  of  Museum   and   Library   for  Veterinary 

purposes $2,000  00 

Grant   towards  establishing  a  School  of  Art  and  Design  $1,000  00 


Total $.3,000  00 

97.  To  defray  the  expenses  of  a  grant  in  aid  of  Hospitals  and  Charities,  as  follow  : — 
Amount  required  to  make  appropriations  equal  to  last  year.    $4,403  89 

3 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  12.)  A.  1875-6 


Required  for  Hospitals  and  Charities  not  included  in  appro- 
priation of  former  years  •••••      4,394  72 

Total $8,798  61 

98.  To  defray  the  expenses  of  Miscellaneous  Expenditure,  as  follow  :;— 

Philadelphia  International  Exhibition  for  expenses   of  Ad- 
visory Committee  and  aiding  Provincial  objects   $15,000  00 

George  Buckland,  to  re-imburse  him  for  payment  of  £70 
10s  3d  sterling,  paid  by  him  for  Agricultural  Implements 
ordered  in  England,  on  the  authority  of  the  then  Com- 
missioner      $343  15 

To  pay  claimants  for  '  Scott'  reward $5,000  00 

Gratuities    to  the  following  officials    on    their    retirement, 
namely  : — 

Joseph  JVorkman,  M.  D.,  late  Medical  Superintendent,  Toronto 

Asylum,  (22  years' service) $4,000  00 

Benjamin  JVorkman,  M.D.   late   Assistant  Medical  Superin- 
tendent, (20  years'  service) -  $2,000  00 

A.  N.  Buell,  Accountant  Court  of  Chancery  (25  years'  service  $4,666  00 

John  Hughes,  Gardener,   (18  years  service)    $550  00 

E.  A.  McLaurin,    late  Emigration  Agent   at  Quebec,  on  the 

office  being  discontinued  $400  00 

Eenry    John    Jones,   Crown    Lands  Department,  Gratuity, 

(35  years' service) •...  $2,000  00 

William  Bell,  Crown   Lands   Department,  extra  clerk  since 

1871,  on  his  services  being  dispensed  with    $266  66 

For  repairs  and  care  of  ^roc^'s  "Monument" $400  00 

Expenses    attending    the    Lieutenant-Governor's    visits    to 

Toronto  before  Government  House  was  ready $572  29 

99.  To  defray  the  expenses  of  works  at  the  Toronto  Lunatic  Asylum,  as  follow  :— « 

Furniture  for  rooms  of  Superintendent  $1,341  72 

Repairs  to  roof  of  out-buildings,  sewer  box,  &c 2,000  00 

Total $3,341  72 

100.  To  defray  the  expense  of  Works  at  the  London  Lunatic  Asylum,  as  follow  : — 
General  Repairs  (including  guards  for  steam  coils,  re-arrange- 
ment of  drainage,  re-fiooring  and  re-plastering  corridors, 

water  supply,  &c.) $15,000  00 

101.  To  defray  the  expense  of  Works  at  the  Blind  Institute,  Brantford,  as  follow  : — 
Outside  closets,  enlargement  of  tanks  and  additional  repairs.    $2,000  00 
Additional  fire-hose  250  00 


Total $1,750  00 

102.  To  defray  the  expense  of  Works  at  the  Central  Prison,  as  follow  : — 

Third  rail  to  bring  in  stone $300  00 

Amount  payable  to  Canada  Car  Company  under  agreement...  $15,576  07 


Total 15,876  07 

iOJ.  To  defray  the  expense  of  Works  at  the  Hamilton  Asylum,  as  follow  : — 
Wire  guards,  for  windows  and  steam  coils,  building  of  stable 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (IN o.  12.)  A   1876-6 


and  sheds,   painting  and  oiling  of  floors,  material  for 

roads,  &c   , $6,000  00 

104.  To  defray  the  expense  of  Works  at  the  Parliament  Buildings,  as  follow  :  - 
Repairs,  including  additional  gas  supply  to  Library,  alter- 
ations of  sunlight,  and  alterations  in  Keporter's  galleries, 

&c    Sl,500  00 

105.  To  defray  the  expense  of  Works  at  Osgoode  Hall,  as  follow  : — 

Additional  for  repairs  (remedying  drainage,  &c.) $1,500  00 

106.  To  defray  the  expense  of  Works  at  the  Bridge  at  Port  Sandfield,  Muskoka,    $2,008  00 

107.  To  defray  the  expense  of  Crown  Lands  inspection  ...  $500  00 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  13.)  A.  1875 


ANNUAL  REPORT 


OF   THE 


ONTAEIO 

SCHOOL  OF  AGRICULTURE 


AND 


EXPERIMENTAL   FARM, 

FOR  THE  YEAR  ENDING  30th  SEPTEMBER, 

1875. 


^vlnUA  by  CDrtUr  of  the  legislative  ^^semlrlii. 


PRINTED  BY  HUNTER,  aOSE  &  CO.,  2-5  WELLINGTON  STREET  WEST. 

1875. 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  13.)  A.  1875 


CONTENTS. 


Page 
A.  Intkoduction  1 

I.  The  School 3 

1  In  the  Class  Room 3 

2  On  the  Farm 6 

(1)  In  the  Field  Department 6 

(2)  In  the  Live  Stock  Department 7 

(3)  In  the  Horticultural  Department 7 

(4)  In  the  Mechanical  Department 8 

II.  The  FAKM...1 9 

1  The  Field  Department 9 

2  The  Live  Stock  Department 12 

3  The  Horticultural  Department 13 

4  The  Mechanical  Department 14 

III.  The  Financial  Statement 14 

IV.  Results  and  Recommendations 10 

V.  Appendices, 

Appendix  A.  Christmas  Examination  Papers,  1874 20 

B.  Circular  for  1875 23 

"         C.  Easter  Examination  Papers,  1875 28 

D.  Easter  Class  Lists,  1875 33 

"        E.  Financial  Tables 35 

Table  A.  Appropriation  Expenditure  for  1875 36 

"     B.  Estimated  do  for  1876 37 

"     C.  Inventory  of  Stock,  with  Prices 39 

"     D.  Inventory  of  Implements,  with  Prices 40 

"     E.  Farm  Income  and  Expenditure  for  1875 43 

"     F.  Estimated  do  for  1876 45 

VI.  Repoet  op  the  Physician 46 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  13.)  A.  1875 


EEPOET 


OF  THE 


ONTARIO  SCHOOL  OF  AGRICULTURE 


AND 


expeeime:ntal  faem. 

FOR  THE  OFFICIAL  YEAR  ENDING  31st  DECEMBER,  1875. 


Ontario  School  of  Agriculture, 

GUELPH,  November  16th,  1874. 

To  the  Honourable  the  Commissioner  of  Agriculture  : 

Sir, — I  have  the  honour  of  submitting  to  you  the  following  Report  of  the  Ontario 
School  of  Agriculture  and  Experimental  Farm  for  the  official  year  beginning  1st  Novem- 
ber, 1874,  and  ending  31st  October,  1875,  being  the  first  regular  year  of  its  existence,  t 
shall  divide  it  into  the  six  foUowing^ections  : — 

A.  Introduction. 

1.  The  School. 

2.  The  Farm. 

.3.  The  Financi.^l  Statement. 

4.  Re-sults  and  Recommendations. 

5.  Appendices. 


A.  Introduction. 


Before  proceeding  to  record  the  operations  and  results  of  the  past  year's  work,  in 
order  to  understand  thoroughly  their  scope  and  aim,  it  may  be  well  to  call  to  remem- 
brance the  reasons  which  led  to  the  establishment  of  this  Institution,  the  ends  it  is  ex- 
pected to  secure,  and  the  manner  in  which  it  is  to  be  employed  in  order  to  accomplish 
those  ends. 

In  the  first  place,  then,  it  was  evident  to  the  most  cursory  observer  that  Canada  de- 
pended, and  would  be  obliged  for  many  years  to  depend,  largely,  if  not  exclusively,  on  her 
raw  produce  for  her  national  Avealth.  And  amongst  the  various  forms  of  raw  material 
none  were  so  valuable  as  those  included  under  the  head  of  agricultural  produce.  To 
observant  statosmen  it  was  plain  that  the  readiest  manner  of  increasing  the  national 
wealth   was    by   increasing   the    quantity    and    quality  of  that  produce.     But,  though 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  13.)  A.  1875 


plainly  seen,  it  was  not  so  easily  accomplished.  Precedent,  prejudice,  and  general  con- 
servatism stood  in  the  way..  Though  throughout  the  Province  there  was  a  powerful 
minority  of  intelligent,  enterprising,  and  successful  farmers  purging  an  improved  system 
of  cultivation,  yet  the  great  majority  were  depending  solely  on  increased  acreage  for  in- 
creased returns.  This  could  not  last,  and,  looking  to  the  near  future,  the  various  means 
of  producing  increased  returns  from  the  same  acreage  were  earnestly  discussed  by  thought- 
ful men  There  were  two  main  difficulties  in  the  way,  arising  from  two  different  classes 
of  agriculturists.  The  one  class,  like  the  earlier  settlers,  pursued  no  system,  followed  no 
fixed  rotation,  placed  in  and  took  out  what  the  land,  rich  or  impoverished,  afforded  them, 
and,  unaccustomed  to  consecutive  thinking,  blamed  the  seasons  or  Providence  for  the 
smaller  yearly  returns.  The  other  class  were  thoughtful,  intelligent  farmers,  well  able  to 
trace  the  relation  of  cause  and  effect  in  their  action  and  reaction  on  soil  and  crop  ;  well 
read — knowing  that  in  other  courktries  land  not  half  so  valuable  was  yielding  double  re- 
turns by  a  system  of  improved  farming.  The  means  of  improvement  they  knew,  but  how 
to  procure  them,  or  if  procured  adapt  them  to  this  country,  was  the  question.  Improved 
seeds,  improved  stock,  improved  methods  of  cultivation — all  were  wanted.  But  these  in- 
volved climatic  trial,  trial  involved  failures,  failure  involved  loss  of  capital,  and  the  capi- 
tal to  lose  few  in  this  new  land  possessed.  Here,  if  anywhere,  even  on  the  most  rigid 
grounds  of  political  economy,  was  a  sphere  for  indirect  governmental  action.  On  the  one 
hand  was  the  certainty  of  diminished  returns, ;  on  the  other  the  possibility  of  increased 
receipts.  To  make  the  certainty  an  impossibility,  and  to  make  the  possibility  a  certainty, 
the  government  took  indirect  action.  Thej'^  determined,  to  a  certain  extent,  to  meet  the 
■wants  of  the  second  class ;  and  if  not  the  desire,  at  least  the  results  of  the  action  of  the 
fir.st.  They  determined  that  with  regard  to  the  latter  it  should  not  be  the  fault  of  their 
rulers  if  the  sons  were  not  better  producers  than  their  fathers ;  and  with  regard  to  the 
former,  that  the  loss  incident  on  experiments  that  were  to  benefit  the  country  at  large 
should  be  borue  by  all  that  were  benefited  ;  and  that  the  intelligence,  enterprise  and 
energy  of  the  producer  should  be  spent  on  that  which  had  already  been  proved  successful. 
Those  were  the  reasons  for  the  establishment  of  such  an  Institution  as  this. 

Its  objects,  as  will  be  readily  seen  from  the  foregoing  statement,  must  be  twofold. 
It  must,  in  the  first  place,  teach  to  the  succeedii  ig,  if  not  the  present,  generation  the  most 
improved  methods  of  cultivation — in  one  word,  "  train  young  men  in  the  science  and  art 
of  improved  husbandry ;  "  and  in  the  second,  it  must  conduct  experiments  and  publish 
the  results. 

Finally,  the  manner  in  which  the  place  is  to  accomplish  those  ends  is  twofold  :  (1.) 
By  experimenting.  This  requires  that  a  certain  po^jjbion  of  the  farm  be  made  ready  as  an 
experimental  portion,  and  when  ready  be  used  as  such.  (2.)  By  teaching  :  And  that  in 
two  ways,  indirect  and  direct.  The  first  demands  that  as  youth  is  taught  almost  more 
by  example  than  by  precept,  that  the  farm  shall  be  made  in  every  conceivable  way  a 
"  model  farm,"  in  order  that  the  youths  may  absorb,  as  it  were,  by  attention  and  practice, 
the  methods  of  improved  cultivation  until  in  their  case  they  become  principles  of  action. 
The  second  demands  that  there  should  be  direct  teaching,  in  classroom  and  field,  of  every- 
thing relating  to  agriculture,  whether  those  requisites  be  theoretical  or  practical. 

Such  are  the  reasons  for,  such  the  ends  to  be  served  by,  the  existence  of  the  Ontario 
School  of  Agriculture  and  Experimental  Farm  ;  and  such  is  the  manner  in  which  that 
Institution  is  to  accomplish  those  ends. 

Descending  now  from  the  abstract  to  the  concrete,  allow  me  to  close  this  introduc- 
tion b}'  a  brief  description  of  the  instrument  to  be  used — the  farm  itself. 

The  farm  consists  of  part  of  lots  6,  7  and  8  in  the  1st  concession  ;  lots  6,  7,  8  and  9 
in  the  2nd,  3rd  and  4th  concessions  of  Division  G,  of  the  Township  of  Guelph,  together 
with  50  acres  in  the  Township  of  Puslinch,  all  in  the  County  of  Wellington.  It  contains 
exactly  550  acres.  It  is  situated  one  mile  and  a  half  from  the  centre  of  the  Town  of 
Guelph.  In  general  appearance  the  land  is  undulating,  the  farm  being  composed  of 
three  gently  rising  slopes  with  the  level  land  lying  between.  Beginning  from  the  east, 
the  first  slope  is  crowned  with  a  grove  of  trees  some  twelve  acres  in  extent,  the  second  by  the 
College  and  Farm  Buildings,  and  the  third  by  anotlw^r  grove  of  ten  acres,  lu  the  valley 
between  the  first  and  second  runs  the  macadamized  road  from  Guelph  to  Hamilton. 
From  the  road,  the  second  slope  gently  rises  until  the  Buildings  are  reached.     The  siiua- 

2 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  13.) 


A.  1875 


tion  is  in  every  respect  all  that  could  be  desired.  The  soil  m  ly,  in  general,  be  character- 
ized as  a  gravelly  loam,  varying  in  richness,  according  to  the  variations  of  the  subsoil, 
through  all  the  forms  of  gravelly  loam  inclining  to  gravel,  to  sand,  to  marl,  to  clay.  The 
variety  is  of  great  importance  for  the  purposes  to  which  it  is  to  be  placed. 

The  Institution  was  opened  on  the  1st  of  May.  1874,  and  last  year's  report  contains 
a  record  of  the  operations  both  of  the  School  and  Farm  up  to  the  1st  of  November  of  the 
same  year. 

I  shall  now  proceed  with  that  record,  and,  as  it  lies  more  immediately  in  my  way,  I 
shall  commence  with  the  School. 


I.  The  School. 
1.  In  the  Class-room. 


By  reference  to  last  year's  Report  it  will  be  seen  that  the  instruction  given  in  the 
class-room  during  the  fall  of  1874  wa«  based  on  no  fixed  plan,  but  consisted  of  two  daily 
lectures  delivered  by  myself — one  on  Botany  and  one  on  Practical  Agriculture.  The 
subjects  emljraced  in  those  lectures  will  be  clearly  seen  by  a  reference  to  the  papers  found 
in  Appendix  A,  the  questions  contained  in  which  were  answered  by  the  pupils  in  a  two 
days'  written  examination  held  immediately  before  Christmas  of  last  year. 

The  result  of  the  examination  was  highly  satisfactory,  and  encouraged  us  in  making 
greater  efforts  to  obtain  for  the  pupils,  especially  during  the  winter  months,  that  amount 
of  education  which,  owing  to  the  unfortunate  troubles  ofthe  spring  and  summer,  they  had 
been  unable  to  acquire.  Acting  on  the  recommendations  I  had  the  honour  of  making  to 
the  Commissioner  of  Agriculture  {vide  Keport  of  Commissioner  of  Agriculture  for 
1874),  the  School  was  during  the  (yhristm;is  vacation  thoroughly  organized  ;  the  curri- 
culum laid  down,  the  subjects  of  study  divided  into  distinct  departments,  and,  with 
some  difficulty,  a  lecturer  obtained  for  each  department.  By  the  1st  of  January,  1875,  we 
were  able  to  issue  the  circular  or  prospectus  containeil  in  Appendix  B,  which  may  be  given, 
as  it  explains — better  than  any  mere  description  can  do — not  only  the  basis  on  which 
the  class-room  instruction  has  since  been  conducted,  but  furnishes  in  a  compact  shape  all 
the  information  regarding  the  School  which  is  or  may  be  required. 

The  Winter  Term  opened  with  twenty-eight  pupils  in  attendance — all  that  could  be 
crowded  in.  They  came  from  widely  scattered  portions  of  the  Province,  and  were  of 
various  creeds,  as  the  following  tables  will  show  : — 


Counties. 


Brant 

Carleton 

Elgin  

Grey 

Halton 

Frontenac 

Lincoln 2 


Pupils. 

..  1 

..  1 

..  1 

..  1 

..  1 

..  1 


Counties.  Pupils. 

Northumberland 1 

Oxford 4 

Simcoe 2 

Renfrew 1 

Wentworth 1 

Wellington 2 

York 1 


Toronto  City..  3  Pupils. 

England 4     do. 

Nova  Scotia 1     do. 

Denomination. 

Episcopalian 14  do. 

Presbyterian...    10  do. 

Wesleyan  Methodist 2  do. 

Baptist 2  do. 

The  class-room  instruction  was  continuous  throughout  the  winter  months.  Dr. 
Baptie  and  myself  delivered  two  daily  lectures  each  on  the  subjects  of  Chemistry,  Physio- 
logy, Botany,  Zoology,  Book-keeping,  or  Mensuration. 

3 


39  Victoria.  vSessional  Papers  (No.  13.)  A.  1875 


Professor  Buckland  and  Dr.  Grange,   V.S.,  delivered  tri- weekly  lectures   on  Agricul- 
ture, and  the  Anatomy  and  Physiology  of  Farm  Animals. 

Rev.  Dr.  Burnet  gave  occasional  lectures  on  Horticulture. 

In  most  of  the  classes  there  were  daily  oral  and  monthly  written  examinations. 

The  great  majority  of  the  young  men  showed,  by  their  attention  to  lectures  and 
diligence  in  study,  that  they  were  both  willing  and  anxious  to  obtain  all  the  instruction 
that  could  possibly  be  afforded  them  during  the  time  they  remained  at  the  Institution.  At 
the  close  of  the  Winter  Term  the  students  were  subjected  to  a  rigid  written  examination 
extending  over  six  days.  The  papers  used  are  contained  in  Appendix  C.  They  are  given 
that  there  may  be  plainly  seen  both  the  details  of  the  subjects  on  which  lectures  were 
given,  and  the  standard  required  to  be  reached  at  the  end  of  the  first  year  of  the  course. 

Each  lecturer  examined  the  answers  of  the  students  on  his  own  particular  paper,  and 
according  to  the  results  of  those  answers  they  were  arranged  in  the  class-list  given  in 
Appendix  D.  Those  answering  over  75  per  cent,  of  the  questions  asked  on  each  paper 
are  in  the  first  class,  over  60  in  the  second,  and  over  40  in  the  third.  All  behind  40  are 
marked  with  an  asterisk.  From  those  lists  the  name  and  proficiency  of  each  student  can 
be  obtained.  Such  a  list  need  not  be  given  annually,  but  is  now  furnished  that  the  mode 
of  procedure  may  be  clearly  understood.  It  will  be  seen  that  whilst  a  few  fail  altogether, 
a  large  proportion  answer  more  than  half  the  questions  asked — showing  that  diligent  study 
had  given  them  an  intimate  acquaintance  with  the  various  subjects. 

The  examinations  closed  on  Wednesday,  the  14th  April.  On  Thursday,  the  15th, 
the  annual  closing  day  of  the  School  was  held.  There  were  present  the  Commissioner  of 
Agriculture,  the  representatives  of  the  press,  and  the  leading  local  agriculturists  to  the 
number  of  some  fifty  or  sixty.  The  prizes  were  distributed  to  the  successful  candidates, 
and  speeches  made  by  leading  men.  After  congratulating  the  lecturers  and  students, 
the  Commissioner  declared  the  School  closed  until  the  1st  of  May. 

It  may  be  appropriate  here  to  remark  that  at  this  meeting  we  were  favoured  with  the 
presence  and  assistance  of  Principal  Roberts.  Unfortunately  for  the  Institution,  as  well 
as  for  himself,  he  was  seized  during  the  next  week  with  an  illness  so  serious  that,  accord- 
ing to  medical  decision,  resignation  of  his  position  became  a  necessity.  It  was  accordingly 
tendered  and  accepted.  He  had  impressed  every  one  whom  he  met  in  a  favourable 
manner,  and  amid  expressions  of  desire  for  the  welfare  of  the  place  under  his  charge  were 
heard  on  every  side  congratulations  on  the  wisdom  of  the  Grovernment's  choice.  The 
Institution  received  a  blow  from  which  it  has  not  yet  recovered  by  the  sudden  and  dan- 
gerous illness  which  rendered  necessary  the  resignation  of  its  Principal. 

From  the  beginning  of  March  until  the  end  of  April  the  following  advertisement 
was  occasionally  inserted  in  a  few  of  the  leading  newspapers  : — 

"ONTARIO  SCHOOL  OF  AGRICULTURE. 

"  The  second  Preparatory  Term  of  this  Institution  will  commence  on  the  1st  of 
May,  when  thirty  .students  can  be  accommodated. 

"  The  new  Principal,  C.  Roberts,  Esq. — one  of  the  leading  agriculturists  of  England, 
Gold  Medallist  of  the  Royal  Agricultural  College — will  enter  upon  his  duties  by  the 
middle  of  April. 

"  The  School  is  now  temporarily  organized.  The  inside  departments  of  instruction 
are  : — 

"  Agriculture,    Horticulture,   Chemistry,   Natural  Sciences  except  Chemistry,  Veter- 
inary  Surgery   and  Practice,   Engli.sh  and  Mathematics. 

"The  outside  are: — The  Field,  the  lave  Stock,  the  Horticultural,   and  the  Mechani- 
cal. 
"  The  Principal  will  be  assisted  in  the  former  by  well-qualified  Lecturers  ;  in  the  lat- 
ter by  competent  Instructors. 

"  By  faithful  work,  outside  and  in,  a  student  can  pay  for  tuition,  board  and  wash- 
ing, and  leave  fifty  dollars  to  his  credit  at  the  end  of  the  year. 

"  For  particulars  regarding  terms  of  admission,  &c.,   &c.,   send   for  circulars  to  the 

4 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  13.)  A.   1875 


undersigned,  by  whom  applications  for  admission  will  be  received  until  the  15th  of  April. 
An  early  application  will  be  advantageous,  as  several  are  on  file. 

"  Wm.  Johnston, 
"  Rector  0.  S.  of  A. 
"  Guelph,  March  5th,  1875." 

On  the  1st  of  May  the  School  re-opened.  Ten  of  the  old  students  remained  for  a 
second  year's  course,  and  from  amongst  the  applicants  answering  the  above  advertisement 
as  many  had  been  selected  as  the  building  could  accommodate. 

Pending  the  appointment  of  a  Principal,  James  Laidlaw,  Esq.,  Warden  of  the 
County  of  Wellington,  was  appointed  Farm  Superintendent,  and  the  Rector  Acting  Prin- 
cipal. 

The  Spring  Term  extended  from  the  1st  of  May  until  the  middle  of  July.  During 
that  period  of  time,  the  students  were  in  the  forenoon  on  the  farm,  and  during  the  after- 
noon and  evening  in  the  class-room.  This  was  according  to  the  plan  adopted  of  spending 
during  the  Spring  and  Fall  Terms  one-half  of  the  time  in  the  class-room,  and  one-half  on 
the  farm,  whilst  in  the  winter  almost  all  the  time  was  to  be  spent  in  the  former,  and 
during  the  summer  on  the  latter. 

With  tlie  exception  of  the  gentleman  on  Horticulture,  the  same  lecturers  were  re- 
tained. Daily  lectures  were  delivered  by  Dr.  Baptie  and  myself  on  Chemistry,  Botany, 
Geology,  and  Agriculture  ;  and  triweekly  lectures  by  Professor  Buckland  and  Dr.  Grange, 
V.S.,  on  Agriculture  and  Veterinary  Materia  Medica  respectively.  Daily  oral  and 
monthly  written  examinations  were  held  as  before.  Of  course,  from  having  first  and  second 
years'  students,  a  double  number  of  lectures  became  requisite. 

At  the  end  of  the  Term  in  July  the  students  were  subjected  to  a  rigid  written  ex- 
amination on  the  subjects  embraced  in  the  lectures,  when  only  three  failed  to  pass,  and 
the  great  majority  showed  by  the  standing  attained  that  their  time  for  study  had  not 
been  misspent. 

In  the  summer,  class-room  instruction  was  discontinued,  the  students  being  steadily 
employed  on  the  farm. 

On  the  4th  of  October,  the  Fall  Term  of  the  Winter  Session  commenced.  De- 
pending on  the  contractor  finishing  the  mansard  story  at  present  being  placed  on  the 
main  College  building  by  his  specified  time,  the  1st  of  October,  promises  of  immediate 
admittance  had  been  made  to  a  few.  But,  unfoitun.ftely,  that  portion  of  the  building  is 
not  yet  quite  ready  for  occupation,  so  that  our  full  quota  of  forty  cannot  be  taken  in  for 
a  cou])le  of  weeks  at  least. 

The  number  now  in  attendance  is  thirty-two.  The  following  tables  show  the  sections 
of  the  Province  from  whence  they  come,  and  the  religious  denomination  to  which  they 
belong  : — 


Counties.  Pupils. 

Carleton  1 

Elgin 1 

Frouteuac 2 

H.dton ....  2 

Hastings 1 

Lincoln 1 

Oxford 4 


Coimties.  Pupils. 

Peterboro' 1 

Renfrew 1 

Wellington  6 

Wen  tworth 1 

Waterloo 2 

York 1 

Huntingdon,  P.Q 1 


Toronto  City 4  Pupils. 

England 3  do. 

Denomination. 

Episcopalian 14  do. 

Presbyterian 11  do. 

Wesleyan  Methodist 6  do. 

Plymouth  Brethren 1  do. 

5 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  13.)  A.  1875 


Dr.  Baptie  is  still  retained  as  Lecturer  on  Agricultural  and  Practical  Chemistry,  and  Dr. 
Grange,  VS.,  as  Lecturer  on  Veterinary  Surgery  and  Practice.  Owing  to  the  inability 
of  Professor  Buckland,  through  severe  illness,  to  undertake  his  former  work,  the  services 
of  William  Brown,  Esq.,  a  practical  farmer  and  an  agricultural  author  of  repute,  have 
been  secured  as  Lecturer  on  Practical  Agriculture.  Daily  lectures  are  now  delivered  to 
the  first  and  second  years'  classes  by  Dr.  Baptie,  Mr.  Brown  and  myself,  on  the  subjects 
of  Agricultural  Chemistry,  Practical  Agriculture,  and  Natural  History,  and  tri- weekly 
lectures  by  Dr.  Grange,  V.S.,  on  the  subjects  of  his  department. 

Having  now  the  advantage  of  a  fair  number  of  works  on  the  various  subjects  in  the 
Library,  the  students  seem  to  be  applying  themselves  with  fully  greater  zeal  than  before 
to  the  work  of  the  class-room. 

I  cannot  close  this  brief  record  of  the  lecture-room  work  for  the  year  without  refer- 
ring to  the  able  manner  in  which  the  several  lecturers  have  discharged  their  respective 
duties.  Rev.  Dr.  Burnet's  occasional  lectures  on  Horticulture  were  highly  appreciated  by 
the  students.  Dr.  Grange,  V.S.,  has  proved  himself  an  able  lecturer,  the  interest  mani- 
fested by  all  the  students  in  his  department  showing  the  power  he  possesses  of  awaken- 
ing the  sympathy  of  the  students  for  the  subjects  on  which  he  treats.  Dr.  Baptie  has 
amply  borne  out  here  the  character  which  he  obtained  in  Victoria  College  Medical  School 
as  a  thorough,  efficient  and  painstaking  lecturer  and  teacher.  His  attention  and  study 
being  now  turned  to  the  relation  of  Chemistry  to  Agriculture,  his  services  promise,  if  re- 
tained, to  be  simply  invaluable.  And  the  manner  in  which  Professor  Buckland  at  an 
advanced  age,  in  the  face  of  difficulties  which  would  have  daunted  the  majority  of  men, 
with  all  his  other  engagements  pressing  on  him,  without  the  desire  or  hope  of  fee  or  re- 
ward— indeed  refusing  both — at  once  stepped  into  the  breach,  and  coming  weekly  from 
Toronto,  gave  the  students  the  benefit  of  his  long  agi'icultural  experience  in  three  lec- 
tures each  successive  week,  is  beyond  all  praise,  and  certainly  merits  the  warmest  thanks 
of  every  friend  of  the  Institution. 

Summing  up,  then,  the  results  of  the  last  nire  months'  work  in  the  class-room,  it  may 
be  said  that  during  that  time  a  curriculum  has  been  laid  down,  the  subjects  of  study 
divided  into  distinct  departments,  a  regular  and  systematic  course  of  instruction  tested, 
its  success  practically  demonstrated,  and  a  basis  for  all  future  work  well  and  safely  laid. 
In  a  single  sentence,  the  School  has  been  thoroughly  organized,  and  through  all  its  de- 
partments is  now  running  without  a  jar  to  impede  its  progress. 

2k  On  the  Farm. 

The  departments  of  instruction  on  the  farm  are  four  in  number — the  Field,  the  Live 
Stock,  the  Horticultural  and  the  Mechanical.  The  foreman  over  each  of  those  depart- 
ments is  expected  to  perform  not  only  the  work  of  an  overseer,  but  likewise  that  of  a 
practical  instructor.  The  students  were  divided  into  four  relays,  which  were  alternated 
to  each  department.  Thus  every  student  became  practically  acquaintetl  with  the  various 
operations  going  on.  Each  instructor  was  provided  in  the  morning  with  the  names  of 
the  students  assigned  to  his  department  entered  in  a  pass-book,  which  he  returned  every 
evening?  with  the  number  of  hours'  employment,  the  rate  of  payment  for  each  hour,  and 
the  particular  kind  of  work  done  marked  opposite  each  student's  name.  These  items 
were  recorded  in  a  journal  kept  for  the  purpose.  A  ledger  account  was  opened  with 
each  pupil,  and  he  was  credited  at  a  maximum  rate  often  and  a  minimum  of  two  cents  for 
every  hour's  work,  according  to  quantity  and  quality,  the  foremen  being  the  judges.  A 
direct  incentive  was  thus  given,  not  only  co  work,  but  also  to  practical  learning,  for  with- 
out clearly  understanding  the  manner  how,  no  work  could  be  properly  done,  and  if  not  so 
done  payment  was  proportionally  less. 

The  instruction  received  can  be  better  described  under  the  heading  of  the  various 
departments. 

(1.)  TiiK  Field  Department. 

Little  couhl  be  learned  of  course  during  the  winter.  Each  student  was  made  prac- 
tically acquainted  with  the  mode  of  handling  an  axe  and  felling  trees — an  advantage  to 
many  of  them  hereafter  no  doubt.     Threshing  with  all   the  intricacies  of  horsepower, 

6 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  13.)  A.  1875 


separator,  &c.,  came  under  practical  review  whilst  the  majority  learned  to  handle  the  old- 
fashioned  flail.  As  the  spring  opened  up  field  work  began  to  accumulate,  and  instrnctiou 
therein  hastened  proportionally.  The  modes  of  preparing  the  land  for  different  crops  ; 
the  manures,  if  any,  used  ;  the  various  modes  of  applying  them,  were  all  seen  ;  and  the 
operations  consequent  thereon,  participated  in.  A  short  apprenticeship  to  ploughing, 
harrowing,  cultivating,  and  sowing  was  served  by  each.  The  beginiiing  of  various  kinds 
of  rotation  was  seen,  and  the  work  consequent  upon  the  carrying  out  of  a  general  plan 
understood. 

As  the  summer  came  on  the  preparation  of  the  land  for,  and  the  cultivation  of,  root- 
crops — carrot.s,  mangolds,  rape,  turnips — was  taken  part  in  by  all.  Draining  in  all  its 
phases  became  an  ordinary  business,  and  the  various  kinds  of  drains — mains  and  laterals 
— the  mode  of  construction,  depth,  inclination,  size  of  tiles,  manner  of  laying,  covering, 
&c.,  were  matters  of  every  day  experience.  Then  came  haying,  but  unfortunately  our 
hay-crop  proving  a  failure  little  could  be  learned  practically  in  the  hay-field.  The  mower 
however  in  all  its  details,  its  manner  of  working,  the  curing  and  storing  of  hay,  was  well 
understood  by  each.  In  the  harvest  i)roper,  a  pretty  thorough  apprenticeship  in  reaping, 
binding,  shooking,  drawing  in,  mowing  and  all  the  et  ceteras  was  served.  At  present  a 
lesson  in  the  manner  of  taking  up  and  storing  root-crops  is  being  taught. 

To  conclude  in  a  sentence,  in  all  the  ordinary  farm  operations  throughout  the  several 
seasons,  the  students  have  not  only  taken  an  active  part  but  been  instructed,  and  measures 
have  been  taken  to  see  that  whilst  the  hands  wei'e  busy,  the  eyes  were  not  closed  nor  the 
brain  idle,  but  that  the  reason  for  every  operation  was  as  clearly  understood  as  the  work 
itself  was  thoroughly  done. 

(2.)  Live  Stock  Department. 

The  winter  season  was  of  course  an  important  one.  With  thirty-six  head  of  fatten- 
iuii  and  twenty  of  store  cattle  in  the  stables,  some  eighty  of  fattening  and  twenty-five  of 
breeding  slieep  in  the  pens,  besides  six  pairs  of  horses,  it  will  be  readily  seen  that  the- 
manner  of  feeding  and  caring  for  stock  was  pretty  thorouglily  acquired.  The  methods  of 
cutting  hay  and  straw,  of  cutting,  slicing,  and  pulping  roots,  together  with  the  modes  of 
mixing  and  feeding  were  learned.  As  the  winter  advanced,  the  care  of  breeding  cows, 
ewes,  and  swine  became  an  object  of  attention  and  practical  study.  A  rather  large 
amount  of  disease,  principally  owing  to  the  severity  of  the  winter,  enabled  the  students 
to  see  the  ordinary  course  of  treatment  for  the  commoner  of  the  diseases  of  farm  animals. 
As  the  spring  advanced  the  caring  for  foals,  lambs,  calves,  and  litters  was  taken  part  in. 
The  selling  of  the  stock,  the  manner  thereof,  the  prices  obtained  were  noted  by  each,  and 
this  together  with  attemlance  at  the  monthly  fairs  for  which  Gruelph  above  all  the  other 
towns  in  Ontario  is  noted,  g;i-ve  a  fiiir  idea  of  the  trade  in  stock.  As  the  summer  came 
on,  tlie  care  of  stock  took  up  less  time  and  required  less  work.  But  practical  instructions 
were  received  by  the  students  in  the  shearing  and  hurdling  of  sheep,  and  the  soiling  and 
grazing  of  cattle.  As  the  farm  was  stocked  this  summer  with  sheep,  the  characteristics  of 
three  leadiiig  breeds  in  the  Province  were  brought  directly  under  the  notice  of  the  students 
whilst  the  characteristics  of  four  of  the  leading  breeds  of  cattle  were  obtained  partly  at 
home,  and  partly  by  visits  to  the  herds  of  the  leading  farmers  in  the  vicinity.  Consider- 
ing the  nature  of  youth,  it  may  be  useless  to  remark  in  conclusion,  that  of  all  the  kinds, 
of  instructions  on  the  farm  none  is  sought  after  with  greater  avidity  than  that  which 
leads  to  the  handling  of  horses,  cattle,  ifec,  and  in  no  branch  of  practical  husbandry  will 
instruction  be  easier  or  has  it  been  more  rapid  than  in  that  included  under  the  name  of 
Live  Stock. 

(3.)  The  Horticultural  Department. 

A  small  propagating  house,  with  a  smaller  work-shop  and  tool-house  attached, 
was  the  scene  of  the  winter's  operations  in  this  department.  Here,  however,  the 
students  became  acquainted  with  the  manner  of  propagating  and  forcing  plants.  The 
various  soils  used,  the  processes  of  cutting  and  budding,  the  insects  attacking  the  plants 
at  this  stage,  and  the  means  of  combatting  them,  the  caring  for,  selection,  and  arrange- 
ment as  regards  light  and  heat  were  all  learned.  They  were  also  engaged  in  the  con- 
struction of  various  kinds  of  rustic  work  forgarden  ornamentation,  and  learned  the  names 

7 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  13.)  A.  1875 


of  most  of  the  plants,  shrubs  and  trees  by  marking  labels  for  each.  As  the  spring  opened, 
the  construction  of  hotbeds,  the  making  of  compost-heaps,  the  pruning  of  the  various 
orchards  and  hedges,  grafting,  transplanting  of  plants,  trees  and  shrubs,  were  the  subjects 
of  practical  instruction.  With  warm  weather  came  the  preparation  of  the  soil  for,  and 
the  sowing  of  the  various  garden  vegetables,  beets,  carrots,  cabbage,  cauliflower,  cucum- 
bers, citrons,  celery,  parsnips,  tomatoes,  onions,  &c.,  &c.  ;  and  as  the  summer  advanced 
the  mode  of  culture  most  appropriate  to  each  was  learned.  The  pupils  were  also  in- 
structed in  the  methods  of  laying  out  flower  beds  and  borders,  preparing  the  soil  for,  and 
soM^ing  the  commoner  annuals,  the  transplanting  or  removing  of  biennials  and  perennials. 

The  insects  attacking  the  trees  and  jilants  together  with  the  modes  of  destroying 
them  were  practically  studied.  In  canying  out  the  plans  laid  down  last  fall,  a  great 
amount  of  road- making  had  to  be  done  this  summer.  In  laying  out,  grading  and  gravel- 
ling carriage  drives  and  garden  walks  all  took  an  active  part.  The  modes  of  gathering 
and  storing  the  usual  varieties  of  apples,  pears  and  other  fruits,  and  the  different  kinds  of 
garden  vegetables  has  just  been  learned,  and  the  students  are  now  engaged  in  preparing 
for  the  erection  of  a  greenhouse,  and  the  various  structures  connected  with  it,  so  as  to  be 
ready  when  the  spring  of  1876  opens. 

A  knowledge  of  garden  operations  sufficient  to  enable  the  students  to  cultivate  suc- 
cessfully and  profitably,  if  not  a  market,  at  least  a  kitchen  garden  has  been  obtained — a  know- 
ledge which  will  enable  them,  should  they  obtain  farms  of  their  own,  not  merely  to  add  to 
their  economical  resources  but  to  furnish  to  themselves  and  families  comforts  with  which 
many  of  our  farm  households  are  not  supplied,  simply  for  want  of  the  knowledge  requisite 
to  obtain  them. 

(4,)  The  Mechanical  Department. 

During  the  winter  the  students  learned  pretty  thoroughly  how  to  handle  every  species 
of  carpenters'  tools,  as  there  was  performed  a  quantity  of  inside  repairing  in  the  houses 
and  outbuildings,  which  had  been  specially  left  until  the  winter  season.  The  farm  and 
garden  implements  and  tools  needing  repair  were  thoroughly  overhauled,  their  principles 
of  construction  not  only  understood  but  practically  learned  by  their  assisting  in  repairing 
the  majority,  and  even  making  quite  a  few  of  them.  When  spring  came  the  general  re- 
pairs and  permanent  improvements  of  the  place  were  proceeded  with.  The  method  of 
making  hurdles,  building  gates  of  various  descriptions,  erecting  fences  of  different  kinds 
— board,  picket  and  wire — the  preparing  of  paints,  and  painting  in  various  colours  were 
learned  by  constant  practice.  There  are  few  of  those  who  have  been  here  for  tlie  last  six 
months  who  cannot  take  up  and  work  with  almost  any  kind  of  carpenter's  tool,  or  proceed 
to  repair  any  building,  gate,  fence,  or  the  woodwork  of  every  common  farm  implement  or 
tool. 

No  species  of  knowledge  is  more  urgently  required  by  the  majority  of  farmers  tlian 
this,  and  nothing  will  to  a  greater  extent  serve  the  purposes  of  economy  on  a  farm  than  an 
aViility  and  readiness  to  keep  everything  in  order  by  repairing  at  once  any  breakage  in 
house,  outbuilding,  fence  or  implement.  And  therefore  we  conceive  that  the  instruction 
received  in  this  de])artment  of  practical  work  whilst  popular  with  the  great  majority  of 
the  students,  is  likewise  beneficial — almost  indispensable — to  their  technical  training  as 
farmers. 

(A.)  Household,  Building,  &c. 

The  household  affairs  have  been  ably  conducted  under  the  care  of  the  efficient  house- 
keeper now  in  charge. 

The  conduct  of  the  students  has  been  excellent.  Violation  of  any  of  the  rules  and 
regulations  have  been  few  and  far  between.  Punctuality  at  morning  and  evening  ])rayers, 
at  roll-call  for  work,  at  meals  and  lectures  has  been  the  invariable  rule  to  which  only  now 
and  then  was  there  an  exception,  requiring  the  immediate  imposition  of  a  fine.  All  have 
attended  their  resjiective  churches  once  each  Sabbath — the  majority  twice.  All  have  been 
present  at  the  Rector's  bibh^-class  each  Sabbath  afternoon.  The  general  health  of  all  has 
been  good,  indeed  the  proportion  of  the  physical  and  the  intellectual,  together  with  a  regu- 


89   Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  13.)  A.  1875 


lated  diet  and  systematic  habits,  seems  above  almost  everything  else  to  produce  a  splendid 
j)hysique. 

A  laboratory  was  commenced  at  the  first  of  the  year — partly  by  purchase  from  the 
Depository  of  the  Education  Department,  partly  from  other  sources.  It  has  been  found 
very  useful — indeed  indispensable-— during  the  course  of  the  year. 

A  moderate  addition  has  been  made  to  the  library  by  purchases  from  Canada,  Brit- 
ain and  the  United  States.  Almost  the  only  useful  portion  before  was  presented  by  Pro- 
fessor Buckland. 

A  mansard  roof  has  been  placed  on  the  main  college  building,  giving  the  whole  struc- 
ture a  pleasing  appearance.     But  what   is   of  greater  consequence  than  appearance,  it 
increases  the  normal  accommodation  to  forty. 

At  its  meeting  in  July,  the  Executive  Committee  of  the  Agricultural  and  Arts  Asso- 
ciation for  Ontario,  ordered  that  the  sum  of  four  thousand  dollars  ($4,000),  which  had 
been  voted  at  a  previous  meeting,  should  be  directed  towards  the  erection  of  a  Veterinary 
School  Building,  for  the  Veterinary  Department  of  this  School — the  building,  when  com- 
pleted, to  be  handed  over  to  the  Government.  Plans  and  specifications  were  prepared, 
tenders  invited  and  accepted,  and  a  stone  building  forty  by  fifty,  in  height  two  stories  and 
a  basement,  is  in  the  course  of  erection,  and  will,  it  is  expected,  be  ready  for  occupation 
in  December. 

The  Reading  Room  has  been  supplied  during  the  year  with  the  following  papers  and 
periodicals  : — 

Toronto  Glohe  (daily);  Chicago  Live  Stock  Journal; 

"       Mail         "  Scientific  American ; 

Guelph  Mercury    "  Mark  Lane  Express  ; 

"       Herald       "  North  British  Agriculturist ; 

Canada  Farmer ;  Irish  Farmers'  Gazette  ; 

American  Agriculturist ;  Country  Gentleman 

And  the  following  periodicals  are  placed  every  Sabbath  on  fyle  : — 

Sunday  Magazine ;  Family  Treasury  ; 

Good  Wm-ds ;  Leisure  Hour ; 

Quiver ;  Sunday  at  Home. 

II.  The  Farm. 

It  must  constantly  be  borne  in  mind  that  the  Farm  is  at  present  in  a  transition  state. 
The  main  object  to  be  kept  in  view  is  not  so  much  the  raising  of  crops,  the  grazing, 
breeding  and  fattening  of  stock,  as  it  is  to  bring  the  Farm  into  shape  for  the  puiposes  of 
a  Model  and  Expertmental  Farm.  The  length  of  time  necessary  to  do  this  is  variously  esti 
mated.  I  have  placed  it  at  seven  years,  two  of  which  are  now  past,  leaving  five  years  yet 
to  complete  what  has  been  called  the  preparatory  term.  To  sum  up  in  a  single  word — 
the  end  now  sought  is  permanent  improvement.  In  order  to  accomplish  this  object  three 
things  were  to  be  done.  In  the  first  place,  the  whole  farm,  which  was  dirty  and  out  of 
order,  had  to  be  cleaned,  drained  and  put  into  shape.  In  the  second,  a  portion  was  to  be 
separated  from  the  rest,  and  set  apart  as  an  Experimental  Farm.  In  the  third,  the  re- 
maining portion  was  to  be  made  a  Model  Farm,  a  part  kept  for  garden  purposes,  and  each 
field  of  the  remainder  properly  enclosed  and  placed  into  some  particular  form  of  rotation. 

Little  of  this  was  done  in  1874.  It  was  the  1st  of  May  ere  work  was  begun  ;  and, 
as  there  had  been  no  fall  ploughing,  it  will  be  easily  understood  that  during  that  spring 
and  summer,  even  under  the  best  management,  no  great  amount  could  have  been  ac- 
complished. By  reference  to  last  year's  report,  the  amount  of  land  cultivated  can  be 
seen,  and  in  Table  E.  of  Appendix  E.  of  this  Report  the  amount  of  produce  raised  is 
given.  Suflace  it  to  say,  that  during  the  spring  of  1874  there  was  placed  under  cultiva- 
tion 175  acres.  During  the  summer  thirty  additional  acres  were  added,  making  in  all  205 
acres. 

At  the  close  of  the  season,  plans  were  laid  for  the  improvements  to  be  carried  out 
during  the  summer  of  this  year.     During  the  winter  months  the  labour  on  the  Farm  was 

9 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  13.)  A.   1875 


confined  to  the  usual  winter  routine  of  farm  work.  The  road  dividing  the  Farm  in  two 
was  carried  through  the  bush,  the  wood  cut  being  used  by  the  officers  and  the  employees  ; 
the  grain  was  threshed  and  the  stock  attended  to.  At  Christmas  17  head  of  cattle  were 
sold,  and  at  Easter  1  9  head  more.  In  January  68  sheep  were  likewise  sold.  The  prices 
obtained,  together  with  the  disposition  of  the  money,  will  be  seen  by  reference  to  Table 
E.  Plants  were  propagated  in  the  propagating  house  ;  and  in  the  shop  all  the  Farm  im- 
plements were  overhauled,  whilst  all  inside  repairs  were  performed.  Awaiting  the 
advice  and  assistance  of  the  new  Principal,  Charles  Roberts,  Esq.,  of  whom  mention  has 
already  been  made,  the  details  of  the  plans  for  the  spring  and  summer  work  were  not 
drawn'  out.  As  has  been  already  stated,  he  was  obliged  through  serious  illness  to  resign 
ere  he  had  been  a  single  day  in  charge.  This  sudden  change  necessitated  immediate  ac- 
tion. Accordingly,  temporary  arrangements  were  made  for  the  conduct  of  the  place  dur- 
ing the  season  ;  and  until  the  appointment  of  another  Principal,  I  was  requested  to  act  as 
Principal  of  the  School,  and  Mr.  James  Laidlaw,  Warden  of  the  County  of  Wellington, 
was  appointed  Superintendent  of  the  Farm  in  all  its  branches.  Though  undertaking  the 
duties  of  the  position  with  great  reluctance,  yet  no  sooner  was  Mr.  Laidlaw  put  in  charge 
than  he  entered  upon  his  work  with  zeal,  and  for  a  part  of  almost  every  day  since  his  ap- 
pointment he  has  been  on  the  place,  bringing  to  bear  his  thirty  years'  experience  as  a 
successful  practical  farmer  with  marked  results.  His  report  of  the  Farm  operations  during 
the  three  seasons  follows  : — 

Ontaeio  School  of  Agriculture, 

GuELPH,  November  16th,  1875. 
To  the  Honmable 

The  Commissioner  of  AgricuUwe. 

