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SESSIONAL  PAPERS 


VOLUME  4 


SECOND  SESSION  OF  THE  FOURTEENTH  PARLIAMENT 


DOMINION  OF  CANADA 


SESSION    1923 


VOLUME  LIX 


13-14  George  V  Alphabetiral  Index  to  Sessional  Papers 


A. 1923 


ALPHABETICAL    INDEX 

TO   THE 

SESSIONAL    PAPERS 

OF  THE 

PARLIAMENT   OF   CANADA 


SECOND  SESSION,  FOURTEENTH  PARLIAMENT,  1923 


A 

Acadia   Coal    Co. — Agreements   with   re 

Railway 99 

Agriculture  Department: — 

Annual    Report,    1921-22 16 

Employees  of 147 

Agricultural    Instruction   Act:— 
Report   of  Duncan   Marshall  re..    ..      86o 

Report  on,  1921-22 86 

Agricultural  workers,  etc. — Draft  agree- 
ment with  British  Government  re- 
specting prepaid  passages 201 

Air   Board— Annual    Report,    1922..     ..     241 
Alberta    coal    strike,    1922    ..149,    149a,    1496 
Alberta  Drainage  Co.—  Sale  of  land  to    250 
Archives,   Public— Annual   Report,   1921      30 
Arctic    Islands — Occupancy    of    by    ex- 
peditions  231,    231o 

Auditor  General — Annual  Report,  1921- 
22 1 

B 

Bacon  sides  (fresh  American)  shipped 
into  Canada 151 

Bank  Act— Returns  under  S.  91,  sub- 
section 2 222 

Barristers— Payments  to  account  C.N.R. 
and  G.T.R.  arbitrations 81 

Beckett,  M.  C,  Owen  Sound,  Ont.— 
Employment  of 130 

Belanger,  A.  C,  St.  Moise,  P.Q.— Dis- 
missal of 182 

Belanger,  U.,  Padoue,  P.Q. — Dismissal 
of.. 181 

Blackwood,  H.  P.,  Winnipeg,  Man. — Em- 
ployment of 168 

Blake,  Charles,  Winnipeg,  Man. — Em- 
ployment of 166 

Bolte,  Camille,  Post  Office,  Montreal, 
P.Q 198 

Bonds  or  securities  registered — State- 
ment       80 

Boulay,  Adrienne,  Sayabec,  P.Q. — Dis- 
missal       137 

Bounties  for  development  sea  fisheries 
and   building   of   fishing   vessels..    ..     115 

Bridge,  Montreal  and  Longeuil — Con- 
struction of 234 

63347—1 


Bridge,  on  Lachine  Canal,  St.  Henry 
Ward,  Montreal 200 

British  Columbia^^Jlaims  of  on  Fed- 
oral  Government 140 

Butter — Imports  and  exports 95 

C 

Campbell,  Orin — Claim  for  loss  of  horse     105 
Canada    Temperance    Act — Representa- 
tions of  B.C.  Government 136 

Canadian  Battlefields   Memorials  Com- 

mis-sion— Report 69 

Canadian   Government   Merchant   Mar- 
ine, Limited; — ■ 

Annual  Report  for  1922 189 

Earnings  and  e.xpenditures  of  certain 

vessels 219 

Sale  of  27  of  smaller  vessels 218 

U.se.  suitability,  sale  or  other  disposi- 
tion of  vessels 253 

Canadian    National    Railwa.v   Act,    1919 

— Regulations  under 93 

Canadian  National  Railways: — 
Correspondence  of  members  of  Gov- 
ernment   or    officials    of    Depts;    of 
Members  of  Parliament;   with  late 
Directors    re    resignations..    ..215,    215o 

Costs,   fixed   charges,   etc 160 

Details    of    appropriations,     1923-24..     230 
Equipment    orders    placed   since    Oct. 

4,  1922 238 

Hotels  operated  by 134 

Orders   in    Council..    ..55,   55o,   556,    228o 

Private  or  oflScial  cars 204 

Purchase     of     property,     King-Yonge 

Sts.,  Toronto 221 

Real  estate  purchased  or  agreed  to  be 

purchased 228 

Real  estate  sold  or  agreed  to  be  sold 

since  Oct.  4,  1922 228 

Revenue,  freight  and  passenger  traffic 

originating     Ontario,     Quebec,     etc.      94 
Ruling  grades,  construction  costs,  etc.    195 
Canadian    Northern   Railway  Co.: — 
Arbitration  proceedings — Payments  to 

barristers 81 

Correspondence  of  members  of  Gov- 
ernment  or  officials  of  Depts.;    of 

members    of    Parliament 215,    215o 

Orders  in  Council 228a 


13-14  George  V  Alphabetical  Index  to  Sessional  Papers 


A.  1923 


Canadian  Pacific  Railway  Co.: — 

Assets,  capital  stock  issued,  etc 170 

Data  re 170a 

Land  held;  land  sold  past  five  years.  85a 
Land  sold  year  ended  Sept.  30,  1922.  85 
Rulinp;  grades,  construction  costs,  etc.  195 
Terminals,     Quebec     City— Use     by 

Canadian  National 124 

Cattle,  dairj' — Testing  of  vicinity  Monc- 

ton,  N.B 152 

Cattle,  pure  bred — Accredited  herds 114 

Cattle,  store  and  breeding — Entry  into 

Great  Britain 239 

Civic  Employees'  Union,  Prince  Rupert 

^Board  of  Conciliation 190 

Civil  Service: — 
Dismissal  of  employees,  City  and  dis- 
trict of  Quebec 243 

Dismissal     of    officers    or    employees 

from  Jan.  1,  1922 226,    226a 

Employees,  City  and  district  of  Que- 
bec      245 

Employees,    Department    of    Agricul- 
ture      147 

Employees,   No.   each    year    1911-22; 

costs  since  1911 102 

Employees,    No.    on    Dec.    31,    1922; 
totals   of 'amounts  payable  to,  etc. 

112,    112a 
Employees,   No.   on   March   31    each 

year    since    1900;    salaries..     ..121,     121a 
Employees,   No.  on   March  31,   1923; 

total  cost  of  service 251 

Employees,  temporary,  Dec.  31,  1921, 

Dec.  31,  1922 192 

Employees,  temporary,  made  perman- 
ent  206,    206a 

Employees,    full-time — Number..     ..     225 
Retirements     under     Public     Service 

Act 109 

Superannuation    and   Retiring   Allow- 
ances, 1922 42 

Technical    and    professional    appoint- 
ments,   Sept.    1911    to    Dec.    1922..     252 
Total  cost,  each  department,   1911-22    214 

Total  cost,  1918-19,  1921-22 210 

Civil    Service   Commission: — 
Annual    Report,   year   ended   Decem- 
ber 31,  1922 24 

Appointments    or    nominations    made 

by  since  Jan.  1,  1922 180 

Positions   removed   from   the   control 

of 127  127a,    127b 

Civil   Service   Insurance — Statement  for 

1921-22 43 

Coal   for  federal  buildings,  Winnipeg..     207 
Coal  importations  from  U.S.,   1896-1921     100 
Coastal     shipping    regulations — Abroga- 
tion or  suspension  of 232,    232a 

Congdon,   K.C.,  F.   C— Alleged  malad- 
ministration in  Yukon  Ty 191a 

Congdon,  K.C.,  F.  C— Order  in  Council 

appointing   Commissioner 191 

Convention  between  Canada  and  JJS., 

halibut  fisheries Ill 

Conventions   of  Commerce: — 

France-Canada,  1922 72 

Italy-Canada,   1923 78 


Country  elevators — Regulations  of 
Board   of  Grain   Commissioners..    ..      64 

Customs  and  Excise — Annual  Report, 
1921-22 3 

Customs  and  Excise  tax  collections, 
1918-22 179 

Customs  tariff  rates  in  France 72a 

Customs  officials,  etc.,  Co.  Halton,  Ont.    203 

D 

Dairy  cattle,  vicinity  Moncton,  NJJ. — 
Testing  of 152 

Dauphinee,  Charles,  Lunenburg,  N.S. — 
Dismissal 82 

Debt  of  Canada  on  March  31,  1921, 
etc 142 

Destructive  Insect  and  Pest  Act — Regu- 
lations under 66 

Disarmament  on  the  Great  Lakes — 
Papers 141 

Doctors  employed  on  Government  rail- 
ways, Quebec 146 

Dominion  buildings — Ofiicers  in  Charge. 
Chief  Architect's  Branch,  Dept.  Pub- 
lic Works 209 

Dominion  Coal  Co.  strike,  1922— Send- 
ing of  troops 122 

Dominion  Lands — Leases,  licenses,  per- 
mits cancelled 89 

Dominion  Lands  Act — Orders  in  Council      59 

Dominion  Lands — 40  mile  railway  belt, 
B.C. — Orders   in   Council 63 

Dominion  Lands  Survey  Act— Orders 
in  Council 62 

Dominion  Statistician — Annual  Report, 
1921-22 10 

Dorchester  Penitentiary- — Emergency  re- 
quisitions for  supplies 97 

Driden,  W.  A. — Communications  and 
reports 244 

Dry-dock.  Levis.  P.Q 158 

Dundas  St.  Highway,  Toronto  to  Lon- 
don  ; 103 


Eastern   Land  Co.,   The,  Capreol,   Ont. 
— Purchase  of  land 133 

Eastern   Lands   Development   Co.,  The 
— Transfer  of  land 133a 

Editorial    Committee — Annual    Report, 
1922 87 

Economic    Conference,    Genoa,    1922 — 
Report    of    Canadian    Delegates..    ..      35 

Elections     Act,     Dominion — ^Tariffs     of 
fees 76 

Elections,  By,  1922— Report 34a 

Electoral  Officer,  Chief— Report  for  1922      34 

Embargo     on     cattle     entering     Great 
Britain 239 

Empire      Settlement      Scheme — Draft 
agreement    with    British    Govt. .     . .     201 

Estimates: — 

Main,  1923-24 88 

Details.  Ci\'il  Govt..  1923-24 88o 

Supplementarv,    1923-24 88c 

Supplementarj',    further,    1922-23..     .      88b 
Supplementary,  further,   1923-24.  .88(f,      88e 


13-14  George  V  Alphabetical  Index  to  Sessional  Papers 


A.  1923 


Eureka,   S.S. — Appointments   of   officers 

and  men 199 

Experimental  Farms,  Dominion — Report 

of  Director  1921-22 65 

Exports    of    certain    commodities    from 

Canada,  1922 120 

Express     charKes,     etc. — Payments     by 

various  departments 217 

External   Affair? — Annual  Report,   1921- 

22 25 

F 

Fairs — Officials  Dept.  Agriculture  attend- 
ing, 1922 240 

Fire  insurance,  property  soldier  settlers, 
Prov.  Manitoba 117 

Fish  trawlers — Landing  of  fish  in  Mari- 
time province  ports 247 

Forest  Reserves  and  Parks  Act — Orders 
in  Council 60 

France-iCanada  Convention  of  Com- 
merce, 1922 72 

Freight  and  express  rates,  apples  and 
vegetables,  Windsor,  N.S.  to  Mont- 
real, P.Q 106 

Freight  rates — Alleged  discrimination 
against  B.C 173 

C 

Genoa  Economic  Conference,  1922 — 
Report  of  Canadian  Delegates 35 

Gold,  placer,  in  Labrador — Statement  by 
Geological  Survey 202 

Governor  General's  Warrants — State- 
ment       38 

Grain  Commissioners,  Fort  William — 
Employees,  etc 194 

Grain  dealers  Western  Inspection  Di- 
vision,   licensed    under    Grain    Act..     212 

Grain  elevator  system,  Fort  William 
to  Montreal— Papers 237 

Grain  grown  on  Indian  reserves,  prairie 
provinces 171 

Grain  marketing  and  shipment 138 

Grain  rates.  Great  Lakes — Report  of 
Royal   Commission..- 211 

Grain  .shipped  from  Montreal,  years, 
1920-21-22..    .. 176 

Grain  trade  investigation — Correspon- 
dence   with    R.    M     Rombough..     ..     132 

Grand  Trunk  Railwa.v  Co.: — 
Arbitration  proceedings — payments  to 

barristers 81,      81a 

Correspondence    with    late    Directors 

re  resignations 215,    215a 

Orders  in  Council 70,  70a, 

706,    228a 
Preference    and    Common    sharehold- 
ers— Memorial    and    reply    of   Gov- 
ernment      233 

Revenue,  freight  and  passenger  traffic, 

originating   Ontario,   Quebec,   etc...      94 
Terminal   facilities,  etc—Chicago  and 
Detroit 125 

Grand  Trunk  Pacific  Railway  Co.: — 
Memorial  of  holders  4  per  cent  deben- 
ture stock 227 


H 

Halibut  fisheries  of  Northern  Pacific: — 

Convention  between  Canada  and  U.S., 
1923 Ill 

Communications  re  signing  of  conven- 
tion      Ilia 

Harbours,   Govt.— Tolls   and   dues,   1921      68 
Health     Department — Annual     Report, 

1921-22 19 

Hotels    owned    by    Canadian    National 

Railways 134 

Hudson,     Government     cutter — Crew..     165 
Hudson's    Bay     Railway — Removal     of 

rails 118 

I 

Illicit  stills — Remissions  granted  to  con- 
victed persons 223 

Immigration  and  Colonization — Annual 
Report,  1921-22 13 

Immigration,  assisted — Draft  agreements 
with  Great  Britain 201 

Imperial  Conference,  Imperial  Econ- 
omic Conference,  1923 — Correspon- 
dence and  Agenda 177 

Imperial  Oil  Co. — Construction  of  pipe 
line.  Barrack  Point,  N.S 216 

Imperial  Oil  Co. — Sale  or  lease  of  lands 
at  Barrack  Point,  N.S 148,    148a 

Imports  into  Canada — Value  in  cur- 
rency of  country  of  origin,  also  in 
Canadian   currencv 164 

Income   tax   collections,    1918-1922..     ..     178 

Income  War  Tax  Act,  1917 — Remission 
of  fines,  etc 242 

Indian    Act — Enfranchisements    under..      58 

Indian   Affairs— Annual  Report,  1921-22       14 

Insurance— Report  of  Superintendent, 
1921 45 

Interior  Department — Annual  Report, 
1921-22 12 

Internal  Economy,  House  of  Commons 
— Report    of    Commissioners,    1922 ...       75 

International  Labour  Conference,  Gen- 
ev.a — Reports  and  documents,.    ..150, 

laOa    1506,     150c 

Intoxicants  taken  into  N.W.Ts.  under 
permit 56 

Irrigation  Act — Supplementary  rules, 
etc 84 

Italv-Canada  Convention  of  Com- 
merce, 1923 78 

J 

Joint  Peat  Committee— Data 128 

.Joseph  LeBlanc,  fishing  boat — Confisca- 
tion of 193 

L 

Labour  Department — Annual  Report, 
1921-22 26 

Lake  Grain  Rates — Report  of  Royal 
Commission 211 

Land  within  pre-emption  area,  Domin- 
ion Lands  Act 155 


13-14  George  V 


Alphabetical  Index  to  Sessional  Papers 


A.  1923 


Lands  sold  by  C.P.R.  year  ended  Sept. 

30,  1922 85 

Lands  sold  by  C.P.R.  past  five  years..      85a 
League  of  Nations: — 

Third    Assembly.    1922— Report     of 

Canadian  Delegates 36 

Lewis,  John  L. — Correspondence  between 

Minister  of  Labour  and 90 

Librarians  of  Parliament — Appendix  to 

Annual   Report,    1922 37 

Licenses,      permits,      etc. — Government 

scale  of  fees 156 

Licenses  to  United  States  fishing  vessels.    116 
Lignite  Utilization  Board  of  Canada — 

Data 119 

Lindsay  market  scales 96 

Liquor     export     warehouses     N3. — Es- 
tablishing of 139 

Liquor — Imports,   exports,   duty,   etc...     246 
Liquor — Transportation    over    Canadian 

National   Railway  into   N.S...    ..    ..     236 

Live  stock  conditions  South  America — 

Report  of  W.  A.  Drj'den 174 

L(ian    and    Trust    Companies — Abstract 

statement  of,  1921 46 

Lots  31-32.  Block  8,  Vermilion,  Alta.— 

Sale  to  Govt 169 

H 

Mail  subsidies  and    steamship    subven- 
tions—.\nnual  Report,  1921-22 7 

Margaree    River   Salmon   Fisheries   As- 
sociation      229 

Marine  and  Fisheries: — 
Annual    Report    (Fisheries')    1921-22..      29 
Annual  Report  (Marine)  1921-22..   ..      28 

Marshall,  Duncan — Communications  and 
Reports 244 

Marshall,      Duncan — Appointment      as 
Commissioner 126 

Migratory  Birds  Convention  Act — Orders 
in  Council 61 

Militia    and   Defence: — 

Annual  Report,  1921-22 17 

Appointments,      promotions,      retire- 
ments       53 

Disbursements    out    of    monies    other 
than    those    included    in    amovmts 

voted  by  Parliament 157 

General  Orders 52 

Militia  Orders 54 

Motor  cars,   official — ^Data 204 

Milking  machines — Duty  collected..    ..      95 

Mines      Department — Annual      Report, 
1921-22 15 

Miscellaneous     Unforeseen     Expenses — 
Statement 39 

Morrison,    D.    W.,    St.    Peter's    N.S.— 
Dismissal 186 

N 

National    Battlefields    Commission — Fi- 
nancijil    statement,    1921-22 48 

Naval    Sers-ice: — • 

,\nnual  Report.  1921-22 17a 

Orders  in  Council 51,  51a  to  51(7 


Newspapers  companies — Payments  to 
since   Jan.    1,    1922 208,   208a,    2086 

Nicomen  Island,  B.C.  —  Protection 
against  flooding 153 

Xohn,  J.,  St.  David,  P.Q.— Resignation     175 

North  Oakville  Post  Office — Opening  of    159 

Northwest  Territories  Act — Ordinances 
under 57 

Nova  Scotia  Statutes,  1921— Disallow- 
ance of  Chapter  177 145 

Nova  Scotia  Statutes,  1921 — Memo- 
randa, opinions,  etc 144,     144a 

O 

Oleomargarine — Manufacture    of,    etc...  95 

Ordinances  of  Yukon  Ty.,  1921-22..    ..  71 
Oriental  Immigration  into  B.C. — Papers, 

correspondence,  etc..   ..187,  187a,  188,  188a 
Ottawa  Improvement  Commission — An- 
nual Report,  1921-22 49 

P 

Park  St.  Charies  Land  Co.  Ltd 101 

Patent  Commissioner — Annual  Report, 
1921-22 9 

Peace  Treaties  Acts — Orders  in  Council 
under 107 

Penitentiaries— Annual    Report,    1921-22      20 

Pensions  and  Re-establishment: — 
Report  of  Royal  Commission  on  First 

Part  of  Investigation 154 

1st  Interim  Report  of  Commission  on 
Second  Part  of  Investigation lS4a 

Pension  Commissioners — Annual  Re- 
port, 1921-22 91 

Pension  Commissioners — Annual  Re- 
port, 1922-23 91a 

Postmasters,  Countv  of  Levis — Dismis- 
s.iJs.  1911-22 185 

Postmaster  General — Annual  Report, 
1921-22 30 

Proprietary'  or  Patent  Medicine  Act — 
Order  in  Council 74 

Provincial   Legislation — Disallowance  of    143 

Printing  and  translation  of  departmen- 
tal  reports,  etc 224 

Printing  companies — Payments  to  since 
Jan.   1.   1922 208,  208a,    208b 

Printing  outside  Printing  Bureau — Pay- 
ments for  past  five  years 208c 

Public  Accounts — Annual  Report,  1921- 
22 2 

Public  Printing  and  Stationery — Annual 
Report.  1921-22 27 

Public  Service  Act — Retirements  under    109 

Public  Works— .'Annual   Report,   1921-22      31 

Purchasing  Commission — Departments 
purchasing  through 205 


Radiotelegraph  regulations  —  Amend- 
ments  79,      79a 

Railwavs  and  Canals — Annual  Report, 
1921-22 32 

Railwav  Belt  (40  mile)  B.C.— Orders  in 
Council 63 


13-14  George  V  Alphabetical  Index  to  Sessional  Papers 


A.  1923 


Railway  Commissioners,  Board  of — An- 
nualReport,  1922 33 

Railways  owned  by  Dominion  in  1896, 
etc 184 

Reclamation  Act — Drainage  works  con- 
structed, etc 83 

Remissions  and  refunds  of  customs 
duties,   excise   taxes,  sales  taxes..    ..     108 

Reports,  etc..  Departmental — Printing 
of  in  English  and  in  French 224 

Returned  Soldiers'  Insurance — State- 
ment. 1921-22 44 

Revenue  of  Canada  from  various 
sources 142 

Road  projects,  Ontario — Data 98 

Road  project?,  Quebec — Data 110 

Roval  Canadian  Mounted  Police — An- 
nual Report,  1922 21 

Royal  Society  of  Canada — Financial 
statement 47 

Rule  of  the  road,  N.S. — Disallowance  of 
legislation 135 

S 

St.  Lawrence  River  Watcrw.ay — Papers 
relating  to  Report  International  Joint 
Commission 249 

Sales  Tax — Exemptions  from   operation     104 

Salt— Duty   collected 95 

School  lands,  pre-emption  area,  Dom- 
inion Lands  Act 162 

Scientific  and  Industrial  Research  Coun- 
cil:— 

Annual  Report.  1921-22 77 

Financial  statement,  1921-22 77a 

Secretary  of  State — Annual  Report,  1921- 
22 22 

Six  Nations  Indian  Reserve,  Grand 
River.  Ont.— Claims  of 172 

Soldiers'  Civil  Re-establishment — An- 
nual Report,  1921-22 18 

Soldiers'  Comforts  Branch,  Toronto — 
Closing  of 248 

Soldier  Settlement  Act — Amendments  to 
regulations 73 

Soldiers'  Settlement  Board — Placing  of 
insurance  at   Edmonton 254 

Shareholders,  Canadian  chartered  banks      ,50 

Shareholders.    Quebec    Savings   banks..       506 

Shipbuilding  industry — Endorsements  or 
liabilities 41 

Shipping  (Navig.ation  and  SJiipping) 
—Annual  Report.   1921-22 4 

Steamboat  Inspection — .Ainnual  Report, 
1921-22 196 

Strikes  in  shipping  or  railway  trades.. 

149,    149a,    149b 


Superannuation  and  Retiring  Allow- 
ances. Civil  Service,   1922 42 

Supreme  Court  of  Canada — Rules..    ..  123 

.Sydenham  Hospital,  Kingston — Dismis- 
sal of  medical  officers 131 

.Sydney  coal  strike,   1922..    ..149,  149a,  1496 

T 

Temporary  loans — Statement 40 

Terminal  elevators,  Fort  William  and 
Port    Arthur 235 

Thibeau,  Peter — Cancellation  of  mail 
contract 161 

Thompson,  F.  G.,  Winnipeg — Employ- 
ment of 167 

Thornton.  K.B.E..  Sir  Henry  W. — Agree- 
ment with  Government 92 

Toronto    Suburban    Railway — Sale   of. .     220 

Trade  and  Commerce — Annual  Report, 
1921-22 5 

Trade  Commissioners,  etc. — Names,  etc.     129 

Trade  of  Canada  (Imports  and  Ex- 
ports)—Annual    Report,    1921-22..    ..        6 

Trade  with   France.   .Spain,  etc 113 

Transcontinental  Railway  line  to  Que- 
bec, etc. — Utilization  of 197 

Translation  and  printing  of  departmental 
reports,  etc 224 

Treasury  Board  over-rulings — State- 
ment       38 

U 

Unclaimed  balances,  Canadian  chartered 
banks 50a 

Unclaimed     balances,     Quebec     Savings 

banks 506 

V 

Valcartier  Camp  grounds — Utilization 
of.  etc 213 

\'ancouver  Harbour  Board — Retirement 
of  certain  members 163 

W 

Wrights,  Measures,  Electricity.  Gas  Ser- 
vices—.A.nmi.al  Report,  1921-22 8 

Wharves,  piers,  breakwaters — Leases  of  67 

Wheat  crop  of  the  worid,  1921,  etc..   ..  183 


Yukon    Tv. — ,'Mleged    maladministration 

of  F.  C'.  Congdon,  K.C 191a 

Yukon  Ty.— Ordinances  of  1921-22..    ..      71 


13-14  George  V  List  of  Sessional  Papers  A.  1923 


LIST   OF   SESSIONAL   PAPERS 

Arranged  in  Numerical  Order,  with  their  titles  at  jull  length;  the  dates  when  Ordered  and 
when  presented  to  the  Houses  oj  Parliament;  the  Names  oj  the  Senator  or  Member 
who  moved  for  each  Sessional  Paper,  and  whether  it  is  ordered  to  be  Printed  or  not 
Printed.    Also  those  printed  but  not  presented.  , 


Contents  of  Volume  1 

'his   volutne  is   bound   in   three  parti.) 


1.  Report   of  the   Auditor  General   for  the   voar  ended    March   31,   1922,— Vol.   1,  Parts 

a-b— A  to  J,  Volume  II,  Parts  K  to  SS,  Volume  III,  Parts  T   to  ZZ.    Presented 
February  1,  1923 Printed  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

Contents  of  Volume  2 

2.  Public    Accounts    of   Canada    for    the    fiscal    year    ended    March    31,    1922.    Presented 

February  6,   1923 Printed  for  distribution  and  seisbional  papers. 

3.  Report   of  the   Department   of  Cu.stoms   and  Excise,   containing   accounts   of   revenue 

with  statements  relative  to  the  Imports,  Exports,  and  Excise  of  the  Dominion  of 
Canada,   for  the   fiscal   year  ended   March   31,   1922.    Presented   February   6,   1923. 

Printea  foi  distribution  and  sessio7ial  papers. 

4.  Shipping  Report  of  the  Department  of  Customs  and  Excise,  containing  the  Statements 

of  Navigation  and  shipping  of  the  Dominion  of  Canada  for  the  fiscal  year  ended 
March  31,   1922.     Presented  February  6,   1923. 

Printed  for  distribiition  and  sessional  papers. 

5.  Thirtieth   .Vnnual  Report  of  the  Department  of  Trade  and  Commerce,  for  the  fiscal 

year  ending  March  31,  1922.    Presented  February  1,  1923. 

Printec  for  distributior.  and  sessional  papers. 

Contents  of  Volume  3 

6.  Annual  Report  of  the  Trade  of  Canada  (Imports  for  Consumption  and  Exports),  for 

the  fiscal  year  ended  March  31,  1922.    Presented  April  17,  1923. 

Printed  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

Contents  of  Volume  4 

7.  Report   relating    to    Mail    Subsidies   and    Steamship    Subventions    for    the    fiscal    year 

ending  March  31,  1922,  with  traffic  returns,  etc.,  to  December  31,  1922.    Presented 
April  11,  1923 Printed  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

8.  Annual  Report  of  the  Weights  and  Measures,  Electricity  and  Gas  Inspection  Services 

of  the  IDopartment  of  Trade  and  Commerce  for  the  fiscal  year  ending  March  31. 
1922.    Presented  February  1,  1923 Printed  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

9.  Report  of  the  Commissioner  of  Patents  for  the   fiscal   year  ending   March   31,   1922. 

Presented  February  1,  1923 Printed  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

10.    Annual  Report  of  the  Dominion  Statistician,  for  the  fii^cal  year  ended  March  31,  1922. 
Presented  March  27,  1923 Printed  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

12.  Annual  Report  of  the  Department  of  the  Interior,  for  the  fiscal  year  ended  March  31, 

1922.    Presented  February  1,  1923 Printed  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

13.  Annual   Report   of  the   Department   of  Immigration   and   Colonization,   for  the   fiscal 

year  ended  March  31,  1922.    Presented  February  1.  1923. 

Printed  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

7 


13-14  George  V  List  of  Sessional  Papers  A.  1923 

Contents  of  Volume  4 — Concluded 

14.  Annual  Report  of  the  Dep;irtmeat  of  Indian  Affairs,  for  the  year  ended  March  31,  1922. 

Presented  Febniarj'  1,  1923 Printed  /or  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

15.  Annual  Report  of  the  Department  of  Mines,  for  the  fiscal  year  ended  March  31,  1922. 

Presented  February  1,  1923 Printed  jor  distribution  mid  sessional  papers. 

16.  Report   of  the   Minister  of   Agrioidture   for   the   Dominion   of   Canada,   for  the  yeai 

ended  March  31,  1922.    Presented  February  1,  1923. 

•  Printei'  jo'  distribution  ana  sessional  papers. 

17.  Report  of  the  Department  of  Militia  and  Defence,  for  the  fiscal  year  ending  March 

31,  1922.    Presented  February  1,  192Z.. Printed  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

17a  Report  of  the  Department  of  the  Naval  Service,  for  the  fiscal  year  ending  March  31, 
1922.    Presented  Februarj-  1,  1923 Printed  jor  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

18.  Report  of  the  work   of  the  Department  of  Soldiers'  Civil   Re-establishmcnt,  for  the 

year  ending  December  31,  1922.    Presented  February  12.  1923. 

Printed  jor  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

19.  Report  of  the  Department  of  Health,  for  the  fiscal  year  ended  March  31,  1922.    Pre- 

sented Febniary  o.  1923 Printed  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

Contents  of  Volume  5 

20.  Report  of  the  Superintendent   of  Penitentiaries,  for  the  fiscal  year  ended  March  31, 

1922.    Presented  Febniary  6,  1923 Printed  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

21.  Report  of  the  Royal  Canadian  Mounted  Police  for  the  year  ended  September  30,  1922. 

Presented  February  16,  1923 Printed  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

22.  Report  of  the  Secretarj'  of  State  of  Canada,  for  the  year  ended  March  31,  1922.    Pre- 

sented Februarj-  2,  1923 Printed  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

24.  Fourteenth  Annual  Report  of  the  Civil  Service  Commission  of  Canada  for  the  year 

ended  December  31,  1922.    Presented  June  14.  1923. 

Printed  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

25.  Report  of  the  Secretarv  of  State  for  External  Affairs  for  the  year  ended  March  31, 

1922.    Presented  February  1,  1923 Printed  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

26.  Report  of  the  Department  of  L.ibour  for  the  fisral  year  ended  March  31,  1922.    Pre- 

sented February  1,  1923 Printed  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

27.  Annual   Report  of  the   Department  of  Public   Printing  and   Stationerj-  for  the  fiscal 

year  ended  March  31,  1922.    Presented  Februari-  1.  1923. 

Printed  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

28.  Fiftv-fifth  Annual  Report  of  the  Department  of  Marine  and  Fisheries,  for  the  year 

1921-22— Marine.    Presented  February  2,   1923. 

Printed  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

Contents  of  Volume  6 

29.  Fifty-fifth  Annual  Report  of  the  Fisheries  Branch  of  the  Department  of  Marine  and 

Fisheries,  for  the  year  1921-22.    Presented  Febniarj'  2,  1923. 

Printed  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

30.  Report   of   the   Postmaster   General   for   the   year   ended   March   31.    1922.    Presented 

February   1,  1923 Printed  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

30.  Report  of  the  Public  Archives  for  the  year  1921.    Presented  Febniar\'  6.  1923. 

Printed  for  distribution. 

31.  Report,  of   the   Minister   of   Public   Works   on   the   works   under   his   control   for   the 

fiscal  year  ended  March  31,  1922.    Presented  February  1.  1923. 

Printed  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

8 


13-14  George  V  List  of  Sessional  Papers  A.  1923 

Contents  of  Volume  6 — Continued 

32.  Annual  Report  of  the  Department  of  Railways  and  Canals,  for  the  fiscal  year  from 

April  1,  1921,  to  March  31.  1922.    Presented  February  1,  1923. 

Printed  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

33.  Ei<rhteenth  Annual  Report  of  the  Board  of  Railway  Ck)mmissioners  for  Canada,  for  tho 

year  ended  December  31,  1922.    Presented  (manuscript)   April  9,  1923. 

Printed  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

34.  Report    of    the    Chief   Electoral    Officer    for    1922.    Presented   January    31,    1923. 

Not  printed. 

34a.  Report  on  By-Elections  for  the  House  of  Commons  of  Canada,  held  during  the  year 
1922.    Presented  February  8,  1923 Printed  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

33.  Joint  Report  of  the  Canadian  Delccates,  Sir  Charles  Gordon,  G.B.E.,  and  Professor 
Edouard  JMontpetit,  K.C.,  LL  D.,  M.R.S.C,  of  the  Genoa  Conference  for  the 
economic  and  financial  reconstruction  of  Europe,  held  from  April  10  to  May  19, 
1922.    Presented  Februarj-  1.  1923. 

Printed  for  sessional  papers  and  distribution  to  Senators  and  Members. 

36.  Report  of  the  Canadian  Delegates    Hon.  W.  S.  Fielding,  Hon.  Ernest  Lapointe   and 

Hon.  Peter  C.  Larkin,  to  the  Tliird  Assembly  of  the  League  of  Nations,  September 
3  to  30,  1922.    Presented  February  1,  1923. 

Printed  for  sessional  papers  and  distribution  to  Senators  and  Members. 

37.  Appendix  to  the  Report  of  the  Joint  Librarians  of  Parliament  for  1922.    Presented 

January  31,   1923 Not  printed. 

38.  Statement  of  Governor  General's  Warrants  issued  since  last  session  of  Parliament  on 

account  of  1922-23.  Statement  of  the  .■Vuditor  General  respecting  over-rulings  by 
the  Treasury-  Board  on  decisions  of  the  Auditor  General.  Presented  Februarj'  1, 
1923 ." Not  printed. 

39.  Statement  of  Expenditure  on  account  of  "  Miscellaneous  L^nforeseen  Expenses,"  from 

tho  1st  .'^pril,  1922,  to  the  31st  January.  1923,  in  accordance  with  the  Appropriation 
Act,  1922-23.    Presented  February  1,  1923 Not  printed. 

40.  Statement   of  Temporary   Loans   under  Chapter  24,   Section   13,   R.S.     (Consolidated 

Revenue  and  Audit  Act).    Presented  Febniary  1,  1923 Not  printed. 

41.  Statement  of  endorsements  made  or  liabilities  incurred  under  the  provisions  of  Chapter 

70,  10-11  Geo.  V,  An  Act  respecting  the  Sliipbuilding  Industrv.  Presented  Februarv 
1,  1923 Not  printed. 

■12.  Statement  of  Superannuation  and  Rehiring  Allowances  in  the  Civil  Service  during  the 
year  ended  December  31,  1922,  trader  Chap.  17,  R.S.C..  1905,  showing  name,  rank. 
salar>'.  age,  service  allowance  and  cause  of  retirement  of  each  person  superannuated 
or  retired,  also  whether  the  vacancy  h.as  been  filled  by  promotion,  or  by  .appoint- 
ment, and  the  saiar\-  of  any  new  appointee.     Presented   February   1,   1923. 

Not  printed. 

43.  Statement  in  pursu.ance  of  Section  17  of  the  Ci\"il  Sennce  Insurance  .\ct.  for  the  vear 

ending  March  31,  1922.    Presented  February  1,  1923 Not  printed. 

44.  Statement   of   Returned    Soldiers'   Insurance,   for   the   year   ended    31st    March.    1922. 

Presented  Febniari-  1,  1923 ." Not  printed. 

45.  Report  of  the  Superintendent  of  Insurance  of  the  Dominion  of  Canada  for  the  year 

ended  December  31,  1921 — Volume  I,  Insurance  Companies  other  than  Life; 
Volume    II,    Life    Insurance    C-ompanies.    Presented    Februarj-    1.    1923. 

Presented  in  printed  form. 

46.  Abstract  of  Statements  of  Loan  and  Trust  Companies  in  Canada,  for  the  vear  ended 

December  31.  1921.    Presented  February  1,  1923 Presented  in  printed  form. 

47.  Statement  of  the  Receipts  and  Expenditures  of  the  Roval  Society  of  Canada,  for  the 

year  ended  April  30,  1922.    Presented  February  1,  1923 Not  printed. 

48.  Statement  of  Reeeipts  and  Expenditures  of  the  National  Battlefields  Commission  for 

the  year  ended  March  31,  1922.    Presented  Februarv  1,  1923 Not  printed. 

9 


13-14  George  V  List  of  Sessional  Papers  A.  1923 

Contents  of  Volume  6 — Continued 

49.  Report  of  the  Ottawa  Improvement  Commission  for  tlie  fiscal  year  ended  March  31, 

1922.  Presented    February    1,    1923 Not    printed. 

50.  Lists   of   Shareholders   in   the   Chartered   Banks   of   the   Dominion   of   Canada   as   on 

December   31,    1922.    Presented   February   1,   1923 Not   printed. 

50a.  Lists  of  Unclaimed  Balances,  etc.,  in  Canadian  Chartered  Banks,  in  accordance  with 
Section  114,  Chap.  9,  Acts  of  1913  (The  Bank  Act).    Presented  Februar>'  1,  1923. 

Not  printed. 

506.  Lists  of  Shareholders  in  Quebec  Saving  Banks;  Lists  of  Unclaimed  Balances,  etc.,  in 
Quebec  Savings  Banks — made  in  accordance  with  Sections  58  and  59  of  Chap.  42, 
Acts    of    1913    (Quebec    Savings   Bank    Act).    Presented    February    1,    1923. 

Not  printed. 

51.  Copies  of  Orders  in  Council  in  respect  to  the  Department  of  National  Defence  under 

the  provisions  of  Section  47,  Chapter  43,  9-10  Edward  VII,  as  follows:  P.C.  1964, 
dated  September  21,  1922,  re  Regulations  for  payment  of  transportation  to  depen- 
dents of  Naval  Officers  and  Men  transferred  from  one  Naval  Station  to  another  in 
Canada.  P.C.  2224,  dated  October  27,  1922,  re  amending  Pav  and  Allowances 
Regulations  (Clerk  to  Senior  Naval  Office.-).  P.C.  2346,  dated  November  11,  1922, 
re  entry  of  Instructors,  Royal  Canadian  Naval  Volunteer  Reserve.  P.C.  79,  dated 
January  15,  1923,  re  authorizing  formation  of  Canadian  Naval  Reserve.  P.C.  80, 
dated  January  15,  1923,  re  authorizing  Regulations  for  the  organization  and  main- 
tenance of  The  Canadian  Naval   Reserve.    Presented  February   1,   1923. 

Not  printed. 

51u.  P.C.  139,  of  January  31,  1923,  authorizing  formation  of  the  Canadian  Naval  Volunteer 
Reserve.  P.C.  140,  of  January  31,  1923.  luthorizing  Regulations  for  the  Canadian 
Naval    Volunteer    Reserve.    Presented    February    13,    1923 Not   printed. 

51b.  P.C.  202.  dated  February  7.  1923,  authorizing  Pay  and  Allowances  of  Petty  Officer 
Instructors  in   Canadian   Naval   Volunteer   Reserve.    Presented  February   16,   1923 

Not  printed. 

51c.  P.C.  64.  dated  February  15,  1923,  authorizing  an  allowance  to  cover  moving  expenses 
for  Royal  Canadian  Naval  ratings.    Presented  March  6,  1923 A'ot  printed. 

51d.  P.C.  391,  of  March  5,  1923,  amending  Rates  of  Pay  and  Allowances  for  the  Royal 
Canadian    Navy.    Presented    March    16,    1923 Not   printed. 

51e.  P.C.  781,  dated  May  2,  1923,  amending  Regulations  for  the  Royal  Canadian  Naval 
Volunteer  Reserve  in  respect  to  the  age  limit  of  enrolment  of  graduates  from  the 
Royal  Naval  College  of  Canada.    Presented  May  8,  1923 Not  printed. 

51/.  P.C.  716,  dated  April  25,  1923,  regarding  Pay  of  Royal  Canadian  Naval  Officers  serving 
in   the   Royal   Na\T-    Presented   May   18,    1923 Not   printed. 

51g.  P.C.  1006,  dated  May  31,  1923 — Amendments  to  Naval  Service  Pay  and  Allowance 
Regulations — Pay   of   Headquarters   Supervising   Officer.    Presented   June   20,   1923. 

Not  printed. 

52.  Copies  of  General  Orders  promulgated  to  the  Militia  for  the  period  between  February 

2,   1922,  and  February   1,   1923.     Presented  February  1,   1923. 

Presented  in  printed  form. 

53.  .\ppoiutments.    Promotions    and    Retirements,    Canadian    Militia    and    Canadian    Ex- 

peditionary Force,  from  February  2,  1922,  to  February'  1,  1923.  Presented  February 
1,   1923 Presented  in  printed  form. 

54.  Copies   of   Militia   Orders  promulgated   between   Februarj'  2,    1922,   and  February   1, 

1923.  Presented    February    1,    1923 Presented   in   printed   form. 

55.  Copy    of    Order   in    Cotincil,    P.C.    115,    dated   January'    20,    1923.    entrusting    to    the 

Canadian  National  Railway  Company  the  management  and  operation  of  the 
Canadian   Government   railways.    Presented   February   1,   1923 Not  printed. 

55o.  P.C.  2094,  dated  October  4,  1922,  nominating  Directors  of  the  Canadian  National 
Railway    Company.    Presented   Februarj'   2,    1923 Not   printed. 

10 


13-14  George  V  List  of  Sessional  Papers  A.  1923 

Contents  of  Volume  6 — Continued 

556.  Return  to  an  Address  to  His  Excellency  the  Governor  General  of  the  5th  March, 
1923,  for  a  copy  of  all  Orders  in  Council  passed  since  the  first  day  of  January, 
1922,  in  any  way  relating  to  the  Canadian  National  Railways  or  any  railway 
now  forming  part  of  the  National  System.  Presented  April  26,  1923.  Sir  Henry 
Drayton A^ot    printed. 

56.  Return  showing  the  number  of  permits  granted  to  take  intoxicants  into  the  North 

West  Territories,  for  the  year  ended  December  31,  1922,  in  accordance  with  the 
provisions  of  the  Revised  Statutes,  Chapter  62,  Section  88.  Presented  February 
1 ,    1923 Not    printed. 

57.  Ordinances    pas?ed    during    the   period   Febru-iry   28,    1922.    to   January    18,    1923,    in 

atcordance  with  provisions  of  Section  11,  Chapter  62,  Revised  Statutes  of  Canada, 
1906,   Northwest  Territories  Act.    Presented   Februarj-   1,   1923 Not  printed. 

58.  Statement   showing   the   number   of   Enfranchisements   under   the    Indian    Act,    from 

April  1,  1922,  to  January  31,  1923.    Presented  February  1,  1923 Not  printed. 

59.  Return   of   Orders   in   Council   which   have   been   published   in   the   Canada  Gazette, 

between  February  2,  1922,  and  December  30,  1922.  in  accordance  with  the  pro- 
visions of  Section  77  of  "  The  Dominion  Lands  Act,"  Chapter  20,  7-8  Edward  VTI. 
Presented    February    1,    1923 Not    printed. 

60.  Return   of   Orders   in   Council   which   have   been   published    in    the    Canada    G'azctle 

between  February  2.  1922,  and  December  30,  1922.  in  accordance  with  the  pro- 
visions of  Section  19.  Chapter  10,  1-2  George  V, — "  The  Forest  Reserves  and  Parks 
Act."    Presented    February    1,    1923 Not    printed. 

61.  Copies  of  Orders  in  Council  passed  between  February  2,  1922,  and  December  30,  1922, 

approving  of  regulations  and  forms  prescribed  in  accordance  with  the  provisions 
of  Section  4.  Chapter  IS,  1917,  "  Migratory  Birds  Convention  Act."  Presented 
February    1,    1923 Not    printed. 

62.  Return   of   Orders   in    Council    which    have   been    published   in   the    Canada    Gazette, 

between  February  2,  1922,  and  December  30,  1922,  in  accordance  with  the  pro- 
visions of  Section  5  of  "The  Dominion  Lands  Survey  Act,"  Chapter  21,  7-8  Ed- 
ward   VII.    Presented    February    1,    1922 Not    printed. 

63.  Return  of  Orders  in  Council  which  have  been  published  in  the  Canada  Gazette  and 

in  the  British  Columbia  Gazette,  between  February  2,  1922,  and  December  30, 
1922,  in  accordance  with  provisions  of  Subsection  id)  of  Section  38  of  the  regu- 
lations for  the  survey,  administration,  disposal  and  management  of  Dominion 
Lands  within  the  40-mile  Railway  Belt  in  the  Province  of  British  Columbia.  Pre- 
sented February   1,   1923 Not  printed. 

64.  Copy  of  Rules  and  Regulations  of  the  Board  of  Grain  Commissioners  in  respect  to 

Country   Elevators.    Presented   Februan,-    1,    1923 Not   printed. 

65.  Report   of  the  Director  of  Dominion  Experimental  Farms  for  the  fiscal  year  ended 

March  31,   1922.    Presented  February   1,   1923 Presented  in  printed  form. 

66.  Regulations   under  "  The   Destructive   Insect   and   Pest   Act,"  pursuant  to   Section  9. 

Chapter  31  of  9-10  Edward  VII.    Presented  February  1,  1923 Not  printed. 

67.  Return  of  leases  of  wharves,  piers  and  breakwaters.    Presented  February  2,  1923. 

Not  printed. 

68.  Return   of   tolls    and    dues   of   Government   harbours,   etc.,   for   the   j'ear    1921.    Pre- 

sented   February    2,    1923 Not   printed. 

69.  Report  of  the  Canadian  Battlefields  Memorials  Commission  from   April   1,   1922,  to 

date.    Presented    Februarj'    2,    1923 Not    printed. 

70.  Copy  of  P.C.  2095,  dated  October  4,  1922,  accepting  resignations  of  the  Directors  of 

the  Grand  Trunk  Railway  Company  of  Canada,  and  appointing  others  in  their 
stead.    Presented    February    2,    1923. Not    printed. 

11 


13-14  George  V  List  of  Sessional  Papers  A.  1923 

Contents  of  Volume  6 — Continued 

70a.  Copy  of  P.C.  114,  dated  January  19,  1923,  declaring  that  the  whole  of  the  preference 
and  common  stock  of  the  Grand  Trunk  Railway  of  Canada  is  the  property  of 
the  Government  of  Canada,  in  accordance  with  the  Judgment  of  the  Judicial 
Committee  of  the  Privy  Council ;  and  directing  that  proper  entries  thereof  in  the 
stock  registers  and  other  books  of  the  Company  in  that  behalf  shall  forthwith 
be    made.    Presented    February    2,    1923 A'ot    printed. 

706.  Copy  of  P.C.  181,  dated  January  30,  1923,  amalgamating  the  Grand  Trunk  Railway 
Company  of  Canada  with  the  Canadian  Xational  Railway  Companj'.  Presented 
February   2,    1923 ^ Not    printed. 

71.  Ordinances   of  the  Yukon  Te.'ritoi-y  passed  by   the  Yukon   Council,  Second   Session, 

1921,  and  in  the  year  1922.     Presented  February  5,  1923. 

Presented  in  printed  form. 

72.  Convention   of   Commerce   between   France   and   Canada   entered   into   at  Paris   on 

the  15th  day  of  December,  in  the  year  1922,  between  His  Majesty  The  King 
and   the   President   of  the  French   Republic.    Presented  February   5,   1923. 

Presented  in  printed  form. 

72a.  Copy  of  Convention  of  Commerce  between  Canada  and  France.  1922. — Particulars 
relating   to   Customs  Tariff  Rates  in   France.     Presented    March    19,   1923. 

Presented  in  printed  form. 

73.  Amendments   to    Regulations    made    under   the    authority   of   the    Soldier    Settlement 

Act,   1919,   pursuant   to  subsection  2,   of  section   63.     Presented   February  5,   1923. 

Not   printed. 

74.  Copy  of  Order  in   Council,  P.C.   No.  2413,  dated   November  20.   1922.  in  respect  to 

Regulations  made  under  the  Proprietarv  or  Patent  Medicine  Act,  as  amended 
by   Chap.  66,  9-10  Geo.  V.     Presented  February  5,   1923 A^o(   printed. 

75.  Report  of  the  proceedings  of  the  Commissioners  of  Internal  Economy  of  the  House 

of   Commons   for   1922.     Presented   February   5,    1923 Not   printed. 

76.  Copies  of  Orders  in  Council  Nos.  P.C.  1459  and  P.C.  2416.  of  1922,  approving  tariffs 

of  fees  of  elections  officers  under  section  76  of  the  Dominion  Elections  Act.  Pre- 
sented  February   6,    1923 Not    printed. 

77.  Report  of  the  administrative  chairman  of  the  Honorary  Advisory  Council  for  Scien- 

tific and  Industrial  Research  of  Canada,  for  the  year  ending  March  31,  1922. 
Presented    February    6,    1923 Not    printed. 

77a.  Financial  Statement  of  the  Honorary  Advisoiy  Council  for  Scientific  and  Industrial 
Research  of  Canada,  for  the  year  ended  March  31,  1922.  Presented  February'  6. 
1923 Not   printed. 

78.  Copy    of    a    Convention    respecting    the    Commercial    Relations    between    Italy    and 

Canada  entered  into  at  London  the  4th  day  of  January.  1923,  between  His  Majesty 
the  King  of  the  United  Kingdom  of  Great  Britain  and  Ireland  and  of  the  British 
Dominions  beyond  the  Seas,  etc.,  and  His  Majesty  the  King  of  Italy.  Pre- 
sented  February   6,   1923 Presented   in   printed   form. 

79.  Amendments  to  Radiotelegraph  Regulations  Nos.  1  and  2,  approved  by  the  Governor 

in  Council;  and  Regulations  Nos  1  to  32.  inclusive,  72,  75,  76,  77,  78.  88  (a) 
and  97,  issued  by  the  Minister  of  the  Department  of  Marine  and  Fisheries. 
Presented  February  8,   1923 Not  printed. 

79a.  Amendment  to  "Private  Commercial  Broadcasting  License.  Form  W.  69.":  Amend- 
ment to  Radiotelegraph  Regulations,  "Licenses"  No.  2  (6).  Presented  Mav  23. 
1923 Not  printed. 

80.  Detailed   statement   of   all   bonds   or  securities   registered   in   the   Department   of   the 

Secretary  of  State  of  Canada,  since  last  return  (March  9.  1922),  submitted  to  the 
Parliament  of  Canada  under  Section  32  of  Chapter  19,  of  the  Revised  Statutes 
of  Canada,   1906.     Presented  February   8,   1923 Not   printed. 

12 


13-14  George  V  List  of  Sessional  Papers  A.  1923 

Contents  of  Volume  6 — Continued 

81.  Return  to   an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  14th  June,   1922,  for  a  return  showing  a 

statement  of  all  moneys  paid  by  the  Government  of  Canada  or  any  department 
thereof,  to  barristers  and  solicitors  of  the  various  provinces  of  Canada  for  legal 
services  in  connection  wiih  the  arbitration  concerning  the  Canadian  Northern 
Railway  and  the  Dominion  of  Canada,  and  the  Grand  Trunk  Railway  and  the 
Dominion  of  Canada,  said  statement  to  set  forth  retainers,  per  diem  pay,  expense 
allowances,  number  of  days  employed  and  the  names  of  the  barristers  and  solicitors 
so   engaged.    Presented  February  9,   1923.    Mr.   Martell Not  printed. 

81a.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  19th  March,  1923,  for  a  copy  of  the  bills  for 
living  allowances  and  disbursements,  retainers,  certificates  of  taxation  and  auth- 
orities to  act  on  behalf  of  the  Government,  of  W.  N.  Tilley,  K.C.,  H.  A.  Lovett, 
K.C.,  Hector  Mclnnes,  K.C..  J.  C.  H.  Dusseault,  K.C.,  E.  F.  Xewcombe,  Z.  A. 
Lash,  K.C.,  Pierce  Butler  of  Minneapolis,  T.  Ludlow  Christie  of  New  York,  Laurence 
Jones  &  Co.  of  London,  England,  Charles  Russell  &  Co.  of  London,  England, 
in  connection  with  the  Grand  Trunk  Arbitration  and  the  legislation  upon  which 
such  proceedings  were  based.    Presented  April  25,  1923.    Mr.  d'Anjou..  ..Vot  printed. 

82.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  7th  June,  1922,  for  a  copy  of  all  letters,  tele- 

grams, reports,  correspondence  and  other  documents  embodying  the  representations 
made  to  the  Minister  of  Public  Works  with  reference  to  the  dismissal  of  Charles 
Dauphinee  as  janitor  of  public  building  at  Lunenburg,  Nova  Scotia,  and  which 
representations  were  referred  to  by  the  Honourable  Minister  as  considered  by  him 
as  being  satisfactory  to  warrant  the  dismissal  of  Dauphinee  without  investigation. 
Pre.^nted  February-  9.  1923.    Hon.  Mr.  Baxter Not  printed. 

83.  Report  under  section  7  of  the  Reclamation  Act.  9-10,  George  V,  showing  the  drainage 

works  constructed,  the  area  of  land  reclaimed,  the  expenditure  and  money  received 
from  the  sale  or  lea.^e  of  Dominion  Lands.     Pre>;ented  February   12,   1923. 

Not    printed. 

84.  Supplementary    Rules,    Regulations    and    Forms    prescribed    under    the    provisions    of 

section  54  of  the  Irrigation  Act.    Presented  February  12,  1923 Not  printed. 

85.  Return  showing  all  lands  sold  by  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  Company  during  the 

year  ended  September  30,  1922,  together  with  the  names  of  the  purchasers,  in 
accordance  with  49  Victoria,  Chapter  9,  Section  8.     Presented  February   12,   1923. 

Not    printed. 

85a.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  11th  June.  1923,  for  a  Return  showing: — 1. 
The  amount  of  land  held  by  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  along  its  own  lines. 
2.  The  amount  of  land  held  by  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  along  Canadian 
National  lines.  3.  The  amount  of  land  sold  by  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway 
Company  along  its  own  line;  in  the  past  five  years,  and  the  average  price  per  acre 
obtained.  4.  The  amount  of  land  sold  by  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  Company 
along  Canadian  National  lines  in  the  past  five  years  and  the  average  price  per  acre 
obtained.     Presented  June  28,  1923.     Mr.  Lucas Not  printed. 

86.  Report  on  "  The  Agricultural  Instruction  Act,"  1921-22,  pursuant  to  Section  8,  Chapter 

5  of  3-4  George  V.     Presented  February   13,   1923 Presented  in  printed  form. 

86a.  Copy  of  a  Report  of  Duncan  Marshall  on  the  operation  of  the  Agricultural  Instruc- 
tion Act,  during  the  past  ten  years,  and  recommendations  as  to  future  financial 
aid  to  the  provinces  for  the  continuation  and  development  of  agricultural  instruc- 
tion.    Presented    April    18,    1923 Not    printed. 

87.  Sixth  Annual  Report  of  the  Editorial  Committee  on  Government  Publications,  dated 

January  30,  1923.    Presented  February  15,  1923 Presented  in  printed  form. 

88.  Estimates  of  sums  required  fo.-  the  ser\'ice  of  the  Dominion  for  the  year  ending  on 
the  31st  March,   1924.     Presented  February   16,  1923 Presented  in  printed  form. 

88a.  Details  of  Civil  Government  Estimates,  for  the  year  ending  March  31,  1924.  Pre- 
sented   March    2,    1923 Presented    in    printed    form. 

885.  Further  Supplementary  Estimates  of  sums  required  for  the  service  of  the  Dominion 
for  the  year  ending  on  the  31st  March,  1923.     Presented  March  28,  1923. 

Presented  in  printed  form. 

13 


13-14  George  V  List  of  Sessional  Papers  A.  1923 

Contents  of  Volume  6 — Continued 

88c.     Supplementary  Estimates  of  sums  required  for  the  service  of  the  Dominion  for  the 
year  ending  on  the  31st  March,  1924.    Presented  March  28,  1923. 

Presented  in  printed  form. 

88(1,  88e.  Further  Supplementary  Estimates  of  sums  required  for  the  service  of  the  Dom- 
inion for  the  year  ending  on  the  31st  March,  1924.    Presented  June  26  and  28,  1923. 

Presented  in   printed  form. 

89.  List  of  Leases.  Licenses,  Permits  or  other  authorities  cancelled  under  the  provisions 

of  Section  3,  Chapter  21,  of  the  Statutes  of  1922,  An  Act  respecting  Notices  of 
Cancellation   of   Leases   of   Dominion   Lands.     Presented   February   19,   1923. 

Not    printed. 

90.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  12th  February,  1923,  for  a  copy  of  all  cor- 

respondence, papers,  writings,  documents,  etc.,  passing  between  the  Minister  of 
Labour  and  John  L.  Lewis  since  taking  office  by  the  present  Minister  of  Labour. 
Presented  February  22,   1923,  Rt.  Hon.  Mr.   Meighen Not  printed. 

91.  Report   of   the   Board   of   Pension    Commissioners   for   Canada    for   the   year   ending 

March  31,   1922.     Presented  February  22,   1923 Presented  in  printed  jorm. 

91a.  Report  of  the  Board  of  Pension  Commissioners  for  Canada  for  the  year  ending  March 
31,  1923.    Presented  June  30.  1923 Presented  in  printed  jorm. 

92.  Copy  of  Agreement  between  His  Majesty  the  King  and  Sir  Henry  Worth  Thornton, 

K15.E.,  to  act  as  directing  head  of  the  railways,  steaiiiships  and  other  undertakings 
comprised  in  the  Canadian  National  Railway  System.    Presented  February  23,  1923. 

Not  printed. 

93.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  21st  February,  1923,  for  a  return  showing  all 

regulations  and  conditions  passed  by  the  Governor  in  Council  under  Section  11, 
Chapter  13,  of  the  Statutes  of  1919,  being  the  Canadian  National  Railway  Act. 
Presented  February  2G,  1923.    Mr.  MacLaren Not  printed. 

9t.    Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  12th  February,  1923,  for  a  Return  showing: 

1.  During  the  last  completed  annual  accounting  period  the  amount  of  revenue, 
freight  and  passenger  tratKc  originating  on  the  different  divisions  of  ihe  Grand 
Trunk  Railway  in  the  Provinces  of  Quebec  and  Ontario,  and  the  earnings  therefrom. 

2.  During  the  last  completed  annual  accounting  period  the  amount  of  revenue, 
freight  and  passenger  traffic  originating  on  the  Grand  Trunk  Railway  in  the  cities 
of  Montreal,  Ottawa,  Toronto,  and  Hamilton,  and  the  earnings  therefrom.  3.  During 
the  last  completed  annual  accounting  period  the  amount  of  freight  moving  in  less 
than  carload  lots  from  the  cities  of  Montreal,  Ottawa,  Toronto  and  Hamilton  on 
the  Grand  Tnmk  Railway,  and  the  earnings  therefrom.  4.  During  the  last  com- 
pleted annual  accounting  period  the  number  of  way  freight  trains  operated,  their 
mileage  and  earnings,  from  the  cities  of  Montreal,  Ottawa,  Toronto  and  Hamilton 
on  the  Grand  Trunk  Railway.  5.  During  the  last  completed  annual  accounting 
period  the  amount  of  revenue,  freight  and  passenger  traffic  originating  on  the  differ- 
ent division?  of  the  Canadian  National  Railways  in  the  Provinces  of  Quebec  and 
Ontario,  and  the  earnings  therefrom.  6.  During  the  last  completed  annual  account- 
ing period  the  amount  of  revenue,  freight  and  passenger  traffic  originating  on  the 
Canadian  National  Railways  in  the  cities  of  Montreal,  Ottawa,  Toronto  and  Hamil- 
ton, and  the  earnings  therefrom.  7.  During  the  last  completed  annual  accounting 
period  the  amount  of  freight  moving  in  less  than  carload  lots  from  the  cities  of 
Montreal,  Ottawa,  Toronto  and  Hamilton  on  the  Canadian  National  Railways,  and 
the  earnings  therefrom.  8.  During  the  last  completed  annual  accounting  period  the 
number  of  way  freight  trains  operated,  their  mileage  and  earnings  from  the  cities 
of  Montreal,  Ottawa,  Toronto  and  Hamilton,  on  the  Canadian  National  Railwa.vs. 
Presented  February  26,  1923.    Sir  Henry  Drayton Not  printed. 

95.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  19th  February',  1923,  for  a  Return  showing: 
1.  Whether  the  supervision  over  the  manufacture  of  oleomargarine,  the  inspection 
and  analysis  thereof  appertain  to  that  branch  of  the  Department  of  Health  relating 
to  pure  food  for  the  people  or  to  that  branch  of  the  Department  of  Agriculture 
relating  to  the  health  of  animals.  2.  Firms,  corpor.itions  or  individuals  granted 
licenses  under  the  Oleomargarine  Act  of  1922  to  re-work  and  adulterate  butter  by 
incorporating  therewith  baser  and  cheaper  materials.  3.  Whether  the  manufacturers 
of  butt«r  are  allowed  to  adulterate  the  same  bv  adding  thereto  baser  or  cheaper 
14 


13-14  George  V  List  of  Sessional  Papers  A.  1923 

Contents  of  Volume  6 — Continued 

ingredients.  4.  Quantitj'  of  oleomargarine  manufactured  in  Canada  during  the  past 
fiscal  year.  5.  Quantity  of  butter  re-worked  and  incorporated  into  the  oleomargarine 
manufactured  in  Canada  during  the  period  referred  to.  6.  Whether  it  is  compul- 
son,-  to  show  on  the  wrapper  or  label  attached,  the  ingredients  contained  in  oleo- 
margarine, manufactured  in  or  imported  into  Canada.  7.  Whether  it  is  compulsory 
to  show  on  the  wrapper  or  label  attached,  all  oleomargarine  manufactured  wholly 
from  vegetable  oils,  or  which  contains  no  butter.  S.  Quantity  and  to  what  countries 
butter  has  been  exported  from  Canada  during  the  past  fiscal  year.  9.  Quantity 
and  from  what  countries  butter  has  been  imported  into  Canada  during  the  past 
year.  10.  Rate  of  duty  collected  on  the  butter  imported  into  Canada  and  from 
whence  it  came.  11.  Amount  of  duty  collected  on  the  butter  imported  into  Canada 
during  the  past  year.  12.  Rate  of  duty  collected  on  salt  imported  for  use  in  the 
manufacture  of  oleomargarine.  13.  Rate  of  duty  collected  on  salt  imported  for  use 
in  the  manufacture  of  butter  or  cheese.  14.  Duty  on  milking  machines  and  amount 
of  dutv  collected  on  such  imports  during  the  past  year.  Presented  February  26, 
1923.    Mr.  Sutherland Not  printed. 

96.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  12th  February-,  1923,  for  a  copy  of  all  corre- 

spondence, letters,  telegrams  and  other  documents  exchanged  between  the  Department 
of  Inland  Revenue,  any  officer  of  the  said  department,  or  any  other  department  of 
the  Government,  and  the  Scale  Inspector  at  Lindsay,  Ontario,  or  any  other  person 
or  persons,  relative  to  the  Lindsay  Market  Scales  or  Lind.^ay  Market  Clerk  and 
District  Inspector  F.  D.  Diamond,  of  Belleville,  or  Senior  Inspector  G.  H.  Howson, 
of  Peterboro.    Presented  February  26,  1923.    Mr.  Thurston Not  printed. 

97.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  Hou.'^e  of  the  21st  of  February,  1923.  for  a  Return  showing: 

1.  Whether  any  merchandise,  material,  or  supplies  of  any  kind  was  purchased  on 
emergency  requisitions  for  use  at  the  Maritime  Penitentiary  at  Dorchester,  New 
Brunswick,  between  January-  1,  1922,  and  December  31,  1922.  2.  If  so,  what  goods 
were  purchased,  what  quantities  of  each  kind  and  on  what  date.*.  3.  From  what 
persons,  firms  or  corporations  were  said  purchases  made  and  the  business  address 
of  said  persons,  firms  or  corporations.    Presented  February-  26,  1923.    Mr.  Michaud. 

Not  printed. 

98.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  26th  February,  1923,  for  a  Return  showing: 

1.  What  road  projects  have  been  submitted  to  the  Dominion  Govei'nmcnt  by  the 
Ontario  Department  of  Public  Works  for  approval,  under  the  Canada  Highways 
Act.  2.  What  projects  have  been  approved.  3.  The  estimated  cost  of  these  road 
projects  and  the  mileage  .as  submitted  by  the  Ontario  Department  of  Public  Works. 

4.  The  amounts  paid  by  the  Dominion  Government  on  these  approved  road  projects. 

5.  The  amount  payable  to  the  Province  of  Ontario  under  the  Canada  Highways 
Act.  6.  Of  the  estimated  cost  of  projects  submitted,  what  would  40  per  cent  of  the 
reason.able  cost  amoimt  to.  7.  If  any  request  has  been  made  by  the  Ontario 
Government  for  further  c\sh  a.ssistance.  other  than  that  contained  in  the  Dominion 
Highways  Act.    Presented  Febniary  26,  1923.    Mr.  Wilson Not  printed. 

99.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  Senate  dated  June  8,  1922,  showing  copies  of  all  agree- 

ments between  the  Government  or  any  department  of  the  Government  and  the 
Acadia  Coal  Company  in  respect  to  the  railway  between  New  Glasgow  and  Thorburn 
in  Nova  Scotia.    Presented  Febmarj'  27,  1923.    Hon.  Mr.  Tanner Not  printed. 

100.  Supplementary  Return  to   an   Order  of   the   Senate   dated   April   27,   1922,   showing: 

1.  The  quantity  of  (a)  bituminous  and  (i>)  anthracite  coal  imported  from  the 
United  States  into  Canada  in  each  of  the  years  1896  until  1921,  inclusive.  2.  The 
quantity  of  (n)  bituminous  and  (b)  anthracite  coal  imported  from  the  United 
States  into  Canada  in  each  of  the  years  1896  until  1921.  inclusive,  by  the  Govern- 
ment of  Canada  for  use  upon  (1)  railways;  (2)  Federal  buildings  and  public  works. 
3.  The  amount  of  (a)  bituminous  and  (6)  anthracite  coal  imported  by  the  Govern- 
ment of  Canada  from  the  United  States  during  the  above-mentioned  years  for  use 
upon  railways  (1)  Ea.«t  of  Lake  Superior;  (2)  West  of  Lake  Superior."  4.  The  cost 
of  such  coal  per  ton  imported  by  the  Government  of  Canada  from  the  United 
States  during  the  above-mentioned  years  (1)  at  point  of  production;  (2)  at  point 
of   Canadian   delivery-.    Presented   February   27,    1923.    Hon.    Mr.    Tanner. 

Not  printed 

15 


13-14  George  V  List  of  Sessional  Papers  A.  1923 


Contents  of  Volume  6 — Continued 

101.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  Senate,  dated  May  16,  1922,  showing  copy  of  all  letters, 

telegrams,  memoranda,  exchanped  between  the  Harbour  Commissioners  of  Quebec, 
the  Department  of  Marine  and  Fisheries  and  La  Compagnie  du  Pare  St-Charles 
Land,  Ltd,  also  letters  and  telegrams  exchanged  between  Ministers  of  the  Govern- 
ment'and  attorneys  of  said  Land  Company;  copies  of  judgments  of  the  various 
courts  in  relation  "thereto  and  report  of  the  proceedings  before  the  Royal  Commis- 
sion  appointed  in   1921.    Presented  February  27,   1923.    Hon.   Mr.   Casgrain. 

Nol  printed. 

102.  Partial   Return  to   an   Order  of  the  Senate  dated   March  22,   1922,   for  a  statement 

showing  the  number  of  employees  appointed  in  the  different  departments  of  the 
Government  each  year  since  1911,  up  to  1922,  and  the  increiase  of  cost  of  the 
Civil    Service   since    1911.    Presented    Februarj'   27,    1923.    Hon.    Mr.    David. 

A'of  printed. 

103.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  28th  February,  1923,  for  a  Return  showing:  1. 

What  part  or  parts  of  Dundas  Street  between  Toronto  and  London  have  been 
completed  by  the  Provincial  Department  of  Highways.  2.  Number  of  miles 
completed.  3.  The  actual  cost  per  mile.  4.  Number  of  miles  approved  by  the 
Dominion  Department  of  Highways.  5.  Amount  paid  to  the  Province  of  Ontario 
on  account  of  the  approved  parts  of  this  road.  6.  The  estimated  cost  per  mile. 
7.  Number  of  miles  of  this  road  which  have  been  completed  within  the  County 
of  Halton  and  the  number  of  miles  approved  in  the  said  County.  8.  Whether 
the  actual  cost  has  exceeded  the  estimated  co.st  or  a  reasonable  cost  for  this  section 
of   the  road.    9.  If  so,   how   much.    Presented   Februarj-   28,    1923.    Mr.   Anderson. 

Not  printed. 

104.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  28th  February,  1923,  for  a  Return  showing: 

What,  if  any,  rulings,  orders  or  regulations  have  been  made  or  adopted  which 
exempt  or  declare  to  be  exempt  from  the  operations  of  the  sales  tax,  purchases 
when  made  by  certain  individuals,  organizations  or  companies,  or  what,  if  any, 
rebates  or  remissions  have  been  made  or  authorized  to  be  made  in  respect  of  taxes 
payable   under  the   sales  tax.    Presented  February   28,   1923.    Sir  Henry   Drayton. 

Not  printed. 

103.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  26th  February,  1923,  for  copy  of  all  corres- 
pondence, reports  and  memoranda,  relative  to  the  claim  of  Orin  Campbell  against 
the  Department  of  Railways  and  Canals,  in  respect  to  his  claim  for  damages 
arising  out  of  the  work  at  Nassau,  near  Peterborough.  Presented  March  2,  1923. 
Mr.    Clifford    Not    printed. 

106.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  26th  February,  1923,  for  a  return  showing  the 

freight  and  express  rates  charged  on  apples  and  vegetables  shipped  from  Windsor, 
in  the  County  of  Hants,  Nova  Scotia,  to  the  City  of  Montreal.  Quebec,  and  the 
cities  of  Ottawa  and  Toronto,  Ontario,  together  with  a  complete  statement  as  to 
the  reason  for  the  fixing  of  said  rates  or  charges,  and  including  a  copy  of  all 
evidence  upon  which  the  same  has  been  determined.  Presented  March  2,  1923.  Mr. 
Martell Not   printed. 

107.  Copies  of  Orders  in  Council,  under  the  various  Peace  Treaties  Acts,  on  the  files  of 

the  Department  of  External  Affairs.     Presented  March  2,  1923 Not  printed. 

108.  Detailed  statement  of  Remissions  of  Customs  Duties,  Excise  Taxes  and  Sales_  Taxes 

and  the  Refund  thereof,  under  Section  92.  Consolidated  Revenue  and  Audit  Act, 
through  the  Department  of  Customs  and  Excise,  for  the  fiscal  year  ended  March 
31,    1922.    Presented    March    2,    1923 Not    printed. 

109.  Third  Annual  Report  of  retirements  under  the  Public  Service  Act,  1920.  as  amended, 

1921  and  1922,  authorized  by  Orders  in  Council  passed  from  January  1  to  December 
31.    1922.    Presented    March    5,    1923 Not    printed. 

110.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  .5th  March.  1923,  for  a  Return  showing:   1. 

Plans  for  roads  submitted  by  the  Quebec  Government,  for  the  approval  of  the 
Dominion  Government,  by  virtue  of  the  Highways  Act.  2.  What  plans  were 
approved.     3.  Sums   paid  by   the   Dominion   Government   towards  these   approved 

roads.    Presented    March    5,    1923.    Mr.    Prevost Not    printed. 

16 


13-14  George  V  List  of  Sessional  Papers  A.  1923 


111. 


Contents  of  Volume  6 — Continued 

Copy  of  a  Convention  dated  the  second  day  of  March,  1923,  entered  into  at  Wash- 
ington, between  His  Majesty  the  King  and  the  President  of  the  United  States  of 
America,  respecting  the  halibut  fisheries  of  the  Northern  Pacific  Ocean,  including 
Behring    Sea.    Presented    March    6,    1923 Not    printed. 

Ilia.  Return  to  Address  to  His  Excellency  the  Governor  General,  of  the  V2i\\  March. 
1923,  for  a  copy  of  all  correspondence,  papers,  communications,  cablegrams,  tele- 
grams, writings,  documents,  etc.,  passing  between  the  Government  of  Canada  or 
any  member  thereof  and  the  Government  of  Great  Britain  or  any  member  thereof 
or  the  representatives  respectively  of  other  governments  referring  to  the  recent 
negotiations  for  and  to  the  execution  of  a  treaty  with  the  United  States  respecting 
Halibut  Fisheries,  and  also  between  the  Government  of  Canada  or  any  member  or 
representative  thereof,  and  the  British  Ambassador  at  Washington  respecting 
the  same  subject.    Presented   March   16,   1923.    Rt.  Hon.   Mr.   Meighen. 

Printed  for  Sessional  Papers  and  distribution  to  Seiiators  and  Members. 

112.  112a.  Returns  to  an  humble  Address  of  the  Senate,  dated  February  6,   1923.  for  a 

Return  showing:  1.  The  total  number  of  persons,  including  Deputy  Heads,  em- 
ployed on  the  31st  December.  1922,  in  the  Civil  Service  and  in  all  other  positions 
in  the  Public  Service  of  Canada  to  which  (he  provisions  of  TIte  Civil  Service  Act, 
WIS,  and  its  amendments,  apply  as  to  the  holidays  to  be  observed.  2.  The  respec- 
tive numbers  of  such  persons  emploj'ed: — (a)  at  Ottawa  permanently;  (6)  at 
Ottawa  temporarily;  (c)  elsewhere  permanently;  (d)  elsewhere  temporarily.  3. 
The  totals  of  the  amounts  payable  to  such  persons  employd  as  in  item  (2)  at  that 
date,  for:  (a)  annual  or  other  salaries  of  permanent  employees;  (6)  bonuses  to 
permanent  employees;  (c)  wages  or  other  compensation  of  temporary  employees; 
and  (d)  bonuses  to  temporary  employees.  4.  The  respective  amounts  of  the 
several  totals  in  item  (3)  payable:  (a)  at  Ottawa;  (6)  elsewhere.  5.  As  nearly 
as  can  be  ascertained,  the  cost  of  one  day's  pay.  as  at  the  31st  December,  1922, 
of  the  persons  then  employed  in  the  Civil  Service  and  in  the  other  positions 
referred  to  in  item  (1).  Presented  March  6  and  April  11,  1923.   Hon.  Mr.  Bradhurj'. 

Not    printed. 

113.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  Senate,  dated  February  27,  1923,  for  a  Return  showing: 

1.  What  was  the  volume  of  trade  between  Canada  and  the  following  countries: 
France,  Spain,  Italy,  Belgium,  Australia,  Japan  and  China,  for  the  years  1911,  1916, 
1918  and  1921.  2.  What  was  the  volume  of  export  trade  from  Canada  to  each  of 
the  said  countries  during  the  said  years.  3.  And  also,  what  was  the  volume  of 
imports  into  Canada  from  the  said  countries  during  the  said  years.  Presented 
March   6,    1923.    Hon.   Mr.   Schaffner Not   printed. 

114.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  26th  Februar>'.  1923,  for  a  Return  showing  all 

accredited  herds  of  pure  bred  cattle,  and  all  herds  under  process  of  accreditation. 
by  provinces,  giving  the  names  of  owners  of  those  fully  accredited  and  also  names 
of  owners  of  herds  under  accreditation.    Presented  March  7,   1923.    Mr.  Caldwell. 

Not  printed. 

115.  Copy  of  Order  in  Coimcil.  PC.  2.59.  dated  Februan-  4.  1923.  providing  for  the  dis- 

tribution of  boimty  under  the  provisions  of  chapter  46  of  the  Revised  Statutes, 
1906.  "  .\n  .\et  to  encouraee  the  development  of  the  Sea  Fisheries  and  the  build- 
"ing   of   Fi.shing   Vessels."     Presented    March   7.    1923 Not    printed. 

116.  Cony  of  Order  in  Council.  P.C.  74.  dated  .January  15.  1923,  re  issue  of  licenses  to 

United  States  fishing  vessels  for  the  purchase  of  bait,  etc.,  the  transhipment  of 
catch,  and  the  shipping  of  crews.    Presented  March  7.  1923 Not  printed. 

117.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  21st  February.  1923.  for  a  return  showing 

the  amoimt  of  Fire  Insurance  placed  on  property  of  Soldier  Settlers  in  the  Province 
of  Manitoba,  under  the  Soldier  Settlement  Act:  the  names  of  the  brokers  who 
wrote  the  said  insurance  and  the  amount  placed  by  each.  The  total  amount  of 
•  premiums  paid  to  each  of  the  several  insurance  companies  placing  said  insurance, 
showing  which  of  the  said  companies  are  Canadian,  British  and  American,  re- 
spectively.    Presented  March  7,  1923.     Mr.  McMurray Not  printed. 

118.  Return  to  an   Order  of  the  House   of  the   12th  February-.   1923.   for  a  copy   of   nil 

correspondence,  writings,  telegrams,  and  other  documents  pas.sing  from  the  Govern- 
ment or  the  Canadian  National  Railways  since  August  1.  1922,  having  to  do 
with  the  taking  up  of  rails  on  the  Hudson's  Bay   Railway.    Presented   March   7, 

1923.    Rt.  Hon.  Mr.  Meighen Not  printed. 

63347—2  17 


13-14  George  V  List  of  Sessional  Papers  A.  1923 

Contents  of  Volume  6 — Continued 

119.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Februarj'   19,   1923,  for  a  Return  showing: — 

1.  On  what  date  and  by  what  authority  the  Lignite  Utilization  Board  of  Canada 
was  appointed.  2.  Names,  addresses  and  previous  occupations  of  the  several  mem- 
bers of  the  said  Board.  3.  Total  amount  of  money  expended  by  the  said  Board 
to  date,  also  the  amounts  expended  during  each  of  the  several  years  since  appoint- 
ment. 4.  Whether  the  said  Board  owe  any  money  for  goods,  machinery  or  other 
materials  supplied,  goods,  machinery  or  other  materials  ordered  but  not 
yet  supplied,  property  purchased  or  agreed  to  be  purchased,  or  services  ren- 
dered or  under  contract.  5.  If  so,  how  much  and  what  the  details  are.  6.  Quan- 
tity, in  short  tons,  of  briquettes  made,  and  the  quantity  in  short  tons,  marketed, 
sold  and  paid  for  each  year,  and  at  what  price  f.o.b.  Bienfait  the  briquettes 
manufactured,  were  sold  in  1922.  7.  Whether  the  briquettes  produced  during 
the  year  1921-22  have  been  found  by  consumers  to  be  satisfactory  as  fuel.  8. 
Whether  the  members  of  the  Board  were  paid  for  their  services  or  for  expenses. 
9.  If  so,  what  amounts  wore  paid  each  year,  and  to  whom,  under  both  these 
headings.  10.  Names  of  salaried  officers  employed  by  said  Board,  length  of 
time  employed,  salaries  paid,  previous  employment  before  being  engaged  by  the 
Board,  and  salaries  received  by  them  in  such  previous  employment.  11.  What, 
if  any,  monetary  obligations  were  undertaken  by  the  Board  in  excess  of  or  in 
anticipation  of  Govemmpnt  appropriations.  12.  By  whose  authority  fourteen 
expensively  constructed  houses,  besides  a  probably  necessary  boarding  house 
were  erected.  13.  Reasons  for  such  constructions,  in  face  of  the  continued  failure 
of  the  works  to  make  biiquettes  commercially.  14.  Whether  officials  of  the 
Government  were  employed,  without  remuneration  from  the  Board,  to  do  work 
for  the  said  Board.  1.5.  If  so,  the  names  of  such  officials  and  what  estimated 
time  they  were  so  employed.  16.  Whether  it  is  the  intention  of  the  Govern- 
ment to  continue  the  operations  of  the  Board.  Presented  March  7,  1923.  Mr. 
Irvine Not  printed. 

120.  Return   to   an   Order   of   the   House   of   March   5,   1923,   for   a   Return   showing: — 1. 

Quantity  and  value  of  each  of  the  following  commodities  exported  from  Canada 
during  the  past  veaij,  .and  amount  of  duty  paj'able  (or  collected)  on  each:  (a) 
Agricultural  machinery  or  farm  equipments;  (6)  Meats;  (c)  Animal  grease,  oils 
or  fats;  (d)  Milk  and  milk  products;  (e)  Cattle,  calf  and  sheep  skins,  green 
or  salted;  (/)  Wool;  (ij)  Eggs;  (/i)  Apples,  green;  (0  Potatoes;  (;)  Fish  and 
fishery  products.  2.  Quantity  and  value  of  each  of  the  above  commodities 
produced  in  Canada  during  the  past  year.  Presented  March  7,  1923.  Mr.  Gar- 
land   (Bow    River) Not    printed. 

121.  121a.  Returns  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  12th  February,  1923,  for  a  Return 

showing: — 1.  The  total  number  of  employees  in  the  iiLside  (bivil  Service  on  the 
31st   March  in   each  year  since   1900  to   the  last   nine   months   of   1922,  inclusive. 

2.  The  total  amount  paid  in  salaries  (any  bonus  included)  each  year  ending 
March  31,  from  1900  to  1922  inclusive.  3.  The  total  number  of  employees  and 
salaries  (including  any  bonus)  paid  them  in  each  year  from  1900  to  1922  inclusive 
in  the  following  Departments: — Public  Works.  Customs.  Post  Office.  Interior, 
with  Immigration,  Militia  and  Defence,  Marine  and  Fisheries,  Agriculture,  External 
Affairs,  Justice,  Railways  and  Canals.  Secretary  of  State,  Trade  and  Commerce, 
Finance,  Labour.     Presented   March  7,   and   April   9,   1923.     Hon.   Mr.   Crcrar. 

Printed  for  distribution  to  Senators  and  Members. 

122.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  21st  February,  1923,  for  a  copy  of  all  papers, 

correspondence,  letters,  telegrams  and  documents  of  all  kinds  which  passed  between 
the  Minister  of  Militia  and  Defence  and  the  Dominion  Coal  Company  of 
Nova  Scotia,  in  connection  with  the  sending  of  troops  to  Cape  Breton  during  the 
strike  of  the  employees  of  said  company  last  August.  Presented  March  8,  1923. 
Mr.  Irvine Not  printed. 

123.  Copy  of  Rules  of  the  Supreme  Court  of  Canada,  pursuant  to  Section  109  of  the 

Supreme  Court  Act.     Presented  March  8,   1923 Presented  in  printed  jorm. 

124.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  5th  March,  1923,  for  a  copy  of  all  con- 

tracts entered  into  between  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  and  the  Transcontinental 
Commission  or  the  Government,  concerning  the  price  and  conditions  for  the  use 
by  Canadian  National  or  Transcontinental  Railway  of  Canadian  Pacific  Rail- 
way Terminals  and  station  at  the  city  of  Quebec.  Presented  March  9,  1923.  Mr. 
Parent '. Not  printed. 

18 


13-14  George  V  List  of  Sessional  Papers  A.  1923 

Contents  of  Volume  6 — Continued 

125.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  5th  March,  1923,  for  a  copy  of  the  agree- 

ments made  between  the  Grand  Trunk  Railway  or  any  company  affiliated  there- 
with, relating  to  terminal  facilities  or  grade  crossing  eliminations  in  the  cities  of 
Chicago  and  Detroit  in  the  United  States  of  America,  executed  since  the  31st  day 
of  December,  1922.     Presented  March  12,  1923.    Sir  Henry  Drayton..  .A'of  printed. 

126.  Return  to  nn  address  to  His  Excellency  the  Governor  General  of  the  5th   March, 

1923,  for  a  copy  of  Order  in  Council,  P.C.  223,  of  February  7,  1922,  appointing 
Mr.  Duncan  Marshall,  of  Olds,  Alberta,  a  Commissioner.  Presented  March  12, 
1923.     Mr.  Sutherland Not  printed. 

127.  Return  to  an   .\ddress   to  His  Excellency  the  Governor  General   of  the   15th  Feb- 

■■uary.  1923.  for  a  copy  of  all  Orders  in  Council  passed  since  January  1,  1921, 
removing  appointments  or  iffecting  the  removal  of  appointments  or  promotions 
from  the  Civil  Service  Commission.    Presented  March  13,  1923.    Hon.  Mr.  Manion. 

Not    printed. 

127a.  Copy  of  Report  for  the  year  1922  of  positions  excluded  under  the  provisions  of 
Section  3SB  (2)  from  the  operation  of  the  Civil  Service  Act,  1918,  as  amended 
by  Chap.  22,  11-12  Geo.  V.     Presented  March  15,  1923 Not  printed. 

1276.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  7th  March,  1923,  for  a  copy  of  all  recom- 
mendations, correspondenco,  and  reports  passing  between  the  Government  and 
the  Civil  Service  Commission  referring  to  the  exemptions  made  under  Order  in 
Council   1053,  June  29,  1922.     Presented  June  25,  1923.     Mr.  Irvine..  .A'ot  printed. 

128.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  19th  February,  1923,  for  a  Return  showing: — 

1.  On  what  date  and  by  what  authority  the  Joint  Peat  Committee  was  appointed. 

2.  Names,  addresses  and  previous  occupations  of  the  several  members  of  the  Com- 
mittee. 3.  Total  amount  of  money  expended  by  the  Joint  Peat  Committee  to  date, 
including  grand  total,  also  total  spent  each  year.  4.  Whether  the  Committee  owe 
any  moneys  for  goods  supplied,  property  purchased  or  services  rendered.  If  so, 
how  much,  and  for  what.  5.  Total  amount  of  moneys  expended  by  the  Mines 
Branch,  Department  of  Mines,  upon  experimental  work  at  the  Alfred  Peat  Bog. 
prior  to  the  appointment  of  said  Joint  Peat  Committee.  6.  Estimated  number  of 
days  expended  by  each  and  sundry  members  of  the  Mines  Branch  upon  work 
to  .lid  the  operators  of  the  said  Joint  Peat  Committee,  the  value  of  which  time 
has  not  been  charged  up  to  or  paid  for  by  the  said  Committee.  7.  Whether  it  is 
the  intention  of  the  Government  to  continue  the  operations  of  the  Joint  Peat 
Committee.  8.  What  precautions  have  been  taken  by  the  Government  to  ensure 
the  compilation  of  a  full  and  complete  technical  report  of  the  work  attempted, 
the  failures  made,  and  the  work  accomplished.  9.  Quantity  of  merchantable  peat 
fuel  m.anufactured  and  sold  during  1922.  10.  At  what  price  this  peat  fuel  was 
sold  f.o.b.  cars  Alfred,  and  at  what  price  the  Joint  Peat  Committee  permitted 
this  peat  fuel  to  be  retailed  in  the  city  of  Ottawa.  11.  Where  the  offices  of  the 
Joint  Peat  Committee  were  located.  12.  Names  of  salaried  officers,  their  resi- 
dential addresses,  and  amounts  paid  to  each  of  them  each  year,  for  salaries  and 
expenses.  13.  Whether  any  of  the  salaried  officials  have  applied  for  patents  for 
improvements  in  the  manufacture  of  peat  fuel  or  in  the  machinery  required  in 
said  manufacture.  14.  If  so,  when  and  in  whose  name  such  applications  for 
patent   were   made.     Presented   March    13,    1923.     Mr.   Irvine Not   printed. 

129.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  5th  March.  1923,  for  a  return  showing  the 

names  of  all  the  Commercial  Agents  or  Trade  Commissioners  representing  the 
Canadian  Government  abroad,  showing  their  address,  the  date  of  their  respective 
appointments,  and  their  respective  silaries.  Presented  March  14,  1923.  Mr. 
Arehamlxiult Not  printed 

130.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  5th  March,  1923,  for  a  copy  of  all  papers, 

correspondence,  and  writings  of  any  kind,  relating  to  the  appointment  of.  and  dis- 
continuance from  office  of.  Matt  C.  Beckett  of  Owen  Sound.  Ont.  Presented 
March  14.  1923.    Mr.  Duncan Not  printed. 

131.  Return  to  an   Order  of  the   House  of  the  26th  Febniar\-,   1923.   for  a  copy   of  all 

communications,  papers  and  documents  relating  to  the  dismissal  of  certain  Medical 
Officers  employed  by  Department  of  Soldiers'  Civil  Re-establishment,  and  the 
appointments  to  positions  so  vacated  following  the  clo.sing  of  Sydenham  Hospital, 
Kingston.    Presented   March   14.   1923.    Mr.   Ross    (Kingston) Not   printed. 

6.3347— 24  19 


13-14  George  V  List  of  Sessional  Papers  A.  1923 

Contents  of  Volume  6 — Continued 

132.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the   19th  February,   1923,  for  a  copy   of  all 

correspondence,  writings,  documents,  or  other  communications  passing  between  the 
present  Prime  Minister  or  any  one  on  his  behalf  and  R.  M.  Rombouith  since  May 
1,  1921,  on  the  subject  of  an  investigation  or  proposed  investigation  into  the  Grain 
Trade.    Presented    March    15,   1923.    Hon.    Mr.   Stevens Not   printed. 

133.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  Ho\ise  of  the  26th  Februar>',  1923,  for  a  copy  of  all  letters, 

telegrams,  correspondence  and  other  documents  exchanged  between  the  Govern- 
ment or  any  department  thereof  and  The  Kastern  Land  Company,  of  Capreol. 
Ontario,  relative  to  the  purchase  of  land  adjoining  the  Town  of  Capreol  from  The 
Canadian  National  Railways  by  said  The  Eastern  Land  Company.  Presented 
March    15,    1923.    Mr.    Lapierre .\ot    printed. 

133a.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  28th  March.  1923,  for  a  coi>y  of  all  papers, 
documents,  telegrams,  letters  and  other  correspondence,  exchanged  between  the 
Mimstor  of  Rjulways,  or  any  official  of  his  department,  and  the  Land  Com- 
missioner of  the  Canadian  National  Railways,  relating  to  the  transfer  of  the  Gov- 
ernment lands  to  the  Eastern  Lands  Development  Company  near  Capreol  and 
Poleyct.    Presented    April    9,    1923.     Mr,    Carruthers Not    printed. 

134.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  Sth  March,  1923,  for  a  Return  showing: 

1.  The  number  of  hotels  owned  by  the  Canadian  National  Railways.  2.  The  co.^t 
of  construction  of  each  of  these  hotels.  3.  The  present  value  of  equipment  of 
each  hotel.  4.  Quantity  of  fire  insurance  carried  on  each  hotel  and  equipment, 
and  in  what  Companies.  5.  Whether  all  these  hotels  are  being  operated  by  the 
Railway's.  6.  The  revenue  of  eacii  of  these  hotels  in  each  of  the  la^st  three  fiscal 
years.  7.  The  expenditure  in  connection  with  each  of  these  hotels  in  each  of  the 
last  three  fiscal  years.  8.  In  regard  to  each  of  these  hotels  operated  by  the  Rail- 
ways, in  each  of  the  last  three  fiscal  years,  the  net  profit  or  loss  in  connection 
with  the  operation,  including  all  charges  such  as  insurance,  interest  on  investment, 
and  allowance  for  depreciation  on  building  and  equipment.  Presented  March  16. 
1923.    Mr.    Coote Not    printed. 

135.  Return  to   an  Order  of  the  House  of  the   12tli   February.   1923.  for  a  copy  of  all 

papers,  correspondence,  letters,  documents,  r.nd  other  writings  relating  to  the  dis- 
allowance of  an  Act  of  the  Legislature  of  Nova  Scotia  changing  the  Rule  of  the 
Road,  and  for  a  copy  of  the  opinion  of  the  Department  of  Justice  respecting  the 
question  of  disallowing  such  legislation.  Presented  March  16.  1923.  Sir  Henr>' 
Drayton Not   printed. 

136.  Return  to  an  Address  to  His  Excellency  the  Governor  General,  of  the  12th  March, 

1923,  for  a  copy  of  all  correspondence  exchanged  between  the  Attorney  General. 
Honourable  Alex.  Manson  of  British  Columbia,  and  the  Solicitor  General,  in 
reference  to  the  proposed  amendment  to  the  Canada  Temperance  Act.  together 
with  copies  of  resolution  of  the  British  Columbia  Legislature,  with  the  accompany- 
ing Brief  of  the  Attorney  General  of  British  Columbia,  containing  his  references 
regarding  the  vote  of  the  British  Columbia  Legislature.  Presented  March  16, 
1923.     Hon.  Mr.  Stevens Printed  for  distribution  to  Senators  and  Members. 

137.  Return  to   an  Order  of  the  House  of  the   19th  February,   1923.   for  a  copy  of  all 

correspondence,  petitions,  reports  and  memoranda  relative  to  the  dismissal  of 
Mdlle.  Adrienne  Boulay.  postmistress  at  Sayabec.  and  relative  to  the  appointment 
of  her  successor.    Presented  March   16,   1923.    Hon.  Mr.   Baxter .\'i)/   printed. 

138.  Returr,  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  21st  February,  1923.  for  a  Return  showing: 

1.  The  quantity  of  grain  sold  on  the  Winnipeg  Sample  .Market  in  each  of  tlie  last 
four  \ears.  2.  What  amounts  have  been  received  by  the  Goveinmeut  from  the 
proceeds  of  terminal  elevaior  overages  for  the  last  year  for  which  returns  are 
available.  3.  Whether  the  Government  proposed,  towards  the  close  of  1922  fhipi>ing 
season,  to  waive  the  regulations  forbidding  foreign  boats  carrying  Canadian  grain 
between  Canadian  ports.  4.  If  so,  whether  any  Canadian  carrier  or  carriers  nis  de 
objections,  and  the  names  of  such  objectors.  Presented  March  19.  1923.  Mr. 
.   Millar    Not   printed. 

20 


13-14  George  V  List  of  Sessional  Papers  A.  1923 


Contents  of  Volume  6 — Continued 

139.  Return  to  an  Address  to  His  Excellency  the  Governor  General  of  the  5th  March, 

1923.  for  a  copy  of  all  letters,  telegrams  md  other  documents,  exchanged  between 
the  Governmeat,  or  any  department  or  official  thereof,  and  the  Government  of 
New  Brunswick,  or  any  department  or  official  thereof,  with  regard  to  the  estab- 
li.«hing  of  liquor  export  warehouses,  or  other  export  warehouses  in  the  Province  of 
New  Brunswick,  within  the  last  two  years.  Presented  March  20.  1923.  Mr. 
Caldwell    Not   printed. 

140.  Return  to  an  Address  to  His  Excellency  the  Governor  General  of  the  28th  Februarj', 

1923,  for  a  Return  of  all  correspondence  passing  between  the  Prime  Minister  and 
the  Honourable  John  Oliver.  Premier  of  British  Columbia,  since  January'  the  1st, 
1923.  having  reference  to  claims  of  British  Columbia  on  the  Federal  Government 
and  other  problems  outstanding  between  the  two  Governments.  Presented  March, 
1923.     Hon.    Mr.    Stevens Printed    jor    sessional    papers. 

141.  Partial  Return  to  an  Address  to  His  Excellency  the  Governor  General  of  the  21st 

February.  1923.  for  a  copy  of  all  papers,  letters,  writings,  correspondence,  docu- 
ments, etc..  of  any  kind,  imssing  between  the  Government  of  Canada  and  the  Gov- 
ernment of  the  United  States  relative  to  the  Great  Lakes  Disarmament  question. 
Presented   March  20,   1923.    Rt.   Hon.   Mr.   Meighen Not   printed. 

142.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  Senate,  dated  Februarj-  27.  1923,  for  a  Return  showing: 

I.  What  was  the  net  debt  of  Canada  at  p.*ch  of  the  following  dates  respectively. 
(a)  March  31st.  1921.  (6)  December  31st,  1921.  (c)  March  31st.  1922.  (d) 
December  31st.  1922.  II.  In  each  of  the  periods  of  time  following,  namelv:  (a) 
Fiscal   year   1920-21.     (fe)  Fiscal   year   1921-22.     (c)  April    1st   until   December  31st, 

1922,  what  was  the  amount  of  revenue  received  by  the  Government  from  the 
following  sources.  1.  Customs  Taxation.  2.  Income  Taxation.  3.  War  Profits 
Taxation.  4.  Sales  Tax.  .5.  Stamp  Tax.  6.  Other  taxation  specifying  same  re- 
spectively. III.  In  each  of  the  periods  mentioned  in  paragraph  two.  what  was  the 
total  revenue  received  liy  the  Government,  (a)  Frorii  direct  taxation,  (b)  From 
indirect  taxation,  (c)  From  other  sources.  Presented  March  20,  1923.  Hon.  Mr. 
Tanner    Not    printed. 

143.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  Hoti.'^e  of  the  12th  February,  1923.  for  a  copy  of  all  memor- 

andums, opinions  and  reports  made  by  different  Ministers  of  .Justice  or  their 
deputies,  from  Januarj-  1,  1904.  to  date,  on  the  question  of  disallowance  of  Provin- 
cial le^iislation  and  exercise  of  Provincial  Acts  and  laying  down  the  principles  which 
justify  the  disallowance  of  the  provincal  acts.  Presented  March  21,  1923.  Sir 
Henry  Drayton Not  printed. 

lit.  RctvuTi  to  an  Address  to  His  Excellency  the  Governor  General  of  the  12th  February, 

1923,  for  a  copy  of  all  memoranda,  opinions,  letters,  reports  and  other  document,^, 
including  renorts  to  Council  and  Orders  in  Cotmcil.  relating  to  anv  Nova  Scotia 
Statute  in  1922.    Presented  March  22,  1923.    Mr.  Hanson .'..ATot  printed. 

144a  Return  to  a  humble  Address  to  His  Excellency  the  Governor  Generrd,  dated  Febru- 
ar>-  6.  1923.  praying  that  His  Exc<>llency  cause  to  be  laid  before  the  Senate  a 
Retum  to  include  all  corros]xindencp.  reports  to  council  and  orders  in  council 
relating  to  disallowance  of  Nova  Scotia  Statutes  during  1922.  Presented  April  25. 
1923.    Hon.  Mr.  Tanner ; Not  printed. 

145.  Retum   to  an   Order  of  the  Hou.se   of  the   12th   Febniary.   1923,   for   a  copy  of   all 

papers,  correspondence,  letters,  document.*,  .and  other  writings  rel.ating  to  the 
disallowance  of  a  .statute  of  the  Legislature  of  Nova  Scotia,  being  Chapter  177  of 
the  Statutes  enacted  in  the  ye.ar  1921.  and  entitled  "  An  Act  to  Vest  Certain  Lands 
in  Victoria  Cotmty  in  Jane  E.  MacNeil."  Presented  March  22,  1923.  Sir  Henrv 
Dr.iyton Not  printed. 

146.  Retum  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  5th   March.   1923,  for  a  Return  showing: 

1.  Number  of  Doctors  employed  by  the  Government  Railways,  whether  the  I.C.R.. 
C.NJR.  or  the  G.T.R.  in  the  Province  of  Quebec.  2.  Their  names  and  addresses. 
3.  Salaries  received.  4.  On  whose  recommendation  these  appointments  were  made. 
5.  Whether  thev  are  allowed  to  take  part  in  politics,  either  Provincial  or  Federal. 
Presented   M.arch  22.   1923.    Mr.  d'.\njou Not  printed. 

21 


13-14  George  V  List  of  Sessional  Papers  A.  1923 

Contents  of  Volume  6 — Continued 

147.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  5th  March,  1923,  for  a  return  showing  the 

names,  occupations,  salaries,  bonus  included,  and  address  of  all  inside  and  outside 
employees  of  the  Department  of  Agriculture.  Presented  March  23,  1923.  Mr. 
Bouchard Not  printed. 

148.  148a.  Returns  to  an  Order  of  the  Senate,  dated  February  27, 1923,  for  a  Return  showing : 

(a)  All  correspondence,  telet;rams,  i)etitions  and  documents  deiiliug  with  the  sale, 
or  loiuse  to  the  Imperial  Oil  Company,  or  other  Company,  or  jnirsons,  of  any  part 
of  the  lands  at  B.irraek  Point,  Sydney,  N.S.,  with  any  Department  of  the  Govern- 
ment and  with  the  management  of  the  Canadian  National  Railways,  as  well  as  any 
Orders  in  Council  dealing  with  this  matter.  (6)  The  correspondence,  with  instruc- 
tions to  and  the  reports  of  any  Engineers,  or  other  ofiicials  of  the  Department  of 
Railways,  or  of  Public  Works,  or  of  the  Canadian  National  Railways  on  this 
matter,  (c)  A  plan  showing  the  relation  of  the  land  in  question  to  the  city  of 
Sydney,  the  Terminals  of  the  Canadian  National  Railways  and  Sydney  Harbour. 
Presented  March  22  and  April  17,  1923.    Hon.  Mr.  McLennan Not  printed. 

149.  149a,  1496.  Returns  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  7th  March,  1923:   1.  For  copies 

of  all  communications  of  whatsoever  sort  exchanged  between  the  departments  of 
the  Government  or  any  member  of  the  Government  with  any  person  or  firm 
respecting  the  Sydney  coal  strike  of  last  summer.  2.  For  copies  of  all  communica- 
tions made  to  or  received  by  any  department  of  the  Government  from  the  railways 
in  connection  with  the  shop  trades  controversy  of  last  summer,  and  concerning  the 
Alberta  coal  strike  in  the  autumn  of  1922.  3.  For  copies  of  opinions  of  the  Depart- 
ment of  Justice  given  in  relation  to  conduct  of  either  emploj-ees  or  employers 
affected  by  any  strike  or  threatened  strike  of  workers  in  shipping  or  railway  trades; 
and  4.  Also  for  copies  of  all  correspondence  relating  to  or  requisitions  for  troops 
in  connection  with  the  Sydney  coal  strike  of  last  summer.  Presented  March  23, 
May  4  and  9,  1923.    Sir  Henry  Drayton Not  printed. 

150.  Authentic   texts   of   the   Draft   Conventions    and   Recommendations    adopted   by    the 

International  Labour  Conference  (League  of  Nations)  at  its  Third  Session  held  in 
Geneva,  Switzerland,  October  25-November  19.  1921,  together  with  a  copy  of  Order 
in  Council,  P.C.  1358,  dated  June  27.  1922.  concerning  the  same.  Presented  March 
23,  1923 Not  printed. 

150a.  Copy  of  a  reprint  of  an  article  in  the  Labour  Gazette  of  December,  1922,  containing 
a  report  of  the  Fourth  Session  of  the  Internationa!  Labour  Conference  held  at 
Geneva,  Switzerland,  from  October  18  to  November  3,  1922.  Presented  March  23. 
1923 Not  printed 

150b.  Copy  of  the  Agenda  of  the  18th  Session  of  the  Governing  Body  League  of  Nations 
International  Labour  Office  meeting  April  10,  1923,  at  Geneva;  together  with 
correspondence  appointing  a  Canadian  delegate  thereto.    Presented  March  26,  1923. 

Not  printed. 

150c.  Authentic  text  of  a  Recommendation  concerning  a  Communication  to  the  Interna- 
tional Labour  Office  of  Statistical  and  other  Information  regarding  Emigration, 
Immigration  and  the  Repatriation  and  Transit  of  Emigrants  adopted  by  the  Inter- 
national Labour  Congress  at  its  Fourth  Session  in  Geneva,  October  18  to  November 
3,  1922.    Presented  March  28,  1923. 

Printed  for  distribution  to  Senators  and  Members. 

151.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House   of   the  8th  March,   1923,  for  a   Return  showing: 

1.  The  amount  of  fresh  American  bacon  sides,  shipped  into  Canada,  in  bond,  lor 
curing  in  Canadian  plants,  and  .shipped  out  as  Canadian  cured  American,  during 
the  years  1919,  1920,  1921  and  1922.  2.  The  percentage  of  this  amount  exported  to 
the  British  markets  during  these  years.  Presented  March  26,  1923.  Mr.  Kennedy 
(Edmonton) iVot  printed. 

152.  Return  to  an  Address  to  His  Excellency  the  Governor  General  of  the   19th  March, 

1923,  for  a  copy  of  all  correspondence  between  the  Federal  Department  of  Agri- 
culture, or  any  official  of  the  Department  of  Agriculture,  and  the  town  of  Moncton, 
New  Brunswick,  or  any  official  of  the  town  of  Moncton,  or  any  official  of  the 
Department  of  Health  of  the  Province  of  New  Brunswick,  regarding  the  testing 
of  Dairy  cattle,  under  the  Animals  Contagious  Diseases  Act,  in  the  vicinity  of 
Moncton,  New  Brunswick.  Presented  March  26,  1923.  Mr.  Caldwell. .  .A'ot  printed. 
22 


13-14  George  V  List  of  Sessional  Papers  A.  1923 

Contents  of  Volume  6 — Continued 

153.  Return  to  an  Address  to  His  Excellency  the  Governor  General  of  the  26tli  February, 

1923,  for  a  return  of  all  correspondence,  letters,  tekgrams,  documents,  reports,  etc., 
between  the  Minister  of  Public  Works  or  any  official  of  his  Department,  or  any 
other  Minister  or  official  of  the  Government  and  the  Minister  of  Public  Works  in 
the  Province  of  B.C.  or  any  official,  or  other  Minister  or  official  of  the  Provincial 
Government  of  B.C.,  regarding  the  problem  of  protection  for  Nicomen  Island 
against  high  water  flooding  by  the  Fraser  River.  Presented  March  26,  1923.  Hon. 
Mt.  Stevens Not  printed. 

154.  Report  on  First  Part  of  Investigation  (matters  referred  to  in  G.W.V.A.  telegram)  by 

the  Royal  Commission  on  Pensions  and  Re-establishraent.  Presented  March  28, 
1923 Printed  jor  sessional  papers  aitd  distribution  to  Senators  and  Members. 

lS4a.  Report  of  the  Royal  Commission  on  Pensions  and  Re-establishment — First  Interim 
Report  on  Second  Part  of  Investigation  (certain  questions  relating  to  pensions, 
medical  treatment  and  re-establishment  needs  of  Canadian  ex-service  men  and 
their  dependents).     Presented  M.ay  21,  1923. 

Printed  jor  sessional  papers  and  distribution  to  Senators  and  Members. 

155.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the   12th  March,  1923,  for  a  Return  showing: 

1.  The  total  area  in  acres  of  all  lands  within  what  is  known  as  the  pre-emption 
area  aa  defined  by  Dominion  Lands  Act,  1908.  2.  The  number  of  acres  of  such 
lands  under  the  administration  of  the  Dominion  Government  by  virtue  of:  (a)  Un- 
proved pre-emption;  (6)  Unproved  purchased  homesteads;  (c)  Forest  Reserves  and 
Parks;  (d)  Grazing  Lease;  (c)  School  lands.  Presented  March  28,  1923.  Mr. 
McTaggart Not  printed. 

156.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  12th  February,  1923,  for  a  Return  showing: 

1.  The  record  of  the  proceedings  of  a  sub-committee  of  the  Privy  Council  appointed 
under  P.C.  1566,  May  12,  1921,  to  whom  was  referred  the  matter  of  arriving  at  a 
scale  of  fees  charged  by  the  Government  for  licenses,  permits,  leases,  etc.  2.  The 
reports  and  recommendations  of  all  department  officers  made  to  Council  or  to  any 
Minister  concerning  said  matter.  3.  The  names  and  offices  held  by  all  depart- 
mental officers  who  inquired  into  and  reported  on  said  subject.  4.  The  report 
recommending  the  scale  of  fees  charged  by  the  Government  for  recording  transfers 
and  other  documents  tmder  the  regulations  governing  quartz  mining  claims  in 
Yukon  Territory.    Presented  April  9,  1923.    Mr.  Bl.ick  (Yukon) Not  printed. 

157.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  19th  February,  1923.  for  a  Return  showing: 

1.  What  expenses,  payments  or  disbursements  of  any  kind  have  been  made  since 
April  1,  1922,  out  of  other  moneys  than  those  included  in  the  amount-s  voted  by 
Parliament  for  the  Department  of  Militia  and  Defence  in  respect  of  items  or 
charges  paid  in  the  fiscal  year  1920-21  out  of  moneys  verted  for  the  Department  oi 
Militia  and  Defence.  2.  Under  what  authority  such  moneys  were  so  paid  from  other 
votes,  and  why  the  change  was  made.  3.  Whether  objections  were  offered  by  the 
Department  of  the  Auditor  General  to  payments  being  so  made  or  to  other 
attempts  to  make  similar  payments.  If  so,  in  what  cases.  Presented  April  9,  1923. 
Mr.  Boys Not  printed. 

158.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  19th  March,  1923.  for  a  Return  showing: 

1.  Whether  the  Government  owns  a  drv-dock  at  Le\^s.  2.  If  so.  when  purchased. 
3.  From  whom  said  dr>'-dock  was  purchased.  4.  The  price  the  Government  paid 
for  same.  5.  Date  of  purch.ase.  6.  Number  of  boats  repaired  each  year  in  said 
drj'-dock.  7.  The  tonnage  of  each  boat  repaired.  8.  Extent  of  repairs.  9.  Where 
said  dry-dock  is  located.  10.  To  whom  the  adjoining  properties  belong.  Presented 
April  9,  1923.    Mr.  Archambault Not  printed. 

159.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  7th  March.  1923,  for  a  copy  of  all  papers, 

correspondence,  memoranda,  reports  and  other  documents  relating  to  the  appli- 
cation for  the  opening  of  a  Post  Office  in  North  Oakville  in  1921  and  al.so  relating 
to  the  Order  countermanding  the  opening  of  said  Post  Office.  Presented  April 
9,    1923.    Mr.    Anderson Not   printed. 

160.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  28th  February,  1923.  for  a  Return  showing: 

1.  The  total  sum  now  charged  against  the  railways  now  comprised  in  the  National 
Railways  by  way  of  cost  of  construction,  cost  of  equipment,  and  deficits.  2.  What 
portion  of  said  sum  is  chargeable  to  capital  expenditure  and  deficits  respectively. 
3.  What    amounts    regarding    No.    2    are   respectively    chargeable   to    the    railwavs 

23 


13-14  George  V 


List  of  Sessional  Papers 


A.  1923 


Contents  of  Volume  6 — Continued 

formerly  known  as  tlic  Canadian  Northern,  the  Grand  Trunk  Pacific,  the  NationaJ 
Transcontinental,  the  Intercolonial  and  the  Grand  Trunk.  4.  What  the  respective 
fixed  charpcs  are  against  the  former  Canadian  Northern  Railway,  the  Grand  Trunk 
Pacific,  the  National  Transcontinental  and  the  Grand  Trunk  Railway.  5.  Whether 
there  arc  any  annual  fi.\ed  charges  against  the  Intercolonial  Railway  and  the  Prince 
Edward  Island  Railway.  6.  If  so,  the  amounts.  7.  The  total  annual  fixed  charges 
on  account  of  securities  held  against  the  National  Railways  by  private  investors 
and  excluding  all  .securities  and  advances  made  by  the  Government  of  Canada. 
8.  The  amount  of  the  annual  fixed  charges  of  the  various  railways  in  the  National 
system  on  account  of  securities  and  loans  made  by  the  Government  of  Canada. 
Presented   April  9,   1923.     Mr.   F-ulcr. 

Printed  for  diHribution  to  Senators  and  Members. 

161.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  oth  March,  1923.  for  a  copy  of  all  corres- 

pondence, papers,  writings,  and  other  documents,  relating  to  the  cancellation  of 
the  contract  of  Peter  Thibrau  for  the  carrying  of  mail  from  Thibeauville  to 
Sporting  Mountain  Station,  Nova  Scotia.    Presented  April   10,  1923.    Mr.  Hanson. 

A'ot  printed. 

162.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  12t,h  March,  1923.  for  a  Return  showing: 

1.  The  number  of  quarter  sections  of  schools  lands  within  pre-emption  area  as 
defined  by  Dominion  Lands  Act,  190S,  sold  up  to  December  31,  1922.  2.  The  total 
revenue  derived  therefrom  up  to  December  31,  1922.  3.  The  amount  rcmaimng 
unpaid  upon  such  lands  at  December  31,  1922.  4.  The  number  of  quarter  sections 
of  such  lands  that  have  been  surrendered  to  the  Government.  Presented  April 
10,    1923.    Mr.   McTaggart Not   printed. 

163.  Return  to  an  Address  to  His  Excellency  the  Governor  General  of  the  19th  Februan.', 

1923,  for  a  Return  showing  all  correspondence,  letters,  documents,  petitions,  etc., 
passed  between  the  Government  or  any  member  of  the  Government,  or  officials 
of  the  Department  and  persons  in  Vancouver,  B.C.,  relating  to  the  retirement 
of  certain  members  of  the  Vancouver  Harbour  Board  and  the  appointment  of 
successors;  also  copies  of  the  Orders  in  Council  appointing  members  of  the  Van- 
couver Harbour  Board  since  its  inception;  also  Orders  in  Council  that  have 
passed  since  January  1.  1922.  authorizing  the  expenditure  of  moneys  by  the  Har- 
bour Commissioners  in  harbour  improvements.  Presented  April  11,  1923.  Hon. 
Mr.    Stevens Not    printed. 

164.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  Senate,  dated   March  S,   1923,  for  a  Return  giving  the 

following  information:  The  value  of  imports  into  Canada  in  the  currency  of  the 
country  of  origin  as  well  as  in  Canadian  eurrenc}-.  showing  importations  from  each 
countrj-  separately  with  the  amount  of  duties  collected  on  such  goods  from  each 
such  country  and  average  rate  of  duty  from  each  such  countrj-  separatel,y  between 
July  1,  1922,  and  January  1,  1923,  on  following  articles: — 

V.^LVE  or  Imports,  as  Specified,  Entered  for  Consumption  in  Canada,  and  Customs  Dutv  Collected 
Thereon,  During  the  Calendar  Year,  1922. 


Customs 
Duty 


(o)  Agricultural  machinery 

(6)  Meats -.: .■■. 

(c)  Animal  grease,  oils  or  fats 

(d)  Milk  and  milk  products 

(e)  Cattle,  calf  and  sheep  skins,  green  or  salted 

CO  Wool 

(g)  Eggs 

(h)  Apples,  green 

(i)  Potatoes 

0)  Fish  and  fishery  products 

__ 


732,215 
286,5.52 
977,100 
325,897 
747,824 
883,433 
476, 906 
914.862 
450.909 
800,980 


$   cts. 

660,464  16 

1,815,609  42 

311,817  93 

267, 184  52 

651  72 
244,216  22 
153,525  60 
69,487  60 
315,509  79 


13-14  George  V 


List  of  Sessional  Papers 


A.  1923 


Contents  of  Volume  6 — Continued 

Imports  Entekbd  for  Consumption  Calendar  Year  1922 


Quantity 


Duty 


(a)  Agricultural  Machinery  or  Farm  Equipment- 
Binding  attachments 

Steel  bowls  for  cream  separators 

Cream  separators 

Cultivators  and  weeders  and  parts 

Traction  ditching  machines  not  more  than  $3,000  value 
and  parts 

Drills,  seed 

Portable  engines  for  farm  purposes 

Repairs  for  traction  engines 

Traction  engines  not  more  than  $1,400  for  farm  pur- 
poses   ■  ■  ■  ■ 

Traction  engines,  n.o.p.,  for  farm  purposes  and  repairs. 

Fanning  mills 

Fodder  or  feed  cutters 

Forks,  pronged 

Grain  crushers 

Harrows  and  parts 

Harvesters,  self  binding 

Hay  loaders 

Hay  presses 

Hay  tedders 

Hoes 

Horse  rakes 

Knives,  hay  or  straw 

Knives,  edging 

Mowing  machines 

Manure  spreaders 

Ploughs,  and  parts 

Post  hole  diggers .^ , 

Potato  diggers •. 

P,akes,  n.o.p 

Reapers 

Rollers,  farm,  road  or  field 

Scythes 

Sickles,  or  reaping  hooks 

Spades  and  shovels 

Threshing  machine  separators 

Threshing  machine  separtor  parts 

Windmills  and  parts 

Parts  of  agricultural  implements 

AJl  other  agricultural  implements ■ 

Milk  machines  and  attachments,  centrifugal  machines 
for  testing  butter,  fat,  mijk.  etc.     (From  May  24 


$ 

No. 
$ 

No. 

No. 

No. 

$ 

No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 

$ 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 

$ 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
Doz. 
Doz. 
Doz. 
No. 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 


1922). 


Grading  machines,  fruit  or  vegetable.   (From  May  24 

1922) 


Total  agricultural  machinerj'. 


(b)  Meals—      ,  ,. 

Beef,  fresh ■ 

Beef,  pickled,  in  barrels 

Mutton  and  lamb,  fresh 

Pork,  fresh 

Bacons  and  hams,  etc..  cured 

Pork,  barrelled  in  brine 

Pork,  dr.v  salted 

Poultry  and  game,  n.o.p 

Sausage 

Other  meats,  fresh 

Other  meats,  salted 

Dried  or  smoked  meats  and  meats  preserved,  n.o.p. 

Canned  meats * 

Extracts  of  meats 

Soups 


Total  meats 


Lbs. 

Lbs. 

Lbs. 

Lbs. 

Lbs. 

Lbs. 

Lbs. 
$ 

Lbs. 

Lbs. 

Lbs. 

Lbs. 

Lbs. 
$ 
$ 


4,392 
81 
29 
885 
4,344 
85 


1,582 

3 

148 

1 

3,584 

180 

2,115 

19: 

409 

60 


1,111 

928 

3,638 

30 

20 

530 

336 

2,852 

1,922 


13.713 

9.412 

216. 134 

46.228 

30,286 

32,819 

506 

734,961 

2,411,653 

312,617 

9,487 

67,621 

3,276 

4,6.58 

71,508 

253,694 

870 

41,347 

29 

1,755 

5,585 

1,738 

208 

23,188 

5.. 56: 

571,680 

1.424 

69.664 

2.112 

2,220 

8,137 

6,200 

834 

15,646 

1,631,115 

621.704 

34,046 

266.943 

192,834 


6,515 

2, SSI 


$       cts. 

1,379  70 
Free 
Free 
6,584  72 

Free 
4,806  5S 
88  56 
Free 

Free 

54,689  33 

1,610  30 

10,342  25 

675  45 

801  05 

9,904  62 

25,450  96 

130  50 

11,370  49 

4  35 

378  37 

737  39 

261  90 

42  91 

2,447  84 

766  86 

93,265  50 

250  65 

10,904  2.5 

464  67 

222  20 

1,572  75 

1,286  92 

149  87 

4,248  85 

245,750  65 

97,2.59  62 

5,958  46 

31,486  80 

33,759  44 


977  25 

432  15 


7.732,215 


110,566 
858,900 
2,061,025 
34,708,132 
4,544,009 
11,560,950 
1,536,363 


349,966 

275,418 

88.785 

140,563 

1,569,812 


32,250 
53,465 

344,014 
5,321 

672,349 
1,226,744 

196,, 348 
67.449 

108.081 
29,684 
18,619 
32,822 

282.481 

110t694 

789,764 


3,316  98 

17, 176  00 

.58,160  1.5 

,041,243  90 

90.876  37 

231,217  00 

30.727  2(i 

13,297  31 

6,999  32 

8.258  39 

1,775  70 

2,811  26 

71,420  65 

21,. 586  5S 

216,742  49 


9,286,552  1,815,609  42 


25 


13-14  George  V 


List  of  Sessional  Papers 


A.  1923 


Contents  of  Volume  6 — Continued 

Imports  Entered  for  Consumption  Calendar  Year  1922— Coniinued 


Quantity 


(c)    Animal  Oils  and  Fata — 

Grease  rough  for  manufacture  of  soap  and  oil. 

Grease  and  degras  for  stuffing  leather 

Lard 

Lard  compound,  animal  stearine,  etc 

Lard  oil 

Oleomargarine 

Oleo  oil 

Neat's-foot  oil 

Other  animal  oil,  n.o.p 

Tallow 

Candles,  n.o.p 

Beeswax 


Lbs. 
Lbs. 
Lbs. 
Lbs. 
Gal. 
Lbs. 
Gal. 
Gal. 
Gal. 
Lbs. 
Lbs. 
Lbs. 


Total  animal  oils,  fats,  etc. 


<(J)  Milk  and  Milk  ProducU— 
Milk  and  cream,  fresh. . . 

Milk,  condensed 

Butter 

Casein 

Cheese 


S 

Lbs. 
Lbs. 
Lbs. 
Lbs. 


Total  milk  and  milk  products. 


(e)  Cattle.  Calf  and  Sheep  Skins- 

Calf  Skins,  raw 

Cattle  skins,  raw 

Sheep  skins,  raw 


Lbs. 
Lbs. 
Lbs. 


Total  calf,  cattle  and  sheep  skins. 


CD    Wool- 
Wool,  etc.,  not  further  prepared  than  washed,  n.o.p 
Leicester,  Cotswold,  Lincolnshire,  South  Down  comb- 
ing wools,  or  wools  known  as  lustre  wools  and  other 
like  combing  wools  such  as  are  grown  in  Canada 

Total  wool 


Lbs. 
Lbs. 


(S)  Eggs 

(A)  Apples,  green. 


(i)  Potatoes,  n.o.p. 


(j)  Fish  and  Fishery  Produels — 

Cod,  haddock  and  pollock,  fresh 

Cod,  haddock  and  pollock,  pickled.. 
Cod,  haddock  and  pollock,  smoked. 
Cod.  haddock  and  pollock,  dried.  .. 

Halibut,  fresh 

Herring,  fresh 

Herring,  canned 

Herring,  smoked 

Herring,  pickled 

Mackerel,  fresh 

Sardines,  anchovies,  etc.,  in  tins 

Salmon,  fresh 

Salmon,  canned 

Salmon,  smoked 

Salmon,  pickled 

Squid 

Lobsters,  fresh 

Lobsters,  canned 

Oysters,  seed  and  breeding 

Oysters,  fresh,  in  shell 

Oysters,  shelled,  in  bulk 


Lbs. 
Lbs. 
Lbs. 
Lbs. 
Lbs. 
Lbs. 
Lbs. 
Lbs. 
Lbs. 
Lbs. 
Boxes 
Lbs. 
Lbs. 
Lbs. 
Lbs. 

S 

$ 
Lbs. 

S 
Brls. 
Gals. 


15,973,504 

1,515,844 

10,232.095 

2.739,658 

20.6.33 

1,032,405 

8,833 

6.232 

56.509 

876,458 

458,895 

221,352 


232, 285 

6,396,836 

535, 703 

686,754 


5,466,304 
32,847,294 
2,764,390 


15,885,150 
21,724 


8,140,547 
170,584 
347,453 


1,180,761 

261,114 

590 

7,563 

2.746,009 

237,942 

326,015 

1,360 

10,167,744 

52,2*4 

4,021,992 

2,792,977 

518,463 

21,285 

455,777 


59,231 


2,499 
133,390 


1,077,938 

70,227 

1,105,854 

268.960 

19,329 

172,738 

7,827 

7,005 

42.373 

65,537 

80,309 

59.003 


2.977,100 


33.841 
51.823 
1,912,519 
61,185 
266,529 


2,325,897 


1,289,548 

5,114,662 

343,614 


6,397 


44,026 

10,005 

44 

449,538 

220,638 

6,038 

49,865 

257 

297,100 

5,154 

384,993 

179,601 

28,838 

6,489 

27,984 

24, 1.34 

4,220 

40,239 

4,240 

20. 197 

272,065 


13-14  George  V 


List  of  Sessional  Papers 


A.  1923 


Contents  of  Volume  6 — Continued 
Imports  Entered  for  CoNSUMPnoN  Calendar  Year  1922~Concludfd 


Unit        Quantity  Value 


Duty 


0)    Fish  and  Fishery  Products — Con. 

Oysters,  canned 

Oysters,  prepared,  n.o.p 

Bait,  fish,  fresh 

Fish,  smoked  or  boneless 

Fish,  preserved  in  oil,  n.o.p 

Fish,  all  other,  fresh 

Fish,  all  other,  pickled 

Fish,  dried,  n.o.p 

Fish,  preserved,  n.o.p 

Live  fish  and  fish  eggs  for  propagating  purpo.'^es. 

Fish  oil,  cod  liver 

Fish  oil,  other,  n.o.p 

Seal  oil 

Whale  oil 

Ambergris 

Sponges,  marine 

Fish  offal  or  refuse 

Other  articles,  fisheries 


Cans 
Lbs. 
Lbs. 
Lbs. 

$ 
Lbs. 
Lbs. 
Lbs. 

$ 

$ 
Gals. 
Gals. 
Gals. 
Gals. 

S 

s 

s 


130,345 

13,008 

1,800 

25,274 


1,128,560 
786,245 
336,610 


113,938 
28,357 
13.010 
13,914 


27,225 
7,941 
24 
4,380 
43,  (MO 
96,959 
64,593 
78,862 
1.39,848 
3,299 
67,984 
16,362 
8,133 
9,288 
251 
82.436 


$      cts. 

