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SESSIONAL   PAPERS 


VOLUME  6 


FOURTH  SESSIONOFTHETHIRTEENTH  PARLIAMENT 


OF  THE 


DOMINION  OF  CANADA 


SESSION  1920 


t 


/£<& 

^\l 


VOLUME  LVI 


10-11  George  V         Alphabetical  Index  to  Sessional  Papers 


A.  1920 


ALPHABETICAL  INDEX 


TO  THE 


SESSIONAL  PAPERS 


OF  THE 


PARLIAMENT  OF  CANADA 


FOURTH  SESSION,  THIRTEENTH  PARLIAMENT,  1920 


A 

No. 

Advertisements  respecting  voluntary  enlistment, 
before  year  1917 181 

Agreement  between  Allies  and  Associated  Powers,  re 
cost  of  liberation  of  Territories  of  former  Austro- 
Hungarian  Empire. .       42A 

Agreement  between  Allies  and  Associated  Powers 
re  Italian  reparation  Payments,  etc 42/ 

Agriculture — Report  of  Department  of — 1919 15 

Agricultural  Instruction  Act — 1918-19 15a 

Air  Board,  Report  of  year  1920 47a 

"  O.  in  C.  respecting  re-organization  of — 1920  476 
"  Force  in  Canada — O.  in  C.  1920  re  organization.  .  127 
"    Regulations — O.  in  C.  relating  to,  1920 47 

Alberta — respecting  irrigation  development  in  164 

Antigonish,  N.S. — Date  of  establishing  Branch  of 
P.VV.  Department  at 101 

Antigonish,  N.S.  and  North  Sydney  Branches  of 
P.W.  Department  at 101a 

Appointments  to  Civil  Service  in  Cities  of  Canada 
since  1915 191 

Archives,  Department  of,  Ottawa- -number  of  em- 
ployees in,  salaries,  etc 170c 

Arms  Traffic  Convention — Protocol  re — 1919 42c 

Assets  of  Canada — Total  Amount,  interest,  etc.  from 
1910 — average  to  present  time 137 

Auditor  General's  Report,  Vol.  I,  Pt.  A-B— A-to  J.  .1 

"     II,  Pt.  KtoS 1 

"     III,  Pt.TtoZ 

"     IV,  Pt.  ZZ..., j 

Automobiles — respecting  the  amount  of  excise  dutv 
collectedon,  in  1918-1919 2C3 


B 


Banks,  chartered — number  of,  profits,  etc.  years, 
1911-12-13-14-15-16-17-18-19 

Beatonville  P.O. .Inverness  Co. ,N.S.,  respecting  site  of 

Becker  &  Co.,  London,  England — Copy  of  correspond- 
ence between,  and  Government  

Berlin  and  Brussells  Acts  Convention— 1919 

Board  of  Commerce — re  resignation  of  Chief  Com- 
missioner of,  etc 

Board  of  Commerce  of  Canada,  First  Annual  Report 
of — and  O.  in  C.  accompanying  same  

Bonds  and  securities,  statement  re,  1919  

British  House  of  Commons— Resolutions  of  thanks 
passed  by,  to  troops  in  late  war 


is 


114 


c 

Canadian  Expeditionary  Forces— re  payments  to — 
respecting  rate  of  exchange  90 

Canadian  Expeditionary  Forces— Copies  of  Routine 
Orders  promulgated— 1919-1920 94 

Canadian  Expeditionary  Forces — Appointments,  Pro- 
motions and  Retirements— 1919-20 95 


c 

No. 

Canadian  Government  Merchant  Marine  Ltd. — Report 
of  Directors  of 161 

Canadian    Militia — Promotions,    Appointments    and 
Retirements— 1919-1920 95 

Canadian   Munition   Resources   Commission — Report 
year  1915  to  1919 184 

Canadian  Munition  Resources  Commission  O.  in  C. — 
Copy  of  dissolving  same,  1920 184a 

Canadian  National  Railways — re  amount  of  work  on 
certain  lines  of 97 

Canadian  Naval  Service — number  of  vessels  of,  during 
war— names,  etc 117 

Canadian  Naval  Service  re  gratuity  to  warrant  officers 
of.. 43c 

Canadian  Northern  Railway  Company  re  mortgage 
deeds  granted  by  Government  to,  1918-1919  175 

Canadian    Northern     Railway    System — Report    of 
Directors  for  year  1919 160 

Canadian  Securities  once  held  in  Great  Britain,  now 
by  U.  S.  of  America 89 

Canadian  Silver  Coinage — defining  standard  of 76 

Canal  Statistics,  season  of  navigation,  1919 20a 

Captain  Superintendents  H.M.C.  Dockyards — re  pay- 
ments to 43 

Carvill,  George — respecting  dismissal  of  from  position 
of  Ticket  Agent  at  St .  John  134 

Census  of  Industry,  Pulp  and  Paper 17c(4) 

Chippewa — Indians — Agreement  between  and  Govern- 
ment— re  surrender  of  Sarnia  Indian  Reserve 207 

Civil  Service  Commission — Annual  Report  of,  1919. . .      32 
"          number  of  persons  employed 
on — names  and  salaries  150 

Civil  Service  Commission,  re  correspondence  with, 
respecting  classification  of  Civil  Service 90 

Civil  Service  Investigation  Commissions — No.  of  ap- 
pointed since  1895 166 

Civil  Service  Insurance  Act,  Statement  in  pursuance  ol      50 
Number  of  Classification  engineers  em- 
ployed in  re-classification  of 98a 

Civil  Service,  respecting  names,  salaries,  etc.,  of  men 
employed  to  re-classify  same 228 

Coal  operations — Orders  of  the  Director  of — No.  1  to 
144  inclusive 202 

Coal — Production  of  in  Canada  past  10  years — Total 
Exportation  and  importation  of  past  10  years 103 

Commissions — re  date  and  object  of  appointment  of 
since  1911  to  date f  5 

Commissions — re  date  and  object  of  appointment  of 
since  1912  to  date 65a 

Commissions — re  date  and  object  of  appointment  of 
since  1914  to  date 656 

Commissions — re  date  and  object  of  appointment  of 
since  1911  to  date 65c 

Commissions  of  Enquiry — re  cost  of  reporting,  trans- 
lating, etc. .since  1900 141 

Conner,  Jas.,  re  dismissal  of,  etc 82 

Cost  of  Living  Bonus  for  Civil  Service  Employees, 
years  1920-21 193 


5951— i 


10-11  George  V         Alphabetical  Index  to  Sessional  Papers 


A.  1920 


Xo. 
Court  Martial — re  trials  by  of  certain  Riflemen  of 

Canadian  Siberian  Force,  1919 96i 

.Consolidated  Debt,  of  Canada — Amount  of  in  gross — 

also  net,  etc 106 

Correspondence,  copy  of  between  Prime  Minister,  and 

Prime  Minister  of  Gt.  Britain 211 

Customs  and  Inland  Revenue — Report  of  1919 11 

"        Shipping  Department,  Report  of,  1919 11a 


Departments  of  the  Government — number  of  non- 
Canadian-born  in — Engineers,  etc 

Department  of  Health — re  sum  of  $200,000  for  combat- 
ting Veneral  Disease 

Demonstration  Farm  at  Baie  St.  Paul,  Co.  of  Charle- 
voix  

Deputy  Postmaster  at  Edmonton,  Alberta — reappoint- 
ment of 

Dillon,  John  A.,  respecting  retention  as  Fishing  Over- 
seer in  Co.  of  Guysborough,  X.S 

Dismissals  of  Civil  Servants  in  Cities  of  Canada  since 


1915. 


Dog-Fish  Reduction  Works — Clark's  Harbour,  X.S.. 
Dominion   Council  of  Health — O.   in  C.  appointing 

same,  1919 

Dominion  Lands  Survey  Act — O.  in  C.  respecting     . . 

Dominion  Lands  Act — O.  in  C.  respecting  

Dominion     Manufacturers     Association — respecting — 

appeals  connected  with,  from  Supreme  Court 

Dominion  Railways  Commission — re  proceedings  and 

evidence,  at  Ottawa  in  1911,  and  1919 


214 
206 
195 
186 
199 

191 

180 

93a 

74 

75 

153 

136o 


Edmonton,  Alberta,  re  theft  of  §50,000  from  post  office 
at 


•—Election,  Return  of  the  Thirteenth  General. 
/■^        Emergency  Fund  for  re-establishment  of  Soldiers- 


amount  overpaid  to  those  not  entitled. 

Estimates  of  Canada 

"         Supplementary 


Further  Supplementary. 


Exchequer  Court  of  Canada — Rules  and  Orders  of. . 

Experimental  Farms.  Report  of,  1919 

Explosives  Division,  Dept.  of  Mines — Report  of  vear 

1919 

External  Affairs — Report  of  Department  of,  1919 


187 


1 25 

3 
5 


56 
58 
58a 
16 

110 
34 


Federal  Government  of  Canada — Respecting  number 

of  persons  employed  by — both  sexes 

Federal  Housing  Scheme— Orders  in  Council  respect- 


ing. 


Feed  for  Live  Stock — in  Southern  Alberta — cost  of  in 
years  1918-19-20 

Ferry,  Steamboat — between  Ste.  Catherine  and  Tad- 
oussac 

Finance  Department — number  of  employees  in — in- 
cluding Insurance  Dept. 

Fiset,  Dr.  Michel — respecting  appointment  of  in  1914 
as  Parcel  Post  Supervisor,  Quebec  City 

Fisheries  Branch  at  Ottawa — names,  salaries,  etc.  of, 
years  1919-20 

Forbes,  J.  L.  A. — Reports  concerning  indemnity  paid 
to  widow  of 

Forest  Reserves  and  Parks  Act 


Gagnon,  F.  X. — correspondence  between  and  Govt., 
rfi  Military  exemption 

Geographic  Board — Report  of — including  all  decisions 
from  1917  to  1919 

Geological  Surveys  Branch,  Department  of  Mines, 
year  1919 

Generals — number  of  retiring,  also  number  of  pro- 
moted, etc.,  since  six  months  past 

Governor-Generals  Warrants — Statement  respecting 
—1919-20 

Grain  Supervisors  of  Canada,  Board  of,  O.  in  C. 
appointing,  1919 

Grand  Etang  Harbour,  X.S.,  re  improvements  on, 
years  1918,  1919,  and  1920 

Grand  Trunk  Ry.  Co.  of  Canada — Agreement  between 
Government  and 


85 

194 

104 

173 

158/ 

204 

156 

209 
72 


129 


224 


G 

No. 

Greece — re  Contract  between  Canadian  Wheat  Board 
and  Govt,  of  Canada  respecting  Wheat 86 

Greece — amounts  loaned,  or  credits  given  to — dates  of, 
etc 147 

Griffenhagen  and  Associates — O.  in  C.  re  contract 
with,  by  Government 216 


Halford,  H.  J. — O.  in  Co.  appointing  as  member  of 
Dominion  Council  of  Health 93a 

Halifax  Graving  Dock — re  expropriation  of 231 

Harbours  of  Halifax,  St.  John,  Quebec,  Montreal, 
Toronto,  Hamilton,  Port  Arthur,  Vancouver,— 
Amount  of  money  spent  in  since  Confederation 201 

Harbour  Commission  of  Quebec — Documents  re  con- 
struction of  Docks,  Elevators,  etc 131 

Headquarters,  Militia  Department  at  Ottawa, — 
names  of  all  officers  employed  at 91a 

Highlanders — 78th  Regt.  of  Pictou,  X.S.  re  names  of 
officers  of,  etc 142a 

Highlanders — 78th  Regt.  of  Pictou  Co.,  N.S.  re  names 
of  officers  of 142 

Historical  Documents  Publication  Board — Annual 
Report  of 30 

Houses — number  of  commenced  and  finished  under  Act 
of  1919 113 


Imperial  Xews  Sen-ice — Correspondence  respecting 
establishment  of  same 

Income  Tax — Number  of  companies  and  persons 
paying  in  Toronto .« 

Inspectors  of  Terminal  Elevators — re  authority  of 

Immigration  and  Colonization — Report  of  Department 
of,  1919... 

Indian  Affairs — Report  of  Department  of — 1919 

Indian  Affairs— Respecting  number  employed  in 
Department  of — salaries,  etc 

Insurance  Abstract  of  Statement  of  year  1919  

Insurance — Report  of  Superintendent  of — 1918 

Insurance  showing  names  of  societies  complying  with 
provisions  of  Insurance  Act,  also,  those  which  have 
neglected  to  do  so,  etc 

Interior — number  of  employees  in  service  of  Depart- 
ment of — inside 

Interior — number  of  employees  in  service  of  Depart- 
ment of — in  Ottawa 

Interior — Report  of  Department  of — 1919 

International  Opium  Association — Copy  of,  etc  

International  Joint  Commission  re  development  of 
St.   Lawrence   River — O.   in   C 

International  Labour  Conference  at  Washington — Draft 
Conventions,  etc 

International  Labour  Conference  at  Washington — 
Xames  of  Canadian  Representatives  at 

Intoxicants  into  X.  West  Territories — re  permits 
granted  for — 1919 


Jellicoe — Admiral — Report  of  respecting  Xaval  Mission 
to  Canada 

Justice,  Department  of  at  Ottawa — number  of  em- 
ployees in 


Ill 
178 


170 


231 

158a* 

170»" 
25 
45 

78 
100 
100a 

60 


61 
170* 


Labour,  Department  of — Xumber    of    employees    in, 

etc 158 

Labour,   Department  of — Xumber  of  employees  in, 

names,  salaries,  etc 170a 

Labour,  Department  of — Report  for  year  1920 _  . .      37 

Lady  Evelyn,  Steamer,  Documents  re  carriage  of  mails, 

etc.  to  Magdalen  Islands .■;•'--■     *' ' 

Lawyers,  acting  as  public  representatives  in  Military 

Sen-ice  trials — salaries,  eto 192 

League  of   Xations — Apportionment   of    expenses   of, 

also  re  Canada's  share  in 115 

Librarians  of  Parliament — Report  of — 1919 41 

Life  Saving  Station  at  Cheticamp,   X.S.  respecting 

closing  of ;       221 

Liquor    Traffic    Convention — Protocol    re    traffic    in 

Africa— 1919 42d 

Loans  negotiated  by  Government  since  1911 108 

Lobster  Hatchery — sale   of  at  Charlottetown,  P.E.I.     116 


10-11  George  V         Alphabetical  Index  to  Sessional  Papers 


A. 1920 


M 

No. 

Mabou,  and  Whycocomah,  N.S. — Documents  re  mail 
route  between 148 

Mail  carriers — County  of  Charlevoix-Montmorency, 
number  of 63 

Mail  Bags — re  transfer  of  from  C.P.R.  to  trains  at 
Iberville  Junction— 1917-1918 120 

'Marine  and  Fisheries,   Report  of  Department  oi — 
1918-19— Marine 21 

Marine  and  Fisheries — Steamboat  Inspection  Report 
(Marine)— 1918-19. . 23 

Marine   and    Fisheries,    Department    of — number   of 
employees  in  inside  service  of  1586 

Marine   and    Fisheries,    Department   of — number   of 
employees  in  at  Ottawa 1706 

Marine  and  Fisheries,  List  of  Vessels  year  1919 . .       22 

Mariners — sick — amount    of    dues    from    shipping    in 
Canadian  Ports  in— 1912-13-14-15-16-17-18-19 190 

Married  Women — No.  of  in  employ  of  Government — 
Salaries,  etc 167 

Metabetchouan — respecting     appointment     of     Post- 
master at 99 

Mewburn,  Hon.  8.  C. — resignation  of 71 

Metagama  Stmr.  re  complaints  of  soldiers  sailing  on — 
February  8,  1919  189 

Militia  Council— Report  of  year  1919 36 

Militia  Department — re  officers  retained,  who  have 
not  been  overseas 91 

Militia  Department — General  Orders  promulgated — 
1919-1920 94 

Militia  Department — Number  of  employees  in  Inside 
Service  of 1586 

Militia  and  Defence — Memo,  re  European  War — 1918- 
1919 179 

Mines  Branch — Department  of  Mines — Annual  report.       78a 

Mines,    Department   of  in  Ottawa — number  of  em- 
ployees in,  etc \ 170/ 

Miscellaneous    Unforeseen   Expenses — Statement    res- 
pecting—1920 52 

Missisquoi  Bay — re  seine  or  net  fishing  in 200 

Mixed  Fertilizers — re  values  of  exportation  of  years — 
1916-17-18-19,  etc 64 

Montreal  Gazette — respecting  names  of  publishers  of, 
and  amounts  paid  to  in  last  5  yrears 172 


Mc 


McLean,  Hon.  A.  K.,  resignation  of 71 

Mc-Nutt,  Dr.  L.  \V.,  Vancouver,  B.C. — correspondence 
re  claim  of  against  Government 157 


N 


National  Battlefields  Commission — 1919 54 

"  "  —1920 54a 

Naval  Service — Report  of  Department  of  1919 39 

— number  of  employees  in — Ottawa. . . .     170a 
Fisheries  Branch,  Report     of     Depart- 
ment of,  1919 40 

Naval  Mission  to  India— correspondence  with  British 
Admiralty  respecting 176 

Newspapers — Amounts  paid  to  following— vears,  1919 
and  1920— "Montreal  Gazette,"  the  "Gazette  Print- 
ing Co.,"  "Montreal  Daily  Star,"  "The  Globe," 
Toronto,  "Mail  and  Empire"  of  Toronto,  "Tele- 
gram," of  Toronto,  "Star"  of  Toronto,  "The  Jour- 
nal" and  "The  Journal  Press,"  Ottawa,  and  the 
"Citizen,"  Ottawa 226 


O'Connor,  W.  F. — copy  of  O.  in  C.  accepting  resignation 

of  same 212 

Orders  in  Council: — 

re  payment  of  Command  Money  to  Captain  Super- 
intendents        43 

Cancellation  of  payment  of  Separation  Allowance 
dependents  in  Naval  Service 43a 

Naval  Forces  of  Canada,  placed  on  peace  footing. . . .       436 
Ottawa  Improvement  Commission — Report  of  year 

1919 55 

Outside  printing  done  for  Government  during  vears 

1918-19 146 


5951- 


No. 

Parent,  Elisee,  Inspector  of  Inland  Revenue — papers 
re  dismissal  of  in  1916 152 

Parent,  Elisee,  Inspector  of  Inland  Revenue — supple- 
mentary Return,  etc 152a 

Parliamentary  Library — number  of  employees  in, 
salaries,  etc 188 

Peace  Conference — Declaration  by  Supreme  Council 
of,  on  Economic  Conditions 143 

Peace  Treaty — 

Copy  of  between  Allies  and  Bulgaria — 1919 42 

Serb-Croat-Slovene — 

1919 426 

"  "  Czecho-Slovakia— 1919..      33 

Penitentiaries,  Report  of  Minister  of  Justice,  as  to  year, 
1919 34 

Port  of  Canso,  N.S. — re  appointment  of  Harbour  Mas- 
ter at 81 

Postmaster-General — Report  of — 1919 24 

Prince  Edward  Island — re  appointment  of  Lieut. 
Governor  for -  227 

Printing  Bureau,  Govt. — number  of  dismissals  from, 
starting  January  1  to  March  1,  1920 119 

Proprietary  or  Patent  Medicine  Act — re  appointment 
of  Advisory  Council,  etc 93a 

Public  Accounts  of  Canada 2 

Public  cross  road  between  Ste.  Catherine  and  Tadous- 
sac — O.  in  C.  respecting 102 

Public  Health:— 

Number  of  employees  in  Department  of,  etc 170n 

Orders  in  Council  relating  to  organization  and  work 
of.. 93 

Public  Printing — number  of  persons  employed  in  De- 
partment of — names  and  salaries 170 

Public  Printing  and  Stationery — Report  of  Depart- 
ment of,  year  1919 33 

Public  Works: — 

Report  of  Department  of,  1919 19 

Names  of  tenderers  for,  in  Co.  of  Mbntmorency,  Que.  92 
Number  of  employees  in  Canada  from  1915  to  1920  .  196 
Number  of  names  and  salaries  throughout  Canada, 

up  to  January,  1920 196a 

Number  of  names  and  salaries  in  Ottawa 170i 

Public  Service — number  of  employees  in  Departments 
of,  subject  to  new  classification  of 217 

Postmasters — names  and  P.O.  addresses  of,  appoint- 
ed in  N.S.  since  1917 — also  documents  re  number  of 
in  County  of  Charlevoix — Montmorency 62 

Postmasters — re  salaries  paid  to 132 

Post  Office  Department — number  of  employees  in 
inside  service  of 158a 

Post  Office  Department  at  Ottawa — number  of  em- 
ployees in,  salaries,  etc 1 70o 

Post  Offices — number  of  north  of  St.  Lawrence  from 
Tadoussac  to  Esquimaux  Point 112 

Pound  Sterling,  British — Value  of  in  Canadian  cur- 
rency in  last  of  1914,  and  in  years  1915-17-18-19  124 

Prince  Edward  Island — respecting  names  of  persons 
from,  passing  Civil  Service  Exams 165, 

Q 

Quebec  and  Saguenay  Railway  re  curtailing  of  service 
on  since  November,  1919 197 

Quebec,  Board  of  Trade  of  City  of,  re  letter  to  Minister 
of  Trade  and  Commerce  re  Mail  Steamers 155 

Quebec,  City  of-rcorrespondence  re  Dam  on  St. 
Charles  River gg 

Quebec,  Riots  of  1918 — respecting  claims  for  damages, 
etc.,  incurred  in 140 

Quebec  n  copy  of  letter  of  Western  Senators  and  Mem- 
bers of  Commons,  respecting  routing  shipments  via    171 

R 

Radiotelegraph  Regulations— Amendments  to  44 

"  "  44q 

Railways  and  Canals— number  of  employees  in  De- 
partment of  in  Ottawa i7oy 

Railways  and  Canals— Report  of  Department  of,  1919      20 

Railway  Statistics  of  Canada,  year  1919     206 

Railway  Commission— respecting  sessions  of,  relating 
to  compensation  for  damages  caused  by  C.N.  Ry. .  .     208 

Railway  Commission— respecting  sessions  of  relating 
to  compensation  for  damages  caused  by  C.N.  Ry. 
passing  through  North  Bay 208a 

Railway  Commissioners: — 

Report  of  Board  of,  year  1919 1     20c 

Report  of,  year  1919 .       J 


10-11  George  V         Alphabetical  Index  to  Sessional  Papers 


A.  1920 


Report  of  re  fixing  of  rates  for  carriage  of  mails  bv 
C.P.R.  and  G.  Trunk  Rys 

Railway  Belt,  40  miles  in  Province  of  B.C. — 0.  in  C. 

respecting 

Railway  between  St.  Camille,  Que.,  and  Cabano,  Co. 
of  Temiscouata 

Railway  Station — "  The  Palais  "  at  Que.  re  construc- 
tion of 

Remissions  and  Refund  of  Customs  .Duties,  year 
1918 

Revenue— total  estimate  for  1891-1896-1901-1906-1911- 
1912-13-14-15-16-17-18-19;  also  expenditure,  etc 

Richibucto  Beach,  N.B.,  re  closing  of  the  life  saving 
station  at 

Ricthdorf,  Prof.  F.  V.,  papers,  letters,  etc.,  naturaliza- 
tion of,  etc 

River  Batiscan — Champlain  Co.,  respecting  Bridge 
over 

River  Batiscan — Champlain  Co.,  Reports,  correspond- 
ence, etc 

Robson,  Judge,  correspondence  re  resignation  of,  as 
Chairman  of  Board  of  Commerce 

Roumania — Amounts  loaned  or  credits  given  to — 
dates,  etc 

Royal  Canadian  Navy — 0.  in  C. — 1920,  re  engagement 
of  Seamen  in 

Royal  Canadian  Navy — 0.  inC. — 1920,  't  amendment 
to  pay  of  Sergeant  Lieutenants  of 

Royal  Commission  on  Indian  Affairs  for  Province  of 
B.C 

Royal  North  West  Mounted  Police — Report  of  1919. . . 

Royal  Society  of  Canada — Report  of  1919 

Running  Race  Meets — Report  and  Evidence  of  Com- 
mission to  enquire  into  conditions  re 

Rural  Mail  Carriers — re  salaries,  etc.,  paid  to 

Rural  Mail  Routes— Reports  re,  in  Parishes  of  Champ- 
lain, Batiscan  and  St.  Luc,  Quebec 


No 

136 

73 

135 

80 

83 

105 

218 

121 


48a 

147 

43d 

43e 

66 
28 
56 

67 
132 


Scientific  and  Industrial  Research— Report  of  Chaii- 
man  for  Council  of,  year  1920 222 

Secretaries — Private,  Number  of  to  Members,  chair- 
men, or  members  of  commissions,  since  1911 225 

Secretary  to  Deputy  Minister  of  Justice — Documents 
respecting  promotion  of 163 

Secretary  of  State,  Report  of  Department  of — 1919 29 

Secretary  of  State,  Department  of — number  of  em- 
ployees in 1586 

Secretary  of  State-  Department  of — number  of  em- 
ployees in.  .  170 

Seed  Grain — Cost  of  providing  for  settlers  in  Leth- 
bridge  in  1918-19-20 _ 104 

Sentences  commuted  of  prisoners  to  be  hanged — number 
of— 1916-17-18-19 118 

Siberia  Expedition  to — number  of  men  composing  it, 
voluntarily  or  otherwise — Cost  of  expedition  to,  etc. .      96 

Siberia,  Expedition  to — Trial  by  Court  Martial  oi 
Riflemen  attached  to  Expedition  to — 1919 96a 

Soldiers  Civil  Re-establishment — Report  of  Depart- 
ment of— 1919 14 

Soldiers  Civil  Re-establishment  re  institutions  under 
jurisdiction  of,  etc 159 

Soldiers  Civil  Re-establishment — Number  of  persons 
employed  in  Department  of  in  Ottawa 170? 

Soldiers  Settlement  Act — Number  of  farms  in  Quebec 
purchased  by  returned  soldiers 145 

Soldiers  Settlement  Board — Correspondence  between, 
and  Minister  Lands,  Province  Quebec 107 

Soldiers  Settlement  Board  re  number  of  persons  em- 
ployed by  in  Province  of  Quebec  < 133 

Spirituous  Liquors:  quantity  of  imported  into  Canada 
years  1913-14-15-16-17-18-19 151 

Superannuation  and  Retiring  Allowances — Statement 
respecting,  to  Dec.  31,  1919 49 

Superannuation  and  Retiring  Allowances  re  additional 
years  granted  under 49a 

Superior  Courts  of  Criminal  Jurisdiction — Copies  of 

__  Rules  of  210 

Supreme  Court  of  Nova  Scotia — Rules  of  re  Con- 
troverted Elections  Act 59 

Supreme  Court  of  Nova  Scotia — Rules  of  Judges  of  re 
Criminal  Code 59a 


St.  and  Ste. 

No. 

Ste.  Catherine  and  Tadoussac — re  subsidy  connected 
with  ferry   between 173 

Ste.  Catherine  and  Tadoussac,  respecting  postal  ferry 
service  between 19 

St.  Charles  river — Quebec,  re  construction  of  a  dam  on.      88 

Ste.  Anne  de  Beaupre,  Ste.  Famille,  He  d'Orleans, 
St.  Francois  du  Sud,  He  d'Orleans,  St.  Jean,  He 
d'Orleans,  He  de  la  Quarantine,  and  Pointe  aux 
Trembles,  names  of  tenderers  for  public  works 
at — amounts  of,  etc 92 

Ste.  Anne  de  Bellevue  re  Military  Hospital  at, — cost 
of,  number  of  patients  at 229 

St.  John  and  Quebec  Ry.,  N.B.,  re  procuring  running 
rights  of,  over  C.P.Ry.  to  enter  St.  John 220 

T 

Temporary     Appointments — number     of     made     by 

commission  since  Armistice  still  on  pay-rolls 182 

Temporary  Loans  since  last  session  of  Parliament. .    .       53 
Textile  Manufactures — re  drawbacks  paid  to  on  raw 

wool  and  cotton,  year  1920 215 

Toronto  Harbour — re  work  of  development  of  under 

present  scheme  of  work 219 

Trade  and  Commerce — Report  of  relating  to  subsidies 

and  Steamship  Subventions,  for  year  1919  10a 

Trade  and  Commerce — Trade  of  Canada  (Imports  for 

consumption  and  exports)  for  the  vear  ending  March 

31,  1919 106 

Trade  and  Commerce — Criminal  Statistics  for  year 

ended  September  1919 lOrf 

Trade   and  Commerce — Report  of  the  Weights  and 

Measures,  Electricity  and  Gas  Inspection  Services. 

year  1918-19 10<> 

Trade  and  Commerce — Report  of  the  Dominion  Stat- 
istician year  1918-19 10/ 

Trade   and   Commerce — Department   of — number  of 

employees  in,  salaries  and  names 170d 

Trade  and   Commerce — Department   of — number   of 

employees  in,  salaries  and  names 158a 

Trade  Commission  overseas — re  purposes  of  creation, 

etc 128 

Transcontinental  Ry.,  Commission — correspondence  re 

Ry.  Station  at  Champlain  Market,  City  of  Quebec — 

also  Elevators,  etc 130 

Translators — number  of  in  Senate,  House  of  Commons, 

and  different  Depts.  of  Government,  etc 154 

Treaty  between  Allies,  and  Associated  Powers  and 

Roumania,  Dec.  9,  1919 42g 

Treat j-  of  Peace  between  Allies  and  Bulgaria — 1919. ...      42 
"  "  "        Czecho-Slovakia— 1919    42a 

Treaties  and  Conventions — Return  re  ratification  of— 

1920 42/ 

Tunnel,  construction  of  in  City  of  Quebec  connected 
with  Transcontinental  Ry S4 

u 

Unforeseen  Expenses — Miscellaneous  Statement  re  1920.     52 

V 

Venereal    Disease — re    sum  of    S200.000  placed  with 

Health  Department  for  combatting 2t>6 

Veterinary  Director  General — Report  of  year  1919  .  . .       156 
Victory  Loan — 1919— Total  cost  and  general  expenses 

of 109 

Victory    Loan — Appointment   of   Special    Committee 

respecting  stabilizing  Loan  of  1917 168 

Victory  Loan — Total  amount  of  commission  charges 

paid  to  brokers  and  agents,  1919 138 

w 

War  Purchasing  Commission — Sales  of  Military  and 
other  supplies  made  by  in  1917-18-19 162 

War  Records  Office,  Canadian — Reports  by  Officer  in 
charge,  London,  England _  169 

War  Revenue  Stamps — re  prosecutions  in  N.S.  for 
neglect  in  placing  on  Medical  Packages 126 

Wharves  on  St.  John  River,  etc.,  re  liability  of  Do- 
minion Government  for .         87 

White,  A.  V..  consulting  Engineer  of  Conservation 
Commission — re  expenses,  etc.  of 144 

Y 

Young,  Arthur  &  Company — Names,  cost,  amounts 

paid  to,  etc 139 

Yukon,  Ordinances  of  Territory  of,  year  1920 223 


10-11  George  V 


List  of  Sessional  Papers 


A. 1920 


LIST  OF  SESSIONAL  PAPERS 

Arranged  in  Numerical  Order,  with  their  Titles  at  Full  Length;  the  Dates  when 
Ordered  and  when  Presented  to  the  Houses  of  Parliament;  the  Name  of  the 
Senator  or  Member  who  moved  for  each  Sessional  Paper,  and  whether  it  is 
Ordered  to  be  Printed  or  not  Printed.     Also  those  Printed  but  not  Presented. 

CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME  1. 

{This  volume  is  bound  in  three  parts). 

1 .  Report  of  the  Auditor  General  for  the  year  ended  March  31,  1919,  Volume  I,  Parts  a-b— A  to  J.     Presented  by  Sir 

Henry  Drayton,  March  19,  1920 Printed  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

Report  of  the  Auditor  General  for  the  year  ended   March  31,  19i9,  Volume  II,  Parts  K  to  S.     Presented  by  Sir 
Henry  Drayton,  March  29,  1920 PrinUd  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

Report  of  the  Auditor  General  for  the  year  ending  March  31,  1919,  Volume  III,  Parts  T  to  Z.     Presented  by  Sir 
Henry  Draj  ton,  March  16,  1920 Printed  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

Report  of  the  Auditor  General  for  the  year  ended  March  31,  1919,  Volume  rV,  Part  ZZ.     Presented  by  Sir  Henry 
Drayton,  May  14,  1920 Printed  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME  2. 

(This  volume  is  bound  in  two  parts). 

2.  The  Public  Accounts  of  Canada,  for  the  fiscal  year  ended  March  31,  1919.     Presented  by  Sir  Henry  Drayton,  March 

■  P>  intedfor  distribution  and  sessional  papers-. 

3.  Estimates  of  sums  required  for  the  service  of  the  Dominion  for  the  year  ending  on  the  31st  March,  1921.    Presented 

by  Sir  Henry  Drayton,  March  22,1920 Presented  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

4.  Supplementary  Estimates  of  sums  required  for  the  service  of  the  Dominion  for  the  year  ending  on  the  31st  March 

1921 .    Presented  by  Sir  Henry  Drayton,  April  15,  1920 Presented  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

5.  Further  Supplementary  Estimates  of  sums  required  for  the  service  of  the  Dominion  for  the  year  ending  on  the  31st 

March,  1920.    Presented  by  Sir  Henry-  Drayton,  May  17,  1920 Printed  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers.' 

5a.  Further  Supplementary  Estimates  of  sums  required  for  the  service  of  the  Dominion  for  the  year  ending  on  the  31st 
March,  1921.    Presented  by  Sir  Henry  Drayton,  June  25,  1920 Printed  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

56.  Further  Supplementary  Estimates  of  sums  required  for  the  sendee  of  the  Dominion  for  the  year  ending  on  the  3ls1 
March,  1921.    Presented  by  Sir  Henry  Drayton,  June  29,  1920 Printed  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

8.  Report  of  the  Superintendent  of  Insurance  of  the  Dominion  of  Canada   for  the   year  ended  December  31    1918 

\oIume  I,  Insurance  Companies  other  than  Life;  Volume  II,  Life  Insurance  Companies.     Presented  bv  Sir 
Henry  Drayton,  March  2,  1920 Printed  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

9.  Abstract  of  Statements  of  Insurance  Companies  in  Canada,  year  ending  December  31,  1919. 

Printed  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME  3. 

10a  Report  relating  to  Mail  Subsidies  and  Steamship  Subventions  as  controlled  by  the  Department  of  Trade  and  Com- 
merce, for  the  year  ended  March  31,  1919,  with  Traffic  Returns,  etc.,  to  December  31,  1919.    The  Senate. 

Printed  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers . 

10b.  Annual  Report  of  the  Trade  of  Canada  (Imports  for  consumption  and  Exports)  for  the  fiscal  year  ended  March  31, 
Printed  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers'. 

CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME  4. 

10d.  Criminal  Statistics  for  the  year  ended  September,  1919 Printed  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers 

lOe.  Report  of  the  Weights  and  Measures,  Electricity  and  Gas  Inspection  Service,  for  the  fiscal  year   ended  March  31. 

Printed  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 
10/.  Report  of  the  Dominion  Statistician  for  the  year  ended   March  31,  1919. 

Printed  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

11.  Annual  Report  of  the  Department  of  Customs  and  Inland  Revenue,  containing  accounts  of  revenue  with  statements 
relative  to  the  Imports,  Exports  Customs  and  Inland  Revenue  of  the  Dominion  of  Canada,  for  the  fiscal  year 
ended  March  31,  1919,  as  compiled  from  official  returns.     Presented  by  Hon.  Mr.  Burrell,  March  4,  1920. 

Printed  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

11a  Shipping  Report  of  the  Department  of  Customs,  containing  Statements  of  Navigation  and  Shipping  of  the  Dominion 
of  Canada  for  the  fiscal  year  ended  March  31,  1919,  as  compiled  from  official  returns.  Presented  by  Hon  Mr 
Burrell,  March  4,  1920 Printed  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

13.  Return  of  the  Thirteenth  General  Election  for  the    House  of    Commons  of  Canada,   held  on  the    17th  day  of 
December  1917 Printed  for  distribution  and  sessional  paoert. 


10-11  George  V  List  of  Sessional  Papers  A.  1920 


CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME  5. 

14.  Report  of  the  Work  of  the  Department  of  Soldiers'  Civil    Re-establishment,  December,  1919.    Presented  by  Mr 

Clark  (Bruce),  March  15,  1920 Printed  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

15.  Report  of  the  Minister  of  Agriculture  for  the  Dominion  of  Canada,  for  the  year  ended  March  31,  1919.    Presented  by 

Hon.  Mr.  Tolmie,  March  9,  1920 Printed  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

15a.  Report  on  "The  Agricultural  Instruction  Act,"  1918-19,  pursuant  to  Section  8,  Chapter  5  of  3-4  George  V.    Presented 
by  Hon.  Mr.  Tolmie,  March  9,  1920 Printed  for  distribution  and  sessional  papas. 

15b.  Report  of  the  Veterinary  Director  General,  year  ending  March  31,  1919 Printed  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

16.  Report  of  the  Dominion  Experimental  Farms  for  the  fiscal  year  ending  31st  March,  1919.    Appendix  to  the  Report 

of  the  Minister  of  Agriculture.    Presented  by  Hon.  Mr.  Tolmie,  March  9,  1920. 

Piinled  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers  . 

CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME  6. 

17c.  Census  of  Industry — Pulp  and  Paper Printed  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

18.  Annual  Report  of  the  Department  of  Immigration  and  Colonization,  for  the  fiscal  year  ended  March  31,  1919. 

Presented  by  Hon.  Mr.  Calder,  March  3,  1920 Presented  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

19.  Report  of  the  Minister  of  Public  Works  on  the  works  under  his  control  for  the  fiscal  year  ended  March  31,  1919. 

Presented  by  Hon.  Mr.  Reid,  March  10,  1920 Printed  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

20.  Annual  Report  of  the  Department  of  Railways  and  Canals,  for  the  fiscal  year  from  April  1,  1918,  to  March  31,  1919. 

Presented  by  Hon.  Mr.  Reid,  May  20,  1920 Printed  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

20a.  Canal  Statistics  for  the  season  of  navigation  of  1919 Printed  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

20b.  Railway  Statistics  of  the  Dominion  of  Canada  year  of  1919 Printed  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

20c.  Fourteenth  Report  of  the  Board  of  Railway  Commissioners  for  Canada,  for  the   year  ending   March  31,  1919. 
Presented  by  Hon.  Mr.  Reid,  March  19,  1920 Printed  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME  7. 

20d.  Fifteenth  Report  of  the  Board  of  Railway  Commissioners  for  Canada,  for  the  nine  months  ending  December  31, 
1919.     (Manuscript  copy.)     Presented  by  Hon.  Mr.  Reid,  April  19,  1920. 

21.  Fifty-second  Annual  Report  of  the  Department  of  Marine  and  Fisheries,  for  the  year  1918-19 — Marine.    Presented 

by  Hon.  Mr.  Ballantyne,  March  1,  1920 Printed  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

22.  Marine  and  Fisheries — List  of  Vessels,  year  1919 .Printed  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

23.  Supplement  to  the  Fifty-second  Annual  Report  of  the  Department  of  Marine  and  Fisheries  for  the  fiscal  year  1918-1919 

(Marine) — Steamboat  Inspection  Report.    Presented  by  Hon.  Mr.  Ballantyne,  March  1,  1920. 

Printed  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

24.  Report  of  the  Postmaster  General  for  the  year  ended  March  31,  1919.    Presented  bv  Hon.  Mr.  Rowell,  March  2,  1920. 

Printed  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME  8. 

25.  Annual  Report  of  the  Department  of  the  Interior,  for  the  fiscal  year  ended  March  31,  1919.     Presented  by  Hon.  Mr. 

Meighen,  March  10,  1920 Printed  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

25a.  Report  of  the  Topographical  Surveys  Branch  of  the  Department  of  tne  Interior,  year  1918-1919. 

Printed  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

25b.  Sixteenth  Report  of  the  Geographic  Board  of  Canada,  containing  all  decisions  from  April  1,  1917,  to  March  31,  1919. 
Presented  by  Hon.  Mr.  Meighen,  April  28,  1920 Printed  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

26.  Report  of  the  Geological  Survey  Branch,  Department  of  Mines,  year  1919    Printed  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

26a.  Summary  Report  of  the  Mines  Branch  of  the  Department  of  Mines,  for  the  year  ending  December  31,  1919. 

Printed  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers, 

27.  Report  of  the  Department  of  Indian  Affairs  for  the  year  ended  March  31,  1919.     Presented  by  Hon.  Mr.  Meighen, 

March  16,  1920 Printed  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers 

28.  Report  of   the  Royal  Northwest  Mounted  Police  for  the  year  ended  September  30,  1919.     Presented  by  Hon.  Mr. 

Rowell,  March  22,  1920 Printed  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

29.  Report  of  the  Secretary  of  State  of  Canada  for  the  year  ended  March  31,  1919.     Presented  bv  Hon.  Mr.  Sifton,  March 

10,  1920 Printed  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME  9. 

(This  volume  is  bound  in  two  parts.) 

30.  (Sessional  Paper  No.  IS,  6-7  Edward  VII,  Rev.  Ed.)  Second  Annual  Report  of  the  Historical  Documents  Publication 

Board,  together  with  accompanying  printed  volumes,  being  the  second  edition,  revised  and  enlarged,  of  the  first 
volume  of  the  Constitutional  Documents  relating  to  Canada  1759-1791,  now  issued  in  two  parts.  Presented  by 
Hon.  Mr.  Rowell,  March  18,  1920 Printed  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

6 


10-11  George  V  List  of  Sessional  Papers  A.  1920 


CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME  10. 

32.  Eleventh  Annual  Report  of  the  Civil  Service  Commission  of  Canada,  September  1,  1918-December  31,  1919.  Pre- 
sented by  Hon.  Mr.  Sifton,  April  16,  1920 Printed  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

33.  Annual  Report  of  the  Department  of  Public  Printing  and  Stationery  for  the  fiscal  year  ended  March  31,  1919.  Pre- 
sented by  Hon.  Mr.  Sifton,  June  8,  1920 Printed  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

34.  Report  of  the  Secretary  of  State  for  External  Affairs,  for  the  year  ended  March  31,  1919.    Presented  by  Hon.  Mr" 

Rowell,  April  22,  1920 Printed  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers- 

35.  Report  of  the  Minister  of  Justice  as  to  Penitentiaries  for  year  ending  March  31,  1919. 

Printed  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers' 

36.  Report  of  the  Militia  Council  for  the  Dominion  of  Canada,  for  the  fiscal  year  ending  March  31,  1919.  Presented  by 
Hon.  Mr.  Guthrie,  May  28,  1920 Printed  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

37.  Report  of  the  Department  of  Labour  for  the  year  ended  March  31,  1919.    The  Senate. 

Printed  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

38.  Annual  Report  of  the  Editorial  Committee  for  the  year  1920.    Presented  1920. 

Printed  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

39.  Report  of  the  Department  of  the  Naval  Service,  for  the  fiscal  year  ending  March  31,  1919.    Presented  by  Hon.  Mr. 

Ballantyne,  March  1 ,  1920 Printed  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

40.  Fifty-second  Annual  Report  of  the  Fisheries  Branch  of  the  Department  of  the  Naval  Service,  1918.    Presented  by 

Hon.  Mr.  Ballantyne,  March  11,  1920 Printed  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

1 .  Report  of  the  Joint  Librarians  of  Parliament .    Presented  by  Hon.  Mr.  Speaker,  February  26,  1920 Not  printed. 

42.  Copy  of  the  Treaty  of  Peace  between  the  Allied  and  Associated  Powers  and  Bulgaria,  signed  at  Neuilly-sur-Seine 
on   the   27th   day   of    November,    1919.     Presented   by   Hon.    Mr.    Rowell,    February   26,    1920. 

Printed  for  distribution  to  senators  and  members. 

42a.  The  Czecho-Slovak  Minorities  Treaty— Treaty  between  the  Principal  Allied  and  Associated  Powers  and  Czecho 
Slovakia,  signed  at  Saint-Germain-en-Laye,  September  10,  1919.  Ratification  on  behalf  of  Canada  authorized 
by  Order  in  Council  of  December  1,  1919.     Presented  by  Hon.  Mr.  Rowell,  March  1,  1920. 

Not  printed. 

42b    The  Serb-Croat-Slovene  Minorities  Treaty— Treaty  between  the  Principal  Allied  and  Associated  Powers  and  the 
Serb-Croat-Slovene  State,  signed  at  Saint-Germain-en-Laye,  September  10,  1919.     Ratification  on  behalf  of 
Canada  authorized  by  Order  in  Council  of  December  1,  1919.    Presented  by  Hon.  Mr.  Rowell,  March  1,  1920. 
a  Not  printed. 

42c.  Arms  Traffic  Convention — Convention  for  the  control  of  the  trade  in  arms  and  ammunition,  and  Protocol,  signed 
September  10,  1919.  Ratification  on  behalf  of  Canada  authorized  by  Order  in  Council  of  December  9,  1919. 
Presented  by  Hon.  Mr.  Rowell,  March  1,  1920 Not  printed. 

42d.  Liquor  Traffic  Convention— Convention  relating  to  the  liquor  traffic  in  Africa,  and  Protocol,  signed  at  Saint-Germain- 
en-Laye,  September  10,  1919.  Ratification  on  behalf  of  Canada  authorized  by  Order  in  Council  of  December 
1919.    Presented  by  Hon.  Mr.  Rowell,  March  1,  1920 Not  printed. 

42c  Berlin  and  Brussels  Acts  Convention— Convention  revising  the  General  Act  of  Berlin,  February  26,  1885,  and  the 
General  Act  and  Declaration  of  Brussels,  July  2,  1890,  signed  at  Saint-Germain-en-Laye,  September  10,  1919. 
Ratification  on  behalf  of  Canada  authorized  bv  Order  in  Council  of  December  9,  1919.  "Presented  by  Hon.  Mr. 
Rowell,   March   1,   1920 Not  printed. 

42/.  Return  to  an  Address  to  His  Excellency  the  Administrator,  of  the  22nd  March,  1920,  for  a  copv  of  the  Orders  in 
Council  of  December  1,  1919,  and  December  9,  1919,  respecting  ratification  of  the  treaties  and  conventions  laid 
before  the  House  of  Commons  on  Monday,  March  1,  1920    Presented  March  29,  1920,  Mr.  Fielding Not  printed. 

42g.  Copy  of  the  English  text  of  the  Treaty  between  the  Principal  Allied  and  Associated  Powers  and  Rumania,  signed 
at  Pans,  Decembei  9,  1919.    Piesented  by  Hon.  Mi .  Rowell,  Apiil  14,  1920 Not  printed. 

42h.  Copy  of  the  agreement  of  September  10,  1919,  between  the  Allied  and  Associated  Powers  with  regaid  to  the  con- 
tiibutions  to  the  cost  of  libeiation  of  the  tenitoiies  of  the  foimei  Austio-Hungaiian  monaichy,  and  copy  of 
Declaiation  dated  the  8th  of  Decembei,  1919,  modifying  this  Agieement.  Piesented  by  Hon.  Mi.  Rowell, 
Apiil  21,  1920 Not  printed. 

42i.  Copy  of  Agieement  of  September  10,  1919,  between  the  Allied  and  Associated  Poweis  and  Italy  with  legaid  to  the 
Italian  lepaiation  payments  and  copy  of  Declaiation  of  Decembei  8,  1919,  modifying  this  Agieement.  Piesented 
by  Hon.  Mi.  Rowell,  Apiil  21,  1920 Not  printed. 

43.  Oidei  in  Council,  P.C.  69,  dated  Febiuaiy  28,  1920,  Pavment  of  Command  Money  to  Captain  Supeiintendents  H.M.C. 
Dockyaids.    Piesented  by  Hon.  Mi.  Ballantyne,  Maich  1,  1920 Not  printed. 

43«.  Copy  of  Oidei  in  Council,  P.C.  566,  dated  Maich  17,  1920:  Cancellation  of  Oideis  in  Council  authoiizing  and 
governing  the  payment  of  Sepaiation  Allowance  to  dependents  of  Officeis  and  Men  in  the  Canadian  Naval  Set  vice 
Piesented  by  Hon.  Mi.  Ballantyne,  Maich  22,  1920 Not  printed. 

436.  Oidei  in  Council,  P.C.  559,  dated  17th  Maich,  1920:  Naval  Foices  of  Canada,  including  the  Naval  Volunteei 
Foices,  placed  on  a  peace  footing.    Piesented  by  Hon.  Mi .  Ballantyne,  Maich  25,  1920 Not  printed. 

43c.  Copy  of  Oidei  in  Council  P.C.  1061,  dated  15th  May,  1920:  Payment  of  Giatuitv  to  Ratings  and  Wanant  Officer* 
of  the  Royal  Canadian  Navy.    Piesented  by  Hon.  Mi .  Ballantyne,  May  21,  1920 Not  printed 


10-11  George  V  List  of  Sessional  Papers  A.  1920 


CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME  10— Continued. 

43d.  Copy  of  Oidei  in  Coucnil,  P.C.  1005,  dated  20th  May,  1920;  Engagement  of  Seamen  in  Royal  Canadian  Navy.     Pie- 
sented  May  31 ,  1920.     Mi .  Hocken Not  printed. 

43c.  Oidei  in  Council,  No.  P.C.  1155,  dated  May  22,  1920, — Amendments  to  Rates  of  Pay  foi  Suigeon  Lieutenants,  Royal 
Canadian  Navy.     (Sessional  Papers,  1920,  Xo.  .)    The  Senate Not  printed. 

44.  Amendments  to  Radiotelegiaph  Regulations,  Nos.  78,  25  and  104.     Piesented  bv  Hon.  Mi.  Ballantvne,  Maieh  1, 

1920 Not  printed. 

44a.  Amendment   to    Radiotelegiaph    Regulation    No.    92.      Piesented   by    Hon.    Mi.    Ballantyne,    Maich    15,    1920. 

Not  printed. 

45.  Copy  of  the  International  Opium  Convention,  signed  at  The  Hague,  Januaiv  23,  1912,  and  ratified  Januaiy  10,  1920. 

Piesented  by  Hon.  Mi .  Rowell,  Maich  2,  1920 Not  printed. 

46.  Copy  of  an  Agieement  between  His  Majesty  the  King  and  the  Gland  Tiunk  Railway  Company  of  Canada.    Pie- 

sented by  Hon.  Mi.  Reid,  Maich  2,  1920 Not  printed. 

47.  Copv  of  Oidei  in  Council,  P.C.  2596,  dated  31st  Decembei,  1919— Ail  Regulations,  1920.    Piesented  bv  Hon.  Mi. 

Sifton,  Maich  2,  1920 Not  printed. 

41a.  Repoit  of  the  Aii  Boaid,  foi   the  fiscal  jeai   ending  Maich  31,  1920.     Piesented  by  Hon.  Mi.  Sifton,  April  20,  1920. 

Not  printed. 

47b.  Copy  of  Order  in  Council,  P.C.  826,  dated  19th  April,  1920,  respecting  the  reorganization  of  the  Air  Board.  Presented 

by  Hon.  Mr.  Sifton,  April  20,  1920 Not  printed. 

48.  Copy  of  correspondence  in  respect  to  the  resignation  of  the  Chief  Commissioner  of  the  Board  of  Commerce.    Presented 

by  Sir  George  Foster,  March  2,  1920 ' Not  printed. 

48a.  Copy  of  correspondence  relating  to  the  resignation  of  Judge  Robson  as  Chairman  of  the  Board  of  Commerce  of  Canada. 
Presented  by  Sir  Robert  Borden,  June  26, 1920 Not  printed. 

49.  Statement  supplementary  to  that  of  13th  September,  1919,  of  Superannuation  and  Retiring  Allowances  in  the  Civil 

Service  between  the  said  date  and  the  31st  December,  1919,  showing  name,  rank,  salary,  service  allowance  and 
cause  of  retirement  of  each  person  superannuated  or  retired,  also  whether  the  vacancy  has  been  filled  by  pro- 
motion, or  by  appointment,  and  the  salarv  oj  anv  new  appointee.  Presented  bv  Sir  Henry  Drayton,  March  2, 
1920 Not  printed. 

49a.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  22nd  March,  1920,  for  a  Return  showing  the  cases  in  which,  from  October  1, 
1896,  to  the  present,  in  the  computation  of  superannuation  allowances  to  retiring  officials,  additional  years  were 
allowed  under  the  provisions  of  Section  12,  of  Chapter  7,  R.S.,  the  dates  of  the  granting  of  the  allowances,  the 
names  of  the  officials  and  the  number  of  years  added  to  the  actual  service;  along  with  a  copy  of  all  Treasury 
Board  Reports  and  Orders  in  Council  relating  to  such  cases.    Presented  March  31,1920,  Mr.  Fielding  ..Not  printed. 

50.  Statement  in  pursuance  of  Section  17  of  the  Civil  Service  Insurance  Act,  for  the  year  ending  March  31, 1919.     Presented 

by  Sir  Henry  Drayton,  March  2,  1920 Not  printed. 

51 .  Statement  of  Governor  General's  Warrants  issued  since  the  last  Session  of  Parliament  on  account  of  1919-20.  Presented 

by  Sir  Henry  Drayton,  March  2,  1920 Not  printed. 

52.  Statement  of  Expenditure  on  account  of  "Miscellaneous  Unforeseen  Expenses,"  from  the  1st  September,  1919,  to 

the  1st  March,  1920,  in  accordance  with  the  Appropriation  Act  Number  (1),  1919.  Presented  by  Sir  Henry 
Drayton,  March  20,  1920 Not  printed. 

53.  Statement  of  Temporary  Loans  issued  by  the  Government  of  Canada  since  the  last  Session  of  Parliament  still  out- 

standing.   Presented  by  Sir  Henry  Drayton,  March  2,  1920 Not  printed. 

54.  Statement  of  Receipts  and  Expenditures  of  the  National  Battlefields  Commission  to  31st  March,  1919.     Presented 

by  Sir  Henry  Drayton,  March  2,  1920 Not  printed. 

54a.  Statement  of  Receipts  and  Expenditures  of  the  National  Battlefields  Commission  to  31st  March,  1920.  Presented 
by  Sir  Henry  Drayton,  April  19,  1920 Not  printed. 

55.  Report  of  the  Ottawa  Improvement  Commission  for  the  fiscal  vear  ended  March  31,  1919.     Presented  bv  Sir  Henry 

Drayton,  March  2,  1920 'Not  printed. 

56.  Statement  of  the  Receipts  and  Expenditures  of  the  Royal  Societv  of  Canada,  for  the  vear  ended  April  30,  1919. 

Presented  by  Sir  Henry  Drayton,  March  2,  1920 Not  printed. 

57.  Financial  Statement  of  the  affairs  of  the  Montreal  Turnpike  Trust  for  the  vear  ended  December  31,  1919.  Presented 

by-Sir  Henry  Drayton,  March  2,  1920 Not  printed. 

58.  Copy  of  General  Rules  and  Orders  of  the  Exchequer  Court  of  Canada,  in  accordance  with  the  provisions  of  Section 

88  of  the  Exchequer  Court  Act,  Chapter  140,  R.S.C.  1906.    Presented  by  Hon.  Mr.  Sifton,  March  10,  1920. 

Not  printed. 

58n.  Copy  of  General  Rules  and  Orders  of  the  Exchequer  Court  of  Canada,  in  accordance  with  the  provisions  of  Section  88 
of  the  Exchequer  Court  Act,  Chapter  140,  R.S.C.  1906.    Presented  by  Hon.  Mr.  Sifton,  April  14,  1920. 

Not  printed. 

59.  Copy  of  the  Rules  of  the  Supreme  Court  of  Nova  Scotia  enacted  under  the  provisions  of  the  Controverted  Elections 

Act,  Chapter  7,  R.S.C.  1906,  in  accordance  with  the  requirements  of  Section  85  of  the  Act.  Presented  by  Hon. 
Mr.  Sifton,  March  10,  1920 Not  printed.  ■ 

■Copy  of  the  Crown  Rules  oj  the  Judges  oj  the  Supreme  Court  of  Xova  Scotia  in  accordance  with  the  provisions  of 
Sect.on  576,  subsection  2,  of  the  Criminal  Code.    Presented  bv  Hon.  Mr.  Sifton,  April  16,  1920 Not  printed. 

8 


10-11  George  V  List  of  Sessional  Papers  A.  1920 


CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME  10— Continued. 

60.  Return  showing  the  number  of  parmits  granted  to  take  intoxicants  into  the  Northwest  Territories,  for  the  year  ending 

the  31st  of  December,  1919,  in  accordance  with  the  provisions  of  the  Revised  Statutes,  Chapter  62,  Section  88. 
Presented  March  10,  1920 Not  printed  . 

61 .  Report  of  Admiral  of  the  Fleet,  Viscount  Jellicoe  of  Scapa,  G.C.B.,  O.M.,  G.C.V.O. ,  on  Naval  Mission  to  the  Dominion 

of  Canada  (November-December,  1919).     Presented  by  Hon.  Mr.  Ballantyne,  March  10,  1920. 

Printed  far  distribution  to  Senators  and  Members  only . 

62.  Return  showing:— 1.  Number  of  postmasters  in  the  County  of  Charlevoix-Montmorency.    2.  Their  names.    3.  Their 

residence.  4.  When  they  were  appointed.  5.  Their  actual  salary.  6.  Whether  it  was  ever  increased  since  they 
were  appointed.     7.  If  not,  why.    8.  If  so,  when,  and  to  what  extent.     Presented  March  10,  1920,  Mr.  Casgrain. 

Not  printed. 

63.  Order  of  the  House  for  a  Return  showing:— 1.  Number  of  mail  carriers  in  the  County  of  Charlevoix-Montmorency. 

2.  Their  names.  3.  Their  residence.  4.  When  they  were  appointed.  5.  Their  actual  salary.  6.  Whether  it 
was  ever  increased  since  they  were  appointed.  7.  If  not,  why.  8.  If  so,  when,  and- to  what  extent.  Presented 
March  10,  1920,  Mr.  Casgrain A'o<  printed. 

64.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  Senate,  dated  September  30,  1919,  for  a  statement  giving  weights  and  values  of  the  exporta- 

tion from  Canada  during  the  fiscal  years  of  1916-17-18-19  of  mixed  fertilizers,  also  of  Sulphate  of  Ammonia,  Nitrate 
of  Soda,  Ammoniates,  Phosphate  Rock,  Super  Phosphates,  Kanite  of  Potash  Salts,  Chloride  of  Potash  and 
Crude  Sulphate  of  Potash,  and  of  any  miscellaneous  chemicals  as  are  used  in  the  manufacture  of  artificial  fertilizers 
also  Basic  Slag  from  the  Provinces  of  Ontario,  Quebec,  New  Brunswick,  Nova  Scotia,  Prince  Edward  Island  , 
by  each  province,  and  where  exported  to  as  shown  by  clearances  of  the  various  Custom*Houses.     The  Senate. 

*  Not  printed  . 

65.  Return  to  an  humble  Address  of  the  Senate  to  His  Excellency  the  Governor  General,  dated  May  8,  1919,  showing 

the  date  and  object  of  all  commissions  appointed  by  the  Government  since  its  accession  to  power  in  1911,  up  to 
the  present  date;  the  number  of  days  during  which  each  of  the  said  commissions  sat;  the  names  of  the  persons 
composing  the  said  commissions  and  the  cost  of  each  ol  these  commissions  to  the  country.     The  Senate. 

Not  printed 

65a.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  Senate,  dated  September  5,  1919,  showing:— The  number  of  commissions  appointed  sines 
1912,  their  object,  the  names  of  their  members  and  their  salaries,  the  total  cost  of  each  commission  and  those 
which  are  still  existing.    The  Senate Not  printed. 

656.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  30th  April,  1919,  for  a  Return  showing:— 1.  The  number  of  commissons 
appointed  by  the  Government  since  the  year  1914,  to  date,  and  the  purpose  for  which  each  was  appointed.  2.  Th» 
number  of  members  on  each  of  said  commissions,  and  their  names.    Presented  March  18,  1920.    Mr.  Prevosf 

Not  printed  . 

65c.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  19th  June,  1919,  for  a  Return  showing:— 1 .  How  many  commissions  have  been 
appointed  by  the  Governor  in  Council  and  by  Parliament  since  the  year  1911.  2.  The  names  of  the  various 
commissions  and  the  names  of  the  members  of  the  said  commissions.  3.  The  amount  of  salary  and  travelling 
expenses  paid  to  each  commission  and  the  sum  drawn  by  each  commissioner.  Presented  March  18,  1920.  Mr. 
Michaud Printed  for  distribution  to  Senators  and  Members  only. 

66.  Copy  of  Report  of  the  Royal  Commission  on  Indian  Affairs  for  the  Province  of  British  Columbia.    Presented  by 

Sir  George  Foster,  March  11,  1920 Not  printed. 

67.  Report  of  the  Royal  Commission  appointed  to  inquire  into  and  concerning  the  conditions  pertaining  to  running  race 

meets  and  betting  in  connection  therewith,  in  Canada.  Also  copy  of  the  evidence  taken  before  the  Royal  Com- 
mission appointed  to  inquire  into  and  concerning  the  conditions  pertaining  to  running  race  meets  and  betting  in 
connection  therewith,  in  Canada.    Presented  by  Sir  George  Foster,  March  16,  1920. 

Printed  for  Members  and  Senators  only. 

68.  Return  to  an  Address  to  His  Excellency  the  Governor  General  of  the  19th  March,  1919,  for  a  copy  of  the  Order  in 

Council  appointing  the  Board  of  Grain  Supervisors  for  Canada.    Presented  March  12,  1920.     Mr.  Stevens. 

Not  printed. 

69.  Detailed  Statement  of  Bonds  or  Securities  registered  in  the  Department  of  the  Secretary  of  State  since  February  26, 

1919.     The  Senate Not  printed  . 

70.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  showing: — 1.  How  many  Acting  Ministers  have  been  named  or  appointed  since 

December  17,  1917.    2.  Their  names  and  in  what  Department  they  have  administered  as  Acting  Minister. 

3.  On  what  date  each  Minister  was  so  appointed.    Presented  March  15,  1920.     Mr.  Tobin Not  printed. 

71.  Copy  of  correspondence  relating  to  the  resignation  of  Hon.  A.  K.  Maclean,  and  Hon.  S.  C.  Mewburn,  Minister  of 

Militia  and  Defence,  as  Members  of  the  Government  of  Canada.    Presented  by  Sir  George  Foster,  March  15, 1920. 

Not  printed. 

72.  "The  Forest  Reserves  and  Parks  Act."    Presented  by  Hon.  Mr.  Meighen,  March  16,  1920 Not  printed. 

73.  Return  of  Orders  in  Council  which  have  been  published  in  the  Canada  Gazette  and  in  the  British  Columbia  Gazette, 

between  1st  August,  1919,  and  the  5th  February,  1920,  in  accordance  with  provisions  of  Subjection  (d)  of  Section 
38  of  the  regulations  for  the  survey,  administration,  disposal  and  management  of  Dominion  Lands  within  the 
40-mile  Railway  Belt  in  the  Province  of  British  Columbia.    Presented  by  Hon.  Mr.  Meighen,  March  16,  1920. 

Not  printed. 

74.  Return  of  Orders  in  Council  which  have  been  published  in  the  Canada  Gazette,  between  the  1st  August,  1919,  and  the 

5th  February.  1920,  in  accordance  with  the  provisions  of  Section  5  of  "The  Dominion  Lands  Survey  Act,"  Chapter 
21,7-8  Edward  VII.    Presented  by  Hon.  Mr.  Meighen,  March  16,  1920 Not  printed. 

75.  Return  to  Orders  in  Council  which  have  been  published  in  the  Canada  Gazette,  between  1st  August,  1919,  and  the 

5th  Februarv,  1920,  in  accordance  with  the  provisions  of  Section  77  of  "The  Dominion  Lands  Act,"  Chapter  20, 
7-8  Edward  VII.    Presented  by  Hon.  Mr.  Meighen,  March  16,  1920 Not  printed. 


10-11  George  V  List  of  Sessional  Papers  A.  1920 


CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME  10— Continued. 

76.  Copy  of  Order  in  Council,  P.C.  198,  dated  29th  day  of  January.  1920 — Defining  the  standard  of  Canadian  silver  coin- 

age.   Presented  by  Sir  Henry  Drayton,  March  16,  1920 Not  printed. 

77.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  8th  October,  1919,  for  a  copy  of  the  correspondence  exchanged  between  the 

firm  of  Becker  and  Company,  Ltd.,  London,  England,  and  the  High  Commissioner  of. Canada  in  London,  con- 
cerning a  certain  circular  issued  by  the  Canadian  Mission.    Presented  by  Sir  George  Foster,  March  17,  1920. 

Not  printed. 

78.  Copies  of  Orders  in  Council,  P.C.  1445,  dated  17th  July,  1919;  P.C.  1955,  dated  18th  September,  1919;  and  P.C.  .2562, 

dated  24th  December,  1919,  together  with  copy  of  letter  addressed  to  the  Chairman  of  the  Canadian  Section  of 
the  International  Joint  Commission,  dated  21st  January,  1920,  relating  to  the  development  and  use  of  the  waters 
of  the  St.  Lawrence  river  forming  the  boundaries  between  the  United  States  and  Canada.  Presented  by  Hon. 
Mr.  Rowell,  March  18,  1920 Not  printed. 

79.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  12th  May,  1919,  for  a  copy  of  all  reports,  letters,  memoranda,  telegrams,  plans 

and  estimates  in  connection  with  the  construction  of  a  bridge  over  the  river  Batiscan,  in  the  parish  of  St .  Francois- 
Xavier  de  Batiscan,  Champlain  County.    Presented  March  18,  1920.    Mr.  Deslauriers Not  printed. 

79a.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  12th  April,  1920,  for  a  copy  of  all  reports,  letters,  memos,  correspondence, 
plans  and  specifications  relative  to  the  construction  of  a  bridge  on  the  Batiscan  river,  in  the  parish  of  St.  Francois- 
Xavier  of  Batiscan,  in  the  County  of  Champlain.    Presented  by  Hon.  Mr.  Reid,  April  26,  1920 Not  printed. 

80.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  29th  September,  1919,  for  a  copy  of  all  letters,  plans  and  contracts  between 

the  Government  or  the  Commission  of  the  Transcontinental  and  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  Company,  con- 
cerning (a)  the  construction,  by  this  Company,  of  a  railway  station  at  "The  Palais"  in  the  City  of  Quebec; 
(6)  the  conditions  of  exploitations  of  the  said  station  by  the  Transcontinental  Railway  Company  or  by  the 
National  Railways,  and  also  any  Orders  in  Council  in  this  connection.    Presented  March  18,  1920.     Mr. 

Not  printed. 

81 .  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  29th  September,  1919,  for  a  copy  of  all  correspondence  and  other  papers  and 

documents  in  the  possession  of  the  Government  or  of  the  Civil  Service  Commission  relating  to  the  appointment 
of  a  Harbour  Master  for  the  Port  of  Canso,  N.S.     Presented  March  18,  1920.    Mr.  Sinclair  (Antigonish). 

Not  printed. 

82.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  29th  September,  1919,  for  a  copy  of  all  correspondence  relating  to  the  dismissal 

of  James  Conner  from  the  dual  positions  which  he  held  at  Snowflake,  Manitoba,  under  the  Department  of 
Customs,  and  Immigration  and  Colonization.    Presented  March  18,  1920.    Mr.  Richardson Not  printed. 

83.  Detailed  Statement  of  Remissions  of  Customs  Duties  and  the  Refund  thereof,  under  Section  92,  Consolidated  Revenue 

and  Audit  Act,  through  the  Department  of  Customs,  for  the  fiscal  year  ended  31st  March,  1918.  Presented  by 
Hon.  Mr.  Sifton    March  18,  1920 Not  printed. 

84.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  29th  September,  1919,  for  a  copy  of  all  documents,  letters  and  plans,  exchanged 

between  the  Government  and  any  person,  commission  or  company  concerning  the  construction,  in  the  City  of 
Quebec,  or  in  the  suburbs,  of  a  tunnel  to  facilitate  the  entrance  of  the  Transcontinental  or  of  any  other  company 
in  the  said  city.    Presented  March  18,  1920.     Mr.  Parent Not  printed . 

85.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  22nd  September,  1919,  for  a  Return  showing  the  total  number  of  persons  of 

both  sexes  now  employed  by  the  Federal  Government  of  the  Dominion  of  Canada.  Presented  March  18,  1920. 
Mr.  Tobin Not  printed. 

86.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  10th  Match,  1920,  for  a  copy  of  the  contiact  between  the  Government  of 

Canada  or  the  Canadian  Wheat  Board  and  Greece,  for  12,000,000  bushels  of  wheat.  Presented  March  18,  1920. 
Mr.  Archambault Not  printed. 

87.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  10th  November,  1919,  for  a  copy  of  all  correspondence,  telegrams  and  other 

documents  exchanged  between  the  Federal  Government  and  the  Government  of  New  Brunswick  with  regard 
to  the  transfer  of  wharves  on  the  St.  John  river  and  tributary  waters,  including  a  copy  of  all  correspondence 
regarding  the  liability  of  the  Dominion  Government  in  maintaining  and  repairing  these  wharves.  And  Return 
to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  10th  November,  1919,  for  a  copy  oi  all  reports  and  recommendations  made  by  the 
officers  of  the  Department  of  Public  Works  during  the  years  1918-1919,  on  the  condition  of  the  wharves  in  the  St. 
John  river  and  tributary  waters,  and  the  repairs  required  thereto.  Presented  March  18,  1920.  Mr.  McLean 
(Royal) Not  printed. 

88.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  29th  September,  1919,  for  a  copy  of  all  documants,  letters  and  plan3  passed 

between  the  Government  and  the  City  of  Quebec  or  any  other  corporation  or  construction  and  transport  company 
or  any  other  person,  concerning  the  construction  or  the  non-construction  of  a  dam  on  the  St.  Charles  river,  in  the 
City  of  Quebec.     Presented  March  18,  1920.     Mr.  Parent Not  printed. 

89.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  10th  March,  1920,  for  a  Return  showing  the  total  amount  of  Canadian  securities 

previously  held  in  Great  Britain,  and  sold  to  the  United  States,  with  the  amount  of  interest  now  payable  by  this 
Dominion  to  the  United  States  to  replace  amount  formerly  paid  to  Great  Britain.  Also  a  copy  of  all  corres- 
pondence relating  to  this  matter.    Presented  March  18,  1920.     Mr.  Devlin Not  printed. 

90.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  11th  March,  1920,  for  a  copy  of  all  correspondence,  agreements  and  contracts, 

between  the  Government  and  any  banks  touching  the  payment  of  officers  and  men  in  the  Canadian  Expeditionary 
Forces,  especially  as  regards  the  rates  of  exchange  prevailing  between  Canadian  and  British  currency  and  the 
manner  in  which  the  same  affected  the  pay  of  said  officers  and  men,  together  with  copies  of  all  departmental 
or  other  Government  orders  or  regulations  dealing  with  the  subject  of  soldiers'  pay  and  the  effect  of  fluctuations 
of  exchange  thereon.    Presented  March  22,  1920.    Mr.  McMaster Not  printed. 

91.  Return  to  an  Ouder  of  the  House  of  the  11th  March,  1920,  for  a  Return  showing:— 1.  The  number  of  officers  being 

retained  in  the  service  of  the  Militia  Department  at  Headquarters  at  Ottawa  who  have  not  seen  service  overseas. 
2.  Their  names,  positions,  sala'nies  and  length  of  time  in  the  service,  respectively.  3.  Whether  returned  men 
are  available  for  those  positions.    Presented  March  22,  1920.     Mr.  McKenzie Not  printed. 

10 


10-11   George  V  List  of  Sessional  Papers  A.  1920 


CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME  10— Continued. 

91a.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  29th  March,  1920,  for  a  Return  giving  a  list  of  the  names  of  all  the  officers 
employed  at  the  Headquarters  of  the  Militia  Department,  at  Ottawa,  their  respective  salaries  the  date  of  their 
appointment  and  the  length  of  their  services  in  the  Canadian  Expeditionary  Force.  Presented  June  8  1920 
Mr.  Archambault Not  wintei\ 

92.  Return  showing:— 1.  Names  of  the  tenderers  for  the  works  to  be  done  at  the  following  places  in  the  County  of  Mont- 

morency, Quebec  :  Ste.  Anne  de  Beaupre,  Ste.  Famille-Ile  d'Orleans,  St.  Francois  du  Sudlle  d'Orleans,  St.  Jean- 
Isle  d  Orleans,  lie  de  la  Quarantine,  Pointe  aux  Trembles.  2.  Where  they  reside.  3.  Amount  of  each  tender 
4.  Who  the  successful  tenderers  were.  5.  Whether  the  said  works  have  been  started.  6.  When  thev  will  be 
completed.    Presented  March  22,  1920.    Mr.  Casgrain jVoi  printed. 

93.  Orders  in  Council  relating  to  the  organization  and  work  of  the  Department  of  Health,  as  follows-— 1.  Order  in  Council 

P.C.  1627,  dated  August  2, 1919,  naming  the  President  of  the  Privy  Council  as  the  Minister  of  the  Crown  to  preside 
over  the  Department  of  Health  and  providing  for  the  transfer  to  the  Department  of  Health  from  the  Department 
of  Immigration  and  Colonization  of  the  staff  of  the  Quarantine  and  Medical  Service.  2.  Order  in  Council  P  C 
1765,  dated  August  23,  1919,  transferring  to  the  Department  of  Health  from  the  Department  of  Trade  and'Coml 
merce  the  administration  of  the  Adulteration  Act,  the  Proprietary  or  Patent  Medicine  Act,  the  Commercial 
Feeding  stuffs  Act  and  the  Fertilizers  Act.  3.  Order  in  Council,  P.C.  2204,  dated  October  30,  1919,  transferring 
to  the  Department  of  Health  the  work  of  the  Housing  Committee  of  the  Cabinet.  4.  Order  in  Council  P  C 
2321,  dated  November  21,  1919,  transferring  to  the  Department  of  Health  from  the  Department  of  Marine  and 
.bisnenes,  the  administration  of  Marine  Hospitals.  5.  Order  in  Council,  P.C.  2612,  dated  December  31  1919 
transferring  to  the  Department  of  Health  the  Medical  Branch  of  the  Commission  of  Conservation.  Presented 
by  Hon.  Mr.  Rowell,  March  24, 1920 xot  printei. 

93a.  Order  in  Council,  P.C.  1961,  dated  September  29,  1919,  covering  the  appointment  of  an  Advisorv  Board  as  prescribed 
1?™..™  to  amend  the  Proprietary  or  Patent  Medicine  Act."  Chapter  66,  9-10  George  V.  Order  in  Council, 
i,U'  ,™  '  j  j  Oct°ber  8-  1919-  covering  the  appointment  of  the  Dominion  Council  of  Health.  Order  in  Council 
£.C.  328,  dated  February  11,  1920,  accepting  the  resignation  of  the  Hon.  Walter  R.  Rollo  as  a  Member  of  the 
Dominion  Council  of  Health  and  appointing  Mr.  H.J.  Halford,  of  Hamilton,  Ontario,  Vice-President  of  the  Trades 
and  Labour  Congress  of  Canada,  in  Mr.  Rollo's  place.     Presented  by  Hon.  Mr.  Rowell,  March  25,  1920. 

Not  printed. 

94.  Copies  of  General  Orders  promulgated  to  the  Militia  for  the  period  between  February  1,  1919,  and  February  2   1920 

Also,— Copies  of  all  Routine  Orders  of  the  Canadian  Expeditionary  Fdrce  promulgated  from  Februarv  22'  1919 
to  February  24,  1920.    Presented  by  Hon.  Mr.  Guthrie,  March  24,  1920 Not  printed. 

95.  Appointments,  Promotions  and  Retirements,  Canadian  Militia  and  Canadian  Expeditionary  Force,  from  Februarv 

6,  1919,  to  January  22,  1920.    Presented  by  Hon.  Mr.  Guthrie,  March  24,  1920 ....Not  printed. 

96.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  18th  September,  1919,  for  a  Return  showing:— 1.  The  total  number  of  men 

who  joined  the  Expeditionary  Force  for  service  in  Siberia.  2.  How  many  of  such  number  voluntarily  enlisted 
lor  service  in  Liberia.  3.  W  hether  the  Government  is  aware  as  to  whether  or  not  a  considerable  number  of  mem- 
bers of  such  Expeditionary  Force  were  made  to  embark  at  Victoria,  B.C.,  by  compulsion  and  with  the  point 
of  the  bayonet  directed  at  them.  4.  Whether  the  Government  is  aware  as  to  whether  or  not  certain  members 
of  such  Expeditionary  Force  who  had  not  voluntarily  enlisted  for  service  in  Siberia  were  court-martialed  and 
sentenced  to  hard  labour.  If  so,  who  such  members  are  and  what  the  nature  of  the  sentence  was.  5.  The  cost 
to  the  Covernment  of  the  Expeditionary  Force  for  service  in  Siberia.  Presented  March  25,  1920  Mr  Archam- 
bault Not  printed. 

96a.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  7th  April,  1920,  for  a  copy  of  all  correspondence,  documents,  and  records 
£nVi  Ti  e^TldJe"07nd  Judgments  in  connection  with  the  trials  held  by  Field  General  Court  Martial  of  the 
Tn?n  \°i»  a  Vantdlan  Expeditionary  Force  in  Siberia,  on  the  following  Riflemen,  sentenced  on  the  28th  of  January, 
I?  h  ,1  L"Pjantte-  9-  Borsvert,  Edmond  Leroux,  Joseph  Guenard,  E.  Pauze  and  Arthur  Roy.  Presented 
May  18,  1920.    Mr.  Archaumbault Not  winM 

Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  17th  March,  1920,  for  a  Return  showing:-l.  Whether  any  work  has  been 
done  on  any  of  the  lines  enumerated  in  the  Second  Schedule  of  Chap.  13,  9-10,  George  V,  being  an  Act  to  incor- 
porate the  Canadian  National  Railway  Company  and  respecting  Canadian  National  Railways.  2.  If  so,  on 
what  particular  line  the  work  has  been  done.  3.  What  kind  of  work  has  been  done.  4.  How  much  money  has 
been  expended  for  this  work.  5.  How  much  in  construction.  In  surveys.  In  expropriation,  and  the  purchase 
a  \  \  ay-,  6.  How  many  station  sites  have  been  located  on  said  lines,  what  the  name  is  of  each  station, 
and  on  what  particular  line.  7.  Description  of  the  land  upon  which  it  is  located.  How  much  was  paid  for  said 
station  site,  and  who  was  representing  the  Government  or  the  Canadian  National  Railwavs  in  negotiating  the 
purchase.  8.  If  moneys  weve  paid  for  any  of  such  sites,  to  what  appropriation  thev  were  charged,  and  on  whose 
or.der  they  were  paid.  9  W  hether  any  Order  in  Council  has  been  passed  entrusti ng  said  company  with  the  man- 
agement and  operation  of  the  Grand  Trunk  Pacific  and  the  Intercolonial  Railwavs.  Presented  March  25,  1920 
Mr.Bureau Not  ^in(ed 

98.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  18th  March,  1920,  for  a  copy  of  all  representations,  complaints  and  other  corre- 

spondence filed  with  the  Civil  Service  Commission  regarding  Classification  of  the  Civil  Service  of  Canada.   Pre- 
sented March  26,  1920.     Mr.  Fnpp  Not  printeJ. 

98a.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  12th  April,  1920  for  a  Return  showing:-l .  Number  of  classification  engineers 
employed  in  connection  with  the  Civil  Service.  2.  Total  amount  paid  to  classification  engineers  to  date  in  con- 
v?»Z  Z  t  ¥0^™  c,lass*"ln=  the  Civil  Service.  3.  Further  estimate  required  to  complete  the  work. 
Presented  April  29,  1920.     Mr.  Sinclair  (Antigonish.) ...Not  printed. 

99.  Return ,  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  10th  March,  1920,  for  a  copy  of  all  correspondence  relating  to  the  appointment 

of  the  Postmaster  at  Metabetchouan,  Quebec.    Presented  March  29,  1920.     Mr.  Savard Not  printed. 

100.  Draft  Conventions  and  Recommendations  adopted  by  the  International  Labour  Conference  at  Washington  and  com- 
municated to  the  Government  by  the  Secretary-General  of  the  League  of  Nations  pursuant  to  Article  405,  Treaty 
ol  Versailles:— 1  Draft  Convention  limiting  the  hours  of  work  in  industrial  undertakings  to  eight  in  the  dav  and 
rorty-eight  in  the  week.  2.  Draft  Convention  concerning  unemployment.  3.  Recommendation  concerning 
unemployment.  4.  Recommendation  concerning  reciprocity  of  treatment  of  foreign  workers.  5.  Draft  Con- 
vention concerning  the  employment  of  women  before  and  after  childbirth.  6.  Draft  Convention  concerning  the 
employment  of  women  during  the  night.    7.  Recommendation  concerning  the  prevention  of  anthrax.    8.  Recom- 

11 


97. 


10-11  George  V  List  of  Sessional  Papers  A.  1920 


CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME  10— Continued. 

mendation  concerning  the  protection  of  women  and  children  against  lead  poisoning.  9.  Recommendation  con- 
cerning the  establishment  of  Government  Health  Services.  10.  Draft  Convention  fixing  the  minimum  age- 
for  admission  of  children  to  industrial  employment.  11.  Draft  Convention  concerning  the  night  work  of  young 
persons  employed  in  industry.  12.  Recommendation  concerning  the  application  of  the  Berne  Convention  of 
1906,  on  the  prohibition  of  the  use  of  white  phosphorus  in  the  manufacture  of  matches.  Presented  by  Hon.  Mr. 
Rowell,  March  29,  1920 Not  printed. 

100a.  Return  showing:— 1.  Names  of  the  Canadian  representatives  at  the  International  Labour  Conference  last  fall. 
2.  Amount  expended  in  connection  with  this  delegation.  3.  Names  of  Canadian  representatives  at  the  Labour 
Conference  at  Paris.    4.  Amount  expended  in  relation  thereto.     Presented  March  29,  1920.     Mr.  Archambault 

Not  printed. 

101 .  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  18th  March,  1920,  for  a  Return  showing:— 1.  On  what  date  a  Branch  of  the 

Public  Works  Department  was  first  established  at  Antigonish,  N.S.  2.  What  counties  in  Nova  Scotia  were 
originally  under  the  jurisdiction  of  the  Antigonish  Branch.     3.  When  the  North  Sydney  office  was  established. 

4.  Names  of  the  employees  in  the  Antigonish  Branch  prior  to  the  change  and  the  amount  of  their  yearly  salaries. 

5.  Names  of  the  employees  in  both  offices  on  December  31,  1914,  and  their  yearly  salaries.  6.  Names  of  the 
present  employees  in  both  branches  and  their  respective  yearly  salaries.  7.  How  much  was  expended  in  public 
works  in  the  area  under  the  jurisdiction  of  the  Antigonish  Branch  for  five  years  prior  to  December  31,  1911. 
8.  How  much  was  expended  in  public  works  in  the  area  covered  by  both  the  Antigonish  and  North  Sydney 
Branches  during  the  five  years  subsequent  to  January  1,  1912.  Presented  March  29,  1920.  Mr.  Sinclair  (An- 
tigonish)   Not  printed. 

101a.  Return  showing  the  details  of  the  expenditure  of  $1,372,079  82  made  in  the  area  covered  by  both  the  Antigonish 
and  North  Sydney  Branches  of  the  Department  of  Public  Works  during  the  five  years  subsequent  to  January 
1 ,   1912.     Presente'd  April  7,   1920.     Mr.  Sinclair   (Antigonish.) Not  printed. 

102.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  22nd  of  March,  1920,  for  a  copy  of  all  correspondence  relating  to  the  public 

cross-road  between  Ste. -Catherine  and  Tadoussac.     Presented  March  29,  1920.     Mr.  Savard Not  printed. 

103.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  29th  March,  1920,  for  a  Return  showing:— (a)  the  total  production  of  coal  in 

Canada  during  the  past  ten  years  (6)  how  much  of  said  coal  was  anthracite  (c)  the  total  importation  of  coal 
into  Canada  during  the  same* period  (d)  how  much  of  same  was  anthracite  (e)  the  total  exportation  of  coal  from 
Canada  during  the  past  ten  vears  and  (/)  how  much  of  this  total  was  anthracite.  Presented  March  31,  1920. 
Mr.  Archambault Not  pi  inted. 

104.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  10th  March,  1920,  tor  a  Return  showing:— 1.  What  amount  of  money  has  been 

expended  by  the  Government  during  the  years  1918-19-20  in  providing  seed  grain  for  settlers  in  the  Lethbridge 
and  Calgary  land  districts  respectively.  2.  What  amount  of  money  has  been  expended  by  the  Government 
as  its  share* of  the  freight  charges  in  providing  feed  for  live  stock  in  Southern  Alberta  in  the  years  1918-19-20. 
Presented  April  6,  1920.     Mr.  Buchanan Not  printed. 

105.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  15th  March,  1920,  for  a  Return  showing  for  each  of  the  fiscal  years  1891,  1896, 

1901,  1906,  1911,  1914,  1915,  1916,  1917,  1918,  1919  and  estimated  1920  (a)  Total  revenue  of  the  Dominion  (6)  Expen- 
diture chargeable  to  Consolidated  Fund  'c)  Expenditure  chargeable  to  capital  (d)  Total  expenditure  (e)  Estimated 
population  CO  Total  revenue  per  head  of  population  (a)  Expenditure  per  head  chargeable  to  Consolidated  Fund, 
and  {h)  Total  expenditure  per  head.     Presented  March  6,  1920.    Mr.  Fielding Not  printed. 

106.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  22nd  March,  1920,  for  a  Return  showing:— 1.  The  total  amount  of  the  gross 

consolidated  debt  of  Canada  on  the  28th  of  February,  1920.  2.  Total  amount  of  the  net  consolidated  debt  of 
Canada  on  the  same  date.  3.  Total  amount  of  the  assets  of  the  consolidated  debt  of  Canada  on  the  said  date. 
4.  Total  amount  of  the  yearly  interest  payable  on  the  gross  consolidated  debt  of  Canada  on  the  said  date.  5.  Total 
amount  of  yearly  interest  or  revenue  received  or  collected  by  Canada  in  respect  to  the  property  or  securities 
constituting  the  assets  of  the  public  debt.  6.  Total  amount  of  the  floating  debt  of  Canada  on  the  28th  of  Febru- 
ary, 1920.  7.  Total  amount  of  yearly  interest  pavable  on  the  floating  debt  of  Canada  on  the  said  date.  Presented 
April  6,  1920.    Mr.  Parent Not  printed. 

107.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  24th  March,  1920,  for  a  copy  of  the  correspondence  between  the  Minister  of 

Lands  and  Forests  of  the  Province  of  Quebec  and  the  Soldiers'  Settlement  Board.  Presented  April  6,  1920.  Mr. 
Gauvreau v Not  printed. 

108.  Return  showing:— 1.  What  loans  have  been  negotiated  by  the  Dominion  Government  since  1911.    2.  The  distinctive 

name  of  each  loan  and  its  amount.  3.  Of  the  said  loans,  which  were  (a)  foreign,  (6)  British,  and  (c)  Canadian. 
Presented  April  7,  1920.     Mr.  Casgrain Not  printed. 

109.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  19th  March,  1919,  for  a  return  showing  the  total  cost  and  general  expense  of 

the  1918  Victory  Loan,  including  detailed  statements  of  the  amounts  paid  to  brokers,  banks,  newspapers,  adver- 
tising agencies,  and  all  other  persons,  corporations,  firms  and  agencies  to  whom  payments  were  made,  giving 
the  names  of  such  persons,  banks,  newspapers,  agencies  or  firms  in  each  case.  Presented  April  7,  1920.  Mr. 
Blake Not  printed. 

110.  Report  of  the  Explosives  Division  of  the  Department  of  Mines  for  the  year  1919.     The  Senate Not  printed. 

111 .  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  22nd  March,  1920,  for  a  Return  showing  the  number  of  persons  or  corporations 

paving  and  the  aggregate  amount  paid  bv  each  group  by  way  of  Dominion  Income  Tax  in  the  City  of  Toronto 
during  the  fiscal  years  1917  and  1918  whose  assessed  income  was  over  $1,500,  $6,000,  $10,000,  $20,000,  $30,000, 
$50,000,  $100,000.    Presented  April  12,  1920.     Mr.  Kennedy Not  printed. 

112.  Return  showing:— 1.  Number  of  post  offices  on  the  north  shore  of  the  St.  Lawrence  from  Tadoussac  to  Esquimaux 

Point.  2.  Names,  postal  addresses  and  the  date  of  appointment  of  each  of  these  postmasters.  Presented  April 
12,  1920.     Mr.  Savard Not  printed. 

113.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  25th  March,  1920,  for  a  Return  showing  how  many  houses  have  been  com- 

menced, and  how  many  finished,  under  the  legislation  of  a  year  ago.  Presented  April  13,  1920.  Mr.  Clark  (Red 
Deer) Not  printed. 

114.  Copy  of  Resolutions  of  thanks  passed  by  the  British  House  of  Commons  to  the  Forces  engaged  in  the  late  War,  and 

embodying  thanks  to  the  troops  from  the  Dominions  overseas  for  their  services  during  the  said  war.  Presented 
by  Hon.  Mr.  Rowell,  April  13,  1920 Notpnnted. 

12 


10-11  George  V  List  of  Sessional  Papers  A.  1920 


CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME  10— Continued. 

115.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  31st  March,  1920,  for  a  copy  of  all  correspondence,  Orders  in  Council,  reports 
and  all  other  documents  respecting  the  apportionment  of  expenses  on  the  League  of  Nations  and  the  payment  of 
the  sum  of  S64  043  IS  on  February  13th,  1920,  as  Canada's  share  of  such  expense.  Presented  April  13,  1920. 
Mr.  Fielding Not  printed. 

116.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  15th  March,  1920,  for  a  copy  of  all  papers,  documents,  telegrams,  correspond- 
ence and  reports  made  between  the  Department  of  Naval  Service  and  the  Inspector  of  Fisheries  in  Prince  Edward 
Island  or  any  other  partv  or  parties  regarding  the  sale  of  the  lobster  hatchery  at  Charlottetown,  P.E.I.  Pre- 
sented April  15,  1920.    Mr.  Sinclair  (P.E.I.) Not  printed. 

117.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  19th  March,  1919,  for  a  Return  showing:— 1 .  The  number  of  vessels  belonging 
to  the  Canadian  Government  in  the  Canadian  Naval  Service  during  the  war.  2.  Their  names.  3.  The  number 
of  vessels  employed  in  the  work  of  the  Canadian  Naval  Service  rented  or  chartered  during  the  period  of  the  war. 
4.  Their  names."    Presented  April  15,  1920.     Mr.  Deslauriers Not  printed. 

118.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  24th  March,  1919,  for  a  Return  showing  the  number  of  commutation  of  sentences 
accorded  by  the  Department  of  Justice  to  prisoners  condemned  to  be  hanged,  where  the  crimes  were  committed, 
and  the  sentence  imposed  after  commutation,  within  the  last  four  years.    Presented  April  15,  1920.     Mr;Casgrain. 

A  ot  printed 

119.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  10th  March,  1920,  for  a  Return  showing:— 1 .  Number  of  persons  discharged 
from  the  Government  Printing  Bureau  and  Department  of  Public  Printing  and  Stationery  from  1st  January,  1919, 
to  1st  March,  1920.    2.  Upon  whose  recommendation  and  report  dismissals  were  made.    3.  Whether  the  King's 

Printer  or  Assistant  King's  Printer  recommended  the  persons  to  be  dismissed.  4.  Whether  the  report  of  dismissal 
was  in  writing.  5.  What  qualifications  the  person  or  persons  had  who  investigated  the  respective  cases  for 
dismissal,  what  investigation  was  made  bv  them'  and  whether  their  conclusions  are  reduced  to  writing.  Pre- 
sented April  15,  1920.    Mr.  Fripp Not  printed. 

120.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  24th  March,  1920,  for  a  copy  of  all  letters,  telegrams,  correspondence,  and  other 
papers  in  the  possession  of  the  Government,  in  connection  with  the  transfer  of  mail  ba'gs  from  the  C.P.R.  mad 
car  to  the  mail  car  oi  the  Quebec,  Montreal  and  Southern  Railway  Company,  and  from  the  latter  to  the  former, 
at  Iberville  Junction,  during  the  period  extending  from  the  month  ot  November,  1917,  to  the  month  of  April,  1918. 
Presented  April  16,  1920.     Mr.  Demers Not  printed. 

121 .  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  31st  March,  1920,  for  a  copy  of  all  telegrams,  papers,  letters  and  correspondence 
with  reference  to  the  application  for  naturalization  of  Professor  F.  V.  Ricthdorf,  alias  Frederick  Edwards,  205 
Scott  BIock,  Winnipeg,  also  for  copies  of  all  correspondence  to  date  with  reterence  to  the  resignation  of  the  said 
F.  V.  Ricthdorf,  alias  Frederick  Edwards,  from  the  employ  of  the  Department  of  State  and  in  particular  cor- 
respondence with  the  President  of  the  Priw  Council,  Controller  McLean  and  Mr.  A.  Brophy  of  the  said  Depart- 
ment.   Presented  April  16,  1920.     Mr.  Power Not  printed. 

122.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  22nd  Marcn,  1920,  for  a  Return  showing:— 1.  Number  of  chartered  banks  in 
Canada  in  1880.  2.  Number  of  chartered  banks  in  Canada  at  the  present  time.  3.  What  profits,  as  shown  b> 
their  annual  statements,  were  made  by  each  of  the  chartered  banks  in  the  years  1911,  1912,  1913,  1914,  1915,  1916, 
1917,  1918  and  1919.  4.  What  taxes  each  paid  to  the  Federal  Treasury  in  each  of  the  above  years.  5.  What 
amount,  not  being  interest  on  monev  borrowed,  the  Federal  Government  paid  to  each  chartered  bank  in  each 
of  the  years  1914,  1915,  1916,  1917,  1918  and  1919  for  service  rendered.  6.  The  paid  up  capital  of  each  bank,  and 
its  reserve.     Presented  April  16,  1920.     Mr.  Ross Not  printed. 

123.  Copy  of  all  correspondence,  papers,  documents  and  telegrams,  concerning  the  amelioration  of  conditions  among  the 
Indians  and  Eskimos  inhabiting  the  east  coast  of  James  and  Hudson  Bays,  from  East  Main  River  in  the  south 
to  Hudson  Straits  in  the  north,  showing  what  has  been  and  is  being  done  to  provide  emergency  relief,  medical 
attention,  administration  of  Justice,  industrial  training,  introduction  of  reindeer  treaty  rights,  securing  of 
adequate  prices  for  their  furs,  and  any  other  matter  in  the  interests  of  these  people.    The  Senate Not  printed. 

124.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  15th  April,  1920,  for  a  Return  showing:— 1 .  What  the  value  in  Canadian  currenc} 
oi  the  British  pound  sterling  was  on  the  first  of  the  months  of  November  and  December,  1914,  on  the  first  of  all 
the  months  of  the  vears  1915,  1916,  1917,  1918,  and  on  the  first  of  January  and  February,  1919.  2.  During  the 
years  1914,  1915,  1916,  1917  and  1918,  whether  the  officers  and  men  of  the  Canadian  Expeditionary  Force  were  paid 
in  accordance  with  the  rates  of  exchange  prevailing  at  the  various  times  at  which  payments  were  made  to  them, 
and  if  not,  at  what  rate  or  rates.  3.  What  was  done  in  this  respect  with  payments  made  to  interned  Canadian 
soldiers,  and  at  what  rate  or  rates  their  pav  was  converted  into  the  currencies  of  the  countries  in  which  they  were 
interned.    Presented  April  19,  1920.    Mr.  McMaster Not  printed. 

125.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  12th  April,  1920,  for  a  Return  showing:— 1 .  How  much,  if  any,  of  the  Federal 
Emergency  Fund  for  the  re-establishment  of  the  returned  soldier  was  overpaid  or  inadvertently  paid  to  those 
not  entitled  to  it  under  the  regulations.  2.  How  much  of  this  amount  has  been  recovered.  3.  How  many 
prosecutions  have  been  instituted  for  this  recovery.  *■  What  the  decision  has  been  in  each  case.  5.  Whether 
it  is  the  intention  of  the  Government  to  undertake  anv  further  action  in  cases  of  this  nature.  Presented  April  19, 
1920.     Mr.  Chisholm Not  printed. 

126.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  12th  May,  1919,  for  a  Return  showing:— 1.  Whether  prosecutions  were  auth- 
orized by  the  Government  against  parties  in  the  Province  fo  Nova  Scotia  for  neglecting  to  place  War  Revenue 
Stamps  upon  packages  of  Proprietary  or  Patent  Medicine  before  the  sale  thereof,  as  required  by  the  War  Revenue 
Act,  1915.  2.  Person  or  persons  appointed  to  institute  these  prosecutions.  3.  Number  of  prosecutions,  if  any 
brought.  4.  Names  of  solicitors  designated  by  the  Government  to  conduct  them.  5.  Terms  of  said  solicitors' 
appointment.  6.  Gross  amount  of  fines  imposed.  7.  In  what  counties  in  Nova  Scotia  such  prosecutions  were 
brought.  8.  Who  recommended  the  appointment  of  such  Prosecutors  and  Solicitors.  Presented  April  19,  1920. 
Mr.  Sinclair  (Antigonish) ' Not  printed. 

127.  Copv  of  Order  in  Council  P.C.  395,  dated  18th  Februarv,  1920,  in  respect  to  the  organization  of  an  Air  Force  in  Canada. 
Presented  by  Hon.  Mr.  Sifton,  April  19,  1920 Not  printed. 

128.  Return  showing: — 1.  For  what  purposes  the  special  Trade  Commission  of  the  overseas  branch  of  the  Department 
of  Trade  and  Commerce  has  been  created,  and  how  the  purposes  are  to  be  accomplished.  2.  Who  is  in  charge 
thereof,  and  his  salarv.     3.  If  publicitv  for  Canadian  production  is  sought,  who  has  received  the  appointment 

13 


10-11  George  V  List  of  Sessional  Papers  A.  1920 


CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME  10 —Continued. 

of  publicity  expert,  and  what  the  proposed  remuneration  is  for  such.  4.  What  sums,  annually  or  otherwise,  are 
paid  by  Canada  to  the  British  newspaper  known  as  Canada,  and  what  sums  to  the  Canada  Gazette?  Presented 
April  19,  1920.     Mr.  McMaster Not  printed. 

129.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  7th  April,  1919,  for  a  copy  of  the  correspondence  exchanged  between  F.  X. 

Gagnon,  Port  Daniel  East,  Quebec,  and  the  Department  of  Justice,  regarding  the  Military  Exemption  Tribunal 
which  sat  at  that  place.     Presented  April  20,  f920.    Mr.  Marcil  (Bonaventure) Not  printed. 

130.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  29th  September,  1919,  for  a  copy  of  all  telegrams,  letters,  contracts  and  plans, 

passed  between  the  Commission  of  the  Transcontinental  Railway,  or  the  Government  and  the  City  of  Quebec, 
the  different  transport  companies,  the  Harbour  Commission  of  Quebec  or  any  other  persons,  corporations  or 
companies  from  1910  to  date,  concerning  the  construction  of  a  railway  station  at  the  Champlain  Market  in  the 
city  of  Quebec,  also  the  construction,  in  the  said  city,  of  wharves,  docks,  elevators  to  facilitate  the  transport 
oi  grain  from  the  West  via  the  Port  of  Quebec.     Presented  April  20,  1920.     Mr.  Parent Not  printed. 

130a.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  5th  May,  1920,  for  a  copy  of  all  documents,  contracts  and  correspondence 
relating  to  the  negotiations  between  the  City  of  Quebec  and  the  Transcontinental  Railway  regarding  the  Cham- 
plain  market  site  and  the  proposed  docks  and  grain  elevators  situated  atong  the  front  of  the  St.  Lawrence  river. 
Quebec.     Presented  May  18,  1920.     Mr.  Power ; Not  printed. 

131 .  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  29th  September,  1919,  for  a  copy  of  all  documents,  letters,  and  plans,  submitted 

by  the  Harbour  Commission  of  Quebec  since  1910  to  date,  concerning  the  construction  of  wharves,  docks  elevators, 
cold  storage,  terminal  facilities  in  the  Port  of  Quebec,  for  the  transport  by  land  and  water.  Presented  April  21, 
1920.     Mr.  Parent Not  printed . 

132.  Return  showing: — 1.  Minimum  and  maximum  salary  being  paid  to  postmasters.     2.  By  what  method  the  minimum 

and  maximum  salary  of  postmasters  is  determined.  3.  Whether  postmasters  receive  a  bonus  on  account  of  the 
high  cost  of  living.  4.  It  not,  why.  5.  Minimum  and  maximum  salary  being  paid  to  rural  mail  carriers. 
6.  Whether  the  Government  has  fixed  a  maximum  rate  per  mile  to  apply  to  rural  mail  routes.  7.  How  the  salary 
of  rural  mail  carriers  is  determined.  8.  Whether  rural  mail  carriers  receive  a  bonus  on  account  of  the  high  cost 
of  living.  9.  If  not,  why.  10.  Minimum  and  maximum  salary  being  paid  to  letter  carriers.  11.  Whether  letter 
carriers  receive  a  bonus.     12.  If  so,  how  much.     Presented  April  21,  1920.     Mr.  Kennedy  (Glengarry.) 

Not  printed. 

133.  Return  showing: — 1.  Number  of  persons  employed  in  the  province  of  Quebec  in  connection  with  the  work  of  the 

Soldiers'  Settlement  Board.  2.  Their  names  and  post  office  addresses.  3.  Salary  or  remuneration  each  one  is 
drawing.  4.  Whether  any  of  these  employees  are  allotted  to  certain  constituencies.  5.  If  so,  what  persons  are 
allotted  to  the  various  constituencies,  and  to  what  constituencies.    Presented  April  26,  1920.     Mr.  Tobin. 

Not  printed. 

134.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  31st  March,  1920,  for  a  copy  of  all  letters,  telegrams  and  other  correspondence 

that  has  passed  between  one  George  Carvill.  of  the  City  of  St.  John,  formerly  City  Ticket  Agent  for  the  Canadian 
Government  Railway  (formerly  Intercolonial  Railway)  at  the  said  City  of  St.  John,  and  any  and  all  others  for 
and  on  behalf  of  the  said  George  Carvill  and  the  Minister  of  Railways  and  Canals,  Deputy  Minister  or  any  other 
Ministers  of  the  Government  or  any  general  manager,  assistant  manager,  superintendent  or  other  officials  of  the 
Canadian  Government  Railway  in  reference  to  the  dismissal  of  the  said  George  Carvill  from  said  railway  on  the 
30th  day  of  April,  A.D.  1917,  and  the  request  of  the  said  George  Carvill  for  an  investigation  under  oath  before 
an  independent  tribunal  into  the  causes  for  his  dismissal  and  the  refusal  of  the  management  of  the  said  railway 
to  grant  such  an  investigation.     Presented  April  27,  1920.     Mr.  Copp Not  printed. 

135.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  22nd  March,  1920,  for  a  copy  of  all  documents,  letters,  telegrams  and  other 

correpondence  in  the  hands  of  the  Government  concerning  the  proposed  railway  oetween  St.  Camille,  County  of 
Bellechasse,  and  Cabano,  County  of  Temiscouata.    Presented  April  27,  1920.     Mr.  Fafard  Not  printed. 

136.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  22nd  March,  1920,  for  a  copy  of  the  Report  made  by  the  Board  of  Railway 

Commissioners  for  Canada,  on  the  application  of  the  Canadian  Pacific  and  Grand  Trunk  Railway  Companies, 
on  behalf  of  themselves  and  other  railways  carrying  His  Majesty's  mail  in  Canada,  asking  that  fair  and  reasonable 
rates  be  fixed  by  the  Board  for  the  carriage  of  mails  pursuant  to  the  reference  of  the  matter  to  the  Board  by 
Order  in  Council,  P.C.,  617,  dated  March  7,  1917,  for  the  determination  as  to  the  accuracy  or  inaccuracy  of  the 
claim  made  by  the  railway  companies,  that  these  rates  are  inadequate,  and,  if  it  is  found  that  the  present  rates 
are  inadequate  to  determine  as  the  result  of  evidence  to  be  submitted  by  the  Post  Office  Department  and  the 
railway  companies  interested  what  would  be  a  fair  rate  of  payment  for  the  service.  Also  a  copy  of  all  correspond- 
ence between  members  of  the  Government  or  any  officials  thereof  and  the  Board  of  Railway  Commissioners 
or  any  officials  thereof  in  reference  to  the  report  mentioned  above.    Presented  April  27,  1920.    Mr.  Bureau. 

Not  printed. 

136a.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  Senate  dated  April  28,  1920,  for  a  Return  of  the  evidence  and  other  proceedings  submitted 
before  the  Dominion  Railway  Commission  at  the  sessions  at  Ottawa  on  October  3,  1911,  November  7,  1911,  and 
March  18,  1919,  relating  to  freight  rates  and  all  matters  before  said  Board  on  said  rates.  2.  A  copy  of  the  report 
made  by  said  Board  to  the  Government  as  the  result  of  said  investigations.  3.  A  copy  of  the  postal  rate  agree- 
ment or  agreements  existing  between  the  Government  and  the  railway  companies  for  parcel  post  service,  including 
a  statement  or  copy  of  the  rates  charged  by  the  Government  railways.  4.  A  copy  of  the  report  made  by  the 
Dominion  Railway  Board  to  the  Government  on  the  contracts  between  the  Government  and  the  railway  com- 
panies as  to  the  rates  charged  for  the  postal  services.  5.  Does  the  said  report  show  (or  is  the  Government  aware) 
that  the  rates  fixed  and  paid  are  less  than  it  cost  the  railway  companies  to  perform  the  services.  6.  What  quantity 
of  mail  is  carried  annually  by  parcel  post.  7.  How  much  of  it  is  carried  for  mail  order  houses — distinguishing 
quantities  by  provinces.  8.  What  are  the  postal  rates  charged  for  parcel  post  packages:  (a)  to  the  public  (b)  to 
mail  order  houses.  9.  Do  these  rates  pay  the  full  cost  of  transportation.  If  not,  what  is  the  loss.  10.  If  there 
is  a  loss  how  is  it  provided  for?  11.  Does  the  Government  intend  to  make  a  change  in  the  parcel  post  rates. 
If  so,  what.     The  Senate Not  printed. 

137.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  12th  April,  1920,  for  a  Return  showing  at  the  end  of  the  fiscal  year  1910,  and 

each  subsequent  year,  the  total  assets  of  Canada,  the  amount  received  in  each  year  as  interest  or  other  income 
from  such  assets,  and  the  average  rate  of  interest  or  other  income  so  received  in  each  year.  Presented  April  28, 
1920.    Mr.   Fielding Not   printed. 

14 


10-11   George  V  List  of  Sessional  Papers  A.  1920 


CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME  10— Continued. 

138.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  10th  March,  1920,  for  a  Return  showing: — 1.  The  total  amount  of  commission 

charges  paid  to  brokers  and  agents  in  connection  with  the  last  Victory  Loan.  2.  What  amounts  have  been  paid 
to  each  oi  the  said  brokers  and  agents.  3.  Whether  any  of  the  said  commission  charges  have  not  yet  been  paid. 
4.  If  so,  whose  accounts  they  are,  and  for  what  reason  they  have  not  been  paid.  Presented  April  28,  1920.  Mr. 
Archambault Not  printed. 

139.  Return  showing: — 1.  Names  of  the  so-called  experts  employed  by  the  Arthur  Young  Company  to  classify  the 

employees  of  the  various  departments,  and  which  department  or  departments  did  each  such  expert  classify. 

2.  The  ages,  nationality  educational,  and  practical  qualification,  including  positions  previously  held,  with  special 
reference  to  classification  work,  ot  each  such  expert.  3.  (a)  Cost  to  the  Government  for  the  services  of  each  such 
expert;  (6)  what  is  the  cost  to  the  Arthur  Young  Company  of  the  services  oi  each  expert.  Have  they  been  paid 
in  Canadian  or  American  money.  4.  How  many  Deputy  Ministers  have  approved  the  classification  of  hheir 
departments.  5.  Whether  the  Arthur  Young  Company  pay  an  income  or  business  tax  in  Canada.  6.  In  case 
of  difference  of  opinion  respecting  classification  between  the  so-called  experts  and  the  Civil  Service  Commission 
whose  opinion  prevails.    Presented  April  28,  1920.    M.  Gauvreau Not  printed. 

140.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  14th  April,  1920,  for  a  copy  of  all  reports,  letters,  petitions  or  documents 

referring  to  claims  for  damages  on  behalf  of  innocent  victims  who,  during  the  so-called  Quebec  riots  of  1918,  have 
either  been  killed  or  wounded  by  the  soldiers  of  His  Majesty.    Presented  April  29,  1920.    Mr.  Parent. 

Not  printed. 

141.  Return  to  an  OruvJof  the  Senate  dated  April  18,  1918,  for  a  Return  showing: — The  amount  paid  in  each  year  since 

1900  inclusive,  for  (a)  reporting,  (6)  translating,  (r)  typewriting,  and  (d)  printing  proceedings  before  Commission 
of  Inquiry  and  all  other  investigations  for  or  on  behalf  of  the  Government  or  any  Department  thereof,  in  English 
and  in  French  respectively,  the  names  of  the  persons  under  (a),  (b)  and  (c)  to  whom  such  payments  were  made, 
the  amount  paid  to  each  as  salary  or  other  compensation,  and  the  amount  paid  on  account  of  each  such  person  for 
travelling  and  living  expenses.    The  Senate Not  printed. 

142.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  Senate,  dated  April  16,  1918,  for  a  Return  referring  to  Return  of  the  Senate  (No.  7, 

August  23,  1917,  re  officers  78th  Regiment,  Highlanders  of  Pictou  County,  Nova  Scotia): — 1.  (a)  Giving  the 
names  of  the  officers  mentioned  in  the  said  Return  who  served  with  the  overseas  forces  at  the  fighting  front  since 
said  Return  was  compiled.  (6)  The  unit  and  date  each  one  so  served,  (c)  The  number  who  became  casualties, 
and  when.  2.  The  location,  connection  and  rank  of  each  of  the  officers  mentioned  in  said  Return  in  the  overseas 
forces  at  the  present  time.    The  Senate Not  printed. 