Sir, — I  have  the  honour  to  submit  my  report  of  the  farm  operations  of  this  place  for 

the  six  months  beginning  10th  May  and  ending  10th  November,  1875. 

When  t  took  charge  of  the  place,  it  was  plain  to  any  one  that  the  first  thing  to  be 
done  was  to  put  it  in  order.  It  had  to  be  cleaned,  the  fields  placed  into  a  regular  rota- 
tion, and  the  whole  changed  from  a  stock  to  a  mixed  farm.  Unsightly  fences  cut  up  and 
spoiled  the  appearance  of  the  gentle  slope  on  which  the  college  buildings  stood,  facing  the 
Dundas  Road.  Immediatfdy  past  the  buildings,  facing  the  same  road,  were  some  85  acres 
of  natural  pasture  lau'l,  dotted  over  with  stumps  and  small  swamps.  A  lawn  was  to  be 
laid  out  and  the  garden  enlarged.  Under  the  first  Principal,  the  money  appropriation 
for  the  purchase  of  stock  had  been  invested  in  buying  fattening  cattle,  These  had  been 
fattened  and  sold,-  and  the  nucleus  of  a  breeding  stock  purchased  in  the  shape  of  a  few 
Durhams,  grade  cows,  and  Cotswold  sheep.  The  plans  laid  down  were  carried  out  or 
modified,  as  seemed  to  me  for  the  best  interests  of  the  place.  What  has  been  done  can  be 
best  described  under  the  heading  of  each  of  the  four  Departments. 

(1.)  The  Field  Department. 

Here,  the  existing  cultivated  portion,  amounting  to  some  two  hurdred  acres,  was  as 
far  as  possible  to  be  cleajied,  each  field  to  the  best  of  our  ability  placed  under  a  regular 
rotation,  and  a  large  amount  of  the  old  pasture-land— and  it  was  almost  all  old — broken 
up.  To  accomplish  the  second  about  eighty  acres  were  seeded  down  ;  and  to  accomplish 
the  third,  forty-three  acres  were  broken  up  in  the  spring.  To  this  has  been  added  twenty- 
five  out  of  our  forty-one  acres  of  summer  fallow,  making  in  all  sixty-eight  acres  broken 
up.  There  was  on  the  place  thirty  acres  of  fall  wheat,  all  of  which,  with,  the  exception  of 
eight,  was  winter-killed,  and  ha<l  to  be  re-sown.  There  was  placed  under  grain  crop  the 
following  acreage  : — 

Barley 5b  acres. 

Wheat 19         " 

Oats 42         " 

Peas 41  " 

Total  number  of  acres  in  grain    158       " 

10 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  13.)  A.  18"& 


Immediately  on  these  being  sown,  attention  was  turned  to  the  root  crop.  The  barn- 
yard manure,  of  which  there  was,  from  the  quantity  of  feeding  cattle,  a  large  amount,  was 
placed  on  the  turnip-field  together  with  manure  of  other  descriptions.  There  was  placed 
under  root  crop  the  following  acreage  : — 

Potatoes 4  acres. 

Carrots 1^         " 

Mangolds l|         " 

Turnips 23         " 

Total  number  of  acres  in  roots    30 

There  was  likewise  sown  as  forage  crop : —  • 

Rape 15       acres. 

Corn 4 

OatsandTares .,  ...     3         " 

Total 22 

If  to  the  acreage  of  these  several  crops  be  added  forty  of  hay,  the  total  number  of 
acres  under  cultivation  will  be  seen.  That  number  is  2.50.  To  this  add  twenty-six  acres 
of  usual  pasture  land,  and  276  acres,  or  the  available  land  for  crop,  is  obtained.  From  this 
simple  statement  it  will  be  seen  that  a  considerable  amount  of  labour  is  yet  in  store. 

The  crops  promised  an  excellent  yield  until  the  dry  weather  set  in,  but  the  drought 
seriously  affected  returns.  x-Vn  early  frost  at  the  beginning  of  June  made  such  havoc  of 
our  timothy  that  when  hay-time  came  we  cut  offforty  acres  of  land  buttwenty-five  tons  of  hay. 
The  majority  of  the  other  crops  turned  out  well.  None  of  the  grain  is  yet  threshed,  but 
a  tolerably  close  approximation  can  be  made  as  to  the  total  ri'sult.  By  reference  to  Table 
F.  of  Appendix  E.  it  will  be  seen  that  the  number  of  bushels  of  each  crop  is  estimated  as 
follows  : — 

Barley 2200  bushels. 

Peas 1200 

Oats 1600 

Wheat 300 

Potatoes 150 

Carrots 200 

Mangolds    400 

Turnips 12000 

Barley  was  good,  but  one  half  slightly  discoloured  from  the  wet  weather.  Fall  wheat 
a  failure — almost  nothing.  Spring  wheat  a  good  crop  ;  good  sample.  Peas  a  large  crop. 
Oats  an  average  crop.  Potatoes  a  failure,  owing  to  the  attacks  of  the  Colorado  beetle, 
but  more  especially  to  a  blight  which  prevailed  over  this  section  of  country.  Carrots  a 
poor,  mangolds  a  fair  crop.  Turnips  above  an  average.  The  rape  was  a  fine  crop,  car- 
rying over  160  fattening  sheep. 

During  the  summer  and  fall,  draining  operations  have  been  extensively  carried  on. 
Three  main  drains,  running  at  angles  across  the  width  of  the  farm,  the  first  260,  the  se- 
cond 216,  and  the  third  1 16  rods  in  length, have  been  opened'out.  These  with  their  laterals, 
when  fully  completed,  will  drain  the  greater  portion  of  the  farm.  It  was  thought  advisable 
to  place  those  laterals  only  in  the  parts  where  they  were  most  urgently  needed,  leaving  the 
rest  of  the  draining  to  be  gradually  carried  out.  And  they  were  placed  in  likewise  at  wide 
though  regular  ijitervals,  in  order  to  save  expense  should  they  be  found  sufficient  for  the 
purpose  intended  ;  if  not,  others  can  be  placed  between,  as  a  regular  map  has  been  kept  of 
every  field  drained,  with  the  position  of  each  drain.  In  the  heaviest  of  the  three,  which 
drains  an  area  of  fully  one  hundred  and  fifty  acies,  a  six  and  a  four  inch  tile  was  placed 
side  by  side,  as  the  stream  of  water  to  be  carried  out  by  it  had  filled,  during  the  spring 
months,  an  open  ditch,  fully  a  foot  deep  with  water.  The  second  and  third  mains,  laid 
with  six  inch  tile,  have  been  left  open  for  a  considerable  distance  from  the  mouth  in  order 

11 


d9  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  13.) 


A.  1875 


that  it  may  be  seen  whether  the  tile  is  sufficient  to  carry  off  the  flow  of  water.  The  aver- 
age depth  of  those  mains  can  be  seen  from  the  statement  given  below.  Seams  of  various 
kinds  of  soil  were  cut  at  that  depth,  but  none  gave  any  trouble  except  the  quicksand 
which  was  met  with  here  and  there.  In  that  case  every  care  was  taken  to  make  the  drains 
secure.  Boards  were  laid  at  the  bottom  of  the  drains,  and  the  tiles  placed  on  those. 
The  tiles  were  securely  cohered  either  with  inverted  sods  and  straw,  or  both.  A  suffi- 
cient number  of  laterals  to  carry  off  all  superfluous  water  has  been  laid  in  forty-seven 
acres.  The  following  statement  has  been  drawn  out  to  show  the  average  cost  per  rod  of 
the  various  drains  opened,  with  the  different  sizes  of  tile  used.  By  means  of  it  any 
farmer,  in  any  portion  of  the  country,  will  have  at  leas'^  an  approximate  idea  of  what  any 
piece  of  draining  he  may  require  to  be  done  will  be  worth  by  the  rod.  The  prices  of  the 
various  description  of  tile  are  about  the  same  in  all  the  yards  over  the  Province,  and 
the  nearer  the  manufactory  the  cheaper  the  tile.  As  for  ourselves,  our  nearest  yard  was 
at  a  distance  of  twenty-six  miles,  and  the  cost  of  the  tile  laid  down  at  Guelph  Station  was 
$62  for  6-inch,  $22  for  4-inch,  $16  for  3-inch,  and  $10  for  2-inch.  The  following  state- 
ment shows  the  number  of  rods  laid,  the  size  of  tile  used,  the  cost  per  rod  at  various 
depths  and  sizes,  and  the  total  amount  spent  up  to  31st  October  : — 


No.  of  rods. 

Species  of  tile. 

Average  depth. 

Av.  price  per  rod. 

Total  cost. 

261 

144 

6-inch  and  4-incn. 
6-inch. 
4     " 
3     " 
2    " 

4  feet  8  inches. 
4    "    6      " 
3    "    9      " 
3    "    1      " 
3    " 

$2.38 

1.95 

1.00 

65 

50 

$621  18 
280  80 

196 

196  00 

544 

150 

353  60 
75  00 

S1526  58 


The  teams  have  been  turned  in  to  assist  in  various  species  of  permanent  improvements, 
and  the  process  of  filling  up  and  gravelling  the  Farm  road,  together  with  the  ordinary  farm 
work  will  occupy  the  time  pretty  faiily  during  the  winter.  It  will  take  a  few  years 
before  the  several  fields  will  be  cleaned  sufficiently,  and  put  into  such  rotation  that  the 
placemay  properly  deserve  the  name  "model;"  but  if  the  grass  sown  stands  the  winter, 
a  basis  has  been  laid  on  which,  with  proper  planning  and  application,  that  desirable  end 
may  eventually  be  attained. 

(2.)  The  Live  Stock  Department. 

As  I  have  already  stated,  the  fattening  stock  had  been  replaced  by  the  nucleus  of  a 
breeding  stock  when  I  was  appointed.  Besides  this,  two  additional  pairs  of  horses  had 
been  purchased  in  the  spring  of  1875.  As  there  was  a  large  amount  of  pasture  to  be 
consumed,  which  would  naturally,  except  the  season  was  a  moist  one,  die  out  in  July,  the 
two  or  three  head  of  fattening  cattle  still  remaining  were  sold  off,  and  some  180  head  of 
fattening  sheep  bought  and  turned  on  to  this  pasture.  To  subsidize  the  pasture  from  the 
month  of  August,  15  acres  of  rape  were  sown.  Those  sheep  cost  on  an  average  $4.45 
per  head,  and  will  average  double  the  money  at  the  lowest  calculation  when  sold.  But  it 
was  jjlain  that  what  was  wanted  was  to  stock  the  place.  The  money  granted  was  not 
sufficient  to  do  this  thoroughly.  One  cow — Louan  of  Brant  the  fifth — of  the  famous  Louan 
tribe,  was  purchased  by  the  Hon.  Mr.  McKellar,  and  added  to  our  herd  of  Durhams.  The 
remainder  of  the  appropriation,  after  paying  for  her  and  the  horses,  was  invested  in  breed- 
ing sheep.  It  was  hardly  sufficient  to  stock  the  place  thoroughly,  even  in  that  one  line, 
and  we  were  obliged  slightly  to  curtail.  The  three  best  breeds  have  been  chosen  as  a 
beginning.     There  are  now  of  each  of  those — 

34  Cotswold  Ewes  and  one  Ram. 
12  Leicester  Ewes  and  one  Ram. 
12  Southdown  Ewes  and  one  Ram. 
Some  of  these  are  imported,  and  what  are  not  are  from  the  very  best  home  flocks. 
If  to  the  stock  at  present  on  the  farm  were  added  a  few  additional  Durhams,  a  male 
and  two  females  of  each  of  the  following  breeds — Herefords,  Ayrshires,  and  Devons — the 

12 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  13.)  A.  1875 


Farm  would,  in  my  humble  judgment,  be  pretty  thoroughly  stocked  with  breeding  cattle. 
The  prevailing  herd  should,  however,  undoubtedly  be  the  Durham,  of  which  a  male  and  four 
females  should  be  purchased.  To  these  should  be  added  a  male  and  two  females  of  the 
various  principal  breeds  of  swine,  as  there  is  nothing  but  three  Berkshire  sows  and  one 
Berkshire  boar  on  the  place.  The  principal  varieties  of  poultry  should  likewise  be  pro- 
cured. 

(3.)  Horticultural  Department. 

In  this  department  the  greater  portion  of  the  labour  has  been  spent  on  permanent 
improvements  rather  than  on  gardening.  Had  the  latter  been  the  main  object,  a  market 
would  have  to  be  sought,  as  the  house  is  by  no  means  able  to  consume  all  the  produce 
raised  in  the  garden.  As  it  is,  the  house  is  charged  with  [more  than  it  really  requires. 
The  old  garden  of  about  three  acres  was  continued,  and  other  two  brought  under  cultiva- 
tion. Both  were  laid  out  in  plots,  and  the  usual  routine  of  garden  vegetables  planted. 
As,  however  the  old  garden  is  too  full  of  fruit  trees,  the  site  of  the  garden  has  been 
changed,  and  the  old  site  will  henceforward  be  used  as  an  orchard  for  small  fruits. 

The  following  may  be  taken  as  the  produce  of  the  kitchen  garden  : — 

Apples 125  Bushels, 

Asparagus 132  Bunches. 

Beans 7  Bushels. 

Beets 46       do. 

Cabbage 5,100  Heads. 

Cauliflower.. 300     do. 

Carrots 220  Bushels. 

Cucumbers 500 

Celery 1,020  Heads. 

Lettuce 150  Bunches. 

Onions....  21  Bushels. 

Parsnips  51       do. 

Pea.s  (Early)  23       do. 

Pears 4       do. 

Plums  4       do. 

Potatoes 120       do. 

Rhubarb 140  Bunches. 

Tomatoes 5       do. 

Besides  Melons,  Squashes,  Spinach,  Radishes,  &c.,  &c. 

The  fruit  crop  was  light,  and  it  is  difficult  for  us  to  secure  it,  owing  amongst  other 
reasons  to  our  proximity  to  a  town.  Ai)ples  were  poor  ;  trees  blighted.  Pears  a  fair  crop. 
Plums  better  than  usual.  Our  currants,  gooseberries  and  strawberries  are  things  of  the 
future. 

The  vegetable  garden  was,  on  the  whole,  a  decided  success.  It  presented  a  fine  ap- 
pearance, bordered  as  it  was  by  flowers.  Cabbage  and  Cauliflower  successful,  Carrots 
average.  Parsnips  average,  Onions  good  ; — and  without  enumerating  all,  I  may  say  in  a 
word  that  everything  that  work  and  skill  could  do  was  done,  and  if  the  dry  weather 
affected  some  species  more  than  others  the  misfortune  was  not  ours  alone.  Taken  as  a  whole, 
the  produce  of  four  acres  has  been  very  satisfactory. 

But,  as  I  have  before  intimated,  the  main  strength  has  been  placed  on  permanent  im- 
provements. Two  carriage  drives,  each  72  rods  in  length  describing  similar  arcs — lead- 
ing approaches  from  the  Dundas  Road — have  been  constructed,  graded  and  gravelled. 
Upon  the  two  have  been  placed  925  cubic  yards  of  gravel.  The  material  was  found  on 
our  own  place,  and  the  work  has  been  performed  by  the  gardener  and  his  class.  The 
two  acres  of  garden  taken  in  have  been  cleaned  and  levelled.  The  orchard  has  been 
cleaned  of  sod  and  weeds,  and  seeded  down.  The  field  in  front  of  the  buildings  has  been 
sown  with  lawn  grass.  Another  kitchen  garden  of  five  acres  has  been  laid  ofi"  and  en- 
closed. Facing  the  road,  ditches  have  been  cut,  and  sidewalks  graded,  levelled,  and 
where  requisite  gravelled.     Maples  have  been  planted  around  the  lawn  and  garden,  and 

13 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  13.)  A.  1876 


evergreens  along  the  sides  of  the  carriage  drives.     Excavation  for  a  greenhouse  and  fruit" 
house  is  now  being  proceeded  with. 

From  this  bare  record  it  will  readily  be  seen  that  more  than  one-half  of  the  work  has 
been  spent  on  permanent  improvements  ;  in  other  words,  bringing  into  shape  the  twenty 
acres  lying  in  front  of  the  place,  for  the  purposes  of  lawn  and  gardens.  As  on  the  farm  the 
raising  of  crops  has  not  been  the  main  end  kept  in  view,  so  in  the  garden  the  primary 
object  has  been  rather  to  make  a  garden  than  to  raise  plants  and  vegetables. 

(4.)  Mechanical  Department. 

As  soon  as  the  spring  opened,  outside  work  commenced  in  this  department.  The  va- 
rious implements  had  been  made  ready  for  use.  The  several  houses  on  the  place  were 
attended  to,  and  are  now  in  shape  for  four  or  five  years  at  least.  The  barns,  stables 
and  outbuildings  generally  next  received  attention,  and  all  needed  repairs  were  performed. 
Some  sixty  hurdles,  sheep-racks,  feed-boxes,  and  a!)  other  appliances  required  in  the  graz- 
ing and  feeding  of  stock  were  constructed.  A  picket  fence  200  rods  long,  and  a  straight 
board  fence  1 44  rods  in  length,  have  been  built.  A  wire  fence  70  rods  in  length  is  now 
in  process  of  erection.  As  these  fences  enclose  the  lawn  and  gardens,  not  only  had  greater 
care  to  be  taken  in  building,  but  the  number  of  entrances  absolutely  necessary  required  a 
proportionate  number  of  gates  and  surroundings.  The  carpenter  and  his  class  are  busy 
at  present  in  the  erection  of  a  fruit-house  and  workshop  for  the  garden,  both  to  be  here- 
after attachments  of  a  greenhouse  and  conservatory. 

As  a  considerable  portion  of  the  carpenter  work  of  the  Veterinary  School  building 
is  to  be  performed  by  them,  there  will  be  no  lack  of  work  during  the  winter.  A  glance 
will  show  that  all  work  in  this  department  comes  under  the  head  of  Repairs  or  Perma- 
nent Improvements —by  far  the  greater  portion  under  the  latter. 

I  may  say,  in  conclusion,  that  with  the  money  and  material  at  hand  a  fair  amount  of 
work  has  been  accomplished  ;  that  a  good  start  has  been  made  in  overcoming  the  work  of 
a  six  years'  plan  ;  that  if  during  the  next  five  years  as  much  land  is  improved  and  work 
done,  the  place  will  in  some  slight  measure  deserve  the  title  of  a  "  Model  Farm."  A  small 
portion  is  now  ready  for  the  purposes  of  an  Experimental  Farm,  and  I  would  advise  that 
plans  be  formed  and  purchases  made  this  winter  with  that  end  in  view,  in  order  that 
next  year  a  carefully  compiled  report  on  experiments  will  be  added  to  any  that  may  be 
given,  similar  to  my  own,  on  improvements. 

I  have  the  honour  to  be. 

Your  obedient  servant, 

(Signed)  J.oiES  Laidlaw, 

Farm  Superintmdent. 


III.  Financial  Statement. 

This  is  given  in  the  several  tables  of  Appendix  E.  Table  A.  shows  the  expenditure  of 
the  Institution  for  the  ten  months  out  of  the  appropriation  voted  by  parliament ;  it  in- 
cludes both  Farm  and  Scliool.  Some  of  the  items  are  abnormal.  The  items  under  the 
heading  of  the  "Farm  Department"  are  wholly  so.  During  the  first  spring  of  the 
Farm's  existence  no  first-class  seed  from  a  different  section  of  country  had  been  pur- 
cliased.  This  was  done  last  spring.  A  large  amount  of  repairs,  almost  though  not 
altogether  in  the  shape  of  permanent  improvements,  had  likewise  to  be  made.  B  )th 
were  A  first  charge,  and  b  .>th  items  can  now  be  struck  out  of  appropriation  items,  and 
charged,  as  is  done  in  Table  F.,  to  Expenditure  out  of  Farm  Income.  In  the  Horti- 
cultural Department  likewise  "  plants  and  seeds  "  had  to  be  purchased  this  spring,  as 
it  were,  for  the  first  tira.;  ;  but  now,  by  propagating  plants,  and  to  a  large  extent  pro- 
ducing our  own  seeds,  that  item  can  be  struck  out,  and,  with  the  exception  of  what 
goes  into  the  capital  account  as  permanent  improvements,  in  th<;  shape  of  fruit  trees,  &c., 
the  amount  of  this  item  will  hereafter  be  charged  against  Garden  Income.     The  item 

14 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  13.)  A  1875 


of  "  Bonus  to  Pupils,"  it  is  to  be  hoped,  will  likewise  prove  an  abnormal  one,  and  in 
another  year,  when  the  advantages  of  the  School  are  better  placed  before  the  farming 
community,  be  done  away  with  altogether. 

Those  abnormal  items  excluded,  there  will  remain  but  the  cost  of  maintaining  the 
House,  the  Business  Department  and  the  School.  What  is  wanted  then  is  to  arrive  at 
a  satisfactory  basis  for  estimating  the  cost  of  maintaining  each  of  those.  Taking  the  first 
two  items  of  "Food"  and  "Household  Expense,"  which  includes  all  under  the  House, 
there  is  to  be  struck  out  the  expense  of  the  Principal  and  lady  during  a  six  weeks' 
illness  of  the  former,  the  cost  of  board  for  extra  lecturers,  and  the  cost  of  rei>airs  inci- 
dent on  changes  for  Principal's  jesidence.  There  is  to  be  added  the  wages  of  the  Matron 
and  her  servants.  This  being  done,  there  is  given  the  sum  of  $2,704  27.  To  this  add 
the  cost  of  the  fruit  and  vegetables  sujiplied  by  the  garden,  and  there  is  found  to  be  some 
$3,000  as  the  total  expenditure,  or  a  little  over  $100  as  the  cost  of  maintaining  each  stu- 
dent for  ten  mouths — say  $125  for  the  twelve  months.  Were  the  number  one  hundred, 
instead  of  thirty,  the  individual  cost  would  of  course  be  less.  It  is  slightly  greater  than 
in  the  majority  of  our  other  public  institutions  ;  but  then  the  class,  the  age,  and  the  oc- 
cupation of  the  students  is  far  diflferent,  and  when  these  are  taken  into  consideration,  the 
amount  can  certainly  not  be  considered  extravagant.  As  a  basis  for  estimating  the  House 
expenditure,  one  hundred  and  thirty  dollars  at  the  outside  may  then  be  taken  as  the  ave- 
rage cost  of  maintaining  each  pu))il. 

The  amount  paid  in  the  Business  Department  last  year,  and  the  amount  asked  for 
next  year,  are  both  $200  above  the  normal  expenditure,  owing  to  the  necessity  of  issuing 
a  prospectus,  &c.,  and  otherwise  advertisiug  the  place.  Adding  to  the  $400  left  $800,  as 
a  fair  portion  of  the  salary  of  the  individual  rejoicing  in  the  ecclesiastical  title  of  Rector, 
and  we  have  $1,200  per  annum  as  the  normal  expense  of  the  Business  Department. 

The  cost  of  the  School  Department  of  expenditures  depends  entirely  on  the  staff  kept, 
and  that  is  a  matter  the  decision  of  which  must  be  left  to  other  hands  than  mine.  AVhat 
is  thought  requisite  may  be  seen  by  reference  to  Table  B. 

Looking  at  this  table  it  will  be  seen  that  the  only  one  of  what  is  called  abnormal 
Items  continued  is  that  entitled  "  Bonus  to  pupils,"  Avhich  it  is  hoped  will  be  shortly 
abolished.  However,  as  all  the  students  here  have  entered  under  the  old  regime,  it  must 
be  continued  for  this  year.  The  number  of  pupils  provided  for  is  forty,  and  the  aveiage 
cost  of  maintaining  each  pupil  taken  at  the  aforesaid  amount  of  $130,  to  which  total  has 
been  added  $600  for  repairs  and  incidentals.  The  former  is  asked  for  enlarging  the  wash- 
room, relaying  water  pipes  and  repairing  generally. 

In  considering  the  amount  under  the  heading  of  capital  account,  the  plan  on 
which  the  amounts  asked  for  is  based  must  be  thoroughly  lunderstood.  In  the  first 
place  it  is  considered  that  it  will  r«quire  five  years  more  to  put  the  place  into  shape  for 
the  purposes  of  a  model  and  experimental  farm,  and  thai  the  amount  of  capital  to  be 
spent  in  doing  this  will  not  be  less  than  $15,000.  Hence  the  sum  of  $3,000  will  be  asked 
for  yearly  for  this  purpose.  Again  it  is  thought  by  competent  judges  that  the  lowest  sum 
with  which  the  place  can  be  stocked  in  addition  to  what  we  have  is  $10,000.  Six  thous- 
and of  that  is  asked  for  this  year,  leaving  $4,000  yet  to  be  required.  If  the  principal 
herd  is  Durham  that  sum  will  certainly  not  be  extravagant. 

At  the  end  of  five  years  then  the  place  may  be  left  to  itself  to  pay  for  everything 
which  may  be  required.  It  will  then  pay  for  labour,  repairs,  seeds,  and  interest  on  capi- 
tal outlay.  All,  but  the  last  and  perhaps  a  little  of  that  it  will  pay  from  this  year  hence- 
forward. 

There  remains  an  item  on  "  no  man's  land,"  viz.  : — that  of  experiments.  In  any 
case,  this  will  always  have  to  be  provided  for  by  appropriation. 

If  this  preparatory  term  last  for  five  additional  years,  as  tlie  best  practical  men  say 
it  must,  at  the  end  of  that  period  it  is  not  too  much  to  expect  that  the  place  will  have  be- 
come so  fully  known,  and  if  rightly  conducted  the  benefits  to  be  conferred  by  it  so 
thoroughly  appreciated,  that  parents  sentling  their  sons  will  at  least  pay  for  their  board  ; 
and  that  the  farm  will  hate  been  placed  in  such  condition  that  all  but  the  experimental 
portion  will  be  self-sustaining.  At  the  end  of  that  period  the  country  will  have  to  pay 
only  the  salaries  of  the  staff,  and  the  cost  of  experiments. 

During  those  five  years  however  an  annual  ouiday  will  have  to  be  made  in  what  may 

15 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  13.)  A.  1875 


be  called  section  No.  one  of  capital  account.  In  section  No.  two — "  building  "  all  work 
either  completed  or  contemplated  goes  into  a  general  plan.  During  the  present  year  the 
Veterinary  School  Building  has  been  erected  as  one  of  the  wings  of  a  main  building  24:0 
feet  long  of  which  the  present  College  Building  will  be  the  centre.  The  most  of  $13,000 
asked  for  next  year  is  for  the  erection  of  a  Principal's  residence  to  form  the  second  wing 
of  the  proposed  building. 

Tables  C.  and  D.  require  little  explanation.  It  will  readily  be  seen  that  the  stock 
requires  replenishing  in  the  direction  of  cattle,  pigs  and  poultry.  As  the  farm  grows  by 
bringing  a  greater  number  of  acres  under  cultivation,  a  greater  number  of  implements 
will  be  required  than  those  mentioned  in  Table  D.  But  the  farm's  income  should  be  in  a 
proportionate  ratio  to  its  growth,  so  that  all  such  could  be  purchased  out  of  it. 

Two  or  three  items  require  explanation  in  Table  E.  The  first  section  under  the  head 
of  income  is  plain.  It  represents  the  produce  of  some  180  acres,  all  that  could  be  brought 
under  tillage  owing  to  the  lateness  of  taking  possession.  The  full  amount  of  section  No. 
two  should  not  properly  be  charged  to  farm's  income.  There  must  be  substracted  fro  m  it 
the  cost  of  the  cattle  which  was  $1,998.  By  reference  to  the  expenditure  account  it  will 
be  seen  that  $2,660  23  worth  of  stock  has  been  purchased.  The  diflference  between  this 
and  $1,998  or  $662  03  shows  the  amount  actually  invested  in  stock  out  of  the  farm  in- 
come. The  amount  paid  for  feed  and  fodder  was  abnormal,  and  was  owing  in  the  first 
place  to  the  lateness  of  occupation  requiring  fodder  to  be  bought  to  supply  the  place  of 
that  which  might  otherwise  have  been  grown,  and  in  the  second  place  to  the  necessity  of 
investing  in  fodder  to  fatten  the  cattle  purchased  to  a  paying  point. 

The  second  part  of  Table  E.  does  not  represent  the  produce  of  the  garden  for  this 
year,  but  the  amount  stored  last  fall,  and  the  amount  consumed  this  summer.  To  this 
latter  may  be  added  the  amount  stored  this  fall,  and  there  will  be  found  to  be  the  total 
described  before  in  the  Horticultural  Department. 

Table  F.  shows  the  disposition  to  be  made  of  the  income  expected  to  be  derived  from 
the  produce  at  present  lying  unthreshed  in  the  barns  together  with  the  stock  fattening  in 
stables  and  pens.  It  comes  under  the  various  heads  of  "  purchase  of  fattening  c  attle," 
"  labour,"  "  supply,"  "repairs,"  and  "  seeds."  A  different  disposition  may  be  made  by  a 
new  Principal,  but  there  is  little  doiibt  that  the  farm  will  pay  all  the  charges  coming  under 
those  heads  of  expenditure. 

For  further  particulars  reference  must  be  made  to  the  detailed  accounts  of  the  farm. 
The  greatest  diflSculty  in  adjusting  those  accounts  is  in  fixing  the  amount  to  be  paid  for 
students'  labour  and  sinking  fund  requisite  to  cover  capital  outlay.  Another  year's  ex- 
perience will  enable  us  however  to  firmly  establish  a  basis  on  which  to  settle  those  mat- 
ters, and  all  others  include^  under  the  terms — "  farm  income  and  expenditure." 


IV.   Results  and  Recommendations. 

In  order  that  the  results  of  the  year's  operations  may  be  fairly  judged,  it  will  be 
necessary  to  recall  the  objects  for  which  the  Institution  was  established,  and  the  manner 
in  which  it  was  to  be  used  in  order  to  accomplish  those  ends.    Those  objects  were  :-  - 

(1)  Teaching. 

(2)  Experimenting. 

And  the  manner  in  which  they  were  to  be  accomplished  was  threefold  : — 

(1)  An  Experimental  Farm  was  to  be  made. 

(2)  A  Model  Farm  was  to  be  made. 

(3)  A  School  was  to  be  organized. 

Let  us  look  more  closely  at  what  tlie  latter  uieans.  In  the  first  place,  then,  a  part  ol 
the  farm  must  be  cleaned — freed  from  weeds  and  stones — the  relative  qualities  of  tlie  soi, 

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39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  13.)  A.  1875 


noted  by  analysis  and  experiment — divided  into  plots,  and  made  ready  for  experiments. 
In  the  second  place,  the  remainder  of  the  farm  has  to  be  improved.  Natural  pasture  has 
to  be  changed  into  cultivated  land,  stumps  and  small  swamps  eradicated,  and  a  very  large 
amount  of  draining  done.  The  land  has  to  be  cleared  of  thistles,  weeds  and  stones. 
Fields  have  to  be  laid  out  and  enclosed.  In  each  of  those  fields  the  basis  of  a 
certain  rotation  has  to  be  established.  The  barns,  yards  and  stables  have  to  be  put  in 
order,  and  the  place  properly  stocked  ;  «  lawn,  gardens  and  orchards  have  to  be  laid  out 
or  planted,  and  proper  approaches  made  to  the  building  ;  and  lastly,  a  school  has  to  be 
organized,  the  subjects  to  be  taught,  with  their  mode  of  arrangement  and  distribution  laid 
down,  and  the  staff  requisite  for  the  purposes  of  instruction  determined  upon. 

How  far,  then,  has  this  been  accomplished  1  In  the  first  place,  a  part  of  the  farm  is 
being  cleaned  and  put  in  order  as  an  Experimental  Farm.  A  small  portion  is  now  ready, 
its  condition  and  qualities  ascertained,  and  it  will  be  divided  into  experimental  plots 
next  spring. 

In  the  second  place,  there  has  been  a  beginning — and  no  small  beginning — made  this 
summer  in  bringing  the  place  into  shape  as  a  "  Model  Farm."  Main  drains  to  carry  off 
the  superfluous  water  of  nine-tenths  of  the  farm  have  been  laid.  47  acres  lying  on  the 
two  sides  of  the  Dundas  road  have  been  underdrained — 25  of  them,  beside  our  regular 
summer  fallow,  have  been  summer  fallowed.  As  many  acres  have  been  cleaned  and 
stoned.  68  acres  have  been  broken  out  of  sod,  and  some  80  acres  seeded  down  as  the 
commencement  of  rotation  ;  the  20  acres  in  front  of  the  buildings  have  been  laid  out  in 
lawn  and  garden,  and  so  divided  and  enclosed  that  the  general  plan  can  at  a  glance  be 
comprehended.  Trees  have  been  planted  around  and  within  the  lawn,  and  others  have 
been  transplanted  or  removed.  Carriage  drives,  as  approaches  to  the  College,  have  been 
constructed,  aiid  the  roadway  through  the  farm  graded  and  enclosed  for  a  considerable 
distance.  200  rods  of  a  picket,  70  rods  of  a  wire,  and  1.35  rods  of  a  straight  board  fence 
have  been  built.  If  as  much  be  performed  during  each  of  the  five  succeeding  years,  the 
place  will  begin  to  deserve  the  proud  title  of  a  "  Model  Farm." 

And  finally,  one  of  the  wings  of  a  main  structure,  240  feet  long,  of  which  the  present 
College  will  be  the  centre,  has  been  erected  in  the  shape  of  a  Veterinary  School  building, 
whilst  the  present  College  has  been  improved  and  its  accommodation  increased  by  an 
additional  mansard  story.  And,  what  is  of  greater  importance,  the  class-room  work  has 
been  thoroughly  organized,  and  the  subjects  to  be  taught  determined  ;  their  arrangement 
and  distribution  crystallized  into  a  curriculum,  and  those  subjects  for  the  last  ten  months 
consecutively  and  successfully  taught. 

And  now  it  may  be  asked,  from  the  experience  of  the  past  year,  what  would  you 
suggest  for  present  action  ?  From  that  experience  I  would  make  the  following  recom- 
mendations regarding  the  School,  of  which  alone  it  is  allowable  for  me  to  speak,  as  another 
gentleman  is  in  charge  of  the  Farm. 

In  the  first  place,  as,  through  the  liberality  of  the  Agricultural  and  Arts  Association, 
we  will  have  a  building  to  be  used  solely  for  Sch.ool  purposes,  I  would  suggest  that  pro- 
vision be  made  this  year  for  furnishing  a  suitable  laboratory,  not  merely  to  be  used  for 
lecturing  purposes,  but  mainly  to  serve  as  the  home  of  a  practical  chemist.  In  the 
second  place,  I  would  suggest  that  a  prospectus  should  be  immediately  issued,  containing 
not  merely  the  information  to  be  found  in  our  present  circular,  but  likewise  a  resume  of 
tlie  practical  instruction  to  be  given  in  the  outside  department,  together  with  a  synopsis 
of  the  lectures  to  be  delivered  during  each  session  of  the  two  years  in  each  department  of 
field  and  class-room  instruction.  In  the  third  place,  I  would  recommend  that  for  the  pre- 
sent the  following  constitute  the  staff: — 

A  President,  (Lecturer  in  some  Department ;)  and  Bursar. 

A  Professor  of  Agriculture  and  Farm  Manager. 

A  Practical  Chemist,  and  Lecturer  on  Chemistry. 

A  Veterinary  Surgeon,  and  Lecturer  m  Veterinary  Subjects. 

Beginning  at  the  last,  it  is  admitted  on  all  hands  that  a  Veterinary  Department  is 
indispensable  in  such  an  Institution  as  this,  and  it  is  as  economical  and  far  more  satisfactory 
to  obtain  tlie  flermanent  services  of  a  single  individual  than  to  pay  an  intermittent  lecturer. 
2  17 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  13.)  A.  1875 


Again,  if  experiments  are  to  be  tried,  and  the  country  as  well  as  the  objects  for  which  the 
Institution  Avas  called  into  being  demand  that  they  should — a  practical  chemist  will  be 
next  year  as  great  a  necessity  as  a  Lecturer  on  Chemistry  invariably  is.  But  no  man  will 
turn  his  attention  to  the  application  of  Chemistry  to  Agriculture  unless  his  appointment 
be  made  a  permanent  one. 

And  I  recommend  the  first  two  appointments  to  be  made,  instead  of  those  of  a  Prin- 
cipal and  Rector,  for  the  following  reasons  :  In  the  first  place,  it  is  extremely  difficult  to 
obtain  the  services  of  a  man  who  unites  in  himself  the  qualifications  required  in  the  Prin- 
cipal of  School  and  Farm,  and  utterly  impossible  to  obtain  them  at  the  salary  offered. 
In  the  second  place,  even  if  the  salary  were  offered  and  the  man  obtained,  he  would  be 
physically  unable  to  overtake  the  work  required  of  the  "  Principal." 

I  would  therefore  suggest  that  the  example  of  the  Kojal  Agricultural  College  at 
Cirencester,  England,  and  the  United  States  Agricultural  Colleges,  in  this  particular  be 
foDowed,  and  one  man  appointed  to  take  charge  of  the  Farm,  together  with  the  practical 
instruction  of  the  pupils  thereon,  and  to  deliver  lectures  on  Practical  Agriculture  ;  whilst 
another  should  be  appointed  to  act  as  Principal  of  the  School,  and  Lecturer  in  some  de- 
partment— say  Natural  History.  For  some  time  to  come  he  might  act  as  Bursar,  and  with 
assistance  from  the  rest  perform  the  duties  of  Piector.  The  latter  term  is  misleading,  and 
impugns  the  non-sectarian  character  of  the  Institution  in  the  minds  even  of  those  who 
cannot  strictly  be  called  ignorant.  But  whatever  the  titles,  the  fact  rt'mains  undisputed 
and  indisputable,  that  in  Canada — or  indeed  the  world — the  attainments  of  the  practical 
farmer  and  the  experienced  educationalist  are  seldom  or  ever  found  united  in  a  single  in- 
dividual. 

And  now,  in  the  last  place,  it  may  be  asked,  in  view  of  the  past  year's  experience,  what 
ought  to  be  done  with  regard  to  organization  for  the  future  ?  I  answer,  unhesitatingly, 
that  we  are  on  the  light  path.  We  are  leaving  out  the  section  on  the  "  Staff  of  Officials," 
and  working  up  to  the  ideal  sketched  clearly  by  the  ProAdncial  Farm  Commission. 
There  are  various  questions  to  be  settled.  It  is  true  they  are  questions  of  detail, 
but  on  the  manner  of  their  settlement  depends  the  success  or  failure  of  the  Insti- 
tution. Allow  me  to  enumerate  some  of  them.  There  is  the  relation  of  the 
students'  labour  to  the  Model  and  Experimental  Farms,  the  possibility  of  perfecting 
thorough  practical  instruction,  the  best  mode  of  imparting  that  instruction,  the  relation 
of  the  theoretical  to  the  practical,  the  relation  of  apprenticeship  to  study,  the  financial 
relation  of  the  School  to  the  Farm.  There  is  the  question  of  the  number  of  outside  in- 
structors necessary,  the  number  of  inside  lecturers  requisite — the  question  of  the  establish- 
ment of  a  staff.  There  is  the  question  of  the  relation  of  Agriculture  to  Horticulture  ;  the 
relation  of  the  various  depaitments  to  each  other  and  the  whole.  Many  other  questions 
there  are,  but  they  will  all  require  careful  attention  and  practical  solution,  and  it  will  be 
well  on  to  the  end  of  the  five  years  of  the  preparatory  term  ere  the  majority  of  them  can 
be  solved.  What  we  want  is  those  five  years  to  lay  a  foundation.  We  are  different  from 
the  other  public  institutions.  Other  institutions  are  finished  at  once;  this  is  to  be  com- 
pleted on  a  progressive  system.  The  capital  outlay  in  their  case  is  immediate  ;  in  ours, 
gradual.  The  results  in  their  case  can  at  once  be  seen  ;  in  ours,  years  must  elapse.  Even 
financially,  however,  at  the  end  of  the  preparatory  term  we  will  be  in  advance  of  them. 
Then  the  country'  will  have  to  pay  but  the  salaries  of  the  stafi  and  part  of  the  costs  of 
experiments  ;  in  their  case,  the  usual  annual  outlay  will  be  continued. 

What  we  want,  then  is  forbearance  and  assistance  for  the  preparatory  term  of  five 
years  We  have,  during  that  period,  practically  to  settle  a  great  number  of  questions  ; 
and  in  settling  them  mistakes  will  be  made.  What  we  ask  for,  then,  is  forbearance.  We  have 
to  bring  a  place  into  shape  for  instructing,  perhaps, ten  generations.  What  we  ask  for  is  assis- 
tance from  this.  From  its  very  nature,  the  Institution  cannot  be  immediately  popular.  It  is  a 
case  of  statesmen  discerning  a  want  and  striving  to  su])ply  it,  rather  than  of  tlie  i)oople  feeling 
a  want  and  dem;inding  it.  It  is  a  case  of  Governmental  action  preceding  ])o])ular  agitation. 
But  if  the  ))lace  Ije  rightly  conductf^d,  keeping  its  ultimate  objects  in  view,  all  will  be 
right.  The  personal  interests  of  the  second  class,  of  whom  1  have  spoken  in  the  introduc- 
tion, centre  in  the  success  of  the  second  object  of  th*;  Institution's  existence  ;  the  i)ersonal 
interesthi  of  the  first  class  centre  in  indifference.  The  intelligence  of  the  second  will  soon 
commend   the  Institution  to  their  favourable  judgment,  and  the  first    class,  as  they   have 

1» 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  13.)  A.  1875 


done  from  time  immemorial,  will  follow  the  bell-wethers.  But  whatever  the  opinion  of  the 
people  at  large,  we  look  for  the  action  of  statesmen  from  their  rulers.  The  reasons  for 
the  establishment  of  the  Institution  are  wise  reasons;  the  ends  it  is  intended  to  serve  are 
for  the  national  benefit,  and  it  is  progressing  favourably  towards  the  accomplishment  of 
those  ends.     On  these  grounds  we  ask  for  support. 

I  have  the  honour  to  be,  Sir, 

Your  obedient  servant, 

William  Johnston, 

Acting  Principal. 


I 


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39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  13.)  A.  1875 


A.PPEJ1S^DIX   (A.) 


EXAMINATION    PAPERS— CHRISTMAS,    1874. 


Scientific  Agriculture. 
Examiner  :  W.  Johnson,  B.  A. 


1.  From  what  and  by  what  agencies  was  the  soil  on  the  surface  of  the  earth  formed  ? 
Describe  the  action  of  the  atmosphere  and  of  water  in  its  formation. 

2.  Morton  says,  "  The  soil  partakes  of  the  nature  of  the  rock  on  which  it  rests." 
Discuss  the  truth  of  this  statement. 

3.  Name  the  principal  chemical  constituents  of  soils  and  give  their  chemical  classifi- 
cation. 

4.  Give  the  commoner  classification  of  soils  and  the  physical  characteristics  of  each 
class. 

5.  Enumerate  the  mechanical  processes  of  improving  the  soil.  In  ploughing,  e.  g., 
show  the  benefits  the  penetration  of  air  confers  upon  the  soil. 

6.  It  is  said  that  "  Subsoil  ploughing  brings  to  the  surface  injurious  soil  and  the 
larvte  of  insects."     Answer  this  objection,  and  give  the  advantages  of  subsoil  ploughing. 

7.  What  is  meant  by  "  thorough"  draining  ?  Show  particularly  all  the  different  ways 
in  which  the  soil  is  improved  by  a  system  of  underdraining. 

8.  Define  the  term  "  manures  "  and  show  the  jiecessity  for  their  use.  Enumerate  the 
principal  proximate  elements  of  plants,  and  describe  the  process  by  which  manures  reple- 
nish these — especially  the  non-azotized. 

Practical  Agriculture. 

*  Farm  Department. 

1.  Describe  the  various  processes  you  would  pursue  in  bringing  under  cultivation  a 
Cedar  Swamp. 

2.  What  .should  be  the  condition  of  the  land  for,  and  what  the  evidence  of,  good 
ploughing  : 

(1)  In  a    andy  Loam, 

(2)  In  a  Clay  Soil, 

(3)  In  a  Clay  Loam 

3.  Give  your  method  of  preparing  a  stubble  field — clean  and  regularly  rotated;  sowing 
and  harvesting  thereon  : 

(1)  A  crop  of  Spring  Wheat. 

(2)  A  crop  of  liarley. 

20 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  13.)  A.  1875 


4.  What,  if  any,  are  the  advantages  of  Fall  Ploughing  and  Summer  Fallowing  1 
Discuss  the  matter. 

5.  Give  a  six  years'  rotation  of  crops  : 

(1)  On  a  sod  field,  clean. 

(2)  On  the  same  field,  full  of  Canada  thistles. 

6.  For  sowing  turnips,  give  your  method  of  preparation  and  treating  with  manures  a 
stubble  field— sandy  loam — cropped  for  three  successive  years. 

7.  Give  a  list  of  necessary  farm  implements  ;  and  describe  the  parts  of  a  plough  and 
reaping  machine. 

Live  Stock  Department. 

1.  Give  the  different  breeds  of  cattle  in  general  use  in  Canada,  the  leading  character- 
istics of  each  breed,  and  compare  them : 

(1)  As  to  dairy  purposes. 

(2)  As  to  beef, 

(3)  As  to  both  combined. 

2.  Give  the  different  breeds  of  sheep  in  general  use  in  Canada,  the  leading  character- 
istics of  each  breed  ;  and  compare  them  : 

(1)  As  to  wool. 

(2)  As  to  mutton. 

(3)  As  to  both  combined. 

3.  In  the  same  way  name  the  various  breeds  of  hogs,  and  give  the  marks  of  a  pure 
Berkshire  pig. 

4.  In  purchasing  cattle  what  are  the  points  you  would  look  to  : 

(1)  In  a  good  feeder  1 

(2)  In  a  good  milker  1 

5.  What  points  do  you  consider  essential : 

(1)  In  a  draught  horse  1 

(2)  In  a  roadster  1 

6.  Write  brief  notes  on  the  following :  "  Grade,"  "  thorough-bred,"  "  hurdling  or 
folding,"  "pulping,"  "stall  feeding,"  "  storing"  cattle,  "Barn-yard  manures  —  storing, 
mixing  and  saving." 

Horticultxmd  Department. 

1.  Give  a  proper  rotation  of  garden  crops. 

2.  With  regard 

(1)  To  the  Onion. 

(2)  To  the  Carrot. 

(3)  To  the  Beet. 

(4)  To  the  Potato. 
Give 

(1)  A  description  (botanical)  of  the  plant. 

(2)  Proper  soil  and  best  fertilizers. 

(3)  Method  of  Cultivation  and  Propagation. 

(4)  Name  of  commoner  varieties. 

3.  Write  brief  notes  on  "  Trenching,"  "  Pruning,"  "  Grafting,"  "  Budding,"  "  Trans- 
planting," "  Forcing." 

4.  Lay  out  an  acre,  two  roods  square,  in  garden  plots,  showing  the  vegetables  grown 
in  each. 

5.  Describe  the  preparation  of  hot-beds. 

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39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  13.)  A.   1875 


Botany. 

1.  Distinguish  the  Vegetable  kingdom,  on  the  one  hand,  from  the  Mineral  ;  and  on 
the  other,  from  the  Animal. 

2.  Give  the  composition  of  a  typical  cell,  and  describe  the  various  kinds  of  cells. 

3.  Describe  the  process  of  cell  growth  by  free  formation,  by  budding  and  by  division. 

4.  Cellular  and  Vascular  tissue,  how  distinguished  1  Describe  the  different  kinds  of 
vascular  tissue. 

5.  Distinguish  between  the  structure  of  the  root  and  the  stem,  describing  both. 

6.  Give  the  distinguishing  characteristics  of  the  Acrogenous,  the  Endogenous,  and 
the  Exogenous  stem.  Describe  the  various  parts  of  the  latter,  and  distinguish  clearly  be- 
tween the  Medullary  sheath  and  the  Medullary  rays. 

7.  Epidermal  Appendages,  Abnormal  roots,  Abnormal  stems.  Enumerate  these, 
and  distinguish  between  hairs  and  tendrils,  thorns  and  prickles,  suckers  and  runners. 

8.  Describe  the  growth  and  structure  of  a  bud.  Characterize  the  different  varieties 
of  buds. 

9.  Describe  the  structure  and  parts  of  a  leaf,  and  give  the  characters  of  the  two  main 
divisions  of  the  simple  leaf,  and  the  classes  of  the  same  based  on  the  shape  of  the  margin. 