4,561  63 

2,382  30 

18  00 

222  96 

14,705  00 

10,892  28 

1,645  83 

3,069  87 
38,716  41 

Free 

2,906  24 

3.616  77 

Free 

2,041  27 

Free 
13,501  41 

Free 
13,828  40 


Total  fish  and  products 

Presented  April   11,   1923.    Hon.   Mr.  Lynch-Staunton. 


2,800,980     315,. 509  79 
Not   printed. 


165.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  26th  June,  1922,  for  a  copy  of  all  corres- 

pondence from  and  to  any  member  of  the  Government,  and  Government  depart- 
ment or  official  thereof,  or  other  persons,  with  reference  to  the  appointment  and 
dismissal  in  the  years  1921  and  1922  of  the  new  of  the  Government  cutter  Hudson. 
Presented  April   13,  1923.    Hon.   Mr.  Baxter Not   printed. 

166.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  5th  March,  1923,  for  a  copy  of  all  corres- 

pondence, papers,  writings,  documents,  telegrams,  etc.,  coimected  with,  leading  to, 
or  in  any  way  relating  to  the  withdrawal  of  professional  work  for  the  Inland 
Revenue  Department,  formerly  performed  by  Charles  Blake,  barrister,  at 
Rnindon,  and  a  returned  soldier,  and  the  turnmg  of  same  over  to  Mr.  Clement,  of 
that  city.    Presented  April  13,  1923.    Mr.  Black  (Yukon) Not  printed. 

167.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  5th  March,  1923,  for  a  copy  of  all  corres- 

pondence, papers,  writings,  documents,  telegrams,  etc.,  connected  with,  leading  to, 
or  in  any  way  relating  to  the  withdrawal  of  professional  work  for  the  Inland 
Revenue  Department,  formerly  performed  by  Mr.  F.  G.  Thompson,  barrister,  at 
Winnipeg.    Presented    April    13,    1923.    Mr.   Black    (Yukon) Not   printed. 

168.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  5th  March,  1923,  for  a  copy  of  all  corres- 

pondence, papers,  writings,  dqcuments,  telegrams,  etc.,  connected  with,  leading 
to.  or  in  any  way  relating  to  the  withdrawal  of  professional  work  for  the  Inland 
Revenue  Department,  formerly  performed  by  Mr.  H.  P.  Blackwood,  barrister,  at 
Winnipeg.    Presented    April    13,    1923.    Mr.    Black    (Yukon) Not   printed. 

169.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  19th  March,  1923,  for  a  copy  of  all  papers, 

correspondence,  letters,  documents,  telegrams  and  other  writings  which  have 
passed  between  the  Government  of  the  day,  or  any  Minister  thereof,  and  any 
person  or  persons  connected  with  the  sale  ro  the  Government  of  Lots  31  and  32, 
Block  8,  in  the  town  of  Vermilion,  Alberta.  Presented  April  13,  1923.  Mr. 
Spencer    Not    printed. 

170.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  26th  February,  1923,  for  a  Return  showing: 

1.  The  total  value  of  the  assets  of  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway.  2.  The  total 
.amount  of  issued  capital  stock  of  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway.  3.  The  bonded 
indebtedness  of  the  said  companj-.  4.  All  the  other  obligations  of  the  said  com- 
pany excepting  current  accounts.  5.  The  total  cash  reser^^es  of  the  said  company 
as  at  the  date  of  the  31st  December,  1922,  including  loans  of  monev  made  by  the 
27 


13-14  George  V  List  of  Sessional  Papers  A.  1923 

Contents  of  Volume  6 — Continued 

said  company.  6.  Whether  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  has  any  other  reserves 
than  cash.  If  so,  what  they  are,  and  what  their  total  value  is.  7.  The  value  of 
the  assets  of  the  said  railway  created  out  of  earnings  or  created  from  the  receipts 
secured  from  the  sale  or  other  disposal  of  the  company's  as.sets.  8.  Whether  the 
Dominion  Government  extended  any  assistance  to  any  railway  which  was  acquired 
subsequent  to  the  granting  of  such  assistance,  by  the  C.P.R.  9.  If  so.  the  names 
of  the  railway  or  railways,  and  the  extent  of  the  assistance  given  in  the  following 
detail:  (n)  grant  of  land  m  acreage;  (b)  amount  of  money;  (c)  other  assistance 
and  its  value.  10.  Whether  the  provinces  of  Canada  extended  any  assistance  to 
the  C.P.R.  11.  If  so,  the  nature  and  extent  of  the  assistance  divided  as  follows: 
(a)  name  of  railway;  (6)  name  of  jirovince;  (c)  the  amount  of  land  granted  in 
acreage;  (d)  the  amount  of  money;  (e)  the  nature  and  extent  and  value  of  all 
other  assistance;  (/)  bond  guarantees.  12.  Whether  any  of  the  provinces  of  the 
Dominion  extended  any  aid  or  assistance  to  the  C.P.R.  or  to  any  company  sub- 
sequently acquired  by  the  C.P.R.  13.  If  so,  the  nature  and  extent  of  the  said 
assistance  given  them  in  the  following  detail:  (n)  name  of  company;  (fa)  name  of 
province;  (e)  extent  of  land  in  acreage  and  in  value;  (d)  rights  the  grant  of  land 
contained;  (e)  amount  of  money;  (/)  the  nature  and  extent  of  all  other  assistance: 
((/)  bond  guarantees  amount.    Presented  April   13,  1923.    Mr.  Lucas.. ATot  printed. 

170a.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  26th  February,  1923.  for  a  Return  showing: 
1.  Whether  the  C.P.R.  between  Kamloops  and  Port  Moody  was  constructed  by  the 
Dominion  Government  and  turned  over  to  the  C.P.R.  without  cost  to  the  said 
company.  2.  If  not,  what  portion  of  the  C.P.R.  in  British  Columbia  was  con- 
structed by  the  Dominion  Government.  3.  The  actual  cost  of  the  C.P.R.  lines 
built  in  British  Columbia  by  the  Dominion  Government,  and  turned  over  to  the 
C.P.R.  4.  Whether  the  Dominion  Government  built  or  paid  for  the  construction 
of  any  portion  of  the  C.P.R.  If  so,  the  portions  so  con.structed  or  paid  for  and 
their  value.  5.  The  total  value  of  the  lines  turned  over  to  the  CP.R.  either  fully 
or  partially  constructed  and  paid  for  by  the  Dominion  Government.  6.  The  total 
amount  of  cash  given  to  the  C.P.R.  Company  to  aid  the  construction  of  the  com- 
pany's railway.  7.  The  total  number  of  icres  of  land  given  to  the  C.P.R.  to  aid 
in  the  construction  of  the  company's  railway.  S.  The  total  receipts  received  by 
the  C.P.R.  Co.  from  the  sale  or  disposal  of  said  lands  to  date.  9.  The  number 
of  acres  of  the  said  lands  remaining  in  the  C.P.R.  to-day.  or  its  subsidiary  com- 
panies, and  the  value  thereof  per  acre  and  total.  10.  The  amounts  of  dividends 
paid  bv  the  C.P.R.  Co.  during  the  following  vears;  1914.  1915.  1916,  1917.  1918, 
1919.  1920  and  1921  in  per  cents  and  annual  totals.  Presented  .'^pril  24,  1923.  Mr. 
Kellner Sot   printed. 

171.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  14th  March,  1923,  for  a  Return  showing: 

1.  The  quantity  of  grain  g.-own  on  the  Indian  Reserves  in  the  three  prairie  prov- 
inces during  the  last  five  years.  2.  What  proportion  of  this  was  grown  by  indi- 
vidual Indians.  3.  What  proportion  by  White  Lessees.  4.  What  proportion  by 
the  Greater  Production  operations.  5.  The  quantity  of  grain  grown  on  these  same 
reserves  during  the  five  years  previous  ;o  this  period.  6.  What  area  has  been 
summer-fallowed  and  broken  by  Indians  during  the  la.st  five  years.  7.  What  area 
during  the  previous  five  years.  S.  Amount  of  rentals  collected  during  the  Ia.st 
five  years.  9.  Amount  during  the  previous  five  years.  Presented  April  13.  1923. 
Mr.    Evans     , Not    printed. 

172.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  19th  March,  1923.  for  a  copy  of  all  corres- 

pondence, papers,  writings,  petitionsy  telegrams  and  other  documents  passing 
between  the  Department  of  Indian  Affairs,  the  Minister  and  Officers  of  this  De- 
partment, and  the  Six  Nations  Indian  Reserve,  its  Council  or  members  or  resident* 
thereof,  since  1st  January,  1922,  having  to  do  with  the  relations  of  such  Reserve 

to  the  Government  of  Canada  and  to  the  complaints  of  such  Council  regarding 
the  Department  of  Indian  Affairs.    Presented  April  13,  1923.    Mr.  Senn 

Not  printed. 

173.  Copy  of  a  letter  from  the  Secretary  of  the  Vancouver  Board  of  Trade  to  the  Prime 

Minister  of  Canada  respecting  the  question  of  alleged  discriminatorj'  freight  rates 
against  the  province  of  British  Columbia.     Presented  April  16.  1923..A'^ot  printed. 

174.  Copy  of  a  Report  of  W.  A.  Dryden  on  his  mission  to  South  America  for  the  pur- 

pose of  looking  into  live  slock  conditions  there,  and  the  possibilities  of  a  market 

for   Canadian   breeding    stock.    Presented    April    18,    1923 Not    printed. 

2B 


13-14  George  V  List  of  Sessional  Papers  A.  1923 

Contents  of  Volume  6 — Continued 

175.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  Hcuse  of  the  26fh  March,  1923,  for  a  copy  of  all  papers, 

correspondence,  letters,  telegrams,  petitions,  requests  and  other  documents, 
exchanged  between  the  Post  Office  Department  and  any  persons,  from  the  year 
1911  to  date  in  regard  to  the  resignation  of  Mrs.  J.  Nolin,  Postmistress  of  St. 
David,  County  of  Levis.    Presented  April  18,  1923.     Mr.  Bourassa Not  printed. 

176.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  Hou.?e  of  the  18th  April,  1923,  for  a  Return  showing: — 

1.  The  amount  of  grain  of  each  kind  shipped  from  the  Port  of  Montreal  in  each 
of  the  years  1920,  1921  and  1922.  2.  How  much  of  this  grain  was  Canadian  grown 
and  how  much  American.  3.  How  much  of  the  1922  Canadian  grain  crop  was 
.-^hipped  from  Montreal  in  1922.  4.  How  much  grain  was  handled  by  the  Grand 
Trunk  elevator  and  how  much  by  the  elevators  owned  by  the  Montreal  Harbour 
Commission  in  the  years  1920.  1921  and  1922.  5.  Whether  the  Montreal  Harbour 
Commission  recently  purchased  from  the  Canadian  National  Railway  System  the 
said  Grand  Trunk  elevator  If  so,  the  price  paid  for  same.  6.  The  storage 
capacity  of  this  elevator.  7  The  storage  capacity  of  the  other  elevators  owned 
by  the  Harbour  Commission  and  the  total  cost  of  these  elevators.  Presented 
.\pril    18,    1923.      Mr.    Coote Not    printed. 

177.  Copy  of  correspondence  and  agenda  respecting  the   Imperial   Economic  Conference 

and  the  Imperial  Conference,  to  be  held  in  1923.     Presented  April   19.   1923. 

Not   printed. 

178.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  1st  March.  1923.  for  a  Return  showing: — 

1.  The  total  cost  of  collecting  the  Income  Tax  during  the  years  1918.  1919,  1920, 
1921  and  1922.  2.  The  total  amount  of  rental  paid  for  offices  used  in  ccyinection 
with  the  said  work  during  the  above-mentioned  j'ears.  3.  What  the  total  amoimt 
of  interest  would  amount  to  on  money  invested  in  buildings  owned  by  the  Gov- 
ernment and  used  in  connection  with  the  collection  of  said  tax  during  the  above 
stated  years.  4.  The  total  amount  of  salaries  paid  in  connection  with  the  gaid 
collections  during  the  years  mentioned.  5.  The  total  amount  of  all  other  expenses 
incidental  to  the  collecting  of  Income  Tax  during  the  said  vears.  6.  The  total 
amount  of  Income  Tax  collected  during  the  vears  1918,  1919.  1920,  1921  and  1922. 
Presented  April  23,   1923.     Mr.  Black    (Huron) A'^ot   printed. 

179.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  5th  March,  1923,  for  a  Return  showing: — 

1.  Total  cost  of  collecting  the  Customs  and  Excise  Taxes  for  the  years  1918, 
1919,  1920,  1921  and  1922.  2.  Total  amount  of  rental  paid  for  offices  used  in  con- 
nection with  the  said  work  during  the  above  mentioned  years.  3.  Total  amount 
of  interest  money  invested  in  buildings  owned  by  the  Government  and  used  in 
connection  with  the  collection  of  said  taxes  during  the  above  stated  ye.ars.  4. 
Total  amount  of  salaries  paid  in  connection  with  the  said  collections  during  the 
years  mentioned.  5.  Total  amount  of  all  other  expenses  incidental  to  the  collect- 
ing of  Customs  and  Excise  taxes  during  the  said  years.  6.  Total  amount  of 
Customs  and  Excise  Taxes  collected  during  the  years  1918,  1919.  1920,  1921  and 
1922.     Presented  April  23.   1923.     Mr.  Black   (Huron) Not  printed. 

180.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the   12th  Februarj-,  1923,  for  a  return  giving 

a  list  of  all  appointments  made  or  nominations  to  appointments  made  by  the 
Civil  Service  Commission  since  Januar>'  1,  1922,  with  the  names  of  the  persons 
appointed  or  nominated  in  all  cases  where  such  appointments  or  nominations  have 
not  been  followed  by  the  appointee  or  person  nominated  actually  taking  the 
position,  also  showing  in  each  case  who  is  occupying  the  position  which  the 
appointee  of  the  Commission  is  not  occupying,  and  also  showing  the  instances 
where  the  appointee  of  the  Commission  was  a  returned  soldier.  Presented  April 
23,    1923.     Rt.    Hon.   Mr.    Meighen Not    printed. 

181.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  H.-.use  of  the  26th  March,  1923.  for  a  copy  of  all  letters, 

papers,  reports  and  other  documents,  regarding  the  dismissal  of  U.  Belanger, 
Station  .\gent  at  Padoue,  County  of  Matane.  in  1922.  Presented  April  23.  1923. 
Mr.  Pelletier Not  printed. 

182.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  26th  March,  1923,  for  a  copy  of  all  letters, 

papers,  reports  and  other  documents,  regarding  the  dismissal  of  A.  C.  Belanger. 
Night  Station  Agent  at  St.  Moise,  Matane  Countv.  in  1922.  Presented  April 
23,   1923.     Mr.  Pelletier Not  printed. 

29 


13-14  George  V  List  of  Sessional  Papers  A.  1923 


Contents  of  Volume  6 — Continued 

183.  Return  to  aa  Order  of  the  Senate,  dated  March  2,  1923,  for  a  Rotum  showinR: — 

1.  What  was  the  total  wheat  crop  of  the  world  for  1921.  2.  What  amount  of 
wheat  is  stored  at  Port  Arthur  and  Fort  William  during  the  winter  of  1922-23. 
3.  W'hat  amount  of  wheat  was  exported  from  Canada  to  the  Orient  during  the 
years  1911,  1916,  191S,  1921  and  if  possible  1922.  4.  How  many  hundredwcipht 
of  flour  and  of  what  grades  were  cxiiorted  to  the  Orient  from  Canada  during  the 
said  years.  5.  How  many  bushels  of  wheat  and  hundredweight  of  flour  were 
exported  from  Canada  to  Europe,  giving  if  possible  the  several  countries  of 
Europe  to  which  it  was  exported,  during  the  years  1911,  1916,  1918  and  1921.  Pre- 
sented April  25,   1923.     Hon.  Mr.  Schafifner Not  printed. 

184.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  Hou.^e  of  the  7th  March,  1923,  for  a  Return  showing: — 

1.  Mileage  of  railways  owned  by  the  Dominion  Government  in  1896.  2.  Cost  of 
same  to  the  country  at  that  date.  3.  Total  mileage  of  railways  owned  by  the 
Dominion  Government  in  1911.  4.  Cost  of  same  to  the  country.  5.  Total  mileage 
of  railways  owned  by  the  Dominion  Government  on  January  i,  1922.  6.  Net  cost 
to  the  country  on  January  i.  1922,  of  the  railways  taken  over  by  the  Government 
from  McKenzie  &  Mann.  7  Total  mileage  in  Canada  of  the  railways  taken  over 
by  the  Government  from  ihe  Grand  Trunk  Railway.  8.  Total  mileage  in  the 
United  States.  9.  Total  cost  to  Canada  of  the  Grand  Tnmk  Railway  both  in 
Canada  and  the  United  States,  on  the  1st  of  January,  1922.  10.  Total  cost  to 
Canada  of  all  rnilwavs  owned  bv  the  Dominion  Government  on  January  1,  1922. 
Presented  April  26,   1923.     Mr.  tobin Not  printed. 

185.  Retiun  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  22nd  February,  1923.  for  a  Return  showing: 

1.  The  names  of  the  Postmasters,  in  the  County  of  Levis,  that  were  dismissed 
between  July  1,  1911,  and  January  1,  1922.  2.  The  names  of  those  dismissed  after 
inquiry.  3.  The  reasons  for  their  dismissal.  4.  The  names  of  those  dismissed 
without  an  inquiry.  5.  The  reasons  for  the  dismissal  of  the  latter.  0.  The  names 
of   those   who   have  been   reinstated.     Presented   April   26,    1923.     Mr.   Bourassa. 

Not    printed. 

186.  Return  to  an  Address  to  His  Excellency  the  Governor  General  of  the  26th  March, 

1923.  for  a  copy  of  all  papers,  writings,  telegrams.  Orders  in  Coimcil,  affidavits  or 
documents  of  any  kind  relating  to  the  dismissal  of  Mr.  D.  W.  Morrison  from  the 
position  of  Postmaster  at  St.  Peters,  Nova  Scotia,  including  all  communications 
to  and  from  Mr.  W.  E.  McLellan,  Acting  District  Superintendent  of  the  Post 
Office  Department  for  the  Province  of  Nova  Scotia.  Presented  April  26.  1923. 
Mr.  Hanson A'oi  printed. 

187.  187a.  Returns  to  an  Address  to  His  Excellency  the   Governor  General   of  the   19th 

March,  1923,  for  a  copy  of  all  papers,  correspondence,  letters,  documents,  tele- 
grams, and  other  writings  which  have  passed  between  the  present  Government, 
or  anj'  Minister  or  official  thereof,  and  the  Government  of  the  Province  of  British 
Columbia  or  any  Minister  or  official  thereof,  on  the  subject  of  oriental  immigra- 
tion, or  in  any  way  affecting  or  dealing  with  the  rights  or  privileges  of  orientals  in 
Canada.     Presented  April  26,  and  June  28,  1923.     Mr.  McQuarrie Not  printed. 

188.  188a.  Returns  to  an  Address  to  His  Excellency  the  Governor  General  of  the   19th 

March,  1923,  for  a  return  showing: — 1.  All  statutes,  orders  in  council,  regula- 
tions and  other  enactments  and  provisions  of  the  Province  of  British  Columbia 
since  the  entry  of  that  Province  into  Confederation,  dealing  with  or  affecting 
oriental  immigration,  or  the  rights  or  privileges  of  orientals,  wliich  have  been 
disallowed;  giving  dates  of  disallowance  and  the  reasons  therefor  in  every  case 
respectively.  2.  A  copy  of  all  papers,  correspondence,  letters,  documents,  tele- 
grams and  other  writings  which  have  passed  between  the  present  Government 
or  any  Minister  or  official  thereof,  and  the  Government  of  the  Province  of  British 
Columbia,  or  any  Minister  or  official  thereof,  relative  to  the  disallowance  of  any 
Provincial  enactment  affecting  orientals.  3.  A  copy  of  all  papers,  correspondence, 
letters,  telegrams  or  other  writings  which  have  passed  between  the  Secretary-  of 
State,  or  any  of  his  officials  and  any  of  the  County  Court  Judges  in  Vancouver 
on  the  subject  of  naturalization  of  oriental  aliens.  4.  A  copy  of  all  orders  in 
council  or  other  regulations  passed  during,  or  since  January  1,  1917,  affecting  oriental 
immigration.  5.  Details  as  to  oriental  immigration  since  January  1.  1917,  classified 
as  to  age,  sex.  nationality  and  occupation.     Presented  April  26,  and  June  28.  1923. 

Mr.  MoQuarrie Not  printed. 

30 


13-14  George  V  List  of  Sessional  Papers  A.  1923 

Contents  of  Volume  6 — Continued 

189.  Fourth   Annual   Report   of  the  Board  of   Directors  of  Canadian   Government    Mer- 

chant Marine,  Limited,  for  the  year  ended  December  31,  1922.  Presented  April 
30,    1923 Presented    in    printed   jorm. 

190.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  April  23,  1923,  for  a  copy  of  all  letters,  corres- 

pondence, telegrams,  and  other  documents,  since  January  last,  passing  between  the 
Minister  of  Labour  or  any  officer  of  his  department  and  the  Civic  Employees 
Union  of  Prince  Rupert,  or  any  officer  or  official  of  the  Municipal  Council  of 
Prince  Rupert,  or  other  person?,  having  reference  to  a  request  for  a  Conciliation 
Board.    Presented   April   30,   1923.    Hon.   Mr.   Stevens Not   printed. 

191.  Copy  of  Order  in  Council,  P.C.  713,  dated  April  21,  1923,  appointing  F.  T.  Congdon, 

K.C..  of  Ottawa,  Commissioner  to  inquire  into  and  report  upon  all  circumstances 
incidental  to  or  connected  with  any  gratuities  or  payments  made  by  the  Grand 
Trunk  Railway  Company's  directors  by  way  of  bonus  or  retiring  allowances  to  any 
directors  of  the  company.    Presented  April  30,  1923 Not  printed. 

191a.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  30th  April,  1923,  for  a  copy  of  all  letters, 
correspondence  and  documents  passing  between  Justice  Department  or  any  officer 
thereof  and  any  other  Minister  of  the  Crown,  having  reference  to  a  Commission 
presided  over  by  the  late  Augustus  Power,  K.C.,  investigating  charges  of  the 
alleged  maladministration  of  F.  C.  Congdon,  K.C.,  during  his  term  as  public 
administrator  of  the  Yukon  territory,  and  copy  of  the  report  of  the  said  Power 
Commission.    Presented   June    14,    1923.    Mr.    Hanson Not   printed. 

192.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  22nd  March,  1923,  for  a  Return  showing: 

1.  Number  of  persons  employed  in  a  temporary  capacity  by  the  various  departments 
of  the  Government  on  the  Slst  December.  1921.  2.  Number  of  persons  employed  in 
a  temporary  capacity  by  the  various  departments  of  the  Government  on  the  31st 
December,  1922.    Presented  May   1,  1923.    Mr.  Archambault Not  printed. 

193.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  26th  March,  1923,  for  a  copy  of  all  letters, 

papers,  telegrams,  correspondence  and  other  documents,  in  the  possession  of  the 
Government,  exchanged  between  Mr.  Walter  Fisher,  Chief  Fishery  Inspector, 
Eastern  Division,  Halifax.  Nova  Scotia ;  T.  W.  Crocker.  Fishery  Inspector.  New 
Castle,  New  Brunswick,  and  Joseph  Le  Blanc  of  Richibucto  Village,  and  the 
Department  of  Marine  and  Fisheries,  in  reference  to  the  seizure  and  confiscation 
of  the  Ja*eph  Le  Blanc  fishing  boat,  so  called,  for  illegal  fishing,  in  the  ye.ir  1922. 
at  Richibucto  Cape,  New  Brunswick.  Also  a  copy  of  the  order  given  by  the 
Minister  of  Marine  and  Fisheries  for  the  release  of  said  confiscated  boat  to  the 
said   Joseph   Le   Blanc.    Presented   May   1,   1923.    Mr.   Leger Not   printed. 

19-1.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  26th  April.  1923.  for  a  Return  showing: 
1.  The  total  number  of  employees  of  the  Board  of  Grain  Commissioners  at  Fort 
William  in  the  year  1922,  and  the  total  of  the  salaries  paid  during  the  year.  2. 
The  number  of  persons  employed  in  the  Weighing  Department  in  each  month, 
and  the  amount  of  wages  paid  to  them  in  each  month.  3.  The  amount  of  grain 
weighed  by  this  department  in  each  month.  4.  The  number  of  persons  employed 
in  the  Inspection  Department  in  each  month,  and  the  amount  of  wages  paid  to 
them  in  each  month.  5.  The  amount  of  grain  inspected  by  this  department  in 
each  month.    Presented  May  2,   1923.    Mr.  Coote. 

Printed  for  distribution  to  Senators  and  Members. 

195.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  26th  Februarj'.  1923.  for  a  Return  showing: 
1.  The  ruling  grades  on  the  Canadian  National  Railways  against  east  and  west 
bound  traffic  between  the  following  points:  (a)  Vancouver  and  the  eastern 
boundary  of  British  Columbia ;  (b)  the  easterly  boundarv'  of  British  Columbia  to 
Fort  William;  (c)  Fort  William  to  North  Bay;  (d)  North  B.ay  to  Toronto:  (e) 
North  Bay  to  Montreal.  2.  The  ruling  grades  on  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway 
between:  (a)  Vancouver  and  Revelstoke:  (b)  Revelstoke  and  Canmore:  (c) 
Canmore  and  Fort  William;  id)  Fort  William  and  Montreal;  (p)  Montreal  and 
West  St.  John.  3.  Whether  rhe  section  of  the  Canadian  National  Railway  through 
the  Fraser  River  Canyon,  viz:  section  between  Kaniloops  and  Hoi>o.  Briti.«h 
Columbia.  w.a.s  the  most  costly  section  of  the  said  niilway  to  con.^niet  west  of 
Fort  William.  4.  The  cost  of  construction  rer  mile  of  line  of  section  of  said  rail- 
way through  the  Fraser  River  Canyon  be'ween  Kamloops  and  Hope.  5.  The  cost 
of  construction  per  mile  of  line  of  the  Canadian  National  Railwav  between  Ottawa 

31 


13-14  George  V  List  of  Sessional  Papers  A.  1923 

Contents  of  Volume  6 — Continued 

and.  Montreal,  includinp:  the  Montreal  tunnel.  6.  The  co.«t  of  con.struction  of  the 
Canadian  National  Railway  i>er  mile  of  line  between  the  following  points:  (a) 
between  Montreal  and  Winnipee.  includinu  the  Montreal  tunnel;  (h)  between 
Winnipeg  and  Vancouver.  7.  Whether  it  costs  more  to  haul  freight  over  the 
C.P.R.  between  Vancouver  and  the  prairies  than  it  does  to  haul  the  same  freight 
between  Vancouver  and  the  prairies  over  the  C.N.R.  or  between  Prince  Rupert 
and  the  prairies  over  the  Grand  Trunk  Pacific.  8.  When  the  C.N.R.  Company  and 
the  G.T.P.  Company  commenced  operations  between  the  praaries  and  Pacific  coast 
points,  whether  the  said  railway  companies  were  allowed  by  the  Board  of  Railway 
Commissioners  to  adopt  the  scale  of  rates  applied  by  the  C.P.R. ,  and  based  on  the 
cost  of  operation  of  the  C.P.R.  through  the  mountains,  and  which  said  scale  qj 
rates  was  known  as  the  mountain  scale.  9.  Whether  the  same  scale  of  rates,  viz : 
the  mountain  scale  now  in  application  applies  to  the  C.P.R.  on  the  movement  of 
all  goods  in,  to,  from,  or  through  British  Columbia  in  the  same  way  that  the  said 
mountain  scale  applies  to  the  movement  of  goods  over  the  C.N.R.  10.  If  it  is  the 
intention  of  the  Government  to  see  that  the  rates  on  the  C.N.R.,  where  the  said 
railways  move  through  British  Columbia  on  grades  equally  favourable  to  those 
obtaining  on  the  prairies,  are  no  higher  than  the  prairie  scale  of  rates.  II.  Whether 
the  winter  weather  increases  the  cost  of  operating  railways  in  the  prairies  and  in 
eastern  Canada  over  and  above  the  co.st  of  operating  the  same  railways  during 
the  summer  season.  12.  Whether  the  C.P.R.  is  divided  into  eight  operating 
•  divisions,  and  whether  the  operating  expenses  of  the  said  railway  is  kept  by 
divisions,  viz:  the  divisions  of  New  Brunswick,  Quebec,  Ontario,  Algoma,  Manitoba, 
Saskatchewan.  Alberta  and  British  Columbia.  13.  The  mileage  of  the  C.P.R.  in 
each  division.  14.  The  main  line  boundaries  of  such  divisions.  15.  Whether  the 
C.N.R.  system  is  divided  into  operating  divisions,  viz :  lines  east  and  lines  west 
w|ith  the  dividing  point  at  Fort  William.  16.  Whether  there  are  any  other 
divisions  of  the  Canadian  National  Railways  system  for  which  accounts  of  operating 
expenses  or  revenues  are  kept.  If  so,  what  they  are.  and  when  the  same  were 
established.  17.  The  total  operating  expenses  of  the  C.P.R.  per  mile  of  line  for 
the  years  1917,  1920  and  1921  for  the  following  divisions,  viz:  British  Columbia, 
Manitoba,  Quebec,  New  Brun.swick.  IS.  The  total  cost  of  operation  of  C.P.R.  as 
expressed  in  the  cost  per  gross  ton  mile  in  the  years  1917.  1920  and  1921  in  the 
following  of  the  said  divisions:  British  Columbia,  Quebec,  New  Brunswick.  19. 
The  total  cost  of  operatior.  of  the  C.P.R.  as  expre.ssed  in  the  cost  per  car  mile  in 
the  following  of  the  said  divisions,  viz:  British  Columbia,  New  Brunswick,  Quebec, 
20.  The  cost_  of  operation  of  the  C.P.R.  as  expres.sed  in  the  cost  per  mile  of  line  in 
the  said  divisions  of  Alberta  and  British  Columbia  taken  together,  and  in  the  said 
divisions  of  New  Brunswick  and  Quebec  taken  together  for  the  years  1917,  1920 
.and  1921.  21.  The  density  of  traffic  as  .shown  in  car  miles  per  the  mile  of  line,  and 
in  gross  ton  rniles  per  mile  of  line,  for  the  years  1917-  1920  and  1921.  in  the  follow- 
ing of  the  said  divisions:  (a)  British  Columbia;  ib)  New  Brun.swick:  New  Bruns- 
wick and  Quebec,  taken  together;  (c)  British  Columbia  and  Alberta,  taken 
together.  22.  Whether  the  C.P.R.  Companv  is  divided  into  two  m-iin  division^ 
for  accounting  purposes,  viz:  lines  east,  and  lines  west,  and  whether  the  divisional 
point  of  the  said  sy.stem  of  railways  is  Fort  William,  Ont.-irio.  23.  The  net  revenues 
per  mile  of  line,  and  per  train  mile  produced  by  the  C.P.R.  Company  on  lines  east, 
and  lines  west  for  the  years  1916.  1917,  1918,  19i9  and  1920,  24.  The  "net  earnings  of 
the  C.P.R.  per  mile  of  line,  and  per  train  mile  for  the  years  1912  to  1916,  both 
inclusive,  in  the  following  of  the  said  divi.sions,  viz:  New  Brunswick  or  Atlantic, 
British   Columbia.    Presented   May   2,   1923.    Mr.    McBride Net   printed. 

196.  Steamboat    Inspection    Report,    supplement    to    Fifty-fifth    Annual    Report    of    the 

Department  of  Marine  and  Fisheries,  for  tho  fiscal  year.  1921-22,  (Marine).  Pre- 
sented May  2,  1923 Presented  in  printed  form. 

197.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  Senate,  dated  .\pril   13,   1923.  for  a  copy  of  all   corres- 

pondence, letters  and  telegrams  between  the  Boards  of  Trade  and  Municipal 
Councils  of  the  Cities  of  Quebec.  St.  John.  Moncton  and  Halifax,  and  the  Govern- 
ment of  Canada,  the  Canadian  Railway  Commission  and  the  Directors  of  the 
Canadian  Nation,al  Railways  since  the  1st  of  July,  1922,  to  this  date  in  reference 
to  the  utilization  of  the  Transcontinental  line  to  Quebec.  St.  John  and  Halifax. 
Presented    May   2,    1923.    Hon.    Mr.    Turgeon Not   printed. 

198.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  12th  March,  1923.  for  a  copy  of  all  papers, 

correspondence,  letters,  documents,  telegrams  and  other  writings  exchanged  between 
32 


13-14  George  V  List  of  Sessional  Papers  A.  1923 


Contents  of  Volume  6 — Continued 

the  Post  Office  Department,  the-  Civil  Service  Commission,  at  Ottawa,  and  Mr. 
Camile  Bolte,  an  employee  of  the  Post  Office,  at  Montreal;  also  between  Mr. 
Uaboury,  Superintendent  of  Post  Office,  at  Montreal,  Mr.  P.  T.  Coolican,  at 
Oltrtwa,  Mr.  Leonard,  Postmaster,  at  Montreal,  and  the  Post  Office  Department 
in   regard   to   Mr.  (.'ainille   Bolte.    Presented   May  4,   1923.     Mr.   ArcKambault. 

Not  printed. 

199.  KrIiMii  to  an  Order  of  Ihc  House  of  the  21.st  March,  l!)2r!,  for  a  copy  of  all  papers, 

writings,  telegrams,  affidavits  or  documents  of  any  kind  in  the  possession  of  the 
Government,  relating  to  appointments  of  officers  and  men  by  the  present  Govern- 
ment on  the  boat  Eureka  at  Pointe  au  Perc,  or  relating  to  the  condu<-t  of  the 
men  so  placed  by  the  Government  in  charge  of  such  boat.  Presented  May  7,  1923. 
Mr.    Hanson Not    printed. 

200.  Return  to  an  Address  to  His  Excellency  the  Governor  General  of  April  30,  1923,  for 

a  copy  of  air  letters,  papers,  telegrams,  petitions.  Orders  in  Council  and  other 
documents  regarding  the  constioiction  of  a  bridge  on  the  Lachine  Canal,  in  SI. 
Henry  Ward,  in  the  City  of  Montreal.    Presented  May  8,  1923.    Mr.  Mercier. 

Not  printed. 

'201.  Copy  of  Draft  Agreement  maile  between  the  British  Government  and  the  Canadian 
Government  res|)Ccting  jirepaid  passages  for  agricultural  workcis,  household  workers, 
juvenile  immigrants,  coming  to  Canada.    Presented  May  9,  1923. 

Printed  for  distribution  to  Senators  and  Member'^. 

202.  Statement  prepared  by  the  Geological  Survey  of  Canada  respecting  a  reporte'l 
discoverj'  of  placer  gold  in  Labrador.    Presented  May  9,  1923 .Vot  printed. 

20.S.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  7th  March,  1923,  for  a  Return  showing: 
1.  Names  of  the  Customs  Officials  in  the  County  of  Halton  and  where  they  are 
located.  2.  .\mount  collected  in  each  office  in  the  said  county  in  (a)  1921,  (6)  1922. 
3.  Total  expense  of  each  office,  including  the  salary  of  the  official,  during  the  j'cars 
1921  and  1922  respectively.  4.  Name  of  Customs  Oificial  in  Streetsville,  County  of 
Peel,  Ont;mo.  5.  Amount  collected  in  that  office  during  the  years  1921  and  1922 
respectively.  6.  Total  expense  of  the  office,  including  salary  to  the  official,  during 
tlie  said  j-ears  respecti\'ely.  7.  What  part  of  the  receipts  from  this  office  was  col- 
Iccteil  on  goods  entering  the  County  of  Halton  in  the  years  1921  and  1922 
rcsjiectively.     Presented  May  9,  1923.     Mr.  Anderson Not  printed. 

201.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  Senate,  dated  February  27,  1923,  for  a  Return  showing: 

1.  How  many  jirivate  or  official  cars  are  there  connected  with  the  Canadian 
National  Railways.  2.  What  officials  of  the  road  are  given  the  use  of  private 
or  official  cars.  3.  Wliat  is  the  average  initial  cost  of  a  private  or  official  car  fully 
equipped.  4.  How  manj-  men  constitute  the  "  crew  "  of  a  private  or  official  car  and 
and  what  are  their  several  positions  and  rate  of  pay.  5.  Are  these  priv'ate  or  official 
cars  supplied  with  food  when  used  on  trips  and  at  whose  expense.  6.  Outside  of 
private  or  official  cars  maintained  by  the  Railway  Department,  how  many  other 
private  or  official  cars  are  maintained  and  used  in  connection  with  the  adminis- 
tration of  the  Government  of  Canada.  7.  By  whom  respectively  are  these  cars 
used.  8.  .\rc  crews  provided  for  these  cars  and  at  whose  expense.  9.  How  many 
official  motor  cars  are  attached  to  the  Department  of  Militia  and  Defence.  10.  What 
was  the  initial  cost  of  same.  11.  What  is  the  cost  of  the  annual  upkeep.  12.  By 
whom  and  for  what  purposes  exclusively  are  these  cars  used.  13.  How  many  official 
motor  cars  other  than  tho.-e  belonsing  to  the  Militia  Department  are  maintained 
by  the  Government  of  Canatki  at  the  public  expense  in  Ottawa  and  by  whom 
are  they  used  and  what  is  the  aggregate  cost  of  maintenance  of  said  motor  cars 
together  with  their  initial  cost.  14.  How  many  motor  cars  (if  any)  are  main- 
tained by  the  Government  of  Canada  and  what  was  the  initial  cost  of  .said  cars 
and  wliiit  is  the  annual  cost  of  maintenance  of  same.  15.  How  many  chauffeurs  are 
in  charge  of  the  official  motor  cars  of  the  Department  of  Militia  and  Defence. 
What  pay  and  allowances  do  they  receive  respectively.  16.  How  man}'  if  any 
chauffeurs  .are  employed  or  paid  by  the  Government  of  Canada  outside  of  those 
employo>d  by  the  Department  of  Militia  and  Defence.  Presented  May  9.  1923.  Hon. 
Mr.  Fowler Not  printed, 

r.334-— 3  33 


13-14  George  V  List  of  Sessional  Papers  A.  1923 


Contents  of  Volume  6 — Continued 

205.  Return  to  an  Onlor  of  tlie  House  of  the  22nd  March.  1923,  for  a  Return  sl»o«-ing: 

1.  Whether  all  liic  deinutment^  of  the  Uovernuient  arc  making  their  purchases 
through  the  Purchasing  Comiiii.-sion  of  Caiia(l;i.  2.  If  not,  wliat  ciepartnients  are, 
and  what  departments  are  not.  3.  If  all  are  not  purchasing  through  the  Commis- 
sion, what   the  rea.-on  is.     Prcscntetl  May  14.   1923.     Mr.  Kennedy   (Kdmonton). 

Not  printed. 

206.  lletiim  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of   the  5th   March,   1923,   for  a   Return  showing: 

1.  Number  of  temporary  employees  made  permanent  by  the  Civil  Service  Commi.s- 
sion.  between  March  15,  1921,  and  the  day  the  late  Government  resigned.  2.  How 
many  of  the  above-mentioned  employees  p;u«ed  the  Civil  Service  examination. 
3.  How  many  of  the  saiti  employees  cannot  write  anil  were  unable  to  sign  tiieir 
names,  but  .simply  affi.\ed  a  crosjs  to  the  form  of  oath  required  by  the  Act.  Pre- 
.sent<Hl  May  14,  1923.     Mr.  .\rcharabaiilt Nut  printed. 

206a.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  22nd  March,  1923,  for  a  Return  showing; 
1.  Number  of  temporary  clerks  in  the  Ci\il  Service  made  permanent  by  the  Civil 
Service  Conimis.sion  since  the  1st  Januaiy,  1922.  2.  The  names  of  such  clerks  and 
what  their  po.sitions  are.  3.  At  what  date  tliev  were  made  permanent.  Presented 
May  18,  1923.    Mr.  Archanibault '. Not  printed. 

207.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  21st  February,  1923,  for  a  copy  of  all  tenders, 

contracts  and  other  documents  pertaining  to  the  coal  purchased  by  the  Dominion 
Govei-nment  during  the  year  ending  Januarj-  31,  1923.  in  the  City  of  Winnipeg, 
used  in  coimection  with  fe<ieral  buildings,  etc.,  including  a  list  of  persons  from 
whom  said  coal  was  purchased,  the  amount  purchased  in  each  case,  and  the  amount 
paid  to  the  Canadian  Coal  S;Ues  Company.  Limited,  for  coal  su'pplied  as  above- 
mentioned.    Presented  May  14,  1923,    Mr.  McMurray Not  printed. 

208.  208fi.  Returns  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  18th  April.  1923.  for  a  return  showing 

the  names  of  news))aper  companies  and  jirinting  comjianies  who  have  received 
federal  moneys  for  printing,  since  Januar\-  1.  1922,  with  the  respective  amounts 
received  by  each  of  raid  companies.    Presented  May  16,  1923.    Mr.  Bhick  (Yukon). 

Not  printed. 

208b.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  30th  Ajiril,  1923,  for  a  Return  .showing  the 
names  of  newspaper  companies  and  printing  companies  who  have  received  federal 
moneys  for  printing  since  January  1,  1918.  with  the  respective  amounts  received  by 
each  of  said  companies.    Presented  May  28,  1923.    Mr.  d'Anjou Not  printed. 

208c.  Statement  showing:  1.  The  total  .sum  paid  by  the  Government  for  printing  ouUside 
the  printing  bureau  each  year,  for  the  past  fi\e  years.  2.  The  cost  to  the  Govern- 
ment of  printing  the  Laboiu'  Gazette  outside  the  printing  bureau  each  year  for 
the  past  five  veal's.    Presented  May  30,  1923 Not  printed. 

209.  Return  to  an   Order  of  the   House  of  the   7th    May,   1923,   for  a   Return   showing: 

1.  The  names,  official  titles,  and  salaries  of  Officer.«-in-Chargc  of  Dominion  Build- 
ings, Chief  Architect's  Branch,  Department  of  Public  Works,  on  January-  1,  1912. 
1922  and  1923.  2.  In  what  cities  or  towns  the  offices  (if  each  are  located.  3.  The 
date-of  their  appointment  and  how  they  have  been  cla.*,sified.  4.  The  number  of 
employees  under  each  Officer-in-Charge  on  January  1.  1912.  1922  and  1923.  5.  The 
number  of  buildinirs  each  Officer-in-Ch.arce  had  under  his  charge  on  January  1. 
1912.  1922  and  1923.  6.  Whether  all  the  po.sitions  of  these  Officers-in-Charge  have 
been  classifiwl  by  the  Civil  Service  Commission  or  .\rthur  Young  &  Company. 
7.  Whether  any  positions  of  the?e  Officers-in-Charge  are  vacant.  8.  If  so.  what 
they  are.  and  since  what  dale  they  have  been  vacant.  9.  The  causes  of  these 
vacanci^.  10.  In  what  locality  they  have  occurred.  Presented  May  16.  1923.  Mr. 
Deslauriers iVot  printed. 

210.  Return  to  an   Order  of  the  Senate  dated  April   13.   1923.  for  a   Return  showing  the 

total  cost  of  the  Civil  Service  for  the  year  ending  March  31,  1919.  and  for  the 
year  ending  March  31.  1922.  (By  the  Civil  Service  is  meant  all  the  Government 
employees  afTected  bv  the  provi.<ions  of  the  Ci\-il  Service  .\ct,  1919,  and  its  amend- 
ments).   Prei=ented  May  16,  1923.    Hon.  Mr.  Bradburv- Not  printed. 

211.  Report  of  the  Roval  Commission  appointed  to  inquire  into  the  Lake  Grain  Rates. 

Presented  May  18,  1923. 

Printed  for  Sc:..<.onal  Paner.t  and  di.itribution  to  Senator.')  and  Members. 

34 


13-14  George  V  List  of  Sessional  Papers  A.  1923 


Contents  of  Vtolume  6 — Continued 

212.  Return  to  an  Older  of  the  House  of  tlie  30th  April,  1923,  for  a  return  showing  the 

names  of  gram  dealers  in  the  western  inspection  division  who  have  taken  out  a 
license  under  the  Grain  Act.  Also  a  list  of  those  operating  in  gi-ain  and  who  have 
not  taken  out  such  license.    Presented  May  18,  1923.    Hon.  Mr.  Stevens. 

Not    printed. 

213.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  30th  April,   1923,   for  a   Return  showing: 

1.  Whether  the  Government,  since  Peace  was  si(;ned,  ever  considered  the  utili- 
zation of  Valcartier  Camp  grounds.  If  so,  what  the  result  was  of  such  considera- 
tion. 2.  Whether  it  is  a  fac',  that  this  land,  formerly  under  cultivation,  is  now  a 
complete  loss  to  agriculture  as  well  as  to  the  Municipality  of  Ste.  Catherine,  on 
the  outskirts  of  the  City  of  Quebec.  3.  Whether  it  is  true  that  the  waterworks 
system  on  this  property  will  soon  be  worthless.  4.  Whether  it  is  a  fact  that  the 
whole  property,  situated  as  it  is,  only  a  few  minutes  distant  from  Valcartier 
Station  and  lying  on  both  sides  of  Jacques  Cartier  River,  could  be  sold  advan- 
tageou.sly.  5.  Whether  the  Government  has  received  any  offer  for  this  property 
or  whether  any  representations  have  been  made  on  this  subject.  6.  Name  of  the 
present  caretaker  of  the  said  Valcartier  Camp.  Under  what  circumstances  and 
by  whose  influence  he  was  appointed.  Whether  his  appointment  was 
subject  to  cancellation  at  the  pleasure  of  the  Government.  What  his  duties  are. 
Who  his  immediate  suiierioi  is.  Whether  the  Government  receives  regular  reports 
concerning  this  camp  and  this  caretaker.  Has  the  caretaker  any  assistants.  If 
so,  their  names  and  whom  appointed.  Whether  the  said  camp,  as  a  military 
property,  is  inspected  from  time  to  time.  Whether  reports  are  made  to  the 
Department  of  Militia.  Whether  the  Government  is  aware  that  last  summer, 
1922,  there  were  a  large  number  of  people  occupying  the  various  camp  buildings. 
In  what  right  and  under  whose  authority  said  buildings  were  occupied.  7.  Whether 
the  Commanding  Officer  of  Military  District  No.  5  has  any  supervision  over  this 
property  and  does  he  make  reports.  If  so,  whether  the  Government  will  pro- 
duce such  reports.  Whether  there  is  any  correspondence  between  the  Department 
of  Militia  and  the  Department  of  Agriculture,  concerning  this  property.  If  so, 
whether  the  Government  will  produce  it.  Salary  of  this  caretaker  and  his  assist- 
ants. 8.  Whether  it  is  a  fac'-  that  one  of  the  buildings  on  this  camp  was  destroyed 
by  tire  in  the  month  of  January  last.  Whether  a  military  inquiry  w;vs  made 
as  to  the  causes  of  this  fire  and  to  that  end  were  all  witnesses  sought  for  or 
was  the  department  satisfied  with  a  mere  report.  Whether  there  are  any  corres- 
pondence or  documents  on  the  subject.  If  so,  whether  the  Government  will  pro- 
duce them.  9.  Whether  it  is  a  fact  that  in  1915  a  road  was  built  from  the  said 
camp  to  Quebec  and  that  the  Ste.  Catherine  public  road  between  Range  IV  and 
St.  Michel  was  then  closed  by  the  military  authorities  and  that  since  that  time  the 
camp  road  alone  is  and  can  be  used.  Whether  or  not  this  road  is  the  properly 
of  the  Government  and  as  such  must  it  be  looked  after  by  the  Government 
winter  and  summer.  Whet.'ter  orders  were  given  to  this  effect  and  is  there  any 
control  over  the  execution  of  the  orders  given.  Whether  it  is  the  caretaker  of 
the  camp  who  is  responsible  for  the  maintenance  of  this  road.  Presented  Mav 
21,    1923.     Mr.   Delisle Not   printed. 

214.  Return   to   an  Order  of  the   House  of  the  23rd   April.   1923,   for  a   Return  showing 

the  total  expenditure  for  each  department  of  the  Government  for  civil  salaries, 
both  for  temporary  and  permanent  employees,  for  the  fiscal  years  from  1911  to 
1922,  both  inclusive.     Presented  May  21,  1923.     Mr.  Michaud Not  printed. 

215.  215a.  Returns   to   an   Order   of   the   House    of   the    12th   February,    1923:      1.  For   a 

copy  of  all  papers,  correspondence,  letters,  documents,  or  other  writings  of  any 
kind  since  December  31,  1921,  passing  between  (a)  members  of  the  Government 
or  officials  of  the  Departments  of  the  Government  and  the  Canadian  National 
Railway  Company  or  Canadian  Northern  Railw.ay  Company  or  any  other  rail- 
way company  owned  by  Canada;  (6)  members  of  Parliament  and  the  Cana- 
dian National  Railway  Company  or  Canadian  Northern  Railway  Company  or  any 
other  railway  owned  by  Canada.  2.  A  copy  of  all  papers,  correspondence,  letters, 
documents,  or  writings  of  any  kind  between  members  of  the  Government  or 
officials  of  the  Government  and  the  late  directors  of  the  Canadian  National 
Railway  Company  relative  to  the  resignation  of  such  directors.  3.  A  copy  of  all 
papers,  correspondence,  letters,  documents,  or  writings  of  any  kind  between  mem- 
bers of  the  Government  or  officials  of  the  Government  and  the  late  directors  of 
the  Grand  Trunk  Railway  Company  relative  to  the  resignation  of  such  directors. 
Presented  May  21   and  30,   1923.     Sir  Henry  Drayton Not  printed. 

63347—4  35 


13-14  George  V  List  of  Sessional  Papers  A.  1923 

Contents  of  Volume  6 — Continued 

216.  Return   to   aa   Order   of   the   Senate,   dated   April    13,    1923,   for   a   return   showing: 

(a)  The  authority  granted  to  the  Imperial  Oil  Coiuiiany  to  lay  a  pipe  line  from 
the  wharf  of  the  Government  Railway  to  tlioir  tanks  at  Barrack  Point,  Sydney, 
Nova  Scotia,  over  land  belonging  to  His  Majesty.  (6)  The  amount  charged  im 
this  privilege  and  for  wharfage  ou  a  cargo  or  cargoes  discharged  there  last  autumn 
(t)  For  how  long  this  charge  is  established,  (d)  All  correspondence  between  the 
Canadian  Xational  Railways  or  any  department  of  the  Government  with  the 
Imperial  Oil  Company  or  its  representatives,  and  documents  relating  to  this 
matter.     Presented  May  30    1923.     Hon.  Mr.  McLennan Not  printed. 

217.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  Senate,  dated  April  26,  1923,  for  a  Return  showing  what 

sums  of  money  liave  been  paid  by  the  various  departments  of  the  Government 
for  express  charges,  railway  fares,  and  telegraph  tolls,  between  January  1,  1922, 
and  December  31,  1922,  and  to  what  railway,  express  and  telegraph  companies 
respectively  were  such  sums  paid.    Presented  May  30,  1923.    Hon.  Mr.  McDonald. 

Not    printed. 

218.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  7th  May,  1923,  for  a  copy  of  all  papers, 

documents,  sale  specifications,  terms  and  conditions  of  sale,  agreements,  official 
reports  recommending  sale,  and  all  other  correspondence  relating  to  the  sale  of 
about  27  of  the  smaller  ships  of  the  Canadian  Government  Merchant  Marine 
(Limited).     Presented  June   1,   1923.     Mr.  Church Not  printed. 

219.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  16th  April,  1923,  for  a  return  showing  the 

earnings  and  expenditures  of  the  following  vessels  on  the  trips  set  forth  below: 
1.  Canadian  Winner,  leaving  Vancouver  August  8.  1922,  for  the  Orient,  returning 
October  12,  1922.  2.  Canadian  Inventor,  leaving  Vancouver  September  28,  1922, 
for  the  Orient,  returning  November  20,  1922.  3.  Canadian  Britisher,  leaving  Van- 
couver, May  13,  1922,  for  Australia,  returning  October  4,  1922.  4.  Canadian 
Traveller,  leaving  Vancouver  July   13,   1922,   for  Australia,   returning   December   1, 

1922.  5.  Canadian  Farmer,  leaving  Vancouver  July  18,  1922,  for  Cahfomia  points, 
returning  August  12,  1922;  also  from  Vancouver,  August  14,  for  California  points, 
returning  September  13,  1922.  6.  Canadian  Observer,  leaving  Vancouver  July 
7,  1922,  for  California,  returning  August  23,  1922;  also  August  8,  1922,  for  Cali- 
fornia points,  returning  September  24,  1922.  Presented  June  1,  1923.  Hon.  Mr. 
Stevens Not  printed. 

220.  Return   to  an   Address  to  His  Excellency  the  Governor  General  of  the  25th   April, 

1923,  for  a  copy  of  all  Orders  in  Council,  letters,  agreements,  telegrams^  and  other 
correspondence  relating  to  the  sale  of  the  Toronto  Suburban  Railway  or  any 
part  thereof  by  the  Government  of  Canada  or  the  Canadian  National  Railways 
to  the  Hydro  Electric  Power  Commission  of  Ontario  or  the  City  of  Toronto. 
Presented  June   1,   1923.     Mr.  Church Not  printed. 

221.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  7th  May,  1923,  for  a  copy  of  all   corre- 

spondence, contracts,  agreements,  letters,  telegrams  and  other  documents  relating 
to  the  purchase  of  property  on  the  northwest  corner  of  King  and  Yonge  streets, 
Toronto,  by  the  Government  of  Canada  or  the  Canadian  National  Railways,  for 
railway   purposes.     Presented  June    1,   1923.     Mr.   Church A'ot   printed. 

222.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  30th  May,  1923,  for  a  copy  of  all  returns 

made  to  the  Minister  during  the  last  fiscal  year  under  subsection  2  of  section  91 
of  the  Bank  Act.    Presented  June  5,  1923.    Mr.  Coote Not  printed. 

223.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  30th  .4pril,  1923,  for  a  return  showing  a 

list  of  cases  where  remissions  have  been  granted  to  persons  convicted  and  fined  for 
breach  of  the  Inland  Revenue  Act  in  establishing  or  conducting  or  being  con- 
nected with  the  establishment  or  conduct  of  illicit  stills  or  illegal  stills,  and 
showing  the  names  of  the  persons  in  respect  of  whom  such  remissions  were  made, 
and  the  counsels  or  lawyers  acting  for  such  persons  in  each  case:  said  return 
to  cover  all  cases  since  the  first  day  of  January,  1922,  and  to  show  the  person  or 
persons  directly  benefiting  m  each  case  from  such  remission.  Presented  June  5, 
1923.     Mr.  Ladner Not  printed. 

224.  Return   to  an  Order  of  the  House   of  the  26th   March,   1923,  for  a   return  showing 

a  statement  of:  1.  \\]  annual  and  supplementary  reports  of  the  Departments  of 
the  public  Service  which,  since  the  appointment  of  the  Editorial  Committee 
(October  4,  1917)  to  date,  have  been  printed  in  the  English  language,  and  which 
have  not,  at  the  time  or  later,  been  translated  into  the  French  language,  or  which, 

36 


13-14  fieorge  V  List,  of  Sessional  Papers  A.  1923 


Contents  of  Volume  6 — Continued 

having  hron  translalpd,  havn  not  boon  printed.  2.  All  pamphlets  and  miscpl- 
lanerms  book  work  which  have  been  printed  in  the  English  lanniiage,  during  the 
same  period  to  date,  and  v.hich  have  not.  at  the  time  or  later,  been  translated 
into  the  Frenrh  language,  or  which,  having  been  translated,  have  not  been  printed. 
.'!.  -\ll  the  orders  or  rulings  issued  by  either  the  Kditorial  Committee  or  the 
departments,  under  which  such  tr.in.slation  ha.s  not  been  effected,  or  >mder  which, 
after  translalion,  the  printing  of  the  .said  documents  has  not  taken  place.  Pre- 
sented June  5,  1923.    Mr.  Vien Not  printed. 

2'l7t.  lid  urn  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  30th  Ma.v.  1923,  for  a  Return  showing: 
1.  How  many  Civil  Servants  employed  l\ill  time  there  are  in  all  departments, 
resident  in  the  city  of  Ottawa.  2.  How  many  Civil  Servants  employed  full  time 
there  arc  in  all  the  departments,  resident  outside  the  city  of  Ottawa.  Presented 
June    5,    1923.    Mr.    McQuarrie Not    printed. 

226.  226n.  Returns  (o  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  5th  March,  1923,  for  a  Return  showing 

the  number  of  dismissals  of  ofTipers  or  employees  of  the  Covernment,  and  all  others 
appointed  at  any  time  by  the  Covernment  of  Canada  (in  c.ises  where  the  position 
vacated,  or  required  to  be  vacated,  has  been  filled  by  another,  or  is  intended  to  be 
filled  by  another),  from  the  1st  day  of  January,  1922,  until  the  passing  of  this 
Order,  and  showing  also  the  position  vacated  or  requested  to  be  vacated,  and  the 
names  of  the  persons  so  dismissed,  or  whose  resignations  were  so  requested  and  the 
reason  in  each  ca.se  for  such  dismissal  or  request  for  resignation,  and  the  name  of  the 
person  now  occupying  the  position  thus  vacated,  also  showing,  in  each  case  whether 
an  investigation  into  charges  made  against  the  person  dismissed  or  requested  to 
resign    was   made,   and   by   whom.    Presented   June   6   and   8,    1923.     Mr.    Hanson. 

Nob  printed. 

227.  Copy  of  a   Memorial   presented  to  the  Prime  Minister  of  Canada   from   the  Stock- 

holders' Committee  containing  representations  on  behalf  of  the  holders  of  the 
Grand  Trunk  Pacific  Railway  four  per  cent  debenture  stock.  Presented  June  6, 
1923 Presented  in  printed  form. 

228.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  7th  May,  1923,  for  a  Return  showing  all  real 

estate  properties,  with  the  approximate  location  and  area  and  brief  description  of 
each,  sold  or  agreed  to  be  sold  by  the  Canadian  National  Railway  Company  or 
its  subsidiaries  since  October  4,  1922,  and  showing,  secondly,  all  real  estate  pro- 
perties purchased  or  agreed  to  be  purchased  or  in  respect  of  which  an  offer  to 
purchase  has  been  made  by  the  Canadian  N:itional  Railway  Company  or  any  of  its 
subsidiaries  since  said  date,  and  in  each  case  showing  the  snle  price  or  the  purchase 
price,  as  the  ca.se  mav  be,  and  the  names  of  the  purchasers  and  vendors.  Presented 
June   7,    1923.    Rt.   Hon.    Mr.    Meighen ...   Not    printed. 

228n.  Return  to  an  Address  to  His  Excellency  the  Governor  General  of  the  11th  April, 
1923,  for  a  copy  of  all  Orders  in  Coimcil  passed  since  January  1,  1922,  authorizing 
or  ratifying  purchases  or  sales  of  lands  or  property  either  by  the  Canadian 
Northern  Railway  Company,  or  any  of  its  subsidiaries,  or  by  the  Canadian  National 
Railways,  or  by  the  Grand  Trunk  Railway  Company,  or  any  of  iis  subsidiaries. 
Presented   Jimc   7,    1923.    Mr.   Boys Not   printed. 

229.  Rrturn  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  14th   May.  1923,  for  a  copy  of  all   papers, 

letters,  telegrams  and  other  documents,  relating  to  the  Margaree  River  Salmon 
Fisheries  A.ssociation  during  the  year  1922  and  the  present  year,  including  iti 
particular,  all  papers,  letters,  telegrams  and  other  documents  relating  to  the  mem- 
bership or  owner.shi]i  of  such  association,  and  the  distribution  of  moneys  payable 
by  the  Department  of  Marine  and  Fisheries  to  the  said  association  or  the  members 
thereof.    Presented   June   8.    1923.    Mr.   Hanson Not   printed. 

2."0.  Supplementary  Statement  showing  details  of  Appropriations  for  Canadian  National 
Railways,    1923-24.    Presented    June    14,    1923 Not    printed. 

2.'J1.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  5th  March,  1923,  for  a  copy  of  all  corre- 
spondence exchanged  between  the  Government  and  any  firm  or  party  pertaining  to 
the  occupancy  of  Arctic  Islands,  and  northern  Quebec,  by  various  expeditions  in 
those  regions,  reports  on  results  of  said  expeditions;  also  copy  of  all  contracts,  if 
any.  entered  into  between  the  Government  and  any  firm  or  party  granting 
privileges  on  said  territorv.  Presented  June  14,  1923.  Mr.  Parent... A''ot  printed. 
37 


13-14  George  V  List  of  Sessional  Papers  A   1923 

Contents  of  Volume  6 — Continued 

231n.  Relurn  to  an  Order  of  thp  Housr  of  the  SSlh  J<mc.  1923,  for  a  Rolum  phowine- 
t.  Wlielher  the  Govprnment  intend  to  send  an  expedition  to  the  Arctic  Islands 
during  this  year.  If  so,  for  what  purpose.  2.  Whether  the  Government  has  at  its 
disposal,  for  the  said  piirpo.se,  a  vessel  by  the  name  of  ArrHr.  3.  Whether  thf 
said  vessel  ever  made  trips  into  Arrtic  regions.  If  so.  (n)  On  what  date.*,  (hi 
Who  the  members  of  the  crew  were,  (r)  Number  of  Government  depart nient.< 
represented  on  said  vessel,  and  the  names  of  said  reprosentatives  and  their 
respective  salaries,  (d)  Cost  of  s:iid  expeditions,  and  expenses  incurred  by  each 
department.  4.  Whether  the  Go\prnment  intend  to  sprri:illy  equip  one  or  more 
vessels  for  the  Arctic  regions.  If  so.  \\h:\t  amount  has  been  agreed  upon  for  each 
of  these  vessels.  5.  Whether  the  Department  established  Mounted  Police  Posts  in 
certain  localities  of  said  regions.  If  so.  number  of  men  at  present  in  said  localities 
and  their  duties.  6.  Whether  the  Government  intend  to  .«end  artists  to  above 
regions  to  take  moving  pictures.  7.  Whether  the  Government  has  any  knowledge 
of  a  murder  being  committed  in  those  regions.  If  .so.  what  measures  have  been 
tjiken  to  bring  the  supposed  murderers  to  trial.  Presented  June  21,  1923.  Mr. 
Parent    Not    printed. 

232,  2Z2n.  Returns  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  9th  May.  1923.  for  copy  of  all  corre- 

spondence, telegrams  or  other  communications  passing  during  the  summer  or  fall 
of  1922  between  the  Dominion  Government  or  any  of  its  ministers  or  representa- 
tives, and  the  Dominion  Marine  Association  or  any  of  its  agents  or  representatives, 
or  of  any  other  person  or  persons  whatsoever,  in  any  way  relating  to  the  abroga- 
tion or  suspension  of  the  Dominion  Coastal  Shipping  Regulations,  or  in  any  way 
relating  to  the  grain  concestion  at  lal<e  ports  or  Montreal!,  or  to  the  alleged  com- 
bine, or  the  imposition  of  exorbitant  rates  by  shipping  interests  engaged  in  the  grain 
trade.    Presented   June    14    and   21.    1923.    M.-.    Coote ,Not   printed. 

233.  Copy  of  Memorial   on  behalf  of  the  Preference  and  Common  stockholders  of   the 

Grand  Trunk  Railway  Company  of  Canada,  of  November  27,  1922,  to  the  Prime 
Minister  of  Canada,  and  reply  of  Canadian  Government  thereto,  covering  Report 
of  the  Canadian  Committee  which  examined  for  the  Canadian  Government  the 
representations  made  on  behalf  of  the  Grand  Trunk  shareholders.  Presented 
June    15.    1923 Not   printed. 

23t.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  23rd  April,  1923,  for  a  copy  of  the  Report 
of  1923  of  the  Montreal  Harbour  Commission  on  the  construction  of  the  new 
bridge  between  Montreal  and  Longueuil,  and  also  a  copy  of  the  plans  prepared  by 
the  Harbour  Commission  for  the  construction  of  said  bridge.  Presented  June  21. 
1923.    Mr.    Archambault Not    printed. 

235.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  13th  .hmr.  1923,  for  a  Return  showing: 
1.  (n)  How  many  public  terminal  elevators  in  Fort  William  and  Port  Arthur  have 
private  terminal  elevators  which  are  owned  by  the  same  company,  or  practically 
the  same  compan.v.  or  whose  .shareholders  and  executives  are  interlocked  and  asso- 
ciated in  hot.h  enterprisers;  and  how  many  of  these  said  elevators  have  facilities 
for  direct  connections  for  transferring  grain  from  the  private  elevator  to  the  public ; 
(h)  Whether  any  direct  transferring  between  a  public  and  private  elevator  has 
ever  been  done,  or  reported  to  have  been  done;  (c)  WTiether  the 
practice  is  being  carried  on  at  the  present  time.  (d)  By  whose  authority 
the  transferring,  if  any,  was  done.  (e)  Whether  the  Canada  Grain 
.\ct,  does  not  state  that  a  private  and  a  public  elevator  shall  have  no  phy.sical 
connection.  2.  W'hether  all  t!he  grain  at  a  terminal  point,  as  provided  by  the 
Canada  Gr.ain  Act,  is  officially  weighed  in  and  out  of  all  elev.afors.  3.  Whether 
all  elevators  at  Fort  William  and  Port  Arthur  are  weighed  up  annually,  as  provided 
by  the  Canada  Grain  Act.  If  not.  why  not.  4.  Whether  the  laspection  Depart- 
ment in.spects  grain  and  i-ssues  certificates  according  to  section  27  of  the  Grain 
Act.  5.  (n)  In  the  loading  of  grain  on  boats  at  waterfront  elevators  situated  at 
Port  Arthur  and  Fort  William,  what  method  of  inspeotion  is  carried  on  by  the 
Inspection  Department;  (61  Whether  sampler  are  tflken  from  the  belt  in  the 
tunnels  of  the  elevator,  or  from  the  nmning  stream  of  grain  when  it  is  running 
into  the  boat,  or  whether  it  is  taken  both  in  the  tunnel  of  the  elevator  and  from 
the  nmning  stream:  (r1  In  the  case  of  a  difference  between  thp  sample  taken  a' 
the  tunnel  and  the  one  taken  from  the  running  stream  into  the  boat,  which  sample 
is  con-sidered  official.  6.  (n)  Whether  the  Inspection  Department  determines  the 
amount  of  excess  moisture  that  is  contained  in  tough,  damp  and  wet  grain.  an.H 
places  same  on  each  certificate  issi^d  for  off-grade  grain:  (b)  Whether  the  terminal 

38 


13-14  George  V  List  of  Sessional  Papers  A.  1923 


Contents  of  Volume  6 — Continued 

rlevator  takes  out  the  excess  moisture  above  normal,  wlien  drying  grain  as  per 
their  tariff;  (c)  Whether  moisture  tcst-s  are  made  before  grain  is  dried  in  public 
termihal  elevators  to  ascertain  what  shrinkage  or  loss  will  be  charged  tlie  owner 
of  the  grain  by  the  elevator  performing  the  drying.  If  not,  how  is  the  shrinkage 
arrived  at.  (d)  Whether  the  Inspection  Department  verifies  and  sees  that  terminal 
elevators  take  out  all  excess  moisture  over  normal  on  grain  they  are  drying  accord- 
ing to  their  tariff.  7.  What  authority  the  Inspection  Department  demands  of  a 
terminal  elevator  as  to  ownership  or  authorized  agenoy,  before  any  parcel  can  be 
loaded  out;  and  w'hcther  inspection  is  made  accordingly  to  ensure  that  the  quality 
of  grain  or  grain  by-products  ordered  out  by  the  owner  or  authorized  agent  is  up 
■to  that  received  by  the  elevator  from  the  owner.  8.  Whether  the  Inspection 
Department  issues  and  charges  a  fee  for  inspecting  gi\ain  or  grain  by-product,s 
that  do  not  represent  the  qu.ality  as  ordered  out  by  the  owner  or  authorized  agent. 
9.  If  contract  wheat  contains  one  to  two  per  cent  of  small  and  shrivelled  wlheat, 
whether  the  Inspection  Department  makes  this  car  a  "  clean  to  clean,"  or  whether 
they  put  one  or  two  \>cv  cent  dockage,  as  the  case  may  be,  on  this  car.  10.  The 
dharges  levied  by  the  Government  for  inspection  and  weighing  grain  in  each  con- 
secutive vear  .^-inre  1912.  11.  Whether  grain  arriving  at  a  public  terminal  elevator 
in  the  Western  Inspection  Division,  carrying  a  grade  certificate  and  binned  under 
(rovernment  supervision,  as  provided  for  by  the  Canada  Grain  Act,  is  subject  to 
another  inspection  charge  on  being  loaded  out.  If  so,  why  the  duplicate  inspection. 
12.  Whether  the  weighing  and  inspection  charges  are  b.ised  on  the  actual  cost  of 
the  .services  rendered,  and  how  this  is  determined.  13.  Whether  the  owner  of 
grain,  the  grade  of  which  is  in  dispute  with  the  Inspection  Department  and  placed 
for  survey,  is  entitled  \o  a  sealed  portion  of  official  s.'imple  the  survey  is  determined 
on.  If  .so,  from  whom  lie  obtains  same.  Presented  .June  21,  1923.  Hon.  Mr. 
Stevens Not  printed. 

236.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  IGth  .\pril,  1923,  for  a  copy  of  .ill  corre- 
spondence, lettei's,  telegrams  and  other  documents  passing  between  the  Right 
Honourable  the  Prime  Minister,  the  Honourable  Minister  of  Railways  and  H.  R. 
Grant,  of  Sydney  Mines,  Nova  Scotia,  or  other  persons,  having  reference  to  tjie 
transportation  of  liquor,  over  Canadian  National  Railways  or  other  Hues  under 
the  control  of  the  Canadian  National  Railways,  into  the  Province  of  Nova  Scotia. 
Presented  June  21.  1923.    Hon.  Mr.  Stevens Not  printed. 

2.17.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  30th  May,  1923,  for  a  copy  of  all  corre- 
spondence, telegrams,  reports,  memoranda  and  other  docimients.  passing  between 
the  Department  of  Railwav-s  and  Canals  or  the  Department  of  Marine  and  Fi.sher- 
ies  and  Messrs.  Fennell.  Henr>'  and  Smith,  in  regard  to  the  Grain  Elevator  System 
from  P'ort  William   to  Montreal,  during  the  vears   1922  and   1923.     Presented  .Tune 

25,  1923.    Mr.  Coote ". Not  printed. 

238,  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  14tli  May,  1923.  for  a  return  showing  all 
orders  for  equipment  placed  by  the  Canadi.an  National   Railways  since  October  4, 

1922,  includine  orders  for  cars  of  different  kinds,  seiiarately  stated;  for  engines  of 
different  kinds,  separately  stated,  with  prices  in  each  ca.se  or  basis  of  prices,  and 
comparison  of  such  prices  with  last  prices  at  which  similar  ftoods  were  ordered. 
The  said  return  to  contain  also  names  of  firms  and  location  of  factories,  with  whom 
such  ordei-s  have  been  placed,  and  where  same  are  to  be  filled.  Also  showing  all 
con-espondence  and  reriuisitions  between  officers  of  the  companies  and  any  member 
of  the  Go\-ernment  referrine  to  the  neces.sitv  for  such  orders.    Presented  June  2iy, 

1923.  Rt.  Hon.  Mr.  Meighcn ' Not  printed. 

23?.  Return  to  an  Order  nf  the  House  of  the  12fh  February.  1923,  for  a  copy  of  all  corre- 
spondence, writings,  documents,  and  as  well  a  complete  statement  of  regul.at.ions 
and  conditions  and  full  an'anaements  entered  into  between  reprcse^ntatives  of 
Canada  and  representatives  of  Great  Britain  in  re.spect  of  the  admission  of  Cana- 
dian store  cattle  and  Canadian  breedine  cattle  into  Great  Britain.     Presented  .Tune 

26,  1923.    Rt.  Hon.  Mr.  Meighen Not  printed. 

24Q.     lieturn  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  1.5th  February,  1923,  for  a  Return  slunvin;:: 

1.  The  niimber  of  officials  of  the  Department  of  .^gnculture  who  attended  fairs 
during  the  nine  months  ended   December  31,   1922.  and  what  duties  they   fulfilled. 

2.  The  total  expense  incurred  by  such  officials.  Presented  June  25.  1923.  Mr 
Leader Not  printed. 

'""'  39 


13-14  rieorgc  V  List  of  Sessional  Papers  A.  1923 

Contents  of  Volume  6 — Continued 

2M.    Report  of  the  Air  Board,  for  the  year  1922.    Presented  June  28,  1923. 

Presented  in  ■printed  form. 

242.  Return   to  an  Order  of   the  Ilou.^e  of  the  6th  Jvine,   1923,  for  a   return  showinR   all 

rase.s  where  fines  and  costs  have  been  in  whole  or  part  remitted  after  eonvietion 
for  violation  of  the  Income  \A'ar  Tax  Act  of  1917,  sinc^>  .January  1,  1922.  Such 
return  also  showinc  at  whose  instance  or  at  whose  representation,  verbal  or  other- 
wise, such  remissions  have  been  made,  and  also  .showing  in  each  ca.se  when  the 
law  was  or  has  been  complied  with  by  the  delinquent.  Presented  June  28,  1923. 
Mr.  Stewart  (Leeds) Not  printed. 

243.  Partial  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  19th  February,  1923,  for  a  Return 

.•^howinR:  1.  Names  of  the  Oovemmrnt  employees,  temporary  or  permanent, 
employed  in  the  city  ami  district  of  Quebec  who  have  been  dismis,sed  between 
October  15,  1911,  and  December  25,  1921.  2.  Names  of  those  dismissed  following 
an  inquiry.  3.  Names  of  those  dismissed  without  an  inquir.v.  4.  How  many  of 
thew  employees  have  been  reinstated,  and  on  what  dates.  Presented  Jime  28,  1923 
Mr.  Cannon Not  printed 

244.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  Hruse  of  the  11th  June,  1923.  for  a  copy  of  all  commimi- 

cations  passing  between  W.  A.  Dr^'den.  of  Ontario  County.  Ontario,  and  the 
Government  of  Canada  or  any  member  thereof,  or  any  Deputy  Minister  thereof, 
and  also  all  reports  made  by  either  W.  A.  Dryden.  or  Duncan  Mar.^hall.  to  the 
Government   or  any  department  thereof.     Presented  June  28.   1923.     Mr.  Maybee. 

Not    printed. 

245.  Partial  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  19th  February,  1923,  for  a  Return 

showing:  1.  Names  of  the  civil  .servants  employed  in  the  various  Government 
departments  who  are  stationed  in  the  city  and  district  of  Quebec.  2.  On  what 
dates  they  were  employed.  3.  On  who.=e  recommendation  each  appointment  was 
made.  4.  The  nature  of  their  employment  and  the  salary  of  each.  5.  The  namp^ 
of  those  who  pas.sed  the  Civil  Service  examinations.  Presented  J\me  28.  1923  Mr 
Cannon A'^o(    printed. 

246.  Return   to   an   Order  of  the   House   nf   the   llth   June,   1923.  for   a    Return   showing. 

1.  The  requirements  and  procedure  regarding  liquor  (spirits,  wine  and  beer)  ex- 
ported from  Canada   (a)   when  drawback  is  allowed;   (h)   when  liquor  is  duty  paid. 

2.  A  statement  by  years  for  the  last  ten  years  giving  (n)  the  quantitv  of  liquor 
manufactured  in  Canada;  (h)  the  quantity  of  liquor  imported  into  Canada:  (e) 
the  quantity  of  liquor  exported  from  Canada  (1)  with  drawback.  (2)  duty  paid; 
(d)  the  quantity  of  liquor  entered  for  consumption  in  Canada:  ('■)  the  gross 
revenue  collected,  customs  nnd  excise:  (/)  the  gross  amo\mt  rebated,  cu.«toms  and 
excise.     Presented  June   28.   1923.     Mr.   Good Not  printed. 

247.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  Senate,  dated   March   8.   1923.  showing:    1.  Was  any   fish 

trawler  which  was  not  registered  in  Canada  allowed  in  1922  to  land  fish  at  any 
maritime  province  port  without  payment  of  customs  dutv  on  its  catch.  2.  (n) 
From  what  trawler  or  trawlers  was  fish  so  landed,  (b)  What  was  the  respective 
value  of  each  cargo  so  landed,  (r)  At  what  port  or  ports  were  such  cargoes  landed. 
(d)  On  what  date  respectivelv  was  each  cargo  landed.  3.  Under  what  (n)  pro- 
vision of  the  customs  law  of  Canada  or  (fe)  other  authority  was  any  such  cargo  of 
fish  allowed  to  be  .so  landed.  4.  Is  it  the  pnlicy  of  the  Government  of  Canada  to 
allow  fish  trawlers  not  registered  in  Canada  and  not  manned  by  Canadian  fisher- 
men to  land  their  catches  at  Canadian  ports  without  payment  of  customs  dutv. 
Presented    June    28,    1923.     Hon.    Mr.    Tanner ." A^o(    printed. 

248.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  Hruse  of  the  6th  June,  1923,  for  a  copy  of  all  correspon- 

dence, letters,  telegrams,  reports  and  other  documents,  relating  to  the  closing  of  the 
Soldiers'  Comforts  Branch  at  Toronto  on  June  20th  next,  of  the  Department  of 
Soldiers'   Civil   Re-establishment.    Presented   June   29,    1923.    Mr.   Church. 

Not  printed. 

249.  Return   to  an  Address  to  His  Excellency  the  Governor  General   of  the   llth  June, 

1923,  for  a  copy  of  all  letters,  reports,  agreements,  telegrams.  Orders  in  Council, 
and  other  correspondence,  exchanged  betiveen  the  Government  of  Canada  and  the 
Government  of  the  United  States  in  reference  to  the  International  Deep  Watenvays 
Report,  and  a  proposed  agreement  for  the  St.  Lawrence  Ship  Channel,  since  the 
last    session    of    Parliament.    1922.    Presented    June    29,    1923.     Mr.    Church. 

A^ot  printed. 
40 


13-14  George  V  List  of  Sessional  Papers  A.  1923 

Contents  of  Volume  6 — Concluded 

250.  Relurn  to  an  Address  to  His   Excellency  ihe  Governor  General   of  the  2Sth   May. 

1923,  fur  a  copy  of  all  correspondence,  letters,  telegrams,  Orders  in  Council  and 
other  documents,  regarding  the  sale  of  'a  parcel  of  land,  under  Order  in  Council 
No.  811,  dated  April  26,  1922,  to  the  Alberta  Drainage  Company,  Edmonton, 
-Mberta,  containing  by  admeasurement  12,800  acres  more  or  less.  Presented  June 
29,    1923.     Mr.   Kelluer \ot   printed. 

251.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  May  7,  1923,  for  a  Return  showing:  1.  The  total 

number  of  employees,  both  permanent  and  temporary,  of  the  Dominion  Govern- 
ment as  of  thirty-first  of  March  last,  (a)  in  the  inside  service,  and  (6) 'in  the 
outside  service.  2.  The  total  cost  to  the  Dominion  for  the  last  fiscal  year  in 
.salaries  and  allowances  of,  (ii)  the  inside  service,  and  (6)  the  outside  service. 
Presented   June   29,    1923.    Mr.    Hanson Not   printed. 

252.  Partial  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  ihc  5th  March,  1923,  for  a  Return  show- 

ing the  various  technical  and  professional  olBcials  appointed  to  the  Civil  Service 
of  Canada  during  the  years  from  Se(itember,  1911,  to  December,  1922,  both  years 
inclusive,  with  a  statement  showing  the  salaries  of  each  official,  the  qualification 
of  each  official  and  the  method  employed  by  the  Civil  Service  Commission  to 
select  each  said  technical  and  professional  official ;  also  a  detailed  statement  naming 
the  examiners  in  each  case  and, the  office  lo  which  the  party  selected  was  appointed. 
Presented   June   29,    1923.    Mr.    Martell Not   printed. 

253.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  13th  June,   1923,  for  a  copy  of  all  corres- 

pondence, telegrams,  papers,  writings  and  documents  of  any  kind,  passing  between 
any  member  or  Department  of  the  Government  and  the  Canadian  National  Rail- 
ways or  Canadian  Mercantile  Marine  managers  or  directors  or  officers,  since 
January  1,  1922,  relating  in  any  way  to  the  vessels  of  the  Canadian  Mercantile 
Marine,  their  use  or  suitability,  or  making  in  any  way  recommendations  as  to  sale 
or  other  disposition  of  said  vesseKs.    Preseniv^d  June  29.  1923.    Sir  Henry  Drayton. 

Not  printed. 

254.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  Gth  June,   1923.  for  a  Return  showing:   1. 

By  what  method  or  in  accordance  with  what  principle  the  insurance  business, 
arising  out  of  the  transactions  of  the  Soldiers'  Settlement  Board  at  Edmonton  is 
distributed.  2.  To  what  pei-sons,  firms  or  companies,  acting  as  agents  for  insur- 
ance companies  and  resident  in  Edmonton,  this  insurance  business  was  given  in-  - 
(a)  year  1921,  and  (6)  year  1922,  and  the  premiums  paid  to  each  of  such  persons, 
firms  or  companies.  3.  To  what  iiersons,  firms  or  companies,  acting  as  agents 
for  insurance  companies,  and  resident  in  Edmonton,  this  insurance  business  was 
given  from  January  1,  1923,  until  the  i>res.?nt  time,  and  the  premiums  paid  to  each 
of  such  persons,  firms  or  companies.  4.  Whether  any  of  the  persons  above 
mentioned  have  had  no  service  overseas  in  the  late  w'ar.  If  so,  wlio.  .5.  Whether 
it  is  the  policy  or  the  intention  of  the  Government  to  give  any  of  the  insurance 
business,  arising  out  of  the  transactions  of  the  Soldiers'  .Settlement  Board  at 
Edmonton,  to  persons  who  did  not  serve  overseas  in  the  late  war.  6.  Whetlier 
it  is  the  policy  or  the  intention  of  the  Government  to  distribute  the  business  of 
insurance,  arising  out  of  the  transactions  of  the  Soldiers'  .Settlement  Board  at 
Edmonton,  to  a  list  of  selected  persons.  If  so.  the  names  of  these  persons. 
Presented   June   30,    1923.     Mr.    Boys Nut    printed. 


41 


13  GEORGE  V  SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  7  A.  1923 

DOMINION  OF  CANADA 
THE  DEPARTMENT  OF  TRADE  AND  COMMERCE 

MINISTER  DEPUTY  MINISTER 

Hon.  J.  A.  ROBB  F.  C.  T.  O'HARA 


REPORT 

RELATING  TO 

MAIL  SUBSIDIES  AND  STEAMSHIP  SUBVENTIONS 


Fiscal  Year  ending  March  31,  1922,  with  Traffic  Returns,  etc.,  to 
December  31,  1922. 


This  Report  is  published  as  a  Supplement  to  the  Annual  Report  of  the  Deputy  Minister 


I'laXTKl)  BY  ACT  OF  PAHLIAMEXT 


OTTAWA 

F.  A.  ACLAND 

PRINTER  TO  THE  KING'S  MOST  EXCELLENT  MAJESTY 

1  923 


13  GEORGE  V 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  7 


A.  1923 


Explanation  of  Estimates  for  the  yeitr  ending  March  31,  1924,  as  compared 
with  those  for  the  year  ending  Alarch  31,  1923,  with  statements  of  services 
rendered  and  expenditures  to  December  31,  1922,  on  account  of  IMail 
Subsitlics  and  Steamship  Subventions. 

XVII.— MAIL  SUBSIDIES   AND   STEAMSHIP   SUBVENTIONS 

Amount  to  be  voted $1,128,275.66 


Vote 
No. 


Atlantic  Oce.kk. 

Canad.a  and  Newfoundland 

Canada,  the  West  Indies  and  South  America 

Canada  and  South  Africa 

Pacific  Ocean. 

Canada,  and  New  Zealand  fl'acific) 

Prince  Rupert  and  Queen  Charlotte  Islands 

Victoria  and  San  Francisco 

\'ictoria,  \'ancouver  and  Skag^N'ay 

Victoria  and  West  Coast  Vancouver  Island 

Vancouver  and  Northern  ports  of  British  Columbia 

Vancouver  and  ports  on  Howe  Sound 

Local  Sebvice.s 

Baddeck  and  lona 

Charlottetown  and  Pictou 

r'harlottctown,  Victoria  and  Holliday's  Wharf 

( ;  ram  1  M  :inan  and  the  mainland 

Ilalifav.  Canso  and  Guysboro 

Halifax  and  La  Have  River 

Halifax  anti  Newfoundland  via  Cape  Breton  ports 

Halifax  and  Spry  Bay 

Halifax,  South  Cape  Breton  and  Bras  d'Or  Lakes 

Halifax  and  West  Coast  Cape  Breton 

Mainland  and  Islands  of  Miscou  and  Shippcgan 

Mulgrave  and  Canso 

MulKrave  and  Cuysboro , 

Xowcastic,  Xrtruiic  and  Escuminac,  Miramichi  River  and  Bay 

IVlco  Ij^land  and  the  Mainland 

Mul^'ravr,  Aricliat  and  Petit  de  Grat '. . . 

Pictou,  ^lontacuc,  Murray  Harbour  and  Georgetown 

Pictou,  Mulerave  and  Cheticamp 

Pictou.  New  Glasgow  and  Antigonish  County 

I'orl  Mul^ravc.  St.  Peter's,  Irish  Cove  and  Marble  Mountain. 

Pictou.  Souiis  Mnd  the  Maadalen  Islands 

Quclicr,  \'ataslu|uan  aiifl  H.irrington 

Quebec.  Montreal  and  Gaspe 

St.  Catlicrine'  s  Bay  and  Tadoussac 

St.  John  and  St.  Andrew's,  N.B 

St.  John  and  Bear  Hiver 

St.  .John  and  I^ridgetown 

St.  .John  and  Digby 

St.  .Inhn,  Digby,  Annapolis  and  Granville 

St.  .John,  Hay  of  Fundv,  and  Minas  Basin 

St.  .lohn  and  Wodgeport 

."^t.  .lohn.  West  port  and  Yarmouth 

Syilncy  and  Bay  .St.  Lawrence 

Sydney  and  Whycocomagh 

Sydney,    Bras   d'Or    Lake    ports   and    West  Coast  of  Cape 

Breton 

Expenses  of  supervision 

Other  appropriations  for  1922-23,  not  required  for  1923-24. . 


3,';,ooo  00 

35,000  00 

340.666  66 

340,666  66 

146,000  00 

146,000  00 

130, 509  00 

130,. 509  00 

21,000  00 

21,000  00 

3,000  00 

3,000  00 

23,000  00 

25,000  00 

15,600  00 

15,000  00 

24,800  00 

24,800  00 

5,000  00 

5,000  00 

9,000  00 

9,000  00 

8,000  00 

8,000  00 

4,000  00 

4,000  00 

15,000  00 

15,000  00 

9,000  00 

9,000  00 

6,000  00 

6,000  00 

5,000  00 

5,000  0(1 

6,000  00 

6, 000  00 

6,000  00 

6,000  00 

6,000  00 

0, 000  00 

3,300  00 

3,300  00 

13, ,500  00 

13,. 500  00 

9,500  00 

9,  .500  00 

5,000  00 

5,000  00 

11,000  00 

n.ooo  00 

10,000  00 

10,000  00 

fi,000  00 

6,000  00 

11,000  00 

11,000  00 

I,. 500  00 

i,.5no  00 

8,000  00 

8,000  00 

24, 000  00 

24,000  (II) 

85,000  00 

85,000  110 

30,000  00 

30,000  00 

2,000  00 

2,000  00 

4,000  00 

4,000  00 

2,000  o:) 

2,000  no 

l,.50fl  00 

I,. 500  00 

15,000  00 

15,000  00 

2,000  00 

2.000  00 

8,500  00 

8.. 500  00 

5,000  00 

5,000  00 

10,000  00 

10,000  no 

9.000  00 

9.000  00 

7,000  00 

13,000  00 

14,000  00 

14,000  00 

4,000  00 

4,500  00 

3,000  00 

1,124,775  66 

1,128,275  66 

7-1 J 


13  GEORGE  V 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  7 


A.  1923 


ATLANTIC  OCEAN  SERVICES 

CANADA   AND   NEWFOUNDLAND 

Contract  No.  60. 

T.  &  C.  File  No.  28464. 

Vote  169. — Canada  and  Newfoundland. — Steam  service  or  services  between — 

1922-23 $  35,000 

1923-24 35,000 

Contractors. — Reid  Newfoundland  Company,  Ltd.,  of  St.  John's,  Nfld. 

Co?itract  Daterf.— April  1,  1922.— D^lrati on  of  Contract.— April  1,  1922,  to 
March  31,  1923. 

Service. — Three  complete  round  trips  each  week  between  North  Sydney 
and  Port  aux  Basques.  Should  Port  aux  Basques  or  North  Sj^dnej'  be  blocked 
with  ice  at  any  time,  the  service  may  during  such  period,  at  the  option  of  the 
Contractors,  he  performed  to  Placentia  or  Argentia,  Nfld.,  and  Louisburg,  N.S., 
respectively. 

Ports  of  Call. — North  Sydney  (or  Louisburg),  N.S.,  and  Port  aux  Basques 
(or  Argentia  or  Placentia),  Nfld. 

Speed  required. — Not  stated. 

Subsidy. — At  the  rate  of  S35,000  per  annum,  payable  quarterly,  on  June  30, 
September  30,  December  31,  and  March  31. 

Mails. — To  be  carried  free. 

Canadian  Trade  Commissioners. — To  be  carried  free. 

Government  Wharves. — Steamers  are  required  to  call  at  Government  wharves 
whenever  possible. 

DISTANCES 

Miles 

North  Sydney  to  Port  aux  Basques 101 

Louisburg  to  Placentia 250 

North  Sydney  to  St.  John's 300 

DESCRIPTION  OF  VESSEL  EMPLOYED 


Passenger 

'r- 

Dimensions. 

Tonnag 

e 

Accom- 

o 

Built 

modation 

•d 

Name 

.a 

-3 

J3 
C. 

■•i 

£ 

c. 

i 

0 

i 

At 

In 

Of 

^ 

« 

Q 

z 

O 

U 

-2 

IN 

K 

•Z 

03 

Ft. 

Ft. 

Ft. 

eft. 

Kts 

Kyle 

220 

32-3 

18-3 

548 

1,055 

68 

160 

Nil. 

263 

12 

Newcastle . . 

lfll3 

Steel 

S.igona 

I7,'> 

2S-3 

20-3 

420 

808 

327 

40 

77 

Nil. 

136 

11 

Dundee 

1914 

Steel 

220 

30 

15 

427 

836 

162 

Glasgow 

1881 

TRADE  AXD  VOMMElirE 


TR.\FFIC   RETURNS 


13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1923 


Calendar  Year 

No. 

of  round 

trips 

run 

Passengers 
Carried 

Tons 
Freight 
Carried 

Live 
Stock 

Mails 

Subsidy 
Paid 

First 
Class 

Second 
Class 

Sealed 
Bags 

Tied 
Sacks 

1914 

289 
216J 
284 
270 
255J 
254} 
159 
149 

130 

6.267 
5.373 
7,056 
7,S»4 
10, 185 
13.430 
9.550 
6,755 

In        3, 166 
Out     4,252 

8,925 
9,160 
13,596 
12.441 
8.421 
7,223 
7.862 
4.231 

1,4S6 
3,612 

22,035 
24,087 
32, 6.35 
41,209 
27.646 
17.710 
26.534 
22.542 

18.148 
1.209 

735 
5.39 
1.729 
16.685 
3.924 
5,363 
1,809 
1,143 

826 

68 

3,462 
2,654 
3.309 
2.921 
3.300 
2.960 
1.698 
1.668 

780 

774 

23.365 
17.1.54 
22. 739 
22.4.38 
20.983 
22.796 
17.969 
16.790 

11,815 
5,176 

$   cts. 
64,683  02 

1915 

48,418  06 

1916 

63,625  58 

1917.   .   . 

.55.. 382  80 

1918 

57. 140  02 

1919 

55. SOS  18 

1920 

27.731  .36 

1921 

29,435  19 

1922 

29. 166  SO 

Total 

7.418 

5,108 

19.357 

894 

1.554 

16,991 

ORIGIN.  QUANTITY  AND  VALUE  OF  CARGO  EXPORTED  FROM  CANADA 
(Including  Live  Stock) 


Calendar 
Year 

Canadian  Origin 

United  States  Origin 

Total 

Tons 
weight 

Tons 
measure- 
ment 

Value 

Tons 
weight 

Tons 
measure- 
ment 

Value 

Tons 
weight 

Tons 
measure- 
ment 

Value 

1914 

13.286 
16.510 
16.692 
26,838 
15, 626 
12.669 
20.852 
19.151 
17, 196 

Nil. 
Xil. 
Nil. 
Nil. 
Nil. 
Xil. 
Nil. 
Nil. 
Nil. 

S 

8.58,605 
1,108.876 
1,559.228 
4,165,668 
2.382,697 
1,911.162 
2,205.070 
1,034,710 

921,797 

7,6.51 
6.491 
9.534 
13.192 

Nil. 
Nil. 
Nil. 
Vil. 

S 

587,196 

643.885 
1.280.032 
2.. 585. 724 
2.182.497 

.395. 107 
1. 283. 694 

512.862 

20,937 
23,001 
26.226 
40.030 
22. 707 
15.077 
24.507 
21.08'' 

Xil. 
Xil. 

S 

1.445.801 

1915 

1.752.761 

1916..; 

Xil.         2,839,260 

1917 

Xil.         6,751,392 

1918... 

7.081        Xil. 
2.408        Xil. 
3.655        Xil. 
1.931        Xil. 
952        Nil. 

Nil.          4,575.194 

1919 

Xil.         2.806.269 

1920 

Xil.         3.488.764 

1921 

Xil.          1.547.572 

1922 

■no.  .9.       IS.  1481       Xil.       11.341.294 

PRINfIP.\L    ARTICLES    EXPORTED 

Of  Canadian  Origin. — Flour,  oats,  hay.  bran,  feed,  potatoes,  live  stock,  beef, 
pork,  fresh  meal,  condersed  milk,  machinery,  lard,  yeast  cake,  pig  iron,  roofing 
and  cement. 

Of  United  States  Origin. — Floui-,  meal,  oats,  dried  fruit,  pork,  beef,  leather, 
oil,  organs,  soap,  beans,  rice,  roofing,  tobacco,  sugar  and  machinerj'. 

CANADA,   THE   WEST   INDIES   AND   SOUTH   A:\IERICA 
Contract  No.  9. 
T.  &  C.  File  No.  28207. 

Vote  170. — Canada  and  the  Wi»i  Indies  or  South  America,  or  both,  steam  service 
between — 

1922-23 S  340,666  06 

1923-24 ' 340,666  66 

Contractors. — The  Roval  ^lail  Steam  Packet  Company,  of  London,  England, 
(Canadian  address:  St.  Paul  Building,  Halifax,  N.S.)  (Freight  ami  passenger 
agents:  Pickforil  and  Black,  H;Uifax,  N.S.) 


^ 


STEAMSHIP  SUBSIDIES  7 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  7 

Contract  Datetl  .—ApiW  1,  1922.— Duration  of  Contract.— -  April  1,  1922,  to 
March  31,  1924. 

Service  arid  Ports  of  C«7Z. -^Commencing  from  St.  John,  N.B.,  saihng  thence 
to  Halifax,  N.S.,  and  sailing  thence  to  (ieorgetown,  British  (iuiana,  every 
fourteen  days: — Calling  at  the  following  islands:  Bermuda,  St.  Kitts,  Antigua, 
Montserrat,  Dominica,  St.  Lucia,  Barbados,  St.  Vincent,  (irenada,  and  Trinidad, 
and  returning  from  Georgetown  to  St.  John,  calling  at  all  the  aforesaid  islands, 
in  reverse<l  order.  This  itinerary  may  be  subject  to  any  change  wliich  may  be 
mutually  agreed  upon  between  the  minister  and  the  contractors. 

Speed  required. — 11  knots. 

Subsidy.— £70,000  (.f340,666.6G)  per  annum,  based  on  payments  of  £2,692 
6s.  2d.  (.$13,102.50)  for  each  complete  round  voyage,  payable  on  the  last  day  of 
each  month. 

Canadian  Trade  Cotninissioners. — To  be  carried  free. 

Mails. — To  be  carried  free. 

Freight  charges  from  St.  John  to  Halifax. — The  contractors  are  required,  at 
their  own  expense,  when  so  required  by  consignors,  to  pay  the  freight  charges  by 
rail  from  St.  John  to  Halifax  on  butter,  cheese,  and  fruit  intended  for  shipment 

\>y  the  contractors'  steamships. 

Delay  at  Ports. — The  contractors  must  make  every  reasonable  effort  to  avoid 
undue  delay  at  Canadian  or  West  Intlian  ports. 

Development  of  Trade. — The  contractors  must  use  their  utmost  endeavour 
to  develo])  the  cargo  and  passenger  trade  between  Canada  and  the  British  West 
Indies  by  means  of  reasonable  advertising  and  regular  soliciation  through  agents. 

Through  rates  of  Freight.— The  contractors  must  use  their  best  endeavours  to 
arrange  through  rates  of  freight  between  inland  points  in  Canada  and  the  various 
I)orts  of  call  referred  to  in  this  contract  in  the  British  West  Indies  and  Central 
and  South  America. 

Transfer  by  connecting  lines.- — As  the  design  of  this  agreement  is  to  give 
regular  fortnightly  communication  both  ways  to  all  the  ports  previously  men- 
tioned, arraiigemeiits  must  be  made  for  the-  transport  of  freight  and  passengers 
on  all  voj'ages  south  bound  and  north  bound  by  transfer  to  the  lines  of  the 
contractors'  steamers  conducting  the  insular  service  from  and  to  Trinidad,  and 
at  the  rates  obtaining  for  the  direct  service. 

A'o  discrimination. — No  discrimination  of  any  kind  as  regards  freight  and 
passenger  rates  may  be  made  in  favour  of  any  merchant,  shipper  or  importer 
in  any  one  of  the  British  colonics  rcferrcil  to  herein,  as  against  any  other  merchant 
shipper  or  importer  in  the  same  colony. 

Through  Bills  of  Lading. — Through  bills  of  lading  must  be  issued  from  any 
Canadian  point  of  shipment  to  any  port  in  Central  or  South  America,  which  is 
a  iTgular  i)ort  of  call  for  any  of  the  steamships  employed  or  controlled  by  the 
contractors  on  other  services,  and  which  make  regular  connections  with  the 
service  herein  contracted  for. 


TRADE  A\'D  COMMERCE 

13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1923 

DISTANCES 

Miles 

St.  John  to  Halifax 288 

Halifax  to  Bermuda 764 

Bermuda  to  St.  Kitts 942 

St.  Kitts  to  Antipia 60 

Antigua  to  Montserrat 35 

Montserrat  to  nominica 97 

Dominira  to  St.  Lucia 81 

.•^t.  Lucia  to  St.  Vincent 59 

St.  Vincent  to  Barbados 96 

Barbados  to  CIrenada 147 

Grenada  to  Trinidad 96 

Trinidad  to  Deinerara 374 

3.0.39 


DESCRIPTION   OF   VESSELS  EMPLOYED 


Dimensions 

Tonnage 

Passenger 
Accom- 
modation 

1 
a. 

0 

1 

& 

P-' 
X 

z 

•o 

Built 

Name 

ill) 

J 

1 

& 

a 

■z 

s 
o 

1 

e9 

5 

■a 
c 

1 

1 

At 

In 

Of 

Chignecto... 

Chaleur 

Caraquet.... 
Ch&udiere... 

Ft. 

400-5 
400-5 
400-5 
370 -fl 

Ft. 

47-2 
47-2 
47-3 
45  9 

Ft. 

31-1 
31-1 
31-1 
25-0 

2.990 
2.994 
2,975 
2,499 

4,744 
4,746 
4,889 
4,019 

5.567 
5.574 
5,129 
4,726 

41 
41 
40 
50 

60 
60 
72 
64 

90 
90 
80 
76 

eft. 

4988 
5288 
5565 
900 

418 
418 
418 
584 

Kts 

11 
11 
11 
12 

Belfast 

Belfast 

Belfast 

Middleboro. 

1893 
1893 
1894 
1899 

Steel. 
Steel. 
Steel . 
Steel. 

TRAFFIC  RETURNS 


Calendar 
Year 

No.  of 

round 

trips  run 

Number 

of  Passengers 

Carried 

Tons 

of  Freight 

Carried 

Live  Stock 

Mails 

Subsidy 
Paid 

26 
26 
26 
25 
16 
26 
26 
26 
26 

1st  Class 

2nd 
Class 

3rd 
Class 

Tons 
Weight 

Tons 
Measure- 
ment 

48 

Lock 
Bags 

Tied 
Sacks 

$      ct.s. 

1914 

1,080 

465 

1,742 

52,320 

90,398 

705 

1,627 

330.897  33 

1915 

959 

786 

2,727 

78,414 

94,781 

34 

518 

3,472 

340.666  56 

1916 

1,459 

461 

3,948 

100,883 

127,631 

31 

1,690 

3,146 

340,666  66 

1917 

1,253 

422 

2,256 

94,042 

99,5(M 

32 

3,421 

1,970 

334,115  38 

1918 

1,344 

389 

1,064 

70, 691 

72,370 

86 

2,710 

1,255 

209, 640  96 

1919 

3,154 

1,100 

1,871 

93,890 

110,313 

162 

2,178 

4,092 

340, 666  56 

1920    .     .     . 

3,007 

1,045 

1.866 

69,837 

110,921 

107 

2,522 

3,583 

340,666  56 

1921 

2,152 

237 

1,387 

49,824 

112,574 

91 

3,579 

3,350 

340,666  56 

1922 

In         738 
Out      710 

186 
99 

439 
655 

7,019 
5,589 

63,381 
91.114 

1 
55 

1.098 
1,791 

1,636 
1,577 

340.666  56 

Total.... 

1,448 

285 

1,094 

12,608 

154,495 

56 

2.889 

3,213 

STE.\^fSHn'  SUBSIDIES 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  7 

ORIGIN,   QUANTITY  AND   VALUE   OF   CARGO  EXPORTED   FROM   CANADA 
(Including  Live  Stock) 


Calen- 
dar 
Year 

From 

Canadian  Origin 

United  States  Origin 

Total 

Tons 
Weight 

Tons 
Measure- 
ment 

Value 

Tons 
Weight 

Tons 
Measure- 
ment 

Value 

Tons 
Weight 

Tons 
Measure- 
ment 

Value 

1914 

St.  John.. 
Halifax... 

1,557 
2,951 

15.130 
75.254 

i 

234.008 
2,384.256 

i 

1.557 
2,951 

15.120 
75.254 

S 

234,008 

2.384.256 

Total . . 

4,508 

90,374 

2,618,264 

Nil. 

Nil. 

Nil. 

4.508 

90,374 

2.618.264 

St.  John.. 
Halifax... 

1915.. 

2,031 
3,621 

12,362 
82,419 

301 , 659 
3.206.176 

2.031 
3.621 

12,362 
82,419 

301.659 

3,206,176 

Total . . 

5,652 

94,781 

3.507,835 

Nil. 

Nil. 

Nil. 

5,652 

94,781 

3,507.835 

St.  John.. 
Halifax... 

1916... 

1,781 
2,812 

15,899 
96.907 

425,664 
4,272,628 

1,781 
2,812 

15,899 
96.907 

425.664 

4.272.628 

Total.. 

4.593 

112,806 

4,698,292 

Nil. 

Nil. 

Nil. 

4,593 

112,806 

4.698,292 

St.  John. 
Halifax... 

1917 

1,460 
5,071 

14.570 
89,820 

532,012 
5, 726, 139 

1,460 
5,071 

14,570 
89,820 

532,012 

5,726.139 

Total . . 

6,531 

104,390 

6,258.151 

Nil. 

Nil. 

Nil. 

6,531 

101,390 

6,2.58.151 

St.  John.. 
Halifax... 

1918..   • 

3,789 
2,295 

36.113 
36.257 

3,065,5S7 
3.194.007 

3,789 
2,295 

36,113 
36,257 

3. 065,. 587 

3.194,007 

Total  . 

6,084 

72.370 

6,259.594 

Nil. 

Nil. 

Nil. 

6,084 

72,370 

6,259.594 

St.  John.. 
Halifax... 

1919.. 

829 
3,569 

19.378 
87,559 

1,276.  .582 
6.836.810 

829 
3,569 

19.378 
87.559 

1,276.582 

6.836.810 

Total.. 

4,398 

106,937 

8.113,392 

Nil. 

Nil. 

Nil. 

4.398 

106.937 

8.113,392 

St.  John.. 
Halifax... 

1920.... 

1,320 
6,640 

20,894 
84,436 

1.477,800 
8.312.749 

1.320 
6,640 

20.894 
84.436 

1,477,800 

8,312,749 

Total.. 

7,960 

105,330 

9.790,549 

Nil. 

Nil. 

Nil. 

7,960 

105.330 

9,790,549 

St.  John.. 
Halifax... 

1921.... 

719 
4,525 

9,118 
85,097 

655,588 
5,843,187 

719 
4,525 

9.118 
85,097 

655,588 

5,843,187 

Total 

5,244 

94.215 

6,498.775 

Nil. 

Nil. 

Nil. 

5,244 

94,215 

6.498,775 

St.  John.. 
Halifax... 

1922.... 

809 
4,780 

5.760 
85.374 

361.747 
4.836. 79S 

SO-- 

4.780 

5,740 
85,374 

361,747 

4.836.799 

Total . . 

5.589 

91,114 

5.198,546 

Nil. 

Nil. 

Nil. 

5,589 

91,114 

5,198,546 

Principal  Articles  Exported  from  Canada 

All  of  Canodian  Origin. — Fish,  canned  goods,  flour,  feed,  meal,  oilmeal,  haj', 
oats,  cheese,  butter,  eggs,  apples,  potatoes,  spHt  peas,  vegetables,  groceries,  beef, 
live  stock,  mineral  water,  tea.  soap,  sulphate  of  ammonia,  fertilizer,  lumber, 
shingles,  shocks,  laths,  furniture,  chairs,  brooms,  brushes,  stoves,  trunks,  rope, 
cordage,  nails,  paper,  and  biscuits. 


10  TliADE  A.\T>   COMMERCE 

13  GEORGE  V,  A.   1923 

CANADA   AND   SOUTH   AFRICA 

Contract  No.  2. 

T.  &  C.  File  No.  28313. 

Vote  171. — Canada  and  South  Africa,  steam  service  between — 

1922-23 §146,000 

1923-24 146,000 

Contractors. — Elder  Dempster  &  Co.,  Ltd.,  133  Board  of  Trade  Building, 
Montreal,  Que.     (Head  oflBce:  4  St.  Mary  Axe.,  London,  E.C.,  England.) 

Contract  dated. — August  8,  1922.  Duration  of  Contract.— October  1,  1922, 
to  March  31,  1923. 

Service. — Monthly,  during  the  first  fifteen  days  of  each  month. 

Ports  of  Call. — From  Montreal,  calling  at  Quebec,  at  the  option  of  the  con- 
tractors; and  during  the  months  of  September,  October  and  November  at 
Halifax,  and,  at  the  option  of  the  contractors,  at  other  Canadian  ports  during 
the  season  of  open  navigation  on  the  St.  La^^Tence;  and,  during  closed  naviga- 
tion on  the  St.  Lawrence,  from  St.  John,  calling  at  Halifax,  and,  at  the  option 
of  the  contractors,  at  other  Canadian  ports;  proceeding  direct  to  Cape  Town 
and  not  less  than  two  other  South  African  ports. 

Speed  required. — 10  knots. 

Subsidy. — §146,000  per  annum,  payable  quarterly. 

Coaling. — Steamers  may  call  at  any  Canadian  port  soleh'  for  the  purpose 
of  coaling. 

Crovernment  Raihcay  Clatise. — Included. 

Cold  Storage. — There  must  be  accommodation  for  not  less  than  200  tons  of 
cargo  in  cold  storage  on  each  ship.  The  contractors  must  provide  such  further 
cold  stoi'age  accommodation  as  may  be  needed  from  time  to  time. 

Additional  Vessels. — The  contractors  agree  to  provide  additional  vessels 
when  necessary  to  meet  the  requirements  of  the  trade  offered. 

Mails. — To  be  carried  free. 

Canadian  Trade  Commissioners. — To  be  carried  free. 

Supervision  of  handling. — The  handling,  loading,  stowing  and  unloading  of 
anj'  fruit  or  perishable  products  carried  bj^  the  said  vessels  shall  be  subject  to 
and  under  the  supervision  of  any  cargo  inspector  or  other  officer  appointed  for 
that  purpose,  should  the  ^Minister  of  Agriculture  for  Canada  deem  it  advisable 

E:cemption  from  calling  at  Canadian  Ports. — If  sufficient  cargo  is  not  forth- 
coming from  anj-  of  the  ports  of  call  in  Canada,  the  minister  may  relieve  the 
contractors  from  the  obligation  of  calling  at  such  ports. 

DI.'^T.VXCES 

Miles 

Montreal  to  Oape  Town 7, 338 

Port  Kl  izabcth 7, 778 

l\ast  London , 7, 909 

Durban 8, 162 

St.  John  to  Cape  Town 6,978 

I'ort  Elizabeth 7, 413 

Kaist  Ix)ndon 7, 549 

Durban 7,802 


STEA  USIIir  SUIiSIDIE.'i 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  7 

DKSCRIPTION   OF  VESSELS  EMPLOYED 


Dimensions 

Tonnage 

< 
1 

i 

X 

Built 

Name 

J 

1 

a 

■& 

i 

6 

At 

In 

Of 

Kaduna 

Ft. 
360  0 
360  0 
425-5 
412-6 
412-6 
412-6 
385-3 
412 -fi 
399-5 
4C0-2 
440-1 

Ft. 
52-0 
52-0 
53-0 
55-8 
55-8 
55-8 
51-2 
55-8 
.53-0 
52-3 
59-2 

Ft, 
26-2 
261 
29-2 
34-4 
34-4 
34-4 
25-5 
34-4 
32-8 
28-3 
31-1 

2,308 
2,304 
3,534 
4,044 
4,044 
4,023 
4,278 
4,044 
3,527 
3,197 
4,486 

4,4.55 

4,441 

8,100 

s.ino 

12 
12 

4 
\'il. 
\il. 
\il 

Cu.  ft. 
10,000 
10,000 
10,390 
Nil. 
Nil. 
Nil. 
Nil, 
Nil. 
Nil. 
Nil. 
17,500 

3.39 
428 
556 
517 
517 

-140 
517 
517 
369 

Kt,s 
10 
10 

Middlesbro 

1910 
1910 
1910 
1918 
1910 
1920 
1917 
1920 
1920 
1919 
1921 

Benguola 

Xew  CieorKia 
Now  Moxico.. 

i;,  -,iii:  lii.criii 
i;..-,c,i;  |{i,in;ii 

Ne\vcastle-on-Tyne . 

Hclfast. 

Belfast 

Belfast.... 

Stwl. 
Stool. 
Stool. 
Stool 

Jekri 

5,875 
6,566 
5,663 
5,248 
7,206 

9.020  Nil. 
10,000  Nil. 

9,000  Nil. 

8, 130  Nil. 
10,660      12 

Steel 

Belfast 

Steel. 

Steel 

Steel. 

Steel, 

TRAFFIC   RETUHNS   (Outward  voyages) 
No  cargo  is  carried  inward 


Calendar  Year 

No.  of 

Trips 

run 

Number  of 

Passengers 

Carried 

Tons  of 
Freight  Carried 

Live 
Stock 

Mails 

Subsidy 
Paid 

12 
12 
10 
9 
3 
U 
12 
10 
11 

3 

I 
Nil. 
Nil. 
Nil. 

Nil. 
Nil. 

Nil. 
Nil. 

Weight 

Measure 

235 
Nil. 
Nil. 
Nil. 
Nil. 
Nil. 
Nil. 
Nil. 
Nil. 

Nil. 
Nil. 
Nil. 
Nil. 

Nil. 
Nil. 
Nil. 
Nil. 
Nil. 

S       ets. 

1914              

45,296 
.52.543 
30, 797 
23,140 
9,972 
22,503 
.35,9.56 
18,243 
23.206 

.33,. 563 
37,166 
38,6,30 
36, 6,53 
9,054 
49,038 
56,970 
20,132 
27,010 

146,000  00 
145,999  92 
121,666  68 

1915 

1916 

1917 

109  ,'')00  02 

1918 

31),  499  98 

1919 

133  83.3  26 

1920 

146,000  00 

1921 

121,666  60 

1922 

133,833  26 

ORIGIN,  QUANTITY  AND  VALUE  OF  CARGO  EXPORTED  FROM  CANADA 


Calendar 
Year 

Canadian  Origin 

United  States  Origin 

Total 

Tons 
Weight 

Tons 
Measure- 
ment 

Value 

Tons 

Weight 

Tons 
Measure- 
ment 

Value 

Tons 
Weight 

Tons 
Measure- 
ment 

Value 

1914 

1915.   .    . 

42,741 
46,981 
28,465 
20.404 
9,889 
22, 165 
34,387 
16,962 
22,217 

22,488 
23, 589 
24,600 
24,209 
8. 630 
36, 509 
34,259 
14,395 
22,777 

S 

3,236,733 
3,889,139 
3,350,296 
3,644,333 
2,714,870 
8, 348,. 508 
8.274.449 
4,082,959 
4, 108, 142 

2,555 
5,. 562 
2.. 332 
2,736 
83 

338 
1,,569 
1,281 

989 

11,075 
13.577 
14.030 
12,444 
424 
12,529 
22,711 
5,737 
4,239 

$ 

948,339 

1,331,441 

1,430,772 

1,390,8.56 

74,670 

.2,237,072 

3,192,026 

677,720 

449,811 

45.296 
.52,. 543 
30, 797 
23,140 
9,972 
22,503 
35,956 
18,243 
23,206 

.33.563 
37.166 
38,630 
36.6.53 
9,0.54 
49.038 
.56,970 
20,132 
27,016 

S 

4,185,072 
5  220,580 

1910 

4,781,068 
;)  03")  189 

1917 

1918 

1919 

2. 789.. 540 
10,  .585. 580 

1920 

11  466  475 

1921 

4.760.679 

1922 

4.. 557, 953 

Principal  Articles  Exported  • 

0/  Canadian  Origin. — Agricultural  implements,  calcium  carbide,  auto- 
mobiles, paper,  lumber,  cereal  foods,  eggfiUers,  chairs,  woodenware,  cotton  duck, 
Reaver  board,  nails,  iron  and  steel,  malt,  horseshoes,  condensed  milk,  loco- 
motives, cardboard,  shovels,  cement,  wire,  ])ipe,  flour  and  wheat. 

Of  United  States  Origin. — Automobiles,  mining  machinery,  fruit  jars,  canned 
meats,  washing  powder,  ammonia,  agricultural  implements  and  tractors. 


13  GEORGE  V  SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  7  A.  1923 

PACIFIC  OCEAN  SERVICES 

CANADA   AND   NEW   ZEALAND 

Contract  No.  27. 

T.  &  C.  File  No.  28366. 

\'ote  172. — Canada  and  New  Zealand,  on  the  Pacific  Ocean,  stea^n  service  between — 

1922-23 S130,509 

1923-24 130,509 

Contractors. — The  Union  Steamship  Co.,  of  New  Zealand,  Ltd.  (Canadian 
address:  Canadian  Australasian  Royal  Mail  Line,  739  Hastinfis  Street  West, 
Vancouver,  B.C.) 

Contract  dated. — June  15,  1922.  Duration  of  Contract. — August  1,  1922,  to' 
March  31,  1924. 

Service. — Sailing  at  alternate  intervals  of  approximately  four  weeks  and 
five  weeks,  making  20  round  trips  during  the  period  covered  by  the  contract. 

Ports  of  Ca,ll. — Vancouver,  B.C.;  Victoria,  B.C.;  Honolulu,  in  the  Sandwich 
islands;  Suva,  in  the  Fiji  islands;  and  Auckland,  N.Z.  At  the  contractor's 
option,  each  voyage  from  Canada  to  New  Zealand  may  be  extended  to  a  port  or 
ports  in  Australia.  The  Australian  port  of  call  is  Sydnej'.  The  call  at  Suva  is 
conditional  upon  the  Government  of  Fiji  also  continuing  their  contract  for  a  like 
period  and  on  the  same  terms  as  heretofore,  and  also  upon  their  maintaining  the 
same  charges  for  light  and  other  dues  levied  on  ships  employed  in  the  service. 

Speed  required. — Duration  of  voyage  is  not  to  exceed  20  days,  including 
one  day's  detention  at  Honolulu. 

Subsidy. — $130,509  per  annum  (payable  in  approximately  monthly  instal- 
ments.) 

Provided  that  the  contractors  shall  be  entitled  to  receive  such  subsidy  as 
the  Governments  of  New  Zealand  and  Fiji  may  i)ay  towards  the  service;  and 
also  the  Government  of  Australia,  should  the  service  be  extended  to  that  Com- 
monwealth. 

Deductions  from  Subsidy. — £30  are  to  be  deducted  from  the  amount  of 
subsidy  payable  on  each  claim  for  every  complete  period  of  twenty-four  hours 
by  which  the  time  occupied  in  conveyance  of  the  mails  between  Auckland  and 
^'ancouver  has  exceeded  twenty  days. 

Preference  to  Canadian  Shippers. — No  discrimination  as  regards  freight  or 
passenger  rates  is  to  be  made  against  Canadian  ports,  railways,  merchants  or 
shippers.  Canadian  merchants  and  shippers  are  to  have  preference  at  all  times 
for  the  carriage  of  their  goods  over  other  merchants  and  shippers,  as  far  as 
regards  the  Canadian  comiection. 

Freight  and  Passenger  Rates. — Freight  rates  from  Vancouver  or  Victoria  to 
New  Zealand  shall  not  exceed  the  current  rates  charged  on  similar  cargo  to 
New  Zealand  ports  by  Union  S.S.  Co.  of  N.Z.  Limited  Mail  Steamers  from  San 
Francisco. 

13 


14 


TRADE  A\D   COMMERCE 


13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1923 

Passenger  rates  from  Vancouver  or  Victoria  to  Auckland  shall  not  exceed 
passenger  rates  during  the  same  period  from  Auckland  to  Mctoria  or  Vancouver, 
and  return  fares  from  Canadian  ports  to  New  Zealand  ports  shall  not  exceed 
return  fares  in  the  opposite  direction  during  the  same  iwriod. 

No  discrimination  shall  be  made  in  any  manner  directlj-  or  indirectly  against 
any  Canadian  port  or  ports,  railway,  mc^rchants  or  shippers,  and  Canadian  mer- 
chants and  shipjjcrs  shall  at  all  times  have  preference  for  the  carriage  of  their 
goods  over  other  merchants  and  shippers,  as  far  as  regards  the  Canadian  con- 
nection. 

The  Canadian  National  Railways  shall  receive  in  all  respects  the  same 
treatment  as  regards  agencj'  representation,  advertising  facilities,  and  facilities 
for  handling  and  booking  freight  and  jxissengers,  as  is  accorded  by  the  contractors 
to  any  other  railway;  and  shall  have  equal  opportunity  with  any  other  railwaj' 
for  securing  steamship  accommodation  for  its  patrons,  and  for  ticketing  passen- 
gers to,  from  and  across  Canada. 

In  regard  to  freight  traffic,  equal  rates  and  equal  facilities  for  obtaining 
cargo  space  and  through  bills  of  lading  shall  be  granted  to  all  Canadian  railways. 

Mails. — To  be  carried  free. 

Canadian  Trade  Commissioners. — To  be  carried  free. 

DISTANCES 


Vaneouvcr  to  Viftoria 
Vii'toiia  to  Hinilulu   . . 
Honolulu  to  Suva,  Fiji. 
Suva  to  Auckland 


Total. 


Milps 
85 
2,3-42 
2,799 
1,140 


DESCRIPTION  OF  VESSELS  EMPLOYED 


Passenger 

o 

Dimensions 

Tonnage 

Accommo- 
dation 

EC 

g 

Built 

Name 

j: 

>. 

s 

'S 

1 

3 

Q 

1 

S 

o 

a. 

6 

O 

1 

•1 

1 

At 

In 

Of 

Ft. 

Ft, 

Ft 

Cu.ft. 

Makura 

480 

.W 

3,S 

4,920 

8,200 

3,000 

270 

114 

72 

14,985 

2,035 

m 

Glasgow 

190,S 

Steel 

Niagara 

542 

66 

37-6 

7,581 

13,444 

3.800 

2S9 

210 

27B 

63,200 

♦12,500 

i"i 

Clydebank . 

1913 

Sfeel 

■  Indicated  Horse  Power. 


TRAFFIC  RETURNS 


Calendar  Year 

Round 
Trips 

Passengers 
Carried 

Freight 
Carried 

Live  Stock 

Mails 

Subsidy  Paid 

m 

13 
13 
13 
12 
11 
11 
9J 
12 

Number 

5,886 
4,366 
4,311 
3,870 
6,. 592 
9, 521 
8,717 
5,862 
In        3, 462 
Out     3,549 

Tons 

42,615 
48,827 
.59,597 
.55,606 
63.205 
55,723 
43,484 
27,997 
12,101 
.34, 378 

76 

8 

Nil. 

20 
Nil. 
Nil. 
Nil. 
Nil. 
Nil. 
Nil. 

Lock 
bags 

Tied 
sacks 

$       cts. 

J914                  

15,338 
20,845 
22,281 
30,6.59 
72,395 
35,364 
29,265 
20,951 
10,262 
19,553 

29,815 

907 

936 

753 

773 

703 

861 

1,230 

1,291 

213 

1,635 

173,566  36 

1915 ■.. . 

180,509  00 

1916 

180,509  00 

1917              

180,509  00 

1918 

166,623  72 

1919 

152,7.38  41 

1920  . 

137,353  73 

1921 

88,679  09 

1922 

130,508  93 

Totiil  

7,011 

46,479 

Nil. 

1,848 

STEAMSHIP  SUBSIDIES  15 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  7 

ORIGIN,  QUANTITY  AND  VALUE  OF  FREIGHT  EXPORTED  FROM  CANADA 


Canadian  Origin 

United  States  Origin 

Total 

To 

Tons 
Weight 

Tons 
Measure- 
ment 

Value 

Tons 
Weight 

Tons 
Measure- 
ment 

Value 

Tons 
Weight 

Tons 
Measure- 
ment 

Value 

1914  Auckland 

Suva 

Honolulu 

Sydney 

967 

13S 

136 

2,377 

2,434 

3,901 

36 

8,737 

$ 

285,999 
128,844 
25, 748 
585,927 

861 
87 
Nil. 
2.916 

1,0,54 
160 

Nil. 
1,421 

$ 

.535.646 
42,276 
Nil. 
1,595,831 

1,828 
225 
136 

5,293 

3,488 

4,061 

36 

10,158 

$ 

831,645 

171,120 

25,748 

2,181,758 

Total 

3,618 

15,108 

1,026,518 

3,864 

2,635 

2.173,753 

7,482 

17,743 

3.200,271 

19I5Auokland 

4,482 

1,(M5 

2 

2,765 

2,450 
2,861 

5,700 

509,051 

176,329 

923 

927,085 

614 
142 

1,722 

1.356 
217 

4,500 

433.939 
44,213 

1,483,945 

5,096 

1,187 

2 

4,487 

3,806 
3,078 

10,200 

942,990 
220,542 

Honolulu 

923 
2,411.030 

Total 

8,294 

110,513 

1,613,388 

2,478 

6,073 

1,962,097 

10,772 

17,086 

3,575,485 

I916AuckIand 

Suva .. 