142a.  Supplementary  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  Senate  dated  April  16,  1918,  for  a  Return  referring  to  Return  of  the  Senate 
(No.  7,  August  23,  1917,  re  officers  78th  Regiment,  Highlanders  of  Pictou  County,  Nova  Scotia>— 1.  (a)  Giving 
the  names  of  the  officers  mentioned  in  the  said  Return  who  served  with  the  overseas  forces  at  the  fighting  front 
since  said  Return  was  compiled.  (6)  The  unit  and  date  each  one  so  served,  (c)  The  number  who'became 
casualties,  and  when.  2.  The  location,  connection  and  rank  of  each  of  the  officers  mentioned  in  said  Return  in 
the  overseas  forces  at  the  present  time.    The  Senate Not  printed. 

143.  Copy  Declaration  by  the  Supreme  Council  of  the  Peace  Conference  on  the  Economic  Conditions  of  the  World.    The 

Senate Not  printed. 

144.  Return  showing:— 1.  Whether  the  Government  pays  the  expenses  of  an  office  in  Toronto  for  A.  V.  White,  consulting 

engineer  of  the  Conservation  Commission.  2.  If  so,  what  expenses  for  said  office  it  paid  in  the  fiscal  year 
1919-20,  including  rent,  salaries  of  assistants,  travelling  expenses,  etc.  3.  What  relation,  if  any,  the  said  A.  V 
White  is  to  James  White,  Deputy  Head  of  the  Conservation  Commission.  4.  If  any  other  relatives  of  its  Deputy 
Head  were  employed  by  the  Conservation  Commission  in  the  past  fiscal  year,  their  names,  what  positions  they 
fill  and  what  salaries  were  paid  them.  5  Whether  it  is  the  practice  of  the  Government  to  maintain  offices  for 
all  its  consulting  engineers.  6.  Whether  it  is  the  intention  of  the  Government  to  continue  to  defray  the  expenses 
of  the  Toronto  office  of  the  said  A.  V.  White.  7.  If  the  said  A.  V.  White  was  employed  by  the  Department  of 
Public  Works,  what  was  the  last  year  he  was  so  employed  and  what  remuneration  he  was  paid.  S.  At  what 
annual  salary  rate  he  is  being  paid  by  the  Conservation  Commission  for  1920-21.  9.  What  reports,  if  any,  by 
A.  V.  White,  other  than  reports  on  water-powers  and  hydro-electric  conditions,  the  Conservation  Commission 
has  published.  10.  Whether  A.  V.  White  holds  the  degree  ot  Electrical  Engineer  from  a  recognized  university. 
11.  Name  of  the  Hydro-Electric  Engineer  of  the  Conservation  Commission.  12.  What  degrees  he  holds  and  what 
practical  experience  he  has  had.    13.  What  annual  salary  he  is  paid.    Presented  May  3,  1920.     Mr.  Casgrain. 

Not  printed. 

145.  Return  showing: — 1.  How  many  farms  in  each  constituency  in  the  province  of  Quebec  were  purchased  by  returned 

soldiers  under  the  provisions  of  the  Soldiers'  Settlement  Act.  2.  The  names  of  the  buyers  and  sellers  of  each 
of  the  said  farms.  3.  The  price  paid  for  each  of  these  farms.  4.  Who  visited  each  of  the  said  farms  on  behalf 
of  the  Government.  5.  What  assistance  was  given  by  the  Government  in  connection  with  each  purchase.  Pre- 
sented May  3,  1920.    Mr.  Tobin Not  printed. 

146.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  19th  April,  1920,  for  a  Return  showing:— 1.  Whether  there  was  any  printing 

done  for  the  Government  outside  of  the  Printing  Bureau  during  the  years  1918/1919.    2.   If  so,  by  whom. 

3.  Addresses  of  persons  or  firms  to  whom  such  printing  was  given.  4.  Amount  paid  for  this  outside  printing, 
in  each  case,  in  1918-19.     Presented  May  4,  1920.     Mr.  Dechesne Not  printed. 

147.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  19th  April,  1920,  for  a  Return  showing:— 1.  Amounts  loaned  or  credits  given 

by  the  Government  of  Canada:  (o)  to  Greece;  (6)  to  Rumania.  2.  The  dates  these  loans  were  granted  or  credits 
given:  (a)  to  Greece;  (bVto  Rumania.  3.  The  nature  of  merchandises  purchased  by  the  Government  of  Canada 
and  charged  in  each  case:  (a)  to  Greece"  (6)  to  Rumania.  4.  The  names  of  commercial  firms  or  persons  from 
whom  said  goods  were  so  purchased,  specifying:  (a)  the  nature  of  goods  in  each  case  (6)  the  amounts  paid  by  the 
Government  to  these  firms  or  persons  in  each  case  and  also  the  date  of  these  payments.  Presented  May  5,  1920. 
Mr.  Archambault Not  printed. 

148.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  ot  the  10th  March,  1920,  for  a  copy  of  all  telegrams,  petitions,  letters  and  documents 

ot  all  kinds  sent  to  the  Post  Office  Department  referring  in  any  way  to  the  mail  route  and  mail  service  between 
Mabou,  N.S.,  and  Whycocomagh,  N.S.    Presented  May  5.  1920.    Mr.  Chisholm Not  printed. 

15 


10-11  George  Y  List  of  Sessional  Papers  A.  1920 


CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME  10— Continued. 

149.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  31st  March,  1020,  for  a  copy  of  all  correspondence,  reports  and  other  documents 

in  any  way  referring  to  a  proposed  change  in  the  site  o(  Beatonville  Post  Office,  Inverness  County,  X.S.  Presented 
May  5.  1920.     Mr.  Chisholm Not  printed. 

150.  Return  showing: — 1.  How  many  persons  are  employed  on  the  staff  of  the  Civil  Service  Commission.    2.  Their  names. 

3.  The  respective  salaries  of  said  persons.     Presented  May  0,  1920.     Mr.  Hocken Not  printed. 

151 .  Return  to  an  Order  ol  the  House  of  the  26th  April,  1920,  for  a  return  showing  the  total  quantify  in  gallons,  of  spirituous 

liquors  imported  into  Canada  during  the  years  1913,  1914,  1915, 1916,  1917, 1918  and  1919;  and  also  showing  the  value 
in  money  of  the  said  imports  during  the  same  years.    Presented  May  10,  1920.     Mr.  Archambault. . . .  Arot  printed. 

152.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  3rd  May,  1920,  for  a  copy  of  all  correspondence  and  reports  concerning  the 

dismissal  of  Mr.  Elisee  Parent,  inspector  of  Inland  Revenue,  the  6th  of  September,  1916  (file  No.  111085).  Pre- 
sented March  10,  1920.     Mr.  Rinfret Not  printed. 

152^.  Supplementary  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  3rd  May,  1920,  for  a  copy  o|all  correspondence  and  reports 
concerning  the  dismissal  of  Mr.  Elis}e  Parent,  inspector  of  Inland  Revenue,  the  6th  of  September,  1916  (file  No. 
111085).    Presented  May  17,  1920.    Mr.  Rinfret Not  printed. 

153.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  10th  March,  1920,  for  a  copy  of  all  correspondence  between  the  Dominion 

Government  or  any  member  thereof  and  the  Dominion  Manufacturers'  Association  or  any  manufacturer,  relating 
to  appeals  from  the  Supreme  or  other  courts  in  regard  to  validity  of  certain  Dominion  or  Provincial  Acts  and 
Provincial  Licenses  whereby  the  Dominion  Government  undertook  to  give  financial  aid  to  said  manutacturers 
for  said  appeals,  as  shown  in  the  Financial  Times,  Montreal,  oi  the  21st  February-,  1920.  Presented  May  10,  1920. 
Mr.    Devlin Not  printed . 

154.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  19th  April,  1920,  for  a  Return  showing: — 1.  Number  ot  translators  employed 

by  the  Senate,  House  of  Commons  and  the  different  departments  of  the  Government,  and  number  employed  by 
each  department.  2.  Number  employed  permanently.  3.  Number  engaged  for  the  session  only.  4.  Total 
annual  cost  of  the  translation  service.  5.  Whether  any  translation  was  done  outside  of  Ottawa  during  the  fiscal 
year  ending  31st  March,  1919.  6.  If  so,  in  how  many  instances,  ana  whr.t  rate  was  paid  per  page  of  printed  matter. 
Presented  May  10,  1920.     Mr.  Hocken Not  printed. 

155.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  5th  May,  1920,  for  a  copy  of  a  letter  from  the  Board  of  Trade  ot  the  City  of 

Quebec  to  the  Minister  of  Trade  and  Commerce,  dated  October  24,  1919,  concerning  the  new  policy  adopted 
by  the  Ocean  Mail  Steamers  ol  not  stopping  at  Quebec  in  their  outward  voyage,  and  a  copy  of  the  answer  to  said 
letter.    Presented  May  10,  1920.     Mr.  Lapointe Not  printed. 

156.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  oj  the  29th  April,  1920,  for  a  Return  showing: — 1.  Name  of  each  official  and  clerk 

in  the  Fisheries  Branch  at  Ottawa  who  will  be  in  receipt  of  a  salary  of  SI, 800  or  over  during  the  fiscal  year  1920-21 

2.  Salary'  of  each  such  official  and  clerk  during  the  fiscal  years  1916-17,  1917-18,  1918-19  and  1919-20.  3.  Minimum 
and  maximum  salary  of  eacu  such  official  and  clerk  as  at  present  fixed  by  the  classifying  experts  of  the  Civil  Service 
Commission.  4.  What  the  salary-  of  each  such  official  and  clerk  will  be  during  the  fiscal  year  1920-21.  5.  What 
practical  experience  or  direct  connection,  if  any,  each  such  official  and  clerk  has  had  in  or  with  the  fishing 
industry;  the  nature  of  such  experience  or  connection  and  the  number  of  years  it  covers.  6.  What  position  each 
such  official  and  clerk,  who  has  had  no  practical  experience  in  or  direct  connection  with  the  fishing  industry, 
filled  or  what  duties  he  performed  on  first  becoming  attached  to  the  Fisheries  Branch.  7.  Present  duties  and 
responsibilities  of  each  such  official  or  clerk.     Presented  May  10,  1920.     Mr.  Duff Not  printed. 

157.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  3rd  May,  1920,  for  a  copy-  of  all  correspondence,  telegrams,  and  other  documents 

exchanged  between  Dr.  L.  W.  McXutt,  Vancouver,  B.C.,  and  the  Department  of  Soldiers'  Civil  Re-establishment, 
Sir  Robert  Borden  and  the  Director  of  Medical  Services  of  the  Soldiers'  Civil  Re-establishment,  with  reference 
to  claim  for  $2,590.72  by  the  said  Dr.  McXutt  against  the  above  mentioned  department,  and  also  with  reference 
to  the  resignation  or  dismissal  of  the  said  Dr.  McXutt  from  the  department  in  question.  Presented  May  11, 
1920.     Mr.  Power Not  printed. 

158.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  17th  March,  1920,  for  a  Return  showing: — 1.  Xumber  of  employees  in  the 

inside  service  of  the  Labour  Department.  2.  How  many  are  males.  3.  How  many  are  females.  4.  How  many 
males  are  French.  5.  How  many  females  are  French.  6.  How  males  are  Protestants.  7.  How  many  females 
are  Protestants.     Presented  May  11,  1920.    Mr.  Hocken Not  printed. 

158i.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  17th  March,  1920,  for  a  Return  snowing: — 1.  Number  of  employees  in  the 
inside  service  of  the  Post  Office  Department.  2.  How  many  are  males.  3.  How  many  are  females.  4.  How 
many-  males  are  French.  5.  How  many  females  are  French.  6.  How  many  males  are  Protestants.  7.  How 
many  females  are  Protestants.     Presented  May  11,  1920.     Mr.  Hocken Not  printed. 

158''.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  17th  March,  1920,  for  a  Return  showing: — 1.  Xumber  of  employees  in  the 
inside  service  of  the  Secretary  of  State  Department,  including  the  Printing  Bureau.    2.  How  many  are  males. 

3.  How  many  are  females.  4.  How  many  males  are  Freneii.  5.  How  many  females  are  French.  6.  How  many 
males  are  Protestants.     7.  How  many  females  are  Protestants.    Presented  May  11,  1920.     Mr.  Hocken. 

Not  printed. 

158c.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  12th  April,  1920,  for  a  Return  showing:— 1 .  Xumber  of  persons  employed  by 
the  Civil  Service  Commission.  2.  How  many  are  males.  3.  How  many  are  females.  4.  How  many  males  are 
French.  5.  How  many  females  are  French.  6.  How  many  males  are  Protestants.  7.  How  many  females 
are  Protestants.     Presented  May  11,  1920.     Mr.  Hocken Not  printed. 

158/.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  17th  March,  1920,  for  a  Return  showing: — 1.  Number  of  employees  in  the 
inside  service  of  the  Department  of  Interior.  2.  How  many  are  males.  3.  How  many  are  females.  4.  How 
many  males  are  French.  5.  How  many  females  are  French,  fi.  How  many  males  are  Protestants.  7.  How 
many  females  are  Protestants.     Presented  May  11,  1920.     Mr.  Hocken Not  printed. 

158c  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  17th  March,  1920,  for  a  Return  showing:— 1.  Xumber  of  employees  in  the 
inside  service  of  the  Marine  and  Fisheries  Department        2.  How  many  are  males.    3.  How  many  are  females. 

4.  How  many  males  are  French.  5.  How  many  females  are  French.  6.  How  many  males  are  Protestants. 
7    How  manv  females  are  Protestants.     Presented  Mav  11,  1920.     Mr.  Hocken Not  printed. 

16 


10-11  George  V  List  of  Sessional  Papers  A.  1920 


CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME  10— Continued. 

158  f.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  22nd  March,  1920,  for  a  Return  showing:— 1.  Number  of  employees  in  the 
inside  service  of  the  Finance  Department  including  the  Insurance  Branch.  2.  How  many  are  males.  3.  How 
many  are  females.  4.  How  many  males  are  French.  5.  How  many  females  are  French.  6.  How  many  males 
are  Protestants.    7.  How  many  females  are  Protestants.    Presented  May  11,  1920.     Mr.  Tobin Not  printed. 

158;.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  17th  March,  1920,  for  a  Return  showing:—! .  Number  of  employees  in  the 
inside  service  of  the  Department  of  Trade  and  Commerce.  2.  How  many  are  males.  3.  How  many  are  females. 
4.  How  many  males  are  French.  5.  How  many  females  are  French.  6.  How  many  males  are  Protestants. 
7.  How  many  females  are  Protestants.    Presented  May  11,  1920.    Mr.  Hocken Not  printed. 

1 58ft .  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  1 7th  March,  1920 ,  for  a  Return  showing:— 1 .  Number  of  employees  in  the  inside 
service  of  the  Militia  Department.  2.  How  many  are  males.  3.  How  many  are  females.  4.  How  many  males 
are  French.  5.  How  many  females  are  French.  6.  How  many  males  are  Protestants.  7.  How  many  females 
are  Protestants.    Presented  May  17,  1920.    Mr.  Hocken Not  printed. 

159.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  26th  April,  1920,  for  a  Return  showing:— 1.  What  institutions  are  at  present 

under  the  jurisdiction  and  management  of  the  Department  of  Soldiers'  Civil  Re-establishment.  2.  Number 
of  patients  in  each  institution.  3.  Number  of  employees  in  each  institution.  4.  Cost  per  year  of  each  institution. 
Presented  May  12,  1920.    Mr.  Pardee Not  printed. 

160.  Fifth  Annual  Report  of  the  Board  of  Directors  of  the  Canadian  Northern  Railway  System,  for  the  year  ended 

December  31,  1919.    Presented  by  Hon.  Mr.  Reid,  May  12, 1920 Printed/or  sessional  papers  only. 

161.  First  Annual  Report  of  the  Board  of  Directors  of  Canadian  Government  Merchant  Marine,  Limited.    Presented 

by  Hon.  Mr.  Reid,  May  12,  1920 Printed  for  sessional  papers  only. 

162 .  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  12th  Mav,  1920,  for  a  Return  showing:— 1 .  Sales  of  military  and  other  supplies 

made  by  the  War  Purchasing  Commission  in  each  of  the  years  1917, 1918  and  1919,  and  amount  of  money  obtained 
for  these  supplies  in  each  of  the  above  years.  2.  Whether  these  supplies  were  sold  by  tender,  by  advertisement, 
or  at  public  auction.  3.  How  military  supplies,  including  rugs,  furniture,  etc.,  at  Camp  Borden  were  sold,  who 
the  purchasers  were  and  what  prices  were  received  for  the  various  articles.    Presented  May  14, 1920.    Mr.  Ross 

Not  printed. 

163.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  19th  April,  1920,  for  a  copy  of  all  papers,  letters,  correspondence  between  the 

Department  of  Justice  or  any  of  its  officers  and  the  Civil  Service  Commission  or  any  of  its  members  with  refer- 
ence to  the  promotion  of  the  Secretary  to  the  Deputy  Minister  of  Justice  in  1919  and  1920.  Presented  May  14, 
1920.    Mr.  Cahill Not  printed. 

164 .  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  24th  March,  1920,  for  a  copy  of  all  correspondence  and  telegrams  between  the 

Dominion  Government  and  the  Alberta  Government  relating  to  irrigation  development  in  Alberta,  and  more 
particularly  to  Lethbridge  Northern  Irrigation  District.    Presented  May  17, 1920.    Mr.  Buchanan. .  .Not  printed. 

165.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  5th  May,  1920,  for  a  Return  showing  the  names  of  all  persons  who  have  passed 

the  Civil  Service  examinations  from  the  province  of  Prince  Edward  Island  in  1917,  1918  and  1919,  showing: 
(n)  the  grade  for  which  they  passed;  (bltbe  number  of  marks  made  by  each;  (c)  those  who  are  returned  soldiers; 
(d)  those  who  have  received  an  appointment,  with  the  name  of  their  position.  Presented  May  17,  1920.  Mr. 
Sinclair  vP.E.I.) Not  printed. 

166.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  12th  April,  1920,  for  a  Return  showing:— 1.  Number  of  Civil  Service  Investi- 

gating Commissions  appointed  since  the  lstof  January,  A. D.  1895.  2.  On  what  respective  dates  said  Commissions 
were  appointed,  what  number  of  Commissioners  comprised  each  Board,  their  names  and  their  home  addresses. 
3.  How  long  each  Board  was  engaged  on  such  inquiry  and  how  much  was  paid  to  each.  4.  Whether  there  is  any 
Board  or  any  Member  of  a  past  or  present  Board  now  engaged  in  connection  with  the  Civil  Service  inquiry  or 
classification  of  the  Civil  Service,  other  than  the  regular  Civil  Service  Commission  of  which  Honourable  Doctor 
Roche  is  the  Chairman.  5.  What  amount  or  amounts  were  paid  by  the  Government  to  the  Civil  Service 
Classification  Commissioners  during  the  time  from  1st  January,  1916,  to  and  including  the  15th  of  March,  A.D. 
1920,  what  amounts  were  paid  to  each  of  the  said  Classification  Commissioners  and  on  what  dates.  Presented 
May  17,  1920.    Mr.  McKenzie Not  printed. 

167.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  17th  May,  1920,  for  a  Return  showing:— 1.  Number  of  married  women  whose 

husbands  did  not  serve  in  the  Canadian  Expeditionary  Force  who  are  in  the  pay  of  various  Government  depart- 
ments at  Ottawa.  2.  Whether  it  is  a  fact  that  the  Department  of  Immigration  has  in  its  employ  a  lady  at  a 
salary  of  $300  per  month.  3.  Whether  this  lady  is  the  wife  or  mother  of  a  returned  soldier,  and  whether  any 
effort  was  made  at  the  time  of  her  employment  to  secure  the  services  of  a  war  widow  or  dependent.  4.  Whether 
this  lady's  husband  is  in  the  employ  of  the  Government  or  of  one  of  the  provincial  governments.  5.  Whether 
it  is  a  fact  that  the  daughters  of  several  departmental  heads  are  employed  by  their  fathers  in  Government  service 
and  that  in  such  cases  these  young  ladies  hold  positions  which  could  be  well  filled  with  men  who  have  been 
trained  by  the  Department  of  Soldiers'  Civil  Re-establishment  for  the  Civil  Service  but  are  unable  to  secure 
appointments.    Presented  May  19,  1920.    Mr.  Andrews Not  printed. 

168.  Copy  of  Order  in  Council,  P.C.  1595,  dated  31st  July,  1919:  Appointment  of  Victory  Loan  Special  Committee  in 

connection  with  the  stabilizing  of  the  Victory  Loan  of  1917.    Presented  by  Sir  George  Foster,  May  20,  1920. 

Not  printed. 

169.  Reports  submitted  by  the  Officer  in  charge  of  the  Canadian  War  Records  Office,  London,  England,  to  the  Right 

Honourable  Sir  Robert  L.  Borden,  G.C.M.G.,  M.P.,  Prime  Minister  of  Canada;  and  to  the  Honourable  bir 
Edward  Kemp,  K.C.M.G.,  M.P.,  Minister,  Overseas  Military  Forces  of  Canada,  1916-1919,  with  which  is 
included  a  Report  of  the  Executive  Committee  of  the  Canadian  War  Memorials  Fund.  Presented  by  Sir  Robert 
Borden,  May  20, 1920 -No'  printed. 

170.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  19th  May,  1920,  for  a  Return  showing:— 1.  Number  of  persons  employed  in 

the  Department  of  Indian  Affairs  in  Ottawa.  2.  Their  names  and  salaries.  Presented  May  21,  1920.  Mr. 
Hocken Not  printed. 

170a.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  19th  May,  1920,  for  a  Return  showing:— 1.  Number  of  persons  employed  in 
the  Department  of  Labour  in  Ottawa.    2.  Their  names  and  salaries.    Presented  May  2i,  1920.    Mr.  Hocken. 

Not  printed. 

17 

5951— j 


10-11    George  V  List  of  Sessional  Papers  A.  1920 


CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME  10— Continued. 

170h.  Return  to  an  <  Irder  of  the  House  of  the  19th  May,  1920,  for  a  Return  showing: — 1.  Number  of  persons  employed  in 
the  Department  of  Marine  in  Ottawa.    2.  Their  names  and  salaries.    Presented  May  21,  1920.     Mr.  Hoeken. 

Not  printed. 

170'  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  19th  May,  1920,  for  a  Return  showing: — 1.  Number  of  persons  employed  in 
the  Department  of  Public  Archives  in  Ottawa.  2.  Their  names  and  salaries.  Presented  May  26,  1920.  Mr. 
Hoeken ~ Nat  printed. 

\70d.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  19th  May.  1920,  for  a  Return  showing: — 1.  Number  of  persons  employed  in 
the  Department  of  Trade  and  Commerce  in  Ottawa.  2.  Their  names  and  salaries.  Presented  May  26,  1920. 
Mr.  Hoeken Not  printed. 

170< .  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  19th  May,  1920,  for  a  Return  showing: — 1.  Number  of  persons  employed  in  the 
Department  of  the  Secretary  of  State  in  Ottawa.  2.  Their  names  and  salaries.  Presented  May  31 ,  1920.  Mr. 
Hoeken Not  printed. 

\70i.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  19th  May,  1920,  for  a  Return  showing:— 1.  Number  of  persons  employed  in  the 
Department  of  Mines  in  Ottawa.     2.  Their  names  and  salaries.    Presented  May  31,  1920.     Mr.  Hoeken. 

Not  printed. 

170.7.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  19th  May,  1920,  for  a  Return  showing: — 1.  Number  of  persons  employed  in 
the  Department  of  Naval  Service  in  Ottawa.  2.  Their  names  and  salaries.  Presented  May  31,  1920.  Mr. 
Hoeken '. Not  printed. 

170h.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  19th  May,  1920,  for  a  Return  showing: — 1.  Number  of  employees  in  the 
Department  of  Justice  in  Ottawa.    2.  Their  names  and  salaries.    Presented  May  31,  1920.     Mr.  Hoeken. 

Not  printed. 

170i.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  19th  May,  1920,  for  a  Return  showing:— 1.  Number  of  persons  employed  in- 
the  Department  of  the  Interior  in  Ottawa.     2.  Their  names  and  salaries.    Presented  June  2,  1920.    Mr.  Hoeken. 

Not  printed . 

170, .  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  19th  May,  1920,  for  a  Return  showing:— 1.  Number  of  persons  employed  in 
the  Department  of  Railways  and  Canals  in  Ottawa.  2.  Their  names  and  salaries.  Presented  June  8,  1920. 
Mr.  Hoeken Not  printed. 

170/;.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  19th  May,  1920,  for  a  Return  showing:— 1.  Number  of  persons  employed  in 
the  Department  of  Public  Works  in  Ottawa.  2.  Their  names  and  salaries.  Presented  June  10,  1920.  Mr. 
Hoeken Not  printed. 

170  /  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  19th  May,  1920,  for  a  Return  showing: — 1.  Number  of  persons  employed  in 
the  Department  of  Soldiers'  Civil  Re-establishment  in  Ottawa.  2.  Their  names  and  salaries.  Presented  June 
14,  1920.    Mr.  Hoeken Not  printed. 

170 m.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  19th  May,  1920,  for  a  Return  showing: — 1.  Number  of  persons  employed  in  the 
Department  of  Public  Printing.    2.  Their  names  and  salaries.    Presented  June  17, 1920.   Mr.  Hoeken.  .Not  printed. 

170".  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  19th  May,  1920,  for  a  Return  showing: — 1.  Number  of  persons  employed  in  the 
Department  of  Public  Health.    2.  Their  names  and  salaries.    Presented  June  17, 1920.    Mr.  Hoeken..  Not  printed. 

170o.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  19th  May,  1920,  for  a  Return  showing:—] .  Number  of  employees  in  the  Post 
Office  Department  in  Ottawa.    2.  Their  names  and  salaries.    Presented  June  18, 1920.    Mr.  Hoeken.  .Not  printed. 

171.  Also, — Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  5th  May,  1920,  for  a  copy  of  a  letter  signed  by  twenty-two  Senators 

and  Members  of  the  House  of  Commons  representing  the  Provinces  of  Alberta,  Saskatchewan  and  Manitoba, 
addressed  to  Sir  Robert  L.  Borden,  Prime  Minister  of  Canada,  dated  September,  1919,  recommending  the 
shipment  of  grain  by  rail  via  Quebec;  also  a  copy  of  the  answer  to  such  letter  as  well  as  the  letters  sent  by  J.  T. 
Ross,  Esq.,  President  of  the  Quebec  Board  of  Trade,  to  the  Minister  of  Railways  and  Canals  during  the  months 
of  January  and  February,  1920,  concerning  export  of  wheat  via  Quebec,  and  of  the  letters  of  the  Minister  of  Rail- 
ways and  Canals  in  answer  thereto.    Presented  May  21,  1920.    Mr.  Lapointe Not  printed. 

172.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  19th  May,  1920,  for  a  Return  showing: — 1.  Who  the  publishers  are  of   the 

Montreal  Gazette.  2.  Amounts  paid  to  the  Montreal  Gazette  Publishing  Company  for  each  of  the  last  fiscal  years 
by  the  Dominion  Government  for  (a)  advertising,  and  (6)  job  printing.    Presented  May  21,  1920.     Mr.  Edwards. 

Not  printed. 

173.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  7th  April,  1920,  for  a  copy  of  all  correspondence,  letters  and  petitions  received 

from  the  citizens  of  the  Saguenay  district  and  all  others  in  connection  with  a  subsidy  from  the  Department  of 
Trade  and  Commerce  in  order  to  obtain  the  services  of  a  steamboat  ferry  between  Ste. Catherine  and  Tadoussac. 
Presented  May  21 ,  192i>.     Mr.  Savard Not  printed. 

174.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  19th  March,  1919,  for  a  return  showing  the  names  and  post  office  addresses 

of  all  postmasters  appointed  in  the  Province  of  Nova  Scotia  since  June  1,  1917,  along  with  a  copy  of  all  corre- 
spondence with  the  Post  Office  Department  or  withthe  Civil  Service  Commission  relating  to  such  appointments. 
Presented  May  26,  1920.     Mr.  Sinclair  (Antigonish) Not  printed. 

175.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  3rd  May,  1920,  for  a  copy  of  the  mortgage  deeds  for  the  twenty-five  and  the 

thirty-five  million  dollars  granted  bv  the  Government  of  Canada  to  the  Canadian  Northern  Railway  Company 
in  1918  and  1919.    Presented  May  26,  1920.     Mr.  Papineau  Not  printed. 

176.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  Senate  dated  the  4th  instant,  for  a  Return  showing  all  correspondence  that  may  have  taken 

place  with  the  British  Admiralty,  and  with  the  Naval  Mission  to  India  and  the  Dominion,  1919-20,  and  also  a 
list  of  shareholders,  officers  and  directors  of  the  Imperial  Oil  Company.    The  Senate Not  printed. 

177.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  Senate  dated  the  oth  instant,  for  a  Return  of  copies  of  contracts  between  any  Department 

or  Departments  of  the  Government  and  the  owners  of  the  steamship  Lady  Evelyn,  in  respect  to  the  carriage  of 
mails,  passengers  and  freight  between  Pictou,  Souris,  and  the  Magdalen  Islands;  and  copies  of  schedules  of  rates 
for  such  service,  if  such  schedules  are  in  the  possession  of  the  Government.    The  Senate Not  printed 

18 


10-11  George  V  List  of  Sessional  Papers  A.  1920 


CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME  10— Continued. 

178.  Return  of  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  10th  May,  1920,  for  a  Return  showing: — 1.  Whether  inspectors  in  chai  ge  of 
terminal  elevators,  under  the  Board  of  Grain  Commissioners,  have  full  authority  to  inspect  grain,  as  provided 
for  in  the  Canada  Grain  Act.  2.  If  not,  why  not .  3.  If  so,  whether  the  inspectors  issue  the  requisite  inspection 
certificates,  with  their  signatures  attached  thereto,  as  evidence  of  such  inspection.  4.  Whether  the  Chief  Inspec- 
tor or  his  immediate  assistant,  in  charge  of  terminal  elevators,  has  authority  to  change  such  inspection,  without 
consent  of  the  inspector  directly  in  charge  of  a  terminal  elevator.  5.  If  so,  whether  this  practice  is  provided 
for  in  the  Canada  Grain  Act.  6.  Whether  inspection  certificates,  either  inwards  or  outwards,  are  signed  in  blank 
by  an  officer  under  the  Board  of  Grain  Commissioners,  and  then  rilled  in  afterwards  by  a  clerk.  7.  Whether 
Western  Inspection  Certificates  are  signed  in  blank  by  the  Chief  Inspector  or  one  of  his  officers,  and  then  filled 
in  by  an  officer  in  the  Eastern  Inspection  District.  S.  Whether  the  inward  and  outward  inspection  at  terminal 
elevators  is  identically  the  same.  9.  Whether  the  Canada  Grain  Act  provides  for  the  inspection  of  grain  into 
terminal  elevators,  from  steamers  :ind  barges.  10.  If  so,  whether  the  inward  or  outward  inspection  governs. 
11.  How  much  grain  the  Government  elevator,  Port  Vrthur,  has  handled  from  September  1,  1919,  to  May  1, 
1920.  12.  How  much  grain  the  above  elevator  handled  during  the  following  crop  years:  1913-14,  1911-15.  1915—16, 
1910-17,  1917-18,  1918-19.  13.  Cost  per  liushcl  in  handling  grain  in  the  Government  elevator,  Port  Arthur,  for 
the  above  crop  years,  and  for  the  period,  September  1,  1919,  to  May  1,  1920.  14.  Whether  the  above  cost  includes 
any  provision  for  interest  on  investment  and  management.  15.  Revenue  per  bushel  for  the  above  period:  (a) 
including  as  revenue,  money  derived  from  the  sale  of  overages,  screenings  ami  scalpings;  [6 )  excluding  as  revenue, 
money  derived  from  the  sale  of  overages,  screenings  and  scalpings.  16.  Number  of  employees  engaged  in  the 
above  elevator  during  the  above  periods.  17.  Name  of  the  senior  officer  or  manager  who  superintended  the 
operations  of  the  Government  elevators  under  the  Department  of  Trade  and  Commerce,  for  the  above  periods. 
18.  Whether  all  the  Government  elevators  earn-  insurance  on  grain  stored  therein,  in  accordance  with  law.  19.  If 
not,  why  the  discrimination  against  the  other  commercially  owned  elevators,  and  on  whose  authority  the  law 
is  broken.  20.  Section  95,  subsection  7,  of  'hi-  Canada  Grain  Act  provides  for  the  confiscation  of  overages  over 
one-quarter  of  one  per  cent  to  the  Government.  Whether  the  Board  of  Grain  Commissioners  are  keeping  strict 
accounting  of  all  grain  going  into  and  out  oi  the  terminal  elevators,  including  screenings  and  scalpings,  so  as  to 
arrive  at  the  above  figures.  21.  Whether  the  Registration  Department,  under  the  Board  of  Grain  Commis- 
sioners, has  full  information  tabulated  showing  the  gross  weight  in  and  gross  weight  out  of  terminal  elevators. 

22.  Change  made  by  the  Board  of  Grain  Commissioners  in  the  wording  of  the  outward  weight  certificates. 

23.  When  the  change  was  made.  24.  Whether  the  weight  certificate,  as  worded,  was  considered  faulty  up  to 
the  time  of  the  change.  25.  If  not,  why  the  change  in  the  wording  was  made.  26.  Whether  the  Canada  Wheat 
Board  has  an  officer  at  Fort  William,  whose  duty  it  is  to  check  the  grades  given  by  the  inspection  department 
under  the  Department  of  Trade  and  Commerce,  on  all  grains  shipped  for  and  on  account  of  the  Canada  Wheat 
Board.  27.  If  so,  how  many  officers  are  engaged  in  this  office,  their  names  and  salaries.  2(S.  If  so,  what  the 
necessity  is  of  two  Government  officials  doing  the  one  task.  29.  If  so,  whether  the  expenses  incidental  to  this 
office,  are  deducted  from  the  money  which  ought  rightly  be  given  to  the  farmers,  for  the  participation  certificates 
issued.  30.  Whether  the  Canada  Wheat  Board  accepts  the  inspection  certificates  as  issued  by  the  Department 
of  Trade  and  Commerce,  without  reservation.  31.  Whether  the  Canada  Wheat  Board  always  avails  itself  of 
the  highest  market  for  all  wheat  sold  for  and  on  account  of  the  producers.  32.  Since  the  Government  has  taken 
over  the  control  of  the  wheat  business,  w  hether  this  has  had  a  tendency  to  reduce  the  work  of  the  Board  of  Grain 
Commissioners.  33.  If  so,  whether  the  number  of  employees  under  the  Board  of  Grain  Commissioners  have 
been  reduced,  for  the  purposes  of  economical  administration.  34.  Whether  the  administration  of  the  Canada 
Grain  Act  is  self  sustaining.  35.  If  not,  how  the  deficits  are  made  up  from  year  to  year  and  on  whose  authority. 
36.  Salaries  paid  to  the  Secretary  of  the  Board  of  Grain  Commissioners  and  the  Secretary  of  the  Canada  Wheat 
Board.  37.  Whether  the  public  terminal  elevators  at  Fort  William  or  Port  Arthur  purchase  and  sell  grain 
from  time  to  time,  contrary  to  the  Canada  Grain  Act.  38.  If  so,  on  whose  authority.  39.  Section  4S  of  the 
Canada  Grain  Act  provided  for  the  fixing  of  grades  other  than  statutory  grades,  by  the  Grain  Standards  Board. 
Whether  this  Board  has  fixed  the  composition  of  grades  of:  (a;  screenings,  (b)  scalpings.  40.  I?  not,  why  not. 
41.  If  not,  who  has  fixed  the  composition  and  grades  up  to  the  present  time,  and  on  what  authority.  42.  If 
fixed,  what  they  are.  43.  Whether  the  original  dockages  taken  from  the  grain  are  returned  to  the  producer  or 
the  buyer  of  the  warehouse  receipt  covering  the  specific  parcel.  44.  If  not,  why  not.  45.  How  long  the  Govern- 
ment, through  the  Department  of  Agriculture,  has  handled  standard  stock  food  ex  terminal  elevators.  46.  Whe- 
ther the  venture  has  been  profitable.  47.  Surplus  or  deficit  for  each  year.  48.  Price  paid  to  the  terminal  eleva- 
tors (or  the  standard  stock  food  basis  f.o.b.  Fori  William.  49.  Price  received  by  the  Government  for  the  same 
food  on  the  same  basis.    Presented  May  27,  1920.    Mr.  Stevens Printed  for  sessional  papers  only. 

179.  Memorandum  No.  6,  respecting  work  of  the  Department  of  Militia  and  Defence— European  War — from  November 

1,  1918,  to  October  31,  1919      Presented  by  Hon.  Mr.  Guthrie,  May  28,  1920 Not  printed. 

180.  Ret  urn  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  r  he  12th  May,  1920,  for  a  Return  showing: — 1.  Whether  the  Government  operations 

at  the  Dog  Fish  Reduction  Works  at.  Clark's  Harbour,  Nova  Scotia,  have  been  discontinued.  2.  If  so,  what 
disposition  has  been  made  of  the  property.  3.  Total  Government  disbursements  including  the  original  cost 
and  loss  in  operation.  4.  On  whose  report  or  recommendation  the  operation  was  abandoned.  5.  Recommen- 
dation of  the  authority  advising  abandonment.  6.  Whether  J.  B.  Fielding,  of  the  Honorary  Advisory  Council 
for  Scientific  and  Industrial  Research,  authorized  the  report  of  the  chairman  on  fish  waste  in  Canada  as  intimated 
on  page  53  of  the  report  of  the  Administrative  Chairman  of  the  Honorary  Advisory  Council  for  Scientific  and 
Industrial  Research  for  the  year  ending  March  31 ,  1919.  7.  Whether  Mr. "Fielding  reported  with  regard  to  the 
above-mentioned  plant  as  follows:  "At  Clark's  Harbour  I  inspected  the  Government  Dog  Fish  Reduction  plant, 
which  though  very  badly  cared  for  appeared  to  be  in  working  order,  and  well  worth,  in  my  opinion,  retaining 
for  the  purpose  of  the  manufacture  of  fertiliser,  though  quite  unsuitabie  for  the  manufacture  of  food."  8.  Con- 
sideration given  by  the  Government  to  Mr   Fielding's  report.    Presented  May  2S,  1920.     Mr.  MeCurdy. 

Not  printt  d. 

181 .  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  12th  May,  1920,  for  a  return  showing  the  total  amounts  paid  for  advertisements 

or  newspaper  articles  relating  to  voluntary  enlistment  before  the  Military  Service  Act  of  1917  was  in  force:  m  to 
English  newspapers  in  Canada  and  United  States:  (6  I  to  French  newspapers  in  Canada  and  t'nited  States:  (r)  to 
English  newspapers  in  the  province  of  Quebec:  [d)  to  French  newspapers  in  the  province  of  Quebec.  Presented 
May  28,  1920.     Mr.  Archambault Not  printed. 

182.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  15th  March,  1920,  for  a  Return  showing:— How  many  of  the  22,954  temporary 

appointments  made  by  the  Board  of  Civil  Service  Commissioners  since  the  armistice  are  at  present  on  the  pay 
rolls  of  the  various  departments  of  the  Government.    Presented  May  28,  1920.     Mr.  Sinclair  (Antigonish.) 

Not  printed. 

183.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  3rd  May,  1920,  for  a  Return  showing: — 1.  How  many  generals  belonging  to  the 

permanent  force  have  had  to  give  up  their  rank  during  the  last  six  months.  2.  How  many  generals  have  been 
promoted  since  the  armistice,  and  the  names  of  those  who  are  still  in  the  service.    3.  How  many  officers  have 

19 


10-11   George  V  List  of  Sessional  Papers  A.  1920 


CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME  10— Continued. 

been  promoted  brigadier  general  since  the  armistice,  their  names,  how  they  are  employed,  and  whether  it  is  the 
intention  to  retain  them  in  that  rank.  4.  How  many  officers  of  the  permanent  force  have  been  pensioned,  their 
names  and  the  amount  of  pension.    Presented  May  28,  1920.    Mr.  Bureau Xot  printed. 

184.  Final  report  of  the  work  of  Canadian  Munition  Resources  Commission,  from  November,  1915,  to  March,  1919,  inclus- 

ive.  Presented  by  Sir  Robert  Borden,  May  31,  1920 Not  printed. 

184«.  Copy  of  Order  in  Council,  P.C.  1192,  dated  the  29th  May,  1920:  Dissolving  the  Canadian  Munitions  Resources  Com- 
mission.   Presented  by  Sir  Robert  Borden,  May  31,  1920 Xot  printed. 

185.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  26th  April,  1920,  for  a  copy  of  all  correspondence  between  the  Government 

or  any  member  thereof  and  the  Canadian  Press,  Limited,  and  the  Canadian  Associated  Press,  with  regard  to 
the  establishment  of  an  Imperial  news  service.    Presented  May  31,  1920.     Mr.  Robb Xot  ; 

186.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  3rd  May,  1920,  for  a  copy  of  all  correspondence,  telegrams,  petitions  or  any  other 

documents  relative  to  the  appointment  of  the  Deputy  Postmaster  at  Edmonton,  Alberta.  Presented  May  31, 
1920.    Mr.  Mackie  (Edmonton.) Not  printed. 

187.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  31st  March,  1920,  for  a  copy  of  all  correspondence,  letters,  telegrams,  reports  by 

detectives  and  others,  and  every  document  relating  to  the  theft  of  Fifty  Thousand  dollars  from  the  post  office 
in  the  City  of  Edmonton,  and  to  George  Armstrong,  Postmaster  of  the  said  post  office,  as  well  as  to  all  employees 
in  the  said  post  office  so  far  as  all  these  may  relate  to  the  theft  of  Fifty  Thousand  dollars.  Presented  May  31, 
1920.    Mr.  Mackie  (Edmonton.) Xot  print,  d. 

188.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  19th  May,  1920,  for  a  Return  showing: — 1.  Names  and  respective  salaries  of 

the  employees  of  the  Parliamentary  Library.  2.  How  many  are  graduates  of  any  college  in  Arts  or  Library 
Science.  3.  Whether  it  is  the  intention  of  the  Government  to  make  any  more  appointments  to  the  said  Library 
of  persons  who  have  not  taken  a  library  science  course  in  some  recognized  college.  Presented  May  31 ,  1920.  Mr. 
Wigmore ■ Xot  printed. 

189.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  17th  May,  1920,  for  a  Return  showing: — 1 .  Whether  the  steamship  Metagama 

sailed  from  Liverpool  carrying  soldiers  and  their  families  on  or  about  the  eighth  day  of  February,  A.D.  1919. 
2.  Complaints  made  to  the  Militia  Department  or  any  other  department  of  the  Government  as  to  the  condition 
of  said  steamer  at  time  of  sailing  and  duriog  said  voyage.  3.  Complaints  made  to  the  Government  or  any  depart- 
ment thereof  as  to  the  treatment  accorded  to  said  soldiers,  their  wives  or  families  during  said  voyage.  4.  Whe- 
ther a  delegation  from  the  City  of  St.  John  appeared  before  a  committee  of  the  Cabinet  on  or  about  the  27th  day 
of  February,  1919,  protesting  against  alleged  ill  treatment  of  said  soldiers  and  their  families  during  the  said  voyage. 

5.  If  so,  who  comprised  said  delegation  and  what  members  of  the  Government  acted  on  said  Cabinet  committee. 

6.  Whether  the  Government  took  any  action  as  a  result  of  said  conference.  If  so,  what  action,  and  the  result 
of  same.  7.  Whether  said  delegation  filed  affidavits  or  solemn  declarations  of  passengers  as  to  the  condition  of 
the  steamer  and  treatment  accorded  said  passengers  during  said  voyage.  8.  If  so,  whether  the  Government 
held  an  investigation  concerning  said  complaints.  9.  Result  of  such  investigation.  Presented  June  2,  1920.  Mr. 
Copp Not  printed. 

190.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  19th  May,  1920,  for  a  Return  showing:— 1.  Total  amount  of  sick  mariners' 

dues  collected  from  shipping  entering  Canadian  ports  for  each  of  the  years  1912,  1913,  1914,  1915,  1916,  1917,  1918 
and  1919.  2.  Amount  expended  by  the  Government  in  assistance  to  sicK  or  distressed  mariners  during  each 
of  said  years.  3.  Number  of  officials  of  the  Marine  Department  in  Ottawa  engaged  exclusively  on  duties  con- 
nected witn  collection,  distribution  and  administration  of  sick  mariners'  dues.  4.  Number  of  officials  of  Marine 
Department  transferred  to  Health  Department  in  connection  with  sick  mariners'  dues.  Presented  June  2,  1920. 
Mr.  Stevens Not  printed. 

191 .  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  10th  March,  1920,  for  an  order  showing: — 1.  Number  of  dismissals  of  Civil 

Servants  made  in  the  cities  of  the  Dominion  of  Canada  since  the  1st  of  January,  1915.  2.  Number  of  appoint- 
ments which  have  taken  place  or  have  been  made  of  Civil  Servants  in  the  cities  of  the  Dominion  of  Canada  since 
January,  1915.    Presented  June  2,  1920.    Mr.  Mackie  (Edmonton.) Xot  printed. 

192.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  10th  March,  1920,  for  a  return  giving  a  list  of  the  lawyers  from  the  province 

of  Quebec  who  acted:  (a)  as  public  representatives;  <b)  military  representatives;  (c)  in  the  office  of  the  registrars; 
and  (<2)  in  the  office  of  the  Central  Appeal  Judge,  during  the  administration  of  the  Military  Service  Act ,  showing 
the  amount  paid  to  each  of  the  said  lawyers.    Presented  June  4,  1920.    Mr.  Archambault Not  print, ,[. 

193.  Copies  of  Orders  in  Council,  P.C.  1022,  dated  8th  May,  1920,  P.C.  1065,  dated  15th  May,  1920,  and  P.C.  1280,  dated 

4th  June.  1920,  covering  the  Cost  of  Living  Bonus  for  employees  in  the  Civil  Service  of  Canada  for  the  fiscal  year, 
1920-21.    Presented  by  Hon.  Mr.  Rowell,  June  7,  1920 Not  prmte'd 

194.  Copies  of  Orders  in  Council  in  respect  to  the  Federal  Housing  Scheme,  as  follows:— P.C.  639,  of  March  27,  1920, 

authorizing  an  increase  in  the  maximum  amounts  of  the  loans  which  may  be  granted  under  Class  (a )  of  the  Federa  1 
project.  P.C.  375,  of  February  20,  1919,  approving  the  General  Scheme  of  Housing  of  the  Province  of  Ontario. 
P.C.  2201,  of  October  30, 1919,  approving  certain  amendments  to  the  British  Columbia  Housing  Scheme,  approved 
on  May  1,  1919,  P.C.  907.  P.C.  1090,  of  May  19,  1920,  approving  certain  amendments  to  the  General  Housing 
Scheme  of  the  Province  of  Quebec.  PC  1-233,  of  May  31,  1920,  approving  the  General  Scheme  of  Housing 
of  the  Province  of  Saskatchewan.    Presented  by  Hon.  Mr.  Rowell,  June  7,  1920 Not  printed. 

195.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  5th  May,  1920,  for  the  production  of  copies  of  all  letters,  telegrams,  papers 

and  correspondence  exchanged  between  the  Department  of  Agriculture  and  others  in  reference  to  the  establishment 
of  a  Demonstration  Farm  at  Baie  St.  Paul,  in  the  County  of  Charlevoix.    Presented  June  7,  1920.    Mr.  Casgrain. 

Not  p 

196.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  Sth  April,  1920,  for  a  Return  showing: — 1.  What  is,  or  has  been,  the  numerical 

strength  of  the  staff  of  the  Department  of  Public  Works,  by  districts,  throughout  the  Dominion  of  Canada  since 
the  1st  of  January,  1915,  to  the  1st  of  January,  1920.  2.  The  names  of  the  employees.  3.  What  salary  is  paid, 
or  was,  to  each  employee  of  the  Department  during  this  period.  4.  Which  of  said  employees  could  have  been 
discharged  since  January,  1917.  5.  How  many  employees  in  each  district  can  now  be  dispensed  with.  6.  The 
expenditure  in  each  of  said  districts  during  the  entire  period.     Presented  June  8,  1920.     Mr.  Mackie  (Edmonton). 

Not  printed. 

20 


10-11  George  V  List  of  Sessional  Papers  A.  1920 


CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME  10— Continued. 

196'/.  Supplementary  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  8th  April,  1920,  for  a  Return  showing: — 1.  What  is,  or  has 
been,  the  numerical  strength  of  the  staff  of  the  Department  of  Public  Works,  by  districts,  throughout  the 
Dominion  of  Canada  since  the  1st  of  January,  1915,  to  the  1st  of  January,  1920.  2.  The  names  of  the  employees. 
3.  What  salary  is  paid,  or  was.  to  each  employee  of  the  Department  during  this  period.  4.  Which  of  said 
employees  could  have  been  discharged  since  January,  1917.  5.  How  many  employees  in  each  district  can  now 
be  dispensed  with.  0.  The  expenditure  in  each  of  said  districts  during  the  entire  period.  Presented  June  17, 
1920.     Mr.  Mackie  (Edmonton) Not  printed . 

197.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  10th  March,  1920,  for  a  copy  of  all  letters,  telegrams,  documents,  petitions, 

reports,  received  by  the  Department  of  Railways  and  Canals  and  Canadian  National  Railways,  and  the 
correspondence  exchanged  between  this  Department,  and  different  persons  and  public  bodies  in  reference  to  the 
curtailing  of  the  railway  service  along  the  new  line  of  the  Quebec  and  Saguenay  Railway  between  Quebec  and 
Murray  Bay  since  the  1st  of  November,  1919.     Presented  June  8,  1920.    Mr.  Casgrain Not  printed. 

198.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  7th  April,  1920,  for  a  copy  of  all  correspondence,  letters  and  telegrams  in 

connection  with  the  granting  of  an  allowance  by  the  Post  Office  Department  for  a  regular  postal  ferry  service 
by  motor  yacht  between  Ste.  Catherine  and  Tadoussac.    Presented  June  8,  1920.    Mr.  Savard Not  printed. 

199.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  15th  March,  1920,  for  a  copy  of  all  letters,  petitions,  telegrams  and  other 

documents  relating  to  the  retention  in  office,  as  a  Fishery  Overseer,  of  John  A.  Dillon,  of  Guysborough,  X.S. 
Presented  June  S,  1 920.     Mr.  Sinclair  (Antigonish) . .  Not  printed. 

200.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  12th  April,  1920,  for  a  copy  of  all  documents,  letters,  telegrams  and  all  other 

papers  and  correspondence  exchanged  between  the  Government  or  any  department  or  commission  thereof  and 
the  Government  of  the  United  States,  the  State  of  New  York,  the  State  of  Vermont,  or  any  other  body,  and  a 
copy  of  any  evidence  given  before  anv  commission,  referring  to  seine  or  net  fishing  in  Mississquoi  bav.  Presented 
June  8,  1920.     Mr.   Kay Not  printed. 

201 .  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  5th  May,  1920,  for  a  Return  showing  amount  of  money  spent  by  the  Dominion 

Government  since  Confederation  on  improvements  in  the  harbours  of  Halifax,  St.  John,  Quebec,  Montreal, 
Toronto,  Hamilton,  Port  Arthur,  Victoria  and  Vancouver.     Presented  June  S,  1920.     Mr.  Foster  (York). 

Not  printed. 

202.  Orders  of  the  Director  of  Coal  Operations— Nos.  1  to  144,  inclusive.      Presented  by  Hon.  Mr.  Meighen,  June  8,  1920. 

Not  printed. 

203.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  22nd  March,  1920,  for  a  Return  showing: — 1.  Number  of  automobiles  valued 

under  81,000  imported  into  Canada  in  each  of  the  years  1918  and  1019.  2.  Number  valued  at  between  81,000  and 
82,000.  3.  Number  at  a  greater  valuation  than  82,000.  4.  Duty  collected  on  these  automobiles.  5.  The  duly 
collected  on  parts  of  automobiles  imported  during  the  years  1918  and  1919.  6.  On  what  number  of  automobiles 
valued  at  less  than  81,000  excise  duty  was  paid  in  the  years  1918  and  1919.  7.  On  what  number  of  automobiles 
valued  at  between  81,000  and  82,000  excise  duty  was  paid  in  the  same  years.  8.  On  what  number  of  automobiles 
valued  at  over  82,000  excise  duty  was  paid  in  the  same  years.  9.  The  amount  of  such  excise  duty.  Presented 
June  9,  1920.    Mr.  Ross * Not  printed. 

204.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  5th  May,  1920,  for  a  copy  of  all  papers,  documents  and  letters  in  connection 

with  Dr.  Michel  Fise't,  of  Quebec  City,  appointment  by  Order  in  Council,  dated  18th  April.  1914,  as  parcel  post 
supervisor  in  Quebec  City,  with  a  salary  of  >2,800  a  year".    Presented  June  10, 1920.     Mr.  I  avigoeur  . .  Not  printed. 

205.  First  Annual  Report  of  the  Board  of  Commerce  of  Canada,  dated  31st  May,  1920:  and  also.— Copy  of  Order  in  Council, 

P.C.  12fi4,  dated  1st  June,  1920,  submitting  the  above  Report  for  His  Excellency's  information.  Presented  by 
Sir  Robert  Borden,  June  10,  1920 Not  printed. 

206.  Copy  of  Order  in  Council,  P.C.  2529,  dated  December  18,  1919,  regarding  the  distribution  to  the  Provinces  of  the 

sum  of  $200,000,  which  was  placed  at  the  disposal  of  the  Department  of  Health  for  combatting  venereal 
diseases.    Presented  by  Hon.  Mr.  Rowell,  June  11,  1920  Not  printed. 

207.  Copy  of  Agreement  between  the  Chief  and  Principal  men  of  the  Chippewas  of  Sarnia  Band  of  Indians  and  His  Majesty 

the  King  regarding  the  surrender  of  the  Sarnia  Indian  Reserve  to  the  Government  of  Canada,  dated  at  Sarni.-. , 
Ont.,  10th  December,  1919.    Presented  by  Hon.  Mr.  Meighen,  June  14,  1920 Not  printed. 

208.  Return  showing: — 1.  How  many  sittings  were  held  by  the  Railway  Commission  to  fix  compensation  for  damages 

caused  by  the  passing  of  the  Canadian  Northern  through  North  Bay.  2.  Who  presided  over  the  said  sittings. 
3.  The  awards  made.  4.  To  whom  they  were  paid.  5.  The  total  cost  of  the  said  sittings.  6.  The  amount 
paid  for  counsel  fees.  7.  What  amount  was  paid  for  witnesses.  8.  To  whom  the  amounts  were  paid.  Presented 
June  16,  1920.    Mr.  McDonald - Not  printed. 

208  j.  Supplementary  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  16tb  June,  1920,  for  a  Return  showing: — 1.  How  many  sittings 
were  held  by  the  Railway  Commission  to  fix  compensation  for  damages  caused  by  the  passing  of  the  Canadian 
Northern  through  North  Bay.  2.  "\\'ho  presided  over  the  said  sittings.  3.  The  awards  made.  4.  To  whom 
they  tverepaid.  5.  The  total  cost  of  the  said  sittings.  6.  The  amount  paid  for  counsel  fees.  7.  What  amount 
was  paid  for  witnesses.    8.  To  whom  the  amounts  were  paid.    Presented  June  21,  1920.     Mr.  McDonald. 

Not  printed. 

209.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  2nd  June,  1920,  for  a  copy  of  all  papers,  documents,  telegrams  and  reports  concerning 

the  indemnity  paid  to  the  widow  and  children  of  J.  L.  A.  Forbes,  killed  at  Aston  Junction,  the  11th  of  September, 
1918,  while  on  duty  as  brakeman  on  the  Government  railways.    Presented  June  i7,  1920.     Mr.  Bourassa. 

Not  printed. 

210.  Partial  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  5th  May,  1920,  for  the  production  of  copies  of  all  Rules  of  Court  made  by 

the  different  Superior  Courts  of  Criminal  Jurisdiction  of  Canada  according  to  the  provisions  of  Section  576  of  the 
Criminal  Code.     Presented  June  17,  1920.     Mr.  Casgrain Not  printed. 

211.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  19th  Marcn,  1920,  for  a  copy  of  all  correspondence  between  the  Prime  Minister 

of  Canada  and  the  Prime  Minister  of  Great  Britain  under  authority  of  a  resolution  of  the  Imperial  War  Cabinet 
of  July  30,  1918.    Presented  June  17,  1920.     Mr.  Fielding Not  printed. 

21 


1(<-11    George  V  Lisl   of  Sessional  Papers  A.  1920 


CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME  10— Continued. 

212.  Copy  of  Order  in  Council,  P.C.  1361,  dated  16th  June,  1920,  accepting  the  resignation  of  Mr.  W.  F.  O'Connor,  as  a 

Commissioner  of  the  Board  of  Commerce  of  Canada;  and  also, — copy  of  letter  communicating  the  said  resigna- 
tion.   Presented  by  Sir  Robert  Borden.  June  17,  1920 Not  printed. 

213.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  26th  May,  1020,  for  a  copy  of  all  correspondence,  petitions,  reports  and  other 

documents  regarding  the  establishment  of  rural  mail  routes  in  the  parishes  of  Champlain,  Batiscanand  St.  Luc, 
in  the  County  of  Champlain,  Quebec.    Presented  June  18,  1920.     Mr.  Desaulniers Not  p 

214.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  I9th  April.  1920.  for  a  Return  showing: — 1.  Number  of  non-Canadian  born 

in  the  different  Departments  of  the  Government  where  the  services  of  Engineers,  Architects,  Draughtsmen, 
etc.,  are  required.  2.  Number  of  non-Canadian  born  Engineers,  Arcliitects.  Draughtsmen,  etc.,  who  have  been 
given  positions  within  the  last  five  years  in  the  different  departments  of  the  Government.  3.  Number  of 
Canadian  born  Engineers.  Arcliitects,  Draughtsmen,  etc.,  who  have  obtained  similar  positions  within  the  last 
five  years.  4.  Whether  American  Engineers  were  given  preference  in  obtaining  such  positions  and  appointetl 
over  the  heads  of  Canadian  born  Engineers,  Architects,  etc.     Presented  June  21,  1920.     Mr.  Casgrain 

Not  printed^ 

215.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  10th  May.  1920,  for  a  Return  showing: — 1 .  Total  amount  of  drawback  for  the 

fiscal  year  ending  March  31,  1920,  paid  to  textile  manufacturers  on  (n)  raw  cotton,  and  (h)  cotton  yarns.  2.  Total 
amount  of  drawback  for  the  fiscal  year  ending  March,  1920,  paid  to  textile  manufacturers  on  (a)  raw  wool,  and 
(6)  wollen  yarns.    Presented  June  21 ,  1920.     Mr.  Reid  (Mackenzie) Not  printed. 

216.  Copy  of  Order  in  Council  number  1238,  passed  on  the  31st  day  of  -May.  1920.  concerning  a  contract  entered  into  with 

Griffenhagen  ana  associates  at  a  rate  of  $10, 000  per  month.    Presented  June  21, 1920.     Mr.  Leniieux.  - .   Not  printt  ■!. 

217.  Statement  show  ing  number  of  Emplovees  in  the  several  Departments  of  the  Public  Service  for  the  fiscal  year  ending 

March  31,  1921,  desi sauted  in  accordance  with  the  new  Classification  Schedules.  (Subject  to  possible  amendment 
in  some  instances  as  the  result  of  appeals  pending  but  not  vet  finally  disposed  of.)     Presented  bv  Hon.  Mr.  Powell, 

June  23,  1920 * Not  printed. 

218.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  31st  May.  1920,  for  a  copy  of  all  letters,  telegrams  and  other  documents  relating 

to  the  closing  of  the  life  saving  station  at  Richibucto  Beach,  in  the  county  of  Kent,  N.B.  Presented  June  24, 
1920.     Mr.  Leger ." Not  printed. 

219.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  15th  April,  1920,  for  a  Return  showing: — 1.  When  the  work  under  the  present 

scheme  of  development  of  Toronto  Harbour  was  commenced.  2.  Milesof  docks  included  in  this  scheme  and  how 
much  of  this  work  has  been  completed.  3.  Depth  of  water  provided  by  this  scheme.  4.  Expenditure  by  the 
Dominion  Government  on  this  scheme  for  each  year  since  the  commencement  of  the  work.  5.  Number  of  ships 
and  tonnage  entered  and  cleared  from  this  harbour  each  year  since  1912.  6.  Amount  of  water  borne  freight  imported 
and  exported  to  and  from  this  harboursince  1912.  7.  What  reduction,  if  any,  in  freight  rates  on  goods  entering  and 
leaving  Toronto  by  rail  has  been  secured  by  reason  of  the  harbour  improvements  in  question.  S.  What  the 
extent  of  land  reclamation  is  in  connection  with  this  scheme.  9.  Who  the  owner  of  this  land  is  and  what  the 
policy  of  the  Government  is  relative  thereto.  10.  Depth  of  the  St.  Lawrence  canals  and  of  the  Welland  canal. 
Presented  June  24,  1920.     Mr.  Campbell   Not  printed. 

220.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  Hou^e  of  12th  Maw  1920,  for  a  copy  of  all  letters,  telegrams,  correspondence,  documents 

and  other  papers  exchanged  between  the  Dominion  Government,  or  any  official  thereof,  or  the  officials  of  the 
Canadian  Government  Railways  and  the  Government  of  New  Brunswick,  or  any  official  of  the  said  Government, 
or  any  of  the  officials  of  the  St.  John  and  Quebec  Railway  Company  with  regard  to  the  procuring  of  running 
rights  for  the  trains  of  the  St.  John  and  Quebec  Railway  over  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  between  Westfield 
Beach  and  St.  John.  Also  of  all  papers,  documents  and  correspondence  exchanged  between  the  Dominion  Govern- 
ment or  any  official  thereof  or  any  officials  of  the  Canadian  Government  Railways  and  the  Canadian  Pacific 
Railway  Company  or  any  official  thereof,  regarding  the  securing  of  the  said  running  rights.  Presented  June  20, 
L920.     Mr.  Caldwell.   ..,   .* Not  printed. 

221 .  Ret  urn  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  t  he  21  it  h  May,  1920,  for  a  copy  of  all  telegrams,  letters  and  other  documents  relating 

to  the  closing  of  the  Life  Saving  Station  at  Cheticamp,  Inverness  County,  N.S.  Presented  June  26,  1920.  Mr 
Chisholm Not   printed. 

222.  Report  of  the  Administrative  Chairman  of  the  Honourary  Advisory  Council  for  Scientific  and  Industrial  Research 

of  Canada,  for  the  year  ending  March  31,  1920.   Presented  by  Sir  George  Foster,  June  26,  1920 Not  printed. 

223.  Ordinances  of  the  Yukon  Territory,  passed  by  the  Yukon  Council  in  the  year  1920.    The  Senate Not  printed. 

224.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  23rd  June,  1920,  for  a  copy  of  letters,  telegrams,  petitions   and  documents  of 

all  kinds  which  passed  between  the  Department  of  Public  Works  and  any  person  during  the  years  1918,  1919, 
1920,  in  any  way  referring  to  improvements  made  on  Grand  Etang  Harbour,  N.S.  Presented  June  30,  1920.  Mr 
Chisholm , Not  printed. 

225.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  2Sth  April,  1920,  for  a  Return  showing:— 1.  Number  of  private,   assistant 

private,  joint  and  associate  secretaries  appointed  to  members  of  the  Cabinet,  Chairman  or  Members  of  Com- 
mission since  1911,  and  how  much  money  has  been  paid  to  each  of  them  respectively.  2.  Number  of  private, 
assistant  private,  joint  and  associate  secretaries  each  of  the  Members  of  the  Cabinet  actually  have.  3.  Their' 
names  and  respective  salaries.  4.  Number  of  employees  in  the  office  of  each  member  of  the  Cabinet,  their  names 
and  respective  salaries.    Presented  June  30, 1920.     Mr.  Dechene Not  irinted. 

226.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  7th  June,  1920,  for  a  Return  showing  amounts  paid  to  the  following  newspapers 

during  the  fiscal  years  1919  and  1920  respectively  for  (a)  advertising,  ('"  printing:  Montreal  Gazette  and  The  Gazette 

Printing  Company,  Montreal  Daily  Star.  The  Globe,  The  Mail  and  Empire,  Toronto,  The  Telegram,  Toronto,  The 

Toronto,  The  Journal  and  The  Journal  Press,  Ottawa,  The  Citizen,  Ottawa.     Presented  June  30.  1920.     Mr 

Cowan Nut  printt  d 

227 .  Heturn  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  8th  October,  1919,  for  a  copy  of  ail  letters,  telegrams,  petitions,  memorials 

or  other  papers  or  documents  received  by  the  Right  Honourable  the  Prime  Minister  or  any  member  of  t  he  Govern- 
ment during  the  year  1919  relating  to  the  appo'ntment  ol  a  Lieutenant-Governor  for  Prince  Edward  Island  and 
the  replies  thereto.    Presented  June  30,  1920.    Mr.  Sinclair  (Antigonish). 

22 


10-11  George  V  List  of  Sessional  Papers  A.  1920 


CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME  10— Concluded. 

228.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  26th  May.  1920,  for  a  Return  showing:— 1.  Who  are  or  who  were  the  men 

engaged  by  the  Civil  Service  Commission  to  re-classify  the  Civil  Service  at  Ottawa.  2.  When  they  were  emplov- 
ed  and  at  what  rate  of  wages.  3.  Whether  they  are  still  in  the  service  of  the  Civil  Service  Commission  c  are 
any  of  them  in  said  service.  4.  How  much  was  paid  to  each  of  such  assistants  from  date  ol  engagement  lip  to 
the  end  of  April.  1920.  5  Total  amount  paid  to  the  men  so  engaged  from  the  date  of  the  engagement  to  theend 
of  April  1920.    Presented  June  30, 1920.     Mr.  McKenzie 2\0i  printed. 

229.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  29th  September,  1919.  for  a  Return  showing  the  cost  of  the  Military  Hospital 

at  Saint  Anne  de  Bellevue;  the  number  of  patients  received  and  treated  therein,  to  date;  expenses  to  date  for 
maintenance  as  to,  (a)  coal;  (6)  wood;  (c)  electricity;  (d)  food:  (c)  lingerie;  (/)  remedies;  (-7)  social  events  and 
recreations;  the  cost  of  theatre  installed  in  hospital;  names  of  physicians,  officers,  nurses  and  privates  of  the 
general  services,  showing  those  who  went  to  the  front,  and  those  who  did  not;  their  nationality  and  religion- 
salaries  paid  to  each  of  the  said  persons;  and  the  names  and  salaries  of  the  chaplains  attached  to  the  hospital ' 
Presented  June  30, 1920.    Mr.  Archambault Xot  printed. 

230.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  the  14th  June,  1920,  for  a  Return  showing  the  names  of  the  societies  wh;ch  have 

filed  copies  of  policies  complying  with  the  provisions  of  the  Insurance  Act,  1910,  Geo.  V,  Chap.  157,  Section  11.5- 
the  names  of  tne  societies  which  have  neglected  to  file  copies  of  policies  as  required  bv  said  Act,  and  to  whom 
licenses  have  been  issued  for  the  current  year:  and  names  of  any  societies  from  whom  licensee  have  been  withheld 
Presented  June  30,  1920.    Mr.  Archambault fifot  printed' 

231 .  Halifax  Graving  Dock,  re  expropriation  of.    The  Senate Xot  printed. 


23 


10  GEORGE  V 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  17c  (4) 


A.  1920 


CANADA 
DOMINION  BUREAU  OF  STATISTICS 


CENSUS  OF  INDUSTRY 

1918 


PULP  AND  PAPER 

1918 


(Prepared  in  collaboration  with  the  Dominion  Forestry  Branch; 

The  Department  of  Crown  Lands,  Nova  Scotia;  The 

Department  of  Lands  and  Mines,  New  Brunswick; 

The    Department    of   Lands    and    Forests, 

Quebec;  and    the    Department    of 

Lands,  British  Columbia.) 


PRINTED  BY  ORDER  OF  PARLIAMENT 


OTTAWA 

THOMAS    MULVEY 

PRINTER   TO    THE   KINGS    MOST    EXCELLENT    MAJESTY 

1920 


17c  (4)— 1 


10  GEORGE  V  SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  17c  (4)  A.  1920 


CENSUS   OF   INDUSTRY,  1918. 

PULP   AND   PAPER. 

Preface. 

The  statistics  of  the  pulp  and  paper  industry  in  this  report  were  collected 
and  compiled  during  1919,  as  for  the  calendar  year  1918.  Acknowledgments 
are  tendered  to  the  Department  of  Crown  Lands,  Nova  Scotia,  the  Depart- 
ment of  Lands  and  Mines,  New  Brunswick,  the  Department  of  Lands  and 
Forests,  Quebec,  the  Department  of  Lands,  British  Columbia  and  the  Canadian 
Pulp  and  Paper  Association  for  their  assistance  in  preparing  the  preliminary 
lists  of  operating  concerns  and  in  securing  a  complete  return. 

The  report  has  been  compiled  and  written  under  a  co-operative  arrange- 
ment between  the  Bureau  of  Statistics  and  the  Forestry  Branch  of  the  Depart- 
ment of  the  Interior,  the  work  of  the  Bureau  being  under  the  supervision  of 
Mr.  J.  C.  Macpherson,  whilst  the  report  was  checked  and  edited  by  Mr.  R.  G. 
Lewis,  B.  Sc.  F.  of  the  Forestry  Branch. 

R.  H.  COATS, 

Dominion  Statistician. 

Dominion  Bureau  of  Statistics, 
Ottawa,  Januar}",  1920. 


17c  (4)— li 


10  GEORGE  V  SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  17c  (4)  A.  1920 


TABLE   OF   CONTENTS. 

Preface 


Introduction  and  Summary. 

Summary  of  Capital  Investment,  1917  and  1918 v 

Arrangement  of  Report v 

Production vi-vii 

Wood-pulp vi 

Paper vi-vii 

Raw  Materials vii-ix 

Wood-pulp vii-ix 

Paper ix 

Fuel  Consumption ix 

Agencies  of  Production ix-xiii 

Capital ix-x 

Pulp  Mill  Machinery x-xi 

Paper  Mill  Machinery- xi 

Power  Employed xi 

Employees,  Salaries  and  Wages xii-xiii 

Classified  Weekly  Wages xiii 

Working  Time xiii 

Miscellaneous  Expenses xiii-xiv 

Imports  and  Exports xiv 


TABLES. 

I — Wood-pulp  Production 2-3 

•       II — Paper  Production 4-7 

III— Pulpwood  by  Provinces,  1917  and  1918 8 

IV— Pulpwood  by  Kinds  of  Wood,  1917  and  1918 8 

V — Pulpwood  by  Processes,  1917  and  1918 8 

VI — Pulpwood  by  Provinces,  Kinds  of  WTood  and  Processes,  1918 9 

VII — Pulpwood  Consumption  by  Kinds  of  Wood  and  Classes  of  Mills,  1918 10-11 

VIII — Other  Materials  used  in  Manufacture  of  Wood-pulp 12 

IX — Average  Number  of  Pounds  of  Pulp  per  Cord  of  Wood 13 

X — Materials  used  in  Manufacture  of  Paper 14-15 

XI — Fuel  Consumption  by  Classes  of  Mills 16-17 

XII — Capital  Invested  in  the  Pulp  and  Paper  Industry 18-19 

XIII — Equipment  in  Mills  Making  Ground  Wood-pulp 18-19 

XIV— Pulp  Mill  Machinery 20-21 

XV— Paper  Mill  Machinery 20-21 

XVI— Power  Employed. 22-25 

XVII — Employees,  Salaries  and  Wages 26-27 

XVIII— Employees  by  Months 28-29 

XIX — Number  of  Employees  by  Classified  Weekly  Wages 30-33 

XX — Averages  of  Working  Time 32-33 

XXI — Miscellaneous  Expenses 34-35 

XXII — H  xports  of  Pulpwood 34-35 

XXIII — Production,  Manufacture  and  Export  of  Pulpwood 36-37 

XXIV — Exports  of  Wood-pulp  by  Countries 38 

XXV — Imports  of  Wood-pulp  by  Countries 38 

XXVI— Exports  of  Paper 39 

XXVII — Imports  of  Paper 


10  GEORGE  V 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  17c  (4) 


A.  1920 


THE   PULP   AND   PAPER   INDUSTRY,  1918. 

Introduction  and  Summary. 

That  the  expansion  of  the  pulp  and  paper  industry  in  Canada  continues, 
is  shown  by  a  comparison  of  the  statistics  for  the  calendar  year  1918  with  those 
of  the  year  1917,  aspresented  in  this  report. 

The  number  of  mills  operating  in  1917  was  83,  with  a  production  of 
$96,340,327.  In  1918  the  number  of  active  mills  had  risen  to  94  and  the  volume 
of  production  to  $119,309,434,  an  increase  in  the  number  of  active  mills  of  11, 
or  13-25  per  cent,  and  in  production  of  $22,969,107,  or  23-84  per  cent. 

The  consumption  of  pulpwood  in  1918  was  2,210,744  cords,  as  compared 
with  2,104,334  cords  in  1917,  or  an  increase  for  the  year  of  5  per  cent.  The 
total  cut  of  pulpwood  for  manufacture  and  for  export,  which  hvl917  was  3,122,188 
cords,  increased  to  3,560,280  cords  in  1918.  The  quantity  cut  for  export  rose 
from  1,017,854  cords  in  1917  to  1,349,536  cords  in  1918,  an  increase  of  331,682 
cords,  or  32-50  per  cent. 

Capital  investment  in  the  pulp  and  paper  industry  is  shown  in  the  following 
comparative  summary  for  the  years  1917  and  1918: — 


Items  of  Capital 

1917 

1918 

Increase 

Amount 

Per 

cent 

$ 

84,461,837 
59,266,596 
27,902,466 
15,156,506 

$ 

118,805,581 
60,627,266 
39,652,078 
22,259,779 

$ 

34,343,744 
1,360,670 

11,749,612 
7,103,273 

p.c. 
40-66 

2-29 

Materials  on  hand,  stocks  in  process,  etc 

Cash,  trading  and  operating  accounts,  etc 

42-11 
46-86 

Totals 

186,787,405 

241,344,704 

54,557,299 

29-21 

The  increase  in  total  capital  investment,  as  shown  in  the  bulletin  for  1917 
for  the  two-year  period  1915-17,  was  39-6  per  cent,  or  an  annual  average 
of  19-8.  The  increase  for  1918  was  29-21  per  cent,  or  an  increase  of  almost 
10  points  over  the  annual  average  for  the  preceding  years. 

Salaries  and  wages  rose  from  $20,358,019  in  1917  to  $26,974,225  in  1918, 
an  increase  of  $6,616,206,  or  32-5  per  cent.  The  number  of  persons  employed 
on  salary  increased  from  1,563  in  1917  to  1,929  in  1918,  or  a  percentage  increase 
of  23-41.  The  average  number  of  persons  working  for  wages,  which  in  1917 
was  21,402,  increased  during  the  year  1918  to  23,934,  or  11-83  per  cent. 

Arrangement  of  report. — The  statistics  of  the  present  report  deal  with  the 
various  phases  of  the  industry,  comprising  production,  raw  materials,  capital, 
equipment  and  power,  employees,  salaries  and  wages,  working  time,  miscellaneous 
expenses,  and  exports  and  imports. 

For  the  purposes  of  the  investigation  the  various  concerns  engaged  in  this 
industry  are  grouped  under  three  headings:  (1)  mills  making  pulp  only;  (2) 


CENSUS   OF    INDUSTRY 


10  GEORGE  V    A.  1920 


mills  making  both  pulp  and  paper;  and  (3)  mills  making  paper  only.     Statistics 
are  presented  in  the  tables  for  each  of  these  groups,  as  well  as  for  "  all  mills." 


Production. 

The  opening  tables  of  the  report  (Tables  I  and  II)  deal  with  the  production 
of  wood-pulp  and  paper  respectively. 

Wood-pulp. — The  production  of  wood-pulp  in  the  Dominion  for  the  calendar 
year  1918  in  all  classes  of  mills  amounted  to  1,557,193  tons,  as  compared  with 
1,464,308  tons  in  1917  and  1,296,084  tons  in  1916.  Of  the  1918  product, 
820,584  tons  were  used  by  the  producing  mills  in  the  manufacture  of  paper, 
and  736,609  tons  were  made  for  sale.  The  amount  received  for  pulp  sold 
was  $41,302,882,  or  an  average  price  per  ton  for  all  classes  of  pulp  of  $56.07. 
The  quantity  and  value  of  each  kind  of  pulp  made  for  sale,  and  also  the  average 
value  per  ton  at  the  mill,  is  given  in  the  following  summary: — 


» 

Kinds  of  Pulp  made  for  sale 

Quantity 

Value 

Average 
value  per 
ton 

tons 
273, 180 

318,882 

144,547 

$ 

7,133,711 

22,464,063 
11,705,108 

$ 

2611 

70-44 

80-98 

Totals      

736,609 

41,302,882 

56  07 

There  is  also  an  item  "  miscellaneous  products  "  in  Table  I,  amounting 
to  81,305,639,  which  is  made  up  of  sawn  lumber  and  certain  by-products  of  the 
industry. 

Paper. — Table  II  deals  with  the  production  of  paper  of  all  kinds  by  quantities 
and  values  for  each  class  of  mills.  The  following  summary  table  shows  the 
tonnage,  value  and  value  per  ton  of  each  class  of  paper  products,  and  also  the 
percentage  of  each  to  the  total  production: — 


Classes  of  paper  • 

Tons 

Value 

Average 
value 
per  ton 

Per  cent 
of  total 
tonnage 

Per  cent 
of  total 

value 

734,783 
48,150 
61.180 
87,749 
35,862 

S 
46,230,S14 
10,732,807 
7,341,37: 
5,551,409 
3,267,142 
3,577,369 

$    cts. 

62  91 
222  90 
119  99 

63  26 
91  10 

75-93 
4-97 
6-32 
907 
3-71 

63-22 

14-68 

1004 

7-59 

4-47 

Totals                                    

967,724 

76,700,913 

- 

109  00 

100  00 

The  newsprint  group,  which  in  1917  accounted  for  80-8  per  cent  of  the 
total  tonnage  and  62-4  per  cent  of  the  total  value,  fell  in  1918  to  75-93  per 
cent  of  the  tonnage,  but  shows  a  small  increase  in  per  cent  of  total  value,  being 
63-22.  Book  and  writing  paper,  which  were  5-6  per  cent  of  the  tonnage  and 
14  •  9  per  cent  of  the  value  in  1917,  fell  to  4  •  97  per  cent  of  the  tonnage  and  14  •  68 
per  cent  of  the  value  in  1918.  The  other  groups  show  increases  in  tonnage 
and  value  over   1917,   the  percentages  being  as  follows:      wrapping  papers, 


FORESTRY,  PULP   AND    PAPER  vii 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  17c  (4) 

which  in  1917  were  5-9  per  cent  of  the  total  tonnage  and  9-1  per  cent  of  the 
total  value,  rose  in  1918  to  6-32  per  cent  of  tonnage  and  10-04  per  cent  of 
value;  boards,  which  in  1917  were  6-3  per  cent  of  tonnage  and  5-7  per  cent 
of  value,  rose  in  1918  to  9-07  per  cent  of  tonnage  and  7-59  per  cent  of  value; 
other  paper  products,  which  were  in  1917  1-3  per  cent  in  tonnage  and  2-4 
per  cent  of  value,  rose  to  3-71  per  cent  and  4-47  per  cent  for  tonnage  and  value 
respectively  in  1918. 

The  average  value  per  ton  of  newsprint  paper  rose  from  $56.35  in  1917 
to  $62.91  in  1918,  an  advance  of  §6.56  per  ton,  or  11-64  per  cent;  book  and 
writing  paper  rose  from  $193.40  per  ton  in  1917  to  $222.90  per  ton  in  1918, 
an  advance  of  $29.50  per  ton,  or  15-25  per  cent;  wrapping  papers  rose  from 
$112.12  per  ton  in  1917  to  $119.99  per  ton  in  1918,  an  advance  of  $7.87  per 
ton,  or  7-02  per  cent.  Boards  on  the  other  hand  show  a  decline  from  $65-50 
per  ton  in  1917  to  $63-26  per  ton  in  1918,  a  decrease  per  ton  of  $2.24,  or  3-42 
per  cent;  other  paper  products  also  show  a  decrease,  having  fallen  from  $132.06 
per  ton  in  1917  to  $91. 11  per  ton  in  1918,  a  decline  of  $40.95  per  ton,  or  31  per 
cent. 

The  number  of  mills  engaged  in  the  production  of  paper  is  shown  by  classes, 
as  follows:  Newsprint,  23  mills;  book  and  writing  paper,  16  mills;  wrapping 
paper,  16  mills;  boards,  13  mills;  and  other  paper  products,  18  mills. 

The  production  of  paper  by  provinces  is  summarized  in  the  following 
table  by  tonnage  and  value: — 


British 
Columbia 

Ontario 

Quebec 

Canada 

113,142 

325,023 

296,618 

734,783 

7,576,711 

20,673,268 

17,980.835 

46,230,814 

- 

30,989 

17,161 

48,150 

- 

6,319,007 

4,413,800 

10,732,807 

9,374 

12,388 

39,418 

61,180 

1,244,504 

1,330,316 

4,766,552 

7,341,372 

- 

51,922 

35,827 

87,749 

_ 

2,810,527 

2,740.882 

5,551,409 

_ 

4.906 

30,956 

35,862 

_ 

735,840 

2,531,302 

3,267,142 

442,990 

1,399,811 

1,734,568 

3,577,369 

12?, 516 

425,228 

419,980 

967,724 

9,264,205 

33,268,769 

34,167,939 

76,900,913 

Newsprint ftons 

lvalue 
Book  and  writing  paper ftons 

\  value 
Wrapping  paper ftons 

Walue 
Boards /tons 

lvalue 
Other  paper  products /tons 

\value 
Other  products  (value  only) 

Tota!  <  PaPer  tonnage) 

10tal  \ralue  all  products) 


Raw  Materials. 

Materials  used  in  the  Manufacture  of  Wood-pulp. — Tables  III,  IV,  V,  VI, 
and  VII  deal  exclusively  with  the  wood  used  in  the  manufacture  of  pulp,  forming 
the  principal  or  primary  raw  material.  Table  VIII  treats  of  the  secondary 
materials  used  with  wood  in  the  manufacture  of  chemical  pulp. 

The  consumption  of  pulpwood  in  all  mills  making  pulp,  whether  purchased 
or  cut  from  own  limits  in  1918,  was  2,210,744  cords,  of  the  value  of  $24,886,475, 
as  compared  with  2,104,334  cords,  of  the  value  of  $18,817,483  in  1917.  The 
average  price  per  cord  was  $8.94  in  1917  and  $11.26  in  1918,  being  an  increase 
per  cord  over  the  previous  year  of  25  •  83  per  cent. 

Pulpwood  consumption  in  the  provinces  continues  in  the  same  order  as 
in  the  reports  for  previous  years,  Quebec  leading  with  1,085,478  cords,  Ontario 
being  second  with  784,691  cords,  British  Columbia  third  with  218,774  cords, 
New  Brunswick  fourth  with  110,133  cords,  and  Nova  Scotia  fifth  with  11,668 
cords.  The  quantity  of  pulpwood  consumed  shows  an  increase  in  each  of  the 
provinces  except  Nova  Scotia,  where  the  decrease  amounted  to  6,706  cords. 

Spruce  with  1,638,733  cords  continues  to  lead  all  classes  of  wood  used 
in  the  production  of  pulp,  being  74  •  13  per  cent  of  the  total  of  all  woods.     Balsam 


viii  CENSUS    OF    INDUSTRY 

10  GEORGE  V,  A.  1920 

fir  is  next  in  order  with  447,243  cords  or  20-23  per  cent,  hemlock  with  89,007 
cords  or  4-30  per  cent,  jack  pine  with  25,851  cords  or  1-16  per  cent,  poplar 
with  9,885  cords  or  -45  per  cent,  and  all  other  woods  with  25  cords.  Spruce 
and  hemlock  show  slight  decreases  in  the  quantity  used  as  compared  with  1917, 
while  the  principal  remaining  woods  show  increases. 

The  number  of  mills  reporting  the  consumption  of  each  kind  of  wood 
is  shown  in  Table  IV.  Spruce  was  reported  as  used  in  57  mills,  balsam  fir 
in  35  mills,  hemlock  in  7  mills,  poplar  in  8  mills  and  jack  pine  in  2  mills. 

For  the  first  time  in  the  history  of  the  industry  the  quantity  of  wood  used 
in  the  manufacture  of  sulphite  pulp  exceeds  that  of  ground  wood,  the  figures 
for  1918  being  1,044,697  cords  and  873,084  cords,  respectively.  The  percent- 
ages of  wood  used  in  the  various  processes  in  1918,  were  for  mechanical  or  ground 
wood  pulp  39-50  per  cent,  for  sulphite  fibre  47-01  per  cent,  for  sulphate  fibre 
13-14  per  cent  and  for  soda  fibre  -35  per  cent,  or  a  total  of  60-50  per  cent 
for  the  chemical  process,  as  compared  with  39-50  per  cent  for  the  mechanical 
process.  The  increase  in  the  proportion  of  wood  used  in  the  manufacture 
of  pulp  by  the  chemical  processes  does  not  represent  an  equal  increase  in  the 
production  of  pulp  by  these  methods  as  will  be  seen  from  a  study  of  Table 
IX,  which  gives  the  average  number  of  pounds  of  pulp  produced  per  cord  of 
wood  in  each  of  the  processes,  a  comparative  summary  of  which  follows  for 
the  years  1917  and  1918:— 


Pounds  of  pulp  produced  per  cord  of  wood 

Year 

Soda 
lb. 

Sulphate 
lb. 

Sulphite 
lb. 

Ground 
wood  lb. 

1917 

930 
980 

1,105 
1,133 

1,063 
1,037 

2,043 

1918 

2,039 

The  quantity  of  pulp  produced  per  cord  of  wood  in  the  provinces  varies 
considerably  in  each  of  the  processes.  British  Columbia  is  highest  in  the 
production  of  pulp  by  the  mechanical  process,  averaging  2,485  pounds  per 
cord.  Quebec  is  next  with  2,078  pounds,  Ontario  third  with  1,917  pounds, 
New  Brunswick  fourth  with  1,893  pounds  and  Nova  Scotia  fifth  with  1,825 
pounds.  In  the  sulphite  process  British  Columbia  again  leads  with  an  average 
production  of  1,059  pounds  per  cord,  followed  by  New  Brunswick  with  1,046 
pounds,  Quebec  with  1,042  pounds  and  Ontario  with  1,002  pounds.  In  the 
sulphate  process  Ontario  is  first  with  1,176  pounds  per  cord,  British  Columbia 
second  with  1,163  pounds  per  cord,  Quebec  third  with  1,145  pounds  and  New 
Brunswick  fourth  with  1,050  pounds.  Ontario  and  Quebec  are  the  only  prov- 
inces producing  pulp  by  the  soda  process,  the  quantity  per  cord  being  1.000 
pounds  and  961  pounds  respectively. 

The  value  of  the  wood  used  in  the  various  processes  rose  from  $8.94  in 
1917  to  $11.26  in  1918,  an  increase  of  $2.32  per  cord,  or  26  per  cent. 

The  value  of  wood  used  in  the  mechanical  process  rose  from  $8.07  in  1917 
to  Sll  .40  in  1918,  or  41  per  cent.  In  the  sulphite  process  the  rise  is  less  marked 
as  only  the  higher  grades  are  used,  the  prices  being  $10.18  per  cord  in  1917 
as  compared  with  $11.64  in  1918,  an  increase  of  about  14-5  per  cent.  The 
value  of  wood  in  the  sulphate  process  rose  from  $8. 10  per  cord  in  1917,  to  $9.41 
per  cord  in  1918,  or  16-2  per  cent.  By  the  soda  process  the  increase  was  from 
$10.07  per  cord  in  1917  to  $11.23  per  cord  in  1918,  or  nearly  11-5  per  cent. 

The  value  of  all  other  materials  used  in  the  manufacture  of  wood-pulp 
is  shown  in  table  VIII,  and  amounts  to  $4,938,667,  as  compared  with  a  total 
cost  of  $1,602,212  in  1917.  The  items  comprising  this  total  were  sulphur, 
58,950  tons,  valued  at  $1,830,319;  limestone  and  lime,   127,014  tons  ,valued 


FORESTRY,  PULP   AND   PAPER  ix 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  17c  (4) 

at  $729,793;  sulphate  of  soda,  20,495  tons,  valued  at  $522,423;  soda  ash,  3,708 
tons,  valued  at  $159,430;  bleach,  3,061  tons,  valued  at  $140,287;  and  all  other 
miscellaneous  materials  for  which  quantities  were  not  specified,  valued  at 
$1,556,415. 

Materials  used  in  the  Manufacture  of  Paper. — The  quantity  and  value  of 
the  materials  used  in  the  manufacture  of  paper,  whether  in  the  raw  or  partially 
manufactured  state,  are  shown  in  table  X  by  provinces  and  classes  of  mills. 
A  summary  table  for  the  Dominion  showing  the  quantities  and  values  of  the 
principal  materials  in  1918  follows: — 


Kinds  of  materials 


Quantity 


Cost 
value 
at  mill 


Ground  wood  pulp 

Sulphite  fibre 

Sulphate  fibre 

Soda  fibre 

Other  chemical  fibre 

Rags 

Old  or  waste  paper 

All  other  paper  stock 

Soda  ash 

Alum 

Clay 

All  other  materials  (value  only). . 

Total  cost  of  materials 


tons 

679,395 

242,68.5 

35,587 

4,775 

2,419 

20,138 

46,350 

8,764 

968 

8,382 

9,212 


14,215,895 

13,665,361 

2,260,443 

397,621 

219,654 

1,412,367 

1,320,338 

634,149 

47,280 

375,366 

217,922 

2,782,940 


37,549,336 


The  total  cost  of  materials  in  1917  was  $28,617,334  and  in  1918,  $37,549,336, 
an  increase  of  $8,932,002,  or  31-2  per  cent. 

Fuel  consumption. — Table  XI  shows  the  quantities  and  values  of  the  various 
kinds  of  fuel  used  in  each  class  of  mills  for  the  year  ended  December  31st,  1918. 
The  total  cost  of  all  fuel  used  in  the  industry  was  $10,191,084,  of  which  bitum- 
inous coal  accounted  for  $9,151,522  or  about  90  per  cent  of  the  entire  fuel 
cost.  The  following  summary  table  shows  the  quantity  and  value  of  each 
class  of  fuel  used  in  the  Dominion  by  origin: — 


Kinds  of  fuel 


Bituminous  coal,  slack ton 

Bituminous  coal,  lump " 

Bituminous  coal,  run  of  mine ' 

Anthracite  coal,  dust " 

Anthracite  coal,  lump ' 

Lignite  coal " 

Coke " 

Gasoline gal 

Oil  (fuel) " 

Wood : cd 

All  other  fuel 

Total  fuel  cost 


Canadian 


Quantity 


11,388 
2,972 

128,979 


788 

91,451 

1,820 

53,296 


Value 


84,832 

30,711 

1,981,579 


7,410 

22,002 

373 

356,573 

17,914 


2,501,394 


Foreign 


Quantity 


212,938 

255,960 

399,362 

12,174 

162 

17 

36 

13,947,600 


Value 


1,650,681 

1,880,239 

3,523,480 

90,000 

1,762 

190 

676 

519,390 

23,182 


7,689,690 


Agencies   of  Production  —  (1)    Capital 

Employed. 


Mill   Equipment  —  Power 


as   outlined   above,    are 


The  agencies  of  production  of  a  fixed    character, 
presented  in  Tables  XII  to  XVI  of  this  report. 

Capital. — Table  XII  shows  the  distribution  of  capital  under  four  heads: 
(a)  land,  buildings  and  fixtures,  (b)  machinery  and  tools,  (c)  materials  on  hand, 
stocks  in  process,  finished  products  on  hand,  fuel  and  miscellaneous  supplies, 


CENSUS    OF    INDUSTRY 


10  GEORGE  V,  A.  1920 

and  (d)  cash,  trading  and  operating  accounts  and  bills  receivable.  The  statistics 
are  also  presented  by  provinces  and  classes  of  mills,  a  summary  of  which  is 
appended  for  the  Dominion : — 


In  paper 
mills 


In  pulp 
mills 


In  pulp 

and  paper 

mills 


In  all 
classes 
of  mills 


Land,  buildings  and  fixtures 

Machinery  and  tools 

Materials  on  hand,  stocks  in  process,  etc 

Cash,  trading  and  operating  accounts,  etc 

Totals 

Percentages 

Land,  buildings  and  fixtures 

Machinery  and  tools 

Materials  on  hand,  etc 

Cash,  trading  and  operating  accounts,  etc 


4,379,659 
3,965,298 
2,276,540 
1,899,268 


37,230,737 

18,098,279 

8,955,808 

7,423,399 


77,195,185 
38,563,689 
28,419,730 
12,937,112 


118,805,581 
60,627,266 
39,652,078 

22,259,779 


12,520,765 


71,708,223 


157,115,716 


241,344,704 


34-98 

51-92 

49-13 

31-67 

25-24 

24-55 

18-18 

12-49 

18-09 

1517 

10-35 

8-23 

100  00 

100  00 

100  00 

49-23 
25-12 
16-43 
9-22 


100-00 


The  total  capital  investment  by  provinces  for  each  class  of  mills  in  1918 
is  presented  in  the  following  summary  table: — 


Provinces 

In  paper 
mills 

In  pulp 
mills 

In  pulp 

and  paper 
mills 

In  all 

classes  of 
mills 

British  Columbia 

$ 

5,341,192 
7,179,573 

$ 

17,413,569 

21,198,866 

24,490,175 

7,852,225 

753,388 

$ 

25,292,419 

62,036,749 
69,786,548 

$ 

42,705,988 

88,576,807 
101,456,296 

7,852,225 

753,388 

Totals  for  Canada 

12,520,765 

71,708,223 

157,115,716 

241,344,704 

The  percentage  of  capital  is  largest  in  the  class  of  pulp  and  paper  mills, 
being  65-10  per  cent  of  the  total;  pulp  mills  are  next  with  29-71  per  cent,  and 
paper  mills  last  with  5-19  per  cent.  Each  province  shows  an  increase  in  the 
amount  of  capital  investment  over  1917.  British  Columbia  rose  from 
$22,584,652  in  1917  to  $42,705,988  in  1918,  an  increase  of  90  per  cent;  Ontario 
from  S72,006,972  in  1917  to  $88,576,807  in  1918,  or  about  23  per  cent;  Quebec 
from  $84,609,584  in  1917  to  $101,456,296  in  1918,  or  about  30  per  cent  increase; 
New  Brunswick  from  $7,136,277  in  1917  to  $7,852,225  in  1918,  or  10  per  cent 
increase,  and  Nova  Scotia  from  $449,920  in  1917  to  $753,388  in  1918,  or  a  little 
more  than  67  per  cent.  The  average  value  of  the  total  capital  invested  in 
the  30  plants  making  paper  only,  was  $417,359;  in  the  38  plants  making  pulp 
only,  $1,887,058,  and  in  the  26  combined  pulp  and  paper  mills,  $6,042,912. 

Pulp  Mill  Machinery  (Table  XIII). — The  total  capacity  of  mills  making 
ground  wood-pulp  in  the  Dominion  in  1918  was  1,146,154  tons  dry  weie.ht, 
of  which  the  mills  in  the  province  of  Quebec  reported  a  total  capacity  of  620,784 


FORESTRY,  PULP   AND   PAPER  xi 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  17c  (4) 

tons,  or  54-16  per  cent  of  the  capacity  of  the  Dominion.  Ontario  mills  had 
a  capacity  of  382,270  tons,  or  33-35  per  cent;  British  Columbia  mills  of  103,600 
tons,  or  9-04  per  cent;  Nova  Scotia  mills  of  31,500  tons  or  2-75  per  cent;  and 
New  Brunswick  mills  of  8,000  tons,  or  0-70  per  cent. 

The  actual  output  of  ground  wood-pulp  in  the  Dominion  during  the  year 
was  879,510  tons,  or  76-74  per  cent  of  the  total  capacity.  In  Quebec  the  actual 
output  of  ground  wood-pulp  was  493,520  tons  ,or  79-50  per  cent  of  full  capacity; 
in  Ontario  the  actual  output  was  277,922  tons,  or  72-70  per  cent  of  full  capacity; 
in  British  Columbia  the  actual  output  was  91,588  tons,  or  88-40  per  cent  of 
full  capacity;  in  New  Brunswick  the  actual  output  was  6,463  tons,  or  80-80 
per  cent  of  full  capacity;  and  in  Nova  Scotia  the  total  actual  output  was  10,017 
tons,  or  31-80  per  cent  of  full  capacity. 

Table  XIV  gives  the  equipment  in  mills  making  chemical  pulp  by  the 
various'  processes.  Sulphite  pulp  occupies  the  first  place  in  the  Dominion, 
with  a  yearly  capacity  of  613,477  tons  and  an  actual  putput  of  494,322  tons, 
or  80  per  cent  of  the  full  capacity.  The  sulphate  process  is  next,  with  a  yearly 
capacity  of  191,620  tons  and  an  actual  output  of  179,600  tons,  or  about  94  per 
cent  of  full  capacity,  and  the  soda  process  last,  with  a  yearly  capacity  of  5,600 
tons  and  an  actual  output  of  3,761  tons,  or  67  per  cent  of  full  capacity. 

Paper  Mill  Machinery. — The  machinery  with  which  the  different  classes 
of  mills  are  equipped  for  the  manufacture  of  paper  is  given  in  Table  XV  for 
Canada  and  the  provinces.  The  total  yearly  capacity  of  all  mills  making  paper 
of  any  kind  in  the  Dominion  was  1,019,534  tons,  and  the  actual  output  reported 
for  the  year  was  967,724  tons,  or  about  95  per  cent  of  full  capacity.  Ontario 
leads  the  provinces  with  a  yearly  capacity  of  456,672  tons  and  an  actual  output 
of  425,228  tons,  or  over  93  per  cent  of  full  capacity.  Quebec  is  second  with 
a  total  yearly  capacity  of  424,862  tons  and  an  actual  output  of  419,980  tons, 
or  nearly  98  per  cent  of  full  capacity,  and  British  Columbia  third  with  a  total 
yearly  capacity  of  138,000  tons  and  an  actual  output  of  122,536  tons,  or  nearly 
89  per  cent  of  full  capacity.  From  these  figures  it  will  be  seen  that  the  margin 
between  capacity  and  output  is  5  per  cent  for  the  Dominion,  7  per  cent  in 
Ontario,  2  per  cent  in  Quebec,  and  11  per  cent  in  British  Columbia. 

Power  Employed. — The  various  kinds  of  power  employed  in  the  industry > 
whether  owned  or  rented,  is  presented  in  Table  XVI  for  provinces  and  classes 
of  mills.  The  total  units  of  power  in  the  Dominion  in  1918  numbered  4,001 
with  a  rated  horse-power  of  664,097,  of  which  546,198  was  actually  employed. 
Water-wheels  or  turbines  consisted  of  382  units  or  360,858  rated  and  300,965 
actually  used  horse-power.  Electric  motors,  owned  and  rented,  numbered  2,946 
units  of  183,384  rated  horse-power  and  137,183  actually  employed;  steam 
engines  numbered  269  units  of  56,660  rated  and  47,362  used  horse-power; 
gasoline  engines  numbered  9  with  82  rated  and  82  used  horse-power.  Other 
unspecified  powers  numbered  18  Units  with  a  rated  horse-power  of  3,100  and 
used  horse-power  of  2,375. 

Of  the  total  power  actually  employed  64  •  57  per  cent  was  in  pulp  and  paper 
mills,  30  •  86  per  cent  in  pulp  mills  and  4  •  57  per  cent  in  paper  mills.  By  provinces, 
Quebec  used  51-40  per  cent  of  the  power  actually  employed,  Ontario  32-22 
per  cent,  British  Columbia  12-23  per  cent,  New  Brunswick  2-48  per  cent  and 
Nova  Scotia  1-67  per  cent. 


CENSUS    OF   INDUSTRY 


10  GEORGE  V,  A.  1920 


Agencies  of  Production  —  (2)  Employees,  Salaries,  Wages,  and  Working 

Time. 

Employment  statistics  are  presented  in  Tables  XVII  to  XX. 

Employees,  Salaries  and  Wages. — A  general  review  of  the  number  of  persons 
at  employment,  male  and  female,  by  classes  of  mills,  together  with  the  amount 
paid  in  salaries  and  wages,  is  given  in  Table  XVII.  A  comparison  of  the  number 
at  employment  by  classes  and  the  salaries  and  wages  paid  for  the  years  1917 
and  1918  shows  as  follows: — 


Male 
No. 

Female 
No. 

Salaries 

and 
Wages 

Increase  per  cent 

Employ- 
ees 

Salaries 
and  Wages 

Officers,  superintendents  and  managers / 1917 

\l918 

Clerks,  stenographers  and  other  salaried  employees.. /1917 

\1918 

Wage  earners,  average  number (1917 

\1918 

384 
462 

961 
1,164 

20,730 
23,086 

5 
2 

213 
301 

672 
848 

$ 

1.250,191 
1,807,468 

[,288,821 

1,888,151 

17,789,007 

23,278,606 

19-28 
24-70 
11-83 

41-19 
46-50 
30-86 

Totals..., /1917 

\W18 

32,075 
24,712 

890 
1,151 

20,358,019 
26,974.^5 

12  62 

32  50 

It  will  be  observed  in  the  foregoing  table  that  the  total  employees  connected 
with  the  industry  increased  by  12-62  per  cent  and  the  total  of  salary  and  wage 
payments  by  32-50  per  cent.  In  the  class  of  officials,  superintendents  and 
managers,  the  number  of  persons  employed  increased  by  19  •  28  per  cent  and 
the  salaries  paid  by  41  •  19  per  cent.  In  the  class  including  clerks,  stenographers, 
etc.,  the  number  of  persons  employed  increased  by  24-70  per  cent  and  the 
salaries  by  46-50  per  cent.  In  the  class  of  employees  working  for  wages  the 
increase  in  number  was  11-83  per  cent  and  in  wages  paid,  30-86  per  cent.  Thus, 
while  the  number  of  employees  in  each  class  shows  a  considerable  increase, 
the  amounts  paid  in  salaries  and  wages  in  the  same  classes  show  marked  increases. 

A  comparison  of  the  average  salaries  and  wages  paid  to  each  class  of  em- 
ployees for  the  calendar  years  1917  and  1918  is  given  in  the  accompanying 
table : — 


Officers,  superintendents,  etc 
Clerks,  stenographers,  etc  . 
Wage  earners 


3,291 
1,098 

831 


1918 


3,895 

1,289 

972 


Increase 


Amount 


604 
191 

141 


Per  cent 


18-35 
17-39 
16-97 


It  will  be  observed  that  the  average  salaries  of  officers,  superintendents 
and  managers  have  advanced  from  $3,291  in  1917  to  $3,895  in  1918,  an  increase 
of  $604  for  the  year,  or  18-35  per  cent;  that  of  clerks,  stenographers,  etc.,  from 
$1,098  in  1917  to  $1,289  in  1918,  an  advance  of  $191  per  employee,  or  a  per 
cent  increase  of  17-39.  The  average  wages  of  workers  rose  from  $831  in  1917 
to  $972  in  1918,  or  an  advance  in  yearly  wages  of  $141  each,  equal  to  a  per 
cent  increase  of  16-97. 

The  number  of  persons  employed  by  months  in  the  various  classes  of  mills 
is  shown  in  Table  XVIII.     The  months  of  highest  employment  in  pulp  mills 


FORESTRY,  PULP   AND   PAPER  xiii 

SESSIONAL   PAPER  No.  17c  (4) 

were  from  June  to  September,  and  the  lowest  December,  January,  February 
and  March.  In  pulp  and  paper  mills  it  ranges  from  June-August  for  highest 
and  December-March  for  lowest  employment.  Paper  mills  show  highest  em- 
ployment in  December  and  lowest  in  January,  while  in  the  remaining  months 
employment  varies  little  from  the  average  throughout  the  year. 

Table  XIX  presents  statistics  of  classified  weekly  wage  payments  by  mill 
workers.  A  comparative  table  is  given  below.  Of  the  21,699  employees  on 
wages  in  1917,  the  number  receiving  less  than  $10  per  week  was  1,546,  or  7-1 
per  cent  of  the  total,  whereas  in  1918  the  number  receiving  less  than  $10  per 
week  was  1,173  or  5  per  cent.  .Those  receiving  $10  but  less  than  $15  per  week 
numbered  6,999  in  1917,  or  32-2  per  cent,  as  compared  with  3,062  in  1918, 
or  13-1  per  cent.  In  the  class  receiving  $15  per  week  but  less  than  $20  the 
number  was  8,130  in  1917,  or  37-5  per  cent  as  against  7,499  in  1918,  or  32-2 
per  cent.  In  the  class  receiving  $20  but  less  than  $25  per  week  the  number 
was  3,119  in  1917,  or  14-4  per  cent,  as  against  6,318  in  1918,  or  27-1  per  cent. 
In  the  class  receiving  more  than  $25  per  week  the  number  in  1917  was  1,905 
or  8-8  per  cent,  as  against  5,259  in  1918,  or  22-6  per  cent. 


1918 

1917 

Over  16  yrs. 

Under  16  yrs. 

Total 

Over 

6  yrs. 

Under 

16  yrs. 

Total 

Male 

Female 

Male 

Female 

Male 

Female 

Male 

Female 

5 

3 

3 

39 

87 

122 

216 

371 

2,402 

7,420 

6,308 

5,258 

4 

16 

5 

65 

87 

210 

111 

148 

102 

22 

9 

1 

16 
5 
10 
21 
21 
13 
22 
23 
16 
55 
1 

8 
12 
16 

8 
29 
16 

3 

2 

33 

36 

34 

133 

224 

361 

352 

542 

2.520 

7,499 

6,318 

5,253 

38 

.24 

44 

72 

114 

122 

477 

1,331 

5,595 

8,117 

3,119 

1,904 

8 

17 

84 

141 

112 

95 

108 

50 

14 

6 

1 

2 
3 
3 
14 
17 
3 
17 
8 

6 

10 
13 
2 

1 

48 

50 

$5  but  under  S6 

141 

$6  but  under  S7 

240 

245 

$8  but  -lnder  19 

220 

S9  but    .nierSlO    

602 

$10  bv    -nder  $12 

1,390 

$12  but  under  $15  . 

5,609 

$15  but  under  $20 

8,130 

$20  but  under  $25 

3,119 

1,905 

Totals    

33,334 

780 

303 

94 

33,311 

30,957 

636 

74 

33 

31,699 

The  average  weekly  wages  of  all  employees  irrespective  of  age  or  sex  was 
$1,576  in  1917  and  $1,920  in  1918,  or  an  average  increase  of  21-83  per  cent. 

Table  XX  shows  the  average  working  hours  for  each  class  of  mills,  (a)  on 
full  time  operation,  (6)  three-quarter  time,  (c)  one-half  time,  (d)  less  than  one- 
half  time,  and  (e)  idle.  Pulp  and  paper  mills  lead  with  a  total  of  290-8  days 
on  full  time,  followed  by  paper  mills  with  257  •  5  days  and  pulp  mills  with  245  •  7 
days,  or  an  average  for  the  three  classes  of  mills  of  264-7  days.  Pulp  mills  are 
highest  on  the  per  shift  and  per  week  basis  with  11-2  and  70-3  hours,  respect- 
ively, followed  by  paper  mills  with  10-1  and  62-9  hours,  and  pulp  and  paper 
mills  with  9-3  and  55-3  hours,  respectively.  Time  lost  through  mills  being 
idle  was  greatest  in  pulp  mills  with  44-9  days,  paper  mills  being  next  with 
37-8  days  and  pulp  and  paper  mills  following  with  8-8  days. 


Miscellaneous  Expenses  of  Production. 

Miscellaneous  expenses  by  classes  of  mills  and  provinces  are  presented  in 
Table  XXI,  and  include  the  following  :  Rent  of  offices,  works  and  machinery 
$268,224;  rent  of  power,  $1,429,873;  insurance,  $694,510;  taxes  (internal  revenue, 
war,  etc.),  $872,880;  taxes  (provincial,  municipal,  etc.),  $700,680;  royalties, 
use  of  patents,  etc.,  $12,181;  advertising  expenses,  $60,301;  travelling  expenses, 


xiv  CENSUS   OF   INDUSTRY 

10  GEORGE  V,  A.  1920 

8362,178;  ordinary  repairs  to  buildings  and  machinery,  S3, 116,042;  and  all 
other  sundrjr  expenses,  $5,908,678,  making  a  total  for  the  Dominion  of 
$13,425,547. 

All  other  sundry  expenses  constituted  the  principal  item,  being  44  per  cent 
of  the  total  outlay,  repairs  to  buildings  and  machinery,  23-2  per  cent;  rent 
of  power,  10-7  per  cent;  taxes,  11-7  per  cent;  insurance,  5-2  per  cent;  and  the 
remaining  items  about  5-2  per  cent. 


Imports  and  Exports. 

Tables  XXII,  XXIII,  XXIV,  XXV,  XXVI,  and  XXVII  of  this  report 
present  statistics  of  the  exports  and  imports  of  pulpwood,  wood-pulp  and  paper 
for  the  calendar  years  1916,  1917,  and  1918. 

Pulpwood. — The  quantity  and  value  of  the  exports  of  pulpwood  by  provinces 
for  the  calendar  years  1916,  1917,  and  1918  is  given  in  Table  XXII.  A  large 
increase  in  the  quantity  and  value  of  pulpwood  exported  will  be  noted  for  the 
year  1918  when  compared  with  1916-17.  In  the  latter  period,  there  was  a 
decrease  of  50,362  cords  in  1917  as  compared  with  1916  or  4-95  per  cent,  while 
in  1918  there  was  an  increase  of  331,691  cords  or  approximately  32-58  per 
cent.  The  average  value  per  cord  of  pulpwood  exported  was  $6.43  in  1916, 
$7.78  in  1917,  and  $9.63  in  1918.     There  are  no  imports  of  pulpwood  into  Canada. 

In  Table  XXIII  the  production,  manufacture  and  export  of  pulpwood  are 
brought  together  by  provinces.  There  has  been  a  gradual  increase  in  the 
quantity  used  in  production  and  in  manufacture  in  each  year,  while  the  quantity 
for  export  has  fluctuated.  The  province  of  Quebec  exported  over  65  per  cent 
of  the  total  number  of  cords  in  1918,  New  Brunswick  nearly  20  per  cent,  and 
Ontario  a  little  under  15  per  cent. 