10.  Inflorescence.  Define  the  term.  Characterize  the  two  divisions,  and  describe 
the  various  forms  of  indefinite  inflorescence. 

11.  Describe  the  parts  of  a  flower,  and  give  the  meaning  of  the  terms  "regular," 
"  symmetrical,"  "  complete,"  "  distinct,"  as  applied  to  the  flower. 

12.  Write  brief  notes  on  the  following  : — "  Protoplasm,"  "  exosmose"  and  "  endos- 
mose,"  "  cyclosis,"  "  organs  of  nutrition  and  organs  of  reproduction,"  "  annual,  biennial 
and  perennial  plants,"  "  radicle,"  "  peduncle,"  pedicle,"  "  stomata,"  "  venation,"  "  verna- 
tion," "  bract,"  "  cyme,"  "  chorosis." 


22 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  13.)  A.  1875 


A.PPE][srDIX  (B,) 


CIRCULAR  OF  THE  ONTARIO  SCHOOL  OF  AGRICULTURE  FOR  THE 
SCHOLASTIC  YEAR  1875. 


Honorary  Council. — Hon.  David  Christie,  Hon.  George  Brown,  Hon.  Archibald  Mc- 
Kelliir,  Professor  Buckland,  James  Young,  Esq.,  M.P.,  Delos  W.  Beadle,  Esq.,  James 
Laidlaw,  Esq. 

Stapf. 

*(a)  Charles  Roberts,  Esq.,  Principal,  Professor  of  Agriculture 

(h)  William  Johnston,  B.A.,   Eedor,  Interim   Lecturer  on  Natural  Sciences  except 
Chemistry. 

(c)  George  Baptie,  M.A.,  M.B.,  Interim  Lecturer  on  Chemistry. 
*{d)  E.  A.  A.  Grange,  V.S.,  Interim  Lecturer  on  Veterinary  Surgery  and  Practice. 
*{e)  Rev.  Robert  Burnet,  Interim  Lecturer  on  Horticulture. 

James  Stirton,  Instructor  in  Live  Stock  Department. 

James  McNair,  Instructor  in  Field  Department. 

John  F.  Barron,  Instructor  in  Horticultural  Department. 

James  Mackintosh,  Instructor  in  Meclmnical  Department. 


CONTENTS. 

Introduction. 

I.  Terms  of  Admission. 

II.  Course  of  Study. 

III.  Departments  of  Instruction. 

IV.  Course  of  Apprenticeship. 

V.  Hours  of  Labour  and  Study  ;  Fees  ;  Remuneration. 

VI.  Sessions  and  Examinations. 

A.  General  Rules. 

B.  General  Regulations. 


INTRODUCTION. 

The  Institution  known  as  "The  Ontario  School  of  Agriculture  and  Experimental 
Farm,"  is  situated  about  a  mile  to  the  south  of  the  Town  of  Guelph.     The  Farm  consists 


(a)  Gold  Medallist  of  Royal  Agricultural  College,  England. 

(b)  Gold  Medallist  of  the  University  of  Toronto. 

(c)  Medallist  of  the  Univei-sity  of  Toronto,  and  formerly  Professor  of  Chemistry  in  Victoria  College 

Medical  School. 

(d)  Lecturer  on  Anatomy  in  the  Ontario  Veterinary  College. 
{e)  President  of  the  "  Ontario  Fruit  Growers'  Association." 
(*)  For  Fall  and  Winter  at  least. 

23 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  13.)  A.  1875 


of  550  acres,  about  400  of  which  are  cleared,  and  is  composed  of  almost  every  variety  of 
soil.  It  is  in  the  centre  of  an  extensive  agricultural  district—  one  unrivalled  in  the  Pro- 
vince for  the  raising  of  stock.  Readily  accessible  by  rail  from  all  parts  of  the  Province, 
in  clese  proximity  to  a  town  at  once  one  of  the  finest  grain  and  stock  markets  in  Ontario 
—noted  besides  for  the  strong  moral  and  religious  tendencies  of  its  people,  no  site  could 
have  been  found  more  eminently  uited  for  the  establishment  thereon  of  such  an 
Institution. 

Immediately  upon  obtaining  possession,  the  GoA^ernment  appointed  a  Commission  to 
inquire  and  report  regarding  the  manner  of  adapting  "  the  said  farm  and  management  and 
control  thereof,  to  the  purposes  of  a  model  and  experimental  farm."  A  few  extracts  from 
the  Report  of  this  Provincial  Farm  Commission  will  show  clearly  the  basis  upon  which 
the  Institution  is  at  present  established. 

"  The  name  of  the  Institution  should  be  '  The  Ontario  School  of  Agriculture  and 
Experimental  Farm.' " 

"  The  objects  of  the  Institution  should  be  : — First,  to  give  a  thorough  mastery  of  the 
practice  and  theory  of  husbandry  to  young  men  of  the  Province  engaged  in  Agricultural 
and  Horticultural  pursuits,  or  intending  to  engage  in  such  ;  and.  Second,  to  conduct  expe- 
riments tending  to  the  solution  of  questions  of  material  interest  to  the  Agriculturists  of  the 
Province,  and  publish  the  results  from  time  to  time. 

"  That  the  Farm  should  be  separated  into  five  distinct  departments,  namely  : — 

"  (1)  The  Field  Department. 

"  (2)  The  Horticultural  Department. 

"  (.3)  The  Live  Stock  Department. 

"  (4)  The  Poultry,  Bird  and  Bee  Department. 

"  (5)  The  Mechanical  Department. 

"  All  permanent  improvements  on  the  Farm  should  be  carried  out  on  a  gradually 
developed  system,  and  in  such  a  manner  as  to  exhibit  and  test  the  comparative  values  of 
the  most  approved  method  of  executing  the  several  works,  and  to  test  the  cost,  conveni- 
ence and  durability  of  the  several  appliances  from  time  to  time  recommended  for  adop- 
tion on  the  farms  of  the  Province. 

"  That  for  some  time  to  come  the  work  of  the  Farm  must  be  mainly  confined  to  the  pre- 
paration of  the  fieldsand  buildings  forthe  systematic  instruction  of  the  pupils;  that  theknow- 
ledge  that  might  be  acquired  from  the.se  preparatory  operations  would  be  most  valuable  to 
the  pupils ;  that  the  labour  of  the  pupils  ought,  therefore,  to  be  employed  as  far  as  practicable 
in  those  preparatory  operations  ;  and  that  it  is  expedient  to  provide  at  present  merely  for 
the  conduct  of  the  Institution  during  this  preparatory  term,  and  utilize  the  practical  expe- 
rience obtained  from  it  in  settling  hereafter  the  permanent  organization  and  educational 
curriculum. 

"  That  during  the  said  Preparatory  Term  the  chief  aim  should  be  to  teach  the  pupils 
how  to  perform  farm  work  in  the  l)est  and  most  profitable  manner — coupled  with  such  an 
amount  of  scientific  knowledge  as  will  enable  them  clearly  to  comprehend  the  results 
sought  to  be  obtained  from  each  operation  and  the  scientific  facts  and  principles  upon 
which  it  is  based." 

In  order  to  carry  out  the  suggestions  of  the  Provincial  Farm  Commission,  the  Govern- 
ment made  such  improvements  on  the  residence  found  on  the  place  as  would  best  utilize 
it  for  present  purposes.  Accommodation  was  provided  for  about  thirty  })ui)ils,  a  Princi- 
pal and  a  Rector  were  appointed,  and  a  foreman  for  each  of  the  following  four  depart- 
ments engaged,  viz.  : 

1.  Farm  Department. 

2.  Live  Stock  Department. 

3.  Horticultural  Department. 

4.  Mechanical  Department. 

The  Institution  was  opened  in  May,  1874,  and  the  experience  gained  during  the  last 
six  months  has  enabled  the  following  course  of  study,  rules,  and  regulations,  to  be  tem- 
poraril)-  drawn  up.  Although  temporary — in  force  but  for  the  "  jjreparatory  term  " — they 
are  publislifd  in  order  that  the  people — and  e.specially  the  Agriculturists — of  the  Province 

24 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  13.)  A.  1875 


may  see  at  a  glance  the  terms  of  admission  to,  the  subjects  taught  in,  and  the  benefits  to 
be  conferred  on  its  pupils  by  "  The  Ontario  School  of  Agriculture  and  Experimental  Farm." 

I.   TERMS   OF  ADMISSION. 

Before  admission  to  the  School  as  a  pupil,  each  candidate,  being  at  the  full  age  of 
fifteen  years,  will  produce  the  following  certificates  : 

(1)  As  to  moral  conduct. 

(2)  As  to  physical  health  and  strength. 

(3)  As  to  the  assent  of  his  parents  or  guardians  for  admission. 

(4)  As  to  his  intention  to  follow  agriculture  as  an  occupation. 

The  standard  of  education  necessary  for  admission  as  a  pupil  will  be  as  follows  : 

(1)  Reading,  Writing,  Spelling. 

(2)  English  Grammar  and  Composition  —analysis  and  parsing  of  an  ordinary  English 
author  ;  familiar  and  business  correspondence. 

(3)  Arithmetic — through  Simple  Interest. 

(4)  Outlines  of  General  Euglish  and  Canadian  History. 

(5)  Outlines  of  General  Geography  and  Geography  of  Canada. 

Those  who  can  produce  certificates  of  entrance  into  any  High  School,  those  who  hold 
Teachers'  certificates,  or  are  graduates  or  undergraduates  of  any  University  in  Her 
Majesty's  dominions,  are  considered  to  possess  the  literary  qualifications  requisite  for 
admission. 

II.  Course  of  Study. 

First  Year.  —  Practical  Agriculture. 

Practical  Horticulture. 

Botany — Structural  and  Physiological,  and  Zoology. 

Elements  of  Geology  and  Physical  Geography. 

Chemical  Physics  and  Inorganic  Chemistry. 

Animal  Anatomy  and  Physiology,  with 

Veterinary  Surgery  and  Practice. 

Mensuration,  Bookkeeping  and  English  Literature. 
Second  Year. — Agriculture. 

Horticulture. 

Agricultural  Chemistry. 

Economic  anrl  Field  Botany. 

Zoology,  Entomology  and  Meteorology. 

Animal  Anatomy  and  Physiology,  with 

Veterinary  Surgery  and  Practice. 

Mechanics,  Land  Surveying  and  English  Literature. 
The  regular  course  is  one  of  two  years,  but  a  single  year's  course  may   be  taken  by 
those  who  can  produce  evidence  of  having  assisted   in  farm  operations  for  at  least  two 
summers.  ' 

The  term  of  engagement  is  for  one  year. 

III. — Departments  of  Instruction. 

L  Agriculture. 

2.  Horticulture. 

3.  Chemistry. 

4.  Natural  Sciences  except  Chemistry. 

5.  Animal  Anatomy  and  Physiology,  with  Veterinary  Surgery  and  Practice. 
G.  English  and  Mathematics. 

IV. — Course  of  Apprenticeship. 

The  pupils  will  be  daily  distributed  alternately  to  each  of  the  following  four  Depart- 
ments : — 

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39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  13.)  A.  1875 


1.  The  Live  Stock  Department. 

2.  The  Field  Department. 

3.  The  Horticultural  Department. 

4.  The  Mechanical  Department. 

They  will  be  taught  the  manner  of  performing  the  various  operations  in  each  Depart- 
ment by  the  Instructor  or  his  assistants  in  that  Department ;  and  being  distributed  alter- 
nately to  each,  it  is  expected  that  at  the  end  of  two  years  a  thorough  apprenticeship  will 
have  been  served.  The  instruction  received  in  the  class-room  wUl,  as  far  as  possible,  be 
illustrated  and  exemplified  in  the  fields,  yards  and  shops. 

V. — Hours  of  Labour  and  Study  ;  Fees  ;  Remuneration. 

The  relative  number  of  hours  of  labour  and  study  will  vary  with  the  seasons,  but  the 
arrangement  will  be  such  that  an  annual  daily  average  of  five  hours  of  each  ^vill  be  ob- 
tained and  enforced. 

For  work  faithfully  and  zealously  performed,  payment  for  the  whole  year  at  the  rate 
often  cents  per  hour  will  be  made — for  all  other  work  in  proportion.  For  tuition,  board 
and  washing,  a  cost  rate  of  two  dollars  per  week  will  he  charged. 

By  faithful  work,  therefore,  a  student  can  receive  tuition,  board  and  washing,  and 
leave  to  his  credit  at  the  end  of  the  year  a  balance  of  fifty  dollars.  This  amount,  or  such 
other  sum  as  the  student  may  have  earned,  will  be  paid  to  him  at  the  end  of  the  scholastic 
3-ear,  on  his  passing  satisfactorily  the  terminal  and  sessional  examinations. 

VI. — Sessions  and  Exajviinations. 

There  will  be  two  sessions  in  each  year,  a  winter  and  a  summer  one.  The  former  will 
commence  on  or  about  the  first  of  October,  the  latter  about  the  middle  of  April. 

There  will  be  a  vacation  at  the  end  of  each  session. 

Examinations,  which  every  student  is  required  to  pass,  will  be  held  at  the  close  of 
the  session.  In  each  inside  Department,  on  the  subject  of  Lectures  in  that  Department 
for  that  session  ;  and  in  each  outside  Department,  on  the  work  of  that  Department  for  the 
session. 

A.    General  Rules. 

I. — Students  are  required  : — 

1.  To  render  cheerful  and  willing  obedience  to  orders. 

2.  To  conduct  themselves  in  a  gentlemanly  and  orderly  manner  at  all  times. 

3.  To  avoid  all  noisy  or  boisterous  conduct  in  or  about  the  building. 

4.  To  observe  neatness  in  dress  at  prayers,  meals,  and  lectures,  and  tidiness  in  their 
rooms. 

5.  To  observe  all  general  and  minor  regulations. 

II. — The  following  Practices  are  Absolutely  Forbidden  : — 

1.  Profane  swearing,  improper  language,  and  gambling. 

2.  Upe  of  intoxicating  liquors  and  firearms. 

3.  Use  of  tobacco  while  on  detail,  in  or  about  the  building,  barns  or  outbuildings, 
or  in  any  place  except  in  the  smoking  room. 

4.  Entering  the  domestic  or  sleeping  apartments  without  permission. 

5.  Absence  without  leave. 


B.     General  Regulations. 

1.  All  .students  shall  reside  in  the  building,  where  they  are  under  the  immediate 
charge  of  the  Rector. 

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39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  13.)  A.  1875 


2.  Each  student  upon  entrance  shall  sign  a  declaration  that  he  will  conform  to  the 
rules  and  regulations  relative  to  students. 

3.  A  register  shall  be  kept  of  the  attendance  of  students  at  prayers,  work,  and 
lectures. 

4.  All  students  shall  attend  the  morning  and  evening  prayers  unless  exempted  from 
so  doing  in  consequence  of  the  objection  of  their  parents  or  guardians. 

5.  They  shall  regularly  attend  their  respective  places  of  worship  on  Sabbath. 

6.  No  student  shall  be  absent  from  the  Institution  after  the  time  of  evening  prayers, 
except  by  permission  of  the  Rector. 

7.  The  Rector  is  authorized  to  impose  fines  and  other  penalties  for  the  infraction  of 
rules  and  regulations. 

8.  The  morning  bell  shall  be  rung  at  5:  30  a.m.  ;  bell  for  morning  prayers  at  6  a.m.  ; 
breakfast  at  6:  30  a.m.  ;  farm  bell  at  7  a.m.  ;  school  bell  at  9  a.m.  ;  farm  bell  at  12  noon  ; 
dinner  at  12:30  p.m.;  farm  and  school  bells  at  1:30  p.m.  ;  farm  and  school  bells  at 
4:30  p.m. ;  tea  at  5  p.m.  ;  school  bell  at  7:  30  p.m.  ;  bell  for  evening  prayers  at  9  p.m.  ; 
lights  out  and  doors  closed  at  9:  30  p.m. 

9.  No  student  whose  work  does  not  at  least  pay  for  his  tuition,  board  and  washing, 
or  who  fails  to  pass  the  requisite  examinations,  will  be  allowed  to  remain  at  the 
Institution. 


27 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  18.)  A.  1876 

EXAMINATION  PAPERS— EASTER,  1875. 


ONTARIO  SCHOOL  OF  AGRICULTURE. 

Agriculture. 

Examiner:  Professor  Buckland. 

1.  From  what,  and  by  what,  agencies  was  soil  formed  1 

2.  Enumerate  the  principal  chemical  constituents  of  the  soil,  and  give  a  classification 
of  soils  founded  upon  their  physical  characters. 

.3.  State  the  principles  and  effects  of  draining — depth,  inclination,  distance  and  material 
ot  drains. 

4.  What  is  a  manure  ?     Name  the  most  important  articles  used  as  such. 

5.  State  the  properties  and  use  of  lime — carbonate,  sulphate  and  phosphate. 

6.  Farm  yard  manure  :  give  its  composition  and  properties ;  how  to  manage  and 
preserve  it. 

7.  What  is  meant  by  "  In-and-in  breeding  ? "     Give  its  advantages,  dangers  and  draw- 
hacks. 

8.  The  same  of  "  Cross-breeding." 

9.  What  is  meant  by  "  Ancestral  Influence  1  "     Give  illustrations. 

10.  Which  produces  the  greatest  influence  on  off'spring,  the  sire  or  the  dam  1     Give 
iUustrations. 

11.  What  is  the  readiest  and    most   practicable   system    of  improving  live   stock 
adapted  to  the  wants  and  means  of  Canadian  farmers  generally  1 

12.  What  are  the  weak  points  of  Canadian  farming,   and  how  are  they  to  be  cor- 
rected ? 

Horticulture. 
Examiner :  Rev.  Robert  Burnet. 

1.  Distinguish  between  horticulture  as  science  and  as  an  art. 

2.  What  are  the  benefits  to  be  derived  from  Horticultural  Exhibitions  ? 

3.  Give  some  account  of  the  sources  of  the  soil. 

4.  Write  out  a  synopsis  of  the  three  modes  mentioned  in  preparing  the  soil. 

5.  Enumerate  a  few  of  the  manures  treated  of  in  the  third  lecture,  and  the  method 
of  preparation,  if  prepared. 

6.  What  are  the  uses  of  absorbents  in  the  preparation  of  manures,  and  name  the  best 
absorbents  ? 

7.  Give  the  different  modes  of  securing  new  varieties  of  fruits. 

8.  Describe  the  process  of  hybridization,  and  give  the  parts  of  the  flower  operated 
on  ? 

9.  What  are  the  best  methods  of  gathering  and  preserving  fruit  1 

28 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  13.)  A.   1875 


10.  State  the  leading  advantages  of  fruit  culture. 

11.  Give  the  benefits  of  planting  trees  for  shelter,  and  the  best  varieties  to  plant. 

12.  What  subjects  treated  of  in  these  lectures  are  common  to  the  horticultui'ist  and 
the  farmer  ? 

13.  Write  brief  notes  on  the  following  : — "Forcing,"  "pruning,"  "grafting,"  "bud- 
ding," "  hot  beds." 

Chemistry. 

Examiner,  George  Baptie,  M.A.,  M.B. 

1.  What  is  Heat  1     Outline  experiments  to  prove  your  statement. 

2.  Describe  the  manufacture  of  an  ordinary  Thermometer. 

3.  Explain  the  terras — Conduction,  Convention,  and  Radiation,  and  give  an  example 
of  each. 

4.  Latent  heat,  what  is  it  ? 

5.  What  is  meant  by  Chemical  Action  1     Illustrate. 

6.  Mention  the  modes  of  Chemical  combination,  with  examples. 

7.  Write  a  chapter  on  the  atmosphere  and  its  composition. 

8.  Describe  at  length  the  preparation  and  properties  of  each  element,  free  or  com- 
bined, present  in  the  atmosphere. 

9.  Show  the  relation  of  anything  you  have  mentioned  in  7  and  8  to  agriculture. 

10.  State  what  you  know  of  water. 

11.  State  lea<ling  facts  with  regard  to  preparation  and  properties  of 

Sulphuric  Acid. 
Phosphorus. 
Ammonia. 
Nitre. 

12.  Practical  application  of  your  knowledge  of  the  same  to  agriculture. 

Structural  Botany. 
Examiner  :  W.  J(;hnston,  B.A. 

1.  Define  Botany,  and  show  in  what  relation  it  stands — on  the  one  hand  to  Biology, 
and  on  the  other  to  Zoology. 

2.  Give  the  composition  of  a  typical  cell,  and  describe  the  various  kinds  of  cell-growth. 

3.  Distinguish  between  cells  and  vessels,  and  describe  the  structure  of  the  spiral  and 
lactiferous  vessels. 

4.  Describe  the  structure  of  the  root,  distinguishing  it  from  that  of  the  stem,  and 
define  the  terms — "  annual,"  "  biennial,"  and  "  perennial,"  as  applied  to  roots. 

5.  Give  the  different  varieties  of  stems,  and  describe  the  structure  and  parts  of  the 
exogenous  stem  1 

6.  Describe  the  growth  and  structure  of  a  bud,  and  give  the  structure  and  parts  of 
a  leaf. 

7.  Name  the  parts  of  a  flower,  and  give  the  structure  of  the  reproductive  organs, 
describing  generally  the  mode  of  reproduction  in  plants. 

8.  Give  the  composition  of  the  seed,  and  describe  the  manner  in  which  the  plant 
springs  therefrom. 

9.  Give  a  list  of  the  Simple  Fruits,  and  describe  the  Legum,  Achese,  Caryopsis, 
Pome  and  Cone. 

10.  Write  brief  notes  on  the  following: — "Cyclosis,"'  "organs  of  nutrition  and 
organs  of  reproduction,"  "epidermal  appendages,"  "parasite,"  "  adventitious,"  buds, 
"suckers,"  "tendrils,"  "root-stock,"  "venation,"  "vernation,"  "petiole,"  "stipules," 
"inflorescence,"  "  bract,"  "  raceme,"  "cyme,"  "complete,"  and  "regular,"  flower,  "dehis- 
cent," and  "compound"  fruit. 

29 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  13.)  A.  1875 


Physiological  Botany. 
Examiner  : — W.  Johnston,  B.A. 

1.  Name  the  principal  organic  and  inorganic  constituents  of  plants,  giving  a  list  of 
the  azotized  and  non-azotized  organic  elements  ;  and  state  as  nearly  as  you  can  the  part 
of  the  plant  in  which  such  constituent  is  found. 

2.  GiA'e  concisely  the  physiology  of  tlie  root. 

3.  Describe  the  mode  of  growth  of  an  exogenous  stem. 

4.  Describe  the  process  of  absorption  and  exhalation  by  leaves,  and  give  the  causes 
of  coloration  and  defoliation  of  leaves. 

5.  Describe  fully  the  circulation  of  the  sap,  giving  the  various  physical,  chemical, 
and  vital  causes  operating  in  its  movement. 

6.  State  briefly  the  chemical  changes  that  take  place  in  calyx,  corolla,  stamens  and 
pistils,  at  the  period  of  flowering  ;  and  describe  fully  the  process  of  fertilization. 

7.  Darwin  says  that  "the  great  majority  of  the  so-called  species  of  plants  are  the  re- 
sult of  a  process  of  hybridization."  Discuss  the  truth  of  this  statement.  Define  "  hybrid," 
"sub-hybrid,"  and  "  perfect  hybrid."  Describe  the  process  of  hybridization,  and  give  its 
practical  uses  in  Horticulture. 

8.  Give  the  commoner  causes  of  diseases  in  plants,  and  a  classification  of  plant  diseases. 

9.  Give  the  physiological  eff'ects  resulting  from  the  action  of  fungi,  poisons,  parasites, 
and  insects  on  plants. 

10.  Give  the  causes,  and  a  description  of  the  diseases  known  as — smut,  rust,  mildew, 
ergot,  dry  rot,  potato  disease,  galls,  and  ear-cockle. 


ZooLoaY. 
Examiner, W .  Johnston,  B.A. 

1.  Define  Natural  History  ,  Biology,  and   Zoology,  and  show  their  relation  to   each 
other. 

2.  Life — What  are  its  conditions  1     What  its  characteristics  1    By  what  is  living  dis- 
tinguished from  dead  matter  ] 

3.  Give  the  six  sub-kingdoms  into  which  Zoology  is  divided,  and  the  leading  charac- 
teristics of  the  first  four. 

4.  Give  the  structure  and  functions  of  an  Amoeba. 

5.  Distinguish  the    "  test"  of  the  Foraminifera   from  that  of  a    "  Sea-Urchin" — de- 
scribing the  latter  fully. 

6.  Give  the  external  and  internal  structure  of  the   "  hidden-eyed  "  Medusa'-,  and  show 
in  what  way  they  illustrate  reproduction  by  "  alternation  of  generations." 

7.  Describe  the  structure  of  a  Sea- Anemone. 

8.  Give  the  process  of  growth  and  reproduction  of  a  tape- worm. 

9.  Give  the  two  main  divisions  of  the  Annulosa,  and  distinguish  between  the  Crus- 
tacea and  the  insecta. 

10.  Describe  the  external  structure  of  the  Lobster,  the  Spider,  and  the  Butterfly. 

11.  Give  the  main  divisions  of  insecta,  and  desciibe  the  external  and  internal  struc- 
ture of  the  typical  insect. 

Physiology. 
Examiner,  George  Baptie,  M.A.,  M.B. 

1.  Define  Physiology, 

2.  What  are   the  results  of  active  life  in  an  animal  1     How  may  this  be  proved 
experimentally  ? 

3.  What  is  the  plan  of  the  body  as  shown  by  a  transverse  section  1 

30 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  13.)  A.  1875 


4.  What  is  Mucous  Membrane,  and  where  is  it  found  1 

5.  Describe  fully  the  process  of  digestion. 

6.  State  the  results  of  eiuy  experiments  remembered,  going  to  show  the  necessity  of 
a  mixed  diet. 

7.  Write  brief  notes  on  the  blood. 

8.  State  what  is  the  object  and  describe  the  circulation  of  the  blood. 

9.  What  are  your  reasons  for  believing  in  the  circulation  of  the  blood  ? 

10.  Animal  Heat — How  is  it  maintained  1 

11.  Enumerate  the  organs  of  excretion,  and  explain  as  far  as  you  can  their  modus 
operandi  respectively. 

12.  What  is  the  function  of  the  sympathetic  system  of  nerves'?  How  has  this  view 
been  sujiported  by  actual  experiment  % 

13.  What  is  the  appearance  of  a  transverse  section  of  the  spinal  cord  1  What  is  the 
result  of  section  (a)  of  the  right  half  of  spinal  cord,  (b)  of  the  anterior  root  of  a  spinal 
nerve,  (c)  of  posterior  root  of  a  spinal  nerve,  (d)  of  both  anterior  and  posterior  roots  of  a 
spinal  nerve  ? 

Veterinary  Surgery  and  Practice. 

Examiner,    E.  A.  A.  Grange,  V.S. 

1.  Name  the  regions  into  which  the  vertebral  column  is  divided. 

2.  How  many  dorsal  vertebrae  has  the  horse  1 
•3.  Mention  the  bones  of  the  fore  extremity. 

4.  Mention  the  bones  of  the  hind  extremity. 

5.  Mention  the  structures  entering  into  the  formation  of  a  joint. 

6.  What  constitutes  the  alimentary  canal  1 

7.  What  are  the  preparatory  organs  of  digestion  1 

8.  Mention  the  various  structures  entering  into  the  formation  of  the  foot. 

9.  Mention  the  organs  of  respiration. 
10.  Mention  the  organs  of  circulation. 

Shout-horn  History. 
Emminer,    W.  Johnston,  B.A. 

1.  Give  the  characteristics  of  the  various  breeds  of  cattle  in  use  in  Canada,  and  show 
to  what  end  and  in  what  manner  the  Improved  Short-horns  are  their  superiors. 

2.  State,  with  reasons,  your  opinion  as  to  the  origin  of  the  Shorthorn  breed  of  cattle, 
and  give   a  reason  for  making  the  year  1 780  an  epoch  in  Short-horn  history. 

3.  What  were  the  characteristics  of  the  Teeswater  cattle.  Name  a  few  of  the  noted 
breeders  and  noted  bulls  prior  to  the  year  1780. 

4.  Give  a  short  biographical  sketch  of  the  Brothers  CoUings,  and  state  your  reasons 
for  considering  them  the  originators  of  the  Improved  breed. 

5.  Trace  the  history  and  pedigree  of  Hubback,  and  explain  what  is  meant  by  the 
"  Kyloe  controversy." 

6.  Illustrate  by  examples  the  system  of  "in-and-in  breeding,"  as  pursued  by  Charles 
Collings.  Give  the  origin  of  the  Duchess  tribe,  and  name  some  of  the  families  originated 
by  Robert  Collings. 

7.  By  what  means  did  the  Short-horns  gain  immediate  notoriety,  and  show  the  results 
by  quotations  from  the  Collings'  sales,  naming  a  few  of  the  purchases,  purchasers,  and 
prices. 

8.  Give  a  summary  sketch  of  the  breeding  of  Mr.  Thomas  Bates,  showing  the  families 
he  favoured  most,  and  the  peculiarities  following  as  results  of  the  Bates'  blood. 

9.  Give  a  short  biographical  sketch  of  the  B.)0ths.  State  their  principles  of  selection 
and  pairing,  and  define  the  term  "  Booth  standard." 

10.  Give  the  names  of  some  of  the  Short-horn  breeders  contemporaneous  with  Col- 

31 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  13.)  A.  1875 


lings,  Bates,  and  the  Booths  ;  and  enumerate  as  many  as  you  can  of  the  famous  breeders 
of  established  Short-horn  blood  in  Great  Britain  at  the  present  time. 

11.  Give  a  concise  chronological  sketch  of  Short-horn  importations  into  Canada  ;  and 
name  our  most  famous  breeders. 

12.  Show  how  the  E.  H.  B.  originated,  and  distinguish  between  the  Coates  and  the 
Strafford  Herd  Book.  Give  the  number  of  vols,  of  the  E.  Am  and  Can.  Herd  Books, 
dating  the  issues  of  the  latter  ;  and  state  any  difference  in  principle  of  admission,  and  in 
the  manner  of  recording  the  numbers  in  the  three. 

13.  Distinguish  between  a  "  pure  "  and  a  "  perfect "  Short-horn  ;  and  give  the  points 
of  the  latter  as  respects — 

(a)  Muzzle,  (b)  Crops, 

(c)  Brisket,  (d)  Spine, 

(e)  Hips,       .  (f)   Twist, 

(g)  Touch,  (h)  Skin  and  Tail. 

Book-keeping  and  Mensuration. 
Uxaminer,   William  Johnston,  B.A. 

T.  Enter  in  the  day-book,  journalize  and  post  the  following  memoranda  : — 

1.  April  10th,  1874  :— Sold  to  Samuel  Long  47  lbs.  butter  at  21c,  per  lb.,  and  63 
doz.  eggs  at  19|c.  per  doz.  Bought  from  him  seed  grain  of  following  description  and 
amounts : — 

Clover  seed  375  lbs.  at  $6  25  per  bushel. 

Timothyseed    585     "     at  $3  25     " 

Peas  .., 2,212     "    at  85     " 

Oats  1,765     "     at  48     " 

Barley    2,357     "     at  $1  05     " 

2.  April  20th,  1874  : — Paid  to  James  Smith  the  balance  of  my  note  for  two  cows, 
drawn  on  October  20th,  1872,  for  $550  dollars,  payable  in  two  years,  interest  at  rate  of 
7  percent,  per  annum.  Following  sums  paid  on  it : — Sept.  15th,  1873,  $200  ;  Jan.  1st, 
1874,  $150  ;  discount,  6  per  cent. 

3.  April  25th,  1874 :— Sowed  on  F.  No.  4,  42|  bushels  barley,  worth  $107  per 
bushel,  with  seed  drill  and  broadcast  sower  :  two  teams  harrowing. 

4.  May  1st,  1874  :— Bought  and  paid  for  yard-wide  Axminster  carpet,  at  $1  75  per 
yard  ;  and  wall  paper  at  75c.  per  roll  of  8  yards,  for  parlour  20  x  24  x  11 — in  it  3  win- 
dows, 5x8,  with  casings. 

5.  May  3rd,  1874  : — Bought  from  a  friend  and  paid  in  advance  for  tile  to  drain  F. 
No.  6,  field  square,  40  rods  a  side ;  two  main  drains  direct  through  a  whole  length,  4  inch 
pipe  in  one,  3  inch  in  other  ;  side  drains  2  inch  tile,  at  right  angles  to  these,  and  32  feet 
apart — usual  prices. 

6.  May  10th,  1875  : — Sent  two  teams  to  R.  Williams'  mill  for  lumber  ;  one  took 
down  two  ash  logs — No.  1,  32  feet  long,  15  and  12^  inches  in  diameter  ;  No.  2,  26  feet 
long,  13^  and  9  inclies  in  diameter,  at  $18  per  thousand.     Brought  following  : — 

2  pieces  sq.  timber — 

No.  1,  28  feet  long  :  10  x  12  :  11  x  14  )      .    ©on  fi    ......  i 

No.  2,  27  feet  long  j  12  x  12  ;  10  x  10  P^^   ^^0    per  thousand. 


12  pieces,  4  x  4 — 16  feet  long, 
15  "    "       2  X  4—14     " 


2i  X  10—18  "       "  ( 


t. 


•at  $9  50 
425  ft.  2  inch  plank,  surface  measure, 


32 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  13.) 


A.  1875 


APPENDIX  D. 


ONTARIO  SCHOOL  OF  AGRICULTURE. 


Easter  Examination  Class  List,  1875. 


Classes. 

Agriculture. 

Horticulture. 

Chemistry. 

Structural 
Botany. 

Physiological 
Botany. 

I.... 

1.  J.  Palmer. 

l.W.W.  Bremner. 

1.  Palmer. 

1    )  J.  Palmer. 
^-  \  T.  Mason. 

1.  T.  Mason. 

2.  W.  W  Bremner. 

2.  Ware. 

1.  Brethner. 

2.  Bremner. 

3.  H.  W.  Rhiud. 

3.  Watle. 

3.  T.  Mason. 

3.  Bremner. 

3.  Palmer. 

4.  C.  Wells. 

4.  Canfield. 

4.  Wells. 

4.  Wells. 

5.  T.  Mason. 

5.  T.  Mason. 

5.  VViule. 

5.  Gill. 

6.  G.  G.  Ware. 

f.   j  Lund. 
*••  \  Pahner. 

6.  Gill. 

6.  Wade. 

7.  Comport. 

7.  Canfield. 

8.  Ball. 

II.... 

1.  H.  S.  Lund. 

1.  llhind. 

1.  WellB. 

1.  Thomson. 

1.  Ware. 

2.  F.  Canfield. 

2.  Thomson. 

2.  Gill. 

2.  Coate. 

2.  Coate. 

3.  J.Thomson. 

3.  Gill. 

3.  Lund. 

3.  Berry. 

3.  Thomson. 

4.  H.  J.  Coate. 

4.  Mitchell. 

4.  Ware. 

4.  Dunlop. 

5.  C.  Berry. 

,"5.  Dick. 

5.  Khind. 

6.  S.  Dunlop. 

6.  Wells. 

7.  H.  Wade. 

7.  Coate. 

8.  A.  T.  BaU. 

HI.... 

1.  T.  Gill. 

1.  Shaw. 

1.  Ware. 

1.  Montgomery. 

1.  Montgomery 

2.  G.  Shaw. 

2.  Durrant. 

2.  Durrant. 

2.  MitcheU. 

2.  BaU. 

3.  H.  Montgomery. 

3.  A.  Mason. 

3.  Thomson. 

3.  Eaton. 

3.  Khind. 

4.  A.  H.  Shirk. 

4.  Montgomery. 

4.  Wade. 

4.  Lund. 

4.  Berry. 

5.  J.  Mitchell. 

5.  Comport. 

.5.  Coate. 

h.  A.  Mason. 

5.  Mitchell 

6.  A.  Mason. 

().  Shirk. 

6.  A.  Mason. 

*(').  Durrant. 

6.  Durrant. 

7.  A.  Comport. 

■*7.  Eaton. 

7.  C.  Berry. 

*7.  Comport. 

7.  Lund. 

*8.  C.  Durrant. 

8.  S.  Dunlop. 

*8.  Dick. 

8.  4.  Mason. 

*9.  J.  Dick. 

9.  F.  Canfield. 

*9.  Shirk. 

9.  Shirk. 

*10.  H.  H.  Eaton. 

10.  A.  BaU. 

11.  Shaw. 

12.  Montgomery. 

13.  Khind. 

14.  Shirk. 
*1.5.  Eaton. 
*16.  Comport. 
»17.  MitcheU. 
*18.  Dick. 

«10.  Dick. 
*11.  (Comport. 
*12.  Eaton. 

39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  13.) 


A.  1875 


Easter  Examination  Class  List — 

-Continued. 

1 

1 
Book-keeping 

Classes.           Zoology. 

Animal  Anatomy. 

Physiology. 

History. 

and 
Mensuration. 

I.... 

1.  T.  Mason. 

1.  A.  Mason. 

1.  Bremner. 

1.  Ware. 

1.  Palmer. 

2.  Palmer. 

2.  J.  Palmer. 

2.  Palmer. 

2.  Palmer. 

2.  Bremner. 

3.  Bremner. 

3.  Shaw. 

3.  T.  Mason. 

3.  Bremner. 

3.  Mason.  T. 

4.  GiU. 

4.  WeUs. 

5.  Lund. 

6.  T.  Mason. 

4.  GiU. 

4.  Thomson. 
6.  T.  Mason. 

6.  Lund. 

7,  Wells. 

4.  Dunlop. 

II 

1.  WeUs. 

1.  Wade. 

1.  Dunlop. 

1.  Dunlop. 

1.  Canfield. 

2.  Wade. 

2.  GiU. 

2.  Canfield. 

2.  Gill. 

2.  Ware. 

3.  Durrant. 

3.  Wells. 

3.  Shaw. 

3.  Thomson. 

4,  Bremner. 

4.  Wade. 

4.  Rhind. 

4.  WeUs. 

5.  Dunlop. 

5.  Wade. 

6.  Berry. 

U.  Ball 

III.... 

1.  Ware. 

1.  Dick. 

1.  Ware. 

1.  Canfield. 

1.  Montgomery. 

2.  Cantield. 

2.  Coate. 

2.  Ltmd. 

2.  Coate. 

2.  BaU. 

.,    J  Ball. 
"^^  }  Coate. 

3.  Ball. 

3.  A.  Mason. 

3.  Berry. 

3.  Coate. 

4.  Ware. 

4.  BaU. 

4.  A.  Mason. 

4.  Rhind. 

.5.  Montgomery. 

5.  Comport. 

5.  Durrant. 

5.  Montgomery. 

5.  Dick. 

6.  Rhind. 

6.  Thomson. 

6.  Shaw. 

6.  Shirk. 

6.  Berry. 

7.  Lund. 

7.  Montgomery. 

7.  Coate. 

7.  Dick. 

7.  Shirk. 

8.  Dunlop. 

8.  Rhind. 

8.  Thomson. 

8.  Durrant. 

8.  Eaton. 

1 

9.  A.  Mason, 

9.  Canfield. 

9.  Berry. 

9.  Comport. 

9.  A.  Mason. 

10.  Shaw. 

*10.  Shirk. 

10.  Montgomery. 

*10.  MitcheU. 

10.  Gill. 

' 

11.  Thomson. 

ni.  Mitchell. 

11.  Rhind. 

*11.  Eaton. 

11.  Durrant. 

12.  Berry. 

*12.  Eaton.               ' 

*12.  Eaton. 

12.  Lund. 

*13.  Comix)rt. 

*13.  Shirk. 

13.  Shaw. 

«14.  Dick. 

1 

•14.  Dick. 

14.  Wade. 

*1.5.  Shirk. 

1 

*15.  Mitchell. 

*15.  Comport. 

*]  6. -Eaton. 

*16.  Comport. 

*16.  MitcheU. 

*17.  Durrant. 

1 

One  was  gone ;  one  was  ill ;  and  two  were  excused  from  examination. 
The  following  were  the  prizemen  in  their  respective  subjects  : — 

Agriculture J.  Palmer. 

Horticulture    W.  W.  Bremner. 

Chemistry    J.  Palmer. 

Botany T.   Mason. 

Zoology    T.  Mason. 

Animal  Anatomy    A.  Mason. 

Animal  Physiology  W.  W.  Bremner. 

Short  Horn  History     G.  G.  Ware. 

Bookkeeping  and  Mensuration J.  Palmer. 


34. 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  13.)  A.  1875 


^PFEISI DIX  (K) 

FINANCIAL   TABLES. 


TABLE    A. 

Showing  Appropriation   Expenditure   of  the  Ontario  School   of  Agriculture,  being  for 
ten  months  ending  31st  October,  1875. 

I.  Maintenance  Account. 

1.  Food.  $    cts.       $     cts.       .•?    cts. 

Meat,  Fish  and  Fowl     718  74 

Bread  and  Biscuit 277  62 

General  Groceries 794  50 

|1,790  86 

2.  Household  Expenses. 

Fuel— Coal    495  24 

Light— Oil    55  41 

Laundi-y,  Soap  and  Cleaning  75  28 

Furniture  and  Furnishing 62  37 

Repairs     208  37 

896  67 

3.  Business  Department : 

Advertising,  Printing,  Postage,  Stationery,  &c 526  96 

4.  Miscellaneous. 

Medicines  and  Medical  Comforts 18  74 

Unenumerated 174  55 

193  29 

Salaries  and  Wages 2,006  27 

5,414  05 

5.  llortieuliural  Department  : 

Plants  and  Seeds 199  40 

199  40 

Salaries  and  Wages 516  68 

716  08 

So 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  13.)  A.  1875 


6.  Farm  Department  : 

Seeds $625  09 

Repairs 904  71 

Contingencies     283  32 

1,813  12 

Salaries  and  Wages 2,905  14 

4.718  26 

Bonus  to  Pupils 1,022  00 

Salaries  of  Lecturers  (paid) ...      850  00    1,872  00 

1,872  GO 

$1,2720  39 

A.  Estimated   Expenditure  for  tvvo   months,  ending  31st 

December,  1875 5,400  00 

Balance  in  favour  of  School 267  61 

Total  amount  voted  for  1875 $18,388  00 

II.  Capital  Account. 

Library,  Books  and  Apparatus  $167  31 

Implements 525  .35 

Artificial  Manure 157  87 

^  Permanent  Improvements  1,340  10 

Livestock 4,748  05 

Mansard  Story 3,000  00 

10,038  68 

Estimated  Expenditure  for  the  two  months  ending  31st 

December,  1875  1,800  00 

11,838  68 

Balance  in  favour  of  School 491   32 

Total  amount  voted  for  1875  $12,530  00 


86 


39  Victoria-  Sessional  Papers  (No.  13.)  A.  1875 


TABLE  B. 


Showing  the  Estimated  Appropriation  Expenditure  of  the  Ontario  School  of  Agriculture 
and  Experimental  Farm,  for  the  year  1876. 


I.  Maintenance  Account. 


1.  Food:  %    cts.       $     cts.       $  cts. 

Meat,  Fish  and  Fowl  1,600  00 

Bread  and  Biscuit    600  00 

General  Groceries  1,600  00 


3,800  00 


2.  Household  Expenses  : 

Fuel— Coal 900  00 

Light 200  00 

Laundry,  Soap  and  Cleaning  , 150  00 

Furniture  and  Furnishing    200  00 

Kepairs 400  00 

Incidentals    200  00 


2,050  00 


3.  Business: 

Advertising,  Printing,  Postage,  Stationery,  &c  600  00 

4.  School : 


Fuel,  Light  and  Cleaning   150  00 

Stationery,  Printing,  &c   50  00 


200  00 


5.  Miscellaneous  : 


Medicines  and  Medical  Comforts 50  00 

Bonus  to  Pupils 900  00 

Contingencies 600  00 


1,550  00 

8,200  00 


A.  Salaries  and  Wages. 

Professor  of  Agriculture  and  Farm  Manager 2.000  00 

President  and  Lecturer  on  Science 1,500  00 

Lecturer  on  Chemistry  and  Practical  Chemist     .,.    1,200  00 

Lecturer  on  Veterinary  Surgery  and  Practitioner  ...     600  00 

Physician  .     200  00 

37 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  13.)  A.  1875 


$    cts.  ^      cts. 

Field  Foreman 600  00 

Live  Stock  Foreman 600  00 

Gardener  600  00 

Carpenter 600  00 

Housekeeper     300  00 

Cook 120  00 

Laundress 120  00 

I>airymaid 120  00 

Tablemaid 96  00 

Two  Housemaids  180  00 

ilessenger 120  00 

Engineer    360  00 

Assistant  do.  for  five  months 100  CO 

9,416  00 

$18,616  00 


II.  Capital  Account. 

Li1)rary  and  Apparatus  1,000  00 

Livestock 6,000  00 

Implements 300  00 

Artificial  Manure    300  00 

I'ermanent  Improvements 3,000  00 

Experiment    s........ 1,500  00 

Building  13,000  00 

125,000  00 


38 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  13.) 


A.  1875 


TABLE  C. 


Inventory  of  Stock,  with  Prices. 


1 4  Working  Horses 
2  Brood  Mares 
2  Foals 


I.  Horses. 


$     cts.      $     cts. 
2,100  00 

400  00 

100  00 
2,600  00 


n.  Cattle. 


1.  Short  Horns 

1  Two  Year  Old  Bull 
1  Bull  Calf 
3  Cows 

2.  Ch'ades. 

10  Cows 
7  Calves 


300 

00 

100 

00 

2,500 

00 

500 

00 

140 

00 

2,900  00 


G40  00 


III.  Sheep. 


1.  Cotswold. 

34  Breeding  Ewes 

7  Ewo  Lambs 

1  Shearling  Ram 

4  Ram  Lambs 

2.  Leicester s. 

12  Breeding   Ewes 

1  Ram  Lamb 

3.  Souihdoiuns. 

8  Breeding  Ewes 

2  Ewe  Lambs 

1  Two  Shear  Ram 

4.  Grades. 

160  Fattening  Sheep 
16  Lambs 

5.  Pigs  {Berkshire.) 

1  Boar 

5  Sows 


1,190 

00 

175 

00 

175 

00 

200  00 

—  1 

,740 

00 

240 

00 

40 

00 

'>80 

00 

280 

00 

50 

00 

150 

00 



— 

480 

00 

1,120 

00 

64 

00 



—  ] 

[,184  00 

50 

00 

150 

00 

200 

00 

39 


),024  00 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  13.)  A.  1875 


TABLE  D. 

INVENTOEY  OF  IMPLEMENTS  WITH  PRICES. 

I.    Field  Department. 

No.  of 

4  Waggons $390  00 

4  Sleighs    157  00 

2  Carts      80  00 

7  Ploughs   215  00 

4  Pairs  of  Harrows  88  00 

1  Gang  Plow 50  00 

1  Seed  Drill  85  00 

1  Broad-cast  Sower 85  00 

1  Reaper 135  00 

1  Mower 85  00 

2  Horse  Rakes  64  00 

2  Rollers    85  00 

1  Cultivator 45  00 

1   Horse  Power  120  00 

1  Separator ...  360  00 

1  Fanning  Mill 32  00 

1  StrawCutter  50  00 

1   Grain  Crasher 50  00 

1  Democrat  Waggon 125  00 

I  Folding-seat  Buggy 125  00 

1   Pleasure  Sleigh  65  00 

1  Folding-seat  Cutter    5100 

4  Hay-racks   50  00 

7  Sets  Plough  Harness 175  00 

4  Sets  Team  Harness    200  00 

2  Sets  Cart  Harness  30  00 

1  Set  Buggy  Harness  (double) 50  00 

1  Set  Buggy  Harness  (single)  30  00 

3  Buffalo  Robes     55  00 

5  Pairs  Horse  Blankets 18  00 

1   Drag  Saw    55  00 

1   Pair  Platform  Scales  51   00 

1   Turnip  Drill '  18  00 

1  Scuffler 80  00 

200  Bags 20  00 

Trees   26  00 

Tools,  viz :  Draining  Spades  and  Shovels,  Rakes, 
Pitchforks,   Manure  Forks,  Scythes,  Chains, 

Hoes,  Axes,  (fee.  &c 200  00 


40 


519  00 
5595  00 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  13.) 


A.  1875 


II.  Live  Stock  Department. 


2  Root  Cutters  $80  00 

4  Dozen  Cattle  Chains    18  00 

2  Barrows 10  00 

4  Manure  Forks 4  00 

Shovels,  E,akes,  Feed  Buckets,  Sheep  Shears,  &c  10  00 


122  00 


III.    HORTICrLTURAL   DEPARTMENT. 


00 

Flower  Pots    . 