3,084 

910 

1 

3,525 

4,6C4 

1,850 

36 

9.533 

645,970 

160.285 

3.602 

1,380.367 

409 
79 

580 

3,405 
687 

8,843 

511,380 
88,275 

1,707,840 

3,493 

989 

I 

4,105 

8,009 

2,537 

36 

18,376 

1,157,350 
248,560 

Honolulu 

Sydney 

3,602 
3,088,207 

Total 

7,520 

16,0?3 

2,190,224 

1.068 

12,935 

2,307,495 

8,588 

28,958 

4,497,719 

19l7AuckIand 

4,813 
54 

2,809 

6,211 

1,,3.53 

38 

8,419 

1,099,650 

108,806 

3,527 

1,301.674 

77 
1 

2,696 
.    396 

5,091 

411,012 
64,233 

1,121,660 

4,890 
55 

2,809 

8,907 

1,749 

38 

13,510 

1,510,662 

173,039 

3,527 

2,423,334 

Honolulu 

Sydney 

Total 

7,676 

16,021 

2,513.657 

78 

8,183 

1,596,905 

7,754 

24,204 

4,110,562 

19I8Auckland 

Suva 

566 
775 

20,400 

1,457 

105 

5,593 

2,0.38,144 

225,363 

8,991 

1,641,174 

58 
9 

72 

2,448 

212 

4,367 

850,256 
68.792 

1.696,129 

624 
■9 

847 

22,848 

1,669 

105 

9,960 

2,888,400 
294, 155 

Honolulu 

Sydney 

8,991 
3,337,303 

Total 

1,341 

27,555 

3,913,672 

139 

7,027 

2,615,177 

1,480 

34,582 

6,528,849 

1919Auckland 

Suva 

284 

21,922 

838 

45 

4,619 

2,161,146 

141,296 

6,700 

1,645,625 

58 

7 

192 

2,030 

226 

11 

3,869 

710,228 

61.950 

2.299 

•1.572,273 

342 

! 
302 

23.9.52 

1,064 

56 

8,488 

2,871,374 
203.246 

Honolulu 

Sydney 

1 

no 

8,999 
3.217,898 

Total 

395 

27.424 

3,954,767 

257 

6,136 

2,346,750 

652 

33.560 

6,301,517 

1920Aupkl3nd 

Suva 

2,475 

431 

21 

809 

14,161 

1,262 

15 

5,277 

1.895,106 

225,136 

2,625 

1,255.756 

201 
3 

8(M 

2,725 

327 

18 

2,516 

573,066 

69,454 

9,319 

1,274.937 

2,676 

434 

21 

1,613 

16,886 

1,589 

33 

7,793 

2,468,172 
294,590 

Honolulu 

Sydney 

11,944 
2,530,693 

Total 

3,736 

20.715 

3,378.623 

1,008 

5,586 

1.926,776 

4,744 

26,301 

5,305,399 

192I  Auckland 

Suva 

113 
52 

18 

7,. 301 

1,250 

674 

8,117 

1,096.220 

134.604 

47, 1.37 

1.063.932 

- 

738 

187 

19 

1,471 

302,841 

37,992 

4,380 

980,332 

113 
52 
18 

8,039 

1,437 

693 

9.588 

1,399,061 
172,596 

Honolulu 

Sydney.  ..■ 

51.517 
2.(M4,264 

Total 

183 

17,342 

2, .341. 893 

- 

2.415 

1,325,545 

183 

19, 757 

3,667,438 

1922AurkIand 

Suva 

46 
11 
61 
64 

7,8.30 

1,8.50 

180 

14.671 

1,047,467 

113,126 

8,204 

1,827,652 

22 
38 

1,154 

119 

17 

8.315 

341,876 

34,279 

2,158 

1,946.139 

46 
33 
61 
102 

8,984 

1,969 

197 

22, 986 

1.389.  .343 
147  405 

Honolulu 

Sydney 

10. 362 
3.773.791 

Total 

182 

24.531 

2,996,449 

60 

9,605 

2,324,452 

242 

34.13f 

5.320.901 

16  THAUE   A  SI)   COMMERCE 

13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1923 
PRINCIPAL    ARTICLES    EXPORTED 

0/  Canadian  Origin. — Canned  salmon,  fresh  fruit  (in  cold  storage),  potatoes, 
onions,  leather  and  rubber  goods,  lumber,  codfish,  whisky,  bicycles  and  parts 
thereof,  chairs,  corsets,  suspenders,  sewing  machines,  hardware  and  machinery. 

Of  United  States  Origin. — Drugs,  sewing  machines,  automobiles,  gas  engines 
and  other  machinery,  soap  and  scouring  powders,  leather  and  rubljer  goods, 
cash  registers  and  scales,  cereal  foods,  telephone  material,  adding  machines, 
vacuum  cleaners,  motor  cycles,  and  corsets. 


PRINCE    RUPERT,   B.C.,   AND   QUEEN   CHARLOTTE   ISLANDS 

Contract  No.  6L 

T.  &  C.  File  No.  28008. 

Vote    173. — Prince   Rupert,    B.C.,    and   Queen    Charlotte   Idands — .steam   service 
between — 

1922-23 .?  21 ,000 

1923-24 21 ,000 

Contractors. — The  Grand  Trunk  Pacific  Coast  S.  S.  Co.,  Ltd. 

Date  of  Contract.— March  8,  1922.  Duration  of  Contract.— Apnl  1,  1922,  to 
March  31,  1923. 

Services  and  Ports  of  Call. — Fortnightly  trips  from  Prince  Rupert,  B.C., 
calling  each  way  at  Refuge  Bay  (on  Porcher  Island),  and  Masset,  Port  Clements, 
Sandspit,  Skidegate,  Queen  Charlotte,  Jedway,  Thurston  Harbour,  and  Locke- 
port,  and  calling  once  each  month  at  Cumshewa  Inlet,  it  being  understood  that 
the  call  at  Refuge  Bay  shall  be  made  by  a  subsidiary  launch  service  provided 
by  the  contractors;  calling  at  the  option  of  the  companj'  when  deemed  necessary 
at  Ketchikan,  Alaska. 

Speed  Required. — Not  stated. 

Subsidy. — S2 1,000  per  annum,  payable  quarterly  in  July,  October,  January 
and  April. 

Mails. — To  be  carried  free. 

Government  ivharves. — Steamer  must  call  whenever  po.ssible. 

DISTANCES 

Miles. 

Prince  Rupert  to  Masset 85 

Masset  to  Port  Clements 26 

Port  Clements  to  Mas.set 26 

Masset  to  Prince  Rupert 85 

222 

Prince  Rupert  to  Refuge  Bay 20 

Refuge  Bay  to  Sandspit 77 

Sandspit  to  .Skidegate 5 

Skidegate  to^Queen  Charlotte  City 2 

Queen  Charlotte  City  to  Ikeda 100 

Ikeda  to  Jedway 10 

Jedway  to  Lockeport 43 

Lockeport  to  Prince  Rupert 128 

385 

607 


STEAMSHIP  SUBSIDIES 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  7 

DESCRIPTION  OF  VESSELS  EMPLOYED  » 


Dimensions 

Tonnage 

a 
.2 

a 

■a 

t.  o 

X 

Built 

j: 

>, 

Name 

^ 

1 

a 

S 

1 

11 

X 

•a 

At 

In 

Of 

^ 

S 

Q 

Z 

O 

O 

1^ 

z 

CG 

Feet 

ft. 

ft. 

Knots 

232 

30 

141 

587 

1,015 

170 

Hull 

1892 

Steel 

185-3 

29-6 

10-9 

540 

905 

103 



Bowling 

1910 

Stfifil 

TRAFFIC   RETURNS 


No.  of 
Round 
trips  run 

Passengers 
Carried 

Freight 

Live 
Stock 

Mails 

Calendar  Year 

Tons 
Weight 

Tons 
Measure- 
ment 

Lock 
Bags 

Tied 
Sacks 

Subsidy 
Paid 

1914 

35 
13 
25 
24 
34 
39 
38 
26 

3,175 

686 

1,584 

2,217 

11.157 

3.251 

5,566 

In           803 

Out        961 

2,695 
1,380 
5,264 
6,553 
17,395 
5,948 
5,158 
2,408 
1,241 

•11  M  ft. 

465 
1.586 
Nil 

Nil 
69Mft. 

260 
Nil 
Nil 

4C 

117 

116 

5 

35 

24 

Nil 

Nil 

2 

1,780 
1.321 
2,116 
1,951 
4,231 
3,335 
3,246 
849 
3,128 

1,52) 
Nil 
Nil 
209 
551 
33 
101 
Nil 
31 

7,000  03 

1915 

7,333  30 

1916         

6,000  00 

1917 

19.7.50  on 

1918                    

21.000  00 

1919 

21.000  00 

1920 

1921                                       .    . 

21,000  00 

21,000  00 

Total 

1,764 

3,649 

NU 

2 

3,977 

31 

26 

1922 

In        1.333 
Out      1.024 

5,541 
3,952 

Nil 
Nil 

14 
Nil 

1,045 
3,193 

NU 
63 

21,000  00 

Total  2,357 

9,493 

Nil 

14 

4,238 

63 

(Can- 


•  Lumber. 

VICTORIA   AND   SAN   FRANCISCO 
Contract  No.  10. 
T.  &  C.  File  No.  27977. 

^'ote  174- — Victoria  and  San  Francisco. — Sleam  service  between — 

1922-23 S3 ,000 

1923-24 3 ,000 

Contractors. — The  Pacific  Steamship  Co.  of  Seattle,  Wash.,  U.S.A. 
adian  address  1117  Wharf  street,  Victoria,  B.C.), 

Date  of  Con^rrtc^— February  27,  1922.     Duration  of  Con/roc^— April  1,  1922, 
to  March  31,  1923. 

Service. — Weekly. 

Ports  of,Call. — Victoria,  B.C.,  and  San  Francisco,  U.S.A. 

Subsidy. — S3, 000  per  annum,  payable  in  quarterlj'  instalments  on  the  first 
days  of  July,  October,  January  and  April. 

Speed  Required. — Not  stated. 

Mails. — To  be  carried  free. 

Canadian  Trade  Commissioners. — To  be  carried  free. 

Distance. — N'ictoriu  to  San  Francisco,  750  miles. 
7—2 


TRADE  AM)  COMMERCE 


13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1923 


DESCRIPTION  OF  VESSELS  EMPLOYED 


Dimensions 

Tonnage 

Pa.s.senger 
modation 

1 
o 

2 
1 

■r. 

Built 

Name 

►3 

1 

1 

O 

1 

O 

C 

1 
1 

At 

In 

Of 

President ...'.. 
Ruth 

Ft. 
391 

455 
417 
291 
291 

Ft. 
48  0 

55-9 
49 
36 
36 

Ft. 
19-7 

43 
37 
23 
23 

2.546 

4,935 
2,546 
1,336 
1,336 

5,218 

8,226 
5.453 
2,1(M 
2,104 

2,800 

4,000 
2,800 
1.300 
1.300 

340 

284 
374 
102 
102 

179 

138 
294 
42 
42 

C.ft 

601 

Kts 
15 

14 
15 
11 
11 

Camden, 
N.J 

Germany. 

U.S.A.... 

U.S.A.... 

U.S.A.... 

1906 

1906 
1898 
1898 

Steel 
Steel 

Dorothy 

-Mexander.. . 
Admiral 

Schley 

601 

Steel 
Steel 

Admiral 

Steel 

I 


NoTF..-*-A  steamship  service  between  Victoria  and  San  Francisco,  provided  by  the  Dominion  Govern- 
ment is  required  under  the  terms  of  the  agreement  by  which  British  Columbia  entered  Confederation. 


TRAFFIC    RETURNS 


Calendar  Year 

No.  of 

Round 

Trips  run 

Number  of 

Passengers 

Carried 

Tons  of  Freight 
Carried 

Live 
Stock 
Carried 

Mails 
Carried 

Subsidv 
Paid 

Weight 

Measure 

Lock 
Bags 

Tied 
Sacks 

1914. 

54 

52 

47i 

52 

43J 

36 

49i 

41i 

62 

3.630 
4,307 
3.249 
6,703 
3.864 
4,296 
5,215 
3,912 
In           1,714 
Out       4,068 

3,534 

4  368 

Nil. 
Nil. 
Nil. 
Nil. 
Nil. 
Nil. 
Nil. 
Nil. 
Nil. 
Nil. 

Nil. 
Nil. 
Nil. 
Nil. 
Nil. 
Nil. 
Nil. 
Nil. 
Nil. 
Nil. 

Nil. 
Nil. 
Nil. 
Nil. 
Nil. 
NU. 
Nil. 
Nil. 
Nil. 
Nil. 

S     cts. 
2  971  15 

1915 

1916 

1.955 
3.702 

2,435 
2,514 

3,0C0  00 
2,769  23 

1917 

4,815 
2,949 
2,011 
3,844 
3,144 
1,942 
785 

Nil. 
NU. 
Nil. 
Nil. 
Nil. 
Nil. 
Nil. 

3  000  00 

1918 

2.509  77 

1919  . 

2  076  95 

1920 

2.826  90 

1921 

2,394  19 

1922. 

2,b25  00 

Total.    . 

5.782 

2.727 

Nil. 

Nil. 

Nil. 

Nil. 

ORIGIN,  QUANTITY  AND  VALUE  OF  CARGO  EXPORTED  FROM  CANADA 


Calendar  Year 

Canadian  Origin 

United  States  Origin 

Total 

Tons 
Weight 

Tons 
Meas't 

Value 

Tons 
Weight 

Tons 
Meas't 

Value 

Tons 
Weight 

Tons 
Meas't 

Value 

1914 

95 
175 
212 
234 
67 
69 
197 
314 
777 

873 
306 
370 

Nil. 

NU. 

NU. 

Nil. 

NU. 

Nil. 

S 

128,307 
37,730 
51,323 
55,941 
28,948 
28,911 

109,261 
82,975 

106,323 

Nil. 

6 
21 
19 

8 
,9 
46 

2 

8 

87 
27 
14 

NU. 

Nil. 

NU. 

NU. 

NU. 

Nil. 

$ 

10.911 
10.514 

4.901 
11,438 

4,475 

11,360 

31,7C0 

735 

8,878 

95 
181 
233 
253 
75 
78 
243 
316 
785 

r 

980 
333 
384 

NU. 

NU. 

NU. 

NU. 

NU. 

NU. 

% 
139,218 

1915  . 

48,244 

1916 

56,224 

1917 

67,379 

1918 

33,423 

1919 

40,271 

1920 

140,961 

1921 

79,710 

1922 

115,201 

.<?7Vi'.i Msiiir  srjisiDiKS 


19 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  7 

PRINCIPAL    ARTICLES    EXPORTED 

Of  Cnixiilian  Origin. — Household  goods,  automobiles,  Imildiiig  i);ipcr,  holly. 

Of  Vnitcd  Sillies  Origin. — Empty  cylinders,  automoViiles,  machinery,  raisins 
and  furs. 

VK'TOHIA,    \  ANCorVKH,    WAYPORTS   AND   SKAGWAY 

Contract  No.  28. 

T.  &  C.  File  No.  2824(5. 

Vote  175. — Victoria,.  Vancouver,  Wayi)urt.-i  and  Skagwmj,  steam  .'service  lietwcen — 

1922-23 .' S  25 ,000 

1923-24 25,000 

Contractor. — Canadian  Pacific  Railway  Co.,  Montreal,  Que. 

Contract  Dated.— Mii\  H,  V.)22.  Duration  of  Contracl.—\\)v\\  1,  1922,  to 
March  31,  1923. 

Service.- — Four  complete  round  trips  each  month  from  June  to  October, 
inclusive;  three  complete  round  trips  each  month  from  March  to  May,  inclusive; 
and  two  complete  round  trips  each  month  from  November  to  Februarj',  inclusive. 

Forts  of  call. — Victoria,  Vancouver,  Prince  Rupert,  Ketchikan,  Juneau  and 
Skagway.  Steamers  are  permitted  to  call  at  the  United  States  ports  mentioned 
in  the  preceding  paragraph  on  outward  trips  only. 

Subsidy. — $25,000  per  annum,  payable  in  July,  October,  Jaiuiary  and  Ai)ril. 

Mails. — To  be  carried  free. 

DISTANCES 

Knots 

Victoria  to  Varuouvor 73 

A'anrouvor  to  I^ort  Essington : ,...,.•.-  472 

Port  Kssinslon  to  Prince  Rupert - .'■ 27 

Prince  Rupert  to  Port  Simpson 36 

Port  Simpson  to  Ketchikan 66 

Ketchikan  to  Skagway i '. 307 

Total 981 

DESCRIPTION  OF  VESSELS  EMPLOYED 


Passenger 

6 

Dimensions 

Tonnage 

Accom- 

n 

Built 

modation 

u 

»   1   » 

" 

j£ 

■n 

P, 

■3 

■3 
g 

a 

0. 

a 

;z; 

i 
0 

1 
0 

»j 

u 
•a 

5 

•3 

(2 

55 

■a 
1 

U2 

At 

In 

Of 

Ft. 

Ft. 

Ft. 

eft. 

Kts 

Princess 

289  0 

460 

170 

1,903 

3,099 

500 

,500 

Nil. 

Nil. 

Nil. 

filO 

17i> 

Newcastle- 

1911 

Steel 

Alice. 

on-Tyne. 

Princess 

248-4 

401 

140 

1,346 

2,155 

900 

500 

Nil. 

Nil. 

Nil. 

195 

14 

Paisley 

1910 

Steel 

Mary. 

Princess 

317 

48 

18-6 

2,448 

4,031 

1,000 

.=>(«) 

.Nil. 

Nil. 

Nil. 

364 

17? 

North  Van- 

1921 

Steel 

Louise. 

couver. 

20 


TRADE  A\D  COMMERCE 


13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1923 


TRAFFIC  RETURNS 


Calendar  Year 

No.  of 

Round 

Trips  run 

Number 

of  Pa.ssenger8 

Curried 

Tons 

of  Freight 

Carried 

Live 
Stock 

MaUs 

Subsidies 
Paid 

1st 
Class 

2nd 
Class 

3rd 
Class 

Tons 
Weight 

Tons 
Mea.s't 

482 

Lock 
Bags 

Tied 
Sacks 

t       cts. 

1913 

40 

12,292 

1.461 

584 

6,409 

1.372 

3,460 

9.118 

12,500  00 

1914 

40 

12.788 

827 

811 

11,483 

349 

925 

6.665 

6,377 

12.500  00 

1915 , 

40 

6.020 

601 

249 

10.818 

597 

1,521 

5.067 

7,703 

12.500  OO 

1916 

42 

7,638 

440 

199 

13.506 

180 

1,239 

3.361 

14,207 

12.500  00 

1917 

40 

7,616 

528 

322 

13.909 

ISTil. 

779 

4,240 

9.347 

12.500  00 

1918 

32i 

6,308 

810 

112 

16.890 

Nil. 

158 

4,496 

8,195 

11.263  03 

1919 

34 

9,430 

699 

493 

8,583 

NU. 

260 

6.517 

7,649 

21.875  OO 

1920 

35 

10. 175 

705 

472 

9.582 

Nil. 

101 

4,144 

9,380 

23.. 593  75 

1921 

37    In 
Out 

5,-383 
4.484 

304 
358 

334 
320 

3.106 
5,563 

Nil. 
Nil. 

62 

1.586 
2,474 

3,186 
11,748 

Total... 

9,867 

662 

654 

8,669 

NU. 

64 

4,060 

14.934 

24,218  75 

1922 

40    In 
Out 

6,314 
5,523 

387 
157 

371 
131 

2.847 
6.841 

Nil. 
Nil. 

10 

123 

2.094 
3.986 

2,195 
10,013 

25,000  00 

Total..  .. 

11.837 

544 

502 

9.688 

Nil. 

133 

6,080 

12,208 

VICTORIA   AND   WEST   COAST   VANCOUVER   ISLAND 

Contract  No.  63. 

T.  &  C.  File  No.  28235. 

Vote  176. — Victoria  and  West  Coast  Vancouver  Island. — Steam  service  between — 

1922-23 , $  15,000 

1923-24 15,000 

Contractors. — Canadian  Pacific  Railway  Company  of  Montreal.  Que. 

Date  of  Contract.— May  4,  1922.  Duration  of  CotUract.— April  1,  1922,  to 
March  31,  1923. 

Service. — Three  complete  round  trips  each  month. 

Ports  of  Call. — Victoria,  Port  Renfrew,  Carmanah,  Cla-oose,  Bamfield,  New 
Alberni,  Uchucklesit,  Sechart,  Ucluclet,  Clayoquot,  Tofino,  Christie  School, 
Ahousaht,  Hesquiot,  Nootka,  Whaling  Station,  Kyuquot,  Quatsino,  and  Port 
Alice;  and  if  sufficient  business  offers  at  other  intermediate  accessible  ports. 

Speed  Required. — Not  stated. 

Subsidy. — S15,000  per  annum,  payable  in  June,  September,  December  and 
March. 

Mails. — To  be  carried  free. 


fSTEAMSHIF  SUBSIDIES 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  7 

DISTANCES 

Knots 

Victoria  to  Port  Renfrew 54 

Port  Renfrew  to  Carmanah 15 

Carmanah  to  Clar^ose S 

Cla-oose  to  Bamfield 25 

Bamficid  to  Kew  .Alberni 34 

New  Albcnii  to  8echart 34 

Sechart  to  I'cluelct 12 

Ucluelet  to  Clayoquot 28 

Clayoquot  to  Christie's  School 3 

Christie's  School  to  Ahousaht 9 

Ahousaht  to  Hesquoit 36 

Hesquoit  to  Friendly  Cove 25 

Friendly  Cove  to  Whaling  Station 68 

Whaling  Station  to  Kyuquot 11 

Kyuquot  to  Winter  Harbour 45 

Winter  Harbour  to  Quatsino 22 

Quatsino  to  Holberg 23 

Total 447 


2t 


DESCRIPTION  OF  VESSELS  EMPLOYED 


Dimensions 

Tonnag 

e 

Passenger 
Accom- 
modation 

1 

Built 

Name 

JS 
M 

J 

J3 

•5 
n 

a. 

a 

■z 

>> 

§■ 

O 

1 
O . 

5 
1 

s 

1 

1 

K 

-a 
I. 

02 

At 

In 

Of 

Ft. 

Ft. 

Ft. 

C.ft 

t 

Princess 
Maquinna. 

232 

24S 

38 
40 

17 
16 

978 
1,345 

1,777 
2,155 

800 
900 

'500 
500 

Nil. 
Nil. 

Nil. 
Nil. 

Nil. 
Nil. 

238 
388 

12 
14 

Victoria 
B.C. 

1913 
1911 

Steel 
Steel 

Mary. 

TRAFFIC  RETURNS 


Calendar  Year 

No.  of 
Round 
Trips 
Tun 

Passengers 
Carried 

Tons  of  Freight 
Carried 

Live 

Stock 

Mails 

Subsidy 
Paid 

1st 
Class 

2nd 
Class 

3rd 
Class 

Tons 
Weight 

Tons 
Meas. 

62 

Lock 
Bags. 

Tied 
Sacks 

%  cts. 
5  000  00 

1914 

43 

4,123 

2,469 

615 

6.806 

1,739 

2,479 

1,101 

1915  

42 

2,984 

916 

605 

7,442 

5,382 

40 

2,936 

898 

5  000  00 

1916 

42 

3,275 

1,343 

Nil. 

9,756 

NU. 

20 

2,321 

1,817 

5,000  00 

1917 

42 

5,292 

2,169 

Nil. 

11,636 

Nil. 

105 

4,353 

174 

5,000  00 

1918 

36 

7,168 

1,516 

438 

15,930 

Nil. 

151 

1,302 

3,936 

4,374  94 

1919 

36} 

5,733 

1.525 

Nil. 

15.047 

Nil. 

207 

3,335 

1,277 

4,375  00 

1920 

36 

6,980 

1,364 

Nil. 

21,050 

Nil. 

248 

3,979 

1,229 

12,500  OO 

1921 

36 

5,542 

1,323 

38 

20,507 

Nil. 

40 

4,777 

968 

15,000  00 

1922 

36    In 
Out 

Total  . . 

2,633 
2,600 

429 
488 

Nil. 
Nil. 

12.633 
7,513 

Nil.  • 
Nil. 

12 
111 

709 
1,519 

531 
3,930 

15,000  00 

5,233 

917 

Nil. 

20, 147 

Nil. 

123 

2,228 

4,461 

22  rix'ADI':  AM)   COMMKUCK 

13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1923 

VANCOUVER  AND  NORTHERN  BRITISH  COLU]\IBIA  PORTS 

Contract  No.  18. 

T.  &  C.  File  No.  28231. 

Vole   177. —  Vancouver    and    Xorlhern    British    Columbia    ports,    steam    seri'ice 
between — 

1922-23 $24,800 

1923-24 24,800 

Contractors. — The  Union  Steamship  Company  of  British  Columbia,  Ltd., 
Vancouver,  B.C. 

Date  of  Contract.— Max  2,  1922.  Durnliion  of  Contract. — April  1,  1922, 
to  March  31,  1923. 

Service  and  Ports  of  Call. — Regular  sailings  throughout  the  year  from  Van- 
couver to  Anyox  (Granby  Bay),  on  Observatory  Inlet,  making: — 

(a)  Two  calls  each  way  each  week  at  Campbell  River,  Alert  Bay,  Port 
Hardy  and  Quathiasca  Cove. 

(6)  One  call  each  way  each  week  at  Sointula  (including  mails  for  Suquash), 
Beaver  Cove,  Namu,  Bella  Bella,  Swanson  Bay,  Prince  Rupert,  Port  Simpson, 
Ocean  Falls,  and  .\nyox. 

(c)  During  the  summer  season  of  six  months,  one  call  each  week  at  Shu- 
shartie  Bay,  Wadham's,  Schooner  Passage,  Rivers  Inlet,  Bella  Coola,  China 
Hat,  Butedale,  Hartley  Bay,  Lowe  liilet,  Claxton,  Port  Essingtou,  Oceanic, 
Kumeon,  Arrandale,  Kincolith,  Mill  Bay,  Surf  Inlet,  Naas  Harbour  (Mill  Bay 
and  Naas  Harbour  calls  to  be  made  monthly  alternately  during  the  six  winter 
months),  and  Alice  Arm;  and  calling  at  the  aforesaid  ports  three  times  per 
month  during  the  winter  season  of  six  months. 

(d)  One  call  one  way  every  two  weeks  during  summer  and  every  four  weeks 
during  winter  at  Margaret  Bay  (Smith's  Inlet). 

(e)  Dm-ing  the  summer  season  one  call  one  way  every  two  weeks  at  Kims- 
quit. 

(/)  The  contractors  will  arrange  with  the  Post  Office  Department  to  con- 
tribute half  the  cost  of  a  semi-monthly  mail  service  to  Kitimat,  such  half  cost 
not  to  exceed  .$50  a  month. 

Under  the  present  service  to  Anyox  by  the  steamer  making  that  place  the 
terminal,  one  call  per  week  suffices. 

Speed  required. — -Not  stated. 

Subsidy. — .$24,800  per  annum,  payable  quarterly  in  July,  October,  January 
and  April.  (In  addition  to  this,  .$8,200  per  annum  is  paid  by  the  Post  Office 
Department.) 

Mails. — To  be  carried  free.  The  contractors  further  agree  to  carrj'  the 
mails  to  and  from  all  ports  at  which  thej'  call,  whether  such  call  be  stipulated 
in  the  agreement  or  not. 

Government  Wharves. — Steamers  must  call  whenever  possible. 


STEAMSinP  SCBSfDIES 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  7 


Vancouver  to  Campbell  River 

Campbell  River  to  Quathiasca  Cove 

Quathiasca  Cove  to  Alert  Bay 

Alert  Bay  to  ."^ointula 

Sointula  to  Sufiua.sh 

Suquash  to  Port  Hardy 

Port  Hardy  to  Sliusliarlie  Bay 

Shushartie  Buy  to  Taku.sh  Harbour 

Tukush  Harbour  to  Smith's  Inlet.  

Smith's  Inlet  to  Wadham's 

Wadham's  to  River.-;  Inlet  Cannery 

Rivers  Inlel  Cannery  to  Schooner  Passage. 

Schooner  Pa.ssaKe  to  Safety  Cove 

Safety  (,'ovc  to  \amu 

Namu  Cove  to  Bella  Coola 

Bella  Coola  to  Kiin.Miuit 

Kiiosquit  to  (Jccan  I'alls 


DISTANCES 

Miles  Miles 

lOI         Ocean  Tails  to  Bella  Bella 28 

2         Bella  Bella  to  China  Hat 39 

81         (  hina  Hat  to  Swanson  Bay 24 

5        Swanson  Bav  to  Butedale 13 

9         Butedale  to  Hartley  Bay 28 

12         Hartley  Bay  to  Kitimat 40 

19         Hartley  Bay  to  Lowe  Inlet 21 

39         Lowe  Inlet  to  Claxton 41 

12  Claxton  to  Port  Essington 9 

21)         Port  Essington  to  Inverness 12 

14         Inverness  to  C)ccanic 7 

13  Oceanic  to  Prinrc  Rupert 14 

!.'>        Prince  Rupert  to  Port  Simpson 34 

22         Port  Simpson  to  Arrandale 32 

.59         .\rrandale  to  Kincolith 2 

.^.:!         Kincolith  to  Mill  Bay 5 

.57         Mill  Bay  to  Anyox .33 

921 


DESCRIPTION  OF  VESSELS  EMPLOYED 


Dimensions 

Tonnage 

Passenger 
Accom- 
modation 

s 
1 

X 

1 

Built 

Name 

5 

■fi 

a 

0 

Z 

6 

1 

5 

0 

T3 

a 

1 

s 
1 

At 

In 

Of 

Chelohsin.. . 

Venture 

Coquitlam. . 
Camosun — 
Cowichan... 
Chilkoot... 
Chilliwack.. 

Ft. 

175-5 
180-4 
120-0 
1920 
156-1 
170-6 
172-6 

Ft. 
35-1 
32-2 
22-2 
35-2 
32-0 
•   27-6 
30-2 

Ft. 
15-7 
17-0 
9-6 
17-9 
13-5 
10-5 
12-9 

597 
580 
165 
7G3 
520 
219 
410 

1,133 
1.011 
256 
1,369 
961 
557 
756 

479 
560 
357 
713 
565 
750 
800 

100 

inn 

Nil. 
ion 

lO.i 

Nil. 

21 

91 

.S4 
Nil. 

lu:; 

Nil. 
Nil. 
Nil. 

Nil. 
Nil. 
Nil. 
Nil. 
Nil. 
Nil. 
Nil. 

C.ft 
Nil. 
Nil. 
Nil. 
Nil. 
Nil. 
Nil. 
Nil. 

131 

171 
28 
224 
151 
81 
95 

Kts 

m 

12 

7h 
11 
11 

9 
10 

Dublin 

Glasgow.. . 
Vancouver.. 
Paisley... 

.^yr 

Bowling 

N.    Vancou- 
ver  

1911 

I9I0 
1892 
11105 
1908 
1903 

1920 

Steel 
Steel 
Steel 
Steel 
Steel 
Steel 

Steel 

TRAFFIC   RETURNS 


Calendar  Year 

No.  of 
Round 
Trips 

Passen- 
gers 
Carried 

Tons  of  Freight 
Carried 

Live 
Stock 

Mails 

Subsidy 
Paid 

Weight 

Measure- 
ment 

Lock 
Bags 

Tied 
Sacks 

I9I4 

209 
189 
241 
236 
268 
218 
234 
237 
244 

Total. . 

21,167 
15.126 
21,424 
23,453 
30,454 
27,309 
32,477 
23,619 
In        8,465 
Out   15,938 

31,291 
30,627 
,34.550 
31,011 
40,116 
31,474 
20,216 
22,308 
12,391 
10.977 

10,600 
S..541 
14,738 
13,511 
16.891 
12,169 
14,9-56 
12,569 
2,473 
10,763 

518 
602 
362 
309 
230 
165 
242 
127 
37 
88 

17,256 
13,831 
16,964 
19,526 
20,997 
22,103 
26,872 
29,516 
11.201 
19,493 

Nil. 

Nil. 
Nil. 
Nil. 

100 
Nil. 
Nil. 
Nil. 
Nil. 
Nil. 

$ 

16.800 

1915        

16,800 

1916 

16,800 

1917 

16,800 

1918 

16,800 

1919 

1920 

1921 

1922 

16,800 
22,800 
24,800 

24,800 

24,403 

23,368 

13,236 

125 

30,694 

Nil. 

24  TRADE  AND  COMMERCE 

13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1923 

VANCOUVER  AND  PORTS  ON  HOWE  SOUND 

Contract  No.  78. 

T.  &  C.  File  No.  28365. 

Vote  178. — Vancouver  and  ports  on  Howe  SounrI,  steam  service  between — 

1922-23 .So,000 

1923-24 5,000 

Contractor. — The  Howe  Sound  Navigation  Co.,  Ltd.,  of  Vancouver,  B.C. 

Date  of  Contract.— June  9,  1922.  Duration  of  Contract.— Apn\  1,  1922,  to 
March  31,  1923. 

Sermce  and  Ports  of  Call. — 

(a)  A  regular  dail.y  service  from  JMay  15  to  September  15  between  Van- 
couver and  Gibson's  Landing,  Hopkin's  Landing,  New  Brighton,  Port  Mellon, 
Grantham,  and  Seaside  Park. 

(6)  A  regular  service  three  times  each  week  from  April  1  to  May  14  and 
from  September  16  to  March  31  and  more  frequently  if  business  should  warrant 
it,  between  Vancouver  and  Gibson's  Landing,  Hopkin's  Landing,  Grantham, 
and  New  Brighton. 

(c)  A  regular  service  twice  a  week  throughout  the  j'ear  between  Van- 
couver and  Hope  Point  (or  Long  Bay),  West  Bay,  Grace  Harbour,  Elkin's 
Point,  McNab  Creek,  Douglas,  North  Bay  and  Halkett  Bay. 

(d)  A  regular  service  t\\-ice  a  week  from  October  1  to  March  31  between 
Vancouver,  Port  ^Mellon  and  Seaside  Park,  with  more  frequent  trips  if  business 
should  warrant  it. 

Speed  required. — Not  stated. 

Subsidy. — 85,000  per  annum,  payable  quarterly. 

Mails. — To  be  carried  free.  Mails  to  be  received  and  delivered  at  ship's 
side. 

DI-ST-SlNCES 

Miles 

^■ancouvor  to  Hope  Point ^ 22 

Hope  Point  to  West  Bay ; 5 

West  Bay  to  Gibson's  Landing 8 

Gibson's  Landing  to  Hopkins'  Landing 4 

Hopkin's  Landing  to  Smith's  Landing 2 

Smith's  Landing  to  Xcw  Brighton 3 

New  Brighton  to  Port  Mellon 10 

Port  Mellon  to  Seaside  Park 1 

Seaside  Park  to  MoXab's  Creek 6 

McXab's  Creek  to  Elkin's  Point 2 

Elkin's  Point  to  Douglas  Bay -   4 

Douglas  Bay  to  Xorth  Bay 4 

North  Bay  "to  Halkett 4 

Halkett  to  Vancouver 22 

Total 97 

\'ancouver  to  Gib.^on's  Landing 24 


STEAMSHIP  SVliSIDIES 
SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  7 

DESCRIPTION   OF  VESSELS   EMPLOYED 


Dimensions 

Tonnage 

1" 

•3 

Built 

Name 

f 

pa 

■5 

2; 

O 

1 

At 

In 

Of 

liritannia 

Lady  Evelyn. 

Ft. 

104-8 
189 

Ft. 

22-4 
26-1 

Ft. 

609 
9-05 

221-6 
338 

.■52.5-9 
589 

60 
100 

200 
481 

33 
ISO 

Knots 

10 
16 

Vancouver,  B.C. 
Tranmore 

1902 
1905 

Wood 
Steel 

TRAFFIC   RETURNS 


Period 

No.  of 

Round 

Trips 

run 

Number  of 

Passengers 

Carried 

Tons  of 
Freight 
Carried 

Live 
Stock 

Mails 

Lock        Tied 
Bags       Sacks 

Subsidy 
Paid 

Auk.  1  to  Deo.  31.  1919 

114 
264 
238 
219 

Total.. 

.5,378 

18,603 

16,013 

In            7,032 

Out        7,851 

531 
1,955 
1,635 

117 
1,450 

48 
62 
61 
16 
41 

309 
2,033 
1,692 
1,022 
1,057 

464 
2,254 
2,399 

462 
2,507 

1,744  88 

1920 

1921 

5,000  00 
4  711  53 

1922 

4,967  95 

14,883 

1,567 

57 

2,079 

2,969 

13  GEORGE  V 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  7 


LOCAL  SERVICES 

BADDECK  AND  lONA 
Contract  No.  25. 

T.  &  C.  File  28128. 

Vote  179. — Baddeck  and  Inna,  steam  service  between — 

1922-2:3 .19,000 

1923-24 9,000 

Contractors. — The  Buddeck  Stcamshii)  Company,  Ltd.,  of  Baddeck,  N.S. 

Contract  dated.— Marvh  31,  1922.  Duration  of  Contract.— April  1,  1922,  to 
March  31,  1923. 

Service. — Two  full  rounil  trips  daily,  during  open  navigation. 

Parts  of  Call. — Baddeck,  lona  and  McKay's  Point;  calling  at  Kempt  Head 
on  the  western  end  of  Boularderie  Island  on  trips  from  Baddeck  to  lona;  such 
calls  to  be  made  only  on  those  days  on  which  the  subsidized  steamer  from 
Sydney  to  Whycocomagh  makes  her  westbound  trip  from  Sydney  to  Whyco- 
coniagh;  and  calling  at  Grand  Narrows  whenever  there  is  a  reasonable  amount 
of  freight  to  take  on  or  put  off  at  that  place. 

(a)  PiDvidcd,  however,  that  if  weather  conditions  prevent  the  steamer 
making  a  landing  at  lona  at  any  time,  she  shall,  if  possible,  proceed  to  Shena- 
cadie  to  land  and  take  on  passengers  and  freight. 

Connections  at  lona. — The  steamer  Blue  Hill  shall  make  connections  at  lona 
with  the  afternoon  eastbound  train  from  Halifax  to  Sydney.  In  case  the  train 
is  late  in  arriving  at  lona,  the  steamer  must  wait  for  a  reasonable  time  before 
proceeding  to  Baddeck. 

Government  Wharves. — Steamer  must  call  whenever  possible. 

Subsidy. — §9,000  per  annum,  payable  quarterly  in  July,  October,  January, 
and  April  at  the  rate  of  SIS. 00  a  round  trip  to  a  maximum  of  500  trips. 

Mails. — To  be  carried  free. 

DISTANX'ES 

,;..,!      ,    :<:  Miles 

Baddeck  to  lona 12 

"         Grand  Narrows 20 

"         McKay's  Point 10 

"         Kempt  Head 5 

Distance  between  terminal  points 20 

DESCRIPTIOX  OF  VESSEL  EMPLOYED 


g 

Dimensions 

Tonnag 

B 

Is 

Pi  i 
< 

•a 

1 

Built 

Name 

1 

pa 

a. 

a 

2 

SS 

s 
o 

At 

In 

Of 

Ft. 

Ft. 

Ft. 

Knots 

Blue  Hill 

1.3.5 

IS 

' 

92 

19.5 

100 

300 

38 

12 

East  Boston, 

U.S.A. 

18S7 

Wood 

27 


TRADE  AND  COMMERCE 


TRAFFIC  RETURNS 


13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1923 


Calendar  Year 

No.  of 

Round 

Trips  run 

Passengers 
Carried 

Freight 
Carried 

Live 
Stock 

Mails 

Subsidy 

Lock  Bags 

Tied  Sacks 

Paid 

I9I4 

1915 

1916 

500 
598 
510 
477 
453 
573 
484 
522 
492 

Total 

4.468 
4,1,56 
3.463 
4,380 
3,418 
5,6.52 
5,745 
5,761 
In        2,190 
Out     2,202 

782 
824 
789 
1,015 
783 
923 
841 
711 
602 
160 

98 
54 

Nil. 

Nil 
28 
25 

1 
15 

3,227 
3,065 
3,034 
2,8.54 
2,999 
3.869 
3,104 
3.615 
1.830 
1,356 

4,801 
4,200 
4,986 
5,419 
4,6.59 
6,711 
5,929 
6,74.S 
6,327 
1,121 

$  cts. 
5.825  00 
5,728  32 
5.750  64 
5.825  00 

1917 

1918 

1919 

6,825  00 
6  825  00 

1920 

1921 

7  979  40 

1922 

8,648  00 

4.392 

762 

16 

3,186 

7,448 

CHARLOTTETOWN   AND   PICTOU 

Contract  No.  79. 

T.  &  C.  File  28276. 

Vote  180. — Charlottetown  and  Pidou,  steam  service  between — 

1922-23 $8,000 

1923-24 8,000 

Contractors. — The  Georgetown  Steamship  Co.,  Ltd.,  of  Pietou,  N.S. 

Contract  dated. — May  10,  1922.  Duration  of  contract. — From  the  opening 
of  navigation  until  November  30,  1922. 

Service  and  ports  of  call. — Daily,  except  Sundays,  until  October  1,  and 
thereafter  three  round  trips  a  week  until  the  termina"tion  of  the  service  in  Novem- 
ber, between  Pietou  and  Charlottetown. 

Subsidy. — $8,000  for  the  season,  payable  in  instalments  on  July  1,  Sept.  1, 
and  on  the  completion  of  the  contract. 

Mails. — To  be  carried  free. 

Distance. — Charlottetown  to  Pietou,  52  miles. 

DESCRIPTION   OF  STEAMER  EMPLOYED 


Dimensions 

Tonnage 

Built 

Name 

j5 
1 

.a 

Q 

Z 

O 

1 

6 

c  o 

r 

At 

In 

Of 

Ft. 

Ft. 

Ft. 

Knots 

Magdalen 

98-6 

21-6 

8-8 

91 

134 

150 

40 

Shelburne 

1906 

Wood 

28 

10 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  7 


STEAMSHIP  SUBSIDIES 


TRAFFIC   RETURNS 


Calendar  Year 

No.  of 
Trips 
run 

No.  of 

Passengers 

Carried 

Tons  of 
Freight 
Carried 

Live 
Stock 

Bags 

of 
Mail 

Auto- 
mobiles 

Subsidy 
Paid 

I02I 

141 

2,776 

746 

207 

Nil. 

117 

$       cts. 
2,000  00 

1922 

146* 
Total 

In      1,188 
Out   1,437 

460 
251 

36 
4 

31 
61 

Not 
Stated 

7,938  77 

2,625 

711 

40 

92 

CHARLOTTETOWN,   VICTORIA   AND   HOLLIDAY'S   WHARF 

Contract  No.  74. 
T.  &  C.  File  28314. 

Vote  181. — Charloltetown,  Victoria  and  HoUidai/s  Wharf,  steam  service  between — 

1922-23 ." $4 ,000 

1923-24 4 ,000 

Contractors. — The  Cliarlottetown  Steamship  Co.,  Ltd.,  of  Charlottetown, 
P.E.I. 

Contract  dated. — May  30,  1922.  Duration  of  Contract. — From  the  opening 
to  the  close  of  navigation  in  1922. 

Service  aiid  Port.'t  of  Call — 

Two  round  trips  each  week  from  the  opening  of  navigation  until  October  1st, 
and  thereafter  one  round  trip  each  week  until  the  close  of  navigation,  from 
Charlottetown  to  Mctoria;  and  two  round  trips  each  week  throughout  the 
sea.son  to  Holliday's  Wharf,  East  River  and  West  River,  calling  at  China  Point, 
Orwell  and  Orwell  Cove. 

Subsidy. — $4,000  per  season,  payable  in  two  instalments. 

Mails. — To  be  carried  free. 


DISTANCES 


Cliarlrittftown  to  Holliday's 

HolliclayV  to  Cliin:i  Point :.. 

China  Point  to  Orwill  Cove 

Chariot tptown  to  \'i'toria 

Cluirlottetown  to  Hickey's  Wharf. 

Hickoy's  Wharf  to  Haggarty's 

IlaRgarty's  to  Haydon's 

Charlottetown  to  McEwen's 

MeEwen's  to  West  River  Bridge. . . 


Miles 

17 

2i 

i 

28 


DESCRIPTION  OF    VESSEL  EMPLOYED 


c 

Dimensions 

Tonnag 

B 

•a 

Built 

Name 

•a 

.a 
a 

Sg 

a. 

gs 

Is 

X 

■a 

At 

In 

Of 

^ 

e 

Q 

12 

o 

6 

&< 

z 

k 

Ft. 

Ft. 

Ft. 

Knots 

Harland 

113 

27 

6-7 

217 

352 

so 

286 

33 

10 

Shelbume.  N.S. 

1908 

Wood 

THADE  AM)  COMMERCE 


TRAFFIC   RETURNS 


13  GEORGE  V,  A,  1923 


Calendar  Year 

No.  of 

Round 

Trips  run 

No.  of 

Passengers 

Carried 

Barrels  of 
Freisht 
Carried 

Live 
Stock 

Mail 
Baics 

Subsidy 
Paid 

1914                                    ... 

251 
255 
234 
226 
No  scrv 
198 
242 
242 
241 

Total 

13.232 

13,165 

10,159 

10,. 536 

ice  was  perf 

3.123 

9.125 

9.092 

In      4.620 

Out   4,692 

33,050 
31,041 
35,898 
41.873 
ormed 
.30.018 
30,665 
26,066 
10,7.58 
16.970 

1,617 
1.0.53 
1,528 
1.275 

471 
1.728 
472 
861 
66 

Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 

Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 

i  cts. 
2,. 500  00 

1915 

2,500  00 

1916 

2,500  ro 

1917 

1918                                  

1919                                     

1920.                                

1921 

1922.                              

2,500  00 

2.031  25 
2,500  00 
3,500  00 

4.000  00 

9.312 

27,728 

927 

Nil 

GRAND   :\IAXAN    AND   THE   MAINLAND 

Contract  No.  14. 

T.  &  C.  File  No.  28056. 

Vote  182. — Grand  Manan  and  the  Mainland,  steam  service  between — 

1922-23 Sl,5 ,000 

1923-24 15,000 

Contractors. — The.  Grand  Manan  Steamboat  Company,  of  Grand  Manan, 
N.B. 

Date  of  Contract.— March  20,  1922.  Duration  of  Contract.— Ayinl  1,  1922,  to 
March  31,  1923. 

Service  and  Ports  of  Call. — From  June  to  September,  inclusive: — 

(a)  One  trip  each  week  between  Grand  IManau  and  St.  Andrew's,  calling; 

both  ways  at  Campobello  and  Eastport,  Maine. 

(6)  One  trip  each  week  between  Grand  Manan  and  St.  .Jolin,  via  and  calling 

both  ways  at  Campoi^ello  and  Eastport. 

(c)  One  round  trip  each  week  between  Grand  Manan  and  St.  John  direct. 

(d)  One  trip  each  week  between  Grand  Manan  and  St.  Stephen,  calling  both 
ways  at  Campobello,  Eastport  and  St.  Andrew's. 

And  during  the  remaining  eight  months  of  the  year: — 

(e)  One  trip  each  week  between  Grand  IManan  and  St.  Stephen,  calling  both 
ways  at  Campobello,  Eastport  and  St.  Andrew's. 

(/)  One  trip  each  week  between  Grand  JManan  and  St.  John,  calling  both 
ways  at  Campobello  and  Eastport. 

(g)  One  trip  each  week  between  Grand  Manan  and  St.  Andrew's,  calling 
both  ways  at  Campobello  and  Eastport. 

Sttbsidy. — §15,000  per  annum,  payable  quarterly  in  July,  October,  January 
and  April. 

Mails. — To  be  carried  free. 

Government  Wharves. — Steamers  must  call  at  Government  Wharves  when- 
ever possible. 


STEAMSHir  SUBSIDIES 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  7 

DISTANCES 

Cirand  Munan  to  Campobello 

('ampol>ollo  to  Eastport 

Eastport  to  Pt.  John 

Eastport  to  St.  Andrew 

St.  Andrew's  to  St.  Steplien 

St.  John  to  Grand  Manan 

St.  Stephen  to  Grand  Manan * , 

St.  Andrew's  to  Grand  Manan 1 


DESCRIPTION   t)F   STEAMER   EMPLOYED 


Dimensions 

Tonnage 

§ 

-I 
It  c 

ll 

a; 

Built 

Name 

j= 

a 
Q 

^ 

O 

I 

At 

In 

Of 

Grand  Manan. 

Ft. 
1.30 

Ft. 
26 

Ft. 
11 

180 

363 

2.50 

3.50 

32 

Knots 
12 

Liverpool.  N.S. 

1911 

Wood 

TRAFFIC   RETURNS 


Calendar 

No.  of 

Round 

Trips  run 

No.  of 

Passengers 

Carried 

Tons 
Freight 
Carried 

Live 
Stock 

Mails 

Subsidy 

"iear 

Lock  Bags 

Tied  Sacks 

Paid 

1914 

176| 
174 
173 
163  J 
165 
168 
175 
173 

Total 

6,. 525 
6.416 
6,977 
6,473 
5,606 
7,921 
8.047 
7,963 
In      3,555 
Out  4.144 

3,927 
4,589 
5.427 
4,607 
4,789 
4.793 
3,606 
3,448 
2,782 
859 

54 
26 
34 
41 
21 
107 
439 
134 
88 
9 

1,6.33 
1,775 
1,9.52 
1,805 
2,680 
1,782 
1,626 
1,700 
808 
663 

2.215 
2,. 587 
2,859 
3.089 
3,493 
3,577 
3,791 
4,268 
3,261 
673 

S  cts. 
10,000  00 

1915 

1916 

10,000  00 
10,000  00 

1917 

10,000  00 

1918 

10,000  00 

1919 

1920 

11,875  00 
14,375  00 

1921 

1922. 

15,000  00 

15,000  00 

7,699 

3,641 

1      97 

1,471 

3,934 

HALIFAX,   CANSO   AND   GUYSBOROUGH 

Contract  No.  30. 

T.  &  C.  File  No.  28267. 

Vote  1S3. — Halifax,  Canso  and  Guysboroiigh,  xteam  service  between — 

1922-23 $9,000 

1923-24 9,000 

Contractors. — The  Halifax  and  Canso  Steamship  Co.,  Ltd.,  of  Halifax,  N.S. 

Date  of  Contract.— May  12,  1922.      Duration  of  Contract.— April  1,  1922,  to 
March  31,  1923. 

Service. — Weekly,  all  the  j-ear  ronnd,  between  Halifax  and  Guysborough. 


32  TRADE   AM)  CUMMEHCK 

13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1923 

Piirt.s  of  Call. — C^illiriK  on  all  voyages  each  way  at  C'aiiso,  Whitehead, 
Drumhead,  Isaae's  Harbour,  Goldl)oro,  Port  Beckcrton  and,  weatlier  permitting, 
at  Port  Hilford;  and  calling  on  all  outwartl  voyages  at  Half  Island  Cove  and 
Queensport;  calling  fortnightly  during  ()])en  navigation  on  outward  voyages  at 
Country  Harbour  and  Boylston;  and  during  the  months  of  January,  February 
and  March  at  Port  Dufferin  and  Moser's  River. 

(a)  From  January  to  March  inclusive  a  fortnighth'  call  only  need  be  made 
at  Guysborough,  Queensport  and  Half  Island  Cove. 

(6)  Calls  at  Port  Hilford  shall  not  be  required  when  the  depth  of  water 
south  of  the  breakwater  is  less  than  14  feet.  The  contractors  shall,  however, 
make  every  reasonable  effort  to  call  at  this  port. 

Capacity  of  Steamer. — The  steamer  employed  is  guaranteed  to  have  a  cargo 
capacity  of  380  tons,  with  passenger  accommodation  for  40  passengers,  electric 
lighted  throughout  and  fitted  with  adeciuate  refrigeration  for  the  carriage  of 
fresh  fish. 

Laying  off  Steamer. — The  steamer  may  lay  off  for  refitting  two  trips  each  in 
year,  at  such  time  or  times  as  will  least  interfere  with  the  requirements  of  the 
service. 

Government  wharves. — The  steamer  must  call  whenever  possible. 

Subsidy. — $9,000  per  annum,  payable  quarterly  in  July,  October,  Januarj' 
and  on  the  completion  of  the  service,  (a)  Provided  that  no  deduction  from 
subsidy  shall  be  made  for  the  loss  of  one  trip  during  the  quarter  ending  March  31 
1923,  due  to  heavy  ice  conditions. 

Mails. — To  be  carried  free. 


DIST.\NCES 


Halifax  to  Port  Hilford 

Port  Hilford  to  Beckerton 

Beckcrton  to  Isaac's  Harbour. . 
Isaac's  Harbour  to  Whitehead. 

\Vhitch<>ad  to  Canso 

Canso  to  Queensport 

Queensport  to  Guysborough 


Total. 


DEfiCRIPTIOX   OF   VE^^SEL   EMPLOYED 


Dimensions 

Tonnag 

e 

§ 
1 

|i 
II 

P.' 

X 

■a 

Built 

Name 

1 
£ 

a 
Q 

•1 

S3 
S 
o 

^ 

1 

At 

In 

Of 

Ft. 

Ft. 

Ft. 

Knots 

14.5 

24-5 

16-5 

268 

509 

tons 
380 

40 

69 

g 

1910 

Steel 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  7 


STEAMSHIP  SUBSIDIES 


TRAFFIC    RETURNS 


Calendar  Year 

No.  of 

Round 

Trips  run 

No.  of 

Passengers 

Carried 

Tons  of 
Freight 
Carried 

Live 
Stock 

Mail 
Bags 

Subsidy 
Paid 

I9I4 

1915 

■.1 
51 
SO 
51 
48 
50 
45 
49 
50 

2,377 
2,247 
2.475 
2,44.'5 
2,168 
2,287 
1,8.-0 
1,223 
In          863 
Ont       896 

22.731 
25,098 
19,862 
25,481 
23,869 
30.701 
19,295 
19,153 
4.513 
15,23  5 

30 

Nil 
Nil 

21 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 

Nil 
Nil 
Nil 

Nil 
Nil  . 
Nil 
Nil 

Nil 
Nil 

$       ets. 

5.000  00 
5,000  00 
5  000  00 

i9ie ... 

1917 

5,000  00 

1918 

5  000  00 

1919 

5,000  00 

1920       

6  096  20 

1921 

6,932  69 

1922 

Total 

1,759 

10,749 

Nil 

Nil 

8.365  38 

HALIFAX   AND   L.^HAVE   RIVER   PORTS 

Coiitnict  No.  67. 

T.  &  C.  File  No.  28070. 

Vole  1S4- — Halifax,  LaHave  and  LaHave  River  Ports,  steam  service  between — 

1922-23 S6,000 

1923-24 6,000 

Contractors. — The  Western  Steamship  Co.,  Ltd.,  Halifax,  N.S. 

Date  of  Contract. — March  23,  1922.  Duration  of  Contract. — Opening  of 
navigation,  1922,  to  March  31,  1923. 

Service  and  Ports  of  Call. — Leaving  Halifax  once  each  week,  calling  at 
LaHave,  Riverport,  East  LaHave,  Pleasantville,  Conquerall  Bank  and  Day- 
spring,  and  returning  to  Halifax,  calling  at  the  aforesaid  ports. 

During  the  winter  months,  when  the  LaHave  river  is  frozen  over,  calls  at 
Pleasantville,  East  LaHave,  Conquerall  Bank  and  Dayspring  may  be  omitted. 

During  the  months  of  January  and  February  calls  at  any  of  the  said  ports 
may  be  omitted  if  ice  conditions  prevent  their  being  made. 

Government  wharves. — Steamer  must  call  whenever  possible. 

Subsidy. — ?6,000  per  annum,  payable  in  instalments  on  the  last  days  of 
June,  September  and  March. 

Mails. — To  be  carried  free. 

Withdrawal  of  steamer  for  repairs. — The  steamer  may  be  withdrawn  from 
the  service  for  a  total  period  of  fourteen  days,  if  required,  for  necessary  repairs. 


DISTANCES 

Miles 

Halifax  to  LaHave ^ 52 

Riverport 54 

West  LaHave 56 

Conquerall  Bank 60 

-3 


34 


TRADE  AND  COMMERCE 


13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1923 


DESCRIPTION  OF  VESSEL  EMPLOYED 


g 

Dimensions  - 

Tonnage 

11 

1 
o. 

Built 

Name 

c 

•5 

i 

a 

o. 

a 

2 

6 

OS 

At 

In 

Of 

Ft. 

Ft. 

Ft. 

Knots 

Enterprise 

108 

25 

8-6 

98 

211 

100 

100 

42 

11 

Shelburne.  N.S. 

1907 

Wood 

TRAFFIC   RETURNS 


Calendar  Year 

No.  of 

Round 

Trips  run 

No.  of 

Passengers 

Carried 

Tons  of 
Freight 
Carried 

Live 
Stock 

Bags 
Mail 

.Subsidy 
Paid 

1914 

685 
765 
835 
72 
23 
44 
46 
39 
47 

Toial 

Nil 
134 
682 
885 
368 
343 
246 
308 
In         133 
Out       152 

4.294 
4.820 
5,287 
7.310 
2,300 
3,807 
3.282 
2,025 
857 
2,190 

Nil 
Nil 
6 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 

Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 

$       cts. 
2,815  00 

1915      

3,000  77 

1916 

3,639  60 

1917                

4,513  .57 

1918     ■ 

1.095  26 

1919 

2,250  00 

1920    

3,7.50  00 

1921 

4,423  07 

1922 

5.769  23 

285 

3,047 

Nil 

Nil 

HALIFAX   AND   NEWFOUNDLAND   via   CAPE   BRETON   PORTS 

Contract  No.  11. 

T.  &  C.  File  No.  28059. 

Vote   185. — Halifax   ami   Newfoundland   via   Cape   Breton   Ports,   steam   service 
between — 

1922-23 S5 ,000 

1923-24 5,000 

Contractors. — J.  A.  Farquhar  &  Co.,  Ltd.,  of  Halifax,  N.S. 

Date  of  Contract. — March  17,  1922.  Duration  of  Contract. — For  the  season 
of  navigation,  1922. 

Service. — Fortnightly,  until  14  complete  round  trips  have  been  performed; 
or  until  the  close  of  navigation,  should  it  close  before  the  said  14  trips  can  be 
performed. 

Ports  of  Call. — Halifax  to  Sydney,  via  the  south  shore  of  Cape  Breton, 
thence  to  North  Sydney,  Marble  Mountain,  Baddeck,  Ingonish,  Neil's  Harbour 
White  Point  and  St.  Paul's  Island;  thence  to  Channel,  Codroy,  Sandy  Point 
Bay  of  Islands  and  Bonne  Bale,  Nfld.;  thence  returning  to  Halifax,  calling  at 
Bay  of  Islands,  Sandj-  Point,  Codroy,  Channel,  St.  Paul's  Island,  White  Point 
Neil's  Harbour,  Ingonish,  North  Sydney  and  Sydney. 

Subsidy. — $5,000  for  the  season,  payable  at  the  rate  of  $357.14  per  round  trip. 

Mails. — To  be  carried  free. 


STEAMSHIP  SUBSIDIES 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  7 


DISTANCES 

Miles 

Halifax  to  St.  Peter's : 154 

.''t.  Petrr's  to  Grand  Narrows ' 21} 

f  Irand  Narrows  to  Baddeck 9? 

Haddick  to  Nort h  Sydney 40 

North  Sydney  to  Sydney 4} 

.Syilnf-y  to  Ingonish 31 

Ineoni..ih  to  Neil's  Harbour II 

Niil's  Harbour  to  Aspy  Buy • 10 

Aspy  15ay  to  St.  Paul's  Island 21 

St.  Paul's  Island  to  Channel 49 

Channel  to  Codroy 27 

Codroy  to  Bay  St.  George 45 

Bay  St.  George  to  Bay  of  Islands Ill 

B.ny  of  Islands  to  Bonne  Bay 52 

Total 596 


DESCRIPTION  OF  VESSEL  EMPLOYED 


Dimensions 

Tonnage 

c 

a 
•o 

|l 

is 

1 

Built 

Name 

n 

c. 
0 

Z 

s 

1 

'     At 

In 

Of 

Stella  Maris... 

Ft. 
124 

Ft. 
23-6 

Ft. 
12-2 

54 

229 

350 

Nil 

70 

Knots 

8J 

1882 

Wood 

and 
iron 

TRAFFIC   RETURNS 


Calendar  Year 

No.  of 

Round 

Trips  run 

No.  of 

Passengers 

Carried 

Tons  of 
Freight 
Carried 

Live 
Stock 

Mail 
Bags 

Subsidy 
Paid 

1914 

14 
15 
14 
13 
13 
18 
14 
14 
14i 

203 
276 
293 
317 
36 
145 
55 
54 
In            16 
Out         13 

9,028 
9.346 
9,051 
7,700 
5,136 
4,913 
4,S17 
4,468 
2, 136 
2,405 

Nil 

Nil 
2 

Nil 

Nil 
S3 

Nil 

Nil 
5 
7 

28 
39 
44 
65 

51 

56 
55 
21 
26 

$       cts. 

10,000 
10,000 
10,00O« 

10,  oo* 

8, 000" 
lO.OOO 
5,000 
5,000 

1915 

I9I6 

1917 

1918 

1919 

1920 

1921 

1922 

5,000 

Total   

29 

4,541 

12 

47 

-35 


THADE   AM)  COMMERCE 


13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1923 


ORIGIN",  QUANTITY  AND  VALVE  OF  FPEIOHT  EXPORTED  1  ROM 
CANADA  TO  NEWFOUNDLAND 


Calendar 
Year 

Canadian  Origin 

L'nited  .States  Origin 

Total 

Weight 

Measure- 
ment 

Value 

Weight 

Measure- 
ment 

Value 

Weight 

Measure- 
ment 

Value 

1914 

To«s 

4,421 
4,308 
4,012 
3,0,58 
2,280 
2,631 
2,56.'! 
1.848 
1,711 

Tons 

100 
167 
73 
53 
34 
S3 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 

S 

217.962 
2.57,505 
276.533 
203.323 
246.535 
410.6.^0 
.374.210 
191.767 
124,48? 

Tons 

178 
293 
690 
454 
300 
621 
3.M 
809 
C91 

Tons 

129 
278 
12 
3 
3 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 

S 

25,925 
46,341 
110,740 
75,290 
43.121 
73.2.32 
69.. 502 
99.464 
72.787 

Tons 

4.599 
4.601 
4.702 
3.512 
2.. 580 
3.2.52 
2.919 
2.657 
2.405 

Tons 

229 
445 
85 
56 
37 
S3 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 

$ 

243,887 

1915 

303,846 

1916 

387,273 

1917 

368,613 

I9I8        

291,656 

1919 

483.882 

1920        

443,712 

1921 

1922 

291,231 
197,269 

PRINCIPAL    ARTICLES    EXPORTED 

Of  Canadian  Origin. — Flour,  paint,  molasses,  gasolene,  beans,  stoves, 
furniture,  butter,  tea,  hay,  rope,  tin  ingots,  apples,  oats,  kerosene  oil,  beef, 
pork,  sugar,  potatoes,  oil,  clothing,  boots  and  shoes,  nets,  hardware,  wire  fencing, 
roofing,  axes,  and  engines. 

Of  United  States  and  Foreign  Origin. — Molasses,  engines  and  parts  thereof, 
beef,  rope,  machinery,  pork,  tobacco,  kerosene  oil,  oranges,  shoes,  feed,  whisky, 
sugar,  tea,  salt,  gasolene  engines,  bananas,  oranges,  and  raisins. 


HALIFAX,  SPRY  BAY  AND  CAFE  BRETON  PORTS 

Contract  No.  .55. 

T.  &  C.  File  No.  28281. 

Vote  186. — Halifax  and  Spry  Bay  and  ports  in  Cape  Breton,  steam  service  between 

1922-23 S6,000 

1923-24 G,000 

Contractors. — Halifax  and  Sheet  Harbour  Steamship  Company,  Ltd.,  234-236 
Hollis  street,  Halifax,  N.S. 

Date  of  Confrad.— June  1,  1922.  Duration  of  Contract.— April  1,  1922,  to 
JVIarch31,  1923. 

Service. — Weekly,  all  the  year  round. 

Ports  of  Call. — Halifax,  Jeddore,  Owl's  Head,  Tangier,  Pope's  Harbour, 
Ship  Harbour,  Sheet  Harbour,  Sober  Island,  Spry  Bay,  St.  Peter's,  Arichat, 
West  Arichat,  Poulamond  and  L'Ardoise;  as  well  as  such  other  ports  or  places 
between  the  above  terminal  ports  as  may  be  required  by  the  minister. 

(a)  The  call  at  Pope's  Harbour  is  at  the  discretion  of  the  contractors. 

(6)  The  call  at  L'Ardoise  may  be  omitted  in  January,  February  and  March. 

(c)  Between  January  20  and  March  20  the  contractors  have  the  option  of 
omitting  calls  at  St.  Peter's,  Arichat,  West  Arichat  and  Poulamond,  provided 
satisfactory  proof  can  be  shown  the  minister  that  the  steamer  was  prevented 
from  calling  at  these  p'orts  on  account  of  ice  conditions. 


STEAMSlI/r  SUBSIDIES  37 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  7 

((/)  A  fortnightly  service  to  Marble  Mountain  shall  be  performed  during 
the  season  of  open  navigation. 

(e)  Through  bills  of  lading  shall  bo  issued  by  the  Margaret  between  Hahfax 
and  all  ports  in  the  Bras  d'Or  lakes  and  on  the  eastern  coast  of  Cape  Breton 
called  at  by  the  Arcadia  during  the  present  season. 

Subsidy. — S6,000  per  annum,  payable  in  four  equal  instalments  in  July, 
October,  January  and  April. 

Government  Wharves. — Steamers  must  call  whenever  possible. 

Time  for  repairs. — Three  weeks  are  allowed  during  the  year  for  Govern- 
ment inspection  and  annual  overhauling. 

Mails. — To  be  carried  free. 

DIST.\N'CES 

Miles 

Halifax  to  Jeddore 55 

Jcddoro  to  Owl's  Head 15 

0«  r.s  Head  to  Taneier 10 

TanKifr  to  Popo'.s  Harbour ; 10 

Popi'.-i  Harbour  lo  Ship  Harbour 10 

Ship  Harbour  to  Sheet  Harbour 20 

Sheet  Harbour  to  Sober  Island 20 

Total ..       120 

DESCRIPTION  OF  VESSEL  EMPLOYED 


Dimensions 

Tonnage 

•a 

t.  o 

i  ? 
(2^ 

si 

1 

Built 

Name 

1 
£ 

Q 

1 

1 

At 

In 

Of 

Margaret 

Ft. 
92 

Ft. 
19 

Ft. 
9 

100 

195 

175 

90 

27 

Knots 
10} 

Sheet  Harbour. 

1907 

Wood 

TRAFFIC   RETURNS 


Calendar  Year 

No.  of 

Round 

Trips  run 

No.  of 

Passengers 
Carried 

Tons  of 
Freight 
Carried 

Live 

Stock 

Mail 

Subsidy 
Paid 

1914 

50 
SO 
45 
45 
41 
46 
46 
48 
48} 

Total.... 

2.572 
2,630 
2,207 
1.522 
1,101 
1,342 
1,979 
1,962 
In           765 
Out        9S0 

7.700 
7,535 
9,180 
7,155 
5,740 
6,225 
5,600 
5.390 
1,920 
2,695 

Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
100 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 

Nil 

Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 

$     cts. 
3,000  00 

1915        

4,000  00 

1916 

3,603  08 

1917 

3,750  25 

1918 

3.767  92 

1919 ■.. 

4,000  00 

1920 

4.000  00 

1921 

5,346  15 

1922 

5,884  61 

1,755 

4,615 

Nil 

T^il 

38  TRADE  AXD   COMMERCE 

13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1923 

HALIFAX,   SOUTH   CAPE   BRETON   AND   BRAS   D'OR  LAKE  PORTS 

Contract  No.  66. 

T.  &  C.  File  No.  28283. 

Vote  187. — Halifax,  South  Cape  Breton  and  Bras  d'Or  Lake  Ports,  steam  service 
between — 

1922-23 86,000 

1923-24 6,000 

Contractors. — ^Messrs.  Hendry,  Ltd.,  Halifax,  N.S. 

Date  of  Contract. — June  1,  1922.  Duration  of  Contract. — From  the  opening 
to  the  closing  of  navigation  in  1922. 

Service  and  Ports  of  Call. — Passengers  and  freight  shall  be  conveyed  between 
Halifax  and  St.  Peter's  bj'  the  steamers  Margaret  and  Strathlorne,  and  shall  be 
transhipped  at  St.  Peter's  to  and  from  the  Arcadia  for  the  pm-pose  of  jiroceeding 
to  or  from  the  undermentioned  points  in  the  Bras  d'Or  lakes,  and  on  the  east 
coast  of  Cape  Breton.  The  Arcadia's  services  shall  be  as  follows:  (a)  Four 
round  trips  each  month  from  St.  Peter's,  N.S.  to  Sydnej-,  through  the  Bras 
d'Or  lakes,  calling  at  all  ports  on  the  east  and  west  sides  of  the  lakes  at  which 
freight  is  offered,  or  is  to  be  delivered,  including  Grand  Narrows,  Zona,  Baddeck, 
Whycocomagh,  Little  Narrows,  Nyanza,  Boularderie  Centre,  Boularderie,  Marble 
Mountain,  West  Ba\',  Washabuck  Centre,  Johnston's  Harbour,  Irish  Cove,  Big 
Pond,  East  Bay,  Castle  Bay  and  Grand  Narrows,  extending  each  trip  from  Sydney 
to  North  Sydnej-, Glace  Bay, Port  Alorien,  ^Iain-a-dieu,Louisburg  and  Gabarous. 

Through  tickets  for  passengers  and  through  bills  of  lading  for  freight  shall 
be  issued  between  Halifax  via  the  Margaret  and  Strathlorne,  and  the  above- 
mentioned  ports  in  the  Bras  d'Or  Lakes  and  on  the  East  Coast  of  Cape  Breton. 

If,  during  the  early  spring  and  late  fall,  the  steamers  Strathlorne  and 
Margaret  have  their  full  complement  of  freight  and  are  unable  to  carry  the 
additional  freight  required  to  and  from  the  Arcadia,  the  contractors  agree  to 
supply  an  additional  steamer  betweem  Halifax  and  St.  Peter's,  for  the  purpose 
of  carrying  the  surplus  of  the  Arcadia's  freight. 

The  calls  at  ]Main-a-dieu  are  to  be  conditional  upon  the  weather  permitting. 
Calls  at  Glace  Bay  shall  not  be  made  unless,  in  the  opinion  of  the  Minister,  it 
is  safe  for  the  steamer  Arcadia  to  call  at  this  port. 

Government  Wharves. — Steamer  must  call  whenever  possible. 

Subsidy. — §6,000  per  annum,  payable  in  four  instalments  of  -SI, 500  each. 

Mails. — To  be  carried  free. 

DI.STAXCE.S 

Miles 

Halifax  to  St.  Peter's 145 

St.  Peter's  to  Grand  Narrows 20 

Grand  Xarrows  to  lona 1 

lona  to  Baddeck 10 

Baddeck  to  Pt.  Bevis 9 

Pt.  Bevis  to  Boularderie 3 

Boularderie  to  Boularderie  Centre 5 

Boularderie  Centre  to  Big  Bras  d'Or 6 

Big  Bras  d'Or  to  New  Campbellton [ 

New  Campbellton  to  North  Sydney 15 

North  ?ydncy  to  Sydney. ^ 

Sydney  to  Glare  Bay 21 

Glace  Bay  to  Port  Morien 15 

Port  Morien  to  Main-a-dieu 1  -t 

Main-a-dieu  to  Louisburg H> 

Xouisburg  to  Gabarous H 

Total 300 


STEAMSHIP  SUBSIDIES 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  7 

DESCRIPTION  OF  VESSEL  EMPLOYED 


Dimensions 

Tonnage 

B 

.2 
a 

t.  O 
=  1 

1  o 

1^" 

-a 

1 
CO 

Built 

Name 

1 

s 

■z 

O 

1 

O 

At 

In 

Of 

Arcadia 

Ft. 
73 

Ft. 
16-7 

Ft. 
6-4 

42 

62 

70 

Nil 

30 

Knots 
8 

Yarmouth,  N.S. 

1SS4 

Wood 

TRAFFIC   RETURNS 


Calendar  Y'ear 

No.  of 

Round 

Trips  run 

No.  of 

Passengers 

carried 

Tons  of 
Freight 
carried 

Live 
Stock 

Bags 
Mail 

Subsidy 
Paid 

1914  .. 

19 
14 
15 
15 
14 
26 
32 
32 
33 

6 
Nil 
Nil 

57 

Nil 

181 

280 

274 

In          105 

Out       150 

4,603 
4,290 
3,770 
4,270 
2.342 
3,775 
5,820 
5,725 
2,E65 
3,115 

Nil 

Nil 

Nil  . 

Nil 

Nil 

Nil 

Nil 

Nil 

Nil 

Nil 

Nil 

Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 

i   cts. 

3,333  33 

1915 

2.666  66 

1916 

1917 

1918 

1919 

1920 

1921 

5,625  00 
5,625  00 
3,999  94 
6,000  00 
6,000  00 
6,000  00 

1922 

0. OCO  00 

255 

6,080 

Nil 

Nil 

In  1918  this  service,  commencing  at  Halifax,  was  performed  by  the  Provincial  S.S.  Co.,  and  previous 
to  that  by  the  Halifax  and  Glace  Bay  S.S.  Co. 


HALIFAX  AND  WEST  COAST  CAPE  BRETON 

Contract  No.  70. 

T.  &  C.  File  No.  28282. 

Vote  188. — Halifax  and  West  Coast  of  Cape  Breton,  callitig  at  iray  ports,  steam 
service  between — 

1922-23 $6,000 

1923-24 6,000 

Contractors. — The  Halifax  and  Inverness  SS.  Co.,  Ltd.,  of  Halifax,  N.S. 

Date  of  Contract. — May  15,  1922.  Duration  of  Contract. — From  the  opening 
to  the  close  of  navigation  in  1922. 

Service. — Weekly.  Twenty-six  trips  shall  constitute  a  full  season's  service, 
although  the  contractors  shall  be  required  to  make  such  additional  sailings  as 
weather  conditions  shall  permit. 

Ports  of  Call. — Port  Mulgi-ave,  Halifax,  Port  Hawkesbury,  Port  Hastings, 
Port  Hood,  Mabou,  IMargaree,  Grand  Etang,  Cheticam]),  and  Eastern  Harbour, 
calling  once  every  two  weeks  at  Havre  au  Boucher,  Cape  George  and  Pleasant 
Bay,  and  calling  at  Inverness,  Broadcove  Marsh  and  Margarec  Island  whenever 
there  is  a  reasonalile  quantity  of  freight  or  number  of  passengers  to  be  landed 
or  embarked,  weather  permitting. 


40  TUADE  AM)  COMMERCE 

13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1923 

(6)  Calls  to  be  made  at  Chimney  Corner  when  the  wharf  is  completed, 
and  when  there  are  passengers  or  freight  to  be  taken  on  or  put  off  at  that  place. 

(c)  One  call  shall  be  made  during  the  autumn  of  the  present  year  at  Ballan- 
tyne's  Cove,  N.S. 

{(/)  Through  bills  of  lading  shall  be  issued  by  the  Strathlorne  from  Halifax 
to  all  ports  in  the  Bras  d'Or  Lakes,  and  on  the  lOastern  Coast  of  Cape  Breton, 
called  at  bj^  the  Arcadia  during  the  present  season. 

(p)  On  all  trips  north  the  captain  of  the  Strathlorne  shall  advise  the  agent  of 
the  contractors  at  Margaree  from  Mulgrave  or  Mabou  the  approximate  hour  of 
his  arrival  at  Margaree,  and  on  southbound  trips  he  shall  similarly  advise  the 
agent  at  Margaree  from  Grand  Etang. 

(/)  When  weather  conditions  at  !Margaree  are  such  as  to  prevent  boats  or 
lighters  coming  out  to  the  steamer,  the  agent  shall  hoist  a  red  or  white  flag 
within  a  reasonable  time  of  the  steamer's  announced  arrival,  so  that  the  steamer 
may  not  be  unduly  delaj'ed. 

{g)  On  arrival  off  the  port  of  Margaree  the  steamer  shall  anchor  and  give 
notice  of  her  presence  by  whistle  or  other  suitable  means.  If  boats  do  not 
come  off  from  the  shore  within  half  an  hour  after  anchoring,  the  steamer  shall 
be  at  hbcrty  to  hoifet  her  anchor  and  proceed  on  her  voyage. 

Government  Wharves. — Steamer  must  call  whenever  possible. 

Subsidy. — .§6,000  per  annum,  payable  in  instalments  of  .S3, 000  on  July  1 
and  on  completion  of  the  service.  , 

Mails. — To  be  carried  free. 

DISTANCES 

Miles 

Halifax  to  Mulgrave 150 

Mulgrave  to  Hawkesbury 1 

Hawkesbury  to  Hastings 3 

Hastings  to  Havre  Boucher 7 

Havre  Boucher  to  Port  Hood 20 

Port  Hood  to  Mabou 10 

Mabou  to  Margaree 31 

Margaree  to  Grand  Etang 8 

firand  Etang  to  Eastern  Harbour 9 

Eastern  Harbour  to  Pleasant  Bay 15 

Total 254 


DESCRIPTION  OF  VESSEL  EMPLOYED 


c 

Dimensions 

Tonnag 

e 

'i 

n 

K 
2 

-a 

1 

Built 

Name 

•z 

2 
o 

1 

At 

In 

Of 

Ft. 

Ft. 

Ft. 

Knots 

Strathlorne... 

116 

20-2 

9 

81 

135 

180 

40 

24 

9 

Mahone... 

1909 

Wood 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  7 


STEAMSHIP  SUBSIDIES 


TRAFFIC   RETURNS 


Calendar  Year 

No.  of 

Round 

Trips  run 

No.  of 

Passengers 

carried 

Tons  of 
Freight 
carried 

Live 
Stock 

Bags 
Mail 

Subsidy 
Paid 

I9I4    

27 
25 
27 
27 
27 
26 
33 
26 

Total  . .  . 

Nil 

3 

Nil 

108 

64 

57 

470 

325 

In            85 

Out       110 

4,662 
3,782 
6,079 
7. 1,50 
4,960 
3,125 
6,000 
5,730 
1,455 
2,125 

Nil 
■    Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 

Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
■      Nil 

$     ets. 
3,058  82 

1015 

1916 

3,000  00 
2,941   18 

1917 

4,000  00 

1918 

1919 

4,000  00 
4,000  00 

1920 

4,000  00 

1921 

6,000  00 

1922 

6,000  CO 

195 

3.580 

Nil 

Nil 

MISCOU,  SHIPPEGAN  AND  THE  MAINLAND 

Contract  No.  57. 

T.  &  C.  File  No.  28295. 

Vote  189. — Mainland   and   Inlands   of  Miscou   and   Shippegan,   ateam   service 
between: — 

1922-23 $     3,300 

1923-24 3,300 

Contractors: — The  Gloucester  Navigation  Co.,  Ltd.,  of  Lameque,  N.B. 

Date  of  contract:— July  15,  1922. 

Duration  of  contract: — From  the  opening  to  the  close  of  navigation  in  1922. 

Service: — Daily,  except  Sunday. 

Ports    of   call: — Lameque,    Shippegan,    Little    Lameque    Wharf,    IMiscou 
Wharf  and  Little  Shippegan. 

Subiiidy: — -$3,300  for  the  season  of  navigation,  payable  in  two  instalments, 
in  September,  and  on  the  close  of  navigation. 

Mails: — To  be  carried  free. 


DIST.VXCES 


Lameque  to  Shippegan 

Shippenan  to  Little  I.ameque.. 

Little  Lameque  to  Island  R 

Island  Kiver  to  Little  Shippega 
Little  .Shippegan  to  Miscou 


Miles 
5 


Return' — Miscou  to  Shippegan. . . 
Shippegan  to  Lameque 


42 


TRADE  AXD  COMMERCE 


13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1923 


DESCRIPTION  OF  VESSEL  EMPLOYED 


c 

Dimensions 

Tonnage 

•5 
t-  o 

ge 

«   0 

^  S 

Built 

Z 

Name 

-a 
t 

a 

a. 

!S 

o 

At 

In 

Of 

'X 

Ft. 

Ft. 

Ft. 

Knots 

En  Avant 

42 

12 

4} 

10 

12 

6 

8 

Lameque. 

1913 

Wood 

12 

7i 

This  vessel  is  a  gasoline  schooner. 

TRAFFIC  RETURNS 


Calendar  Year 

No.  of 

Round 

Trips  run 

No.  of 
Passengers 
Carried 

Tons  of 
Freight 
Carried 

Live 
Stock 

Mails 

Subsidy- 
Paid 

1922.     . 

168 

fn             228 
Out          202 

1S6 
179 

Nil 
NU 

Nil 

Nil 

% 

3.300 

Total....  430 

305 

Nil 

Nil 

MULGRAVE   AXD   CANSO 

Contract  No.  53. 

T.  &  C.  File  No.  27980. 

Vote  190. — Mulgrave  and  Canso,  steam  service  between — 

1922-23 S  13,500 

1923-24 13,500 

Contractors. — Hugh  Cann  &  Son,  Ltd.,  of  Yarmouth,  N.S. 


Date  of  Contract.— MsLTch  1,  1922. 
March  31,  1923. 


Duration  of  Contract. — April  1,  1922,  to 


Service. — Daily  (Sundays  excepted). 

Ports  of  Call. — Port  Mulgrave  and  Canso,  N.S. 

Withdraival  for  Repairs. — The  steamer  R.  G.  Cann  may  be  withdra^Ti  for 
repairs  for  one  month  in  each  year.  During  such  withdrawal  the  service  shall 
be  performed  bj-  such  steamer  other  than  the  Malcolm  Cann  or  the  Percy  Cann 
as  may  be  approved  by  the  Minister. 

Wind  and  Ice. — In  the  event  of  any  trip  or  trips  being  missed  on  account  of 
^\^nd,  fog,  snow  or  ice  upon  satisfactory  evidence  being  submitted  to  the  Minister, 
he  may  direct  that  no  deduction  be  made  from  the  subsidy  otherwise  payable 
for  the  trip  so  missed. 

Government  Wharves. — Steamer  must  call  whenever  possible. 

Subsidy. — S13,500  per  annum,  payable  in  quarterly  instalments  in  July, 
October,  and  January,  and  upon  completion  of  the  service. 


STEAMSHII'  SUBSIDIES  43 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  7 

(a)  One-qu;irter  of  the  subsidy  otherwise  payable  shall  be  deducted  when 
the  contractors  fail  to  make  connections  with  the  Intercolonial  Railway  at 
Mulgrave  for  both  eastbound  and  westbound  traffic  in  summer,  and  westbound 
traffic  in  winter,  in  sufficient  time  to  permit  of  the  transfer  of  passengers,  mails 
and  express  shipments;  but  such  penalty  shall  not  be  inflicted  when  the  con- 
tractors are  able  to  satisfy  the  Minister  that  the  connection  has  been  missed 
owing  to  wind,  fog,  snow  or  ice. 

(b)  $oO()  of  the  subsidy  shall  be  deducted  should  the  contractors  not  place 
on  the  said  route  a  substitute  steamer  other  than  the  Malcolm  Cann  or  the 
Percy  Cann  when  the  Robert  G.  Cann  is  taken  off  the  said  route  for  repairs  as 
hereinbefore  stipulated. 

Mails. — To  be  carried  free. 

Distance. — Canso  to  Mulgrave,  24  miles. 

DESCRIPTION   OF  VESSEL   EMPLOYED 


c 

Dimensions 

Tonnage 

•o 

ii 

-a 

Built 

Name 

IZ 

c 

1 

U 

At 

In 

Of- 

Ft. 

Ft. 

Ft. 

• 

Knots 

Robert  G. 
Cann 

119 

24-6 

9-4 

111 

265 

Not 
stated 

100 

42 

11 

Shelburne,  N.S. 

1911 

Wood 

TRAFFIC   RETURNS 


Calendar  Year 

No.  of 

Round 

Trips  run 

No.  of 

Passengers 

carried 

Tons  of 
Freight 
carried 

Live 

Stock 

Bags 
Mail 

Subsidy 
Paid 

1914 

2965 
307 
305 
306 
295 
294 
293J 
298 
301 

Totals... 

3,795 
5,303 
4,897 
4,580 
4,251 
4,820 
4,438 
3,550 
In        1,826 
Out     1,830 

3.356 
3,963 
4.295 
0.873 
5,232 
4,266 
3,847 
2,920 
1,360 
1,386 

13 
12 
Nil 
609 

Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 

3,724 

4,036 

2,852 

2,407 

3.777 

Nil 

4,957 

5,528 

}      6,183 

$     cts. 
6,500  00 

1915 

6,500  00 

1916 

6,500  00 

1917 

6,. 500  00 

1918 

6,500  00 

1919 

8,7.50  00 

1920 

10,786  85 

1921 

12,870  06 

1922 

13,500  00 

3,656 

2,746 

Nil 

6,183 

MULGRAVE   AND   GUYSBOROUGH 

Contract  No.  54. 

T.  &  C.  File  No.  28190. 

Vote  191. — Mulgrave  and  Guyshorough,  calling  at  intermediate  ports,  steam  service 
between — 

1922-23 S9 ,500 

1923-24 9,500 


TRADE  AXD  COMMERCE 


13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1923 

Contractors. — The  Elaine  Steamship  Co.,  Ltd.,  Halifax,  N.S. 

Date  of  Contract.— May  12,  1922.  Duration  of  Contract.— April  1,  1922,  to 
March  31,  1923. 

Service. — Daily  (except  Sundays). 

Ports  of  Call. — Port  Mulgrave  and  Guyshoroush,  calling  at  Quecnsport 
every  trip  in  each  direction.  Trips  to  Boylston  shall  be  matle  three  times  each 
week,  during  the  season  of  open  navigation. 

Repairs. — The  steamer  may  be  withdrawn  one  month  during  each  year  for 
repairs,  etc.  During  such  withdrawal  the  service  shall  h(>  performed  by  such 
steamer  as  may  be  approved  bj'  the  Minister. 

Wind,  Fog,  Snow  or  Ice. — If  any  trip  be  missed  on  account  of  wind,  fog, 
snow  or  ice,  no  deductions  may  be  made  from' the  subsidy  otherwise  payable 
for  the  trip  so  missed. 

Subsidy. — $9,500  per  annum,  payable  quarterly,  in  July,  October,  January 
and  April. 

(a)  One-quarter  of  the  subsidy  otherwise  payable  shall  be  deducted  when 
the  contractors  fail  to  make  connections  with  the  Intercolonial  Railway  at 
Mulgrave  for  both  eastbound  and  westboxmd  traffic  in  the  summer  season  and 
westbound  traffic  in  the  winter  season  in  sufficient  time  to  permit  of  the  transfer 
of  passengers,  mails  and  express  shipments,  unless  the  connection  has  been 
missed  owing  to  wind,  fog,  snow  or  ice. 

Mails. — To  be  carried  free. 

DISTANCES 

Miles 

Guysborough  to  Mulgrave  (via  Queensport) 29§ 

Mulgrave  to  Guysborough  (direct) 25 

Guysborough  to  Boylston 5 

DESCRIPTION  OF  VESSEL  EMPLOYED 


B 

Dimensions 

Tonnag 

B 

as 
i§ 
II 

Built 

Name 

1 

m 

I 

2 

o 

>> 

O. 

a 

At 

In 

Of 

Ft. 

Ft. 

Ft. 

Knots 

Westport  III.. 

10! 

21 

9 

49 

140 

70 

35 

24 

10 

Shelburne 

1903 

Wood 

TRAFFIC   RETURNS 


Calendar  Year 

No.  of 

Round 

Trips  run 

No.  of 

Passengers 

carried 

Tons  of 
Freight 
carried 

Live 

Stock 

Bags 
Mail 

Subsidv 
Paid 

1914 

297i 

308 

264 

294 

252   , 

225 

283 

278 

Total. . . . 

3,812 
4,037 
3,670 
3,504 
2,584 
1,748 
1,683 
In           492 
Out        570 

1,815 

1,679 

1,600 

2,803 

1,9.-3 

1,606 

753 

472 

380 

Nil 

Nil 

Nil 

Nil 
I 
2 

Nil 
2 
2 

3,052 
3,440 
2,722 
2,248 
2.622 
719 
1,821 
1,783 
73 

$     cts. 
5,, 500  00 

1915 

5.,''00  00 

1916 

3,041  66 

1917 

5,500  00 

1919 

6,219  62 

1920 

5  507  29 

1921 

6,942  40 

1922 

8,407  7S 

1,062 

852 

4 

1,856 

STEAMSHIP  SCBS/DfF'i 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  7 


newcastle,  neguac  and  escuminac,  miramichi  river  and 
jViiramichi  bay 

Contract  No.  49. 

T.  &  C.  File  No.  28167. 

Vote  192. — Newcastle,  Neguac  and  Escumiriac,  calling  at  all  intermediate  points  on 
the  Miramichi  River  and  Miramichi  Bay,  steam  service  between — 

1922-23 .S5,00() 

1923-24 5 .000 

Contractors. — The  Miramichi  River  Service,  Ltd.,  of  Chatham,  N.B. 

Date  of  Contract. — May  9,  1922.  Duration  of  Contract. — From  the  opening 
to  the  close  of  navigation  in  1922. 

Service  and  Forts  of  Call. — On  Mondaj's,  Wednesdays  and  Fridays:  From 
Newcastle,  to  and  calling  both  ways  at  Chatham,  Lower  Newcastle,  Loggieville, 
Oak  Point,  Church  Point,  and  Neguac. 

On  Tuesdays,  Thursdays  and  Saturdays:  From  Newcastle,  to  and  calling 
both  ways  at  Chatham,  Loggieville,  Oak  Point,  Bale  du  Vin,  and  Hardwicke; 
calHng  on  Tuesdays  antl  Thursdays  at  Escuminac. 

Calls  at  Escuminac  are  to  be  made  during  favourable  weather  in  the  salmon- 
fishing  season.  When,  owing  to  unfavourable  weather,  the  steamer  does  not 
call  at  Escuminac,  calls  shall  be  made  at  Hardwick.  Calls  shall  be  made  at  Lower 
Newcastle  when  there  are  passengers  or  freight  to  be  taken  on  or  put  off  at  that 
place. 

Government  Wharves. — Steamer  must  call  whenever  possible. 

Subsidy.— $5,000  payable  in  two  equal  instalments,  on  September  1  and 
on  the  completion  of  the  contract. 

Mails. — To  be  carried  free. 


Newcastle  to  Ch.ithain 

Chatham  to  LoRcii'ville 

LogKicvillo  to  ( )ak  Point 

Oak  Point  to  Burnt  Chureh... 
Burnt  Chureh  to  Bay  du  Vin. 

Bay  (lu  Vin  to  Eseuminac 

Escuminac  to  Neguac 


Total 


I)IST.\NCES 


DESCRIPTION  OF  VESSEL  EMPLOYED 


§ 

Dimensions 

Tonnag 

e 

■3 

gE 
|8 

X 

1 

Built 

Name 

.^ 

M 
J 

n 

a 
Q 

■z 

s 
o 

i 

At 

In 

Of 

Ft. 

Ft. 

Ft. 

Knots 

Alexandra 

97 

24-5 

9 

136 

200 

50 

400 

38 

10 

Chatham 

1902 

Wood 

46 


TRADE  AM)  ('OM MERCK 


TRAFFIC  RETURNS 


13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1923 


Calendar  Year 


No.  of 

Round 

Trips  run 


No.  of 

Passengers 

carried 


Tons  of 
Freight 
carried 


Live 
Stock 


Subsidy 
Paid 


1914 
1915 
1916 
1917 
1918 
1919 
1920 
1921 
1922 


160 
186 
180 
172 
177 
165 
153 
158 
184 


7,7.56 
7,762 
8.478 
7,848 
7,070 
8,278 

3,548 
2,021 


1,921 
2,404 
2,414 
2,275 
2,426 
2,558 
No  statistics 
2,102 

742 

743 


44 
36 
40 
24 
available 

Nil 

Nil 

Nil 


Nil 


510 
594 
560 
544 
560 
508 

632 
368 
368 


S  cts. 
2,262  00 
2,500  00 
2,500  00 
2.500  00 
2,. 500  00 
3,000  OO 
3,000  00 
3,938  77 

5,000  Ot> 


PELEE   ISLAND   AND   THE   MAINLAND 

Contract  No.  52. 
T.  &  C.  File  27976. 

Vote  193. — Pelee  Island  and  the  Mainland,  steam  service  between — 

1922-23 Sll  ,000 

1923-24 11,000 

Contractors. — The  Windsor  and  Pelee  Island  Steamshi])  Co.,  Ltd.,  Pelee 
Island,  Ont. 

Date  of  Contract. — April  13,  1922.  Duration  of  Contract. — From  the  opening 
of  navigation  in  1922  to  March  31,  1923. 

Service  and  Ports  of  Call. — Six  round  trips  each  week,  weather  permitting, 
during  the  months  of  April,  May,  June,  September  and  October,  and  five  round 
trips  each  week  during  Julj',  August  and  November,  and  until  the  close  of 
navigation,  weather  permitting,  between  Pelee  Island  and  the  mainland,  calling 
on  each  trip  at  Kingsville  and  Leamington,  Ont. 

Tariff  Rates. — Passenger  rate  for  the  trip  between  Pelee  Island  and  Kings- 
ville or  Leamington  or  vice  versa,  $1 ;  and  for  the  trip  between  Pelee  Island  and 
Windsor  or  vice  versa,  $1.50. 

Freight  rates  are  to  be  same  as  those  contained  in  a  schedule  attached  to 
the  contract. 

Government  Wharves. — Steamer  must  call  whenever  possible. 

Stibsidy. — $11,000,  payable  in  equal  instalments  on  the  last  days  of  June, 
September,  December  and  March. 

Mails. — Are  to  be  carried  during  open  navigation  between  the  post  offices 
of  Pelee  Island,  Pelee  Island  South  and  Scudder,  and  .such  post  offices  on  the 
mainland  as  ma}'  be  designated  by  the  Postmaster  General. 


STEAMSHIP  SCBSIDIES 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  7 


Kingsvillr  to  Leamington  . 
I.ramington  to  Pelfo  Island. 
Pclee  Island  to  Windsor 


DISTANCES 


DESCRIPTION   OF  VESSEL  EMPLOYED 


Dimensions 

Tonnage 

i§ 

II 

K 

1 

CO 

Buiit 

Name 

£ 

c. 

a 

2 

O 

a 
O 

At 

In 

Of 

Pelec 

Ft. 
145 

Ft. 
24 

Ft. 
13 

242 

537 

389 

58 

Knots 
13 

CollingB-ood. . . 

1914 

Stppl 

TRAFFIC  RETURNS 


Calendar  Year 

No.  of 

Round 

Trips  run 

Passengers 

Freight 

Lumber 

Live 

Stock 

Mails 

Subsidy 

Bags 

Sacks 

Paid 

1914 

187 
241 
236 
231 
.205 
218 
211* 
217} 
217 

Total... 

No. 

3,672 
3,825 
3.987 
3.761 
4.546 
5.662 
5,940 
5,586 
In        2.S95 
Out     2,989 

Tons 

3,469 

3,. WO 

Feet 

169,000 

174.000 

"S  11(10 

571 
1,010 
1.065 
1,101 

561 

913 
1,305 

444 
13 

826 

562 
765 
732 
872 
500 
662 
781 
700 
4,52 
459 

455 
726 
644 
583 
676 
972 
803 
740 
1,149 
38 

$ 

7,000 

1915 

8  000 

1916 

8,000 

1917 

2.('.'.'i;         ,sv,  1(1(1 

1  ,s(,r      ii,:  I  (,(i 

8.000 

1918    . 

8  000 

1919 

2!  404 

1,878 

787 

1,078 

1."4,(,IIU 
166,000 
63,000 
61,000 

Nil 

8,000 

li)20 

8,000 

1921 

8,000 

1922 

10,250 

5.984 

1,865 

61,000 

839 

911 

1,187 

TRADE  AM)   COMMERCE 


SCHEDULE   OF   FREIGHT   RATES 


13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1923 


Kingsville 

and 
Leamington 


Grain  and  potatoes,  per  cwt,  car  lots 

Grain  and  potaloeis,  less  than  carload 

Fruit  in  baskets,  per  cwt 

Wine,  per  bbl 

Oil,  per  barrel 

Salt  and  flour,  per  bbl 

Minimum  oharne  on  one  parcel 

Any  one  animal,  horse  or  cattle,  up  to  five,  each 

Any  additional  animal  over  five 

Hogs  and  sheep  up  to  ten,  each 

Hogs  and  sheep  over  ten,  each 

Groceries  and  hardware,  per  cwt 

Lumber,  per  M  ft .  up  to  5  M  ft 

Over  ,i  M  ft 

Shingles,  per  M 

Laths,  per  M 

Gristing,  per  bag,  return 

Tobacco,  per  cwt 

Buggies,  set  up,  each 

Buggies,  crated,  each , 

Coal,  per  ton 

Coal,  per  ton,  in  carload  lots 

Farm  machinery,  per  cwt 

Flour,  per  barrel 

Lubricating  oils,  per  barrel 

Linseed  oils,  per  barrel 

Turpentine,  per  barrel ., 

3  inch  tile,  perlOO ' 

4  "  "       

.5         "  "       

6         "  "       ." 

8         "  "       ■ 

10         "  "       

12         "  "       

Fish ,  per  cwt 

Automobiles,  one  way,  including  driver 

Automobiles,  return,  including  driver 

Brick,  per  M , 

Lime,  per  barrel 

Cement,  per  barrel , 

Cement,  carloads 

Beer,  prr  case 

Pop,  per  case 

Eggs,  per  crate ■. 

Hay  and  straw,  per  ton , . 

Wool,  per  cwt 

Hides,  per  cwt 

Fence  posts,  each 

Wagon,  empty 

Stone,  per  ton 

Hard  wall  plaster,  per  cwt 

Scrap  iron,  per  cwt 

Cauliflower,  per  cwt 

Pianos,  each 

Organs,  each 

Onions,  in  carloads 

Onions,  less  than  carloads 

Poultry,  in  crates,  per  cwt 

Poultry,  not  crated,  per  cwt 


$  cts. 
0  10 
0  12 
0  30 
0  75 
0  8.5 
0  35 
0  25 
2  50 

2  25 
0  75 
0  65 
0  25 

3  .■0 
3  00 
0  40 
0  50 
0  20 

0  40 

1  75 

2  50 
2  00 
1  50 
0  45 
0  40 
0  85 
0  85 
0  75 
0  fiO 

0  SO 

1  00 
1  20 

1  60 

2  00 

2  40 
0  35 

3  00 
5  00 
0  00 
0  50 
0  55 
0  50 
0  35 
0  25 
0  25 
2  50 
0  40 
0  45 

0  05 

2  50 

1  50 
0  25 
0  25 
0  14 
5  00 

3  00 
0  10 
0  12 

0  75 

1  00 


PASSENGER   FARES 
Between  Pelee  Island  and  Leamington  and  Kingsville — .Single. 


STEAMSfin'  SriiSfDIK.'^ 


49 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  7 


MULGRAVE,  ARICHAT  AND  PETIT  DE  GRAT 

Contract  No.  20. 

T.  &  C.  File  No.  28168. 

Vote  194- — Mulgrave,  Arichat  and  Petit  de  Grat,  steam  service  betiveen — 

1922-23 $10,000 

1923-24 10,000 

Contractor. — The  Arichat  Steamship  Co.,  Ltd.,  of  Sydney,  N.S. 

Date  of  Co7itr act.— AprW  11,  1022.  Duration  of  Contract. — April  1,  1922,  to 
March  31,  1928. 

Service  and  Ports  of  Call. — One  full  trip  each  way  (Si^ndaj's  excepted)  daily 
between  Petit  de  Grat  and  Mulgrave,  calling  on  all  trips  both  going  and  coming 
at  Arichat  and  West  Arichat. 

TT';«f/  and  Ice. — In  the  event  of  an}'  trip  or  trips  being  missed  on  account  of 
wind  or  drifting  ice,  no  deduction  may  be  made  from  the  subsidy  otherwise 
payable  for  the  trips  so  missed. 

Government  Wharves. — Steamer  must  call  whenever  possible. 

Siibsidy. — $10,000,  payable  quarterly  in  July,  October,  Januarj'  and  April. 

Repairs. — The  steamer  may  be  laid  off  during  such  period  as  may  be 
approved  of  by  the  iMinister  for  repairs,  inspection,  cleaning,  painting,  etc. 
While  the  Arichat  is  laid  off,  the  contractors  shall  perform  a  daily  service  with 
a  substitute  vessel. 

Mails. — To  be  carried  free. 

DISTANX'ES 

Miles 

Petit  de  Grat  to  Arichat 8 

Arichat  to  West  Arichat : 7 

West  Arichat  to  Mulgrave , ." 18 

Total 33 


DESCRIPTION  OF  \'ESSEL  EMPLOYED 


c 

Dimensions 

Tonnag( 

Built 

.g 

as 

fc 

Name 

M 

-3 

a 

t^ 

S 

1 

«  3 

X 

-3 

At 

In 

Of 

^ 

K 

a 

Z 

O 

O 

!^< 

z 

03 

Ft. 

Ft. 

Ft. 

Knots 

Arichat 

84-9 

19-3 

10-3 

54 

144 

120 

100 

24 

9} 

Montreal.. 

1917 

Wood 

TRADE   AXD  COMMERCE 


TRAFFIC   RETURNS 


13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1923 


Calendar  Year 

No.  of 

Round 

Trips  run 

No.  of 

Passengers 
Carried 

Tons  of 
Freight 
Carried 

Live 
Stock 

Mail 

Sacks 

Subsidy 
Paid 

I9I4 

1915 

276i 

27SJ 

241 

21 7J 

265 

242J 

166 

200 

269 

2,569 
2,140 
2.392 
1,535 
1,969 
2.108 
2,. 386 
1,224 
In      1,069 
Out       740 

835 

832 

1,009 

1,106 

1..541 

2.051 

875 

969 

625 

296 

Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
2 

100 

Nil 
Nil 

3,. 354 

2,944 

2,485 

2,235 

3,075 

3,. 503 

2.612 

Nil 

Nil  . 

NU 

$      cts. 

6,750  00 
7.000  00 

1916 

6  125  00 

1917 

5,512  43 

1918 

7.000  OO 

1919 

6,107  .58 

1920 

1921 

7,562  50 
9,666  67 

1922 

9.968  35 

1,809 

921 

Nil 

Nil 

PICTOr  AND  .MONTAGUE 

Contract  No.  19. 

T.  &  C.  File  No.  24082. 

Vote  195. — Pidou  and  Montague,  calling  at  Murray  Harbour  and  Georgetown, 
steam  service  between — 

1922-23 !?6,000 

1923-24 6,000 

Contractor. — La  Have  Steamship  Co.,  Ltd.,  of  West  La  Have,  N.S. 

Date  of  Contract. — August  12,  1922.  Duration  of  Contract. — From  the 
opening  to  the  close  of  navigation  in  1922. 

Serince  and  Ports  of  Call. — Tliree  round  trips  each  week,  sailing  from 
Montague,  calling  at  Georgetown  and  Beach  Point,  P.E.L,  and  Pictou,  N.S., 
returning  to  Beach  Point,  Georgetown  and  ^Montague,  and  roalciDg  two  calls 
each  week  at  Cardigan,  Newport  and  Murray  Harbour  North.  Any  changes 
in  the  itinerary  may  be  made  by  the  contractors  subject  to  the  approval  of  the 
Minister. 

Subsidy. — $6,000  for  the  season,  payable  in  three  instalments. 

Mails. — To  be  carried  free. 

Government  Wharves. — Steamer  must  call  whenever  possible. 


DIST.\NCES 

Miles 

Pictou  to  Montague 47 

Montague  to  Cardigan 22 

Xfontague  to  Murray  Harbour 20 

Murraj'  Harbour  North  to  Pictou 38 

GeorgetowTi  to  Pictou '. 40 

Montague  to  Lower  Montague > 4 

Lower  Montague  to  Georgetown 2 

Cardigan  to  Newport 4 


STEAMSHIP  SCBSIDIES  ■ 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  7 

DESCRIPTION   OF   VESSEL  EMPLOYED 


c 

Name 

Dimensions 

Tonnage 

11 
X  o 

1 
eg 

Built 

3 

•5 

1 
« 

a 
Q 

■♦J 

O 

a 

OS 

O 

At 

In 

Of 

Ft. 

Ft. 

Ft. 

Knots 

Tu 

ssle 

83-2 

20-5 

9-S 

67 

151 

100 

25 

28 

10  Lunenburg,  N.S. 

1915 

Wood 

TRAFFIC   RETURNS 


Calendar  Year 

No.  of 

Round 

Trips  run 

No.  of 

Passengers 

Carried 

Tons  of 
Freight 
Carried 

No.  of 

Live 

Stock 

Carried 

Bags 
Mails 

Subsidy 
Paid 

1914 

1915 

97 
96 
85 
84 
4.'i 
61 
68 
50 
28 

Total 

1,885 

1,926 

1.455 

1,562 

1,497 

1..544 

2,153 

897 

In             98 

Out         HI 

5,126 

4,892 

5,468 

5,956 

1,040 

1,890 

1,191 

517 

203 

13 

423 
230 
88 
72 
62 
107 
41 

23 

417 

393 

124 

15 

Nil 

Nil 

Nil 

Nil 

Nil 

Nil 

S       cts. 

6,000  00 
6,000  00 

1916 

1917 

5,684  21 
6,000  00 

1918 

3,580  00 

1919 

6.000  00 

1920 

6,000  00 

1921 

6,000  00 

1922 

3,360  00 

209 

216 

23 

Nil 

PICTOU,  MULGRAVE  AND  CHETICAMP 

Contract  No.  IG. 

T.  &  C.  File  No.  28161. 

Vote  196. — Pictou,  Mulgrave  and  Cheticmtip,  steam  sennce  beticeen — 

1922-23 $11,000 

1923-24 11,000 

Contractor. — The  North  Bay  Steamship  Co.,  Ltd.,  of  Port  Hood,  N.S. 


Duration  of  Contract. — From  the  opening 


Date  of  Contract.— May  1,  1922. 
to  the  close  of  navigation,  1922. 

Service  and  Ports  of  Call. — (a)  12  round  trips  during  the  season  between 
Pictou  and  Mulgrave,  calling  both  ways  (where  there  are  passengers  or  freight 
offering)  at  Arisaig,  Ceorgeville,  Cape  Ceorge,  Morristown,  Malignant  Cove, 
Livingstone  Cove,  Ballantyne  Cove,  and  Cribbin's  Point. 

(b)  Three  round  trips  each  week  from  May  15th  to  November  15th,  both 
ilates  inclusive,  and  two  round  trips  each  week  during  the  remainder  of  the 
season,  between  Mulgrave  and  Cheticamp,  calling  both  ways  at  Port  Hastings, 
Port  Hawkesbury,  Port  Hood,  Port  Hood  Island,  Margaree  Harbour,  Grand 
Etang,  and  Eastern  Harbour,  making  50  round  trips  during  the  season;  and 
7— U 


52  TRADE  A\D  COMMERCE 

13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1923 

calling  once  each  wook  at  Pleasant  Bay,  and  whenever  passengers  or  freight 
are  offered  and  whenever  required  by  the  Minister,  at  Chimney  Corner,  Henry 
Island,  Mabou  !Mouth,  Inverness,  Red  Cape,  and  Port  Bain,  as  well  as  at  such 
other  port  or  ports,  place  or  places  en  route  as  the  minister  may  direct. 

(c)  If  so  requiretl  by  the  minister  eight  round  trips  during  the  season  between 
Souris  and  IMulgnive  may  be  substituted  for  eight  round  trips  between  Pictou 
and  ^lulgrave  aforesaid,  calling  both  ways  at  Arisaig,  (Jeorgeville,  Cape  (leorge, 
Morristown,  Malignant  Cove,  Livingstone  Cove,  Ballantyne  Cove,  and  Cribbin's 
Point,  of  which  one  trip  shall  he  mude  in  June,  two  in  July,  two  in  August,  one 
in  September  and  two  in  October. 

Regular  semi-weekly  connections  are  to  be  maintained  with  the  Canadian 
National  Railways  at  iNIulgrave,  anti  the  Plant  Line  steamers  at  Hawkesbury. 

Subsidy. — SI  1,000,  paj'able  in  equal  instalments  on  the  first  days  of  July 
and  October  and  on  the  completion  of  the  service. 

Mails. — To  be  carried  free. 

Government  Wharves. — Steamer  must  call  whenever  possible. 


DISTAXCES 

MUes 

Souris  to  Arisaig 88 

Pictou  to  Arisaig 24 

Arisaig  to  Malignant  Cove H 

Malignant  Cove  to  Georgeville .5 

Georgcville  to  I^ivingstone 4 

Livingstone  to  Ballantyne 16 

Ballantyne  to  Morristown 10 

Morristown  to  Mulgrave '. 27 

Mulgrave  to  Hawkesbury 2 

Hawkesbury  to  Hastings .3 

Hastings  to  Port  Hood 27 

Port  Hood  to  Mabou  Mouth 8 

Mabou  Mouth  to  Port  Bain 1,5 

Port  Bain  to  Inverness 5 

Inverness  to  Red  Cape ,") 

Red  Cape  to  Margaree 11 

Margaree  to  Grand  Etang 10 

Grand  Etang  to  Chetioamp 10 

Chetieamp  to  Pleasant  Bay 19 

Total 206 


DESCRIPTION  OF  \'ESSEL  EMPLOYED 


c 

Dimension 

Tonnage 

•a 
li 

11 

(2< 

P.' 

z 

Built 

Name 

.a 
■a 

S 
a 

a 
Q 

Z 

2 
o 

a 

6 

At 

In 

Of 

Ft. 

Ft. 

Ft. 

Knots 

Kinburn 

114 

23-5 

10-5 

79 

168 

40 

28 

10 

Mahone  Bay. 

N.S. 

1910 

Wood 

STEA  MSIIIP  SUBSIDIES 


53 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  7 


TRAFFIC   RETURNS 


Calendar  Year 

No.  of 

Round 

Trips  run 

Number  of 

Passengers 

Carried 

Tons  of  Freight 
Carried 

No.  of 
Live 
Stock 

Bags 
Mail 

Subsidy 

Weight 

Measure- 
ment 

Paid 

1914.                           

64 
67 
66 
66 
62 
65 
65 
63 
76J 

Total 

550 
315 
633 
343 
493 
824 
4.'=4 
333 
In            4'0 
Out         358 

535 
1,145 
1,311 

922 
3,125 
9,000 
2,445 
2,237 
1.348 
1,264 

Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
.'i45 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 

Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 

Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 

Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 

Nil 
Nil 

i  cts. 
5,942  70 

lUlf)                              

5,566  26 

1916 

1917 

1918 

8.106  39 
7,500  00 
7,.'iC0  00 

1919                                  

7  .''00  00 

1920 

1921 _. 

7,. '00  00 
7  500  00 

1922 - 

11,000  CO 

768 

2,612 

Nil 

Nil 

Nil 

PICTOU,  NEW  GLASGOW  AND  ANTIGONISH   COUNTY   PORTS 

Contract  No.  75. 

T.  &  C.  File  No.  28037. 

Vote  197. — Pidou,  New  Glasgow  and  Antigonish  County  Ports,  schooner  service 
between — 

1922-23 $1,500 

1923-24 ]  ,500 

Contractor. — James  Wilson  Smith,  of  Pictou.  N.S. 

Date  of  Contract. — April  3,  1922.  Duration  of  Contract. — From  the  opening 
to  the  close  of  navigation  (November  1),  1922. 

Service  and  Ports  of  Call. — One  round  trip  each  week  from  Pictou,  calling  at 
New  Cilasgow,  Lisniorc,  McAra'.s  Brook,  Aiisaig,  Malignant  Cove,  (ieorgoville, 
Livingstone  Cove,  BuUantyne  Cove,  Morristown  Wharf,  Bayfield,  Traeadi(>  and 
Havre  au  Boucher.  The  call  at  Tracadie  is  contingent  upon  there  being  sufficient 
depth  of  water  at  the  wharf  there. 

Gopernment  Wharves. — Steamer  must  call  whenever  possible. 

Subsidy. — $1,500,  of  which  $750  is  payable  on  August  1,  and  the  balance' 
upon  the  completion  of  the  service. 

Mails. — To  be  carried  free. 


DISTANCES 


New  Glasgow  to  Pietou 

Pictou  to  Lismore 

Lismore  to  Me.Xra's  Brook 

Mr.Vra's  Brook  to  Arisaig 

Arisaig  lo  Malignant  Cove 

Malignant  Cove  to  Cicorgeville 

Georgeville  to  Livingstone  Cove 

Living^tone  Cove  to  Ballantyne  Cove. 
Ballant yne  Cove  to  Morristown 


Total. 


TRADE  ASD  COMMKKCE 


13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1923 


DESCRIPTION  OF  VESSEL  EMPLOYED 


Dimensions 

Tonnage 

e 

.0 

a 

ai 

g£ 
II 

Ah' 

K 

■o 
•1 

Built 

Name 

a 

^ 

£ 

1 

At 

In 

Of 

Ryse 

Ft. 
47-3 

Ft. 
12-8 

Ft. 
6 

20 

20 

28 

Nil 

30 

Knots 

8 

Shipppgan,     Re- 
built, Souris. 

1889 
1914 

Wood 

This  vessel  i.<  a  sihooner.  fitted  with  an  auxiliary  gasolene  engine. 
TR.\FFIC   RETURNS 


Calendar  Year 


No.  of 

Round 

Trips  run 


Number  of 

Passengers 

Carried 


Tons  of 
Freight 
Carried 


Live 
Stock 


Subsidy 
Paid 


1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 
1919. 
1920. 
1921. 
1922. 


Nil 

Nil 
26  Nil 

26  Nil 

No  service  was  performed 


Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
In  Nil 
Out  Nil 


Nil 


.540 
660 
253 
565 

290 
440 
530 
50 
450 


Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 

Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 


Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 

Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 

Nil 


5      cts. 

1,000  00 
1,000  00 
1,000  00 
1,000  00 

\JM  00 

i..':no  00 

1,3'J6  55 


PORT  MULGRAVE,  ST.  PETER'S,  IRISH  COVE  AND   MARBLE 
MOUNTAIN 

Contract  No.  26. 

T.  &  C.  File  No.  28092. 

Vote  19S. — Port  Mxdgrave,  St.  Peter's,  Irish  Cove  and  Marble  Mountain,  and  other 
ports  on  the  Bras  d'Or  Lakes,  steam  service  between — • 

1921-22 $8,000 

1922-23 8,000 

Contractors. — The  Richmond  Steamship  Company,  of  Sydnej',  N.S. 

Date  of  Contract. — May  29,  1922.  Dnrati-on  of  Contract. — From  the  opening 
to  the  close  of  navigation,  1922. 

Service  and  Ports  of  Call. — Two  full  round  trips  each  week  between  Port 
Mulgrave,  Poulamond,  Grandique,  River  Bourgeois,  St.  Peter's,  Johnston's 
Harbour,  Irish  Cove  and  Grand  Narrows;  and  four  full  round  trips  each  week 
between  Grand  Narrows  and  Marble  Mountain,  two  of  which  each  week  are  to 
extend  to  West  Bay.  Provided  that  calls  at  West  Bay  shall  not  be  required 
unless  or  until  a  \vharf  is  provided  at  that  point. 

Government  Wharves. — Steamers  must  call  whenever  possible. 

Subsidy. — .18,000  per  annum,  payable  in  July,  October,  December  and  at 
the  close  of  the  service. 

Mails. — To  be  carried  free. 


STEA ^fSHn'  SUBSIDIES 
SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  7 

DISTANCES 

Grand  Narrows  to  Marble  Mountain 

West  Bay 

"  Irish  Cove , 

"  Johnston's  Harbour 

"  St.  Peter's 

"  Orandique 

MulRrave. 

DESCRIPTION   OF  VESSEL   EMPLOYED 


Miles 
18 
31 


Dimensions 

Tonnag 

e 

.2 
a 

IE 

(2-< 

si 
z 

■3 

i 

nuilt 

Name 

■3 

.a 
c 

Q 

'^. 

c 

1 

O 

-At 

In 

Of 

Ft. 

Ft. 

Ft. 

Knots 

Richmond 

112-5 

18 

8-25 

10.5 

162 

75 

100 

21 

9 

Sydney... 

1905 

Wood 

TRAFFIC   RETURNS 


Calendar  Year 

No.  of 

Round 

Trips  run 

No.  of 

Passengers 

carried 

Tons  of 
Freight 
carried 

Live 
Stock 
carried 

Mails 

Subsidy 
paid 

1914 

197 
2085 
233 
214 
212 
lj'2 
183 
191 

1,250 

1.360 

I,. 390 

1,680 

1,580 

970 

1,220 

610 

In          480 

Out       325 

475 
467 
483 
585 
700 
430 
710 
3.S4 
267 
240 

10 
15 
23 
18 
35 
6 
12 
9 
8 
6 

Nil 
Nil 

Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 

$     cts. 
6  500  00 

1915 

6,500  00 

]916 

1917 

6  500  00 

1918 

1910..                       

192C 

1921 

1922                             

6.207  64 
6,500  00 

182 

8,000  00 

Total 

805 

507 

14 

Nil 

PIC'TOr,   SOURIS   AND   THE   MAGDALEN   ISLANDS 

Contract  No.  12. 

T.  &  C.  File  '26863. 

Vote  199.—Fictou,  Souris  and  the  Magdalen  Islands,  steam  service  between — 

1922-23 $24 ,000 

192.3-24 24,000 

Contractor. — Wm.  C.  Leslie  (Magdalen  Transports,  Ltd.). 

Date  of  Contract. — March  8,  1921.  Duration  of  Contract. — From  the  opening 
of  navigation,  1921,  to  the  close  of  navigation,  1925.  This  contract  has  been 
cancelled. 

Service  and  Ports  of  Call. — A  regular  semi-weekly  service  between  Pictou, 
Souris  and  the  Magdalen  Islands,  as  follows: — 

(a)  First  trip  each  week:  From  Pictou,  calling  at  Souris,  Etang  du  Nord, 
Amherst,  Grindstone  and  Pointe  Basse,  returning  to  Grindstone,  Amherst,  Souris 
and  Pictou. 


56 


TRADE  AM)  COMMERCE 


13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1923 

(6)  Second  trip  each  week:  From  Pictou,  ciilling  at  Souris,  Amherst,  Grind- 
stone, Pointe  Basse  and  Grand  Entry,  returning  to  Pointe  Basse,  Grindstone, 
Amherst,  Souris  and  Pictou. 

(c)  Four  trips  each  year  are  to  be  made,  in  place  of  four  of  the  regular  semi- 
weekly  trips  aforesaid,  from  Pictou  to  Souris,  West  Point  (to  land  Amherst 
mails),  Etang  du  Nord,  Bryan  Island,  Pointe  Basse,  Grindstone,  Amherst, 
Souris  and  Pictou. 

Subsidy. — S24,000  per  annum,  payable  as  follows:  On  July  1  and  October  1 
in  each  year,  $8,000;  and  on  the  close  of  navigation  in  each  year,  S8,000. 

Mails. — To  be  carried  free. 


DISTAXCES 


Pictou  to  Souri.s 

ISouris  to  Etang  du  Nord 

Etang  du  Nord  to  Amherst 

AmhiTst  to  Grindstone 

Grindstone  to  Pointe  Basse 

Pointe  Basse  to  Grand  Entry. 


Total 

Etang  du  Nord  to  Bryan  Island. 


187 
50 


DESCRIPTION  OF  VES!?EL  EMPLOYED 


Dimensions 

Tonnage 

c 
-g 

i§ 

X 

& 

Built 

Name 

J 

1 

a. 

a 

■z 

s 

At 

In 

Of 

R.  W.  Hendry 

Ft. 
139 

Ft. 
28 

Ft. 
11 

352 

439 

500 

16  and 
24 

49 

Knots 
10 

Gilbert's  Cove, 

N.S. 

1921 

Wood 

TRAFFIC   RETURNS 


No.  of 

Round 

Trips  run 

No.  of 

Passengers 

carried 

Tons  of 
Freight 
carried 

Live 
Stock 

Mails 

Subsidy 

Lock  Bags 

Tied  Sacks 

Paid 

1914 

61 
60 
52 

54 
43 
53 
54h 
65 
59 

Total.    . 

1..380 

633 

1,714 

1,913 

1,379 

1,651 

1,952 

1,.328 

In          665 

Out       648 

4.802 
8.462 
6,591 
8,860 
4,932 
9.500 
5,980 
5,925 
1,541 
4,839 

811 
174 
26 
69 
130 
119 
169 
Nil 
1 

2,788 
2,505 
2,267 
2,966 
3,083 
2,497 
2,544 
3,341 
1,510 
1,217 

921 
1.297 
1,239 

505 
1,393 
1,469 
1,066 
1,056 
12 
1,344 

t  cts. 
18  000  00 

1915 

17,769  23 
14,000  OO 
17  769  23 

1916  . 

1917 

1918 

18,000  00 

1919 

18  000  00 

1920 

16,934  45 
24,000  00 

24,000  00 

1921 . . . 

1922 

1,313 

6,380 

8 

2,727 

1,356 

STEAMSHIP  SUBSIDIES 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  7 


QUEBEC,  NATASHQUAN  AND  HAKRINGTON 

Vote  200. — Quebec,  Natashquan  and  Harrington  and  other  points  on  the  North 
Shore  of  the  Gulf  of  St.  Lawrence,  steam  service  between — • 

1922-23 $85,600 

1923-24 85,000 

T.  &  C.  File  28077. 
Contract  No.  3.5. 

Contractors. — The  Clarke  Steamship  Co.,  Ltd.,  Quebec,  P.Q. 

Date  of  contract. — April  7,  1922.  Duration  of  contract. — From  the  opening 
of  navigation  in  1922  to  the  close  of  navigation  in  1931. 

Service  and  ports  of  call. — One  round  trip  each  week,  during  the  season  of 
navigation,  from  Quebec  to  Natashquan,  calling  each  way  at  Godbout,  Franque- 
lin  River,  Trinity  Bay,  Egg  Island,  Pentecost,  Clarke  City,  Seven  Islands, 
Riviere  aux  Graines,  Sheldrake,  Thunder  River,  Magpie,  St.  John  River,  Longue 
Pointe,  Mingan,  Esquimaux  Point,  Piastre  Bay  and  Natashquan,  extending 
every  alternate  trip,  (.that  is  to  .say,  each  trip  by  the  smaller  steamer)  to  Harring- 
ton and  Bras  d'Or  Bay,  calling  at  way  ports,  and  calling  one  way  at  a  port  to  be 
named  by  the  Minister,  in  the  Island  of  Anticosti,  on  such  trips  as  are  not  extend- 
ed to  Harrington  and  Bras  d'Or  Bay. 

(a)  Provided  that  calls  siiall  be  made  at  Les  Escoumains,  in  either  direction, 
whenever  there  is  a  reasonable  number  of  passengers  or  quantity  of  freight 
olTering  to  or  from  that  port,  that  is,  when  there  is  at  least  $150  worth  of  business 
per  call  for  the  steamer. 

(6)  At  the  direction  of  the  Minister,  the  contractors  maj'  be  permitted  to 
omit  from  time  to  time  such  calls  at  the  above  ports  as  may  be  deemed  advisable, 
or  to  call  alternately  or  otherwise  at  such  ports  as  may  be  required  by  the  Min- 
ister, having  in  view  the  public  interest,  and  the  efficient  despatch  of  passen- 
gers and  freight. 

Delays. — In  order  that  undue  delay  to  the  vessels  performing  the  various 
services  herein  mentioned  may  be  avoided,  it  is  agreed  that  when  any  such  vessel 
arrives  within  a  reasonable  distance  off  any  of  the  aforesaid  ports  and  anchors, 
and  if  no  boats  come  out  to  load  or  unload  freight  within  thirty  minutes  from 
the  time  of  anchoring,  such  vessel  shall  be  at  liberty,  at  the  Captain's  discretion, 
to  heave  up  her  anchor  and  proceed  on  her  voyage  without  further  delay.  Due 
notice  of  arrival  must  be  given  by  steam  whistle  or  other  suitable  means  at  the 
time  of  anchoring.  In  case  any  port  is  passed  by,  as  provided  for  by  this  clause, 
such  action  must  be  reported  to  the  Minister  at  the  time  the  claim  for  subsidy  for 
the  trij)  in  question  is  made. 

Subsidy. — §85,000  per  annum,  payable  in  equal  instalments  of  $21,250,  or 
such  proportion  thereof  as  may  have  been  earned,  on  June  1,  August  1,  October  1, 
and  on  the  close  of  navigation  in  each  year. 

Mails. — To  be  carried  free. 