Wood-pulp. — Tables  XXIV  vand  XXV  deal  with  the  exports  and  imports 
of  wood-pulp  by  classes  and  by  countries  to  which  it  was  exported,  for  the 
calendar  years  1916,  1917,  and  1918.  Nearly  93-20  per  cent  of  the  total  quan- 
tity exported  in  1918  went  to  the  United  States,  4-89  per  cent  to  Japan,  1-04 
per  cent  to  other  countries,  and  0  •  87  per  cent  to  the  United  Kingdom.  Of  the 
kinds  of  pulp  exported  chemical  pulp  formed  69  per  cent  of  the  total  exported 
and  mechanical  pulp  31  per  cent.  The  United  States  in  1918  took  over  98 
per  cent  of  the  total  export  of  mechanical  pulp  and  over  90  per  cent  of  the  export 
of  chemical  pulp. 

Table  XXV  shows  the  value  of  the  imports  of  wood-pulp  into  Canada 
for  the  calendar  years  1916,  1917,  and  1918.  All  of  it  came  from  the  United 
States.  The  value  in  1918  decreased  by  $116,853  or  nearly  20  per  cent,  as 
compared  with  the  previous  year. 

Paper. — The  exports  and  imports  of  paper  and  its  manufacture,  bjr  kinds 
or  classes,  for  the  calendar  years  1916,  1917,  and  1918  are  shown  in  Tables 
XXVI  and  XXVII.  The  exports  of  paper  (Table  XXVI)  show  increases  in 
each  of  the  various  items,  the  largest  single  item  being  that  of  printing  paper 
or  newsprint,  which  amounted  to  $37,301,269  in  a  total  value  of  all  exports 
of  $42,950,759,  or  nearly  87  per  cent.  The  increase  over  the  year  1917  was 
$7,328,827,  or  approximately  20  per  cent.  Table  XXVII  shows  the  statistics 
of  imports  for  1916,  1917,  and  1918.  The  value  of  imported  papers  show 
annual  increases  but  in  a  lesser  degree  than  that  of  exports.  In  the  year  1917 
the  increase  of  exports  was  approximately  52  per  cent  and  of  imports  26  per  cent, 
while  in  1918  the  increases  were  20  per  cent  in  exports  and  7-6  per  cent  in 
imports. 


10  GEORGE  V  SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  17c  (4)  A.  1920 


TABLES 


PRODUCTION : 

Table  I  —Wood-pulp. 

Table  II  —Paper. 

RAW   MATERIALS: 

Table  III        — Pulpwood,  by  Provinces,  1917  and  1918. 

Table  IV         —Pulpwood,  by  Kinds  of  Wood,  1917  and  1918. 

Table  V  —Pulpwood,  by  Processes,  1917  and  1918. 

Table  VI         — Pulpwood,  by  Provinces,    Kinds    of  Wood  and   Processes, 

1918. 
Table  VII       — Pulpwood  Consumption,  by  Kinds  of  Wood  and  Classes  of 

Mills,  1918. 
Table  VIII     — Other  Materials  used  in  the  Manufacture  of    Wood-pulp, 
1918. 
-Average  Number  of  Pounds  of  Pulp   per  cord  of   Wood. 
-Materials  used  in  the  Manufacture  of  Paper,  1918. 
-Fuel  Consumption,  by  Classes  of  Mills,  1918. 

EQUIPMENT,  POWER   EMPLOYED: 

— Capital  Invested  in  the  Pulp  and  Paper  Industry. 
— Equipment  in  Mills  making  Ground  Wood-pulp. 
—Pulp  Mill  Machinery. 
— Paper  Mill  Machinery. 
— Power  Employed. 

EMPLOYEES,  SALARIES,  WAGES,  WORKING   TIME: 
Table  XVII   — Employees,  Salaries  and  Wages. 
-    Table  XVIII — Employees,  by  Months,  etc. 

Table  XIX    — Number  of  Employees  by  Classified  Weekly  Wages. 
Table  XX      —Averages  of  Working  Time,  etc. 

MISCELLANEOUS   EXPENSES: 

Table  XXI     — Miscellaneous  Expenses. 

IMPORTS   AND   EXPORTS: 

Table  XXII  —Exports  of  Pulpwood. 

Table  XXIII — Production,   Manufacture  and  Export  of  Pulpwood  com- 
pared, 1916,  1917  and  1918. 
Table  XXIV— Exports  of  Wood-pulp  by  Countries,  1916,  1917  and  1918. 
Table  XXV   —Imports  of  Wood-pulp  by  Countries,  1916,  1917  and  1918. 
Table  XXVI  —Exports  of  Paper,  1916,  1917  and  1918. 
Table  XXVII— Imports  of  Paper,  1916,  1917  and  1918. 


Table 

IX 

Table 

X 

Table 

XI 

CAPITAL 

EQl 

Table 

XII 

Table 

XIII 

Table 

XIV 

Table 

XV 

Table 

XVI 

10  GEORGE  V  DOCUMENT  PARLEMENTAIRE  No  17c  (4)  A.  1920 


TABLEAUX 


PRODUCTION : 

Tableau  I  — Pulpe  de  bois. 

Tableau  II  — Papier. 

MATIERES    PREMIERES: 

Tableau  III        — Bois  a  pulpe,  par  provinces,  1917  et  1918. 

Tableau  IV        — Bois  a  pulpe,  par  essences  de  bois,  1917  et  1918. 

Tableau  V  — Bois  a  pulpe,  par  procedes,  1917  et  1918. 

Tableau  VI         — Bois  a  pulpe,  par  provinces,  essences  de  bois  et  procedes, 

1918. 
Tableau  VII       — Consommation  du  bois  a  pulpe,  par  essences  de  bois  et 

genres  de  fabriques,  1918. 
Tableau  VIII     — Autres  matieres  premieres  employees  dans  la  fabrication 

de  la  pulpe  de  bois,  1918. 
Tableau  IX        — Quantite  moyenne  de  livres  de  pulpe  par  corde  de  bois. 
Tableau  X  — Matieres   premieres    employees    dans    la    fabrication   du 

papier,  1918. 
Tableau  XI        — Consommation  du  combustible   par  genres  de    fabriques, 

1918. 

CAPITAL,  MACHINERIE,  FORCE   MOTRICE   EMPLOYEE: 

Tableau  XII      — Capital  place  dans  l'industrie  de  la  pulpe  et  du  papier. 
Tableau  XIII    — Agencement  des  fabriques  de  pate  de  bois. 
Tableau  XIV     — Machinerie  des  pulperies. 
Tableau  XV       — Machinerie  des  papeteries. 
Tableau  XVI     — Force  motrice  employee. 

PERSONNEL,    APPOINTEMENTS,    SALAIRES,    DUREE    DES   OPERA- 
'     TIONS: 
Tableau  XVII    — Personnel,  appointements  et  salaires. 
Tableau  XVIII  — Employes,  par  mois,  etc. 
Tableau  XIX     — Salaires  hebdomadaires  classifies. 
Tableau  XX       — Duree  moyenne  des  operations. 

FRAIS    GENERAUX: 

Tableau  XXI     — Frais  generaux. 

IMPORTATIONS  ET  EXPORTATIONS: 

Tableau  XXII  — Exportations  de  bois  a  pulpe. 

Tableau  XXIII — Production,    consommation    et    exportations    du   bois    a 

pulpe,  comparees,  1916,  1917  et  1918. 
Tableau  XXIV — Exportations  de  pulpe  de  bois  par  pays,   1916,  1917  et 

1918. 
Tableau  XXV    — Importations  de  pulpe  de  bois,  par  pays,  1916,  1917  et 

1918. 
Tableau  XXVI  — Exportations  de  papier,  1916,  1917  et  1918. 
Tableau  XXVII— Importations  de  papier,  1916,  1917  et  1918. 

17c  (4)— 2  1 


CENSUS   OF   INDUSTRY 

10  GEORGE  V,  A.  192 
Table  I. — Wood-Pulp  Production,  Use  and  Sale  by  Classes  of  Mills,  1918. 


Pulp  Mills 
Pulperies 

Pulp  and 
Pulperies  et 

Kinds  of  pulp  by  provinces 

Total 
production 

Production 
tot  ale 

Made  for 
own  use 

Pour  la  con- 
sommation 

Made  for  Sale 
Pour  la  vente 

Total 
production 

Production 
totale 

Made  for 
own  use 

Pour  la  con- 
sommation 

Tons  of 

2,000  lbs. 

Tonnes  de 
2,000  liv. 

Tons  of 
2,000  lbs. 

Tonnes  de 
2,000  liv. 

Tons  of 
2,000  lbs. 

Tonnes  de 
2,000  liv. 

Value 
Valeur 

Tons  of 
2,000  lbs. 

Tonnes  de 
2,000  liv. 

Tons  of 
2,000  lbs. 

Tonnes  de 
2,000  liv. 

British  Columbia 

37,795 
2,562 

: 

37,795 
2,562 

2,834,625 
252,580 
766,146 

91,588 

28,534 
12,682 

91  138 

28,230 

9,825 

Totals  .                   

40,357 

6,463 

30,766 
29,390 

- 

40,357 

6,463 

30,766 
29,390 

3,853,351 

155,000 

2.089,662 
2,823,994 

132,804 

129,193 

New  Bruuswick 

Total 

66,619 

10,017 

- 

66,619 

10.017 

5,068,656 

226,740 
16,711 

_ 

Nova  Scotia 

Total 

10,017 

15,119 

93,820 
10,459 

- 

10,017 

15,119 

93,820 

10,459 

243,451 

483,268 

7,857,987 
853,030 
517,555 

262,803 

730 

122,435 

Ontario 

°40,943 

730 

70,786 

Total 

119,398 

201,730 

41,955 
45,267 

- 

119,398 

201,730 

41,955 
45,267 

9,711,840 

5,326,784 

3,054,500 

3,631,747 

5,227 

385,968 

291,790 

3,031 

139,017 

79,240 

312,459 

Quebec 

274,249 

3,031 

76,424 

25,228 

Total 

388,952 

233,329 

204,336 
87,678 

- 

288,952 

233,329 

204,336 
87,678 

12,018,258 

6,191,792 

15,836,774 
7,561,351 

1,305,639 

513,078 

646,181 

3,761 

289,986 

91,922 

378,932 

Canada 

606,330 

3,761 
175.440 

35,053 

Total 

525,343 

- 

525,343 

30,895,556 

1,031,851 

820,584 

FORESTRY,  PULP   AND   PAPER  ; 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  17c  (4) 

Tableau  I. — Production,  consommation  et  vente  de  la  pulpe  de  bois,  par  genres  de  fabriques,  1918. 


paper  mills 

All  mills  mak 

ng  wood  pulp 

papeteries 

Toutes  fabriques 

de  pulpe  de  bois 

Made  for  Sale 
Pour  la  vente 

Total 
production 

Production 
totale 

Made  for 
own  use 

Pour  la  con 
sommatioi 

Made  for  Sale 
Pour  la  vente 

Especes  de  pulpe,  par  provinces 

Tons  of 
2,000  lbs. 

Value 

Tons  of 
2,000  lbs. 

Tons  of 
2,000  lbs. 

Tons  of 
2,000  lbs. 

Value 

Tonnes  de 
2,000  liv. 

Valeur 

Tonnes  de 
2,000  liv. 

Tonnes  de 
2,000  liv. 

Tonnes  de 

2,000  liv. 

Valeur 

Colombie  Britannique 

450 

304 
2,857 

6,709 

19,099 
183,565 

91,588 

66,329 
*       15,244 

91,138 

28,230 
9,825 

450 

38,099 
5,419 

6,709 

2,853,724 
436,145 
766,146 

Pulpe  mecanique. 
Pulpe  chimique,  a  la  soude. 
Pulpe  chimique,  au  sulfite. 
Pulpe  chimique,  au  sulfate. 
Autres  produits  divers. 

3,611 

209,373 

173,161 

129,193 
1 

43,968 

4,062,724 

Total 
N'ouveau-Brunswick 

- 

- 

6,463 

30,766 
29,390 

: 

6,463 

30,766 
29,390 

155,000 

2,0S9,662 
2,823,994 

Pulpe  mecanique. 
Pulpe  chimique,  a  la  soude. 
Pulpe  chimique,  au  sulfite. 
Pulpe  chimique,  au  sulfate. 
Autres  produits  divers. 

66,619 

66,619 

5,068,656 

Total 
NouTelle-Ecosse 

- 

- 

10,017 

: 

10,017 

226,740 
16,711 

Pulpe  mecanique. 
Pulpe  chimique,  a  la  soude. 
Pulpe  chimique,  au  sulfite. 
Pulpe  chimique,  au  salfate. 
Autres  produits  divers. 

10,017 

10,017 

243,451 

Total 
Ontario 

21,860 

51,649 

505,844 
3,395,955 

277,922 

730 

216,255 

10,459 

240,943 
730 

70,786 

36,979 

145,469 
10,459 

989,112 

11,253,942 
853,030 
517,555 

Pulpe  mecanique. 
Pulpe  chimique,  a  la  soude. 
Pulpe  chimique,  au  sulfite. 
Pulpe  chimique,  au  sulfate. 
Autres  produits  divers. 

73,509 

3,901,799 

505,366 

312,459 

192,907 

13,613,639 

Total 
Quebec 

17,541 

62,593 
54,012 

429,366 

3,212,235 
3,960,192 

493,520 

3,031 

180,972 

124,507 

274,249 

3,031 

76,424 

25,228 

219,271 

104,551 
99,279 

5,756,150 

6,266,735 

7,591,939 

5,227 

Pulpe  mecanique. 
Pulpe  chimique,  a  la  soude. 
Pulpe  chimique,  au  sulphite. 
Pulpe  chimique,  au  sulfate. 
\utres  produits  divers. 

134,146 

7,601,793 

802,030 

378,932 

423,101 

19,620,051 

Total 
Canada 

39,851 

114,546 
56,869 

941,919 

6,627,289 
4,143,757 

879,510 

3,761 

494,322 

179,600 

606,330 

3,761 

175,440 

35,053 

273,180 

318,882 
144,547 

7,133,711 

- 

22,464,063 

11,705,108 

1,305,639 

'ulpe  mecanique. 
-"ulpe  chimique,  a  la  soude. 
-"ulpe  chimique,  au  sulphite, 
'ulpe  chimique,  au  sulfate 
\utres  produits  divers. 

211,366 

11,712,965 

1,557,193 

820,584 

736,609 

42,608,521 

Total 

17c  (4)—  2\ 


CENSUS   OF    INDUSTRY 

10  GEORGE  V,  A.  1920 

Table  II. — Paper  production  in  Canada  and  the  Provinces  by  Classes  of  Mills,  1918. 


Kinds  of  Products 


In  Paper  Mills 
Dans  les  papeteries 


Ontario 


Quantity 
Quantite 


Value 
Valeur 


Quebec 


Quantity 
Quantite 


Value 
Valeur 


Canada 


Quantity 
Quantite 


Value 
Valeur 


Tons 


Newsprint  Paper- 
In  rolls 

In  sheets 

Hanging  papers 

Poster  paper 

Book  and  Writing  Papers- 
Book,  wood  fibre  chief  ingredient 

Book ,  rags  chief  ingredient 

Cover  paper 

Plate,  map  lithograph,  etc 

Cardboard,  bristol  board,  etc 

Coated  paper 

Writing  paper 

All  other  fine  paper 

Wrapping  papers- 
Manilla  (rope,  jute,  tag,  etc) 

Heavy  wrapping  (mill  wrapper) 

Straw  wrapping 

Bogus  or  wood  manilla  

Kraft  paper 

All  other 

Boards- 
Wood-pulp  board 

Straw  board 

News  board 

Binder's  board 

All  other  boards 

Other  Paper  Products- 
Tissue  paper 

Toilet  paper 

Blotting  paper 

Building,  roofing  and  sheathing  paper 

Asbestos 

Miscellaneous 

All  other  products  

Construction  and  repair  work — 

Buildings 

Machinery 

Total 


4,664 

165 
7,137 

7,757 

5.204 

170 


99!) 


208 

762 


1,276 
4,833 
2,114 

460 


913 
1,306 


2,100 
413 


835,000 

29,862 
1,044,759 
1,378,560 
1,128.427 

92, 194 


125.989 


39,694 
143,888 


82,262 
288,415 
116,163 

28,309 

280.193 
257,852 

109,500 

78,725 

71,924 


5,055 
34,74 


Tons 


248 

850 

1,478 


211 

822 
3,603 
3,354 


7,248 

233 

14 

931 


26 
400 


16,631 
513 


19,906 
64,250 
131,262 


537,948 


77,015 

207,263 
1.540.59S 
1,110,046 


616,100 

17,591 
1,670 

62,650 


1,560 
68,000 


1,472,703 
55,311 

457,771 


105,000 
74,504 


Tons 


248 

850 

1.478 


7,591 

165 
7,348 
7,757 
6,026 
3,773 
3,354 


999 

7.24S 

233 

222 
1.693 


1.276 
4,859 
2.114 

860 


913 
1,306 


18.731 
926 


6,171.518 


6,621,1481 


19,906 
64,250 
131,262 


1,372.948 

29,862 
1.121,774 
1,378,560 
1,335,690 
1,632,792 
1,110.046 


125,989 

616,100 

17,591 
41,364 
206.538 


82,262 
289,975 
116,163 

96,309 


280,193 
257, S52 

1,582,203 

134,036 

529,695 


110,055 
109,251 


12.792,666 


FORESTRY,  PULP   AND   PAPER  5 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  17c  (4) 
Tableau  II. — Production  du  papier  au  Canada,  par  provinces  et  par  genres  de  fabriques,  1918. 


In  Pulp  and  Paper  Mills 

Dans  les  pulperies 

et  papeteries 

British  Columbia 

Ontario. 

Quebec. 

Canada. 

Especes  de  produits 

Colombie  Britannique 

Quantity 

Value 

Quantity 

Value 

Quantity 

Value 

Quantity 

Value 

Quantity 

Valeur 

Quantite 

Valeur 

Quantite 

Valeur 

Quantite 

Valeur 

Tons 

S 

Tons 

| 

Tons 

S 

Tons 

S 

Papier  a  journaui— 

109.037 

7.325,157 

317,51620 

206,331 

287,398 

17,286,120 

713,951 

44,817,608 

En  rouleaux. 

4,105 

251,554 

4,692 

293.629 

6,644 

479,297 

15,441 

1,024,480 

En  feuilles. 

- 

- 

2,815 

173,308 

- 

- 

2,815 

173,308 

A  tapisserie. 

Pour  affiches. 
Papier  a  litres  et  pour  ecrire. 

- 

- 

2,118 

374,001 

3,888 

560,812 

6,006 

934,813 

A  liv.,  ele.  princ.  en  fib.  de  bois. 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

A  liv.,  elem.  princ.  en  chiffon. 

- 

- 

- 

- 

491 

86,322 

491 

86,322 

Pour  couvertures  de  livres. 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Enduitv  a  cartes  geogr.  a  lit  hog. 

_ 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Carton*  bristol,  etc. 

_ 

- 

_ 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Papier  couche. 

_ 

- 

3,774 

1,436,204 

1,287 

212,876 

5,061 

1,649,0S0 

Papier  a  ecrire. 

578 

80,920 

578 

80,920 

Tous  autres  papiers  fins. 
Papier  d'emballage— 

- 

- 

989 

217,580 

3,124 

366,812 

4,113 

584,392 

Manille,  cordage,  jute,  tag,  etc. 

1,094 

38,290 

5,656 

228,030 

875 

71,849 

7,625 

338, 169 

Gros  papier  d'emballage. 

_ 

- 

- 

- 

358 

31.40S 

358 

31,408 

De  paille  pour  emballage. 

_ 

- 

966 

96,600 

3,353 

290,022 

4,319 

386,622 

Facon  manille  ou  manille  de  bois. 

7,074 

997,309 

212 

36,040 

23,102 

3,291,790 

30,408 

4,325,139 

Papier  Kraft. 

1,206 

208,905 

2,596 

442,495 

180 

16,660 

3,982 

668,060 

Tous  autres  papiers  d'emballage. 
Cartons- 

_ 

_ 

30,097 

1,380,653 

29,054 

2,088,301 

59,151 

3,468,954 

Carton  de  pulpe  de  bois. 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Carton  de  paille. 

_ 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Carton  pour  impressions. 

_ 

_ 

_ 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Carton  pour  reliure. 

' 

13,142 

914,725 

6,347 

583,021 

19,489 

1,497,746 

Tous  autres  cartons. 
Autres  produits  du  papier- 

_ 

_ 

_ 

- 

48 

9,600 

48 

9,600 

Papier  Joseph  ou  papier  pelure. 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

611 

70,265 

611 

70,265 

Papier  de  toilette. 

_ 

_ 

_ 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Papier  buvard. 

_ 

_ 

174 

9.570 

15 

730 

189 

10,300 

Papier  de  toiture,  de  lambrissage 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

- 

- 

- 

- 

D'amiante. 

- 

- 

- 

- 

13,138 

922,693 

13,138 

922,693 

Divers. 

- 

- 

- 

454,812 

- 

195,719 

- 

650,531 

Tous  autres  produits. 

Constructions  et  reparations — 

_ 

346,127 

- 

130.251 

- 

19,362 

- 

495,740 

Aux  batiments. 

- 

96,863 

- 

703,022 

- 

882,212 

- 

1,682,097 

A  la  machinerie. 

- 

9,364,205 

- 

27,097,251 

- 

27,546,791 

- 

63,908,247 

Total. 

6  CENSUS   OF   INDUSTRY 

10  GEORGE  V,  A.  1920 

Table  II. — Paper  production  in  Canada  and  the  Provinces  by  Classes  of  Mills,  1918 — Concluded. 


Kinds  of  Products 


Newsprint  Paper:— 

In  rolls 

In  sheets 

Hanging  papers 

Poster  paper 

Book  and  Writing  Papers:— 

Book,  wood  fibre  chief  ingredient 

Book,  rags  chief  ingredient 

Cover 

Plate,  map,  lithograph,  etc 

Cardboard,  bristol  board,  etc 

Coated  paper 

Writing  paper 

All  other  fine  paper 

Wrapping  Papers:— 

Manilla  (rope,  jute,  tag,  etc.) 

Heavy  wrapping  (mill  wrapper) 

Straw  wrapping 

Bogus  or  wood  manilla 

Kraft  paper 

All  other  WTapping  paper 

Boards:— 

Wood  pulp  board 

Straw  board 

News  board 

Binder's  board 

All  other  boards 

Other  Paper  Products:— 

Tissue  paper 

Toilet  paper 

Blotting  paper 

Building,  roofing  and  sheathing  paper 

Asbestos 

Miscellaneous 

All  other  products 

Construction  and  repair  work: — 

Buildings 

Machinery 

Total 


In  all  Classes 
Dans  toutes 


British  Columbia 
Colombie  Britannique 


Quantity 
Quantite 


Tons 


109,037 
4,105 


1,094 


7,074 
1,206 


Value 
Valeur 


7,325,157 
251,554 


997,309 
208,905 


346,127 
96,863 


9,264,805 


Ontario 


Quantity 
Quantite 


Tons 


317,516 
4,692 
2,815 


6,782 

165 
7,137 
7,757 
5,204 
3,944 


1.! 

5,656 

966 

420 

3,358 


31,373 
4,833 
2,114 

13,602 


913 
1,306 


2,274 
413 


Value 
Valeur 


20,206,331 
293,629 
173,308 


1,209,001 

29,862 
1,044,759 
1,378,560 
1,128,427 
1,528,398 


343,569 
228,030 

96,600 

75,734 

586,383 


1,462,915 
288,415 
116,163 

943,034 


2S0.193 
257,852 

119,070 

78,725 

526,736 


135,306 
737,769 


33,268,769 


FORESTRY,  PULP   AND    PAPER 
SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  17c  (4) 


Tableau  II. — Production  du  papier  au  Canada  par  provinces  et  par  genres  de  fabriques,  1918 — 

fin. 


of  Paper  Mills 

papeteries    , 

Quebec 

Canada 

Especes  de  produits 

Quantity 

Value 

Quantity 

Value 

Quantity 

Valeur 

Quantite 

Valeur 

Tons 

$ 

Tons 

S 

Papier  &  journaux:— 

287,646 

17,306,026 

,714, 199 

44,837,514 

En  rouleaux. 

7,494 

543,547 

16,291 

1,088,730 

En  feuilles. 

1,478 

131,262 

4,293 

304,570 

A  tapisserie. 

Pour  affiches. 
Papier  k  livres  et  pour  eerire:— 

6,815 

1,098,760 

13,597 

2,307,761 

A  livres,  element  principal  en  fibre  de  bois. 

- 

- 

- 

- 

A  livres,  element  principal  en  chiffon. 

491 

86,322 

656 

116,184 

Pour  couvertures  de  livres. 

211 

77,015 

7,348 

1,121,774 

Enduit,  a  cartes  geographiques  et  lithographie. 

- 

- 

7,757 

1,378,560 

Carton,  bristol,  etc. 

822 

207,263 

6,026 

1,335,690 

Papier  couche. 

4,890 

1,753,474 

8,834 

3,281,872 

Papier  a  eerire. 

3,932 

1,190,966 

3,932 

1,190,966 

Tous  autres  papiers  fins. 
Papier  d'emballage: — 

3,124 

366,812 

5,112 

710,381 

Manille  (cordage,  jute,  tag). 

8,123 

687,949 

14,873 

954,269 

Gros  papier  d'emballage. 

358 

31,408 

358 

31,408 

De  paille  pour  emballage. 

3,586 

307,613 

4,552 

404,213 

Facon  manille  ou  manille  de  bois. 

23,116 

3,293,460 

30,610 

4,366,503 

Papier  Kraft. 

1,111 

79,310 

5,675 

874,598 

Tous  autres  papier  d'emballage. 
Cartons:— 

29,054 

2,088,301 

60,427 

3,551,216 

Cartons  de  pulpe  de  bois. 

26 

1,560 

4,859 

289,975 

Cartons  de  paiile. 

- 

- 

2,114 

116,163 

Cartons  pour  impressions. 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Cartons  pour  reliure. 

6,747 

651,021 

20,349 

1,594,055 

Tous  autres  cartons. 
Autres  produits  du  papier:— 

48 

9,600 

961 

289, 793 

Papier  Joseph  ou  papier  pelure. 

611 

70,265 

1,917 

328,117 

Papier  de  toilette. 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Papier  buvard. 

16,646 

1,473,433 

18,920 

1,592,503 

Papier  de  toiture,  de  lambrissage. 

- 

- 

- 

- 

D'amiante. 

13,651 

9/8,004 

14,064 

1,056,729 

Divers. 

- 

653,490 

- 

1,180,226 

Tous  autres  produits. 

Constructions  et  reparations: — 

_ 

124,362 

- 

605,795 

Aux  batiments. 

- 

956,716 

- 

1,791,348 

A  la  machineries. 

- 

34,167,939 

76,700,913 

Total. 

CENSUS   OF   INDUSTRY 


10  GEORGE  V,  A.  1920 


Table  III. — Pulpwood  used  by  Provinces,  1917  and  1918. 
Tableau  III. — Bois  a  pulpe,  1917  et  1918,  par  provinces. 


No. 

Average  value 

of  firms 

Quantity 

Per 

per  cord 

reporting 

— 

cent 

Total 

— 

— 

Quantite 

distri- 

value 

Valeur  moyenne 

Provinces 

Nombre 

bution 

— 

par  corde 

de  compa- 
gnies 

Yaleur 
totale 

Provinces 

Cords 

Cords 

Bour- 

faisant 

— 

— 

centage, 

1917 

1918 

rapport 

Cordes 

Cordes 

1918 

1918 

1917 

1918 

1918 

S 

$ 

$ 

Canada 

64 

3,104,334 

2,210,744 

100  00 

24,886,475 

8-94 

11-26 

Quebec — Quebec. 

27 

1,109,869 

1,085,478 

49-10 

11,061,191 

8-60 

10-19 

Ontario — Ontario 

21 

735",  691 

784,691 

35-50 

10,395,717 

10-10 

13-25 

British  Columbia 

6 

134,814 

218,774 

9-90 

2,431,897 

7-19 

11-13 

New  Brunswick- 

Xouveau-Brunsw 

•ick 

5 

105,586 

110,133 

4-98 

920,854 

6-95 

8-36 

Nova  Scotia — Nouvelle-Ecosse  . 

5 

18,374 

11,668 

0-52 

73,816 

7-26 

6-32 

Table  IV.— Pulpwood  by  Kinds  of  Wood,  1917  and  1918. 
Tableau  IV. — Bois  a  pulpe,  1917  et  1918,  par  essences. 


Kinds  of  wood — Essences  de  bois 


No. 
of  firms 
reporting 

Nombre 
de  com- 
pagnies 
faisant 
rapport 
191S 


Quantity 
Quantite 


Cords 


Cordes 
1917 


Cords 


Cordes 
1918 


Per 
cent 

distri- 
bution 

Pour- 

centage, 

1918 


Total 
value 

Valeur 
totale 
1918 


Average  value 
per  cord 

Yaleur  moyenne 
par  corde 


Total  all  woods— Total,  tous  bois 

Spruce — Epinette 

Balsam  Fir — Sapin-baumier 

Hemlock — Pruche 

Poplar — Peuplier 

Pine— Pin 

Other  kinds — Autres  especes 


2,104,334 

1,678,656 

315,301 

101,321 

5,168 

2,S50 


2,210,744 

1,638,733 

447.243 

89,007 

9,885 

25,851 

25 


100  00 

74-13 

20-23 

403 

0-45 

1-16 


24,886,475 

18,887,125 

4.604,987 

1,038,867 

100,987 

254,384 

125 


8-94 

8-76 
9-76 
9.37 
8-44 
9-00 


$ 
11-26 

11-52 

10-28 
11-67 
10-21 
9-84 
5-00 


Table  V. — Pulpwood  by  Processes  1917.  and  1918. 
Tableau  V. — Bois  a  pulpe,  1917  et  1918,  selon  les  procedes  de  fabrication. 


Processes — Procedes 


No. 
of  firms 
reporting 

Nombre 
de  com- 
pagnies 
faisant 
rapport 
1918 


Quantity 
Quantite 


Cords 


Cordes 
1917 


Cords 


Cordes 
1918 


Per 

cent 
distri- 
bution 

Pour- 
centage, 

1918 


Total 
value 

Yaleur 
totale 
1918 


Average  value 
per  cord 


Valeur   moyenne 
par  corde 


All  processes— Tous  procedes 

Mechanical — Mceanique 

Sulphite— Sulfite 

Sulphate— Sulfate 

Soda — Soude 


2.104.334 

964,479 

855,489 

274,646 

9,720 


2.210,744 

873,084 

1,044,697 

285, 194 

7,769 


103  00 
39-50 
4701 
13-14 
0-35 


24,886,475 

9,951,390 

12,164,248 

2,683,576 

87,261 


$ 

$ 

8  94 

11  26 

8-07 

11-40 

10-18 

11-64 

8-10 

9-41 

10-07 

11-23 

FORESTRY,  PULP   AND   PAPER 
SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  17c  (4) 

Table  VI. — Pulpwood  1918  by  Provinces,  Kinds  of  Wood  and  Processes. 
Tableau  VI. — Bois  a  pulpe,  1918,  par  provinces,  essences  de  bois  et  procedes  de  fabrication. 


Pulp  produced— Pulpe  fabriquee 

Quebec 

Ontario 

British  Columbia — Colombie  Biitannique  .. 

New  Brunswick — Nouveau-Brunswick 

Nova  Scotia — Nouvelle-Ecosse 

Wood  used  (Total,  all  kinds)— Bois  employe, 

total,  toutes  essences 

Quebec 

Ontario 

British  Columbia — Colombie  Britannique... 

New  Brunswick — Nouveau-Brunswick 

Nova  Scotia — Nouvelle-Ecosse 

Spruce— Epinette  blanche 

Quebec 

Ontario 

British  Columbia — Colombie  Britannique... 

New  Brunswick — Nouveau-Brunswick 

Nova  Scotia — Nouvelle-Ecosse 

Baslsam  Fir— Sapln  baume 

Quebec 

Ontario 

British  Columbia — Colombie  Britannique... 

New  Brunswick — Nouveau-Brunswick 

Nova  Scotia — Nouvelle-Ecosse 

Hemlock— Pruche 

Quebec 

Ontario 

British  Columbia — Colombie  Britannique... 

Jack  Pine— Pin  gris 

Ontario 

Poplar— Peuplicr 

Quebec : 

Ontario 

British  Columbia — Colombie  Britannique... 
Nova  Scotia — Nouvelle-Ecosse 

All  other  fnot  specified)— Tous  autres  (non 

specifies)  

Quebec 


Total 
quantity 

Quantite 
totale 


tons 
1,557.193 

802,030 

505,366 

173,161 

66,619 

10,017 

cords 
2,310,744 

1,085.478 

784,691 

218,774 

110,133 

11,668 

1,638,733 

733,606 
711,574 
104,258 
79,141 
10,154 

447,243 

342,807 
41,803 
30,227 
30,992 
1,414 

89,007 

5,336 

1,759 

81,912 

25,851 

25,851 

9,885 
3,704 
3,704 
2,377 
100 


Total 
cost 


Cout 
total 


24,886,475 

11,061,191 

10,395,717 

2,434,897 

920,854 

73,816 

18,887,125 

7,544,150 

9,506,034 

1,102,284 

670,030 

64,627 

4.604,987 

3,432,456 

562,305 

350,913 

250,824 

8,489 

1,038,867 

43,896 
35,180 

959,791 

254,384 

254,384 

100,987 
40,564 
37,814 
21,909 
700 


Average 
cost 


Cout 
moyen 


$      cts 
11 

10 

13 

1113 
36 
33 


5  00 

5-00 


Mechani- 
cal 


Meca- 
nique 


tons 
879,510 

493,520 
277,922 

91,588 
6,463 

10,017 

cords 
873,084 

488,765 
292,127 

73,699 
6,825 

11,668 

671.53S 

351,620 
265,874 

40,122 
3,768 

10,154 

173,450 

133,106 

20,214 

15,659 

3,057 

1,414 

19,580 

4,039 

15,541 

4,727 

4,727 

3,789 

1,312 

2,377 

100 


Sulphite 
Sulfite 


tons 
494,322 

180,972 

216,255 

66,329 

30,766 


cords 
1,044.697 

377,792 

469.916 

119,699 

77,290 


800,669 

239,225 

443,582 

48,919 

68,943 


178,549 

137,367 

21,589 
11,246 
8,347 


61,293 

1,759 
59,534 

2,055 

2,055 

2,131 

1,200 
931 


Sulphate 
Sulfate 


tons 
179,600 

124,507 
10,459 
15,244 
29,390 


cords 
285,194 

212,613 
21,187 
25,376 
26,018 


164,044 

140,279 
2,118 
15,217 
6,430 


95,244 

72,334 


3,322 
19,588 


6,837 


6,837 


19,069 

19,069 


Soda 
Soude 


tons 
3,761 

3,031 
730 


cords 
7,769 

6,308 
1,461 


2,482 
2,482 


1,297 

1,297 


3,965 

2,504 
1,461 


10 


CENSUS   OF   INDUSTRY 


10  GEORGE  V,  A.  1920 

Table  VII. — Materials  used — Pulpwood  Consumption  by  Kinds  of  Wood  and  Classes  of  Mill 
whether  purchased  or  cut  from  own  limits. 


Pulp  Mills 
Pulperies 

Pulp  and  Paper 
Pulperies  et 

Kind  of  wood  by  provinces 

Purchased 
Achet6 

From  own  limits 

Coupe  chez  le  fabri- 
cant 

Purchased 
Achete 

Quantity 
cords 

Quantite 
cordes 

Value 
Valeur 

Quantity 
cords 

Quantite 
cordes 

Value 
Valeur 

Quantity 
cords 

Quantity 
cordes 

Value 
Valeur 

British  Columbia              * 

57,452 

16,959 
7,580 
32,913 

20,241 

20,241 

11,014 

9,500 

1,414 

100 

95,921 

81,073 

5,719 

161 
8,968 

80,477 

35,703 

41,215 

3,559 

265,105 

163,476 

55,928 

36,472 

261 

8,968 

S 
749,703 

177,011 
109,186 
463,506 

163,315 

163,315 

69,700 

60,511 

8,489 

700 

1,278,519 

1,141,819 
66,401 

2,152 
68,147 

645,580 

279,211 

342,020 

24,349 

2,906,817 

1,821,867 

526,096 

487,855 

2,852 

68,147 

18,840 

13,697 

5,143 

89,892 

58,900 
30,992 

654 

654 

174,180 

162,288 
1,791 

10,101 

318,026 

216,020 
102,006 

601,592 

451,559 
134,789 

5,143 

10,101 

S 

148,899 

108,399 
40,500 

757,539 

506,715 
250,824 

4,116 

4,116 

2,134,789 

2,007,311 
12,271 

115,207 

2,376,219 

1,643,956 
732,263 

5,421,562 

4,270,497 
995,358 
40,500 

115,207 

21,484 

5,599 

3,018 

12,251 

616 

209,788 

194,860 

8,822 

3,543 
2,563 

220,730 

158,918 

56,296 

1,777 

3,704 

25 

451,992 

359,377 

68,136 

14,028 

7,863 

2,563 

25 

$ 

164,038 

45,438 

24,452 

90,915 

3,233 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

3,033,328 

2,819,613 

144,394 

35,662 

33,659 

2,877,124 

1,934,342 

882,546 

19,547 

40,564 

125 

6,074,490 

4,799,393 

1,051,392 

110,462 

79,459 
33,659 

125 

FORESTRY,  PULP   AND   PAPER 
SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  17c  (4) 


11 


Tableau  VII. — Matieres  premieres  employees — Consommation  du  bois  de  pulpe  selon  les  essences 
de  bois  et  genres  de  fabriques,  soit  qu'il  ait  ete  achete  ou  coupe  chez  le  fabricant. 


Mills 

All 

mills  mak 

ing  wood  pulp 

papeteries 

Toutes  fabriques 

de  pulpe  de  bois 

From  own  limits 

Purchased 

From  own  limits 

Coupe  chez  le  fabri- 
cant 

Achete 

Coupe  chez  le  fabri- 
cant 

Essences  de  bois,  par  provinces 

Quantity 
cords 

Value 

Quantity 
cords 

Valeu 

Quantity 
cords 

Value 

Quantite 
cordes 

Valeur 

Quantite 
cordes 

Valeur 

Quantite 
cordes 

Valeur 

120,998 

1,372,257 

78,936 

913,741 

139,838 

1,521,156 

Colombie  Britannique 

68,003 

19,629 

31,605 

1,761 

771,436 

217,275 

364,870 

18,676 

22,558 

10,598 

45,164 

616 

222,449 

133,638 

554,421 

3,233 

81,700 

19,629 

36.74S 

1,761 

879,835 

217,275 

405,370 

18,676 

Epinette. 
Sapin-baumier. 
Pruche. 
Peuplier. 

: 

: 

20,241 

20,241 

163,315 

163,315 

89,892 
58,900 
30,992 

757,539 

506,715 
250,824 

Nouveau-Brunswick 

Epinette. 

Sapin-baumier. 

Pruche. 

- 

- 

§   11.014 

9,500 

1,414 

100 

69,700 

60,511 

8,489 

700 

654 

654 

4,116 

4,116 

Nouvelle-Ecosse 

Epinette. 
Sapin-baumier. 
Peuplier. 
Pin  gris. 

304,802 

273,353 

25,471 

1,759 

4,219 

3,949,081 

3,537,291 

339,239 

35,180 

37,371 

305,709 

275,933 

14,541 

sj      ~~ 

3,704 

11,531 

r   • 

301,197 

194,621 

97,511 

5,336 

3,704 

25 

4,311,847 

3,961,432 
210,795 

37,814 
101,806 

478,982 

435,641 

27,262 

1,759 

14,320 

6,083,870 

5,544,602 

351,510 

35,180 

152,578 

Ontario 

Epinette. 
Sapin-baumier. 
Pruche. 
Peuplier. 
Pin  gris. 

466,255 

322,965 
143,290 

5,162,268 

3,686,641 
1,475,627 

3,522,704 

2,213,553 

1,224,566 

43,896 

40,564 

125 

784,281 

538,985 
245,296 

7,538,487 
5,330,597 
2,207,890 

Quebec 

Epinette. 
Sapin-baumier. 
Pruche. 
Peuplier. 
Tous  autres. 

892,055 

664,321 

188,390 

33,364 

1,761 

4,219 

10,4S3,606 

7,995,368 

2,032,141 

400,050 

18,676 

37,371 

717,097 

522,853 

124,064 

50,500 

8,124 

11,531 

25 

8,981,307 

6,621,260 

1,577,488 

598,317 

82,311 

101,806 

125 

1,493,647 
1,115,880 

323,179 

38,507 

1,761 

14,320 

15,905,168 

12,265,865 

3,027,499 

440,550 

18,676 

152,578 

Canada 

Epinette. 
Sapin-baumier. 
Pruche. 
Peuplier. 
Pin  gris. 
Tous  autres. 

12 


CENSUS   OF   INDUSTRY 


10  GEORGE  V,  A.  1920 

Table  VIII. — Other  Materials  used  in  the  manufacture  of  Wood  Pulp,  by  Kinds  and  Classes  of 

Mills  for  Provinces,  1918. 

Tableau  VIII. — Autres  matieres  premieres  employees  dans  la  fabrication  de  la  pulpe  de  bois,  par 
especes  et  par  genres  de  fabriques,  dans  les  provinces,  1918. 


Kinds  of  materials  by  provinces 
Matieres  premieres,  par  provinces 


Pulp  Mills 
Pulperies 


Tons 
Tonnes 


Value 
Yaleur 


Pulp  and  Paper  Mills 

Pulperies  et  pape- 
teries 


Tons 
Tonnes 


Value 
Yaleur 


All  Mills  Manufac- 
turing Wood  pulp 

Toutes  fabriques  de 
pulpe  de  bois 


Tons 
Tonnes 


Value 
Valeur 


British  Columbia— Colombie  Britannique 

Sulphur — Soufre 

Limestone  and  lime — Pierre  calcaire  et  chaux 

Soda  ash— Carbonate  de  soude 

Sulphate  of  soda — Sulfate  de  soude 

All    other    miscellaneous    materials— Autres    matieres 
di  verses 

New  Brunswick— Nouveau-Brunswick 

Sulphur — Soufre 

Limestone  and  lime — Pierre  calcaire  et  chaux 

Soda  ash — Carbonate  de  soude 

Sulphate  of  soda — Sulfate  de  soude 

Bleach — Chlorure 

All    other    miscellaneous    materials — Autres    matieres 
diverses 

Nofa  Scotia-Noufelle-Ecosse 

Sulphur — Soufre 

Limestone  and  lime — Pierre  calcaire  et  chaux 

Soda  ash — Carbonate  de  soude 

Sulphate  of  soda— Sulfate  de  soude 

All   other   miscellaneous    materials — Toutes    matieres 
diverses 

Ontario— Ontario  ... 

Sulphur — Soufre 

Limestone  and  lime — Pierre  calcaire  et  chaux 

Soda  ash — Carbonate  de  soude 

Sulphate  of  soda — Sulfate  de  soude 

Bleach — Chlorure 

All    other    miscellaneous    materials — Autres    matieres 
diverses 

Quebec— Quebec 

Sulphur — Soufre 

Limestone  and  lime — Pierre  calcaire  et  chaux 

Soda  ash— Carbonate  de  soude 

Sulphate  of  soda — Sulfate  de  soude 

All    other    miscellaneous    materials — Autres    matieres 
diverses 

Canada 

Sulphur — Soufre 

Limestone  and  lime — Pierre  calcaire  et  chaux 

Soda  ash — Carbonate  de  soude 

Sulphate  of  soda — Sulfate  de  soude 

Bleach — Chlorure 

All    other    miscellaneous    materials — Autres    matieres 
diverses 


4,94 
8,79 
1,300 


6,313 

10,361 

826 

5,750 

1,778 


13,017 

23,462 

243 

4,168 

833 


6.075 
20,310 


8,210 


30,352 
62,931 

2.465 
18,137 

2,611 


258,636 

169,669 
40,667 
46,800 


1,500 

720,330 

200,994 
140,544 

39,854 
151,880 

80,949 

106,109 
6,312 


6,312 

707.964 

374,995 

117,691 

7,302 

130,810 

44,179 

32,987 

716,415 

207,229 

89,164 

3,705 

176, 02S 

270,289 

2.439,657 

952,887 

388,066 

97,661 

458,718 
125,128 

417,197 


4,286 

7,338 

19 

1,901 


14.131 
18,889 

327 
2 

450 


10,181 
37,856 

S97 
455 


28,598 
64,083 

1..M:; 

2,358 
450 


S 
286,814 

154,221 

80,292 

969 

51,332 


934.381 

419,986 

57,484 

14,737 

88 

15.159 

426,927 

1,277,815 

303,225 

203,951 

46,063 

12.285 

712.291 

2,499  019 

>77,4:<2 

:;11.727 

61,769 

63,705 

15,159 

1,139,218 


9,233 

16,136 

1,319 

1,901 


6.313 

10,361 

826 

5,759 

1,778 


27, 148 

42,351 

570 

4,170 

1,283 


16,256 

58,166 

993 

8.665 


58,950 
127,014 

3.  70S 
20,49.5 

3.061 


545,450 

323,890 
120,959 
47,769 
51,332 

1,500 

720.330 

200,994 
140,544 

39,854 
151,880 

80,949 

106,109 
6.312 


6,312 

1,642,345 

794,981 
175,175 

22,039 
130,898 

59,338 

459,914 

2,024,230 

510,454 
293,115 

40,768 
188,313 

982,580 

4,938,667 

1,830,319 
729,793 
159,430 
522,423 
140,287 

1,556,415 


FORESTRY,  PULP   AND   PAPER 
SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  17c  (4) 


13 


Table  IX. — Average  number  of  pounds  of  Pulp  produced  per  cord  of  wood  by  classes  of  Mills, 

1918. 

Tableau  IX. — Quantite  moyenne  de  livres  de  pulpe  extraites  d'une  corde  de  bois,  par  genres  de 

fabriques,  1918. 


Kinds  of  pulp  by  processes 
Especes  de  pulpe,  selon  les  precedes 

British 
Columbia 

Colombie 
Britannique 

New 
Brunswick 

Nouveau- 
Brunswick 

Nova 
Scotia 

Nouvelle- 
Ecosse 

Ontario 

Quebec 

Canada 

Pulp  mills — Pulperies — 

Soda  process — Procede  a  la  soude 

Sulphate  process — Procede  au  sulfate 

Sulphite  process — Procede  au  sulfite 

Mechanical  process — Procede  mecanique 

Pulp  and  paper  mills — Pulperies  et  papeteries — 

1,100 
945 

1,227 
1,173 
2,485 

1,163 
1,059 
2,485 

1,050 
1,046 
1,893 

1,050 

1.046 
1,893 

1.825 
1,825 

1,176 

836 

1,932 

1,000 

1,168 
1,903 

1.000 
1,176 
1,002 
1.917 

1,250 
1,030 
2,082 

961 
1,041 
1,054 

2.074 

961 
1,145 
1.042 
2,078 

1,144 

964 

1,933 

980 
1,134 
1,132 

2.077 

980 
1,133 
1.037 
2,039 

Sulphate  process — Procede  au  sulfate 

Sulphite  process — Procede  au  sulfite 

Mechanical  process — Procede  mecanique 

All  mills  making  pulp — Toutes  fabriques  de  pulpe— 

Soda  process — Procede  a  la  soude 

Sulphate  process — Procede  au  sulfate 

Sulphite  process — Procede  au  sulfite 

14 


CENSUS   OF   INDUSTRY 


10  GEORGE  V,  A.  1920 

Table  X. — Materials  used  in  the  manufacture  of  Paper  by  Kinds  and  Classes  of  Mills  for  the 

Provinces,   1918. 

Tableau  X. — Matieres  premieres  employees  dans  la  fabrication  du  papier,  selon  le  genre  de 

fabriques,  dans  les  provinces,  1918. 


Kinds  of  materials 
Matieres  premieres 


British  Columbia-  Colom- 
bie  Britannique 

Ground  wood  pulp — Pate  de  bois. . . . 

Sulphite  fibre — Fibre  preparee  au  sul- 
fite  

Sulphate  fibre — Fibre  preparee  au 
sulfate 

Soda  fibre — Fibre  trait ee  par  la  soude 

Other  chemical  fibre — Fibre  traitee 
par  d'autres  produits  chimiques. . . 

Rags,  etc. — Chiffons,  etc 

Old  or  waste  paper — Yieux  papiers. . . 

Straw — Paille 

All  other  stock — Toutes  autres  fibres 

Soda  ash — Carbonate  de  soude 

Alum — Alun 

Clay — Argile 

Other  miscellaneous  materials — Tou- 
tes autres  matieres  diverses 

Ontario 

Ground  wood  pulp — Pate  de  bois.  .  . 

Sulphite  fibre — Fibre  preparee  au  sul- 
fite....,  

Sulphate  fibre — Fibre  preparee  au 
sulfate 

Soda  fibre — Fibre  traitee  par  la  soude 

Other  chemical  fibre — Tibre  traitee 
par  d'autres  produits  chimiques. . . 

Rags,  etc. — Chiffons,  etc 

Old  or  waste  paper — Yieux  papiers. . . 

Straw — Paille 

All  other  stock — Toutes  autres 
fibres 

Soda  ash — Carbonate  de  soude 

Alum — Alun 

Clay — Argile 

Other  miscellaneous  materials — Tou- 
tes autres  matieres  diverses 

Quebec 

Ground  wood  pulp — Pate  de  bois. . . . 

Sulphite  fibre — Fibre  preparee  au  sul- 
fite  

Sulphate  fibre — Fibre  preparee  au 
sulfate 

Soda  fibre— Fibre  traitee  par  la 
soude 

Other  chemical  fibre — Fibre  traitee 
par  d'autres  produits  chimiques. .  . 

Rags,  etc. — Chiffons,  etc 

Old  or  waste  paper — Yieux  papiers. . . 

Straw— Paille 

All  other  stock — Toutes  autres  fibres 

Soda  ash — Carbonate  de  soude 

Alum — Alun 

Clay — Argile 

Other  miscellaneous  materials — Tou- 
tes autres  matieres  diverses. . . . 


Paper  mills 
Papeteries 


Quan- 
tity pro- 
duced 
and 
used 
Tons 
,000  1b. 

Quan- 
tity pro- 
duite  et 

em- 
ployee. 
Tonnes 
2,0001iv. 


Quan- 
tity pur- 
chased 
Tons 
2,000  lb. 

Quan- 
tity 
achetee 
Tonnes 
2,000  liv 


45,73 

3,590 
13,838 

302 

53 

123 

IS, 606 

810 

2,493 
614 
872 

3,952 


54,162 

7,993 
11,480 


1,814 

17,006 
12,232 


73 
882 


Yalue. 
Yaleur. 


3,426,492 

119,642 
1,297,566 

40,118 

63,084 

7,566 

559,533 

4,357 

342,096 
33,232 
38,236 
94,952 

826,110 

3,399,792 

212,292 
977,838 

5,132 

152,770 

1,288,725 

343,755 

45,503 

3,903 

43,591 

29,187 

297.096 


Pulp  and  Paper  mills 
Pulperies  et  papeteries 


Quan- 
tity pro- 
duced 
and 
used 
Tons 
2,000  lb. 

Quan- 
tity pro- 
duite  et 

em- 
ployee 
Tonnes 
2.0001iv. 


12S.S05 

90,953 

28,184 

9,668 


314,114 

244,119 
69,113 

730 
152 


378,927 

274,244 

76,424 

25,228 

3,031 


Quan- 
tity pur- 
chased 
Tons 
2,000  lb. 

Quan- 
tity 
achetee 
Tonnes 
2,000liv. 


M 


96,249 

44,625 
26,666 

529 

68 

2,547 

14,127 

753 

2,770 

176 

2,620 

1,368 


40,588 

13,871 

16.9S0 

691 

141 


462 
1,233 

1,278 

90 

3,930 

1,912 


Yalue 
Valeur 


2,968,957 

1,285,166 

1,023,079 

531,740 


983 

4,22s 


123.761 
14,390,177 
6,520,864 
5,634,198 

115,865 

3,800 

81,804 
365,705 

7,147 

166,071 

5,309 

123,431 

62,238 

1,303,745 

13,363,918 

6,077,931 

4,732,680 

1,728,703 

236,506 


34,272 
51,345 

68,975 

3,853 

165,880 

31,545 

232,228 


All  classes  of  mills  making 
paper 

Toutes  fabriques  de  papier 


Quan- 
tity pro 
duced 
and 
used 
Tons 
2,000  lb 

Quan- 
tity pro- 
duite  et 

em- 
ployee 
Tonnes 
2,000liv. 


128,805 

90,953 

28,184 

9,668 


314.114 

244,119 
69,113 

730 


378,927 

274,244 
76,424 
25,228 
3.031 


Quan- 
tity pur- 
chased 
Tons 
2,000  lb 

Quan- 
tity 
achetee 
Tonnes 
2,0001iv 


M 


141,986 

48,215 
40,504 


831 

605 

2,670 

32,733 

1,563 

5,263 

790 

3,49: 

5,320 


94,750 

21,864 

28,460 

691 

183 

1,814 
17,468 
13,465 

1,938 

163 

4,812 

3,892 


Yalue 
Yaleur 


2,968,957 

1,285,166 

1,023,079 

531,740 


983 
4,228 


123,761 
17,816,669 

6,640,506 
6,931,764 

155,983 

66,884 

89.370 

925,238 

11,504 

508,167 
38,541 
161,667 
157,190 

2,129,855 

16,763,710 

6,290,223 

5,710,518 

1,728,703 

241,638 

152,770 

1,322,997 

395,100 

114,478 

7,756 

209,471 

60,732 

529,324 


FORESTRY,  PULP   AND   PAPER 
SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  17c  (4) 


15 


Table  X. — Materials  used  in  the  Manufacture  of  Paper  by  Kinds  and  Classes  of  Mills  for  the 

Provinces,  1918 — Concluded. 

Tableau  X. — Matieres  premieres  employees  dans  la  fabrication  du  papier,  selon  le  genre  de 
fabriques,  dans  les  provinces,  1918 — fin. 


Kinds  of  materials 
Matieres  premieres 


Quan- 
tity pro- 
duced 
and 

used 

Tons 

2,000  lb. 

Quan- 
tity pro- 
duite  et 

em- 
ployee. 
Tonnes 
2,0001iv. 


Canada 

Ground  wood  pulp> — Pate  de  bois. . . . 

Sulphite  fibre — Fibre  preparee  au  sul- 
fite  

Sulphate  fibre — Fibre  preparee  au 
sulfate 

Soda  fibre — Fibre  traitee  par  la 
soude 

Other  chemical  fibre — Fibre  traitee 
par  d'autres  produits  chimiquea. . . 

Rags,  etc. — Chiffons,  etc 

Old  or  waste  paper — Vieux  papiers. . . 

Straw — Paille 

All  other  stock — Toutes  autres  fibres 

Soda  ash— Carbonate  de  soude 

Alum — Alun 

Clay— Argile. 

Other  miscellaneous  materials — Tou- 
tes autres  matieres  diverses 


Paper  mills 
Papeteries 


Quan 
tit  y  pur- 
chased 
Tons 
2,000  lb 

Quan- 
tity 
achetee 
Tonnes 
2,0001iv 


99,899 
11,583 
25,318 

344 

2,351 

17,129 

30,838 

810 

3,153 

687 

1 ,  754 

5,932 


Value 

Valeur 


6,826,284 

331,934 

2,275,404 

45,250 

215,854 

1,296,291 

903,288 

4,357 

387,599 

37,135 

81,827 

124, 139 

1,123,206 


Pulp  and  Paper  mills 
Pulperies  et  papeteries 


All  classes  of  mills  making 
paper 

Toutes  fabriques  de  papier 


Quan 
tity  pro- 
duced 
and 
used 
Tons 
2,000  lb. 

Quan- 
tity pro- 
duite  et 

em- 
ployee. 
Tonnes 
2,0001iv. 


821,846 
609,316 
173,721 
34,896 
3,761 

152 


Quan- 
tity pur- 
chased 

Tons 
2,000  lb. 

Quan- 
tity 
achetee 
Tonnes 
2,0001iv. 


136.930 

58,496 
43,646 

691 
670 


3,009 
15,360 

753 
4,048 

281 
6,628 
3,280 


Value 
Valeur 


30,723,052 

13,883,961 

11,389,957 

2,260,443 

352,371 

3,800 

116,076 

417,050 

7,147 

235,046 

10,145 

293,539 

93,783 

1,659,734 


Quan- 
tity pro- 
duced 
and 
used 
Tons 
2,000  lb. 

Quan- 
tity pro- 
duite  et 

em- 
ployee. 
Tonnes 
2,0001iv. 


821,846 
609,316 

173,721 

34,896 

3,761 


Quan- 
tity pur- 
chased 
Ton3 
2,000  lb. 

Quan- 
tity 
achetee 
Tonnes 
2,0001iv. 


236,829 

70,079 

68,964 

691 

1,014 

2,419 

20,138 

46,198 

1,563 

7,201 

968 

8,382 

9,212 


Value 
Valeur 


37,549,336 

14,215,895 

13,665,361 

2,260,443 

397,621 

219,654 

1,412,367 

1,320,338 

11,504 

622,645 

47,280 

375,366 

217,922 

2,782,940 


16 


CENSUS   OF   INDUSTRY 


10  GEORGE  V,  A.  1920 

Table  XI. — Fuel  Consumption  for  Classes  of  Mills  by  Provinces,  1918. 


Pulp  Mills 

Pulp  and  Paper  Mills 

Pulperies 

Pulperies  et  papeteries 

Cana 

dian 

Foreign 

Canadian 

Foreign 

Kinds  of  fuel  by  provinces 

— 

Canadien 

Etranger 

Canadien 

Etranger 

Quantity 

Value 

Quantity 

Value 

Quantity 

Value 

Quantity 

Value 

Quantity 

Valeur 

Quantite 

Valeur 

Quantite 

Valeur 

Quantite 

Valeur 

British  Columbia 

1 

$ 

$ 

$ 

Bituminous  coal,  slack tons 

3,763 

27,087 

- 

- 

5,135 

38,761 

- 

Bituminous  coal,  lump ' 

2,872 

29,761 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Bituminous  coal,  run  of  mine 

7,771 

38,855 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Anthracite  coal,  lump ' 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

788 

7,410 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Coke " 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

35 

676 

Gasoline gal. 

1,835 

734 

- 

- 

86,784 

20,308 

- 

- 

Oil  (fuel) " 

_ 

_ 

1,173,216 

32,181 

- 

_ 

12,774.384 

487,209 

3,880 

45,996 

- 

- 

2.515 

8,961 

- 

- 

Gas m.c.ft. 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Other  fuel 

392 

— 

New  Brunswick 

Bituminous  coal,  slack.              tons 

146 

1.095 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Bituminous  coal,  lump ' 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Bituminous  coal,  run  of  mine.      ' 

21,367 

901,830 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Anthracite  coal,  lump ' 

- 

- 

17 

190 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Anthracite  coal,  dust " 

- 

- 

303 

1,667 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Coke " 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Oil  (fuel) " 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

— 

- 

Wood cords 

1,971 

7,320 

_ 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Gas m.c.  ft. 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

Nova  Scotia 

Bituminous  coal,  slack tons 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Bituminous  coal,  lump ' 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Bituminous,  coal,  run  of  mine     " 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Anthracite  coal,  lump " 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Anthracite  coal,  dust " 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Coke " 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

- 

- 

Gasoline gal. 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Oil  (fuel) ....      " 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

- 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

- 

- 

Gas m.c.ft. 

- 

- 

_ 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

Ontario 

Bituminous  coal,  slack tons 

- 

- 

12,305 

90,635 

2,344 

17,889 

46,647 

310,193 

Bituminous  coal,  lump " 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

181,433 

1,340,074 

Bituminous  coal,  run  of  mine,     " 

- 

- 

85,301 

723,709 

- 

- 

127,924 

1,033,151 

Anthracite  coal,  slump " 

- 

- 

- 

_ 

- 

_ 

162 

1,762 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

_ 

— 

Coke " 

- 

Gasoline gal. 

- 

- 

- 

- 

2,047 

686 

- 

- 

Oil  (fuel) 

_ 

— 

Woods cords 

1,008 

5,227 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

- 

- 

_ 

- 

- 

_ 

_ 

_ 

- 

- 

Other  fuel 

2.304 

6,280 

22,539 

Quebec 

Bituminous  coal,  slack tons 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

153.986 

1,249,853 

Bituminous  coal,  lump " 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

70,000 

500,000 

Bituminous  coal,  run  of  mine.     " 

43,185 

491,514 

34,008 

422,397 

53,543 

523,558 

103,105 

927,068 

Anthracite  coal,  lump.. " 

- 

- 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

- 

- 

Anthracite  coal,  dust " 

_ 

- 

4.421 

40,568 

_ 

_ 

7.40C 

47,730 

Coke 

- 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

- 

- 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

- 

- 

Oil  (fuel) 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

- 

- 

Wood cords 

37,207 

260,183 

- 

_ 

4,504 

19,508 

- 

- 

_ 

_ 

- 

_ 

_ 

_ 

- 

- 

2,690 

" 

6,248 

- 

Canada 

Bituminous  coal,  slack tons 

3.909 

28,182 

12,305 

90,635 

7.479 

56,650 

200,633 

1,560,046 

Bituminous  coal,  lump " 

2,872 

29,761 

- 

- 

- 

- 

251,433 

1,840,074 

Bituminous  coal,  run  of  mine.     " 

72,323 

1,432,199 

119,309 

1,146,106 

53,543 

523, 55S 

231,029 

1,960,219 

Lignite  coal " 

788 

7,410 

17 

190 

_ 

_ 

26 

643 

Anthracite  coal,  dust " 

4.724 

42,235 

_ 

_ 

7.400 

47,730 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

162 

1,762 

Coke " 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

36 

676 

1,835 

734 

- 

_ 

88,831 

20,994 

- 

- 

Oil  (fuel) 

1,173,216 

32,181 

12,774,384 

487,209 

44,066 

318,726 

7.019 

28,469 

- 

Gas m.c.  ft. 

- 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

- 

- 

Other  fuel 

- 

5,386 

_ 

_ 

_ 

12,528 

- 

23,182 

FORESTRY,  PULP   AND   PAPER  17 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  17c  (4) 

Tableau  XI. — Consommation  de  combustible,  par  genres  de  fabriques  et  par  provinces,  1918. 


Paper  Mills 
Papeteries 


Canadian 
Canadien 


Quantity 
Quantite 


Value 
Yaleur 


Foreign 
Etranger 


Quantity 
Quantite 


Value 
Valeur 


All  Mills 
Toutes  fabriques 


Canadian 
Canadien 


Quantity 
Quantity 


Value 
Valeur 


Foreign 
Etranger 


Quantity 
Quantite 


Value 
Valeur 


Sortes  de  combustibles,   par 
provinces 


100 
3,113 


785 
1,820 
2,211 


100 
3,113 


785 
1,820 
2,211 


950 
25,822 


274 
373 

9,378 


950 

25,822 


274 

373 

9,378 


30,899 
4,52 
12.03 


3,140 
36,987 


34,039 

4,527 

49,024 

50 


193,342 
40,165 
97,035 

125 


24,630 
320,120 


217,972 

40,165 

417,155 

125 


2,872 
7,771 

788 

88,619 

6,395 


146 
21,367 


1,971 


2,344 


2,047 
1,008 


100 
99,841 


785 

1,820 

43,922 


11,388 

2,972 

128,979 


91,451 

1,820 

53,296 


65,848 
29,761 
38,855 

7,410 

21,042 

54,957 

392 

1,095 

901,83 


7,320 


5,227 

8,584 


950 
1,040,894 


274 

373 

289,069 


36 
13,947,600 


17 
303 


3,938 


84,832 

30,711 

1,981,579 

7,410 


22,002 

373 

356.573 

17,914 


89,851 

185,960 

225,262 

162 

50 


157,126 
70,000 
174,100 

11,821 


- 

212 

938 

255 

'.1'ill 

399,362 

17 

12 

174 

162 

36 

13,947,600 

- 

Colombie  Britannlque 

Charbon  bitumineux,  menu. 
Charbon  bitumineux,  morceaux. 
Charbon  bitumineux,  tout  venant. 
Charbon  anthracite,  morceaux. 
Charbon  lignite. 
676  Coke. 
Gasoline. 
519,390  Huile  (combustible). 
Bois. 
Gaz. 
Autres  combustibles. 


NouYeau-Brunswlck 

Charbon,  bitumineux,  menu. 

Charbon  bitumineux,  morceaux. 

Charbon  bitumineux,  tout  venant. 

Charbon  anthracite,  morceaux. 

Charbon  anthracite,  poussier. 

Coke. 

Gazoline. 

Huile  (combustible). 

Bois. 

Gaz. 

Autres  combustibles. 

Nouvelle-Ecosse 

Charbon  bitumineux,  menu. 

Charbon  bitumineux,  morceaux. 

Charbon  bitumineux,  tout  venant. 

Charbon  anthracite,  morceaux. 

Charbon  anthracite,  poussier. 

Coke. 

Gazoline. 

Huile  (combustible). 

Bois. 

Gaz. 

Autres  combustibles. 


Ontario 

594,170  Charbon,  bitumineux,  menu. 
1,380,239  Charbon,  bitumineux,  morceaux. 
1,853,895  Charbon,  bitumineux  tout  venant. 
1,762  Charbon  anthracite,  morceaux. 
125  Charbon  anthracite,  poussier. 
Coke. 
Gazoline. 

Huile  (combustible). 
Bois. 
Gaz. 
22,539  Autres  combustibles. 

Quebec 

1,274,483  Charbon  bitumineux,  menu.        — . 

500,000  Charbon  bitumineux,  morceaux. 
1,669,585  Charbon  bitumineux,  tout  venant. 
-    Charbon  anthracite,  morceaux. 
55, 130  Charbon  anthracite,  poussier. 
Coke. 
Gazoline. 

Huile  (combustible). 
Bois. 
Gaz. 
Autres  combustibles. 

Canada 

1,650,681  Charbon,  bitumineux  menu. 
1,880,239  Charbon  bitumineux,  morceaux. 
3,523,480  Charbon  bitumineux,  tout  venant 
190  Charbon  lignite. 
90,090  Charbon  anthracite,  poussier. 
1 ,  762  Charbon  anthracite,  morceaux. 
676  Coke. 
Gazoline. 
519,390  Huile  (combustible). 
Bois 
Gaz 
23,182  Autres  combustibles. 


17c  (4)— 3 


18 


CENSUS   OF   INDUSTRY 


10  GEORGE  V,  A.  1920 

Table  XII. — Capital  invested  in  the  Pulp  and  Paper  industry,  by  Provinces  and  Classes    of 

Mills,  1918. 


Items  of  Capita]  by  Provinces 


In  Paper 
Mills 

Dans  les 
papeteries 


In  Pulp 
Mills 

Dans  les 
pulperies 


British  Columbia 

Land,  buildings  and  fixtures 

Machinery  and  tools 

Materials  on  hand,    stocks  in  process,  etc 

Cash,  trading  and  operating  accounts,  and  bills  receivable. 

Total  Capital 

New  Brunswick 

Land,  buildings  and  fixtures 

Machinery  and  tools 

Materials  on  hand,  stocks  in  process,  etc — 

Cash,  trading  and  operating  accounts,  and  bills  receivable. 

Total  Capital 

Nova  Scotia 

Land,  buildings  and  fixtures ,. 

Machinery  and  tools 

Materials  on  hand,  stocks  in  process,  etc 

Cash,  trading  and  operating  accounts,  and  bills  receivable 

Total  Capital 

Ontario 

Land,  buildings  and  fixtures 

Machinery  and  tools 

Materials  on  hand,  stocks  in  process,  etc. . 

Cash,  trading  and  operating  accounts,  and  bills  receivable 

Total  Capital 

Quebec 

Land,  buildings  and  fixtures 

Machinery  and  tools 

Materials  on  hand,  stocks  in  process,  etc 

Cash,  trading  and  operating  accounts  and  bills  receivable 

Total  Capital 

Canada 

Land,  buildings  and  fixtures 

Machinery  and  tools 

Materials  on  hand,  stocks  in  process,  etc 

Cash,  trading  and  operating  accounts  and  bills  receivable. . 

Total  Capital 


12,461,181 

2,756.179 
1,018,663 

1,177,546 


- 

17,413,569 

- 

4,119  662 

1,933,114 

1,356,886 

442,563 

- 

7,852,235 

= 

482,715 
141,000 
61,404 
68,269 

- 

753,388 

1,782,782 

1,724,685 

880,845 

952,880 

7,804,453 
5,485,472 
3,375,249 
4.533  692 

5,341,192 

21,198,866 

2,596,877 

2,240,613 

1,395,695 

946,388 

12,362,726 
7,782  514 
3,143,606 
1,201,329 

7,179,573 

24,490,175 

4,379,659 
3,965,298 
2,276,540 
1,899,268 

37,230,737 
18,098,279 
8,955,808 
7,423,399 

12,520,765 


71,708,223 


Table  XIII. — Equipment  in  mills  making  Ground  Wood  Pulp  by  Classes  of  Mills,  by  Provinces. 


Schedule 


Pulp  mills — 

Number  of  grinders 

Capacity  per  24  hours 

Horse  power  used  on  grinders 

Yearly  capacity  of  mill,  dry  weight,  tons 

Pulp  and  Paper  mills — 

Number  of  grinders 

Capacity  per  24  hours 

Horse  power  used  on  grinders 

Yearly  capacity  of  mill,  dry  weight,  tons 

All  mills  making  ground  wood  pulp — 

Number  of  grinders 

Capacity  per  24  hours 

Horse  power  used  on  grinders 

Yearly  capacity  of  mill,  dry  weight,  tons 


British 
Colum- 
bia 

Colombie 

Bri- 
tannique 


51 

340 

24,000 

103,600 


51 

340 

24,000 

103,600 


New 
Bruns- 
wick 

Nouveau- 
Bruns- 
wick 


28 
2,000 
S.000 


28 
2,000 
8,000 


Nova 
Scotia 


Nouvelle- 
Ecosse 


26 
105 

4,900 
31,500 


26 
105 

4,900 
31,500 


FORESTRY,  PULP   AND   PAPER 


19 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  17c  (4) 


Tableau  XII. 


-Capital  place  dans  l'industrie  de  la  pulpe  et  du  papier,  par  provinces  et  genres 
de  fabriques,  1918. 


In  Pulp  and 
Paper  Mills 

Dans  les 

pulperies  et 
papeteries 

In  all  Classes 
of  Mills 

Dans  tous 
genres  de 
fabriques 

Repartition  du  capital,  par  provinces 

12,684,831 

8,514,679 

3,253,016 

839,893 

25,146,012 
11,270,858 
4,271,679 
2,017,439 

Colombie  Britannique 

Terrain,  batiments  et  agencement. 

Machinerie  et  outillage. 

Matieres  en  mains,  produits  en  cours  de  fabrication 

Caisse,  comptes  et  billets  a  recevoir. 

Total  du  capital. 

Nouveau-Brunswick 

Terrain,  batiments  et  agencement. 

Machinerie  et  outillage. 

Matieres  en  mains,  produits  en  cours  de  fabrication 

Caisse,  comptes  et  billets  a  recevoir. 

Total  du  capital. 

Nouvelle-Ecosse 

Terrains,  batiments  et  agencement. 

Machinerie  et  outillage. 

Matieres  en  mains,  produits  en  cours  de  fabrication 

Caisse,  comptes  et  billets  a  recevoir. 

Total  du  capital. 

Ontario 

Terrain,  batiments  et  agencement. 

Machinerie  et  outillage. 

Matieres  en  mains,  produits  en  cours  de  fabrication 

Caisse,  comptes  et  billets  a  recevoir. 

Total  du  capital. 

Quebec 

Terrain,  batiments  et  agencement. 

Machinerie  et  outillage. 

Matieres  en  mains,  produits  en  cours  de  fabrication, 

Caisse,  comptes  et  billets  a  recevoir. 

Total  du  capital. 

Canada 

Terrain,  batiments  et  agencement. 

Machinerie  et  outillage. 

Matieres  en  mains,  produits  en  cours  de  fabrication, 

Caisse,  comptes  et  billets  a,  recevoir. 

Total  du  capital. 

etc. 

25,392,419 

42,795,988 

4,119,662 

1,933,114 

1,356,886 

442,563 

etc. 

- 

7,852,225 

482,715 
141,000 
61,404 
68,269 

etc. 

32,058,785 
14,254,125 
10,465,445 

5,258,394 

753,388 

41,646,020 
21,464,282 
14,721,539 
10,744,966 

etc. 

62,036,749 

32,451,569 

15,794,885 

14,701,269 

6,838,825 

88,576,807 

47,411,172 
25,818,012 
19,240,570 
8,986,542 

etc. 

69,786,548 

77,195,185 
38,563,689 
28,419,730 
12,937,112 

101,456,296 

118,805,581 
60,627,266 
39,652,078 
22,259,779 

etc. 

157,115,716 

241,344,704 

Tableau  XIII — Agencement  des  fabriques  de  pate  de  bois,  par  genres  de  fabriques  et  par  provinces. 


Ontario 

Quebec 

Canada 

Nomenclature 

Pulperies — 

li 

142 

185 

Nombre  de  broyeuses. 

242 

925 

1,300 

Capacite  par  24  heures. 

4,450 

66,970 

78,320 

Force  en  chevaux-vapeur  employee  pour  les  broyeurs. 

19,400 

258,031 

316,931 

Capacite  annuelle  des  pulperies,  tonnes  (poids  sec) . 
Pulperies  et  paptereies— 

181 

176 

408 

Nombre  de  broyeuses. 

718 

1,029 

2,087 

Capacite  par  24  heures. 

112, 69S 

96,400 

233,098 

Force  en  chevaux-vapeur  employee  pour  les  broyeuses. 

362,870 

362,753 

829,223 

Capacite  annuelle  des  pulperies-papeteries,  tonnes  (poids  sec). 
Toutes  fabriques  de  pate — 

192 

318 

593 

Nombre  de  broyeuses. 

960 

1,954 

3,387 

Capacite  par  24  heures. 

117,148 

163,370 

311,418,     Force  en  chevaux-vapeur  emplovee  pour  les  broyeuses. 

382,270 

620,784 

1, 146, 154;     Capacite  annuelle  de  toutes  les  fabriques,  tonnes  (poids  sec). 

17c  (4) — 3J 


20  CENSUS   OF   INDUSTRY 

10  GEORGE  V,  A.  1920 

Table  XIV. — Pulp  mill  machinery  by  Processes  for  the  Provinces  and  Canada,  1918. 


Kind 

British  Columbia 
Colombie  Britannique 

New  Brunswick 
Nouveau-Brunswick 

Ontario 

For 

Sulphate 

Sulfate 

For 
Soda 

Soude 

For 

Sulphite 

Sulfite 

For 

Sulphate 

Sulfate 

For 

Soda 

Soude 

For 
Sulphite 

Sulfite 

For 
Sulphate 

Sulfate 

For 

Soda 

Soude 

For 

Sulphite 

Sulfite 

Pulp  Mills- 
Digesters — 

2 

2 

48 

3,600 

4 

2 

150 

13,500 

6 

4 

198 

17,100 

- 

9 

42 

82 

56,000 

5 

22 

58 

32,560 

14 

64 

140 

88,560 

5 

10 
34 

19,000 

5 

10 

34 

19,000 

- 

10 

37 

95 

45,000 

10 

37 

95 

45,000 

4 

5 

50 

13,000 

4 

5 

50 

13,000 

3 
1 

54 
1,800 

3 
1 

54 

1,800 

15 

Capacity,      tons     per 

138 

Number  of  cooks  per 

208 

Yearly     capacity     of 

105,000 

Pulp  and  paper  mills — 
Digesters — 

Number 

Capacity,     tons  per 

cook 

Number  of  cooks  per 

19 
152 
252 

Yearly     capacity     of 
mill,  tons 

All  mills  making  pulp — 
Digesters — 

Number 

Capacity,      tons      per 

161,000 

34 
290 

Number  of  cooks  per 

week 

Yearly     capacity     of 

460 
266,000 

Table  XV.— Paper  Mill  machinery,  1918. 


Paper  Mill  Machinery 

British 
Columbia 

Colombie 
Britan- 
nique 

Ontario 

In  paper  mills — 

8 
460 

138,000 

8 
460 

138,000 

11 

110 

10 

77 

46,550 

29 

In  pulp  and  paper  mills — 

1  140 

258 

410  122 

In  all  mills  making  paper — 
Fourdrinier  machines , 

40 

Cylinder  machines 

21 

335 

456  679 

FORESTRY,  PULP   AND   PAPER 
SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  17c  (4) 


21 


Tableau  XIV. — Machinerie  des  pulperies,  selon  les  procedes,  pour  les  provinces  et  pour  le  Canada' 

1918. 


Quebec 

Canada 

Enumeration 

For 
Sulphate 

For 

Soda 

For 

Sulphite 

For 

Sulphate 

For 
Soda 

For 

Sulphite 

Sulfate 

Soude 

Sulfite 

Sulfate 

Soude 

Sulfite 

8 

8 

19 

42 

Pulperies — 
Digesteurs — 
Nombre. 

40 

- 

32 

57 

- 

249 

Capacite,  tonnes  par  cuisson. 

176 

- 

88 

308 

- 

473 

Nombre  de  cuissons  par  semaine. 

46,000 

- 

66,000 

81,600 

- 

272,000 

Capacite  annuelle  des  pulperies,  tonnes. 

16 

4 

22 

20 

7 

46 

Pulperies  et  papeteries— 
Digesteurs — 
*   Nombre. 

54 

7 

89 

56 

8 

263 

Capacite,  tonnes  par  cuisson. 

487 

28 

285 

637 

82 

595 

Nombre  de  cuissons  par  semaine. 

96,520 

3,800 

147,917 

110,020 

5,600 

341,477 

Capacite  annuelle  des  pulperies-papeteries,  tonnes. 

24 

4 

30 

39 

7 

88 

Toutes  fabriques  de  pulpe — ■ 
Digesteurs — 
Nombre. 

94 

7 

121 

113 

8 

512 

Capacite,  tonnes  par  cuisson. 

663 

28 

373 

945 

82 

1,068 

Nombre  de  cuissons  par  semaine. 

142,520 

3,800 

213,917 

191,620 

5,600 

613,477 

Capacite  annuelle  de  toutes  les  fabriques,  tonnes. 

Tableau  XV. — Machinerie  des  papeteries,  1918. 


Quebec 

Canada 

Machinerie  a  fabriquer  le  papier 

Dans  les  papeteries — 

9 

20 

Machines  Fourdrinier. 

81 

191 

Capacite  par  24  heures. 

13 

23 

Machines  a  cylindres. 

65 

142 

Capacite  par  24  heures. 

44,716 

91,266 

Capacite  annuelle  en  tonnes  de  papier. 
Dans  les  pulperies  et  papeteries — 

35 

72 

Machines  Fourdrinier. 

1,151 

2,751 

Capacite  par  24  heures. 

6 

17 

Machines  a  cylindres. 

135 

393 

Capacite  par  24  heures. 

380,146 

928,268 

Capacite  annuelle  en  tonnes  de  papier. 
Dans  toutes  fabriques  de  papier — 

44 

92 

Machines  Fourdrinier. 

1,232 

2,942 

Capacite  par  24  heures. 

19 

40 

Machines  a  cylindres. 

200 

535 

Capacite  per  24  heures. 

424,862 

1,019,534 

Capacite  annuelle  en  tonnes  de  papier. 

22  CENSUS   OF   INDUSTRY 

.      10  GEORGE  V,  A.  1920 
Table  XVI. — Power  employed  by  Classes  of  Mills  and  Provinces,  1918. 


Pulp  Mills 
Pulperies 


Class 


Number 
of  units 


Nombre 

d'unites 


Total 

HP. 
according 
to  manu- 
facturer's 
rating 

Total 
en  chev  - 
vap.  selon 
l'indica- 
tion  du 
fabricant 


Total 
HP. 

actually 
employed 

Nombre 
en  chev.- 
vap.   reel- 

lement 
employes 


Pulp  and  Paper  Mills 
Pulperies  et  papeteries 


Number 
of  units 


Nombre 

d'unites 


Total 
H.P. 

according 
to  manu- 
facturer's 
rating 

Total 
en  chev.- 
vap.  selon 
I' indica- 
tion du 
fabricant 


Total 

H.P. 

actually 

employed 

Total 

en  chev.- 

vap     reel- 

Iement 

employes 


British  Columbia 


Power  owned : 

Boilers 

Engines:  Steam 

Gas 

Gasolene 

Water  wheels 

Water  motors 

Other  powers 

Electric  motors  irun  by  power  generated  by  establish- 
ment)  

Power  rented: 

Electric  motors  operated  by  rented  power 

Other  powers 


New  Brunswick 


Power  owned 

Boilers 

Engines:  Steam 

Gas 

Gasolene 

Water  wheels 

Water  motors 

Other  powers 

Electric  motors  (run  by  current  generated  by  establish 

ment) 

Power  rented: 

Electric  motors  operated  by  rented  power 

Other  powers 


Nora  Scotia 


Power  owned: 

Boilers 

Engines:  Steam. 


Gasolene 

Water  wheels 

Water  motors 

Other  powers 

Electric  motors  (run  by  current  generated  by  establish- 
ment)  

Power  rented: 

Electric  motors  operated  by  rented  power 

Other  powers 


Outario 


Power  owned: 

Boilers 

Engines:  Steam 

Gas 

Gasolene 

Water  wheels 

Water  motors 

Other  powers  

Electric  motors  (run  by  current  generated  by  establish- 
ment)  " 

Power  rented: 

Electric  motors  operated  by  rented  power 

Other  powers 


244 


178 


:j.)l 

41 

18 

1 

13 

2 
93 
183 


16.437 


5.407 
3,370 


3,585 


18,680 


3.025 

7,536 

125 

31 

2,800 


5,163 

13.640 

1,540 

12.100 


41,564 

12,440 
,  2,395 

25 
13,400 

1,800 

4,097 

7,407 


15.375 


5.350 
2,645 


3.335 


4.045 


14,212 


2.450 

5.378 

125 

31 

2.800 


3,428 

3.520 

1.520 

8.000 


28,440 

10.400 
1,930 

25 
5,400 

1,100 

2,300 

7,285 


158 

36 


M(! 


336 

281 


75,156 


7,413 
2,400 


44,000 


21,343 


22,040 
11,845 


26 
93,533 


18,839 
23,499 


54.612 


8,000 
2,300 


34,000 


10,312 


146,529 


18,865 
10,055 


26 
80,905 


13,985 
22,693 


FORESTRY,  PULP   AND    PAPER 
SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  17c  (4) 

Tableau  XVI. — Force  motrice  employee,  par  genres  de  fabriques  et  par  provinces,  1918. 


23 


Paper  Mills 

All  Mills 

Papeteries 

Toutes  fabriqu 

33 

Total 
HP. 

Total 
H.P. 

according 

Total 

according 

Total 

to  manu- 

H.P. 

to  manu- 

H.P. 

Number 

facturer's 

actually 

Number 

facturer's 

actually 

of  units 

rating 

employed 

of  units 

rating 

employed 

Genre 

Nombre 

Total 

Total 

Nombre 

Total 

Total 

d'unites 

en  chev.- 

en  chev.- 

d' unites 

en  ehev.- 

en  chev.- 

vap.  selon 

vap.    reel- 

vap.  selon 

vap.    reel- 

l'indiea- 

lement 

l'indica- 

lement 

tion  du 

employes 

tion  du 

employes 

fabricant 

fabricant 

- 

- 

- 

631 

91,593 

69,987 

Colombie  Britannique 

Force  motrice  appartenante: 

- 

- 

- 

71 

12,820 

13,350 

Chaudieres  a  vapeur. 

- 

- 

- 

15 

5,770 

4,945 

Machines  motrices:  a  vapeur. 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

a  gaz. 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

a  gazoline. 

- 

- 

- 

31 

47,585 

37,335 

Turbines. 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Moteurs  hydrauliques. 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Autre  force  motrice. 

514 

25,418 

14,357 

Moteurs  electriques    mus  par  courant  produit  par  l'6ta- 
blissement. 
Force  motrice  louee: 

- 

- 

- 

_ 

- 

- 

Moteurs  electriques  actionnes  par  force  motrice  lou6e. 

~ 

_ 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Autre  force  motrice. 

- 

- 

- 

244 

18,689 

14,212 

Nouveau-Brunswick 

Force  motrice  appartenante: 

- 

- 

- 

22 

3,025 

2,450 

Chaudieres  a  vapeur. 

- 

- 

- 

35 

7,536 

5,378 

Machines  motrices:  k  vapeur. 

- 

- 

- 

1 

125 

125 

k  gaz. 

- 

- 

- 

4 

31 

31 

a  gazoline. 

- 

- 

- 

4 

2,800 

2,800 

Turbines. 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Moteurs  hydrauliques. 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Autre  force  motrice. 

17S 

o,163 

3,428 

Moteurs  electriques  mus  par  courant  produit  pari 
blissement. 
Force  motrice  louee: 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Moteurs  electriques  actionnes  par  force  motrice  louee 

- 

" 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Autre  force  motrice. 

- 

- 

- 

16 

13,640 

9,520 

Nouvelle-Ecosse 

Force  motrice  appartenante: 

- 

- 

- 

2 

1,540 

1,520 

Chaudieres  a  vapeur. 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Machines  motrices:  a  vapeur. 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

a  gaz. 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

a  gazoline. 

- 

- 

- 

14 

12,100 

8,000 

Turbines. 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Moteurs  hydrauliques. 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

_ 

Autre  force  motrice. 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Moteurs  electriques  mus  par  courant  produit  pari 'a  it 
blissement. 
Force  motrice  louee: 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Moteurs  electriques  actionnes  par  force  motrice  louee. 

— 

_ 

~ 

~ 

- 

- 

Autre  force  motrice. 

212 

12,238 

9,472 

1,409 

223,584 

184,411 

Ontario 

Force  motrice  appartenante: 

26 

2,960 

2,265 

136 

37,440 

31,530 

Chaudieres  a  vapeur. 

11 

1,405 

1,185 

100 

15,645 

13,170 

Machines  motrice:  &  vapeur. 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

a  gaz. 

- 

- 

- 

5 

51 

51 

a  gazoline. 

20 

3,432 

2,632 

118 

110,365 

88,937 

Turbines. 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Moteurs  hydrauliques. 

- 

- 

- 

2 

1,800 

1,100 

Autre  force  motrice. 

62 

1,369 

853 

491 

24,305 

17,138 

Moteurs  electriques  mils  par  courant  produit  par  l'eta- 
blissement. 
Force  motrice  louee: 

93 

3,072 

2,537 

557 

33,978 

32,515 

Moteurs  electriques  actionnes  par  force  motrice  louee. 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Autre  force  motrice. 

24  CENSUS    OF    INDUSTRY 

10  GEORGE  V,  A.  1920 

Table  XVI. — Power  employed  by  Classes  of  Mills  and  Provinces — -concluded. 


Class 


Quebec. 


Power  owned:  . 

Boilers 

Engines:  Steam 

Gas 

Gasolene 

Water  wheels 

Water  motors 

Other  powers 

Electric  motors  (run  by  current  generated  by  establish- 
ment)   

Power  rented: 

Electric  motors  operated  by  rented  power 

Other  powers 


Canada 


Power  owned: 

Boilers 

Engines:  Steam 

Gas 

Gasolene 

Water  wheels 

Water  motors 

Other  powers 

Electric  motors  (run  by  current  generated  by  establish 

ment) 

Power  rented: 

Electric  motors  operated  by  rented  power 

Other  powers 


Pulp  Mills 
Pulperies 


Number 
of  units 


Nombre 
d'unites 


•211 


1.028 

127 

99 

1 

5 

112 

8 

441 

225 
10 


Total 

H.P. 
according 
to  manu- 
facturer's 
rating 

Total 
en  chev.- 
vap.  selon 
['indica- 
tion du 
fabricant 


114,442 


7,675 
3,405 


97,220 

300 

3,082 

1,700 
1,000 

885,783 

30,087 

17,766 

125 

56 

129,105 

2,100 

16,417 

9,10 
1,000 


Total 
HP. 

actually 
employed 

Nombre 
en  chev.- 
vap.   reel- 
lement 
employes 


108,11? 


7,260 
3,310 


91,930 

275 

2,942 

1,400 

1,000 


27,980 

13,263 

125 

56 

111,465 

1 ,  375 

12,715 

8,685 
1,000 


Pulp  and  Paper  Mills 
Pulperies  et  papeteries 


Number 
of  units 


Nombre 
d'unites 


1,249 


206 
814 


2,553 


938 
1,095 


Total 
H.P 
according 
to  manu- 
facturer's 
rating 

Total 
en  chev.- 
vap.  selon 
1' indica- 
tion du 
fabricant 


213,296 


25,450 
21,350 


79,760 


23,264 
63,472 


458,234 


54,903 
35,595 


26 

217,293 


63,446 
83,971 


Total 

H.P. 

actually 

employed 

Total 

en  chev.- 

vap.   rfeel- 

lement 

employes 


168,393 


24,807 
19,040 


61,930 


13,034 
49,582 


369,534 


51,672 
31,395 


26 

176,835 


37,331 
72,275 


FORESTRY,  PULP    AND   PAPER  25 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  17c  (4) 

Tableau  XVI. — Force  motrice  employee,  par  genres  de  fabriques  et  par  provinces. — fin. 


Paper  Mills 

All  Mills 

Papeteries 

Toutes  fabriques 

Total 

Total 

H.P. 

according 

Total 

according 

Total 

to  manu- 

HP. 

to  manu- 

H.P. 

Number 

facturer's 

actually 

Number 

facturer's 

actually 

of  units 

rating 

employed 

of  units 

rating 

employed 

■ — 

— 

— 

■ — 

— 

— 

Genre 

Nombre 

Total 

Total 

Nombre 

Total 

Total 

d'unites 

en  chev.- 

en  chev.- 

d'unites 

en  chev.- 

en  chev.- 

vap.  selon 

vap .    reel- 

vap.  selon 

vap.    reel- 

1 'indica- 

lement 

tion  du 

lement 

tion  du 

employes 

l'indica- 

employes 

fabricant 

fabricant 

208 

18,459 

16,699 

1,701 

347,197 

294,209 

Quebec 

Force  motrice  appartenante: 

20 

2,535 

2,360 

133 

35,660 

34,427 

Chaudieres  a  vapeur. 

18 

1,894 

1,519 

119 

26,709 

23,869 

Machines  motrice:    a  vapeur. 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

a  gaz. 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

a  gazoline. 

78 

11,028 

10,033 

227 

188,008 

163,893 

Turbines. 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Moteurs  hydrauliques. 

- 

- 

- 

6 

300 

275 

Autre  force  motrice. 

40 

1,172 

1,112 

298 

27,518 

17,088 

Moteurs  electriques  mus  par  courant  produit  par  l'eta 
blissement. 
Force  motrice  louee: 

52 

1,830 

1,675 

908 

65,172 

50,982 

Moteurs  electriques  actionnes  par  force  motrice  louee. 

_ 

_ 

- 

10 

;,ooo 

1,000 

Autre  force  motrice. 

420 

30,697 

26,171 

4,001 

691,694 

572,389 

Canada 

Force  motrice  appartenante: 

46 

5,495 

4,625 

364 

90,485 

84,277 

Chaudieres  a  vapeur. 

29 

3,299 

2,704 

269 

56,660 

47,362 

Machines  motrices:    a  vapeur. 

- 

- 

- 

1 

125 

125 

a  gaz. 

- 

- 

- 

9 

82 

82 

a  gazoline. 

98 

14,460 

12,665 

394 

360,858 

300,965 

Turbines. 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Moteurs  hydrauliques. 

- 

- 

- 

8 

2,100 

1,375 

Autre  force  motrice. 

102 

2,541 

1,965 

1,481 

82,404 

52,011 

Moteurs  electriques  mus  par  courant  produit  par  l'eta. 
blissement. 
Force  motrice  louee: 

145 

4,902 

4,212 

1,465 

100,980 

85,172 

Moteurs  electriques  actionnes  par  force  motrice  louee. 

— 

~ 

" 

10 

1,000 

1,000 

Autre  force  motrice 

26  CENSUS   OF   INDUSTRY 

10  GEORGE  V,  A.    1920 
Table  XVII. — Employees,  Salaries  and  Wages  by  Classes  of  Mills  for  the  Provinces,  1918. 


Provinces 

Pulp  Mills 
Pulperies 

Pulp  and  Paper  Mills 
Pulperies  et  papeteries 

Males 
Hommes 

Females 
Femmes 

$ 

Males 
Hommes 

Females 
Femmes 

S 

British  Columbia 

Officers,  superintendents  and  managers 

- 

- 

- 

31 

142 

1,042 

14 

78,452 
307,160 

1,396,665 

Total  salaries  and  wages 

- 

- 

_ 

1,215 

33 

34 

942 

14 

10 
6 

1,782,277 

104,915 
43,680 
786,510 

New  Brunswick 

Clerks,  stenographers  and  salaried  employees 

Total  salaries  and  wages 

- 

_ 

- 

1,009 

6 
1 

141 

16 

2 

i 

935,105 

9,800 

2  100 

Nova  Scotia 

Officers,  superintendents  and  managers 

66,826 

Total  salaries  and  wages 

36 

25 

663 

19 
204 

127,872 
48,335 
765,085 

148 

25 
62 

1,713 

3 

14 
9 

78,72* 

119,555 

128,201 

1,972,584 

Ontario 

Clerks,  stenographers  and  salaried  employees 

Total  salaries  and  wages 

724 

45 
58 
948 

223 

19 
289 

941.292 

164,497 

85,864 

858,962 

1.800 

49 

148 

2,959 

23 

31 

18 

2.220,340 

163,568 

195,475 

2,133,343 

Quebec 

Officers,  superintendents  and  managers 

Clerks,  stenographers  and  salaried  employees 

Total  salaries  and  wages 

1,051 

81 

83 

1,611 

308 

38 
493 

1,109,323 

292,369 

134,199 

1,624.047 

3,158 

144 

387 

6,797 

49 

71 
34 

2,492,386 

476,290 

676,616 

6,355,928 

Canada 

Officers,  superintendents  and  managers 

Clerks,  stenographers  and  salaried  employees 

Total  salaries  and  wages 

1,775 

131 

2.050,615 

7,328 

105 

7,508,834 

FORESTRY,  PULP   AND   PAPER 


27 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  17c  (4) 

Tableau  XVII. — Personnel  d'employes  et  d'ouvriers,  appointements  et  salaires,  par  genres  de 

fabriques,  pour  les  provinces,  1918. 


Paper  Mills 

All  Mills 

Papeteries 

Toutes  fabriques 

Males 

Females 

$ 

Males 

Females 

S 

Hommes 

Femmes 

Hommes 

Femmes 

Colombie  Britannique 

24 
46 

1,728 

26 
28 

138.607 
94,597 

2.O'j>.750 

55 

188 

2.770 

40 
28 

217,059 

401,757 

3,495,415 

Administrateurs,  directeurs  et  gerants. 
Commis,  stenographes  et  autres  employes. 
Ouvriers  et  journaliers. 

1,798 

54 

3  331.954 

3,013 

68 

4,114,231 

Total  des  traitements,  appointements  et  salaires. 
Nouveau-Brunswick 

- 

- 

: 

33 

34 

942 

10 
6 

104,915 
43,680 
786,510 

Administrateurs,  directeurs  et  gerants. 
Commis,  stenographes  et  autres  employes. 
Ouvriers  et  journaliers. 

- 

- 

- 

1,009 

IS 

935,105 

Total  des  traitements,  appointements  et  salaires. 
Xouvelle-Ecosse , 

- 

- 

: 

6 
1 

141 

2 
1 

9.800 

2,100 

66,826 

Administrateurs,  directeurs  et  gerants. 
Commis,  stenographes  et  autres  employes. 
Ouvriers  et  journaliers. 

- 

- 

148 

3 

78,726 

Total  des  traitements,  appointements  et  salaires. 
Ontario 

93 

190 

5,942 

1 
65 
114 

346.675 

302.648 

8.488.612 

154 

277 

8,318 

1 
98 

327 

594.102 

479,184 

9.226.281 

Administrateurs,  directeurs  et  gerants. 
Commis,  stenographes  et  autres  employes. 
Ouvriers  et  journaliers. 

8.235 

180 

7  137  935 

8,749 

436 

10.399.567 

Total  des  traitements,  appointements  et  salaires. 
Quebec 

120 

458 

7.008 

1 
101 
179 

553.527 
680.091 

6.711.260 

214 

664 

10.915 

1 

151 
486 

881.592 

961.430 
9.703.574 

Administrateurs,  directeurs  et  gerant-. 
Commis,  stenographes  et  autres  employes. 
Ouvriers  et  journaliers. 

7,586 

381 

7,944  887 

11,793 

638 

11.546.596 

Total  des  traitements,  appointements  et  salaires. 
Canada 

237 

694 

14,678 

2 
192 

321 

1,038.809 
1,077.336 

15,298.631 

462 
1,164 

23,086 

2 
301 
848 

1,807.468 
1,888.151 

23.278.606 

Administrateurs,  directeurs  et  gerants. 
Commis.  stenographes  et  autres  employes. 
Ouvriers  et  journaliers. 

15,609 

515 

17,414,776 

24,713 

1,151 

36.974,335 

Total  des  traitements,  appointements  et  salaires. 

28  CENSUS   OF    INDUSTRY 

10  GEORGE  V,  A.  1920 

Table  XVIII. — Employees  by  Months  for  Classes  of  Mills  by  Provinces,  1918. 


Classes  of  mills  by  Provinces 


British  Columbia— 

Pulp  mills 

Pulp  and  paper  mills. 

Paper  mills 

All  mills 


New  Brunswick- 
Pulp  mills 

Pulp  and  paper  mills. 

Paper  mills 

All  mills 


No?3  Scotia- 
Pulp  mills 

Pulp  and  paper  mills. 

Paper  mills 

All  mills 


Ontario- 
Pulp  mills 

Pulp  and  paper  mills. 

Paper  mills 

All  mills 


Pulp  and  paper  mills 
Paper  mills. 
All  mills.... 


Canada- 
Pulp  mills 

Pulp  and  paper  mills. 

Paper  mills 

All  mills 


■a  i  § 


Quebec- 
Pulp  mills 2,449 

6,477 


January 
Janvier 


844 
1,441 


945 
945 
200 
200 


1,661 

6,893 

634 

9,188 


£  ,   E 


9,789 


6,099 
14,811 

1,497 
22,407 


February 
Fevrier 


939 
1,485 


2,424 
963 


963 

[8fi 


194 
304 


13 

IV} 

260 
457 


302 
454 

783 


186 


1 ,  722 

6,697 

627 

9,046 


2,497 
6,492 


9,871 


6,307 
14,674 
1,509 

22,490 


March 
Mars 


987 
1,595 


193 


1,739 

6,321 

655 

8,715 


1  £ 


April 
Avril 


977 
1,697 


2,674 
955 


955 


201 


13 

2.427 

153 

6,553 

265 

900 

431 

9,880 

27 

6,272 

281 

14,469 

461 

1 .  555 

769 

22,296 

1: 
115 

207 
334 


29 
307 
484 

820 


201 


1,720 

5,316 

650 


2,560 
6,787 


10,233 


6,413 

13,800 

1,536 

21,749 


May 

Mai 


2  ,  E 


999 
1,700 


10 
117 
203 
330 


15 
187 

282 

489 


2 
327 
490 
844 


1,743 

5,342 

65' 

7,742 


June 
Juin 


%  ,  £ 


10 
1 1 6 
205 
331 


1,055 
1,915 


2,970 
972 
972 


9 


2,991 

18 

7,114 

175 

921 

288 

11,026 

481 

6,821 

36 

14,819 

319 

1,578 

493 

23,218 

848 

1,705 

5,298 

663 

7,666 


3,301 

7,777 

933 

12,011 


7,131 
14,990 

1,596 
23,717 


118 
213 
340 


24 
183 

288 
495 


41 
335 
501 

877 


FORESTRY,  PULP   AND   PAPER 
SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  17c  (4) 

Tableau  XVIII. — Employes  par  mois,  par  genres  de  fabriques  et  par  provinces,  1918. 


29 


July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

Juillet 

Aout 

Septembre 

Octobre 

Novembre 

Decembre 

no 

» 

_ 

_ 

Genre  de  fabriques,  par  provinces 

a.      2 

fi      c 

2 

2.      S 

S,      o 

o     8 

<o     8 

3  1  £ 

- 

=3    1    S 

£  ,  | 

1  i  E 

*      o 

S      5 

£   £ 

=J  1   s 

£     5 

W 

o 

W 

i'i 

s  I  a 

o 

=       z 

Colombie  Britannique— 

1,144 

- 

1,125 

- 

1,138 

- 

1,113 

- 

1,105 

- 

1,086 

- 

Pulperies. 

1,885 

32 

1,875 

32 

2,023 

32 

1,858 

33 

1,492 

32 

1,533 

32 

Pulperies  et  papeteries. 
Papeteries. 

3,029 

32 

3,000 

32 

3,161 

32 

2,971 

33 

2,597 

32 

2,619 

32 

Toutes  fabriques. 
Nouveau-Brunswick— 

997 

7 

933 

8 

943 

8 

902 

9 

982 

10 

812 

10 

Pulperies. 

Pulperies  et  papeteries. 

Papeteries. 

997 

7 

933 

8 

943 

8 

902 

9 

982 

10 

•    812 

10 

Toutes  fabriques. 
Noufelle-Ecosse — 

99 

1 

79 

1 

67 

1 

90 

1 

159 

1 

205 

2 

Pulperies. 

Pulperies  et  papeteries. 

Papeteries. 

99 

1 

79 

1 

67 

1 

90 

1 

159 

1 

205 

2 

Toutes  fabriques. 
Ontario — 

1,812 

9 

1,691 

8 

1,649 

10 

1,612 

8 

1,718 

7 

1,786 

6 

Pulperies. 

5,391 

133 

6,342 

127 

5,704 

115 

5,850 

108 

5,861 

112 

5,931 

100 

Pulperies  et  papeteries. 

678 

216 

670 

201 

649 

197 

666 

198 

678 

198 

730 

215 

Papeteries. 

7,881 

358 

8,703 

336 

8,002 

322 

8,128 

314 

8,257 

317 

8.447 

321 

Toutes  fabriques. 
Quebec— 

3,596 

18 

3,445 

19 

3,300 

20 

3,115 

23 

3,060 

18 

2,767 

21 

Pulperies. 

7,707 

180 

7,565 

171 

7,261 

178 

6,716 

189 

6,818 

187 

6,757 

198 

Pulperies  et  papeteries. 

1,004 

286 

1,019 

293 

987 

325 

989 

314 

982 

282 

1,010 

301 

Papeteries. 

12,407 

484 

12,029 

•    483 

11,548 

523 

10,820 

526 

10,860 

487 

10,534 

520 

Toutes  fabriques. 
Canada— 

7,648 

35 

7,273 

36 

7,097 

39 

6,832 

41 

7,024 

36 

6,656 

39 

Pulperies. 

14,983 

345 

15,782 

330 

14,988 

325 

14,424 

330 

14,171 

331 

14,221 

330 

Pulperies  et  papeteries. 

1,682 

502 

1,689 

494 

1,636 

522 

1,655 

512 

1,660 

480 

1,740 

516 

Papeteries. 

24,313 

882 

24,744 

860 

23,721 

886 

22,911 

883 

22,855 

847 

22,617 

885 

Toutes  fabriques. 

30  CENSUS   OF   INDUSTRY 

10  GEORGE  V,  A.  1920 

Table  XIX. — Classified  Weekly  wages  by  Provinces  and  Classes  of  Mills,  1918. 


Provinces 


Pulp  Mills 
Pulperies 


16  years  of  age 
and  over 

Ages  de  16  ans 
et  plus 


Male 
Hommes 


Female 
Femmes 


Under  16  years 
of  age 


Au-dessous  de  16 
ans 


Male 
Gargons 


Female 
Filles 


Pulp  and  Paper  Mills 
Pulperies  et  papeteries 


16  years  of  age 
and  over 

Ages  de  16  ans  et 
plus 


Male 
Hommes 


Female 
Femmes 


Under  16  years 
of  age 

Au-dessous  de  16 
ans 


Male 
Gargons 


Female 
Fflles 


British  Columbia 

Under  S3 

S3  but  under  S4 

$4  but  under  So 

So  but  under  S6 

$6  but  under  S7 

$7  but  under  S8 

$8  but  under  $9 

$9  but  under  $10 

$10  but  under  S12 

$12  but  under  $15 

$15  but  under  $20 

$20  but  under  $25 

$25  and  over 


New  Brunswick 

Under  S3..    

$3  but  under  S4 

$4  but  under  S5 

S5  but  under  S6 

$6  but  under  $7 

$7  but  under  $8 

$8  but  under  $9 

S9  but  under  $10 

S10  but  under  $12 

$12  but  under  $15 

$15  but  under  S20 

$20  but  under  $25 

$25  and  over 


Nova  Scotia 

Under  $3 

$3  but  under  $4.. 

$4  but  under  ?5 

$5  but  under  S6 

$6  but  under  $7 

$7  but  under  $8 

$8  bur  under  $9 

$9  but  under  $10 
$10  but  under  S12. 
$12  but  under  815 
$15  but  under  $20. .  . . 
$20  but  under  $25. 
$25  and  over 


Ontario 

Under  $3 

$3  but  under  S4  . . 
$4  but  under  $5. . . 
$5  but  under  $6..  . 
S6  but  under  S7. .  . 
$7  but  under  SS. . . 
$8  but  under  $9. .  . 
$9  but  under  $10. . 
$10  but  under  $12. 
$12  but  under  $15. 
$15  but  under  J20. 
$20  but  under  $25. 
$25  and  over 


1 

1 
1 

33 
1 

11 
61 
183 
120 
81 
49 


11 

> 

673 

319 

708 


2  s 


602 

^47 


- 

1 

5 

1 

4 

- 

2 

- 

15 

- 

IS 

- 

109 

- 

52 

- 

600 
1,615 

1,642 
1,468 


FORESTRY,  PULP   AND   PAPER  31 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  17c  (4) 
Tableau  XIX. — Salaires  hebdomadaires  classifies  par  provinces  et  par  genres  de  fabriques,  1918 


Paper  Mills 

All  Mills 

Papeteries 

Toutes  fabriques 

16  years  of  age 

Under  16  years 

16  years  of  age 

Under  16  years 

and  over 

of  age 

and  over 

of  age 

— 

— 

■ — 

— 

Provinces 

Ages  de  16  ans  et 

Au-dessous  de  16 

Ages  de  16  ans  et 

Au-dessous  de  16 

plus 

ans 

plus 

ans 

Male 

Female 

Male 

Female 

Male 

Female 

Male 

Female 

Hommes 

Femmes 

Gareons 

Filles 

Hommes 

Femmes 

Gareons 

Filles 

Colombie  Britannique 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

Au-dessous  de  $3. 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

S3  mais  moins  de  $4. 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

84  mais  moins  de  $5. 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

$5  mais  moins  de  $6. 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

$6  mais  moins  de  $7. 

- 

- 

- 

- 

1 

- 

- 

- 

■57  mais  moins   de  88. 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

88  mais  moins  de  89. 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

89  mais  moins  de  810. 

- 

- 

- 

- 

1 

5 

- 

- 

810  mais  moins  de  812. 

- 

- 

- 

- 

29 

20 

- 

- 

812  mais  moins  de  815. 

- 

- 

- 

- 

132 

- 

7 

- 

815  mais  moins  de  820. 

- 

- 

- 

- 

891 

6 

- 

- 

820  mais  moins  de  825. 

1,578 

825  et  plus. 

Nouveau-Brunswich 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

Au-dessous  de  S3. 

- 

- 

- 

- 

1 

- 

- 

- 

S3  mais  moins  de  84. 

- 

- 

- 

- 

1 

- 

- 

- 

84  mais  moins  de  85. 

- 

- 

- 

- 

1 

- 

- 

- 

85  mais  moins  de  86. 

- 

_ 

- 

- 

- 

1 

- 

- 

$6  mais  moins  de  87. 

- 

- 

- 

- 

33 

- 

- 

- 

87  mais  moins  de  88. 

- 

- 

- 

- 

1 

- 

- 

- 

88  mais  moins  de  $9. 

- 

- 

- 

- 

11 

- 

6 

- 

89  mais  moins  de  810. 

- 

- 

- 

- 

61 

9 

- 

- 

S10  mais  moins  de  812. 

- 

- 

- 

- 

183 

- 

- 

- 

812  mais  moins  de  815. 

- 

- 

- 

- 

420 

- 

- 

- 

815  mais  moins  de  820. 

- 

_ 

- 

- 

81 

- 

- 

- 

820  mais  moins  de  825. 

49 

825  et  plus. 

Nouvelle-Ecosse 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

Au-dessous  de  83. 

- 

- 

_ 

_ 

- 

1 

- 

- 

83  mais  moins  de  S4. 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

84  mais  moins  de  85. 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

85  mais  moins  de  86. 

- 

_ 

- 

- 

5 

1 

- 

_ 

86  mais  moins  de  87. 

- 

- 

- 

- 

4 

- 

- 

- 

87  mais  moins  de  $8. 

- 

- 

- 

- 

2 

- 

- 

- 

88  mais  moins  de  89. 

- 

- 

- 

- 

15 

- 

- 

- 

89  mais  moins  de  810. 

- 

- 

- 

- 

45 

- 

- 

_ 

810  mais  moins  de  812. 

- 

- 

- 

- 

109 

- 

- 

- 

812  mais  moins  de  815. 

- 

- 

- 

- 

52 

- 

- 

- 

815  mais  moins  de  820. 

- 

- 

- 

- 

6 

- 

- 

- 

820  mais  moins  de  825. 

825  et  plus. 

Ontario 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

Au-dessous  de  83. 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

$3  mais  moins  de  84. 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

$4  mais  moins  de  85. 

1 

1 

- 

- 

1 

1 

- 

- 

85  mais  moins  de  86. 

6 

1 

2 

- 

6 

1 

2 

3 

86  mais  moins  de  87.             , 

1 

2 

3 

3 

1 

11 

3 

7 

87  mais  moins  de  88. 

1 

35 

- 

6 

2 

40 

4 

7 

88  mais  moins  de  89. 

3 

47 

5 

1 

3 

56 

5 

1 

89  mais  moins  de  810. 

8 

83 

- 

- 

28 

93 

1 

- 

810  mais  moins  de  812 

71 

20 

3 

- 

729 

74 

13 

- 

812  mais  moins  de  815 

310 

4 

- 

- 

2,598 

14 

8 

- 

815  mais  moins  de  820 

200 

1 

- 

- 

2,161 

2 

1 

- 

820  mais  moins  de  825 

118 

- 

- 

- 

2,294 

- 

- 

- 

825  et  plus. 

3  2  CENSUS   OF   INDUSTRY 

10  GEORGE  V,  A.  1920 
Table  XIX. — Classified  weekly  Wages  by  Provinces  and  Classes  of  Mills,  1918 — Concluded. 