3 

Garden  Rakes 

16 
12 

Garden  Spades 
Drain  Hoes 

5 

Dutch  Hoes 

12 

Shovels 

2 
1 

Scythes  and  Snaths 
Garden  Plough 

1 

Cultivator     . 

2 

Barrows 

1 

Screen 

2 

Trowels 

5 

2 

Pruning  Saws 
Manure  Forks 

3 

Potato  Forks 

2 

Garden  Rule  and  Lines 

3 

1 

Tree  Scrapers 
Hammer 

1 

1 
6 

Edging  Scissors 
Hedge  Scissors 
Garden  Pans 

1 

Pruning  Scissors 

1 

Greenhouse  Syringe 

2 

Pruning  Knives  3x6 

40  Hotbed  Lights 

2 

Picks 

1 

Hellebore  Duster 

1 

Edging  Knife 

1 

Bill  Hook 

5 

Garden  Dibbles 

^28 

00 

3 

00 

22 

00 

9 

00 

3 

25 

18 

00 

3 

00 

12 

00 

8 

00 

10 

00 

1 

00 

80 

3 

7.5 

2 

00 

4 

50 

3 

00 

90 

1 

00 

2 

50 

3 

00 

7 

50 

3 

00 

5 

00 

2 

00 

80 

00 

2 

50 

1 

25 

1 

50 

1 

25 

5 

00 

16-1    It 

$248  20 


III.  Mechanical  Department. 


6  Jack  Planes 

5  Joiners  do         . 

6  Smooth  do 

2  Rabbits  do         . 

3  Boxing  Braces  and  Bits 
6  Hammers 

1  Boxing  Machine  and  Extra  Bit 
1  Paint  Mill 

41 


$  cts. 


00 
50 
40 
50 


18  50 


00 
00 


6  00 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  13.)  A.  1875 


1  Cross-cut  Saw             .  .             .             .           $3  00 

3  Eip  Saws             .  .             .             .         .           7  50 

i  Cross-cut  Saws        .  .             .             .               8  00 

1  Set  Chisels         .  .             .             .             .         5  00 

1  Blacksmith's  Vice      .  .             .             .             7  00 

1  Adze          .             .  .             .             .             .     1  50 

3  Draw  Knives             .  .             .             •             3  75 

2  Hand  Axes         .  .             .             .             .         4  00 

2  Steel  Squares         .  .             .             .             .     3  00 

3  Tool  Brackets  .  .  .  .  3  75 
6  Bench  Levers        .  .             .             .             .     7  50 

6  Chisels  .  .  .  .  .  2  00 
5  Try  Squares  .  .  .  .  .  2  00 
1  Compass  Saw  .  .  .  .  85 
1  Glue  Pot 1  00 

7  Paint  Brushes  .  .  .  .  .  3  00 
1  Grindstone  .  .  .  .  .  3  00 
Oil   Cans,    Gimlet  Bits,  Stone  Hammer,  Oil  Truss, 

&c.,  &c.               .  .             .              .               20  00 


143  75 

Field  Department         ....  3,595  00 

Live  Stock  Department         .  .  .  122  00 

Horticultural  Department  .  .  .  248  20 

Total     14,108  95 


42 


39  V'ictoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  13.) 


A.   1875 


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39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  13.) 


A.    1875 


Ontario  School  of  Agricuture,  in  Account  with  the  Garden. 


{Frojn  Nov.  1st,  1874,  to  October  3lst,  1875.) 


Dr. 

Apples — 107  bushels,  at  60c 
Cabbage — 1600  heads,  at  5c 
Beets — 12  bushels,  at  50c  . 
Carrots — 30  bushels,  at  25c 
Parsnips — 10  bushels,  at  50c 
Radishes — 4  bushels  at  50c 
Turnips — 4  bushels,  at  20c    • 


Cr. 


Apples — 21  bushels,  at  50c 

(Crab)— 3^  bushels  at  $1 

Asparagus — 132  bunches,  at  4c 
Beans— 5  bushels,  at  80c 
Beets — 6  bushels,  at  50c 
Cabbage — 92  heads,  at  6c 
Cauliflower — 101  heads,  at  10c 
Carrots — 36  bunches,  at  5c 

"       —  3  bushels,  at  40c 
Corn — 4  dozen,  at  10c     . 
Cucumbers — 450 
Currants — 1  peck     . 
Celery — 18  heads,  at  lOc 
Lettuce — 76  bunches,  at  5c 
Marrow  (Vegetable)— 11,  at  10c 
Onions — 62  bunches,  at  5c 
Parsnips — 7  bushels,  at  50c 
Parsley — 18  bunches,  at  5c 
Peas — 17  bushels,  at  50c 
Plums— 2  bushels,  at  ^2 
Potatoes — 43  bushels,  at  50c 
Radishes — 14  bunches,  at  5c     • 
Rhubarb — 110  bunches,  at  5c 
Spinach — 3  bunches,  at  50c 
Squash — 17,  at  10c 
Tomatoes,  4^  bushels,  at  $1     . 
Turnips — 2  bushels,  at  25c 

"         10  bunches,  at  5c 


For  fall  of  1874,  per  list  above 

Garden. 
By  Fruits  and  Garden  Vegetables 

44 


64 

00 

80 

00 

6 

00 

7 

50 

5 

00 

2 

00 

80 

10 

50 

3 

50 

5 

28 

4 

00 

3 

00 

5 

52 

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1 

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5 

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1 

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70 

4 

50 

0 

50 

0 

50 

165  50 


111  67 

165  00 

5277  17 


$277  17 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  13.) 


A.  1875 


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39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  13.)  A.  1875 

VII   Report  of  the  Physician. 

GuELPH,  Nov.  17th,  1875. 
The  Honourable  the  Provincial  Secretary  : 

Sir, — I  have  the  honour  as  Physician  to  the  Ontario  School  of  Agriculture,  to  trans- 
mit to  you,  this  my  first  Report. 

The  sanatory  condition  of  the  Institution  is  good,  with  the  exception  of  six  rooms 
in  the  Mansard  story,  not  yet  occupied  ;  I  would  suggest  that  a  moveable  fan  light  be 
placed  over  each  door,  and  thus  make  the  ventilation  what  it  ought  to  be. 

The  food  is  good  and  well  prepared.  On  the  whole  the  health  of  the  pupils  has  been 
good. 

E.  W.  McGuiRE, 

Physician  O.S.A. 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  14.)  A.  1875 


RETUEN 

To  an  Address  of  the  Legislative  Assembly  to  His  Excellency  the 
Lieutenant-Governor,  praying  His  Excellency  to  cause  to  be  laid 
before  the  House  a  Return  of  all  papers  and  correspondence 
whic^li  may  have  passed  between  the  Provincial  Government  or  any 
of  its  Members  or  Departments  on  the  subject  of  the  Northerly 
and  Westerly  boundaries  of  this  Province,  and  which  are  not  al- 
ready in  the  possession  of  the  House. 

4 

By  Command, 

S.  C.  WOOD, 

Secretary. 
Provincial  Secretary's  Office, 

Toronto,  December  6th,  1875. 


SCHEDULE  OF  COREESPONDENCE  REGARDING  THE  BOUNDARY  LINE 
BETWEEN  THE  PROVINCE  OF  ONTARIO  AND  THE  NORTH-WEST  TER- 
RITORIES. 

1873. 
January       3L — Letter  from  H.  E.  Lieutenant-Governor  transmitting  Resolution  to  the  Sec- 
retary of  State  for  the  Provinces. 
February       3. — Letter  from  the  Secretary  of  State   for  the  Provinces  to  H.  E.  Lieutenant- 
Governor. 
March         14. — Letter  from  H.  E.  Lieutenant-Governor  to  the  Secretary  of  State  for  the 
Provinces. 
'•  18.—  Secretary  of  State  for  the  Provinces  to  H.  E.  the  Lieutenant  Governor. 

December  5. — Letter  from  H.  E.  Lieutenant-Governor  to  the  Secretary  of  State  of  Canada. 
"  20. — Letter  from  Under-Secretary  of  State  of  Canada  to  H.  E.  Lieutenant-Gov- 

ernor, 
'■  26. — Letter  from  the  Secretary  of  State  of  Canada  to  H.  E.  the  Lieutenant- 

Governor. 
1874. 
February     12.— Letter  from  Under  Secretary  of  State  of  Canada  to  H.  E.  the  Lieutenant- 
Governor,  enclosing 
January       21. — Letter  from  Secretary  of  State  for  the  Colonies  to  H.  E.  the  Governor-Gen- 
eral. 
February     20. — Letter  from   Under  Secretary  of  State  of  Canada  to  H.   E.  Lieutenant- 
Governor,  enclosing 
January       29. — Letter  from  the  Secretary  of  State   for  the  Colonies  to  H.  E,  Governor- 
General. 
March  3. — Letter  from  David  Mills,  M.P.,  to  the  Hon.  0,  Mowat. 

May  18. — Letter  from  H.  E.  Lieutenant-Governor  to  the  Secretary  of  State  of  Canada 


89  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  14.) 


A.  1875 


1874. 


June 


« 

3. 

2. 

July 

10. 

July 

u 

9.- 
22.- 

(i 

June 
August 

8. 

26. 

6.- 

July 

10.- 

June 

30.- 

November 

21.- 

November 

(( 

(( 
December 

12.- 

25.- 

10.- 

3.- 

-Letter  from  Under-Secretary  of  iState  of  Canada  to  H.  E.  Lieutenant  Gover- 
nor, enclosinjj: 

-Report  of  the  Privy  Council. 

-Report  from  Minister  of  the  Interior  as  to  provisional  settlement  of 
boundaries. 

-Letter  from  H.  E.  Lieutenant-Governor  to  the  Secretary  of  State  of  Canada, 
enclosing 

-Order  in  Council. 

-Letter  from  Tinder-Secretary  of  State  of  Canada  to  H.  E.  the  Lieutenant- 
Governor. 

-Order  in  Council, 

-Basia  f 'r  provisional  settlement  of  boundaries. 

-Letter  from  the  Under-Secretary  of  State  of  Canada  to  H.  E.  Lieutenant- 
Governor,  enclosing 

-Letter  from  the  Secretary  of  State  for  the  Colonies  to  H.  E.  the  Governor- 
General, 

-Communication  from  Mr.  Sainsbury  as  to  records  affecting  the  boundary 
question. 

-Letter  from  Under  Secretary  of  State  of  Canada  to  H.  E.  the  Lieutenant- 
Governor,  enclosing 

-Order  in  Council. 

-Order  ia  Council. 

-Report  of  the  Hon.  the  Treasurer  of  Ontario. 

-Letter  from  I.  R.  Eckart,  Assistant-Secretary,  to  the  Honourable  William 
Buell  Richards. 


Government  Hoube, 

Toronto,  31st  January,  1873. 

Sir, — I  have  the  honour  to  transmit  herewith  a  copy  of  a  Resolution  of  the  Legislative 
Assembly  of  this  Province,  asking  for  certain  information  relative  to  the  North- West  Bound- 
aries, and  to  request  you  to  be  good  enough  to  furnish  the  same  at  your  earliest  convenience. 

I  have  the  honour  to  be,  Sir, 

Your  obedient  servant, 
(Signed)  W.  P.   Howland. 

The  Honorable  the  Secretary  of  State, 

(Provinces,)  Ottawa. 


Ottawa,  3rd  February,  1873. 

Sir, — I  have  the  honour  to  acknowledge  the  receipt  of  your  despatch  of  the  31st  ultimo, 
covering  a  copy  of  a  resolution  of  the  Legislative  Assembly  of  the  Province  of  Ontario,  asking 
for  certain  informytion  relative  to  the  North-West  Boundaries  of  Ontarin. 

Your  despatch  vtill  be  submitted  for  the  early  consideration  of  the  Governor-General  in 


Council. 


The  Houorahle  W.  P.  Howland,  C.B., 

Lieut. -Governor,  Toronto,  Ont 


1  have  the  honour  to  be,  Sir, 

Your  obedient  servant, 
(Signed)  Joseph  Howe, 

Secretary  of  State  for  the  Frumuces. 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  14.)  A.   1875 


Government  House. 
^  Torouto,  14th  March,  1873. 

Sir, — I  have  the  honour  to  invite  your  attention  to  my  despatch  of  31st  January  last, 
transmitting  a  copy  of  a  resolution  of  the  Legislative  Asi-embly  of  this  Province,  asking  for 
certain  information  relative  to  the  North-West  Boundaries  of  Ontario.  I  have  to  request 
you  to  be  good  enough  to  furnish  the  same  at  your  earliest  convenience,  with  a  view  to  its 
presentation  to  the  Legislative  Assembly  this  Session. 

I  have,  &c., 

W.  P.  Rowland. 
The  Hon.  the  Secretary  of  State, 

(Provinces),  Ottawa. 


Ottawa,  18th  March,  1873. 

Sir, — Referring  to  your  despatches  of  the  31st  January  last,  and  the  14th  inst.,  request- 
ing certain  information  relative  to  the  North-West  Boundaries  of  Ontario, 

I  have  to  acquaint  you  that  I  am  informed  that  the  Memorandum  of  the  Commissioner 
of  Crown  Lands  for  the  late  Province  of  Canada,  made  in  March,  1857,  and  referred  to  in 
the  Resolution  of  the  Legislative  Assembly  of  Ontario,  enclose<l  in  your  despatch  first  above 
mentioned,  is  not  in  posses.sion  of  the  Government,  but  will,  with  the  Report  of  Mr.  Justice 
Draper,  referred  to  in  the  same  Resolution,  be  Ibund  in  the  Appendix  to  the  Journals  of  the 
Legislative  Assembly  of  the  late  Province  of  Canada  (Vol.  1.5,  No.  4,  1857). 

I  have  the  honour  to  be,  Sir, 

Your  obedient  servant, 
(Signed)  Joseph  Howe, 

Seen  tart/  uj'  iStatejvr  the  Piovinces. 
His  Honor  the  Lieut.-Governor 

of  Ontario,  Toronto. 


Government  House, 

Toronto,  5th  Dec,  1873. 

Sir, — Adverting  to  the  correspondence  that  has  taken  place  respecting  the  settlement 
of  the  question  of  the  Northern  and  Western  Boundaries  of  the  Province  of  Ontario,  I  have 
the  honour  to  desire  you  to  be  good  enough  to  obtain  through  the  Colonial  Office,  for  the  use 
of  my  Government, tracings  of  the  Maps  used  by  the  English  and  French  Plenipotentiaries  in 
1713  and  17(i3,  and  of  those  sent  at  differ*  nt  times  by  the  Hudson's  Bay  Con.pany  to  the 
Lords  of  Trade  and  Plantations  ;  copies  of  all  correspondence  between  the  Governmi  nts  of 
England  and  France  v  pon  the  subject ;  and  also  copy  of  the  instructions  given  to  the  Eng- 
lish Commi?sioners  appointed  under  both  the  Treaty  of  Ryswick  and  the  Ireaty  of  Utrecht, 
together  with  any  reports  which  they  may  have  made. 

I  have,  tic, 

W.  P.   HOWLANI*. 


Department  or  the  Secretary  op  State, 

Ottawa,  20th  December,  1873. 

Sir, — With  reference  to  your  despatch  No.  240,  of  the  5th  inst.,  requesting,  with  refer- 
ence to  previous  correspondence  on  the  subject  of  the  settlement  of  the  Northern  and  West- 
ern Boundaries  of  the  Province  of  Ontario,  that  application  be  made  through  the  (  olonial 
Office  for  copies  of  certain  Maps   and  other   Documents  connected  with  such   boundaries,  I 

3 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  14.)  A.  1875 


have  the  hoaour  to  iaform  you  that  His  ExcelleDcy  the  Groveraor-Geaeral  ia  Couacil  has 
beeu  pleased  to  direct  that  steps  be  taken  to  procure  copies  of  the  Maps  aad   Documents  in 

question. 

I  have  the  honour  to  be,  Sir, 

Your  obedient  servant, 
(Signed)  Edouard  J.  Lanqevin, 

Under  Secretary  of  State. 

To  His  Honour  the  Lieutenant-Q-overnor  of  Ontario, 
Toronto,  Ontario. 


Department  of  the  Secretary  op  State, 

Ottawa,  26th  Dec,  1873. 

SiR^ I  have  the  honour  to  invite  your  attention  to  the  letter  addressed  to  your  prede- 
cessor, on  the  12th  November,  1872,  covering  a  copy  of  a  Report  of  His  Excellency  the 
Governor-General  in  Council,  on  the  subject  of  the  Northern  and  Western  Boundaries  of  the 
Province  of  Ontario. 

May  I  request  that  you  will  have  the  goodness  to  bring  the  matter  under  the  early 
notice  of  your  2;overnment  with  a  view  to  their  coming  to  a  decision  in  the  proposition,  con- 
tained in  the  Order  in  Council  in  question,  to  submit  the  question  of  the  boundary  to  the 
decision  of  the  Judicial  Commission  of  the  Privy  Council. 

I  have  the  honour  to  be.  Sir, 

Your  obedient  servant, 
(Signed)  D.  Christie, 

Secretary  of  State. 
To  His  Honour  the  Lieutenant-Governor 
of  Ontario,  Toronto. 


Department  of  the  Secretary  of  State, 
Ottawa,  Feb.  12th,  1874. 

Sir, — I  have  the  honour  to  transmit  to  you  for  the  consideration  of  your  Government,  a 
copy  of  a  despatch  from  the  Right  Hon.  the  Secretary  of  State  in  the  Colonies  on  the  sub- 
ject of  the  application  contained  in  your  despatch,  No.  240,  of  the  5th  December  last,  for 
copies  of  certain  documents  connected  with  the  question  of  the  Northern  and  Western 
Boundaries  of  the  Province  of  Ontario. 

I  have  the  honour  to  be, 
Sir, 
Your  obedient  servant, 
(Signed)         Edouard  J.  Langbvin, 

Under  Secretary  of  State. 

To  His  Honor  the  Lieutenant-Governor  of  Ontario, 
Toronto. 


The  Secretary  of  State  for  the  Colonies  to  the  Governor-General. 

Downing  Street,  January  21st,  1874 

I  have  received  your  despatch,  No.  .300,  of  the  24th  ult.,  forwarding  a  copy  of  a  report 
of  a  Committee  of  the  Privy  Council,  applying  for  copies  of  certain  documents  for  the  use 
of  the  Govt-riiment  of  Ontario.  I  shall  have  much  pleasure  in  endeavouring,  as  far  as  possi- 
ble, to  comply  with  the  request  of  the  Council,  but  it  will  be  desirable  that  I  should  be  fur- 

4 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  14.)  A.  1875 


nished  with  more  specific  details  as  to  what  documents  are  required,  as  I  am  informed  that 
without  such  particulars  a  very  extensive  search  would  be  necessary — as  much  as  six 
months — to  copy  out  tl;e  request  of  the  Government  of  Ontario. 

I  have,  &c., 

(Signed)  Kimberley. 

Governor  General  the  Rt.  Honorable 
the  Earl  of  Dufferin,  K.P.,  K.U.B. 


Department  of  the  Secretary  of  State, 
Ottawa,  20th  Feb.,  1874. 

Sir, — With  reference  to  my  letter  of  the  12th  inst.,  I  have  the  honour  to  transmit  to 
you,  for  the  information  of  your  Government,  a  copy  of  a  further  despatch  from  the  Right 
Hon.  the  Secretary  of  State  for  the  Colonies,  in  reference  to  your  application  for  certain 
documents  connected  with  the  question  of  the  Northern  and  Western  Boundaries  of^the 
Province  of  Ontario. 

I  have  the  honour  to  be,  Sir, 

Your  obedient  servant, 

Edward  J.  Langevin, 

Under  Secretary  of  State. 

To  His  Hon.  the  Lieut.-Governor  of  Ontario, 
Toronto. 


The  Secretary  of  State  for  the  Colonies  to  the  Governor-General. 

Downing  Street, 

29th  January,  1874. 

My  Lord,— With  reference  k)  my  Despatch,  No.  373,  of  the  21st  inst.,  I  have  to  accjuaint 
your  Lordship  that  I  have  caused  inquiries  to  l)e  made  at  the  Public  Record  Office,  with  the 
viewof  asceitainin<r  the  best  means  of  obtaining  the  tracings  of  maps,  and  copies  of  correspon- 
dence required  for  the  use  of  the  Oovernmcnt  of  Ontario. 

From  a  preliminary  examination  which  has  been  made  in  that  Department,  it  appears 
that  between  1713  and  17G3,  there  are  1  65  volumes  of  correspondence  with  France  alone, 
three  volumes  relating  to  the  Treaty  of  Ryswick,  and  thirty-seven  volumes  of  instructions 
with  reference  to  the  Treaty  of  Utrecht. 

Of  maps,  there  appear  to  be,  on  a  casual  examination  only,  about  fifty  relating  to  Canada, 
besides  various  volumes  of  charts. 

The  authorities  at  the  Record  Office  are  desirous  of  giving  every  assistance  in  their 
power,  in  obtaining  the  requisite  information,  but  they  are  unable  to  undertake  such  an  ex- 
tensive search,  as  the  examination  of  all  the  documents  to  which  I  have  referred  would  entail, 
and  they  could  not  take  upon  themselves  the  responsibility  of  deciding  what  maps  and  corres- 
pondence should  bo  copied. 

In  these  circumstances  they  suggest  that  some  gentleman  should  be  appointed  by  the 
Canadian  Government,  to  make  the  necessary  search,  and  to  decide  what  documents  it  may  be 
desirable  to  copy ;  but  in  order  that  your  Government  may  not  be  put  to  any  unnecessary  ex- 
pense on  account  of  copies  of  documents  or  maps  which  may  be  already  in  the  Archives  of 
Canada,  I  would  suggest  that  any  one  appointed  by  your  Government  for  that  purpose,  should 
be  instructed  to  submit  to  your  Lordship,  in  the  first  instance,  a  list  of  what  he  may  deem 
necessary  to  be  copied. 

Should  your  Government  decide  to  adopt  the  course  proposed,  it   will   be   necessary  for 

5 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers   (No.  14.)  A   1875 


your  Lordship  to  communicate  to  me  the  name  of  the  gentleman  appointed,  so  that  the  nec- 
essary permission  may  be  given  to  the  Record  Office  for  granting  him  access  to  the  Records  of 
this  department. 

I  have,  (^c, 
(Signed)  Kimberley. 

Governor-General  the  Right  Honorable 

The  Earl  of  Dufferin,  K.P.,  C.B., 
&c.,         &c.,         &c. 


Clearville,  3rd  March,  1874. 

My  Dear  iSir, — I  received,  a  few  days  ago,  a  letter  from  Mr.  Kinlock,  enclosing  a  copy 
of  a  despatch  from  Lord  Kimberly,  in  refierence  to  your  application  for  maps,  memorials,  and 
despatches,  tending  to  establish  the  claims  put  forward  by  your  Government  in  reference  to 
the  Western  and  Northern  Boundaries  of  the  Province.  1  will,  as  requested  by  you,  state 
more  definitely  than  I  did  in  the  closing  paragraph  of  my  Report,  the  maps  and  papers  which 
I  think  will  be  valuable  in  the  settlement  of  the  disputed  boundaries. 

1.  Map  used  by  the  English  and  French  plenipotentiaries  in  1713,  and  referred  to  in  a 
memorial  addressed  by  the  Marquis  de  Forcy  to  Mr.  Prior,  7th  January,  1713,  U.  S.,  and 
by  Mr.  Prior  to  Lord  Bolingbrooke,  on  the  following  day  (see  my  Report,  pp.  121,  122,319, 
320,  321,  322). 

2.  Map  referred  to  by  Mr.  Pitt  in  his  despatch  to  M.  Bussy,  of  the  17th  August,  1761  (see 
Report,  pp.  70,  222,  22.3). 

3.  Map  used  by  Due  de  Choiseul  and  the  Duke  of  Bedford,  and  the  formal  cession  of 
Canada,  February,  1763. 

4.  Map  referred  to  by  M.  de  Mofras  in  the  extract  from  his  book  entitled  "  Exploration  de 
r  Oregon  et  des  Caiifornies  "  here  given  in  a  map  engraved  in  17.57,  and  attached  to  the 
memorial  of  the  Commissioners  of  the  Kings  of  France  and  of  England  in  America.  It  may  be 
observed  that  New  France  extended  as  far  as  the  Pacific  Ocean.  This  must  have  been  the 
memorial  of  the  Commissioners  for  settling  the  boundaries  under  the  Treaty  of  Paris  of  1763, 
or  1783  (see  Report,  pp.  71,  230,  231). 

5.  Map  from  the  Hudson's  Bay  Company  to  the  Lords  of  Trade  and  Plantations,  Febru- 
ary 8th,  1712  (see  Report,  116,  117,  and  pages  308,  309). 

6.  Map  from  the  Hudson's  Bay  Company  to  the  L,ords  of  Trade  and  Plantations, 4th  Au- 
ust,  1714  (see  Report,  pp.  120  and  315,  216). 

7.  Map  from  the  Hudson's  Bay  Company  to  the  Lords  of  Trade  and  Plantations,  setting 
forth  the  limits  of  their  Territories,  July  and  October,  1750  (see  Report,  p.  123). 

8.  Copy  of  the  instructions  to  the  English  Commis.sioners  appointed  in  1719,  under  the 
Treaty  of  Utrecht,  to  settle  the  boundary  between  Canada  and  the  Hudson's  Bay  Company's 
territories,  and  any  Report  they  may  have  made  (.see  Report,  pp.  121  and  318). 

9.  Copy  of  the  Memorial  of  the  French  Ambassador,  3Iarch,  1698-9,  in  reference  to  the 
Northern  limits  of  Canada,  and  the  English  Memorial  to  which  it  is  a  reply  (sec  p.  125). 

What  other  papers  there  may  be  that  would  be  valuable,  it  would  be  impossible  to  say 
without  an  actual  examination  of  the  papers  referred  to  by  Lord  Kimberley.  My  impression 
is  that  tho.se  that  I  have  here  enumerated  will  be  found  sufficient ;  especially  will  the  map 
referred  to  by  the  Marquis  dc  Forcy  be  found  to  give  to  Canada  a  large  section  of  territory, 
which,  at  a  later  period,  was  claimed  by  the  Hudson's  B:iy  Company.  I  am  led  to  this  con- 
clusion by  Mr.  Prior's  letters,  and  by  a  comparison  of  the  Hudson  Bay  Company's  Memorial 
of  1712  and  1714  (see  pp.  308-9  and  315-16). 

I  am,  yours  very  truly, 
Hon.  0.  Mowat,  Attorney-General,  David  Mills. 

Ontario. 


Government  House, 

Toronto,  18th  May,  1874. 

Sir, — I  have  the  honour,  in  reply  to  your  communication  of  20th  February,  1874.  to 
state  that  aa  far  as  the  data  in  the  posses.sion  of  this  Government  throw  any  light  upon  the  ques- 

6 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  14.)  A.  1876 


tion  of  the  Northern  and  Western  boundaries  of  this  Province,  copies  of  the  following  maps 
and  papers  ■will  be  sufficient  to  establish  the  point  which  it  seeks  to  prove,  vit.  : — 

1.  Map  used  by  the  English  and  French  Plenipotentiaries  in  1713,  and  referred  to  in  a 
memorial  addressed  by  the  Marquis  De  Forcy  to  Mr.  Prior,  7th  January,  1713,  U.S.,  and  by 
Mr.  Prior  to  Lord  Bolingbroke  on  the  following  day. 

2.  Map  referred  to  by  Mr.  Pitt  in  his  despatch  to  Mr.   Bussy  of  the  17th  August,  17G1. 

3.  Maps  used  by  Due  de  Choiseul  and  the  Duke  of  Bedford,  at  the  signing  of  the  Treaty 
of  Paris,  and  the  formal  cession  of  Canada,  February,  1763. 

4.  Map  referred  to  by  M.  de  Mofras  in  the  extract  from  his  book  entitled  "  Explorations 
de  I'Oregon  et  des  Californies"  here  given.  In  a  map  engraved  in  1757,  and  attached  to  the 
memorial  of  the  Commissioners  of  the  Kings  of  France  and  of  England,  in  America,  it  may 
be  observed  that  New  France  extended  as  far  as  the  Pacific  Ocean.  This  must  have  been 
the  memorial  of  the  Commissioners  for  settling  the  boundaries  under  the  Treaty  of  Paris  of 
17G3  or  1783. 

r>.  Map  from  the  Hudson's  Bay  Company  to  the  Lords  of  Trade  and  Plantations, 
February  8th,  1712. 

C).  Map  from  the  Hudson's  Bay  Company  to  the  Lords  of  Trade  and  Plantations,  4th 
August,  1714. 

7.  Map  from  the  Hudson's  liay  Company  to  the  Lords  of  Trade  and  Plantations,  set- 
ting forth  the  limits  of  their  territories,  July  and  October,  17.50. 

8.  Copy  of  the  Instructions  to  the  English  Commissioners  appointed  in  1719  under  the 
Treaty  of  Utrecht,  to  settle  the  boundaries  between  Canada  and  the  Hudson's  Bay  Company's 
territories,  and  any  Report  they  may  have  made. 

9.  Copy  of  the  Memorial  of  the  French  Ambassador,  March,  1098-9,  in  reference  to  the 
northern  limits  of  Canada,  and  the  Engli.sh  Memorial  to  which  it  is  a  reply.  Should  it  be 
found  that  further  information  will  be  desirable,  this  Government  will  be  happy  to  avail  itself 
of  the  kind  suggestion  of  the  Right  Honourable  the  Secretary  of  State  for  the  Colonies. 

I  have,  &c., 

John  Crawford. 
The  Hon.  The  Secretary  of  Stat« 
of  Canada,  Ottawa. 


Department  of  the  Secretary  ok  State, 

Ottawa,  5th  June,  1874. 

Sir, — I  have  the  honour  to  transmit  to  you  herewith  a  copy  of  an  Order  in  Council  of 
the  3rd  inst.,  suggesting  that  your  Government  be  moved  to  appoint  a  Commissioner  to  meet 
the  Hon.  the  Minister  of  the  Interior,  and  arrange  some  joint  sytem  for  the  sale  of  lands,  and 
adjusting  disputed  rights  in  the  territory  claimed  by  both  Governments,  by  the  adoption  of  a 
conventional  boundary  on  the  West  and  North,  and  for  the  other  purposes  mentioned  in  the 
said  Order  in  Council. 

I  have  the  honour  to  be,  Sir, 

Your  obedient  servant, 
(Signed)  Edouard  J.  Lanoevin, 

Undersecretary  of  State. 
His  Honor  The  Lieutenant-Governor 
of  Ontario,  Toronto. 


Copy  of  a  Report  of  a  Committee  of  the  Honourable  the  Privy  Council,  approved  by  His  Excel- 
lency the  Governor-General  in  Council,  on  the  3rd  June,  1874. 

The  Committee  of  the  Privy  Council  have  had  under  consideration  the  memoran- 
dum, dated  2nd  June,  and  hereunto' annexed,  from  the  Hon.  the  IMinister  of  the  Interior,  re- 
presenting that  as  some  considerable  time  must  elapse  before  the  Northern  and  Western 
boundaries  of  Ontario  can  be  finally  adjusted,  it  is  desirable  in  the  meantime  to  agree  upon 

7 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  14.)  A.   1875 


.conventional  boundaries,  and  suggesting  that  the  Ontario  Government  be  moved  to  appoint 
a  Commissioner  to  meet  him,  the  Minister  of  the  Interior,  and  arrange  some  joint  system  for 
the  sale  of  lands,  and  adjusting  disputed  rights  in  the  territory  claimed  by  both  Governments 
by  the  adoption  of  a  conventional  boundary  on  the  West  and  North,  and  that,  after  the  final  ad- 
justment of  the  true  boundaries,  titles  to  lands  should  be  confirmed  by  the  Government, 
whether  of  Ontario  or  the  Dominion,  whichever  should  be  the  party  to  legalize  the  same. 

The  Committee  concur  in  the  recommendation  submitted  in  the  said  memorandum,  and 
submit  the  same  for  your  Excellency's  approval. 

(Signed)  W.  A.   Himsworth, 

Clerk  Privy  Council. 


Department  of  the  Interior, 

June  2nd,   1874. 

The  undersigned  has  to  report  that  on  the  16th  May,  1872,  a  Report  of  the  Honourable 
the  Privy  Council  was  approved,  embodying  a  memorandum,  from  the  Honourable  the  Min- 
ister of  Justice,  having  reference  to  the  boundaries  of  the  northern  and  western  part  of 
Ontario,  wherein  the  Minister  of  Justice  calls  attention  to  the  fact  that  the  mineral  wealth  of 
the  North- West  country  is  likely  to  attract  a  large  immigration  into  those  parts,  with  a  view 
to  its  development  as  well  as  to  prevent  the  confusion  and  strife  that  is  certain  to  arise  and 
continue  among  the  miners  and  other  settlers  so  long  as  the  uncertainty  as  to  boundary 
exists.  The  undersigned  begs  leave  to  recommend  that  the  Government  of  Ontario  be  urged 
to  arrange  with  that  of  the  Dominion  for  some  joint  course  of  action  as  to  the  granting  of 
land. 

That  as  the  Indian  title  of  a  considerable  part  of  the  territory  in  dispute  had  not  then 
been  extinguished,  it  was  thought  desirable  to  postpone  the  negotiations  for  a  conventional 
arrangement,  under  which  the  territory  might  be  opened  for  sale  or  settlement,  until  a  Treaty 
was  concluded  with  the  Indians. 

That  barrier  being  now  removed,  the  undersigned  has  the  honour  to  recommend  that  as 
some  considerable  time  must  yet  elapse  before  the  boundaries  of  Ontario  can  be  finally  ad- 
justed, it  is  desirable  in  the  meantime  to  agree  upon  conventional  boundaries,  otherwise  the 
development  of  that  important  portion  of  Canada  lying  between  Lake  Superior  and  Lake  of 
the  Woods  will  be  seriously  retarded,  as  applications  to  take  up  lands  in  that  section  are 
being  constantly  made,  and  the  inability  to  obtain  recognition  of  claims  from  either  the  Gov- 
ernment of  Ottawa  or  Toronto  is  impeding  the  settlement  of  the  country. 

The  undersigned  would  therefore  suggest  that  the  Ontario  Government  be  invited  to 
arrange  with  the  D(jminion  Government  for  some  joint  course  of  action  as  to  the  granting  of 
land  and  adjusting  disputed  rights  in  the  territory  claimed  by  both  Governments,  and  that 
the  Ontario  Government  be  moved  to  appoint  a  Commissioner  to  meet  the  undersigned  and 
arrange  some  joint  system  for  the  sale  of  lands,  by  the  adoption  of  a  conventional  boundary 
on  the  We^t  and  North,  and  that  after  the  final  adjustment  of  the  true  boundaries,  titles  to 
the  land  should  be  confirmed  by  the  Government,  wliether  of  Ontario  or  the  Dominion, 
whichever  should  be  the  proper  party  to  legalize  the  same. 

(Signed)  David  Laird. 

Minister  of  the  Interior. 


Government  House, 

Toronto,  10th  July,  1874. 

Sir, — T  have  the  honour  to  transmit  herewith  a  copy  of  an  Order  in  Council  approving 
of  a  joint  memorandum,  signed  by  the  Honourable  David  Laird,  Minister  of  the,  Interior  of 
the  Dominion  of  Canada,  and  the  Honourable  the  Commissioner  of  Crown  Lands  of  this  Pro- 

8 


B9  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  14.)  A.  1875 


viace  (a  copy  of  which  is  also  enclosed)  fixing  a  temporary  boundary  of  the  Province  of  On- 
tario on  the  West  and  North,  and  adopting  a  system  for  the  sale  of  lands  and  for  adjusting 
disputed  rights  in  the  territory  claimed  by  both  Governments. 

I  have,  &c., 

John  Crawford. 
The  Honourable  the  Secretary  of  State, 
Canada,  Ottawa. 


Copy  of  an  Order  in  'Council,  approved  by  His  Excellency  the  Lietitenant-Govemor,  the  ninth 

day  of  July,  1874. 

The  Committee  of  Council  have  had  under  consideration  the  Report  of  the  Honourable 
the  Commissioner  of  Crown  Lands,  dated  2nd  July,  1874,  submitting  for  ratification  and 
approval  by  your  Excellency'  a  joint  memorandum  signed  by  the  Hon.  David  Laird,  Minister 
of  the  Interior  of  the  Dominion  of  Canada,  and  the  Honourable  the  Commissioner  of  Crown 
Lands, whereof  a  copy  is  hereto  annexed,  fixing  a  temporary  conventional  boundary  of  the  Pro- 
vince of  Ontario  on  the  West  and  North,  and  adopting  a  system  for  the  sale  of  lands  and  for 
adjusting  disputed  rights  in  the  territory  claimed  by  both  Governments. 

The  Committee  advise  that  the  arrangements  proposed  in  the  said  memorandum  be  adopted 
and  ratified  by  your  Excellency. 

Certified.  (Signed)  J.  G.  Scott, 


9th  July,  1874. 


Clerk  Executive  Council,  Cntario. 


Department  of  the  Secretary  of  State, 
Ottawa,  22nd  July,  1874. 

Sir, — I  have  the  honour  to  transmit  to  you,  for  the  information  of  your  Government,  a 
copy  of  an  order  of  His  Excellency  the  Governor-General  in  Council,  approving  of  a  memo- 
randum of  agreement  adopted  by  the  Hon.  the  Minister  of  the  Interior  and  the  Hon.  the  Com- 
missioner of  Crown  Lands  of  the  Province  of  Ontario,  relative  to  a  provisional  arrangement 
respecting  the  Western  and  Northern  Boundaries  of  that  Province. 

I  have  the  honour  to  be, 
Sir, 

Your  obedient  servant, 

Edotiard  J.  Lanoevin, 

Under-Secretary  of  State. 
To  His  Honor  the  Lieutenant-Governor  of  Ontario, 
Toronto,  Ont. 


Copy  of  a  Repoii  of  a  Committee  of  the  Honourable  the  Privy  Council,  ajyprovcd  by  His  Excel- 
lency the  Governor-General  in  Council  on  the  8th  day  of  July,  1874. 

The  Committee  have  had  nnder  consideration  a  memorandum,  dated  29th  June,  1874, 
from  the  Honorable  the  Minister  of  the  Interior,  stating  that,  in  pursuance  of  the  suggestion 
contained  in  the  Minute  in  Council  of  the  3rd  June  inst.  relative  to  a  provisional  arrangement 
respecting  the  Western  and  Northern  Boundaries  of  the  Province  of  Ontario  and  the  ques- 
tions therewith  connected,  the  Ontario  Government  appointed  the  Hon.  T.  B.  Pardee,  Com- 
missioner of  Crown  Lands  in  that  Produce,  to  meet  him,  the  Minister  of  the  Interior,  at  his 
ofiice,  with  a  view  to  their  arriving  at  some  understanding  of  a  provisional  nature  on  the  sub 
jects  referred,  and  that  on  the  26th  June  ult.  the  memorandum  hereto  annexed  was  agreed, 
upon,  and  he  submits  the  same  for  the  consideration  of  Your  Excellency  in  Council. 

9 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  14.)  A.  1875 


The  Committee  are  of  opinion  that  the  provisional  krrangement  proposed  in  the  said 
memorandum  is  unobjectionable,  and  advise  that  the  same  be  sanctioned  by  Your  Excellencry^ 
in  Council. 

Certified — 
(Signed)         W.  A.  Himsworth. 

C.  P.  C. 
To  the  Honorable  the  Secretary  of  State. 


The  Government  of  the  Dominion  of  Canada  having,  by  an  Order  in  Council,  dated  the 
3rd  day  of  June,  1874,  suggested  that  the  Ontario  Government  should  be  moved  to  appoint 
a  Commissioner  to  meet  the  Minister  of  the  Interior,  and  "arrange  some  joint  system  for  the 
sale  of  lands,  and  adjusting  disputed  rights  in  the  Territory  claimed  by  both  Governments, 
by  the  adoption  of  a  conventional  boundary  on  the  West  and  North,  and  that  after  the  final  ad- 
justment of  the  true  boundaries  titles  to  lands  should  be  confirmed  by  the  Government, 
whether  of  Ontario  or  the  Dominion,  whichever  should  be  the  proper  party  to  legaliee  the 
eame  ;" 

And  the  Ontario  Government  having  acted  on  the  suggestion  of  the  Privy  Council,  by 
appointing  the  Commissioner  of  Crown  Lands  of  that  Province  to  meet  the  Minister  of  the 
Interior,  and  discuss  the  proposed  arrangements,  and  the  said  parties  having  met  this  day, 
have  agreed  to  the  following  propositions  as  the  basis  of  a  memorandum  to  be  submitted  to 
their  respective  Governments  : — • 

1.  That  the  conventional  boundary  of  the  Province  of  Ontario,  for  the  purposes  set  forth  in 
the  said  Order  in  Council  of  the  3rd  June  instant,  shall  be  in  the  West  the  meridian  line 
passing  through  the  most  easterly  points  of  Hunter's  Island,  run  south  until  it  meets  the 
boundary  line  between  the  United  States  and  Canada,  and  north  until  it  intersects  the  fifty- 
first  parallel  of  latitude,  and  the  said  fifty-first  parallel  of  latitude  shall  be  the  conventional 
boundary  of  the  Province  of  Ontario  and  the  north. 

2.  That  all  patents  for  lands  in  the  disputed  Territory,  to  the  east  and  south  of  the  said 
conventional  boundaries,  until  the  true  boundaries  can  be  adjusted,  shall  be  issued  by  the 
Government  of  Ontario  ;  and  all  patents  of  lands  on  the  west  or  north  of  these  conventional 
boundaries  shall  be  issued  by  the  Dominion  Government. 

3.  That  when  the  true  west  and  north  boundaries  of  Ontario  shall  have  been  definitely  ad- 
justed, each  of  the  respective  Governments  shall  confirm  and  ratify  such  patents  as  may  have 
been  is-ued  by  the  other  for  lands  then  ascertained  not  to  be  within  the  Territory  of 
the  Government  which  granted  them,  and  each  of  the  rospective  Governments  shall  also  ac- 
count for  the  proceeds  of  such  lands  as  the  true  boundaries,  when  determined,  may  show  to 
belong  of  right  to  the  other. 

4.  That  the  Government  of  the  Dominion  shall  transfer  to  the  Government  of  the  Province 
of  Ontario  all  applications  for  lands  lying  to  the  east  and  south  of  the  conventional  bounda- 
rie.«,  and  also  all  deposits  paid  on  the  same;  and  the  Ontario  Government  shall  transfer  to 
the  Dominion  Government  all  applications  for  lands  lying  to  the  west  or  north  of  the  said 
boundaries,  and  likewise  all  deposits  paid  thereon  ;  and  such  of  the  said  applications  as  are  bona 
fide  and  in  proper  form,  shall  be  dealt  with  finally,  according  to  the  priority  of  the  original 
filing,  and  where  applications  for  the  same  lands  have  been  filed  in  the  Departments  of  both 
Governments,  the  priority  shall  be  reckoned  as  if  all  had  been  filed  in  one  and  the  same 
ofl&ce. 

Signed  in  duplicate  this  2Gth  day  of  June,   1874. 

(Signed)  David  Laird,  /• 

Minhter  of  the  Interior. 
(Signed)  T.  B.  Pardee, 

Commissioner  Crown  Lands. 


Department  of  the  Secretary  of  State, 
Ottawa,  6th  August,  1874. 

Sir,-  -With  reference  to  your  despatch  of  the  18th  May  last,  on  the  subject  of  maps  and 
papers  necessary  to  establish  the  Northern  and    Western   Boundaries  of  the  Province  of  On- 

10 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  14.)  A.  1875 


*ario,  I  have  the  honour  to  transmit  to  you,  for  the  information  of  your  Government,  a  copy 
of  a  despatch  from  the  Right  Honorahle  the  Secretary  of  State  for  the  Colonies,  together 
with  a  copy  of  the  letter  from  the  Public  Record  Office  therein  referred  to,  specifying  the 
documents  connected  with  the  boundary  line  cpiestion,  which  are  to  be  found  among  the  re- 
cords of  that  office. 

May  I  ref|uest  that  you  will,  in  accordance  with  the  request  contained  in  the  last  para- 
graph of  Lord  Carnaivon's  despatch,  cause  this  Department  to  be  furnished  with  a  list  of  the 
maps  or  documents  (if  any;  enumerated  in  the  letter  from  the  Record  Office,  which  your 
Government  may  desire  to  be  supplied  with  ? 

I  have  the  honour  to  be,  Sir, 

Your  obedient  servant, 

Edouard  J.  Langevin, 

Under-Sec.  of  State. 
Tt)  His  Honor  the  Lieutenant-Governor  of  Ontario. 
Toronto,  Ont. 


T'lH  Serretari/  of  State  for  the  Colonies  to  the  Earl  of  Ihiffcrin. 

Downing  Street,  10th  July,  1874. 

My  Lord, — With  reference  to  your  Lor.lship's  despatch.  No.  Ufi  of  the  27th  May, 
transmitting  a  copy  of  a  despatch  from  Lieutenant-Governor  Crawford,  relative  to  the  maps 
and  (jtlier  documents  connected  with  the  NortliL-rn  and  Western  Boundaries  of  the  Province 
0'  Ontario,  I  transmit  to  you  herewith  a  Report  which  has  been  received  from  the  Record 
Office. 

2.  From  the  Report  you  will  perceive  that  the  maps  askod  for  in  paragraphs  one  to 
sev«i  of  the  Lieutenant-Governor's  despatch  cannot  be  found  in  the  Record  Office,  although 
there  are  two  copies  of  another  map,  which  might  convey  the  information. 

The  other  documents  are  not  exactly  identical  with  those  of  which  copies  seem  to  be 
wanted  by  the  Lieutenant-Governor. 

3.  In  the  circumstances.  I  have  to  rcfjuest  that  you  will  communicate  this  Report  to 
the  Lieutenant-Governor,  in  order  that  he  may  decide  which,  if  any,  of  the  maps  or  docu- 
ments mentioned  he  would  wish  to  have  copied  before  any  further  proceedings  are  taken. 

I  have,  (fee, 

(Signed)  CARNARVON. 


Mr.  Sainsburi/  to  Sir  T.  Dvffus  Hardy,  D.  C.  L. 


Public  Record  Office, 

30th  June,  1874. 


Dear  Sir  Thomas.— With  reference  to  the  Hon.  Robert  Meade's  letter  to  you  of  the 
l.Tth  inst.,  enclosing  one  from  the  LieutcnantGovornor  of  Ontario  of  ISth  March  last,  speci- 
fying certain  maps  and  documents  connected  with  the  Nortliern  and  Western  Boundaries  of 
the  Province,  which  are  required  for  the  use  of  his  Government,  and  requesting  the  Master 
of  the  Rolls  to  have  the  documents  applied  for,  furnished  through  the  Colonial  office  to  the 
Lieutenant-Governor  of  Ontario,  I  have  the  honour  to  report  that  I  have  made  a  careful 
search  through  the  collection  of  maps  preserved  in  this  office,  consisting  of  thirty-four 
volumes  of  maps,  and  ten  cases  containing  upwards  of  four  hundred  MS.  and  printed  maps, 
but  that  I  do  not  find  either  of  the  maps  specified  in  paragraphs  one  to  seven  of  Lieutenant- 
Governor  Crawford's  said  letter  of  the  18th  March  last.  There  is  in  this  office  "  an  accurate 
Map  of  North  America,  describing  and  distinguishing  the  British,  Spanish  and  French  Do- 
minions on  this  Great  Continent,  according  to  the  definitive  I'reaty  concluded  at  Paris  lOth 
February,  1763  (maps,  case  3G,  No.  20),  with  several  of  the  articles  of  siid  Treaty  also  printed 
thereon."  This  map  is  in  size  about  4  feet  by  3^  feet,  but  cannot  be  the  "  map  used  by  the 
Due  de  Choiseul  and  the  Duke  of  Bedford  at  the  signing  of  the  Treaty  of  Paris  and  the  for 
mal  cession  of  Canada  February,  1763,  referred  to  by  Lieut.-Governor  Crawford  in  paragraph 
3  of  his  said  letter.   There  is,  however,  another  copy  of  this  map  in  the  Public  Record  Office 

11 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  14.)  A.   1875 


appended  to  a  most  elaborate  Keport  of  the  Lords  of  Trade  and  Plantations,  to  the  King,  of 
8th  June,  176.3  (America  and  to  India,  Volume  268),  in  reference  to  the  "  Articles  of  the 
late  definitive  Treaty  of  Peace,  which  relate  to  the  cessions  made  by  France  and  Spain,"  and 
"  particularly  as  to  Canada  and  Newfoundland  "  the  "  encroachments  made  by  the  French  in 
this  Article,  contrary  to  the  stipulations  in  the  Treaty  of  Utrecht."  Pencil  lines  have  been 
made  on  this  map  (endorsed,  "  This  belongs  to  Mr.  Secretary  Townshend's  Office  ")  propos- 
ing the  future  bounds  of  the  new  colony  of  Canada,  "  With  reference  to  paragraph  eight  of 
Lieutenant-Governor  Crawford's  letter,  requesting  a  "  Copy  of  the  instructions  to  the  English 
Commissioners,  appointed  in  1719,  under  the  Treaty  of  Utrecht,  to  settle  the  boundary  be- 
tween Canada  and  the  Hudson's  Bay  Company's  Territories,  and  any  report  they  may  have 
made,"  I  have  the  honour  to  report  that  I  find  the  following  documents,  viz.  :  1719,  July 
3rd,  Mr.  Bladon  to  "Sir.  Delafaye,  Report  on  the  Articles  of  the  Treaty  of  Utrecht  that  occur 
to  me  as  not  hitherto  decided,  enclosing  the  full  powers  given  by  Her  late  Majesty  to  her 
Commissioners  appointed  to  treat  with  those  of  France  upon  the  Ninth  Article  of  the  Treaty 
of  Commerce,  and  the  full  powers  given  by  the  late  French  King  to  his  Commissaries  .Also 
Draft  of  Instructions  for  Martin  Bladen,  Esq.,  appointed  His  Majesty's  Commissary  to  treat 
with  the  Commissary  or  Commissaries  to  be  appointed  by  the  most  Christian  King.  And  a 
paper  of  alterations  for  the  same  (France,  No.  357). 