'I'RADE  AXD  COMMKH'E 


DISTANCES 


Quel)ee  to  Franklin 

Franklin  to  Godlmut 

Godbout  to  Trinity  Bay 

Trinity  Bay  to  Egg  Island 

Egg  Island  to  Penterost 

Pentecost  to  Slultel"  Bay 

Shelter  Ray  to  ( 'hirkc  ( "ity 

Clarke  (  ity  to  Seven  Islands 

Seven  Islands  to  Hiviire  aui  Graines. 

Riv.  Graines  to  Sheldrake 

Sheldrake  to  Thunder  River 

Thunder  River  to  Magpie 

Magpie  to  St.  John  River 

St.  John  River  to  Antieosti 

Anticosti  to  Long  Point 

Long  Point  to  .\Iingan 

Mingan  to  Esquimaux  Point 

Esquimaux  Point  to  Piastre  Bay 

Piastre  Bay  to  Xatashquan 

Natashquan  to  Harrington 

Harrington  to  Mutton  Bay 

Mutton  Bay  to  St.  Augustin 

St.  Augustin  to  Old  Fort  Bay 

Old  Fort  Bay  to  Bonne  Esperance 

Bonne  Esperanee  to  Bradore  Bay 


13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1923 


m 

16 

9} 
19 
25i 

41 


Total. 


24J 


s(if<; 


DESCRIPTION  OF  VESSEL  EMPLOYED 


D 

mensions 

Tonnag 

e 

a 

Built 

Name 

^ 

as 

?H 

;:£ 

S 

c. 

^ 

a 

s  I 

K 

"s 

At 

In 

Of 

^ 

« 

c 

2; 

O 

o 

5-< 

;s 

a. 
a: 

Ft. 

Ft. 

Ft. 

Knots 

North  Shore.. 

206- 

281 

13 

480 

811 

500 

.50  and 
50 

122 

lU 

Newcastle 

1896 

Steel 

Labrador 

125 

n-9> 

13-6 

174 

316 

200 

32 

61 

9i 

Lanzon 

1918 

.Steel 

TRAFFIC    RETURNS 


Calendar  Year 

No.  of 

Round 

Trips  run 

No.  of 

Passengers 
carried 

Tons  of 
Freight 
carried 

Live 
Stock 

Mails 

Subsidy 

Lock  Bags 

Tied  Sacks 

Paid 

1914 

1915 

2S| 
32 
32 
14 
25 
30 
28 

33 

Total.... 

2,285 

3,081 

4,013 

1,114 

773 

1,215 

1,959 

2,281 

In       1,1.54 

Out   1,344 

9.339 
4,669 
3,383 
1,711 
3,836 
3,. 527 
3,657 
2,948 
1,217 
3,228 

Nil 

Nil 

Nil 

Nil 
47 
67 
71 
143 
28 
160 

1,946 
2,737 
2.247 
2,146 
3.622 
4,123 
4,148 
1,128 
752 
857 

Nil 

Nil 

Nil 

Nil 
49 
35 

Nil 

3,494 
199 

4,366 

$  cts. 
25,983  35 
28,000  00 

1916 

1917 

28,000  00 
23,666  60 

1918 

28,000  00 

1919 

1920      

30,000  00 
30,000  00 

1921 

50,000  00 

1922 

85.000  00 

2,498 

4,445 

188 

1,609 

4,565 

STEAMSffff  sriiSlDIES  59 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  7 

QUEBEC,    MONTREAL   AND   GASPE 

Vote  20] . — Quebec  or  Montreal  and  (iaspe,  and  ports  on  the  South  Shore  of  the  Gulf 
of  St.  Lawrence,  steam  service  between — 

1922-23 S30,000 

1923-24 30 ,000 

Contract  No.  81. 
File  No.  28078. 

Contractors. — The  Clarke  Steamship  Co.,  Ltd.,  of  Quebec,  Que. 

Date  of  Contract. — October  5,  1922.  Duration  nf  Contract. — From  August  1, 
1922,  to  the  close  of  navigation  in  1931. 

Service  and  ports  of  call. — A  regular  fortnightly  service  during  the  seasop  of 
navigation  in  each  year  from  Quebec  (or  Montreal,  at  the  contractors'  option,) 
to  Gaspe,  calling  each  way  at — 

Matane,  Cap  Chat,  Ste.  Anne  des  Monts,  Mont  Louis,  Grande  Vallee, 
Chlorydormes,  St.  Joachim,  Petit  Cap,  Little  Fox  River,  Fox  River,  Griffin 
Cove,  Anse  a  Louise,  Grand  Greve  and  Douglastown,  and  calling  once  on  each 
round  voyage  either  on  up  or  down  trip,  at  Mechins,  Marsouins,  Martin  River, 
Claude  River,  St.  Antoine,  Magdalen,  Petite  Vallee,  Pointe  Jregate,  St.  Yvon 
(Pointe  Sechc),  Grand  Etang,  Anse  a  Valeau  and  Pointe  Jaune;  provided  that 
until  the  close  of  navigation  in  1922,  the  said  fortnightly  service  shall  be  con- 
tinued between  Gaspe  Basin  and  Pasjjebiac,  calling  each  way  at  Malbaie,  Perce, 
Cape  Cove,  Grand  River,  Chandler,  Newi)<)rt  and  Port  Daniel.  On  and  after  the 
opening  of  navigation  in  1923,  the  Eastern  terminus  of  the  subsidized  service 
shall  be  Gaspe;  provided  that  the  subsidized  steamer  shall  have  the  right  to 
proceed  to  other  ports  if  conditions  warrant. 

Subsidy. — 830,000  per  annum,  payable  in  instalments  on  ,lune  1,  August  1, 
October  1,  and  on  the  close  of  navigation  in  each  year. 

Mails. — To  be  carried  free. 


DIST.\NCES 

Miles 

Montreal  to  Quebec 139 

Quebec  to  Mechins 222 

Mechins  to  Cap  Chat    13 

Cap  Chat  to  Ste.  .\nnc  des  Monts 9 

Ste.  .\nnc  des  Mont.s  to  .Martin  River .•..  15 

Martin  River  to  Claude  River 11 

Claude  River  to  Mont  I.ouis 6} 

Mont  l/ouis  to  St.  Antoine 7| 

St.  .Vntoine  to  Lit.  Madeleine 5 

Lit.  Madeleine  to  Cap  Madeleine 4 

Cap  Madeleine  to  Orand  Valley 6i 

Grand  Vallev  to  Pte.  \'all^e 3J 

Pte.  Valine  to  Pte.  Kr^Rate 4 

Pte.  Frigate  to  Chlorydomes 5i 

Chlorydomes  to  Pte.  "S^che 25 

Pte.  .S'che  to  Grand  Etang 3 

Grand  Etang  to  .\nse  h  Valeau 6i 

Anse  a  \'aleau  to  Pte.  Jaune 3 

Pte.  Jaune  to  Little  Fox  River 3 

Little  Fox  River  to  Fox  River 3 


TRADE  AND  COMMERCE 

13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1923 

distances-Co.  Huded. 

Miles 

Fox  River  to  Griffin  Cove , 51 

Griffin  Cove  to  L'Ansc  h  Louise 4 

L'Anse  d  Louise  to  Cup  Rosier 2 

Cup  Rosier  to  Cirant  Or^ve ' 11 

(ifand  CirO-ve  to  Douj::histown 5 

Douglastown  to  Gaspf-  Basin 8J 

Gasp6  Basin  to  Mai  Bay 28 

Mai  Bay  to  Porc6 6 

Perrfe  to  Cape  Cove 8 

Cape  Cove  to  Cirande  Rivifere 9 

Grande  Rivii're  to  Chandler 5 

Chandler  to  Xewport 7 

Newport  to  Port  Daniel ' 11 

Port  Daniel  to  Paspebiac ■ 19 

Total 59U 


DESCRIPTION   OF  VESSELS   EMPLOYED 


Dimensions 

Tonnage 

c 
t-  o 

as 

g  B 

1 " 

o 
c 
M 

■6 
I 

Built 

Name 

c 

3 

-a 
t 

■z 

O 

At 

In 

Of 

Gaspesia 

Ft. 
214-6 

Ft. 
321 

Ft. 
13-7 

520 

1,014 

1,200 

50  and 
50 

184 

Knots 
121 

Rostock 

1909 

Steel 

TRAFFIC    RETURNS 


Calendar  Year 

No.  of 

Round 

Trips  run 

No.  of 

Passengers 

Carried 

Tons  of 
Freight 
Carried 

Live 
Stock 

Mail 

Subsidj' 
Paid 

1914 

15 
15 
31 
9 
13 
14 
•10 

m 

4 

Total 

13 

Total 

1..523 

1,233 

1,224 

373 

166 

210 

839 

483 

In           63 

Out       144 

3.275 
3,562 
3,921 
641 
1,646 
3.108 
3,459 
3,930 
32 
1,210 

Nil 

Nil 

Nil 

Nil 

Nil 

Nil 

Nil 

Nil 
1 
5 

Nil 
Nil 
Nil 

Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 

$       cts. 
8,500  00 

1915           

8,500  00 

1916 

8,500  00 

1917 

5. 100  00 

1918 

8,. 500  00 

1919 

14,000  00 

1920         

20,000  00 

1921 

30,000  00 

1922  Brumalh            

7,500  00 

207 

1,242 

6 

Nil 

In         717 
Out       573 

1,306 
3,166 

6 
4 

Nil 
Nil 

22,500  OO 

1,290 

4,472 

10 

Nil 

The  Brumath.  a  wooden  steamer  of  1,140  gross  tons,  operated  by  La  Cie. 
Gasp^  Cotier,  of  Quebec,  divided  this  service  with  the  Gaspesia  during  1922,  up 
to  August  1,  wlien  the  Brumath  was  destroyed  by  fire,  and  the  Gaspesia  carried 
on  the  full  service  for  the  remainder  of  the  season,  and  will  continue  it  until  the 
close  of  navigation  in  1931. 


STEAMSHIP  SrnSIDIES 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  7 


ST.  CATHERINE'S  BAY  AND  TADOUSSAC. 

Contract  No.  24. 

T.  &  C.  File  No.  28165. 

Vote  202. — St.  Catherine's  Bay  and  Tadoussac,  winter  steam  service  between: — 

1922-23 82,000 

1923-24 2,000 

Contractor: — ^E.  O.  Bouliannc,  of  Tadoussac,  P.Q. 

Date  of  contract: — October  11,  1922.     Duration  of  contract: — November  15, 
1922  to  May  15,  1923. 

Service: — Two  round  trips  each  day  (except  Sundays) 

Ports  of  call: — St.  Catherine's  Bay  and  Tadoussac. 

Subsidy: — 12,000  for  the  winter  season,   payable  in  Noveml)er,   January, 
March  and  May. 

Mails: — To  be  carried  free. 

Distance: — St.  Catherine's  Bav  to  Tadoussac 2  miles. 


DESCRIPTION"  OF  VESSEL  EMPLOYED 


c 

Dimensions 

Tonnage 

u  a 

as 

H 

Built 

Xanip 

t3 

2) 

■z 

2 

OS 

O 

.\t 

•  In 

Of 

Ft 

Ft 

St.  I':iul   

3.5 

12 

6 

10 

6 

20 

8 

191.5 

Wood 

TRAFFIC  RETURNS 


Period 

No.  of 
Trips  run 

No.  of 

Passengers 
carried 

Pounds  of 

Freight 
carried 

Live 
Stock 

Bags 

of 
Mail 

Subsidy 
Paid 

Nov.  15  to  Nov.  30,  1922.. . . 

31 
Total 

In             8 
Out           6 

200 
2,350 

Nil 

51 
9 

S      cts. 
500  00 

14 

2.550 

2 

60 

These  are  the  only  traffic  returns  available  so  tar. 


TliADE  AM)  COMMEKCE 


13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1923 


ST.   JOHN   AND   ST.   ANDREWS,   N.B. 

Contract  No.  41. 

T.  &  C.  File  No.  28102. 

Vote  203. — St.  John,  N.B.,  and  St.  Andrews,  N.B.,  calling  at  intermediate  points, 
steam  service  between — 

1922-23 S4 ,000 

1923-24 4 ,000 

Co7itractors. — The  ^laritime  Steamship  Companv,  Ltd.,  of  Black's  Harbour, 
N.B. 

Date  of  Contract.— April  3,  1922.  Duration  of  Contract.— April  1,  1922,  to 
March  31,  1923. 

Service  atid  Ports  of  Call. — A  regular  service  between  St.  John  and  St. 
Andrews,  calling  at  Dipper  Harbour,  Black's  Harbour,  Back  Bay,  Letete,  Deer 
Island  and  St.  George. 

One  round  trip  per  week  is  to  be  run  throughout  the  year,  as  follows: — 

(a)  Leave  St.  John  for  St.  Andrews  on  Tuesday  mornings,  calling  at  Dipper 
Harbour,  Beaver  Harbour,  Black's  Harbour,  Back  Bay  or  Letete,  Deer  Island 
and  Red  Store  or  St.  George. 

(6)  Returning  leave  St.  Andrews  for  St.  John  on  Thursday  mornings,  call- 
ing at  Letete  or  Back  Bay,  Black's  Harbour,  Beaver  Harbour  and  Dipper 
Harbour. 

Government  Wharves. — Steamer  must  call  whenever  possible. 

Subsidy. — $4,000  per  annum,  payable  as  follows:  On  July  1,  October  1, 
January  1,  and  April  1,  S1,000  each. 

Mails.'— To  be  carried  free. 


DLSTAXCES 


)  Dipper  Harbour. . 
Beaver  Harbour. . 
Black's  Harbour. 

Lord's  Cove 

Back  Bay 

Letete 

St.  George 

St.  Andrew's 


Miles 
19 


DESCRIPTION  OF  \'ESSEL  EMPLOYED 


D 

mensions 

Tonnage 

§ 

If 

•2 

■ji 

Built 

Name 

1 

Z 

1 

i 

At 

In 

Of  ' 

Connors  Bros. 

Ft. 
97 

Ft. 
21-6 

Ft. 
9 

49 

133 

150 

197 

30 

Knots 

8 

Shelburne,  N.S. 

19(M 

Wood 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  7 


STEAMSHIP  SUBSIDIES 


Tll.\FFIC   RETURNS 


Calendar 
Year 

No.  of 

Round 

Trips  run 

Number  of 

Passengers 

Carried 

Tons  of 
Freight 
Curried 

Live  Stock 

Mails 

Sub.sidy 

Lock  Bags 

Tied  Sacks 

Paid 

1314 

1915 

4S 
50 
52 
52 
52 
48 
53 
52 

1,121 

1.270 

1.275 

1.289 

1.280 

1 . 6.30 

1.080 

894 

In          450 

Out       373 

5.436 
5.884 
(i.84fi 
5.719 
7.0.39 
9.169 
5.760 
6.202 
■3.097 
4.448 

Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 

200 
200 
208 
1.S4 
498 
418 
425 
312 
1,56 
156 

Nil 
6 
12 

12 
12 
48 

Nil 

Nil 

Nil 

$       cts. 

4.000  00 
4.000  00 

1916 

4.000  00 

1917 

4.000  00 

1918 

4.000  00 

1919 

4.000  00 

1920 

4.000  00 

1921 

1922 

4.000  00 
4.000  00 

Total 

823 

7.545 

Nil 

312 

Nil 

ST.  JOHN  AND  BEAR  RIVER. 

Contract  No.  45. 

T.  &  C.  File  No.  28479. 

Vote  204- — St.  John  and  Bear  Rirer,  and  other  xvay  ports,  steam  service  betiveen — 

1922-23 $2,000 

1923-24 2,000 

Contractors. — The  Bear  River  Steamship  Co.,  Ltd. 

Date  of  Contract.— iuW  26,  1922.  Duration  of  Contract.— \pr\l  1,  1922  to 
March  31,  1923. 

Service  and  Por/.s  of  Call. — A  regular  weekly  service  between  St.  John  and 
Bear  River,  c'llling  (in  all  trips  both  ways  at  Victoria  Bridge  and  Digby.  In 
the  winter,  if  ice  i)revents  the  steamer  reaching  Bear  River,  trijjs  may  be  termi- 
nated at  either  Victoria  Bridge  or  Digby. 

Subsidy. — $2,000  per  annum,  payable  quarterly. 

Mails. — To  be  carried  free. 


DISTANCES 

Miles 

Bear  River  to  Victoria  Bridge 4 

Victoria  Bridge  to  Digby 4 

Digby  to  St.  John 45 

Total 53 


TRADE   A\D  COMMERCE 


13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1923 


DESCRIPTION  OF  VESSEL  EMPLOYED 


Dimensions 

Tonnage 

.1 

d 

1 

CO 

Built 

Name 

"0 

o. 

Q 

Z 

s 

o 

1 

At 

In 

Of 

Ft. 
90 

Ft. 
20 

Ft. 
8-4 

70 

103 

100 

30 

16 

Knots 
9 

Shelburne . 

1903 

Wood 

TRAFFIC   RETURNS 


Calendar  Year 

No.  of 

Trips 

run 

No.  of 

Passengers 

Carried 

Tons  of 
Freight 
Carried 

Live 
Stock 

Mails 

Subsidy- 
Paid 

1922 

37 
Total" 

In         Nil 
Out      Nil 

895 
440 

Nil 
Nil 

Nil 
Nil 

Nil 

$     cts. 
l.JOOOO 

Nil 

1,335 

Nil 

ST.  JOHN  AND   BRIDGETOWN 
Contract  No.  72. 
T.  &  C.  File  No.  28274. 

Vote  205. — St.  John  and  Bridgetown,  steatn  service  between — 

1922-23 S2,500 

1923-24 2,500 

Contractors. — The  Bridgetown  Steamship  Company,  Ltd., of  Bridgetown, N.S. 

Date  of  Contract. — Maj'  11,  1922.  Duration  of  Contract. — From  the  opening 
to  the  close  of  navigation,  in  1922. 

Service  and  Ports  of  Call. — Weekly;  making  thirty-two  ronnd  trips  during 
the  season  of  navigation  between  St.  John  and  Bridgetown,  (".illing  each  way  at 
Ray's  Creek,  Tupperyille  and  Round  Hill;  and  calling  fortnightly  at  Clements- 
port. 

Government  Wharves. — Steamer  must  call  whenever  possible. 

Subsidy.- — S78.12  for  each  round  trip,  not  to  exceed  a  total  of  $2,500  for  the 
season,  payable  on  July  1,  October  1,  and  at  close  of  na^^gation. 

Mails. — To  be  carried  free. 

DISTANCES 

Miles 

Bridgetown  to  Vpper  Granville S^ 

Granville  to  Tupper\-ille i 

Tupperville  to  Round  Hill 7 

Round  Hill  to  St.  John 57 

Total 70 


STEA MSHir  srHSIDlES 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  7 

DESCRIPTION   OF  VESSEL  EMPLOYED 


Dimensions 

Tonnage 

s 

>-   0 

as 
ii 

p.; 

■2 

Built 

Name 

c 

,3 

« 

1 

Z 

s 

c 

a 
O 

At                 In 

Of 

Valinda 

Ft. 
95 

Ft. 
21-5 

Ft. 
9-3 

56 

117 

60 

25 

19 

Knots 
95 

Liverpool,  X.S      1911 

Wood 

TRAFFIC  RETURNS 


Calendar  Year 

No.  of 

Round 

Trips  run 

No.  of 

Passengers 

Carried 

Tons  of 
Freight 
Curried 

Live 
Stock 

Mails 

Subsidy 
Paid 

I'JU 

1915 

.      35 
36 
35 
36 
34 
37 
36 
33 
34 

Total 

30 
17 
29 
28 
23 
12 
14 
20 
In            16 
Out          4 

3.845 
2,313 
2, 554  J 
2,493 
2,404 
2,964 
2,913 
2,952 
1,859 
975 

Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 

Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 

Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 

$ 

2,. 500 
2,500 

1916 

2,500 

1917 

2.500 

1918 

2.500 

1919 

2,, 500 

1920 

2.000 

1921          

1,500 

1922 

2,500 

20 

2,834 

Nil 

Nil 

ST.  JOHN   AND  DIGBY 

C\)ntr;ict  No.  8. 

T.  &  C.  File  No.  27794. 

Vote  206. — .S7.  John  anri  Dighy,  fsteani  service  between — 

1922-23 •  $15,000 

1923-24 15,000 

Contractors. — The  Uoininion  Atlantic  Railway  Company,  of  Kcntville,  N.S. 

(On  September  1,  1913,  this  line  passed  to  the  control  and  owncrshij)  of  the 
C'.inadian  Pacific  Railway,  Montreal,  Que.) 

Date  of  Contract.— March  28,  1922.  Duration  of  Contract.— April  1,  1922,  to 
-March  31,  1923. 

Service  and  Ports  of  ('«//.--  Full  round  daily  trijis  (Sundays  excepted)  from 
St.  John  to  Dig!)}-  aiul  return  to  St.  John. 

Connection  at  St.  John. — On  all  trips  from  Digl)y  to  St.  John  the  steamer 
shall  arrive  at  St.  John  in  ami)le  time  for  passengers,  mails  and  perishable 
express  goods  westward  bound  to  be  transferred  to  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railwaj' 
afternoon  train  for  Montreal. 

In  the  event  of  any  trip  from  Digby  to  St.  John  or  the  connection  with  the 
westbound  trains  at   St.  John  being  missed  owing  to  stress  of  weather,  upon 
satisfactory  evidence  thereof  being  furnished  to  the  minister,  he  may  direct  that 
no  deductions  be  maile  from  the  subsidy. 
7—5 


66  TRADE  AND  COMMERCE 

13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1923 

Government  irAarres.— Steamer  mast  call  whenever  possible. 

Subsidy. — $15,000,  payable  quarterly,  in  July,  October,  January  and  Aj)ril. 

Mails. — To  be  carried  free.  If  during  the  continuance  of  this  contract 
other  trips  are  made  than  as  above  stated,  all  mails  tendered  shall  be  carried 
wihout  additional  remuneration. 

Sub.stitute  Steamer. — During  the  time  the  Empress  is  off  the  route  for  annual 
overhaul  or  for  other  purposes,  the  contractors  shall  use  their  best  endeavours 
to  supply  a  suitable  substitute  steamer. 

Distance. — St.  John  to  Digby,  47  miles. 

DESCRIPTION  OF  VESSEL  EMPLOYED 


Dimensions 

Tonnage 

_o 
•a 

11 
II 

a.' 
X 

•a 
1 

Built 

Name 

J3 
1 

pa 

J3 
C. 

C 

1 

At 

In 

Of 

Empress 

Ft. 
235 

Ft. 
34 

Ft. 
28 

612 

1,341 

500 

450 

365 

Knots 

16J    Newcastle-on- 
Tyne. 

1906 

Steel 

TRAFFIC   RETURNS 


Calendar 
Year 

No.  of 

Round 

Trips  run 

Number  of 

Passengers 

Carried 

Tons  of 
Freight 
Carried 

Live  Stock 

Mails 

Subsidy 

Bags 

Sacks 

Paid 

1914 

377 

312 

315 

305 

304 

.303* 

299 

301 

300 

20,957 
25,795 
31,109 
27,532 
38.058 
36.357 
36,569 
33,737 
In     16,780 
Out  14.785 

23.810 
22,367 
.32,893 
34, 772 
29,686 
25,016 
22,271 
19.081 
5.351 
16.078 

1.155 
617 
569 
801 
885 
955 
788 
262 
720 
78 

3,443 
3,438       . 
3,421 
3.344 
3.344 
3,341 
3,269 
3,311 
2.40T 
900 

25.427 
25, 186 
26.213 
27,022 
21,600 
25,516 
21,040 
17,740 
7.952 
9.911 

17.863 

S       cts. 
19.805  19 

1915 

20.000  00 

1916 

20.000  00 

1917 

19.423  08 

1918 

20.000  00 

1919 

20.000  00 

1920 

12.083  73 

1921  

9.647  83 

1922 ,. 

13,269  83 

Total 

31,565 

21,429 

795 

3.300 

1 

ST.  JOHN,   DIGBY,  ANNAPOLIS  AND   GRANVILLE 

Contract  No.  37. 

T.  &  C.  File  28029. 

Vote  207. — St.  John,  Digby,  Annapolis  and  Granville,  steam  service  between,  viz.: 
along  the  ivest  coast  of  the  Annapolis  Basin — 

1922-23 S2.000 

1923-24 2,000 

Contractors. — The  Valley  Steamship  Co.,  Ltd.,  of  Gran\-ille  Ferry,  N.S. 

Date  of  Contract.— March  9,  1922.    Duration  of  Contract. —AprW  1,  1922,  to 
March  31.  1923. 


STEAMSHIP  SihSIDIES 


67 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  7 

Service  and  Ports  of  Call. — A  ■ft'cckly  service  between  St.  John,  N.B., 
Annapoli-s  Royal  and  Granville  Ferry,  N.S.,  calling  on  all  tri{)s  both  ways  at 
Victoria  Beach  and  Littlewood.s  Wharf  (opposite  Goat  Island),  and  when  tide 
and  weather  will  permit,  continuing  such  trips  to  Granville  Centre,  with  the 
privilege  on  the  part  of  the  contractors  of  further  extending  the  route  to  Bridge- 
town, N.S. 

Duiing  the  winter  months,  in  ease  the  ice  will  not  permit  the  running  of 
the  vessel  up  the  Annapolis  basin  and  river,  the  trip  from  St.  John  shall  be 
allowed  to  terminate  at  Digby. 

Repairs. — ^The  contractors  have  the  right  at  any  time  to  withdraw  the 
steamer  for  a  period  of  two  weeks,  and  also  in  addition  thereto  for  a  period 
not  exceeding  14  days  for  the  purpose  of  inspection  or  repairs,  and  may  also 
replace  it  with  another  steamer  subject  to  the  approval  of  the  minister. 

Government  Wharves. — Steamer  must  call  whenever  possible. 

Mails. — To  be  carried  free. 

Subsidy. — .'?2,000  per  annum,  ]iayable  quarterly  in  July,  October,  January 
and  April. 

DISTANCES 

Miles 

St.  John  to  .\nnapolis 62 

St.  John  to  Victoria  Beach ^ 45 

Victoria  Beach  to  Port  Wade 5 

Port  Wailo  to  Granville  Kerry 12 

(iranville  IVrry  to  (Iranville  Centre 4 

Granville  ( "enlre  to  .\nnapoIis 4 

Granville  Kerry  to  .\nnapolis J 

Distance  between  terminal  points  via  way  ports 70 

DESCRIPTION  OF  VESSEL  EMPLOYED 


Dimensions 

Tonnage 

^1 

Built 

Name 

t 

■3 

o. 

o 

.5 

1 

as 

gs 

5 

■g 

At 

In 

Of 

^ 

n 

Q 

'A 

O 

O 

p,< 

Z 

CO 

Kt. 

Ft. 

Ft. 

Knots 

Granville 

112 

22 

9 

49 

139 

100 

38 

24 

9 

Shelburne 

1909 

Wood 

TRAFFIC   RETURNS 


Calendar  Year 

No.  of 

Round 

Trips  run 

No.  of 

Passengers 

Carried 

Tons 
Freight 

Live 

Stock 

Mail 

Subsidy 
Paid 

1914 

52 
50 
50 
45 
44 
52 
52 
50 
51 

Total 

69 
39 
77 
78 
74 
51 
95 
82 
In           49 
Out        41 

3,024 
3,079 
4,069 
3,299 
3,976 
3,807 
3,197 
3,992 
2,752 
775 

Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 

Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 

$       cts. 
1,875  00 

1915       

1  961  55 

1916 

2.000  00 

1917 

1.875  00 

1918 

2.000  00 

1919 

2,000  00 

1920 

2,000  00 

1921 

2,000  00 

1922  

2,000  00 

90 

3.527 

Nil 

Nil 

7— 5J 


68  TRADE  A.\D  COMAfEfiCE 

13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1923 

ST.  JOHN  AND  PORTS  ON  THE  BAY  OF  FUNDY  AND  .MINAS  BASIN 

Contract  No.  71  A. 
T.  &  C.  File  27944. 

Vote  208. — St.  John,  N.B.,  and  ports  on  the  Boy  of  Fundy  and  Minos  Basin,  steam 
service  between — 

1922-23 S8,.500 

1923-24 8,500 

Two  contracts  arc  entered  into  under  this  vote: — (a)  St.  Jolin  Steamship 
Co.,  (6)  Bay  of  Fundy  and  !Minas  Basin  SS.  Co.. 

(a)  St.  Joh.n  Ste.\mship  Co. 

Contractors. — The  St.  John  Steamship  Co.,  Ltd.,  of  St.  John,  N.B. 

Date  of  Contract. — February,  15,  1922.  Duration  of  Contract. — From  the 
opening  to  the  closing  of  navigation,  1922. 

Serrice  and  Ports  of  Call — 

(a)  A  regular  service  every  two  weeks  between  St.  John,  N.B.,and  Windsor, 
N.S.,  calling  each  way  at  Canning,  Wolfville,  and  Cheverie. 

(6)  A  regular  service  every  two  weeks,  alternating  with  the  .service  sp?cified 
in  section  (a)  aforesaid,  between  St.  John,  N.B.,  and  Maithiml.  N.S.,  calling  at 
Spencer's  Island,  Parrsboro',  Noel  and  Bass  River. 

(c)  The  minimum  number  of  trips  to  be  made  during  the  season  of  naviga- 
tion shall  be  28. 

Subsidy. — S5,000  per  annum,  payable  in  equal  instalments  on  Julj-  1, 
October  1,  and  at  the  close  of  na\'igation,  on  the  basis  of  S178.57  for  each 
round  trip. 

Mails. — To  be  carried  free. 

DIST.\NCES 

Miles 

St.  ,lohn  to  Spencer's  Island 62 

■Spencer's  Island  to  Parrsboro ',..; ', ;■..•..•;....  24 j 

Parrsboro'  to  Bass  River i.  ■,'■■.■ '•.■•--  ■".•■!• '.....  26 

Bass  River  to  Maitland —  .i. 13 J 

Maitland  to  Noel '. ;.'.....' 13 

139 

St.  John  to  Spencer's  Island 62 

Spencer's  Island  to  Canning 28 

Canning  to  Wolfville 7$ 

Wolfville  to  Cheverie 9J 

Cheverie  to  Windsor 13 

120 


STEA  MSHIF  S I  liSI  Dl  ES 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  7 

•       DESCRIPTION   OF   VESSEL      EMPLOYED 


Dimensions 

Tonnage 

.2 

gE 
|E 

11 

Built 

Xame 

1 
3 

1 

s 

pa 

1 

Z 

s 

o 

1 
a 

At         , 

In 

Of 

(ilonholme... . 

Ft. 
102..5 

Ft. 
30-5 

Ft. 
9-7 

125 

233 

7 

24 

Knots 

8} 

Yarmouth,  N.S. 

1919 

Wood 

TRAFFIC   RETURNS 


Caleiuhir  Year 

No.  of 

Hound 

Trips  run 

No.  of 

Passengers 

Carried 

Tons  of 
Freight 
Carried 

Live 
Stock 

Mail 

Subsidy 
Paid 

1919 

15 
21 

24 
Total 

36 

32 

47 

In           15 

Out         21 

3,125 
2,. 550 
3,025 
600 
2,400 

Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 

Nil 
Nil 

Nil 
Nil 
Nil 

%      cts. 
3, .500  00 

1920 

3,749  97 

1021 

3  455  61 

1922 

4,285  69 

36 

*    3,003 

Nil 

Nil 

"  ."Approximate. 


(b)    B.\Y    OF   FUNDY   AND    MiNAS   BaSIN    STEAMSHIP   Co.,  LtD. 

Contract  Xo.  71. 

T.  <fc  C.  File  No.  28356. 

Contractors. — Tho  Ray  of  Fuiuly  and  Alinas  Basin  Steamship  Co.,  Ltd.,  of 
Margaretville,  N.S. 

Date  of  Contract. — Junt^  10,  1922.  Duration  of  Contract. — From  th(>  opening 
to  tlip  closing  of  navigation  in  1922. 

Service  and  Ports  of  Call. — A  regular  weekly  service  between  St.  John,  N.B., 
and  Margaretville,  N.S.,  calling  each  way  at  Hampton,  Port  Lome,  Port  CJeorge, 
Harhourville,  and  Morden  and  calling  every  two  weeks  at  Scott's  Bay  and  Port 
WilHams.  Not  less  than  32  round  trips  shall  be  made  during  the  season  of 
navigation. 

Subsidy. — $3,500  per  annum,  i)ayal)le  in  four  equal  instalments,  on  July  1, 
September  1,  November  1,  and  at  the  close  of  navigation,  on  the  l)asis  of  1109.37 
per  round  trip. 

Mails. — To  be  carried  free. 


TRADE  ASD  COM  MERCK 

13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1923 

DISTANCES 

Mil.s 

St.  John  to  Hampton 40 

Hampton  to  Port  Lornc i 5 

Port  Lome  to  Port  George 7 

Port  GeorRc  to  M arfiaretville 6 

MarKaretville  to  Morden 6 

Morden  to  Harbt)urville 7 

Harbourvillc  to  Hall's  Harbour 12 

Hall's  Harbour  to  Scott's  Bay 12 

Scott's  Bay  to  Port  Williams 30 

Total ...  125 


DESCRIPTION  01'  VESSEL  EMPLOYED 


c 

Dimensions 

Tonnage 

tm    0 

0-< 

J 

Built 

Name 

J 

PQ 

.a 
a. 

a 

■z' 

£ 

At 

In 

Of 

Ft. 

Ft. 

Ft. 

Knots 

Ruby  L.  II.. 

107 

23 

9 

117 

200 

150 

20 

24 

9 

Margarctville.. 

1921 

Wood 

TRAFFIC  RETURNS 


Calendar  Year 

No.  of 

Round 

Trips  run 

No.  of 

Passengers 

carried 

Tons  of 
Freight 
carried 

Live 
Stock 

Bags 
Mail 

Subsidy 
paid 

1914 

1915 

1916 

1917 

1918 

1919 

1920 

1921 

1922 

100 
76i 
93 
83 
27 
37 
No 
31 
32 

Total... 

436 
190 
261 
121 
52 
90 
contract. 

46 
In           33 
Out         27 

8,874 
6,530 
7,305 
6,6485 
2,440 
3,090 

3,4S0 
2,200 
1,090 

Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 

Nil 
Nil 
Nil 

Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 

Nil 
Nil 
Nil 

$   cts. 

7, .547  17 
5.914  83 
6,122  52 
4,919  88 
2,249  91 
3,000  00 

2,268  75 

3,499  70 

60 

3.290 

Nil 

Nil 

ST.  JOHN  AND  WEDGEPORT. 


Contract  No.  58. 

T.  &  C.  File  No.  28049. 


Vote  209. — St.  John  niid  Wedgeport,  steam  service  between — 

1922-23 ■ So,000 

1923-24 5,000 

Contractor. — D.  D.  LeBlanc,  of  Wedgeport,  N.S. 

Date  of  Contract. — May  23,  1922.     Duration  of  Contract. — For  the  season 
of  navigation,  1922. 


STEAMSHIP  SUBSIDIES  71 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  7 

Service  and  Ports  of  Call. — Three  round  trip^  a  montli,  throughout  the 
season  of  navigation,  between  St.  John,  N.B.,  and  Wedgeport,  N.S.,  calling 
each  way  at  Cape  St.  Mary  and  Port  Maitland. 

Subsidy. — *.5,0()()  for  the  season,  payable  in  three  instalments. 

Mails. — To  be  carried  free. 


St.  John  to  Cape  .^t.  Mary 

Cape  St.  Mary  to  Port  Maitland. 
Port  Maitland  to  Wedgeport 


DISTANCES 


DESCRIPTION  OF  VESSEL  EMPLOYED 


Dimensions 

Tonnage 

.1 

ga 

e-<: 

X 

Built 

Nume 

« 

a 

Q 

Z 

o 

O 

1 

Cj 

At 

In 
\ 

Of 

* 
Madeline  A... 

Ft. 

71 

Ft. 
18 

Ft. 
7 

27 

Nil 

Knots 
8 

Mahone    Bay, 

N.S. 

1912 

Wood 

TRAFFIC   RETURNS 


Calendar  Year 

No.  of 

Round 

Trips  run 

No.  of 

Passengers 

Carried 

Tons  of 
Freight 
Carried 

Live 
Stock 

Mails 

Subsidy 
Paid 

1922     .. 

25 
Total 

In         Nil 
Out      Nil 

355 

Nil 

Nil 

Nil 

$    Vts. 
5.000  00 

Nil 

3.55 

ST.  JOHN,  WESTPORT  AND  YARMOUTH  AND  OTHER  WAY  PORTS 

Contract  No.  42 A. 

T.  &  C.  File  No.  26984. 

Vote  210. — St.  John,  Westport  and  Yarmouth  and  other  ivay  ports,  steam  service 
between — 

1922-23 810,000 

1923-24 10 ,000 

Contractors. — Hugh  Cann  &  Son,  Ltd.,  of  Yarmouth,  N.S. 

Date  of  Contract.— March  2,  1922.     Diiration  of  Co7itract.—\]ml  1,  1922,  to 
March  31,  1923. 


72 


TRADE  A\D  COMMERCE 


13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1923 

Service  and  PorL^  of  Call. — Seventy  round  trips  are  to  bo  made  during  the 
period  covered  by  the  contract,  between  St.  John,  Westport  and  Yarmouth, 
calling  on  each  trip  both  ways  at  Freeport  and  Tiverton,  unless  ice  prevents. 

Four  round  trips  are  to  be  made  in  each  of  the  months  of  April,  November, 
December,  January,  February  and  March;  6  rountl  trips  in  the  month  of  Ma\'; 
and  8  round  trips  in  each  of  the  months  of  June,  July,  August,  September  and 
October. 

Government  Wharves. — Steamer  must  call  whenever  possililc. 

Subsidy. — $10,000,  payable  as  follows:  $142.86  for  each  round  trip  per- 
formed, to  be  paid  at  the  close  of  June,  September,  December  and  March. 

Mails. — To  be  carried  free. 


DIST.\NCES 

Miles 

St.  John  to  Tiverton .51 

Tiverton  to  Freeport 11 

Freeport  to  Westport 1 

Westport  to  Yarmouth ^ 33 

Total 96 


DESCRIPTION  OF  VESSEL  EMPLOYED 


c 

Dimensions 

Tonnage 

•T3 
u  O 

e-' 

Built 

j= 

>. 

Name 

-a 

JS 

•z 

2 

o 

1 

OS 

U 

B   g 

S    0 

•3 

i 

At 

In 

Of 

Ft. 

Ft. 

Ft. 

Knots 

Keith  Cann.. . 

120  00 

25-8 

11-8 

176 

299 

350 

28^ 

53 

U} 

Shelbume,  N.S. 

1917 

Wood 

TRAFFIC    RETURNS 


Calendar  Year 

No.  of 

Round 

Trips  run 

No.  of 

Passengers 

carried 

Tons  of 
Freight 
carried 

Live 
Stock 

Bags 
Mail 

Subsidy- 
paid 

1914 

81 

III 
78J 
75i 
78 
76i 
76 
74 

Total... 

959 
1,192 
1,258 
1,290 
1,293 
2,116 
2,150 
1,749 
In         851 
Out       870 

4,497 
5,684 
5,723 
6,598 
11,820 
11,096 
9,443 
9,123 
1.941 
6,642 

Nil 
Nil 
Nil 

Nil 
Nil 
Nil 

Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 

Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 

$     cts. 
5.871   IS 

1915 

6,000  00 

1916 

6,000  00 

1917 

5,999  70 

1918 

9.943  05 

1919 

10.000  00 

1920 

10,000  00 

1921 

10,000  Otf 

1922        

10,000  00 

1,721 

8,583 

Nil 

NU 

STEAMSHIP  SUBSIDIES 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  7 


SYDNEY   AND   BAY   ST.   LAWRENCE 

Contract  No.  33. 

T.  &  C.  File  No.  27972. 

Vote  211. — Sydney  and   Bay  St.   Lawrence,   calling  at   way  port.';,  steam  service 
between — 

1922-23 $9,000 

1923-24 9 ,000 

Contractors. — The  North  Shore  Steamship  C'ompanv,  Limited,  of  Sj'dney, 
N.S. 

Dale  of  Contract. — Feb.  23,  1922.  Duration  of  Contract. — From  the  opening 
to  the  close  of  navigation  in  the  j'ear  1922. 

Serifices  and  Ports  of  Call. — From  the  opening  of  navigation  until  June  1.5, 
and  from  October  15  until  the  close  of  navigation,  one  full  round  trip  each  week 
between  Sydney  and  St.  Anne'ts  Bay,  calling  both  going  and  returning  at  North 
Sydney,  Breton  Cove,  Englishtown  and  North  River;  and  one  full  round  trip 
each  week  between  Sydney  and  Bay  St.  Lawrence,  calling  at  North  Sj'dney, 
Ingonish,  Neil's  Harbour  and  Dingwall;  returning  calling  at  Neil's  Harbour, 
Ingonish  and  North  Sydney. 

From  June  15  to  October  15  two  full  round  trips  each  week  lietween  Sydney 
and  Ste.  Anne's  Bay,  with  calls  as  above  given;  and  two  full  round  trips  each  week 
between  Sydney  and  Neil's  Harl)our,  calling  both  going  and  returning  at  North 
Sydney  and  Ingonish,  one  trip  each  week  to  be  extended  to  Bay  St.  Lawrence, 
with  calls  on  the  outward  trip  at  Dingwall  and  Cape  North.  The  Friday  trip  to 
Ingonish  and  Neil's  Harbour  is  to  y)e  extended  to  Dingwall  during  July  and 
August. 

Government  Wharves. — Steamer  must  call  whenever  possible. 

Subsidy. — S9,000,  payable  in  instalments  in  June,  August  and  October,  and 
on  the  clo.se  of  navigation. 

Mails. — To  be  carried  free. 


<i  North  Sydney- .  -  - 

Breton  Cove 

En^lishtown  . . 

North  River 

Ingonish. , , 

Neil's  Harbour 

Aspy  Bay. 

Cape  North 

Bay  St.  I.awrenee 


Miles 
5 
27 
39 
43 
35 
47 
59 
70 
S5 


DESCRIPTION  OF  VESSEL  EMPLOYED 


§ 

Dimensions 

Tonnage 

•3 

li 

1 

03 

Built 

Name 

J3 
1 

n 

a 

Z 

O 

6 

At 

In 

Of 

Ft. 

Ft. 

Ft. 

Knots 

Aspy 

113 

25 

8-5 

99 

215 

250 

250 

42 

10 

Shelburne.  N.S. 

1910 

Wood 

74 


TRADE  AND  COMMERCE 


13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1923 


TRAFFIC  RETURNS 


Calendar  Year 

No.  of 

round 

trips  run 

No.  of 

passengers 

carried 

Tons  of 
freight 
carried 

Live 
btock 

Mails 

Subsidy 
paid 

1914 ,.^ , 

1915 '..; 

110 
112 
110 
114 
113 
U2 
116 
111 
106 

1.715 
1.360 
1,510 
1.515 
1.680 
1.860 
1.900 
1.325 
In          950 
Out    1.090 

860 

765 

835 

1.120 

1.260 

1.640 

1.935 

1.275 

570 

J55 

45 
130 
45 
55 
226 
70 
90 
40 
20 
5 

Nil 
Xil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 

$     cts. 
6.000 
6  000 

1916 

6  000 

1917 

6.000 

1918 

6  000 

1919 .: 

6.000 

1920 

9  000 

1921 i....- 

9,000 

1922..- 

9.000 

Tatal 

2.C40 

1.525 

25 

Nil 

SYDNEY   AND   WHYCOCOMAGH 
Contract  No.  34. 
T.  &  C.  File  No.  28659. 

Vote  212. — Sydney  and  Whycocomagh,  steam  service  between — 

1922-23 S7 ,000 

1923-24 13 ,000 

The  "Steamer  Marion,  which  had  performed  this  service  for  man}'  years, 
was  destroyed  by  fire  in  the  autumn  of  1922.  The  contractor,  J.  T.  Burchell, 
of  Sydney,  N.S.,  put  on  the  steamer  MacHinery  to  finish  out  the  season. 

On  November  30,  1922,  the  Department  called  for  tenders  for  this  service, 
in  order  to  give  ample  time  for  preparation  for  the  season  of  1923.  Tenders  were 
returnable  at  noon  on  December  12,  1922,  and,  by  Order  in  Council  of  December 
15,  1922,  the  tender  of  J.  T.  Burchell  of  Sydney,  N.S.,  was  accepted,  for  the 
performance  of  the  service  for  five  years,  commencing  in  1923,  at  an  annual 
subsidy  of  S13,000,  with  the  steamer  St.  Andrews.  AVhen  the  contractor 
inspected  the  St.  Andrews  in  New  York,  he  found  that  she  was  not  as  suitable 
as  the  Princess,  which  he  had  previously  offered  to  the  Government  for  an  annual 
subsidy  of  S16,000.  He  therefore  decided,  with  the  approval  of  the  Department, 
to  place  the  Princess  on  the  route  at  the  amiual  subsidy  of  §13,000. 

Contractor. — James  T.  Burchell,  of  Sydney,  N.S. 

Date  of  Contract. — December  16,  1922.  Duration  of  Contract. — From  the 
opening  of  navigation  in  1923  to  the  close  of  navigation  in  1927. 

Service  and  Ports  of  Call. — From  the  opening  of  navigation  to  June  30,  and 
from  October  1  to  close  of  navigation,  two  full  round  trips  each  week;  and  from 
July  1  to  September  30,  three  full  round  trips  each  week,  between  Sydney  and 
Whycocomagh.  calling  both  going  and  returning  at  North  Sydney,  Big  Bras  d'Or, 
New  Campbellton.  Boularderie,  Ross  Ferry.  Rig  Harbour,  Kempt  Head,  Bad- 
deck,  Washabuck  Centre,  Nyanza  and  Little  Narrows. 

It  is  agreed  that  if,  upon  due  and  proper  investigation,  the  Minister  should 
deem  it  advisable  that  three  round  trips  a  week  should  be  performed  after 
September  30,  the  contractors  will  perform  the  said  three  round  trips  each  week, 
until  otherwise  instructed  by  the  ^Minister. 


STEAMSHIP  SUBSIDIES  75 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  7 

.S'(/6.s7V/(/.-^S13,000,  piiy;xl)le  at  the  rate  of  $162.50  per  trip  for  each  round  trip 
performed  up  to  maximum  of  80  round  trips. 

Government  Wharres. — Steamer  must  call  whenever  possible. 

Mails. — To  he  carried  free. 

DISTANCES 

Miles 

Sydney  to  North  Sydney 5 

North  Sydney  to  Big  Hrasd'Or 20 

Big  Bras  d'Or  to  New  Campbellton 2 

New  C'amphfllton  to  Boularderie  Centre 7 

Boularderir  Cf litre  to  Ross  Ferry 7 

Ro.ss  Ferry  to  Hir  Harbour 2 

Big  Harbour  to  Kempt  Head 6 

Kempt  Head  to  Baddeck 5 

Baddeck  to  Washabuek ., , ,. .  5 

VVa.shabuek  to  Nyanza .;.....!./.. ..'...;....  6 

Nyanza  to  Little  Narrows 10 

Little  Narrows  to  Whycoeomagh 7 

Total ' .- 82 


DESCRIPTION  OF  VESSEL  EMPLOYED 


Dimensions 

Tonnage 

_o 

u   O 

as 

ii 

K 

s. 

CO 

Built 

Name 

J5 

i 

« 

a 

O 

O 

At 

In 

Of 

Marion 

Princess  

Ft.' 

ISO 
112 

Ft. 

26-5 
28 

Ft. 

8 
10-3 

269 
170 

478 
251 

100 
150 

400 
500 

49 
96 

Knots 

12 
13 

New  York 

Brooklyn;  N.Y. 

1876 
1913 

Wood 
Steel 

The  Marion  was  destroyed  by  fire  on  Oetober  31 .  1922. 


TRAFFIC   RETURNS 


Calendar  'Year 

No.  of 

round 

trips  run 

No.  of 
passengers 
carried 

Tons  of 
freight 
carried 

Live 
stock 

Mails 

Subsidy 
paid 

1914 

78 
80 
81 

5,879 
5.773 
6,655 
6.399 
4,756 
6,976 
5,073 
4,190 
In      1,000 
Out   1.500 

1,554 
I,5.')6 
1 ,  794 
2,029 
2,319 
4,042 
2,. 542 
3,059 
1,000 
1,250 

5,485 
4,081 
3,631 
2,674 
2,848 
2,621 
2,568 
1,892 
500 
105 

Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 

?     cts. 
3  000  00 

I9I.5 

3,000  00 
3  000  00 

1916 

1917 

79 

3,000  00 

1918 

79 
81 
82 
SO 
79 

3  000  00 

1919 

4  000  00 

1920 

4  000  00 

1921 

4  000  00 

1922 

4.923  .50 

2,500 

2,250 

603 

Nil 

TRADE  AND  COMMERCE 

13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1923 


SYDNEY,  BRAS  D'OR  LAKES,  AND  CAPE  BRETON  PORTS 

Contract  No.  77. 
T.  &  C.  File  27971. 

Vote  213. — Sydney  and  Bras  d'Or  Lake  Ports,  and  Ports  on  the  West  Coast  of  Cape 
Breton,  steam  service  between — 

1922-23 $14 ,000 

1923-24 14 ,000 

Contractors. — The  Coastal  Steamship  Company,  Ltd.,  of  Sydney,  N.S. 

Dale  of  Contract. — Feb.  23,  1922.  Duration  of  Contract. — From  the  opening 
to  the  close  of  navigation,  1922. 

Serrice  and  Ports  of  Call. — Weekly,  from  Sydney  to  Nt)rtli  Sydney,  Baddeck. 
Grand  Narrows,  East  Bay,  Big  Pond,  Irish  Cove,  Johnston's  Harbour,  Marble 
Mountain,  St.  Peter's,  Grandiqu?.  Poulamond,  L'Ardoise,  Arichat,  Mulgrave, 
Hawkesbury,  Hastings,  Port  Hood,  Margaree,  Grand  Etang  and  Ch^ticamp. 
returning  to  Sydney  and  proceeding  thence  to  Gabarous,  calling  at  Port  Morien. 
Main-a-dieu  and  Louisijurg. 

(a)  If  it  be  fouiul  impossible  for  the  Bras  d'Or  to  make  weekly  calls  at  Port 
Morien,  Main-a-dieu,  Louisburg  and  Gabarous,  a  reduced  service  to  the  said 
ports  may  be  performed.  The  contractors,  however,  shall  us?  thoir  best  endeav- 
ours to  perform  a  weeklj'  service  to  the  said  ports,  if  time  permits. 

Subsidy. — $14,000  per  annum,  payable  in  instalments  on  ,Iuly  1,  October  1, 
and  at  the  close  of  navigation. 

Mails. — To  be  carried  free. 

DISTANCES 

Miles 

Sydney  to  North  Sydney :..-....  .,.,■■;,•. .[. ;"...., 5 

North  Sydney  to  Baddeck 55 

Baddeck  to  Grand  Narrows 20 

Grand  Narrows  to  East  Bay 25 


East  Bay  to  Big  Pond. 

Big  Pond  to  Irish  Cove 

Irish  Cove  to  Johnston's  Harbour 

.Johnston's  Harbour  to  Marble  Mountain. 

Marble  Mountain  to  St.  Peter's 

St.  Peter's  to  Grandique 

Grandique  to  Poulamond 

Poulamond  to  L'Ardoise 

L'Ardoise  to  Arichat 

Arichat  to  Mulgrave 

Mulgrave  to  Hawkesbury 

Hawkesbury  to  Hastings 

Ha.stings  to  Port  Hood 

Port  Hood  to  Margaree 

Margaree  to  Grand  Etang 

Grand  Etang  to  Chfticamp 


Sydney  to  Port  Morien 32 

Port  Morien  to  Main-a-dieu 14 

Main-a-dieu  to  Ix)uisburg 15 

Louisburg  to  Gabarous 13 


f^TEAMSUin  SCSSlDfES 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  7 


UESCRIPTIOX  OF  VESSEL  EMPLOYED 


Dimensions 

Tonnage 

•B 

fc  2 
|| 

-3 

K 
CO 

Built 

Xainc 

M 
J 

1 

■z 

2 
O 

1 

At 

In 

Of 

Brasd'Or 

Ft. 

12S 

Ft. 

2S 

Ft. 
9 

136 

371 

400 

250 

71 

Knots 
13 

Mahone  Bay. 

M.S. 

1919 

Wood 

TRAFFIC  RETURNS 


Calendar  Year 

No.  of 

Round 

Trips  run 

No.  ot 

Passengers 

carried 

Tons  of  Freight 
carried 

Live 
.Stock 

Mails 

Subsidy 

Weight 

Measure- 
ment 

Lock 
Bags 

Tied 
Sacks 

pajd 

I9I9  

36 
3.5 
34! 
35 

45 

1,060 

925 

In          520 

Out       405 

1.825 
3. 400 
2.3.-8 
447 
2.140 

Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 

Nil 
Nil 
225 
265 

Nil 

Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 

Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 
Nil 

?      ct.^. 
8.420  64 

1920, 

14,000  00 

1921 

1 9'^2 

14.000  00 

14.001  00 

Total 

925 

2.587 

Nil 

265 

Nil 

Nil 

SUPERVISION   OF  SUBSIDIZED  STEAMSHIP  SERVICES 

\'ote  214- — Expenses  in  connection  with  the  svpervision  of  Subsidized  Steamship 
Serinces — 

1922-23 .$4,000 

1923-24 4,500 

By  Order  in  Council  of  April  10,  1912,  IMr.  W.  E.  Tupper,  of  Digby,  N.S., 
was  appointed  Supervising  Officer  of  Subsidized  Steamship  Services.  His  salar}- 
i<  .'?2,760  per  annum,  and  he  is  allowed  the  usual  travelling  and  other  contingent 
exi)etises.  The  title  of  this  position  has  been  changed  to  "Inspector  of  Subsidized 
Steamsliips." 

In  December,  1916,  I\Ir.  Tupper  enlisted  for  active  service  overseas.  He 
returned  to  Canada  in  1918,  and  resumed  his  position  as  supervising  officer  on 
January  1,  1919. 

The  Inspector's  Annual  Rejjort  is  as  follows: — 


DiGBY,  N.S.     Januarv    18,    1923. 
F.  C.  T.  O'Hara,  Esq.. 
Deputy  Minister,  Trade  and  Comerce, 
Ottawa. 

Dear  Sir: — 

I  beg  to  submit  my  report  on  Subsidized  Steamship  Services  for  the  year 
ending  December  31,  1922. 

During  the  year  thirty  services  were  inspected.  The  steamers  performing 
the  various  services  were  with  few  exceptions  adequate  to  requirements,  both 
in  respect  to  passenger  accommodation  and  cargo  capacity,  and  the  food  and 
ser\ace  were  satisfactorv. 


78  TRADE  AND  COMMERCE 

13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1923 

Although  complaints  are  of  course  inseparable  from  all  branches  of  public 
service,  it  is  gratifying  to  note  that  comparatively  few  complaints  were  received 
last  year  in  regard  to  irregularities  of  service. 

During  the  year  two  new  services  were  subsidized.  These  were  the  St. 
John  and  Wedgeport,  and  the  Mainland  and  Islands  of  Miscou  and  Shippegan 
services. 

St.  John  and  Wedgeport. — Early  in  the  spring,  Mr.  D.  D.  LeBlanc, 
of  Wedgeport.  N.S.,  applied  for  a  subsidy  for  the  SS.  "Madeline  A",  for  the 
performance  of  a  service  consisting  of  three  round  trips  a  month,  during  the 
season  of  open  na\igation,  between  St.  John,  N.B.,  and  Wedgeport,  X.S., 
calling  both  ways  at  Cape  St.  Mary  and  port  Maitland.  A  thorough 
inspection  of  the  districts  proposed  to  be  served  resulted  in  the  application 
receiving  favourable  consideration,  and  a  subsidy  of  -So, 000,  was  granted.  In 
view  of  the  fact  that  the  districts  embracing  the  Nova  Scotia  ports  of  call  are 
in  particular  neeil  of  this  ser^^ce  during  the  early  spring  months,  it  is  unfortunate 
that  conditions  were  such  that  it  was  impossible  for  the  "Madeline  A."  to 
commence  her  trips  until  the  middle  of  May.  However,  should  the  contract 
be  renewed  for  1923,  arrangements  have  been  made  to  place  the  steamer  on 
the  route  on  or  about  the  first  of  April. 

Mainl.\nd  and  the  Islands  of  Miscou  and  Shippegan. — Last  May 
application  was  made  by  the  Gloucester  Navngation  Co.  Ltd.,  of  Shippegan 
N.B.,  for  a  daily  service,  except  Sunday,  between  the  mainland  and  ^Iiscou 
and  Shippegan  Islands.  When  the  service  was  inspected  it  was  found  that 
the  contractors  had,  without  i)ermission  from  this  Department,  substituted 
a  small  gasoline  vessel,  the  "En  Avant",  for  the  SS.  "Beaver",  the  boat  stipul- 
ated in  the  contract.  Trade  conditions  proved  to  be  such,  however,  that  we 
were  able  to  approve  of  the  substitution,  providing  that  in  the  event  of  the  con- 
tract being  renewed  for  1923,  a  larger  and  more  adaptable  vessel  were  procured. 
The  contractors  thereupon  agreed  to  build  a  new  boat,  following  certain  spe- 
cifications outlined  by  this  Department,  and  it  is  expected  that  next  j'ear  the 
service  will  be  performed  by  a  steamer  which  will  prove  entirely  satisfactory. 

During  the  v-ear  substitution  of  steamers  in  the  case  of  three  services  was 
effected.     These  were  as  follows: — 

Charlottetown  and  Pictou. — The  contract  for  this  service  was  awarded 
to  the  Georgetown  Steamship  Co.,  of  Pictou,  N.S.,  which  placed  the  SS. 
"Magdalen"  on  the  route.  It  is  considered  that  this  steamer  proved,  generally 
speaking,  more  suitable  than  the  SS.  "Constance",  which,  during  the  previous 
year,  performed  the  service  for  a  few  months. 

Pictou,  Montague,  aIurray  Harbour  and  Georgetown. — At  the  close 
of  the  season  of  1921,  the  contractors  permanently  withdrew  their  steamer 
fron  the  route.  Partly  in  consequence  of  this  fact,  and  partly  due  to  the  fact 
that  there  seemed  to  be  no  other  vessel  available,  this  service  was  not  reopened 
until  late  in  the  summer,  when  the  application  of  the  LaHavre  Steamship  Co. 
of  West  LaHave,  X.S.,  which  offered  the  SS.  "Tussle",  was  accepted.  Subs- 
equent to  the  inauguration  of  the  car  ferry  between  P. E. Island  and  the  main- 
land, there  seems  to  be  considerable  douljt  whether  there  is  sufficient  traffic 
over  the  route  to  justifj'  the  continuance  of  the  service. 

Quebec,  Montreal  and  Paspebiac. — In  my  annual  report  for  1921, 
I  referred  briefly  to  the  very  unsatisfactory  condition  of  this  service  since  the 
sinking  of  the  SS.  "Lady  of  Gasp6".     It  is  with  extreme  satisfaction  therefore 


STEAMSHIP  SUBSIDIES  79 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  7 

that  I  am  able  to  report  the  excellent  service  furnished  last  year  bj'  the  SS. 
"Gaspesia".  This  steamer,  purchased  early  last  year  by  the  contractors, 
the  Clarke  Steamship  Co.  of  Quebec,  is  most  excellently  adapted  in  every 
respect  to  the  route.  This  vessel  has  a  carrying  capacity  of  1200  tons  and 
passenger  accommodation  for  fifty  first-class  and  fifty-six  steerage.  The  speed 
of  th(>  "Gaspesia" — 121  knots — permitted  last  year  of  extending  the  service, 
without  additional  subsidy,  to  Charlottetown  and  Summerside,  in  P.E.  Island. 
This  has  i)roved  of  great  benefit  to  these  Island  ports,  jtarticularly  Summerside, 
which  hadfor  several  years  previously  been  (le])rive(l  of  tlirect  steamship  con- 
nection with  Montreal  and  Quebec. 

Sydney  and  Whycocomagu. — On  October  31,  the  SS.  "Marion"  caught 
fire  at  Whycocomagh,  the  western  terminus  of  the  route,  and  was  totally 
ilestroyed.  As  there  was  no  other  suitable  boat  available,  this  Department 
was  compelled  to  sanction  the  employment  of  the  "Mac  Hinery",  a  drifter. 
Although  a  new  contract  for  the  ])erformance  of  the  service  next  season  has 
not  yet  been  awarded,  negotiations  are  in  progress  leading  to  the  acceptance 
of  the  SS.  "Princess".  This  steamer  was  irsjiected  recently  by  an  officer  of 
this  Department,  anil  it  is  considered  that  she  will  prove  a  very  suitable  boat- 
for  the  service,  providing  that  the  owners  are  willing  to  effect  certain  altera- 
tions, specified  by  the  Department. 

In  view  of  the  fact  that  full  traffic  returns  for  the  calendar  year  are  unavail 
able  at  present,  it  is  imiK)Ssil)le  to  furnish  relialile  information  in  respect  to  the 
volume  of  freight  anil  passenger  traffic  carried  b.v  local  subsidized  steamers, 
compared  with  that  for  1921.  Observation  during  my  inspection  trips  leads 
me  to  believe  that  although  the  liaffic  over  a  few  of  the  routes  exceeded  that 
for  the  previous  year,  it  will  be  found  that  in  the  great  majority  of  cases  a 
comparison  will  prove  very  unfavourable.  In  regard  to  this  sul^ject,  it  perhaps 
is  unnecessary  to  state  that  nearly  all  the  operations  of  our  subsidized  coastal 
steamships  are  confined  to  the  coast  waters  of  Nova  Scotia  and  New  Brunswick. 
In  these  provinces  fish  and  lumliering  are  the  major  industries.  The  fishing 
industry  was  not  only  actively  prosecuted,  but  prices  showed  a  considerable 
increase  over  1921.  Although  a  "clean  up"  policy  was  followed  last  j-ear  in 
the  lumbering  industry,  the  total  value  of  exports  did  not  fall  very  far  short 
of  that  for  the  previous  year.  In  view  of  these  facts  it  may  be  somewhat 
difficult  to  account  for  the  general  slackness  of  passenger  and  freight  traffic 
over  local  routes.  Notwithstanding  the  increased  trade  activity,  the  conditions 
seemed  to  be  due  to  the  scarcity  of  money  and  the  instability  of  prices.  In 
nearly  all  cases  local  subsidized  steamship  companies  depend  chiefly  upon 
heavy  outward  freights.  Last  year  it  was  particularly  noticeable  that  all  the 
merchants  doing  business  at  way  ports  purchased  in  very  small  lots.  This 
fact  leads  one  to  believe  that  we  shall  see  little  improvement  in  conditions 
affecting  our  local  services  until  prices  become  stabilized  and  until  outport 
merchants  are  able  to  collect  outstanding  accounts. 

I  have  the  honour  to  be,  Sir, 

Your  obedient  servant, 

(Sgil.)  W.  E.  TuppER, 
Inspector  Subsidized  Steamships. 


80  lUADE   AM)   COMMERCE 

13  GEORGE  V,  A,  1923 

SOME  CLAUSES  COMMOK  TO  ALL  COXTHACTS 

Note. — Some  of  the  principal  sections  common  to  all  contracts,  and  as 
such  hereinl)efore  frequently  referred  to,  read  as  follows:— 

Proof  of  Performance  of  Serrice  to  be  furnished 

The  contractors  shall  furnish  and  establish  at  their  own  expense  the  neces- 
sary agents  required  for  the  efficient  performance  of  this  contract,  and  shall 
with  dilignece  as  soon  after  the  comjiletion  of  each  voyage  as  may  be,  furnish 
to  the  minister  full  and  complete  copies  of  the  manifests  of  the  cargoes  and  list 
of  passengers  carried  on  each  voyage,  duly  certifieil  by  the  proper  officers  of 
customs,  and  also  such  other  documents,  information  and  evid(Mice  as  may  be 
reasonably  required  bj-  the  minister  to  show  the  volume,  extent  and  value  of 
the  trade  carried  on  by  the  said  steamers  and  the  full  performance  on  their 
part  of  services,  requirements  and  conditions  of  this  contract,  in  order  to  enable 
him  to  judge  as  to  whether  the  terms  of  this  contract  have  been  or  are  being 
fxilly  and  faithfully  carried  out  and  complied  with,  within  the  true  intent  and 
meaning  thereof,  and  his  decision  in  that  respect  shall  be  binding,  final  and  con- 
clusive; and  the  furnishing  of  such  certificates,  documents  and  evidence  as 
hereinbefore  specified  shall  be  a  condition,  precedent  to  the  payment  of  the 
subsidy  herein  provided  for,  or  any  portion  thereof,  and  if  in  the  opinion  of  the 
minister  all  the  terms  of  this  contract  have  not  been  fully  complied  with  by  the 
contractors,  he  may  deduct  from  the  subsidy  otherwise  payable  such  portion 
thereof  as  he  may  deem  fit  and  proper,  taking  into  consitleration  all  the  circum- 
stances connected  therewith,  and  the  contractors  shall  at  all  times  during  the 
continuance  of  this  contract  well  and  faithfully  aV)ide  by  and  conform  to  all 
such  requirements  as  may  be  made  by  the  minister  with  regard  to  the  said 
steamers  in  the  performance  of  this  contrac.t. 

Financial  Statements 

It  is  furtlier  understood  and  agreed  that  the  contractors,  whenever  so 
required,  shall  furnish  to  the  minister  such  financial  statement  or  statements 
as  he  may  desire  from  time  to  time  respecting  all  revenues  derived  from  and 
all  expenditures  in  connection  with  the  conduct  of  the  service  herein  provided 
for. 

British  Subjects 

It  is  further  understood  and  agreed  by  the  contractors,  that  two-thirds  of 
the  total  number  of  officers,  engineers,  stewards,  crew  or  other  employees  what- 
soever upon  the  steamships  engaged  in  the  performance  of  the  service  herein 
contracted  for,  shall  be  British  subjects,  but  the  non-ob.servance  of  this  clause 
shall  not  constitute  a  violation  of  this  contract  in  such  individual  cases  as  may 
from  time  to  time  be  approved  by  the  minister  in  writing. 

Equipment  of  Steamers 

The  steamers  to  be  employed  as  herein  specified  shall  at  all  times  during 
the  continuance  of  this  contract  be  fully  seaworthy,  well-officered,  manned, 
victualled,  equipped,  provided  and  furnished,  having  regard  to  the  service 
which  the  contractors  have  hereby  undertaken  to  perform;  and  shall  have 
ample  and  suitable  accommodation  for  the  passengers,  mails  and  freight  to  be 
carried  over  the  route  specified;  and  shall  at  all  times  carry  boats  and  life- 
saving  appliances  in  compliance  with  the  law,  and  shall  be  in  all  respects  subject 
to  the  approval  of  the  minister. 


STEAMSHIP  SUBSIDIES  81 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  7 

Carriage  of  Mails 

The  contractors  shall  during  the  performance  of  this  contract,  convey  on 
each  and  every  trip  of  the  steamers  performing  the  aforementioned  services, 
both  on  outward  and  hoinewanl  voyages,  all  such  mails  as  shall  be  tendered  to 
the  proper  officers  or  persons  in  that  behalf  on  the  said  steamers  by  or  on  behalf 
or  under  the  direction  of  the  postal  authorities  of  Canada,  or  those  at  the  terminal 
port  or  ports  of  call  herein  referred  to,  and  shall  deliver  all  such  mails  at  their 
proper  destination  at  the  terminal  port  or  ports  of  call  above  referred  to;  and  the 
expenses  of  carrying  such  mails  from  the  post  offices  or  railway  stations  to  the 
steamers  and  from  the  steamers  to  the  post  offices  or  railway  stations  at  the 
terminal  ports  and  at  the  ports  of  call  shall  be  borne  by  the  contractors,  who 
will  be  subject  to  all  general  and  special  regulations  now  or  hereafter  existing 
during  the  continuance  of  this  contract  in  connection  mth  the  postal  service. 
For  the  conveyance  of  all  such  mails  no  payment  shall  be  made  or  required, 
over  or  beyond  the  amount  of  subsidy  herein  mentioned  or  provided  for. 

Accommodation  for  Mails 

The  said  steamer  shall  be  provided  with  sufficient  and  convenient  accom- 
modation and  protection  for  all  such  mails,  to  the  satisfaction  of  the  Honourable 
the  Postmaster  General  of  Canada,  for  the  time  being,  and  the  contractor  shall 
further  take  all  reasonable  and  necessary  precautions  for  the  protection  of  such 
mails  while  upon  the  said  steamers  or  while  in  the  contractor's  charge  or 
custody,  from  loss,  damage,  or  injury,  in  any  way,  and  the  contractors  shall  be 
responsible  for  any  loss  or  damage  thereto  caused  by  negligence  or  want  of 
proper  care  or  accommodation  on  the  part  of  the  contractors,  their  agents  or 
servants,  or  on  the  part  of  the  officers,  employees  or  crew  on  board  the  said 
steamers,  and  this  without  regard  to  any  question  as  to  the  legal  liability  of 
the  Postmaster  General  to  the  owners  of  the  articles  of  mail  matter  contained 
in  such  mails  for  damage  or  loss  sustained  in  transit. 

DeJiJiition  of  the  Term  "Mails" 

The  expression  "mails"  for  the  purpose  of  this  contract  shall  be  deemed  to 
meanand  include  all  boxes,  bags,  baskets  or  packets  of  or  containing  letters, 
post-cards,  newspapers,  parcels,  books,  or  printed  papers,  and  all  other  articles 
which  under  the  Post  Office  Act  and  postal  regulations  for  the  time  being  in 
force  are  transmissible  by  post  in  Canada,  without  regard  to  place  either  of 
origin  or  destination,  and  also  all  empty  bags,  empty  boxes  and  other  receptacles, 
stores  and  articles  used  or  to  be  used  in  carrying  on  the  post  office  service,  or 
which  shall  ordinarily  be  sent  by  or  to  or  from  the  post  office. 

No  Letters  except  H.  M.  Mails  to  be  Carried 

The  contractors  shall  not,  nor  shall  anj-  of  their  agents  or  servants,  or 
officers  or  crews  of  the  said  steamers  receive  or  permit  to  be  received  on  board 
of  the  said  steamers  any  letters  for  conveyance  other  than  those  contained  in 
His  Majesty's  mails,  or  which  are  or  may  be  privileged  by  law,  nor  the  mails 
of  any  other  country,  except  such  as  are  specified  bj'^  the  Postmaster  General 
of  Canada  for  the  time  being. 

Government  Officials  to  he  carried  Free  of  Charge 

The  Honourable  the  Postmaster  General  of  Canada,  or  the  Honourable  the 
Minister  of  Trade  and  Commerce  for  the  time  being,  or  any  inspector  or  officer 
of  the  Post  Office  Department  or  the  Department  of  Trade  and  Commerce  who 
may  in  the  execution  of  his  duty  travel  in  the  said  steamers,  shall  be  carried 
free  of  charge. 

7—6 


82  TRADE  AXD  COMMERCE 

13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1923 

Proper  Accounts  to  be  Kepi 

The  contractors  shall  keep  full  and  proper  accounts  of  and  in  connection 
with  the  working  of  this  service,  and  shall  keep  such  accounts  separate  and 
distinct  from  any  other  accounts  of  or  connected  with  other  branches  of  their 
business;  and  in  any  contingency  which,  in  the  opinion  of  the  minister,  may 
render  such  a  course  necessary,  the  contractors  shall  allow  any  officer  or  officers 
named  by  the  minister  free  access  to  such  accounts  and  all  books,  papers  and 
documents  connected  therewith. 

Substitute  for  Disabled  Steamers 

It  is  understood  that  if  the  said  steamer  shall  be  by  peril  of  the  sea  or  other 
unavoidable  casualty,  lost,  destroyed  or  temporarily  disabled  from  performing 
the  voyages  herein  agreed  to  be  performed  according  to  the  true  intent  and 
meaning  of  these  presents,  the  contractors  may  in  such  case  as  soon  as  reason- 
ably may  be,  having  regard  to  the  circumstances,  replace  the  said  steamer  by 
another  of  equal  class,  speed,  equipment,  character  and  capacity  to  the  satis- 
faction and  approval  of  the  minister  in  case  the  said  steamer  has  been  only 
temporarily  disabled,  and  continue  the  service  herein  contracted  for  with  such 
substituted  or  repaired  steamer  with  as  little  delay  as  possible  under  all  circum- 
stances. 

Freight  ar^d  Passenger  Tariffs — Proof  of  Performance  of  Service  to  be  Furnished 

The  contractors  shall  carry  on  each  steamer  running  under  this  contract, 
according  to  its  capacity,  on  all  voyages,  all  the  freight  and  passengers  which 
may  be  reasonably  offered  or  obtained,  and  at  tariff  rates,  both  as  to  passengers 
and  freight,  which  may  be  from  time  to  time  approved  bj^  the  minister;  and  the 
contractors  shall  furnish  to  the  minister  such  documents,  information  and 
evidence  as  may  be  required  by  the  minister  to  show  the  volume,  extent  and 
value  of  the  trade  carried  on  by  the  said  steamer,  and  such  customs  certificates, 
documents  and  evidence  as  may  be  necessary  or  as  may  be  required  by  the 
minister  to  prove  the  performance  of  the  service  herein  contracted  for,  and  to 
enable  the  minister  to  judge  as  to  whether  this  contract  is  being  carefully  and 
faithfully  carried  out  and  performed  and  the  furnishing  of  such  certificates, 
documents,  information  and  evidence,  as  hereinbefore  specified,  shall  be  a  con- 
dition precedent  to  the  payment  of  the  subsidy  herein  provided  for  or  any 
portion  thereof. 

Deductions  from  Siibsidy — Time-tables  to  be  furnished — Docking  Disabled  Steajners 

Provided  however,  that  it  is  the  true  intent  and  meaning  of  these  presents 
that  no  amount  or  instalment  of  subsidy  shall  be  paj^able  or  be  paid  at  any  time, 
unless  it  appears  to  the  satisfaction  of  the  minister  that  up  to  the  time  of  such 
instalment  becoming  due,  as  herein  stipulated,  the  service  herein  described  and 
defined  has  been  fully  and  faithfully  performed,  and  that  all  provisions  and 
stipulations  as  to  freight  and  freight  rates  and  dates  of  sailing  have  been  in  all 
respects  faithfully  observerd  and  carried  out,  according  to  the  true  intent  and 
meaning  of  these  presents;  and  it  is  understood  and  agreed  to  be  a  further  con- 
dition of  these  presents  that  the  contractors  shall  at  least  two  weeks  prior  to  the 
first  sailing  under  this  contract  furnish  to  the  minister  time-tables  showing  the 
proposed  sailings,  and  upon  the  same  being  approved  by  the  minister,  they  shall 
be  duly  advertised  in  such  manner  as  he  may  direct;  and  it  is  also  agreed  that  in 
case  either  of  the  steamers  herein  named,  or  a  substituted  steamer  sanctioned  by 
the  minister,  does  not  sail  from  a  terminal  port  as  herein  specified  within  of 

the  date  fixed  by  such  time-tables,  there  shall  be  deducted  from  the  amount  of 


STEAMSHIP  SUBSIDIES  83 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  7 

subsidy  payable  for  such  voyage  a  sum  equal  to  one-tenth  of  the  amount  other- 
wise paj-jibie  for  the  performance  of  such  voyage,  and  so  in  proportion  for  further 
delays  or  failure  to  sail  from  such  terminal  port.  Provided,  however,  that  the 
minister  may  authorize  any  vessel  to  sail  either  at  an  earlier  or  a  later  date  than 
that  specified  in  such  time-tables  should  he  for  any  reason  deem  it  advisable  to 
do  so;  it  being  understood  and  agreed  that,  in  the  event  of  any  of  the  said 
steamers  being  at  any  time  so  disal)U'd  as  to  be  obliged  to  be  docked  for  repairs, 
the  failure  to  perform  the  terms  of  this  contract  owing  to  such  accident  and  for 
the  time  reasonably  occupied  in  the  repair  of  the  damaged  steamer,  shall  not  be 
taken  as  a  default  or  breach  of  the  stipulations  of  this  contract,  or  subject  the 
contractors  to  deductions  as  above  from  the  amount  of  this  subsidj',  if  any, 
payable  for  any  voyage  delayed  in  consequence  of  such  docking  for  repairs,  but 
there  shall  be  no  claim  for,  nor  payment  of  any  subsidy  in  respect  of  any  voyage 
not  actually  performed. 

Publicity  of  Tariff  Charges 

The  freight  and  passenger  rates  charged  by  the  contractors  over  said  route 
may  at  any  time  be  reciuireil  to  be  aj)proved  of  by  the  Minister,  whose  decision 
shall  be  final,  and  the  said  freight  and  passenger  rates  shall  be  made  available  at 
all  times  to  the  public  at  the  head  ofl&ce  and  the  agencies  of  the  contractors. 

Calls  at  Foreign  Ports 

The  steamer  employed  in  carrying  out  the  provisions  of  this  contract  shall 
not  on  any  of  its  trips  call  at  any  foreign  port  not  specified  in  this  contract. 

Carrying  of  nitro-glycerine  or  dangerous  articles 

The  contractors  shall  not  convej'  or  permit  to  be  conveyed  in  any  steamer 
while  cmplo3-ed  in  this  service  any  nitro-glj'cerine  or  any  other  article  which  in 
the  opinion  of  the  Minister  shall  be  considered  dangerous. 

Subsidy  subject  to  Vote  of  Canadian  Parliament 

It  is  conditioned,  declared  and  agreed  that  the  payment  of  subsidy,  as  here- 
inbefore stipulated,  is  subject  to  the  amount  specified  being  provided  for  the 
purpose  by  a  vote  of  the  parliament  of  Canada,  and  that  if  no  amount  is  voted 
for  the  purpose,  or  if  any  amount  voted  has  become  exhausted  in  payment 
thereof,  and  no  further  sum  is  voted  for  the  purpose,  this  contract  or  agreement 
shall  terminate  and  become  void  and  of  no  effect,  and  the  party  of  the  first  part 
shall  not  in  consequence  be  held  liable  to  damage. 

Minister's  Right  to  Terminate  Contract 

It  is  declared  to  be  the  true  intent  and  meaning  of  these  presents,  that  the 
Minister  shall  have  the  right  at  any  time  during  the  continuance  of  this  contract, 
upon  30  days'  notice  in  writing  to  the  contractors,  their  successors  or  assigns,  to 
terminate  thfs  contract,  and  every  matter  and  thing  herein  contained,  if  it  shall 
appear  to  the  Minister  that  there  has  been  any  breach  on  the  part  of  the  con- 
tractors, their  successors  or  assigns,  of  anj'  of  the  covenants,  agreements,  stipula- 
tions or  provisions  herein  contained  and  entered  into  on  the  part  of  the  contract- 
ors; and  it  is  declared  and  agreed  that  the  Minister  shall  at  all  times  be  the  sole 
and  final  judge  as  to  whether  there  has  been  any  such  breach,  and  his  decision 
shall  be  absolute,  final  and  conclusive. 


84  TRADE  A.\D  COMMERCE 

13  GEORGE  V,  A    1923 

Assignment  of  Contract 

This  contract  shall  not,  nor  shall  any  right  or  interest  therein  be  assigned 
without  the  consent  in  writing  of  the  Minister  to  such  assignment  having  been 
first  obtained. 

Canadian  Members  of  Parliament  not  Admilled  to  Share  in  Contract 

It  is  a  condition  of  these  presents  that  no  member  of  the  House  of  Commons 
of  Canada  shall  be  admitted  to  any  share  or  part  of  this  contract  or  agi'cement 
nor  to  anj-  benefit  to  arise  therefrom. 

Changes  in  Contract 

The  minister  may  authorize  any  change  or  changes  in  the  terms  of  this 
contract  as  may  not  be  inconsistent  with  the  vote  providing  for  the  payment  of 
the  subsidy. 

Minister  to  be  final  judge  as  to  fidl  Carrying  out  of  Coidract 

The  minister  shall  at  all  times  be  the  judge  as  to  whether  the  terms  of  this 
contract  have  been  or  are  being  fully  and  faithfully  carried  out  and  complied 
with  within  the  true  intent  and  meaning  thereof,  and  his  decision  in  that  respect 
shall  be  binding,  final  and  conclusive. 

Tounng 

No  towing  shall  be  undertaken  by  the  vessel  performing  the  service  specified 
in  this  contract,  if  such  towing  might  interfere  in  any  way  with  the  regular 
performance  of  said  service,  except  for  the  purpose  of  saving  hfe  or  assisting 
vessels  in  distress,  or  performing  other  work  of  great  importance,  without  the 
permission  of  the  minister  first  having  been  obtained. 

Transportation  of  Trade  Commissioners 

(Inserted  in  contracts  for  ocean  services) 

The  Canadian  Trade  Commissioners  and  their  \\dves,  children  and  servants 
or  Canadian  Commercial  Agents,  shall  be  granted  free  transportation,  meals 
included,  with  first-class  accommodation  and  free  transportation  for  their 
household  effects,  upon  any  steamships  employed  by  the  contractors  in  the 
performance  of  the  contract  when  requested  so  to  do  by  the  Minister,  and  when 
the  said  Commissioner  or  Commercial  Agent  is  travelling  upon  his  official 
duties  or  being  transferred  from  one  official  post  to  another. 

Calls  at  Government  Wharves 

(Inserted  in  contracts  for  local  ser\ices) 

In  consideration  of  the  subsidy  herein  stipulated  the  contractors  agree  to 
call  at  all  Government  wharves  when  such  is  practicable  and  when  such  wharves 
are  available. 

Handling  of  -perishable  products 

(Inserted  in  contracts  for  Atlantic  ocean  services) 

The  handling,  loading,  stowing  and  unloading  of  any  fruit  or  perishable 
products  carried  by  the  said  vessels  shall  be  subject  to  and  under  the  supervision 
of  any  cargo  inspector  or  other  officer  appointed  for  that  purpose,  should  the 
Minister  of  Agriculture  for  Canada  deem  it  advisable. 


INDEX  TO  SERVICES 


Page 

Batldfok  and  lona 27 

Canada  and  New  Zealand  (on   the    Pacific 

ocean) 13 

Canada  and  Newfoundland 5 

Canada  and  Soutli  Africa 10 

Canada,  Tlie  West  Indies  and  South  America  8 

Charlottetown  and  Pictou 28 

Charlottetown,     Victoria    and     HoIIiday's 

Wharf 29 

Grand  Manan  and  Mainland 30 

Halifax,  Canso  and  Guysboro 31 

Halifax  and  La  Have  River  ports 33 

Halifax  and  Newfoundland,  via  Cape  Breton 

ports 34 

Halifax  and  Spry  Bay 36 

Halifax,  South  Cape  Breton  and  Bras  d'Or 

Lake  ports 38 

Halifax  and  West  Coast  Cape  Breton 39 

Mainland   and   the  Lslands    of  Miscou    and 

Shippegan 41 

Mulgrave,  Arichat  and  Petit  de  Grat 49 

Mulgrave  and  Canso 42 

Mulgrave  and  Guysboro 43 

Newcastle,   Neguao  and  Escuminac;    Mira- 

michi  River  and  Miramichi  Bay 4.5 

Pelee  Island  and  Mainland. 46 

Pictou,    Montague,    Murray    Harbour    and 

Georgetown 50 

Pictou,  Mulgrave  and  C'hcticamp 51 


Page 
Pictou,  New  Glasgow  and  Antigonish  County 

ports 53 

Pictou,  Souris  and  the  Magdalen  Islands 55 

Port  Mulgrave,  St.  Peter's,  Irish  Cove  and 

Marble  Mountain 54 

Prince  Rupert  and  Queen  Charlotte  Islands .  16 

Quebec,  Natashquan  and  Harrington 57 

Quebec.  Montreal  and  Gaspe 59 

St.  Catlierincs  Hav  and  Tadousac 81 

St.  J.  hn  and  liinr  River 63 

St.  John  and  Bridgetown 64 

St.  John  and  Digby 65 

St.  John,  Digby,  Annapolis  and  Granville. . .  CO 
St.  John  and  Bay  of  iSindy  and  Minas  Basin 

ports 68 

St.  John  and  St.  Andrews 62 

St.  John  and  Wedgeport 70 

St.  John,  Westport  and  Yarmouth  and  other 

way  ports 71 

Sydney  and  Bay  St.  Lawrence 73 

Sydney  and  the  West  Coast  of  Cape  Breton.  76 

Sydney  and  Whycocoinagh 74 

Vancouver  and  Howe  .Sound 24 

Vancouver  and  Northern  British  Columbia 

ports 22 

Victoria  and  San  Francisco 17 

Victoria,  Vancouver  and  Skagway 19 

Victoria  and  West  Coast  Vancouver  Island. .  2o 

Supervision  of  subsidized  steamship  services  7_ 


INDEX  TO  PERSONS  OR  COMPANIES  SUBSIDIZES 


P.\GE 

Arichat  SS.  Co 49 

Baddeck  SS.  Co.,  Ltd 27 

Bay  of  Fundy  and  Minas  Basin  SS.  Co 69 

Bear  River  SS.  Co 63 

Boulianne,  E.O 61 

Bridgetown  Steamship  Co 64 

Burehell,  J.  T 74 

Canadian  Australasian  Royal  Mail  Line 13 

Canadian    Pacific    Railway    (St.   John   and 

Digby) 05 

Canadian   Pacific   Railway   (Victoria,  Van- 
couver and  Skagivay ) 19 

Canadian    Pacific    I{ailway    (Victoria    and 

West  Coa.st  Vancouver  Island) 20 

Cann  &  Son,  Hugh  (Mulgrave  and  Canso). . .  42 

Cann  &  Son,  Hugh  (St.  John  and  Westport).  71 

Charlottetown  SS.  Co 29 

Clarke  Steamship  Co ,  57,  59 

Coastal  Steamship  Co 76 

Dominion  Atlantic  Railway  Co 65 

Elaine  SS.  Co 43 

Elder-Dempster  A  Co.  (South  African  ser- 
vice)   10 

Farquhar  &  Co.,  3.  A.  (Halifax  and  New- 
foundland via  Cape  Breton) 34 

La  Cie  Gaspe-Cotier,  Ltee 60 

Georgetown  SS.  Co 28 

Gloucester  Navigation  Co 41 


Page 

Grand  Manan  Steamboat  Co 30 

Grand  Trunk  Pacific  Coast  SS.  Co 16 

Halifax  and  Canso  SS.  Co 31 

Halifax  and  Inverness  SS.  Co 39 

Halifax  and  Sheet  Harbour  SS.  Co 36 

Hendry,  Ltd 38 

Howe  Sound  Navigation  Co 24 

LaHave  Steamship  Co 50 

Leblanc.  D.  D 70 

Leslie,  W'illiam  C .W 

Magdalen  Transports,  Ltd 55 

Maritime  SS.  Co 62 

McDougal,  Roderick 51 

Miramichi  Steam  Navigation  Co.,  Ltd 45 

North  Bay  SS.  Co 51 

North  Shore  SS.  Co 57 

Pacific  SS.  Co 17 

Riid-Ncwfdundland  Co.,  Ltd 5 

Richmond  Steamship  Co 54 

Royal  Mail  Steam  Packet  Co 6 

Smith,  J.  W 53 

St.  John  SS.  Co 68 

Union  SS.  Co.  of  British  Columbia 22 

Union  SS.  Co.  of  New  Zealand 13 

Valley  SS.  Co..  Ltd 66 

Western  Steamship  Co 33 

Windsor  and  Pelee  Island  Steamship  Co., 

Ltd 46 


INDEX  TO  NAMES  OF  VESSELS  EMPLOYED 


Page 

Admiral  Dewey 18 

Admiral  Sehlcy 18 

Alexandra , 45 

Arcadia 39 

Arirhat 4<) 

Aspy 73 

Hear  River 64 

Benmiela ; 11 

Bcreby 11 

Blue  Hill 27 

Bras  d'Or 77 

Britannia 25 

Brumath 60 

Calgary 11 

Camosun 23 

Caraquet 8 

Chaleur 8 

Chaudiere 8 

Chedabucto 32 

Chelohsin :■ i3 

Chignecto 8 

Chilkoot 23 

Chilliwack 23 

Connors  Bros 62 

Coquitlam 23 

Cowichan 23 

Dorothy  Alexander 18 

En  Avant 42 

Empress 66 

Enterprise 34 

Fantee 11 

Gaspesia 80 

Glenholme 69 

Grand  Manan 31 

Granville 67 

Harland 29 

Jekri 11 

Kaduna 11 

Keith  Cann 72 

Kinburn 52 


Page 

Kwarra 11 

Kyle 5 

Labrador 58 

Lady  Evelyn 25 

Madeline  A ; 71 

Macdalen 28 

Makura 14 

Margaret 37 

Marion 75 

Meigle 5 

New  Brighton 11 

New  Brooklyn 11 

New  Georgia 11 

New  Mexico 11 

North  Shore 58 

Niagara 14 

Pelce 47 

President 18 

Prince  Albert 17 

Prince  John 17 

Princess 75 

Princess  Alice 19 

Princess  Maquinna 21 

Princess  Mary 19,  21 

Princess  Louise 19 

Richmond 55 

Robert  G.  Cann 43 

Ruth  Alexander 18 

Ruby  L.  II 70 

R.  W.  Hendry 56 

Ryse 54 

Sagona 5 

St.  Paul 61 

Strathlorne 40 

Stella  Maris 35 

Tussle 51 

Valinda 65 

Venture 23 

Westport  III 44 


86 


13  GEORGE  V  SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.   8 

i 


DOMINION   OF   CANADA 


REPORTS,  RETURNS  AND  STATISTICS 

OF   THE 

WEIGHTS  AND  MEASURES,  ELECTRICITY  AND  GAS 
BRANCHES 

OF   THE 

DEPARTMENT  OF  TRADE  AND  COMMERCE 

FOR  THE  YEAR  ENDED  MARCH 

1922 


PRIXTED   BY  ORDER  OF  PARLIAMEXT 


OTTAWA 

F.  A    ACI.AND 

PRINTER  TO  THE  KING'S  MOST  EXCELLENT  MAJESTY 


[No.  8—192.3.1—1 


13  GEORGE  V  SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  8  A.  1923 

REPORT 

OF    THE 

INSPECTION    OF    WEIGHTS    AND    MEASURES, 
ELECTRICITY    AND    GAS. 


To  the  Honourable 

The  Minister  of  Trade  and  Commerce. 

SiH, — I  have  the  honour  to  submit  the  annual  report  on  the  Inspection  of 
Weights  and  Measures,  Electricity  and  (trs;  also  statements  in  connection 
therewith  for  the  fiscal  year  ended  March  31,  1922. 

F.  C.  T.  O'HARA, 

Deputy  Minister. 

WEICIITS  AND  .MEASURES  INSPECTION  SERVICE. 

Mr.  E.  O.  Way,  Director  of  Weights  and  Measures,  reports  as  follows: — 

The  year  1921-22  has  proved  somewhat  disappointing.  Our  object  is  to 
make  the  Weights  and  Measures  Inspection  Service  self-supporting,  without 
inflicting  any  undue  burden  or  hardship  upon  trade  and  industry,  but  not- 
withstanding an  increase  in  revenue  collected,  amounting  to  $5,034.78,  the 
prevailing  business  depression  and  the  high  freight  and  express  charges  on 
the  transportation  of  our  standards  and  ('(luipnient.  have  nullified  our  efforts, 
and  left  us  financially  in  almost  the  same  position  as  last  year  1920-21.  The 
figures  are  as  follows: — 

TOTAL    REVENUE    COLLECTED. 

1920-21.  1921-22.  Increase. 

»267.105.62  $272,140.40  $5,034.78 

TOTAL    EXPENSES. 

$307,07G.08        $313,982.04         $6,905.96 

TOTAL    DEFICIT. 

$39,970.46  $41,841.64  $1,871.18 

In  view  of  the  financial  depression  and  the  .serious  falling-ot!'  of  new  pro- 
duction at  the  factories,  the  service  has  done  well  to  maintain  its  1921  status. 
Weights  and  Measures  is  a  travellftig  service,  and  the  Dominion  is  a  vast  ter- 
ritory to  cover.  In  1914-15,  travelling  expenses,  which  included  freight  and 
express  charges  on  the  transportation  of  standards,  only  amounted  to  $35,310.12, 
whilst  for  the  year  under  report,  this  item  has  advanced  to  $93,323.06.  But 
since  1914,  express  charges  have  increased  from  53  cents  a  hundred  pounds 
to  $1.15^ — which  means  that  an  officer  must  pay  a  minimum  charge  of  $11.50 
every  time  he  ships  1,000  pounils  of  test  weights  for  inspection  purposes.  When 
these  exactions  are  reduced,  Weights  and  Measures  will  make  a  better  showing. 
8-U 


4  DEt'ARTMEXT  OF  TRADE  AXD  COMMERCE 

13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1923 

Three  hundred  thousand  dolhirs  seems  a  large  ex])eiiditure  for  Weights 
and  Measures  Inspection,  l)ut  it  only  averages  some  SSo.OOO  a  year  for  each 
province,  or  h>ss  tlian  5  cents  per  capita,  a  small  charge  for  the  maintenance  of 
standards  in  trade  and  industry  and  the  protection  of  the  public  from  short 
weight  and  measure,  when  1  ounce  of  butter  is  valued  at  2^  cents  under  present 
favourable  prices. 

A  general  financial  statement  for  the  year  1921-22  by  districts  and  provinces 
will  be  found  in  appendix  A.  As  covering  the  second  j'ear  under  the  application 
of  annual  inspection,  it  is  encouraging  to  note  that  in  spite  of  business  depression 
the  very  great  increase  in  revenue  collected  last  year  has  been  maintained  and 
slightly  exceeded. 

The  following  table  gives  a  summary  of  the  weights,  measures,  weighing 
and  measuring  machines,  etc.,  inspected  during  the  year,  of  which  detailed- 
statements  will  be  found  in  appendices  B  and  C 


Verified. 


Percentage 
Rejected.  of 

rejection . 


Weights  (Dominion) 

Weights  (Metric) 

Measures  of  capacity  (Dominion) 
Measures  of  capacity  (Metric).. . . 
Measures  of  length  (Dominion). 

Milk  cans 

Ice-cream  containers 

Babcock  glassware  (pipettes) 

Measuring  pumps 

Weighing  machines 

Weighing  machines  (Metric) 


89,530 

971 

114,922 

13 

13,396 

77,295 

57.227 

34,633 

17,894 

156,752 

454 


88,919 

960| 

114,644 

12| 
13,3221 
77,1841 
57, 2031 
33,9771 
17,243! 
148,801 
418 


563,087 


552,683 


611 
11 

278 

1 

74 

111 

24 

6561 

651 

7,951 

36| 


0-68 

113 

0-24 

7-7 

0-5 

0  1 

004 

19 

3-6 

5-0 

8-6 


The  number  of  article,s  inspected  shows  a  decrease  of  some  60,000  over 
1920-21,  but  this  is  largely  due  to  the  fact  that  that  year,  all  ice-cream  packing 
cans  were  inspected  for  the  first  time,  whilst  last  year  only  the  new  factory 
production  of  this  class  of  measure  was  inspected. 

The  percentage  of  rejections  is  still  low,  for  the  same  reasons  as  explained 
in  my  report  last  year,  that  inspectors  make  all  the  adjustments  they  possibly 
can,  short  of  mechanical  operations. 

DAIRY    GLASSWARE. 

There  has  also  been  a  considerable  drop  in  the  amount  of  dairy  Babcock 
glassware  inspected  as  compared  with  1920-21.  Altogether  34,633  pieces 
were  inspected  as  against  43,318,  whilst  inspection  fees  dropped  $440.35,  from 
$2,139.95  to  $1,699.60.  Agriculture,  the  dairy  industry  in  particular,  has 
not  escaped  the  general  depression,  but  there  are  signs  that  there  will  be  a  much 
greater  demand  for  this  dairy  glassware  for  the  current  year,  as  the  Ontario 
Government  has  passed  legislation  whereby  all  milk  and  cream  shall  be  bought 
and  sold  upon  a  butter  fat  basis,  involving  a  compulsory  use  of  these  standardised 
metric  bottles  and  pipettes. 

SEIZURES    AND    PROSECUTIONS. 

One  hundred  and  twenty-four  (124)  seizures  of  false  and  unjust  machines 
have  been  made  during  the  year,  and  in  nine  oases  only  were  proceedings  taken, 
three  for  selling  short  weight,  and  six  for  using  unjust  machines.  Five  con- 
victions were  obtained  with  penalties  amounting  to  $65.  One  case  was  settled 
out  of  court,  one  was  withdrawn  and  one  lapsed. 


WEIGHTS  A.XD  AfEASURES  5 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  8 

Tliis  remarkable  freedom  from  prosecutions  is  not  to  he  interpreted  as 
laxity  upon  the  part  of  the  service.  The  severity  practised  in  the  Old  World 
cannot  reasonably  be  applied  in  Canada,  inasmuch  as  the  vast  distances  of 
Canada  make  it  so  costly  and  difficult  for  merchants  to  secure  expert  service. 

Reasonable  commercial  accuracy  is  assured  and  insisted  upon  and  the 
same  is  greatly  facilitated  by  the  almost  general  use  of  high  class  machines  of 
beautiful  workmanship  and  by  the  excellent  "service"  given  to  purchasers, 
particularly  in  the  cities,  by  the  manufacturing  and  selling  organizations. 
Nearly  all  defective  machines  are  seized  from  amongst  the  poorer  foreign  section 
of  the  population  and  there  is  little  to  be  gained  by  their  prosecution.  The 
loss  of  their  machines  is  usually  sufficient  penalty  and  reminder  that  Canadian 
laws  are  to  be  complied  with. 

INSPECTION    FEES   AND    CARTAGE. 

During  the  year  the  retail  merchants  have  reiterated  their  demand  for 
free  inspection,  whilst  three  or  four  complaints  have  been  lodged  against  the 
separate  cartage  charge. 

Weights  and  ^Measures  Inspection  has,  for  its  first  object,  the  protection 
of  the  public  against  dishonest  weights  and  measures,  and  therefore  it  is  assumed 
that  the  merchant  should  not  pay  fees.  The  public  do  enjoy  this  protection, 
but  the  traders  enjoy  greater  advantages.     Amongst  these: — 

(1.)  The  dishonest  trader  is  a  greater  menace  to  the  honest  trader  than 
he  is  to  the  public,  for  he  practices  unfair  competition. 

(2.)  Weighing  and  measuring  machines  almost  invariably  wear  against 
the  merchant.  That  is,  he  is  liable  to  give  excess  weights,  and  his  loss  from 
this  cause  is  cumulative.  The  inspector  finds  out  these  faults  under  his  standard 
tests  and  probably  saves  the  merchant  a  steady  loss,  far  exceeding  the  one 
inspection  fee  he  pays  once  a  year. 

(3.)  Nearly  every  machine  goes  out  of  adjustment  after  a  period  of  use. 
Inspectors  in  every  case,  wherever  possible,  make  the  necessary  adjustments  and 
by  this  service  save  the  merchants  the  considerable  expense  of  calling  in  a 
tradesman  or  of  sending  his  machine  away  to  some  repair  shop.  In  other 
words,  the  Government  inspectors  are  a  "service  organisation"  of  material 
and  economic  benefit  to  the  merchants. 

It  is  here  that  the  disputed  "cartage  charge"  is  justified.  It  is  the  merchants 
responsibility  to  see  that  he  docs  not  use  an  unstamped  or  an  incorrect  and 
unjust  machine.. 

If  then  the  inspector  visits  the  merchant,  with  his  standards,  instead  of 
the  merchant  going  to  the  inspector,  the  merchant  should,  as  a  fair  alternative, 
contribute  towards  the  expense  of  this  facility  and  service.  If  the  merchants 
equipment  is  incorrect  and  the  officer  is  delayed  whilst  adjusting  the  equipment, 
it  is  only  equitable  that  the  merchant  should  also  pay  a  charge  equivalent  to 
the  hourly  rate  the  carter  or  conveyance  is  kept  standing,  such  money  of  course 
being  covered  by  revenue  stamps  and  deposited  to  the  credit  of  the  Receiver 
General. 

Critics  of  the  cartage  charge  also  claim  that  it  should  not  be  a  separate 
charge  but  incorporated  in  the  inspection  fees.  This  has  been  carefully  studied 
for  many  years,  but  the  advantages  of  a  separate  "service"  or  "cartage"  charge 
is  obvious.  It  can  be  applied  and  collected  where  delay  occurs  through  faulty 
equipment  without  discrimination  against  the  careful  merchant  whose  equip- 
ment is  carefully  loodked  after  and  quickly  inspected. 

ADMINISTRATION    AND    STAFF. 

During  the  year  seven  officers  have  been  retired  under  the  Calder  Retire- 
ment Act,  viz:  District  Inspectors  C.  W.  Johnston  of  Saskatoon,  R.  McKay  of 
Winnipeg,  Thos.  Gallagher  of  Kingston,  Wm.  O'Brien  of  Halifax,  and  Inspectors 


6  DFA'ARTMENT  OP  TRADE  AND  COMMERCE 

13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1923 

J.  A.  Daoust,  J.  E.  Boudet  and  D.  Poitras  of  Montreal,  whilst  four  others  have 
died,  viz: — Inspector  Chas.  E.  Hoy  of  Quebec,  A.  Boucher,  E.  Dubord  of  Three 
Rivers,  and  Finlay  Marshall  of  London. 

All  the  above  vacancies  have  been  filled  with  returned  men  through  the 
Civil  Service  Commission,  with  the  exception  of  the  district  inspectorships  of 
Halifax  and  Kingston.  In  the  interest  of  economj*  and  efficiency  the  Kingston 
District  has  been  abolished  and  the  territory  assigned  to  the  adjoining  districts 
of  Ottawa  and  Belleville,  whilst  Pictou,  N.8.,  another  small  district,  was  amal- 
gamated with  Halifax,  and  Mr.  O'Brien's  position  taken  by  the  district  inspector 
of  Pictou,  transferred  to  Halifax.  Small  districts  are  not  and  cannot  be  efficient. 
The  above  amalgamations  save  the  expense  of  two  head  offices  and  increase  the 
efficiency  of  those  districts  to  which  the  territory  has  been  assigned. 

Mention  should  also  be  made  of  the  fact  that  seven  of  the  above  vacancies 
were  filled  with  vocational  students  selected  by  tiie  Soldiers  Civil  Re-Establish- 
ment Department  in  conjunction  with  the  Civil  Service  Commission.  Weights 
and  Measures  work  is  heavy  and  exacting  and  does  not  permit  of  any  major 
disability,  but  by  careful  selection  on  the  part  of  the  S.C.R.  officials,  we  have 
succeeded  in  absorbing  seven  partially  disabled  men,  including  one  amputation 
case  for  purely  office  work  in  the  Toronto  District  office.  All  of  these  men 
have  given  full  satisfaction,  as  hav(>  all  the  returned  men  who  have  secured 
appointments  to  this  service.  This  is  the  experience  of  every  district  inspector 
who  has  a  returned  man  on  his  staff — their  ability  and  initiative  no  doubt  being 
largely  due  to  the  fact  that  they  are  the  successful  candidates  of  competitive 
examinations  and  take  pride  in  justifying  their  appointment  and  position. 

To  date,  twenty-three  returned  men  have  been  appointed  to  this  service  and 
now  constitute  twenty  per  cent  (20^  f)  of  the  staff. 

During  the  year.  Weights  and  Measures  Inspection  has  veen  extended  to 
the  Yukon  through  the  intermediacy  of  the  Royal  Canadian  Mounted  Police. 
Under  special  arrangement  with  that  department  and  the  Civil  Service  Com- 
mission, two  staff-sargeants  have  been  appointed  inspectors  of  weights  and 
measures,  one  at  White  Horse  and  one  at  Dawson  City,  at  the  nominal  salary 
of  $180  per  annum,  these  men  reporting  to  Superintendent  R.  E.  Tucker,  of 
Dawson,  who  acts  as  district  inspector,  ex-officio,  without  salary.  There  is 
not  a  great  deal  of  work  in  the  Yukon,  but  it  is  well  that  the  law  should  be 
represented  and  the  protection  of  Weights  and  Measures  Inspection  extended 
to  the  community.  That  the  step  is  justified  is  borne  out  by  recent  demand, 
that  an  officer  of  this  service  should  make  an  inspection  trip  thr£)ugh  the  rapidly 
progressing  Peace  River  District,  Northern  Alberta.  Discrepancies  in  weights 
occur  and  the  parties  concerned  become  suspicious.  In  self-protection,  the 
honest  trader  calls  for  an  inspection  and  a  Covernment  certificate  certifying 
to  the  accuracy  of  his  equipment. 

THE    METRIC    SYSTEM. 

The  Metric  controversy  has  subsided  into  silence  for  the  past  year.  Pro- 
ponents of  this  system  no  doubt  regard  the  present  period  of  business  and 
industrial  depression  as  inimical  to  the  tremendous  expense  translation  to  the 
Metric  System  wouid  involve.  Several  Canadian  manufacturers  of  weighing 
machines  have  sought  an  outlet  in  export  trade  and  many  inquiries  have  been 
received  as  to  the  weights  and  measures  in  use  in  foreign  countries — China, 
Japan,  Russia,  South  America,  Cuba  for  example.  All  of  these  countries  are 
classified  as  Metric — but  the  manufacturers  find  that  weighing  machines  are 
required  to  be  graduated  in  native  weights,  which  is  significant.  Japan  and 
China  still  use  the  "catti,"  equal  to  about  1-33  pounds,  or  0-604  kilogramme 
with  its   multiples  and  sub-multiples.     Whilst  South   America  still   uses  the 


WEIGHTS  AND  ifEASURES  7 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  8 

old  Spiinish  lil)r:i,  equal  to  1-012  pounds,  or  0-4605  kilogramme.  Weights 
and  measures  arc  largely  an  expression  of  nationality  and  persist  with  the 
persistence  of  the  mother  tongue. 

THK   INTERN.\TIONAL    CONFERENCE    OF    WEIGHTS    .\ND    MEASURES. 

The  month  of  September,  1921,  saw  the  sixth  International  Conference  of 
Weights  and  ^Measures  at  the  International  Bureau  of  Weights  and  Measures, 
Paris,  France.  The  inception  of  this  conference  dates  back  to  the  early  days 
of  the  Metric  System  when  the  new  Metric  Standards  had  to  be  compared 
and  verified  with  other  national  standards.  This  scientific  work  was  strongly 
endorsed  by  the  International  Geodetic  Association  (1867),  who  were  feeling 
and  advocating  the  necessity  of  a  uniform  international  system  of  weights 
and  measures. 

Whether  the  new  Metric  Standards  became  universal  or  not,  it  had  become 
essential  that  some  standards  of  international  reference  should  be  agreed  upon 
and  established,  and  in  1872,  the  International  Bureau  of  ^\'eights  and  Measures 
was  established  by  agreement  on  the  part  of  the  delegates  of  some  thirty  nations, 
to  study  the  situation  and  to  carry  on  the  scientific  work  of  international  stan- 
dardisation. 

The  functions  of  the  bureau  therefore  are  purely  scientific.  As  a  result  of 
its  activities,  and  with  the  assent  of  the  International  Conference,  the  Inter- 
national metre  and  kilogranune  have  been  established  as  the  world  International 
Standards  of  Weight  and  Measure,  under  a  treaty  known  as  the  "Convention 
du  Metre",  in  rehition  to  which,  all  other  standards  now  have  a  known  and 
fixed  value. 

Notwithstanding  English  scientists  of  the  day.  such  as  Professor  Miller, 
Sir  Cieorge  Shuckburgh  and  Cajit.  Clark,  played  a  prominent  part  in  the  early 
and  important  scientific  comparisons  of  the  standards,  the  British  Government, 
owing  to  suspicions  of  French  metric  propaganda,  did  not  give  adhesion  to  this 
"Convention  du  metre"  until  1884.  Canada  joined  the  convention  in  its  own 
right  in  1904,  being  the  only  over.seas  Dominion  that  has  done  so.  As  a  high 
contracting  State.  Canada,  with  the  otlun-  jiowers,  makes  an  annual  contribution 
for  the  upkeep  of  the  bureau  (S246)  l)ased  upon  population  and  certain  con- 
stants agreed  upon,  and  enjoys  the  right  of  sending  a  delegate  to  the  conference, 
which  takes  place  every  six  years. 

As  there  was  nothing  of  importance  in  the  agenda  for  last  Fall,  the  Govern- 
ment arranged  that  the  Imperial  Government  representative,  the  Deputy 
AVarden  of  the  Standards  of  the  Board  of  Trade,  London,  Eng.,  should  also 
represent  Canada,  inasmuch  as  Canadian  and  Imperial  interests  are  identical 
as  regards  weights  and  measures. 

Metric  propaganda  is  no  part  whatsoever  of  the  functions  of  the  bureau 
or  the  conference,  so  that  adhesion  to  the  "Convention  du  metre"  must  not  be 
translated  as  Canadian  approval  of  the  compulsory  introduction  of  the  Metric 
System,  nor  classify  Canada  as  a  metric  country.  The  Metric  System  is  legal 
and  permissive  in  Canada  for  all  purposes  and  has  been  so  since  1871.  Its 
benefits  and  advantages,  as  they  may  exist,  are  therefore  legally  at  the  service 
of  whoso ver  finds  them  of  value,  the  Government  service  being  equipped  with 
Metric  Standards  with  which  trade  weights  and  measures  of  this  denomination 
can  be  compared. 


8  DEPARTMENT  OF  TRADE  AND  COMMERCE 

13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1923 
APPENDIX  A. 

Statement  of  Weights  and  Measures  Expenditures  and  Kevcnucs  for  the  Fiscal 
Year  ending  March  31,  1922. 


Inspcctors. 

Eipenditures. 

Districts. 

Salaries. 

Special 
Assist- 
ance. 

Rent, 

Travel- 
ling 
expenses. 

Sundries. 

Totals. 

Revenue. 

Ontario— 
Belleville 

F.  D.  Diamond 

%     cts. 

6,990  00 
12,480  00 
2.070  00 
S.270  00 
17,260  00 
12,900  00 

S      cts 

6  00 
367  50 

%      cts. 

$     cts. 
,.2,282  94 

t     cts. 

330  94 
266  79 
42  15 
222  81 
122  77 
132  76 

i       cts. 

9,609  88 
19.299  30 

3.484  53 
13,253  51 
23,631  82 
17,444  65 

S       cts. 

7,698  40 

6,185  01 
1,372  38 
4,142  41 
5,879  97 
4,044  39 

20,765  78 

T.Gallagher 

3.796  95 

618  29 
369  08 
367  50 

16,981  80 

E.  H.  Hinchey 

J.  J.  McConvey 

Ontario 

A,  A.  Bernard 

J.  W.  LeBel 

0.  C.  Delorme 

J.  A.  Desilets 

15,903  30 

59,970  00 

1,728  37 

23,907  10 

1,118  22 

86,723  69 

91,461  68 

Qdebec— 

Montreal 

17.189  66 
9,810  00 
6,165  00 
5,025  00 

1,387  14 
229,66 

2,000  00 
400  00 
500  00 

8.535  20 
8,772  55 
2,496  43 
3,903  63 

395  32 
378  90 
165  50 
186  16 

29,507  32 
19,591  11 
9,326  93 
9,114  78 

32,701  75 

Sherbrooke 

Three  Rivers. . . . 

7.905  15 
7,783  15 

38.189  66 

1,616  80 

2,900  00 

23,707  81 

1,125  87 

67.540  14 

65,798  45 

Jaines  Barry 

W.  M.  Dustan 

W.  M.  Dustan  to  1- 
7-22 

Nova  Scotia...  . 

New  Brttnswick- 

5.530  00 

1,606  79 

131  04 

7,267  83 

7, 176  70 

NovA  Scotia— 
Halilai 

7,560  00 
1,125  00 

68.00 
12  00 

3,042  76 
271  05 

514  27 
52  57 

11.185  03 
1,460  62 

7.221  40 

Pictou 

677  20 

8,686  00 

80  00 

3.313  81 

566  84 

12,645  65 

7.898  60 

Prince  Edward 
Island — 

3,180  00 

612  44 

24  05 

3.816  49 

1.864  45 

J.  B.  Attridge 

Geo.  D.Fyfe 

John  McLeod 

Manitoba— 
Winnipeg 

12.020  48 

411  65 

324  99 

10.020  64 

356  61 

23.134  37 

25.843  60 

Alberta — 

7,320  00 
4,425  00 

4.883  65 
4,469  05 

304  02 
285  54 

12,507  67 
9, 179  59 

12,766  40 

12,150  65 

11,745  00 

9,352  70 

589  56 

21,687  26 

24,917  05 

E.  B.  Lorimer 

R.  Wallace  Actg... . 

S.VSKATCHEWAN . 

Thos.  Parker 

A.  H.  Dutton 

British  Colcmbu. 

Robert  E.  Tucker... 

Saskatchewan— 

Regina 

Saskatoon 

10,052  58 
5,435  00 

105  00 
1,579  00 

■226.00 

8,973  -.3 
7.615  »7 

324  76 
271  44 

596  20 

19,456  07 
15.121  41 

19.113  35 
18,129  30 

15,487  58 

1.684 

00    220  00 

16,58(-  70 

34,577  48 

37.242  65 

British   Colum- 

3,060  00 
3,360  00 

180  00 

2.051  35 

129  65 
985  06 

5,421  00 
5,150  32 

2,622  10 

48  00 

757  26 

5,034  25 

6,420  00 

48  00 

180  00 

2.808  61 

1.114  71 

10,571  32 

7,656  35 

225  00 

35  00 

41  63 

301  63 

98  80 

WEIGHTS  AXD  MEASURES 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  8 


APPENDIX  A— Concluded. 

Statement  of  M'eights  and  Measures  Expenditures  and  Revenues  for  the  Fiscal 
Year  ending  March  31,  1922. 


Inspectors. 

Expenditures 

Districts. 

Salaries. 

Special 
Assist- 
ance. 

Rent. 

Travel- 
ling 
expenses. 

Sundries. 

Totals. 

Revenue. 

Eastern     Elev 

A.  A.  Bowen 

;.  G.  White 

$     cts. 

660  00 

500  00 
2,220  00 
1.860  00 

$     cU. 

$     cts. 

S     cts. 

24  50 

126  21 
631  60 
586  15 

t     cts. 
91  45 

S      cts. 

775  95 

626  21 
2.851  60 
2,436  90 

150  61 

S      cts. 

Westbrn  Elev. 

D.J.  McLean 

R.  Wallace 

75 
150  81 

E  O  Way 

Total  for  dbtbicts. 

5.230  00 

1,368  46 

243  01 

6.841  47 

166.682  72 

5.568  82 

3,624  99 

93,323  06 

5.907  74 

275.107  33 

269.958  33 

General  contingenc 

1,386  79 
8.227  29 
1,444  14 
27.623  46 
193  03 

Cost  of  living  bonu 
International  Burea 
Weights  and  Measui 
Weights  and  Meaaiu 

Gr 

u  of  Weights  and  Men 

1 .699  60 

479  09 

313,982  04 

272.137  02 

1,170  00 

2,086  66 

720  00 

3,976  66 

67.  10^11  Ge 

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22  DEl'MiTMENr  OF  TRAD!':  AM)  COMMERCE 

13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1923 

ELECTRICITY  AND  GAS  INSPECTION  SERVICES. 

Mr.  O.  Hignian,  Director  of  Electricity  and  Cas  Inspection  Services, 
reports  as  follows: — 

The  returns  for  the  fiscal  year  which  ended  on  the  31st  March  last  show  a 
('onsideral)le  increase  in  the  niunl)er  of  meters  tested  throiighont  the  Dominion, 
indicating  to  .some  extent,  a  retmn  towards  normal  trade  conditions.  The 
number  of  meters  tested  during  the  year  was  as  follows: — 

Electricity  meters 218,710 

Gas  meters 118,299 

Total 337,009 

These  figures  show  an  increase  of  14,628  meters  over  the  previous  year. 
The  amount  of  revenue  accruing  from  the  inspection  fees  was: — 

Electricity  inspection S  140, 069  35 

Gas  inspection 81,800  00 

Total S  221,869  35 

or  an  increa.se  of  $10,040.75  over  the  previous  year. 

The  expenditure  for  the  fiscal  year  1921-22  was  as  follows: — 

Electricity $  117,050  97 

Gas 45,387  84 

Total $  162,438  81 

to  this  must  be  added  $15,000  for  salaries  of  laboratory  and  administration 
staff  at  Ottawa  and  $22,000  for  office  accommodation  throughout  Canada,  making 
the  total  expenditure  $199,438.81. 

EXPORTATION    OF    ELECTRICAL    ENERGY. 

The  total  amount  of  electric  power  exported  to  the  United  States  during  the 
fiscal  year  just  ended  was  861,567,183  kilowatt-hours,  being  a  decrease  of 
157,996,828  kilowatt-hours  as  compared  with  the  previous  year. 


ELECTRICITY  Ai\D  GAS  INSFECTIOS  23 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  8 

APPENDIX  D. 

Statement    of    Electricity    Inspection,    Expenditures    ami    Revenues    for    the 
Fiscal  Year  ending  March  31,  1922. 


District 
Inspectors. 

Expenditures. 

Districts. 

Salaries. 

Special 
Assist-  ' 
ance. 

Kent. 

Travel- 
ling 
expenses. 

Sundries. 

Totals. 

Revenue 

Ont.»  Rio- 

VV.  H.  Middleton.... 

$      CU. 

4.490  00 
1.800  00 

S     cts. 

t     cts. 

S     cts. 

1.166  15 
417  10 

1.123  05 

1.113  S7 
922  65 
336  14 

1,729  85 

S     cts. 

61  45 
109  55 
let-  83 
143  81 
95  43 
81  34 
262  12 

$     cts. 

5,717  50 
2.326  63 
1.345  8S 
8.067  68 
7,948  58 
2.217  48 
17.914  15 

i    cts. 
4,429  30 

1,447  1« 

Hamilton.  ... 

H.  LuU 

24  00 
600  00 
60  00 

30  00 

10,164  60 

A  F  Nash    .... 

6.210  00 
6.870  50 
1.800  00 
15,888  31 

12,242  50 

6,652  90 

Sudbury 

L.  H.  Bousidil 

H.M.Clark 

Ontario 

1.933  50 

33  87 

23,457  10 

37,058  81 

717  87 

30  00 

6,808  81 

922  53 

45.538  02 

60.327  80 

QrtBEi  — 

315  00 

890  76 
636  70 
271  90 
646  90 

315  35 
115  90 
28  51 
90  45 

1,521  11 

26.372  3& 

Quebec 

2.540  00 

F.  C.  Bowen,  Actg. . 
A  Olivier 



300  41 
3.637  19 

1.174  35 

2.899  84 

3.549  70 

5,539  84 

315  00 

2,446  26 

550  21 

8,851  31 

33,906  30 

J.  E.  Wilson.    .  .    . 

New  Brunswick— 

249  60 

64  41 

314  01 

2.318  65 

KoVA  Scoiu— 
Halilai 

3.240  00 

1.295  00 

1.083  85 

15S27 

5.7/7  12 

4,879  5S 

J.  H.  Bell 

Pri.vce  Edwabo  Island 

500  00 

98  85 

18  65 

617  50 

343  95 

Manitoba— 
Winnipeg  . 

594  35 

214  45 

808  80 

14. 103  Sd 

W  P  Kyle 

4.215  00 
2.820  00 

1.026  58 
401  00 

177  96 
140  48 

5,419  54 
3.361  48 

3,312  50 

A.  J.Cantin 

Alberta 

S.  N.  Hart 

2,533  50 

7,035  00 

1.427  58 

318  44 

8.781  02 

5,846  06 

Saskatchewan — 

Regina 

2.100  00 

60  00 

1.834  98 

196  30 

4,191  28 

5.061  75 

H.  B.  Penny 

O.  T.  Scouler 

British  Columbia— 
Kelson 

1,575  00 
7,189  98 

45  00 
135  48 
48  00 

492  91 
363  61 
316  50 

99  35 
210  78 
140  22 

2,212  26 

7,899  85 

504  72 

1.122  85 

8.749  95 

2,450  30 

BRirtsH  Columbia 

8,764  98 

228  48 

1,173  02 

450  35 

10,616  83 

12.323  10 

24  DEPARTMENT  OF  TRADE  AND  COMMERCE 

13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1923 

APPENDIX  D— Concluded. 

Statement    of    Electricity    Inspection,    Expenditures   and    Revenues   for   the 
Fiscal  Year  ending  March  31,  1922. 


District 
Inspectors. 

Expenditures. 

Districts. 

Salaries. 

Special 
Assist- 

Rent. 

Travel- 
ling 
expenses. 

Sundries. 

Totals. 

Revenue 

DlRCrTOR.      . 

S     cts. 

$     cts. 

$     cts. 

%     cts. 

860  57 
457  15 
507  63 

S     cts. 
291  11 
14  61 
138  71 
272  57 

t     cts. 
291  11 
3.335  18 
4.585  86 
3,240  20 

S     cts. 

SrPERINTENDENT  OF  EAS- 
TERN Division 

Superintendent  or  Cen- 
TRAi.  Division 

Supenintendent    of 

J.  L.  stiver 

P.  R.  Rutledge 

James  Stott 

Total  TOH  Districts 

2.460  00 
3.990  00 
2.460  00 

8,910  00 

1.825  35 

717  00 

11.45  235 

73.148  63 

2.616  35 

30  00 

17.542  65 

3.610  61 

96.948  24 

139,310  80 

4.115  44 
1.657  23 
2.567  24 
214  00 
11.060  22 
35  26 

International  Electro-tccl 

Cost  of  Living  Bonus 

Export  of  Electirc  Power 
Electrical  Standard  Lab 
Electrical  Casual  Revenu 

Grand  Total 

Gratuities  to  Relatives  o 

525  00 

Fees 

154  65 

78  90 

116.597  63 

140.069  35 

300  00 
33  34 
120  00 

n  No    4       Chanter  fi7-l(V-ll  n»m 

■geV. 

Vote  529  Arrears  in  Salary  owing  to  Classifica 

ion 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  8 


GAS  INSPECTION 


APPENDIX  E. 


Statement  of  Gas  Inspection,  Expenditure  and  Revenues  for  the  Fiscal  Year 
ending  March  31,  1922. 


District 
Inspectors. 

Expenditures. 

Districts. 

Salaries. 

Special 
Assist- 

Kent. 

Travel- 
ling 
expenses. 

Sundries. 

Totals. 

Revenue. 

Ontario— 
Belleville 

W   H   Middlelon  .  . 

S     cts. 

i     cts. 

t     cts. 

S     cts. 

99  55 
506  66 
786  30 

i     cts. 

16  82 

50  64 

51  02 

t     cts. 

116  37 

8,207  30 

849  32 

S     cts. 
2,210  30 

H.  LuU 

7.635  00 

15  00 

A  F  Nssh    . 

12  00 

7,748  75 

I.  A.  Ham 

2,408  40 

H  M  Clark 

61  20 

145  43 

206  63 

31,160  60 

Ontario 

R.  J.  Chevrier 

I.  A.  Cantin 

7,635  00 

12  00 

15  00 

1,453  71 

263  91 

9,379  62 

51,420  95 

Qdebe<— 

14,030  00 

14,030  00 

17.973  50 

F.  C.  Bowen.  Actg.. 

716  60 

716  60 

326  75 

14,746  60 

14,746  60 

19,264  55 

I  E  Wilson 

New  Brpnswick- 

3, 165  00 

313  65 

14  75 

3,493  40 

1 , 175  70 

NovA  Scotia- 

U.  Hamilton 

W.  P.  Kyle 

Manitoba  - 
Winnipeg       . 

7,094  33 

7,094  33 

3.645  75 

Alberta— 
Calgary 

1,757  60 

British  Columbia— 

5  34 

5  34 
2,954  52 

3,197  85 

E,  H.  Ruttan 

2,924  52 

772  65 

158  45 

British  Columbia 
Totals   for    Dis- 

2,924  52 

5  34 

2,929  86 

35,565  45 

12  00 

15  00 

1,772  70 

278  66 

37,643  81 

101  68 

828  62 

1,283  62 

5,530  U 

' 

45,387  84 

81,800  00 

DEl'AUTME.W  ill'    THAliE  AXD  COMMERCE 

13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1923 
APPENDIX  F. 

Coal  and  Water  CJas  Companies  Registered  and  Gas  Tests  made. 