Provinces 


Pulp  Mills 
Pulperies 


16  years  of  age 
and  over 

Ages  de  16  ans 
et  plus 


Male 
Hommes 


Female 
Femnies 


Under  16  years 
of  age 

Au-dessous  de  16 
ans 


Male 
Garcons 


Female 
Filled 


Pulp  and  Paper  Mills 
Pulperies  et  papeteries 


16  years  of  age 
and  over 

Ages  de  16  ans  et 
plus 


Male 
Hommes 


Female 
Femmes 


Under  16  years 
of  age 

Au-dessous  de  16 
ans 


Male 
Garcons 


Female 
Filles 


Quebec 

Under  S3 

$3  but  under  S4. . 
$4  but  under  $5.  . 
So  but  under  S6. . 

56  but  under  S7. . 

57  but  under  $8. . 
$8  but  under  $9. . 
$9  but  under  S10. 
$10  but  under  S12 
$12  but  under  $15 
$15  but  under  S20 
$20  but  under  $25 
$25  and  over 


Canada 

Under  S3 

$3  but  under  S4.. 
$4  but  under  $5. . 
$5  but  under  S6. . 
$6  but  under  $7. . 
$7  but  under  S8. . 
$8  but  under  $9. . 
$9  but  under  $10. 
$10  but  under  $12 
$12  but  under  $15 
$15  but  under  $20 
$20  but  under  $25 
$25  and  over 


10 

20 

23 

70 

101 

321 

946 

1,159 

226 


1 
1 
1 

15 

58 

26 

96 

219 

672 

2,166 

1,854 

1,714 


4 
1 

11 

19 

84 

€0 

106 

719 

2,830 

1,861 

1,024 


4 
1 

11 

19 

85 

60 

115 

1,347 

4,502 

4,105 

3,339 


Table  XX. — Averages  of  Working  Time  by  Classes  of  Mills,  and  Provinces  1918. 


Provinces 

Pulp  Mills 
Pulperies 

Pulp  and 
Paper  Mills 

Pulperies  et 
papeteries 

Paper  Mills 
Papeteries 

All  Mills 

Toutes 
fabriques 

British  Columbia— Colombie  Britannique 

252 

52 
9-5 
57 

285-6 

18-4 
14 

84 

159-2 
33-4 
11-6 

99-8 

12 

72 

301-5 

2-5 
8 
48 

- 

276-7 

27-2 

8-7 

52-5 

New  Brunswick— Nomeau-Brunswick 

285-6 

Days  on  less  than  %  time — Moins  d'une  j  journee 

Days  idle — Arret  complet 

18-4 

14 

Hours  worked  per  week — Heures  de  travail  par  semaine 

Nova  Scotia— Nouvelle-Ecosse 

84 
159-2 

33-4 

11-6 

99-8 

Hours  worked  per  shift — Heures  de  travail  par  jour. . . 

12 

Hours  worked  per  week — Heures  de  travail  par  semaine 

72 

FORESTRY,  PULP   AND    PAPER 
SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  17c(4) 


33 


Tableau  XIX. — Salaires  hebdomadaires  classifies  par  provinces  et  par  genres  de  fabriques 

1918— fin. 


Paper 

Mills 

All  Mills 

Papeteries 

Toutes  fabriques 

16  years  of  age 

Under  16  years 

16  years  of  age 

Under  16  years 

and  over 

of  age 

and  over 

of  age 

— 

— 

— 

■ — 

Provinces 

Ages  de  16  ans  et 

Au-dessous  de  16 

Ages  de  16  ans  et 

Au-dessous  de  16 

plus 

ans 

plus 

ans 

Male 

Female 

Male 

Female 

Male 

Female 

Male 

Female 

Hommes 

Femmes 

Garcons 

Filles 

Hommes 

Femmes 

Garcons 

Filles 

Quebec 

- 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

11 

6 

Au-dessous  de  $3. 

- 

- 

- 

- 

4 

3 

5 

2 

$3  mais  moins  de  $4. 

1 

- 

2 

- 

2 

16 

5 

12 

84  mais  moins  de  $5. 

1 

- 

8 

14 

1 

4 

10 

16 

$5  mais  moins  de  $6. 

7 

31 

10 

4 

28 

62 

19 

5 

36  mais  moins  de  $7. 

9 

46 

3 

13 

48 

76 

18 

22 

37  mais  moins  de  $8. 

10 

100 

2 

8 

117 

170 

9 

9 

38  mais  moins  de  S9. 

01 

38 

2 

2 

187 

55 

11 

2 

39  mais  moins.de  $10. 

29 

35 

- 

- 

236 

41 

22 

- 

310  mais  moins  de  $12. 

312 

3 

- 

- 

1,352 

8 

3 

- 

812  mais  moins  de  S15. 

442 

5 

- 

- 

4,218 

8 

40 

2 

315  mais  moins  de  820. 

149 

- 

- 

- 

3,169 

1 

- 

- 

820  mais  moins  de  325. 

87 

* 

1,337 

1 

825  et  plus. 

Canada 

- 

_ 

- 

_ 

_ 

_ 

11 

6 

Au-dessous  de  $3. 

- 

- 

- 

- 

5 

4 

5 

2 

33  mais  moins  de  84. 

1 

- 

2 

- 

3 

16 

5 

12 

84  mais  moins  de  85. 

2 

1 

8 

U 

3 

5 

10 

16 

85  mais  moins  de  $6. 

13 

32 

12 

4 

39 

65 

21 

8 

86  mais  moins  de  87. 

10 

48 

6 

16 

87 

87 

21 

29 

37  mais  moins  de  88. 

11 

135 

9 

14 

122 

210 

13 

16 

88  mais  moins  de  89. 

60 

85 

7 

3 

216 

111 

22 

3 

39  mais  moins  de  $10. 

37 

118 

- 

- 

371 

148 

23 

- 

810  mais  moins  de  S12. 

383 

23 

3 

- 

2,402 

102 

16 

- 

•812  mais  moins  de  $15. 

752 

9 

- 

- 

7,420 

22 

55 

2 

815  mais  moins  de  $20. 

349 

1 

- 

- 

6,308 

9 

1 

- 

320  mais  moins  de  $25. 

205 

" 

" 

5,258 

1 

- 

~ 

325  et  plus. 

Tableau  XX. — Duree  moyenne  des  operations,  par  genres  de  fabriques  et  par  provinces  1918. 


Provinces 


Ontario 

Days  on  full  time — Journees  entieres 

Days  on  J  time — ■}  de  journee 

Days  on  5  time — ?  journee 

Days  on  less  than  J  time — Moins  d'une  i  journee 

Days  idle — Arret  complet 

Hours  worked  per  shift — Heures  de  travail  par  jour 

Hours  worked  per  week — Heures  de  travail  par  semaine 

Quebec 

Days  on  full  time — Journees  entieres 

Days  on  J  time — J  de  journee 

Days  on  j  time — -j  journee 

Days  on  less  than  \  time — Moins  d'une  \  journee 

Days  idle — Arrgt  complet 

Hours  worked  per  shift — Heures  de  travail  par  jour 

Hours  worked  per  week — Heures  de  travail  par  semaine 

Canada 

Days  on  full  time — Journees  entieres 

Days  on  f  time — |  de  journee 

Days  on  5  time — |  journee 

Days  on  less  than  \  time — Moins  d'une  §  journee 

Days  idle — Arret  complet 

Hours  worked  per  shift — Heures  de  travail  par  jour 

Hours  worked  per  week — Heures' de  travail  par  semaine 

17c  (4)— 4 


Pulp  Mills 
Pulperies 


289-4 


14-1 
10-5 
71  5 


242-5 
9-4 
4-1 
8 

40 

10 


245-7 

8-6 

3-2 

1-6 

44-9 

11-2 

70-3 


Pulp  and 
Paper  Mills 

Pulperies  et 
papeteries 


286-2 


17-8 
9-7 
58-2 


293-6 
4.4 

4-4 
•7 
•9 

9 
53-6 


290-8 
2 

2-1 

•3 

8-8 

9-3 

55-3 


Paper  Mills 
Papeteries 


254 
3-3 

7 

39-7 
10-1 

60-1 


261 
•6 
6-6 

35-8 
9-4 
66-2 


257-5 
2 
6-7 

37-8 
9-8 
63-2 


All  Mills 


Toutes 
fabriques 


276-5 
1-1 
2-5 

23-9 
101 
63-3 


265-7 

4-8 

5 

2-9 
25-6 

9-4 
62-3 


264-7 
4-2 
4 

•6 
30-5 
10-1 
62-9 


34 


CENSUS   OF    INDUSTRY 


10  GEORGE  V,  A.  1920 
Table  XXI. — Miscellaneous  Expenses  by  Classes  of  Mills  for  Provinces,  1918. 


Provinces 


Rent  of 

Offices, 

Works  and 

Machinery 

Loyer  de 

bureaux, 

usines  et 

machineries 


Rent  of 
Power 

Loyer  de 
la  force 
motrice 


Insurance 
Assurance 


Taxes 


Internal 
Revenue, 
War,  etc. 

Surle 

revenu, 

de  guerre, 

etc. 


Provincial 

Municipal, 

etc. 

Provin- 

ciales, 

municipales, 

etc. 


British  Columbia 

Pulp  mills 

Pulp  and  paper  mills 

Paper  mills 

All  mills 

New  Brunswick 

Pulp  mills 

Pulp  and  paper  mills 

Paper  mills 

All  mills 

Xova  Scotia 

Pulp  mills 

Pulp  and  paper  mills 

Paper  mills 

All  mills 

Ontario 

Pulp  mills 

Pulp  and  paper  mills 

Paper  mills 

All  mills 

Quebec 

Pulp  mills 

Pulp  and  paper  mills 

Paper  mills 

All  mills 

Canada 

Pulp  mills 

Pulp  and  paper  mills 

Paper  mills 

All  mills 


5,300 
1,400 


2.000 


2.000 


2.060 


2.060 


5,336 

228,311 

11,844 


245,491 


10,037 
1,896 


11,933 


14,696 
239,788 

13,740 


2,800 


85,500 
70,083 


293,519 


2.800 


155,583 


35,926 


293,519 


35,926 


6,372 


2,797 


113,932 

407,054 

53,218 


6,372 


96,703 
118,947 
22,758 


2,797 


783 
33,663 
70,195 


28,160 
785,053 
39,656 


23,3,408 


59,761 
165,339 
33,121 


104,641 


925 
470,998 


852,869 


142,092 

1,194,907 

92,874 


268,224 


1,429,873 


258,221 


284,262 
354,369 
55,879 


471,923 


4,505 

798, 180 

70\  195 


694 ,  510 


872,880 


46,500 
120,311 


166,811 


37,340 


37.348 


4,016 


4.016 


25,278 
38,119 
14,946 


78,343 


68,828 
318,782 
26,560 


414,170 


181,962 

477,212 

41,506 


Table  XXII.— Exports  of  Pulp-wood  from  Canada  in  the  calendar  years  1915-1916-1917-1918 
and  for  each  Province  by  quantities  and  values. 


1915. 

1916 

Provinces 

Quantity 
Quantite 

Value 
Valeur 

Quantity 
Quantite 

Value 

Valeur 

Cord 

119,896 

3,310 

202,239 

624,269 

949,714 

$ 

770,825 

24,982 

1,256,814 

4,111,492 

6,164,113 

Cord 

118 

127,730 

*       3,735 

149,745 
786,879 

1,068,207 

s 

354 

New  Brunswick 

726,293 

27,883 

915,025 

5  197  114 

Canada 

6,866.669 

FORESTRY,  PULP   AND   PAPER 


35 


SESSIOWAL  PAPER  No.  17c  (4) 

Tableau  XXI. — Frais  generaux,  par  genres  de  fabriques  et  par  provinces  ,1918. 


Royalties, 

Use  of 

Patents, 

etc. 

Advertising 
Expenses 

Travelling 
Expenses 

Ordinary 

repairs  to 

buildings 

and 

machinery 

All 
other 
sundry 
expenses 

Total 

Provinces 

Droits 

rfegaliens, 

Defenses 
de 

Frais 
de 

Reparations 
ordinaires 

Toute9 

autres 

usage  de 

brevets, 

etc. 

publicity 

voyage 

aux 
batiments 

et  k  la 
machinerie 

depenses 
diverges 

$ 

$ 

S 

$ 

$ 

1 

Colombie  Britannique 

1,211 

3,250 

9,400 

4,112 
336,359 

60,050 
1,246,094 

215,323 
2,070,606 

Pulperies. 

Pulperies  et  papeteries. 

Papeteries. 

Toutes  fabriques. 

1,311 

3,250 

9,400 

340,471 

1,306,144 

2,285,929 

Nouveau-Brunswich 

: 

200 

5.050 

137,815 

709,861 

928,192 

Pulperies. 

Pulperies  et  papeteries. 

Papeteries. 

Toutes  fabriques. 

- 

200 

5,050 

137,815 

709,861 

928,192 

Noufelle-Ecosse 

- 

100 

163 

2,423 

23,379 

41,310 

Pulperies. 

Pulperies  et  papeteries. 

Papeteries. 

Toutes  fabriques. 

- 

100 

163 

2,423 

23,379 

41,310 

Ontario 

10,374 

6,778 

627 

4,510 

12,266 
61,256 
8,617 

243,053 
661,236 
113,907 

42,163 

649,487 
237,951 

546,292 

2,198,700 

568,320 

Pulperies. 

Pulperies  et  papeteries. 

Papeteries. 

Toutes  fabriques. 

10,374 

11,915 

82,139 

1,038,196 

929,601 

3,313,312 

Quebec 

469 

127 

4,565 
18,801 
21,470 

79,897 
143,446 
42,083 

467,253 

1,016,978 

112,906 

1,239,008 

1,353,892 

346,793 

1,948,866 

4,283,453 

624,485 

Pulperies.                                                  „ 

Pulperies  et  papeteries. 

Papeteries. 

Toutes  fabriques. 

596 

44,836 

265,426 

1,597,137 

2,939,693 

6,856,804 

Canada 

1,680 

127 

10,374 

14,893 
19,428 
25,980 

106,776 

204, 702 

50,700 

854,656 

2,014,573 

246,813 

2,074,461 

3,249,473 

584,744 

3,679,983 
8,552,759 
1,192,805 

Pulperies. 

Pulperies  et  papeteries. 

Papeteries. 

Toutes  fabriques. 

12.181 

60.301 

362.178 

3.116.012 

5,908,678 

13,425,547 

Tableau  XXII. — Exportations  de  bois  de  pulpe  du  Canada  dans  les  annees   1915-1916-1917- 
1918,  pour  chaque  province,  par  quantities  et  valeur. 


1917 

1918 

Quantity 
Quantite 

Value 
Valeur 

Quantity 
Quantite 

Value 
Valeur 

Provinces 

Gord 

329 
156,255 

770 
161,652 
698,839 

1,017,845 

$ 

747 

1,145,967 

5,498 

1,166.316 

5,603,894 

7,922,422 

Cord 

436 
263,907 

199,421 
885,772 

1.349,536 

$ 

1,236 
2,773,784 

1,856,178 
8,368,586 

12,999,784 

Colombie  Britannique. 

Xouveau-Brunswick. 

Xouvelle-Ecosse. 

Ontario. 

Quebec. 

Canada. 

17c  (4)- 


36 


CENSUS    OF    INDUSTRY 


10  GEORGE  V,  A.  1920 

Table  XXIII. — Production,  Manufacture   and   Export  of  Pulp-wood  compared  for  the  calendar 
years  1916,  1917  and  1918,  by  Provinces. 


Schedule 

1916 

1917 

Quantity 

Value 

Value 
per  Cord 

Quantity 

Value 

Value 
per  Cord 

Quantity 

Valeur 

Valeur  par 
corde 

Quantite 

Valeur 

Valeur  par 
corde 

Canada 

Cords 
Cordes 

S 

S 

Cords 
Cordes 

$ 

S 

2,833,119 
1,764,912 
1,068,207 

19,971,127 
13,104,458 
6,866,669 

7-05 
7-42 
6-43 

3,122,188 
2,104,334 
1,017,854 

26,739,905 
18,817,483 
7,922,422 

8-56 

8-94 

7-78 

Quebec 

1,711,151 
924,272 
786,879 

12,037,603 
6,840,489 
5,197,114 

7  03 
7-40 
6-60 

1,808,708 

1,109,869 

698,839 

15,155,326 
9,551,432 
5,603,894 

8-38 

8-60 

805 

Ontario 

787,357 
637,612 
149,745 

5,931,450 

5,016,425 

915,025 

7-53 

7-87 

6-1 

897,343 
735,691 
161,652 

8,596,671 
7,430,355 
1,166,316 

9-58 

10-10 

"•21 

New  Brunswick 

207,324 
79,594 
127,730 

1,317,998 
591.705 
726,293 

6-36 
7-43 
5-69 

261,841 
105,586 
156,255 

1,879,449 

733,482 

1,145,967 

7-18 

6-95 

7-33 

British  Columbia 

Production. . 

109,115 

108,997 

118 

580,153 

579,799 

354 

5-32 
5-32 
300 

135,143 

134,814 

329 

969,510 

96S.763 

747 

7-17 
7-19 

Export 

2-30 

Nova  Scotia 

Manufacture. 

18,172 
14,437 
3,735 

103,923 
76,040 
27,883 

5-72 
5-27 

7-47 

19,094 

18,324 

770 

138,949 

133,451 

5,498 

7-28 
7-28 
7-14 

FORESTRY,  PULP   AND   PAPER 
SESSIOWAL  PAPER  No.  17c  (4) 


37 


Tableau  XXIII. — Production,  consommation  et  exportation  de  bois  de  pulpe,  comparees,  pour 
les  annees  1916,  1917  et  1918,  par  provinces. 


1918 

Per  cent  distribution  of  pulp  wood 
Pourcentage  de  repartition 

Quantity 

Value 

Value 
per  Cord 

Enumeration 

Quantity 

Valeur 

Valeur  par 
corde 

1916 

1917 

1918 

Cords 
Cordes 

$ 

$ 

Cords 
Cordes 

$ 

$ 

Canada 

3,560,280 
2,210,744 
1,349,536 

37,886,259 

24,886,475 
12,999,784 

10-64 
11-26 
9-63 

100-0 
62-3 
37-7 

100-0 
70-4 
29-6 

100  0 
65-7 
34-3 

Production. 

Consommation. 

Exportation. 

Quebec 

1,971,250 
1,085,478 

885,772 

19,429,777 
11,061,191 
8,368,586 

9-85 
1019 
9-45 

100-0 
540 
46-0 

100-0 
63-0 
37-0 

100-0 
56-9 
43  1 

Production. 
Consommation . 
Exportation. 

Ontario 

984,112 
784,691 
199,421 

12,251,895 
10,395,717 
1,856,178 

12-45 
13-25 
9-31 

100-0 
81-0 
19-0 

1000 
86-4 
13-6 

100-0 
84-8 
15-2 

Production. 
Consommation . 
Exportation. 

Nomeau-Brunswlck 

374,040 
110,133 
263,907 

3,694,b38 

920,854 

2,773,784 

9-88 
6-95 
10-51 

100-0 
38-4 
61-6 

100-0 
39-0 

61-0 

100-0 

24-9 
75-1 

Productiop. 

Consommation. 

Exportation. 

Colomble  Britannique 

219,210 

218,774 

436 

2,436,133 

2,434,897 

1,236 

1111 
7-19 
2-84 

100-0 
99-9 
01 

100-0 
99-9 
0-1 

100-0 

99-9 

01 

Production. 

Consommation. 

Exportation. 

Nouvelle-Ecosse. 

11,668 
11,668 

73,816 
73,816 

7-26 
7-26 

103-0 
79-4 
20-6 

100-0 
96-0 
4-0 

100-0 
100-0 

Production. 
Consommation . 
Exportateur. 

38 


CENSUS   OF   INDUSTRY 


10  GEORGE  V,  A.  1920 


Table  XXIV.— Exports  of  Wood-pulp  by  Countries  for  the  Calendar  years  1916,  1917  and  1918. 
Tableau  XXIV. — Exportation  de  pulpe  de  bois  par  pays,  pour  les  annees  1916,  1917  et  1918. 


Kinds  of  pulp  and  countries  to  which 
exported 

Espece  de  pulpe  et  pays  de 
destination 


1916 


Quan- 
tity 


juan- 
tite 


Value 
Valeur 


Ave- 
rage 
value 
per 
ton 

Valeur 

moy- 

enne  par 

tonne 


1917 


Quan- 
tity 


Quan- 
tity 


Value 
Valeur 


Ave- 
rage 
value 
per 
ton 

Valeur 

moy- 

enne  par 

tonne. 


1918 


Quan- 
tity 


yuan- 
tite 


Value 
Valeur 


Ave- 
rage 
value 
per 
ton 

Valeur 
moy- 

enne  par 
tonne 


Total  wood  pulp  exported— Total 

de  la  pulpe  de  bois  ex  port  ee 

Mechanical  pulp — De  fabrication 

mecanique 

Chemical   pulp — De   fabrication 
chimique 

To    United     States— Aux    Etats- 

Unis 

Mechanical    pulp — De    fabrication 

mecanique 

Chemical  pulp — De   fabrication 
chimique 

To  United  Kingdom— Au  Royau- 

me  Uni 

Mechanical  pulp— De  fabrication 

mecanique 

Chemical   pulp — De   fabrication 
chimique 

To  France— En  France 

Mechanical    pulp — De    fabrication 

mecanique 

Chemical     pulp— De     fabrication 

chimique 

To  Japan— Au  Japon 

Mechanical    pulp— De    fabrication 

mecanique 

Chemical  pulp — De  fabrication 

chimique 

To  all  other  Countries— Aux  autres 

pays 

Mechanical  pulp — De  fabrication 

mecanique 

Chemical   pulp — De   fabrication 
chimique 


ton 
558,899 

329,752 
229,147 

466,761 

270,179 
196,582 

51,072 

25,955 
25,117 
31,821 
31,821 

7,039 

7,039 

2,206 

1,797 
409 


17,344,242 

5,649,365 
11,694,877 

14,275,185 

4,741,526 
9,533,659 

2,266,585 

401,468 

1,865,117 

473,190 

473, 190 

274,485 

274,485 

54,797 

33,181 
21,6ft 


S 

3  103 

1-713 
5-104 

3  058 

1-755 
4-850 

4  438 

1-547 
7-426 
1-487 
1-487 

3  899 

3-899 

2  493 

1-847 
5-285 


ton 
511,803 

250,043 
261,760 

473,849 

248,375 
225.474 

20,875 

20,875 
1,668 

1,668 

13,762 

13,762 


$ 
26,192,906 

7,082,206 
19,110,700 

23,049.292 

7,048,306 
16,000,985 

2,037,017 

2,037,017 
33,900 
33,900 

933,350 

933,350 


1,649   139,347 


1,649 


139,347 


$ 

5  117 

2-832 
7-301 

4  864 

2-838 
7-096 

9  758 

9-758 
2  032 
2-032 

6-782 

6-782 
8-450 

8-450 


ton 
583,911 

181,061 
402,850 

544,188 

17S.409 
365,779 

5,102 

5,102 


28,547 

28,547 

6,074 

2,652 
3,422 


33,359,923 

4,786,044 
28,573,879 

30,156,873 

4,727,717 
25,429,156 

428,049 

428,049 


2,474,148 

2,474,148 

300,853 
58,327 

242,526 


$ 

57  13 

26-43 
70-93 

55  41 

26-49 
69-52 

83-99 
83-90 


86-67 

86-67 

49  5 J 

21-99 
70-87 


Table  XXV. — Imports  of  Wood-pulp  for  the  Calendar  years  1916,  1917  end  1918  by  Countries. 
Tableau  XXV. — Importations  de  pulpe  de  bois  pour  les  annees  1916,  1917  et  1918,  par  pays. 


1916 

1917 

1918 

Countries  from  which  imported — Pays  de  provenance 

Value 
Valeur 

Value 
Valeur 

Value 
Valeur 

$ 

552,002 

552,002 

$ 

587,369 

587,369 

$ 

470,516 

470,516 

FORESTRY,  PULP   AND   PAPER 
SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  17c  (4) 


39 


Table  XXVI. — Exports  of  Paper,  the  Produce  of  Canada  for  the  Calendar  years  1916,  1917  and 

1918. 

Tableau  XXVI. — Exportations  de  papier  de  fabrication  canadienne  pendant  Ies  annees   1916, 

1917  et  1918. 


1916 

1917 

1918 

Kinds — Especes 

Quantity 

Value 

Quantity 

Value 

Quantity 

Value 

Quantite 

Valeur 

Quantite 

Valeur 

Quantite 

Valeur 

Paper,  wall,  rolls — Papier  a  tapisserie,  rouleaux 

1,120,057 

$ 

88,201 

1,549,504 

S 

122,556 

2,893,931 

$ 

268,860 

Paper  felt  and  roofing — Papier  feutre  et  a  toiture 

- 

226,136 

- 

340,227 

- 

379,988 

Paper  wrapping,  lb. — Papier  d'emballage,  liv 

13,309,900 

738,715 

22,622,500 

1,158,348 

26,197,400 

1,767,567 

Paper  printing,  cwt. — Papier  a  imprimer,  qtx 

10,523,256 

21,098,997 

11,923,737 

32,561,020 

12,730,671 

37,301,269 

Paper,  all  other,  lb.— Tout  autre  papier,  liv 

- 

1,313,653 

'        - 

1,439,781 

- 

3,233,075 

Total 

- 

33,465,701 

- 

35,621,932 

- 

42,950,759 

Table  XXVII. — Imports  of  Paper  for  the  Calendar  years  1916,  1917  and  1918. 
Tableau  XXVII. — Importations  de  papier  pendant  les  annees  1916,  1917  et  1918. 


1916 

1917 

1918 

Kinds — Especes 

Quantity 
Quantite 

Value 
Valeur 

Quantity 
Quantite 

Value 
Valeur 

Quantity 
Quantite 

Value 
Valeur 

Card  board,  not  pasted  or  coated — Carton,  fin,  ni  enduit, 

2,765,579 
4,930,445 

9,399,025 
7,177,287 

$ 

143,184 

241,656 

64,524 
346,361 

273,098 

165,120 

183,373 

250,056 

4,580,889 

2,134,074 
6,386,339 

9,865,872 
4,665,895 

S 

184,666 

255,518 

92,070 
555,165 

312,583 

257,447 

304,684 

246,369 

5,670,813 

1,702,544 
5,694,196 

4,937,515 

$ 

269,272 

Hanging  or  wall  paper,  including  borders,  rolls  of  8  yds. — 

Papier  a  tapisserie,  y  compris  bordure,  rouleaux  de  8  vgs. 

Millboard  not  coated  or  pasted — Carton  de  pate,  ni  enduit, 

224,797 
119,716 

Printing  papers,  lb. — Papiers  a  imprimer,  liv 

Ruled  and  bordered  and  coated  papers,  boxed  paper  and 
papeteries — Papier  raye  et  marge,  papier  glace,  papier  a 

544, 196 
573,622 

Straw  board,  not  pasted,  or  coated,  lb.— Carton  de  paille, 

284,718 

Tarred  and  other  building  papers,  n.o.p. — Papier  goudron- 
ne  et  autres  papiers  de  construction,  n.a.e 

337,073 
279,916 

Paper,  all  other — Tout  autre  papier 

5,847,188 

Total 

- 

6,248,261 

- 

7,879,315 

- 

8,480,498 

10  GEORGE  V 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  17c  (4) 


A.  1920 


APPENDIX— APPENDICE. 


PULP  AND  PAPER   MILLS   IN   CANADA,  1918. 
FABRIQUES  DE  PULPE  ET  DE  PAPIER  DU  CANADA,  1918. 


The  following  is  a  list  of  the  producing  mills  in  operation  during  1918, 
arranged  by  provinces,  classes  of  mills  and  products. 

Voici  une  liste   des   etablissements   producteurs,   qui   etaient   en   activity 
en  1918;  ils  sont  classes  par  provinces,  par  genres  de  fabriques  et  produits. 

PULP  MILLS— PULPERIES. 


Name 

Norn 


Location 
Endroit 


Classes  of  products 
Genres  de  produits 


Pulp 
Pulpe 


Whalen  Pulp  and  Paper  Mills,  Ltd 

YYhalen  Pulp  and  Paper  Mills,  Ltd 

Whalen  Pulp  and  Paper  Mills,  Ltd 

Rainy  River  Pulp  and  Paper  Co 

La  Have  Pulp  Co.  Ltd 

Clyde  River  Pulp  and  Pafper  Co.  Ltd 

G.  D.  Campbell  and  Co 

Medway  Pulp  and  Power  Co 

MacLeod  Pulp  Co.  Ltd 

New  Brunswick  Sulphate  Fibre  Co.  Ltd 

St.  George  Pulp  and  Paper  Co.  Ltd 

Nashwaak  Pulp  and  Paper  Co.  Ltd 

Dominion  Pulp  Co.  Ltd 

Bathurst  Lumber  Co.  Ltd 

Port  Arthur  Pulp  and  Paper  Co.,  Ltd 

Mattagami  Pulp  and  Paper  Co.  Ltd 

The  Bronson  Co 

Dryden  Pulp  and  Paper  Co.  Ltd 

Foley-Rieger  Pulp  and  Paper  Co.  Ltd 

Thorold  Pulp  Co.  Ltd 

Riordon  Pulp  and  Paper  Col  Ltd 

Riordon  Pulp  and  Paper  Co.  Ltd 

Hydro-Electric  Power  Commission  of  Ontario 

Ha  Ha  Bay  Sulphite  Co.  Ltd 

Nairn  Falls  Power  and  Pulp  Co.  Ltd 

Brown  Corporation 

Donnacona  Paper  Co.  Ltd 

Compagnie  de  Pulpe  de    Chicoutimi   (St.    Lawrence    Pulp 

and  Lumber  Co.) 

Compagnie  de  Pulpe  de  Chicoutimi 

Compagnie  de  Pulpe  de  Chicoutimi 

F.  F.  Soucy 

Price  Bros,  and  Co.  Ltd.  (Price-Porritt) 

Brompton  Pulp  and  Paper  Co.  Ltd 

Riviere  du  Loup  Pulp  Co.  Ltd 

James  MacLaren  Co.  Ltd 

J.  C.  Wilson  and  Co.  Ltd 

Gulf  Pulp  and  Paper  Co.  Ltd 

Lake  Megantic  Pulp  Co 


Mill  Creek B.C. 

Swanson  Bav B.C. 

Port  Alice B.C. 

Port  Mellon B.C. 

New  Germany N.S. 

Clyde  River N.S. 

Weymouth N.S. 

Bridgewater N.S. 

Liverpool N.S. 

Millerton N.B. 

St.  George N.B. 

St.  John N.B. 

Chatham N.B. 

Bathurst N.B. 

Port  Arthur Ont. 

Smooth  Rock  Falls Ont. 

Ottawa Ont. 

Dryden Ont. 

Thorold Ont. 

Thorold Ont. 

Merritton Ont. 

Hawkesbury Ont. 

Campbellford Ont. 

Port  Alfred Que. 

Murray  Bay Que. 

La  Tuque Que. 

Pont  Rouge Que. 

Chandler Que. 

Val  Jalbert Que. 

Chicoutimi Que. 

Old  Lake  Road Que. 

Rimouski. Que. 

Brompton  ville Que. 

FiviAre  du  Loup Que. 

Buckingham Que. 

St.  Jerome Que. 

Clarke  City Que. 

Lake  Megantic Que. 


Sulphite 
Sulphite. 
Sulphite. 
Sulphate. 

Ground  wood. 
Ground  wood. 
Ground  wood. 
Ground  wyood. 
Ground  Wood. 

Sulphate. 

Ground  wood. 

Sulphite. 

Sulphite. 

Sulphite  and  Sulphate. 

Sulphite. 
Sulphite. 
Ground  wood. 
Ground  wood  and  Sul- 
phate. 
Ground  wood. 
Ground  wood. 
Sulphite. 
Sulphite. 
Ground  wood. 

Sulphite. 
Ground  wood. 
Sulphate. 
Ground  wood. 

Sulphite. 
Ground  wood. 
Ground  wood. 
Ground  wood. 
Ground  wood. 
Ground  wood. 
Ground  wood. 
Ground  wood. 
Ground  wood. 
Ground  wood. 
Ground  wood. 


40 


FORESTRY,  PULP   AND   PAPER 
SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  17c(4) 

PULP  AND  PAPER  MILLS— PULPERIES  ET  PAPETERIES. 


41 


Name 
Nom 


Location 
Endroit 


Classes  of  Products 
Genres  de  produits 


Pulp 
Pulpe 


Paper 
Papier 


Powell  River  Co.  Ltd 

Pacific  Mills,  Ltd 

Beaver  Co.  Ltd 

Canada  Boxboard  Co.  Ltd 

Spanish   River  Pulp  and  Paper  Co.   Ltd.    (Lake 
Superior  Co.). 

Spanish  River  Pulp  and  Paper  Co.  Ltd 

Spanish  River  Pulp  and  Paper  Co.  Ltd 

The  Toronto  Paper  Mfg.  Co.  Ltd 

Fort  Frances  Pulp  and  Paper  Co.  Ltd 

Abitibi  Power  and  Paper  Co.  Ltd 

Lincoln  Paper  Mills  Co.  Ltd 

Provincial  Paper  Mills  Co.  Ltd 

J.  R.  Booth 

Ontario  Paper  Co.  Ltd 

E.  B.  Eddy  Co.  Ltd 

Price  Bros,  and  Co.  Ltd 

St.  Maurice  Paper  Co.  Ltd 

Dominion  Paper  Co.  Ltd 

Belgo-Canadian  Pulp  and  Paper  Co.  Ltd 

Canada  Paper  Co.  Ltd.  (2  Mills) 

Laurentide  Co.  Ltd 

Price  Bros,  and  Co.  Ltd 

Brompton  Pulp  and  Paper  Co.  Ltd 

News  Pulp  and  Paper  Co.  Ltd 

Donnacona  Paper  Co.  Ltd 

Wayagamack  Pulp  and  Paper  Co.  Ltd 


Powell  River. 
Ocean  Falls. . . 


.  B.C 
..B.C 


Thorold Ont. 

Frankford Ont. 

Sault  Ste.  Marie Ont. 

Sturgeon  Falls Ont. 

Espanola Ont. 

Cornwall Ont. 

Fort  Frances Ont. 

Iroquois  Falls Ont. 

Merritton Ont. 

Georgetown Ont. 

Ottawa Ont. 

Thorold Ont. 

Hull Que. 

Jonquieres Que. 

Cap  Madeleine Que. 

Kingsey  Falls Que. 

Shawinigan  Falls Que. 

Windsor  Mills Que. 

Grand  Mere Que. 

Kenogami Que. 

East  Angus Que. 

St.  Raymond Que. 

Donnacona Que. 

Three  Rivers Que. 


G.W.,  Sulphite 

G.W.,  Sulphite,  Sul- 
phate. 

Ground  wood 

Ground  wood 

G.W.,  Sulphite 

G.W.,  Sulphite 

Ground  wood 

Sulphite 

Ground  wood 

G.W.,  Sulphite 

Sulphite 

Soda 

G.W.,  Sulphite 

G.W.,  Sulphite....'.. 
G.W.,  Sulphite 

Ground  wood 

G.W.,  Sulphite  and 
Sulphate. 

G.W.,  Sulphate 

G.W.,  Sulphite 

G.  W.,  Soda 

G.W.,  Sulphite 

G.W.,  Sulphite 

Sulphate 

Ground  wood 

Ground    wood    and 

Sulphite. 
Sulphate 


N.P.,  W.P. 
N.P.,  W.P. 

W.P.B. 

Straw     and     other 

boards. 
N.P.,W.P.,B.,B.R. 

and  S.P. 
N.P. 
N.P. 

Bk.  and  W.P. 
N.P. 
N.P. 

N.P,  W.P. 
Bk.  and  W.P. 
N.P.,  W.P.B. 
N.P. 
N.P.,  Bk.  and  W.P., 

W.P.,  B.,  Mis.  P. 
B.,  Mis. 
N.P. 

N.P.,  B.R.  and  S.P. 

N.P. 

N.P.,Bk.  andW.P., 

W.P. 
N.P.,  B. 
N.P. 
N.P..W.P.,  B.,Mis. 

P. 
N.P. 
N.P. 

W.P. 


42 


CENSUS   OF   INDUSTRY 


10  GEORGE  V,  A.  1920 


PAPER  MILLS-PAPETERIES. 


Name 
Xom 


Location 
Endroit 


Classes  of  Paper 
Genres  de  papier 


Jas.  Stutt  and  Sons 

Provincial  Paper  Mills  Co.  Ltd. 

Geo.  La  Monte  and  Son  Ltd 

Don  Valley  Paper  Co.  Ltd 


The  Strathcona  Paper  Co 

Kinleith  Paper  Mills  Ltd 

Garden  City  Paper  Mills  Co.  Ltd. 
Garden  City  Paper  Mills  Co.  Ltd. 

Ritchie  and  Ramsay  Ltd 

Provincial  Paper  Mills  Co.  Ltd.. . . 
Interlake  Tissue  Mills  Ltd 


Provincial  Paper  Mills  Co.  Ltd 

The  Northumberland  Paper  and  Electric  Co.  Ltd. 

Camden  Paper  Mills  Ltd '. 

Lazier  Paper  Mills  Ltd 

Miller  Bros.  Co.  Ltd 


Canada  Boxboard  Co.  Ltd... 

J.  C.  Wilson  Ltd 

Eastern  Paper  Co.  Ltd 

National  Paper  Co.  Ltd 

Montreal  Paper  Co.  Ltd 

The  Rolland  Paper  Co.  Ltd. 
The  Rolland  Paper  Co.  Ltd. 

Rowland  Ford  and  Son 

J.  Ford  and  Co 


Bird  and  Son  Ltd 

Alex.  McArthur  and  Co.  Ltd 

Howard  Smith  Paper  Mills  Ltd.  (Crabtree  Division) 

Howard  Smith  Paper  Mills  Ltd.  (Beauharnois  Division). 

J.  R.  Walker  and  Co.  Ltd 

Samuel  Tremblay 


West  Flamborough. 

Thorold 

Toronto 

Toronto 


Strathcona 

St.  Catharines. 
St.  Catharines. 

Merritton 

New  Toronto. . . 
Mille  Roches.. . 
Merritton 


Georgetown  .  . 
Campbellford. 

Xewburgh 

Belleville 

Sydney 


Montreal 

Lachute  Mills 

St.  Basile 

Valleyfield 

Portneuf  Station. 

St.  Jerome 

Mont  Rolland. . . . 
Portneuf  Station. 
Portneuf 


Pont  Rouge 
Joliette 


Crabtree  Mills. 

Beauharnois 

Montreal 

Sault  a  la  Puce. 


.Ont 
.Ont 
.Ont 
Ont 

Ont 
.Ont. 
.Ont. 
.Ont. 
.Ont. 
.Ont. 
.Ont. 

.Ont. 
.Ont. 
.Ont. 

Ont. 

Ont. 

.Que. 
.Que. 
.Que. 
.Que. 
.Que. 
.Que. 
.Que. 
Que. 
.Que. 

Que. 
Que. 

.Que. 
.Que. 
.Que. 
.Que. 


B.R.S.P. 

Bk.  and  W.P. 

Mis.  P. 

Bk.    and    W.P.,    W.P., 

Mis  P. 
B.R.S.P. 
Bk.  and  W.P. 
Toilet  and  Tissue  P. 
Toilet  and  Tissue  P. 
C.P. 

Bk.  and  W.P. 
W.P.,  Toilet  and  Tissue 

P.,  Mis.  P. 
C.P. 
B. 

W.P. 
B. 
B. 

B. 

W.P. 

B.R.S.P. 

C.P. 

B.R.S.P. 

Bk.  and  W.P. 

Bk.  and  W.P. 

B.R.S.P. 

N.P.,  W.P.,  B.,  B.R.S. 

P.,  Mis.  P. 
B.R.S.P. 
N.P.,    W.P.,    B.R.S.P., 

Mis.  P. 
N.P.,  Bk.andW.P.,W.P. 
Bk.  &  W.P. 
B„  B.R.S.P. 
B. 


Abbreviations  used — Abreviations  usitees: — 

N.P Newsprint. 

Bk.  &  W.P Book  and  writing  paper. 

W.P Wrapping  paper. 

B Boards. 

W.P.B Wood  pulp  board. 

S.B Strawboard. 

B.R.S.P Building,  roofing  and  sheathing  paper. 

C.P Coated  paper. 

Mis.  P Miscellaneous  products. 

G.W Ground  wood. 


10  DOCUMENT  PARLEMENTAI  RE  No  17c  (4)  A.  1920 

CANADA 
BUREAU  FEDERAL  DE  LA  STATISTIQUE 


RECENSEMENT  LNDUSTRIEL,  1918 


PULPE  ET  PAPIER 

1918 


(Prepare  en  collaboration  avec  la  Division  Forestiere  du  Dominion, 

le  ministere  des  Terres  Domaniales  de  la  Nouvelle-Ecosse, 

le  ministere  des  Terres  et  des  Mines  du  Nouveau- 

Brunswick,  les  ministeres  des  Terres  et  des 

Forets  de  Quebec  et  le  ministere  des 

Terres  de  la  Colombie 

Britannique.) 


PUBLIE  PAR  ORDRE  DU  PARLEMENT 


OTTAWA 
THOMAS     MULVEY 
IMPRIMEUR  DE  SA  TRES  EXCELLENTE  MAJESTE  LE  ROI 
1920 


10  GEORGE  V  DOCUMENT  PARLEMENTAIRE  No  17c  (4)  A.  1920 


RECENSEMENT   INDUSTRIEL,  1918. 

PULPE   ET   PAPIER. 

Preface. 

Les  statistiques  de  Pindustrie  de  la  pulpe  et  du  papier  rcmnies  dans  ce 
rapport  ont  ete  recueillies  et  compilees  en  1919;  elles  se  rapportent  a  l'annee 
terminee  le  31  decembre  1918.  Nous  adressons  nos  remerciements  aux  fonction- 
naires  du  ministere  des  Terres  Domaniales  de  la  Nouvelle-Ecosse,  du  ministere 
des  Terres  et  Mines  du  Nouveau-Brunswick,  du  ministere  des  Terres  et  des 
Forets  de  Quebec,  du  ministere  des  Terres  de  la  Colombie  Britannique  et  a 
l'Association  canadienne  de  la  Pulpe  et  du  Papier,  qui  nous  ont  aide  a  preparer 
la  liste  preliminaire  des  industriels  de  cette  categorie  et  dont  le  personnel  a 
facilite  les  operations  du  recensement. 

Ce  rapport  a  ete  prepare  en  collaboration,  par  le  Bureau  Federal  de  la 
Statistique  et  la  Division  Forestiere,  du  ministere  de  l'Interieur.  Le  travail 
de  compilation  a  ete  fait  au  Bureau  Federal  de  la  Statistique,  sous  la  direction 
de  M.  J.  C.  Macpherson;  la  verification  des  chiffres  et  la  redaction  du  rapport 
sont  l'ceuvre  de  M.  R.  G.  Lewis,  de  la  Division  Forestiere. 

R.  H.  COATS, 

Statisticien  du  Dominion. 
Bureau  Federal  de  la  Statistique, 
Ottawa,  Janvier  1920. 


10  GEORGE  V  DOCUMENT  PARLEMENTAIRE  No  17c  (4)  A.  1920 


TABLE   DES   MATIERES. 


Introduction  et  resume. 

Resume  des  capitaux  engages,  1917  et  1918 v 

Ordre  adopte v 

Production vi 

Pulpe  de  bois vi 

Papier vi 

Matieres  premieres vii-ix 

Pulpe  de  bois vii 

Papier ' ix 

Consommation  du  combustible ix 

Moyens  de  production x-xiv 

Capital r • x 

Machinerie  des  pulperies xi 

Machinerie  des  papeteries xi 

Force  motrice  employee xii 

Personnel,  traitements,  appointements  et  salaires xii 

Salaires  hebdomadaires  classifies xiii 

Duree  des  operations xiv 

Frais  generaux xiv 

Importations  et  exportations xv 


TABLEAUX. 

I  — Production  de  la  pulpe  de  bois 2-3 

II — Production  du  papier 4-7 

III — Bois  a  pulpe  par  provinces,  1917  et  1918 8 

IV — Bois  a  pulpe,  par  essences,  1917  et  1918 8 

V — Bois  a  pulpe,  par  proc6des,  1917  et  1918 ! 8 

VI — Bois  a  pulpe,  par  provinces,  essences  de  bois  et  procedes 9 

VII — Consommation  du  bois  a  pulpe,  par  essences  de  bois  et  genres  de  fabriques,  1918 10-11 

VIII — Autres  matieres  premieres  employees  dans  la  fabrication  de  la  pulpe  de  bois 12 

IX — Quantite  moyenne  de  livres  de  pulpe  par  corde  de  bois 13 

X — Matieres  premieres  employees  dans  la  fabrication  du  papier 14-15 

XI — Consommation  du  combustible  par  genres  de  fabriques 16-17 

XII — Capital  place  dans  l'industrie  de  la  pulpe  et  du  papier 18-19 

XIII — Agencement  des  fabriques  de  pate  de  bois 18-19 

XIV — Machinerie  des  pulperies '. 20-21 

XV — Machinerie  des  papeteries 20-21 

XVI — Force  motrice  employee 22-25 

XVII — Personnel,  appointements  et  salaires 26-27 

XVIII— Employes,  par  mois 28-29 

XVIII — Salaires  hebdomadaires  classifies 30-33 

XIX — Duree  moyenne  des  operations 32-33 

XX — Frais  generaux 34-35 

XXII— Exportations  de  bois  a  pulpe 34-35 

XXIII — Production,  consommation  et  exportations  du  bois  a  pulpe 36-37 

XXIV — Exportations  de  pulpe  de  bois,  par  pays 38 

XXV — Importations  de  pulpe  de  bois,  par  pays 38 

XXVI — Exportations  de  papier 39 

XXVII — Importations  de  papier 39 


10  GEORGE  V 


DOCUMENT  PARLEMENTAIRE  No  17c  (4) 


A.  1920 


L'INDUSTRIE  DE  LA  PULPE   ET  DU  PAPIER,  EN    1918. 
Introduction  et  resume. 

La  comparaison  des  statistiques  de  l'annee  civile  1918  avec  celles  de  l'annee 
1917,  telle  qu'elle  resulte  du  present  rapport,  temoigne  de  la  continuation  des 
progres  de  1'industrie  de  la  pulpe  et  du  papier  au  Canada. 

En  1917  il  y  avait  83  fabriques  de  pulpe  et  de  papier  en  exploitation,  dont 
la  production  atteignait  $96,340,327.  En  1918  le  nombre  des  pulperies  et  des 
papeteries  s'est  eleve  a  94  et  la  valeur  de  leur  production  a  $119,309,434,  soit 
une  augmentation  de  11  fabriques,  egale  a  13-25  p.  c  .  et  un  accroissement  de 
production  de  $22,969,107,  ou  23-84  p.c. 

II  a  ete  consomme  en  1918  2,210,744  cordes  de  bois  a  pulpe  contre  2,104,334 
cordes  en  1917,  soit  5  p.c.  de  plus  au  cours  de  l'annee.  La  coupe  du  bois  a 
pulpe  tant  pour  la  consommation  que  pour  1'exportation,  qui  etait  en  1917  de 
3,122,188  cordes  est  montee  a  3,560,280  cordes  en  1918.  Le  bois  abattu  pour 
1'exportation,  evalue  a  1,017,854  cordes  en  1917  formait  un  volume  de  1,349,536 
cordes  en  1918,  soit  une  augmentation  de  331,682  ou  32-50  p.c. 

Les  capitaux  engages  dans  1'industrie  de  la  pulpe  et  du  papier  en  1917 
et  1918  sont  indiques  dans  le  tableau  suivant: 


Repartition  des  capitaux 


Terrains,  batinients  et  agencement 

Machinerie  et  outillage 

Matures  premieres  et  produits  en  stock,  etc 

Caisse  et  comptes  courants 

Totaux 


1917 

1918 

Augmentation 

Montant 

Pourcentage 

$ 

$ 

S 

p.c. 

84,461,837 

118,805,581 

34,343,744 

40-66 

59,266,596 

60,627,266 

1,360,670 

2-29 

27,902,466 

39,652,078 

11,749,612 

42-11 

15,156,506 

22,259,779 

7,103,273                  46-86 

186,787.405 

241,344,704 

54,557,390 

29-21 

Le  recensement  de  1917  indique  une  augmentation  de  ces  capitaux  de  39-6 
p.c.  soit  une  moyenne  annuelle  de  19-8  p.c.  au  cours  de  la  periode  1915-17. 
En  1918  cette  augmentation  fut  de  29-21  p.c.  soit  une  progression  de  presque 
10  points  sur  la  moyenne  des  annees  precedentes. 

Les  appointements  et  salaires  payes  aux  employes  et  ouvriers  de  cette 
industrie,  passaient  de  $20,358,019  en  1917  a  $26,974,225  en  1918,  en  augmen- 
tation de  $6,616,206  ou  32-  5  p.c.  Le  nombre  des  commis  et  employes  s'est  eleve 
de  1,563  en  1917  a  1,929  en  1918,  accroissement  de  23-41  p.c.  Le  nombre 
moyen  des  ouvriers  et  journaliers,  etabli  a  21,402  en  1917  a  ete  porte  a  23,934 
en  1918,  augmentation  de  11-83  p.c. 

Ordre  adopte. — Les  statistiques  du  present  rapport  traitent  successive- 
ment  des  differentes  phases  de  1'industrie,  c'est-a-dire  la  production  des  matieres 
premieres,  les  capitaux,  la  machinerie  et  la  force  motrice,  le  personnel,  les  appoin- 
tements et  salaires,  la  duree  des  operations,  les  frais  generaux  et  les  export ations 
et  importations. 

Dans  les  operations  de  compilation,  les  difterents  etablissements  consacr6s 
a  cette  industrie  ont  6te  classes  en  trois  categories,  savoir:  (1)  ceux  qui  fabri- 
quent  la  pulpe  exclusivement,  appeles  pulperies;  (2)  ceux  qui  fabriquent  tout 


vi  RECENSEMENT   INDUSTRIEL 

10  GEORGE  V,  A.  1920 

a  la  fois  la  pulpe  et  le  papier,  que  nous  designerons  sous  le  nom  de  pulperies- 
papeteries;  et  (3)  ceux  qui  ne  fabriquent  que  du  papier,  connus  sous  le  nom  de 
papeteries. 

Dans  les  tableaux  qui  vont  suivre,  les  statistiques  sont  donnees  separement, 
d'abord  pour  chacun  de  ces  groupes,  puis  pour  l'ensemble,  sous  le  vocable  «toutes 
f  abriques  » . 

Production. 

Les  tableaux  introductifs  du  rapport  (tableaux  I  et  II)  sont  consacres 
respectivement  a  la  production  de  la  pulpe  de  bois  et  du  papier. 

Pulpe. — En  1918  la  production  de  pate  de  bois  pour  l'ensemble  des  fabriques 
canadiennes,  a  atteint  1,557,193  tonnes,  au  lieu  de  1,464,308  tonnes  en  1917 
et  1,296,084  tonnes  en  1916.  Tandis  que  820,584  tonnes  de  la  production 
de  1918  etaient  transformees  en  papier  dans  les  etablissements  producteurs 
eux-memes,  736,609  tonnes  etaient  destinees  a  la  vente.  Cette  vente  a  rapporte 
$41,302,882,  soit  un  prix  moyen  par  tonne,  pout  toutes  especes  de  pulpe,  de 
$56.07.  La  quantite  et  la  valeur  de  chaque  sorte  de  pulpe  fabriquee  pour 
la  vente,  ainsi  que  sa  valeur  moyenne  par  tonne,  prise  a  la  fabrique,  sont  indi- 
quees  dans  le  tableau  suivant: 


Sortes  de  pulpe  fabriquee  pour  la  vente 

Quantite 

Valeur 

Prix  moyen 
par  tonne 

Tonnes 
273,180 
318,882 
144,547 

S 
7,133,711 
22,464,063 
11,705,108 

$ 

26.11 

70.44 

80-98 

Totaux 

736,609 

41,302,882 

56  07 

On  trouve  aussi  dans  le  tableau  I,  sous  l'entete  ((Produits  divers))  une 
somme  de  $1,305,639,  qui  repr^sente  le  bois  scie  et  certains  sous-produits  de 
l'industrie. 

Papier. — Le  tableau  II  traite  de  la  production  du  papier  de  tous  genres, 
par  quantites  et  valeur,  pour  chaque  categorie  de  fabriques.  L'etat  resume 
qui  suit  donne  le  volume,  la  valeur  absolue  et  la  valeur  par  tonne  de  chaque 
espece  de  papier  et  aussi  le  pourcentage  respectif  de  chacune  de  ces  especes, 
par  rapport  a  la  production  tot  ale. 


Sortes  de  papier 

Tonnes 

Valeur 

Valeur 
moyenne 
par  tonne 

Pourcentage 

du 

volume 

Pourcentage 

de  la  valeur 

totale 

734,783 
48,150 
61,180 
87,749 
35,862 

t 

46,230,814 
10,732,807 
7,341,372 
5,551,409 
3,267,142 
3,577,369 

S 

62.91 
222.90 
119-99 
63-26 
91,10 

p.c. 

75-93 
4-97 
6-32 
907 
3-71 

p.c. 
63-22 

14-68 

Papier  d'emballage 

Cartons 

Autres  produits  du  papier 

1004 
7-59 
4-47 

Totaux 

967,724 

76,700,913 

- 

100  00 

100  00 

Le  papier  de  journal  qui,  en  1917,  representait  80-8  p.c.  du  volume  total 
et  62-4  p.c.  de  la  valeur  totale,  est  descendu  en  1918  a  75-93  p.c.  du  volume, 
mais  sa  valeur  ayant  hauss6,  elle  comporte  63-22  p.c.  de  la  valeur  totale.  Le 
papier  a  ecrire  et  a  imprimer  les  livres  qui  constituait  5-6  p.c.  du  volume  et 


PULPE  ET  PAPIER  vii 

DOC.  PARLEMENTAIRE  No  17c  (4) 

14-9  de  la  valeur  en  1917  est  descendu  a  4-97  p.c.  du  volume  et  constitue  encore 
14-68  de  la  valeur.  Les  autres  sortes  presentent  des  augmentations  sur  1917, 
tant  en  quantite  qu'en  valeur,  les  pourcentages  en  1918  etant  les  suivants: 
le  papier  d'emballage  qui  absorbait  en  1917  5-9  p.c.  du  tonnage  total  et  9*1 
p.c.  de  la  valeur  totale  est  monte  en  1918  a  6-32  p.c.  du  volume  et  10-4  p.c. 
de  la  valeur;  le  carton,  dont  la  part  en  1917  representait  6-3  p.c.  du  volume 
et  5-7  p.c.  de  la  valeur  est  passe  en  1918  a  9-07  p.c.  du  volume  et  7-59  p.c. 
de  la  valeur;  les  autres  produits  du  papier  qui  figuraient  en  1917  pour  1-3 
p.c.  du  volume  et  2-4  p.c.  de  la  valeur  reclament  en  1918  3-71  p.c.  du  volume 
et  4-47  p.c.  de  la  valeur. 

La  valeur  moyenne  d'une  tonne  de  papier  de  journal  qui  etait  de  $56.35 
en  1917  est  devenue  $62.91  en  1918,  avancant  ainsi  de  $6.56  par  tonne  ou 
11.64  p.c,  le  papier  a  ecrire  et  a  imprimer  les  livres  qui  se  vendait  $193.40 
la  tonne  en  1917  etait  cote  $222.90  la  tonne  en  1918,  soit  une  augmentation  de 
$29.50  par  tonne  ou  15-25  p  c;  le  papier  d'emballage  valant  $112.12  la  tonne 
en  1917  s'est  vendu  $119.99  en  1918,  augmentation  de  $7.87  par  tonne  ou  7-02 
p.c.  D'autre  part  le  carton  a  subi  un  declin,  tombant  de  $65.50  la  tonne  en 
1917  a  $63.26  la  tonne  en  1918,  soit  une  diminution  par  tonne  de  $2.24  ou  3-42 
p.c;  les  autres  papiers  sont  egalement  en  baisse  ayant  descendu  de  $132.06 
la  tonne  en  1917  a  $91.11  par  tonne  en  1918,  diminution  de  $40.95  par  tonne 
ou  31  p.c. 

Le  classement  des  papeteries,  par  genres  de  production,  nous  indique 
que  23  d'entre  elles  fabriquent  du  papier  a  journal,  16  autres  du  papier  a  ecrire 
et  a  imprimer  les  livres,  16  autres  du  papier  d'emballage;  13  produisent  du 
carton  et  enfin  18  des  papiers  autres  que  ceux  deja  enumeres. 

Le  tableau  suivant  donne  le  detail  de  la  production  du  papier  dans  les 
provinces,  par  volume  et  par  valeur. 


Papier  de  journal -tonnes 

-valeur 
Papier  a  ecrire  et  k  imprimer  les  livres -tonnes 

-valeur 
Papier  d'emballaga -tonnes 

-valeur 
Cartons tonnes 

-valeur 
Autres  produits  du  papier -tonnes 

-valeur 
Tous  autres  produits  (valeur  seulement) 

Totaux  (volume  du  papier) 

"         (valeur,  tous  produits) 


Colombie 
Britannique 


113,142 
7,576,711 


1,244,504 


442,990 


1,322,516 
9,264,205 


Ontario 


325,023 

20,673,268 

30,989 

6,319,007 

12,388 

1,330,316 

51,922 

2,810,527 

4,906 

735,840 

1,399,811 

425,228 
"33,268,769 


Quebec 


236,618 
17,980,835 

17,161 
4,413,800 

39,418 
4,765,552 

35,827 
2,740,882 

30,956 
2,531,302 
1,734,568 


419. 9SJ 
34,167,939 


Canada 


734,783 

46,230,814 

48. 150 

10,732,807 

61,180 

7,341,372 

87,749 

5,551,409 

35,862 

3,267,142 

3,577,369 


967,724 
76,90-3,913 


Matieres  premieres. 


Matieres  premieres  servant  a,  la  fabrication  de  la  pulpe  de  bois. — Les  tableaux 
III,  IV,  V,  VI  et  VII  sont  entierement  consacres  au  bois  que  Ton  transforme 
en  pulpe  et  qui  forme  la  principale  matiere  premiere  de  ce  produit,  et  le  tableau 
VIII  s'occupe  des  matieres  premieres  d'ordre  secondaire,  employees  concurrem- 
ment  avec  le  bois  dans  la  fabrication  de  la  pulpe  chimique.  La  consommation 
de  bois  a  pulpe  de  toutes  les  fabriques  productrices  de  pulpe,  sans  distinction 
entre  le  bois  achete  et  celui  coupe  sur  les  terres  leur  appartenant  ou  affermees 
par  elles,  atteignait  en  1918  a.  2,210,744  cordes  valant  $24,886,475,  au  lieu  de 
2,104,334  cordes  valant  $18,817,483  en  1917.  Le  prix  moyen  par  corde  qui 
etait  de  $8.94  en  1917  est  monte  a  $11.26  en  1918,  s'Stant  accru  de  25-83  p.c 
sur  l'annee  pre>edente. 

L'ordre  d'importance  des  cinq  provinces  n'a  pas  varied,  Quebec  continuant 
a  tenir  la  tete  avec  1,085,478  cordes,  Ontario  occupant  le  second  rang  avec 
17c  (4)— 5 


viii  RECENSEMENT   INDUSTRIEL 

10  GEORGE  V,  A.  1920 

784,891  cordes,  la  Colombie  Britannique  arrivant  troisierne  avec  218,774  cordes, 
le  Nouveau-Brunswick  quatrieme  avec  110,133  cordes  et  la  Xouvelle-Ecosse 
cinquieme  avec  11,668  cordes.  Dans  chaque  province,  on  constate  une  aug- 
mentation de  la  consommation  de  bois  a  pulpe,  sauf  dans  la  Nouvelle-Ecosse 
ou  il  y  eut  une  diminution  de  6,706  cordes. 

Entre  les  diverses  essences  d'arbres  servant  a  cet  usage  l'epinette  blanche 
continue  a  occuper  le  premier  rang,  avec  1,638,703  cordes  represent  ant  74-13 
p.c.  de  toutes  les  essences  employees.  Viennent  ensuite,  le  sapin  baumier 
avec  447,243  cordes  ou  20-23  p.c,  la  pruche  avec  89,007  cordes  ou  4-3  p.c, 
le  pin  gris  avec  25,851  cordes  ou  1-16  p.c,  le  peuplier  avec  9,885  cordes  ou  -45 
p.c,  et  toutes  autres  essences  avec  25  cordes.  On  constate  une  legere  decrois- 
sance  dans  la  quantite  d'epinette  blanche  et  de  pruche  sur  1917;  au  contraire 
toutes  les  autres  essences  presentent  des  augmentations. 

Dans  le  tableau  IV  est  relatee  la  consommation  respective  de  ces  diffe- 
rentes  essences  de  bois,  par  pulperies.  57  pulperies  emploient  l'epinette  blanche, 
35  consomment  le  sapin  baumier,  la  pruche  est  broyee  dan?  7  pulperies,  le 
peuplier  dans  8  et  le  pin  gris  dans  les  deux  derniere^. 

Pour  la  premiere  fois  dans  I'histoire  de  cette  Industrie,  la  quantite  de  bois 
employee  a  la  fabrication  de  pulp;'  au  sulfite  excede  cello  de  la  pate  d !  bois, 
les  chiffres  de  1918  etant  respectivement  1,044,697  cordes  et  873,084  cord.'-. 
Les  differents  procedes  de  la  fabrication  de  la  pulpe  en  1918  se  partageaient 
la  production  dans  la  proportion  suivante:  pulpe  mecanique  ou  pate  de  bois 
39-50  p.c,  fibre  au  sulfite  47-01  p.c,  fibre  au  sulfate  13-14  p.c,  et  fibre  a  la 
soude  35  p.c.  soil  un  total  de  60-50  p.c.  pour  les  procedes  chimiques  contre 
39-50  pour  le  procede  mecanique.  L' augmentation  du  volume  du  bois  servant 
a  la  fabrication  de  la  pulpe  chimique  ne  correspond  pas  a  l'accroissement  de 
la  production  de  ce  genre  de  pulpe.  Le  tableau  VIII  qui  indique  le  nombre 
moyen  de  livres  d?  pulpe  que  produit  une  corde  de  bois,  selon  le  procede  de 
fabrication  usite,  nous  donne  un  apercu  de  la  consommation  de  bois  pour  les 
procedes  chimiques  au  cours  des  annees  1917  et  1918. 


Arm6e 

Livres  de  pulpe  produites  par  corde  de  bois 

Soude 

liv. 

Sulfate 
Uv. 

Sulfite 
liv. 

Pate  de  bois 
Ev. 

1917 

930 
980 

1,105 
1,133 

1,063 
1,037 

2  013 

1918 

2,039 

La  quantite  de  pulpe  produite  par  corde  de  bois  dans  les  provinces  varie 
considerablemeht  dans  chacun  des  procedes.  La  Colombie  Britannique  deiieiit 
le  record  de  la  production  de  pulpe  par  le  broyage  mecanique,  sa  moyenne 
etant  2,485  livres  par  cordes;  Quebec  vient  en  second  lieu  avec  2,078  livres, 
Ontario  troisierne  avec  1,917  livres,  le  Nouveau-Brunswick  quatrieme  avec 
1,893  livres  et  la  Xouvelle-Ecosse  cinquieme  avec  1,825  livres.  Dans  la  fabri- 
cation au  sulfite  la  Colombie  Britannique  tient  encore  la  tete  ,avec  une  moyenne 
de  production  de  1,059  livres  par  corde,  suivie  par  le  Nouveau-Brunswick 
avec  1,040  livres,  Quebec  avec  1,042  livres  et  Ontario  avec  1,002  livres.  Dans 
le  procede  au  sulfate  Ontario  arrive  en  tete  avec  1,176  livres  par  corde.  la 
Colombie  Britannique  seconde  avec  1,163  livres  par  corde,  Quebec  troisierne 
avec  1,145  livres  et  le  Nouveau-Brunswick  quatrieme  avec  1,050  livres.  Ontario 
et  Quebec  sont  les  seules  provinces  produisant  la  pulpe  a  la  soude,  la  production 
par  corde  etant  1,000  livres  et  961  livres  respectivement. 

La  valeur  du  bois  employe  dans  les  differents  procedes  s'est  elevee  de 
88.94  en  1917  a  $11.26  en  1918,  soit  une  augmentation  de  82.32  par  corde  ou 
26  p.c. 


PULPE   ET   PAPIER 


COD.  PARLEMENTAIRE  No  17c  (4) 

Le  bois  transforme  en  pate  par  le  procede  mecanique,  qui  valait  $8.07 
en  1917  a  atteint  $11.40  en  1918,  soit  une  augmentation  de  41  p.c.  La  hausse 
est  moins  considerable  dans  le  procede  au  sulfite  qui  n'emploie  que  les  bois 
les  meilleurs,  les  cours  etant  $10.18  par  corde  en  1917  et  $11.64  en  1918,  aug- 
mentation d'environ  14-5  p.c.  Le  bois  traite  par  le  procede  au  sulfate  a  passe 
de  $8.10  par  corde  en  1917  a  $9.41  par  corde  en  1918,  augmentation  de  16-2 
p.c.  Dans  le  procede  a  la  soude,  le  bois  qui  valait  $10.07  par  corde  en  1917 
s'est  hausse  a  $11.23  par  corcle  en  1918  soit  pres  de  11-5  p.c.  en  sus. 

La  valeur  de  toutes  les  autres  matieres  premieres  utilisees  dans  la  fabri- 
cation de  la  pulpe  de  bois  est  donnee  dans  le  tableau  VIII  et  represente 
$4,938,667,  tandis  qu'en  1917,  ces  produits  n'avaient  coute  que  $1,602,212. 
Le  total  ci-dessus,  pour  1918,  se  decompose  ainsi:  Soufre  58,950  tonnes,  evaluees 
a  $1,830,319;  pierre  calcaire  et  chaux  127,014  tonnes  evaluees  a  $729,793; 
sulfate  de  soude  20,495  tonnes  evaluees  a  $522,423;  carbonate  de  soude  3,708 
tonnes  evaluees  a  $159,430;  chlorure  3,061  tonnes  evaluees  a  $140,287  et  enfin 
toutes  autres  matieres  premieres  diverses  dont  les  quantites  n'ont  pas  ete  speci- 
fiers, evaluees  ensemble  a  $1,556,415. 

Matieres  premieres  employees  a  la  fabrication  du  papier. — Le  tableau  X 
est  consacre  aux  matieres  premieres  employees  a  la  fabrication  du  papier, 
soit  a  l'etat  brut  ou  partiellement  ouvrees;  il  nous  en  fait  connaitre  la  quantite 
et  la  valeur  par  provinces  et  par  categories  de  fabriques.  Nous  resumons 
dans  le  tableau  ci-dessous  les  chiffres  de  1918  pour  F  ensemble  de  la  Puissance, 
concernant  les  principales  matieres  premieres. 


Nomenclature 


Pate  de  bois 

Fibre  au  sulfite 

Fibre  au  sulfate 

Fibre  au  soude ^ 

Autre  fibre  chimique 

Chiffons ' 

Vieux  papiers  ou  rognures  de  papier 

Tous  autres  papiers , 

Carbonate  de  soude 

Alun 

Argile 

Toutes  autres  matieres  premieres  (valeur  seulement) 

Cout  total  des  matieres  premieres 


Quantite 


679,395 

242,685 

35,587 

4,775 

2,419 

20,138 

46,350 

8,764 

968 

8,382 

9,212 


Prix 
coutant 

a  la 
fabrique 


14.215.S95 

13,665,361 

2,260,443 

397,021 

219,654 

1,412,367 

1,320,338 

634,149 

47,280 

375,366 

217,922 

2,782,940 


37,549,336 


Ces  matieres  premieres  qui  en  1917,  avaient  une  valeur  de  $28,617,334 
valaient  en  1918  $37,549,336,  soit  une  augmentation  de  $8,932,002  ou  31-2  p.c. 

Consommation  de  combustible. — Le  tableau  XI,  consacre  au  combustible, 
indique  la  quantite  et  la  valeur  des  differentes  sortes  de  combustible  consomme 
dans  les  differentes  categories  de  fabriques  au  cours  de  l'annee  terminee  le  31 
decembre  1918.  La  totalite  du  cout  du  combustible  consomme  par  cette 
industrie  s'eleve  a  $10,191,084,  dans  laquelle  somme  la  houille  bitumineuse 
entre  pour  $9,151,522,  soit  environ  90  p.c.  de  la  totalite.  Dans  l'etat  qui  suit, 
on  verra  les  differentes  sortes  du  combustible  consomme  dans  la  Puissance,  selon 
son  origine. 


17c  (4)— G 


RECENSEMENT    INDUSTRIEL 


10  GEORGE  V,  A.  1920 


Sortes  de  combustible 


Houille  bitumineuse,  menue ton. 

Houille  bitumineuse,  en  morceaux ' 

Houille  bitumineuse,  tout  venant ' 

Houille  anthracite,  poussier 

Houille  anthracite,  en  morceaux 

Lignite 

Coke " 

Gazoline gal. 

Petrole " 

Bois cordes 

Tous  autres  combustibles 

CoGt  total  du   combustiMe 


De  provenance 
canadienne 


Quant  ite 


11,388 

2,972 

128,979 


91,451 

1,820 

53,296 


Valeur 


84,832 

30,711 

1,981,579 


7,410 

22.002 

373 

356,573 

17,914 


2,501,394 


De  provenance 
Strangere 


Quantity 


212,938 

255,960 

399,362 

12,174 

162 

17 

36 

13,947,600 


Valeur 


1,650,681 

1,880,239 

3,523,480 

90,000 

1,762 

190 

676 

519,390 

23,182 


7,689,690 


Moyens  de  production  —  (1)  Capital,  machinerie,  force  motrice. 

Les  tableaux  XII  a  XVI  de  ce  rapport  sont  consacres  aux  moyens  de  pro- 
duction d'une  nature  fixe,  ci-dessus  mentionnes. 

Capital. — Dans  le  tableau  XII  on  voit  le  capital  reparti  sous  quatre  rubri- 
ques  distinctes  (a)  terrains,  batiments,  agencement,  (b)  machinerie  et  outillage, 
(c)  matieres  premieres  en  mains,  stocks  en  voie  de  fabrication,  produits  ouvres 
en  magasin,  combustible  et  approvisionnements  divers  et  (d)  fonds  de  roule- 
ment,  caisse  et  comptes  courants.  Les  memes  statistiques  sont  egalement 
presentees  par  provinces  et  par  categories  de  fabriques;  nous  en  donnons 
ci-dessous  le  resume  pour  la  Puissance: — 


Terrains,  batiments,  agencement 

Machinerie  et  outillage 

Matieres  premieres  en  main,  stocks  en  voie  de  fabrication,  produits 
ouvres,  etc 

Caisse  et  comptes  courants 

Totaux 

POl'RCE.VTAGES 

Terrains,  batiments,  agencement 

Machinerie  et  outillage 

Matieres  premieres  en  main,  stocks  en  voie  de  fabrication,  produits 
ouvrfes,  etc i 

Caisse  et  comptes  courants 


Papeteries 


4,379,659 
3,965,298 

2,276,540 

1,899,268 


12,520,765 


Pulperies 


37,230,737 

18,098,279 


8,955,808 
7,423,399 


71,708,223 


Pulperies- 
papeteries- 


77,195,185 
38,563,689 

28,419,730 
12,937,112 


157,115,716 


Toutes 
fabriques 


118,805.581 
60,627,266 

39,652,078 
22,259,779 


241,344,704 


34-98 
31-67 

18-18 

15-17 


100-00 


51-92 
25-24 

12-49 

10-35 

10000 


49-13 
24-55 

1809 
8-23 


10000 


49-23 
25-12 

16-43 

9-22 


PULPE     ET    PAPIER  xi 

DOC.  PARLEMENTAIRE  No  17c  (4) 

La  repartition  de  ces  capitaux  par  provinces,  pour  chaque  categorie  de 
fabriques,  s'operait  en  1918  de  la  maniere  suivante: 


Provinces 


Papeteries 


Pulperies 


Papeteries- 
pulperies 


Toutes 
fabriques 


Coloinbie  Britannique 

Ontario 

Quebec 

.Vouveau-Brunswick 

Xouvelle-Ecosse 

Totaux  pour  le  Canada 


5,341,192 

7,179,573 


17,413,569 

21,198,866 

24,490,175 

7,852,225 

753,388 


25,292,419 
62,036,749 
69,786,548 


42,705,988 

88,576,807 

101,456,296 

7,852,225 

753,388 


12.520,765 


71,7«8,223 


157, 11"),  716 


241,344,701 


Les  etablissements  fabriquant  tout  a  la  fois  la  pulpe  et  le  papier  absorbent 
le  plus  grand  pourcentage  du  capital,  soit  65-10  p.c.  du  total;  les  pulperies 
viennent  ensuite  avec  29-71  p.c.  et  les  papeteries  en  dernier  lieu  avec  5-19 
p.c.  Dans  chaque  province  on  constate  une  augmentation  sur  1917  dans  le 
montant  des  capitaux.  Dans  la  Colombie  Britannique  ils  ont  ete  portes  de 
822,584,652  en  1917  a  $42,705,988  en  1918,  en  augmentation  de  90  p.c;  dans 
Ontario  ils  sont  montes  de  872,006,972  en  1917  a  $88,576,807  en  1918,  soit  envi- 
ron 23  p.c;  Quebec  les  a  vu  s'accroitre  de  $84,609,584  en  1917  a  $101,456,296 
en  1918,  soit  d'environ  30  p.c;  au  Nouveau-Brunswick  le  chiffre  de  1917  etait 
$7,136,277,  tandis  que  celui  de  1918  atteint  $7,852,225,  soit  une  augmentation 
de  10  p.c;  enfin  en  Nouvelle-Ecosse,  de  $449,920  en  1917  ils  se  sont  eleves 
a  $753,388  en  1918,  accroissement  superieur  a  67  p.c.  La  moyenne  du  capital 
servant  a  l'exploitation  des  30  fabriques  de  papier  est  de  $417,359;  la  meme 
moyenne  s'eleve  a  81,887,058  dans  les  38  pulperies,  tandis  que  dans  les  26 
fabriques  de  pulpe  et  de  papier  combinees  elle  atteint  $6,042,912. 

Machinerie  des  pulperies — Le  tableau  XIII  relate,  par  provinces  et  par 
categories  de  fabriques,  la  machinerie  servant  a  la  fabrication  de  la  pulpe 
mecanique  ou  pate  de  bois.  La  capacite  totale  des  fabriques  de  pate  de  bois 
dans  la  Puissance  etait  en  1918  de  1,146,154  tonnes  (a  l'etat  sec),  dont  620,784 
tonnes  ou  54-16  p.c  se  trouvaient  dans  la  province  de  Quebec,  382,270  ton- 
nes ou  33-35  p.c  dans  Ontario,  103,600  tonnes  ou  9-04  p.c.  en  Colombie 
Britannique,  31,500  tonnes  ou  2-75  p.c.  en  Nouvelle-Ecosse  et  enfin  8,000 
tonnes  ou  70  p.c.  au  Nouveau-Brunswick. 

Au  cours  de  l'annee  la  production  effective  de  pulpe  de  bois  dans  la  Puissance 
fut  de  879,510  tonnes  ou  76-74  p.c.  de  la  production  potentielle.  La  province 
de  Quebec  a  produit  493,520  tonnes  ou  79-50  p.c.  du  maximum  possible;  Ontario 
277,922  tonnes  ou  72-70  p.c;  La  Colombie  Britannique  91,588  tonnes  ou  88 •  40 
p.c;  le  Nouveau-Brunswick  6,463  tonnes  ou  80-80  p.c  et  la  Nouvelle-Ecosse 
10,017  tonnes  ou  31-80  p.c 

Le  tableau  XIV  concerne  la  machinerie  des  fabriques  produisant  la  pulpe 
par  differents  procedes.  La  pulpe  au  sulfite  occupe  le  premier  rang  dans  la 
Puissance,  avec  une  capacite  potentielle  annuelle  de  613,477  tonnes  et  une 
production  effective  de  484,322  tonnes  ou  80  p.c.  du  maximum  realisable.  Le 
procede  au  sulfate  tient  le  second  rang  avec  une  capacite  potentielle  annuelle 
de  191,620  tonnes  et  une  production  reelle  de  179,600  tonnes,  representant 
environ  94  p.c,  et  le  procede  a  la  soude  vient  en  dernier  lieu  avec  une  capacite 
potentielle  annuelle  de  5,600  tonnes  et  une  production  effective  de  3,761  tonnes 
ou  67  p.c. 

Machinerie  des  papeteries. — La  machinerie  constituant  l'agencement  des 
papeteries  figure  au  tableau  XV,  tant  pour  le  Canada  que  pour  les  provinces. 
La  capacite  potentielle  annuelle  de  toutes  les  papeteries  sans  exception,  dans 


xii  RECENSEMENT   INDUSTRIEL 

10  GEORGE  V,  A.  1920 

la  Puissance,  etait  1,019,534  tonnes  et  la  production  effective  de  la  meme 
annee  fut  967,724  tonnes,  ou  environ  95  p.c.  du  maximum  possible.  ■  La  province 
d'Ontario  se  place  au  premier  rang  avec  une  capacite  potentielle  annuelle  de 
456,672  tonnes  et  une  production  effective  de  425,228  tonnes,  depassant  93 
p.c.  du  maximum  realisable.  Quebec  vient  ensuite  avec  une  capacite  potentielle 
annuelle  de  424,862  tonnes  et  une  production  effective  de  419,980  tonnes,  soit 
pres  de  98  p.c.  du  maximum,  puis  la  -Coloinbie  Britannique  qui  possede  une 
capacite  potentielle  annuelle  de  138,000  tonnes  et  dont  la  production  a  donne 
122,536  tonnes,  approehant  de  89  p.c.  du  maximum.  II  resulte  de  ces  chiffres 
que  la  marge  entre  le  maximum  possible  et  la  production  reelle  est  de  5  p.c. 
pour  la  Puissance,  de  7  p.c.  dans  Ontario,  2  p.c.  dans  Quebec  et  11  p.c.  dans 
la  Coloinbie  Britannique. 

Force  motrice  employee. — Les  different  es  sortes  de  force  motrice  employee 
dans  rindustrie.  soit  produite  par  elle,  soit  achetee,  sont  mentionnees  dans  le 
tableau  XVI,  par  provinces  et  par  categories  de.  fabriques,  En  1918,  pour 
toute  la  Puissance,  la  nombre  total  des  machines  motrices  atteignait  4.001 
susceptibles  de  developper  664,097  chevaux-vapeur,  dont  546,198  etaient  effec- 
tivement  utilises.  Les  roues  hydrauliques  ou  turbines  represent aient  382  unites 
pouvant  fournir  360,858  chevaux-vapeur,  dont  300,965  chevaux-vapeur  effecti- 
vement  utilises.  Les  moteurs  electriques  possedes  ou  loues  etaient  au  nombre 
de  2,946;  leur  force  combinee  etait  de  183,384  chevaux-vapeur.  dont  137,183 
chevaux-vapeur  effectivement  utilises;  les  machines  a  vapeur  formaient  269 
unites  d'une  force  totale  de  56,660  chevaux-vapeur,  dont  47,362  chevaux- 
vapeur  effectivement  utilises;  il  y  avait  aussi  9  moteurs  a  gazoline  pouvant 
dormer  82  chevaux-vapeur,  entierement  utilises.  Enfin  d'autres  machines 
motrices  non  specifiers  etaient  au  nombre  de  18,  possedant  une  force  totale  de 
3,100  chevaux-vapeur,  dont  2,375  chevaux-vapeur  effectivement  utilises. 

Sur  la  totalite  de  la  force  effectivement  utilisee  64-57  p.c.  se  trouve  dans 
les  pulperies-papeteries;  34-86  p.c.  dans  les  pulperies  et  4-57  p.c.  dans  les 
papeteries.  En  examinant  ces  chiffres  par  provinces,  on  trouve  que  Quebec 
a  consomme  51-40  p.c.  de  la  force  motrice  effectivement  utilisee,  Ontario  32-22 
p.c,  la  Colombie  Britannique  12-23  p.c,  le  Nouveau-Brunswick  2-48  p.c.  et 
la  Xouvelle-Ecosse  1-67  p.c. 

Moyens  de  production  —  (2)  Personnel,  traitements,  appointements  et 
salaires,  et  duree  des  operations. 

Toutes  les  donnees  relatives  au  travail  sont  concentrecs  dans  les  tableaux 
XVII  a  XX. 

Personnel,  traitements,  appointements  et  salaires. — Le  tableau  XVII  traite 
du  personnel  d'exploitation;  il  nous  indique  le  nombre  de  personnes  des  deux 
sexes  que  fait  travailler  cette  Industrie,  soit  comme  employes,  soit  comme 
main-d'eeuvre  et  le  chiffre  de  leur  remuneration,  tant  en  traitemi  nts  et  appointe- 
ments qu'en  salaires.  Nous  donnons  ci-dessous  un  etat  comparatif  du  nombre 
du  personnel  classifie  et  des  traitements,  appointements  et  salaires  pave.-,  durant 
les  annees  1917  et  1918. 


Administrateurs,  directeurs  et  gerants.      .    . 

/->  •  \1918 

Comrnis,  stenographer  et  autres  employes  de  bureau. /1917 

Ouvners  et  journaliers,  nombre  moven  1917 

\1918 


Totaux. 


/1917 

^1918 


Nombre 

5 

2 

213 

301 

848 


890 
1,151 


Traite- 
ments, 

appointe- 

sal  aires 


$ 

17.7SO.0O7 


20,358.019 
26,974,225 


Poureentages 
d'augmentation 


Personnel 


24-70 


11-83 


12  62 


Traitem. 

appointem. 
et  salaires 


4119 
46-50 


30-86 


32-50 


PULPE   ET   PAPIER  xiii 

DOC.  PARLEMENTAIRE  No  17c  (4) 

On  constate  par  le  resume  ci-dessus  que  le  personnel  employe  par  cette 
industrie  a  augmente  de  12-62  p.c.;  tandis  que  sa  remuneration  s'est  elevee 
de  32-50  p.c.  Dans  la  classe  des  administrateurs,  directeurs  et  gerants,  le 
nombre  des  personnes  presente  une  augmentation  de  19-28  p.c.  et  les  chiffres 
des  traitements  une  augmentation  de  41-19  p.c.  Dans  la  classe  des  commis 
stenographes,  etc.,  le  nombre  du  personnel  s'est  accru  de  24-70  p.c.  et  leurs 
appointements  de  46-50  p.c.  Dans  la  classe  ouvriere  l'augmentation  fut  de 
11-83  p.c.  quant  au  nombre,  et  de  30-86  p.c.  quant  aux  salaires.  II  y  eut 
done  une  augmentation  notable  du  nombre  du  personnel  de  toutes  classes,  mais 
la  remuneration  de  ses  services  s'est  accrue  dans  une  progression  encore  plus 
considerable. 

En  jetant  un  coup  d'ceil  sur  l'etat  ci-dessous,  on  etablira  une  comparaison 
facile  de  la  moyenne  des  traitements,  appointements  et  salaires  du  personnel 
pendant  les  annees  1917  et  1918. 


Administrateurs,  directeurs  et  gerant; 

Commis,  stenographes,  etc 

Ouvriers  et  journaliers 


1917 


3,291 

1,098 

831 


1918 


3,895 
1,289 

972 


Augmentation 


Montant 


604 

191 
141 


Pour- 
centage 


p.c. 
18-35 
17-39 
16-97 


On  remarquera  que  la  moyenne  des  traitements  des  administrateurs,  direc- 
teurs et  gerants  qui  etait  de  $3,291  en  1917  a  ete  portee  a  $3,895  en  1918,  soit 
une  augmentation  de  $604  dans  l'annee  ou  18-35  p.c;  les  appointements  des 
commis,  stenographes,  etc.,  sont  passes  de  $1,098  en  1917  a  $1,289  en  1918, 
soit  une  augmentation  de  $191  par  personne  ou  17-39  p.c.  La  moyenne  des 
salaires  des  ouvriers  et  journaliers,  etablie  a  $831  en  1917  est  portee  a  $972, 
en  1918,  soit  une  augmentation  de  $141  par  personne  et  par  an  ou  16-97  p.c. 

Dans  le  tableau  XVIII  se  trouve  l'indication  du  nombre  des  ouvriers  occupes 
pendant  chaque  mois  de  l'annee  dans  les  differentes  fabriques.  Les  mois  de 
plus  grande  actitive  dans  les  pulperies  furent  ceux  de  juin  a  septembre,  et  ceux 
de  morte-saison  furent  decembre,  Janvier,  fevrier  et  mars.  Dans  les  pulpeiies- 
papeteries,  la  premiere  periode  se  place  de  Janvier  a  aout,  la  seconde  de  decembre 
a  mars.  Les  papeteries  emploient  le  plus  grand  nombre  d'ouvriers  en  decembre 
et  le  minimum  en  Janvier;  il  y  a  tres  peu  de  variations  dans  tous  les  autres  mois, 
se  isiblement  egaux  a  la  moyenne. 

Le  tableau  XIX,  consacre  a  la  remuneration  de  la  classe  ouvriere  nous 
fait  eonnaitre  la  moyenne  de  ses  gains  hebdomadaires;  nous  en  donnonsci-apres 
un  resume.  Sur  la  totalite  des  21,699  ouvriers  et  journaliers  vivant  de  cette 
industrie  en  1917,  il  y  en  avait  1,546  ou  7-1  p.c.  qui  gagnaient  moins  de  $10 
par  semaine,  tandis  qu'en  1918,  le  nombre  de  ceux  recevant  moins  de  $10  par 
semaine  est  descendu  a  1,173  ou  5  p.c.  Ceux  qui  gagnaient  entre  $10  et  $15 
par  semaine  etaient  au  nombre  de  6,999  en  1917  soit  32-2  p.c.  au  lieu  de  3,062 
en  1918  ou  13-1  p.c.  Ceux  qui  regoivent  hebdomadairement  entre  $15  et  $20 
se  chiffraient  par  8,130  en  1917  ou  37-5  p.c,  en  1918  il  y  en  avait  7,499  ou 
32-2  p.c.  Ceux  dont  le  gain  se  plagait  entre  $20  et  $25  par  semaine  etaient  au 
nombre  de  3,119  en  1917  ou  14-4  p.c.  mais  en  1918,  ce  nombre  s'est  eleve  a 
6,318  personnes,    soit    27-1    p.c     Enfin  ceux  dont  le  salaire- est  superieur  a 


RECENSEMENT   INDUSTRIEL 


10  GEORGE  V,  A.  1920 

$25  par  semaine  n'etaient  que  1,905  ou  8-8  p.c.  en  1917,  mais  ils  sont  au  nom- 
bre  de  5-259  en  1918,  represent  ant  32-6  p.c.  de  la  totalite. 


1918 

Total 

1917 

Au-dessus  de  16 
ans 

Au-dessous  de 
16  ans 

Au-dessus  de  1 6 
ans 

Au-dessous  de 
16  ans 

Total 

Hom- 
ines 

Fem- 

mes 

Gar- 
cons 

Filles 

Hom- 
ines 

Fem- 

mes 

Gar- 
eons 

Filles 

5 

3 

3 

39 

87 

122 

216 

371 

2.402 

7,420 

6,038 

5,258 

4 
16 

5 
65 

S7 

210 

111 

148 

102 

22 

9 

1 

16 
5 
10 
21 
21 
13 
22 
23 
16 
55 
1 

8 
12 
16 

8 
29 
16 

3 

2 

33 

36 

34 

133 

''24 

361 

352 

542 

2,520 

7,499 

6,318 

5.259 

38 
24 

41 

72 

HI 

122 

477 

1,331 

8   117 
3,119 
1,904 

8 

17 

M 

141 

112 

95 

108 

50 

14 

6 

1 

2 
3 
3 

14 
17 

3 
17 

8 

7 

6 
10 
13 

2 

1 

48 

50 

141 

°40 

245 

220 

$9  mais  moins  de  $10 

$10  mais  moins  de  $12. 

?12  mais  moins  de  SI  5 

S15  mais  moins  de  $20 

$20  mais  moins  de  $25  

$25  et  plus 

602 
1,390 
5,609 
8,130 
3,119 
1.905 

Totaux 

32,234 

780 

203 

94 

23,311 

20,957 

636 

74 

32 

21,699 

La  moyenne  des  salaires  hebdomadaires  de  tous  les  ouvriers  sans  distinc- 
tion d  age  ni  de  sexe  etait  de  815.76  en  1917  et  de  $19.20  en  1918,  soit  une 
augmentation  egale  a  21-83  p.c. 

Le  tableau  XX  donne  la  moyenne  de  la  duree  du  travail  dans  chaque  cate- 
gorie  de  fabriques  et  nous  indique  pendant  combien  de  temps  elles  ont  fonctionne 
(a)  en  travaillant  tout  le  jour  (6)  pendant  trois-quarts  de  journee  (c)  pendant 
une  demi-journee  (d)  pendant  moins  d'une  demi-journee  et  enfin  (e)  pendant 
combien  de  jours  elles  ont  cess£  leur  travail.  Ce  sont  les  pulperies-papeteries 
qui  ont  fourni  la  plus  grande  somme  de  travail,  c'est-a-dire  290-8  jours  entiers 
puis  se  placent  les  papeteries  avec  257-5  jours  et  les  pulperies  avec  245-7  jours, 
soit  une  moyenne  pour  les  trois  categories  de  fabriques  de  264-7  jours.  Les 
pulperies  tiennent  la  tete  au  point  de  vue  de  la  duree  du  travail  par  jour  et  par 
semaine  avec  11-2  et  70-3  heures  respectivement;  elles  sont  suivies  par  les 
papeteries  avec  10-1  et  62-9  heures;  dans  les  pulperies-papeteries  on  a  travaille 
9-3  et  55-3  heures  respectivement.  La  perte  de  temps  resultant  de  Parrel 
des  fabriques  a  etc  la  plus  considerable  dans  les  pulperies  avec  44-9  jours; 
Irs  papeteries  venant  ensuite  avec  37-8  jours  et  enfin  les  pulperies-papeteries 
avec  8-8  jours. 


Frais  generaux  de  production. 

Ces  donnees,  par  categories  de  fabriques  et  par  provinces,  figurent  au 
tableau  XXI;  elles  se  decomposent  ainsi:  loyer  de  bureaux,  usines,  fabriques 
et  machinerie  $268,224;  achat  de  force  motrice  $1,429,873;  assurance  $694,510; 
taxes  (de  guerre,  sur  les  benefices,  etc.)  $872,880;  taxes  (provinciales,  munici- 
pales,  etc.)  $700,680;  droits  regaliens,  usage  de  brevets,  etc.  $12,181;  depenses 
de  publicity  860,301;  frais  de  voyages  $362,178;  reparations  ordinaires  aux 
batiments  et  a  la  machinerie  $3,116,042  et  tous  autres  frais  generaux  $5,908,678, 
formant  un  total  pour  la  puissance  de  $13,425,547. 

Les  frais  generaux  non  classifies  constituent  la  depense  la  plus  importante, 
representant  44  p.c.  de  la  totalite,  les  reparations  aux  batiments  et  a.  la 
machinerie  23-2  p.c,  l'achat  de  force  m  trice  10-7  p.c,  les  taxes  11-7  p.c, 
l'assurance  5-2  p.c.  et  le  surplus  environ  5-2  p.c 


PULPE   ET   PAPIER  xv 

DOC.  PARLEMENTAIRE  No  17c  (4) 

Importations  et  exportations. 

Les  tableaux  numerotes  XXII,   XXIII,   XIV,  XXV,   XXVI  et  XXVII 

de  ce  rapport  sont  consacres  aux  statistiques  des  importations  et  des  exporta- 
tions du  bois  de  pulpe,  de  la  pate  de  bois  et  du  papier  pendant  les  annees  civiles 
1916,  1917  et  1918. 

Bois  a  pulpe. — Dans  le  tableau  XXII  nous  voyons  les  exportations  du 
bois  a  pulpe,  par  provinces,  pour  les  annees  1915,  1916,  1917  et  1918.  En  compa- 
rant  cette  derniere  annee  aux  deux  precedentes,  on  constate  une  augmentation 
considerable  des  exportations  du  bois  a  pulpe,  tant  au  point  de  vue  de  son 
volume  que  de  sa  valeur.  En  1917  on  avait  signale  une  diminution  de  50,362 
cordes  ou  4-95  p.c.  sur  les  chiffres  de  1916,  tandis  qu'en  1918  il  s'est  produit 
une  augmentation  de  331,691  cordes  ou  environ  32-58  p.c.  La  valeur  moyenne 
par  corde  du  bois  a  pulpe  exporte  etait  de  $6.43  en  1916,  $7.78  en  1917  et  $9.63 
en  1918.     Le  Canada  n'a  pas  importe  de  bois    a  pulpe. 

Dans  le  tableau  XXIII  on  peut  voir,  places  en  regard,  les  chiffres  de  la 
production,  de  la  consommation  et  de  l'exportation  du  bois  a  pulpe,  par  pro- 
vinces, aux  fins  de  comparaison.  On  observe  une  augmentation  graduelle 
d'annee  en  annee,  de  la  quantite  produite  et  du  volume  de  la  consommation, 
tandis  que  le  volume  des  exportations  subit  des  fluctuations. 

En  1918  les  exportations  de  la  province  de  Quebec  absorbent  plus  de 
60  p.c.  de  la  totalite  du  volume,  celles  du  Nouveau-Brunswick  pres  de  20  p.c. 
et  celles  d'Ontario  un  peu  moins  de  15  p.c. 

Pulpe  de  bois. — Les  tableaux  XXIV  et  XXV  nous  renseignent  sur  les  expor- 
tations et  importations  de  pulpe  de  bois  par  sortes  et  par  pays  de  destination, 
dans  les  annees  1916,  1917  et  1918.  A  peu  pres  93-20  p.c.  de  la  quantite  totale 
exportee  en  1918  est  allee  aux  Etats-Uuis,  4-89  p.c.  au  Japon,  1-04  p.c.  dans 
d'autres  pays  et  -87  p.c.  au  Royaume-Uni.  En  considerant  les  sortes  de  pulpe 
exportees,  la  pulpe  chimique  represente  69  p.c.  de  la  totalite  et  la  pulpe  meca- 
nique  31  p.c.  En  1918  les  Etats-Unis  ont  absorbe  pres  de  98  p.c.  de  nos  expor- 
tations de  pulpe  mecanique  et  pres  de  90  p.c.  de  nos  exportations  de  pulpe 
chimique. 

Les  importations  de  pulpe  de  bois  au  Canada  en  1916,  1917  et  1918  font 
l'objet  du  tableau  XXV.  Toutes  la  pulpe  importee  est  venue  des  Etats-Unis. 
Comparee  a  l'annee  precedente  sa  valeur  en  1918  a  deem  de  $116,853,  soit  pres 
de  20  p.c. 

Papier. — Les  exportations  et  importations  de  papier  et  sa  fabrication,  par 
differentes  sortes,  pendant  les  annees  1916,  1917  et  1918  figurent  dans  les 
tableaux  XXVI  et  XXVII.  Les  exportations  de  papier  (tableau  XXVII) 
presentent  des  augmentations  dans  chaque  sorte  de  papier,  le  papier  a  imprimer 
ou  papier  a  journal  represcntant  a  lui  seul  $37,301,269,  soit  plus  de  87  p.c. 
du  total  des  exportations,  qui  ont  atteint  $42,950,959.  L'augmentation  sur 
l'annee  1917  fut  de  $7,328,827,  ou  approximativement  20  p.c.  Les  statistiques 
des  importations  en  1916,  1917  et  1918  sont  indiquees  dans  le  tableau  XXVII. 
La  valeur  des  papiers  importes  augmente  annuellement,  mais  a  un  degre  moindre 
que  celle  des  exportations.  En  l'annee  1917  l'augmentation  des  exportations 
etait  approximativement  52  p.c.  et  celle  des  importations  26  p.c,  tandis  qu'en 
1918  les  augmentations  furent  20  p.c.  dans  les  exportations  et  7-6  p.c.  dans  les 
importations. 


M>  GEORGE  V 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  18 


A.   1920 


ANNUAL   REPORT 


DEPARTMENT 


IMMIGRATION  AND  COLONIZATION 


FISCAL  YEAR  ENDED  MARCH  31,  1919 


PRINTED  BY  ORDER  OF  PARLIAMENT 


OTTAWA 

J.  de  LABROQUERIE  TACHE 

PRINTER  TO  THE  KING'S  MOST  EXCELLENT  MAJESTY 

1920 


[No.  18—1919.] 


i 


To  His  Excellency  the  Duke  of  Devonshire,  E.G.,  P.O.,  G.C.M.G.,  G.C.V.O.,  etc.,  etc., 
Governor  General  and  Commander  in  Chief  of  the  Dominion  of  Canada. 

May  it  Please  Your  Excellency: 

The  undersigned  has  the  honour  to  lay  before  Your  Excellency  the  report  of  the 
transactions  of  the  Department  of  Immigration  and  Colonization  for  the  fiscal  year 
ended  March  31,  1918. 

Respectfully  submitted, 

J.  A.  CALDER, 

Minister  of  Immigration  and  Colonization. 
Ottawa,  February  2,  1920. 


18—lJ 


10  GEORGE  V  SESSIONAL   PAPER    No.  18  A.   1920 


CONTENTS 

Page 

Report  of  Acting  Deputy  Minister 5 

"         Assistant  Deputy  Minister S 

"         Chief  Controller  of  Chinese  Immigration 20 

Chief  Medical  Officer 21 

Canadian  Exhibition  Commissioner 23 

Commissioner  of  Immigration,  Ottawa,  Ont 24 

"         Commissioner  of  Immigration,  Winnipeg,  Man 27 

"         Commissioner  of  Immigration,  Vancouver,  B.C 29 

"         Commissioner  of  Emigration,  London,  Eng 30 

u         Chief  Inspector  of  British  Immigrant  Children 32 

"        Inspector  of  United  States  Agencies 35 


10  GEORGE  V 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  18 


A.   1920 


REPORT 

OF    THE 

DEPARTMENT  OF  IMMIGRATION  AND  COLONIZATION 

1918-19 


This  is  the  second  Annual  Report  of  the  Department. 

During  more  than  eight  months  of  the  year  actual  hostilities  in  the  great  world 
war  continued,  and  as  the  strain  and  stress  in  consequence  increased  with  its  duration, 
it  is  a  matter  of  no  surprise  that  immigration  decreased  in  comparison  with  that  of 
the  preceding  year. 

The  following  is  a  comparative  statement  of  immigrant  arrivals  from  1881 
onward : — 

IMMIGRATION  TO   CANADA. 


Period. 


Calendar  year  1881 

1882 

1883 

1884 

1885 

1886 

1887 

1888 

1889 

1890 

1891 

1892 

1893 

1894 

1895 

1896 

1897 

1898 

1899 

Six  months  ended  June  30,  1900 

Fiscal  5-ear  ended  June  30,  1901 

1902.... 
1903.... 
1904 .... 
1905 .... 
1906.... 

Nine  months  ended  March  31,  1907. 
Fiscal  year  ended  March  31,  1908. . . 
1909 .... 


1910. 
1911. 
1912. 
1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 
1919. 


From 
British  Isles 


17,033 

41,283 

45,439 

31,787 

18,591 

23,507 

31,104 

30,852 

19,384 

21 , 793 

22,042 

22,636 

20,071 

16,004 

14,956 

12,384 

11,383 

11,173 

10,660 

5,141 

11,810 

17,259 

41,792 

50,374 

65,359 

86,796 

55,791 

120, 182 

52,901 

59,790 

123,013 

138,121 

150,542 

142,622 

43,276 

8,664 

8,282 

3,178 

9,914 


From 
United 
States. 


21,822 
58,372 
78,508 
65,886 
57,506 
40,650 
41,046 
44,952 
67,896 
50,336 
52,516 


2,412 

9,119 

11,94.5 

8,543 

17,987 

26,388 

49,473 

45,171 

43,543 

57,796 

34,659 

58,312 

59,832 

103,798 

121,451 

133,710 

139,009 

107,530 

59,779 

36,937 

61,389 

71,314 

40,715 


From  other 

Totals. 

Countries. 

9,136 

47,991 

12,803 

112,458 

9,677 

133,624 

6,151 

103,824 

3,072 

79,169 

4,995 

69,152 

12,376 

84,536 

12,962 

88,766 

4,320 

91,600 

2,938 

75,067 

7,607 

82,165 

8,360 

30,996 

9,562 

29,633 

4,825 

20,829 

3,834 

18,790 

4,451 

16,835 

7,921 

21,716 

11,608 

31,900 

21,938 

44,543 

10,211 

23,895 

19,352 

49, 149 

23,732 

67,379 

37,099 

128,364 

34,786 

130,331 

37,364 

146,266 

44,472 

189,064 

34,217 

124,667 

83,975 

262,469 

34,175 

146,908 

45,206 

208,794 

66,620 

311,084 

82,406 

354,237 

112,881 

402,432 

134,726 

384,878 

41,734 

144,789 

2,936 

48,537 

5,703 

75,374 

4,582 

79,074 

7,073 

57,702 

6  IMMIGRATION  AND  COLONIZATION       ' 

10  GEORGE  V,  A.   1920 
BRITISH  IMMIGRATION. 

During  the  year,  there  were  9,914  immigrant  arrivals  in  Canada  from  the  United 
Kingdom,  as  compared  with  3,178  in  the  previous  year. 

CONTINENTAL  IMMIGRATION. 

An  increase  from  4,582  to  7,073  in  arrivals  from  continental  countries  during  the 
last  fiscal  year  as  compared  with  that  of  the  preceding  year  is  shown. 

AMERICAN   IMMIGRATION. 

There  is  a  marked  decrease  in  the  number  of  immigrant  arrivals  from  the  United 
States;  during  last  fiscal  year,  there  were  40,715  arrivals  as  against  71,314  in  1917-18; 
this  represents  a  falling  off  to  the  extent  of  43  per  cent. 

IMMIGRATION  INSPECTION. 

Reports  will  be  included  dealing  with  immigration  inspection.  During  the  year 
a  careful  survey  of  the  department  was  made  by  Commissioners  appointed  therefor, 
and  as  a  result  of  this  survey  about  100  employees  were  retired  from  the  service 
as  filling  positions  no  longer  necessary.  A  number  of  immigration  halls  were  closed, 
which  were  found  to  have  outlived  their  usefulness.  As  a  further  result  of  the  report 
of  the  Commissioners  the  work  of  the  department  in  Canada  has  been  placed  under 
three  Commissioners.  The  Eastern  District  includes  all  the  territory  east  of  longi- 
tude 87  west.  The  Western  District  includes  all  territory  east  of  longitude  116-15 
west  and  west  of  longitude  87  west.  The  Pacific  District  includes  all  territory  west  of 
longitude  116-15  west.    Reports  of  the  three  Commissioners  will  be  found  herewith. 

It  is  gratifying  to  note  that  there  has  been  no  relaxation  in  the  enforcement  of 
regulations  pertaining  to  the  admission  and  rejection  of  passengers  along  the  inter- 
national boundary. 

JUVENILE   IMMIGRATION. 

The  immigration  of  British  children,  unaccompanied  by  parents  or  guardians, 
occupies  a  distinct  and  important  place  in  the  work  of  the  department,  a  separate 
report  on  this  interesting  subject  will  be  included. 

During  the  year  a  Publicity  Bureau  has  been  added  to  the  department  with  a 
Director  of  Publicity  at  Ottawa,  and  a  Director,  Bureau  of  Publicity  and  Information 
at  Winnipeg. 

Beginning  with  July,  1917,  the  department  became  interested  in  the  return  to 
Canada  from  the  United  Kingdom  of  the  dependents  of  Canadian  soldiers.  Between 
that  date  and  the  date  of  the  armistice  (November  11,  1918),  slightly  over  17,000 
dependents  returned  to  Canada.  Many  of  these  had  to  be  landed  at  New  York  and 
accompanied  by  officers  of  the  department,  from  New  York  to  points  in  Canada.  In 
January,  1919,  it  was  decided  to  repatriate  at  public  expense  the  wives  and  minor 
children  of  Canadian  soldiers.     During  the  first  few  weeks  following  the  signing  of 


IMMIGRATION  AND  COLONIZATION  7 

SESSIONAL   PAPER   No.   18 

the  armistice  the  work  of  arranging  passage  in  the  United  Kingdom  was  attended  to 
by  the  Overseas  Military  Authorities,  but  beginning  the  latter  part  of  January,  1919, 
this  work  was  returned  to  the  control  of  the  department.  Dependents  who  sailed'  on 
or  after  November  11,  1918,  were  supplied  with  free  third-class  rail  and  ocean  trans- 
portation. In  order  to  provide  for  dependents  better  safeguards  and  comforts  than 
usually  accompany  third-class  travel,  the  department  arranged  for  conductors 
and  conductresses  on  the  ships,  and  conductors  on  the  special  trains  from  Canadian 
ocean  ports  to  destination  in  Canada.  In  additon  to  this  the  Department  of  Militia 
and  Defence  provided  medical  officers,  and  the  Canadian  Red  Cross  provided  nurses 
to  travel  on  trains  in  Canada.  The  special  trains  carrying  dependents  were  equipped 
with  mattresses,  blankets,  and  pillows  without  charge  to  the  dependents.  The  num- 
ber of  dependents  who  sailed  between  the  date  of  the  armistice  and'  the  end  of  the 
fiscal  year  was  9,466,  and  it  is  estimated  that  from  30,000  to  35,000  still  remain  to  be 
brought  back. 

The  return  of  soldiers  and  dependents  has  produced  serious  congestion  in  ocean 
transport,  and  this  condition  is  likely  to  continue  for  the  best  part  of  another  year. 
Already  there  are  signs  of  a  revival  of  immigration  from  European  countries,  and  in 
connection  with  this  there  are  numerous  problems  which  will  require  most  careful 
consideration.  Some  attention  has  already  been  given  to  a  more  advanced  policy  in 
the  selection  of  our  future  immigration.  The  movement  itself,  however,  is  not  likely 
to  be  noticeable  for  another  twelve  months. 

W.  W.  CORY, 

Acting  Deputy  Minister. 


IMMIGRATIOX  AXD  C0L0X1ZATWX 


10  GEORGE  V,  A.   1920 


REPORT  OF  THE  ASSISTANT  DEPUTY  MINISTER,  W.  D.  SCOTT. 


SUMMARY    FOR    THE    FISCAL    YEAR,    1918-19. 

Per  ocean  travel — 

St.  John 7,034 

Vancouver 3,478 

Victoria 2.23S' 

Halifax 1,606 

North  Sydney ' 513 

Quebec 287 

New  York 1,808 

Portland 21 

Boston 2 

1,831 

From  the  United  States 

Total 


16.9S7 
40,715 


57,702 


Comparative  Statement. — Immigration  to  Canada,  via  Ocean  Ports,  by  months,  for 
the  Fiscal  Year,  1918-19,  compared  with  that  of  the  Fiscal  Year,  1917-18. 


April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

January 

February 

March 

Totals 


271 
348 
236 
227 
208 
159 
280 
138 
265 
216 
207 
224 


1917-18. 


Fe- 
Males.     males. 


171 
239 
262 
249 
270 
377 
329 
164 
401 
99 
59 
621 


2,779       3,241 


Chil- 
dren.     Totals. 


89 
160 
101 
144 
145 
176 
205 
118 
221 
"59 

26 
296 


1,740 


531 
747 
599 
620 
623 
712 
814 
420 
887 
374 
292 
1,141 


7,760 


1918-19. 


Fe- 
Males.     males. 


249 
327 
371 
375 
542 
272 
459 
700 
512 
716 
762 
826 


6,111 


395 
220 
166 
236 
227 
213 
496 
432 
473 

1,261 
893 

2,267 


7,279 


Chil- 
dren.     Totals. 


169 
160 
81 
138 
136 
141 
287 
267 
225 
571 
320 
1,102 


3,597 


813 

707 

618 

749 

905 

626 

1,242 

1,399 

1,210 

2,548 

1,975 

4,195 


16,987 


Comparative  Statement. — Immigration  from  the  United  States  to  Canada,  by  months,, 
for  the  Fiscal  Year,  1918-19,  compared  with  that  of  the  Fiscal  Year,  1917-18. 


1917-18. 


Fe-         Chil- 

Males.     males.       dren.      Totals. 


1918-19. 


Males. 


Fe- 
males. 


Chil- 
dren.     Totals. 


April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

January 

February 

March 

Totals 


10,283 
6,788 
3,842 
3,001 
3,512 
3,431 
2,837 
2,597 
2,043 
1,691 
1,361 
3,332 


44,718 


2,138 

2,031 

1,694 

1,281 

1,235 

1,095 

1,180 

917 

690 

474 

497 

1,302 


1,988 

1,677 

1,265 

887 

968 

851 

1,055 

855 

500 

321 

391 

1,304 


14,409 
10,496 
6,801 
5,169 
5,715 
5,377 
5,072 
4,369 
3,233 
2,486 
2,249 
5,938 


3,086 
2,261 
1,453 
1,180 
1,820 
1,281 
832 
723 
1,021 
1,152 
1,367 
3,555 


1,530 

1,265 

1,118 

951 

939 

872 

735 

584 

649 

548 

675 

1,449 


1,694 
1,028 
706 
588 
851 
682 
627 
489 
556 
385 
599 
1,464 


14,534 


12,062 


71,314 


19,731 


11,315 


9,669 


6,310 
4,554 
3,277 
2,719 
3,610 
2,835 
2,194 
1,796 
2,226 
2,085 
2,641 
6,468 


40,715 


IMMIGRATION  AND  COLONIZATION 
SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.   18 


Comparative  Statement. — Total  Immigration  to  Canada,  by  months,  for  the  Fiscal 
Year,  1918-19,  compared  with  that  of  the  Fiscal  Year,  1917-18. 


1917-18. 


Males. 


Fe-         Chil- 

males.      dren.     Totals. 


1918-19. 


Males. 


Fe- 
males. 


Chil- 
dren. 


Totals. 