1719  Aug.  26th.  Report  of  the  Lords  of  Trade  ahd  Plantations  to  the  Lords  Justices, 
relating  to  Mr.  Bladon's powers  and  instructions  (signed  by  Charles  Cook,  P.  Docminique. 
D.  Pulteney  and  Martin  Bladon).      (France,  No.  357.) 

1719,  Sept.  3rd.  Copy  of  the  Commission  of  Daniel  Pulteney  and  Martin  Bladon 
(France,  No.  357). 

1719,  Sept.  3rd.  Instructions  for  Daniel  Pulteney  and  Martin  Bladon,  appointed  His 
Majesty's  Commissaries  to  treat  with  the  Commi.^sary  or  Commissaries  to  be  appointed  by 
the  Most  Christian  Kins.  Given  at  Whitehall  the  3rd  day  of  September,  1719  (King's  let- 
ters, No.  13,  1719.) 

1719,  Sept.  3rd.     Full  powers  to  Pulteney  and  Bladon  (Ibid). 

The  memorial  of  the  Governor  and  Company  of  Adventurer.^  of  England  tradin  into 
Hudson's  Bay,  to  the  Lords  Commissioners  of  Trade  and  Plantations,  with  this  man.  The 
seal  of  the  Company  was  affixed  to  the  original  which  Col.  Bladon  took  with  him  to  Fiance 
in  Sept.,  1719.     (B.  T.  Hudson's  Bay,  No.  1). 

1719,  Nov.  Ist.  Letter  from  Martin  Bladon  to  iMr.  Delafaye,  from  Paris  :  The  meet- 
ing first  intended  for  Saturday,  took  not  place  till  yesterday  (France,  No  355),  enclosing 
copy  of  the  French  Commission  appointing  Marechal  d'Estr^^es  and  Abb6  Dubois  to  trea^ 
with  His  Majesty's  Commissaries. 

1719,  Nov.  7.  Letter  from  Mr.  Bladon  to  Mr.  Delafliyc  from  Paris:  Our  time  was 
spent  on  Saturday  last  in  preparatory  discourses  concerning  the  intent  of  the  10th  Article  of 
the  Treaty  of  Utrecht,  relating  to  the  boundaries  of  Hudson's  Bay,  and  at  our  next  meeting 
to-morrow  we  design  to  give  in  the  claim  of  the  Hudson's  Bay  Company  in  writing,  in  case 
Abb6  Dubois'  health  wilf  allow  him  to  be  there,  which  I  fear  it  will  not.     (France,    No.  355.) 

1719,  Nov.  lltli.  M.  Bladon  to  Mr.  Delafaye  from  Paris  :— On  Wednesday  last  my 
Lord  Stair  (the  English  Ambassador  in  Paris)  and  I  delivered  to  Marechal  d'Estrfees  the 
demand  of  the  Hudson's  Bay  Company  with  respect  to  their  limits  ;  and  by  comparing  the 
enclosed,  which  is  a  copy  of  that  demand,  with  the  instructions  upon  this  head,  you  will  per- 
ceive the  same  has  been  fully  complied  with;  enchsixig  M^moire  pour  Jixei-  les  limited  (U  la 
Buye  d' Hudson's,  (France,  No.  355).  This  is  the  last  letter  in  1719  that  I  find  in  the 
French  correspondence  in  reference  to  these  conferences.  The  Abbe  Dubois'  health  probably 
did  not  allow  him  to  attend,  as  the  demand  of  the  Hudson's  Bay  Company  was  delivered  to 
the  Mar<:'clial  d'Estrc'es  and  the  conference  of  the  Commissaries  here  interrupted.  In  the 
Board  of  Trade  Series  there  is  a  volume  (Trade  Papers,  No.  23),  "  Minute  and  Letter  Book." 
the  first  entry  being  minutes  of  a  meeting  of  His  Majesty's  Commissioners  for  Trade  and 
Plantations,  on  the  21  .st  July,  1719,  in  reference  to  the  appointment  by  the  Lords  Justices  of 
Col.  Bladon  to  go  to  the  Court  of  France  "to  settle  such  matters  relating  to  the  respective 
limits  of  the  Plantations  of  the  two  Crowns  in  America,"  itc. ;  and  the  last  entry,a  letter  from 
Pulteney,  from  Paris,  of  27th  March,  1720,  acknowledging  receipt  of  papers  about  St.  Lucia, 
"  the'  1  do  not  see  any  likelihood  of  my  making  any  use  of  them  here."  In  the  French  Cor- 
respondence of  1720  (France,  No.  355)  there  are  u  few  more  letters  on  this  subject 

12 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  14.)  A.    1875 


1720,  March  12th.  Mr.  Pulteney  to  Mr.  Secretary  Craggs  from  Paris  :  His  Excellency 
(Lord  Stair)  continues  to  solicit  the  renewing  the  conferences  with  the  French  (Jommissaries ; 
it  is  always  promised  they  shall,  but  I  do  not  see  any  likelihood  of  it  (France,  No.  3fi5). 
,  1720,  April  14th.  Mr.  Secretary  Craggs  to  Mr.  Pulteney  :  His  Majesty  would  have 
you  demand  some  peremptory  answer  upon  the  subject  of  your  Commission,  and  whether  the 
French  Court  will  renew  the  conferences  with  you,  which,  if  you  find  they  will  not,  His 
Majesty  would  have  you  say  to  come  away,  but  not  to  come  away  till  such  times  as  you  shall 
have  further  orders  from  hence  (France,  No.  354  A). 

1720,  April  29th.  D.  Pulteney  to  Mr.  Secretary  Craggs  from  Paris  :  I  am  persuaded 
that  though  they  might,  for  form  and  decency  sake,  appoint  a  conference,  it  would  not  turn 
to  any  account  for  us,  and  that  they  are  determined  not  to  give  us  satisfaction  in  any  of  the 
points  we  are  to  insist  upon. 

1720,  May  4th.  Pulteney  to  Secretary  Craggs,  from  Paris  :  I  have  been  here  near  six 
months,  and  have  seen  only  one  conference  :  I  think  there  had  been  two  conferences  before  I 
came.  At  the  first  the  Commissions  were  read,  and  at  the  second  Lord  Stair  and  Mr.  Bladon 
gave  in  a  memorial  about  the  limits  of  the  Hudson's  Bay  Company  to  which  no  answer  has 
been  made.  I  never  could  expect  much  success  from  this  Commission,  since  the  French 
interests  and  ours  are  so  directly  opposite- 

1720,  Aug  22nd.  Pulteney  to  Mr.  Delafaye  from  Paris:  Marechal  d'Estrdes'  negligence 
was  the  occasion  that  this  and  other  matters  of  the  Commission  have  not  been  settled  ;  but 
as  he  is  going  to  Brittany,  he  is  to  leave  behind  him  several  papers  relating  to  these  paper-, 
that  the  business  of  the  Commission  may  be  pursued  in  some  other  hands.  Upon  receipt  of 
this  paper,  Mr.  Pulteney  was  instructed  by  a  letter  from  Mr.  Delafaye,  from  Whitehall,  If-t 
Sept.,  1720,  to  tran.sact  only  with  Commissaries  having  the  like  powers  with  his  own  from 
the  most  Christian  King,  the  Lords  .Justices  having  commanded  to  pursue  the  interests  of 
his  Commission,  and  to  decline  entering  into  any  negotiations  with  other  Commissaries 
(France,  No.  350).  After  this  I  do  not  find  that  the  Commissaries  met ;  but  on  a  further 
search  in  the  Colonial  Series  of  Papers  (America  and  West  Indies,  No.  539).  I  iind  that  the 
Governor  and  Committee  of  the  Hudson's  Bay  Company  wrote  to  Secretary  Sir  Thomas  Rob- 
inson, 19th  Feb.,  1755,  enclosing  their  claim  as  to  boundaries,  together  with  a  demand  uf  £108, 
514  198.8d.  claimed  by  the  Company  in  ]  709, and  afterwards  by  the  Commissaries  appointed  by 
virtue  of  the  Treaty  of  Utrecht,  "  irhich  hath  subsisted  ever  niiice."  And  again  on  the  19th 
December,  1759,  the  Lords  of  Trade  endorse  to  Secretary  W.  Pitt  a  memorial  of  the  Hud- 
sons  Bay  Company,  stating  their  claims  with  rej-pect  to  limits  and  other  matters  provided  for 
by  the  Treaty  of  Utrecht.  With  reference  to  paragraph  9  of  Lieutenant-Governor  Crawford's 
letter  requesting  "  copy  of  the  memorial  of  the  French  Ambassador,  March,  1G9||,  in  refer- 
ence to  the  northern  limits  of  Canada  and  the  English  memorial  to  which  it  is  a  reply,"  I 
have  to  report  that  there  is  preserved  in  this  Department  a  MS.  volume  of  about  fifty  pages 
(America  and  West  Indies,  No.  539),  containing  the  transactions  between  England  and 
France  relating  to  Hudson's  Bay,  169{^  and  1G99,  being  a  record  of  the  proceedings  of  the 
English  and  French  Commissaries,  in  which  there  are,  among  other  papers,  the  following  me- 
morial and  answers  : — 

A  memorial  for  justifying  the  pretensions  of  France  to  the  Fort  Bourbon,  and  answer 
to  the  French  paper  entitled  "  A  memorial  for  justifying  the  pretensions  of  France  to  the 
Fort  Bourbon." 

Answer  to  the  memorial  presented  by  the  Commissaries  of  the  King  of  England.  (Trans- 
lation of  the  French  answer.)  Reply  of  the  Hudson's  Bay  Company  to  the  answer  of  the 
French  Commissaries  (with  marginal  note),  "  To  which  the  French  Commissaries  never 
made  any  application." 

I  have,  &c., 
Sir  T.  Duffus  Hardy,  D.C.C.,  '  (Signed)  W.  Noel  Sainsbury, 

Deputy  Keeper  of  the  Public  Records. 


Department  of  the  Secretary  of  State, 

Ottawa,  21st  November,  1874. 

Sir, — I  am  directed  to  transmit  to  you,  for  the  information  of  your  Government,  a  copy 

13 


39  Victoria  Sessional  Papers  (No.  14.)  A.    1875 


of  an  Order  of  His  Excellency  the  Governor-General  in  Council,  on  the  subject  of  the  ap- 
pointment of  referees  to  determine  the  Northern  and  Western  Boundaries  of  the  Province 
of  Ontario,  relating  to  the  rest  of  the  Dominion. 

I  have  the  honour  to  be, 
Sir, 
Your  obedient  servant, 

Edouard  J.  Langevin, 
I  Under-sec.  of  State. 

His  Honor,  the  Lieutenant-Governor  of  Ontario, 
Toronto,  Ont. 


Copy  of  a  Report  of  a  Committee  of  the  Honourable  the  Privy  Cotmcil,  approved  by  His  Excel- 
lency, the  Governor-General  in  Council,  on  the  \2th  November,  1874. 

On  a  memorandum  dated  12th  November.  1874,  from  the  Hon.  W.  Mackenzie,  stating 
that  he  recommends  concurrence  in  the  proposition  of  the  Government  of  Ontario,  to  deter- 
mine, by  means  of  a  reference,  the  Northern  and  Western  Boundaries  of  that  Province,  rela- 
tively to  the  rest  of  the  Dominion — 

That  the  Ontario  Government  having  named  the  Honourable  William  Buell  Richards, 
Chief  Justice  of  Ontario,  as  one  of  the  referees,  he  submits  the  name  of  the  Honourable 
Lemuel  Allan  Wilmot,  formerly  Lieutenant-Governor  of  the  Province  of  New  Brunswick,  to 
act  in  conjunction  with  him,  and  advises  that  authority  be  given  them  to  agree  upon  a  third 
person,  not  being  a  resident  of  Canada  ;  and  that  the  determination  of  a  ni;ijority  of  such 
three  referees  be  hnal  and  conclusive  upon  the  limits  to  be  taken  as  and  for  such  bounda- 
ries respectively. 

He  further  recommends  that  the  Dominion  agree  to  concurreiit  action  with  the  Provi  oe 
of  Ontario  in  obtaining  such  legislation  as  may  be  necessary  for  giving  binding  effect  to  the 
conclusions  arrived  at,  and  for  establishing  the  Northern  and  Western  limits  of  the  Province 
of  Ontario  in  accordance  therewith. 

The  Committee  submit  the  above  recommendations  for  your  Excellency's  approval. 

Certified. 
To  the   Honourable 

The  Secretary  of  State, 
&c.,     ka. 


Copy  of  an  Order  in  Council  approved  by  His  Excellency  the  Lieutenant-Governor,  the  2bth  day 

of  November,   1874. 

The  Committee  of  Council  have  had  under  consideration  the  annexed  Report  of  the 
Hon.  the  Treasurer,  dated  10th  November,  1874,  with  reference  to  the  Western  and  Northern 
Boundaries  of  Ontario,  and  advise  that  the  action  of  the  Treasurer  be  approved  of  by  your 
Excellency,  and  that  the  recommendations  contained  in  the  said  Report  be  acted  upon. 

Certified,  J.  (J.  ScOTT, 

Clerk  Executive  Council,  Ontario. 
Executive  Council  Chamber, 

25th  November,  1874. 


May  it  please  Your  Excellency  : 

The  undersigned  has  the  honour  to  report  the  following  on  the  subject  of  the  Western 
and  Northern  J^joundaries  of  the  I'rovince  of  ()nt;iiio  : 

By  Chapter  28  of  the  Acts  of  the  Parliament  of  the  United  Kingdom  of  Great  liritain 
and  Ireland,  passed  in  the  Session  held  in  the  thirty-fourth  and  tliirty-fitth  yc  ars  of  Her 
Majesty's  reign,  and  intituled  "  An  Act  respecting  ihi  establishment  of  Provinces  in  the 
Dominion  of  Canada,"  it  was  enacted    that   the  Parliument  of  Canada  might  from  time  to 

14 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  14.)  A.  1875 


time,  with  the  consent  of  the  Leo;islature  of  any  Province  of  the  said  Dominion,  increase, 
diminish  or  otherwise  alter  the  limits  of  such  Province,  upon  such  erms  and  conditions  as 
might  be  agreed  to  by  the  said  Legishiture,  and  mitrht,  wiih  the  like  consent,  make  pro- 
vision respectinii;  the  effect  and  operation  of  any  such  increase  or  diminution  or  alteration  of 
territory  in  relation  to  any  Province  affected  thereby.  By  a  resolution  of  the  Legislative 
Assembly,  passcl  on  the  3rd  day  of  March  last,  the  House  approved  of  the  reference  of  the 
question  of  the  Western  Boundary  of  this  Province  to  arbitration,  or  to  the  Privy  Council, 
according  as  the  Lieutenant-Governor  in  Council  should  see  fit.  It  is  considered  by  your 
Excellency's  Council  to  be  expedient  that  the  question  of  the  Northern  Boundary  of  this 
Province  should  be  determined  at  the  same  time  as  the  Western  Boundary,  thouirh  the  de- 
termination of  the  Northern  Boundary  is  not  of  so  pressing  importance  as  the  other.  In 
view  of  these  objects,  the  undersigned,  before  his  late  visit  to  Ottawa  on  other  public  busi- 
ness, was  authorized  by  the  other  members  of  your  Excellency's  Council  to  propose  (subject 
to  your  Excellency's  approval)  to  the  Government  of  the  Dominion  that  the  question  con- 
cerning the  Northern  and  Western  Boundaries  of  the  Province  of  Ontario  should  be  deter- 
mined by  a  reference  to  arbitrators  to  be  mutually  agreed  upon,  and  whose  standing  and 
ability  might  readily  be  expected  to  secure  for  their  decision  the  confidence  alike  of  the 
people  of  Ontario  and  the  jieople  of  the  Dominion. 

Your  Excellency's  Council  were  of  opinion  that  a  decision  by  such  arbitrators  is  likely 
to  be  more  prompt  and  perhaps  more  satisfactory  than  any  other  mode  of  decision  which  is 
attainable. 

The  undersigned  was  also  authorized  to  suggest  the  name  of  the  Hon.  William  Buell 
Richards,  Chief  Justice  of  Ontario,  as  one  of  the  arbitrators,  subject  to  your  Excellency's 
approval. 

Accordingly,  the  undersigned  while  at  Ottawa  conferred  with  the  Premier  and  other 
members  of  the  Dominion  Government  on  the  subject  of  the  said  matters,  and  made  the 
above  suggestions  to  them. 

The  Government  of  the  Dominion  concurred  in  the  views  expressed  on  the  part  of  the 
Government  of  Ontario,  and  proposed  on  behalf  of  the  Dominion  the  name  of  the  Hon. 
Lemuel  Allan  Wilmot.  late  Lieutf^uant-Govcrnor  of  New  Brunswick,  to  act  in  conjunction 
with  the  said  Chief  .Justice,  and  that  authority  be  given  to  the  said  the  Hon.  William 
Buell  Richards  and  the  Hon.  Lemuel  Allan  Wilmot.  to  agree  upon  a  third  person  to  be 
associated  with  them,  such  third  person  not  being  a  resident  of  Canada,  and  that  the  deter- 
mination of  a  majority  of  such  referees  should  be  final  and  conclusive  upon  the  limits  to  be 
taken  as  and  for  such  boundaries  as  aforesaid  respectively. 

The  undersigned  recommends  that  the  Province  agree  to  concurrent  action  with  the 
Dominion  in  obtaining  such  legislation  as  may  be  necessary  for  giving  binding  effect  to  the 
conclusion  which  may  be  arrived  at.  and  for  establishing  the  Northern  and  Western  Boun- 
daries of  the  Province  of  Ontario  in  accordance  therewith. 

(Signed)  Adam  Crooks. 

10th  November,    1874. 


Provincial  Secretary's  Office,  Ontario. 

Toronto,  3rd  December,   1874. 

Sir, — I  am  commandod  by  His  Honor  the  Lieutenant-Governor  to  inform  you  that 
he  has  been  pleased  to  appoint  you  one  of  the  arbitrators  in  the  matter  of  the  settlement  of 
the  Northern  and  Western  Boundaries  of  the  Province  of  Ontario.  I  am,  at  the  same  time, 
to  transmit  herewith  copy  of  the  Order  in  Council,  and  the  recommendation  of  the  Hon. 
the  Treasurer  relating  to  such  proposed  arbitration. 

I  have  the  honour  to  be,  Sir, 

Your  obedient  servant, 

L    K.    EOKART, 

Assistant-iSecretaiy. 
The  Honourable  W'm.  ijuell  Richards, 

Chief  Justice  of  Ontario. 

1.5 


t9  \  ictoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  15.) 


A.  1876-6 


EETURN 


To  an  Address  of  the  Legislative  Assembly  to  His  Excellency  the 
Lieutenant-Governor,  praying  His  Excellency  to  cause  to  be  laid 
before  the  House  a  Return  showing  the  amount  of  Aid  granted 
by  way  of  Loan,  Bonus,  Stock,  or  otherwise,  by  the  several 
Municipalities  of  Ontario,  to  Railway  enterprises  since  July, 
1867. 

By  Command, 

S.  a  WOOD, 

Secretary. 
Provincial  Seoretaky's  Office, 
Toronto,  6th  December,  1875. 


Township  Municipalities,  Ontario. 


townships. 


Abinger 

Adelaide    

Adjala    

Adiiiaston  .... 
Adolphustown 

Albemarle < 

Albion    

Aldborough 

Alfred    

Algotna 

Alice  

Alnwick    

Amabel 

Amaranth  .... 
Ameliasburgh  . . 
Amherst  Island 

AncastPr    

Anderdon  , 

Anglesea    

Anson 

Anstruther    .... 

Arran     

Artemesia 

Arthur   

Ashby     

Ashfield     

Asphodel   

Athol 

Augusta    

Bagot 

Bangor  

Barrie    

Barton   


Amount. 


•S     cts. 


40,00<)  00 
7,.528  GO 


30,000  00 


35,000  00 
10,000  00 


15,000  00 


Loan,  Bonus,  Stock,  or  otherwise. 


None. 


Bonus,  Toronto,  Grey  and  Bruce  Railway. 
Bonus,  Hamilton  and  North-Western  Railway. 


None. 

None. 

Bonus,  Toronto,  Grey  and  Bruce  Railway. 

None. 

None. 


None. 

Bonus,  Toronto,  Grey  and  Bruce  Railway. 

Bonus. 

None. 

Bonus,  Pembroke  and  K-ngston  Railway. 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  15.) 


A.  ]  875-6 


Township  Municipalities,  Ontario. — Continued. 


TOWNSHIPS. 


Bastard 

Bathui-st    

Bayhan^ 

Beck^^-ith  

Bedford     

Belmont 

Bentinck    

Bertie 

Beverly 

Bexley    

Biddulph  

Binbrook   

Blanford    

Blanshard 

Blenheim  

Blythefield  .... 
Bosanquet 

Brant 

Brantford 

Brighton    

Brooke    

Bromley 

Brock 

Brougham 

JBruc-     

Brudenell 

Bruton    

Buchanan  

Burford 

Burgess,  North 

Burleigh    

Caistor   

Caledon 


Caledonia 

Cambridge    

Camden 

Camden,  Ea-st . . 

Canborough 

Canonto,  South 

Cardan    

Cardiff    

Cardwell    

Carlow  

Carradoc    

Carrick 

Cartwright    

Cashel 

Caven  

Cavendish 

Cayuga,  North 
Cayuga,  South 

ChandoR 

Charlottenburg 
Charlotteville   . . 

Chatham    

Chinguacousy  . . 

Clarence 

Clarendon 

Clarke    

Clinton 

Colbome    

ColchcMter    ■  ■  ■  . 
Oollingwood ... 

^"'omwall    .     • . 

Oramahe    

Orosby,  North. 

Crosby,  South 


Amount. 


Loan,  Bonus,  Stock,  or  otherwise. 


cts. 


I  None. 
■None. 


'None. 


15,000  00  I  Bonus,  Toronto  and  Nipissing  Railway  Company. 
None. 


15,000  00 
37,600  00 


50,000  00 


Bonus,  Credit  Valley  Bailway. 
Bonus,  Credit  Valley  Railway. 


None. 

Bonus,  Toronto  and  Nipissing  Railway. 
None. 


30,000  00    Bonus,  Brantford,  Norfolk  and  Port  Burwell  Ry. 
None. 


I  None. 

45,000  00  I  Bonus,  Toronto,  Grey  and  Bruce  Railway,  inde- 

;     pendent  of  Sectional  Bonuses  in  Countj'  grants. 
None. 


10,000  00 


84,000  00 


Bonus,  Erie  and  Huron  Railway  Company. 

None. 


(None. 

None. 
None. 
None. 

None. 
None. 


None. 

Bonus,  Pembroke  and  Kingston  Railway. 


None. 
None. 
None. 
None. 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  15.) 


A.  1875-6 


Township  Municipalities,  Ontario. — Continued. 


TOWNSHIPS. 


Crowland  . . 
Culross  .... 
Cumberland 
Dalhmisie  . . 

Dalton    

Darling  .... 
Darlington . . 

Dawn 

I)el;vware    . . 

iJeiibigh 

Derby 


Amount. 


•S     cts. 


43,000  00 


Loan,  Bonus,  Stock,  or  othfrwise. 


No  road  mentioned. 


264.000  00 


Dereham    

Digby 

Dorchester,  North 

Dorehei3ter,  South 

Douro 

Dover 

Downio , 

Draper  j 

Dnimmond   | 

Dudley  

Dumfries,  North     |      69,:i00  00 

Dumfries,  South I 

Dummer    

Dungannon   

Dunn 

Dunwiuh    

Dy.sart    

Easthope,  North     

Easthope,  South 

Eastnor , 

EdM'ardpburg    

Effingham 

Egremont 

Ekf  rid    

Elderslie    

Klddii 

Elizabethtown 

Elhce 


None. 
Bonus. 

None. 

None, 
None. 
None. 


Grouped  with  ten  others  in  giving  this  as  a  Bonu 
i     to  the  Toronto,  Grey  and  Bruce  Railway. 


None. 
None. 


Bonus,  Credit  Valley  Railway. 
None. 


None. 


I  None. 


Elma ^ 

Elnisley,  North  

Elm.sley,  South   

Elzevir    

Emily 

Eniiisldllen    

Emii.smore     

Eramosa    

Erin     

Erne.stown 

EscDtt,  Front  of 

Escott,  Rear  of  

Esquesing 

Essa    I     300,000  00 


None. 

I  None. 

30,000  00  jBonus,  Wellington,  Grey  and  Bnicp  Rai  way. 


I  None. 

11,000  00    Bonus.     No  road  mentioned. 


Etobicoke 

Euphemia 

Euphrasia 

Faraday 

Fenelon 

Finch 

Fitzroy   

Flamboro',  Ea.st  . 
Flamboro',  West. 

Flos 

Foley 

Eraser    


32,500  00 
1.5.000  00 


None. 
'  None. 
I  None. 

I  None. 
I  None. 
I 

Nf)ne. 

Grouped  with  others.    Bonus,  Hamilton  and  N)rth- 
Western  Railway. 

None. 

Bonus,  Northern  Extension  Railway. 

Bonus,  Victoria  Railway. 

None. 

None. 

None. 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  15.) 


A.  1875-6 


Township  Municipalities,  Ontario, — Continued. 


TOWXSHIPS. 


Fredericksburg,  North. 
Fredericksburg,  South  . 

Fullarton   

Gainsborough  

Galway 

Garafraxa,  East . 

Garaf i-axH,  West 

Georgina    


Glamorgan 
Glauford  . 
Glenelg  .... 


Gloucester 

Goderich    

Gosfield 

Goulbum  

Gower,  North 
G^wer,  South 
Grantham  .... 

Gi-attan 

Greenock   

Grey    


Griffith  

Grimsby 

Grimsthorpe 

Guelph  

Guilford 

Gwillimbury,  East. . 
Gwillimburj',  North 

Gwillimbmy,  West 


Haldimand    

HalloweU 

Hamilton   

Harbum    

Harcourt   

Harwich    

Harvey 

Hawkesbury,  East. . 
Hawkesbury,  West 

Hay    

Head 

Herschel    

Hibbert 

Hillier    

Hinchinbrooke . . . : . 

Hindon  

Holland 

Hope 

Horton  

Houghton 

Howard 

Howe  Island    


Howick 

Hullett  

Humberwtone 
Humjihrey 
Hung'-rford   . 
Hiuitiiigdon  . 

Huntley 

Huron    


Amount. 


S      cts. 


Loan,  Bonus,  Stock,  or  otherwise. 


1,620  00 
45,000  00 


None. 

None, 

Surplus  Fund,  Credit  VaUey  Piailway 

Bonus.     Grouped  with  Xorth  and   East  Gwillim- 
bm-y.     "  Lake  Simcoe  Junction  Railway." 


jNone. 

29,7.56  00    Bonus,  for  which  the  Township  is  liable,   under 

I     a  Coimty  grant  to  the  Toronto,  Grey  and  Eruce 

I     Railway. 

15,000  00    Bonus,  London,  Huron  and  Bruce  Railway. 


35,0S0  00 


45,000  00 
42,000  00 


None. 
None. 


Bonus,  Southern  Extension  Wellington,  Grey  and 
Bruce  Railway. 


Grouped  Math  two  othei-s  in  granting  this  Bonus 
to  Lake  Simcoe  Junction  Railway. 

Grouped  with  others  in  granting  this  Bonus  to 
Hamilton  and  North- Western  Railway. 


None. 


140,000  00 
15,000  00 


Bonus,  Vaiidreuil  and  Ottawa  Railway. 

Bonus,  London,  Hm'on  and  Bruce  Railway. 
None. 

.  -None. 
.  None. 


7,500  00 

90  00 

20,000  00 
40,000  00 
25,000  00 


■None, 

IStock,  Canada  Central  Railway  Company. 

'None. 

'Share  of  County  Frontenac  Bonus  of  .'?1.')0,000  to 
I     Kingston  and  Pembroke  Railway. 
'Bonus,  Wellington,  Grey  and  Bruce  Railway, 
i Bonus,  Toronto,  Grey  and  Bruce  Railway. 
iBonus,  London,  Hunm  and  Bruce  Railway. 
I  None, 
None, 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  15.) 


A.  1875-6 


Township  Municipalities,  Ontario. — Continued. 


TOWNSHIPS. 


Innisfil  . . 
Kal.-vdor  . . 
Kennebec 
Kenyon  . . 


Keppel    ... 
Kincardine 


King   

Kingston    

Kinloss 

Kiltey 

Korah 

Lake   

Lanark  

Lancaster 

Lansdowne,  Front 
LansdoNvne,  Rear 

Lavant   

Laxton    


Leeds,  Front  of 
Leeds,  Rear  of 

Limerick    

Lindsay 

Lobo   

L'Orignal 

Lochiel  


Logan 

London  

Longford    

Longiitniil 

Loughborough 

Louth 

Luther    

Lutterworth 

Lynedoch 

Macaulay 

Madoc    

Maidstone 

Malahide  

Maiden 

Manvers    

Mara 

March    

Maria 

Marijiosa   

Markham 

Marlborough    .... 

Marmora   

Maryborough    .... 

Marysburg,  North 

Marysljurg,  South 

Matawatchan  .... 

Matchedash 

Matilda 

Mayo 

Medonte     

Melancthon 

Mersea    

Metcalfe    

Methven     

Middleton 

Miller 

Minden 

Minto 


Amount. 


$     cts. 

40,000  00 
264,000  00 


Loan,  Bonus,  Stock,  or  otherwise. 


Bonus,  Montreal  and  City  of  Ottawa  Junction 
Railway,  .     ,.  . 

Grouped  with  seven  other  Municipalities  to  give 
Bonus  to  the  Toronto,  Grey  and  Bruce  Railway. 

None. 


12,.500  00 


40,000  00 


15,000  00 


Bonus,  in  conjunction  with  Ui.gby  and  Longford 
to  the  Toronto  and  Nipissing  Railway. 


None. 

None.  ^  T       i.- 

Bonus,   Montreal  and   City  of   Ottawa  .Junction 

Railway. 
None. 
Bonus,  London,  Huron  and  Bruce  Railway. 


15,000  00 


:iO,000  00 


None. 
None. 
Bonus,  Canada  Southern  Railway. 

None. 


Bonus.     Road  not  mentioned. 
None. 


40,000  00  [Bonus,  Wellington,  Grey  and  Bnice  Railway. 


See  Orillia,  page  W, 


Grouped  with  Clarendon. 
None. 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers, (No.  15.) 


A.  1875-6 


Township  Municipalities,  Ontario. — Continued. 


TOWNSHIPS. 

Amount. 

Loan,  Bonus,  Stock,  or  otherwise. 

Monaghan,  North 

$     cts. 
4.5,000  00 

Monaghan,  South 

Monk 

Monmouth     

Mono 

Bonus,  Toronto,  Grey  and  Bruce  Railway. 

Montague 

Monteagle 

Moore 

None 

Momington 

None. 

Morris    

Morrison    

Mosa  

Moulton     

None. 

Mountain 

None. 

Mulmer 

Miirray 

Muskoka    

McClure     

McDougall    

McGilli\Tay 

McKay 

McKeUar 

None. 

McKiUop  

■ 

McNab 

None. 

Nas&agaweya    

Nelson    

Nepean   

Niagara 

10,000  00 

Bonus,  Wellington,  Grey  and  Bnice  Eailway. 

Nissouri,  East 

None. 

Normanby  

None. 

/- 30,000  00 

i    30,000  00 

(    75,000  00 

\    10,000  00 

48,000  00 

5  000  00 

Bonus,  Woodstock,  Port  Dover  and  Lake  Huron 
Railway. 

Norwich,  South  

Bonus,    Brantford,    Norfolk    and    Port    Burwell 

Railway. 
Bonus,  Canada  Southern  Railway. 

Bonus,  Port  Dover  and  Lake  Huron  Railway. 
Sectional  Bonus  of  a  County  grant   to  Hamilton 
and  N(jrth-Westem  Railway. 

Oakley    

Oneida    

i 

1 

Ops 

1 

1 

Orillia 

12, .500  00  IBonns,  in  conjunction  with  Matchedash,  to  Mid- 

Oro "• 

N  one. 

Osnabruck 

■ 

Osprey    

1 

Owenge 

Oxford,  East    

Oxford,  West '. '. 

Palmerston    

Peel '....'.'.'.'.'.'.'...                        .'.'.'.'.'. 

112  00 
40,000  00 

Bonus,  Wellington,  Grey  and  Bruce  Railw.^y. 

Pembroke 

39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  15.) 


A.  1876-6 


Township  Municipalities,  OifTXRio.— Continued. 


TOWNSHIPS. 


Amount. 


Loan,  Bonus,  Stock,  or  otherwise. 


Pettewawa    

Pickering   

Pilkington 

Pittsburgh     

Plantagenet,  North   

Plantagenet,  South    

Plyinpton 

Portland    

Prince     

Proton    

Puslinch     

Ratlcliffe    ■ 

Kaglan    

Rainliam    

Raleigh 

Rama 

R.-\ni«ay 

Rawdon 

Reach 

Richmond 

Rochester A 

Rolph 

Romney 

Ross    

Bflxborongh 

Russell  

Eyde  

Sftltfleet 

Sandwich,  East 

Sandwich,  West 

Sarawak    

Sarnia     

Saugeen 

Scarborough 

Scott  

Scugog    

Sebastopol 

Seneca    


$     cts. 


None. 
None. 


None. 


in'^  ^  jBonus,  drand  Junction  Railway. 

J0,000  00    Bonus,  Whitby  and  Port  Perry  Railway. 

None. 


Seymour    

Sheffield 

Sherbrooke    

Sherbrooke,  North. 
Sherbrooke,  South. 

Shuniah 

Sidney    

Smith 

Snowden    

Sombra 

Somerville 

Snphiasburgh    

Southwold 

Stafford 

Strtmford    

Stanhope    

Stanley 

St.  Edmund's 

Stephen 

Stephenson    

Storrington    

S*-..   Regis   

St.  Vincent 

SiiUivan 

Sunnidale 

Sydenham 

Tarentorus    


10,000  00 

2,000  00 

65,000  00 


1.5.000  00 
10,000  00 


17,500  00 


60,000  00 


None. 
None. 

None. 


None. 

Bonus,  Toronto  and  Nipissing  Railway. 

Bonus,  Port  Whitby  and  Port  Perry  Railway 
None. 

Grouped  mth  Oneida,  Walpole,  and  C^aledonia,  in 
Bonus  to  Hamilton  and  Lake  Erie  Railway  Co. 

None. 
None. 
None. 


None. 

Bonus,  Toronto  and  Nipissing  Railway. 

Bonus,  Victoria  Railway. 


None. 


Bonus,  Lake  Huron  and  Bruce  Railway  Co. 

None. 

None. 

Bonus,  Northern  Extension  Railway  Co. 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  15.) 


A   1876-6 


Township  Municipalities,  Ontario. — Continued. 


TOWNSHIPS. 


Amount. 


Loan,  Bonus,  Stock,  or  otherwise. 


T»y 

Tecumseth    . . . 

Thorah   

Thorold 

Tliurlow 

Tilbury,  East  . 
Tilbury,  West. 

Tiny    

Torbolton 

Toronto 


$     cts. 
25,000  00 


Toronto  Gore 
Tossorontio  . . 


Townsend 


Trafalgar  . . . 
Tuckersmith . 
Tudor 


Tumberry . 


Tuscarora 

Tyendinaga  

XJsborue 

TJxbridge   

Vaughan    

Veriilam    

Vespra    

Wainfleet 

Wallace 

Walpole 

Walsingham 

Warwick    

Waterloo    

Watt   

Wawanosh,  East 
Wawanosh,  West 

Wellesley  

Westmeath    

Westminster 

Whitby,  East  . . . . 
Whitby,  West.... 

Whitchurch 

Wicklow    

Wilbei-force  

Williams,  East  .  . 
WilliauLS,  West  . . 
Williamsburg    . . . . 

Willoughby  

Wilmot 

Winchester   

Windham 

Wolfe  Island    . . . . 

Wolford 

WoUaston 

WoofUiouse    

Woolwich 

Wylie 

Yannouth 

Yonge,  Front  of. 
Yonge,  Rear  of  . 

York   

Zone        

Zorra,  East  

Zorra,  West 


5,257  00 


300,000  00 

{  30,000  00 
,    11,000  00 


10,000  00 

28,000  00 
5,000  00 
5,000  00 


25,000  00 
50,000  00 

7,156  90 


25,000  00 
18,000  00 


15,000  00 
15,000  00 


Bonus,  Midland  Railway. 


None. 
None. 
None. 


Share  of  S75,000  Bonus  granted  by  Peel  County 
to  Credit  Vallej'^  Railway. 

Grouped  with  others,  in  County  of  Simcoe,  to  give 
Bonus  to  Hamilton  and  North-Westem  Railway. 

Bonus,  Canada  Southern  Railway. 

Surplus  Fund  due  the  Township  was  granted  to 
Brantford,  Norfolk  and  Port  Burweli  Railway. 

Bonus,  London,  Huron  and  Bruce  Railway. 

Bonus,  Wellington,  Grey  and  Bruce  Railway. 
Bonus,  Toronto,  Grey  and  Bruce  Railway. 
Bonus,  London,  Huron  and  Bruce  Railway. 

None. 

Bonus,  London,  Hvu-on  and  Bruce  Railway. 

Bonus,  Toronto  and  Nipissing  Railway. 

Bonus,  Victoria  Railway  Co. 


None. 

None. 

Bonus,  London,  Huron  and  Bruce  Railway  Co. 

Bonus,  Wellington,  Grey  and  Bruce  Railway. 

None. 
None. 


15,000  00 


Bonus. 
Bonus. 


None. 


None. 


Road  not  mentioned. 

Name  of  Road  not  mentioned. 


Bonus,  Port  Dover  and  Lake  Huron  Railway. 
None. 


I  None. 
None. 


I>9  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  15.) 


A.  1875-6 


Incorporated  Cities,  Towns,  and  Villages,  Ontario. 


CITIES,  TOWNS,  &c. 


Almonte  . .  . 
Amherstburg 
Amprior    ... 

Arthur    

.Vslilmmham 

Aurora    

Aylnier 


Barrie. 


Bath    .... 
Belleville 
BerHn .  . . . 


Bothwell    . . . 
Bowman  villa 


Brantford 


Amount. 


$     cts. 


Loan,  Bonus,  Stock,  or  otherwise. 


.SO.OOO  00 
.  24,000  00 
100,000  00 


.•None. 

Bonus,   Toronto,  Simcoe  and   Muskoka  Junction 

Railway- 
Bonus,  Hamilton  and  North-Western  Railway. 


Brampton 

Bradford    

Brighton    

Brockville 

Caledonia 

Carleton  Place 

Cajiiga   

Chatham    


32,  .500  00 

75,000  00 

70,(X»0  00 

20,000  00 


Chippawa  . . 
Clifton  .... 
Clinton  .... 

Col)i)urg 

Colbome    .  . 
CollingTvood 
Cornwall 
Dre.'iden 


Duudas  . 
Duiinville 

Elora 

Embro 

Fergus    . . 

Fort  Erie 

Gait    .... 


Gananoque  .... 
Garden  Island . . 
Georgetown  .... 

Goderich    

Guelph    

Hamilton  

Hawkesbnry .... 

He.speler    

Holland  Landing 

IngersoU     

Iroquois    

Kemptville    

Kincardine  .... 
Kingston    


10,000  00 
:«,000  00 

20,000  00 
20,.500  00 


Bonus, 

None. 

None. 

None. 

Bonus, 

Bonus, 

Bonus, 

Bonus, 

None. 


Grand  Junction  Railway. 


Grand  Tnmk  Railway. 

tireat  Western  Railway. 

Brantford,  Norfolk  and  Port  Burwell  Ry. 

Credit  Valley  Railway. 


10.000  00 

10,000  00 
1.3.5,000  00 

32,im  .38 
40,647  .52 


10,000  00 


300,000  00 

9 


None. 

Bonus,  Ontario  and  Quebec  Railway. 

Bonus,  under  a  (!ounty  By-law,  to  the  Erie  and 
Huron  Railway.  The  By-law  is  disputed,  and 
the  Municipality  may  not  be  liable  for  this 
amount. 


Bonus,  London,  Huron  and  Bruce  Railway. 

I  Bonus,  North  Grey  Extension. 

;(See  "Supplementary."    Page  II). 

I 

iNone. 
Bonus,  Wellington,  Grey  and  Bruce  Railway. 

Bonus,  Wellington,  (irey  and  Bruce  Railwajr. 
Bonus,  grouped  with  others,  Credit  Valley  Ry. 

Loan,  Grand  Trunk  Railway. 
1  Bonus,  Credit  Valley  Railway. 


Bonus,  Hamilton  and  North- Western  Railway. 


None. 


Bonus,  Kingston  and  Pembroke  Railway. 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  i'apers  (No.  15.) 


A.  1875-6 


Incorporated  Cities,  Towns,  and  Villages,  Ontario. — Continued. 


CITIES,  TOWNS,  &c. 


Amount. 


Loan,  Bonus,  Stock,  or  otherwise. 


Lanark  . 
Lindsay  . 
Listowel . 


S     cts. 


London  

Lucan ( 

Merrick\Tlle ! 

Millpoint   

^^to"^ A    2;ooooo 

Mitchell j 

MoiTisburgh ' 

Mount  Forest !      20,000  00 

Napanee     j 

Newburgh I 

Newcastle 

New  Edinburgh   

New  Hamburg     

Newmarket  

Niagara 

Oakville 

Oil  Springs  

Orangeville    

OriHia 

Oshawa 

Ottawa  


85,000  00    Bonus,  Victoria  Railway.      » 
15,000  00    Bonus,  Southern  Extension,  Wellington,  Orey  and 
Bruce  Railway. 
100,000  00    Bonus,  London,  Huron  and  Bruce  Railway. 

None. 


Owen  Sound 41,000  00 

Paris    

Parkhill 

Pembroke    

Perth !     100,000  00 


Bonus,  Credit  Valley  Railway  Co. 
.Hamilton  and  North- Western  Railway. 

I  None. 

I 

iBonus,  Toronto,  Grey  and  Bruce  Railway. 

None. 
None. 


None. 
None. 


None. 
100,000  00  iBonus,   Montreal   and   City  of   Ottawa  Junction 
Railway. 
Bonus,  Toionto,  Grey  and  Bruce  Railway. 


Peterborough 

Petrolia 

Picton 

Port  Colborne  . 
Port  Dalhousie 

Port  Hope    . . . 


Bonus,  Hiiron  and  Quebec  Railway. 
100,000  00  Bonus,  Huron  and  Quebec  Railway. 
'None. 


Port  Perry    

Portsmouth   

Prescott 

Preston 

Prince  Arthur's  Landing. 

Renfrew 

Richmond 

Richmond  Hill    


30,000  00 
49,002  64 


[Bonus,  Midland  Railway  Co. 

I  Money  expended  since  1867  for   Railway  pur- 

i     poses. 


INone. 

,30,000  00    Stock,   Canada  Central  Railway. 


I       30,000  00 


Sandwich  

Samia 

Sault  Ste.  Marie 
Seaf  orth 


Simcoe    

Smith's  Falls    . 
Southampton    . 

Stirling  

Stratford    

Strathroy  . 

Streets  ville  . . 
St.  Catharines 
St.  Mary's. 


10,000  00 
15,000  00 


The  Mimicipality  is  liable  for  a  portion  of  thi« 
Bonus,  which  is  a  County  grant  to  the  Nipia- 
sing  Railway. 

None. 


Bonus,  Woodstock  and  Lake  Erie  Railway. 
Bonus,  Brantford  and  Port  Dover  Railway. 


5,000  00    Bonus,  Grand  .Junction  Railway. 


20,000  00    Bonos,  Credit  Valley  Railway  Co. 


I  None. 


St.  Thomas   I  {  3«5?  «« 


Thorold 


|Town  Debentures,  Canada  Southern  Railway 
200,000  00  I  Bonus  by  Elgin  Coimty,  Canada  Southern  Ry. 


10 


3J)  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  15.) 


A.  1875-6 


Incorporated  Cities,  Towns,  and  Villages,  Ontario.^ — Continued. 


CITIES,  towns,  &c. 


Tilsonburg . 
Trenton  . . . 
Toronto  . . . 
Vienna  . . . 
Walkerton 
Wardsville . 
Waterloo  . 
WeUand... 
Wellington 
Whitby  . . . 
Windsor. .  . 


Woodstock 
Yorkville  . 


Amount. 


S     cts. 


4,000  00 


Loan,  Bonus,  Stock,  or  otherwise. 


25,000  00 
25,000  00 


(See  "Supplementary."    Page  11). 

Bonus,  Norfolk  and  Port  Burwell  Railway. 


None. 

None. 

Municipal    Debentures,     Port    Dover    and    Lake 
Huron  Railway 

Do  do  do 

The  last  issue  is  cancelled. 


SUPPLEMENTARY. 


Amount. 

1868- 

-City  of  Toronto  

$     cts. 
2.50,000  00 
l.')O,0(M)  00 
100,000  00 
100,000  00 
100,000  00 

239  45 

15,000  00 

Bonus,  Toronto,  (Trey  and  Bruce  Railway- 

Do             

Do      I'oronto  and  Nipissing  Railway. 

1870- 
1872- 

Do             

Do             

Do     Toronto,  Simcoe  and  Musk  oka  Junction. 
Do      Credit  Valley  Railway. 

1874- 

Do             

Do      Toronto,  Grey  and  Bruce  Railway. 
Paid  to  aid  in  preliuiinarj'  survey  of  the  Dresden 

Do       

and  Oil  Springs  Railway. 
Share  of  a  County  Bonus  to  the  Huron  and  Erie 

Railway. 

Provincial  Secretary's  Office, 

Toronto,  6th  December,  1875. 


1.  K.  ECKART, 

Assist.  Secretary. 


11 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  16.)  A.  1875-6 


(No.   16.) 

Return  showing  the  MunicipaHties  in  the  different  Counties  in  Ontario 
for  which  Voters'  lists  have  been  certified  by  the  County  Court 
Judges,  with  the  dates  when  such  lists  were  respectively  so  cer- 
tified, and  showing  tlie  Municipalities  (if  any)  in  which  lists  have 
not  been  certified,  with  a  statement  in  any  such  case  of  the  reason 
why  the  list  has  not  been  certified.     (Not  Printed.) 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  17.)  A.  1875-6 


STATEMENT 

Of  the  Returns  forwarded  to  the  Office  of  the  Provincial  Secretary  of 
all  Fees  and  Emoluments  received  by  the  Registrars  of  Ontario 
for  the  year  1874,  made  in  accordance  with  the  provisions  of  the 
Statutes  of  Ontario,  31  Vic,  Cap.  20,  Sec,  74. 