Company 


Number 

of 
Meters 


Barrie.  Ont 

Belleville.  Ont 

Brandon,  Man 

Brockville.  Ont 

Cobourg,  Ont 

Cornwall.  Ont 

Guelph.Ont 

Halifax,  N.S 

Hamilton,  Ont 

Kingston.  Onfe 

Kitchener.  Ont 

London,  Ont 

Montreal,  P.Q 

Nelson,  B.C 

New  Westminster,  B.C. 
Oshawa,  Ont. 


Ottawa.  Ont Ottawa  Gas  Co 


Barrie  Gas  Co 

Belleville  Gas  Department 

Brandon  Gas  &  Power  Co 

Corp.  of  Brockville 

H.E.P.  Comm 

Stormont  Gas  Co 

Corp.  of  Guclph 

N.S.  Tramways  &  Power  Co.,  Ltd. 

United  Gas  <St  Fuel  Co 

Cor.  of  Kingston 

Kitchener  Light  Comm 

Citv  Gas  Co 

Montreal  L.H.  &  P.  Co 

Corporation  of  Nelson 

New  Westminster  Gas  Co.,  Ltd 

H.E.P.  Comm. 


W 

and  C.W. 


.W 

.and  C.W. 


W 

W 

W 

and  C.W. 
and  C.W. 


Owen  Sound.  Ont.. 
Peterboro,  Ont. . . . 
Port  Hope.  Ont. . , 

Quebec,  Que 

St.  John,  N.B 

St.  Thomas.  Ont.. 
Sherbrooke,  Que.. 

Sorel .  Que 

Stratford,  Ont 

Toronto,  Ont 

Vancouver.  B.C.. . 

Victoria.  B.C 

Waterloo,  Ont 

Winnipeg,  Man. . . . 


Corp.  of  Owen  Sound C.  and  C.W. 

~  W 


H.E.P.  Comm. 

Port  Hope  Gas  Dept 

Quebec.  Gas  Co 

St.  John  Ry.  Co 

City  of  St.  Thomas 

Corp.  of  Sherbrooke 

Corp.  of  Sorel 

Stratford  Gas  Co. . . , 

Consumers  Gas  Co 

\'ancouver  Gas  Co.,  Ltd. 

Victoria  Gas  Co 

Wat«r  &  Light  Comm — 
Winnipeg  E.  Ry.  Co 


and  C.W. 
.W 


and  C.W. 
and  C.W. 
and  C.W. 


T.i.'i 
1,400 
1,004 
2,041 

411 

48;i 
3,764 
1,861 

898 

3,429 

4,018 

11,734 

121,713 

486 

504 
1,236 
17,726 
1,329 
2,900 

430 
7.688 
1,696 
3,685 
1,765 

265 

1,118 

127.740 

19.235 

3,921 

921 
21,682 


Tests  for  Sulphuretted  Hydrogen  were  discontinued  from  October  15th,  1921. 


DEI'AKTMEXT  OF  TRADE  AXD  COMMERCE  27 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  8 

APPENDIX  F. 

Coal  and  Water  Gas  Companies  registered  and  Gas  Tests  made. 


Sulphuretted  Hydrogen 
(No  trace  permitted) 


Calorimotrie  Tests 
(Standard:  450  British  Thermal  Units  per  cu.  ft.) 


No.  of 

No.  of  tests 

Times 

No.  of  tests 

B.  T 

.  U.  Values  Found 

times 

found 
present 

below 
standard 

Prescribed  1  Made 

Prescribed 

Made 

Highest 

Lowest 

Average 

value 

12       11 

11 

24 

23 

602 

484 

532 

0 

26 

27 

0 

48 

43 

533 

443 

476 

3 

26 

12 

0 

48 

22 

569 

394 

483 

5 

52 

62 

0 

96 

96 

675 

440 

580 

2 

13 

13 

0 

24 

24 

607 

468 

548 

0 

13 

13 

0 

24 

24 

5.52 

461 

491 

0 

52 

50 

0 

96 

96 

574 

461 

515 

0 

26 

26 

0 

48 

48 

546 

483 

507 

0 

13 

13 

0 

24 

24 

544 

4.58 

487 

0 

52 

52 

0 

96 

96 

628 

476 

546 

0 

52       52 

0 

96 

96 

582 

476 

523 

0 

165       165 

0 

305 

305 

562 

458 

502 

0 

165       166 

0 

305 

306 

511 

441 

471 

2 

13 

13 

0 

24 

24 

504 

450 

467 

0 

13 

13 

0 

24 

24 

620 

469 

531 

0 

26 

25 

23 

48 

48 

523 

406 

454 

14 

165 

163 

0 

305 

300 

523 

456 

476 

0 

26 

26 

1 

48 

48 

637 

476 

533 

0 

52 

52 

5 

96 

96 

505 

455 

479 

0 

11        11 

0 

24 

24 

679 

569 

617 

0 

78 

78 

0 

144 

144 

547 

457 

497 

0 

26 

26 

0 

48 

48 

589 

530 

564 

0 

52 

52 

0 

96 

96 

590 

463 

527 

0 

26 

27 

0 

48 

48 

519 

487 

477 

0 

Apparatus 

not  install 

ed. 

26 

26 

0 

48 

48 

618 

483 

545 

0 

165 

165 

33 

305 

305 

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471 

500 

0 

165 

166 

1 

305 

299 

514 

350 

462 

30 

52 

53 

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96 

96 

532 

433 

474 

1 

13 

13 

0 

24 

24 

630 

475 

520 

0 

165 

173 

0 

305 

308 

546 

467 

504 

0 

DEPARTMENT  OF  TRADE  AND  COMMERCE 

13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1923 


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SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  8 


29 


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DEPAHTMENT  OF  TRADE  AND  COMMERCE 

13  GEORGE  V.  A.  1923 
APPENDIX  I 

Statement  of  Natural  Gas  Companies  Registered 


District  and  Name 

Location 

Number 

of 
Meters 

Calgary  Di/^trict — 

Bow  Island.  Alta 

138 

Canadian  \Vi>«tirn  \aiural  (ia^i    I    H.  A-  V 

Co. 
Co. 
Co. 
Co. 
Co. 
Co. 
Co. 
Co. 
Co. 
Co. 
Co. 
Co. 

Ltd     

Ltd 

Ltd 

Ltd 

Ltd 

Ltd 

Ltd 

Ltd 

Ltd 

Ltd. 

7 

Brooks  Alta 

118 

9,641 

213 

Field  Alta 

1 

102 

1,042 

257 

Canadian  Western  Xatural  Ga<   L.H.  &  P 

24 

152 

Ltd 

Ltd 

111 

6 

Red  Cliff    \lta          

313 

2,950 

Suffield,  Village  of 

29 

Hamilinn  nislrici— 

140 

Brantford  Gas  Company 1 

Brantford  and  Echo  Place,  Ont. 

4,438 

Caistor   and   Gainsboro   Twps., 

250 

Welland    and  Lincoln  Counties. 

81 

227 

253 

Dominion  Xatural  Gas  Company 

1,079 

1,250 

1,544 

1.719 

227 

40 

587 

471 

244 

534 

1,571 

135 

St  William   Ont 

99 

Vittoria,  Ont 

Welland  County,  Ont 

Port  Erie,  Ont 

."of 
Ont. 

71 

73 

Lake  Shore  Natural  Gas  &  Fuel  Co 

P,t)0 

366 

Hamilton.  Ont 

Haldimand    County    Twps 
Oneida  &  Xorth  Cayuga, 

30 

35 
34 

Port  Colbome  Welland  Xatural  Gas  Co 

531 

80 

Provincial  Xatural  Gas  &  FuelCo..  Ltd 

Bridgeburg  and  Sherkstone, 

Ont. 

1,574 

3,193 

Provincial  Xatural  Gas  &  Fuel  Co     Ltd. 

2,383 

Bertie      Twp.       Rosehill 

and 

40 

Sterling  Gas  Company 

1,308 

235 

3,444 

473 

21,865 

London  DiMrict — 

1,167 

Leamington,      Wheatley 

and 

404 

3.723 

Central  Pipe  Line  Company,  The 

Aylmer,  Ont 

688 

ELECTRICITY  AXD  CAS  IXSPKCTIOX 

.SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  8 

APPENDIX  I— Concluded 

Statement  of  Natural  Gas  Companies  Registered 


District  and  Name 


'c-niral  Pipe  Line  Company.  Tlie iMalahide  and  Bayham,  Ont.. 

Central  Pipe  lAw  C\)nipany.  The Port  Burwell,  Ont 

C^entrnl  Pipe  Line  Company.  The [Vienna,  Ont 

Dominion  Xatunil  Gas  Company,  The iTillsonburi;.  Ont 

Glenwooil  Natural  Gas  Company,  The Glcnwood.  Ont. 


Ingersool  Ga.s  Light  Company,  The. 

LeamiiiKton,  Town  of 

Pelrolia   Utilitie.s  Company,  The 

Sarnia  C!as  Company.  The 

Southern  Ontario  Gas  Company,  The 

Southern  Ontario  Gas  Company,  The 

Southern  Ontario  Gas  Company,  The 

Southern  Ontario  Gas  Company,  The 

Southern  Ontario  Gas  Company,  The 

Southern  Ontario  Gas  Company.  The 

Southern  Ontario  Gas  ( "ompany ,  The 

Union  Natural  Gas  Company,  The 

Union  Natural  Gas  Company.  The 

Union  Natural  Gas  Company.  The 

Union  Natural  (ias  (^ompany.  The 

WallaceliurR  Gas  Company,  The 

Windsor  Gas  Company,  The 

Windsor  Gas  Company.  The 

Windsor  Gas  Company.  The 

Wind.sor  Gas  Company.  The '. .  ■ .' 

Windsor  Gas  Company.  The 

Woodstock  Gas  Light  Company,  The 

SI.  J.ihn  Dislricl— 
Moncion  Tramways  Electricity  &  Gas  Company,  Ltd. 


Ingcr.s<joll.  Ont 

Leamington.  Ont 

Petrolia.  Ont 

Sarnia.  Ont 

Dorchester  and  Putman 

Dutton.  Ont 

Highgate  .and  Wallacetown,  Ont. 

Lembeth,  Ont 

Rodney  and  The  Main  Line 

Shedden.Ont 

West  Lome,  Ont 

Blenheim,  Ont 

Dresden.  Ont 

Ridgetown.  Ont 

Tillbury.Ont 

Wallaccburg.  Ont 

Ford.  Ont 

Sandwich.  Ont.. 

Sandwich  East,  Ont 

Walkeryillc.  Ont 

Windsor.  Ont 

Woodstock,  Ont 


Moncton      and      Suburbs      and 
Hillsboro,  N.B 


67 

88 

83 

1,251 

253 

1,217 

1,135 

801 

3.900 

123 

272 


662 

153 

219 

520 

495 

625 

400 

1,047 

440 

445 

25 

1,403 

7,209 

2,101 


APPENDIX  J 

Statement  of  Acetylene  Gas  Companies,  Registered 


District  and  Name 


Location 


Number 

of 
Meters 


Winnipeg  Dinlricl — 
Acetylene  Construction  Company,  The 
Acetylene  Construction  Company,  The 

Cartierry  Gas  Company 

Deiorraine  Gas  Company 

Manitou  Gas  Company 

Souris  Consumers  Gas  Company,  Ltd. . 


Hamiota.  Man.. 
Morris,  Man .... 
Carherry,  Man.. 
Deiorraine.  Man 
Manitou.  Man... 
Souris.  Man 


50 
71 
SO 
73 
66 
120 


NoTi. — Verdun  Gas  Department  has  discontinued  making  gas. 


DEI'AliT.MKST  OF  THADE  AND  COMMERCE 

13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1923 


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13  GEORGE  V 


SESSIONAL  PAPER   No.  9 


DOMINION  OF  CANADA 


REPORT 


COMMISSIONER  OF  PATENTS 


FOR   THE 


Fiscal  Year  ending  March  31,  1922 


PRIXTED  BY  ORDER  OF  PARLIAMENT 


OTTAWA 

F.A.  ACLAND 

PRINTER  TO  THE  KING'S  M03T  EXCELLENT  MAJESTY 

1923 


[Xo.  9—1923] 


13  GEORGE  V  SESSIONAL  PAPER   No.  9  A.   1923 


To  His  Excellency,  General,  the  Right  Honourahle  Lord  Byn-g  of  Vimy,  G.C.B., 
G.C'.M.O.,  M.V.O.,  Governor  General  and  Commander  in  Chief  of  the  Dominion 
of  Canada. 

May  it  Please  Your  Excellency: 

The  undersigned  has  the  honour  to  present  to  Your  Excellency  the  report  of  the 
Commissioner  of  Patents  for  the  fiscal  year  ended  March  31,  1922. 

All  of  which  is  respectfully  submitted. 

JAMES  A.  EOBB, 

Minister  of  Trade  and  Commerce. 
Ottawa,  July  20,  1922. 


9-li 


13  GEORGE  V  SESSIONAL  PAPER   No.  9 


ANNUAL  REPORT 


COMMISSIONER  OF  PATENTS 

The  Honourable  James  A.  Eobb,  M.P., 

Minister  of  Trade  and  Commerce. 
Sir, — In  pursuance  of  the  requirements  of  the  63rd  section  of  the  Patent  Act, 
chapter  69,  R.S.C.,  1906,  and  section  5A  of  an  Act  respecting  the  Patent  Act,  the 
Copyright  Act,  the  Trade  Mark  and  Design  Act,  and  the  Timber  Marking  Act, 
chapter  64.  9  and  10,  George  5,  I  have  tlie  honour  to  report  as  follows  upon  the  pro- 
ceedings in  the  fiscal  year  ending  March  31,  1922,  under  the  provisions  of  these  Acts. 

Proceedinos  Under  Peace  Provisions 

Provision  was  made  by  the  Treaties  of  Peace  for  extending  the  time  for  the  ful- 
filment of  any  action  which  should  have  been  effected  during  the  period  of  the  war. 
The  Treaty  of  Peace  (Germany)  Order,  1920,  and  tlie  Treaties  of  Peace  (Austria 
and  Bulgaria)  Order,  1921,  gave  effect  to  these  provisions  in  Canada.  Under  the 
powers  conferred  by  tliese  Orders  and  under  an  Act  to  amend  the  Patent  Act,  chap- 
ter 44,  11-12  George  5,  the  renewal  fees  on  260  patents  were  aecopted  and  the  patents 
revived.  Extension  of  time  to  import  and  manufacture  was  granted  on  71  and  73 
patents  respectively.  There  was  also  a  large  number  of  applications  accepted  for 
wliich  the  time  for  filing  had  expired  under  section  8  of  the  Patent  Act. 

General  Business 

The  general  business  of  the  office  for  the  year  ended  March  31,  1922,  showed  a 
slight  decrease  as  compared  with  the  preceding  year.  This  was  for  the  most  part 
due  to  the  expiration  of  the  period  giving  relief  by  special  legislation  for  those 
inventors,  patentees  and  proprietors  who  owing  to  causes  arising  from  the  war  had 
lost  or  had  failed  to  acquire  their  rights  under  the  Patent  Act. 

The  number  of  applications  for  patents  filed  was  12,274.  This  is  1,172  less 
than  last  year,  or  a  decrease  of  8  per  cent.  There  were  7,393  patents  issued.  This 
is  a  decrease  of  3,739,  or  over  33  per  cent  less  than  last  year.  This  large  diminution 
resulted  in  the  change  in  the  manner  of  payment  of  fees  under  an  Act  amending 
the  Patent  Act  assented  to  June  4,  1921.  By  this  amendment  applicants  were  given 
six'  months  from  the  date  of  the  notice  of  allowance  of  the  application  in  which  to 
remit  the  final  fee.  So  many  took  advantage  of  this  privilege  tfl  withhold  the  fee 
until  the  last  moment  that  the  issue  was  temporarily  reduced.  Since  the  expiration 
of  the  first  six  months  under  the  new  Act  the  number  of  patents  issued  has  increased 
and  during  the  next  year  should  make  up  for  the  apparent  decrease  in  this  year. 
Certificates  for  renewal  fees  totalled  2,620,  an  increase  of  71,  or  about  3  per  cent  over 
the  previous  year.  Four  hundred  and  eighty-seven  of  these  renewals  were  received 
under  the  Patent  Act,  chapter  69,  E.S.C.,  1906,  and  2,133  were  received  as  final  fees 
under  the  amendment  to  the  Patent  Act  (11-12  George  5,  chapter  44).  The  number 
of  assignments  re<;orded  was  5,481,  a  decrease    of    44,    or    less    than    one  per  cent. 

5 


6  TRADE  AND  COMMERCE 

13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1923 
Patents  placed  uiuler  the  benefit  of  the  provisions  of  section  M  of  the  Patent  Act 
numbered  2,410.  This  is  a  decrease  of  nearly  36  per  cent,  or  a  total  of  1,347  less 
than  during  the  preceeding  twelve  months.  Of  the  total  number  granted  fees  were 
paid  on  1,717  under  the  Order  in  Council  of  June  18,  1921.  There  were  6.935 
reports  on  applications  issued  by  examiners.  This  exceeds  last  year  by  115.  or  about 
2  per  cent.  The  applications  for,  and  the  issue  of  caveats  increased  slightly.  Appli- 
cations for  519  caveats  were  filed  and  420  caveats  were  issued.  This  is  an  increment 
of  51  and  10,  or  10  per  cent  and  2  per  cent  respectively.  Notices  ui>der  section  8  of 
the  Patent  Act  were  practically  the  same  as  last  year.  They  were  381  in  number, 
or  three  more  than  in  1921.  The  total  number  of  transactions  relating  to  patents 
was  38,577,  a  decrease  of  5,928,  or  over  13  per  cent  less  than  last  year. 

Registrations  of  Copyright  numbered  1,465.  This  is  264  less  than  last  year,  a 
decrease  of  15  per  cent.  Trade-mark  registrations  totalled  2,488,  an  increment  of 
360,  or  nearly  17  per  cent.  There  were  369  Industrial  Designs  recorded,  an  increase 
of  53,  or  16  per  cent.  Timber  Marks  registrations  declined  to  20,  a  4ecrease  of  38, 
or  about  65  per  cent.  The  number  of  assignments  of  Copyright,  Trade-marks, 
Designs  and  Timber  Marks  amounted  to  570,  a  decrease  of  54,  or  8  per  oent.  The 
total  registrations  affecting  Copyrights,  Trade-marks,  Industrial  Designs  and  Tim- 
ber Marks  were  5,048,  a  gain  of  193,  or- about  4  per  cent  greater  than  last  year. 

A  statement  of  the  particulars  of  the  transactions  of  the  Patent  and  Copyright 
OfiSee  is  given  in  appendix  A,  and  a  comparative  statement  for  the  last  ten  years  is 
given  in  appendi.x  B. 

Receipts  .\xd  Expenditure 

The  receipt  of  fees  from  all  sources  exceeded  any  previous  year,  notwithstand- 
.ing  the  lowering  of  the  fee  and  the  decrease  in  the  number  of  applications  filed. 
The  increase  was  due  for  the  most  part  to  the  change  in  the  system  of  paying  a 
filing  and  an  issue  fee  instead  of  a  filing  fee  and  renewals.  About  $11,000  of  the 
increase  came  from  the  new  fees  collected  for  filing  petitions  for  license,  importa- 
tion and  manufacture.  The  total  net  receipts  were  $454,886.24,  an  increase  of 
$46,999.51  over  the  net  amount  received  in  1921.  The  expenditure  was  $202,193.39, 
and  the  surplus  of  receipts  over  expenditure  was  $252,692.85.  The  receipts  from 
Patent  fees  was  $380,206.90,  a  gain  of  $35,494.67  over  the  preceding  year.  From 
the  Copyright  and  Trade-mark  Branch  of  the  office  the  fees  were  $74,679.34,  an 
iuerease  of  $11,504.84. 

A  statement  of  the  receipts  and  expenditure  is  given  in  appendix  C,  and  detailed 
monthly  statements  of  fees  from  the  Patent  Branch  and  the  Copyright  and  Trade- 
mark Branch  are  given  in  appendices  D  and  E  respectively. 

Residence  of  Inventors  for  Patents  Granted  ' 

The  country  of  residence  of  inventors  for  patents  issued  is  given  in  appendix  F. 
Of  the  total  number  granted  4,929  were  applied  for  by  residents  of  the  United  States 
of  America.  This  is  nearly  67  per  cent  of  the  whole  issue  but  is  a  2  per  cent 
decrease  from  last  year.  Inventors  resident  in  Canada  contributed  1.199,  or  16  per 
cent,  an  increment  of  1  per  cent.  Residents  of  Great  Britain,  its  colcnies  and  pos- 
sessions applied  for  838,  or  over  11  per  cent  of  the  total.  This  is  also  an  increase 
of  over  3  per  cent.  The  remaining  427,  or  over  5  per  cent,  came  from  inventors  in 
twenty-seven  other  countries. 

Exchange  of  Puislications 

The  office  received  during  the  year,  in  exchange  for  the  Patent  Office  Record. 
t..o  .  tiicial  publications  and  reports  of  patents,  trade-marks,  and  designs  from  Gre<u 


COMMISSIONER  OF  PATENTS  7 

SESSIONAL   PAPER   No.  9 

Britiiin,  Austiiilia,  New  Zealand,  France,  the  United  States,  Itab',  Switzerland  and 
Japan.  The  office  also  reeeived  at  intervals  as  published  the  abrid^oments  of  patents 
and  bound  volumes  of  patents  of  Great  Britain,  the  printed  copies  of  French  patents, 
and  the  current  weekly  issue  of  United  States  patents. 

In  addition  about  si.\ty  scientific  and  technical  periodicals  for  the  use  of  the 
examining  corps  were  subscribed  for  or  exchanged  for  the  Record. 

St.xff 

The  number  of  employees  of  the  office  averaged  111  during  the  year,  consisting 
of  90  permanent  and  21  temporary  officers  and  clerks.  During  the  twelve  months 
one  examiner  of  patents  resigned  and  one  retired  on  superannuation.  One  clerk  was 
superannuated  and  two  resigned.  The  position  of  chief  examiner  of  patents  was 
created.  All  additional  appointments  were  made  to  the  clerical  staff  and  were  filled 
by  temporary  employees. 

The  additions  to  the  staff  were  for  the  most  part  necessary  on  account  of  the 
increased  work  caused  by  the  amendment  to  the  Patent  Act.  By  this  amendment 
the  rcveipt  of  fe«  in  two  installments  and  the  taxing  of  petitions  under  sections 
39,  -to  and  44  of  the  Patent  Act  resulted  in  an  increase  issue  of  receipts  and  book- 
keeping in  the  accounting  division.  The  preparation  and  mailing  of  notices  of 
allowance  and  the  resulting  noting  and  filing  of  applications  added  to  the  work  of 
the  correspondence,  records  and  examiners'  clerks  divisions. 

Trend  of  Invention 

There  were  few  outstanding  features  in  the  field  of  invention.  The  subject  of 
locomotion  maintained  its  pre-eminence.  The  land  vehicle  class  was  again  the 
largest  single  class  of  invention  and  internal  combustion  engines  was  the  next 
largest.  Both  these  classes  showed  substantial  gains  in  the  number  of  applications 
filed  therein.  Applications  relating  to  aeronautics  declined.  In  railways,  rolling 
stoek  and  draft  appliances  there  were  slight  decreases,  but  there  was  an  increase  in 
the  number  for  railway  brakes.  There  were  fewer  applications  for  ships  but  an 
increased  number  for  small  boats  and  ships'  davits. 

Small  arms,  ammunition,  ordnance  and  other  classes  of  inventions  relating  to 
warfare  were  very  inactive. 

Some  classes  of  metal  working  such  as  grinding,  founding,  tool-making  and 
turning  increased.  In  metal  founding  there  were  numerous  inventions  for  centri- 
fugal casting  machines  and  devices  for  handling  moulders'  sand.  In  the  general 
class  of  metal-working  apparatus  the  number  of  applications  for  machines  com- 
bining a  plurality  of  operations  and  devices  for  assembling  machine  parts,  such  as 
valve  spring  appliors  and  removers,  increased. 

In  agricultural  machinery  there  were  decreases  in  the  applications  for  ploughs, 
harrows,  harvesters  and  grain  separators. 

The  electrical  classes  as  a  whole  were  active.  Applications  for  high-tension 
insulators,  thermal  cutouts  and  electric  heaters  showed  substantial  gains.  There 
has  also  been  continued  progress  in  automatic  and  semi-automatic  telephone 
exchanges  and  in  the  development  of  wireless  communication. 

In  apparel  and  dress  fastenings  there  have  been  notable  gains  in  soft  collars 
and  uuffs  and  in  separable  fasteners. 

The  treatment  of  textile  fibres  and  their  manufacture  into  thread  and  cloth 
has  decreased. 

The  interest  in  vehicle  signals  both  mechanically  and  electrically  operated  has 
been  well  maintained. 


8  TRADE  AXD  COMMERCE 

13  GEORGE  V,  A.   1923 

Machines  for  use  in  g]ass  blowinjr  and  moulding  increased  nearly  fifty  per  cent. 

Other  arts  which  had  substantial  gains  were  printing,  advertising  devices,  paper 
manufactures,  oil  distillation,  food  products  and  confectionery,  dyes,  book  binders, 
plastics  and  rubber  treatment,  boots  and  shoes,  and  furniture. 

In  many  classes  of  invention  there  were  slight  decreases.  In  the  classes  con- 
taining tire  valves,  pulp  and  paper  treating  processes  and  machines,  electric  railway 
signalling  systems,  typewriters,  metal  cans  and  boxes,  metallurgical  and  electro- 
chemical processes,  fences  and  gates,  hoisting  and  loading  means,  and  water  con- 
trolling and  distributing  apparatus,  there  was  a  marked  falling  off. 

New  Legislation  .\nd  Orders  in  Council 

During  the  year  two  new  Acts  were  passed  by  Parliament,  viz.,  an  Act  to  amend 
the  Patent  Act  (11-12  George  5,  chapter  44),  and  an  Act  to  amend  and  consolidate 
the  Law  relating  to  Copyright  (11-12  George  5,  chapter  24).  Both  Acts  were 
assented  to  June  4,  1921. 

The  first  of  those  Acts  provided  for  extension  of  time  for  filing  applications 
for  patent,  and  for  importation  and  manufacture,  and  gave  the  (Commissioner  of 
Patents  powers  to  carry  out  the  provisions  respecting  industrial  property  under  the 
Treaties  of  Peace  as  defined  in  the  Peace  Treaties  Orders  in  Council.  It  also 
changed  the  fee  for  a  patent  and  the  manner  of  payment  from  a  fee  of  sixty  dollars 
payable  in  three  terms  of  sis  years  each  to  a  fee  of  thirty-five  dollars  payable  fifteen 
dollars  on  the  filing  of  the  application  and  twenty  dollars  on  the  issue  of  the  patent. 
Tliis  has  resulted  in  an  increased  revenue  to  the  office  notwithstanding  that  the  cost 
to  the  patentee  has  been  reduced  over  forty  per  cent. 

The  second  Act  is  to  come  into  force  on  a  day  to  be  fixed  by  proclamation  of 
the  Governor  in  Council,  but  euch  proclamation  has  not  yet  been  issued.  This  Act 
affords  most  complete  copyright  protection  throughout  Canada  to  literary,  dramatic, 
musical  and  artistic  works,  including  dramatization  of  non-dramatic  literary  works, 
the  making  of  phonographic  records,  pianola  rolls  of  musical  works,  and  moving 
picture  films  of  artistic  works,  and  will  enable  Canadians  to  obtain  similar  protec- 
tion for  their  works  throughout  the  civilized  countries  of  the  world. 

An  Order  in  Council  of  June  18,  1921,  passed  under  subsection  3  of  section  2 
of  the  Act  to  amend  the  Patent  Act  assented  to  on  the  4th  of  June,  1921,  provided 
for  the  imposition  of  a  fee  of  five  dollars  on  filing  a  petition  for  an  extension  of 
time  under  sections  39  or  40  of  the  Patent  Act  or  for  the  benefit  of  the  provisions 
of  section  44  of  the  said  Act  for  each  patent  mentioned  in  such  petition. 

Eespectfullj   submitted, 

GEOEGE  F.  O'HALLORAN, 

Commissioner  of  Patents. 
Ottawa,  July  20,  1922. 


13  GEORGE  V  SESSIONAL  PAPER   No.  9  .  A.   1923 


APPENDICES 

APPENDIX   A 

Tkansactioxs  of  the  Patent  and  Copyright  Office  fuom  April  1,  1921,  to 
iL\RCH  31,  1922 

(o)  Transactions  of  the  Patent  Branch. 

Applications  for  Patents 12,274 

Patents  trranted — 

Under  Chapter  69,  R.S.C.,  1906. 

Fees  paid  for    6  years  on  Lssue 2,221 

Fees  paid  for  12  years  on  issue 1 

Fees  paid  for  IS  years  on  issue 3 

Under  Chapter  44,  11-12  George  V. 

Fees  paid  for  IS  years  on  issue 5,14S 

Re-issues  granted — 

Under  Chapter  69,  R.S.C.,  1906. 

For     6  years 5 

For  1 2  years * 

Under  Chapter  44,  11-12  George  V. 

For     6  years * 

For  1 S  years ' 

Total 7,393 

Certificates  for  renewal  fees  after  issue — 

Under  Chapter  69,  R.S.C..  1906. 

For     6  years 459 

For  12  years 28 

Under  Chapter  44,  11-12  George  V. 

For    6  years 247 

For  1 2  years 13 

For  18  years  (as  final  fees) 1,873 

Total 2,620 

Reports  by  Examiners  in  addition  to  patents  granted 6,935 

Assignments  of  Patents 5,481 

Patents  placed  under  section  44 2,410 

Importation  extensions "^1 

Manufacture  extensions "^3 

Notices  under  section  S 381 

Caveats — 

Applications 519 

Grants *20 


Total  transactions. .    .  .t 38,577 

(6)  Transactions  of  the  Copyright  and  Trade-mark  Branch. 

1.     Copyrights — 

Full  Copy-rights  without  certificates 1,139 

Full  Copyrights  with  certificates 191 

Temporary  Copyrights  without  certificates 41 

Temporary  Copyrights  with  certificates 19 

Interim  Copyrights  without  certificates 41 

Interim  Copyrights  with  certificates 34 

Renewals  of  Cojiyrights .••• 

Assignments  of  Copyrights 35 

Total 1,500 

9 


TRADE  AND  COMMERCE 


13  GEORGE  V,  A.   1923 


Trade    Marks 2,488 

Renewals  of  Specific  Trade  Marks   ..    __    __ 121 

Assignments  of  Trade  Marks .'. 485 

Total 3.094 

Industrial  Designs 309 

Renewals  of  Industrial  Designs 15 

Assignments  of  Industrial  Designs 44  n 

Total 428 

Timber  Marks 20 

Assignments  of  Timber  Marks 0 

Total 26 

Total  registrations 5.048 


COMMISSIONER  OF  PATENTS 


SESSIONAL   PAPER   No.  9 


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TRADE  AND  COMMERCE 


13  GEORGE  V,  A.   1923 


APPENDIX  C 

Eeceipts  and  ExPExniTiREs  FOR  1921-22 


Receipts 

Expenditures 

.  .     $480,378   81 

Salarie.? 

Patent  Record 

Continirencies 

Receipts  over  expenditures   . .    . 

.    $150,649   74 
22,593  82 
28,949   83 

Cash  refunded. . 

25,492   57 

$202,193   39 
.       252,692  85 

Net  cash 

..     $454,886   24 

$454,886  24 

COMMISSIONER  OF  PATENTS 


13 


SESSIONAL   PAPER   No.  9 


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TRADE  AND  COMMERCE 

13  GEORGE  V,  A.   1923 
APPENDIX   E 

Detailed   Statement   Trademark   and   Copyright  Fees,   1921-1922. 


Month 

Trade- 
marks 

Copy- 
rights 

Designs. 

Timber- 
marks 

Assign- 
ments 

Certified 
Copies 

Totals 

1921 

$     cts. 

6,664  55 
7.228  20 
5,890  65 
5,300  35 
6,934  25 
4,835  40 
6,179  00 
6,810  17 
7,685  75 

7,545  43 
5,640  07 
8.730  33 

i     cts. 

171  50 
199  65 
124  00 
147  00 
136  77 

131  50 
185  00 
170  00 
165  15 

1.33  90 

132  15 
191  00 

$     cts. 

211  00 
99  00 
137  00 
167  00 
170  00 
201  50 
298  00 
174  00 
192  00 

167  25 
222  50 
517  00 

$     cts. 

8  50 
7  00 
15  00 
2  00 
6  00 
2  00 
2  00 

S     cts. 

89  17 
52  15 

87  50 
41  00 
48  00 

44  00 

45  00 
62  00 

88  00 

91  00 
82  00 
69  00 

$     cts. 

99  95 
34  50 
49  25 
16  2.5 
16  00 

28  75 
24  25 
31  25 
57  25 

.55  50 

29  3.5 
43  50 

$       Ct8. 

7,244  67 

May 

7.620  SO 
6,303  40 

July 

5,673  60 

7.311  02 

5,243  15 

October.    . 

6,733  25 
7,247  42 

December. 

1922 

600 

2  00 
2  00 
6  00 

8,194  15 
7,995  08 

6, 108  07 

9,556  83 

tals 

To 

79,444  15 
10,051  45 

1,887  62 
45  90 

2,556  25 
431  00 

58  50 

798  82 
2  00 

485  80 
21  45 

85,231  14 

10.551  80 

tals 

To 

69,392  70 

1,841  72 

2, 125  25 

68  50 

796  00 

464  35 

74,679  34 

COMMISSIONER  OF  PATENTS 


15 


SESSIONAL   PAPER   No.   9 


APPENDIX  F 


Keside.nxe  of  Inventors  for  Patents  Granted  ix  1921-22 


Canada — 

Ontario 508 

Quebec 276 

British  Columbia 103 

Saslsatchewan 101 

Alberta 96 

Manitoba 75 

Nova  Scotia 22 

New  Brunswick 14 

Prince  Edward  Island 4 

Total 1.199 

Great  Britain  and  Ireland — 

EnRland 633 

Scotland 49 

Ireland 14 

Wales 10 

Channel  Islands 1 

Total "07 

British  Colonies  and  Possessions — 

Australia 65 

New  Zealand 48 

Transvaal 6 

South   Africa 4 

Egypt 4 

India 2 

Newfoundland 1 

British  Guiana 1 

Total 131 

Foreign  States — 
America — 

United  States 4,929 

Cuba 5 

Argentine  Republic 4 

Mexico 3 

Philippine  Islands 3 


'orcign    States — Con. 
America — Con. 

Chili 3 

Porto  Rico 2 

Dominican  Republic 2 

Panama 1 

Total 4.952 

Europe —      , 

Germany 97 

France 92 

Sweden 53 

Norway 35 

Switzerland 30 

Italy 29 

Holland 20 

Denmark 12 

Belgium 11 

Austria 7 

Spain 3 

Finland 2 

Luxemburg 2 

Czecho   Slovakia 1 

Total 394 

Africa — 

Algeria 1 

Portuguese  East  Africa. .    ..  1 

Total 2 

Asia — 

Japan 8 

Total 8 

Grand  total 7.393 


CANADA 
DOMINION   BUREAU   OF   STATISTICS 


ANNUAL    REPORT 


DOMINION  STATISTICIAN 


FOR  THE 


FISCAL  YEAR  ENDED  MARCH  31 

1922 


PRINTED  BY  ORDER  OF  PARLIAMENT 


OTTAWA 

F.  A.  ACLAND 

PRINTER  TO  THE  KINGS  MOST  EXCELLENT  MAJESTY 

1923 


13  GEORGE  V  SESSIONAL   PAPER   No.   10 


LETTER   OF   TRANSMITTAL 

To  General  His  Excellency  the  Right  Honourable  Lord  Bxjng  oj  Vimy,  G.CB.. 
G.C.M.G.,  M.V.O.,  Governor  General  and  Commander  in  Chief  of  the 
Dominion  of  Canada. 

May  it  Please  Yotjb  Excellency: 

I  have  the  honour  to  submit  herewitli,  for  the  information  of  Your  Excel- 
lency and  the  Parliament  of  Canada,  the  Annual  Report  of  the  Dominion  Statis- 
tician, under  Section  4  of  the  Statistics  Act,  1918  (8-9  Geo.  V,  Chap.  43),  for 
the  year  ended  March  31,  1922. 

I  have  the  honour  to  be, 

Your  Excellency's  most  obedient  servant, 

JAMES  A.  ROBB, 
Minister  of  Trade  and  Commerce. 

Department  of  Tr-uje  and  Commeece, 
Ottawa,  February  1,  1923. 


13  GEORGE  V  SESSIONAL  PAPER   No.   10 


DIAGRAM  SHOWING    ORGANIZATION  OF  THE 

DOMINION  BUREAU  OF  STATISTICS, 

CANADA 


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13  GEORGE  V  SESSIONAL  PAPER   No.   10 


REPORT 

OF  THE 

DOMINION  STATISTICIAN 

FOR  THE 

FISCAL  YEAR  ENDED  MARCH  31,   1922 


Ottawa,  February  1,  1923. 
The  Honourable  James  A.  Robb,  M.P., 
Minister  of  Trade  and  Commerce, 
Ottawa,  Canada. 

Sir;— Under  section  4  of  tiie  "Act  respecting  the  Dominion  Bureau  of 
Statistics",  (8-9  George  V,  chapter  43),  I  have  the  honour  to  report  as  herein- 
after for  the  fiscal  year  1921-22. 

Tiie  report  is  in  two  main  parts.  In  the  first  a  general  review  is  given  of 
the  present  organization  of  tiie  Bureau  and  of  the  stage  now  reached  in  the 
development  of  statistical  policy  in  Canada — with  special  reference  to  the  line 
of  future  development.  The  second  part  contain.s  an  outline  of  the  work  carried 
out  in  the  different  branches  of  the  Bureau  during  the  period  under  review  as 
reported  by  the  chiefs  in  immediate  charge. 

I.     ORGANIZATION   OF   THE   DOMINION   BUREAU   OF   STATISTICS 

— STAGE  NOW  REACHED  IN  THE  DEVELOPMENT  OF 

STATISTICAL  POLICY  IN  CANADA — THE  UIVE 

OF  FUTURE  DEVELOPMENT 

The  Dominion  Bureau  of  Statistics  was  set  up  by  statute  in  1918  as  a  central 
statistical  department  for  Canada  (8-9  Geo.  V.,  c.  43,  "An  Act  respecting  the 
Dominion  Bureau  of  Statistics").  The  Act  was  a  consolidation  of  all  previous 
statistical  legislation  (Census  Act,  General  Statistics  Act,  Railway  Statistics 
Act,  etc.)  with  important  additions. 

The  Act  was  based  on  the  report  of  a  Commission  on  Statistics  of  seven 
members,  appointed  in  1912,  which  after  detailed  investigation,  criticized  severely 
the  omissions,  inequalities,  inaccuracies,  overlapping  and  lack  of  coherence  and 
common  purpose  in  Canadian  official  statistics,  and  recommended  (a)  a  series  of 
specific  reforms  and  enlargements,  and  (b)  a  policy  of  statistical  co-ordination 
for  the  Dominion  under  central  direction.* 

•  The  report  of  the  commiBsion  ran  to  scvt-nly-two  pages  of  descriptive  comment  and  recommt-ndations. 
Other  public  bodie.s  tiad  drawn  eaually  pointed  attention  to  the  defioiencies  of  Canadian  statistics.  These 
statistics  had  previously  consi.sted  of  reports  brought  out  independently  by  different  departments  on  subjects 
within  their  respective  interests.  The  British  North  America  Art  had  assigned  "statistics"  to  the  Doiuinion 
Government,  implying  that  statistics  are  a  national  concern  and  that  it  is  the  duty  of  the  Federal  Government, 
while  not  precluding  provincial  statistics,  to  organize  the  field  from  a  national  standpoint.  Previously  to  1916 
that  duly  had  not  been  undertaken,  thotieh  the  creation  of  a  p<'rniaiient  O'nsus  OfTice  in  1905  was  an  im- 
portant step  fonA'ard.  For  a  brief  account  of  Dominion  and  provmcial  statistical  activities  from  the 
earliest  times  up  to  1912.  see  "First  .Annual  Report  of  the  Dominion  Statistician,  1919,"  pp.  9-14,  which  sums 
up  as  follows;  "A  considerable  but  desultory  body  of  statistics  had  grown  into  existence:  in  certain  sections 
good  work  was  being  done — in  others  not  good.  There  were  many  duplications,  and  at  the  same  time  numerous 
gaps  at  crucial  points;  finally  there  was  a  total  lack  of  general  plan.  The  embarrassment  which  this 
caused  with  the  growth  of  the  eouiitr\-  and  the  increasing  complexity  of  its  problems  will  be  appreciated." 


6  TRADE  AND  COMMERCE 

13  GEORGE  V,  A.   1923 

In  1915,  following  this  report,  the  office  of  Dominion  Statistician  was 
created,  and  the  next  two  years  were  devoted  to  the  drafting  in  detail  of  the 
various  plans  involved,  which  included  a  definitive  monograph  on  each  important 
field  of  statistics  and  covered  the  statistical  work  of  all  the  departments.  A 
memorandum  entitled  "A  National  System  of  Statistics  for  Canada"  was 
printed  for  the  Cabinet  prior  to  the  final  adoption  of  these  plans.  Subsequently 
the  Bureau  was  created  in  1918. 

Creation  of  the  Bureau. 

The  Bureau  has  been  constituted  by  the  transfer  of  the  following  work  and 
branches:  (1)  The  Census  and  Statistics  Office  (covering  the  census  of  popula- 
tion and  the  statistics  of  agriculture,  general  manufactures  and  criminal  justice) ; 
(2)  Fisheries  Statistics;  (3)  Mining  Statistics;  (4)  Forestry  Statistics;  (5) 
Dairying  and  Fruit  Statistics;  (6)  Water  and  Electric  Power  Statistics;  (7)  the 
Railways  and  Canals  Statistical  Branch  (railways,  express,  telegraphs,  tele- 
phones, canals) ;  (8 1  External  Trade  Statistics  (exports  and  imports  I ;  (9)  Grain 
Trade  Statistics;  (10)  Live  Stock  Statistics;  and  (11)  Employment  and  Prices 
Statistics.  In  addition  four  new  branches  were  erected,  dealing  respectively 
with  Public  Finance,  Internal  Trade,  Vital  Statistics  and  Education.  Subse- 
quently the  statistical  activities  of  the  Fuel  Controller  and  of  the  Board  of  Com- 
merce were  absorbed.  Modifications  of  the  Bankruptcy,  Public  Health  and 
Railway  Acts  and  of  the  regulation  on  franking  privileges  were  also  made. 

Working  Constitution  of  the  Bureau. 

The  Act  makes  the  Bureau  responsible  for  the  statistics  "relative  to  the 
commercial,  industrial,  social,  economic  and  general  activities  and  conditions  of 
the  people" — a  imiversal  mandate.  Certain  statistics,  however,  originate  as  by  ■ 
products  in  particular  departments,  or  can  best  be  collected  through  the  field 
staffs  or  other  machinery  of  such  departments.  These  should  not  only  meet 
the  requirements  of  the  departments  in  question,  but  should  constitute  an  integral 
part  of  the  general  system.  The  Act  accordingly  assigns  the  Bureau  the  further 
task  of  "collaborating  with  all  other  departments  of  the  Government  in  the  com- 
pilation and  publication  of  statistical  records  of  administration."  The  machin- 
ery for  this  collaboration  is  provided  by  a  regulation  dated  October  12,  1918, 
which  gives  the  Dominion  Statistician  direct  access  to  heads  of  department  for 
conference  purposes,  with  an  instruction  after  such  conference  to  prepare  a 
recommendation  for  submission  to  Council,  such  recommendation  on  approval  to 
constitute  a  permanent  arrangement  governing  the  particular  subject  dealt  with. 
A  further  regulation  provides  for  central  machine  compilation  as  an  adjunct  to 
the  system.  In  this  way  the  Bureau  is  constituted  a  comprehensive  central 
statistical  office,  working  for  the  most  part  under  the  Governor  in  Council,  all 
purely  statistical  work  having  been  brought  by  transfer  under  its  immediate 
direction,  whilst  remaining  departmental  statistics  are  indirectly  made  part  of 
the  system.  Delimitation  is  also  achieved  between  the  two  classes  of  depart- 
ment which  have  legal  inquisitional  powers,  namely,  executive  departments  hav- 
ing administrative  functions  in  specific  fields,  and  the  statistical  department 
which  collects  data  for  informative  purposes  onh'. 

The  linking  up  of  provincial  departments  (which  under  the  British  North 
America  Act,  cover  some  most  important  statistical  subjects)  is  secured  through  a 
clause  permitting  provincial  officers  to  serve  as  agents  under  the  Statistics  Act. 
A  further  clause  gives  the  Bureau  right  of  access  to  all  provincial,  municipal  or 
corporation  records. 


DOMINION  STATISTICIAN  7 

SESSIONAL   PAPER   No.   10 

Purpose  of  Statistical  Centralization. 

The  purpose  of  statistical  centralization  includes,  of  course,  the  numerous 
economies  in  overhead  which  concentration  promotes,  as  in  staff,  equipment,  elim- 
ination of  duplication,  etc.  For  example,  two  pronounced  characteristics  of  sta- 
tistical work  are  (a)  the  large  proportion  of  routine,  and  (b)  its  ebb  and  flow; 
a  "floating"  staff  is  accordingly  a  feature  of  a  central  bureau.  The  use 
of  electrical  tabulating  machinery,  again,  has  revolutionized  statistical  work, 
but  it  effects  an  economy  only  on  large-scale  (i.e.,  centralized)  operations.  (The 
Bureau  has  an  investment  of  over  $125,000  in  machinery.)  Central  library, 
record  and  administration  systems  are  further  examples.  Still  another  economy, 
from  a  different  angle,  flows  from  the  concentration  of  statistical  experience  as 
a  result  of  bringing  the  higher  statistical  officers  of  the  Government  into  con- 
stant contact  with  each  other.  Finally  the  regulation  above  quoted  provides 
a  means  for  continuous  unbiassed  review  of  departmental  statistical  activities. 

The  convenience  of  the  public  is  also  promoted  by  the  centralization  of 
statistical  inquiries.  On  the  one  hand  the  number  of  questionnaires  is  reduced 
by  each  being  made  to  serve  the  purposes  of  several  departments  simultaneously, 
and  on  the  other  a  general  information  agency  is  provided  to  which  the  public 
may  apply  for  all  resulting  data  on  the  production,  trade,  population,  and  other 
phases  of  progress  in  the  country. 

But  the  fundamental  purpose  of  statistical  centralization  lies  in  the  fact 
that  its  great  subjects,  such  as  production,  trade,  finance,  population,  etc.,  are 
not  separate  and  distinct,  but  are  closely  inter-related.  The  State,  in  otiier 
words,  is  not  a  series  of  heterogeneous  activities,  but  is  itself  an  entity.  The  sta- 
tistics of  the  country,  therefore,  must  be  framed  to  illustrate  these*  relationships. 
If,  however,  the  statistics  of  mines,  fisheries,  manufactures,  and  other  phases  of 
production  arc  carried  out  in  a  series  of  water-tight  compartments,  the  phenom- 
ena common  to  all,  sucii  as  labour,  capital,  eciuipment,  etc.,  will  inevitably  be 
handled  differently,  with  non-comparable  rf'sults.  Again,  if  one  system  of  classi- 
fying commodities  is  employed  by  the  trade  statistician,  another  by  the  produc- 
tion statistician,  and  another  by  the  prices  statistician,  no  general  study  of  con- 
ditions surrounding  a  particular  group  of  commodities  can  be  made;  similarly, 
the  classification  of  occupations  should  be  uniform,  whether  in  the  census  anal- 
ysis of  population,  in  the  vital  statistical  record  of  deaths,  in  criminal  stati.=tics, 
in  labour  statistics,  and  so  on.  Again,  on  points  of  method  like  the  construction 
of  index  numbers — clearly  such  devices  should  yield  results  that  are  comparable 
from  field  to  field.  In  brief,  a  true  national  statistic  is  not  a  mere  aggregation 
of  the  statistics  of  different  activities,  but  involves  also  a  purview  of  the  totality 
of  phenomena  with  the  object  of  revealing  their  interplay  and,  if  possible,  the 
controlling  forces  from  time  to  time.  Not  only  should  the  State  be  provided  with 
statistics  on  all  subjects  of  truly  national  interest  (which  will  not  be  the  case  un- 
less the  duty  of  ensuring  it  is  definitclj-  undertaken),  but  these  statistics  should 
be  properly  "  articulated  "  with  each  other,  so  as  to  form  in  so  far  as  possible,  a 
single  conspectus. 

Statistics  is  an  art  or  method  which  must  serve  various  interests  and  depart- 
ments; but  it  must  also  be  conceived  and  approached  from  the  governmental 
standpoint  as  a  science  which  has  for  subject  the  corporate  progress  of  the  nation. 

Progress  under  the  Bureau  to  Date 

The  Bureau  has  completed  the  plans  for  a  unified,  nation-wide  statistical 
system,  covering  the  most  important  phases  of  social  and  economic  activity,  and 
has  carried  them  out  to  a  considerable  degree,  though  part  is  not  yet  realized.  The 
First  Annual  Report  of  the  Dominion  Statistician  contained  a  full  description  of 
the  subject-matter  of  these  plans  and  of  the  preliminary  organization    of    the 


8  TRADE  AXD  COMMERCE 

13  GEORGE  V,  A.   1923 

Bureau.  Tlic  chart  appearing  as  frontispiece  is  from  that  report,  and  shows  the 
eleven  main  branches  under  wliich  the  work  is  conducted;  a  list  of  the  publica- 
tions of  tiie  Bureau  is  also  attached  (see  appendix)  as  further  indicating  the 
scope  and  character  of  the  work. 

In  briefest  fonn,  the  chief  reorganizations  effected  to  date  are  as  follows: 

(1)  The  Census  (decennial  and  quinquennial)  has  been  reorganized  as  & 
stocktaking  of  the  people  and  of  their  basic  industry,  and  its  true  place  as  such 
in  t.'ie  national  statistical  system  and  in  relation  to  other  fields  of  statistics  de- 
termined; it  has  been  considerably  simplified  as  a  result  of  the  Bureau's  widened 
control  of  allied  statistics. 

(2)  A  national  scheme  of  vital  statistics  has  been  established  by  inducing 
the  provinces  (a)  to  enact  uniform  legislation  drafted  by  the  Bureau;  (6)  to 
adopt  uniform  administration  of  the  same;  (c)  to  use  standard  forms  issued  by 
the  Bureau,  and  (d)  to  supply  transcripts  of  the  original  returns. 

(3)  The  monthly  and  annual  statistics  of  agriculture  have  been  brought  un- 
der joint  operation  of  the  Bureau  and  the  nine  Provincial  Governments,  to  the 
material  improvement  of  these  data  and  the  elimination  of  much  duplication  of 
work  and  conflicting  results.  As  re-organized,  the  work  includes  among  other 
features  an  annual  postal  census  of  acreages  under  field  crops  and  livestock  on 
farms  carried  out  through  rural  school  teachers;  also  a  complete  pooling  of  data 
re  crop  conditions,  etc.,  monthly  between  Dominion  and  provinces. 

(4)  The  statistics  of  fisheries,  mines,  forestry,  dairying,  central  power  and 
general  manufactures  have  been  unified  and  placed  on  an  annual  basis  (Indus- 
trial Census),  in  co-operation  with  the  several  Dominion  and  provincial  depart- 
ments concerned;  altogether  the  statistical  activities  of  over  thirty  departments 
have  been  brought  into  harmony.  In  conjunction  with  agricultural  statistics, 
this  provides  comprehensive  and  up-to-date  information  on  all  phases  of  pro<luc- 
tion — worked  out,  it  may  be  added,  in  consultation  with  some  thirty-five  trade 
and  industrial  associations  in  different  sections  of  tlie  field.  The  statistics  of 
industr>-  were  previously  limited  to  those  of  certain  Dominion  and  provincial 
departments,  using  widely  different  methods,  covering  only  part  of  the  field  and 
without  comprehensiveness  of  viewpoint. 

(5)  The  statistics  of  foreign  trade  and  of  transportation  and  communica- 
tions have  been  completely  remodelled;  in  trade  statistics  a  saving  of  $25,000  a 
year  has  been  effected,  whilst  the  analytical  and  interpretative  data  have  been 
increased  and  placed  on  a  logical  basis. 

(6)  A  branch  dealing  with  the  more  important  aspects  of  internal  trade, 
including  interprovincial  trade  movements,  the  marketing  of  staple  commodities 
(grain,  livestock,  fruits,  etc.).  and  a  complete  system  of  prices  statistics,  has 
been  established. 

(7)  Criminal  statistics  have  been  reorganized  and  co-ordinated  with  the 
Census  and  other  social  statistics. 

(8)  Substantial  beginnings  have  been  made  in  the  treatment  of  public 
finance  and  of  education— the  latter  in  collaboration  with  the  nine  provincial 
governments,  after  an  interpro\'incial  conference  held  in  Ottawa,  1920. 

(9)  Relations  between  the  Bureau  and  the  Department  of  Labour  covering 
the  entire  range  of  labour  statistics  have  been  reduced  to  formal  working  ar- 
rangement and  overlapping  has  been  eliminated  (1922). 

(10)  A  library  of  the  statistics  of  all  countries  has  been  established,  and  a 
central  mehanical  tabulating  service  available  for  all  departments  has  been  put 
in  operation. 


DOMINION  STATISTICIAN  9 

SESSIONAL   PAPER   No.    10 

The  main  achievement  of  the  Bureau,  however,  lias  been  in  the  organization 
of  these  several  subjects  in  correlation  in  accordance  with  a  general  plan,  and 
the  consequent  establishment  of  a  comprehensive  survey  of  the  country  as  a 
single  "going  concern."  In  adilitioii  and  as  a  result,  there  has  been  created  what 
is  frequently  called  a  central  '"thinking  office"  in  statistics,  continuously  in 
touch  with  general  conditions  and  the  line  of  probable  developments. 

Organization  not  yet  completed 

A  statement  of  the  fields  in  which  statistical  organization  is  incomplete  is 
given  below.  On  each  of  the  subjects  mentioned  a  plan  of  procedure  has  been 
drawn  up  in  detail  by  the  Bureau.  It  may  be  added  that  the  general  problem 
is  essentially  one  of  improved  organization;  in  certain  fields  savings  might  be 
effected  that  would  offset  expansion  in  others. 

(1)  Migration. — The  statistics  of  immigration  and  emigration  are  incom- 
plete and  out  of  correlation  with  the  census  and  vital  statistics,  the  remaining 
branches  of  population  statistics,  with  which  they  should  unite  to  form  an  entity. 

(2)  Navigation. — Certain  improvements  in  this  field  arc  needed  to  round 
out  the  scheme  of  general  transportation  statistics  and  to  complete  the  system 
of  internal  trade  records  above  mentioned. 

(3)  Importu  and  Export.s. — Improvement  in  the  compilation  of  these 
statistics  could  probably  be  effected  under  section  23  of  the  Statistics  Act. 

(4)  Trading  Operations. — The  Industrial  Census  should  be  made  to  throw 
ligiit  on  general  merchandizing  operations.  Interprovincial  arrangements  in 
certain  sections  should  be  completed — particularly  in  forestry  and  mining 
statistics. 

(5)  Public  Finance. — There  is  need  for  further  organization  of  the  statistics 
of  public  finance,  especially  in  the  field  of  municipal  statistics. 

(6)  Income. — The  body  of  data  which  is  being  brought  together  on  incomes 
of  the  people  should  be  correlated  with  the  data  of  the  Bureau. 

(7)  Private  Firiance. — The  statistics  of  loan  and  trust  companies  require 
remodelling,  and  the  general  scope  of  the  Bureau's  researches  in  connection  with 
the  wealth,  capital  imports,  and  general  financial  status  of  the  country  should 
be  enlarged. 

(8)  No  statistics  of  Civil  Justice  exist. 

(9)  The  Canada  Year  Boofc.— Though  the  Canada  Year  Book  has  been 
steadily  improved  during  the  past  five  years,  it  still  falls  short  of  the  success 
achieved  by  the  Year  Books  of  certain  other  countries.  The  Bureau  is  now 
in  a  position,  at  little  extra  cost,  to  place  this  publication  (which  circulates 
throughout  the  world  as  the  official  compendium  of  Government  data  on  the 
resources  and  development  of  Canada,  and  for  which  the  demand  is  rapidly 
growing),  on  a  definitely  higher  level. 

(10)  Monthly  Review  of  Canadian  Statistics. — The  General  Statistics 
Branch  (which  issues  the  Year  Book)  is  now  in  a  position  to  issue  a  monthly 
review  of  Canadian  statistics  which  would  cost  little  and  which,  it  is  believed, 
would  be  of  marked  service  to  the  business  community.  The  object  would  be  to 
bring  together  each  month  the  latest  "barometric"  statistics,  in  a  way  that 
would  reveal  the  current  economic  trend.    Reviews  of  this  kind  are  issued  in 


10  TRADE  AND  COMMERCE 

13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1923 

the  United  States,  France,  Australia,  and  other  countries.  Germanj'  tliis  year  is 
beginning  a  new  monthly  review  of  "Economics  and  Statistics"  that  is  probably 
the  mo!st  ambitious  attempt  of  the  kind  yet  i)lannpd.  A  model  has  been  worked 
out  in  the  Bureau. 

With  the  above  additional  organization,  the  Bureau  it  is  believed  would 
have  a  scheme  of  fundamental  statistics  adequate  to  the  country's  needs  and 
capable  of  adjustment  to  conditions  for  a  considerable  time  to  come. 

Administrative  Machinery 

The  preceding  section  of  this  statement  has  dealt  exclusively  with  problems 
of  subject-matter.  The  Bureau  is  also  in  need  of  improvements  in  administra- 
tive machinery,  for  the  purpose  primarily  of  incrpasing  its  facilities  for  organiza- 
tion. 

(1)  More  explicit  definition  of  the  Bureau,  in  the  terms  of  its  progress  to  date, 
as  a  central  statistical  organization,  bearing  tiie  same  relation  as  such  to  each 
and  every  department  of  the  government,  would  simplify  relationships,  increase 
appreciation  of  its  function  and  add  to  its  forcefulness.  Whilst  de  facto  the 
Bureau  has  been  given  a  free  hand,  it  has  suffered  by  being  regarded  as  a 
movement  by  one  Department  to  encroach  on  others,  both  Dominion  and 
provincial.  It  is  submitted,  however,  that  it  represents  the  one  and  only  metliod 
of  attacking  a  problem  otherwise  insoluble,  and  that  its  function  must  be 
regarded  as  nation-wide  if  the  important  object  for  which  it  exists  is  to  achieve 
complete  success. 

It  may  be  added  that  the  Bureau  has  an  exceptionally  complex  staff  and 
organization.  Its  larger  branches  and  subdivisions  (most  of  which  were  pre- 
viously major  branches  of  departments)  number  14,  and  it  carries  out  altogether 
over  50  distinct  pieces  of  work.  Its  staff  this  year  totals  500;  last  year  it  reached 
G50,  and  it  seldom  falls  below  300 — the  whole  covering  an  exceedingly  varied 
field  and  requiring  correspondingly  varied  qualifications  and  organization. 

(2)  It  is  of  interest  to  note  that  several  countries  have  established  advisory 
statistical  councils  as  a  feature  of  tlieir  statistical  organization.  European 
examples  are  afforded  by  Austria,  Belgium,  Holland,  etc.,  and  a  committee  of 
the  kind  has  been  recently  set  up  in  Great  Britain.  In  the  countries  just 
mentioned  the  councils .  consist  wholly  of  Government  officials.  Another  model 
is  that  of  South  Africa  whose  Census  and  Statistics  Act  has  the  following 
clause: — 

"There  shall  be  a  statistical  council  consisting  of  not  less  than  four 
and  not  more  than  eight  persons,  who  shall  be  appointed  bj'  the  Governor 
General  and  shall  hold  office  during  pleasure;  and  it  shall  be  the  function 
of  such  council  to  advise  in  matters  conected  with  this  Act." 

The  South  African  Statistical  Council  consists  of  representatives  of  various 
public  interests  and  has  proved  a  valuable  piece  of  machinery.  The  United 
States  also  has  attached  an  outside  advisory  council  to  the  Census  Bureau,  and 
other  instances  might  be  adduced,  notably  that  of  the  new  republic  of  Czecho- 
slovakia, which,  under  its  newly  constituted  central  statistical  department,  holds 
an  annual  national  "assembly"  of  over  60  delegates  on  statistics.  The  object  is 
on  the  one  hand  to  democratize  statistics,  to  meet  objections  through  misunder- 
standing of  the  Government's  aim,  and  to  increase  the  practicalness  of  the  work. 
Good  statistical  work  is  peculiarly  dependent  upon  public  appreciation  and 
support,  yet  the  raiso7i  d'etre  for  many  individual  phases  and  for  co-ordinated 
organization  is  peculiarly  liable  to  misconception.  A  Council  aims  also  to 
increase  the  pressure  for  good  organization  brought  to  bear  on  outlying  govern- 
mental machinery,  and  thus  to  mitigate  the  dead  weight  of  indifference  which 


DOMIXIOX  f^TATISTIClAN  11 

SESSIONAL  PAPER   No.   10 

sometimes  obtains.  The  subject  is  a  many-sided  one,  and  materials  for  the 
full  discussion  of  the  form  and  function  of  such  Councils  are  available  in  the 
Bureau. 

(3)  The  providing  of  a  permanent,  properly  planned  and  protected  statistical 
building  is  advised. 

Conclusion 

The  final  concept  in  the  organization  of  the  Bureau  is  that  of  a  national 
laboratorj-  for  social  and  economic  research.  Statistics  are  not  merely  a  record 
of  what  has  been,  but  are  for  use  in  planning  what  shall  be;  it  is  the  duty  of  a 
statistical  bureau  to  assist  directly  in  the  daj^-to-day  problems  of  administration, 
as  well  as  to  provide  their  theoretic  background.  The  action  of  several  large 
universities  in  establishing  research  departments,  and  the  endowment  of  the 
National  Bureau  of  Economic  Research  in  the  United  States  are  suggestive 
here.  One  of  the  most  significant  of  recent  developments  in  administration  i3 
the  extent  to  which  statistical  organization  has  been  increased  as  a  guide  to 
policy.  The  United  States  has  recently  made  statistical  organization  the  subject 
of  a  special  report  to  Congress  by  the  official  Bureau  of  Efficiency  (a  report,  it 
may  be  pointed  out,  that  confirms  in  its  recommendations  the  line  of  action 
taken  in  Canada).  In  Germany  the  Central  Statistical  Department  has  been 
for  many  years  one  of  the  most  powerful  engines  of  Government,  its  organization 
permeating  the  country,  embracing  several  subsidiary  state  bureaus  and  some 
forty  municipal  offices.  Itah"^  reorganized  statistics  as  a  war  measure;  Spain 
has  done  the  same  during  the  present  year;  most  European  countries  have 
centralized  statistics.  The  progress  already  made  in  Canada  has  attracted 
favourable  comment  both  inside  and  outside  the  coimtry.  Though  the  usefulness 
of  the  Bureau  has  only  begun,  in  the  i)ast  three  years  tlie  applications  to  it  for 
data  by  the  public  have  more  than  trebled.  From  an  organization  standpoint 
the  Bureau  may  be  said  already  to  have  laid  the  foundations  for  a  service  which 
under  constructive  development  will  permit  it  to  rank  with  that  of  any  other 
country  of  similar  institutions  and  conditions. 

II.    WORK  OF  THE  BUREAU  OF  STATISTICS  DURING  1921-22 
REPORTS    BY   CHIEFS    OF    BRANCHES 

The  work  of  the  Bureau  during  1921-22  was  as  reported  below  by  the  chief 
officers  in  charge  of  the  respective  branches.  No  change  in  fundamental  organi- 
zation was  made  from  the  preceding  year. 

Population 

The  outstanding  feature  of  the  year  in  the  work  of  the  Bureau  was  the 
decennial  census  of  population  and  agriculture,  which  fell  to  be  taken  as  of 
date  June  1,  1921,  and  which  as  now  organized  represents  the  general  stock- 
taking of  the  nation  and  the  background  of  jiractically  all  other  branches  of 
statistics.  Mr.  E.  S.  Macphail,  Chief  of  the  Branch  on  Demographj-  in  the 
Bureau,  reports  as  follows: — 

The  Census 

The  planning  of  the  census  of  1921  in  full  detail  was,  of  course,  completed 
several  months  prior  to  the  beginning  of  the  fiscal  year  1921-22.  As  elsewhere 
explained,  its  scope  was  considerably  altered  as  compared  with  the  previous 
census  of  1911,  largely  as  a  result  of  the  improved  organization  of  subsidiary 
statistical  fields  which  has  been  effected  by  the  Bureau  during  the  past  five 
years.     In  the  main  the  decennial  census  is  now  limited  to  the  function  of  a 


12  TRADE  ASD  COMMERCE 

13  GEORGE  V,  A.   1923 

stocktaking  of  the  Canadian  people  and  of  tiieir  lja;*ic  industry,  namely, 
agriculture.  This  has  permitted  some  important  eliminations.  The  creation  of 
a  national  system  of  vital  statistics,  for  example,  has  enabled  the  mortuary 
census,  which  was  a  feature  of  previous  decennial  censuses,  to  be  discontinued. 
Similarly  the  organization  of  the  statistics  of  mines,  fisheries,  forestry  and 
manufactures  on  an  annual  basis  in  co-operation  with  the  Dominion  and  pro- 
vincial administrative  departments  concerned,  has  resulted  in  a  reduction  of 
forms,  the  census  collecting  only  lists  of  operating  concerns  throughout  the 
country  as  a  basis  for  the  annual  investigation.  The  opening  volume  of  the 
final  census  report  will  contain  copies  of  the  various  schedules  that  were  used 
and  cxplanatorj'  matter  as  to  tlic  purpose  of  each. 

The  work  of  the  year  may  be  divided  under  two  headings:  field-work  ami 
compilation.  The  field-work  was  extended  over  the  period  April  to  August 
inclusive,  being  at  its  "peak"  in  June.  The  Dominion  for  census  purposes  is 
divided  into  some  230  "districts"  corresponding  as  nearly  as  possible  with  the 
number  of  constituencies  in  the  Dominion  House  of  Commons.  These  are  in 
turn  subdivided  into  "subdistricts"  or  enumeration  areas,  roughly  corresponding 
with  polling  divisions.  Remote  and  uncirsaiiized  district*  are  covered  by  special 
machinery.  Each  district  is  under  the  supervision  of  a  "commissioner"  who  has 
charge  of  enumerators,  the  latter  numbering  altogether  11,425. 

During  the  month  of  IMay  a  pamphlet  entitled  "The  Coming  Census — Why 
it  is  taken — How  it  is  taken"  was  issued  by  the  Bureau  for  republication  in  the 
press.  The  pamphlet  contained  a  complete  description  of  the  origin,  purpose 
and  methods  of  the  census  in  popular  form  and  was  designed  to  secure  the 
co-operation  of  the  public  with  the  enumerators,  a  factor  so  essential  to  the 
success  of  an  undertaking  of  this  nature.  The  moving-picture  service  of  the 
Department  of  Trade  and  Commerce  was  also  effectively  employed  to  the  same 
end. 

The  commissioners  were  for  the  most  part  appointed  and  instructed  in 
April  and  the  enumerators  in  May.  April,  and  Rlay  were  also  devoted  to 
the  distribution  of  supplies,  of  which  720  large  boxes  containing  some  12,000 
parcels  were  sent  forward.  Notwithstanding  the  increased  volume  of  the  returns 
resulting  from  the  growth  in  population,  the  schedules  were  received  back  in 
somewhat  less  time  than  were  those  of  the  census  of  1911. 

The  work  of  revising  and  correcting  the  schedules  was  begun  in  .lune,  the 
staff  being  taken  on  gradually  as  the  return  of  the  schedules  necessitated. 
Altogether  over  24,000  letters  were  written  in  connection  with  the  revision 
of  the  population  schedules,  whilst  about  150,000  individual  farmers  were 
communicated  with  in  the  checking  of  the  agricultural  returns. 

Immediately  following  the  revision  and  audit  of  the  returns,  the  coding 
of  the  information  and  its  transfer  to  punch  cards  was  begun.  A  new  code  of 
occupations  was  prepared.  By  September  some  350  temporary  clerks  were 
engaged  on  this  work,  and  reductions  were  not  begim  until  the  close  of  the 
year. 

An  innovation  in  the  publication  of  results  was  adopted,  whereby  the 
figures  for  the  various  cities,  towns,  constituencies  and  provinces  were  given 
out  to  the  press  subject  to  revision,  as  the  progress  of  the  work  permitted. 
This  not  only  satisfied  local  interest  in  the  census,  but  it  assisted  in  the 
process  of  final  checking.  As  the  work  for  each  province  was  finally  completed 
printed  bulletins  were  prepared  and  given  wide  distribution.  These  bulletms 
were  followed  by  one  on  the  Dominion  as  a  whole,  which  will  in  turn  be  followed 
by  bulletins  giving  special  analyses  of  the  population,  as  by  racial  origin, 
birthplaces,  religions,  etc.,  and  giving  the  agricultural  returns  for  each  province. 


DOMINION  fiTATlSriCIAN  13 

SESSIONAL.   PAPER    No.    10 

Vital  Statistics 

The  year  1921-22  saw  tlic  application  of  the  plan  for  national  vital 
statistir,«/first  drawn  up  in  1918,  and  tentatively  put  in  operation  in  1920. 
The  returns!  for  1920,  though  not  considered  final,  were  compiled  and  issued 
in  mimeographed  form  (except  for  Quebec  I;  summary  statements  of  births, 
deaths  and  marriages  by  provinces  were  also  given  to  the  press  at  the  close 
of  each  month  as  collected.  With  the  progress  now  achieved  it  will  be  possible 
to  issue  during  the  coming  year  the  first  general  report  on  Canadian  Mtal 
.-tatistics  anfl  to  continue  the  same  from  year  to  year  thereafter. 

Agricultural  Statistics  Branch 

Mr.  E.  H.  Godfrey,  in  ciiarge  of  the  branch  on  agricultural  statistics, 
reports  as  follows: — 

Monthly  Crop  Reports.— The  monthly  crop  reporting  service,  originated 
in  1908,  has  been  continued  on  the  same  lines  as  in  recent  previous  years.  The 
subjects  of  inctuin,-  have  comprised  stocks  of  farm  products  on  hand,  and  the 
proportions  merchantable;  fall  sown  areas  winter  killed;  the  progress  of 
spring  seeding;  preliminary  (May  31)  and  revised  (.Tune  30)  estimates  of  the 
areas  sown  to  field  crops;  reports  on  the  condition  of  crops  during  growth 
(April  30  to  September  30) ;  preliminary,  revised,  and  final  estimates  of  crop 
yields;  records  of  agricultural  values,  including  land,  wages  and  farm  live 
stock.  Monthly  observations  as  to  the  influence  of  the  weather  upon  the 
growth  of  spring  wheat  have  been  continued  and  published  in  co-operation  with 
the  Dominion  Meteorological  Service.  In  co-operation  with  the  Markets  Intel- 
ligence Division  of  the  Seed  Branch  of  the  Department  of  Agriculture  inquiries 
were  conducted  through  crop  correspondents  as  to  the  prices  of  grass  and  clover 
seeds;  these  inquiries  have  proved  exceedingly  valuable  in  connection  with  its 
efforts  to  secure  a  satisfactory  basis  of  marketing  for  farmers  who  grow  clover 
and  grass  seeds  for  sale.  Special  telegraphic  crop  reports,  as  in  previous  years, 
have  been  collected  and  published  after  the  close  of  the  three  critical  growing 
months  of  June,  July  and  August.  Arrangements  have  been  made  for  the  cabling 
of  official  reports  of  the  Argentine  wheat,  corn  and  flaxseed  crops,  and  these  are 
published  immediately  on  receipt.  A  similar  arrangement  of  mutual  character 
has  been  made  with  the  Indian  Department  of  Statistics  at  Calcutta  for  the 
Indian  and  Canadian  wheat  crops. 

Reports  to  the  International  Institute  of  Agriculture. — From  the  establish- 
ment of  the  Institute  in  1910,  the  Agricultural  Branch  of  this  Bureau  (Census 
and  Statistics  OflSce  prior  to  1918)  has  reported  monthly  to  the  International 
Institute  of  Agriculture  on  the  principal  field  crops  of  Canada,  the  reports 
being  cabled  from  Ottawa  by  the  Canadian  Commissioner  of  the  Intitutc. 

Annual  Agricultural  Statistics. — Annual  agricultural  returns  of  field  crops 
and  farm  live  stock  were  collected  in  June  under  co-operative  arrangements 
between  the  Dominion  and  Provincial  Governments,  which  have  been  in  force 
since  1918  for  all  the  nine  provinces  and  since  1917  for  the  four  provinces  of 
Quebec,  Saskatchewan,  Alberta,  and  British  Columbia.  As  in  previous  years, 
the  returns  were  collected  on  cardboard  schedules  from  individual  farmers 
through  the  rural  school  teachers  and  children,  except  in  British  Columbia, 
where  the  returns  were  obtained  direct  by  mail.  The  compilation  of  the  returns 
was  effected  during  tlie  summer  with  the  aid  of  a  special  temporary  staff, 
and  the  estimates  based  thereon,  as  finally  settled  in  consultation  with  the 
Provincial  Governments,  were  published  in  summarv'   form  on  November  22 


14  TRADE  AND  COMMERCE 

13  GEORGE  V,  A.   1923 

and  in  detail  in  the  Monthly  Bulletin  of  Agricultural  Statistics  for  November, 
1921. 

Monthly  Bulletin  of  Agricultural  Statistics. — In  addition  to  the  monthly 
reports  of  the  Bureau's  own  crop  correspondents,  the  annual  statistics  of  field 
crops  and  live  stock,  the  visible  supplies  of  grain,  the  prices  of  agricultural  pro- 
duce, and  the  monthly  weather  record,  various  reports  and  articles  on  agricul- 
tural subjects  have  been  published  in  the  Monthly  Bulletin  of  Agricultural  Sta- 
tistics during  the  year  ended  March  31,  1922.  The  following  is  a  selection  of 
the  titles  of  the  more  important:  Crop  Reports  of  Provincial  Governments; 
Reports  of  the  Dominion  Experimental  Farms  and  Stations;  Crop  Reports  from 
Other  Countries;  International  Institute  of  Agriculture;  Effect  of  Winter  on  the 
Storage  of  Potatoes  (April) ;  Exports  of  Grain  from  Canada,  1915-1921  (May) ; 
Forecasting  of  Crops  from  the  Weather,  by  E.  H.  Chapman,  D.Sc,  M.A., 
(June) ;  Index  Numbers  of  Agricultural  Prices,  1909-20  (June.  1921,  and  March, 
1922) ;  Production  of  Sugar  Beet  and  Beetroot  Sugar  (July) ;  Production  of  Flax 
Fibre  (July);  Production  of  Dairy  Factories,  1920  (July);  Fruit  Statistics  of 
Canada,  1920  (August) ;  Fur  Farming  Industry  of  Canada,  1920  (September) ; 
European  Corn  Borer  Conference,  by  Arthur  Gibson,  Dominion  Entomologist, 
Department  of  Agriculture.  Ottawa  (October) ;  Egg  Production  in  Canada,  1920 
and  192r  (November) ;  The  World's  Wheat,  by  Sir  James  Wilson,  K.C.S.I.,  An- 
nieslea,  Crieff,  Scotland  (December) ;  Preliminary  Estimate  of  the  Value  of 
Canadian  Field  Crops,  1919-21  (December) ;  Cultivation  of  Fall  Wheat  in  Dry 
Seasons  (December) ;  Acreage  under  Pasture  in  Canada,  1918  to  1921  (Decem- 
ber) ;  British  Imports  of  Butter  and  Cheese  (December) ;  Agricultural  Settle- 
ment of  Returned  Soldiers  (December);  Quality  of  Grain  Crops,  1912-1921 
(January) ;  Canadian  Tobacco  Crop,  1921  (January) ;  Cost  of  Wheat  Production 
in  Alberta  (February) ;  Average  Yields  Per  Acre  of  Field  Crops,  1912-21 
(March) ;  Field  Crops  of  Canada  Compared  as  to  Quantity  and  Value,  1920  and 
1921  (March).  Special  articles  have  been  contributed  by  the  Chief  of  the  Divi- 
sion on  the  following  subjects:  Collection  of  Annual  Agricultural  Statistics 
(April,  May,  November) ;  Distribution  of  the  Canadian  Wheat  and  Oat  Crops, 
1919  and  1920  (April) ;  Values  of  Field  Crops  of  Canada,  1870  to  1920  (IMay) ; 
Average  Grain  Yields  in  Various  Countries  (June) ;  World's  Production  of 
Cereals  and  Potatoes  (December) ;  Agricultural  Revenue  and  Wealth  of  Canada 
(March). 

Miscellaneous. — The  list  of  crop  correspondents  has  been  revised,  and 
many  new  correspondents  have  been  appointed  either  in  replacement  of  non- 
effectives or  in  obtaining  more  complete  representation.  This  work  is  still  in 
process.  In  addition  to  the  ordinary  routine  correspondence,  a  large  number 
of  domestic  and  foreign  inquiries  by  letter  have  been  answered  throughout  the 
year. 

Industrial  Census,  1920 

The  industrial  census,  under  sections  20  and  21  of  the  Act,  includes  the  sta- 
tistics of  fisheries,  mines,  forestry,  furs,  water-power,  and  general  manufactures. 
The  organization  of  the  field  has  been  carried  out  by  the  Bureau  in  co-operation 
with  the  several  Dominion  and  provincial  departments  which  have  jurisdiction 
in  the  various  sections  of  the  field,  some  thirty  in  number — the  object  being  to 
eliminate  duplication  and  to  secure  uniformity  of  method  and  the  best  agencies 
for  statistical  collection  and  compilation.  It  was  decided  to  include  the  hand 
trades  as  well  as  general  manufactures  in  the  survey  for  1920  in  order  to  render 
the  results  comparable  with  previous  decennial  census  records.  The  work  in 
this  connection  was  carried  out  in  the  following  main  divisions: — 


DOMINION  STATISTICIAN  15 

SESSIONAL   PAPER   No.   10 

Fisheries,  Fur  Farms,  Dairy  Factories. 

Under  Miss  F.  A.  Brown,  the  fisheries  statistics  of  Canada  were  collected 
in  collaboration  with  the  fisheries  departments  of  the  Dominion  and  of  the  prov- 
inces of  Ontario  and  Quebec,  the  statistics  of  fur  farms  and  of  the  fur  trade  in 
general  in  collaboration  with  the  different  provincial  game  and  fisheries  depart- 
ments, and  the  statistics  of  dairy  factories  in  collaboration  with  the  Dominion 
and  provincial  dairy  commissioners  and  the  Bureau  of  Statistics  of  Quebec.  The 
reports  followed  the  lines  of  previous  years,  but  were  issued  more  promptly  and 
with  various  improvements  in  detail  which  permitted  of  a  reduction  in  printing 
costs.  This  division  now  supervises  the  statistics  of  slaughtering  and  meat-pack- 
ing establif^hments,  leather,  etc.;  so  that  it  embraces  the  entire  field  of  manufac- 
tured animal  products. 

Mining,  Metallurgical  and  Chemical  Branch. 

Mr.  S.  J.  Cook,  chief,  reports  as  follows: 

Progress  was  made  in  the  work  of  every  division  of  the  branch  during  the 
twelve  months  ended  March,  1922.  The  consolidation  of  mineral  statistics;  the 
preparation  of  special  reports  on  chemicals  and  allied  products;  the  publication 
of  a  revised  edition  of  the  Directory  of  Chemical  Industries  in  Canada;  the 
establishment  of  a  division  of  iron  and  steel  statistics;  and  the  adoption  of  a  new 
commodity  classification  tiiroughout  the  branch  were  among  the  principal  items 
of  tiie  year's  work.  The  new  classification  was  put  into  effect  at  the  close  of  the 
year  and  statistics  relating  to  the  production  of  1921  were  collected  under  it. 
The  change  involved  a  considerable  amount  of  work  in  the  revision  of  filing 
systems  and  indexes. 

A  new  feature,  undertaken  in  view  of  the  apparently  depressed  condition  of 
the  mining  industry,  was  a  special  survey  of  mineral  production  during  the  first 
half  of  the  year,  the  results  of  which  were  issued  in  August.  The  report  was 
similar  in  character  to  the  Preliminars'  Annual  Reports  of  Mineral  Production 
formerly  issued  by  the  Department  of  Mines,  except  that  only  slight  reference 
was  made  to  the  non-metals,  though  complete  statistics  for  coal  were  obtained. 
The  report  was  well  received  as  a  distinct  contribution  to  the  mining  literature 
of  the  year.  It  also  assisted  towards  the  preparation  of  the  Preliminary  Report 
for  the  calendar  year,  which  was  given  out  in  December  and  which  proved  to  be 
close  to  the  final  figures  available  a  few  months  later.  The  customary  Report 
on  the  Mineral  Production  of  Canada  during  the  calendar  year  was  also  pre- 
pared and  presented  at  the  meeting  of  the  Canadian  Institute  of  Mining  and 
Metallurgy  on  March  1,  1922.  In  addition  to  these  reports,  four  reports  on  coal 
production  were  published  during  the  year. 

Late  in  1921  a  plan  of  complete  co-operation  with  the  Mines  Department 
of  Ontario  was  perfected,  and  the  reports  of  mineral  production  for  that  year 
were  collected  on  a  co-operative  basis,  the  Bureau  printing  and  distributing 
the  forms  and  the  Ontario  Government  collecting  the  returns  and  forwarding 
copies  to  the  Bureau.  The  plan  was  highly  successful,  and  the  minor  difficulties 
encountered  will  be  overcome  next  year.  The  provinces  of  Quebec  and  British 
Columbia  have  been  ver>'  helpful  in  their  suggestions  and  in  their  willingness 
to  supply  information  collected  by  them  which  might  be  of  use  to  the  Bureau. 
Complete  co-operation  obtains  with  the  other  provinces. 

The  Director>'  of  Chemical  Industries  published  by  the  Bureau  of  Statistics 
as  of  date  .January  1,  1919,  met  with  a  cordial  reception,  the  entire  edition  of 
3,000  copies  being  exhausted  within  a  few  weeks.  In  1921  the  Bureau  had 
approximately  1.000  unfilled  requests  on  hand,  to  meet  which  a  second  edition 
was  prepared.  The  edition  contained  a  large  amount  of  new  material  in  addi- 
tion to  revisions. 


16  TRADE  AXD  COMMERCE 

13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1923 

Advantage  was  taken  of  the  Seventh  National  Exposition  of  Chemical 
Industries,  held  in  New  York  during  the  week  of  September  12-17,  1921,  to  place 
before  the  thousands  of  visitors  to  the  exposition  the  salient  facts  relating  to 
Canada's  progress  in  industrial  chemistry.  An  electrically-driven  exhibit  was 
installed  wliich  presented  in  graphic  form  by  a  series  of  flashlights  the  most  out- 
standing facts  of  Canada's  chemical  and  metallurgical  industries. 

The  desirability  of  consolidating  all  the  work  done  in  the  Bureau  relating 
to  the  production  of  iron  and  steel  and  the  fabrication  of  products  from  these 
metals  was  met  during  1921  by  the  organization  of  a  special  division.  The  first 
task  of  the  division  was  the  consolidation  of  the  collected  reports  relating  to 
everj-  phase  of  the  industn,-.  By  the  end  of  February,  1922.  this  had  been  com- 
pleted, and  preparations  were  going  fonvard  U|)on  the  Bureau's  first  complete 
report  on  the  iron  and  steel  industry.  The  report  will  contain  in  one  cover 
the  production  of  pig-iron,  steel  ingots  and  castings  in  detail,  and  the  fabrication 
of  iron  and  steel  products  of  everj'  kind. 

Beginning  with  January.  1921,  a  monthly  series  of  mimeographed  bulletins 
giving  the  production  of  pig-iron,  steel  ingots  and  castings  in  all  grades  was  in- 
augurated and  met  with  the  general  approval  of  manufacturers.  It  was  found 
possible  to  collect  and  compile  the  information  with  sufficient  promptitude  to 
issue  the  statement  by  the  15th  of  the  following  month. 

General  Manufactures. 

Mr.  J.  C.  Macpherson,  chief  of  the  branch  on  the  statistics  of  general 
manufactures,  reports: — 

In  co-operation  with  various  manufacturers'  associations  and  prominent 
manufacturers  the  forms  used  for  collecting  the  statistics  for  1921  were  improved 
with  a  A'iew  to  render  them  more  in  line  with  records,  methods  of  accounting,  etc. 
Special  attention  was  given  to  the  improvement  of  the  reports  for  a  number  of 
industries  amongst  which  may  be  cited  the  following:  saw-mills  and  logging, 
rubber  goods,  clothing,  woollen  goods.  A  marked  improvement  was  noted  in 
the  manner  in  which  the  reports  were  completed  by  the  firms  reporting.  The 
proportion  of  reports  received  perfect  increased  by  about  15  per  cent.  In  addi- 
tion the  regrouping  of  industries  to  bring  together  closely  related  industries  under 
the  supervision  of  the  same  clerks  materially  improved  the  work.  The  press 
letters  and  reports  that  were  issued  were  consequently  of  a  much  more  com- 
prehensive and  detailed  nature  than  in  previous  j-ears. 

The  number  of  inquiries  received  from  the  public  is  constantlj'  on  the 
increase,  and  a  large  volume  of  information  has  been  supplied  during  the  year. 
For  the  most  part  the  information  requested  is  of  a  special  nature  and  does  not 
follow  the  lines  of  the  ordinary:  compilations.  In  all  but  a  few  instances  it  has 
been  possible  to  satisfy  these  inquiries. 

By  arrangement  with  the  Forestn*'  Branch  of  the  Department  of  the  Interior, 
special  information  was  collected  by  the  Bureau  as  to  the  quantity,  kind  and 
value  of  lumber  used  by  wood-using  industries.  The  inquirj'  is  to  cover  a  period 
of  four  years,  the  Dominion  being  divided  as  follows:  (1)  Ontario,  (2)  Quebec, 
(3)  Eastern  pro\ances,  (4)  Western  provinces.  Ontario  and  the  Eastern 
provinces  have  now  been  covered,  and  preparations  are  under  waj*  for  the 
province  of  Quebec.     For  Ontario  alone  some  10,000  reports  were  collected. 

With  a  staff  decreased  by  eleven  clerks  some  5,000  additional  reports  were 
collected,  audited  and  compiled,  and  the  additional  work  for  the  Forestry 
Division  was  carried  on  without  extra  help,  in  addition  to  the  special  work 
rendered  necessary  by  elaboration  of  the  schedules  and  by  the  inclusion  of  addi- 
tional questions  by  request  of  manufacturers'  associations,  etc.     Though  such 


DOMIMOX  Sr/177.':r/r/.4.V  17 

SESSIONAL    PAPER    No.    10 

analysis  as  tlii'  citii-s  and  town^  cumpilalioiis,  the  classilifation  of  employees 
and  the  elassitication  of  plants  by  value  of  production,  as  well  as  the  study  oi' 
proportionate  production  as  between  small  anil  larn;c  establishments  could  not 
be  undertaken,  the  above  record  was  rendered  jKissiblc  only  by  the  increased 
efficiency  and  impro\-ed  organization  of  the  statT. 

Evieiiial   Tnulc   Brnnt-h    (Slalistics  of   Iini»<»rK«  and   Exports) 

Mr.  W.  A.  Warne,  in  charge  of  the  branch  on  statistics  of  imports  and 
exports,  reports  as  follows: — 

Revition  of  Trade  Classification.^At  a  series  of  conferences  between 
representatives  of  the  Bureau  of  Statistics  and  the  Department  of  Custxiras, 
the  classifications  used  in  collecting,  analysing  and  issuing  trade  statistics 
were  considerably  enlarged  and  otherwise  improved,  while  the  systems  of  work  in 
the  Bureau  and  the  department  were  i)rought  into  complete  co-ordination 
and  harmony.  In  connection  with  this  revision  a  large  number  of  leading 
manufacturing  and  commercial  concerns  throughout  Canada  had  previously 
been  consulted  as  to  their  views  concerning  additional  items  in  the  classifications 
which  would  be  of  special  value  to  their  businesses.  As  a  result  of  these 
conferences,  more  tluin  300  nev,-  items  \\avv  been  added  to  the  classifications 
during  the  last  three  years,  the  number  being  about  equally'  divided  between 
the  import  and  export  lists.  The  system  of  grouping,  adopted  in  1920,  has  also 
been  improved;  so  that  inciuiries  for  statistics  of  various  categories  of  com- 
modities may  be  answered  without  delay  and  with  the  maximum  of  accuracy. 
Under  present  arrangements  a  conference  between  the  Bureau  and  the  Depart- 
ment of  Customs  is  held  annually  for  the  thorough  consideration  of  the 
changes  in  the  classification  suggested  in  the  course  of  the  year's  work.  At 
the  conference  in  October,  1921,  twenty  additions  were  made  to  tiie  imports 
and  eight  to  the  expiirts  classification,  chiefly  in  response  to  requests  from 
various  business  interests. 

Annual  Trade  Report. — The  Annual  Trade  Report  for  the  year  introduced 
several-  new  features  in  Canadian  trade  statistical  presentation.  The  arrange- 
ment is  now  in  three  sections  as  follows:  (1)  h^ummary  tables,  including  twenty- 
five  statements  of  an  introductory  and  summary  character,  giving  (a)  a  general 
historical  review  of  trade  back  to  Confederation  and  {b\  an  analysis  from  various 
points  of  view  of  recent  or  current  trends,  generally  over  a  five-year  period. 
(2)  Detailed  tables,  giving  the  current  statistics  for  all  items  of  the  trade 
classifications,  with  numerous  totals  and  reca])itulations  by  groups  and  classes. 
These  tables  are  two  in  number,  the  first  containing  detailed  information 
respecting  all  commodities  imported,  with  countries  whence  received,  for  a 
five-year  period,  the  figmes  for  the  latest  year  being  further  e.\tended  to  show 
the  amount  imported  and  the  duty  collected  under  the  General,  Preferential 
and  Treaty  tariffs  respectively.  The  second  table  contains  details  of  all 
Canadian  commodities  exported,  with  country  of  destination,  for  a  five-year 
period,  also  the  exjjorts  of  foreign  commodities  for  the  last  two  years  only. 
In  the  presentation  of  these  statistics  the  items  are  grouped  on  the  principle 
of  Cotnponent  MntrrinI:  i.e.,  under  such  headings  as  "  Agricultural  and  veget- 
able products,"  "Animals  and  animal  products,"  "Fibres,  textiles  and  textile 
products,"  "Wood,  wood  products  and  paper,"  "Iron  and  its  products,"  etc., 
making,  in  all,  nine  main  groups.  (3)  To  the  above  was  added  a  section 
analysing  the  imports  and  exports  by  main  groups  and  degree  of  manufactur- 
ing classified  according  to  origin  (e.g.,  "  articles  of  agricultural  or  vegetable 
origin,"  "of  animal  origin,"  "of  marine  origin,"  "of  forest  origin,"  "of  mineral 

10— :j 


18  TRAnK  .WD  (OMMF.IiCE 

13  GEORGE  V,  A.    1923 

origin,"  etc.)  and  also  accordinp,  to  thoir  \ise  or  purpose  (e.g.,  "food,"'  "clothing," 
■'producers'  materials,"  etc.).  Another  important  innovation  was  the  "bi- 
lingualizing"  of  the  report;  the  French  text  is  now  printed  side  by  side  with 
the  English,  thus  obviating  the  necessity  of  printing  two  reports  and  gaining 
the  advantage  of  i.^siic  in  iioth  languages  simultaneously.  The  new  format  has 
been  corilially  received  h\-  finaiifinl.  industrial  and  commercial  interests.  The 
Bureau  is  now  issuing  a  more  complete  and  concise  annual  trade  report  than 
was  over  before  published  in  Canada. 

Monthly  Trade  Report. — This  report  was  issued  as  heretofore,  with  certain 
amendments  and  added  details  designed  to  make  it  more  useful  to  the  public. 
The  addition  of  hundreds  of  new  items  has  increased  the  size  of  the  publication. 
There  has  been  a  decided  gain  in  respect  to  timeliness  of  issue  during  the  year, 
the  various  numbers  reaching  thc'public,  on  an  average,  nineteen  days  earlier 
than  in  the  previous  year.  The  average  elapsed  time  between  the  receipt  of 
monthly  data  in  the  Fiureau  from  the  Department  of  Customs  and  the  despatch 
of  first  copy  to  the  printer  was  three  and  one-half  days,  compared  with  five 
ilays  in  the  previous  year. 

Mor^thly  .Advance  Trade  Summary. — The  branch  has  continued  the  issue 
of  a  Monthly  Trade  Bulletin,  giving  a  general  statistical  summary  of  Canada's 
trade,  in  advance  of  the  detailefl  report.  There  was  an  urgent  demand  for  sucli 
preliminary  information.  This  bulletin  is  issued  on  or  about  the  24th  of 
each  month. 

Special  Trade  Statements. — A  feature  of  the  work  has  been  the  great 
increase  in  the  number  and  circidation  of  special  statements.  Inquiries  for  sucli 
statements  have  been  rcceiveil  in  cimstantl}-  increasing  numbers,  originating 
from  almost  every  line  of  Canadian  enterprise,  including  industrial,  commercial, 
transportation,  banking  and  other  activities.  The  branch  now  prepares,  a- 
a  regular  feature  of  its  montli's  work,  some  thirty  different  advance  trade 
statements  to  meet  urgent  appeals  from  business  interests.  The  number  of 
these  special  compilations  has  doubled  since  last  year  as  has  also  the  number 
of  addresses  on  the  mailing  list  to  receive  them.  Nvunerous  other  •  special 
statements  were  compiled  during  the  j-ear  from  British  and  foreign  returns  to 
meet  the  demand  of  Canadian  exporters  for  information  indicating  the  oppor- 
tmiities  for  extending  Canadian  trade  abroad.  Special  statements  were  also 
compiled  for  the  League  of  Nations,  for  the  International  Institute  of  Agricul- 
ture, and  many  others. 

General. — On  the  whole,  tiiere  has  been  a  marked  advance  both  in  the 
quantity  and  the  character  of  work  performed  by  the  branch.  The  lack  of 
separate  publications  giving  statistics  of  the  trade  of  Canada  with  British 
and  foreign  countries,  such  as  were  published  prior  to  1917,  has  been  respon- 
sible for  a  large  increase  of  work  in  the  compilation  of  special  trade  state- 
ments. In  view  of  the  urgent  and  increasing  demand  for  such  statistics  it  i< 
suggested  that  a  series  of  trade  brochures  be  now  issued  on  a  conservative  plan, 
showing  the  trade  of  Canada  with  (a)  Africa;  (b)  Asia;  (c)  Central  and 
North  America;  [d)  Europe;  (c)  Oceania;  (/)  South  America,  and  (g)  West 
Indies. 

Internal  Trade  Branch 

jSIr.  F.  J.  Horning,  in  charge  of  statistics  of  internal  trade,  reports  as 
follows: — 

Grain  Trade  Statistics. — The  report  on  the  Grain  Trade  of  Canada  for 
the  crop  year  enderl  August  31,  1920.  was  completed  and  published  in  due  course. 


UOMIMUX  SrATlSTlCIAX  19 

SESSIONAL   PAPER   No.   10 

The  matter  of  grain  statistics  has  been  thoroiiglily  discussed  with  the  Board  of 
Grain  Commissioners  for  Canada,  witli  the  result  that  several  new  features 
have  been  added,  and  the  reports  for  both  1920  and  1921  made  more  complete 
than  any  issued  for  jirevious  years.  The  annual  statistics  of  the  Canadian  grain 
trade  may  now  be  regarded  as  a  compreluiisive  treatment  of  the  production 
and  movement  of  grains  within  Canada  towards  international  markets  ami 
in  relation  to  the  cereal  resources  of  the  world. 

Weekly  grain  trade  reports  are  also  issued  in  mimeographed  form  showing 
Canadian  grain  in  store  by  elevators  and  grades  with  comparative  figures  for 
previous  years;  receipts  and  shipments  of  grain  at  the  different  classes  of 
elevators  sui)divided  according  to  their  location;  United  States  grain  in  store, 
with  receipts  and  shipments,  at  the  jmblic  elevators  in  the  east.  Monthly 
reviews  are  included  in  this  series  summarizing  the  receipts  and  shipments  of 
grain  by  months  with  comparative  figures  for  the  previous  year;  movement  of 
United  States  grain  at  the  St.  Lawrence  and  Canadian  Atlantic  ports;  inspections 
of  grain  in  both  the  Eastern  anil  Western  Inspection  Divisions;  exports  of  grain 
by  customs  ports  of  exit,  with  summary  showing  shipping  routes.  A  further 
monthly  statement  is  also  included  showing  quantities  of  grain  ground  and 
products  produced  therefrom  at  flour  and  other  mills  in  Canada,  with  totals 
for  the  Eastern  and  Western  Inspection  Divisions.  Other  supplemental  and 
special  statements  arc  included  from  time  to  time. 

Live  Stock  and  Animal  Products  Statistics. —The  second  annual  report 
covering  the  marketing  of  live  stock  and  animal  products  for  the  calendar  year 
1920  was  prepared  and  issued  during  the  past  year,  in  collaboration  with  the 
Dominion  Department  of  Agriculture,  several  tables  being  added  in  order  to 
round  out  the  material  and  render  the  statistics  covering  this  industry  as 
complete  as  possible.  The  report  traces  the  movement  of  animals  from  the 
larm  through  live  stock  yards,  for  slaughter  and  the  manufacture  of  meat 
jjroducts  or  for  export; — also  the  movement  of  live  animals  between  province 
and  province.  The  marketing  of  animal  products  is  nexi.  dealt  with  and  covered 
to  show  the  various  phases  of  production,  visible  supply  and  inter-provincial 
movement.  A  re\iew  of  Canada's  international  trade  in  live  stock  and  animal 
products  in  relation  to  world  supply  is  added,  together  with  a  section  on  prices. 

Coal  Trade  Statistics. — With  the  cessation  of  fuel  control  at  the  end  of 
the  fiscal  year  1920-21,  the  collection  and  compilation  of  special  data  required 
for  the  use  of  the  Board  of  Railway  Commissioners  for  Canada  in  connection 
with  the  coal  situation  were  discontinued.  Monthly  reports  were  continued 
from  retail  and  wholesale  dealers  showing  quantities  of  e"it  ro.f.;\-pd_  prices 
and  stocks  on  hand  at  the  end  of  each  month. 

Prices  Statistics. — Records  of  the  fluctuations  of  the  w  iioicsaie  i)rices  of  a 
selected  list  of  commodities  have  been  maintained  ni  the  Bureau  since  January, 
1919.  These  prices,  together  with  corresponding  figures  for  the  year  1913,  are 
now  lieing  revised  and  tabulated,  and  index  numbers  are  being  calculated  based 
on  the  average  prices  for  1913.  When  this  material  is  completed  it  is  proposed 
to  publish  same  in  the  form  of  a  special  report,  with  anual  supplements  from 
time  to  time.  Data  will  be  compiled  monthly  and  press  letters  issued  covering 
same,  so  that  current  information  on  the  subject  of  prices  will  be  jivailable. 
Retail  prices  of  a  selected  list  of  commodities  are  also  ijeing  compiled  and 
tabulated  in  the  Bureau,  statements  being  sent  each  month  to  the  Department 
of  Labour  and  printed  in  the  Labour  Gazette.  In  addition  to  the  retail  prices 
of  food  commodities  collected  from  retail  dealers,  a  record  of  prices  prevailing 
•at  farmers'  markets  throughout  Canada  has  been  maintained.  The  fluctuations 
of  prices  of  stocks  and  bonds  listed  on  the  leading  stock  exchanges  in  Canada 


20  TUADE  AM)  (OMMERCE 

13  GEORGE  V,  A.   1923 

uru  also  recorded  weekly  in  the  Bureau.  These  prices  are  being  tabulated  for 
the  years  1913,  1919.  1920,  and  1921  and  index  numbers  calculated  showing 
the  average  prices  for  the  year  1913  as  a  base.  Parallel  statistics  will  therefore 
be  axailable  covering  both  security  and  commodity  prices.  Data  are  also 
collected  relating  to  fluctuations  in  the  rates  of  interest  and  will  be  included 
in  reports  on  security  prices. 

Information  relating  to  the  various  services  paid  for  through  gas.  water 
and  electric  rates,  liospital  charges,  etc.,  is  also  collected  and  compiled  in  the 
Bureau.  These  data  together  with  material  showing  tax  rates,  collected  with 
other  municipal  statistics  of  the  Finance  Branch  of  the  Bureau,  and  freight, 
telejiiione  rates,  etc.,  collected  by  the  Transportation  Branch,  alTord  valuable 
information  regarding  those  factors  of  the  cost  of  living  not  represented  by 
commodity  prices. 

Visible  Supply — Cold  Storage,  etc. — A  record  of  the  \-isible  supplies  of  food 
commodities  in  cold  storage  is  compiled  in  the  Bureau  monthly  and  published 
in  mimeograph  form.  The  visible  supply  of  grain  in  store  in  the  country. 
interior  terminal,  public  terminal  and  private  terminal  elevators  in  the  Western 
Inspection  Division  and  public  elevators  in  the  east  is  compiled  and  published 
weekly  as  set  out  above.  Data  regarding  stocks  of  coal  on  hand  arc  also 
collected  monthly  in  connection  with  the  coal  trade  statistics.  Statistics  are  also 
collected  weekly  showing  stocks  of  raw  and  refined  sugar  in  the  hands  of  refiners, 
receipts  and  meltings  of  raw  sugar,  manufacture  and  shipments  of  refined  sugar. 
These  are  compiled  and  issued  in  the  form  of  monthly  press  letters  with  .i 
summary  statement  at  the  end  of  the  calendar  year.  A  quarterly  inventory  is 
also  compiled  and  published  showing  stocks  of  raw  hides  and  skins  in  the  hands 
of  Canadian  packers,  tanners  and  dealers  and  others. 

hitcrproviricial  Trade.— The  Transportation  Branch  of  the  Bureau  collects 
monthly  traffic  reports  from  railway  companies  showing  loadings  and  unloadings 
of  freight  by  classes  of  commodities  according  to  provinces.  With  similar 
reports  from  water  transportation  companies,  statements  yielding  a  fairly  com- 
prehen.si\-e  view  of  bulk  interprovincial  trade  movements,  will,  it  is  thought,  be 
feasible.  Up  to  the  present,  however,  no  comprehensive  data  on  coastwise  trade 
have  been  obtainable.  The  railway  reports  have  been  used  by  the  Transporta- 
tion Branch  as  an  index  of  the  volume  of  traffic  only. 

Transportation  Branch 

Mr.  G.  P.  Wrong,  chief,  reports  as  follows: — 

The  annual  report  on  railway  statistics  is  now  issued  on  a  calendar  year 
basis  instead  of  for  the  year  ending  on  June  30,  and  advantage  has  been  taken 
of  the  change  to  introduce  several  improvements  in  method  of  presentation,  the 
net  result  being  a  material  reduction  in  the  size  of  the  report.  Conferences  with 
the  leading  railway  companies  were  held  prior  to  the  introduction  of  these 
changes. 

A  feature  of  the  past  year  was  the  inauguration  of  a  monthly  report  on 
railway  operating  revenues  and  expenses.  This  not  only  provides  up-to-date 
information  on  a  subject  on  which  public  interest  is  largely  centred,  but  it 
enables  an  advance  summary  of  the  year's  operations  to  he  given  out  several 
months  prior  to  the  date  at  which  similar  statistics  were  previously  available. 

The  first  monthly  railway  traffic  report,  planned  in  1920,  was  is.sued  in 
April,  1921.  In  addition  to  its  direct  interest  it  throws  a  considerable  light  on 
the  interprovincial  movement  of  commodities. 

In  canal  statistics  additional  statements  on  the  movement  of  Canadian  oats, 
barley  and  flour  were  introduced.  A  monthly  mimeographed  report  on  canal 
traflic  was  begun. 


rJOMlXION  STATISTICIAN  21 

SESSIONAL   PAPER  No.   10 

Tlie  usucal  statistical  sumiimries  of  express,  telegraph  and  telephone  statis- 
tics were  issued. 

The  staff  of  the  branch  was  reduced  by  two  during  the  year  with  the  com- 
pletion of  extra  work  entailed  by  the  reorganization  of  these  statistics  under 
Order  in  Council.  P.C.  1754,  August  29,  1919. 

The  transportation  branch  also  collected  and  published  the  annual  statistics 
of  central  power  stations  in  Canada  in  co-operation  with  the  Dominion  Water 
Powers  Branch,  of  the  Department  of  the  Interior. 

Statistics  of  Finance 

Lt.-Col.  J.  R.  Munro,  in  charge  of  statistics  of  finance,  reports  as  follows: — 

Provincial  Finance. — The  co-ordination  of  provincial  public  revenues  and 
expenditures  which  has  been  occupying  the  attention  of  the  branch  for  some 
time  has  been  completed  for  the  five-year  period  1916-1920,  and  the  analysis 
is  now  ready  for  use  in  detail  or  for  publication  if  it  is  thought  advisable  to 
issue  a  report.  A  summary  will  be  published  in  the  Canada  Year  Book.  A 
classified  statement  of  assets  and  liabilities  of  the  provinces  for  1919  and  1920 
has  also  been  carried  out.  National  interest  in  matters  pertaining  to  taxation 
and  public  finance  has  involved  a  growing  demand  upon  the  Bureau  for  state- 
ments which  will  show  comparative  conditions  not  only  by  years  but  by  geo- 
praphic  distribution  as  well.  As  there  is  almost  an  entire  lack  of  uniformity  in 
methods  of  accounting  as  between  the  provinces  the  only  method  of  obtaining 
comprehensive  or  accurate  comparative  statements  is  by  an  analysis  of  the 
nature  just  completed. 

Mvnicipal  Finance. — The  second  report  of  a  series  dealing  with  municipal 
finance,  showing  statistics  of  towns  in  Canada  having  a  population  of  from 
three  to  ten  thousand,  was  compiled  and  printed  during  the  year,  while  a  third 
report  giving  similar  data  for  towns  having  a  population  of  one  to  three  thou- 
sand is  now  ready  for  press.  These  reports  arc  supplemental  to  the  first  report 
of  the  Bureau  on  municipal  finance,  which  covered  the  cities  of  Canada  of 
10,000  and  over.  The  demand  for  the  last-mentioned  report  has  been  so  large 
that  a  reprint  was  found  necessarj-  for  1920.  The  experience  gained  in  the 
compilation  of  the  first  report  led  to  slight  alterations  in  the  schedule  of  accounts 
which  met  with  the  general  approval  of  civic  officials.  The  Bureau's  series  of 
studies  on  the  financial  activities  of  urban  centres  of  Canada  having  a  popula- 
tion of  one  thousand  and  upward  is  not  complete.  I'ntil  some  uniform  scheme  of 
reporting  financial  statistics  is  adopted  and  put  into  operation  by  municipalities 
and  provincial  governments  throughout  Canada,  the  present  treatment  of  the 
subject  by  the  Bureau  would  appear  to  be  all  that  is  feasible,  though  a  file 
of  individual  municipal  returns  as  issued  is  maintained. 

Judicial  Statistics  Branch 

The  annual  report  on  Criminal  Statistics,  prepared  under  the  supervision 
of  Mr.  R.  E.  Watts,  followed  much  the  same  lines  as  the  two  previous  reports. 
The  main  body  of  the  report  consists  of  seventeen  tables  covering  indictable 
and  non-indictable  olTcnces  by  judicial  districts  and  compiled  according  to  the 
nature  of  offences,  birthplace,  occupations,  religions,  civil  condition  and  educa- 
tion; summary  convictions,  juvenile  offences,  pardons  and  commutations,  retro- 
spective tables — 1876  to  date — respecting  classified  groups  of  offences  with  ratios, 
etc.  To  these  are  added  statistics  relating  to  penitentiaries  and  other  penal 
institutions,  140  in  number,  police  activities  in  urban  municipalities  of  4,000  and 

10—2 


22  ri(M>F.  AM)  I  <i\l MKUCh: 

13  GEORGE  V,  A.   1923 

over,  court  jjioceedlngs,  panluiis  and  coinni-utations,  etc.  A  special  compilation 
of  offences  iincVer  the  Opium  and  Narcotic  Drug  Act  was  added  in  view  of  tlic 
current  interest  in  this  class  of  crime.  The  collection  of  these  statistics  involved 
tiie  distriliution  of  6,000  schedules  and  circulars  of  instructions  to  500  court 
officials  in  1()3  judicial  districts. 

Special  attention  was  given  during  the  year  td  the  improvement  of  statistics 
relating  to  juvenile  delinquency.  A  tentative  form  was  issued  as  a  basis  of  dis- 
cussion with  judges  of  juvenile  courts,  members  of  social  service  councils,  proba- 
tion officers,  etc.,  the  general  object  being  to  differentiate  juvenile  offenders  and 
secure  certain  details  as  to  home  conditions,  etc.  which  are  considered  of  impor- 
ance  as  l)earing  on  the  treatment  of  this  class  of  offenders.  A  scheme  for  the 
collection  of  statistics  relating  to  civil  justice  was  drawn  up  as  a  basis  for  dis- 
cussion should  it  ajipear  desirable  at  any  time  to  institute  a  statistical  service  of 
this  character. 

Education  Statistirs  Branch 

Prof.  S.  A.  Cudmore,  Chief,  reports  as  follows:--- 

During  the  year  ending  March  31,  1922,  the  Education  Statistics  Branch  of 
the  Bureau  prepared  and  published  the  first  comprehensive  Dominion-wide 
survey  of  education  issued  in  Canada  viz.,  an  ''  Historical  Statistical  Survey  of 
Education  in  Canada  ".  This  publication,  the  preparation  of  which  entailed 
very  considerable  research  in  a  liitherto  undeveloped  field  of  statistical  work, 
was  favourably  received  by  the  educational  world  both  within  and  outside 
of  Canada,  as  an  attempt  for  the  first  time  to  deal  comprehensively  with  Cana- 
dian education.  The  work  was  carried  out  under  the  immediate  direction  of 
Mr.  M.  C.  Maclean,  M.A. 

Under  the  agreement  reached  at  the  Dominion-Provincial  Conference  on 
education  statistics  of  1920  the  annual  statistics  of  the  provinces  of  Manitoba 
and  Saskatchewan  were  compiled  by  the  Education  Statistics  Branch,  the  results 
being  placed  at  the  joint  disposal  of  the  Departments  of  Education  concerned 
and  of  the  Bureau.  The  education  statistics  for  Alberta  were  also  compiled  on 
the  same  plan,  so  tliat  comparable  statistics  of  education  are  now  available  for 
the  three  Prairie  Provinces.  In  order  to  secure  comparable  results,  Saskatche- 
wan and  Alberta  have  changed  their  statistical  year  for  education  statistics  from 
the  calendar  year  to  the  natural  school  year  ending  June  30,  as  recommended  by 
tlie  Dominion-Provincial  Conference.  The  Department  of  Education  of  New 
Brunswick  has  also  requested  the  Branch  to  clraft  a  form  of  return  for  that 
province,  which  should  include  the  information  recommended  at  the  Conference 
on  Education  Statistics.  This  work  was  completed  with  the  minimum  of  change 
in  the  provincial  statistics.  The  Department  of  Education  for  Nova  Scotia  has 
also  accepted  the  scheme  and  states  that  "  the  new  form  of  registers  and  returns 
will  come  into  use  in  every  school  in  the  next  school  year  ".  Besides  its  activities 
carried  on  in  co-operation  with  the  provincial  departments,  the  Education  Statis- 
tics Branch  has  carried  out  considerable  complementary  work.  For  instance, 
it  has  secured  education  statistics  from  numerous  private  schools  which  were  not 
included  in  provincial  returns;  from  the  business  colleges  of  the  country;  from 
the  twenty -two  universities  and  the  forty  odd  professional,  technical  and  affiliated 
colleges;  besides  making  a  first  attempt  to  secure  comparable  statistics  for  the 
public  libraries  throughout  Canada.  It  has  also  answered  numerous  inquiries 
from  educationists,  both  within  and  outside  of  Canada,  who  arc  learning  to  look 
upon  the  branch  as  an  authoritative  anrl  impartial  source  of  statistics  relating 
to  Canadian  education.  Several  of  these  inquiries  were  extensive,  and  were  made 
at  the  request  of  officials  of  provincial  Departments  of  Education. 


DOMIXIOX  STAriSTlCIAX  23 

SESSIONAL   PAPER   No.   10 

General  Statistics — The  Canada  Year  Book,  Etc. 

Prof.  S.  A.  Cudmore,  editor  of  tlie  Canada  Year  Book,  and  in  charge  of  the 
l)ranch  on  general  statistic?,  reports  as  follows: 

The  chief  single  work  of  the  (general  Statistics  Branch  is  the  preparation  and 
l)iiblication  of  the  Canada  Year  Book.  Tliis  involves  a  revision  of  statistical  ta- 
bles covering  practically  the  entire  range  of  social  and  economic  statistics,  and 
the  careful  jjrcjjaration  of  a  considerable  amount  of  descriptive  matter  therefor. 
The  leading  article  of  tiie  1920  Year  Book  dealt  with  "Reconstruction  in  Can- 
ada" and  was  written  by  the  editor.  It  extended  to  64  pages  and  entailed  very 
considerable  research.  Other  features  were  careful  .-summaries  of  the  Dominion 
;;nd  provincial  legislation  of  1920,  and  of  the  principal  events  of  that  year. 

After  a  careful  study  of  the  statistics  of  current  economic  trend  ("barom- 
etric"' statistics!  published  in  different  countries  by  official  authorities  (the  Fed- 
eral Reserve  Bulletin  and  the  Survey  u(  Current  Business  in  the  United  Stat?s. 
Wirtschaft  und  Statistik  in  Germany  1,  and  by  unofficial  bodies  (Babson's,  Brad- 
vtreet's  and  Brookmire's  in  the  United  States,  the  Economist,  the  Statist  and  the 
London  Times  in  the  United  Kingdom),  the  Branch  has  prepared  a  Montiily 
Review  of  Current  Canadian  Statistics  which  is  being  kept  up  to  date.  In  con- 
nection with  this  feature  of  its  work,  the  branch  collects  the  statistics  of  bank- 
ruptcies under  the  Bankruptcy  Act. 

The  branch  has  furnished  materials  during  the  year  in  response  to  many 
official  and  unolficial  enquiries  for  statistics  of  a  general  character  relatinr  to 
Canada  and  other  countries  both  within  and  without  the  British  Empire.  Among 
these,  a  considerable  body  of  statistical  information  was  prepared  for  the  Cana- 
dian representatives  at  the  Genoa  Conference.  In  order  properly  to  discharge 
its  duties  in  answering  inquiries,  the  hrancli  is  entrusted  with  the  administratitjn 
of  the  library  of  the  Bureau,  consisting  of  some  16,000  or  18,000  volumes  on 
statistical  and  economic  subjects,  including  the  official  statistics  of  practically 
every  government  in  the  world.  One  of  the  most  strenuous  tasks  of  the  branch 
during  the  year  was  the  moving  of  this  library  from  the  Daly  Building  to  it-; 
])rescnt  quarters  without  serious  interruption  to  the  library  service. 

An  important  part  of  the  work  of  the  branch  has  been  the  preparation  of 
fhe  material  relating  to  Canada  published  in  such  official  British  publication-  as 
tlie  Statistical  Abstract  for  the  several  l?ri(ish  oversea  dominions  and  protecto- 
rates, and  the  Colonial  Office  list;  also  for  such  unofficial  but  important  and 
widely  circulated  statistical  annuals  as  the  Statesman's  Year  Book,  Whitaker's 
.Vlmanac,  the  London  Stock  Exchange  Office  Intelligence  (Britishi,  the  New 
York  World  Almanac  and  the  Brooklyn  E.igle  Almanac  (U.S.I.  Heaton's  Aiuui.-il. 
I'ive  Thousand  Facts  About  Canada.  Bank  Reports,  etc.  The  branch 
.also  prepares  each  month  the  Canadian  statistics  included  in  the  League  of  Na- 
tions monthly  statement.  Recently  it  revised  the  Canadian  material  published 
in  the  Home  and  School  Reference  Work  published  by  the  Home  and  School  Ed- 
ucation Society  of  Chicago.  While  there  is  a  limit  to  such  activities,  it  is  un- 
questionable that  much  accurate  information  concerning  Canada  has  been  dis- 
seminated in  tills  way  throughout  the  world. 

I  have  the  honour  to  l)e.  sir, 

your  obedient  servant, 

R.  H.  COATS. 
Dominion  Statistician. 


13  GEORGE  V  SESSIONAL  PAPER   No.   10 


APPENDIX 

REPORTS,  BULLETINS,  PRESS  RELEASES,  ETC.,  ISSUED  BY  THE  DOMINION 
BUREAU  OF  STATISTICS 

ADMINISTRATION— 

Annual  Report  of  Dominion  Statistician. 

POPULATION — 

Censiis — 

Bulletins  of  the  Sixth  Census  of  Canada,  1921.  (A  bulletin  on  the  Population  and 
area  of  each  Province  by  Electoral  districts,  Cities,  Towns  and  A^illages,  with  a 
summary  of  rural  and  urban  population. 

The  rejiorts  of  the  1921  census  will  include  three  volumes  on  population  and  one  on 
agricidturc;  there  will  also  be  issued  a  series  of  special  reports  on  the  Foreign- 
born,  Origins  of  the  People,  Religions,  Families,  Housing,  Literacy  and  School 
Attendance,  Earnings  of  the  People,  Unemployment,  etc.,  etc.  A  bulletin  on  the 
agriculture  of  each  province  will  also  be  issued. 

Reports  of  the  Fifth  Census  of  Canada,  1911 :  Vol.  I.  Areas  and  Popidation  by  Provinces, 
Districts  and  Subdistricts,  with  Introduction.  Tables  I  to  XV,  pp.  i-viii,  1-623. 
Vol.  II.  Religions,  Origins,  Birthplace.  Citizenship.  Literacy  and  Infirmities  by 
Provinces,  Districts  and  Subdistricts,  with  Introduction.  Tables  I-XL\T,  pp.  i-iv, 
1-634.  Vol.  III.  Manufactures  for  1910  as  enumerated  in  June,  1911.  with  Intro- 
duction. Tables  I-XX,  pp.  i-xvi,  1-432.  Vol.  IV.  Agriculture,  with  Introduction. 
Tables  1-90,  I-XXXV,  pp.  i-xcv,  1-428.  Diagrams  5  pp.  Vol.  V.  Forest,  Fishcrv. 
Fur  and  Mineral  Production,  with  Introduction.  Tables  1-51,  I-XX\T;  pp.  i-1. 
1-171.  Vol.  VJ.  Occupations  of  the  People,  with  Introduction.  Tables  1-25,  I-VI. 
pp.  i-xxxi,  1-469. 

Bulletins  of  the  Fifth  Census  of  Canada.  1911:  Manufactures  of  Canada — Dairy  Indus- 
tries— Agriculture,  Prince  Edward  Island — Agriculture,  Nova  Scotia — Agriculture. 
New  Brunswick — Agriculture,  Quebec — Agriculture,  Ontario — Agriculture,  Mani- 
toba^— Agriculture,  Saskatchewan — Agriculture,  Alberta — Agriculture,  British  Colum- 
bia— Religions— Origins  of  the  People — Birthplace  of  the  People — Educational 
Status — Mineral   Production — Infirmities — Ages — School   Attendance. 

Special  Report  of  the  Foreign-born  Population.  (Abstracted  from  the  Records  of  the- 
Fifth  Census  of  Canada,  June,  1911,  23  tables,  62  pp.,  1915.) 

Report  of  the  Census  of  Population  and  Agriculture  of  the  Prairie  Provinces,  1916. 
Tables  1-54;  I-XX^7,  pp.  i-lxiv,  1-356. 

Vital  Statistics. — Annual  Report  on  Vital  Statistics  of  Canada  by  provmces  and  mumci- 
palities.  Monthly  Report  of  Births,  Marriages  and  Deaths,  by  provinces.  Report  of 
Conference  on  Vital  Statistics,  held  June  19-20,  1918.  pp.  1-48. 

PRODUCTION— 

/.  General  Summary  oj  Production — 
Including   (1)   Primary  Production   (Agriculture,  Fishing,  Furs,  Forestry  and   Mining), 
and  (2)  Secondaiy  Production,  or  General  Manufactures. 
JI.  Agriculture. — 

(1)  Monthly  Bulletin  of  Agricultural  Statistics.  (Contains  monthly  reports  on  agri- 
cultural conditions,  prices,  weather,  etc. — preliminary,  provisional  and  final  esti- 
mates of  areas,  yields,  quality  and  values  of  field  crops — numbers  and  values  of 
farm  live  stock,  poultry,  etc. — fruit  statistics — stocks  of  grain — annual  summao'  of 
agricultiiral  production — international  agricultural  statistics.)  (2)  Advance  Sum- 
maries of  Agricultural  Statistics  (monthly). 
///.  Furs.— 

(1)  Annual  Report  on  Fur  Farms.     (2)  Annual  Report  on  the  Production  of  Raw  Furs. 

IV.  Fisheries. — 

(1)  Annual  Report  of  Fisheries  Statistics.  (2)  Advance  Summary  of  Fish  caught, 
marketed  and  prepared. 

V.  Forestry. — 

(1)  Annual  summaiy  of  the  value,  etc.,  of  forest  production.  (Covei-s  operations  in  the 
woods  for  sawmills,  shingle  mills,  pulp  and  paper  mills,  etc.,  production  of  mining 
timber;  production  of  poles  and  cross  ties,  and  farm  production  (decennial)  of  fire- 
wood, posts,  etc.) 


DOMINION  STATISTICIAN"  25 

SESSIONAL   PAPER   No.    10 

17.  Mineral  Production:  ( Mining  and  Metallurgy). — 
(I)  General  Reports:  (a)  Annual  Report  on  the  Mineral  Proiluetion  of  Canada;  (b) 
Preliminary  Reports  (semi-.annual)  on  the  Mineral  Production  of  Canada.  (2) 
Coal:  (a)  .\nnual  Report  on  Coal  Statistics  for  Canada;  (b)  Monthly  Report  on 
Coal  Statistics  for  Canada.  (3)  Annual  Bulletins  on  the  following  subjects:  (a) 
Gold  Production;  (b)  Silver  Production;  (c)  Copper  Production;  (d)  Nickel  Pro- 
duction; (e)  Lead  Production;  (f)  Zinc  Production;  (g)  Copper-Gold-Silver  Indus- 
try; (h)  Auriferous  Quartz  Mining  Industry;  (i)  Placer  aud  Hydraulic  Gold  Mining 
IndustPi';  (j)  Nickel-Copper  Industry;  (k)  Silver-Cobalt-Nickel  Industry;  (!) 
Silver-Lead-Zinc  Industry;  (ra)  Miscellaneous  Non-Ferrous  Metals,  including 
.\ntiinony.  Molybdenite  and  Tungsten;  (n)  Asbestos  Industry;  (o)  Feldspar  Indus- 
trj';  (p)  Graphite  Industry;  (q)  Mica  and  Phosphate  Mining  Industries;  (r)  The 
Salt  Industry;  (s)  Miscellaneous  Non-Metallic  Minerals,  including  Actinolito. 
Barytes,  Chromite,  Corundum,  Fluorspar,  Magnesite.  Magnesium,  Sulphate.  Man- 
ganese, Mineral  Pigments,  Mineral  Waters,  Natro-alunite,  Peat.  Pyrites,  Quartz. 
Sodium.  Sulphate  and  Talc;  (t)  Stone  Quarrying  Industrv;  (u)  Sand  and  Gravel 
Industry;  (v)  Portland  Cement  Industry;  (w)  Miscellaneous  Clay  Products, 
including  clay  sewer  pipe.  Brick  and  Tile,  Stoneware  and  Pottery,  Fire  Brick  and 
Fire  Clay,  Kaolin  and  other  Clays. 

17/.  Manufactures. — 

(1)  General  Summary,  by  Provinces  and  leading  cities — (industrial  groups  chtssifiud  by 
component  materials,  purpose,  etc. — comparative  statistics). 