April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

January 

February 

March 

Totals 


10,554 
7, 136 
4,078 
3,228 
3,720 
3,590 
3,117 
2,735 
2,308 
1,907 
1,568 
3,556 


2,309 
2,270 
1,956 
1,530 
1,505 
1,472 
1,509 
1,081 
1,091 
573 
556 
1,923 


2,077 

1,837 

1,366 

1,031 

1,113 

1,027 

1,260 

973 

721 

380 

417 

1,600 


14,940 
11,243 
7,400 
5,789 
6,338 
6,089 
5,886 
4,789 
4,120 
2,860 
2,541 
7,079 


3,335 
2,588 
1,824 
1,555 
2,362 
1 ,  55.3 
1,291 
1 ,  423 
1,533 
1,868 
2,129 
4,381 


1,925 
1,485 
1,284 
1,187 
1,166 
1,085 
1,231 
1,016 
1,122 
1,809 
1,568 
3,716 


1,863 
1,188 
787 
726 
987 
823 
914 
756 
781 
9.56 
919 
2,566 


47,497   17,775   13,802 


79,074 


25,842 


18,594 


13,266 


7,123 
5,261 
3,895 
3,468 
4,515 
3,461 
3,436 
3,195 
3,436 
4,633 
4,616 
10,663 


57,702 


Comparative  Statement. — Total  Immigration  to  Canada,  by  Ports,  for  the  Fiscal  Year, 
1918-19,  compared  with  that  of  the  Fiscal  Year,  1917-18. 


1917-18. 

1918-19. 

Males. 

Fe- 
males. 

Chil- 
dren. 

Totals. 

Males. 

Fe- 
males. 

Chil- 
dren. 

Totals. 

St.  John 

243 
497 
709 
70 
453 
173 

634 
44,718 

490 
96 
391 
821 
450 
379 

614 
14,534 

276 
71 
87 
452 
256 
225 

373 

12,062 

1,009 
664 
1,187 
1,343 
1,159 
777 

1,621 
71,314 

601 

3,157 

1,586 

130 

119 

97 

421 
19,731 

4,400 
149 
533 
954 
229 
110 

904 

11,315 

2,033 
172 
119 
522 
165 
80 

506 
9,669 

7,034 
3,478 
2, 238 
1,606 
513 
287 

1  831 

Vancouver 

Victoria 

Halifax 

North  Sydney 

Quebec 

United   States  ports   (New   York, 
Portland  and  Boston) 

From  the  United  States 

40  715 

Totals 

47,497 

17,775 

13,802 

79,074 

25,842 

18,594 

13,266 

57,702 

10  IMMIGRATION  AND  COLONIZATION 

10  GEORGE  V,  A.   1920 

Sex,   Occupation  and  Destination  of  Total  Immigrant  Arrivals   in   Canada  for  the 
Fiscal  Year  ended  March  31,  1919. 


Description. 


Via 

Ocean  Ports. 


From  the 
United  States 


Totals. 


Sex- 
Males 

Females 

Children 

Totals 

Trade  or  Occupation- 
Farmers  and  Farm  Labourers — 

Males 

Females 

Children 

General  Labourers — 

Males .... 

Females 

Children 

Mechanics — 

Males 

Females 

Children 

Clerks,  Traders,  etc. — 

Males 

Females 

Children 

Miners — 

Males 

Females 

Children 

Female  servants 

Not  classified — 

Males 

Females 

Children 

Destination — 

Maritime  Provinces 

Quebec 

Ontario 

Manitoba 

Saskatchewan 

Alberta 

British  Columbia 

Yukon  Territory 


6,111 

7,279 
3,597 


16,987 


583 
255 
141 

797 

110 

60 

334 
265 
153 

457 
155 

35 

15 

15 

18 

508 

3,925 
5,971 
3,190 

1,325 
1,566 
4,988 
1,141 
1,126 
1,275 
5,565 
1 


19,731 

11,315 

9,669 


40,715 


9,553 
3,413 

4,780 

2,648 
734 
535 

3,778 
1,205 
1,120 

1,078 
640 
254 

273 
53 

48 
1,188 

2,401 
4,082 
2,932 

2,535 
5,206 
8,838 
3,721 
7,426 
10,365 
2,525 
99 


25,842 
18,594 
13,266 


57,702 


10,136 
3,668 
4,921 

3,445 
844 
595 

4,112 
1,470 
1,273 

1,535 
795 
289 

288 

68 

66 

1,696 

6,326 
10,053 
6,122 

3,860 
6,772 

13,826 
4,862 
8,552 

11,640 

8,090 

100 


IMMIGRATION  AND  COLONIZATION  11 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.   18 

Comparative  Statement. — Total  Immigration  to  Canada,  by  Nationalities,  for  the 
Fiscal  Year  1918-19,  compared  with  that  of  the  Fiscal  Year  1917-18,  showing 
Increase  or  Decrease  of  each  Nationality. 


1917-18. 


1918-19. 


Increase. 


Decrease. 


English. 
Irish. . .  , 
Scotch. . 
Welsh... 


Total  British. 


African,  South 

Australian 

Galician 

Belgian 

Bermudian 

Chinese 

Cuban 

Dutch 

French 

German 

Greek 

Hebrew — 

Hebrew,  N.E.S 

"        Russian 

Italian 

Jamaican 

Japanese 

Maltese 

Mexican 

Negro 

Newfoundland 

New  Zealand 

Persian 

Polish- 
Polish,  N.E.S 

"       Russian 

Portuguese 

Russian — 

Russian,  N.E.S 

Finnish 

Scandinavian — ■ 

Danish 

Icelandic 

Norwegian 

Swedish 

Serbian 

Spanish 

Swiss 

Turkish — 

Armenian 

Syrian 

U.  S.  A.  Citizens,  via  ocean  ports. 
West  Indian 


Total  Continental,  etc. . . 
From  the  United  States. 
Total  immigration 


2,477 

174 

473 

54 


3,178 


4 
34 


19 

10 

769 

1 

94 

114 

1 

45 

2 

30 

189 

24 

883 

144 

1 

35 

1,199 

13 

2 


42 
113 

74 

3 

235 

156 


28 
12 

2 

2 

28 

273 


4,582 


71,314 


79,074 


7,954 
336 

1,518 
106 


9,914 


35 
2 

48 

1 

4,333 


59 

222 

1 

4 

15 
7 

49 

2 

1,178 

2 

3 

22 
512 

15 
2 

3 

1 


42 
2 

44 
12 
91 
101 
1 
12 
11 


21 
220 


7,073 


40,715 


57,702 


5,477 

162 

1,045 

52 


6,736 


1 

2 

29 


3,564 


108 


13 


295 


2,491 


1 

35 


41 


23 

140 

22 


142 


13 

687 


111 
30 


144 
55 


in 
1 

2 

2 

7 

53 


30,599 


21,372 


ARRIVALS   AT   OCEAN    PORTS. 

During  the  fiscal  year  1918-19,  there  arrived,  via  Canadian  and  United  States 
ocean  ports,  73,062  passengers  of  whom  17,305  travelled  saloon,  and  55,757  steerage. 
Of  the  saloon  passengers,  13,873  were  destined  to  Canada  and  3,432  to  the  United 
States.  Of  the  steerage  passengers,  51,823  were  for  Canada  and  3,934  for  the  United 
States.  Included  in  the  steerage  passengers  for  Canada  were  23,036  returned  Cana- 
dians and  11,800  tourists,  leaving  the  immigration  proper  at  16,987  souls,  which  together 


12 


IMM1GRATI0X  AXD  COLOXIZATIOX 


10  GEORGE  V,   A.   1920 

with  the  40,715  settlers  from  the  United  States,  brings  the  total  immigration  to  57,702, 
a  decrease,  as  compared  with  that  of  the  preceding  fiscal  year,  of  21,372  persons. 

The  following  further  statistical  information  will  be  of  interest :  table  I  deals  with 
the  total  arrivals  of  saloon  passengers;  table  II  with  the  total  arrivals  of  steerage 
passengers;  table  III  with  the  monthly  arrivals  of  immigrants  for  Canada;  and  tables 
IV  and  V  give  summaries  of  the  information  obtained  from  immigrants  for  Canada 
upon  arrival. 

Table  I. — Nationality  and  Sex  of  Saloon  Passengers  arriving  at  Ocean  Ports  during 
the  Fiscal  Year  ended  March  31,  1919. 


Canada. 

United  States. 

Canada  and  United  States. 

— 

o 

"5 

m 

o 

£ 

a 

o 

2 

DQ 

O 

73 

O 

o3 

"5 
£ 

a 

a 

o 

•A 

3 

o 

02 

tn 

■A 

s 
s 

c 
— 

c-1 

1 

I 

1 
82 
1 
1 
5 
7 
1 

1 

40 
1 

9 

3 

1 

35 

14 
18 

1 

356 

27 

69 

4 

6 

3 

8 
2 
3 

12 
7 

44 
1 

13 
434 

13 
1 

1 
4 
9 
2 
67 

10 
2 

32 
9 

17 
3 

1 

1 

11 

865 

22 

2,520 

3,650 

1 

1 

1 

39 
1 

1 

1 

6 

4 

11 

35 

8 

41 

12 

93 

1 

1 
1 
2 

3 

1 
6 
4 

1 

7 

1 

5 
1 

5 

2 

1 

4 

11 

7 

4 
2 
1 

16 

14 

1 

35 

4 

9 

48 

4 
1 

5 

25 

1 

751 

53 

127 

8 

1 
1 

2 

9 

2 
5 
1 

342 
15 
48 

1 

48 

1 
2 
9 
1 

114 

10 

22 

2 

1 

1 

2 
2 

1 

42 
4 
2 

1 
16 
23 

3 

387 

31 
65 

4 
6 

4 

3 

2 

4 

10 

1 

Dutch 

2 
6 

3 
16 

3 

5 
25 

12 

12 

1 

231 

17 

41 

2 

5 

3 

3 
2 
3 
9 

21 

48 

3 

Great   Britain    and   Ire- 
land— 

125 

10 

28 

2 

1 

637 

43 

105 

6 

300 
11 
46 

1,062 

64 

179 

8 

1 

1,449 

9.5 

Scotch 

244 

Welsh 

12 

7 

4 

Hebrew — 

Hebrew   N.E  S 

5 

2 

1 

8 

11 

2 

1 
1 

1 

1 

13 

7 

1 

64 

620 

10 

6 

203 

1 

4 

3 

7 
1 

3 
20 

2 

13 

13 
1 

20 

43 

1 

4 

305 

13 

1 

1 
4 
5 
2 
61 

8 
2 

25 
7 

15 
3 

1 

6 

1 

29 

379 

10 

4 

86 

1 

49 
2 

37 
770 

24 
1 

o 

4 

5 

2 

99 

10 
2 
31 
11 
29 
5 

1 

51 

2 

9 

129 

35 
241 

2 

117 

46 

487 

83 

Newfoundland 

1,257 

New  Zealand 

24 

1 

Polish- 
Polish,  N.E.S 

2 

2 

3 

4 

4 

1 

5 

1 

10 

2 

6 
2 

1 

2 

9 

2 
3 
9 
3 
4 
2 

24 
2 

14 

25 

2 
3 

7 
4 
7 
4 

16 

1 
1 
9 

108 

Scandinavian — 

12 

3 
2 
1 
1 
2 

1 

5 

7 
2 
2 

5 

3 

6 
2 

1 

1 
8 

40 

Swedish 

14 

33 

Swiss 

7 

Turkish — 

Turkish,  N.E.S 

1 

1 
1 

16 

20 

2,520 

3,602 

1 

4 

32 

73 

5,574 

6,165 

1 

2 

13 

43 

2,148 

1,959 

1 

3 

10 

906 

604 

10 

849 
2 

1 

558 

5 

1 

191 
1 

12 

1,59S 
8 

3 

571 

48 

2,148 

1,980 

2 

194 

11 

906 

606 

16 

U.  S.  A.  Citizens 

West  Indian 

1,630 
81 

5,574 

48 

21 

2 

71 

6,236 

Totals 

6,55.3 

5.295 

2,025 

13,873 

1,799 

1,259 

374 

3,432 

8,352 

6,554 

2,399 

17.305 

IMMIGRATION  AXD  COLON  I Z  AT I OX 


13 


SESSIONAL   PAPER   No.   18 

Table  II. — Nationality  and  Sex  of  Steerage  Passengers  arriving  at  Ocean  Ports  during 
the  Fiscal  Year  ended  March  31,  1919. 


Canada. 

United  States. 

Canada  and  United  States. 

— 

03 
CO 

DQ 

CD 

"3 

s 

O 

a 

CD 
u 

o 

7 

to 

O 

H 
35 

CD 

"3 

tn 

CD 

"3 

e 

CD 

a 

CD 
u 

13 

o 

o 

CO 

CD 

m 

"el 

•g 
CD 

a 

CD 

O 

"cl 
O 

10 

18 

44 

33 
1 

13 

90 

1 

54 

1 

36 

1 

1 

4,095 

26 

94 

7 

814 

78 

253 

19 

3 

7 

2 
17 

1 
12 

2 
609 

2 

2 

21 

375 

22 

2 

3 

2 
86 

81 
11 

39 
8 

67 

52 

1 

153 

9 

6 
497 
179 

51 

1 
1 

25 

20 

8 

125 

1 

2 

69 

1 

1 

4,333 

69 

228 

7 

8,387 

406 

1,664 

116 

5 

11 

21 

50 

1 

54 

9 

Austro-Hungarian — ■ 

Galician 

i 

18 

1 

1 

23 

7 

2 

48 

1 

Belgian 

18 

2 

1 

21 

1 

1 

Chinese 

4,095 

16 

92 

1 

591 
40 

183 
15 

2 

63 

28 

108 

175 

15 
22 

4,333 

59 

222 

1 

7,954 
336 

1,518 

106 

4 

63 

28 

110 

175 

15 

24 

Dutch 

10 
2 
6 

223 
38 
70 

4 
1 

7 

12 
1 

4 

10 
6 
6 

433 
70 

146 

10 

1 

11 

6 

43 

1 

5 

French 

2 

2 

German 

Great   Britain   and   Ire- 
land- 

4,957 

188 

841 

63 

2 

2,406 
108 
494 

28 

161 

26 

59 

3 

49 
6 

17 
3 

5,118 

214 

900 

66 

2 

2 

9 

18 

2,455 

114 

511 

31 

2 

10 
15 

Irish 

Scotch 

Welsh 

Greek 

2 

2 

16 

2 

4 
15 

Hebrew — 

Hebrew,  N.E.S 

"         Russian 

2 
5 

7 
2 

6 

15 

7 

Italian 

8 

2 

584 

2 

i 

10 
118 

2 
2 

2 

25 

16 

49 

2 

1-178 

2 

3 

22 

5i2 

15 

2 

3 
1 

1 

26 

16 

Jamaican  

Japanese      

530 

64 

25 

11 

36 

541 

64 

1,214 

2 

Maltese         

Mexican               

1 

12 

230 

11 

1 

164 

2 

1 

11 

257 

20 

1 
37 

453 
34 

1 

36 

372 

20 

1 

2 

218 

7 

4 

Negro  

Newfoundland     

New  Zealand     

24 

142 

9 

2 
54 

5 

59 

965 
49 

2 

Persian    

Polish- 
Polish,  N.E.S 

1 
1 

1 

2 

86 

65 

9 

14 

1 

37 

22 

14? 
3 

6 
488 

8 

1,639 

485 

2,124 

1 

2 

322 

278 
9 

20 

1 

41 

26 

4 

409 

3 

16 

787 

28 

1 
1 

77 

100 

159 
139 

4 

3 

77 
90 

159 
123 

322 

320 

11 

Russian — ■ 

Russian,  N.E.S 

Finnish 

16 

2 

25 
7 

30 

30 
1 

11 
6 

10 

16 

42 
2 

44 
12 
91 
101 
1 
12 
11 

Scandinavian — 

Danish 

10 

3 

46 

45 

9 
2 

15 
26 

3 

3 

13 

3 

48 

49 

2 

81 

5 

3 

205 

56 

12 
2 

17 

26 

2 

187 

7 

106 

13 

64 

Icelandic 

13 

Norwegian 

Swedish 

2 

4 

2 

80 

2 

2 

187 

132 

127 

5 

421 

Spanish 

1 

5 

Swiss 

14 

Turkish— 

3 

199 

15 

7 

100 

5 

16 
808 
248 

U.  S.  A.  Citizens 

West  Indian 

9 

171 

6 
41 

6 

8 

21 
220 

16.987 
23.03P 
11,800 

51,823 

Total  immigration 

Returned  Canadian 

6,111 
14,268 
10,595 

7,279 

5,054 

900 

3,597 

3,714 

305 

969 
33 

761 

47 

3,369 
565 

7,750 
14,268 
11,080 

8,248 

5,054 

933 

4,358 

3,714 

352 

20,356 
23,036 
12,365 

13,233 

7,616 

1,002 

808 

3,934 

33,098 

14,235 

8,424 

55,757 

14 


IMMIGRATION  AND  COLONIZATION 


10  GEORGE  V,  A.   1920 

Table  III. — Monthly  arrivals  of  Immigrants  for  Canada,  by  Nationalities,  at  Ocean 
Ports,  for  the  Fiscal  Year  ended  March  31,  1919. 


April. 

May. 

June. 

July. 

Aug. 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Dec. 

Jan. 

Feb. 

Mar. 

Totals 

1 

4 

2 
2 

8 

2 

11 

5 

3 

1 

35 

2 

4 

4 

2 

3 

3 

6 

2 

3 
1 
601 
6 
17 
1 

1,515 

60 

217 

18 

4 

15 

48 

I 

135 

190 

222 

7 

26 

247 
4 
3 

410 
18 
17 

211 
9 

316 
15 
14 

544 

395 

633 

1 

24 

429 

8 

60 

4,333 

Dutch  

59 

19 

20 

8 

5 

222 

1 

Great  Britain  and 
Ireland — 
English 

349 

25 

50 

6 

1 

197 

11 

52 

9 

2 

147 
4 
5 

1 

247 

1 

55 

2 

166 

2 

27 

4 

253 

4 

21 

4 

492 

19 

100 

5 

495 

27 

73 

5 

493 
19 

117 
5 
1 

1,012 

25 

123 

10 

2,588 

139 

678 

37 

7,954 
336 

Scotch 

1,518 

Welsh 

106 

4 

Hebrew — 
Hebrew,  N.E.S 

1 

5 

1 

8 
1 
4 

1 

3 
5 

15 

1 

2 

1 

7 

17 

12 

9 

49 

2 
113 

2 

Japanese 

134 

2 

127 

141 

114 

22 

91 

81 

56 

38 

90 

171 

1,178 
2 

3 

1 

13 

2 

7 

3 

Negro 

Newf  ounciland 

1 
33 

7 
49 

2 

1 
31 

4 

39 
6 

1 
80 

46 

4 

3 

81 

3 

51 

50 

1 

1 
25 

14 
2 

22 

512 

15 

2 

Polish- 
Polish    N.E.S. 

2 

1 
1 

3 

1 

Russian — 
Russian,  N.E.S 

12 
1 

3 

3 

6 

3 

1 

1 
1 

2 

7 

2 

42 

2 

Scandinavian — 

5 

1 

5 

4 

1 

2 
8 
8 

1 
1 
9 
4 

12 

10 

4 

10 

1 

10 

10 

44 

4 

4 
10 

13 

12 

Norwegian 

Swedish 

Serbian 

7 
2 
1 
7 
1 
2 

2 
10 

6 
4 

18 
5 

9 

37 

9 

4 

91 

101 

1 

1 

1 

3 

1 

20 

] 
] 

19 

1 

2 
47 

1 

1 

2 
1 

12 

3 
1 

71 

11 

USA   Citizens 

1 

35 

9 

9 

4 

21 

1 

12 

6 

220 

Totals.... 

813 

707 

618 

749 

905 

626 

1,242 

1,399 

1,210 

2,548 

1,975 

4,195 

16,987 

IMMIGRATION  AND  COLONIZATION 


15 


SESSIONAL  PAPER   No.   18' 

Table  IV. — Monthly  Arrivals  of  Immigrants  for  Canada,  by  Occupation  and  Destina- 
tion, at  Ocean  Ports,  for  the  Fiscal  Year  ended  March  31,  1919. 


April 

May 

June 

July 

Aug. 

Sept. 

Oct, 

Nov. 

Dec. 

Jan. 

Feb.| 

Mar. 

Totals 

Agiculturists 

Mechanics 

Clerks,  traders,  etc.. . 

62 
65 
36 
56 

58 

121 

63 

56 

48 
85 
43 
35 
8 
17 
382 

43 
82 
58 
38 
5 
23 
500 

69 
69 
42 
54 
1 
27 
643 

22 
52 
15 
44 
5 

13 
475 

80 
106 

58 

49 
1 

37 
911 

47 

109 

71 

74 

1 

32 

1,065 

40 
72 
45 
40 

80 
32 
92 
53 

140 
94 
81 
75 
.  3 
31 
1,551 

290 
80 

148 
73 
24 

211 
3,369 

979 
967 
752 
647 
48 

Female  servants 

Not  classified 

21 
573 

31 
378 

31 

982 

34 
2,257 

508 
13,086 

Totals 

813 

707 

618 

749 

905 

626 

1,242 

1,399 

1,210 

2,548 

1,975 

4,195 

16,987 

Maritime  Provinces... 
Quebec 

64 
90 

226 
53 
57 
51 

272 

59 

131 

138 

47 

39 

39 

254 

48 
76 
88 
29 
34 
29 
314 

53 
87 

192 
45 
36 
39 

296 
1 

80 
65 

145 
32 
35 
43 

505 

92 
92 

209 
23 
48 
60 

102 

122 

112 

399 

72 

90 

72 

375 

150 
96 

273 
60 
75 

120 

625 

141 
99 

400 
64 
67 
73 

366 

182 
158 
866 
186 
173 
185 
798 

114 
159 
527 
111 
119 
165 
780 

220 
401 
1,525 
419 
353 
399 
878 

1,325 
1,566 
4  988 

Manitoba 

Saskatchewan 

Alberta 

British  Columbia 

1,141 
1,126 
1,275 
5,565 
1 

Totals 

813 

707 

618 

749 

905 

626 

1,242 

1,399 

1,210 

2,548 

1,975 

4,195 

16,987 

16  IMMIGRATION  AND  COLONIZATION 

*       10  GEORGE  V,  A.   1920 
Table  V. — Nationality,  Sex,  Occupation  and  Destination  of  Immigrant  Arrivals 


Sex. 

Trade  or 

Farmers 
and  Farm 
Labourers. 

General 
Labourers. 

Mechanics. 

tn 

CO 

a 
10 

1 

18 

1 

4,095 

16 

92 

1 

591 
40 

183 
15 

2 

2 
5 
8 
2 

584 

2 

1 

10 

118 
2 
2 

2 

CO 

"3 
£ 

o 

c 

CD 

u 
T3 

IS 

o 

"3 
o 

GO 

1 

"5 
o 

z 

02 

3 

m 
"5 

E 

a 

CD 

o' 

"3 

CO 

"3 
5 

a 

- 

U 

18 

1 

23 

7 
7 

35 

2 

48 

1 

4,333 

59 

222 

1 

7,954 
336 

1,518 

106 

4 

15 
7 

49 

2 

1,178 

2 

3 

22 
512 

15 
2 

3 
1 

42 

2 

44 
12 
91 

101 

1 

12 

11 

21 

220 

4 

4 

4 

2 

1 

4 

1 

2 

1 

3 

3 

1 

«fi(l 

63 

28 

108 

175 
15 
22 

56 
9 

12 
1 

161 

8 
41 

6 

"l 
17 

Dutch 

5 
6 

2 

2 

3 
12 

3 

6 

6 
3 

2 
34 

2 

3 

Great  Britain  and  Ireland — 

4,957 

188 

841 

63 

2 

7 

2 

25 

2,406 
108 
494 

28 

6 
16 

139 

7 

20 

3 

79 

3 

19 

49 
10 

12 

1 
1 

27 
2 
8 

22 

5 

10 

146 

5 

56 

3 

166 

7 

40 

93 

3 

40 

Welsh 

Greek 

Hebrew — 
Hebrew    V  E  S 

4 

1 
2 

3 

2 

1 

2 

2 

2 

3 

1 

3 

530 

64 

217 

43 

3 

208 

59 

3 

17 

2 

2 

1 

12 

230 

11 

1 

164 
2 

6 
69 

4 
15 

1 

1 

5 
3 

3 

7 

6 

Polish- 
Polish    N  E  S. 

1 
1 

10 

16 

• 

1 

Russian — 
Russian   X  E  S 

16 

2 

25 
7 

30 

30 
1 

11 

6 

9 

171 

2 

i 

19 

3 

10 

20 

3 

2 

6 

2 

Scandinavian — 

10 

3 

46 

45 

9 
2 

15 
26 

5 

2 

5 

10 

7 
2 
5 
8 

3 

1 

1 
2 
3 

9 
4 

1 

"3 

1 

1 

5 

5 

41 

6 
8 

1 
2 
2 
4 

3 

5 

130 

1 

28 

12 

2 

Totals 

6,111 

7,279 

3,597 

16,987 

583 

255 

141 

797 

110 

60 

334 

265 

153 

IMMIGRATION'  AXD  COLONIZATION 


17 


SESSIONAL   PAPER   No.    18 

for    Canada,   at    Ocean   Ports,   for    the   Fiscal   Year    ended    March   31,    1919. 


Occupation. 

Destination 

. 

Clerks, 

Traders, 

etc. 

Miners. 

03 

c 

03 
> 
© 

gq 

_© 

"3 

£ 
0 

Not  Classified. 

03 
O 
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> 

O 

O 

03 

d 

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0 
3 
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e3 
-^ 

c 

0 

3 

O 

'3 

1 

3 
< 

n 
3 

"o 

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X 

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u 

0 

© 
"3 

03 
JJ 

"3 
S 

c 

o 

S-i 

IS 
O 

03 

"3 

03 
© 

g 

3 

© 

03 

O 

"3 

03 

S 
ft 

<B 

O 

u 

00 

H 
c 
0 

-^ 

3 

2 

3 

4 

! 

3 

1 

2 
25 

1 
411 

1 
104 

5 

1 

1 

8 

19 

1 

1 

1 

8 

20 

4 

1 

7 

3 

9 

1 

94 
32 
13 

2 

2,815 

4 
11 

343 

1 

3 

3436 

62 
19 

64 

172 

5 

13 

40 
22 

768 

10 

23 

1 

3,319 

131 

502 

39 

1 

1 
32 
2 
3 
2 
3 
9 

78 
1 

61 

3 

22 

144 

9 

27 

1 

1 

23 

11 

4 

1 

11 

43 
3 

13 
1 

95 

2 
34 

1 

16 

4 

8 

1 

6 
5 

4 
1 
8 

6 
"7 

204 
21 

101 

9 

186 

14 

56 

5 

1 

4,322 

148 

630 

50 

2 

3 

1 
12 

2,190 

93 

410 

27 

564 
12 

71 
4 

675 
31 

170 

15 

3 

1 

1 

11 

756 

35 

199 

7 

668 
38 

152 
11 

,    838 

42 

147 

16 

1,133 

47 

277 

14 

1 

1 

3 

9 
■-*•■• 

2 

1 

3 

3 

1 

2 

107 

5 
1 

1 

3 

5 

11 

4 

33 

7 

1 

2 

1 

3 

6 

412 

54 

2 

5 

31 

1,137 

1 

32 
1 

1 

1 

150 

5 

1 

149 

1 

10 
71 

1 

2 
392 

ii 
33 

2 

1 

2 

5 

1 

1 

1 

1 

3 
11 

2 

1 

2 

2 

1 

1 

1 

7 

'2 

1 

1 
20 

5 

6 

1 

2 
2 
8 
3 

1 
2 
4 
7 

7 

14 

1 
4 

2 
1 

3 

4 

2 

14 

1 

1 

22 

17 

4 

2 

5 
10 

4 
16 

5 

1 

22 

21 

6 

25 
15 

16 

1 

17 

31 

1 

1 

18 
15 

9 
18 

13 

4 

6 
5 
1 
2 
3 
4 
22 

4 
9 

1 
4 
6 

3 

1 

7 

5 

8 

10 

2 
1 
3 

1 

1 

1 

1 

3 

1 

6 

5 

1 
188 

2 

2 

24 

457 

155 

35 

15 

15 

18 

508 

5925 

5,971 

3,190 

1,325 

1,566 

4,988 

1,141 

1,126 

1,275 

5,565 

1 

18—2 


18 


imilGRATIOy  AID  COLOXIZATIOX 


10  GEO..GE  V,  A.    1920 


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IMMIGRATION  AND  COLONIZATION 


19 


SESSIONAL   PAPER   No.   18 


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IMMIGRATIOX  AXD  COLOXIZATION 


10  GEORGE  V,  A.   1920 
The  following  is  a  statement  showing  literature  ordered  during  1918-19 : — 


"  Immigration  Pacts  and  Figures  "  .  . 

"  Canada  Annual " 

"  Le  Canada  "    (French) 

"5,000  Facts  about  Canada" 

"  School  Map  " 

"  Atlas  of  Canada  " 

"Atlas  of  Canada"   (British  Edition) 

"  Canada  West  " 

"  Report  on  Juvenile  Immigration  "  .  . 


1,000 

300 

10,000 

500 

10.000 

50,000 

50,000 

15,328 

1,000 


REPORT   OF   THE   CHIEF   CONTROLLER   OF   CHINESE   IMMIGRATION, 

W.  D.   SCOTT. 


During  the  fiscal  year  ended  March  31,  1919,  4,333  persons  of  Chinese  origin 
entered  Canada,  of  whom  267  were  admitted  as  exempt  from  head  tax,  and  4,066  upon 
payment  of  $500  each.  For  the  purpose  of  comparison  it  is  considered  advisable  to 
publish  statistics  relating  to  Chinese  immigration  since  the  imposition  of  the  first  head 
tax  in  1885,  which  head  tax  was  increased  to  $100  on  January  1,  1901,  and  to  $500  on 
January  1,  1904: — 


Fiscal  Years. 

Exempts. 

Paying  Tax. 

Percentage 

of  total 

arrivals 

admitted 

exempt. 

Registered 
for  leave. 

Total 
revenue. 

1886                 

1 

211 

124 

290 

782 

1,069 

2,114 

3,276 

2,244 

2,087 

1,440 

1 ,  762 

2,447 

2,175 

4,385 

4,231 

2,518 

3,525 

5,245 

4,719 

8 

22 

91 

1,482 

1,411 

1,614 

4,515 

6,083 

7,078 

5,274 

1,155 

20 

272 

650 

4,066 

0 

47 

829 

734 

868 

1,322 

1,671 

1,617 

•     2,168 

1,277 

666 

473 

697 

768 

802 

859 

1,102 

1,204 

1,922 

2,044 

1,9°0 

2,080 

2,421 

2,594 

3,535 

3,731 

4,002 

3,956 

4,322 

3,742 

3,450 

4,373 

4,064 

3,312 

2,907 

3,244 

S           cts 
11,693  00 

1887                                

7,424  50 

1888                                          

15,694  50 

1S89                                

112 

97 

12 

6 

14 

22 

22 

24 

24 

17 

17 

26 

26 

62 

84 

128 

69 

146 

200 

752 

695 

688 

805 

498 

367 

238 

103 

69 

121 

119 

267 

12 

8 
0 
0 
0 
1 
1 
1 
0 
0 
0 
0 
1 
1 
1 
2 

89 

86 

68 

33 

33 

29 

15 

7 

4 

4 

8 

77 

30 

15 

6 

53 
32 
56 
18 
62 
04 
50 
34 
97 
78 
39 
61 
02 
73 
58 
64 
61 
90 
73 
66 
00 
89 
13 
56 
93 
32 
19 
53 
79 
47 
56 

40,808  00 

1890                              

56,258  00 

1891                                

107,785  50 

1892                            

166,502  50 

1893                                

113,491  00 

1894                                 

105,021  50 

1895                                 

72,475  00 

1896                                   

88,800  50 

1897                              

123,119  50 

1898                    

109,754  00 

1899                               

220,309  50 

1 900                               

215,102  00 

1901                                     

178,704  00 

1902                                 

364,972  00 

1903 

526,744  00 

1904                                   

474,420  00 

1904-5                                 

6,080  00 

1905-6                                   

13,521  00 

1906-7 

1907-S             

48,094  00 
746,535  00 

1908-9                                 

713,131  00 

1909-10                             

813,003  00 

1910-11                      

2,262,056  00 

1911-12   

3,049,722  00 

1912-13              

3,549,242  00 

1913-14   . .                       

2,644,593  00 

1914-15   

588,124  00 

1915-16              

19,389  00 

1916-17 

140,487  00 

1917-18     

336,757  00 

1918-19   

2,069,669  00 

Total 

5,831 

78,385 

7-43 

74,676 

19,999,482  00 

IMMIGRATION  AND  COLONIZATION  21 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.   18 

The  Chinese  Immigration  Act  provides  that  Chinese  legally  admitted  into  Canada 
may,  upon  payment  of  the  $1  fee,  register  out,  which  registration  carries  with  it  the 
right  to  free  re-entry  within  a  period  of  twelve  months.  By  Orders  in  Council  it  has 
been  provided  that  Chinese  who  left  Canada  on  or  since  April  1,  1914,  up  to  and  includ- 
ing March  31,  1919,  may  remain  away  until  twelve  months  after  a  proclamation  has 
been  published  in  "  The  Canada  Gazette  "  that  a  state  of  war  no  longer  exists.  On 
March  31,  1919,  there  were  away  from  Canada  5,587  Chinese  who,  under  the  provisions 
just  quoted,  are  entitled  to  free  re-entry.  Lack  of  sufficient  transportation  facilities  is 
the  chief  reason  why  the  majority  of  these  Chinese  have  not  already  returned  to  the 
Dominion. 


EEPOET  OF  THE  CHIEF  MEDICAL  OFFICEE  OF  IMMIGRATION,  PETER 

H.  BRYCE. 

Ottawa,  July  9,  1919. 

With  the  continuation  of  the  war  during  the  spring  and  summer  of  1918  there 
were,  as  for  several  former  years  but  few  immigrants  to  Canada  from  overseas  though 
40,715  from  the  United  States  served  to  maintain  the  activities  of  departmental  work. 
It  is  of  further  interest  to  note  that  with  the  return  of  the  soldiers  to  Canada  there  has 
been  an  unlooked  for  but  notable  addition  to  our  population  of  British  people  as  the 
wives  of  Canadian  soldiers. 

It  is  satisfactory  to  be  able  to  say  both  from  personal  observation  and  from  state- 
ments of  our  medical  officers  at  the  seaports,  that  the  great  proportion  of  these  women 
will  prove  satisfactory  additions  to  the  population  of  Canada  and  make  up  in  some 
degree  for  the  lack  of  the  usual  immigrants  of  the  years  before  the  war.  These  medical 
officers  have,  however,  been  engaged  especially  in  assisting  the  military  authorities  and 
when  it  is  recalled  that  in  some  months  since  the  armistice  more  than  30,000  soldiers 
have  been  landed  in  Canada  much  necessary  if  unusual  work  has  been  performed. 

Table  I. — The  following  table  gives  the  number  of  persons  detained  for  inspection  and 
the  number  rejected  in  different  years,  at  ocean  ports  : — 


Fiscal  year  ended  June  30,   1903.    . 

1904.  . 

1905.  . 

1906.  . 
Nine  months  ended  March  31,  1907. 
Fiscal  year  ended  March   31,   190S. 

1909., 
1910., 
1911.. 
"    ■       "  "  1912.  . 

1913.. 
1914.. 
"    .        "  1915., 

1916.. 
1917., 
1918.. 
1919.. 


Totals. 


Number  held 

Number 

For  Inspection. 

Rejected. 

273 

273 

1,835 

274 

2;559 

611 

3,570 

524 

3,543 

440 

4,573 

1,172 

3,544 

509 

7,202 

1,515 

8,457 

2,210 

5,892 

972 

3,559 

756 

4,923 

1,827 

2,081 

998 

325 

163 

384 

174 

179 

71 

668 

70 

53,567 

12,559 

It  is  apparent  from  the  table  that  the  668  persons  detained  out  of  the  16,987  immi- 
grants from  overseas  countries  is  much  the  same  proportion  as  the  8,457  detained  out 


22  IMMIGRATION  AND  COLONIZATION 

10  GEORGE  V,  A.   1920 

of  189,633  in  1911.    The  causes  for  the  rejection  of  the  seventy  persons  are  seen  in  the 
following  table : — 

Table  II. — Statement    showing   Immigrants    rejected  at  Ocean    Ports,  by  causes,  in 

1918-19. 

Avoiding  port  of  entry 5 

Barbers'  itch 

Desertion ' 

Epilepsy " 

Gonorrhea 1 

Ichthyosis 

Immorality 1 

Indirect  passage 2 

Lack  of  funds 1° 

Likely  public  charges.  . 23 

Poor  physique 1 

Prostitution 

Skilled  labour 4 

Stowaway 4 

Trachoma 11 

Tuberculosis 2 

Total 70 


The  table  gives  data,  interesting  as  showing  how  varied  are  the  causes  which  make 
persons  undesirable  as  immigrants.  Of  these  rejections  thirteen  were  for  distinctly 
illegal  or  immoral  acts,  while  those  classed  as  public  charges  always  include  various 
defective  persons.  Trachoma  as  a  cause  of  rejection  still  continues  to  appear,  especi- 
ally in  immigrants  from  the  Orient. 

Tarle  III. — Statement  of  Causes  for  which  Deportations  have  taken  place  for  Fiscal 

Year  1918-19. 

Accompanying 10 

Blindness 1 

Desertion 2 

Criminality 234 

Diabetes 1 

Drug  habit 8 

Epilepsy 2 

Immorality 12 

Insanity 49 

Public  charges 9  0 

Mentally  weak 3 

Paralysis 2 

Prostitution 23 

Syphilis 1. 

Tuberculosis 3 

Vagrancy 13 


Total 454 


This  table  gives  much  valuable  information  illustrating  the  misfortunes  which 
continue  to  attach  to  a  percentage  of  immigrants  even  after  a  number  of  years  in 
Canada.  Of  the  total  454  deported  it  will  be  noted  that  more  than  50  per  cent  belonged 
to  the  criminal  class ;  but  it  is  fair  to  assume  that  some  crimes  were  those  incidental 
to  times  of  war. 

As  usual,  the  "  public  charges  "  were  numerous  and  doubtless  included  persons  who 
might  be  placed  under  the  mentally  weak  or  other  defective  class.  The  49  deported  for 
insanity  is  an  unduly  large  number,  being  almost  one-quarter  of  the  total  deported  for 
the  same  cause  in  1913-14  when  3S4,8-78  immigrants  entered  Canada.  It  is  notable 
that  8  persons  were  deported  for  the  drug  habit,  and  only  2  for  epilepsy  and  3  for 
tuberculosis.    If  vagrancy,  syphilis,  prostitution,  immorality,  the  drug  habit,  desertion, 


IMMIGRATION  AND  COLONIZATION 


23 


SESSIONAL  PAPER   No.   18 

and  mentally  weak  be  grouped  making  G2,  and  to  these  be  added  the  90  public  charges, 
it  is  apparent  that  with  the  234'  criminals,  85  per  cent  of  the  deports  are  included.  Of 
the  total  deports  it  is  notable  that  279  were  American.  This  must  be  expected  with  the 
constant  communication  between  Canada  and  the  United  States,  although  it  is  probable 
that  war  conditions  have  made  the  movement  to  Canada,  to  escape  military  responsi- 
bilities, greater  than  in  times  of  peace. 

Table  IV. — Statement  of  Deportations  by  Nationalities. 


— 

1916-17. 

1917-18. 

1918-19. 

1902-19. 

British 

186 

324 

95 

36 
407 

84 

99 

279 

76 

7,110 

3,379 

2,815 

This  brief  review  of  the  rejections  and  deportations  of  immigrants  serves  to  make 
plain  how,  as  exact  statistics  are  prepared,  we  are  obtaining  comprehensive  data  upon 
which  to  base  broad  conclusions  as  to  the  effects  of  immigration.  It  seems  on  the 
surface  that  immoral  and  unsocial  acts  make  up  the  greater  number  of  causes  of 
undesirable  immigrants. 

Table  V. — Giving  Deportations  by  Years  and  by  Nationalities. 

Total  British  immigration,    1903-1919 1,160,5>97 

Total  United   States   immigration,   1903-1919 1,224,418 

Total  from  other  countries,   1903-1919 809,955 

Total   British   deportations,   1903-1919 7,110 

Total  United  States  deportations,   1903-1919 3,379 

Total  deportations  from  other  countries,   1903-1919 2,815 

Ratio  of  deportations  of  British 1  to   163  persons. 

Ratio  of  deportations  of  Americans 1  to  362  " 

Ratio  of  deportations  of  other  countries 1  to  288  " 

The  studies  of  crime,  insanity  and  feeblemindedness  seem  so  intimate  a  part  of  the 
work  of  the  medical  inspection  of  the  immigrant  that  I  trust  the  provisions  made  for 
greater  protection  against  undesirables  entering  Canada  under  the  Act  will  be  associ- 
ated with  equally  effective  means  for  guarding  the  health,  both  physical  and  mental 
of  the  immigrant  after  his  admission  to  Canada. 


REPORT   OF  THE   CANADIAN  EXHIBITION   COMMISSIONEE, 

A.  W.  TOLMIE. 


I  have  the  honour. to  submit  the  following  report  of  the  operations  of  the  Exhibition 
Branch  of  the  department  for  the  fiscal  year  ending  March  31,  1919,  this  branch  hav- 
ing been  transferred  from  the  Department  of  Agriculture,  July  1,  1918,  under 
P.C.  1348. 

Throughout  the  fiscal  year  1918-19  the  exhibition  staff,  besides  giving  the  proper 
care  to  our  stock  of  exhibition  goods,  which  require  constant  attention  and  much 
labour,  was  busily  engaged  in  preparatory  work  for  coming  exhibitions,  and  in  assist- 
ing other  departments  who  needed  their  services. 

The  services  of  our  demonstrator  were  loaned  from  May  to  November,  1918,  to 
the  Department  of  Agriculture,  where  he  fulfilled  the  duties  of  agricultural  repre- 
sentative for  Military  District  No.  3,  and  from  December  to  March  he  was  attached 
to  the  Records  Branch  of  the  Department  of  Immigration  and  Colonization.  Our 
mineralogist  assisted  in  the  Geological  Survey  Museum  from  September  to  March. 

Our  fruit  expert  besides  doing  over  some  of  our  old  fruit  at  headquarters,  was  sent 
to  the  Niagara  district,  to  gather  from  the  new  fruit  crop  sufficient  stock  to  be  pro- 


24  IMMIGRATION  AND  COLONIZATION 

10  GEORGE  V,  A.   1920 

eessed,  to  fill  the  ever-increasing  demand  made  upon  us  for  this  material  by  emigra- 
tion agents  in  Great  Britain  and  the  United  States  for  exhibition  purposes  at  the 
different  fairs  where  it  is  deemed  proper  to  display  the  natural  products  of  Canada. 

The  chief  decorator  of  this  branch,  besides  assisting  the  fruit  expert,  was  engaged 
in  drafting  and  executing  new  exhibit  cases  and  stands  for  a  permanent  exhibit  in 
Chicago;  also  for  exhibits  to  be  placed  in  the  state  fairs  at  which  your  agents  are  to 
take  part  this  year. 

On  a  request  made  by  the  Fruit  Branch  of  the  Department  of  Agriculture,  we 
supplied  the  material  and  installed  an  exhibit  of  bottled  and  natural  fruits  for  them 
at  the  Canadian  National  Exhibition  in  Toronto,  covering  some  fifteen  hundred  square 
feet. 

Work  in  connection  with  the  proper  treatment  of  our  numerous  specimens  of 
Canadian  fauna  against  moth,  is  now  in  hand  and  proceeding  satisfactorily. 


REPORT  OF  THE  COMMISSIONER  OF  IMMIGRATION,  OTTAWA,  ONT., 

W.  R.  LITTLE. 

I  beg  to  submit  the  following  report  on  immigration  work  in  the  Eastern  District : — 
Organization. — On  the  1st  of  January,  1919,  I  was  appointed  Commissioner  of 
Immigration  for  the  above  district,  which  includes  all  that  portion  of  Canada  east 
of  Port  Arthur  and  jurisdiction  over  Canadian  immigration  inspectors  stationed  at 
United  States  Atlantic  ports.  In  the  eastern  district  there  are  108  ports  of  entry  and 
261  immigration  officers  and  employees  who  may  be  classified  as  follows: 

Agents S 

Assistant  agents 4 

Medical  inspectors 11 

Inspectors 96 

Stenographers  and  clerks 9 

Interpreters 4 

Deportation  officers 7 

Matrons 4 

Guards 24 

Firemen,  watchmen,  etc 7 

Special  agent. 1 

Cooks 2 

Servants 2 

Special  officers 2 

Inspector  of  immigrant  children 1 

Relieving  inspectors 7 

Travelling  immigration  officers 4 

Immigration  officers 3 

Travelling  inspector 1 

Customs — Immigration  officers 64 

Total 26  L 

Head  office  staff \\  g 

267 


IMMIGRATION  AND  COLONIZATION  25 

SESSIONAL   PAPER   No.    18 

Immigration. — The   following   is   a    statement    of    admissions    and   rejections    at 
border  ports  during  the  fiscal  year  1918-19: — 

Admissions.       Rejections. 

And  over ....  35 

Armstrong- 21  12 

Aroostook  Junction 50  i 

Aultsville ....  50 

Beebe  Junction 1136  S3 

Bridgeburg '.'   .'.'   .'.'    .' .'    .' .'    \\    \\    \\  ^593  1>015 

Brockville 258  17 

Charlotte 38  9 


Clair. 


10  1 


Coaticook 619 

Cobourg 25                         9 

Comin's  Mills '.'   .'.'    ''      '    \  56                         5 

Connors - 

Cornwall .'.    ..    ..    "    .  ig3                     !■>•> 

Courtwright " " ,  o 

Crystal  Beach ".".    .  .    '  58                       37 

Debec ' '    '  6- 

Dundee -,-, 

Edmundston g3                         s 

Erie  Beach -,                      -. 

t,   .  ,                             1                       04 

Pairhaven o 

Fort  Erie '.'.'.'  .'.'    "  .'.'  //  .'.'   _"    "'      \    \\  m       "             m 

Frelighsburg 5 

Georgeville ' -. 

Grand  Falls ..    ..   '.'.    \\  "12 

Grand  Manan , 

Green  River '3 

Hemmingford 14                       91 

Hereford 18                       ' 

Highwater ..'..".."..'.'.WW'.'.'.'.'.'.'.  1,678                       S3 

Kingston 72 

Sl::::::;:::;::;;;;;::::':::^;^  nl        'J? 

Lewiston j,,                       fi ' 

McAdam  Junction 1  978                       fi1 

Malone 'ofi4                       „£ 

Mansonville '.'.'.'  .".'  .' ."    *'    \\    \\   ''    "  jg                       '6 

Megantic '.'.'.'.'.  117 

Milltown n.n                       12 

Morrisburg '  9 

Niagara  Falls '. '.    '. '.    \\    [[    [[    \\    \\    \\    \\  15,&&                 2  g40 

Niagara-on-the-Lake in                       r  , 

Parry  Sound ".'.   "    '/    '  \    '  " 

Point  Edward '  '    '  '  \2Z 

Port  Lambton 35 

^resc°" '■'•'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.:.::  2e^          5s 

Queenston 

Richmond  Road ......  '7 

Rockport r 

Rouses  Point 4.55                     01- 
St.   Agnes.  . '.';."".!  1.06                        38 

St.  Albans *  „n,                      99n 

St.  Andrews ...'.*.".   '.'.    '.'    "  27                         2 

St.  Leonards R(.                         , 

st-  Regis .."..".::.:.:.:.  w  v. ::  ill          I 

St.   Stephen .100  t-, 

Sarnia '.*.'.'.'.'.'. gi,                      ** 

Sault  Ste.  Marie.. "•" S7S                    }'* 

Sombra '. '.    \\      \    \\    \\ 878,                      147 

Stanhope ' '.  ' '    '  '    '  '    .....  ^ 

Toronto ln                         X 

Upper  Mills ..   '.'.   ".'.   '.'.  '.".    .'.   '.". 3                         7 

Walkerville .".""""  1«9                     cai 

Wallaceburg \\  \\  ' f                    bb7 

Windsor '  "  ."    "   "    "  „  „S1                  9  aq- 

woif  island ;.  ;;  ;;  ;;  ;;  ;;  ;;  6ii*\          2-89^ 


Totals 18,429 


9,121 


26  IMMIGRATION  AND  COLONIZATION 

10  GEORGE  V,   A.   1920 

Statement   of   admissions   and  rejections   at   ocean   ports   during  the   fiscal  year 
1918-19:— 

Admissions.  Rejections. 

Quebec 2S7 

Halifax 1.606  3 

St.  John 7,034  6 

North  Sydney * 513  3 

New  York 1,808  5 

Boston 2  .... 

Portland *  •              21  

Totals 11.271  22 


Overseas  immigration  during  the  next  few  years  'will  no  doubt  depend  upon  the 
economic  conditions  in  Europe.  As  a  general  rule  there  will  be  more  immigration 
from  countries  which  can  more  readily  find  the  means  of  reconstruction  than  from 
countries  which  are  on  the  verge  of  economic  exhaustion.  In  so  far  as  the  domestic 
servant  problem  is  concerned,  it  may  be  of  interest  to  note  that  there  is  a  movement 
in  the  United  Kingdom  to  secure  recognition  of  domestic  service  as  a  skilled  occupa- 
tion. It  is  proposed  to  furnish  junior  technical  education  at  the  expense  of  local 
educational  authorities  aided  by  state  grants. 

Medical  Inspection  of  Immigrants. — I  assume  that  in  future  the  medical  officers 
who  undertake  the  inspection  and  medical  care  of  immigrants  and  seamen  will  be 
officers  of  the  Department  of  Health.  The  twelfth  annual  report  of  the  inspector  of 
feeble-minded  for  Ontario  shows  the  necessity  for  a  very  careful  examination  of  over- 
seas immigrants.  The  administration  fines  prescribed  by  the  amendments  to  the 
Immigration  Act  will  no  doubt  ensure  a  more  careful  selection  of  immigrants  by 
agents  of  transportation  companies. 

Seamen. — Ocean  ports :  The  amendments  to  the  Immigration  Act  provide  for  a 
more  strict  civil  and  medical  examination  of  seamen.  At  the  present  time  monthly 
reports  are  received  of  seamen  who  are  landed,  discharged,  or  who  desert. 

Ports  on  the  Great  Lakes :  Instructions  have  been  issued  to  immigration  officers 
at  ports  of  entry  on  the  Great  Lakes  regarding  the  manifesting  of  seamen  who  ship 
from  United  States  ports.  Monthly  reports  are  also  received  showing  particulars  of 
seamen  who  desert  or  who  are  discharged.  The  manifests  and  monthly  reports  form 
the  basis  for  action  under  the  reciprocal  arrangement  for  the  deportation  to  the  United 
States  of  seamen  who  effect  illegal  entry  and  who  may  be  subject  to  deportation. 

Deportations.— The  number  of  persons  deported  after  having  entered  or  landed 

in  Canada  was  273,  of  whom  181  were  deported  to  the  United  States  and  92  to  other 

countries. 

To  To 

United  States.   Other  Countries. 

Accompanying 1  3 

Blindness ....  1 

Criminality ' 106  28 

Desertion ....  2 

Drug  habit 5  .... 

Epilepsy •  •  •  •  1 

Immorality 4  4 

Insanity 15  19 

Mentally  defective 2  .... 

Paralysis 1  1 

Prostitution 9  7 

Public  charge 30  22 

Syphilis ....  1 

Tuberculosis 1  1 

Vagrancy 7  2 

Totals 1S1  92 


IMMIGRATION  AND  COLONIZATION  27 

SESSIONAL   PAPER   No.    18 

The  immigration  agency  in  Montreal  may  be  designated  as  the  clearing  house  for 
deports  to  European  countries  from  all  districts.  Considerable  delay  has  been  experi- 
enced in  executing  orders  for  deportation  not  only  on  account  of  the  difficulty  of 
securing  transatlantic  accommodation  but  also  by  reason  of  the  precautions  taken  by 
the  consuls  of  allied  and  neutral  countries  in  issuing  passports. 

Investigations. — Numerous  investigations  were  made  in  the  following  cases : — 

(a)  Persons  alleged  to  have  effected  illegal  entry. 

(b)  Persons  alleged  to  be  subject  to  deportation  from  causes  arising  subse- 
quent to  entry. 

(c)  Applications  for  entry  and  appeal  cases. 

(d)  The  entry  of  aliens  applying  for  naturalization. 

(e)  Enemy  subjects. 

(/)  Persons  alleged  to  be  anarchists,  bolshevists  or  revolutionists. 
Several  revolutionists  were  arrested,  some  of  whom  were  deported,  interned,  or  are 
still  held  pending  deportation. 

Passports. — Immigration  officers  at  ocean  ports  are  charged  with  the  administra- 
tion of  the  Order  in  Council  of  the  9th  of  August,  1917  (P.  C.  2173),  which  pro- 
vides that  no  person  shall  embark  in  Canada  upon  any  ship  or  vessel  to  any  destina- 
tion, outside  of  Canada,  or  the  United  States,  without  a  valid  passport. 

Exeats. — Officers  at  ports  of  entry  still  enforce  the  provisions  of  the  regulations 
which  prohibit  enemy  subjects  from  leaving  Canada  without  an  exeat.  Eeports  which 
have  recently  been  received  show  that  there  is  no  widespread  movement  of  enemy 
subjects  from  Canada  to  the  United  States. 

Literacy  Test. — The  amendment  to  the  Immigration  Act  provides  for  a  literacy 
test.  It  may  be  of  interest  to  note  that  in  1901  there  were  680,132  persons  in  Canada 
who  could  neither  read  nor  write,  and  in  1911  the  number  was  663,453,  a  decrease  of 
nearly  2i  per  cent  in  ten  years. 

'  Buildings. — Suitable  accommodation  for  the  inspection  and  detention  of  passen- 
gers has  been  provided  at  Lacolle  Junction.  Arrangements  have  also  been  made  for 
the  erection  of  a  joint  customs  and  immigration  building  on  the  King  Edward  highway 
at  Lacolle  village.  Office  accommodation  has  also  been  provided  and  equipped  at  the 
dock  at  Toronto  for  the  inspection  of  passengers  arriving  by  vessels  from  Charlotte. 
Better  accommodation  has  also  been  provided  at  Queenston  bridge  and  also  at  Sarnia 
for  the  inspection  of  passengers  by  vessel  from  Detroit.  More  commodious  and  suit- 
able quarters  should  be  provided  at  the  lower  bridge  and  the  upper  steel  arch  bridge 
at  Niagara  Falls,  at  the  Windsor  ferry  dock  and  at  Walkerville.  Eepresentations  have 
already  been  made  by  the  department  to  have  an  overhead  passage  erected  from  the 
shed  where  steamers  dock  at  St.  John,  N.B.,  to  the  examining  room,  so  that  third-class 
passengers  can  proceed  direct  from  the  vessel  to  the  examining  room  without  comma- 
in  contact  with  cabin  passengers. 


REPORT  OF  THE  ACTING  COMMISSIONER  OF  IMMIGRATION,  WINNI- 
PEG, MAN.,  THOMAS  GELLEY. 

On  account  of  war  conditions,  there  has  been  very  little  emigration  from  the  Brit- 
ish Isles  and  other  European  countries  to  Western  Canada,  but  since  the  armistice  has 
been  signed,  large  numbers  of  soldiers'  dependents  have  arrived  and'  are  continuing  to 
do  so. 

Immigration  from  the  United  States. — Although  the  number  of  immigrants 
settling  in  Western  Canada  during  the  last  four  years  has  not  been  as  large  as  in  pre- 


28  IMMIGRATION'  AXD  COLONIZATION 

10  GEORGE  V,  A.   1920 

war  times,  there  has  been  a  noticeable  and  gratifying  increase  in  the  proportionate 
amount  of  live  stock,  effects  and  wealth  brought  into  the^  country. 

No  alien  enemies  were  admitted  and  no  effort  was  made  to  encourage  the  immigra- 
tion of  any  other  class  than  bona  fide  agriculturists. 

Deportations. — There  were  eighty-seven  deportations  carried  out  by  officers  under 
the  jurisdiction  of  this  office,  as  compared  with  one  hundred  and  thirty-two  during 
the  previous  year.  Of  the  eighty-seven,  fifty-three  were  deported  to  the  United  States 
and  thirty-two  were  taken  to  Montreal  on  their  way  to  European  countries. 

Farm  Labourers. — Special  rates  of  one  cent  per  mile  from  the  boundary  line  were 
granted  by  the  railway  companies  to  farm  labourers  coming  temporarily  to  Canada 
from  the  United  States  to  assist  in  the  spring  and  fall  work  on  farms  in  the  Prairie 
Provinces.  In  the  spring,  fourteen  hundred  were  admitted  at  western  boundary  ports, 
and  in  the  fall  eleven  hundred  were  admitted.  A  large  number  returned  south  to  their 
homes  as  soon  as  freeze-up  set  in. 

Immigration  Hall,  Winnipeg. — Although  there  has  been  practically  no  European 
immigration  to  provide  for,  this  hall  has  afforded  accommodation  and  shelter  for  six 
hundred  and  sixty- four  immigrants  during  the  year,  who  were  passing  through  Winni- 
peg to  western  points.  There  were  also  twenty  indigent  persons  cared  for.  The  total 
number  of  meals  supplied  to  the  above  persons  was  2,135,  at  a  total  cost  of  $228.80, 
showing  an  average  cost  of  10- '71  cents  per  meal.  This  includes  the  meals  supplied  to 
the  matron  in  charge  of  the  hall,  and'  to  occasional  deports  who  were  held  in  Winnipeg 
on  their  way  east  or  south. 

The  two  upper  floors  of  No.  1  Immigration  Hall,  as  well  as  the  buildings  known 
as  No.  2  and  No.  3  Halls,  are  still  in  the  temporary  possession  of  the  Military  Hos- 
pitals Commission. 

Western  Immigration  Halls  and  Agencies. — During  the  year,  sixteen  interior 
immigration  halls  and  agencies  have  been  closed  by  departmental  instructions,  but 
the  following  eleven,  confined  to  the  more  unsettled  districts  of  the  country,  are  still 
open  for  the  reception  and  temporary  care  of  immigrants. 

In  Alberta:  Edmonton,  Athabasca,  Edson,  Donnelly,  Grouard,  Peace  River, 
Spirit  River  and  Grande  Prairie. 

In  Saskatchewan :  North  Battleford,  Prince  Albert  and  North  Portal. 

The  closing  of  halls,  as  mentioned  above,  also  caused  a  reduction  of  staff  at  the 
points  affected,  from  thirty-three  to  seventeen. 

The  superintendent  of  Western  Agencies  has  regularly  inspected  the  halls  and 
agencies  during  the  year. 

Western  Boundary  Ports. — There  are  now  twenty-eight  boundary  ports  under  the 
jurisdiction  of  this  office,  and  the  length  of  the  international  boundary  line  included 
in  the  Western  district  is  from  Port  Arthur,  Ont.,  to  Kingsgate,  B.C.,  a  distance  of 
approximately  fourteen  hundred  miles.  The  number  of  the  inspection  staff  (includ- 
ing customs  officers  acting  as  immigration  inspectors)  is  forty-one. 

Grain  Exhibits. — During  the  year,  samples  of  the  best  grains,  grasses,  vegetables, 
and  other  products  grown  in  the  Prairie  Provinces,  were  purchased',  prepared,  packed, 
and  shipped  by  the  grain  warehouse,  in  connection  with  the  Winnipeg  office,  to  the 
important  fairs  and  exhibitions  in  the  United  States,  and  to  the  Canadian  Gov- 
ernment agencies  and  public  schools  in  that  country.  This  has  proved  to  be  a  very 
effective  method  of  advertising  the  agricultural  products  of  Western  Canada. 

The  following  figures  show  the  number  of  cases  sent  out: — 

Grains  and  grasses  in  straw cases.  9C 

Threshed  grains boxes.  21 

Vegetables crates.  74 

Cheese,  cereals,  bacon,  etc boxes.  15 

Assorted  exhibits  for  schools "  117 


IMMIGRATION  AXD  COLONIZATION  29 

SESSIONAL   PAPER   No.   18 

Permits  (P.O.  llfSS). — On  November  20,  1918,  the  regulations  requiring  males  of 
military  age  to  obtain  permits  before  leaving  Canada  were  rescinded.  This  relieved 
the  various  agencies  and  boundary  ports  of  a  great  deal  of  work,  as  it  no  longer  neces- 
sitated an  outgoing  inspection  of  persons  leaving  Canada. 

Investigations. — The  practical  disbandment  of  the  Koyal  Northwest  Mounted 
Police,  when  that  force  was  called  upon  for  overseas  service,  caused  us  to  turn  to  the 
various  provincial  police  organizations  for  assistance  in  making  investigations,  and  in 
the  location  and  detention  of  undesirables  coming  within  the  provisions  of  the  Immi- 
gration Act.  I  am  pleased  to  be  able  to  report  that  every  assistance  was  obtained  from 
these  forces,  and  that  the  best  of  good  feeling  and  co-operation  exists  between  them 
and  this  office.  The  re-establishment  of  the  R.N.W.M.  Police,  and  the  appointment  of 
an  investigating  officer,  will  greatly  facilitate  this  important  branch  of  our  work.^ 

The  demand  for  farm  hands,  domestic  servants,  etc.,  for  western  farms,  was  brisk, 
and  the  Labour  Bureau  in  connection  with  the  Winnipeg  office  received  applications, 
and  placed  immigrants  in  the  Prairie  Provinces,  as  follows: — 

Total  Total  No. 

applications.  placed. 

Farm  labourers 6,501  5,393 

Married  couples 49        ,  13 

Domestics  and  housekeepers 60  3 

Farm  Wages. — Wages  showed  an  increase  over  previous  years,  and  would  appear 
to  still  have  an  upward  tendency.    For  last  year,  the  average  was  as  follows  :— 

Farmhands,  experienced $55  to   $6>5   per  month. 

"           "       inexperienced 35  to     45 

Married  couples "'^ 

Domestic  servants •  •  25 

(All  including  board  and  lodging.) 


REPORT    OF    THE    COMMISSIONER    OF    IMMIGRATION,    VANCOUVER, 

B.C.,  A.  L.  JOLLIFFE. 

I  beg  to  submit  annual  report  covering  the  Pacific  district  for  the  year  ending 
March  31,  1919.  In  August,  1918,  the  Pacific  district  was  organized,  the  various 
immigration  officers  in  the  said  district  coming  under  the  jurisdiction  of  this  office,  and 
I  am  pleased  to  be  able  to  report  that  the  same  has  resulted  in  a  better  co-ordination 
and  increased  efficiency  in  the  administration  of  the  Immigration  Acts. 

During  the  past  six  months  there  has  been  increased  activity  along  the  inter- 
national border.  This  no  doubt  may  be  accounted  for  by  the  fact  that  the  Order  in 
Council  prohibiting  the  entry  of  labour  has  been  withdrawn  in  so  far  as  the  admission 
from  the  United  States  is  concerned  at  border  ports.  The  number  of  rejections  has 
materially  increased,  and  our  officers  are  all  rigidly  enforcing  the  regulations.  At 
the  port  of  Vancouver  during  the  past  year,  the  number  of  passengers  arriving  is 
considerably  less  than  that  of  the  previous  fiscal  period,  owing  to  the  fact  that  in 
1917-18  there  was  a  movement  of  over  70,000  Chinese  to  France.  There  is,  however, 
an  actual  increase  of  over  400  per  cent  in  the  number  of  immigrants  landed.  Below 
will  be  found  a  comparative  statement  giving  figures  covering  the  items  referred  to 
above : — 

1917-18.  1918-19. 

Passengers  arriving  at  Vancouver 115,012  48,384 

Immigrants  landed 664  3.47S 

Tourists  entering  at  Vancouver 114,738  40,69S 

Deportations 70  91 

During  the  past  year,  we  have  been  called  upon  to  investigate  a  number  of  cases 
where  the  heads  of  families  in  British  Columbia  have  desired  to  bring  their  dependents 


30  IMMIGRATION  AXD  COLOXIZATIOX 

10  GEORGE  V,  A.   1920 

to  Canada  for  permanent  residence,  and  this  work  apparently  is  increasing  as  time 
goes  on. 

Below  will  be  found  a  statement  giving  information  relative  to  detentions  in  our 
building  at  this  port: — 

19i7-18.  1918-19. 

Number  of  persons  detained.  .    .  :    .  .    ...    .  .    .  .    .  .                11,090  7.S58 

Number  of  meals  supplied 79.655  Sl,50<5 

Cost  of  janitors,  supplies $249.57  $361.61 

Building  account,  balance  in  favour  of  department 

on  years'  detention  and  maintenance  charges.       $13,366.50  $9,962.50 

At  the  port  of  Victoria,  the  Chinese  business  during  the  past  year  has  been  very 
heavy.  The  number  of  exempt  cases  amounting  to  135  as  against  70  the  previous  year. 
There  has  also  been  a  general  increase  in  all  branches  of  immigration  work  at  that 
port. 


EEPORT  OF  THE  COMMISSIONER  OF  EMIGRATION  FOR  CANADA, 
LONDON,  ENGLAND,  J.  OBED  SMITH. 

Although  the  armistice  has  been  signed  and  hostilities  have  largely  ceased,  con- 
ditions have  arisen  which  will  continue  to  suspend  any  active  propaganda  looking  to 
emigration  to  Canada  until  the  autumn  of  this  year,  which  will  result  in  no  adequate 
opportunity  of  moving  people  until  the  spring  of  1920,  although  all  our  offices  are 
receiving  continually  increasing  numbers  of  enquiries  regarding  Canada. 

The  necessity  for  repatriating  Canadian  troops  and  their  dependents  being  of 
paramount  importance,  shipping  will  not  be  available  for  new  emigration  until  after 
the  winter  season  has  set  in. 

It  is  noted  among  returning  Canadian  officers  and  soldiers  an  increasing  desire  to 
devote  their  attention  to  agriculture  and  kindred  industries  in  Canada,  and  the  bounti- 
ful provision  made  for  their  financial  and  other  assistance  by  the  Canadian  Govern- 
ment, through  the  Land  Settlement  Board,  has  been  largely  responsible. for  what  bids 
fair  to  be  a  satisfactory  result. 

When  an  emigration  propaganda  is  possible,  the  British  ex-Service  man  will 
renew  with  vigour  his  enquiries  regarding  Canada,  and  if  similar  advantageous  terms 
are  offered  to  them  I  have  no  doubt  a  large  number  will  desire  to  take  advantage  of 
what  appears,  on  examination,  to  be  the  most  acceptable  scheme  propounded  for  the 
benefit  of  those  who  desire  to  settle  on  the  land  anywhere. 

The  British  Government  have  apparently  decided  to  follow  very  much  along  the 
same  lines,  but  the  disadvantage  of  having  only  comparatively  small  areas  of  land 
available  in  the  British  Isles  leaves  Canada  in  a  very  advantageous  position  in  this 
regard. 

We  cannot,  however,  at  the  moment,  offer  direct  inducements  to  British  ex-Service 
men  to  emigrate  because  of  lack  of  travelling  facilities  and  the  obvious  obligation  on 
Canada  to  re-establish  her  own  sons  first;  but  the  indications  are  very  strong  that, 
given  fair  inducements,  our  department  will  not  have  to  seek  in  vain  for  a  large 
number  of  excellent  emigrants,  who  will  at  least  take  with  them  the  advantage  of 
open-air  training  and  that  healthy  physical  condition  which  is  so  essential  to  success- 
ful work  on  the  land  in  Canada. 

For  this  purpose  and  for  these  reasons  it  is  desirable,  in  my  opinion,  that  a  large 
and  continuous  supply  of  informative  literature  be  made  available  for  use  in  the 
British  Isles  for  many  enquirers. 

No  agencies  being  open  on  the  continent  of  Europe  during  the  past  fiscal  year, 
I  have  no  reports  to  make  thereon. 

Lectures. — Continuing  to  give  lectures  on  Canada  to  school  children  and  to  others 
where  the  opportunity  arose  has  been  the  policy  adopted  during  the  past  year.     A 


IMMIGRATION  AND  COLONIZATION  31 

SESSIONAL   PAPER   No.   18 

restriction  on  lighting  arrangements  militated  against  work  of  this  kind,  but  after 
the  signing  of  the  Armistice  we  found  an  increasing  demand  both  from  adults  and 
scholars  for  lectures  on  Canada  and  these  we  have  been  able  to  satisfy  in  every  case, 
including'a  number  of  lectures  given  by  some  of  our  best  agents  in  Imperial  military 
camps.  We  have  not  failed  to  keep  Canada  well  before  desirable  classes  here,  although 
emphasizing  the  practical  impossibility  of  moving  across  the  seas  until  the  spring  of 
1920. 

Exhibitions  and  Shows. — We  have  had  no  exhibits  available  since  the  commence- 
ment of  war  (save  apples)  and  we  could  not  have  made  an  exhibition  worthy  of  Canada 
even  if  the  opportunity  had  been  available.  Most  of  the  exhibitions  and  shows  that 
were  held  in  previous  years  were  again  cancelled  during  the  year  1918. 

We  have  made  the  best  of  the  stock  in  hand,  and  have  produced  an  exhibition  of 
Canada's  grain  and  other  resources  in  all  our  excellent  show  windows  and  we  appreciate 
the  sending  for  our  exhibition  expert  that  he  might,  on  the  ground  in  Canada,  select 
such  exhibits  as  he  knows  are  so  urgently  required  for  the  work  over  here.  Already 
the  list  of  exhibitions  and  shows  during  1919,  indicates  a  return  to  the  old  order  as 
soon  as  possible,  and  we  will  need  very  urgently  a  very  large  stock  of  exhibits  of  all 
kinds,  including  manufactured  articles  and  branches  of  Canada's  natural  resources. 

School  Atlas. — Having  been  advised  by  the  department  that  a  revised  edition  is 
in  print  and  will  soon  be  issued,  we  have  taken  the  opportunity  of  releasing  our  present 
stock  from  storage  and  are  making  excellent  use  of  it  amongst  school  children,  who  have 
not  been  provided  with  such  a  geographical  opportunity  since  the  war  started,  and  those 
children  who  were  nine  or  ten  years  old  at  the  beginning  of  the  war  have  now  reached 
an  age  when  their  native  discrimination  ought  to  be  of  value  in  our  attempt  to  guide 
their  minds  and  interests  towards  Canada. 

Canadian  News  Items. — This  excellent  system  of  propaganda  has  been  continued, 
and  we  have  obtained  results  far  exceeding  our  expectations.  We  have  spent  nothing 
in  advertising,  and  it  is  all  the  more  gratifying  that  the  good-will  of  the  public  press 
in  the  British  Isles  has  been  retained  to  its  present  extent. 

Expenditure. — The  amount  expended  here  for  all  purposes  (not  including  repatria- 
tion) has  been : — 

Fiscal  year    ended    March  31,   1914 f 91. 000 

"               *'                1915 57,100 

1916 31,600 

1917 27,400 

1918 28,500 

1919 32,700 

Sailings  to  Canada. — Because  shipping  has  been  needed  and  is  likely  to  continue 
to  be  required  for  the  return  of  soldiers  and  the  repatriation  of  their  dependents,  very 
little  space  has  been  available  for  ordinary  passengers  and  emigrants.  We  are  con- 
tinuing the  arduous  duty  of  repatriating  Canadian  officers  and  soldiers  and  their 
dependents,  and  this  matter  will  be  dealt  with  in  detail  in  a  subsequent  report  on 
repatriation.  It  suffices  to  say  that  we  have  not  lost  sight  of  the  true  work  of  this 
department  in  the  way  of  emigration  propaganda,  while  endeavouring  to  place  safely 
back  in  Canada  without  undue  delay  the  many  thousands  who  came  overseas  to  their 
soldier  husbands,  and,  in  addition,  twenty-five  to  thirty  thousand  British  women  who 
have  married  Canadian  soldiers  since  the  war  started. 

Passport  Restrictions. — The  regulations  laid  down  by  the  Home  Authorities  that 
no  person  can  leave  these  shores  without  the  permission  of  the  British  Government,  as 
illustrated  by  an  official  passport,  has  been  continued,  with  the  exception  that  I  have 
been  able  to  repatriate  the  wives  and  children  of  all  Canadian  officers  and  soldiers  on 
my  personal  certificate,  without  any  passport  at  all. 


32  IHUIGRATIOX  AXD  COLONIZATION 

Emigration  Returns. — The  British  Board  of  Trade  have  not  issued  any  figures 
during  the  past  year. 


REPORT  OF  THE  CHIEF  INSPECTOR  OF  BRITISH  IMMIGRANT 
CHILDREN,  G.  BOGUE  SMART. 

Child  immigration  has,  as  is  known  by  those  interested,  been  in  operation  nearly 
fifty  years.  It  has  always  been  the  subject  of  philanthropic  work  with  the  purpose  in 
view  of  checking  pauperism,  ignorance,  and  the  moral  depreciation  of  the  race. 
Perhaps  in  no  other  enterprise  for  the  good  of  humanity  has  there  been  a  greater 
degree  of  unselfish  devotion  than  has  been  shown  in  this  uplifting  Christian  service. 

From  a  national  point  of  view  there  are  three  great  purposes  to  serve  as  separated 
from  the  motives  of  those  who  carry  on  this  work.  These  are  (1)  the  interests  of  the 
children;  (2)  the  interests  of  the  community  which  receives  them;  and  (3)  the  interests 
of  the  community  which  sends  them  forth.  The  change  from  habitations  and  sur- 
roundings in  densely  populated  centres,  where  influences  are  of  the  loosest  character, 
into  the  training  homes  of  the  various  societies  and  State  institutions  in  the  Old 
Country,  where  the  children  are  reared  with  sole  regard  for  their  future  welfare  and 
brought  under  strict  rules  of  discipline,  must  have  an  abiding  effect  in  reforming  the 
condition  of  life.  Then  at  a  later  period  when  this  necessary  preliminary  training  has 
been  completed  to  transfer  the  children  to  the  second  change  absolutely  different  from 
all  their  previous  experiences  makes  only  for  the  saving  of  such  children  to  lives  of 
usefulness  for  their  future  in  Canada. 

No  less  advantageous  to  a  new  country,  particularly  one  seeking  population  of 
the  right  kind,  is  the  arrival  of  these  young  men  and  women  who  will  go  to  make 
up  the  future  population  of  our  country.  There  are  thousands  of  examples  which 
may  be  cited  as  to  the  progress  and  general  success  attending  this  class  and  their 
absorption  into  the  general  population.  What  is  more  desirable  to  the  country  seeking 
additions  to  her  population  than  boys  and  girls  generally  of  the  age  to  begin  work 
who  have  been  educated  and  trained  with  the  sole  object  of  fitting  them  to  be  strong, 
healthy,  God-fearing  citizens  in  a  new  and  promising  land. 

The  testing  time  arrived  sooner  than  the  people  of  this  country  could  have  expected 
and  we  are  now  able  to  prove  beyond  contradiction  the  residts  of  the  early  training  of 
thousands  of  these  children  in  their  rushing  to  the  colours  in  the  time  of  their  country's 
need.  It  is  now  known  that  practically  every  boy  of  military  age  and  physical  fitness, 
who  had  been  brought  to  this  country  by  the  societies  from  their  own  training  homes 
and  the  State  schools  voluntarily  enlisted  to  serve  in  the  great  war.  It  is  besides  a 
satisfaction  to  the  communities  from  which  these  children  come  to  realize  that  their 
conditions  of  life  in  this  country,  together  with  their  previous  training,  have  brought 
about  such  commendable  and  permanent  results,  not  only  in  their  own  lives  but  in  that 
of  the  nation. 

General  Remarks. 

There  is  nothing  to  report  as  to  the  arrivals  of  children  from  Great  Britain,  as 
the  movement  has  been  suspended  since  1916.  This  is  in  consequence  to  the  dangers 
attendant  on  ocean  travel  as  well  as  to  the  shortage  of  shipping,  during  the  great  war. 

This  year,  however,  it  is  expected  that  the  movement  will  be  resumed  as  there 
was  no  cessation  in  the  carrying  on  of  the  work  of  reclaiming  children  in  Great  Britain 
during  the  period  of  the  war.  This  applies  to  all  the  organizations  engaged  in  child 
immigration. 

The  employment  by  our  farmers  and  others  seeking  this  class  of  apprenticeship 
and  help  will  show  no  diminution  as  the  demands  during  the  past  year  were  as  great 
as  ever. 


IMMIGRATION  AND  COLONIZATION  33 

SESSIONAL   PAPER   No.   18 

Statement  of  the  number  of  juveniles  emigrated  to  Canada  by  the  principal 
organizations  in  Great  Britain  during  the  past  19  years,  also  the  number  of  applications 
annually  received  at  their  Canadian  Keceiving  and  Distributing  Homes  during  the 
same  period: — 

Children      Applications 

Fiscal  Tear.                                                                                             Emigrated.  Received. 

1900-1 977  5,783 

1901-2 1,540  8,587 

1902-3 1,979  14,219 

1903-4 2,212  16,573 

1904-5 2,808  17,833 

1905-6 3,264  19,374 

1906-7 1,455  15,800 

1907-8 2,375  17,239 

1908-9 2,424  15,417 

1909-10 2,422  18,477 

1910-11 2,524  21,768 

1911-12 2,689  31,040 

1912-13 2,642  33,493 

1913-14 2,318  32,417 

1914-15 1,799  30.854 

1915-16 821  31,725 

1916-17 251         ,  28,990 

1917-18 17,916 

1918-19 11,718 

The  following  contains  a  record  of  the  poor  law  children  who  were  subject  to  the 

direct  inspection  of  myself  and  assistants  during  the  past  year  classified  in  such  a  way 
as  will  enable  the  reader  to  readily  understand  the  conditions  under  which  the  children 
were  found  by  our  inspections : — 

The  number  of  children  found  in  homes  and  situations — 

Good 819 

Fair 23 

Unsatisfactory 4 

Health — 

Good 838 

Fair 7 

Unsatisfactory 1 

Progress — 

Good 7S0 

Fair 47 

Unsatisfactory 13 

Conduct  and  character — 

Good 803 

Fair 39 

Unsatisfactory 4 

Poor  law  boys,  formerly  under  the  supervision  of  this  department,  who 

have  enlisted  for  overseas  service 156 

Killed  in  action 56 

Died  of  wounds 7 

Wounded  or  missing 12 

Died - 3 

Prisoner  of  war 

Joined  the  navy 

Promoted 7 

Awarded  honours 

Returned  to  Canada 

Temporarily  lost  track  of 40 

Removed  to  new  address 

Returned  to  home 

Working  in  munition  factory • 

Marriages 

Deaths 2 

Removed  to  United  States 

Special  reports 7 

Number  of  children  eligible  for  inspection — January   1,   191S 871 

Duplicate   and  special  reports  made   during  the   year 339 

Total  number  of  inspections  and  reports  made,  1918 1,210 

18—3 


34  IMMIGRATION  AND  COLONIZATION 

10  GEORGE  V,  A.'  1920 

Children  under  indenture  (poor  law) — 
Wage  earning,  626;  total  wage,  $71,704.80. 
Average  age  16^  years. 

Children  under  indenture  (poor  law)  for  board,  clothing  and  schooling,  not  wage 
earning,  210;  average  age,  13-84  years. 

Memorandum    respecting    my  inspections    of  Records    of  Receiving  and  Distributing 

Homes. 

All  institutions  engaged  in  child  emigration  and  having  receiving  Homes  in 
Canada,  maintain  a  definite  system  of  regular  annual,  and  often  more  frequent  visits 
to  each  child  apprenticed  to  farmers  and  others.  The  records  of  each  individual  case 
are  made  available  for  inspection  by  an  officer  of  this  department. 

The  inspection  of  these  records  has  served  a  most  useful  purpose.  The  cases  which 
might  show  defects  or  grounds  for  unfitness,  etc.,  are  proportionately  few  in  numbers 
and  in  nearly  every  case,  as  years  have  passed,  such'  progress  has  been  shown  as  should 
remove  any  objections  or  reasons  for  questioning  their  fitness  for  citizenship  in  Canada. 
There  have  been  only  a  comparatively  few  child  deportations  to  the  Old  Country,  and 
these  have  been  carried  out  by  the  societies  voluntarily,  without  delay,  rather  than  by 
following  the  ordinary  legal  process  of  deportation. 

These  organizations  have  emigrated  to  Canada  over  73,000  children,  and  at  the 
present  time  there  are  at  least  6,000  still  under  supervision,  reports  regarding  which 
have  required  a  careful  and  often  a  somewhat  laborious  and  lengthy  examination. 
This  is  the  only  supervision  of  the  homes  by  the  Government  and  all  that  has  been 
considered  necessary;  the  reports  being  made  so  comprehensive  as  to  be  regarded  as 
thoroughly  trustworthy,  and  complete. 

The  main  purpose  of  our  inspection  of  the  home  reports  is  to  inquire  into  the 
health,  deportment,  treatment  and  progress  of  the  individual  child. 

Health. — It  is  gratifying  to  find  in  general,  good  health  amongst  the  children; 
this  is  to  a  great  extent  due  to  the  general  provision  under  which  the  child  is  emigrated, 
and  a  very  careful  medical  examination  is  carried  out,  and  those  defective  in  mind  or 
body  are  kept  in  the  Old  Country.     Few  cases  of  ill  health  have  come  under  my  notice. 

Deportment. — These  children  are  received  for  training  early  in  years  and  placed 
under  6trict  rules  of  conduct,  health  and  wholesome  environment,  genuine  religioTis 
teaching  and  a  proper  reverence  for  truth,'  sobriety  and  right  living,  the  effect  of 
which  is  to  inculcate  foundational  tendencies  of  character  which  must  be  lasting. 

The  children  are  more  or  less  prone  to  be  affected  by  their  new  surroundings  and 
it  is  often  a  matter  of  regret  that  the  farmer  or  other  employer  seems  sometimes  to 
overlook  responsibility.  Unfortunately  we  have  had  cases  of  children's  early  training 
being  thus  impaired.  In  really  evident  cases  of  bad  influences  the  homes  are  obliged 
to  cancel  the  engagement.  Such  cases  are  as  a  rule  reported  to  me,  and  the  child  is 
forthwith  taken  from  such  surroundings. 

I  am  pleased  to  record  that  on  the  whole  these  children  have  maintained  a  high 
reputation  for  character  and  conduct. 

Treatment — On  the  whole  the  foster  parents,  if  they  may  be  so  termed,  treat  these 
children  well.  A  large  majority  being  childless  parents,  become  closely  attached  to  and 
have  a  most  affectionate  regard  for  them.  Others,  who  are  anxious  to  secure  the  child 
for  help  alone — and  while  the  greater  majority  are  naturally  of  this  class,  and  perhaps 
less^  thoughtful  than  they  might  be,  yet  of  this  majority  there  are  few  who  fail  to 
realize  some  responsibility  for  the  child's  future  and  endeavour  to  treat  him  with 
fair  consideration. 


IMMIGRATION  AND  COLONIZATION  35 

SESSIONAL   PAPER  No.   18 

Of  those  of  tender  years  provision  is  made  for  their  attendance  at  school  and  the 
home  authorities  have  wisely  arranged  for  regular  reports  from  teachers  and  others 
regarding  their  individual  progress. 

The  object  in  general  of  the  close  inspection  of  the  individual  reports  has  been, 
not  only  to  keep  in  touch  with  the  work  of  the  various  homes  but  to  show  them  that 
the  department  intends  to  be  thoroughly  alive  to  the  importance  of  the  thorough  fitness 
of  all  children  brought  to  Canada,  and  it  is  quite  evident  that  the  various  organizations 
are  consequently  influenced  in  the  quality  of  their  emigration  work,  not  only  regarding 
the  class  of  children  emigrated  and  their  suitability  for  life  in  Canada,  but  to  place 
these  children  under  such  conditions  as  the  Government  would  approve. 

The  following  statement  shows  the  number  of  applications  received  by  the 
various  agencies  for  children  during  the  year  just  ended. 

Applications  Received 

Society  or  Agency —  for  Children. 
Dr.   Barnardo's   Homes,   Toronto    and    Peterborough,    Ontario    and 

Winnipeg,  Manitoba 6,698 

Miss  Macpherson,  Stratford 438 

Mr.  J.  W.   C.  Fegan 300 

National  Children's  Home  and  Orphanage,  Hamilton -           995 

Mr.    Quarrier's,    "  Kairknowe  "   Home,    Brockville 492 

Mrs.  Birt,   Marchmont  Home,   Belleville 399 

Mrs.  Smyley,  "  The  Combe,"  Hespeler 5'0 

The  Catholic   Emigration   Association,    St.    George's    Home,    Ottawa.  1,886 

The  Church  of  England  Waifs  and  Strays  Society,  Sherbrooke,  P.Q.  .  60 

Mr.  J.  T.  Middlemore,  Halifax,  N.S 150 

The  Salvation  Army  Agency,  Toronto,  Ontario  and  Montreal,  P.Q..  250 

The  great  success  of  this  work  is  beyond  doubt  to  be  attributed  to  the  favourable 
conditions  met  with  in  Canada  whose  illimitable  territory  and  vast  resources  have 
abundantly  enabled  her  to  absorb  and  assimilate  the  children  and  find  profitable 
employment  for  their  energies. 


EEPORT  OF  THE  INSPECTOR  OF  UNITED  STATES  AGENCIES, 

W.  J.  WHITE. 

Ottawa,  April  1,  1919. 

Sir, — Many  influences  during  the  first  six  months  of  the  past  fiscal  year  were 
factors  in  hindering,  in  some  measure,  the  movement  of  settlers  from  the  United 
States  to  Canada  and  reducing  the  number  to  a  figure  less  than  we  had  reason  to 
expect  had  they  not  existed. 

One  of  these  was  the  restriction  placed  upon  a  movement  to  points  outside  of  the 
United  States  of  males  between  the  ages  of  21  and  45  and  the  imposition  of  the  Draft 
Act  which  made  it  impossible  for  men  in  this  class  to  move  unless  granted  special 
permission,  generally  very  difficult  to  obtain. 

Those  in  this  class  were  the  people  to  whom  our  agents  were  giving  special 
attention. 

The  draft  took  from  the  ranks  of  our  prospective  settlers  many  young  men, 
who  with  their  families,  had  already  made  arrangements  to  move  to  Canada.  In 
consequence,  these  families  were  broken  up  and  in  the  meantime  they  were  lost  to  us. 
Nothwithstanding  this,  the  records  of  the  Department  will  show  that  a  surprising 
number  of  a  good  class  entered  Canada  during  that  period,  many  of  them  having 
secured  permission  for  temporary  leave.  They  took  advantage  of  this  for  the  purpose 
of  looking  over  the  country  and  making  selections  so  as  to  be  in  readiness  when  they 
would  be  permitted  to  make  a  permanent  move,  while  others  were  able  to  secure 
permission  for  a  permanent  stay.     It  was  a  repetition  of  the  conditions  that  were 


36  IMMIGRATION  AND  COLONIZATION 

10  GEORGE  V,  A.   1920 

brought  about  at  the  time  that  the  United  States  went  into  the  war,  but  possibly 
they  were  now  more  acute  by  reason  of  the  stringent  regulations  made  necessary  in 
order  to  increase  the  fighting  force  of  that  country. 

The  interest  in  Canada  was  no  less  keen  than  in  the  past  and  while  the  results 
may  not  seem  to  be  commensurate  with  the  efforts  employed,  there  was  no  sign  of 
discouragement  on  the  part  of  our  agents,  for  they  were  fully  aware  of  the  reasons. 
They  knew  that  as  soon  as  there  were  changed  conditions  in  the  world's  war  there 
would  be  an  immediate  response  to  reward  them  for  the  work  they  had  been  doing. 
Their  programme  of  education  was  being  continued,  and  they  were  keeping  alive  the 
interest  they  had  already  aroused.  This  was  growing  and  therefore  satisfactory. 
They  continually  reported  that  in  all  the  districts  they  visited  they  had  found  a 
warmer  feeling  towards  Canada.  The  war  and  the  fact  that  Canada  and  the  United 
States  were  fighting  side  by  side  was  a  ■  wonderful  influence  in  bringing  the  tw<  i 
countries  closer  together  and  causing  a  seeking  after  information  about  Canada, 
greater  than  had  ever  been  previously  known. 

During  all  the  year,  there  was  carried  on  a  propaganda  of  advertising  fully  a9 
great  as  in  the  past,  literature  was  forwarded  to  thousands  of  applicants,  districts 
where  it  appeared  likely  settlers  could  be  secured  were  visited  by  our  agents  and 
every  legitimate  effort  used  to  keep  up  and  increase  the  interest  in  Canada. 

Another  factor  that  was  an  influence  in  reducing  the  number  of  entries  to  Canada 
as  compared  with  some  few  years  past  was  the  reservation  made  in  the  homestead 
areas  for  returned  soldiers.  This  temporarily  reduced  the  interest  in  a  large  number- 
of  intending  settlers.  The  invitation  to  Canada  for  the  purpose  of  taking  up  a 
homestead  was  no  longer  a  slogan  that  could  be  effectively  worked,  yet  we  found  a 
considerable  number  taking  advantage  of  the  opportunities  offered  in  districts  where 
homesteads  were  available  to  others  than  returned  soldiers. 

Even  without  war  conditions  and  our  free  land  grant  so  materially  reduced  we 
could  not  have  looked  for  the  trainload  after  trainload  of  settlers  and  their  effects, 
that  we  witnessed  in  1910  and  1911  when  we  had  almost  an  illimitable  number  of 
homesteads  to  give  to  settlers.  He  could  then  leave  a  train  in  almost  any  district 
of  the  three  provinces,  travel  a  few  miles  and  get  his  160  acres.  To-day  this  cannot 
be  done.  The  homestead  that  he  took  up  then  is  now  worth  $25  to  $50  an  acre.  Its 
owner  has  become  rich.  A  good  portion  of  our  work  now  consists  of  inducing  the 
man  who  has  sold  his  farm  in  his  own  home  State  at  anywhere  from  $200  to  $300  an 
acre,  to  move  to  Canada  where  he  can  secure  three  or  four,  or  more  acres  at  a  price 
less  than  he  obtained  for  the  one  he  sold,  and  he  will  get  land  fully  as  good  as  that  he 
would  leave.  There  is  still  sufficient  land  in  Canada  to  supply  many  thousands  of 
these  people  but  of  course  it  now  has  to  be  purchased.  We  will  not  see  the  settlers 
enter  Canada  in  such  large  numbers  as  in  1910-11  but  we  will  see  a  steady  flow  month 
by  month  of  the  class  of  settlers  who  have  money  with  which  to  purchase.  Our 
correspondence  warrants  this  statement.  It  is  to  be  hoped  though  that  the  continued 
rise  in  the  price  of  farm  lands  in  the  United  States  will  not  cause  our  dealers  to 
increase  the  prices  of  salable  property  to  figures  that  will  delay  the  movement  we  fully 
expect.  " 

The  last  six  months  of  the  year  have  shown  that  what  looked  like  unappreciated 
effort  on  the  part  of  the  agents  during  the  early  period  of  the  year,  was  anything  but 
that.  Although  achievement  was  not  as  rapid  as  we  had  hoped  the  discontinuance  of 
the  war  would  bring,  on  looking  back  now  it  is  readily  understood. 

The  signing  of  the  armistice  in  November  did  not  bring  about  the  movement  to 
Canada  that  we  hoped,  yet  there  were  good  reasons  for  it.  The  lateness  of  the  season 
was  against  it,  notwithstanding  the  keen  interest  exhibited  by  many  who  wished  to 
make  the  move.  Then,  too,  there  was  the  interest  at  home  in  preparation  for  the 
return  of  the  troops  which  might  be  looked  for  at  any  time.     Yet  we  secured  a  great 


IMMIGRATION  AND  COLONIZATION  37 

SESSIONAL   PAPER   No.   18 

number,  as  the  reports  will  show,  and  we  had  the  satisfaction  of  work  ahead  which 
would  largely  repay  the  efforts  of  the  year.  In  this  we  were  not  disappointed.  During 
January,  February,  and  March,  the  movement  westward  to  Canada  was  greater  than 
it  had  been  for  some  years.  This  was  the  advance  guard  of  the  large  influx  of  settlers 
that  we  may  confidently  expect  during  1919-20.  It  was  made  up  of  settlers  taking 
with  them  large  sums  of  money  to  invest  in  Canadian  lands  and  but  little  of  it  for 
speculation.  To  them  there  was  a  merit  in  these  lands,  for  in  bringing  them  under 
production  they  would  be  brought  to  a  condition  that  would  make  them  fully  as 
remunerative  as  the  land  they  had  sold  in  their  home  States  at  from  four  to  five 
times  the  price  they  were  paying  for  the  Canadian  lands. 

One  of  the  best  evidences  of  the  high  class  of  the  settlers  was  shown  in  the 
demand  for  lands  to  purchase  and  the  consequent  reasonable  increase  in  the  price 
obtained  by  Canadian  owners. 

During  the  year  every  agent  was  active  in  his  particular  field.  The  methods 
adopted  were  not  all  similar,  but  the  general  campaign  was  the  same.  Different 
methods  were  adopted  in  different  districts,  and  the  plan  of  carrying  these  out  was 
left  largely  to  the  agent's  discretion,  who,  being  familiar  with  his  territory,  knew  the 
means  most  suitable  for  carrying  on  the  work  in  that  locality. 

At  various  exhibitions  held  throughout  the  States  were  installed  exhibits  of 
Canadian-grown  grain,  roots,  fruit,  and  vegetables.  At  these  fairs,  literature  was 
distributed,  and  the  demand  for  it,  the  care  taken  of  it  after  receiving  it,  showed  an 
appreciative  interest.  During  the  period  of  the  war,  our  activities  in  placing  exhibits 
and  taking  advantage  of  the  invitations  to  exhibit  Canadian  products  was  not  as 
extensive  as  before  the  war. 

Realizing  the  deep  and  growing  interest  in  the  United  States  and  having  assur- 
ance of  a  welcome  almost  anywhere,  I  feel  it  would  be  a  good  time  to  increase  our 
fair  work.  I  will  take  the  liberty  at  an  early  date  of  submitting  a  programme  out- 
lining places  where  exhibits  could  be  installed  to  advantage.  We  have  had  assur- 
ance from  several  fair  boards  that  they  would  gladly  welcome  the  Canadian  exhibit 
as  one  of  their  exhibition  attractions.  These  come  from  the  States  in  which  we  have 
never  shown,  and  also  from  fair  boards  which  at  one  time  did  not  think  it  advisable 
to  allow  Canada  to  exhibit. 

Our  advertising  propaganda  has  been  carefully  looked  after.  The  best  farm 
papers  and  high-class  country  weeklies  were  the  mediums  used. 

"  Canada  West,"  our  well-known  periodical,  containing  entirely  new  matter  each 
year,  has  had  a  wide  circulation.  The  demand  for  it  has  been  great,  but  we  have  been 
able  to  meet  it. 

I  am  confident  in  making  the  statement  that  Canada  and  Canada's  resources, 
especially  those  of  agriculture,  through  the  efforts  of  the  agents,  by  means  of  litera- 
ture, advertising,  lectures  and  exhibits,  there  has  been  established  a  line  of  work  that 
has  made  Canada  known  throughout  the  United  States  in  a  way  that  could  not  have 
been  accomplished  by  any  other  means. 

The  schools  of  the  United  States  to-day  are  teaching  about  Canada  in  a  manner 
never  done  before.  At  one  time,  what  was  taught  of  Canada  was  the  extent  of  its 
icebergs,  the  wildness  of  its  natives,  and  the  general  unsuitability  for  the  existence 
of  the  ordinary  white  man.  These  errors  are  not  taught  now.  Their  geographies  are 
revised.  Grain  fields,  mining  scenes,  fruit  orchards  and  pleasant  homes  are  pictured, 
and  the  text  matter  is  intended  to  show  to  the  pupils  that  in  the  country  across  the 
line  there  lives  a  people  as  happy  and  contended  as  they  are,  enjoying  privileges  equal 
to  their  own  and  with  an  environment  that  makes  them  akin  to  themselves  in  this 
respect. 

It  is  not  too  early  to  offer  a  prediction  of  what  may  be  expected  during  the  coming 
year.    I  feel  that  we  will  see  an  excellent  class  of  settlers  helping  to  fill  up  vacancies 


38  IMMIGRATION  AND  COLONIZATION 

10  GEORGE  V,  A.   1919 

in  the  older  settled  districts  and  going  forward  into  new  localities,  increasing  land 
values,  and  a  general  tendency  to  further  uplift  the  splendid  conditions  that  now  exist 
throughout  the  entire  West.  I  base  this  largely  on  the  foregoing  statements  which 
show  that  land  prices  in  the  United  States  are  increasing  to  an  extent  that  makes  it 
possible  for  the  owner  to  sell  at  good  figures  and  secure  equally  as  good  land  at  about 
one-tenth  the  price.  I  feel  that  with  the  increased  price  of  land  in  the  United  States, 
the  rentals  for  land  have  also  increased,  and  the  renter  feels  that  paying  $12  to  $15 
per  acre  rent  for  land,  and  sometimes  higher,  is  not  a  paying  proposition,  and  he  is 
looking  around  for  another  home.  The  cheap  lands  of  Western  Canada  are  an  attrac- 
tion. 

We  may  not  see  the  full  benefit  of  our  work  until  later  in  the  season  of  1919, 
but  I  confidently  look  for  a  steady  movement  beginning  during  the  summer  and  fall 
months,  and  this  will  continue  to  grow. 

It  is  not  only  the  western  portion  of  Canada  that  is  attractive.  In  some  of  the 
Eastern  and  New  England  States,  particularly,  it  is  found  that  there  is  a  great  deal 
of  interest  being  centred  in  the  Eastern  and  Maritime  Provinces.  Quebec  will  get 
a  large  number  of  new  people  during  the  year,  as  also  will  New  Brunswick  and  Nova 
Scotia,  while  the  northern  portions  of  Ontario  will  be  largely  benefited  by  the  work 
of  the  Immigration  Department.  In  Ohio  and  Indiana  there  is  found  to  be  some 
interest  in  Ontario  lands,  and  it  would  not  surprise  me  if  there  should  be  some  move- 
ment in  these  States  during  the  next  fiscal  year. 


10   GEORGE  V  SESSIONAL   PAPER   No.   19  A.    1920 


CANADA 


REPORT 


OF  THE 


MINISTER  OF  PUBLIC  WORKS 


ON  THE 


WORKS  UNDER  HIS  CONTROL 


FOR  THE 


FISCAL  YEAR  ENDED  MARCH  31 

1919 


Submitted  in  Accordance  with  the  Provisions  of   Chapter  39,  Section  34, 
of  the  Revised  Statutes  of  Canada. 


PRINTED     BY     ORDER     OF     PARLIAMENT. 


OTTAWA 

J.  de  LABROQUERIE  TACHE 

PRINTER  TO  THE  KING'S  MOST  EXCELLENT  MAJESTY 

1919 

[No.  19—1920.] 


10  GEORGE  V  SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  19  A.   1920 


To  His  Excellency  the  Duke  of  Devonshire,  E.G.,  P.O.,   G.C.M.G.,   G.C.V.O.,   etc., 
etc.,   Governor  General  and  Commander  in  Chief  of  the  Dominion  of  Canada. 

I  have  the  honour  to  lay  before  Your  Excellency  the  Keport  of  the   Department 
of  Public  Works  of  Canada,  for  the  fiscal  year  ended  March  31,  1919. 

I  have  the  honour  to  be,  sir, 

Your  Excellency's  most   obedient   servant, 


A.  L.  SIETON, 

Minister    of   Public    Works. 


Ottawa,  September  27,  1919. 


19— A* 


10  GEORGE   V  SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  19  A.   1920 


CONTENTS. 

REPORTS  OF:— 

DEPUTY  MINISTER. 

CHIEF  ARCHITECT. 

CHIEF  ENGINEER. 

GENERAL  SUPERINTENDENT  OF  TELEGRAPHS 

COLLECTOR  OF  REVENUE. 

CHIEF  ACCOUNTANT. 

LAW  CLERK. 

NATIONAL  GALLERY. 


10  GEORGE  V 


SESSIONAL   PAPER  No.   19 


A.   1920 


ALPHABETICAL  INDEX  TO  REPORT 


Names   of   Places,    etc. 


Page 


Abbots  harbour,  N.S 26-91 

Accountant's   report 72 

Acton,  Ont.,  post  office 80 

Acton  Vale,  P.Q.,  public  building.  ...  75 

Advertising 90 

Agassiz,    B.C.,    experimental    farm....  88 

Ainsworth,  B.C 99 

Alberni,  B.C.,  post  office 88 

Albert,  N.B 93 

Alberta   telegraphs 61-101 

Alexandria,   Ont.,  public  building.  ...  80 

Allanburg,   Ont.,   military  building....  106 

Almonte,  Ont.,  public  building 80 

Amherstburg,   Ont.,   public  building    .  .  80 

Amherst,  P.Q 95 

Amherst,  N.S.,    public    buildings.  ...  72 

Andersons  Cove,  N.S 91 

Anderson's  Hollow,  N.B 93 

Annapolis  Royal,  N.S 91 

Annapolis,   N.S.,   public  buildings..    ..  72 

Annacis  Island.  B.C 43 

Annieville  Bar.   B.C 99 

Anse  a  Beauflls,  P.Q 95 

Anse  a  la  Grosse  Roche.  P.Q 95 

Anse  a  l'Eau.  P.Q 95 

Anse  aux  Gascons.  P.Q 95 

Anse  St.  Jean,  P.Q 95 

Anticosti,   P.Q.,   telegraphs 61-101 

Antigonish,  N.S.,  public   building..     ..  72 

'*       wharf 91 

Argyle  Sound.  N.S 91 

Argenta,  B.C 99 

Arichat,  N.S.,  public  building 72 

*'       wharf 91 

Arisaig,  N.S 91 

Armstrong,    P.Q..    custom   house,    etc.  .  75 

Arnprior,  Ont 97 

"              public    building 80 

Arthabaska,  P.Q.,  public  building.  ...  75 

Art  gallery 15-156 

Asbestos,    P.Q.,   post   office 75 

Ashcroft,  B.C.,  post  office,   etc 88 

Ashcroft-Dawson,  telegraphs 102 

Athabaska  Landing,  Alta.,  public  build- 
ing   87 

Athens,  Ont,  post  office 80 

Atlin,  B.C.,  post  office 88 

Aurora,  Ont.,  post  office 80 

Avonport,  N.S 91 

Ayer's  Cliff,  P.Q. ,  wharf 95 

Aylmer,  P.Q  ,  post  office 75 

"           "       wharf 95 

Aylmer,    Ont.,    post    office 80 

B 

Babins  Cove,  N.S 91 

Back  Bay,  N.B 93 

Baddeck,  N.S.,  public  building 72 

Baie  du  Vin,  N.B 93 


Names    of    Places,    etc. 


Page 


B 

Baie   St.    Paul,   P.Q 95 

Baileys  Brook,  N.S 91 

Balfour,    B.C.,    military   hospitals..     ..  112 

Banff,   Alta.,   bridge 101 

Barachois,  N.S 91 

Barachois  de  Malbaie,  P.Q 95 

Barkers  wharf,   N.B 93 

Barnstone   Island,    B.C 99 

Barracks « 9-19 

Barrie,   Ont.,    public  buildings 80 

Barrie,  Ont 97 

Barrington  Cove,  N.S 91 

Barrys  Bay,  Ont 97 

Bassano,   Alta.,   post  office S7 

Bassin,  P.Q.. 95 

Bathurst  N.B.,  public  building 74 

Battleford,   Sask.,  public  building.  ...  S5 

Battery  Point,  N.S 91 

Bay  St.  Lawrence,  N.S 91 

Bay   of  Fundy   telegraphs 61-101 

Bayfield.   Ont 97 

Beamsville,    Ont.,    sanatorium 106 

Bear  River,  N.S 91 

Beaton,  B.C 99 

Beauharnois,   P.Q.,   post   office 75 

Beaumaris,   Ont 97 

Beaver   Harbour.    N.B 93 

Belleville,   Ont.,  public  buildings    ....  80 

wharf 97 

Beloeil,  P.Q 95 

Berlin   (Kitchener),  Ont.,  public  build- 
ing-   81 

Bersimis,   P.Q 95 

Berthierville,    P.Q.,    public   building    .  .  75 

Biggar,  Sask.,  immigration  building   .  .  85 

Big  Bay  Point,  Ont 97 

Big  Bras   d'Or,    N.S 91 

Big  Stone  River,   Sask 42-99 

Bindlays  Landing,  B.C 99 

Black  Lake,  P.Q.,  post  office 75 

Black  River.  Ont 55-101 

Blenheim,   Ont.,  post  office 80 

Blind  River.  Ont 97 

Bonus  paid 102 

Bowmanville,    Ont.,   public   building    .  .  80 

Bow    River    bridge 57 

Bracebridge,    Ont.,   post   office 80 

Brampton,  Ont.,  public  building  ....  80 
Brandon,  Man.,  public  buildings.  .  .  .  84-109 
Brantford,    Ont,    public  buildings..     ..    80-106 

Breens  Pond,  N.S 91 

Breton  Cove,  N.S 91 

Brewers  Creek,   P.Q 95 

Bridgeburg,  Ont.,  public  building.  ...  80 

Bridgewater,  N.S.,  public  building.  ...  72 

Bridges   and    roads 56 

Brighton,   Ont.,   post  office 8  0 

British  Columbia,  harbours  and  rivers.  43 

"  telegraphs 62-102 

Brockville,    Ont.,    public   building.  ...  80 


DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  WORKS 


10  GEORGE  V,  A.   1920 


Names   of   Places,   etc.  Page 

B 

Brockville,   Ont.,   wharf 97 

Brownsburg,    P.Q.,    post   office 75 

Buckingham,  P.Q.,  public    building     .  .  75 

Buckingham,  P.Q.,  float 95 

Buctouche,   N.   B 94 

Burford,    Ont.,    post    office 80 

Burks  Head,  N.S 91 

Burlington,  N.S 91 

Burlington,     Ont..     military    hospital..  107 

"              channel,  Ont 97 

beach,  Ont 97 

Burnt    Island,    Ont 97 

Burton   Court   House,   N.B 94 

Burton,  B.C 99 

Burwood  Bay,  B.C 99 

C 

Cabano,  P.Q 95 

Cable  ship  Tyrian 62-101 

Cacouna,  P.C.,  wharf 95 

"      post  office 75 

Calgary,  Alta.,  public  buildings 87-111 

Campbell  River,  B.C 99 

Campbellton,  N.B.,  public    building    .  .  74 

"       wharfs 94 

Campobello,  N.B.,  public  building.  ...  74 

Cannes  de  Roches,  P.Q 95 

Canning,   N.S 91 

Canso.    N.S.,    public   building 72 

Cape  Bald,  N.B 94 

Cape  Breton,   N.S.,  telegraphs 61-101 

Cap    Chat,   P.Q 95 

Cape  Ray,  telegraph 101 

Cap  Rouge,  P.Q.,  experimental  farm .  .  75 

Cape  Sable  Island,   N.S 91 

Cap  St.   Ignace,   P.Q 95 

Cape   Tormentine,    N.B 28-94 

Caraquet,  N.B 94 

Cardigan,    P.E.I 93 

Cardinal,  P.Q.,  post  office 80 

Carleton,   P.Q .'.    ..  95 

Carleton  Place,  Ont.,  public  building.  .  80 

Carman,  Man.,  public  building 84 

Castor,   Alta.,   immigration  building.  .  .  87 

Caughnawaga,    P.Q 95 

Cayuga,    Ont.,  public  building 80 

Champlain,  P.Q.,  dry  dock 66-70 

Champlain,    P.Q 95 

Chapel   Point,   P.E.I 93 

Charlottetown,  P.E.I.,  public  buildings.   73-104 

Chase,    B.C.,    public    buildings 88 

Chatham,   N.B.,   public   buildings 74 

dredging 29-94 

Escuminac    telegraphs.  .      .  .  101 

Chatham,    Ont.,    public   building 80 

Chegoggin,  N.S 91 

Chesley,  Ont.,  public  building 80 

Chester   Basin,   N.S 91 

Cheticamp,    N.S 91 

Chicoutimi,   P.Q.,  harbour 95 

"      public    building.  ...  75 

Chief    Accountant,,    report 72 

Chief  Architect,   report 17 

Chief   Engineer,   report 26 

Chilliwack,  B.C 99 

"    post  office 88 

Chimney  Corner,  N.S 26-91 

Church  Point,  N.S 91 

Clair,  N.B..  immigration  office 74 

Clyoquot,   B.C 99 


Names   of   Places,    etc.  Page 
G 

Clinton,    Ont.,   public  building 80 

Coal 6-90 

Coaticook,  P.Q.,  public  buildings    ....  75 

Cobalt,  Ont,  post  office 80 

Cobourg,   Ont.,  public   buildings    .  .     .  .  80-107 

"             "       harbour 97 

Collector    of    revenue 3-63 

Collection  of  slide  and  boom  dues.  .    .  .  64-101 

Collingwood,  Ont.,  graving   docks..     ..  97 

"       post  office 80 

Columbia  river,  B.C 99 

Comox,  B.C.,  post  office 88 

Compton,   P.Q.,   post  office 75 

Contract    dredging 48 

Contracts  let 115 

Contrecoeur,  P.Q 95 

Cookshire,   P.Q.,   public  building    ....  75 
Cornwall,     Ont.,     public     building.  ...           80 

Coteau  Landing,  P.Q 95 

Coulonge  River,  Ont 55-101 

Courtenay  bay,  N.B 31-94 

Coutts,   Alta.,   immigration  building.  .  .  87 

Cow  Bay,  N.S 91 

Cranbrook,    B.C.,    public   building.  ...  88 

Crapaud,  P.E.I 93 

Crawford   Bay,    B.C 99 

Cribbins   Point,   N.S 91 

Cross  Point.  P.Q 95 

Cumberland  Lake,    Sask 42-99 

Cumberland,  B.C.,  public  building.  ...  88 

Cumberland,  Ont 97 

Cummings  Cove,  N.B 94 

D 

Dalhousie,   X.B 94 

"    public  building 74 

Dalton    Sanatorium,    P.E.I 22 

Darcy  Island,  B.C 99 

Dartmouth,  N.S.,  public  buildings.  ...  72 

"       naval    station 103 

Dauphin,    Man.,    public   buildings.  .     .  .  S4-109 

Deep  Brook,  N.S "  91 

Deep  Cove,   B.C 99 

Deer  Park,   B.C 99 

Delap's    Cove,    N.S 91 

Deloraine,  Man.,  immigration  building.  84 

Departmental   dredging 51 

Deschambault,    P.Q 95 

Deseronto,   Ont.,   public  building    ....  80 

Desjardins,    P.Q 95 

Devils  Island,  N.S 91 

Digby,   N.S.,  public  buildings 72 

"     pier 91 

Dignan's    Bay,    B.C 99 

Dipper  Harbour.  N.B 94 

Dodds  Landing,  P.Q 95 

Dorchester,    N.B 94 

county  telegraphs 101 

Dorval,   P.Q.,   barracks 105 

Douglas,    B.C.,   immigration   building.  .  88 

Dredging 5-48-100 

Dresden,    Ont..    post    office SO 

Drummondville,    P.Q.,    public    building.  75 

Dry  docks 2-52 

Dumoine  River.  Ont 55-101 

Duncan,  B.C.,  post  office 88 

Dundas,   Ont.,   public  building 80 

Dundee,  P.Q.,  custom  house 75 

Dunnville,   Ont.,  post  office 80 

Durham.   N.B 94 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  19 


INDEX 


Names    of   Places,    etc. 