By  Command, 

S.  C.  WOOD, 

Secretarii. 

Provincial  Secretary's  Office, 

Toronto,  Gth  December,  1875. 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  17.) 


A.  1875-6 


Statement  of  the  Returns  forwarded  to  the  Office  of  the  Pro\niicial  Secretary  of 
made  in  accordance  with  the  provisions  of  Statutes  of  Ontario,  31  Vic,  Cap.  20_, 


OFFICE. 


Algoma  District 

Brant  

Bruce 

Carleton 


IIEGISTRAK. 


John  ?vr.  Savage 
Thoii'jis  S.  Sheiistou 

John  McLay    

E.  Sherwood 


Dundas John  Tliny  Crysler 


Durham,  East  Riding 
Do       West  Riding 

Elgin  

Essex 

Frontenac 


George  C.  Ward 
Robert  Armour 
John  McKay 
James  W.  Askiu . 
R.  M.  Rose 


Glengarry I  Alex.  M.  Mackenzie 

William  J.  Sott. 
Thomas  Lunn 
Thomas  Lander 
A.  P.  FaiTell 
Thomas  Racey. 
W.  H.  Ponton. 
James  Dickson . 

E.  J.  Barker. 
P.  D.  ^NIcKellar 
Thomas  W.  .Tohnstun. 
John  Menzies 
James  Bell 


Grenville 

Grey,  North  Riding 

Do    South  Riding 

Haldimand    

Halton    

Hastings    

Huron    


Kingston  City 

Kent    

Lambton    

Lanark,  North  Riding 
Do      South  Riding 


Leeds Ormond  Junes. 


M.  P.  Roblin 
John  Powell 
William  C.  L.  Gill 
James  Ferguson 
Stephen  Blackbu 
John  E.  Lount 
jJohn  Doran 


Lennox  and  Adding^on 

Lincoln 

London  City 

Middlesex.  N.  andE.  Ridin 
Do  West  Riding.. 

Muskoka      

Nipissing    

Nnrff>lk (Francis  L.  Walsh 

Northumberland,  East  Riding..  J.  M.  Grover 

Do  West    do       |W.  H.  Eyre 

Ont.'uio John  Hane  Perry 

Ottawa  City Alex.  Burritt 

I 

Oxford    James  Ingersoll 

Parry  Sound  District I  Patrick  McC'urry    | 


Peel 

Perth,  North  Riding 
Do      South    do 

Peterborough    

Prince  Edward    .... 

Pre«cott 'John  Higginson 

Renfrew lAndrew  Irving 

James  Keays 
Samuel  Lount 
.John  C/'oi)el.and 


D.  F.  CampbeU 
Samuel  Rol)t 
P.Whelihan..., 
F.  W.  Haultain 
John  P.  Roblin 


BuBsell 

Simcoe    . 

Stormont 

Thunder  Bay  District 


•J  onn  V  01 
D.  D.  Vi 


Toronto  City Charles  Lindsey 


200  20 
119  40 
449  00 
358  65 
320  04 
105  30 

89  85 
102  05 

60  90 
414  06 
299  25 
580  45 
207  80 

i22'i5' 
218  40 
851  75 

33  20 
196  35 

91  00 
255  48 

75  35 
355  05 
398  0.^ 
185  00 

18  60 

0  25 

247  82 

162  50 

84  70 


an  Norman 


291  70 

757  95 

244  90 

22  50 

167  57 

357  40 

107  15 

451  75 

142  85 

53  35 

309  00 

26  30 

604  00 

200  44 

18  25 

200128 

39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  ^7.) 


A.  1875-G 


all  Fees  and  Emoluments  received  by  the  Registrars  of  Ontario  for  the  year  187 
Sec.  74 ;  with  which  are  contrasted  Recoipts  of  the  same  nature  in  1872  and  187 


received  under  the  Tariflf  as  allowed  by  Sub-Sections  1  to  13  of  Section  70. 

t- 

00 

5  i 
B  ft 
<l 

0  m 
u  <o 

0 

to 
S  ft 

Is 

0 

C© 

11 

c3  0 

P 

Special  Rec€|t)ts. 

t>. 

00 

■Si  |sS-5 

11 

0 

$  cts. 
24  00 

S  cts. 

5  20 

34  95 

S  cts. 

$   cts. 

$   cts. 

.?  cts. 
241  75 
3256  25 
6860  55 
4415  70 
1758  65 

1915  60 
1722  70 
547.3  20 
61(i8  96 
2479  48 
871  80 
2014  41 
3726  05 
2676  23 
2.590  55 
2114  35 
6300  60 
4.507  30 
N.  Riding 

880  00 
5488  45 
7148  72 
1703  81 
2007  60 
3203  08 
30(;i  60 
3588  17 
2095  20 
5659  (i8 
3217  40 

881  78 
29  60 

3564  44 
2958  92 
2018  95 
4530  70 
4407  40 

6641  72 

315  30 

2468  47 

4250  30 

2545  00 

3771  20 

2117  03 

1794  75 

2879  93 

1173  25 

7687  35 

1364  64 

421  02 

12248  28 

$  cts, 

$   cts. 

286  35 
1271  75 

10  00 

None 
do 
do 
do 

do 

None 
do 
do 
do 

do 

2803  00 
6161  35 
3617  85 
1399  52 

19.58  80 
1711  65 
5130  07 
5129  47 
2531  55 

962  23 
2019  55 
3187  35 
2442  78 
2485  56 
2104  10 
5673  75 
2672  95 
4120  80 

840  60 
7279  75 
6998  70 
1256  19 
1922  90 
2893  63 
2496  65 
3502  13 
2282  50 
5528  47 
3050  78 

865  25 
31  65 
3021  27 
2970  70 
2233  35 
5109  40 
4176  10 

6318  39 
222  40 
2710  51 
3464  95 
2370  25 
3319  45 
1907  00 
1452  45 
1754  47 
1022  50 
7234  50 
1316  10 
401  79 
9072  74 

2954  50 
5579  00 

5:34  30 
116  75 

75  75 

1  00 

24  .50 
Other 
Documents 
70  70 

3472  28 
1351  65 

238  25 
423  85 

Rele;iKes  of 
Mortgages. 

163  20 

1645  35 
1764  38 

277  45 
1393  86 
142  44 
51  .50 
189  66 
509  60 
SiO  90 

6  00 
44  75 
15  65 

1  00 

3  25 
42  20 
29  45 

1  50 
13  25 
79  00 
22  70 

i  75 
12  00 

4  75 
44  00 

5  50 
2  75 

do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
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do 
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do 
do 
do 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
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do 
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4550  54 
4380  72 
1958  55 
872  15 
1993  65 
3487  70 
2504  95 

28;^  96 
141  55 
829  35 
690  45 

9  00 

1  00 

;J6  25 

1  75 

2533  69 
2367  90 
4.585  90 
2433  05 
4100  82 

26  70 

5  00 
17  85 
9  50 
4  65 
11  75 
25  00 
65  10 

do 
do 

do 

do 
do 
do 
do 
du 
do 
do 
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«lo 

do 

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777  97 

627  05 
092  50 
82  16 
35  35 
280  33 
380  57 

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2  ;»5 

4  50 

1  75 

26  50 

7065  45 
7131  05 
1250  80 
1939  35 
2893  62 
2470  35 

410  35 

3610  33 

68  15 
510  60 

87  20 

124  65 

208  75 

6  35 

0  25 

2308  50 
5794  90 

662  90 
140  00 

33  75 

2801  98 
981  05 

0  25 

0  50 
included  in  R 

8  00 

1  00 
0  25 

65  .50 

297  20 

u^atratiou 

3783  08 

661  71 

45  00 

2741  55 

523  15 

18.56  47 

734  00 
424  50 

80  20 
86  00 

18  15 
3  50 
11  25 
36  15 
123  85 
15  .50 
11  00 
47  80 
20  15 

6  00 

Paid  by  County. 

6522  65 
3000  95 

1251  05 

10  25 
6  00 
0  25 

0357  61 

22  95 

403  60 

350  72 

2596  07 

678  35 

3297  07 

470  90 



2297  75 

413  85 
247  37 

3  50 

29  00 

1  50 

;;.;;;;;;■ 

288  90 

2919  70 
1770  34 

49  25 

1376  60 

228  05 

2217  25 

133  25 

52  70 

785  99 

7149  45 

76  80 

5  75 

9  00 

1817  75 

44  80"' 

384  00 

203  25 

8128  45 

39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  17.) 


A.  1875-6 


Statement  of  the  Returns  forwarded  to  the  Office  of  the  Pro\'ineial  Secretaiy  of 
made  in  accordance  with  the  provisions  of  Statutes  of  Ontario,  31  Vic,  Cap.  20, 


.s 

Amount  of  Fees. 

% 

1-5 

0) 

§. 

ito 

gtx, 

.a    . 

o 

1-^ 

gg     . 

P  T-t 

OFFICE. 

REGISTRAR. 

3 

M-^ 

1— 1~ 

5^2 

tJD_Q        « 

to 

tM  h 

o'iS! 

"S-Bg 

rt^g- 

^(N 

S-OO 

t-OO 

§  a 

s3 

umber 
registe 
year  1 

umber 
registe 
year  1 

if: 

o  o 
§02 

^ 

^ 

^ 

H 

fH 

$   cts. 

$   Cts. 

H.  Dunsf ord 

17 
11 
14 
10 

2374 
1707 
2397 
1945 

2439 
1947 
1926 
1935 

3190  20 

2199  a5 
3211  88 
2554  45 

243  28 

Dougall  McDougall    

D.  D.  Everardo   

John  Anderson    

196  25 

Welland            

729  24 

Wellington,  North  Eiding 

Do          South  and  Centre . . 

73  45 

James  Webster    

12 

2672 

2564 

373.5  45 

379  40 

John  H.  Greer 

10 

8 

8 

4602 
1425 
2040 

4133 
1277 
2011 

5074  32 
2045  20 
3893  94 

346  40 

York    North  Riding    * 

James  J.  Pearson    

John  Ridout 

275  60 

673  25 

Grand  Total 

114230 

109322 

Receipts— 


Offices  may  he  generally  classified  as  under. 


Over  §12000  and  under  ^12500— (1)- 

Over  7500  and  under  8000— (1)- 

Over  7000  and  under  7500— (1)- 

Over  6500  and  under  7000^2)- 

Over  6000  and  under  6500 -(2)- 

Over  5500  and  under  6000— (1)- 

Over  5000  and  under  5500— (1)- 

Over  4500  and  under  5000-   (4)- 

Over  4000  and  under  4500-(5)- 

Over  3500  and  under  4000  -(4)- 

Over  3000  and  under  3500— (5)- 

Over  2500  and  under  3000— (6)- 


-City  of  Toronto. 

-Simcoe. 

-Lambton. 

-Bruce,  Oxford. 

-Hastings,  Essex. 

-East  Eiding  of  Middlesex. 

-Elgin. 

-South  Riding  of  York,  South  Riding  of  Wellington,  South 
Riding  of  Huron,   Ontario. 

-Carleton,  Ottawa  City,  Welland,  North  Eiding  of  Perth, 
Victoria. 

-Peterborough,  North  Eiding  of  Grey,  Lincoln,  Norfolk. 

-North  Riding  of  Wellington,  Brant,  North  Riding  of  Mid- 
dlesex, Leeds,   Lennox  and  Addington. 

-East  Eiding  of  Northimiberland,  Eenfrew,  South  Eiding  of 
Grey,  Waterloo,  Haldimand,  South  Riding  of  Perth. 


Provinclil  Secretary's  Office, 

Toronto,  7th  December,  1875. 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Pcpers  (No.  17.) 


A.  1875-6 


all  Fees  and  Emo]um?n1s  received  by  the  Registrars  of  Ontario  for  the  year  1874, 
Sec.  74 ;  with  which  are  contrasted  Receipts,  Szc. — Continued. 


received  under  the  Tariff  as  allowed  by  Sub-Sections  1  to  13  of  Section  70. 


$  cts 
829  77 
197  25 
431  94 
652  35 
516  65 

1466  60 
334  60 
324  40 


Special  Receipts. 


JBM 


u 


$    cts. 


S    cts. 


13  25 

12  45 

4  75 

81  00 

22  25 

4  20 

57  70 


12  00 

16  00 

1  00 

included  in 

Searches 

4  00 

0  75 

10  25 


S    cts. 


•s  g  1:2  ^o 

.    ai  g  J3  ce  <-;  1) 


$    cts. 


70  70 


$  cts. 
42("^  25 
2618  60 
4401  51 
3286  00 
4712  50 

691:^  57 
2660  35 
4959  54 


199063  19 


as- 


o^ 


$  cts. 
4244  59 
3257  80 
3602  46 
3299  90 
4668  80 

8083  41 
2373  55 
.3915  16 


189585  52 


,Pm 


o,s 


$  cts. 
4167  82 
3.504  00 
3524  04 
3152  30 
4689  45 

7440  07 
2499  95 
3652  95 


182783  60 


Receipts— 

Over  $2000  and  under  $2500— (8)— Frontenac,    Peel,    Halton,    West   Riding   of   Northumberland, 

Prince  Edward,    Grenville,    London  (City),   South  Riding 
of  Lanark. 

Over     1500  and  under     2000 — (5)  -Prescott,  Diindas,  East  and  West  Riding  of   Durham,  North 

Riding  of  I>anark. 

Over     1000  and  under     1.500— (2)— Stormont,   Russell. 

Over       500  and  under     1000 — (3) — Kingston  (City),  Glengarry,  Muskoka. 

Over       2.50  and  under       .500— (2) — Thunder  Bay,  Parry  Sound  District. 
Under       2.50— (2)— Algoma,  Nii)i88ing. 

The  total  number  nf  Instruments  registered  in  1874  shows  an  increase  of  4908  over  the  number  for  1873, 
and  of  9438  over  that  of  1872. 

The  total  amount  of  Fees  received  in  1874  shows  an  increase  of  89,477.67  over  the  amount  returned  in 
1873,  and  of  .S16.279.59  over  that  of  1872. 


I.  R.  ECIKART, 

Af<sist<int  Secretary. 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  18.)  A.  1875 


EETUEISr 

To  an  Address  of  the  Legislative  Assembly  to  His  Honour  the  Lieu- 
tenant-Governor, praying  that  he  will  cause  to  be  laid  before  the 
House  Copies  of  all  Correspondence  and  Papers  under  the  control 
of  the  Government,  relating  to  the  resignation  of  Dr.  Workman, 
late  Superintendent  of  the  Toronto  Lunatic  Asylum,  and  the  ap- 
pointment of  his  successor. 

By  Command. 

S.  C.  WOOD, 

Secretary. 
Provincial  Secretary's  Office, 

Toronto,  Gth  December,  1875. 


SCHEDULE  OF  CORRESPONDENCE  AND  PAPERS  RELATING  TO  THE  RE- 
SIGNATION OF  DR.  WORKMAN,  LATE  MEDICAL  SUPERINTENDENT  OF 
THE  ASYLUM  FOR  THE  LXSANE,  TORONTO,  AND  THE  APPOINTMENT  OF 
DR.  GOWAN  AS  HIS  SUCCESSOR. 

1875. 

Jau.     7th — Letter  from  Dr.  Workmau  to  the  Hon.    tlie  Proviucial  Secretary,   tendering 

his  resignation. 
June  11th — Letter  from  Assistant-Secretary  F^ckart  to  Dr.  Workman. 

April   14t)i — Letter  from  Dr.  Gowan   to    the    Hon.   the  Provincial  Secretary,  intimating 
his  intention  of  applying  for  the  appointment  of  Medical  Superintendent 
of  the  Asylum  for  the  Insane,  Toronto. 
"       20th — Letter  from  Dr.  Gowan   to  the  Hon.  the  Provincial  Secretary,  formally  ap- 
plying for  such  appointment,  and  enclosing 
Letters  of  recommendation  and  testimonials  dated,  severally,  December  7, 
1874,  and  April  IGth,  17th,  19th  and  21st,  1875. 
"       21st — Letter  from  Dr.    Gowan    to  the    Hon.   the    Provincial  Secretary,   further 
transmitting  copies  of  testimonials  (printed). 
May         1st — Letter  from  Dr.  H.  A.  Nicholson,  F.R.S.E.,  to  the  Hon.  0.  Mowat,  recom- 
mendatory of  Dr.  Gowan. 
"        14th — Letter  from  the  Hon.  Wm.  McMaster  to  the  Hon.   the   Provincial  Secre- 
tary, enclosing  testimonials  of  Dr.  Gowan. 


Asylum  for  the  Insane, 

Toronto,  7th  January,  1875. 

Sir — Will  you  be  pleased,  on  my  behalf,  to  tender  to  His  Honor  the  Lieutenant- 
Governor  of  Ontario  my  resignation  of  the  ofBce  of  Medical  Superintendent  of  the  A.sylum 
for  Insane  at  Toronto,  on  the  grounds  of  my  advanced  age  and  the  consciousness  of  result- 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  18.)  A.  1875 


iug  inability  to  discharge  satisfactorily  to  myself  the  largely  augmented  duties  of  uiy  office. 
I  shall  await  the  pleasure  and  convenience  of  Government  as  to  the  date  of  my  retirement, 
but  I  respectfully  solicit  that  it  may  not  be  later  than  1st  July  next,  which  will  be  the 
termination  of  my  twenty-second  year  of  service. 

Most  respectfully,  &c., 


(Signed)  JOSEPH  WORKMAN,   M.D. 


The  Honorable  A.  McKellar, 

Provincial  Secretary  of  Ontario. 


Provikcial  Secretary's  Office,  Ontario, 

Toronto,  llth  June,  1875. 

Sir, — Adverting  to  your  resignation  of  the  office  of  Medical  Superintendent  of  the 
Asylum  for  the  Insane,  Toronto,  I  am  directed  to  inform  you  that  His  Excellency  the 
Lieutenant-Governor  has  been  pleased  to  appoint  Dr.  Charles  Gowan,  Assistant  Superin- 
tendent of  the  Worcester  Asylum,  England,  as  your  successor.  I  am  at  the  same  time 
to  state  that  Dr.  Gowan  will  leave  England  for  Toronto  on  the  1st  July,  and  it  is  proba- 
ble will  arrive  in  time  to  enter  upon  the  discharge  of  his  duties  between  the  loth  and 
20th  July.  I  am  also  to  add  that  the  Government  has  under  consideration  the  matter  of 
granting  you  a  retiring  allowance,  and  that  the  result  will  shortly  be  communicated. 

I  have  the  honor  to  be,  Sir, 

Your  obedient  Servant, 

(Signed)  I.  E.  Eckart, 

Assistant  Secretary. 

Dr.  Joseph  Workman,  M.D.,  &c.,  &c.,  Toronto. 


PowiCK,  NEAR  Worcester, 

14th  April,  1875. 

Sir, — I  have  observed  in  some  of  the  medical  papers  of  last  week,  that  an  advertise- 
ment was  inserted  asking  for  candidates  who  had  experience  in  Asylum  management  and 
the  treatment  of  the  insane,  for  the  office  of  Medical  Superintendent  of  the  Toronto 
Asylum,  and  that  they  were  to  forward  their  applications  to  you  for  the  consideration  of 
the  Government  of  the  Province  of  Ontario. 

I  therefore  Vjeg  to  advise  you  that  I  intend,  in  correspondence  with  the  terms  of  the 
advertisement,  to  apply  for  the  appointment,  and  to  say  that  I  am  preparing  my  testi- 
monials, which  I  hope  to  be  able  to  forward  in  a  week  or  so. 

Having  determined  to  adopt  this  course,  I  would  be  glad  to  know  from  you  whether 
it  would  be  desirable  for  to  send  printed  copies  of  my  testimonials  and  (pialificatious  to 
the  individual  members  of  the  Government  who  make  the  appointment,  and  in  that  case 
would  you  be  good  enough  to  send  me  by  the  next  nuiil  a  list  of  such  gentlemen.  If, 
however,  nothing  beyond  the  submis.'sion  of  my  testimonials  is  necessary,  this  will  not  be 
requisite. 

I  have  the  honor  to  be,  &c., 


(Signed)         CiiARi-KS  GowAN,  M.D 


Arch.  McKellar,  Eh({., 

Provincial  Secretary  of  the  Goverrimcnt 
tjf  tln!  I'rovinci;  of  ( )ritario. 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  18.)  A.  1875 


PowicK,  NEAR  Worcester, 
To  Archibald  McKellar,  Esquire,  20th  April,  1875. 

Provincial  Secretary  of  the  Government 

oj  the  Province  of  Ontario,  Canada. 

Sir, — I  beg  to  offer  m)self  as  a  candidate  for  the  office  of  Medical  Superintendent 
of  the  Toronto  Asylum,  Canada. 

I  am  twenty-eight  years  of  age,  at  present  unmarried,  and  a  member  of  the  Protestant 
Church. 

1  .studied  my  profession  at  the  University  of  Edinburgh,  Avhere  I  obtained  the  degrees 
of  Bachelor  of  Medicine  and  Master  in  Surgery,  and  subsequently  proceeded  to  the  Degree 
of  Doctor  of  Medicine,  at  which  time  I  presented  a  graduation  thesis  on  the  treatment  of 
insanity,  which  received  special  commendation  from  the  Senatus  of  th  :■  University.  I  also 
possess  the  license  of  the  Royal  College  of  Surgeons  of  Edinburgh,  and  all  my  qualifica- 
tions are  duly  registered  under  the  Medical  Act. 

I  have  studied  insanity  ;  the  care  antl  treatment  of  the  insane,  and  the  construction, 
regulation  and  management  of  Asylums,  for  upwards  of  four  and  a  half  years  :  first,  at  the 
Koyal  Asylum  of  Montrose,  N.  B.,  which  contains  400  county  and  private  patients  of  all 
classes  of  society,  and  for  nearly  four  years  in  the  Worcester  County  and  City  Lunatic 
Asylum  at  Powick,  which  contains  upwards  of  700  patients. 

I  have  also  visited  and  made  myself  personally  acquainted  with  the  varying  arrange- 
ments of  many  of  the  large  Asylums  of  this  country. 

In  proof  of  my  fitne.ss  for  the  office  for  which  I  am  now  a  candidate,  I  beg  to  submit 
for  your  consideration  testimonials  extending  over  the  whole  cour.se  of  my  professional 
career,  which  comprise  the  oj)inions  of  many  of  the  Professors  under  whom  I  studied,  the 
views  of  the  members  of  the  Committee  of  Visiting  Justices  of  this  Asylum,  and  .special 
references  from  the  Superintendents  under  whom  I  have  held  office. 

While  engaged  in  the  practice  of  psychological  medicine,  the  Superintendents  of 
several  other  Asylums,  and  gentlemen  occupying  a  leading  position  in  their  profession, 
have  been  able,  from  their  official  interdourse  with  me,  to  form  an  estimate  of  my  qualifi- 
cations, and  their  expressions  of  opinion  I  also  annex. 

Should  the  Government  of  Ontario  entrust  me  with  the  superintendence  of  the 
Toronto  Asylum,  no  effort  on  my  part  shall  be  spared  to  secure  the  recovery,  care  and 
comfort  of  all  the  patients  under  my  supervision,  and  the  management  of  the  affairs  of 
the  Institution  shall  invariably  receive  my  constant  and  undivided  attention. 

I  am,  &c., 

(Signed)        Charles  Gowan. 


r  Legacion  de  Chili,  Paris, 

December  7th,  1874. 

Dear  Sir, — In  answer  to  your  .several  letters  respecting  the  appointment  of  a  head 
physician  for  the  Santiago  Lunatic  Asylum,  I  am  instructed  by  the  Chilian  Minister  to 
iiiform  you  that  he  has  selected  a  candidate  for  that  position,  you  being  the  second  in  a 
list  of  about  thirty  who  applied  for  that  employment. 

Enclo.sed  you  will  find  the  series  of  testimonials  you  were  kind  enough  to  send  us  for 
our  perusal,  and  by  this  same  post  I  forward  to  you  your  original  diplomas  in  a  sure  and 
convenient  envelope. 

Regretting  that  you  have  been  put  to  unnecessary  trouble  in  this  matter, 
I  remain.  Sir, 

Yours  most  sincerely, 

Carlos  Morls,  Viemia, 

Secretary  to  the  Chilian  Legation. 
Charles  Gowan,  Esq., 

County  and  City  of  Worcester  Pauper  Asylum,  \ 

Powick,  near  Worcester,  England, 
3 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  18.)  A.  1875 


13  Belgrave  Square,  London, 

April  16th,  1875. 

My  Dear  Sir, —  I  do  not  feel  myself  at  liberty  to  address  directly  the  Provincial 
Secretary  of  Ontario  in  reference  to  the  merits  of  Dr.  Charles  Gowan,  but  I  venture  to 
think  that  the  high  cliliracter  which  others  more  qualified  than  I  am  to  speak  on  the  subject 
have  given  him,  and  the  great  advantage  he  has  obtained  from  pursuing  his  career  under 
your  su]ierAision,  and  in  the  Asylum  which  you  have  brought  to  so  high  a  pitch  of  perfec 
tion,  will  secure  iPor  his  testimonials  that  consideration  which  is  due  to  them. 

I  remain,  yours  very  truly, 

Beauchamr, 
/.  P.  for  Worcestershire,  and  Lord  Steward  of  the  Queen's  Houselwld. 
3.  Sherlock,  Esq.,  M.  D. 


9  Eaton  Square,  London,  W., 

April  17th,  1875. 

My  Dear  Martin  Curtler, — 1  think  Dr.  Gowan  must  be  mistaken  in  attaching 
any  weight  to  such  a  certificate  of  merit  as  it  is  in  my  power  to  give  him.  I  must  say  I 
think  the  fact  of  Dr.  Gowan  having  taken,  for  four  years,  a  leading  and  active  part  in 
such  a  large  and  admirable  establishment  as  our  Asylum  near  Worcester,  would  be  of 
more  service  to  him  than  anything  I  can  say.  But  as  he  feels  desirous  of  such  assistance 
as  my  name  may  give  him,  I  cannot  fairly  refuse  to  say  that  I  have  heard  him  very  highly 
spoken  of,  and  I  believe  him  to  be  fully  competent  to  the  duties  of  the  position  he  now 
seeks. 

Believe  me. 

Sincerely  yours, 
^      (Signed)  Hampton. 

M.  Curtler,  Esquire. 


PowiCK,  near  Worcester, 

April  19th,  1875. 

Sir, — Dr.  Charles  Gowan,  the  Deputy  Superintendent  and  Assistant  Medical  Officer 
of  this  Asylum,  in  conformity  with  the  terms  of  the  advertisement  which  has  lately  ap 
peared  in  the  "  Lancet,"  intends  forwarding  you,  by  an  early  pest,  testimonials  for  the 
office  of  Medical  Superintendent  of  the  Toronto  Asylum.  Being  myself  fully  assured  of 
his  perfect  competence  and  fitness  to  undertake  the  office  in  question,  from  his  experience 
in  Asylum  management  and  treatment  of  patients,  his  high  professional  attainments  and 
undoubted  probity  of  character,  I  beg  to  submit  to  you,  for  presentation  to  the  elective 
body,  along  with  his  general  testimonals,  two  letters,  enclosed  herewith,  from  noblemen 
resident  in  this  county,  who  are  thoroughly  acquainted  both  with  the  working  and  general 
character  which  the  Worcester  Asylum  bears  in  this  country ;  and  it  is  only  due  to  Dr. 
Gowan  that  any  collateral  evidence  should  be  presenteil  to  your  authorities  from  such 
undeniable  sources  as  Earl  Beaucharap,  who  was  formerly  a  member  of  the  Committee  of 
Visitors  of  this  Asylum  ;  and  Lord  Haraptcui  (formerly  Sir  John  Pakington),  who  has 
been  Cabinet  Minister  in  various  capacities,  in  several  of  the  Governments  of  this 
country. 

It  would  have  been  quite  within  my  power  to  have  obtained  similar  testimonials 
from  other  nobU-men  residing  in  this  county,  but  I  believe  that  the  expressions  of  opinion 
recorded  in  the  enclosures  render  unnecessary  a  multiplication  of  such  documentary  proof. 
I  feel,  however,  strongly,  that  a  professional  gentleman  like  Dr.  Gowan,  applying  for  a 
situation  in  one  of  our  Colonies,  should  not  rest  his  claims  altogether  on  testimonials  sub- 
mitted from  purely  local  authorities  and  those  eminent  in  the  department  of  medicine  in 
which  he  is  engaged,  and  that  it  was  incumbent  upon  him,  if  he  wished  to  present  himself 
in'the  most  favourable  light  to  the  electors  of  the  Government  of  Ontario,  that  the  highest 

4 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  18.)  A.  1875 


possible  testimony  should  be  furnished  by  hira  for  their  information  regarding  his  antece- 
dents and  it  is  upon  those  grounds  that  I  have  taken  the  liberty  of  addressing  you. 

Dr.  Gowan  having  been  associated  with  me  in  this  Asylum,  in  the  care  of  the 
patients  and  its  management,  for  nearly  four  years,  I  can  confidently  state  that  the  testi- 
monial T  have  myself  given  him  is  a  true  and  candid  expression  of  the  opinion  at  wliioh  I 
have  arrived  in  regard  to  his  qualifications. 

I  have  honour  to  be,  &c., 

(Signed)  James  Sherlock,  M.D., 

Superintendent  and  Medical  Officer. 
Archibald  McKellar,  Esquire, 
Toronto, 
Canada. 


PowicK,  near  Worcester, 
21st  April,  1875. 

We,  James  Sherlock,  Doctor  of  Medicine,  and  Alfred  Bond,  B.A.,  Clerk  in  Holy 
Orders,  both  of  the  Parish  of  Powick,  in  the  County  of  Worcester,  hereby  certify  that  we 
have  this  day  personally  examined  the  manuscript  testimonials  of  Dr.  Charles  Gowan, 
and  we  believe  them  to  be  tlie  true  and  original  documents  obtained  liy  him  from  the 
several  gentlemen  whose  signatures  are  appended,  and  with  whose  handwriting,  in  most  of 
the  cases,  we  are  well  acquainted. 

(Signed)  James  Sheiilock,  M.D. 

Edinhtrgh,  Sv per inti' mien t  and  Medical  Officer  of  the  Worcester 
Cminty  and  Citij  Lunatic  Asylum. 
Alfred  Bond,  B.A., 
Chaplain  of  the  Worcester  County  and  City  Asylum, 


Powick,  near  Worcester, 
21st  April,  1875. 

Sir, — To-day  I  have  posted,  for  the  consideration  of  your  Government,  my  applica- 
tion for  the  office  of  Medical  Superintendent  of  tlie  Toronto  A.sylum,  accompanied  by 
original  testimonials,  and  certified  copies  of  my  medical  qualifications. 

I  also  take  the  liberty  of  sending,  per  book-post,  six  printed  copies  of  my  testimo- 
nials, which  are  more  easy  of  reference  than  the  originals,  and  tell  at  a  glance  t4ie  names 
and  status  of  the  gentlemen  by  whom  they  are  given.  I  also  send  with  this  a  note,  certi- 
fying that  all  the  testimonials  are  original  and  genuine.  I  should  like  to  give  you  a  few 
particulars  about  myself,  which  cannot  well  be  done  in  a  formal  application.  You  will 
observe  that  some  of  my  testimonials  refer  to  another  appointment — thut  of  Northumber- 
land, for  which  I  was  an  applicant  last  year.  The  only  other  Asylum  I  have  tried  for 
was  that  of  Santiago,  for  which  you  will  see,  by  the  enclosed  letter  from  the  S'jcretary  of 
Legation,  I  was  second  out  of  thirty  candidates. 

The  only  reasons  I  have  for  wishing  to  leave  Worcester  are  that  I  may  have  full 
charge  of  an  Asylnra,  and  so  better  my  position,  and  also  that  my  office  here  precludes  the 
possibility  of  my  being  able  to  marry,  as  the  Deputy  Superintendent,  according  to  the 
rules  of  our  Committee,  must  be  single. 

I  may  add  that  I  am  5  feet  11^  inches  in  height,  an<l  of  strong  constitution.  I  weigh 
upwards  of  12  stone.  Should  you  desire  it,  I  shall  be  happy  to  forward  my  photograph 
on  hearing  from  you. 

Trusting  you  will  excuse  my  troubling  you  with  these  personal  details, 

I  have  the  honour  to  be,  Sir, 

Your  obedient  servant, 
(Signed)  Charles  Gowan. 

Archibald  McKellar,  Esquire, 
Toronto. 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  18.)  A.  1875 

College  of  Physical  Science,  Newcastle-on-Tyne, 

May   1st,  1875. 

My  Dear  Attorney-General, — I  take  the  great  liberty  of  writing  to  urge  on  your 
consideration  the  claims  of  Dr.  Charles  Gowan,  Superintendent  of  the  Lunatic  Asylum  of 
Worcester,  who  is  a  candidate  for  the  post  of  Superintendent  of  the  Lunatic  Asylum  of 
Toronto.  I  know  how  difficult  a  matter  it  is  to  choose,  amongst  a  number  of  perhaps 
nearly  equally  qualified  men,  and  therefore,  I  write  with  great  diffidence. 

I  believe,  howe\'er,  that  I  may  fairly  say  that  Dr.  Charles  Gowan  has  greatly  distin- 
guished himself  in  his  present  post,  and  that  he  is  admirably  qualified  for  the  appointment 
which  he  is  now  seeking. 

Once  more  apologizing  for  troubling  you  on  this  subject 

Believe  me,  my  dear  Attorney-General, 
Yours  very  truly, 

H.  Alleyne  Nicholson. 
The  Honorable  Oliver  Mowat,  Q.C.,  &c.,  &c. 


The  Canadian  Bank  of  Commerce, 

Toronto,   Ontario,  14th  May,  1875. 

Sir — Understanding  that  Dr.  Charles  Gowan,  of  Scotland  (whose  testimonials  and 
photographs  I  now  enclose),  is  a  candidate  for  the  appointment  of  Medical  Superintendent 
of  the  Toronto  Lunatic  Asylum,  and  having  reason  to  believe  that  he  is  well  qualified  to 
discharge  the  duties  of  that  position  with  credit  to  himself  and  satisfaction  to  the  public, 
I  beg  to  recommend  him  to  the  favourable  consideration  of  the  Administrator  of  the  Gov- 
ernment in  Council. 

Your  obedient  servant, 
(Signed)  VVm.  McMaster. 


The  Honorable  A.  McKellar, 

Provincial  Secretary,  Toronto. 


Provincial  Secretary's  Office, 

Toronto,  7th  December,  1875. 


Certified, 

I.  K.   Eckart, 

Assistant-Secretary. 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  18.)  A.   1875 


SUPPLEMENTARY    RETURN 

Of  Correspondence  and  Papers  relating  to  the  Resignation  of  Dr. 
Workman,  late  Superintendent  of  the  Toronto  Lunatic  Asylum, 
and  the  appointment  of  his  successor. 

By  Connnand, 

S.  C.  WOOD, 

Secretary, 
Pkovincial  Secketaky's  Office, 
Toronto,  December  14th,  1875. 


SUPPLEMENTARY  SCHEDULE  OF  CORRESPONDENCE  AND  PAPERS  RELAT- 
ING TO  THE  RESIGNATION  OF  DR.  WORKMAN,  "LATE  SUPERINTEN- 
DENT OF  THE  TORONTO  LUNATIC  ASYLUM,  AND  THE  APPOINTMENT 
OF  HIS  SUCCESSOR. 

1875. 
Feb.  8th. — Extract  from  Mr.  Inspector  Lani,'muir's  Report  of  his  inspection  of  the  Asylum 

for  the  Insane,  Toronto,  8th  February,  1875. 
May  15th. — Memo,  of  advertisement  by  the  Government  for  applications  for  the  situation 
of  Medical  Superintendent  of  the  Toronto  Asylum,  Canada,  about  to  become 
vacant  by  the  resignation  of  Dr.  Workman. 
"   17th. — Memo.  Report  of  Mr.  Inspector  Langnmir  on  applications  from  candidates  for 
the  office  of  Medical  Superintendent  of  the  Toronto  Asylum. 


Extract  from  Inspector  Langmuir' s  Report  of  Inspection  of  Toronto  Asylum,  ^th  February. 
1875  :— 

"The  resignation,  owing  to  advancing  years  and  declining  health,  of  Dr.  Joseph 
Workman,  who  for  the  past  twenty-two  years  has  hlled  the  position  of  Medical  Superin- 
ten«lent  of  the  Toronto  Asylum,  followed,  as  I  am  informed  it  shortly  will  be,  and  for  the 
same  causes,  by  the  resignation  of  Dr.  Benjamin  Workman,  who  has  performed  the  duties 
of  Assistant  Physician  for  nearly  twenty  years,  will  necessitate  the  instalment  at  an  early 
day,  of  a  new  Medical  Superintendent  and  Assistant  Physician. 

"  In  dealing  with  the  subject  of  retiring  allowances,  I  am  sure,  in  relation  to  Dr. 
Workman,  that  I  need  not  remind  the  Government  of  the  long  and  faithful  services  of  this 
veteran  in  the  specialty  of  Asylum  administration  in  Canada,  nor  of  the  arduous  and  respon- 
sible character  of  these  services.  For  twenty- two  years  he  has  managed,  with  the  greatest 
skill  and  tact,  the  affairs  of  this  large  and  important  public  Institution. 

"  That  his  management  has  given  general  satisfaction  will  not  only  be  admitted  by 
the  general  public,  but  also  by  the  members  of  the  various  Governments  he  has  served 
under  since  his  appointment. 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  18.)  A.  1875 


"  That  it  has  brought  credit  aud  houoiir  to  himself,  the  esteem  in  which  he  is  held  by 
the  medical  profession,  and  the  position  and  rank  that  he  holds  among  the  members  of 
that  branch  of  it  engaged  in  the  same  work  as  himself  on  the  Continent  of  America, 
abundantly  prove.  I  respectfully  claim,  therefore,  that  Dr.  Workman  is  entitled  to  a 
liberal  gratuity  on  retiring  from  a  service  of  which  he  has  been  the  acknowledged  head 
in  Canada  for  so  many  years,  and  in  which  service  he  has  faithfully  performed  his  duty 
to  his  country  and  humanity. 

'•  The  appointment  of  an  inexperienced  person  to  take  the  place  of  Dr.  Workman,  no 
matter  how  excellent  his  professional  qualities  may  be,  will  be  attended  with  many  dif- 
ficidties  for  a  considerable  time.  Under  such  circumstances,  it  would  be  advisable  to  se- 
cure— if  at  all  possible — the  services  of  Dr.  Workman  as  consulting  physician  for  a  year 
or  two,  in  order  that  his  successor  may  have  the  benefit  of  his  large  and  varied  experience. 
If,  however,  a  gentleman  is  appointed  who  has  had  experience  in  the  management  of 
Asylums  for  the  Insane — which  course  is  obviously  the  best,  and  which  I  cannot  too 
strongly  recommend — then  such  an  engagenent,  which  might  be  attended  with  conflict  of 
authority,  would  be  altogether  unnecessary. 

"  Respecting  Dr.  Benjamin  Workman's  services,  as  Assistant  Physician,  which  have 
extended  over  nineteen  years,  I  can  only  say  that  during  my  period  of  office  he  has 
not  only  performed  his  duties  most  faithfully  and  conscientiously,  but  his  kind  and  genial 
manner  has  won  for  him  the  esteem  and  respect  of  all  who  have  come  in  contact  with 
him.  I  therefore  trust  that  a  gratuity  having  some  equivalence  to  the  value  of  his  long 
and  honest  services  will  be  granted  to  him." 


Applications  will  be  received  by   the  Government  of  the  Province  of  Ontario,   ad- 
dressed to  the  undersigned, 

Up  to  the  15th  May,  1875, 

From  regularly  certified  Physicians  having    had  experience   in  the   management    and 
working  of 

Asylums  for  the  Insane, 

For  the  position  of  Medical   Superintendent  of  the  Toronto  Asylum,  Canada,  about  to 
become  vacant  by  the  resignation  of  Dr.  Joseph  Workman, 

All  applications  must  be  accompanied  by  duly  certified  testimonials  as  to  character 
and  position,  stating  age,  whether  married  or  unmarried,  and  length  of  service  in  an  Asy- 
lum for  the  Insane,  together  with  certified  copies  of  Diplomas  as  Physicians  or  Surgeons 
by  recognized  medical  authorities.  Salary  $2,000,  or  about  £400  sterling  per  annum 
with  furnished  apartments,  fuel,  light,  water  and  furnished  table  for  family. 
Appointment  to  take  effect  from  1st  July,  1875. 

A.  McKellak, 

Provincial  Secretary. 
Office  of  Provincial  Secretary, 

Toronto,  March  15th,  1875. 


Re  Medical  Superintendent's  Office, 

Inspector  Asylums,  Prisons,  &c,,  Ontario, 

Toronto,  May  17th  1875. 

Sir, — Under  the  terms  of  the  advertisement  soliciting  appplications  for  the 
position  of  Medical  Superintendent  for  the  Asylum  for  Insane,  Toronte,  all  papers  connected 
tliercwitli,  were  to  be  traufsmitted  to  the  HonouraljJe  Provincial  Secretary  up  to  the  15th 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  18.)  A.  1875 


May.     These  applications,  numbering  32,  have  been  referred  to  me  ;  and  I  beg  to  report 
upon  them  as  follows  : — 

One  of  the  conditions  of  the  advertisement  implied  that  the  applicant  should  have 
had  certain:  experience  in  Asylum  management.  Of  the  number  who  have  applied,  how- 
ever, there  are  nine  from  the  Province  of  Ontario  who  have  had  no  experience  whatever, 
more  than  that  of  ordinary  practice.     Their  names  are  as  follow,  viz  : 

1st.  M.  H.  fctarr,  M.D. Georgetown. 

2nd.  D.  Hamilton,  "                         Toronto. 

3rd.  D.  Clarke,  "  -         -                  -         .         .         .  Princeton. 

4th.  J.  K.  Lake,  "             .....  Picton. 

5th.  J.  McL.  Wallace,  "  -         .         -                   ...  Spencerville. 

6th.  E.  W.  Bingham,  "             Waterloo. 

7th.  Jacob  Smith,  ".......  Ridgetown. 

8th.  George  Smith  "             Stratford. 

9th.  J.  Bridgeman,  " Toronto. 

Only  one  of  the  above  named  applicants  from  the  Province  of  Ontario  (Dr.  Smith,  of 
Stratford),  has  had  any  experience  in  Asylum  management.  He  is  stated  to  have  been  on 
the  medical  staff  of  Hanwell  Asylum,  for  about  a  year  prior  to  his  coming  to  Canada.  Of 
the  applicants  from  Great  Britain,  seven  have  had  only  casual  experience  in  such  matters, 
viz.  : — 

1st.  F.  Hewit,  M.D.,  -        -         -         Hants,  Northumberland. 

2nd.  F.  C.  Crossle,  "  ....     Tandragee,  Ireland. 

3rd.  H.  D.  M.  Pentland,  "  -         .         -         .          London",  England. 

4th.  J.  T.  Pennefather,  "  .         -         .         . 

5th.  Stewart  Harris,  "  -         .         .         .                 «'             " 

6th.  Leighton  Kustevin,  "  ....      Macclesfield  " 

7th.  Richard  O'Kelly,  "  .        .         -         .          Cork,  Ireland. 

The  sixteen  above  named  gentlemen  may  be,  and  no  doubt  are,  excellent  medical 
men,  of  good  professional  standing,  and  in  some  cases,  as  proved  by  their  testimonials, 
ranking  high  in  the  profession  ;  yet,  still,  without  experience  in,  or  practical  knowledsie 
of,  the  specialty  of  Insanity,  and  more  particularly  without  experience  in  the  domestic  man- 
agement of  a  large  Institution.  In  these  matters  the  risk  of  undertaking  to  educate  an 
incompetent  man  would  be  both  hazardous  and  costly,  yet  at  the  same  time,  if  the  training 
of  the  experienced  applicant  has  not  been  varied,  thorough  and  sound,  it  will  avail  little 
in  obtaining  efficient  Asylum  management. 

Eminence  in  the  medical  profession  should  not  alone  be  the  standard  for  selection, 
unless  combined  with  sound  judgment,  a  knowledge  of  human  nature,  and  good  adminis- 
trative ability.  With  the  three  latter  qualifications  a  man  of  moderate  professional  ac- 
quirements may  be  better  suited  to  the  position  than  an  unpractical  man  of  the  most 
scientific  attainments. 

Five  of  the  applicants  have  had  experience,  either  as  Medical  Superintendents  or  As- 
sistant Superintendents  in  Asylums  in  the  United  States,  viz.  : — 

1st.  Dr.  Hughes,  at  present  Medical  Superintendent  of  St.  Louis  Asylum. 

2nd.  Dr.   Attwood,    Assistant   Superintendent,    Flatbush  Asylum,   King's   County, 

N.  Y. 
3rd.  Dr.  Blackmer,  Assistant  Superintendent  United  States  Asylums. 
4th.  Dr.  Bowers,  Assistant  Superintendent,  Minnesota  Hospital  for  Insane. 
5th.  Dr.  Hayard,  Assistant  Superintendent,  King's  County  Asylum,  for  one  yeai'. 

The  first  named  is  the  only  Medical  Superintendent  of  an  Asylum  who  has  applied  for 
the  position.  He  is  stated  to  be  a  man  of  very  considerable  ability,  though  still  young, 
holding  a  fair  position  among  specialists,  and  as  a  writer  on  medical  subjects.  He  has, 
however,  the  reputation  of  being  eccentric  and  diantjeable  in  his  views,  but  without  per- 

9 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  18.)  '    A.  1875 


sonal  knowledge  of  his  character,  I  am  not  prepared  to  express  an  opinion  on  this  matter. 

Dr.  Ray  (whose  opinion  is  entitled  to  great   weight  in  such  matters)  is,  I  observe,  very 

cautious  and  guarded  in  his  recommendation  of  him.     The  other  applicants,  though  well 

recommended,  are,  to  a  certain  extent,  unknown  in  the  specialty. 

Dr.  Bowers,  who  served  for  some  time  as  Medical  Superintendent  on  the  death  of  Dr. 

Schautz,  Avas  born  in  Canada,  and  is  well  spoken  of  by  men  well  qualified  to  judge  of  his 

ability  and  character. 

Dr.  Attwood,  I  believe,  you  had  a  personal  interview  with. 

From  Great  Britain  there  are  eight  applicants  who  possess  experience  as  specialists, 

and  in  management,  although  in  some  instances  of  a  limited  character — none  having  served 

as  Superintendents,  unless  in  the  absence  of  the  heads  of  Institutions  to  which  they  were 

attached.     Some  have,  however,  had  considerable  experience,  and  from  their  recommenda- 
tions must  be  of  good  professional  standing. 

The  names  of  these  applicants  are  as  follow  : 

1st.  Charles  Go  wan,  aged  28  ;  unmai-ried  ;  over  four  years  Deputy  Superintendent,  Worces- 
ter County  and  City  Asylum,  England. 

2nd.  David  Cassidy,  aged  30  ;  married  ;  has  been  assistant  in  several  Asylums  for  the  past 
seven  years. 

3rd.  Sutherland  Rees  Phillips,  aged  28  ;  unmarried  ;  assistant  at  Devon  Asylum,  was  As- 
sistant Physician  at  the  Three  Counties  Asylums. 

4th.  John  Hawkes,  aged  43  ;  unmarried  ;  fourteen  years  engaged  in  Asylums,  and  seven 
years  one  of  the  Assistant  Superintendents  of  Hanwell  Asylum  (the  largest  in  Eng- 
land). 

5th.  H.  B.Patteson,  aged  33  ;  unmarried  ;for  five  years  one  of  the  Assistant  Physicians  of 
Hanwell  Asylum. 

6th.  John  Watson,  aged  36  ;  married  ;  for  six  years  senior  Medical  Officer  of  the  County 
Lunatic  Asylum,  Prestwich,  England  ;  also.  Physician  to  other  instutions. 

7th.  W.  R.  Gumming,  aged  35  ;  for  two  years,  and  now  one  of  the  Assistant  Physicians 
of  Hanwell. 

8th.  Andrew  Irving,  aged  28  ;  unmarried  ;  Assistant  Medical  Resident  Officer,Royal  India 
Asylum,  Ealing,  London,  for  two  years  and  now. 

From  this  Province  there  are  two  applications  from  expei'ienced  Physicians,  viz. : — 

1  St.  Stephen  Lett,  aged  28  ;  married  ;  now  Assistant  Physician  Insane  Asylum,  London. 
2nd.  S.  Richardson,  aged  27  ;  for  two  years  Chief  Clinical  Assistant  of  the  Toronto  Asy- 
lum for  Insane. 