(2)  Manufacture  of  A'egetable  Products — General  report.  Special  Bulletins  as  follows: 
(a)  Coffee  and  Spices;  (b)  Cocoa  and  Chocolate:  (c)  Fruit  and  Vcget.able  Prepara- 
tion, including  canning,  evaporating  and  preserving:  (d)  Pickles.  Sauces,  Vinegar 
and  Cider;  (o)  Flour  and  Cereal  Mills;  (f)  Bread  and  other  bakery  products: 
(g)  Biscuits  and  Confectionery- ;  (h)  Macaroni  and  Vermicelli;  (i)  Liquors,  dis- 
tilled; (j)  Liquors,  Malt;  (k)  Liquors,  Vinous;  (1)  Rubber  Goods  and  Rubber 
Boots  and  Shoes;  (m)  Starch  and  Glucose:  (n)  Sugar  Refineries;  (o)  Tobacco 
Products;  (]))  Linseed  Oil  and  Oil  Cake. 

(3)  Animal  Products  and  their  manufactures — General  report.  Special  Bulletins  as 
follows:  (a)  Dairy  Products:  (b)  Slaughtering  and  Meatpacking:  (c)  Fish  and 
Fish  Products:  (d)  Leather  Tanneries:  (e)  Hame.ss  and  Saddlerj-;  (f)  Leather 
Boots  and  Shoes:   (g)   Leather  Goods;   (h)   Leather  Gloves  jind  Mitts. 

f4)  Textile  and  .-Mlied  Industries — General  report.  Special  Bulletins  as  follows:  (a) 
Cotton  Textiles  (Cloth,  yarn,  thread  and  waste);  (b)  Woollen  Textiles  (Cloth, 
yarn,  blankets,  felt  and  waste);  (c)  Silk  Mills;  (d)  Clothing  (Men's  and  women's 
factory  and  custom):  (e)  Hats.  Caps  and  Furs:  (f)  Hosiery  and  Knit  Goods;  (g) 
Neckwear  (Men's  and  women's)  an<l  Fancy  Goods;  (h)  Oiled  Clothing  and  Water- 
proofs;  (i)  Corsets;   (j)   Carpets.  Rugs  and  M.ats;    (kl   Cordage.  Rope  and  Twine. 

(a)  Manufactures  of  Wood  and  Paper  Products — General  report.  Special  Bulletin  as 
follows:  (a)  Lumber.  Lath  and  Shingle  Industry  (containing  a  statistical  .survey 
of  Operations  in  the  Woods  contingent  to  this  industrv-);    (b)    Pulp  and   Paper; 

(c)  Cooperage;  (d)  Planing  Mills,  Sash  and  Door  Factories;  (el  Prmting.  Book 
binding.  Publishine,  Lithographing  and  Engraving.  Stereotyping  and  Electrotyping. 
Maps  and  Blue  Prints:  (f)  Furniture;  (g)  Carriages,  Wagons,  and  Sleighs,  and 
Materials  thereof;  (h)  Canoes,  Rowboat«  and  Launches:  (i)  Coffins  and  Caskets: 
(j)  Containers — Boxes  and  bags  (paper) :  boxes  and  packing  cases  (wood) ;  baskets 
and  crates ;  woodenware. 

(6)  Iron  and  Its  Products— General  Report.  Special  Bulletins  as  follows:  (a)  Blast 
Furnaces  and  Steel  Mills  (annual);  (h)  Foundries  and  Machine  Shops:  (c)  Iron 
and  steel  fabrication;  (d)  Machiner>';  (e)  Boilers  and  Kngines;  (f)  Agricultural 
Implements:  (g)  Motors  and  Cycles:  (h)  Railway  Eauipraent;  (i)  Heating  and 
Ventilatinz  appliances:   (j)  Wire  and  wire  goods:   (k)   Sheet  Metal  Products. 

(N.B— .4  Monthly  Report  on  the  Production  of  Iron  and  Steel  is  issued) 

(7)  Manufactures  of  Non-Fertous  Metals — General  report.  Special  Bulletins  as  follows :  • 
(a)  Aluminium  Products;  (b)  Brass  and  Copjicr  Products;  (c)  Lead,  Tin  and  Zinc 
Products;   (d)   Manufactures  of  precious  metals;   (e)   Electrical  apparatus. 

(8)  Manufactmes  of  Non-Metallic  Minerals — General  report.  Special  Bulletins  as  fol- 
lows:   (a)   Aerated  Waters:   (b)  Asbestos  and  .\llicd  Products:   (c)  Coke  and  Gas; 

(d)  Gla.ss  and  its  Products:  (e)  Graphite  Products:  (f)  Petroleum  Products;  (g) 
Stone  Products:   (h)  Abrasives. 

(9)  Chemical  anil  Allied  Products — General  report.  Special  Bulletins  as  follows:  (a) 
Coal  Tar  and  its  Products:  (b)  Exi)losives.  Ammunition.  Fireworks  and  Matches: 
(c)  Fertilizers;  (d)  Medicinal  and  Pharmaceutical  preparations;  (e)  Pigments, 
Paints  and  Varnishes;  (f)  Soap.  Perfume.  Cosmetics  and  Toilet  preparations:  (g) 
Inks.  Dyes  and  Colour  compounds:   (h)  Wood  distillation  and  extracts. 


26  TRADE  AM)  VOMMKRCK 

13  GEORGE  V,  A.    1923 

(10)  Miscellaneous  Alaiuifactiues.  Special  Bulletins  as  follows:  (a)  Brooms  and 
Brushes;  (b)  Musical  Instruments  (including  pianos  and  organs,  and  phonographs); 
(c)  Musical  Instrument  Materials  and  Parts;  (d)  Buttons;  (e)  Trunks  and 
^"alises. 

(ID  Summary  Reports  on  Groups  of  Industries,  classified  according  to  the  use  or  pur- 
l<ose  of  their  principal  pro<luct  as  follows:  (a)  Food;  (b)  Clothing;  (el  Drink  and 
Tobacco;  (d)  Personal  and  Household  Goods;  (c)  Books:  (f)  Isquipnicnt ;  (g) 
Materials   for  further   manufacture. 

17//.  i'()u.--lrutlioti. — (a)    The   Building   and   general    construction    industiy;    (b>    Railway 
Telephone  and  Telegraph — ('oust  met  ion.  Maintenance  of  Way  and  Repairs;   (c)   Gov- 
ernment  and   Municipal   Construction:    (d)   Tlie  Brirlgebuilding   Industri-;    (el    The 
Shipbuilding  Industry:    (f)   Buildinsr  Permits — Monthly  Record. 

EXTERNAL  TRADE   (IMPORTS  AND   EXPORTS)— 

.\nnu:il    Report    of   the   Trade   nf   Can:..!  ■  ■    M. .ntl.lv    H.  .  „vt    .,.■    ,!„-   T.   .i.     ■'<:    Canada; 
Monthly  Siuiimiin'  of  Trade  Statisti< 

INTERNAL  TRADE— 

( I'rnln. — : 

Annual  Report  on  the  Grain  Trade  of  Canada;  Weekly  Report  on  tlie  Grain  Move- 
ment; Monthly  Report  on  Mvll  Grind. 

I.ii'e  Stocl-,  etc. — 
Annual   Report   on  Live  Stock  and  Animal   Products;    Montlily   KeiuMi   on   Sttuks   m 
Cold  Storage;  Quarterly  Report  on  Visible  Supi)ly  of  Hides  and  Skins. 

I'rirc  Stalistics. — 
Producers   Prices;    Wholesale   and   Jobbers'   Prices;    Retail    Prices;    Municipal    Market 
Prices;  Prices  of  Seonities;  Prices  of  Services. 

(',■/„  ,:— 
Monthly  Kejiort  oi  ^'isible  Supply  of  Raw  and  Refined  Sugar. 

TRANSPORTATION,  COMMUNICATIONS  AND  PLBLIC  UTILITIES —    . 

Huitirays  and  Tromuay.-i. — 

Anuual  Ri-pon  on  Railway  Statistics;  Monthly  Bulletin  re  Ilailwa.v  Revenues,  Expenses, 
Incomes  and  Operating  Statistics;   Monthly  Statement  re  Traffic  of  Railways. 
lixiiress. — 

Annual  Re)>ort  on  Ivxpress  Statistics. 
Tih(jraph.'>. — 

.Annual  Report   nn  Telegraph  .'statistics 
I'ehphonex. —  - 

.\nnual  Report  un  Telephone  Statistics. 
Water  Transportation. — 

Report  of  Census  of  Canadian  Registered  Ships;  Annual  Report  on  Canal  Statistics; 
Montlil.v  Report  on  Canal  Statistics;  .\nnual  Report  on  Navigation. 

iAeciric  Stations. — 
Central  Electric  Stations  m  Canatla. 

FINANCE — 

.\nntial  Report  on  Provincial  Finance;  Annu.al  Municipal  .Statistics  of  Cities  of  10.000 
I'oiiulaiion  and  over;  Annual  Municipal  Statistics  of  I'rban  Municipalities  of  3,000 
to  10.000  population;  Annual  Mvmicipal  Statistics  of  Urban  Municipalities  of  1,000 
to  3,000  population. 

JUSTICE— 

.\nnual  Report  on  Criminal  Statistics. 

EDUCATION— 

.\imvinl  Report  on  Education  Statistics;  Report  of  Conference  on  Education  Statistics, 
held  October  27-28,  1920;  Historical  Statistical  Survey  of  Education  in  Canada; 
Library  Statistics  of  Canada,  1920-21;  Statistics  of  Business  Colleges;  Statistics  of 
Private  Elementar>'  and  Secondary  Schools;  Statistics  of  Universities  and  Colleges. 


DDMIMOX  STA'I'ISTICLW  27 

SESSIONAL   PAPER   No.   10 

GENERAI. — 

Kmploijmciil. — Moiuhly  uiid  Aniiu:il  Kupoils,  by  LocaliUos  and  ludusilries.  • 

The  Canada  Year  Book,  1920,  with  Map  of  Canada  and  Newfoundland,  a  Statistical 
.Suniniary  of  the  Progress  of  Canada,  and  maps  and  diagi-aras,  pji.  i-xviii,  1-768. 
Contents:  1.  Reconstiuction  in  Canada,  by  S.  .\.  Ciidniore,  B.A.,  (Tor.),  M.A. 
(Oxon.),  F.S.S.,  F.  R.  Econ.  Soc,  Editor  Canada  Year  Book.  Dominion  Bureau  of 
ytatistie*,  Ottawa.  II.  Chronological  Histoiy  of  Canada.  III.  Physical  Character- 
istics of  Canada  includmg  Geographical  Features;  Economic  Geology,  1919,  by 
Wyatt  Malcolm,  Department  of  Mines,  Ottawa.  IV.  Area  and  Population.  V. 
Education.  VI.  Climate  and  Meteorology.  VII.  Production.  VIII.  Trade  and 
Commerce.  IX.  Transportation  and  Communications.  X.  Labour,  Wages  and 
Prices.  XI.  Finance.  XII.  Administration.  XIII.  Legislation  and  Principal  Events 
of  the  Year,  1920.    XIV.  Extracts  from  the  Canada  Gazette. 

The  Canada  Year  Book,  1921,  with  frontispiece  "  The  Arms  of  Canada,"  map  of  Canada 
and  Newfoimdland,  a  Statistical  Summary  of  the  Progress  of  Canada  since  1871,  and 
maps  and  diagrams,  pp.  i-xxiii,  1-909. 
Contents:    I.  The  Constitution  and  Government  of  Canada,  by  S.  A.  Cudmore,  B.A. 
(Tor.),  M.A.  (Oxon.),  F.S.S.,  F.  R.  Econ.  Soc,  Editor  Canada  Year  Book.     II. 
Provincial  and  Local  (jovernraent  in  Canada;  Maritime  Provinces,  Quebec,  Ontario, 
Manitoba,  Saskatchewan,  Alberta  and  British  Columbia,  by  various  writers.     III. 
Chronological  History  of  Canada.     IV.  Phj-sical  Characteristics  of  Canada,  includ- 
ing sjiecial   articles  on  Geology   and  Economic   Minerals,   Geology  in   Relation   to 
.\grieulture  in  Canada,  the  Flora  of  Canada,  the  Faunas  of  Canada  and  Economic 
Geology  of  Canada,  1920-21.    V.  Area  and  Population.    VI.  Education.    VII.  Climate 
and  Meterology,  including  article  on  the  Climate  of  Canada  since  Confederation. 

VIII.  Production,  including  article  on  the  Development  of  Agriculture  in  Canada. 

IX.  Trade  and  Commerce.  X.  Transportation  and  Communications.  XL  Labour, 
Wages  and  Prices.  XII.  Finance.  XIII.  Administration.  XIV.  Legislation  and 
Principal  Events  of  the  Year.  1921.    XV.  Extracts  from  the  Canada  Gazette. 


13  GEORGE  V  SESSIONAL   PAPER    No.    12 


ANNUAL  REPORT 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 


Fiscal  Year  ended  March  31,  1922 


I'RIMKI)  HY  OliDKIi  uy  PAHI.I  AM  EST 


OTTAWA 

F.  A.  ACLAND 

PRINTICR  TO  tup;  KING'S  MOST  EXCEI.LF.NT  MAJESTY 

1923 


13  GEORGE  V  SESSIONAL   PAPER   No.   12 


To  His  Excellency  The  Eight  Honourable  Lord  Byng  of  Vimy,  G.C.B.,  G.C.M.G., 
M.V.O.,  etc.  Governor  General  and  Commander  in  Chief  of  the  Dominion  of 
Canada. 

ilAY  IT  Please  Your  Excellency: 

The  undersigned  lias  the  honour  to  lay  before  Your  Excelleney  the  report  of  the 
transactions  of  the  Depnrtmcnt  of  the  Interior  for  the  fiscal  year  ending  March  31, 
1922. 

Respectfully  suhmittcil, 

CHAELES  STEWAET, 

Miiiister  of  the  Interior. 

Ottawa,  September  1,  1922. 


13  GEORGE  V  SESSIONAL   PAPER   No.   12 


TABLE  OF  CONTENTS 

Page 

lieport  of  Deputy  ilinistov 5 

I'AKT  I. -DOMINION  LANDS. 

Report  of  tlie  Conunissioiuu- 39 

'■         ■'         Chief  Inspector  of  Dominion  Lands  Agencies 39 

Inspector   of   Dominion    Lands   Agencies,    Manitoba    and    Sas- 

katcliowan 39 

Dominion   Lands    Subagencies,   Manitoba   and.   Saskatchewan.  .  40 

Homestead  Inspectors  in  Manitoba  and  Saskatchewan 40 

■'        Inspector    of    Dominion    Lands    Ajrcncips,    Alberta  and  Britisii 

Columbia 41 

Dominion  Lands  Subagencies,  Alberta  and  Britisii   Columbia..  41 

Homestead  Inspectors  in  Alberta  and  Britisii  Ci)luiiibia 42 

.\gcnt  of  Dominion  Lands,  Battleford.  . 42 

"       "           "               "        Calgary 43 

■•       '■           ■■              "        Daupliin 44 

"       •"  ■           "       ■■           •■               '■        Kdmontou 44 

'■        "  ■          ■'       ■■           ■■              ■'        Grande  Prairie 45 

"             "       "          "              "        Kamloops 46 

"        Lethbridgo 47 

■'        ^foose  Jaw 47 

''        New  Westminster 48 

■'        Prince  Albert 49 

"        Peace  Eiver 49 

'■        •'             '•      ■•          •■              "       Revelstoke 50 

'•        "             "       ''          "              "        Saskatoon 51 

"         "              "       "           "               "        Swift  Current 51 

"        "  •'       "  "  "       Winnipeg 52 

"        "        Land  Patents  Branch 53 

"        "         School  Lands  Division 65 

"        "         Mining  Lands  and  Yukon  Branch 70 

"        "        Gold  Commissioner  and  Crown  Timber  and  Land  Agent,  Dawson  74 

"        ■'        Inspecting  Engineer,  Mining  Lands  and  Yukon  Branch 77 

"        "         Timber  and  Grazing  Lands  Branch 82 

"        "        Superintendent  of  Dominion  Timber  Agencies 84 

■'        "         Ordnance  and  Admiralty  Lands  Branch 87 

"        Financial  Controller 90 

PART  11.— CANADIAN  NATIONAL  PARKS 

Report  of  the  Commissioner  of  National  Parks 95 

"        "         Superintendent  of  Rocky  Mountains  Park 118 

Nationalities  of  visitors  to  Rocky  Mountains  Park 121 

12— 1 J 


TABLE  OF  CONTENTS 


PAJIT  II— CANADIAN  XATTON'AI.  PMlK^'i— Concluded 

Pack 

Eejwrt  of  the  Secretary  of  the  Alpine  Club  of  Canada 122 

Superintendent  of  Yoho  and  Glacier  Parks 124 

Revelstokc  Park 126 

Jasper  Park 126 

Waterton  Lakes  Park 128 

Buffalo  Park 130 

Elk  Island  Park 131 

Point  Pelee  Park 132 

St.  Lawrence  Islands  Parks 133 

Hon.  Superintendent  Fort  Anne  Park 133 

PART  III.— FOKESTRY. 

Report  of  the  Director  of  Forestry IS.'i 

•■         "         Chief  of  the  Tree  Planting  Division 149 

District  Forest  Inspector  for  Manitoba 151 

''             "             "             "    Saskatchewan 154 

"            "            '•■            "    Alberta 159 

"            "            ■'            "    British  Columbia 163 

Superintendent  of  tJie  Forest  Products  Laboratories 167 

PART  IV.— RECLAMATION 

Report  of  the  Director  of  the  Reclamation  Service 175 

Report  of  Irrigation  Surveys  and  Inspections 182 

Report  on  Drainage  Surveys  and  Inspections 202 

PART  T^— ^YATER  POWER. 

Report  of  the  Director  of  Water  Power 209 


13  GEORGE  V  SESSIONAL   PAPER    No.    12 


REPORT 

OF  THE 

DEPARTMENT  OF  THE   INTERIOR 

1921-22 

Hon.  CiiAiuKs  Stewart, 

Minister  of  the  Intcricu-, 
Ottawa. 

SiK, — I  liavc  tlie  lioiioui-  to  submit  tlio  49tli  Aimual  Ilcport  of  the  Department  of 
the  Interior  for  the  fiscal  year  ended  March  31,  1922. 

The  total  area  of  the  three  Prairie  Provinces  is  485,642,698  acres,  of  which 
30,853,020  acres  are  water.  Of  the  total  area  200,484,841  acres  have  been  surveyed. 
Of  the  surveyed  area  129,074,028  acres  are  held  iinder  homestead  entry  or  other 
government  grant,  that  for  homesteads  alone  representing  54,339, KW1  acres.  Dominion 
Parks  and  Forest  reserves  cover  25,094,400  acres,  and  school  lands  endowment 
9,335,000  acres.     The  surveyed  area  now  available  for  entry  is  25,896,400  acres. 

There  was  an  increase  of  1,960  in  the  number  of  homestead  entries  the  past  year, 
7,349  being  granted,  compared  with  5,839  the  previous  year.  Manitoba  showed  the 
greatest  percentage  of  increase,  having  more  than  doubled  the  number  of  the  year 
before. 

As  was  expected,  the  ninnber  of  soldier  grant  entries  declined,  there  being  but 
1,655  entries  compared  with  2,892  the  previous  yejir.  This  form  of  entry  will  gr.idu- 
ally  decrease  with  the  lapse  of  time. 

Letters  patent  issued  were  13,110,  accounting  for  2,024,519  acres.  This  shows  a 
decline  in  the  three  Prairie  Provinces,  but  an  increase  in  area  is  registered  in  the 
Northwest  and  Yukon  Territories  and  in  Dominion  lands  in  British  Columbia. 

No  school  lands  were  offered  for  public  sale  by  auction  during  the  year,  but 
appro.ximately  44,400  acres  were  disposed  of,  at  an  average  price  of  $13.30  per  acre 
to  the  Soldier  Settlement  Board,  raihva.v  companies  and  school  districts. 

The  world-wide  readjustment  of  financial  conditions  and  the  temporary  lower 
earnings  from  agriculture  were  reflected  in  a  reduced  revenue  from  the  sale  of 
Dominion  lands.  The  Hudson's  Bay  Company  and  the  railway  companies  also  felt 
the  effect  of  the  above  conditions  in  a  decrca.sc  of  land  sales  and  of  the  average  price 
secured. 

Outstanding  features  in  the  development  of  mineral  resources  were  the  continued 
activity  in  the  new  gold  field  in  northern  Manitoba,  which  bears  evidence  of  being 
valuable;  the  more  intensive  development  of  the  new  silver-lead  areas  in  the  Mayo 
district,  Yukon  Territory;  and  the  drilling  for  oil  over  very  wide  area  throughout 
the  west.  The  bringing  in  of  pi'odiiring  oil  wells  in  northern  Montana  has  resulted 
in  an  increased  amount  of  drilling  on  the  Canadian  side  of  the  border. 

The  total  quantit.v  <>f  timber  cut  on  Dominion  lands  showed  a  slight  decrease, 
but  there  were  increases  in  some  important  lines.  Timber  licenses  and  permits  in 
force  cover  approximately  6,2,50  square  miles.  The  6,578  grazing  leases  in  force  cover 
more  than  six  million  acres.     Over  five  thousand  permits  to  cut  hay   were  granted. 

5 


6  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 

13  GEORGE  V,  A.   1923 

The  growth  in  the  number  of  visitors  to  our  Xational  i^arks,  noted  iu  my  report 
of  last  year,  still  continues  and  this  year  shows  a  large  increase  over  the  previous  one. 
Good  progress  has  been  made  on  the  construction  of  the  Banff-Windermere  highway, 
which  is  expected  to  be  ready  for  travel  next  year,  and  which,  no  doubt  will  attract 
a  large  number  of  motorists. 

The  buffalo  herd  now  numbers  over  6,000  and  must  be  reducccl.  Stops  will  be 
taken  soon  to  dispose  of  about  1,000  of  the  surplus  males. 

The  enforcement  of  the  Migratory  Birds  Convention  Act  is  resulting  in  a  most 
encouraging  increase  of  wild  birds,  especially  wildfowl,  throughout  the  Dominion. 

The  Historic  Sites  Board  has  rceomniended  action  in  the  case  of  some  600  sites 
and  steps  arc  being  taken  by  the  department  to  have  them  suitably  marked. 

Losses  from  forest  fires  were  lighter  than  in  the  preceding  year  due  partly  to 
climatic  conditions  and  partly  to  increased  efficiency  and  better  equipment  of  the 
forest  protective  organizations.  Aeroplanes  were  for  the  second  season  successfully 
used  in  forest  protection,  the  work  being  carried  on  in  co-operation  with  the  Air 
Board. 

Greater  interest  was  manifested  than  ever  before  in  tree-planting  on  prairie 
farms  and  the  work  is  steadily  extending. 

The  work  of  forest  research  as  regards  the  regeneration  of  forests,  carried  on  at 
forest  experiment  stations  in  different  parts  of  Canada,  and  as  to  the  most  efficient 
utilization  of  forest  products,  conducted  at  the  Forest  Products  Laboratories,  show 
steady  progress. 

During  the  year  a  total  of  7,500  pounds  of  the  seeds  of  Canadian  trees  was  col- 
lected and  shipped  to  'Great  Britain  for  use  in  reforestation  work  by  the  British 
Forestry  Commission. 

The  increasing  interest  in  irrigation  is  shown  in  the  greater  number  of  applica- 
tions for  water  rights,  228  in  1921,  compared  with  196  in  1920  and  177  in  1919. 
Surveys  and  construction  work  have  commenced  on  several  large  irrigation  projects.' 

Drainage  schemes  for  the  reclamation  of  swamp  lands  in  the  Prairie  Provinces 
have  received  much  attention.  Surveys  have  been  made  and  plans  suggested  covering 
approximately  220,000  acres  in  the  three  provinces. 

New  water-power  development  to  the  extent  of  approximately  300,000  horse-power 
is  reported  for  the  year.  This  was  practically  all  in  Eastern  Canada..  Further 
development  of  the  water-power  of  the  Winnipeg  river  is  under  way,  the  Manitoba 
Power  Company  and  the  city  of  Winnipeg  having  power  projects  under  way. 

During  the  year  in  order  to  provide  administration  for  the  resources  in  the 
Northwest  Territories,  the  Northwest  Territories  Branch  was  established  and  adminis- 
trative offices  were  opened  at  Fort  Smith  with  suboffices  at  Norman  and  Resolution. 
At  these  offices  matters  connected  with  the  oil  and  other  mineral  resources,  forests, 
lands,  health,  transportation,  and  educational  institutions  were  dealt  with  during  the 
year. 

The  scientific  work  of  the  obser\-atories  at  Ottawa  and  Victoria  lias  been  con- 
tinued. A  large  amount  of  data  has  been  secured  and  compiled  which  is  of  much 
service  to  the  country  at  large  both  directly  and  through  governmental  departments. 

Evidence  of  the  effect  of  the  educational  work  concerning  Canada's  natural 
resources  is  seen  in  the  widespread  and  growing  interest  therein,  especially  in  Great 
Britain  and  the  United  States,  23,500  requests  for  information  being  received  by  the 
Natural  Resources  Intelligence  Branch,  as  compared  with  20,304  last  year.  Much 
has  been  done  both  to  arouse  and  satisfy  this  demand  by  the  use  of  lantern  slides  an<i 
lectures  and  by  the  distribution  of  literature. 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  7 

SESSIONAL   PAPER   No.   12 

Witli  a  view  to  improviiiR  the  efficiency  and  effecting  economy  in  administration, 
the  Topographical  Survey,  Opodetic  Survey,  and  International  Boundary  divisions 
have  been  amalgamated  under  Dr.  E.  Deville  as  Director  General  of  Surveys. 

The  total  revenue  of  the  department  from  all  sources  for  the  year  was  $5,667,- 
419.79,  compared  with  $10,189,.596..52  for  the  preceding  year,  !f:l,312,090.74  of  this 
decrease  being  accounted  for  in  lessened  sale  of  lands. 

I  append  hereto  a  brief  synopsis  of  the  work  of  the  various  branches,  followed  hy 
more  detailed  statements  submitted  l>y  the  bead  of  each  branch. 


Your  obedii^nt  servant, 


W.  AV.  (OKY, 

D^pufii  Minhter. 


Ottawa.  August  W.  1022. 


Lands  Patents 

LETTERS  patent 

The  number  of  letters  patent  issued  during  the  last  fiscal  year  was  13,116,  cover- 
ing an  area  of  2,024,519  acres,  being  a  decrease  of  4,831  letters  patent  and  a  decrease 
in  tlie  area  patented  of  723,975  acres,  as  compared  with  the  total  area  of  the  previous 
year.     These  totals  were  made  up  by  provinces  as  follows: — 

Province  Patents  Acres 

M.initoba 2.39S  362,175 

Saskatchewan 5.5.t1  883,043 

Alberta 4,792  739.849 

British  Columbia 342  38,761 

Yukon  Territory 20  391 

Northwest  Territories 16  300 

13.116  2,024„519 


HOMESTEAD   EXTllJES 

Homestead  entries  to  the  number  of  7,349  were  granted  during  the  year,  aggre- 
gating an  approximate  area  of  1,175,840  acres,  being  an  increase  of  1,960  in  the  num- 
ber of  homestead  entries  granted  as  compared  with  the  previous  year. 

Province  Entries 

Manitoba 1.4SS 

Saskatchewan 2,73.> 

Alberta 2.92S 

British  Columbia 200 

7.349 


There  were  1.G55  soldier  grant  entries  made  during  the  year,  aggregating  approxi- 
mately 264,S(»(i  a'eres,  made  up  by  provinees  as  follows: — 


Manitoba 

Saskatchewan .  .    . 

Alberta 

British  Columbia. 


Entries 
383 
S90 
614 
6S 

Acres 
G1.2S0 
94.400 
98.240 
10.880 

1.653 

264,800 

There  were  291  sales  made  during  the  fiscal  year  for  10,493  acres  of  land,  with 
an  average  for  each  sale  of  about  36  acres. 


8  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  IXTERIOR 

13  GEORGE  V,  A.   1923 
ACCOVVTS!    AND   RKVENUE 

Diirinfi  tlu>  fiscal  year  $742,451.72,  iwludins  $1  l'M.7i)0.25  interest  on  deferred 
payments,  was  received  on  account  of  purcha'-ed  liomet^teads,  pre-emptions  and  ordi- 
nary sales,  beiiifr  a  decrease  of  $9<!1.9ri0..">.")  a:?  compared  with  the  payments  received 
during  the  previmis  year. 

The  sum  of  $133,862.69  was  received  for  entr.v  fees,  improvcnuMit-;  mid  sundries, 
makins?  a  total  revenue  for  the  fiscal  year  of  $876,314.41. 

Ivofuiids  were  made  amounting  to  $55,42S.86,  as  follows: — 

Value  of  improvements  collected   on   cancelled  homesteads..    ..  $l."..340   54 

Overpayments  on  sales:  and  of  moneys  paid  on  account  of 
purcha.scd  homesteads  and  prc-fmiition  s.ilt-s,  fntriHC  f..r 
which  had  been  cancelled 10, OSS   "2 


SriiiKii.  I,.\XDS 

Owinir  to  tin-  prevailing:  financial  depression  no  scluxjl  lands  were  offered  for 
sale  by  public  auction  during  the  fiscal  year  endinp-  March  31,  1922.  A  considerable 
area,  however,  was  disposed  of  by  private  sale  to  the  Soldier  Settlement  Board,  rail- 
way companies,  and  school  districts,  as  shown  by  the  following  statement: — 

Average 
Province  Area  Value  per  acre 

Manitoba 4,065.01  $   41.565   74  $10   22 

Saskatchewan r,5.340.SG  475.031    IS  13   44 

Alberta 4,985.4S  75,997   42  15  24 

The  net  revenue  derived  from  all  sources  for  the  fiscal  year  was  as  follows: — 

Manitoba %    203.795  51 

Saskatchewan 1,475,299   55 

Alberta 602,658   53 

Total $2.2S1.7S3   59 

The  amount  paid  to  the  Government  of  each  province,  after  Jeduotiug  principal 
moneys  and  cost  of  administration,  was  as  follows: — 

Manitoba S       49,201  92 

Saskatchewan 3S3,24S   70 

Alberta 256.149  61 

Total $    6S8,600  23 

The  expenditure  incurred  was  as  follows: — 

Manitoba $       16.292   16 

Saskatchewan 49,947  00 

Alberta .14,633   36 

Total i    100.872  52 


The  amount  standing  to  the  credit  of  the  fund  of  each  province  as  on  March  31. 
1922.  wa^  n=  follows:— 

Balance  of 
Total  amount  at  Amount  invested  fund 

Pi-ovlnoe  credit  of  fund  in  debenture  stock     uninvested 

Manitoba $   5.635,839   74  $   5.635,000   00  $839   74 

Saskatchewan 12.027.514   84  12.027,000   00  514   84 

Alberta 6,471,051    94  6,471,000   00  51    94 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  9 

SESSIONAL    PAPER    No.    12 

^fiMxr;  T.vxDS 

Activity  is  beins:  maintained,  and  continued  interest  is  being  manifested  in  the 
development  of  the  mining  resources  on  lands  administered  by  this  department.  Coal 
mining  in  the  western  provinces  continues  to  be  the  principal  mining  industry.  Next 
in  imijortanee  ic;  pliK'cr  mining  in  the  Yukon  Territory.  Considerable  qiiantities  of 
tlie  silver  lead  ores  of  the  Mayo  district  in  that  territory  are  being  mined  for  ship- 
ment to  outside  smelters.  The  amounts  realized  from  shipments  made  last  year  were 
(|\iite  up  to  expectations,  and  the  tonnage  being  mined  for  treatment  is  steadily 
increasing. 

Prospes3ts  for  obtaining  oil  in  large  quantities  in  that  portion  of  southern  Alberta 
ad.iacent  to  the  international  Iwiundary  are  most  encouraging,  as  several  producing 
wells  are  reported  to  have  been  completed  not  far  south  of  that  boundary. 

Everytiiing  that  has  occurred  during  the  past  .year  in  connection  with  lode 
mining  in  northern  Manitoba  verities  the  forecast  that  in  that  province  this  type  of 
mining  gives  promise  of  developing  into  a  great  industry. 

TiMUiiR  AND  Gua/.inl;  Lands 

Tiie  total  rcviMiiic  derived  from  timber,  grazing,  and  hay  land-  amounted  to 
.$7i'3.32i>.Sl. 

There  were  manufactured  on  licensed  timber  berths  188,227,507  feet  board  mea- 
sure of  lumber,  in  addition  to  large  quantities  of  other  materials,  including  25,262,905 
laths,  ?M',?>9'i  railway  ties,  9'7l,62'3  lineal  feet  of  mining  timber,  etc.  There  were 
also  manufactured  under  permits  41,972,40(1  feet  board  measure  of  lumber,  besides 
otlier  materials. 

Xincty-one  new  timber  berths  were  granted,  wliieh  inchided  one  pulpwood  berth 
covering  a  large  ai-ea  in  the  province  of  Manitoba.  Timber  berths  held  under  license 
and  permit  t'over  6,249  square  miles. 

Tlu're  are  6,518  grazing  leases  in  force,  of  which  581  were  issued  during  the  year. 
Over  ."i.OOO  permits  to  cut  hay  were  taken  out.  The  grazing  leases  cover  a  total  area 
of  6,341,952  acres. 

Oaxadiax  Xation'ai.  Parks 

The  steady  increase  in  travel  to  the  Canadian  National  parks  continues  to  be 
one  of  the  most  gratifying  features  in  connection  with  the  work.  Last  year  prac- 
tically every  park  showed  an  advance  in  the  number  of  visitors,  both  foreign  and 
Canadian.  In  the  larger  pai'ks  it  is  interesting  to  note  an  increased  percentage  of 
(\inadians.  in  the  smaller  a  much  larger  registration  of  people  from  a  distance.  The 
former  .«how<  that  our  own  people  are  awakening  to  the  attractions  and  recreational 
opportunities  offered  by  these  groat  resers'ations,  the  latter  reveals  that  the  smaller 
parks  are  outgrowing  the  local  stage  and  are  coming  to  be  widely  known.  The  greatest 
advance  this  year  as  well  as  last  was  in  Waterton  Lakes  park,  which  was  visited  by 
approximately  20,000  visitors.  This  is  rapidly  becoming  one  of  the  most  popular  of 
the  i>nrks  and  in  spite  of  its  comparative  isolation,  it  promise.;  soon  to  rival  some  of 
the  larger  reservations  along  the  main  railway  lines. 

The  chief  work  of  importance  was  the  prosecution  of  the  Banff-Windermere 
highway.  This  road  is  now  nearing  completion  and  it  is  expected  that  it  will  be 
ready  for  travel  by  the  coming  spring,  or  a  year  in  advance  of  the  date  set  by  the 
agreement  between  the  Government  of  British  Columbia  and  the  Dominion.  There 
is  no  doubt  that  as  soon  as  this  road  is  ready  we  may  look  for  a  tremendous  increase 
in  motor  visitors.  Requests  for  information  as  to  the  date  of  its  opening  have  been 
received  from  practically  every  stale  in  the  union  as  well  as  all  parts  of  Canada,  and 


10  Dh'I-'AIiTMKXT  OF  THE  LM'EKIOR 

13  GEORGE  V,  A.   1923 

it  is  anticipated  thut  liijUoQ  (,-ars  will  jju  uver  iIil-  inad  the  tirst  summer.  Au  iiitcr- 
iiatiiiiK'.l  traffic  of  this  magnitude  means  much  to  this  coiintry  both  on  account  of  th' 
foreign  lovenue  it  will  bring:  in  and  the  increased  international  knowledge  andgociii 
will  that  must  inevitably  result. 

The  (jovernmeut  bufialo  lierd  continues  to  increase  and  now  numbers  over  6,000. 
This  ib  as  many  as  the  present  park  can  adequately  support  unless  its  boundaries  are 
extended.  The  preponderance  of  males  in  the  herd  has  also  become  too  great  for  the 
welfare  of  the  herd  and  it  is  probable  that  some  disposal  will  be  made  of  about  1,000 
of  these  in  the  immediate  future. 

The  n>ults  of  the  enforcement  of  the  'Migratory  Birds  Convention  Act  arc  shown 
in  a  must  encouraging  increase  in  wild  bird  life  of  many  kinds.  This  is  especially 
true  of  wildfowl  where  the  benefieial  elVeets  of  the  prohibition  of  spring  shooting  are 
lieconiing  widely  evident.  The  staff  of  honorar.y  wardens  now  numbers  1,722,  includ- 
ing all  forestry  officers,  and  fishery  officers  along  the  Atlantic  coast.  It  is  found  that 
a  good  deal  of  educational  effort  is  still  necessary  with  regard  to  the  Aot  and  special 
efforts  were  directed  to  this  end.  During  the  year  over  125,000  pamphlets  were  dis- 
tributed and  approximately  35,000  posters.  The  most  valuable  publication  was  prob- 
ablj'  a  small  leaflet  entitled  "iLessons  on  Bird  Protection."  prepared  for  use  in  the 
schools,  which  has  been  approved  and  authorized  by  the  ministers  of  education  in 
each  province.  The  extension  of  the  work  of  the  National  Audubon  Society  to  the 
Canadian  schools  was  also  an  important  step  and  one  that  will  be  of  great  educa- 
tional value.  The  creation  of  bird  sanctuaries  is  going  steadily  forward.  An  officer 
of  the  department  spent  considerable  time  investigating  conditions  on  the  north 
shore  of  the  gulf  of  St.  Lawrence  and  has  recommended  the  creation  of  ten  sanctu- 
aries there.  The  creation  of  public  shooting  grounds  which  will  ensure  the  public  of  a 
fair  share  of  the  game  is  also  being  considered  and  recommendations  have  been 
received  from  several  of  the  provincial  governmentt?  as  to  areas  which  they  consider 
advisable. 

Good  progress  has  been  made  with  the  marking  and  preserving  of  the  historic 
sites  of  national  importance.  Over  000  sites  have  been  considered  by  the  Historic 
Sites  Board  and  recommendations  as  to  the  action  which  should  be  taken  made  to 
the  department.  Eighty-two  of  these  have  been  selected  to  receive  immediate  atten- 
tion. Attractive  tablets,  from  a  design  prepared  by  the  well-known  Canadian  artist, 
Ernest  Fosbcrry,  E.C.A.,  are  now  being  cast  in  bronze  to  be  used  in  connection  with 
the  marking  of  the  selected  sites,  and  a  competition  for  designs  for  suitable  land- 
marks will  be  initiated  in  the  near  future. 


Forestry 

Though  the  general  commercial  depression  r(-sulted  in  decreased  revenues  for  the 
branch  in  some  lines  of  its  work,  these  decreases  were  offset  by  gains  in  other  items 
of  revenue,  so  that  the  total  revenue  of  the  branch  shows  a  satisfactory  increase  for 
the  year. 

Losses  from  forest  fires  were  considerably  less  than  during  the  year  1920-21. 
The  total  number  of  fires  was  appreciably  less,  the  proportion  of  large  fires  (i.e., 
those  covering  an  area  of  ten  acres  or  more)  was  also  less,  and  the  total  area  burned 
over  was  only  about  one-fourth  of  that  burned  the  previous  year.  The  season  was 
exceptionally  favourable  in  Manitoba  and  Saskatchewan,  but  in  Alberta  and  the 
Salmon  Arm  district  of  British  Columbia  the  fire-danger  was  exceptionally  groat. 
Improveil  organization  of  the  fire-fighting  force  and  the  use  of  improved  eciuipmenc 
both  contributed  to  keep  down  the  fires.  The  use  of  aeroplanes  in  the  work  of  forest 
patrol  and  fire-fighting  was  a  development  of  the  year.  Tliese  machines  were  used 
in  the  jirovinccs  of  Manitoba,  Alberta,  and  British  Columbia  with  excellent  results. 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  11 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.   12 

There  was  a  decrease  in  the  quantity  of  timber  taken  from  the  re:-erves,  except 
in  the  case  of  fuel-wood,  building  logs,  and  railway  ties.  As  might  be  expected  from 
the  depression  in  the  grazing  industry,  tlie  number  of  permits  for  grazing  shows  a 
sliglit  docroaso.  Two  new  co-operative  grazing  associations  were  formed  during  the 
year ;  tliere  are  now  over  fifty  of  these  associations  pasturing  cattle  on  the  forest 
reserves. 

A  notable  indication  of  th6  importance  of  Canada's  forests  to  the  Empire  was 
tlie  sending  to  the  British  Forestry  Commission  of  T,500  pounds  of  seed  for  use  in 
afforestation  in  tlie  British  Isles.  This  was  all  seed  of  British  Columbia  coniferous 
species. 

The  number  of  trees  distributed  to  farmers  in  the  Prairie  Provinces  shows  a 
gratifying  increase,  as  does  the  number  of  new  applicants  for  trees.  The  value  of 
shelter-belts  in  increasing  the  comfort  of  the  farmhome  and  in  the  growing  of  fruit 
trees,  small  fruits  and  tender  vegetables  is  being  more  and  more  appreciated.  Th>i 
wori\  of  experimental  planting  and  seeding  on  tlie  reserves  was  continued. 

The  Forest  Products  Laboratories  report  an  increasing  number  of  requests  for 
technical  information  and  service.  The  research  and  investigative  work  is  increasing, 
and  good  progress  is  reported  in  the  various  lines  of  work  generally. 

The  silvicultural-research  staff  continued  its  work  in  the  investigation  of  methods 
of  liandling  forest  areas  in  order  to  secure  the  highest  possible  continuous  jaroduction. 
This  work  is  being  carried  on  in  most  of  the  provinces.  Work  on  methods  of  estimating 
timber,  of  handling  ijulpwood  species,  of  natural  and  artificial  regeneration  of  the 
forest,  and  of  handling  timber  sales  under  pii>iier  «ilvieultnral  methods  ha-;  so  far 
shown  the  most  immediately  useful  results. 


Eecl.\m.\tion 

Irrigation. — In  preparing  for  the  extensive  irrigation  development  which  is  now 
taking  place  in  southern  Alberta,  the  Reclamation  Service  has  played  a  major  part. 
Since  1S94,  when  the  Northwest  Irrigation  Act  was  passed,  investigations  of  water 
supply  and  surveys  of  irrigable  lands  have  been  advocated  and  carried  out  well  in 
advance  of  any  strong  demand  for  development  of  particular  areas. 

During  the  year  a  total  of  228  applications  for  water  rights  of  all  kinds  was 
received.  When  compared  with  196  for  the  year  1920  and  177  for  1919,  some  idea  is 
obtained  of  the  steadily  increasing  demand  for  legal  rights  in  water. 

On  October  4,  1921,  the  International  Joint  Commission  defined  the  method  of 
apportioning  the  waters  of  the  St.  IMary  and  iliik  rivers  and  their  tributaries  in. 
Montana,  Alberta,  and  Saskatchewan.  The  uncertainty  in  connection  with  the 
development  of  irrigation  projects  depending  upon  these  streams  as  a  source  of  water 
supply  is  now  largely  removed  and  progress  with  these  projects  may  be  expected  in 
the  near  future. 

An  area  of  9,400  acres  was  irrigated  this  year  by  the  Canada  Land  and  Irrigation 
Company,  as  compared  with  4,200  acres  in  the  year  1920.  Over  10,000  acres  were 
irrigate<l  in  the  Taber  Irrigation  District  project,  as  compared  with  2,000  acres  in 
1920.    Both  of  these  projects  were  operated  for  the  first  time  in  1920. 

Construction  was  commenced  on  the  Lethbridge  Northern  Irrigation  District 
project  during  the  year  and  it  is  expected  that  both  this  and  the  United  Irrigation 
District,  on  which  construction  will  be  commenced  in  1922,  will  be  in  readiness  for 
operation  in  the  spring  of  1923. 

Surveys  of  the  Lethbridge  Southeast  project  were  comi)lcted  this  year  and 
estimates  of  cost  wei-e  prepared  during  the  winter  months.  Another  huge  project  now 
being   investigated   in   detail   is   the  North    Saskatehowan   jiroject    for   the   irrigation 


12  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  ISTERIOR 

13  GEORGE  V.  A.    1923 

of  a  tract  of  approximately  1,700,000  acres  to  the  northeast  of  the  Canadian  Pacific 
Railway  Irrigation  block.  Surveys  of  other  projects  near  Lethbridge  and  Medicine 
Hat  were  followe<l  up  during  the  year  and  in  some  cases  completed.  It  is  expected 
that  the  construction  of  several  of  these  jirojects  will  soon  be  commenced.  A  full 
afcount  of  each  will  be  found  in  the  part  of  this  rojwrt  describing  more  fully  the 
work  of  the  Reclamation  Service. 

Duty  of  water  experiments  were  continued  at  Brooks,  Vauxhall.  and  Coaldale, 
with  excellent  results.  A  very  valuable  collection  of  data  has  been  obtained  on  the 
basis  of  which  a  special  bulletin  is  being  preparetl.  This  bulletin,  which  should  be 
exceedingly  useful  to  irrigators  in  Western  Ciiniida,  will  be  printed  in  pamphlet 
form  for  distribution. 

Drainage. — The  Drainage  Division  of  the  Rocliimntion  .Service  was  organized 
ill  1910.  A  few  parties  were  sent  out  in  that  year  but  it  was  only  possible  to  do 
reconnaissance  work.  In  1920  and  1921,  with  a  full  staff  and  a  well  planned  pro- 
gramme, more  important  investigations  were  undertaken  and  much  valuable  informa- 
tion was  obtained  of  the  nature  and  extent  of  submerged  and  swampy  areas  in  Alberta. 
Manitoba  and  Saskatchewan.  Projects  comprising  approximately  220.000  acres  of 
swam])  and  submerged  land  have  been  recommended  as  suitable  for  Governmental 
reclamation. 

As  an  experiment  in  the  reclamation  of  Crown  lands,  the  Reclamation  Service 
has  undertaken  to  drain  AVaterhen  lake  near  Kinistino,  Saskatchewan.  Contracts 
for  work  on  this  project  were  let  early  this  year  and  constriiction  proceeded  actively 
throughout  the  season.  It  is  expected  that  the  works  will  be  completed  in  the  autumn 
of  1922. 

Surveys  of  areas  reijuiring  drainage  are  being  proceeded  with  along  similar 
lines  to  those  that  have  been  followed  in  connection  with  irrigation  development. 
The  way  is  being  prepared  for  the  drainage  of  these  areas  by  districts  organized  for 
co-operative  effort  under  provincial  laws. 

Surveys  of  the  Carrot  River  Triangle  project  were  commenced  in  the  spring  of 
this  year.  This  tract  lies  near  the  town  of  Pas,  Manitoba,  between  the  South 
Saskatehcwim  and  Carrot  rivers  and  comprises  approximately  1,100  square  miles.  So 
much  of  this  area  is  inaccessible  during  the  summer  months  that  tlie  parties  working 
on  it  were  kept  in  the  field  well  into  the  winter.  The  soil  of  the  area  seems 
eminently  suitable  for  agriculture  and  should  the  project  prove  economically  feasible 
its  construction  would  mean  much  to  this  northern  district,  in  which  considerable 
mining  development  is  now  taking  place. 

Twenty-five  applications  were  received  during  the  year  for  permission  to  con- 
struct small  projects.  These  were  investigated  and,  where  favourable  consideration 
was  given,  the  necessary  surveys  were  made  and  plans  prepared.  The  general  pro- 
gress of  the  varioiis  schemes  under  development  has  been  satisfactory. 

Watkr  Powei! 

An  analysis  of  the  general  water-power  situation  thro\ighout  the  Dominion  made 
by  the  Dominion  Water  Power  Branch  indicates  that  the  tot.il  installation  now  totals 
2,763,000  horso-power,  the  increase  during  the  past  fiscal  year  amounting  to  300,000 
horse-power.  Unlike  last  year,  much  of  this  increase  is  due  to  entirely  new  con- 
struction and,  as  it  is  unusual  for  any  power  site  to  be  developed  to  full  capacity  in 
a  single  stage,  extensions  to  these  new  plants  will  continue  to  show  from  year  to 
year  a  steady  increase  in  horse-power  installed. 

The  increase  in  power  installation  during  the  past  year  above  noted,  although 
a  record  for  the  Dominion  was  practically  confined  to  eastern  Canada.  West  of 
Ontario  conditions  are  on'y  now  beginning  to  be  satisfactory  for  the  initiation  of  large 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  13 

SESSIONAL    PAPER    No.    12 

projects.  Tliiit  the  lull  in  the  li,v(lr(.>-electi-ic  enterprise  noted  since  the  outbreak  of 
the  great  war  is  now  ended  is  evidenced  by  the  activity  of  the  Manitoba  Power 
Oompan.v  at  Great  Falls,  on  the  Winnipeg  river,  where  an  initial  development  of 
56,000  liorse-power  is  now  in  progress.  The  ultimate  capacity  of  this  site  is  168,000 
horse-power  and  its  development  is  the  first  notable  new  enterprise  of  its  kind  under- 
taken west  of  the  Great  Lakes  for  nearly  a  decade. 

The  city  of  Wiiinijieg  municipal  plant  at  I'ointe  du  Bois,  on  the  Winnipeg 
river,  tirst  delivered  power  in  October,  1911,  and  in  the  ten  years  since  the  completion 
of  the  initial  installation  has  been  steadily  increasing  its  output  and  adding  new 
units  until  its  development  to  maximum  capacity  is  nearly  accomplished.  The  city's 
engineers  are  now  making  detail  surveys  at  Slave  falls,  some  five  miles  down  stream 
for  the  construction  of  a  new  development  which  will  be  required  in  a  comparatively 
short  time. 

The  price  of  coal  and  the  general  unsettled  state  of  that  industry  couijled  with 
aa  easing  of  the  financial  situation  and  increased  stability  in  the  matter  of  labour 
and  materials  are  briuginpr  about  a  definite  public  preference  for  hydro-electric 
energy.  There  can  be  little  doubt  therefore  that  Canada,  already  famous  for  her 
water  powers  is  on  the  eve  of  .still  greater  achievements  in  this  direction. 

The  general  departmental  progress  in  water-power  matters  has  been  distinctly 
satisfactory  during  the  past  year.  The  new  Dominion  Water  Power  Regulations, 
which  had  for  some  years  been  engaging  the  attention  of  officials  of  the  Dominion 
Water  Power  Branch  in  the  closest  research,  were  promulgated  by  Order  in  Council 
of  October  31,  1921.  While  no  doubt  experience  will  indicate  the  necessity  for  certain 
changes  or  jirovisions  in  these  regulations,  it  is  nevertheless  believed  that  they  form  the 
most  up-to-date  and  workable  regulations  yet  evolved  which,  at  the  same  time,  protect 
the  public  interest  and  offer  reasonable  attraction  to  private  corporate  enterprise. 

The  Hydromctrio  Survey  of  Canada  instituted  by  Order  in  Council  of  July  19, 
1920,  established  a  uniform  system  of  basic  water  reeouree  investigator.v  effort 
across  the  Dominion. 

The  Water  Resources  Tndex-Inventory  work  has  been  continued  with  satisfactory 
results,  the  collation  of  data  regarding  water-power  development  and  water  resources 
generally  throughout  the  Dominion  was  substantially  increased.  This  inventory 
makes  it  jiossible  to  jilace  government  officials.  Dominion  or  provincial,  and  members 
of  the  general  public  interested  therein  in  immediate  touch  with  the  most  up-to-date 
and  a\ithentic  information  obtainable. 


Sl'RVKVS 
TOPOORAPIIIC.VL  SUKVl'.YS  liKAXCII 

Details  i>f  the  work  of  the  Topographical  Surveys  Brancii  art'  presented  in  com- 
plete form  in  tlie  annual  report  of  the  branch,  which  is  issued  as  a  separate  publica- 
tion of  the  department;  the  following  is  a  brief  sumnmry  of  what  was  accomplished 
during  the  year. 

Thirty-seven  parties  were  engaged  in  field  work  as  compared  with  forty-five 
parties  during  the  season  of  1920-21.  Of  this  number,  four  were  employed  in  Mani- 
toba, five  in  Saskatchewan,  five  in  Alberta,  three  in  the  Railway  Belt  of  British 
Columbia,  si.xteen  partly  in  one  province  and  partl.v  in  another,  and  three  were 
employed  in  the  Mackenzie  River  district.  Northwest  Territories. 

Mackenzir  Hirer  Surveys. — Perhaps  the  most  interesting  feature  of  the  season's 
survey  prognimme  was  the  work  accomplished  in  the  Mackenzie  River  district.  It 
consisted  of  an  accurate  survey  of  the  main  waterways — Slave  river,  (rreat  Slave 
lake,  and  J[:\ckenzie  river — from  the  "Oth  base  line  to  a  point  110  miles  below  Nor- 


14  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 

13  GEORGE  V,  A.   1923 

man.  Control  during  the  course  of  the  survey  was  obtained  by  a  combinatioa  of 
ohained  bases  with  methods  of  trianpulation  and  stadia  adapted  to  the  form  of  tho 
traverse  and  the  physical  characteristics  of  the  shoreline. 

Operations  extended  over  a  distance  of  1,000  miles  involving  the  survey  of  moro 
than  4,000  miles  of  shoreline  and  the  erection  of  monuments  at  intervals  of  from  two 
to  iive  miles. 

Three  parties  co-operated  in  the  work  and  considering  the  distances  in  that 
country,  the  difficulties  of  transportation  and  conditions  under  which  operations  had 
to  be  carried  on,  the  results  obtained  were  remarkable.  The  surveys  are  intended  ti> 
provide  control  for  the  survey  of  mineral  claims,  oil  leases,  and  other  surveys  re.sult- 
insr  from  recent  important  discoveries  of  oil  and  minerals  in  that  district.  Much 
additional  work  of  an  exploratory  nature  which  will  assist  materially  in  the  develop- 
ment of  the  valuable  reeourees  of  the  district  was  also  completed. 

Topographical  Surreys. — Topographical  surveys  for  the  revision  of  four  sectional 
maps  were  completed  by  as  many  parties,  which  brings  the  total  number  of  these 
sheets  which  have  been  revised  to  seventeen,  eleven  of  which  are  available  for  distri- 
bution. The  areas  covered  by  these  sheets  are  confined  prinoipally  to  the  vicinities 
of  important  centres  of  population  and  comprise  Dufferin,  Emerson,  Brandon,  and 
Winnipeg  sheets  in  Manitoba;  Moose  Jaw,  Regina,  and  Saskatoon  sheets  in  Sas- 
katchewan; and  Blackfoot,  Red  Deer,  Peace  Hills,  and  Edmonton  sheets  in  Alberta. 
The  maps  arc  greatly  in  demand  and  many  letters  exprcesing  appreciation  of  their 
excellence  and  utility  have  been  received. 

One  party,  employing  photographic  methods,  was  engaged  on  revision  work  in 
the  Railway  Belt  of  British  Columbia,  where  ordinary  methods  of  survey  are  imprac- 
ticable for  this  purpose,  on  account  of  the  rough  nature  of  the  countr.v. 

In  compliance  with  a  request  from  the  Forestry  Branch  of  this  department, 
another  party  undertook  a  plane-table  topogr.qphioal  survey  of  Cypress  Hills  forest 
reserve.  The  purpose  of  this  survey  is  to  make  available  for  general  administrative 
purposes  a  map  which  will,  with  reasonable  accurac.v,  show  the  topography  of  the 
area  and  serve  for  developing  detailed  forest  management  of  the  reserve. 

Land  Olassification  Surveys.- — Thiee  parties  were  employed  upon  detailed  land 
classification  surveys.  One  party  was  engaged  upon  reconnaissance  work  in  a  com- 
paratively unsettled  district  to  determine  what  lands  should  be  given  a  more  detailed 
examination  at  a  later  date. 

The  classification  of  lands  for  settlement  purixiscs  has  been  one  of  the  most 
important  features  of  the  activities  of  the  Topographical  Surveys  Branch  since  191S. 
Some  seventeen  million  acres  have  been  examined  and  classified  to  date  and  mai)s. 
plans,  and  reports  showing  the  results  of  these  surveys  are  available  for  Peace  River 
and  Saint  Paul  des  Metis  districts  in  Alberta,  Prince  Albert  district  iu  Saskatche- 
wan, and  the  district  between  lakes  Manitoba  and  Winnipc^osis  in  Manitoba. 

Stadia  Surveys. — The  stadia  survey  of  water  areas  for  the  purpose  of  revising 
the  plans  of  townships  surveyed  many  years  ago  and  in  which  many  of  the  lakes  have 
partially  or  completely  dried  up  was  continued  by  four  parties  as  compared  with 
eleven  parties  employed  during  the  previous  season.  This  work  was  begun  in  1913 
and  is  now  almost  completed. 

Ini<erprovincidl  Boundary  Surveys. — Two  parties  were  engaged  upon  the  con- 
tinuation of  the  survey  of  the  boundary  between  the  provinces  of  Alberta  and  British 
Columbia.  The  survey  of  this  line  has  been  in  progress  for  several  years,  and  that 
portion  lying  between  the  International  Boundary  and  Yellowhead  pass  is  now  com- 
pletely surveyed,  as  well  as  part  of  the  120th  meridian  whore  it  forms  the  boundary 
between  these  provinces  in  the  Peace  River  district. 

Another  party  was  employed  upon  the  delimitation  of  the  boimdary  between  the 
provinces  of  Manitoba  and  Ontario,  northerly  from  Winnipeg  river. 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  15 

SESSIONAL    PAPER    No.    12 

Those  surveys,  involving  as  they  do  the  question  of  jurisdiction,  not  only  as  to 
till"  ownership  of  land,  but  also  to  the  application  of  provincial  laws  and  the  adminis- 
li;ition  of  justice,  are  both  necessary  and  important. 

Levelling  Operations. — Seven  parties  ■were  employed  upon  the  further  extension 
(if  levels,  a  total  of  3,638  milcc;  being  run.  A  record  of  the  elevations  of  a  district  is 
essential  to  its  economic  development  and  in  the  absence  of  such  a  record,  questions 
such  as  the  feasibility  of  (Kinstructing  railways,  the  drainage  of  wet  areas,  the 
improvement  of  rivers  for  various  purposes,  and  many  other  matters  on  wliioh  the 
(Ifvelnpmrnt  of  the  country  depends  cannot  be  satisfactorily  dealt  with.  Since  the 
!i'coption  of  levelling  by  this  branch  in  190S,  more  than  34,t)0O  miles  of  levels  have 
lii'on  run. 

Miscellaneous  Surveys  and  Resurveys. — As  in  previous  years,  there  was  an 
iirirent  demand  for  small  resurveys  and  scattered  miscellaneous  surveys.  These  neces- 
sitated the  employment  of  three  travelling  parties.  Some  work  of  this  class  was  also 
MPcomplislicd  by  two  parties  employed  upon  the  survey  of  additions  to  several  small 

liiwnsitos. 

Subdivision  Surveys. — Only  three  parties  as  compared  with  nine  for  the  previous 
-easoM  Mere  employed  upon  subdivision  surveys  in  Manitoba,  Saskatchewan,  and 
.Vlberta.  Two  parties  were  engaged  for  part  of  the  season  on  subdivision  in  the 
liailway  Belt  of  British  Columbia,  the  remainder  of  the  season  being  devoted  to 
miscellaneous  work  and  the  collection  of  information  for  sectional  map  revision. 

General. — The  foregoing  summary  of  the  work  of  the  Topographical  Surveys 
Branch  reviewed  in  the  light  of  similar  statements  appearing  in  the  reports  of  the 
'  Department  of  the  Interior  for  the  years  preceding  the  war,  reveals  a  gradual  but 
nevertheless  a  decided  change  in  the  activities  of  the  branch. 

Topographic  land  classification,  exploratory  and  other  important  classes  of 
surveys  are  now  being  given  more  attention.  Reductions  in  the  appropriations  for 
surveys  during  the  past  four  years,  made  necessary  by  conditions  brought  about  b.v 
the  war,  have  prevented  extensive  development. 

Topographic  surveys  have  been  in  progress  in  Canada  for  some  years  and  a 
considerable  amount,  including  surveys  executed  by  the  use  of  photographic  methods, 
has  been  done  by  this  branch.  A  limited  number  of  parties  have  been  employed  in 
the  western  provinces  on  small  scale  topographical  work,  and  the  results  of  the  surveys 
have  been  most  satisfactory.  The  object  is  to  complete  a  rapid  survey  on  a  smaller 
scale  than  one  mile  to  an  inch  and  the  methods  employed,  although  not  absolutely 
accurate,  are  most  economical  and  yield  results  sufficient  for  practical  purposes. 

Much  of  the  information  required  is  already  available  in  the  form  of  sectional 
maps  which  have  been  issued  by  the  branch  for  manj'  years.  Valuable  data  also  are 
obtained  from  the  various  provincial,  municipal  and  railway  offices.  The  field  work 
is  conducted  by  small  parties  which,  travelling  rapidly  over  the  country,  secure  by 
expeditious  methods  information  regarding  topography,  elevations,  roads,  improve- 
ments and  other  data  not  otherwise  available.  The  whole  is  co-ordinated  and  the 
maps,  which  are  compiled  and  drawn  by  the  surveyors  in  cliarge  of  the  field  parties, 
arc  printed  in  the  office.  In  the  open  country,  a  survey  party  can  revise  one  sheet, 
or  4.300  square  miles,  in  a  season  at  a  cost  of  approximately  $1.42  a  square  mile. 

Land  classification  surveys  were  first  undertaken  at  the  request  of  the  Soldier 
Settlement  Board,  a  number  of  Dominion  land  surveyors  on  the  staff  of  the  branch 
being  selected  to  obtain  information  required  in  settling  returned  soldiers  on  the 
land.  The  result  of  these  surveys  has  contributed  much  to  the  efficiency  of  tlie  work 
of  the  board  and  has  proven  of  gi-cat  benefit  to  settlers  in  general.  The  greatest  value 
of  the  work  lies  in  its  use   in   the  intelligent  direction  of  the  settlement  and  early 


16  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 

13  GEORGE  V,  A.    1923 

development  of  new  lands  by  providing  intending  settlers  with  accurate  and  reliable 
information  which  will  assist  them  in  selecting  homesteads  in  suitable  districts. 

GEODETIC    SURVEV 

During  the  past  fiscal  year  marked  progress  has  been  made  in  extending  the 
Geodetic  Survey  over  the  Dominion  of  Canada,  thus  laying  a  foundation  upon 
which  accurate  maps  of  tlie  country  are  based,  and  also  furnishing  the  control  neces- 
sary for  all  other  surveys. 

The  AnticoBti  Island  Base  Line  was  prepared  and  measured  during  the  year. 
This  base  line  is  nearly  twelve  and  a  half  kilometres  (73  miles)  long,  and  will  serve 
as  a  splendid  control  for  the  scale  of  the  triangulatiun  on  the  lower  St.  Lawrence. 

Geodetic  astronomy  comprised  the  occupation  of  two  Laplace  stations.  West 
Base  on  Anticosti  island,  and  Derby  in  the  Cape  Breton  triangulation  net;  also  the 
observing  of  the  azimuth  of  the  line  Cap-Chat  to  Castor  on  the  St.  Lawrence  trian- 
gulation. 

This  year  saw  the  completion  of  the  reconnaissance  survey  along  the  east  coast 
of  Xew  Brunswick  from  the  bay  of  Fundy  to  the  bay  of  Cbaleur,  and  in  eastern 
Xova  Scotia  the  triangulation  to  the  vicinity  of  S.vdney. 

Agreements  were  made  with  the  provincial  forest  services  of  Xew  Brunswick  and 
Quebec  for  a  division  of  the  cost  of  towers  which  are  required  by  this  Survey  on 
certain  triangulation  stations  to  obtain  the  necessary  intervisibility  of  stations  and 
by  the  forest  services  as  look-out  towers  for  the  detection  and  localization  of  forest 
fires. 

In  Quebec  the  reconnaissance  for  primary  triangulation  on  the  Saguenay  river* 
was  partly  completed,  while  the  reconnaissance  on  the  western  half  of  Anticosti 
island  was  finished.  Tower  building  was  carried  on  at  the  stations  at  the  west  end 
and  along  the  southwest  coast  of  Anticosti  island,  and  along  the  Gaspe  coast  opposite. 
Angle  measuring  observations  were  taken  on  all  primary  and  .secondary  triangulation 
stations,  together  with  lighthouses  and  other  points  of  interest  along  the  gulf  of 
St.  Lawrence  in  the  area  bounded  on  the  west  side  by  a  line  joining  Point-des-Monts 
lighthouse  on  the  north  store  and  Cap-Chat  lighthouse  on  the  south  shore,  and  on 
the  east  side  by  a  line  joining  Thunder  river  on  the  north  shore  and  St.  Antoine 
village  on  the  south  shore.  Triangulatiun  stations,  one  primary  and  one  sccondarv, 
were  e.stablished  on  Mount  Albert  in  the  Shickshock  mouiitains. 

The  work  in  Quebec  also  included  the  location  of  the  necessary  points  for  the 
control  of  the  aerial  survey  carried  on  in  the  hills  north  of  Ottawa.  These  points 
were  located   by  triangulation   and  traverse  and  their  elevations  determined. 

Primary  triangulation,  cit.v  triangulation,  precise  levelling,  and  precise  traverse 
comprised  the  ojierations  in  Ontario. 

In  the  spring  of  1921  an  arrangement  was  made  between  the  United  States 
Coast  and  Geodetic  Sui-vey  and  the  Geodetic  Survey  of  Canada  for  co-operative 
action  in  e.Ktending  a  primary  triangulation  net  along  the  49th  parallel  International 
Boundary  to  form  a  basis  for  all  future  triangulation  work  which  may  be  required 
in  the  West.  It  was  agreed  that  the  Canadian  portion  of  this  survey  should  extend 
from  the  lake  of  the  Woods  to  the  109th  meridian  and  that  the  United  States  parties 
should  survey  the  section  between  the  109th  meridian  and  the  Pacific  coast.  Recou- 
naissance  covering  about  500  miles  of  the  Canadian  section  was  completed. 

In  British  Columbia  reconnaissance  was  carried  np  the  Fraser  river  from  Van- 
couver to  Kamloops.  Through  the  co-operation  of  the  Air  Board  a  hydroplane  was 
available  for  this  work.  Along  the  coast  reconnaissance  and  primary  triangulation 
were  continued  between  Xamu  and  Prince  Rupert.     This  section  of  primar.v  trian- 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  17 

SESSIONAL   PAPER   No.   12 

gulatioii  is  part  of  an  international  oo-ordinatod  sclionie  for  trianj^ulation  control 
along  the  Pacific  coast  through  northern  United  States,  British  Colunihia,  south- 
eastern Alaska.  Yukon  and  the  main  i)art  of  Alaska. 

Nine  hundred  and  eighty-five  miles  of  precise  levelling  were  added  to  the  level 
net,  making  the  total  amount  to  date  15,01G  miles.  Three  hundred  and  eighty-four 
permanent  hench-marks  were  estahlished,  bringing  the  total  number  at  the  present 
time  to  4,544. 

It  is  to  bt>  noted  that  the  lines  of  precise  lcvt>ls  which  have  been  run  by  the 
national  geodetic  organizations  of  the  United  States  and  Ca)uida  will  strengthen  the 
precise  level  nets  of  the  two  countries. 

ISTKP.XATIDXAL    IIOI'.ND.VRY 

The  surveying  operations  in  connection  with  the  demarcation  (jf  the  Interna- 
tional boundary  along  ths  different  sections  from  the  Arctic  ocean  to  the  Atlantic,  a 
total  distance  of  4,083  miles,  have  been  practically  completed. 

The  boundary  line  as  defined  in  the  different  treaties  follows  in  many  places 
along  the  middle  of  rather  small,  tortuous  streams  and  in  order  to  have  a  practical 
line  of  demarcation  it  was  necessary  to  define  a  great  number  of  short  courses.  Most 
accurate  traver.ses  were  necessary,  and  the  length  and  direction  of  each  course  were 
determined. 

These  conditions  were  found  between  the  height  of  land  and  the  Eainy  lake  on 
the  Ontario-ilinnesota  boundary,  along  Monument  brook  at  the  head  of  the  St.  Croix 
river  between  Maine  and  New  Brunswick,  and  along  the  southwest  branch  of  the 
St.  John  river  between  Quebec  and  Maine. 

One  party  operated  or  the  St.  Croi.x  river  and  another  on  the  Ontario-Minnesota 
boundary,  thi-ough  the  Rainy  Lake  system.  They  each  worketl  in  connection  with  a 
United  States  party. 

A  party,  headed  by  the  engineers  to  the  Canadian  and  Unitetl  States  sections 
of  the  connnission,  made  an  inspection  of  the  boundary  line  and  an  examination  of 
the  monuments  between  the  gulf  of  Georgia  and  the  summit  of  the  Rocky  mountains. 
A  number  of  monuments  have  been  damaged  and  will  have  to  be  replaced  or  repaired. 
It  was  strongly  urged  by  the  customs  and  immigration  officers  that  the  vista  which 
was  cut  out  fifteen  years  ago,  be  reoj>ened ;  particularly  in  the  vicinity  of  the  different 
customs  houses.  It  is  so  overgrown  in  many  places,  particularly  across  the  Fraser 
delta,  that  there  is  no  indication  of  the  line. 

The  report  on  the  re-establisluncnt  of  the  boundary  from  the  49th  Parallel 
through  the  gulf  of  Georgia,  and  through  the  straits  of  Juan  de  Fuca  to  the  Pacific 
ocean,  was  submitted  to  Parliament  and  distributed  to  th(>  public. 

During  the  year  eighteen  maps  of  the  49th  Parallel  series  were  engraved  and 
lirinted,  nine  of  tlie  section  from  the  St.  Lawrence  to  the  bay  of  Fundy  and  four  of 
the  British  Columbia  and  S.E.  Alaska  section. 

Northwest  Tkiiuitoriks 

Tlie  oil  .-trike  on  the  Mackenzie  river,  in  August,  1920.  approximately  .">0  miles 
north  of  Fort  Norman,  Northwest  Territories,  was  given  wide  publicity  by  the  news- 
papers and  magazines  throughout  Canada  and  the  United  States.  All  indications 
pointed  to  an  oil  stampedi'  into  the  Mackenzie  district  on  the  opening  of  navigation 
in  1921.  and  it  was  deemed  advisable  to  establish  the  Northwest  Territories  Branch 
in  Ottawa  for  the  piirpose  of  administering  the  natural  resources  and  transacting 
departmental  business  pertaining  to  those  territories. 

An  administrative  party  was  despatched  to  Fort  Smith,  via  Peace  river.  This 
party,  consisting  of  a  recorder,  subrecorders,  foremen  carijenters  and  other  workers, 
with  supplies  for  the  erection  of  suitable  buildings,  office  equipment,  and  stationery, 
left  Peace  River  on  May  5,  1921.  in  two  scows,  with  thirty  tons  of  supplies,  and 
arrived  at  Fort  Smith,  without  mishap,  on  the  26th  of  the  same  month. 

12—2 


18  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 

13  GEORGE  V,  A.    1923 

Arrangements  had  been  made  with  the  Department  of  Indian  Affairs  to  secure 
sufficient  logs  and  lumber  for  the  construction  of  buildings  at  Fort  Smith,  but  on 
arrival  the  administrative  party  found  there  were  no  logs  or  lumber  available.  Owing 
to  the  scarcity  of  labour  the  Indian  agent  at  Fort  Smith  had  not  been  able  to  secure 
the  materials. 

It  was  necessary  to  purchase  two  teams,  wagons,  etc.,  to  transport  the  freight 
over  the  portage  between  Fitzgerald  and  Fort  Smith,  as  the  tractors  and  local  teams 
were  kept  busy  hauling  supplies  for  the  oil  and  transportation  companies,  prospec- 
tors, etc. 

Immediate  steps  were  taken  to  secure  logs  and  lumber  for  the  erection  of  per- 
manent buildings  at  Fort  Smith  and  to  establish  Crown  Timber,  Land,  and  Mining 
Eecording  offices  for  the  district.  The  Recording  office  at  Fort  Smith  was  perman- 
ently opened  for  business  on  July  1,  1921,  and  subsequently  suboffices  were  opened 
at  Nomian  and  Resolution.  For  the  purpose  of  accepting  api)lications  from  persons 
who  had  travelled  from  the  Pacific  coast,  the  mining  recorders  at  Dawson,  New 
Westminster  and  Edmonton  were  made  temporary  subrecorders  for  the  Mackenzie 
district. 

ADMINISTRATION'    AND    INSPECTION 

The  administration  building  at  Fort  Smith  was  completed  on  August  15,  1921. 
Settlers,  prospectors  and  tourists  were  furnished  with  all  i>ossible  information  regard- 
ing the  natural  resources  of  the  Xorthwest  Territories  and  every  effort  was  made  to 
facilitate  the  development  of  the  country. 

Timber  regulations,  applicable  to  the  Mackenzie  district,  wore  drafted  and 
authorized,  and  steps  taken  for  their  enforcement. 

An  inspection  was  made  of  all  settlement  lots  and  the  outstanding  claims  for 
free  grants  or  purchases  were  satisfactorily  dealt  vdth  after  the  extinguishment  of 
the  Indian  Title  in  October,  1921.  In  each  of  the  settlements  one  or  two  lots  were 
reserved  for  Government  purposes  in  the  event  of  the  establishment  of  land  agencies, 
radio-telegraph  stations,  aerodromes,  etc. 

At  the  request  of  the  Dominion  Statistician  the  census  of  the  white  population 
of  the  Northwest  Territories  was  taken,  also  the  census  of  the  Eskimo  of  the 
Mackenzie  delta. 

The  appointment  of  officials  and  the  drafting  of  forms  to  he  used  for  registering 
births,  marriages,  and  deaths  in  the  Northwest  Territories  were  taken  up  with  the 
Bureau  of  Statistics.  New  forms,  which  it  is  presumed  will  cover  the  requirements 
for  some  years,  are  in  course  of  preparation  and  will  be  distributed  during  open 
navigation  this  year. 

The  annual  return  up  to  December  31,  1921,  showing  the  number  of  permits 
issued  by  the  Commissioner,  to  import  liquor  into  the  Northwest  Territories  for 
medicinal  and  sacramental  purposes,  was  laid  before  Parliament  on  March  22,  1922. 
The  number  of  permits  issued  was  81  for  207i  gallons,  including  70  gallons  of 
sacramental  wine. 

It  was  decided  to  maintain  the  office  of  the  Mining  Recorder.  Crown  Timber 
and  Land  Agent  at  Fort  Smith  during  the  winter,  and  keep  open  the  Mining 
Recording  suboffice  at  Norman.  There  was  a  staff  of  seven  at  Fort  Smith,  and  of 
two  at  Norman.  Reports  from  these  outlying  points,  have  reached  this  office  by 
every  available  mail. 

During  the  temporary  absence  of  the  postmaster  at  Fort  Smith  the  mining 
recorder  acted  in  that  capacity,  and  a  report  on  mail  conditions  generally  was  sub- 
mitted to  the  Post  Office  Department  which  has  resulted  in  increased  mail  facilities 
for  1922. 

The  administration  of  the  Northwest  Game  Act  was  transferred  in  the  course  of 
the  year  from  the  Commissioner  of  Dominion  Parks  together  with  the  administration 
of  the  Wood  Bison  herds  near  Fort  Smith,  and  the  reindeer  herd  at  Lobster  Bay, 
Quebec. 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MIXISTER  19 

SESSIONAL   PAPER   No.   12 

HOSPITALS   AXB   HEALTH 

In  the  inspection  of  the  settlements,  hospitals,  boarding  schools,  ;uid  day  schools 
were  visited,  and  a  grant  to  the  hospitals  in  the  Mackenzie  district  was  arranged,  for 
all  patients,  on  a  per  capita  per  diem  basis. 

The  Royal  Canadian  Mounted  Police  reported  that,  in  the  Coronation  Gulf 
district,  infanticide,  particularly  in  the  case  of  females,  was  practiced  by  some  of  the 
Eskimo.  When  a  tribe  was  on  the  march,  and  a  female  child  was  born  it  gave  the 
parents  more  or  less  trouble,  and  quite  frequently  tiie  infant  was  desti'oyed.  As  a 
result  a  number  of  Eskimo  tribes  were  reported  to  be  decreasing.  This  condition  led 
to  an  appropriation  of  $1,500  to  be  expended  in  the  purchase  of  wearing  apparel, 
flour,  nt-edles,  tliread,  and  similar  articles,  which  will  be  distributed  by  the  Royal 
Canadian  Mounted  Police  to  Eskimo  parents  with  children  under  five  years  of  ago, 
as  an  inducement  to  retain  and  bring  up  their  children.  This  condition  of  affairs  is 
limited  to  the  Coronation  Gulf  district. 

During  the  summer  of  1921  an  epidemic  of  smallpox  broke  out  among  the  natives 
in  northern  Alberta  and  the  disease  spread  into  the  Northwest  Territories.  With  the 
aid  of  additional  medical  health  officers.  Royal  Canadian  Mounted  Police  and  the 
hospitals,  the  epidemic  was  successfully  combated  and  finally  stamped  out.  Provision 
has  been  made  for  additional  medical  assistance  in  the  Xorman  area. 

ROADS,  TRADE,  AND  NAVIGATION 

The  saw-mill  at  Fitzgerald,  owned  and  operated  by  the  Department  of  Indian 
Affairs,  was  transferred  to  this  department  during  the  past  winter.  At  the  same  time 
the  staff  of  the  mining  recorder,  who  remained  at  Fort  Smith  during  the  winter, 
took  out  a  quantity  of  logs  which  will  be  turnetl  into  lumber  ready  for  delivery, 
on  till-  ojiening  of  navigation,  to  settlers  and  prosijcctors  who  have  been  unable  to 
secure  building  material  from  private  sources. 

During  the  winter  considerable  preliminary  work  was  done  on  a  new  highway 
from  the  Alberta  boundary  to  the  centre  of  the  settlement  at  Fort  Smith. 

The  Union  Bank  of  Canada  opened  a  Branch  at  Fort  Smith  in  June,  1921, 
affording  banking  facilities  for  Government  offices  as  well  as  for  the  public  generally. 
This  convenience  was  greatly  appreciated  by  the  settlers  and  prosjjectors. 

Experimental  farming  operations  which  were  carried  on  by  the  Indian  Agent 
at  Fort  Smith  have  been  discontinued  and  the  stock  and  implements  transferred  to 
the  mining  recorder.  A  certain  amount  of  land  was  broken  in  the  fall  and  seeding 
operations  will,  no  doubt,  be  commenced  in  the  spring. 

On  behalf  of  the  Department  of  Marine  and  Fisheries  aids  to  navigation  were 
established  on  the  Athabaska,  Slave,  and  ^Mackenzie  rivers,  which  proved  of  great 
benefit  to  prospectors  and  the  transportation  companies. 

ARCTIC   EXPEDITIOX 

Owing  to  the  necessity  for  an  extensive  inspection  and  the  placing  of  addition  J 
adniinistrative  posts  on  the  islands  of  the  Arctic  arahipelago,  the  northern  exploration 
ship  Arctic,  which  had  been  on  lightship  duty  in  the  gulf  of  St.  Lawrence  for  several 
years,  was  transferred  from  the  Department,  of  Marine  and  Fisheries  to  the  Depart- 
ment of  the  Interior  and  was  overhauled  and  outfitted  for  a  trip  to  the  north.  The 
work  of  preparation  was  all  but  completed  in  1921,  but  it  was  finally  decided  to  post- 
pone the  sending  of  the  expedition.  The  conduct  of  the  expotlition  was  placed  in 
the  charge  of  the  Northwest  Territories  Branch  and  at  the  end  of  the  fiscal  year  it 
was  anticipated  that  preparations  would  be  complet-^'l  ;i'vl  tli:"  ''■•  I  ■•/•')>  would 
make  the  trip  to  the  north  in  the  season  of  1922. 

12— 2  J 


20  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 

13  GEORGE  V,  A.   1923 
NORTIIWKST    COINCIL 

In  order  to  dewl  with  the  increased  work  the  Northwest  Council  wa?  increased 
from  four  to  six  members  and  is  now  composed  as  follows : —     . 
Commissioner — 

W.  W.  Cory,  C.M.O..  Deputy  :N[inister  ,,f  the  Interior. 
Dcpnty  Commissioner — 

Roy  A.  Gibson,  Assistant  Deputy  Minister  of  the  Interior. 

Councillors — 

J.  W.  Greenway,  Commissioner  of  Dominion  Lauds. 

Dr.  Charles  Camsell,  Deputy  Minister,  Department  of  Mine,-. 

H.  H.  Rowatt,  Superintendent  of  Mining-  Lands  Branch,  Deparimeut  of  the 

Interior. 
O.   S.  Finnic.  Director  of  the  Northwest   Territories  Brancii,  Department  of 

the  Interior. 
Lt.-Col.     Cortlandt     Starnes,     Assistant     Commissioner.     Royal     Canadian 
Mounted  Police. 
The  council   is   composed   wholly   of   officers   of   the   Dominion   Government    who 
perform  their  council  duties  without  any  extra  remuneration. 

NORTHWEST  TERRITORIES  REVENUE 

Statemknt — Revenue  collected  in  the  Northwest  Territories  in  the  fiscal  year  1921-22. 
Dominion  Lands —  J  cts.  $  cts. 

General  sales 1.170  90 

Sundry   fees 100   00 

Miscellaneous  fees 30  00 

Suspense  account 12   00 

I.ni2   90 

Crown  Timber — 

Timber  dues 2,370   CS 

Hay  permits 30  7.t 

2.407   43 

Mining — 

Petroleum 113.443   40 

Registration  fees ISO  00 

Mining  fees 1,40S   00 

115.031   40 

General — 

Liquor  permit  fees 194   00 

Fines  and  forfeitures 222   00 

Trappers'  licenses 1,599   on 

Traders'  licenses 1,280   00 

3,295   00 

Grand  total 122,046   73 


Dominion  Observ.\torv,  Ott.^wa 

Work  with  the  meridian  circle  was  prosecuted  on  the  same  programme  as  in 
recent  years,  observations  having  been  obtained  on  1'3&  nights.  The  observations  for 
the  present  programme  are  now  practically  completed,  with  tlje  exception  of  two  or 
three  months'  work  which  can  not  be  carried  out  till  the  coming  autumn  and  winter. 

Field  observations  for  latitude  and  longitude  were  carried  out  at  live  stations  in 
the  Mackenzie  basin.  Since  only  one  of  these  stations  could  be  reached  by  telegraph 
the  connection  for  longitude  was  made  by  wireless  telegraphy.  For  this  purpose  the 
wireless  time  signals  sent  out  from  three  United  States  stations  were  used,  the  signals 
being  observed  both  at  the  field  stations  and  at  Ottawa ;  the  longitudes  are  thus  based 
strictly  upon  Ottawa,  irrespective  of  the  accuracy  of  the  time  signals  employed.  At 
the  one  station  which  could  be  reached  by  telegraph  the  longitude  was  determined 
both  in  the  ordinary  way  and  by  wireless  signals,  the  interagreement  between  the 
two  methods  being  highly  satisfactory.  A  publication  has  been  issued  containing  the 
results  of  all  latitude  and  longitude  observations  which  have  been  carried  out  by  the 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  21 

SESSIONAL   PAPER    No.    12 

Observatory  up  to  the  end  of  IDli),  tn<;ftlier  with  the  sohition  ami  adjustment  of  the 
Canadian  longitude  net. 

This  observatory  also  »xi-operatcd  in  the  Australian  longitude  campaign  carried 
out  by  Adelaide  Observatory,  by  receiving  the  wireless  time  signals  eent  for  that  pur- 
pose by  Annapolis,  ilaryland,  U.S.A.,  and  Lafayette,  France. 

The  time  service  has  been  maintained  as  in  previous  years,  and  the  time  system 
in  the  new  Parliament  Buildings  has  been  connected  with  the  observatory.  Ten 
secondary  master  docks  are  synchronized  continuously;  these  in  turn  control  over 
550  clocks  and  dials  of  various  kinds,  including  the  tower  clocks  at  the  observatory 
and  the  city  post  office.  Relays  beating  seconds  are  maintained  in  three  offi>ses  in 
the  city,  one  clock  is  synchronized  every  hour,  time  signals  are  sent  out  by  telegraph 
and  telephone,  and  the  time  is  recorded  on  the  various  seismographs  at  the  observa- 
tory. 

A  time  comparison  is  made  daily  with  Washington  and  Paris  by  means  of  the 
wireless  time  signals  sent  out  by  Annapolis  and  Lafayette.  This  is  in  co-operation 
with  the  International  Time  Commission  in  connection  with  an  investigation  of 
une.xplained  discrepancies  in  meridian  obeervations.  E3q)eriniental  work  has  been 
continued  in  c<innection  with  the  chronograph  registration  of  wireless  time  signals, 
and  a  method  of  registration  has  been  developed  which  i-s  praotically  free  from  sys- 
tematic error. 

The  l.'i-inch  equatorial  telescope  has  been  utilized  as  heretofore  for  obtaining 
radial  velocities  of  stars,  a  total  of  942  speetograme  having  been  made,  with  exposures 
varying  from  30  to  70  minutes;  102  direct  photographs  (average  exposure  three  hours) 
have  also  been  obtained  with  the  .short  focus  camera  attached  to  the  equatorial.  The 
work  has  largely  been  confined  to  the  study  of  stars  of  the  Beta  iCanis  Majoris  type; 
quite  a  large  number  of  these  have  been  discovered;  several  of  them  have  been  studied 
somewhat  in  detail  and  show  very  interesting  peculiarities.  Considerable  experimental 
work  has  also  been  done  with  the  S-ineh  doublet  camera  in  order  to  determine  the 
light  curves  of  some  of  the  stars  of  this  type  at  the  same  time  as  the  radial  velocity 
curves. 

Three  publications  have  been  jjrcpareil  during  the  v;ourse  of  the  year,  describing 
the  investigations  in  progress. 

The  equatorial  has  been  available  to  the  public  on  Saturday  nights,  and  this 
privilege  has  been  taken  advantage  of  by  many  visitors. 

With  the  coelostat  and  solar  spectograph,  304  plates  comprising  over  1,450  obser- 
vations recording  over  13,000  strips  of  solar,  iodine,  and  electric  arc  spectra  were 
secured.  Also  52  i)hotographs  of  the  sun  were  taken  with  the  coelostat  camera  to 
record  sun-spots,  and  measurements  of  the  spcctograms  have  been  carried  on  as  usual. 
A  first  instalment  (four  sections)  of  "  Spectroecopio  Investigations  of  the  Sun " 
(Volume  VI  of  "  Publications  of  the  Dominion  Observatory  ")  has  been  prepared. 
Some  results  of  the  .vear's  work  ma.v  be  mentioned:  Diseovei-y  and  elimination  of  an 
important  error  due  to  capillary  lag  in  oil  of  micrometers;  measurements  of  sunspot 
spectra  support  our  pore  theory  of  variation  in  solar  wave-lengths,  and  this  theory 
has  been  applied  to  cepheid  variation:  measurements  of  the  solar  rotation  in  1915 
were  found  to  de<'line  progressively  from  January  to  July — a  change  explained  in 
terms  of  "blended  spectrum."  The  new  double  spectrcn'omjiarator,  designed  in  1917. 
was  satisfactorily  finished  in  the  observatory  machine-shop.  Vacuum  arcs  were 
designed  in  preparation  for  an  extended  programme  of  observation  of  arc  and  solar 
wave-lengths. 

With  the  photographic  equatorial  telescope  the  observing  programme  has  not 
been  regularly  carried  out  owing  to  lack  of  observ'crs.  Some  work  has  been  done  on 
the  reduction  of  previous  observations,  the  magnitude  scale  derived  being  in  go<:)<l 
agreement  with  that  of  Professor  Parkhurst.  The  thermopile  equipment,  consisting 
of  thermopile,  light-source,  condensing  lenses,  and  projection  lenses,  has  been 
mounted  and  some  experimental  work  has  been  done  with  it  during  the  year. 


22  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 

13  GEORGE  V.  A.  1923 

The  operation?  of  the  magnetic  survey  were  carried  out  aloup;  the  line-  followed 
durinp:  previous  years.  Field  observations  for  the  magnetic  elements  were  made  at 
over  fifty  stations  in  southeastern  Ontario,  Quebec,  and  the  Maritime  Provinces.  A 
publication  has  been  issued  giving  the  results  of  all  our  magnetic  observations  up  to 

1920,  comprising  about  500  magnetic  stations  from  coast  to  coast,  and  containing 
the  values  of  declination,  inclination,  and  intensity,  all  reduced  to  epoch  1921, 
including  a  map  showing  graphically  the  declination  at  each  of  the  magnetic 
stations. 

Gravity  work,  which  had  been  suspended  for  some  years,  owing  to  the  lack  of 
an  observer,  was  resumed  during  the  last  season.  The  stations  occupied,  in  addition 
to  observations  at  Washington  and  Ottawa  for  standardization  purposes,  were  the 
same  as  those  occupied  for  latitude  and  longitude  in  the  ^Mackenzie  basin.  Work  of 
this  kind,  in  this  region,  forms  a  marked  addition  to  available  data,  on  account  of 
the  far  northern  situation  of  the  stations,  very  little  work  having  been  done  in 
latitudes  as  high  as  this.  Such  work  is  also  useful,  in  this  particular  region,  in 
connection  with  the  possibilities  of  the  existence  of  oil  and  gas.  A  publication  has 
been  prepared  covering  this  work  as  well  as  giving  a  reduction  of  all  previous  gravity 
work  done  in  Canada. 

During  the  year  there  were  eighty-nine  earthquakes  registered  at  Ottawa,  of 
which  but  a  very  small  number — eighteen  in  all — admitted  of  a  distance  estimation; 
the  season  was  remarkable  for  the  small  number  of  well-marked  earthquakes.  All 
the  instruments  were  kept  recording  continuously,  and  in  addition  to  the  Bosch 
seismographs  and  the  Wiechert  vertical  instrument,  there  was  received  and  installed, 
as  a  north-south  component,  one  of  the  Milne-Shaw  seismographs  on  order.  This 
instrument  is  now  satisfactorily  recording  in  the  vault  previously  provided  for  its 
reception. 

The  series  on  the  Location  of  Epicentres  was  continued,  the  location=  for  1917- 
18-19  appearing  in  two  publications. 

Eeports  have  been  made  monthly  to  120  stations,  the  reports  being  issued  as  a 
rule  between  the  first  and  the  fifth  of  the  month  for  the  preceding  month;  reports 
from  these  stations  have  also  been  received  here. 

The  seismographs  at  Halifax  and  Saskatoon  have  furnished  us  with  their  records 
for  reading  and  the  results  have  been  published  in  our  bulletins.  The  vindagraph  at 
Chebucto  Head,  Nova  Scotia,  has  also  furnished  records  of  the  wave  counts  which 
have  been  incorporated  into  our  records  here. 

The  observatory  library  at  present  contains  nearly  11,000  bound  books  and 
pamphlets;  the  bindery  has  continued  to  be  very  useful  in  binding  and  numbering 
books  and  pamphlets,  mounting  maps,  repairing  books  and  other  such  work. 

During  the  year  there  have  been  two  international  astronomical  meetings,  one 
at  Middletown.  Conn.,  the  other  at  Toronto.  At  both  of  these  meetings  the  Obser- 
vatory was  represented  by  the  Director  and  several  members  of  the  staff;  thirteen 
papers  were  presented,  covering  the  various  phases  of  observatory  work. 

Dominion-  Astrophysical  Observatory,  Victoria,  British  Columbia 

This  is  the  fourth  annual  report  of  the  work  of  the  Dominion  Astrophysical 
Observatory  in  which  actual  observations  commenced  on  May  6,  1918.  The  details 
of  the  work  are  presented  in  complete  form  in  the  publications  of  the  observatory 
of  which  11  numbers  were  published  during  the  year,  the  total  number  to  date  being 
31.     It  will  be  necessary  here  only  to  present  a  brief  description  of  the  work. 

The  observing  weather  during  the  past  year  has  been  poorer  than  even  the 
previous  year  which  itself  was  poorer  than  the  two  first  years.     In  the  year  April  1, 

1921,  to  March  31,  1922,  1,561  stellar  spectra  were  photographed,  between  the 
numbers  5829  and  7389.       The  total  number  of  nights  the  dome  was  onened  and 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  23 

SESSIONAL   PAPER   No.   12 

observing  started  was  224.  On  7  of  these  nights  no  successful  observations  were 
made  and  on  27  nights  only  one  spectrogram  was  secured.  On  97  nights  the  sky 
remained  clear  for  a  considerable  part  of  the  usable  time,  on  the  average  about  60 
per  cent,  and  on  93  nights  the  sky  was  clear  for  the  whole  night.  On  the  remaining 
141  nights  the  sky  was  either  wholly  cloudy  or  so  broken  that  no  observations  were 
attempted. 

The  first  main  programme  of  work  of  the  observatory,  the  determination  of  the 
radial  velocities  of  upwards  of  700  stars  from  Boss'  Preliminary  General  Catalogue 
was  completed  during  the  year  and  the  results  published  in  two  numbers.  Vol.  II, 
Xo.  1,  "The  Radial  Velocities  of  j94  Stars.''  and  Vol.  I,  No.  26,  "Eighty-eight  Spec- 
troscopic Binaries,'"  Vol.  I,  No.  10,  "One  Hundred  Spectroscopic  Binaries,"  having 
appeared  earlier.  Observations  and  measurements  for  this  major  work  were  com- 
pleted by  July,  the  preparation  of  the  manuscript  for  publication  occupied  about  a 
month  and  it  was  finally  received  from  the  printers  about  the  end  of  the  calendar 
year.  The  main  publication  contains  the  velocities  of  537  constant  velocity  stars, 
the  velocities  of  the  systems  of  22  spectroscopic  binaries  and  of  35  suspected  binaries, 
a  total  of  594  stars.  There  were  measured  :ind  reduced  to  obtain  these  velocities 
4,970  stellar  spectrograms  and  the  magnitude  of  the  work  will  be  more  easily 
understood  when  it  is  stated  that  the  stars  whose  radial  velocities  had  been  previously 
determined  at  all  other  observatories  over  a  time  interval  of  twenty  years  are  only 
about  2,000  in  number.  In  the  course  of  this  work  188  spectroscopic  binaries  were 
discovered  here  as  compared  with  about  600  discovered  elsewhere. 

A  new  observing  programme  comprising  about  1,500  stars  between  5.5  and  6.5 
visual  magnitude  selected  from  Harvard  50  was  prepared  and  observations  of  some  of 
these  stars  were  secured.  It  was,  however,  felt  desirable,  before  actively  undertaking 
a  programme  of  this  magnitude,  to  finish  up  -sume  smaller  pieces  of  work  which  had 
arisen  in  the  course  of  the  previous  programme.  The  principal  one  is  the  deter- 
mination of  the  absolute  magnitude,  and  hence  of  the  distance  (spectroscopic 
parrallax  it  is  generally  termed),  of  the  stars  whose  velocities  had  been  determined 
here,  and  which  are  susceptible  to  treatment  by  this  method,  about  400  in  number. 
This  method  depends  upon  estimates  of  the  relative  intensities  of  certain  pairs  of 
lines  in  the  spectra  of  the  stars  and  has  been  developd  by  Prof.  Adams,  of  Mount 
Wilson.  Spectra  of  a  considerable  number  of  additional  stars  to  those  already  obtained 
are  required  for  ^tnndardizing  the  method.  It  is  of  considerable  magnitude  and  will 
take  about  another  year  for  completion. 

The  director  has  prepared  a  programme  of  observation  of  all  the  Oe  and  Oe3 
stars  within  reach  at  Victoria.  Stars  of  this  spectral  type  are  relatively  few  m 
number,  only  about  30  in  the  northern  sky,  are  the  stars  of  highest  temperature  and 
are  of  special  interest  in  the  scheme  of  stellar  evolution.  Some  progress  has  been 
made  in  the  observation  and  measurement  of  these  stars. 

Considerable  preliminary  work  has  been  done  on  the  distribution  of  intensity 
in  stellar  spectra  but  this  investigation  is  not  yet  far  enough  advanced  to  permit  cf 
any  statement  as  to  results.  Most  of  the  time  after  the  completion  of  the  first  pro- 
gramme of  radical  velocities  has  been  devoted  to  the  observation  and  discussion  of 
three  0-type  spectra.  In  these  spectra  the  presence  of  the  enhanced  helium  com- 
ponents to  the  Baliner  lines,  these  connwnents  being  intermediate  members  of  the 
well  known  Pickering  Series,  has  been  conclusively  demonstrated.  These  components 
previously  foimd  in  tlie  laboratory  and  now  found  in  the  stars  give  strong  support 
to  Bohr's  theory  of  atomic  structure.  From  the  measured  wave  lengths  of  these 
stellar  lines,  independent  values  of  the  Rydberg  and  other  atomic  constants  were 
obtained.  These  values  are  in  excellent  agreement  with  laboratory  values  and  show 
that  atomic  structure  and  behaviour  is  similar  in  the  stars  and  the  laboratory.  Other 


24  DEPARTMEST  OF   THE  ISTEKIOR 

13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1923 

deductions  as  to  teiiijierature  and  otlicr  physical  conditions  are  bcin^  made  and  tlic 
whole  work  will  appear  as  Vol.  I,  Xo.  30,  of  our  publications. 

In  addition  to  these  main  investigations  considerable  additional  time  has  been 
spent  by  the  director  on  the  determination  of  the  spectroscopic  orbits  and  dimensions 
of  eclipsing  variables  and  by  other  members  of  the  staff  on  the  orbits  of  spectroscopic 
binaries. 

The  telescope  and  spectrograph  remain  unchanged  since  last  year's  report  ami 
they  have  worked  in  the  same  satisfactory  manner  as  heretofore. 

During  the  year  an  ultra-violet  spectrograph  for  use  at  the  principal  focus  of 
the  72-inch  telescope  was  obtained  from  Ililgar,  London.  This  instrument  wa- 
receiveil  about  the  new  year  and  considerable  of  the  director's  tin)e  was  spent  in 
testing  and  adjusting  it.  Preliminary  exposures  to  stars  show  very  well  defined 
and  satisfactory  spectra  and  the  instrument  should  be  especially  useful  in  giving 
information  about  the  little-kn(iwn  ultra-violet  portion  of  stellar  spectra. 

The  i>rivilege  extended  to  the  public  of  viewing  celestial  objects  through  the 
telescope  every  Saturday  evening  has  been  continued  and  is  much  appreciated,  the 
average  number  through  the  summer  months  being  about  200  and  even  in  the  bad 
weather  of  the  winter  generally  reaching  50. 

Papers  by  various  members  of  the  staflf  have  been  read  at  scientific  meetings 
during  the  year  and  many  of  these  have  appeared  in  scientific  journals.  These 
investigations  have  in  general  been  published  in  detail  in  the  Publications  of  the 
Dominion  Astrophysical  Observatory. 

Natural  Eesoirce.s  Ixtelligence 

While  the  past  year  has  been  one  of  marked  decline  in  prices — imiwsing  a  trying 
period  upon  almost  every  branch  of  basic  industry — interest  has  not  flagged  regarding 
the  natural  resources  of  Canada  as  a  field  for  development.  More  inquiries  than 
usual  concerning  natural  resources  have  been  received  from  abroad,  particularly 
from  the  United  States. 

Information  Service. — During  the  year  the  Xatural  Resources  Intelligence 
Branch  received  some  25,500  requests  for  information  and,  in  resixinse,  issued  to 
correspondents  tJC.TOO  maps  and  157,000  reports  and  pamphlets.  Roughly  8,800 
publications  were  supplied  to  commercial  firms,  8,300  to  prospective  land  settlers, 
direct  and  about  84,000  to  general  applicants.  The  distribution  by  countries — 37,700 
copies  to  residents  of  the  United  States,  24.300  to  correspondents  in  Great  Britain, 
and  1,500  to  individuals  in  other  countries — denotes  the  widespread  itublicit.v  obtained 
respecting  Canadian  resources.  In  the  preparation  of  the  material  required  to 
conduct  this  intelligence  service  generous  aid  was  received  from  federal  and  provincial 
departments  and  136,000  copies  of  publications  were  supplied  to  such  departments 
for  their  own  use  or  for  further  distribution.  Several  sets  of  slides  with  accompanying 
lectures  on  Canadian  life  and  resources  were  sent  to  (ireat  Britain,  Xewfoundland, 
Australia,  New  Zealand,  and  the  United  States  for  use  by  officials  or  by  publicity 
agencies.  In  addition,  a  circulating  lantern-set  library  for  the  use  of  public  lecturers, 
schools,  community  clubs,  etc.,  has  been  widely  used,  especially  in  Ontario.  Branches 
of  the  departments  of  education  in  Saskatchewan  and  Alberta  have  acted  as  agents 
for  this  service  in  their  respective  provinces. 

Unoccupied  and  Uncidtirated  Lands. — Intermingled  with  the  settled  agricultural 
lands  of  the  Dominion  are  large  areas  of  vacant  lands,  notably  in  the  Prairie  Pro- 
vinces. As  it  is  generally  realized  that  the  total  acreage  of  such  lands  is  very  great 
and  that  the  problem  of  their  early  settlement  is  of  first  importance,  steps  have  been 
taken  to  provide  eflFective  machinery  for  placing  the  land-seeker  in  touch  with  owners 
of  unoccupied  areas.     Investigations    have    been    carried    out    by    the    Department 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  25 

SESSIONAL   PAPER   No.   12 

throufjh  its  Natunil  Resources  Intelligence  Bnuich.  and  lists  of  vacant  lamls  have 
been  published  giving  information  as  to  their  area,  nature  of  soil,  improvements, 
prices  and  terms  of  sale  or  lease,  and  the  owners'  names  and  addresses.  Maps  have 
also  been  issued  showing  the  oxact  location  of  such  lands  in  western  Canada.  To 
date  these  investigations  have  covered  Manitoba,  Saskatchewan,  Alberta,  Xnva  Scotia, 
New  Brunswick,  and  Prince  Edward  Islnnd.  A  new  siirvey  is  now  being  made  of  the 
situation  in  the  Prairie  Provinces  and  revised  list>,  bringing  the  information  up  to 
date,  are  being  prepared. 

Three  statements  dealing  with  the  land  situation  in  Western   Canada   follow. 

DF.T.Mi-FnJ   Statk.me.nt   of    Surveyed    Areas    in   Manitoba,    Saskatchewan   and   Alberta 

January  1,  1922 


Area  under  homestead  (including  military  home- 
steads)   

Area  under  pre-emption,  purchased  homesteads  sales, 
Half-Breed  scrip,  bounty  grants,  special  grants, 


etc 


Area  Krante<l  to  railway  companies 

Area  granted  to  Hud.son's  Ray  Company 

Area  of  School  Land  Endowim-nt  (1-18  of  area  sur- 
veyed in  sections) 

Area  sold  subject  to  reclamation  by  drainage 

Area  sold  under  irrigation  system. 

'Area  under  timber  berths ' 

*Area  under  grazing  leases 

*Area  of  forest  reserA'es  and  parks 

•Area  reser\'ed  for  forestry  purposes  (inside  surveyed 
tract) 

•Area  of  road  allowances 

Area  of  parish  and  river  lots. , 

Area  of  Indian  Reserves 

Area  of  Indian  Reserves  surrendered 

•Area  of  water-covered  lands  (inside  surveyed  tract) . 

Area  now  available  for  entry 


Total  surveyed  area 35,700,028 


Acres 
8,404,800 


5.108,200 
3,566,997 
1,196,700 


908,200 

132,600 

2,386,700 

746,300 
976,900 
505,211 
4.33,860 
87,560 
4,260,400 
5,348,300 


.«ias 
katche 


Acres 
27,634,300 


7,762,900 
15,177,063 
3,183,600 

3,942,000 

267 

76.832 

785,600 

3, 069,. 500 

5.953,700 

1.430,000 
1,467,500 
84,010 
1,071,109 
410,297 
1.911,200 
5,068.000 


79,027,878 


Acres 
18,300,000 


3,895,100 
13,120,014 
2,175,700 

3,7.55.700 
32.505 
y80,.S.50 
1,293,900 
2.933,400 
16.754.000 

1,677,. 500 
1,287,200 
118,564 
1,367,974 
302,228 
2,. 302, 200 
15,460,100 


85,756,935 


Acres 
54,339,100 


16,766,200 
31.864,074 
6,. 556, 000 

9,335,000 
32,772 
1,057,682 
2.987,700 
6.135,500 
25.094,400 

3,8.53,800 
3.731.600 

707,785 
2.872,943 

800,085 
8,473,800 
25,896,400 


200,484,841 


•Area  not  available  for  cultivation. 

The  Land  Situation — Manitoba,  Saskatchewan,  and  Alberta  corrected  to  1st  January, 

1922 


— 

Manitoba 

Sas- 
katchewan 

Alberta 

Total  for 
all  three 
provinces 

Surveyed  area — 

I  Jind •. 

Water 

Acres 

31.4.39.628 
4,260,400 

Acres 

77,116,678 
1,911.200 

Acres 

83.454.7.35 
2.. 302. 200 

Acres 

192,011,041 

S  473  800 

Total 

35,7M.«28 

7»,027,878 

85.756.935 

300,484,841 

Vnsurveyed  area-- 

Land 

Water 

112,131,070 
13,341,200 

75,223,642 
6,836,480 

75,423.925 
2. 201.. 540 

262.778,637 
22.379,220 

Total 

12S,47?,We 

143,570,698 
17,801,600 

82,W*,122 

152,340,-320 
8,747,680 

77,t?5.4CS 

1.58.878,660 
4.503,740 

285,1S7,8S7 

454,789,678 
30  8.53  020 

Total  area- 

Water 

Grand  total 

ui,in,iK 

1C1,«88,«M 

1$$,382,4H 

485,M2,«S8 

DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 

13  GEORGE  V,  A.   1923 
Statement  of  Land  Sales  by  Railway  Companies  having 


Hudson's  Bay 

Canadian  Pacific 

Manitoba  South- 
western Colonization 
Railway  Company 

Qu'Appclle,  Loni! 
Lake  and  Saskatche- 

Company 

Railway 

Company 

wan  Itailroad  and 
Steamboat  Coinpanv 

Year 

Acres 

Amount 

Acres 

Amount 

Acres 

Amount 

Acres 

Amount 

$ 

S 

S 

$ 

1S93 

48^225 
23,209 

93,184 
43,155 
55,453 

295,288 
131,628 
176,950 

14.164 
6.312 
5.623 

57,559 
280,003 
22,330 

1,603 

640 

2,391 

1894            

7.526 
4,431 

1895 

1S96 

9.299 

52,410 

66,624 

220,360 

21.2.54 

88,, 568 

286 

1897 

10,784 

.53,277 

135,681 

431,095 

63,800 

634,644 

2,524 

IS98 

62.000 

310,000 

242, 135 

757,792 

106,473 

363.982 

22,. 534 

1899 

.56.875 

274,625 

261,832 

814,857 

.58,019 

1 99,. 558 

61,030 

178,517 

1900 

70, 196 

.3.52,631 

379,091 

1.152,836 

1.33,507 

437,449 

18,932 

.53.974 

1901 

82, 308 

399,804 

339,985 

1,046,665 

59,749 

214,9.53 

22,266 

74,810 

1902 

269,  .577 

1.412,332 

1,362,478 

4,440,500 

206,411 

713,365 

.39,8.35 

147,365 

1903 

330,046 

1,9.39,804 

2,260,722 

8,472.2,50 

2.50,372 

699,210 

843.900 

1,476,900 

1904 

144.857 

879,910 

857,474 

3,516,864 

29,522 

113,303 

1905 

139.721 
236,191 

865,905 
1,863,375 

411,451 
1,012,322 

2,045,800 
6.015,060 

80,342 
83,418 

296,936 
360,889 

1906 

1907    (9   months 

to  March  31),. 

69, 158 

742,221 

851,083 

4,817,682 

3,051 

22,645 

1,353 

16,789 

1908 

21,184 

267,215 

81,060 

727,367 

31,982 

153,007 

5,621 

68,869 

1909 

25,449 

288.836 

29,331 

383,390 

10,396 

84.845 

37,662 

380,371 

1910 

104.. 382 

1,297,454 

655,585 

10,473,425 

14,501 

126,9,50 

106,000 

964,600 

I9I1 

267.038 

3,747,768 

715,095 

10,372,661 

20,313 

284,859 

11 3.. 533 

1,237,204 

1!HJ    , 

42.554 

808,943 

855,280 

12,420,488 

18.932 

117,497 

35,213 

495,116 

I'ji:;  . 

.53.. 581 

1.128,806 

447,1.58 

6,, 348, 352 

2.768 

48,639 

15,395 

2.55,399 

1914 , 

26.292 

572,837 

263,962 

4,242,089 

7,626 

91,948 

1,629 

21,546 

1915 

16.400 

306,550 

151,262 

2,496,872 

489 

5,508 

1,292 

19,118 

1916 

79.31C 

1.273,144 

242,215 

3,670,421 

4,780 

58,808 

12,246 

180,361 

1917 

2.54.941 

4.234,244 

405,764 

6,612,040 

12,470 

165,245 

21,5.33 

331,596 

IfllS   . 

386,394 

6,914,947 

545,285 

11,044,883 

25,933 

321,005 

49,723 

783,062 

1919  .. 

285,561 

4,978,950 

602,555 

10.580,669 

5.289 

67,214 

33,838 

527,670 

1920 

276,628 

4,724,941 

571,571 

11.356,146 

4,623 

56,760 

32,095 

474.895 

1921 

178,301 

3,0.37,369 

275,636 

5,898,994 

1,518 

20.058 

11,432 

160,472 

1922 

33,595 

545,611 

101,497 

1,732,350 

1,519 

15,497 

1,274 

22.315 

Total 

3.544.580 

43.345.343 

14,315,926 

132,695.724 

1,285,1.56 

5,471.134 

1,495,780 

7,870.949 

REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  27 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.   12 
Goverument  Land  Grants,  and  by  the  Hudson's  Bay  Company. 


1  algarv    and    Edmon- 
ton Railway  Com- 
pany 

Canadian  Northern 
Kaihvay  Company 

Great  Northwest  Cen- 
tral Railway  Company 

Total 

Average 
per 

Acres 

Amount 

Acres 

Amount 

Acres 

Amount 

Acres 

Amount 

II  2(iO 

s 

$ 

i 

120.211 
fiS.  6fiS 

$ 

.352,847 

207.856 

222.489 

361.. 338 

719,016 

1.431.774 

1.520.792 

2,125,146 

2,088,269 

7.746,9.58 

14.651.757 

5., 5  W,  240 

5.046,572 

9,871,241 

7,697,930 
3,052,461 
2,211,885 
15,835,228 
19,122,937 
18.224.419 
9,867,155 
7,398.191 
3.279.031 
5.4.35.949 
12. 357.. 377 
20.887,600 
18,148,736 
19,188,225 
10,860,756 
2,8,33,572 

S  c. 

2  93 

1 1 . 035 

3  02 

46.815 
if.  553 

114,713 
108.016 

1  94 

3  34 

9  436 

222,225 

3  23 

15.481 

448.623 

462,494 

648,379 

621,027 

2,201,795 

4,229,011 

1,267,187 

990,005 

1,642,084 

1,237,759 

346,693 

109..373 

1,184,790 

1,406,651 

1,329,390 

707.149 

,501,575 

192,801 

,3,54.886 

755,154 

1,116,237 

1,0,38,6,57 

1.026.157 

553.6.30 

155,239 

3  18 

24  738 

.53,335 
128,256 
352,037 
1.033.. 396 
909. 800 
.563,507 
512.898 
480. 063 

.346.064 
75.644 
06.. 508 
182,926 
116.231 
1.54.424 
44.212 
460. 129 
444.018 
172.033 
573.875 
815.628 
479.496 
425. 65fi 
191. 928 
51.603 

3  28 

46.6.53 

3  27 

116  719 

3  36 

323.494 

128,435 
41,8,58 
17,. 593 
20,003 

4,023 

1,294 
165 
.571 

1,438 
632 

1,601 

316 
4.646 
8,829 
16,021 
14,, 530 
27,981 
5,128 
167 

522,490 
177,081 
103,564 
137,503 

41,470 
13,855 
7,935 
6,863 
27,417 
11,373 
32, 105 

6,956 

81,182 
141.439 
275,724 
2,52,774 
464,586 
96,616 
2,997 

3  56 

2.'!1.S00 
129.007 
109.191 

S5. 784 

59.515 
8,606 
6.370 
18.323 
11.820 
10.8.53 
4.1.55 
19.. 575 
23.042 

183,736 
64,469 
231.707 
204.966 

289.576 
.196.946 

285,428 
277.414 
365. 926 
182.491 
182,491 

631,503 

313,575 

1,221,469 

1,014,351 

1,711,109 
1,746,504 

2,783,010 
3,336,797 
4,216,,578 
2,009,642 
2,009.642 

3  46 

4  39 

5  09 

6  01 

6  02 
8  80 
11  08 
13  36 
13  59 
13  70 

13  95 

14  75 
17  01 

11.689 

15  32 

.33.821 
.53.. 3.35 
31.774 
26.953 
11.681 
3.024 

17,796 
.39,. 546 
65.110 
86.305 
69,934 
14,163 

298,938 

732,351 

1,261,963 

1,685,241 

1,455,319 

263.199 

16  .35 
18  71 

17  47 

18  69 

19  61 
16  96 

1.506.. 502 

8.633.467 

2,758,004 

26.691.191 

295,231 

2.403.939 

25,201.179 

227.111.747 

9  01 

DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 


13  GEORGE  V.  A.   1923 


Accounts 


Statement  of  Gross  Cash  Eecoipts  from  all  Sources,  Duriiij;  the  Fiscal  V»'ar  endoil 
March  31.  1922,  Compared  with  Receipts  for  the  Previous  Fiscal  Year. 


Source  of  Revenue 

1921-22 

1920-21 

Increase 

Decrease 

Net  Decrease 

$       cts. 

2,918,529  .59 

2,33.5,726  83 

8,446  48 

.372,. 350  89 

20, 128  63 

524  64 

2,912  73 

S,800  00 

%      cts. 

4,086,076  49 

4,480,270  67 

8,887  88 

773,200  67 

811,970  45 

448  31 

1 , 139  75 

27,602  30 

$       rts. 

$       rt.^. 

1,167,546  90 

2,144,543  84 

441  40 

400,849  78 

791,841  82 

$        rts. 

76  33 
1,772  98 

Registration  fees — Yukon 

Sales  of  railway  lands — Special 

18,802  30 

5,667.419  79 

10,189,596  52 

1,849  31 

4.524.026  04 

4.. 522. 176  73 

REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  29 

SESSIONAL   PAPER   No.   12 

Statkment  of  Casli  Receipts  uii  Account  of  Doniinioii  Lands  Revenue  for  the  Fiscal 
Year  Ended  March  ol,  1922,  as  Compared  with  tlie  Receipts  for  the  Previous 
Fiscal  Year. 


Particulars 


1921-22 


1920-21 


Increase 


Decrease 


Net   Decrease 


Home.stea<l  fees 

.Sale  fees 

Improvements 

Pre-emption  sales  under   190S 

Act 

Purchased  homestead  sales 

General  sales 

Map  .sales,  office  fees,  etc 

Rentals  of  land 

Survey  fees 

D.L.S.  Examination  fees 

Patent  and  interchange  fees... . 

•Suspense  account 

Interim   receipt  account — 

Yukon 

Miscellaneous... 

Timber  dues 

Grazing  rental 

Gra/,in(;  lands  improvements.. 

Hay  pcniiils     

Irri>;ati..nf..^. 

Irrigation  sales 

Sale    of    trees,    etc. — Forestry 

Branch 

Fisliing  permits — Forestry 

Branch 

(foal  lands 

Mining  fees 

DredRing  leases 

Hydraulic  leases 

Pota.sll  Iraki's 

Petroleum  leases 

Export  tax  on  gold . 

Free  certificates  for  export  of 

Kold 

Stone  quarries 

Sand,  stone  and  gravel 

Rent  of  water-power 

Amber  lea.ses 

Quartz  rental 

Rocky  Mountains  park 

Jasper  park 

Waterton  Lukes  park 

Yoho  park 

Antelope  park 

BufTiilo  park 

Elk  Island  park 

Fort  Anne  park 

Glacier  park 

Moose       .Mountain        buffalo 

reser\-e 

Point  Pelee  park 

Isle-aux-Noix  reserve 

Kootenay  park 

Liquor  permits  N.W.T 

Traders  licenses  N.W.T. . . . 
Trappers  licenses  N.W.T. . . 
Taxidermist  licenses 


Refunds 


7.1.540  00 

170  00 

5.">,IB8  1,'i 

660,501  II 
36,200  35 
.52,178  91 
23.3.52  07 
10.924  49 

170  00 

470  00 

10.294  23 

61  00 

5,006  18 

683,490  99 

144.344  67 

916  70 

24,398  99 

436  00 

12.969  52 

2.843  75 

1,420  00 

413.913  67 

.SS.962  73 

2,538  30 

2,569  00 

1,553  75 

488.359  75 

.30,774  68 

4  50 

7,527  23 

1,363  75 

3.429  .56 

238  00 

I.Ofil  90 

.59.208  63 

7,973  01 

3,148  12 

1.544  12 

1,015  20 

226  85 

80  00 

45  00 

285  38 

452  60 

21  02 

215  00 

8  75 

194  00 

1,280  00 

1..599  00 

79  00 


.53,880  00 

50  00 

69.732  66 

1,484,277  49 

93,571  24 

135,749  20 

16,333  67 

12,029  05 

31  65 

200  00 

320  00 

3,400  79 

578  15 

11,212  29 

705,313  r 

183,756  9' 

760  00 

30,217  62 

399  00 

7,573  68 

7,269  12 

1 , 660  00 

457,065 

fi.5,824  73 

1,443  22 

2,160  00 

893  80 

620,872  62 

31,126  21 

1  50 
9,842  92 
2,5.37  74 
3.244  93 


60.961  23 

5,473  12 

2,896  13 

1.206  09 

409  60 

124  15 

31  50 

38  00 

230  82 

35  60 
l,:i41 


19.660  00 
120  00 


1.50  00 
0.893  44 


37  00 

.  395  84 


23,138  00 

1,095  08 

409  00 

659  95 


184  63 

238  00 

1,061  90 


251  99 
338  03 
605  60 
102  70 

48  50 
7  00 

.54  56 

417  00 


215  00 

8  75 

194  00 

1,280  00 

1,599  00 

79  00 


823,776  .38 
57,370  89 
83,570  29 


1,104  56 
31  65 
30  00 


517  15 
6,206  11 
21,822  78 
39,412  30 


5,818  63 


4.425  .37 


240  00 
43,151  41 


132,512  87 
351  .53 


2,315 
1,173 


2,918,529  .59 
119,079  58 


4,086.076  49 
130,750  93 


73,921  96 


1,241,468  86 
11,671  35 


1,167,546  90 
11,671  35 


73,921  96 


In  addition  to  $52,1T8.91  on  account  of  general  sales,  the  department  received 
$8,800  from  sales  of  railwa.v  lands,  which  sum  as  provided  by  Orders  in  Council, 
has  been  credited  to  special  accounts  in  the  books  of  the  Finance  Department. 


30 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  IXTERIOR 


13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1923 


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SESSIONAL  PAPER   No.   12 


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DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 


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SESSIONAL  PAPER   No.   12 


33 


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34 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 


13  GEORGE  V,  A.   1923 


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1,887,041  18 
1,811,577  61 
2, ,526. 123  55 
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2,751,816  22 
3,228,904  96 
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REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MIMSTER  3 

SESSIONAL   PAPER   No.   12 

STATEMtNT  of  Revenue  Collected  within  Canadian   ^iational  Parks  lor  the  Fiscal 
Year  Ended  March  31,  1922.  as  Compared  with  the  Pre\-iou5  Year. 


Particulars 

Fiscal  Year 

Increase 

Decrease 

Net 
Increase 

1921-22 

1920-21 

Hocky  Mountaim  Park 

$    cts. 

9.497  21 

910  50 

654  55 

S.204  1)2 

2,961  92 

208  00 

10,403  .35 

.'!44  00 

236  00 

102  50 

70  00 

7.-)5  00 

o,S31  .55 

5,160  53 

S    cts. 

11,784  15 

801  38 

1.131  98 

8.580  08 

3.065  21 

207  00 

10,578  20 

307  00 

200  00 

-       103  00 

90  00 

521  00 

6.886  35 
4,044  74 

896  00 
70  00 
67  50 

233  00 
43  00 

220  00 
20  25 

357  00 

5.887  00 
32  00 

6  25 
15  25 
22  00 
54  00 

$   cts. 

$   cts. 
2.286  94 

S   cts. 

•       109  12 

477  43 
375  46 
103  29 

1  00 

174  85 

537  00 

24  00 
0  50 
20  00 

234  00 
i, 121  79 

1,054  80 

896  00 

144  00 
60  00 

360  00 
92  00 
60  00 
4S  85 

.506  00 

6.431  00 

32  50 

10  25 

16  00 
35  OO 
51  00 

17  00 
20  00 

3.471  .50 
59  80 

74  00 

7  50 

Camping  poriiiits 

127  00 
49  00 

160  00 

Sand  and  cnivcl 

Dor  li<■en^es 

28  60 
149  00 
544  00 
0  .50 
10  00 
0  75 
13  00 

Scales     

Ice                 . . 

Saleoflime... 

3  00 

Garden  and  dairy  licenses.. 

17  00 

48  00 
3,643  00 
735  34 
0  55 
171  00 
80  00 

28  00 
171  50 
675  54 
0  55 
144  00 

27  00 

1.270  00 

9  00 

1  00 

635  00 

1.190  00 

9  00 

1  00 

635  00 

Decreaae 

59,208  63 

60,961  23 

4.850  76 

6.603  36 

1,752  60 

W'aterton  Lakes  Park 
Kent 

.SOI  82 
253  00 
129  05 
37  00 

371  73 
170  00 

no  00 

.38  00 

10  00 

1.912  00 

4  00 
44  00 
68  00 
10  00 

4  00 
10  00 

9  00 
10  00 
125  40 

430  09 
S3  00 
19  05 

1  00 
10  00 
149  00 

1  50 
44  00 

1,763  00 
2  50 

6  00 

74  00 

10  00 

7  00 

3  00 

10  00 

10  00 

3  00 
30  00 
33  75 

4  00 

10  00 

600 

20  00 

91  65 

4  00 

3.148  12 

2,896  13 

575  14 

323  IS 

261  99 

36 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 


13  GEORGE  V,  A.   1923 

Stateiikxt   of  Revenue   Collected   within   Canadian  ^National   Parks   for   tlie  Fiscal 
Year  Ended  March  31,  1922,  as  Compare*!  with  the  Previous  Year — Continued 


Fiscal  Year 


Jasper  Park 


K^nt ^ 

Timber  dues ' 

Building  permits 

Boat  licenses 

Hay  dues 

Peddler's  licenses 

Fines 

Grazing  rental 

Guides'  licenses 

Drivers'  and  livery  licenses 

Camping  permits 

Pool,  billiard  and  bowling  licenses. 

Dog  licenses 

Restaurant  licenses 

Butcher  licenses 

Telephone  rent 

("old  water  rates 

Miscellaneous 

Theatre  licenses 

Transfer  fees 

Sand 

Cemetery  lots 

Coal  leases 

Chauffeurs'  licenses 

Garden  and  dairy  licenses 

Auto  permits 

Cat  taxes 

Ice 

Impounding  fees 


Timber  dues 

Rent 

Transfer  fees 

Camping  permits. 
Cemetery  lots. . 
Grazing  rental. . . . 
Fines 


Guides'  licenses 

Miscellaneous 

Pool,  billiards  and  bowling  licenses.. 

Restaurant  licenses 

Butchers'  licenses 

Dog  licenses 

Boat  licenses 

Drivers'  and  livery  licenses 

Auto  permits 

Building  permits 

Peddlers'  licenses 


Buffalo  Park 


Timber  dues... 

Hay  dues 

Grazing  rental. 
Auto  perniitp... 
Miscellaneou.-*. . 
Motor  license 
Ice 


t       cts. 

2,144  79 
4,342  72 
76  00 
.5  00 
3  60 
46  00 


255  00 

47  50 
166  00 

92  00 
170  00 
189  00 
90  00 
30  00 

30  00 

48  00 
83  95 
22  00 

31  00 
6  00 

18  00 


10  00 

4  00 
45  00 
12  00 

5  00 
0  45 


319  92 
530  20 
20  00 
13  00 

70  00 


25  00 
2  00 
.30  00 
50  00 
10  00 
116  00 
12  00 
171  00 
133  75 
35  25 
6  00 


96  25 
32  50 
28  00 
15  00 
39  85 
5  00 
10  25 

226  85 


$   cts. 