Page 


East    Angus,    P.Q.,    public    building.  .  .  75 

East  Arrow  Park,   B.C 99 

East  Chezzetcook,   N.S 91 

East  River,  N.S 91 

East  Robson,  B.C 99 

East  Templeton,  P.Q 95 

Edmonton,   Alta.,  public  buildings.  .    .  .  87-111 

Edmonton  South,  Alta.,  public  building.  87 

Edmonton  bridge,   Alta 57-101 

Edmundston,  N.B.,  public  buildings...  74 

Edson,    Alta.,    immigration    building.  .  87 

Eganville,   Ont.,  post  office 80 

Elmira,  Ont.,  post  office 80 

Elora,   Ont.,   post  office 80 

Emerson,   Man.,    public   buildings.  ...  84 

Entwistle,  Alta.,  immigration  building.  87 
Esquimau,   B.C.,  graving  dock .  .    ..53-66-69-99 

"              "       hospitals,  etc 19-112 

Esquimalt,   B.C..  wharf 43-99 

Essex,    Ont.,    public    building 80 

Estevan,   Sask.,   post  office 85 

Exeter,   Ont.,  post  office 81 

Expenditure 1-59 

F 

Fabre,   P.Q 95 

Fairville,  N.B.,  post  office 74 

Falher,  Alta.,  immigration  building.    .  .  87 

Fanny  Bay,   B.C 99 

Farnham,    P.Q.,    public   buildings.  ...  75 

Farmers   Landing.    B.C 99 

Farrington,    B.C 99 

Fassett,   P.Q 95 

Father  Point,  P.Q 95 

Feltzen    South,    N.S 91 

Fergus,    Ont..    public   building 81 

Fernie,    B.C..    public    building: SS 

Ferries 68 

Field.    B.C..   Dost   office 88 

Five  Islands,    N.S 91 

Flags  for  public  buildings 90 

Fort   Coulonge.   P.Q 95 

Fort  Dufferin,   N.B 31 

Fort  Erie,    Ont.,   immigration   building.  81 
Fort  Francis,  Ont.,  immigration  build- 
ing   81 

Fort  William,   Ont 5-35-97 

"    public    buildings.     . 

19-31-107 

Fort  William,   P.Q 95 

Fourchu,   N.S 26-91 

Fox   Island.   N.S 91 

Frank,  B.C.,  hospital Ill 

Fraser    River,    B.C 43-99 

Frasers  Landing,  B.C 99 

Fraserville,  P.Q.,  public  buildings..    ..  75 

Fredericton,    N.B.,    public    buildings..  74-104 

Freeman,    Capt.    B 102 

Freeport,  N.S 91 

"          Ont.,    sanatorium 107 

French  River,  Ont 97 

French  Village,   N.S 91 

Fruid's  Point,  N.S 91 

G 

Gabarus,   N.S 91 

Gagetown,  N.B 94 

Gait,  Ont.,  public  buildings 81 

Gananoque,  Ont.,  public  buildings.  ...  81 

Gatineau  Point,  P.Q 95 


Names    of    Places,    etc.  Page 

G 

Gatineau  River,  P.Q 55-101 

Georgetown,   P.E.I.,  public  building.  .  .  73 

Georgeville,   P.Q 95 

N.S 91 

Gimli,  Man.,  post  office 84 

Glace   Bay,   N.S.,   public  building.  ...  72 

91 

Glacier,    B.C..   post   office 88 

Glencoe,  Ont.,  post  office 81 

Goderich,   Ont 97 

Goderich,  Ont.,  public  building 81 

Gordon    Creek,    Ont.,    dam 102 

Gower  Point.  B.C 99 

Grace  Harbour,   B.C 99 

Graham,   P.Q 95 

Grahams  Pond,  P.E.I 93 

Granby,   P.Q.,   public  building 75 

Grande    Anse.    N.B 94 

Grand  Bend,  Ont 97 

Grand  Entree,  P.Q 95 

Grand   Etang,  N.S '. 91 

Grand  Falls,  N.B.,   post  office 74 

Grand  Forks,   B.C.,   public   building... 

Grand'Mere,  P.Q.,  post  office 75 

Grand  Narrows,  N.S 91 

Grande  Prairie,  Alta.,  public  building.  87 

Grand  River,  bridge 56 

Grand  River,  P.Q 95 

Gratuities,   paid 102 

Gravelbourg,   Sask.,   public  buildings.. 

Graving  docks 66 

Gray's  Creek.  B.C 99 

Great   Salmon  River.    N.B 94 

Great   Village.    N.S 91 

Greenwood,    B.C.,    post    office 89 

Gretna,    Man.,   immigration   office.  ...  84 

Griffiths  Island.   Ont 97 

Grimsby,    Ont.,    public    buildings.  .     .  .    81-107 

Grindstone,   P.Q 95 

Grondines,    P.Q 95 

Grosse  Isle.  P.Q 95 

"  "    quarantine  station.  17-75-101 

Grouard,    Alta.    lands    office,    etc..     .. 

Guelph,    Ont..    public   building 81-107 

Gunters,   N.B 94 

Guysborough,    N.S.,    public   building.  .  .  72 


Hailevburv,    Ont 97 

Halcyon.   B.C 99 

Halifax,  N.S. ,    public    buildings 17-72 

"            "        military    buildings.     .  .  103 

"            "        graving  dock 4—91 

wharf 27-91 

Hamilton,    Ont.,    public   buildings.  .     .  .  81-107 

Hampton,    N.B..    public    building..      ..  74 

Hampton,    N.S 91 

Hanover,    Ont..   post   office 81 

Harbour   and   river   works 3-26 

Harbour    au    Bouche.    N.S 91 

Hardwicke,   N.B 29 

Hardy  Bay.   B.C 45-99 

Harricana    River.    P.Q 95 

Harriston,    Ont,    public   building 81 

Hartland,   N.B..  post  office 74 

Hawkesbury,     Ont.,     public    building.  .  81 

Heating,    lighting,    etc 6-72—90 

Herring  Cove,  N.S 91 

High  Falls.  P.Q 95 

High  Prairie,   Alta..   lands   office    ....  87 

Hillsborough,   N.B..  post  office 74 


DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  WORKS 


10  GEORGE  V,  A.   1920 


Names   of  Places,    etc.  Page 

H 

Honfleur.  P.Q 95 

Hospitals,    military 7-20 

Hnausa,   Man 42-98 

Hospital  Bay.  P.Q 95 

Hudson.    P.Q 95 

Hudson   Bay   Junction,    Sask.,   forestry 

office 85 

Hull.  P.Q.,  wharf 95 

"  "       public    building 18-75-105 

Humboldt,   Sask.,   public  building.  ...  85 

Hunker  road,  Y.T 101 

Hunter    Building.    Ottawa 18-79 

Huntingdon,  P.Q.,    post   office 75 

B.C.,    immigration     build- 
ing   89 

I 

Iberville,    P.Q.,   public  building.  ...  75 

He  Verte.  P.Q 95 

Indian  Head.  Sask.,  public  buildings..  85 

Ingersoll,    Ont.,    public   building 81 

Inspection  boats 102 

International    Joint    Commission.  .      .  .  102 

Invermere,    B.C.,    experimental   farm.  .  89 

Inverness,  N.S 91 

"    public  building 73 

Iona.   N.S 91 

Isaac's  Harbour,  N.S 91 

J 

Jamesville.    N.S 91 

Johnsons  Harbour.   N.S 91 

Joliette,  P.Q.,  public  buildings 75 

Jonquieres,  P.Q.,  post  office .  75 

Judique.    N.S 91 

K 

Kagawong,    Ont 98 

Kaministikwia   River.    Ont 36 

Kamloops,   B.C.,   public  buildings..     ..  89 

Kamouraska.  P.Q 95 

Kapuskasing,  Ont.,  experimental  farm.  81 

Kaslo,   B.C 99 

Kelly's  Cove.  N.S 91 

Kemptville,  Ont.,  post  office 81 

Kenora,  Ont.,  public  buildings 81-107 

Kentville,    N.S.,    public    buildings..     ..  73-103 

Kerobert,   Sask.,   immigration  building.  85 

Kicking  Horse.   B.C 45-99 

Kincardine,    Ont..    post    office 81 

Kingsport.  N.S 92 

Kingston,  Ont 98-101 

"  public    buildings     .  .      .  .  81-107 

"graving   dock 53-66-98 

Kingsville.  Ont 98 

"  post  office 81 

Kipawa  dam 102 

Kitchener   (Berlin),  Ont.,  public  build- 
ings   81 

Kittos  Landing.  B.C 99 

Knowlton,   P.Q.,   public  building    ....  75 

Kootenay,  B.C 99 

Kraut  Point.   N.S 92 

L 

Lac   des   Isles.   P.Q 95 

Lachine,  P.Q.,  public    building     ...  75 


Names    of   Places,    etc.  Page 

L 

Lachute,  P.Q..  public  building 75 

Lacolle,    P.Q.,   immigration   office. ...  75 

Lacombe,  Alta.,  experimental  farm...  87 

Ladysmith,   B.C 99 

"  public  building 89 

Lake    Edward.    P.Q.,    sanatorium.  .     .  .  105 

Lakefield,   Ont.,   post  office 81 

Lake  Megantic,  P.Q.,  barracks.  .    .  .    .  .  105 

Lake  Nomining,    P.Q 95 

Lake    St.    Louis,    P.Q 5-32-95 

Lameque,  N.B 94 

Lands  leased 134 

Lanoraie,  P.Q 95 

Lansdowne,    Ont.,    post   office 81 

La  Passe,  Ont 98 

Laprairie,    P.Q 33-96 

"            "    public   building 75 

L'Ardoise,  N.S 92 

L'Assomption,    P.Q.,    public    building.  .  75 

Lauzon,  P.Q.,  dry  docks 96 

Lavaltrie,  P.Q.  .    .' 96 

Lawlors  Island,   N.S 72 

Leamington,   Ont.,   wharf 98 

"       public  building.    .  .  81 

Legal  services 102 

Lennoxville,  P.Q.,  experimental  farm..  76 

Leonardville,  N.B 94 

Le  Pas,   Man.,  post  office,   etc 84 

Les  Eboulements,    P.Q 96 

Les  Escoumains,    P.Q 96 

Lethbridge,    Alta.,    public    buildings...    88-111 

Levis,  P.Q.,  harbour 96 

"           "      graving    dock 66-70 

"           "      post  office 76 

Lindsay.   Ont.,  public  building 81 

L'Islet.   P.Q 96 

Listowel,    Ont..   public   buildings    ....  81 

Little  Brook,  N.S 92 

Little  Current.    Ont 98 

Little  Narrows,   N.S 92 

Little  River,  N.S 92 

B.C 99 

Little  Pembina  River,  Man 98 

Liverpool,    N.S.,    public    building.  ...  73 

Livingston   Cove,    N.S 9  2 

Lloydminster,    Sask.,    public    buildings.  85 

Lockeport,  N.S 92 

Locks  and  dams 54 

Loggieville,   N.B 29-94 

London,  Ont.,  public  buildings 81-107 

Long  Bay,    B.C 99 

Long  Beach,  B.C 99 

Long   Point.    N.S 92 

Longueuil,  P.Q.,   public  building 76 

L'Orignal,   Ont..  post  office 81 

"              "      wharf 98 

Lotbiniere.    P.Q 96 

Louiseville,  P.Q.,  post  office 76 

Lower   Kingsburg,   N.S 27-92 

Lower   Newcastle,   N.B 94 

Lumber    trade 2 

Lunenburg,   N.S..   public   building.  ...  73 

Mc 

McAras  Brook.  N.S 92 

McDonald's,   B.C 99 

McKay's  Point.  N.S 92 

McLean's  Gully.  N.B 94 

McXair's   Cove.  N.S.. 92 

McPherson's  Cove,  P.E.I 93 


SESSIONAL   PAPER   No.   19 


IXDEX 


Names  of  Places,  etc.  Page 

M 

Mabou.  N.S 92 

Macleod,    Alta..    public    building.  ...  88 

Madawaska    River.    Ont 55-101 

Magdalen    Islands,    P.Q.,    telegraphs..  61--101 

Magog,   P.Q 96 

"           "  public   building 76 

Maitland,  N.S 92 

Malagash,  N.S 92 

Malbaie.  P.Q 96 

Maple  Creek,  Sask.,  public  buildings.  .  85 

Margaree,    N.S 27-92 

Margaretville,    N.S 92 

Marieville.   P.Q..  public  building    ....  73 

Maritime   Provinces,    telegraphs    .  .     .  .  101 

Markham.   Ont..  post  office 81 

Martins   Head,    N.B 94 

Marysville,   N.B.,   public  building.  .     .  .  17-74 

Matane,  P.Q.,  post  office 76 

Matane,  P.Q.,  wharf 96 

Matapedia,    P.Q.,    bridge 56-101 

Maugerville,  N.B 94 

Meat   Cove,   N.S 92 

Mechin,    P.Q 96 

Medicine    Hat,    Alta.,    public    building. 

Megantic,   P.Q.,   post  office 76 

Melfort,    Sask.,   post   office 85 

Melita,  Man.,  post  office 84 

ickville,   Ont.,   post   office 8n 

Meteghan,  N.S 92 

Middle  River,  N.S 92 

Midland,    Ont.,    post   office 81 

Mildmay,   Ont.,   post  office 81 

Military    hospitals,    etc 7-20-113 

Mill  Creek,  N.S 92 

Mille  Vaches,  P.Q 96 

Milltown,    N.B.,    public   building    ....  74 

Milton,  Ont.,  post  office 81 

Milverton,   Ont.,  post  office 81 

Miminegash,    P.E.I 93 

Minaki,  Ont 98 

Mink  River,  P.E.I '.  .    .  .  93 

Minnedosa,   Man.,  public  building.  ...  84 

Miramichi  River,  N.B 29-94 

Mirror  Lake.  B.C 99 

Mission  City,  B.C 99 

Mission   River.    Ont 35 

Mitchell,  Ont.,  public  building 82 

Moncton,    N.B.,    public    building.  .      .  .  74-104 

"              "        wharf 94 

Montague,     P.E.I.,     public    building...  73 

Mont  Joli,  P.Q.,  post  office 76 

Montmagny,  P.Q.,  public    buildings     .  .  76 

•'                  "      wharf 96 

Montmorency    Falls,    P.Q.,    hospital...  105 

Montreal  River,  Ont 98 

Montreal,    P.Q.,    public    buildings..     ..  76-105 

"               *'       dry   dock 96 

Monuments 102 

Moosejaw,    Sask.,   public  buildings.  .  .  .  85-110 

Moosomin,    Sask.,    land    office 86 

Morden,    Man.,   post   office 84 

"               experimental    farm.     .  .  84 

Moshers    Bay,    N.S 92 

Mount   Forest,    Ont.,   public   building.  .  82 

Mount  Stewart.  P.E.I 93 

Murray  Bay,  P.Q 96 

"                  post  office 77 

Murray  Harbour,  P.E.I 93 

Musquodoboit,  N.S 92 


Names  of  Places,  etc.  Page 
N 

Xaas   River,   B.C 99 

Xakusp,    B.C 99 

Xanaimo,  B.C.,  public  building 89 

Xappan,    N.S.,    experimental    farm.    .  .  73 

Napanee,    Ont,    public    buildings..     ..  82 

National  Art  Gallery 15-156 

Xaufrage,   P.E.I 93 

Xecum  Teuch,  N.S 92 

Needles,  B.C 100 

Neepawa,    Man.,    post    office 84 

Negro    Point,    N.B 94 

Xeguac,   N.B v 94 

Neils  Harbour,   N.S 92 

Nelson,   B.C.,   public  buildings 89 

Newcastle,    N.B.,    public   building.  ...  74 

New  Campbellton,    N.S 92 

New  Carlisle,  P.Q 98 

New   Glasgow,    N.S.,   public   building.  .  73 

Newmarket,  Ont.,  public  buildings.  .    ..  82-108 

Newport,  P.Q 96 

New   Westminster,    B.C.,    public 'build- 
ings   89-112 

Niagara    Falls,    Ont.,    public  buildings.  82-108 

Nicolet,  P.Q.,  public  buildings 77 

Xicomen    Slough,    B.C 99 

Ninette,   Man.,   sanatorium 109 

XTomining,    P.Q.,      immigration     build- 
ing   77 

North    Battleford,    Sask,    public   build- 
ing   86 

North  Bay,   Ont,    breakwater 98 

North  Bay,  Ont.,  public  buildings 82-108 

North  Gut,  N.S 92 

North  Head,  N.B 94 

North     Shores      St.      Lawrences      tele- 
graphs  ; 61-101 

North   Sydney.    N.S 27-92 

"  public  buildings    .  .  73-103 

North  Timiskaming    bridge 101 

North  Vancouver,    B.C.,    public    build- 
ing   89 

North  Wiltshire,    P.E.I. ,    hospital..     ..  104 

Northwest  telegraphs 

Northwest   Miramachi    River,    N.B.     ..  29-94 

Norway  Bay,  P.Q 96 

Norwich,    Ont.,    post   office 8  2 

Notre    Dame    du    Portage,    P.Q 96 

Nyanza,   N.S 92 

O 

Oak   Point.   N.B 94 

Oakville,   Ont 98 

Ogdens  Pond.  N.S 92 

Ogilvies,   N.S 92 

Okanagan  River,  B.C 100 

Orangeville,   Ont,  public  building.  ...  82 

Orillia,    Ont.,    public    building 82 

Oromocto,  N.B 94 

Oshawa,   Ont.,  post    office 82 

"       pier 98 

Ossekeag,   N  B.„  post  office 74 

Ottawa,  Ont.,  art    gallery 156 

"      buildings  and   grounds.  .  79 

"             "      experimental    farm..     ..  18-79 

"             "      government    house.  ...  79 

"      Hunter  Building 18-79 

"      public  buildings 18-79-106 

"             "      river 101 

"             "      roads    and    bridges.  .     .  .  57-101 

"      slides    and    booms 54-64 

Owen    Sound,    Ont.,    public    building.  .  82 


DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  WORKS 


10  GEORGE  V,   A.   1920 


Names  of  Places,  etc. 


Pacific    Highway,     B.C.,      immigration 

office 89 

Palmerston,  Ont.,  post  office.  .......  82 

Papineauville,    P.Q 9  6 

Paris,  Ont.,  public  building 82 

Parkers  Cove,  N.S 92 

Parkhill,  Ont.,  public  building 82 

Parliament    buildings,    Ottawa 10-79 

Parrsboro,    N.S.,    public   building.  ...  73 

wharf 92 

Partridge    Island,    N.B 30-94 

Paspebiac,    P.Q 96 

Peace  River,   Alta.,  immigration  build- 
ing   SS 

Peace  River     Crossing,     Alta.,     public 

buildings 88 

Pelee  Island,  Ont.,   telegraphs 60-101 

Pembroke,    Ont.,   public   buildings..     ..  82 

wharf 98 

Penticton,   B.C.,   post  office 89 

Perce,  P.Q 96 

Pereaux,  N.S.,  wharf 92 

Peribonka,  P.Q.,   immigration  building.  77 

wharf 96 

Perth,   Ont.,   post  office 82 

Peterborough,   Ont.,    public  buildings.  .  82 

Petawawa,  Ont 98 

"  river 55-101 

Petite   Riviere,    N.S 92 

Petit    Rocher,    N.B 94 

Petrolia,    Ont.,    public    building 82 

Phillipsburg,  P.Q 96 

Pieton,    Ont.,    public    building 82 

Pictou,    N.S.,    public    building 73-103 

92 

Pierreville,  P.Q.,  public    building.  ...  77 

wharf 96 

Pincher   Creek,   Alta.,   forestry   office.  .  88 

Pleasant  Bay,  N.S 92 

Plessisville,    P.Q.,    post    office 77 

Pointe  a  Blie,  P.Q 96 

Pointe    a    Pizeau,    P.Q 96 

Pointe  aux  Esquimaux,  P.Q 96 

Pointe  aux   Trembles.   P.Q 96 

Pointe  Cavignale,    P.Q 96 

Pointe  Claire,  P.Q 96 

Pointe  Fortune,  P.Q 96 

Pointe  Piche.  P.Q 96 

Poirierville,    N.S 92 

Poltimore,  P.Q 96 

Portage  la  Prairie,  Man.,  public  build- 
ings      84 

Portage  du  Fort  bridge 56-101 

Portage   River,   N.B 94 

Port  a  Pique.  N.S 92 

Port  Alberni.   B.C.,   post  office 89 

Tort   Arthur,   Ont 5-37-98 

"  public  buildings.     .19-82-108 

Port  Burwell.  Ont 38-98 

Port  Colborne,  Ont.,    public    building.  .  82 

"       breakwaters. ...  98 

Port  Dover.   Ont 98 

Port  Pufferin.  N.S 92 

Porters  Lake,  N.S 92 

Port  George,  N.S 92 

Port  Hawkesbury,    N.S 92 

Port  Hilford,   N.S 92 

Port  Hood,  N.S 92 

Port  Hope,   Ont 98 

"    public    building 82 

Portland,    Ont 98 


Names  of  Places,  etc.  Page 

P 

Port  Latour,    N.S 92 

Port  Maitland,    Ont 98 

Port  Perry,    Ont.,    post    office 82 

Port  Robinson,  Ont.,  military  building.  108 

Port  Rowan,  Ont 98 

Portsmouth,   Ont 98 

hospital 108 

Port  Stanley,  "Ont 39-98 

Port  Wade,   N.S 92 

Portuguese    Cove,    N.S 92 

Poulamond,   N.S..    ' 92 

Powell  River,  B.C 100 

Pownal,  P.E.I -93 

Prescott,    Ont.,    public    buildings..     ..  82 

reston,  Ont.,  post  office 82 

Prince  Albert,   Snsk.,  public  buildings.  86 

Prince  Edward  Island,  telegraphs..    ..  101 

Prim  Island,  P.E.I 93 

Prince   Rupert,    B.C 100 

"                    "    public    buildings...  89 

Proctor,   B.C..     : 100 

Printing  and  stationery 90 

Properties    purchased    and    sold 126 

"             leased 134 

Public  buildings 6-17 

Q 

Quarantine   telegraphs 61 

Quebec  telegraphs 101 

public  buildings 17-75 

Quebec  city,  harbour 96 

"  public    buildings 18-77-105 

Queens  Bay,   B.C 100 

Queen  Charlotte  City,   B.C 100 

Quinze  dam 102 

R 

Rainy  River,  Ont 98 

Recapitulation 114 

Red  Deer,    Alta.,   public    building.  ...  88 

Red  Point,   P.E.I 93 

Red  River,   Man 42-98 

Regina,    Sask.,    public   buildings 86-110 

Renata,    B.C 100 

Renfrew,  Ont.,  public  building 82 

Rents 67 

Reston,  Man.,  post  office 

Revelstoke,  B.C.,  public    buildings.     .  .  89-112 

100 

Revenue 2-59 

Rexton,    N.B 94 

Richards  Landing,   Ont 98 

Richardson,   N.B 94 

Richibucto,    N.B.,   public   building.  ...  74 

Richmond,    P.Q.,    public    building.  ...  77 

Ridgetown,  Ont.,  post  office 82 

Rigaud,    P.Q.,   public   building 77 

Rimouski,  P.Q 96 

"              "    public   building 77 

Riverglade,    N.B.,   sanatorium 104 

River   gaugings 102 

Riviere  aux  Vases.  P.Q 96 

Riviere  Batiscan,  P.Q 96 

River  Bourgeois,  NiS 92 

Riviere  du  LiSvre,  P.Q 96 

"                     "        lock 54 

Riviere  du    Loup,    P.Q 34-96 

Riviere   Gatineau.    P.Q 55-101 

Riviere  Ouelle,   P.Q 96 

Riviere  Saguenay,    P.Q 101 

River  St.    Charles.   P.Q 54 


SESSIONAL   PAPER   No.   19 


INDEX 


Names  of  Places,  etc. 


Page 


R 

River  St.   Clair.  Ont 98 

River  St.  John  and  tributaries 94 

Riviere    St.   Louis.   P.Q 96 

Riviere  St.   Maurice,  P.Q.,    dredging...  96 

"                         "                     slides  ....  65 

Roads   and   bridges 56-101 

Roberts   Creek.   B.C 100 

Roberval,   P.Q.,  public    buildings..      ..  77 

"                     wharf 96 

Robichauds.   N.B 30 

Roblin,    Man.,    forestry    office 84 

Roche's    Point.   Ont 98 

Rock  Island.   P.Q..  post  office 77 

Rocky  Mountain,  Alta.,  forestry  office.  88 

Rondeau.   Ont 98 

Rossland,  B.C.,  public  building 89 

Ross   Ferry.   N.S 92 

Rosthern,    Sask.,    experimental    farm..  86 

Round   Hill.    N.S 9  2 

Roy,  B.C 100 

Royston,   B.C 100 

Ruscum   River.   Ont 39-9S 

Rustico,  P.E  1 93 

St. 

Ste.   Adelaide  de  Pabos,  P.Q 96 

Ste.   Agathe     des     Monts,      P.Q.,      post 

office 77 

Ste.    Agathe    des    Monts,    P.Q.,    sana- 
torium   105 

St.   Alphonse,    P.Q 9'6 

St.   Andrew's,    N.B 94 

St.   Andrews,  P.Q 96 

St.    Andrews   Rapids,   Man 99 

Ste.  Anne  de  Beaupre,  P.Q 9  6 

Ste.    Anne    de     Bellevue,      P.Q..     post 

office 77 

Ste.   Anne  de  Bellevue,  P.Q.,  dredging.  96 
Ste.   Anne   de   Bellevue.   P.Q.,    military 

hospital 105 

Ste.   Anne  de  Chicoutimi,   P.Q 96 

Ste.    Anne    de    la    Pocatiere.    P.Q.,    ex- 
perimental   farm 77 

Ste.   Anne  des  Monts.  P.Q 96 

St.   Antoine  Station,  P.Q 96 

St.   Antoine  de  Richelieu,   P.Q 96 

St.   Boniface,   Man.,   public  building...  84 
St.   Catharine's,   Ont.,   public  buildings.   82-108 

St.  Charles  de  Richelieu.   P.Q 96 

Ste.    Croix.    P.Q 96 

St.   Denis  de  Richelieu,  P.Q 96 

Ste.   Emilie.   P.Q 96 

St.   Eustache,   P.Q.,  post  office 77 

Ste.   Famille,  P.Q 97 

Ste.  Felicite,  P.Q 97 

St.  Felix    de   Valois,    P.Q.,   post   office.  77 

St.  Francois,   Isle   d'Orleans,   P.Q..    ..  97 

St.  Francois   du   Lac.   P.Q 97 

St.  Gabriel    de     Brandon,      P.Q.,     post 

office 77 

Ste.   Genevieve.   P.Q 97 

St.  George  de  Beauce,  P.Q.,  post  office.  78 

St.   Godfroy.  P.Q 97 

St.   Hyacinthe,   P.Q.,  public  buildings..  78 

St.  Ignace  de  Loyola.   P.Q 97 

St.  Irenee,  P.Q 97 

St.    Jacques    de    l'Achigan.    P.Q.,     post 

office 78 

St.  Jean  des  Chaillons,  P.Q 97 

St.  Jean   de   Matha,   P.Q.,   post  office.  .  78 


Names  of  Places,  etc.  Page 

St. 

St.  Jean  d'Orleans,  P.Q 97 

St.  Jer6me,  P.Q.,  public    building..     ..  78 

wharf 97 

St.   John,   N.B.,   harbour 30-94 

"               "        river 94 

public    buildings    .  .  17-74-104 

St.   Johns,    P.Q.,    public  buildings: .     ..  78-105 

St.  Johns.    P.Q. 55-97 

"     booms 101 

St.  Joseph  de  Beauce,  P.Q.,  post  office.  78 

St.  Joseph.    N.S 92 

St.  Lambert,   P.Q.,   post  office 78 

St.  Lambert.  P.Q 97 

St.   Laurent.   P.Q 97 

St.  Lawrence   river 5—32 

St.  Leonards    bridge 56-101 

St.   Mary's,  Ont.,    public   building.  ...  82 

St.    Marys    Bay,    P.E.I 93 

St.  Mathias,  P.Q 97 

St.  Maurice   River,   dredging    .  .  ...     ..  34 

St.   Maurice  River,  P.Q.,  slides 65 

St.   Michel,    de    Bellechasse,    P.Q.  .     ..  97 

St.   Nicholas,  P.Q 97 

St.  Ours,    P.Q.,    wharf 97 

St.   Pierre    les    Becquets,    P.Q 97 

St.   Roch  de  Richelieu,  P.Q 97 

Ste.   Rose,   P.Q.,   post  office 78 

St.   Simeon,   P.Q 97 

St.   Stephen,  N.B.,  public  building.  ...  75 

<t.   Stephen,  N.B.,  wharf 94 

St.   Sulpice.   P.Q 97 

Ste.   Thfirese,     P.Q.,    public    building.  .  78 

St.   Thomas,  Ont.,  public  building.  ...  82 

St.   Tite,    P.Q.,    post    office 78 

St.  Valier,    P.Q 97 

Ste.  Victoire,  P.Q 97 

St.   Zotique,   P.Q 97 

S 

Sabrevois,    P.Q 97 

Saguenay    River,    P.Q 66-101 

Salaries    of    clerks    of    works 90-100 

Salmon  Arm,   B.C.,   post  office 89 

Salmon    River.    N.S 92 

"  Samson,"  snagboat 99 

Sandheads,    B.C 44-99 

Sand  Point,   Ont 98 

Sandwich,   Ont.,   public  building    ....  82 

Sandy  Cove,   N.S 93 

Sarnia,  Ont.,   public  buildings 82-108 

Sarnia   Bay,   Ont 39-98 

Saskatoon,  Sask.,  public  buildings.  .    .  .  86-110 

Saskatchewan    public    buildings 19-110 

telegraphs 61-101 

Savary   Island.    B.C 100 

Sault  Ste.  Marie,  Ont,  public  buildings.  82-108 

Sayabec,    P.Q.,    post    office 78 

Scotch  Cove,  N.S 93 

Scotchtown,   N.B 94 

Scott,    Sask.,    experimental    farm.  ...  86 

Seaforth,     Ont.,    public    building.  ...  82 

Sea  Otter  Cove,  B.C 100 

Selkirk.   Man.,   public  building 84 

"               99 

repair  slip 66-71-99 

Shawinigan,    P.Q.,    post   office 78 

Shawville,   P.Q.,  post  office 78 

Shediac,   N.B 94 

Sheguindah,    Ont 98 

Shelburne,    N.S.,    public    building.  ...  73 

Shelburne,  Ont.,   public   buildings..     ..  83 

Sherbrooke,    P.Q.,    public   buildings.    .  .  78 

Shippigan   Gully,    N.B 30-32-94 


DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  WORKS 


10  GEORGE  V,  A.   1920 


Names  of  Places,  etc. 


Shippigan,    N.B 32-94 

Shoal   Lake,   Man.,   post  office 84 

Short  Beach.  N.S 93 

Sidney  Mills,  B.C 99 

Sidney,    B.C.,    experimental    farm..     ..  89 

Silver   Centre,    Ont 98 

Simcoe,    Ont.-,   public   building 83 

Skeena    River,    B.C 100 

Skidegate,  B.C 100 

Skinners   Cove,   N.S 93 

Slides  and  booms 54-101 

Smiths    Falls,    Ont.,    public    building.  .  83 

Smiths    Landing,    B.C 100 

Snagboat    "  Samson  " 99 

Sointula,   B.C 100 

Soldiers,   C.R.  hospitals 8-22 

Somas    River,    B.C 100 

Sorel,  P.Q.,  public    buildings 78 

wharf 97 

Souris,  P.E.I.,  public  building 74 

"                breakwater 93 

Souris,  Man.,  post  office 84 

Southampton,  Ont 98 

South  Cove,   N.S 93 

South  East    Cove,    N.S 93 

South  Ingonish,   N.S 93 

South  Lake,  N.S 93 

Spirit   Lake,    P.Q.,    experimental   farm.  78 
Spirit  River,   Alta.,   immigration  build- 
ing   88 

Spry  Bay,  N.S 93 

Springhill,    N.S.,    public    building.  ...  73 

Squamish,    B.C.,   wharf 100 

Squirrel    Cove,    B.C 45-100 

Stanstead   Plain,   P.Q.,   post  office,   etc.  78 

Stag  Bay,  B.C 100 

Steelton,  Ont.,  post  office 83 

Stellarton,    N.S.,    post    office 73 

Steveston,    Jetty,    B.C 44-99 

Stewart,   B.C 100 

Stonewall,  Man.,  post  office 84 

Stoney  Island,  N.S 93 

Storage  dams 102 

Stratford,    Ont.,    public    buildings..     ..    83-108 

Strathroy,   Ont.,   post  office 83 

Sturgeon  Falls,   Ont 98 

post  office 83 

Sudbury,   Ont.,  post  office 83 

Summerland,   B.C.,   post  office 89 

Summerside,  P.E.I. ,  public   building.  .  .  74 

"        breakwater 93 

Surveys    and    inspections 102 

Sussex,    N.B.,   public   building 75 

Sutherland,    Sask.,    forest   nursery   sta- 
tion   86 

Swims  Point,  N.S 93 

Swift   Current,   Sask.,   public  buildings.  86 

Sydney,  N.S.,    public    buildings 73-103 

harbour 93 

Sydney  Mines,  N.S.,  public  buildings.  .  73 

T 

Tadousac,  P.Q 95 

Tangier,  N.S 93 

Telephones 60 

Telegraph    lines,    generally 14-58-101 

"        revenue    3 

Terrebonne,  P.Q.,  public  building.  ...  78 

Test   borings 100 

The   Range,  N.B 94 

Thessalon,  Ont 98 


Names  of  Places,  etc. 


Page 


T 

Thetford   Mines,   P.Q.,   public   building.  78 

Three  Rivers,   P.Q.,  public  buildings..  18-78 

Three  Rivers,  P.Q 34-97 

Thurso,    P.Q 97 

Tignish,  P.E.I. ,  public    building 74 

"             "        breakwater 93 

Tilbury.    Ont..    post    office 83- 

Tillsonburg.    Ont.,    post   office 83 

Timiskaming    telegraphs 101 

dam 102 

Tisdale,   Sask.,   immigration  building.  .  86 

Tobermory,    Ont 98 

Torino,   B.C 100 

Toronto,   Ont.,    harbour 40-98 

public    buildings    .  .     .  .  83-108 

Tiacadie,    N.B..    lazaretto 75 

Trail,    B.C.,   post   office 89 

Transcona,    Man.,    post    office 94 

Treadwell,    Ont 98 

Trent    and    Newcastle    slides 66-101 

Trenton,  Ont.,  public  building 83 

Trenton,    N.S.,    post    office 73 

Trois  Pistoles,  P.Q.,  post  office 78 

Truro,    N.S.,    public   buildings 73 

Turners  Island.  N.S 93 

Tynemouth  Creek,   N.B 94 

Tynan,  SS.,   cable  ship 62-101 

TJ 

Union  Bay,   B.C.,   post   office 89 

wharf 100 

Unity,    Sask.,    immigration    building.  .  86 

Upper    Ottawa    storage   dams 102 

Uxbridge,  Ont.,   post  office 83 

V 

Valleyfield,    P.Q.,   public   building..     ..  78 

Van    Anda.    B.C 100 

Vancouver,  B.C.,  public  buildings.  .  .19-89-112 

Vancouver,   B.C.,    harbour 46-100 

Vancouver    Island    telegraphs 62 

Vaudreuil,  P.Q 97 

Vercheres,  P.Q 97 

Verdun,  P.Q.,  post  office 78 

Vermilion,  Alta.,  immigration  building.  8S 

Vernon,    B.C..    public  building 89 

Victoria,   B.C.,     public    buildings      ....  89-113 

harbour,   B.C 47-100 

Victoria,    P.E.I 93 

Victoriaville,   P.Q.,   post  office 78 

Viking,    Alta.,    immigration    building.  .  88 

Ville   Marie,   P.Q 97 

Virden,    Man.,    post   office,    etc 84 

W 

Wadena,    Sask.,    buildings 86 

Wainwright,   Sask.,  immigration  build- 
ing   88 

Walkerton,    Ont.,   public  building.  ...  83 

Walkerville,  Ont,  public  building.  ...  83 

War   appropriations 102 

Washabuck,   N.S 93 

Centre,    N.S 93 

Waterloo,  Ont.,  public  building 83 

Watt    Settlement,    N.S 93 

Wedgeport,    N.S 93 

Welchpool,  N.B 94 

Welland,    Ont.,    public    buildings..     ..  83-109 

Wellington,    Ont 98 

Wendover,  Ont 98 


SESSIONAL   PAPER   No.   19 


INDEX 


Names  of  Places,  etc.  Page 

W 

West   Demars,    B.C 100 

"West  Poplar,  Sask.,  immigration  build- 
ing-   86 

West  Pubnico,   N.S 93 

West   Sheet   Harbour,   N.S 93 

West    Ship    Harbour,    N.S 93 

Westville,    N.S.,    public    building.  ...  73 

Wetaskiwin,    Alta.,    public    buildings..  88-111 

Weyburn,  Sask.,  post  office 86 

Weymouth,    N.S.,    post    office 73 

Wheatly,   Ont 98 

"Whitby,    Ont.,    public    buildings 83-109 

White  Rock,  B.C 100 

Whycocomagh,    N.S *      93 

Wilkie,    Sask.,    public    building 86 

Williams     Head,      B.C.,       quarantine 

station 19-90-10-0 

Willow  Point,  B.C 100 

Wilsons  Beach,  N.B 94 

Windsor,   Ont.,    public    buildings    .      .  .  83-109 

dock 98 

N.S.,  public    buildings...     ..  73-103 

Wingham,    Ont.,    public   building.  ...  84 


Names  of  Places,  etc. 


Page 


W 

Winnipeg,     Man.,     public    buildings...    85-109 

Woburn,   P.Q 97 

Wolf  son  Bay,  B.C 100 

Wolfville,  N.S.,    public    building 73 

"        wharf 93 

Wood  Islands,  P.E.I 93 

Woodstock,  N.B.,   public  building..    ..  75 

Ont.,   public  building.  ...  84 

Woodward    Cove,    N.B 94 

Woodward  Slough,     B.C 45-99 

-  Y 

Yamaska,    P.Q 97 

Yamaska  River,  P.Q.,  lock  and  dam..  54-97 

Yarmouth,  N.S 93 

public  building 73 

Yorkton,    Sask.,    public   buildings..     ..  86 

York    Bridge,    Ont 101 

Youngs  Cove,  N.B , 94 

Yukon  public  buildings 90 

Yukon,    B.C 101 

"        telegraphs 62 


10  GEORGE  V  SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  19  A.   1920 


REPORT 

OF  THE 

DEPUTY  iMINISTER  OF  PUBLIC  WORKS 

FOR  THE 

FISCAL  YEAR  ENDED  MARCH  31,  1919. 


DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  WORKS,  CANADA, 

Ottawa,  September  25,  1919. 
Hon.  Arthur  L.  Sifton, 

Minister  of  Public  Works, 
Ottawa.  Ont. 

Sir, — I  have  tbe  honour  to  submit  the  report  of  the  Department  of  Public  Works 
for  the  fiscal  year  ended  March  31,  1919. 

EXPENDITURE. 

The  total  expenditure  incurred  by  the  department  during  the  fiscal  year  1918-19, 
on  its  various  works  of  construction,  maintenance,  and  operation  amounted  to  the 
sum  of  $21,395,500.45,  of  which  the  sum  of  $8,492,503.87  is  charged  to  the  War  Appro- 
priation. The  details  of  this  outlay  may  be  classified  under  the  following  sub- 
divisions : — 

Harbour  and  river  works $   3,181,348   90 

Dredging-,  plant,  etc 677,500  29 

Slides  and  booms 56,168   70 

Roads  and  bridges 24,952   21 

Public  buildings 7,466,679   35 

Telegraphs 789, SS3   40 

Miscellaneous 706,463   73 

Total ' $12,902,996   5S 

Expenditure  chargeable  to  War  Appropriation,   not  included 

in  above S, 492, 503   87 

Grand  total $21,395,500   4- 

It  will  be  observed  that  the  departmental  expenditure  on  ordinary  account  was 
some  one  and  one-half  million  dollars  less  than  that  of  the  preceding  year,  as  a  result 
of  the  continued  application  of  the  policy  of  retrenchment  which  has  been  carefully 
practised  throughout  the  period  of  the  war.  Within  the  last  four  years,  the  expendi- 
ture of  this  department  has  been  decreased  by  the  enormous  sum  of  $16,380,320.24, 
the  outlay  in  1915  having  reached  the  sum  of  $29,283,316.82. 

19—1 


2  DEPARTMENT  OE  PUBLIC   WORKS 

10  GEORGE  V,  A.   1920 
REVENUE. 

The  revenue  for  the  year  amounted  to  the  sum  of  $530,482.61,  and  is  made  up  as 
follows : — 

Slides  and  booms *   16. .63    4.> 

Graving  docks 72.42S   04 

Rents 101.664    Zi 

Telegraphs 231,331    6o 

Casual  revenue 10S.295   19 

Total $530,482   61 


There  is  an  increase  of  $108,990.77  over  last  year's  figures;  the  principal  increase 
occurring  under  the  headings  of  "Graving  Docks,"  "Telegraphs,"  and  "Casual 
Revenue,"  while  the  returns  from  "  Slides  and  Booms,"  fell  off  from  $26,187.92  in 
1917-18  to  $16,763.45  in  1918-19,  a  difference  of  $9,424.47.  The  Petawawa  river 
returned  $3,863.36  in  1917-18,  while  last  year  there  was  no  timber  at  all  on  that  river. 
On  the  Black  river,  roughly  speaking,  there  was  only  one-third  of  the  revenue  received 
in  1917-18. 

The  last  three  years  have  been  particularly  trying  to  the  producers  of  sawn  lum- 
ber. Not  only  have  they  had  to  contend  at  times  with  low  water,  which  makes  driving 
arduous  and  expensive,  but  the  cost  of  labour  increased  very  rapidly;  and,  as  the 
flower  of  the  woodsmen  went  overseas,  notwithstanding  the  greatly  enhanced  price  paid 
for  labour,  the  quality  was  not  at  all  equal  to  the  extra  cost.  Moreover,  the  cost  of 
provisions  was  a  very  serious  item.  The  department's  information  is  that  last  winter 
it  cost  ninety-two  cents  per  day  to  feed  a  man  in  the  bush,  or  about  one  hundred  and 
fifty  per  cent  more  than  it  did  in  1914.  It  may  be  said  that  the  prices  obtained  for 
sawn  lumber  fully  compensated  for  the  increased  cost  of  production.  Possibly  this 
might  be  true,  if  it  could  have  been  marketed;  but  it  is  a  recognized  fact  that  no  space 
whatever  was  available  for  the  transportation  of  lumber  overseas  in  1916,  1917  and 
1918 ;  and,  as  the  cost  of  labour  and  other  materials  had  so  rapidly  increased,  building 
operations  were  so  largely  curtailed  that  no  market,  but  for  a  limited  portion  of  the 
output  of  Canadian  lumber,  was  obtainable  either  in  Canada  or  the  United  States, 
and  there  was  little  or  no  transportation  space  available  for  shipment  of  lumber  to 
South  America.  Taking  all  these  facts  into  consideration,  it  is  not  a  matter  of  sur- 
prise that  last  year  the  number  of  logs  which  passed  through  the  Ottawa  River  works 
was  the  smallest  on  record.  To  counterbalance  this,  however,  the  quantity  of  pulp 
wood  which  came  through  was  more  than  double  that  of  the  previous  year. 

In  the  revenue  derived  from  dry  docks,  there  was  an  increase  of  $15,943.88.  One 
vessel  alone — a  Japanese  boat,  the  Canada  Maru,  of  5,760  tons — was  in  the  Esquimalt, 
B.C.,  dry  dock  from  the  16th  September,  1918,  until  the  11th  January,  1919,.  one  hundred 
working  days,  and  the  charges  thereon  were  $17,170.60.  This  is  the  record  for  a  single 
merchant  vessel  since  this  dock  opened  for  business. 

Towards  the  close  of  last  season,  a  number  of  vessels  belonging  to  the  United  States 
Shipping  Board,  which  it  was  desired  to  get  out  to  sea  before  the  close  of  navigation 
on  the  St.  Lawrence,  caused  quite  a  rush  in  the  Levis  dock  from  the  beginning  of 
December,  1918.  The  dock  was  occupied  by  these  vessels  up  to  December  22,  1918,  the 
latest  date  on  record. 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  3 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  19 

The  increase  of  $26,454.22  over  last  year  in  the  Telegraph  Revenue  was  derived 
chiefly  from  the  western  provinces.  The  lines  in  Alberta  show  an  increase  of  $4,785.17; 
those  in  British  Columbia  of  $8,042.63;  while  the  Yukon  yielded  $12,313.71  more 
revenue  than  in  the  year  1917-18.  This  was  mainly  due  to  the  activities  of  the  Imperial 
Munitions  Board  on  Queen  Charlotte  island  in  the  production  of  aeroplane  spruce. 

The  large  increase  in  Casual  Revenue  is  due  principally  to  the  sale  of  various 
items  of  plant,  old  immigration  buildings  no  longer  required,  and  scrap,  together  with 
rentals  from  dredging  plant  which  was  not  in  use  by  the  Department  during  the  last 
year.  ; 


From  1845  to  1864,  the  revenue  from  slides  was  collected  by  the  Department  of 
Customs  through  the  collectors.  In  1855,  the  collection  was  transferred  to  the  Depart- 
ment of  Crown  Lands.  In  1867,  Confederation,  the  dues  having  ceased  to  be  provincial 
revenue,  the  collection  was  transferred  to  the  Department  of  Inland  Revenue,  but  in 
1868  it  was  arranged  that  the  Crown  Timber  Office  at  Ottawa  be  continued  as  a 
Dominion  Office,  which  would  also  collect  all  timber  and  slide  dues  for  the  three 
Governments,  each  Government  paying  an  equal  share  of  the  office  expenses.  On  the 
19th  August,  1889,  an  Order  in  Council  was  passed,  transferring  the  collection  of 
slide  and  boom  dues  to  the  control  of  the  Department  of  Public  Works.  In  April,  1895, 
the  collection  of  revenue  from  graving  docks  and  locks  was  placed  under  the  charge 
of  the  Collector  of  Revenue.  The  collection  of  rents  became  a  feature  in  1902,  and 
increased  rapidly  on  the  acquisition  of  the  Sussex  Street  and  Wellington  Street  proper- 
ties; and,  by  Order  in  Council  of  the  27th  April,  1909,  the  collection  of  rentals  under 
leases  granted  by  this  Department  and  previously  collected  by  the  Inland  Revenue 
Department,  was  transferred  to  the  Department  of  Public  Works. 

HARBOUR   AND   RIVER  WORKS. 

The  total  expenditure  in  this  branch  of  the  Department  of  Public  Works  was 
$3,181,348.90,  which  is  $2,370,425.07  less  than  last  year's  outlay. 

The  following  is  a  list  of  works  which  have  been  completed  during  the  year : — 

Nova  Scotia. — Battery  Point,  extension  to  south  breakwater;  McKay's  Point, 
reconstruction  of  portion  of  breakwater;  Margaree,  breakwater;  Meteghan,  repairs 
to  wharf. 

Ontario. — Bayfield,  renewal  of  south  pier;  Cobourg,  repairs  to  east  pier;  Port 
Burwell,  repairs  to  pier;  Port  Stanley,  extension  to  breakwater. 

British  Columbia. — Esquimalt,  coaling  wharf;  Squirrel  Cove,  small  float;  Van- 
couver, sprinkler  system,  sheds  on  wharf,  shed  on  west  side. 

The  following  works  were  under  contract,  but  unfinished  at  the  end  of  the  fiscal 
year : — 

Nova  Scotia. — Chimney  Corner,  wharf;  Halifax,  north  slip  King's  Wharf, 
retaining  wall  and  dredging;  Inverness,  extension  to  breakwater  and  dredging; 
Lower  Kingsburg,  breakwater,  skidway  and  shed. 

New  Brunswick. — Back  Bay,  renewal  of  wharf;  St.  John  Harbour,  Courtenay 
Bay  Breakwater  extension,  dredging,  dry  dock;  Tynemouth  Creek,  reconstruction  of 
western  block. 

19— li 


4  DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  WORKS 

10  GEORGE  V,   A.   1920 

Quebec. — Champlaiu  dry  dock;  Laprairie,  improvements  to  dyke;  Yereheres, 
wharf. 

Ontario. — Burlington,  repairs  to  pier;  Cobourg,  repairs  to  Langevin  Pier; 
Toronto,  Harbour  Works. 

Saskatchewan. — Sutherland,   water   supply   system. 

British  Columbia. — Esquimalt,  dockyard  wharf;  Fraser  River,  protection  works 
to  jetty;  Hardy  Bay,  construction  of  float;  New  Massett,  wharf;  Victoria,  shed  on 
pier  No.  3. 

As  a  result  of  the  disastrous  explosion  of  a  munitions  ship,  which  occurred  in  the 
harbour  of  Halifax  in  December,  1917,  the  dry  dock  constructed  by  the  Halifax  Graving 
Dock  Company,  Limited,  and  completed  in  1889,  and  the  repair  sheds  and  plant 
connected  therewith,  were  practically  destroyed.  In  view  of  the  great  importance  of 
the  port  of  Halifax  as  a  naval  base,  and  the  fact  that  it  was  largely  used  by  warships 
and  war  craft  of  all  kinds,  and  by  transports  of  His  Majesty  and  his  allies,  and  also 
as  a  rendezvous  for  ships  needing  convoy,  it  was  urgently  necessary  for  the  purposes 
of  the  war  that  all  facilities  for  the  repairing  of  ships  of  war  and  other  vessels  should 
be  effectively  available  with  the  least  possible  delay;  and,  in  order  to  attain  this 
object,  an  agreement  was  entered  into  with  the  owners  of  the  dock,  by  which  they 
agreed  to  proceed  with  its  reconstruction  and  to  furnish  the  sum  of  $111,000,  which 
•  was  the  amount  of  insurance,  towards  the  cost,  provided  the  Government  would  supply 
the  balance  of  the  cost  of  reconstruction  by  way  of  subsidy;  the  company  to  relieve 
the  Government  of  any  alleged  liability,  as  well  as  responsibility,  for  the  operation 
and  maintenance  of  the  dock.  However,  the  progress  made  by  the  company  in  the 
reconstruction  of  the  dock  was  not  satisfactory ;  and,  in  view  of  the  urgency  of  restor- 
ing the  port  of  Halifax  to  its  former  status  as  a  naval  base  and  rendezvous  during 
the  war,  and  preparing  it  to  meet  the  greatly  increased  needs  of  shipping  after  the 
war,  it  was  necessary  for  the  Government  to  take  steps  to  possess  itself  of  the  dock. 

At  this  time  a  new  company,  known  as  the  Halifax  Shipyards,  Limited,  was 
formed,  with  the  object  of  taking  up  shipbuilding  and  repairing  on  a  large  and 
modern  scale.  This  company  acquired  the  property  innnediately  adjoining  the  dry 
dock,  which  formerly  belonged  to  the  Acadia  Sugar  Refinery,  and  proceeded  to  lay 
down  three  shipbuilding  berths,  upon  which  steel  ships  of  approximately  ten  thousand 
tons  could  be  constructed.  The  first  of  these  ships,  the  largest  hitherto  built  in 
Canada,  will  be  ready  for  commission  in  or  about  the  month  of  September,  1920, 
.although  the  time  limit  specified  in  the  contract  is  the  17th  January,  1921. 

It  was  considered  advisable,  when  the  provision  of  additional  tonnage  was  so 
urgent  and  important  in  the  public  interest,  to  lease  the  dry  dock  property  to  the 
Halifax  Shipyards,  Limited,  to  be  operated  by  that  company  in  connection  with  its 
new  enterprise.  This  was  authorized  by  Order  in  Council  under  date  of  June  10,  1918, 
and  the  property  was  leased  to  the  Halifax  Shipyards,  Limited  for  a  period  of  one 
year,  at  a  rental  of  $62,500  per  annum;  the  lease  to  continue  from  year  to  year  upon 
the  same  terms  and  conditions;  the  lessee  binding  itself  to  purchase  the  property  for 
the  sum  of  $1,250,000  at  any  time  during  the  currency  of  the  lease,  upon  a  thirty- 
days'  notification  in  writing  from  the  Minister  of  Public  Works. 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  5 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  19 

DREDGING. 

The  sum  expended  under  this  heading  amounted  to  $677,500.29,  which  is  $728,- 
337.87  less  than  the  outlay  of  the  previous  year. 

•  The  further  reduced  expenditure  on  account  of  dredging  during  the  past  fiscal 
year  indicated  the  continued  endeavour  on  the  part  of  the  department  to  reduce 
expenditures,  on  account  of  the  war.  This  is  also  shown  by  the  fact  that  there  were 
thirty-eight  units  of  departmental  dredging  plant  not  in  commission. 

Due  to  this  fact,  a  number  of  departmental  tugs  were  released  and  placed  at  the 
service  of  other  departments,  by  which  they  were  needed  in  connection  with  their 
work.  The  steamers  Helena,  Canso,  and  Speedy  were  in  service  with  the  Department 
of  the  Naval  Service,  and  the  Lis  gar  with  the  Customs  Department.  The  tugs  Point 
Ellice  and  Point  Grey  were  used  by  the  Imperial  Munitions  Board  in  connection  with 
the  production  of  aeroplane  spruce. 

Other  plants,  not  required  by  other  departments,  were  rented  to  private  parties 
at  a  considerable  gain  to  the  Government. 

The  expenditure  on  the  Departmental  Dredging  Plant  has  been  kept  at  the  lowest 
possible  limit  consistent  with  economic  efficiency.  No  new  plant  has  been  acquired  or 
constructed,  and  a  dredge  and  tug  of  the  department,  which  had  outlived  their  use- 
fulness, have  been  dismantled. 

Works  of  dredging  have  been  confined  to  only  such  places  as  there  was  absolute 
and  urgent  necessity  for  work  to  be  carried  on.  The  improvement  in  the  main  channel 
of  the  St.  Lawrence  river,  in  Lake  St.  Louis,  has  progressed  to  such  a  point  that  the 
channel  is  now  in  good  condition.  The  harbours  of  Port  Stanley  and  Port  Burwell, 
Ont.,  were  maintained  in  the  interest  of  the  large  coal  traffic  at  those  points,  which 
is  a  source  of  considerable  revenue  to  the  Government. 

An  area  of  land  was  reclaimed  in  the  harbour  of  Sydney,  N.S.,  to  enable  the  con- 
struction of  a  seaplane  and  kite-balloon  station  for  defence  purposes. 

The  channel  at  Shippigan  Gully,  which  is  of  great  service  to  the  large  fishing 
fleets  passing  that  point,  was  finally  brought  to  a  state  of  completion. 

Dredging  operations  have  continued  at  the  mouth  of  the  Fraser  river,  British 
Columbia,  to  maintain  a  channel  for  navigation  at  that  point. 

The  work  of  dredging  the  harbour  of  Fort  William,  Ont.,  was  about  completed, 
and  will  be  finished  to  the  extent  originally  planned  during  the  course  of  the  ensuing 
year. 

At  Port  Arthur,  very  satisfactory  progress  was  made  in  the  dredging  adjacent  to 
the  Richardson  and  Grain  Growers'  elevators.  This  work  will  be  completed  during 
the  next  season. 

Special  reports  to  the  number  of  fifty-eight  were  forwarded  during  the  year  to  the 
Departments  of  Marine  and  the  Naval  Service,  covering  works  of  dredging  performed 
during  the  season  for  changes  in  conditions  at  various  ports,  so  that  mariners  might  be 
kept  acquainted  by  means  of  alterations  of  charts  and  notices  to  mariners  with  such 
work  as  had  been  accomplished. 

In  the  further  interest  of  efficiency,  various  Departments  of  the  Government,  which 
have  knowledge  of  a  special  nature  relating  to  problems  presented  to  this  Department, 
have  been  consulted  to  considerable  advantage. 


6  DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  WORKS 

10  GEORGE  V,   A.   1920 

Dredging  operations  were  carried  on  at  the  following  places,  where  an  expenditure 

of  $10,000  or  over  was  made: — 

Nova  Scotia. — North  Sydney  (Kelly's  Beach),  and  Yarmouth. 

New  Brunswick. — Cape  Tormentine  and  Shippigan  Gully. 

Quebec. — Lake  St.  Louis  and  River  St.  Maurice. 

Ontario. — Fort  William,  Port  Arthur,  Port  Burwell,  and  Port  Stanley. 

British  Columbia. — Eraser  River  sandheads;  Skeena  River,  Steveston  and  Wood- 
ward Slough. 

PUBLIC  BUILDINGS. 

The  sum  expended  on  the  construction,  maintenance,  and  repair  of  public  build- 
ings throughout  the  Dominion  was  $7,466,679. 35,  exclusive  of  military  buildings,  which 
shows  an  increase  of  $1,623,390.63  over  the  outlay  made  during  the  last  fical  year.  Of 
this  amount,  $4,199,813.73  was  expended  on  the  construction  and  improvement  of  public 
buildings,  and  $3,266,865.62  in  repairs  and  maintenance. 

The  following  buildings  were  completed  during  the  year : — 

New  Brunswick. — St.  John  post  office,  mail  entrance. 

Quebec. — Three  Rivers,  public  building. 

Ontario. — Ottawa  Experimental  Farm,  storage  building. 

The  following  buildings  were  still  under  contract  at  the  close  of  the  fiscal  year : — 

Nova  Scotia. — Lawlor's  Island,  pump-house  and  water  supply. 

Quebec. — Grosse  Isle,  boiler-house,  two  barns,  and  ice-house. 

Ontario. — Ottawa,  Soldiers'  Civil  Re-Establishment  Building,  Vittoria  street, 
Hunter  Building,  O'Connor  street;  and  the  Parliament  Buildings. 

The  department  had  considerable  difficulty  last  firing  season  with  its  coal  supply. 

The  public  buildings  in  Ottawa,  and  four  hundred  and  nine  public  buildings  outside 
of  Ottawa,  had  to  be  taken  care  of. 

Tenders  were  invited  by  public  advertisement,  and  by  letter  addressed  to  every 
known  dealer  in  Canada.  They  were  opened  on  the  6th  July,  1918.  No  tenders  were 
received  for  the  supply  for  public  buildings  in  Ottawa,  nor  for  one  hundred  and 
seventy-four  of  the  public  buildings  outside  of  Ottawa.  In  many  cases,  the  dealers 
stated  they  feared  to  tender  because  of  the  uncertainty  of  obtaining  coal;  many  declared 
they  had  little  or  no  hope  of  obtaining  any  anthracite  coal  and,  therefore,  would  not 
tender. 

The  War  Purchasing  Commission  sent  Mr.  A.  E.  Howard  to  Washington  and  the 
anthracite  coal  districts  of  the  United  States  to  endeavour  to  arrange  for  the  importa- 
tion direct  from  the  mines  of  a  sufficient  quantity  of  coal  to  supply  the  public  buildings 
in  Ontario  and  Quebec,  for  which  no  tenders  had  been  received.  Owing  to  the  shortage 
of  anthracite  coal,  only  eighty  per  cent  of  the  quantity,  required  in  Ontario  could  be 
obtained.  The  deduction  of  twenty  per  cent  in  many  cases  would  have  decreased  the 
tonnage  below  minimum  carload  tonnage.  Arrangements  finally  were  made  to  import 
only  eighty  per  cent  of  our  anthracite  requirements  for  the  province  of  Ontario  as  a 
whole.    This  was  distributed  as  follows:    The  smaller  towns  received  the  full  quantity 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  7 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  19 

required.  What  remained  of  the  eighty  per  cent  allowed  was  sent  to  larger  centres,  and 
bituminous  coal  was  used  wherever  possible  to  cover  the  deficit  in  anthracite.  In  this, 
the  Department  of  Militia  and  Defence  came  to  the  rescue  by  using  bituminous  largely, 
thus  freeing  the  available  anthracite  coal  for  use  in  public  buildings. 

In  Quebec,  the  situation  as  regards  anthracite  coal  was  more  acute  than  in 
Ontario,  bad  as  it  was  in  that  province.  The  local  fuel  controllers  flatly  refused  to 
allow  any  building  more  than  seventy  per  cent  of  the  anthracite  usually  consumed. 
This  so  decreased  the  tonnage  that  but  few  places  could  get  a  minimum  carload'. 
Finally,  hope  of  securing  any  anthracite  had  to  be  abandoned,  and  bituminous  coal 
was  used  instead.  Its  use  gave  much  trouble  and  considerable  dissatisfaction,  but, 
fortunately,  the  winter  was  comparatively  mild  and  nobody  suffered  seriously. 

In  the  Maritime  Provinces  very  little  anthracite  coal  was  supplied.  In  many 
cases  local  dealers  could  not  supply  coal  of  any  sort,  and  arrangements  were  made 
with  the  Dominion  Coal  Company,  Limited,  to  supply  run-of-mine  bituminous  coal 
at  $5  per  ton,  f.o.b.  cars  at  Springhill  Junction,  N.S. 

In  Manitoba,  Saskatchewan,  Alberta,  and  British  Columbia,  Canadian  coal  was 
used,  except  at  two  or  three  of  the  Experimental  Farms  and  Forestry  Stations,  where 
it  was  insisted  that  anthracite  was  absolutely  necessary.  Persistent  efforts  resulted 
in  obtaining  a  supply  from  local  dealers. 

The  clearing  of  customs,  payment  of  freight,  unloading  and  cartage  of  coal 
imposed  upon  the  caretakers  work  to  which  they  were  unaccustomed.  Upon  the 
whole,  they  performed  their  duties  promptly  and  satisfactorily. 

In  towns  where  the  quantity  required  was  less  than  a  minimum  carload,  the 
caretakers  were  instructed  to  keep  after  the  local  dealers  for  a  supply,  at  prices  not 
exceeding  those  paid  by  other  consumers.  In  every  case  they  secured  a  sufficient 
supply.  In  Ontario  there  were  seventeen  such  towns;  in  Quebec,  thirteen;  in  the 
Maritime  Provinces,  nine;  in  Manitoba,  four;  in  Saskatchewan,  two;  in  Alberta, 
four;  and  in  British  Columbia,  six. 

The  price  fixed  for  anthracite,  imported  by  the  War  Purchasing  Commission, 
ranged  from  $4.80  to  $5.55  for  egg  coal,  $5.05  to  $5.80  for  stove  coal,  and  $5.15  to 
$5.90  for  nut  coal,  per  gross  ton  of  2,240  pounds,  f.o.b.  at  the  mines.  Altogether, 
20,039  tons  of  coal  were  imported  by  the  War  Purchasing  Commission  for  this 
department. 

MILITARY    HOSPITALS. 

Prior  to  April  1,  1918,  the  construction  and  equipment  of  military  hospitals 
was  under  the  direction  of  the  Military  Hospitals  Commission.  As  the  building 
department  had  become  a  large  and  increasing  one,  it  was  decided  to  have  it  merged 
with  the  Chief  Architect's  Branch  of  the  Public  Works  Department.  This  change 
was  authorized  by  Order  in  Council  (ISTo.  P.C.  433),  and  on  April  1,  1918,  the  staff, 
plans,  and  documents  were  transferred  to   this   department. 

At  that  time,  the  Department  of  Militia  and  Defence  furnished  a  schedule  show- 
ing all  projects  under  construction,  with  proposed  and  required  additions  to  same, 
to  be  erected  in  various  cities  throughout  the  Dominion,  providing  for  additional 
hospital    accommodation    of    8,501    beds,    involving    an    additional    expenditure    of 


8  DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  WORKS 

9 

10  GEORGE  V,  A.   1920 

$5,292,000.  There  was  also  transferred  to  this  department  by  the  Military  Hospitals 
Commission  the  sum  of  $1,723,380.14,  making  the  total  appropriation  for  military 
hospital  works  $7,015,380.14. 

HOSPITALS    UNDER   DEPARTMENT    OF    MILITIA    AND    DEFENCE. 

The  following  buildings  were  completed  during  the  year: — 

Nova  Scotia. — Rockhead  Infirmary,  being  an  addition  to  the  existing  hospital. 

Prince  Edward  Island. — Charlottetown,  addition  to  old  Government  House  and 
one  new  ward  building. 

New  Brunswick. — Fredericton,  alterations  and  additions  to  old  Government 
House;  St.  John,  alterations  to  armouries  and  Martello  hotel. 

Ontario. — Burlington,  the  Brant  House  was  acquired  and  improved,  and  two 
buildings  were  erected;  Toronto,  St.  Andrew's  College  building  purchased  and 
improved. 

Alberta. — Edmonton,  Alberta  College  converted;  Strathcona,  City  Hospital 
enlarged;  Wetaskiwin,  alterations  made  to  hotel. 

British  Columbia. — Esquimalt,  Government  buildings  altered  and  improved; 
Qualicum  and  Restkaven,  alterations  made  in  Country  Clubs;  Vancouver,  Shaugh- 
nessy,  a  large  school  and  Fairmont  Institution  were  altered. 

The  following  buildings  were  still  under  contract  at  the  close  of  the  fiscal  year  :— 

Nova  Scotia. — Camphill  Military  Hospital. 

Quebec. — Ste.  Anne  de  Bellevue. 

Ontario. — Toronto,  Dominion  Orthopa?dic  Hospitals  buildings  raised  two  storeys 
and  several  new  buildings  erected;  Kingston,  Sydenham  Hospital. 

Manitoba. — Winnipeg,  Tuxedo  Park,  eight  buildings  erected. 


HOSPITALS    UNDER    DEPARTMENT    OF    SOLDIERS     CIVIL    RE-ESTABLISHMENT. 

The  following  buildings  were  completed  during  the  year : — 

Quebec. — Lake  Edward  Sanatorium,  two  pavilions  erected. 

Ontario. — Freeport,  near  Kitchener,  pavilion  erected  and  sanatorium  improved; 
Kingston,  new  pavilion  to  Mowat  Sanatorium. 

Saskatchewan. — Regina.  Earl  Grey  Sanatorium,  two  buildings  added  to  a  school 
building  which  was  remodelled. 

Alberta. — Balfour,  a  pavilion  erected  and  a  hotel  building  improved;  Frank 
Sanatorium,  hotel  altered. 

The  following  buildings  were  still  under  contract  at  the  close  of  the  fiscal  year : — 

Nova  Scotia. — Bellevue  Hospital,  Halifax,  being  improvements  to  an  old  home 
owned  by  the  Provincial  Government. 

Prince  Edward  Island. — Dalton  Sanatorium,  North  Wiltshire,  loaned  to  Govern- 
ment. 

Neiv  Brunswick. — Riverglade,  Jordan  Memorial  Sanatorium,  alterations  made  in 
1918;  St.  John  County  Hospital,  altered  and  enlarged. 

Ontario. — London,  Westminster  Hospital  buildings,  five  under  contract. 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  9 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  19 

A  number  of  other  buildings,  loaned  to  or  leased  by  the  Military  Hospitals  Com- 
mission, and  improved  or  altered,  were,  on  the  1st  April,  1918,  transferred  to  the  control 
of  the  Department  of  Public  Works: — 

MILITARY    HOSPITALS    UNDER    THE    DEPARTMENT    OF    MILITIA    AND    DEFENCE. 

Nova  Scotia. — Halifax,  Pine  Hill  Hospital;  Sydney,  Moxham  House;  Sydney, 
Eoss  House. 

Ontario. — Kingston,  Elmhurst,  rented  and  fitted  up;  Kingston,  Queen's  Univer- 
sity, rented  two  buildings,  remodelled  them  and  built  one;  London,  alterations  made 
to  Victoria  General  Hospital;  Ottawa,  Fleming  Home,  one  building  loaned,  other 
rented,  and  vocational  building  erected;  St.  Catharines,  Oakhill  loaned  and  improved. 

Manitoba. — Winnipeg,  Deer  Lodge,,  loaned  and  alterations  made. 

Saskatchewan. — Regina,  Episcopal  College  loaned  for  convalescent,  hospital. 

MILITARY  HOSPITALS   UNDER   THE   DEPARTMENT  OF   SOLDIERS'   CIVIL  RE-ESTABLISHMENT. 

Quebec. — Montreal,  Loyola  College  and  Grey  Nuns  buildings  leased  and  altered; 
Ste.  Agathe,  Laurentide  Inn.  altered  and  two  wings  built  (afterwards  purchased 
by  S.C.R.). 

Ontario. — Cobourg,  loaned  by  Ontario  Government,  building  remodelled  and  six 
buildings  erected;  London,  Byron  Sanatorium  (owned  by  Health  Association),  voca- 
tional building  and  pavilions  erected;  Newmarket,  hospital  owned  by  Society  of 
Friends,  remodelled. 

BARRACK   BUILDINGS. 

The  following  barracks  were  erected  for  the  Department  of  Militia  and  Defence 
during  the  year: — 

Nova  Scotia. — Halifax,  temporary  barracks;  and  Halifax  testing  building. 

New  Brunswich. — St.  John,  barracks  and  garage. 

Quebec. — Cove  Fields  barracks. 

Ontario. — Kingston,  temporary  barracks;  London,  temporary  barracks;  Toronto, 
temporary  barracks. 

Alberta. — Calgary,   detention  cell  building. 

British  Columbia. — Esquimalt,  barracks. 

The  following  buildings  were  erected  for  the  Department  of  Naval  Service  during 
the  year: — 

Nova  Scotia. — Naval  Stations,  Eastern  Passage;  Halifax  County,  naval  stations, 
North  Sydney. 

British  Columbia. — Esquimalt,  naval  college,  detention  building  and  central 
heating  plant. 


10  DEPARTUDXT  OF  PUBLIC  WORKS 

10  GEORGE  V,  A.   1920 
RECONSTRUCTION    OF   PARLIAMENT    BUILDINGS,    OTTAWA. 

There  has  been  steady  progress  made  during  the  last  year  on  the  reconstruction  of 
the  Parliament  Buildings.  All  the  trades  have  kept  apace  of  each  other,  with  the 
exception  of  the  interior  stone  and  marble  work,  which  has  not  advanced  as  rapidly  as 
the  other  trades. 

The  four  upper  floors  were  completely  plastered  by  the  middle  of  May,  and  early 
in  July,  1919,  the  setting  of  the  wood  trim  was  commenced  on  the  fourth  floor. 

The  Commons  Chamber,  committee  rooms,  and  main  corridors,  with  the  exception 
of  the  main  entrance  hall,  will  be  ready  for  occupation  by  February,  1920. 

The  power-house,  at  the  foot  of  Cliff  street,  is  practically  completed,  the  boilers 
being  fired  for  the  first  time  on  September  10,  1919.  In  addition  to  heating  the  Parlia- 
ment Buildings,  this  plant  will  also  supply  heat  to  the  following  Government  office 
blocks;  Department  of  Soldiers'  Civil  Re-Establishment,  on  Vittoria  street;  the 
Supreme  Court,  East  and  West  blocks,  the  Langevin  block,  and  the  city  post  office. 

Regarding  the  Main  Tower,  the  foundations  have  been  constructed  and  the  corner 
stone  of  the  tower  was  laid  by  His  Royal  Highness  the  Prince  of  Wales  on  September 
1,  1919.  It  is  impossible  to  get  enough  skilled  mechanics  to  proceed  with  the  stone 
work  on  the  tower  and  the  interior  stone  work  at  the  same  time. 

Since  the  laying  of  the  corner  stone  of  the  building,  on  September  1,  1916,  by  His 
Royal  Highness  the  Duke  of  Connaught,  two  winter  seasons  have  intervened,  when 
all  outside  work  had  to  be  closed  down. 

In  view  of  the  fact  that  the  reconstruction  of  the  Parliament  Buildings  is  under 
the  direction  of  a  Joint  Committee  of  Parliament,  and  no  detailed  report  of  the  progress 
of  the  work  during  the  year  is  included  elsewhere  in  this  volume,  it  is  appropriate 
that  some  further  particulars  be  given  in  this  report. 

At  the  time  of  closing  down  the  masonry  work  for  the  winter  of  1917-18,  the 
exterior  walls  of  the  main  building  were  completed  to  the  main  cornice,  and  the 
interior  court  walls  up  to  the  roof  level,  the  copings  only  not  being  set.  The  four 
north  towers,  the  front  pavilion  towers,  the  chimneys,  and  the  pent-houses  above  the 
roof  level  were  also  incomplete. 

Work  was  resumed  on  the  masonry  at  the  beginning  of  April,  1918,  and,  with 
the  exception  of  the  main  tower,  all  the  exterior  masonry  is  now  complete,  the  build- 
ing having  been  cleaned  down  and  pointed  by  the  end  of  August,  1918. 

The  structural  steel  work,  which,  at  the  end  of  May,  1917,  had  been  completed, 
except  for  minor  sections  of  rooms,  etc.,  is  now  fully  completed. 

The  fireproofing  of  roof  surfaces  was  continued  during  the  spring  and  summer 
of  1918,  and  completed  in  August,  191S,  and  the  laying  of  the  composition  and  copper 
roof  covering  completed  in  November,  1918.  The  finials,  crestings,  etc.,  were  com- 
pleted in  the  spring  of  1919. 

Terra-cotta  floor  arching  and  floor  fill,  the  laying  of  which  commenced  on  Sep- 
tember 25,  1917,. were  completed  by  September  18,  1918.  The  furring  and  partition 
work  has  been  practically  completed  throughout  all  floors,  with  the  exception  of  the 
ground  floor,  where  about  two-thirds  of  the  work  has  been  finished. 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  11 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  19 

The  installation  of  the  electrical  work  was  commenced  on  January  17,  1918. 
Practically  the  whole  of  the  conduit  has  been  installed,  panel  boxes  are  completed, 
wires  drawn,  primary  switchboard  erected.  The  main  switchboard  has  been  received 
on  the  site,  but  is  not  yet  installed. 

Plastering  was  commenced  on  August  1,  1918.  With  the  exception  of  the  dining 
room  and  kitchen,  the  plastering  is  practically  completed  on  the  first,  second,  third, 
and  fourth  floors.  The  rooms  at  the  eastern  end  of  the  main  floor  are  not  yet  plastered, 
and  certain  portions  of  the  ground  floor  are  still  to  be  completed.  It  is  expected  that 
the  whole  of  this  work  will  be  done  in  about  six  weeks  from  date. 

The  flooring  in  the  offices  throughout  the  building,  with  the  exception  of  the  main 
floor  and  portions  of  the  ground  floor,  has  been  laid.  The  laying  of  battleship  linoleum 
on  these  floors  was  commenced  on  the  fourth  floor  on  the  1st  of  September,  1919. 

Practically  all  the  marble  floors  from  the  main  floor  up  are  completed.  The  ground 
floor  corridors  are  still  to  be  finished.  The  ashlar  dadoes  in  the  second-  and  third-floor 
corridors  are  still  to  be  completed,  the  work  being  in  progress  at  the  present  time  on 
the  office-block  corridors  of  the  third  floor. 

The  marble  in  the  lavatories,  and  for  safes  and  backs  of  radiators,  comes  under  a 
separate  contract  from  the  above.  To  date,  the  radiator  safes  and  backs  in  the  majority 
of  rooms  on  the  first,  second,  third,  and  fourth  floors  have  been  set.  All  lavatories  are 
practically  completed,  except  on  the  main  and  ground  floors. 

The  setting  of  the  interior  stonework  was  begun  in  the  "West  Division  Lobby  and 
Commons  Entrance  Hall  on  October  17,  1918.  The  stonework  has  been  completed 
throughout  the  main  floor,  with  the  exception  of  the  Main  Entrance  Hall  and  staircases, 
Senate  Chamber,  and  Senate  Hall.  Work  is  now  in  progress  in  the  Senate  Chamber 
and  Senate  Entrance  Hall,  where  it  is  expected  all  stonework  will  be  set  by  November 
30,  1919.  The  stonework  in  the  corridors  on  the  first  floor  is  completed,  with  the  excep- 
tion of  the  Senate  light  well  corridors.  The  stone  arches,  etc.,  in  the  upper  corridors 
are  all  completed.  In  the  Commons  Chamber,  stone  setting  was  begun  on  January  22, 
1919,  and  is  now  well  advanced. 

The  contract  for  plumbing  was  awarded  on  September  20,  1917.  Work  has  been 
carried  on  continuously  since  that  time.  All  pipe  installation  has  been  completed, 
and  a  great  number  of  the  fixtures  set.  The  setting  of  the  remainder  will  follow  close 
on  the  completion  of  the  marble  in  the  lavatories. 

The  contract  for  heating  and  ventilating  work  was  awarded  on  March  25,  1918. 
The  installation  is  practically  complete.  The  radiators  remaining  to  be  set  will  be 
installed  upon  the  receipt  of  the  balance  of  the  marble  radiator  safes  and  backs.  The 
building  is  now  being  heated  from  the  power-house.  As  it  was  impossible  to  obtain 
boilers  for  the  power-house  last  year,  owing  to  prohibition  of  the  use  of  boiler  plate 
for  other  than  war  work,  a  temporary  boiler-house  was  erected  on  the  site,  and  old 
boilers  were  made  use  of  for  a  temporary  hot-water  system,  which  was  attached  to 
the  permanent  mains  in  the  building.  This  temporary  system  was  put  in  operation  in 
December,  1918.  The  ventilating  duct  work  is  practically  completed.  All  fans,  air 
washers,  etc.,  have  been  installed,  and  will  be  in  use  during  the  month  of  October. 

All  steel  casements  and  metal-covered  windows  throughout  the  building  have  been 
installed  and  glazed,  with  the  exception  of  those  in  the  tower  connection. 


12  DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  WORKS  - 

10  GEORGE  V,   A.   1920 

The  elevators  in  the  office  blocks  are  installed,  except  for  the  cabs,  which  have 
been  delivered  at  the  building. 

The  Central  Heating  Plant :  Bock  excavation  for  the  power-house  building  on 
Cliff  street  was  commenced  January  8,  1918,  and  completed  May  29,  1918.  Concrete 
foundations  and  framing  work  were  commenced  on  May  28  and  completed  October 
30,  1918.  Masonry  work  was  commenced  on  August  7  and  completed  on  October  21, 
1918,  with  the  exception  of  pent-houses  and  yard  wells,  which  were  built  in  May  and 
June,  1919.  The  chimney  stack  was  completed  on  November  2,  1918.  The  plumbing 
and  electric  conduit  work  are  practically  completed.  The  boilers  were  installed  dur- 
ing the  summer  of  1919,  and  were  fired  for  the  first  time  on  September  10,  1919. 
Excavation  of  the  heating  tunnel  was  commenced  at  the  western  end  of  Yittoria 
street  on  April  16,  1918.  On  October  9,  1918,  the  tunnel  connecting  the  power-house 
to  the  Centre  Block,  and  that  connecting  the  Centre  Block  to  the  East  Block,  were 
completed.  * 

Unsettled  conditions  of  labour  throughout  the  year  had  to  be  contended  with,  but 
generally  a  sufficient  force  was  maintained.  The  daily  average  of  the  force  employed 
by  the  general  contractors  was  six  hundred  and  two  men. 

During  the  year,  there  were  held  twenty-six  meetings  of  the  Advisory  Board,  and 
thirteen  of  the  Joint  Parliamentary  Committee  on  the  Eeconstruction  of  the  Par- 
liament Buildings. 

In  addition  to  the  contracts  mentioned  in  last  year's  report,  the  P.  Lyall  and  Sons 
Construction  Company,  Limited,  as  general  contractors  for  this  work,  have,  with  the 
approval  of  the  Joint  Parliamentary  Committee,  entered  into  the  following  sub-con- 
tracts since  the  first  of  April,  1918 : — 

On  April  9,  1918,  authority  was  given  to  enter  into  a  contract  with  Messrs. 
McFarlane  and  Douglas,  Limited,  Ottawa,  for  bronze-covered  frames  and  sashes,  at 
$32,500. 

On  April  12,  1918,  authority  was  given  to  enter  into  a  contract  with  Messrs.  Ahearn 
and  Soper,  Limited,  Ottawa,  for  electric  wire  and  cable,  at  $21,500.  This  contract  was 
completed  July  31,  1918. 

On  April  12.  1918,  authority  was  given  to  enter  into  a  contract  with  the  Peck 
Rolling  Mills  of  Montreal,  for  reinforcing  steel,  at  $12,870.  This  contract  was  com- 
pleted August  6,  1918. 

On  April  23,  191S,  authority  was  given  to  enter  into  a  contract  with  Messrs.  Goldie 
and  McCulloch,  Limited,  Gait,  Ont.,  for  four  boilers  and  stokers  for  the  central  heating 
plant,  at  $S3,362. 

On  April  23,  1918,  authority  was  given  to  enter  into  a  contract  with  John  E. 
Hoidge,  of  Toronto,  for  marble  dado  work,  at  $85,7S1.54. 

On  May  1,  191^.  authority  was  given  to  enter  into  a  contract  with  Messrs.  Ahearn 
and  Soper,  Limited,  Ottawa,  for  switchboards,  panel  boards,  and  transformers,  at 
$39,414. 

On  May  1,  1918,  authority  was  given  to  enter  into  a  contract  with  Messsrs.  H. 
Dupuis  and  Son,  of  Hull,  Que.,  for  2,000  cubic  yards  of  sand,  at  $1.50  per  cubic  yard. 
Total  amount  paid,  $4,321.15. 

On  May  1,  1918,  authority  was  given  to  enter  into  a  contract  with  the  Eideau 
Canal  Supply  Company  for  5,000  cubic  yards  of  sand,  at  $1.50  per  cubic  yard.  Total 
amour. t  paid,  $8,046.75. 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  13 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  19 

On  May  1,  1918,  authority  was  given  to  enter  into  a  contract  with  the  Canadian 
General  Electric  Company,  Limited,  Ottawa,  for  electric  conduit  and  fittings,  at 
$5,152.50. 

On  May  6,  1918,  authority  was  given  to  enter  into  a  contract  with  the  Canadian 
Construction  Company,  Limited,  of  Ottawa,  for  the  rental  of  cement  gun  plant,  at 
$35  per  working  day.   Total  amount  paid,  $4,427.50. 

On  May  14,  1918,  authority  was  given  to  enter  into  a  contract  with  the  Trussed 
Concrete  Steel  Company,  of  Canada,  for  rolled  steel  casements,  at  $80,000. 

On  July  5,  1918,  authority  was  given  to  enter  into  a  contract  with  Messrs.  Bryson 
and  Graham,  Limited,  of  Ottawa,  for  battleship  linoleum,  at  $52,981.25. 

On  July  5,  1918,  authority  was  given  to  enter  into  a  contract  with  the  Luxfer 
Prism  Company,  of  Toronto,  for  exterior  leaded  glazing,  at  $7,317. 

On  July  5,  1918,  authority  was  given  to  enter  into  a  contract  with  Messrs.  Ahearn 
and  Soper,  Limited,  of  Ottawa,  for  lighting  fixtures,  at  $23,859.77. 

On  July  5,  1918,  authority  was  given  to  enter  into  a  contract  with  the  Ottawa 
Fireproof  Supply  Company,  of  Ottawa,  for  1,000  tons  (more  or  less)  of  Hardwell 
plaster,  at  $10.80  per  ton.   Total  amount  paid,  $12,389.19. 

On  July  5,  1918,  authority  was  given  to  enter  into  a  contract  with  the  Aikenhead 
Hardware  Company,  of  Toronto,  for  hardware,  at  $45,145.40. 

On  July  5,  1918,  authority  was  given  to  enter  into  a  contract  with  the  Consolidated 
Plate  Glass  Company,  of  Toronto,  for  plate  glass,  at  $15,360. 

On  July  5,  1918,  authority  was  given  to  enter  into  a  contract  with  the  Custodis 
Canadian  Chimney  Company,  of  Montreal,  for  the  chimney  for  the  central  heating 
plant,  at  $8,400.  Completed  November  2,  1918. 

On  July  5,  1918,  authority  was  given  to  enter  into  a  contract  with  the  Hull  "Wall 
Plaster  Company,  of  Hull,  Que.,  for  1,900  tons  (more  or  less)  of  Nail-a-Crete  flooring 
material,  at  $19.61  per  ton  net.     Total  amount  paid,  $17,248.17. 

On  July  26,  1918,  authority  was  given  to  enter  into  a  contract  with  the  Canadian 
Wire  and  Iron  Goods  Company,  Limited,  of  Hamilton,  for  iron  stairs  and  ladders,  at 
$33,700. 

On  July  31,  1918,  authority  was  given  to  enter  into  a  contract  with  Messrs.  Henry 
Morgan  and  Company,  Montreal,  for  interior  doors  and  trim,  at  $85,712.72. 

On  July  31,  1918,  authority  was  given  to  enter  into  a  contract  with  Messrs.  C. 
Wilson  and  Son,  of  Toronto,  for  auto-truck  weighing  scales  for  power-house,  at  $549. 

On  August  1,  1918,  authority  was  given  to  enter  into  a  contract  with  the  Campbell 
Steel  and  Iron  Works,  of  Ottawa,  for  three  water  storage  tanks  for  the  pumping  system, 
at  $9,400. 

On  August  14,  1918,  authority  was  given  to  enter  into  a  contract  with  the  Canadian 
Agency  and  Supply  Company,  of  Ottawa,  for  pipe  supports  in  the  heating  tunnel,  at 
$6,045.35. 

On  August  14,  1918,  authority  was  given  to  enter  into  a  contract  with  the  Canadian 
Link  Belt  Company,  of  Toronto,  for  coal  and  ash  handling  equipment,  at  $20,037. 

On  August  14,  1918,  authority  was  given  to  enter  into  a  contract  with  the  Mariotti 
Marble  Company,  of  Montreal,  for  lavatory  marble,  at  $81,500. 

On  September  20,  1918,  authority  was  given  to  enter  into  a  contract  with  Messrs. 
Ahearn  and  Soper,  Limited,  of  Ottawa,  for  switch  boards,  panel  boards,  etc.,  for  the 
central  heating  plant,  at  $4,785. 

On  August  1,  1918,  authority  was  given  to  enter  into  a  contract  with  Arthur  S. 
Leitch,  of  Toronto,  for  two  pumps  and  controls  for  house  pumping  system,  at  $2,738. 


14  DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  WORKS 

10  GEORGE  V,  A.   1920 

On  September  20,  1918,  authority  was  given  to  enter  into  a  contract  with  H.  H. 
Symes  Company,  of  Montreal,  for  mastic  roofing  for  the  central  heating  plant,  at  38 
cents  per  square  foot.     Approximate  cost,  $4,350. 

On  October  1,  1918,  authority  was  given  to  enter  into  a  contract  with  W.  J. 
McGuire,  Limited,  of  Toronto,  for  plumbing  pipes  and  fixtures  for  the  central  heating 
plant,  at  $3,990. 

On  October  2,  1918,  authority  was  given  to  enter  into  a  contract  with  the  Archi- 
tectural Bronze  and  Iron  Works,  of  Toronto,  for  elevator  enclosure  doors,  at  $61,000. 

On  October  2,  1918,  authority  was  given  to  enter  into  a  contract  with  the  Cana- 
dian Welding  Works,  Limited,  of  Montreal,  for  iron  stairs  and  ladders  for  the  central 
heating  plant,  at  $6,000. 

On  October  11,  1918,  authority  was  given  to  enter  into  a  contract  with  the  Wallace 
Sandstone  Quarries  for  marble  flooring,  flagging  and  borders,  at  $217,797.65. 

On  January  18,  1919,  authority  was  given  to  enter  into  a  contract  for  register 
faces  and  grilles  with  the  Tuttle  and  Bailey  Company,  at  $11,000. 

On  January  18,  1919,  authority  was  given  to  enter  into  a  contract  with  the  N.Y. 
Continental  Jewell  Company,  for  water  filters,  at  $3,012. 

On  January  15,  1919,  authority  was  given  to  enter  into  a  contract  with  the  Hor- 
wood  Glass  Company,  of  Ottawa,  for  polished  glass,  at  $642. 

On  January  16,  1919,  authority  was  given  to  enter  into  a  contract  with  the  A.  B. 
Ormsby  Company,  of  Toronto,  for  steel  sashes,  doors  and  partitions,  at  $3,688. 

On  January  18,  1919,  authority  was  given  to  enter  into  a  contract  with  the 
Standard  Underground  Cable  Company,  of  Hamilton,  for  wire  and  cable,  at  $6,403.83. 

On  March  6,  1919,  authority  was  given  to  enter  into  a  contract  with  the  Canadian 
Cutler  Company,  of  Montreal,  for  mail  chutes,  at  $4,730. 

TELEGRAPHS. 

During  the  year  there  have  been  added  forty-six  miles  of  new  line  in  the  province 
of  British  Columbia,  as  follows : — 

Waneta-Pend  d'Oreille 14  miles. 

Edgewood-Renata 32 

46  miles. 

There  is  now  a  total  mileage  of  12,093|  miles,  and  the  offices  number  1,122.  The 
messages  sent  during  the  year  aggregated  507,027,  as  compared  with  448,797  during 
the  preceding  fiscal  year,  or  an  increase  of  58,230  messages. 

The  expenditure  on  maintenance  was  $739,907.07,  as  against  $732,158.47  in  the 
previous  year,  an  increase  of  $7,748.60. 

The  revenue  shows  an  increase  of  $26,454.22  over  1917-18. 

The  telephone,  telegraph,  and  conjoint  offices  on  the  system  are  as  follows: — 

Telephones 

Telegraph 

Conjoint 

1,122  1,106 


1919. 

1918. 

681 

665 

Inc.  16 

389 

»89 

52 

52 

REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  15 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  19 

NATIONAL    GALLERY. 

Since  the  destruction  of  the  Parliament  Buildings  by  fire,  and  the  occupation  of 
the  Victoria  Memorial  Museum  building  by  the  Senate  and  House  of  Commons,  the 
[National  Gallery  of  Canada  has  been  placed  at  a  disadvantage  through  its  inability 
to  exhibit  works  of  art  now  owned  by  the  Government.  As  explained  in  my  report  for 
1918,  the  Trustees  of  the  Gallery  have  concentrated  their  energies  on  the  development 
of  loan  exhibitions  to  any  gallery  or  body  having  proper  facilities  for  exhibiting. 
Within  the  past  year,  works  of  art  were  sent  out  to  the  following  places:  Moose  Jaw 
and  Regina,  Saskatchewan;  Winnipeg,  Manitoba;  Port  Arthur,  Fort  William,  and 
Hamilton,  Ontario;  Sherbrooke,  Quebec;  and  St.  John,  New  Brunswick;  while  a 
special  exhibit  of  thirty-four  Canadian  pictures  was  sent  to  St.  Louis,  Missouri; 
Muskegon,  Michigan;  Minneapolis,  Minnesota;  Chicago,  Illinois;  and  Milwaukee, 
Wisconsin.  A  further  collection  of  seventy-five  pictures  was  sent  to  the  Art  Museum 
of  Toronto,  from  January  7  to  February  23,  1919.  All  these  exhibitions  were  highly 
successful,  and  the  continual  increase  in  the  applications  for  them  is  evidence  of  a 
growing  desire  for  artistic  knowledge.  Several  works  have  been  acquired  "by  gift,  and 
twenty-eight  drawings  have  been  purchased. 

On  the  completion  of  the  reconstruction  of  the  Parliament  Buildings,  the 
National  Gallery  will  probably  again  occupy  the  space  formerly  allotted  for  that  pur- 
pose in  the  Victoria  Memorial  Museum  building,. until  such  time  as  normal  conditions 
return,  when,  undoubtedly,  every  effort  will  be  made  to  advance  interest  in  art  as  well 
as  science  and  literature,  which  should  keep  pace  with  Canada's  anticipated  advance- 
ment in  trade  and  commerce. 

Appended  to  this  report  will  be  found  detailed  statements  from  the  different 
branches,  giving  full  particulars  of  the  various  works  carried  out  by  the  department 
during  the  year. 

I  have  the  honour  to  be,  sir, 

Your  obedient  servant, 

J.  B.  HUNTER, 

Deputy  Minister. 


10  GEORGE  V  SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  19  -  A.   1920 

PUBLIC  BUILDINGS. 

By  R.  C.  WRIGHT,  Chief  Architect. 

NOVA   SCOTIA. 

Halifax — Lawlor's  Island  Quarantine  Station. — In  August,  1918,  a  contract  was 
,  entered  into  for  the  construction  of  an  artesian  well,  a  pump  house,  a  pumping  engine, 
a  shelter  building,  and  the  necessary  connections  from  pump  to  main  water  service  pipe 
and  to  plumbing  in  building.     These  works  are  still  in  progress. 

Public  Buildings  Generally. — The  electric  lighting  of  the  Halifax  custom  house 
was  largely  renewed.  At  the  following  buildings  the  walls  and  ceilings  were  tinted 
and  the  woodwork  painted,  either  wholly  or  in  large  parts ;  Inverness  post  office,  Kent- 
ville,  Liverpool,  New  Glasgow,  North  Sydney  puiblic  buildings,  and  Pictou  custom 
house,  Springhill,  Truro,  Windsor,  and  Yarmouth  public  buildings. 

Furniture  and  fittings  were  provided  and  minor  additions,  alterations,  and 
renewals  made  at  the  foregoing,  as  well  as  at  Pictou  post  office,  Shelburne,  Wolfville, 
and  Westville  public  buildings. 

Minor  repairs  were  made  throughout  the  following  buildings:  Arichat  public 
building,  Antigonish,  Baddeck,  Glace  Bay,  Halifax  immigration  shed,  pier  No.  2, 
Lunenburg,  Parrsboro,  and  Sydney  public  buildings. 

NEW   BRUNSWICK. 

Marysville  Public  Building. — An  arrangement  was  effected  with  the  Canadian 
Cottons,  Limited,  to  tap  their  water  supply  pipe  and  connect  therefrom  to  the  Dominion 
building  water  service,  a  distance  of  325  feet.  Previously  the  water  supply  depended 
on  a  spring  some  distance  away. 

St.  John  Post  Office. — An  extension  28  feet  by  13  feet  6  inches  and  one  story 
in  height  was  made  from  the  rear  for  the  reception  and  delivery  of  mail.  A  number 
of  partitions  were  erected  in  attic,  to  form  offices. 

Public  Buildings  Generally. — At  the  following  buildings  the  walls  and  ceilings 
were  painted  or  tinted  and  the  woodwork  painted:  Chatham  public  building,  Dal- 
housie,  Fairville,  Predericton  public  buildings  and  custom  house,  Milltown,  Marys- 
ville, Newcastle  and  Woodstock  public  buildings,  and  St.  John  savings  bank. 

At  the  foregoing,  as  also  at  Bathurst,  Campbellton,  Grand  Falls,  Hartland, 
Hampton,  Hillsboro,  Moncton,  St.  Stephen  public  buildings,  St.  John  custom  house, 
St.  John  old  post  office,  St.  John  immigration  buildings,  Sussex  post  office,  Tracadie 
Lazaretto,  and  Woodstock  public  building,  repairs  and  renewals  were  made  to  masonry, 
brickwork,  glazing  and  joinery,  and  furniture  and  fittings  were  provided. 

QUEBEC. 

Grosse  Isle  Quarantine. 

New  Boiler-house,  Western  Division. — A  contract  was  entered  into  October  28, 
1918,  for  the  construction  of  this  building,  which  work  is  still  in  progress.  It  measures 
52  feet  in  breadth  by  53  in  depth,  situated  adjoining  the  original  boiler-house,  and 
contains,  in  addition  to  the  original  three  boiler's,  electric  apparatus  and  waterworks 
pump,  two  new  steam  boilers  of  100  horse-power  each. 

19—2 


18  DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  WORKS 

10  GEORGE  V,  A.   1920 

Middle  Division. — Two  new  barns  were  constructed,  one  of  which  measures  29  by 
24  feet,  provided  with  a  hay  loft,  and  the  other  14  by  18  feet.  An  ice-house,  74  by  12 
feet,  was  built  for  use  of  the  superintendent. 

Eastern  Division  Hospital. — One  hundred  and  thirty  feet  of  drain  was  laid  5  feet 
in  depth  through  rock,  with  6-inch  pipe. 

Generally. — Seven  artesian  wells  of  a  total  length  of  250  feet  were  bored  at  differ- 
ent parts  of  the  island  and  furnished  with  850  feet  of  suction  pipe  and  8  pumps. 

HULL. 

Stewart  Homestead,  Mountain  Avenue. 
The  old  stone  farmhouse  was  altered  and  made  suitable  for  offices  for  the  veterinary 
staff  of  the  Department  of  Agriculture.  Two  barns  were  altered  and  added  to,  to  con- 
form to  the  requirements  of  this  staff.  The  office  building  had  a  water  service  from 
the  Hull  waterworks,  as  also  entirely  new  drainage,  plumbing,  electric  lighting,  and 
hot-water  heating. 

THREE  RIVERS. 

Public  Building. 
This  building,  which  was  described  in  the  report  of  this  office  for  1914-15,  is  com- 
pleted, fitted  up,  and  occupied. 

QUEBEC. 

Post  Office. 
This  building,  which  was  described  in  a  report  of  this  office  of  1913-14,  has  been 
completed,  fitted  up,  and  occupied. 

ONTARIO. 

Ottawa. 

Central  Experimental  Farm. — A  contract  was  entered  into  on  the  19th  November, 
1918,  for  the  erection  of  a  root,  seed,  and  implement  storage  building  on  site  adjacent 
to  the  agricultural  building.  It  is  to  be  a  two-story  wooden  building  on  a  concrete 
basement  measuring  64  feet  by  25  feet  on  plan,  and  consists  on  the  ground  floor  of  an 
implement  room  and  a  canning  room ;  on  the  first  floor,  one  large  drying  room ;  in  the 
basement  are  the  root  cellars,  having  a  humidifying  chamber  below  the  floor;  lighting 
will  be  by  electricity. 

Soldiers'  Civil  Re-establishment  Building. — A  contract  was  entered  into  in 
December,  1918,  for  the  construction  of  this  building,  which  is  situated  on  corner  of 
Bank  and  Yittoria  streets,  having  frontage  of  42  feet  on  Vittoria  by  120  feet  on  Bank 
street  and  110  feet  on  lane.  The  buildingis  of  wood,  three  stories,  on  a  concrete  base- 
ment.    It  is  heated  by  steam  and  lighted  by  electricity. 

Hunter  Building. — On  August  13,  1918,  a  general  contract  for  the  construction 
of  this  building  on  a  site  with  frontages  198  feet  on  O'Connor,  Queen,  and  Albert 
streets,  was  entered  into,  and  the  work  is  still  in  progress.  That  portion  of  the  pro- 
perty on  O'Connor  and  Queen  streets,  with  frontages  of  99  feet,  was  previously  the 
property  of  the  Government,  and  before  proceeding  with  the  construction  of  the  Hunter 
building  it  was  necessary  to  demolish  the  Marine  museum,  which  was  situated  thereon. 
The  building  measures  198  by  150  feet,  and  has  a  central  court  48  by  96  feet.  The 
building  consists  of  9  stories  and  basement,  is  constructed  with  a  steel  frame,  a  con- 
crete basement,  a  ground  and  first  floor  of  Indiana  limestone  with  brick  backing,  and 
the  remaining  stories  brick  facing  with  tile  backing.  The  construction  is  fireproof 
throughout.  A  vacuum  heating  system,  electric  lighting,  and  elevators  are  installed. 
The  building  is  designed  for  use  as  offices  to  accommodate  the  Public  Works,  Civil 
Service  Commission,  Marine  and  Naval  Service.  The  basement  contains  boiler  room, 
fuel  room,  machine  room,  storage,  and  a  small  number  of  offices.  The  basement  por- 
tion of  the  central  court  is  roofed  in  for  use  as  storage.  Plans  and  specifications  sup' 
plied  and  work  supervised  by  the  Chief  Architect's  staff. 


REPORT  OF  THE  CHIEF  ARCHITECT  19 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  19 

Fort  William. 

Public  Building. — In  November,  1918,  a  contract  was  entered  into  for  the  con- 
struction of  an  elevator  which  has  since  been  completed. 

Port  Arthur. 

Public  Building. — In  November,  1918,  a  contract  was  entered  into  for  the  con- 
struction of  an  elevator  which  has  since  been  completed. 

Generally. 

All  the  public  buildings  throughout  the  province  had  usual  and  ordinary  repairs, 
while  in  a  large  number,  items  of  expenditure  were  incurred  for  extensive  renewals, 
heating,  plumbing,  sidewalks,  drainage,  etc. 


SASKATCHEWAN. 

Generally. — At  Regina  the  offices  were  fitted  up  in  the  old  Royal  Rank  for  the 
Assistant  Receiver  General,  provided  with  a  burglar  alarm  system.  Cleaning,  tinting, 
and  painting  of  woodwork  and  plastering  were  effected  at  Battleford  public  building, 
Gravelbourg,  Lloydminster,  Melfort,  Moosejaw,  Regina,  the  Sutherland  nursery 
station,  and  Hun.boldt  public  building.  Electric  elevators  were  installed  at  the 
Receiver  General's  office,  Regina,  and  the  public  building  Saskatoon.  Storm  porches 
were  supplied  to  Battleford  post  office,  Maple  Creek  public  building  and  Yorkton. 


BRITISH   COLUMBIA. 

Esquimalt. 

Work  Point  Barracls. — A  contract  was  entered  into  on  August  15,  1916,  for  the 
erection  of  a  detention  building  for  eighteen  prisoners.  It  is  of  wood,  on  a  concrete 
foundation.  The  building  is  heated  by  hot  water,  has  hot  and  cold-water  services 
and  electric  light. 

Alterations  of  the  eighteen  married  quarters  brick  huts,  and  five  wooden  married 
quarters  huts,  covering  rearrangement  of  partitions  and  doors  and  the  provisions  of 
new  heating,  plumbing,  painting,  papering  and  tinting  were  effected. 

Cadets'  College. — A  contract  was  entered  into  on  September  3,  1918,  for  altera- 
tions of  and  additions  to  the  drill  hall  and  naval  yard  to  provide  dormitories,  offices, 
kitchens,  store-room,  gun-room,  officers'  quarters,  etc.,  complete  for  the  educational 
building.  On  October  7,  1918,  a  contract  was  entered  into  for  the  erection  of  the 
boiler-house,  chimney  stack,  and  central  heating  plant,  to  serve  cadets'  dormitory 
and  educational  building.  The  storekeeper's  residence  was  altered  to  provide  a  hospital 
for  naval  cadets. 

Vancouver. 

Old  Post  Office  building. — To  accommodate  the  platinum  furnaces  in  the  assay 
office,  the  ground  floor  was  enlarged  by  extending  the  gas  room  10  feet  across  the  lane 
to  adjoining  building,  and  equipping  the  room  with  furniture  and  fittings. 

William  Head. 

Quarantine  Station. — Two  minor-disease  hospitals  and  one  scarlet-fever  hospital, 
with  sewer  and  septic  tank,  were  erected  during  the  fiscal  year.  The  sewer  of  dis- 
infecting building  was  extended  40  feet,  and  the  disinfecting  building  was  refloored. 

19— 2i 


20  DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  WORKS 

10  GEORGE  V,  A.   1920 

Generally. — At  Atlin  public  building  tbe  outside  stairs  were  enclosed  and  out- 
side ladders  supplied.  Cleaning,  painting,  and  tinting  were  done  at  Cumberland  and 
Nanaimo  public  buildings. 

Minor  usual  and  ordinary  repairs  and  renewals  were  made  to  the  following  build- 
ings: Ashcroft  public  building;  Cloverdale  immigration  office;  Chilliwack,  Comox 
and  Cranbrook  public  buildings;  Douglas  immigration  building;  Fernie,  Field, 
Glacier,  Grandforks,  Greenwood,  Ladysmitb,  North  Vancouver,  Port  Alberni,  Revel- 
stoke  and  Sicamous  public  buildings;  Summerland  Experimental  Farm;  Union  Bay 
and  Vernon  public  buildings. 


MILITARY  HOSPITALS. 

Prior  to  April  1,  1918,  the  construction  and  equipment  of  military  hospitals  was 
under  the  direction  of  the  Military  Hospitals  Commission.  As  the  building  depart- 
ment had  become  a  large  and  increasing  one,  it  was  decided  to  have  it  merged  with 
the  Chief  Architect's  branch  of  the  Public  Works  Department. 

This  change  was  authorized  by  Order  in  Council,  No.  P.C.  433,  and  on  April  1, 
1918,  the  staff,  plans,  and  documents  were  transferred  to  this  department. 

At  that  time,  the  Department  of  Militia  and  Defence  furnished  a  schedule  show- 
ing all  projects  under  construction,  with  proposed  and  required  additions  to  same,  to 
be  erected  in  various  cities  throughout  the  Dominion,  providing  for  additional  hospital 
accommodation  of  8,501  beds,  involving  an  additional  expenditure  of  $5,292,000.  There 
was  also  transferred  to  this  department  by  the  M.H.C.  the  sum  of  $1,723,380.14,  making 
the  total  appropriation  for  Military  Hospital  works,  $7,015,380.14. 

A  copy  of  this  schedule  follows : — 


REPORT  OF  THE  CHIEF  ARCHITECT 


21 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  19 


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t 

22  DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  WORKS 

10  GEORGE  V,   A.   1920 

The  work  was  carried  on  according  to  the  above  programme  up  to  the  date  of  the 
signing  of  the  armistice,  after  which  there  were  many  retrenchments,  certain  projects 
being  altogether  abandoned. 

Following  is  a  brief  summary  of  the  work,  classified  according  to  provinces. 


NOVA   SCOTIA. 

Camphill  Military  Hospital,  Halifax. — This  hospital  is  erected  on  a  site  owned 
partly  by  the  city  of  Halifax  and  partly  by  the  Federal  Government. 

Prior  to  April  1,  191S,  the  M.H.C.  had  erected  a  300-bed  hospital,  and  additional 
300-bed  wards  were  in  process  of  erection,  which  the  Department  of  Militia  and 
Defence  decided  to  increase  by  a  further  400  beds  at  an  estimated  cost  of  $300,000. 
Plans  were  drawn  and  contracts  let  amounting  to  $551,586,  covering  the  necessary 
wards,  also  administration  and  staff  accommodation. 

In  December,  1918,  this  accommodation  was  cut  down  to  the  original  size,  and 
only  administration  -and  staff  accommodation  erected  at  the  contract  price  of 
$289,608.92.    This  work  is  now  almost  completed. 

Boclhead  Infirmary  Hospital;  Halifax. — An  existing  hospital  centre  has  been 
increased  by  the  erection  of  a  three-story  building  at  a  cost  of  $63,202.60. 

This  is  now  ready  for  occupancy,  and  will  become  a  permanent  addition  to  this 
centre. 

Belle  vue  Military  Hospital,  Halifax. — An  old  Government  building  was  remodelled 
for  hospital  purposes,  under  instructions  from  the  Department  of  Soldiers'  Civil 
Re-Establishment.  It  provides  accommodation  for  75  patients  and  all  branches  of 
hospital  work,  at  an  approximate  cost  of  $120,000.    Work  is  now  proceeding. 

Considerable  work  was  also  done  in  connection  with  pier  No.  2  discharge  depot, 
and  Pine  Hill  military  hospital,  Halifax,  and  also  Moxham  and  Ross  house,  Sydney, 
C.B.,  at  an  approximate  expenditure  of  $12,500. 


PRINCE    EDWARD    ISLAND. 

Charlottetonn. — The  work  here  was  conmenced  by  the  M.H.C.  and  completed 
"by  this  department.  It  consisted  of  the  remodelling  of  old  Government  House  and 
the  erection  of  wards  with  accommodation  for  200  beds  and  for  medical  and  surgical 
departments,  the  erection  of  a  new  recreation  building,  the  remodelling  of  other 
existing  buildings  for  vocational  purposes,  and  also  providing  for  new  sewer,  water, 
and  electric  light  service.    Total  cost  $300,000. 

DaUon  Suniitarium,  Xorth  ^Yiltshire. — Alterations  and  additions  to  an  existing 
sanitarium  were  undertaken  by  the  M.H.C.  and  continued  by  this  department,  being 
now  practically  complete.  The  work  included  a  central  power  and  heating  plant  and 
water  system,  a  new  vocational  building  and  alterations  to  M.O's  residence  and 
administration  building.     Total  expenditure,  $265,000. 


NEW    BRUNSWICK. 

Frcthricton. — Here,  the  old  Government  House  was  renovated  and  enlarged,  and 
two  new  wards  and  service  building  erected,  providing  about  400  beds  and  accommo- 
dation for  all  derartnents.  A  new  recreation  hall  was  also  erected,  and  certain  old 
buildings  remodelled  for  vocational  purposes.  Work  started  by  the  M.H.C.  'and 
completed  by  this  department  with  expenditure  of  $232,000. 


REPORT  OF  THE  CHIEF  ARCHITECT  23 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  19 

St.  John's  County  Hospital,  St.  John,  N.B. — The  work  here  comprised  additions 
and  alterations  to  the  existing  hospital,  and  the  erection  of  new  huildings  for  nurses 
and  medical  officer.  The  additional  accommodation  was  68  beds,  and  the  approxi- 
mate total  cost  $130,000. 

Jordan  Memorial  Sanatorium,  Riverglade. — Also  consisting  of  extensive  altera- 
tions and  additions  to  existing  premises,  including  alterations  to  the  central  heating 
plant  and  the  water  service.  Work  '©till  in  progress  with  an  ultimate  approximate 
cost  of  $70,000. 

Other  minor  works  continued  'and  completed  were  repairs  to  armouries,  and  the 
Martello  hotel  at  St.  John,  with  outlay  about  $4,000. 


QUEBEC. 

Lake  EdiraM  Sanatorium. — This  property  is  a  tuberculosis  sanatorium,  and  was 
originally  loaned  to  the  M.II.C,  who  started  work  on  two  new  pavilions. 

These  were  completed  by  this  department,  also  alterations  to  the  administration 
building  and  a  medical  officer's  residence.  Expenditure  by  this  department  approxi- 
mately $14,000. 

Ste.  Artnue  de  Beltevue  Military  Hospital. — This  is  now  the  largest  and  most 
complete  military  hospital  centre  in  the  Dominion,  comprising  seven  ward  buildings 
with  a  total  accommodation  of  1,000  beds,  'administration  building,  a  central  heating 
and  power  plant,  and  a  completely  equipped  steam  laundry,  also  recreation, 
vocational  and  physiotherapy  buildings,  and  quarters  for  nurses,  orderlies,  M.O's, 
and  officers. 