If  previous  experience  is  to  be  the  initial  test  for  applicants,  in  filling  the  appoint- 
ment, the  number  of  applicants  is  narrowed  down  to  fifteen,  five  from  the  United  States, 
eight  from  Great  Britain,  and  two  from  Ontario  ;  or  perhaps  it  would  be  more  fair  to  con- 
sider them  in  inverse  order,  as  from  their  acquaintance  with  the  country,  and  the  inner 
life  of  the  Asylums,  the  two  latter  are  perhaps  entitled  to  the  preference. 

It  will  be  observed,  perhaps,  that  out  of  the  English  applicants,  with  the  exception 
of  Dr.  Hawkes,  Dr.  Watson  and  Dr.  Gumming,  all  are  under  35  years  of  age,  and  may 
therefore,  perhaps,  lack  that  solidity  and  maturity  of  judgment  which  should  characterize 
the  Superintendent  of  an  Asylum  of  so  important  a  character  as  that  of  Toronto ;  it  is, 
nevertheless  certain,  however,  that  those  who  are  most  highly  recommended  are  under  the 
age  of  thirty. 

Without  further  comment,  I  beg  to  submit  the  list  of  names  for  the  consideration  of 
the  Government. 

In  addition  to  the  thirty-two  applications  for  the  position  of  Medical  Superintendent, 
tliere  are  also  four  applications  for  the  assistant  Superintendency  of  the  Asylum,  which, 
through  the  resignation  of  Dr.  Benjamin  Workman,  will  also  fall  vacant  on  the  1st  of 
July. 

The  applicants  for  the  position  are  as  follow  :— 

1st.  T.  S.  Covernton,  M.D.,  at  present  Chief  Clinical  Assistant  in  the  Toronto  Asylum,  in 
whicli  service  he  has  been  for  the  pa.st  four  years. 

10 


39  Victoria.  "^Sessional  Papers  (No.  18.)  A.   IS75 


2nd.  T.  J.  W.  Burgess  ;  was  on  the  Clinical  staff"  of  the  Toronto  Asylum  for  about  a  year. 
3rd.  W.  G.  Metcalf ;  was  on  the  staff"  of  Clinical  assistants  of  the  Toronto  Asylum  from 

August,  1871,  to  October,  1874. 
4th.  A.  M.  Synod  ;  no  Asylum  experience  ;  Assistant  in  the  Toronto  Hospital. 

It  is  of  the  utmost  importance  that  the  Assistant  Physician  of  the  Asylum  should  be 
a  man  of  good  ability  and  address,  so  that  in  the  event  of  the  death  or  resignation  of  the 
Medical  Superintendent,  he,may  be  worthy  of  ])romotion  to  the  chief  position  in  the 
Asylum  ;  and  1  would  strongly  recommend  that  the  appointment  be  made  with  a  view  to 
that. 

Dr.Covernton,  the  present  chief  of  the  Clinical  staff,  has  given  the  greatest  satisfaction 
in  the  discharge  of  his  duties,  and  I  believe  is  eminently  fitted  to  take  the  place  of  Assist- 
ant Physician.  From  his  knowledge  of  the  patients,  and  the  anatomy  of  the  Asylum,  he 
would  be  a  most  valuable  assistant  to  a  new  Medical  Superintendent. 

I  have  the  honour  to  be,  Sir, 

Your  obedient  servant, 
(Signed)  J.  W.  LANGiruiR. 

P.S. — Since  writing  the  foregoing  Report,  another  English  application  has  been  re- 
ceived from  Dr.  Warren  Hastings  Diamond,  a  medical  gentleman  of  considerable  experi- 
ence in  Asylum  management,  and  well  recommended  for  ability  ;  also  one  from  Dr. 
Andrew  More,  of  Inkerman,  Ontario,  who  has  had  no  experience  in  Asylum  management. 
~  W.  L. 


Also  just  received  the  application  of  John  S.  Wilson,  M.D.,  of  Inverurie,  Aberdeen- 
shire, Scotland,  who  is  stated  to  liavi'  IkhI  considerable  experience  as  Assistant  Physician 
in  the  Perth  District  Asylum. 


11 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  19.)  A.  1875-6 


(No.  19.) 

Annual  Statement  of  the  Ontario  Mutual  Assurance  Company.     (Not 
Printed.) 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  20.)  A.  1875-6 


(No.   20.) 

Annual  Statement  of  the   Toronto  Life  Assurance  and  Tontine  Com- 
pany,    (Not  Printed.) 


89  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  21.)  A.  1875-6 


(No.    21.) 

Statement  of  the  Queen's  Printer  as  to  the  disposal  of  the  Ontario 
Statutes,  since  that  presented  at  the  last  Session.     (Not  Printed.) 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  22.)  A.  1875-6 


DETAILED    STATEMENT 


Of  all  Bonds  and  Securities  recorded  in  the  Provincial  Registrar's 
Office  since  the  last  Return  submitted  to  the  Legislative  As- 
sembly upon  the  27th  of  November,  1874,  made  in  accordance 
with  the  Provisions  of  Statute  of  Ontario,  32  Vic,  Cap.  29. 

By  Command, 

S.  C.  WOOD, 
Secretary  and  Registrar, 

Pkovincial  Registrar's  Office, 
10th  December,  1875. 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  22.) 


A.  1875-6 


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39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (JSo.  28.)  A.  1875 


EETUKN 

To  an  Address  of  the  Legislative  Assembly  to  His  Honour  the  Lieu- 
tenant-Governor, praying  His  Honour  to  cause  to  be  laid  before 
the  House  a  Statement  of  amounts  paid  in  each  year  from  1867 
to  1875,  for  the  repairs  and  maintenance  of  the  Departmental 
Buildings,  viz.  : — Parlianient  House  and  East  and  West  Wings. 

By  Command. 

S.  C.  WOOD, 

Secretary. 
Provincial  Secretary's  Office, 
ToKONTo,  December  10th,  1875. 


STATEMENT  OF  EXPENDITURE 

ON   ACCOUNT   OF 

EEPAlllS    AND  MAINTEiNANCE,  PARLIAMENT    AND  DE- 
PARTMENTAL  BUILDINGS 


1867-8- 

1869— 
1870 — 

—Parliament  and  Departmental   Buildings.    Capital 

Account. 

—         do                             do 

— Centre  Buildin"' 

81195  69 
517  71 
343  37 
150  00 

$69,946  07 
2,808  59 

Ea.st  Wing 

West  Win-.- 

^Attorney   General's  Office  

—Parliament  and   Departmental   Buildings,  Capital 

Account 

Centre  Building 

2,206  77 

1871  — 

1,862  38 
1,504  49 

776  58 
1,172  88 

300  00 

East  Wing 

West  Wing 

*Attorney  General's  Office...  

—  Parliament  ^and    Departmental  Buildings,  Capital 

Account 

Centre  Building 

East  Wing     

5,G16  33 

1872 — 

2,886  82 
4,053  29 
l,354jl9 

*Includiniir  Office  Rent. 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  23.) 


A.   1875 


9,489  15 


18,614  10 


1872 West  Wing $773  95 

*Attoruey  General's  Office 420  90 

1873 Parliament  and    Departmental  Buildings,  Camtal 

Account '.  ...  11,204  68 

Centre    Building 6,176  64 

East  Wing    540  78 

West  Wing 292  00 

*  Attorney  General's  Office  .- 400  00 

1874 Parliament  and    Departmental  Buildings,   Capital 

Account         9,687  71 

Centre  Building 1,372  51 

East  Wing 103  56 

West  Wing , 414  75 

^Attorney  General's  Office 1,064  34 

*  Public  Works 634  95 

1875. 

To  30th  Sept.— Centre  Building 1,228  56 

East  Wing 293  76 

West    Wing 66  25 

*Attorney  General's  Office 772  65 

*  Public  Works...... 959  21 

♦Immigration 128  75 

Total 


13,277  82 
$121,958  83 


3,449  18 
.25,408  01 


W.  CAYLEY, 

Auditor. 


^Including  Office  Rent. 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  24.)  A.    1875-6 


RKTUKN 


To  an  Address  of  the  Legislative  Assembly  to  His  Honor  the  Lieu- 
tenant-!'overnor,  praying  that  he  will  cause  to  be  laid  before  the 
House  a  Return  showing  the  receipts  of  the  Crown  Lands  Office 
in  its  <lifferent  departments  <luring  the  year  1875,  up  to  the  date 
of  said  Return,  as  far  as  can  be  ascertained. 

By  Command, 

S.  C.  WOOD, 

Sei^retarv. 
Provincial  Secretary's  Office, 

Toronto,  December  9th,   1875. 


STATEMENT    OF    THK    RECEIPTS    OF    THE    DEPARTMENT    OF    '  ROWN 
LANDS   FROM    1st  JANUARY  TO  0th   DECEMBER,   1875. 

• 

Crown   Lands $91,808  24 

Clertry  Lands 42,125  3:5 

Common  School  Land^ '  53,907  49 

Grummsr  School   Lands 8,454  12 

Wood.s  and  Forests 2t^8,509  70 

Casual  Fees 300  49 

Surveyors'  Fee  Fund  242  03 


$485,347  40 


Tiios.  H.  Johnson, 

Assistant  L'ormimsioner. 
William  Ford, 

Accountant. 
Department  of  Crown  Lands,  9th  December,  1875. 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  25.)  A.  1875-6 


EETUEN 


To  an  Address  of  the  Legislative  Assembly  to  His  Honor  the  Lieu- 
tenant-Governor, praying  His  Honor  to  cause  to  be  laid  before  the 
House  a  Return  of  all  correspondence  between  the  Government  and 
the  Board  of  Directors  of  the  Eye  and  Ear  Infirmary  of  Toronto. 

By  Command, 

S.  C.  WOOD, 

Secretary. 
Provincial  Secretary's  Office, 

Toronto,  December  lOth,  1875. 


SCHEDULE    OF   CORRESPONDENCE    AND    PAPERS    RELATING   TO    THE 
"EYE  AND  EAR  INFIRMARY  OF  TORONTO." 
1875. 

Not.  25th. — Memorials  of  the  President  and  Board  of  Directors  of  the  Toronto  Eye  and 
YjdX  Infirmary,  enclosing  abstract  from  the  statistics  for  the  year  endin<r  30th 
September,  1875,  Inspector  Langmuir's  Report,  and  a  Circular  from  i!»e 
Board  of  Directors. 


To  His  Honor  Donald  Alexander  Macdonald,  Lieutenant-Governor  of  Vie  Province  of 
Ontario,  in  Council. 

Sir,— The  President  and  Board  of  Directors  of  the  Toronto  Eye  and  Ear  Infirmary 
beg  leave  to  memorialize  your   Honor  as  follows: 

Mr.  J.  W.  Langmuir,  the  Inspector  of  Asylums,  &c.,  as  well  as  the  Surgeons  of  the 
Infirmary,  having  frequently  called  the  attention  of  the  Directors  to  the  great  need  of  a  more 
.suitable  building  for  the  purpose,  the  Directors  in  1H72  took  up  the  consideration  of  the  sub- 
ject, and  they  found  at  the  outset  that  it  was  impossible  to  get  the  lease  of  any  i  uilding  in  the 
city  at  all  suitable  for  the  wants  of  such  an  Institution.  They  despaired  of  being  able  to 
raise  the  necessary  amount  by  private  subscription  for  an  Institution  that  was  not  local, 
but  Provincial  in  its  character;  they  ;ilso  felt  that  the  Institution  had  a  claim  upon  the  Local 
Government,  fully  equil  to  that  of  the  Institution  for  the  Deaf  and  Dumb  and  Blind.  The 
Directors  memorijiTzed  the  Lieutenant-Governor  in  Council  both  in  1872  and  1873,  and  aa 
interview  was  had  with  the   Honourable  Attorney-General    Mowat  in  1874;  and  as  a  result 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  25.)  A.  1875  6 


of  such  interview  it  was  subsequently  intimated  to  the  President  that  on  account  of  the  near 
approach  to  the  fourth  session  of  the  present  Parliament,  the  Government  did  not  feel  pre- 
pared to  take  up  the  question  at  that  time.  Warm  sympathy  was,  however,  at  tie  same  time 
expressed  for  the  objects  and  aims  of  the  Institution,  and  the  Directors  were  led  to  hope,  if 
not  fully  to  expect,  that  the  matter  would  be  taken  up  by  the  Government  this  summer.  As 
no  communication  has  as  yet  been  received  from  the  Government,  the  Board  of  Directors 
would  most  respectfully  call  the  attention  of  your  Honor  to  the  matter,  and  request  that  an 
ant-wer  be  given  at  an  early  date,  as  it  is  a  matter  of  extreme  urgency  to  tht'  welfare  and  effi- 
ciency of  the  Institution  that  the  policy  of  the  Government  should  be  made  known  at  as  early 
a  date  as  possible. 

In  addition  to  the  consideration  presented  in  a  previous  memorial,  as  well  as  the  recent 
Report  of  the  Inspector  of  Asylums  (copies  of  which  are  hereto  annexed),  the  Directors  would 
respectfully  submit  the  following  : — 

The  superiority  of  special  over  general  hospitals  for  the  treatment  of  diseases  of  the  eye 
and  ear  may  be  inferred  from  the  great  success  that  has  marked  the  history  of  Ophthalmic 
and  Aural  Institutions  in  the  old  world  and  in  some  of  the  larger  cities  on  this  continent. 

The  history  of  the  Toronto  Eye  and  Ear  Infirmary  shows  conclusively  the  need  of  such 
an  Institution  in  the  Province  of  Ontario. 

The  attendance  of  patients  was  as  follows  : — 

First  year 104 

Second  year 120 

Third  year 187 

Fourthyear 260 

Fifth  year 274 

Sixth  (16  months) 514 

Seventh  year 535 

And  in  the  year  just  closed  634 

Making  a  total  of 2628   patients. 

An  Ophthalmic  and  Aural  Hospital  should  be  centrally  located,  so  as  to  be  convenient 
of  access  for  out-patients,  who  form  the  largest  part  of  the  number  treated,  and  many  of 
whom  are  nbliged  to  attend  daily,  for  weeks  at  a  time  (at  present  two  infants  in  arms  are 
brought  to  the  Infirmary,  and  one  is  attended  twice  daily) ;  and  for  the  further  reason  that 
often,  after  important  operations  on  the  eye,  cases  require  to  be  seen  by  the  surgeon 
twice  daily. 

An  Ophthalmic  and  Aural  Hospital  should  be  apart  from  a  general  hospital,  because 
nearly  all  the  arriingements  of  the  former  are  special.  It  would,  moreover,  be  unfair  to  the 
patients  to  subject  them  to  the  danger  of  contracting  contagious  diseases ;  an  operation 
might  be  followed  by  the  total  destruction  of  the  eye  from  the  vitiated  atmosphere  I'f  a  gen- 
eral ho.-pital.  One  case  of  erysipelas  in  a  hospital  might  render  it  hazardous  to  perform  any 
surgical  operation  in  the  building. 

A  former  patient  of  the  P^ye  and  Ear  Infirmary  caught  the  small-pox  in  a  general  hos- 
pital where  he  was  a  patient  for  treatment  for  disease  of  the  eye. 

The  Pjye  nnd  Ear  Infirmary,  Toronto,  is  doing  a  good  work  in  developing  voluntary 
benevolence  ;  about  two  thirds  of  its  funds  are  raised  outside  of  Government  aid. 

The  Institution  is  also  doing  a  good  work  in  the  direction  of  developing  self-respect 
amon'/  its  inmates  ;  payment  for  board  is  insisted  upon,  which  must  be  paid  either  by  the 
patient,  his  friends,  or  by  the  municipality  from  which  becomes;  exception  is,  however,  made 
in  favour  of  immigrants,  lumbermen,  &c.  ;  in  short,  of  people  who  have  no  homes.  Scarcely 
ODe-fourth  of  the  in-patients  are  admitted  on  the  free  list.  r '• 

We  may  add  that,  with  the  exception  of  the  superintendent  and  matron,  the  services  of 
the  medical  officers  and  all  others  connected  with  the  management  of  the  Institution^is 
gratuitous.  On  behalf  of  the  Board  of  Directors, 

(Signed)  A.  T.  McCorp, 

Prc.mlent. 
W.  T.  Mason, 

Secretary-Treasurer. 

2 


89  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  26.)  A.  1875-6 


To  His  Honw  the  Lieutenant-Governor  of  the  Province  of  Ontario  in  Council. 

The  Petition  of  the  President  and  Board  of  Directors  of  the  Toronto  Eye  and  Ear 
Infirmary, 

Humbly  Sheweth  : 

1.  That  your  Petitioners  on  the  4tb  instant  memorialized  your  Honor,  setting  forth 
the  great  need  of  a  suitable  building  and  premises  for  an  Infirmary  where  the  poor  of  this 
Province  who  are  affected  with  diseases  of  the  eye  and  ear  might  be  effectually  treated. 

Your  Petitioners  having  estimated  the  probable  cost  of  a  suitable  site  and  building  at 
about  tw.  nty  thousand  dollars  ($20,000),  further  set  out  that  it  would  be  impossible  to 
raii^e  that  sum  in  the  City  of  Toronto  alone  for  such  a  purpose,  and  that  the  undertaking, 
being  Provincial  rather  than  local  in  its  character,  had  claims  upon  the  Local  Legislature  of 
this  Province  similar  to  the  claims  of  the  Institution  for  the  Blind  at  Brantford,  or  for  the 
Deaf  and  Dumb  at  Bellt-ville. 

2.  In  addition  to  what  is  set  forth  in  the  said  memorial,  your  Petitioners  would  re- 
spectfully submit  that  the  chief  expense  in  the  establishment  and  maintenance  of  an  Eye  and 
Ear  Infirmary  is  on  account  of  the  intern  or  hospital  patients,  and  less  than  one-fifth  of  the  ex- 
pense for  the  maintenance  of  the  intern  patients  of  the  Toronto  Eye  and  Ear  Infirmary  is 
on  account  of  Toronto  patients. 

This  appears  from  the  fact  that,  of  the  three  hundred  and  fifty  intern  patients  who 
were  maintainel  in  the  Institution  up  to  the  thirtieth  September  last,  only  sixty-three  be- 
longed to  the  City  of  Toronto,  and  of  the  entire  disbursements  up  to  that  date,  fully  four- 
fifths  were  on  account  of  patients  from  different  parts  of  the  Province 

The  statistics  are  as  follows  : — From  the  opening  of  the  Ilosjjital  department,' in  1870, 
to  ;30th  September,  1875,  there  were  sixty-three  patients  from  Toronto,  who  were  maintained 
in  the  Infirmary  for  the  aggregate  number  of  2,773  days,  and  there  were  277  other  poor 
patients,  principally  from  the  Province  of  Ontario,  who  were  maintained  in  the  Infirmary 
for  the  aggregate  number  of  13,057  days. 

Your  Petitioners  would  further  set  forth  that  many  of  the  out-patients  are  also  from  the 
country,  and  they  doubt  not  that  many  patients  who  profess  to  belong  to  Toronto  acquired 
temporary  residence  there  for  the  purpose  of  receiving  the  advantages  of  the  charity. 

Your  Petitioners  are  willing,  so  far  ius  it  is  possilile,  to  continue  to  benr  this  inequal  bur- 
den, provided  that  a  suitable  building  l)e  provided  where  the  patients  may  be  more  effectually 
treated,  and  for  that  purpose  pray  that  a  grant  be  made  equal  to  one-half  of  the  entire  cost 
of  said  building. 

Your  Petitioners  would  undertake  to  use  their  best  endeavours  to  raise  an  equal  amount, 
which  they  doubt  not  they  will  be  successful  in  accomplishing,  and  would,  immediately  after 
such  grant  be  made,  proceed  to  purchase  a  site,  and  erect  a  suitable  building  thereon. 

Your  Petitioners  would  further  submit  thai  an  Eye  and  Ear  Infirmary  is  quite  excep- 
tional in  its  character,  that  the  entire  number  of  poor  persons  throughout  the  Province  who 
are  afflicted  at  anyone  time  with  diseases  of  the  Eye  and  Ear  is  not  sufficiently  large  to  make 
it  an  object  for  ;.ny  other  locality  to  establish  a  similar  institution. 

Your  Petitioners  submit  to  your  Honourable  Council  the  accompanying  abstract  of  the 
Statistics  of  the  Infirmary  for  the  year  closing  on  the  thirtieth  day  of  September,  one  thousand 
eight  hundred  and  seventy  five. 

Your  Petitioners  therefore  respectfully  ask  that  a  grant  may  be  made  to  assist  in  the 
erection  of  a  building,  as  set  forth  in  the  above  Petition. 

And  your  Petitioners  will  ever  pray. 

A.  T.  McCoRD, 

President. 


W.  T.  Mason, 

Secretary  and  Treasurer. 


Toronto,  Nov.  25th,  1875. 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  25.)  A.  1875-6 


Abstract  from  the  Statistics  of  the  Toronto  Eye  and  Ear  Infirmary,  for  the  year  ending 
30th  September,  1875. 

Total  number  of  patients  under  treatment 634 

For  disease  of  the  eye 507 

"  of  the  ear , 127 

634 


Males...  370 

Females 264 


Patients  over  40  years  of  age 137 

"       between  20  and  40 304 

"       under  20  years 193 


634 


634 


The  religious  denominations  were  given  as  follows : — 

Episcopalians 219 

Roman  Catholics 206 

Methodists  116 

Presbyterians 56 

Other  denominations 37 


The  intern   patients   numbered 76 

Extra  "  "         5.58 


Of  the  extra  patients,  there  were  immigrants 9 

From  the  County  of  York ,  60 

"     other  couBties  in  Ontario 29 

"     the  City  of  Toronto  , 460 


634 
634 

558 


Of  the  intern  patients  there  were — 

Immigrants .  5,  and  maintained 135  days. 

From  Toronto  9  "  601     " 

County  of  York 5  "  336     " 

Other  counties  in  Ontario...   52  " 2,939     " 

The  income  for  the  year  was  as  follows : — 

From  the  Government,  for  1875 $1,000 

"            balance  from  1874       500 

"      Municipalities'  patients 1,100 

"      Private  subscriptions ..  725 

"      Toronto  Corporation  (a  grant)  200 


$3,525 


Toronto  bivE  and  Ear  Infirmary, 

21  Adelaide  Street  West. 

Inspector's   Report. 

V 

Toronto,  September  9th,  1875. 

Statutory  inspection  was  made  by  the  undersigned  of  the  Eye  and  Ear  Infirmary  in  this 
city,  on  this  day,  on  which  occaBion  he  passed  over  the  entire  house,  and  found  it  in  a  well- 

4 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (Xo.  25.)  A.   1875-6 


kept  and  orderly  state,  considering  the  bad  internal  arrangements  of  the  premises,  and  their 
unfitness  for  the  purpose  for  which  they  are  used.  The  dormitories,  beds  and  bedding  were 
clean  and  fairly  comfortable,  but  the  rooms  were  by  no  means  cheerful  in  appearance.  There 
were  twelve  beds  made  up  for  the  patients  at  the  time  of  his  visit.  Eleven  patients  were  found 
in  residence,  viz.,  eight  males  and  three  females.  They  were  all  affected  with  various  diseases 
of  the  eye.  Seven  of  this  number  are  paying  for  their  board  and  lodging  in  the  House  ;  one 
is  being  supported  by  the  City  of  Toronto ;  one  was  received  from  the  Ontario  Ins'itution  for 
the  Blind ;  and  one  was  paying  half  support,  and  one  was  a  free  patient ;  only  one  of  these 
patients  was  a  resident  of  Toronto  ;  all  the  rest  were  received  from  other  places  in  the  Pro- 
vince (except  a  Mennonite  Immigrant),  clearly  showing  that  the  Infirmary  is  Provincial  in  its 
character  and  object.  Besides  the  resident  patients,  he  noted  that  nine  external  patients  re- 
ceived treatment  and  medicine  from  the  visiting  Physician,  Dr.  Rosebrugh;  on  the  morning 
of  his  visit — nearly  all  of  them  being  residents  of  Toronto. 

An  examination  of  the  register  shewed  an  increase  tince  the  1st  October  last  in  external, 
but  a  slight  decrease  in  the  number  of  resident  patients.  He  was  glad  to  be  informed  by  the 
Superintendent  that,  notwithstanding  the  hard  times,  the  subscriptions  in  aid  of  the  funds  of 
this  Hospital  have  shown  an  increase  over  all  the  previous  years,  indicating,  undoubtedly,  the 
high  appreciation  of  the  public  in  its  aims  and  objects. 

The  books  of  record  were  examined,  and  found  particularly  well-kept. 

^Signed)  J.  W.  Lanomuir, 


Sir,— His  Excellency  the  Hon.  John  Crawford,  Lieutenant  Governor  of  the  Province 
of  Ontario,  having  been  memorialized  in  Council,  on  the  nece^sity  of  a  suital;le  building  being 
provided  by  the  Government  for  the  efficient  treatment  of  tt  e  poor  of  this  Province  who  are 
afflicted  with  diseases  of  the  eye  or  ear,  the  President  and  Board  of  Directors  of  the 
Toronto  Eye  and  Ear  Infirmary  would  respectfully  call  your  attention  to  the  following 
considerations : — 

First, — When  the  sum  of$75,()(>()  was  voted  for  the  establishment  of  an  Iu^titution  for 
the  blind  of  Ontario,  during  the  Sc-^sion  of  18G'J  and  1870,  it  was  expected  by  many  mem- 
bers of  the  Legislative  Assembly,  and  the  public  generally,  that  the  proposed  Institution 
would  combine  a  mratire  with  an  Educational  Department, — that  it  would  be  both  a  School 
and  an  Ophthalmic  Hospital. 

Second, — In  merely  providing  for  the  education  of  50  or  100  incurably  blind  boys  or 
girls  of  the  Province,  the  original  conception  has  not  been  fully  carried  into  effect,  inasmuch 
as  ample  provision  has  not  yet  been  made  for  the  efficient  treatment  of  the  curable  blind. 

Third, — If  it  be  wise  and  proper  for  the  Government  of  Ontario  to  establish  on  an  exten- 
sive scale,  and  maintain  at  a  laigc  yearly  expense,  an  Institution  for  educating  the  hopelessly 
blind,  it  would,  it  is  submitted,  be  a  still  wiser  policy  for  the  Government  to  found  an  Int-ti- 
tution  which  has  for  its  object  the  prevention  of  blindness  and  deafness  among  the  poor  of  the 
Province,  thereby  not  only  relieving  the  patients  afflicted  with  these  diseases,  but  also  providing 
the  means  for  imparling  the  necessary  skill  to  the  students  and  young  practitioners,  who 
attend  the  Medical  Colleges  of  this  city. 

Fourth, — 'Ihe  Toronto  Eye  and  Ear  Infirmary  was  established  in  May,  1867,  and  for 
six  and  a  quarter  years,  ending  September,  1873,  there  were  1,  l:r)5  r  oor  persons  from  different 
parts  of  the  Province,  who  received  gratuitous  medical  treatment  for  diseases  of  the  eye  and  ear. 
The  number  of  patients  in  attendance  gi-adually  increased  from  104  the  first  year,  to  380  the 
sixth.  Of  these  1,455  patients  the  large  number  of  about  1,100  have  been  either  cured  or 
relieved  of  their  affliction.  Many  of  these  patients  were  quite  blind,  and  if  medical  skiU  had 
not  been  charitably  extended  to  them,  would  now  be  hopelessly  blind.  In  some  cases,  when  the 
father  of  a  family  had  been  so  afflicted,  the  whole  family  would  have  been  reduced  to  helpless 
pauperism,  and  made  dependent  upon  public  and  private  charity  for  their  maintenance,  but 
for  the  relief  afforded  at  this  Institution. 

Fifth, — The  Toronto  Eye  and  Ear  Infirmary  is  not  a  local  but  a  Provincial  Institution, 
affording  relief  to  the  poor  of  every  part  of  the  Province — as  exhibited  by  the  Infirmary 
Register,  and  as  reported  to  the  Government  from  year  to  year.  It  also  affords  valuable 
clinical  advantages  in  Ophthalmic  and  Aural  Surgery  to  medical  students,  which  cannot  be 

5 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  25.)  A.  1875-6 


obtained  in  any  other  Institution  ia  the  Province.  These  students,  as  they  settle  in  different 
parts  of  the  country,  carry  the  experience  into  practice  which  they  have  gained  at  the  Eye 
an,d  Ear  Infirmary,  and  thereby  coufer  a  public  benefit.  For  these  reasons,  among  others, 
we  submit  that  this  Institution  should  be  provided  by  the  Provincial  Legislature  with  ample 
grounds  and  commodious  buildings. 

Sixth. — The  building  now  in  use  for  the  Eye  and  Ear  Infirmary,  with  its  few  feet  of 
yard-room,  is  quite  inadequate  for  such  an  Institution.  This  has  been  pointed  out  to  the 
Directors  by  the  Inspector  of  Asylums,  &c.,  J.  W.  Langmuir,  Esq.  ;  and  the  Surgeons  of  the 
Infirmary  have  frequently  called  the  attention  of  the  Directors  to  the  great  need  of  a  suitable 
isolated  building,  in  a  central,  healthy  locality,  with  sufficient  ground  to  enable  patients  to 
take  required  out-door  exercise. 

The  Directors  of  the  Eye  and  Ear  Infirmary  believe  that  they  have  only  to  bring  the 
foregoing  facts  and  considerations  to  the  notice  of  the  members  of  the  Local  Legislature,  to 
secure  sympathy  and  aid  for  this  afflicted  and  dependent  class  of  our  fellow-subjects  ;  and  the 
present  time  is  deemed  to  be  opportune,  when  a  warm  interest  is  being  taken  on  behalf 
of  the  Government  Educational  Institutions — for  the  Blind  at  Brantford,  and  for  the  Deaf 
at  Belleville. 

While  the  claims  of  the  incurably  Deaf  and  Blind  are  being  fully  recognised  by  the 
Pro\dneial  Government,  is  it  not  of  equal,  if  not  of  peramount  importance,  to  make  ample 
provision  for  the  proper  treatment  of  those  who  may  yet  be  rescued  from  the  sad  condition  of 
incurable  blindness  or  deafness  ? 

On  behalf  of  the  Board  of  Directors, 

A.  T.  McCoRD,  President. 


Diredots. 


W.  T.  Mason,  Secretary. 


A.  Dredge, 
WiLLiJiM  Elliott, 
A.  R.  McMasier, 
R.  Wilkes,  M.P. 
E.  J.  Palmer, 

A.  M.  Rosebrugh,  M-.D.,  Surgeon. 

W.  F.  Coleman,  M.D.,  M.R.C.S.,  Eng.,  Asst.-Surgeon. 

N.  Aqnew,  M.D., 


W.  J.  Macdonell, 
J.  H.  Mason, 
Wm.  McCabe,  LL.B. 
John  McBean, 
Daniel  McLean. 


W.  H.  Miller,  M.D.,    }  ^^'""''"'^  Assistants. 


39  Victoria,  Sessional  Papers  (No.  26.)  A.  1875-6 


RETUKN 

Showing  the  number  of  applications  for  admission  to  the  Lunatic  and 
Idiot  Asylums  during  the  years  1874  and  1875,  giving  the  num- 
bers of  applications  from  each  County,  the  number  of  apphcations 
granted  and  those  refused  :  also,  by  Counties.  The  number  re- 
maining on  file  at  the  present  time  :  also  by  Counties  ;  the  Order 
or  Rules  of  the  Department  regulating  the  admission  of  Patients 
into  each  Asylum. 

By  Command, 

S.  C.  WOOD, 

Secretary, 

Provincial  Secretary's  Office,  ', 

Toronto,  December  1875. 


Office  of  the  Inspector  of  Asylums,  Prisons,  &c.,  Ontario, 

Toronto,  11th  December,  1875. 

Sir, — I  have  the  honour  to  transmit,  for  the  information  of  the  Legislature,  the 
returns  asked  for  in  respect  to  apphcations  for  the  admission  of  insane  persons  to  the 
asyhims  of  the  Province,  and  the  disposal  of  the  same,  for  the  period  embraced  between 
1st  January,  1874,  and  the  1st  December,  1875. 

These  returns  are  necessarily  made  under  the  headings, — 

1st.  Application  made  direct  to  the  Medical  Superintendents  of  Asylums,  under  the 
provisions  of  36  Victoria,  cap.  .31,  section  31. 

2nd.  Applications  made  by  Sheriffs  to  the  Provincial  Secretary  for  the  removal  from 
gaols  to  asylums  of  persons  committed  as  being  insane,  and  so  certified,  under  the  pro- 
visions of  36  Victoria,  cap.  31,  section  16. 

The  orders  or  rules  regulating  the  admission  of  the  first  named  class  of  patients  to 
asylums  are,  that  the  Medical  Superintendents  shall  select  from  among  the  applicants  the 
most  curable  cases,  without  reference  to  priority  of  application,  and  very  often  the  most 
recently  afflicted  are  the  most  curable  subjects.  The  Medical  Superintendent,  in  forming 
his  opinion  in  respect  to  curability,  is  governed  largely  by  the  statements  in  the  applica- 
tion papers.  These  considerations,  together  with  the  general  mental  state  of  the  patient 
involving  danger  to  life  or  property,  and  the  special  knowledge  of  the  Medical  Superin- 
tendent in  respect  to  insanity  and  its  treatment,  regulate  the  admission  of  patients  under 
the  provisions  of  36  Victoria,  cap.  31,  section  31. 

With  respect  to  the  second  named  class,  as  soon  as  the  applications  are  received  from 
Sheriffs  they  are  at  once  referred  to  this  office  for  examination  and  report.  The  reasons 
which  govern  recommendations  for  transfer  from  gaols  are  substantially  the  same  as  in 
ordinary  admissions.     The  nature  and  urgency  of  the  case,  and  the  benefits  likely  to  be 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  26.)  A.  1875-6 


derived  from  treatment,  as  set  forth  in  the  papers  furnished  by  the  examining  physicians 
and  the  County  Judge,  are  the  only  reasons  upon  which  a  recommendation  issues  for 
transfer  to  an  asylum.  In  both  methods,  chronics,  incurables,  paralytics  and  epileptics 
are,  as  much  as  possible,  excluded  from  asylums,  and  all  who  are  likely  to  be  benefited 
are  admitted  the  moment  a  vacancy  takes  place. 

The  applications  made  to  JNIedical  Superintendents  during  the  period  named  num- 
bered 1027,  which  includes  285  applications  for  transfer  from  gaols.  When  the  Lieuten- 
ant Governor's  warrant  issues  for  the  removal  of  a  lunatic  from  a  gaol  to  an  asylum,  it  is 
transmitted  to  the  Sheriff  for  execution.  Before  acting  upon  it,  however,  the  Sheriff  has 
to  communicate  with  the  Medical  Superintendent,  in  order  to  find  out  if  there  is  a  vacancy. 
For  this  reason,  the  Medical  Superintendent  treats  the  Sheriff's  notification  as  an  applica- 
tion. The  applications  made  to  Medical  Superintendents  and  the  Provincial  Secretary 
have,  therefore,  to  be  classified  as  follows  : — 

Applications  made  to  Medical  Superintendents 1027 

"  "     to  Provincial  Secretary 431 

Less  number  included  in  those  made  to  Medical  Superintendents,  be- 
ing the  number  of  lunatics  removed  from  ga6ls 285 

146 


Total  number  of  applications  from  1st  Jan.,  1874,  to  1st  Dec,  1875.  1173 

Disposed  of  as  follows  : — 

Awarded  admission  and  admitted 608 

"  «  "     declined 96 

704 

Number  rejected  for  want  of  room,  and  unfitness 469 

The  regulations  relating  to  the  discharge  of  inmates  from  the  asylums  for  the  insane 
are,  in  respect  to  those  admitted  under  the  provisions  of  36  Victoria,  cap.  31,  section  31. 
that  the  asylum  authorities  shall  detain  the  person  so  long  as  he  continues  to  be  insane, 
in  accordance  with  the  provisions  of  sub-section  7  of  section  31  of  the  before  named  Act. 

With  reference  to  lunatics  committed  to  asylums  under  the  warrant  of  the  Lieutenant 
Governor,  the  same  Act  (section  17)  provides,  that  the  person  so  committed  shall  be  de- 
tained "  untD  the  discharge  of  such  prisoner  is  directed  upon  such  evidence  of  his  complete 
or  partial  recovery  as  may,  by  the  Lieutenant  Governor,  be  deemed  sufficient."  Section  18 
of  the  same  Act  provides  for  the  probational  discharge  of  warrant  patients,  if  the  Medical 
Superintendent  thinks  that  such  a  course  would  be  conducive  to  recovery. 

I  have  the  honour  to  be,  Sir, 

Your  obedient  servant, 

J.  W.  Langmuir, 

InspecUrr. 
The  Honourable, 

The  Provincial  Secretary  of  Ontario. 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  26.) 


A.  1875-6 


Return  of  Lunatics  committed  to  the  Gaols  of  the  Province,  and  who  were  certi- 
fied to  be  Insane,  from  the  1st  January,  1874,  to   1st  December,  1875. 


Name  of  County 
were 

Gaols  to  which  Lunatics 
committed. 

Number  of  Lunatics  com- 
mitted to  Gaols  who  were 
afterwards  certified  to  be 
In.sane,   and    for   whom 
applications  for  transfer 
to  Asylums  were  made. 

Number  of  Limatics  who 
were    transferred     from 
the   Common    Gaols    to 
Asylums  by  the  Warrant 
of  the  Lieutenant-Gov- 
ernor. 

Number  of  Lunatics  who 
were  left  in    the  Com- 
mon Gaols. 

Remarks. 

County  of 

«       ^    1  -: 

S 

a 

"* 

1 

■« 
S 

s  1  1 

4 

11 

3 

1 
3 
4 
3 

13 

7 
4 
7 
4 

12 
8 

11 
7 
6 
4 

11 

10 
4 
3 
2 
4 
5 
6 
9 
9 

11 
2 

6 
4 
2 
4 
6 
2 

4 

6 
3 
3 
2 

4 

17 
7 
3 
7 
10 
5 

17 

13 
7 

10 
6 

4 
9 
3 
2 
2 
1 
1 

8 

4 
4 
6 
3 
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» 
7 
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*In  some  in- 

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stances    appli- 

Waterloo   

cations      were 

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received    prior 

Leeds  and  Grenville    

Hastings 

1 
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5 

3 

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4 

4 
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6 
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7 
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7 

6 
1 
1 
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9 
12 
9 
2 
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3 
6 
3* 
4 

', 

3 

4 

2 

10 

to      the       1st 

Belleville 

January,  1874, 

Haldimand   

although      the 

Stormont,      Dundas      and 
Glengarry 

transfers  to 
Asylums      did 

Northumberland  and  Dur- 

not  take  place 
until  after  that 

Kent     

date,  which  ac- 

Huron     

counts  for  the 

Guelph            

Wellington    

difference       in 

Wentworth  

8  20 
15     23 

9  20 
6     13 

the  totals. 

Middlesex  

Prescott  and  Russell 

3 
1 
3 
6 
6 
8 
1 
2 
5 
2 
7 
5 
3 
2 
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3 
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9 

9 

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16 

10 

11 

3 

6 

10 
7 

16 

14 

14 

4 

2 

3 

64 

12 

11 

2 

16 

5       3 

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Halton    

2 

7 
6 
2 
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4 
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3 
3 
8 
7 
1 

1 
7 
4 
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3 
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Lanark  

Prince  Edward 

Picton     ..  . 

Renfrew 

Peterborough 

Peterborough    

Norfolk 

Lambton    

4     5 

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3 

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7 
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St.  Thomas.    . 

Elgin  

Sault  Ste  Marie 

3 
33 
9 
9 
1 
1      7 

York  

23 
7 
6 
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6 
6 

177 

22 
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11 

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9!  19 

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Bruce 

""i 

4 

1* 
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1 
5 

Oxford    

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1      1 

5     11 
I      6 

Whitby   

Ontario  

249 

182 

431 

1 

108 

285 

81 

80 

155t 

t  Six  Appli- 
cations prior  to 
1874=161. 

L 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  26.) 


A.  1875-6 


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39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  26.) 


A.  1875-6 


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39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  27.)  A.  1875-6 


REPORT 


ON    THE 


SCHOOL  OF  PRACTICAL  SCIENCE, 

FROM   JANUARY,    1874,   TO  JUNE,   1875. 


To  the  Honourable  tlie  Provincial  Secretary. 

Sir, — I  have  the  honour  to  submit  the  following  Report  of  the  progress  of  the  School  from 
the  date  of  my  last  Report  in  January,  1874,  to  the  close  of  the  winter  term  of  1874-5. 

The  objects  sought  to  be  attained  by  the  establishment  of  a  School  of  Practical  Science 
were  three  in  number : 

1.  Technical  instruction  in  the  various  branches  of  engineering,  mining  and  manufactures. 

2.  Special  instruction  in  the  different  departments  of  experimental  science. 

3.  Instruction  to  artizans,  mechanics  ami  workmen,  by  evening  classes,  in  such  subjects 
as  may  further  their  improvement  in  their  different  callings. 

As  it  is  only  the  last  of  these  three  parts  of  the  scheme  which  has  hitherto  been  at- 
tempted, it  will  be  improper  to  do  more  than  revert  to  the  great  and  growing  importance 
of  the  first  two,  and  to  the  necessity  of  providing,  at  an  early  day,  some  means  by  which 
they  may  be  carried  out. 

At  the  present  day  no  country  can  afford  to  omit  furnishing  the  best  means  of  scientific 
training  at  her  command  to  those  willing  to  avail  themselves  of  it,  and  least  of  all  a  country 
whose  wealth  must  so  largely  depend  upon  her  mineral  resources  as  our  own.  At  the  same 
time,  however,  all  facilities  supplied  by  Government  for  such  scientific  training  should  be  the 
natural  outcome  of  a  need  felt,  and  any  premature  attempt  at  forcing  an  elaborate  scheme  of 
scientific  education  on  a  people  unprepared  for  it  could  only  result  in  failure.  It  would  seem, 
however,  that  the  time  had  now  arrived  when  circumstances  would  justify,  and  indeed  de- 
mand, the  adoption  of  some  more  extended  and  more  permanent  scheme.  Letters  are  con- 
stantly being  received  at  the  School  from  all  parts  of  the  country,  asking  if  the  regular  course 
has  yet  been  instituted,  and  expressing  a  desire  on  the  part  of  the  writers  to  become  students 
of  such  an  institution  as  is  proposed. 

The  third  part  of  the  scheme,  that  of  affording  evening  instruction  to  artizans,  has  been 
in  active  operation  since  1872,  and  the  results  up  to  the  close  of  18  73  have  been  embodied  in 
my  former  Reports.  The  names  oP  the  students  attending  during  the  first  part  of  1874  were 
given  in  my  Report  lor  m73.  and  the  classes  in  drawing  and  chemistry  of  that  year  were  con- 
tinued without  change.  In  addition,  however,  a  course  of  lectures  on  Natural  Philosophy  was 
given  by  Mr.  Loudon. 

At  the  close  of  the  term,  examinations  were  held  and  certificates  given  to  successful  can- 
didates. The  following  is  a  list  of  those  who  passed  the  examination,  arranged  in  order  of 
merit : — 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  27.) 


A.  1875-6 


Annual  Examination,  May,  1874. 


Class  I. 

4.  Cathron. 

2.  Stuart. 

3.  Armstrong. 

4.  Barber. 

5.  Ramsey. 

6.  Townsend. 

7.  Wood. 


Chemistry, 


Drawing. 


Class  II. 

1.  Strathairn. 

2.  Teskey. 

3.  Hartman. 

4.  Mallory. 

5.  Daniell. 


Engineering  and  Architectural. 


1.  Carre. 

2.  Mowatt, 

.3.  McTaggart. 

4.  Brotherston. 


Gibson,  A 
George. 
Gibson,  J. 
Irvine,  W. 
Freeman. 


Class  I. 


Class  II. 


5.  Townshend. 

6.  Wooster. 

7.  Callie, 


Hewitt. 
Javine,  J. 
Churchill. 
Currie. 


1.  Joslin. 

2.  Harcourt. 


Clare. 


Mechanical. 


Free  Hand. 


3.  Smith. 

4.  Haggert. 


Ewart. 


In  the  autumn  of  1874  the  classes  were  recommenced,  and  a  list  of  the  names,  occupa- 
tions, &c.,  of  the  students  attending  them  will  be  given  in  the  Appendix.  It  appears  from 
this  list  that  the  numbers  attentiing  the  school  during  the  past  year  were  greater  than  during 
any  previous  year  ;  for  while  the  number  of  students  during  the  winter  of  1872-3  was  181, 
and  the  number  of  students  during  1873-4  was  129,  the  number  who  attended  the  classes 
during  the  winter  of  1^74-5  was  189. 

Of  these  hundred  and  eighty-nine,  sixty-five  were  admitted  to  the  Drawing  class,  fifty  to 
the  class  in  Natural  Philosophy,  and  one  hundred  and  eleven  to  the  class  in  Chemistry.  The 
following  table  gives  the  occupations  of  the  students,  and  the  number  of  students  of  each  oc- 
cupation : — 

Table   showing  the  occupation^  of  the   students  of  the   Evening  Classes  at  the  School  of 
Practical  Science,  durintjr  the  winter  of  1874-5. 


Architects*  pupils 2 

Booksellers 2 

Bookbinder 1 

Builder 1 


Cabinet-makers <5 

Carpenters  30 

Civil  Engineers .    2 

Cl.irks 18 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  27.) 


A.  1875-6 


Coachbuilder 1 

Dentists 13 

Druggists 6 

Engineers 2 

Gardener 1 

Machinists 6 

Marble-cutter 1 

Painters 3 

Pattern-maker 1 

Photographers 2 

Physicians 2 


Plumber 1 

Porter 1 

Printer 1 

Silver  plater 1 

Stonecutter 1 

Students 33 

Teachers 4 

Tinsmith 1 

Veterinary  students 20 

Wood  turners 3 


Lectures. 

instruction  in  Drawing,  Architectural  and  Mechanical,  was  given  by  Mr.  Armstrong, 
C.  E.,  on  Tuesday  and  Thursday  evenings  throughout  the  winter.  The  number  of  students 
seeking  admission  to  this  class  was  far  greater  than  it  was  possible  to  accommodate.  Only 
really  earnest  students  were  admitted,  and  the  progress  of  the  pupils  in  this  department  was 
most  gratifying,  and  the  work  done  by  many  of  the  students  was  of  a  highly  creditable 
character. 

A  course  of  lectures  on  Light  was  given  by  Mr.  Loudon,  which  was  attended  not  only 
by  the  regular  students  of  the  School,  but  also  by  many  others.  The  lectures  were  fully 
illustrated  by  experiments,  the  apparatus  for  which  was  procured  by  Mr.  Loudon  from  Lon- 
don. Although  not  numerous  nor  elaborate,  the  instruments  are  of  excellent  quality  and  give 
great  satisfaction.  It  is  much  to  be  regretted  that  on  the  appointment  of  Mr.  Loudon  to  the 
Chair  of  Mathematics  and  Natural  Philosophy  in  University  College,  he  has  resigned  his 
position  in  the  School  of  Practical  Science,  and  I  would  venture  to  hope  that  some  means  may 
be  found  to  retain  the  services  of  that  gentleman  if  the  School  is  to  be  placed  upon  a  permanent 
basis,  and  in  any  event  to  continue  his  lectures  during  the  pres^ent  winter.  A  course  of  lec- 
tures on  Elementary  Chemistry  was  given,  as  in  previous  years,  but  in  addition  a  class  was 
formed  for  Practical  Chemistry  and  instruction  given  in  Chemical  Manipulation  and  Qualitative 
Analysis  on  each  Wednesday  evening.  At  the  conclusion  of  the  term  a  practical  examination 
of  this  class  was  held,  at  which  they  acquitted  themselves  in  a  highly  satisfactory  manner. 

Examinations. 

Examinations  in  Chemistry  were  held  on  the  17th  of  March  and  on  the  27th  of  May,  ls75. 
The  following  is  a  list  of  those  who  passed  : — 

EASTER   EXAMINATION. 


Chemistry. 


Class  I. 

Class  JI. 

1. 

Davidson. 

1.     Clark. 

2. 

Teskcy. 

2.     Shutt. 

3. 

Thomas. 

3.     Reid. 

4. 

McBride. 

4.      Hogarth. 

5. 

Hendry. 

6.     Huott. 

6. 