3,018  23 

84  33 

35  00 

20  00 

5  70 

:»  00 

192  00 

368  00 

.54  40 

313  00 

26  00 

210  00 

208  00 

120  00 

.50  00 

55  00 

33  00 

109  76 

33  00 

12  00 

8  70 

33  00 

282  00 

1  00 

SO  00 

.50  00 

37  00 


4,258  39 
41  00 


5  00 
0  45 


5,473  12 


4,425  S4 


172  50 
517  39 
8  00 
24  00 
3  00 
52  00 

5  00 
15  00 

1  20 
30  00 
30  00 
10  00 
126  00 

6  00 
96  00 

110  00 


147  42 
12  81 
12  00 


10  00 
0  80 


16  75 
25  40 
72  00 
10  00 


6  00 
75  00 
23  75 
35  25 

6  00 

367  03 


79  50 
7  10 

5  00 
39  85 

5  00 
10  25 

146  70 


S   cts, 
873  44 


15  00 
2  10 

192  00 

113  00 

6  90 

147  00 


40  00 

19  00 
.30  00 

20  00 
25  00 


25  81 
11  00 

2  70 

15  00 

282  00 


76  00 
5  00 
25  00 


11  00 
3  00 


REPORT  OF 
SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.   12 
Statement  of  Revenue  Collected 


THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER 


within    Canadian    Xational   Parks   for    the   Fiscal 
Year  Ended  March  31,  1922,  as  Compared  with  the  Previous  Year — Concluded 


Particulars 

Fiscal  Year 

Increase 

Decrease 

Net 
Increase 

1921-22 

1920-21 

Glacier  Park 

$       cts. 

53  88 
9  00 

30  00 
4  50 

30  00 

20  00 

$       cts. 

33  07 
2  00 

35  00 
2  25 

27  00 

20  00 

2  50 
106  00 

3  00 

$       cts. 

20  81 

7  00 

$       cts. 

$       cts. 

500 

2  25 

3  00 

2  50 

S  00 

3  00 

98  00 

40  00 

40  00 

285  38 

230  82 

73  06 

18  50 

54  56 

Elf:  island  Park 
CampinR  permits 

U  00 
44  00 
20  00 

3  00 
26  00 
2  00 
0-50 

S  00 
18  00 
18  00 

0  50 

5  00 

5  00 

80  00 

31  50 

49  00 

0  50 

48  SO 

A  nil  lope  Park 

1,015  20 

409  60 

605  60 

605  60 

Fort  Anne  Park 

45  OO 

38  00 

7  00 

7  00 

Isk  Aux  Xoix  Hcscrce 
Hay  dues 

215  00 

215  00 

215  00 

KooUnay  Park 

8  75 

8  75 

8  75 

Moose  Mountain  Buffalo  Reserve 

452  60 

35  60 

417  00 

417  OO 

Pt.  Pelee  Park 
Rent.. 

12  52 
8  50 

1.341  15 

1,328  03 

8  50 

21  02 

1,341  15 

8  50 

1.328  63 

1,320  13 

M  isccllancoux 

79  00 

4, 102  70 

4.023  70 

Decrease 
4,023  70 

Totals      . 

74,302  68 

76.S.50  09 

11,749  3.S 

14.290  79 

Decrease 
2,547  41 

13  GEORGE  V 


SESSIONAL   PAPER   No.   12 


PART  I 


DOMINION  LANDS 


REPORT   OF  THE   CO.MMISSIOXER,  J.  W.  GREENWAY 

Applications    for    Patent —  1920-21  1921-22 

Number  examined 77,313  72,972 

New  applications 16,041              9.908 

Applications  aocepled  and  notifications  issued 13,080             9.607 

Certificates  of  recommendation  sent  out 5,221              2,636 

Report  of  the  Chief  Inspector  of  Dominion"  Lands  Agencies,  H.  O.  Cuttle 

In  referring  to  the  general  services  rendered  to  the  public  in  the  various  land 
offices  in  the  West,  I  am  pleased  to  be  able  to  report  that  it  has  been  of  a  very  satis- 
factory nature,  as  will  be  shown  by  the  detailed  reports  of  the  agencies,  subagencies 
and  homestead  appraisers  as  submitted  by  Mr.  O.  Xeff,  Inspector  of  Dominion  land 
agencies  in  Manitoba  and  Saskatchewan,  and  Mr.  J.  W.  Martin,  Inspector  in  Alberta 
and  British  Columbia. 

During  the  past  year  I  have  visited  most  of  the  land  agencies,  going  fully  into 
all  matters  which  would  tend  to  improve  the  service  to  the  public,  and  found  the 
general  condition  to  be  satisfactory.  On  my  visits  I  interviewed  a  nunlber  of  tae 
homestead  appraisers,  discussing  the  better  routing  of  inspections  in  order  to  speed 
up  the  work  generally,  and  save  mileage,  and  am  pleased  to  report  a  marked  improve- 
ment in  their  general  work.  There  has  also  been  a  great  number  of  special  investi- 
gations in  connection  with  both  Dominion  lands  and  seed  grain  matters,  a  number 
of  which  have  been  held  under  oath  authorized  under  special  order  in  council.  There 
has  also  been  considerable  work  done  in  connection  with  the  distributions  of  seed 
grain,  also  the  listing  of  accounts  and  the  collection  of  outstanding  indebtedness. 

Report    of    the    Tnspectou    of    Dominion    Lands    Agencies    for    Manitob.v    and 
Saskat(hew.\n,  O.  Neff 

agencies 


Homestead 
entries 
granted 

Land  Sales 

Appli- 
cations 

for 
patent 
received 

Land 

entries 

cancelled 

Permits  Issued 

Agenc.x- 

Ordinary 

and  school 

lands 

Timber 

Hay 

Battlcford 

Dauphin 

Moose  Jaw 

Prince  Albert 

Saskatoon . .                    

Swift  Current                   

343 
611 
334 
1,227 
547 
287 
877 

41 
13 
24 
20 
15 
51 
Mining  lo 

280 

.514 

883 

604 

606 

1.019 

1.183 

uations  (813) 

640 
613 
552 
830 
533 
766 
1,062 
Assessment  | 

409 
293 
3 
669 
64 
91 

622 

704 

1,070 

1,504 

747 
363 

The  Pas' 

ayments  (19 

Total 

4,226 

186 

5,089 

4,996 

1.529 

5,010 

Compared  with  1920-21 

2,394 

254 

8,836 

5,041 

2,042 

7,973 

Compared  with  1919-20 

3,292 

285 

14,352 

4,526 

4,287 

8,669 

'The  Pas  office  is  that  of  a  mining  recorder  who  is  also  subagent. 

39 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 


Sl'BAGE^■CIES 


13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1923 


Naini'  cif  subagcnl 

Subageney 

Applications  tor 

Home- 
steads 

Grazing 
leases 

Grazing 
permits 

Patents 

Inspec- 
tions 

Timber 
Permits 

Hay 
permits 

C.J.Lee 

Assinlboia 

83 

118 

9 

40 

64 

22 
176 

79 
237 

80 
240 

14 
221 

9 
4 

2 
19 
28 
11 

1 
41 

18 
11 

1 
30 
44 

4 
24 
32 

169 
58 
42 
25 

132 
18 
79 
42 

113 
57 

1.53 

1 

87 

M 
37 
26 
23 
55 
19 
77 
57 

109 
58 

125 
1 

127 

35' 

38' 

22 
29 
13 
24 
2 
12 
40 
58 

23 

P.  Goulding    ...    . 

68 

J.  Cusack 

Empres.s 

Lloydminster 

Maple  Creek 

Meadow  Lake .... 
Melfort 

\V.  H.  Holland 

C.  H.  Stockdale  

J.  T.  McCordir 

W.J.  YounR 

North  Battleford . 

Preeceville 

Turtleford 

Tisdale 

118 
67 

D.  McMurphv 

A.C.  Heud 

8 
4 
7 

3 

2 

2 

83 

W.  B.  McLcllan 

The  Pas 

Total 

1,383 

134 

171 

976 

778 

273 

Compared  with  1920-21 . 

747 

157 

200 

2.3.54 

568 

328 

Compared  with  1919-20 . 

836 

350 

4,317 

749 

284 

1  316 

HOMESTEAD   INSPECTORS,   PRINCIPAL   WORK   PERFORMED   BV 


Name 

Headquarters 

Land  in- 
spections 
made 

Applica- 
tions for 
patent 

Miles  travelled 

Wagon 

Rail 

D.  .\nderson 

Battleford 

Dauphin 

Prince  Alljert. . . 
Moose  Jaw 

Saskatoon 

271 
294 
387 
412 
521 
216 
245 
379 
257 
248 
504 
276 
478 
29 
340 
250 

56 
102 
171 
167 
141 
65 
10 
61 
38 
13 
14 
110 

0,727 
,".,.560 
4,414 
8,229 
«,322 
2,958 
5,365 
2,976 
4,387 
7,100 
10,118 
4,883 
9,571 
768 
.S,346 
5.844 

946 

N.  F.  Leach 

6  605 

T.C.Martin 

4,705 

Robt.  Hunt 

2,640 

S.  Taylor 

688 

E.  H.  E.  Webb-Bowen 

2  427 

W.  W.  Whclan 

1  706 

C.  E.  Barr 

W.  Erratt 

14,315 
5,079 
7,445 
1  134 

E.  J.  Hober 

F.  G.  Arnold 

142 
149 
47 

A.  E.  Henke 

2,556 

A.  Smyth 

Winnipeg 

Swift  Current... 

267 
505 
283 
533 
457 
690 
278 
54 
447 
372 
275 
435 

45 
60 
42 
119 
129 
234 
158 
18 
178 
26 
79 
131 

5,932 
6,981 
2,484 
3,847 
4,004 
5, 168 
2.704 
598 
7,614 
6,629 
7,824 
0,671 

5  703 

2  552 

4  847 

3,735 
1  098 

H.  VV.  Mabb 

W.  D.  Gillespie 

2  500 

3,285 
I  389 

W.  Shields 

42 

1  360 

J.  A.  McDonald 

1  699 

Total 

9,703 

2,505 

154,054 

85,994 

Compared  with  1920-21 

11,049 

2,746 

105,791 

85,647 

Compared  with  1919-20 

10,222 

3,050 

149,521 

85, 101 

DOMINION  LANDS  41 

SESSIONAL   PAPER   No.   12 

Repdkt  of  the  Inspector  of  Dominion'  Lands  Agencies  for  Albert.v  and  British 
Columbia,  J.  W.  Martin 


Homt-- 

stead 

entries 

granted 

Soldier 
grants 

Land  sales 

Appli- 
cations 

for 
patent 
received 

Land 

entries 

cancelled 

Permits  issued 

Agency 

Ordinary 

and  school 

lands 

Timber 

Hay 

341 
1,668 
312 
113 
149 

41 
461 

49 

85 
308 
96 
15 
27 
48 
109 
7 

16 
60 
16 
14 

5 
21 

716 
1,348 
384 
101 
409 

40 
279 

22 

531 

2,089 

362 

63 
264 

36 
681 

26 

474 

1.529 
397 
363 
454 

1,467 

500 
95 

388 

Total 

3,134 

695 

137 

3,299 

4,052 

3,812 

1920-21 

2,994 

1,232 

249 

6,947 

4,056 

4.155 

3,830 

SUBAGENCIES 


Name  of 
.Subagent 

Subagency 

Period 

Applications  tor 

Home- 
steads 

Soldier 
grants 

Patent 

Inspec- 
tions 

Timber 
permits 

Hay 

permits 

59 
91 
36 
36 
49 
51 
1 
37 
52 
56 
25 
70 
58 
37 
72 
81 
23 
38 
31 
42 

126 
37 
44 

120 
40 
33 
63 
78 

6 

6 
10 
4 
5 

43 
17 
60 
73 
50 
31 

38 
60 
31 
47 
19 
14 

67 
72 
56 
4 
6 
9 

Dodds,  Geo.  E 

75 

Requier,  E.  E 

Cusack,  J 

Jackson,  \V 

Glover,  1"     .   . 

Barber,  J.  C 

Edgecombe,  H.W.. 
Revnolds,  H 

Ft.  St.  John 

Ft.  Vermilion 

11  months. . 
11       " 

7 
10 
9 
8 
4 
10 
5 
20 
12 
3 

5" 

\l 
3 
1 

23 

1 
3 
9 
2 

2 
20 
33 
19 
37 
137 
69 
(H 
49 
14 
10 
73 
69 
51 

\t 
104 
13 
12 
99 
33 

16 
9 
14 
8 
30 
46 
46 
36 
25 
16 
25 
20 
35 
52 
15 
59 
69 
19 
19 
62 
24 

43 

is 

9 
25 
1 
4 
15 
25 
24 

SO 

21 
23 
3 
59 

13 

ii' 

7 
70 

Holland,  \V.  H 

'2 

Hamel,  P.  D 

52 

Medicine  Hat 

•'6 

Jamieson,  Th 

Hankinson,  R.  T 

Pouce  Coup6 

Rockv  Mtn.  Hse. 

11  months. . 

24 
33 

Row,  Cuthbert 

Reii  Deer 

g 

Cray,  \V.  IJ 

.) 

Kildc3,J.  M 

51 

LaPlante,  J.  R 

St.  Lina 

38 

St.PauldesM^tis 

6  months. . 

Sutton.  \V.  E 

Wood,  \Vm.  J 

Wcstlock 

41 

Todd.  H.  E 

Wetaskiwin 

Closed 

17 

8 

46 

Wenham.M 

Yeoford 

24 

Totals 

1,486 

198 

1,214 

854 

558 

767 

1920-21 

1,203 

389 

2,738 

681 

542 

1,490 

DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 

13  GEORGE  V.  A.   1923 

HOMESTEAD    INSPECTORS,    PRIXCIPAL     WORK     PERFORMED     BV 


Headquarters 


Land  In- 
spections 
made 


Appli- 
cations 

for 
patent 
taken 


Miles  travelled 


Wagon 


Benzie,  J.  M 

Cook,  H . 

Cunningham,  T.  .). 

Doze,  I.  S 

Fleming,  G.  W 

Griffin,  A.  H 

Hagen,  S.  C 

Home,  J.  A 

Key,  A.  E 

Kembry,  R.  A... 

Magee,  \V.  D 

May  berry,  W.  .1. . 
McCowan,  H.  .'^.. 
McConnochie.  A 
McMuUen.  J.  E.. 
Newton.  T.  M 
Nurcombe,  J.. 

Smith,  L.  T   

Tempany.  W 

Taylor,  P.  E 

Wilcox,  D.  E 

Woodlock,  P.  A. . . . 
WjTine,  A.  E 


Totals. 


Kamloops 

Revelstoke 

Edmonton 

Edmonton 

Calgarj- 

Edmonton 

Edmonton 

Edmonton 

Peace  River 

Calgary....! 

New  Westminster. 

Lcthbridge 

Edmonton 

Edmonton 

Peace  River 

Grande  Prairie 

Edmonton 

Grande  Prairie 

Calgary 

Edmonton 

Lethbridge 

Calgary 

Edmonton 


.323 
102 
271 
3  5 
178 
485 
437 
433 
109 
293 
150 
413 
492 
288 
273 
165 
350 
216 
628 
211 
3.30 
405 
356 


7,293 


4,735 
469 
5,615 
4,117 
4,284 
3,822 
5,544 
5,894 
1,.S16 

11.030 
1,082 
8,265 
4,825 
4,190 
4.077 
6.724 
4.009 
6,578 

12,397 
2,300 
6,318 

11,208 
8,096 


127,095 


109, 178 


.920 
180 
,476 
,392 
546 


REPORT    OF    THE    AGENT    OF    DOMISIOX    LANDS,    D.    .T.    ROSE,    BATTLEFORD,    SASKATCIIEWAX 


Land  Patent  Branch —  Xumber 

Homestead  fees 344 

Soldier  grants 84 

Improvement^: .t7 

Land  sales    (cash) 21 

I*re-emption  payments 45 

Purchased  homestead  payments 13 

Searches,  map  sales,  oIKce  fees,  etc..    ..  209 

Applications  for  patent 280 

Applications  for  Inspection 341 

Entries  cancelled 640 

Sundries 6 

Total 

Timber  and  Graziug  Branch — 

Timber  permits 286 

Timber  seizures 15 

Hay  permits 459 

Grazing   rentals    (cash) 420 

Grazing  rentals  (scrip) 5 

Total 

Forestry  Branch — 

Permit  tees  and  rental 193 

Grazing  rent,  etc 125 

Hay  dues,   etc 35 

Total 

Reclamation  Service — 

Sales Sale 

Total 

3f<ninp  Lands  and   Yukon  Branch — 

Mining   tees 26 

Rental 2 

Total 


Revenue 
3,440  00 

2.27- 

1.091 

12.829 

2.719 

39 
04 
97 

1,875 

25 

2,249 

38 

9 

00 

J 

3.677  45 

t 

44  05 

i 

44  05 

% 

ISO  00 
140  49 

DOMISION  LANDS  43 

SESSIONAL   PAPER   No.   12 

REPORT  OF   THE   AGENT  OF  DOMINION   LANDS,  D.   J.   ROSE.   HATTLEFORD.   SASKATCHEWAN — Cotl. 

kchool  Lands  Branch —                                              Number  Revenue                  Total 

Timber  permits 12  $           ri2   50 

Hay    permits 289  1.0G4   75 

Grazing  rentals 42:1  7,653  02 

Cultivation   permits 2  78   50 

Total $      S,S4S   77 

.in.v<'r(!oneou8 — 

Seed  grain  ami  provision  payments.  .    .  .             65  $      5.534   14 

Sundries 1  2   75 

Total $      5.536  S9 

Grand   total $   47,268    19 


REPORT  OF  THE  AGENT  OF  DOMINION  LANDS,  W.  E.  TALBOT.   CALCARY,  ALBERTA 


Land  Patents  Branch — 

Soldier  prants 

Homestead  fees 

Improvements 

Land    sales 

Pre-emption  payments 

Purchased  homestead  payments..    . 

Searches,  etc 

Applications  for  patent 

Applications  for  cancellation 

Entries  cancelled 

Total , 

Timber  and  Grazing  Branch  — 

Ground    rent 

Royalty  on  sales 

Timber  permits 

Timber  seizures 

Hay  permits 

Grazing    rentals 

Sundries 

Total 

Forestry    Branch — 

Permit  fees  and  rental 

Seizures 

Grazing  rent 

Hay  dues 

Total 

/fec/omatiou    .Service — 

Reservoir  rental 

Total 

Mining  Lands  and    Yukon   Branch— 

Mining  fees  (quartz  and  placer)..    . 

Rental   (coal) 

Royalty 

Petroleum    and    natural    gas 

Domestic  coal  permits 

Alkali 

Dredging 

Total 

School  Lands  Branch — 

General    sales 

Timber  permits 

Hay  payments , 

Grazing  rentals 

Coal  rentals  and  fees 

Coal  royalty 

Petroleum   and    natural   gas 

Cultivation  permit 

Gravel   fees 

Total 

Uiacellaneous — 

Seed  grain  and  provision  payments. 
Total 


401 
716 
393 
531 


223 

578 


289 
237 


569 
347 


342 

,155 


Revenue 

(     3,410  00 

4,889  03 

2,201  84 

170,136  87 

5,751  55 

33  65 


7.933  71 

15,698  71 

7,038  34 

369  34 

1,127  25 

6,787  50 

18  00 


$    16.879   94 

569   17 

S,368   60 


4,292  00 

46,956  64 

63,817  93 

38,565  52 

5  00 

432  50 


6,945  49 

198  85 

1,669  61 

24,687  27 

3,847  89 

2,912  12 

2,754  03 

14  08 

26  00 


Grand  total. 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  IXTERIOR 

13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1923 

UEPORT    OF    THE    AGENT    OF    DOMFNION    LAMDS,    E.    WlDMEYEIt,    DAUPHIS,     MANITOBA 

Land  Patents  Branch —  Xnmhir         Revenue                  Total 

Homestead    fees Oil  t     fi.090  00 

Soldier  grants 212                 

Improvements 5S                2.126  80 

Land  sales   (cash) 41                 1.392   77 

Search 1,523                   660  75 


Applications  for  patent. 

Applications    for    inspection R89  

Entries    cancelled '>9Z  

Total 

ibei'  and  Grazing  Bfanch — 

Timber  permits 316  {      2.553   32 

Timber  seizures 25  670   IS 

Hay  permits 444  1,578    73 

Grazing    rentals 44  654   89 

Total 


Forestry    Branch — 

Timber  permits 

Permit  fees  and  rentals. 

Seizures 

'Irazins  rentals 

Hay  dues 

Total 


Mining  Lands  and  Yukon  Branch- 
Fees 

Petroleum  and  gas 

Coal  permits 

Total 


i 

7.934 

83 

186 

on 

838 

14 

1.504 

45 

1,260 

75 

i 

54 

00 

12.322 

07 

17 

00 

School  Lands  Branch — 
General  sales. .  . . 
Timber  permits. .    .  . 

Hay  i>ermits 

Grazing  rentals..    .. 

Cultivation  permits. 

Petroleum  and  gas. . 

Total 


Miscellaneo  us — 

Seed  grain  payments 
Total 


891 

00 

932 

73 

23 

00 

66 

00 

$    308 

00 

Grand  total. 


REPORT    OF    THE    AGENT    OF    DOMINION    LANDS,    A.    NORQUAY,    EDMONTON,    ALBERTA 

Land  Patents  Branch —  Number 

Homestead  fees 1.668 

Soldier   grants 308 

Improvements 256 

Land  sales    (cash) 60 

Pre-emption  payments 5 

Searches 63 

Applications   for   patent 6,482 

Applications   for    inspection 1,017 

Kntries  cancelled 2,089 

Sundries 

Total 

Timber  and   Grazing  Lands  Branch — 

Ground    rent 4  4 

Royalty   on   sales 49 

Timber  permits 1,418 

Timber    seizures 125 

Hay    permits 977 

Grazing   rentals    (cash) 304 

Sundries 146 

Total 


Revenue 

Tota 

$  16.640 

00 

8.658 

10 

3.752 

13 

803 

45 

21 

60 

30 

66 



$  29,905 

$   8,148 

51 

16,459 

07 

62,699 

69 

7,020 

86 

3,005 

10 

1,361 

37 

11,558 

67 

$110,253 

DOMIXION  LANDS  45 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.   12 

REPORT    OF    THE    AGENT    OF    DOMINION    LANDS.    A.    NORgUAY,     KDMONTON.    AI.BERTA Con. 

Forestry    Branch —                                                     Number  Revenue                 Total 

Timber    dues .',8  $    21.788   91 

Permit    fees    and    rental 5"  63   2.5 

Seizures 38  410   0.''. 

DrazluK  rent,  rti' .'i2  TSS   01 

Hay   i.1ues 20  l.")5  2.'; 

Total J   23,215   47 

Hcclnmatioii  Service — 

Sales 9  $         631    92 

Total %         631    92 

Minino  I.imils  and  Yitkm  Branch — 

Mining:  fees .<4  %        543   00 

Rental 91  38,370   59 

Royalty 97  57,891    83 

Coal    permits 16  6.786   00 

Sundries 615  49,476   70 

Total. .'.■ . — —         5153.068    12 

School  Lands  Branch — 

General    sales 2  $      1.228    15 

Timber  iiermlts 60  3.817   74 

Hay    permits 475  1.121    95 

Grazing   rentals 493  .S.179   77 

Mining  fees 1  5  00 

Coal   rentals 11  836  15 

Coal  royalty 2  557  93 

Petroleum 1  10  00 

Sundries 29  3.055   70 

Total $   18.812   39 

Miscella  nco  u  s — • 

Seed  grain  and  provision  payments  ....          147  $     7.4S8  38 

Sundries 7  752   1 3 

Total $      S.240   51 

Grand  total $344,126   96 


UKl'OKT    UK     IIIE   AC.ICNT    OF    DO.MIMON    LANHS,    F.    1-.    CHlilSTIi:,    GRANDE    PUAIUIE,    ALBERTA 


Land  Patents  Branch — 

Homestead  fees 

Soldier  grants 

Improvements 

I.«nd  sales   (cash) 

T>and  sales   (scrip) 

Searches,    map    sales,    office    fees.    etc. 

Applications   for    patent 

Api>Ilcatlons  for  inspection 

Kntries  cancelled 

Total 


Timber  and  Grazinp  firanrh — 

Bonus   (hay) 

Timber  permits 

Timber  seizures 

Hay  jiermlts 

Grazing  rentals  (cash) 

Timber  permits   (e.tcess) 

Hay    permits    (excess) 

Sundries  (lease  fees  and  assignments). 


Total. 


Mininp  Lands  ayid  YitJcon  Branch — 

Mining   fees 

Rental 

Royally 

Petroleum   and   natural   gas 

Dredging 

Sundries   (assignments  and   lease  fees) . 
Total 


Number 

Revenue 

312 

$ 

3.120  00 

;i« 

16 

1 

2.113  73 
906  44 
160  00 

384 
212 
362 


176 
lOS 


1,969 

SB 

196 

05 

479 

00 

2.324 

86 

595 

36 

2 

25 

29 

00 

i      3.945 

00 

440 

75 

31 

59 

23.436 

78 

440 

00 

510 

85 

46  •  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  ISTERIOR 

13  GEORGE  V.  A.  1923 

REPORT  OF  THE  AGKXT  OF  DOMIXIOX  LANDS,  F.  L.  ClIRISTin.  GRANDE  PRAIRIE.  AI.BERTA — Con. 

RecJamation  Service —  Number         Revenue  Total 

Sales 1         $  79  36 

Total $  79   3fi 

School  Lands  Branch — 

Hay    permits    (excess) 1  $  25 

Hay  permits fia  145  50 

Grazing  rentals G4  1.396  64 

Petroleum   and  natural   gas 7  390  00 

Gravel   tolls 1  1  00 

Petroleum   and   natural   gas   assignment 

fees 1  3  00 

Timber    seizures 2  37  20 

Total $     1.973  59 

Miscellaneous — 

Seed  grain  and  provision  payments.  ...  '.'-  $      3.022   70 

Total $      3,022   70 

Grand    total $   45.817   92 


REPORT    OF   THE   .\(:EXT    OF   DOMIXIOX    L.WDS,    \V.    C.    COWEI.L,    K.AMLOOP.'i,    BRITISH    COLUMBIA 


Land  Patents  Branch — - 
?Iomestcad    fees.  . 


Soldier    grants 

Improvements 

Land  sales 

Searches 

Applications    for    patent..     . 
Applications    for    inspection. 

Entries   cancelled 

Sundries 

Total 


3.567   75 

1.349    70 

9S   95 


Timber  and  Grazing  Branrh  — 

Sale  scale  books 

Bonus 

Ground  rent 

Royalty   on   sales 

Timber  permits 

Timber   seizures 

Hay    permits 

Grazing  rentals 

Fire  guarding 

Sundries 

Total 


1,329 

S5 

8,323 

80 

19,603 

85 

4,353 

77 

125 

97 

27 

50 

7,413 

76 

943 

51 

154 

20 

Forestry  Branch — 
Timber  dues.  . 
Permit  dues. . 
Grazing  rent. . 
Hay  dues.  .  .  . 
Total..    .. 


Mining  Lands  and  Yukon  Branch- 

Mining  fees 

Rental 

Coal  permits 

Sundries 

Total 


JJiscellancous — 

Seed    grain    collections. 
Total 


$     50 

00 

192 

30 

200 

00 

1 

00 

Grand  total. 


DOMINION  LANDS 
SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.   12 

REPORT  OF   THE   AGENT  OF   DOMINION    LANDS,   J.   A.    REID,   I-ETHBRinCE.   ALBERTA 


47 


Land  Patents  Branch — 

Homestead  fees 

Soldier  grants 

Improvements 

Tjand   sales    (Cash) 

I're-cmptinn    payments 

Purchased    homestead    payments 

Searches,   etc 

AT>pMcations  for  patent 

Applications  for  Inspection    . .    . 

Entries  cancelled 

Total 


Timber  and  Gracing  Bratirh- 

Tlmber  permits 

Timber  seizures. 

Hay    permits 

Orazinsr   rentals    (Cash).. 

Improvements 

Sundries 

Total 


Forestry    Branch- — 

Timber  dues 

Permit  fees  and  rental . 

Seizures 

Grazing  rent,  etc 

Hay  dues,  etc 

Total 


Muling  Lands  and  Yukon  Branch- 
Mining  fees 

RentaJ 

Royalty 

Petroleum  and  natural  pas    . 

Sundries 

Total 


School  Lands  Branch — 

Timber  seizures 

Hay  permits 

(trazing  rentals 

Mining    fees 

Coal  rental,  petroleum  and  natural   gas. 

Coal  royalty 

Cultivation    permits 

Sundries 

Total .,  . .   ; 


Misccllaneotts — 

Seed    grain    and   provis 


Number 

Revenue 

149 

$ 

1.490  00 

27 

oS 

2.S91  2.'. 

5 

845  20 

9.T 

31.249  10 

15 

1,S33  SO 

2G 

10  01 

409 

169 

260 

Total 


439 
451 


S    37,819    66 


240 

00 

96 

40 

17,990 

37 

25 

00 

9 

00 

S  19.456 

2,460 

21 

457 

00 

121 

ss 

S,841 

00 

" 

75 

5  , 

310 

on 

14,4S3 

22 

53.504 

19 

67.465 

9S 

203 

50 

$135,966 

12 

3" 

47 

25 

10,395 

36 

20 

00 

7,096 

45 

14,003 

95 

276 
ir. 

50 

00 

. 

$   31.866 

83 

Grand   total 


TlIK     V(  Tl\c 


UlENT    OF   UOMIXION    I.AXDS,    G. 
S.^SKATCHEWAN 


A.    NICHOLSON.    MOOSE    JAW, 


r,/  falrnts  Utunch—  Number 

Soldier  grants 42 

Homestead  fees 334 

Improvements 52 

Land  -sales   (Cash) 12 

Pre-emption  payments 303 

Purchased   homestead   payments 24 

.Searches 242 

Applications  for  patent 883 

Applications  for  inspection 550 

Bntiies  cancelled 552 

Total 


3.340  00 

2,850  89 

1.944  40 

SS.94S  09 

4.716  93 


$101,894  06 


48 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 

13  GEORGE  V,  A.   1923 
REPORT   OK   THE   ACTING   AGENT  OF  DOMINION    LANDS.   G.   A.   XICHOLSOM,    MOORE    JAW. 
SASKATCHEWAN — Coil. 

Tlmher  atul  Orazitig  Branch —  Number         Revenue  Total 


Timber  permits 
Hay  permits. .    . 
Grazing   rentals 
Sundries 


540 
1046 


Total. 


Forestry    Brauch — 
Surface  rental  . . 
Timber  dues. .    . 
Permit  fees  and 

Seizures 

Grazing  rental. . 

Hay  ilues 

Total 


.1/iiiin<7  Lands  and  Yufcon  Branch- 

MininK    fees 

Rental 

Royalty 

Sundries 

Total 


ISS 

47 

119 


f'chool  Lands  Branch — 
General    .^sales     .  .     . 

Hay  permits 

Grazing  rentals..    . 

Mining  tees 

Coal  rental 

Coal    royalty.  .     .  . 
Cultivation  permits. 

Sundries 

Total 


528 
980 


Miscellaneoits — 

Seed    grain   and   provision    payi 
Total 


Grand  total. 


409 

60 

12 

00 

1.854 

15 

588 

75 

$   2.036 

00 

1.664 

39 

2.486 

33 

2,030 

00 

$   4.369 

17 

1.674 

4.". 

19.4.31 

67 

REPORT    OF   THE    .\GENT    OF   DOMINION    L.\NDS,    W.    D.    M.\GEE,    NEW    WESTMINSTER,    BRITISH 

COLUMBIA 


Patents  Branch — 

Homestead    fees 

Soldier  grants 

Improvements 

Land   sales 

Purchased  homestead  payments 

Searche.<;.    map    sales,    office    feesi    etc... 

Applications  for  patent 

Applications    for    inspection 

Entries  cancelled 

Sundries,  patent  fees,  etc 

Total 


Mininrt  Lands  and  Yukon  Branch- 
Mining  fees 

Rentals 

Bonus   payments 

Coal    applications 

Sundries,    assignments,    etc... 
Total 


Nutnber 

Revenue 

41    1 

S    410  00 

47 

S 

422  00 

5 

552  30 

12 

484  93 

12 

5  70 

37 

74 

36 

t      1.S89  93 

$   1.000  00 

55.546  10 

532  50 

965  00 

245  50 

58.289  10 

'trand  total 


DOMIXIOX  LANDS  49 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.   12 
UirrORT   OF  THE    AGKXT   OF   DOMIjnON    LANDS,   R,    M.   TREEN,    PRINCE    ALBERT,    SASKATCHEWAN 


Land  Patents  Branch —  Number 

Homestead    fees 1,227 

Pre-emption  fees 1 

Soldier  grants 258 

Imprcivements 116 

Ijand  sales  (cash) 24 

Searches,  map  sales,  office  fees,   etc.    . .  252 

Applications  tor  patent 604 

Applications  for  inspection 649 

Entries  cancelled 830 

Sundries 1 

Total 

Timber  and  Grazing  Branch- — 

Bonus 4 

Ground  rent 42 

Royalty  on  sales 64 

Timber  permits 631 

Timber  .seizures 82 

Hay   permits 1,088 

Grazing  rentals  (cash) 360 

Grazing  rentals   (scrip) 2 

Sundries 1 

Total 

Forestry    Branch — 

Timber  dues 815 

Seizures 11 

Grazing  rent,  etc 75 

Hay  dues,  etc 119 

Total 

Mining  Lands  and  Yukon  Branch — 

Mining    fees 20 

Rental 7 

Royalty 1 

Coal  permits 2 

Sundries 15 

Total 

School  Lands  Branch — 

Timber   permits 35 

Hay  permits 416 

Grazing  rentals 296 

Coal  permits 4 

Cultivation  permits 2 

Sundries 5 

Total 

ilisceUaneons — 

Seed  grain  and  provision  payments....  46 

Total 

Grand  total 


Total 


$   12,270   00 
10   00 


4,760   75 

1,749   17 

88   50 


4.2D1  SO 

11.078  45 

46,845  06 

19,459  06 

1,225  03 

2,997  98 

1,654  17 

18  00 


520.600   25 

242  01 

1,269   76 

S24   25 


100   00 
4,632   00 


$    526 

61 

906 

48 

3.959 

66 

41 

50 

8 

25 

39 

95 

HEI'ORT   OF  TlIK   ACTING   .\GENT  OF  DOMINION    LANDS,    H,    F.    KINCIIAM,    PEACE   RIVER,  ALBERTA 


Land  Patents  Branch —  Number 

Homestead  tees 461 

Improvements 53 

Land  sales 21 

Searches,  sales,  etc 9 

Applications  for  patent 279 

Applications   for  inspection 227 

Entries  cancelled 681 

Soldier  grants 109 

Total 

12—4 


Revenue 

$   4,610   00 

2,508   50 

1.662   35 


60 


DEPARTMEST  OF  THE  INTERIOR 

13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1923 

REPORT  OF  THE  ACTING  AOt:NT  OF  DOMINION   LANDS,   H.   F.  FINCHAM,   PEACE  RIVER, 
ALBERTA — Con. 


Timber  and  Grazing  Branch —  Number 

Timber   permits 499 

Hay  permits 292 

Grazing  rentals 162 

Total 

Forestry    Branch — 

Grazing  rental 1 

Hay  dues 7 

Total 

Mining  Lands  and  Yukon  Branch — 

Coal  royalty 2 

Mining  fees 22 

Plaicr 39 

Dredging 26 

Petroleum  and  natural  gas 532 

Coal  permits' 9 

Prospecting  fees 178 

Total 

School  Lands  Bra7ich — 

General  sales 1 

Hay  permits 90 

Grazing  rentals 51 

Petroleum  and  natural  gas 36 

Coal  rentals 3 

Cultivation  permits 1 

Total 

Miscellaneous — 

Seed  grain  and  provisions 10 

Total 

Grand  total 


Revenue 

t     3.581   89 

1,009   15 

1,113   07 


$     42 

75 

167 

00 

390 

00 

1,147 

00 

38,072 

29 

90 

75 

712 

00 

i           30 

00 

389 

20 

1,185 

41 

2,782 

39 

50 

00 

5 

00 

$60,370  91 


RKPOUT  OF   THE  AGENT  OF  DO.MINION   LANDS,  T.   J.  WADMAN,   REVELSTOKE,   BRITISH   COLUMBl.' 


Lund  Patents  Branch — 

Homestead  entry  fees 

Soldier  grant  entries 

Improvements 

Townsite  payments 

Payments 

Searches,  map  sales,  etc 

Applications  for  patent 

Applications  for  inspection 

Entries  cancelled 

Sundries 

Total 

Timber  and  Grazing  Branch — 

Bonus  

Ground  rentals 

Royalties 

Timber  permits '. . 

Fire  guarding  charges 

Sundries 

Total 

Mining  Lands  and  Yukon  Branch — 

Application  fees,  petroleum  and  natural 

gas  leases 

Rental,  petroleum  and  natural  gas  leases 

Total 

Grand  total   . .  


Number 

Revenue 

49 

i      490 

00 

7 

28 

1,602 

45 

2 

109 

06 

2 

95 

S3 

42 

20 

30 

$2,352  64 

2 

i         555  01 

97 

5,273  57 

23 

13,267  83 

95 

2,350  SO 

12 

470  53 

24 

131  61 

22.048  85 

70   00 
404   30 


DOMINION  LANDS 


SESSIONAL    PAPER    No.    12 

REPORT  OF  THE  AGENT  OF  DOMINION  LANDS,  M.  A.  MOINNES,  SASKATOON,  SASKATCHEWAN 


Land  Patents  Branch — 

Homestead  fees 

Soldier  grants 

Iniprovenifnts 

Land  sales  (cash) 

Land  sales  (scrip) 

Pre-emption  payments 

Purchased  homestead  payments 

Office  fees,  etc 

Applications  for  patent 

Applications  for  inspection    . .    . 

Kntries  cancelled 

Sundries 


Total 

ibei-  and  Graziiifi  Branch- 
Timber  permits 

Timber  seizures 

Hay  permits 

Gra7.in1;  rentals  (cash)   . 
Sundries 


Total 

Forestry   Branch — 

Timber  dues 

Permit  fees  and  rental 

Seizures 

Grazing  rents,  etc.    .  .    . 
Hay  dues,  etc 


Total  .... 
Reclamation  Service- 
Sales  


Total 

Mining  Lands  and  Yukon  Branch- 
Mining  fees 

Rental 


Number 


604 
500 
532 


Revenue 
%   5,450   00 


3.538  65 

1,540  93 

37.254  98 

6,407  52 

120  00 


452 

1,600 

61 

168 

S13 

95 

3 

9 

00 

28 

470  36 

13 

169  30 

95 

1.796  06 

04 

S71  25 

i  3.4: 


Total 

School  Lands  Branch — 
General  sales  .  .  .  . 
Timl>LT  permits   .  .    . 

Hay  ixirmits 

Grazing  rentals  .  .    . 

Mining  fees 

Cultivation  permits 
Sundries 


(   2,383   48 

18   00 

1,993   14 

11,862   70 

17   50 

353   00 

132   50 


Total 

Iftscellaneotu — 

Seed  grain  and  provision  payment 

Total 

Grand  total 


REPORT    OF    THE    AGENT    OF    DOMINION    LANDS,    S.    LEE,    SWIFT    CURRENT,    SASKATCHEWAN 


Land  Patents  Branch — 

Homestead  fees 

Pre-emption  fees 

Purchased  homestead  fees 

Soldier  settlement  grants 

Improvements 

Land   sales    (cash) 

Miscellaneous 

Pre-emption  payments 

Purchased    homestead    payments 

Searches,  map  sales,  office  fees.  etc. 

Applications  for  patent 

Applications  for  inspection 

Entries  cancelled 

Certificates   of   recommendation.. 

Total 

12— IJ 


Revenue 
2.790  00 


il 

3.044  60 

6 

865  97 

4 

4  00 

432 

155.450  65 

21 

4,654  47 

363 

139  00 

1.015 

716 

Total 


52 


DEPARTMEXr  OF  THE  IXTERIOR 


13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1923 
IlKPORT  OF  THE  AGENT   OF  DOMINION  LANDS,  S.   LEE,  SWIFT   CURRENT,   SASKATCHEWA.'.'— Con. 


Timber  and  Grazing  Lands  Branch —  Numbei 

Timber  permits 90 

Timber  seizures 2 

Hay  permits 211 

Grazing  rentals  (cash) l.lSfi 

Sundries li 

Total 

Forestrti    Branch — 

Permit   fees   and    rental 315 

Seizures 10 

Grazing  rent,  etc 436 

Miscellaneous 11 

Total 

Irrioation   Branch — - 

Sales 2 

Total 

Mininff  Lands  and  Yukon  Branch — ■ 

Mining  fees,  etc 60 

Rental — coal 17 

Royalty — coal 27 

Petroleum  and  natural  gas 67 

Quarrying 12 

Alkali 3 

Total 

Softool  Lands  Branch — 

General  sales 4 

Timber  permits 1 

Hay  permits 152 

Grazing^  rentals 714 

Petroleum  and  natural  gas 4 

Cultivation  permits 24 

Sundries 5 

Total 

Miscellaneous — 

Seed   grain  and   provisions  payments    .  .  347 

Total 

Grand  total 


Revenue 
t      130  03 


*  •"- 

IV 

%       739 

4S 

58 

20 

10.328 

97 

63 

75 

11,190 

40 

$1,S16 

87 

1.816 

87 

$  265 

00 

436 

40 

295 

16 

3,721 

30 

270 

00 

235 

CO 

5.222 

86 

$1,703 

57 

5 

05 

355 

25 

17,436 

36 

28S 

90 

1.7S4 

35 

11 

25 

$279,329   87 


KEPOIiT   OF  THf;  AGEXT   OF   DOMINION   LANDS,  L.    P.   0.   NOEL,   WINNIPEG,   MANITOBA 


Land  Patetits  Branch — 


Number         Revenue 


Homestead  fees 877 

Soldier  grants 168 

Improvements 152 

Land  sales    (cash) 46 

Searches,  maps,  etc 1,670 

Sundries 2 

Applications  for  patent 1,183 

Applications  for  inspection 1,283 

Entries  cancelled 1,062 

Total 

Timber  and  Grazing  Lands  Branch — 

Grazing  rentals 89 

Hay  leases 1 

Total 

Mining  Lands  and  Yukon  Branch — 

Mining  fees 1.787 

Quarries 45 

Petroleum   and   natural   gas 14 

Total 

School  Lands  Branch — 

Sales 10 

Hay  leases 2 

Grazing  rentals 162 

Mining  fees 6 

Petroleum  and  natural  gas 8 

Cultivation  permits 10 

Total 

Miscellaneoics — 

Seed  grain  and  relief  payments 

Total 

Grand  total 


»8,770  00 

8,298  33 

4,064  57 

752  60 

13  00 


$668   37 
8   50 


$13,924 

4S 

1,184 

29 

864 

45 

$2,402 

76 

80 

00 

2,539 

65 

35 

00 

1,480 

00 

486 

50 

Total 


DOMINION  LANDS  53 

SESSIONAL   PAPER  No.   12 


KEPORT  OF  THE  COMTKOLLER  OF  THE  LAND  PATENTS  BRANCH 

AND  REGISTRAR  OF  DOinNION  LANDS  PATENTS,  N.  O.  COTE 

With  statements,  A  to  L  in  relation  thereto 

LETTERS   PATKST 

The  number  of  letters  patent  issued  was  13,116,  covering  an  area  of  2,024,519 
acres,  which  may  be  classified  as  follows: — 

Province                                                                                    Patents  Acres 

Manitoba 2.395  362,176 

Saskatchewan S.B.")!  883,043 

Alberta 4,792  739,849 

British  Columbia 342  38,761 

Yukon  Territory 20  391 

Northwest  Territories 16  300 

13,116  2,024,519 


These  grants  are  given   in  detail  in  the  statements  marked  A  to  G,  inclusive, 
and  may  be  summarized  as  follows : — 

Grants  Patents  Acres 

Homesteads 9,656  1,501,399 

Sales 1,261  108,342 

Pre-emptions 1.4S1  234,393 

Purchased  homesteads 178  26,140 

Railways 96  3,154 

Special  or  free  grants 362  48,407 

Northwest  Halfbreeds 4  723 

Licenses  of  occupation 10  410 

Soldier  grants 63  10,015 

Hud.son's  Bay  Company 5  1,036 

13.116  2,024.519 


There  was  a  decrease  of  4,831  letters  patent  and  a  decrease  in  the  area  patented 
of  72S,975  acres  as  compared  with  the  previous  year. 

There  are  recorded  in  the  Lands  Patent  Branch  446,331  letters  patent,  aggre- 
gating 99,607,938  acres,  which  have  been  issued  since  May,  1S73,  to  March  31,  1922. 


I>.«DS   DISPOSED   OF 

Seven  thousand  three  hundred  and  forty-nine  homestead  entries  were  granted, 
aggregating  an  approximate  area  of  1,175,S40  acres,  made  up  by  provinces  as  fol- 
lows : — ■ 

Province  Homestead  entries 

Manitoba ' 1,488 

Saskatchewan 2,733 

Alberta 2.928 

British  Columbia 200 


7,349 


There  was  an  increase  of  1,960  in  the  number  of  homestead  entries  granted,  as 
compared  with  the  previous  year. 


54  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 

13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1923 

By  land  agencies  the  7,340  homestead  entries  are  made  up  as  follows: — 

Manitoba —  Entries 

Dauphin 611 

Winnipeg 877 

1,488 

Sasltatchewan — - 

Battleford 343 

Moose  Jaw 334 

Prince  Albert 1.228 

Saskatoon 648 

Swift  Current 280 

2.733 

Alberta — 

Calgary 341 

Edmonton 1,664 

Grande  Prairie 312 

Lethbridge 149 

Peace  River 462 

2,928 

British  Columbia — 

Kamloops Ill 

New  Westminster. . 41 

Revelstoke 48 

200 

The  7,349  entrants  for  homesteads  represented  15.573  persons,  as  compiled  from 
information  obtained  from  each  entrant.  Of  these  entries  2,162  were  made  by 
residents  of  the  several  provinces  of  the  Dominion;  3  by  Canadians  who  had 
returned  from  the  United  -States,  and  940  by  persons  who  had  previously  obtained 
homestead  entries,  but  which  entries  had  been  cancelled  by  default  or  at  the  request 
of  the  entrants  in  order,  in  most  cases,  to  enter  for  other  lands;  1,083  were  made 
by  persons  from  the  British  Isles;  1,505  by  people  from  the  United  States;  712  by 
naturalized  Austro-Hungarians ;  208  by  Russians  and  Finns;  159  by  Norwegians; 
173  by  Swedes;  40  by  naturalized  Germans;  63  by  Frenchmen;  37  by  Belgians,  and 
the  remaining  258  were  made  by  citizens  of  yarious  other  countries. 

There  were  1,655  soldier  grant  entries  made  during  the  year,  aggregating 
approximately  264,800  acres,  made  up  by  provinces  as  follows: — 

Manitoba 

Saskatchewan 

Alberta 

British  Columbia 


By  land  agenciee  as  follows  :- 

Manitoba — 

Dauphin 

Winnipeg 


Saskatchewan — 

Battleford..  . 
Moose  Jaw . .  . 
Prinne  Albert. 
Saskatoon..  .. 
Swift  Current. 


No.  of  entries 

3S3 

590 

614 

CS 

Acres 
C1.2S0 
94.400 
98.240 
10.880 

1,655 

264.800 

DOMINION  LANDS 

SESSIONAL   PAPER   No.   12 

AH)f;rta — 

Calgary 80 

Edmonton 302 

Grande  Prairie 96 

Lethbrldee 27 

Peace  River 109 

British  Columbia — 

Kamloops 18 

New  Westminster 43 

Revelstoke ^ 


CANCELLED  ENTRIES 

There  wei'e  oaucelled  8,554  entries,  as  follows: — 

Manitoba  Saskatchewan 

Homesteads 1,846  2.370 

Pre-emptions ....  490 

Purchased   homesteads    ....  ....  29 

Sales 36 

Total 1.846  2.925 

SALES 

Two  liuudreJ  and  ninety-one  sales  were  made  for  10,493  acres  of  land,  with  an 
average  for  each  sale  of  about  36  acres. 

.\CCOUNTS   AND  REVEXUE 

There  are  :it  present  k«pt  in  this  branch  about  ~20,3(K)  individual  accounts  in 
connection  with  purchased  homesteads,  pre-emptions  and  ordinary  sales. 

The  sum  of  $742.4'il.72,  including  $165,Tl)0.-25  interest  on  deferred  paymente, 
was  received  on  account  of  purchased  homesteads,  pre-emptions  and  ordinary  sales, 
being  a  decrease  of  $W1,%0.55  as  compared  with  the  payments  received  during  the 
previous  year. 

The  amount  of  $133,862.69  has  also  been  received  for  entry  fees,  improvements 
and  sundries,  making  a  total  revenue  for  the  fiscal  year  of  $876,314.4'1. 

REFUNDS 

There  were  1,075  refunds  made,  amountiug  to  $55.42S.S6,  as  follows: — 
722  refunds — Value  of  improvements  collected  on  cancelled  home- 
steads        $45,340  54 

353  refunds — Overpayments  on  sales;  and  of  moneys  paid  on 
account  of  purchased  homesteads  and  pre-emption  sales, 
entries  for  which  have  been  cancelled 10,088  32 


British 

Alberta 

Columbia 

3,383 

207 

149 

9 

25 

10 

3.566 

217 

$55,428   86 


NEWLY     SL'R^•ETED    LANDS    THROWN    OPEN    TO     HOMESTEAD    ENTRY 

Newly   surveyed   lands    comprised   in    one   hundred   and    three    townships    were 
made  available  for  homestead  entry  in  the  following  land  agencies: — 

Dauphin,  Man in  20  townships 

Winnipeg.  Man "     8 

Battleford.  Sask "     5 

Prince  Albert,  Sask "15 

Saskatoon,  Sask "     1 

Calgary,  Alta "     1 

Edmonton,  Alta "     1 

Grande  Prairie,  Alta "13 

Peace  River,  Alta "24 

New  Westminster.  B.C "     7 

Kamloops,  B.C "     5 

Revelstoke.  B.C "     3 


56 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 


13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1923 

Statkmknt  a — Letters  patent  issued  corering  Dominion  Lands  situate  in  Manitoba, 
Saskatchewan,  and  Alberta,  Northwest  Territories,  British  Columbia,  and  the 
Yukon  Territory. 


Nature  of  Grant 


From  April  1,1921, 
to  March  31,  1922 


From  April  1,  1920, 
to  March  31, 1921 


All)crta  Railway  and  Irrigation  Co's  sales 

British  Columbia  homesteads 

British  Columbia  sales 

Coal  surface  sales 

Greater  Winnipeg  Water  District 

Homesteads,  Peace  River  Block 

Homesteads 

Hudson's  Bay  Co 

License  of  occupation 

Military  bounty  grants 

Military  homesteads 

Mining  lands  sales.     (55  acres,  underrights) 

Mineral  rights.     (3,494  acres) 

Northwest  half-breed  grants 

Parish  sales 

Pre-emption  sales 

Purchased  homesteads 

Quit  claim ,  sales 

Quit  claim,  special  grants 

Railways — 

Alberta  and  Great  Waterways  Railway  Co.. 

Calgarj'  and  Edmonton  Railway  Co 

Canadian  Northern  Alberta  Railway  Co 

Canadian  Northern  Railway  Co 

Canadian  Northern  Saskatchewan  Railway 
Co 

Canadian  Northern  Pac'ific  Railway  Co 

Canadian  Northern  Western  Railway  Co. . . . 

Canadian  Pacific  Railway  grants 

Canadian    Pacific    Railway    roadbed    and 
station  grounds 

Central  Canada  Railway  Co 

Edmonton,  Dunvegan  and  British  Columbia 
Railway  Co 

Grand  Trunk  Pacific  Railway  Co 

Grand  Trunk  Pacific  Branch  Lines  Co 

Kettle  Valley  Railway  Co 

Manitoba   Southwestern   Colonization   Rail- 
way Co 

Nicola.   Kamloops  and   Similkameen   Rail- 
way Co 
ale: 


Sales,  Peace  River  Block 

School  lands  sales 

School  lands  sales,  special  grants 

Soldier  grants 

Special  grants 

Yukon  Territory  homesteads 

Yukon    Territory    sales.     (51-65    acres, 
rights) 


87 

9,363 

5 

10 


12 
4 
6 
1,481 
178 
20 
58 


Totals 


13,116 


21,922 
1,276 


13,850 
1,464,675 
1,036 
410 
319 
632 
653 


723 

508 

234,393 

26,140 

869 

7,546 


206 

15 

33,755 

61 

161,649 

12 

10,015 

40,530 

320 


1 

150 

9 

1 

1 

108 

12,065 

2 

12 

2 


12 
S 
3 
7 
3,350 
406 
16 
25 

1 


142 

18,538 

402 

670 

2 

16,716 

899,668 

las 

26 
318 


612 


283 

829 

531,045 

62,. 369 

867 

2,057 


317 

153 

5,313 


76 

27 

3,026 


564 

98 
665 


30 

26,662 

81 

138,689 


7,805 
34,791 


17,947 


2,753,494 


DOMINION  LANDS  57 

SESSIONAL   PAPER   No.   12 

Statement  B — Letters  patent  issued  covering  Poniiiiion  Lands  in   the  Province  of 

Manitoba 


Nature  of  Grant 


From  April  1,  1921, 
to  Mareli  31,  1922 


From  April  1,  1920, 
to  March  31,  1921 


f  JreatPf  Winnipeg  Water  District 

Homesteads 

Iludson's  Hay  C'o 

iMilitary  bounty  grants 

Mining  lands  sales 

Parish  sales 

Pre-emption  sales 

Quit  claim,  sales 

Quit  claim,  special  grants 

Railways — 

Canadian  Northern  Railway  Co 

Cana<lian  Pacific  Railway  grants 

Canadian  Pacific  Railway  roadbed  and 
Stat  ion  grounds 

Manitoba  Southwestern  Coloniiation  Rail- 
way Co 

Sales 


School  lands  sales. 

Soldier  grants 

Special  grants 


2.063 
1 


321,308 
160 


361 
508 
320 
107 
421 


206 
2,344 
23,839 


1 
2,249 


2,601 


160 
612 
777 
336 


5,489 


Statement  C — Letters  patent  issued  covering  Dominion  Lands  in  the  Province  of 

Saskatchewan 


Nature  of  Grant 


From  April  1,  1921, 
to  March  31,  1922 


From  April  I,  1920, 
to  March  31,  1921 


Homesteads 

Huds<)n'.«i  Hay  Co 

License  nf  occupation 

Military  homesteads 

M i.iinr'lan.ls  .sales 

M  incnil  i  iglits  (1,285  acres) 

Nort hwcst  half-breed  grants 

Pre-emption  sales 

I'urcliiuied  homesteads 

Quit  claim ,  sales 

(Juit  claim,  special  grants 

Railways — 

( 'anadian  Northern  Railway  Co 

Canadian  Northern  Saskatchewan  Railway.. 

Canadian  Pacific  Railway  grants 

Canadian    Pacific    Railway    roadbed    and 
station  grounds 

Kdmonton,  Dunvegan  and  British  Columbia 
Railway  Co 

(Jrand  Trunk  Pacific  Railway  Co 

Grand  Trunk  Pacific  Branch  Lines  Co 
Sales 


School  lands  sales 

^>chool  Ituids,  special  grants.. 

Soldier  grants 

Special  grants 


Totals.. 


3,638 


570,939 

408 

1 

320 

239 


403 

I50,67.i 

17,762 

495 

4,544 

2,146 
14 
102 


1 

6.735 

110.388 

12 

5,873 

11,986 


5,227 


1 

2,279 
284 


823,931 


48 

361,561 

44,204 

612 

1,577 

5,231 

'     2,9<u 


12,518 
74,417 


5,090 
6,024 


1,338,332 


58 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 


13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1923 

Statement  D — Letters  patent  issued  covering  Dominion  Lands  in  the  Province  of 

Alberta 


Nature  of  Grant 


From  April  1,  1921 
to  March  31,  1922 


From  April  1 ,  1920 
to  March  31,  1921 


Mberta  Railway  and  Irrigation  Go's  sales     . 

Goal  surface  sales 

Homesteads 

Hudson's  Bay  Co 

License  of  occupation 

Military  bounty  grants 

Military  homesteads 

Mining  lands  sales  (.55  acres,  under  rights)   . . 

Mineral  rights  (2. 209  acres) 

Northwest  half-breed  grants 

Pre-emption  sales 

Purchased  homesteads 

Quit  claim,  sales 

Quit  claim,  special  grants 

Railways: — 

Alberta  and  Great  Waterways  Railway  Co 

Calgary  and  Edmonton  Railway  Co 

Canadian  Northern  Railway  Co 

Canadian  Northern  Alberta  Railway  Go 

Canadian  Northern  Western  Railway  Co.. 

Canadian  Pacific  Railway  grants 

Canadian  Pacific  Railway  roadbed  and  station 
grounds 

Central  Canada  Railway  Co 

Edmonton    Dunvegan   and   British   Columbia 
Railway  Co 

Grand  Trunk  Pacific  Railway  Co. 

Grand  Trunk  Pacific  Branch  Lines  Co 

Sales 

School  lands  sales 

Soldier  grants 

Special  grants 


Totals. 


3,662 
3 


320 
83.398 
8,252 

267 
2,581 


24,378 
27.422 
3,988 
14,840 


739,849 


1,068 

117 

4 

7 

1 


142 
670 
723,272 
108 
19 
158 


235 

169,148 

18,095 

255 

400 


153 

27 
23 


1 
564 
95 
9.813 
31,100 
2,715 
22,317 


979,662 


.Statement  E- 


-Letters  patent  issued  covering  Dominion  Lands  in  the  Province  of 
British  Columbia 


No, 

Nature  of  Grant 

From  April 
to  March  31 

,  1921 
1922 

From  April  1 
to  March  31, 

1920 
1921 

Patents 

Acres 

Patents 

Acres 

I 

202 
15 
87 

21,922 
1,276 
13,850 

156 

9 

108 

1 
5 

1 

29 
12 
43 

3 
1 
8 

18  538 

2 

402 

3 

16,716 

4 

52 

5 

8 

1 

5 
6 

126 

10 

98 
66 

70 

6 

Railways: — 

Canadian  Pacific  Railway  grants — 

Canadian  Pacific  Railway  roadbed  and  station 

12 

299 

8 
9 

Canadian  Northern  Pacific  Railway  Co.     .... 

7t) 
665 

10 

Nicola,  Kamloops  and  Similkameen  Railway 
Co 

2 
1 
15 

15 

61 

1,337 

30 

11 

81 

12 

961 

Totals 

342 

38,761 

376 

37,902 

DOMINION  LANDS  59 

SESSIONAL   PAPER  No.   12 

Statemext    F — Letters    patent    issued    covering    Dominion    Lands    in    the    Yukon 

Territory 


No. 

Nature  of  Grant 

From  April  1,  1921 
to  March  31.  1922 

From  April  1,  1920 
to  March  31,  1921 

Patents 

Acres 

Patents 

Acres 

1 

0 

Yukon  Territory  homesteads 

2 
18 

320 
71 

40 

70 

Totals 

20 

391 

40 

70 

Statement   G — Letters   patent   i.-;ued   covering  Dominion   Lamds   in   the  Northwest 

Territories 


No. 

Nature  of  Grant 

From  April  1,  1921 
to  March  31,  1922 

From  April  1,  1920 
to  March  31.  1921 

Patents 

Acres 

Patents 

Acres 

1 

Sales 

15 

1 

298 
2 

10 

102 

Totals 

16 

300 

10 

102 

60  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 

13  GEORGE  V.  A.  1923 

Statement  H — Number  of  Homestead  Entries  made  during  the  fiscal  year  1921-22, 
the  nationality  of  the  homesteaders  and  the  provinces  in  which  the  entries 
were  made. 


Manitoba 


Canadians  from  Ontario 

"  Quebec 

"  Nova  Scotia 

"  New  Brunswick 

"  Prince  Edward  Island 

"  Manitoba 

"  Saskatchewan 

Alberta 

"  British  Columbia 

Persons  who  had  previous  entry 

Newfoundlanders 

Canadians  returned  from  the  United  States. 

Americans 

English 

Scotch 

Irish : 

French 

Belgians 


Italians 

Roumanians 

Syrians 

Germans 

Austro-Hungarians 

Hollanders 

Danes  (other  than  Icelanders). 

Icelanders 

Swedes 

Norwegians 

Russians  other  than  Finns 

Finns 

Servians 

Bulgarians 

Chinese 

Japanese 

Persians 

Australians 

New  Zealanders 

Hindoos 

Greeks 

Poles 

South  Americans 

South  Africans 

Armenians 


Total. 


Provinces 


309 
5 
6 
12 
34 
20 
39 
22 


Saskat' 
chewan 


366 

127 

35 

17 

18 

109 

154 

14 

9 

326 


British 
Columbia 


11 

4 

10 

I 

■' 

tio 

1 
18 

II 

?n 

4S 

12 

61 

4 

49 

3 

786 

318 

83 

51 

47 

398 

201 

220 

55 

946"" 

4 

3 

1.505 

762 

229 

92 

63 

37 

17 


40- 
712 
23 
44 
19 
173 
159 
168 
40 


7,349 


Number  of  souls  represented  by  above  entries,  15,573. 


DOMINION  LANDS  61 

SESSIONAL   PAPER  No.   12 

Statement  I — Number  of  Homestead  Entries  made  in  tlie  Provinces  of  Manitoba, 
Saskatchewan,  Alberta,  and  British  Columbia  during  the  fiscal  year  1921-22  by 
liersons  coming  from  the  United  States  of  America 


States 

Prov 

nces 

Total 

Manitoba 

Saskat- 
chewan 

Alberta 

Britisli 
Columbia 

1 

2 

3 

Alaska      

1 

Arkansas 
Califomw        . 

1 
3 

4 
14 
5 
3 
9 
1 
2 
58 
35 

1 

I 

6 
18 

1 

4 
9 
1 
6 
164 
73 

Columbia,  District  of 

1 

30 

1 

2 

76 

35 

1 

1 

Dakota,  North , 

Dakota.  South 

1 

1 
5 
12 
16 
3 

33 
9 
9 
1 

12 
41 
151 
3 
22 
13 
19 

2 

17 
33 
15 

5 
47 
22 

7 

4 
22 
49 
34 

8 
86 
33 
20 

4 
3 

1 

Iowa              

S 
2 
4 

Maine 

4 

10 

53 
107 
I 
36 
39 
30 

6 
2 
25 
103 
285 
4 
62 
52 
52 

i 

3 

7 
26 

4 

Nebraska 

3 

Nevada  

6 
5 

1 

9 
12 
5 
3 
6 
3 

4 

2 
4 
34 

3 

New  Mexico 

New  York                                         

34 
18 
9 
24 
14 

4 
10 

3 
6 

40 
36 
16 

1 
1 

1 

50 
36 
14 
29 
20 
6 
6 

Ohio ,.. 

1 

1 

Tennessee 

16 
5 
7 
13 
8 
46 
90 
16 

Utah 

2 
3 

1 
2 
17 

3 

Total 

133 

567 

1.505 

1 

62 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 


13  GEORGE  V.  A.  1923 

Statement  J — Number  of  Homestead  Entries  made  during  the  fiscal  year  as  com- 
pared with  the  previous  fiscal  year 


Agenry 

Manitoba 

Saskatchewan 

Alberta 

British 
Columbia 

Total 

1921-22 

1920-21 

1921-22 

1920-21 

1921-22 

1920-21 

1921-22 

1920-21 

343 

367 

341 

280 

611 

358 

1,664 
312 

1.297 
548 

111 

71 

149 

78 

334 

240 

41 

44 

462 

671 

1,228 

674 

48 

5 

548 
280 

163 
226 

877 

367 

Fiscal  year  1921-22.... 

7,349 

Fiscal  year  1920-21 . . 

5,389 

1,960 

Total 

1,488 

725 

2,733 

1,670 

2,928 

2,874 

200 

120 

RECAPITULATION 


Month 

Manitoba 

Saskatchewan 

Alberta 

British 
Columbia 

1921-22 

1920-21 

1921-22 

1920-21 

1921-22 

1920-21 

1921-22 

1920-21 

April 

83 
355 
170 
160 
146 
122 
126 
138 
74 
45 
2.5 
44 

90 
59 
86 
83 
64 
61 
73 
61 
45 
32 
27 
44 

149 
625 
329 
320 
275 
183 
225 
242 
147 
87 
62 
83 

130 
144 
207 
253 
191 
129 
123 
151 
114 
77 
79 
72 

251 
447 
385 
357 
311 
198 
287 
241 
154 
83 
92 
122 

192 
316 
356 
332 
297 
254 
271 
237 
214 
124 
120 
161 

16 
34 
24 
17 
20 
12 
19 
20 
9 
7 
6 
16 

11 

May 

11 

10 

July 

11 

13 

10 

4 

10 

4 

February.  1922 

11 

March,  1922 

18 

Total 

1,488 

725 

2,733 

1,670 

2,928 

2,874 

200 

120 

DOMIMON  LANDS  63 

SESSIONAL  PAPER   No.   12 

Statement  K — Number  of  Soldier  Grant  Entries  made  during  the  fiscal  year  1321-22 
as  compared  with  the  previous  fiscal  year 


Agency 

Manitoba 

Saskatchewan 

Alberta 

British 
Columbia 

Total 

1921-22 

1920-21 

1921-22 

1920-21 

1921-22 

1920-21 

1921-22 

1920-21 

93 

218 

80 

212 

214 

185 

302 
96 

489 
209 

18 

38 

27 

73 

42 

153 

• 

43 

12 

109 

188 

298 

467 

7 

8 

79 
76 

166 
184 

Swift  Current... 

169 

290 

Fiscal  years  1920-21 

2,892 

1,655 

383 

475 

."^go 

1.188 

614 

1,171 

68 

58 

1,237 

RECAPITULATION 


1921-22    1920-21 


Saskatchewan 


1921-22    1920-21 


1921-22    1920-21 


British 
Columbia 


1921-22    1920-21 


April 

May 

.June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

January 

February 

March 

Total 


I 


64 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  IXTERIOR 


13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1923 

Statement  L — Number  of  Letters  Patent  is=ued  by  the  Department  of  the  Interior 
for  Dominion  Lands  since  1873,  and  the  number  of  acres  patented 


Number  of 
patents 
issued 


Acreage 


1873. 
1874, 
1875, 
1876, 
1877, 
1878, 
1879, 
1880. 
1881? 
1882, 
188.1, 
1884, 
1885. 
1886. 
1887. 
1888, 
1889. 
1890, 
1891, 
1892, 
1893. 
1894. 
1894. 
1895. 
1896. 
1897. 
1898. 
1899. 
1900. 
1901, 
1902. 
1903. 
1904. 
1905. 
1906 
1906, 
1908, 
1909 
1910, 
191 1, 
1912 
1913, 
1914 
1915, 
1916 
1917 
1918 
1819 
1920, 
1921, 
1922 


May  to  December  31 

January  1  to  December  31 
.lanuarj-  1  to  October  31.. 
jear  ended  October 31 


November  and  December. 
Year  ended  December  31 . . 


January  1  to  June  30. 
Year  ended  June  30. . 


July  1  to  March  31,  1907. 
Year  ended  March  31 


420 
.577 
464 
318 
,437 
.3.57 
,663 
,084 
,885 
,197 
.341 
,896 
533 
570 
599 
275 
282 
273 
479 
9.55 
936 
.5,53 
413 
,118 
.66.5 
.972 
.0.'?7 
.904 
.970 
.461 
,768 
,349 
,890 
.7P8 
.370 
,.596 
,690 
.431 
,854 
,7,54 
354 
96.5 
053 
260 
989 
774 
227 
810 
732 
947 
116 


92, 

74, 

.50, 

47S, 

462 

426 

173 

400 

506 

831 

909 

898, 

942 

1,071 

647 

661 

626 

411 

549 

502 

420 

66 

348 

531 

499 

646 

714 

310 

6,846 

4,711 

3,266 

2,982 

6.197 

4.181 

2,361 

6.138 

4.215 

3.662 

3,710 

3.155 

4.209 

5.192 

3,996 

3,089 

3,019 

3,721 

3,063 

2,785 

2,753 

2.024 


200 
320 
240 
880 
840 
880 
080 
440 
802 
785 
341 
604 
464 
055 
364 
644 
636 
019 
073 
257 
601 
238 
102 
964 
861 
859 
671 
748 
.501 
857 
104 
388 
579 
354 
345 
330 
977 
326 
259 
288 
388 
388 
141 
013 
636 
178 
632 
383 
830 
494 


DOMINION  LANDS  65 

SESSIONAL   PAPER   No.   12 
IIRPORT    OF   THE    CONTROLLER   OF   SCHOOL   LANDS,   W.   T.   ROLLINS 

Owing  to  the  prevailing  financial  depresoion,  no  school  lands  were  ofFered  for 
fale  by  public  auction  during  the  fiscal  year.  A  conjidcra'ble  area,  however,  was 
disposed  of  by  private  sale  as  shown  by  the  following  statements: — 

MANITOBA 

Average 
How  disposed  of  Area  Value  Per  acre 

Soldier  Settlement  Board 4,0.'?4C6    $    41,23.')  24    $  10  22 

Railway  companies 23-35  260  50  1116 

School  sites 7-00  70  00  10  00 


Total 4,005-01     $    41,565  74    t  10  22 


.SASKATCHEWAN- 

Average 

How  disposed  of                                   Area  Value  Per  aere 

Soldier  Settlement  Board 35,121-30  $  472,4S5  09  $            13  45 

Railway  companies 85-02  1,402  1!)  16  49 

.School  .sil PS 3-04  .30  40  10  00 

Dricd-up  areas 131-30  1,113  .50  S  48 


Total 35,340-66    $475,03118    S  13  44 


ALBFRTA 

Average 

How  disposed  of                                   Area  ^'aIue  Per  aore 

Soldier  Settlement  Board 4.924-11  $     74,994  79  $            15  23 

Railway  companies 36-37  .544  48  14  97 

School  sites 2500  258  15  10  33 

Town  lot 200  00     


Total 4,985-48    i    75,997  42    S 


The  following  statement  shows  the  approximate  area  of  school  lands  disposed  of 
down  to  March  31,  1922,  after  making  deductions  for  cancelled  sales,  etc. : — 

Area 

Province                                         Acres  Value              Average 

Manitoba 664,218-57  ?    0,42.5,600  75        $    9  67 

Saskatchewan 1,511,09780  20,4.50,429.55            17  50 

Alberta 952,164-94  13,161,415  19            13  82 

The  value  of  town  lot-s  disposed  of  to  March  31,  1922,  was  as  follows: — 

Manitoba S     4, 803  40 

Saskatchewan 1.3, 291  00 

Alberta.. 39,880  00 

The  number  of  permits  and  leases  issued,  the  number  of  leases  in  good  standing, 
and  the  combined  revenue  derived  tlierefrom  for  the  three  provinces  to  March  31, 
1922,  was  as  follows  :— 

Permits  Leases  Leases  in  Revenue 

issued  issued       good  standing        derived 

Grazing 6,692  $104,741   23 

Coal 78  28,949  06 

Petroleum  and  gas   ....  3S9  628  32,411    31 

Hay 3.6ti7  3  22  10.209  72 

Cultivation 198  4,237  48 

Timber 191  9.452  72 

Special 15  1,040  62 

Registralion  Fees— The  revenue  derived  from  the  registration  of  420  assignments 
for  the  three  jji-oviucee  amounted  to  $1,202.85. 

12—6 


66  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 

13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1923 
The  total  net  revenue  collected  for  the  fiscal  year  was  as  follows : — 

Manitoba $    203.795   51 

Saskatchewan 1,475,299  55 

Alberta 602,688  53 

Total »2,281,783   69 


The  revenue  collected  for  the  fiscal  .year,  less  principal  moneys  and  less  expendi- 
ture, was  paid  over  to  the  Governments  of  the  provinces  of  Manitoba,  Saskatchewan, 
and  Alberta,  as  follows : — 

Manitoba — 

Revenue  other  than  principal  moneys $   65.in4   OS 

Less  expenditure 16.292  16 

Amount  paid  to  province i   49,201    92 

Saskatchewan — 

Revenue  other  than  principal   moneys $433,195  70 

Less  expenditure 49,947   00 

Amount  p.Tid  to  province $383,248   70 

Alberta — 

Revenue  other  than   principal  moneys $290,782  97 

Less  expenditure 34.633  36 

Amoimt  paid  to  province $256,149   61 


The  balance  standing  to  the  credit  of  the  School  Lands  Fund  for  each  province 
as  on  March  31,  1922,  -was  as  follows: — 

Manitoba — 

Total  amount  at  credit  of  fund $   5,035,839   74 

Amount  invested  in  debenture  stock 5,635,000  00 

Balance  of  fund  uninvested $  839   74 

Saskatchewan 

Total  amount  at  credit  of  fund $12,027,514  84 

Amount  invested  in  debenture  stock 12,027.000   00 

Balance  of  fund  uninvested $  514   84 

Alberta — 

Total  amount  at  credit  of  fund $   6,471,051   94 

Amount  invested  in  debenture  stock 6,471,000  00 

Balance  of  fund  uninvested $  51   94 


Statements  herewith  lettered  A,  B'  and  C,  respectively,  show  the  revenue  collected 
from  each  of  the  provinces  of  Manitoba,  Saskatchewan,  and  Alberta,  duly  classified. 

Statements  herewith  lettered  D,  E  and  F,  respectively,  show  the  balance  standing 
to  the  credit  of  the  School  Lands  Fund  for  each  province  as  on  March  31,  1922,  after 
deducting  amounts  invested  in  Dominion  of  Canada  debenture  stock,  ae  provided  for 
by  order  in  council  dated  December  1.  1919. 


DOMINION  LANDS 


67 


SESSIONAL   PAPER   No.   12 


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DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 


13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1923 


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DOMINION  LANDS  69 

SESSIONAL   PAPER  No.   12 
Statement  D — Manitoba  School  Lands — Revenue  and  Expenditure  on  account  of 


Particulars 

Period 

Dr. 

Cr. 

$       cts 

$      cts. 
.538  31 



191,180  .59 

542  00 

"   timber   dues,    hay    permits,    grazing 
rental,  coal,  petroleum  and  miscel- 

11.901  92 

.1                            r<                            .• 

171  00 

1,261  31 

To  cost  of  management  at  Ottawa 

"   salaries,  printing  and  advertising  and 

•'               .. 

11,743  22 
4.548  94 

49.201  92 

1,201  31 

138,000  00 
839  74 

"   revenue  and  interest  paid  to  Manitoba 

"   interest   on    fund    paid    to   Manitoba 

"   investments  in  5  per  cent  debenture 

205,595  13 

205,595  13 

Note.— Balance  at  credit  of  Manitoba  School  Lands  Fund  on  March  31,  1922.  was  $5,635,839.74  o' 
which  $5,635,000.00  is  invested  in  5  per  cent  Dominion  of  Canada  debenture  stock,  maturing  October  1. 
1922,  as  per  Order  in  Council  of  December  1,  1919.  Interest  paid  on  investment  for  fiscal  vear  1921-22 
totalled  $276,935  62. 


Statement   E — Saskatchewan    School   Lands — Revenue  and   Expenditure   on 
account  of 


By  balance  on  April  1,  1921 

"  sales 

"  cultivation  permits 

"  timber  dues,  hay  permits,  grazing 
rental,  coal,  petroleum  and  miscel- 
laneous  

"   registration  fees 

"   interest  on  fund 


12  months  ended  March  31,  1922 


To  cost  of  management  at  Ottawa 

"  salaries,  printing,  advertising  and 
general  expenses 

"  revenue  and  interest  paid  to  Saskatch- 
ewan Government 

"  interest  on  fund  paid  to  Saskatchewan 
Cjovernment 

"  investments  in  5  per  cent  debenture 
bonds 

"   balance  March  31 ,  1922 


35,229  04 

14,717  36 

383,248  70 

8,. 545  96 

1,(M3.000  00 

514  84 


1,410  99 

,401,904  02 

3,342  25 


69,530  63 

522  65 

8,545  96 


1,485,256  50       1,485,256  50 


Note.— Balance  at  credit  of  Saskatchewan  School  Lands  Fund  on  March  31,  1922  was  $12,027,514  84 
of  which  $12,027,000  00  is  invested  in  5  per  cent  debenture  stock  maturing  October  1,  1922,  as  per  Order 
in  Council  of  December  1,  1919.    Interest  paid  on  investments  for  fiscal  year  1921-22  totalled  $565,251.30. 


70  DEPARTMEXr  OF  THE  ISTERIOR 

13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1923 
Statement  F — Alberta  School  Lands — Revenue  iirnl  Expenditure  on  account  of 


Particulars 

Period 

Dr. 

Cr. 

$       cts 

$       cts. 
146  38 

12  months  ended  March  31,  1922 

496  065  46 

353  23 

"    timber  dues,   hay   permits,     grazing 
rental,  coal,  petroleum  and  miscel- 

105.  e.w  64 

017  20 

4,069  23 

To  cost  of  management  at  Ottawa 

"   salaries,     printing,     advertising    and 

"          .. 

23,486  43 

11,146  93 

256. 149  61 

4.069  23 

312,000  00 
51  94 

"   revenue  and  interest  paid  to  Alberta 

"   interest  on  fund  paid  to  Alberta  Gov- 

"   investments  in  5  per  cent  debenture 

"    balance  March  31,  1922 

606,904  14 

606,904  14 

Note. — Balance  at  credit  of  Alberta  .Schools  Lands  Fund  on  March  31,  1922  was  $6,471,051.94  of 
which  $6,471,000.00  is  invested  in  5  per  cent  debenture  stock  maturing  October  1,  1922  as  per  Order  in 
Council  of  December  1 ,  1919.    Interest  paid  on  investments  for  fiscal  year  1921-22  totalled  $313, 170.27. 


EEPOKT    OF    THE    SUPEEIiS'TE'NDENT,    MIXING   LANDS    AND    YUKON 
BRANCH,  H.  H.  ROWATT 

Tlie  total  revenue  of  this  brancli,  derived  from  all  sources  during  the  fiscal  year 
lft21-22,  amounts  to  $1,049,089.24.  There  is  a  decrease  in  the  revenue  of  the  branch, 
amounting  to  $1<36,066.87.  This  is  partly  due  to  an  amendment  to  the  Petroleum 
and  Natural  Gas  Regulations,  under  the  provisions  of  which  lessees  who  incur  an 
expenditure  in  drilling  operations  in  excess  of  that  which  might  be  applied  to  the 
payment  of  the  accrued  rental  due  on  the  leases  afFected,  may  obtain  credit  for  a 
portion  of  such  excess  exjienditure  aud  may  apply  suoh  credit  to  the  payment  of  the 
rental  of  other  petroleum  locations  acquired  b.v  such  lessees. 

Statement.s  lettered  A  and  B,  showing  in  different  forms  how  the  revenue  is 
made  up,  will  be  found  at  the  end  of  this  report.  The  statement  lettered  A  shows 
the  total  revenue,  and  the  statement  lettered  B  shows  the  revenue  collected  at  each 
agency,  including  the  Yukon  Territory. 

The  revenue  from  the  Yukon  Territory  for  the  year  amounts  to  $97,176.10,  an 
increase  of  $6,139.97  over  the  previous  year. 

The  reports  and  statements  for  the  fiscal  year  from  the  Gold  Commissioner  and 
-the  Crown  Timber  and  Land  Agent  at  Dawson,  in  the  Yukon  Territory,  also  the 
report  of  the  Inspecting  Engineer  of  Mines,  are  submitted. 

PETROLEUM  AND  NATUR.\L  GAS 

There  are  now  in  force  under  the  regulations  7,379  petroleum  and  natural  gas 
leases,  embracing  a  total  area  of  2,2'60,84O-74  acres,  distributed  as  follows:  In 
Manitoba,  254  leases,  comprising  42,673-05  acres;  in  Saskatchewan,  335  leases,  com- 
prising 141,657-2'0  acres;  in  Alberta,  5,097  leases;  comprising  1,681,006-30  acres; 
in  British  Columbia,  1,393  leases,  comprising  242,389-21  acres;  and  in  the  North- 
west Territories,  200  leases,  comprising  153,114-98  acres,  and  126  permits,  com- 
prising 194,273-62  acres.  The  total  area  under  lease  and  permit  in  the  Northwest 
Territories  is  347,388-60  acres.  The  total  revenue  derived  from  petroleum  lands 
during  the  year  amounts  to  $487,983.67. 


DOMINION  LANDS 


71 


SESSIONAL   PAPER   No.   12 

Natural  gas,  which  has  been  discovered  in  large  quantities,  is  being  utilized  for 
domestic  and  industrial  pui-poses  in  different  parts  of  the  province  of  Alberta.  Oil 
in  small  quantities  has  been  discovered  in  different  parts  of  the  province  of  Alberta 
and  in  the  Northwest  Territories,  and  drilling  operations  with  a  view  to  further 
discoveries  are  being  diligently  prosecuted  in  different  i)arts  of  tlie  provinces  of 
Alberta,  Saskatchewan,  and  Manitoba,  as  well  as  in  the  Northwest  Territories.  Oil 
in  what  would  appear  to  be  commercial  quantit.v  is  reported  to  have  been  discovered 
in  the  state  of  Montana  near  the  international  boundary,  and  as  a  result  a  large 
number  of  petroleum  leases  have  been  acquired  in  southern  Alberta  as  near  to  the 
point  of  disccvery  as  ix)ssible,  and  intensive  drilling  operations  are  in  immediate 
contemplation. 

Tlie  dei)artment  maintains  a  technical  staff  of  officers  at  Calgary,  who  have 
"been  furnished  with  appliances  necessary  to  close  petroleum  and  natural  gas  wells 
which  are  beyond  the  control  of  the  operators,  owing  to  the  release  of  gas  and  water 
under  inten.se  pressure.  Reference  is  made  to  the  work  of  this  staff  in  the  report 
of  the  inspecting  engineer. 

CO.\L    MIXING    LANDS 

Kcgulations  for  the  sale  of  coal  mining  lands  were  withdrawn  a  number  of  years 
ago  and  all  sales  made  under  the  provisions  of  such  regulations  have  now  been  com- 
pleted. The  total  amount  of  revenue  collected  from  the  sale  of  coal  mining  lands 
was  $1,565,632.08. 

CO.\L   LEASES 

The  total  number  of  coal  mining  leases  in  force  at  the  close  of  the  fiscal  year 
was  T73,  comprising  a  total  area  of  341,758-08  acres,  distributed  as  follows:  In 
Manitoba,  one  lease,  comprising  40  acres;  in  Alberta,  673  leases,  comprising  332,122-23 
acres;  in  Saskatchewan,  07  leases,  comprising  7,625-85  acres;  in  British  Columbia, 
one  lease,  comprising  1,930  acres;  and  in  the  Yukon  Territory,  one  lease,  comprising 
40  acres. 

The  total  number  of  coal  mining  leases  issued  during  the  year  was  220,  compris- 
ing l(i2,.'')'52-89  acres.  The  total  revenue  collected  during  the  year  for  rental  of  coal 
mining  rights  was  $209,275-21. 

ROYALTY   OX  COAL 

Under  the  regulations  governing  the  issue  of  leases  to  mine  coal,  the  royalty  is 
li.xed  at  five  cents  per  ton  of  2,000  pounds  on  the  merchantable  output  of  the  mine. 

The  following  is  a  statement  showing  the  amount  collected  on  account  of  royalty 
on  coal  mined  from  lands  in  the  western  provinces,  the  Northwest  Territories,  and 
the  Yukon  Territory,  respectively,  during  each  year  since  the  regulations  came  into 
effect : — 


Yi-ar 

Alberta 

Saskatchewan 

British 
Columbia 

Yukon 

Northwp.^t 
Territories 

1903-04 

S      cts. 

56  90 

2,822  00 

2,379  75 

3,865  26 

7.621  67 

5,322  39 

1.53,559  98 

218.932  88 

104.894  55 

142,997  79 

147, 198  75 

104,489  77 

67,190  17 

149,447  S2 

144,634  75 

175,687  66 

181.641  80 

190.545  80 

185.4.^6  8.S 

%       cts 

Nil. 

110  70 

47  10 

74  20 

4  30 

3.58  11 

1.672  50 

2,184  74 

2,034  74 

3,145  72 

2.123  43 

1,880  06 

2.601  52 

2.228  OS 

4.046  55 

3, 193  05 

2,573  32 

2,703  41 

3.. 309  86 

S       ets. 
■    Nil. 

3  00 

3  50 

2  78 
6  95 

19  35 

4  90 

3  50 
8  92 

Nil. 

S       cts. 

22  40 

47  00 

569  33 

517  34 

1,.543  .38 

371  73 

136  38 

125  00 

390  00 

1.069  11 

Nil. 

i      cts. 
Nil. 

1904-05 

1905-06 

" 

1906-07 

" 

1907-08 

1908-09 

" 

1909-10 

tt 

1910-11 

i< 

1911-12. 

" 

1913-13 

'I 

1913-14 

1914-15 

ti 

1915-16 

5  10 

191fr-17 

Nil. 

1917-18 

6  00 

1918-19 

Nil. 

1919-20 

1920-21 

" 

1921-22 

72  DEl'ARTMEST  OF  THE  INTERIOR 

13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1923 

By  an  Order  in  Council  dated  March  16,  1918,  provision  was  made  tliat,  owing 
to  the  scarcity  of  fuel  in  the  Yukon  Territory,  no  royalty  shall  be  levied  or  collected 
on  coal  mined  in  that  territory  for  a  period  of  five  years;   that  is,  up  to  April  7,  1923. 

The  total  revenue  derived  from  coal  mining  lands  on  account  of  purchase  prico, 
rental,  royalty,  and  application  fees,  during  the  fiscal  year,  amounted  to  $402,751.21. 

QL  ARTZ  .\ND  PL.\CER  MINMNO  CLAIMS 

During  the  fiscal  year  1,468  entries  for  quartz  and  975  entries  for  phxcer  mining 
claims  were  granted  by  the  mining  recorders  in  Manitoba,  Saskatchewan,  and  Alberta, 
and  by  the  mining  recorder  for  the  Northwest  Territories.  The  total  revenue  received 
from  rentals  of  quartz  mining  leases  and  fees  in  connection  -witli  mineral  claims  was 
.$37,.-)45.88. 

The  total  revenue  received  for  fees  in  connection  with  the  administi'ation  of  the 
Placer  Mining  Regulations  relating  to  lands  outside  of  the  Yukon  Territory  was 
$9,750. 

According  to  the  returns  from  the  Yukon  Territory  during  the  fiscal  year  83 
entries  for  placer  mining  claims  and  2,647  renewals  were  recorded.  The  revenue  from 
these  sources  and  from  fees  for  registering  documents  in  connection  with  mining 
properties  was  $46,147.75. 

Very  satisfactory  results  appear  to  have  been  obtained  from  a  shipment  of  2,200 
tons  of  silver-lead  ore  from  the  Keno  Hill  district,  in  the  Yukon  Territory,  notwith- 
standing the  fact  that  the  cost  for  the  production,  transportation,  and  treatment  of 
such  ore  amounted  to  nearly  one  hundred  dollars  per  ton. 

QUARRVIXO 

The  number  of  leases  now  in  force,  issued  under  the  provisions  of  the  regula- 
tions, is  245,  distributed  as  follows:  In  Manitoba,  89  leases,  comprising  2,681-97  acres; 
in  Saskatchewan,  2S  leases,  comprising  845-77  acres;  in  Alberta,  94  leases,  comprising 
4,145-.30  acres;  and  in  British  Columbia,  34  leases,  comprising  838-98  acres. 

The  total  revenue  collected  during  the  fiscal  year  on  account  of  quarrying  and 
clay  leases,  including  the  application  fees,  amounts  to  $7,771.93. 


Under  the  provisions  of  the  regulations  for  the  disposal  of  potash  rights,  the 
property  of  the  Crown,  45  leases  in  all  were  issued,  of  which  number  only  five  leases, 
comprising  an  area  of  3,082  acres,  are  now  in  good  standing.  The  revenue  derived 
from  this  source  during  the  year  was  $245. 


By  an  Order  in  Council  dated  April  20,  1921,  regulations  were  established  for 
the  disposal  of  all  natural  accumulations  of  soluble  mineral  salts  and  associated  marls, 
the  property  of  the  Crown,  in  the  western  provinceo  and  territories.  Under  these 
regulations  10  leases  have  been  granted,  comprising  a  total  area  of  3,266-18  acres, 
and  the  revenue  derived  from  the  issue  of  such  leases  amounts  to  $1,221.25. 

ROYALTY  ON  GOLD  MINED  IN  THE  YUKON  TERRITORY 

The  total  amount  collected  up  to  March  31,  1922,  for  royalty  on  gold,  the  output 
of  placer  mining  claims  in  the  Yukon  Territory,  after  deducting  the  exemption  at 
one  time  allowed  under  the  regulations,  was  $4,816,847.27,  of  which  amotmt  $30,774.68 
waa  collected  during  the  last  fiscal  year.  For  the  purpose  of  estimating  royalty,  the 
gold  is  valued  at  $15  an  ounce,  which  is  much  below  its  real  value. 

The  actual  value  of  gold  produced  from  placer  mining  operations  in  tlie  Yukon 
Territory,  up  to  March  ".1  last,  might  be  safely  placed  at  $160,000,000. 


DOMIXION  LANDS 
SESSIONAL   PAPER  No.   12 


Xine  leases  to  dredge  for  minerals  in  the  beds  of  rivers  in  the  Yukon  Territory 
nre  now  in  force,  including  a  total  river  stretch  of  3S-43  miles.  The  total  revenue 
derived  from  this  source  up  to  March  31,  1922,  amounts  to  8201,387.12,  of  whicl 
amount  $168.30  was  collected  during  the  fiscal  year  just  closed. 

These  dredging  leases  comprise  portions  cf  the  Yukon,  Fortymile,  and  Klondike 
rivers. 

For  the  purpose  of  gold  recovery,  there  are  at  present  six  dredges  engaged  in 
mining  in  the  Yukon  Territory,  all  of  which  are  being  operated  by  hydro-electric 
motive  power.  Two  of  thft^e  dredges  are  of  large  capacity,  capable  of  excavating 
::nd  treating  15,000  cubic  yards  of  gravel  per  day. 

Twenty-nine  leases  to  dredge  for  minerals  in  the  submerged  beds  of  rivers  in 
the  provinces  of  Manitoba,  Saskatchewan,  and  Alberta  are  now  in  force,  covering  a 
total  frontago  of  134  miles.  Of  these  leases,  twenty-three  are  in  Alberta  and  include 
111  miles,  five  in  Saskatchewan,  including  eighteen  milec,  and  one  in  Manitoba, 
including  five  miles.  The  total  revenue  derived  from  tliis  source  up  to  March  31, 
1022,  amounts  to  $50,727.47,  of  which  amount  $2,032  was  collected  during  the  past 
fiscal  year. 

HYDRAULIC    SItSING 

The  regulations  for  tlie  disposal  of  hydraulic  mining  locations  in  the  Yukon 
Territory  were  withd^a^\^l  by  an  Order  in  Council  dat^ed  February  4,  1904.  The 
leases  then  in  force  were  not  affected  by  such  withdrawal. 

There  are  still  six  hydraulic  mining  locations  held  under  leases  comprising  a  total 
area  of  15  03  square  miles. 

Kentals,  amounting  to  $155,801.08  have  been  collected  on  account  of  such  loca- 
tions and  the  amount  paid  on  this  account  during  the  fiscal  year  wae  $2,569. 

TI.MBER    IN    THE    YIKOS   TERRITORY 

The  total  amount  of  dues  collected  on  account  of  timber  cut  in  the  Yukon 
Territory  during  the  fiscal  year  was  $9,991.79.  One  hiuidred  and  thirty-eight  permits 
were  issu«l  during  the  year  under  the  authority  of  which  16,164  cords  of  wood  were 
cut.  the  dues  on  which  amounted  to  $8,812.06. 

There  are  in  existence  seventy -six  timber  berths,  held  under  license  to  cut  timber 
within  the  territory,  covering  an  area  of  164-75  square  miles,  which  licenses  were 
granted  prior  to  May  10,  1906,  on  which  date  the  regulations  governing  the  granting 
of  such  licenses  were  rescinded,  and  regulations  for  the  issue  of  permits  were  substi- 
tuted therefor. 

The  quantity  of  lumber  manufactured  from  timber  cut  under  license  during 
the  year  and  sold  was  1,282.?  feet,  board  measure,  and  the  number  of  cords  of  wood 
cut  was  1.220,  from  which  a  revenue  of  $9,991.79  was  derived.  Seizure  dues,  amount- 
ing to  $568.35  were  collected  on  1,072-71  cords  of  wood  cut  in  trespass.  This  does  not 
include  the  very  large  amount  of  timber  and  cordwood  cut  free  of  dues  for  mining 
purposes. 

WATER  RIGHTS 

There  are  now  in  force  in  the  Yukon  Territory  488  gi-ants  to  divert  water  for 
mining  purposes  under  the  provisions  of  the  Yukon  Placer  Mining  Act,  aggregating 
a  total  of  120,445  miner's  inches.  During  the  last  fiscal  year  no  water  rights  were 
issued. 

HOMESTEADS   I.\   THE    YUKON   TERRITORY 

One  hundred  and  six  homestead  entries  have  been  granted  in  the  Yukon  Terri- 
tory, of  which  fiity-nine  are  now  in  force,  comprising  a  total  area  of  8,970-56  acres. 
Patents  have  been  issued  for  sixteen  homesteads. 


74 


DEPAKTMEST  OF  THE  ISTERIOR 

13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1923 

DOMIXIOX    LAXDS    REVENUE — MIXIN'O    LANDS    AND    YUKON    BRANCH 


Statement  A— Revenue  obtained  fii-ni  eoal  and  other  minevals  disposed  of  in  the 
western  provinces  and  ten-itnrie?,  also  Cdllections  made  on  account  of  timber, 
etc.,  for  the  fiscal  year: — 


Quartz  acreage  sales 

Dominion  lands  sales 1 

Coal   lands  sales 

Coal  mining 4 

Coal  royalty ISS, 

C?oal  rental 20? 

Rental,  Yukon 5, 

Timber  dues,  Yukon 9, 

Mining   tees 03, 

Hydraulic  leases 2, 

Dredging    leases,    Western    Pro- 
vinces   2, 

Dredging  leases  Yukon 

Gold  export  tax 30, 

Amber  lease 


325  64  Free  certificates,  export  of  gold. 

664   16      Stone  quarry 

472   76  Registration  and  ofBce  fees. .    . . 

256   r>0      Homestead  fees 

74G   74      Hay,  Yukon 

27a   21      Interim    receipt   account 

419  78      Tar  sands 

991   79      Sanil.  stone  and  gravel 

333   63      Petroleum 

569  00      Potash 

Quartz  rental 

032   00      Rent  of  equipment 

168   30      Gypsum 

774  68      Alkali 

238   00      Miscellaneous 


%         cts. 

4   60 

7,771   93 

1,004   80 

20  00 

22   40 

132   50 

900   00 

39   00 

87,983   67 

245  00 

110  00 

300  00 

5S  00 

1,221   25 

11   00 


Statement   B — Total    amount    of   revenue   collected   at   each    agenc.v,   including   the 
Yukon  Territory,  for  the  fiscal  year: — 


$        cts. 

1.224  48 

239,331  01 

12,896  43 

215,142  72 

30.454  77 

743  55 

Lethbridge 166,164  14 


Battleford.. 
Calgary . .    . .   '. 

Dauphin 

Edmonton . .  . . 
Grande  Prairie. 
Kamloops. 


Moose  Jaw 
New  Westminster..  . 
The  Pas.  Manitoba..  . 
The    Pas,    Saskatchewf 

Peace  River 

Prince  Albert 

Revelstoke 

Saskatoon 


9,996  22 

56,446  33 

15,763  80 

4,236  75 

60,384  61 

8,962  80 

524  40 

1,085  68 


Swift  Current 

Fort  Smith,  N.W.T 

Winnipeg 

Dawson,      Gold      Commissioner's 

Offlce   

Dawson,  Crown  Timber  Offlce   . . 
Dawson,   Royalty   C.    Offlce . .     . . 

Dawson,  Comp.  Office 

Dawson,   Dominion   Lands    . .     . . 

Whitehorse,  Min.  Rec 

WTiitehorse,  Crown  Timber  Offlce. 
Whitehorse,    Royalty    Collector's 

Office 

Whitehorse,  Dom.  L.  Office  . .    . . 


i 

:ts. 

6.610 

83 

04,594 

40 

17,350 

32 

47,440 

36 

8,815 

69 

30,714 

84 

4 

hO 

4,465 

22 

1,763 

43 

1.198 

SO 

59 

84 

2,713 

72 

Report  of  the  Gold  Commissioner  and  Crown  Timber  and  Land  Agent,  Dawson 

The  revenue  from  the  Gold  Commissioner's  office  and  Crown  Timber  and  Land 
Agent's  offices  for  the  year  was  $59,971.27,  exclusive  of  rentals  paid  direct  to  the 
department  at  Ottawa.    This  is  an  increase  of  $8,103.54  over  last  year. 


PLACER   GOLD    MINING 

The  export  tax  was  paid  on  82,065.79  ounces  of  gold  during  the  year,  which  for 
practical  purposes  may  be  considered  the  amount  mined.  The  past  summer  was  the 
the  driest  of  which  there  is  any  record  in  the  history  of  the  camp,  and  the  conse- 
quent shortage  of  water  seriously  affected  the  output,  especially  from  the  hydraulic 
mines. 

YUKON  GOLD  COMPANY 

This  company's  operations  were  on  a  slightly  reduced  scale  compared  to  the 
previous  year  chiefly  on  account  of  the  shortage  of  water  referred  to,  and  also  on 
account  of  a  shortage  of  labour.  One  dredge  was  in  operation  on  Gold  Run  creek 
during  a  dredging  season  of  138  days  from  May  17  to  October  2.  A  total  of  556,957 
cubic  yards  of  material  was  handled  by  this  dredge. 


DOMiXION  LANDS  75 

SESSIONAL   PAPER  No.   12 

Ten  hydraulic  mines  were  operated  at  the  following  points :  Ore  Fino  Hill, 
Lovett  Ilosford,  Cheeehaco  Hill,  Fox  Gulch,  Jackson  Gulch,  Adams  Hill,  Monte 
Cristo.  Gold  Hill,  American  Gulch,  Trail  Gulch.  A  total  of  l,060,-468  cubic  yards 
was  washed. 

The  hydro-electric  power  plant  of  the  company  on  the  Twelve-mile  river  was 
operated  and  furnished  throughout  the  season  an  adequate  supply  of  power.  The 
daily  average  of  men  employed  during  the  mining  season  (Apiil  to  October)  was  as 
follows:  hydraulic  mines,  54;  dredges  and  thawing,  47;  ditch,  24;  otherwise 
employed,  43;   total,  168. 

BURRALL  AND  BAIRD,   LIMITED 

Thi;i  ccnipany,  the  successor  to  the  Canadian  Klondike  Mining  Oonipany. 
Limited,  operated  dredges  Canadian  Xos.  2  and  4  in  the  Klondike  Valley  on 
Hydraulic  Mining  Leasehold  No.  18,  and  Dredging  Leasehold  No.  24.  No.  2  Dredge 
operated  from  May  10  to  November  30  and  handled  1,539,795  cubic  yards.  No.  4 
operated  from  May  12  to  November  7  and  handled  1,245,000  cubic  yards.  An  average 
of  sixty  men  were  employed  by  this  company. 

The  pumping  plant  of  the  company  near  the  mouth  of  Hunker  creek  was  in 
operation  from  May  10  to  September  19  and  furnished  500  inches  of  water,  which 
was  used  by  Mr.  M.  H.  Jones  in  his  hydraulic  operations  on  Last  Chance  creek. 

THE    NEW    NORTH    WEST    CORPORATION,    LIMITED 

This  company  is  the  successor  of  The  North  West  Corporation,  Limited,  and  is 
the  holder  of  1,020  placer  claims  on  creeks  in  the  Indian  river  watershed.  A  dredge 
of  7J  cu.  ft.  capacity  was  operated  on  Nos.  13-A  to  20  Below  Lower  Discovery  on 
Dominion  Creek  and  393,700  cubic  yards  of  material  were  dredged.  Their  No.  2 
Dredge  referred  to  in  my  report  last  year  as  being  installed  on  Lower  Dominion 
Creek,  was  made  ready  for  digging  on  August  1  and  during  the  remainder  of  the 
season  handled  342,930  cubic  yards  of  material. 

The  cold  water  thawing  process  referred  to  in  my  foi-mer  reports  has  proved  a 
complete  success,  but  supplementary  steam  plants  are  found  necessary  during  th'j 
early  months  of  the  season.    An  average  of  112  men  was  employed  by  this  company. 

TITUS  DREDGING   COMPANY 

The  dredge  operated  by  this  company  on  Highet  creek  handled  400,000  cubic 
yards  of  material.    An  average  of  twenty  men  was  employed  in  its  operation. 

OTHER  PLACER   OPERATIONS 

In  addition  to  what  may  be  termed  the  large  scale  operations  referred  to,  many 
individuals  and  miners  working  in  partnership  were  engaged  in  placer  mining 
throughout  the  various  camps  of  the  district.  The  shortage  of  water  interfered 
seriously  with  these  operations. 

Mr.  Nuvill  A.  D.  Armstrong  and  associates  carried  on  extensive  prospecting 
operations  on  Russell  creek,  a  tributary  of  the  MacMillan  river.  A  Keystone  drill 
was  transported  to  that  creek  and  was  in  operation  a  part  of  the  season.  The  results 
obtained  were  satisfactory  and  further  extensive  drilling  operations  will  be  carried 
on  there  this  coming  season. 

LODE   MINING 

Activity  in  lode  mining  has  now  centred  on  the  silver  lead  properties  on  Keno 
Hill  and  vicinity.  The  smelter  returns  from  the  ores  shipped  last  year  by  the  Kenc 
Hill,  Limited,  were  very  satisfactory,  and  the  same  company  have  now  at  Mayo, 


76  DEPARTMbST  OF  THE  IMERIOR 

13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1923 

awaiting  shipment  on  the  opening  of  navigation,  ovt-r  Ii.lOO  tons  of  high  grade  ore. 
In  addition  to  mining  this  ore  they  have  carried  on  extensive  development  work 
throughout  the  last  year;  1,500  fctt  of  drifts,  winzes,  and  cross-cuts  were  driven. 
On  the  "Sadie"  and  "Friendship"  claims  ISO  feet  of  shafts,  drifts,  and  cross-cuta 
were  driven  in  development  work.  The  men  employed  were  as  follows:  In  the  mine, 
41;   power  plant,  4;   furnishing  wood  for  plant,  8;    transportation,  25. 

Mr.  F.  W.  Bradley  and  associates  have  acquired  extensive  interests  in  the  camp 
and  have  devoted  their  energies  almost  entirely  to  development  work,  no  attempt 
being  made  to  mine  ores  for  shipment.  Twenty-five  men  were  employed  in  these 
operations.  ' 

The  Slate  Creek  Mining  Company  on  the  "Fisher"  and  "Rondo"  claims,  near 
Lightning  creek,  have  carried  on  extensive  development  work  on  their  properties 
•with  very  satisfactory  results. 

In  general  it  is  safe  to  say  that  the  work  accomplished  by  the  above  companies 
and  others  during  the  past  year  has  immeasurably  increased  the  confidence  of  mining 
men  in  the  future  of  the  camp. 

WOOD,    TIMBER,    ASD    COAL 

One  hundred  and  fourteen  permits  to  cut  wood  and  timber  were  issued  during 
the  year.  The  quantity  of  timber  cut  under  permits  during  the  year  on  which  dues 
were  paid  was  343,300  feet,  board  measure.  Xumber  of  cords  cut  imder  authority  of 
permits  during  the  year  was  14,218;  number  of  cords  cut  without  authority  of  permit 
on  which  seizure  dues  were  paid,  1,072 ;  number  of  feet  board  measure  cut  and  sold 
under  license  during  the  year,  1,282. 

The  Five  Fingers  Coal  Company  were  not  able  to  make  satisfactory  arrange- 
ments with  the  transportation  company  to  transfer  their  coal  to  Dawson,  and  as  a 
result  the  local  market  was  not  properly  supplied.  Satisfactory  arrangements  have, 
however,  been  perfected  for  next  season. 


AGRICULTURE 

The  season  being  exceptionally  dry.  the  crop  of  hay  and  grain  out  green  for 
fodder  was  not  up  to  usual  standard.  The  potato  crop,  however,  which  is  of  very 
considerable  importance,  was  of  good  quality.  The  experiment  of  bringing  in  seed 
grain  and  fertilizer  and  selling  the  same  to  the  farmers  at  cost  has  been  satisfactoi-y 
and  has  been  much  appreciated  by  the  farming  community. 


HOSPITALS    AND    PUBLIC    HEALTH 

The  health  of  the  people  has  been  exceptionally  good,  no  epidemics  having 
occurred.  St.  Mary's  Hospital  at  Dawson  has  continued  to  render  splendid  service, 
as  well  as  the  General  Hospital  at  Whitehorse,  each  serving  their  respective  terri- 
tories in  a  most  satisfactory  manner. 


EDUCATION 

Owing  to  lack  of  funds  it  was  necessary  to  reduce  the  teaching  staff  in  the 
Dawson  Public  and  High  Schools.  A  fully  paid  Government  school  was  provided 
at  Mayo. 


SESSIONAL   PAPER   No.   12 


DOMIXIOX  LAXDS 


LAW   AND    ORDER 


The  Royal   Canadian   Mounted   Police  have  maintained   order   in    their   usual 
efficipnt  manner.     Patrols  were  maintained  to  outlying  creeks  at  frequi^nt  intervals. 


Eeport  of  In'specting  Engineer  of  Mine.s,  0.  S.  Finnie 

Largely  owing  to  increased  United  States  competition,  unfavourable  weather 
conditinns,  and  general  business  depression,  there  was  a  decrease  in  the  production 
of  coal  in  Alberta  of  about  14  per  cent  during  1921,  as  compared  with  the  previoxis 
year.    In  Saskatchewan  the  production  was  practically  the  same  as  in  1920. 

For  purposes  of  comparison  the  schedule  below  indicates  the  output  from  these 
provinces  for  the  past  two  years.  It  is  divided  into  three  classes:  coal  subject  to 
royalty  on  Dominion  lands,  coal  subject  to  royalty  on  School  lands,  and  coal  not 
subject  to  royalty. 


Calendar 
year 

Output  subject  to  royalty 

Not 
subject  to 
royalty 

Province 

Dominion 
lands 

School 
lands 

Total 

.Mberta 

1920 
1920 
1921 
1921 

Tons 
3.631.672 

41.798 
3,282.838 

46.142 

Tons 
523,318 
45,9.52 
312.962 

48,480 

Tons 
2,752,773 

247,372 
2.331,470 

247. 190 

Tons 
6.904,935 

346,328 

Alberta 

5,927,270 

341,812 

The  following  schedule  shows  the  number  of  mines  in  Alberta  and  Saskatchewan 
during  the  years,  1920  and  1921,  subject  to  royalty  on  Dominion  and  School  Lands 
and  those  not  subject  to  royalty,  also  the  total  number  operated  in  each  year. 


Province 

Calendar 
year 

Number  of  operating  coal 
mines  subject  to  royalty 

Mines 

not 

subject  to 

royalty 

Total 

Dominion 
lands 

School 
lands 

mines 

Alberta 

1920 
1920 
1921 
1921 

No. 

177 

.5,8 
179 

57 

Xo. 

16 
10 

16 
6 

Xo. 

76 
4 
76 
15 

No. 

269 

72 

.Mberta 

271 

78 

It  will  be  noted  that  there  was  a  reduction  of  output  in  Alberta  of  nearly  one 
million  t-ons.  The  decrease  in  the  different  fields  was  approximately  as  follows: 
T.nber  field,  67  per  cent;  Lethbridge  field,  8  per  cent;  Crowsnest  pass,  28  per  cent; 
Drumheller  field,  18  per  cent;  Brazeau  field,  5  per  cent. 

The  mines  in  southern  Alberta,  including  those  in  the  Taber,  Lethbrldge,  and 
Drumheller  fields,  were  in.-qiected  during  the  year. 

There  was  a  considerable  amount  of  development  work  in  the  Sheep  Creek  area, 
but  owing  to  lack  of  transportation  facilities  no  coal  was  shipped  out. 

At  the  end  of  the  fiscal  year,  Mr.  J.  W.  Mcintosh,  one  of  the  mining  inspectors 
-tatiouod  at  Calgary,  retired.'  On  May  1,  1921,  Mr.  R.  J.  Lee  was  appointed  a  mining 
iuspe<'tor  and  assigned  to  duty  in  Saskatchewan,  with  headquarters  at  Estevan. 

All  t!ie  operating  mines  in  Saskatchewan  were  inspected  and  thirty-four  surveys 
were  made.  Experiments  were  conducted  for  the  purpose  of  determining  what  steam 
power  could  be  generated  from  Souris  lignite.  It  is  hoped  that  the  results  obtained 
will  l>e  the  means  of  creating  a  greater  demand  for  Saskatchewan  coal. 


78  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 

13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1923 

During  the  year  the  petroleum  engineer's  division  was  called  upon  to  render 
advice  and  assistance  to  numerous  operators  in  addition  to  the  routine  inspections 
and  reports. 

The  petroleum  engineer  himself  made  an  extended  inspection  in  the  Northwest 
Territories  and  Vancouver  fields,  while  the  petroleum  and  natural  gas  inspector  in 
addition  to  assisting  with  the  usual  inspections  was  engaged  in  superintending  the 
mudding  and  cementing  operations  at  Peace  River  well  No.  2,  also  repairing  defective 
gas  wells  at  Medicine  Hat. 

The  following  special  undertakings  were  completed: — 

1  A  system  of  graphic  well  logs  built  of  stripe  of  wood. 

2  A  peg  model  of  the  Peace  River  field. 

3  A  relief  model  of  the  Turner  Valley  oil  field. 

4  A  map  showing  the  ga?  fields  of  Western  Canada. 

5  A  manual  for  the  use  of  oil  and  gas  operators. 

6  A  system  for  collecting  and  analysing  water  samples  from  oil  and  gas  wells. 

PRODLCTIOX    OF    NATURAL    GAS    AXD    PETROLEl"M    IX    WESTERN    C.\KADA    DURING    1921 

Natural  Gas 
Bow  Island  Gas  Field 

Canadian   Western   Natural   Gas,  Light,  Heat   and   Power    Company — i, 759,727 

cubic  feet. 
Town  of  Bow  Island — Nominal. 

Turner  TaUey  Field 

Royalite  Company,  January  to  March,  1922 — 214,370,000  cubic  feet. 
Southern  Alberta  Oil  Company — Nominal. 

Medicine  Hat  Field 

City  of  Medicine  Hat— 1,652,191,000  cubic  feet. 

Note — Gas  was  also  produced  in  the  Medicine  Hat  field  by  the  Redcliff  Gas 
Company,  the  Ogilvie  Flour  Mills,  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway,  the  Alberta  Clay 
Products,  and  others,  but  a  record  of  their  production  is  not  available. 

WetasJi-iivin  Field — Nominal. 

Petroleum 
Turner  Valley  Field 

Royalite  Company,  February,  1921,  to  March,  1922—30,415  gallons. 

Sheep  River  Oil  Company,  operating  only  September  to  December,  1921 — 15,01." 

gallons. 
Canada  Southern  Oil,  June  to  December,  1921 — 12,005  gallons. 
Illinois  Alberta  Oil  Company — Nominal. 
Southern   Alberta   Oil   Company,   December,   1920,   to  December,    1921 — 204,730 

gallons. 
Alberta    Southern   Oil    Company,   December,    1920,    to    December,    1021 — 47,250 

gallons. 

Northwest  Territories 

Northwest  Company  at  Fort  Norman — Nominal. 

Natural  Gasolene 
Turner  Valley  Field 

Royalite  Oil  Company,  February,  1921,  to  March,  1922— 1(K,6S9  gallons. 


SESSIONAL   PAPER   No.   12 


DOMINION  LANDS 


BORING    OPERATIONS 


Boring  operations  were  commenced  on  eight  petroleum  and  natural  gas  leases, 
durlii<r  the  year  1921-22  and  ten  hore  holes  were  officially  abandoned.  One  well 
reported  new  flows  of  gas.  No  new  production  of  oil  was  reported.  Details  of  opera- 
tions during  year  are  submitted  in  the  following  schedule: — 

DETAILS    OF   0PER.\T10N.S;    APRIL,    1921-JIARCH,    1922 


Province 

Number 

drillinR 

during  year 

Com- 
niencod 
this  year 

Aban- 
doned 
til  is  year 

Producing 
gas 

Producing 
oil 

- 

Alberta 

24 
3 
5 

0 

5 

57 

6 

Docs    not    in- 

wol Is  capped 

Railway  Belt 

4 

1 

only. 

DETAILS   OF   OPERATIONS 


Northern  Alherla 

Peace  River  Field. — Three  companies  operated  during  the  past  year.  Two  of 
these  met  with  losses  because  very  heavy  flows  of  water  and  natural  gas  wore  pene- 
trated, and  gushing  out  with  great  force  completely  wTCckcd  the  surface  equipment. 
There  are  now  eight  bore  holes  in  the  Peace  River  field,  where  the  water  horizons 
have  not  been  sealed  off  and  from  which  large  colimins  of  natural  gas  are  being  con- 
tinuously wasted.  The  department's  mudding  and  cementing  equipment  was  being 
used  at  well  No.  3  of  the  Peace  River  Oil  Company  during  the  summer. and  autumn, 
and  a  summary  of  the  operations  will  be  fcund  under  another  heading. 

Pouce  Coupe  Field. — The  Northwest  Company  were  drilling  a  well  on  section 
26,  township  80,  range  13,  west  of  the  6th  meridian,  and  reached  a  depth  of  1,730 
feet  during  the  year.  A  flow  of  10,627,200  cubic  feet  of  gas  per  2-1  hours  was  pene- 
trated at  a  depth  of  1,076  feet,  and  the  gauge  pressure  was  found  to  be  700  pounds 
to  the  square  inch.  Below  the  gas  at  a  depth  of  1,730  feet  salt  water  came  into  the 
well  and  the  company  found  it  advisable  to  temporarily  plug  off  the  gas  and  water 
with  mud  fluid,  and  suspended  operations  until  the  spring  of  1922. 

^[c^f-urra1J  Field. — The  Alcan  Oil  Company  drilled  a  well  to  the  depth  of  262  feet 
on  section  28,  township  90,  range  10.  west  of  the  4th  meridian,  some  six  miles  east 
of  the  Athabasca  river.  The  "  tar  sands  "  were  penetrated  immediately  below  the 
surface  beds  and  at  a  depth  of  245  feet  the  sand  appeared  to  contain  a  more  fluid 
bitumen  which  slowly  seeped  into  the  drill  hole.  However,  the  oil  was  too  viscous 
to  either  bail  or  pump  of  the  drill  hole.  It  is  the  company's  intention  to  prosi)ect 
furtlii^r  in  this  district. 

Cenfral  Alberta 

Birch  Lake  Di.strict. — The  J.  K.  Talpey  syndicate  "spudded  in"'  a  well  on  sec- 
tion 14,  township  50,  range  12,  west  of  the  4th  meridian.  A  depth  of  750  feet  was 
attained  before  operations  were  suspended  for  the  winter. 


80  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 

13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1923 

Czar  Disfrirf. — The  Xoitliwo?t  Company's  bore  hole  on  section  17,  township  39, 
range  7,  west  of  the  4th  moridinn,  which  hnd  been  drilled  to  a  depth  of  3,500  feet, 
and  had  penetrated  well  into  the  Palacoznio  Limestones,  was  abandoned  as  a  "  dry 
hole." 

Monitor  District. — The  Talpey  Syndicate  began  a  bore  hole  on  section  5,  town- 
ship 35,  range  4,  west  of  the  4th  meridian. 

The  West  Eegent  Oil  and  Gas  Company  using  the  only  rotary  rig  in  central 
Alberta  on  section  19,  township  34,  range  4,  west  of  the  4th  meridian,  attained  a 
depth  of  some  2,000  feet  before  operations  were  suspended  for  the  winter. 

The  !Mud  Butte  Oil  Company  in  section  29,  township  32,  range  4,  west  of  the 
4th  meridian,  attained  a  depth  of  500  feet  with  a  diamond  drill  before  operations 
were  suspended  for  the  winter. 

Misty  nUls  District. — The  Northwest  Company  drilling  in  section  24,  township 
32,  range  4,  west  of  the  4th  meridian,  were  delayed  most  of  the  year  by  the  destruc- 
tion of  their  rig  b.v  fire. 

Foothills 

Codlspur  District. — The  Northwest  Company  have  recently  "  spuddod  in"  a 
well  on  section  3,  township  49,  range  21,  west  of  the  5th  meridian. 

Turner  Valley  Oil  and  Gas  Field. — After  the  destruction  of  some  of  the  equip- 
ment of  the  Calgary  Petroleum  Products  Company,  the  operations  on  section  6, 
township  20,  range  2,  west  of  the  5th  meridian,  were  taken  over  by  the  Royalite 
Company.  The  gasolene  absorption  plant  was  reconstructed  along  more  elaborate 
lines,  a.  compressor  plant  was  installed  and  a  6-inch  pipe  line  laid  from  the  plant  to 
connect  with  the  Calgary  Bow  Island  line  of  the  Canadian  Western  Natural  Gas, 
Light,  Heat  and  Power  Company.  The  gas  is  drawn  from  wells  Nos.  1  and  2  under 
0  inches  of  vacuum  into  the  compressors  and  is  discharged  therefrom  into  the 
absorption  plant  at  a  pressure  of  120  pounds  per  square  inch.  The  gasolene  is 
extracted  and  the  gas,  after  being  metered,  is  conducted  through  the  6-inch  pipe  line 
to  be  finally  consumed  in  Calgary.  The  daily  production  of  gas  approximates 
2,000,000  cubic  feet. 

A  production  of  oil  is  maintained  by  the  Southern  Alberta  wells  Nos.  1  and  2, 
the  Alberta  Southern  well  No.  1.  the  Canada  Southern  well  No.  1,  the  Sheep  River 
Oil  Company's  well  No.  1  and  the  Illinois-Alberta  Oil  Company's  well  No.  1. 

No.  3  well  of  the  Eoyalite  Company,  which  is  being  drilled,  is  constantly  striking 
new  flews  of  gas. 

Willow  Creek  District. — The  Alberta  Associated  well  (Christie  No.  1")  on  sec- 
tion 7,  township  16,  range  2,  west'  of  the  5th  meridian,  was  officially  abandoned  this 
year. 

The  Willow  Creek  well  on  section  29,  township  14,  range  2,  west  of  the  Stii 
meridian,  being  drilled  by  the  Northwest  Company,  has  been  delayed  by  drilling 
difficulties. 

Pincher  Creek  District. — Twin  Butte  well  No.  1  of  the  Northwest  Company 
drilling  to  a  depth  of  2,780  feet  was  abandoned  as  a  dry  hole  in  February,  1922. 
Twin  Butte  well  No.  2  of  the  Northwest  Company  was  abandoned  in  March,  1922, 
at  a  depth  of  4,370  feet. 

Southern  Alherta  Prairie 

Bow  Island  Gas  Fi^ld. — This  important  field,  which  has  been  rapidly  declining 
during  the  past  few  years,  had  in  November,  1921,  an  average  closed  pressure  for 
the  working  wells  of  220  pounds.    No  new  drilling  has  been  undertaken  in  the  field. 


i 


DOMINION  LANDS  81 

SESSIONAL   PAPER   No.   12 

Medicine  Ilat-Rrdcliff  Field. — No  new  development  took  place  duriug  the  year. 
Pressure  tests  indicate  a  decline  of  25  to  30  pounds  in  gas  pressure  for  the  year. 

Sasl-atchewan 

Drilling  operation  were  conducted  in  Saskatchewan  by  the  Northwest  Company 
on  section  9,  township  1,  range  27,  west  of  the  3rd  meridian,  and  on  section  7, 
township  39,  range  22,  west  of  the  3rd  meridian. 

Tlie  Rush  Lake  well  of  the  Northwest  Company,  located  on  section  30,  township 
19,  range  11,  west  of  the  3rd  meridian,  was  abandoned  at  a  depth  of  2,325  feet,  as  a 
dry  hole. 

Brilish  Columiia 

Inspections  were  made  and  reports  furnished  of  drilling  operations  which  were 
being  conducted  during  the  year  on  the  Friiser  delta  in  the  vicinity  of  Vancouver. 

Northtvest  Territories 

An  investigation  was  made  of  tlie  drilling  operations  in  the  Northwest  Terri- 
tories. At  the  time  of  the  inspection  (July)  the  Northwest  Company  was  "rigging 
up"  preparatory  to  drilling  on  four  locations  in  the  vicinity  of  Discovery  well  in 
the  Fort  Norman  area.  The  Fort  Norman  Oil  Company  had  "  spudded  in "  on  a 
lease  six  miles  down  stream  from  Discovery  well. 

After  carefully  investigating  conditions  at  the  Discovery  well  the  general  conclu- 
sion arrived  at  was  that  the  well  would  probably  produce  a  high  grade  petroleum 
at  a  rate  of  less  than  eight  barrels  per  day. 

The  bore  hole  at  Windy  Point  on  Great  Slave  lake  which  was  being  sunk  by 
the  Northwest  Company  was  operating  at  a  depth  of  1,300  feet  in  a  salt  formation. 
The  well  was  subsequently  abandoned  at  a  depth  of  1,806  feet  in  Lower  Palaeozoic 
measures.    No  oil  or  gas  was  obtained. 

MUDDIXG   AND    CEMENTING    OPERATIONS 

At  the  request  of  the  Canada  Cement  Company  the  branch  supervised  the  work 
of  repairing  and  putting  in  a  tubing  and  packer  in  their  No.  3  well  at  Medicine  Hat. 
The  work  was  successfully  accomplished  and  the  water  which  had  been  seeping  into 
the  well  was  effectively  sealed  off  from  the  gas  sands. 

The  operations  conducted,  with  a  view  to  ascertaining  the  advisability  of  further 
work,  on  No.  1  well  of  the  Canada  Cement  Company  at  Medicine  Hat  were  also 
supervised.  This  work  was  completed  during  February,  1921.  The  department's 
mudding  and  cementing  equipment  had  been  transferred  to  Peace  Eiver  in  July  last 
year.  Preliminary  operations  were  begun  on  well  No.  3  of  the  Peace  River  Oil 
Company.  Owing  to  the  great  difficulty  and  expense  that  would  have  attended  the 
shipping  of  clay  suitable  for  making  mud  fluid,  an  attempt  was  made  to  cement  the 
well  without  first  killing  agitation  by  mud  fluid.  It  was  hoped  that  the  casing  was 
suificiently  tight  to  prevent  any  movement  of  gas  in  the  well.  After  the  operations 
were  completed,  it  was  soon  discovered  that  the  attempt  at  cementing  without  mud 
fluid  w.<is  not  successful.  As  the  season  was  then  too  short  to  begin  new  work,  it 
was  decided  to  suspend  operations  until  the  spring  of  1922. 


82 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 


13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1923 

REPORT  OF  THE  CONTROLLER,  TIMB^ER  AND  GRAZING  LANDS 
BRANCH.  B.  L.  YORK 

The  total  revenue  derived  from  timber,  grazing,  and  hay  lands  during  the  fiscal 
year  amounted  to  $723,322.81.  This  is  a  decrease  of  $83,796.42  as  compared  with  the 
revenue  for  the  previous  year,  and  is  the  result  of  the  generally  adverse  conditions. 


Statements  A,  B,  and  C,  showing  the  total  revenue  from  the  timber  agencies,  and 
other  sources  of  revenue  by  agencies,  also  the  statements  from  the  Crown  timber 
agents  at  Calgary,  Edmonton,  Prince  Albert,  Winnipeg,  Kamloops,  New  West- 
minster, and  Revelstoke,  showing  the  revenue  collected  within  their  respective 
agencies,  and  other  information  are  apj^ended  hereto. 