Prior  to  April  1,  the  M.H.C.  had  under  way  the  'administration  and  four  ward 
buildings,  and  had  expended  approximately  $240,000. 

This  centre  is  now  practically  completed,  including  fencing,  grading,  roadway, 
etc.,  and  represents  an  outlay  of  about  $1,500,000. 

Cove  Fields. — 'Complete  plans  and  specifications  were  prepared  and  tenders  taken 
for  the  converting  of  one  unit  of  Cove  Fields  barracks,  Quebec,  into  a  250-bed  hospital 
at  an  approximate  cost  of  $100,000.     This  work  was  not  proceeded  with. 


ONTARIO. 

Mowat  Sanatorium,  Kingston. — The  existing  sanatorium  was  loaned  to  the  M.H. 
C,  who  commenced  alterations  and  additions  to  same,  which  were  completed  by  this 
department. 

The  work  comprised  the  building  of  three  new  pavilions,  each  providing  32  beds, 
and  a  vocational  building,  together  with  alterations  to  the  administration  building  and 
the  power  house  including  a  central  heating  plant.  Expenditure  by  this  department, 
approximately  $45,000. 

Sydenham  Military  Hospital,  Kingston. — A  new  isolation  hospital  was  erected 
by  this  department  at'  a  cost  of  $40,000.  In  addition  to  this,  alterations  were  made  to 
a  group  of  stone  buildings  converting  them  into  an  up-to-date  hospital  centre  having 
accommodation  for  200  beds,  together  with  space  for  administration,  nurses'  quarters, 
orderlies'  quarters,  M.O's,  etc.  This  group  is  now  almost  completed  and  will  repre- 
sent with  fencing,  grading,  sewage  disposal,  etc.,  an  outlay  of  approximately  $250,000. 

At  Kingston,  a  number  of  small  amounts,  totalling  $3,000  were  expended  on  Elm- 
hurst,  Queen's  University,  Richardson  house,  and  a  nurses'  home. 


24  DEPARTMEXT  OF  PUBLIC  WORKS 

10  GEORGE  V,  A.   1920 

Dominion  Orthopaedic  Hospital. — This  was  the  factory  and  offices  of  the  National 
Cash  Register  Company,  which  was  acquired  by  the  M.H.C.  Large  additions  were 
made  and  two  stories  added  to  the  miain  building,  providing  a  total  accommodation  of 
950  beds.  The  new  buildings  included  a  power  house,  kitchen,  laundry,  recreation 
building,  and  limb  factory,  also  quarters  for  nurses,  orderlies,  M.O's,  and  officers.  All 
buildings  are  occupied  and  only  some  minor  work  remains  to  be  done  on  grounds,  etc. 
The  total  expenditure  will  be  approximately,  $1,500,000. 

St.  Andrews. — The  site  and  buildings  of  St.  Andrew's  college  were  purchased  by 
the  Dominion  Government,  and  the  existing  college  building  converted  into  a  con- 
valescent home,  with  accommodation  for  100  beds,  the  alterations  costing  upwards  of 
$40,000. 

The  new  work  here  provided  for  the  erection  of  nineteen  buildings,  with  accommo- 
dation for  1,500  beds.  Plans  were  drawn  and  contracts  let  totalling  approximately 
$1,250,000.  With  the  signing  of  the  armistice  all  contracts  were  cancelled  and  all 
work  abandoned. 

Burlington. — A  large  hotel  known  as  Brant  house  was  acquired  by  the  M.H.C, 
and  alterations  made  totalling  $205,175.07.  This  department  also  spent  on  improve- 
ments to  the  plumbing  and  heating,  and  the  installing  of  hre  escapes,  approximately 
$18,000.  In  addition,  a  new  active-treatment  ward  and  a  gymnasium  building  were 
erected  at  a  cost  of  approximately  $90,000.  All  buildings  are  now  occupied,  and 
accommodate  600  beds. 

Freeport  Sanatorium,  Kitchener. — This  property  was  loaned  by  the  Sanatorium 
Board  to  the  Department  of  Soldiers'  Civil  Re-Establishment,  who  arranged  for  the 
erection  of  a  new  30-bed  pavilion.  This  was  erected  and  improvements  made  to 
electric,  sewer  and  water  services,  grounds,  etc.,  at  an  outlay  of  $35,000. 

Westminster  Military  Hospital,  London. — A  farm  adjacent  to  the  city  was 
presented  by  the  city  to  the  M.H.C.  as  a  hospital  site,  and  some  work  was  done  on  the 
grounds.  This  department  has  prepared  plans  for,  and  has  practically  completed, 
the  following  buildings,  viz.:  Service,  administration,  power  house,  laundry,  and  six 
ward  buildings,  providing  550  beds.  Also  contracts  have  just  been  let  for  a  garage 
and  mortuary  building,  a  T.  B.  pavilion,  isolation  building,  and  a  recreation  build- 
ing.   The  total  estimated  cost  of  this  centre  is  $1,250,000. 

Newmarket. — Pickering  college  building  was  loaned  by  the  owners  to  the  M.H.C, 
who  made  necessary  alterations  to  make  it  suitable  for  hospital  purposes.     This  depart-  ' 
ment  completed  the  work  with  an  expenditure  of  practically  $13,000. 

Central  Ontario  Sanatorium. — A  site  for  this  institution  has  been  secured  at 
\Yoodbridge,  and  plans  are  being  prepared  for  five  buildings  with  accommodation  for 
125  beds  at  an  estimated  cost  of  $350,000. 


MANITOBA. 

Tuxedo  Pari  Military  Hospital,  Winnipeg.— -The  site  and  original  buildings  at 
this  centre  were  purchased  by  the  Dominion  Government  after  building  operations  had 
been  started  by  the  M.H.C.  The  work  undertaken  by  this  department,  and  now 
almost  completed,  comprises  the  following  buildings,  viz. :  Four  ward  buildings,  with 
accommodation  of  1,500  beds;  also  quarters  for  medical  officers,  nurses,  and  orderlies- 
a  recreation  building,  a  power-house  with  central  heating  plant,  and  a  laundry  build- 
ing and  guard-house.     The  ultimate  total  cost  will  be  about  $1,817,036.44. 


REPORT  OF  THE  CHIEF  ARCHITECT  25 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  19 

SASKATCHEWAN. 

Regina. — At  this  point  two  buildings,  the  Episcopal  college  and  Western  stores 
were  loaned  by  the  owners  to  be  fitted  up  and  used  as  convalescent  homes.  Approxi- 
mately $15,000  were  spent. 

The  Earl  Grey  Sanatorium. — This  was  a  school  building  remodelled  and  two 
buildings  added.     This  department  spent  upwards  of  $4,000  completing  same. 

The  Sherwood  Building. — A  large  departmental  store  was  acquired',  and  plans 
and  specifications  prepared  for  the  converting  of  it  into  a  complete  400-bed  hospital 
at  a  probable  cost  of  $150,000.     This  work  was  not  proceeded  with. 

ALBERTA. 

Edmonton. — Alberta  college  was  rented  and  converted  at  a  cost  of  approximately 
$30,000,  half  of  which  was  expended  by  this  department. 

Strathcona  Military  Hospital. — Was  a  city  hospital,  rented  by  the  ALII.C.  from 
the  city  of  Edmonton,  and  $38,000  spent  on  improvements,  mostly  by  this  department. 

[Calgary. — Plans  and  specifications  were  prepared  for  a  hospital  of  1,000  beds, 
and  contracts  let  for  the  first  group  of  buildings  at  approximately  $300,000.  This 
work  was  all  abandoned,  only  a  few  thousand  dollars  being  spent. 

At  Wetaskiwin. — About  $350  was  spent  in  completing  alterations  to  a  hotel, 
which  was  being  converted  into  a  convalescent  hospital  by  the  aI.H.C. 

At  Balfour. — A  hotel  was  rented  from  the  C.P.R.  by  the  M.H.C.  and  converted 
into  a  sanatorium,  with  the  addition  of  a  new  pavilion.  This  department  expended 
$10,355. 

Frank  Sanatorium. — This  was  a  hotel  rented  by  the  M.H.C.  This  department 
spent  about  $1,900  completing  the  alterations. 


BRITISH  COLUMBIA. 

Vancouver  City. — The  expenditure  here  amounting  to  about  $9,000  was  for  certain 
works  on  the  general  hospital. 

Shaughnessy  school  building  and  Fairmont  institution  were  acquired,  and  exten- 
sive alterations  and  additions  proposed.  Tenders  were  submitted  amounting  to  $75,- 
000,  but  the  work  was  not  proceeded  with.  Approximately  $14,000  was  spent.  The 
existing  premises  provided  150  beds  and  the  proposed  additions  would  have  given  an 
additional  400  beds. 


VANCOUVER   ISLAND. 

Esquimalt. — A  group  of  buildings  owned  by  the  Dominion  Government  was 
taken  over  and  additions  planned  to  provide  accommodation  for  250  beds,  besides 
buildings  for  administration,  gymnasium,  service  building,  etc.  Contracts  amount- 
ing to  about  $126,000  were  let  and  afterwards  cancelled.  The  work  carried  out  cost 
approximately  $25,000. 

Qualicum  and  Resthaven. — The  work  here  consisted  of  alterations  and  additions 
to  what  was  originally  club  houses.     This  department  spent  approximately  $1,400. 


10  GEORGE   V  SESSIONAL   PAPER   No.  19  A.    1920 


HARBOUR  WORKS. 

By  E.  D.  LAFLEITIt,  Chief  Engineer. 


NOVA  SCOTIA. 

ABBOTS    HARBOUR. 

Dredging. 

Abbots  Harbour  is  a  small  harbour  lying  between  Abbots  island,  some  two  miles 
from  West  Pubnico,  and  thirty-two  miles  from  Yarmouth.  There  are  entrance  chan- 
nels on  each  end  of  the  island,  the  southerly  channel  being  more  frequently  used. 

A  shoal  extended  out  from  the  shore  on  the  southerly  side  of  Mr.  D'Entrement's 
wharf,  making  a  sharp  turn  in  the  channel,  and  it  was  claimed  that  vessels  and  fish- 
ing boats  leaving  this  wharf  were  frequently  carried  on  tbe  shoal  by  ebb  tide  and 
westerly  winds;   a  portion  of  the  shoal  was  dry  at  low  water. 

In  order  to  improve  navigation  at'  this  point,  7,619  cubic  yards,  barge  measure- 
ment, of  sand,  mud,  gravel,  and  stones  were  removed  by  the  departmental  dredge 
No.  7  between  December  16,  1918,  and  January  28,  1919,  over  an  area  of  approximately 
35,000  square  feet. 

The  main  portion  of  the  work  was  dredged  to  8  feet  below  low  water,  but  a  small 
area  in  front  of  Mr.  D'Entrement's  wharf,  dredging  to  a  depth  of  12  feet  was  per- 
mitted to  provide  the  dredge  with  space  when  unable  on  account  of  the  tide  to  dredge 
on  the  main  area. 

CHIMNEY    CORNER. 

Cbimney  Corner,  Inverness  county,  is  a  small  bay  situated  on  the  western  shore 
of  Cape  Breton  island,  on  the  gulf  of  St.  Lawrence,  about  five  miles  south  from  the 
entrance  to  Margaree  harbour. 

It  is  resorted  to  by  fishermen  and  in  order  to  form  a  small  boat  harbour,  and  at 
the  same  time  to  provide  facilities  for  the  exportation  of  coal  from  two  small  coal 
mines  in  the  neighbourhood,  on  August  28,  1918,  a  contract  was  entered  into  for  the 
construction  of  a  wharf,  in  the  sum  of  $5,700. 

The  proposed  work  is  to  be  170  feet  in  length  and  20  feet  in  width  on  top,  extend- 
ing into  10  feet  at  low  water,  and  will  consist  of  a  stone  approach  75  feet  in  length 
and  of  a  cribwork  extension  96  feet  in  length. 

The  work  was  commenced  in  October,  but  owing  to  stormy  weather,  it  was  found 
advisable  to  suspend  operations  until  spring. 


FOURCHU. 

Fourchu  harbour,  Eichmond  county,  is  situated  on  the  southern  or  Atlantic 
coast  of  Cape  Breton  island,  about  30  miles  to  the  southward  of  Louisburg  harbour. 
The  harbour  is  an  inlet  of  the  sea,  extending  inland  for  a  distance  of  over  a  mile. 

26 


REPORT  OF  THE  CHIEF  EXGINEER  27 

SESSIONAL   PAPER   No.  19 

A  contract  for  widening  the  channel  inside  to  a  depth  of  10  feet  at  low  water  to 
enable  vessels  and  steamers  to  turn  in  front  of  the  government  wharf  was  entered 
into  with  the  Atlantic  Dredging  Company  during  the  fiscal  year.  The  contract 
involved  the  removal  of  9,000  cubic  yards,  scow  measure,  of  sand  and  clay  at  the  rate 
of  60  cents  per  cubic  yard. 

Operations  were  commenced  October  12,  1918,  and  work  was  completed  on  Novem- 
ber 13  following.  The  final  examination  showed  that  the  in  situ  quantity  removed  was 
7,598  yards,  and  as  the  scow  measure  quantity  was  9,046  cubic  yards,  the  expansion 
factor  was  19  per  cent. 

HALIFAX. 

H.  M.  Gun  wharf  was  reconstructed  during  the  year  1918-19,  by  the  Department 
of  Public  Works  at  an  expenditure  of  $4,603.10.  This  structure  belongs  to  the  Depart- 
ment of  Militia  and  Defence. 

The  work  consisted  of  tearing  down  the  old  pile  wharf  and  rebuilding  same.  The 
part  rebuilt  was  82  feet  long  along  the  face,  31  feet  wide,  with  a  shoreward  ell  22  feet 
wide  by  38  feet  long.  Repairs  were  also  made  to  the  retaining  wall  on  the  inside  of 
the  wharf,  making  this  sufficiently  strong  for  teams  to  pass  from  the  ^approach  on  to 
the  wharf. 

LOWER   KINGSBURG. 

Lower  Kingsburg  is  situated  in  Lunenburg  bay,  about  10  miles  southeast  of 
Lunenburg  town.  The  chief  industry  is  fishing,  there  being  fifteen  boats  employed, 
and  the  value  of  the  catch  averaging  $7,500  per  annum. 

During  the  fiscal  year  1918-19,  contract  wias  let  to  Mr.  Donald  Sutherland,  jr.,  of 
Halifax,  for  the  construction  of  breakwater,  skidway,  and  boat  shed  at  this  place.  Up 
to  the  31st  of  March,  the  boat  shed  had  been  completed,  and  most  of  the  materials  were 
on  the  ground  in  readiness.     The  contract  will  be  completed  by  June  30. 

MARGAREE   BREAKWATER. 

On  June  7,  1918,  a  contract  was  entered  into  with  Mr.  Maurice  A.  Condon,  of 
Digby,  N.S.,  in  the  sum  of  $12,690  for  the  construction  of  a  breakwater  580  feet  in 
length,  consisting  of  native-timber  cribwork,  10  feet  wide  for  a  distance  of  300  feet 
from  the  inner  end,  15  feet  wide  for  a  further  distance  of  250  feet,  and  of  a  block  30 
feet  long  and  30  feet  wide  at  its  outer  end,  fully  ballasted  and  fendered,  and  all  outer 
faces  closesheathed  between  the  fenders  with  the  sheathing  driven  2  feet  into  the 
bottom. 

The  work  of  construction  was  commenced  on  July  8  and  fully  completed  on 
November  28,  1918. 


NORTH   SYDNEY. 

Sea-plane  Station. . 

Xorth  Sydney,  Cape  Breton  county,  is  an  incorporated  town  and  seaport  on  the 
northern  side  of  Sydney  harbour,  and  is  one  of  the  eastern  terminals  of  the  Canadian 
Government  railways. 

For  the  purpose  of  establishing  a  sea-plane  station,  the  department  undertook  the 
filling  in  of  a  lagoon  inside  of  Kelly's  beach,  so  called,  on  the  western  end  of  the  town, 
to  make  up  the  necessary  ground,  and  the  department  dredge  No.  5  was  detailed  for 
the  purpose. 


28  DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  WORKS 

10  GEORGE  V,  A.   1920 

The  space  to  be  filled  had  an  area  of  about  11  acres,  and  the  intention  to  fill  it  to 
a  height  of  2  feet  above  high-water  spring  tides,  with  sand  and  gravel  taken  from  the 
sea  outside,  and  it  was  estimated  that  the  amount  of  material  required  would  be  65,000 
cubic  yards,  and  as  a  quantity  of  20,000  cubic  yards  of  sand  and  gravel  was  estimated 
to  be  required  for  building  and  for  road  purposes  in  connection  with  the  air  station, 
the  total  quantity  required  for  all  purposes  was  estimated  at  85,000  cubic  yards. 

Dredge  No.  5  commenced  operations  September  28  and  continued  until  December 
4,  when  the  work  was  suspended  for  the  season.  During  that  period,  a  total  of  82,200 
yards  had  been  deposited  in  the  area,  but  the  cross  sections  taken  after  the  suspension 
of  operations  show  that  the  total  quantity,  after  settlement,  was  42,700  yards;  besides 
this,  the  contractors  had  hauled  away  and  used  in  building  roads  and  mixing  concrete 
for  buildings,  etc.,  about  1,800  cubic  yards,  which  would  bring  the  total  deposit  to 
44,500  cubic  yards. 

Over  about  140,000  square  feet  of  this  area  the  original  bottom  was  composed  of 
a  soft,  alluvial  deposit  which  could  be,  penetrated  by  a  2-  by  4-inch  stick  to  a  depth  of 
6  to  10  feet,  with  a  pressure  of  about  10  pounds  to  the  square  inch,  therefore  the  gravel 
was  deposited  by  the  dredge  and  would  settle  considerably,  probably  as  much  as  5  or 
6  feet  in  the  softest  places ;  again,  a  small  quantity  of  material  was  carried  away  while 
in  suspension  through  the  outlet  of  the  lagoon  into  the  sea  Where  it  formed  a  bar,  so 
that  all  things  considered  the  disparity  between  the  in  situ  measurement  deposited 
and  the  quantity  removed  cannot  be  said  to  be  conflicting,  as  it  is  impossible  to  deter- 
mine how  much  the  deposited  material  has  settled. 

The  season  during  which  operations  were  carried  on  was  very  stormy,  and  this 
was  the  principal  cause  of  delay  in  the  prosecution  of  the  work.  During  the  progress 
of  the  work,  the  average  daily  output  was  about  1,100  cubic  yards,  and  as  this  dredge, 
under  favourable  circumstances,  can  easily  dredge  twice  that  quantity,  the  work  would 
have  been  completed  during  the  season  if  the  weather  had  been  favourable.  The 
amount  required,  to  complete  the  work  is  estimated  at  22,000  cubic  yards,  without 
making  any  allowance  for  settlement,  but  as  it  is  not  likely  that  much  settlement  will 
take  place  in  the  area  to  be  filled,  as  the  bottom  is  harder,  an  addition  of  30  per  cent 
for  settlement  will  likely  cover  this,  so  that  the  total  quantity  required  to  the  height 
proposed  may  be  estimated  at  28,60Q  cubic  yards. 


NEW  BRUNSWICK. 

CAPE    TORMENTINE   DREDGING. 

To  furnish  accommodation  for  the  car  ferry  steamer  Prince  Edward  Island,  now- 
maintaining  daily  communication,  winter  and  summer,  between  Prince  Edward 
Island  and  the  mainland,  a  harbour  and  terminal  was  constructed  at  Port  Borden, 
Prince  Edward  Island,  and  the  Dominion  Public  Works  pier  at  Cape  Tormentine, 
N.B..  taken  over  by  the  Railway  Department  in  1913,  reconstructed,  provided  with 
car-ferry  dock  and  protected  by  isolated  stone  breakwater.  The  approach  and  turn- 
ing basin  at  Tormentine  was  formed  by  dredging  to  20  feet  at  low  water  spring  tides. 

Eor  enlargement  of  the  Tormentine  turning  basin,  at  the  request  of  the  manage- 
ment of  the  Canadian  Government  Railways,  authority  was  granted  for  dredge  D.P. 
W.  No.  9,  to  undertake  the  removal  of  some  20,000  cubic  yards,  scow  measurement,  of 
mud,  brick  clay,  and  rock.  Operations  were  commenced  on  July  15,  1918,  and  carried 
on  continuously  until  October  26,  when  satisfactorily  completed,  23,747  cubic  yards 
of  material  being  removed.  The  portion  enlarged  had  an  area  of  about  104,000  square 
feet,  being  triangular  in  shape,  extending  250  feet  in  a  westerly  direction  measured 
at  right  angles  from  the  outer  end  of  west  side  of  shorter  guide  pier  of  dock;  thence 


REPORT  OF  THE  CHIEF  EXGINEER  29 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  19 

running  southerly  a  distance  of  800  feet,  these  two  lines  now  forming  the  northern 
and  western  limits,  respectively,  of  the  basin;  the  whole  area  between  the  western 
limit  and  the  main  pier  now  carries  a  least  depth  of  20  feet  at  low  water  spring  tides. 

CHATHAM. 

Dredging. 

Chatham  is  situated  on  the  south  side  of  the  Miramichi  river  about  14  miles  above 
its  mouth  in  Miramichi  bay.  Dredge  P.W.D.  No.  IS  was  employed  on  10th,  11th, 
and  part  of  12th  June,  1918,  in  digging  a  pocket  in  the  lower  end  of  the  Snowball 
boom  near  the  upper  end  of  the  Canada  dock.  About  2,200  cubic  yards,  barge  measure, 
were  removed,  and  the  pocket  or  basin  which  was  intended  for  storing  shell  mud,  used 
as  a  fertilizer,  was  about  200  feet  long,  40  feet  wide  at  bottom  and  100  feet  at  top  and 
17  feet  deep  at  low  water,  the  original  depth  varying  from  3  to  10  feet. 

On  13th  to  15th  June,  the  dredge  worked  on  the  shell  mud  beds  about  8  miles 
below  Chatham,  digging  1,516  cubic  yards  of  mud,  of  which  1,480  were  dumped  in 
the  pocket  at  Chatham,  and  36  taken  to  Nelson  by  private  parties  with  <their  own  tugs 
and  scows. 

During  March,  1919,  farmers  were  supplied  with  470  cubic  yards  of  mud  from 
the  pocket,  and  the  balance  will  be  supplied  from  the  ice  in  the  autumn. 

HARDWICKE   (MCLEANS  GULLY). 

McLeans  gully  is  the  main  passage  between  the  French  Bay  lagoon,  at  the  south- 
eastern end  of  the  inner  Miramichi  bay  and  the  outer  or  Miramichi  bay  proper. 

On  6th  February,  1918,  a  contract  was  entered  into  with  Mr.  F.  A.  Fowlie  for 
the  removal  of  12,000  cubic  yards,  barge  measure,  in  dredging  a  cut  950  feet  long  and 
75  feet  wide  to  5  feet  at  low  water  spring  tides  across  the  shoal  inside  the  entrance. 
The  contract  price  was  36  cents  per  cubic  yard,  and  work  was  done  by  the  dredge 
Fowlie  between  24th  June  and  11th  October,  when  a  total  of  8,884-6  cubic  yards  of 
mud  and  sand  were  removed. 

LOGGIEYILLE. 

Loggieville  is  situated  on  the  south  shore  of  the  Miramichi  river,  5  miles  below 
Chatham. 

Between  17th  and  22nd  June,  dredge  P.W.D.  No.  13  dredged  berths  along  the  outer 
face  and  easterly  side  of  the  public  wharf,  removing  5,506-4  cubic  yards,  of  which  480 
yards  were  overcast  and  the  remainder  removed  in  scows. 

The  dredging  extended  over  a  length  of  about  260  feet  on  the  outer  face,  giving  a 
depth  of  about  lOi  to  12  feet  at  low  water.  On  the  easterly  side  the  dredging  was 
about  100  feet  long  by  90  wide,  and  the  depth  given  about  6  to  7  feet  at  low  water. 
The  assumed  range  of  spring  tides  is  6  feet. 

On  24th  June,  the  dredge  removed  820  cubic  yards  in  excavating  a  berth  about 
175  feet  long  and  50  wide  to  8  to  9  feet  at  low  water  at  the  upper  end  of  the  A.  and  K. 
Loggie  wharf,  which  lies  immediately  above  the  public  wharf. 

NORTHWEST   MIRAMICHI   RIVER. 

Shoals  occur  on  the  5  miles  below  Bedbank,  which  is  at  the  head  of  navigation 
and  11  to  16  miles  above  Newcastle. 

Dredging  was  in  progress  between  August  26  and  September  30,  1918,  under  con- 
tract with  Feter  England,  with  the  dredge  Peter  England,  on  the  shoal  at  Lawlors 


30  DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  WORKS 


10  GEORGE  V,  A.   1920 


Shore,  2  miles  below  Redbank,  where  two  cuts  were  made  over  the  worst  sections,  at 
either  end  of  the  shoal,  the  upper  being  about  700  and  the  lower  about  350  feet  long; 
the  distance  between  them  being  about  600  feet.  The  width  of  the  cuts  is  about  100 
feet  and  depth  reached  4J  to  o\  feet,  and  a  total  of  5,499-4  cubic  yards,  barge  measure, 
of  sand  was  removed  at  44  cents  per  cubic  yard. 

Assumed  range  of  spring  tides,  7  feet;  neaps,  4  feet. 

Between  June  25  and  29,  the  sum  of  $46.25  was  expended  in  dragging  the  channel 
throughout  the  upper  5  miles,  and  locating  and  removing  twenty-three  sunken  logs, 
6  to  15  inches  in  diameter  and  10  to  26  feet  long;  a  couple  of  branches,  12  and  30  feet 
long,  and  a  section  of  an  old  boom  block  containing  10  logs  bolted  together,  all  of 
which  were  a  menace  to  navigation. 

ROBICHAUDS    (SHIPPIGAX   ISLAND). 

Robichauds,  so-called,  is  a  small  settlement  immediately  opposite  and  about  4,000 
feet  from  the  Shippigan  public  wharf.  On  account  of  mud  flats  there  is  considerable 
difficulty  in  landing  on  the  island  shore;  passengers  can  be  carried  across  the  fiats, 
but  teams  and  autos  must  wait  for  high  tide,  therefore  it  is  proposed  to  dredge  a 
channel  across  the  flats  and  build  a  small  landing  wharf,  with  the  pierhead  at  the  end 
of  this  channel. 

Dredge  P.W.D.  Xo.  13  began  this  dredging  on  October  18  and  19,  and  dredged 
directly  into  scows  648  cubic  yards  and  overcast  1,500  yards  in  making  a  cut  150  feet 
long,  45  wide,  and  7-1  to  8*  feet  deep,  where  the  original  depth  was  lh  feet  at  low  water 
ordinary  spring  tides. 

The  assumed  range  of  spring  tides  is  5-8  feet. 

The  estimated  quantity  to  be  removed  is  20,000  cubic  yards,  barge  measure. 

ST.   JOHX   HARBOUR. 

Bracing  Xos.  6  and  7  Sheds. 

Bracing  frame  pile  bents  in  the  substructure  of  -sheds  No.  6  extension  and  No.  7, 
having  to  be  done  during  low  water,  slow  progress  was  consequently  made,  and  up  to 
the  end  of  the  fiscal  year  1917-18,  a  total  of  $4,747.34  bad  been  expended.  During 
the  current  year,  this  work  has  been  completed,  the  expenditure  being  $2,455.47. 

The  portion  paid  to  the  city  by  the  department  for  repairing  trestle  adjoining 
No.  5  shed,  amounted  to  $2,908.70. 

Expenditure  during  1918-19 $2,455.47 

City  of  St.  John 2,908.70 


$5,364.17 
Repairs  to  Xo.  7   Wharf. 

On  August  28,  a  contract  was  let  to  Messrs.  Kane  &  Ring  for  repairs  to  and 
placing  additional  ballast  at  the  outer  end  of  No.  7  wharf.  This  work  was  found 
necessary  as  during  extreme  high  tides  there  was  movement  in  the  end  cribs,  on 
account  of  not  being  sufficiently  braced  or  ballasted.  The  work  has  been  satisfactorily 
completed,  and  final  estimate  issued,  the  total  expenditure  being  $9,782.63. 

Partridge  Island. 

The  wharves  at  Partridge  island,  which  have  been  in  continuous  service  for 
about  forty  years,  received  very  little  maintenance  during  the  previous  four  years. 
They  have    been  in  continuous  use  during    the  war  period,    in  connection    with  the 


REPORT  OF  THE  CHIEF  ENGINEER  31 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  19 

military  authorities  stationed  on  the  island.  Authority  was  given  in  April,  1918,  to 
make  repairs.  Work  was  immediately  commenced  and  'all  defective  stringers  and 
cross  ties  renewed,  and  the  faces  of  both  wharves  re-fendered.  The  work  is  now  in 
good  repair,  and  should  so  remain  for  a  few  years.  The  total  expenditure  was 
$2,996.62. 

Water  Supply. 

The  water  supply  at  Partridge  island  serves  the  Militia  buildings,  in  addition 
to  the  various  buildings  used  by  the  Marine  Department  and  the  Immigration 
authorities.  The  service  has  been  in  use  for  a  period  of  years,  and  on  account  of 
various  inprovements  made  during  the  past  few  years,  the  system  was  extended 
about  150  feet,  two  hydrants  were  renewed,  and  other  repairs  made  to  the  system. 
Total  expenditure  $777.54. 

Fort  Dufferin. 

During  the  fiscal  year  1917-18,  a  portion  of  the  breastworks,  about  110  feet  long, 
was  reconstructed  and  repairs  made  to  small  breaks  caused  by  previous  storms. 
There  still  remained  two  portions  to  be  rebuilt,  in  addition  to  repairs  to  Jhe  existing 
breastworks  adjoining  these  breaks.  Early  in  the  year,  plans  and  specifications 
were  prepared  for  the  completion  of  this  work,  but  it  was  later  decided  not  to  proceed 
with  the  whole  work,  but  to  do  the  portion  of  repairs  more  urgently  required  by  day 
labour.  Early  in  October,  arrangements  were  made  to  commence  work,  which  was 
proceeded  with  continuously  during  the  winter;  455  feet  of  the  breastwork  was 
repaired,  and  135  feet  rebuilt,  leaving  161  feet  to  be  built  during  1919-20.  Expendi- 
ture to  the  end  of  the  fisoal  year  was  $15,549.26. 

Courtenay  Bay. 

On  July  11,  1918,  a  contract  was  let  for  the  extension  of  Courtnay  Bay  break- 
water, necessary  dredging,  etc.,  in  connection  with  the  scheme.  Early  in  August, 
the  contractors  commenced  preliminary  work,  getting  necessary  plant  in  shape,  and 
in  October  work  was  commenced  and  proceeded  continuously  during  the  year.  For- 
tunately for  the  contractors,  there  were  no  delays  through  storms  or  severe  weather. 
The  rock  for  the  breakwater  is  being  deposited  by  cars  from  a  single-track  trestle, 
built  in  advance  of  the  work.  To  date,  the  breakwater  has  been  extended  600  feet, 
and  88,523  cubic  yards  of  rock  have  been  deposited.     Total  expenditure  $222,099.03. 

Borings  and  Soundings. 

On  account  of  the  revised  Courtenay  Bay  channel  entrance  and  the  indefinite 
information  regarding  the  submarine  rock  in  the  dry  dock  entrance,  it  was  decided 
to  make  a  thorough  examination  of  the  material  to  be  removed.  A  boring  outfit 
commenced  work  early  in  August,  and  worked  continuously  throughout  the  winter. 
Sufficient  information  has  been  obtained  to  make  a  very  close  estimate  of  the  submarine 
rock  to  be  removed,  and  the  outfit  is  now  at  work  taking  borings  in  the  channel 
entrance.     The  expenditure  was  $7,552.49. 

General   Maintenance. 

General  repairs  were  made  to  all  the  different  government  wharves  and  buildings 
in  the  harbour,  particularly  floating  fenders,  vertical  fenders  on  the  wharves,  platform 
renewals  and  repairs  to  leaking  shed  roofs.  The  expenditure  to  date  has  been 
$27,049.26. 


32  DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  WORKS 

10  GEORGE  V,  A.   1920 
SHIPPIGAN  GULLY. 

Dredging. 

Shippigan  gully,  the  southeastern  entrance  to  Shippigan  harbour  between  Shippi- 
gan  island  and  the  mainland,  at  the  northeastern  point  of  Gloucester  county,  is  us,ed 
by  the  fishing  fleet  and  tugs,  trading  schooners,  etc. 

Two  sharp  bends  in  the  channel  inside  the  gully  hav.e  made  navigation  difficult, 
and  at  different  times  dredging  has  been  undertaken  to  give  a  straight  course  from  the 
gully  inwards  towards  Shippigan  harbour. 

During  1917,  after  an  interval  of  four  years,  work  was  begun  by  dredge  P.W.D. 
No.  13  to  remove  the  lower  point  and  widen  the  cut  across  the  upper  point  and  extend 
it  through  a  shoal  formed  since  the  last  dredging  was  done.  The  work  at  both  points 
was  completed  in  1918,  between  July  10  and  October  18,  which  period  includes  12J  days 
at  different  times  when  the  dredge  worked  at  the  Shippigan  public  wharf. 

At  the  lower  point,  an  area  700  feet  long  and  200  wide  was  dredged  to  from  9  to  11 
feet  at  low  water.  At  the  upper  point  or  shoal,  a  cut  800  to  1,000  feet  long  and  200 
wide  was  dredged  to  8  to  9  feet  at  low  water.  Material  removed  was  18,557  cubic 
yards  barge  measure  at  the  lower,  and  34,262  yards  at  the  upper  point  of  gravel, 
sand,  and  mud. 

Spring  tides  rise  5.8  feet,  neaps  3  fe^t. 

SHIPPIGAN    HARBOUR. 

Dredging. 

On  eighteen  days  between  July  5  and  October  24,  1918,  dredge  P.W.D.  No.  13 
worked  in  the  berths  at  the  public  wharf  and  in  the  basin  between  it  and  the  W.  S. 
Loggie  Co.  wharf,  in  continuation  of  the  work  done  during  the  previous  season. 

On  the  westerly  side  of  the  wharf,  a  cut  or  berth  90  feet  wide  was  continued 
from  the  pierhead  200  feet  inwards  to  the  easterly  side  of  the  Comeau  Bros,  fish  shed, 
the  depth  given  being  about  8  to  10  feet  at  low  water  ordinary  spring  tides. 

On  the  southeasterly  side,  a  ridge  left  in  the  previous  year  close  to  the  wharf 
was  removed  on  a  length  of  about  300  feet,  and  the  basin  was  widened  at  the  entrance 
next  the  W.  S.  Loggie  Co.  wharf  in  an  ar.ea  about  100  feet  square  where  the  depth 
given  was  about  8  to  11  feet  at  low  water.     Spring  tides  rise  5.8  feet,  and  neaps  3  feet. 

The  quantity  removed  in  scows  was  9,902  cubic  yards,  of  which  3,296  was  first 
overcast;  the  material  was  mud,  with  soft  sandstone  towards  the  shore  end  of  the 
basin. 


PEOVINCE  OF  QUEBEC. 

LAC    ST.    LOUIS. 

Dredging. 

The  site  of  dredging  is  in  the  main  channel  of  the  St.  Lawrence,  through  Lac  St. 
Louis,  at  the  shoal  patches  which  obstruct  the  channel  upstream  from  the  junction 
of  the  Ottawa  river  and  the  St.  Lawrence  main  channel,  3  miles  upstream  from  Lachine 
between  Jacques  Cartier  and  Chateauguay  counties. 

The  object  is  to  facilitate  the  passage  of  boats  drawing  14  feet,  tugs  towing  scows 
loaded  with  sand,  etc.    From  May  26  to  September  30,  1918,  departmental  dredge  No. 


REPORT  OF  TEE  CHIEF  EXGIXEER  33 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  19 

116  worked  on  both  sides  of  the  main  channel  and  removed  at  shoal  No.  1,  on  the 
south  side  of  the  channel,  10,600  cubic  yards  scow  measure;  on  shoal  No.  2,  north  of 
channel,  13,600  yards;  and  at  shoal  No.  3,  north  of  the  main  channel,  3,650  yards, 
making  a  total  of  27,850  cubic  yards  scow  measure  for  the  season,  in  making  a  16-foot 
channel  clear  at  low  water  level.  The  material  removed  is  clay,  boulders,  and  hardpan. 
Shoal  No.  1  is  situated  at  5,800  feet  upstream  of  the  lower  light  of  new  range  on 
the  south  side  of  the  channel,  a  length  of  350  feet  parallel  with  present  channel  by  100 
feet  wide  was  dredged  to  16  feet,  corresponding  to  14  feet  on  the  upper  sill  of  Lachine 
canal;  shoal  Xo.  2  is  situated  4,000  feet  upstream  of  lower  light  on  north  side  of  main 
channel,  was  dredged  on  a  length  of  350  feet  parallel  with  channel  by  150  feet  wide  to 
a  depth  of  16  feet;  shoal  No.  $  is  situated  3,000  feet  upstream  of  lower  light  on  north 
side  of  main  channel  was  dredged  on  a  length  of  600  feet  by  a  width  of  100,  also  to  a 
clear  depth  of  16  feet. 

From  May  16  to  September  15,  1917,  departmental  dredge  No.  123  worked  here  and 
removed  29,500  cubic  yards,  scow  measure,  in  making  a  14-foot  channel  north  of  main 
channel,  completing  41-6  per  cent  of  the  whole  14-foot  project. 

To  complete  to  16  feet  below  extreme  low  water  with  2  feet  subgrade  will  require 
the  removal  of  53jS55  cubic  yards,  place  measure,  or  71,807  scow,  over  seven  different 
shoals  on  both  sides  of  main  channel  on  a  length  of  two  miles  for  a  500jfoot  channel, 
and  will  take  two  working  seasons  for  a  dredge  of  the  No.  116  type. 


LAPRAIRIE. 

Laprairie,  a  town  in  Laprairie  county,  is  on  the  smth  shore  of  the  St.  Lawrence 
and  a  station  on  the  Grand  Trunk  railway.  (This  work  is  described  in  the  annual 
report  for  1918.) 

( A)  Dyke — Contract. — The  contract  with  Quinlan  and  Robertson  being  cancelled, 
tenders  were  asked  in  August,  1918,  to  complete  the  following  work  on  the  dyke: — ■ 

(a)  In  excavating  a  trench  along  and  underneath  the  present  western  stone  rip- 
rap a  distance  of  25  feet  south  of  bridge  and  a  distance  of  30  feet  at  chainage  6,250, 
and  to  underpin  and  brace  the  western  stone  riprap  to  prevent  it  from  crumbling  when 
doing  this  excavation. 

(b)  In  filling  the  bottom  of  these  trenches  with  a  layer  of  stone  2  feet  thick  and 
3  feet  wide. 

(c)  In  underextending  at  those  places  the  western  stone  riprap  on  a  thickness  of 
18  inches  following  the  same  slope,  to  the  top  of  the  stone  footing. 

(d)  In  rebuilding,  where  directed,  the  18  inches  stone  riprap  of  western  wall  from 
chainage  2,800  to  4,200,  and  from  6,155  to  6,680. 

(e)  In  surfacing  the  western  wall  riprap  with  a  layer  of  concrete  6  inches  thick, 
from  the  point  where  surfacing  was  discontinued,  to  the  bridge,  and  from  the  bridge 
to  chainage  4,200.  Part  of  this  surfacing  shall  be  18  inches  thick  at  the  bridge 
approach. 

(/)  In  surfacing  the  western  wall  riprap  from  chainage  6,155  to  6,680  for  the 
height  of  5  feet  above  the  stone  footing  with  a  layer  of  concrete  6  inches  thick. 

(g)  In  altering  from  the  slope  of  1  in  4  to  the  slope  of  1  in  1  with  stone  filling 
and  riprapping,  the  eastern  slope  of  dyke,  the  remaining  distance  from  where  the  work 
was  discontinued  to  chainage  4,200. 

(h)  In  surfacing  part  of  eastern  slope  of  the  dyke  approaching  the  bridge  with  a 
12-inch  layer  of  concrete. 

(i)  In  laying  an  13-inch  high  dry  stone  wheel  guard  on  both  sides  of  dyke's  road- 
way on  its  whole  length  from  where  the  actual  concrete  curbs  end. 

19—3 


34  DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  WORKS 

10  GEORGE  V,  A.   1920 

0)  In  regrading  the  whole  of  dyke  roadway  on  an  average  width  of  20  feet  and 
and  average  thickness  of  3  inches  with  stone,  crushed  stone,  gravel,  and  sand,  the 
whole  properly  rolled'. 

(k)  In  building  a  plank  inclined  roadway  of  access  to  the  dyke  at  chainage  4,200. 

The  contract  was  awarded  on  September  14  to  Duranceau  and  Poupart  at  an 
approximate  price  of  $22,874. 

Up  to  April,  the  contractors  had  completed  items  A,  B,  C,  D,  E,  G,  H,  K,  20  per 
cent  of  item  /,  20  per  cent  of  item  J,  at  a  total  cost  of  $14,647.25. 

(B)  Plank  Roadway. — In  fiscal  year  1915-16,  in  order  to  accommodate  the  traffic 
during  the  construction  of  the  dyke,  a  plank  roadway  was  constructed  in  eight  days 
alongside  the  dyke  for  a  length  of  6,500  feet. 

This  roadway  is  16  feet  wide  and  consists  of  3-inch  plank  laid  lengthwise  on 
8  by  4  sleepers  laid  3  feet  apart.  Where  necessary,  a  wheel  guard  8  inches  high  was 
built  on  each  side  of  the  roadway.  This  roadway  was  widened  to  24  feet  at  the  bends, 
and  side  ditches  were  provided. 

Total  expenditure  $14,924.32. 

During  the  fiscal  year  1916-17,  the  plank  roadway  and  temporary  bridge  were 
maintained  in  good  order.  The  planks  were  renewed  as  they  broke,  and  the  road  was 
always  in  first-class  condition. 

This  work  was  performed  by  day  labour. 

During  the  fiscal  year  1917-18,  the  plank  roadway  and  temporary  bridge  were 
maintained  in  good  order;  nearly  all  the  planks  were  renewed.  This  work  was  per- 
formed by  day  labour. 

During  the  present  fiscal  year,  this  plank  roadway  and  temporary  bridge  were 
maintained  in  good  order  by  day  labour,  at  an  approximate  cost  of  $3,375.46. 

An  additional  $500  was  also  expended  on  rent  of  land',  shed,  and  advertising. 

RIVIERE-DU-LOUP    (EN    HAUT). 

This  river  flows  through  the  county  of  Maskinonge,  taking  its  rise  in  the  Lauren- 
tian  mountains,  74  miles  north,  and  empties  into  the  St.  Lawrence  on  the  northern 
shore  of  Lake  St.  Peter,  at  Louiseville. 

During  the  season,  the  department  decided  to  loan,  without  charge,  the  dredging 
plant  P.W.D.  No.  106  to  the  Tourville  Lumber  Mills  Company,  who  operated  the 
dredge  at  their  own  cost.  Dredging  operations  were  undertaken  in  front  of  their  wharf 
for  a  distance  of  1,200  feet  by  a  width  of  45  and  to  a  depth  of  10  feet  at  low  water. 
Material  removed  was  10,450  cubic  yards,  scow  measure,  of  clay  and  sand.  Work 
was  commenced  September  25  and  discontinued  November  16,  1918. 

ST.  MAURICE  RIVER   (EASTERN  CHANNEL). 

The  river  St.  Maurice  flows  through  the  Laurentian  mountains  for  a  distance  of 
360  miles,  and  discharges  into  the  St.  Lawrence  at  Trois  Pivieres. 

A  contract  was  entered  into  with  the  Laurin  and  Leitch  Engineering  and  Con- 
struction Company,  Limited,  of  Montreal,  dated  July  27,  1918,  and  as  a  help  dredge 
Progress,  P.W.D.  No.  116  was  put  to  work  in  the  eastern  channel.  The  work  performed 
during  the  season  consisted  of: — 

1.  The  dredging  of  a  part  of  a  basin  in  front  of  the  establishment  of  the  Tide- 
waters Shipbuilding  Company,  Limited,  the  said  basin  being  of  an  irregular  form, 
measuring  900  feet  in  length  by  a  mean  width  of  155  feet  and  a  depth  of  15  feet  at 
low  water.    The  total  material  removed  on  this  work  being  54,592  cubic  yards,  and  the 


REPORT  OF  THE  CHIEF  ENGINEER  35 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  19 

dredging  was  done  by  dredge  No.  4  of  the  Laurin  and  Leitch  Engineering  and  Con- 
struction Company,  Limited. 

2.  Another  small  basin  was  dredged  from  the  Canadian  Pacific  Eailway  bridge  to 
900  feet  below,  so  as  to  permit  vessels  to  turn  the  curve  at  this  point.  This  basin  is 
of  irregular  form,  measuring  800  feet  long  with  a  width  of  80  feet  upstream,  150  feet 
in  the  middle  and  40  feet  downstream,  and  the  depth  is  15  feet  at  low  water.  This 
dredging  was  done  by  dredge  No.  If.  of  the  Laurin  and  Leitch  Company,  which  removed 
12,923  cubic  yards,  and  dredge  Progress,  P.W.D.,  No.  116,  which  removed  8,263  yard's. 
The  balance  of  the  dredging,  3,500  feet  long  by  40  wide  at  the  bottom  to  a  depth  of 
15  feet,  was  dredged  for  a  great  part  by  the  Progress,  No.  116,  which  removed  48,523 
yards,  and  No.  If  of  the  Laurin  and  Leitch  Company,  removed  5,010  cubic  yards  from 
this  channel. 

A  total  of  72,525  cubic  yards  were  removed  by  dredge  No.  If  of  the  Laurin  and 
Leitch  Company,  and  56,786  yards  by  dredge  Progress,  P.W.D.,  No.  116,  or  a  grand 
total  of  129,311,  scow  measure.  From  soundings  taken  after  dredging  it  was  found 
that  the  place  measurement  was  122,616  yards,  giving  an  expansion  factor  of  5-5  per 
cent.  The  material  removed  was  clay,  sand,  and  a  few  sheet-pilings  of  an  old  coffer 
dam  of  the  Canadian  Pacific  Eailway  bridge. 

The  contract  dredging  was  done  at  the  rate  of  18-J  cent9  per  cubic  yard,  scow 
measurement,  and  the  sheet-piling  removed  was  paid  for  in  accordance  with  wrecking 
clause.  Work  was  commenced  August  4  and  discontinued  on  account  of  the  advanced 
season  on  November  26,  1918. 


ONTARIO. 

FORT   WILLIAM. 

Fort  William,  district  of  Thunder  Bay,  is  situated  at  the  mouth  of  the  Kaminis- 
tikwia  river  near  the  northwest  end  of  lake  Superior  and,  together  with  Port  Arthur, 
which  directly  adjoins  it  on  the  north,  forms  the  western  terminus  in  Canada  of 
navigation  on  the  Great  Lakes. 

The  harbour  consists  of  13-02  miles  of  navigable  channels  in  the  Kaministikwia 
river  and  in  the  McKellar  and  Mission  channels,  which  for  the  most  part  have  been 
dredged  to  a  depth  of  25  feet  below  L.W.L.  and  have  a  general  width  of  500  feet 
between  harbour  headlines.  The  harbour  frontage  available  for  dockage  amounts  to 
22-45  miles,  of  which  7-61  miles  have  already  been  built  up. 

Length  of  frontage  protected  1918 230  feet. 

Length  of  frontage  removed  1918 860  feet. 

(Old  O.N.R  coal  dock). 

Dredging. 

Dredging  was  performed  in  this  harbour  during  the  current  fiscal  year  under  con- 
tract by  the  Great  Lakes  Dredging  Co.,  Limited. 

This  contract,  which  expired  on  December  15,  1918,  covered  all  work  of  widening 
and  deepening  in  the  Kaministikwia  river  and  Mission  channel,  and  all  work  attended 
to  during  the  past  season  was  performed  by  dredge  No.  6  and  dredge  Frank  between 
the  following  dates:  dredge  No.  6,  May  8  to  November  26,  inclusive;  and  dredge 
Frank,  May  16  to  November  13,  inclusive. 

The  derrick  scow  Sampson  was  also  used  for  a  short  time  in  connection  with  the 
cutting  down  of  high  clay  banks  and  in  the  removal  of  boulders  and  of  certain  obstruc- 
tions in  the  harbour,  while  a  drill  scow  was  in  commission  from  November  11  to 
November  26,  in  drilling  and  blasting  a  bed  of  boulders  in  the  Mission  channel. 

19— 3J 


36     '  DEPARTMENT  OF  PIBL1C  WORKS 

10  GEORGE  V,  A.   1920 

The  total  quantity  authorized  for  removal  during  the  season  was  739,998  cubic 
yards,  scow  measure,  consisting  of  441,741  yards  in  the  main  area  covered  by  con- 
tract and  in  the  West  Fort  turning  basin,  and  348,257  yards  in  removing  the  C.N.  By. 
Coal  Dock  area  and  widening  the  downstream  approach  to  the  West  Fort  turning 

basin. 

The  total  quantity  removed  was  591,339  cubic  yards  scow  measure,  consisting  of 
434J  yards,  class  "  A "  material,  and  590,904^  yards,  class  "  B  "  material,  while  the 
quantities  removed  per  dredge  are  as  follows:— 

Dredge   No.   6 305,364  cubic  yards  s.m. 

«       Frank 285,955       "  "       " 

Total 591,339      "  "       " 

The  following  work  was  performed: 

Main  Areas  and  West  Fort  bas-in — 

Kaministikwia  river. — The  whole  of  the  area  to  be  improved  in  the  development 
of  the  West  Fort  turning  basin  was  dredged  to  grade,  dredge  No.  6  having  performed 
the  bulk  of  this  work,  and  a  total  quantity  of  187,672  yards  was  removed.  Con- 
siderable difficulty  was  met  in  deepening  the  area  in  this  basin,  immediately  fronting 
the  property  of  the  Canadian  Car  &  Foundry  Co.,  Limited,  on  account  of  the  devel- 
opments made  by  this  company  in  constructing  their  shipbuilding  plant,  and  later  on 
in  the  season  on  account  of  the  trawlers  that,  as  they  launched,  were  moored  to  the 
company's  wharf,  and  consequently  interfered  to  some  extent  with  the  operations  of 

dredging. 

The  channel  between  the  G.T.P.  bridge  and  the  upper  end  of  the  old  C.ls.  Ey. 
coal  dock  was  scraped  by  the  dredge  Franl;  and  a  total  quantity  of  20,215  yards  was 

removed. 

Certain  shoals  that  were  found  to  exist  between  the  Mission  channel  and  elevator 
"  B  "  were  removed  by  dredge  No.  6,  the  quantity  of  materials  in  this  ease  amounting 
to  10,657  yards. 

A  small  shoal  fronting  the  C.N.  Ey.  hard  coal  plant,  that  involved  the  removal  of 
529  yards  was  removed. 

Mission  Channel. — Certain  shoal  areas  that  existed  between  the  head  of  the  Mission 
channel,  at  its  confluence  with  the  Kaministikwia  river,  and  the  waterworks  crossing 
were  removed  to  grade  by  the  dredge  Frank,  the  quantity  dredged  being  10,415  yards. 

Similar  shoals  that  existed  between  the  Fort  William  Coal  Dock  Company's  hard- 
coal  sheds  and  the  entrance  channel,  containing  73,164  yards,  were  removed,  both 
dredges  being  used  over  various  portions  of  these  areas. 

Certain  areas  where  shoaling  had  occurred  in  the  entrance  channel  in  Thunder 
bay  were  again  dredged  to  grade,  a  quantity  of  55,480  yards  being  removed  by  the 
dredge  Frank. 

Femoral  of  C.N.  By.  Coal  Dock  and  widening  approach  to  West  Fort  Truning  Basin — 

Kaministikwia  river. — The  total  quantity  dredged  in  this  work  was  233,297  yards, 
of  which  quantity  S8,30C  yards  were  removed  from  the  north  side  of  the  river  and 
144,991  yards  from  the  south  side. 

All  dredging  was  performed  to  a  depth  of  25  feet  below  L.W.L.  or  601-86  feet 
above  mean  tide  New  York,  NY. 

In  addition   to   the   above-mentioned  works,   the   Ogilvie   Flour   Mills   Co.,   Ltd./ 
dredged  1,152  yards  and  the  Canadian  Car  and  Foundry  Co.,  Ltd.,  1,780  yards,  at 
their  own  expense,  in  removing  shoals  fronting  their  respective  properties  in  the  Kam- 
inistikwia river,  for  which  these  companies  were  responsible. 

Total  expenditure  to  March  31  last,  under  this  contract,  $100,016.81. 


REPORT  OF  THE  CHIEF  ENGINEER  37 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  19 

The  following  unit  prices  obtained  in  the  above  contract,  viz: — 

Widening — Rock  $2.40  per  cubic  yard,  s.m.     All  other  materials,  10 J  cents. 
Deepening — Rock,  $2.85  per  cubic  yard,  s.m.      All  other  materials,  22 J  cents. 
Extra  Haul — 1  cent  per  cubic  yard,  s.m.  per  mile  over  3  J  miles. 

Synopsis  of  quantities  removed  by  dredging  under  the  above  contract  in  accordance 
with  the  respective  locations  of  areas  dredged: — 

Main  Areas  and  West  Fort  Basin. 
Kaministikwia  river — 

West  Fort  turning  basin 187,672 

G.  T.  P.  bridge  to  C.  N.  Ry.  coal  dock 20,215 

Mission  channel  to  elevator  "B" 10,567 

C.  P.  R.  hard-coal  plant 529 

218,983 

Mission  channel — 

Kaministikwia  river  to  water-works  crossing 10,415 

Hard  coal  shed  to  entrance ^  73,164 

Entrance  channel 55,480 

. 139,059 

C.  N.  Ry.   coal   dock  and   widening  approach   to   West   Fort 
turning  basin — 

North  side  Kaministikwia  river SS.306 

South     "  "  "      144,991 

233,297 

Total    (cubic  yards  scow  measure) 591,339 

In  connection  with  the  above  contract,  it  might  be  stated  that  prior  to  the  current 
fiscal  year  a  total  quantity  of  15,264,361  cubic  yards,  scow  measure,  had  been  dredged 
at  a  total  cost  of  $2,530,287.61,  so  that  the  total  quantity  removed  under  this  contract 
is  15,855,700  at  a  cost  of  $2,630,299.42. 

Removal  of  old  C.N.R.  Coal  Dock: — 

On  June  10  last,  an  Order  in  Council  was  passed  authorizing  the  acceptance  of 
the  revised  tender  of  Stuart  MacKenzie,  of  Fort  William,  for  the  removal  of  the  super- 
structure and  piling  of  the  old  CJST.Ky.  coal  dock  at  Fort  William,  at  the  following 
rates,  viz. : — 

170  cords  at  $3  per  cord $    510 

58,400  lineal  feet  of  piling  at  10  cents  per  lineal  foot 5,840 

Total $6,350 

This  work  was  performed  between  June  15  and  August  17  last,  and  the  total 
quantities  removed  were  as  follows,  viz: — 

1S4-4  cords  of  timber. 
42,150      lineal  feet  pay  length  of  piling  pulled. 

Total  expenditure  under  this  contract  was  $5,038.20. 

^   PORT  ARTHUR.     A 

Dredging. 

The  city  of  Port  Arthur  has  a  fine  natural  location  on  the  shore  of  Thunder 
bay,  near  the  northwestern  end  of  lake  Superior.  Its  frontage  on  the  lake,  which  can 
be  considerably  extended,  is  seven  and  one-half  miles. 

During  the  present  season,  a  total  pay  quantity  of  178,321-72  cubic  yards, 
scow  measure,  was  removed  by  the  dredge  Excelsior  belonging  to  the  Canadian 
Dredge  Company,  Limited,  .under  contract.  This  quantity  consists  of  154,207-58 
yards  of  class  UB"  material  and  24,114-14  yards  of  class  "A"  material.  The  former 
class  of  material  consisted  principally  of  clay  and  sand,  together  with  a  certain 
quantity   of  soft   shale  rock.     The  latter   class   of  material  consisted   of  solid  rock 


38 


DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  WORKS 


10  GEORGE  V,  A.   1920 

obtained  from  the  inner  half  of  the  slip  fronting  the  Richardson  elevator,  all  of 
which  has  been  drilled  and  blasted,  together  with  a  certain  quantity  of  rock  boulders, 
each  over  2  cubic  yards  in  size,  that  were  removed  in  stripping  the  rock. 

The  areas  dredged,  and  the  respective  quantities  of  materials  removed  from  said 
areas,  were  as  follows : — 

Areas  Dredged.  Quantities. 

Slip  between  Saskatchewan  Co-operative  elevator  and  the  United 
Grain  Growers'  elevator;  removing  shoals  to  25  feet  below 
L.W.L.    (cubic  yards  s.m.  class  "B"  material) 28,733 

Slip  fronting  the  James  Richardson  &  Sons  elevator;  150  wide,  25 
feet  deep  below  L.W.L.  for  outer  half  of  slip  and  22  feet  below 
L.W.L.  for  inner  half  of  slip  (cubic  yards  s.m.  class  "B" 
material) 43,229 

And      (cubic     yards      s.m.     class    "A"   material) 21,114 

Entrance  channel   to   Richardson   slip,    270   feet  wide.    25   feet  below 

L.W.L.,  and  1,300  feet  long  (cubic  yards  s.m.  class  "B"  material.  80,501 

King's  channel  widening  immediately  to  the  north  of  main  entrance 
channel,  deepening  to  25  feet  below  L.W.L.  (cubic  yards  s.m. 
class  "B"  material) 1,744 

Low-water  level,  or  the  zero  of  guage,  is  601-86  above  mean  tide,  New  York, 
and  the  range  in  water  level  during  the  present  season  was  about  1-3  feet,  varying 
from  0-5  feet  below  L.W.L.  to  0-8  feet  above  L.W.L. 

Expenditure,  fiscal  year  ending  March  31,  1919,  $69,386.17. 


PORT  BURWELL. 

Dredging. 

Sediment  is  deposited  by  Otter  creek  in  the  winding  basin  and  between  the 
piers,  particularly  during  freshets.  South  of  the  breakwater,  lake  currents  and 
storms  drift  sand  into  the  dredged  channel.  A  great  amount  of  dredging  is  thus 
necessary  to  maintain  a  depth  of  water  sufficient  for  navigation. 

Otter  creek,  between  the  car-ferry  slip  and  the  public  highway  bridge,  had 
become  silted  to  such  an  extent  that  fishing  tugs  could  not  operate  in  this  part  of 
the  river.  A  channel  for  their  accommodation,  and  to  allow  boats  to  reach  the 
public  wharf,  was  therefore  dredged,  dimensions  as  follow:  Length,  1,020  feet; 
width,  40  feet ;  and  depth,  20  feet. 

The  material  from  the  outer  end  of  the  entrance  pier  northerly  is  composed  of 
silt,  and  from  the  outer  end  southerly  it  is  chiefly  sand  with  a  mixture  of  silt  near 
the  piers. 

Public  Works  dredge  No.  Ill  began  work  April  8,  and  stopped  August  31.  Work 
was  resumed  on  November  18  and  discontinued  for  the  season  December  21. 

The  following  table  is  the  result  of  a  study  of  place  and  scow  measurement  based 
on  surveys  made  March,  1918,  and  August  15  to  22,  1918 : — 

DREDGING   1918-19. 


Location. 

Average  dimension, 
in  feet. 

Cubic  yds. 
S.M. 

Cubic  yds. 
P.M. 

Exp. 
factor. 

Turning  basin  north  of  ferry  slip  for  plant. 
Between  piers 

/  276-6  x      486-6x3-6    1 
\    800  x      840-0x8-3    / 
103-3  x      7800x2 
100-0  x  1.025x2 
246-0  x  752-0x2-5 
1,020-0  x    400 

57,144 

26, 125 
30,323 
62,581 
•25,786 

39,332 

8,459 
16,230 
25,000 

% 
71-4 

208-8 
85-7 

Entrance  channel  south  breakwater 

150-3 

Total 

201,959 

REPORT  OF  TEE  CHIEF  ENGINEER  39 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  19 

It  will  be  noted  that  the  expansion  factor  is  unusually  large,  due  probably  to  a 
large  quantity  of  sedirrent  deposited  by  Otter  creek  and  sand  drifting  on  the  lake 
bottom  during  the  progress  of  the  season's  work. 

The  dredge  was  laid  up  at  Port  Burwell  for  convenience  in  making  repairs  and 
resuming  work  during  the  ensuing  season. 

PORT    STANLEY, 

Dredging. 

Port  Stanley  is  an  important  fishing  and  commercial  point. 

Sand  is  deposited  in  the  inner  harbour  and  winding  basin,  particularly  during 
freshets,  by  Kettle  creek.  Sand  drifting  on  the  lake  bottom  collects  in  the  dredged 
channel  south  of  the  breakwaters.  Public  Works  dredge  No.  117  began  work  Septem- 
ber 3,  and  stopped  ^November  14.     The  area  and  quantities  dredged  were  as  follows : — 

DREDGING  PERFORMED  1918. 

Average  Dimensions  Cubic  Yards 

Location—  in  Feet.  Removed  P.M. 

Inner  harbour 100  by  523  17,406 

Outer   entrance   channel   and   piers 160  by  737*5  26,272 

to    breakwater 255  by  450*8  17,379 

Total  cubic  yards  removed 61,057 

Contractor  M.  J.  Hogan  dredged  between  th^  old  Pere  Marquette  breakwater  and 
the  new  breakwater  in  providing  an  approach  for  the  construction  of  the  breakwater. 
He  was  paid  for  this  by  schedule  prices  according  to  the  terms  of  his  contract  for 
constructing  the  breakwater. 

RUSCOM  RIVER.  - 

Dredging. 

The  Euscom  river  enters  lake  St.  Clair  at  a  point  5  miles  east  of  Belle  river. 

In  1907,  a  channel  having  a  depth  of  6  feet  was  dr,edged;  this  remained  open  for 
six  or  seven  years  during  which  time  there  was  a  considerable  increase  in  the  amount 
of  fish  caught  and  shipped  at  this  point.  The  present  work  was  done  under  contract 
by  the  Windsor  Dredging  Company  between  June  4  and  26,  with  the  exception  of  174 
yards  of  re-dredging  which  was  done  at  a  later  date. 

The  dredging  consisted  of  the  cutting  of  a  channel  27  feet  wide,  1,950  feet  long, 
and  having  a  depth  of  5£  feet  below  the  zero  of  gauge.  The  zero  of  gauge  used  thi3 
year  was  one  foot  lower  than  the  gauge  used  in  1907.  The  quantity  removed  was 
6,501-4  cubic  yards,  and  the  cost  of  the  work  was  $1,300.20. 

It  is  anticipated  that  this  channel  will  in  time  need  r,e-dredging. 


SARXIA. 


Dredging  at  Salt  Block. 

Sarnia  is  an  important  manufacturing  town  on  the  east  bank  of  the  St.  Clair 
river,  county  of  Lambton,  3  miles  south  of  lake  Huron. 

For  the  purpose  of  assisting  in  the  importation  of  coal  to  the  Sarnia  Salt  Block 
and  the  Cleveland  and  Sarnia  Saw-mills  Company,  a  channel  was  dredged  in  Sarnia 
bay  of  the  following  dimensions:  Length  1,030  feet,  average  width  63  feet,  average 
depth  of  cut  2-884  feet. 


40 


DEPABTMEXT  OF  PUBLIC  K'OBKS 


10  GEORGE  V,  A.   1920 

The  total  quantity  removed  amounted  to  7,152  cubic  yards  place  measurement. 
The  above  work  was  done  by  the  Ontario  Gravel  Freighting  Company  at  a  cost  of  35 
cente  per  cubic  yard.  The  total  cost  of  the  work  was  $2,503.20.  The  depth  of  water 
provided  was  15  feet  below  the  zero  of  the  gauge  at  Point  Edward,  no  allowance 
was  made  for  slope  of  the  river  between  Point  Edward  and  Sarnia. 


TORONTO. 

The  city  of  Toronto,  with  a  population  of  half  a  million,  and  situated  near  the 
head  of  lake  Ontario,  possesses  an  exceptionally  fine  land-locked  harbour,  known  as 
Toronto  Bay.  The  harbour  is  protected  by  a  large  crescent-shaped  island  separated  at 
each  end  from  the  mainland  by  the  Eastern  and  Western  channels,  through  which 
access  to  the  bay  is  obtained. 

(This  work  is  described  in  the  annual  report  for  1915.) 

Section  "A." — The  eastern  sea  wall,  length  17,295  feet,  extending  along  the  lake 
front  from  the  Eastern  channel  to  "Woodbine  avenue.  This  wall  is  of  standard  pile 
bent  and  concrete-top  construction,  but  has  not  yet  been  commenced. 

Section  "  B:' — The  Western  breakwater  consists  of  sections  of  wall  running 
parallel  to  the  extended  shore  line  at  approximately  300  feet  distance. 

During  the  past  season,  only  rectification  work  was  done  on  the  breakwater. 
Approximately,  100  tie  rods,  2  inches  in  diameter,  were  placed  in  the  work,  and  some 
twenty-six  square  piles  being  also  driven.  This  completes  the  rectification  proper,  but 
some  parts  of  the  work  damaged  or  otherwise  rendered  useless  have  not  been  replaced 
by  the  contractors.     These  portions  of  the  work  have  been  deducted  as  shown  below :— 


Item 

Description  of  work. 

Deduction. 

Unit  price. 

Amount. 

12 

13 

20 

20-A 

Round  piles ,  . . . . 

Cribwork 

Dredging 

9, 196  lineal  feet 

581  cubic  yards. .  .  . 
4,444  cubic  vards. . .  . 
1,680  F.B.M 

SO -40 
4  90 
3  75 
0  09 

$3,678-40 

2,846  90 

1,666  50 

151  20 

$8,343  00 

Section  "  C ." — Ship  channel  and  turning  basin.  On  this  section  of  the  work 
excellent  progress  has  been  made;  all  the  old  substructure  work  has  been  rectified;  on 
the  concrete  superstructure  18,744  cubic  yards  have  been  poured,  completing  both  walls 
of  the  ship  channel,  making  a  total  of  13,002  lineal  feet  of  wall. 

As  in  the  previous  year,  the  contractors  have  done  this  work  in  the  dry,  maintain- 
ing the  level  of  the  water  about  2  feet  below  the  top  of  the  bent  piles. 

In  the  turning  basin,  practically  all  round  piles,  caps,  and  stringers  are  in  place. 
~Ro  work  has  been  done  on  this  section  of  the  work  this  season. 

During  the  season,  the  entire  ship  channel  has  been  dredged  to  the  required  depth 
and  the  material  deposited  as  back-fill. 

Below  is  a  summary  of  work  performed  during  period  from  April  1,  1918,  to 
March  31,  1919:— 

Round  piles $     3.S37  92 

Hemlock 302  40 

British  Columbia  fir  sheet  piles 11,861  35 

"    in  other  parts  of  work 133  76 

Concrete 164,011  92 

Structural  steel 20,835  21 

Drift  bolts,  etc 5,616  54 

Cast-iron  bollards 5,477  22 

British  Columbia  fir  waling 16,129  07 

Dredging 45,926  07 

Total $274,131   46 


effort  of  THE  CHIEF  ENGINEER  41 

SESSIONAL   PAPER   No.   19 

Extra  work  done  during  the  season  amounted  to  $216.73,  consisting  of  placing 
corner  plat.es  at  corners  A,  B,  K,  V,  and  WL  and  filling  cast-iron  bollards  with  con- 
crete. 

Section  "  D ,'  Retaining  ivalls,  Northern  slip  and  Marginal  way. — That  portion  of 
the  contract  known  as  the  northern  slip  or  the  Don  diversion  channel  was  completed 
ready  for  back-fill  during  the  fiscal  year  of  1916-1 7,,  as  was  also  the  north  marginal 
way-wall. 

On  Section  W-Wl,  known  as  Poison's  Extension  (924  feet  in  length)  the  concrete 
portion  of  the  superstructure  was  completed  and  the  entire  superstructure  built  during 
this  season.  This  work  consisted  of  placing  334  yards  of  concrete  and  62,394  f.b.m. 
of  timber. 

On  sections  KV  and  VY,  known  as  the  south  marginal  way,  the  top  lift  of 
concrete  was  poured,  388  cubic  yards,  completing  this)  section  of  the  work. 

No  work  was  done  on  the  ventilating  channel  walls  during  this  season. 

Eollowing  is  a  summary  of  the  work  performed  during  the  period  April  1,  1918, 
to  March  31,  1919:— 

Round  piles $       58  17 

Hemlock 4,367  59 

British  Columbia  fir  sheet-piles $5,272   05 

"    in  other  parts  of  work 33  26 

Concrete 4,581  40 

Reinforcing  steel 687  67 

Structural  steel 4  22 

Drifts,  bolts,  etc 454  06 

British  Columbia  fir  waling 1,573  58 

Cast-iron  bollards 670  68 

Dredging  in  ventilating  channel 472  49 

$5,272   05   .   $12,903   06 
5,272   05 

$7,631   01 

The  deduction  of  $5,272.05,  shown  above,  for  B.C.  fir  sheet  piles,  is  due  to  an 
adjustment  between  progress  estimates  and  final  estimate. 

General. — The  gross  value  of  the  work  performed  and  materials  furnished  by 
the  contractors  as  per  final  estimate,  dated  December  17,  1918,  is  $2,579,890.11. 

The  advance  against  materials  in  yards  is  now  $2,909.09,  being  $40,426.65  less 
than  on  March  31,  1918. 

The  gross  value  of  the  work  performed  from  April  1,.  1918,  to  March  31,  1919, 
is  $273,419.47.  The  cost  of  inspection,  engineering  and  maintenance  and  equipment 
of  resident  engineer's  office  for  the  period  has  been  $33,026.52. 

On  December  21,  1917,  the  department  notified  the  Canadian  Stewart  Company, 
Limited,  that  on  the  completion  of  the  ship  channel  walls,  north  and  south  marginal- 
way,  that  their  contract  would  be  terminated.  This  work  was  completed  during  the 
season  1918-19,  and  on  February  4,  1919,  an  Order  in  Council  was  passed  cancelling 
their  contract. 

On  March  10,  1919,  a  new  contract  was  entered  into  between  the  Department 
and  Messrs.  Soger  Miller  &  Sons,  Limited,  of  Toronto,  for  the  completion  of  the 
turning  basin  and  ventilating  channel,  and  repairing  and  completing  sections 
A,  B,  C,  B,  and  S  of  the  western  breakwater. 

The  contractors  are  preparing  for  the  coming  season;  work  has  been  started 
on  a  railway  spur  line  and  road  to  the  turning  basin,  and  a  yard  on  the  water  front 
of  Toronto  bay  is  being  prepared  for  the  making  of  concrete  blocks  for  the  break- 
water superstructure. 


42  DEPART MEXT  OF  PUBLIC  WORKS 

10  GEORGE  V,  A.   1920 
MANITOBA. 

HXAUSA. 

Dredging. 

The  object  of  this  work  was  to  improve  the  berth  beside  the  government  wharf. 

Dimensions  of  the  work  were  81  by  90  feet,  with  an  average  cut  of  6  feet. 

The  quantity  of  material  removed  was  156  cubic  yards,  place  measure,  consisting 
of  hard  clay. 

P.W.D.  dredge  No.  201  was  employed  from  July  22  to  August  3,  a  possible  time 
of  120  hours,  of  which  115  hours  were  lost  mainly  through  storms  and  weather. 

RED   RIVER. 

New  Channel  Dredging. 

The  work  at  this  place  was  for  the  purpose  of  maintaining  the  channel  outside 
the  protection  work. 

The  dimensions  of  the  work  were  768  by  140  feet  with  an  average  cut  of  3  feet. 
This  work  is  required  annually  and  varies  with  the  extent  and  severity  of  the  spring 
flood  in  the  Red  river. 

The  material  removed  consisted  of  river  silt  and  clay,  and  the  quantity  removed 
was  11,941  cubic  yards,  place  measurement,  and  was  all  cast  over. 

P.W.D.  dredge  No.  201  was  employed  from  May  31  to  July  20  and  from  August 
5  to  August  15,  or  a  possible  time  of  534  hours,  of  which  426  were  lost  due  to  weather, 
repairs,  towing,  etc. 

The  cost  of  the  work  was  $6,976.79,  or  a  cost  per  cubic  yard  of  58-4  cents. 


SASKATCHEWAN. 

BIG   STOXE   RIVER. 

The  object  of  this  work  was  to  improve  navigation  in  the  Big  Stone  River  rapids, 
near  Cumberland  House. 

No  work  of  any  kind  had  been  done  at  this  locality  in  the  past. 

The  work  done  during  the  past  season  was  not  completed  as  proposed,  on  account 
of  the  exceptionally  high  water  in  the  Big  Stone  river,  due  to  ice  jams  in  the  Saskat- 
chewan river. 

Th,e  work  consisted  of  excavating  clay  and  gravel  by  means  of  a  slusher  after 
blasting  had  been  completed,  the  removal  of  large  boulders  and  the  clearing  of  a  tow- 
ing path,  1,271  feet  long,  for  "lining"  steamers  and  barges  up  the  rapids.  A  channel 
242  feet  long  and  30  wide,  with  a  maximum  depth  of  3  feet  at  low  water,  was  secured. 
The  work  lasted  from  January  11  to  February  28,  1919.  The  total  cost  of  the  work 
was  $2,451.13. 

CUMBERLAND    LAKE. 

Dredging. 

The  object  of  the  work  was  to  provide  a  channel  through  the  bar  in  Cumberland 
lake,  at  the  point  at  which  it  empties  into  the  Big  Stone  river. 

The  work  done  during  the  past  season  consisted  of  one  cut  4,140  feet  long,  50 
feet  wide,  with  an  average  cut  of  2-8  feet.  During  the  summers  of  1914  and  1915, 
35,096  cubic  yards  were  removed,  or  a  place  measure  of  28,077  cubic  yards.  There 
still  remains  20,000  cubic  yards  place  measurement,  to  complete  the  work. 


REPORT  OF  THE  CHIEF  ENGINEER  43 

SESSIONAL  DAFER  No.  19 

The  material  consisted  of  clay,  gumbo,  and  sand. 

The  quantity  removed  amounted  to  27,350  cubic  yards,  cast  over,  which  with  an 
expansion  factor  of  1-2  gives  a  place  measure  of  21,880  cubic  yards. 

P.W.D.  dredge  No.  208  was  employed  from  May  20,  to  September  25,  a  possible 
time  of  1,110  hours,  512J  hours  being  lost  time,  due  mainly  to  storms  and  weather. 

The  cost  of  this  work  was  $7,935.23,  or  a  cost  per  place  measure  cubic  yard  of 
29-01  cents. 


BRITISH  COLUMBIA. 

ESQUIMALT. 

Coaling  Jetty. 

Plans  and  specifications  were  prepared  and  contract  placed  with  Messrs.  Palmer 
Bros.,  Vancouver,  B.C.,  for  the  renewal  of  the  naval  coaling  jetty,  the  old  wharf  being 
beyond  repair. 

A  new  wharf  was  constructed  of  the  following  dimensions:  Wharf  head  250  by 
GO  feet,  main  approach  183  feet  6  inches  by  31  feet  10£  inches,  side  approaches  150 
by  9  feet  6  inches  and  134  feet  4  inches  by  20  feet.  Creosoted  piles  were  used 
throughout,  together  with  creosoted  lumber  for  all  bracings  below  H.W.L.  The  new 
wharf  has  a  depth  of  32  feet  at  L.W.L.  at  its  face,  being  extended  out  considerably 
beyond  the  face  of  the  old  wharf.  The  work  was  completed  in  a  thoroughly  satis- 
factory manner  in  January,  1919,  at  a  total  cost  of  $46,781.06.  Improved  methods  of 
unloading  and  placing  coal  in  the  storage  sheds  adjacent  to  the  wharf  and  delivering 
same  to  ships  or  scows  should  be  provided;  the  existing  system  of  using  small  trucks 
being  both  slow  and  expensive. 

ESQUIMALT. 

Dockyard   Wharf. 

Plans  and  specifications  for  the  reconstruction  of  the  dockyard  wharf  have  been 
prepared  and  a  contract  was  awarded  to  Messrs.  McDonald  &  Watson,  for  the  sum 
of  $52,924.07,  unit  prices. 

FRASER    RIVER. 

Boneyard,  Annacis  Island. 

To  provide  berthing  and  working  room  for  scows  and  other  departmental  plant, 
stored  at  a  Public  Works  storage  yard  on  Annacis  island,  the  departmental  dipper 
dredge  Mudlark  was  put  on  the  work  to  dredge  the  necessary  cut.  The  materials  being 
too  fine  to  hold  in  the  scow  pockets,  the  dredge  King  Edward  (305)  was  put  on  the 
work  April  2,  3,  11,  and  12,  1918. 

A  cut  160  feet  long  and  100  feet  wide  was  made,  roughly  at  right  angles  to  the 
protective  wing  dam  opposite  the  storage  yard,  and  to  a  depth  of  20  feet  below 
L.W.O.S.T. 

The  outer  end  of  the  cut  meets  the  deep  water  of  the  main  channel  of  the  Praser 
river  at  a  point  one  mile  southwest  of  !New  Westminster  city. 

A  total  of  3,825  cubic  yards,  place  measurement,  of  light  silt  and  sand  was  pumped 
out  of  the  cut  and  deposited  around  the  outer  end  of  the  wing  dam,  where  it  will  act 
as  a  protection  to  it  against  scour. 

Further  dredging  will  have  to  be  done  in  the  course  of  a  few  years,  the  exact  year 
being  determined  by  action  of  the  Fraser  floods  and  the  requirements  for  berthing 
room  at  that  time. 


44  DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  TVORKZ 

10  GEORGE  V,  A.   :920 
Sandheads. 

With  the  object  of  assisting  the  natural  tendency  of  the  Eraser  river  to  find  its 
way  to  the  sea  through  a  defined  channel,  and  to  train  the  waters  into  a  course  which 
is  most  desirable  from  the  standpoint  of  navigation,  the  departmental  dredge  Fruhlvng 
(SOS)  was  operated  during  the  whole  of  the  fiscal  year  1918-19  along  the  main  channel 
and  through  the  sandheads,  from  Steveston  to  the  deep  waters  of  the  gulf  of  Georgia, 
a  distance  of  5£  miles. 

No  accurate  dimensions  of  the  cuts  made  can  be  given,  but  an  approximation 
would  place  the  total  length  of  area  worked  over  at  9,400  lineal  feet,  and  the  widths 
as  varying  between  200  and  300  feet;  these  cuts  were  made  along  a  definite  and  pre- 
determined line  paralleling  the  existing  and  proposed  jetty  line,  and  the  line  of 
greatest  depth  of  river  bed. 

Between  the  fiscal  years  1910-11  and  1918-19,  both  inclusive,  a  total  of  5,315,467 
cubic  yards  of  material  have  been  removed  from  the  channel  by  dredging.  The  work 
done  during  the  fiscal  year  1918-19  has  assisted  in  maintaining  a  minimum  depth  of 
14-0  feet  L.W.O.S.T.,  or  26  feet  on  a  12-foot  tide  through  the  channel,  and  the  work  is 
still  under  way.  ' 

Some  818,048  cubic  yards,  hopper  measurement,  of  sand  and  silt  were  removed 
from  the  cuts  between  buoys  1-3,  9-11,  and  15-18. 

The  duration  of  the  improvements  made  in  the  last  fiscal  year  cannot  be  deter- 
mined, but  each  year's  work  has  a  tendency  to  make  more  or  less  permanent  the  channel 
trained  by  the  existing  jetty. 

Steveston. 

To  provide  a  sufficient  depth  of  water  to  allow  small  freighters,  tugs,  etc.,  to  tie 
up  to  and  remain  alongside  the  wharves  of  operating  canneries  at  Steveston  during 
any  stage  of  the  tide,  berths  were  dredged  in  front  of  the  plants  of  the  Imperial 
Cannery  to  10-0  feet  below  L.W.O.S.T.,  the  Phoenix  Cannery  and  the  Dominion  Pro- 
ducts Company  to  8-0  feet  below  L.W.O.S.T. 

There  were  three  berths  dredged:  that  in  front  of  the  Imperial  Cannery  is  900 
feet  long  and  155  wide;  that  in  the  front  of  the  Phoenix  Cannery  is  1,000  feet  long 
and  155  wide;  and  that  in  front  of  the  Dominion  Products  Company's  plant  is  200  feet 
long  and  150  wide.  These  berths  are  isolated  from  the  main  channel  of  the  Fraser 
by  shoal  water  at  low  tide,  but  advantage  is  taken  of  high  -water  periods  to  get  in  and 
out  of  the  berths. 

A  total  of  56,000  cubic  yards  (place  measurement,  based  on  a  survey)  of  sand  and 
silt  were  removed  from  the  three  berths.  As  the  work  was  performed  by  the  suction, 
dredge  King  Edward  (805),  no  scow  measurement  is  given  or  computed. 

The  works  were  performed  between  the  following  dates:  June  17  to  26;  July  2  to 
23;  and  October  30  to  November  9,  1918,  a  total  of  43  days,  including  time  getting  on 
the  work,  etc. 

Steveston,  Xew  Channel. 

For  several  years  previous  to  1918,  the  waters  of  the  Fraser,  running  through 
the  channel  known  as  "Woodwards  slough  (the  main  navigable  channel  at  that  time) 
showed  a  decided  tendency  to  use  a  channel  farther  to  the  north,  with  the  result  that 
the  old  channel  became  subject  to  shoaling  through  silting,  and  the  new  channel 
offered  deeper  water  for  navigation  to  a  point  where  the  two  channels  m,eet  again  oppo- 
site the  town  of  Steveston.  At  this  point,  the  navigation  of  the  new  channel  was 
impeded  by  a  large  bar  of  sand,  silt  and  clay.  Early  in  1918,  it  was  decided  to  dredge 
a  channel  through  this  bar  rather  than  try  to  keep  the  old  Woodwards  slough  cliimnei 
clear  of  constantly  forming  shoals. 


REPORT  OF  THE  CHIEF  ENGINEER  45 

SESSIONAL  PAPER   No.   19 

The  dredge  King  Edward  ('305)  was  put  on  the  work  May  8,  and  working  between 
the  following  dates  she  dredged  a  channel  5,150  feet  long  and  300  feet  wide,  to  a  depth 
of  16  feet  at  L.W.O.S.T. 

May  8  to  June  15,  July  24  to  August  31,  September  12  to  October  29,  November 
11  to  March  26. 

In  dredging  the  channel  a  total  of  545,900  cubic  yards  of  materials  were  removed. 

In  addition  to  the  work  in  the  new  channel  performed  by  the  dredge  King  Edward, 
ft  .-mall  triangular  area  at  its  westerly  end,  and  connecting  it  with  the  main  river 
channel  was  dredged  to  16  feet  at  L.W.O.S.T.  by  the  dredge  SOS. 

Work  was  performed  between  October  16  and  November  30;  according  to  the 
dredge  returns  the  quantity  of  materials  removed  was  114,700  cubic  yards,  hopper 
measurement,  of  silt,  sand  and  clay. 

Woodwards  Landing. 

To  provide  sufficient  berthing  room  at  the  Provincial  Government  ferry  dock  at 
Woodwards  Landing,  for  the  ferries  plying  between  this  point  and  Ladner,  2£  miles 
distant,  it  was  asked  that  the  berth,  which  had  silted  up,  be  dredged  to  11-0  feet  at 
L.W.O.S.T. 

The  dredge  King  Edward  (S05)  was  put  on  the  work  March  27,  1918,  and  a  cut 
roughly  100  feet  long  and  50  feet  wide  was  made  in  front  of  the  wharf,  to  the  11-foot 
contour  of  the  river  bottom. 

A  total  of  195  cubic  yards  (place  measurement)  of  sand  and  silt  were  removed  in 
the  one  day's  operations. 


HARDY    BAY. 

-lardy  bay  is  situated  at  the  north  end  of  Vancouver  island.  The  old  wharf, 
which  had  been  built  many  years  ago,  was  carried  away  in  a  storm  early  in  1918.  It 
was  decided  to  replace  this  by  a  float,  for  the  construction  of  which  the  tender  of 
Messrs.  McDonald  &  Watson,  Victoria,  for  $2,136  was  accepted,  but  owing  to  bad 
weather  conditions,  the  work  has  not  been  commenced  at  the  end  of  the  fiscal  year. 

KICKING    HORSE    RIVER. 

The  channel  of  Kicking  Horse  river,  at  Golden,  was  obstructed  by  an  accumula- 
tion of  gravel  carried  down  from  the  canyon  above  the  town  and  deposited  on  the  flats 
on  which  the  town  is  built.  At  one  point  the  gravel  had  formed  a  bar  over  six  feet  in 
height,  the  top  of  which  was  only  one  foot  below  the  level  of  the  adjoining  banks,  and 
during  high  water  seasons  of  1916,  1917,  and  1918,  the  water  overflowed  these  banks 
and  flooded  the  adjacent  portions  of  the  town,  and  the  farming  lands  in  the  vicinity, 
to  a  depth  of  several  feet,  doing  an  enormous  amount  of  damage  besides  causing  great 
inconvenience.  To  prevent  further  flooding  during  future  periods  of  high  water,  it 
was  decided  to  clear  out  the  obstructions  in  a  part  of  the  present  channel,  past  the  point 
of  the  most  severe  flooding  and  bank  erosion,  thus  forming  a  new  channel  150  feet 
wide  and  approximately  3,400  in  length,  with  an  average  depth  of  6  feet. 

Funds  for  this  work  were  provided  by  the  appropriations  of  $12,200  by  the  pro- 
vince of  British  Columbia,  and  the  same  amount  by  this  department. 

The  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  Company,  which  is  largely  interested  in  the  preven- 
tion of  future  floods,  have  lent  a  3*  yard  steam  shovel  which  is  being  used  for  excavat- 
ing above  water,  and  the  excavation  below  water  is  being  done  by  three  steam  drag 
scrarers  ownad  by  this  department. 


46  DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  WORKS 

10  GEORGE  V,  A.   1920 

The  work  of  excavating  was  started  during  November,  1918,  and  by  March  31, 
1919,  60,030  cubic  yards  of  material  had  been  moved  and  a  pile  and  timber  wall,  600 
feet  long  had  been  constructed. 

The  expenditure  to  March  31  was  $23,073.26. 

Work  is  still  in  progress. 

SQUIRREL   COVE. 

A  new  float  was  built  here,  18  by  36  feet,  and  an  approach  6  by  100  feet.  The  float 
was  anchored  with  two  3-ton  rocks,  and  two  50-foot  anchor  chains;  expenditure  was 
$352.50. 

VANCOUVER. 

On  March  5,  1918,  a  contract  was  entered  into  between  the  department  and  Messrs. 
Hodgson  &  King  for  the  construction  of  a  freight  shed  on  the  west  side  of  the  govern- 
ment wharf,  and  work  was  started  about  April  1,  1918,  and  was  finished  January  4, 
1919,  as  a  cost  of  $129,280. 

The  contract  price  was  $128,274,  and  two  extras,  the  alteration  of  the  doors  on 
the  east  side  costing  $786,  and  the  laying  of  the  track  on  the  west  side  of  the  shed 
$220. 

On  September  27,  1918,  a  contract  was  entered  into  between  the  department  and 
the  Canadian  General  Fire  Extinguisher  Company  for  the  installation  of  a  sprinkler 
system  in  the  two  sheds  on  the  government  wharf.  The  work  was  commenced  about 
October  1,  1918,  and  was  completed  on  March  31,  1919,  at  a  cost  of  $33,194.73.  The 
contract  being  a  lump  sum  of  $32,853.45,  and  an  extra  of  $341.28  for  carrying  the 
power  wires  from  the  pole  line  to  the  air  compressors,  which  were  installed  as  the 
system  is  what  is  known  as  the  dry-pipe  system  to  prevent  freezing,  the  building  not 
being  heated. 

The  other  expenditures  on  the  Vancouver  wharf  consisted  in  laying  rails  on  the 
west  side  of  the  shed,  and  connecting  the  tracks  with  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  at 
a  cost  of  $1,790.29. 

The  total  expenditure  for  this  fiscal  year  was  $164,265.02. 

Dredging. 

Coughlans  Shipyards,  False  Creele. — To  enable  ships  built  in  the  Coughlan's  ship- 
yards to  be  launched  into  the  slips  alongside  the  launching  ways,  it  was  asked  that 
these  slips  and  the  berth  at  the  end  of  the  dock  be  dredged  to  12-0  feet  at  L.W.O.S.T. 

A  contract  was  entered  into  with  the  Pacific  Dredging  Company  to  dredge  some 
22,000  cubic  yards  of  materials  at  the  rate  of  ten  (10)  cents  per  cubic  yard. 

Work  was  started  May  4,  1918 ;  between  this  date  and  May  20,  15,816  cubic  yards 
of  silt  and  stiff  clay  was  removed  from  the  slips  and  pumped  to  the  head  of  False 
creek,  on  the  area  reclaimed  for  the  Canadian  Northern  Pacific  Railway  Company. 

The  area  dredged  over  consists  of  three  parts:  a  berth  on  the  west  side  having  an 
average  length  of  205  feet  and  a  width  of  62  feet,  a  berth  on  the  east  side  having  an 
average  length  of  311  feet  and  a  width  of  62  feet,  and  an  end  berth  connecting  the 
two  former  127  feet  long  and  approximately  80  feet  wide.  All  of  these  were  dredged 
out  to  the  12-foot  contour  line  paralleling  the  main  20-foot  channel  of  False  creek. 

As  it  was  found  that  a  suction  dredge  could  not  remove  all  of  the  harder  materials 
encountered,  a  new  contract  was  entered  into  with  J.  W.  Pike  to  perform  the  remainder 
of  the  work  with  a  dipper  dredge,  at  the  rate  of  twenty-eight  (28)  cents  per  cubic 
yard.    This  work  was  commenced  June  13  and  completed  September  18,  1918. 

A  total  of  3,297  yards,  place  measurement,  of  stiff  clay  and  boulders  was  removed. 
Scow  measurement  was  4,455  cubic  yards,  an  expansion  factor  of  35  per  cent  over- 
place  measurement. 


REPORT  OF  TEE  CHIEF  EXGINEER  47 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  19 

The  total  yardage  removed  and  total  cost  is  as  follows : — 

Pacific  Dredging  Co 15.S16  cubic  yards  at  10  cents  per  yard.    $1,581  60 

J.W.Pike 3,297  "  28     "  "  923   16 


Total 19,113  "  $2,504   76 


Vancouver  Gas  Works,  False  Creek. — To  provide  berthing  and  working  room 
for  scows  and  tugs  alongside  the  Vancouver  Gas  Company's  plant  and  wharf  on 
False  Creek,  it  was  asked  that  the  slip  be  dredged  to  12.0  feet  at  L.W.O.S.T. 

A  contract  was  entered  into  with  J.  W.  Pike  to  remove  12,850  cubic  yards  of  silt, 
boulders,  and  hardpan  at  a  rate  of  thirty-six  and  a  half  (36 J)  cents  per  cubic  yard. 

"Work  was  commenced  March  11  and  completed  as  far  as  possible  May  8,  1919, 
when  a  total  of  6,697  cubic  yards  of  materials  had  been  removed  from  the  slip. 

Up  to  and  including  March  31,  1919,  2,555  cubic  yards  of  materials  had  been 
removed  at  a  cost  to  the  department  of  $932.58.  The  above  yardage  is  place  measure- 
ment, as  against  2,970  cubic  yards  scow  measurement,  an  expansion  factor  of  16  per 
cent  over  place  measurement. 

The  area  dr.edged  over  is  318  feet  long  and,  over  the  greater  part  of  its  length, 
117  wide,  with  the  only  dredge  available  which  could  pass  under  the  Georgia  Street 
viaduct,  it  was  not  possible  to  dredge  to  th,e  full  depth  desired  over  the  entire  area, 
owing  to  the  extremely  hard  materials  encountered. 

The  work  done  would,  however,  seem  to  meet  the  requirements  of  the  tugs  and 
scows  operating  in  the  slip,  and  the  depth  should  be  maintained  for  at  least  five  years. 

VICTORIA. 

On  September  7,  1918,  a  contract  was  awarded  for  the  construction  of  a  freight 
shed,  200  feet  by  199  feet,  together  with  the  necessary  trackage  on  pier  No.  3. 

The  shed  is  similar  in  design  to  the  one  constructed  last  year  on  pier  No.  2  and 
being  located  200  feet  from  the  inner  end  of  the  pier  can  be  extended  at  both  ends 
if  at  any  tim,e  the  business  of  the  port  so  warrants. 

The  trackage  which  connects  with  the  existing  system  and  ferry  slip,  consists 
of  surface  tracks  on  each  side  of  the  pier  extending  to  the  outer  end  and  a  depressed 
track  extending  to  the  end  of  the  shed. 

Work  was  commenced  October  7  and  proceeded  slowly  on  account  of  delay  in 
delivery  of  materials  till  the  beginning  of  1919  when  better  progress  was  made. 

At  the  end  of  the  fiscal  year  work  to  the  value  of  $57,311,  or  75  per  cent  of  the 
total  amount  of  the  contract  price  of  $76,495,  had  been  done,  and  the  whole  contract 
will  be  completed  in  May,  1919. 

PIER  XO.  3. 

On  December  27,  1918,  a  contract  was  awarded  for  the  construction  of  an  adjust- 
able slip  and  the  alteration  of  protective  fenders  on  pier  No.  3. 

The  slip  is  located  on  the  north  side  of  the  pier  opposite  the  centre  of  the  shed 
now  under  construction,  and  the  work  consisted  of  the  removal  of  a  portion  of  the  exist- 
ing concrete  parapet  wall,  lining  with  concrete,  the  framing  and  building-in  of  the 
slip  with  lifting  mechanism,  and  the  replacement  of  200  feet  of  rigid  fenders  with 
boom  logs. 

Work  was  commenced  January  29,  1919,  and  the  contract  was  completed  the 
last  week  in  March. 

The  contract  was  $3,500. 


48  DEPARTUEXT  OF  PUBLIC  WORKS 

10  GEORGE  V,  A.   1920 
DREDGING  OPERATIONS. 

Contract  Dredging  and  Dredging  hy  Days'  Labour,  1918-19. 

Port  A  rthur,  Ont. — 

Under  agreement  No.  9490  with  W.  E.  Phin,  dredge  Excelsior. 

Quantity  removed:  Class  A,  24,114-14,  Class  B,  154,207-58  cubic  yards,  scow 
measurement  at  $2  per  cubic  yard,  Class  A,  and  13  cents  Class  B,  of  rock,  clay, 
sand,  and  gravel,  $68,275.26;  additional  paid  dredging  in  1917,  in  Richardson 
Slip  by  Richardson  &  Sons,  $1,301.07;  inspection  $929;  total  expenditure  $70,- 
405.33. 

Work  commenced  May  13,  1918;  completed  November  20,  1919. 

Object  of  work:  To  continue  by  dredging  the  scheme  of  having  25  feet  depth  all 
over  the  harbour. 

Fort  William,  Ont. — 

Under  contract  No.  7339  with  Great  Lakes  Dredging  Co.     Dredge  Xo.  6  and  Frank. 
Quantity  removed:   Class  B,   590,904^   cubic  yards,   Class  A,   434*   cubic   yards, 

scow  measurement  at  $2.40,  $2.86  per  cubic  yard,  Class  A,  and  10£  cents  26£, 

22£  cents,  Class  B;  clay,  sand,  gravel  and  rock.     Average  for  all  materials,  16-9 

cents. 
Amount  passed   for  payment,   $100,016.81;   less,   held   back   by    order,   $1,500.00 

Inspection,  etc.,  $3,350.50;  total  expenditure,  $101,867.31. 
Work  commenced  May  8,  1918;  completed  November  26,  1918. 
Object  of  work:  To  complete  dredging  of  channels  of  Mission  and  Kaministikwia 

rivers  on  basis  of  500  feet  width  and  25  feet  depth  and  to  complete  Westfort. 

turning  basin. 

False  Creek,  Vancouver,  B.C. — 

Under  agreement  with  J.  W.  Pike,  dredge  Beaver  Xo.  2. 

Quantity  removed:  3,297  cubic  yards  place  measurement  at  28  cents  per  cubic 

yard,  class  B. 
Amount  passed  for  payment,  $923.16. 

Work  commenced,  June  13,  1918;  completed  September  20,  1918. 
Object  of  work:  dredging  channel  and  berth  at  lay-to  berth,  at  Coughlan  shipyard. 

False  Creek,  Vancouver,  B.C. — ■ 

Under  agreement,  with  Pacific  Dredging  Co.,  dredge  Xo.  1. 

Quantity  removed:  15,816  cubic  yards,  place  measurement  at  10  cents  per  cubic 

yard,  class  B;  hardpan  and  clay. 
Amount  passed  for  payment,  $1,581.60;  total  expenditure,  $1,581.60. 
Work  commenced,  May  11,  1918;  completed  May  20,  1918. 
Object  of  work:  Dredging  channel  berth  at  Coughlan  shipyard. 

Fort  William,  Ont — 

Under  contract  No.  11646  with  Stewart  MacKenzie. 

Quantity  removed:  184-4  cords  at  $3;  42,150  lineal  feet  piling  at  10  cents  per 

lineal  foot. 
Amount  passed  for    payment,    $4,768.20;    inspection,    $270;    total    expenditure, 

$5,038.20. 
Work  commenced,.  June,  1918;  completed  August  17,  1918. 
Object  of  work:  removal  of  superstructure  and  piling  of  old  Canadian  Northern 

railway  dock. 


REPORT  OF  THE  CHIEF  ENGINEER  49 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  19 
Sarnia,  Ont. 

Under  agreement  with  Ontario  Gravel  Freighting  Co. 

Quantity  removed:  7,152  cubic  yards,  place  measurement  at  35  cents  per  cubic 

yard,  class  B;  clay. 
Amount  passed  for  payment,  $2,503.20;  total  expenditure,  $2,503.20. 
Work  commenced,  April  17,  1918;  completed,  May  14,  1918. 
Object  of  work:  To  dredge  channel  in  Sarnia  bay  into  and  along  the  front  of 

the  wharf  of  the  Dominion  Salt  Company. 

Ruscom  River,  Ont. 

Under  agreement  with  Windsor  Dredging  Co.  dredge,  Reaume. 

Quantity  removed:  6,501  cubic  yards,  place  measurement  at  20  cents  per  cubic 

yard,  class  B ;  sand  and  clay. 
Amount  passed  for   payment,   $1,300.20;   inspection,   $13.10;   total   expenditure, 

$1,313.30. 
Work  commenced,  June  10,  1918 ;  completed,  July  16,  1918. 
Object  of  work:  To  dredge  channel  5  feet  deep  and  27  feet  wide  at  low  water 

at  mouth  of  river. 

HardwicJc,  N.B.,  McLeans  Gully. 

Under  contract  No.  11196  with  F.  A.  Fowlie,  dredge  Fowlie. 

Quantity  removed:  8,884.6  cubic  yards,  scow  measurement  at  36  cents  per  cubic 

yard,  class  B;  sand  and  mud. 
Amount  passed  for   payment,   $3,198.45;   inspection,  $122.50;   total  .expenditure, 

$3,320.95. 
Work  commenced,  June  24,  1918;  completed,  October  11,  1918. 
Object  of  work:   Channel   5   feet  deep  from  Miramichi   bay   through  shoal  in 

McLeans  gully. 

St.  Maurice  River,  Three  Rivers,  Que.,  Eastern  Channel.  ' 

Under  agreement  contract  No.  11775  with  Laurin  and  Leitch,  Engineering  and 

Construction  Company,  dredge  No.  Jf. 
Quantity  removed:     72,525  cubic  yards  scow  measurement  at  18 J  cents  per  cubic 

yard,  class  B;  clay,  sand  and  mud. 
Amount  passed  for  payment,  $14,098.82;  inspection,  $712.76;  total  expenditure, 

$14,811.58. 
Work  commenced  August  4,  1918;  completed,  November  15,  1918. 
Object  of  work:     Channel  40  feet  wide,  16  feet  deep,  from  St.  Lawrence  river  to 

shipyard  of  Tidewater  Shipbuilders,  Limited. 

y.   IF.  Miramichi  River,  N.B.,  Laivlor's  Shore. 

Under  contract  No.  11,S03  with  Peter  England. 

Quantity  removed :    54,994  cubic  yards,  scow  measurement  at  44  cents  per  cubic 

yard,  class  B;  sand. 
Amount  passed   for  payment   $2,419.74;   inspection,  $130.26;   total   expenditure, 

$2,550. 
Work  commenced  August  28,  1918;  completed  September  30,  1918. 
Object  of  work:     Channel  through  shoal. 

Fourchu,  N.S. 

Under  contract  No.  11,933  with  Atlantic  Dredging  Company,  dredge  Pepperill. 

Quantity  removed:    8,694  cubic  yards,  scow  measurement,  at  60  cents  per  cubic 
yard,  class  B,  mud. 

19—4 


50  DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  WORKS 

10  GEORGE  V,  A.   1920 

Amount  passed  for  payment,  $5,216.40;  inspection  $168.11;  total  expenditure, 
$5,384.51. 

Work  commenced  October  12,  1918;  completed  November  13,  1918. 
Object  of  work:     Enlarge  basin  at  government  wbarf. 

Mill  Creek,  N.S. 

Under  day's  labour,  band  dredging,  with  C.  E.  W.  Dodwell,  District  Engineer. 

Amount  passed  for  payment,  $147.25;  total  expenditure,  $147.25. 

Work  commenced  November,  1918;  completed  February,  1919. 

Object  of  work :  Eemoval  of  sand  bar  at  end  of  wharf  to  allow  vessels  to  pass  in 
and  out  of  Mill  creek. 

Kingsport,  N.S. 

Under  agreement  with  Mr.  David  White. 

Quantity  removed:     One  boulder. 

Amount  passed  for  payment,  $20 ;  total  expenditure  $20. 

Work  completed  June,  1918. 

Object  of  work :  To  remove  boulder  carried  by  the  ice  and  deposited  in  the  berth 
alongside  public  wharf. 

Naufrage,  P.E.I. 

Under  day's  labour,  with  District  Engineer. 

Amount  passed  for  payment,  $771.69;  total  expenditure,  $771.69.  Work  com- 
menced June,  1918;  completed  November,  1918. 

Object  of  work:  To  dredge  between  piers  to  give  increased  depth  for  fisbing 
boats. 


REPORT  OF  THE  CHIEF  ENGINEER 


51 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  19 

CALENDAR  YEAR  DEPARTMENTAL.  DREDGING  REPORT,   1918. 

MARITIME  PROVINCES. 


ONTARIO  AND  QUEBEC. 


Dredge. 

Date. 

Locality. 

Material. 

Quan- 
tity 
cu.  yds. 

Locality 
Cost. 

Total 
Cost. 

Cost 

per 

cu.yd. 

"No.  1" 

$    cts. 

S    cts. 
13,673  35 
3,366  39 

3,126  87 
19,219  96 

170  00 

S 

"No.  2" 

"No.  3" 

Rented  from  May  1st,  Foley 
Bros.,  Welch,  Stuart  &  Fau- 

Sept.  28-Dec.  4.. 

"No.  5" 

"No.  6"     . 

Kelly'  Beach  North  Sydney, 

N.S. 

Stones,    gravel    and 
fine  sand. 

82,200 

19,219  96 

0-233 

"No.  7" 

Jan.  1-19 

May  8-  June  26. 
Dec.  12-31 

June  5-July  6 

Nov.  1-14. 
July8-Oct.31.... 

Mud 

10,955 
1,832 

13,168  08 
3,129  00 

1-202 

Abbott's  Harbour,  N.S 

Pownal,  P.E.I 

Cape  Tormentine,  N.B 

Mud,  sand,  stones. . . 

Brick  clay,  mud  and 

boulders. 
Sand,     rock,     mud, 

brick  clay. 

1-708 

16,297  08 

"No   9" 

12,787 
8,678 

23,647 

6,159  72 
16,734  58 

1-274 
0-71 

0-70 

22,894  30 
1,676  49 
3,492  33 
1,670  35 

"No.  10" 

32,325 

0-71 

"No.  11" 

- 

"No.  12"... 

"No   13" 

May  21-28 

May  29-June  15.. 
June  17-27 
June28-Oct.  31.. 

Chatham,     N.B.,   Snowball's 

Wharf. 
Chatham,  N.B.,  Canada  Dock 

Mud  and  gravel 

Mud    

i,335 

3,736 

6,326 

68,215 

543  43 

1,333  88 

2,420  75 

22,243  78 

0-407 

0-357 

0-382 

Mud,  sand,  rock  and 
gravel . 

0-326 

26,541  84 
983  92 
570  65 

720  47 
1,571  81 

2,023  40 
1,629  68 

251  09 

79,612 

0-333 

"No   14" 

"No   15" 

Rented  to  Foley  Bros.,  Welch, 

No  3" 

No.  1" 

Tug  "Frederic- 
ton" 

"No.  4" 

1,880  91 

889  68 

1,152  91 

3,570  45 

2,369  64 

14,304  97 

10,441  91 

611  37 

905  29 

1,243  32 

,821  24 

"No.  101" 

"No.  102"... 

"No.  103" 

"No.  106" 

"No.  109"... 

"No.  110" 

"No.  Ill" 

"No.  112" 

"No.  114" 

"No.  115" 

"No.  116".... 

May  28-Sept.  30. 
Oct.  1-Nov.  16.. 

Apr.  8-Aug.  31.. 
Nov.  18-Dec.  17 
Sept.  2-Nov.  16. 

Hardpan,     boulders 
and  clay. 

Silt,  sand  and  mud.. 

27,850 
56, 786 

23,122  23 
9,932  94 

6-83. 

0-174 

Port  Burwell,  Ont 

33,055  17 

84,636 
175,572 
25,786 
60,057 

0-39 

"No.  117" 

27,319  97 
3,803  84 
9,599  03 

0155 

Port  Burwell,  Ont 

0-147 

Port  Stanley,  Ont 

Clay,  sand,  mud 

0-159 

40,722  84 

260  13 

1,817  10 

1,377  26 

5,939  64 

10,612  77 

600  00 

56  86 

220  69 

261,415 

0  155 

"No.  118" 

"No.  119" 

"No.  120" 

"No.  121" 

"No.  123" 

Stonelifter 

"No.  101" 
Stonelifter 

_  "No.  102" 
"Steam  Der- 

rick" 

May-July  ($380). 

19-^ti 


52 


DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  WORKS 


10  GEORGE  V,  A.   1920 


MANITOBA,   SASKATCHEWAN   AND  ALBERTA. 


Dredge. 

Date. 

Locality. 

Material. 

Quan- 
tity 
cu.  yds. 

Locality 
Cost. 

Total 
Cost. 

Cost 

per 

cu.yd. 

"No  201" 

May31-July20.. 
Au"  5-15      

Mouth  of  Red  River 

11,941 
156 

$    cts. 

8,773  61 
405  38 

$    cts. 

$ 

0-734 

July22-Aug.  3... 

2-598 

9,178  99 
1,614  30 
1,327  27 
1,571  93 
7,902  40 

1,145  77 

12,097 

0-75S 

"No  202".   . 

"No.  204"... 

"No.  205"... 

"No.  208" 
"No.  210".    . 

May  20-Sept.  25. 

Cumberland  Lake,  Sask 

Clay,  sand  and  gum- 
bo. 

27,350 

7,902  40 

0-288 

BRITISH  COLUMBLV. 


No.  301". 


'No.  302". 
No.  303". 


No.  304". 


•No.  305". 


No.  306". 
No.  307". 


No.  309".... 

No.  311" 

No.  313" 

Rockbreaker 
No.  1". 
'  Rockbreaker 
No.  2" 
Drilling 
Plant" 


Jan.  1-12 

Jan.  14-Mar.  31.. 


Jan.  1-Oct.  12... 

Dec.  2-31 

Oct.  14-Nov.  30, 


Mar.  4-Mar.  6 . 
Mar.  7-16 


Jan. 
Jan. 
Mar 
Mar 
Apri 
Apr. 
May 
July 
Nov 
June 
July 
July 
Nov 


1-21 

22-Mar.  6... 

.7-14 

.  15-31 

1  1-13 

15-May  4 . . 
6-  June  15.. 
24-Oct.31.. 
.  11-Dec.  31 
17-July8... 

15-23 

9-13 

.  1-Nov.  9.. 


Jan.  1-Mar.  31. 

Jan.  1-2.5 

Jan.  26-Mur.  9. 
Mar.  11-12 


Jan.  1-Mar.  31. 


Jan.  1-Mar.  31. 
Jan.  1-Feb.  28. 


Nanaimo  Harbour. 
Victoria  Harbour. . 


Not  in  commission . 
Sand  Heads 


Woodwards  Slough . 


Okanagan  River  (Head). 
Okanagan  R.  Stn.  27,  29. 


Shipyd.  Coquitlam 

Burr's  Landing 

Brunette  Sawmills 

Eburne 

Annieville  Bar 

Sidney  Mills 

New  Channel,  Steveston 


Cannery  Channel,  Steveston. 


Imperial  Channel. . . 
Dominion  Products . 


Parthia  Shoal,  First  Narrows. 

Victoria  Harbour 

Coquitlam 

Boneyard 


Not  in  commission. 

Forest  Glen 

Not  in  commission . 
Victoria  Harbour.. 


Nanaimo,  B.C 

Not  in  commission. 


Broken  rock 

Silt  and  broken  rock 


Sand  and  clay. 
Sand  and  clay. 


Sand 

Sand  and  mud . 


Clay,  boulders. 
Sand  and  silt. . . 


Gravel  and  boulders 

Rock  and  clay 

Clay  and  gravel 

Fine  sand 


Sand.. 
Rock. 
Rock. 


1,277 
27,184 


28,461 


762,400 
114,700 


877,100 
125 
795 


920 

1,210 

35,065 

6,395 

30,895 

3,825 

5,205 

313,545 


33,100 

14,015 
9,785 


16,875 


55,200 
'   i ."  576 

1,194 


3,429  17 
20,908  44 


59,794  16 
11,584  80 


294  82 
1,579  38 


3,773  74 
5,125  24 
1,592  32 
2,716  51 
468  14 
2,395  24 
30,055  46 


5,245  65 

1,392  00 
1,231  10 


453,040 

54,990 

3,875 

12,900 

100 

32,701  43 

3,647  71 

8,428  79 

364  52 

12,441  02 


3,811  13 
9,9i6  61 

10,828  25 


24,337  61 
745  35 


71,378  96 


1,874  20 


53,995  40 
32,701  43 


12,441  02 

181  50 
3,811  13 

741  91 
9,910  61 

10,828  25 

1,018  S6 


2-6S 
0-769 

0-855 

6-07S 

0101 

0  081 
2-358 
1-986 

2-037 

3-118 

0-146 

0-249 

0-087 

0-122 

0-46 

0  095 

0-158 

0-099 
0-125 

0119 
0-594 
0-941 
0-653 
3-64 

0-737 

6-690 
6-28' 
9-06 


DRY  DOCKS. 