McAree. 

g   f  McBride 
Bunce. 

8.     Blake. 

39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  27.) 


A.  1875  6 


1.  Coleman. 

2.  Thomas. 

3.  Davidson. 
.  /Clark. 

*•  \  Shutt. 


MAY    EXAMINATION. 

CJiemistry. 


6.  Mc  Bride 

7.  Hendry. 


The  actual  standing  for  the  year,  as  determined  by  the  aggregate  number  ot  marks  ob 
tained  at  both  examinations,  is  as  follows  : — 


General  Chemistry. 


1. 

2. 

3. 


Davidson. 

Thomas. 

Clark. 


Shutt. 

Hendry. 

McBride. 


An  examination  in  Practical  Chemistry  was  held  on  the  26th  of  May,  1875.     The  fol- 
lowbg  is  a  list  of  those  who  passsed  : — 

Practical  Chemistry. 

1.  McAllister. 

2.  Chubb. 

q     f  Armstrong. 
,  '   \  Coleman. 


Daniell. 


Drawing. 

Engineering. 
A.  Mowatt. 


1.  Carr6,  T.  A. 

2.  Mowatt. 

3.  Townshend. 

4.  McCamus. 


Gerril. 
Wells,  J. 
Wells,  R. 
Barbour. 
Jesseman. 


Architectural. 
Class  I. 


Class  II. 


Class  III. 
Arnott. 


5.  Miller. 

6.  Collie. 

7.  Robins. 


Churchill,  B. 
Reilly. 
Churchill,  J. 
Hay. 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  27.)  A.  1876-6 


Mechanical. 
Class  I. 

1.  Joslin. 

2.  Townshend. 

Class  II. 

1.  Brotherston. 

2.  Ewart. 

Free  Hand. 

1.  Joselin.  4.      Clare. 

2.  Robins.  5.      Carr6. 

3.  Miller. 

Library. 

The  Library  has  been  kept  open  two  afternoons  during  the  week  ;  and  at  any  time  per- 
sons wishing  to  consult  any  of  the  works  are  admitted  on  application  to  Mr.  Hays,  who  has 
charge  of  the  liibrary. 

There  are  a  great  number  of  Patent  Reports  which  require  to  be  bound.  In  their  pre- 
sent form  they  are  not  available  for  reference,  and  their  great  value  makes  it  extremely  de- 
sirable that  they  should  be  put  into  a  shape  puit.ible  for  easy  consultation.  There  are  also  a 
number  of  scientific  and  technical  periodicals  whicli  re(|uire  binding. 

The  cost  of  binding  these  works  would  be  about  $2,000,  and  it  is  to  be  earnestly  hoped 
that  an  appropriation  will  be  made  to  cover  the  expense  of  this  most  necessary  proceeding. 

I  append  a  list  of  the  students  attending  the  classes,  their  names,  ages,  birthplaces, 
occupations  and  residences.  Also  a  list  of  the  Instructors  and  Assistants  engaged  in  the 
work  rf  the  School. 

I  have  the  honour  to  be, 

Your  most  obedient  servant, 

W.  H.  Elus. 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  27.) 


A.  1875-6 


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SCHOOL  OF  PRACTICAL  SCIENCE. 


SUPPLEMENTARY    REPORT. 

17th  December,   1875. 
To  the  Honourable  the  Provincial  Secretary, 

Sir, — I  have  already  submitted  for  the  information  of  His  Excellency  a  Report  on 
the  School  of  Practical  Science,  up  to  May  of  the  present  year.  In  addition,  I  have  the 
honour  to  submit  the  following  Report  of  the  work  done  during  the  present  winter. 

The  evening  classes  were  recommenced  on  Monday,  October  4th,  and  are  now  in 
operation. 

In  my  own  department,  lectures  on  Elementary  Chemistry  have  been  given  on  each 
Monday  and  Friday  evening.  The  number  of  students  attending  the  class  is  fifty.  I  ap- 
pend a  list  of  their  names,  ages,  occupations  and  residences. 

Instruction  to  more  advanced  students  in  Chemical  Manipulation  and  Qualitative 
Analysis  has  been  given  on  each  Wednesday  evening.  To  cover  the  expense  of  chemicals 
and  apparatus,  a  fee  of  $10  has  been  charged  for  admission  to  this  class. 

I  enclose  the  Reports  of  Mr.  Armstrong  and  Professor  Loudon. 

I  have  the  honour  to  be, 

Your  obedient  servant, 

W.  H.  Ell«. 


Toronto,  December  17th,  1875. 

To  the  Honourable  S.  C.  Wood, 

Provincial  Secretary  for  Ontario. 

Sir, — At  the  request  of  the  Honourable  the  Provincial  Treasurer,  I  beg  to  submit  to 
you  the  following  brief  statement,  by  way  of  addition  to  the  reports  of  Dr.  Ellis  and  Mr. 
Armstrong  on  the  School  of  Practical  Science,  in  order  that  the  Legislature  may  be  pre- 
cisely informed  of  the  character  of  the  instruction  which  has  been  given  there  during  the 
last  three  years,  and  of  the  place  which  such  teaching  occupies  in  the  general  plan  contem- 
plated in  the  Act  constituting  the  School.  The  impression  seems  to  prevail  in  some  quar- 
ters that  the  Institution  has  all  along  been  in  a  position  to  provide  the  training  of  a  regu- 
lar Engineering  College  or  School  of  Science,  and  to  aflbrd  at  the  .same  time  the  educa- 
tional advantages  of  a  thoroughly  equipped  Mechanics'  Institute.  Much  more  indeed  has 
been  expected  from  the  School,  and  it  is  therefore  all  the  more  necessary  that  its  present 
functions  should  be  clearly  understood,  in  order  that  those  who  look  in  vain  for  the  realization 
of  their  expectations  may  not  be  disappointed.  The  existing  arrangements  are,  as  I  have 
always  understood  them,  merely  temjjorary,  and  in  no  way  intended  to  carry  out  the  very 
comprehensive  aims  foreshadowed  in  the  Act  aforesaid.     An  experiment  has  been  tried 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  27.)  A.  1876-6 


thus  far  which  certainly  cannot,  such  as  it  is,  be  pronounced  unsuccessful ;  but,  in  •on- 
ducting  this  experiment,  no  pretence  has  been  made  of  providing  instruction  in  Engineer- 
ing, or  of  carrying  out  any  general  scheme  of  evening  classes  for  artisans.  The  reports  of 
Dr.  Ellis  and  Mr.  Armstrong  will  have  imformed  you  of  the  character  of  the  instruction 
given  to  their  respective  classes.  With  reference  to  the  lectures  which  I  myself  delivered 
prior  to  my  resignation,  I  may  say  that  they  were  chiefly  experimental,  the  subjects  being 
restricted  to  two  branches  of  Natural  Philosophy.  The  part,  which  such  instruction  as 
has  been  given  in  the  School  plays  in  the  general  scheme  already  referred  to,  is  compara- 
tively small,  and  will  be  better  understood  after  a  brief  reference  to  the  proposals  which 
have  been  made  to  meet  the  educational  requirements  of  the  country  at  large.  To  meet 
these  needs  it  was  proposed  (1.)  To  supply  instruction  in  the  various  branches  of  Engi- 
neering and  in  Chemistry  as  applied  to  the  Arts  and  Manufactures  ;  and  (2  )  To  encourage 
a  more  practical  study  of  the  Physical  Sciences.  These  two  objects  constitute  the  main 
features  of  the  scheme,  and.  are,  it  may  be  remarked,  perfectly  definite  and  entii-ely  dis- 
tinct from  one  another.  Under  the  first  head  comes  the  wide  subject  of  Engineering, 
embracing  the  sub-divisions  of  Civil,  Mechanical  and  Mining  Engineering.  With  regard 
to  these  and  all  other  professional  snhiects  I  hold  that  ichere  the  demand  is  sufficiently  large 
for  such  training,  it  is  best  to  provide  a  separate  School,  independent,  that  is  to  say.  of  the 
control  of  an  Arts  faculty.  The  functions  of  such  a  School,  at  the  beginning  of  last  year, 
were  described  by  me  in  a  communication  to  the  press,  in  which  I  took  occasion  to  point 
out  that  there  ought  to  be  at  least  five  Professors  on  the  staff  of  such  an  institution. 
These  would  be  required  to  give  instruction  in  such  subjects  as  Drawing,  Mathematics, 
Applied  Mechanics,  Surveying,  Assaying,  Metallurgy,  Civil  Engineering,  &c.  The  ques- 
tion of  the  existing  need  for  such  an  independent  School  I  have  never  discussed  ;  but  I 
think  that,  before  undertaking  such  a  burden  as  its  support  would  involve,  the  country 
should  be  clearly  informed  that  the  immediate  outlay  required  for  mere  outfit  would  be 
very  large,  whilst  the  cost  of  maintenance  would  be  at  least  $15,000  per  annum.  Such 
an  expenditure  ought  not  to  be  incurred  unless  the  demand  for  trained  Engineers  is  very 
large  indeed,  it  must,  moreover,  not  be  forgotten  that  the  above  outlay  would  be  incurred 
solely  for  the  teaching  of  Engineering  and  Applied  Chemistry ;  whilst  the  still  more  im- 
portant object — the  promotion  of  the  practical  study  of  the  Physical  Sciences — would  re- 
main to  be  provided  for.  Such  provision  ought  certainly  to  be  made  in  connection  with 
the  University  of  Toronto,  where,  by  a  moderate  outlay  for  necessary  additions,  the  country 
could  be  placed  in  possession  of  a  good  Physical  Laboratory  in  which  students  could  de- 
ceive that  practical  instruction  which  makes  the  teaching  of  science  really  eff'ective.  Until 
such  additions  are  made  and  the  Library  and  Museums  placed  on  a  proper  footing,  the 
Physical  Sciences  will  not  have  received  the  encouragement  which  the  times  require. 

Taking  into  account  the  circumstances  of  the  country,  I  now  proceed,  as  requested, 
to  offer  the  following  suggestions  with  regard  to  the  best  means  of  compassing  the  objects 
already  referred  to. 

With  regard  to  the  subject  of  Engineering,  it  would  be  amply  sufficient,  in  my 
opinion,  to  establish  a  chair  of  Civil  Phigineering  in  University  College,  where  a  compe- 
tent Professor  could  give  all  the  necessary  instruction  (as  is  clone  elsewhere  under  like 
circumstances),  in  Drawing,  Surveying,  Applied  Mechanics,  and  Civil  and  Mechanical 
Engineering  ;  whilst  the  requisite  training  in  the  subjects  pertaining  to  mining  Engineer- 
ing, such  as  Assaying,  Metallurgy,  &c.,  could  be  received  at  the  hands  of  Professor  Chap- 
man, who  would  require  for  the  purpose  a  small  laboratory  and  the  aid  of  an  assistant. 

In  connection  with  the  department  of  Chemistry  thera  is  a  very  considerable  demand 
in  the  country  for  practical  laboratory  instruction  in  Qualitative  and  Quantitative  Analysis. 
To  meet  this  demand  more  accommodation  and  teaching  power  are  required  than  Uni- 
versity College  can  at  present  afford  ;  but  the  necessities  of  the  case  will  be  fully  met  by 
appointing  a  skilled  assistant  to  Professor  Croft,  and  furnishing  additional  accommodation 
and  .jpparatus. 

The  cost  of  outfit  for  the  above  purposes  will  be  comparatively  small ;  a  considerable 
outlay,  however,  will  be  required  to  provide  physical  apj)aratus  for  the  experimental  illus- 
tration of  the  subjects  of  mechanics,  sound,  heat,  hght,  &c.  As  there  is  not  sulficient  ac- 
commodation in  University  College  for  depositing  such  instiuments,  the  present  building 
must  be  enlarged.     All  the  accommodation  that  is  needed,  however,  may  be  found  in  u 

14 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  27.)  A.  1875-6 


structure  of  very  moderate  dimensions,  placed  in  immediate  connection  with  the  Unirer- 
sity  building,  and  containing  rooms  for 

(1.)  Physical  Apparatus. 

(2.)  Laboratory  for  Quantitative  Analysis  with  balance  room. 

(3.)  Laboratory  for  Assaying,  &c. 

(4.)  Physiological  Laboratory. 

(5.)  One  Lecture  Koom. 

Such  a  building  and  apparatus  together  with  the  appliances  already  in  the  possessiom 
of  University  College,  would  constitute  a  tolerably  good  Physical  Laboratory. 

The  cost  of  carrying  out  the  various  parts  of  the  above  scheme  may  be  distributed  as 
follows : 

Maintenance. 

•Salaries — 

Professor  of  Engineering $2500  00 

Assist.-Professor  of  Chemistry 1500  00 

Asst.  in  Assay  Laboratory 600  00     $4600  00 


HiATiNG,  repairs,  &c.  600  00 


Total $5,200  00 

An  annual  appropriation  should  also  be  set  aside  for  the  purpose  of  increasing  th« 
the  different  collections  in  the  Natural  History  Museum,  in  the  Mineralogical  and  Geolo- 
gical Museums,  and  for  adding  occasionally  to  the  apparatus  of  the  difterent  laboratories. 

Outfit. 

Apparatus — 

0  Natural  Philosophy  and  Engineering $10,000  00 

Chemistry,  Mineralogy  and  Zoology 4,000  00 

$14,000  00 

Additions  to  University  building  for 

Physical  Laboratory 20,000  00 

Total $34,000  00 

In  connection  with  the  question  of  the  promotion  of  science  in  general,  there  are  two 
subjects  which  are  sometimes  confounded  with  the  matters  already  referretl  to.  Many 
persons  fail  to  distinguish  between  the  scientific  training  of  an  Arts  or  Engineering  stu- 
dent, on  the  one  hand,  and  the  education  of  the  artisan  classes,  and  the  teaching  of  popular 
science,  on  the  other.  The  latter  constitutes  entirely  difierent  questions,  whose  solution 
depends  in  no  way  on  that  of  the  former.  Where  there  is  a  large  artisan  class,  I  am  free 
to  admit  that  it  is  well  to  furnish  those  whose  early  education  has  been  neglected  with 
facilities  for  improving  themselves.  Such  classes,  however,  form  no  necessary  adjunct  to 
a  School  of  Science,  although  they  may  be  carried  on  in  connection  therewith.  Under 
any  circumstances,  the  Mechanics'  Institute  is  the  proper  place  for  such  instruction  to  be 
given.  With  regard  to  the  question  of  Popular  Science  lectures,  on  the  other  hand,  lei,as- 
lation  can  do  almost  nothing.  It  is  only  in  a  very  large  community  that  we  may  expect 
to  find  a  sufficient  number  of  individuals  to  take  a  permanent  interest  in  such  subjects  ; 
and  even  there  appreciative  audiences  are  more  easily  obtained  than  successful  lecturers. 
I  entertain  the  hope  that  something  will  be  done  ere  long  towards  establishing,  in  a  suiall 
way,  a  few  short  courses  of  such  lectures  in  connection  with  the  Canadian  In.stitute  Es- 
tablished, as  that  Institution  is,  for  the  promotion  of  original  research  in  science,  it  is,  I 

15 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  27.)  A.  1875-6 


conceive,  at  the  same  time  the  proper  place  to  which  we  should  look  for  the  best  popular 
lecturers  that  the  country  can  produce.  Whilst,  however,  the  Canadian  Institute  is 
worthy  of  every  encouragement  the  Government  can  bestow,  so  far  as  the  promotion  of 
original  research  and  the  publication  of  its  Journal  are  concerned,  I  consider  that  any 
scheme  for  establishing  such  lectures  there  should  be  supported  by  the  citizens  of  Toronto, 
and  not  by  the  Province  at  large. 

In  conclusion,  I  may  be  permitted  to  express  the  hope  that  the  suggestions  which  I 
herewith  submit  will  commend  themselves  to  your  consideration,  and  that  the  vexed 
question  of  the  encouragement  of  science  will  shortlj'^  receive  a  satisfactory  solution  at 
your  hands. 

I  have  the  honour  to  be.  Sir, 

Your  obedient  servant, 

J.    L0U»0N. 


School  op  Practical  Science, 

Toronto,  December  1st,  1875. 

Dkawing  Department. 

To  Hon.  S.  C.  Wood,  Provincial  Secretary. 

Sir, — In  accordance  with  your  desire,  I  have  the  honour  to  make  the  following 
statement  with  regard  to  the  classes  in  Engineering  and  Architectural  Drawing.  The 
-statement  of  attendance  for  the  Session  of  1874  is  embodied  in  the  Report  of  Dr.  Ellis. 
This  Session  commenced  on  the  1st  of  October,  and  I  was  obliged  to  refuse  admission  to 
a  large  number,  as  the  drawing  rooms  were  quite  filled  ;  in  all  cases  the  names  and  ad- 
dresses of  applicants  were  taken,  and  as  vacancies  occurred  they  were  filled  from  that  list. 
An  inspection  of  the  work  done  in  the  school  must  convince  the  most  casual  observer  that 
the  mechanics  forming  the  classes  are  possessed  of  high  intelligence,  as  evinced  by  the  rapid 
advancement  towards  perfection  in  the  diflferent  styles  of  drawing.  Several  mechanics 
have  returned  to  the  school  to  express  their  gratitude  for  the  instruction  they  had  fe- 
ceived,  which  had  been  the  means  of  advancing  them  in  their  different  callings.  In  all 
cases  the  pupils  are  first  put  through  a  course  of  rudimentary  linear  and  geometric  draw- 
ing, after  which  the  teaching  of  constructive  drawing  is  commenced.  Although  the  ori- 
ginal prospectus  only  named  engineering  and  architectural  drawing,  I  have  given  instruc- 
tion in  the  following  classes,  viz. : — Engineering,  architectural,  mechanical,  ornamental  de- 
sign, free  hand,  landscape  and  perspective.  A  class  has  been  formed  to  attend  a  course 
of  lectures  on  "  Drawing  from  Objects,"  and  how  to  teach  drawing.  The  lectures  are 
attended  by  a  highly  educated  class  of  men  ;  several  students  in  the  engineering  course 
at  the  University  have  attended  the  drawing  classes,  and  one'  of  them  has  become  the  best 
draughtsman  in  the  school. 

It  must  be  gratifying  to  you  and  the  Government  to  find  such  a  large  number  ol 
working  men  spending  their  evenings  in  improving  themselves,  and  showing  so  good  an 
example  to  the  youth  of  the  Province.  Several  ladies  applied  to  join  the  "  Drawing 
from  Objects  "  class,  and  were  quite  willing  to  pay  fees.  You  are  aware  that  {)rizes  are 
not  offered  as  an  inducement  to  swell  the  classes.  The  drawings  executed  duiing  the 
last  Session  and  part  of  the  jjresent  are  ready  for  exhibition  ;  and  should  you  wish  speci- 
mens sent  to  the  Philadelphia  Exhibition,  I  feel  confident  the  drawings  will  compare  fa- 
vourably with  those  from  any  other  School  of  Practical  Science. 

Annexed  is  a  list  of  the  number  and  occupations  of  the  students. 

I  have  tlie  honour  to  be,  Sir, 

Your  most  obedient  servant, 

William  Armstrong,  C  E., 

Drawing  Indrucloi . 

16 


39  Victx)ria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  27.) 


A.  1875-6 


Occupations  and  Number  of  Students. 


1  Glass  Stainer. 

1  Land  Surveyor. 
3  Clerks. 

5  Bricklayers. 

2  Tinsmiths. 

1  School  Teacher. 
1  Wood  Carver. 

1  Builder. 

2  Upholsterers. 

1  Pattern-maker. 

2  Painters. 

8  Machinists. 

3  Architects. 
1  Mason. 

1  Jeweller. 

2  Cabinet  Makers. 
1  Millwright. 

1  Brass  Finisher. 
1  Organ  Builder. 
1  Fitter. 

1  Bobbin  Turner. 
55  Carpenters. 
8  Students. 


Drawing  from  Objects  and 
Perspective. 

2  School  Teachers. 

2  Students. 

1  Chemist. 

1  Doctor. 

1  Surveyor. 

1  Upholsterer. 

1  Banker. 

9.  Average  attendance,  9. 


83    Average  attendance,  69. 
Drawing  from  Objects,        9 


Total  number. 


92 


Lectures  on  Engineering  and  Mechanical  Drawing  on  Tuesday  and  Thursday  even- 
iAgs  from  7.45  to  8.45  P.  M. 

Lectures  on  Drawing  from  Objects  on  Monday  and  Friday  evenings  from  7  to  8  P.M. 
Certificates  (printed)  are  given  after  the  examination,  at  the  end  of  the  Session,  ac- 
cording to  merit. 

William  Armstrong,  C.  E., 

Drawing  Instructor. 


17 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  27.) 


A.  1875-6 


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39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  28.)  A.  187;'-6 


REPORT 

Of  Inspector  of  Division  Courts,  setting  forth  duties  appertaining  to 
his  office. 

By  Command, 

S.  C.  WOOD, 

Secretary. 
Provincial  Secretary's  Office, 
Toronto,  Dec.  15th,  1875. 


Toronto,  Dec.  4th,  1875. 

Sir, — I  have  the  honour  to  lay  before  you  the  following  summary  of  the  duties 
appertaining  to  my  office,  together  with  results  as  far  as  ascertained  to  this  date. 

My  duties  require  me  to  examine  the  Court  books  in  every  Division  Court  Office 
other  than  those  in  cities  and  county  towns,  known  as  the  Procedure  Book,  Cash  Book, 
Debt  Attachment  Book  and  Foreign  Service  Book. 

First — To  see  that  each  of  these  books  is  according  to  the  forms  given  for  the  same 
in  the  forms  of  July,  18G9,  or  sufficient  to  answer  all  the  requirements  of  these  forms  ;  and 
that,  as  nearly  as  possible,  a  uniform  system  of  entering  all  matters  in  these  books  is  follow- 
ed in  each  office. 

Second — As  regards  the  Procedure  Book.  I  require  that  it  shall  show  the  date  of 
the  receipt  of  each  cause,  the  names  of  the  parties  thereto  and  their  address,  the  dates  at 
which  all  process  issued,  and  of  all  orders,  judgments,  decrees,  transcripts  received,  war- 
rants, writs  of  execution  and  returns  thereto  ;  the  receipt  of  all  moneys  by  the  Clerk,  and 
that  it  shows  the  items  of  costs  in  each  cause,  and  that  each  page  is  signed  by  the  Clerk. 
I  examine  to  see  if  the  summonses  are  issued  at  a  reasonable  time  from  the  receipt  of  the 
particulars  ;  that  it  was  served  by  the  Bailiff  and  returned  within  six  days  after  the  day 
of  service ;  that  if,  on  a  special  summons,  the  notice  of  a  defence  entered,  or  no  defence 
entered,  as  the  case  may  be,  is  given  to  the  proper  party  entitled  to  receive  it,  by  mail  or 
otherwise  ;  that  judgment  is  altered  within  a  proper  time,  and  according  to  form,  or  that 
it  is  brought  to  trial,  as  the  case  may  be;  that  judgments  are  entered  on  the  original 
summons  and  in  the  Procedure  Book.  The  desirability  of  this  last  requirement  is  shown 
in  some  instances  where  the  Procedure  Book  may  have  been  destroyed  by  fire  and  the 
papers  saved,  or  where  the  papers  may  have  been  burned  or  lost,  in  the  hasty  removal  to 
avoid  destruction  by  fire,  and  the  Procedure  Book  saved.  That,  after  the  Clerk  receives 
money  in  any  suit,  he  notifies  the  party  entitled  to  the  same. 

Third — As  regards  the  Cash  Book.  I  require  that  it  shall  show  an  amount  of 
suitors'  moneys  paid  into  and  out  of  Court,  giving  the  date  of  receiving  and  the  date  of 
paying  out,  and  the  receipt  of  the  party  receiving  the  same  ;  that  it  shall  be  balanced 
quarterly,  and  when  the  proper  book  has  been  kept,  I  examine  to  see  if  the  balance  on 
hand,  if  any,  agrees  with  the  undischarged  entries  in  both  the  Cash  Book  and  the  Pro- 
cedure Book. 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  28.)  A.  1S75-6 


Fourth — As  regards  the  Debt  Attachment  Book.  I  require  that  garnishee  causes, 
both  before  and  after  judgment,  are  entered  upon  it,  under  the  several  heads  given  in 
that  book  ;  but  this  in  no  case  interferes  with,  the  entry  of  all  these  suits  in  the  Procedure 
Book. 

Fifth — I  examine  the  blank  forms  in  use,  to  see  if  they  are  such  as  are  authorized  in 
the  general  forms  of  July,  1869. 

Sixth — I  examine  the  Foreign  Ser\dce  Book,  and  require  that  all  summonses  received 
from  other  Courts  are  duly  entered  therein,  showing  the  date  of  receiving,  the  date  of 
service  and  the  date  at  which  a  return  is  made  to  the  office  issuing  the  same. 

Seventh — I  enquire  into  the  sureties  given  by  the  Clerks  and  Bailiffs,  both  as  to  the 
covenants  for  the  due  performance  of  the  duties  of  their  respective  offices,  and  the  bond  to 
Her  Majesty.  I  require  each  officer  to  show  me  the  certificate  of  the  Clerk  of  the  Peace 
for  the  filing  of  liis  covenant  with  that  official.  I  also  examine  to  see  if  each  officer's  bond 
to  Her  Majesty  has  been  filed  with  the  Hon.  the  Provincial  Secretary.  I  further  enquire 
into  the  standing  of  the  sureties,  to  ascertain  if  they  are  sufficient. 

Eighth — I  examine  the  papers  and  documents  of  each  Court,  to  ascertain  if  they 
have  been  stamped  according  to  law,  and  the  stamps  duly  cancelled. 

Ninth — I  enquire  as  to  whether  the  Clerks  and  Bailiffs  make  the  returns  they  are 
by  law  required  to  make,  and  as  to  the  Bailiff  keeping  a  Process  Book  in  which  to 
enter  every  warrant,  process,  order  or  execution  which  he  has  been  required  to  serve  or 
execute. 

A  careful  examination  of  my  notes  made  at  the  time  of  each  inspection,  and  also  of 
my  reports  thereon,  have  enabled  me  to  classify  the  several  offices  according  to  merit,  and 
lay  before  you  some  of  the  results  of  my  inspections  to  date  in  as  concise  and  convenient  a 
form  as  possible ;  and  to  this  end  I  have  arranged  the  classification  under  different  heads 
embracing  the  more  prominent  duties  of  the  office. 

Procedure   Books    and    mode  of   keeping   them. — Note  :    Under  this  head  I  include* 
all  the  points  named  above,  under  the  first  and  second  divisions,  in  so  far  as  they  apply 
to  the  same,  together  mth  other  matters  of  less  importance. 

Of  the  first  class,  being  those  only  who  can  fairly  be  said  to  have  observed  the 
rules  in  regard  to  this  department  of  their  duties,  I  can  report  only  about  twenty-eight 
per  cent. 

Of  the  second  class,  being  those  who  have  by  their  practice  shown  a  careless  disre- 
gard for  the  proper  discharge  of  their  duties,  but  who  are  competent  enough  to  perform 
them  in  a  creditable  manner  when  they  find  that  their  full  duty  is  required  of  them, 
and  have  it  explained  to  them  at  the  same  time,  I  can  report  about  fifty-seven  per 
cent. 

Of  the  third  class,  being  those  who  have  neglected  more  important  duties,  and  who 
in  some  instances  are  perhaps  incompetent — in  this  class  I  may  instance  a  Clerk  who  more 
than  once  issued  a  writ  of  execution  before  a  judgment  was  entered  in  the  cause — I  have 
to  report  about  foui^teen  per  cent. 

Cash  Books  and  mode  of  keeping  them. — Of  the  first  class,  including  all  who  had 
books  of  the  authorized  form,  1  have  to  report  about  sixteen  per  cent. 

Of  the  second  class,  including  all  those  who  had  books  of  unauthorized  forms,  and 
that  could  not  be  said  to  answer  the  purposes  required  bylaw,  I  have  to  report  about  fifty 
per  cent. 

Of  the  third  class,  including  all  offices  in  which  I  found  no  Cash  Book,  and  no 
separate  cash  account,  I  have  to  report  about  thirty-three  per  cent. 

Debt  Attachment  Books  and  modes  of  keeping  them. —  Of  the  first  class,  including  all 
offices  in  which  I  found  books  of  the  authorized  form,  and  kept  as  required,  I  can  report 
thirty-six  per  cent. 

Of  the  second  class,  including  all  offices  in  which  I  found  books  of  unauthorized 
forms,  and  not  sufficient  for  the  purposes  required,  I  have  to  report  about  twenty-one 
per  cent. 

Of  the  third  class,  including  all  the  offices  in  which  I  found  no  Debt  Attachment 
Book,  or  anything  to  take  its  place,  I  have  to  report  about  forty-two  per  cent. 

Only  a  few  of  the  Clerks  have  been  in  the  habit  of  making  the  returns  recpiircd    by 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  28.)  A.  1875-6 


law.     I  cannot  give  the  exact  figures,  but  I  am  not  exceeding  the  number  when  I  say 
that  not  more  than  twenty  per  cent,  of  them  have  been  in  the  habit  of  doing  so. 

A  still  smaller  number  have  observed  the  law  as  regards  giving  notice  to  parties 
when  a  defence  was  entered,  or  no  defence  entered,  as  the  case  may  be. 

As  to  giving  notice  to  parties  entitled  to  it,  when  money  is  paid  into  Court,  compar- 
atively few  have  done  so,  although  to  fail  to  do  so  is,  in  the  language  of  the  Rule,  to 
"  subject  himself  to  the  loss  of  his  office." 

Of  the  Bailiffs,  I  have  to  report  that  sixty-five  per  cent,  of  those  acting  for  the 
Courts  inspected  have  failed  to  make  the  returns  required  by  the  93rd  Eule,  and  as  a 
consequence  many  irregularities  have  occurred  that  never  would  have  happened  if  this 
Rule  had  been  observed. 

The  very  Iftrge  proportion  of  Bailiffs  shown  to  have  neglected  their  duty  as  regards 
the  returns  just  mentioned,  and  the  state  of  affairs  generally  when  these  officers  have  so 
neglected  this  duty,  shows  the  great  necessity  that  exists  for  strictly  enforcing  compli- 
ance with  the  Rule.  If  a  Bailiff  is  careless  or  negligent,  and  from  that  or  any  other  cause 
holds  writs  of  execution  past  the  time  at  which  the  same  should  have  been  returned  ac- 
cording to  law,  or  refuses  to  make  proper  returns  to  writs  when  handing  the  same  to 
the  Clerk,  the  fact,  whatever  it  may  be,  will  appear  under  oath  in  the  return  to  be  made 
under  Rule  93,  and  that  return  is  kept  on  file  in  the  Clerk's  office,  and  may  be  examined, 
by  any  party  interested,  free  from  charge.  With  the  knowledge  before  them,  and  know 
ing  at  the  same  time  that  they  must  comply  with  the  Rule,  it  is  fair  to  suppose  that  these 
officers  will  exert  themselves  to  discharge  their  duties  in  this  particular  in  a  manner  that 
will  bear  inspection.  My  observations  satisfy  me  that  when  this  duty  is  neglected,  it  is 
generally  because  there  are  irregularities  to  be  concealed,  and  that  will  not  bear  exam- 
ination without  calling  down  upon  them  censure,  and  in  many  cases  would  show  that 
serious  liability  to  suitors  was  one  of  the  effects  of  such  a  course. 

1  notice  that  Clerks,  as  a  rule,  have  not  used  the  remedy  provided  for  the  correction 
of  these  abuses,  chiefly  because  it  requires  them  to  make  a  complaint  to  the  Judge.  In 
this,  of  course.  Clerks  have  not  done  their  duty,  and  indeed  they  too  often  look  upon  it 
as  a  degradation  bringing  them  down  to  the  level  of  an  informer,  and  raising  disagreeable 
feeling  between  the  Clerk  and  Bailiff',  a  state  of  things  that  it  is  desirable  to  avoid.  In 
every  instance  I  have  shown  the  necessity  of  compliance  with  this  rule,  and  1  have  rea- 
son to  believe  it  is  now  complied  with  in  many  places  where  it  was  neglected.  But  that 
it  may  be  carried  out  fully  by  every  officer,  and,  if  possible,  at  once  put  an  end  to  the  chief 
source  of  complaints  by  suitors  in  the  Division  Courts,  it  is  desirable  that  some  mode  of 
obtaining  information  on  this,  along  with  other  important  matters,  should  be  devised. 

If  to  this  end  Clerks  were  required  to  make  half-yearly  or  yearly  returns  to  the  fol- 
lowing effect : — 

Return  of  X Y ,  Clerk   of  the  Division  Court,  in  the  County  of 

,  from  the  first  day  of  January  to  the  tliirtieth  day  of  June,  18       ,  both 

days  inclusive,  in  pursuance  of 

Total  number  of  suits  entered,  exclusive  of  Interple  ader  Suits,  Garnishee  Causes, 
and  Transcripts  of  Judgments  received  from  other  Courts. 

Total  amount  of  claims  thus  entered. 

Total  amount  of  Transcripts  of  Judgments  received  from  other  Courts. 

Number  of  Interpleader  Suits  entered.  , 

Number  of  Judgment  Summonses  issued. 

Number  of  Garnishee  Causes  entered  (before  Judgment). 

Number  of  Garnishee  Causes  entered  (after  Judgment). 

Total  amount  of  Garnishee  Causes  entered  (before  Judgment). 

Number  of  instances  in  which  the  Clerk  has  entered  Judgment  under  the  Second 
Section  of  the  Division  Courts  Act  of  1869. 

Number  of  Cases  in  which  the  Judge  has  given  judgment. 

Number  of  Transcripts  of  Judgment  from  other  Courts. 

Number  of  Summonses  received  from  other  Courts  for  service.  ' 

Give  the  names,  residence  and  occupation  of  your  Sureties  in  the  Bond  to  Hev 
Majesty,  under  the  Twenty- fourth  Section  of  the  "Division  Courts  Act." 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  28.)  A.  1875-6 


Give  the  names,  residence  and  occupation  of  your  Sureties  in  the  Covenant,  under 
the  Twenty-fifth  Section  of  the  "  Division  Courts  Act." 

Give  the  names,  residence  and  occupation  of  the  Sureties  of  the  Bailiff  of  the  Court 
in  the  Bond  to  Her  Majesty,  under  the  Twenty-fourth  Section  of  the  "  Division  Courts 
Act,"  as  reported  by  him. 

Give  the  names,  residence  and  occupation  of  the  Sureties  of  the  Baihff  of  the  Court, 
in  the  Covenant,  under  the  twenty-fifth  Section  of  the  "  Division  Courts  Act,"  as  re- 
ported by  him, 

Have  you  made  the  Returns  required  to  be  made  by  Clerks,  under  the  Forty-first 
Section  of  the  "  Division  Courts  Act,"  Form  one  hundred  and  fifteen  1 

Total  amount  of  the  emoluments  of  my  office. 

Have  you  made  the  Return  required  to  be  made  by  Clerks,  under  the  Forty-third 
Section  of  the  "  Division  Courts  Acti  " 

Total  amount  of  moneys  paid  into  Court,  and  which  remained  unclaimed  for  six 
years  on  the  31st  day  of  December  last. 

Amount  of  Fines  or  Forfeitures. 

How  many  sittings  of  the  Court  1 

How  many  returns  has  the  Bailiff  of  the  Court  made,  under  Rule  Ninety -three,  Form 
One  hundred  and  twenty-six  1 

Total  amount  of  Suitors'  money  paid  into  Court. 

Total  amount  of  Suitors'  money  paid  out  of  Court. 

These  Returns  would  not  be  difficult  to  make  by  any  Clerk  discharging  the  duties  of 
his  office  correctly,  and  would  lead  to  more  correct  habits  on  the  part  of  those  who  have, 
in  their  practice,  taken  no  notice  of  many  of  the  points  named. 

The  Inspector  could  tabulate  these  Returns,  and  at  any  time  furnish  the  Government 
with  all  the  facts  therein  contained. 

It  is  not  necessary  to  say  anything  as  to  the  desirability  of  having  these  statistics  ; 
but  it  will  be  apparent  that  the  possession  of  these  facts,  carefully  preserved  for  a  num- 
ber of  years,  would  be  of  great  value  in  considering  the  working  of  these  Courts,  as 
well  as  adding  greatly  to  their  efficiency,  and  would  be  useful  as  a  means  of  showing,  to 
some  extent  at  any  rate,  what  Courts  most  urgently  required  the  attention  of  the  In- 
spector. 

My  inspections  in  regard  to  the  proper  use  of  Law  Stamps  in  the  several  offices  in- 
spected, have  enabled  me  to  report  omissions  to  affix  stamps  to  the  papers  and  documents 
of  the  Courts  amounting  to  ($2,31G  50)  Two  thousand  three  hundred  and  sixteen  dol- 
lars and  fifty  cents,  and  to  cancel  large  numbers  of  Ontario  Law  Stamps  that  I  found 
affixed  to  papers  but  not  cancelled. 

This  sum,  however,  cannot  be  considered  as  fairly  showing  the  result  of  inspections 
in  this  department  of  my  duties,  as,  from  tlie  state  of  the  papers  examined  by  me  from 
time  to  time,  I  have  often  had  very  good  reason  to  believe  that  they  had  been  reviewed 
and  stamped  for  omissions  before  my  arrival.  The  evidence  of  the  correctness  of  this 
opinion  is  ample  in  the  number  of  instances  in  which  I  have  found  the  Ontario  Law 
Stamp  affixed  to  papers  for  dates  prior  to  the  time  at  which  these  stamps  were  issued,  and 
when  the  only  Law  Stamp  in  use  was  the  Canada  Law  Stamp,  proving  conclusively  that 
the  Clerk  had  been  reviewing  and  correcting  his  past  errors  of  omission. 

Before  the  Division  Courts  Act  of  1869  became  law,  all  the  judgments  rendered  in  the 
Court  were  given  by  the  Judge  ;  since  that  time,  however,  a  very  large  proportion  of  the 
judgments  in  these  Courts  are  entered  by  the  Clerk  ;  and  now  that  the  use  of  Law  Stamps 
is  abolished,  these  cases  are  not  reviewed  by  the  Judges.  There  is  thus  a  great  power 
given  to  Division  Court  Clerks  that  formerly  was  exercised  by  Judges  only ;  and  as  many 
of  these  Clerks  are  engaged  in  other  business,  and  in  too  many  instances  have  not  given 
sufficient  attention  to  Division  Court  practice  to  enable  them  to  fully  understand  the  same, 
it  is  very  desirable  that  some  supervision  should  be  had  of  their  acts  to  prevent  wrongs 
being  done  to  suitors. 

In  the  course  of  my  inspections  I  have  found  Clerks  doing  some  strange  things,  as 
they  supposed  under  the  authority  of  this  section  of  the  Act.  Judgments  have  been  entered 
in  this  way  after  a  notice  of  defence  was  given  ;  also  after  the  lapse  of  one  month  after  the 
return  of  the  summons. 

4 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  28.)  A.  1875-6 


It  has  been  felt  that  many  of  these  officers  should  have  an  opportunity  to  improve 
their  practice  under  the  instructions  given  them  before  being  called  to  a  very  strict  account 
for  irregularities  that  in  many  instances  have  been  handed  down  to  them  by  predecessors 
in  office,  and  followed  blindly  without  consulting  the  rules  of  practice  for  themselves ;  or  it 
may  be  that  having  read  the  rules,  they  have  not  understood  them  correctly.  Of  the  Clerks 
reported  I  know  of  only  one  having  been  dismissed.  Others  have  been  guilty  of  irregu- 
larities more  or  less  discreditable  to  them,  but  none  of  offences  so  bad  as  the  one  dis- 
missed. 

At  this  date  1  am  not  aware  of  any  Bailiffs  having  been  dismissed,  although  I  have 
reported  several  as  guilty  of  offences  well  worthy  of  dismissal.  These  offences  were 
chiefly  holding  writs  of  execution  past  the  time  at  which  they  should  have  been  returned, 
refusing  to  execute  writs,  and  refusing  and  failing  to  make  proper  returns  when  handing 
writs  of  execution  to  the  Clerk. 

The  inspections  conducted  in  the  manner  described  above  cannot  fail  to  bring  about 
necessary  reforms  in  the  practice  of  Division  Court  officers.  The  officers  themselves  have 
as  a  rule  accepted  my  suggestions  in  a  pruj^er  spirit,  and  have  provided  themselves  with 
the  necessary  books  and  blanks  to  enable  tliem  to  carry  out  these  suggestions,  very  much 
to  the  benefit  of  all  parties  having  business  in  these  offices. 

I  have  had  proofs  of  these  tacts  in  offices  that  I  have  visited  a  second  time,  and  also 
in  the  numerous  instances  in  which  I  have  been  solicited  to  order  books,  &c.,  for  Clerks 
living  at  a  distance  from  where  these  are  to  be  had,  and  who  were  anxious  to  carry  out 
my  instructions  as  early  as  possible. 

I  take  the  liberty  here  of  calling  your  attention  to  what  many  Division  Court  officers 
consider  a  hardship,  namely,  that  they  have  to  provide  costly  books  and  blanks  fur  their 
respective  offices,  some  of  these  books  costing  as  much  as  fifte^^n  dollars  each  ;  and  as  soon 
as  a  single  cause  is  entered  in  it  the  book  becomes  the  property  of  the  Government,  and,  in 
case  of  dismissal  or  removal  by  death  or  otherwise,  must  be  left  in  the  office  for  a  suc- 
cessor. Some  County  Councils  have  been  so  liberal  as  to  provide  the  Di-s-ision  Court 
Clerks  of  their  county  with  books,  but  in  no  instance  that  I  know  of  have  blanks  been 
provided.  These,  however,  are  exceptional  cases,  and  there  is  no  certainty  tliat  their 
successors  in  office  will  be  equally  just.  The  Statutes  require  the  Municipalities  to  pro\ide 
books  for  public  officers  whose  claims  to  this  provision  in  their  favour  cannot  be  urged  on 
the  ground  that  they  are  less  liberally  rewarded  than  Division  Court  officials.  If  any 
such  provision  was  made  for  providing  these  officials  with  books  and  blanks,  it  would  be 
more  equitable  to  cause  the  township,  village,  town  or  city  corporation  in  which  the  office 
was  situated  to  do  so,  as  in  that  case  each  municipality  would  then  pay  in  proportion  to  its 
own  requirements. 

I  have  to  report  the  proportion  of  Clerks  who  have  not  given  security  as  required  by 
Statute,  or  whose  sureties  at  the  time  of  inspection  were  insufficient,  as  nearly  ten  per 
cent.  ;  and  that  the  proportion  of  Bailiffs  who  have  not  given  security  as  required  by  Sta- 
tute, or  whose  sureties  at  the  time  of  inspection  were  insufficient,  as  nearly  eiglit  per 
cent. 

The  following  statement  will  show  the  number  of  suits  entered  in  the  Division  Courts 
of  the  several  counties  named,  from  the  1st  day  of  May  to  the  31st  day  of  October,  1875, 
both  days  inclusive  ;  also  the  total  amount  of  claims  entered  in  the  said  Courts  of  the  said 
counties  for  the  same  period,  showing  in  the  case  of  each  county  the  number  of  offices  not 
heard  from  in  response  to  an  application  for  these  figures  : — 

Counties.  No.  of  Suits.      Amount. 

Algoma  District 16  $637  34 

"        Two  offices  not  heard  from. 

Brant  715         13,804  08 

Bruce  1,093         30,077  44 

"     One  office  not  heard  from. 

Carleton 334  9,952  01 

"         Three  offices  not  heard  from. 

Elgin 986         31,139  41 

Essex 899         24,647  92 

Frontenac 497         15,669  80 

5 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  29.)  A.  1875-6 


(No  29.) 

Return  showing  the  amount  of  money  expended  in  drainage  by  several 
municipalities,  and  the  increase  in  the  value  of  the  land  so  drained. 
(Not  Printed.) 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  30.)  A.  1875-6 


RETURN 

To  the  Address  of  the  Honourable  the  Legislative  Assembly,  dated 
the  first  day  of  December,  1875,  respecting  the  amounts  granted 
under  the  Acts  establishing  the  Railway  Aid  and  Railway  Sub- 
sidy Funds  ;  also  showing  the  amounts  paid  under  each  Act,  and 
specifying  the  portions  of  Railways  so  aided,  and  amounts  still 
payable  according  to  the  terms  of  the  said  Resolutions  of  1st 
December,  1875. 

By  Command, 

S.  C.  WOOD. 

Secretary. 
Provincial  Secretary's  Office, 

Toronto,  December  17th,  1875. 


So  much  of  the  said  Address  as  relates  to  a  Returii  of  Bonuses  contributed  by 
Municipalities  to  Railways  aided  from  the  Railway  Aid  and  Railway  Subsidy  Funds 
respectively,  will  be  submitted  in  a  Supplimentary  Return  when  the  several  Railways 
have  furnished  the  requisite  information. 

No  Railway  which  has  been  aided  out  of  either  of  these  Funds  has  forfeited  the 
amount  granted  to  it. 

Respectfully  submitted, 

ADAM  CROOKS, 

Treasurer 
Treasury  Department, 

December   Kith,   1875. 


39  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  30.) 


A.  1875-6 


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39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  31.)  A.  1875-6 


RETURN 

To  an  Address  of  the  Legislative  Assembly,  praying  His  Honor 
to  cause  to  be  laid  before  the  House  a  Return,  showing  the 
number  of  Division  Court  Clerks'  Offices  inspected  in  the  years 
1873  and  1874,  and  the  nine  months  ending  30th  September,  1875, 
and  a  list  of  the  names  of  those  inspected  in  each  year. 

By  Command, 

S.  C.  WOOD, 

Secretary. 

Provincial  Secretary's  Office, 
Toronto,  Dec.  20th,  1875. 


Toronto,  1 5th  December,  1875. 

Sir, — In  compliance  with  your  letter  of  yesterday  requiring  a  return  showing  the  num- 
ber of  Division  Courts  Clerks'  Offices  inspected  in  the  years  1873  and  1874,  and  the  nine 
months  ending  the  30th  September,  1875,  and  a  list  of  the  names  of  those  inspected  in  each 
year,  I  have  the  honour  to  lay  before  you  the  annexed  statement,  under  the  three  divisions 
of  time  as  required. 

As  these  offices  are  designated  by  numbers,  I  give  the  number  of  each  office  in"'  each 
county  or  united  counties,  as  the  case  may  be,  which  will  of  course  be  the  name  by  which  the 
office  is  known. 

I  have  the  honour  to  be.  Sir, 

Your  obedient  servant, 
Joseph  Dickey, 
Inspector  of  Division  Courts. 
The  Hon.  S.  C.  Wood, 

Provincial  Secretary. 


Division  Couhts  Clerks'  Oppioes  Inspected  in  the  tear  1873,  and  the  name  op 
EACH  Office. 

County  of  Essex,  Division  Court  No.  6 1 


Kent, 

Elgin, 

Lambton, 

Huron, 

Halton, 

Wentworth, 

Bruce, 


Nos.  2,  3,  4,  5,  6 5 

"     1,  2,  4 3 

"     2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9 8 

"     4 1 

"     6 1 

"     2,3,4,5,6,7,8 7 

"     2,3,4,5,6,7 fl 


39  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  31.)  A.  1875-6 


County  of  Wellington,  "  "  2,  3,  4,  5,  6,  7,  8, 9,  10, 11, 12.  11 

"  Waterloo,  "  "  2,3,4,5,6,7 6 

"  Brant,  "  "  2,3,4,5,6 5 

"  Middlesex,  "  *'  2,3,4,5,6,7,8 7 

"  Perth,  "  «  2.3,4,5,6 5 

"  York,  «  «'  2,3,4,5,6,7,8,12 8 

"  Oxford,  "  "  2,3,4,5,6 5 

"  Norfolk,  "  "  2,3,4,5,6,7. 6 

"  Haldimand,  "  "  1,3,4,5,6 5 

"  Welland,  "  "  2,  3,  4,  5 4 

"  Lincoln,  "  "  1,3,4 3 

"  Carleton,  "  "  2,3,4,5,6,7 6 

"  Ontario,  "  <<  3 1 

Total  offices... 104 


Division  Courts  Clerks'  Offices  Inspected  in  the  year  1874,  and  the  name  of 
EACH  Office. 

County  of  Wellington,  Division  Court  No.  12 1 

"    Ontario,                    "          Nos.  2,  3,  4,  5,  6,  7 6 

"     Victoria,                   "             "     1,2,3,4,   6 5 

United  Counties  of  Northumberland  and  Durham,    Division  Co