The  report  of  the  Superintendent  of  Dominion  Timber  Agencies,  and  the  report 
of  the  inspectors  of  ranches  located  at  Calgary,  Moose  Jaw,  Prince  Albert,  and  Peace 
River  are  also  attached. 

The  revenue  from  timber,  grazing,  and  hay  lands  received  at  the  Crown  Timber 
agencies,  and  also  the  number  of  mills  operated  nnder  license,  and  the  number  of 
mills  operated  under  permit  are  as  follows: — 


Agency 

Total 
revenue 

Xumljcr  of 

mills 

operating 

under 

license 

Number  of 

mills 

operating 

under 

permit 

S       cts. 

43,019  42 
113.681  24 

88,766  44 
136,690  99 

42,796  16 
1.53.000  38 

22,396  50 

11 
27 
31 
27 
10 
30 
11 

16 

95 

51 

47 



The  returns  of  operations  show  the  quantity  of  timber  and  also  other  material 
manufactured  and  sold  under  license  to  be  as  follows : — 


itanu- 
factured 


Sawn  lumber,  feet  board  measure. 

Railway  ties 

Laths 

Shingles 

Shingle  bolts,  cords 

Mine  timber,  lineal  feet 

Piling,  lineal  feet 

Mine  tics 

Telephone  poles 

Cordwood,  cords 

Lagging,  cords 

Fence  posts 

Boom  timber,  lineal  feet 


188.227,507 

307,397 

25,262,905 


25,410 

971,623 

82,4.'54 

62S 

28,036 

1,012 

1,245 

115,884 

14,579 


200,568,835 

255,090 

30,222,808 

16,000 

27,634 

1,063,917 

89,979 

628 


974 
1,145 


DOMINION  LANDS  83 

SESSIONAL   PAPER    No.    12 

The  total   quantity  of  timber  and  also  otlicr  material   manufactured   and  sold 
under  permit  and  portable  saw-mill  berths  is  as  follows: — 


JFanu- 
factured 


Sawn  lumber,  feet  board  measure 

Railway  ties 

Shingles 

Laths 

Mine  ties,  lineal  foct 

Mine  timber,  lineal  feet 

Telephone  poles 

Fence  posts 

Fenre  rails 

Cordwood,  cords 


,972,406 

214,492 

597,250 

307,9.50 

172,065 

,578,775 

2,232 

44,873 

1,168 

2,241 


35,680,520 
214,1.52 
581,250 
282,9.50 
165,367 
2,576,660 
1,607 
56, 139 


3,128 


The  area  of  lands  held  under  license  and  permit  in  the  provinces  of  Manitoba, 
Saskatchewan,  Alberta,  and  British  Columbia  is  as  follows: — 


Under  license 

Under  Permit 

sq.  miles 

901-47 

1,042-77 

1,835-32 

1,727-68 

sq 

miles 
396  05 

119-37 

127-04 

9-.i0 

5,597-24 

651-96 

During  the  year  91  berths  were  granted,  as  follows :  2  license  berths,  35  portable 
saw-mill  berths,  38  cordwood  berths,  15  permit  and  flrekiUed  berths,  1  pulpwood  berth. 

GRAZING 

There  were  6,518  grazing  leases  in  force,  covering  an  area  of  6,341,952  acres, 
made  up  as  follows:  Manitoba,  135,837  acres;  Saskatchewan,  2,911,365  acres;  Alberta, 
2,879,504  acres;  British  Columbia,  415,246  acres.  During  the  year  581  new  leases 
were  issued. 

Statement  A — Eevenue  for  fiscal  year  1921-22 

Timber $573,479   98 

Grazing 101,175   22 

Hay 18,829   25 

Registration  fees 278   00 

Flreguarding  dues 24,056   76 

Improvements 916  70 

Scaling  fees 4,426  65 

Scale  books 41   25 

License  fees 118   00 

Sundries 1   00 

Total $723,322   81 

Statement  B — ^Revenue  from  Timber  for  fiscal  year  1921-23 

Bonus $   20.631   12 

Rent 83.339   81 

Royalty 216,044   10 

Permit  fees,  dues  and  rentals 238,497  15 

Seizure  dues 14,967  80 

Scaling  fees 4,426  65 

Scale  books 41  25 

License  fees 118  00 

Total $578,065  88 


12—61 


84  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 

13  GEORGE  V,  A.   1923 

Statement  C — Revenue  from  Grazing,  Hay,  Eegistration  Fees,  Improvements  and 
Sundries  for  fiscal  year  1921-22 

Grazing $101,175  22 

Hay IS. 829   25 

Registration  fees 278  00 

Fireiruarding  dues 24,056  76 

Improvements 916  70 

Sundries 1   00 

Total $145,256  93 


Report  of  Superixtent>ext  of  Dominion  Timber  Agencies,  E.  F.  Stephenson 

Statement  A — Summary  of  work  performed  and  revenue  collected  in  the  respective 
Crown  Timber  oflBces,  during  the  fiscal  year. 


Timber  and  Grazing 

Forestry 

Schools  Lands 

Agency 

0 

35 

C 
3 

S 

a 
o 

p  =0 

r  D 
E.J 

ss 

286 

136 

290 

1010 

427 

319 

11 

3 

174 

447 

599 

95 

51 

90 

1095 

c  ^ 

P- 

17 
14 

198 
3 
4 
12 

"12 

69 

1 

s 

456 

217 
450 
951 
176 
18 
45 
525 

M-5 

5  £ 

425 
578 
64 
304 
108 
4S0 
946 
1046 

-a 
c 
3 

16 
11 

i46 

96 

46 

5 

5 

203 

1 

3 

36 
3 
6 
60 

!l 

0  * 

193 

272 

1110 

67 

3 

I 
2 
52 
38 

11 

125 
237 

147 
52 

a 

>. 

a 
X 

3; 

13 

264 

27 

12 
4 

38 

1 
1 

21 

2 

X 

T. 

0 

•D 

c 

3 
O. 

Revenue 

Battleford 

280 
322 

2ro 

472 
64 

■37 
510 

423 

1155 

72 

475 

433 
980 

51 
296 

750 
714 

6 

n 
2? 

1 

$  cts. 
19.115  61 

44 

37 

91,455  79 

18, .551  02 

1 
3 

44 

"89 

49 
■49 

'49,643  90 

7,213  47 

24 
451 
144 

15 

17 
294 
183 

23 
2 
97 

49.2^0  59 

41.802  17 

Moose  Jaw 

11 

225 

223 

34.475  37 
49.. ''46  81 

292 
969 

162 
360 

1 
75 

95 
436 

194 

114 

m 
II 

137 

"45 

"3 

1 
83 

6 

16 

86 
298 

sii 

152 
662 

10,219  27 

Prince  Albert 

4 
2 

42 
97 

64 
23 

875 

i36 
315 
206 

13 

is 

10 

8 

15,986  02 
22.048  85 

80 

390 
211 

721 

168 
1436 

20. 170  48 

46.328  41 

73 

60 

'00.489  29 

21 
17 

Total 

614 
518 

505 
618 

i033 
7088 

438 
323 

5421 
8786 

6077 
638f 

637 
1405 

3793 
4723 

153 
123 

1846 
1818 

833 
908 

186 
328 

4- 

75 

3644 

-84r 

74 

S76.297  04 

Previous  year 

^257 

=90P 

107 

'.039.9.^(73 

N.B. — Revenue  exclusive  of  payments  made  direct  to  Department  on  account  of  respective 
Agencies. 


DOMINION  LANDS 


85 


SESSIONAL    PAPER    No.    12 


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276,499 
21,231 
45,006 
26,587 
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11,016,003 
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5,0.57,796 
773,490 
4,6.55,179 

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7,003,44 
5,742,979 
6,684, 04t 
773,490 
6,906,327 

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86  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 

13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1923 

Statement     C — Timber    material    covered    by   Permits    issued    at    the    respective 
Agencies,  principally  to  settlers  during  the  fiscal  year 


Agency 

Lumber 
and  logs 

Fence 
rails 

Poles 

Fence 
posts 

Cord- 
wood 

Rail- 
way 
ties 

Poles, 
tele- 
graph 
and 
tele- 
phone 

Round 
timber 

.Shingle 
bolu 

Battleford 

Ft.  b.m. 

1,324,831 

569, 180 

3,117,456 

9,193,4.il 

2.454,398 

7,6.50,753 

137, 151 

9,840 

5,373,015 

2,760,298 

15,029.461 

773.490 

258,589 

.52, 130 

7,703.499 

36.030 
13.68.=^ 
4.060 
49,337 
909,. 520 
2.115 
4.46" 
900 

441,149 
292,048 

No. 

7,110 

4,460 

5,4"0 

95.833 

91,998 

757 

650 

500 

8.5 ,538 
26,757 

31,344 
14.7.30 
47.140 
209.241 
95,069 
67,585 
39,. 59 1 
7,975 

3.000 
103,2.55 
271.732 
57,470 
11,28.5 
23,110 
74,363 

Cords 
1,400 
5,. 507 
14.413 

No. 

No. 

lin.  ft. 

Cords 

Calgary 

1,2.50 

12,500 

10.150,000 

Edmonton 

Grande  Prairie. 

3.372 
533 
5,412 
3,809 
1.003 

74S 

5,703 

36,278 

6.53 

1,113 

2,739 

35,023 

358,730 

1,050 

660,029 

Kamloops 

68,491 

22,131 

105 

Lethbridge 

Moose  Jaw 

599,718 

New     W  e  s  t  - 
minster 

19.951 
7.100 
15,749 
10,278 

45,006 
1,943 

22,131 
1,791 

4.895 

Pekce  River  ... 
Prince  Albert... 

42 

870 

Saskatoon 

100 
7,6S0 
14,900 

"i.'io.- 

6,602 

Swift  Current... 

Winnipeg 

52,5.54 

2.000 

470 

Total 

56,407.542 

1,775,989 

327,060 

1,056,890 

117,706 

.534.148 

108,5.52 

11,410,2-59 

5,870 

Previous  year... 

105,714,310 

3,594,248 

472,628 

2,252,376 

90,561 

1.052,942 

194.957 

2.6-58,327 

7,886 

St.vtemext  D — Xumber   of  Hay  Permits  issued   at   the   respective   Crown   Timber 
offices  and  the  amount  of  hay  covered  thereby  for  the  fiscal  year 


Dominion  Lands 

School  Lands 

Forestry  Lands 

Revenue 
from  Hay 

Agency 

Permits 
issued 

Hay 

Permits 
issued 

Hay 

Permits 
issued 

Hay 

Battleford 

No. 
456 
217 
450 
951 
176 
18 
45 
525 

Tons 
5,389 
3,636 
5.593 
7,472 
1,563 
80 
386 
7.491 

No. 
280 
322 
250 
472 
64 

Tons 
3,252 
6.128 
4,360 
3,982 
503 

No. 

35 

13 

264 

27 

Tons 
1,789 

302 
4.4.''0 

825 

$           cts. 
3.264  50 

2.873  36 

3.909  48 

4,282  30 

624  75 

23 
2 
97 

275 

15 

3,166 

105  25 

37 
510 

313 
6,849 

151  40 

4.215  40 

292 
969 

3,652 
8,4S1 

86 
298 

1,161 
2,692 

5 
114 

300 
3,000 

1,547  14 

3,728  71 

399 
211 
721 

.5.400 
7.132 

7.2.58 

511 
1,52 
662 

7,214 
2.019 
7.634 

105 
11 
137 

3.475 

241 

2.703 

4,465  00 

Swift  Current 

996  40 

5,089  62 

Total 

5,430 

63.993 

3,644 

46, 107 

833 

20,541 

35,253  31 

Previous  Year 

9,537 

125.610 

5,157 

78,075 

965 

26,107 

43,476  40 

DOMINION  LANDS  87 

SESSIONAL    PAPER   No.    12 

EErORT    OF    THE    SUPERENTENDENT,    OEDNANCE   AND    ADMIRALTY 
LANDS   BRANCH,  JOS.  P.  DUNNE 

During  the  fiscal  year  there  were  no  public  sales  of  Ordnance  lands  held,  but, 
with  resjiect  to  lands  previously  sold  or  occupied  under  leases  with  the  option  of 
purchase,  eigrhteen  whole  lots  and  six  part  lots,  situated  in  the  several  localities 
hereunder  mentioned,  and  in  the  accompanying  statement  lettered  A,  have  been 
paid  in  full  and  letters  patent  issued. 

Nepenn — Nine  lots  fcrming  part  of  a  subdivision  of  a  portion  of  township  lots 
39  and  40,  1st  concession,  Ottawa  Front,  now  within  the  limits  of  the  city  of  Ottawa, 
were  sold  at  a  valuation  to  the  party  in  possession,  in  accordance  with  the  ijrovisions 
of  the  Ordnance  and  Admiralty  Lands  Act,  the  party  dn  questicn  having  been  in 
occupation  of  the  land  for  many  years,  with  the  consent  of  the  Crown. 

Ottawa — ^Lots  in  this  locality  are  occupied  by  tenants  under  terms  and  condi- 
tions embodied  in  the  original  leases  granted  by  the  Imperial  authorities.  One  cf 
such  conditions'  being  that  the  tenant  may  convert  his  leaseshold  into  freehold  at 
any  time  on  payment  in  cash  of  the  purchase  jirice  placed  on  the  land.  During  the 
fiscal  year  eight  whole  lots  and  four  part  lots  were  redeemed  and  letters  patent  issued 
therefor. 

Port  Mail-land. — One  lot  forming  part  of  the  reserve  situated  on  the  westerly 
side  of  the  Grand  river  at  this  point  and  which  has  been  occupied  under  lease  with 
the  option  of  jiurchase  was  redeemed  in  full  and  letters  patent  issued. 

Sorel — Two  small  parcels  of  land,  known  as  "Continuations",  situated  in  the 
parish  of  St.  Pierre  de  Sorel  and  which  have  been  occupied  for  many  years  were 
sold  to  the  party  in  possession  and  letters  patent  issued. 

South  Crosby — A  small  parcel  of  land,  being  a  portion  of  let  17,  Sth  Concession, 
in  this  township,  forming  part  of  the  Canal  reserve,  and  being  no  longer  required  for 
the  purposes  of  the  canal  was  transferred  to  this  Department  to  be  scld  at  a  ■valuation 
to  the  party  in  possession,  which  was  accordingly  done  and  letters  patent  issued. 

RAILWAY    LANDS    DIVISION 

During  the  fiscal  year,  the  activities  of  this  division,  dn  connection  with  the 
railway  land  subsidy  work  consisted  chiefly  in  the  auditing  of  the  land  accounts  of 
the  ditlcrent  railway  companies  which  received  a  land  subsidy  from  the  Crown  in 
the  Prairie  Provinces.  Much  correspondence  passed  between  the  railway  officials 
and  this  branch  in  comparing  and  checking  the  result  of  this  audit  and  adjustment. 

Included  in  work  relative  to  railway  companies  was  a  large  volume  ff  corres- 
pondence with  the  Grand  Trunk  Pacific  Railway  Company,  the  Edmonton,  Dunvegan 
and  British  Columbia  Railway  Company  and  the  Alberta  and  Great  Waterways 
Railway  Company  in  connection  with  the  administration  of  the  lands  required  for 
right  cf  way  purposes  for  these  railways. 

The  following  statement  shows  the  acreage  patented  for  railway  subsidy  and 
right  of  way  purposes  from  this  Branch  during  the  fiscal  year : — 

Canadian  Northern  Railway  Company 2,231.03  acres 

Manitoba  Southwestern  Colonization  Railway  Company.    ..  209. C3 

Alberta  and  Great  Waterways  Railway  Company 6.50 

Edmonton,   Dunvegan  and  British  Columbia  Railway  Com- 
pany   295.97 

Total 2,743.13  acres 


88  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 

13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1923 
Statement  A — Number  of  lots  and  part  lots  sold  or  redeemed  during  the  fiscal  year 


Locality 

Number  of 
lots  sold  or 
redeemed 

Amount  of 

consideration 

or  purchase 

money 

Amount 
received 

on  account 
during 

fiscal  year 

Remarks 

9  lots 
pt.  lot 
pt.  lot 
pt.  lot 
Hot 
1  lot 
1  lot 
1  lot 
1  lot 
1  lot 
I  lot 
1  lot 
pt.  lot 
1  lot 

2pt.lot3 
pt.  lot 

$       cts. 

3,92.5  00 
9.5  00 
91  OS 
100  00 
400  00 
370  33 
74  16 
83  33 
83  33 
83  33 
83  33 
400  00 
100  00 
67  60 
1.50  00 
133  32 

$       cts. 

3,925  00 
9.5  00 
36  78 
100  00 

In  full 

In  full 

Balance  of  purchase  money 
In  full 

" 

« 

« 

•' 

" 

« 

<• 

It 

« 

« 

« 

100  00 
67  60 
].50  00 
133  32 

In  full 

Port  Maitland 

In  full 

Sorel 

In  full 

South  Crosby 

In  full 

6,240  71 

4,607  70 

Statement  B- 


-Localities  where  Ordnance  Lands  are  situated  on  account  of  which 
mcnies  have  been  received  during  the  fiscal  year 


Locality 

Amount 

$       cts. 

Anhr,  N.B.  (Westmorland  Point) 

64  00 

Burlinston  Beach 

60  00 

Burritts  Rapids 

4  00 

Carillon 

0  40 

Chaffev's  Locks,  Ont 

Edmunston,  N.B.; ;.    . 

1  00 

Elmslpy 

7  60 

Fort  Erie 

2  00 

Grand  Falls,  N.B 

69  60 

2  00 

''06  50 

Montreal 

100  00 

2  00 

2  00 

Old  PIv's  Rapids  (Montague,  Ont.) 

4  00 

Ottawa 

6,1.S6  13 

Port  Maitland 

99  18 

Prescott 

1  00 

830  00 

1.50  00 

200  00 

Smiths  Falls 

50  50 

Sorel.  Que 

4  00 

St.  Andrew's,  N.B 

1  OO 

Wolford 

101  75 

Fees 

8,330  48 
U6  00 

Total 

8,446  48 

DOMINION  LANDS  89 

SESSIONAL   PAPER   No.   12 

Statement  C — Receipts  each  month  of  the  fiscal  year;    classified  as  fees,  rents  or 
interest  equivalent  to  rent,  and  principal 


Monlh 

Fees 

Rent  or 
interest 

Prineip.il 

Total 

1921 
April  . .                                                          

$    cts. 

20  00 
6  00 
8  00 

10  00 
3  00 

13  00 

39  00 

S      cts. 

134  .-^0 
712  .';9 
IS.";  60 
364  10 

.'54  47 
D.'ie  89 

31   18 

248  00 

8  40 

100  00 
4"0  90 
268  75 

$       cts. 
'4,04000 

$       cts. 
I.';4  .'iO 

May 

4,7.i8  59 

193  60 

July 

95  00 
36  78 
250  00 

469  10 

94  25 

1,219  89 

October                                                         

70  18 

100  00 

348  00 

8  40 

1922 

100  00 

40  00 
233  32 

510  90 

17  00 

519  07 

116  00 

3.535  38 

4,795  10 

8,446  48 

Statement  D — Amounts  due  and  unpaid  on  account  of  purchase  money  and  rent  or 
interest  for  the  fiscal  year 


Locality 

Rent  or 
interest 

Principal 

Total 

$       cts. 

2  12 
470  00 
I  06 
30  36 
5  96 

0  40 
219  96 

21  35 
64  67 
312  65 

1  74 
2,290  37 

19  93 

2  <;4 

95  83 

8  34 

2,093  75 

4  42 

202  95 

85  40 

145  30 

$       cts. 

$  cts. 
2  12 

470  00 

1  06 

23  00 

53  36 

5  96 

0  40 

Grand  Falls.. .^ 

238  17 

4.";8  13 

21  35 

64  67 

507  00 
"4;96300 

819  65 

1  74 

Ottawii 

7,2.53  .■57 
19  93 

Oxford 

2  94 

Port  Mnitland 

69  08 

164  91 

8  34 

2,093  75 

South  Crosby 



4  42 

Sorcl 

202  95 

85  40 

Wolford 

145  .30 

6,079  50 

5,800  25 

11,879  75 

90 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  IXTERIOR 


13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1923 


EEPOET   OF   THE   FINANCIAL   CONTKOLLER,   P.   ilAECHAND 

Statement  of  revenue  collected  from  various  sources  during  the  fiscal  year  1921-22 

A  Dominion   Lands,   including:   Yukon J2. 918, 529  59 

B  School  L.ands 2,335,726  83 

C  Ordnance  Lands S.4'16  4.8 

D  Registration   Fees,   Yukon 524  64 

E  Fines  and   Forfeitures 2.912  73 

F  Casual   Revenue 20,128  63 

G  Seed  Grain  and  Relief  Repayments 372.330  89 

H  Sales  of  Railway  Lands,   special   account 8. SCO  00 

$5,067,419   79 


A  statement  of  revenue  on  account  of  Dominion  Lands  marked  I  shows  the 
receipts  classified  under  subheads. 

Statement  marked  J  shows  a  comparison  between  the  revenue  of  the  present 
fiBcal  year  and  that  of  the  previous  twelve  months. 


Statement  A — Dominion  Lands  Revenue  for  the  fiscal  year  1921-22 


Agencies 

Amount 

Battleford 

Dominion  Land  Agencies 

$    ets. 
32,773  53 

210  e'Q  97* 

12.825  52 

36,424  48 

6,367  52 

6,207  09 

42,564  17 

152,128  90 

2,243  63 

9,518  49 

19,435  42 

2,358  64 

80,460  11 

238,182  14 

28,238  25 

30,906  06 

Crown  Timber  Agencies 

911,265  92 

Battlcford 

11,869  19 

74,942  93 

683  58 

18,627  70 

140,764  63 

13,451  82 

49,279  87 

42,082  23 

2,007  65 

17,978  23 

153,000  41 

6.364  65 

115,319  72 

21,925  97 

7,315  47 

Swift  Current 

41,101  14 

145,267  79 

861,982  98 

DOMINION  LANDS 
SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.   12 

A — Continued — Dominion  L.inds  Revenue  for   the  fiscal  vear   1921-22 


Battleford 

Calsary 

Dauphin 

Edmonton.. 

Grandi*  Prairie. . . . 

Kani  loops 

LethbridKe 

Moosf  .law 

New  Westminster. 

Peace  Hiver 

The  Pas 

Prineo  .\lhert 

Revel.stoke 

Saskatoon 

Swift  Current 

Winnipeg 


Mining  Agencies 


Canadian  National  Parks 


Antelope  Park 

Buffalo  Park 

Elk  I.slandPark 

Fort  .\nno  Park 

Glacier  ]*ark 

lsle-au\-\oix  Reserve. 
Jasper  Park. 


Kootcnay  Park 

Moose  Mountain  Buffalo  Reserve. 

Point  Pelee  I'ark 

Rocky  Mountains  Park 

W  aterton  Lakes  Park 

Yolio  Park 

Miscellaneous 


$  cts. 
,224  48 
.621  81 
,,S9G  43 
,fi04  92 
,464  77 

743  5.5 
,898  09 
,996  22 
,101  64 
.439  .56 
,973  05 
,902  80 

.524  40 
,085  68 
,610  83 
.822  95 


Yukon  Tekritort 

Homestead  fees 

General  sales  of  land 

Rentals  of  land 

Map  sales,  office  and  registration  fees 

Interim  receipt  account 

Timber  dues 

Hay  dues [_[ 

Mining  fees 

Coal  royalty  and  fees 

Dredging  leases 

Export  tax  on  gold 

Free  certificates  tor  export  of  gold 

Hydraulic  leases 

Northwest  TERRrroRiES 

General  sales  of  land 

Patent  fees '..'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 

Registration  fees 

Suspense  account , ., 

Liquor  permit  fees 

Tfaders  licenses 

Trappers'  licenses 

Timber  dues 

Hay  permits 

Mining  fees 

Petroleum  leases 

Miscellaneous 

Total  revenue 

Less  refunds 


,015  20 

220  85 

80  00 

45  00 

285  38 

215  00 

,973  01 

8  75 

4.52  60 

21  02 

,208  63 

,148  12 

,544  12 

79  00 


20  00 

1,927  90 

5,229  47 

30  00 

01  00 

9,991  79 

22  40 

46,147  75 

235  31 

168  30 

30,774  68 

4  50 

2,. 569  00 


97,182  10 


1,170  90 

110  00 

189  00 

12  00 

194  00 

1,280  00 

1,.599  00 

2,370  68 

36  75 

1,399  00 

113,443  00 

20  40 


121,824  73 


.918.529  59 
119,079  58 


92 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 


13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1923 

Statement  B — Receipts  on   account   of  Scliool   Lands  Revenue  for  the  fiscal  year 

1921-22 


Province 

Gross 
Revenue 

Refunds 

Net 
Revenue 

$    cts. 

213,214  41 

1,511,292  73 

611,219  69 

$    cts. 
9,418  90 
35,993  18 
8,531  16 

S    cts. 
203  795  51 

1  475  '99  55 

Alberta 

2,335,726  83 

53,943  24 

2,281,783  59 

Statement   C — Ordnance   Lands  Revenue  for   the   fiscal   vear 


Fiscal  year 

Gross 
Revenue 

Refunds 

Net 
Revenue 

1921-1922 

$     cts. 
8,446  48 

S    cts. 
8  58 

t    cts. 
8,437  90 

Statement  D — Registration  Fees  in  tlie  Yukon  Territory  for  the  fiscal  year 


Fiscal  Year 

Gross 
Revenue 

Land 

Assurance 

Fund 

Net 
Revenue 

1921-1922 

S    cts. 
524  64 

S    cts. 
42  89 

$    cts. 
481  75 

Statement  E — Fines  and  Forfeitures  for  the  fiscal  year 


Fiscal  Year 

Northwest 
Territories 

Northwest 
Game  and 
Migratory 
Bird  Act 

Dominion 

Parks 

Regulations 

etc. 

Gross 
Revenue 

Refunds 

Net 
Revenue 

1921-1922  .     . 

$    cts. 
222  00 

$    cts. 
641  90 

$    cts. 
2.048  83 

S    cts. 
2,912  73 

$    cts 

744  00 

$    cts. 
2  16^  73 

Statement  F — Casual  Revenue  for  the  fiscal  year 


Fiscal  Year 

Particulars 

Gross 
Revenue 

Refunds 

Net 
Revenue 

1921-1922  . . 

Casual  revenue,  mis- 

S    cts 
20,128  63 

$    cts 

8,779  03 

i    cts. 

11,349  60 

DOMINION  LANDS 


93 


SESSIONAL   PAPER   No.   12 

Statement  G — Net  Eepayments  of  Seed  Grain  and  Eelief  Mortgages  for  the  fiscal 
year  ended  March  31,  1922 


Year 

Gross 
Collections 

Refunds 

Net 
Receipts 

1876                       

$    cts. 

177  03 

832  48 

674  85 

1,492  34 

1,593  66 

841  79 

73  77 

283  17 

96  75 

3,677  12 

460  41 

2,466  87 

4.851  56 

1,182  14 

939  66 

175,527  65 

107,980  85 

2,652  70 

11,589  26 

26,196  81 

14,403  75 

11,128  34 

508  07 

237  00 

2,502  86 

S    cts. 

$    cts. 
177  03 

832  48 

1890 

674  85 

1,492  34 

1895 

71  6V 
9  36 
2  30 
2  12 

1..521  97 

1896                 

832  43 

1900 

71  47 

1901                         

281  05 

1905 

96  75 

1908                     

43  35 

13  71 

6  74 

26  40 

4  14 

6  05 

6,009  02 

1,084  91 

101  07 

269  35 

418  59 

434  95 

3,2,52  86 

82  80 

3,633  77 

1P09 

446  70 

1911           .                  

2,440  13 

1912 

4,825  16 

1913                                   

1,178  00 

1914  

933  61 

1915  S   G                

169,518  63 

1915  Relief 

106,895  94 

1917                          

2,. 551  63 

1918    

11,319  91 

1919                                          

25,778  22 

1920  S  G 

13,968  80 

1920  Kelief                           

7,875  48 

425  27 

1P21  Relief                                         

237  00 

31  40 

2,471  46 

372,350  89 

11,870  81 

360,480  08 

Statement  II — Dominion  Lands  Revenue  for  the  fiscal  year  ended  March  31,  1922, 
credited  to  the  special  account  of  the  following  railway  company 


Railway  Company 

Date  of  Order  in  Council 

Amount 

December  5,  1908 

Canad  ian  Northern  Railway  System / 

Statement  I — Gross  Cash  Eeceipts  on  account  of  Dominion  Lands  Revenue  for  the 
fiscal  year  ended  March  31,  1922 


Source  of  Revenue 


Homestead  fees 

Sale  fees 

Improvements 

Ciencral  sales  of  land 

Timber  dues 

Rental  from  grajing  lands 

Kxport  tax  on  gold,  hay,  coal,  petroleum,  etc... 

Canadian  National  Parks 

Map  sales,  rentals,  office  fees  and  miscellaneous 
Liquor  permits,  traders'  and  trappers'  licenses. 


$    cts. 

73,. 540  00 

170  00 

.56,084  S3 

761,849  89 

683,490  99 

144,344  67 

1,071,395  56 

74,302  68 

50,277  97 

3,073  00 


2,918,529  59 


94  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 

13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1923 

Statement   J — Gross   Receipts    (cash   and   scrip)    on   account   of   Dominion   Lands 
Revenue  for  the  fiscal  year  compared  with  the  previous  year 


Particulars 

1921-22 

1920-21 

Increase 

Decrease 

Net  decrease 

$     cts 

fln,2f>5  92 
861.9S2  9f 
851.971  18 
97,182  10 
74.302  68 
121,824  73 

$    cts. 

1,837,137  59 

696,025  30 

1,385,142  60 

90,920  91 

76,850  OS 

S    cts. 

S    cts 
925,871  67 

$    cts. 

165,957  68 

533, 171  42 

6,261  19 

2,547  41 

121,824  73 

2,918,529  59 

4.086,076  49 

294,043  60 

1,461,590  50 

1,167,546  90 

13  GEORGE  V  SESSIONAL  PAPER   No.   12 


PART  II 

CANADIAN  NATIONAL  PARKS 


EEPORT   OF   TIIE   COMMISSIONER,   J.   B.  HARKIN 

The  steady  increase  in  tra\^el  to  nearly  all  of  the  Canadian  National  parks  has 
been  the  mosit  gratifying  feature  of  the  past  fiscal  year  (1921-22)  and  a  matter  for 
great  satisfaction  to  all  who  are  concerned  with  their  administration.  It  indicates 
more  clearly  than  words  the  gi-eat  and  increasing  service  these  reservations  are 
capable  of  rendering  and,  both  from  the  economic  and  social  aspect,  justifies  their 
creation,  maintenance  and  development.  A  few  years  ago.  Dr.  T.  G.  Langstaff,  the 
eminent  alpinist,  writing  of  the  Canadian  Rockies  and  the  National  parks  in  the 
"  London  Field,"  remarked  that  it  seemed  to  him  that  Canadians  scarcely  realized 
the  value  of  their  unique  possessions,  and  it  must  be  admitted  there  appeared  to  be 
good  grounds  for  his  indictment.  For  many  years  the  name  of  the  Canadian  Rockies 
was  better  known  abroad  than  at  home  but  there  is  now  noticeable  on  the  part  of 
Canadians  themselves  a  growing  interest  in  the  beauty  of  their  own  country  and  an 
appreciation  of  the  Tich  possibilities  for  enjoyment  and  recreation  offered  by  the 
National  parks,  and  each  year  sees  a  steady  gain  in  the  number  of  Canadian  visitors. 

Owing  to  the  high  cost  of  railway  travel  this  traffic  has  not  yet  reached  the  high 
water  mark  set  in  1915,  the  year  of  the  Panama-Pacific  exposition,  but  it  is  noted 
with  a  great  deal  of  satisfaction  that  people  tend  each  year  to  remain  an  increasing 
kngth  of  time  in  the  parks.  While  the  total  registrations  are  necessarily  lower  the 
use  that  is  being  made  of  the  parks  is  a  much  better  use  and  one  that  is  more 
consistent  with  the  ideals  lying  behind  their  creation.  For  while  no  one  can  travel 
through  the  Canadian  Rockies  or  spend  even  a  few  hours  among  the  wonders  of  the 
National  pai-ks  without  gaining  a  new  conception  of  the  greatness  and  beauty  of 
Canada  and  of  the  possibilities  of  national  life,  still  the  mountains  yield  their  real 
riches  only  to  those  who  come  and  live  among  them,  absorbing  through  days  and 
weeks  their  strength  and  health  and  beautiful  serenity.  These  are  the  things  the 
parks  were  created  to  give  and  they  cannot  be  gained  by  the  visitor  who  rushes 
through  them  in  a  few  hours  either  by  railway  train  or  motor  car.  The  fact  that  so 
many  Canadians  are  making  the  parks  the  objective  for  their  entire  holiday  is, 
therefore,  a  matter  for  much  satisfaction.  The  total  travel  to  the  parks  during  the 
past  fiscal  year  is  as  follows: — 

1921-22 

Banff  National  Park 71,540 

Yoho   Natlon.Tl   Park 3.000 

Glacier  National  Park 3.223 

Mount    Revelstoke    Park    (estimated) 4.000 

Jasper  National    Parli    (estimated) 7.000 

Waterton  Lakes  National  Park  (estimated) 20,000 

Buffalo  National    Park    (e.stimated) 7,000 

Elk  Island  National  Park 5,443 

Point  Pelee  National  Park   (estimated) 7.000 

St   Lawrence  Islands  National   Park   (estimated) 30,000 

Fort  Anne  National  Park  (estimated) 8,000 

Total 166,206 

95 


96  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 

13  GEORGE  V,  A.   1923 
THK     year's     travel     ANALYZED 

An  analysis  of  the  year's  travel  shows  that  88,7C3  people  went  to  the  large  parks 
along  the  main  railway  lines,  of  whom  approximately  65,000  were  from  foreign 
countries.  Estimated  on  the  basis  of  expenditure  used  in  this  report  in  former 
years,  namely,  $300  fox  each  foreign  visitor,  which  is  admitted  to  be  a  conservative 
figure,  it  means  that  the  national  parks  are  r^ponsible  for  an  indirect  revenue  of 
approximately  $19,500,000. 

The  total  appropriations  for  the  National  parks  during  the  past  year  were 
$966,000.  According-  to  the  last  census  the  population  of  Canada  numbers  8,775,8.'>3  so 
that  the  National  parks  last  year  cost  the  people  of  Canada  about  12  cents  per  capita. 
As  shown  above  however,  they  bring  in  an  indirect  revenue  of  $19,500,000,  or  a  per 
capita  return  of  approximately  $2.22.  That  is  indirect  revenue.  But  it  must  be 
renienijbered  that  this  $19,500,000  is  divided  among  the  people  and  increases  their 
incomes  to  that  extent.  A  good  part  of  it  is,  therefore,  taxable  under  the  business 
and  income  tax  so  that  a  considerable  percentage  of  it  comes  back  again  directly  to 
the  Dominion  treasury  by  way  of  this  tax.  There  are  also  other  revenues  from  the 
parks,  from  the  sale  of  timber  and  from  various  concessions  and  leases,  which 
amounted  last  year  to  $72,000. 

In  addition  there  were  approximately  27,000  foreign  visitors  to  the  smaller  parks 
and  while  these,  in  some  instances,  as  at  Point  Pelee  park  or  the  St.  Lawrence 
Islands  park,  might  represent  an  expenditure  of  only  a  few  dollars,  in  the  other  cases 
and  in  the  aggregate  it  would  amount  to  a  considerable  sum.  It  must  be  remembered, 
too.  that  the  parks  performed  a  direct  service,  which  cannot  be  calculated  in  dollars 
and  cents,  by  serving  as  a  means  of  recreation  for  nearly  75,000  Canadians. 

A  considerable  part  of  the  increase  in  Canadian  travel  must  be  credited  to  the 
increasing  use  of  the  automobile.  An  analysis  of  the  registrations  of  cars  at  Banff 
shows  that  a  very  large  percentage  come  from  points  on  the  prairies  although  there 
are  cars  froni  as  far  east  as  Winnipeg  and  from  practically  every  section  of  the 
United  States.  The  gratifying  feature  of  this  class  of  travel  is  that  it  also  indicates 
that  these  great  reservations  are  becoming  each  year  more  truly  "people's  parks". 
It  means  that  they  are  no  longer  a  luxury  within  reach  only  of  the  rich.  Any  one 
from  Vancouver  to  Winnipeg  who  owns  ^a  car  may  now  enjo.v  the  delights  and 
benefits  of  a  holiday  among  the  mountains  at  a  slight  expenditure  of  both  time  and 
money. 

As  was  the  case  last  year  the  greatest  comparative  gain  has  been  in  the  smaller 
purks,  Waterton  Lakes  park,  which  is  becoming  deservedly  popular,  again  showing  a 
very  large  increase.  Elk  Island  park,  which  serves  not  only  for  a  buffalo  reserve 
but  for  a  summer  resort  as  well,  also  reports  an  increasing  number  of  campers  and 
at  Point  Pelee  park  in  southern  Ontario,  although  no  registrations  were  kept,  the 
superintendent  reports  that  travel  was  the  largest  yet  experienced. 

A  growing  interest  in  the  historic  parks  is  also  noticeable.  Each  year  the 
honorary  superintendent  of  Fort  Anne  park,  Annapolis  Royal,  reports  a  steady  gain.- 
This  year  he  estimates  the  number  of  visitors,  not  including  people  from  the  town 
itself,  would  total  8,000,  the  largest  yet  recorded  in  the  history  of  the  park. 

1'he  increasing  number  of  demands  for  information  of  various  kinds  about  the 
parks  and  requests  for  illustrated  lectures  on  the  part  of  schools,  clubs,  and  other 
organizations,  as  well  as  for  material  for  articles  from  newspapers  and  magazines 
evidences  also  a  much  livelier  interest  in  the  parks  on  the  part  of  the  general  public 
and  indicates  the  formation  of  a  public  sentiment  out  of  which  we  may  confidently 
exi>ect  to  draw  a  large  tourist  travel  in  the  future. 

POSSIBILITIES  OF  TOURIST  TRAVEL 

For  some  years  there  has  been  pointed  out  in  this  report  the  tremendous  unde- 
veloped possibilities  that  lie  within  Canada's  reach  with  respect  to  tourist  travtl    It 


CANADIAN  NATIONAL  PARKS  97 

SESSIONAL  PAPER   No.   12 

is  increasingly  apparent  that  the  value  of  tourist  traffic  is  now  becoming  widely 
recognized.  The  experience  of  those  provinces  which  have  undertaken  special  publicity 
canipaig:ns  and  the  prosperity  that  has  followed  the  buildin<?  of  motor  highways  have 
convinced  evtryone  that  tourist  travel  pays,  and  that  it  can  be  developed  like  any 
other  industry.  Herbert  Cuthbert,  Secretary  of  the  Pacific  Northwest  Tourist  Asso- 
ciation, at  the  Annual  Conference  of  the  orjranization  in  Tacoma  in  April,  1022, 
stated  that  five  years  ag-o  tourist  traffic  into  the  Pacific  Northwest  was  worth  only 
$7,000,000.  Ii>  l'921,  as  a  result  of  organized  publicity,  it  reached  $40,000,000  and  it 
was  expected  it  would  total  $60,000,000  in  1922.  An  industry  that  can  be  developed 
from  $7,000,000  to  $<!0.000,000  in  five  years  by  an  expenditure  of  a  few  hundred 
thousand  dollars  must  be  taken  into  consideration  by  every  economist.  The  total 
dividends  from  the  gold  and  silver  mines  of  Ontario  up  to  1921,  according  to  figures 
]-ecently  published  in  the  daily  pi-ess,  have  amounted  approximately  to  only 
$115,000,000,  or  a  little  less  than  double  what  the  Pacific  Northwest  States,  including 
British  Columbia,  cxjx^ct  to  receive  this  year. 

From  reports  received  from  the  different  sections  of  Canada,  and  from  railway, 
steamship,  and  motor  travel  figures,  there  is  good  reason  to  believe  that  a  conservative 
estimate  of  the  value  of  tourist  traffic  into  Canada  for  the  past  year  would  total 
not  less  thau  $100,000,000.  This  means  that  it  has  already  become  one  of  our  most 
iir'.portant  sources  of  wealth.  As  shown  in  previous  reports  when  we  bring  money  into 
the  country  by  tourist  travel  it  is  just  the  same  as  if  we  exported  goods  to  that  amount 
and  received  money  in  return  with  this  exception  that  we  have  sent  nothing  out  of 
the  country  that  leaves  our  capital  stock  diminished.  Now  compare  the  value  of 
our  four  highest  exports  during  the  fiscal  year  1921-22  with  our  export  of  scenery 
and  they  will  bo  seen  to  rank  as  follows: — 

Agricultural   and  vegetable   products $317,578,963 

Wood  and  paper 179,925,887 

Animal    products 135,798,720 

Foreign  tourist  travel 100,000,000 

Iron  and  its  products 27,312,272 

That  means  that  what  we  may  call  our  export  of  scenery  must  already  take  fourth 
place  in  our  foreign  trade.  It  will  be  observed,  too,  that  its  total  value  amounted  to 
only  a  little  less  than  one-third  of  the  value  of  our  farm  and  garden  products,  while  it 
is  considerably  more  than  half  the  value  of  our  total  forest  products  both  raw  and 
manufactured. 

In  the  twelve  months  ending  March  31,  1922,  Canada's  total  exports  amounted 
to  only  $740,240,680,  as  against  $1,189,163,701  in  1921,  and  $1,239,492,098  in  1920. 
That  is  a  decrease  in  foreign  business  of  approximately  $450,000,000  in  one  year. 
This  is  an  enormous  sum  but  it  is  less  than  the  annual  revenue  of  France  from  tourist 
travel  in  the  years  immediately  preceding  the  war,  and  is  approximately  equal  to  the 
amount  formerly  spent  by  Americans  in  foreign  travel  each  year.  If  under  these 
circumstances  we  could  attract  to  Canada  a  tourist  traffic  only  four  times  what  we 
are  now  receiving,  it  is  clear  that  we  should  have  aehieved  the  same  result  so  far 
as  our  national  prosperity  is  concerned.  And  probably  no  one  would  deny  that 
there  is  no  part  of  Canada  which  is  not  capable  of  attracting  four  times  as  many 
tourists  as  it  had  last  year.  Organized  publicity  has  brought  about  such  results 
already  in  special  districts.  The  growth  of  travel  to  the  Pacific  Coast  States,  as 
mentioned  above,  is  now  eight  times  what  it  was  five  years  ago  and  similar  results 
have  been  secured  in  California  and  other  places  that  have  turned  their  attention 
to  an  organized  development  of  the  industry.  It  is  reported  that  at  the  present  time 
from  30  to  40  per  cent  of  all  the  gold  in  the  world  is  stored  in  New  York  vaults. 
Part  of  surplus  wealth  of  this  kind  can  be  drawn  into  circulation  only  through  the 
purchase  of  luxuries.  Now  Canada  manufactures  few  luxuries  which  she  can  export 
but  she  possesses  other  things  that  are  equally  valuable.  Her  scenery,  her  romance, 
her  summer,  and  even  her  winter  climate,  her  big  game  and  wilderness  areas  can 

12—7 


98  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 

13  GEORGE  V,  A.   1923 

all  be  made  to  serve  as  a  magnet  for  foreign  gold.  It  is  impossible,  too,  to  say  to 
what  limits  an  industry,  that  caters  to  a  universally  desired  pleasure,  may  be 
developed.  Twenty  years  ago  the  motor-car  was  practically  unknown.  To-day 
over  ten  billion  dollars  of  private  money  is  invested  in  cars  in  the  United  States 
alone  and  the  annual  upkeep  must  amount  to  hundreds  of  millions.  The  desire  for 
travel  is  almost  equally  universal  and  in  fact  it  is  often  one  of  the  reasons  behind 
the  desire  to  own  a  car. 

GROWTH  OF  MOTOR  TRAVEL 

The  astonishing  growth  of  motor  travel  into  Canada  has  been  one  of  the  sur- 
prising features  of  the  past  year.  According  to  figures  collected  by  the  Department 
of  Customs  the  number  of  cars  entering  Canada  during  the  calendar  year  has 
jumped  from  93,300  in  1920  to  617,284  in  1921;  of  these  615,074  registered  for  less 
than  one  month,  2,211  for  more  than  one  month  and  less  than  six  months.  The 
entries  by  provinces  were:  Xova  Scotia,  223;  Prince  Edward  Island,  22;  New 
Brunswick,  1,826;  Quebec,  43.264;  Ontario,  537.183;  Manitoba,  8,020;  Saskatchewan, 
427;  Alberta,  363;  and  British  Columbia,  25,957.  This  shows  that  we  have  entered 
upon  a  new  phase  of  the  tourist  industry.  The  wide  distribution  of  profits  from 
high  prices  during  the  war  brought  the  automobile  within  reach  of  thousands  of 
skilled  workmen,  farmers,  and  small  tradesmen,  and  with  it  came  the  possibilities  of 
travel.  The  thousand-mile  journey  has  now  become  a  commonplace.  It  is  only 
necessary  to  build  good  roads,  to  provide  adequate  accommodation  and  to  advertise 
the  attractions  of  any  district  sufficiently  and  the  travel  will  come. 

There  is  one  other  consideration  with  respect  to  tourist  travel  that  is  not  always 
recognized  and  that  is  its  value  as  a  forerunner  of  permanent  settlement  and  financial 
investment.  In  an  undeveloped  country  like  Canada  it  is  of  inestimable  advantage 
to  have  people  from  foreign  countries  touring  through  it  and  gaining  an  idea  of  its 
rich  undeveloped  possibilities,  its  great  resources  and  its  attractiveness  as  a  place 
in  which  to  live.  Tourist  travel,  in  fact,  is  one  of  the  best  immigration  agencies,  as 
it  is  also  one  of  the  best  methods  of  attracting  foreign  capital,  and  a  policy  looking 
towards  its  development  appears  worthy  of  consideration  along  with  policies  of 
immigration  or  trade. 

It  is  increasingly  evident  that  other  countries  are  coming  to  regard  tourist  travel 
seriously  as  an  industry  and  are  taking  official  steps  to  encourage  it.  Kcference 
has  been  made  before  to  the  French  Office  of  Touring  and  to  the  attitude  of  Italy 
in  this  regard.  A  pamphlet  received  from  the  Information  Office  for  Tourists 
located  at  the  Hague  shows  that  action  is  also  being  taken  by  Holland.  The  bureau 
in  question  is  supported  by  the  Government  and  under  its  direct  supervision.  It 
plans  tours  throughout  Holland,  helps  lovers  of  art  to  see  the  wonderful  Dutch 
galleries,  takes  the  artist  to  the  pictiu-esque  villages  near  inland  lakes,  procures 
sailing  vessels  or  motor  boats  for  those  who  wish  to  undertake  a  yachting  cruise, 
engages  reservations  in  hotels  and  trains,  and  provides  maps,  charts,  and  guides,  all 
absolutely  free  of  cost.  The  traveller  is  thus  relieved  of  all  the  petty  worries  of  travel 
and  knows  in  advance  just  how  much  his  trip  will  cost.  Service  of  this  kind  is  of 
inestimable  value  to  a  tourist  and  it  will  probably  not  be  many  years  until  it  will 
come  to  be  adopted  by  all  coimtries  that  are  seeking  to  attract  foreign  travel. 

BAXFF-WENDERMERE   ROAD 

Construction  operations  on  the  Banff- Windermere  highway  were  carried  on 
throughout  the  year  and  the  early  completion  of  the  road  is  now  in  sight.  During 
the  spring  clearing  was  continued  along  the  Kootenay  and  Vermilion  divisions  and 
grading  was  started  in  June.  During  the  summer  about  11  miles  were  graded  from 
the  north  end,  the  road  being  completexi  to  within  a  mile  of  Vermilion  crossing. 


CANADIAN  NATIONAL  PARKS  99 

SESSIONAL   PAPER    No.    12 

From  tlic  soutli,  grading  was  carried  out  from  the  end  of  the  old  British  Columbia 
construction  to  Kootenay  crossing,  a  distance  of  about  17  miles,  so  that  during  this 
season  a  total  of  about  28  miles  of  gi-aded  road  was  completed.  The  tiniss  bridges 
at  Vermilion  crossing  and  Hawk  creek,  which  had  been  partially  completed  the 
previous  year,  were  finished.  Clearing  of  the  surveyed  line  was  completed  during  the 
winter  of  1921-22  and  extra  clearing  of  burnt-over  timber  carried  out  on  the  south 
end  of  the  Kootenay  division.  On  the  Sinclair  divisions  portions  of  the  road  built 
by  the  Government  of  British  Columbia  through  solid  rock  were  widened.  It  is 
c.Kpecte<l  that  this  road  will  be  ready  for  travel  by  June,  1923,  or  a  year  sooner 
than  called  for  by  the  contract  made  with  the  British  Columbia  Government.  The 
commissioner  wont  over  the  road  during  the  past  summer  by  motor  and  horseback 
and  was  much  impressed  with  the  wonderful  scenic  attractions  and  the  judgment 
shown  in  its  location.  The  grandeur  and  beauty  of  this  section  of  the  Rockies 
can  scarcely  be  surpassed,  particularly  as  one  approaches  the  beautiful  Sinclair  canyon 
where  the  road  winds  between  towering  walls  of  red  rock.  The  area  is  rich  in  game 
of  many  kinds:  sheep,  goat,  moose,  elk,  and  bear  are  numerous  and  rapidly  increasing. 
Indeed,  the  wild  life  along  this  road  will  undoubtedly  prove  one  of  its  greatest 
attractions.  To  see  these  beautiful  creatures  moving  fearlessly  about,  often  feeding 
within  camera  shot  of  a  motor  car,  is  a  unique  and  delightful  experience. 

As  no  hotel  accommodation  exists  between  Banff  and  Inverniere,  camp  sites 
will  be  located  at  suitable  points  and  equipped  with  stoves  and  other  conveniences. 
The  erection  of  s)iecially  designed  warden's  cabins,  adapted  also  as  shelter  homes 
and  social  rooms  will  probably  bo  considered  later. 

OTHER    ENGINEERING    AND    CONSTRUCTION     WORIv 

liocky  Mountains  Parle. — The  most  important  vpork  in  the  Rocky  Mountains 
park  was  the  completion  of  the  new  steel  and  concrete  bridge  over  the  Bow  river  at 
Banff.  This  is  a  very  artistic  structure  that  adds  greatly  to  the  appearance  of  the 
town  and  provides  better  facilities  for  the  rapidly  increasing  motor  traffic  in  the 
park.  Several  other  bridges  were  constructed  at  different  points,  including  a  high- 
way bridge  over  the  Cascade  river  and  trail  bridges  over  the  Spray  river  at  two 
points. 

Work  was  continued  on  the  construction  of  the  new  18-hole  golf  links  at  Banff 
and  by  the  close  of  the  year  good  progress  had  been  made  towards  its  completion. 
The  new  water-mains  have  been  of  great  service  in  keeping  the  fairways  in  good 
condition. 

Jasper  Park. — A  cement  floor  was  laid  on  the  new  steel  highway  bridge  over 
the  Athabaska  river,  near  Jasper,  and  the  "fill"'  for  the  approaches  to  the  bridge 
was  completed.  A  new  trail  was  constructed  from  Sunwapta  to  Southesk  via 
Bra/.cau  lake,  work  being  carried  out  from  each  end  towards  the  centre.  At  the  end 
of  the  year  only  some  eight  miles  remained  unfinished.  The  old  bridge  over  the 
Athabaska  was  dismantled-  In  addition  maintenance  work  was  carried  out  on  the 
various  park  roads,  trails,  waterworks,  and  telephone  lines. 

Waierton  Txihcs  Parle. — Two  timber  bridges  were  constructed  one  over  Cameron 
creek  and  one  over  Pass  creek.  Winter  work  was  carried  out  on  the  Watcrton- 
Akamina  pass  road,  chiefly  clearing  and  solid  rock  excavation.  An  ice-house  with 
cold  storage  rooms  was  erected  in  the  townsite.  The  construction  of  a  new  nine-hole 
golf  course  was  commenced  and  good  progress  made,  so  that  the  course  will  be  in 
a  playable  condition  during  the  summer  of  1922. 

Yoho  Park. — The  approaches  to  the  new  bridge  over  the  Kicking  Horse  river 
at  Field  were  completed  and  the  bridge  painted.    As  the  old  Canadian  Pacific  railway 
12— -i 


100  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 

13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1923 

grade  in  the  vicinity  of  tlie  Ottertail  river  had  been  abandoned  as  a  highway,  the 
old  high  trestle  crossing  the  river  was  dismantled  and  the  timber  salvaged  for  use 
in  construction  purposes  at  various  points  in  the  park.  Construction  of  a  new 
bridge  over  the  Kicking  Horse  river  on  the  Lcanchoil  trail  was  also  commenced 
before  the  end  of  the  year. 

Revelstohe  Park. — The  maintenance  of  the  motor  road  up  Mount  Eevelstoke 
involves  each  year  considerable  repair  work  owing  to  the  damage  done  on  the  moun- 
tain side  by  melting  snows.  By  keeping  the  ditches  and  culverts  well  open  whilo 
the  snow  is  melting  it  is  found  that  washouts  can  be  averted  and  as  soon  as  spring 
opens  these  are  at  once  cleared.  It  is  hoped  to  complete  construction  work  on  the 
motor  road  to  the  summit  during  the  coming  summer.  As  soon  as  the  west  road 
from  Revelstoke  to  Sicamous  and  Vernon  is  completed  Eevelstoke  will  have  com- 
munication with  the  greater  part  of  interior  and  southern  British  Columbia,  which 
will  result  in  very  much  increased  motor  traffic  to  this  park. 

The  erection  of  a  shelter  house  on  the  ski  hill  provided  a  much  needed  con- 
venience. The  ski  tournament  held  at  this  park  each  year  is  among  the  most  notable 
on  the  continent  and  attracts  professionals  and  amateurs  from  all  parts  of  America. 

Kootenay  Parle. — Arrangements  were  made  during  the  year  for  the  topographical 
survey  of  the  new  Kootenay  park.  Much  of  this  territory  is  virgin  country  and  the 
geographical  data  in  connection  with  it  are  very  incomplete. 

BUNGALOW    CAMPS 

The  bungalow  camp  established  last  year  at  Wapta  lake  by  the  Canadian  Pacific 
Railway  Company  proved  very  popular.  It  is  becoming  increasingly  evident  that  this 
class  of  accommodation  meets  the  requirements  of  a  large  part  of  the  travelling 
public,  providing  as  it  does  plain  but  comfortable  sleeping  quarters  and  an  excellent 
table.  This  simple  accommodation,  in  touch  as  it  is  with  the  actual  out  of  doors, 
is  preferred  by  many  genuine  nature  lovers  and  people  of  refinement.  It  is  expected 
in  the  near  future  similar  accommodation  will  be  provided  in  Jasper  and  Waterton 
Lakes  parks. 

MOSQUITO  COKTROL  AT   BANFF 

The  interesting  work,  which  was  begun  last  year,  looking  towards  the  exter- 
mination of  mosquitoes  in  the  vicinity  of  Banff,  was  continued  during  the  summer. 
In  view  of  the  extraordinary  differences  in  the  breeding  habits  of  these  insects  it 
was  seen  that  in  making  any  attempt  at  competent  control  it  was  necessary  to  have 
an  expert  and  intimate  knowledge  of  the  species  concerned  and  of  the  local  condi- 
tions. The  services  of  three  young  entomologists,  university  students,  were  secured, 
and  they  began  work  on  May  15  under  the  direction  of  Mr.  N.  B.  Sanson,  curator 
of  the  Banff  museum.  From  that  date  to  the  end  of  June  they  kept  watch  on  the 
breeding  areas,  spraying  with  oil  wherever  larvte  were  found  and  collecting  specimens 
for  identification.  It  was  found  that  the  most  important  species  to  combat  in  the 
neighbourhood  of  Banff  is  the  aedes,  members  of  which  breed  in  flooded  areas  and 
when  hatched  out  into  adults  may  travel  as  far  as  four  or  five  miles.  The  eggs  are 
laid  in  the  water  and  when  the  latter  evaporates  or  drains  off  they  are  left  on  the 
sod.  Before  hatching  they  have  to  become  dry  and  then,  on  the  land  being  reflooded, 
will  hatch  out.  Experiments  show  that  eggs  will  remain  fertile  for  as  long  as  six 
years.  During  the  larva  and  pupa  stages  the  insects  must  breathe  through  the  sur- 
face of  the  water  and  a  thin  film  of  oil  spread  upon  the  surface  will  cause  suffoca- 
tion inside  of  a  maximum  time  of  four  hours.  The  areas  flooded  by  the  Bow  and 
Echo  rivers  and  Vermilion  lakes  were  given  attention  during  the  first  week  following 


CANADIAN  NATIONAL  PARKS  101 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.   12 

the  rise  of  water,  and  systematic  oiling  operations  carried  out.  Later  a  foreman  and 
three  men  were  set  to  work  clearing  out  the  heavy  willow  growth  to  make  trails  to 
and  around  the  sloughs,  and  some  filling  in  and  draining,  as  well  as  dyking  on  a 
small  scale,  were  undertaken. 

In  June  Jlr.  Arthur  Gibson,  Dominion  Entomologist,  and  Mr.  Eric  Hearle, 
who  is  in  charge  of  the  mosquito  laboratory  in  the  Eraser  River  valley  and  one  of 
the  foremost  mosquito  experts  on  the  continent,  visited  the  park,  inspected  condi- 
tions both  at  Banff  and  Lake  Louise,  and  made  a  number  of  valuable  recommenda- 
tions. The  marked  decrease  in  the  number  of  mosquitoes  during  the  tourist  season 
brought  very  favourable  comments  from  visitors  and  it  is  the  intention  to  carry  on 
the  work  more  extensively  next  season. 


Thanks  to  the  excellent  work  being  done  by  the  Department  of  Marine  and 
Fisheries  in  the  maintenance  of  hatcheries,  the  fishing  in  park  lakes  and  streams 
continues  good,  and,  particularly  in  the  parks  on  the  east  slope  of  the  Rockies,  forms 
one  of  our  most  important  tourist  attractions.  Waterton  Lakes  park  probably  ranks 
first  as  a  fishing  resort,  the  lake  itself  and  practically  all  its  tributary  streams  abound- 
ing in  trout  of  a  good  size  and  quality.  Lake  trout,  too,  the  largest  game  fish  found 
in  the  parks,  specimens  of  which  are  sometimes  taken  weighing  as  much  as  50  pounds, 
are  found  in  Waterton  Lakes  park.  As  is  well  known,  the  lower  Waterton  lake 
extends  across  the  boundary  into  the  United  States  Glacier  National  park,  so  that 
it  becomes  an  international  fishing  water.  Last  year  fry  were  again  received  from 
the  United  States  park  and  deposited  in  the  upper  waters  of  the  lake,  thus  benefiting 
the  fishing  in  both  parks. 

About  half  a  million  fry  were  liberated  in  the  waters  of  Rocky  Mountains  park 
from  the  Banff  hatcheries  during  the  season:  300,000  rainbow  and  cutthroat  trout 
in  July  and  200,000  of  the  same  varieties  in  August.  The  Spray  Lake  hatchery  had 
one  of  the  best  seasons  in  its  history,  the  return  of  spawning  cutthroat  being  greater 
than  ever  before. 

RECREATIOSAI.    AREAS 

An  interesting  phase  of  recent  development  is  the  creation  of  so  called  "recrea- 
tional areas."  These  are  reservations  of  Crown  lands  which  are  adapted  for  public 
use  and  enjoyment  for  summer  resort  and  recreational  purposes  but  vphich  do  not 
possess  scenery  of  sufficient  importance  to  justify  their  creation  as  national  parks. 
They  are  usually  lands  about  a  lake,  which  arc  unfit  for  agriculture  and  so  have 
remained  unpatented,  but  which  are  adapted  for  summer  cottage  sites  and  recrea- 
tional purposes.  In  response  to  strong  local  demands  investigations  have  been  made 
of  several  such  lakes  in  the  Prairie  Provinces  and  their  reservation  is  now  under 
consideration. 


The  total  revenue  for  1921-22  was  $78,907.21.  Wliile  this  was  $2,214.89  less  than 
the  previous  year,  the  apparent  decrease  is  accounted  for  by  the  fact  that  the  revenue 
for  1920-21  contained  two  unusual  items:  the  $1,341.15  which  resulted  from  the  sale 
of  muskrat  skins  at  Point  Pelee  park  and  $3,975.70  derived  from  the  sale  of  buffalo 
heads  and  robes  at  the  Montreal  fur  sales.  If  these  two  items  were  omitted  from  tho 
previous  year's  returns  the  past  year  would  show  a  gain  of  $3,100.96. 


102  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 

13  GEORGE  V,  A.   1923 
TIMBER    PROTECTION 

The  betterniciit  of  tlie  patrol  system,  increased  telephonic  communication, 
improvpiiiont  of  the  mechanical  fire-fighting  a])|)aratus,  and  the  detailed  instructions 
given  tlie  warden  service  in  the  use  of  the  portable  fire-engines  developed  by  this 
branch,  had  a  good  deal  to  do  with  the  lower  acreage  of  timber  destroyed  by  the 
season's  fires.  A  comparative  statement  of  the  season  of  1921  with  that  of  192(1 
shows : — 

1920  1921 

Number  of  fires 94  70 

Acres  damaged 6,003  acres  2,614  acres 

Cost  of  extinguishing $7,585.93  J8.296.26 

The  average  number  of  wardens  for  the  year  was  52,  compared  with  48  in  1920, 
and  their  patrol  covered  194,854  miles  compared  with  appro.ximately  141,700  miles 
in  1920, 

A  new  and  improved  model  of  the  small  portable  gasolene  fire-pump,  designed 
by  the  Canadian  National  Parks  Branch  for  fighting  forest  fires  in  the  parks,  ha.' 
recently  been  developed.  These  units,  which  were  introduced  a  few  years  ago,  have 
proved  themselves  so  successful  that  they  have  been  adopted  by  practically  all 
organizations  engaged  in  forest  protection  work  in  Canada  and  by  many  in  the 
United  States  as  well.  Seven  of  these  units  were  recently  used  in  one  of  the  parks 
in  relays  pumping  through  one  to  the  other  from  a  mountain  stream  situated  a  mile 
and  a  quarter  from  the  scene  of  the  fire  and  excellent  results  were  secured. 

The  forests  of  the  National  parks  are  now  protected  by  thirty  of  these  engines, 
which  are  modelled  along  the  lines  of  the  gasolene  marine  motor  but  so  reduced  in 
bulk  and  weight  as  to  be  readily  portable  on  pony  back  over  the  mountain  trails,  by 
gasolene  speeders  along  the  railways  or  over  the  400  miles  of  motor  highways  in  the 
park.5  by  automobiles. 

Construction  work  during  the  year  included  208  miles  of  trails,  109  miles  of 
telephone  lines,  and  8  cabins.  The  telephone  line  from  the  city  of  Revclstoke  to  the 
cabin  at  the  top  of  the  mountain  was  completed.  An  important  inauguration  also 
was  the  construction  of  the  telephone  line  running  from  the  Red  Deer  cabin  Xo.  IS 
in  District  10,  Rocky  Mountains  park,  to  the  Forestry  cabin  on  Red  Deer  river. 

No  direct  aeroplane  patrol  work  has  been  carried  out  in  the  Canadian  national 
parks  except  in  Waterton  Lakes  park,  but  during  the  season  of  1921  a  number  of 
fine  oblique  photographs  were  taken  of  the  different  main  valleys  to  show  the  water 
and  timber  areas  in  Jasper  park. 

Twelve  sets  of  artillery  field  telephones,  useful  as  temporary  fire  lines  or  on 
construction  work,  were  distributed  among  the  parks. 

The  fire  protection  work  included  the  ploughing  of  139  miles  of  fireguard  at 
Buffalo  park  and  19  miles  at  Elk  Island  park.  A  volunteer  fire  brigade  was  organized 
in  Field,  making  the  third  of  such  bodies  now  in  the  parks,  brigades  at  Jasper  and 
Bantf  having  already  been  established.  Thirty  camp  stoves  of  cast  iron  and  concrete 
body  were  distributed  among  Banff,  Jasper,  Waterton  Lakes  and  Toho  parks  to  meet 
the  outdoor  cooking  requirements  of  tourists  an-d  campers. 


CANADIAN  NATIONAL  PARKS  103 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.   12 

STATEMENT   OF  FIRES   IN   CANADIAN  NATIONAL   PARKS.   SEASONS.    1920.    1921 


Date 

Name  of  Park 

Unknown 

Campers 

Railway 

Lightning 

Other 
Causes 

Total 

Cost  of 

Extinguish- 

Jig 

1920 

Rocky  Mountains. 

2 

21 
8 

1 

8 
39 

2 

1 

34 

47 

1 

6 

5 

$  4.425  46 
840  22 

50  70 

1 
1 

5 
3 

l,r4'<  59 

1 
1 

620  00 

Kootenay 

2 

32 

49 

10 

1 

94 

S  7,585  93 

1921 

Rocky  Mountains. 
Jasper  

3 
1 

1 

l.i 
1 

7 
27 

25 
33 
3 

1 

1 

>     2 

2 

3 

$  1,528  12 

1,33".  .':9 

1 

4,782  72 

Yoho  

Glacier  

1 
1 
1 

7.1  90 

43  75 

1 
2 

33n  10 

Buffalo 

195  03 

ik  Island  and  Point 
Pclce     

3 

3  05 

5 

24 

34 

3 

4 

70 

$8,296  is 

TOWN    PLANNING 

In  1921  the  town  planning  office  previously  a  part  of  the  C!oniniission  of  Con- 
servation was  transferred  to  the  Canadian  National  Parks  Branch.  By  this  transfer 
the  services  of  the  town  planning  division  were  more  intimately  available  for  the 
planning  of  community  life  within  the  limits  of  the  national  parks  and  for  the  better 
provision  for  the  needs  of  tourists,  while  at  the  same  time  the  educational  work  of 
the  division  could  proceed  as  in  the  past. 

The  educational  work  of  the  branch  which  has  been  carried  on  in  Canada  during 
the  past  seven  years  with  such  good  results  was  also  continued.  Lectures  were  given 
by  members  of  the  staff  at  the  universities  of  Montreal  and  Toronto  and  at  various 
places  where  civic  authorities  are  contemplating  town  planning  improvement. 
Exhibits  of  town  planning  material  were  provided  for  various  conferences  and  public 
meetings  and  lantern  slides  and  lectures  sent  to  distant  parts  of  the  Dominion  from 
coast  to  coast.  Where  there  is  no  provincial  town  planning  executive  or  no  provincial 
town  planning  act,  private  citizens  who  are  desirous  of  improving  the  methods  of 
town  development  usually  write  to  Ottawa,  and  advice  and  literature  are  sent  to 
them.  Much  assistance  has  been  given  to  the  Journal  of  the  Town  Planning  Insti- 
tute of  Canada,  both  in  preparation  of  literary  material  and  in  the  provision  of  plans 
illustrating  the  movement  and  advantages  of  town  planning  methods. 


Projects 

Among  other  projects  are  the  following: — 

Rocky  Movntains  Park. — Plans  for  the  improvement  of  the  general  layout,  street 
system,  and  buildings;  designs  for  the  grounds  of  the  various  public  buildings  and 
general  planning  at  Canmore;  plans  for  the  general  improvement  of  Banff  and 
detailed  studies  for  the  improvement  of  Banff  avenue,  layout  of  an  automobile  camp 
on  a  fairly  large  scale  for  Banff,  with  the  buildings  that  will  be  required,  lighting, 
water,  and  drainage  systems ;  layout  of  automobile  camps  at  lake  Louise  and  on  the 
road  from  lake  Louise  to  Banff. 


104  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 

13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1928 

Kootenai/  Park. — Layout  of  'automobile  camps  on  the  Banff-Windevmere  road; 
layout  of  townsite  at  Radium  Hot  Springs  together  with  plans  of  buildings  that 
may  be  required  there,  e.g.  swimming  pool,  etc. 

Jasper  Park. — Layout  of  townsite  at  lac  Beauvert  together  with  designs  for 
buildings  required — golf  club  house,  bath  house,  etc. ;  plans  of  a  layout  scheme  for 
the  various  government  buildings  at  Jasper,  some  of  which  are  already  erected,  e.g. 
garage,   stores,   stables,  etc.,   layout   of   a   townsite  in  connection   with   Miette   Hot 

Springs. 

Waterion  Lakes  Park. — Revised  layout  for  business  section,  new  residential  areas, 
auto  camp,  plans  for  community  building,  etc. 

Elk  Island  Park. — Layout  of  lots  for  summer  cottages  with  plans  for  buildings 
that  may  be  required. 

Brereton   and  Norah  Lakes. — Layout   of  lots  for  summer   cottages. 

Historic  Sites. — Plans  for  the  improvement  of  the  various  historic  sites. 

•  PROTECTION   OF   ANIMAL  LIFE   IX   THE   PARKS 

There  is  perhaps  nothing  in  connection  with  the  work  of  National  parks  that  is 
a  cause  for  more  satisfaction  than  the  steadily  increasing  abundance  of  practically 
every  form  of  wild  life.  It  offers  a  demonstration  of  the  value  of  sanctuaries  more 
impressive  than  any  arguments,  and  shows  how  quickly  a  species  will  re-establish 
itself  under  adequate  protection  as  well  as  how  readily  wild  animals  will  accustom 
themselves  to  the  presence  of  man,  once  they  are  convinced  there  is  nothing  to  be 
feared.  The  decrease  of  larger  game  mammals  throughout  much  of  the  continent 
makes  the  abundance  and  fearlessness  of  the  larger  mammals  in  the  National  parks 
an  increasing  attraction  to  tourists  and  this  attraction  is  bound  to  increase  as  the 
game  in  unprotected  portions  of  the  country  diminishes  or  is  driven  off  to  more 
remote  sections.  Indeed  the  time  may  not  be  very  far  distant  when  it  will  be  only  in 
such  protected  reserves  that  some  of  our  larger  mammals  will  be  known  to  future 
generations.  In  this  connection  it  is  interesting  to  note  the  observations  of  Dr. 
Henry  Fairfield  Osborn,  President  of  the  American  Museum  of  Natural  History,  at 
a  meeting  of  tlie  American  Society  of  Mammalogists  in  New  York  City  in  May  last. 
Mr.  Osborn  is  reported  as  saj-ing  that  we  are  now  witnessing  the  close  of  the  age  of 
mammals,  an  elimination  which  was  begun  by  man  about  400,000  years  ago  but 
which  has  become  acute  in  recent  years.  "  Nothing  in  the  history  of  creation  ",  said 
Dr.  Osborn,  "has  paralleled  the  ravages  of  the  fur  and  hide  trade  which  now,  with 
the  bone  fertilizer  trade,  threatens  the  entire  vertebrate  kingdom."  Other  dis- 
tinguished mammalogists  present  predicted  that  it  will  be  only  a  matter  of  years 
when  wild  game  will  be  seen  only  in  museums  and  picture  books.  In  view  of  these 
gloomy  predictions  it  is  doubly  gratifying  to  witness  the  steady  increase  of  wild 
life  in  the  parks  and  to  note  that  the  natural  overflow  is  gradually  re-stocking  the 
adjacent  districts.  These  areas  seem  likely  to  be  in  the  future  the  most  important 
museums  and  schools  of  natural  history,  and  it  is  a  matter  for  satisfaction  to  realize 
that  they  must  become  as  time  goes  on  increasing  sources  of  delight  and  interest 
to   the  student  or  lover  of  wild  life. 

The  increase  in  bighorn  sheep  and  Rocky  Mountain  goat  in  all  of  the  mountain 
parks  is  everywhere  apparent.  While  it  is  obviously  impossible  to  form  an  accurate 
estimate  of  their  numbers  without  a  careful  survey,  it  is  interesting  to  note  that  the 
superintendent  of  Jasper  park  estimates  that  there  are  now  10,000  bighorn  and  5,000 
goat  in  that  park  where  ten  years  ago  these  animals  had  been  almost  exterminated. 
The  numbers  in  Banff  park  must  also  reach  a  large  figure.  The  elk  herd  procured 
from  Yellowstone  park  in  1920  has  done  splendidly  and  practically  doubled  in 
numbers.     Deer  are  found  everywhere  in  abundance  and  moose  are  steadily  increasing. 


CANADIAN  NATIONAL  PARKS  105 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  12 

Buffalo. — At  the  close  of  the  fiscal  year  the  total  number  of  buffalo  in  the  parks 
was  6,^39;  of  these  6,1-46  are  in  Buffalo  park,  280  in  Elk  Island  and  13  in  the  small 
exhibition  herd  at  Banff.  The  increase  for  the  year  was  1,102.  The  proposed 
slaughter  of  surplus  males  has  not  yet  been  undertaken  but  it  has  become  imperative 
that  action  should  be  taken  in  this  connection  in  the  immediate  future  as  the  present 
range  is  overstocked. 

The  addition  of  19  square  miles  to  Elk  Island  park  brings  the  present  area  of  this 
fenced  animal  reservation  up  to  35  square  miles.  The  extension  takes  in  all  that 
portion  of  the  Cooking  Lake  foi-est  reserve  lying  north  of  the  Edmonton-Tofield 
highway.  The  new  area  will  not  only  provide  additional  grazing  grounds  for  the 
buffalo,  elk,  deer,  and  moose  in  the  park  but  will  supply  further  opportunities  for 
recreation.  Its  proximity  to  the  motor  highway,  too,  will  make  it  much  more 
accessible  to  the  general  public  and  a  large  increase  of  visitors  is  expected  as  a  result. 

The  abundance  and  fearlessness  of  many  forms  of  wild  life  in  this  park  are  a 
constant  source  of  pleasure  to  tourists.  Fine  big  mallards  will  sit  on  a  lake  only  20 
feet  away  from  a  humming  motor  and  the  sight  of  bands  of  elk  moving  freely 
through  the  open  woodlands  never  fails  to  give  delight. 

Antelope. — The  antelope  herd  at  Xemiskam  continues  to  thrive  and,  according 
to  reports  received  from  the  caretaker,  although  no  actual  count  has  been  made,  is 
oelieved  to  number  considerably  over  100.  The  success  of  this  experiment  has  led 
to  a  determination  to  establish  other  reserves  of  a  similar  nature,  and  two  additional 
areas,  one  in  southern  Alberta,  the  other  in  the  Medicine  Hat  region,  will  shortly  be 
set  aside  and  proclaimed  national  parks  for  the  preservation  of  this  species.  There 
is  no  doubt  that  these  sanctuaries  are  urgently  needed  if  the  antelope  is  to  be 
preserved  from  extinction.  The  chief  game  guardian  of  Saskatchewan  estimates 
that  there  are  now  only  about  250  wild  antelope  left  in  the  whole  of  that  province. 
The  number  in  Alberta,  in  the  opinion  of  the  provincial  chief  game  guardian,  is  not 
more  than  1,000.  As  is  well  known  antelope  disappeared  several  years  ago  from 
Manitoba.  It  is  therefore  evident  that  the  species  is  now  on  the  verge  of  extinction 
and  unless  immediate  steps  are  taken  must  inevitably  disappear.  The  efforts  being 
made  for  their  preservation  in  the  Dominion  sanctuaries  are  therefore  of  great 
interest  and  importance.  It  is  perhaps  too  soon  to  say  yet  that  the  antelope  can  be 
saved  but  it  is  certainly  encouraging  to  note  the  good  results  so  far  obtained  in  the 
Neniiskam  reserve,  which  appear  to  indicate  that  they  can  be  successfully  bred  in 
captivity. 

Predatory  Animals  and  Birds. — Coyotes  are  troublesome  and  it  is  necessary  to 
keep  up  a  continual  war  on  these  pests.  The  caretaker  also  reports  that  there  is 
a  species  of  eagle  which  he  finds  is  nearly  as  great  an  enemy  to  the  young  antelope 
as  the  coyote.  Two  young  antelope  were  caught  and  killed  this  spring  in  the  reserve, 
both  by  eagles.     Efforts  to  protect  the  herd  from  these  birds  will  therefore  be  made. 

Donations  to  Other  Paris. — A  number  of  donations  of  wild  animal  specimens 
from  the  parks  was  made  including  6  Rocky  Mountain  sheep  to  the  Zoological  Society 
of  New  York  and  12  Rocky  Mountain  sheep  to  the  Bison  range,  Montana.  Eight 
sheep  will  also  be  shipped  to  the  State  Game  farm  in  South  Dakota  when  weather 
conditions  permit. 

Farming. — The  farms  maintained  within  the  parks  for  the  production  of  feed 
for  the  animals  continue  to  give  good  returns  and  are  resulting  in  a  substantial 
saving  to  the  department.  Farming  operations  are  now  carried  on  at  Waterton 
Lakes  park,  Elk  Island  park.  Rocky  Mountains  park  and  Buffalo  park.  At  Rocky 
Mountains  and  Elk  Island  only  haying  operations  are  carried  on,  50  tons  having  been 
put  up  in  the  former  and  about  350  in  the  latter.  At  Waterton  Lakes  park  there  were 
grown  967  bushels  of  oats  and  74  tons  of  hay.     The  crop  at  Buffalo  park  was  not 


106  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 

13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1923 

quite  so  large  as  the  previous  year  when  the  yield  was  exceptionally  heavy,  but  it 
amounted  to  9,200  bushels  of  oats,  ISO  tons  of  straw,  850  tons  of  hay  and  35  acres  of 
green  fodder,  which  were  estimated  at  a  total  value  of  $22,712. 

PROTECTION    OF    MIGRATORY    BIRDS 

The  enforcement  of  the  Migratory  Birds  Convention  Act  has  been  continued 
throughout  the  year  and  the  great  value  of  the  new  regulations  in  protecting  the 
birds  of  the  continent,  which  pass  through  Canada  and  the  United  States  in  course 
of  migration,  has  been  e\'inced  by  reports  received  from  practically  all  sections  of  the 
country.  While  there  are  a  few  localities  in  which  increases  in  migratory  bird  life 
have  not  been  apparent,  these  it  may  be  assumed  have  suffered  because  of  some 
unfavourable  local  condition.  Taking  the  country  as  a  whole  the  reports  show  a 
marked  inci'case  in  bird  life  of  many  kinds.  In  some  localities,  it  is  true,  mis- 
apprehension concerning  the  fundamental  principle  underlying  the  treaty  still  exists. 
It  has  been  said  that  it  favours  the  United  States  shooter,  a  belief  which  can  arise 
only  from  an  erroneous  conception  of  the  Act.  In  some  cases  it  has  been  necessary 
to  point  out  that  no  seasons  for  migratory  waterfowl  in  the  United  States  extend 
beyond  January  31  in  any  year  which  means  that  the  treaty  has  effectually  stopped 
the  destructive  practice  of  spring  shooting.  To  the  stoppage  of  this  practice  and 
to  the  fact  that  the  sale  of  migratory  game  birds  is  forbidden  throughout  most  of  the 
continent,    the   general   increase   in   migratory   waterfowl   is  undoubtedly   due. 

In  the  summer  of  1921  an  amendment  was  made  to  the  regulations  under  the 
Migratory  Birds  Convention  Act  which  brought  into  effect  certain  minor  changes  in 
open  seasons,  added  some  provinces  to  those  in  which  the  sale  of  migratory  game 
birds  was  forbidden,  and  altered  slightly  the  restrictions  placed  upon  certain  methods 
for  capturing  these  birds. 

The  permanent  organization  for  the  enforcement  of  the  Act  throughout  C.inada 
has  been  kept  at  approximately  the  same  strength  and,  in  addition  to  the  enforce- 
ment of  the  Act,  the  staff  has  engaged  in  continuous  efforts  through  lectures, 
publicity,  and  in  other  ways  to  extend  information  concerning  the  value  of  birds  and 
the  need  for  their  protection.  In  carrying  on  this  work  throughout  Canada  the  staff 
has  enjoyed  the  fullest  co-operation  with  the  provincial  game  departments  and, 
except  in  provinces  where  the  provincial  law  does  not  conform  to  the  treaty,  the 
actual  enforcement  of  bird  protection  measures  has  been  left  largely  in  the  hands  of 
the  provincial  authorities. 

One  hundred  and  thirteen  honorary  game  officers  were  appointed  during  the  year, 
bringing  the  number  of  our  honorary  staff  up  to  1,722.  Through  the  co-operation 
of  the  Forestry  Branch  of  the  Department  of  the  Interior  all  forestry  officers 
throughout  the  Dominion  were  also  appointed  honorary  game  officers  and  they  are 
furnishing  this  office  with  important  information  concerning  the  value  of  the  various 
forest  reserves  as  breeding  grounds  for  migratory  waterfowl.  The  officers  of  the 
Marine  and  Fisheries  Department  stationed  along  the  Atlantic  coast  and  the  officers 
of  the  Royal  Canadian  Mounted  Police  throughout  Canada  have  also  co-operated  in 
bird  protection  work.  As  a  result,  too,  of  negotiations  with  the  province  of  Alberta, 
the  provincial  authorities  agreed  to  have  their  provincial  officers  act  as  honorary 
game  officers  under  the  Migratory  Birds  Convention  Act. 

Educational 

Educational  work  with  regard  to  the  meaning  and  value  of  the  treaty  was  again 
carried  on.  Further  editions  of  previous  pamphlets  on  bird  protection  were  published 
during  the  year,  the  total  distribution  of  pamphlets  of  all  kinds  amounting  to  125,813. 
Publicity   concerning  the  shooting  seasons   and  other  bird  protection  matters  was 


CANADIAN  NATIONAL  PARKS  107 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.   12 

obtained  through  the  distribution  of  34,6(il  posters.  The  Post  Office  Department 
co-operated  witli  the  branch  by  liaving:  one  of  the  posters  regarding  open  seasons 
under  the  Jligratory  Birds  Convention  Act  phiced  in  each  post  office  in  Canada. 

The  most  important  bird  publication  of  the  year  was  a  pamphlet  entitled 
"Lessons  in  Bird  Protection".  Eighty  thousand  copies  of  this  pamphlet,  sufficient 
to  supply  each  school  teacher  in  Canada  with  one  copy,  were  published  and  dist- 
tributed.  This  publication  has  now  been  authorized  for  use  in  every  school  in 
Canada. 

Kighty-fivo  lectures  on  bird  protection  were  given  by  members  of  the  permanent 
staff  during  the  year  and  lantern  slides  and  other  material  were  furnished  to 
honorary  officers  and  others  so  that  they  might  deliver  lectures  on  this  subject. 
Moving  picture  films  of  bird  life  were  also  distributed  and  proved  an  excellent 
publicity  medium. 

Short  articles  in  connection  with  the  work  were  also  written  by  many  of  the  game 
officers  of  the  branch  as  well  as  by  the  honorary  game  officers.  Mr.  A.  G.  Lawrence, 
one  of  the  western  lionorary  officers,  began  the  publication  in  a  Manitoba  paper  of  a 
weekly  column  on  birds.  The  preparation  of  material  for  a  weekly  column  oi  bird 
news  involves  a  groat  deal  of  labour  on  the  part  of  Mr.  Lawrence,  but  its  educational 
influence  is  undoubtedly  far-reaohing  and  beneficial. 

Copies  of  the  late  Dr.  Ilewitt's  book  "  The  Conservation  of  Wild  Life  in  Canada," 
were  sent  to  all  honorary  game  offieere. 

Two  exhibits  of  protected  birds  were  prepared  for  display  during  the  winter  car- 
nival at  Ottawa  in  January  last.  One  of  these,  through  the  courtesy  of  the  Canadian 
National  Railways,  was  displayed  in  the  window  of  their  main  offices  on  Sparks 
street.  It  consisted  of  about  20  specimens  of  mounted  birds,  named  in  English  and 
French,  as  well  as  a  large  seizure  of  gull  plumage.  A  poster  explained  that  all  these 
had  been  seized  for  illegal  possession  and  as  the  display  attracted  a  great  deal  of 
attention  it  is  believed  that  it  served  to  educate  a  great  many  people  as  to  some  of 
the  birds  which  the  general  public  does  not  yet  appear  to  realize  are  protected  under 
tlie  -Migratory  Birds  Convention  Act.  This  exhibit  was  later  taken  to  Montreal  and 
shown   in  the  window  of  the  Canadian   Pacific  Kailway   Telegraph  office  there. 

Following  the  decision  of  the  Department  of  Justice  that  Indians  in  Canada  are 
amenable  to  the  provisions  of  the  Migratory  Birds  Convention  Act,  a  special  poster 
has  been  prepared  to  acquaint  Indians  in  the  different  parts  of  Canada  with  the  pro- 
visions of  this  Act. 

The  National  Association  of  Audubon  Societies  has  agreed  to  the  extension  of 
its  J.unior  Bird  Club  organization  to  Canada.  This  involves  a  very  considerable 
expense  to  the  association,  and  the  branch  was  much  gratified  to  learn  of  the  success- 
ful termination  of  negotiations  which  had  been  instituted  to  bring  about  this  desir- 
able end.  The  formation  of  bird  clubs  in  the  schools  and  the  valuable  publications, 
including  "  Bird-Lore,"  distributed  by  the  association,  form  one  of  the  best  methods 
of  educating  children  with  respect  to  the  importance  of  bird  protection,  and  the  exten- 
sion of  the  work  to  Canada  is  bound  to  result  beneficially.  The  various  provinces  have 
been  acquainted  with  the  result  of  negotiations  for  the  establishment  of  these  bird 
clubs  in  Canada  and,  with  few  exceptions,  the  departments  of  education  have  approved 
of  the  plan. 

As  part  of  its  work  for  the  preservation  and  protection  of  valuable  bird  life  the 
branch  has  been  encouraging  the  building  of  bird-houses  and  early  in  the  present 
year  honorary  game  officers  were  written  to  and  asked  to  organize  bird-house  competi- 
tions among  the  children  of  their  neighbourhood.  In  Ottawa  and  some  of  tlie  larger 
cities  the  manual  training  teachers  have  directed  the  boys  in  the  building  and  design- 
ing of  bird  homes  and  more  than  2,000  bird  dwellings  have  been  built  this  spring  in 
the  city  of  Ottawa  alone.  A  number  of  bird-houses  were  also  made  and  erected  in 
some  of  the  national  parks. 


108  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 

13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1923 

One  of  tho  most  important  aids  to  the  study  of  bird  life  lies  in  the  work  of  bird 
banding  which  is  now  being  officially  directed  from  the  Hiological  Survey  at  Wash- 
ington, D.C.  A  considerable  number  of  people  in  Canada  were  already  carrying  on 
this  work  but  the  desirability  of  having  workers  in  every  part  of  the  country  sug- 
gested that  the  undertaking  should  be  extended  if  i)ossible.  A  circular  was  accord- 
ingly drafted  and  sent  to  all  honorary  game  wardens  and  other  persons  interested  in 
bird  protection  explaining  the  work  and  suggesting  co-operation. 

Bird  Sanctuaries 

The  creation  of  bird  sanctuaries,  which  is  an  indispensable  part  of  the  work  of 
bird  protection  in  Canada,  is  going  steadily  forward. 

Following  investigations  by  the  chief  federal  migratory  bird  officer  for  Ontario 
and  Quebec,  who  studied  conditions  on  the  north  shore  of  the  gulf  of  St.  Lawrence 
during  the  summer  of  1921,  a  recommendation  has  been  made  that  ten  bird  sanctu- 
aries be  established  on  this  coast.  These  have  been  selected  with  great  care  and 
should  serve  as  valuable  refuges  for  the  important  bird  life  of  this  region.  This 
matter  is  still  under  advisement  but  it  is  hoped  that  early  action  will  be  taken. 

The  bird  sanctuary  at  Last  Mountain  lake,  Saskatchewan,  which  has  been  under 
preservation  since  1887,  was  brought  under  the  Migratory  Birds  Convention  Act  by 
an  Order  in  Council  during  the  summer  of  1921. 

A  preliminary  survey  of  provincial  game  reserves  in  the  province  of  Manitoba 
was  also  made,  and  the  report  on  the  matter  is  at  present  before  the  department. 

It  is  interesting  to  note  that  the  existence  of  the  bird  sanctuary  on  Bonaventure 
island  near  Perce,  Gaspe  county,  Quebec,  is  proving  a  noticeable  attraction  to  tour- 
ists. During  tlie  summer  of  1921  numbers  of  prospective  guests  had  to  be  turned 
away  because  of  lack  of  accommodation,  although  the  principal  hotel  in  Perce  was 
considerably  enlarged  last  spring.  The  residents  regard  the  sanctuary  as  very  desir- 
able and  it  is  the  source  of  a  considerable  income  to  those  living  in  the  vicinity, 
because  of  the  money  spent  there  each  summer  by  visitors  attracted  by  the  bird 
colonies. 

As  the  public  learn  the  necessity  for  the  creation  of  bird  sanctuaries  various 
objections  to  them  became  less  frequent.  The  sportsmen  are  already  fairly  well 
acquainted  with  the  necessity  and  desirability  of  setting  aside  breeding  grounds  for 
game  birds,  but  this  necessity  is  not  so  generally  understood  by  the  farming  com- 
munities. With  a  view  to  acquainting  persons  in  Western  Canada,  who  may  apply  for 
permission  to  use  sanctuary  lands  for  various  purposes,  with  the  need  for  bird  sanc- 
tuaries, a  circular  was  drafted  and  a  copy  sent  to  all  such  applicants,  making  it  clear 
that  without  these  sanctuaries  the  supply  of  migratory  water-fowl  in  the  future  would 
be  seriously  reduced.  The  continued  reduction  of  the  marsh  and  lake  areas  in  the 
western  provinces  of  Canada,  because  of  the  extension  of  agriculture  and  drainage 
operations,  cannot  but  have  a  serious  effect  upon  the  supply  of  water-fowl  in  the 
future. 

Arrangements  have  been  completed  with  the  Natural  Resources  Department  of 
the  Canadian  Pacific  Eailway  for  the  creation  of  a  bird  sanctuary  on  the  property 
of  the  railway  at  lake  Newell,  Alberta. 

Public  Shooting  Grounds 

While  the  policy  of  the  branch  is  to  use  every  effort  to  secure  the  protection 
of  migratory  wild-fowl  and  to  set  aside  for  this  purpose  available  sanctuaries  for 
breeding  grounds,  it  is  also  of  the  opinion  the  public  should  have  access  to  a  fair 
and  reasonable  share  of  the  game.  It  is,  therefore,  recommending  the  creation  of 
public  shooting  grounds  where  any  citizen  of  Canada  may  have  the  right  to  hunt- 


CANADIAN  NATIONAL  PARKS  109 

SESSIONAL   PAPER   No.   12 

Several  of  tlie  provincial  governments  have  made  recommendations  concerning 
areas  which  they  consider  should  be  set  aside  as  shooting  grounds  of  this  kind,  and 
already  certain  of  these  areas  have  been  inspected  by  officers  of  the  branch.  In  this 
connection  the  province  of  Alberta  recommended  the  setting  aside  of  57  lakes,  while 
the  province  of  Saskatchewan  recommended  the  setting  aside  of  15  lakes.  The 
movement  is  one  that  has  received  the  almost  unanimous  support  of  sportsmen,  who 
recognize  that  if  the  two  policies  are  carried  out — (1)  adequate  protection  by  sanc- 
tuaries, and  (2)  public  shooting  grounds  where  hunting  is  permitted  under  what- 
ever restrictions  the  game  supply  warrants — there  will  be  permanent  shooting  for 
every  one. 

Prosectdions 

During  the  year  the  branch  took  court  action  in  86  cases  for  violation  of  the 
Migratory  Birds  Convention  Act.  Convictions  were  registered  in  79  cases,  in  6  of 
which  the  sentence  was  suspended ;  4  cases  were  dismissed,  3  were  withdrawn.  The 
total  fines  imposed  amounted  to  $865,  while  6  guns,  1  boat,  54  bird  specimens  and  7 
pieces  of  miscellaneous  equipment  were  confiscated. 

At  the  request  of  the  Association  for  the  Protection  of  Fish  and  Game  in  the 
province  of  Quebec  the  supervisor  of  wild  life  protection  spent  two  days  in  Montreal 
attending  court  and  giving  exjiert  evidence  as  to  the  identification  of  some  thirty 
shore  birds  that  had  been  seized  by  the  officers  of  the  association  in  carrying  out  the 
provisions  of  the  provincial  game  laws. 


FcrmUs  and  Licenses 

One  hundred  and  sixty-three  permits  were  issued  allo\ving  the  holders  to  take 
birds  for  scientific  purposes  and  21  permits  allowing  the  capture  of  protected  birds 
for  banding  purposes.  The  following  numbers  of  permits  allowing  the  capture  and 
possession  of  migratory  birds  for  propagating  purjioses  were  issued  during  the  year: 
7  allowing  the  possession  of  migratory  birds  in  British  Columbia,  23  allowing  the 
possession  of  migratory  birds  in  Ontario,  and  33  allowing  the  capture  and  175  allow- 
ing the  possession  of  migratory  birds  in  the  other  provinces  of  Canada.  Four  permits 
allowing  the  killing  of  migratory  birds  found  injurious  to  fishing  interests  and  4 
allowing  the  killing  of  migratory  birds  found  injurious  to  agricultural  interests 
were  issued  from  this  office  during  the  year.  In  addition,  68  taxidermists'  licenses 
were  issued. 

Copies  of  the  permit  principles  which  form  part  of  each  of  the  scientific  permits 
issued  by  this  branch  are  being  distributed  as  a  circular  with  each  scientific  permit 
issued  by  the  state  of  California,  due  credit  being  given  to  the  Department  of  the 
Interior,  Canada. 

Advisory  Board  on  Wild  Life  Protection 

During  the  year  this  board  held  five  meetings.  It  now  includes  representatives 
from  seven  departments,  the  niemborship  having  been  increased  during  the  year  by 
the  addition  of  the  following  jiersons:  Mr.  Arthur  Gibson,  Dominion  Entomologist, 
Department  of  Agriculture;  Colonel  A.  B.  Perry,  C.M.G.,  Commissioner  of  the 
Royal  Canadian  Mounted  Police;  Dr.  E.  E.  Prince,  Dominion  Commissioner  of 
Fisheries,  Department  of  Marine  and  Fisheries;  and  Mr.  O.  S.  Finnic,  B.Sc,  D.L.S., 
Director  of  the  Northwest  Territories  Branch,  Department  of  the  Interior.  The 
Supervisor  of  Wild  Life  Protection,  who  had  been  acting  secretary  of  the  board,  was 
appointed  secretary. 


110  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 

13  GEORGE  V,  A.   1923 
Importation   of  Foreign  Species 

At  the  instance  of  tho  branch  the  Customs  Tariff  respecting  the  importation  of 
birds  and  mammals  was  revised  by  the  addition  of  the  following  to  the  prohibited 
list: — 

(1)  Aigrettoi?,  egret  plumes,  or  so  called  osprey  plumes,  and  the  feathers,  quills, 
heads,  wings,  tails,  skins  or  parts  of  skins  of  wild  birds  either  raw  or  manufactured. 
This  provision  does  not  apply  to: — 

(d)  the  feathers  or  plumes  of  ostriches; 

(b)  the  jiluniage  of  the  English  pheasant  and  the  Indian  peacock; 

(c)  the  plumage  of  wild  birds  ordinarily  used  as  articles  of  diet; 
id)  the  plumage  of  birds  imported  alive,  nor  to 

(e)  specimens  imported  under  regulations  of  the  Minister  of  Customs  for  any 
natural  history  or  other  museum  or  for  educational  purposes. 

(2)  Common  mongoose  or  mongoose  of  any  kind;  common  mynah,  Chinese 
niynnh,  crested  mynah,  or  any  other  species  of  the  starling  family;  Java  sparrow, 
rice  bird,  nutmeg  finch  or  other  species  of  the  weaver  bird  family;  European  chaffinch; 
and  great  titmouse. 

General 

A  number  of  petitions  were  received  from  different  parts  of  Canada  including 
Alberta,  Saskatchewan,  Quebec,  and  Nova  Scotia,  asking  for  the  suspension  or 
modification  of  regulations  under  different  Acts,  federal  or  provincial,  respecting 
bird  sanctuaries,  protected  birds,  open  seasons,  or  the  whole  or  partial  opening  or 
closing  of  certain  areas  to  hunting  and  fishing.  In  every  case  the  petition  was 
given  the  most  careful  consideration  and  the  reasons  for  the  decision  arrived  at 
explained  to  the  petitioners.  Some  matters  were  still  under  advisement  at  the  end 
of  the  year. 

NORTHWEST   GAME   ACT 

On  1st  January,  1922,  the  administration  of  the  Northwest  Game  Act  passed 
from  the  National  Parks  Branch  to  the  newly  created  Northwest  Territories  Branch. 
The  transfer  included  the  administration  of  the  Wood  Buffalo  herd  near  Fort  Smith, 
Northwest  Territories,  and  the  reindeer  herd  at  Lobster  Bay,  Quebec,  a  herd  which 
is  to  be  used  for  developing  the  Northwest  Territories.  Assistance  was  given  the 
new  staff  in  handling  the  work  and  acquainting  them  with  procedure. 

Licenses  and  Permits. — Licenses  under  the  Northwest  Game  Act  have  been  issued 
during  the  year  as  follows:- — 

Hunting  and  Trapping:  Residents,  113;  non-residents,  British,  17;  non-residents, 
non-British,  10. 

Trading  and  Trafficking:  Residents,  160:  non-resident,  British,  2;  non-resident, 
non-British,  1.     The  revenue  received  from  these  licenses  amounted  to  $2,151. 

The  following  is  a  statement  of  the  game  taken  in  the  Northwest  Territories 
under  the  Northwest  Game  Act  licenses  as  shown  by  returns  received  during  the 
fiscal  year  1921-22,  with  the  average  value  and  approximate  total  value  of  the  furs 
secured : 


LA>JAVIAX  NATIONAL  PARKS 


SESSIONAL   PAPER   No.   12 


Animal 

Hunting 

and 
Trapping 

Trading 

and 

Trafficking 

Totals 

Approximate  value 

.  f  pelts 

Average 

Total 

Mo  SI  .                                    

No. 

34 

371 

40 

6 

4 

9 

126 

847 

6 

647 

7,970 

3,001 

188 

7" 

23 

1,339 

44 

17 

229 

1 

No. 

22 
431 
30 

No. 

.56 

802 

70 

11 

4 

63 

2,034 

5,191 

IS 

4.659 

87.911 

15,685 

337 

191 

117 

7,520 

746 

49 

1,265 

9 

5 

$     c. 

24  25 
15  00 
37  50 
48  75 
12  00 

1  60 
37  50 

7  .50 

6  00 

18  00 

85 

12  00 

3  60 
IS  50 
90  00 
15  50 
35  75 

$          c. 

Diir                 

Ottir 

54 

1.908 

4,344 

12 

4.012 

79,941 

12.6.84 

149 

114 

94 

6.1S1 

702 

32 

1.036 

8 

5 

5 

1.527  75 

30,510  00 

194.662  50 

Fisliir 

877  50 

Mnk 

55. 90S  00 

140.657  60 

\Vliit"toic 

588, 187  50 

Wolvis 

2.527  50 

W.  Iv.rinca 

1.146  00 

2. 106  00 

6.392  00 

8,952  00 

Skunks 

176  40 

Fox< 

19,607  50 

Blur  fox    

810  00 

Red  fox 

108  50 

Cross  fox 

178  75 

1.0.54.335  50 

..     •../ 

The  wolf  bounty  paid  during  tlie  year  amounted  to  $3,320,  covering  payments 
of  $20  each  for  166  wolves. 

There  have  been  two  convictions  for  violation  of  the  Northwest  Game  Act  during 
the  year.     Fines  amounting  to  $150  were  imposed  and  5  white  fox  skins  seized. 

Reindeer  Herd. — The  reindeer  herd  at  Old  Fort,  in  the  province  of  Quebec,  has 
been  cared  for  as  usual  by  a  staff  consisting  of  a  supervisor  and  three  men.  The 
herd  according  to  the  latest  returns  consists  of  about  107  animals  all  of  which,  the 
supervisor  reports,  are  in  good  condition. 

PROPOSED    EASTEK.V    PARJvS 


Tlie  great  benefits  accruing  from  the  National  parks  make  it  seem  more  and  more 
desirable  tliat  the.se  should  be  established  more  generally  throughout  Canada.  As 
has  been  pointed  out  in  previous  reports  it  is  especially  important  that  reservations 
for  jiublic  enjoyment  should  be  made  within  reach  of  our  large  centres  of  population. 
These  would  be  undoubtedly  of  great  benefit  now  but  they  are  bound  to  be  of 
immensely  greater  value  as  our  population  increases  and  the  great  hinterland  of 
Canada  disappear.*.  Throughout  Ontario  and  the  eastern  provinces  there  are  stiU 
wilderness  areas  that  are  specially  adapted  for  recreational  purposes  and  that  could 
be  acquired  now  and  set  aside  at  slight  expense.  If  considered  only  as  an  attraction 
to  foreign  tourists  and  a  means  of  disseminating  tourist  revenue  more  widely 
throughout  the  country  they  would  be  eminently  worth  while.  But  their  greatest 
value  and  the  most  important  reason  for  setting  them  aside  must  be  their  benefit  to 
Canadians  themselves.  Deep  down  in  every  man  is  the  craving  for  the  beauty  of 
nature  and  for  the  freedom  of  life  in  the  out  of  doors.  The  cramped  life  of  city 
workers,  their  insufficient  opportunities  for  vigorous  play  in  the  open  are  resulting  in 
a  lowering  of  vitality  that  must  in  the  end  weaken  the  fibre  of  the  race.  Mr.  Herbert 
Hoover  in  a  report  to  the  Federation  of  American  Engineers,  recently  pointed  out 


112  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 

13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1923 

the  immense  waste  due  to  preventable  diseases.  Tie  estimated  tlic  economic  loss  on 
this  continent  at  over  three  billions,  three  hundred  millions,  approximately  two 
billions  of  which  is  among  those  gainfully  employed.  The  chief  source  of  this  loss 
arises  from  what  is  known  as  degenerative  diseases,  or  diseases  that  are  fundamentally 
due  to  a  lack  of  vitality.  The  changes  in  human  environment  since  the  intro- 
duction of  machinery  have  been  so  rapid  and  so  sweeping  that  the  human  organi- 
zation has  not  yet  learned  how  to  adapt  itself  to  the  new  conditions.  Yet  the  long 
history  of  the  processes  of  nature  shows  that  the  species  which  fails  to  adapt  itself 
to  a  changing  environment  inevitably  goes  under.  There  is  no  question  of  more 
fundamental  national  importance  than  the  maintenance  of  the  vitality  and  virility 
of  the  race  and  everything  that  contributes  to  that  end  must  constitute  a  sound 
national  policy. 

As  a  first  step  in  the  programme  of  extension  of  national  parks  to  the  East  it 
has  been  suggested  that  an  area  of  sufficient  size  in  the  Laurentian  region  within 
reach  of  the  large  centres  of  population  of  Eastern  Canada  should  be  devoted  to  this 
purpose.  The  commercial  benefit  to  the  country  would  be  very  considerable  on 
account  of  the  tourist  revenue  that  would  result  but  the  benefit  to  city  workers  who 
could  reach  a  reservation  of  this  kind  in  a  few  hours  time  would  be  of  far  greater 
importance. 

It  is  also  very  desirable  that  areas  should  be  set  aside  in  the  Maritime  Provinces 
at  an  early  date  including  some  part  of  the  beautiful  sea  coast  and  the  original 
forest  if  any  area  where  this  remains  can  be  secured. 

PUBLICITY  ■DIVISION 

For  the  first  time  since  the  outbreak  of  the  war  it  was  possible  to  devote  part  of 
the  appropriation  to  publicity.  This  was  most  necessary  as  our  supply  of  literature 
of  every  kind  was  practieall.v  exhausted.  A  new  and  enlarged  edition  of  the  "Glaciers 
of  the  Rockies  and  Selkirks  ",  by  Prof.  A.  P.  Coleman,  was  issued  and  distributed  and 
an  attractive  descriptive  guide  to  the  parks  along  the  Canadian  Pacific  main  line 
entitled,  "  Through  the  Heart  of  the  Rockies  and  Selkirks ",  was  published. 
Material  was  also  collected  for  other  necessary  publications  including  a  small  pocket 
information  folder  on  the  BanfE  park,  intended  chiefly  for  motorists. 

During  the  Winter  Carnival  at  Ottawa  in  January  a  large  exhibit  was  prepared 
and  placed  in  the  entrance  hall  of  the  Central  Station.  It  consisted  of  a  large 
painted  drop  of  Mount  Edith  Cavell,  Jasper  park,  with  a  miniature  forest  in  the 
foreground  disclosing  a  tepee  beside  a  camp-fire  which  by  an  ingenious  arrangement 
of  chemicals  appeared  to  give  off  real  smoke.  The  reverse  side  of  the  exhibit  was 
filled  in  by  a  large  panel  in  which  was  inserted  a  beautifully  painted  transparency 
of  the  globe  with  the  legend  "  Canada's  National  Parks  the  Playground  of  the 
World  ".  This  was  flanked  by  two  columns  in  which  transparencies  of  striking  park 
scenes  were  inserted.  A  fine  specimen  of  a  mounted  buffalo  completed  the  exhibit, 
which  attracted  a  constant  stream  of  visitors  throughout  the  carnival  and  elicited 
much  favourable  comment. 

A  somewhat  similar  exhibit  on  a  smaller  scale  was  also  sent  to  California  and 
was  shown  in  several  of  the  principal  coast  cities  and  also  in  Vancouver.  The 
interest  in  the  Canadian  National  Parks  created  by  this  exhibit  led  to  many  inquiries 
and  requests  for  literature  and  a  number  of  parties  including  the  Seattle  Alpine  Club 
arranged  for  a  trip  to  Jasper  National  park  as  a  result.  Arrangements  were  also 
made  whereby  moving  picture  films  of  some  of  the  mountain  parks  were  shown  at 
several  of  the  Pacific  coast  theatres  and  the  cordial  co-operation  of  the  officers  of 
a  number  of  prominent  educational  organizations  and  institutions,  such  as  the 
California  Audubon  Society  and  the  universities  of  California  and  Southern  Cali- 
fornia, who  arranged  to  show  slides  and  plans  of  the  Canadian  parks  in  connection 
with  their  work,  was  secured. 


CANADIAN  NATIONAL  PARKS  113 

SESSIONAL   PAPER  No.   12 

Througli  the  courtesy  of  the  Exhibition  Uranch,  Department  of  Agriculture,  a 
special  display  of  National  Park  scenes  was  also  shown  in  connection  with  the 
Southern  Florida  Exposition  at  Tampa,  thereby  reaching  another  large  section  of  the 
wealthy  travelling  class. 

A  scries  of  illustrated  lectures  on  the  national  parks  was  given  in  western 
Ontario  during  the  late  winter  and  spring  months  by  Captain  F.  G.  Forster,  B.A., 
whose  services  were  loaned  to  this  Branch  by  the  Soldiers  Settlement  Board.  Cap- 
tain Forster  appeared  before  numerous  educational  and  other  organizations  and 
showed  films  of  the  scenery,  the  wild  life,  the  government  buffalo  herd  at  Wainwright 
and  the  bird  sanctuaries,  reaching,  it  is  estimated,  about  60,000  persons. 

Several  thousand  lantern  slides,  with  accompanying  lecture  notes,  were  set  out 
in  response  to  requests  for  prepared  lectures  from  Canada,  England,  the  United 
States  and  even  Australia. 

HISTOHH-  A.\l>  PUEIIISTORIU  SITKS 

In  i-i>nni'(!tion  with  the  work  of  marking  and  preserving  historic  and  prehistoric 
sites  of  national  imiwrtance,  very  satisfactory  progress  was  made.  One  general 
meeting  i>f  the  Historic  Sites  and  ^Monuments  Board,  which  acts  in  an  advisory 
capacity  to  the  department  in  connoctiou  with  this  work,  was  held  at  which  all  sites 
under  consideration  were  reviewed  with  the  object  of  defining  their  importance  from 
a  national  point  of  view.  Requests  for  the  co-operation  of  provincial  and  local 
historical  societies  and  associations  which  arc  interested  in  the  preservation  of 
Dominion  landmarks  met  witli  favourable  response  and  40  of  these  are  at  present 
assisting  in  the  national  work. 

An  artistic  design  for  a  tablet,  emblematic  of  Canadian  history,  has  been 
purchased  from  the  well  known  *C;inadian  artist.  Major  Ernest  Fosberry,  B.C. A. 
These  tablets  are  now  being  oast  in  bronze  and  will  be  used  in  connection  with  the 
marking  of  the  above  sites. 

Cairns  of  attractive  design,  constructed  of  rough  field  stones,  will  be  erected 
on  several  sites,  to  carry  the  standard  bronze  tablet.  Where  these  are  not  suitable  it 
is  proposed  to  erect  monurnents.  A  competition  for  designs  for  suitable  types  of 
landmarks  has  been  organized  and  is  at  pr'.^sent  being  carried  out. 

An  educational  campaign  is  being  carried  on  relative  to  the  various  sites  selected 
for  action,  with  a  view  to  stimulating  public  interest  and  creating  a  national  conscious- 
ness with  respect  to  the  important  events  connected  with  Canadian  history.  Small 
pamplilets  have  been  published  and  are  available  for  distribution  containing  a  history 
of  the  sites  of  Fort  Anne,  Fort  Lennox,  Fort  Chambly,  and  Port  Dover.  Others  will 
be  prepared  and  published  as  the  work  progresses.  Copies  may  be  had  upon  applica- 
tion to  the  Commissioner,  Canadian  National  Parks,  Ottawa. 

The  attention  of  the  department  has  already  been  called  to  610  sites  and  82 
have  been  selected  to  receive  immediate  attention.  In  the  last  report  the  steps  that 
had  been  taken  with  regard  to  a  number  of  these  were  reviewed.  The  following  shows 
the  additional  action  tHken  this  year: — 

Maritime  Provinces* 
Louisburg,  N.S. — Area  approximately  90  acres.  Ruins  of  old  French  fort,  built 
iu  1720-40,  once  the  stronghold  of  Franco  at  the  threshold  of  the  continent,  played 
an  important  part  in  the  events  which  led  to  withdrawal  of  French  rule  from  Canada. 
A  survey  of  the  site  has  been  carried  out  by  the  Department  of  Railways  and  Canals 
which  has  furnished  this  department  with  the  returns  and  plans  and  has  promised 
to  transfer  to  the  control  of  this  department  an  area  of  ai)prosimately  60  acres  which 
is  at  present  under  their  control. 


•Where  historical  details  of  site  were  siven  last  year  these  are  not  repeated. 
12—8 


114  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 

13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1923 

Fort  Edward,  Windsor,  "N.S. — Area  27  acres.  Transferred  by  Order  in  Council 
from  the  Department  of  Militia  and  Defence  for  preservation  and  restoration.  The 
remains  include  the  original  blockliouse  still  intact  and  the  ruins  of  the  officers' 
quarters,  recently  partially  destroyed  by  fire.    A  part-time  caretaker  has  been  appointed. 

Fori  Moncton,  ahout  one  and  a  half  miles  from  Fort  Elgin,  N.B. — The  site  is 
privately  owned  but  as  the  proprietor  is  averse  to  disposing  of  it,  it  has  been  decided 
to  place  the  memorial  on  the  property  owned  by  the  Department  of  Marine  and  Fish- 
eries, permission  to  this  end  having  been  secured. 

Dc  la  Verendrye.  Three  Rivers,  P.Q. — Pierre  Gauthier  de  Varennes,  son  of  the 
Governor  of  Three  Eivers,  was  bom  at  that  place  November  18,  1685,  and  saw  service 
in  France  during  the  war  of  the  Spanish  Succession.  He  returned  to  Canada  in  1712 
under  the  name  of  la  Verendrye,  and  established  a  fur  trade  on  the  St.  ilaurice  river. 
In  1727,  he  was  sent  to  take  charge  of  a  trading  post  at  lake  Nipigon  and  later  under- 
took an  e.^pedition  to  discover  what  he  called  the  "  Pacific  Ocean."  In  1737  he  built 
a  fort  at  Portage  la  Prairie  (Manitoba),  from  which  several  campaigns  of  explora- 
tion were  carried  out  as  far  as  the  Rocky  mountains.  He  was  recalled  in  1744  and 
died  at  Montreal  in  1747,  while  preparing  a  further  expedition  to  the  Northwest.  The 
remains  of  the  foundations  of  his  birthplace,  situated  in  a  beautiful  park  overlooking 
the  St.  Lawrence  river,  in  the  city  of  Three  Eivers,  are  still  visible  and  an  appropriate 
tablet  has  been  placed  on  one  of  the  pillars  supporting  the  iron  railing  which  sur- 
rounds the  park. 

Fort  Lennox,  Ile-aux-Noix,  P.Q. — One  of  tbe  forts  which  formed  the  line  of 
defence  in  the  Richelieu  valley.  Remains  consist  of  earthworks  and  a  number  of  well 
preserved  buildings.  This  was  a  massive  old  fortpess  situated  about  12  miles  below 
the  outfall  of  lake  Champlain  in  the  Richelieu  river  and  10  miles  from  the  Canada- 
United  States  border.  It  was  built  in  1609  by  the  French  and  famous  in  the  conflicts 
of  1760,  1775,  and  1812.  It  continued  to  be  garrisoned  until  the  withdrawal  of  the 
Imperial  troops  in  1869.  On  May  18,  1921,  the  site,  comprising  5  islands  and  cover- 
ing an  area  of  approximately  210  acres,  together  with  the  buildings  thereon,  was  trans- 
ferred from  the  Department  of  Militia  and  Defence  to  the  Department  of  the  Interior 
for  preservation  and  restoration.  A  custodian  has  been  appointed  to  keep  the  property 
in  order,  and  a  museum  opened  in  the  fort  wherein  have  been  placed  Indian  relics, 
military  buttons,  bayonets,  crests,  badges,  and  plates,  etc.,  silver  and  copper  coins,  etc. 
A  pamphlet  recently  published  containing  a  full  history  of  the  fort  may  be  obtained 
upon  application. 

Fort  Chamhly,  Chambly,  P.Q. — One  of  the  most  venerable  and  picturesque  ruins 
on  the  American  continent.  Built  of  palisades  in  1665;  burnt  by  Iroquois  in  1702. 
Rebuilt  of  stone  1709-1711.  Taken  by  the  Americans  in  1775,  and  interior  buildings 
burnt  in  1776.  Restored  in  1777 ;  abandoned  definitely  in  1850.  The  site  was  transferred 
to  the  Department  of  the  Interior  in  1921.  Steps  have  been  taken  to  arrest  the  disin- 
tegration of  the  massive  walls,  and  to  redeem  the  cemetery  fftm  neglect  and  decay. 
A  valuable  museum  containing  articles  of  rare  interest  has  been  added  to  the  fort. 
A  pamphlet  has  been  prepared  containing  complete  data  and  information  relative  to 
the  fort  which  may  be  secured  upon  application. 

Fort  Laprairie,  La-prairie,  Quebec. — B.uilt  in  1687,  the  scene  of  an  unsuccessful 
attack  by  New  England  States  Militia  troops  in  1691.  The  fort  was  a  refuge  for  the 
inhabitants  during  tlie  wars  of  1687-1713.  It  is  proposed  to  erect  a  monument  and 
tablet  in  a  public  park  known  as  Foch  square,  the  necessary  lease  of  occupation  hav- 
ing been  executed  with  the  mimicipal  authorities  for  the  required  area. 

Duluth's  Birthplace,  Montreal,  P.Q. — Corner  of  St.  Paul  Street  and  Place 
Jacques   Cartier,    Montreal.     Site   of   residence   of   Daniel    Greysolon   Duluth,   who 


CANADIAN  NATIONAL  PARKS  115 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.   12 

died  February,  25,  ITIO.  One  of  the  explorers  of  tlie  Upper  Mississippi,  after  ■whom 
the  city  of  Duluth  was  named.  A  marble  tablet  has  already  been  erected  in  com- 
memoration of  his  services  to  the  Dominion  on  the  building  at  the  intersection  of  the 
above  streets. 

Eastern  Ontario 

Glengarry  House.  Ont. — Site  of  the  residence  of  Lt.-Col.  John  McDonnell,  a 
noted  pioneer  in  the  settlement  of  the  province,  first  speaker  of  the  Legislative 
Assembly  of  Upper  Canada  and  oommandinar  officer  of  the  2nd  Battalion,  Royal 
Canadian  Volunteers  ]TS>6-1S01.  Situated  some  200  yards  from  the  main  highway, 
near  Cornwall.  Only  ruins  of  walls  remain.  A  cairn  with  a  commemorative  tablet 
is  to  be  erected  on  the  site,  which  has  been  donated  for  this  purpose  by  Mrs.  Annie  J. 
Craig,  the  present  owner. 

Chryder's  Farm.  Ont. — Situated  about  5  miles  east  of  Morrisburg,  adjacent  to 
the  Montreal-Toronto  highway.  A  monument  consisting  of  an  obelisk,  on  either 
side  of  which  are  two  guns,  was  erected  in  1895  by  the  Dominion  Government  to 
commemorate  the  victory  over  invading  United  States  forces  at  the  battle  of 
Chrysler's  Farm,  November  11,  1S13.  This  site,  comprising  an  area  of  .23  acre  which 
is  enclosed  with  a  chain  fence,  has  been  transferred  to  the  control  of  this  department 
by  the  Department  of  Militia  and  Defence. 

Western  Ontario 

Mission  of  Ste.  Marie  II.  Christian  Island,  Ont. — ^Situated  near  Penetanguishene, 
on  an  Ojibway  Indian  reserve.  The  Indians  by  resolution,  have  granted  this  depart- 
ment permission  to  carry  ( n  the  proposed  work  of  restoration,  etc.  This  second 
fort,  of  stone,  72  feet  squf  e,  flanked  by  four  bastions,  was  burnt  in  1649  by  the 
missionaries  after  the  bun  ng  of  Ste.  Marie  I  (which  was  on  the  Wye  river  near 
Midland,  Ontario),  and  was  evacuated  on  June  10,  M50.  The  ruins  are  to-day  easily 
traceable  though  much  overgrown  with  trees  and  brush.  A  memorial  tablet  will  be 
placed  on  the  site  and  the  property  cleared,  drained  and  fenced. 

Port  Dover  (Site  of  the  Cross)  "  Cliff  Site  ". — Situated  in  the  village  of  Port 
Dover  on  a  flat-topped  point  of  land  where  the  river  Lynn  enters  lake  Erie  on 
property  owned  by  the  Grand  Trunk  Railway  Company,  which  has  signed  a  lease  of 
occupation  covering  an  area  of  .17  of  an  acre.  An  artificial  stone  cross,  16  feet  high, 
has  been  erected  to  signalize  the  taking  possession,  in  the  name  of  King  Louis  XIV 
of  France,  of  the  lands  of  the  lake  Erie  region  by  the  Sulpician  priests,  Dollier  and 
Galinee,  on  March  23,  1670,  during  the  exploration  of  the  Great  Lakes.  A  com- 
memorative tablet  is  to  be  placed  on  the  pedestal  of  the  cross  and  the  site  enclosed 
with  an  artistically  designed  fence.  A  pamphlet  recently  published  containing  a 
history  of  the  site  may  be  obtained  upon  application. 

Port  Dover,  Ont..  "  Wintering  Site  ". — ^Situated  about  three-quarters  of  a  mile 
from  the  "' Cliif  Site"  at  the  mouth  of  Black  creek  on  property  owned  by  Mr.  A. 
Ansley.  Site  of  the  wintering  place  of  Dollier  and  Galinee  and  seven  other  French- 
men in  1669-1670.  An  area,  on  which  a  cairn  with  a  commemorative  tablet  will  be 
erected,  has  been  donated  to  the  department  by  Mr.  Ansley. 

Niagara  Front 

The  historic  sites  of  national  significance  along  this  front  between  lake  Erie  and 
lake  Ontario  have  already  been  fairly   well   indicated  by   the  erection  of  markers  or 
tablets.     It  has  been  decided  to  carry  out  the  completion  of  this  work  by  taking  action 
in  regard  to  the  following  sites: — 
12— 8i 


116  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 

13  GEORGE  V,  A.  1923 

Chippfwii. — T)ic  most  ancient  village  on  the  Canadian  frontier.  Situated  on 
the  south  side  of  Chippews:  creek  in  an  open  field  near  Niagara  Falls.  Scene  of  a 
desperate  fight  on  July  5,  1814,  between  Canadian  and  United  States  troops,  with 
serious  losses  of  men  on  both  sides.  A  monument  is  being  constructed  by  the 
Niagara  Falls  Park  Commission  adjacent  to  the  main  boulevard  on  which  one  of  the 
department's  standard  commemorative  tablets  will  be  placed. 

Frenchnwn's  Creek. — Situated  near  Bridgeburg.  Site  of  the  action  of  Novem- 
ber 27,  1JS12,  between  Canadian  and  United  States  troops,  also  of  landing  place  of 
Fenians,  May  31,  l^Ctl.  It  is  proposed  to  place  a  conimeniorative  tablet  in  honour 
of  the  otfinis  and  men  of  the  Koyal  Artillery,  49th  Regiment,  and  Norfolk  Militia, 
killed  in  this  action,  on  a  monument  which  is  being  erected  by  the  Niagara  Falls 
Park  romniission. 

Vroom/in's  Battery. — A  suitable  standard  is  being  erected  by  the  Niagara  Falls 
Park  Commission  on  which  a  commemorative  tablet  will  be  affixed. 

Battle  of  Cooh's  Mills. — A  monument  and  tablet,  enclosed  by  an  appropriately 
designed  fence,  will  be  erected  on  the  site  which  has  been  donated  by  Mr.  Roy 
Matthews. 

Battlefield  of  Fort  George. — Situated  outside  the  town  of  Niagara.  Landing 
place  of  invading  United  States  troops  and  battle  of  May  27,  1813,  resulting  in 
the  capture  of  Fort  George.  A  plot  of  land  25  feet  square  on  the  military  property 
at  Fort  Mississagua  has  been  transferred  from  the  Department  of  Militia  and  Defence 
to  the  control  of  this  department.  A  monument  and  commemorative  tablet  will  be 
erected. 

Battlefield  of  Beechwoods  or  Beaver  Dam. — Situated-  on  the  Mountain  road  near 
Thorold.  Site  of  the  action  of  June  24,  1813,  between  ^he  invading  United  States 
troops  and  Canadian  troops,  the  former  being  dispersed^with  heavy  losses.  A  site 
has  been  donated  by  Mr.  R.  L.  Peck,  and  a  monument  ani^-^iablet  will  be  erected. 

Site  of  Tete  du  Pont  Battery. — Situated  on  Hog  island  at  the  mouth  of  the 
Chippewa  river.  Permission  for  the  erection  of  a  stone  marker  has  been  secured 
from  the  council  of  Chippewa,  but  action  was  deferred  until  the  completion  of  the 
Hydro-Electric  power  canal  on  the  island. 

Sault  Ste.  Marie,  Ont.  (Loch  Site). — Constructed  by  the  Northwest  Fur  Com- 
pany in  1797  and  destroyed  in  July,  1814.  by  a  force  of  United  States  troops.  A 
portion  of  the  old  lock  was  uncovered  in  1SS9  and  later  it  was  rebuilt  of  stone.  A 
monument  and  tablet  will  be  placed  on  the  site,  which  is  owned  by  the  Lake  Superior 
Paper  Company,  who  have  executed  a  lease  of  occupation  covering  the  land. 

Turl-ey  Point. — Situated  about  3  miles  east  of  Port  Rowan.  To  commemorate 
the  encampment  of  Dollier  and  Galinee,  in  March,  1670;  the  passage  of  Major 
Gladwin  and  Sir  William  Johnson  to  obtain  a  treaty  with  the  Indians  in  1761 ;  and 
of  occupation  by  the  British  in  war  of  1812-14.  A  site  for  a  monument  and  tablet 
has  been  selected  on  the  reserve  of  Ordnance  lands  near  the  lakeside. 

Glengarry  Landing. — Situated  between  Minesing  and  Edenvale.  Here  Lt.-Col. 
Robert  McDouall  built  the  flotilla  of  boats  with  which  he  effected  the  relief  of  the 
British  garrison  at  Fort  Mackinac  in  May,  1814.  Owing  to  its  remote  location,  per- 
mission has  been  secured  fr