CHAMPLAIN  DRY   DOCK. 

During  the  fiscal  year,  the  following  works  were  executed: 

Excavation. — The  excavation  above  and  below  coping  and  the  submarine  excava- 
tion were  completed  and  amounted  to: — 

(Common   excavuion 34,420  cubic  yards. 

Above  coping.   ^  Rock  eXcavatiop ,  902      „ 

Below   coping.  "  "  17,740       " 

Submarine.  "  "  10,300 


REPORT  OF  THE  CHIEF  ENGINEER  53 

SESSIONAL   PAPER   No.   19 

Concrete  work. — The  concrete  work  was  completed  in  the  dock  walls  and  pier 
superstructure,  the  total  yardage  of  concrete  laid  amounted  to  7,266  in  the  dock 
proper,  and  7,774  for  the  crib  superstructure. 

Granite.— The  laying  of  the  granite  was  completed  and  amounted  to  9,435  cubic 
feet. 

Crib  work. — The  last  three  cribs  were  set  in  place,  the  total  yardage  of  cribwork 
amounted  to  13,337  cubic  yards. 

Gravel  road,  etc. — Half  of  the  gravel  road  was  completed  and  all  the  bollards, 
capstans,  lamp  posts  and  galvanized  ladders  on  the  dock  sides  were  set  in  place. 

Power  house  and  pump  house. — The  work  in  the  power  house  and  pump  house 
consisted  in  testing  and  adjusting  machinery,  and  replacing  what  did  not  fill  the 
requirements  of  the  specifications. 

Generally. — As  the  machinery  installed  did  not  prove  satisfactory  when  tested 
and  inspected,  deductions  were  made  in  order  to  guarantee  the  completion  and  for 
putting  the  machinery  installation  in  good  running  order.  The  amount  held  back 
is  $33,755. 

ESQUIMALT    GRAVING    DOCK. 

During  the  fiscal  year  ending  March  31,  1919,  the  dock  was  occupied  206  days, 
in  which  time  twenty  ships  were  docked.  Besides  attending  to  the  docking  and 
undocking  of  the  above  ships  the  staff  were  variously  employed  in  attending  to  the 
up-keep  of  machinery,  buildings  and  grounds.  The  buildings  have  been  painted  and 
rninpr  repairs  effected  where  necessary,  so  that  all  are  now  in  good  condition  with  the 
exception  of  the  lumber  warehouse  which  will  require  a  new  roof  in  the  near  future, 
and  the  chief  engineer's  dwelling  which  requires  extensive  repairs  and  its  condition  is 
such  that  an  entirely  new  house  is  required.  The  dock  gate  has  been  cleaned  and 
painted  on  the  exposed  side,  and  has  been  provided  with  a  small  portable  electrically 
driven  centrifugal  pump  to  be  utilized  for  pumping  the  water  from  the  caisson  when 
same  is  moved  from  the  inside  to  the  outside  berth,  and  thus  avoid  the  former  incon- 
venience of  waiting  for  the  tides.  The  intermediate  sleeve  to  one  of  the  main  pumps 
was  repaired  by  fixing  a  strengthening  band  round  it,  and  both  circulating  pumps 
to  the  main  engine  and  chambers  were  re-bored  and  plungers  made  to  fit.  Four  of  the 
electric  light  poles  on  the  east  side  of  the  dock  were  renewed. 

Owing  to  heavy  motor  traffic  in  the  winter  months,  the  condition  of  the  roads 
through  the  grounds  became  very  bad  in  wet  weather.  These  roads  were  repaired 
with  ashes,  but  the  result  was  not  very  satisfactory,  and  it  is  advisable  that  a  portion 
of  the  roads  should  be  properly  surfaced,  while  the  renewal  of  two  dolphins  near  the 
dock  entrance  is  required,  due  to  the  action  of  marine  borers. 

The  general  condition  of  the  plant  is  good,  but  the  efficiency  of  the  dock  would  be 
considerably  improved  by  the  provision  of  compressor  and  a  travelling  crane. 

The  total  expenditure  to  March  31,  1919,  was  $20,293.93. 

KINGSTON  DRY  DOCK. 

During  the  year,  work  of  renewal  of  cribwork  above  water-line  along  face  of  the 
wharves  at  the  government  dry  dock  was  done  to  provide  wharfage  for  vessels  enter- 
ing dry  dock.  The  dock  is  leased  to  the  Collingwood  Shipbuilding  Co.,  and  was 
urgently  in  need  of  repairs. 

Work  was  done  from  June  1,  to  January  22,  at  different  times,  and  the  cost  was 
$9,275. 


54  .  DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  WORKS 

10  GEORGE  V,  A.  1920 
LOCKS  AND  DAMS. 
Quebec. 

river  st.  charles locks  and  dam. 

(The  description  of  the  work  to  complete  the  proposed  locks  and  dam  has  been 
fully  covered  by  the  annual  report  of  1916-17.) 

The  work  performed  during  the  present  fiscal  year  is:  The  railway  cribwork 
between  the  concrete  piers  of  the  sluiceway  in  the  line  of  the  dam  on  the  north  side 
of  the  river  St.  Charles,  which  had  to  be  removed  before  the  sluiceway  could  be  finished, 
was  in  such  bad  condition  that  it  had  to  be  removed  during  the  summer,  and  the  steel 
girders,  which  were  under  contract  with  the  Dominion  Bridge  Company,  were  erected 
to  replace  the  cribwork  to  carry  the  railway  tracks  with  safety.  The  contractors  for 
ihe  construction  of  the  locks  and  dam  abandoned  their  contract.  The  contract  was 
afterwards  officially  cancelled,  and  the  plant  taken  over  by  the  Department  of  Public 
Works. 

RIVIERE  DU   LDZVRE — LOCK  AND  DAM. 

During  the  past  season,  the  lock  has  been  kept  in  operation.  The  booms  were 
placed  during  April,  May,  and  June,  removed  and  placed  in  winter  quarters  in  Novem- 
ber. Minor  repairs  to  the  lockrnaster's  house  also  effected.  Some  15,000  feet  b.m. 
B.C.  fir  was  also  purchased  to  build  a  new  gap  boom,  but,  owing  to  the  early  break  up 
of  winter  roads,  this  material  could  not  be  hauled,  and  was  stored  in  Buckingham  to 
be  taken  up  by  water  early  this  spring. 

Departmental  dredge  No.  102  and  plant  was  looked  after  in  1918-19;  throughout 
the  fiscal  year,  the  hulls  of  all  floating  plant  were  kept  pumped. 

Expenditure  during  the  fiscal  year,  $2,354.41. 

YAMASKA  LOCK  AND  DAM. 

The  lock  and  dam  built  between  1882  and  1885  are  situated  about  two  miles  below 
the  village  of  St-Michel  d'Yamaska,  where  the  Q.M.  &  S  railway  crosses  the  river,  and 
where  the  Government  built  a  wharf  in  1909. 

The  dam  consisted  of  a  stone-filled  crib,  with  plank  sheathing  on  the  upper  side, 
502  feet,  with  a  stone-filled  close-faced  crib  abutment  at  each  end. 

The  lock  is  a  masonry  construction  with  crib  guide  wings  at  each  end,  33  feet 
wide  (inside  of  walls)  and  125  feet  between  upper  and  lower  gates,  minimum  draught 
over  the  sills  4-14  feet. 

The  reconstruction  of  a  part  of  the  dam  started  the  previous  year  was  continued. 

The  dam  and  lock  being  in  60  dilapidated  a  condition  that  its  complete  recon- 
struction would  be  necessary  and,  on  ike  other  hand,  the  traffic  on  this  river  is  so 
small  that  it  does  not  command  such  a  large  expenditure.  In  view  of  these  facts,  it 
has  been  decided  not  to  continue  the  operation  and  maintenance  of  these  works,  and 
for  these  reasons  the  $1,500  voted  for  partial  reconstruction  were  not  expended. 

The  lock  was  operated  during  the  year  at  a  cost  of  $1,761.84. 

SLIDES  AND  BOOMS. 

Ottawa  River  Works. 
Ottawa  River. 

North  Chaudiere  Station.  The  only  expenditure  at  this  station  was  for  timber 
for  an  apron  at  the  outlet  of  the  lower  slide. 

Cheneaux  Station. — The  outlay  was  for  linseed  oil,  turpentine,  and  paint  used  in 
repairing  the  boats  required  by  the  boom  master  and  his  men. 


REPORT  OF  THE  CHIEF  ENGINEER  55 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  19 

Tributaries  of  Ottawa  River. 

Gatineau  River. — Eepairs  to  these  works  consisted  in  renewing  portions  of  the 
booms  and  keeping  the  boats  and  station  house  and  buildings  in  proper  condition. 

Madawaslca  River. — At  Arnprior  station,  a  temporary  division  was  built  in  the 
centre  of  slide  to  narrow  the  channel,  and  thus  reduce  the  area  of  cross  section,  in 
order  to  conserve  the  water  and  permit  the  passage  of  the  drives  when  the  river  was 
at  low-water  stage.    The  chains  of  the  guide  booms  were  also  overhauled  and  repaired. 

The  timber  required  to  rebuild  the  dam  at  Flat  Eapid  station,  which  was  delivered 
by  rail  at  Arnprior,  was  transferred  to  Flat  Rapids  and  laid  up  convenient  to  the 
works.  At  head  of  Calabogie  lake,  High  Falls,  Eagged  Chute,  and  Chain  Eapids 
stations,  stone  ballast  was  provided  to  fill  the  dams  and  piers  at  these  places,  and  at 
High  Falls,  a  new  length  of  double  boom,  48  feet,  was  built  for  service  at  the  head 
of  the  slide;  the  boom  is  35  inches  wide,  14  inches  deep,  and  is  held  together  by  1|- 
inch  screw  bolts. 

Coulonge  River— Two  wing  piers  and  the  bulkhead  pier  at  the  entrance  to  High 
Falls  slide  were  rebuilt.  The  eastern  wing  pier  is  36  feet  long,  and  that  on  western 
side  38  feet  long,  height  of  each  being  11J  feet.  The  bulkhead  pier  is  14  feet  long,  10 
feet  wide  and  12  feet  high.  The  platform  of  the  bulkhead  and  the  frame  for  the 
gear  to  raise  and  lower  the  stop-logs  were  also  built  in  the  new.  The  sides  of  slide, 
under  the  bulkhead,  were  sheathed  with  3  inch  hardwood  plank.  In  a  section  of 
slide,  120  feet  in  length,  immediately  below  the  bulkhead,  23  posts  and  4  cross  sills 
were  required,  and  the  sides  and  bottom  of  this  section  were  covered  with  3  inch 
maple  plank. 

Black  River. — The  slide  at  High  Falls  was  overhauled  throughout;  at  several 
places,  here  and  there,  sheeting  in  sides  and  bottom  and  sills  and  braces  had  to  be 
replaced;  the  iron  bars  in  sides  and  bottom  near  the  outlet  were  fastened  and  some 
of  them  had  to  be  removed  and  rebored;  five  stop  logs  were  made  for  the  bulkhead,  and 
a  support  pier  with  the  usual  stay  was  built  on  the  shore  to  keep  the  guide  boom  in 
proper  position  in  the  channel. 

Petawawa  River. — A  supply  of  4  inch  pine  plank  was  purchased  for  repairs  to  slide 
and  waste  gate  at  Second  Chute  station.  At  head  of  Lake  Traverse  the  boom  was 
placed  and  attached  to  the  support  piers.  At  Poplar  Chute,  a  glance  pier  60  feet  long, 
6  feet  high  and  8  wide  was  built  to  keep  the  logs  in  mid-channel  and  prevent  erosion 
of  the  bank.  At  Cedar  Lake,  the  piers  supporting  the  guide  boom  leading  to  the  sluice- 
way required  attention;  one  new  pier  was  built  and  three  others  were  partially  rebuilt 
and  repaired;  the  boom  was  extended  225  lineal  feet;  the  sheeting  on  the  booms  was 
repaired;  the  bottom  and  sides  of  sluiceway  were  patched  and  fenders  were  placed 
at  the  corners  of  piers  of  sluiceway.  An  accumulation  of  driftwood,  stumps  and  roots 
were  removed  from  front  of  waste  gate  to  relieve  the  pressure  on  the  main  dam. 

Dumoine  River. — At  High  Falls  station,  the  floor  of  sluiceway  for  logs  was 
repaired,  and  logs  lodged  in  the  sluiceway  were  removed.  At  the  foot  of  Second  Chute, 
two  large  rocks  were  blasted  and  at  another  place  a  reef  10  feet  in  length  was  also 
blasted.  A  pier  dam  was  built  in  the  rapids  to  divert  the  water  into  main  channel, 
the  structure  being  31  feet  long,  8  feet  wide  and  8  feet  high. 

In  the  spring  of  1918,  the  water  in  the  Ottawa  river  and  its  tributaries  was  not 
as  high  as  usual,  but  it  remained  at  a  fair  pitch  throughout  the  summer  especially  in 
the  month  of  June  and  altogether  the  season  was  a  favourable  one  for  the  lumbermen. 

St.  Johns — Booms. 

The  chef -lieu  of  the  united  counties  of  St.  Johns  and  Iberville  is  situated  on  the 
Eichelieu  river,  27  miles  south-east  of  Montreal. 


56  DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  JYORES 

10  GEORGE  V,  A.   1920 

During  the  present  fiscal  year,  two  of  the  booms,  94  feet  2  inches  by  4  feet  and 
96  feet  S  inches  by  4  feet,  were  renewed  at  a  cost  of  $1,297.56. 

A  new  pile  cluster  of  5  piles  was  built  and  others  repaired  at  a  cost  of  $416.24. 

BRIDGES  AND  ROADS. 

NEW  BRUNSWICK. 

St.  Leonards — Van  Buren  Bridge. 

This  bridge  is  located  on  the  St.  John  river,  between  St.  Leonards,  N.B.,  and- 
Van  Buren,  Maine. 

During  the  year,  75  cubic  yards  of  rip-rap  were  placed  at  pier  No.  1  on  the 
Canadian  side,  so  as  to  protect  pier  from  scour  induced  by  log  jams. 

Work  done  November  1  to  14,  and  the  cost  was  $235. 

QUEBEC. 

Matapedia — Interprovincial  Bridge. 

A  contract  was  entered  into  with  Messrs.  Chas.  McLean  and  James  A.  Eeid,  Dec. 
3,  1918,  for  the  renewal  of  flooring  on  Matapedia  Interprovincial  highway  bridge,  over 
the  Restigouche  river  between  the  provinces  of  Quebec  and  New  Brunswick. 

Owing  to  the  influenza  epidemic,  and  to  the  unfavourable  weather,  the  contractors 
did  not  commence  work  before  March  22,  1919,  and  were  granted  an  extension  of  time 
of  two  months,  to  April  30,  1919. 

The  work  done  up  to  the  end  of  the  fiscal  year  1918-19,  consisted  in  one-fourth  of 
the  new  flooring  being  completed  and  40,000  feet  B.M.  of  lumber  delivered  on  the  site. 

Expenditure,  $2,004.33. 

ONTARIO.        ' 

Grand  Biver  Bridge. 

Grand  River  bridge  is  on  a  highway  over  the  Grand  river  at  York,  5  miles  from 
Caledonia.     Seneca  flag  station  is  the  nearest  shipping  point. 

During  the  spring  freshets,  serious  erosions  occurred  to  the  lower  part  of  the 
central  pier,  upon  investigation  it  was  found  that  the  concrete  in  the  lower  portion 
of  the  pier  had  absolutely  no  strength  and  no  cohesion  whatever  existed  in  the  gravel 
forming  the  aggregate,  this  portion  from  about  one  foot  below  the  water  line  to  three 
feet  above  and  throughout  the  whole  width  of  the  upper  half  of  the  pier  was  removed 
and  replaced  with  new  concrete,  the  same  being  reinforced  by  steel  tie  rods.  A  steel 
outwater,  four  feet  high  bending  back  two  feet  on  each  side  of  the  point  was  placed  on 
the  upper  end.  On  the  eastern  pier,  a  portion  of  the  concrete  of  about  two  cubic  yards 
was  found  to  be  disintegrated,  and  this  was  removed  and  replaced  with  new  concrete 
at  a  cost  of  $454.93. 

Portage  du  Fort  bridge. 

The  roadway  planking  on  both  bridges  was  repaired.  On  the  bridge  across 
the  main  channel,  900  feet  B.M.  of  3  inch  plank  were  laid  at  different  places  where 
defects  wer.e  found,  and  on  the  smaller  bridge  at  the  village,  300  feet  B.M.  of  the  same 
material  were  used  in  patching  the  floor. 


REPORT  OF  THE  CHIEF  ENGINEER  57 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  19 

Ottawa. 

Laurie r  bridge. 

The  surface  of  the  sandstone  pavement  on  both  approaches  had  become  so  uneven, 
owing  to  wear  of  blocks  and  unequal  settlement  of  foundations,  that  it  was  considered 
advisable  to  take  up  all  the  blocks  and  relay  them  to  grade.  A  bed  of  crushed  stone 
and  sand  was  prepared  to  compensate  for  the  wear  and  settlement  and  upon  this 
the  blocks  were  laid  to  the  new  grade;  the  exterior  of  the  pavement  was  grouted  and 
the  mixture  well  worked  into  the  joints. 

Union  bridge. 
The  roadway  planking  was  patched  and  the  sidewalks  were  repaired. 

Hull  slide  bridge. 

The  bottom  of  the  buckle  plates,  beams  and  posts  underneath  received  two  coats 
of  paint  after  the  steelwork  had  been  thoroughly  cleaned. 

Roadway   and  approaches,   Hull   and   Ottawa. 

The  pav.ement  was  repaired  from  time  to  time  and  kept  up  to  grade.  The  road- 
way was  cleaned  often,  the  drainage  basins  and  gratings  received  attention  and  the 
wooden  sidewalks  was  patched. 

ALBERTA. 

Bow  Fiver  Bridge. 

Work  of  repair  consisted  of  lifting  and  relaying  roadway  decking,  lifting  and 
renewing  footpath  decking,  adjusting  elevation  of  bridge  truss  and  approaches, 
renewal  of  rip-rap  around  piers  and  making  good  deficiencies  in  roadway. 

Work  was  carried  out  by  direct  labour  at  a  cost  of  $2,343.31. 

• 

EDMONTON". 

A  small  amount  of  repair  work  in  connection  with  maintenance  of  the  bridge 
was  incurred  by  the  City  during  the  present  fiscal  year,  previous  to  November  30th  last. 
The  Department  paid  for  one-third  the  cost  of  this  work  which  amounted  to  $41.04. 


58 


DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  WORKS 


10  GEORGE  V,  A.   1920 


GOVERNMENT  TELEGRAPH  SERVICE. 


By  D.  H.  Keeley,  General  Superintendent. 


Location  of  Lines. 

Year 
Constructed 

Len 

?th  of  Lines. 

No.  of 
Offices. 

Messages  sent. 

Land 
Lines. 

Cables. 

Total. 

1917. 

1918. 

1919. 

1883 
1880-1916 

1885 
1880-1916 

1SS0-1910 
1881-1890 
1881-1915 
1881-1912 
1885-1912 
1909-1914 
1910-1912 

1889-1901 

1885-1912 

1912 
1883-1913 

1883-1915 
1914-1915 

1899-1918 
1896-1914 

1889-1916 
1913-1914 

14 
9394 

56| 
534 

111* 

251* 

1.071J 

479 
150 
102 

82 

•      28i 

212 
295 
5624 

1,136 
315 

1,4144 

l,174f 

3,1854 
123 

314 

39! 

73  \ 

65  J 
54 

21! 
17! 

84 
73* 

14 
971 

564 
934 

184f 
316! 
"1,077 
479 
171! 
102 
82 

45! 

212 
295 
5624 

1,136 
315 

1,423 
1,2484 

3,1854 
123 

"     2 

144 

25 
18 

20 
9 
771 
36/ 
25 
19 
10 

18 

?1 

28J 

581 
6/ 

248 
154 

197\ 

13; 

21,270 

7,016 
3,790 

4, '3 16 
1,730 

38,30* 
8,038 
5,963 
1,050 

840 

27,048 

38,861 

93,057 
82,559 

78,091 

22,095 

5,514 
3,660 

4,574 
1,908 

44,860 
9,674 
6,231 
1,443 

850 

29,721 

39,304 

83,012 
110,906 

76,045 

25,340 

New  Brunswick — 

5,945 

3,978 

Quebec — 

4,768 

1,266 

53,964 

11  332 

8,404 

1,693 

Ontario — 

525 

Saskatchewan — 

31,799 

Alberta — 

Onion  Lake-Hudson  Hope-Loops  and  branches 
Athabasca — Ft.  McMurray  and  branches 

British  Columbia — 

47,182 
89,263 

119,593 

Yukon — 
Ashcroft-Dawson-Boundary  and  branches.... 

101,975 

ll,757f 

336 

12,093! 

1,122 

411,934 

448,797 

507,027 

GOTERXMEXT  TELEGRAPH  LINES 


59 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  19 

TELEGRAPH    SYSTEMS    OF    THE   DOMINION. 

As  a  matter  of  general  interest,  pursuant  to  the  statement  submitted  last  year, 
the  latest  figures  to  hand  showing  the  extent  of  telegraph  lines  in  operation  in  the 
Dominion  are  as  given  hereunder. 


Canada. 


Length  of  Lines  in  Miles. 


Aerial. 


Under- 
ground . 


Sub- 
marine. 


Total. 


Length  of  Conductors  in  Miles. 


Under-      Sub- 
Aerial,    ground,   marine     Total. 


No.  of 
Offices. 


1918-19. 

Great  North  Western  Tele- 
graph Co 

Canadian    Pacific     Tele- 
graph   

Government    Telegraph 
service 

Grand  Trunk  Pacific 
telegraph 


10,064 
14,617 
ll,757f 

5,279 


23 


13 

95 

336 

1 


10,084 

14,735 

12,093f 

5,279 


31,357 
106,143 
11,757! 
19,525 


192 
820 


18  25 


78 

227 

336 

2-19 


31,627 
107,190 
12,0951 

19,545 


1,519 

1,122 

279 


REVENUE    AND    EXPENDITURE. 


The  revenue  and  expenditure  for  each  of  the  Government  lines  in  the  several 
districts  hereinbefore  mentioned,  are  given  in  the  following  table: — 


1918-19. 


Expenditure. 

Revenue. 

S      cts. 

S     cts. 

7,859  68 

1,130  93 

3,844  77 

1,271  22 

32,685  65 

5,866  92 

250  00 

1,771  18 

847  33 

200  00 

7,492  14 

2,447  19 

30,656  60 

10,239  93 

18,845  59 

2,484  31 

1,855  60 

657  53 

6,848  32 

288  80 

7,164  41 

1,335  53 

6,946  66 

44,018  89 

21,704  28 

2,880  72 

407  95 

2,849  53 

89  00 

56,215  99 

8,685  85 

79,480  12 

23,068  84 

61,757  23 

35,205  19 

103,353  76 

39,538  65 

238,559  52 

97,766  48 

2,466  43 

739,707  07 

231,331  65 

Lower  St.  Lawrence  and  Maritime  Provinces 

Anticosti  lines 

Bay  of  Fundy 

Cape  Breton 

Cape  Ray  (subsidy) 

Escuminac 

He  aux  Coudres  (subsidy) 

Magdalen  Islands 

North  Shore,  east  of  Bersimis 

North  Shore,  west  of  Bersimis 

Orleans  telephone 

Quarantine  system 

Quebec  County  Lines 

Prince  Edward  Island  and  Mainland 

Cable  ship  Tyrian — 

Maintenance 

Generally — 

Gulf  and  Maritime  Provinces 

Timiskaming  District — 

Telephone  Line 

Ontario — 

Pelee  Island  Telephone 

North  West  Lines — 

Saskatchewan 

Alberta 

British  Columbia — 

Mainland 

Vancouver  Island 

Yukon — 

Ashcroft-Dawson 

Telegraphic  service  generally 

Total 


60 


DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  WORKS 


10  GEORGE  V,  A.   1920 


Department. 


Xo.  of  Telephones. 


Offices.l  Residences 


Total. 


Cost  per 
annum. 


Agriculture 

Auditor  General 

Canadian  Trade  Commission  P.  B.  X 

Census 

Civil  Service  Commission 

Clerk  of  Crown  in  Chancery 

Conservation  Commission,  Housing * 

"  "  of  Cabinet 

Customs 

Dominion  Archives 

Dominion  Police 

Exchequer  Court 

External  Affairs 

Finance 

P.  B.  X 

Government  House 

"  "  Private  Line 

P.  B.X 

House  of  Commons 

Immigration  and  Colonization 

Indian  Affairs 

Inland  Revenue. . . ; 

Interior 

"         Soldiers'  Settlement  Board 

Justice 


Labour 

Library  of  Parliament 

Marine 

Marine  and  Xaval  P.  B.  X : 

Military  Service  Council,  P.  B.  X..   . . 

Militia  and  Defence 

P.  B.X 

Mines 

"     P.B.  X 

Mounted  Police 

Xaval  Service 

Northwest  Territories 

Patriotic  Fund  Committee 

Post  Office 

Printing  and  Stationery 

P.B.X 

Privy  Council , 

Public  Information 

Public  Works 

Railways  and  Canals 

Secretary  of  State 

Senate 

Soldiers'  Civil  Re-establishment 

Supreme  Court 

Trade  and  Commerce 

War  Purchasing  Commission,  P.  B.  X. 


18 

16 

13 

13 

8 

109 

14 

26 

12 

3 

1 

71 

9 

18 

264 

24 

36 

4 

6 

1 

1 

45 

20 

49 

9 

5 

64 

25 

14 

17 

2 

2 

30 

11 

1,163 


225 


18 
17 
18 
15 
12 
119 
18 
42 
19 

5 

9 
71 

9 

37 

264 

26 

36 

7 
16 

1 

1 
54 
31 
49 
14 

5 
85 
36 
19 


35 
11 

1,388 


2,625  00 
736  00 

1,400  00 

80  00 

665  00 

50  00 

375  00 

165  00 

1,187  00 
300  00 
890  00 
145  00 
858  00 
705  00 

1,699  00 
520  00 
123  00 

1,146  00 
685  00 
790  00 
591  00 
476  00 

5,319  00 
700  00 

1,758  00 
817  00 
185  00 
360  00 

2,014  20 

1,100  66 

1,817  00 
10,472  50 

1.142  00 
1,349  00 

280  00 

586  66 

50  00 

80  00 

2,232  00 

1,298  00 

1.143  00 
703  00 
230  00 

3,831  00 

1,659  00 

861  00 

942  00 

115  00 

80  00 

1,535  00 

1,032  00 

59,903  02 


GOVERNMENT  TELEGRAPH  LINES  61 

SESSIONAL  PAPER   No.   19 

CAPE  BRETON. 

Conditions  Generally. — Outside  of  casual  trouble,  the  lines  have  been  continuously 
in  operation,  the  traffic  for  the  year  being  the  largest  recorded,  due  to  active  trading 
conditions  and  reopening  of  the  pulp  and  paper  industry  within  close  proximity  to  the 
Englishtown  office.  A  new  telephone  office  was  opened  at  Mitchell's  Farm,  Glencoe 
Mills,  on  February  24. 

General  repair  work  was  carried  on  by  the  regular  repairers,  and  all  lines  put  in  a 
state  of  efficiency. 

BAY  OF  FUNDY. 

The  Campobello-Quebec  cable  and  the  Seal  Cove-Wood  Island  cable,  which  are 
broken  at  the  date  of  this  report,  will  be  repaired  by  the  cable  ship  Tyrian  at  the  first 
opportunity. 

There  have  been  no  serious  interruptions  during  the  year;  no  new  offices  added. 

MAGDALEN  ISLANDS. 

The  Meat  Cove  cable  has  been  interrupted  since  December  7,  1917,  the  business 
being  handled  by  the  Marconi  Company.  The  Byron  cable  was  interrupted  November 
16 :  both  cables  will  be  repaired  when  the  ss.  Tyrian  is  available.  The  lines  will  receive 
a  general  overhauling  during  the  coming  summer. 

ANTICOSTI  ISLAND. 

The  usual  general  repairs  were  completed  during  the  season.  No  additional  offices 
opened. 

NORTH   SHORE  LINES. 

These  lines  received  a  thorough  overhauling  under  the  supervision  of  the  general 
repairers,  730  new  poles  being  planted  and  1,305  braces  placed.  The  revenue  showed'  a 
marked  increase. 

QUARANTINE  LINES. 

Between  November  27  and  December  31,  1917,  the  following  cables  were  broken  by 
gas  buoys  drifted  with  the  ice:  Crane  Island-Montmagny,  Crane  Tsland-St.  Margaret 
Island,  Isle  Keaux-Grosse  Island,  St.  Francois-Isle  Beaux,  and  Orleans  Island-Ange 
Gardien.  All  were  repaired  in  May,  1918.  The  land  lines  gave  good  service  throughout 
the  year. 

PELEE  ISLAND. 

The  cable  connecting  with  mainland  was  broken  by  an  unknown  vessel  in  December, 
1917:  repairs  completed  May  14,  191S;  again  broken  December  16,  1918,  and  will  be 
repaired  as  soon  as  possible  after  the  opening  of  navigation. 

SASKATCHEWAN. 

The  lines  have  been  kept  in  fairly  good  working  order;  the  line  east  of  Saskatoon 
having  deteriorated,  wire  was  strung  on  the  Canadian  Northern  Bailway  poles,  from 
Humboldt  to  Warman,  a  distance  of  48  miles.  A  severe  storm  in  July  tore  up  a  mile 
of  line  on  the  Saskatoon  loop,  which  was  repaired  promptly.  The  revenue  shows  a  satis- 
factory increase  over  the  previous  year. 

ALBERTA. 

The  line  was  kept  in  fairly  good  working  order  throughout  the  year;  bush  fires  and 
storms  caused  trouble  on  various  parts  of  the  circuits ;  repairs  were  effected  with  mini- 
mum delay. 

Bepairs  were  made  to  buildings  at  Feace  Biver  and  to  office  dwelling  and  stables 
at  Mooswa,  and,  at  Athabasca,  a  wagon  shed  was  erected  and  building  repaired. 


62  *  DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  WORKS 

10  GEORGE  V,  A.   1920 
BRITISH  COLUMBIA  (MAINLAND). 

The  construction  of  the  telephone  line  on  the  Arrow  lakes  was  completed  between 
Edgewood  and  Renata,  now  giving  through  service  from  Nakusp  to  Castlegar,  at  which 
point  connection  is  made  with  the  British  Columbia  Telephone  Company's  line  to 
Nelson  and  Rossland.  The  wire  was  strung  in  on  the  new  pole  line,  14  miles  from 
Waneta  up  the  Pend-d'Oreille  valley,  and  five  offices  opened. 

Then  central  office  on  the  local  exchange  at  Athalmer  was  moved  to  Invermere,  one 
and  one-half  miles  and  five  miles  of  pole  line  constructed  in  and  around  Invermere  to 
accommodate  the  several  applications  for  telephone  service. 

Fifty-seven  miles  of  line  was  re-poled  from  Tulameen  to  Merritt,  forty-two  miles 
from  Kamloops  to  Barriere.  An  extra  wire  was  strung  in  between  Malakwa  and  Sica- 
mous,  and  the  circuit  changed  from  grounded  to  metallic. 

KAMLOOPS-G00SE  LAKE  SECTION  (14  miles). 

Important  connection  is  made  at  Goose  Lake  office  with  the  Dominion  Forestry 
Branch  line,  to  Fish  Lake,  at  which  point  we  have  opened  an  office.  This  line  is  in 
very  good  shape,  as  it  was  only  built  in  1916.  This  line  will  be  extended  this  year  to 
Long  Lake  district,  and  serve  a  thickly  settled  district. 

MERRITT-MAMETTE   LAKE   SECTION    (37   miles). 

This  extension  from  Merritt  includes  Canford  spur.  Two  more  offices  were  opened 
during  the  year. 

NELSON  TRAIL   SECTION    (61   miles). 

An  extension  from  Waneta,  14  miles  east  up  the  Pend-d'Oreille  valley  was  com- 
pleted last  fall,  and  five  new  offices  have  been  opened.  General  repairs  were  carried  on 
during  the  year  and  the  various  lines  brought  up  to  the  proper  working  standard. 

VANCOUVER  ISLAND. 

No  new  construction  was  undertaken,  operations  being  confined  to  general  repairs, 
the  service  being  maintained  efficiently. 

The  cable  connecting  Mayne  and  Galiano  islands  was  broken  by  a  tug  on  October 
23,  and  repaired  October  25,  1918. 

The  telephone  cable  connecting  Valdes  island  and  mainland  at  Campbell  Biver 
parted  on  February  28  and  repaired  on  March  5,  1919. 

YUKON  LINES. 

General  satisfaction  was  found  with  operating  conditions  during  the  year;  inter- 
ruptions were  few  and  of  short  duration. 

There  was  a  heavy  increase  of  business  necessitating  the  installation  of  a  composite 
system  of  telephone  and  telegraph  between  Hazelton  and  Bulkley  to  relieve  the  con- 
gestion on  the  single  telegraph  line.  General  repair  gangs  were  employed  on  the 
various  sections  during  the  summer  and  the  line  put  in  good  order. 

CABLE   SHD?   "  TYRIAN." 

On  April  1,  1918,  the  cable  between  Tancook  island  and  mainland  was  repaired 
after  which  the  ship  docked  at  Halifax  for  general  repairs,  and  was  out  of  commission 
for  the  remainder  of  the  year. 


COLLECTION  OF  REVENUE  63 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  19 


COLLECTION  OF  REVENUE. 


By  E.  T.  Smith,  Collector  of  Public  Works  Revenue, 

The  revenue  accounts  for  the  year  ended  March  31,  1919,  show  a  net  increase  in 
accruals  of  $9,845. Oi,  and  in  the  amounts  collected  also  an  increase  of  $1,978.59. 
Examination  of  the  details  show  that  the  slide  and  boom  dues  which  in  the  year 
ended  March  31,  1918,  were  $40,122.87  less  than  the  previous  year,  are,  for  the  year 
just  closed,  $10,318.43  less  than  for  the  year  1917-18.  This  decrease  seems  to  call  for 
an  explanation.  In  the  accounts  for  the  preceding  year,  there  appeared  an  item  of 
$30,910.33  from  the  St.  Maurice  district,  being  amount  claimed  to  be  due  to  the 
department  by  the  St.  Maurice  Boom  and  Driving  Company  as  the  excess  of  revenue 
collected  by  them  over  and  above  the  cost  of  operation  and  maintenance  as  authorized. 
For  the  last  fiscal  year,  the  accounts  of  the  company  show  that  their  expenditure 
exceeded  the  revenue  for  the  year  1918-19,  by  $3,393.04.  This  would  reduce  the 
amount  claimed  as  above  if  it  be  found  that  the  expenditure  claimed  was  duly 
authorized,  which  has  not  at  this  writing  been  yet  determined.  No  accruals  have 
been  charged  up  for  the  year  under  consideration.  It  seems  now  that  upon  close 
examination  of  the  lease  that  the  company  is  not  bound  to  pay  over  to  the  department, 
or  in  a  word,  settle  for  surplus  revenues  collected  until  the  end  of  the  term  of  their 
lease,  which  will  be  on  the  29th  January  next. 

The  Ottawa  district  shows  a  deficit  of  $9,838.01,  while  the  Newcastle  district  and 
the  Saguenay  show  an  increase  of  $429.91  over  the  preceding  year.  As  the  Saguenay 
boom  has  never  paid  a  sum  sufficient  to  cover  maintenance  and  operation,  it  was 
decided  last  spring  not  to  put  the  same  in  commission.  However,  the  parties  interested 
were  permitted  to  put  it  in  place  and  use  the  boom  on  condition  that  they  paid  all 
the  expenses  in  connection  therewith. 

In  regard  to  the  Ottawa  river  works,  for  some  years  past  the  revenue  has  not 
been  equal  to  necessary  expenditure,  and  a  similar  arrangement  is  being  made  with 
the  Upper  Ottawa  Improvement  Company  to  take  over  and  operate  them,  and  collect 
the  authorized  rates,  the  whole  under  the  supervision  of  the  Department,  bo  that 
the  rights  of  the  public  are  fully  protected. 

The  Gatineau  boom  has  been  handed  over  to  the  control  of  the  Gatineau  Boom 
Company  on  a  slightly  different  understanding.  The  company  is,  of  course,  to  main- 
tain and  operate  the  boom,  keep  it  in  repair,  etc.,  collect  only  the  rates  authorized  by 
order  in  council,  and  is  to  pay  over  to  the  department  90  per  cent  of  any  surplus  that 
may  be  left  over  the  cost  of  operation  and  maintenance. 

The  only  works  of  this  nature  which  we  will  control  will  be  the  improvements 
at  Burleigh  falls  on  the  Trent  navigation  system.  This  is  connected  with  the  canal 
system,  in  fact  being  a  passage  provided  for  timber  in  lieu  of  another  channel  which 
was  in  use  before  the  construction  of  the  locks. 

The  last  three  years  have  been  very  trying  ones  for  the  lumber  trade,  or,  more 
particularly,  the  sawn-lumber  business.  Owing  to  the  scarcity  of  men,  wages  amounted 
to  an  enormous  figure,  while  the  cost  of  provisions  increased  the  expense  of  feeding 
tb«  men  more  than  150  per  cent  on  what  they  were  in  1914.  It  may  be  said  that  the 
high  prices  obtainable  for  lumber  counterbalanced  these  disadvantages,  but  when  it 


64  DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  WORKS 

10  GEORGE  V,  A.   1920 

is  realized  that  the  demand  was  seriously  curtailed  through  the  war,  and  that  practic- 
ally no  transportation  could  be  had  for  the  export  of  wood  products  to  Old  Country 
markets,  the  accuracy  of  the  statement  above  made,  I  think,  would  be  readily 
acknowledged. 

From  the  other  source  of  revenue  handled  in  this  office,  we  have  had  sub- 
stantial increases,  the  dry-docks  giving  $15,943.88  more  than  last  year,  and 
rents  and'  sales  $33,797.16  more  than  in  1917-18.  As  this  office  does  not  deal  with 
the  expenditures  on  the  different  works  from  which  we  obtain  revenues,  these 
comparisons  are  simply  in  regard  to  the  amounts  collected  from  the  different  sources 
for  the  years  mentioned,  so  that  no  attempt  is  made  to  show  how  these  various  revenues 
compare  with  the  expenditure  for  the  same  period.  I  mention  this  because  it  was  found 
that  owing  to  the  increase  cost  of  labour,  fuel,  and  other  outlays  in  connection  with  the 
operation  of  the  graving  docks,  it  was  found  desirable  to  revise  the  -tariff  of  dues 
charged  for  the  use  of  the  Levis  dock  and  the  Selkirk  repair  slip.  New  tariffs  were 
therefore  prepared  during  the  course  of  the  year  just  closed  increasing  the  rates  in  both 
cases,  and  the  regulations  were  revised  iii  order  to  correspond  therewith,  and  it  is  noted 
with  considerable  satisfaction  that  up  to  the  present,  at  least,  no  objection  from  the 
ship-owners  against  the  increased  charges  has  been  raised. 

Similar  revision  of  the  tariff  and  regulations  for  the  Esquimalt  dock  is  under 
consideration. 

In  consequence  of  legislation  at  the  session  of  1918,  the  administration  of  ferries 
was  transferred  to  this  department  from  the  Inland  Revenue  Department.  As  most 
of  the  revenues  for  the  then  current  year  had  been  collected  by  the  latter  department, 
only  the  sum  of  $1,635.50  was  collected  by  me  during  the  fiscal  year. 

The  following  is  a  brief  summary  of  revenue  dealt  with  by  this  office: — 

During  the  year  1918-19,  the  revenue  accrued  from  public  works  shows  an  increase 
of  $9,845.61,  being  $198,745.71,  while  in  the  preceding  year  it  was  $188,900.10.  The 
collections  show  an  increase  of  $1,978.59,  being  $190,855.77,  while  in  1917-18  they 
amounted  to  $188,877.18. 

The  revenue  accrued  from  slides  and  booms  was  $16,754.71,  or  $10,318.43  less  than 
for  the  year  ended  31st  March,  1918.  The  collections  were  $16,763.45,  or  $9,424.47 
less  than  for  the  previous  year.  The  outstanding  uncollected  revenue  from  slides  and 
booms  is  $8.74  less  than  last  year. 

The  graving  docks  yielded  $72,128.04,  or  $15,943.88  more  than  in  1917-18. 

Sales  and  rents  collected  amounted  to  $100,028.78,  or  $6,176.32  less  than  for  the 
preceding  year. 

I  now  submit  the  particulars  in  detail  relative  to  the  several  services  under  their 
respective  heads. 


SLIDES   AXD    BOOMS. 


OTTAWA   DISTRICT. 

The  tolls  charged  up  amounted  to  $16,039.64,  or  $9,838.01  less  than  1917-18. 
The  number  of  saw-logs  which  passed  through  the  works  during  the  past  year  was  1,601, 
847  or  1,973,892  less  than  for  the  previous  year.  There  were  54,368.03  cords  pulpwood, 
or  27,905.63  more  than  in  1917-1S.  All  the  revenue  accrued  during  the  yeajr  was 
collected.  Of  the  dues  accrued  since  July  1,  1889,  when  this  department  took  over 
the  collection,  there  remains  uncollected  $9,161.61.  Of  the  dues  accrued  before  July  1, 
1889,  there  still  remains  unpaid  $56,505.65,  all  of  which  should  be  written  off. 


COLLECTION  OF  REVENUE 


65 


SESSIONAL   PAPER   No.  19 

The  accounts  for  the  Ottawa  district  stand  thus  :— 

Dues  accrued  during  the  year $16,039   61 

Outstanding-  March  31.  1919 '        9,16161 

$25,201   25 

Collected '. 16,039    64 

Balance  outstanding  March  31,   1919 $   9,161   61 

being  composed  of: 

Dues  of  1889-90 $6,903   05 

1890-91 28   42 

1892-93 379   80 

1896-97 196   71 

1903-04 '. 637   37 

1911-12 723   63 

1912-13 251   15 

1913-14 25   31 

1914-15 16  17 


U61   61 


Balance  of  dues  outstanding  prior  to  July  1,  1889,  when  this  department  took  over 
the  collection  was  $56,805.66. 

Herewith  are  statements  in  detail. 

No.  1. —  Statement  of  the  number  of  pieces  of  square  timber,  sawlogs,  etc.,  which 
passed  through  the  Ottawa  Works  during  the  year  ended  March  31,  1919. 

No.  2. —  Statement  of  dues  accrued  from  each  of  the  slides  and  works  of  the  Ottawa 
District  during  the  year  ended  March  31,  1919. 

Apart  from  the  two  accounts  amounting  to  $1,044.68,  all  the  revenue  from  the 
Ottawa  slides  and  booms,  since  I  took  charge  in  1889,  has  been  collected,  excepting  such 
as  should  have  been  written  off  long  ago,  or  a  few  items  in  dispute  which  I  expect  will 
have  to  be  forgiven. 

The  following  shows  a  comparison  between  the  amounts  of  dues  accrued  from  the 
different  works  on  the  Ottawa  district  which  will  explain  to  a  considerable  extent  the 
great  falling  off  in  the  revenue  and  the  number  of  pieces  which  passed  through  the 
works : — 


1917-18. 

1918-19. 

Increase. 

Decrease. 

$1,806  93 
2,877  81 
3,863  36 
3,678  38 
252  32 
6,722  18 

$1,146  42 
2,111  38 

S  660  51 

766  43 

3,863  36 
463  32 

3,215  06 
271  12 

2,375  47 
949  23 

5,970  96 

18  80 

4,346  71 

949  23 

6,676  67 

705  71 

$25,877  65 

$16,039  64 

S968  C3 

$10,806  04 

THE  ST.  MAURICE  DISTRICT. 


I  have  already  referred  to  the  condition  of  the  account  as  between  the  department 
and  the  St.  Maurice  River  Boom  and  Driving  Company  with  regard  to  the  amount  due 
the  department  under  the  lease  of  the  works  to  this  company.  I  would  draw  attention 
to  the  fact  that  with  the  exception  of  an  item  of  $3,709.62,  dues  of  1909-10,  disputed, 
all  the  dues  accrued  in  this  department  since  I  took  it  in  1892  have  been  collected, 

19—5 


66  DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  WORKS 

10  GEORGE  V,  A.   1920 

except  in  the  amount  first  referred  to.  The  amount,  outstanding  prior  to  July  1,  1892, 
remains  unchanged,  namely,  $14,4S1.49.  The  number  of  pieces  of  all  kinds  of  timber 
which  passed  through  the  works  was  equivalent  to  8,972,654  pulp  and  sawlogs,  or 
1,685,879  pieces  less  than  the  previous  year. 

NEWCASTLE  DISTRICT. 

The  dues  accrued  amounted  to  $184.57,  being  $175.83  more  than  the  previous  year, 
which  amount  has  been  collected.  The  total  outstanding  on  March  31,  1919,  amounted 
to  $3,556.89,  of  which  $3,521.19  should  be  written  off  in  accordance  with  a  judgment  of 
the  exchequer  court;  $35.70  will  also  have  to  be  forgiven,  the  debtor  being  hopelessly 
insolvent  at  the  time  of  his  decease. 

SAGUENAY  DISTRICT. 

The  dues  accrued  during  the  year  ending  March  31,  1919,  amounted  to  $530.50, 
or  $254.08  more  than  in  1917-18. 


GKAYING  DOCKS. 


ESQUIMALT   GRAVING   DOCK. 

The  revenue  collected  from  this  service  was  $34,394.45,  or  $18,852.80  more  than 
the  previous  year.  (See  statement  No.  3.)  The  dock  was  occupied  for  206  days 
during  the  past  year,  as  against  109  for  the  previous  period.  It  was  occupied  by  two 
Government  vessels  for  18  days,  and  by  other  vessels  198  days.  The  total  number  of 
vessels  was  20  of  68,095  tons. 


LEVIS   GRAVING   DOCK. 

The  revenue  was  $30,502,24,  or  $1,274.09  more  than  in  1917-18.  (See  statement 
No.  4).  During  the  season  of  navigation  the  dock  was  occupied  for  201  days  by  11 
vessels  of  21,388  tons.  Two  Government  vessels  occupied  the  dock  for  45  days  of  this 
period.  During  the  winter  of  1918-19,  the  dock  was  occupied  by  the  steel  barges  Wa'r- 
riner  and  Thompson. 

KINGSTON   GRAVING   DOCK. 

The  Collingwood  Shipbuilding  Company,  successors  to  the  Kingston  Shipbuild- 
ing Company,  have  paid  the  reduced  rental  authorized  in  1918.,  namely,  $5,000  for 
the  year  ending  May  1,  1918. 


SELKIRK  REPAIR   SLIP. 

During  the  last  fiscal  year,  the  revenue  was  $2,531.35,  being  $816.99  more  than  the 
previous  year.  The  slip  was  occupied  for  85J  days  by  23  vessels  of  5,052  tons.  One 
vessel  Wolverine,  remained  on  the  slip  during  the  entire  winter  of  1918-19.  (See 
statement  No.  5.) 


COLLECTION  OF  REVENUE  67 

SESSIONAL   PAPER   No.  19 

RENTS. 

During  the  year  1918-19,  the  revenue  accrued  from  government  properties  from 
rents,  sales,  and  interest,  was  $109,139.96,  or  $33,797.16  more  than  the  previous  year, 
the  accounts  stand  thus : — 

Balance  from  previous  years •■ $   IS, 940   89 

Accrued,  March  31,  1919 109,139   9(5 

Collected $100,028   78 

Written  of 9,545   83 

Balance  March   31,   1918 IS, 506   24 

$128,080   85         $128,080   85 


The  collections  are  thus  $6,176.32  less  than  for  the  preceding  year.  This  may  be 
accounted  for  because  in  1917-18  considerable  sums  were  included  in  settlement  of 
rentals  which  had  been  held  over  from  previous  years  in  adjusting  expropriated  pro- 
perties', and  the  gradual  withdrawal  from  rental  of  properties  given  over  to  the  use  of 
public  service.  The  amount  written  off,  $9,545.83,  is  composed  principally  of  com- 
missions deducted  by  rental  agents  and  the  cost  of  up-keep  of  properties  expropriated 
in  Toronto.  From  the  amounts  apparently  uncollected,  namely,  $18,506.24,  there  is 
one  item  alone,  $10,600.62,  composed  of  a  charge  for  Dunnville  bridge,  Ontario,  and 
another  for  the  Dundas  and  Waterloo  road,  which  business  came  to  this  department 
from  the  Inland  Eevenue  Department  in  1909.  These  matters  originated  a  great 
many  years  ago,  and  I  am  not  aware  that  we  were  ever  furnished  with  the  details,  but 
I  take  it  from  the  condition  of  the  accounts  that  they  are  of  very  doubtful  value,  and 
as  for  the  remainder,  $7,905.62,  a  large  portion  of  this  has  been  collected  since  the 
close  of  the  financial  year. 

In  the  administration  of  these  properties  there  are  serious  obstacles  to  obtaining 
as  favourable  results,  rentals,  etc.,  as  compared  with  the  same  property  in  the  hands 
of  private  individuals.  The  latter  can  make  terms,  periods  of  leases,  etc.,  as  they  see 
fit,  but  we  cannot  give  any  assurance  in  most  cases  for  more  than  a  thirty-day  term, 
as  we  do  not  know  when  some  of  these  properties  may  be  required  for  Government 
purposes.  Hence,  we  cannot  expect  to  obtain  as  good  rentals  as  parties  who  can  give 
a  lease  for  one  or  more  years,  and  I  may  say  here  that  this  condition  makes  it  difficult 
for  our  agents  to  retain  the  tenants  we  may  have.  The  four  agents  who  look  after 
the  Wellington  Street  property  have  done  their  work  well,  and  I  do  not  anticipate 
much  loss  of  rent,  except  perhaps  from  unavoidable  misfortune  to  some  of  our  tenants. 

The  following  is  a  summary  of  rents  collected  from  public  properties  during  the 
year  ended  March  31,  1919,  viz. : — 

Hydraulic  and  other  rents $      3,456  00 

Ottawa,  Sussex  street 2,219  00 

Egan  block 350  02 

"         Wellington  street,  north 23,88>5  01 

Toronto  post-office  site 6,045  00 

Province  of  Manitoba 441  00 

Victoria  and  Vancouver,  B.C 2,341  50 

Public  building  sites 5,824  81 

Sundry  places 50,381  36 

Sales  and  interest l|576  00 

Sand  dredging 3,509  05 

$100,028   7S 


19— 5J 


68 


DEPARTMENT  OF  Pl'BLlC  WORKS 


10  GEORGE  V,  A.   1920 


FERRIES. 


According  to  the  statement  handed  to  rne  from  the  Inland  Revenue  Department, 
the  balance  of  ferry  rentals  due  to  July  22,  1918,  was  $3,061.12.  The  accruals  during 
the  period  up  to  March' 31,  1919,  were  $123,  making  a  total  of  $3,484.12.  Of  these 
amounts  I  collected  $1,635.50,  leaving  a  balance  due  on  March  31,  1919,  of  $1,848.62. 

For  any  amounts  collected  by  the  Inland  Revenue  Department  and  returned  to 
the  Receiver  General  between  April  1,  1918,  and  July  22,  1918,  I  presume  the  Inland 
Revenue  Department  will  show  them  in  their  report. 

Comparative  Table  of  Public  "Works  Revenue  accrued  during  the  year  ended  March 
31,  1919,  compared  with  that  of  the  fiscal  year  ended  March  31,  1918,  and  of 
amounts  collected  on  account  of  same. 


Year  ended 

March  31, 

1919. 


Year  ended 

March  31, 

1918. 


Increase, 
1919. 


Decrease, 
1919. 


Slides  and  booms — 

Ottawa  district 

St.  Maurice  district 

Newcastle  district 

Saguenay  district 

Net  decrease.  $40,318.43 

G  raving  docks — 

Esquimalt,  B.C 

Kingston,  Ont 

Levis,  P.Q 

Selkirk  repair  slip,  Manitoba 

Net  increase,  SI 5, 943. 88. 

Feries 

Rents  and  Sales — 

Hydraulic  rents 

Minor  public  works 

Other  public  properties 

Net  increase,  $33,797.16. 

Accrued — 

Slides  and  booms 

Graving  docks 

Ferries 

Rents  and  sales 

Net  increase,  89,845.61 . . 

Col  lected — 

Slide  and  boom  dues 

Graving  docks 

Ferries 

Rents  and  sales 

Net.  increase,  $1,978.59. 


$  cts. 

16,039  64 

184  57 
530  50 


$   cts. 

25,877  65 

30,910  33 

8  74 

276  42 


S  cts 


175  83 
254  08 


16,754  71 


57,073  14 


429  91 


34,394  45 
5,000  00 

30,502  24 
2,531  35 


15,541  65 

10,000  00 

29,228  15 

1,714  36 


18,852  80 


1,274  09 
816  99 


72,428  04 


56,484  16 


20,943  88 


423  00 


423  00 


3,460  00 

26  00 

105,653  96 


3.487  00 

26  00 

71,829  80 


33,824  16 


109,139  96 


75,342  80 


33,824  16 


16,754  71 

72,428  04 

423  00 

109,139  96 


57,073  14 
56,484  16 


75,342  80 


15,943  88 

423  00 

33,797  16 


198,745  71 


188,900  10 


50, 164  04 


16,763  45 

72,428  04 

1,635  50 

100,028  78 


26,187  92 
56,484  16 


106,205  10 


15,943  88 
1,635  50 


190,855  77 


188,877  18 


17,579  3S 


$  cts. 

9,838  01 
30,910  33 


40,748  34 


5,000  00 


5,000  00 


27  00 


27  00 


40,318  43 


40,318  43 


9,424  47 


6,176  32 


15,600  79 


COLLECTION  OF  REVENUE 


69 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  19 

Statement  showing  the  dues  accrued  on  the  undermentioned-nvorks  on  the  Ottawa  river 
and  its  tributaries  during  the  fiscal  year  ended  March  31,  1919. 

■  River  or  other  improvements —  Amount. 

Main  Ottawa $   1,146   42 

Cheneaux  boom 2,111   3S 

Coulonge  river 3,215   06 

Dumoine  river 271   12 

Black  river 2,375   47 

Gatineau  river 5,970   93 

Madawaska 949   23 

$16,039   64 


Statement  of  the  number  of  pieces  of  square  timber,  sawlogs,  etc.,  that  passed 
through  the  Government  slides  and  works  on  the  Ottawa  river  and  its  tributaries 
during  the  fiscal  year  ended  March  31,  1919. 

Square  timber none. 

Sawlogs 1,6'01,S47 

Dimension  timber .  14,160 

Cedars 616 

Railway  ties 22,615 

Fence  posts 6,583 

1,645,821 


Also  54,368-03  cords  of  pulpwood. 

The  revenue  accrued  on  the  above  was  $16,039.64. 


THE  DRY  DOCK  AT  ESQUIMALT,  B.C. 
Statement  of  dues  and  other  charges  collected  during  the  year  ending  March  31,  1919. 


Name  of  Vessel  Docked. 


Tonnage. 


Period  of  Dockage. 


From 


To 


Dockage 
Charges. 


Other 
Charges. 


Total. 


D.G.S.  "Lilloet" 

SS.  "War  Yucon" 

SS.  "Princess  Charlotte" 

SS.  "Aikoka  Maru" 

SS.  "Monteagle" 

H.M.C.S.  "Malaspina" . . 

SS.  "War  Nootka" 

SS.  "Alaska" 

SS.  "War  Longhu" 

SS.  "ElLobo" 

SS.  "War  Camp" 

SS.  "Canada  Maru" 

SS.  "War  Chief" 

SS.  "Canora" 

SS.  "Prince  Rupert". . . 
SS.  "Princess  Maguinna" 

SS.  "ElLobo" 

SS.  "Prince  George". . . . 
SS.  "Princess  Beatrice" . 
SS.  "City  of  Portland".. 


574 
2,324 
3,844 
3,217 
6, 163 

392 
2,324 
5,825 
2,324 
4,800 
5,818 

5,760 

5,825 
2,382 
3,379 
1,850 
4,800 
3,372 
1,289 
1,833 

68,095 


July 


1918. 
April    8 . 

26. 
June     8. 

11. 

19. 

21. 

26. 
3. 

17 

26. 
Sept.  14. 

16. 
1919. 
Jan.     15. 

"       20 

"  27. 
Feb.  11. 
Mar.     3. 

"       20. 

"       26. 

"       27. 


1918. 

April  12. 

May    12. 

June     8 . 

12. 

20. 

24. 

29. 

July      6. 

"       20. 

Sept.  14. 

"       15. 

1919. 

Jan.     11. 

"  19. 

"  24. 

"  29 

Feb.  18. 

Mar.  4. 

"  25. 

"  26. 

"  29. 


S  cts. 
400  00 

1,519  00 
200  00 
362  50 
350  00 
300  00 
724  00 
871  00 
574  00 

5,976  00 
492  50 

15,844  00 

871  00 
752  00 
370  00 
766  25 
440  00 
710  00 
200  00 
385  00 

32, 107  25 


cts. 
4  80 
18  00 


20  40 
3  60 

13  80 

52  80 

7  20 

472  80 

24  60 

1,326  60 

3  60 

205  80 

24  00 

10  20 

15  00 

42  00 


42  00 

2,287  20 


S  cts. 
404  80 

1,537  00 
200  00 
362  50 
370  40 
303  60 
737  80 
923  80 
581  20 

6,448  80 
517  10 

17,170  60 

874  60 
957  80 
394  00 
776  45 
455  00 
752  00 
200  00 
427  00 

34,394  45 


70 


DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  WORKS 


10  GEORGE  V,   A.   1920 


THE  DRY  DOCK  AT  LEVIS,  QUE. 

Statement  of  dues  and  other  charges  collected  during  the  year  ending  March  31,  1919. 


Name  of  Vessel  Docked. 

Tonnage. 

Period  of  Dockage. 

Dockage 
Charges. 

Other 
Charges. 

Total. 

From 

To 

SS   "Northwest"            

1918. 
Entry 

Winter 

May    12.. 

Entry 
tt 

tt 

tt 

Oct.      9.. 

Nov.  21.. 

Entry 

Oct.      9.. 

9.. 

Entry 
it 

Aug.    15. . 

"       15.. 

Entry 

Nov.  28.. 

Dec.     6.. 

6.. 

"       19.. 

Entry 

Telep 

1918. 
fee. 

1917-18. 

May    13  J 
fee. 

Nov.  20.. 
"       28.. 
fee. 

a 

Nov.  20. . 

"       20. . 
fee. 

Oct.     8.. 
8.. 
fee. 

Dec.     3.. 

16.. 

"       16.. 

"       22.. 

fee. 

hone. 

$     cts. 
200  00 
200  00 
450  00 

7,628  60 
200  00 
200  00 
200  00 
200  00 
200  00 
200  00 
200  00 
200  00 

4,602  32 
973  48 
200  00 
200  00 
200  00 
200  00 
200  00 
800  00 
750  00 
200  00 
200  00 
200  00 
200  00 

3,249  80 

2,550  00 
200  00 
624  00 

1,155  80 
777  32 
535  52 
200  00 
200  00 

S     cts. 

$  cts. 
200  00 

SS   "Northland"                  

200  00 

SS   "John  S.  Thorn" 

20  00 
1  50 

470  00 

SS   "Fruhlin"-"     

2,170 

7,630  10 
200  00 

200  00 

SS  "Plessis"                     

200  00 

SS  "Colomb" 

200  00 

SS   "Mariska"                   

200  00 

200  00 

Schooner  "G  T.  L."     

200  00 

SS   "Guide"                      

200  00 

3,974 
2,279 

35  00 
16  80 

4,637  32 

SS.  "A.  W.  Thompson" 

990  28 

200  00 

200  00 

SS  "B   Stuart  W."                    

200  00 

200  00 

200  00 

SS.  "Colomb" 

559 
559 

2  00 
2  00 

802  00 

SS.  "Plessis" 

752  00 

SS   "War  Ottawa"                   

200  00 

200  00 

200  00 

200  00 

1,432 
733 

9  75 
5  00 

3,259  55 

SS.  "Lady  Grey" 

2,555  00 

SS.  "Thunder  Bay"                 

200  00 

SS.  "War  Ottawa" 

2,000 
2,279 
2,311 
3,092 

1,100  05 
235  35 
217  50 
356  45 

1,724  05 

1,391   15 

SS.  "Maruba" 

994  82 

891  97 

SS.  "War  Radnor" 

200  00 

200  00 

4  00 

4  00 

21,388 

28,496  84 

2,005  40 

30,502  24 

COLLECTION  OF  REVENUE 


71 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  19 

THE  SELKIRK  REPAIR  SLIP. 

Statement  of  dues  and  other  charges  collected  during  the  year  ending  March  31,  1919. 


Name  of  Vessel  Docked. 


Tonnage. 


Period  of  Dockage. 


To 


Dockage 
Charges. 


Other 
Charges. 


Total. 


Barge  "Marvyl" 

Dredge  No.  201 

Str.  "Wolverine" 

Str.  "Goldfield" 

Barge  No.  6 

Str.  "Majestic" 

Str.  "Lady  of  the  Lake". 

Str.  "Majestic" 

Tug  "Vaughan" 


Barge  "Lynx" 

Barge  "Beaver" 

Str.  "Wolverine" 

Str.  "Goldfield" 

Str.  "Garry" 

Barge  "Ft.  Alexander". . .  . 

Str.  "Rocket" 

Str.  "IdeH" 

Str.  "Tempest" 

Str.  "J.  R.  Spears" 

Coal  Barge  D.P.W 

Dredge  Crane  No.  202 

Str.  "Amisk" 

Str.  "  Rocket' ' 

Str.  "Lady  of  the  Lake". . 

Str.  "Orion" 

Str.  "Goldfield" 

Str.  "W.J.  Guest" 

Str.  "Garry" 

Str.  "Lady  of  the  Lake" . . 

Str.  "Luana" 

Str.  "Victor" 

Str.  "Wolverine" 

Str.  "Wolverine"  (winter). 
Str.  "Wolverine"  (winter). 
Str.  "Bradbury" 


Str.  "Wolverine"  (winter). 
Str.  "Wolverine"  (winter). 
Str.  "Wolverine"  (winter). 


225 
132 
278 
56 
491 
127 
201 
127 
134 

120 

120 

278 

56 

120 

316 

56 

54 

75 

34 


233 
32 
56 

201 


56 

97 

120 

201 


278 

278 


500 


1918. 
April  29. 

"   27. 
May  1. 

"   11. 

"   17. 

"   23. 

"   25. 

"   29. 

"   30. 

June  IS. 

21. 

27. 

July   1 . 

12. 

13. 

"   30. 

Aug.  3. 

"   21. 

"   22. 

June  12. 

July   9. 

Aug.  29. 

Sept.  9. 

10. 

21. 

28. 

Oct.  21. 

"   26. 

Nov.  4. 


Dec.  1 

Aug.  9. 

1919. 
Jan.   1 
Feb.  1. 
Mar.  1 . 


1918. 
April  29. 

"   27. 
May  10. 

"   17. 

"   22. 
'"   25. 

"   29. 

"   30. 

"   31. 


July 


Aug. 


June  15. 

21. 

27. 

2. 

13. 

Hi. 

36 

7. 

22. 

28. 

June  13. 

July  10. 

Sept.  7. 

9. 

"   20. 

"   21. 

1. 

21. 

26. 

7. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


"  30. 

Dec.  31. 

Aug.  20. 

1919. 

Tan.  31. 

Feb.  28. 

Mar.  31. 


5,052 


$  cts. 
45  00 
26  40 
191  82 
65  00 
218  50 
25  40 
68  34 

25  40 

26  80 

55  00 
45  00 
75  06 
25  00 
25  00 
85  32 
25  00 

45  00 
25  00 
65  00 
25  00 

46  60 
90  00 
25  00 

159  80 
25  00 
40  00 
25  00 
25  00 
61  31 
25  00 
25  00 
55  60 
57  00 
75  00 

380  00 

78  00 
72  00 
78  00 

2,531  35 


$  cts 


(Mar.  '19 
ret.) 


$  cts. 
45  00 
26  40 

191  82 
65  00 

218  50 
25  40 
68  34 

25  40 

26  80 

55  00 
45  00 
75  06 
25  00 
25  00 
85  32 
25  00 

45  00 
25  00 
65  00 
25  00 

46  60 
90  00 
25  00 

159  80 
25  00 
40  00 
25  00 
25  00 
61  31 
25  00 
25  00 
55  60 
57  00 
75  00 

380  00 

78  00 
72  00 
78  00 

2,531  35 


72 


DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  WORKS 


10  GEORGE  V,  A.   1920 


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DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  WORKS 


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BEPARTUEXT  OF  PUBLIC  WORKS 


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77 


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REPORT  OF  THE  CHIEF  ACCOUNTANT 


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SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  19 

Amounts  expended  by  the  Department  of  Public  Works  of  Canada  during  the  fiscal 

year  ended  March  31,  1919. 


Name  of  Work. 


Dredging. 


Construc- 
tion and 
Improve- 
ments. 


Repairs. 


Staff 
and 
Main- 
tenance. 


Total. 


Habbours  and  Rivers. 
Nova  Scotia. 

Abbott's  Harbour 

Anderson's  Cove,  breakwater 

Annapolis  Royal,  pier 

Antigonish  Landing,  wharf 

Argyle  Sound,  wharf 

Arichat  wharf,  (Shed) 

Arisaig,  wharf 

Avonport,  wharf 

Babin's  Cove,  wharf  (Shed) 

Baily's  Brook,  protection  piers 

Barachois,  training  pier 

Barrington's  Cove,  Sydney  Mines,  wharf 

reconstruction 

Battery  Point  breakwater,  reconst.,etc 

Bay  St.  Lawrence,  breakwater 

Bear  River,  repairs  to  warping  pier 

Big  Bras  d'Or,  wharf 

Breen's  Pond,  breakwater 

Breton  Cove,  wharf 

Burke's  Head,  breakwater 

Burlington,  wharf 

Canning,  wharf 

Cape  Sable  Island  (east  end)  breakwater 

Chegoggin  breakwater 

Chester  Basin  (Lunenburg  Co. )  abutm'ts 

Cheticamp  wharf 

Chimney  Coner  (Inverness  Co.)  wharf . 

Church  Point,  wharf 

Cow  Bay  (Port  Morien),  breakwater. . . 

Cribbin's  Point,  wharf 

Deep  Brook  (Antigonish  Co.)  wharf.     . 

Delaps  Cove,  removal  of  rocks 

Devil's  Island,  breakwater 

Digby,  pier  renewals 

East  Chezzetcook,  wharf 

East  River  (Pictou  Co.)  improvements 

Feltzen  South,  breakwater 

Feltzen  South,  wharf 

Five  Islands,  wharf 

Fourchu . .  - 

Fox  Island,  breakwater  approach 

Freeport,  breakwater- 

French  Village,  wharf 

Fruid'l  Point  wharf 

Gabarous,  breakwater 

Gabarous  Harbour,  beach  protection. . . 

Georgeville,  wharf 

Glace  Bay,  protection  works 

Grand  Etang,  protection  works 

Grand  Narrows,  wharf 

Great  Village,  wharf 

Halifax  Graving  dock 

"       Gun  wharf 

"       King's  wharf 

"       Lawlor's  Island  quar.  sta.  wharf 

Hampton,  Breakwater 

Harbour  au  Bouche,  wharf 

Herring  Cove,  wharf 

Inverness  breakwater  extension 

harbour  improvements 

Iona,  wharf 

Isaac  Harbour,  wharf 

Jamesville,  breakwater 

Johnston's  Hr.  (Richmond  Co.)  wharf 

Judique  (Baxter's)  wharf 

Kelly's  Cove,  Breakwater 


I  cts 

9,200  50 


cts 


3  95 


434  22 
694  20 


1,063  54 
3,752  98 


25  00 


111  72 


1,156  21 


1,796  71 
100  00 


3,108  66 


5,384  51 


34  20 


35,349  68 
4,591  24 


7,130  00 
564  73 


1,511  07 
1,700  04 


cts. 


1 , 194  64 
149  56 


101  10 

39  68 

441  94 

500  20 


60  00 


344  27 


220  00 

1,191  04 

270  10 


1,142  23 

498  70 

148  75 

368  47 

102  16 

416  CO 


500  00 
4,037  83 


99  97 


121  82 

4,255  17 

310  54 


873  89 
630  02 
503  10 


36  72 

1,263  00 

1,222  45 

654  26 

699  59 

100  00 

75  66 

1  00 

649  99 

147  91 

340  85 


413  53 

300  48 
760  08 
207  77 


280  16 

282  29 


60  05 

201  02 

34  75 


1,071  94 


$        cts. 

9,200  50 

1,194  64 

149  56 

3  95 

101  10 
39  68 

441  94 
500  20 
434  22 
694  20 
60  00 

1,063  54 

3,752  98 

344  27 

25  00 

220  00 

1,191  04 

270  10 

111  72 

1,142  23 

498  70 

148  75 

368  47 

102  16 
'  416  60 
1,156  21 

500  00 

4,037  83 

1,796  71 

99  97 

100  00 

121  82 

4,255  17 
310  54 

4,180  60 
873  89 
630  02 
503  10 

5,384  51 
36  72 

1,263  00 

1,222  45 

654  26 

699  59 

100  00 

75  66 

1  00 

649  99 

147  91 

340  85 

35,349  68 

4,591  24 
34  20 
413  53 
300  48 
760  08 
207  77 

7, 130  00 
564  73 
280  16 
282  29 

1,511  07 

60  05 

201  02 

1,734  79 


92 


DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  WORKS 


10  GEORGE  V,  A.   1920 

Amounts  expended  by  the  Department  of  Public  Works  of  Canada  during  the  fiscal 
year  ended  March  31,  1919 — Continued. 


Name  of  Work. 


Harbours  &  Rivers. 

Nova  Scotia  {Continued). 

Kingsport 

Kraut  Point,  wharf 

L'Ardoise,  breakwater 

Little  Brook  (Digby  Co.)  breakwater 

Little  Narrows,  wharf 

Little  River  (Digby  Co.)  breakwater 
"  "  "  wharf 

Livingstone's  Cove,  wharf 

Lockeport,  beach  protection 

Long  Point  (Craigmore)  breakwater.. 

Lower  Kingsburg,  skidway  and  break 
water 

Mabou  Harbour,  Jetties 

Maitland  wharf 

Malagash,  wharf 

Margaree  (Salmond  pond) 

Margaree  harbour,  improvements 

Margaretville,  breakwater 

McAra's  Brook,  pier 

McKay's  Point  (Judique)  breakwater 

McXair's  Cove,  breakwater 

Meat  Cove,  breakwater 

Meteghan  River,  wharf 

Meteghan ,  wharf 

Middle  River  (lower)  shear  dams 

Mill  Creek  (King's  Co.)  wharf 

Mosher's  Bay,  breakwater 

Musquodoboit  Harbour,  wharf 

Necum  Teuch,  wharf , 

Neil's  Harbour,  breakwater 

New  Campbellton,  wharf 

North  Gut  (St.  Ann's)  wharf 

North  Sydney  (Kelley 's  Beach) 

Nyanza,  wharf 

Odgen's  Pond,  protection  works 

Ogilvies,  breakwater 

Parker's  Cove,  breakwater 

Parrsboro,  beach  protection 

Pereaux  wharf 

Petite  Riviere  (Lunenburg  Co.)  break- 
water  

"     wharf 

Pictou  Hr.  Abercrombie  wharf 

Pictou  Island,  west  wharf 

Pleasant  Bay,  wharf 

Poirierville,  wharf 

Portapique,  wharf 

Port  Dufferin,  wharf 

Porter's  Lake,  removal  of  boulders. . . . 

Port  George  (Annapolis  Co.jbreakwater 

Port  Hawkesbury,  wharf  approach. . . 

Port  Hilford,  breakwater 

Port  Hood,  wharf 

Port  Latour 

"  "         (Upper) 

Portuguese  Cove,  breakwater 

"       impts.  to  road  leadin, 
to  breakwater 

Port  Wade,  wharf 

Poulamond,  wharf 

River  Bourgeois,  wharf ... 

Ross'  Ferry,  wharf 

Round  Hill,  wharf 

St.  Joseph's  (Inverness  Co.)  breakwater 

Salmon  River'(Cape  Breton  Co.)  break 
water 


Dredging. 


cts 
20  00 


Construc- 
tion and 

Improve- 
ments. 


$  cts. 


29  96 


147  25 


20,029  76 


Repairs. 


cts 


471  95 
'674 '25 


2,305  24 


15,688  31 


4,159 


429  59 


116  00 


75  00 


1,699  38 


560  16 


194  86 

1,776  97 

1,975  98 

30  00 


1,198  46 


116  31 
692  50 


157  00 
1,000  13 
-  850  02 


Staff  and 

Main- 
tenance. 


2,998  00 

299  83 

4,676  47 

2,800  41 

371  77 

29  27 

200  75 

201  00 


1,574  15 

14  80 

105  83 

179  11 

1,053  48 
140  32 


349  91 


246  14 

101  15 

1,000  35 

319.09 

415  75 


249  40 
150  20 

250  77 
,437  87 

27  00 
113  57 


150  00 
2,451  66 


552  70 

699  24 

1 , 187  49 

1,520  00 


253  64 
199  98 
324  30 
749  19 
1.934  14 
204  98 

600  54 


cts 


Total. 


cts. 


20  00 

194  86 

1,776  97 

1,975  98 

30  00 

471  95 

1,198  46 

674  25 

116  31 

692  50 

2,305  24 

157  00 

1,000  13 

850  02 

29  96 

15,688  31 

2,998  00 

299  83 

4,676  47 

2,800  41 

371  77 

29  27 

4,360  63 

201  00 

147  25 

1,574  15 

14  80 

105  83 

179  11 

1,053  48 

140  32 

20,029  76 

349  91 

429  59 

246  14 

101  15 

1,000  35 

319  09 

415  75 

116  00 

249  40 

150  20 

250  77 

1,437  87 

27  00 

113  57 

75  00 

150  00 

2,451  66 

1,699  38 

552  70 

699  24 

1,187  49 

1 , 520  00 

560  16 

253  64 

199  98 

324  30 

749  19 

1,934  14 

204  98 

600  54 


REPORT  OF  THE  CHIEF  ACCOUNTANT 


93 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  19 

Amounts  expended  by  the  Department  of  Public  Works  of  Canada  during  the  fiscal 
year  ended  March  31,  1919 — Continued. 


Name  of  Work 


Dredging. 


Construc- 
tion and 
Improve- 
ments. 


Repairs. 


Staff  and 

Main- 
tenance. 


Total. 


Harbours  &  Rivers. 
Nova  Scotia — (Continued.) 

Sandy  Cove,  breakwater 

Scotch  Cove  (White  Point)  wharf. . 

Short  Beach,  breakwater 

Skinner's  Cove,  pier 

South  Cove  (Victoria  Co.)  wharf... 
South   East   Cove    (Tangier)   grading 

right  of  way 

South  Ingonish,  beach  protection 

South  Lake  (Lakevale)  channel  protec 

tion 

Spry  Bay  Henley's  wharf 

Spry  Bay  Leslie's  wharf 

Stoney  Island,  breakwater 

Swim's  Point,  wharf 

Sydney  Harb.  South  bar  (cribwork). 

Tangier  wharf  (Shed) 

Trout  Cove,  breakwater 

Turner's  Island  (Halifax  Co.)  wharf. . 
Washabuek  Beach  protection  works. . 

Center,  wharf 

Watt  Settlement,  wharf 

Wedgeport,  wharf 

West  Pubnico,  wharf 

West  Sheet  Harbour,  wharf 

West  Ship  Harbour,  wharf 

Whycocomagh,  wharf 

Wolfville,  wharf  approach 

Yarmouth  harbour,  improvements. . . 
Generally 

Totals,  Xova  Scotia 


cts, 


cts. 


1,084  56 
1,044  58 


cts. 


244  16 
15,45 


cts 


103  50 


250  33 
1,010  22 


474  90 
18  80 
14  63 

499  98 
1,651  82 

150  00 
22  05 

284  83 

103  41 

300  00 
59  98 

149  96 
1,037  94 

200  00 
67  47 
27  74 

149  97 

131  17 


10,179.69 
3,140  30 


1,547  37 


I  cts. 

244  16 

15  45 

1,084  56 

1,044  58 

103    50 

250  33 
1,010  22 

474  90 
18  80 
14  63 

499  98 
1,651  82 

150  00 
22  05 

284  83 

103  41 

300  00 
59  98 

149  96 
1,037  94 

200  00 
67  47 
27  74 

149  97 

131  17 
10,179  69 
..4,687  67 


48,191  17 


92,638  40 


70,087  58 


2,619  31 


213,536  46 


Prince  Edward  Island — 

Cardigan  North,  (Newport)  pier 

South,  wharf 

Chapel  Point,  pier 

Graham's  Pond,  breakwater 

McPherson's  Cove,  pier 

Miminigash,  breakwaters 

Mink  River,  wharf 

Mount  Stewart,  wharf 

Murray  Harbour  (South  River)  wharf 

Naufrage  Harbour 

Pownal 

Prim  Island,  wharf 

Red  Point,  wharf 

Rustico  (north)  beach  protection  works 

St.  Mary's  Bay,  pier 

Souris  harbour,  breakwater 

Summerside,  breakwater 

Tignish,  breakwaters 

Victoria  (Crapaud)  pier 

Wood  islands,  breakwaters 

Generally 


116  IS 

40  20 

15  50 

266  56 

40  50 
1,994  23 
1,481  47 

284  17 

41  79 


771  69 
6,835  25 


1,570  98 


Totals,  Prince  Edward  Island. 


9,177  92 


New  Brunswick — 

Albert,  berth  for  vessels 

Anderson's  Hollow,  wharf 

Back  Bay,  wharf 

Baie  du  Vin,  wharf 

Barker's  (Sunbury  Co.)  wharf 
Beaver  Harbour,  wharf 


38  50 


195  86 
201  86 
245  95 
306  25 
114  30 
709  27 
515  95 
1,332  08 
1,377  28 


1,667  41 


116  18 
40  20 
15  50 

266  56 

40  50 
1,994  23 
1,481  47 

284  17 

41  79 
771  69 

6,835  25 

195  86 

201  86 

245  95 

306  25 

114  30 

709  27 

515  95 

1,332  08 

1,377  28 

3,238  39 


9,279  40 


1,667  41 


20, 124  73 


69  82 

100  43 

27  43 

38  00 

117  03 


38  50 
69  82 

100  43 
27  43 
38  00 

117  63 


94 


DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  WORKS 


10  GEORGE  V,   A.   1920 

Amounts  expended  by  the  Department  of  Public  Works  of  Canada  during  the  fiscal 
year  ended  March  31,  1919 — Continued. 


Name  of  Work. 

Dredging. 

Construc- 
tion and 
Improve- 
ments. 

Repairs. 

Staff  and 

Main- 
tenance. 

Total. 

Harbours  and  Rivers. 
Xew  Brunsirick — Concluded. 

8       cts. 

S       cts. 

S       cts. 

171  20 

48  80 

37  64 

417  93 

$       cts 

$       cts. 
171  20 

48  80 

37  64 

417  93 

18,267  84 

18,267  84 

10  00 

10  00 

1,604  56 
528  86 

1,604  56 

528  86 

114  64 

421  18 

114  64 

421  18 

Dipper  Harbour,  breakwater  wharf 

492  96 
667  07 

492  96 

667  07 

65  01 
668  62 
750  18 

88  66 
177  15 
741  96 
103  47 

15  00 
370  71 

65  01 

668  62 

750  18 

88  66 

177  15 

741  96 

103  47 

2,911  98 

2,916  98 

370  71 

McLean's  Gully  (Kent  Co.)  . . 

3,320  95 

3,320  95 

858  87 

858  87 

Maugerville.  wharf 

9  34 

9  34 

Miramichi  river  (North  West)     . 

2,587  00 

2,587  00 

Moncton,  wharf .... 

131  26 

2,916  63 

93  46 

83  38 

131  26 

Neguac,  wharf 

2,916  63 

North  Head,  breakwater 

93  46 

Oak  Point,  wharf 

83  38 

Oromoeto  shoals 

20  45 

20  45 

481  04 

5  00 

249  00 

21  18 

146  52 

481  04 

Petit  Rocher,  breakwater 

5  00 

249  00 

Rexton,  wharf .... 

21  18 

Richardson  wharf  (Slip). . .                .... 

146  52 

River  St.    John    &    tributaries,    final 

4,785  99 

4.785  99 

St.  Andrews,  wharf. ...                   

733  48 

733  48 

St.  John  harbour  improvements: — 
Courtnev  bay 

226,193  62 
15,598  07 

226, 193  62 

15,598  07 

Negro  point,  breakwater. . .           .... 

440  97 

2,996  62 
21,361  10 

440  97 

Partridge     Isld.     quarantine     Sta., 
deep  water  wharf. . 

777  54 

3,774  16 

St.  John  West,  piers,  sheds,  &c. . . 

14,956  13 
670  00 

36,317  23 

St.  Stephen  (Charlotte  Co.)  floating 
slip 

670  00 

Scotchtown,  wharf 

89  50 
1,360  09 
3,617  53 

27  94 
139  89 

89  50 

Shediac,  wharf 

1 , 360  09 

26,760  82 

30,378  35 

Shippegan  Hr.  wharf 

27  94 

The  Range  (Grand  Lake)  wharf.   . 

139  89 

107  35 

107  35 

Welshpool,  wharf 

959  83 
69  29 

78  50 

263  80 

959  83 

69  29 

Woodward's  Cove  (Charlotte  Co.) 
breakwater 

78  50 

Young's  Cove  (Queen's  Co.)  break- 

263  80 

3,140  30 

2,319  04 

5,459  34 

59,142  76 

264,368  56 

40,830  81 

3,096  58 

367,438  71 

REPORT  OF  THE  CHIEF  ACCOUNTANT 


95 


SESSIONAL   PAPER  No.  19 

Amounts  expended  by  the  Department  of  Public  Works  of  Canada  during  the  fiscal 
year  ended  March  31,  1919 — Continued. 


Name  of  Work. 

Dredging. 

Construc- 
tion and 
Improve- 
ments. 

Repairs. 

Staff  and 

Main- 
tenance. 

Total. 

Harbours  and  Rivers. 
Quebec — 

$       cts. 

$       cts. 

$       cts. 

128  25 
2,608  07 

45  25 
174  30 
191  57 
105  58 
224  50 

29  92 

795  78 
2,385  70 

539  95 
1,710  14 

251  37 

$       cts. 

$       cts. 
128  25 

2,608  07 

45  25 

174  30 

191  57 

105  58 

224  50 

29  92 

Baie  St.  Paul  (Cap  aux  Corbeaux), 

795  78 

2,385  70 

539  95 

* 

1,710  14 

251  37 

Brewer's  Creek  (Labelle),  landing  float 

7  00 

7  00 

18  00 
148  62 
159  95 

18  00 

148  62 

159  95 

24  00 

24  00 

249  99 

322  08 

189  80 

61  50 

36  95 

751  92 

754  23 

523  65 

993  32 

1,881  61 

2G  00 

97  80 

249  99 

322  08 

189  80 

61  50 

36  95 

751  92 

309  46 

1,063  69 

523  65 

993  32 

1,881  61 

20  00 

97  80 

7  00 

7  00 

9  00 

979  22 
299  05 
224  23 
198  98 
457  08 
258  78 
212  62 

988  22 

299  05 

224  23 

198  98 

457  08 

258  78 

212  62 

96  00 

96  00 

25  00 

25  00 

1,713  44 

1,713  44 

Grande  Entree  (Magdalen  islands) 

34  25 
32  00 

1,019  71 
31  85 

34  25 

32  00 

Grindstone  (Magdalen  islds.)     break-' 

1,019  71 

31  85 

Grosse  Isle  (Quar.  sta.)  new  coal  shed. 

2,014  88 

2,014  88 

474  52 

474  52 

High  Falls  (Labelle  Co.)  landing  float 

4  75 
207  62 

17  13 

4  75 

207  62 

Hospital  Bay  (Magdalen  Isl'ds.)break- 

17  13 

437  62 

437  62 

267  72 

60  00 
56  20 
1,191  19 
107  79 
141  31 

267  72 

He  Verte,  Notre  Dame  des  Sept.  Dou- 

60  00 

56  20 

1,191  19 

107  79 

141  31 

27,012  75 

27,012  75 

1,772  66 

25  17 

1,797  83 

96 


DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  WORKS 


10  GEORGE  V,  A.   1920 

Amounts  expended  by  the  Department  of  Public  Works  of  Canada  during  the  fiscal 
year  ended  March  31,  1919 — Continued. 


Name  of  Work. 

Dredging. 

Construc- 
tion   and 
Improve- 
ments. 

Repairs. 

Staff  and 

Main- 
tenance. 

Total. 

Harbours  and  Rivers. 
Quebec — Concluded . 
Laprairie,  protection  Works 

$       cts. 

§       cts. 

18,390  62 
442,386  02 

S       cts. 

S       cts. 

$       cts. 
18,390  62 

Lauzon  "Champlain"  dry  dock 

692  03 

29,733  08 

41  00 

443,078  05 

"       "Lome"  dry  dock 

29,733  08 

Lavaltrie,  wharf 

549  49 
697  08 
220  75 

590  49 

Les  Eboulements,  wharf 

697  08 

3,230  07 
956  68 

3,450  82 

Levis  deep  water  wharf 

1,  353  30 

2,309  98 

1,172  36 
29  50 
82  92 

1,172  36 

Lotbiniere,  wharf 

29  50 

Magog,  wharf 

82  92 

2,907  63 
6,901  68 

2,907  63 

985  00 
733  05 
391  57 
306  91 
236  46 

7,886  68 

733  05 

Mechins,  wharf 

391  57 

Mille  Vaches,  wharf 

306  91 

Montmagny,  wharf 

236  46 

Montreal,  dry  dock 

105,000  00 

105,000  00 

Murray  Bay,  wharf 

881  29 
612  01 
299  85 
482  30 
60  00 
150  43 
292  99 
479  56 
329  60 

881  29 

New  Carlisle,  wharf 

612  01 

Newport,  breakwater 

299  85 

Norway  Bav  (Ottawa  river)  wharf. . . 

482  30 

Notre  Dame  du  Portage,  wharf 

60  00 

Papineauville,  wharf 

150  43 

292  99 

479  56 

Peribonka,  wharf 

329  60 

817  31 

817  31 

Pierreville,  wharf 

226  96 

1,194  39 

190  01 

15  00 

33  32 
27  20 

226  96 

Point  a  Elie  (Magdalen  islands)  break- 

1,194  39 

190  01 

Pointe  aux  Esquimaux,  wharf 

15  00 

Pointe  aux   Trembles    (Portneuf   Co), 

1,276  80 

1,310  12 

Pointe  Cavagnole,  wharf 

27  20 

Pointe  Claire,  wharf 

150  00 

150  00 

Pointe  Fortune,  wharf 

623  93 
299  60 

8  50 

623  93 

Pointe  Piche  (Timiskaming)  wharf... 

299  60 

Poltimore    (Riv.    du   Lievre)    landing 

8  50 

Quebec   Harbour   (Riv.   St.   Charles) 

400,382  61 

77,648  58 

6,000  00 

400,382  61 

Rimouski,  harbour  improvements 

77,648  58 

wharf 

1,931  54 

391  69 

672  92 

8,604  46 

Riviere  aux  Vases  (Chicoutimi)  wharf 

391  69 

12  00 

12  00 

Riviere  du  Lievre,  lock 

2,343  86 

2,343  86 

Riviere  du  Loup  (en  bas)  wharf 

1,557  37 

1,557  37 

Riviere  Ouelle,  wharf 

1,379  79 

1,379  79 

Riviere  St.  Louis 

240  98 
26,368  57 

240  98 

Riviere  St.  Maurice,  Eastern  channel. 

26,368  57 

Roberval,  wharf 

529  00 
352  61 

798  03 

240  76 

529  00 

Ste.  Adelaide  de  Pabos,  wharf 

352  61 

St.  Alphonse  (Chicoutimi  Co.)  wharf.. 

798  03 

St.  Andrews,  wharf 

249  76 

Ste.  Anne  de  Beaupre,  wharf 

328  16 
3,191  32 

328  16 

Ste  Anne  de  Chicoutimi,  pontoon 

341  25 

3,532  57 

19  20 

19  20 

Ste.  Anne  des  Monts,  landing  pier,  etc. 

600  03 
243  62 

399  34 
25  56 

600  03 

St.  Antoine  de  Richelieu,  wharf(Shed) 

243  62 

St.  Antoine  Station  (Pointe.Dansereau) 

399  34 

25  56 

Ste.  Croix,  wharf 

10  00 

10  00 

St.  Denis  de  Richelieu,  wharf 

92  05 
40  50 

92  05 

40  50 

REPORT  OF  THE  CHIEF  ACCOUNT  AX  T 


97 


SESSIONAL  PA;  ER  No.  19 

Amounts  expended  by  the  Department  of  Public  Works  of  Canada  during  the  fiscal 
year  ended  March  31,  1919 — Continued. 


Name  of  Work. 


Dredging. 


Construc- 
tion and 

Improve- 
ments. 


Repairs. 


Staff  and 
Maintenance 


Total. 


Harbours  and  Rivers. 
Quebec — Continued. 

St.  Famille  (lie  d'Orleans)  wharf 

Ste.  Felicite,  wharf 

St.  Francois  du  Lac,  wharf 

St.  Francois  (He  d'Orleans,  south  side) 

wharf 

Ste.  Genevieve  de  Batiscan,  wharf 

St.  Godfrey,  wharf 

St.  Ignace  de  Loyola,  wharf 

St.  Irenee  les  Bains,  wharf 

St.  Jean  des  Chaillons,  wharf 

St.  Jean  (He  d'Orleans)  wharf 

St.  Jerome,  wharf 

St.  John's,  reconstruction  of  booms. . . . 

Guide  piers 

St.  Lambert,  protection  dyke 

St.  Laurent  (He  d'Orleans)  wharf 

St.  Mathias,  wharf 

St.  Michel  de  Bellechasse,  wharf 

St.  Nicholas,  wharf 

St.  Ours  (Riv.  Richelieu)  wharf 

St.  Pierre  les  Becquets,  wharf 

St.  Roch  de  Richelieu,  wharf 

St.  Simeon,  wharf 

St.  Sulpice,  wharf 

St.  Valier  (Bellechasse;  wharf 

St.  Victoire  (Riv.  Richelieu)  wharf  . . 

St.  Zotique,  wharf 

Sabrevois,  wharf 

Sorel,  wharf 

Three  Rivers,  wharf 

Thurso,  wharf 

Vaudreuil,  wharf 

Vercheres,  wharf 

Ville  Marie,  wharf 

Woburn,  wharf 

Yamaska,  lock  and  dam 

wharf y. . . . 

Generally 


S      cts 


S     cts 


$     cts. 

16  75 

292  44 
349  40 

261  80 

64  45 

982  89 

474  86 

791  17 

81  00 

396  42 

83  65 


$     cts 


1,496  56 


420  54 

19  99 

2,885  27 

398  69 

514  47 

35  80 

454  43 

795  90 

321  22 

99  87 

553  48 

99  52 

216  17 

61  45 

599  52 

2,499  65 

2,274  51 

243  52 

853  96 


26  25 


2,668  10 
3,761  57 
1,225  74 


48  00 


209  02 


1,761  84 


9,158  48 


38,635  07 


$     cts. 

16  75 

292  44 
349  40 

261  80 

64  45 

982  89 

474  86 

791  17 

81  00 

396  42 

83  65 

1,496  56 

420  54 

19  99 

,911  52 

398  69 

514  47 

35  80 

454  43 

795  90 

321  22 

99  87 

553  48 

99  52 

216  17 

61  45 

599  52 

2,499  65 

2,274  51 

243  52 

853  96 

2,716  10 

3,761  57 

1,225  74 

1,761  84 

209  02 

47,793  55 


Totals,  Quebec. 


63,286  50- 


979,220  18 


59,515  13 


180,839  98 


1,282,861  79 


Ontario — 

Arnprior,  wharf 

Barrie,  wharf 

Barry's  Bay,  wharf 

Bayfield,  piers 

.     Beaumaris,  wharf 

>■  Belleville,  wharf  and  shed 

Big  Bay  Point,  wharf 

Blind  River,  wharf 

Brockville  wharf,  improvements 

Burlington  Channel,  bridge 

Burlington  Channel,  pier 

Burnt  Island,  wharf 

Cobourg,  east  pier 

Langevin,  pier 

Collingwood  graving  dock  No.  1 

"      No.  2 

Cumberland,  wharf 

Fort  William,  harbour  improvements.. 

FrenchRiver,  dams  (Big  Chaudiere). 
""»  Goderich,  harbour  improvements 

Grand  Bend,  piers,  etc 

Griffith's  Island,  wharf 

Haileybury,  dockyard 

wharf 


22  50 

201  95 

46  66 

4,122  09 

35  82 


45  96 


2,416  69 
1,219  63 


190  19 
478  59 
340  85 


7,311  69 

17  80 

4,604  37 

19,108  32 


4,752  48 


112,476  88 


5,062  14 
5,779  64 


374  85 

1,993  00 

3,160  72 

2,655  98 

489  03 

785  19 


15,000  00 
9,208  96 


572  18 


2,102  53 


68  46 

201  95 

46  66 

4,122  09 

35  82 

2,416  69 

190  19 

478  59 

1,560  48 

4,752  48 

7,311  69 

17  80 

4,604  37 

19,108  32 

15,000  00 

9,208  96 

374  85 

119,532  02 

8,940  36 

2,655  98 

489  03 

785  19 

2,102  53 

572  18 


19—7 


98 


DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  WORKS 


10  GEORGE  V,  A.   1920 

Amounts  expended  by  the  Department  of  Public  "Works  of  Canada  during  the  fiscal 
year  ended  March  31,  1919 — Continued. 


Name  of  Work. 

Dredging. 

Construc- 
tion and 
Improve- 
ments. 

Repairs. 

Staff  and 

Main- 
tenance. 

Total. 

Harbours  and  Rivers. 
Ontario — Concluded. 

S       cts. 

$       cts. 

S       cts. 
10  10 

S       cts. 

S       cts. 
10  10 

9,410  76 

9,410  76 

8,853  03 
94  78 

"           Maintenance  and  operation  of 
combined  roadway,  wharf 

8,853  03 

94  78 
104  12 
88  68 

104  12 

88  68 

26  50 

26  50 

489  45 
1  00 

489  45 

1  00 

2,297  05 

2,297  05 
658  62 

658  62 

495  48 
95  83 

14.5  91 
44  10 

495  48 

95  83 

145  91 

44  10 

37,741  50 

37,741  50 

"            harbour  improvements... 

72,341  47 
34,214  90 

72,341  47 

14,770  69 

-7,417  62 

4,365  77 

2,160  43 

9  80 

48,985  59 

7,417  62 

4,365  77 

2,160  43 

9  80 

Port  Maitland 

30  00 

30  00 

3,227  19 
45  39 

3,227  19 

45  39 

Port  Stanlev,  harbour  improvements. . 

10,102  19 

62,785  33 

72,887  52 
10  00 

10  00 
93  00 

93  00 

1,850  19 

1,850  19 

81  06 
..  3,700  41 

81  06 

4,559  90 

8  260  31 

1,313  30 

1  313  30 

94  13 

94  13 

2,503  20 

2,503  20 

787  37 

787  37 

515  86 

515  86 

1,792  24 

3,038  80 

840  83 

448  04 

207  29 

N206  67 

1,792  24 

3,038  80 

840  83 

448  04 

207  29 

***  Toronto  Harbour  improvements: — 

206  67 

322,436  81 

322,436  81 
483  31 

-  483  31 
v  554  39 

554  39 

Fisherman's  island  (new  Building)... 

-  1,191  45 

1,191  45 

25  00 

25  00 

515  03 

515  03 

3,240  00 

3,240  00 

1,024  99 
1,578  97 

12  4.") 

24  00 

1,048  99 

1,578  97 

3,366  97 
9,213  00 

3,379  42 

91158  48 

18,371  48 

244,017  11 

419,276  83 

95,547  10 

92,630  48 

851  471  52 

Manitoba — 

Hnausa  (Lake  Winnipeg)  wharf 

324  48 

324  48 

Little    Pembina    river,    diversion    into 

828  28 

828  28 

Red  River,  channel  protection 

2,668  92 

2,668  92 

7,008  75 

7,008  75 

REPORT  OF  THE  CHIEF  ACCOUNTANT 


99 


SESSIONAL   PAPER  No.   19 

Amounts  expended  by  the  Department  of  Public  Works  of  Canada  during  the  fiscal 
year  ended  March  31,  1919 — Continued. 


Name  of  Work. 


Dredging. 


Construc- 
tion and 

Improve- 
ments. 


Repairs. 


Staff  and 

Main- 
tenance. 


Total. 


Harbours  and  Rivers — 
Manitoba — Continued. 
St.  Andrews  rapids,  lock  and  dam. 

Selkirk,  slip 

Generally 


cts 


$       cts 


$       cts 
83  50 


$       cts 

13,724  80 
4,707  52 
3,076  00 


Totals,  Manitoba. 

Saskatchewan  and  Alberta — 

Big  Stone  river 

Cumberland  lake 

Generally 


7,333  23 


828  28 


2,752  42 


21,508  32 


2,451  13 
7,934  90 


876  13 


Totals,  Saskatchewan  and  Alberta 


British  Columbia — 

Ainsworth,  wharf 

Argenta,  wharf 

Barnston  Island,  wharf 

Beaton,  wharf 

Bindlay's  Landing,  float 

Burdwood  Bay,  float 

Burton,  wharf 

Campbell  river,  wharf 

Clyoquot,  wharf 

Columbia  River,  snagging 

Crawford  Bay,  wharf 

D'Arcy  Island,  slip  way 

Deep  Cove,  float 

Deer  Park,  wharf 

Dignan's  Bay  (Gabriola  Isld.)  float 

East  Arrow  Park,  float 

East  Robson,  float 

Esquimalt,  naval  coal  wharf 

old  dry  dock 

Fanny  Bay,  float 

Farmer's  Landing,  float 

Farrington's  wharf , 

Fraser's  Landing,  wharf 

Fraser  River  improvements — 

Annieville  bar 

Chilliwack,    removal    of    snags 

Greyell's  slough 

Nicomen,  dams 

Sandheads 

Sidney  Mills 

Snagboat  Samson 

Steveston  jetty 

Woodwords  slough 

Gower  Point,  float 

Grace  harbour,  float 

Gray's  Creek,  wharf 

Halcyon,  wharf 

Hardy  Bay,  landing  float 

Kaslo,  wharf 

Kicking     Horse     river,     removal     of 

obstructions 

Kitto's  Landing,  wharf 

Kootenay  River,  snagging 

Ladysmith,  wharf 

Little  River,  wharf 

Long  Bay,  float 

Long  Beach,  wharf 

McDonald's  Landing,  wharf 

Mirror  Lake,  wharf 

Mission,  wharf 

Naas  river 

Nakusp,  wharf 

19—73 


10,386  03 


495  04 


171  95 


400  00 


46,951  97 


at 


531  98 


54,683  01 
2,720  71 


60,828  38 
11,105  71 


399  25 
704  19 


32,028  42 


83  92 


11,500  00 


602  83 


750  00 


3,993  51 


30  50 

184  00 

175  62 

91  39 

59  16 


23  00 

1,835  59 

700  00 


100  00 


876  13 


225  00 
475  87 
159  87 
252  25 
297  25 


383  00 
187  04 
55  34 
20  55 


58  98 

24  01 

54  00 

171  08 


188  00 


508  63 


10  00 


106  85 
154  26 

80  53 
388  69 

58  76 


2  45 


20,272  25 


20,927  69 


$   cts. 

13,808  30 
4,707  52 
3,076  00 


32,422  25 


2,451  la 

7,934  90- 

876  13 


11,262  16- 


30  50 
184  00 
175  62 

91  39 

59  16 
495  04 

23  00 

1,835  59 

700  00 

171  95 

100  00 

400  00 

225  00 

475  87 

159  87 

252  25 

297  25 

46,951  97 

20,272  25 

383  00 

187  04 
55  34 
20  55 

531  98 

399  25 

704  19 

54,683  01 

2,720  71 

20,927  69 

92,856  80 

11,105  71 

58  98 

24  01 

54  00 

171  08 

83  92 

188  00 

11,500  00 

508  63 

602  83 

10  00 

750  00 

106  85 

154  26 

80  53 

388  69 

58  76 

3,993  51 

2  45 


100 


DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  WORKS 


10  GEORGE  V,  A.   1920 

Amounts  expended  by  the  Department  of  Public  Works  of  Canada  during  the  fiscal 
year  ended  March  31,  1919 — Continued. 


Name  of  Work. 


Dredging. 


Construc- 
tion and 

Improve- 
ments. 


Repairs. 


Staff  and 

Main- 
tenance. 


Total. 


Harbours  and  Rivers. 
British  Columbia — Concluded. 

Needles,  wharf 

Okanagan  river,  improvements 

Powell  River,  wharf 

Prince  Rupert,  Quarantine  Sta.,  wharf. 

Proctor,  wharf 

Queen's  Bay,  wharf 

Queen  Charlotte  city,  wharf 

Renata,  wharf 

Revelstoke,  protection  works 

Robert's  Creek,  wharf 

Roy,  float 

Royston,  wharf 

Savary  Island,  wharf 

Sea  Otter  Cove,  float 

Skeena  river 

Skidegate,  wharf 

Smith's  Landing,  float 

Sointula,  wharf 

Somas  River,  snagging 

Squamish,  wharf 

Squirrel  Cove,  float 

Stag  Bay,  float 

Stewart,  wharf 

Tofino,  wharf 

Union  Bay,  wharf 

Van  Anda,  wharf 

Vancouver  False  Creek 

"  First  Narrows 

"  Harbour  improvements. . . . 

Victoria,  harbour  improvements 

West  Demars,  wharf 

White  Rock,  wharf 

William's  Head,  quarantine  station  — 

Willow  Point,  wharf 

Wolfsen  Bay,  wharf 

Generally 


cts, 


$       cts, 
"41613 


I       cts, 
217  10 


cts 


13  40 

2,197  58 

1,192  35 

38  95 

349  37 

30  90 

1  13 

395  00 

142  85 

291  80 

366  00 


10,004  16 


300  00 
728  79 


106  70 
218  03 


100  00 

55  91 

352  50 


121  01 

136  00 

1,599  70 

2,412  80 

166  98 


839  33 
267  43 


149,783  22 
129,226  33 


90  75 

4,479  47 

368  80 

94  55 
438  74 
611  43 

23  65 


40  09 


7,368  12 


11,514  99 


Totals,  British  Columbia. 


152,342  34 


375,050  45 


23,166  71 


52,755  02 


Generally — 

General  expenses  of  staff 

Salaries  of  Dist.  Engineers,  Assistants, 

etc 

Test    borings    for    sundry    projected 

works 


8,496  84 
377, 124  94 


7,172  04 


Totals,    Harbours    and    Rivers 
Generally 


7, 172  04 


385,621  78 


Dredging  Plant — 
Maritime  Provinces. 
Ontario  and  Quebec. 

Manitoba 

British  Columbia. . . 


1,422  16 


13,059  30 

30,910  46 

5,736  36 

32,494  95 


Totals,  Dredging  plant. 


1,422  16 


82,201  07 


$       cts. 

217  10 
416  13 

13  40 

2,197  58 

1,192  35 

38  95 

349  37 

30  90 

1  13 

395  00 

142  85 

291  80 

366  00 

300  00 

10,004  16 

728  79 

106  70 

218  03 
100  00 

55  91 

352  50 

121  01 

136  00 

1,599  70 

2,412  80 

166  98 

839  33 

267  43 

149,873  97 

133,705  80 

368  80 

134  64 

438  74 

611  43 

23  65 

18,883  11 


603,314  52 


8,496  84 

377, 124  94 

7, 172  04 


392,793  82 


13,059  30 

32,332  62 

5,736  36 

32,494  95 


83,623  23 


REPORT  OF  TEE  CEIEF  ACCOUNTANT  101 

SESSIONAL  PAPER   Mo.  19 

Amounts  expended  by  the  Department  of  Public  Works  of  Canada  during  the  fiscal 
year  ended  March  31,  1919 — Continued. 


Name  of  Work. 


Construc- 
tion and 
Improve- 
ments. 


Repairs. 


Staff  and 

Main- 
tenance. 


Total. 


Slides  and  Booms. 


cts. 


River  Saguenay 

St.  John's  boom 

Ottawa  District — 

Black  River 

Coulonge  River 

Dumoine  River 

Gatineau  River 

Madawaska  River 

Ottawa  River 

Petawawa  River 

Trent  and  Newcastle  District 

Collection  of  slide  and  boom  dues. 


49  70 


89  78 


105  00 


Totals,  Slides  and  Booms 

Roads  axd  Bkidges. 

Maritime  Provinces — ■ 

St.  Leonard-Van  Buren  International  Bridge 

Quebec  and  Ontario^- 

Kingston,  old  Swing  bridge 

Matapedia  Interprovincial  bridge 

North  Timiskaming  bridge 

Ottawa  City  bridges  and   streets  maintained  by 
Government — 

Connaught  Place  and  Wellington  street 

Laurier  bridge,  etc 

New  Chaudiere  bridge , 

Lighting  all  above 

Portage  du  Fort  bridge 

York  bridge  (Grand  river) 

Alberta — 

Banff  bridge 

Edmonton  bridge 

Yukon  Territory — 
Hunker  road 


244  48 


9  04 


790  87 


6,789  32 


Totals,  Roads  and  Bridges 

Telegraph  Lines. 

Newfoundland — 

Cape  Ray  (Subsidy) 

Maritime  Provinces — 

Bay  of  Fundy  lines 

Cape  Breton  lines 

Chatham-Escuminac  line,  extension 

Prince  Edward  Isld.  and  mainland  cable 

Quebec  Mainland — 

Dorchester  County  lines 

North  Shore,  East  of  Bersimis 

"         West  of  Bersimis 

Quebec  County  lines 

Timiskaming,  lines 

Quebec  Islands —  

Anticosti  system 

Cable  ship  "Tyrian" 

Grosse  Isle,  Isle  and  Coudres  and  Island  of  Orleans 
system 

Magdalen  Islands  system 

Maritime  Provinces  and  Gulf  generally 

Ontario — 

Pelee  Island  cable 

Saskatchewan  Lines 

Alberta  Lines 


7,589  23 


cts.         S       cts 
9,280  11 


1,673  34 
3,462  11 
399  82 
66  82 
3,332  04 
1,050  38 
2,105  88 


12,090  39 


991  80 

483  70 


1,712  75 


234  47 

1,218  33 

2,085  28 


5,437  02 


128  20 
456  26 

2,343  31 

41  04 


11,943  91 


600  00 


29,370  58 


4,583  14 


43,833  83 


781  75 


2,017  68 
1,922  20 


2,984  87 
2,434  20 


5,419  07 


250  00 

3,844  77 

32,685  65 

1,771  18 

6,946  66 


30,656  60 

18,845  59 

7,164  41 

2,880  72 

7,859  68 
44,018  89 

8,903  92 

7,492  14 

21,704  28 

2,849  53 
56,215  99 
79,480  12 


%       cts. 

9,280  11 
49  70 

1,673  34 

3,462  11 
399  82 
756  60 

3,332  04 
30,420  96 

2,105  88 
105  00 

4,583  14 


56,168  70 


234  47 

1,218  33 

2,085  28 

9  04 


2,984  87 

5,437  02 

790  87 

2,434  20 

128  20 

456  26 

nn 

2,343  31 

41  04 

6,789  32 


24,952  21 


250  00 

3,844  77 

33,467  40 

2,762  98 

6,946  66 

483  70 

30,656  60 

18,845  59 

7, 164  41 

2,880  72 

7,859  68 
44,018  89 

8,903  92 

7,492  14 

21,704  28 

2,849  53 
58,233  67 
83,115  07 


102 


DEPARTMENT  OF  PUBLIC  WORKS 


10  GEORGE  V,  A..  1920 

Amount  expended  by  the  Department  of  Public  Works  of  Canada  during  the  fiscal 
year  ended  March  31,  1919. — Concluded. 


Name  of  Work. 

Construc- 
tion and 
Improve- 
ments. 

Repairs. 

Staff 
and  Main- 
tenance. 

Total. 

Telegraph  Lints — Concluded. 

British  Columbia  and  Yukon — 
Aschcroft-Dawson  system 

S       cts. 

8       cts. 

I       cts 

238,559  52 

61,757  23 

103,353  76 

2,466  43 

S       cts. 
238,559  52 

5,713  87 

30,052  58 
6,500  00 

97,523  68 

109,853  76 

2,466  43 

8,902  12 

41,274  21 

739,707  07 

789,883  40 

MlSCELL.\>TEOUS. 

Surveys: — 
Maritime  Provinces 

23,506  61 
17,597  23 
12,894  20 
2,487  94 
2,873  68 
11,369  31 
50  13 

Quebec 

Generally 

70,779  10 

Upper  Ottawa  Storage  Dams: — 

44  50 
421  30 
14,508  12 
25,359  34 
24,610  52 
18,076  45 
27,651  16 

Kippewa  dam 

Quinze  dam 

Generallv 

110,671  39 

Accounts  Branch: — Salaries  and  travelling  expenses  of 
agents,  clerks,  etc.,  of  outside  service 

22,031  56 

2,000  00 

9,842  89 
315  63 

22,031  56 

Gratuity  to  Capt.  Barney  Freeman  seriously  injured 
while  at  work  in  the  Government  shipyard  at 
Selkirk,  Man 

2,000  00 

Gratuities  to  widows  or  other  representatives  of  54 
deceased  employees,  under  Civil  Service  Amend- 

9,842  89 

Legal  services  re  cases  before     International  Joint 

315  63 

Monument  to  His  late  Majesty  King  Edward  VII. . . 

3,150  00 

3,150  00 

Operation  and  maintenance  of   inspection  boats 

14,413  42 
23,946  58 

79,210  29 

367,896  62 

2,206  25 

14,413  42 

River  gaugings  and  metering 

23,946  58 

War    Appropriation: — Salaries    in     connection     with 
military  service 

79,210  29 

Bonus 

367,896  62 

Vote  No.  419  (Bonus) 

2,206  25 

Totals,  Miscellaneous 

113,821  39 

592,642  34 

706,463  73 

REPORT  OF  THE  CHIEF  ACCOUNTANT 


103 


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